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CENTRAL CIRCULATION BOOKSTACKS pj 

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[HE CRISIS 




E^ECOR,D OF THE DARKER. RACXS 



Vol. 5, No. 1 



NOVEMBER, 1912 



Wkole No. 25 







ONE DOLLAR A YEAR 



TEN CENTS A COPY 




FOR^VARD 

MARCH YOUR SON OFF TO 

NV^ilberrorce IJiiiversity 



The only school in the country for Negro 
Youth which has a Military Department 
eciuippcd by the Xational Government, and 
commanded by a detailed United States Army 
Officer. 

DEPARTMENTS 
MILITARY SCIENTIFIC 



NORMAL 

COMMERCIAL 

CLASSICAL 



TECHNICAL 

THEOLOGICAL 

MUSICAL 



PREPARATORY 

Banking taujrht by the actual operations 
in the Sludcnts' Savings Bank. Twelve In- 
dustries, 180 acres of beautiful campus, Ten 
Buildings. Healthful surroundings, excep- 
tional community. Maintained in part by the 
St.iti- (if Ohio which supplies facilities for the 
tliorougli training of teachers. 

Fall term began September, 1912. Write 
for Catalog. 



W. S. SCARBOROUGH, President 

WM. A. JOINER, Superintendent, C. N. I. 

Department. 

.\ddress all coriininiiications to 
BOX 36 WILBERFORCE, OHIO 



Atlanta University 

Is beautifully located in the City of Atlanta, Ga. 
The courses of study include High School, Noi"- 
mal School and College, with manual training 
and domestic science. Among the teachers are 
graduates of Yale, Harvard, Dartmouth, Smith 
and Wellesley. Forty-one years of successful 
work have been completed. Students come from 
all parts of the South. Graduates are almost 
universally successful. 

For further information address 

President EDWARD T. WARE 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Knoxville College 

Beautiful Situation. Healthful Location. 
The Best Moral and Spiritual Environment. 

A Solendid Intellectual Atmosphere. 
Noted for Honest and Thorough Work. 

Offers full courses in the following departments: 
College, Normal, High School, Grammar School and 
Industrial. 

Good water, steam heat, electric lights, good 
drainage. Expenses very reasonable. 

Opportunity for Self-help. 

Fall Term Began September, 1912. 

For information address 

President R. W. McGRANAHAN 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Uirdinia Union University 

RICHMOND, VA. 

A College Department, of high standards and 
modern curriculum. 

A Theological Department, with all subjects 
generally required in the best theological seminaries. 

An Academy, with manual training, giving a 
preparation for life or for college. 

The positive moral and religious aim of the 
school, its high standards of entrance and of class 
work, its tine new buildings and well-equipped 
laboratories and library prepare a faithful student 
for a life of wide usefulness. 

GEORGE RICE HOVEY, President 



Fisk University 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

The largest colored college in the South. 
A new department of sociology and social 
service. A notable equipment in land 
and buildings. Endorsed by the General 
Education Board. For information address 

GEORGE A. GATES, President 



Mention The Ckisis. 






THE CRISIS 

A RECORD OF THE DARKER RACES 



PUBLISHED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED 
PEOPLE. AT 26 VESEY STREET. NEW YORK CITY 

Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, with the co-operation of Oswald Garrison Villard, 
\V. S. Braithwaite, M. W. Ovington, Charles Edward Russell and others. 



Contents for November^ igi2 

ARTICLES 

PAGE 

THE PROGRESSIVE PARTY AND THE NEGRO. By Jane Addams. . . . 30 

THE COLORED MAGAZINE IN AMERICA 33 

THE RELIGION OF SLAVERY. By Charles Edward Stowe 36 

SAMUEL COLERIDGE-TAYLOR. By Alfred Noyes (Reprinted) 40 

HISTORIC DAYS IN NOVEMBER. By L. M. Hershaw 26 

DEPARTMENTS 

ALONG THE COLOR LINE 7 

MEN OF THE MONTH 15 

OPINION 18 

EDITORIAL ; . . . . 27 

WHAT TO READ. By Jessie Fauset 38 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 39 

TEN CENTS A COPY; ONE DOLLAR A YEAR 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS TWENTY-FIVE CENTS EXTRA. 

RENEWALS: When a subscription blank is attached to this page a renewal of your 
subscription is desired. If the blank is BIyUE your subscription expires NEXT month. If the 
blank is YELLOW your subscription expires THIS month. If the blank is RED your subscription 
has already expired and no further copies of the magazine will be sent until you renew. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS: The address of a subscriber can be changed as often as desired. 
I-n ordering a change of address, both the old and the new address must be given. Two weeks' 
notice is required. 

MANUSCRIPTS and drawings relating to -colored people are desired. They must be accom- 
panied by return postage. If found unavailable they will be returned. 

Entered as Second-class Matter in the Post Office at New York, N. Y. 



•300f;79 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Avery College Training Scnools 

NORTH SIDE, PITTSBURGH, PA. 

A superior training school for young colored women, thoroughly instructing 
its students as a means of self-support in dressmaking, cutting and drafting, domestic 
science, music, nurse training, millinery, and an intermediate English course. This 
institution is under the influence of no religious denomination, is the oldest endowed 
chartered Negro institution in America. The accommodations in its dormitory, 
which is in charge of a competent matron, are excelled by no colored institution 
in this country. 

The hospital department offers the same course as the large hospitals of the 
State of Pennsylvania, fully equipped with its operating rooms, diet kitchen and 
ambulance service. The course requires three years' lectures on general nursing, 
anatomy, ethics, surgery, obstetrics, asepsis, antiseptics, gynecology, pediatrics, eye, 
nose, throat, materia medica, therapeutics and dietetics under a staff of white and 
colored physicians. Catalogues now ready. 

Address all communications to 



JOSEPH D. MAHONEY, Secretary 



Box 154 



Nortli Side, Pittsturgk, Pa. 



Daytona Educational and Industrial 
School for Negro Girls 

DAYTONA, FLORIDA 

It reaches, by reason of its location, a large 
territory of Negro children deprived of educa- 
tional privileges. 

Its comfortable home life and Christian in- 
fluences insure a certain individual attention 
and superior training Impossible in larger in- 
stitutions of its kind. 

Mrs. Frances R. Keyser, formerly in charge 
of the White ' Rose Home for Working Girls, 
In New York City, has been elected Principal 
of the Academic Department. Write for catalog 
and detailed information. 

MARY McLEOD BETHUNE 

Founder and Principal 

Binghamton Normal, Industrial and 
Agricultural Institute 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

Courses offered: Academic, Trades, Agri- 
culture, Music and Band Instruction for 
boys. A course in Dining Room work 
and the Art of Serving is ofTered to men 
and women in addition to other studies. 
Arrangements can be made for anxious 
students to work out part expenses. 
Attached department for boys and girls 
between the ages of ten to fifteen years. 

For terms and information address 

FRED C. HAZEL, President 
(Graduate Hampton Institute) 
Campus and Farm contains 105 acres overlooking 
tbe Chenango and Susquehanna Rivers. 



Agricultural and 
Mechanical College 

Open all the year round. For 
males only. Strong, practical and 
theoretical courses leading to 
degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture, and Bachelor of 
Science in Mechanics. Board, 
lodging and tuition, $7.00 per 
month. Write to-day for catalog 
or for further information. 



JAS. B. DUDLEY, President 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Northwestern Normal, Agricultural and 
Industrial Institute, Lorain, Ohio. 

A partly free industrial school, the only institu- 
tion in the Northwest that offers a thorough indus- 
trial and literary, moral and religious training to 
Negro youths. Beautifully located in sight of Lake 
Erie. Healthful location. Fall term opened October 
1, 1912. For information address 

Rev. S. Douglass McDuffie, Principal. 
Lorain, Ohio. 

Atlanta University 

Studies of the 

Negro Problems 

16 Monographs. Sold Separately, 

Address: 

A. G. DILL 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga. 

The Curse of Race Prejudice 

By James F. Morton, Jr., A. M. 

An aggressive exposure by an Anglo-Saxon 
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Belongs in the library of every friend of social 
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JAMES F. MORTON, JR. 

244 West 143d Street New York, N. Y. 

A Remarkable Book by Wm. George Jordan 

Ike MAJESTY of CALMNESS 

CONTENTS: 

The Majesty of Calmness. 
Hurry, the Scourge of America. 
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F A NARRATIVE of f 



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By Mrs. Leila Amos Pendleton 

A comprehensive history of the 
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Address: Price $1.50 

MRS. L. A. PENDLETON 
1824 nth Street, N. W., 



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A Race Between Tapv^o Straits 

A New Book on Labor Unions and Bad 

Politicians by Rev. nV . B. R.eed, 

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REV. W. B. REED, Author and Lecturer 

The book shows that labor unions are the 
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knov^r the truth. Price 25c. Sold by The 
Crisis. Agents vv^anted everywhere. Write 

Rev. \V. B. REED, Newport, R. I. 



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Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS 



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The World To-day Is Galling for 
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Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS 



Vol. 5, No. 1 



NOVEMBER, 1912 



Whole No. 25 




ALONG 
COLOR LINE 



POLITICAL. 

COLORED women will vote in the next 
presidential election as follows : 

California 6,936 

Colorado 3,861 

Idaho 187 

Utah 313 

Washington 1,697 

Wyoming 494 

Total (six States) 13,488 

^ In Kentucky women are being allowed to 
vote in school elections. A report comes 
from Hopkinsville showing that more inter- 
est is being taken in registration by the col- 
ored women than by the white women, 190 
of the former registering as against 8.5 
whites. 

^ Laurens County, Ga., had in 1900, 14,565 
white persons and 11,338 colored persons. 
To-day it probably has at least 30,000 in- 
habitants, and perhaps 6,000 males of voting 
age. There were registered in October 3,781 
qualified voters, of whom only fifty-four were 
Negroes. A report in the Savannah News 
says: "It is probable that there will not 
be a single NegTo vote cast here." 

^ It is probable that woman's suffrage will 
be inaugurated in Hawaii within a short time 
and that no color line will be drawn. 

ECONOMICS. 

"TJEAL JACKSON, a Negro, brought to 
-•^ market in South Georgia, on September 
3, the first bale of cotton made this season 




in the entire South. He has both white and 
colored tenants on his farm. 

^ A. H. Holmes, a prominent Negro farmer, 
has gTown two acres of rice at McRae, Ga., 
in a region where it was not thought hitherto 
that rice could be raised. 

^ After a long fight for excluding Negroes 
the Holders' International Union of America 
is again considering the question of admitting 
them. One speaker said in their last con- 
vention : 

"The Negro has demonstrated that he is 
a capable mechanic, and is quite able to fill 
the place of the white laborer. The Southern 
foundry managers are making capital out of 
the race prejudice between the white and the 
colored molders, and if we do not raise the 
colored worker to our standard he will drag 
us down to his. 

"We can hardly find language strong 
enough to express our opinion of the feudal 
lords, when we consider the days when the 
laborer was bought and sold with the land. 
Our evolution from a condition of slavery 
to the freedom that we now enjoy was slow, 
but we now withhold our aid from the Negro, 
who is trying to gain the same freedom. 

"How can you get the NegTo organized 
unless you are willing to meet with him? 
His interests are identical with yours. 
Everyone knows that this condition will have 
(o be met, yet some of us want to postpone 
the day and let others take the responsibility. 
Do not let your race prejudice warp your 
judgment." 



8 



THE CRISIS 



^ In the waiters' strike in Boston eighty 
colored waiters from New York were brought 
in as strikebreakers. 

^ Two thousand five hundred colored cotton 
pickers are at work on the 8,000 acres of 
cotton which the Taft ranch, of San Patricio 
County of Texas, has planted. 

^ In Columbus, 0., there are 121 colored 
people in business and twenty-five in the 
professions. Among the businesses repre- 
sented are six coal dealers, four confection- 
ers, three contractors, three feed merchants, 
four hotels, eight restaurants and five shoe- 
makers. 

^ In Houston, Tex., the colored people have 
thirty barber shops, one bank, one dry goods 
store, three undertaking establishments, two 
bakeries, six printing offices, forty groceries, 
five newspapers, twelve contractors, one 
brickyard, nine lawyers, four dentists, six- 
teen doctors, three drug stores, ten real-estate 
agents, six notary publics, five peace officers, 
two carriage and wagon manufactories, 
twenty-one blacksmith shops, thirty restaur- 
ants, four hotels, two insurance associations, 
one badge factory, two beauty parlors, three 
jewelers, four ice-cream factories, one busi- 
ness college, two night schools, two archi- 
tects, sixteen hucksters, fourteen trained 
nurses, twelve music teachers, fifty dress- 
makers, one kindergarten, six manicurists, 
two chiropodists, one veterinary surgeon, 
three cemeteries, eighteen painters, six cabi- 
netmakers, three plasterers, one sign painter, 
one second-hand store, six cement contract- 
ors, two stone cutters, fourteen brick masons, 
three tailor shops, four hack lines, two steam 
laundries and two photographers. 

^ In Bryan, Tex., the wages of colored 
laborers have been gradually increasing until 
they get from $1.50 to $2.50 a day. Among 
them will be found bricklayers, carpenters, 
grocers, real-estate agents, insurance agents, 
barbers and one physician. All of these 
are meeting with success. A colored under- 
taking establishment, recently begun with a 
capital of $2,000, is receiving support. 
NegToes are rapidly buying property and 
building better homes, thus causing the 
whites who have colored renters to put up 
more comfortable houses; In and near Bryan 
are Negroes owning from 500 to 1,000 acres 
of some of the best land in this State. 

fl M. Delcasse, French Minister of Marine, 



has appointed Captain Moltenot to the full 
command of a war vessel. M. Moltenot is a 
full-blooded Negro. 

SOCIAL UPLIFT. 
^ I ' HE national committee of management 
■*' of the Mosaic Templars of America 
have had their annual meeting in Little Rock, 
Ark. They are about to invest $70,000 in 
securities and real estate, and have $51,000 
in their endowment fund. 

^ Augusta,. Ga., has a colored civic and 
improvement league, supported by member- 
ship fees. They have supported during the 
summer two playgrounds for children, done 
neighborhood work and plan to employ a 
colored district nurse. 

^ The seventh annual report of the colored 
branch library of Loui*\'ille, Ky., shows that 
the circulation has grown from 17,831 the 
first year to 73,462. The books were loaned 
from the central branch and three stations 
and through forty-eight classroom collections. 
Thirty per cent, of the circulation was fic- 
tion ; the attendance at the story hour was 
1,873; 1,582 reference questions were looked 
up and 244 meetings held. 

^ A colored community named Norwood, 
near Indianapolis, is to have a public library 
with about 1,000 books. Miss Ada B. Harris, 
principal of the local school, has been chief 
promoter of the project, and the citizens 
themselves have cleaned and remodeled the 
building, while local firms have given much 
of the furniture. 

^ Colorado College has a colored athlete by 
the name of Holmes. He has done 100 yards 
in ten seconds. The Denver Post says: 

"Holmes Avill be the target of every player 
in the State. On account of his color there 
will be a general demand to see him leaving 
the field on a stretcher, but anyone thai 
knows the way Holmes can play football 
will be safe enough in venturing to say that 
he will be able to take care of himself." 

^ A package of currency containing $55,000 
was mysteriously extracted from a shipment 
by the First National Bank of Pensacola, 
Fla. It was recently found in the rear of 
the bank by the Negro janitor and turned 
over to the authorities. 

^ A group of colored people at Nyack, 
N. Y., recently gave an entertainment and 
raised $130 for the benefit of the Nyack 
Hospital. 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



^ Chattanooga, Tenn., has established a col- 
ored park and playground for the colored 
people by purchasing nine and one-half acres 
on Orchard Knob. 

fl New Orleans is going to attempt a Negro 
daily newspaper called The Daihi Spokes- 
man. The pajDer is to have its own printing 
plant. 

fl The women's convention, auxiliary to the 
National Baptist Convention, reported for 
the fiscal year $26,968 raised. Of this $18,992 
was spent on the National Training School. 
Local organizations raised $8,000 in addition 
to this. 

EDUCATION. 
'T'HE fight against colored schools still 

•*• goes on in certain parts of the South. 
Louisiana, which has by far the largest 
percentage of colored illiteracy of any State 
in the United States, is especially active in 
spoiling the Negro schools. New Orleans 
stops the education of colored children vdth 
the sixth grade and has recently appointed 
to the colored schools twenty-four white 
teachers, who will go to the colored schools to 
get experience, and after a month or two 
will be appointed to white schools and other 
raw recruits appointed to take their places. 
The board has also refused to establish a 
night school for colored people. The excuse 
given for not appointing colored teachers 
was that only five passed the examination; 
but the charge is made that the board did not 
intend that colored teachers should pass the 
examination under any circumstances. 

^ A colored man sends the following letter 
to a New Orleans paper: 

September 15, 1912. 
Editor The Item, 
City. 

Dear Sir: 

It is not clear to us why the school board 
at its last meeting assigned twenty-four white 
normal girls to teach in the colored public 
schools. Can it be that colored schools are 
the best places for the normal girls to secure 
experience in order to teach white children *? 
Or is it true that, contrary to the long-cher- 
ished traditions of the South, these girls pre- 
fer to serve colored children to the children 
of their own race? Perhaps these positions 
were given to control votes; maybe to save 
the ring from defeat. However, in justice to 
the colored children of this city, these schools 
ought to be taught by colored teachers, as 



there ought to be no- semblance of social 
equality in our schools. These normal girls 
are placing themselves in a position where 
they are not wanted, and, in justice to them- 
selves and their friends, they ought to imme- 
diately resign. 

Very respectfully yours, 

John F. Guillaume. 

^ The legislature of Louisiana has ordered 
the Southern University, a colored State 
school, to sell all its property in New Orleans 
and find a location in the country. 

^ President G. E. Gates, of Pisk University, 
has resigned his position on account of ill 
health. President Gates was in a railroad 
accident last spring, and in consequence suf- 
fered a breakdown. He is said to be in a 
serious condition now. 

^ Allen LeRoy Locke, formerly a Rhodes 
scholar and a graduate of Harvard, has ac- 
cepted the position of assistant professor of 
English in the Teachers' College, Howard 
University. 

^ Dr. Charles H. Marshall has been appoint- 
ed a member of the board of education of the 
District of Columbia. He is a graduate of 
the Union University, Richmond, and of the 
Howard University Medical School. 

^ School No. 91, in Baltimore, has been 
turned over to the colored pupils. It was 
formerly a white school. There was much 
opposition to the transfer. 

q Miss Clara M. Standish of Talladega Col- 
lege, Ala., writes to the New Bedford 
Standard : 

"One-half of the NegToes get no schooling 
whatever. The average child in the South, 
white as well as black, who attends school at 
all, stops with the third grade. In school- 
houses costing an average of $275 each, un- 
der teachers receiving an average salary of 
$25 a month, the children in actual attend- 
ance received five cents' worth of education 
a day for forty-seven days only in the 
year." 

•I New Negro schools are being built at 
Tampa, Fla., and Fernwood, Miss., by State 
authorities. Negroes themselves are starting 
institutions in Helena, Ark., and Pine Bluff, 
Ark. 

^ Mr. W. T. S. Jackson, a teacher in the 
M Street High School, Washington, and a 
graduate of Amherst College, has been made 



10 



THE CRISIS 



principal of the colored business high school, 
Washington, D. C. 

^ For the first time in fifteen years the 
Baltimore County school board has decided 
to increase the salaries of colored teachers. 
The increase will be 14: per cent. 

fl Bishop Thirkield says of the public schools 
of Atlanta, Ga. : 

"Not only are the white children unpro- 
vided for, but thousands of colored children 
cannot be accommodated in either session of 
the public schools. This means that they are 
permitted to run wild on the streets in eon- 
tact with the lower life of the city. If 
criminal instincts are developed and these 
colored children thrown in the way of vice 
the authorities of this city are responsible. 

"I have studied this situation for some 
years and am utterly amazed at the lack of 
foresight in building schoolhouses merely for 
the sake of saving on an investment which 
promises the largest returns in the moral and 
industrial life of the city." 

^ Tuskegee Institute has opened with the 
largest enrollment in its history. The plant 
consists now of 2,345 acres of land and 108 
buildings valued at $1,339,248. The endow- 
ment fund is $1,401,826, not including 19,910 
acres of unsold government land valued at 
$300,000. There are 9,000 graduates and 
former students. 

Q A colored woman teaching in Lowndes 
County, Ala., says in an appeal for funds: 

"Where I am now working there are 
27,000 colored people and about 1,500 whites. 
In my school district there are nearly 400 
children. I carry on this work eight months 
in the year and receive for it $290, out of 
which I pay three teachers and two extra 
teachers. The State provides for three 
months' schooling, but practically I am work- 
ing without any salary. The only way I can 
run the school eight months is to solicit funds 
from persons interested in the work of Negro 
education. 

"I have been trying desperately to put up 
an adequate school building for the hundreds 
of children clamoring to get an education. 
To complete it and furnish it with seats I 
need about $800." 

^ About twenty-five years ago Miss Kather- 
ine Drexel, of the wealthy Drexel family of 
Philadelphia, took the veil of a nun and an- 
nounced her intention of founding a Catholic 



order for the education of the Indian and 
colored race. Colored schools have been 
opened at Rock Castle, Va., Nashville, Tenn., 
two in Philadelphia, one in New York, one 
in Chicago and one in Columbus, 0. These 
Catholic schools are non-sectarian in the 
sense that they receive children of all de- 
nominations; they are taught, however, by 
Catholic sisters. 

Q J. Pierpont Morgan has agreed to give 
$10,000 toward a $60,000 fund for the St. 
Paul's Episcopal School for Negroes at Law- 
renceville, Va. 

^ The American Church Institute for Ne- 
groes in its sixth annual report shows that 
$89,582 has been raised for the support of 
its six schools during the year. The report 
contains a careful study of the needs of 
Negro education. 

THE CHURCH. 
*■ I 'HE twentieth annual meeting of the col- 
-*■ ored convocation of the diocese of 
Southern Virginia was held recently. Thirty 
churches and missions reported 1,700 com- 
municants and $6,000 raised by the colored 
people. 

^ Over 1,000 colored people from four 
States met in New Orleans to greet Bishop 
Thirkield, of the M. E. Church, who came 
to take special charge of colored work. 

^ The total membership of the Negro Baptist 
Church in America is now reported to be 
2,444,055. There are 18,987 churches worth 
$25,000,000. 

^ Rev. J. S. Quarles of Columbia, S. C, has 
been appointed archdeacon of that diocese. 

^ For thirtj^-three years the colored Baptists 
have been engaged in missionary work in 
Africa. They have sent in all sixty-two mis- 
sionaries and fifteen native workers; they 
have established eighty churches, 300 out- 
stations and own about $30,000 worth of 
property on the West Coast. The Rev. L. G. 
Jordan is at present the secretary in charge 
of the work. 

Q Pope Leo XIII. established two apostolic 
vicariates in equatorial Africa; that of 
Northern Nyanza and that of the Upper 
Nile. In the first there are 98,000 Catholics 
and fifty-eight schools and eleven hospitals. 
In the vicariate of the Upper Nile there are 
19,000 Catholics and thirteen schools with 
fourteen medical institutions. 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



11 



MEETINGS. 

'' I 'HE thirty-second annual meeting of the 
■*■ True Reformers has taken place in 
Richmond with delegates from all States of 
the United States. Mr. Floyd Ross was 
placed at the head of the order. 

fl Colored people in New Jersey and Penn- 
sylvania are proceeding with their arrange- 
ments for celebrating the jubilee of emanci- 
pation at Philadelphia next year. 

^ The celebration of the fiftieth anniversary 
of the issuance of the preliminary Emancipa- 
tion Proclamation took place in Washington, 
D. C. President Taft was one of the 
speakers. 

fl The Society of American Indians held 
its second annual conference at Ohio State 
University, October 2 to 7. 

^ Many Negro fairs are being held in the 
South. The fifth annual exhibition of the 
Tennessee Colored Fair Association was held 
in Nashville and was unusually successful. 
The annual colored fair was held in Memphis. 

^ The fifth annual session of the Arkansas 
Federation of Colored Women's Clubs con- 
vened in Pine Bluff. The organization is 
chiefly concerned in raising funds for a 
Negro reformatory. 

PEESONAL. 

T R. HENDERSON, a colored man of 
'■-'• Greensboro, N. C, has joined the 
United States army. He is 21 years 
old, stands six feet three inches in his bare 
feet and weighs 171 pounds. 

fl Spurred by recent attacks upon the civil 
service in Philadelphia, Assistant Director 
Reed has appointed Fred. W. Matheas as 
foreman of repairs at $850 a year in the 
city street repair corps. 

"I was very glad," Mr. Reed said, ''to give 
this man the job. He is a graduate of the 
University of Maine in civil engineering and 
came to this city several months ago asking 
for employment in municipal work. I asked 
him if he was willing to begin as a laborer 
and he promptly said he was and hoped by 
good work to fit himself for preferment. He 
started as a laborer and then took a civil- 
service examination for a better position, 
with the result that he came out second on 
the list and has been appointed to his present 
place." Matheas is colored. 



^ Rice Barnett, one of the best-known col- 
ored men in Zanesville, 0., is dead. 
fl A memorial meeting to , honor the late 
George F. T. Cook, formerly superintendent 
of colored schools of the District of Colum- 
bia, is planned. 

^ Dr. A. C. McClennan, the founder of a 
colored hospital in Charleston, S. C, is dead. 
In sixteen years he has raised $60,000 for the 
hospital, beside the annual cost of mainte- 
nance, $3,500. One of his white co-workers 
said: 

"Knowing Dr. McClennan well, it is no 
exaggeration to say that this community can 
ill afford to lose a man of his stamp. He 
belonged to that class of refined colov^d men 
who, while standing true to his own race, 
never ceased to show respect to those of a 
different race. His friends were numbered 
among white and colored. They lament his 
taking off. I shall drop a tear upon his 
newly made grave." 

^ The celebrated Millie-Christine twins died 
in Wilmington, N. C., October 9, at the home 
of the pair. Millie died first, and the other 
within a few hours. 

The twins, who were colored, had two heads 
and two sets of lower extremities, but had 
the same body. They had been exhibited all 
over this country and in Europe, and could 
speak several languages fluently. They were 
born in slavery and were sold for $40,000 for 
exhibition purposes. 

^ The Rev. Felix A. Curtright came to 
Joliet, 111., two years ago with nothing. 
Since then he has bought and paid for a 
church, costing $12,000 and established a 
social center. The building is open all the 
time; there are regular lectures, an employ- 
ment bureau, night school, restaurant and 
baths. 

^ Mr. W. H. Ellis of New York, a man of 
international fame, is pushing a claim of 
$105,000,000 against the Mexican govern- 
ment. Mr. Ellis, who is a broker and pro- 
moter, is remembered as the energetic Ameri- 
can who, after the death of Frank D. Loomis, 
the Assistant Secretary of State, took the 
treaty papers to Abyssinia. 
^ In the recent wreck of the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford Railway, P. B. Cleve- 
land, a porter on one of the Pullman cars, 
had his left arm broken; he, nevertheless, 
kept on his work of rescue, taking some of 
the last persons from the burning car. 



12 



THE CRISIS 



FOREIGN. 

A MEMORIAL meeting on the death of the 
late Dr. E. W. Blyclen has been held 
in Lagos, West Africa, and the Blyden 
memorial committee was formed. The Hon. 
C. A. Sapara Williams, of the legislative 
council, presided. The Right Rev. Bishop 
Johnson was the principal speaker. The 
meeting decided upon a life-sized portrait 
and a scholarship or technical school. 

q The free NegToes of the Gulf Coast of 
Africa and of the German colony of Kame- 
run are raising and exporting over 40,000 
tons of cocoa each year. This whole develop- 
ment is said to be the result of mission 
schools. 

fl The first blue book on native affairs pub- 
lished by the Union government of South 
Africa forms a volume of 400 pages. The 
report shows that while $1,500,000 is raised 
from native taxation, only $55,000 is spent 
on native education. 

THE GHETTO. 

A TLANTA, GA., is trying to register and 
•^^ tax its colored washerwomen. Col- 
ored people are protesting. 

^ Difficulties are continually arising on the 
"Jim Crow" street ears in the South. Recent 
fights are reported in Houston, Tex., Louis- 
ville, Ky., and Mobile, Ala. 

^ A white woman ran away from the hos- 
pital in Cincinnati, 0., because a colored 
woman was on a cot next to her. 

^ In Kansas City, Mo.^ a Negro clerk in the 
city treasurer's office was discharged because 
he was black. The civil-service commission 
decided that the colored man had been un- 
justly removed, but had no power to reinstate 
him. 

^ The appointment of a colored teacher in 
the Sexton School, Chicago, has led to a 
strike on the part of some of the white 
pupils. 

^ A local paper reports : "Hatred of 
the Negro and those who employ 
Negroes has been carried to an outrageous 
extreme in Briartown, Okla. Three farmers 
have been shot there because they em- 
ployed- Negro cotton pickers in violation 
of local sentiment. It is thought that two 
of the farmers will die. Heretofore, Negroes 
never have been allowed to stay in the Briar- 
town section. When it became known that 



the three farmers had imported NegTo help 
armed mobs formed and marched to the 
farms. The farmers were shot when defend- 
ing themselves, their families, the NegTo and 
the farm property against the mobs. Cer- 
tainly, if the officials of Oklahoma have any 
respect for themselves and their State, they 
will ferret out and punish the assailants of 
the three men and their employees." 

^ White Southerners in Newburgh, N. Y., 
tried to start a row because colored people 
were eating in the same Chinese chop suey 
restaurant. 

^ When Negro property owners of Harlem 
met to discuss the colored "invasion," Mr. 
John E. Nail, a colored real-estate agent, 
addressed the meeting and declared that 
property depreciation following the coming 
into the neighborhood of a Negro family was 
due to panic on the part of the white owners. 
"If a Negro family gets in a house on your 
block," said he, "don't run away. If your 
tenants move out don't rent to Negroes at a 
lower rate. Just get together and stick and the 
chances are you will find your houses will fill 
up with white families who will learn that the 
Negro family is minding its own affairs and 
is above the average in intelligence. If you 
get scared and throw your property on the 
market or put in Negro tenants you lose 
money, because Negro tenants do not pay as 
much as white ones." 

^ In Summit Township, Kansas, there is 
trouble over the local school. There are a 
larger number of Negro families in the dis- 
trict than white families, but there are more 
white children to attend the school than col- 
ored children. The Negroes own the most 
land and pay a greater amount of the taxes 
and they, standing on their constitutional 
rights, elect Negroes as members of the school 
board. To this the white patrons object, but 
it does little or no good. The school board 
employed Mrs. Rosa Johnson, a colored 
teacher of Alma, Kan., to teach the school, 
but county superintendent W. E. Connelly 
refused to indorse her teacher's certificate 
and she is therefore debarred from taking 
charge of the school officially. She appeared 
there one morning, but the white people 
were at the schoolhouse and Mrs. Johnson did 
not call school to order. 

Two or three white teachers have been sent 
to the district to get the job, but the board 
did not employ them, saying they had already 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



13 



emiDloyed a teacher. Just when the school 
will begin cannot be told at this time, and 
what the outcome of the trouble in No. 67 
will be is also a mystery. 

^ A Boston woman living in Washington 
has discovered that her husband has colored 
blood. 

^ Kansas City firemen recently refused to 
rescue workmen who were entombed beneath 
a burning building. "Why risk our lives'? 
We know of only two there; they are dead, 
undoubtedly — and Negroes." 

^ The city of Macon, Ga., has removed its 
''red-light" district to the vicinity of a Negro 
church. The church has protested and is 
preparing to move. 

^ A mob in Dawsonville, Ga., has burned a 
NegTO church and run a Negro tenant away 
from his home. 

^ A Buckingham County, Va., jury brought 
in such a curious verdict to deprive colored 
people of 342 acres of land that appeal has 
been made to the Supreme Court of Appeals 
in the case. 

^ In Guthrie, Okla., two colored women with 
their little girls drew water with their own 
cups from a public fountain. For this they 
were told that "Niggers" were not allowed 
there, and one of them was knocked down 
by a policeman. 

CRIME. 
'T' HE following lynchings have taken place 
■■■ since our last report : 

^ At Bakersfield, Cal., an unknown Negro 
accused of attacking a child. At CuUings, 
Ga., "Bob." Edwards, suspected of complicity 
in attacking a girl. He was shot, dragged 
through the streets and mutilated. At Ameri- 
eus, Ga., a Negro, Yarborough, accused of 
attacking a girl. In Rawlins, Wyo., a col- 
ored man, Wigfall, was lynched by the con- 
victs. He was charged with the assault of an 
old woman. At Shreveport, La., fifty men 
killed a half-witted Negro, "Sam." Johnson. 
He was accused of killing a white lawyer. 

^ The governor of Georgia declared martial 
law and sent 167 soldiers and officers to pro- 
tect six Negroes who were being tried for 
criminal assault in Forsythe County. Two 
of the Negroes were sentenced to be hanged. 

^ An unusual number of colored men have 
been murdered this month: 



One at Swayuesboro, Ga., supposed to have 
been killed by unknown white men. At 
Bristol, Va., a steward of a hotel killed a 
Negro bellboy. At Huntsville, Ala., a white 
man killed a colored laborer. At New Orleans 
an old colored man was killed by a white 
man. In Marion County, Ala., Willis 
Perkins was killed by a party of white men 
for no apparent cause. In Homer, La., a 
in-ominent farmer shot and killed a Negro, 
John Woods. At Fitzgerald, Ga., a promi- 
nent dentist accused a Negro of stealing and 
shot him dead when the NegTo tried to run 
away. Forest Boland of Lucedale, Miss., 
was recently killed because he had testified 
against white liquor sellers. 

^ A white man in York, Pa., shoved a col- 
ored man roughly off the sidewalk. He was 
stabbed three times with a knife. 

^ Governor Donaghey has given absolute 
l^ardon to Robert Armstrong, a Negro con- 
victed and sentenced to be hanged for attack- 
ing a white woman. The governor says : 

"My reason for granting this pardon is 
that I have become thoroughly convinced of 
Armstrong's innocence. Feeling this way 
about it, there can be no middle ground 
so far as my action is concerned. He is 
either guilty or innocent, and believing him 
innocent, I have pardoned him. 

"I have given the case careful thought and 
study, have read the transcript of the evi- 
dence and have considered it m an unbiased 
and unprejudiced manner. The evidence as 
disclosed by the transcript does not show the 
identification of Armstrong by the prosecut- 
ing witness to be of such a nature as to con- 
vince me of its absolute certainty. The 
opportunity for her to identify her assailant 
was limited to the flare of a match as he 
stood by the bureau in the dark room and to 
a dim light from a possible street lamp that 
might have shown through a crack in the 
window curtain. There is some evidence that 
she had stated the party might have been a 
dark-skinned Greek or a mulatto Negro. 

"I have every confidence in her honesty 
and sincerity in this matter, but under all 
conditions connected with the ease I feel that 
she is bound to be mistaken in her identi- 
fication. 

"Armstrong's defense was an alibi. True, 
it was Negro testimony, but to prove where 
a Negro is at night, after working hours, one 
would ordinarily have to resort to Negro tes- 



14 



THE CRISIS 



timony, as it is Negroes with whom he asso- 
ciates. His alibi was apparently made out 
as well as a Negi'o alibi could have been 
proven." 

^ The special gxand jury investigating the 
lynching of Robert Johnson at Pineville, 
W. Va., refused to indict the lynchers, al- 
though there seems to be no reasonable doubt 
that the murdered man was not guilty. 

MUSIC AND ART. 

SAMUEL COLERIDGE-TAYLOR, the 
distinguished composer who died after a 
four days' illness of pneumonia in London, 
Eng., on September 1, was buried at Croyden 
on September 5. The service was held in 
St. Michael's Church. 

W. J. Read, violinist, played the slow 
movement from Mr. Coleridge-Taylor's vio- 
lin sonata, and Julien Henry sung "When I 
Am Dead, My Dearest," selection from the 
"Six Sorrow Songs," dedicated to the dead 
composer's wife. 

While the body was being removed from 
the church the funeral march of "Minne- 
haha," from "Hiawatha," was played by 
H. L. Balfour, organist of the Royal Choral 
Society. 

Wreaths and flowers from all the principal 
, musical organizations of London, as well as 
from many professional musicians and 
friends, were received, and two open broug- 
hams filled with wreaths headed the cortege. 

^ Mr. WUliam Speights, tenor, an intelligent 
singer of skill in the use of his voice and 
in clear diction, gave an exacting program 
before a large and enthusiastic audience at 
Steinert Hall, Boston, Mass., on September 
18. He was assisted by Mr. J. Shelton 
Pollen, pianist, and Mr. Clarence Cameron 
White, violinist. Mrs. Clarence C. White 
was the efficient accompanist. 

Mr. Speights, who graduated from the New 
England Conservatory of Music last June, 
has opened a studio for pupils in vocal 
training. 

^ A recital was given on September 5 by 
Mr. J. Elmer Spyglass, baritone, of Toledo, 
C, at the Trinity Congregational Church, at 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

^ Miss Hazel Harrison, the talented young 
pianist of La Porte, Ind., has been studying 
under Hugo Van Dalen, in Berlin, Germany, 



for the past year. She has lately met Avith 
the good fortune of having been accepted as 
a pupil by the distinguished pianist and 
teacher, Ferrucio Busoni. 

Miss Harrison will be heard in concert 
work during her stay in Berlin. 

^ Miss Helen E. Hagan, pianist, of New 
Haven, Conn., will begin her student life in 
Prance under particularly sad circumstances. 
She sailed on August 31 for Paris, where 
she is to study composition and to continue 
her work in pianoforte. A few days after 
her departure her mother died at New 
Haven. Miss Hagan is remembered as the 
recipient of the Sanf ord Fellowship at the 
Yale Conservatory of Music at the last 
commencement. 

^ "Christophe," an Haitian tragedy, written 
by Mr. William Edgar Easton of Los 
Angeles, Cal., was presented this summer at 
the Gamut Auditorium at Los Angeles. The 
play is laid In the early nineteenth century, 
during the brief reign of Christophe. Special 
music was arranged for the play and given 
by Wheaton's Orchestra. 

^ Mrs. E. Azalia Hackley, soprano, gave an 
illustrated lecture and demonstration in voice 
culture on September 20, at St. John's 
Church at Springfield, Mass. The Spring- 
field Bepublican notes that "Mrs. Hackley 
sought to instruct and elevate her audience 
in the simplest and most unconscious way. 

"Her voice is very rich and full and her 
high notes ran to tremendous power, having 
a noteworthy force and clearness." 

Mrs. Hackley gave a retiring lecture-recital 
in Jordan Hall, Boston, Mass., on the night 
of September 30, and was greeted by an 
appreciative audience. 

Mrs. Hackley is now in the fulness of her 
powers, and it is to be regretted that her 
splendidly trained voice of remarkable range 
and clearness is not to be heard again in 
concert work in Boston. 

Mrs. Hackley played her own accompani- 
ments. 

^ On October 8, at the Church of the Holy 
Spirit, Mattapan, Mass., Mr. Wm. H. Rich- 
ardson, baritone, of Boston, assisted by Mrs. 
Maud Cuney Hare, accompanist, appeared in 
an afternoon of song before the Woman's 
Club, of which Mrs. Francis Peabody, Jr., is 
president. 





THE LATE FREDERICK LAMAR McGHEE 

A GREAT ADVOCATE. 
"VT THEN the twenty-nine colored men met 
^^ at Niagara Falls in 1905 and 
stemmed the tide of abject surrender to op- 
pression among Negroes, Frederick L. 
McGhee of St. Paul was a central figure; 
and he is the first of that faithful group to 
die. He was born in Mississippi on the eve 
of the Civil War, educated in Tennessee and 
studied law with the well-known E. H. Morris 



MEN OF THE 



MONTH 



Lffi-ATTMFR-'|| 



of Chicago. In 1889 he began to practice in 
St. Paul, and he became, as the years went 
by, one of the great criminal lawyers of the 
Northwest. 

But McGhee was not simply a lawyer. He 
was a staunch advocate of democracy, and 
because he knew by bitter experience how his 
own dark face had served as excuse for dis- 
couraging him and discriminating unfairly 
against him, he became especially an advo- 
cate of the rights of colored men. He stood 
like a wall against the encroachmenl of color 
caste in the Northwest and his influence and 
his purse were ever ready to help. As a 
prominent member of the Catholic church 
and a friend of Archbishop Ireland and 
others, he was in position to render unusual 
service. 

He died at 51, leaving a" widow and 
one daughter. His pallbearers were among 
the most prominent men, white and colored. 




THE LATE JOSEP±lliNE SILONE-YATES 



16 



THE CRISIS 




J. MAX BARBER, D. D. S. 

of St. Paul, and a solemn public memorial 
service was held afterward. 

Those who knew McGhee personally can- 
not reconcile themselves to his loss. He was 
to them more than a great and good man — 
he was a friend. 



JOSEPHINi: SILONE-YATES. 

-VTRS. JOSEPHINE YATES, youngest 
-'■ ■'■ daughter of Alexander and Parthenia 
Reeve-Silone, was born in Mattituck, Suffolk 
County, X. y., November 17, 1859, where her 
parents, grandparents and great-grandpar- 
ents were long and favorably known as indi- 
viduals of sterling worth. On the maternal 
side she is a niece of Rev. J. B. Reeve, D. D., 
of Philadelphia. 

She was educated at the Institute for Col- 
ored Youth, Philadelphia, and at the public 
schools of Newport, R. I., where she took 
high rank, and graduated from the Rhode 
Island Normal School in 1879. That fall she 
began her Avork as teacher and taught until 
her marriage to W. W. Yates of Kansas 
City, Mo., in 1889. During her married life 
she kept in touch with current events, wrote 



for the papers and became a leader in club 
life. She was elected third president of the 
National Association of Colored Women. 

In 1902 she resumed teaching and taught 
until her death, • September 3, 1912. Mrs. 
Yates was a master of arts of the University 
of Iowa. She leaves a husband, who is prin- 
cipal of the Lincoln School, Kansas City; a 
daughter, Josephine, who is a teacher, and a 
son, Blyden, who is in his junior college 
year in the University of Kansas. She was 
a woman of rare personal charm, simple dig- 
nity and keen insight. 



A PLUCKY MAN. 
TPHIRTY-TWO years ago a brown boy 
■*• was born in Carolina. He had not only 
ability but pluck. He was trained in the 
local schools, and eventually went to Virginia 
Union University, where he did his academic 
work; and also was a leader in student 
activities. On graduating he became editor 
of the Voice of the Negro^ and immediately 
the name of J. Max Barber became known 
throughout the colored race. 

Then came the severest temptation a young 
man can meet. A little dishonesty to his own 
ideals, a little truckling diplomacy, and sne- 
eess and a fine income awaited him. This he 
refused to give. Perhaps there was some 
arrogance of youth in the decision to hew to 
the line of his thought and ideal, but it was 
fine arrogance, and when defeat came and 
the Voice stopped publication, he simply set 
his teeth and started life again. Only menial 
employment was open to him, but he took 
it, faced poverty, and began to study den- 
tistry. For four long years he studied, until 
last spring, when he graduated from a 
Philadelphia dental college, among the best 
in the class. 

For the first two years of its existence 
The Crisis was glad to carry Mr. Barber's 
name on its title page among its contributing 
editors as some slight token of appreciation 
for a plucky man. 



HENRY L. PHILLIPS. 
'T'HE raising of the rector of the Church 
■*■ of the Crucifixion in Philadelphia to 
the archdeaconate marks an era in the history 
of colored men in America. Henry L. 
Phillips was born in Jamaica in 1847. In 
his own words: 

"Father was a planter of sugar eane and 
ginger. At the usual age I went to a board- 



GARRISON AT BENNINGTON 



17 



ing school, the Moravian Training School at 
Fairfield. In 1868, at the age of 21, I left 
to teach in St. Croix, Danish West Indies. 
In 1870 I came to Philadelphia. 

"After two years of private study, I en- 
tered the Philadelphia Divinity School and 
was graduated and ordained in 1875." 

Mr. Phillips is thus the oldest colored 
American priest in point of service in the 
Episcopal Church. His great work has been 
the upbuilding of the Church of the Cruci- 
fixion in Philadelphia, which, as he says, 
"was institutional when that kind of work 
was little known." Young peoples' clubs, 
singing societies, lecture courses, kindergar- 
tens and other activities have been carried 
on in the parish house for twenty-five years. 

But Mr. Phillips' energies have not been 
confined to his church. He is trustee of the 
Starr Center for Settlement Work, member of 
the Law and Order Society, and recently ap- 
pointed by Mayor Blankenberg a member of 
the vice commission; he is president of the 
Home for the Homeless, and of the organiza- 
tion for the protection of colored women, 
and trustee of several schools. 

Out of his work at the Crucifixion have 
sprung three other churches. It was fitting 
that in June, 1912, this indefatigable worker 
should have been made archdeacon for col- 
ored woi'k in the diocese of Pennsylvania. 
His own good words will best close this 
sketch : "I have always worked on the prin- 
ciple that man is greater than any church 
or organization. If anyone needs me, and 
I can be of service to him, I am not to. stop 
and ask about his religious affiliatigns before 
I decide to do anything." 




THE VENERABLE HENRY L. PHILLIPS 
Archdeacon in Pennsylvania 



GARRISON AT BENNINGTON 



By WENDELL PHILLIPS STAFFORD 

{Written for The Crisis.) 

Here, where the meadow grasses fringed the 

street 
And shadows fell from the green mountain 

height, 
He crooned above his types, hearing the 
sweet 
Voices of future fame by day and night. 
And here to him the footworn Quaker came 

Bearing the burden of a race's wrong, 
His lonely eyes alight with freedom's flame. 
His stammering lips raptured with free- 
dom's song. 



Forth from this place the summoned warrior 
went 
Snow white in armor and the sword in 
hand 
That from its aim was never to be bent 
Till slavery fell upon the blood-soaked 
land. 

Fit spot — most fit- — for that higli trumpet 
call 

That comes, one day, welcomed or spurned, 
to all. 



THE NEGRO 
IN POLITICS. 



There is still some discussion 
in both the colored and white 
press concerning the colored 
vote more particularly with regard to Mr. 
Roosevelt. Harper's Weekly says that Mr. 
Roosevelt has dropped the subject because 
the Southerners did not "nibble at the bait," 
and continues: 

"That indicates the other reason why 
Roosevelt himself has not been discussing his 
new plan with the colored brother. If it 
has not helped him in the South, it has 
positively and substantially weakened him in 
the North — and he knows it. Unhappily, 
there are conscientious and honorable people 
in his motley following, and not a few of 
them are of the anti-slavery strain. Such 
people have not approved, or pretended to 
approve, his sudden desertion of the South- 
ern Negro after all his loud declaration of 
friendship for them. Neither could they per- 
ceive the slightest basis in reason or morals 
for his distinction between Southern Negroes 
and Northern Negroes. There is none. The 
only basis for that distinction was and is 
political. 

"The maneuver has failed — failed com- 
pletely and ignominiously. It is the worst 
kind of failure, for his act is not bitterly 
denounced, it is not raged at, it is laughed 
at. A demagogue can thrive on denunciation 
and hatred, but ridicule and indifference are 
fatal." 

The Southern papers have been spurred to 
new arguments because of Roosevelt's 
Southern trip. The Birmingham Age-Herald 
cannot forget the past: 

"The South, and particularly Alabama, 
cannot forget his attitude toward the Repub- 
lican party of the State right after Alabama 
adopted her present constitution, at which 
time he was President. He declared that it 
was his purpose to support the building up 
of a white man's party in Alabama, and 
taking him at his word the Republicans met 
in convention — the most enthusiastic conven- 



tion in the history of the party in this State 
— and it was addressed by a special envoy 
from the President in the person of Judge 
Pritchard of North Carolina. The Negroes 
were not allowed to even look on. A very 
short while after the President proceeded to 
cut off heads of every officeholder that par- 
ticipated in the 'lily-white' movement, and 
the federal patronage again fell into the 
hands of the regulars and Booker T. 
Washington. 

"The colonel, therefore, should not feel 
peevish if the people of Alabama are a little 
bit inclined to be from Missouri regarding his 
sudden conversion to a white man's party in 
the South." 

The Atlanta Journal, in an editorial en- 
titled "Go Home, Colonel," says, among other 
things : 

"If you fancy that the pharisaic pose you 
have recently assumed on the NegTo question 
will win you this section's support, you are 
pitiably deceived. You have straddled this 
issue in both the North and the South, fra- 
ternizing with the NegTo there and execrating 
him here. 

"Do you think we are so stupid as not to 
see through this two-faced and impudent 
game ? 

"Did you not bid might and main for the 
support of the NegTo delegates at Chicago? 

"Would you ever have pretended this sud- 
den change of heart had you succeeded in 
capturing the machinery of that party as you 
violently strove to do? 

"Why was it, colonel, that you never awoke 
to the corrupting influence of the colored 
delegates from the South until you found 
that they would no longer serve but would 
embarrass your political schemes? 

"The whole country knows that no Repub- 
lican ever went further or stooped lower 
than you for these same Negro delegates 
when you needed them to run your particular 
machine." 

The colored ministers of Cincinnati have 



OPINION 



19 



been asking ex-Senator Foraker about the sit- 
uation, and Foraker says that the "Bull 
Moose is flirting with the Lily Whites." 

President Taft in a recent interview says: 

"Had the colored delegates from the South 
to the Republican national convention yielded 
to the influences the newspapers said were 
dangled before their eyes, the Progressive 
party leaders might have viewed differently 
their fitness for participation in the Progress- 
ive party's convention. 

"It occui-s to me that instead of the South- 
ern colored Republicans being declared as 
disqualified to participate in the activities 
of the new party, the very fact of their 
loyalty to a cause they had been elected to 
represent in our national convention should 
have commended them to the Progressive 
party's leaders. 

"A race which in fifty years has reduced 
its illiteracy from 95 to about 30 per cent, is 
certainly deserving of more respectful con- 
sideration than it received from the Pro- 
gressive party leaders." 

It must have taken some urging to 
force Assistant Attorney-General Lewis into 
the ring against his first love, but he cer- 
tainly struck heavily in his Ohio and New 
Jersey speeches : 

"The disfranchisement of eight millions of 
citizens in the South, from party representa- 
tion in the new party, was the worst blow 
that the race has received in the last fifty 
years, because ours is a party government; 
because it is the only means through which 
the citizen can make his ideas of government 
prevail ; and when he is denied his represen- 
tation there he is denied a fundamental right, 
a right most essential to his liberty and his 
happiness. 

"I sat in the gallery of the coliseum at 
the birth of the new party. I saw men and 
women work themselves into a frenzy of 
enthusiasm. I heard the magnificent keynote 
of Senator Beveridge, when he said: 'We 
stand for a nobler America. We stand for 
an undivided nation. We stand for a broader 
liberty and a fuller justice. * * * We 
stand for mutual helpfulness instead of 
mutual hate. We stand for equal rights as a 
fact of life instead of a catchword of poli- 
tics. « * • -^g battle for the actual 
rights of man.' 

"For an hour and a half the great orator 
developed his theme. I listened to the strains 
of music of 'John Brown's Body' and the 



'Battle Hymn of the Republic' My heart 
sank within me when I thought that there 
were men outside clamoring for admission 
who were denied on account of their race and 
color. Since all men did not include South- 
ern Negroes, I could not feel that John 
Brown's soul was marching there. When 
that vast audience sang the 'Battle Hymn of 
the Republic,' 'as Christ died to make men 
holy let us die to make men free,' I felt that 
human cant and hypocrisy could go no 
further; it had reached its fitting climax." 



COLERIDGE-TAYLdR . 



The death of Coleridge- 



Taylor has brought 
much comment on his work. Almost without 
exception the praise has been universal. Of 
course, Phillip Hale, the dyspeptic and some- 
what erratic critic of Boston, had to have his 
usual fling at the Negro. 

Musical America says of Taylor: 

"In the musical circles of Great Britain he 
was a force and a power, a name which with 
that of Elgar represented the nation's most 
individual output in the domain of choral 
music, at any rate. His 'Hiawatha,' which 
has made his name better known than any- 
thing else he has written, is a work that will 
last for many years to come. So, too, his 
'Atonement,' perhaps the finest passion serv- 
ice of modern times. * * * Though sur- 
rounded by the influences that are at work 
in Europe to-day, he retained his individu- 
ality to the end, developing his style, 
however, and evincing new ideas in each 
succeeding work. * * « jjig untimely 
death at the age of 37, a short life — 
like those of Schubert, Mendelssohn, Chopin 
and Hugo Wolf — has robbed the world of one 
of its noblest singers, one of those few men 
of modern times who found expression in the 
language of musical song, a lyricist of power 
and worth, and, what is perhaps most sig- 
nificant, the ablest musician the Negro race 
has yet produced." 

Arthur M. Abell, the well-known reviewer 
of Berlin, Germany, says of the composer in 
the Musical Courier: 

"As the first and only Negro composer of 
real importance, his death constitutes a great 
loss to his race,' but it is also more than that; 
it is a loss to the musical world at large. 
For Coleridge-Taylor was a composer of 
noteworthy achievement and still greater 
promise. Even Berlin will feel his loss, for 



20 



THE CRISIS 



it was the composer's intention to come here 
early in the season and personally conduct 
the tirst European performance of his new 
violin concerto in G minor. * * » jjg 
was a man of sterling character, he was a 
good husband and father and a staunch and 
loyal friend." 

The London Daily Telegraph says: 

"The work of Coleridge-Taylor must be 
regarded as adding lustre to the history of 
musical composition in England. That his 
career, alreadj^ so fruitful, should have been 
cut off while he was at the height of his 
artistic poAver, is a tragedy whose pathos will 
be universally recognized." 

The Philadelphia Public Ledger says that 
he exemplifies the genius of the African race 
in music, and continues : "Coleridge-Taylor 
was to modern music what our American 
NegTO poet, Paul Laurence Dunbar, was to 
literature. His genius was not of the very 
highest order, but it was of elevated rank. 
He never set his pen to an ignoble or un- 
worthy score. The world of melody is im- 
poverished by the premature termination of 
the labors of one who represented by far 
the best achievement of his race in his chosen 
field of endeavor." 

A writer in the New York Tribune speaks 
of Mr. Taylor's visit to the Litchfield County 
Choral Union in 1910, and says: "Coleridge- 
Taylor, who endeared himself to all by his 
charming personality, repeatedly by word 
of mouth and in letters assured me and 
others that the whole-hearted welcome ac- 
corded him by his host and hostess at Nor- 
folk and the cordiality with which he was 
received by those he met there had filled him 
with neAV energy, enthusiasm and love for 
work." 

The Syracuse Post-Standard, remembering 
the artist's descent, says that Providence did 
fiot ^asit upon the offspring of this union 
the penalty which racial amalgamation is 
commonly supposed to incur. "He was," it 
continues, "one of the greatest artists in 
England." 

Miss Natalie Curtis calls attention to the 
taient of the colored people for music — a 
talent which in Coleridge-Taylor's case re- 
ceived in England encouragement and honor, 
whereas in our own country the barrier of 
race has kept colored musicians, with one or 
two exceptions, in the music hall, and has 
made Ihem ashamed of their best heritage — 
the folk music of the old plantation. 



THE NEGRO AND 
THE UNIONS. 



There are several indica- 
tions that the white and 
black workingmen are be- 
ginning to get together. Now and then one 
hears the old attitude of the Negro echoed 
as in the Western Outlook, a colored paper, 
which says : 

"We have always contended that unions 
are no benefit to the Negro and will not 
tolerate him in them only when they are to 
be benefited. Take the barbers' union — they 
are glad to have Negroes as members. Why? 
Because they control most of the good trade 
among the whites, and it helps white barbers 
to keep up prices. In this case they are a 
benefit to the union. But how is it in other 
branches of trade? It was only last week 
Messrs. Siebe & Sons, proprietors of Shell 
Mound Park, came to us and told us that 
union musicians want them to sign a con- 
tract on January 1, 1913, not to rent the 
park to any one, club or society, that does 
not employ union music. He said he had 
refused to sign, as he could see at a glance 
it would only affect colored organiza4;ions 
who gave picnics out there." 

On the other hand, down in Louisiana 
white men have begun to get a taste of the 
way in which colored laborers are treated. 
The white timber workers tried to organize 
the workingmen into a union. Their com- 
mittee of defense in an appeal says : 

"When the forest slaves of Louisiana and 
Texas revolted against peonage, and began, 
about two years ago, the organization of the 
Brotherhood of Timber Workers, an indus- 
trial union, taking in all the workers in the 
sawmills and camps, the lumber kings at 
once recognized the power inherent in such 
a movement and immediately began a cam- 
paign of lying and violence against the union 
and all persons connected with it or suspected 
of sympathizing with us. 

"First among the cries they raised against 
us was, of course, the old bunco cries of 
'white supremacy' and 'social equality',' 
coupled with that other cry, 'they are organ- 
izing the Negroes against the whites,' which 
the capitalists and landlords of the South 
and- their political buzzard and social carrion 
crows always raise in order to justify the 
slugging and assassination of white and col- 
ored workingmen who seek to organize and 
better the condition of their class. From the 
day you, the Negro workers, were 'freed,' 
down to the present hour, these cries have 
been used to cloak the vilest crimes against 



OPINION 



21 



the workers, white and colored, and to hide 
the wholesale rape of the commonwealth of 
the South by as soulless and cold-blooded a 
set of industrial scalawags and carpetbag- 
gers as ever drew the breath of life. 

"For a generation, under the influence of 
these specious cries, they have kept us fight- 
ing each other — us to secure the 'white 
supremacy' of a tramp and you the 'social 
equality' of a vagxant. Our fathers 'fell for 
it,' but we, their children, have come to 
the conclusion that porterhouse steaks and 
champagne will look as well on our tables 
as on those of the industrial scalawags and 
carpetbaggers; that the 'white supremacy' 
that means starvation wages and child slavery 
for us and the 'social equality' that means 
the same for you, though they may mean the 
'high life' and 'Christian civilization' to the 
lumber kings and landlords, will have to go. 
As far as we, the workers of the South, are 
concerned, the only 'supremacy' and 'equal- 
ity' they have ever granted us is the supre- 
macy of misery and the equality of rags. 
This supremacy and this equality we, the 
Brotherhood of Timber Workers, mean to 
stand no longer than we have an organiza- 
tion big and strong enough to enforce our 
demands, chief among which is 'A man's life 
for all the workers in the mills and forests 
of the South.' Because the Negro workers 
comprise one-half or more of the labor em- 
ployed in the Southern lumber industry, this 
battle cry of ours, 'A man's life for all the 
workers,' has been considered a menace, and 
therefore a crime in the eyes of the Southern 
oligarchy, for they, as well as we, are fully 
alive to the fact that we can never raise our 
standard of living and better our conditions 
so long as they can keep us split, whether 
on race, craft, religious or national lines, and 
they have tried and are trying all these 
methods of division in addition to their cam- 
paign of terror, wherein deeds have been 
and are being committed that would make 
Diaz blush with shame; they are so atrocious 
in their white-livered cruelty. For this rea- 
son, that they sought to organize all the 
workers, A. L. Emerson, president of the 
lirotherhood, and sixty-three other union men 
are now in prison at Lake Charles, La., under 
indictment, as a result of the massacre of 
Grabow, where three union men and one 
association g-unman were killed, charged with 
murder in the first degTee, indicted for killing 
their own brothers, and they will be sent to 
the gallows or, worse, to the frightful penal 



farms and levees of Louisiana, unless a united 
working class comes to their rescue with the 
funds necessary to defend them and the 
action that will bring them all free of the 
grave and the levees. 

"Further words are idle. It is a useless 
waste of paper to tell you, the Negro workers, 
of the merciless injustice of the Southern 
Lumber Operators' Association, for your race 
has learned through tears and blood 'the 
hyenaism we are fighting. Enough. Emer- 
son and his associates are in i)rison because 
they fought for the unity of all the workers. 

"Will you remain silent, turn no hand to 
help them in this, their hour of great danger? 

"Our fight is your fight, and we appeal 
to you to do your duty by these men, the 
bravest of the brave! Help us free them 
all. Join the brotherhood and help us blaze 
freedom's pathway through the jungles of 
the South." 



The fiftieth anniversary of the 
'^^^ issuing of President Lincoln's 

JUBILEE. preliminary Emancipation Procla- 
mation has brought much comment together 
with one frightful cartoon in the New York 
Sun. On the whole, the comments are 
encouraging. 

The Philadelphia Ledger says: 

"The problem is still a far cry from the 
final solution. . But if in half a century such 
gTatifying progress — 'up from slavery' — has 
been made, who shall venture to impose a 
limit to the NegTo's developing possibilities 
of usefulness to himself and to his white 
neighbor ?" 

The Boston Post, reviewing some of the 
main facts concerning the Negro's rights, 
adds : 

"Such is the development of half a century 
of acknowledged equal manhood. It marks 
an anniversary that may well be celebrated 
with pride and with confidence in the future." 

The Indianapolis Star calls attention to 
the double meaning of emancipation: 

"Emancipation of the slaves brought free- 
dom to the black race, but its blessings were 
hardly less to the whites. It lifted a cloud 
that had always darkened the nation's fame 
and whose shame was felt by a multitude of 
citizens; it opened the way for a prosperity 
and an advance of civilization never before 
equaled in one-half century in the history 
of the world. Even yet the effect upon the 
nation of a genuine and universal sense of 
liberty has not been fully realized. The debt 



22 



THE CRISIS 



to Abraham Lincoln is not yet wholly under- 
stood by either race that he benefited." 

The New York Nation expresses the view 
of those who are still stri^^.ng to emancipate 
black men and adds to it a curious and 
certainly unAvorthy touch of pessimism : 

"As for the colored people themselves, 
despite aU the injustice under which they 
stUl stagger, they have every reason both to 
venerate the name of Lincoln and to take' 
heart as they look back fifty years. From 
a chattel to a human being — that is the 
measure of the effect of Lincoln's pen. To 
own one's body and one's soul; to know no 
longer the anguish of seeing wife and child 
sold to meet a creditor's demand or an execu- 
tor's order — surely the burdens of to-day are 
but slight compared with those of half a 
century ago. And the future is still theirs. 
How can they falter or fail to have faith 
and hope when they think not only of the 
change since 1862, but of the story of the 
fifty years which preceded the proclamation? 
Their weakness to-day is chiefly their in- 
ability to organize to defend their rights. 
United they would stand far better; divided 
they fall before oppression. Can -anything 
else be expected when one reflects on the 
conditions of their servitude? Or is there 
an innate race weakness such as the Jews 
have never known in the darkest days of 
their age-long battle against prejudice and 
injustice?. Time alone will show." 

The South has little to say, but the Okla- 
homa City Times is glad that slavery is 
gone: 

"Well, it is all past. Perhaps not a single 
soul now living would care to defend the 
morality of the institution, and we of the 
younger generation, even although born and 
reared among former slaveholders, are re- 
joiced that the institution did not come down 
to us, and that Lincoln was persuaded to 
sign that proclamation fifty years ago. 

"Perhaps it may be argued with force that 
the material condition of the Negroes has not 
improved, but certainly the moral condition 
of the white race, the former slave owners, is 
lifted, and the Negro's moral and intellectual 
life has been greatly advanced." 



THE SOUTH 
AND EDUCATION 



The division in the white 
South concerning the ad- 
visability of giving the 
Negroes an effective education is plainly 
evident in this month's comment. The presi- 



dent of the board of education in Savannah 
acknowledges how badly the NegToes have 
been treated in school facilities, while a 
correspondent in one of the daily papers 
asks why they should be educated at all. 

The Petersburg Index- Appeal, a promi- 
nent white paper, says: 

"The Negroes of Petersburg need better 
school facilities. Conditions are so bad that 
they hardly should be discussed in print, 
unless, indeed, there should develop e\T.dence 
that the city school boaM fails to appreciate 
the terrible lack of necessities which exists. 
It is certain that a portion of the board does 
recognize the needs of these schools, just as 
there is evidence that some members fail to 
do so. 

"There may be more than one opinion as 
to the wisdom of educating the Negro, as 
many of them now are being educated, but 
there should be but one as to the absolute 
necessity of keeping him in good health. A 
tuberculous Negro is as much a menace to 
the whites as is a tuberculous white. It is 
impossible to have a city with a low death 
rate among whites if conditions which cause 
a high mortality rate among the colored are 
allowed to exist. And it is impossible to 
have a low death rate in Petersburg as long 
as conditions which exist in the Negro schools 
are permitted to continue." 

The New Era, a colored paper of New 
Orleans, commenting on the forcing of 
twenty-four white girls into the colored 
public schools, charges that the reasons for 
this "are not far to seek," and it goes on 
to explain the failure of the colored teachers 
to pass the examination : 

"Last year certain colored schools were in 
charge of white substitute teachers. Most of 
them were persons who had been found unfit 
to teach in the white schools. Their work 
was so unsatisfactory that the mothers of the 
children were loud in their criticisms and 
did not conceal the fact that they wanted 
colored teachers for their children. This is 
one cause. 

"Last session the city normal school 
turned out nearly 200 graduates, a much 
larger supply than is required by the white 
schools here. Although educated in the long- 
cherished traditions of the South, these young 
ladies have manifested an inconsistent and 
peculiar preference for salaries earned in 
bringing up Negro children in the schools, 
although every one of them would balk at 



OPINION 



23 



doing the same thing in their homes. As 
years go by more teachers will be turned out 
and more colored schools will be required for 
these normal girls and a correspondingly 
less number of colored teachers will be 
needed. This is evidently the chief cause of 
the recent humiliation of the graduates of 
our schools. 

"The examination questions were appar- 
ently framed with the purpose of eliminating 
as manj' of the colored teachers as possible. 
Mr. Bauer's wholesale accusation of the col- 
ored teachers of the intention of stealing in 
the examinations appeared to be a part of 
the program to unnerve the applicants, to 
put them in a state of mind where they 
would be unfit to do their best work. It was 
untimely and uncalled for, and as the results 
of examinations have indicated that his 
charges were wholly unfounded, Mr. Bauer 
will undoubtedly have quite a hard time con- 
vincing many of the applicants that they 
were not intentionally deprived of their 
certificates. 

"Consequently, the whole situation is bad, 
and does little credit to our public-school 
system here. The attempt to discredit the 
work of the colored universities here in order 
to furnish an excuse to fill the colored public 
schools with white teachers is much to be 
deplored. The colored people do not want 
white teachers in the colored public schools, 
and the sooner the white teachers are re- 
moved from the colored public schools the 
better will it be for the advancement of 
Negro education here." 



THE ULTIMATE 
PROBLEM. 



Franklin H^ Giddings, the 
sensational "sociologist" of 
Columbia University, has 
again expressed his reactionary opinions on 
the race problems in the public press. He 
is forced to "admit that the Negro has made 
some progress, that he has become a property 
owner, a small farmer, and has come to enjoy 
some of the privileges of the white man. But 
I cannot see that the Negro has made any 
political progress, and I cannot see that he 
is likely 'to make any in the near future. I 
am not discussing whether this is right or 
wrong. I merely wish to make clear the 
point, irrespective of its ethical considera- 
tions, that there is no likelihood that the 
Ne.gro will be permitted to vote in consider- 
able numbers where he may control results 
for a long time to come, or that he will 
enjoy the same privileges as the white man. 



The South does not intend to allow such a 
condition to come about. And of one thing 
we may rest assured — the North will never 
make another attempt to force the South to 
yield the Negro greater privileges." 

He is, of course, sure that a great mistake 
was made in ever enfranchising Negroes, but 
apparently does not know whether he wants, 
educated Negroes to vote or not. He con- 
cludes that: 

"There is a considerable likelihood that 
for a long time to come the prejudice shown 
against the Negro in the skilled trades will 
continue. In many places in the North he 
has been effectively driven out. In the South 
he is not in such great danger because he has 
many opportunities there to work for his 
own people. 

"I have mentioned these considerations as 
a general impression. I have not made a 
special study of this special aspect of a great 
problem. I feel certain, however, that the 
race problem is far from solution. I am 
also certain that the problem of the future 
will be even greater than that of the present. 
The white man considers the black man so 
inferior to himself that he does not oppose 
him or give him much consideration as a 
rival. But with the improved opportunities 
of the Negro, with a better education and 
extended privileges, he must inevitably claim 
a place alongside of the white man as his 
equal. If he should be able to back up his 
claim on the strength of educational and 
economic equality, then we may prepare to. 
witness a race conflict compared to which the 
present situation is a love feast." 

The comments on this outburst are rather 
to the point. 

The Pittsburgh Despatch says : 

"The Negroes, or the fractional Negroes, 
are here to stay in one form and in one 
condition or another. Thej' have increased 
since the emancipation by Abraham Lincoln, 
the semi-centennial of which is celebrated, 
from about 4,000,000 to more than 10,000,- 
000. They have established great schools and 
acquired hundreds of millions of property. 
They are in everj' calling and every profes- 
sion and the proportion of those who are 
making good is equal to the proportion of 
the whites who are making good. They have 
been disfranchised in the South, in flagrant 
violation of constitutional enactments. They 
go on in their beleaguered way to try for the 
best. 

"If we are to have a race war it will not 



24 



THE CRISIS 



be the fractional Negroes' fault, but the fault 
of the persecutors of the NegTo and of 
sociologists like Dr. Giddings." 

The New Haven Begister rebukes the "im- 
patient sociologist" and says that he "shows 
an impatience — not to call it pessimism — 
which is hardly creditable to a thoughtful 
student of sociology. Professor Giddings can 
find not manj^ miles from the seat of Colum- 
bia a race of white men who do not observ- 
ably make any political progTess, and show 
no signs of doing so. The subjects of Tam- 
many Hall seem, superficially, to be • about 
where thej' were in Tweed's time, and their 
condition under Murphy is not materially 
better. Shall we conclude then that things 
will never be any different in politically 
darkest New York?" 

The Boston Globe is quite cheerful about 
the matter: 

"But the NegTo race will not stand still, 
nor will it be exterminated. With more and 
better education, with greater industrial and 
business pri^i-leges, especially in the South 
where the NegTo has larger opportunity to 
work among and for his own people, his 
progress will be inevitable. Neither will the 
white race stand still, and when the NegTO 
is able to enforce his claim of equality the 
white man will surely be sufficiently en- 
lightened to avert the race conflict which 
Prof. Giddings predicts." 

The Southern papers get considerable 
satisfaction, and yet they do not agree with 
the professor. 

The Savannah News, for instance, says: 

"Prof. Giddings' expressed fear that a 
great race war will come when the Negro 
reaches a plane where he can back up his 
demand for political equality shows that the 
professor still has something to learn. The 
opposition to the ignorant NegTo's ballot was 
more because of the character than the color 
of the voter. * * * There is no sentiment 
here against the Negro in the professions 
provided he qualifies himself, and when he 
fits himself for the ballot there will be little 
if any obstacle to his having it." 

So there you are! And then the Bourbon 
Charleston News and Courier steps in with 
its ancient pseudo-science : 

"Are we face to face with another irre- 
pressible conflict? We doubt it and we doubt 
it because we are sure that the Negro never 
will be aljle to show educational and economic 
equality. Dr. Smith, of Tulane University, 
in his splendid study, 'The Color Line,' 



shows conclusively that physiologically the 
NegTO is precluded from intellectual progress 
comparable to that achieved by the white 
man. In the Northern schools it is often 
noted that black students are very precocious 
in the lower grades. Suddenly their growth 
in a mental way stops. They generally fall 
behind. The reason seems to be that the 
sutures of the black's skull become absolutely 
fixed at about the age of 16, while the growth 
of the white's skull continues until the man 
is 25 years old or more." 

What is one going to do with rational 
people that talk like this? Where is all this 
race confiict coming from, and where does 
the real point of contact occur? If we turn 
to the Negro papers, we may more easily 
see. A little Texas colored paper, for 
instance, says: 

"That this is a 'white man's country' is 
forcibly illustrated by the way Negroes are 
dealt with on the street ears and in all public 
jDlaces where masses of people congregate. 
Regardless of the restrictions limiting the 
races to certain confines, white people are 
prone to violate the law. They do it with 
impuijity and wherever and whenever they 
please. When the cars are crowded white 
people stand and sit right along in the col- 
ored division, even if complaint is made. As 
a rule, the condu-ctors don't kick, nor do they 
attempt to enforce the rules. On the other 
hand, when colored people act similarly, they 
are snatched up, arrested and fined for vio- 
lating the law. In the Negro's case the con- 
ductors make it a point to see everything, 
enforcing the law with vengeance, humiliat- 
, ing 'Cuffy,' treating him with contempt and 
worse than a dog in most cases. In face 
of all this, too many of our people persist 
in butting in where they are not wanted, 
making it harder for us as a class, causing 
us to suffer indignities of every kind and 
degree, as though we were not meml^ers of the 
human race." 

A colored woman soliciting for a Southern 
seliool said to the representative of a Wor- 
cester paper: 

"Because the colored race is colored, and 
because we have been slaves, there will always 
be more or less prejudice, I suppose. We 
should be treated fairly. Have you ever been 
in a depot in the South? You will find the 
))art of the depot that is reserved for white 
folks is clean and comfortable, but the part 
that is for the colored folks is generally 
dirtv and uncomfortable. One day I got a 



OPINION 



25 



registered letter that had been in the post- 
office, I believe, for nearly ten days, but 
each day 1 called for it I could not secure 
it. I brought the matter to the attention of 
the authorities at Washington, and one day 
the postmaster told me the letter was there." 

But for real insight to the innermost mean- 
ing of the race eontiict commend us to 
Laurence Taylor. We do not know Laurence, 
neither does ''Who's Who," but in a letter to 
the Boston Herald *he states the case with 
startling perspicuity. ''Negroes and whites," 
he says, "are different races and should have 
kept apart. Let the traveled, educated 
Negroes educate their own and live among 
them, and whites do the same. They cannot 
be mixed, as the wisest whites and Booker 
Washington have found out. It is not a 
matter of refinement, or learning, or that one 
feels superior; all such compromises lead to 
unfortunate results, unfair to both sides. 
There are many white men who are objec- 
tionable, even dissipated, clubmen; also many 
colored who might conduct themselves better 
than they — that has nothing to do with the 
case. It is instinct and race that are called 
into question, and only this." 

This is getting down to the real pith of 
the matter, and it takes the Chicago Examiner 
to give the final word. Speaking of the 
deaths of children, it says : 

"Science is already working out its race- 
suicide problem in splendid form. Reports 
show that the largest percentage of deaths of 
babies under one year is in families of the 
Negro and of the uneducated foreigner. The 
smallest i^ercentage is in native white 
families." 

We hesitate to suggest to the Examiner 
the use of strychnine as an aid to mal- 
nutrition. 

There comes, however, one large and re- 
assuring word from Mrs. Annie Besant, the 
great lecturer of England. From a speech 
at Letehworth Garden City Summer School 
we clip the following significant extracts: 

"Let us take the colored races one by one 
and try to understand them. Britain has a 
gi'eat future before it in that work if the 
whole of our social system is going to be 
remodeled and reorganized on a new basis 
of human happiness instead of on the basis 
of struggle. 

"China and Japan are both gTeat and 
growing powers in the Pacific. Can we think 
it likely that, if their people are not treated 
with more courtesy and justice, they will 



always submit to a nation of 5,000,000 peo- 
ple"? We should not do it if in their place. 
Is it possible for English people to dis- 
criminate constantly among colored races, 
and yet expect them always to remain quiet 
and submissive, taking an inferior place, 
which very often is not theirs? 

"In Australia we have an enormous terri- 
tory, with about 5,000,000 of white men, 
and an immense coast line. But even in 
Australia there are some parts that exclude 
the colored man. One condition is that a 
man must be able to write and translate in a 
foreign tongue. An Indian going there is 
given a passage in modern Greek to read and 
translate, and if he cannot do it he is turned 
back. No Indian prince can go into 
Australia. Arrangements are carefully made 
beforehand in order to prevent his landing 
when he reaches those shores. 

"There is a terrible outcry when an outrage 
is done to a white woman, but nothing is said 
or done when tens of thousands of Kaffir 
women are outraged by white men. This is 
a most serious question, for no white woman 
was ever touched roughly by a Kaffir until his 
own women had been outraged by the white 
man. The advance of womanhood in South 
Africa has been destroyed by the white man, 
and not by the colored races. It is the white 
man who has broken down the barrier that 
surrounded her and left her no longer safe 
among the colored people. It is there that 
lies one of our greatest sins; the utter dis- 
regard of all morality where colored women 
are concerned; the shameful disregard of 
womanhood in every country where Britain 
has entered and where Britain rules. We 
send our missionaries over to them, but Eng- 
lish people themselves should first be taught. 
I cannot forget the shame I felt one day 
when a great Indian orator, speaking of the 
English in India, turned to me and said: 
'If you take away your religion, police and 
your brothels, we can manage the rest of the 
difficulties for ourselves.' It is no good send- 
ing missionaries while such a retort lies on 
on the lips of the Indian." 



HOUSING THE 
NTEGRO IN CHICAGO. 



The Chicago Post says 
that the difficulty on the 
part of the Negro in get- 
ting decent housing facilities in Chicago is 
well Ijrought out by Miss Sophonisba Breckin- 
ridge, who, with Miss Edith Abbott, has 
edited the series of housing reports of which 
this is a part. Miss Breckinridge, though a 



26 



THE CRISIS 



Southern woman, displays a far greater 
breadth of view and a far more democratic 
attitude in her comments than many a North- 
ern woman, we fear, would be able to show: 
"The majority of people stand for fair 
play, and we believe that the persecutions 
of race prejudice which the Negro endures 
express the feeling only of a small minority 
of his fellow citizens of the white race, and 
that the gTeat majority are completely ig- 
norant of the heavy burden of injustice which 
he carries. Ignorance is always the bulwark 
of prejudice, and race prejudice is singularly 
dependent upon an ignorance which is, to be 
sure, sometimes wilful, but which is for the 
most part unintentional and accidental. It 
has come about, however, that the small 
minority who cherish their prejudices and 
persecute the black man because he is black 
have had the power to make life increasingly 
hard for him. And to-day they not only 
refuse to sit in the same part of the theatre 
with him and to let him enter a hotel which 
they patronize, but they also refuse to allow 
him to live on the same street with them, or 
even in the same neighborhood. Even where 
the city administration does not recognize a 



black 'ghetto' or 'pale,' the real-estate agents 
who register and commercialize what they 
suppose to be a universal race prejudice are 
able to enforce one in practice. It is out of 
this minority persecution that the special 
Negro housing problem has developed." 

In Chicago this active prejudice has re- 
sulted in the gradual establishment of four 
colored districts. By forcing the colored 
people into those districts the real-estate in- 
terests have enabled the landlords there to 
obtain extortionate rents. One of the most 
glaring exhibits in this report is that reveal- 
ing the rents exacted of the colored family. 
There is, for example, a table comparing 
what the colored family has to pay for a 
four-room apartment and what the immi- 
grant families in various districts have to 
pay: 

DISTRICT MEDIAN 

Jewish $10.00 to $10.50 

Bohemian 8.00 to 8.50 

Polish 8.00 to 8.50 

Stockyards 8.00 to 8.50 

South Chicago 9.00 to 9.50 

Colored (south side) 12.00 to 12.50 

Colored (west side) 10.00 to 10.50 



HISTORIC DAYS IN NOVEMBER 



1. Revised constitution of Mississippi 
promulgated, 1890. 

2. Disfranchisement defeated in Mary- 
land the second time, 1909. 

3. Riot at Danville, Va., growing out of 
the exercise of the elective franchise by 
Negroes, 1883. 

4. Massachusetts made declaration 
against man stealing, 1646. 

6. Convention of Negroes at Indianapolis 
asked for suffrage, 1866. 

7. Rev. Elijah P. Love joy, while defend- 
ing his presses against the assault of a 
pro-slavery mob, was killed at Alton, 111., 
1837. 

8. Rev. Elijah P. Lovejoy born, 1802. 

9. Benjamin Banneker born, 1731. 
11. Nat. Turner executed, 1831. 



12. Twenty slaves petitioned New Hamp- 
shire legislature to abolish slavery, 1779. 

13. Liberty party named J. G. Birney 
for President, 1839. 

15. John M. Langston died, 1897. 

16. First attempt by England to estab- 
lish systematic slave trade, 1618. 

17. Stephen S. Foster, abolitionist, born, 
1809. 

19. Organization of the 29th Connecticut 
Volunteers authorized, 1863. 

20. Lemuel Haynes, first Negro in North 
America licensed to preach the gospel, 1780. 

25. Andrew Carnegie born, 1837. 

28. The French evacuated Haiti, 1803. 

29. San Domingo annexation treaty nego- 
tiated, 1869. 

Wendell Phillips born, 1811. 

L. M. Hershaw, 





THE SECOND BIRTHDAY. 

T is natural that there 
should be many misap- 
prehensions concerning 
the origin of The Crisis 
as well as its object. 
Every man with a cause 
longs to voice his belief. Most men, 
however, like the editor of this maga- 
zine, are held back by a very genuine 
doubt as to whether the public will 
recognize any worth in the proposed 
message. They know — or they think 
they know — that when the message is 
voiced, and the world realizes its full 
import, it will welcome and help 
actively in its spread. 

The problem is then how to begin, 
how first to spread the message. Capi- 
tal must be had for the launching of 
such an enterprise, but how may one 
raise it and whence? It seemed to the 
editor of The Crisis in earlier years 
that the benevolent rich might be ap- 
proached with such a proposition. He 
forgot that the benevolent are besieged 
with schemes of all sorts and have little 
time or ability to judge a matter the 
justification of which lies in the far 
future. They are used to helping the 
thing that has already proven its worth. 
A second method would be to furnish 
the necessary capital oneself and 
thus bridge the starving period. Now 
the capital that an American colored 
man, working at "colored" wages, can 
afford to put into a periodical of pur- 
pose is small. The Crisis is a small 
magazine run on extremely economical 
lines with a small — much too small — 
working force; but The Crisis costs 



over $1,000 a month to publish and 
distribute. Persons proposing to start 
small magazines should remember this. 
Yet an earnest agent who is about to 
buy twenty-five copies a month writes 
us : "I will handle your magazine if 
you will promise to enlarge it soon ! ' ' 

The push of the unspoken thought 
that demands utterance is strong. So, 
despite cost and trouble, the editor at- 
tempted seven years ago a small maga- 
zinelike weekly, published at Memphis, 
Tenn., and called The Moon. The 
editor gave all his savings, some twelve 
hundred little dollars, into the hands of 
an ambitious young printer, turned the 
whole business responsibility over to 
him and furnished his services as edi- 
tor free. The result was a flash of 
popularity, a year of unsystematic 
struggle, and then the clear realization 
that either the editor must give his 
whole time and help in the business 
management or give up. Now as the 
editor was earning his daily bread as 
well as capital for The Moon by his 
work as teacher, giving this up seemed 
impossible and the Moon set. 

Immediately friends came forward 
and said: "But we must have such a 
periodical as you sought to give us. 
Suppose we help you bear the ex- 
pense?" The result was a miniature 
magazine called The Horizon, published 
for nearly three years in Washington, 
D. C, by men who themselves paid the 
deficit out of their shallow pockets. 

Here we faced a new problem. 
Scarcely 500 copies of the magazine 
were sold monthly, and, as the young 
manager flatly put it, it seemed as if 
"the people don't want it." 



28 



THE CRISIS 



The problem was serious. If it was 
true that 10,000.000 serfs did not want 
a single uutrammeled champion of 
their larger rights and ambitions, then 
the problem of those rights and ambi- 
tions was even graver than the editor 
had dreamed. But the editor doubted. 
Was it proven that the colorfid folk 
did not want such a magazine? Had 
they been given a fair chance to decide? 

While these questions were being 
pondered the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored People 
was formed and the editor was asked 
to become director of publicity and 
research. 

Articles in this number show how 
difficult it is to try to get publicity 
on the Negro problem in the regular 
periodical press unless the black man is 
vilified and traduced. The editor there- 
fore said to his board of directors : "If 
we are to have publicity, it must be 
through an organ of our OAvn. " The 
board hesitated. They knew far better 
than the editor that magazines cost 
money, and despite legends to the con- 
trary, they had almost no money. 
Nevertheless, the necessity of some 
organ was great, and with many mis- 
firivings the board authorized an expen- 
diture of $50 a month for a small 
monthly. 

The editor will not soon forget that 
first number of The Crisis. William 
English Walling suggested the name; 
Mary Dunlop Maclean saw to the 
"makeup;" Robert N. Wood took the 
printing contract. But it was the edi- 
tor alone, looking out on the forest of 
roofs of lower Broadway, who asked and 
asked again the momentous (piestion : 
"Dare I order 500 copies— or 1,000?" 
And when in a fit of wild adventure 
he ordered 1,000 copies printed he felt 
like Wellington before Waterloo. 
Month before last The Crisis in a fit 
of parsimony ordered but 20,000 copies 
printed. The result was that orders 
for over 1,000 copies could not be 



filled, so that last month we returned 
to our regular 22,000 edition. When 
we tell facts like these, people imagine 
large capital and dividends in connec- 
tion with our magazine. Not so. Not 
a cent of capital has been invested in 
the magazine, except that the National 
Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People has furnished the serv- 
ices of the editor free of charge. This 
means that The Crisis is not quite ipaj- 
ing expenses, for it could not to-day, 
with its present income and expense, 
afford to pay an editor. 

Can, now, a magazine like The Crisis 
ever become entirely self-supporting? 
Many of our friends doubt this. They 
point to the graveyard of ambitious and 
worthy ventures — the Colored Ameri- 
can and the Voice of the Negro 
to name the latest — and say the Ameri- 
can Negro has not yet reached the place 
where he appreciates a magazine enough 
to pay for its support. We doubt this 
assertion. We actually sell each month 
over 21,500 magazines. We are sure 
that if we could get The Crisis to per- 
sons who want it we could to-day sell 
50,000. The problem of distribution 
is, however, extremely difficult. We 
cannot use the ordinary channels of 
distribution, but must have our own 
agents, and these agents must be largely 
missionaries in a crusade, because it 
hardly pays them to give their time 
to one magazine. 

When once The Crisis can reach a 
circulation of 50,000 its permanence 
and independence are assured. Until it 
can there must always be the element 
of doubt as to whether such a magazine 
can command the requisite support. We 
believe it can. The experience of the 
first two years is more than encourag- 
ing. The Crisis has to-day the largest 
net circulation of any periodical de- 
voted to the Negro race in America. 
If the growth in the next two years 
parallels the past, then one at least of 
our problems will be solved — the prob- 
lem of publicity. 



EDITORIAL 



29 




THE LAST WORD IN POLITICS. 

EFORE another number 
of The Crisis appears 
the next President of the 
United States Mali have 
been elected. AVe have, 
therefore, but this last 
word to colored voters and their 
friends. 

Those who have scanned our ad- 
vertising pages this month and last 
have noted an unusual phenomenon : 
the three great political parties have 
in this way been appealing to the 
colored vote for support. They have 
done this out of no love to this 
magazine, but because they needed 
the publicity which this magazine 
alone could give and because they knew 
that our news columns and editorial 
pages were not for sale. We commend 
these advertisements to our readers' 
notice. They are the last word of 
political appeal and they are undoubt- 
edly sincere. 

Taking them now and comparing and 
weighing them, and what is the net re- 
sult? The Republican party emphasizes 
its past relations with the Negro, the 
recent appointments to office, and warns 
against the disfranchisement and caste 
system of the Democratic South. The 
weak point in this argument is that 
without the consent of Republican 
Presidents, Republican Congresses and 
a Republican Supreme Court, Southern 
disfranchisement could not survive a 
single day. 

The Progressive party stresses its 
platform of social reform, so admirable 
in many respects, and points to the 
recognition given in its party councils 
to the Northern Negro voter. The weak 
point here is the silence over the fact 
that Theodore Roosevelt, the perpetra- 
tor of the Brownsville outrage, has 
added to that blunder the Chicago dis- 
franchisement and is appealing to the 
South for white votes on this platform. 
The Democratic party appeals for 



colored votes on the ground that other 
parties have done and are doing pre- 
cisely the things that the Democratic 
party is accused of doing against the 
Negro, and this in spite of the fact 
that these parties receive the bulk of 
the Negro vote. If, therefore, the 
Negro expects Democratic help and 
support, why does he not give the 
Democrats his vote? The weak point 
here is that the invitation is at best 
negative ; the Negro is asked to take a 
leap in the dark without specific prom- 
ises as to what protection he may ex- 
pect after the Democrats are in power. 
In none of these cases, therefore, is 
the invitation satisfactory. Neverthe- 
less, because the Socialists, with their 
manly stand for human rights irre- 
spective of color, are at present out of the 
calculation, the Negro voter must choose 
between these three parties. He is 
asked virtually to vote. 

1. For a party which has promised 
and failed. 

2. For a party which has failed and 
promised. 

3. For a party which merely 
promises. 

We sympathize -with those faithful 
old black voters who will always vote 
the Republican ticket. We respect their 
fidelity but not their brains. We can- 
understand those who, despite the un- 
speakable Roosevelt, accept his platform 
which is broad on all subjects except 
the greatest — human rights. This we 
can understand, but we cannot follow. 

We sincerely believe that even in the 
face of promises disconcertingly vague, 
and in the face of the solid caste-ridden 
South, it is better to elect Woodrow 
Wilson President of the United States 
and prove once for all if the Democratic 
party dares to be Diemocratic when it 
comes to black men. It has proven that 
it can be in many Northern States and 
cities. Can it be in the nation? We 
hope so and we are willing to risk a 
trial. 



The PROGRESSIVE PARTY AND THE NEGRO 



By JANE ADDAMS 




T the ProgTessive convention 
held in Chicago last August 
disquieting rumors arose 
concerning the NegTo dele- 
gates. It was stated that 
although two groups from 
Florida, one of colored men 
and one of white, had been excluded because 
of a doubt as to which had been authorized 
to elect delegates, that the colored men only 
from Mississippi had been excluded ; and 
that this was done in spite of the fact that 
the word "white" had been inserted in the 
call for the State convention which elected 
the accredited delegates. It did not seem 
sufficient to many of us that the credentials 
committee in seating the Mississippi delega- 
tion had merely protested against the use of 
the word "white," and some of us at once 
took alarm on behalf of the colored men. 

With several others, who were also mem- 
bers of the National Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People, I appeared 
before the resolutions committee to point out 
the inconsistency of pledging relief to the 
overburdened workingman while leaving the 
colored man to struggle unaided with his 
difficult situation, if, indeed, the action of the 
credentials committee had not given him a 
setback. 

In reply we were told that colored men were 
sitting as delegates in the convention, not 
only from such Northern States as Rhode 
Island, but that the Progressives of West 
Virginia, Maryland, Tennessee and Kentucky 
had also elected colored delegates, setting a 
standard which it was hoped the States south 
of them would attain when the matter was 
left 'to those men of the South who are im- 
patient in the thraldom of war issues and 
old party alignments. It was pointed out 
that such are the limitations of local self- 
government that free political expression can 
only be secured to the colored man through 
the co-operative action of the patriotic and 
far-seeing citizens of the States in which he 
lives; that only when white men and colored 
men together engage upon common political 
problems will the colored man cease to be 
regarded as himself a problem. We were 
reminded that under so-called Republican 
protection the colored man has practically 



lost his vote in certain States, not only 
through the grandfather clause, but through 
sheer intimidation in those counties where 
the line of party cleavage follows the line of 
race antagonism, all the whites being Demo- 
crats who vote, all the blacks Republicans 
who do not. We were further told that if 
there was any disposition to continue old 
shams, that it would be a very simple matter 
to insert in the Progressive platform the 
glittering phrases which had done valiant 
service for so long a time, not only to blind 
the colored man himself, but to enable the 
manager of a Republican convention to de- 
termine the result through the colored vote. 
By the simple device of appointing to fed- 
eral offices colored men in the sections where 
there is no Republican party, these men elect 
themselves delegates to the national conven- 
tions and naturally repay their party by 
voting as their offieeholding interests require. 
Certainly self-government is not being pro- 
moted by such political recognition on the 
part of the Republicans of the North any 
more than it is by the disenfranchising action 
on the part of the Democrats of the South. 
The. Progressive convention took neither 
point of view and challenged at one and at 
the same time the traditional shibboleths of 
both parties. 

When I asked myself most searchingly 
whether my Abolitionist father would have 
remained in any political convention in which 
colored men had been treated slightingly, I 
recalled an incident of my girlhood which 
was illuminating and somewhat comforting. 
I had given my father an explanation of a 
stupid decision whereby I had succeeded in 
bungling the plans of a large family party, 
and I ended my apology with the honest 
statement that I had tried to act upon what 
I thought his judgment would have been. 
His expression of amused bewilderment 
changed to one of understanding as he re- 
plied: "That probably accounts for your 
confusion of mind. You fell into the easy 
mistake of substituting loyalty and depend- 
ence upon another's judgment for the very 
best use of your own faculties. I should be 
sorry to think that you were always going 
to complicate moral situations, already suffi- 
ciently difficult, by trying to work out 



THE PROGRESSIVE PARTY AND THE NEGRO 



31 



another's point of view. You will do much 
better if you look the situation fairly in the 
face with the best light you have." 

Certainly the Abolitionists followed the 
best light they had, although it differed from 
that possessed by the framers of the Con- 
stitution, whose light had also come from the 
eighteenth century doctrines of natural rights 
and of abstract principles, when ideas were 
pressed up to their remotest logical issues, 
without much reference to the conditions to 
which they were applied. Shall we be less 
fearless than they to follow our own moral 
ideals formed under the influence of new 
knowledge, even, although the notion of evo- 
lution has entered into social history and 
politics, and although "abstract" in the 
tongue of William James, has come to imply 
the factitious, the academic, and even the 
futile? 

We all believe that a wide extension of 
political power is the only sound basis of 
self-government and that no man is good 
enough to vote for another, but we surely 
do ' not become mere opportunists when we 
try to know something of the process by 
which the opinion of the voter has been in- 
fluenced and his vote secured. If it is done 
through bribery, we easily admit that the 
whole system of representative government 
has broken down, and we are not accounted 
to have lost our patriotism Avhen we estimate 
how much of a given vote is due to the liquor 
interests or to manufactured opinion ; only 
on the political status of the colored man is 
it still considered unpatriotic to judge, save 
as one who long ago made up his mind. 

Even in that remarkable convention where, 
for the moment, individual isolation was dis- 
solved into a larger consciousness and where 
we caught a hint of the action of "the col- 
lective mind," so often spoken of and so 
seldom apprehended, I was assailed by the 
old familiar discomfort concerning the 
status of the colored man. Had I felt any 
better about it, I speculated, when I had tried 
in vain for three consecutive vears to have 



the question discussed by a great national 
association to whose purposes such a dis- 
cussion was certainly germain? Was I more 
dissatisfied with this action than I had often 
been with no action at all? I was forced to 
acknowledge to myself that certainly war on 
behalf of the political status of the colored 
man was clearly impossible, but that there 
might emerge from such federal action as 
the interference with peonage, perhaps, a 
system of federal arbitration in interracial 
difficulties, somewhat analagous to the func- 
tion of the Hague tribunal in international 
affairs. In fact, it has already been dis- 
covered at the Hague that many difficulties 
formerly called international were in reality 
interracial. Through such federal arbitra- 
tion it may in time be demonstrated that to 
secure fair play between races living in the 
same nation is as legitimate as it is when 
irrational race hatred breaks out on those 
fringes of empire which the Hague calls 
"spheres of influence." The action of the 
Progressive party had at least taken the 
color question away from sectionalism and 
put it in a national setting which might clear 
the way for a larger perspective. Possibly 
this is all we can do at the present moment. 
Viewing the third-party movement as a 
consistent, practical effort toward the "barn 
raising of a new party in the nation," which 
in its organization and program should not 
be along the old Civil War cleavages, we can 
predict but one outcome. The issues were 
those of political democracy and industrial 
justice — a merging of the political insurgency 
in the West and country districts with the 
social insurgency of the cities. Imbedded 
in this new movement is a strong ethical 
motive, and once the movement is crystallized, 
once as a body of people it gets a national 
foothold, once as a propaganda the rank and 
file are transfused Avith the full scope and 
meaning of social justice, it is bound to lift 
this question of the races, as all other ques- 
tions, out of the gTip of the past and into 
a new era of solution. 





MARY DUNLOP MACLEAN 
Late Managing Editor of THE CRISIS 



<The COLORED MAGAZINE IN AMERICA 




HE first colored magazine in 
America seems to have been 
The African Methodist 
Episcopal Church Maga- 
zine, edited by Dr. Hogarth, 
general book steward, and 
pnblished in Brooklyn, in 
October, 1841. This magazine was in a 
sense the ancestor of The Crisis. Its editor 
seems to have been a native of Haiti, 
although little is known of his life and work. 
The prospectus of the magazine says : "In 
embarking upon this laudable enterprise it 
becomes our duty, in the onset, to inform our 
friends that such a work cannot be concluded 
with dignity and honor to our people unless 
it meets with ample supply of pecuniary and 
intellectual means. A fear of failure in ob- 
taining- these important contingencies had, 
in a great measure, prevented our brethren 
in their deliberations from coming to any 
conclusions on this important subject. But, 
judging from the present as^Deet of things, 
that the times have greatly changed in our 
favor as a people, light has burst forth upon 
us, intelligence in a great measure is taking 
the place of ignorance, especially among the 
younger portions of our people, opening the 
avenues to proper Christian feeling and 
benevolence — our brethren, from those im- 
portant considerations, came to the conclu- 
sion, at our last New York annual confer- 
ence, held in June, in the city of Brooklyn, 
to order such a work and lay it before the 
public for their patronage." This magazine 
lasted two or three years. Its publication 
was then stopped. 

After an interval of forty years Bishop 
B. T. Tanner began the publication of the 
A. M. E. Church Review Quarterly. This 
has been published as a quarterly magazine 
from 1885 down to to-day and is now re- 
ceiving new life from its recently elected 
editor. Dr. R. C. Ransom. The first number 
of the Review says editorially: "My church, 
the African Methodist Episcopal, at its re- 
cent quadrennial session in Baltimore, con- 
cluded to have not only a weekly paper, but 
a Review, for the present quarterly, but 
intended to be bi-monthly, with the manage- 
ment of which it honored me. I have, there- 



fore, gentlemen, to ask at your hands the 
same friendly consideration you so gener- 
ously accorded me when editor of the Chris- 
tian Recorder. Grant an exchange. Speak 
a word — when merited. What we present is 
unique in the world of letters. If you think 
so, advise the thoughtful of your readers 
to subscribe for it." 

A quarterly magazine, however, did not 
quite fill the bill, and in the years from 1845 
to the present there have been a number of 
other adventures. There was, for instance, 
The Repository of Religion and Literature, 
published in Indianapolis and afterward in 
Baltimore for several years. In later days 
the Colo.red American Magazine, started by 
a colored man who put the savings of his 
life from days' labor into it, was first issued 
in Boston in 1900, and rapidly attained a 
wide circulation. At its zenith it distributed 
15,000 copies. Then, however, its troubles 
began. It was at one time sold for debt, 
but Colonel William H. Dupree rescued it, 
and it seemed about to take on new life 
when further difficulties occurred. It was 
suggested to the editor, who was then Miss 
Pauline Hopkins, that her attitude was not 
conciliatory enough. As a white friend said: 
"If you are going to take up the wrongs 
of your race then you m.ust depend for sup- 
port absolutely upon your race. For the 
colored man to-day to attempt to stand up 
to fight would be like a canary bird facing a 
bulldog, and an angry one at that." The 
final result was that the magazine was bought 
by friends favorable to the conciliatory atti- 
tude, and transferred to New York, where 
it became so conciliatory, innocuous and un- 
interesting that it died a peaceful death 
almost unnoticed by the public. 

Meantime, a firm of subscription-book 
printers, then known as the J. L. Nichols 
Company, conceived an idea suggested to it 
by one of its agents of publishing a colored 
magazine in the South. The Voicf of the 
Negro appeared in January, 1904, and a 
young man then just out of college, Mr. J. 
Max Barber, was made its editor. The Voice 
of the Negro proved the greatest magazine 
which the colored people had had. It reached 
a circulation of 15,000, and at one time 



34 



THE CRISIS 





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THE CRISIS "SANCTUM SANCTORUM" 



printed 17,000 copies. It was a magazine 
of fifty-five pages of reading matter, was 
illustrated and well edited. The whole story 
of its final failure has not been written, and 
perhaps ought not to be for some years to 
come. Suffice it to say that the fault did not 
lie with Mr. Barber. The editorial work 
was well done. The business side, on the 
other hand, under a succession of men, was 
not as well attended to; nevertheless, it was 
not a failure, and the magazine might still 
be alive had it not been for sinister influences 
within and without the race that wished either 
to control or kill it; and finally, had it not 
been for the Atlanta riot. Mr. Barber 
found himself continually hampered by in- 
terests which were determined to edit his 
magazine for him. When he asserted his 
independence these interests appealed to the 
firm which was backing him and finally so 
impressed them that they determined to un- 
load the proposition on a new corporation. 
Stock in the corporation sold slowly, but it 
was beginning to sell when the instigators 
of the Atlanta riot drove Mr. Barber from 
the city. Removing to Chicago, Mr. Barber 



found himself facing the task of re-estab- 
lishing his magazine with practically no capi- 
tal. He made a brave effort, but finally had 
to give up and The Voice of the Negro 
ceased publication. Its successor is The 
Crisis, a»d it looks as though this latest 
candidate for popular favor was going to. 
be permanently successful. 

Since then The Crisis represents so in- 
teresting a series of magazines, perhaps a 
word should be said for its force and dwell- 
ing place. As one rides down Broadway, 
New York, past the tallest building in the 
world, one comes to the old postoffice on City 
Hall Park and Park Row, the center of 
newspaperdom. Vesey Street is the west- 
ward extension of Park Row across Broad- 
way. There, opposite the moss-grown graves 
of St. Paul's churchyard, rises a brownstone 
building of the older office design. You 
come up a long flight of stairs and enter 
our rooms. 

The big library and workroom greets you 
first. From this you pass by the agents 
and subscription clerks to the two editorial 
offices or to the offices of the secretary of 



THE COLORED MAGAZINE IN AMERICA 



35 




THE CRISIS BUSINESS FORCE — Messrs. Turner and Holsey; Misses Allison, Jarvis and Sousa 



the National Association for the Advance- and uses the magazine 
ment of Colored People and her assistant, of publicity. At the 
Turning the other 
way you find the 
cashier in his den 
and the advertising 
man, and finally the 
store and mailing- 
room with their peri- 
odicals and machine. 
The present force of 
The Crisis consists 
of an editor, three 
clerks, a bookkeeper 
and advertising man, 
four unpaid editorial 
assistants and 489 
agents in the field. 
Many persons do 
not understand the 
relation of The 
Crisis to the Na- 
tional Association for 
the Advancement of 
Colored People. The 
association owns and george wesley blount, of Hampton, va. 

publishes The Crisis The First subscriber to THE CRISIS 




as its especial organ 
same time it aims to 
make The Crisis 
more than a mere 
bulletin of its work, 
and to conduct it as 
a magazine of gen- 
eral information in 
its sphere. The two 
institutions make, 
therefore, parts of 
one great whole. 

To no part of its 
force does The Crisis 
owe more than to its 
little army of agents 
scattered over the 
world. They sell 
every month from six 
to 1,400 copies each. 
Finally, we cannot 
forget, and would not 
have our readers for- 
get, our first paid-up 
subscriber: Geo. W. 
Blount, of Hampton 
Institute, Virginia. 



Ihc RELIGION OF SLAVERY 

By CHARLES EDWARD STOWE 




RASMUS was once asked, by 
a mystified statesman, why 
the theses of that obscure 
monk, Martin Luther, had 
made such an ominous com- 
motion in the world. 
"Because he touched the 
monks on their bellies and the Pope on'his 
crown," was the aphoristic reply of the 
caustic oracle. 

Something of the same nature may be said 
of the unusual excitement caused by the pub- 
lication of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" sixty-one 
years ago. The significance given to what 
would have been otherwise a comparatively 
obscure effort was that it touched the 
haughty Slave Power at the same time on 
its belly and on its crown. 

Slaves were property, and property pro- 
tected by the Constitution of the United 
States and the laws of the country. An 
attack on any form of property is an assault 
on the whole basis of civilized society, and 
therefore revolutionary and dangerous in the 
highest degTee. This was the view not only 
of the slaveholder of the South, but of some 
of the best people in conservative New Eng- 
land and the Northern States in general. 

That slavery was morally wrong, and a 
national sin that made the whole American 
people subject to the divine wrath, was 
therefore a most discomforting and dis- 
quieting suggestion to conservative, orthodox, 
church-going people both North and South. 
They felt with regard to it as the old lady 
did when she first heard the simian origin 
of the human race hinted at in a sermon. 
"Perfectly shocking! Why, even if it were 
true-, we ought to try to hush it up some- 
how !" 

So good people tried to hush up the moral 
wrong of slavery by shifting the responsi- 
bility on to God and the Bible. This Mrs. 
Stowe attacked with i)itiless satire, and 
added insult to injury by putting her attack 
in the moutli of the slaveholding Southerner 
St. Clare. 

"Suppose," says the garrulous and irre- 
sponsible individual, "that something should 
bring down the price of cotton once and 



forever, and make the whole slave property 
a drug in the market, don't you think that 
we should soon have another version of the 
scripture doctrine? What a flood of light 
would pour into the Church at once, and how 
immediately it would discover that every- 
thing in the Bible and in reason went the 
other way." 

It was certainly A^ery shocking in Mrs. 
Stowe to hint at any possible connection 
between religion, which we are all bound to 
believe sky born, and economics, which 
orthodox people are prone to confess with a 
groan to be hopelessly "earthly, sensual, 
devilish!" The ruthless Mrs. Stowe not 
only attacked the property of pious South- 
erners, but the very religion in which they 
found a divine sanction for holding that 
sort of property. This exascerbation of 
her crime was sure to bring down on her 
head the pious wrath of good, respectable, 
orthodox folk both North and South, and 
it did. 

A most interesting confirmation of this 
is to be found in the files of the New York 
Observer under the date of September 23, 
1852. The editor of that Gibraltar of 
orthodoxy writes m sad sincerity : "We have 
read the book and regard it as anti-Chris- 
tian. We have marked numerous passages 
in which religion is spoken of in terms of 
contempt, and in no case is religion spoken 
of as making a master more humane, while 
Mrs. Stowe is careful to present the indul- 
gent and amiable masters as men without 
religion. This taint pervades the work as 
it does all the school of modern philanthropy. 
It is essentially a non-religious if not a 
non-evangelical school. Mrs. StoAve labors 
through all her book to render ministers 
odious and contemptible by attributing to 
them sentiments unworthy of men or 
Christians." 

The writer of these words was a 
sincere man, earnest, exigent and conscien- 
tious in what he wrote. We can imagine the' 
satisfaction with which the article was read 
by men like the Rev. Doctor Nehemiah 
Adams of Boston and New Orleans — a New 
England man and author of that lubricious 



THE RELIGION OF SLAVERY 



37 



antebellum treatise "The South-side View/' 
which gained him the title of "South-side 
Adams" among the scoffing and gainsaying 
Abolitionists. That marked copy of "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin" with the passages carefully 
l)ointed out in which Mrs. Stowe spoke of 
religion "in terms of eontemj^t" would cer- 
tainly be exhilarating reading in the light of 
to-day; but we can oiu'selves easily imagine 
what and where they were. It is not hard 
to find them. 

Pious old ladies at the South read this 
editorial, and when, after careful inquiry, 
they discovered that Mrs. Stowe was received 
into reputable society at the North felt 
that they bad mournful confirmation of 
their gloomy suspicions as to the condition 
of morals and religion in the Free States. 
For the Southern slaveholder was very 
orthodox and pious in the strict theological 
sense of the word. He believed in the Bible 
from cover to cover as a book of divine 
oracles, and found therein abundant con- 
firmation of his doctrine that slavery was a 
divine institution, and a blessing to both 
races. .It was miavoidable therefore that 
Mrs. Stowe from his point of view should 
appear to be a very wicked woman, guilty 
of attempted robbery and actual blasphemy. 
And such is the subtle relation between 
religion and economics. 

"The modern school of philanthropy" with 
which the editor of the Observer 
somewhat vaguely classified Mrs. Stowe is 
also an interesting subject for analysis. We 
can imagine it to ourselves pictured to the 
eye in the manner of Kaulbach's celebrated 
cartoon of the Reformation. In the back- 
ground we would arrange the Brook Farmers, 
and Transcendentalists, and contributors to 
the Dial. There are Emerson, Riijley, IMar- 
garet Fuller and Theodore Parker — Emerson 
whose "Divinity School Address" had 
recently scared the enlightened Unitarians 
and even the yoimg James Russell Lowell 
half out of their wits; Theodore Parker, 
who denied the miracles and the divinity of 
Christ; Margaret Fuller, who had announced 
in the Dial that Christianity was a prison. 

Then there would be represented as stand- 
ing about in various attitudes Charles Sum- 
ner, Wendell Phillips, Garrison with his 
Liberator^ Horace Greeley with his Tribune 
and Henry Ward Beecher with a copy of the 
Independent. In the foregroufld, wliere 
Von Kaulbach has pictured Martin Luther, 



is Harriet Beecher Stowe with "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin." 

"See the mighty host advancing, 
Satan leading on !" 
No wonder the editor of the Observer was 
alarmed. He doubtless sought and found 
consolation in the doctrines of election and 
total depravity. 

Mr. James Russell Lowell has somewhere 
reminded us that "Time makes ancient good 
uncouth." It is easy for us in the light of 
this modern world in which we live to 
smile at the ancient wisdom of the Southern 
slaveholders and their Northern sympa- 
thizers; but we must not forget that they 
were good men and true and had on their 
side all the conservative and conserving 
influences of human society, as well as the 
Constitution and laws of the United States. 

The anti-slavery movement must be 
reckoned with those onward-reaching forces 
that respect neither conservative traditions, 
constitutions, laws, churches nor thrones, but 
tear them all down ruthlessly in the holy 
name of humanity and of progress. Mrs. 
Stowe with her "Uncle Tom's Cabin" 
belonged, like all the rest of the Beeehers, 
to the destructive rather than the construct- 
ive forces of the universe. That she should 
have been recognized as such in her day and 
generation we can but acknowledge as 
inevitable. 

Slavery, social inequality and war all 
have had an important part and place in 
the evolution of man on this planet. 
Slavery has gone, and we are asking to-day 
if war and social inequality are to follow. 

The lesson of the anti-slavery movement 
is in brief this : Social traditions, consti- 
tutions and laws are often on the side oi 
wrong and injustice. When they are, sooner 
or later they have to go, even though pro- 
tected by the sanction of religion. If it is 
true that might makes right it is truer still 
that in time right will make might. If 
economies for a time dominate religion, the 
day will surely come when religion will rise 
and dominate economics. It was so yester- 
day and it will be so to-morrow. 

We hear much to-day about the "leopard's 
spots." They are harmless compared to the 
"tiger's claws!" The "tiger's claws" seem 
to be thirsting for the poor leopard's blood, 
if the leopard forgets that he is an "inferior 
being" and can never therefore aspire to 



38 



THE CRISIS 



political equality with the tiger. In a speech 
at Poplarville, Miss., in April, 1907, Gov- 
ernor Vardaman said "How is the white man 
going to control the government? The way 
we do it is to pass laws to fit the white man, 
and make the other people come to them. 
* * * If necessary every Negro in the 
State will be lynched, and it will be done to 
maintain white supremacy. * * * The 
Fifteenth Amendment ought to be wiped 
out!" Here are the tiger's claws! Here is 
something worse than economics, race hatred 



and prejudice that utters itself in bestial 
threats of blood and slaughter subversive of 
the very foundations of civilized society. 

It will go down, however, as slavery went 
down. The very stars in their courses will 
fight against it. 

"Right forever on the scaffold, wrong- 
forever on the throne; 
Yet that scaffold rules the future, and 

behind the dim unknown 
Standeth God within the shadow keep- 
ing watch above His own." 




The Autobiography of an ex-Colored Man. 

Boston. Sherman, French & Company, 
1912. 

"This vivid and startling new picture of 
conditions brought about by the race question 
in the United States makes no special appeal 
for the Negro, but shows in a dispassionate, 
though sympathetic, manner conditions as 
they actually exist between the whites and 
blacks to-day. Special pleas have already 
been made for and against the Negro in hun- 
dreds of books, but in these books either his 
virtues or his vices have been exaggerated. 
This is because writers, in nearly every in- 
stance, have treated the colored American as 
a whole; each has taken some one group of 
the race to prove his case. Not before has a 
composite and proportionate presentation of 
the entire race, embracing all of its various 
groups and elements, showing their relations 
with each other and to the whites, been 
jnade." 

The preceding paragraph quoted from the 
opening lines of the preface to this very inter- 
esting book gives in a way a resume of it. It 
is indeed an epitome of the race situation in 
the United States told in the form of an 
autobiography. The varied incidents, the 
numerous localities brought in, the setting 
forth in all its ramifications of our great and 
perplexing race problem, suggests a work of 
fiction founded on hard fact. The hero, a 
natural son of a Southerner of high station, 
begins his real life in a New England town 
to which his mother had migrated, runs the 
whole gamut of color-line experiencss, and 
ends by going over on the other side. 

The work gives a view of the race situa- 



tion in New England, in New York City, in 
the far South, in city and country, in high 
and low society, with glimpses, too, of Eng- 
land, France and Germany. Practically every 
phase and complexity of the race question 
is presented at one time or another. The 
work is, as might be expected, anonymous. 

The South and the Negro. Negroes in the 
Urban Movement. The Negro in New 
York. OutlooTi, June 29, 1912. 

The Negroes in the South are, according 
to one of these articles, flocking to the cities. 
And the reason for this is due, not to the 
call of city life, but largely to the "avidity 
with which Negroes are seizing educational 
opportunities. Thej' insist on being in the 
towns where good schooling is possible." 

Also a commission of Southern university 
professors has decided to deal with the Negro 
from an educational point of view. Eleven 
State universities are to furnish one profes- 
sor each. The article goes on to remark: 
"The formation of this commission is a mani- 
festation not only of the ^dtal work which 
Southern men are doing in social economics, 
but of their real leadership in matters of 
education, for the primary function of' edu- 
cation is to enable men to learn how to live 
in right relations with one another, whatever 
their race and whatever their country." 

All this sounds very well and encouraging. 
But it is to be hoped very earnestly and in 
no spirit of carping that the work of these 
leaders "in matters of education" will be 
carried on in a manner far more scientific 
than that, employed recently by one Mr. 
Charles Stelzle. 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 



MEMBERSHIP. 

SIXTEEN new members have been added 
to the association, and this month we 
also welcome a new branch — St. Louis — to 
membership. We now have ten branches. 
The constitutions of two more are under 
consideration and Ave are in daily receipt of 
applications from all parts of the country. 
May we not especially urge on persons in 
sj'mpathy with our work the necessity of 
personally joining this association'? We 
need your names, your influence and your 
money. As one friend writes, "The clock is 
not going fast enough !" Let us make time, 
and fast time, between now and January 1. 



MEETINGS. 

"K/riSS MARTHA GRUENING, the as- 
■*■ "'• sistant secretary, on September 15 
addressed a meeting at the Harlem Zion 
Church on the work of the association. 
October 7 Miss Gruening spoke before an 
enthusiastic meeting of the Washington 
branch at the Shiloh Baptist Church. 

The Boston branch held the first of a 
series of meetings Wednesday, October 9, 
with the Hon. Albert E. Pillsbury and Dr. 
Erancis H. Rowley as speakers. 



FUNDS. 
T N the campaign for funds the association 
-*• is now making we need the active co- 
operation of every member. Although the 
work of the year has been most encourag- 
ing, we must have larger resources at our 
■disposal if we are to cope successfully with 
the almost daily demands made upon us to 
fight the increasing violence and discrimina- 
tion which are spreading to such an alarm- 
ing degree in this country. Even the aged, 
insane women and morally defective children 
are not exempt, as was evidenced recently by 
the fate of Anne Bostwick in Georgia, Vir- 



ginia Christian in Hampton, Va., and the 
lynching in West Virginia of a probably 
innocent colored man. The association 
makes a special appeal to each member 
to help in this work by securing two $5 
members or the equivalent, $10, in member- 
ships in some form. Literature for free 
distribution and membership blanks will be 
furnished upon request. Checks should be 
drawn to Mr. Walter E. Sachs, treasurer, 
60 Wall Street, New York City. 



LEGAI. BEDBESS. 
'' I ' HE association's investigation of one of 
■■■ the most horrible lynchings of 1911 
has been completed. An account of this will 
appear in one of the leading popular maga- 
zines, of which an exact notice will be given 
later in The Crisis. 

In response to an anonymous appeal from 
a correspondent in Bluefield, W. Va., the 
association secured the services of Mr. James 
Oppenheim, the well-known journalist and 
novelist. Mr. Oppenheim made a careful 
investigation of the situation, the results of 
which appeared in The Independent of 
October 10. 



MEMORIAI. FUND. 
A T the last meeting of the board of direc- 
■*-^' tors it was voted that the Mary Dun- 
lop Maclean memorial fund, or so much of 
it as may be necessary, be devoted to the 
publication of literature in the interest of 
the association, each publication to bear the 
name of the fund. The memorial notice 
which appeared in the August Crisis has 
been reprinted. The memorial committee 
consists of the following : Miss Mary White 
Ovington, secretary; Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois, 
Miss Mary Moseley, Mrs. Frances R. Key- 
ser, Prof. E. R. A. Seligman, Willoughby 
Walling, Martha Gruening and Margaret 
Wycherly Veiller. 



SAMUEL COLERIDGE-TAYLOR 



(Died September 1, 1912, aged 37) 

Written for the London Daily Standard by Alfred Noyes 



Farewell! The soft mists of the sunset sky 
Slowly enfold his fading birch canoe ! 

Farewell! His dark, his desolate forests cry 
Moved to their vast, their sorrowful, depths 
anew. 

II. 

Fading! Nay, lifted through a heaven of 
light, 
His proud sails, brighteni*iig through that 
crimson flame. 
Leaving us lonely on the shores of night, 
Home to Ponemah take his deathless fame. 

III. 
Generous as a child, so wholly free 

From aU base pride, that fools forgot his 
crown. 
He adored Beauty in pure ecstasy. 

And waived the mere rewards of his 
renown. 

IV. 

The spark that falls from Heaven not oft on 
earth 
To human hearts this vital splendor gives; 
His was the simple, true immortal birth! 
Scholars compose; but this man's music 
lives! 



V. 
Greater than England, or than Earth 
discerned, 
He never paltered with his art for gain ; 
When many a vaunted crown to dust is 
turned. 
This uncrowned king shall take his throne 
and reign. 

VI. 
Nations unborn shall hear his forests moan; 
Ages unseanned shall hear his wind's 
lament, 
Hear the strange grief that deepened through 
his own. 
The vast cry of a buried continent. 

VII. 
Through him, his race a moment lifted up 

Forests of hands to Beauty as in jirayer. 
Touched through his lips the sacramental 
cup. 
And then sank back, benumbed in our 
bleak air. 

VIII. 
Through him, through him, a lost world 
hailed the light! 
The tragedy of that triumph none can tell. 
So great, so brief, so quickly snatched from 
sight ; 
And yet — hail, great comrade, not 
farewell ! 



^ The NegTo lawyers of Oklahoma have 
formed a bar association, with forty 
members. 

^ Dr. A. B. Terrell, a colored man, has been 
made assistant physician to the board of 
health of Fort Worth, Tex. He is a 
graduate of the University of Chicago and 
of the Harvard Medical School, and has 
taken an active part in combating the epi- 
demic of meningitis in Texas. 
^ In Hutchinson, Kan., a jury composed 
entirely of colored men has been trying a 
case. Charles Fulton, deputy probate 
judge, remarked that he never saw a finer 
set of men on a jury than those six colored 
men, one of them a doctor, another a min- 
ister and a third a law student, and all of 



them men who have good education and 
character. It attracted a lot of attention, 
being a very unusual occurrence in Kansas 
legal circles. 

^ A company of contractors who are build- 
ing automobile engines in New York are 
developing a new ignition system which is 
the invention of a colored man. 

^ In Perry, Ind., Higby Morgan, a colored 
boy, has taken the W. C. T. U. medal for the 
best composition. 

^ A man named Kelly, who is doing a turn 
called "The Virginia Judge" on the stage, so 
angered the colored people of Montreal by 
his use of the Avord "Nigger" that he had to 
have police escort home. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 41 



ers 



Page 



The Christmas Number 

An exquisite cover by Richard Brown; a novelette, the strongest 
piece of fiction we have published, by Jessie Fauset. 

Ready November 22 — order early. 

Also a dainty Christmas card with baby faces. 



THE DUNBAR COMPANY 

To keep abreast with the remarkable growth of THE CRISIS, we have 
combined our mail-order and service departments into one big department, which 
will be known as THE DUNBAR COMPANY. 

It is fitting that we inaugurate this feature in this, our Anniversary Number, 
as it marks the realization of carefully laid plans and novel ideas for the con- 
venience, pleasure and comfort of our thousands of reader friends. 

Aside from books, pamphlets, patterns, etc., we will add pictures and post- 
cards of Negro subjects, music by Negro composers, jewelry, toilet articles, 
wearing apparel, etc. 

Our splendid location in the busy section of the nation's largest city enables 
us to go directly to manufacturers and producers of these articles for our pur- 
chases and sell them to you at such prices as will eliminate the wholesalers' and 
jobbers' profits. 

Each article sold by us will have our guarantee that it measures up to THE 
CRISIS standard of excellence. Quality will always be our first consideration, 
and while price will be consistent thereto, it will always remain at the lowest 
possible point. 

We believe that such prices and quality will appeal to those in "Jim Crow" 
localities, where direct shopping is robbed of its pleasures by discourteous sales- 
people and shopkeepers. THE DUNBAR COMPANY will always maintain a 
scale of prices within reach of our patrons, and by concentrating the efforts of 
a part of our force to this work, we can assure our friends prompt dispatch of 
orders and careful attention to each detail. 

In the Christmas Number we will offer you some splendid holiday gift 
suggestions, and during the succeeding months other new and novel features to 
this department will be added. 

After Christmas there will be a large illustrated catalogue, brimful of articles, 
many and varied, to meet the every-day requirements of each member of thC' 
family, not forgetting the low prices to save you money. 



42 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 




Suffrage in this country, so far as tlie Negro is concerned, has been a national 
travesty. It has been the one standing blot upon the United States, that, has won for 
her the merited contempt and just criticism of the intelligent and justice-loving 
world. Suffrage was bestowed upon the Negro by the Eepublican party and was stolen 
from him by the Democratic party. "Thou shalt not steal" has had about as much 
place in the political decalogue of the Southern Democrats as it had in the political 
decalogue of the stand-pat Chicago Eepublicans of June, 1912. 

Under the disfranchising laws of the several Southern States, Negro suffrage has 
become so restricted and worthless as a political factor that the Eepublican party has 
tacitly decided that Negro suffrage was a failure, and not the slightest effort was put 
forth to prevent the nullification of those amendments to the Constitution which gave 
the Negro freedom, citizenship and suffrage. And it remained for the Taft admin- 
istration to set the seal of official approval upon the unconstitutional legislation of 
the South, by the wholesale removal of the Negro from federal office throughout the 
South, and declaring that no more would be appointed where it was objectionable to 
Southern whites. 

Upon this Taft propaganda, "lily whitism" took on new life and blossomed and 
bloomed in the South as never before. The Negro was politically down and out. He 
had been bound by his political enemies, the Democrats, and basely deserted and 
betrayed by his political friends, the Eepublicans. He stood without a political friend, 
and not a voice throughout the length and breadth of the land was lifted in sympathy 
or in defense. It was the Negroes' political extremity; and smarting under the grievous 
injustice that had been done them, and spurred on by desire for political revenge, 
thousands reviled the name of Taft, and thousands pocketing their pride, hat in hand, 
started toward the camp of their ancient enemies, the Democrats, intent only on making 
friends and getting even with Taft, the "lily whites," and the Eepublican party, a 
combination of political hypocrites, ingrates and highwaymen. 

"God maketh the wrath of men to praise him;" and if there ever has been a 
demonstration of these words, plain and positive, it was demonstrated at Chicago in 
June. The men who manipulated the Chicago convention forced the nomination of 
Taft in haughty disregard of decency and honesty, little dreamed of what they were 
doing. The Negro delegates, who aided in forcing Taft upon the Eepublican party, 
despite the . thousand-voiced protests of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massa- 
chusetts, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and the West, had not the slightest 
idea that they were stabbing the Eepublican party to death; and thus the political 
selfishness and hate of a few white men and the political blindness of a few Negroes 
accomplished in a day what might have otherwise taken a score of years to encom- 
pass; namely, the death of the Eepublican party. Brought into existence in 1856 to 
protect four millions of enslaved Negroes, it was killed, unintentionally, however, in 1912 
by less than threescore Negroes, the slaves of political bosse-s and the hirelings of the 
"Almighty Dollar." 

The Eepublican party is dying of old age — political senility. It has outlived its 
usefulness. It has served its missions. It has run its race, its days are numbered, and 
on November 5 the Eepublican party will go to its long home and the mourners will 
go about the streets. 

The disintegration, death and annihilation of the Eepublican party will mean a 
second emancipation of the Negro. There will remain no more political debts to be 
paid and the Negro will be absolutely free to vote for whatever party his conscience 
may direct him to support. 

The disfranchisement and "Jim Crowism" of the South have come about because 

the Eepublican party was too cowardly to prevent the same, although it had a 

Eepublican President, a Eepublican Congress and a Eepublican Supreme Court, fo 

legislate, interpret and enforce the plain mandates of the Constitution. 

From 1856 down to 1908 the Eepublican party had never failed to mention the 
Negro in the platform. It remained for the platform of 1912, for the first time in 
the history of the party, to be absolutely silent and forgetful of the Negro, in strict 
and consistent accord with the Taft Southern policy. And yet the Negroes renominated 
him! And in return, his platform forgot themi 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 43 

Deserted by the Kepublican party, undesirable, and not wanted in the national 
Democratic party, which way shall the Negro turn his face, and whither direct his 
steps? Over yonder on the hill of progress is the sun-glinted camp of the Progressives. 
Waving proudly above the camp is a banner upon which is inscribed: "We invite into 
our ranks men and women entirely without regard to their former political affiliations to 
their creed, their birthplace or the color of their skin." Will the Negro go in and 
enroll? Will the Negro still hanker after the flesh pots of dead Republicanism? Will 
the* Nego use sense — common sense — instead of sentiment? Is he so blind that he 
cannot see in the Progressive party a Godsent opportunity for political and civic 
betterment, such as he has not had since the days of reconstruction? Is he so deaf 
that he cannot hear the voice of self-interest and self-protection calling and urging 
him to join the Progressive party? 

What has he to gain by casting his lot with this new party? Everything! What 
has he to lose? Nothing! For down at the very bottom of the civic and political 
life of this country, any kind of political upheaval, political disturbance, political 
earthquake, which destroys old conditions, old parties and old systems, and old ideas, 
must redound to the benefit of the Negro, whether it is so intended or not. 

President Taft, under political fright and pressure, has uttered more words of 
political comfort and performed more acts of political benefit to the Negro since 
Theodore Eoosevelt announced himself a candidate for the Presidency than at any 
other time during the three years of his term of office. Governor Wilson has not 
failed to declare himself a political "Christian gentleman," recognizing the political 
brotherhood of all men under the Constitution, as he welcomed Negro support, and 
thus far has kept from the stump in the North ' ' Jim Growers ' ' and disf ranehisers of the 
South, lest the Negro voter should become frightened and take to his heels at the sight of 
his real leaders, supporters and controllers of his party. 

Is the Negro to be fooled by the deathbed utterances of Taft and the hypocritical • 
utterances of Wilson? The sensible, thoughtful Negro will support the Progressive 
party because it emancipates him from party slavery, wipes out the aged party debt 
to the Eepublican party, and permits him to vote according to the dictates of his 
own conscience; because he can enter the Progressive party as a charter member, and 
be in the party, of the party, and an actual part of the party; because it offers to 
him the line of the least resistance; because he will not be dealt with as racial mass, 
but as a man, recognized by worth and merit; because the success of the Progressive 
party will do away with the Africanizing of three or four political appointments in 
Washington as a return for the support of race; because in following the leadership 
of Theodore Eoosevelt, he will be following not Theodore Eoosevelt the man, but 
Theodore Roosevelt the incarnate representation of a new party whose platform 
recognizes no creed, no race, no color; political equality of sex; physical conservation 
of men, women and children, and the conservation of natural resources; a minimum 
wage; control of the trust; protection to the laborer, and the enforcement of the 
Constitution and every amendment. 

In choosing the least of three political evils, the Negro will certainly choose the 
Progressive party. 

In choosing the best of three political leaders, the unbiased Negro will surely 
choose Theodore Eoosevelt — the man of courage and convictions, fearless and incor- 
ruptible — the man who does things, and who will do more to help the Negro than any 
other Presidential candidate now before the people. 



SHOULDN'T THE NEGRO THEN BE A PROGRESSIVE 
AND VOTE FOR ROOSEVELT AND JOHNSON ? 



JAMES H. HAYES, Richmond, Va. 

(Adv.) 



44 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 




For forty-two years the Eepublican party has ridden up to the gates of heaven on 
the back of the Negro and then tied him on the outside. With the patience of the 
pack mule the black man has submitted. The grand old party of Abraham Lincoln 
would surely come out to the outer gate where he stood tethered and lead him into 
the promised land! Such implicit confidence, such blind, dogged faith, the world has 
seen but once before — the time nearly 300 years ago, when the white men in their 
square-rigged sloops sailed down the Eastern Atlantic from Europe to Africa, and 
with words of honey, trinkets and dross enticed into slavery the forbears of the 
present trustful, gullible black American. Brought hither in droves he has allowed 
himself to be herded ever since, until to-day he stands before the world as the 
greatest psychological phenomenon in all history; actually demonstrating that it is a 
possibility for millions of people of a given racial persuasion to think alike for nearly 
fifty years, no matter how varying and differing the propositions submitted to his 
consideration. Is this a sign of mental activity or mental stagnation or, to be fair, 
does it mean that in American politics, when white men are naturally differing and 
disagreeing over great live questions of civic and economic policies, black men must 
forever herd themselves around the standards of a dead issue? Does it mean that 
while the white man advances from the discussion of Greenbackism, Bimetalism and 
Tariff Schedules to Government Ownership of Public Utilities, the Direct Election of 
United States Senators, the Initiative and Referendum; the polemics of the black 
man must ever be predicated upon Abraham Lincoln and the Ciyil War? 

This is a grave question in any kind of a civilized government. In a democratic 
republic it is a question which connotes a condition of positive danger. For in our 
government each citizen is a sovereign and the very health and life of the nation 
depends upon the intelligent deliberation and wisdom with which each sovereign meets 
the questions submitted to him. An ignorant electorate is a voidable danger; an 
electorate not ignorant, but stubbornly, blindly and traditionally, prejudiced and 
vindictive, is a menace which must be overthrown or it will in time subvert all 
government of the people, by the people and for the people. The enlightened publicists 
of the nation, irrespective of party, have observed this dire phenomenon, and North and 
South, East and West, white men of all shades of political beliefs have grown callous 
to the black man's pleadings for political and civic liberty under the Constitution. 
Of the servants of the Lord the Negro received only the one talent, and as it came 
to pass in the parable of holy writ he comes forth to-day crying: "And I was afraid, 
and went and hid thy talent in the earth. * * * " And the talent which was his 
was taken from him and given to him who had the ten talents. Nearly half a century 
ago the talent of American citizenship was given to the Negro. Wherein to-day, after 
voting like wooden blocks all these years, can he show an increase of his powers 
as a citizen? Almost pari passu with the onward progress of the Eepublican party the 
Negro has descended lower and lower in the scale of American citizenship. He cannot 
accuse the Democratic party as being the responsible and sole agent of his retrogression; 
for the power, the nearly absolute power, has been in the hands of the Republican 
party throughout all but eight of these dreary years of hopes born to die again. 
Whether in that clause apportioning direct taxes and representatives among the people 
of the several States, or in that which makes the House of Representatives the sole 
judge of the qualifications of its own members, or in the clause which guarantees to 
each State a Republican form of government there is ample law in the Constitution. 
It isn 't legislation which is needed, but the honest desire to enforce the law already 
written. This the Republican party has failed to do. There are two kinds of sins — 
the sin of commission and the sin of omission, and the not doing of those things 
which we ought to do is just as culpable as the doing of those things which we ought 
not to do. This in a general way sums up the relation of the black man to the govern- 
ment in which he lives. There are some facts of recent occurrence which show to what 
low estate the Negro has fallen in the house of his friends. 

At Chicago, last June, sixty-six black men held the balance of power in the 
Republican convention. They could have nominated Roosevelt. They nominated Taft; 
not that they loved Roosevelt less, but because, as black Republicans, they obeyed the 
behests of the regular party machinery. For their loyalty they asked for a radical 
platform plank for the race they represented. They received the weakest expression 
for justice to Negroes which has appeared in a Republican platform since "1872. 

When Roosevelt announced the date for his Bull Moose convention for last August 
there were hundreds of thousands of black men whose bosoms heaved with the 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 45 

enthusiastic hope that at last the hour had struck when the dashing Chevalier of the 
"Square Deal," "The Door of Hope," "All Men Up and No Men Down," would 
make solemn asseveration of those Presidential utterances which in a former day had 
wrung from their throats lusty and exultant hosannas. "On to the Roosevelt con- 
vention" was the cry. "The Crusader of the Common People is the Moses who will 
lead us out of the wilderness." Every Southern State elected its full quota of colored 
delegates. Like burning excelsior their enthusiasm was a "fast but fading fire;" for 
there came out of the cloudless heavens a thunderbolt which staggered the nation and 
dashed to the ground, with a cruelty unparalleled, the high hopes of the mighty black 
phalanx of delegates who stood ready to rush to the standards of their idol. It was 
the Julian Harris letter, in which Roosevelt, in the insane delusion that he might 
capture some Southern States, proclaimed his opposition to the sitting of Southern 
colored men in his convention. Disaster followed disaster. Hoping still that the 
convention, whose symbolic hymn was "Onward, Christian Soldiers," would listen to 
their humble pleadings, these colored delegates, through the kindly and noble offices 
of Prof. Spingarn of Columbia University, himself a delegate, offered the following 
plank for incorporation in the platform of the Bull Moose party! 

' ' The Progressive party recognizes that distinctions of race or class In political life 
have no place in a democracy. Especially does the party realize that a group of 
10,000,000 people who have in a generation changed from a slave to a free labor system, 
re-established family life, accumulated $1,000,000,000 of real property, including 
20,000,000 acres of land, and reduced their illiteracy from 90 to 30 per cent., deserve 
and must have justice, opportunity and a voice in their own government. The party, 
therefore, demands for the American of Negro descent the repeal of unfair discrimina- 
tory laws and the right to vote on the same terms in which other citizens vote. ' ' 

The reading of this plank instantly struck a popular chord and everything bade 
fair for its passage, when a man arose and made objection. He was given profound 
attention, for he was a man whose renown extended over two continents. He had been 
a member of the Cabinet of Theodore Roosevelt and later Minister to Turkey. In 
private life he was a merchant prince and philanthropist. This man himself ' was a 
member of a despised race of people whose struggle^ for civic and religious liberty 
have been the marvel of centuries. He encouched his objections to this plank of 
justice to another oppressed people in earnest but brief speech. He carried the day 
and the plank was voted down. This man was Oscar Straus, the Bull Moose nominee 
for Grovernor of New York. Thus was the Negro betrayed in the house of his friends. 

But where can he go? 

The Democratic party, standing on the Jeffersonian principle of ' ' equal rights to 
all, special privileges to none," is opposed to the practice of placing in its party 
platforms declarations making of any class or race its special pledges; it believes that 
planks of this kind are not only inserted for decoy purposes, but that they are of a 
piece with class legislation. At its national convention in Baltimore, last June, Senator 
Newlands of Nevada, a member of the resolutions committee, made a stubborn attempt 
to have his plank declaring for the national disfranchisement of colored persons made 
a part of the Democratic platform. He made a direct and impassioned appeal to the 
Southern members of the committee, among whom were Senators Tillman and Vardaman. 
When the vote was taken it stood 39 to 1. Not only did this Democratic committee 
on resolutions refuse to deliver this wanton attack upon colored men, in spite of the 
fact that colored men had always -voted against the Democratic party; but in the 
convention itself marked courtesies were extended to the members of the National 
Colored Democratic League, and to the ladies who accompanied many of them. 

An earlier instance of this disposition of the Democratic party to extend the olive 
branch to the black man was afforded shortly after the Congressional campaign of 
1910, when colored voters in unprecedented numbers assisted in the election of the first 
Democratic Congress since 1894. Speaker Champ Clark addressed a delegation of 
colored • men in the Speaker's Room at the Capitol, and in a speech remarkable for 
its profound sincerity assured the colored people that inasmuch as colored men were 
finally beginning to identify themselves with the Democratic party, the Democratic 
members of the House would see to it that no legislation inimical to Negroes should 
be given serious consideration as long as he was Speaker. And this promise was 

religiously observed to the closing day of the Sixty-second Congress. 

It does not require a philosopher or a statesman to see a light in a sky long 
shrouded in darkness. All that is needed is clear vision and a mind free from the 
cobwebs of ancient history and traditional prejudice. Governor Wilson is the highest 
type of a Christian gentleman and scholar. His antecedents, training and public life are 
absolute guarantees of an aversion to everything which savors of "Man's inhumanity 
to man." But seldom in their political career have colored men had the opportunity 
to vote for a man who possessed his sympathy with the struggles and aspirations of 
humanity. The opportunity lies open to them and there are thousands who will accept 
it. The others we exhort as did Rienzi the Romans: "Awake, arise, or be forever 
fallen." (Adv.) 



46 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



i ne very Business Opportunity for Avkick YOU 
nave been looking may possibly be nere on tnis page. 

A large corporation advertised in The Crisis for a general manager with 
capital. The wording of their advertisement eliminated all inquirers save those 
with capital and experience. They write: 

' ' We believe that one of the parties is really interested in 
our proposition and will close with him in a few days. ' ' 
They ' ' closed ' ' with him and have since advertised for other high-grade help. 



SUNLIGHT AT NIGHT 

The Sun-Kay Mantle Incandescent Kerosene Burner 
burns common kerosene or coal oil. 100 candle- 
power light. Burns 95% air and only 5% oil. 
Burners fit all screw collar lamps. New improved 
1912 model. Odorless, noiseless, absolutely safe. 
Every lamp guaranteed. Prices defy competition. 
Write for our agency proposition. 

SIMPLEX GASLIGHT CO. 
Dept. C. New York City, N. Y. 

We Will Start You in a 
Paying Business tor $10.00 

We are importers and manufacturers of 
natural human hair and all kinds of human 
hair goods. 

On an investment of $10.00 w^e will ship 
you enough goods to clear from $20.00 
to $30.00, and show^ you how^ to conduct 
a profitable business. 

Hairdressing taught by capable instruc- 
tors. Terms from $5.00 to $50.00. Posi- 
tions guaranteed our graduates. Address 

C. S. STARK, Manufacturer 
54 Oakwood Avenue Orange, N. J. 

Don't Slave for Wages 

Be your own boss. We show you how. 

Particulars free. 

JACKSON SPECIALTY CO. 

Box 22A East Lynn, Mass. 

AGENTS — Represent reliable house, 400 per 
cent, profit. Selling GORDON'S Photo Pillow 
Tops. High grade work. Easy sales. Big money. 
Samples and catalogue free. 
Luther Gordon Co. 206 N. Fifth Ave., Chicago, 111. 

AGENTS — Big money. Johnson-Flynn 
fight and other copyrighted Negro pic- 
tures. Portraits. Pillow Tops. Catalog 
FREE. 30 days' credit. 

PEOPLES PORTRAIT CO. 
Station U, Chicago, 111. 

WANTED — Reliable men with references 
to handle the best Stock Investment on 
the market. Any good solicitor can earn 
from $50 to $100 per month. 

Our reference: The Bank of Mound 
Bayou. 

THE S. I. & E. CORPORATION 
Mound Bayou, Miss. 



RELIABLE, LIVE, 
RESPONSIBLE MEN 

who can sell real estate can MAKE MORE 
than $200 PER MONTH acting as 
AGENTS for the sale of our properties in 
MUSKOGEE and TAFT, OKLAHOMA. 
The real coming country where there are 
opportunities and openings for all. Write 
us to-day, giving your age and experience, 
and we will offer you a FINE PROPOSI- 
TION WHICH WILL MAKE YOU 
MONEY. Address 

REEVES REALTY CO. 

Department G 

217 Flynn-Ames Bldg. Muskogee, Okla. 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

WANTED AT ONCE.— Partner in real 
estate and insurance business. Big oppor- 
tunity for right man. Must be a live wire. 
Business established. Ideal location. 
Address: 
H. DAVID MURRAY, Bank Floor, 
S. E, Cor. State and 31st Sts., Chicago, 111. 

ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE. 

— Owner of millinery and hair-dressing 
business will sell millinery department. 
Established 20 years. Reason, ill health. 
Address: Mrs. J. Wallace, 3247 State St., 
Chicago, 111. 

MUTUAL TEACHERS' 
AGENCY 

Recommends teachers for schools; secures 
employment for teachers. Blanks and 
information furnished free on application. 

1335 T Street, N. W, Washington. D. C. 

The Power of Womanhood 

A Speech by Joseph Wellington 

PRICE 20 CENTS 

Sold by 

THE STANDARD NEWS COMPANY 

131 West 53d Street, New York 

AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 

TYPEWRITERS UNDERTAKERS 



47 



,^=5a?9» 




Remingtons, DensmoFes, 

J e w e t t s, $11.50 each; 
Franklins, Postals, Ham- 
monds, $9 each. Bargains in 
Underwoods, Smiths and all 
others. All guaranteed. 

Supplies. 

Standard Typewriter 
Exchange 

23B Park Row, New York 



NOVELTIES 



Phone: West 3497 Insurance 

W. IRVING THOMAS 

Pen Novelties and Fancy Card \Vritin^ 

Send 15 cents for one dozen sample cards 
with your name and address. Xmas cards 
— all styles. Order early. 

2720 ^Vest Lake Street Ckicago, 111. 

WORTHINGTON'S PHOTO-ETTS 

Something New— 35 cents 

On receipt of thirty-five (35) cents I will send to any 
part of the United States or Canada, six of our little 
PHOTO-ETTS, copied from any photo or tintype. Postage 
prepaid by us. 

Wrap well the photo you send. Special care will tie taken 
with all photos sent to us. We guarantee their prompt 
return with your order as sent. All money should tie sent 
in stamps, or by postofBce money order payable to 

WORTHINGTON ART STUDIO 
4711 State Street Chicago, 111. 

REGALIA 

A RACE ENTERPRISE 

Manufacturing Badges, Banners and Sup- 
plies for all Fraternal and Church Societies. 
■ Catalogue upon request. 

CENTRAL REGALIA CO. 

Jos. L. Jones, Pres. 

N. E. Cor. 8th and Plum Streets 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



PATENTS 



L. H. LATIMER 

MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

and 

SOLICITOR OF PATENTS 

55 John Street New York 

Inventions Perfected, Models and Experi- 
mental Machines Designed and Constructed. 
Technical Translations. 

Room 604 



Telephone Columbus 3935 Open All Night 

RODNEY DADE & BROS. 

Undertakers and Embalmers 

Notary Public 

Funeral Parlor and Chapel Free. 

Licensed Lady Embalmer Prompt Service 

266 West 53d Street New York, N. Y. 

Between Broadway and 8th Avenue 

P. and A. Phone, 4771 F. 

JOHN B. DAVIS 

iFunrral Sirprtor 

Shipping to All Parts a Specialty 

Carriages for Receptions 

Funeral Parlor and Chapel Free 

2154 Wylie Avenue Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A PLACE TO STOP 



HOTEL WASHINGTON 

First-class Service for First-class People 

3252 Wabash Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 



MOVING 

Telephone 4214 Greeley 

BRANIC'S EXPRESS 

PACKING AND SHIPPING 

ANDREW J. BRANIC 

Formerly Manager' Virginia Transfer Company 

459 SEVENTH AVENUE New York City 

Orders by mail or 'phone receive promnt attention 

TRUNKS STORED 25c. PER MONTH 

Ofacial Expressman for the C. V. B. A. 

PERSONAL CARDS 



Telephone 343 John 



WIGINGTON & BELL 

Architects 

Karbach Block Omaha, Neb. 

Telephone 5277 Morningside 

DR. GERTRUDE E. CURTIS 

Surgeon Dentist 

188 West 135th Street, New York City 

Telephone 4885 Morningside 

DR. D. W. ONLEY 

Surgeon Dentist 

S. W. Cor. 133d St. and Lenox Ave., New York 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m., 1 to 9 p. m. 

Sundays by Appointment 



Mention The Crisis. 



48 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 

SCHOOL OF BEAUTY CULTURE AND HAIR DRESSING 



KELSEY'S 



328 Lenox Avenue 

Telephone Harlem 1896 

126tli Street, NEW TOEK. 



Manicuring, Shampooing, Hair Dressing, Marcel Wav- 
ing, Facial and Body Massage, Hair Making, Chiropody, 
etc., scientifically taught. XTnlimited practice in parlor 
day and night. Pupils taught at home, if desired. 
Diplomas. Special Summer Course, $7.50 up. Send for 
booklet. Mme. A. Carter Kelsey, Gen'l Intr.; Dr. Samuel 
A. Eelsey, Chiropodist, President and Gen'l Manager. 




Reddick's World's Greatest 
Polishing Mitt 

A HOUSEHOLD WONDER 

PROTECTS THE HAND 
SAVES TIME AND LABOR 

Thousands of users say it's the best pol- 
isher on earth for silverware, signs, guns, 
harness, pianos, furniture, automobile bodies, 
lamps, etc., etc. 

Made — like cut — of special tanned lamb's 
wool on the hide, and has a protected tip. 

Same mitt 
adopted by the 
Pullman Com- 
pany, for por- 
ters' use on the 
best trains. 
A few large users: All Nixon & Zim- 
merman theatres; the Gladstone, Walton, 
Blenheim Hotels, Philadelphia; Traymore, 
Shelburne, Atlantic City; Knickerbocker, 
New York, and other hotels, garages and 
many ocean liners, yachts and a thousand 
households. 

Price 25 cents each postpaid. 
Special prices to large users. 
A splendid proposition for agents. It 
sells on sight. Write to-day for particulars. 

J. E. REDDICK 

1028 South 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Telephone 3253 Harlem 

CARPET CLEANING 

Cleaners and Renovators 
For Particular People 

New York Careful Cleaning Bureau 

12 West 135th Street 

• We make a specialty of cleaning and renovating- 
carpets, rugs, portiSres and upholstered furniture; 
we also vacuum clean in the home. We are not 
the largest carpet cleaner in the warld, but abso- 
lutely the most careful in every detail. 

SHAMPOOING CAEPETS AND BUGS CUB 
SPECIALTY 



^8 BATH TUB 

Costs littla, no plumbing, reqaires little water. 

Weight K pounds, and folds into small roll. 
Full \eBgib baths, far better than tin tuba. Lastt for 

Write for speolal af^enta offer and deaorlptlon. Robinson 
1 Vanre St. .^°'<^'''0- Mfre. Turkish Bath Cablseta. 




TAe HARRIET TUBMAN 
Neighborhood Club 

For the Benefit of the Detention 
Home for Colored Girls 

Will present for the first time a dramatic 
pantomime of scenes from "Macbeth," 
"Merchant of Venice," "Othello," and a 
grouping of pictures showing some of the 
struggles of the great heroine, Harriet Tub- 
man, at Young's Casino, East 134th Street 
and Park Avenue, on November 15, 1912. 

General admission, 50 cents ; boxes, seating eight 
and ten persons, $4 and $6. 

Mr. Charles Burroughs is director of the panto- 
mime ; Mrs. Dora Cole Norman, instructor of dance ; 
Mrs. Daisy Tapley, in charge of chorus ; Marie Jack- 
son Stuart, president and manager. 

Music by New Amsterdam Orchestra — Prof. Pastor 
Penalver, leader. 

REAL ESTATE 

Valuable Texas Lands 
For Sale 

Large tracts of farm land in the best localities 
of the State for sale at very flattering prices. 
Small tracts of good lands suitable for farming, 
truck, fruits and any domestic product. We have 
for sale a number of large farms already in cultiva- 
tion, good houses an • barns, wells, and nice pasture 
lands, which can be obtained at reasonable rates. 
City property a specialty. Business lots in the best 
part of the city, improved and unimproved. Large 
lots suitable for factory property with switch 
facilities. 

No investment can be more valuable than an in- 
vestment in Texas real estate. Lands are becoming 
so valuable that they are doubling themselves in 
value in less than a year's time. For any invest- 
ment in Texas property, write T. B. Madlsoii Beal 
Estate Company, 2415 Elm Street, Dallas, Texas. 

To Colored People 

"C*OR SAIiE — We have houses from $1,000 to 
$30,000. Our city is the capital of Ohio and 
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house for $50, $100 to $500 down, balance like 
rent. For investment and speculating houses or 
business places, $1,000 to $5,000 down, balance on 
long time payment. Farm land prices from $1,000 
to $10,000 up. Any of these are in good locations. 
Write for further information. 



THIS IS A COLORED ENTERPRISE. 

EDWARD A. SHANKLIN 

Real Estate 
1218^ Mt. Vfirnon Ave. Columbus, Ohio 

Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 49 



"HALF A MAN" 

The Status of the Negro in New York 

By 

MARY WHITE OVINGTON 

With a foreword by Dr, Franz Boas of Columbia University 

Chapter I. How the colored people won their civil and political rights. 

Chapters II. and III. The Negro tenement and the life of the poor. 

Chapters IV. and V. How the colored man earns his living, with a full descrip- 
tion of the professions; the ministry, the stage. 

Chapter VI. The colored woman, her discouragements and successes. 

Chapter VII. A vivid description of the life of the well-to-do Negroes. 

Chapter VIII. The Negro in politics in New York. 

Chapter IX. The author's personal views on the race question. 

Price $1.00; by mail, $1.12. 

LONGMANS, GREEN & CO., Publishers, NEW YORK 

This book is for sale in the Book Department of The Crisis, 26 Vesey St., N. Y. 



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THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



LEGAL DIRECTORY 



This is a ready reference of some of the 
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^|jP"If you are a lawyer and your name is 
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5 Beekman Street (Temple Court) 
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Telephone 5574 Beekman Rooms 905 to 907 

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Uptown Office — 136 West 136th Street 

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Tel. 2026 Fort Hill Cable Address, Epben 

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PUBLISHED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED 
PEOPLE, AT 26 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK. CITY 

Edited bjr W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, with the co-operation of Oswald Garrison Villard, 
W. S. Braithwaite, M, W. Ovington, Charles Edward Russell and others. 



Contents for December^ igi2 

COVER DESIGN. By Richard L. Brown 

ARTICLES 

PAGE 

EMMY. A Story. By Jessie Fauset 79 

SACKCLOTH AND ASHES 87 

THE CLUB MOVEMENT IN CALIFORNIA. By A. W. Hunton 90 

THE CHRISTMAS SERMON. A Poem. By Robert J. Laurence 68 

DEPARTMENTS 

ALONG THE COLOR LINE 59 

MEN OF THE MONTH 66 

OPINION 69 

EDITORIAL 75 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 89 

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Entered as Second-class Matter in the Post Office at New York, N. Y. 






56 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 

Do You Know That 
Talladega College 

for More Than Forty Years Has Been Training Men and Women Who Have 
Been Conspicuous for Their Spirit of Service? 

A College Department. The only Theological School of the Congregational 
Church for Negroes. A High Grade Normal School. A Conservatory of Music. 
The Industries, on farm, in shop, sewing room and kitchen, as contributing to 
character making and helping to real usefulness. Nurse Training School in a 
well-equipped hospital. Unrivaled location in Blue Ridge Foothills. Accom- 
modations and equipment unexcelled. 

TALLADEGA COLLEGE 

An Institution of Christian Learning. For more than forty years it has steadily 
adhered to the policy of preparing well-equipped leaders for the people. In evi- 
dence of this fact consult its catalog for a description of courses in theology, in 
the arts and sciences, in normal training, in music, and read the record of its 
graduates who are devoting themselves the world over to the betterment of 
humanity. 

Rev. J. M. P. METCALF, D.D., President, 
Annual Enrollment Over 700 Talladega, Alabama. 



Avery College Training Schools 

NORTH SIDE, PITTSBURGH, PA. 

A superior training school for young colored women, thoroughly instructing 
its students as a means of self-support in dressmaking, cutting and drafting, domestic 
science, music, nurse training, millinery, and an intermediate English course. This 
institution is under the influence of no religious denomination, is the oldest endowed 
chartered Negro institution in America. The accommodations in its dormitory, 
which is in charge of a competent matron, are excelled by no colored institution 
in this country. 

The hospital department offers the same course as the large hospitals of the 
State of Pennsylvania, fully equipped with its operating rooms, diet kitchen and 
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anatomy, ethics, surgery, obstetrics, asepsis, antiseptics, gynecology, pediatrics, eye, 
nose, throat, materia medica, therapeutics and dietetics under a staff of white and 
colored physicians. Catalogues now ready. 

Address all communications to 

JOSEPH D. MAHONEY, Secretary 
Box 154 North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

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THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



57 




FOR^VARD 

MARCH YOUR SON OFF TO 

Wilterforce University 



The only school in the country for Negro 
Youth which has a Military Department 
equipped . by the National Government, and 
commanded by a detailed United States Army 
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DEPARTMENTS 
MILITARY SCIENTIFIC 



NORMAL 

COMMERCIAL 

CLASSICAL 



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THEOLOGICAL 

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Banking taught by the actual operations 
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State of Ohio which supplies facilities for the 
thorough training of teachers. 

Fall term began September, 1912. Write 
for Catalog. 



W. S. SCARBOROUGH, President 

WM. A. JOINER, Superintendent, C. N. I. 

Department. 

Address all communications to 
BOX 36 WILBERFORCE, OHIO 



Atlanta University 

Is beautifully located in the City of Atlanta, Ga. 
The courses of study include Higb School, Nor- 
mal School and College, with manual training 
and domestic science. Among the teachers are 
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and Wellesley. Forty-one years of successful 
work have been completed. Students come from 
all parts of the South. Graduates are almost 
universally successful. 

For further information address 

President EDWARD T. WARE 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Knoxville College 

Beautiful Situation. Healthful Location. 
The Best Moral and Spiritual Environment. 

A Splendid Intellectual Atmosphere. 
Noted for Honest and Thorough Work. 

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drainage. Expenses very reasonable. 

Opportunity for Self-help. 

Fall Term Began September, 1912. 

For information address 

President R. W. McGRANAHAN 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Uirginia Union University 

RICHMOND, VA. 

A College Department, of high standards and 
modern curriculum. 

A Theological Department, with all subject* 
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school, its high standards of entrance and of class 
work, its fine new buildings and well-equipped 
laboratories and library prepare a faithful student 
for a life of wide usefulness. 

GEORGE RICE HOVEY, President 



Daytona Educational and Industrial 
School for Negro Girls 

DAYTONA, FLORIDA 

It reaches, by reason of its location, a large 
territory of Negro children deprived of educa- 
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Its comfortable home life and Christian In- 
fluences insure a certain Individual attention 
and superior training Impossible in larger in- 
stitutions of its kind. 

Mrs. Frances R. Keyser, formerly in charge 
of the White Rose Home for Working Girls, 
in New York City, has been elected Principal 
of the Academic Department. Write for catalog 
and detailed information. 

MARY McLEOD BETHUNE 
Founder and Principal 



Mention The Cuisis. 



58 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



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GREENFIELD, OHIO 

[jorgest Negro carriage concern in the United States 



YOU SHOULD NOTE CAREFULLY 
EACH HOLIDAY GIFT SUGGESTION 
IN THIS NUMBER. 



Mention Tke Crisis. 



THE CRISIS 



Vol. 5, No. 2 



DECEMBER, 1912 



^Vliole No. 26 




ALONG 
a COLOR UN 



\ 



POLITICAL. 



T N the city of New York it is reported that 
"*■ Wilson received between 20 and 30 per 
cent, of the Negro vote, and that Sulzer, the 
Democratic candidate for governor, received 
50 per cent. 

Q In Lexington, Ky., Jordan .Jackson, a 
well-to-do colored man, ran for city com- 
missioner. Jackson is said to be a "shrewd 
and energetic man, who has quietly amassed 
a considerable fortune without exciting the 
antagonism of the white people." The 
Associated Press dispatch goes on to say: 

"One difficulty which the Negroes will 
meet in giving their solid vote for Jackson 
lies in the fact that the location of the 
thirty-seven candidates' names on the ballot 
are changed with the casting of each fifty 
votes, so that the illiterate members of his 
race will have great difficulty in locating 
the one man for whom they desire to vote. 
However, comparatively few NegTo voters 
of this city are unable to read sufficiently 
to identify a name, and those who cannot 
could be readily taught in the clubs to find 
and identify the name of Jordan Jackson 
in the long list." But Jackson was defeated. 

^ Harry W. Bass, the only colored member 
of the Pennsylvania legislature, was re- 
elected by a vote of 2,655, against 1,214 cast 
for his nearest competitor. 

^ President Taft has appointed J. P. 




Strickland, a colored man of Arkansas, to 
succeed C. F. Adams, the colored Assistant 
Register of the Treasury, who resigned to 
do campaign work. 

^ Two cases illustrate disfranchisement in 
the South: Shreveport, La., has 14,000 col- 
ored inhabitants — of these only thirty-nine 
were qualified to vote; each one of these 
thirty-nine who came to vote was told that 
his name was not on the poll book and had 
to repair to the courthouse, get a certifi- 
cate to the fact that he was a voter and 
attach that certificate to his ballot. This, 
of course, enabled his ballot to be easily 
distinguished during the counting. 

In the whole State of Georgia, with a 
colored population of over a million, 10,000 
Negroes were qualified to vote. 

^ Among the colored officials whom Presi- 
dent-elect Wilson will be called upon to re- 
appoint or supersede by other appointments 
are the ministers to Haiti and Liberia, the 
secretary to Liberia, eight consuls to various 
parts of the world, the Assistant Attorney- 
General, Register and Assistant Register of 
the Treasury, two collectors of internal 
revenue, the recorder of deeds of the District 
of Columbia, one of the auditors of the 
Navy Department, two receivers of public 
moneys, three collectors of customs, three 
Assistant United States District Attorneys 
and several postmasters. 



60 



THE CRISIS 



fl The Negro votes cast in the Democratic 
primary election in Petersburg, Va., have 
been thrown out by the Democratic congres- 
sional committee of that city. 

SOCIAL UPLIFT. 

A HOME for delinquent colored girls 
under 16, to be known as the 
Sojourner Truth House, is to be established 
in New York. The committee on organiza- 
tion, of which Miss Elizabeth Walton is 
chairman, has begnin a financial campaign, 
and by June, 1913, they expect to have on 
hand not less than $15,000, the amount 
necessary for three years' expenses. The 
colored people of the community have taken 
a keen interest in this effort to care for 
these unfortunate women, and have already 
raised and turned over to the committee 
$716. 

The Sojourner Truth House is to be a 
home where the probationer and the girl 
with unwholesome home environment may 
be eared for until she can secure accommo- 
dation in a larger and more adequately 
equipped private institution, or in the now 
overcrowded State institution at Hudson. 

^ A special "Georgia Compendium" of the 
Atlanta Constitution devotes six pages to 
colored people, and contains over twenty-one 
columns of advertisements of NegTO enter- 
prises. Among the Negro enterprises men- 
tioned are various business houses, numbers 
of churches, real-estate enterprises, institu- 
tions of learning, physicians and hospitals, 
and industrial insurance companies. 

^ The cornerstone of the new $100,000 
building for the colored Y. M. C. A. in 
Indianapolis has been laid. A telegram from 
Julius r. Rosenwald was read. 

^ The Bessemer, Ala., Negro Men's League 
is inducing desirable colored families to 
come to town and buy homes, and is estab- 
lishing a school. 

.Q The rirst Congregational Church of 
Atlanta, Ga., has opened a home for colored 
working, girls. 

fl Mrs. Laura Beard is planning an indus- 
trial exchange in Indianapolis. She has 
already helped to secure an appropriation 
of $2.5,000 from the legislature to establish 
an industrial school for colored girls at New 
Albany, Ind. 



^ Efforts are being made to bring under 
one general control the colored theatres of 
the nation. 

^ The colored newspaper men of New York 
gave a dinner at which Congressman Henry 
George was chief speaker. 

Q An attempt is being made to federate the 
philanthropic activities among colored peo- 
ple in Baltimore. A number of associations 
and clubs conducted by colored people, which 
are carrying on work among the NegTo poor, 
have formed a federation under a director. 
This autumn, among other activities, there 
will be a day nursery and a social settle- 
ment, the buildings for which have already 
been secured by the clubs. The federation 
will work in connection with an advisory 
board of white people, of which Elizabeth 
Gilman is chairman. 

The director chosen for this work is Mrs. 
Sarah C. Fernandis. Mrs. Fernandis is a 
Hampton graduate, and has taken the sum- 
mer course in the New York School of 
Philanthropy. She has worked for six years 
in Washington, D. C, at first as a friendly 
visitor for the associated charities, under 
the direction of Charles P. Weller, and later 
as head worker of a social settlement in 
a neglected Negro quarter. 

^ The State Federation of Colored Women's 
Clubs of Alabama has recently helped to 
finish and furnish a new boys' dormitory 
at the reformatory which they founded. 
One hundred acres of land have also been 
added to the plant. 

^ The Douglass Hospital of Philadelphia 
held its founders' day celebration Novem- 
ber 25. A souvenir was issued as an expres- 
sion of gratitude to the friends who con- 
tributed $15,864 through the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger. A bronze tablet was un- 
veiled in honor of several donors. Among 
these was Mr. John Lux, a colored man, who 
left $6,500 for endowing a free bed. The 
hospital which cost $118,000 has raised and 
paid $86,000 in three years. It has a mort- 
gaged indebtedness of $25,000 and a float- 
ing indebtedness of $8,000. 

fl In October the colored musicians of 
Kansas City held their annual outing. All 
the bands were consolidated into one large 
band of 100 musicians. A ladies' band also 
joined in the outing and services were held 
in Allen Chapel. 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



61 



fl The Lincoln Giants, a colored ball team, 
beat the New York Giants, the champions of 
the National League, by a score of 6 to 0. 

^ Lindsay Social Center, a settlement in a 
neglected alley of Washington, D. C, has 
been established. 

fl The colored people of New Orleans are 
proposing to celebrate January 1, Emanci- 
pation Day, with unusual ceremonies. 

^ In London, Eng., at the Women's Insti- 
tute, Mrs. Frances Hoggan, M. D., gave a 
lecture on "Negro Women in America Since 
Their Emancipation Fifty Years Ago." In a 
comprehensive survey of the gradual prog- 
ress of women from the time they ceased to 
be slaves she showed how they had organized 
themselves and gained for themselves politi- 
cal and social rights. She claimed that they 
were moving quietly but forcibly toward the 
intellectual leadership of the race. In some 
States in the American union black women 
whose mothers were slaves were now exer- 
cising intelligently their newly acquired 
political and civic rights. Negro women had 
never failed since their liberation, and their 
record was one to be pondered over with 
respectful admiration, for from such small 
beginnings such far-reaching results had 
ensued. 

EDUCATION. 

'T'HE Florida State Teachers' Association 
■*• will meet in Ocala during the Christ- 
mas holidays. 

fl Lincoln Institute, a colored institution 
which resulted from the refusal of the State 
of Kentucky to allow colored students to 
attend Berea, has at last been opened at 
Simpsonville. The institution represents an 
investment of $400,000, half of which comes 
from Andrew Carnegie. There are 444 
acres of land, and the work is chiefly 
industrial. 

fl In tihe Alabama legislature a compulsory 
education law has been proposed. One 
senator named Thomas announced that he 
would oppose any bill that would compel 
Negroes to educate their children, for it 
had come to his knowledge that Negroes 
would give the clothing off their backs to 
send their children to school, while too often 
the white man, secure in his supremacy, 
would be indifferent to his duty. 

fl Atlantic City is still trying to get rid of 
the colored druggist who was appointed by 



a former mayor on the board of education. 
The matter has been appealed to the State 
board of education. 

fl Bruce Evans has been removed from his 
position as principal of the Armstrong 
Manual Training School of Washington, 
D. C, which he has held since 1885, and 
also from his position as assistant director 
of public night schools. This is the cul- 
mination of a series of complaints which 
have been made against Mr. Evans for the 
last few years. Garnet C. Wilkinson be- 
comes principal of the Armstrong School 
and A. C. Newman assistant director of the 
night schools. 

fl There are in the United States 144,659 
white children and 218,355 colored children, 
10 to 14 years of age, who cannot read 
and write. The colored children form 18.9 
per cent, of all colored children. This 
dangerous situation is much better than in 
1900, when the illiteracy among colored 
children was 30.1 per cent. 

^ John C. Martin, a white philanthropist 
of New York, died, leaving an estate of 
$800,000. He left two wills: one divided 
the principal part of the fortune among the 
Presbyterian. Freedman's Board, College 
Board and the Board of Home Missions; 
the other will left the estate to the J. C. 
Martin Educational Fund, principally for 
colored people. The matter is in litigation. 

ECONOMICS. 

'T' HE Molders' Union is still discussing 
-^ the question of admitting Negroes. 

^ At the Stoughton Industrial Fair, Massa- 
chusetts, the first prize for black Hamburg 
gTapes was awarded to Miss Adelaide 
Washington. Miss Washington is a success- 
ful florist of Stoughton, who supplies the 
flower markets of Boston, as well as carry- 
ing on a transient business in neighboring 
towns. 

^ There are employed in the shipbuilding 
yards of Newport News, Va., 2,200 colored 
men, many of them skilled laborers, who do 
a large part of the work on the battleships 
built there. None of these men are admitted 
to the Ironworkers' Union. 

^ The new cottonseed-oil mill of Mound 
Bayou, a colored town of Mississippi, was 
opened November 25. It represents an in- 
vestment of $60,000. 



62 



THE CRISIS 



Q There has been a strike of white waiters 
in Washington, D. C, and their places were 
filled by colored waiters. The white waiters 
are now inviting the colored men to join 
the union. 

^ A colored man who could not get a check 
cashed after office hours at the Mechanics' 
Savings Bank began a run on the institution. 
This is a colored bank of Richmond, Va., 
under the presidency of Mr. John Mitchell. 
It is a member of the local Clearing House 
Association, and stood the run without diffi- 
culty; $15,000 was paid out in two days, and 
on the next day confidence was restored. 
fl The colored people of Chattanooga are 
endeavoring to establish the Southern Cen- 
tral Life Insurance Company. This will 
engage in all kinds of insurance work. 
fl Mr. Henry P. Slaughter, the manager of 
the Odd Fellows Journal, reports that the 
income of this weekly paper from November 
10, 1910, to July 15, 1912, was $30,315. It 
occupies an office in Washington, which is 
now thoroughly equipped for its work. 
^ The Southeastern Railways and their em- 
ployees have reached a settlement in their 
controversy over wages. Ten per cent, ad- 
vance in wages has been granted to 13,000 
employees, of whom 3,000 are colored. 
^ Twenty colored families formed a colony 
at Blackdon, N. M. They own a consider- 
able amount of land. 

MEETINGS. 
'T'HE sixty-sixth annual meeting of the 
■*■ American Missionary Association was 
held in Buffalo, and devoted some time to the 
Negro problem. Charles L. Coon, a North 
Carolina white man, gave an excellent ad- 
dress, and Kelley Miller, W. H. Lewis, T. S. 
Inborden and -Ma ry Chu rch Terrell were 
among the colored speakers. 

fl The tenth conference of the Rhode Island 
Union of Colored Women's Clubs has been 
held in Newport, at the Mt. Olivet Baptist 
Church. Many delegates attended and re- 
ported a very successful meeting. Among 
the speakers were Rev. Byron Gunner of 
Hillburn, N. Y., Mr. Henry Hammond, sec- 
retary of the colored Y. M. C. A., and Miss 
Elizabeth Carter of New Bedford, Mass. 
fl Colored agricultural fairs have been 
held in Montgomery, Ala., Greenboro, Ala., 
Batesburg, S. C, Aberdeen, Miss., and else- 
where. The local white papers spoke in 
terms of highest praise of the exhibits. 



fl The annual Negro farmers' conference 
Avas held at Hampton Institute November 
20 and 21. 

THE CHURCH. 

'T'HE Negro Baptist Association of the 

■■" State of Texas raised $170,000 during 

the year for its work. One colored man, 

who is a large land owner, gave $40,000. 

n St. Mark's M. E. Church of New York, 
a colored organization, purchased last year 
for $54,000 an apartment house on Lenox 
Avenue. It proposes to buy other pieces 
of improved city property, and then to 
dispose of the whole for a farm convenient 
to the city, upon which a home for the aged 
will be established. The church is publish- 
ing an interesting monthly paper. 

^ Eor the first time in the history of the 
Negro church, a bishop has been suspended. 
George W. Stewart, a bishop of the C. M. E. 
Church, has been suspended from his 
ecclesiastical duties on account of alleged 
misappropriation of funds. His case will 
come before the general conference of the 
church in 1914. 

Q The Catholic Church is considering the 
conferring of sainthood upon twenty-two 
black Christians who suffered martyrdom in 
the lake region of Africa about thirty years 
ago. 

PERSONAL. 

^/TR. FRED M. JOHNSON, a colored 
■*■ ■■■ soldier who fought at San Juan HUl, 
has invented a belt-feed rifle, which it is 
said wUl fire 300 shots without stopping, at 
the rate of twenty seconds. The rifle is being 
considered by the War Department. 

^ On March 19, 1913, the centenary of the 
birth of David Livingstone will be cele- 
brated. In London a national memorial 
service will be held in St. Paul's, with a 
demonstration in Albert Hall. 

^ R. M. Swayne, a colored man of Spring- 
field, 0., stood first among the thirteen per- 
sons who took the State dental examination. 
He made 93 per cent. 

fl Walter P. Carter, the first and only 
school director in Pittsburgh, Pa., is dead. 

fl A colored boy named Fowler has been 
rewarded at Asheville, N. C, for saving a 
pet horse. 

fl Among the names on the Carnegie hero 
list is that of Nathan Record, a Negro 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



63 



farmer, who helped save four persons from 
drowning at Lelot, Tex., in Maj', 1908. He 
was given a bronze medal and $1,000 toward 
the purchase of a farm. 

^ For three years Charles Belgrove, a col- 
ored policeman in Philadelphia, has been 
one of the champion athletes among his 
fellows. This year he won three first prizes. 

Q Frank Damrosch has offered scholarships 
to the United States War Department for 
the instruction of five bandsmen. The men 
were selected by rigid competitive examina- 
tion and one of the five was Alfred J. 
Thomas, a colored musician and chief bands- 
man of the Tenth Cavalry. 
fl Announcement is made of the recent mar- 
riage of J. Max Barber and Miss Hattie B. 
Taylor of Philadelphia. Mrs. Barber is a 
sister of the late John B. Taylor, the runner, 
and was a kindergartner. Dr. Barber has 
opened dental offices at 3223 Woodland 
Avenue, Philadelphia, where he would be 
glad to hear from his many friends. 

MUSIC AND ART. 
A GROUP of four characteristic songs by 
-^^ Will Marion Cook has lately been 
published by the Schirmer music publishers. 
Of Mr. Cook as a composer and musician 
the composer-pianist, Kurt Schindler, says : 
''With the publication of these larger and 
more ambitious works of a colored musician 
the attention of the musical world is sure 
to be focused upon a man of extraordinary 
talent, who has been living in our midst for 
fifteen years unrecognized and unheeded. 

"Not that Will Marion Cook was unknown, 
but because his melodies have been confined 
to the light opera and vaudeville stage, 
where, although much enjoyed, few in the 
audiences were able to appreciate their true 
artistic value. * * * Mr. Cook's work 
at its best means no less than finding the 
proper musical correlative to the Negro 
idiom, and thus adding a new territory to 
musical geography. 

"Besides his larger works, Mr. Cook has 
been writing a great many songs in a more 
popular vein, but it is the development of 
his serious work along the lines of the 'Rain 
Song' and the 'Exhortation' which especially 
interests us, since here he will not only per- 
form a lasting service to his race, but in- 
trinsically enrich the entire musical world." 

^ Following an illustrated article on Samuel 
Coleridge- Taylor, the Musical Times of Lon- 



don, Eng., publishes a fine tribute to the 
composer by Sir Hubert Parry, the principal 
of the Royal College of Music, in which he 
states that "the first performance of the first 
part of 'Hiawatha' in 1898 at the college 
was one of the most remarkable events in 
modern English musical history." And he 
adds that "the triology is one of the most 
universally beloved works of modern English 
music." 

^ A plan is under discussion to give a great 
concert at the Royal Albert Hall, London, 
lale in the month of November, to the mem- 
ory' of Mr. Coleridge-Taylor. It has been 
decided that the memorial will take some 
practical shape, and a committee of influen- 
tial persons is being formed to further that 
end. 

The Central Croydon Choral Society of 
Croydon, Eng., gave a memorial concert on 
November 23 as a tribute to the greatness 
of the musician. 

^ The sad news of Mr. Coleridge-Taylor's 
death cast gloom over the opening of the 
Royal Eisteddfod of Wales. The composer, 
who was one of the appointed judges of the 
festival, was a favorite with the Welsh 
musicians. 

^ Mr. David Mannes, the well-known violin- 
ist and founder of the New York Music 
School Settlement for Colored People in 
New York, has resigned his position of con- 
cert master of the New York Symphony 
Society to the great regret of the directors 
and patrons. 

^ Leoncavallo's latest opera, "Zingari" (the 
Gypsies), the libretto of which is founded 
on a short story by Pushkin, the colored 
Russian poet, was produced at the Hippo- 
drome, London, on September 16. 
fl Madame Maud Powell, the distinguished 
violinist, has begun in the West her Ameri- 
can tour of violin recitals. Coleridge- 
Taylor's concerto in G minor, which was 
dedicated to Maud Powell, heads her 
program. 

^ Choral music is said to be making rapid 
progress in South Africa. A series of 
festival performances was inaugurated this 
season under the management of Dr. Barrow 
Dowling of Cape Town. The festival 
opened at Durban with a performance of 
"Hiawatha." There was a vast audience, 
which included the governor-general, Lord 
Gladstone. 



64 



THE CRISIS 



^ A piano recital was given on November 
15 at Washington, D. C, by Mr. Roy W. 
Tibbs, pianist, who was lately appointed 
teacher of pianoforte in the music depart- 
ment of Howard University. Mr. Tibbs is 
a gxaduate of the Oberlin Conservatory of 
Music, Oberlin, 0., and will be heard in 
concert this winter. 

^ An unusual concert was that given on the 
night of October 16, under the auspices of 
the A. M. E. Zion Church at Boston, Mass. 
The program, which consisted of composi- 
tions by colored composers, was arranged 
and descriptively noted by Mrs. Maud Cuney 
Hare. 

The composers represented were Harry 
T. Burleigh, Harry A. Williams, J. Shelton 
Pollen, M. H. Hodges, DeKoven Thompson, 
J. Rosamond Johnson, Clarence Cameron 
White, S. Coleridge-Taylor and Maud Cuney 
Hare. 

The soloists were Mrs. Adah Gaskins 
Mason, soprano; Mrs. Maud Cuney Hare, 
pianist; Mr. Wm. H. Richardson, baritone, 
and Mr. Clarence Cameron White, violinist. 

fl Mr. Clarence Cameron White, violinist, 
who enjoyed orchestral experience in the 
String-plaj'^ers' Club of London, Eng., has 
been appointed director of the Victorian 
Orchestra of Boston, Mass. The manage- 
ment and conductor propose to develop a 
concert orchestra of the first rank. 

Q Miss Minnie Cordel Kelley, who lately 
completed the normal course in the Milliken 
Conservatory of Decatur, 111., has opened a 
studio for pupils in pianoforte and theory 
at Indianapolis, Ind. 

Q It is reported that John Berry, a colored 
porter in the barber shop of Frankfort, Ind., 
has sold a comic opera and some songs to a 
Chicago company for $3,467. 

fl In the report of the president of Yale 
University for 1912 occurs the following 
paragraph concerning the colored girl of 
whom we have spoken before: 

"The Samuel Simons Sanford Fellowship 
given by his daughter as a memorial to the 
late Prof. Sanford is one of the most stimu- 
lating gifts the department has ever re- 
ceived. This fellowship 'to be given once 
in two years to the most gifted performer, 
who shall also have marked ability in 
original composition,' is intended to defray 



the expenses of a student during two years' 
study in Europe. 

"The award is made this year for the first 
time to Helen Eugenia Hagan for a brilliant 
performance of an original concerto (first 
movement) for piano and orchestra. Miss 
Hagan shows not only pianistic talent of 
rare promise, but also clearly marked ability 
to conceive and execute musical ideas of 
much charm and no little originality. It is 
a source of gratification to her teachers and 
to all interested in the department that she 
is thus enabled to develop further the musi- 
cal gift she has already shown. 

"The annual students' concert with orches- 
tra was given in Woolsey Hall on May 23. 
The audience was larger than we had ever 
had at a concert by students, and it is not 
too much to say that more of interest was 
offered than we have ever had before. The 
most notable feature of the concert was the 
piano concerto by Miss Hagan, to which 
reference has been made above." 

COURTS. 

■jn EV. W. C. IRWIN has brought suit in 
■■■^' the Superior Court of Indiana against 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and 
the Pullman Company for curtaining off his 
seat in the Pullman car while he was riding 
through Kentucky. 

^ Mr, W. H. Lewis has been admitted to 
practice before the Supreme Court of the 
United States, and is expected to assist 
Assistant Attorney-General Wickersham in 
certain government eases. 

^ Charles Boyd, a colored man, has brought 
suit against a Cleveland lunch house for 
charging him double price on an order of 
eggs and coffee. 

fl Some months ago a colored man in 
Georgia accidentally or intentionally touched 
a white woman with one of his hands. He 
was arrested, charged with assault, and an 
attempt was made to lynch him. He was 
hurriedly tried, found guilty of assault, and 
Judge A. W. Fite sentenced him to twenty 
years in the penitentiary. The Court of 
Appeals granted him a new trial. At this 
trial the prisoner was again found guilty 
and the same judge gave him the same 
sentence. The Court of Appeals again re- 
versed Judge Fite, who proceeded to make 
uncomplimentary remarks about the court. 
The court thereupon fined him for contempt. 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



65 



CRIME. 
' I ' HE political campaign seems to have 
•*• lessened lynchings for a while. Since 
our last record there have been but two. 

In Americus, Ga., a Negro railroad hand, 
Yarborough, was hanged for alleged assault 
upon a white child. At Birmingham, Ala., 
Frank Childress, alias "Will" Smith, was 
shot to death by a mob after he had killed 
a city detective. 

fl Continual reports appear in the press of 
white men being discovered in crime with 
blackened faces. In New York three such 
men killed a butcher on 176th Street. 

•I The killing of colored men by policemen 
still goes on. Such murders are reported 
this month in New York City and two in 
Birmingham, Ala. In two of these cases 
there did not seem to be the slightest 
justification. 

Q In Philadelphia a policeman murderously 
assaulted Dr. Thomas G. Coates for remon- 
strating at the beating of another colored 
man. 

fl Murders of colored people by white men 
are reported in three cities. 

In Frederick, Md., Harry Thomas was 
shot dead by W. J. Lewis. Lewis said that 
Thomas was stealing. In Winston, N. C, 
Oscar Fisher, "a prominent livery man and 
popular citizen of this city," killed one of 
his colored employees because he asked for 
his wages. At Chubb, in Polk County, Fla., 
a Negro, Jack Smith, Avas shot and killed 
by a white man because the man was afraid 
of him. There were no arrests. 

^ In Asheville, N. C, B. Hensley, a young 
white man, has been sent to jail for sixteen 
months for assaulting a colored man. 

THE GHETTO. 

'T^ HE fifty-six colored applicants who 
■*■ were marked as not passed in the 
recent New Orleans teachers' examinations 
are still complaining of unfairness. It is 
said that a year ago a colored applicant 
secured a re-examination of his papers and 
received a higher average than anyone who 
had been given a passing mark. 

fl The city of Charleston, S. C, has at last 
adopted "Jim Crow" street cars. The ordin- 
ance is in part as follows. A fine not exceed- 
ing $50 and imprisonment of not more than 
thirty days or both are the penalties for 
infraction of this ordinance: That all street- 



railway companies now or hereafter operat- 
ing lines of street railways in the city of 
Charleston, S. C, are required to provide 
separate accommodations for the white and 
colored passengers on the cars by reserving 
two rear seats and spaces between all cross- 
seated cars for colored passengers, and the 
remaining seats and spaces for white pas- 
sengers, but should the two rear seats thus 
reserved for the colored passengers become 
filled with such passengers then in that 
event any colored person or persons offering 
as passengers may be assigned to a seat or 
seats next in front, provided sufficient room 
in addition remains to accommodate the 
white passengers on the car in seats separate 
from the colored passenger or passengers; 
in such case the conductor or person in 
charge of the car shall have authority for 
this purpose to move forward the white 
passengers to vacant places further to the 
front, and in this manner make room for 
the additional colored passengers. 

The railway company may reserve the 
last seat or the last two seats in the rear 
of the cross-seated open cars exclusively for 
smoking; in that event the term "two rear 
seats" whenever mentioned in this section 
shall be construed to mean the two sea,ts im- 
mediately in front. * * * 

Any colored person in immediate charge' 
of any white child or children or any sick 
or infirm white person shall be permitted to 
ride with said child or children or said 
sick or infirm person in the portion of car 
assigned to the use of white persons. 

^ Miss Elizabeth Williams, a colored woman 
of Norfolk, Va., was abused by a white in- 
surance collector while ill. She shot at him 
and was afterward exonerated by the court, 
and the collector was fined $10. 

fl Cleveland G. Allen has been calling the 
attention of the newspapers to the fact that 
no colored sailors appeared among the 6,000 
who paraded in New York. The official 
in charge of the naval parade says that there 
is no discrimination against Negroes in the 
navy, but that the Negro cannot pass the 
physical tests which admit him as able sea- 
man. This seems rather curious when we 
compare it with the army. According to 
the annual report of Surgeon-General 
George H. Herney, the non-efficiency rate 
of the colored soldier was 25.88, while that 
of the white soldier was 33.60. The colored 
soldiers also were in the hospital less. 





WILL MARION COOK 

VTT'ILL MARION COOK was born in 
^^ Washington, D. C, thirty-nine 
years ago. His mother was a woman of deep 
religious tendencies and, with her son, at- 
tended the emotionally expressive services of 
a small sect of Negroes whose children she 
was serving as teacher. The plaintive melo- 
dies and harmonies of the old Negro hymns 
exerted a lasting influence (in young Cook. 
His first musical effort was as a boy soprano, 
and afterward he began the study of the 
violin. He went to Oberlin College for three 
years and his advancement and promise were 
so marked that an opportunity to study 
abroad was arranged for him. He was sent 
to Berlin, entered the Hochschule, and made 
a splendid impression on Joachim, who in- 
vited him to his home for special lessons on 
the violin. On account of delicate health he 
was forced to abandon his studies in Berlin 
and return to America. At the time of his 
return the "ragtime" craze was at the height 
of its popularity, but nothing had been done 



MEN OF THE 



MONTH 



Z^r?L4-TTMER-^i 



for the development of the melodies in en- 
semble form. It was suggested to Cook by 
the late George W. Walker, of Williams and 
Walker, that he Avrite some NegTo songs with 
arrangement for choral effects; and Paul 
Laurence Dunbar, the NegTo poet, furnished 
him Avith a set of characteristic lyrics which 
he set to stirring and inspiring tunes founded 
upon the old Negro melodies of the planta- 
tion and camp meeting. The little operetta 
was entitled ''Clorindy or the Origin of the 
Cakewalk;" it was produced upon the 
Casino Roof Garden, Avhere it created a 
furore. 

Cook has composed the music for the 
Williams and Walker productions, "In 




MISS HAZEL HARRISON 



MEN OF THE MONTH 



67 




WILLIAM F. CHILDS 

Dahomey," "Abyssinia" and "Bandanna 
Land;" also for Mr. George W. Lederer he 
composed the score of the Casino Theatre 
productions, "The Casino Girl" and "The 
Southerners." Among the distinctive Negro 
songs which he has composed are "Emanci- 
pation Day," "Mandj' Lou," "Lover's Lane," 
"Swing Along," and a score of others. 

Cook's present serious work is the develop- 
ment of XegTo folklore in dance forms for 
chamber music. He feels that the Negro in 
music will have to take his place through 
the development of the old melodies, the 
song-s of the slaves and old religious 
croonings. 



A PIANIST. 

A COLORED girl of La Porte, Ind., is 
"*^^ making her mark as a student of the 
piano in Germany. One of the greatest 
living pianists is Ferruceo Bueoni of Berlin. 
For the past two years he has taken no 
pupils, but when his former pupil, Hugo 
Von Dalen, brought Hazel L. Harrison to 
him he listened to her playing with unusual 
interest. He said that she was gifted, had 
strength, rhythm and poetrj-, and that if she 
would follow his advice she Avould have un- 
doubted success. He thereupon offered to 
direct her studies. Miss Harrison will there-! 
fore remain another year in Berlin and will 
be heard in concert there. 



A LIEUTENANT OF POLICE. 

X/r K. WILLIAM F. CHILDS has just been 
■*- ■*• made a lieutenant of the police force of 
the city of Chicago, the tirst office of the 
kind ever held by a colored American. Mr. 
Childs was born in Marion, Ala., in 1865, of 
a family which has furnished excellent teach- 
ers for colored schools. He came to Chicago 
in 1887 as storekeeper in the dining-car de- 
partment of the Chicago, Milwaukee and 
St. Paul Railroad Company. President 
Hanison appointed him postmaster of 
Marion, where he served four years, return- 
ing to Chicago in 18S)4. Two years later he 
went on the police force. On April 7, 1905, 
he was promoted to sergeant, and October 
18, 1912, he was made lieutenant at a salary 
of $1,800. Both promotions were made by 
Carter Harrison, the Democratic mayor of 
Chicago. 



A PHYSICIAN. 

TN the death of Alonzo C. MeClennan 
-*■ South Carolina loses its most prominent 
colored physician. Dr. MeClennan was born 
in Columbia May 1, 1855. He attended the 
local public schools and was later appointed 
a cadet to the Naval Academy at Annapolis. 




THE LATE DR. A. C. McCLENNAN 



68 



THE CRISIS 



Being the lone colored man at the academy, 
he was imposed on by his fellow cadets, and 
as a man of courage he resented this impo- 
sition one night by fighting all who came 
within his reach in the dining hall. The 
evidence at courtmartial was all one-sided, 
of course, and he was sent to the prison ship. 
At the expiration of his sentence he was 
ad\'ised to resign. He did so, and afterward 
attended school at Wilbraham, Mass. He 
received his medical training at Howard 
University, and after graduation he first 
located in AugTista, Ga., but soon removed 
to Charleston, S. C, and developed a very 
large practice. In 1896 he conceived the 
idea of establishing a training school for 



nurses. With the assistance of friends he 
purchased a plant which developed into the 
Hospital and Training School for Nurses. 
Sixty young women have been graduated, a 
majority of whom are practising their pro- 
fession successfully. 

Personally Dr. McClennan was most un- 
selfish and devoted to good work. He re- 
ceived no pay for his services as surgeon 
and lecturer at the hospital; he was instru- 
mental in founding the first colored drug 
store twenty years ago, and in every way he 
was a helpful, unselfish citizen. He leaves 
a widow, two daughters and a son; one 
daughter is a trained nurse and the son is a 
physician. 



®I|0 Olljrtatmaa ^^rmntt 

By ROBERT J. LAURENCE 



When de trumpets am a-tootin' 
An' de stahs dey am a-shootin' 

An' de owls dey am a-hootin' in de trees, 
When de earf it am a-quakin' 
An' de dead dey am a-wakin' 

An' de people am a-shakin' in de knees; 
When yo' hea' de rollin' thundah, 
An' de rocks am rent asundah, 

An' de hosts am in deir wondah standin' 
awed; 
An' yo' fin' yo'self a-tremblin' 
While de nations am assemblin,' 

Wicked sinner, what yo' gwine to tell de 
Lawd? 



II. 

When de planets get a-knockin' 
At each udder an' a-rockin' 

An' de tempest seems a-mockin' at yo' woe, 
When de darkness am a-fallin' 
An' de buzza'ds am a-squallin' 

An' de angels am a-eallin' yo' to go; 
When de sun hab quit its shinin' 
An' de brack wolves am a-whinin' 

An' de mo'nahs lay a-pinin' on de sod, 
An' yo's asked to tell de story. 
What yo' doin' up in glory, 

Tremblin' sinner, what yo' gwine to tell 
de Lawd? 



III. 
When yo' see de righteous swingin' 
Up de road, an' all a-singin' 

Twul de earf it be a-ringin' wif de psalm, 
AVhen dey fol' deir wings an' rally 
In de golden rivah valley 

Singin' hallaluyah-hally to de Lam'; 
Stop yo' sinnin' an' transgressin', 
Listen to de wahnin' lesson. 

Get yo' wicked knees to pressin' on de sod ; 
When yo's at the bar, an' Satan 
Am a-eyin' you' an' waitin' — dyin' sinner. 

What yo' gwine to tell de Lawd? 




pTnTon7 





THE 
ELECTIOK 



So far as the colored American 
is concerned the late election 
marks an epoch. For the first 
time since emancipation the Negxo vote was 
an unknown quantity. As the New York 
Herald says: 

"It has been assumed in the past that the 
NegTo vote may be counted as solid for the 
Republican candidate. Such does not appear 
to be the case this year. The fact seems to 
be that this year the split in the Republican 
party has induced many members of the race 
to drop their allegiance to the Republican 
party, perhaps for good, and to turn to the 
Democratic candidate." 

The attitude of the press toward the Demo- 
cratic triumph and its relation to the Negro 
problem is very interesting. Some of the 
colored papers, like the Boston Guardian, 
treat it with triumph: 

"Taking the advice of that lifelong South- 
ern Democrat, Col. Henry Watterson, that 
if the white South saw that a presidential 
victory was assisted by the intelligent col- 
ored voters of the North, it would make for 
a better racial understanding, and with two 
candidates born in the South, but of North- 
ern residence and experience, amply assured 
by Governor Wilson, that as President, he 
would be the champion of equal rights, friend 
of the colored American and President of all 
the people of every section, and of every 
race, this league and the National Colored 
Democratic League called upon the colored 
voters of the Eastern and Middle Western 
States to desert the Republican party with 
telling effect." 

Others, like the Richmond Planet, are 
more complacent than triumphant: 

"The election of Gov. Woodrow Wilson 
of New Jersey, on Election Day, as President 
of the United States, should cause no un- 
easiness among the colored people of this 
country. He is not an extremist in either 
politics, religion or the race question. He 
has given voice to no expressions of anti- 



pathy to the colored people, and we believe 
that he Avill prove a better friend to us in 
the White House than some of this 'com- 
mercial material' from the North, which has 
so persistently blundered in dealing with one 
of the kindliest races of people on the face 
of the globe." 

The Afro- American Ledger expresses some 
doubt, but admits that if the President-elect 
lives up to his declarations he will make a 
most substantial contribution toward a genu- 
ine emancipation of the Negro race from a 
slavery, which is in conflict with the loftiest 
and highest ideals of American life. 

Other papers, like the Norfolk (Va.) 
Journal and Guide, voice an undoubtedly 
widespread feeling of apprehension: 

"There is some apprehension on the part 
of our people, fearing that a change of ad- 
ministration may bring an increase of the 
hardships, discriminations and burdens al- 
ready borne by colored citizens — a second 
thought prompts us to believe that such is 
quite unlikely; even the Democratic party is 
now wise enough to profit by its former 
mistakes." 

The St. Luke's Herald thinks that at least ^ 
the Negro can suffer no more than he has: 

"The NegTo had nothing to lose, and we 
venture the assertion that he has lost nothing 
by the change, and it remains to be seen if 
he hasn't gained much. 

"The Negro voter had been put out of 
the Republican party; he had been insulted 
and deserted by the Taft Republican admin- 
istration. He was neither wanted nor sought 
until the Progressive party entered the polit- 
ical arena. Then the Negro was sought, 
cajoled and patted and promised many things 
if he would only stay with the party and 
vote for it, so that the man who insulted 
them could remain in the White House." 

The venerable editor of the Georgia Bap- 
tist, which is just celebrating its thirty- 
second birthdaj', is frankly cast down and 
says: 



70 



THE CRISIS 



"That the result of the election brings 
gloom to many thousands of race-loving col- 
ored men and women in all parts of the 
country. Just what the outcome will be time 
alone must decide. We did not vote Tues- 
day. We saw nothing of promise for the 
colored American in any ticket before the 
people, and so we let the election go by 
default. Our earnest hope is that what we 
have regarded as a mistake on the part of 
leading colored men in other sections of the 
country may turn out to be the best thing 
to happen." 

The Christian Recorder has much to hope 
for from President-elect Wilson, because "he 
is an educator and sees things from the point 
of view of an educator. He is essentially a 
statesman rather than a 'politician,' Poli- 
ticians have never treated the NegTo as he 
ought to be treated, and this has demoralized 
our politics. Mr. Wilson is, we believe, more 
of a democrat than a Democrat." 

The white Southern press has received 
Mr. Wilson's promises to the Negro with 
complacency, although the last phrase in the 
observations of the Charlotte (N. C.) 
Observer brings thought. It says that all 
good Southern people can heartily join in 
this promise : "Understanding what it im- 
plies and what it does not imply." 

What the colored people fear in the 
triumph of the Democratic party is illus- 
trated by a campaign document sent to all 
the Republicans just before election. Know- 
ing that Senator Hoke Smith will be in- 
fluential in the next administration, they 
quote from one of his recent campaign 
speeches : 

"The uneducated Negro is a good NegTo; 
he is contented to occupy the natural status 
of his race, the position of inferiority. The 
educated and intelligent Negro who wants 
to vote is a disturbing and threatening in- 
fluence. We don't want him down here; 
let him go North. I favor and, if elected, 
will urge with all my power the elimination 
of the NegTO from politics." 

Covington Hall, in the Coming Nation, 
severely arraigns the Southern wing of 
Democracy : 

"Shrieking against 'Nigger domination,' it 
has time after time furnished armies of gun- 
men to protect Negro scabs in their 'right to 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,' 
but it is only when he is a scab that the 
Democratic party recognizes the Negro's 
right to even a sawmill commissary living. 



"If the NegTO workers revolted it stirred 
up the basest passions of the whites against 
them and assassinated them back into sub- 
mission ; if the white workers revolted it 
rushed the militia to the scene and proclaimed 
with bayonets the master's right to 'run his 
business as he pleased,' no matter if his 
pleasure consisted of starving and killing 
men in the mines, women in the sweatshops, 
or babies in the mills. If the workers of 
both races united in their revolt, as they 
have done to-day in the timber belt, it raised 
and led the cry that the union was 'organiz- 
ing the Negroes against the whites,' seeking 
thereby to endanger the lives of all its or- 
ganizers, both white and colored, and to 
justify the slugging and killing of union men 
by thugs and gunmen. 

"Under the rule of the Democratic party 
more than one-half of the working class of 
the South, regardless of color, has been dis- 
franchised. Under its rule thousands of 
white children slave their lives away in cot- 
ton mills and canning factories; thousands 
of white girls and women are driven to de- 
grading and mother-killing labor in laun- 
dries and other sweatshops, and the Demo- 
cratic party fights every effort to better their 
condition — this, though its laws on child and 
woman labor would disgrace the statutes of 
the stone age. I do not mention here the hard 
lot of the Negro woman and the NegTo 
child — I have said white children and white 
women, and for the reason that all the baby 
mill slaves of the South are Avhite, and that 
the Democratic party, notwithstanding this, 
is the party of 'white supremacy,' the self- 
appointed guardian and protector of the 
Caucasian race. 

"But the Democratic party was ever mod- 
est, even to the very bribes it demanded for 
its betrayal of the South. It has made the 
statute books of the South black with legal- 
ized crimes against the working class. Its 
'vagrancy' and 'contract labor' laws are the 
soul of peonage and are enforced by as vile 
a set of petty judicial grafters and as brutal 
a force of thugs and gunmen as ever drew 
the breath of life. 

"Its land laws ai-e all in favor of the 
landlord, and Ireland in its darkest hours 
never suffered from a more degrading ten- 
antry than that upheld and conserved in the 
Southern States by the Democratic party; 
the Mexican system alone is comparable to 
it in the extortion it imposes on the tillers 
of the soil. 



OPINION 



71 



"Its whole theory of government is based 
on the aristocratic idea that all workers are 
born peons, all tillers of the soil born ten- 
ants; that the exploitation of labor is a 
'divine' and S'ested right/ against which to 
protest is blasphemy and to rebel a crime. 

"There is not a modern prison under its 
jurisdiction, and the treatment of the con- 
victs of the South, whether in the hideous 
mines of Alabama or on the frightful penal 
farms of Texas, has only been surpassed in 
atrocious cruelty by the rubber demons of 
the Congo and the Amazon." 

As if justifying this stinging arraignment 
Louisiana has been voting to extend the time 
limit of its "grandfather clause," a propo- 
sition which the New Orleans Times-Demo- 
crat says must enfranchise "the most illiter- 
ate white population in the Union." 



COMPL'IINT ^^ ^^^^ ^^*^ ^^"^^ complac- 
ency that Mr. Booker T. 
Washington has joined the ranks of those 
of us who for some time have been insisting 
that the Negro is not having a fair chance 
in America. In the November Century Mr. 
Washington makes the following statements: 

"Keduced to its lowest terms, the fact is 
that a large part of our racial troubles in 
the United States grows out of some attempt 
to pass and execute a law that will make 
and keep one man superior to another, 
whether he is intrinsically superior or 
not. * * • 

"If one is a stranger in a city, he does 
not know in what hotel he will be permitted 
to stay; he is not certain what seat he 
may occupy in the theatre, or whether he 
will be able to obtain a meal in a 
restaurant. * * * 

"The failure of most of the roads to do 
justice to the NegTo when he travels is the 
source of more bitterness than any one other 
matter of which I have any knowledge. * * * 

"The colored people are given half of a 
baggage car or half of a smoking car. In 
most cases the Negro portion of the car is 
poorly ventilated, poorly lighted and, above 
all, rarely kept clean; and then, to add to 
the colored man's discomfort, no matter how 
many colored women may be in the colored 
end of the car, nor how clean or how well 
educated these colored women may be, this 
car is made the headquarters for the news- 
boy. He spreads out his papers, his maga- 
zines, his candy and his cigai-s over two or 
three seats. White men are constantly com- 



ing into the car and almost invariably light 
cigars while in the colored coach, so that 
these women are required to ride in what is 
virtually a smoking car. • * • 

"He is unfairly treated when he has, as 
is often true in the country districts, either 
no school at all, or one with a term of no 
more than four or five months, taught in the 
wreck of a log cabin and by a teacher who 
is paid about half the price of a first-class 
convict. * * * 

"In Wilcox County, Ala., there are nearly 
11,000 black children and 2,000 white chil- 
dren of school age. Last year $3,569 of the 
public-school fund went for the education 
of the black children in that county, and 
$30,294 for the education of the white chil- 
dren; this, notwithstanding that there are 
five times as many Negro children as white. 
In other words, there was expended for the 
education of each Negro child in Wilcox 
County 33 cents, and for each white child 
$15. In the six counties surrounding and 
touching Wilcox County there are 55,000 
Negro children of school age. There was 
appropriated for their education, last year, 
from the public-school fund $40,000, while 
for the 19,622 white children in the same 
counties there Avas appropriated from the 
public fund $199,000. 

"There are few, if any, intelligent white 
people in the South, or anywhere else, who 
will claim that the Negro is receiving justice 
in these counties in the matter of the public- 
school fund. * * * 

"In Alabama 85 per cent, of the convicts 
are Negroes. The official records show that 
last year Alabama had turned into its treas- 
ury $1,085,854 from the labor of its con- 
victs. At least $900,000 of this came from 
Negro convicts, who were for the most part 
rented to the coal-mining companies in the 
northern part of the State. The result of 
this policy has been to get as many able- 
bodied convicts as possible into the mines, 
so that contractors might increase their 
profits. Alabama, of course, is not the only 
State that has yielded to the temptation to 
make money out of human misery. The 
point is, however, that while $900,000 is 
turned into the State treasury from Negro 
convict labor, to say nothing of Negro taxes, 
there came out of the State treasury, to pay 
Negro teachers, only $357,585. * • * 

"I do urge, in the interest of fair play 
for everybody, that a Negro who prepares 
himself in property, in intelligence and in 



72 



THE CRISIS 



character to cast a ballot, and desires to do 
so, should have the opportunity. • * • 

"Not a few cases have occurred where 
white people have blackened their faces and 
committed a crime, knowing that some Negro 
would be suspected and mobbed for it. In 
other cases it is known that where Negroes 
have committed crimes, innocent men have 
been lynched and the guilty ones have 
escaped and gone on committing more 
crimes. * * * 

"Within the last twelve months there have 
been seventy-one cases of lynching, nearly 
all of colored people. Only seventeen were 
charged with the crime of rape. Perhaps 
they are wrong to do so, but colored people 
in the South do not feel that innocence offers 
them security against lynching. They do 
feel, however, that the lynching habit tends 
to give greater security to the criminal, white 
or black. When ten millions of people feel 
that they are not sure of being fairly tried 
in a court of justice, when charged with 
crime, is it not natural that they should feel 
that they have not had a fair chance V 

The curious thing is that these same state- 
ments made by other people have caused 
both denials and threats. The denunciation 
of "Jim CroAv" cars has been laughed at, the 
statement in the Atlanta University publica- 
tions that the Negro is not being fairly 
treated in the distribution of school funds 
has been denied, and the editor of the Voice 
of the Negro was driven out of Atlanta for 
saying that white men blacken their faces 
to commit crime. In Mr. Washington's case 
the severeness of his accusations has had 
its edge taken off by his careful flattery 
of the South; but as the editor of the 
Century says: 

"The shadows upon the race which the 
head of Tuskegee glides over so lightly lie 
heavily upon ever-groAving numbers of in- 
tellectual colored people, who are moved but 
little by figures of increased Negro farm 
holdings, by statistics about Negro grocers, 
lawyers, physicians and teachers. Grateful 
as their hearts may be that they are to-day 
in possession of their own bodies, they re- 
gard the future with troubled eyes. 

"Looking upon their children they ask 
with panic fear if these are to be the chil- 
dren of the ghettos now being established, 
set apart as though leprous, with one avenue 
of advancement after another closed to them, 
denied the participation in government guar- 



anteed to them by law, and in some States 
put beyond the pale of law. They read that 
the American Bar Association has virtually 
drawn the color line. They read almost 
every week of men of their race burned at 
the stake. North and South; of their women 
done to death, ruthlessly shot out of sem- 
blance to their Maker, by the mobs that 
destroy them in the name of the purity of 
the white race! They read that even North- 
ern communities where the mob rules, like 
CoatesvUle, Penn., and Springfield, 111.,, 
once the very home of Lincoln, fail 
to punish those who defy the laws and slay 
the accused or the innocent with barbarities 
known in no other land. They see them- 
selves left out of account in the South by 
a leader of a new political party that boasts 
its desire for 'social justice.' If their chil- 
dren, deprived of school by the thousands, 
and depressed and ignorant, without a single 
influence to uplift, go wrong the imputed 
shame is that of the whole race. Every 
Negro criminal becomes a living indictment 
of his people. Bitterest of all, they cannot 
defend themselves against official wrong- 
doing, for having only a phantom ballot in 
their hands, the vilest sheriff is beyond their 
reach. Moreover, to the injury of the whole 
body politic, no adequate education through 
self-government is provided for them in this 
republic of Lincoln. 

"This is the reverse of the picture and its 
pathos is beyond description. What would 
Lincoln say? Would he, if re-embodied, de- 
clare that the NegTo, for all his progress, is 
having a fair chance, North or South, 
to-day?" 



JACK 
JOHNSON 



The hysteria to which the Cen- 
tury refers is illustrated in the 
case of Jack Johnson. The 
Southern white press has quite lost its head 
on the matter, and two ministers of the 
gospel have recommended lynching. Many 
colored people have joined in the hue and 
cry. 

The Star of Newport News, Va., for in- 
stance, says: 

"No Negro, who has any spark of man- 
hood, and who prayed and hoped that Jack 
Johnson would win his battle with Jim 
Jeffries, and clearly establish his title to the 
championship of pugilists, in his class, now 
feels that he did himself the slightest tinge 
of honor. 



OPINION 



73 



"They would gladly recall that prayer and 
that hope, when they read of his fool infat- 
uation for white women." 

And the New York World applauds the 
Negro race on the "promptness of the repu- 
diation of Johnson." 

Some papers, however, like the Forum, of 
Springfield, 111., are not satisfied simply to 
condemn : 

"We all know that it is not meet to 
argue that Jack Johnson is to be blamed for 
the sins of others. Johnson is probably 
wrong in not seeking female companionship 
among his own race, but the land is pre- 
sumed to be a free land and no white girl 
is forced to leave the large field occupied 
by the white race and come down to the 
meagre opportunities offered the average 
colored person unless it be infatuation. 

"Common sense Avill teach that, so the 
less said along those lines the better. We 
would all rather see the race types preserved 
and the lines drawn if it were possible, but 
the die was cast long ago and the end is 
not yet." 

The Muskogee Cimeter speaks right out 
with italics: 

"The Times-Democrat and the Phoenix 
both had spasms of indignation and out- 
raged virtue over the Jack Johnson incident, 
and while we feel in a way just as they do, 
yet we can't forget that white men have been, 
and are even now, using innocent and ignor- 
ant colored girls and women in the same 
way. White women are not responsible for 
the thousands of white Negroes, but white 
men are, and it's these fellows who should 
quit their devilment, because they are the 
white Jack Johnsons, and are just as de- 
testable in every way to decency as their 
black libertine brother and are no better." 

The TJ. B. F. Searchlight of Sedalia, Mo., 
adds: 

"We have always been well disposed 
toward Johnson as a boxer, and while we do 
not side with his recent escapade, will say 
that he is as good as the white man of his 
type. Were he not an invincible monarch 
of the prize ring all this noise would never 
have arisen." 

The Afro-American Ledger declares that 
"Johnson is the victim of race prejudice." 

And Mr. John E. Milholland has written 
to the Chicago Tribune: 

"The spectacle of two great American 
cities lashing themselves into the fury of a 
Georgia lynching mob over an alleged offense 



as deplorably common among whites as 
campaign lying is a record exhibition to this 
old gray world of canting hypocrisy; espe- 
cially on the part of a nation with 3,000,000 
mulattoes, quadroons and octoroons among 
its native-born population, and that has 
made wife swapping and divorce an estab- 
lished institution. As a display of mediaeval 
race prejudice, it tiptoes up to the Jew bait- 
ing of King John's time in old England. It 
disgraces the most backward civilization. It 
is contemptible beyond expression, and as 
much worse than Johnson's alleged offense 
as the Armenian massacres or Russian 
atrocities surpass in degree a barroom row 
down in Bathhouse John's bailiwick." 

The New York Call has, perhaps, the 
sharpest word : 

"While we are great admirers of oratorical 
declamation and quite ready to worship at 
the shrine of heaven-born eloquence, we 
think there is something lacking in the fol- 
lowing editorial effort of the New York 
Globe in regard to the downfall of Jack 
Johnson, the giant Negro pugilist : 

" 'There came a woman, just a weak, un- 
known woman, with no hard muscles, no 
money and no political pull. .And she went 
out to meet this Goliath. She was a mother. 
The conflict was brief. In a few days the 
giant lay stunned, bleeding, wondering what 
had struck him. His glory had departed. 
For he encountered a power more terrible 
than the whirlwind, fiercer than a volcano, 
more consuming than fire. He had en- 
countered a mother. An outraged mother is 
a thunderbolt. Of all the forces of nature 
she is the most irresistible, etc' 

"The Globe should have told us something 
more about this wonderful mother. W^hether 
her color was white or black, for instance, 
seems to us an important point, but per- 
haps it could not be elucidated without 
weakening the effect of the oratory. 

"We should like the opinion of the Globe, 
however, on the delicate point as to whether 
an 'outraged black mother' would be equally 
irresistible against, say, a white Southern 
gentleman, sah, who might have offended her 
in the same manner Johnson offended the 
girl above referred to. 

"Possibly the avenging power of a female 
Nemesis is not affected by such considera- 
tions, but we cannot shake off a vague feeling 
that the Globe's effort lacks color, so to 
speak." 



74 



THE CRISIS 



The answer to this comes from a colored 
paper, the Sumter (S. C.) Defender: 

"Not a single white rapist in South Caro- 
lina has met death for his crime through 
the orderly process of the courts or by 
lynching. 

''In Sumter County alone there have 
been, during the past ten years, five assaults 
by white men against Negro girls, and not a 
single one of the criminals was even brought 
to trial. 

''The last two, which happened just about 
a month ago, like the former three, will soon 
be forgotten." 



DOWN WITH THE ^- ^- ^'^ ^ colored paper 
BLACK MAN. ^^ South Africa, reports 

a recent meeting of white 
artisans in Kurgersdorp to restrict colored 
competition : 

"Advocate Stallard moved: 'That every 
measure tending to restrict the unfair com- 
petition with white, whether in the Union 
Parliament, Provincial Council or Munici- 
palities, shall receive our support.' He 
welcomed General Hertzog's proposal of 
segTegation, for the struggle for existence 
on the part of the white against the over- 
whelming majority of colored was becoming 
more and more severe. In many skilled 
trades white and colored people Avorked 
side by side, and were drawing practically 
equal wages. He deplored also that so much 
interest was evinced in the education of the 
colored children. He also condemned the 
action of the Kail way Servants' Union for 
admitting colored workers as a retrograde 
step. 

"Mr. George Mason, who seconded the 
above resolution, said that the colored people 
had already captured the Cape, but they 
must resist them in the Transvaal. The 
meeting further resolved to boycott Indian 
stores and all forms of cheap colored labor, 
as it was a suicidal policy on the part of the 
white population to support Indian stores. 

"Mr. Retief said that persons who support 
colored races were traitors to the future race 
of South Africa. 

"The colored man is evidently between the 
devil and the deep sea. He is condemned by 
the white labor party because it is alleged 
that he sells his labor cheaper than the white 
worker in the same trade. Indeed, that is 
the chief reason of the labor party's opposi- 
tion to the employing of colored labor on the 
Rand. He is also regarded as a menace to 



white workers because he gets the same 
wages as white men." 

On the other hand. Earl Grey, in an inter- 
view with the Transvaal Leader, said: 

"The real danger is the native question. 
This is a stupendous problem, before which 
all white men should unite. Every political 
question in this country should be regarded 
from the standpoint of how it will affect the 
strength and prosperity of the South African 
nation years hence. The growing dispro- 
portion between black and white is a matter 
which should engage the close attention of 
you all. You have in Johannesburg 300,000 
celibates who are being educated to believe 
that the white population regard them with 
fear. The compounds are further tending 
to "obliterate the tribal distinctions and the 
old order of things. Unless you can satisfy the 
natives that you have their well-being at 
heart, you will one day be called upon to 
pay a heavy penalty. It is not for me, a 
transient visitor, to suggest a policy. What- 
ever be your policy, it does, however, appear 
to me essential to adopt some course cal- 
culated to keep your government and the 
white population in close touch with the 
needs, grievances and aspirations of the 
native. Nothing would be more dangerous 
than an unsympathetic attitude, based on 
ignorance. Let the native realize that the 
white man not only has his best interest at 
heart, but really understands his require- 
ments, and an important step will have been 
made in the right direction." 

^ Arthur Farwell contributes a long and 
timely article in Musical America, discussing 
the causes of the wider attention being given 
by composers to the development of the 
Indian music in preference to that of the 
Negro. His inquiry continues: "Is the 
Negro music waiting its time and is it to 
hr.ve its period of development later ? Twelve 
years ago the Negro melody was regarded as 
highly poetic and appealing in quality. The 
NegTo music is peculiarly capable of char- 
acteristic and beautiful development. Where 
Negro legend and folklore have come to us 
in any convincing way, as in the 'Uncle 
Remus Tales,' they have proven a source of 
delight to ths white race, and have been 
quickly assimilated. No race prejudice has 
kept them out and no such prejudice, how- 
ever effective in 'society,' ever does close the 
interracial doors to those primal race verities 
which make for new vitality in art." 




EDITORIAL 




THE ELECTION. 

T is a source of deep 
gratification to The 
Crisis that William H. 
Taft and Theodore 
Roosevelt have been de- 
feated in their candi- 
dacy for the presidency of this nation. 
Mr. Taft, refusing to follow the foot- 
steps of the brave Abolitionist, his 
father, allowed the enemies of the Negro 
race in the South practically to dictate 
his policy toward black men. Theodore 
Roosevelt not only made and gloried 
in the wretched judicial lynching at 
Brownsville, but gave Negro disfran- 
chisement its greatest encouragement by 
disfranchising 1,000,000 colored voters 
in the councils of his new party of 
social progress. 

We are gratified in New York State 
at the victory of Sulzer over Straus; 
the former has been a consistent sym- 
pathizer with black folk, and the latter, 
on at least two critical occasions, has 
failed them. 

We are gratified that at least 100,000 
black votes went to swell the 6,000,000 
that called Woodrow Wilson to the 
presidency. We do not as Negroes con- 
ceal or attempt to conceal the risk in- 
volved in this action. We have helped call 
to power not simply a scholar and a 
gentleman, but with him and in his 
closest counsels all the Negro-hating, 
disfranchising and lynching South. 
With Woodrow Wilson there triumphs, 
too, Hoke Smith, Cole Blease, Jim 
Vardaman and Jeff Davis, and other 
enemies of democracy and decency. 
We know that such men, being con- 
sidered in this land the "social equals" 



of gentlemen and ladies, can come into 
close and continual contact with the 
new President, while colored men will 
meet him with the utmost difficulty. 
Why then did we vote for Mr. Wil- 
son? Because, first, we faced desper- 
ate alternatives, and because, secondly, 
Mr. Wilson's personality gives us hope 
that reactionary Southern sentiment 
will not control him. How long shall 
a man submit to insult and injury from 
alleged friends without protest, even if 
the protest involves the encouragement 
of erstwhile enemies? Moreover, can 
Mr. Wilson be fairly considered an 
enemy? Deliberately, and over his own 
signature, he has expressed : 

1. His "earnest wish to see justice 
done them [the colored people] in 
every matter; and not mere grudging 
justice, but justice executed with 
liberality and cordial good feeling." 

2. Their right "to be encouraged 
in every possible and proper way." 

3. "I want to assure them that 
should I become President of the United 
States they may count upon me for 
absolute fair dealing, for everything 
by which I could assist in advancing 
the interests of their race in the United 
States. ' ' 

In such a statement from an honor- 
able and sincere man there remains 
but one source of apprehension : How- 
far are the colored people going to be 
allowed a chance to convince Mr. 
Wilson of injustice ; how far may they 
indicate lines of encouragement, and 
how far will they be permitted to 
judge and speak as to their own 
interests ? 



76 



THE CRISIS 



In other words, it is quite possible 
that Mr. Wilson, surrounded by couh- 
selors who hate us, may never realize 
what we suffer, how we are discour- 
aged, and the hindrances to our advance. 
It will take, on Mr. Wilson's part, 
more than good will — it will demand 
active determination to know and re- 
ceive the truth, to get at the sources of 
Negro public opinion and sympathize 
with wrongs that only Negroes know, if 
he fulfils his own promises and the 
hopes of millions of men. 

As to whether, beyond Mr. Wilson's 
personal efforts, the Democratic party is 
prepared to become a real party of the 
people, and advance toward those great 
ideals of social democracy which every 
true patriot desires, is a question. Cer- 
tainly its first step will be to discard 
the Southern oligarchy and combine 
the liberal and progressive policies of 
North and South, white and black. 



THE TRUTH. 

HAT this nation and. this 
world needs is a Renais- 
sance of reverence for 
the truth. If The 
Crisis stands for one 
thing above others, it is 
emphasis of this fact, and it is here that 
we have to differ with some of our best 
friends. We are here to tell the essen- 
tial facts about the condition of the 
Negro in the United States. Not all 
the facts, of course — one can never tell 
everything about anything. Human 
communication must always involve 
some selection and emphasis. Never- 
theless, in such selection and emphasis 
there can be two attitudes as different 
as the poles. One attitude assumes that 
the truth ought to be as one person or 
race wants it and then proceeds to 
make the facts prove this thesis. The 
other attitude strives without undue 
assumption of any kind to show the 
true implication of the existing facts. 
The first attitude is that of nearly all 
the organs of public opinion in the 




United States on the Negro problem. 
They have assumed, and for the most 
part firmly believe, that the Negro is an 
undesirable race destined to eventual 
extinction of some kind. Every essen- 
tial fact and situation is therefore col- 
ored and grouped to support this thesis, 
and when stubborn facts appear that 
simply will not support this thesis there 
is almost complete silence. 

Few Americans, many Negroes, do 
not realize how widespread and dan- 
gerous this disregard of truth in rela- 
tion to the Negro has become and how 
terrible is its influence. Sir Harry 
Johnston, a great Englishman, was 
recently invited to furnish his views on 
the Negro to a popular American maga- 
zine. When these articles were written 
and seemed favorable to the black man 
the magazine paid for them and sup- 
pressed them. Jane Addams was asked 
to write on the Progressive party for 
McGlure's Magazine. Her defense of 
Negro rights was, with her consent, left 
out, and appeared in The Crisis last 
month. Charles Edward Stowe offered 
his ''Religion of Slavery" to the Out- 
look. It was returned not as untrue but 
' ' unwise. ' ' 

Many persons who know these things 
defend this attitude toward the truth. 
They say when matters are bad do not 
emphasize their badness, but seek the 
encouraging aspects. If the situation 
of the Negro is difficult strive to better 
it, but do not continually harp on the 
difficulties. The trouble with this atti- 
tude is that it assumes that everybody 
knows the truth; that everybody knows 
the terrible plight of the black man in 
America. But how do they knoM' it 
when the organs of public information 
are dumb? Would anybody ever 
suspect by reading the Outlook that 
educated property-holding Negroes are 
disfranchised? Would any future gen- 
eration dream by reading the Southern 
Workman that 5,000 Negroes had been 
murdered without trial during its ex- 
istence ? What right have we to assume 
intuitive and perfect knowledge of 



EDITORIAL 



77 



truth in this one problem, while in 
myriads of other human problems we 
bend every energy and strain every 
nerve to make the truth known to all? 
Is there not room in the nation for one 
organ devoted to a fair interpretation 
of the essential facts concerning the 
Negro? There certainly is, even if the 
silence and omissions of the public 
press were quite unconscious; but how 
much more is the need when the mis- 
representation is deliberate? In the 
recent Congress of Hygiene in Wash- 
ington there was sent from Philadelphia 
a chart alleging in detail the grossest 
and most unspeakable immorality 
against the whole Negro race. Colored 
folk led by F. H. M. Murray protested. 
The secretary immediately had the 
offensive lie withdrawn and said: "I 
am sorry the chart ever found a place 
there, but I should be more sorry if 
the colored people had not protested." 
Here is the attitude of the honest man: 
"I am sorry that colored Americans 
are treated unjustly, but I should be 
more sorry if they did not let the truth 
be known." 

Granted that the duty of chronicling 
ten mob murders a month, a dozen 
despicable insults and outrages, is not 
pleasant occupation, is the unpleasant- 
ness the fault of The Crisis or of the 
nation that perpetrates such dastardly 
outrages? "Why," said one of our 
critics, "if I should tell my white 
guests of the difficulties, rebuffs and 
discouragements of colored folk right 
here in Boston, they would go away 
and never visit us again. If, however, 
I tell how nicely the Negroes are 
getting on, they give money." Yes! 
And if your object is money you do 
right, but if your object is truth, then 
you should not only tell your visitors 
the truth but pursue them with it as 
they run. 

True it is that this high duty cannot 
always be followed. True it is that 
often we must sit dumb before the 
golden calf, but is not this the greater 




call for a voice to cry in the wilderness, 
for reiterated declaration that the way 
of the Lord is straight and not a wind- 
ing, crooked, cunning thing? 

THE ODD FELIiOWS. 

HE Grand United Order 
of Odd Fellows is so 
large and influential an 
organization among the 
colored people of Amer- 
ica that its internal 
affairs are of wide interest. As con- 
trasted with the Elks it represents the 
original English society, while the white 
order, the International Order of Odd 
Fellows, forms the spurious organiza- 
tion. The first lodge was set up by 
Peter Ogden, a Negro, March 4, 1843. 
The order had 4,000 members by 1868, 
and in 1904 reported 286,000. It has 
to-day 492,905 members. Not only has 
the order this large membership, but 
it OMTis something like two and a half 
million dollars' worth of property, and 
pays out through its subordinate lodges 
a half million dollars a year in sick 
and death benefits. It has a central 
governing body which handles nearly 
$200,000 a year. It is natural that in 
an organization like this there should 
come a severe test of Negro democracy 
in elections. At the last meeting in' 
Atlanta one man had, on the face of the 
returns, a majority of votes to elect 
him grand master. Some of the votes, 
however, were contested, and back of 
the effort to contest was a deep and wide- 
spread feeling that the candidate was 
not the proper man to be elected to the 
position. The result was that his elec- 
tion did not take place and the con- 
vention adjourned with the old officers 
holding over. This was accomplished, 
however, by adroit and high-handed 
methods which did not at all savor of 
democracy. On the other hand, the 
defeated candidate, contrary to expec- 
tation, neither withdrew from the order 
nor openly rebelled; but, while criticis- 
ing the methods by which his election 



78 



THE CRISIS 



was prevented, announced his determi- 
nation to run again two years hence. 
Here, then, is a problem of democracy 
put squarely before the colored people. 
It is not a new problem, but old as the 
hills. How, with democratic govern- 
ment, are you going to prevent the elec- 
tion to high office of men whom you 
think unworthy? There is but one way. 
Educate the voters. Any other method 
is dangerous and in the long run sui- 
cidal. If the colored Odd Fellows wish 
the worthiest of their fellows in com- 
mand over them they must train the 
rank and file to know what worth is 
and to select such worth intelligently. 
But, say many, does not this all Drove 
that if colored men generally voted 
throughout the South they would make 
such mistakes as they are making in 
their own organizations? Of course, it 
does; of course, they would make mis- 
takes; but human democracy is built on 
such mistakes. It is only through the 
training of mistaken action that worthy 
democratic government can be founded. 
It is only when the possible mistakes 
mean utter destruction of government 
that oligarchy is justifiable. In the 
present instance there is no such possi- 
bility, for even now the colored people 
in the black belt would vote with some 
intelligence, and if they had been as 
zealously trained to citizenship as they 
have to caste and crime they would 
be voting as intelligently as any class 
of workingmen in the republic. Mean- 
time they are beginning their training 
in democracy in such organizations as 
the Odd Fellows, and it behooves them 
to make that training tell. 

THE BLACK MOTHER. 

HE people of America, 
and especially the peo- 
ple of the Southern 
States, have felt so 
keen an appreciation of 
the qualities of mother- 
hood in the Negro that they have pro- 
posed erecting a statue in the National 
Capital to the black mammy. The 




black nurse of slavery days may receive 
the tribute of enduring bronze from the 
master class. 

But this appreciation of the black 
mammy is always of the foster mammy, 
not of the mother in her home, attend- 
ing to her own babies. And as the 
colored' mother has retreated to her 
own home, the master class has cried 
out against her. "She is thriftless 
and stupid," the white mother says, 
"when she refuses to nurse my baby 
and stays with her own. She is bring- 
ing her daughter up beyond her station 
when she trains her to be a teacher 
instead of sending her into my home 
to act as nursemaid to my little boy 
and girl. I will never enter her street, 
heaven forbid. A colored street is 
taboo, and she no longer deserves my 
approval when she refuses to leave 
her home and enter mine." 

Let us hope that the black mammy, 
for whom so many sentimental tears 
have been shed, has disappeared from 
American life. She existed under a 
false social system that deprived her 
of husband and child. Thomas Nelson 
Page, after — with wet eyelids — recount- 
ing the virtues of his mammy, declares 
petulantly that she did not care for 
her own children. Doubtless this was 
true. How could it have been other- 
wise? But just so far as it was true 
it was a perversion of motherhood. 

Let the present-day mammies suckle 
their own children. Let them walk in 
the sunshine with their own toddling- 
boys and girls and put their own 
sleepy little brothers and sisters to 
bed. As their girls grow to woman- 
hood, let them see to it that, if possi- 
ble, they do not enter domestic 
service in those homes where they 
are unprotected, and where their 
womanhood is not treated with respect. 
In the midst of immense difficulties, 
surrounded by caste, and hemmed in 
by restricted economic opportunity, let 
the colored mother of to-day build her 
own statue, and let it be the four 
walls of her own unsullied home. 





HERE are five races," said 
Emmy confidently. "The 
white or Caucasian, the 
A^ellow or Mongolian, the 
red or Indian, the brown 
or Malay, and the black 
or Negro." 
"Correct," nodded Miss Wenzel mechanic- 
ally. "Now to which of the five do you 
belong?" And then immediately Miss Wenzel 
reddened. 

Emmy hesitated. Not because hers was the 
only dark face in the crowded schoolroom, 
but because she was visualizing the pictures 
with which the geography had illustrated its 
information. She was not white, she knew 
that — nor had she almond eyes like the Chin- 
ese, nor the feathers which the Indian wore 
in his hair and which, of course, were to 
Emmy a racial characteristic. She regarded 
the color of her slim brown hands with 
interest — she had never thought of it before. 
The Malay was a horrid, ugly-looking thing 
with a ring in his nose. But he was brown, 
so she was, she supposed, really a Malay. 

And yet the Hottentot, chosen with careful 
nicety to represent the entire Negro race, had 
on the whole a better appearance. 

"I belong," she began tentatively, "to the 
black or Negro race." 

"Yes," said Miss Wenzel with a sigh of 
relief, for if Emmy had chosen to ally her- 
self with any other race except, of course, the 
white, how could she, teacher though she 
was, set her straight without embarrassment ? 
The recess bell rang and she dismissed them 
with a brief but thankful "You may pass." 
Emmy uttered a sigh of relief, too, as she 
entered the schoolyard. She had been ter- 
ribly near failing. 



"I was so seared," she breathed to little 
towheaded Mary Holborn. "Did you see 
what a long time I was answering? Guess 
Eunice Leeks thought for sure I'd fail and 
she'd get my place." 

"Yes, I guess she did," agreed Mary. "I'm 
so glad you didn't fail — but, oh, Emmy, 
didn't you mind?" 

Emmy looked up in astonishment from the 
oiange she was peeling. 

"Mind what ? Here, you can have the big- 
gest half. I don't like oranges anyAvay — 
sort of remind me of niter. Mind what, 
Mary?" 

"Why, saying you were black and" — she 
hesitated, her little freckled face getting 
pinker and pinker — "a Negro, and all that 
before the class." And then mistaking the 
look on Emmy's face, she hastened on. 
"Everybody in Plainville says all the time 
that j^ou're too nice and smart to be a — er — 
I mean, to be colored. And your dresses are 
so pretty, and your hair isn't all funny 
either." She seized one of Emmy's hands — 
an exquisite member, all bronze outside, and 
within a soft pinky white. 

"Oh, Emmy, don't you think if you 
scrubbed real hard you could get some of the 
brown off?" 

"But I don't want to," protested Emmy. 
"I guess my hands are as nice as yours, 
INIary Holborn. We're just the same, only 
5'ou're white and I'm brown. But I don't 
see any difference. Eunice Leeks' eyes are 
green and yours are blue, but you can both 
see." 

"Oh, well," said Mary Holborn, "if you 
don't mind " 

If she didn't mind — but why should she 
mind? 



80 



THE CRISIS 



"Why should I mind, Archie," she asked 
that faithful squire as they walked home in 
the afternoon through the pleasant "main" 
street. Archie had brought her home from 
school ever since she could remember. He 
was two years older than she; tall, strong 
and beautiful, and her final arbiter. 



If any of the boys in your class say anything 
to you, you let me know. I licked BUI 
Jennings the other day for calling me a 
'guiney.' Wish I were a good, sure-enough 
brown like you, and then everybody'd know 
just what I am." 

Archie's clear olive skin and aquiline fea- 




"AECHIE LOVES YOU, GIRL," SHE SAID TO THE FACE IN THE GLASS. 



Archie stopped to watch a spider. 

"See how he does it, Emmy! See him 
bring that thread over! Gee, if I could 
swing a bridge across the pond as easy as 
that! What d'you say? Why should you 
mind? Oh, I don't guess there's anything 
for us to mind about. It's white people, 
they're always minding— I don't know why. 



tures made his Negro ancestry difficult of 
belief. 

"But," persisted Emmy, "what difference 
does it make?" 

"Oh, I'll tell you some other time," he 
returned vaguely. "Can't you ask questions 
though? Look, it's going to rain. That 
means uncle won't need me in the field this 



EMMY 



81 



afternoon. See here, Emmy, bet I can let 
you run ahead while I count fifteen, and 
then beat you to your house. Want to try?" 

They reached the house none too soon, for 
the soft spring drizzle soon turned into 
gusty torrents. Archie was happy — he loved 
Emmy's house with the long, high rooms and 
the books and the queer foreign pictures. 
And Emmy had so many sensible playthings. 
Of course, a great big fellow of 13 
doesn't care for locomotives and blocks in 
the ordinary way, but when one is trying to 
work out how a bridge must be built over 
a lop-sided ravine, such things are by no 
means to be despised. When Mrs. Carrel, 
Emmy's mother, sent Celeste to tell the chil- 
dren to come to dinner, they raised such a 
protest that the kindly French woman finally 
set them a table in the sitting room, and left 
them to their own devices. 

"Don't you love little fresh green peas?" 
said Emmy ecstatically. "Oh, Archie, won't 
you tell me now what difference it makes 
whether you are white or colored?" She 
peered into the vegetable dish. "Do you 
suppose Celeste would give us some more 
peas? There's only about a spoonful left." 

"I don't believe she would," returned the 
boy, evading the important part of her ques- 
tion. "There were lots of them to start with, 
you know. Look, if you take up each pea 
separately on your fork — like that — they'll 
last longer. ' It's hard to do, too. Bet I can 
do it better than you." 

And in the exciting contest that followed 
both children forgot all about the "problem." 

II. 

'\/r ISS WENZEL sent for Emmy the next 
■^ ■■■ day. Gently but insistently, and 
altogether from a mistaken sense of duty, 
she tried to make the child see wherein her 
lot differed from that of her white school- 
mates. She felt herself that she hadn't suc- 
ceeded very well. Emmy, immaculate in a 
white frock, her bronze elfin face framed in 
its thick curling black hair, alert with inter- 
est, had listened very attentively. She had 
made no comments till toward the end. 

"Then because I'm brown," she had said, 
"I'm not as good as you." Emmy was at all 
times severely logical. 

"Well, I wouldn't — quite say that," stam- 
mered Miss Wenzel miserably. "You're 
really very nice, you know, especially nice 
for a colored girl, but — well, you're 
different." 



Emmy listened patiently. "I wish you'd 
tell me how, INliss Wenzel," she began. 
"Archie Ferrers is different, too, isn't he? 
And yet he's lots nicer than almost any of 
the boys in Plainville. And he's smart, you 
know. I guess he's pretty poor — I shouldn't 
like to be that — but my mother isn't poor, 
and she's handsome. I heard Celeste say 
so, and she has beautiful clothes. I think, 
Miss Wenzel, it must be rather nice to be 
different." 

It was at this point that Miss Wenzel had 
desisted and, tucking a little tissue-wrapped 
oblong into Emmy's hands, had sent her 
home. 

"I don't think I did any good," she told 
her sister wonderingly. "I couldn't make 
her see what being colored meant." 

"I don't see why you didn't leave her 
alone," said Hannah Wenzel testily. "I 
don't guess she'll meet with much prejudice 
if she stays here in central Pennsylvania. 
And if she goes away she'll meet plenty of 
people who'll make it their business to see 
that she understands what being colored 
means. Those things adjust themselves." 

"Not always," retorted Miss Wenzel, "and 
anyway, that child ought to know. She's got 
to have some of the wind taken out of her 
sails, some day, anyhow. Look how her 
mother dresses her. I suppose she does make 
pretty good money — I've heard that trans- 
lating pays well. Seems so funny for a 
colored woman to be able to speak and write 
a foreign language." She returned to her 
former complaint. 

"Of course it doesn't cost much to live 
here, but Emmy's clothes ! White frocks all 
last winter, and a long red coat — broadcloth 
it was, Hannah. And big bows on her hair — 
she has got pretty hair, I must say." 

"Oh, well," said Miss Hannah, "I suppose 
Celeste makes her clothes. I guess colored 
people want to look nice just as much as 
anybody else. I heard Mr. Holborn say 
Mrs. Carrel used to live in France ; I suppose 
that's where she got all her stylish ways." 

"Yes, just think of that," resumed Miss 
Wenzel vigorously, "a colored woman with 
a French maid. Though if it weren't for her 
skin you'd never tell by her actions what she 
was. It's the same way with that Archie 
Ferrers, too, looking for all the world like 
some foreigner. I must say I like colored 
people to look and act like what they are." 

She spoke the more bitterly because of her 
keen sense of failure. What she had meant 



82 



THE CRISIS 



to do "was to show Emmy kindly — oh, very 
kindly — her proper place, and then, using 
the object in the little tissue-wrapped parcel 
as a sort of text, to preach a sermon on 
humility "without aspiration. 

The tissue-"wrai3ped oblong proved to 
Emmy's interested eyes to contain a motto 
of Kobert Louis Stevenson, entitled: "A 
Task" — the phrases picked out in red and 
blue and gold, under glass and framed in 
passepartout. Everybody nowadays has one 
or more of such mottoes in his house, but 
the idea was new then to Plainville. The 
child read it through carefully as she passed 
by the lilac-scented "front j-ards.'' She read 
well for her age, albeit a trifle uneompre- 
hendingly. 

"To be honest, to be kind, to earn a little 
and to spend a little less;" — -"there," thought 
Emmy, "is a semi-colon^let's see — the semi- 
colon shows that the thought" — and she went 
on through the definition Miss Wenzel had 
given her, and returned happily to her motto : 

"To make upon the whole a family happier 
for his presence" — thus far the lettering was 
in blue. "To renounce when that shall be 
necessary and not be embittered" — this 
phrase was in gold. Then the rest went on 
in red : "To keep a few friends, but these 
without capitulation ; above all, on the same 
given condition to keep friends with him- 
self — here is a task for all that a man has 
of fortitude and delicac3^" 

"It's all about some man," she thought with 
a child's literalness. "Wonder why Miss 
Wenzel gave it to me? That big word, 
cap-it-u-la-tion" — she divided it off into syl- 
lables, doubtfully — "must mean to spell "with 
capitals I guess. I'll say it to Archie 
some time." 

But she thought it very kind of Miss 
Wenzel. And after she had shown it to her 
mother, she hung it up in the bay window 
of her little white room, where the sun struck 
it every morning. 

III. 

A FTERWARD Emmy always connected 
•^^^ the motto with the beginning of her 
own realization of what color might mean. 
It took her quite a while to find it out, but 
by the time she was ready to graduate from 
the high school she had come to recognize 
that the occasional impasse which she met 
now and then might generally be traced to 
color. This knowledge, however, far from 
embittering her, simply gave to her life 



keener zest. Of course she never met with 
any of the grosser forms of prejudice, and 
her personality was the kind to win her at 
least the respect and sometimes the wonder- 
ing admiration of her schoolmates. For 
unconsciously she made them see that she 
was perfectly satisfied with being colored. 
She could never understand why anyone 
should think she Avould want to be white. 

One day a girl — Elise Carter — asked her 
to let her copy her French verbs in the test 
they were to have later in the day. Emmy, 
who was both by nature and by necessity 
independent, refused bluntly. 

"Oh, don't be so mean, Emmy," Elise had 
wailed. She hesitated. "If you'll let me 
copy them— I'll— I tell you what I'll do, I'll 
see that you get invited to our club spread 
Friday afternoon," 

"Well, I guess you won't," Emmy had re- 
torted. "I'll probably be asked anyway. 
'Most everybody else has been invited 
already." 

Elise jeered. "And did you think as a 
matter of course that we'd ask you? Well, 
you have got something to learn." 

There was no mistaking the "you." 

Emmy took the blow pretty calmly for all 
its unexpectedness. "You mean," she said 
slowly, the blood showing darkly under the 
thin brown of her skin, "because I'm 
colored?" 

Elise hedged — she Avas a little frightened 
at such directness. 

"Oh, well, Emmy, you knoAv colored folks 
can't expect to have everj^thing we have, or 
if they do they must pay extra for it." 

"I — I see," said Emmy, stammering a little, 
as she always did Avhen she was angry. "I 
begin to see for the first time why you think 
it's so awful to be colored. It's because you 
think we are Avilling to be mean and sneaky 
and" — with a sudden drop to schoolgirl 
vernaculai' — "soup-y. Why, Elise Carter, I 
wouldn't be in your old club with girls 
like you for worlds." There was no mis- 
taking her sincerity. 

"That was the day." she confided to Archie 
a long time afterward, "that I learned the 
meaning of making friends Svithout capitu- 
lation.' Do you remember Miss Wenzel's 
motto, Archie?" 

He assured her he did. "And of course 
you know, Emmy, you were an awful brick 
to answer that Carter girl like that. Didn't 
you really Avant to go to the spread?" 



EMMY 



83 



"Not one bit," she told him vigorously, 
"after I found out why I hadn't been asked. 
And look, Archie, isn't it funnj-, just as soon 
as she wanted something she didn't care 
whether I was colored or not." 

Archie nodded. "They're all that way," he 
told her briefly. 

"And if I'd gone she'd have believed that 
all colored people were sort of — well, you 
know, 'meachin' — just like me. It's so 
odd the ignorant way in which they draw 
their conclusions. Why, I remember reading 
the most interesting article in a magazine — 
the Atlantic Motithly 1 think it was. A 
woman had written it and at this point she 
was condemning universal sutfrage. And all 
of a sudden, without any warning, she spoke 
of that 'fierce, silly, amiable creature, the 
uneducated Negro,' and — think of it, Archie 
— of 'his baser and sillier female.' It made 
me so angi-y. I've never forgotten it." 

Archie whistled. "That was pretty tough," 
he acknowledged. "I suppose the truth is," 
he went on smiling at her earnestness, "she 
has a colored cook who drinks." 

"That's just it," she returned emphatically. 
"She probably has. But, Archie, just think 
of all the colored people we've both seen here 
and over in Newtown, too; some of them 
just as poor and ignorant as they can be. 
But not one of them is fierce or base or 
silly enough for that to be considered his 
chief characteristic. I'll wager that woman 
never spoke to fifty colored people in her 
life. No, thank you, if that's what it means 
to belong to the 'superior race,' I'll come 
back, just as I am, to the fiftieth reincarna- 
tion." 

Archie sighed. "Oh, well, life is very sim- 
ple for 3^ou. You see, you've never been up 
against it like I've been. After all, you've 
had all you wanted practically — those girls 
even came around finally in the high school 
and asked you into their clubs and things. 
WhUe I- " he colored sensitively. 

"You see, this plagued — er — complexion of 
mine doesn't tell anybody what I am. At 
first — and all along, too, if I let them — fel- 
lows take me for a foreigner of some kind — 
Spanish or something, and they take me up 
haU-fellow-well-met. And then, if I let them 
know — I hate to feel I'm taking them in, you 
know, and besides that I can't help being 
curious to know what's going to happen " 

"What does happen?" interrupted Emmy, 
all interest. 

"Well, all sorts of thins's. You take that 



first summer just before I entered prepara- 
tory school. You remember I was working at 
that camp in Cottage City. All the waiters 
were fellows just like me, working to go to 
some college or other. At first I was just one 
of them — swam with them, played cards — oh, 
you know, regularly chummed with them. 
Well, the cook was a colored man — sure 
enough, colored you know — and one day one 
of the boys called him a — of course I couldn't 
tell you, Emmy, but he swore at him and 
called him a Nigger. And when I took up 
for him the fellow said — he was angry, 
Emmj^, and he said it as the worst insult 
he could think of — 'Anybody would think 
you had black blood in your veins, too.' 

"Anybody would think right," I told him. 

"Well?" asked Emmy. 

He shrugged his shoulders. "That was all 
there was to it. The fellows dropped me 
completely — left me to the company of the 
cook, who was all right enough as cooks go, 
I suppose, but he didn't want me any more 
than I Avanted him. And finally the man- 
ager came and told me he was sorry, but 
he guessed I'd have to go." He smiled 
grimly as at some unpleasant reminiscence. 

"What's the joke?" his listener wondered. 

"He also told me that I was the blankest 
kind of a blank fool — oh, you couldn't dream 
how he swore, Emmy. He said why didn't I 
leave well enough alone. 

"And don't you know that's the thought I've 
had ever since — why not leave well enough 
alone? — and not tell people what I am. I 
guess you're different from me," he broke 
off wistfully, noting her look of disapproval; 
"you're so complete and satisfied in your- 
self. Just being Emilie Carrel seems to be 
enough for you. But you just wait until 
color keeps you from the thing you want 
the most, and you'll see." 

"You needn't be so tragic," she commented 
succinctly. "Outside of that one time at Cot- 
tage City, it doesn't seem to have kept yo\i 
back." 

For Archie's progress had been miracu- 
lous. In the seven years in which he had 
been from home, one marvel after another 
had come his way. He had found lucrative 
work each summer, he had got through his 
preparatory school in three years, he had 
been graduated number six from one of the 
best technical schools in the countrj^ — and 
now he had a position. He was to work for 
one of the biggest engineering concerns in 
Philadelphia. 



84 



THE CRISIS 



This last bit of good fortune had dropped 
out of a clear sky. A guest at one of the 
hotels one summer had taken an interest in 
the handsome, willing bellboy and inquired 
into his history. Archie had hesitated at 
first, but finally, his eye alert for the first 
sign of dislike or superiority, he told the man 
of his Negro blood. 

"If he turns me down," he said to himself 
boyishly, "I'll never risk it again." 

But Mr. Robert Fallon — young, wealthy 
and quixotic — had become more interested 
than ever. 

"So it's all a gamble with you, isn't it? 
By George ! How exciting your life must be — 
now white and now black — standing between 
ambition and honor, what? Not that I don't 
think you're doing the right thing — it's no- 
body's confounded business anyway. Look 
here, when you get through look me up. I 
may be able to put you wise to sometliing. 
Here's my card. And say, mum's the word, 
and when you've made j'our pile you can 
wake some fine morning and find yourself 
famous simply by telling what you are. All 
rot, this beastly prejudice, I say." 

And when Archie had graduated, his new 
friend, true to his word, had gotten for him 
from his father a letter of introduction to 
Mr. Nicholas Fields in Philadelphia, and 
Archie was placed. Young Robert Fallon 
had gone laughing on his aimless, merry 
way. 

"Be sure you keep your mouth shut, 
Ferrers," was his only enjoinment. 

Archie, who at first had experienced some 
qualms, had finally completely acquiesced. 
For the few moments' talk with Mr. Fields 
had intoxicated him. The vision of work, 
plenty of it, his own chosen kind — and the 
opportunity to do it as a man — not an 
exception, but as a plain ordinary man 
among other men — was too much for him. 

"It was my big chance, Emmy," he told 
her one day. He was spending his brief 
vacation in Plainville, and the two, having 
talked themselves out on other things, had 
returned to their old absorbing topic. He 
went on a little pleadingly, for she had pro- 
tested. "I couldn't resist it. You don't know 
what it means to me. I don't care about 
being white in itself any more than you do^ — 
but I do care about a white man's chances. 
Don't let's talk about it any more though ; 
here it's the first week in September and I 
have to go the 15th. I may not be back 
till Christmas. I should hate to think that 



you — you were changed toward me, Emmy." 

"I'm not changed, Archie," she assured him 
gravely, "only somehow it makes me feel 
that you're different. I can't quite look up 
to you as I used. I don't like the idea of 
considering the end justified by the means." 

She was silent, watching the falling leaves 
flutter like golden butterflies against her 
white dress. As she stood there in the old- 
fashioned garden, she seemed to the boy's 
adoring eyes like some beautiful but inflexi- 
ble bronze goddess. 

"I couldn't expect you to look up to me, 
Emmy, as though I were on a pedestal," he 
began miserably, "but I do want you to re- 
spect me, because — oh, Emmy, don't you see? 
I love you very much and I hope you will — 
I want you to — oh, Emmy, couldn't you like 
me a little? I — I've never thought ever of 
anyone but you. I didn't mean to tell you 
all about this now — I meant to wait until I 
really was successful, and then come and lay 
it all at j^our beautiful feet. You're so lovely, 

Emmy. But if you despise me " he was 

verj' humble. 

For once in her calm young life Emmy 
was completely surprised. But she had to 
get to the root of things. "You mean," she 
faltered, "you mean you want" — she 
couldn't say it. 

"I mean I want you to marry me," he 
said, gaining courage from her confusion. 
"Oh, have I frightened you, Emmy, dearest 
— of course you couldn't like me well enough 
for that all in a heap — it's different with 
me. I've always loved you, Emmy. But if 
you'd only think about it." 

"Oh," siie breathed, "there's Celeste. Oh, 
Archie, I don't know, it's all so funny. And 
we're so young. I couldn't really tell any- 
thing about my feelings anyway — you know, 
I've never seen anybody but you." Then as 
his face clouded — "Oh, well, I guess even if 
I had I wouldn't like him any better. Yes, 
Celeste, we're coming in. Archie, mother 
says you're to have dinner with us every 
night you're here, if you can." 

There was no more said about the secret 
that Archie was keeping from Mr. Fields. 
There were too many other things to talk 
about — reasons why he had always loved 
Emmy; reasons why she couldn't be sure 
just j-et; reasons why, if she were sure, she 
couldn't say yes. 

Archie hung between high hope and 
despair, while Emmy, it must be confessed, 
enjoyed herself, albeit innocently enough, 



EMMY 



85 



and grew distractingly pretty. On the last 
day as they sat in the sitting room, gaily 
recounting childish episodes, Archie sud- 
denly asked her again. He was so grave and 
serious that she really became frightened. 

"Oh, Archie, I couldn't — I don't really 
want to. It's so lovely just being a girl. I 
think I do like you — of course I like you 
lots. But couldn't we just be friends and 
keep going on^so?" 

"No," he told her harshly, his face set 
and miserable; "no, we can't. And, Emmy — 
I'm not coming back any more — I couldn't 
stand it." His voice broke, he was fighting 
to keep back the hot bojdsh tears. After all 
he was only 21. "I'm sorry I troubled you,'' 
he said proudly. 

She looked at him pitifully. "I don't want 
you to go awaj'' forever, Archie," she said 
tremulously'. She made no effort to keep 
back the tears. "I've been so lonely this 
last year since I've been out of school — you 
can't think." 

He was down on his knees, his arms 
around her. "Emmy, Emmy, look up — are 
you crying for me, dear? Do you want me 
to come back — you do— you mean it? 
Emmy, you must love me, you do — a little." 
He kissed her slim fingers. 

"Are you going to marrj^ me? Look at 
me, Emmy — you are! Oh, Emmy, do you 
know I'm — I'm going to kiss you." 

The stage came lumbering up not long 
afterward, and bore him away to the train — 
triumphant and absolutely happy. 

"My heart," sang Emmy rapturously 
as she ran up the broad, old-fashioned stairs 
to her room — "my heart is like a singing 
bird." 

IV. 
' I ' HE year that followed seemed to her 
■*■ perfection. Archie's letters alone 
would have made it that. Emmy was quite 
sure that there had never been any other 
letters like them. She used to read them 
aloud to her mother. 

Not all of them, though, for some were 
too precious for any eye but her own. She 
used to pore over them alone in her room 
at night, planning to answer them with an 
abandon equal to his own, but always finally 
evolving the same shy, almost timid epistle, 
which never failed to awaken in her lover's 
breast a sense equally of amusement and 
reverence. Her shyness seemed to him the 
most exquisite thing in the world — so exquis- 
ite, indeed, that he almost wished it would 



never vanish, were it not that its very dis- 
appearance would be the measure of her 
trust in him. His own letters showed plainly 
his adoration. 

Only once had a letter of his caused a 
fleeting pang of misapprehension. He had 
been speaking of the persistent good fortune 
which had been his in Philadelphia. 

"You can't think how lucky I am any- 
way," the letter ran on. "The other day I 
was standing on the corner of Fourth and 
Chestnut Streets at noon — you ought to see 
Chestnut Street at 12 o'clock, Emmy — and 
someone came up, looked at me and said: 
'Well, if it, isn't Archie Ferrers !' And guess 
who it was, Emmy? Do you remember the 
Higginses who used to live over in Newtown ? 
I don't suppose you ever knew them, only 
they were so queer looking that you must 
recall them. They were all sorts of colors 
from black with 'good' hair to yellow with 
the red, kinky kmd. And then there was 
Maude, clearly a Higgins, and yet not look- 
ing like any of them, you know; perfectly 
white, Avith blue eyes and fair hair. Well, 
this was Maude, and, say, maybe she didn't 
look good. I couldn't tell you what she had 
on, but it was all right, and I was glad to 
take her over to the Reading Terminal and 
put her on a train to New York. 

"I guess you're wondering where my luck 
is in all this tale, but you wait. Just as we 
started up the stairs of the depot, whom 
should we run into but young Peter Fields, 
my boss's son and heir, you know. Really, 
I thought I'd faint, and then I remembered 
that Maude was whiter than he in looks, and 
that there was nothing to give me away. He 
wanted to talk to us, but I hurried her off 
to her train. You know, it's a queer thing, 
Emmj^; some girls are just naturally born 
stylish. Now there are both you and Maude 
Higgins, brought up from little things in a 
tiny inland town, and both of you able to 
give any of these city girls all sorts of odds 
in the matter of dressing." 

Emmy put the letter down, wondering 
what had made her grow so cold. 

"I wonder," she mused. She turned and 
looked in the glass to be confronted by a 
charming vision, slender — and dusky. 

"I am black," she thought, "but comely." 
She laughed to herself happily. "Archie 
loves you, girl," she said to the face in the 
glass, and put the little fear behind her. It 
met her insistently now and then, however, 
until the next week brought a letter begging 



86 



THE CRISIS 



her to get her mother to bring her to Phila- 
delphia for a week or so. 

"I can't get off till Thanksgiving, dearest, 
and I'm so lonely and disappointed. You 
know, I had looked forward so to spending 
the 15th of September with you — do you 
remember that date, sweetheart? I wouldn't 
have you come now in all this heat — you 
can't imagine how hot Philadelphia is, 
Emmy — but it's beautiful here in October. 
You'll love it, Emmy. It's such a big city — 
miles and miles of long, narrow streets, 
rather ugly, too, but all so interesting. 
You'll like Chestnut and Market Streets, 
■where the big shops are, and South 
Street, teeming with Jews and colored 
people, though there are more of these last 
on Lombard Street. You never dreamed of 
so many colored people, Emmy Carrel — or 
such kinds. 

"And then there are the parks and the 
theatres, and music and restaurants. And 
Broad Street late at night, all silent with 
gold, electric lights beckoning you on for 
miles and miles. Do you think your mother 
W7ill let me take you out by yourself, Emmy? 
You'd be willing, wouldn't you?" 

If Emmy needed more reassurance than 
that she received it when Archie, a month 
later, met her and her mother at Broad 
Street station in Philadelphia. The boy was 
radiant. Mrs. Carrel, too, put aside her 
usual reticence, and the three were in fine 
spirits by the time they reached the rooms 
which Archie had procured for them on 
€hristian Street. Once ensconced, the older 
woman announced her intention of taking 
•advantage of the stores. 

"I shall be shopping practically all day," 
she informed them. "I'll be so tired in the 
afternoons and evenings, Archie, that I'll 
have to get you to take my daughter off my 
hands." 

Her daughter was delighted, but not more 
transparently so than her appointed cavalier. 
He was overjoyed at the thought of playing 
host and of showing Emmy the delights of 
■city life. 

"By the time I've finished showing you 
one-fifth of what I've planned you'll give 
up the idea of waiting 'way till next October 
and marry me Christmas. Say, do it anyway, 
Emmy, won't you?" He waited tensely, but 
«he only shook her head. 

"Oh, I couldn't, Archie, and anyway you 
must show me first your wonderful city." 

They did manage to cover a great deal of 



ground, though their mutual absorption made 
its impression on them very doubtful. Some 
things though Emmy never forgot. There 
was a drive one wonderful, golden October 
afternoon along the Wissahiekon. Emmy, in 
her perfectly correct gxay suit and smart 
little gray hat, held the reins — in itself a 
sort of measure of Archie's devotion to her, 
for he was wild about horses. He sat beside 
her ecstatic, ringing all the changes from a 
boy's nonsense to the most mature kind of 
seriousness. And always he looked at her 
with his passionate though reverent eyes. 
They were very happy. 

There Avas some wonderful music, too, at 
the Academy. That was by accident though. 
For they had started for the theatre — had 
reached there in fact. The usher was taking 
the tickets. 

"This way, Emmy," said Archie. The 
usher looked up aimlessly, then, as his eyes 
traveled from the seeming young foreigner 
to the colored girl beside him, he flushed a 
little. 

"Is the young lady with you?" he whis- 
pered politely enough. But Emmy, engrossed 
in a dazzling vision in a pink decollete gown, 
would not in any event have heard him. 

"She is," responded Archie alertly. 
"What's the trouble, isn't to-night the 
17th?" 

The usher passed over this question with 
another — who had bought the tickets? 
Archie of course had, and told him so, 
frankly puzzled. 

"I see. Well, I'm sorry," the man said 
evenly, "but these seats are already occu- 
pied, and the rest of the floor is sold out 
besides. There's a mistake somewhere. Now 
if you'll take these tickets back to the ofiiee 
I can promise you they'll give you the best 
seats left in the balcony." 

"What's the matter?" asked Emmj', tear- 
ing her glance fropa the pink vision at last. 
"Oh, Archie, you're hurting my arm; don't 
hold it that tight. Why — why are we going 
away from the theatre ? Oh, Archie, are you 
sick? You're just as white!" 

"There was some mistake about the tick- 
ets," he got out, trying to keep his voice 
steady. "And a fellow in the crowd gave 
me an awful dig just then-, guess that's why 
I'm pale. I'm so sorry, Emmy — I was so 
stupid, it's all my fault." 

"What was the matter with the tickets?" 
she asked, incuriously. "That's the Bellevue- 
Stratford over there, isn't it? Then the 



SACKCLOTH AND ASHES 



87 



Academy of Music must be near here. See 
bow fast I'm learning? Let's go there; I've 
never heard a sj^mphony concert. And, 
Archie, I've always heard that the best way 
to hear big music like that is at a distance, 
so get gallery tickets." 

He obeyed her, fearful that if there were 
any trouble this time she might hear it. 
Emmy enjoyed it all thoroughly, wondering 
a little, however, at his silence. "I guess 
he's tired," she thouglit. She would have 
been amazed to know his thoughts as he 
( To he concluded in 



sat there staring moodily at the orchestra. 
"This damnation color business," he kept 
saying over and over. 

That night as they stood in the vestibule 
of the Christian Street house Emmy, for 
the first 'time, volunteered him a kiss. "Such 
a nice, tired boy," she said gently. After- 
ward he stood for a long time bareheaded on 
the steps looking at the closed door. Noth- 
ing he felt could crush him as much as that 
kiss had lifted him up. 
the January Crisis) 



SACKCLOTH AND ASHES 



(~\^ August 18, 1911, a black man was 
^^ burned to death by a mob in Coates- 
ville. Pa. On August 18, 1912, John Jay 
Chapman, an author of New York City, made 
an atoning pilgrimage to Coatesville. As 
he saj's : 

"I felt as if the whole country would be 
different if any one man did something in 
penance, and so I went to Coatesville and 
declared my intention of holding a prayer 
meeting to the various business men I could 
buttonhole." 

He found himself a marked and ostracized 
man in that guilty town. Nevertheless, the 
meeting was held. There were present Mr. 
Chapman, a friend from New York, an old 
colored woman and one citizen of Coates- 
ville, who was probably a spy. "We held 
the meeting," ]\Ir. Chapman says, "just as if 
there was a crowd, and I delivered my ad- 
dress. There was a church going on opposite 
to us, and people coming and going and 
gazing, and our glass-front windows revealed 
us like Daniel when he Avas commanded to 
open the windows and pray." 

We quote from Harper's Weeklij the 
words of Mr. Chapman's extraordinary 
speech : 

My Friends : We are met to commemo- 
rate the anniversary of one of the most dread- 
ful crimes in history — not for the purpose 
of condemning it, but to repent of our share 
in it. We do not start any agitation with 
regard to that particular crime. I under- 
stand that the attempt to prosecute the chief 
criminals has been made, and has entirely 
failed; because the whole community, and in 



a sense our whole people, are really involved 
in the guilt. The failure of the prosecution 
in this case — in all such cases — is only a 
proof of the magnitude of the guilt, and of 
the awful fact that every one shares in it. 

I will tell you why I am here : I will tell 
you what happened to me. When I read in 
the newspapers of August 14, a year ago,, 
about the burning alive of a human being — 
and of how a few desperate fiend-minded, 
men had been permitted to torture a man 
chained to an iron bedstead, burning alive, 
thrust back by pitchforks when he struggled 
out of it, while around about stood hun- 
dreds of well-dressed American citizens, both 
from the vicinity and from afar, coming on 
foot and in wagons, assembling on telephone 
call, as if by magic, silent, whether from 
terror or indifference — fascinated and im- 
potent, hundreds of persons watching this 
awful sight and making no attempt to stay 
the wickedness — and no one man among them 
all who was inspired to risk his life in an 
attempt to stop it, no one man to name the 
name of Christ, of humanity, of government^ 
as I read the newspaper accounts of the 
scene enacted here in Coatesville a year ago 
I seemed to get a glimpse into the uncon- 
scious soul of this country. I saw a seldom- 
revealed picture of the American heart and 
of the American nature. I seemed to be 
looking into the heart of the criminal — a cold 
thing, an awful thing, 

I said to myself: "I shall forget this, we 
shall all forget it; but it will be there. What 
I have seen is not an illusion. It is the 
truth. I have seen death in the heart of this- 



88 



THE CRISIS 



people." For to look at the agony of a fel- 
low being and remain aloof means death in 
the heart of the onlooker. Eeligious fanat- 
icism has sometimes lifted men to the frenzy 
of such cruelty, political passion has some- 
times done it, personal hatred might do it, 
the excitement of the amphitheater in the 
degenerate days of Roman luxury could do 
it. But here an audience chosen by chance 
in America has stood spellbound through an 
improvised auto-da-fe, irregular, illegal, hav- 
ing no religious significance, not sanctioned 
by custom, having no immediate provocation 
— the audience standing by merely in cold 
dislike, 

I saw during one moment something be- 
yond all argTament in the depth of its signifi- 
cance — you might call it the paralysis of the 
nerves about the heart in a people habitually 
and unconsciously given over to selfish aims, 
an ignorant people who kneAV not what spec- 
tacle they were providing, or what part they 
were playing in a judgment play which his- 
tory was exhibiting on that day. 

No theories about the race problem, no 
statistics, legislation, or mere educational 
endeavor, can quite meet the lack which that 
day revealed in the American people. For 
what we saw was death. The people stood 
like blighted things, like ghosts about 
Acheron, waiting for someone or something 
to determine their destiny for them. 

Whatever life itself is, that thing must be 
replenished in us. 

The opposite to hate is love, the opposite 
of cold is heat; what we need is love of God 
and reverence for human nature. For one 
moment I knew that I had seen our true 
need; and I was afraid that I should forget 
it and that I should go about framing argu- 
ments and agitations and starting schemes 
of education, when the need was deeper than 
education. And I became filled with one 
idea, that I must not forget what I had seen, 
and that I must do something to remember 
it. And I am here to-day chiefly that I may 
remember that vision. It seems fitting to 
come to this town where the crime occurred 
and hold a prayer meeting, so that our hearts 
may be turned to God through whom mercy 
may flow into us. 

Let me say one thing more about the 
whole matter. The subject we are dealing 
with is not local. The act, to be sure, took 
place at Coatesville and everyone looked to 
Coatesville to follow it up. Some months 
ago I asked a friend who lives not far from 



here something about this case, and about 
the expected prosecutions, and he replied 
that "it wasn't in his county," and that made 
me wonder whose county it was in. And 
it seemed to be in my county. I live on 
the Hudson River ; but I knew that this great 
wickedness that happened in Coatesville is 
not the wickedness of Coatesville nor of to- 
day. It is the wickedness of all America and 
of 300 years — the wickedness of the slave 
trade. All of us are tinctured by it. No 
one place, no special persons are to blame. 
A nation cannot practice a course of inhu- 
man crime for 300 years and then suddenly 
throw off the effects of it. Less than fifty 
years ago domestic slavery was abolished 
among us; and in one way and another 
the marks of that vice are in our faces. 
There is no country in Europe where the 
Coatesville tragedy or anything remotely like 
it could have been enacted — probably no 
country in the world. * * * 

Some one may say that you and I cannot 
repent because we did not do the act. But 
we are involved in it; we are involved in it. 
We are still looking on. Do you not see that 
this whole event is merely the last parable — 
the most vivid, the most terrible illustration 
that ever was given by man, or imagined by 
a Jewish prophet, of the relation between 
good and evil in this world, and of the rela- 
tion of men to one another? 

This whole matter has been a historic epi- 
sode ; but it is a part not only of our national 
history, but of the personal history of each 
one of us. With the great disease (slavery) 
came the climax (the war) ; and after the 
climax gradually began the cure, and in the 
process of cure comes now the knowledge of 
what the evil was. I say that our need is 
new life — and that books and resolutions will 
not save us, but only such disposition in our 
hearts and souls as will enable the new life, 
love, force, hope, virtue, which surround 
us always, to enter into us. 

This is the discovery that each man must 
make for himself— the discovery that what 
he really stands in need of he cannot get for 
himself, but must wait till God gives it to 
him. I have felt the impulse to come here 
to-day to testify to this truth. 

The occasion is not small; the occasion 
looks back on three centuries and embraces 
a hemisphere. Yet the occasion is small 
compared to the truth it leads us to. For 
this truth touches all ages and affects every 
soul in the world. 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 



BRANCHES. 
'' I ' HIS month Quiney, 111., is the new 
■*■ branch we welcome to membership. 
The association desires to call attention to 
the splendid work the Baltimore branch is 
doing in prosecuting segregation cases, sev- 
eral of which are now on the docket. Mr. 
W. Ashbie Hawkins, who was retained by 
the branch as attorney, has spent several 
months in the preparation of these cases and 
in conference with the association's counsel. 
Mr. Hawkins has neither asked nor received 
any compensation for his able ser\ices. 



PUBLICITY. 

A PRESS committee consisting of thirty 
•^^' members, Avith Mr. James F. Morton, 
Jr., of 62 Vesey Street, New York, as chair- 
man, has been organized to answer unfair 
editorials and articles on the Negro question 
appearing in newspapers and magazines. 



LEGAL REDRESS. 
A LETTER was sent Governor Donaghey 
•■^^" of Arkansas thanking him for commut- 
ing the sentence of Robert Armstrong. Men- 
tion of this case appeared in the last Crisis. 
In response to a letter to the governor of 
West Virginia, calling his attention to the 
article in the Independent of October 10, in 
regard to the lynching of Robert Johnson, 
the following reply was received from 
Governor Glasscock: 

I am in receipt of your favor of October 
16, and also copy of the Independent, of 
October 10, in relation to the recent lynching 
at Bluefield, in this State. You ask if the 
State of West Virginia intends to let the 
murder of Johnson go unavenged or without 
thorough investigation on the part of the 
State authorities. In reply I beg to say that 
I had started a company of militia to Prince- 
ton on the night of the lynching and had 
given orders to the troops to report at Prince- 
ton just as soon as I had information that 
the local authorities might not be able to 
control the situation and prevent the lynch- 
ing. However, before the troops could get 



there the lynching occurred. I then took the 
matter up with the prosecuting attorney and 
the judge of the Criminal Court of that 
county, and asked for a special grand jury 
to investigate the matter, and the grand jury 
after being in session for a week adjourned 
without returning any indictments. This, 
however, does not prevent future grand juries 
from returning indictments against the 
lynchers, and I assure you that I shall do 
everything within my power to see to it that 
the guilty parties are punished and have so 
notified the local authorities, and have also 
made arrangements with the legal authorities 
to furnish them with any funds necessary to 
make a proper investigation. 

I am as much opposed to lynching as your 
association can possibly be, and during my 
term of office have prevented four lynchings; 
on one occasion appearing myself in person 
with a company of militia and personally 
directing the movements of the troops. I 
am sure that if I had been informed a few 
hours earlier of the seriousness of the situa- 
tion I could have prevented this disgrace to 
the State. 



LANTERN SLIDE LECTURE. 

THE association will be glad to furnish 
the typewritten text of Dr. Du Bois's 
lecture before the Chicago conference for 
a nominal charge. The purpose of the lec- 
ture is to illustrate the color line to people 
who do not know about it. 

CHRISTMAS SEAL. 

RICHARD BROWN, JR., has designed 
a Christmas seal for us, which may 
be obtained in quantities from the national 
offices at the usual price. It will add a 
most attractive and appropriate touch to 
Christmas missives and gifts. 

MEETINGS. 

'T^HE assistant secretary addressed two 
-*• meetings in Boston on Sunday, Octo- 
ber 20, under the auspices of the Boston 
branch. On October 30 Miss Gruening ad- 
dressed a meeting of the N. Y. S. Colored 
Baptist convention at the Bethany Baptist 
Church in Brooklyn. 




THE CLUB MOVEMENT IN CALIFORNIA 



By A. W. HUNTON 




Women. 



T is interesting to note that, 
although far removed from 
the center of club activity, 
California is always well 
represented at the biennial 
conventiors of the National 
Association of Colored 
This evidence of the permanency 



of the club movement in that far-off State is 




MRS. KATHARXJSlii D. liLLMAN 

no surprising revelation to those who have 
kept pace with the gTowth of its club spirit 
and the multiplication of its club energies. 
No State has more strongly and clearly de- 



monstrated the blessing of a united woman- 
hood than California ; and this centralizing 
of interests has given these women an in- 
creased ability, opportunity and power which 
they have used to the glory and honor of 
clubwork throughout the country. 

There are tAvo elements that have con- 
tributed toward the divine fire of the Cali- 
fornia organization. First, the large num- 
ber of intelligent colored women in the State 
— some to the manor born; but the larger 
number by far daughters of the Eastern 
States; and secondly, the constant touch of 
the California women Avith the National 
Association of Colored Women. This touch 
led to the organization of their State Fed- 
eration and to the visit of Miss Elizabeth 
Carter during her administration as presi- 
dent of the National Association. This visit 
gave a large impetus to the club spirit of 
that State. 

In Oakland and San Francisco, two of 
the most cosmopolitan of American cities, 
where Mexican, Chinese, Greek, Italian, 
Portugaiese and Spanish women are freely 
mixed Avith their American sisters, Ave are 
told that colored Avonien stand out as repre- 
sentatives of a culture Avhieh manifests it- 
self most of all in their beautiful home life. 
Oakland has seA-eral Avide-aAvake clubs. The 
Art and Industrial Club conducts a first- 
class Avoman's exchange; the Mothers' 
Club has been the resource of needy mothers 
and children, and has maintained a chil- 
dren's home at great sacrifice to themselves. 
The Nautilus and Ne Plus Ultra are girls' 
clubs, Avorking Avith the advice and co-opera- 
tion of the Avomen. A home for the aged 
and infirm at Reulah, a fcAV miles from Oak- 
land, is a result of the efforts of a few 
earnest Avomen. This beautiful home has 



THE CLUB MOVEMENT IN CALIFORNIA 



91 



now been in operation for seven years, and 
its support and management are entirely in 
the hands of women. Says one who knows : 
^'Their annual meeting, where reports are 
made and accounts audited, always wins 
friends for that excellent institution." 

Sacramento is the home of the well-known 
Monday Club, that has had so much to do 
with the social uplift of that city; and San 
Jose has the Garden City, Victoria Earle 
Matthews and Mothers' Clubs. The San 
Jose clubs, under the direction of Mrs. Over- 
ton, have taken several prizes in the Cali- 
fornia pure food exhibit. 

At Bakerstield the women have purchased 
a site for a proposed clubhouse, while Mrs. 
AUensworth has donated to the club of the 
little NegTo town that bears her name a lot 
for a library. Both Riverside and beautiful 
Santa Monica have clubs whose reports show 
commendable work; the former being noted 
for its needlework and the latter for musi- 
cal development. Still another AVoman's 
Exchange Club is to be found at Redlands. 
Pasadena is the home of Mrs. Katherine 
Da\^s Tillman, to whom we are indebted for 
most of the information in this article. Mrs. 
Tillman is an ex-president of the State Fed- 
eration and has been verj^ active in the 
National Association, serving with gTeat effi- 
ciency for a term as chairman of the ways 
and means committee. 

Los Angeles is perhaps the greatest center 
of colored-club activity in California. The 
Sojourner Truth Club, the oldest and largest 
club in the city, has recently completed its 
purchase of a working-girls' home at a cost 



of nearly $3,000. The Day Nursery Asso- 
ciation also owns valuable property. Other 
organizations in Los Angeles are the Pro- 
gressive Woman's Club, the Married Ladies' 
Social and Art Club, the Helping Hand So- 
ciety and the Stickney Women's Christian 
Temperance Union. 

Not only is the clubwork of the colored 
women of California most admirable, but 
there has been a wealth of individual success, 
Mention has already been made of Mrs. Till- 
man, who is also a writer. In Oakland we 
find Madame Powell, a gifted pianist, and 
Mrs. S. Jeter Davis, a musician and reader. 
IMiss L. Simpson is managing milliner in 
the largest department store of Bakersiield, 
while her sister is bookkeeper and stenogra- 
pher for the same firm, as well as editor of 
the State paper. At Santa Monica is Mrs. 
Moxley, the leading caterer of the city and 
vice-president of the State Federation. 
Standing with Mrs. Tillman at Pasadena are 
Mrs, Kate Mann Baker and Mrs. B. L. 
Turner, who is author of the "Federation 
Cook Book." 

Mrs. Frances Elizabeth Hoggan, the noted 
sociological writer of London, Eng., has re- 
cently been the guest of the California club- 
women and made several addresses for them. 

Surely, then, in California, as in other 
States, the women are interpreting the true 
significance of the club movement and are 
facing with faithful affection, courage and 
strength its hardships. Measured by miles 
California is far away, but measured by the 
spirit and success of its clubwork it is 
at the center of things. 




AT THE DIXON CAB- WHEEL FOUNDRY, HOUSTON, TEX. 



92 



THE CRISIS 



"All the Negro women who are sentenced 
to serve on convict farms are not prostitutes 
and harlots. Hundreds of them are honest, 
self-respecting, law-abiding women who do 
not have the opportunity to prove their 
innocence in the courts, because, as a rule, 
they are too illiterate or too poverty- 
stricken to engage the assistance of an 
attorney. Only a few weeks ago, for ex- 
ample, a penniless but honest hard-working 
sei-^^ant girl who resides a few blocks from 
my home was about to be arrested through 
mistake by an officer who at heart is a 
just and honest man. 

"The girl protested her innocence so 
vigorously that she was arrested for resist- 
ing the officer, and was fined $40 and the 
cost of court, which was equivalent to a 
sentence of 86 days on the convict farm. 
The girl had no money with which to pay 
her fine and was about to be sent to the 



convict farm, when an aged colored friend 
of hers, who worked on a private farm near 
town, went to his white employer and in- 
duced him to pay the $43 fine. 

"Rather than go to the convict farm, 
the girl signed a contract with the white 
farmer, agTeeing to work on his farm for 
six months in payment for the $43, and 
also agreed to continue in his employ for 
another six months at a salary of $5 a 
month. This ease will give some idea of 
the horror and aversion with which honest 
Negro women, as well as the more disrepu- 
table classes of our females, look upon the 
convict farm. 

"The unfortunate servant girl to whom I 
have just referred, like many an honest, 
humble woman, has a comely face and figure. 
When such a woman is sent to a convict 
farm, God help her."— J. E. McCall in 
Sparks. 



Ll.tut.ljAuAu.VJ'.U^ 



"^M-H^^H-K-^^^M-^M-^M^ 



We have prepared for the holidays an exquisite little Christmas card in three 
colors on heavy bevelled edge cardboard as daintily done as our cover. It will, 
have two sweet brown baby faces and can be printed to your liking. We have 
designed some for those who wish to give THE CRISIS as a hoUday gift. 
: WRITEUS : : : : 



q The Music School Settlement for Colored 
People, in the city of New York, has se- 
cured permanent quarters at 257 W. 134th 
Street. The settlement is planning another 
great concert at Carnegie Hall, January 21. 
^ The Harriet Tubman Neighborhood Club 
of New York gave an interesting series 
of pantomimes from "Macbeth," "Othello" 
and the "Merchant of Venice," with Mr. 
Charles Burroughs and Mrs. Marie Jackson 
Stuart as readers. 



^.♦j.VJtM.VA*VAA*VA*Vi 



»;«^>>Jh.>*;««Jh>>^<h>Jh$4. 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, etc., 
of THE CRISIS, published monthly at 26 Vesey 
Street, New York, required by the Act of August 
24, 1912. 

Editor and Business Manager: W. E. B. Du Bois, 
26 Vesey Street, New York City. 

Publisher: The National Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People, 26 Vesey Street, New 
York City. 

Owners: The National Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People, a corporation. 

Known bondholders, mortgagees and other 
security holders, holding 1 per cent, or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages or other 
securities, none. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this first 
day of October, 1912. 

HATTIE KASBERG, 

Commissioner of Deeds, 

5 Beekman Street, 
[Seal] New York. 



Yes, Give Her a Phonograph 

She'll appreciate is as a Christmas gift. 
Then, too, you and the children will enjoy 
listening to the world's greatest artists sing 
and play. 

A phonograph in the home is an educa- 
tion and an inspiration; making it better, 
brighter and happier. 




This is a hornless machine and sells for 
$13.50. It is built of clear grained oak, 
plays either ten or twelve-inch records, has 
a noiseless spring motor, the latest attach- 
ments and improvements and in tonal repro- 
duction is the equal of many high-priced 
machines. 

Write for Catalog of Machines and Records 

A'''"'"'' ^pjg DUNBAR COMPANY 

26 Vesey Street New York City 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



93 



Publishers Page 



Business Matters 



ADVERTISING — Address all inquiries to Albon L. Holsey, Advertising Manager. 

CIRCULATION — The present circulation of THE CRISIS is 24,000 copies per month, in 
every State in the Union and in 26 foreign lands. Our circulation books are open to interested 
parties. 

AGENTS — THE CRISIS has at present a staff of 469 agents. Only agents who can furnish 
first-class references are desired 

LETTERS — Address business letters to W. E. B. Du Bois, Manager. Draw checks to 
THE CRISIS, 26 Vesey Street, New York City. 



Holiday Gift Hints 

SAVE MONEY SAVE TIME SAVE BOTHER 

Read These Suggestions Carefully 



CHRISTMAS GIFT HINTS 

With the approach of Christmas, 
we begin to think of gift-giving as a 
mark of respect to parents and rela- 
tives and a token of devotion to wife, 
husband, sweetheart and friend. 

Christmas is the one season in 
which the whole world has a common 
purpose — making some one else 
happy. Grown-ups and children find 
equal joy in gift-getting and gift- 
giving. All sorrows and disappoint- 
ments are forgotten when the glitter- 
ing Christmas tree unfolds its gift- 
laden branches to the expectant eyes 
of the giver and the receiver. 

The spirit of Christmas is a splen- 
did tribute to the memory of Him 
whose birthday it marks. He strove 
to make the world better and through 
goodness to give it happiness. So 
each Christmas leaves the world in a 
cheerful mood, with mind attuned to 
lofty plans and purposes for the 
approaching new year. 

Selecting gifts is a pleasure because 
the very selecting requires certain 
recollections of the tastes, ideals and 
characteristics of our friends which 
bring happy thoughts. 

Simplicity, economy and appro- 
priateness are embodied in the gifts 
selected and arranged on these pages 
for your convenience. The prices are 
right and your orders will have our 
most careful attention. 



An exchange between husband 
and wife. 
Safety razor, willow plume, watch, 
set of silverware, phonograph, silk 
suspenders, hand bag. 



An exchange between 
sweethearts. 

Silk suspenders, candy, hand bag, 
watch, toilet set, manicure set, and 
such books as ''Quest of the Silver 
Fleece" and "Souls of Black Folk," 
by Du Bois, or "Lyrics of Lowly 
Life," by Dunbar. 



An exchange between parents 
and grown-ups. 

Hosiery, safety razor, Hydegrade 
petticoat, set silverware, phonograph, 
hand bag, and such books as Pendle- 
ton's ''Narrative of the Negro," 
"Poems of Phyllis Wheatley," "Life 
of Harriet Beecher Stowe, " Oving- 
ton's "Half a Man," etc. 



An exchange between brother 
and sister. 

Hosiery, Hydegrade petticoat, wil- 
low plume, hand bag, manicure set, 
safety razor and such books as Du 
Bois' "Quest of the Silver Fleece" 
and "Souls of Black Folk," Miller's 
"Race Adjustment," Paynter's "Join- 
ing the Navy," Gibbon's "Flower o' 
the Peach," etc. 



Address all orders to 



THE DUNBAR COMPANY, 26 Vesey Street, NEW YORK 



Mention The Crisis. 



94 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Tke very Business Opportunity for ^vnich YOU 
kave teen looking may possiDiy be here on tnis page. 




AGENTS ITR-STi-t 

Selling the newly patented Brandt "Safe" Razor. 
Cf^K Has all the advantages of a good old-fashlonerl 
razor, yet made safe. Impossible to cut 
yourself. Its construction guarantees a 
lood shave. Has natural sliding stroke, 
with real shaving principles, not scraping. 
Big advantage over the "Hoe" shape safety 
razors No kinlss or adjustments to get out of 
Older. Can be stropped and honed as an 
ordinai-y razor. No more blade expense. Men 
buy it as soon as it is shown to them. Agents 
reaping harvest. Write quick for terms, prices 
and territory. 
R. V. BRANDT RAZOR CO., 42 Hudson St., New York 

SUNLIGHT AT NIGHT 

The Sun-Kay Mantle Incandescent Kerosene Burner 
bums common kerosene or coal oil. 100 candle- 
power light. Burns 95% air and only 5% oil. 
Burners fit all screw collar lamps. New improved 
1912 model. Odorless, noiseless, absolutely safe. 
Evei7 lamp guaranteed. Prices defy competition. 
Write for our agency proposition. 

SIMPLEX GASLIGHT CO. 
Dept. C. New York City, N. Y. 

AGENTS — Represent reliable house, 400 per 
cent, profit. Selling GORDON'S Photo Pillow 
Tops. High grade work. Easy sales. Big money. 
Samples and catalogue free. 
Luther Gordon Co. 206 N. Fifth Ave., Chicago, 111. 

AGENTS — Big money. Johnson-Flynn 
fight and other copyrighted Negro pic- 
tures. Portraits. Pillow Tops. Catalog 
FREE. 30 days' credit. 

PEOPLES PORTRAIT CO. 
Station U, Chicago, 111, 

MUTUAL TEACHERS' 
AGENCY 

Recommends teachers for schools; secures 
employment for teachers. Blanks and 
information furnished free on application. 

1335 T Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 



For 15 Cents 



I will send you one 
dozen cards with your 
name and address. For 30 cents I will 
send you one dozen cards and a handsome 
aluminum card case. 

Orders promptly filled. Address 
WM. THOMAS, Penman 
2720 W. Lake St. Chicago, 111. 

TYPEWRITERS 




Remingtons, Densmores, 

J 8 w 8 1 1 8, $11.50 each; 
Franklins, Postals, Ham- 
monds, $9 each. Bargains in 
Underwoods, Smiths and all 
others. All guaranteed. 

Supplies. 

Standard Typewriter 
Exchange 

23B Park Row, New York 




Reddick's World's Greatest 
Polishing Mitt 

A HOUSEHOLD WONDER 

PROTECTS THE HAND 
SAVES TIME AND LABOR 

Thousands of users say it's the best pol- 
isher on earth for silverware, signs, guns, 
harness, pianos, furniture, automobile bodies, 
lamps, etc., etc. 

Made — like cut — of special tanned lamb's 
wool on the hide, and has a protected tip. 

Same mitt 
adopted by the 
Pullman Com- 
pany, for por- 
ters' use on the 
best trains. 
A few large users: All Nixon & Zim- 
merman theatres; the Gladstone, Walton, 
Blenheim Hotels, Philadelphia; Traymore, 
Shelburne, Atlantic City; Knickerbocker, 
New York, and other hotels, garages and 
many ocean liners, yachts and a thousand 
households. 

Price 25 cents each postpaid. 
Special prices to large users. 
A splendid proposition for agents. It 
sells on sight. Write to-day for particulars. 

J. E. REDDICK 

1028 South 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

WANTED — A partner in a first-class hairdressing 
parlor, experienced, with $500 capital; or person 
to manage store for a year. A well-established 
business in Chicago. Address BUSINESS, care 
of CRISIS, 26 Vesey Street, New York. 

Start tke New Year Riglit 

Resolve to save all your extra money and begin 
that bank account. 

You cannot be more profitably employed than 
acting as agent for THE CRISIS. 

The sales from our magazine will insure you a 
snug little sum of extra money each month. For 
information address : 

Sales Manager of ThE CrISIS . 
26 Vesey Street Ne\v York 

UJS8 BATH TUB 

Costs littla, no plumbing, requires little water. 

Weight 15 pounds, and folds into small roll. 
Full length baths, far better than tin tubs. Laste for 

Write for special agents offer and deeorlption. Robtnbon 
1 Vance St. ,T<''<>'*''> O. Mfrs. TuiklBh Bath Cablnota. 



ARE YOU OOINO TO BUILD? 

If 80, I can design your cottage, bungalow, resi- 
dence, flat, hall or church to suit your ideas, and 
at the same time save you money and worry. No 
matter where located I can serve you satisfactorily. 
Write me your wants. 

M. A. POLLETT, Architect 
633 E. 45th Street Chicago, 111. 




Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



95 



UNDERTAKERS 



Telephone Columbus 3935 Open All Night 

RODNEY DADE & BROS. 

Undertakers and Embalmers 

Notary Public 

Funeral Parlor and Chapel Free. 

Liicensed Lady Embalmer Prompt Service 

266 West 53d Street New York, N. Y. 

Between Broadway and 8th Avenue 

P. and A. Phone, 4771 F. 

JOHN B. DAVIS 

iFunrral Sirwtor 

Shipping to All Parts a Specialty 

Carriages for Receptions 

Funeral Parlor and Chapel Free 

2154 Wylie Avenue Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A PLACE TO STOP 

HOTEL WASHINGTON 

First-class Service for First-class People 

3252 Wabash Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 

MOVING 

Telephone 4214 Greeley 

BRANIC'S EXPRESS 

PACKING AND SHIPPING 

ANDREW J. BRANIC 

Formerly Manager Virginia Transfer Company 

459 SEVENTH AVENUE New York City 

Orders by mail or 'phone receive promot attention 

TRUNKS STORED 25c. PER MONTH 

Official Expressman for the C. V. B. A. 

PERSONAL CARDS 



WIGINGTON & BELL 

Architects 

Karbach Block Omaha, Neb. 



Telephone 5277 Morningside 

DR. GERTRUDE E. CURTIS 

Surgeon Dentist 

188 West 135th Street, New York City 



LEGAL DIRECTORY 



Telephone 4885 Morningside 

DR. D. W. ONLEY 

Surgeon Dentist 

S. W. Cor. 133d St. and Lenox Ave., New York 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m., 1 to 9 p. m. 



Sundays by Appointment 



This is a ready reference of some of the 
best lawyers in the country. 

^^p^-If you are a lawyer and your name is 
not listed here you should write us at once. 

FRANKLIN W. WILLIAMS 

Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law 

Notary Public 

Real Estate Conveyancer 

206 Parrish Street Durham, N. C. 

J. DOUGLAS WETMORE 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 
5 Beekman Street (Temple Court) 
New York City 
Tel. 6222 Oortlandt Cable Address, Judowet 

Telephone 5574 Beekman Rooms 905 to 907 

WILFORD H. SMITH 

Lawyer 

150 Nassau Street New York City 

Uptown Office — 136 West 136th Street 

General Practice Notary Public 

WILLIAM R. MORRIS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

1020 Metropolitan Life Building 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Real Estate and Probate Matters a Specialty 

ROBERT B. BARCUS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Notary Public 

Office: Room 502, Eberly Block, Columbus, O. 

B. S. SMITH 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Offices: Suite 610, Sykes Block. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

GEORGE W. MITCHELL 

Attomey-at-Law 
908 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tel. 2026 Fort Hill Cable Address, Epben 

EDGAR P. BENJAMIN 

Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law 
34 SCHOOL STREET Boston, Mass. 



Telephone Connection 

W. Ashbie Hawkins George W. F. McMechen 

HAWKINS & McMECHEN 

Attomeys-at-Law 

21 East Saratoga Street Baltimore, Md. 

Mention The Crisis. 



96 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



SPECIAL FOR THE HOL ID AYS 

Five Remarkable Books by Wm. George Jordan, Formerly Editor of the 

"Saturday Evening Post" 

"Kingship of Self Control." Ornamental covers, ink and gold, reduced from 35c. to 30c. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

The Kingship of Self Control. The Greatness of Simplicity. 

The Crimes of the Tongue. Living Life Over Again. 

The Red Tape of Duty. Syndicating Our Sorrows. « 

The Supreme Charity of the World. The Revelation of Reserve Power. 

Worry, the Great American Disease. 

OTHER BOOKS BY JORDAN: 

"The Power of Purpose" $ -35 I "Little Problems of Married Life".. $1.00 

"Crown of Individuality" 1-00 , By mail 1.10 

Bv mail 1.10 i (Decorated in two colors; 256 pages) 

(Decorated in* two colors; 256 pages) II "The Majesty of Calmness" 35 

Order from FRANCES L. DUSENBERRY (Book Sbop), 27 East Randolph Street, 
Marshall Field & Co. Block, Chicago, HI. 




OF INTEREST TO 
VOCAL STUDENTS 



Tone Placing and 
Voice Development 

Practical method of singing for 
daily practice, based upon artistic 
principles, together with a care- 
fully prepared number of exercises, 
forming a comprehensive, progres- 
sive and self-explained course in 
voice building, which constitute the 
technical side of the vocal art. 
Comment from the world-renowned conductor of 
the Paulist Choir of Chicago, 111., whose choir has 
just received the first prize awarded at the Sing- 
ing Contest held in Paris on May 25, 1912: 
"Dear Mr. Tinsley: 

"I take great pleasure in commending your 
very useful and succinctly written book on 'Tone- 
Placing and Voice-Development.' Your own appre- 
ciation of the psychology of singing and the funda- 
mental principles of the art you have cleverly re- 
duced to a simple system. 

"Cordially yours, 
"Father WILLIAM J. FINN, C. S. P., 
"Director Paulist Choristers of Chicago." 
Price $1. Address the publisher: 

PEDRO T. TINSLEY 

6448 Drexel Avenue CHICAGO, ILL. 

or Clayton F. Summy, 64-66 E. Van Buren St. 
(Steinway Hall Bldg.), and Lyon & Healy, Adams 
and Wabash Sts., Chicago, 111. 



O I 

R 

B 

i 

R 

t 

H 

d 

A 

y I 

SI 



A NARRATIVE of 
THE NEGRO 

By Mrs. Leila Amos Pendleton 

A comprehensive history of the 
Negro race from the earliest period 
to the present time; told in pleas- 
ing narrative style; may be read 
and understood by children. Bound 
in cloth and illustrated. 

Address: Price $1.50 

MRS. L. A. PENDLETON 



1824 nth Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 



o 
R 

C 
h 
R 
i 

s 

t 

M 
a 

s 



A Race Bet^veen T^^o Straits 

A Ne-w Book on Labor Unions and Bad 

Politicians by R.ev. vJ. B. Reed, 

Newport, R. I. 

The book shows that labor unions are the 
greatest menace to-day to American man- 
hood and freedom. Read the book and 
know the truth. Price 2Sc. Sold by The 
Crisis. Agents wanted everywhere. Write 

Rev. \V. B. REED, Newport, R. I. 



Holiday Books 

These books may be ordered now to be 
delivered on Christmas morning. By mail 
at the following prices: 

Quest of the Silver Fleece, DuBois $1.50 

Souls of Black Folk, DuBois 1.35 

Race Adjustment, Miller 2.15 

House Behind the Cedars, Chesnutt... 1.65 

Flower o' the Peach, Gibbon 1.45 

Joining the Navy, Paynter 1.00 

Lyrics of Lowly Life, Dunbar 1.40 

Poems of Phyllis Wheatley 1.10 

Half-a-Man, Ovington 1.12 

Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, by her 

son and grandson 1.G5 

Negro Explorer at North Pole, Henson 1.10 

Up from Slavery, Washington 1.65 

Autobiography of an ex-Colored Man. 1.40 

The Dunbar Company 

26 Vesey Street New York 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



97 



Agricultural and 
Mechanical College 

Open all the year round. For 
males only. Strong, practical and 
theoretical courses leading to 
degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture, and Bachelor of 
Science in Mechanics. Board, 
lodging and tuition, $7.00 per 
month. Write to-day for catalog 
or for further information. 



JAS. B. DUDLEY, President 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



^VM.H. HACKNEY 



TENOR 



Binghamton Normal, Industrial and 
Agricultural Institute 

' BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

Courses offered: Academic, Trades, Agri- 
culture, Music and Band Instruction for 
boys. A course in Dining Room work 
and the Art of Serving is offered to men 
and women in addition to other studies. 
Arrangements can be made for anxious 
students to work out part expenses. 
Attached department for boys and girls 
between the ages of ten to fifteen years. 

For terms and information address 

FRED C. HAZEL, President 
(Graduate Hampton Institute) 
Campus and Form contains 105 acres overlooking 
the Chenango and Susquehanna Rivers. 

Biggers Business and 
Inaustrial College 

(An Institution of Modern Methods) 
Prepares Teachers, Stenographers, Book- 
keepers and Clerks; grants certificates and 
diplomas and secures positions for all per- 
sons completing courses through mail or in 
our Home College. Write for particulars. 
Address: 
C. A. BIGGERS, A. M., President 
1202 Frederick St. Houston Texas. 



Oratorio, Concert, Recital, Pupils. 
Large repertoire. Engagements 
accepted. Special inaucements to 
College Atnletic Associations 



Studio — 514 East 33d Street, Ckicago, 111. 

Atlanta University 

Studies of the 

Negro Problems 

16 Monographs. Sold Separately. 

Address : 

A. G. DILL 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga. 



Send your boy South — the land of Opportunity. 
The Prairie View State Normal and Industrial 
College of Texas. E. L. Blackshear, Principal. W. 
C. EoUins, Treasurer. Largest State institution for 
colored youth in the United States. Excellent 
literary, scientific and industrial advantages. Ex- 
penses low — ideal climate — new buildings. 

For particulars address: 

H. J. MASON, Secretary 
Prairie View, Waller County, Texas 



The Curse of Race Prejudice 

By James F. Morton, Jr., A. M. 

An aggressive exposure by an Anglo-Saxon 
champion of equal rights. Startling facts and crush- 
ing arguments. Fascinating reading. A necessity 
for clear understanding and up-to-date propaganda. 
Belongs in the library of every friend of social 
justice. Price 25 cents. Send orders to 

JAMES F. MORTON, JR. 

244 West 143d Street New York, N. Y. 



PATENTS 



L. H. LATIMER 

MECHANICAI. AND ELECTBICAI. ENGINEEB 

and 

SOLICITOE OF PATENTS 

65 John Street New Tork 

Inventions Perfected, Models and Experi- 
mental Machines Designed and Constructed. 
Technical Translation's. 

Boom 804 



Telephone S43 John 

Mention The Crisis. 



98 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 

SCHOOL OF BEAUTY CULTURE AND HAIR DRESSING 



KELSEY'S 



328 Iienoz Avenne 

Telephone Harlem 1896 

126th Street, NEW YOBK. 



Manicuring, Shampooing, Hair Dressing, Marcel Wav- 
ing, Facial and Body Massage, Hair Making, Chiropody, 
etc., scientifically taught. Unlimited practice in parlor 
day and night. Pupils taught at home, If desired. 
Diplomas. Special Summer Course, $7.50 up. Send for 
booklet. Mme. A. Carter Eelsey, Gen'l Intr.; Dr. Samuel 
A. Eelsey, Chiropodist, President and Gen'l Manager. 





So.East(6r. State ^ 36 Place 

CH ICAGO." rtlL. 




COMMERCIAL 
BANKING - 
SAVING 
1GCDUNT8- 
REAL ESTATE- 
ESTATES 
MANAGED- 
MORTGAGE 
LOANS 



^afe I/eposit \SjH,s 

$3.92 Per YeaiO 



The Paul Laurence Dunbar Calendar 

For 1913— Ready December 1st 
It is a seven-page calendar, with an autographed 
portrait of the author on the cover. The inside 
pages contain six illustrations, around which are 
appropriate verses. 

/i^These calendars are sold for the benefit of the 
Wilmington (Delaware) Settlement House. 
Address Price 35 cents, postpaid 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY 
26 Vesey Street New York City 

HOWARD UNIVERSITY 

PENNANTS 

12x36 for 60 cents; 8x25 for 35 cents. 
Lincoln University, 8x25 for 35 cents. 
Howard University seal watch fobs of solid 
bronze or German silver, 60 cents. Postpaid. 

Address: WINTHROP & TAYLOR 
516 T Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 



We Will Start You In a 
Paying Business for $10.00 

We are importers and manufacturers of 
natural human hair and all kinds of human 
hair goods. 

On an investment of $10.00 we will ship 
you enough goods to clear from $20.00 
to $30.00, and show you how to conduct 
a profitable business. 

Hairdressing taught by capable instruc- 
tors. Terms from $5.00 to $50.00. Posi- 
tions guaranteed our graduates. Address 

C. S. STARK, Manufacturer 
54 Oakwood Avenue Orange, N. J. 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



99 



THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE 



Offices: 26 Vesey Street, New York. 



Incorporated May 25, 191 1 



orriCERS 



National President — Mr. Moorfleld, Storey, Boston, 

Mass. 
Vice-Presidents — 

Kev. John Haynes Holmes, New York. 

Mr. John E. MilhoUand, New York. 

Bishop Alexander Walters, New York. 

Eev. Garnet K. Waller, Baltimore, Md. 

Miss Mary White Ovington, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Chairman of the Board of Directors — 
Mr. Oswald Garrison Villard, New York. 

Treasurer — Mr. Walter E. Sachs, New York. 

Director of Publicity and Research — 
Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois, New York. 

Secretary — Miss May Childs Nerney, Brooklyn, N. T. 

Assistant Secretary — Miss Martha Gruening, New 
York. 



This year we shall attack segregation laws, investigate lynching, 
defend the Negro in his civil rights, protest unceasingly against 
race discrimination. 

We want 2,000 members January 1, 1913. Watch the clock! 



OUR 


aooo 


1500HH 


T - r\*Vi mjjt W500 


CLOCK 


X^ lA J^^'*^^ 788' November 10, 1912 

^^^^ JOIN US 

lOOO 



MEMBERSHIP BLANK 

I hereby accept membership in the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE. 

Please find enclosed dollars and enter my name as a member in Class 

paying $ a year, and send me THE CRISIS. 

Name 



Address 

Class 1. Life Members, paying $500. 
Class 2. Donors, paying $100 per year. 
Class 3. Sustaining Members, paying $25 
per year. 



Class 4. Contributing Members, paying $10, 

$5 or $2 per year. 
Class 5. Associate Members, paying $1 per 

year. 



The subscription to THE CRISIS is $1 extra, except to members pasmig $5 or more, who 
signify their wish that $1 of their dues be considered a CRISIS subscription. 

All members in good standing have the privilege of attending and voting at the Annual 
Conference of the Association. 

PLEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT 
OF COLORED PEOPLE, 26 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

Mention The Crisu. 



100 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



r 



TELLING A STORY 

To friends who know you, may be easy, but "putting one over" to 
strangers is quite different. 

Telling a busy, business man about your services or your merchandise is still less 
a "cinch," for he hears the same story every day a dozen or more times. 

A clever speaker, before a sleepy or hostile audience, puts a good, stiff punch 
into his very first remark. This "knocks 'em off their feet" and they listen. 

Your business letters may be good, but if they lack the "punch" they won't "pull." 
Correct business stationery is the "punch" that hits the busy man "right in the eye" 
and makes him read your letter. 

We'll show you the sort of stationery we create, if you write us. 

The printed things from our shop are the result of brains, experience and correct 
typing. 

ROBERT N. WOOD, Printing and Engraving 

202 EAST 99th STREET NEW YORK 

'Phone 6667 Lenox 



HALF A MAN 



J9 



The Status of the Negro in New York 

By 

MARY WHITE OVINGTON 

With a foreword by Dr. Franz Boas of Columbia University 

Chapter L How the colored people won their civil and political rights. 

Chapters II. and III. The Negro tenement and the life of the poor. 

Chapters IV. and V. How the colored man earns his living, w^ith a full descrip- 
tion of the professions; the ministry, the stage. 

Chapter VI. The colored woman, her discouragements and successes. 

Chapter VII. A vivid description of the life of the well-to-do Negroes. 

Chapter VIII. The Negro in politics in New York. 

Chapter IX. The author's personal views on the race question. 

Price $L00; by mail, $1.12. 

LONGMANS, GREEN & CO., Publishers, NEW YORK 

This book is for sale in the Book Department of The Crisis, 26 Vesey St., N. Y. 

Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



101 



^5 



Brings Oliver 
Typewriter 

Send $5 for The Oliver Typewriter— the 
machine will come a-flying. The newest 
Model — No. 5 — the regular $100 machine — 
with no extra charge for Printype. 

For the price of a good fountain pen you 
secure the World's Greatest Typewriter. You 
can pay the balance at the rate of 17 cents a 
day. 

This irresistible "$5 offer" is sweeping every- 
thing before it. The era of universal typc- 
zuriting is coming. The triumph of the type- 
writer over primitive pen-and-ink has been 
brought about by the same machine that 
introduced visible writing. 

TB« *- 

The Standard Visible Writer 

This is the typewriter whose high efficiency has 
made it the choice of the greatest firms and cor- 
porations. It is the simplest of all standard type- 
writers, yet the swiftest and by far the most 
versatile. The moving parts work freely in a solid 
metal framework, making the machine so strong 
that the hardest usage has no effect upon it. 



No Extra Charge for 
Trintypc' 



«<i 



k» 



Most people prefer to have the machine equipped 
to write in Printype. This beautiful type is obtain- 
able only on The Oliver Typewriter. 

It is the greatest style improvement ever evolved 
for typewriters — the most easily read type in exist- 
ence — the type which conforms to that in universal 
use on the world's printing presses! 

Win Success with tlie Oliver ! 

The Oliver Typewriter aids success-seekers in a 
multitude of ways. The real-life stories of achieve- 
ment that center around it would fill volumes. 

No matter what your work may be — in office, 
store, shop or home — The Oliver Typewriter will 
prove itself a great convenience and an actual 
money-maker. 

It stands for order and system and success. It is 
the visible evidence of the progressiveness of its 
owner. Young people with brains, ambition and 
Oliver Typewriters are succeeding everywhere. Can 
you afford to let $5 stand between you and success? 
Send lor Special Circular and Art Catalog i 
Full details regarding the 
Oliver Easy-Purchase-Plan, 
beautiful catalog and a 
specimen letter written in 
Printype will be sent you 
on recjuest. 

Let this $5 offer awaken 
you to your need of The 
Oliver Typewriter and the 
ease with which you may 
own it. 

Remember — $S only and on 
comes The Oliver Typewriter ! Sales Department 

(206) 

The Oliver Typewriter Company 

310 Broadway NEW YORK, N. Y. 




^O'^; 




-4 



THIS DIRECTORY shows the 
remarkable organization of the 
Colored people of New Orleans. 
It is published through the co-opera- 
tion of the Colored business community, 
and has the confidence and good will 
of the entire population. 

The Colored population of this 
Southern metropolis is nearly one 
hundred thousand. These people spend 
millions of dollars annually for the 
comforts and necessities of life. Their 
patronage is worth having. 

Woods' Directory is identified with 
the commercial and industrial advance- 
ment of the Colored people of New 
Orleans, and is the best medium through 
which this trade can be effectively 
reached. Honest advertising will be 
accepted for the 1913 edition up to 
December 20, 1912. Rates are very 
low. Ask for proof of the free dis- 
tribution of the entire issue of 5,000 
copies. 



Allen T. Woods 

Publisher 

1823 Seventh Street 
Ne-w Orleans, La. 




Mention The Crisis. 



102 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



HYDEGR ADE PETTICOATS 

Fitted with tlie Newton Adjustable Top 

Every woman knows and appreciates the sur- 
passing quality of Hydegrade Fabrics, but the 
Newton Adjustable Top is new. It adjusts 
instantly to any size waist, eliminating all 
wrinkles and folds and affording a perfect fit 
around the waist and hips. 

By combining expert workmanship with the 
comforts of this adjustable top and the quality 
of Hydegrade fabrics you get the very most in 
petticoat value. 

All sizes; in black, navy, gray, green, brown, 
champagne and Copenhagen. 

Price $1.25. Postpaid. 

Address : 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY 

26 Vesey St. New York 




When Bvf ing Hair Goods 

ask your dealer for Green's Creole hair. It 
not only keeps the crimp, but is the best on 
the market. If your dealer cannot furnish 
you with our goods, send your order direct 
to us and we will be pleased to fill it. 
Switches, puffs, pompadours, transformations 
and anything pertaining to hair goods. 

1-stem Switches $ .50 

i/^-ounce 3-stem Switches 75 

^-ounce 3-stem Switches 1.00 

22-inch Switches 1.50 

24-inch Switches 2.00 

26-inch Switches 2.50 

28-inch Switches 3.00 

These prices not including gray hair. 

Our workmanship is the best, and we feel 
sure that after using our grade of goods, we 
will have you as our regular customer. 

Send in your samples. Perfect match 
guaranteed. If not satisfactory we will 
refund your money. 

GREEN'S HAIR GOODS CO. 
Room 58 

6 West Randolph Street Chicago, 111. 




ODESSA MILLINERY 

Exclusive Parisian Creations for the 

Smartly Dressed Woman. 

41 West 135th Street New York 

'Phone 624 Harlem. 



Mention The Ckisis. 



HOLIDAY GIFTS 



LADY'S HANDBAG 




Economical, Useful Gifts 
That Arc Sure to Delight 

LADY'S MANICURE SET 



jKf.fjtj'iwjtajumjijfjfjmm 




Seal grain liaiulbag, gusseted ends; 
welted black leather lining, reinforced 
gussets; extra pocket inside with 
purse: rose gold fancy ornamented 
frame, double strap handle. 
Size, 11 X 9 inches 
Price, $3.50, Delivered 



Consists of seven (7) pieces, as illus- 
trated above. Equally attractive for 
dressing table or traveling case. Case 
of soft gray suede, deep purple satin 
lining. 

Price, in white bone $4.00 

Price, in pearl 5.00 

Delivered 



ROGERS' 26-PIECE COMBINATION SET OF SILVERWARE 




Consists of six teaspoons, six tablespoons, six table forks, six tal)le knives, one 
sugar spoon and one butter knife. Warranted pure Mebeco Silver, in handsome, 
richly lined, clasp leatherette case. .\]ipropriate gift from husband to wife or 
from children to parents. Price, complete, $7.93. Address: 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY, 26 Vesey Street, NEW YORK 



Mention The Crisis. 



It Has Come at Last 




It had to come and it was for us to introduce it. 

A Face Powder for 
Colored Women 

R_»^^>|j. Whether the complexion is cream, olive or 
„ T^^^\/^ brown, we have a tint to match it. 

perfect Face Powder ' 

It is scientifically perfect, embodying certain ingredients sooth- 
ing to the most sensitive skin, while a soft breath of Oriental 
perfume enhances its cosmetic value. 

It is the final touch to milady's toilette; adding a certain 
inexpressible charm to her appearance, which evokes words 
of admiration from friends and passersby. 



Its quality is unsurpassed. 

Miss Clough says: 

"Its quality equals that of the 
most expensive imported powders." 



Price 50c. postpaid 

Send 2c. stamp for sample 

Address : 

The 
Dunbar Company 

EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS 

26 Vesey Street 
New York 




MISS INEZ H. CLOUGH 

Formerly of the Williams and Walker Company; 

now playing the "Big Circuit" in vaudeville. 



Mention The Crisis. 



E Ivf'A NCIPATION NUMBER 



THE CRISIS 



Vol. 5— No. 3 



JANUARY, 1913 



■:^m^^ 



^VKole No. 27 




/'"'" 






ONE DOLLAR A YEAR g^^^)371 TEN CENTS A COPY 




Bert Williams 

invites you to hear him sing the songs that have made 
him famous. His droll, humorous portrayal of those 
comic songs is heard exclusively on Columbia Records. 



We Sell Columbia Machines and Records 

The world's greatest artists may be assembled in your record cabinet and 
brought fortli at any moment to entertain, inspire and educate. There's Josef 
HoflFman, with a soft masterly interpretation of Mendelssohn's "Spring Song;" 
a bit of nonsense from Weber and Fields, a classic number from ]\[ary Garden, 
Zenatello. David Bispham, or the recorded voices of any of the world's great 
artists without one exception. 

The whole realm of music awaits your every mood and fanc}^; a record to 
meet your everj' demand and a machine artistic in appearance and rich in tonal 
quality to fit the size of j'our purse. 





Columbia "Eclipse," $20 Records from 65c. up 

We have a splendid machine for $13.50 
Columbias sell from $17.50 to $250.00 

The "Eclipse" embodies all the latest. Columbia features— the continuous 
and uninterrupted tone chamber, the perfected Columbia reproducer, the Columbia 
tapered tone arm. the Columbia tone-control shutters, the faultless and noiseless 
Columbia motor (double-spring drive). 

The "Eclipse" is 15-5^ inches square, built of beautiful quartered oak (or 
mahogany) — plays 3 disc records with one winding. 

New records are issued monthly. If you already have a machine let us 
send you each month a catalogue of these new records. 

Simply write and say: "Send me a record catalogue each month." This 
service is FREE. 

Your local dealer may meet our prices, but he cannot duplicate our service. 
His machine has probably been in the store several months, exposed to dust, 
light, finger prints, etc.; ours is shipped new from the factory. Write for 
catalogue -of machines and records. 

THE DUNBAR CO., 26 Vesey St., New York 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS 

A RECORD OF THE DARKER RACES 



PUBLISHED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED 
PEOPLE, AT 26 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, with the co-operation of Oswald Garrison Villard, 
W. S. Braithwaite, M. W. Ovington, Charles Edward Russell and others. 



Contents for January^ 1913 

COVER PICTURE. By Laura Wheeler. 

ARTICLES 

PAGF 

A HOLIDAY SUGGESTION. By M. V. Clark 132 

EMMY. A Story. (Concluded.) By Jessie Fauset 134 

EQUALITY AND LIBERTY. By Caleb S. S. Dutton 144 

THE ROAD TO THE BOW. A Poem. By James D. Corrothers 121 

DEPARTMENTS 

ALONG THE COLOR LINE Ill 

MEN OF THE MONTH 119 

OPINION 122 

EDITORIAL i27 

LETTERS 130 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 143 

THE BURDEN 145 

TEN CENTS A COPY; ONE DOLLAR A YEAR 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS TWENTY-FIVE CENTS EXTRA 

RENEWALS: When a subscription blank is attached to this page a renewal of your 
subscription is desired. The date of the ex^iiration of your subscription will be found on the 
wrapper. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS: The address of a subscriber can be changed as often as desired. 
In ordering a change of address, both the old and the new address must be given. Two weeks' 
notice is required. 

M.\NL'SCRIPTS and drawings relating to colored people are desired. They must be accom- 
panied by return postage. If found unavailable they will be returned. 

Entered as Second-class Matter in the Post Office at New York, N. Y. 



108 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 




FORWARD 

MARCH YOUR SON OFF TO 

Wilberforce University 



The only school in the country for Negro 
Youth which has a Military Department 
equipped by the National Government, and 
commanded by a detailed United States Army 
Officer. 

DEPARTMENTS 
MILITARY SCIENTIFIC 

NORMAL TECHNICAL 

COMMERCIAL THEOLOGICAL 
CLASSICAL MUSICAL 

PREPARATORY 

Banking taught by the actual operations 
in the Students' Savings Bank. Twelve In- 
dustries, 180 acres of beautiful campus, Ten 
Buildings. Healthful surroundings, excep- 
tional community. Maintained in part by the 
State of Ohio which supplies facilities for the 
thorough training of teachers. 

Fall term began September, 1912. Write 
for Catalog. 

W. S. SCARBOROUGH, President 

WM. A. JOINER, Superintendent, C. N. 1. 

Department. 

Address all communications to 
BOX 36 WILBERFORCE, OHIO 



Atlanta University 

Is beautifully located in the City of Atlanta, Ga- 
The courses of study include High) • School, Nor- 
mal School and College, with manual training 
and domestic science. Among the teachers ar« 
graduates of Yale, Harvard, Dartmouth, Smith 
and Wellesley. Forty-two years of successful 
work have been completed. Students come from 
all parts of the South. Graduates are almoit 
universally successful. 

For further information address 

President EDWARD T. WARE 

ATLANTA. GA. 

Knoxville College 

Beautiful Situation. Healthful Location. 
The Best Moral and Spiritual Environment. 

A Splendid Intellectual Atmosphere. 
Noted for Honest and Thorough Work. 

Offers full courses in the following departments: 
College, Normal, High School, Grammar School and 
Industrial. 

Good water, steam heat, electric lights, good 
drainage. Expenses very reasonable. 

Opportunity for Self-help. 

Fall Term Began September, 1912. 

For information address 

President R. W. McGRANAHAN 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Uirginia Union Univer$ity 

RICHMOND, VA. 

A College Department, of high standards and 

modern curriculum. 

A Theological Department, with all subjects 
generally required in the best theological seminaries. 

An Academy, with manual training, giving a 
preparation for life or for college. 

The positive moral and religious aim of the 
school, its high standards of entrance and of class 
work, its fine new buildings and well-equipped 
laboratories and library prepare a faithful student 
for a life of wide usefulness. 

GEORGE RICE HOVEY, President 



Daytona Educational and Industrial 
School for Negro Girls 

DAYTONA, FLORIDA 

It reaches, by reason of its location, a large 
territory of Negro children deprived of educa- 
tional privileges. 

. Its comfortable home life and Christian in- 
fluences insure a certain individual attention 
and superior training impossible in larger in- 
stitutions of its kind. 

Mrs. Frances R. Keyser, formerly in charge 
of the White Rose Home for Working Girls, 
in New York City, has been elected Principal 
of the Academic Department. Write for catalog 
and detailed information. 

MARY McLEOD BETHUNE 

Founder and Principal 



Mention The Cmsis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 109 

SCHOOL OF BEAUTY CULTURE AND HAIR DRESSING 



KELSEY'S 

328 Lenox Avenue 

Telephone Harlem 1896 

126th Street, NEW YORK. 



Manicuring, Shampooing, Hair Dressing, Marcel WaT- 
ing, Facial and Body Massage, Hair Making, Chiropody, 
etc., scientifically taught. Unlimited practice in parlor 
day and night. Pupils taught at home. If desired. 
Diplomas. Special Summer Course, $7.50 up. Send for 
booklet. Mmo. A. Carter Kelsey. Oen'l Intr.; Dr. Samuel 
A. Kelsey, Chiropodist, President and Gen'l Manager. 



Agricultural and 
Meclianical College 



Open all year 'round. For Males 
only. Facilities unsurpassed. Strong 
Faculty. Practical Courses. 

Board, Lodging and Tuition $7 
per month. 

Winter Term Began December 2, 
1912. 

Write to-day for catalog or free 
tuition. 



JAS. B. DUDLEY, President 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Southern Business College 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Day and night school, teaching Shorthand, Type- 
writing, Business English, Business Arithmetic, 
Bookkeeping and preparing for Civil Service. A 
high-grade commercial school with competent in- 
structors and healthy surroundings. The only Negro 
school of its kind in the world. For catalogue and 
further information address 

Southern Business College 

ith Avenue and 15th Street 

W. J. ECHOLS, Principal 

J. P. BOND, Secretary-Manager 



Send your boy South — the land of Opportunity. 
The Prairie View State Normal and Industrial 
College of Texas. E. L. Blackshear, Principal. W. 
C. Eollins, Treasurer. Largest State institution for 
colored youth in the United States. Excellent 
literary, scientific and industrial advantages. Ex- 
penses low — ideal climate — new buildings. 

For particulars address: 

H. J. MASON, Secretary 
Prairie View, Waller County, Texas 



Atlanta University 

Studies of the 

Negro Problems 

16 Monographs. Sold Separately. 

Address: 

A. G. DILL 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga. 



o 
R 

B 
i 

R 
t 

H 
d 
A 

y 

S 



A NARRATIVE of f 
THE NEGRO r 



By Mrs. Leila Amos Pendleton 

A comprehensive history of the E 

Negro race from the earliest period Y^ 

to the present time; told in pleas- p- 

ing narrative style; may be read „ 

and understood by children. Bound K 

in cloth and illustrated. Y 

Address: Price $1.50 

MRS. L. A. PENDLETON ^ 

1824 11th Street, N. W., A 

Washington, D. C. Y 



The Curse of Race Prejudice 

By James F. Morton, Jr., A. M. 

An aggressive exposure by an Anglo-Saxon 
champion of equal rights. Startling facts and crush- 
ing arguments. Fascinating reading. A necesaity 
for clear understanding and up-to-date propaganda. 
Belongs in the library of every friend of social 
justice. Price 25 cents. Send orders to 

JAMES F. MORTON, JR. 

244 West 143d Street New York, N. Y. 



HOME OCCUPATIONS FOE BOYS AND GIELS 
By Bertha Johnston 
Mother finds some happy work for little hands 
to do. Price 50 cents. Address the Author, 1054 
Bergen Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Mention Thb Crisis. 



no 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



GO TO COLLEGE 

The World To-day Is Calling for 
College - trained Men and Women. 

It has been found that out of every one hundred 
pupils in the graded schools only seven reach the 
high school and less than two per cent, go to 
college. Lack of means is found to be the primary 
cause. But a way has been opened by the World's 
Cyclopedia Company to overcome the handicap of 
money. A little energy on your part and the goal 
is won I 

We want high-class student canvassers, and a 
little work on their part will insure a college career 
at Harvard, Yale, Brown, Dartmouth, Smith, Welles- 
ley, Eadcliflfe, etc. 

The tuition fee at any of the colleges named 
averages $150.00, and to any high school student 
who secures one hundred and fifty bona fide sub- 
scriptions to Murray's Historical and Biographical 
Encyclopedia of the Colored Race Throughout the 
World, the World's Cyclopedia Company will pay one 
hundred and fifty dollars ($150.00) as a bonus in 
addition to a regular commission of 10 per cent. 
Even if you fail to reach the mark you will have 
your 10 per cent. 

If you are now in college you are also eligible 
to enter this contest. Note that it is not limited 
to the first student, but open to every student. 

If you are ambitious, and wish to take advantage 
of this splendid offer, write the Scholarship Depart- 
ment of the WORLD'S CYCLOPEDIA COMPANY at 
Washington, D. C. — P. O. Box 2379 — for full in- 
formation and literary outfit. 



OF INTEREST TO 
VOCAL STUDENTS 

Tone Placing and 
Voice Development 

Practical method of singing for 
daily practice, based upon artistic 
principles, together with a care- 
fully prepared number of exercises. 
From "Musical Courier," N. Y. : 
•A very practical little book is 
"Tone Placing and Voice Develop- 
ment," by Pedro T. Tinsley. It 
contains some very excellent material and vocal 
exercises, and should be in the hands of all vocal 
students. 

WORDS OF APPRECIATION 
I offer you the heartiest possible -endorsement 
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Mention The Crisis'. 



THE CRISIS 



Vol. 5, No. 3 



JANUARY, 1913 



Wkole No. 27 




ALONG 
COLOR LINE 



c 




POLITICS. 

A MONG the results of the late 
"^^ presidential election have been the 
following : 

Edward D. Green, a colored member of 
the legislature in Illinois for four consecu- 
tive sessions, was defeated. Major R. R. 
Jackson, a colored candidate for that legis- 
lature, was also defeated. Both of these 
were Republicans. On the other hand, 
B. E- Moseley was elected presidential elector 
on the Progressive ticket. He is the first 
colored man to hold that oflSce. 

^ In Kansas a colored lawyer, W. L. 
Saj'ers, has been elected county attorney of 
Graham County on the Democratic ticket. 
He received 888 votes, against 564 for the 
Republican candidate. 

^ R. L. Fitzgerald was elected freeholder of 
Atlantic City by a vote of 1,054 against the 
Democratic candidate, who had 865. 

^ In Hutchinson, Kan.. James W. Green 
was elected constable, receiving 1,291 votes, 
against 1,235 for his nearest opponent. 

^ In New York City the colored Demo- 
crats have been celebrating with two ban- 
quets — one to Bishop Alexander Walters, 
the chairman of the colored organization, 
and the other to Robert N. Wood, chief of 
the Xew York organization. 

^ Colored men holding civil-service positions 
in the South are alarmed at the advent of 



the Democratic party. A letter to The 
Crisis printed in the New York Evening 
Post says : 

"Colored employees in the Federal service 
have become very fearful of injustice, and 
even of losing their employment, as a result 
of the election. All the colored employees in 

the Federal service at , became connected 

with the service through competitive examina- 
tions required under the civil-service act, and 
they feel that they have a right to continue 
in the service as long as they prove faithful 
to their duty and are competent and efficient 
in its discharge. Since the election the 
report has been widespread and the belief is 
general that every colored employee in the 

Federal service at will lose his or her 

employment as soon as Mr. Wilson's friends 
are placed at the head of the bureaus in this 
district if the new President is not warned 
of the danger in advance. 

"There is not a colored person here, 
whether in the service or not, who believes 
Mr. Wilson would countenance such an out- 
rage as common report has will follow his 
inauguration, if he knew of the pernicious 
purpose before his appointees were selected 
to co-operate with him in his oft-expressed 
plan to do justice to all in the real demo- 
cratic sense. 

"None of the colored employees took any 
part in politics one way or the other, feel- 
ing that obedience to the civil-service regula- 
tions was as much an important part of their 



112 



THE CRISIS 



duties as their work. They, therefore, feel 
that, having violated no rule of the civil- 
service provisions, their tenure of employ- 
ment under the civil-service act should not 
be disturbed by the incoming adruinistration 
simply because they are colored. 

"If the President-elect would see to it that ' 
a square deal and fair play shall rule from 
the beginning to the end of his administra- 
tion his doing so would not only be right, 
but it would have a more salutary and whole- 
some effect in bettering the condition of 
affairs between the races than the work of 
all the Republican Presidents put together 
since the war, and insure good will, peace and 
happiness to all the citizens of this country. 

"We colored people of the South have all 
along believed that, . if it were possible to 
have a Democratic. President who would have 
the courage to do right to all men, and wrong 
to none. North, South, East and West, such 
a President would be the one to set matters 
right. But we have feared that such a 
patriot and statesman would be hard to find 
in the Democratic party." 

fl Reactionary Democrats are already begin- 
ning operations. 

In Missouri there is a plan to disfranchise 
the Negro vote and adopt a "grandfather 
clause" to save the ignorant white vote. 
Such a law has been discussed for the last 
six years. 

SOCIAL UPLIFT. 

"VTASHVILLE, Tenn., has a publishing 
-'■^ house conducted by the African 
Methodist Episcopal Church and another 
large publishing establishment under the 
Baptist Church. From these and other 
printing establishments are issued a Quarterly 
Review, two small monthlies and three weekly 
newspapers. There are three large under- 
taking establishments, two banks, fifty 
colored physicians, four institutions of higher 
learning and a medical school. Three colored 
bishops reside in the city and there are 
Humerous churches. A considerable propor- 
tion of the skilled labor is done by colored 
me«. Negroes are in tke tailoring business 
and also deal in second-hand furniture. 
There are two colored photographers, several 
electrical contractors and plumbers and two 
hospitals. 

^ Rev. H. S. Dunn, in reviewing the prog- 
ress of the Ne^o in New Orle«ns, says : 
"Our higher institutioas, with one single 



exception, have an increased attendance. 
Straight University has an enrollment of 
500 students, wijh 140 in the high school and 
college department. New Orleans University 
has an enrollment of 465, with 145 in the 
high school and college department. 
Southern University has an enrollment of 
479, with 166 in the high school and normal 
department. Leland University has an en- 
rollment of 222, with 72 in the college and 
normal department. The Negro public 
schools all have a larger attendance, and with 
few exceptions have a parents' club, which 
is co-operating with the school board and 
the teachers in order to secure better results. 
Last year several of these clubs furnished 
drawing material for their schools, and some 
furnished shoes for the poorer children. I 
recently visited all of the schools and found 
the general outlook promising. I found a 
total of 7,813 pupils and 125 colored teachers. 
Four of these schools are taught by 31 white 
teachers. The list of colored teachers has 
been completely exhausted, which necessi- 
tates another examination for colored 
applicants. 

"The one great need of the colored schools 
is that of manual training. It is hoped that 
the board will soon introduce this most prac- 
tical phase of training in our schools. A 
note is now being taken of exceptional 
children which will aid much in the progress 
now being made in the schools. This plan 
will group the exceptionally brilliant and the 
exceptionally dull pupils for the good of 
all. The Seventh Ward Educational League, 
under the leadership of Rev. A. Lawless, Jr.. 
has completed the payment on the six lots of 
grounds and the property has been turned 
over to the city for the erection of a school 
building for the children of the Miro School. 
The superintendents express a desire of 
having the Daniel School erected in the 
fourteenth ward. The erection of this 
school will supply a great need." 

^ Andrew Carnegie has given $25,000 for a 
library in New Orleans and the city has at 
last furnished a playground for colored 
children. 

fl In Seattle, Wash., the colored people have 
five churches, two pkysicians, two lawyers, 
one Hewspaper, four apartment houses, six 
fraternal organizations. The estimat©d 
colored population is 2,463. 

^ The movement for erecting and equipping 
first-class Y. M. C. A. buildings for colored 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



113 




THE HOWARD-LINCOLN GAME: THE CROWD 

people has received great impetus during Bass, who has made an unfortunate record 

the month. as a machine politician, has apparently sur~ 

In Baltimore the colored people have rendered the arrangements for the celebra- 

raised $31,000 in ten days, which secures tion into the hands of politicians to a large 

them $75,000 of contingent gifts. They will extent, 

erect a $100,000 building. ^ A provisional gift of $10,000 toward a 

A $100,000 building will also be erected school and old folks' home in New Jersey 

in Cincinnati. It will be a five-story struc- was announced at the Colored Women's Con- 

ture, 77 x 152 feet, and will accommodate gTess in Montclair. 

between 1,500 and 2,000 men and boys. cj Among the 1,500 boy scouts who dined 

fl In the athletic season just drawing to a at the 22d Regiment armory in New York 

close Howard Univei-sity and Atlanta Bap- was a troop of colored boys from Brooklyn, 

tist College seem to have the chief honors. fl The new $60,000 Hubbard Hospital at 

On Thanksgiving Day Howard defeated Meharry Medical College, Nashville, has 

Lincoln by a score of 13 to 0. On the same been dedicated. It is a three-story structure. 

day, in Nashville, 1,200 people watched the ^ Miss Lucretia A. Carter, a colored woman 

championship game between Fisk and ^f Helena, Ark., has taken a State examina- 

Atlanta Baptist College. Atlanta Baptist ^^^^y^ to practice medicine. 

College had before defeated Atlanta Uni- ^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^.^^ settlements are planned in 

versity, Clark University and Tuskegee, Richmond, Va., Wilmington, Del., and 

while Fisk had defeated Roger Williams, the Duivith Minn 

Alabama Mechanical College and Tuskegee. ' ECONOMICS 

The Nashville game was won by Atlanta Bap- rjy HE annual reports of the auditor of the 

tist College. i gtate of Virginia show the following 

^ An unusually large athletic meet is facts about Negro property, 

planned at Washington by colored organiza- The total assessed value of property owned 

tions during inauguration festivities. by Negroes has increased as follows: 

„rru ^> f A 1891 $12,089,965 

•1 Ihere are rumors oi extravagance and ^900 .' 15 856,570 

incompetence on the part of the colored men 1911 32,944,246 

at the head of the emancipation celebration The colored people paid in taxes 

in Peimsylvania. Representative Henry W. $312,000 in 1911. 




THE HOWABD-LIXCOI.N FOOTBALI. GAME. 



114 



THE CRISIS 



fl In Kansas City, Mo., with a colored popu- 
lation of 23,566, a white investigator reports 
800 NegTO property owners assessed at 
$1,400,000. Fifty NegToes own property 
valued at $10,000 or more; one hundred 
between $5,000 and $10,000; two hundred 
between $1,000 and $5,000; four hundred 
and fifty between $500 and $1,000. The 
investigator says : 

"The city takes little interest in any of 
the Negro districts except to have them well 
patrolled by policemen. The streets and 
walks are poorly kept, and no provision 
whatever is made for parks, playgrounds or 
public baths. Nevertheless the Negro takes 
great interest in his yard and house." 

The occupations of 8,000 colored people 
in Kansas City between the ages of 14 and 
60 are as follows: 

Barbers 240- 

Dentists 4 

Doctors 23 

Janitors 350 

Laborers ^. . . 5,006 

Lawyers 6 

Police service 8 

Postal service 20 

Porters in barber shops 375 

Porters in hotels 140 

Porters in saloons 600 

Proprietors, independent 90 

Pool-hall owners 75 

Preachers 25 

Pvillman service 140 

Railway service 250 

Teachers 30 

Teamsters 210 

Waiters 510 

The total annual wages received is 
$3,811,140. Nine .hundred of the 5,006 
common laborers are employed at packing 
plants, eight hundred are hod carriers, two 
thousand work on the street for the city or 
for the Metropolitan Street Railway Com- 
pany, and the remaining 1,306 are engaged 
in various forms of labor. 

The Negro churches own $300,000 worth 
of property with a mortgaged indebtedness 
of $50,000. A house-to-house canvass of 
348 colored families shows the following 
annual expenditure per family: 

Annual Per 
Expenditure. Cent. 

Food .$202.41 38.46 

Rent 116.29 21.27 

Clothing 49.15 7.62 

Fuel and light 24.81 4.20 

Carfare 18.80 3.00 

Other expenses and 

savings 228.29 25.45 

100.00 



^ The colored people of Los Angeles claim 
that they are the best-housed group of their 
race in the United States, They are 
beginning now to build business blocks. 

^ A colored man was sent to jail for mur- 
der twenty-three years ago in Alabama. He 
Was recently pardoned by the governor, and 
found that a small piece of property worth 
one or two hundred dollars when he was 
incarcerated is now worth $20,000. 

^ Mr. John Mitchell, Jr., of Richmond, is 
projecting an "Anglo-American Finance 
Corporation" with a capital of $125,000. 

^ The colored waiters of Washington, D. C, 

are planning a school for the instruction of 

waiters. 

^ The will of Edward J. Fatiu, a colored 

caterer of Baltimore worth $25,000, has been 

broken by his sister. He attempted to found 

an agricultural school, 

EDUCATION. 

X/TISS ALICE M. CURTIS has left 
-*- ■■• $5,000 each to Atlanta University, 
Hampton Institute and Tuskegee. The will 
says : 

"These sums I give to said institutions in 
memory of my mother, Marian A. Curtis, 
and of her enthusiastic efforts during the 
struggle against human slavery in this 
country, and believing that they are doing an 
especially effective, promising and necessary 
work in the education and training of the 
colored people to become citizens of the 
United States; said three sums to be 
invested and held respectively by said institu- 
tions as permanent funds, the income to be 
used in such manner and for such purposes 
as the trustees or other governing bodies of 
said institutions may determine will, in view 
of my motives in giving said sums, best 
serve the interests of said respective institu- 
tions." 

^ The Nashville Institute for Negro Chris- 
tian Workers was founded January 1. 
The board of trustees is composed of colored 
and white men and the grounds are near 
Fisk University. The work will begin with 
the training of deaconesses. 
^ The income of Howard LTniversity for the 
year ending June 30, 1912, was: 

Government appropriation. . .$92,900 

Paid by students 49,370 

Endowment 13,853 ' 

Miscellaneous 4,490 

$160,613 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



115 



The total endowment fund amounts to 
$281,319, and the land and equipment are 
valued at $1,274,985, 

^ Colored teachers of Evansville, Ind., will 
make an educational tour in the South next 
spring. 

^ Colored teachers' associations are meeting 
during the holiday season all over the South, 

^ The inauguration of Stephen Morrell 
Newman as president of Howard University 
took place December 13, 

^ At the meeting of the Association of 
American Agricultural Colleges held at 
Atlanta, Ga., liine colored colleges were rep- 
resented. These institutions also held sepa- 
rate meetings at Atlanta University, Presi- 
dent Byrd Prillerman, of West Virginia 
Colored Institute, acted as chairman of the 
latter conferences. 

fl From three different sources in the South 
a "call for better educational opportunities for 
colored children has been made. 

In Savannah, Ga., J. B. Hammond, the 
Southern white president of a colored col- 
lege, made a strong plea for Southern help 
for Negro education. 

At Fort Worth, Tex., in a discussion on 
compulsory school laws, it was charged that 
the East Texas credit merchants would not 
let Negro children go to school. 

At the Southern Educational Association, 
which met at Louisville, Ky., a committee 
was appointed on the subject of Negro 
education. 

q Florence County, S. C, had, in 1900, 
about 16,000 colored people and 12,000 white 
people. There were enrolled in school in 
1912, 4.621 white and 4,066 colored children. 
There were 139 white teachers employed and 
.63 colored teachers. The white schools ran 
30 weeks, the Negro schools ran 131/2 weeks. 
There was spent on the schools $93,172; of 
this the whites got $84,034, the Negroes 
$9,138. White teachers received in salaries 
$57,399 and Negro teachers $8,583. 

MEETINGS. 

A MEETING at the Civic Club, in New 
•^^ York, on the problem of the city 
Negro was addressed by Dr. George E, 
Haynes of Fisk University, Ray Stannard 



Baker and others. Dr. Haynes made the 
following suggestions: 

"First, we must see to it that the better 
element of white people and the better ele- 
ment of colored people shall come together 
in each city in some organized way. 

"In the second place, the Negro must have 
leaders of his own — strong, wise, well- 
trained leaders, who are learned in all the 
American ways of doing things, and in the 
life and history of their own people. These 
leaders are absolutely indispensable as a 
medium of communication between the seg- 
regated Negro world and the white world 
which incloses them, 

"In the third place, the white people must 
see that the Negro gets a fair opportunity 
in all phases of city life. He must have a 
fair chance to get work, to hold his job, 
and ample facilities to prepare himself for 
any and all work for which he has capacity, 
and for which he may develop ability. He 
must have good houses in which to live, for 
which he must not be compelled to pay 
exorbitant rents, nor mrst he be segregated 
to the poorer sections of the cities when his 
impulses, his culture and his purse enable 
him to buy or rent elsewhere." 

Ray Stannard Baker said : "I do not know 
which is worse, the social disabilities placed 
on Negroes or the moral disabilities which 
we incur in our treatment of the Negroes." 

^ The colored State fair of Georgia, held 
at Macon, was unusually successful. There 
was an attendance of 40,000, a street parade, 
horse races, ball games, an education day and 
an ex-slaves' day. 

^ Washington County (Texas) farmers have 
had a fair with music. and exhibits. 

^ The fourth annual carnival ha& been held 
by colored people for six days at West End 
Park, Houston, Tex. 

^ The fifth annual Negro fair, held in 
Augusta, Ga., had exhibits from the colored 
schools and from women and farmers. 

fl The second annual Orangeburg County 
(S. C.) fair had an attendance of 25,000 
people. 

^ There will be a widespread celebration of 
the fiftieth anniversary of emancipation, 
January 1, among colored people. 



116 



THE CRISIS 



MUSIC AND ART. 

THE London Daily News says : 
"A strange story of the last moments 
of Mr. Coleridge-Taylor, the composer, who 
died recently, was told to the Windsor and 
Eton Choral Society at their annual meet- 
ing by Sir Walter Parratt, the King's Master 
of Music. 

*'He had written a violin concerto, which 
was performed for the first time on Tues- 
day evening at Queen's Hall, and just before 
he died he sat up in bed and conducted the 
whole of the concerto to an imaginary orches- 
tra. At the close he bowed three times to an 
imaginary audience, just as a conductor * 
would." 

^ A great concert was given on November 
22, at Royal Albert Hall, London, England, 
by a Coleridge-Taylor memorial committee 
under the presidency of the Earl of Pem- 
broke, the proceeds of which are to be 
handed to the widow of Mr. Coleridge-Taylor. 

The committee included Lord Alverstone 
(the Lord Chief Justice), the Earl of 
Shaftesbury, the Earl of Plymouth, Sir 
Beerbohm-Tree, Sir Hubert Parry, Sir Fred- 
erick Cowan and other noblemen and well- 
known leaders in the profession. 

The program Avas selected from the works 
of the late Coleridge-Taylor. 

The orchestra and chorus consisted of 1,250 
persons from the Royal Choral Society, 
Alexander Palace Choral Society, Crystal 
Palace Choir, London Choral Society, Lon- 
don Symphony Orchestra, New Symphony 
Orchestra, Royal Amateur Orchestral Society, 
Stock Exchange Orchestral Society and the 
Handel Society. 

The artists were Ruth Vincent, Esta 
D'Argo, Ada Crossley, Ben Davies, Gervase 
Elves, Robert Radford and Julien Henry. 
The organist was H. L. Balfour, Mus. B. 
The conductors were Sir Frederick Bridge, 
Sir Charles Villiers Stanford and Mr. Lan- 
don Ronald. 

The London Musical Times considered the 
concert a fitting tribute to a man who has 
afforded so much delight to his generation, 
and quoted Noyes' tribute : "Generous as a 
child; so wholly free from all base pride that 
fools forgot his crown." 

^ Before the American Geographical Society, 
on October 17, the Kneisel Quartet, a string- 
quartet of international fame, presented a 
program of music. 

The soloist for the occasion was Mr. Harry 



T. Burleigh, baritone, of New York. Mr. 
Burleigh sang a group of folk songs of dif- 
ferent countries, and also an interesting 
group of songs by modern composers. 
^ Mr. Roland W. Hayes, tenor, gave a con- 
cert on November 19, at Jordan Hall, Boston,^ 
Mass., where he was heard before an excep- 
tionally large audience which included a num- 
ber of musicians of prominence. 

The assisting artists were Roy W. Tibbs, 
pianist, of Washington, D. C. ; Wm. H. 
Richardson, baritone, and Maud Cuney 
Hare, accompanist. 

The Boston Herald, under the signature 
of Philip Hale, said of the concert : 

"Mr. Haj^es has an unusually good voice. 
The natural quality is beautiful. It is a 
luscious yet manly voice. Mr. Hayes sings 
freely and with taste, though in his youth- 
ful enthusiasm he occasionally, last evening, 
forced an upper tone. With patience and 
still further study he should go far. 

"Mr. Richardson is also singularly blessed 
by nature. His voice is resonant, firm, com- 
manding, yet smooth and even throughout a 
liberal compass. He, too, sang fluently and 
with marked authority. 

"The pianist showed facility and strength 
in the toccata and fugue and greatly pleased 
the audience by his interpretation of the 
other pieces." 

^ During the last fortnight in November 
Mr. Hayes was heard in concert at Chicago, 
111., Detroit, Mich., and Syracuse, N. Y. 

^ Mrs. E. Azalia Hackley, soprano, sang 
before a very large audience on November 
11, at Washington, D. C, under a long list 
of influential patrons. 

^ Mrs. Portia Washington Pittman, the 
daughter of Mr. Booker T. Washington, is 
now teaching piano-forte at Dallas, Tex. 
Mrs. Pittman was a student of piano-forte 
under Martin Krause, of Berlin, Germany. 

^ On November 10, at Chicago, 111., a large 
public memorial was held by the Choral 
Study Club, Mr. Walter E. Gossett, con- 
ductor. All numbers performed were drawn 
from compositions by Mr. Coleridge-Taylor. 
Dr. Charles E. Bentley was the speaker. 
"Hiawatha's Departure" and "The Blind 
Girl of Castle Cuille" were given by the 
society. The chorus was assisted by Mrs. 
Martha B. Anderson, Mrs. Mayme Marshall, 
Mr. Daniel Protheroe and Mr. Harrison 
Emmanuel, violinist. 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



117 



^ Carlisle Kawbowgam, a full-blooded 
American Chippewa Indian, a graduate of 
the Carlisle Indian School and the Yale 
School of Medicine, and who possesses a re- 
markable tenor voice, is preparing for grand 
opera in Berlin, Germany. Critics declare 
that the singer is destined to rank among 
the world's greatest tenors. 

^ There is now on exhibition in the Corcoran 
Art Gallery at "Washington, D, C, one of 
Henry Tanner's pictures, the subject of 
Avhich is "Christ Learning to Read." Mr. 
Tanner will sail from Europe about the 
fifteenth of this month for New York, where 
soon after his arrival he will have an exhi- 
bition of some of his work. 

^ The following note comes from the art 
critic in the Wasliington (D. C.) Star: 

"At the Veerhoff gallery there is now on 
exhibition a portrait bust in plaster of Assist- 
ant Attorney-General William H. Lewis, the 
work of May Howard Jackson of this city. 
It is strongly and feelingly modeled and is 
vital as well as structurally good. Mrs. 
Jackson has already done some creditable 
work, but this is more than promising; it is 
an achievement. A portrait to deserve the 
name must be more than a likeness; it must 
interpret character; it must have personality. 
Of this bust as much can be truly said." 

PERSONAL. 
A FTER rescuing fifteen persons from 
•^^ burning at the St. Qeorge Hotel, Los 
Angeles, Cal., Julius Malone, a colored 
porter, lost his life in trjdng to rescue 
another person. Mr. Malone was 38 years 
of age and had worked for the proprietor 
of the hotel for twenty-three years. Oscar 
Bell, the colored elevator boy, is also men- 
tioned as unusually heroic. 
q T. ^Y. Walker, of Gloucester County, Va., 
has received much well-deserved notice 
from the article concerning his work in a 
recent number of the World's Work. 
^ Fritz F. Porter, a colored custodian of a 
country club near New York, bought lots 
in Wyoming some years ago which are now 
worth over $50,000 on account of mineral 
rights. 

fl Edward H. Morris, grand master of the 
colored Odd Fellows, while abroad last year, 
met with the Annual Movable Conference of 
English Odd Fellows at Cardiff, South 
Wales. He was accorded especial attention. 
In the street parade he had a place of honor 



at the head of the procession with the grand 
officers. He was also a guest at the Lord 
Mayor's dinner and made several speeches. 

^ Henry Bozemau Jones of Philadelphia, 
grandson of the late Henry Jones, is develop- 
ing talent in portraiture. He has pauited two 
pictures of Frederick Douglass. 

fl Caleb Nelson, a former slave, is dead at 
Allentown, Pa. He left an estate of $10,000. 

fl Mrs. Susan Paul Vashon, the last surviving 
child of Elijah W. Smith, is dead at St. 
Louis. Her father was a member of Frank 
Johnson's band which played before Queen 
Victoria in 1854. Her husband was Pro- 
fessor G. B. Vashon, who conducted a well- 
known school in Pittsburgh, Pa. The late 
Wright Cuney and many other distinguished 
colored men were his pupils. 

^ Two white presidents of Negro colleges are 
dead. Isaac Rendell of Lincoln and George 
A. Gates of Fisk. Dr. Rendell was born in 
1825, and the establishment of Lincoln Uni- 
versity was very largely due to him. 

^ Dr. Lyman B. Teft, president of Harts- 
horn Memorial College for Girls at Rich- 
mond, Va., for twenty-nine years, has 
resigned. W. Riglar succeeds him. 

^ Arthur Reed, a colored player on the 
Everett High School football team, has been 
named on the "all-scholastic" eleven. 
^ Z. W. Mitchell, a charlatan who has been 
rejjeatedly exposed, is operating now in the 
Southwest. Mitchell is a colored man and has 
a "Loyal Legion Co-operative system" for 
collecting money. 

fl Dr. William D. Crum, Minister Resident 
and Consul-General at Monrovia, Liberia, 
died at Charleston, S. C, from fever con- 
tracted in Africa. Dr. Crum was nominated 
by President Roosevelt as collector of the 
port of Charleston in 1902 and in 1903 he 
was rejected by the Senate. The President 
renominated Dr. Crum and placed him in 
charge of the customs house pending his 
confirmation. Some three years ago he was 
appointed Minister to Liberia. 

Dr. Crum was born in Charleston Febru- 
ary 5, 1859. 

^ Howard P. Drew, representing the Spring- 
field High School of Springfield, Mass., 
equaled the world's record of 7 1-5 seconds 
for the seventy-yard dash at the games of 
the Bradhurst Field Club. Drew started from 
the back mark, and, after working hard in 



118 



THE CRISIS 



his trial and semi-final heats, put on so much 
power in his run for the tape in the final 
that he fairly i»an through the men placed far 
in front of him before half the distance was 
covered. 

THE CHURCH. 

THE missionary headquarters of the 
colored Baptists has been moved from 
Louisville to Philadelphia. Dr. L. G. Jordan 
is still in charge. 

^ The general convention of the congrega- 
tional churches has been meeting in Savan- 
nah, Ga. It is composed of colored ministers 
from all over the South. 

§ The Rev. John W. Lee and his congre- 
gation have been celebrating the 105th anni- 
versary of the First African Presbyterian 
Church in Philadelphia. This church was 
founded May 28, 1807. Its first pastor was 
the Rev. John Gloucester, a slave whose 
freedom was purchased. 

THE GHETTO. 

THERE is a movement for "Jim Crow" 
street cars in the District of Columbia, 
agitated by the "Central Citizens' Associa- 
tion." 

q Winston-Salem, S. C, has already segre- 
gated jSTegTO residences and is now trying 
to segregate Negro business enterprises. 

^ A segregation bill has been introduced into 
the Missouri legislature. 

fl The "Progressive Committee of White 
Fraternities" is asking support for a measure 
to keep NegToes from using the names of 
Masons, Odd Fellows, etc. The bill has been 
introduced into Congress by a Massachusetts 
representative, E. W. Roberts. 

^ The authorities of Atlanta, Ga., will not 
grant licenses to colored men to operate 
moving-picture machines. 

^ Macon, Ga., has a segxegated vice district. 
In the district they have included a thriving 
colored Baptist church and a colored public 
school. 

^ Miss Edna Clanton, a colored girl, was 
appointed stenographer at the Elgin (111.) 
State Hospital. She was "frozen out" by 
being given no work to do and left the 
place. 

^ The following note appears in the New 
Orleans Picayune of November 29: 

" 'She's my' wife. We have lived together 
thirty-eight years. The law cannot estrange 



us.' Thus spoke Joseph Lawrence, a white 
farmer, in the second criminal court at New 
Orleans, La., recently, while he was awaiting 
trial on the charge of marrying a colored 
woman. Through the arrest of Lawrence and 
his colored wife the police discovered a hard 
situation. All around Lee Station the white 
farmers and fishermen and other classes have 
intermarried with colored people and reared 
large families regardless of the law against 
such. A number of arrests have been made, 
but it has been impossible to convict one for 
the reason that the white parties all went 
on the stand and swore they were colored. 
Just what the prosecuting attorney can do 
remains to be seen." 

CRIME. 
'T'HE following lynehings have taken place 
-*• since our last record : 

Two Negroes at Newberry, S. C, charged 
with murder; one Will Thomas was shot to 
death; the other has not been found. 

In Bossier parish, Louisiana, three 
Negroes — Burke, Heard and Jimeson — were 
lynched for wounding a sheriff. The 
Shreveport Journal has a picture of the 
lynching and devotes several columns to the 
details. 

At Ocala, Fla., Priest Niles, a Negro, was 
lynched for murder and John Archer, also 
colored, was shot for talking about the 
lynching. 

At Cordele, Ga., Williams, a NegTo, was 
lynched for murder and alleged assault. 

At Butler, Ala., A. Curtis and three other 
colored men were lynched for the alleged 
murder of a planter. 

In Enid, Okla., Dixon, a colored man, 
fearing a mob, hanged himself in jail. He 
was accused of murder. 

In North Dakota George Baker, a white 
man, was lynched. 

H Four colored boys, all under 15 years 
of age, have been made State prisoners in 
Alabama for stealing a bicycle. 

^ Negroes have been killed by officers at 
Macon Ga., Thomason, Ala., and Lumber 
City, Ga. 

^ The governor of Mississippi has been 
asked to pardon Gene Burns, a colored man, 
who was sent to the penitentiary !^or life for 
criminal assault. The father of the girl 
says that he has discovered that Burns was 
not guilty. 




A MAKER OF SCHOOLS. 

THE organization of the colored school 
system in the District of Columbia is 
due to the Cook family more largely than 
to any other persons. The Rev. John F. 
Cook maintained a colored school from 1834 
to 1855, with the exception of one year, when 
this school was stopped by a mob. On the 
21st of May, 1862, Congress set aside 10 
per cent, of the taxes paid by colored people 
for colored schools. In 1864 one teacher was 
employed. In that same year the colored 




THE LATE G. F. T. COOK AT THE 
.AGE OF 50. 

children were allowed their proportion of 
the school taxes according to their numbers. 
Under this act in 1868 George Frederick 
Thompson Cook became superintendent of 
the colored schools. Mr. Cook was a son of 
the Rev. John F. Cook and a brother of the 
late well-known John F. Cook who died a 
few years ago. George F. T. Cook was given 



MEN OF THE 



MONTH 



Lt?l-ATrMER-'\ 



full responsibility; he faced a tremendous 
task and he accomplished it. He built up 
what was, until a few years ago, the best 
colored public-school system in the United 
States and one of the best school systems 
anywhere. He found the schools in shanties 
and old abandoned barracks and left, in 
1900, when he relinquished his trust, twenty- 
three well-housed elementary schools, a high 
school and a normal school. 

Mr. Cook died, after a brief illness, 
August 7, 1912, at the age of 77. 

The office of superintendent of colored 
public schools was, after Mr. Cook's retire- 
ment, subordinated to the superintendent of 
the white schools, and to-day the colored 
superintendent is practically an executive 
clerk and not a responsible official. 

On November 19 the teachers of the 
District of Columbia held memorial exercises 
in honor of their late superintendent. Dr. 
W, S. Montgomery, in the course of an un- 
usually fine address, said: 

"George F. T. Cook was a brave man, an 
independent man. He never flinched from 
uttering his thoughts when occasion de- 
manded. His yea was yea, and his nay, 
nay. In him was not a jot or iota of 
deception, duplicity or indirection. No dis- 
honesty tinged or beclouded his character and 
name, which remain a magnificent legacy 
to a people just planting their feet on 
freedom's ground and winning recognition 
and a place in American civilization." 



THE GEORGIA BAPTIST MAN. 

X\7ILLIAM J. WHITE was born in 
^^ Georgia in 1832. He was, as a 
slave, employed at cabinet making and 
learned his letters from his mother, who was 
a white woman. He taught a night school 
from 1853 to 1865. 

During reconstruction he was made agent 
of the Freedmen's Bureau by Gen. 0. 0. 
Howard. In 1866 he was ordained as a 



120 



THE CRISIS 




WILLIAM J. WHITE. 

Baptist minister and later spent eleven years 
in the service of the United States Revenue 
Department in Georgia. 

Mr. White has been president of four 
different NegTo conventions in Georgia and 
is the most conspicuous leader in his church. 
He is the founder of Atlanta Baptist College. 
Perhaps his greatest work, however, is the 
Georgia Baptist. This influential weekly was 
first issued October 28, 1880 and is to-day 
beginning its thirty-third year. 

Mr. White is a clean, honest man, abso- 
lutely incorruptible, a clear thinker and an 
intrepid fighter, and yet withal the most 
genial and lovable of persons. 



A MAN OF BUSINESS. 

JOSEPH LAWRENCE JONES is the 
founder and proprietor of the Central 
Regalia Company of Cincinnati. He was 
born near that city June 12, 1868. His 
father was secretary of the colored school 
board before the war, and his mother is 
still a well-known worker among colored 
women's clubs.- Jones graduated from the 
Gaines High School under Peter H. Clark, 
became first a teacher and then worked in the 
civil service. In 1902 he organized the 
Central Regalia Company, which is the 
largest colored organization in the world for 
manufacturing secret and fraternal associa- 



tion badges and uniforms, and employs from 
ten to thirty persons, according to season. 
Mr. Jones and his son and four daughters 
live in a pretty modern home in Walnut 
Hills. 



THE PRESIDENT OF HAITI. 

q-' ANCREDE .AUGUSTE, president of the 
■■■ republic of Haiti, was born at Cape 
Haitien March 10, 1856, and is consequently 
56 years of age. He is a business man and 
banker and was made head of the depart- 
ment of the interior and of the police by 
President Hyppolite in 1895. He held office 
until 1902 when he returned to business 
life, but his advice and aid were repeatedly 
sought during the administrations of Nord 
and Simon. After the flight of Simon, 
Auguste was at the head of the committee 
of public safety, which preserved order, and 
when the late President Le Conte perished in 
the terrible accident of August last, Auguste 
was elected his successor by a large majority. 
Free to a greater extent, in the manner of 
his accession to power, than most of his 
predecessors from the machinations of 
political enemies and the importunities of 
political friends, great reforms and great 
achievements are expected of him because 
he is believed to possess both the power and 
the inclination to bring them about. 




JOSEPH L. JONES. 



MEN OF THE MONTH 



121 




HIS EXCELLENCY, TANCREDE AUGUSTE 
President of the Republic of Haiti. 



2IJ)? Snai t0 tl|f lorn 

By James D. Corrothers. 



Ever and ever and anon, 
After the black storm, the eternal, 
beauteous bow ! 
Brother, to rosy-painted mists that arch 
beyond. 
Blithely I go. 

My brows men laureled and my lyre 

Twined with immortal ivy for one little 
rippling song; 
My "House of Golden Leaves" they praised 
and "passionate fire" — 
But, Friend, the way is long ! 

Onward and onward, up! away! 

Though Fear flaunt all his banners in my 
face. 
And my feet stumble, lo ! the Orphean Day ! 

Forward by God's grace! 

These signs are still before me: "Fear," 
"Danger," "Unprecedented," and I hear 
black "No" 
Still thundering, and "Churl." Good Friend, 
I rest me here — 
Then to the glittering bow! 

Loometh and cometh Hate in wrath. 

Mailed Wrong, swart Servitude and 
Shame, with bitter rue, 
Nathless a Negro poet's feet must tread the 
path 
The winged god knew. 

Thus, my true Brother, dream-led, I 
Forefend the anathema, following the 
span. 

I hold my head as proudly high 
As any man. 




cdtT n Ton) 





THE DEMOCRATS ^he New York Globe in 

ANDTHEKEGEO. ^^^ ^°^^'« «^ ^ ^^^^ 

editorial says: 

"At the election, as a result of the treat- 
ment of the Southern NegTo delegates by 
the Bull Moose convention and of NegTo 
dissatisfaction with the Taft administra- 
tion's policy, a large percentage of Negroes 
voted for Woodrow Wilson, a Democrat and 
a man of Southern birth, whose father was 
a violent clerical upholder of slavery and a 
bitter opponent of emancipation. Approxi- 
mately 20 per cent., according to accepted 
estimates, of the total Negro vote went 
Democratic. No party is now character-- 
istically the party of the Negro." 

The editor goes on to say: 

"So the great army of Democratic Negroes 
are looking with keen interest to see what 
will be the policy of the new.administration. 
It ■ can hardly do much worse in an office 
way than its predecessor, for of 9,876 presi- 
dential appointments but thirty have been 
allotted to Negroes. But it is not the offices 
in which the more intelligent members of 
the race are interested. What is to be the 
attitude toward the Negro generally? Is 
the policy to be the one of keeping the 
Negro down, or of helping him to rise? Is 
he to be treated as a member of a per- 
manently inferior race, no matter what his 
personal merits, or is he to be treated as a 
citizen who is to get the same privileges and 
recognitions as others when he deserves 
them? Is the new administration, with 
respect to the race question, to be a demo- 
cratic one?" 

It is evident that the Bourbon Democracy 
of the South, which votes on nothing but 
the Negro question, has already been stirred 
into activity by the success of the Demo- 
crats at the polls. 

In Missouri there is a proposed disfran- 
chisement bill with a "grandfather" clause, 
and also a bill entitled "An ordinance for 
preserving peace, preventing conflict and ill 



feeling between the white and colored races 
in the city of St. Louis and promoting the 
general welfare of the city by providing, 
as far as practicable, for the use of sepa- 
rate blocks by white and colored people for 
residences, churches and schools." 

It provides it shall be unlawful for either 
white or colored persons to move their resi- 
dence into a block in which the major por- 
tion of the inhabitable feet frontage is 
occupied by the other class. It provides 
that NegTo' servants may reside with their 
employers. 

The bill prescribes a penalty of $5 to $50 
a day for each day during which the ordi- 
nance shall be violated, and authorizes the 
building commissioner to identify blocks as 
"white" or "colored." 

Police department permits must be issued 
before any person shall move into a "mixed" 
block, according to the provision of the bill. 

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat asks why 
the Democrats want to disfranchise the 
Negro in Missouri, since they form but 5 
per cent, of the population. It goes on to 
say: 

"Some of the Democratic leaders in the 
State made an especial appeal to the Negroes 
in the recent campaign. They were asked 
to support Wilson and Major, as being 
better friends of the black race than were 
their Republican rivals. A boast was made, 
too, that a considerable number of Negroes 
were enrolled in Democratic clubs, and that 
this number was steadily on the increase. 
What sort of a commentary on this talk does 
the projected anti-Negro legislation in 
Jefferson City make?" 

The Pittsburgh Despatch says that it is 
plain "that the sole reason for the proposed 
disfranchisement is to prevent, if possible, 
another defeat of the Democratic organiza- 
tion by eliminating enough votes from the 
presumably Republican element. It is diffi- 
cult to believe that the enlightened public 
opinion of Missouri will permit so out- 



OPINION 



123 



rageous abuse of power. If it is carried 
out it is sure to be resented, and the out- 
come will probably be more disastrous to 
the schemers than if they played fair and 
trusted to their record to keep them in 
control." 

The colored people of St. Louis are pub- 
licly protesting particularly against the 
segregation law. Their organ, the St. Louis 
Advance, is despondent: 

"It looks as if, one by one, nearly all the 
rights gained through the manly advocacy 
of the Negro leaders of a generation ago 
are now being stolen from us. We had Jim 
Crow cars in St. Louis a generation or more 
ago, but the leading Negroes of that day 
made a manly, not a sycophantic, fight 
against them and won. Now we are not 
only threatened with Jim Crow cars, but 
Jim Crow streets and Jim Crow blocks, and 
the supineness of the young leading Negro 
of to-day shows that he has fallen asleep at 
his post, and when he wakes up he will find 
himself stripped and naked before the fierce 
and chilling blast of American race hate. 

Our young men are largely Booker 
Washingtonized. Their policy is submission 
and surrender, a policy which, as pursued 
by Washington, has cost us nearly all our 
rights in the Southern States, and now it is 
invading the North and we see it teaching 
the doctrine of race separation, proscription 
and surrender everywhere." 

We cannot forbear in this connection to 
print a poem which the Woman's Journal 
attributes to Cotton's Weekly. It is entitled 
"It Pays to Kick," and runs like this: 

There lived two frogs', so I am told, 

On a quiet wayside pool. 
And one of these frogs was a blamed bright 
frog, 

But the other frog was a fool. 
Now a farmer man with a big milk can 

Was wont to pass that way, 
And he used to stop and add a drop 

Of the water, so they say. 
And it chanced one morn, in the early dawn, 

"When the farmer's sight was dim, 
He scooped those frogs in the water he 
dipped, 

Which same was a joke on him. 
The fool frog sank in the swashing tank 

As the farmer bumped to town. 
But the smart frog flew like a tugboat screw, 

And swore he'd not go down. 

So he kicked and splashed and slammed and 
thrashed. 

And he kept on top through all. 
And he churned that milk in first-class shape 

Into a great big butter ball. 



Now, when the milkman got to town 

And opened the can, there lay 
The fool frog drowned, but hale and sound. 

The kicker, he hopped away. 

Moral: 
Don't fret your life with endless strife, 

Yet let this teaching stick. 
You'll find, old man, in the world's big can, 

It sometimes pays to kick. 



The two most talked of 

MESSRS. BLEASE ^^^^^^^ -^ ^^^ United 
AND JOHNSON. g^^^^^ -^ ^^^ j^^^ ^^^^^ 

have been Mr. Cole Blease of South Carolina 
and Mr. Jack Johnson of Chicago. Many bit- 
ter and sarcastic things have been said of both. 

The New York Evening Post, commenting 
on Blease's defense of lynching, says that 
even "if one could accept Governor Blease's 
position, in fairness to the colored people he 
should have stated that, of the 2,942 lynch- 
ings recorded by the Chicago Tribune since 
1885 — there have been far more — but 24.7 
per cent, have been of persons charged with 
the crime of rape. How many of those 
actually lynched for it were innocent, no 
one knows; 50 per cent, would not be a 
rash estimate. Of the other lynehings, 42.2 
per cent, were for murder, and no less than 
33.1 per cent, for other crimes. Moreover, 
of the total of 2,942 killed by mobs, 900 
were white. We venture to prophesy that 
when this tendency goes a little further, 
even Governor Blease will find lynehings less 
praiseworthy. Now, however, the head of a 
Christian American commonwealth in sol- 
emn conclave applauds the mob and upholds 
its lust for blood. Never has a governor 
sunk so low. Even Vardaman sought to put 
down the mob." 

The New York Times adds: 

"There are Bleases in the North as well 
as in the South. It is tedious to 'get the 
right man' by the winnowing processes of 
the law. The law's delay is often exasperat- 
ing even lo those who abide by it. Its tech- 
nicalities sprang from times when there were 
scores of capital offenses, from the penalty 
of which the judges sought escape for hap- 
less prisoners. But criminal procedure has 
of late become swifter. The lynching of 
even Negro assailants of women in the South 
may not longer be condoned, and it never 
could be. The philosophy of 'getting the 
right man' does not stop with Negroes, as 
the record of murderous Southern feuds 
evinces. This is not an age for Blease and 
his like." 



124 



THE CRISIS 



A correspondent to the New York World 
asserts that Blease belongs to the "poor 
white trash" and that it is the rise of this 
class that has debauched the political South, 
Thus the rise of the oppressed in a democ- 
racy is made the cause of such birth pains 
of democracy as Blease represents. In 
exactly the same way Jack Johnson is being 
made the excuse for further Negro oppres- 
sion because in the face of bitter public 
opinion he married the girl whom he was 
accused of wronging. As the New York 
World says: 

"There is a growing suspicion that no 
matter how bad a man Johnson may be — 
and he is bad undoubtedly — popular clamor 
and race prejudice are making him blacker 
than he is. Whatever he may be, he is 
entitled to his rights under laws impartially 
administered." 

Perhaps the fairest comment on the 
whole pitiable situation is the half -satirical 
comment of Le Temps of Paris, with all its 
curious mistakes. The translation is our 
own: 

"The telegrams from the United States 
convey two pieces of news equally interest- 
ing for those who follow with an attentive 
and impartial eye the vagaries of the Negro 
problem of North America. On the one 
hand we learn that Mr. Jack Johnson, the 
boxer, known throughout the world, and the 
holder of a unique record, having knocked 
out all sorts of adversaries of all colors, is 
having annoyance because a young white 
woman has become susceptible to the pres- 
tige of his glory. Mr. Jack Johnson, 
although he has a solid fist, has nevertheless 
liberal ideas and a heart accessible to all 
tenderness. He defends himself against race 
prejudice as valiantly as against the upper- 
cuts of his antagonists, white or black. * * * 

"But the heroine of this touching idyl 
had a father — a noble father, or one calling 
himself such. This patriarch neglected noth- 
ing to blacken beyond measure the future 
son-in-law which his daughter dared to pre- 
tend to impose upon him. First he poured 
upon Jack Johnson a large quantity of ink; 
literally without the least metaphor. This 
spectacle was seen in the streets of Chicago : 
a flood of the black liquid poured from the 
twentieth story, splashed the passersby 
under pretext of getting at the brave boxer 
who, attending to his own business, was 
going at a leisurely gait to cash a check at 
his bankers. This paternal vengeance having 



rather missed its mark, namely, to blacken 
a black man, the irate father has just 
arraigned the excellent boxer of ebony hue 
before a tribunal which will be quite em- 
barrassed to render a just verdict. For, after 
all, they never trouble about the whites who 
seduce Negro women. Why then this un- 
heard-of rigor against a NegTo who, having 
attained results by his own personal merit, 
which make him a very eligible party, lets 
himself be loved by a white girl, and follows 
the perfect love with a person who is evi- 
dently in love with him. . The fury of the 
former planters and slave owners is of a 
kind excessively comic. For it is impossible 
to answer their unforgettable misdeeds by a 
more amiable vengeance. This transatlantic 
episode would rejoice the heart of the excel- 
lent woman who wrote 'Uncle Tom's Cabin.' 

"Happily, America gives us by the same 
courier the account of an affair quite oppo- 
site to this laughable episode. 

"All friends of the United States will be 
glad to know that the young American army 
has just shown how its intelligent liberalism 
can raise it above former prejudices and 
lawless passions in rendering public homage 
to chivalric bravery and military valor, with- 
out occupying itself with the quarrels of 
race which have so cruelly divided the fol- 
lowers of Judge Lynch and the apostles of 
justice. Many ridiculous and harmful 
sophisms have been dissipated since the day 
when Mr. Roosevelt, by a commendable act, 
invited Mr. Booker Washington to the presi- 
dential table at the White House-. 

"There is in that young army already 
marked by notable prowess an excellent 
officer named Charles Young. It was he 
who, in the Cuban War, June, 1898, saved 
from eertam destruction the Rough Riders 
of Colonel Roosevelt. Charles Young, who is. 
as black as the heroes recently celebrated 
by Colonel Baratier in a series of 'd'Epopees 
Africaines,' has just been made a major in 
the Federal army. * * * 

"The legitimate advancement of Major 
Young happened at an opportune moment 
to illustrate the fine points in a recent book 
on 'Le Negre aux Etats-Unis,' by Warring- 
ton Dawson. One can only wish the con- 
tinuance of this movement toward justice." 



There are growing indications 
that the colored laborer is 
beginning to think. A privately 
printed circular sent to Pullman porters 



THE NEGRO 
LABORER. 



OPINION 



125 



by one of their own number runs thus: 
"I say, brother, because I am one of the 
number that makes to see and to know the 
need of a union — and that union should 
extend throughout the United States and to 
every porter that is employed by the Pull- 
man Company; yes, and to those who are 
expecting to be emploj-ed. To be divided as 
we are, and without any protection, we are 
practically no good for any purpose. It 
has been thoroughly proved in the past, as 
we have felt, tasted and seen our condition 
for living. 

"We feel the need of a union among us, 
whereby we may protect ourselves. We 
taste the bitter pills, given to us by the so- 
called officers. We see the disadvantages 
under which we are working. We see our 
money taken away from us and we dare not 
say a word. We see how we are dogged and 
driven about by those illiterate and ignorant 
conductors, and we are almost afraid to 
open our mouths. We see how we are 
forced to honor — to be submissive, to humble 
ourselves to every person, from a millionaire 
down to a tramp. This is all done because 
we are lacking of a union among us. It will 
continue and increase in every way if we do 
not do something to check it." 

The Defender, a colored paper of Chicago, 
noted that : 

"A number of the labor unions are begin- 
ning to realize that they must admit the 
NegTo workman if they hope to preserve 
their unions. This striking and finding their 
places permanently filled by the dark brother 
is getting serious. Both must work and both 
must work to live; the color of the skin 
doesn't matter. If he were permitted to 
join the unions, to share in their fortunes, 
be they good or bad, he would stick." 

There is some evidence of distinctly Social- 
istic leaning; for instance, the Ethiopian 
Phalanx of Covington, Ga., reprints a whole 
column of editorial paragTaphs from the 
socialistic Appeal to Reason, and the Advo- 
cate-Verdict of Harrisburg, Pa., in an edi- 
torial says : 

"Shice there was so much talk during 
the recent campaign about the Negro divid- 
ing his vote, and there seems to be some 
assurance of them breaking away from the 
old party, it might be well for them to 
look into the Socialist camp to see if the 
conditions there are as favorable as 
reported." 



The Southern advisers 

PROFITABLE CRIME. ^f ^^^ ^^^^^^3 ^f the 

Outlook have allowed them to say a few 
words on the shameful traffic in crime in 
the South: 

"The report of the State convict board 
of Alabama shows that the total gross earn- 
ings of convicts in that State for the year 
ending September 10 was $1,073,286.16. 
These figures, without taking into account 
the earnings of one hundred convicts who 
were employed on the State farm, from whom 
the State would have received $30,000 more 
if they had been leased on the same terms 
as the others, shows a gain for 1912 over 
the previous year of $16,456.93. The 
figures for other States where the convict 
lease system is in force are not at hand, but 
there is every reason to believe that the 
above is a fair sample of the profits made 
elsewhere. * * * How many know or have 
considered the actual facts in regard to the 
matter, namely, that under the fee system, 
as it still exists in Alabama and other parts 
of the South, the sheriff is put in the posi- 
tion of a recruiting agent for the em- 
ployers of the convict labor; that about 87 
per cent, of all convicts of the State 
are Negroes, many of whom, arrested for 
trifling offenses, have drifted into crime be- 
cause of ignorance and the neglect of the 
State properly to educate them; that in 
spite of the regulations to protect these 
unfortunate slaves of the State, life in the 
convict camps to-day is more degTading and 
cruel than it ever was under the worst form 
of slavery." 

Further comment on methods of treating 
criminals come from widely separate sources. 
The Afro- American Ledger, a colored paper, 
says : 

"In a riot which occurred up in Connec- 
ticut during a strike a white woman was 
killed by a shot fired by one of the strikers. 
The shot was not intended for the woman, 
and so the defendants got off, although they 
were tried for murder. A colored man in 
South Baltimore shot at a colored man and 
the shot went astray and killed a colored 
woman. This man was tried for murder and 
convicted and is now waiting for the time 
of execution. Why the difference?" 

A white paper, the Eatonton (Ga.) Mes- 
senger, commenting on the shooting of a 
Negro by a white man, says : 

"It is hoped that, should he recover, his 
sliooting will have a salutary effect upon his 



126 



THE CRISIS 



future conduct. Impudent and obstreperous 
Negroes are getting entirely too numerous in 
this immediate section and an object lesson, 
a real first-class hanging, will undoubtedly 
put some cheek to the false teachings of 
many of their leaders and ' 'ciety houses.' " 



THE ETERNAL 
PROBLEM. 



An editorial in the Philadel- 
phia Bulletin has been widely 
quoted in the South. It is 
entitled "The NegTo as a Local Problem" 
and is of the well-known "leave-the-question- 
to-the-South" order; in a course of six 
inches of arg-ument it turns an extraordinary 
logical somersault and declares that "cer- 
tainly the problem is one which ultimately 
will demand the wisdom of the entire nation 
rather than of any section." 

"The Negro in America is still a problem," 
says the Minneapolis Tribune. "Yet on we 
go inculcating the highest standards of 
personal refinement in these, our neighbors, 
only to bar their women from all the better 
hotels, to crowd them into segregated sec- 
tions in the theatres, to run 'Jim Crow' 
cars for them in a third of our States, to 
teach them recreations they cannot follow 
with the rest of us, 

"Coleridge-Taylor writes excellent modern 
music; Tamier paints excellent pictures; 
Dunbar writes excellent poetry. We receive 
them, hear them, talk with them — and shut 
them out. It is all so cruel a tragedy! But 
no thoughtful man has yet come forward 
with a remedy which either the NegTo or 
white man could seriously consider." 

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle has this bit : 

"The keen hatred which the South has 
against the Negro did not seem particularly 
interesting to the large audience which last 
night witnessed Edward Sheldon's play, 'The 
Nigger,' at the Greenpoint social settlement. 
Judged by the actions of the audience, the 
play sustained interest until almost the 
last, when the fact that Georgianna Byrd, a 
typical Southern belle, did not marry Philip 
Morrow, the governor, just because he was 
a 'Nigger,' was sincerely bemoaned, 

" 'It was a good show, but it didn't end 
right,' was the comment made by many of 
the 'regulars' in the lobby after the play." 

The American Israelite declares that 
increase and wealth and refinement will not 
settle the Negro problem: 

"As long as the Jew was pack peddler, 
pawnbroker, junk-shop keeper and old- 



clothes dealer and kept himself to himself, 
and bore himself with humanity toward his 
Christian neighbor, and showed that he 
appreciated their generosity in allowing him 
to live, there was little, if any, prejudice 
against him in the United States, generally 
speaking. But as soon as he and many of 
Ms brethren became wealthy and strove for 
social recognition, and the Jewish women 
began to rival their Christian sisters in dress, 
jewelry, equipage, and manner of living 
generally, the trouble began." 

The Rev. H. P. Dewey, a white cpngTega- 
tion^l minister of Minneapolis, declares for 
social equality without intermarriage: 

"But what we contend is that no legislature 
shall prevent white children and black chil- 
dren from studying together under the same 
roof if they elect to do so, and that there 
shall be no criticism from any source if we 
choose to ask any man of whatsoever color or 
origin to sit at our table, or to sleep in our 
spare bedroom. We cannot legislate the 
social relationship. They are determined by 
influences more subtle and delicate than those 
exerted by the State. They are governed by 
other forces than the volition of man. They 
are fixed by the laws of nature and of 
nature's God. And who is the man who is 
at once the truest aristocrat and the truest 
democrat? He is the one who is possessed 
of the sane mind and the large heart and the 
honorable conscience and the resolute will. 
Sooner or later that man must find every 
door opened to him; he must be laureled and 
crowned without regard to the accident of 
his beginnings or of his complexion." 

Prof. Charles Zueblin, lecturing in Boston, 
declares : 

"It is all very well to glory in the thought 
that we are a superior race. History is 
strewn with the relics of superior races. 
The Romans became so enervated by slave- 
holding^ taxes, conquests and luxuries that 
when they met the unspoiled hordes of the 
North they fell prone before them. 

"We need to cultivate nationalism in this 
country and to avoid provincialism and 
racial antipathy. Provincialism is the re- 
sult of immobility, not of nativity. The 
returned New Englander is as virile and 
valuable as the immigrant, but decadence 
threatens the stationary native. There is no 
prospect that all the racial elements in the 
United States will be fused, but if we cannot 
have race unity we can have race 
reciprocity." 




EDITORIAL 






A PHILOSOPHY FOR 1913. 

AM by birth and law a 
free black American 
citizen. 

As such I have both 
rights and duties. 

If I neglect my duties 
my rights are always in danger. If I do 
not maintain my rights I cannot perform 
my duties. 

I will listen, therefore, neither to the 
fool who would make me neglect the 
things I ought to do, nor to the rascal 
who advises me to forget the oppor- 
tunities which I and my children ought 
to have, and must have, and will have. 

Boldly and without flinching, I will 
face the hard fact that in this, my 
fatherland, I must expect insult and 
discrimination from persons who call 
themselves philanthropists and Chris- 
tains and gentlemen. I do not wish to 
meet this despicable attitude by bloivs; 
sometimes I cannot even protest by 
words; but may God forget me and 
mine if in time or eternity I ever weakly 
admit to myself or the world that wrong 
is not wrong, that insult is not insult, 
or that color discrimination is anything 
but an inhuman and damnable shame. 

Believing this with my utmost soul, I 
shall fight race prejudice continually. 
If possible, I shall fight it openly and 
decidedly by word and deed. When that 
is not possible I will give of my money 
to help others to do the deed and say 
the word which I cannot. This contribu- 
tion to the greatest of causes shall be my 
most sacred obligation. 

Whenever I meet personal discrimina- 
tion on account of my race and color I 
shall protest. If the discrimination is 



'old and deep seated, and sanctioned by 
law, I shall deem it my duty to make 
my grievance known, to bring it before 
the organs of public opinion and to the 
attention of men of influence, and to 
urge relief in courts and legislatures. 

I will not, because of inertia or 
timidity or even sensitiveness, allow new 
discriminations to become usual and 
habitual. To this end I will make it my 
duty without ostentation, but with firm- 
ness, to assert my right to vote, to fre- 
quent places of public entertainment and 
to appear as a man among men. I will 
religiously do this from time to time, 
even when personally I prefer the refuge 
of friends and family. 

While thus fighting for Bight and. 
Justice, I will keep my soul clean and 
serene. I will not permit cruel and 
persistent persecution to deprive me of 
the luxury of friends, the enjoyment of 
laughter, the beauty of sunsets, or the 
inspiration of a well-written word. 
Without bitterness (but also without 
lies), without useless recrimination (but 
also without cowardly acquiescence), 
without unnecessary heartache (but 
with no self-deception), I will walk my 
way, with uplifted head and level eyes, 
respecting myself too much to endure 
without protest studied disrespect from 
others, and steadily refusing to assent 
to the silly exaltation of a mere tint of 
skin or curl of hair. 

In fine, I will be a man and know 
myself to be one, even among those who 
secretly and openly deny my manhood, 
and I shall persistently and unwaver- 
ingly seek by every possible method to 
compel all men to treat me as I treat 
them. 



128 



THE CRISIS 




EMANCIPATION. 

IFTY years ago, on the 
first day of January, 
1863, the American 
people, by the hand of 
Abraham Lincoln, took 
the first formal and legal 
step to remove the unsightly shackles 
of slavery from the footstool of Ameri- 
can liberty. They did not do this deed 
deliberately and with lofty purpose, but 
being forced into a war for the integ- 
rity of the Union, they found themselves 
compelled in self-defense to destroy the 
power of the South by depriving the 
South of slave labor and drafting slaves 
into Northern armies. 

Once having realized that Liberty and 
Slavery were incompatible, the nation 
yielded, for a moment, leadership to its 
highest ideals: it gave black men not 
simply physical freedom, but it 
attempted to give them political freedom 
and economic freedom and social free- 
dom. It knew then, as it knows now, that 
no people can be free unless they have 
the. right to vote, the right to land and 
capital and the right to choose their 
friends. To call a man free who has not 
these rights is to mock him and bewilder 
him and debase him. This the nation 
knew, and for a time it tried to be true 
to its nobler self. But social reform 
costs money and time, and if it seeks 
to right in a generation three centuries 
of unspeakable oppression it faces a 
task of awful proportions. Facing this 
task and finding it hard, the nation 
faltered, quibbled and finally is trying 
an actual volte-face. It has allowed the 
right to vote to be taken from one and a 
half out of two million black voters. It 
has allowed growing land monopoly and 
a labor legislation that means peonage, 
child labor and the defilement of women. 
And above all it has insisted on such 
barriers to decent human intercourse 
and understanding between the races 
that to-day few white men dare call a 
Negro friend. 

The result of this silly and suicidal 
policy has been crime, lynching, mob 



law, poverty, disease and social unrest. 
But in spite of this the Negro has 
refused to believe that the present hesita-' 
tion and hypocrisy of America is final. 
Buoyed then by an unfaltering faith, 
he accumulates property, educates his 
children, and even enters the world of 
literature and art. Indeed, so firm has 
been his faith that large numbers of 
Negroes have even assented to waive all 
discussion of their rights, consent to 
present disfranchisement and do just 
as far as possible exactly what America 
wants them to do. But even here let 
there be no mistake; with Negro agita- 
tors and Negro submissiouists there is 
the one goal: eventual full American 
citizenship with all rights and oppor- 
tunities of citizens. Remove this hope 
and you weld ten million men into one 
unwavering mass who will speak with 
one voice. 

Yet, after fifty years of attempted 
liberty, the reactionary South and the 
acquiescent North come forward with 
this program: 

1. The absolute disfranchisement of 

all citizens of Negro descent 
forever. 

2. The curtailment and regulation of 

property rights by segregation. 

3. Strictly limited education of 

Negro children as servants and 
laborers. 

4. The absolute subjection of Negro 

women by prohibition of legal 
marriage between races. 

5. The eventual driving of the Negro 

out of the land by disease, 
starvation or mob violence. 

Every single item in this program 
has powerful and active support in the 
halls of legislatures, in the courts of 
justice, in the editorial rooms of period- 
icals, and in the councils of Southern 
secret societies. 

There are many organizations Avork- 
ing against this program, but in most 
cases the opposition is not vigorous and 
direct, but apologetic and explanatory, 
and based on temporary philanthropic 



EDITORIAL 



129 



relief, rather than eternal justice. We 
have friends of the Negro who oppose 
disfranchisement by a program of 
partial and temporary and indefinite 
disfranchisement; who tell the Negro to 
buy property and ignore ghetto legisla- 
tion; who believe in caste education and 
hotly accuse others who do not of being 
ashamed of work; who would preserve 
one foolish white woman if it costs the 
degradation of ten innocent colored 
girls, and who would greet the death of 
every black man in the world with a 
sigh of infinite relief. 

The National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People almost 
alone stands for a frank, open, front, 
forward attack on the reactionary 
Southern program. It demands a 
nation-A\ade fight for human rights, 
regardless of race and color; it calls for 
real democracy, social and economic 
justice, and a respect for women which 
is not confined to women of one 
privileged class. 

In this fight we want your help. We 
need it desperately. The nation needs 
it. How in Heaven 's name shall Liberty 
and Justice survive in this land if we 
do not oppose this program of slavery 
and injustice? Abraham Lincoln began 
the emancipation of the Negro-Ameri- 
can. The National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People pro- 
poses to complete it. 

m 

OUR OWN CONSENT. 

E should remember that 
in these days great 
groups of men are not 
long oppressed but by 
their own consent. Op- 
pression costs the oppres- 
sor too much if the oppressed stand up 
and protest. The protest need not be 
merely physical — the throwing of stones 
and ])ullets — if it is mental and spiritual, 
if it expresses itself in silent, persistent 
dissatisfaction, the cost to the oppressor 
is terrific. 

This fact we continually forget. We 
say: the South is in saddle; what can 




we do against twenty millions? The 
white oppressor rules; of what avail is 
agitation against ninety millions? 

If you doubt the efficacy of agitation 
and protest, ask yourself: Why is the 
reactionary oligarchic South so afraid 
of even one protesting voice ? Why are 
the Northern doughfaces, their million- 
aire backers and their allied teachers in 
Southern schools so panicstricken at 
one small voice? Why is the American 
Negro hater always so anxious to affirm 
that the Negro assents to his chains and 
insults, or that the "responsible" 
Negroes assent, or that "the only real 
Negro leader" assents? Is it because 
they know that when one protesting 
voice finds its fellows it may find soon 
ten millions? And when ten million 
voices are raised to say: 

Disfranchisement is undemocratic ; 
"Jim Crow" legislation adds insult to 
theft; "color discrimination is bar- 
barism — -" 

When ten million voices say this they 
will, they must, be heard. And when 
their cause is once heard, its justice will 
be evident and its triumph sure. Agi- 
tate then, brother; protest, reveal the 
truth and refuse to be silenced. The 
most damnable canker at the heart of 
America is her treatment of colored 
folk. 

m 

IN ACCOUNT WITH THE OLD YEAR. 

Credit. 
"P ULL fifty years of freedom and cele- 
brations planned in Pennsylvania 
and New Jersey. 

Defeat of the "grandfather clause" 
in Arkansas. 

Enfranchisement of 50,000 colored 
women. 

The independent political vote. 

Several civil rights cases won. 

Large new Y. M. C. A. buildings 
planned in Chicago and Indianapolis 
and finished in Washington. 

Census reports sho^^dng the reduction 
of our illiteracy to 30 per cent. 

Continued increase in property hold- 
ing throughout the nation. 



130 



THE CRISIS 



Promotion of Major Young. 

Promotion of Lieutenant of Police 
Childs. 

Establishment of Lincoln Institute. 

In art and letters: Tavo doctors of 
philosophy, two artists and the "Auto- 
biography of an ex- Colored Man." 

Debit. 

Over sixty lynchings. 

Segregation laws and ordinances. 

The color bar in the American Bar 
Association. 

The Roosevelt disfranchisement. 

The hanging of a colored girl. 

The deaths oi. Coleridge-Taylor, Fred- 
erick McGhee, Josephine Silone-Yates, 
Drs. Boyd and McClennan, Bishop 
Gaines, George Sale and Mary Dunlop 
Maclean. 



50,000. 

N February, 1911, we 
asked for 10,000 read- 
ers. We had them in- 
side of two months. In 
April, 1911, we asked 
for 25,000 readers. We 
expect to have that number for our 
coming Easter issue. We ask now 
for complete financial independence and 




the assurance of permanence. This 
means 50,000 readers. If every present 
reader of The Crisis will send us one 
more the goal of our present ambition 
will practically be reached. This may 
be done in many ways : You can bring 
the magazine to the attention of persons 
who do not know of it. Their thanks will 
then be added to ours. You may give the 
magazine as a present to a friend — 
twelve presents ; in fact, twelve monthly 
reminders of your thoughtfulness. What 
cheaper Christmas or birthday present 
could you give and what more valuable 
one? You may subscribe and have the 
magazine sent to some white friend 
who needs to know the truth as we see 
it. One club in Topeka has sent us fifteen 
subscriptions and ordered The Crisis 
sent to fifteen of the most prominent 
white men in the city. One hospital sent 
us 100 subscriptions for its white donors, 
that the truth might make them free. 
Do you not know some white man in 
your town who needs The Crisis? 

Perhaps you want to raise money or 
buy books for a church or other or- 
ganization ; get up a club of Crisis 
subscribers and use the liberal pre- 
miums for your purpose. 

At any rate give us 50,000 readers 
before January 1, 1915. 




Yesterday I Avas talking to an assembly of 
colored men and women. About a hundred 
were present at the meeting. I want to tell 
you in a very personal way that I was 
greatly impressed with the character and 
the presumed environment of all these ladies 
and gentlemen. Ten years seem to me to 
have given a distinct lifting to the best part 
of your people. 

I venture to transmit to you this bit of 
evidence. It is of no value in itself, but it 
may have value taken in connection with 
other places, 

Charles F. Thwing. 



I cannot refrain from writing you tO' 
express my keen indignation at the scurri- 
lous article respecting you originating in 
the Bee (rather too busy to be thoughtful 
or even moral) and reprinted in other Negro 
newspapers, You very well know that I da 
not always agree with you or with The 
Crisis, but the brutal and untruthful criti- 
cisms of you contained in this article are 
such as I think no honest friend of the Negro 
should permit to pass without at least a word 
of sympathy to you. One often wonders 
whether such things are worth the notice of 
a gentleman, and ordinarily they would not 



LETTERS 



131 



be. The only possible seriousness attaching 
to such an utterance and to the person out 
of whose mouth it came is that the thought- 
less will' assume the truthfulness of the only 
two points which give the aforementioned 
article any character: First, that you do 
nothing; and, secondly, that your funda- 
mental sympathies are not with the NegToes. 
The man who has engineered or inspired the 
gathering of most of the knowledge we now 
have respecting the conditions of the Ameri- 
can Negro has provided the basis for all 
activities of a louder and more palpable sort. 
If there were any comparison, and if knowl- 
edge be the basis of intelligent action, such 
accomplishment is not only first in order of 
time, but also first in order of importance. 
The man, furthermore, who has kept before 
his people the cultural and the human ideal 
(whether his method of so doing is wise or 
not is not now the important point) has per- 
formed for all time, and particularly for 
this generation, a service so important as to 
constitute it a norm of true progress. In 
my individual opinion your method of serv- 
ice has not been one which I myself would 
always have chosen; but the method of self- 
manifestation of any individual is primarily 
his own, and no one has the right to belie a 
fact because the method of its discovery or 
of its realization* does not happen to please 
him. 

I would like to call to your attention and 
to that of readers of The Crisis the re- 
markable and deep-visioned article "The 
Negro Consciousness and Democracy" in the 
Public of August 30. To my mind the 
great danger of the Negro in America is 
not that he will not become economically 
competent and powerful, but that the forces 
and the motives which play upon and in him 
will drive him along the same old dreary 
road which the white man has so long fol- 
lowed, and which, thank- God, his conscience 
is now impelling him to desert for a better, 
even if a more difficult path. If it were not 
for the ideals which Dr. Crogman, you, 
Professor Kelly Miller and many another 
brave colored man are preaching, the future 
of the Negro would be much more dubious 
than if he continued for a time to lack the 
economic competency and wealth momentum 
the necessity of which is so insistently 
dinned into his ears. 

Faithfully yours, 

Samuel H. Bishop. 



Can you give me any information that 
might help in my advice to one of my 
parishioners, who is seeking assistance in 
regard to the possibility of her daughter 
getting some paid opportunity either in 
social-settlement work or as a stenographer 
under somebody who would treat her 
decently ? 

You will understand my difficulty when 
1 tell you that my parishioner has the mis- 
fortune to be colored. That, you know, in 
this land of godly enlightenment and human 
liberty, is a crime ! It is a cause for pro- 
fanity to know that there is increasing diffi- 
culty for people of color to find occupation 
beyond running an elevator or going out to 
service, just because they are colored. In 
plain English, it is damnable! And is but 
sowing the seeds that, one day, will grow 
a crop of hatred and war. 

The girl is now in College, taking the 

secretarial course, and she is very competent. 
She wdl be ready in a year's time. But in 
♦^^rying to find some little opportunity for 
her to try her hand at social-settlement work^ 
during last summer's vacation, the fact was 
revealed that she is not wanted, even in 
philanthropy, just because she is colored. 
Therefore her mother is getting anxious for 
fear that she will have no opportunity to 
use her gifts after she has trained them at 

; . She could go South, but that 

means hell for a colored girl. One was sub- 
jected to the indignity, recently, of being 
compelled to stay all night in the toilet on a 
journey South. They wouldn't sell her a 
stateroom. Some colored girls coming up 
from the South had to stay a while in the 
railroad station in a large Southern city. 
The room for colored persons was being- 
repaired. They went, naturally, into the 
other waiting room. With what result? 
They were arrested, marched by the officer 
to the police station and fined! And these 
are some of the reasons why the mother 
fears to have her daughter go South and 
is seeking emploj'ment for her in Boston or 
New York. 

An Episcopal Clergymax. 



You have fused new life and vigor to bring 
together a mighty host that will continue to 
plead for the advancements and every right 
the Constitution stands for. 

.J.v^rKs T. Bradford, 
I'hiladelphia, Pa. 



HOLIDAY 

By M. V. 



SUGGESTION 

CLARK 




HE State Charities Aid Asso- 
ciation places friendless 
children from orphan 
asylums in carefully 
selected family homes 
throughout the State of 
New York and in adjoining 
States. During the past fifteen years 
ninety-six colored children have been 
provided with good homes. Here are 
some of the pictures of the children 
already placed out and a few pictures of 
children who are waiting for homes. There 
are a gTeat many colored children in orphan 
asylums in various parts of the State. 
Hundreds of them are in institutions where 
both white and colored are received. In the 
three institutions for the colored alone there 
are nearly 800 children, many of them 
deprived bv death or desertion of the parents 
who shuald care for them. About 600 of 
these are little boys and girls between five 
and fourteen years of age, and about a 
hundred are between two and five. Many of 
these little ones will remain all their young 
lives in an orphan asylum, only to go out at 
fourteen or sixteen into a friendless world 
with ^10 one to turn to for love, sympathy 
and counsel. People who have visited 
orphanages cannot know just how monoto- 
nous is the daily routine of a big institu- 
tion to the children who live there day after 
day and year after year. Even in the 
smaller and more homelike institutions there 
is nothing that quite takes the place of the 
parents^ individual love and care. Children 
need individual and not wholesale treatment; 
homes are made for children; that is what 
they are for, and everyone who has a child- 
less home ought to want a child. Childless 
couples, widows and spinsters living alone in' 
comfortable homes without children are 
missing a great opportunity. Their lives 
would be made much brighter and happier by 
the affection of some of the little ones now in 
institutions. The pictures of the boys and 
girls who have been placed in homes are a 
sufficient indication of their well-being and 
happiness, and of the good cai'e that they 
are getting from their loving foster-parents. 



The association is very careful in the selec- 
tion of homes for the children for which it 
is responsible, sending one of its agents to 
visit, personally, the family who applies for 
a child, to talk with them about their require- 
ments, to see what sort of a home they offer, 
and to interview, confidentially, persons in 
the neighborhood knowing them, who can give 
reliable testimony regarding their character 
and standing in the community, and the kind 
of a chance that they are likely to offer a 
friendless child. If the home, thus visited 
and investigated seems to be a good one, a 
child is selected who will as nearly as possible 
fit into that particular home, and meet the 
special requirements of that individual 
family. Then by frequent correspondence 
and occasional visits the association keeps 
in touch with the family and the child and 
stands ready in case of misfortune to make 
other provision for the little one. 

When there are brothers and sisters 
brought to the attention of the society, an 
effort is made to put them either in the 
same home or with families who are friends 
and neighbors, where they can attend the 
same school and keep in touch with one 
another. 

Would not some' family or some two 
neighbors like to provide such a home or 
homes for a little brother and sister? They 
are attached to each other and hope they 
will not have to be separated. One little 
three-year-old boy in the picture has a 
twelve-year-old brother who has already 
been placed in a good home, but they were 
separated when the little one was too young 
to remember his elder brother, so it does 
not matter if he goes by himself. 

The association would be glad to have 
the co-operation of the readers of The 
Crisis in its work for these homeless colored 
children. Will you either take one of these 
friendless little ones into your home or 
speak to your friends who are childless, or 
whose children are gro'wn up, and suggest to 
them the desirability of their making a home 
for another child? 

Letters sent to The Crisis will find us 
quickly. 




FIVE LITTLE PRESENTS 





EMMY 



By JESSIE FAUSET 

(Concluded from the December Crisis.) 




SYNOPSIS OF PRECEDING CHAPTERS 

(Emmy, a pretty brown girl of Central Pennsylvania, is engaged to Archie Ferrers, 
a young engineer, whose Negro blood is just perceptible. Archie has secured employ- 
ment with the large engineering firm of Mr. Nicholas Fields of Philadelphia. Fields 
assumes that Archie is of foreign extraction and Archie has not undeceived him. Emmy 
and her mother are spending a week with Archie in the city.) 



V. 
"VJOT even for lovers can a week last 
-'■^ forever. Arcbie had kept till the last 
day what he considered his choicest bit of 
exploring. This was to take Emmy down 
into old Philadelphia and show her how the 
city had gTown up from the waterfront — 
and by means of what tortuous self-govern- 
ing streets. It was a sight at once dear and 
yet painful to his methodical, mathematical 
mind. They had explored Dock and Beach 
Streets, and had got over into Shackamaxon, 
where he showed her Penn Treaty Park, and 
they had sat in the little pavilion overlooking 
the Delaware. 

Not many colored people came through 
this vicinity, and the striking pair caught 
many a wondering, as well as admiring, 
glance. They caught, too, the aimless, 
wandering eye of Mr. Nicholas Fields as he 
lounged, comfortably smoking, on the rear 
of a "Gunner's Run" car, on his way to 
Shackamaxon Ferry. Something in the 
young fellow's walk seemed vaguely familiar 
to him, and he leaned way out toward the 
sidewalk to see who that he knew could 
be over in this cheerless, forsaken locality. 

"Gad!" he said to himself in surprise, "if 
it isn't young Ferrers, with a lady, too! 
Hello, why it's a colored woman! Ain't he 
a rip? Always thought he seemed too 
proper, Got her dressed to death, too; so 



that's how his money goes!" He dismissed 
the matter with a smile and a shrug of his 
shoulders. 

Perhaps he would never have thought of 
it again had not Archie, rushing into the 
office a trifle late the next morning, caromed 
directly into him. 

"Oh, it's you," he said, receiving his clerk's 
smiling apology. "What d'you mean by 
knocking into anybody like that?" Mr. 
Fields was facetious with his favorite em- 
ployees. "Evidently your Shackamaxon trip 
upset you a little. Where'd you get your 
black Venus, my boy? I'll bet you don't 
have one cent to rub against another at the 
end of a month. Oh, you needn't get red; 
boys will be boys, and everyone to his taste. 
Clarkson," he broke off, crossing to his 
secretary, "if Mr. Hunter calls me up, hold 
the 'phone and send over to the bank for 
me." 

He had gone, and Archie, white now and 
shaken, entered his own little room. He sat 
down at the desk and sank his head in his 
hands. It had taken a moment for the insult 
to Emmy to sink in, but even vfhen it did 
the thought of his own false position bad 
held him back. The shame of it bit into him. 

"I'm a coward," he said to himself, star- 
ing miserably at the familiar wall. "I'm a 
wretched cad to let him think that of Emmy 
— Emmy! and she the whitest angel that 






ONCE SHE SAID: "NOW THIS, I SUPPOSE, IS WHAT THEY CALL A TEAGEDY. 



136 



THE CRISIS 



ever lived, purity iuearnate." His cowardice 
made him sick, "I'll go and tell him," he 
said, and started for the door. 

"If you do," whispered common sense, 
"you'll lose your job and then what would 
become of you? After all Emmy need never 
know." 

"But I'll always know I didn't defend 
her," he answered back silently. 

"He's gone out to the bank anyhow," went 
on the inward oiDposition. "What's the use 
of rushing in there and telling him before 
the whole board of directors?" 

"Well, then, when he comes back," he 
capitulated, but he felt himself weaken. 

But Mr. Fields didn't come back. When 
Mr. Hunter called him up, Clarkson con- 
nected him Avith the bank, with the result 
that Mr. Fields left for Reading in the course 
of an hour. He didn't come back for a 
week. 

Meanwhile Archie tasted the depths of 
self-abasement. "But what am I to do?" he 
groaned to himself at nights. "If I tell him 
I'm colored he'll kick me out, and if I go 
anywhere else I'd run the same risk. If 
I'd only knocked him down ! After all she'll 
never know and I'll make it up to her. I'll 
be so good to her — dear little Emmy! But 
bow could I know that he would take that 
view of it — beastly low mind he must have!" 
He colored up like a girl at the thought of it. 

He passed the week thus, alternately re- 
viling and defending himself. He knew 
now though that he would never have the 
courage to tell. The economy of the thing 
he decided was at least as important as the 
principle. • And always he wrote to Emmy 
letters of such passionate adoration that the 
girl for all her natural steadiness was carried 
off her feet. 

"How he loves me," she thought happily. 
"If mother is willing I believe — yes, I will — 
I'll marry him Christmas. But I won't tell 
him till he comes Thanksgiving." 

When Mr. Fields came back he sent im- 
mediately for his son Peter. The two held 
some rather stormy consultations, which were 
renewed for several days. Peter roomed in 
town, while his father lived out at Chestnut 
Hiir. Eventually Archie was sent for. 

"You're not looking very fit, my boy." Mr. 
Fields greeted him kindly; "working too 
hard I suppose over those specifications. 
Well, here's a tonic for you. This last week 
has shown me that I need someone younger 



than myself to take a hand in the business. 
I'm getting too old or too tired or something. 
Anyhow I'm played out. 

"I've tried to make this young man here, 
■ — with an angry glance at his son — "see that 
the maiitle ought to fall on him, but he won't 
hear of it. Says the business can stop for 
all he cares; he's got enough money anyway. 
Gad, in my day young men liked to work, 
instead of dabbling around in this filthy 
social settlement business — with a lot of old 
maids." 

Peter smiled contentedly. "Sally in our 
alley, what?" he put in diabolically. The 
older man glared at him, exasperated. 

"Now look here, Ferrers," he went on 
abruptly, "I've had my eye on you ever 
since you first came. I don't know a thing 
about you outside of Mr. Fallon's recom- 
mendation, but I can see you've got good 
stuff in you — and what's more, you're a born 
engineer. If you had some money, I'd take 
you into partnership at once, but I believe 
you told me that all you had was your 
salary." Archie nodded. 

"Well, now, I tell you what I'm going to 
do. I'm going to take you in as 
a sort of silent partner, teach you 
the business end of the concern, and in 
the course of a few years, place the greater 
part of the management in your hands. You 
can see you Avon't lose by it. Of course I'll 
still be head, and after I step out Peter Avill 
take my place, though only nominally I 
suppose." 

He sighed; his son's business defection was 
a bitter point with him. But that imper- 
turbable young naan only nodded. 

"The boss g-uessed right the very first 
time," he paraphrased cheerfully. "You bet 
I'll be head in name only. Young Ferrers, 
there's just the man for the job. What d'you 
say, Archie?" 

The latter tried to collect himself. "Of 
course I accept it, Mr. Fields, and I — 1 don't 
think you'll eA'er regret it." He actually 
stammered. Was there ever such Avonderful 
luck? 

"Oh, that's all right," Mr. Fields went 6n, 
"you wouldn't be getting this chance if you 
didn't deserve it. See here, what about your 
boarding out at Chestnut Hill for a year or 
Iavo? Then I can lay ray hands on you any 
time, and you can get hold of things that 
much sooner. You live on Green Street, 
don't you? Well, give your landlady a 



EMMY 



137 



month's notice and quit the 1st of December. 
A young man coming on like you ought to 
be thinking of a home anyway. Can't find 
some nice girl to marry you, what?" 

Archie, flushing a little, acknowledged his 
engagement. 

"Good, that's fine!" Then with sudden 
recollection — "Oh, so you're reformed. Well, 
I thought you'd get over that. Can't settle 
down too soon. A lot of nice little cottages 
out there at Chestnut Hill. Peter, your 
mother says she wishes you'd come out to 
dinner to-night. The youngest Wilton girl 
is to be there, I believe. Guess that's all for 
this afternoon, Ferrers." 

VI. 

A RCHIE walked up Chestnut Street on 
■^^^ air. "It's better to be born lucky than 
rich," he reflected. "But I'll be rich, too — 
and what a lot I can do for Emmy. Glad 
I didn't tell Mr. Fields now. Wonder what 
those 'little cottages' out to Chestnut Hill 

sell for. Emmy " He stopped short, 

struck by a sudden realization. 

"Why, I must be stark, staring crazy," he 
said to himself, standing still right in the 
middle of Chestnut Street. A stout gentle- 
man whom his sudden stopping had seriously 
incommoded gave him, as he passed by, a 
vicious prod with his elbow. It started him 
on again. 

"If I hadn't clean forgotten all about it. 
Oh, Lord, what am I to do? Of course 
Emmy can't go out to Chestnut Hill to live — 
well, that would be a give-away. And he 
advised me to live out there for a year or 
two — and he knows I'm engaged, and — now 
— making more than enough to marry on." 

He turned aimlessly down 19th Street, and 
spying Kittenhouse Square sat down in it. 
The cutting November wind swirled brown, 
crackling leaves right into his face, but he 
never saw one of them. 

When he arose agaui, long after his din- 
ner hour, he had made his decision. After 
all Emmy was a sensible girl; she knew he 
had only his salary to depend on. And, of 
course, he wouldn't have to stay out in 
Chestnut Hill forever. They could buy, or 
perhaps — he smiled proudly — even build 
now, far out in West Philadelphia, as far 
as possible away from Mr. Fields. He'd 
just ask her to postpone their marriage — 
perhaps for two years. He sighed a little, 
for he was very much in love. 



"It seems funny that prosperity should 
make a fellow put off his happiness," he 
thought ruefully, swinging himself aboard 
a North 19th Street ear. 

He decided to go to Plainville and tell her 
about it — he could go up Saturday after- 
noon. "Let's see, I can get an express 
to Harrisburg, and a sleeper to Plainville, 
and come back Sunday afternoon. Emmy'll 
like a surprise like that." He thought of 
their improvised trip to the Academy and 
how she had made him buy gallery seats. 
"Lucky she has that little saving streak in 
her. She'll see through the whole thing like 
a brick." His simile made him smile. As 
soon as he reached home he scribbled her 
a note : 

"I'm coming Sunday," he said briefly, "and 
I have something awfully important to ask 
you. I'll be there only from 3 to 7. 
'When Time let's slip one little perfect hour/ 
that's that Omar thing you're always quoting, 
isn't it? Well, there'll be four perfect hours 
this trip." 

All the way on the slow poky local 
from Harrisburg he pictured her surprise. 
"I guess she won't mind the postponement 
one bit," he thought with a brief pang. "She 
never was keen on marrying. Girls certainly 
are funny. Here she admits she's in love 
and willing to marry, and yet she's always 
hung fire about the date." He dozed fitfully. 

As a matter of fact Emmy had fixed the 
date. "Of course," she said to herself hap- 
pily, "the 'something important' is that he 
wants me to marry him right away. Well, 
I'll tell him that I will, Christmas. Dear 
old Archie coming all this distance to ask 
me that. I'll let him beg me two or three 
times first, and then I'll tell him. Won't 
he be pleased ? I shouldn't be a bit surprised 
if he went down on his knees again." She 
flushed a little, thinking of that first won- 
derful time. 

"Being in love is just — dandy," she de- 
cided. "I g-uess I'll wear my red dress." 

Afterward the sight of that red dress al- 
ways caused Emmy a pang of actual physi- 
cal anguish. She never saw it without seeing, 
too, every detail of that disastrous Sunday 
afternoon. Archie had come^she had gone 
to the door to meet him — they had lingered 
happily in the hall a few moments, and then 
she had brought him in to her mother and 
Celeste. 

The old French woman had kissed him on 



138 



THE CRISIS 



both cheeks. "See, then it's thou, my 
cherished one !" she cried ecstatically. "How 
long a time it is since thou art here." 

Mrs. Carrel's greeting, though not so de- 
monstrative, was no less sincere, and when 
the two were left to themselves "the cher- 
ished one" was radiant. 

"My, but your mother can make a fellow 
feel welcome, Emmy. She doesn't say much 
but what she does, goes." 

Emmy smiled a little absently. The gray 
mist outside in the sombre garden, the Are 
crackling on the hearth and casting ruddy 
shadows on Archie's hair, the very red of 
her dress, Archie himself — all this was mak- 
ing for her a picture, which she saw repeated 
on endless future Sunday afternoons in 
Philadelphia. She sighed contentedly. 

"I've got something to tell you, sweet- 
heart," said Archie. 

"It's coming," she thought. "Oh, isn't it 
lovely! Of all the people in the world — 
he loves me, loves me!" She almost missed 
the beginning of his story. For he was tell- 
ing her of Mr. Fields and his wonderful 
offer. 

When she finally caught the drift of what 
he was saying she was vaguely disappointed. 
He was talking business, in which she was 
really very little interested. The "saving 
streak" which Archie had attributed to her 
was merely sporadic, and was due to a nice 
girl's delicacy at having money spent on her 
by a man. But, of course, she listened. 

"So you see the future is practically set- 
tled — there's only one immediate drawback," 
he said earnestly. She shut her eyes — it was 
coming after all. 

He went on a little puzzled by her silence ; 
"only one drawback, and that is that, of 
course, we can't be married for at least two 
3'ears yiet." 

Her eyes flew open. "Not marry for two 
years! Why — why ever not?" 

Even then he might have saved the situa- 
tion by telling her first of his own cruel 
disappointment, for her loveliness, as she sat 
there, all glowing red and bronze in the fire- 
lit dusk, smote him very strongly. 

But he only floundered on. 

"Why, Emmy, of course, you can see — 
3'ou're so much darker than I — anybody can 
tell at a glance what you — er — are." He 
was crude, he knew it, but he couldn't see 
how to help himself. "And we'd have to live 
at Chestnut Hill, at first, right there near 
the Fields', and there'd be no way with you 



there to keep people from knowing that 1-- 
that — oh, confound it all — Emmy, you must 
understand! You don't mind, do you? You 
know you never were keen on marrying any- 
way. If we were both the same color — why, 
Emmy, what is it?" 

For she had risen and was looking at him 
as though he were someone entirely strange. 
Then she turned aiid gazed unseeingly out 
the window. So that was it — the "some- 
thing important" — he was ashamed of her, 
of her color; he was always talking about a 
white man's chances. Why, of course, how 
foolish she'd been all along — how could he 
be white with her at his side? And she 
had thought he had come to urge her to 
marry him at once — the sting of it sent her 
head up higher. She turned and faced 
him, her beautiful silhouette distinctly out- 
lined against the gray blur of the window. 
She wanted to hurt him — she was quite cool 
now. 

"I have something to tell you, too, Archie," 
she said evenly. "I've been meaning to tell 
you for some time. It seems I've been mak- 
ing a mistake all along. I don't really love 
you" — she was surprised dully that the 
words didn't choke her — "so, of course, I 
can't marry you. I was wondering how I 
could get out of it — you can't think how 
tiresome it's all been." She had to stop. 

He was standing, frozien, motionless like 
something carved. 

"This seems as good an opportunity as 
any — oh, here's your ring," she finished, 
holding it out to him coldly. It was a beau- 
tiful diamond, small but flawless — the only 
thing he'd ever gone into debt for. 

The statue came to life. "Emmy, you're 
crazy," he cried passionately, seizing her by 
the wrist. "You've got the wrong idea. 
You think I don't want j^ou to marry me. 
What a cad you must take me for. I only 
asked you to postpone it a little while, so 
we'd be happier afterward. I'm doing it all 
for you, girl. I never dreamed — it's pre- 
posterous, Emmy! And you can't say you 
don't love me — that's all nonsense!" 

But she clung to her lie desperately. 

"No, really, Archie, I don't love you one 
bit; of course I like you awfully — let go my 
wrist, you can think how strong you are. 
I should have told you long ago, but I hadn't 
the heart — and it really was interesting." 
No grand lady on the stage could have been 
more detached. He should know, too, how 
it felt not to be wanted. 



EMMY 



139 



He was at her feet now, clutching des- 
perately, as she retreated, at her dress — the 
red dress she had donned so bravely. He 
couldn't believe in her heartlessness. "You 
must love me, Emmy, and even if you don't 
you must marry me anyway. Why, you 
promised — you don't know what it means to 
me, Emmj' — it's my very life — I've never 
even dreamed of another woman but you ! 
Take it back, Emmy, you can't mean it." 

But she convinced him that she could. "I 
wish you'd stop, Archie," she said wearily; 
"this is awfully tiresome. And, anyway, I 
think you'd better go now if you want to 
catch your train." 

He stumbled to his feet, the life all out 
of him. In the hall he turned around : "You'll 
say good-by to your mother for me," he 
said mechanically. She nodded. He opened 
the front door. It seemed to close of its own 
accord behind him. 

She came back into the sitting room, won- 
dering why the place had suddenly grown so 
intolerably hot. She opened a window. 
From somewhere out of the gray mists came 
the strains of "Alice, Where Art Thou?" 
executed with exceeding mournfulness on 
an organ. The girl listened with a curious 
detached intentness. 

"That must be Willie Holborn," she 
thought; "no one else could play as wretch- 
edly as that." She crossed heavily to the 
armchair and flung herself in it. Her mind 
seemed to go on acting as though it were 
clockwork and she were watching it. 

Once she said: "Now this, I suppose, is 
what they call a tragedy." And again : ""He 
did get down on his knees." 

VII. 

'T' HERE was nothing detached or imper- 
■■• sonal in Archie's consideration of his 
plight. All through the trip home, through 
the loBg days that followed and the still 
longer nights, he was in torment. Again and 
agaiuj' he went over the scene. 

"She was making a plaything out of me, ' 
he chafed bitterly. "All these months she's 
been only fooling. And yet I wonder if she 
really meant it, if she didn't just do it to 
make it easier for me to be white. If that's 
the ease what an insufferable cad she must 
take me for. No, she couldn't have cared for 
me, because if she had she'd have 
seen through it all right away." 

By the end of ten days he had worked 
himself almost into a fever. His burning 



face and shaking hands made him resolve, as 
he dressed that morning, to 'phone the office 
that he was too ill to come to work. 

"And I'll stay home and write her a letter 
that she'll have to answer." For although 
he had sent her one and sometimes two let- 
ters every day ever since his return, there 
had been no reply. 

"She must answer that," he said to himself 
at length, when the late afternoon shadows 
were creeping in. He had torn up letter 
after letter — he had been proud and beseech- 
ing by turns. But in this last he had laid 
his very heart bare. 

"And if she doesn't answer it" — it seemed 
to him he couldn't face the possibility. He 
was at the writing desk where her picture 
stood in its little silver frame. It had been 
there all that day. As a rule he kept it 
locked up, afraid of what it might reveal to 
his landlady's vigilant eye. He sat there, 
his head bowed over the picture, wondering 
dully how he should endure his misery. 

Someone touched him on the shoulder. 

"Gad, boy," said Mr, Nicholas Fields, 
"here I thought you were sick in bed, and 
come here to find you mooning over a pic- 
ture. What's the matter? Won't the lady 
have you? Let's see who it is that's been 
breaking you up so." Archie watched him 
in fascinated horror, while he picked up the 
photograph and walked over to the window. 
As he scanned it his expression changed. 

"Oh," he said, with a little puzzled frown 
and yet laughing, too, "it's your colored 
lady friend again. Won't she let you go? 
That's the way with these black women, once 
they get hold of a white man — bleed 'em to 
death. I don't see how you can stand them 
anyway; it's the Spanish in you, I suppose. 
Better get rid of her before you get mar- 
ried. Hello " he broke off. 

For Archie was standing menacingly over 
him. "If you say another word about that 
girl I'll break every rotten bone in your 
body." 

"Oh, come," said Mr. Fields, still pleas- 
ant, "isn't that going it a little too strong? 
Why, what can a woman like that mean to 
you?" 

"She can mean," said the other slowly, 
"everything that the woman who has prom- 
ised to be my wife ought to mean." The 
broken engagement meant nothing in a time 
like this. 

Mr. Fields forgot his composure. "To be 
your wife ! Why, you idiot, you — you'd ruin 



140 



THE CRISIS 



yourself — marry a Negro — have you lost 
your senses? Oh, I suppose it's some of 
your crazy foreign notions. In this country 
white gentlemen don't marry colored 
women.'' 

Archie had not expected this loophole. 
He hesitated, then with a shrug he burnt all 
his bridges behind him. One by one he sav/ 
his ambitions flare up and vanish. 

"No, 3'ou're right," he rejoined. "Wliite 
gentlemen don't, but colored men do." Then 
he waited calmly for the avalanche. 

It came. "You mean," said Mr. Nicholas 
Fields, at first with only wonder and then 
with growing suspicion in his voice, "you 
mean that you're colored?" Archie nodded 
and watched him turn into a maniac. 

"Why, you low-lived young blackguard, 

you " he swore horribly. "And you've let 

me think all this time " He broke off 

again, hunting for something insulting 
enough to say. "You Nigger!" he hurled at 
him. He really felt there was nothing worse, 
so he repeated it again and again with fresh 
imprecations. 

"I think," said Archie, "that that will do. 
I shouldn't like to forget myself, and I'm 
in a pretty reckless mood to-day. You must 
reniember, Mr. Fields, you didn't ask me who 
I was, and I had no occasion to tell you. 
Of course I won't come back to the office." 

"If you do," said Mr. Fields, white to 
the lips, "I'll have you locked up if I have 
to perjure my soul to find a charge against 
3'ou. I'll show you what a white man can 
do — you " 

But Archie had taken him by the shoulder 
and pushed him outside the door. 

"And that's all right," he said to himself 
with a sudden heady sense of liberty. He 
surveyed himself curiously in the mirror. 
"Wouldn't anybody think I had changed 
into some horrible ravening beast. Lord, 
how that one little word changed him." He 
ruminated over the injustice — the petty, 
foolish injustice of the whole thing. 

"I don't believe," he said slowly, "it's 
worth while having a white man's chances if 
one has to be like that. I see what Emmy 
used to be driving at now." The thought of 
her sobered him. 

"If it should be on account of my chances 
that you're letting me go," he assured the 
picture gravely, "it's all quite unnecessary, 
for I'll never have another opportunity like 
that." 



In which he was quite right. It even 
looked as though he couldn't get any work 
at all along his own line. There was no 
demand for colored engineers. 

"If you keep your mouth shut," one man 
said, "and not let the other clerks know 
what you are I might try you for awhile." 
There was nothing for him to do but accept. 
At the end of two weeks— the day before 
Thanksgiving — he found out that the men 
beside him, doing exactly the same kind of 
work as his own, were receiving for it five 
dollars more a week. The old injustice 
based on color had begun to hedge him in. 
It seemed to him that his unhappiness and 
humiliation were more than he could stand. 

VIII. 

"D UT at least his life was occupied. Emmy, 
-■^ on the other hand, saw her own life 

stretching out through endless vistas of 
empty, useless days. She grew thin and 
listless, all the brightness and vividness of 
living toned down for her into one gTay, 
flat monotony. By Thanksgiving Day the 
strain showed its effects on her very plainly. 

Her mother, who had listened in her usual 
silence when her daughter told her the cause 
of the broken engagement, tried to help her. 

"Emmy," she said, "you're probably doing 
Archie an injustice. I don't believe he ever 
dreamed of being ashamed of you. I think 
it is your own wilful pride that is at fault. 
You'd better consider carefully — if you are 
making a mistake you'll regret it to the day 
of your death. The sorrow of it will never 
leave you." 

Emmy was petulant. "Oh, mother, what 
can you know about it? Celeste says you 
married when you were young, even younger 
than I — married to the man you loved, and 
you were with him, I suppose, till he died. 
You couldn't know how I feel." She fell to 
staring absently out the window. It was 
a long time before her mother spoke again. 

"No, Emmy," she finally began again very 
gravely, "I wasn't with your father till he 
died. That is why I'm speaking to you as 
I am. I had sent him away — we had quar- 
relled — oh, I was passionate enough when I 
was your age, Emmy. He was jealous — he 
was a West Indian — I suppose Celeste has 
told you — and one day he came past the 
sitting room — it was just like this one, over- 
looking the garden. Well, as he glanced in 
the window he saw a man, a white man, put 



EMMY 



141 



his arms around me and kiss me. When he 
came in through the side door the man had 
gone. I was just about to explain — no, tell 
him — for I didn't know he had seen me 
when he began." She paused a little, but 
presently went on in her even, dispassionate 
voice : 

"He was furious, Emmy; oh, he was so 
angry, and he accused me— oh, my dear! 
He was almost insane. But it was really 
because he loved me. And then I became 
angry and I wouldn't tell him anything. And 
finally, Emmy, he struck me — you mustn't 
blame him, child; remember, it was the same 
spirit showing in both of us, in different 
ways. I was doing all I could to provoke 
him by keeping silence and he merely retali- 
ated in his way. The blow wouldn't have 
harmed a little bird. But — well, Emmy, I 
think I must have gone crazy. I ordered 
him from the house — it had been my moth- 
er's — and I told him never, never to let me 
see him again." She smiled drearily. 

"I never did see him again. After he left 
Celeste and I packed up our things and 
came here to America. You were the littlest 
thing, Emmy. You can't remember living 
in France at all, can you? Well, when your 
father found out where I was he wrote and 
asked me to forgive him and to let him come 
back. 'I am on my knees,' the letter said. 
I wrote and told him yes — I loved him, 
Emmy; oh, child, you with your talk of 
color; you don't know what love is. If you 
really loved Archie you'd let him marry you 
and lock you off, away from all the world, 
just so long as you were with him. 

"I Avas so happy," she resumed. "I hadn't 
seen him for two years. Well, he started — 
he was in Hayti then; he got to New York 
safely and started here. There was a .wreck 
— just a little one — only five people killed, 
but he was one of them. He was so badly 
mangled, they wouldn't even let me see him." 

"Oh!" breathed Emmy. "Oh, mother!" 
After a long time she ventured a question. 
"Who was the other man, mother?" 

"The other man? Oh! that was my 
father; my mother's guardian, protector, 
everything, but not her husband. She was 
a slave, you know, in New Orleans, and he 
helped her to get away. He took her to 
Hayti first, and then, afterward, sent her 
over to France, where I was born. He never 
ceased in his kindness. After my mother's 
death I didn't see him for ten years, not 
till after I was married. That was the time 



Emile — you were named for your father, 
you know— saw him kiss me. Mr. Peehegru, 
my father, was genuinely attached to my 
mother, I think, and had come after all these 
years to make some reparation. It was 
through him I first began translating for the 
publishers. You know yourself how my 
work has grown." 

She was quite ordinary and matter of 
fact again. Suddenly her manner changed. 

"I lost him when I was 22. Emmy — 
think of it — and my life has been nothing 
ever since. That's why I want you to think 
• — to consider " She was weeping pas- 
sionately now. 

Her mother in tears ! To Emmy it was 
as though the world lay in ruins about her 
feet. 

IX. 

A S it happened Mrs. Carrel's story only 
■^^^^~ plunged her daughter into deeper 
gloom. 

"It couldn't have happened at all if we 
hadn't been colored," she told herself 
moodily. "If grandmother hadn't been col- 
ored she wouldn't have been a slave, and if 
she hadn't been a slave — That's • what it 
is, color — color — it's wrecked mother's life 
and now it's wrecking mine." 

She couldn't get away from the thought 
of it. Archie's words, said so long ago, came 
back to her : "Just wait till color keeps you 
from the thing you want the most," he had 
told her. 

"It must be wonderful to be white," she 
said to herself,' staring absently at the 
Stevenson motto on the wall of her little 
room. She went up close and surveyed it 
unseeingly. "If only I weren't colored," she 
thought. She checked herself angrily, en- 
veloped by a sudden sense of shame. "It 
doesn't seem as though I could be the same 
girl." 

A thin ray of cold December sunlight 
picked out from the motto a little gilded 
phrase : "To renounce when that shall be 
necessary and not be embittered." She read 
it over and over and smiled whimsically. 

"I've renounced — there's no question about 
that," she thought, "but no one could expect 
me not to be bitter." 

If she could just get up strength enough, 
she reflected, as the days passed by, she 
would try to be cheerful in her mother's 
presence. But it was so easy to be melan- 
choly. 



142 



THE CRISIS 



About a Aveek before Christmas her mother 
went to New York. She would see her pub- 
lishers and do some shopping and would be 
back Christmas Eve. Emmy was really glad 
to see her go. 

"I'll spend that time in getting myself 
together," she told herself, "and when mother 
comes back I'll be all right." Nevertheless, 
for the first few days she was, if anything, 
more listless than ever. But Christmas Eve 
and the prospect of her mother's return 
gave her a sudden brace. 

"Without bitterness," she kept saying to 
herself, "to renounce without bitterness." 
Well, she would — she would. When her 
mother came back she should be astonished. 
She would even wear the red dress. But the 
sight of it made her weak; she couldn't put 
it on. But she did dress herself very care- 
fully in white, remembering how gay she 
had been last Christmas Eve. She had put 
mistletoe in her hair and Archie had taken 
it out. 

"I don't have to have mistletoe," he had 
whispered to her proudly. 

In the late afternoon she ran out to Hol- 
bom's. As she came back 'round the corner 
she saw the stage drive away. Her mother, 
of course, had come. She ran into the sitting 
room wondering why the door was closed. 

"I will be all right," she said to herself, 
her hand on the knob, and stepped into the 
room — to walk straight into Archie's arms. 

She clung to him as though she could never 
let him go. 

"Oh, Archie, you've come back, you really 
wanted me." 

He strained her closer. "I've never stopped 
wanting you," he told her, his lips on her 
hair. 

Presently, when they were sitting by the 
fire, she in the armchair and he at her 
feet, he began to explain. She would not 
listen at first, it was all her fault, she said. 

"No, indeed," he protested generously, "it 
was mine. I was so crude ; it's a wonder you 
can care at all about anyone as stupid as I 
am. And I think I was too ambitious — 
though in a way it was all for you, Emmy; 
you must always believe that. But I'm at 
the bottom rung now, sweetheart; you see, I 
told Mr. Fields everything and — he put me 
out." 

"Oh, Archie," she praised him, "that was 
really noble, since you weren't obliged to 
tell him." 



"Well, but in one sense I was obliged to — 
to keep my self-respect, you know. So there 
wasn't anything very noble about it after 
all." He couldn't tell her what had really 
happened. "I'm genuinely poor now, dear- 
est, but your mother sent for me to come 
over to New York. She knows some pretty 
all-right people there — she's a wonderful 
woman, E mm y — and I'm to go out to the 
Philippines. Could you — do you think you 
could come out there, Emmy?" 

She could, she assured him, go anywhere. 
"Only don't let it be too long, Archie — 
I " 

He was ecstatic. "Emmy — you — you don't 
mean you would be willing to start out there 
with me, do you? Why, that's only three 
months off. When " He stopped, peer- 
ing out the window. "Who is that coming 
up the path?" 

"It's Willie Holborn," said Emmy. "I 
suppose Mary sent him around with my 
present. Wait, I'll let him in." 

But it wasn't Willie Holborn, unless he 
had been suddenly converted into a small and 
very grubby special-delivery boy. 

"Mr. A. Ferrers," he said laconically, 
thrusting a book out at her. "Sign here." 

She took the letter back into the pleasant 
room, and A. Ferrers, scanning the postmark, 
tore it open. "It's from my landlady; she's 
the only person in Philadelphia whoi knows 
where I am. Wonder what's up?" he said 
incuriously. "I know I didn't forget to pay 
her my bill. Hello, what's this?" For within 
was a yellow envelope — a telegram. 

Together they tore it open. 

"Don't be a blooming idiot," it read; "the 
governor says come back and receive apolo- 
gies and accept job. Merry Christmas. 

"Peter Fields." 

"Oh," said Emmy, "isn't it lovely? Why 
does he say 'receive apologies,' Archie?" 

"Oh, I don't know," he quibbled, reflecting 
that if Peter hadn't said just that his re- 
turn would have been as impossible as ever. 
"It's just his queer way of talking. He's 
the funniest chap ! Looks as though I 
wouldn't have to go to the Philippines after 
all. But that doesn't alter the main question. 
How soon do you think you can marry me, 
Emmy?" 

His voice was light, but his eyes — 

"Well," said Emmy bravely, "what do you 
Ihink of Christmas?" 

THE END. 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 



MEMBERSHIP. 

A S we go to press our new members for 
-^^ the past month have reached a total of 
115, of which Boston secured 69. 

The annual meeting of the association will 
be held January 21, at 4 p. m., in the New 
York Evening Post Building, 20 Vesey 
Street. There will be an art exhibit and 
tea will be served at the oflBees, 26 Vesey 
Street. 

To supply the demand from the various 
branches which are planning emancipation 
meetings, the association has reprinted part 
of the emancipation supplement of the New 
York Evening Post of September 21, 1912, 
and added a page of interesting matter. 
Single copies, postpaid, cost three cents, 
two for five cents; in quantities, 100 for 
two dollars. 



THE BOSTON BRANCH. 
'' I ' HE Boston branch had its annual meet- 
■*• ing November 9, 1912. The speakers were 
the president, Mr. Francis J. Garrison, 
Hon. Albert E. Pillsbury, Mr. John E. 
MilhoUand and Miss Nerney. Mr. Pdls- 
bury described the proceedings of the Ameri- 
can Bar Association at Milwaukee. Mr. 
Pillsbury and Judge Harvey H. Baker of 
the Juvenile Court gave up their vacations 
to make the journey to Milwaukee, in the 
heat and discomfort of late August, in order 
to protest against the drawing of the color 
lin . 



ONE OF OUR TYPICAL CASES. 

^ I ' HE following interesting case suceess- 

■*■ fulh'^ investigated by the legal 

redress committee of the branch was 

reported by the secretary, Mr. Wilson : 

"Another case was that of a girl in one of 
the Koxbury grammar schools. Early in 
the spring he^* mother was informed by the 
master that the girl would not be allowed 
to graduate, and was with the reluctant 
consent of the mother, without adequate 



reason, transferred to the Trade School for 
Girls. While in the trade school she was 
wrongly marked as absent twenty-one times 
from the grammar school. The mother, a 
poor woman, working by the day for a 
living, applied to friends who sought the 
reason for the transfer of the girl, and for 
the statement that she would not be allowed 
to graduate. Acting under their advice the 
girl applied to the school board for an 
examination, and was informed that no 
reason appeared for refusing her graduation. 
"When the master was pressed for the 
reason for this statement that the girl should 
not graduate, he failed to give any adequate 
reason, became irritable and finally failed 
in courtesy and requested the association's 
representative to withdraw from his office. 
Latsr the girl was told that she could not 
attend school, and her mother, working by 
the day in Brookline, was told that she 
must come herself to the school at 8 o'clock 
to see the master. She had called on him 
several times without result and informed 
him that she would lose her job if she were 
away from it at 8 o'clock. This had no 
influence upon him. .The association quietly 
and persistently pushed the ease. There was 
no noise or blare of trumpets, but the girl 
graduated with her class and is now a mem- 
ber of one of the Boston high schools." 



MEETINGS. 
'' I ■' HE assistant secretary, Miss Gruening, 
"*• addressed meetings in Brooklyn at the 
Berean Baptist Church and at the People's 
Forum. In Manassas, Va., she spoke to the 
students of the Manassas Industrial School 
for Colored Youth. In Hampton she 
addressed the graduates and seniors of 
Hampton Institute and also spoke in the 
Zion Baptist Church, At the latter meet- 
ing an aged Negro who had been a slave 
arose and said in comment on the message 
to which he had listened: "This is the second 
time in my life I have heard the voice of 
God ; T first heard it fifty years ago." 



EQUALITY AND LIBERTY 

By CALEB S. S. BUTTON 




HE doctrine of the equality 
of mankind by virtue of 
their birth as men, with its 
consequent right to equality 
of opportunity for self- 
development as a part of 
social justice, establishes a 
common basis of conviction, in respect to 
man, and a definite end as one main object 
of the State; and these elements are primary 
in the democratic scheme. Liberty is the 
next step, and is the means by which that 
end is secured. It is so cardinal in democ- 
racy as to seem hardly secondary to 
equality in importance. 

We say that and immediately the gravest 
problem in our national life looms up. The 
NegTo problem is the mortal spot of our 
democracy. In America we have a racial 
problem of more fearful portent than that 
of any of the nations of Europe. We are 
still paying the price of slavery. The South 
is psychologically cramped. The North is 
bewildered. 

At the moment we are beset by the prob- 
lem of NegTO suffrage. It is being urged by 
a dominant school of thought that the 
immediate salvation of the Negro is less 
political than economic, and that his posses- 
sion of money and education (above all, of 
technical education) wjll eventually compel 
the grant to him of full political rights at 
a time when he can best . avail himself of 
them. This non-resistant attitude is hotly 
repelled by another gToup, who declare that 
XegTo acquiescence in Negro disfranchise- 
ment is a denial of democracy, a surrender 
to race prejudice, and an obstacle in the 
path of the accumulation of money and 
education, which is the very alternative pro- 
posed to political rights. "If we have not 
the vote," they say, "we shall have neither 
education nor justice; if we have not the 
vote, our schools will be starved and our 
farms and our jobs lost." 

Whatever the merits of this controversy 
as a matter of ethics or practical politics, 
it seems probable — rather more than prob- 
able — that the present democratic move- 
ment, uneasily recognizing this danger in 
its rear, will move forward, leaving the 
problem of the Negro suffrage to one side. 



Witness the attitude of the three great 
parties to-day. 

It is perhaps possible to evade this issue 
if we can satisfy ourselves that the vote is 
not immediately essential to Negro civiliza- 
tion — it is not difficult to find sophistries to 
bolster this thought; the mouse can find 
many reasons, philanthropic and other, for 
not belling the eat. But we may not pre- 
sume to make the Negro an "unde^man," to 
offer him a subhuman or a subcivilized life. 
For, as he gTows, the Negro, if. he be 
not given, will take. Even as we advance, 
hoping, i^erhaps, that democracy won and 
wrought by the whites will descend as an 
easy heritage to the re-enfranchised NegToes, 
we are oppressed by the dread of what may 
occur. There may arise a Negro conscious- 
ness, a sense of outraged racial dignity. 
There may come a stirring of a rebellious 
spirit among ten, or, as it will soon be, of 
fifteen or twenty million black folk. We 
cannot hope forever to sit quietly at the 
feast of life and let the black man serve. 
We cannot build upon an assumed 
superiority over these .black men, who are 
seemingly humble to-day, but who to-morrow 
may be imperious, exigent, and proudly 
race conscious. 

If the democracy in America is to be a 
white democracy, and the civilization in 
America is to be a white civilization; if it 
is proposed to make the Negro a thing with- 
out rights, a permanent semi-emancipated 
slave, a headless, strong-armed worker, then 
let the white civilization beware. We may 
sunder the races if we can; we may pre- 
serve race integrity if we can ; we may 
temporarily limit the Negro's suffrage — but 
this rock-bottom truth remains: if we seek 
to set up lower standards for one race, if 
we abate the ultimate rights, prerogatives 
and privileges of either race we shall plant 
the seeds of our own undoing. Our self- 
protection, as much as our sense of justice, 
must impel us toward the Negro's cause. 
Whether we love the Negro or hate him, we 
are, and shall continue to be, tied to him. 

Let us never forget that the best antidote 
to democracy is jingoism and race hatred. 
Stir up race or national hatred and you 
postpone your social development. 




E BURDENi 



'■'-^'"'^^'^-'^" 



CHAPTER I. 
"Bartow, Nov. 5. — An unknown Negro 
has been creating a little excitement in Bar- 
tow latel}^ Last week, late in the night, he 
went into the home of George Mann, and 
later, in the same night, the same Negro or 
his pal went into the house of R. M. Oglesby, 
bent on robbery, but he failed to secure any 
valuables, and was chased by the county 
bloodhounds, but without success. On a 
later night he tried to enter the house of 
Mr. Minnis. Last night, about 6 o'clock, a 
Negro, supposedly the same Negro, entered 
the home of Tom Page, near the Tillis 
Hotel. While rambling around in one of the 
rooms of the liouse, a telephone girl who 
boards at the Page home came into the room, 
and the Negro knocked her down, rendering 
her unconscious for a while, and then made 
his escape. Several good marksmen and 
householders are wishing that they could 
get a crack at this Negro." — Lakeland (Fla.) 
Evening Telegram. 

CHAPTER II. 
"Bartow, Nov. 7. — Last Monday after- 
noon late it was related that a Negro bent 
on robbery entered the home of Tom Page, 
and on being intercepted by a young lady 
roomer who works for the telephone com- 
pany knocked the young lady senseless. 
The sequel to this occurrence took place last 
night. 



"Mrs. Page, on returning home about 5 
o'clock, found her back door unbolted. On 
leaving home she had securedly bolted it. 
On making a search of her room it Avas 
found that some thief had rummaged through 
the bureau, trunks, etc., and had taken some 
of Mrs. Page's clothing and considerable of 
her jewelry. The county bloodhounds were 
secured at once and taken to the back yard 
where footprints were found. The hounds 
trailed around the yard, but refused to leave 
the premises. Noticing that the footprints in 
the yard were rather small, and suspicioning 
that the depredations had been committed by 
someone in the house, J. P. Murdaugh, who 
had charge of the hounds, asked the tele- 
phone girl to let them measure her feet, and 
upon measuring her feet they were found to 
be of the same dimensions as the tracks in 
the 3'ard. A search of her room was then 
made and all the stolen articles were found 
between the mattresses of her bed. She had 
taken all of Mrs. Page's best jewelry, some 
of her best clothing and a pair of trousers 
belonging to Tom Page. We suppose that 
she was going off to get married. The girl 
is a Georgia girl who has not been working 
at the local tele^Dhone office very long. 

"It is said that the young lady in question 
was for a time night operator at the tele- 
phone exchange in Lakeland." — Lakeland 
(Fla.) Evening Telegram. 



HAEEIET GIBBS-MARSHALL, President 
HARRY A. WILLIAMS, Vice-President 



LOUIS G. GREGORY, Financial Secretary 
GBEGOBIA A. FRASER, Recording Secretary 



The Washington Conservatory of Music 
and School of Expression 

Piano, Violin, Wind Instruments, Piano Tuning, Vocal Expression, History of 
Music Theory and Modern Languages 

The first and only Mission Music School founded and controlled by Negroes 
in America. 

Many scholarships ayvarded. Talented students never turned away unaided. 
902 T Street, N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Mention The Crisis. 



146 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Publishers Page 



THE CRISIS FOR 1913 

Among the many articles to be published are extracts from unpublished 
letters of Robert Gould Shaw, the brave leader of the 54th Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, who was "buried imder his NiggersI" 

"The Black Half," by Jacob Riis. 

"Professional Americanism," by * * * * * ^ leading colored teacher. 

The "Alpha Phi Alpha," a new college fraternity among college men. 

We shall make a specialty of fiction and expect short stories from Charles W. 
Chesnutt and Miss Fauset. 

We have already a striking story by Harry H. Pace, Grand Exalted Ruler 
of the Colored Elks; also one frorft Mrs. Paul Laurence Dunbar. 



A PAGE WORTH READING 

*'Why didn't you tell me about your Children's Number? I would have 
sent you a picture of my boy." 

The Advertising Man looked surprised, for the speaker was a woman' of much 
intelligence and one of our oldest subscribers. 

"Don't blame us," he replied. "It was announced in the magazine several 
months ahead and request was made for photographs of children." 

"I didn't read that. Where was it?" 

Turning to the Publishers' Page the Ad. Man pointed to the announcement 
in the September number, printed in clear, bold-face type. 

"Oh, I never read that page." 

Tho Publishers' Page is not "stuck in" at the last moment to "fill space." It 
is there for a purpose. IT IS THE PUBLISHERS' PERSONAL PAGE. Dont 
forget to read it. 

Important notices regarding our growth, changes of policy and innovations 
appear on this page. Then once in a while the publishers grow real "chatty" and 
talk about their plans, ideas and dreams — all of which makes interesting reading. 



Business Matters 

ADVERTISING — Address all inquiries to Albon L. Holsey, Advertising Manager. 

CIRCULATION — The present circulation of THE CRISIS is 22,000 copies per month, in 
every State in the Union and in 26 foreign lands. Our circulation Tjooks are open to interested 
parties. 

AGENTS — THE CRISIS has at present a staff of 469 agents. Only agents who can 
furnish first-class references are desired. 

LETTERS — Address business letters to W. E. B. Du Bois, Manager. Draw all checks to 
THE CRISIS, 26 Vesey Street, New York City. 

Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



14; 



THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE 

Offices: 26 Vesey Street, New York. Incorporated May 25, 191 I 



OFFICEBS 



National President — Mr. Moorfleld Storey, Boston, 

Mass. 
Vice-Presidents — 

Rev. John Haynes Holmes, New York. 

Mr. John E. JVIilholland, New York. 

Bishop Alexander Walters, New York. 

Rev. Garnet R. Waller. Baltimore, Md. 

Miss Mary White Ovington, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Chairman of the Board of Directors — 
Mr. Oswald Garrison Villard, New York. 

Treasurer — Mr. Walter E. Sachs, New York. 

Director of Publicity and Research — 
Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois, New York. 

Secretary — Miss May Chllds Nerney, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Assistant Secretary — Miss Martha Gruening, New 
York. 



This is the Association which seeks to put into 
practice the principles which THE CRISIS puts 
into words. If you believe what we SAY, join this 
Association and help us to put our words into DEEDS. 



MEMBERSHIP BLANK 

I hereby accept membership in the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE. 

Please find enclosed dollars and enter my name as a member in Class 

paying $ a year, and send me THE CRISIS. 



Name.. 



Address.. 



Class 1. Life Members, pajdng $500. 
Class 2. Donors, pasring $100 per year. 
Class 3. Sustaining Members, paying 
per year. 



$25 



Class 4. Contributing Members, paying $10, 

$5 or $2 per year. 
Class 5. Associate Members, pajring $1 per 

year. 



The subscription to THE CRISIS is $1 extra, except to members pasring $5 or more, who 
signify their wish that $1 of their dues be considered a CRISIS subscription. 

AH members in good standing have the privilege of attending and voting at the Annual 
Conference of the Association. 

PLEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOB THE ADVANCEMENT 
OF COLORED PEOPLE, 26 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

Mention The Crisis. 



148 



THE CRISIS . ADVERTISER 



The very Business Opportunity for ^wnich YOU 
nave teen looking may possioly oe nere on tnis page. 



-ff^'^. 




AGENTS ^«T™^*^ 

Brandt's newly patented Combination Shav- 
ing Brush and Beard Softener. Lathers the 
face : instead of using hands to rub in. use 
the little rubber fingers attached to shaving 
brush. Only sanitary method of rubbing 
in lather to prepare face for shaving. 
Softens the beard much better than ordinary 
method. Just the thing for a man with wiry 
beard and tender sWn. Gives a facial massage with 
every shave. Prevents ingrowing hairs. Bristles 
set in rubber. Sells on sight; every man wants 
one. Write for wholesale terms and prices. 
R. V. Brandt Brush Co., 42 Hudson St., N. Y. City 



You are not too young or too old to start making 
plenty of money selling REDDICK'S WORLD'S 
GREATEST POLISHIXG MITT. 

The newest practical polishing device of the age. 
Write at once for agency. It positively sells on 
sight. 

See page 110 for advertisement. 



RELIABLE, LIVE, 
RESPONSIBLE MEN 

who can sell real estate can MAKE MORE 
than $200 PER MONTH acting as 
AGENTS for the sale of our properties in 
MUSKOGEE and TAFT, OKLAHOMA 
The real coming country where there are 
opportunities and openings for all. Write 
us to-day, giving your age and experience, 
and we will offer you a FINE PROPOSI- 
TION WHICH WILL MAKE YOU 
MONEY. Address 

REEVES REALTY CO. 

Department C 

217 Flynn-Ames Bldg. Muskogee, Okla. 



AGENTS — Big money. Johnson-Flynn 
fight and other copyrighted Negro pic- 
tures. Portraits. Pillow Tops. Catalog 
FREE. 30 days' credit. 

PEOPLES PORTRAIT CO. 
Station U, Chicago, 111. 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, etc., 
of THE CRISIS, published monthly at 26 Vesey 
Street, New York, required by the Act of August 
24, 1912. 

Editor and Business Manager: W. E. B. Du Bois, 
26 Vesey Street, New York City. 

Publisher: The National Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People, 26 Vesev Street, New 
York City. 

Owners: The Nation.al Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People, a corporation, com- 
posed of 30 directors; no stock issued. 

Known bondholders, mortgagees and other 
security holders, holding 1 per cent, or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages or other 
securities, none. 

W. E, B. DU BOIS, 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this first 
day of October. 1912. 

HATTIE KASBERG, 
Commissioner of Deeds, 

5 Beekman Street, 
[Seal] New York. 



MUTUAL TEACHERS' 
AGENCY 

Recommends teachers for schools; secures 
employment for teachers. Blanks and 
information furnished free on application. 

1335 T Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 

TYPEWRITERS 



Remingtons, Densmores, 

J.e w e 1 1 s, $11.50 each; 
Franklins, Postals, Ham- 
monds, $9 each. Bargains in 
Underwoods, Smiths and all 
others. All guaranteed. 

Supplies. 

Standard Typewriter 
Exchange 

23B Park Row, New York 



PRESI DENTS 

NEGRO REPUBLIC 

in colors and a short history of Liberia. 16 x 20. 
Ready to hang on the walls; only 50c. prepaid; in 
gold frames $1.25. Everybody wants one. Write 
NEGRO PRESS, Box 126; Gainesville, Fla., U. S. A. 
1,000 agents wanted. 

REGALIA 




^ 






A Race Enterprise 

Manufacturing Badges, 
Banners and Supplies 
for all Fraternal and 
Church Societies. Cata- 
logue upon request. 
CENTRAL REGALIA CO. 
Jos. L. Jones, Pres. 
N. E. Cor. 8th and Plum Sts. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



WANTED 

500 Negro families (farmers pre- 
ferred) to settle on FREE Govern- 
ment Lands in Chaves County, New 
Mexico. Blackdom is a Negro colony. 
Fertile soil, ideal climate. No "Jim 
Crow" Laws. For information write 

JAS. HAROLD COLEMAN 

Blackdom, New Mexico 

t»8 BATH TUB 

Costs littl«, no plnmblng, requires little water. 

m Weight 15 pounds, and folds into small roll. 

^^ Full length b«th«, far better th»n tin tubs, LmH for 

BW^ reart. Write for apeoial agents otfcr and dexjriptlon. RoB«iOir 

^fo. Co., ill Vanee St, ^'''•*''' •'■ **'^ Turkish Bath Cabinet*. 



Mention Thk Cri«ib. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



149 



UNDERTAKERS 



Telephone Columbus 3935 Open All Night 

RODNEY DADE & BROS. 

Undertakers and Embalmers 

Notary Public 

Funeral Parlor and Chapel Free. 

Licensed Lady Bmbalmer Prompt Service 

266 West 63d Street New York, N. Y. 

Between Broadway and 8th Avenue 



A PLACE TO STOP 



HOTEL WASHINGTON 

First-class Service for First-class People 

3252 Wabash Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 



MOVING 



Telephone 4214 Greeley 

BRANIC'S EXPRESS 

PACKING AND SHIPPING 

ANDREW J. BRANIC 

Formerly Manager Virginia Transfer Company 

459 SEVENTH AVENUE New Tork City 

Orders by mail or 'phone receive pron >t attention 

TRUNKS STORED 25c. PER MONTH 

Official Expressman for the C. V. B. A. 



PERSONAL CARDS 

WIGINGTON & BELL 

Architects 

Karbach Block Omaha, Neb. 

Telephone 5277 Morningside 

DR. GERTRUDE E. CURTIS 

Surgeon Dentist 
188 West 135th Street, New York City 

Telephone 4886 Morningside 

DR. D. W. ONLEY 

Surgeon Dentist 

S. W. Cor. 133d St. and Lcbox Ave., New Yerk 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m., 1 to 9 p. m. 

Sundays by Appointment 

H. HENRY HARRIS 

Architect 

Cor. 8th and Princess Streets 

Wilmington, N. C. 



LEGAL DIRECTORY 



Office Phone 
Home 58 Main 



Residence 2546 Michigan 
Bell Phoiifi E'-2161 

C. H. CALLOWAY 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Notary Public 

117 W. 6th Street Kansas City, Mo. 

FRANKLIN W. WILLIAMS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Notary Public 

Real Estate Conveyancer 

206 Parrish Street Durham, N. C. 

J. DOUGLAS WETMORE 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 
5 Beekman Street (Temple Court) 
New York City 
Tel. 6222 Cortlandt Cable Address, Judowei 

Telephone 5574 Beekman Rooms 905 to 907 

WILFORD H. SMITH 

Lawyer 

150 Nassau Street New York City 

Uptown Office — 136 West 136th Street 

General Practice Notary Public 

WILLIAM R. MORRIS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

1020 Metropolitan Life Building 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Real Estate and Probate Matters a Specialty 

ROBERT B. BARCUS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Notary Public 

Office: Room 502, Eberly Block, Columbus, O. 

B. S. SMITH 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Offices: Suite 610, Sykes Block. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

GEORGE W. MITCHELL 

Attomey-at-Law 
908 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tel. 2026 Fort Hill Cable Address, Epben 

EDGAR P. BENJAMIN 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 
34 SCHOOL STREET Boston, Mass. 

'Belephone Connection 

W. Ashbie Hawkins George W. F. MeMechen 

HAWKINS & McMECHEN 

Attomeys-at-Law 

21 Bast tfaratega Street Baltimore, Md. 



Mention The Crisis. 



150 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 




Do you remember that five-spot -you 
blew in that time, and the "ten" you 
wasted on unnecessary extravagance, 
and the many little sums you had in 
your hand and let get away without 
a single thing to show for them? 

They would be very comforting if 
you had them now, wouldn't they? 
Especially so if you had them wisely 
invested. 

But you did not keep them. If you 
had they would now be keeping you. 
"A hundred dollars wisely invested 
earns as much as a man steadily em- 
ployed.". The eminent financier. Jay 
Gould, said that — and proved it. 

Suppose You Should Lose 
Your Job To-morrow? 

The average Negro is dependent 
upon his job. What opportunity is 
open to him if he loses it? On every 
hand the "Door of Opportunity" is 
being closed against him, burdensome 
restrictions hedge him about and un- 
just and humiliating discriminations 
operate to handicap and discourage 
him. In competition with other races 
the "square deal" is being denied him 
in even his humblest and most menial 
efforts to earn a living. 

What Is the Remedy? 

The Negro must make his own job 

— must get into business of his own. 
He must enter the manufacturing, 
mercantile and commercial fields- 
must become a producer instead of a 
consumer only. He must make for 
iTimsclf the "Opportunity" denied 
him; must himself — in his own enter- 
prises — make openings for his sons 
and daughters, so they may have em- 
ployment when their "schooling" is 
done. 



But he can do this only 
through combination and co- 
operation. Therein alone is 
his protection and self-pre- 
servation. 

The American Sales 
Corporation 

F. W. Williams, President. 
Jno. S. Collins, 1st Vice-President. 
W. W. Jefferson, 2d Vice-President. 
W. J. Kemp, Secretary-Manager. 
Chas. S. Carter, Treasurer. 

A Negro-American corporation 
organized and chartered under the 
strict Corporate Laws of the State 
of Virginia for business promotion 
and development in manufacturing, 
mercantile and commercial lines. Its 
operations are under the direct super- 
vision of the State Corporate Com- 
mission. 

It has for its nucleus a big- profit 
manufacturing business that is bound 
to become national in size because of 
the tremendous and universal need 
for its product. It is "your oppor- 
tunity" to invest a few spare dollars 
where they will bring you very large 
returns and at the same time give 
employment to an increasing number 
of our young men and women. It is 
your chance to become part owner in 
a business that is already going, that 
is already furnishing desirable em- 
ployment openings, that is of produc- 
tive nature and that offers unusually 
quick and profitable "turn-over" for 
your money. 

Provide an Income for Your 

Future 

"One Good Investment Is 

Better Than a Lifetime 

of Labor" 

Shares of Preferred Treasury Stock 
are $10 each, payable in easy monthly 
installments if desired. 

Full information for the asking. 

Call or write the Secretary, 206 
Queen Street, Norfolk, Va. 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 151 



FOR 1913 

Two pretty dark paby faces m colors, and the 
celetrateJ '""Credo, ty ^iV. E. B. Du Bois, beauti- 
fully printed, together AVith a large legible calendar 
by montbs. Price 25 cents, postpaid. 



National Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People 

iEmanripatinn 3l«btb^ ^^ala 

for your letters during tne nolidays and all next 
year, nandsomely designed by Ricbard L. Bro-wn, 
and done m colors. Price 1 cent eacn. 

"" Sbow your belief m freedom on every letter you 
write m 1913. 



lEmannpatinn IGit^ratur^ 

for celebrations, arguments, facts, pictures 
^^^=== Price 5 cents ^^==^^^= 



Site iunbar (Cnmpang, 2fi T&tBt^ Bt, Nem f nrk 



Mention The Crisis. 



152 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



r TELLING A STORY 
To friends who know you, may be easy, but "putting one over" to 
strangers is quite different. 

Telling a busy, business man about your services or your merchandise is still less 
a "cinch," for he hears the same story every day a dozen or more times. 

A clever speaker, before a sleepy or hostile audience, puts a good, stiff punch 
into his very first remark. This "knocks 'em off their feet" and they listen. 

Your business letters may be good, but if they lack the "punch" they won't "pull." 
Correct business stationery is the "punch" that hits the busy man "right in the eye" 
and makes him read your letter. 

We'll show you the sort of stationery we create, if you write us. 

We print for Mr. Conde Nast, of Vogue; we print The CrISIS. 

ROBERT N. WOOD, Printing and Engraving 

202 EAST 99th STREET NEW YORK 

'Phone 6667 Lenox 



"HALF A MAN 



JJ 



The Status of the Negro in New York 

By 

MARY WHITE OVINGTON 

With a foreword by Dr. Franz Boas of Columbia University 

Chapter I. How the colored people won their civil and political rights. 

Chapters II. and III. The Negro tenement and the life of the poor. 

Chapters IV. and V. How the colored man earns his living, with a full descrip- 
tion of the professions; the ministry, the stage. 

Chapter VI. The colored woman, her discouragements and successes. 

Chapter VII. A vivid description of the life of the well-to-do Negroes. 

Chapter VIII. The Negro in politics in New York. 

Chapter IX. The author's personal views on the race question. 

Price $L00; by mail, $1.12. 

LONGMANS, GREEN & CO., Publishers, NEW YORK 

This book is for sale in the Book Department of The Crisis, 26 Vesey-St., N. Y. 

Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



153 



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Exclusive Parisian Creations for the 

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'Phone 624 Harlem. 

P. and A. 'Phone 5252-F 

HEINZ 

THE TAILOR 

I carry a full line of the best woolens. 

Ladies' and Gents' suits made to order. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

1713 Wylie Avenue Pittsburgh, Pa. 




No. 4 Special Buggy 

$65.00 



A value unequaled. Sold on 
$1.00 Profit Margin. Write 
for prices and other styles. 
Send for catalog. 

C. R. Patterson & Sons 

GREENFIELD, OHIO 

lyortieit Negro carriage concern in the United State* 



Mention The Crisis. 



154 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



COLLEGE AND FRATERNITY PINS 




We are now prepared to supply colleges, fraternal organizations, baseball clubs, athletic 
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Send us your idea and let us send you a drawing and a quotation surprisingly small, 
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Watch fobs, rings, cuff buttons and metal novelties of special design are also produced 
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Sterling Silver Pins 40 cents up; Gold-filled 60 cents up; Solid Gold $1.10 up 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY, 26 Vcscy Street, New York 



Provident Hospital and Training School 
for Colored Nurses 

Aim : To keep Its technic equal to the best 

Founded 1891 

The first training school for colored 
nurses in this country, Freedman's 
excepted. 

Comprises a training school for 
nurses, hospital, dispensary, and 
thoroughly equipped children's depart- 
ment; when funds are ample, post- 
graduate work may be undertaken. 

The hospital is open to all. The 
races co-operate in the board of 
trustees, in the medical staff and in 
administration; the institution is the 
only one of its kind in which a colored 
man may act as interne. 

Cost of buildings and equipment, 
$100,000; free from debt. Endowment, 
$50,000, contributed mostly by wills 
made by colored men. Additional 
endowment needed, $50,000. 

The nurses' course covers three 

years; training and instruction given 

by both races, according to the highest 

„, . . , modern standards. 

36th and Dearborn Sts., Ch.cago, III. 




Mention The Crisis. 



BEST BOOKS 

For students of the Negro Problem and general readers. Your library will 
be incomplete without a selection from this up-to-date list. 

These are books produced by the best writers and most able authorities on 
the problems affecting the races. By mail at following prices: 



ESSAYS 

KACE ADJUSTMENT . 

Kelly Miller $2.15 

SOULS OF BLACK FOLK. 

W. E. B. Dn Bois 1.35 

CURSE OF RACE PREJUDICE. 

Jas. F. Morton, Jr '. . .27 

ATLANTA UNIVEESITY STUDIES 

The Atlanta University Studies ave ;in 
annual study of decennially recurring: sub 
jects, covering every phase of Negio-Anieri- 
can life. 

No. 7— THE NEGRO ARTISAN $ .75 

No. 8 — THE NEGRO CHURCH 1.50 

No. 9 — NOTES ON NEGRO CRIME.. .50 

No. 10 — BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 

NEGRO-AMERICAN 25 

No. 11 — HEALTH AND PHYSIQUE 

OF THE NEGRO-AMERICAN 1.50 

No. 12— ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION 
AMONG NEGRO-AMERICANS 1.00 

No. 13 — THE NEGRO - AMERICAN 

FAMILY 75 

No. 14 — EFFORTS FOR SOCIAL 
BETTERMENT AMONG NEGRO- 
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No. 15 — THE COLLEGE -BRED NEGRO- 
AMERICAN 75 

No. 16 — THE NEGRO COMMON 

SCHOOL 75 

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HOUSE BEHIND THE CEDARS. 

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THE WIFE OF HIS YOUTH.' 

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THE CONJURE WOMAN. 

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SPORT OF THE GODS. 

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THE TESTING FIRE. 

Alexander Corkey 1.35 

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POEMS 
LYRICS OF LOWLY LIFE. 

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LYRICS OF LOWLY LIFE (Illustrated) 

Paul Laurence Dunbar 1.75 

LIFE AND WORK OF PAUL 
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POEMS OF PHILLIS WHEATLEY . 1.10 

SUNLIGHT AND STARLIGHT. 

. Henry G. Kost 1.58 

HISTORICAL AND SCIENTIFIC 

NEGRO IN THE SOUTH. 

Washington and Du Bois $1.10 

NEGRO IN THE NEW WORLD. 

Sir Harry Johnston 6 30 

MIND OF PRIMITIVE MAN. 

Franz Boaz 165 

INTER-RACIAL PROBLEMS. 

Official Record, Univ. R. C 2.55 

HISTORY OF THE NEGRO RACE. 

E. A. Johnson i 40 

NEGRO EXPLORER AT THE NORTH 
POLE. 

Matthew A. Henson i lo 

HOME OCCUPATIONS FOR BOYS 
AND GIRLS. 

Bertha Johnston 55 

BIOGRAPHIES, ETC. 

JOHN BROWN. 

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FREDERICK DOUGLASS. 

Booker T. Washington 1.40 

LIFE OF HARRIET BEECHER STOWE. 

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AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN EX- 
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(Anonymous) 1.40 

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AFTERMATH OF SLAVERY. 

W. A. Sinclair 1.65 

SOUTHERN SOUTH. 

Albert B. Hart 1.65 

RACE PREJUDICE. 

J. Finot 3.25 

NEGRO AND THE NATION. 

G. C. Merriam 1.92 



FREE 

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Our location gives us 
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our many patrons. 

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SPECIAL OFFER ^^^ ^^ ""^^ « '^^ 

— — ^^^^— — ^^-^^^— regular price quoted 
for any of these books and we will send yoy THE 
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printed on plain paper, for framing. Size 8% x 11. 
Address all orders to 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY 

26 Vesey Street New York City 



Mention The Crisis. 



WHY NOT YOU? 




Mrs. DAISY TAPLEY 

New York's favorite contralto and vocal instructor 



Mrs. Tapley says : "I find Crisis Maid Face 

Powder a most valuaDie toilet accessory. 

^Whetker tke complexion is cream, olive or 
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|p]^l^r^''''AHV9 P^J* tox. Send 2-cent stamp and name or druggist 

Perfect Face Powder " 

THE DUNBAR CO., 26 Vesey St., New York 




Mention The Crisis. 



1/ 



THE CRISIS 




^ R.ECOR,I> OF THE DARKER. HAOE 



Vol. 5, No. 4 



FEBRUARY, 1913 



\Vliole No. 28 




ONE DOLLAR A YEAR 



TEN CENTS A COPY 



Why You Should Purchase 
Your Jewelry from Us 

Three blocks from our office is Maiden Lane — the world's greatest jewelry 
market. Lower Broadway, with its massive buildings, and Wall Street three 
blocks beyond, with a golden arm enbosoms it in the financial district and 
protects it from the world beyond. Into this world there runs a steady stream 
of salesmen bearing a precious burden to jobber, wholesaler and retailer, for in 
]\Iaiden Lane are the largest .diamond merchants, jewelry manufacturers and 
watch factories. 

When j'ou purchase jewelry from your local dealer you must pay tribute 
to these middlemen all along the line, making a final price to you from 50% to 
100% beyond the original cost. 

By our fortunate location we are enabled to secure goods direct from manu- 
facturer and importer and sell them to jou at prices which your local dealer 
cannot duplicate. With us there are no middlemen. 

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but the manufacturer's guarantee, goes w-itli each piece of jewelry shipped from 
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A-24. 16-size Hunting case, Elgin 
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Of course, we have the DOLLAR WATCLf, guaranteed for one year. 

THE DUNBAR CO., 26 Vesey St., New York 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS 

A RECORD OF THE DARKER RACES 



PUBLISHED "BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENTf OF COLORED 
PEOPLE. AT 26 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

Edited by W. E. Burchardt Du Bois, with the co-operation of Oswald Garrison Villard, 
W. S. Braithwaite, M. W. Ovington, Charles Edward Russell and others. 



Contents for February^ 1913 

CENTER PICTURE: Emancipation. The Third Gerteration. 

ARTICLES 

PAGE 

ABOLITION AND FIFTY YEARS AFTER. By Rabbi Stephen S. Wise 188 

THE REPRESENTATIVE. A Story. By Virgil Cooke 187 

THE ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY. By Charles H. Garvin 196 

FATHER, FATHER ABRAHAM. A Poem. By James Weldon Johnson.. 172 

DEPARTMENTS 

ALONG THE COLOR LINE 163 

OPINION ....... r 173 

EDITORIAL 180 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 190 

THE BURDEN ,.!..„....♦„ 194 



TEN CENTS A COPY; ONE DOLLAR A YEAR 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS TWENTY-FIVE CENTS EXTRA 

RENEWALS: When a subscription blank is attached to this page a renewal of your 
subscription is desired. The date of the expiration of your subscription will be found on the 
wrapper. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS: The address of a subscriber can be changed as often as desired. 
In ordering a change of address, both the old and the new address must be given. Two weeks' 
notice is required. 

MANUSCRIPTS and drawings relating to colored people are desired. They must be accom- 
panied by return postage. If found unavailable they will be returned. 

Entered as Second-class Matter in the Post Office at New York, N. Y. 



160 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 




FORWARD 

MARCH YOUR SON OFF TO 

^A^ilberforce University 



The only school in the country for Negro 
Youth which has a Military Department 
equipped by the National Government, and 
commanded by a detailed United States Army 
Officer. 

DEPARTMENTS 
MILITARY SCIENTIFIC 

NORMAL TECHNICAL 

COMMERCIAL THEOLOGICAL 
CLASSICAL MUSICAL 

PREPARATORY 

Banking taughl; "by the actual operations 
in the Students' Savings Bank. Twelve In- 
dustries, 180 acres of beautiful campus, Ten 
Buildings. Healthful surroundings, excep- 
tional community. Maintained in part by the 
State of Ohio which supplies facilities for the 
thorough training of teachers. 

Fall term began September, 1912. Write 
for Catalog. 

W. S. SCARBOROUGH, President 

WM. A. JOINER, Superintendent, C. N. I. 

Department. 

Address all communications to 
BOX 36 WILBERFORCE, OHIO 



Atlanta University 

Is beautifully located in the City of Atlanta, G». 
The courses of study include High School, Nor- 
mal School and College, with manual training 
and domestic science. Among the teachers arg 
graduates of Yale, Harvard, Dartmouth, Smith 
and Wellesley. Forty-two years of successful 
work have been completed. Students come from 
all parts of the South. Graduates are almost 
universally successful. 

For further information address 

President EDWARD T. WARE 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Knoxville College 

Beautiful Situation. Healthful Location. 
The Best Moral and Spiritual Environment. 

A Splendid Intellectual Atmosphere. 
Noted for Honest and Thorough Work. 

Offers full courses in the following departments: 
College, Normal, High School, Grammar School and 
Industrial. 

Good water, steam heat, electric lights, good 
drainage. Expenses very reasonable. 

Opportunity for Self-help. 

Fall Term Began September, 1912. 

For information address 

President R. W. McGRANAHAN 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



Uirginiii Union University 

RICHMOND, VA. 

A College Department, of high ttandardi and 
modern curriculum. 

A Theological Department, with all lubjeeti 
generally required in the belt theological seminariei. 

An Academy, with manual training, giying m 
preparation for life or for college. 

The positive moral and religious aim of the 
school, its high standards of entrance and of class 
work, its fine new buildings and well-equipped 
laboratories and library prepare a faithful student 
for a life of wide usefulness. 

GEORGE RICE HOVEY, President 

Daytona Educational and Industrial 
School for Negro Girls 

DAYTONA, FLORIDA 

It reaches, by reason of its location, a large 
territory of Negro children deprived of educa- 
tional privileges. 

Its comfortable home life and Christian In- 
fluences insure a certain individual attention 
and superior training Impossible in larger In- 
stitutions of Its kind. 

Mrs. Frances R. Keyser, formerly in charge 
of the White Rose Home for Working Girls, 
in New York City, has been elected Principal 
of the Academic Department. Write for catalog 
and detailed information. 

MARY McLEOD BETHUNE 

Founder and Principal 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 161 

SCHOOL OF BEAUTY CULTURE AND HAIR DRESSING 



KELSEY'S 

328 Zienoz Aveaae 

Telephone Harlem 1896 

126tli Street, NEW YORK. 



Manicuring, Shampooing. Hair Dressing, Marcel War- 
ing, Facial and Body Massage, Hair Making, Chiropody, 
etc., scientifically taught. TTnllmited practice in parlor 
day and night. Pupils taught at home. If desired. 
Diplomas. Special Summer Course, $7.50 up. Send for 
booklet. Mme. A. Carter Kelsey, Gen'l Intr.; Dr. Samuel 
A. Kelsey, Chiropodist, President and Gen'l Manager. 



Agricultural and 
Meckanical College 



Open all year 'round. For Males 
only. Facilities unsurpassed. Strong 
Faculty. Practical Courses. 

Board, Lodging and Tuition $7 
per month. 

Winter Term Began December 2, 
1912. 

Write to-day for catalog or free 
tuition. 



JAS. B. DUDLEY, President 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Southern Business College 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Day and night school, teaching Shorthand, Type- 
writing, Business English, Business Arithmetic, 
Bookkeeping and preparing for Civil Service. A 
high-grade commercial school with competent in- 
structors and healthy surroundings. The only Negro 
school of its kind in the world. For catalogue and 
further information address 

Southern Business College 

4th Avenue and 15th Street 

W. J. ECHOLS, Principal 

J. P. BOND, Secretary-Manager 



Send your boy South — the land of Opportunity. 
The Prairie View State Normal and Industrial 
College of Texas. E. L. Blackshear, Principal. W. 
C. Bollins, Treasurer. Largest State institution for 
colored youth in the United States. Excellent 
literary, scientific and industrial advantages. Ex- 
penses low — ideal climate — new buildings. 

For particulars address: 

H. J. MASON, Secretary 
Prairie View, Waller County, Texas 



Atlanta University 

Studies of the 

Negro Problems 

16 Monographs. Sold Separately. 

Address: 

A. G. DILL 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga. 



o 
R 

B 

i 
R 

t 

H 
d 
A 

y 

S 



A NARRATIVE of I f 
THE NEGRO r 

By Mrs. Leila Amos Pendleton 

A comprehensive history of the 
Negro race from the earliest period 
to the present time; told in pleas- 
ing narrative style; may be read 
and understood by children. Bound 
in cloth and illustrated. 

Address: Price $1.50 

MRS. L. A. PENDLETON 

1824 nth Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 



E 
V 
E 
R 
Y 

D 
A 
Y 



Fisk University 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 
Founded 1866 H. H. Wright, Dean 

Thorough Literary, Scientific, Educa- 
tional and Social Science Courses. Pioneer 
in Negro music. Special study in Negro 
history. 

Ideal and sanitary buildings and grounds. 
Well-equipped Science building. 

Christian home life. 

High standards of independent manhood 
an^ womanhood. 
Telephone 1943 Flushing 

D. H. VAN DE WATER 

FINE GROCERIES 
111 Main Street Flushing, N. T. 



Established 1858 

"THE BURK CIGAR STORE" 

HAVANA AND DOMESTIC CIGARS 
5 Main Street Flushing, N. T. 

Mention Thb Crisis. 



162 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



GO TO COLLEGE 

The World To-day Is Calling for 
College - trained Men and Women. 



It has been found that out of every one hundred 
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1028 South 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. 





OF INTEREST TO 
VOCAL STUDENTS 

Tone Placing and 
Voice Development 

Practical method of singing for 
daily practice, based upon artistic 
principles, together with a care- 
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From "Musical Courier," N. Y. : 
A very practical little book is 
"Tone Placing and Voice Develop- 
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contains some very excellent material and vocal 
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WORDS OF APPRECIATION 
I offer you the heartiest possible endorsement 
of your work, which I believe to be the most com- 
plete course of the kind that has ever come 
under my notice. — Glenn Dillard G-unn, Chicago 
' 'Tribune." 

From "Music News," Chicago, 111.: Accordingly 
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CANNOT FAIL OF GOOD RESULTS 
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development. — Geo. I. Holt, Des Moines, Iowa. 

PRICE $1.00 

Address the publisher: 

PEDRO T. TINSLEY 

6448 Drexel Avenue CHICAGO, ILL. 



Book 



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s on >3ociaiisin 

If you are not quite sure whether you 
want to be classed as a Socialist or not, you 
need to study Socialism and find out. You 
must take sides either for or against it 
some day. 

"Of Eugene V. Debs, the Socialist candi- 
date, we can only say this frankly: if it lay 
in our power to make him President of 
the United States we would do so, for of the 
four men mentioned he alone, by word and 
deed, stands squarely on a platform of 
human rights regardless of race or class." 
—The Crisis, August, 1912. 
Woman and Socialism, 

August Bebel $1.50 

Common Sense of Socialism, 

John Spargo Cloth, 1.00 

Paper, .25 

The Class Struggle, 

Karl Kautsky Paper, .25 

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Louis B. Boudin 1.00 

These and other books on Socialism sent 
prepaid on receipt of price. 

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Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS 



Vol. 5, No. 4 



FEBRUARY, 1913 



WLole No. 28 




ALONG 
EtOLOR LINE 



\ 



c 




SOCIAL UPLIFT. 



'T'HE Woman's League of Kansas City, 
■*■ Mo., has established a working girls' 
home. 

^ Two colored women and one white woman 
took the semi-annual examination for 
physicians before the State board of medical 
examiners of Virginia. 

Q Sixteen new five-room houses were 
recently built by a real-estate agent in 
Savannah, Ga. They were all sold to colored 
people within a period of ninety days. 
fl The Germantown Site and Relic Society 
is marking the grave of the colored woman, 
Diana, who saved the town of Staunton, Pa., 
from destruction by the British soldiers. 

^ The Excelsior Library,- of Guthrie, Okla., 
founded by a colored woman, reports 8,000 
visitors for the year, 3,296 books loaned, 
520 books added. The library now has 2,380 
volumes and . subscribes to 22 periodicals. 
Mrs. J. C. Horton is librarian. 
^ The new colored Y. M. C. A. at Louis- 
ville, representing an outlay of $30,000, has 
been dedicated. It contains forty-six dormi- 
tories, baths, reading rooms, committee rooms, 
an assembly room and a gymnasium. 
Q Mr. W. P. Dabney, of Cincinnati, has been 
developing a 34-acre tract near Cincinnati 
as a fresh-air farm. 

fl The football scores of the two leading 
colored teams for the year were as follows: 



. Atlanta Baptist College. 

A. B. C. 87, Morris Brown 0. 

A. B. C. 48, Atlanta 0. 

A. B. C. 45, Clark 0. 

A. B. C. 12, Tuskegee 3, 

A. B. C. 13, Fisk 6. 

Howard University. 

Howard 6, Annapolis Grays 0. 
Howard 13, Hampton 7. 
Howard 20, Shaw 0. 
Howard 25, Livingston 0. 
Howard 13, Lincoln 0. 

fl The Monday Night Current Events Club 
of Washington is devoting the year to the 
study of socialism. 

^ The Provident Hospital and Training 
School of Chicago reports an income for the 
year ending June 1, 1912, of $25,373. It 
has treated in the hospital in the last twenty- 
one years 13,878 patients and 80,872 
patients in the dispensary. The endowment 
fund now amounts to $47,000, and it is the 
earnest wish of the institution to raise this 
to $100,000. 

^ The West End Workers' Association in 
the San Juan Hill district of New York 
reports the following institutions mainly or 
entirely for the benefit of colored people: 
Five institutions for the care of the sick at 
home; four churches; two institutions for 
cripples; ten schools; three day nurseries; 
three dispensaries ; three employment 
bureaus; three hospitals; eight industrial 
schools; five kindergartens; three institu- 



164 



THE CRISIS 



tions for legal and charitable advice; two 

milk stations; ten missions; three night 

schools; six recreation centers and thirteen 
social clubs. 

^ Boley, one of the several colored towns of 
Oklahoma, is often written of. The latest 
report claims a population of 4,000; a bank 
with a capital and surplus of $11,500 and 
deposits of $75,804.44; twenty-five grocery 
stores; five hotels; seven restaurants; water- 
works worth $35,000; electric plant worth 
$20,000; four drug stores; four cotton 
gins ranging from $8,000 to $12,000 in 
value; one bottling works; one steam laun- 
dry ; two newspapers ; two ice-cream parlors ; 
two hardware stores; one jewelry store, four 
department stores; a $40,000 Masonic Tem- 
ple; two colleges; one high school; one 
graded school; two city school buildings; 
one telephone exchange costing $3,000; 842 
school children; ten teachers; six churches; 
two livery stables; two insurance agencies; 
one second-hand store; two undertaking 
establishments; one lumber yard; two 
photographers; one bakery and one of the 
best city parks in the State. The post- 
office here is the only third-class postoffice 
controlled by Negroes. Its postmaster is the 
highest-paid Negro postmaster in the United 
States. The sidewalks throughout the city 
are constructed with the best cement and 
the streets are well lighted by the electric 
plant. 

ECONOMICS. 

TPHE Mississippi Grand Lodge of Masons 
■*■ collected last year $100,000 and paid 
out to beneficiaries $90,000. It has 10,000 
enrolled in 462 lodges. At its recent annual 
meeting 700 delegates were present. 

^ The United States Court of Appeals in 
Chicago recently decided" that the heirs of 
twenty-eight Negro stevedpres who were 
killed in a naphtha explosion on the steamer 
"Tioga" in the Chicago River twenty-three 
years ago are entitled to $110,000 damages. 
Every direct heir of the identified dead either 
has died or disappeared. The steamship 
company wound up its affairs years ago. 
The attorney that defended the case and the 
lawyer that prosecuted it are dead. 

The case was one of the oldest pending 
Federal cases in Chicago in which there had 
been only one appeal. Charles Furthmann, 
son of the original plaintiff's attorney, won 
the case. There will be an opportunity for 
heirs of the dead to collect damages, if any 



heirs can be located. The company deposited 
a $200,000 cash bond before it went out of 
business. 

^ The Alabama Penny Savings Bank cele- 
brated the new year by moving into its new 
six-story building of reinforced concrete. 
This is a colored institution located at 
Birmingham, Ala. 

^ The. American Beneficial Insurance Com- 
pany is about to erect a $20,000 office build- 
ing in Richmond, Va. 

^ It is reported that the Negroes of Val- 
dosta, Ga., pay tax on nearly $500,000 worth 
of property. One colored stock company 
owns a $20,000 office building in which are 
Negro professional men and other business 
enterprises. There are two schools, fifteen 
churches and twenty-one business enter- 
prises, including drug and grocery stores. 
There are about 7,000 colored people in the 
town. 

fl The timber workers are striking at Merry- 
ville, La. The strikers in a circular say: 

"It is a glorious sight to see, this miracle 
that has happened here in Dixie. This coming 
true of the 'impossible' — this union of the 
workers regardless of color, creed or nation- 
ality. To hear the Americans saying 'You 
can starve us, but you cannot whip us;' the 
Negroes crying 'YOu can fence us in, but 
you cannot make us scab;' the Italians sing- 
ing the 'Marseillaise' and the Mexicans 
shouting vivas for the brotherhood. Never 
did the Santa Fe Railroad, the Southern 
Lumber Operators' Association and the 
American Lumber Company expect to see 
such complete and defiant solidarity, else they 
Avould have thought long and hard before 
the infamous order penalizing men for 
obeying the summons of a court was issued." 

^ The colored people of Tennessee conducted 
33,895 farms in 1900 and 38,308 in 1910. 
These farms were divided as follows : 

Farms 

Under 10 acres 2,398 

10-19 acres 6,883 

20-49 acres 19,063 

50-99 acres 6,866 

, 100 or more acres 3,098 

The farm land in their control has 
increased from 1,500,096 acres in 1900 to 
1,606,078 in 1910, while the value of all farm 
property owned and rented by colored 
farmers has risen 102.3 per cent, in the 
decade and now stands at $54,086,230. 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



165 



fl T. S. Inbordeii makes the following state- 
ment concerning three North Carolina coun- 
ties where his school is situated. In Edge- 
comb County Negroes own: Valued at 

14,665 acres of land $144,444 

768 town lots 187,727 

1,257 mules and horses 98,633 

5,137 goats, sheep, hogs and dogs 24,653 

Implements and tools 14,315 

House and kitchen furniture.... 17,324 
The total of their personal and 

real property amounts to 562,511 

In Nash County the Negroes owti : 

Valued at 

20,349 acres of land $211,701 

549 town lots 131,510 

1,03Q mules and horses 104,035 

6,350 goats, sheep, hogs and dogs 37,929 

Implements and tools 6,772 

Household and kitchen furniture 45,430 

Other possessions 54,552 

The total real and personal 

property amounts to 596,552 

In Halifax County the Negroes own: 

Valued at 

53,937 acres of land .$377,236 

353 town lots 161,275 

2,382 horses and mules 183,714 

3,119 cattle 50,465 

6,802 goats, sheep, hogs and dogs 20,620 
The total real and personal 

property amounts to 748,310 

This excellent showdng is due largely to the 
influence of the Brick School. 

fl The largest blacksmith and repair shop in 
the State of Kansas is kept by a colored man 
in Atchison. His income is over $8,000 a 
year, 

^ The colored people of Rochester, N. Y., 
plan to erect a building for commercial and 
fraternal purposes. 

^ The State of Maryland is trying to buy 
old Fort Frederick which is owned by Nathan 
Williams, a thrifty colored man, who paid 
$7,500 for the property several years ago. 
He has been offered $8,500 for his possession. 
If he persists in his refusal to accept this 
price no more efforts can be made until a 
later legislature increases the appropriation. 
fl The recent United States bulletin on agri- 
culture has some astonishing revelations of 
the increase of farm ownership among 
colored people. Colored people form 6 per 
cent, of all the farm owners, and of all 
colored farmers 26.2 per cent., or 241,221, 
own their farms. This includes a few Indian 
and Asiatic farmers, but not more than 
20,000. Special figures are given for Negroes 
of the South ; there we find the colored 
farmers owned 186,676 farms in 1900 and 
218,467 in 1910. They have added over 



2,000,000 acres to their farms and the value 
of the land and buildings has increased dur- 
ing the decade from $106,500,000 to $273,- 
000,000, an increase of 156 per cent. The 
value of their land per acre is greater than 
the value of white farmers' land. Some of 
the increases in land ownership are indicated 
by the following figures : 

No. of Farms Value 

1900 1910 1910 

Virginia 26,566 32,228 $28,059,534 

North Carolina ... 17,520 21,443 22,810,089 

South Carolina... 18,970 20,372 22,112,291 

Georgia 11,875 15,698 20,540,910 

Alabama 14,110 17,082 17,285,502 

Mississippi 20,973 25,026 34,317,764 

Oklahoma 10,191 11,150 32,325,348 

Texas 21,139 21,232 30,687,272 

EDUCATION. 

JULIUS ROSENWALD offered Fisk Uni- 
versity a year ago to be one of four 
persons to raise $10,000 a year for five 
years toward the current expenses. The 
conditions of Mr. Rosenwald's offer have 
been met so that the $10,000 is assured for 
the next five years; $181,000 has been 
pledged toward the $300,000 endowment 
which the institution is striving to raise. 
^ A course of lectures on the race problem 
is being given at the University of 
Virginia. 

^ The superintendent of schools of Atlanta, 
Ga.. says : 

"We have schools with earth closets, both 
^v\nte and black, which are a daily menace 
to the health, if not the lives, of the chil- 
dren. We have dark, dismal and musty base- 
ment rooms which adjoin toUets and which 
are bound to injure the health of the 
teachers and children. The darkness and 
absence of fresh air is injurious to eyfesight 
as well as to general health. Some of these 
schools are a disgrace to civilization and 
unfit for cattle to be herded in. ■ We have 
school yards which are mud banks and when 
the children go out to play they get their 
feet wet and muddy and that is sure to 
cause sickness. For lack of a sufficient 
janitor service the schools are not kept clean 
and that is not conducive to health. We are 
trying to put 900 Negro children in schools 
that have a seating capacity of only 450. 
It is true that we have sixty and seventy 
children in rooms that were meant to accom- 
modate only about forty." 
^ The board of trustees of the Jeanes Fund 
has met at the White House, Washington. 
Those present were President Taft, Andrew 



166 



THE CRISIS 



Carnegie, Booker T. Washington, H. B. 
Frissell, Dr. C. S. Mitchell, president of 
South Carolina Institute, George Foster 
Peabody, treasurer, R. R. Moten, secretary, 
H. T. Kealing, J. C. Napier, R. L. Smith, of 
Texas, Dr. James H. Dillard. There was 
appropriated $38,000 to pay the salaries of 
117 supervising teachers in the Southern 
States, who will work with the superinten- 
dents chiefly to introduce industrial training. 

^ J. N. Carpenter, of Natchez, Miss., a white 
philanthropist, has given $80,000 for the 
white public schools and $5,000 for a Negro 
school. 

^ In Philadelphia teachers in the public 
schools have organized to tell folklore 
stories to children in order to overcome race 
prejudice. Negro folk songs and folklore 
have been introduced. 

q Colored people of the C. M. E. Church 
have raised $8,000 for Lane College, 
Tennessee, this year. 

Q The annual report of the county superin- 
tendent of education of Richland County, 
S. C, shows more colored children than 
white children in school in spite of the fact 
that the colored children have wretched 
accommodations. 

fl Mrs. Ella Flagg Young, superintendent of 
schools of Chicago, recently visited the 
colored schools of Washington. When asked 
what she thought of the system of segregat- 
ing the races, Mrs. Young said : 

"I am opposed to segregation of races in 
public schools. How could I be otherwise 
and be consistent? I cannot align myself in 
opposition to segregation of the sexes and 
favor separate schools for the whites and 
blacks." 

^ The twentieth annual report of Calhoun 
Colored School, Lowndes County, Ala., shows 
a total income for the year of $34,000. The 
endowment amounts to $93,000. 

THE CHURCH. 

nP HE Baptist Sunday School Congress of 
-■■ 1913 will meet in Muskogee, Okla., in 
June. This will be the eighth annual session. 
^ The American Society of Church History 
has been discussing among other subjects the 
religious history among Negroes in the 
South. 

t[ St John's Congregational Church, of 
Springfield, Mass., has issued a manual and 
direct or v. 



MEETINGS. 

T OCAL emancipation celebrations were 
-'-' held throughout the United States on 
January 1 and 5. 

fl In Boston a large celebration was held 
at Park Street Church, which was addressed 
by the Honorable Samuel W. McCall and 
^Ir. Frank B. Sanborn. 

^ In Mechanics' Building, Boston, another 
meeting was held and addressed by ex-preSi- 
dent C. W. Eliot. 

^ The Whittier Home Association held a 

meeting at the Friends' Meeting House in 

Amesbury, Mass., and laid a wreath on 

Whittier's pew. 

Q In New Orleans the mayor of the city 

addressed the chief emancipation meeting at 

the fair gTounds. 

^ The colored people of Iowa are planning 

an exposition for next September. 

^ The American Negro Academy held its 

sixteenth annual meeting in Washington. 

Papers were read by R. R. Wright, Jr., 

Kelly Miller, Archibald H. Grimke and 

Ernest E. Just. 

Q The twenty-second annual Negro Farmers' 

Conference was held at Tuskegee Institute, 

January 22 and 23. 

^ Mrs. Henry Villard and Dr. Booker T. 

Washington, of Tuskegee Institute, spoke at 

an emancipation meeting in the Church of 

the Messiah, New York, December 5. 

q Dr. Stephen S. Wise, Dr. Felix Adler and 

Dr. Henry Newman delivered addresses on 

emancipation in their respective pulpits .in 

New York. The address of Dr. Wise is 

published in this issue of The Crisis. 

^ Dr. M. W. Gilbert gave an address on 

emancipation at the State Normal School in 

Montgomery, Ala. 

POLITICAL. 

A 'BILL has been introduced into the 
-^^*- United States Senate to promote 
instruction in agriculture, trades and the 
like. It purposes to appropriate $3,000,000 
a year, beginning in 1916, to the various 
States. It also appropriates further moneys 
for branch experiment institutions and pro- 
vides that in States where there are separate 
white and colored institutions $10,000 shall 
be appropriated to each for a college 
teachers' training fund. Provision is also 
made for agricultural high schools for both 
races. To offset this bill another one has 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



167 



passed the House making no provision what- 
soever for the colored people, but leaving the 
whole matter to the States. 

^ During the visit of President-elect Wilson 
to Staunton, Va., Frank T. Ware, a former 
colored slave of his parents, greeted him. 

^ The Honorable James W. Johnson, for- 
merlj' consul at Corrnto, Nicaragua, has been 
appointed as consul to St. Michaels, Azores 
Islands. The Honorable William J. Yerby 
has been transferred from Sierra Leone, 
West Africa, to Turkey. 

PERSONAL. 

'T^HE Plasterer, organ of the Plasterers' 
"■• International . Association, carries a 
picture of George Doyle, a prominent colored 
union member. 

fl Robert Pinkers, of Philadelphia, has 
patented an automatic drill for woodworking. 
He has worked in a woodworkers' shop for 
seven years. 

"^ Dr. J. P. Turner, a colored physician, has 
made a creditable record as one of the 
medical directors of the public schools of 
Philadelphia. 

Q Jefferson Davis, United States Senator 
from Arkansas, and a man of the Tillman- 
Vardaman type, is, fortunately, dead, 
fl It is reported that a young colored student 
of the Greensboro A. & M. College has 
inherited $101,000 from a Frenchman Avhom 
he used to serve. 

^ Nathan Williams, a Negro bellboy at the 
Roj'al Palms Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla., 
rescued a white woman, Mrs. Gertrude 
Diffenbacher, from a burglar, and was killed 
in the encounter. 

^ Miss Josephine Pinyon (Cornell, 1910) has 
succeeded Miss Holloway as student secre- 
tary to the National Board of the Y. W. 
C. A.'s, and Miss Eva Bowles, for two 
years secretary of the 53d Street branch. 
New York Citjs and for four years with 
the Associated Charities, Columbus, 0., is 
now secretary for city work among colored 
women. 

fl Walter Daniels, a colored porter of Kansas 
City, saved the valuable contents of an 
express car by shooting and killing a robber 
who was trying to open the safe. "That 
porter was the only one of us not scared to 
death," said George Peterson, of Tulsa, a 
passenger in the chair car. "The porter 
sneaked into the next car and got a revolver 



while the rest of us were under the seats. 
As he came back, following the hold-up man 
to the express car, he asked somebody with a 
revolver to come and help him. No one in 
my car seemed to have one. The bandit paid 
no attention to passengers." 
^ Joseph Hazel, a colored boy 11 years 
of age, has his picture in the Open Door 
because of his kindness in rescuing animals. 
fl John Williams, a colored detective of 
Charleston, S. C, is making a wide repu- 
tation in trailing criminals. 
^ Aug-ustus Stanfield, a graduate of Howard, 
passed the highest examinations, in a class of 
forty-five applicants, for license to practice 
medicine in New Jersey. 

^ Mr. John A. Agee, one of the first agents 
of The Crisis, and a clerk in the city civil 
service of St. Louis, is dead. 

*I Howard P. Drew, the wonderful colored 
sprinter of Springfield, Mass., has twice 
equaled the world's indoor record for the 
seventy-yard dash. 

^ Mrs. Lillian Starks, widow of the late 
S. W. Starks, died suddenly at the home of 
her brother-in-law, at Athens, 0., Decem- 
ber 24, and was buried 'in Charleston, W. 
Ya., December 28. Mr. Starks was State 
librarian of West Virginia and supreme 
chancellor of the Knights of Pythias at the 
time of his death about five years ago. 

^ William Seymour Edwards, of Charleston, 
W. Va., delivered the address of the emanci- 
pation celebration held at the West Virginia 
Colored Institute. Mr. Edwards is a grand- 
son of Arthur Tappan, president of the first 
anti-slavery society organized in New York. 

MUSIC AND ART. 

X/fR. HAMILTON HODGES, the dis- 
''■ ■*• tinguished baritone from Boston, 
Mass., who makes his home in New Zealand, 
gave, in the early season, two song recitals 
in the town hall concert chamber at Welling- 
ton. The hall was crowded, even standing 
room being taken. 

The New Zealand Free Lance says of the 
recital : 

"Mr. Hodges is helping to raise the stand- 
ard of musical taste in this community, for 
he includes nothing tawdry in his program. 
He has a cultured, artistic judgment, and as 
he is always on the alert for new music of a 
high standard we are indebted to him for a 
knowledge of many fine songs. 



168 



THE CRISIS 



"The progTam was full of interest. * * * 
Mr. Hodges can take credit to liimself for 
being the hrst to introduce to New Zealanders 
an olio of songs by New Zealand composers." 

Mr. Hodges' program included songs from 
Muratori, Von Fieltiz, Schubert, Quilter, 
Horrocks, Mallinson, Buckley, Hunt, Wright 
and Queerie. The American numbers were 
from Arthur Foote and Charles Wakefield 
Cadman. 

One of the most admirable features of 
Mr. Hodges' artistic work is his uncom- 
promising standard for the development of 
the colored musician along the line of absolute 
music, irrespective of any racial limitations. 

Mr. Hodges was engaged to sing in the 
"Messiah" which was produced by the 
Fielding- Choral Society on December 11, 
and will also be heard in Coleridge-Taylor's 
"A Tale of Old Japan," which is to be sung 
by the Royal Choral Society of Wellington. 

^ The ail-American program prepared by 
Frederick Stock for the Theodore Thomas 
Orchestra of Chicago, 111., for the concerts of 
December 13 and 14, opened with "Comedy 
Overture on Negro Airs," by Henry F. 
Gilbert, of Cambridge, Mass. The event, a 
progTam of all-Atnerican music, was the 
first of its kind in the history of the Chicago 
orchestra and one of importance and sig- 
nificance. 

fl Mr. Arthur Abell, the well-known critic 
of Berlin, Germany, writing in Musical 
America of the remarkable voices possessed 
by the two American Chippewa Indians, 
Carlisle Bawbangam and Carlisle Kawbow- 
gam, comments on the beautiful voices found 
particularly among Negroes. 
<I It is related of the composer Massenet, 
who died last Augxist, that he was once 
glancing through a score of one of Coleridge- 
Taylor's works, and without knowing at that 
time the name of the composer, he declared 
the musician must be of Negro extraction, 
owing to the character of his music. 
fl The Colored Social Settlement of Wash- 
ington, D. C, gave a musical program in 
December at the Metropolitan Church, by 
Joseph H. Douglass, violinist, Roy W. Tibbs. 
pianist, and Howard University Glee Club. 
Addresses were delivered by Professor Alain 
Le Roy Locke, formerly Oxford Rhodes 
scholar, and Dr. Stephen Morrell Newman, 
president of Howard University. 
^ John Philip Sousa and his band are pre- 
senting a novelty on this season's concert 



progTam, which is a suite- — three character 
studies — called "Dwellers in the Western 
World" — the red man, the white man, the 
black man. 

^ The incidental music to "Julius Caesar," 
which William Faversham is reviving in 
this country, was composed by Christopher 
Wilson and S. Coleridge- Taylor. 

^ At the celebration of the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of the emancipation proclamation in 
Boston, Mass., on January 1, by the Wendell 
Phillips Memorial Association, a chorus of 
fifty voices from the Handel and Haydn 
Society, Emil Mollenhauer, conductor, sang 
the "Hymn of Praise" and choruses from 
"Elijah" and the "Messiah." 

^ Francis Jackson Garrison has written a 
graphic account of the concert given in Bos- 
ton on January 1, 1863, while everybody 
waited in suspense for Lincoln's second 
proclamation which made actual the emanci- 
pation of the slaves. "Never," writes Mr. 
Garrison, "was a concert more full of inspira- 
tion, and I wish that Boston might have 
signalized this semi-centennial anniversary of 
the gTeat proclamation by repeating it, with 
the same choice progTam." 

fl In New York the Philharmonic Orchestra 
repeated two numbers on that progTam and 
also Dvorak's "New World Symphony,"' 
based in part on Southern echoes, and the 
rhapsodic dance, "Ramboula," by the late 
Coleridge- Tayl or. 

^ Signor Pasquale Amato sang at one of 
the Sunday concerts of the Metropolitan 
Opera House one of J. Rosamond Johnson's 
dialect, songs, "Since You Went Away."' 
The words are by J. W. Johnson. 

^ Mr. Rosamond Johnson and his partner, 
Mr. Hart, have sailed for England, where 
they have several engagements. 

^ Twelve American composers were repre- 
sented at a matinee of new music sung by 
the Schola Cantorum, a branch of the Mac- 
Dowell Club, at Aeolian Hall, New York 
City. Among the composers represented were 
Rosamond Johnson and Will Marion Cook. 
Mr. Kurt Schindler was conductor. 
fl An interesting exhibit of original paint- 
ings and drawings by colored artists was 
held at the Carlton Avenue branch of the 
Y. M. C. A., Brooklyn. The Evening Post 
says: 

"A number of the pictures shown are 
good enough to go in the average exhibi- 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



169 



tiou. Several by Ernest Braxton show force 
and imaginative ability enough to compel 
more than casual attention. 

''The exhibition comprises work of several 
grades and different styles, the color work, 
on the whole, being more interesting than 
the black and white, although in this latter 
field Braxton has some striking military 
heads. The water colors of some of the 
students, it is pointed out, have been done 
at night and under necessarily difficult light 
conditions. All of the work by students 
shows at least painstaking care. 

"Braxton is represented by seven pictures 
in oils and a series of studies in black and 
white. Three of his pictures are 'After the 
Shower,' showing a vague, wind-swept street, 
with a suggestion of the after effects of a 
heavy rain; 'The Umbrella Mender' and 'In 
the Cove,' a Negro's head. Richard L. 
Brown is represented by four pictures of a 
smaller size. One of them is called 'A 
Marshland Evening;' others are 'A Clearing' 
and 'Study of Clouds.' R, H. Lewis, another 
professional, shows the only portraits in the 
exhibition. Of the amateurs, A. Comither 
shows five small paintings, not altogether 
without merit, all depicting various moods 
of nature. Besides these are two pictures 
by the late J. C. de Villis, who was one of 
the best-known NegTO artists in the city. 

"Other exhibitors are Louise R. Latimer, 
John BaUey, J. S. Wilson, Jr., Gladys Doug- 
lass, I. S. Conway, Walter T. Brown, 
Anthony Queman and G. E. Livingston, all 
of whom are students. It is a significant 
fact that none of these students is working 
for pleasure, but rather to fit himself or her- 
self to earn a livelihood as an artist." 

^ Mr. William Stanley Braithwaite, a con- 
tributing editor of The Crisis, has launched 
a new periodical. The Poetry Journal. ' It is 
published in Boston, and is a tasteful little 
magazine. 

^ W. p. Saunders, of Nashville, Tenn., has 
produced his second play. Both his plays 
have been well mentioned by the leading 
papers of the city. 

THE GHETTO. 

ST. LUKE'S Protestant Episcopal Church, 
New York, is trying to get rid of its 
colored Sunday-school children. 

^ Discrimination in Indianapolis has gone 
to the length of a proposition for separate 
playgTounds for children and separate street 



cars. Already there is discrimination in 
amusement parks and colored people are not 
able to get seats in first-class theatres. 

^ A proposed bill segregating colored 
and white people in residence districts of 
St. Louis has been declared unconstitutional 
by the lawyers of the organization which is 
pushing it. 

^ Colored men working in the sawmills of 
EllisvUle, Miss., have been warned to leave. 

^ Underground influences have succeeded in 
having the question of Negroes in the army 
discussed at the conference of army officers. 
Nothing, of course, is expected as an imme- 
diate result of the discussion, but Negro 
haters are hoping that this will be an opening 
wedge. 

^ A colored pastor in Chicago alleges that 
hundreds of colored men and women have 
been discharged from their work on account 
of the Jack Johnson episode. Meantime 
Mr. Johnson has bought himself a $35,000 
house in a fashionable district and there are 
rumors of trouble there. 

^ The unexplained movement which led to 
the killing of seven or eight Negroes in North 
Georgia several months ago has resulted in 
an attempt to drive out Negroes entirely. 
One prominent white citizen, appealing to 
the governor, says: 

"If something is not done to check this 
movement the labor situation in Jackson 
County will become quite acute, for the 
Negroes, including some of the most trust- 
worthy and law-abiding, are becoming terror- 
stricken and are leaving there in large num- 
bers. Our wives and daughters will soon be 
put to the necessity of doing the cooking, 
washing and performing other menial labor. 
In addition, the farmers will suffer greatly, 
for they will be deprived of field hands." 

^ Twenty-eight carpenters struck at Lexing- 
ton, Ky., because a Negro carpenter was 
added to the force. 

,^ Property holders in Minneapolis are try- 
ing to buy out a colored man who moved 
into a house on 18th Avenue. 
^ Congressman Roberts, of Massachusetts, 
denies that his bill concerning secret organiza- 
tions is aimed at colored people. 

^ R. W. Milner, of Monroe, La., a plantation 
manager, committed suicide and left a letter 
to his daughter. The daughter is a colored 
girl. 



170 



THE CRISIS 



^ A deed selling property to a white church 
in West Virginia contains a passage declar- 
ing that the property is "for the use only 
for religious purposes of the Baptist 
Church of Kanawha County. W. Va. Mean- 
ing the Caucasian members of the State 
Baptist denomination.'' etc. 
fl Dr. George Brown was candidate for 
mayor in Atlanta, and made speeches 
throughout the city. In talking to white 
workingmen he said : 

"Concerning the Negro problem nothing 
has been done to solve it. If my suggestion 
is followed out you will have absolute con- 
trol of the servants in this town, and many 
a poor woman who is at present doing her 
own work would have the proper servant 
to do it had she the proper protection." 
Q The following note comes to us from 
Mississippi : 

"Eph Williams presented a fine show 
(minstrel of course, but clean and good) in 
Cleveland, Miss. It Avas reported that some 
mean white boys struck one of their ponies 
in the head and it bled until it fell. A 
little four-year-old girl who was one of the 
dancers was also struck with a stone; the 
show was packed with white people, but they 
refused to pay for several seats, but simply 
took them, and they also refused to pay for 
the side show, but remained in their seats. 
The women had to be guarded to keep the 
white men out of their dressing room and 
they were afraid to leave their cars for fear 
of assault and insult." 

CRIME. 

A TLANTA, Ga., had a small race riot to 
■^^ celebrate Christmas. There were only 
one or two killed and they were white. A 
report on crime in Atlanta says : 

"In his work of examining the records in 
cases where pardon recommendations are 
passed on to Governor Brown by the prison 
commission, secretary Hardy Ulm, in 
making the briefs for the executive, has 
come to the conclusion that there is often 
great inequality, not to say injustice done, 
in sentencing convicted persons, and par- 
ticularly Negroes. 

"To-day he cited several cases bearing out 
his contention. One was that of a Negro 
who had imbibed to an extent to make him- 
self foolish and irresponsible. While in this 
condition he shoved a rusty old revolver in 
his wife's face. It did not even appear that 
the weapon was loaded. 



"The Negro was tried in police court and 
sentenced to ninety days for disorderly con- 
duct. He served it and when he came out 
was yanked up, tried in the city court and 
sent up for twelve months. He finished that 
sentence, Avas arrested again and tried in 
superior court and this time drew a four- 
year sentence. He has served most of that 
sentence. 

"Here is a ease of a Negro tried, con- 
victed and sentenced in three separate courts, 
all on the identical charge. Each time, when 
questioned, the ignorant African only said: 

" 'I guess I'm guilty. I was so drunk I 
don't remember Avhat I did.' 

"Another half-witted Negro boy swiped 
a pair of shoes, was caught in half an hour 
and the shoes recovered. The value of the 
stolen property did not exeed $3 or $4, 
and no one suffered any loss. Yet he got 
four years, most of which he has served. 

"Another NegTo boy had a few drinks and 
imagined himself a bad man. He went home, 
got into a wordy dispute with his stepfather 
and a general fight followed, in which the 
drunken boy slapped practically every mem- 
ber of the family. 

"Nobody was hurt, according to the evi- 
dence, yet this Negro was sent up for a long 
pen sentence. 

"These cftses are selected at random from 
scores. How many fail to be brought to 
attention at all no one knows." 

^ The goA^ernors of Arkansas, South Caro- 
lina and Mississippi have released numbers 
of Negroes from penal institutions on the 
gTounds of injustice in their sentences. 

THE COURTS. 
'T'HE right of 560 Negroes to participate 
-*■ in the distribution of lands and funds 
belonging to the Cherokee Indians has been 
confirmed by the Supreme Court of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. It involves property 
variously estimated as worth from $5,000,000 
to $50,000,000. 

^ The Mississippi Supreme Court has 
declared that the "Jim Crow" car law calls 
for separate sleeping-car accommodations 
for white and colored people. The case has 
been appealed to the Supreme Court of the 
United States. 

Q The Oklahoma Court of Appeals has de- 
clared that the Negroes cannot be excluded 
from the jury on account of color, but that 
those who are disfranchised cannot serve. 




MEN OF THE 



MONTH 



M?L4TTMgR-'n 



A FRIEND. 

"COR twenty-three years Nellie B. Adams, 
•'- a white daughter of the State of Maine, 
has lived at Atlanta University as the wife of 
the dean. She was a keen, capable New 
England worker, quick in word and deed, 
and devoted to the colored people not by 




THE LATE MBS 



ADAMS. 



theory, but by a life full of friendships. As 
she herself wrote on her last journey in the 
world concerning pessimists : 

"No matter what local conditions have pro- 
duced your own particular brand of this 
microbe, a sure and permanent cure has been 
found. The remedy is so agreeable that you 



will wish to continue it indefinitely. This is 
the prescription : go and visit Atlanta Uni- 
versity graduates and former students and 
your cure will be so thorough that you will 
cease to believe the disease ever existed. 

"We at the university know that those 
.who studied here in past years are doing good 
work and still love their school, but there 
is a difference between knowing and seeing. 
After twentj^-three years of knowing from 
report it has been my privilege to come per- 
sonally into contact Avith some of the Atlanta 
University .people in their own homes and 
work. 

"All over the South there are just such* 
groups of Atlanta University people; there 
are also the places where one or two are 
working bravely and carrying heavy burdens. 
I have alwaj's known this, but now I have 
seen and felt it. Let anybody who ever gets 
discouraged about Atlanta University, or 
about the idtimate outcome of the big prob- 
lem that we are trying to help solve, drop 
everything and take a trip to visit former 
students of the school. He will return home, 
so inspired by their cheerfulness and courage, 
their devotion to their work, their love for 
alma mater and loyalty to the principles 
for which she stands, that he will surely 
never be discouraged again." 

Mrs. Adams was born in 1860, married 
in 1884 and died at Atlanta University June 
27, 1912. • 



A WRITER. 

JAMES W. .JOHNSON, United States 
consul in Nicaragua, and recently trans- 
ferred to the Azores, is one of the most 
promising figures in Negro-American litera- 
ture. His poem on emancipation in the New 
York Times is only the latest of a series of 
writings which show true poetic feeling and 
gTasp of the English language. Mr. Johnson 
has had a varied career. He was born in 
Florida forty-two years ago, and graduated 



172 



THE CRISIS 



at Atlanta University. Together with his 
gifted brother, the musician, he came to New 
York and wrote the words to many a lilting 
song that set the world a-daneing. He then 
turned to more serious writing, studied at 
Columbia, and his work began to. appear in 
the Independent and the Century. He 
accepted political office in order to have more 
leisure to write, and has in recent years pre- 
pared two volumes for publication, one of 
which might almost be called epoch making. 
Mr. Johnson married Miss Grace- Nail, of 
New York City. 



A SCHOOL TEACHER. 

'T^HE recent appointment of Garnet Crum- 
"*• mel Wilkinson as principal of the 
Armstrong Manual Training School, in the 
District of Columbia, brings another colored 
educator to the front. * Mr. Wilkinson is a 
native of South Carolina, where he was born 
in 1879. He received his education in Wash- 
ington and at Oberlin, where he took his 
.bachelor's degree in 1902. He has been a 
teacher in the Washington schools since that 
year and has been prominent in activities 




THE HON. JAMES WELDON JOHNSON. 

outside the schoolroom. He represents a 
type of young, clean Negro, well trained and 
well bred, and ready to help in all good work. 




FATHER. FATHER ABRAHAM 

By JAMES WELDON JOHNSON 






Father, Father Abraham, 

To-day look on us from above; 

On us, the offspring of thy faith, 
The children of thy Christlike love. 

For that which we have humbly wrought, 
Give us to-day thy kindly smile; 

Wherein we've failed or fallen short, 
Bear with us. Father, yet a while. 



Father, Father Abraham, 

To-day we lift our hearts to thee, 

Filled with the thought of what great price 
Was paid, that we might ransomed be. 

To-day we consecrate ourselves 

Anew in hand and heart and brain, 

To send this judgment down the years: 
The ransom Avas not paid in vain. 




Father, Father Abraham, 

To-day send on us from above 

A blessing of thy gentle strength, 
Of thy large faith, of thy deep love. 




pTnToni 





James W. Johnson had a 
EMANCIPATION. j^^^^ ^^^ interesting poem 

in the New York Times of January 2, which 
ends with these words: 

No! Stand erect and witliout fear, 

And for our foes let this suflElce — • 
We've bought a rightful sonship here, 

And we have more than paid the price. 
And yet, my brothers, well 1 know 

The tethered feet, the pinioned wings, 
The spirit bowed beneath the blow, 

The heart grown faint from wounds and 
stings; 
The staggering force of brutish might, 

That strikes and leaves us stunned and 
dazed; 
The long, vain waiting through the night 

To hear some voice, for justice raised. 
Full well I know the hour when hope 

Sinks dead, and 'round us everywhere 
Hangs stifling darkness, and we grope 

With hands uplifted in despair. 

Courage! Look out, beyond and see 

The far horizon's beckoning span! 
Faith in your God-known destiny! 

We are a part of some great plan. 
Because the tongues of Garrison 

And Phillips now are cold in death. 
Think you their work can be undone? 

Or quenched the fires lit by their breath? 
Think you that John Brown's spirit stops? 

That Lovejoy was but idly slain? 
Or do you think those precious drops 

From Lincoln's heart were shed in vain? 
That for which millions prayed and sighed, 

That for which tens of thousands fought, 
For which so many freely died, 

God cannot let it come to naught. 

Perhaps the most notable utterance on the 
jubilee of emancipation comes from the 
C ongregationalist. When we remember that 
a few years ago the C ongregationalist was 
edited by one of the most contemptible dough 
faces, that the North has bred in modern 
days, it is all the more reassuring to have 
from the new editors this splendid editorial. 
"On the Negro and the Nation," which we 
quote in full: 

"Fifty years ago President Lincoln pro- 
claimed emancipation for the Southern slaves. 
Upon that New Year's Day four million black 



folk saw the golden gates of opportunity 
swing to their hand. The nation placed the 
Negro and the white' man upon the same 
plane of citizenship, pledged equal protec- 
tion for equal rights of life, liberty, property 
and the pursuit of happiness. That was the 
white man's pledge. The Negro, upon enter- 
ing the compact, assumed all the obligations 
of citizenship, swore fealty to our common 
countrj', pledged obedience to its laws and 
shouldered his share of taxation arid of civic 
and military sendee. That was the Negro's 
pledge. 

"How have the pledges been kept? 

"Ignorant, debased and defiled as a race by 
slavery, the NegTo made his start. Here and 
there a helping hand has grasped his own, 
but where one has helped a thousand have dis- 
couraged and hindered his progress. With 
marvelous courage, optimism and faith in 
God he has pressed on, and never in all 
history has a race made such progress in a 
half century. The worthy things that his 
detractors said the Negro could not do he 
has done. And the unworthy things pre- 
dicted of him he has avoided as successfully 
as the white man. It has been well said by 
Judge Wendell P. Stafford, of the District of 
Columbia Supreme Court, that 'the black 
race in less than fifty years of freedom has 
justified every claim of the Abolitionists. It 
has shown itself brave in battle, faithful in 
business, eager to learn, capable of acquiring 
and controlling wealth and able to produce 
noble, far-seeing leaders of its own blood.' 

"During the past fifty years the Negro 
race in America has increased from four 
million to ten million souls. NegToes have 
established great schools, have become the 
chief agricultural producers of the South, 
have acquired millions of property and have 
achieved success in every profession and call- 
ing. Statistics show that a larger proportion 
of Negroes in Virginia own their homes .than 
of white people in Massachusetts. In Miss- 
issippi and Louisiana are more Negro farm 



174 



THE CRISIS 



owners than white. Throughout the country 
there are over a third more white paupers 
per thousand of pojDulation than Negro, and 
the largest percentage of crime is committed 
by white men. 

"The most bitter hatred and the most 
devilish retribution are meted out to the black 
man whose brutal lust leads him to attack 
white women. But the brutal lust of the white 
man invades the Negro's home, ruins colored 
girls by the thousands, and there is hardly 
a protest from the race that esteems itself 
superior. In his childhood of freedom and 
citizenship the NegTo has made the mistakes 
of childhood. But against this are the 
splendid successes of the rising race as it 
gains education and finds opportunity. 

*'In easting up accounts on this semi-cen- 
tennial we behold to the shame of our nation 
that fifteen Southern States where the Negro 
is most numerous have resorted to con- 
temptible subterfuges to exclude the colored 
citizen from the polls, even the most cultured, 
able and virtuous, while admitting to full 
rights of citizenship the most ignorant, 
inferior and vicious white men. The 
NegTo is taxed for the support of a 
government in which he is refused a voice, 
to pay for schools in which he does not 
receive his fair opportunity, for the main- 
tenance of public parks from which he is 
excluded. And railroad companies, for the 
same fare that the white man pays, force the 
black man into a 'Jim Crow' car, dirty and 
cheap, while the white man rides in whole- 
some comfort. A similar injustice is found in 
the waiting rooms. In the North the field 
of industrial opportunity for the Negro is 
being steadily restricted. No words can 
express the inhumanity which has condoned 
the lynching without trial of sixty to one 
hundred colored men each year during the 
past generation. 

"All this injustice has not been because 
the Negro was ignorant or poor or vicious, 
but because he was a Negro, because of, the 
race prejudice which has outlived the institu- 
tion of slavery under which it began. What 
becomes of the pledges made by our great 
nation and who has broken faith — the Negro 
or the white man? As citizens of this 
Republic, as members of the Christian church, 
we are face to face with a serious problem in 
which we have a personal responsibility. If 
democracy is to be an enduring form of 
government, if any man is to be secure in the 
inherent rights of manhood and in the 



political rights of free government, there 
must be security for all men under that 
government. If the Constitution continues to 
be defied and made a mockery in South 
Carolina, it will one day crumble in Massa- 
chusetts and Illinois. 

"If justice for an oppressed race were the 
only issue, every Christian white man in 
America should spring forward to right the 
wrong. But all that is best in American 
institutions is at stake. The church in 
America is on trial. There is less danger 
from the Bleases and Vardamans and TUl- 
mans, whose verbal violence and brutality 
defeat their own ends, than from indifference 
of the men of influence, culture, scholarship 
and Christian profession. North and South, 
who do not help to remove this blight upon 
our national life. 

"We have faith in the white man ; we have 
faith in the Negro; we have faith in the 
future of democracy and of America. But we 
cannot safely remain indifferent. The Negro 
problem is our problem and, while demanding 
of the black man industry, virtue and good 
citizenship, we must give him justice and 
opportunity. We must have just laws and 
enforce them impartially. If suffrage be re- 
stricted — and it should be restricted — we 
must bar all who are unfit . and them only. 
We must educate all and give proper place 
to the ablest and best. 

"During the observance of this anniversary 
season we need a new vision of the father- 
hood of God, a new consecration to human 
brotherhood the world around^ a new 
recognition of the inherent rights of man for 
his manhood, regardless of color or race 
history, a new appraisal of every man on his 
merits; we need a new birth of Christian 
love, which shall put an end to cant about 
superior and inferior races and overlordship, 
and square all human relations by the Golden 
Rule of the Master." 

The Philadelphia North American, in a 
long leading editorial, says: 

"That giant of intellect, Frederick 
Douglass, foreshadowed the progress of his 
race before its shackles had been struck off. 
The list of its eminent men in our own day 
tells something of the story. And yet we 
would not rest its claims on its painters, 
such as Tanner, or its poets, such as Dun- 
bar, or even on its great teachers, such as 
Booker Washington. But rather on the solid, 
steady, substantial achievements of its 
humbler men and women in agriculture and 



OPINION 



175 



industry and the useful arts. The increase 
in the material wealth of the colored man 
is one of the mai'vels of the age. And he 
has the honorable distinction of the fact 
that the wealth he has is the wealth he has 
created by his own labor, skill and 
intelligence. 

"It is this race that is now entering a 
second and a larger freedom. As half a 
century ago it ceased to be an industrial 
chattel, so now under a new and wise leader- 
ship it shows that it intends to be no longer a 
political chattel. 

''It is a happy sign that the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of Lincoln's proclamation finds the race 
reaching out for that genuine political free- 
dom which Lincoln would have given it, 
not only for the sake of the race itself, but 
because he recognized that the political and 
industrial liberties of the white race miast 
inevitably be influenced by the degree of 
industrial and political liberty shared by the 
black man who dwells within our gates." 

Out of the West comes Archbishop 
Ireland's protest against color prejudice : 

'"Color is a mere incident. Children of 
God have as much right to be pleased with 
one color as another, and to think in .this 
case that we are better only shows our silli- 
ness and our ignorance. Against this 
ridiculous prejudice Catholics are banded to 
protest most strongly and continuously. 

""When that prejudice enters into a mind 
there is no true Catholicity, and I am 
anxious that the white Catholics will agree 
with me in this matter. 

"This prejudice exists only in America, 
and it is the only country where there should 
be no prejudice, because it is the country 
for the equality of men, the prime doctrine 
of the Constitution, but one class did not 
live up to it and made one class servants of 
another. Fortunately this did not last, and 
all were put on the same level. Yet many 
whites remain non-American, but wherever 
the Catholic Church has sway this prejudice 
has been wiped away." 

Even from the South there comes in the 
Alabama Baptist some heart searching: 

"Who are they? The Negroes. Is any 
class of persons nearer to the Southern Bap- 
tists? Next-door neighbors? Why, they are 
indoor neighbors ! They not only till our 
lands and man our factories and public 
works, but they live in our homes. They 
have fed us, by what they produce and by 
what they cook, as they did our fathers 



before us. They are intimatelj' implicated in 
the very texture of our social fabric. They 
nurse our children and create in no incon- 
siderable measure the very atmosphere that 
they breathe in the plastic period of life. 
The Negro race constitutes the rough foun- 
dation upon which our economic structure 
rests. If taken away suddenly and com- 
pletely, the South would be improverished 
and brought into a desolation more appalling 
than that which came to us after the besom 
of a civil war had swept away our fortunes. 
This race of laborers is the trellis upon which 
our commercial prosperity is growing 
luxuriant and fruitful. Tear it down, and 
the vine will riot and rot on our neglected 
fields." 



EDUCATION. 



The Saturday Evening Post has 
an editorial on "The 
Foreclosed" : 

"Illiteracy as measured by the census — 
meaning inability to write — has fallen below 
eight per cent, of inhabitants ten years of 
age and upward, the whole number of illiter- 
ates being only 5,500,000, as against over 
6,000,000 in 1900. Of white native-born 
children between ten and fourteen years of 
age less than two per cent, are illiterate. 
Among all white children, native and 
foreign born, the percentage of illiteracy 
decreased almost one-half in ten years. 

"So far that looks very well; but the 
further figures from which optimism derives 
comfort seem to us rather dubious. About 
forty per cent, of all illiterates are colored, 
and among Negro children from ten to four- 
teen years of age eighteen per cent, are un- 
able to write. True, there was a great gain in 
the census period, the whole number of 
colored illiterates falling by more than 
600,000 and the proportion of illiterate 
children declining from almost a third to 
below one-fifth; but that it is still almost a 
fifth is a great reproach to the country and a 
very material handicap. 

"The child who is unable to write at 
fourteen is virtually foreclosed. Between 
him and opportunity stands a dead wall that 
only very extraordinary luck or ability will 
enable him to scale. Probably his children 
will start at a heavy disadvantage. Two 
million illiterate Negroes make as bad an 
item on the national balance sheet as twenty- 
five bushels of corn to the acre on land 
capable of producing fifty." 



176 



THE CRISIS 



The New York Evening Post shows the 
reason for Negro illiteracy: 

"When you are told that a thing cost $1.98 
you inevitably think of the bargain-counter; 
but when that is the sum named as the 
average amount expended in the State of 
South Carolina, during the year 1912, for 
the education of each of the Negi'o children in 
the public schools, you are not inclined to 
smile. There is a trace of comfort in the 
circumstance that, small as this amount is, 
it is greater by 27 cents — sixteen per cent. ! — 
than the corresponding amount for 1911. It 
is easy to imagine both the quality and the 
quantity of the education provided through 
the laying out of this pittance. The expendi- 
ture in each of the separate counties is speci- 
fied in the report of the State superintendent, 
and from this it appears that two counties — 
Berkeley and Pickens — are neck and neck 
in the race to bring the figure down as near 
to zero as possible, Berkeley standing at 25 
cents and Piekins at 24. We find the table, 
and accompanying statements, in a Columbia 
dispatch to the Augusta Chronicle; appar- 
ently, these infinitesimal amounts represent 
the total outlay, though possibly there is some 
subvention by the State which is not taken 
into account. If so, it is certainly very 
small; and the showing is most discreditable 
to South Carolina. The average expenditure 
for the white school children is $13.02, and 
the lowest in any one county is $6.93." 

The Pittsburgh Dispatch comments on the 
attitude of the South toward ignorance: 

"It is interesting and instructive to learn 
that the hope of Louisiana that it could get 
rid of the 'grandfather clause,' or hereditary 
privilege of illiterate suffrage, after a lapse 
of time has proved unfounded. Therefore 
Louisiana has amended its constitution so as 
to extend that questionable privilege for 
another term of years. 

"The Louisianians were not proud of their 
'grandfather clause' when they adopted it. 
But they conceived it a political necessity to 
enfranchise white illiteracy while disfranchis- 
ing NegTo illiteracy. So, adopting the still 
more unrepublican subterfuge of establishing 
a hereditary political right, they gave it 
life for but fourteen years. 'It was believed,' 
says the New Orleans Times-Democrat, 'that 
this provision would give a stimulus to the 
cause of education and that every white boy 
would insist upon such schooling as would 
enable him to sign his name and ultimately 
to vote. It is generally to be regretted in 



the cause of education that this warning was- 
unheeded, and that the bars had to be let 
down again last month for the new army of 
white illiterates who have grown up in the 
last fourteen years in spite of what has been 
done to give them a schooling.' 

"But the fourteen years are past, and the 
power of white ignorance is so great that 
it must be extended; which was done. Com- 
ment on the fact would be- painting the lily." 

Prom Virginia, too, comes protest. We 
learn that at a recent meeting of colored 
people Judge John A. Buchanan, of the 
Siipreme Court of Appeals of Virginia, con- 
demned the disfranchisement of the Negro in 
Virginia. He attacked the conduct of the 
officers in executing the provision of the 
new constitution and not the law. "The 
black man of Virginia had better be worthy 
to vote and still be disfranchised than to be 
as the white man who was given the vote and 
sold it," said Judge Buchanan. 

Now and then we hear an excuse for the 
fact that NegTo schools are so poor, but on 
the whole the most curious excuse is that 
given by the Houston (Tex.) Post in a long 
editorial : 

"The State of Texas gives to the. Negro 
child the same allotment per capita of 
scholastic population that it does the whites, 
but of the $1,250,000 or more that is allotted 
for the training of Negro children, a large 
sum is diverted to the white schools. 

"Why? Because so many Negro parents 
are indifferent to the training of their chil- 
dren. In the counties having a large Negro 
population there are thousands of Negro 
children who never attend school, and this 
very fact retards the progress of such schools 
as have been established." 

We confess to great sympathy 
OPPRESSION, ^-^j^ Congressman Tribble of 
Georgia. Tribble sees the shadow of an 
awful shape in President Taft's attempt to 
put fourth-class postmasters under civU- 
service rules. Says Tribble with thrilling 
accents : 

"I desire to join my colleague from 
Georgia, Mr. Bartlett, in his protest against 
civil-service examination for fourth-class 
postmasters. I feel that I am especially justi- 
fied in raising my voice against this executive 
order, because if there ever was an officially 
Negro-ridden town it is the city of Athens, 
Ga., where I live. I have seriously con- 
sidered the civil-service proposition as ap- 



OPINION 



177 



plied to post offices, and I see danger in the 
proposition. If you will analyze this order 
and its requirements you will find that the 
examination under the civil-service order will 
place in the fourth-class postoffiees in the 
South, as well as in other parts of the United 
States, many Negroes. They will stand the 
examinations and take their places at win- 
dows of small country and village postoffiees. 
I want to say to you here to-day that the 
people of this country will not stand for it." 
Think of it, proud Southerners compelled 
actually to go into examinations with 
Negroes, and not only going into the examina- 
tions, but being incontinently beaten. It is 
more than human patience can bear! Tribble 
proceeds : 

"This order becomes odious to my people 
the very moment that Negroes stand examina- 
tions for postoffice positions. Every man in 
this house would join in this fight to defeat 
this order if it placed you in the situation it 
places me. I know from experience the 
humiliation of Negro officeholders, and I 
warn you here to-day of danger in the en- 
forcement of that order. For sixteen years, 
since my sojourn in Athens, there have been 
Negroes in the postoffice of that classic city, 
and during twelve years of that time there 
was a Negro postmaster. In this city the 
State university is located, and there are 
over 1,000 students. To-day nearly every 
carrier in that city is a Negro. White people 
will not stand the examinations and compete 
with the NegTo carriers." 

Evidently something must be done. We 
might, for instance, let the Texans take 
hold. Governor Colquitt has just been look- 
ing into some of their methods and the 
Houston Chronicle reports: 

"It is impossible to secure an efficient and 
sensible administration of justice where the 
fee system offers a reward for the conviction 
of persons charged with crime. It has hap- 
pened that innocent persons have been 
convicted because a string of fees stretches 
from the moment of arrest until the defend- 
ant is punished. 

"Negroes have returned from the cotton 
fields with their hard-earned money only to 
be charged with crime and subjected to the 
fee-system drag. There are communities 
in Texas where a Negro imperils his liberty 
if it gets out that he has as much as $50 or 
$100." 

This is the ci\'il sei-vice for which Tribble's 
heart vearns. 



From the program of the Phil- 
^ * harmonic Society of New York we 
clip the following concerning Dvorak's sym- 
phony, "From the New World": 

"There has been much discussion as to the 
origin of the themes of this symphony; some, 
taking their cue from the composer's well- 
known attitude toward Negro folk music, 
asserted that all the thematic material was 
derived from Negro plantation songs; others 
took exactly the opposite view of the matter 
and said that the music was entirely Bo- 
hemian in character and that none of the 
music remotely resembled either the Negro 
melodies themselves or the Foster minstrel 
melodies. Mr. Ki-ehbiel, who has made a 
special study of the subject, justly remarks : 
'As a matter of fact, that which is most 
characteristic, most beautiful and most vital 
in our folk song has come from the Negro 
slaves of the South, partly because those 
slaves lived in the period of emotional, 
intellectual and social development which pro- 
duces folk songs, partly because they lived 
a life that prompted utterance in song, and 
partly because as a race the Negroes are 
musical by nature. Being musical and living 
a life that had in it romantic elements of 
pleasure as well as suffering, they give expres- 
sion to those elements in songs, which reflect 
their original nature as modified by their 
American environment. Dr. Dvorak, to whom 
music is a language, was able quickly to dis- 
cern the characteristics of the new idiom 
and to recognize its availability and value. 
He recognized, too, what his critics forgot, 
that that music is entitled to be called 
characteristic of a people which gives the 
greatest pleasure to the largest fraction of 
a people. It was therefore a matter of in- 
difference to him whether the melodies which 
make the successful appeal were cause or 
effect; in either case they were worthy of 
his attention.' " 



The Columbia State has this 
THE TE interesting psychological study 
DR. CRUM. jj^ ^jjg shape of an editorial on 
the late collector of the port of Charleston : 
"W. D. Crum, lately minister of the United 
States in Liberia and sometime collector of 
the port of Charleston, was a Negro of un- 
common character. President Roosevelt ap- 
pointed him collector against the protest of 
the white people of Charleston, an act for 
which there was no excuse, and in the doing 



178 



THE CRISIS 



of which the President was held by the 
principal spokesmen of the city to have 
broken faith with them. Strenuous efforts 
were made to prevent Crum's confirmation, 
but they failed, and one of the reasons was 
that Crum's reputation as a man of good 
deportment was unimpeachable. No charges 
of any weight could be brought against him. 

"In the conduct of the office of collector, 
Dr. Crum exhibited remarkable discretion, 
tact and common sense. For example, when 
a foreign warship was in port and it was the 
duty of its commander or other officer to call 
at the custom house, the collector was usually 
absent, leaving a white deputy to represent 
him. We have heard various incidents re- 
lated illustrating his good sense and delicacy, 
and it is certain that while he was collector 
he was careful to avoid anything that would 
cause embarrassment to white people. By 
profession he was a physician and had a con- 
siderable practice among the people of his 
race. 

"His acceptance of the office of collector 
was, of course, of no benefit to his race, as it 
aroused race prejudice. Had he declined it 
when the white people raised their protest, 
the declination would have brought him dis- 
tinction and would have been a higher testi- 
monial to the capacity of a Negro to solve a 
delicate situation than any sort of conduct of 
the office could have been, but it is only just 
to say that in the office he bore himself in a 
manner that commended him highly to the 
community, however objectionable to it was 
the occupancy of the office by a NegTo." 



We append three quotations 
teE NEGRO ^itiiout comment. First an 
AT WORK. editorial from the New York 
Evening Post: 

''One of the strange inconsistencies in 
the South's treatment of the Negro is revealed 
by the appearance before Governor Brown, 
of Georgia, of white men to protest against 
the driving of the Negroes out of six counties 
in that State. It seems that there is a sort of 
Ku Klux at work, iDosting notices at night 
wliich warn all the colored people to leave or 
suffer terrible punishments. As a result many 
of them are going, and one of the men who 
called on the governor — but dared not give 
his name — thus described the terrible conse- 
quences of the flight: 'If something is not 
done to check this exodus * * * our wives and 
daughters will soon be put to the necessity of 



doing the cooking, washing and performing 
other menial labor. In addition, the farmers 
will suffer greatly, for they will be deprived 
of field hands.' Not one word, of course, 
about the victims of the outrage, of their loss 
and suffering in having to abandon homes 
and property and flee for safety. The sole 
consideration of importance is that the wives 
and daughters of prosperous whites may be 
without servants and the farmers without 
farm hands. Now, we all know that the Negro 
is the worst possible servant and farm-hand, 
that he is the curse of the South because of 
his criminal nature and general wortlilessness. 
Ought he, then, not to be driven out at 
once, in order that Georgia maj^ surely be a 
white man's country and the way be cleared 
for foreign immigration? Again, we are 
always told that the South would know 
exactly how to settle the Negro problem if 
it were only let alone. But here it is in two 
hostile camps, one saying that the Negro must 
go and the other that he must stay. And 
Governor Brown actually suggests as a 
remedy a law forbidding Georgians to terrify 
into leaving their homes people whose color 
or methods of living they do not like." 

To this we add a clipping from the Char- 
lotte Observer: 

"Just what a colored man can do on 
the farm if he is diligent and painstaking- 
was strikingly attested yesterday when Sam 
Powell, one of the most highly respected 
colored citizens of Paw Creek, sold on the 
Charlotte market thirteen bales of cotton for 
which he received a cheek for $1,086. He 
likewise disposed of 400 bushels of seed 
for $1.50 a bushel, or $600. Eight bales 
brought 18 cents a pound and five bales 
17 cents. The cotton was that of the Lewis 
long staple variety, the staple approximating 
one and three-eighth inches in length. These 
thirteen bales were grown on a. field of 
thirteen acres, Powell averaging a bale to 
the acre on this tract. His sale yesterday 
aggregated $1,686, or an average of $130 
to the acre. 

"Powell is one of the leading colored 
farmers of the county. He is well read, 
subscribes to several papers, including the 
Daily Observer, and is a great believer in 
intensive farming. His success in other lines 
of agriculture in addition to cotton growing 
has been in keeping with his success there. 
Powell raises his own supplies at home and 
sells enough every year to more than pay for 
his expenses. Seed selection, careful tillage 



OPINION 



179 



of the soil and a diligent attention to the 
growing crop are among his strong points." 
The last clipping is from a letter in the 
Charleston Post. The writer is complaining 
of the Negro tenant in South Carolina and 
■ says : 

"Now on the adjacent mainland things 
are in somewhat better shape. New men came 
in and grasped the situation; they moved the 
Negro bodily out — that is, they took away 
all the planting land, selling him just a 
piece of non-arable land to build a house on, 
made him a fixture thereby, and eliminated 
him as a competitor altogether. The conse- 
quence is that the Negro has accepted the 
situation, gets his money every Saturday 
night, is better clothed and better fed than 
his sea island neighbor, just across the 
river, who goes into the farce of farming, of 
which he has no scientific knowledge, makes 
way with half he makes, that is under lien 
to some factor, and erstwhile listens to the 
agitators of his race, who advise him 'Noffer 
wuk fer Buekra.' 

"The question comes in then: Why do you 
all not do the same on the island as the white 
men on the mainland did? 

"No doubt this action would help greatly, 
but it would be harder to accomplish here. 
as so much land is owned by them, or by 
aliens, who have not the interest of the 
community at heart. 

"Therefore to bring about the needed 
change : 

"The factor must cease to advance the 
Negro. 

"The white man of the country must de- 
prive him of planting land, as much for 
the NegTo's good as for his own." 



FROM THE 



"After a good deal of 
effort we are gradually get- 

COLORED PRESS, ^^^g, ^^ ^j^^ ^^-^^^^ ^j^^^^ 

the most dignified and responsible publica- 
tions in the United States are beginning to 
capitalize the word 'Negxo' just the same as 
they do the words 'Jew' and 'Irish.' Both 
the Outlook and the Centunj Magazine have 
recently decided hereafter to spell the word 
'Negro' with a capital 'N.' This we think is 
a distinct victorj'. We hope that publica- 
tions like the Independent and the New York 
Evening Post will soon follow the Outlook 
and Century." — New York Age. 

"The optimistic NegTo boasts continually 
of seeing the bright side of the picture of 
life. If a Negro is burned alive in the 



South, 'Oh, well,' he says, 'such outrages will 
only urge the Negro to make more rapid 
progress.' This optimistic fellow makes no 
estimate of the extent to which such brutality 
will depress and discourage the Negro. He 
agrees with Booker Washington that slavery 
was a blessing. So is hell a blessing. So 
is the devil a blessing. But, nevertheless, we 
ask for none of it for ourselves. You are 
called a pessimist if you predict that a house 
that is all aflame will burn down. Tiie 
optimist leans altogether on God. He expects 
God to build his houses, chop his wood and 
fry his steak. God helps tliose who help 
themselves, and no man can reasonably 
expect assistance in doing a work when he 
himself is endowed with the capacity neces- 
sary to do that work himself. 'Hope deferred 
maketh the heart sick,' but hope deferred and 
crushed a thousand times, instead of making 
the heart sick awakens in some new hopes 
looking toward impossible realization. It is 
this elastic, redundant and overboiling human 
nature that too easily contents the Negro 
and barely sustains the dog-trot pace of our 
existence. We must learn to cry out, to 
make complaints, like the revolutionary 
. fathers did, to send in our remonstrance to 
the throne — the throne of our human govern- 
ment as well as the throne of Grace. 'Heredi- 
tary bondmen, know ye not who would be 
free himself must strike the blow?' 

"You must demand your rights. You 
nmst strike for your rights. You must insist 
or you will be stripped and rendered power- 
less." — St. Louis Advance. 

" 'Jim Crow' laws are for the purpose of 
herding Negroes together in any and every 
public place and conveyance; and in certain 
residential localities. 

"But here is a thing which seems so weak 
and childish in the Negro in all segregated 
localities : He is compelled by law to live 
within certain restricted limits; but when 
you pass through these 'Jim Crow' sections 
inhabited by NegToes, in any Southern town 
or city, you will find upon nearly every 
corner a white man or a white woman keep- 
ing some sort of store, or scattered thickly 
throughout the entire Negro residential 
section. 

"Why do we continue to support these 
white stores in these segregated districts? 
Since we are forced by law, whether legal or 
illegal, to live herded together, why do we still 
enrich the very folks who pen us up like 
cattle in a pen?" — St. Luke's Herald. 




EDITORIAL 






INTERMARRIAGE. 

;EW groups of people are 
forced by their situation 
iuto such, cruel dilem- 
mas as American Ne- 
groes. Nevertheless they 
must not allow anger or 
personal resentment to dim their clear 
vision. 

Take, for instance, the question of the 
intermarrying of white and black folk; 
it is a question that colored people sel- 
dom discuss. It is about the last of the 
social problems over which they are dis- 
turbed, because they so seldom face it 
in fact or in theorj^ Their problems are 
problems of work and wages, of the right 
to vote, of the right to travel decently, 
of the right to frequent places of pub- 
lic amusement, of the right to public 
security. 

White people, on the other hand, for 
the most part profess to see but one prob- 
lem: ''Do you want your sister to 
marry a Nigger?" Sometimes we are 
led' to wonder if they are lying about 
their solicitude on this point; and if 
they are not, we are led to ask why 
under present laws anybody should be 
compelled to marry any person whom 
she does not wish to marry? 

This brings us to the crucial question : 
so far as the present advisability of 
intermarrying between white and colored 
people in the United States is concerned, 
both races are practically in complete 
agreement. Colored folk marry colored 
folk and white marry white, and the 
exceptions are very few. 

Why not then stop the exceptions? For 
three reasons: physical, social and 
moral. 



1. For the physical reason that to 
prohibit such intermarriage would be 
publicly to acknowledge that black blood 
is a physical taint — a thing that no 
decent, self-respecting black man can be 
asked to admit. 

2. For the social reason that if two 
full-grown responsible human beings of 
any race and color propose to live to- 
gether as man and wife, it is only social 
decency not simply to allow, but to com- 
pel them to marry. Let those people 
who have yelled themselves purple in 
the face over Jack Johnson just sit dovm 
and ask themselves this question : 
Granted that Johnson and Miss Cameron 
proposed to live together, was it better 
for them to be legally married or not? 
We know what the answer of the Bour- 
bon South is. We know that they would 
rather uproot the foundations of decent 
society than to call the consorts of their 
brothers, sons and fathers their legal 
wives. We infinitely prefer the methods 
of Jack Johnson to those of the brother 
of Governor Mann of Virginia. 

3. The moral reason for opposing 
laws against intermarriage is the greatest 
of all: such laws leave the colored girl 
absolutely helpless before the lust of 
white men. It reduces colored women in 
the eyes of the law to the position of 
dogs. Low as the white girl falls, she 
can compel her seducer to marry her. If 
it were proposed to take this last defense 
from poor white working girls, can you 
not hear the screams of the "white 
slave" defenders? What have these 
people to say to laws that propose to 
create in the United States 5,000,000 
women, the ownership of whose bodies no 
white man is bound to respect? 



EDITORIAL 



181 




Note these arguments, my brothers and 
sisters, and watch your State legisla- 
tures. This winter will see a determined 
attempt to insult and degrade us by such 
non-intermarriage laws. We must kill 
them, not because we are anxious to 
marry white men's sisters, but because 
we are determined that white men shall 
let our sisters alone. 

"CUTS" AND "WRITE-UPS." 

INDLY inform me what 
will be your price to pub- 
lish my cut and a brief 
write-up." The Crisis 
receives so many requests 
like this that we are 

going to ansM^er all with these emphatic 

statements : 

1. The news columns of The Crisis 
ar'e not for sale. 

2. The news columns of no honest, 
reputable periodical are for sale. 

3. No honest man who realizes what 
he is doing will ask a reputable periodi- 
cal to sell him space anywhere except in 
the plainly marked advertising section. 

4. The dishonesty of foisting paid 
matter on readers as news lies in the 
fact that the reader can never know 
whether a person or deed is commended 
because of its real worth or because 
somebody had money enough to pay for 
flattery. 

5. So far as The Crisis is concerned, 
the public may be absolutely certain that 
whenever a person is commended in our 
columns, the reason therefor is that in 
the editor's judgment (poor and fallible 
as it may be) the person deserves com- 
mendation. In no single case has any 
article appeared in The Crisis because 
of any consideration, monetary or other- 
wise, expressed or implied ; and this will 
continue to be the case as long as The 
Crisis is under the present management. 

6. The public is not wholly to be 
blamed for not understanding clearly 
this code of ethics. Periodicals of all 
kinds are continually selling their 
influence and columns for direct or 



indirect bribery; among colored papers 
two widely circulated weeklies are 
openly and notoriously for sale; 
there is no person or project which 
cannot at any time, for money, buy 
in their columns prominent mention 
or editorial support. Under such cir- 
cumstances it is natural that some men 
should assume that all periodicals de- 
voted to the colored race have a similar 
code of morals. This is not true of Tjie 
Crisis and it is not true of scores of 
other colored papers. We may be poor 
and struggling, but we have not yet lost 
our self-respect. 

7. There are, of course, many prac- 
tices that approach the border line of 
debatable action in the matter of news 
and editorials. Suppose a man wishes 
a hundred copies of the number in which 
his cut appears? Suppose an advertiser 
is worth mention as a man? Suppose 
that the periodical will undoubtedly be 
helped by giving timely notice to some 
man or measure? Here is dangerous 
borderland, but the narrow way is clear 
and straight. The editor must ask : 

(a) Is the matter news? 

( & ) Is the man commendable outside 
all considerations? 

If the answers are "yes," then the 
article should go in; if not it should 
stay out. This is our code of editorial 
ethics. We commend it to our brother 
editors. We especially commend it to 
those who pester our souls with requests 
like the above. It is a good policy. In 
the end it pays. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

;E want every reader of 
The Crisis to send us 
news of the darker 
races. We do not want 
social notes, or essays, or 
biographies, or general 

description. We do want facts, directly 

and simply told, showing : 

1. What colored folk are actually 
doing. 

2. Just what discriminations they 
suffer. 





1863— EMANCIPATION— TH 




THIRD GENERATION— 1913- 



184 



THE CRISIS 



If you look in our ' ' Color Line ' ' notes 
and "Opinion" you will see the kind 
of facts we want. Such facts are dif- 
ficult to gather. The regular news asso- 
ciations do not publish them, the colored 
papers miss half of them, and de- 
spite the fact that we spend over $500 
a year, we do not get as complete 
a picture of colored life in America as 
we M'ish. Will you help us ? Search your 
local papers for notes and editorials; 
note occurrences; let nothing slip. We 
may not be able to write you a letter of 
thanks and we may not always use your 
matter, but we shall appreciate the serv- 
ice just the same. This leads us to say 
a word in answer to hundreds of 
inquiries : . 

Yes. The Crisis wants contributions ; 
it wants news notes, it wants articles, it 
wants stories, it wants poems. 

But The Crisis has a standard. News 
notes must be news notes and not thinly 
concealed "puffs." Articles must be 
written in the king's English and must 
say something. We do not want ram- 
bling thoughts and opinions; we want 
information — good solid information, 
illustrated by facts and pictures. We 
write .our own editorials. They might 
be improved, we admit. But we insist 
on writing them. Again, articles must 
be timely. A good Washington woman 
sent us a note for the January Crisis on 
December 27. On that day the Jany- 
ary Crisis, printed and bound, was being 
mailed to subscribers. 

Yes, we want stories ; but do you know 
what a story is, and can you write one? 
Believe us, it is no easy job. Most 
people who try it fail. This is natural. 
You would not start 'out to make your 
first dress to-day and sell it to John 
Wanamaker to-morrow? No. Well, we 
have reason to know that story writing 
is more difficult than dressmaking and 
less liable to success. We are willing to 
read your first attempts, but be sure and 
send postage for return mailing. 

And poetry. Honestly, until we sat in 
this chair, we never dreamed that there 
were so many people who imagined they 



could write poetry. Of all forms 
of writing, poetry is the most subtle and 
difficult. Yet we receive day after day, 
and month after month, reams of the 
most amazing drivel which we are asked 
to publish. We are getting so that the 
sight of lines of uneven length on a 
written page calls for strong self-control. 
The attempt to write poetry, like 
measles, is a disease we all must have; 
but the attempt to publish such stuff — 
to inflict it on an innocent and uiisus- 
pecting public — that is the unforgivable 
sin. Wherefore send your poetry if you 
must, but we shall remain firm, planted 
with our back to the wall, and our grim 
visage front forward to defend our 
readers, and at the same time discern the 
occasional — oh, very occasional — gem. 

So, in fine, we want contributions, but 
we want them good. 



BLESSED DISCRIMINATION, 

'GOOD friend sends us this. 

word : 

As an optimist of The 
Crisis persuasion, I find 
myself more or less fre- 
quently engaged in argu- 
ments on the eternal race 
question. Here is an argu- 
ment I .am often called upon to meet: "Jim 
Crow" laws make us save money; discrimina- 
tion makes us appreciate and patronize our 
own; segregation gives our business men a 
chance; separate schools give our girls and 
boys something to work for. Possibly there 
are miany doubtful minds who would be bene- 
fited by a word from you on this subject 
through the columns of The Crisis. 

There is no doubt that colored people 
travel less than they otherwise would, 
on account of "Jim Crow" cars, and 
thus have this money to spend otherwise. 
There is no doubt that thousands of 
Negro business enterprises have been 
built up on account of discrimination 
against colored folks in drug Stores, 
grocery stores, insurance societies and 
daily papers. In a sense The Crisis is 
capitalized race prejudice.. 

There is not the slightest doubt but 
that separate school systems, by giving 
colored children their own teachers and 
a sense of racial pride, are enabled to 
keep more colored children in school and 




EDITORIAL 



185 



take them through longer courses than 
mixed systems. The 100,000 Negroes of 
Baltimore have 600 pupils in the 
separate high school; New York, with a 
larger colored population, has less than 
200 in its mixed high schools. 

Therefore discrimination is a veiled 
blessing? It is not, save in a few excep- 
tional cases. 

Take the "Jim Crow" car; is the 
money saved or merely diverted? Is it 
diverted to better things than travel or 
to worse? As a matter of fact separate 
cars and parks and public insult have 
driven Negro amusements indoors, and 
the result is tuberculosis and pneumonia ; 
the}' have deprived colored people of the 
civilization of public contact, and that is 
an almost irreparable loss. 

Take our business enterprises; they 
are creditable and promising, but they 
are compelled to set a lower standard of 
efficiency than that recognized in the 
white business world. Our business men 
must grope in the dark after methods; 
our buyers do not know how to buy and 
our clerks do not know how to sell; our 
banks do not know how to invest, and 
our insurance societies, with few excep- 
tions, do not know what modern insur- 
ance means. 

We all know this, but whom do we 
blame? We blame ourselves. We carp 
and sneer and criticise among ourselves 
at "colored" enterprises and declare 
that Ave can always tell a "colored" 
store or a "colored" paper by its very 
appearance. This is not fair. It is cruel 
and senseless injustice. Negro enter- 
prises conform to a lower standard not 
because they want to, but because they 
must. Color prejudice prevents us from 
training our children and our men to the 
same standards as those set for the sur- 
rounding white world. 

The colored boy can learn servility, but 
he is not allowed to learn business 
methods : colored men learn how to sweep 
the floor of a bank, but cannot learn the 
A B C of modern investments; the 
colored industrial school does not teach 
modern machine methods, but old and 



outworn handwork or decadent trades 
and medieval conditions. 

The result is that our business men are 
not the travelers of a broad and beaten 
path, but wanderers in a wilderness. 
Considering their opportunity, their 
fifty banks and tens of thousands of 
business enterprises and hundreds of 
thousands of dollars in industrial insur- 
ance are little short of marvelous. But 
to call the cruel discrimination that has 
misdirected effort, discouraged ability, 
murdered men and sent women to graves 
of sorrow — to call this an advantage is 
to misuse language. The open door of 
opportunity to colored persons, regard- 
less of the accident of color, would have 
given us to-day $10 of invested capital 
where we have $1 ; and ten business men 
trained to the high and exact standard 
of modern efficiency where now we have 
one grim and battered survivor clinging 
to the ragged edge. Thank God for the 
dollar and the survivor, but do not thank 
Him for the discrimination. Thank the 
devil for that. We black people to- 
day are succeeding not because of dis- 
crimination, but in spite of it. Without 
it we would succeed better and faster, 
and they that deny this are either fools 
or hypocrites. 

The same thing is evident in education. 
Separate school systems give us more 
pupils but poorer schools. The 200 black 
high-school pupils in New York have the 
best high-school equipment in the land — 
beautiful buildings, costly laboratories, 
scores of the best teachers, books and 
materials, everything that money and 
efficiency can furnish; the Baltimore 
high school has to struggle in a building 
about half large enough for its w^ork, 
with too few teachers and those at low 
salaries, and with a jealous public that 
grudges every cent the school has and 
wants to turn the whole machine into a 
factory for making servants for smart 
Baltimore. All honor to their teachers 
for the splendid work they do in spite 
of discrimination, but do not credit dis- 
crimination with the triumph; credit 
Mason Hawkins. 



186 



THE CRISIS 



Turn to our newspapers. They are a 
sad lot, we grant you. But whose is the 
fault? How can they get trained men 
for their work? How can they get 
capital for their enterprise? How can 
they maintain for themselves and their 
readers a standard even as high as their 
white contemporaries, not to say higher ? 
Their workers are shut out from the 
staffs of white magazines and news- 
papers ; their readers are deprived of the 
education of social contact and their very 
writers are, through no fault of their 
0"«Ti, illiterate. There lies on our desk 
this pitiful letter : 

Dear Editor of the Crisis 
New York. 

It would eonfure a great favor upon me. if 
the hessacery arrangment can be secured that 
i may constribet to your magazine Some of my 
origanal MS.S. and Poem, as i have joust 
Begain to Eite Short M.S.S i awaiteing you 
Eeply 

Your truly, 

Shall we laugh at this or weep ? Who 
knows what this man might have done or 
said if the State of Florida had let him 
learn to read and write ? Shall we thank 
the God of Discrimination for planting 
literature in such soil or shall we hate it 
with perfect hatred ? 

No. Race discrimination is evil. It 
forces those discriminated against to a 
lower standard and then judges them by 
a higher. It demands that we do more 
with less opportunity than others do. 
It denies to present workers the accumu- 
lated experience of the past and compels 
them at fearful cost to make again the 
mistakes of the past. Out of this cruel 
grilling may and do come strong char- 
acters, but out of it also come the 
criminal and the stunted, the bitter and 
the insane. One is just as much the 
fruit of the tree as the other. If in any 
place and time race hatred is so un- 
reasoning and bitter that separate 
schools, cars and churches are inevita- 
ble, we must accept it. make the best of 
it and turn even its disadvantages to 
our advantage. But we must never for- 
get that none of its possible advantages 



can offset its miserable evils, or replace 
the opportunity, the broad education, the 
free competition and the generous emu- 
lation of free men in a free world. 






A LETTER TO A SOUTHERN WOMAN. 

(Who asked that her remarks on the ISfegro 
question be regarded as confidential.) 

lY DEAR MRS. X.: 

Of course I understood 
that all you said last 
week was said with the 
sense of security that 
comes from privacy and 
confidence; and, of course, I have 
respected this confidence, although I 
could not resist telling a few friends, in 
a general way, that I was much encour- 
aged by the liberal outlook of many 
people whom I met while I was visiting 
the South. But I am really disappointed 
that I cannot say more. Is this not the 
South 's most intimate tragedy — that its 
Bleases and Vardamans are permitted to 
utter their thoughts freely, while those 
who really represent the best thought of 
the South are forced to be silent? How 
is the world to know that every one of 
you is not a Blease at heart, when your 
noblest hopes and thoughts never find a 
voice ? I know that the Abolitionists are 
anathema south of Mason and Dixon's 
line, but I wish that there were men like 
them there, who would dare to marshal 
the conscience of their fellows in, utter 
disregard of their own careers and for- 
tunes. A few fanatics, a few madmen 
"on the side of the angels," might give 
freedom to your twenty-five million 
people, and overshadow those fanatics 
who bring to you 

"No light, but rather darkness 
visible. ' ' 
I know you will understand the spirit 
in which I write these things. It is the 
thouglit of your own work, and that of 
your husband, that gives me the courage 
to say these things to you. 
Sincerely yours, 

J. E. Spingarn. 
New York, January 2, 1913. 



THE REPRESENTATIVE 

A STORY— By VIRGIL COOKE 




OHN K. TRAVIS was very 
much disturbed when his 
oflfice boy informed him 
that Mr. Jones, the junior 
partner, was about to leave 
for the Charlton Club to 
play a game of golf. 

"Golf !'' he thundered; "that is all he thinks 
about here of late, it's golf, golf, golf ! Send 
him to me and tell him it is something 
of immediate importance." 

"Yes, sir," answered the boy as he hurried 
awaj' ujDon his errand. 

Mr. Jones, when informed that he was 
wanted, made no effort to conceal his dis- 
pleasure. He walked 'into the private ofi&ce 
of his partner with a "Well, what is it?" 

Travis pulled a chair. "Sit down a minute. 
I want to discuss ihat Brazilian proposition 
with you." 

"So you still have that in mind?" 

"Yes." 

"Better forget it," laughed the other. 
"Isn't there enough busii>ess nearer home we 
can get? South Americans have very few 
business relations with this country." 

"I know that, but why don't we Americans 
come in for a share of the South American 
commerce and business? England and 
Germany are all doing enormous business 
with Brazil, while we are idly looking on. 
This is our dull time here. Why not make a 
few thousand off the dagoes?" 

Jones smiled. "You remember, of course, 
that we tried once; you made a special trip 
to Rio de Janeiro to put that deal through?" 

"That's just it " 

"But you didn't succeed, and you didn't 
seem talkative on just why you failed. That 
long trip should have brought results; it 
cost enough." 

"Jones," began Travis, "a few foolish re- 
marks I made is the cause of our losing- 
several thousand dollars. While in Rio de 
Janeiro I stopped at the Avenida. There I 
made the acquaintance of an Englishman, 
who was a very affable and agreeable man. 
One night he and I were in the cafe eating 
supper and telling of the various places we 
had visited when in walked a Negro, who 
seated himself not far from our table. I 
touched my companion on the arm. 'Do they 
allow that at this hotel?' I asked him. 
'What?' he answered as he followed my 
gaze. 'Look at that black man,' I said to 



him. He looked puzzled, but I informed him 
thai his [)resence was disgusting to me. 
'This is South America,' said the Englishman. 
'I know that,' 1 answered him, 'but I could 
kick that Negro out of my sight,' and I 
didn't speak low either." 

Jones pulled out his watch. "Really, can't 
we finish this some other time?" 

His partner flushed with annoyance. 
"This is business, you understand." 
• "Well, what next?" 

"The following day after my supper with 
the Englishman I had an 'appointment with 
one Senor L. Mario, chief of construction 
for the Brazilian Central Railroad. I arrived 
at his office and there before me was the 
Negro I had seen in the cafe at the hotel. 
'Is this Seiior Mario?' I asked him, somewhat 
surprised. He informed me that it was and 
also that he had decided not to sign the eon- 
tract for the building of those bridges." 

"Perhaps the Englishman wanted the con- 
tract himself and had peached," suggested 
Jones. 

"No, that wasn't it, John ; the English- 
man turned out to be the general superin- 
tendent of the Brazilian Central. Well, I 
failed; but I have hit on a new plan. I've 
learned .of a young Negro engineer who's 
sailing for Brazil to-day to try for a job 
under Mario. My plan is to offer him a good 
percentage if he'll represent us and land that 
job. He's black and he'll know how to jolly 
Mario." 

"What — a Negro to reijresent us in Rio?" 

"Why not? What dit¥erence, if he de- 
livers the goods? Besides, we won't, of 
course, pay him as much as we would a white 
man. What do you say? The contract will 
clear us at least $25,000 at any reasonable 
figure." 

"Oh, go ahead if you want to, but deal 
with the darkey yourself, please; good-day, 
I'm off." 

A month passed. 

"Heard from your South American deal?" 
asked Jones one day suddenly as he spied 
a cablegram. 

"Yes," grunted Travis, and tossed him the 
yellow paper. 

It read: 

"Lost the contract, but got a job. Mario , 
sends regards." 

Jones chuckled. 

"Senor Mario has a good memory," he said. 



ABOLITION and FIFTY YEARS AFTER 

By STEPHEN S. WISE, Rabbi of tbe Free Synagogue, New York 




1863 and emancipation 
were not worth while, 
neither was 1776 nor its 
Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, nor yet M a g n a 
Charta. We are ready to 
consider the question 
whether emancipation was worth while, be- 
cause we have not taken wholly to heart the 
response of Emerson to the statesman who 
called the Declaration of Independence a 
mass of glittering- generalities — the response 
— not a glittering generality but a blazing 
ubiquity. Emancipation could have come in 
no other way. One must needs sorrow for 
those who seek to detract from the fame of 
the Abilitionists led by William Lloyd Gar- 
rison ; one pities their detractors. Emancipa- 
tion was needed in order to redeem the 
promise of the Republic, even though the 
latter was veiled by the expediency, which 
dictated the framing of the Constitution. 
The American democracy and NegTo slavery 
could not permanently co-exist. Our nation 
cannot forever exist if the white race be 
half enslaved by its prejudices and partisan- 
ships and the Negro race only half freed 
from its yoke. 

To the unjustly scorning critics of the 
Abilitionists be it said that Garrison was a 
no less noble figure than Robert Gould Shaw 
himself. Men rightly see noblest heroism in 
the deeds of the soldiers of the Civil War, 
and wrongly ignore the noble courage of 
those intrepid souls who fought the war for 
freedom during thirty long, terrible years 
before Gettysburg. Colonel Shaw went forth 
to battle and immortality amid the plaudits 
of Boston and the reverence of a nation, but 
Garrison fared forth unto his thirty years of 
resistless, withal weaponless, warfare amid 
the execrations of the mobs of his day. The 
speaker of the Harvard commemoration 
address of 1865 said of the men of Harvard 
and their kind, who had given their lives 
that the nation might live: ''We shall not 
disparage America now that we have seen 
what men it will bear." This word might 
have been as truly spoken of the men whose 
moral might and spiritual genius had made 
emancipation possible, whose voice Abra- 
ham Lincoln was when he proclaimed 
emancipation. 

Have we really emancipated the Negro or 
merely abolished slavery? It is one thing 



to help a race to throw off its shackles and 
another thing to emancipate it unto perfect 
freedom. We have no more tried emancipaT 
tion as yet than Christians have ever tried 
Christianity, or Jews experimented in the 
art of living by Judaism. Who will essay 
to judge the wisdom of emancipation after 
the brief term of fifty years'? Moreover, in 
the despite of denying to the black race more 
than a tithe of the educational opportunity 
which is the daily portion of the white race, 
we yet presume to judge it, a newly emerged 
people, by the most rigorous of white men's 
standards, forgetting, as a gifted teacher of 
his own race has said, that the Negro began 
at the zero point with nothing to his credit 
but the crude physical discipline of slavery. 

The Negro has proved that he has fitness 
and capacity for education. In truth, he has 
shown a veritable passion for education, as 
is witnessed by the -extraordinary decrease 
in Negro illiteracy Avithin half a century. 
Education, moreover, has not demoralized the 
NegTo. Happily for himself, the Negro has 
refuted the calumny that education is 
dangerous, invented apparently in order 
permanently to disable him on his upward 
march. _ Curiously the North blundered in 
fearing that education would for the first 
time in the history of human striving unfit a 
race for life. Again, the States have not 
fairly and adequately provided educational 
opportunities for the Negro. The education 
which has moralized the Negro has unfitted 
him solely for a life of servitude. If it be 
sought to keep a race in permanent subjec- 
tion, every educational opportunitj' must be 
sedulously withheld from it. If the Southern 
States cannot afford to give to the cause of 
NegTo education more than one-third or one- 
quarter of the amount needed for this Avork, 
in order that the race may be led by teachers 
who are competent, educated and decently 
remunerated, and that the educational 
opportunities of the race be complete and 
diversified and serviceable, then it remains 
the business of the nation to step in aiid 
assume a portion of the burden which is 
explicably too heavy for the South to bear. 

Among the influences which have operated 
as against the rise of the NegTo, and to make 
emancipation a thing of name rather than of 
fact, has been the rise in our own genera- 
tion of the spirit of race consciousness, or 
rather of race consciousnesses, together with 



ABOLITION AND FIFTY YEARS AFTER 



189 



the inevitable stress upon superiority and 
inferiority which race consciousness entails. 
In addition to a veritable madness of race 
boasting and race pride toucliing the so- 
called meaner breeds, Ave have witnessed the 
rise of an almost morbid nationalism demand- 
ing, among other things, Germany for the 
Germans, Eussia for the Slavs and America 
for the white race. This race apotheosis and 
national self-aggrandizement might have been 
successfully combatted if Garrison and 
Phillips had survived to do battle in the name 
of the internationalism which in these days 
is considered an obsolete sentimentality. 

The men of the North have no right to 
cast reproaches at the South touching its 
attitude to the Negro, even at its worst, see- 
ing that the North has done no more for the 
Negro, and is doing no more, than to ignore 
him as though he were not, when it is not 
actually doing him injury and harm. The 
North has ceased to be ready to make sacri- 
fices on behalf of humanitarian convictions 
primarily because it has no convictions of its 
own. In the interest of fancied industrial 
relations and imaginary political peace, the 
North tolerates intolerable courses when it 
does not actually share in them. As long- 
as the men and women of the North suffer 
the NegTo race to live in utter isolation in 
our city and cities, to feel themselves shut 
out and despised, so long do we forfeit the 
right to deal with the injustices of the South 
to the Negro race. 

The outstanding fact in the field of .rela- 
tionship between the two races is the weak- 
ness, though not want of courage, of the few 
who recognize the wrong and the inhospi- 
tality of the multitude touching any protest 
against wrong, if wrong be done merely ( ! ) 
to the Negro. We seem to have become tepid 
and indifferent touching the direst wrong if 
it be only the Negro who is its victim. We 
forget that the stronger race is more suscep- 
tible to moral damage than the weaker race, 
If the moral fibre of partially strong races 
be enfeebled, moral havoc is likely to result. 
Moreover, a political menace is involved, a 
menace to those members of the white race 
primarily in the South, but ultimately in the 
North as well, who are nearest to the Negro 
race in outward or economic circumstance. 
The rights of the poor white have already 
been assailed in the South in order in part 
to justify Negro proscription, and because of 
the ever growing desire of the strong to 
limit the powers of the weak. A nation may 



begin by assailing the rights of the fewest 
and weakest, but it will not end until it holds 
lightly the rights of all save the fewest and 
strongest. 

We may deny justice to the Negro, we 
may withhold from him elementary political 
rights, we may scourge and stripe him, we 
may hang and burn him, but in the end the 
white race will suft'er most. No race can 
violate the moral law with impunity; no race 
can for years and generations pursue courses 
that are unjust without mutilating its own 
moral nature and sinking to a lowered level 
of life. The Negro victim of the Coates- 
ville mob was fiendishly wronged, but the 
wHte community of Coatesville is most 
deeply and abidingly injured, for it is hurt 
in the very fundamentals of its life. 

Earnestly ought we appeal to-day to the 
Negro race to keep their problems out of the 
whirl of politics. The Negro must not suffer 
the fortunes of his race to be embroiled in 
partisan strife. The Democratic party has 
always been ready to treat the political dis- 
abilities of the Negro as a vote-getting 
opportunity, and the Republican party no 
less willing to utilize him as an always 
dependable asset. The third party may mean 
to be just to the Negro, but is it just to treat 
him well in the Northern States, where such 
treatment will be unobjectionable, and to 
treat him ill, virtually to disable him, in the 
Southern States, where such Negro disable- 
ment will be most acceptable to the citizen- 
ship, remembering that in the South, where it 
is proposed to leave his present status of 
disabilities unremedied, there are to be found 
the Negroes who are the true leaders of their 
race? It is unworthy on the part of the 
great political parties to treat the fortunes 
of a race of ten millions and more as a pawn 
upon the chessboard of political advantage. 

Emancipation came as a war measure, and 
rightly so — a measure of war upon slavery. 
Pity did not free the Negro, but war did. 
Pity and charity will not solve the NegTo 
problem of to-day. It is upon the higher 
grounds of justice and democracy that the 
question must be met. We face to-day, as a 
nation, not a Negro question, but the Ameri- 
can question. It is and always has been the 
test and touchstone of American life, testing 
the very foundations of the Republic. If we 
fail here we fail everywhere. The question 
is not one of racial equality, but of social 
justice, of true democracy, of genuine 
Americanism. 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 



MEMBERSHIP. 

TT 7" E have at last passed the "1,000 mem- 
'^ ' bers" mark. The record now is 1,092 
members, which constitutes us the largest 
association of the sort which colored people 
ever had. 



MEETINGS. 

T N the South Dr. Mason addressed meet- 
-*■ ings in the interest of the a'ssociation at 
Bennettsville, Florence and Charleston, S. C. 
In Atlanta he spoke at Morris Brown, 
Clarke and Gammon Colleges. The next 
night he made an address in Birmingham, 
and on January 10 spoke before the Upper 
Mississi^Dpi Conference at Durant. Dr. 
Spingarn spoke at Atlanta Baptist College 
and at Atlanta University. Dr. Du Bois 
addressed the Association of Cosmopolitan 
Clubs at their annual conference in Phila- 
delphia and the colored State teachers of 
Baltimore. In the First Congregational 
Church at Natick, Mass., he spoke on the 
races congress and general problems. 

In Boston, between December 29 and 
January 5, four meetings were held in the 
interest of the association. The chairman of 
the board of directors, Mr. Villard, succeeded 
in interesting a large number of people in 
the work of the association by his stirring 
address in Zion Church on December 29. 
Mr. Charles Edward Russell addressed 
enthusiastic audiences in Kansas City. Miss 
Gruening, the assistant secretary, addressed 
the colored branch of the Y. M. C. A. in 
New York City, the ladies' auxiliary at 
Beth Elohim Synagogue, Brooklyn, and on 
January 5 took charge of the meeting of the 
B. Y. P. U. at the Mount Olivet Baptist 
Church in New York City, where Miss Oving- 
ton and Mr. Morton spoke. 

On January 12 there was a mass meeting 
of the National Association at Young's Casino 
in Harlem. Bishop Alexander Walters pre- 
sided. The speakers were: Mr. William 
Pickens, professor in Talladega College, 



Alabama; Mrs. A. W. Hunton, social worker 
for the Y. W. C. A. ; Mr. W. E. B. Du Bois 
and Mr. Joel Spingarn, president of the New 
York branch. Hon. Charles Whitman was 
unable to be present, but his written address 
was read by Dr. A. C. Powel. Nearly 2,000 
persons were present. Musical selections 
were rendered by the Walker Female Quartet 
and Mme. Lula Robinson Jones. 

Emancipation celebrations have been noted 
elsewhere in this issue. On February 12, 
Lincoln's Birthday, the following branches 
will hold anniversary meetings : Chicago, 
Tacoma, Kansas City, Washington and 
•Boston. In New York the anniversary meet- 
ing will be held at Cooper Union, FalDruary 

lo'^ 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

THE annual meeting of the association 
was held in the Evening Post Build- 
ing on January 21. There were a number of 
addresses and detailed reports by officers and 
committees, and by guests who were present. 
The guest of honor was H. 0. Tanner, the 
artist. There was an exhibition of the work 
of Mr. Harry Roseland, the artist, who has 
achieved notable success in portraying 
Negro life. 

BRANCHES. * 

THE Quincy branch, one of the youngest 
affiliating with the national organiza- 
tion, reports an enthusiastic meeting in one 
of their largest churches. Mr. Charles 
Edward Russell represented the National 
Association. Other speakers were Honorable 
George Wilson, of the State legislatui-e, and 
several ministers. 

The Detroit branch reports that since join- 
ing the National Association, May, 1912, 
their organization has rapidly grown in mem- 
bership and influence, and is now in the 
midst of a vigorous campaign defend- 
ing the civil rights of colored people 
in that vicinity. As a result several 



THE N. A. A. C. P. 



191 



large restaurants and theatres have ceased 
to discriminate against colored people. The 
branch has been greatly assisted by a clear 
and definite State law prohibiting such dis- 
crimination and by Mr. Shepherd, the mili- 
tant prosecuting attorney. The branch has 
been most fortunate in having the co- 
operation of some of the most prominent 
colored men. Re- 
cently the Rev, Mr. 
B a g n a 1 1 and Dr. 
Albert Johnson led 
in the prosecution of 
a restaurant keeper 
for refusing to serve 
colored people. They 
won the suit and 
although it has been 
appealed they are 
confident of u 1 1 i - 
mate victory. 

This month two 
new branches were 
admitted to member- 
ship : Kansas City 
and Tacoma, Wash. 
Not long'since 
Chicago was our 
most western out- 
post ; then came 
Indianapolis, n o w 
Kansas City, and 
with Tacoma we 
reach the Western 
coast. 



NATIONAL 

ORGANIZER. 

WITH the be- 
ginning of 
the new year the 
association has been 
so fortunate as to en- 
gage the services of 
Dr. M. C. B. Mason, 
the well-known 
clergyman and lec- 
turer, as national 
organizer. Dr. 
Mason, who needs no introduction to the 
readers of The Crisis, was ordained in 1883, 
and has held pastorates in New Orleans and 
Atlanta. Since 1891 he has been connected 
with the Freedmen's Aid and Southern Edu- 
cation Board of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, having been corresponding secretary 
for the last seventeen vears. He was 




DR. M. c. 
National Organizer and 



the first colored man ever elected by the 
Methodist Episcopal Church to such a 
position. ^ 

UNIVERSITY COMMISSION ON 

SOUTHERN RACE QUESTIONS. 

T^R. SPINGARN, as representative of the 

^^ National Association, attended the 
University Commission on Southern Race 
Questions which 
met at the 'Uni- 
versity of Georgia on 
December 18 and 19, 
with Professor 
Brough, of the Uni- 
versity of Arkansas, 
as chairman and 
Professor Hurley, of 
the University of 
Virginia, as secre- 
tary. This commis- 
sion is an organiza- 
tion consisting of one 
representative from 
each of the eleven 
Southern State uni- 
versities. The com- 
mission mapped out 
its work for the suc- 
ceeding year and 
decided to hold its 
next meeting at Rich- 
mond, Va., on De- 
cember 18, 1913. In 
the meanwhile its 
various committees 
will undertake a 
series of investiga- 
tions in regard to 
the Negro in the 
South and his rela- 
tions with his white 
neighbors. Dr. J. H. 
Dillard, agent of the 
Jeanes Fund, was, 
with Dr. Spingarn, 
admitted by special 
vote to the sessions of 
the commission. 



B. MASON. 

Corresponding Secretary. 



FLYIIfG SQUADRON. 

"TN BUTTERFLY LAND," a dramatic 
-'- fantasie, was charmingly staged by the 
Flying Squadron in New York, January 3, 
The proceeds, in the form of a substantial 
purse, were presented to the National Asso- 
ciation. The entertainment was the original 
production of the members of the Flying 



192 



THE CRISIS 



Squadron. The talented president, Mrs. Dora 
Cole Xorman, wrote the lyrics and with her 
sister, Miss Carriebel Cole, taught the original 
dances which formed an attractive feature of 
the progxam. The music was directed by 
Miss Helen Elise Smith. The words of the 
charming selection, "Little Lonesome Child," 
were Avritten by Miss Louise Latimer, who 
also -designed the costumes. Miss Carriebel 
Cole ' in her artistic solo dancing received 
enthusiastic applause from an appreciative 
audience. Miss Madeline Allison was de- 
lightfully adapted to the role of ''Little 
Lonesome." The others who took part were 
the Misses Lottie Jarvis, Elsie Benson, Emily 
Douglas, Pauline Mars, Lurline Saunders, 
Alice Sousa, Mamie Sousa, Pauline Turner, 
Ti\'ienne Ward and Bessie Pike. 



COATESVILLE. 

**TF the issue of civilization is flnallj^ en- 
■*■ forced upon Coatesville and the 
State of Pennsylvania, the credit will belong 
to this noble society. I am glad of the 
opportunity to praise them. With inade- 
quate means, lukewarm support, and with 
most avenues of publicity closed to them, 
these people have given themselves to the 
. most unpopular cause in the world, yet 
one Avhieh is obviously fundamental to 
civilization — equality of opportunity for a 
great unprivileged, overborne, unhappy sec- 
tion of our people. As long as any are 
victims of inequality, as long as any are 
exploited. or dispossessed, there can be no 
civilization — and this means Negro human 
beings as well as white. 

"The Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People employed William J. Burns 
to put his operatives into Coatesville. This 
took place in the summer of 1912. In Sep- 
tember the chairman of the society, Mr. 
Oswald Garrison Villard, its attorney, Mr. 
Wherry, and the writer of this article, 
accompanied Mr. Burns to Harrisburg and 
laid the results of the investigation before 
Governor Tener." 

In these words Mr. Albert J. Nock com- 
ments in the February issue of the American 
Magazine upon the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored People and the 
work done by it in investigating the horrible 
burning of "Zach" Walker at Coatesville on 
August 12, 1911. This will give to the 
public and to the members of the associa- 



tion the first definite knowledge that the 
association has been actively concerning 
itself with the situation at €oatesville. Its 
directors decided, after the lynching meeting 
held in Ethical Culture Hall on November 
15, 1912, to devote the sums raised at that 
meeting and by an appeal to the membership, 
and also the sum contributed for legal redress 
during the year 1912, to an investigation of 
the Coatesville lynching with a view of 
obtaining information which might induce 
the authorities to continue the work of prose- 
cuting those guilty of this inexcusable and 
inhuman crime. 

First that splendid journalist and warm- 
hearted woman, the late Mary Dunlop Mac- 
lean, went to Coatesville and found out more 
in two days than the State of Pennsylvania 
had unearthed in as many months. After that 
Mr. William J. Burns, the famous detec- 
tive, was retained by the association, and 
under his instructions two of his men 
opened a restaurant in Coatesville and bent 
themselves to the task of finding out the 
whole story. This was much easier than had 
been anticipated, but the detectives stayed 
in Coatesville for some months', after which 
the restaurant was sold. As a result the 
association has the names of a number of 
participants who were not indicted, but who 
should have been indicted, and a list of wit- 
nesses who were not called by the prose- 
cution when the case was tried, and other 
information of a damaging character against 
a number of citizens of Coatesville, the 
nature of which cannot be revealed even at 
this time. The substance of the information 
thus obtained has, however, been communi- 
cated to the authorities, notably Governor 
Tener of Pennsylvania, who was w^aited upon 
on September 19 by the chairman of the 
board of directors, Mr. Oswald Garrison 
Villard, the counsel for the association, 
Mr. William M. Wherry, Jr., and Mr. 
William J. Burns, accompanied by the head 
of his Philadelphia office, and Mr. Nock of 
the American Magazine. 

The Governor was sincere, straightfor- 
ward and anxious to do everything that he 
could to help. He said frankly that his 
inability to get convictions at Coatesville was 
one of the "failures of my administration," 
and he agreed that there should be a meeting 
Avith the assistant attorney-general, Mr. 
Cunningham, who had charge of the case. 
Mr. Wherry went direct to Pittsburgh to call 
upon him and found Mr. Cunningham equally 



THE N. A. A. C. P. 



193 



chagrined that the State had not been able 
to punish the guilty. 

On December 12 Mr. Villard proceeded to 
Coatesville and spent an evening with the 
courageous group of citizens who have co- 
operated with the association and aided it 
in every way and are determined that the 
stain upon the good name of Coatesville 
shall be redeemed by the conviction of some- 
one, if this is in any Avay possible. The 
basis of both these interviews was the 
admirable brief and summary of the case and 
of the evidence obtained by the Burns detec- 
tives which was prepared by Mr. Wherry 
at very considerable inconvenience and large 
expenditure of time, which he generously 
donated to the association. The association 
feels that this visit to Coatesville and its 
other activities had something to do with the 
admirable recommendation by Governor 
Tener, in his annual message to the legis- 
lature of Pennsylvania, that the charter of 
Coatesville be revoked, since its inhabitants 
have been consorting with and. shielding 
murderers. For this action Governor Tener 
is again entitled to the gratitude of all law- 
abiding citizens in the United States. The 
Coatesville committee proposes, at this 
writing, to get into touch with him, and to 
aid it the association has placed at its 
disposal the substance of Mr. Wherry's 
report. Under the circumstances there is 
every reason to hope that The Crisis will 
shortly be able to report the reopening of the 
prosecutions, in which the association will 
co-operate to the extent of its ability. It 
will freely place the information acquired by 
the Burns detectives in the hands of the 
State authorities if this is desired. 

So far as the crime itself is concerned, the 
investigation of the association proved that 
no more inexcusable crime ever occurred. 
The social conditions of lawlessness and 
degradation which made the crime possible 
are thoroughly covered by Mr. Nock in the 
February American. In addition, it appears 
that there was inefficiency in the police 
department. Notably was this true of officer 
Stanley Howe, who had Walker in charge at 
the hospital and was duly armed and uni- 
formed, but permitted the crowd to take the 
prisoner from him without as much as 
making an effort to protect him, the door of 
the hospital being opened from within. 
Another police officer left town because he 
had helped in the lynching. Still another 



participated, and the head of the police was 
weak if not inefficient. It appears clearly 
that one reason for the popular indifference 
to the punishment of the mob murderers is 
that some of the more important criminals 
and instigators were not put on trial. Those 
whom it was sought to. convict first were 
young boys who were probably drawn to 
the scene by curiosity. The chief instigator 
is known, but he has never even been 
indicted. The police officer, Howe, who 
should have been tried, though indicted, was 
not brought before a jury. The failure. of 
the prosecution is, however, mainly due to the 
depraved tone of the community of Coates- 
ville and of Chester County as a whole. It 
is easy to point out where the authorities 
made mistakes, but, on the whole, they made 
an earnest and serious effort to convict, with 
the governor doing everything he could to 
urge them on. 

As already stated, it is the hope of the 
association before very long to report that 
additional prosecutions have been under- 
taken. The Governor should be all the more 
inclined to do this because it has been openly 
charged in the public print by a burgess of 
Coatesville that, although the chief instigator 
has been known, no effort has been made by 
the State to apprehend him — this being said 
in defense of the Chester County juries. 



My Dear Dr. Du Bois : 

Relating to your editorial on Truth, can 
you keep before us any more effectively than 
you are already doing the Truth that dis- 
crimination against colored Americans is not 
only an evil, but an unnecessary evil? I find 
so many of my friends are inclined to throw 
up their hands in despair with the confession 
that they cannot overcome the race prejudices 
of the community. 

We must keep before them not merely the 
cruelty of their prejudices, but that the 
cruelty is unnecessary and that prejudices 
can be overcome. 

To tell a community already partially 
prejudicial that other communities are more 
prejudiced than they may increase rather 
than decrease the evil, unless you counteract 
the debasing influence of an evil example by 
the inspiring influence of a noble example. 
Sincerely, 

Geo. G. Bradford. 




COLORED MEN AND WOMEN LYNCHED 
WITHOUT TRIAL. 

1885 78 1899 84 

1886 71 1900 107 

1887 80 1901.. 107 

1888 95 1902 86 

1889 ;... 95 1903 86 

1890 90 1904 83 

1891 121 1905 61 

1892 155 1906 64 

1893 154 1907 60 

1894 134 1908 93 

1895 112 1909 73 

1896 80 1910 65 

1897 : 122 1911 63 

1898 102 1912 63 

Total 2,584 

LYNCHINGS, 1912. 
Reported in January — 1. 

Muldrow, Okla. — Man, murder and assault. 
Reported in February — 8. 

Hamilton, Ga. — Three men and a girl, 

murder. 
Cordele, Ga. — Man, rape. 
Bessemer, Ala. — Man, murder. 
Vidalia, Ga.-^Man, murder. 
Macon, Ga. — Man, rape and robbery. 
Reported in March — 7. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. — Three men, murder. 
IMarshall, Tex. — Man and woman, murder. 
Memphis, Tenn. — Man, rape. 
Starksville, Miss. — Man, assault on a 

woman. 
Reported in April — 12. 

Fort Smith, Ark. — Man, murder. 
Marianna, Ark.— Three men, labor troubles 

and insulting' remarks. 
Blackburg, S. C. — Two men forcing a man 

to drink whiskey. 
Glare, S. C. — Three men, arson. 
Cochran, Ga. — Man, murder. 
Shreveport, La. — Man, insulting a white 

man. 
Starksville, Miss. — Man, fright at his 

approach. 
Reported in May— 6. (7?) 

Shreveport, La. — Tom Miles, insulting note 

to a white girl. 



S. Mclntj're, same offense (?) 

Yellow Pine, La. — Boy, writing letters to 

ladies.' 
Jackson, Ga. — Henry Ethrage, securing 

immigrants. 
Greenville, Miss.^ — Man, assaulting a white 

woman. 
Columbus, Miss. — George Edd, shooting a 

woman. 
Monroe, La. — Man, threatening violence. 
Reported in June — 3. 

Tyler, Tex. — Dan Davis, rape. 

Valdosta, Ga. — Emanuel, shooting a white 

man. 
Nashville, Tenn. — J. Samuels, assault on a 

white woman. 

Reported in July — 3. 

Pinehurst, Ga. — A woman, murder. 
Roehelle, Ga.- — McHenry, murder. 
Lucesdale, Miss. — Forest Bolin, testifying 
against liquor sellers. 

Reported in August — 4. (5?) 

Paul Station, Ala. — A man, murder. 

Second man, same place (?) 

Clarksville. Tex. — Leonard Pots, murder. 

Plummerville, Ark. — John Williams, mur- 
der. 

Columbus, Ga. — T. Z. Cotton, 16 years old, 
manslaughter. 

Reported in September — 5. 

Russellville, Ark. — Monroe Franklin, 
assault on a woman. 

Cummings, Ga. — Ed. Collins, accessory to 
assaulting woman. 

Greenville, S. C- — Brooks Gordon, assault- 
ing woman. 

Humboldt, Tenn. — Will Cook, refusing to 
• dance. 

Princeton, W. Va. — Walter Johnson, at- 
tacking a white girl. 
Reported in October. — 5 

Bakersfield, Cal.— Unknown, attacking a 
child. 

Cullings, Ga. — Bob Edwards, complicity in 
attacking child. 



THE BURDEN 



195 



Amerieus, Ga. — Yarborough, attacking a 

girl. 
Kawlins, Wyo. — Wigfall, assaulting a 

woman. 
Shreveport, La. — Sam Johnson, murder. 

Reported in November — 1. 

Birmingham, Ala. — Will Smith, murder. 

Reported in December — 8. (11?) 

Norway, S. C. — John Feldon, obtaining 
goods under false pretenses. 

Preston Ark. — A. Dempsey, assaulting 
woman. 

Jackson, Miss. — Joe Beamon, resisting 
arrest. 

Fort Allen, La. — N. Cadore, murder. 

McRae, Ga. — Sidney Williams, murder. 

Tutwiller, Miss. — Man, insulting language. 

Little Briton, S. C. — Man, resisting arrest. 

Butler, Ala. — A. Curtis, murder. 

Butler, Ala. — Three Negroes, murder (?) 
Total 63, possibly 68. 
For alleged attacks on women, 17. 



THE MANUFACTURE OF PREJUDICE. 



WOMAN CLUBBED 

AND LEFT TO DIE; 
POSSE SEEKS NEGRO 

^New'York Herald, December 4. 



TRENTON WOMAN 

ASSAULTED BY A 

NEGRO IN FIELD 

— Camden (N. J.) Courier, December 4. 



FIRST ARREST 

IN TRENTON MAN 

CHASE MADE 



Posse Capture Negro, Who, It Is 
Believed, Is the Assailant of Miss 
Luela Marshall — Lynching Narrowly- 
Averted — Bloodhounds Led the Trail 

— Jersey City (N. J.) Journal, December 5. 



A BETTER DETECTIVE SYSTEM NEEDED. 

''The shocking crime of a Negro in the 
outskirts of Trenton this week, of which a 
young woman was the victim, calls attention 
anew to the imperfections of the police 
detective system in New Jersey, if it may be 
described as a system." — Newark (N. J.) 
Star, December 5. 



BLOODHOUNDS LOSE 
TRAIL OF NEGRO WHO 
ATTACKED A WOMAN 

— New York World, December 5. 



TRENTON DOGS LAND 

A NEGRO IN LOCK-UP 

— New York Tribune, December G. 



(No news of the matter found since 
the above in any of the metropolitan 
dailies.) 

"William Aj;zenhalfer, a white farm hand 
of Ewing Township, confessed to-day that 
it was he who attacked Miss Luella Marshall 
of this city on last December 3, and injured 
her so severely that she died a week later. 
Atzenhalfer insisted that he had mistaken 
Miss Marshall for a man on whom he sought 
revenge, and that he had not meant to kill 
her." — Amsterdam News (colored), January 
3. 

RACE WAR IN A 

HIGH SCHOOL 



Black and White Pupils Battle in Room 
of Wendell Phillips 



INSULT TO GIRL THE CAUSE 



Football Players Take Active Part in 
the Scrimmage 



"A miniature race war between the black 
and white pupils of Wendell Phillips high 
school developed yesterday afternoon in the 
assembly room of the school. More than a 
dozen boys engaged in the fight. 



196 



THE CRISIS 



"The row started when Leo Stevens, a 
colored boy who had been expelled from the 
school a few weeks ago, was struck by a white 
boy. It was said the Negro insulted a white 
girl as the pupils were passing from the 
assembly hall at 2:30 o'clock. 

**The white boy was attacked by several 
NegTo boj's. These in turn were set upon 
by a group of the high school football plaj^ers 
who were starting out for practice. 

"One of the 'lieutenant marshals,' the 
police force of the student body, tried in 
vain to stop the fight. Some of the girls who 
had remained in the room screamed and 
attracted the attention of the principal, 
Spencer R. Smith. He stopped the battle 
and took Stevens to his office. The other 
boj's were not held. 

"Among the members of the football team 
who were mixed up in the fight were Frank 
Davidson, John Harper, Eoy Hunger, John 
Alberts and Melvin Smith. No one was 



seriously injured. There were several dis- 
colored eyes- and blood was drawn." — 
Chicago (111.) Tribune, November 1. 



"The Tribune published in glaring head- 
lines, 'Race War in Public Schools.' then 
went on to say that a colored boy was pounced 
upon by a number of football players be- 
cause he was supposed to have said some- 
thing to one of the boys' sister while passing. 
Upon investigation they found that there 
was no truth whatsoever in the" storj', so to 
ease their conscience (f) retracted it a few 
days later. The retraction, however, was 
put in an obscure corner of the paper. The 
damage was done and this great paper seems 
to take especial pains to herald broadcast 
anything derogatory to the Negro they can 
find or make up. If they would devote as 
much space to extolling our virtues as they 
do to holding up our faults to the world, Xve 
would be very grateful." — Chicago Defender 
(colored). 



lAe ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY 



By CHARLES H. GARVIN 




HE existence of a Negro 
intercollegiate Greek-letter 
fraternity is scarcely known 
to the general reading pub- 
lic. As far as we know there 
is only one such national 
undergraduate fraternity, 
although there are several local organizations 
that are tending to become national. 

The Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity was 
founded March, 1906, at Cornell University, 
and became incorporated April 16, 1912. Its 
establishment was not accidental, but it ..was 
designed to meet a great need among Negro 
college men. It is accomplishing its purpose 
of bringing together the best type of men. 
Since its founding fifteen chapters' have 
been established. The eleven active chapters 
are Alpha, Cornell; Beta, Howard; Gamma, 
Union; Delta, Toronto (Canada); Epsilon, 
Michigan; Zeta, Yale; Eta, Columbia; Theta, 
Medical School of Illinois; Iota, Syracuse; 
Kappa, Ohio State; Mu, Minnesota; Nu, 
Lincoln; Xi, Wilberforce; one graduate chap- 
ter at Louisville, Ky., and the Alpha Alumni 
Chapter in New York City. 



The fraternity has passed through its for- 
mative stage and his reached a stage at which 
it may, without assumption, claim to be a 
shaping element in the life of Negro college 
men. It was organized by seven young men 
of high character and scholarly ambition, and 
is not to be judged by its growth in num- 
bers alone, nor even by the local influence 
of its chapters, but by the real value of its 
output. It numbers among its active members 
the leading lights in college activities and 
scholarship. One year alone all the "honor 
men" in the college class of Howard were 
Alpha Phi Alpha men; for two years the 
leading oratorical prize at Columbia and the 
honor prize in French were won by Alpha- 
Phi Alpha men. These are but a few of the 
honors won by Alpha Phi Alpha men and 
show the type of men the fraternity seeks. 
Its alumni and honorary members are 
among the foremost men of the race. 

The anjiual conventions of the fraternity 
have been unusually successful ; the first was 
held at the seat of Beta Chapter, the second 
in New York City, the third in Philadelphia, 



THE ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY 



197 




DELEGATES TO THE FOURTH ANNUAL CONVENTION. 

the fourth aj; the seat of the Epsilon Chapter vice-president; Joseph R. Fugett, Cornell, 

and the fifth at the seat of the Kappa Chap- secretary, and Clarence A. Jones, Ohio State, 

ter. Ohio State University, on December 26, treasurer. 

27 and 28. In connection with this was held The Negro Greek-letter fraternity is no 

the first alumni reunion. The officers for the longer an experiment; it is a dominant factor 

past year were: Charles H. Garvin, How- for good and binds Negro college men as no 

ard, president ; Leon S. Evans, Michigan, other organization can. 



HAERIET GIBBS-MARSHALL, President 
HARRY A. WILLIAMS, Vice-President 



LOUIS G. GREGORY, Financial Secretary 
GREGORIA A. FRASER, Recording Secretary 



The Washington Conservatory of Music 
and School of Expression 

Piano, Violin, Wind Instruments, Piano Tuning, Vocal Expression, History of 
Music Theory and Modern Languages 

The first and only Mission Music School founded and controlled by Negroes 
in America. 

Many scholarships awarded. Talented students never turned away unaided. 
902 T Street, N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Mention The Crisis. 



198 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Publisners Page 



PRAISE 



FROM A SON OF 
WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON 

I wish I could adequately express my 
appreciation of the ability and attractiveness 
of the magazine. 

Sincerely yours, 

FRANCIS J. GARRISON, 

Newtonville, Mass. 



FROM TUSKEGEE 

I think it is the best Negro publication 
ever published, not only in its mechanical 
makeup, but also in its contents. 

WILSON S. LOVETT, 
Treasurer's Assistant, 

Tuskegee, Ala. 



FROM HAMPTON 



I appreciate very much indeed the excellent 

manner in which the cuts or half-tones of 

colored people are brought out in your 

magazine. To my mind it is most excellent. 

Yours very truly, 

G. W. BLOUNT, 
Assistant to Commandant, 

Hampton, Va. 



FROM OUR LIVEST 
NEWSPAPER 
THE CRISIS has secured probably the 
biggest circulation of any race publication in 
the country. 

THE AFRO-AMERICAN, 

Baltimore, Md. 



An Open Letter to CrISIS Agents 

Dear Co-workers : 

Nearly ten thousand people have become monthly purchasers of The 
Crisis since January, 1912. Our total circulation was: January, 1912, 15,000: 
January, 1913, 23,000. 

You are largely responsible for this. Your loyalty and aggressiveness 
indicate a devotion to the work which is a constant inspiration to us to make 
The Crisis a better magazine. But we must, have a circulation of 50,000. 

Can you produce it in 1913? We believe you can. 

Begin now a definite plan to double your sales during the year. If possible, 
organize your sub-agents and assistants into a club and hold monthly meetings 
to discuss methods of operation and exchange selling ideas. You will get the 
benefit of each other's experience, and the team work will produce enthusiasm 
and an increase in sales and subscriptions. 

We also plan to make 1913 a banner year for advertisements and need 
your help. 

The only argument we have to present to an advertiser is our ability to 
produce results for him. We know we have a good advertising medium, for 
most of oui- advertisers have told us so; but there are many people who take 
pleasure in boasting that they "never read advertisements," and some of these 
are Crisis readers. 

Our record for clean advertising is history. No exaggerated statements or 
impossible propositions are permitted in our columns and we exercise every 
precaution to verify the reliability of each advertiser. This gives additional 
prestige to the advertisements that appear, since they bear our stamp of 
approval (which fact is a splendid selling argument for you). 

THEREFORE WE WANT YOU TO HELP US BY BOOSTING 
THE CRISIS ADVERTISERS. 

When making a sale direct attention to the clean, concise businesslike 
manner in which each advertiser states his proposition, as well as the well- 
written articles and other features. 

We also wish, for the convenience of our readers, a directory of first-class 
hotels that accommodate colored patrons. Help us secure the advertisements of 
such hotels in your locality. We will allow you very liberal commissions for 
your efforts. 

An acknowledgment of this letter will be deeply appreciated by 

Ike PUBLISHERS OF THE CRISIS 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



199 



DO YOU WANT A PROMOTION? 

Positions filled in every line of educational work. We have a 
special demand for 

Music Teachers Domestic Science Teachers 

High School Teachers Bookkeepers and Stenographers 

Agricultural Teachers Manual Training and Industrial Teachers 

We had calls for teachers in 1912 from 

Alabama Georgia Mississippi South Carolina 

Arkansas Kentucky Maryland Tennessee 

Delaware Louisiana New Jersey Texas 

Florida Missouri North Carolina Virginia 

West Virginia 

School officials are beginning now to select their faculties for 

the coming year. Register early and get in touch with them. 

Blanks and information furnished free upon application. 

MUTUAL TEACHERS' AGENCY 

1335 T Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 



CRISIS- MAID WILLOW PLUMES 



Whenever you see the name CRISIS-MAID, think of 
quality, prompt service and fair prices. 




These high-grade willow plumes shipped prepaid to your 
address at the follow^ing manufacturer-to-consumer prices: 

No. A5. Length, 19 inches; width, 20 inches Price $4.50 

" B7. " 22 " " 23 " " 5.75 

" C9. " 24 " " 25 " " 6.85 

" E13. " 30 " " 30 " " 12.00 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY, 26 Vesey Street, NEW YORK 

Mention The Crisis. 



200 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Xke very Business Opportunity for wnicn i OU 
kave been looking may possibly be nere on tnis page. 



Capitalize your spare time selling REDDICK'S 
WORLD'S GREATEST POLISHING MITTS. Users 
say it's the best practical polishing device on earth. 
Agents of both sexes say it's the best moneymaker 
on earth. Write at once for our liberal proposition. 
It sells itself. See 'advertisement on page 162. 

RELIABLE, LIVE, 
RESPONSIBLE MEN 

who can sell real estate can MAKE MORE 
than $200 PER MONTH acting as 
AGENTS for the sale of our properties in 
MUSKOGEE and TAFT, OKLAHOMA. 
The real coming country where there are 
opportunities and openings for all. Write 
us to-day, giving your age and experience, 
and we will oflfer you a FINE PROPOSI- 
TION WHICH WILL MAKE YOU 
MONEY. Address 

REEVES REALTY CO. 

Department C 

217 Fly nn- Ames Bldg. Muskogee, Okla. 



AGENTS — Big money. Johnson-Flynn 
fight and other copyrighted Negro pic- 
tures. Portraits. Pillow Tops. Catalog 
FREE. 30 days' credit. 

PEOPLES PORTRAIT CO. 
Station U, Chicago, 111. 

TYPEWRITERS 



Remingtons, Densmores, 

J e w e 1 1 s, $11.50 each; 
Franklins, Postals, Ham- 
monds, $9 each. Bargains in 
Underwoods, Smiths and all 
others. All guaranteed. 

Supplies. 

Standard Typewriter 
Exchange 

23B Park Row, New York 



PRESIDENTS 

NEGRO REPUBLIC 

in. colors and a short history of Liberia. 16 x 20. 
Ready to hang on the walls; only 50c. prepaid; in 
.gold frames $1.25. Everybody wants one. Write 
NEGRO PRESS, Box 126; Gainesville, Fla., U. S. A. 
1,000 agents wanted. 

Ml£8 BATH TUB 

Costs littl«, no plambing, rsqniros little water. 

Weight 15 pounds, and folds into small roll. 
Full lengUi bube, far better Iban tin tubs. Luti for 

Write for siwolal agents offer and description. Robtkbon 
1 Vance St Toledo, O. Mfrs. TuiUBh Bath Cabinets. 



REGALIA 






A Race Enterprise 

Manufacturing Badges, 
Banners and Supplies 
for all Fraternal and 
Church Societies. Cata- 
logue upon request. 

CENTRAL REGALIA CO. 

Jos. L. Jones, Pres. 

N. E. Cor. 8th and Plum Sts. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



WANTED 

500 Negro families (farmers pre- 
ferred) to settle on FREE Govern- 
ment Lands in Chaves County, New 
Mexico. Blackdom is a Negro colony. 
Fertile soil, ideal climate. No "Jim 
Crow" Laws. For information write 

JAS. HAROLD COLEMAN 

Blackdom, New Mexico 

There's something extremely touching about 

The Oriole Concert Waltzes 

by Herman Zimmerman. A favorite wher- 
ever heard. 20c. per copy for the next 30 
days. 

PARKS MUSIC HOUSE 
Louisiana, Mo. 

Start tne Ncav i ear Rignt 

Resolve to save all your extra money and begin 
that bank account. 

You cannot be more profitably employed than 
acting as agent for THE CRISIS. 

The sales from our magazine will insure you a 
snug little sum of extra money each month. For 
information address : 

Sales Manager of ThE CrISIS 

26 Vesey Street New YorK 

The Curse of Race Prejudice 

By James F. Morton, Jr., A. M. 

An aggressive exposure by an Anglo-Saxon 
champion of equal rights. Startling facts and crush- 
ing arguments. Fascinating reading. A necessity 
for clear understanding and up-to-date propaganda. 
Belongs in the library of every friend of social 
justice. Price 25 cents. Send orders to 

JAMES F. MORTON, JR. 

244 West 143d Street New York, N. T. 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



201 



UNDERTAKERS 



Telephone Columbus 8935 Open All Night 

RODNEY DADE & BROS. 

Undertakers and Embalmers 

Notary Public 

Funeral Parlor and Ohapel Free. 

Licensed Lady Embalmer Prompt Serrice 

266 West 53d Street New Tork, N. Y. 

Between Broadway and 8th Avenue 



A PLACE TO STOP 

HOTEL WASHINGTON 

First-class Service for First-class People 

3252 Wabash Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 



MOVING 



LEGAL DIRECTORY 



Telephone 4214 Greeley 

BRANIC'S EXPRESS 

PACKING AND SHIPPING 

ANDREW J. BRANIC 

Formerly Manager Virginia Transfer Company 

459 SEVENTH AVENUE New York City 

Orders by mail or 'phone receive pro- >t attention 

TRUNKS STORED 25c. PER MONTH 

Official Expressman for the C. V. B. A. 



PERSONAL CARDS 

WIGINGTON & BELL 

Architects 

Karbach Block Omaha, Neb. 

Telephone 5277 Morningside 

DR. GERTRUDE E. CURTIS 

Surgeon Dentist 

188 West 135th Street, New York City 

Telephone 4885 Morningside 

DR. D. W. ONLEY 

Surgeon Dentist 

S. W. Cor. 133d St. and Lenox Ave., New York 

Office Hoars: 9 to 12 a. m., 1 to 9 p. m. 

Sundays by Appointment 



H. HENRY HARRIS 

Architect 

Cor. 8th and Princess Streets 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Ml 



This is a ready reference of some of the 
best lawyers in the country. 

igi^If you are a lawyer and your name is 
not listed here you should write us at once. 



Office Phone 
Home 58 Main 



Residence 2546 Michigan 
Bell Phone E'-2161 

C. H. CALLOWAY 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 
Notary Public 
117 W. 6th Street Kansas City, Mo. 

FRANKLIN W. WILLIAMS 

Attorney and Connselor-at-Law 

Notary Public 

Real Estate Conveyancer 

206 Parrish Street Durham, N. C. 

J. DOUGLAS WETMORE 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 
5 Beekman Street (Temple Court) 
New York City 
Tel. 6222 Cortlandt Cable Address, Judowet 

Telephone 5574 Beekman Rooms 905 to 907 

WILFORD H. SMITH 

Lawyer 

150 Nassau Street New York City 

Uptown Office — 136 West 136th Street 

General Practice Notary Public 

WILLIAM R. MORRIS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

1020 Metropolitan Life Building 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

BROWN S. SMITH 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Offices: Suite 610, Sykes Block. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

GEORGE W. MITCHELL 

Attomey-at-Law 

908 Walnut Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tel. 2026 Fort Hill Gable Address, Epben 

EDGAR P. BENJAMIN 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 
34 SCHOOL STREET Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Connection 

W. Ashbie Hawkins George W. F. McMechen 

HAWKINS & McMECHEN 

Attomeys-at-Law 

21 East Saratoga Street . Baltimore, Md. 

id: Cicisis. 



202 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 




ODESSA MILLINERY 

Exclusive Parisian Creations for the 

Smartly Dressed Woman, 

41 West 135th Street New York 

"Phone 624 Harlem. 




No. 4 Special Buggy 

$65.00 



A value unequaled. Sold on 
$1.00 Profit Margin. Write 
for prices and other styles. 
Send for catalog. 

C. R. Patterson & Sons 

GREENFIELD, OHIO 

Lameit Negro carriage concern in the United State* 



Telephone 1697 Flushing 

HERMAN WILKENS 

PARQUET FLOOES AND MANTELS 

SCRAPING AND REFINISHING A SPECIALTY 

100 Broadway Flushing, N. Y . 

JOHN F. RYAN 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 
For nure drugs at fair prices go to Ryan's Drug Store 
51 Main Street Flushing, N. Y. 



MADAME GILCHRIST 

CORSETS 

Ohoosing the corset should be a serious thought 
with all well-dressed women, and part of this 
thinking has been done for you by Madame Gilchrist, 
who is an expert corset fitter and whose thorough 
knowledge of the human anatomy enables her to 
give advice wisely as to the correct model of corset 
to be worn for health and comfort. 

576 Main Street East Orange, N. 3. 



Telephone 1439 Flushing 

JOHN FRANZ 

VIENNA BAKERY AND LUNCH ROOM 
21 Main Street Flushing, N. Y. 

Telephone 381 Flushing 

G. ANDERSON 

CABINET MAKER AND UPHOLSTERER 

Agent for Ostermoor Mattresses 

104 Lincoln Street Flushing, N. Y. 

C. BAER 

SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

389 Fulton Street 

Near Hardenbrook Avenue Jamaica, L. I. 

JOSEPH F. P. NORRIS 

HARNESS MAKER 

Repairing Promptly Executed 

Blankets, WMps, Curry Combs, Brushes, Etc. 

72 Broadway Flushing, N. Y. 

Long Distance Telephone 62 Flushing 

ELBERT HALLETT 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBALMER 

Established 1860 



161-163 Amity Street 



Flushing, N. Y. 



Does Baby Cry? 

teething babies instantly relieved with 

fool bite 




Koolbite is an iced nipple for babies' inflamed sums, the 
nipple is specially made without an opening to hold the ice 
water. There is an inner water-tight aluminum container to 
hold cracked ice or snow and an outer case of Persian Ivory 
(Choice of white, pinkior blue). This is so made that it is a 
non-conductor, remaining always at normal temperature. 
The whole toy weighs only 1% oz. Koolbite will be delivered 
free to any address immediately on receipt of $1.00 with 
our guarantee of SATISFACTION OR MONEY BACK. 
Doctors and Dentists Recommend It 

FRED S. CLARK 

Care The Dunbar Company 

26 Vesey Street New York 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



203 



THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE 



Offices: 26 Vesey Street, New York. 



Incorporated May 25, 191 I 



National President — Mr. Moorfleld Storey, 

Mass. 
Vice-Presidents — 

Bev. John Haynes Holmes, New York. 

Mr. John E. Mllholland, New York. 

Bishop Alexander Walters, New York. 

Bev. Garnet B. Waller, Baltimore, Md 

1!^S8 Mary White Ovington, Brooklyn 



OFFICEBS 
Boston, Chairman of the Board of Directors — 

Mr. Oswald Garrison Villard, New York. 
Treasurer — Mr. Walter E. Sachs, New York. 
Director of Publicity and Besearch — 

Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois, New York. 
National Organizer — Dr. M. C. B. Mason, Cincinnati. 
Secretary — Miss May ChUds Nerney, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
N. Y. Assistant Secretary — Miss Martha Gruening, New 

York. 



This is the Association which seeks to put into 
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into words. If you believe what we SAY, join this 
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I hereby axicept membersMp in the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOB THE 
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PLSA8S MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOB THE ADVANCEMENT 
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THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



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n To friends who know you, may be easy, but "putting one over" to 

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A clever speaker, before a sleepy or hostile audience, puts a good, stiff punch 
into his very first remark. This "knocks 'em off their feet" and they listen. 

Your business letters may be good, but if they lack the "punch" they won't "pull." 
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THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 205 



FOR 1913 

Two pretty dark oaby faces in colors, and tKe 
celebrated "Credo, by W. E. B. Du Bois, beauti- 
fully printed, together writh a large legible calendar 
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National Association for tlie Advancement of 
Colored People 

iEmanripattnn 3lubtl^^ Bmla 

for your letters. Handsomely designed by Rickard 
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"' Snow your belief in freedom on every letter you 
■Mvrite m 1913. 



By W. E. B. Du Bois. A four-page pampklet 
giving m condensed form a kistory of tKe material 
advancement of the Negro race. Price 2 cents. 



lEmanrtpattnn Kit^ratur^ 

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31jr iunbar (ttotttpanu, 2fi U^fi^tr BU N^tu f nrk 



Mention TirE Crisis. 



206 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



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Short Xalks on 
Aavertismg and 
Our Advertisers 



It is remarkable to note the growing 
interest of the general reader in advertise- 
ments. Fifteen or twenty years ago the 
intelligent reader regarded the average 
advertisement as a joke, because in those 
days the best "stock in trade" of the ad- 
writer was bombastic or ambiguous state- 
ments designed to deceive the public. 

Then along came C. H. K. Curtis, of 
Philadelphia, who cleaned out the columns 
of the Ladies' Home Journal by compelling 
his advertisers to stick to the truth in their 
printed words. Other publishers joined in 
the movement and have succeeded in driving 
the dishonest advertiser from their pages. 
Of course Dr. Harvey W. Wiley's 
struggle against medical frauds and poisoned 
food, and the government's steady, per- 
sistent warfare on investment swindlers 
were of much assistance to these worthy 
publishers. To-day the pages of all 
respectable publications < are closed to th6 
unscrupulous and left to those who have 
truthful promises and honest values to offer. 
This has inspired confidence between th^ 
advertiser and the buying public. 

When will certain members of the Negro 
press awake to this new condition, clean out 
their pages and make a united effort to 
secure business from the progressive 
advertiser? 

As I write, there is on my desk a copy 
of a colored paper Avith a national reputa- 
tion. In it there is the advertisement of a 
concern which sells "lucky stones" to give 
the purchaser "a certain strange, mysterious 
control over others." 

Imagine such piffle. 

The Crisis is proud of its policy to 
exclude the dishonest advertiser from its 
columns, and our readers show their appre- 
ciation of the manner in which we protect 
them by giving a good portion of their 
business to our advertisers. 

To those who are still skeptical of 
advertisements in general, we solicit their 
interest and confidence in the Crisis 
Advertiser, for we will never know- 
ingly permit them to mislead, defraud or 
swindle our readers. 



ALBON L. HOLSEY, Advertising Manager 
Mention The Crisis. 



Music of the Masters 



We are pleased to announce to the readers of Thk Crisis and our many 
patrons that wc are now able to supply them with all the latest and host 
musical compositions produced by Negro writers. 

i\Iany of the tuneful melodies that you hear on the stage in big musical 
comedies or vaudeville, and afterward hum or whistle, are' composed by colored 
men, and many composers who enjoy national reputations and whose names 
are familiar to you as song writers are Negroes who for business reasons cannot 
boast of their racial identity. 

Whether the wish is for an old plantation melody, a classic number or the 
latest ragtime, we have it for you and can supply your wants with prompt 
dispatch. 

Among the lyric writers and composers whose selections we have are 
the following: 



S. Coleridge-Taylor 
Harry T. Burleigh 
Will Marion Cook 
Alex. Rogers 



"Bob" Cole 
J. Rosamond Johnson 
Jas. Reese Europe 
"Chris." Smith 



Paul Laurence Dunbar 
Cecil Mack 
N. Clark Smith 
Wm. H. Tyers 



Twenty-four Negro Melodies 

Transcribed lor the piano by 

S. COLERIDGE-TAYLOR 

Introduction by 

BOOKER T. WASHINGTON 

In selecting his themes from the 

native song.s of Africa, the West 

Indies and the American Negro during 

slavery days^ Mr. Coleridge-Taylor has 

preserved their distinctive traits and 

individuality, vi^hile giving them a 

charming depth and spontaneity of 

feeling which places them alongside 

the compositions of Liszt and Dvorak- 

as masterly transcriptions of folk 

music. 

Paper binding $1.50 postpaid 

Cloth binding 2.50 postpaid 



Negro Minstrel Melodies 

Edited by 
HARRY T. BURLEIGH 



piano 



This book is a collection of twenty 
five Negro folk songs with 
accompaniment. 

Mr. Burleigh has spent much time 
and patient study in assembling this 
collection ox entertaining and educa- 
tional selections. To the lover of 
music for its own sake this volume 
will especially appeal. 

Price 50c.. postpaid 



EXHORTATION. 

Rogers and Cook $0.60 

(High in D minor; low in A 
minor) 
SWING ALONG. 

Will Marion Cook 60 

(High in F; medium in E 
flat) 
RAIN SONG. 

Rogers and Cook 60 

(For high voice) 



BROWN-SKIN BABY MINE. 

Cook and Mack 60 

(Medium ) 

DOWN DE LOVERS' LANE. 

Dunbar and Cook 60 

(High) 

WID DE MOON, MOON, MOON. 

Moore and Cook 60 

(High in F; low in D) 



Write us for any information regarding the productions of these or any 



other composers. 



THE DUNBAR CO., 26 Vcscy St., New York 



Mention The Crisis. 



STAGE FAVORITES 




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Now starring in vaudeville -with her own company 



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BEST BOOKS 

For students of the Negro Problem and general readers. Your library will 
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These are books produced by the best writers and most able authorities on 
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ESSAYS 

RACE ADJUSTMENT . 

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SOULS OF BLACK FOLK. 

W. E. B. Du Bois 1.35 

CURSE OF RACE PREJUDICE. 

Jas. F. Morton, Jr 27 

ATLANTA UNIVERSITY STUDIES 

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No. 7 — THE NEGRO ARTISAN $ .75 

No. 8 — THE NEGRO CHURCH 1.50 

No. 9 — NOTES ON NEGRO CRIME.. .50 

No. 10 — BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 

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FAMILY 75 

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THE CONJURE WOMAN. 

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THE TESTING FIRE. 

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NEGRO IN THE NEW WORLD. 

Sir Harry Johnston 6.30 

MIND OF PRIMITIVE MAN. 

Franz Boaz 1.65 

INTER-RACIAL PROBLEMS. 

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HISTORY OF THE NEGRO RACE. 

E. A. Johnson 1.40 

NEGRO EXPLORER AT THE NORTH 
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Matthew A. Henson 1.10 

NARRATION OF THE NEGRO. 

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RACE PREJUDICE. 

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NEGRO AND THE NATION. 

G. C. Merriam 1.92 



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CRISIS for one year and one CRISIS cover design, 
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THE CRISIS 

A RECORD OF THE DARKER RACES 

PUBLISHED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED 
PEOPLE. AT 26 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

Edited by W. E. Burchardt Du Bois, with the co-operation of Oswald Garrison Villard. 
W. S. Braithwaite, M. W. Ovington, Charles Edward Russell and others. 

Contents for March^ igij 

COVER PICTURE. Photographed from life and copyrighted by Miles M. Webb. 
CARTOON. By Lorenzo W. Harris 249 

ARTICLES 

PROFESSIONAL AMERICANISM. By * * * 226 

THAT ONE MIGHT LIVE IN THE SUNLIGHT GLAD. A Poem. 

By William Moore 227 

MY LOVE. A Poem. By Fenton Johnson 240 

MILDRED PORTER'S POSITION. A Story. By B. G. Hull. Illustrated 

by J. H. Caines 241 

THE DEAD MASTER ■ 245 

DEPARTMENTS 

ALONG THE COLOR LINE 215 

MEN OF THE MONTH 224 

OPINION 228 

EDITORIAL 236 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 243 

THE BURDEN 246 

LETTER BOX 248 

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RENEWALS: When a subscription blank is attached to this page a renewal of your 
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wrapper. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS: The address of a subscriber can be changed as often as desired. 
In ordering a change of address, both the old and the new address must be given. Two weeks 
notice is required. 

MANUSCRIPTS and drawings relating to colored people are desired. They must be accom- 
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Entered as Second-class Matter in the Post Office at New York, N. Y. 






212 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 




FORWARD 

MARCH YOUR SON OFF TO 

^kVilterforce University 



The only school in the country for Negro 
Youth which has a Military Department 
equipped by the National Government, and 
commanded by a detailed United States Army 
Officer. 

DEPARTMENTS 
MILITARY SCIENTIFIC 

NORMAL TECHNICAL 

COMMERCIAL THEOLOGICAL 
CLASSICAL MUSICAL 

PREPARATORY 

Banking taught by the actual operations 
in the Students' Savings Bank. Twelve In- 
dustries, 180 acres of beautiful campus. Ten 
Buildings. Healthful surroundings, excej)- 
tional community. Maintained in part by the 
State of Ohio which supplies facilities for the 
thorough training of teachers. 

Fall term began September, 1912. Write 
for Catalog. 

W. S. SCARBOROUGH, President 

WM. A. JOINER, Superintendent, C. N. I. 
Department. 

Address all communifations to 
BOX 36 WILBERFORCE, OHIO 



Fisk University 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Founded 1866 H. H. Wright. Dean 

Thorough Literary, Scientific, Educa- 
tional and Social Science Courses. Pioneer 
in Negro music. Special study in Negro 
history. 

Ideal and sanitary buildings and grounds. 
Well-equipped Science building. 

Christian home life. 

High standards of independent manhood 
and womanhood. 

Atlanta University 

Is beautifully located in the Oity of Atlanta, Q». 
The courses of study include High School, Nor- 
mal School and College, with manual training 
and domestic Bcience. Among the teachers ar« 
graduates of Yale, Harvard, Dartmouth, Smith 
and Wellesley. Forty-two years of successful 
work have been completed. Students come from 
all parts of the South. Graduates are almost 
universally successful. 

For further information address 

President EDWARD T. WARE 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Knoxville College 

Beautiful Situation. Healthful Location. 
The Best Moral and Spiritual Environment. 

A Splendid Intellectual Atmosphere. 
Noted for Honest and Thorough Work. 

Offers full courses in the following departments: 
College, Normal, High School, Grammar School and 
Industrial. 

Good water, steam heat, electric lights, good 
drainage. Expenses very reasonable. 

Opportunity for Self-help. 

Fall Term Began September, 1912. 

For information address 

President R. W. McGRANAHAN 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Uirgiitia Union University 

RICHMOND, VA. 

A College Department, of high standards and 

modern curriculum. 

A Theological Department, with all subjeoti 
generally required in the best theological seminaries. 

An Academy, with manual training, giving a 
preparation for life or for college. 

The positive moral and religious aim of th« 
school, its high standards of entrance and of class 
work, its fine new buildings and well-equipped 
laboratories and library prepare a faithful student 
for a life of wide usefulness. 

GEORGE RICE HOVEY, President 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



213 



Agricultural and 
Meckanical College 



Open all year 'round. For Males 
only. Facilities unsurpassed. Strong 
Faculty. Practical Courses. 

Board, Lodging and Tuition $7 
per month. 

Winter Term Began December 2, 
1912. 

Write to-day for catalog or free 
tuition. 



JAS. B. DUDLEY, President. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Southern Business College 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Day and night school, teaching Shorthand, Type- 
writing, Business English, Business Arithmetic, 
Bookkeeping and preparing for Civil SerTice. A 
high-grade commercial school with competent in- 
structors and healthy surroundings. The only Negro 
school of its kind in the world. For catalogue and 
further information address 

Southern Business College 

4th Avenue and 15th Street 

W. J. ECHOLS, Principal 
J. P. BOND, Secretary-Manager 



Send your boy South — the land of Opportunity. 
The Prairie View State Normal and Industrial 
College of Tezas. E. L. Blackshear, Principal. W. 
C. Bollins, Treasurer. Largest State institution for 
colored youth in the United States. Excellent 
literary, scientific and industrial advantages. Ex- 
penses low — ideal climate — new buildings. 

For particulars address: 

H. J. MASON, Secretary 
Prairie View, Waller County, Texas 

The Curse of Race Prejudice 

By James F. Morton, Jr., A. M. 

An aggressive exposure by an Anglo-Saxon 
champion of equal rights. Startling facts and crush- 
ing arguments. Fascinating reading. A necessity 
for clear understanding and up-to-date propaganda. 
Belongs in the library of every friend of social 
justice. Price 25 cents. Send orders to 

JAMES F. MQRTON, JR. 



Atlanta University 

Studies of the 

Negro Problems 

16 Monographs. Sold Separately. 

Address: 

A. G. DILL 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga. 



244 West 143d Street 



New York, N. T. 



O 

R 

B 
i 

R 
t 

H 
d 
A 

y 

S 



A NARRATIVE of 
THE NEGRO 

By Mrs. Leila Amos Pendleton 

A comprehensive history of the 
Negro race from the earliest period 
to the present time; told in pleas- 
ing narrative style; may be read 
and understood by children. Bound 
in cloth and illustrated. 

Address: Price $1.50 

MRS. L. A. PENDLETON 

1824 nth Street, N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 



o 
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HEAVEN AND HELL 



oweaenDorg s great worit on me me alter 
death, 400 pages, only 15 cents postpaid. 
Pastor Landenbergefi Windsor Placoi St. Louis. Mo. 



COLLEGE AND 
FRATERNITY PINS 

We are now prepared to supply colleges, 
fraternal organizations, baseball clubs, ath- 
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Watch fobs, rings, cuff l)uttons and metal 
novelties of special design are also pro- 
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Sterling Silver Pins 40 cents up; Gold- 
filled 60 cents up; Solid Gold $1.10 up. 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY 
26 Vcscy Street New York 



Mention The Crisis. 



214 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



COLORED MEN 

MAKE BIG MONEY AS 

Train Porters or 

Sleeping-car Porters 




Let us prepare you for and assist you in 
getting one of these good paying positions. 

Experience unnecessary. Enclose stamp 
for application blank and book; state posi- 
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I. RAILWAY G. I. 

Dept. K. Indianapolis. Ind. 



J. E. ORMES 
ACCOUNTANT 

Audits Systems 

Business information by mail. ■ Open for 

engagements July and August. 

Box 25, Wilberforce University 
Wilberforce, O. 



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TONE-PLACING 
AND VOICE- 
DEVELOPMENT 



OF INTEREST TO 
VOCAL STUDENTS 

Tone Placing and 
Voice Development 

Practical method of singing for 
daily practice, based upon artistic 
principles, together with a care- 
fully prepared number of exercises. 
From "Musical Courier," N. Y. : 
A very practical little book is 
"Tone Placing and Voice Develop- 
ment," by Pedro T. Tinsley. It 
contains some very excellent material and vocal 
exercises, and should be in the hands of all vocal 
students. 

WORDS OF APPRECIATION 
I offer you the heartiest possible endorsement 
of your work, which I believe to be the most com- 
plete course of the kind that has ever come 
under my notice. — Glenn Dillard Grunn, Chicago 
"Tribune" 

From "Music News," Chicago, 111.: Accordingly 
his "Practical Method of Singing" is a most con- 
cise and practical little manual, containing many 
valuable vocal exercises. It cannot fail to be 
helpful to all ambitious vocal students. 

CANNOT FAIL OF GOOD RESULTS 
The work is especially commendable because it. 
treats in a clear and systematic manner all the vital 
points so essential to the student, making it easy 
for him to advance to the highest point of 
development. — Geo. I. Holt, Des Moines, Iowa. 

PRICE $1.00 

Address the publisher: 

PEDRO T. TINSLEY 

6448 Drexel Avenue CHICAGO, ILL. 

PAMPHLETS 

Published and sold by 

The National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People 

1. African Civilization: By M. D. Mac- 
lean. Price 2 cents. 

2. The Brain of the American Negro: 

By Burt G. Wilder. Price 20 cents. 

3. Social Control: By Jane Addams, of 
Hull House. Price 1 cent. 

4. Negro Suffrage: by Prof. Albert B. 
Hart, of Harvard. Price 5 cents. 

5. Leaving It to the South: An experi- 
ence and some conclusions by Charles 
Edward Russell. Price 5 cents. 

6. Views of a Southern Woman: By 

Adelene IMoffat. Price 2 cents. 



7. Disfranchisement: 

Holmes. Price 5 cents. 



By John Haynes 
Bv W. E. B. 



8. Disfranchisement: 
Du Bois. Price 10 cents. 

Address 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY 

26 VESEY STREET NEW YORK 



Mention The Ciusis. 



THE CRISIS 



Vol. 5, No. 5 



MARCH, 1913 



^Vkole No. 29 




ALONG 
t OLOR LINE 




ECONOMICS. 

/^ENSUS reports on agTiculture have ap- 
^^ peared during the month for five 
States : 

Value 
Farm Land Owned 
and Rented 

1910. 

$56,523,741 
97,370,748 
15,410,628 

157,879,185 



Colored Farmers 1900. 

Louisiana $38,030,298 

Alabama 46,918,358 

Florida 6,471,733 

Georgia 48,708,954 



Mississippi 86,487,434 187,561,026 

^I A leading real-estate agent asserts that the 
colored people of Baltimore own $10,000,000 
worth of real estate. 

^ Wood's Directory of New Orleans has been 
issued for 1913. It catalogs seven asylums 
and homes, eighteen Baptist, two Catholic, 
five Congregational, one Episcopal, two 
Lutheran, fourteen Methodist Episcopal, 
seven African Methodist Churches and one 
Presbyterian Church. There are three hos- 
pitals and three parks open to colored peo- 
ple. There are nine public schools, five pri- 
vate high schools and colleges and four other 
schools. The number of benevolent, charity 
and secret organizations is remarkable, and 
covers eleven pages of the catalog. 

*I The Penny Savings Bank at Yazoo City, 
Miss., is in financial difficulties. 

•3 The mining corporations of Alabama have 
a system of issuing checks to their laborers 
instead of paying them at short intervals. 



These checks are discounted by the miners 
at ruinous rates and are the cause of much 
crime and poverty. 

^ Many colored people in Cincinnati have 
lost a good deal of property through high 
water on the river. 

^I The colored people of Shreveport, La., are 
complaining through their local paper: 
"Some of the most beautiful sections of the 
city are inhabited by Negroes, who own their 
homes and pay heavy taxes into the city 
treasury. We cannot plant trees for the 
reason the streets have not been graded and 
we do not know where to put them. Give 
us some consideration; have us to know that 
we are a part of this growing city." 
^ The Hardriek Brothers, colored men of 
Springfield, Mo., have a large grocery store. 
Their business amounts to $75,000 a year 
and nine-tenths of their customers are white. 
They have ten clerks, one bookkeeper, one 
cashier and four deliverymen and a large 
auto delivery truck. The employees are all 
colored, and the firm has the custom of the 
wealthiest people of the city. 

SOCIAL UPLIFT. 

'T'HE death rate of colored people in New 

■^ Orleans for the year 1912 is reported 

to have been 28.48 per thousand of living 

persons. 

^ The Louisville Public Library is going to 
open a second branch for the colored people. 
It will cost $5,000, of which $4,000 is paid 



216 



THE CRISIS 



by the city and the remainder, including 
taxes of 1913, has been raised by the colored 
people. 

^ The Sunday Forum, of Minneapolis, ar- 
ranges for lectures, entertainments and up- 
lift work. It has just installed a new set 
of officers. 

c; The eighth annual convention of the State 
Federation of Colored Women's Clubs has 
been held in Danville, Ky., and was largely 
attended. Among other things they are pub- 
lishing a year book and a monthly paper. 

^ A general conference concerning the social 
and industrial progTess among colored peo- 
ple is being held this month in St. Louis. 
Among those who are taking part are David 
E. Gordan, Dr. C. H. Turner, Miss M. B. 
Belcher, Dr. G. E. Haynes and Mr. Richard 
Hudlin. 

^ The New Orphan Asylum of Cincinnati 
has issued its sixty-eighth annual report. 
This shows receipts of $3,651 for the year. 
It has an endowment of $37,000 and forty- 
six inmates. 

^ Julius Rosenwald's offer of $25,000 to col- 
ored Young Men's Christian Associations, 
where $75,000 additional is raised, has been 
accepted and conditions met in Chicago and 
Washington. Baltimore, Atlanta, Indian- 
apolis, Philadelphia and Los Angeles are 
expecting to meet the conditions within a 
short time. Four other cities are beginning 
efforts. 

CI For the first time in the history of Vir- 
ginia a colored woman, Miss Lydia E. Ash- 
burn, who was trained at Howard University, 
has been licensed for the practice of medi- 
cine. 

*I A civic center for the colored people of 
Nashville, Tenn., is proposed. 
C! Colored people have been urging the 
mayor of New York to place a colored man 
on the committee which is arranging to cele- 
brate the 300th birthday of Manhattan. 

^ Mr. J. H. Stone, a colored man of Atchi- 
son, has what is said to be the largest black- 
smith and repair shop in the State of Kansas. 
His income exceeds $8,000 annually. 

fl The subcommittee of public comfort to 
supervise arrangements for colored people 
at the inaugural ceremonies has been organ- 
ized. Colored high-school cadets and the 
colored militia will marcl^in the inaugural 
procession. 



EDUCATION. 

A COMPULSORY education bill for the 
•^^ Southern States has been framed at 
the request of the Educators of the South. 
It provides that children between the ages 
of 7 and 16 shall attend school "pro- 
vided there is an available school in his 
or her district with adequate seating capacity 
and teaching officers." The drawer of the 
bill gives the following lucid explanation: 

"You will note that it is not compulsory 
for a student to attend school unless there 
is a school and a teacher provided. So when 
the colored school in the district, or the white 
school in the district, is filled to its capacity, 
it will not be an offense for a student not to 
comply with the law under the plea that he 
had not been enrolled on account of the lack 
of accommodation. 

"In other words, you can't make a boy or 
girl of either race attend school if there is 
no school, seat or teacher at his or her dis- 
posal. 

"I placed this clause in the bill because 
of the constant excuse given me by the people 
of the various Southern States that com- 
pulsory education was not feasible for the 
reason that we had not the money with 
which to build a sufficient number of schools 
to accommodate the Negroes. Under this 
bill they have no cause of complaint." 
^ The Pennsylvania Abolition Society is 
turning its attention toward the support of 
education among colored people of the South. 
It hate recently held a conference on the sub- 
ject in Philadelphia. 

<S Governor Blease of South Carolina, in a 
message to the legislature, has recommended 
a bill to prohibit white teachers from teach- 
ing in the Negro schools, with heavy penal- 
ties. Such a bill has been introduced. In 
a recent letter the governor said : 

"I want to warn you to-day, passing as 
I am rapidly from State politics, that if 
I go higher it will be to a broader and na- 
tional field, when I will fight the education 
of the NegTo. I blush to say that in a 
Yankee State he is breaking down the social 
barriers. 

"God Almighty never intended that he 
sliould be educated, and the man who at- 
tempts to do what God Almighty never in- 
tended should be done will be a failure. 
God made that man to be your servant. 
The Negro was meant to be a hewer of wood 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



217 



and a drawer of water. Jf He had intended 
him to be your equal He would have made 
him white like you and put a bone in his 
nose. 

"Wlien you attempt to break down the 
barrier of social equality by educating the 
Negro, bringing him into the professions and 
giving him the ballot, instead of making an 
educated NegTo you are ruining a good plow 
hand and making a half-educated fool." 
fl A night school for colored people will be 
Oldened at Lexington, Ivy., and one is being 
agitated at Paducah, Ky. 
^ The high school of Washington, Pa., is 
graduating a class of ten white girls and one 
colored boy. The colored boy was "key" 
orator and receives a scholarship for college 
next year. 

^ Various colored colleges have new build- 
ings: a $30,000 building at Wiley Uni- 
versity, Texas, a $3,000 president's home and 
a $3,000 dormitory; a memorial hall and a 
medical college at Claflin University, South 
Carolina, at a cost of $50,000, are contem- 
plated. 

^ The Florida State Teachers' Association 
has held one of the best meetings of its his- 
tory. J. D. McCall succeeds N. B. Young 
as president. 

^ The Gate City Free Kindergarten Associa- 
tion of Atlanta, Ga., is composed of colored 
women and gives 200 children a year daily 
instruction. It has been at work for seven 
years, and during that time has tried in vain 
to secure assistance from the city. The city 
supports white kindergartens. 
^' Congress has appropriated $150,000 
toward a new building for the M Street high 
school for colored pupils in Washington, 
D. C. When completed the new school will 
cost $550,000. 

*] In a Houston (Tex.) night school for 
colored people a grandmother and her gTand- 
son sit side by side on a front bench. 
^ The American Missionary Association is 
seeking to raise $1,000,000 toward the 
endowment of five colored colleges and one 
white college in the South. 
^ Founders' day at Hampton University 
was celebrated by the dedication of a new 
Young Men's Christian Association building, 
which is to cost when completed $33,000. Dr. 
Henry Pitt Warren said in his address : 

"Slavery did what the unscrupulous press 
and demagogues are doing to-day in this 



country; it destroyed eonlidence of man in 
man. Tins same lack of contidence has re- 
larded the progress of the Negro since the 
war. There can be no advancement until 
there is hearty acceptance of leaders and 
faith in them. Slavery made men suspicious 
of one another, and prevented true organiza- 
tion of society. Had there been a few 
thousand men among the Negroes at the 
close of the war recognized as leaders, the 
race would have advanced by leaps and 
bounds. Never has a people shown such 
eagerness for the best for their children or 
been willing to make such sacrifices for 
them. The lack of directive energy of the 
NegTo, in my judgment, was the fruit of 
slavery, not a racial weakness." 

^ A series of lectures has been delivered at 
the University of Virginia on the Negro 
problem. Only Southern white men have 
been invited to speak. Dr. James H. Dil- 
lard, one of the speakers, said : 

"As to the relation between the two races, 
is it not an obvious fact that the millions 
are going on quite peacefully about their 
business and that it is only the hundreds 
about whom we hear trouble? There is little 
trouble in actual j)ractice in the common, 
everyday routine of business. Negroes tes- 
tify to the good will of the Southern whites 
in the enterprises which they undertake. I 
wonder daily at the peaceful relation of the 
races when I remember how much has been 
said and done, from Thad. Stevens to Gover- 
nor Blease, which might cause irritation and 
hatred. 

''As to what can be immediately done, it 
seems to me that we must work first along 
the lines of education and religion. We must 
recognize that the education of the masses 
must depend upon the public schools and 
that these schools must be made more efficient 
by the introduction of home industries and 
by relating them to the life of the people. 
Justice demands a larger appropriation for 
this purpose. 

"No one can predict the future. There 
will always be race problems, for races are 
different and the differences will persist. But 
I see no reason why the white people and 
the colored people may not continue to live 
in the South with a natural segregation and 
yet in mutual co-operation and good will." 

<i At the dedication of the State Normal 
School for Negroes at Nashville, Tenn., the 
governor of the State, president of the State 



218 



THE CRISIS 



board of education and others made speeches. 
The speech of the president of the State 
board was such a remarkable document that 
it is worth quoting from: 

"I had just as well be plain about it and 
say to you Negxoes here that the whole thing 
is meant for you to keep out of politics. 
To do much good at this I might have to 
write a history of your race in polities. But 
that is not necessary here. To you men of 
experience and wisdom I need not point out 
the evils of these things to a race just in its 
formative period. Practically all the white 
political 'bootlegger' wants of you is the 
rounding up of the fellows. He does not 
want you at all unless you can deliver so 
many votes, and is never half so friendly the 
day after the election as the day before. It 
is far more beneficial to you from every 
standpoint to take no part in polities except 
to go to the polls on election day, east your 
vote for the best man on the ticket, regard- 
less of politics, even though it be a choice of 
e\^ls, as is frequently the ease. You know 
as well as I do that it is not for the best 
interests of either race for you to hold office 
in this country under present conditions ; 
therefore your way to preferment is over 
the sometimes hard bat entirely safe road 
of industry and economy. Here in this school 
you have every chance to become a wage 
earner that will bring you always a com- 
fortable living." 

fl The Russell Sage Foundation has issued 
a study of the public-school system of the 
forty-eight States. This report is based on 
the State's own figures and the public may 
be sure that they do not understate condi- 
tions. Taking ten points of efficiency we 
find the Southern States at the bottom in 
practically all cases. For instance, 22 per 
cent, of the children of Mississippi are not 
in school, nearly half the children of Louis- 
iana and one-third of the children of South 
Carolina. The annual expenditure per child 
for schools amounts to $4 in Alabama and 
Georgia, $7 in Louisiana and Texas, and $3 
ill South Carolina. The Alabama child goes 
to school forty-seven days of the year and 
the Louisiana child forty-nine days. It must 
be remembered that these figures apply to 
colored and white children together. If we 
had, as we have not, the tinath concerning 
colored children, the figures would be too dis- 
graceful for a civilized country to read. 
*! The Model Training School under Mrs. 
Judia Jackson Harris at Athens, Ga., is at- 



tracting attention for its splendid community 
work. Farming, gardening, canning, cook- 
ing, washing, sewing, fancy work, bakery, 
carpenter work, blacksmithing and a high- 
school literary course are the features of the 
curriculum which this colored woman has 
been carrying in her institution for several 
years. She called it the Model Training 
School. It is situated in a thickly settled 
Negro section of the county. Since she be- 
gan her work there have been twenty-one 
houses owned by Negroes in the vicinity 
painted; there have been organs and pianos 
introduced; there have been profit-bearing 
gardens cultivated; there have been large 
increases iu the taxable property returned. 
The criminal element has almost entirely 
moved out and the settlement is a model one 
indeed. 

MEETINGS. 

*" I 'HE executive committee of the National 
-*- Press Association has met in Philadel- 
jDhia. 

^ The colored Young Women's Christian 
Associations have met in Baltimore, Md. 
They represent sixteen city associations, with 
an aggTegate membership of 3,034, and be- 
ginnings of work in six other cities. Some' 
of the cities sending delegates were New 
York, Washington, St. Louis, St. Paul and 
Atlanta. 

^ The sixth annual Negro race conference, 
with 1,400 delegates, met in Columbia, S. C. 
^ Two thousand persons attended the annual 
Tuskegee farmers' conference. The keynote 
of Mr. Washington's address was "to him 
that hath shall be given." 
^ A Lincoln celebration was held at the 
Abraham Lincoln Center in Chicago, of 
which Jenkins Lloyd Jones is pastor. Among 
the speakers were Louis Brandeis, Edwin 
Markham and S. Laing Williams. 

PERSONAL. 

JESSE WALKER, of Frankfort, Ky., has 
by court decision become heir to 300 
acres of land. 

•I The Rev. John A. Plantevigne, a colored 
priest, is dead at Baltimore. Cardinal Gib- 
bons said at the funeral that he upheld every 
tradition of the priesthood and that there 
was not a spot or blemish against him. He 
was only 40 years of age, and his death 
leaves four colored men in the Catholic 
priesthood in the United States. 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



219 



fl Mrs. Lucy Tappan Phillips, wife of 
Bishop Phillips of the colol'ed M. E. Church, 
is dead. She was a woman of ability and 
good works. 

fl Mr. P.. M. Johnson, Mr. W. H. White 
and Mrs. Gordan own valuable property in 
Carnegie, Pa., which is being rented to white 
people. 

^ Bishop Derrick of the African Methodist 
Church has sold his estate at Flvfshing, N. Y,, 
known as "Bishop's 'Court." 
fl A colored man, the Hon. Phillip Clark 
Cook, colonial secretary of Jamaica, B. 
W. I., has been sworn in as acting gov- 
ernor on the departure of the late governor. 
Sir Sidney Olivier. He will act until another 
governor is appointed. 

^ A colored man, by waving his red shirt, 
stopped a train from being wrecked at 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

^ Jesse Binga, a colored banker of Chicago, 
has been elected a member of the Illinois 
Bankers' Association. 

^ I. T. Howe is a colored member of 
the English high-school relay team which 
has been victorious over opponents in 
Boston. 

^ Joseph Palmer rescued a white woman 
from an insane man in Birmingham, Ala. 
^ Announcement is made of the marriage of 
Dr. George W. P. Johnson, a leading colored 
physician of Key West, Fla., to Miss Blo- 
neva W. Terry. 

^ The Rev. C. H. Parfish, of Louisville, Ivy., 
has been made a fellow of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society of London. Mr. Parrish 
is the fourth American Negro to receive this 
distinction. 

fl Assistant United States Attorney-General 
W. H. Lewis addressed the Massachusetts 
Legislature by invitation on Lincoln's Birth- 
day. 

^ Mr. William Pickens has been making a 
number of speeches in New England on the 
Negro, which have been widely mentioned. 
^ A bank is being organized at Baton Rouge, 
La., by Dr. J. H. Lowery and Mr. E. D. 
Wright and others. 

MUSIC AND ART. 

TN the 1912 record of "The Progress of 
"*■ American Music" and of compositions 
performed by composers born in America, 
the Musical Courier cites "A New Year's 
Greeting," a song by the baritone-composer. 
Harry T. Burleigh, of New York. 



^ The late S. Coleridge-Taylor's violin con- 
certo in G minor was recently heard for the 
first time in London. It was produced on 
the program with the rhapsodic dance 
"Bamboula," under the direction of Sir 
Henry J. Wood, at the promenade concerts. 
^ A students' musical festival was held on 
January 11 at the Hampton Normal and 
Industrial Institute, Hampton, Va. Madame 
Azalia Hackley conducted the festival. The 
program consisted of folk songs, male and 
female choruses, vocal soli and a demonstra- 
tion in voice culture. 

q The People's Choral Society of Philadel- 
phia, Pa., gave their seventh concert on 
February 13, at Musical Fund Hall. 
Mendelssohn's oratorio, "Elijah," was pre- 
sented under the direction of Alfred J. Hill. 
The soloists were Miss Minnie Brown, 
soprano ; Mrs. Daisey Tapley, contralto ; 
Mr. Roland W. Hayes, tenor, and Mr. 
Harry T. Burleigh, baritone, 
fl The firm of Sehirmer & Co. announce a 
group of new songs by the American com- 
poser, Sidney Homer. In "Songs of the Old 
South," "Way Down South" and "The Song 
of the Watcher" Mr. Homer again shows his 
interest in the Negro idiom. The songs are 
said to be as effective as his "Bandanna 
Ballads." 

^ On December 17, at the concert given by 
the University Choral and Orchestral Society, 
Aberdeen, England, Coleridge-Taylor's "A 
Song of Prosperpine" divided interest with 
the newly found "Jena" symphony of 
Beethoven. 

CI Mr. Alfred Noyes, the English poet, the 
author of "A Tale of Old Japan" and the 
beautiful poem to his friend and co-worker, 
Coleridge-Taylor, is expected this month on 
a visit to America. 

fl On January 13, at Jordan Hall, Boston, 
Mass., the memorial concert was given under 
the patronage of distinguished musicians and 
influential persons of the community. The 
soloists who tendered their services were 
Mr. Roland W. Hayes, tenor; Mr. Harry T. 
Burleigh, baritone, of New York, accom- 
panied by Mr. Mellville Charlton; Mr. 
William H. Richardson, baritone; Mrs. Maud 
Cuney Hare, piano; Mr. Jacques Hoff- 
mann, violin, and Mr. Ludwig Nast, violon- 
cello, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
and Mr. Frederic White, organ. 

A memorial address was delivered by Dr. 
W. E. B. Du Bois, of New York. 



220 



THE CRISIS 



q "A Tale of Old Japan," Coleridge- 
Taylor's last cantata, is receiving many hear- 
ings in England. 

The work has been given at Woking by 
the Musical Society; at Worcester by the 
Worcester Musical Society, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. W. Mann Dyson; at Kugby by 
the Philharmonic Society; by the Teddington 
Philharmonic Society; and at the concert 
given by the Colston School. 
fl The second concert by colored musicians 
under the auspices of the Music School Set- 
tlement for Colored People took place at 
Carnegie Hall, February 12. It was an un- 
usually successful event. 

fl Elena Gerhardt, the world's gTeat lieder 
singer, Avho is again on concert tour in 
this country and repeating her success of 
last season, has become a warm admirer of 
American music, and complains that singers 
and musicians neglect the native music. 
"Why do you thus slight the melody of your 
soil," she asks, "and what real progress is 
being made in preservmg the songs of the 
old South?" 

As a means of arousing interest in Ameri- 
can music Miss Gerhardt suggests a great 
folk songfest to be held at the San Francisco 
Exposition in 1915, with prizes offered both 
for the collection and arrangement of Ameri- 
can melodies and songs and for the singing 
of them. 

^ On the program of the concert of the 
great opera singer, David Bispham, at 
the Harvard Club on Sunday, February 2, 
was a song by Will Marion Cook, entitled 
"Exhortation." Before singing this song Mr. 
Bispham interrupted his program to tell the 
audience that Mr. Kurt Sehindler, the Ger- 
man expert of the great music-publishing 
house of Schirmer & Company, considered 
Mr. Cook nothing short of a genius; that in 
his, Mr. Bispham's opinion, it was an outrage 
that these songs of Mr. Cook's should first 
have been brought out by a foreigner re- 
siding in this country ; that Americans should 
have recognized Mr. Cook's worth long ago. 
He then told of Mr. Cook's training in 
Europe, the varied range of his compositions, 
and wound up by sajdng: "In this field of 
art at least it seems to me as though it 
should make no difference whether a man 
is blue, green or black; he should have his 
due and proper recognition, and be rewarded 
for his achievements." 



^ Miss Kittie Cheatham, the distinguished 
singer who scored a triumph in London, 
England, last year with her singing of Negro 
melodies and songs of childhood, was 
recently heard in Boston in one of her 
characteristic programs. The Boston critics 
state that "Few have revealed a truer under- 
standing of the Negro character than did 
Miss Cheatham in her songs and sayings, 
given, as they were, spontaneously and not 
as laborious imitations of the dialect." 

CHURCHES. 

PJ* IGHT colored churches of the Oranges, 
•'-' N. J., have raised nearly $200 for a 
memorial hospital. 

^ The Colored Institutional Church at At- 
lanta, Ga., reports that it reached 8,350 
peojDle during the year, 

^ The board of bishops of the African 
Methodist Zion Church have been meeting 
in Birmingham, Ala. They report collec- 
tions of $86,740 for six months. 

*j The American Church Institute is organ- 
izing an auxiliary to help in educational 
work in Philadelphia. 

^ An appeal has been issued by Cardinal 
GibboTis for work among Negroes and In- 
dians. 

FOREIGN. 

-V/T AJOE, CHARLES YOUNG and his as- 
■*■ ■'• sistant, Major Ballard, representing 
the United States Army in Liberia, have sub- 
dued wild tribes in the interior for the 
Liberian Government, after some fierce fight- 
ing. Major Young Avas wounded in the arm 
and his force had eight men killed. 

^ The English Government has promised to 
pay interest on the loan of $15,000,000 for 
the improvement, of cotton growing among 
colored people of the Sudan. 

THE GHETTO. 

I^EOPLE who believe that race prejudice 
^ in the United States is spontaneous 
should take note of the following happen- 
ings: 

Practically identical bills against the inter- 
marriage of the races have been introduced 
in Wisconsin, Iowa, Kansas, Colorado. New 
York, Minnesota, New Jersey and Michigan. 
A national bill has been introduced in Con- 
gress. The penalties vary from imprison- 
ment to enforced surgical operation. 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



221 



Segregation ordinances to separate the 
dwelling places of colored people are being 
pushed in Norfolk, Va., the State of Mis- 
souri and the city of St. Louis. 

Boxing contests between colored and white 
people have been prohibited in New York 
City and Pittsburgh by executive action. 

Bills for separate schools have been intro- 
duced in California and Colorado. 

A disfranchisement bill has been intro- 
duced in Missouri and a bill for the repeal 
of the Fifteenth Amendment in South Caro- 
lina. A bill for "Jim Crow" street cars in 
Delaware and a similar proposal in Wash- 
ington, D. C, are noted. 

^ Against this concerted movement for caste 
legislation several counter efforts have been 
made : The colored citizens of Norfolk are 
raising a fund to tight the segTegation ordi- 
nance. 

White clubw^omen of Louisville have so 
far refused to join in a petition for ''Jim 
Crow'' street cars. One of them said in a 
public meeting: 

"I consider this a non-civic movement. We 
are a ciidc league. If the question related 
to civic welfare the request for the discus- 
sion of it would have come from both sides. 
I object very much to our co-operating in 
this movement. I use the cars as much, I 
am sure, as any woman in the city, but I 
have not exi)erieneed any rudeness from 
colored people. If the change is for the 
benefit of both races we should have a con- 
ference and discuss it. I consider the entire 
proposition reaetionarj^ and backward." 

Mr. George W. Woodson appeared before 
the Iowa Legislature and made seventeen 
points against the intermarriage bill. Among 
his points were these : 

"Why should the people of Iowa be asked 
to lend the aid of their legislature every 
two years to the enactment of hostile meas- 
ures proposed and originated from outside 
the State and urged only by the conspiracy 
of the Tillman-Dixon-Vardaman kind in their 
efforts to outlaw and oppress members and 
descendants of the African or black race ? 

"How does it happen that this bill, like 
the infamous secret order bill of the Thirty- 
fourth General Assembly, has been intro- 
duced in nearly every Northern and Western 
State at about the same time? 

"Have the right honorable gentlemen of 
this committee and of this assembly taken 
the care to consult the high-class white ladies 



of Iowa as to their feelings for the need of 
such legislation? 

"Who is responsible for the mixed racial 
cohabitation as we see its results to-day in 
every part of our land? Surely not black 
men. 

"If you gentlemen can frame another stat- 
ute, general in its nature, to give more pro- 
tection to the virtue and integrity of the 
women of our State, name it, and we are 
with you." The bill was defeated. 

Assemblyman A. J. Levy has introduced 
a strong civil-rights bill into the New York 
Legislature designed to strengthen the pres- 
ent provisions. 

^ Howard P. Drew, the colored sprinter, has 
sent this mesage to the Boston Herald: 

"Refused to run at B. A. A. games be- 
cause I understand that members of my race 
are barred from the club because of color. 
Such being the case, I would feel out of 
place competing in their games." 

^ In Springfield, 111., on Jackson Street, 
eight blocks east of the old Abraham Lincoln 
homestead, a number of colored families have 
built modern homes. Recently a great pro- 
test has been made by some of the white 
people living in that neighborhood at what 
they call a threatened Negro invasion. As 
long as colored families lived in old tumble- 
down shacks there did not seem to be any 
objection. But to have intelligent, well-to- 
do colored families erecting modern houses, 
with furnace, water, gas, electric light, etc., 
is more than they can stand, especially when 
the houses they are building are so much 
superior to those of the protestants. The 
animus of the whole matter is that the houses 
occupied by the protesting whites are ever}"- 
way inferior to those being built and occu- 
pied by the colored families. 

^ In addition to this a protective committee 
of white fraternities of South Bend, Ind., is 
pushing action to keep Negroes from using 
the names of secret societies. 

^ J. R. Hicks, commissioner of deeds for 
the State of Georgia in Jacksonville, Fla., 
will not get his commission from the gover- 
nor of Georgia until the awful charge that 
he has NegTo blood has been disproven. 
^ The reform administration of Philadel- 
phia gave a dinner to the city employees at 
which there was an attempt to prevent the 
colored employees from coming. This, how- 
ever, was frustrated. 



222 



THE CRISIS 



W Gimbel Brothers in New York City have 
dismissed twenty colored girls in their em- 
ploy. It is to be hoped that their colored 
customers will act accordingly. 
fl The board of education of Atlantic City, 
N. J., have refused to seat the colored driig- 
gist, James F. Bourne, although the State 
board of education have directed them to. 
admit him. Bourne is seeking a mandamus 
in court. 

COURTS. 

SAMUEL L. BURTON, a colored man, 
for ten years had been carrying on a 
general merchandise business in the town of 
Onancoek, Aecomac County, eastern shore 
of Virginia. He claimed to have a business 
of $10,000 a year. One of his employees 
had a horse attached by the local constable 
for debt. He quarrelled with the constable 
and was arrested, charged with interfering 
with an officer. At the trial Burton was 
one of the witnesses and the employee was 
fined $50. 

As Burton came out of the mayor's office 
he was struck by a young white boy, John 
West, with a blackjack. On the same day 
another colored man, who, with Burton, was 
engaged in the publication of a local colored 
l^aper, was set upon by a mob as he was 
delivering his papers and shot a white man 
and killed him. The disorder kept up and 
some unknown person in the vicinity of the 
Burton store shot and killed a colored man 
named Topping. It was afterward estab- 
lished that Topping was a spy in the employ 
of the wliites, and that he was mistaken for 
Burton. Nevertheless, Burton was arrested, 
charged with the murder of Topping, con- 
victed and given ten years in the peniten- 
tiary. 

The case was appealed, the verdict set 
aside and the case ordered retried, but in a 
different court. In the new trial held at Nor- 
folk, Va., Burton was again convicted, but 
sentenced to one year imprisonment. Upon 
another apepal he was finally freed in 1908, 
having spent in all about a year in jail. 

Meantime the mob had entirely destroyed 
his business and burned down his property. 

In order to bring a case in the United 
States Court Burton acquired a residence in 
Maryland. Then, through his attorney, W. 
Ashbie Hawkins, brought suit in the United 
States District Court at Norfolk for the 
recovery of damages against the town of 
Aecomac and five citizens, including the 
mayor and John West. 



The case came to a final trial on January 
14, 1913, and Burton was awarded $3,500 
damages. Burton during this time has not 
been allowed to return to Aecomac, and was 
unable to get witnesses from there to tes- 
tify, as most of the colored people were 
intimidated. A retrial of the case has been 
refused. The verdict is much too small, but 
any verdict was a triumph and W. Ashbie 
Hawkins deserves great credit. 
fl The Baltimore courts are wrestling with 
the question as to whether the emancipation 
proclamation enabled former slave couples 
.to inherit from each other. 
^ The Oklahoma "grandfather" clause has 
at last reached the Supreme Court from 
the Circuit Court of Appeals for the Eighth 
District. 

«I The Franklin County (0.) Court of Ap- 
peals has held that colored people must be 
served in public places to soda water, and 
has consequently ordered a retrial in the case 
of Deuwell against George and Frank Foer- 
ster, of Columbus, 0. A verdict was brought 
in for the defendant in the lower court and 
the case is noAv ordered to be retried. 
^ The Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court of New York has affirmed the crim- 
inal conviction of the manager of the Lyric 
Theatre in New York City for excluding a 
colored man from the orchestra who had 
bought tickets. This is the first case of its 
kind in New York State; the other cases all 
being civil suits. 

CRIME. 
'T^ HE following lynchings have taken plaee 
■*- since our last record : 

At Drew, Miss., a man, for ''being party 
to the murder of a white man several months 
ago." 

At Houston, Miss., D. Rueker, burned for 
murder and robbery. J. Jones hanged for 
the same crime by "mistake." 

At Cooper, Tex., Henry Mouzon, lynched 
for shooting and killing a girl. He had been 
hunting and alleged that it was an accident. 

At Clarkeville, Tex., D. Stanley, a 16-year- 
old boy, hanged for alleged attempt to as- 
sault a child. 

C! Governor Tener of Pennsylvania recom- 
mends that the charter of the borough of 
Coatesville be revoked because of its failure 
to punish the lynchers. 

*!I A large number of murders by policemen 
and white men have occurred during the 
month. 




A YOUNG- ARTIST. 

WILLIAM EDWARD SCOTT was born 
ill Indianapolis March 11, 1884. His 
grandparents migrated from North Carolina 
in an ox cart. Scott was graduated from 
the high school in 1903, where he made a 
record as an athlete and earned his way 
as a paper boy and day laborer. He entered 




MR. WILLIAM E. SCOTT. 

the Chicago Art Institute in 1904, and 
worked as a waiter the first year. In the 
next three years he won scholarships and 
about $900 in prizes. He took the Magnus 
Brand prize in two successive years. With 
his savings and the help of a friend he 
studied in Paris at the Julian Academy and 
under Henry 0. Tanner. Three of his paint- 
ings Avere accepted at the Salon des Beaux 
Arts at Toquet. He returned to America 



MEN OF THE 



MONTH 



LffUfTTMFR-'ll 



after fifteen months and then went back to 
France, where he was successful in having 
a picture hung at the great spring salon at 
Paris. This was purchased by the Argentine 
Republic and is called "La Pauvre Voisine." 
Ill November, 1912, Mr. Scott brought back 
to the United States twenty-six large and 
many small paintings. All but two of the 
larger paintings have been sold, one being 
bought by the Herran Art Institute of In- 
dianapolis for their permanent exhibit. 

He has just completed three mural paint- 
ings for the Felsenthan School in Chicago, 
and has commissions to paint several in the 
Indianapolis public schools. When these 
are finished he expects to return to Europe, 
this time to attempt to win a medal in the 
great salon at Paris, an honor which is 
very much sought, and wliich but very few 
succeed in sainina'. 




"LA PAUVRE VOISINE. 



224 



THE CRISIS 



A GREAT TEACHER. 

T SAAC NEWTON KENDALL, first presi- 
-*- dent of Lincoln University, Pennsyl- 
vania, died reeentlj' at the age of 88. 
Lincoln was founded as Ashman In- 
stitute in 1854. On the day Lincoln was 
assassinated President Kendall was on his 
way to take charge of the institution, and it 
was named after the great emancipator. 
Lincoln, under Kendall, developed as a cen- 
ter for the training of ministers and for 
higher education. It has a good endowment, 
and perhaps the one word of criticism of 
Dr. Kendall and his associates is that they 
have never trained a NegTo whom they 
thought worthy of teaching at Lincoln. This 
fault will, we trust, soon be remedied, and 
at any rate the memory of this good and 
devoted man will live long in a thousand 
lives. 



A MAKER OF MEN. 

JE. MOOKLAND was born on a farm in 
Ohio. He was educated in the public 
schools of his native State, at the North- 
western Normal University, Ada, 0., and 
at Howard University. His first public 





MR. J. E. MOORLAND. 



THE LATE ISAAC N. RENDALL. 

service was teaching, and for a few years 
he was a pastor in Nashville, Tenn., and 
Cleveland, 0. He found his real life work 
when he entered the secretaryship of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. He be- 
gan work as a local secretary in Washing- 
ton, D. C, in 1892. He has since had some- 
thing to do with the purchase and erection 
of almost every building which is in use for 
association work for colored men through- 
out the country. Hardly a city of conse- 
quence on this continent where there is a 
large colored population but has been visited 
by Mr. Moorland at some time with a view 
to helping to better the condition of colored 
men and boys. 

For the last two years he has been giving 
much of his time to building campaigns, en- 
couraged by Mr. Kosenwald's offer of $25,000 
to every city which would raise $75,000 more 
for a building for colored men and boys. 
Eight cities have tried to meet the condi- 
tions, Kansas City being the last one. One 
building is finished (Washington, D. C.) ; 
Chicago and Indianapolis will dedicate build- 
ings in a few months. 

The object of Mooi-land's life is to con- 
serve the strength of the colored men and boys 



MEN OF THE MONTH 



225 



m 


L J 


^ 

B 



MR. R. C. LOGAN. 

in our i;rban centers so that they may be 
eificient citizens of this great nation. His 
idea is a chain of buildings, embracing every 
important city, which shall be conservation 
stations, power plants, havens of refuge for 
the most tempted group of men in our land. 



A SINGER. 

T^ C. LOGAN is a native of Kentucky 
■■-^* and came into prominence in 1896 
when he sang to 30,000 people at the Welsh 
International Eisteddfod, held at Denver. He 
won a prize there in the open competition 
for professional bassos. A preliminary ex- 
amination was held, and out of the ten com- 
petitors, all of whom were white with the 
exception of Mr. Logan, only three competed 
for the prizes. Mr. Logan was one of the 
three, and defeated Prof. Menze, of the Lon- 
don (England) Academy of Music, and was 
awarded the second prize. The first prize 
was won by Mr. Jones, a Welshman. Since 
then Mr. Logan has toured New South 
Wales, Victoria, Queensland, New Zealand; 
the Hawaiian Islands, America and Canada. 
His voice is of phenomenal register and, as 
a Hawaiian paper says : "Like the pedal 
notes from a pipe organ.'' 



Mr. Logan married Elizabeth V. Williams, 
of Springfield, 0., and they live in Butte, 
Mont. Recently Mr. Logan was one of the 
artists in a local benefit concert for the 
Sacred Heart Catholic Church, at which the 
door receipts were over $2,000. 



A NOBLE WOMAN. 

PANNY JACKSON COPPIN, who is just 
•■■ dead in Philadelphia, was one of the 

most distinguished colored women in the 
United States. She was born in Washing- 
ton, D. C, in 1837, and was purchased from 
slavery by her aunt. She was educated in 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Oberlin 
College, where she was graduated in 1865. 
For thirty-seven years she was principal of 
the celebrated Institute for Colored Youth, 
at Philadelphia, since removed to Cheney, 
Pa. In 1881 Miss Jackson married Levi J. 
Coppin, now bishop of the African Metho- 
dist Church. Such are the brief facts, but 
behind them is the pulsing life of a keen, 
good woman, absolutely unselfish and never 
absent from the firing line. God keep her 
memory/ 




CHAPLAIN W. W. E. GLADDEN 




THE 24TH INFANTRY AT CHURCH IN MANILA, P. I. 



A CHAPLAIN'S WORK. 
A SOLDIEE in the 24th Infantry, United 
•^^' States Army, writes from the Philip- 
pines and gives warm testimony as to the 
work of Chaplain Gladden. He is "solving 
the religious problem," says the soldier, and 
to "prove it sends a picture of a ehuroh service 



with 457 auditors, including Filipinos. "Our 
Sunday school consists of four classes and 
the attendance is very large. The chaplain 
is well thought of and is carrying his good 
work on among the young men as well as the 
old. He is well knoAvn to all and is held in 
the highest esteem." 



PROFESSIONAL AMERICANISM 

Bv * * * 




OWN to no difference in 
essentials from thousands 
of other well-born men. At 
what point, and how the 
blood streams of three 
continents mingled in my 
making, is of no conse- 
quence here. Let it suffice to say that it 
was far over a century ago — long enough 
for the mixed and warring consciousness 
of the three constituent strains to have 
settled all differences, and to have handed 
down to me something of poise and tradi- 
tion. Add to these resultants a university 
education, and you may have some' notion 
of the man who writes these lines — that is, 
if you have imagination. 

You should not wonder, then, that the 
nice manipulation of knife and fork at 
table or the unobtrusive mastication of 
food could be accomplished without ex- 
haustive effort of attention. It should not 
tickle vour sentiment of the comic to 



Homeric guffaws that one knows and fancies 
the proper garment for the proper occasion. 
Neither should it jar upon your exquisite 
sense of the fitness of things that one is not 
an exponent of buffoonery, considers men, 
white or black, merely as men ; can look with 
some pleasure upon the tender beauty of a 
sunset ; and attend a concert with genuine 
appreciation. 

So much for me. And now for the rest 
of us. 

We were about seventy strong, cabin 
passengers on an exquisite ship bound for 
an Eden in the southern seas. Some of us 
Avere Spanish, some English, most of us were 
American — all of us men and brethren, many 
of us reduced to an elemental human level 
by the physical sufl'ering which we liad come 
to sea to alleviate. There was sunshine and 
starshine enough for us all. The tang of 
the sea God had given alike to all for the 
curing of sick bodies, and the peacefulness 
of its calm for the* soothing of weary souls. 



PROFESSIONAL AMERICANISM 



zz7 



The majesty and the might of the sea He had 
likewise given that His children of many 
nations should not forget the Father who 
held it all in the hollow of His hand. Why 
might we not have rejoiced together humanly 
as men, delighting in the world-old mystery 
and glory of the deep? Or, at least, why 
might we not decently have allowed each 
other to take, apart and in peace, full 
measure of the swinging tides, and the light, 
and the air? 

But there were Americans of a certain 
type along, two or three, who felt the duty 
of sustaining a phase of their national repu- 
tation w'hich ranks their kind as haters of 
the darker brood. Just why they should 
rage is a problem for the psychologist, and 
not for one who seeks merely to chronicle an 
experience. The disgruntled group were 
Yankees to a man. Presumably their fathers 
had sacrificed heroically to vindicate the 
sanctity of our common humanity. Behold 
the sons entering upon a vigorous educa- 
tional campaign among the European pas- 
sengers, frenziedly teaching the inferiority, 
and the absurdity, and the evidence of utter 
fatuity on the part of high God, as shown 
in the person of a swarthy gentleman who 
had dared to exercise the privilege of going 
to sea in any other capacity than that of 
body servant. To encroach upon the domain 
of the psychologist, a raw human instinct 
may have impelled my fellow countrymen to 
such ungTacious utterance. 

Estimated by appearances, the two or 
three in question were of the parvenu stamp. 
To such, depressed by unmanly shame of 
their origin, the effort to degrade a man 
brings a pleasing sense of superiority, a 
titillation of the egoistic emotions, refresh- 
ing and necessary. Thus, long and inten- 



lionally audible conversation recounted the 
sad passing of the mammy class of Negro. 
Memories of my own gentle nurse caused 
me to speculate as to whether this shrill- 
voiced woman had ever known, save through 
a magazine story, what a mild-mannered 
Negro woman meant as a companion of one's 
childhood. There were also repeated 
asseverations of hatred for the colored up- 
starts, interspersed with magnificent descrip- 
tions, incidentally worked in, of the old-time 
glory enjoyed in youth by the narrators, 
splendor which the golden servility of the 
black slave threw^ into bold relief. 

To one overhearing at dinner or on deck 
came' a sense of gratitude to the boasters for 
a delicious human revelation. Than you, 
Simple Gentleman, God never wrought finer 
image of Himself; the grace of the breed is 
a sw^eet consideration for the other human; 
but in the creation of the parvenu, He must 
first have conceived the mold in infinite 
humor, and later suffered the type in bound- 
less love; or, it may be, the malicious devil 
tampered with what should have been plain 
but honest clay. 

Whether the Europeans who had met 
gentlemen, and who, with preconceived 
standards of breeding, measured the raucous 
voice, the pretension, the utter crassness at 
table and on deck, of the sad exponents of 
Americanism, whether these dwellers overseas 
perceived the passionately asserted superior- 
ity of all Caucasians over all colored people, 
is the question. If the remarks of the English 
waiters were reliable signs, the European 
contingent rather resented a Yankee effort to 
underrate their intelligence. Spaniards and 
our English cousins are not fools, even 
though they do not utter our vernacular with 
all the purity of our own nasality. 



THAT ONE MIGHT LIVE IN THE SUNLIGHT GLAD 

By WILLIAM MOORE 



That one might live in the sunlight glad 

And know the day; 
That one might dream in the shadows sad 

And love alway. 
O to love and to live and to know, 
O to feel the sea's strengtli and sea's flow. 
That one might sleep while the heart is mad 

And sorroAvs play ! 



That one might speak when the soul's athirst 

And hear the cry; 
That one might feel when the heart has burst 

And love the why. 
to speak and to feel and to know. 
to love the wind's strength and wind's 

blow. 
That one might walk with the sorroAvs first. 
Nor weep, nor sigh ! 
(> to know and to love and to live, 
O to speak and hear and to give. 
Nor fear to die ! 




(OP I N roNj 





EMANCIPATION. 



One who notices carefully 
will see that in the con- 
tinued discussion of emancipation the South 
is being distinctly put upon the defensive. 
This is a tremendous gain over a decade ago 
when the man, black or white, who intimated 
that Negroes were not the best treated and 
least deserving of men, was held up for 
public execration. The Atlanta Constitution 
consequently has it in for the ''NegTo mal- 
contents who would estrange the races by 
preaching things futile or impossible." 

Other papers, like Unity, of Chicago, 
declare : 

"With the white man, as with the black 
man, there is great cause for rejoicing. The 
whites of the South and the North have been 
reconstructed at a marvelous rate. He reads 
contemporary history blindly who allows the 
outrages, the mob violence, the silly conceits 
and the unfounded prejudices in many 
quarters, to blind him to the fact, to the 
mighty fact, the astounding fact, that past 
slaves have been received with cordial 
neighborliness ; that the auction block has 
given place to real-estate titles, gladly 
granted by former masters to former slaves. 
The lash has been replaced by friendly cour- 
tesies. Notes of hand have been exchanged 
between black and white, and the white man 
is growing more and more ashamed of his 
•insincere and illegal treatment of his fellow 
colored citizen. In s^Dite of all absurd and 
reactionary 'grandfather clauses' the black 
man's ballot is being counted more and 
more. Let us rejoice then over the unfinished 
problems Avith a cheerful hope. Let us sing 
down the injustices, and not try to cure race 
prejudice Avith curses." 

Fair Play, of New York, however (save 
the name!), is not so optimistic: 

"Yet it is a question as to whether (he 
generosity of spirit which inspired a large 
majority of the American people to give 
freedom and equality, before the law, to the 



colored race is not, to a considerable extent, 
stultified by the general movement to edu- 
cate them beyond their needs and for their 
entry into spheres of usefulness which are, 
and must, for some time to come, remain 
closed to them. It is not only unnecessary, 
but in our view, unjust, to give a high-school 
or college education to a Negro whose pos- 
sibilities and prospects in life can never rise 
above the level of a bellboy or a railway 
porter. These conditions not only constitute 
a hardship upon the Negro, but undoubtedly 
create in his mind a sense of inferiority and 
resentment which may easily operate preju- 
dicially against white people. Either he 
should be admitted to the positions in life 
for which, by his education and general 
character, he is fitted, or he should be taught 
from his childhood that he is not on the 
same plane as the white man and should be 
according!}^ restricted to a lower form of 
education. 

"The conditions of the NegToes in the 
United States are not, at the present time, 
making for a very extended improvement. 
There is no particularly favorable outlook 
for them in the North, where only a small 
percentage can obtain work that will sup- 
port them, while in the South there is even 
greater congestion. Still, while there is not 
in actual sight a view of any basis to regu- 
late the relations of the two races under a 
common government and civilization, the 
application of justice, wisdom and forbear- 
ance, both in the North and the South, will 
minimize the evils and remoA-e the acute 
situations as they develop. If the Negroes 
are removed, for the time being, from 
political office and from the sphere of polit- 
ical agitation, the racial prejudices now so 
frequently in evidence against him would 
gradually disappear and his prospects would 
be improved in the direction of sharing in 
the general progress and prosperity of the 
people and of the country." 



OPINION 



229 



Between these two extremes the most 
interesting comment comes from the sympo- 
sium in the Survey. Jane Addams asks: 
"What have we done to bring to the status 
of full citizenship the people Lincoln's proc- 
lamation raised from the conditions of 
slavery, "who were thereby enabled at once to 
legitimatize family life and to make con- 
tracts, but who inevitably looked forward to 
the civil and political rights implied in the 
great document? How far are we respon- 
sible that their cx\\\ rights are often rendered 
futile, their political action curtailed, their 
equality before the law denied in fact, in- 
dustrial opportunities withheld from them 
and, above all, that for twenty-five years they 
have been exposed to the black horrors of 
lynching? How far has the act of the 
great emancipator been nullified by our 
national indifference?" 

She goes on to say : 

"The consequence of such bondage upon 
the life of the nation can be formulated only 
when we have a wider and more exact 
knowledge. What has been and is being lost 
by the denial of opportunity and of free 
expression on the part of the Negro, it is 
now very difficult to estimate; only faint 
suggestions of the waste can be perceived. 
There is, without doubt, the sense of humor, 
unique and spontaneous, so different from 
the wit of the Yankee, or the inimitable story 
telling prized in the South; the Negro melo- 
dies which are the only American folk songs ; 
the persistent love of color expressing itself 
in the bright curtains and window boxes in 
the dullest and grayest parts of our cities; 
the executive and organizing capacity so 
often exhibited by the head waiter in a huge 
hotel or by the colored woman who admin- 
isters a complicated household; the gift of 
eloquence, the mellowed voice, the use of 
rhythm and onomatopoeia which is now so 
often travestied in a grotesque use of long 
words. 

"Much more could be added to the list of 
positive losses suffered by the community 
which puts so many of its own members 'be- 
hind the veil.' It means an enormous loss of 
capacity to the nation when great ranges of 
human life are hedged about with antago- 
nism. We forget that whatever is sponta- 
neous in a people, in an individual, a class 
or a nation, is always a source of life, a 
well spring of refreshment to a jaded civili- 
zation. To continually suspect, suppress 



and to fear any large group in a community 
must finally result in a loss of enthusiasm 
for that type of government which gives free 
play to the self-determination of a majority 
of its citizens. Must we admit that the old 
abolitionist arguments now seem flat and 
stale, that, because we are no longer stirred 
to remove fetters, to prevent cruelty, to lead 
the humblest to the banquet of civilization, 
therefore we are ready to eliminate the con- 
ception of right and wrong from political 
affairs and to substitute the base doctrine of 
'political necessity and reasons of State?'" 

George Packard, an Illinois lawyer, says : 

"For two hundred and fifty years the 
colored race has been systematically denied 
its rights as men and citizens. If we reform 
our social attitude toward them — which is 
the only way on earth — and eliminate the 
curse of race prejudice, we can look to the 
Negro to take care of himself. Let us, then, 
as reasonable beings take this first step, by 
influence, example, common sense and cease- 
less agitation, to rid our country of this social 
and political disgrace. The cause possesses 
a moral basis of transcendent import, and 
is bound on that account to triumph in the 
end. The integrity of our institutions, the 
welfare of our political state, the trampled 
rights of a wronged people, cry out for 
justice." 

"Civilization cannot burn human beings 
alive or justify others to do so," says Ida 
Wells Barnett, "neither can it refuse a trial 
by jury for black men accused of crime, 
without making a mockery of the respect for 
law which is the safeguard of the liberties 
of white men. The nation cannot profess 
Christianity, which makes the golden rule its 
foundation stone, and continue to deny equal 
opportunity for life, liberty and the pursuit 
of happiness to the black race." 

Miss Sophronisba Breckenridge, a Southern 
white woman, writes of discrimination in 
housing in Chicago : 

"It has come about, however, that the small 
minority who cherish their prejudices have 
had the power to make life increasingly hard 
for the black man. To-day they not only 
refuse to sit in the same part of the theatre 
with him and to let him enter a hotel which 
tliey patronize, but they also refuse to allow 
him to live on the same street Avith tliem or 
in the same neighborhood. Even in the North, 
where the city administration does not recog- 
nize a black 'ghetto' or 'pale.' the real-estate 



230 



THE CRISIS 



agents who register and commercialize what 
they suppose to be a universal race preju- 
dice are able to enforce one in practice. It 
is out of this minority persecution that the 
special Negro housing problem has developed. 

"But while it is true that the active perse- 
cution of the Xegro is the work of a small 
minority, its dangerous results are rendered 
possible only by the acquiescence of the great 
majority who Avant fair play. This prejudice 
can be made effective only because of the 
possible use of the city administration, and 
the knowledge that legal action intended to 
safeguard the rights of the Negro is both 
precarious and expensive. The police de- 
partment, however, and the courts of jus- 
tice are, in theory at least, the agents of 
the majority. It comes about therefore 
that while the great body of people desire 
justice, they not only become parties to 
gross injustice, but must be held respon- 
sible for conditions demoralizing to the Negro 
and dangerous to the community as a whole. 

"Those friends of the Negro Avho have tried 
to understand the conditions of life as he 
faces them are very familiar with these facts. 
But it is hoped that those who have been 
ignorant of the heavy costs paid in decent 
family life for the ancient prejudice that 
persists among us will refuse to acquiesce in 
its continuance when the facts are brought 
home to them." 

Dr. George Edmund Haynes, a colored 
teacher, says : 

"A long stride toward securing economic 
justice can be made by the labor unions 
extending a welcome to the Negro. Their 
interests are bound up with the industrial 
freedom of the Negi'o to-day as surely as 
the welfare of the free workingmen before 
the Avar Avas affected by slave labor. Civic 
justice Avill gain great heSdAvay Avhen the 
Negro shares in its administration according 
to his capacity." 

Finally, George Burman Foster, of the 
UniA^ersity of Chicago, puts this last good 
word : 

"What Avill that iinier Avorld of the Negro 
turn out to be .? The Orient gaA'e us religion ; 
Greece, art and philosophy; Rome, law and 
equity; the Anglo-Saxon, science and democ- 
racy. What will be the distinctive contribu- 
tion of the Negro race? Perhaps he is too 
new in the making for us to say. I think 
it will be a marvelous combination of realism 
and idealism, of verity and vision, of earth 



and sky. But especially will he soften and 
lighten our harsh and gloomy Anglo-Saxon 
nature and life, Avarm our cold intellect ualism, 
Avater our emotional aridity Avith the poetry 
and art and song and oratory of his dis- 
tinctive genius. His sensuousness, in the 
good sense of that Avord, Avill supplement and 
rectify our spirituality, Avhich is not ahvays 
a good condition. Flesh helps soul, not less 
' than soul, flesh. We must not forget that 
the flesh can sin against the spirit as Avell 
as the spirit against the flesh. I believe that 
the Negro is going to contribute much to 
the solution of the difflcult problem of the 
ideal relation betAveen sensuousness and 
spirituality." 

To this Ave may add a paragraph from the 
very interesting reminiscences of emancipa- 
tion by the venerable Bishop Turner in the 
A. M. E. Review. He is speaking of Wash- 
ington in 1863 : 

"Seeing such a multitude of people in 
and around my church, I hurriedly went up 
to the office of the first paper in Avhich the 
proclamation of freedom could be printed, 
known as the Evening Star, and squeezed 
myself through the dense crowd that was 
Avaiting for the paper. The first sheet run 
off with the proclamation in it was grabbed 
for by three of us, but some active young 
man got possession of it and fled. The next 
sheet was grabbed for by several, and was 
torn into tatters. The third sheet from the 
press was grabbed for by seA^eral, but I suc- 
ceeded in procuring so much of it as con- 
tained the proclamation, and off I AA'ent for 
life and death. Down Pennsylvania Avenue 
I ran as for my life, and when the people 
saw me coming with the paper in my hand 
they raised a shouting cheer that Avas almost 
deafening. As many as could get around me 
lifted me to a great platform, and I started 
to read the proclamation. I had run the best 
end of a mile, I Avas out of breath, and could 
not read. Mr. Hilton, to whom I handed the 
paper, read it with great force and clearness. 
While he Avas reading eA^ery kind of demon- 
stration and gesticulation Avas going on. Men 
squealed, women fainted, dogs barked, white 
and colored people shook hands, songs were 
sung, and by this time cannons began to fire 
at the navy yard, atid follow in the wake of 
the roar that had for some time been going 
on behind the White House. Every face 
had a smile, and eA'en the dumb animals 
seemed to realize that some extraordinary 



OPINION 



231 



event had taken place. Great processions of 
colored and white men marched to and fro 
and passed in front of the White House and 
congratulated President Lincoln on his proc- 
lamation. The President came to the window 
and made responsive bows, and thousands 
told him, if he would come out of that palace, 
they would hug him to death. Mr. Lincoln, 
however, kept at a safe distance from the 
multitude, Avho were frenzied to distraction 
over his proclamation."' 



THE RIGHT 
TO VOTE. 



It seems that the arrangement 
made in the South to keep 
NegToes from voting by legal 
fraud, and discrimination in favor of 
ignorant white men, is already beginning to 
call for revision. Of course, there are some 
people who are still under the impression 
that Negroes are voting in the South. Not 
so, however, with Senator Bailey, erstwhile 
spokesman of the State of Texas. Mr. 
Bailey said in his swan song (we quote from 
the Congressional Record) : 

"In. the Southern States we not only 
exclude women from all participation in our 
government and thus reduce the formula to 
read that we believe in the rule of the men 
people, but even that must be further quali- 
fied, because everj- Southern State except the 
one from which I come has adopted constitu- 
tional amendments designed to exclude a 
large number of men from all participation 
in the government; and consequently the 
formula, according to the theory and practice 
of the Southern States, must read that they 
are in favor of the rule of the white men 
people." 

Mr. Tillman, of South Carolina, thereupon 
asks the New York World: "Which is bet- 
ter — honest white primaries or corrupt legis- 
latures chosen by Negro voters'?" In the face 
of the last "honest white primary" held in 
South Carolina, this sounds just a bit like a 
joke; and so also does the following pas- 
sage : 

"The number of NegToes of voting age 
in the State exceeds the whites. All of these 
are not eligible to register, but more and more 
are becoming so every day. The ignorance 
and natural depravitj^ of the Negro race 
wholly unfit it to participate in government." 
Now the right to vote in South Carolina 
depends, according to law, on property or 
the ability to read and write. Since when, 
then, have the ignorant and depraved 



Negroes of South Carolina gotten hold of 
enough property and education to allow 
them to vote according to law, and if they 
have, why should they not be allowed to 
exercise this right? The argument would 
seem to be very clear and strong in favor of 
Negro suffrage, but the Brooklyn Eagle has 
this astounding comment : 

"It cannot be questioned that Senator 
Tillman sounds a chord with which wliites, 
because whites, instinctively concur. It is 
not ideal, but it is actual. The actual out- 
classes the ideal in so practical a matter as 
white supremacy and the maintenance of 
white civilization. Nor should it be for- 
gotten that the Negroes most qualified for 
voting, men who can read and write, and 
who acquire property, cultivate land, teacli 
school and learn trades, already can vote in 
the States of their residence in the South." 

If the Eagle does not know that this state- 
ment is false, then it is high time that it 
studied Southern conditions outside of its 
sanctum. It is precisely the "Negroes most 
qualified for voting" that Senator Tillman 
and his ilk are determined to exclude by a 
white primary system to which all whites 
and no Negroes are admitted, and whose 
decision is given the force of law by white 
administrative officers without any reference 
to a real election. 

Some papers like the Spring-field Union 
have not lost their heads in this argument and 
say cogently of the black man : 

"To erect any artificial barrier against 
him on a mere racial gi'ound is simply to 
repeat in another form the mistake which 
the emancipation i^roelamation was designed 
to correct." 

The Birmingham (Ala.) Neivs is quite 
ccmiilacent : 

"Senator Tillman is worrying about the 
possibility of Negro domination in South 
Carolina. That may become a live issue 
there, as well as in Mississippi, where the 
Negroes outnumber the whites. The Senator 
points to the fact that there are 150,000 more 
Negroes than Avhites in the State, and that 
many of them are eligible for registration. 
Forewarned is forearmed. No Southern 
State will tolerate such conditions as existed 
during the reconstruction period, and some 
way will be found to prevent the calamities 
dreaded." 

The Columbia State refuses to believe that 
Negroes are getting enough property to make 



232 



THE CRISIS 



them dangerous. ''We question the census 
figures/" says the Columbia State airily. 

The Cherokee (Okla.) llarmonizer speaks 
up for the disfranchised whites of the South : 

"The Montgomery Advertiser says there 
are over 250,000 white men in Alabama who 
are entitled to qualify themselves as voters 
and urges the vital necessity on the part of 
delinquents of paying their jJoU tax before 
the time limit expires. If the Advertiser and 
other dailies would join the Birmingham 
Age-Herald in demanding the repeal of the 
cumulative feature of the poll-tax law we 
would not be confronted with the shame of 
our small electorate. Thousands of men are 
unable to spare from twelve to fifteen dollars 
for the privilege of easting a ballot, however 
anxious thej' might be." 

But the Montgomery Advertiser is ada- 
mant : 

"While there are men who find it too hard 
to raise the price of a poll-tax receipt, it 
is far better to sacrifice their suffrage than 
to menace white supremacy by tearing down 
one of the great barriers between the ballot 
and the hordes of ignorant and vicious men 
iu this State, not all of whom are black, for 
hundreds of them live in Jefferson County." 

This is democracy in the land of the free, 
and the Des Moines (la.) Capital speaks 
right out like this: 

"The black men of the South have been 
deprived of every political right given to 
them by the Constitution. Thev have no hing 
left but representation in Republican national 
conventions. This privilege they have had 
since the emancipation proclamation. It is 
a sacrifice on the part of Northern Republi- 
cans to thus honor the Negro. But it is a 
sacrifice in the memory of Lincoln and the 
men who fought for freedom. So far as we 
are concerned, we are opposed to taking a 
hundred delegates from the Southern Negroes 
and giving them to States like New York, 
Pennsylvania and Illinois. The hundred 
Negroes would be just as honest and sincere 
as the hundred Avhite men who would take 
their places, from the States having large 
cities." 



Once in a wliile Ihe conspiracv 

MURDER. r. •, • ii <j ii • i I 

or silence in the South is too much 
for the South's conscience. Lately there has 
been some iilain speaking in the South about 
murder. 



The Houston (Tex.) Post says: 

"The overshadowing curse of Texas, of the 
South, of the whole United States, is murder. 
Human life is cheap — about the cheapest 
thing going. The killers kill at their pleasure 
with no fear of punishment. Read the 
editorial from the Birmingham News printed 
elsewhere on this page and see how the thirst 
for human blood exists in Jefferson County, 
Ala. We have the same trouble in Texas 
and it is defying the law, the courts, the 
juries. * * * 

"Manifestly, the only way to reach it is to 
make certain the punishment of those who 
take human life. Now, it seems, the only 
approximate certainty is that murderers will 
not be punished, unless, perhaps, they are 
friendless Negroes without means." 

The editorial in the Birmingham News 
referred to says : 

"The unlawful homicides are as follows: 

"In 1909, 130; in 1910, 138; in 1911, 88; 
in 191'2, 306. 

"It is apparent that the homicides in the 
past year were nearly as many as in the 
three previous years — 306 to 356. The per- 
centage increase is appalling, about 250 per 
cent, over 1908, while the increase of last 
year over that of 1911 is 350 per cent. ! 

"The tabulations are not given by months, 
but it is to be assumed that there was a 
steady average throughout the year. The 
startling fact is that the homicides in Jeffer- 
son County last year averaged one for every 
working day. 

"Why is it that bad men have no fear of 
the law? Because in 1912 only one man, a 
NegTo, was hung for murder ! Because only 
three white men were convicted of murder 
in the first degree, and appeals in their cases 
are still pending! The mills of the gods 
grind slowly enough in Jefferson County, but 
who will say they grind surely?" 

The Ohio State Journal adds : 

"The homicide rate in England and Wales 
is 0.9 per 100,000 population. In this coun- 
try, taking thirty cities North and South, 
it is 8.3 per 100,000 population. In Chicago 
the rate is 9.1 ; in San Francisco, 10.4. In 
the Southern States the rate rises consider- 
ably, being 24.1 at New Orleans, 35.3 at 
Nashville, 37.8 at Savannah, and at Memphis, 
which is the highest, 63.4. The reason the 
rate is so high in the South is that down 
there, whenever a Negro does anything that 
a low-down, vicious white man does, they 
kill him." 



OPINION 



233 



The Mobile Register, after exposing the 
eouvict-lease system in Alabama, gives us 
a hint as to how "low-down" human beings 
are manufactured: 

"For money, then, we endure this debas- 
ing, inhuman, man-killing- process — we of 
Alabama ! In this year of our Saviour, 
1913!" 

Meantime, instead of national protest 
against the ugliest form of murder — lynch- 
ing — we have had a singular chorus of con- 
gratulation, led by Mr. Booker T. Washing- 
ton, on the fact that "only 64" human beings 
have been lynched in the United States dur- 
ing 1912 1 This has been heralded as the 
"lessening" of lynching. It is, of course, 
nothing of the sort. There were more lyneh- 
ings in 1912 than in 1911; there were more 
lynchings in the last five years than in the 
previous five-year period, and while, of 
course, we have not equaled again the awful 
record from 1890 to 1895, nevertheless it 
still is, as the Presbyterian Advance of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., says : "An impeachment of our 
civilization." 

The Mobile Register and some other 
Southern papers think that they see a cor- 
rection of lynching in the fact that a poor, 
friendless Xegro the other day was arrested, 
indicted, tried and convicted and sentenced 
to be hanged in seven hours. This ease may 
not go down on the lynching record, but its 
difference from lynching is not large enough 
to cause us any feeling of uplift. 



The assumption of those who wisli 
^ ' to creep into the heaven of democ- 
racy by the back stairs of making serfs of 
colored men, is that their chance to work and 
accumulate property has always been, and 
always will be, unquestioned since 1863; 
and that this is especiallj' true in the South. 
We append a few statements to show what 
a half truth this is. The Masses, for 
instance, says of conditions of Georgia: 

"White men of Northern Georgia have 
banded together in a conspiracy to drive out 
the Negroes. They slink out at night and 
paste threats of death on the doors of black 
families — death, if they aren't out of the 
county in twenty-four hours. There have 
been enough hTichings in that vicinity to 
prove they mean business, and the Negroes 
are leaving, by the hundreds. Many of them 
are deserting property — real estate and 



chattels that were the savings of a lifetime. 
This is what you call 'race war.' " 

The Miami (Fla.) Herald has this bit of 
advice to Northerners who come South: 

"It is true that white mechanics object to 
working alongside of a colored man. It is 
true that white mechanics object to taking 
orders on any subject from a colored man. 
It is true that the white man is at a dis- 
advantage as to wages when he is compelled 
to compete with a colored man. It is true, 
especially in garages, that the presence of 
some members of the colored race is very 
unprofitable to other workmen. All these 
things are acknowledged facts, and cannot 
be changed, at least for the present. 

"Locally, this community is in favor of 
the white man, and does not desire to see 
the operative in a garage placed under any 
of the embarrassments or disadvantages 
which would come from being compelled to 
associate with and receive orders from 
colored chauffeurs. 

"The best way for those who have been 
employing colored drivers in other com- 
munities to do would be to arrange to bring 
white chauffeurs while automobiling in this 
section of the South." 

Turning to the North, we have this testi- 
mony from the Congregationalist : 

"Christian people in the North are send- 
ing their money into the South to help edu- 
cate the NegTo there. It is a worthy cause 
and those who can spare the money ought to 
send more. But what are our people doing 
for the NegTO in the North? They are edu- 
cating colored children just as they educate 
white children in the best of public schools, 
they are firing the heart of the young Negro 
with ambition, they are fitting him for 
industrial business and professional life. 

'^And then — they are denying him an 
opportunity to do the work for which he 
has been trained." 

The Cincinnati Times-Star publishes this 
comjDlaint : 

"We have ])ractising now in the city of 
Cincinnati nine colored physicians among a 
population of 25,000 Negroes. Certainly it 
seems no more than reasonable that they 
sliould have a right to gain that hospital 
experience at the public expense, as does the 
white doctor in our public hospital. It has 
been said to me by members of our hospital 
staff that the white nurses in the hospital 
would not work on the service with colored 



234 



THE CRISIS 



staff doctors. This is where 1 think the 
present condition of the lack of nurses has 
its strongest argument in favor of colored 
nurses in the hospital service." 

The Montgomery Advertise)- puts this 
argument into the mouth of the Southern 
land owner: 

"I own 5,000 acres of the richest land in 
the State. I live in town and find it difficult 
to spend the rents realized from this land, 
land which is cultivated by NegTo hands or 
tenants. I love to conduct a store on that 
plantation, sell a plug of tobacco to this 
NegTo, lend this one a quarter, have this one 
to hitch up my horse, and that one to do 
this. I love to hear the darkies sing and see 
them dance; I love to see them plow in the 
spring of the year and watch them picking 
cotton in the fall. I like to sympathize with 
them in their troubles and laugh with them 
in their pleasures. Negro labor is cheap. 
My profits are easy. To run my business on 
this scale, though an old plan, and perhaps 
not the thing best for the State at large, is 
my jox. I would rather live that way than 
any other way. Why should I sell my land, 
when my natural desire is to buy as much 
more of it as I can ?" 

On the other hand, it is perfectly clear that 
the XegTO is accumulating property in spite 
of his handicap. 

The Star of Zion, for instance, pub- 
lishes extracts from the report of the North 
Carolina State tax commissioner, and says : 

''The commission having made no gTand 
total, we have done so for the benefit of our 
readers and find that Negroes own 1,424,943 
acres of land, not counting town lots, and 
pay taxes on a grant total of $29,982,328 of 
real and personal property. It should be 
known also that the rate of assessment is 
about 40 per cent. This will indicate that 
Negroes own $70,000,000 of real and personal 
property in North Carolina. The report 
shows that in some counties, among them 
Madison, where the Negro population is 
small, no separate list is given. 

"There are a little less than 1,000,000 
Negroes in this State and the showing above 
mentioned is certainly a creditable one." 

Just what this means is well shown bj' the 
Boston Globe: 

"The Negro is land hungTy. Despite the 
fact that he is compelled to pay exorbitant 
prices for every acre, and on account of his 
lack of capital has to carry a heavy mort- 



gage at S per cent., he goes on buying small 
farms." 

A Southern "journalist" writes: 
"When the Negro makes cotton at four 
cents the pound and the white man who 
hires labor makes it at nine cents the pound, 
there can be no question as to Avhich must 
ultimately succumb. The small Avhite 
planter sooner or later either labors in his 
own fields or gives up the fight. He goes to 
the city and his lands go to the people who 
are economically able to make a living out 
of them. Even the white farmers, who do 
their own work, find competition with the 
Negro increasingly difficult and this in spite 
of the fact that the Negro is not a scientific 
farmer. If statistics could truly tell the 
story they would show that a greater and 
greater proportion of the cotton crop each 
year is being made by the Negro for him- 
self, and more and more of it on land to 
which he holds title. Even thirty years 
ago the amount of cotton produced in the 
sea islands of South Carolina by NegToes 
for themselves was insignificant, yet it is 
estimated to-day that at least half of the 
sea-island cotton of South Carolina, the 
finest cotton in the world, is grown by 
Negroes, partly on rented land and partly 
on land of their own. The Negro owner of 
a small farm is- in a position economically 
impregnable. Where cotton at eight cents 
the pound would spell ruin to his white 
neighbor, it means a real profit to him. 
Lands, therefore, have more value for him 
than for anybody else, and that is why he 
is getting possession of them." 

Thus we see that the Negro land owner, 
like the NegTo wage earner, gets his chance 
by undercutting the market. This sort of 
thing has its limits as well as its dangers. 



Out in Kansas where the bless- 
m OUR OWN .^gg ^f ^.^.g^ schools, with 

■ their attendant equal oppor- 
tunities for the Negro boy and girl, made 
jim-crowism an unthought-of proposition 
until Mr. W. T. Vernon came into the State 
and advocated his scheme of segregation, a 
bill has been introduced to prohibit inter- 
marriages between whites and blacks. One 
J. Silas Harris, head of an alleged National 
Negro Educational Congress — a fake — and 
who teaches in a two or three-room Negro 
school in Kansas City, Mo., and who, inci- 
dentally, is a candidate for the Liberian 



OPINION 



235 



ministership under Mr. Wilson, has written 
the author of the bill, praismg the author 
and the bill, and advocating its passage. We 
quote his letter: 

"My Dear Sir: 1 think both of your bills 
are timely and to the point. Their passage 
will in time prove a blessing to both races. 
No sensible Negro will object, nor will any 
honest white man oppose their becoming 
laws. 

''As a Negro, I am in favor of any honest 
measure that will create a more friendly 
relation between the black and white man. 
As president of the Negro State Teachers' 
Association of Missouri, I unhesitatingly 
favor both of your bills. 
• "Yours truly, 

• "J. Silas Harris. 

'•p. S. — You may let the press know where 
I stand.'' 

Any Negro w-ho advocates the passage of 
such a bill only makes it easy to pass some 
other restrictive measure. Any Negro Avho 
urges the passage of "Jim Crow" bills is un- 
worthy to be identified with the Negro race. 
— Washington Bee. 



Two extracts from South African 
AFRICA., uative papers throw^ sinister light 
on conditions. A. P. 0. says: 

"Look fairly at the scramble for what is 
regarded as worldly wealth. It is brutal. It 
is anything but flattering to a highly civilized 
nation. The economic struggle is humanly 
degrading. Every one is seeking to steal 
out of the scramble as soon as he can snatch 
up a big enough bone, and, doglike, sneak 
Away and selfishly enjoy it. But, thank 
Heaven, the bone is dropped frequently, and 
again the human predatory beast has to go 
back into the scramble. No; whites do not 
work for work's sake. Their object is to 
avoid W'Ork, and every improvement even in 
industrial appliances or organization is 
nothing but an attempt to obviate or reduce 
the necessity for work. 'Teach the Nigger 
to work' is a pretty doctrine. It simply 
means 'teach him to do the menial work that 
I don't want to do.' It does not mean teach 
him to work so that he may imi^rove his 
environment. It is selfish in its basis, not 
philanthropic, and is bound to fail ere long. 

"We are thus writing with the object of 
letting the public know that it is impossible 
to fool the colored and natives much longer. 
We have alwavs contended that an absolute 



bar to full political enfranchisement is im- 
possible of maintenance, and we have re- 
peatedly expressed the hope that such bar 
will be removed ere it is too late. The 
satisfaction of the just ambitions of the 
colored and natives for full political rights 
will not disturb the tranquillity of the State, 
but is infinitely associated with its safety and 
gTeatness, Racial pride and prejudice can- 
not very long refuse to grant that satisfac- 
tion. But much more do such contentions 
apply in the economic and industrial world. 
Watertight compartments in the industrial 
world are more impracticable than in the 
political world, and this even the leaders of 
the labor movement must recognize." 

Mochochonono, from Basutoland, says : 

"If they (the missionaries) employ in their 
service these' men they have trained and 
civilized, what do they give them? Prac- 
tically nothing. It is no M'onder, therefore, 
that £60 per annum, got by a few natives, 
should be regarded as a very high wage for 
a sound educated native by an utter igno- 
rant white, and it is no wonder that so many 
such natives get into ignominious debts. 
And when they are in such a- deplorable 
state of life, you will hear the missionaries 
saying that natives are untrustworthy; some 
of them run into debts Avhich thej'^ are 
afterward unable to honor. 

"Let the promoters of our oppressive life 
practice what they preach and the world will 
sooner or later see the right. 

"Some of the missionaries get a round sum 
of £300, but tell the natives that 'you will 
get your remuneration in the world to 
come.' Do they (the missionaries) not 
expect anything in the world to come?" 

That a few Englishmen are realizing the 
situation in South Africa is shown by an 
address of the bishop of Pretoria : 

"History had proved again and again that 
when a people wanted to develop, nothing, 
in the long run, could prevent it from doing 
so. Things were not the same as they were 
twenty years ago. The natives were emerg- 
ing into a sense of nationality that would 
have been tliought impossible fifty years ago. 
The white man could not go on forever 
legislating for the black man without any 
sort of regard for the black man's opinions. 
The black man had opinions, and it was the 
duty of the white man to discover a means 
by which they could find adequate and 
timely expression." 




EDITORIAL 





AN OPEN 



WOODROW 




to 
the 

the 
the 



LETTER TO 

WILSON. 
IR: 

Your inauguration 
the Presidency of 
United States is to 
colored people, to 
white South and to the 
nation a momentous occasion. For the 
first time since the emancipation of 
slaves the government of this nation — 
the Presidency, the Senate, the House 
of Representatives and, practically, the 
Supreme Court — passes on the 4th 
of March into the hands of the party 
which a half century ago fought des- 
perately to keep black men as real estate 
in the eyes of the law. 

Your elevation to the chief magistracy 
of the nation at this time shows not sim- 
ply a splendid national faith in the per- 
petuity of free government in this land, 
but even more, a personal faith in you. 
We black men by our votes helped to 
put you in your high position. It is 
true that in your overwhelming triumph 
at the polls you might have succeeded 
without our aid, but the fact remains 
that our votes helped elect you this 
time, and that the time may easily come 
in the near future when without our 
500,000 ballots neither you nor your 
party can control the government. 

True as this is, we would not be mis- 
understood. "We do not ask or expect 
special consideration or treatment in re- 
turn for our franchises. We did not 
vote for you and your party because 
you represented our best judgment. It 
was not because we loved Democrats 
more, but Republicans less and Roosevelt 
.least, that led to our action. 



Calmly reviewing our action we are 
glad of it. It "was a step toward politi- 
cal independence, and it was helping to 
put into power a man who has to-day 
the power to become the greatest bene- 
factor of his country since Abraham 
Lincoln. 

We say this to you, sir, advisedly. 
We believe that the Negro problem is in 
many respects the greatest problem fac- 
ing the nation, and we believe that you 
have the opportunity of beginning a 
just and righteous solution of this burn- 
ing human wrong. This opportunity is 
yours because, while a Southerner in 
birth and tradition, you have escaped 
the provincial training of the South and 
you have not had burned into your soul 
desperate hatred and despising of your 
darker fellow men. 

You start then where no Northerner 
could start, and perhaps your only real 
handicap is peculiar lack of personal 
acquaintance with individual black men, 
a lack which is the pitiable cause of 
much social misery and hurt. A presi- 
dent of Harvard or Columbia would 
have known a few black men as men. 
It is sad that this privilege is denied 
a president of Princeton, sad for him 
and for his students. 

But waiving this, you face no insolu- 
ble problem. The only time when the 
Negro problem is insoluble is when men 
insist on settling it wrong by asking 
absolutely contradictory things. You 
cannot make 10,000,000 people at one 
and the same time servile and dignified, 
docile and self-reliant, servants and in- 
dependent leaders, segregated and yet 
part of the industrial organism, disfran- 
chised and citizens of a democracy, igno- 



EDITORIAL 



237 



rant and intelligent. This is impossible 
and the impossibility is not factitious ; 
it is in the very nature of things. 

On the other hand, a determination on 
the part of intelligent and decent Amer- 
icans to see that no man is denied a 
reasonable chance for life, liberty and 
happiness simply because of the color 
of his skin is a simple, sane and prac- 
tical solution of the race problem in 
this land. The education of colored 
children, the opening of the gates of 
industrial opportunity to colored work- 
ers, absolute equalitj^ of all citizens be- 
fore the law, the civil rights of all 
decently behaving citizens in places of 
public accommodation and entertain- 
ment, absolute impartiality in the 
granting of the right of suffrage — these 
things are the bedrock of a just solution 
of the rights of man in the American 
Eepublic. 

Nor does this solution of color, race 
and class discrimination abate one jot 
or tittle the just fight of humanity 
against crime, ignorance, inefficiency and 
the right to choose one's own wife and 
dinner companions. 

Against this plain straight truth the 
forces of hell in this country are fight- 
ing a terrific and momentarily success- 
ful battle. You may not realize this, 
Mr. Wilson. To the quiet walls of 
Princeton where no Negro student is 
admitted the noise of the fight and the 
reek of its blood may have penetrated 
but vaguely and dimly. 

But the fight is on. and you, sir, are 
this month stepping into its arena. Its 
virulence will doubtless surprise you 
and it may scare you as it scared one 
"William Howard Taft. But we trust 
not ; we think not. 

First you will be urged to surrender 
your conscience and intelligence in these 
matters to the keeping of your Southern 
friends. They "know the Negro." as 
they will continually tell you. And this 
is true. They do know "the Negro," 
but the question for you to settle is 



whether or not the Negro whom they 
know is the real Negro or the Negro 
of their vivid imaginations and violent 
prejudices. 

Whatever Negro it is that your South- 
ern friends know, it is your duty to 
know the real Negro and know him per- 
sonally. This will be no easy task. The 
embattled Bourbons, from the distin- 
guished Blease to the gifted Hoke 
Smith, will evince grim determination 
to keep you from contact with anj- col- 
ored person. It will take more than 
general good will on your part to foil 
the wide conspiracy to make Negroes 
known to their fellow Americans not as 
flesh and blood but as beasts of fiction. 

You must remember that the ability, 
sincerity and worth of one-tenth of the 
population of your country will be abso- 
lutely veiled from you unless you make 
effort to lift the veil. When you make 
that effort, then more trouble will follow. 
If you tell your Southern friends that 
you have discovered that the internal 
revenue of New York is well collected 
and administered, they are going to re- 
gard you in pained surprise. Can a 
Negro administer! they will exclaim, 
ignoring the fact that he does. 

But it is not the offices at your dis- 
posal. President Woodrow Wilson, that 
is the burden of our great cry to you. 
We want to be treated as men. We 
want to vote. We want our children 
educated. AVe want lynching stopped. 
We want no longer to be herded as cat- 
tle on street cars and railroads. We want 
the right to earn a living, to own our 
own property and to spend our income 
unhindered and uncursed. Your power 
is limited? We know that, but the 
power of the American people is unlim- 
ited. To-day you embody that power, 
you typify its ideals. In the name then 
of that common country for which your 
fathers and ours have bled and toiled, 
be not untrue. President Wilson, to the 
highest ideals of American Democracy. 
Respectfully yours. 

The Crisis. 



238 



THE CRISIS 




THE WOMEN'S COMMITTEE. 

COMMITTEE of colored 
women, headed hy Mrs. 
Carrie Clifford, of Wash- 
ington, is raising a fund 
of $1,000, which is to be 
used in making The 
Crisis beautiful, and in general for 
the encouragement of Negro art. It 
is due to this fund, already in part 
paid in, that we were enabled' to 
present the Christmas cover, the Christ- 
mas cards and the calendar. Strictly 
as commercial investments such efforts 
do not pay, but their spiritual influence 
has been tremendous, and they have 
been widely commended. We are glad 
of this opportunity to do more of such 
work, to encourage young artists and to 
make the colored people realize how 
beautiful their OAvn rich, soft coloring is. 
We take this opportunity to thank Mrs. 
Clifford and her committee. 

THE PROPER WAY. 

HE editor of the Cleveland 
Gazette names three 
main points of attack 
for any national asso- 
ciation which aims to 
help colored people : 

1. Disfranchisement. 

2. Interstate "Jim Crow" cars. 

3. Lynchings. 

This is perfectly true, and the Na- 
tional Association for the Advancement 
of Colored People recognizes this and 
is straining every nerve to attack these 
evils. As to disfranchisement we are 
making every effort to get the proper 
case before the Supreme Court. We 
have already helped by briefs and con- 
tributions the Oklahoma case, and when 
it comes before the court we have offered 
the services of tAvo of the most eminent 
lawyers in the United States. We are 
represented on the counsel of the Missis- 
sippi "Jim Crow" case; the briefs are 
being examined by our lawyers, and we 
are making every effort to get the ques- 
tion before the court in the right way. 




But the Gazette should know that 
cases before the Supreme Court are deli- 
cate matters. It does not do to rush 
into court with any haphazard ease. If 
anj^one has a case or knows of a case 
which will bring out the proper points 
we should be glad to have it. Theoret- 
ically, it would seem very easy to settle 
such matters. Practically, it is very 
hard, but we propose to keep at it. 

As to lynching, there are four things 
to do : Publish the facts, appeal to the 
authorities, agitate publicity and employ 
detectives. Every one of these things 
we have done. The Crisis publishes the 
facts monthly over the protest of sensi- 
tive readers. We have sent telegrams 
and appeals to governors, sheriffs and 
the President ; we have held mass meet- 
ings; we' have sent distinguished writers 
and investigators; we have secured pub- 
licity in prominent magazines, and we 
spent thousands of dollars in putting 
Burns' detectives on the Coatesville 
matter. What else can we do? We 
want suggestions. Meantime we shall 
keep up our present agitation. 

Some folk seem to imagine that the 
walls of caste and prejudice in America 
will fall at a blast of the trumpet, if 
the blast be loud enough. Consequently, 
v/hen an association like the National 
Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People does something, they 
say querulously : ' ' But nothing has hap- 
pened." They ought to say: Nothing 
has yet happened, for that is true and 
that is expected. If in fifty or a hun- 
dred years The Crisis can point to a 
distinct lessening of disfranchisement, 
and an undoubted reduction of lynch- 
ing, and more decent traveling accom- 
modations, this will be a great, an enor- 
mous accomplishment. Would God all 
this could be done to-morrow, but this 
is not humanly possible. 

What is possible to-day and to- 
morrow and every day is to keep up 
necessary agitation, make unfaltering 
protest, fill the courts and legislatures 
and executive chambers, and keep ever- 



EDITORIAL 



239 




lastingly at the work of protest in 
season and out of season. The weak 
and silly part of the program of those 
■vvho deprecate complaint and agitation 
is that a moment's let up, a moment's 
acquiescence, means a chance for the 
Avolves of prejudice to get at our necks. 
It is not that we have too many organi- 
zations : it is that we have too few effect- 
ive workers in the great cause of Negro 
emancipation in America. Let us from 
this movement join in a frontal attack 
on disfranchiseemnt, ''Jim Crow" cars 
and lynching. We shall not win to- 
day or to-morrow, but some day we 
shall win if we faint not. 



THE EXPERTS. 

OR deep insight and 
superb brain power com.- 
mend us to Dr. Ulrich 
B. Phillips, of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 
Phillips is white and 
Southern, but he has a Northern job and 
he knows all about the Negro. He has 
recently been talking to the students of 
the University of Virginia, and he dis- 
closed some powerful reasoning faculties. 
Consider this, for instance : 

"To compare Negro efficiency in cot- 
ton production before and since the 
war, it is necessary to select districts 
where no great economic change has 
occurred except the abolition of slavery 
— where there has been no large intro- 
duction of commercial fertilizers, for 
example, and no great ravages by the 
bolhveevil. A typical area for our pur- 
pose is the Yazoo delta in Northwestern 
Mississippi. Jn four typical counties 
there — Tunica, Coahonia, Bolivar and 
Issaquena — in which the Negro popula- 
tion numbers about 90 per cent, of the 
whole, the per capita output of cotton 
in 1860 was two and one-third bales of 
500 pounds each, while in 1910 and other 
average recent years it was only one 
and one-half bales per capita. That is 
to say, the efficiency of the Negroes has 



declined 35 per cent. A great number 
of other black-belt counties indicate a 
similar decline. 

"On the other hand, the white dis- 
tricts throughout the cotton belt, and es- 
pecially in Texas, Oklahoma and Western 
Arkansas, have so greatly increased their 
cotton output that more than half of the 
American cotton crop is now clearly pro- 
duced by white labor. Other data of 
wide variety confirm this view of Negro 
industrial decadence and white indus- 
trial progress." 

We are delighted to learn all this, for 
in the dark days of' our college 
economics we were taught that it was 
labor and land, together, that made a 
crop ; and that worn-out land and good 
labor would make an even poorer crop 
than rich land and poor labor. It seems 
that we were grie^•ously in error. This 
is apparently true only of white labor. 
If you wish to judge tvhite labor, judge 
it by the results on rich Texas and 
Oklahoma prairies, with fertilizers and 
modern methods; if, on the other hand, 
you would judge Negro labor, slink into 
tlie slavery-cursed Mississippi bottoms 
where the soil has been raped for a cen- 
tury ; and be careful even there ; pick out 
counties where there has been "no large 
introduction of commercial fertilizers," 
and where debt peonage is firmly planted 
under the benevolent guardianship of 
Alfred G. Stone and his kind. Then, 
rolling your eyes and lifting protesting 
hands, point out that, Avhereas the slave 
drivers of 1860 wrung 1,200 pounds of 
cotton from the protesting earth, the lazy 
blacks are able ("with no large intro- 
duction- of commercial fertilizers") to 
get but 700 pounds for their present 
white masters. Hence a decline in 
ef^ciency of "35 per cent." Why, pray, 
35 per cent.? Why not 50 or 75 per 
cent.? And why again are these par- 
ticular counties so attractive to this 
expert? It is because Issaquena 
County, for instance, spends $1 a year 
to educate each colored child enrolled in 
its schools, and enrolls about half its 



240 



THE CRISIS 



black children in schools of three 
months ' duration or less ? 

Astute? Why, we confidently expect 
to see Phillips at the head of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture if he keeps on at 
this rapid rate. Not that it takes brains 
to head our Department of Agriculture 
(perish the assumption!), but that it 
does call for adroitness in bolstering up 
bad cases. 

And the bad case which the South is 
bolstering to-day must make the gods 
scream. Take this same State of Miss- 
issippi, for instance, where Negroes are 
so futile and • inefficient : the property 
which they own and rent was worth 
$86,000,000 in 1900. In 1910 it was 
worth $187,000,000! 

"That, of course," says the Manufac- 
turers' Record, of Baltimore, being 
strong put to it to nullify such ugly 
figures, "is a merely flat statement and 
takes no account of the character of the 
holdings, whether burdened with mort- 
gages or otherwise, and no account of 
what is being, done with the holdings, 
especially land. ' ' 

And then this masterly sheet bewails 
the fact that "Intrusion, in the guise 
of special care for the Negroes, of in- 
fluences bitterly hostile to the whites of 
the South, 'loosened the ties of sympathy 



and interest of the Southern whites and 
the Negroes and alienated the second 
generation of both races from each other. 
In that the Negroes lost much' of the 
advantages their fathers had had in 
close contact with the directing uiinds 
of the South, and the results must be 
considered in studying Negro progress. ' ' 

The late William H. Baldwin, Jr., 
used to affirm that a few more genera- 
tions of that "close contact with the 
directing minds of the South" would 
have left the whole South mulatto ! But 
the Record ends with this master stroke : 

"Another point to be borne in mind 
in measuring progress is the fact that 
the property of nearly 12,000,000 
Negroes in the United States to-day has 
a value less than half the value that 
3,954,000 of them in slavery, or 90 per 
cent, of their total number in the 
country, represented in 1860, at an aver- 
age value of $600 each." 

Frankly, can you beat that ? 

A QUESTION to the thoughtful 
"^ people of South Carolina : 

"Would you stand to-daj^ disgraced 
in the eyes of the civilized world by your 
governor had you allowed the Negroes 
of vour State to vote ? ' ' 



MY LOVE 

By FENTON JOHNSON 



Young gallant from the fairer race of men. 

Have you a love as comely as the maid 
To Avhom I chant my lyre-strung passion 
songs? 
Has she large eyes that gleam from out the 
shade, 
And voice as low as when Ohio's stream 
Glides silently along a summer dream? 



Her face is golden like the setting sun, 
Her teeth as white as January's snow, 

Her smile is like a gleam from Paradise, 
Her laugh the sweetest music that 
know, 

And all the wide, wide world is but a mite 

When she, my darling elf. is in my sight. 



Let Sorrow wring the blood from out my 
heart, 

Let Melancholy be my daily book, 
Let all the earth be like a sinner's grave, 

And let my wand'ring spirit never look 
LTpon the Kingdom if my damozel 
From out my soul the charm of love dispel. 




03IIIIIIIIIIIICO]lllllllillllC03llllllllllll[03IIIIIIIIIIIIQIIIIIIIIIIIICO 
^^ • tz 

I Mildred Porter s | 
I Position I 

I By B. G. HULL I 

— = 

5]llllllllllll[03IIIIIIIIIIIIC03llllllllllltC03llllllllllliailllllllllllCO 

'THINK these gowns with 
those you sold me last week 
will carry me through the 
winter. Do you know you 
are a great comfort to me?" 
The speaker was Mrs. 
Seymour, society woman, famous for her 
wealth and beauty. 

"I am glad that I am of service to you, 
Mrs. Seymour," replied Miss Porter, the 
little brunette saleswoman in the imported- 
gown department of Gable & Co., dry-goods 
merchants. 

Then she continued : ''Before I came here 
1 used to assist mother, who was one of the 
best dressmakers in New York until her 
health failed her." 

"That accounts for your charming taste. 
Well, good-by, I shall not see you again 
until spring, as I am leaving in a few days 
for the South," and Mrs. Seymour hurried 
out to her waiting limousine. 

The firm of Gable & Co. took much pride 
in the fact that Mrs. Seymour was numbered 
among their patrons, and Mr. Adrien Gable, 
senior member of the firm, would have been 
surprised to know that it was due to Miss 
Porter's efficiency that this valued customer 
had become a patron of his store, which she 
entered first quite through accident. 

Miss Porter had finished jotting down in 
her book the record of the large sale she had 
just made, when, looking up from her 
figures, she saw a pleasant-faced colored 
lady looking at her with a friendly smile. 

"Mildred," said the old lady, "how do you 
do? I saw your mother at church last 
Sunday. She told me you were working 
here. How do you like it? I am so glad you 
have such a nice place. Ain't it too bad that 
more of our girls can't get places like this?" 




"Oh, Mrs Jones, I am so glad to see you!" 
Mildred exclaimed, shaking hands cordially. 
"Yes, I like this work very much; there is so 
much to see and do. The day passes so 
quickly it does not seem like work at all." 

•The old lady replied joyfully: "It shows 
that colored people can do anything if they 
get the chance. Well, good-by, dear, remem- 
ber me to your mother. I was downstairs 
and thought I would come up and see you." 
The kindly old soul went her way, little 
knowing the tempest she had stirred up for 
Mildred; for, of course, some of Mildred's 
fellow clerks had overheard all and had 
listened with incredulous ears. They could 
hardly wait for the old lady to get out of 
hearing before they were clustered together, 
and then one sauntered over to Mildred. 
"Mildred, are you a colored girl ? Surely you 
are not. What did she mean?" 

"Oh, yes," said Mildred sweetly, "I'm 
colored— didn't you know it?" There was a 
hurried consultation among the clerks and 
some were for reporting the matter at once. 
But Mildred was a favorite and the girls 
were at bottom good hearted ; so they decided 
to forget all about it. 

However, some one other than they had 
heard, for Miss Briggs, head of the depart- 
ment, had been behind a rack, tagging some 
dresses, when good old Mrs. Jones had her 
conversation. 

]\Iiss Briggs was one of that class whose 
knowledge of colored people comes from 
headlines in dkily papers and she claimed 
some very aristocratic Southern friends out 
of work hours. "The idea — a Nigger," said 
oMiss Briggs, as she stormed down to (lie 
manager. 



242 



THE CRISIS 



"When she returned to her department she 
told Mildred that the manager wished to 
see her. 

"Just as soon as I replace these dresses," 
Mildred answered. 

"Well, what did I tell you," she demanded 
of her particular chum, Nora Casey. "I'll 
bet Miss Briggs heard the whole thing." 

"Don't you mind, dear," the warm-hearted 
Irish ^rl replied. "Sure they know you are 
the best salesgirl in the store. There's 
customers by the dozen that won't have any 
one serve them but you, so don't be alarmed, 
there's nothing to it." 

"I hope not, Xora. I can do almost any- 
thing and I'm not afraid of work, but it 
takes time to get jobs, and mother is not 
very well. I have just got to keep busy; I 
really can't afford to be idle a single day.'* 

Mildred closed the cases and repaired to 
the manager's office. 

The manager looked at her severely. "Ai'e 
you colored?" he blurted out. 

"Yes," said Miss Porter. 

"Why didn't you say so?"' 

"You didn't ask." 

He fidgeted and reddened. 

"Well, we can't keep you — j^ou know we 
can't keep you," he said finally. 

"Why not?" 

"Because we can't. What would our 
customers say if they found out?" 

"Have any customers complained?" 

"Oh, you're an all-right saleswoman. Miss 
Briggs says you are the best of the bunch 
and I'll give you a first-class recommenda- 
tion. But you can't stay here and that 
settles it. Here's your pay and two weeks 
in advance." 

jMildred went out without another word 
and did her work well that afternoon from 
force of habit, but her soul was in turmoil. 

That night she told her mother, and the 
good woman tried to comfort her as only a 
mother can. 

"Never mind, daughter, and don't blame 
poor Mrs. Jones. It was honest pride that 
caused her to speak to you." 

"Of course it was, mother, and I was 
truly glad to see her. I should have 
despised myself forever if I had tried to 
avoid her. But the trouble is now I must 
have work — and, oh, it's sb cruel ; I did 
try so hard to do well." And the girl crept 
into her mother's arms and wept. 



Now it happened that after due considera- 
tion, Mrs. Seymour had come to the conclu- 
sion that a seventh gown was absolutely 
necessary to her happiness in Bermuda. 
Early next morning, therefore, she few to 
Gable & Co.'s and rushed up to the imported 
gowns. 

"Miss Porter — where's Miss Porter?" she 
demanded imperiously. 

Miss Briggs fluttered and pretended to 
search, but could only find Nora Casey. Nora 
tried unsuccessfully to wait on the ladj^ and 
during her trials she blurted out the truth 
about Mildred Porter. 

"But that is perfectly ridiculous!" Mrs. 
Seymour exclaimed. "The idea of such a 
thing. What earthly difference does it make 
if she is colored? I thank you for telling me. 
I can see that you are fond of her. I'll get 
you both places where your services and my 
patronage will be appreciated." 

The next day the firm of Gable & Co. 
received a letter which set the call bells ring- 
ing all over the store, for Mrs. Seymour was 
a customer whose business amounted to 
several thousand dollars a year. 

The manager of the gown department did 
not wait for the elevator; he just fell up the 
stairs, nearly killing a cashgirl who got in 
his way. 

"Do I understand," demanded the head of 
the firm, red with anger, "Do I understand 
that you have discharged a young lady whose 
record shows that she has been with us 
more than a year, and one who is so capable 
that a lady of Mrs. Seymour's wealth with- 
draws her patronage from us on account of 
her discharge? You have two things to do at 
once. Get that girl back in her department 
and get Mrs. Seymour to reconsider her 
determination to withdraw her patronage 

from this firm, or — or " but the manager 

was gone. 

Mrs. Seymour received a letter by special 
messenger that night which assured her that 
she was mistaken. That, as a matter fact, 
"Miss Porter has been promoted and is now 
in charge of our imported-gown depart- 
ment in place of Miss Briggs, who . has 
resigned. Hoping that this will meet your 
approbation and that we may enjoy your 
continued success, we are," etc., etc. 

Mrs. Seymour's limousine was seen in front 
of Gable & Co.'s the next day. 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 



THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

THE annual meeting of llie association 
was well attended. Mr. J. E. Milholland 
presided. Among the well-known members 
present were Mrs. Fanny Garrison Villard, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Loud, Miss Irene 
Lewisohn, Mr. Leslie Hill, Dr. N. F. Mos- 
sell, Rev. J. Milton Waldron, Mr. Charles 
A. Boston, Mr. Wilson M. Powell, Jr., Mr. 
and j\Irs. George R. Seligman, Mrs. Lillian 
Wal ', Mrs. Florence Kelly and many others. 

The ^; s o?_ honor were Mr. H. 0. Tan- 
ner, tii^ iitist, nnd hi., wife. After the 
business ses^'ju xlir •..eeting adjourned to the 
offices of the ;iss(>. aticn, where the mem- 
bers and gucsts wci '- eiven an opportunity 
to meet Mr. and Zi rs. Vanner. Exhibits of 
the art rj v- May Howard Jackson, of 
Wasl'i ,_,.„ii, and the recent work of Richard 
Brown were much admired. The associa- 
tion was particiTlarly indebted to Mr. Harry 
Roseland, who lent us for this occasion his 
painting, "To the Highest Bidder," which 
has won many 'u-t prizes in this country, 
and for which \,e has been offered substantial 
suras abroad. 

The following members were elected to the 
board of directors: Mr. George W. Craw- 
ford, New Haven ; Mr. Thomas Ewing, Jr., 
New York; Mr. Paul Kennaday, New York; 
Mr. Joseph l . Loud, Boston ; Dr. William 
A. Sinclair, Philadel^)hia; Miss Lillian D. 
Wald, New York; V.ev. G. R. Waller, Balti- 
more; Mr. Charles H. Studin, New York; 
Mrs. Max Morgent ^ lau, Jr., New York; Mr. 
Wilson M. Powel). Jr., New York; Dr. V. 
Morton Jones. ^Tew York; Rev. Hutchins C. 
Bishop, New York. 

At the meeting of the board of directors 
held immediately at the close of the annual 
meeting of the corporation the same officers 
were re-elected for another year. 

The chairman of the board of directors 
outlined the work of the year, dwelling par- 
ticularly on the work of organization, legal 



redress and pul)licity. There were reports 
by other officers and committees. Four 
branches — New York, Philadelphia, Boston 
and Washington — reported through repre- 
sentatives. Members had a treat in the 
address of. Dr. Hammond, a white South- 
erner and president of a colored college in 
Augusta, Ga. Speaking of education, he said: 

"Sometimes people ask us: 'Why don't you 
make us better cooks and better field hands?' 
^^'e say to them we are not concerned what 
our graduates shall become; we are trying to 
make better men and women of them. We 
want them to be all that God intended them 
to be when He put personality into them. 
"There is a good deal of humbuggery and 
cry of Southern people against social equal- 
ity, and as I have said to my people — per- 
haps I could say it better than some of you 
could — what we Southern people want more 
than anything else on the part of the Negroes 
is social equality. We want the Negro to 
be our equal in all the social arts. We 
cannot afford not to have them our equal. 
We want them to tell just as much truth as 
we tell, to be just as scrupulous in keeping 
their contracts as we are. In fact, the law 
of self-preservation drives us to believe that 
the best thing for us is to do the best thing 
for him, to get the best out of him that is 
possible for him." 



EMANCIPATION MEETINGS. 

A MOST successful Lincoln-Douglass anni- 
-^^ versary meeting was held at the 
Metropolitan A. M. E. Church, Washington, 
D. C, under the joint auspices of the 
District of Columbia branch of the N. A. 
A. C. P. and the Bethel Literary and His- 
torical Society, on the evening of February 
11. The president of the local branch. Rev. 
J. Milton Waldron, presided, and the chief 



244 



THE CRISIS 



speaker was Dr. J. E. Spingarn, president 
of the New York branch. Brief addresses 




were also made by Moses E. Clapp, United 
States Senator from Minnesota; General 
Burt, of the United States Army; Leslie 
Pinckney Hill, principal of the Manassas 
Industrial School, and S. M. Dudley, presi- 
dent of the Bethel Literary Society. The 
choir of the Wesley A. M. E. Ziou Church, 
under the leadership of John White, 
furnished the music. Many of those present 
signed applications for membership in the 
N. A. A. C. P. 

On the following day Dr. Spingarn also 
spoke at Howard University, the M Street 
High School and the Armstrong Manual 
Training School, in the interests of the 
association. 

In Kansas City Mr. James Usher, of St. 
Louis, was the speaker. In Quincy, 111., Mr. 
Charles Hallinan, of the Chicago Post^ ad- 
dressed the branch. 

In New York, at the meeting held in 
Cooper Union, the speakers were Mrs. Fanny 
Garrison Villard, Mr. John Jay Chapman, 
Dr. M. C. B. Mason, Mr. Henry Wilbur, of 
Philadelphia, and Mr. Spingarn. Mr. John 
E. Milholland presided. A dramatic feature 
of the meeting was the recital of his expe- 
riences by Grant Smith, one of the refugee 
farmers recently driven out of Northern 
Georgia. Melodies and plantation songs 
were sung by members of Dr. Sims' con- 
gregation. Prof. Joel Spingarn spoke on 
the resolutions passed at the meeting. A 
pleasing interlude was the reading of James 
W. Johnson's "Fifty Years" by Mr. Charles 
Burroughs. 

Prof. John W. Hamilton presided at the 
Boston meeting, which was held in the Park 
Street Church. Hon. Albert E. Pillsbury 
in his address took issue with the charge 
based on the Greeley letter that Lincoln 
issued the emancipation proclamation as an 
act-of-war necessity. 

In Chicago the meeting was held at Or- 
chestra Hall. Judge E. 0. Brown presided. 
There were addresses by Miss Jane Addams. 
Dr. Emil Hirsch, Prof. Geo. B. Foster and 
Dr. Du Bois. The music included an organ 
recital by James E. Mundy, jubilee songs 
and selections by the emancipation chorus, 
which was organized by Mrs. Ida B. Wells 
Barnett. Details of the emancipation meet- 
ings in Tacoma and other branches did not 
reacli us in time for publication in this issue. 



HENRY OSSAWA TANNER. 



THE N. A. A. C. P. 



245 



BEANCHES. 
"VTT'ITH this number of The Crisis we 
^^ begin to devote a page to news from 
branches. Tlirough these columns branches 
will be able to keep in touch with each other, 
and benefit by mutual advice and sugges- 
tion. AVe encourage questions and trust 
each branch will endeavor to make this new 
feature of the N. A. A. C. P. notes in The 
Crisis a success. 

Boston. — The Boston branch, through its 
committee on industrial opportunity, is mak- 
ing a card catalog of positions open to 
colored boys and girls, and of positions now 
occupied by them. The purpose is to answer 
the frequent excuse of merchants and others, 
"Well, I am adverse to making the experi- 
ment,'' by having a concrete example where 
the experiment has already been made. 

Indianapolis. — Indianapolis reports that 
the colored people are kept out of the public 
park because it is owned by a private com- 
pany (the street-car company). They are 
barred from the playgrounds owned by the 
city because, to quote Judge Remster's de- 
cision, "The statute providing $100 penalty 
in such discrimination applies only to those 
engaged in business for private gain." The 
association is co-operating with the branch 
in investigating these and other eases of 
discrimination. 

Detroit. — At the request of the Detroit 
brancli the association drafted resolutions of 



protest on the bill introduced into the Michi- 
gan Legislature prohibiting intermarriage. 
These were addressed to Representative 
Bierd, of the Committee on State Affairs. 

Kansas. — A similar bill which the Kansas 
City branch has been fighting was killed in 
committee. 

Nev^ York. — The vigilance committee, 
which is vigorously pushing its legal work, 
reports several interesting eases, with a num- 
ber on hand but not yet ready for trial. 

Philadelphia. — An organization confer- 
ence has been held, attended by prominent 
colored and white people and addressed by 
Dr. N. F. Mossell and Mr. W. E. B. Du Bois. 
A strong effort will be made to have the 
annual spring conference in this city. 



MEETINGS. 
"V^ EE TINGS with representatives from 
"'' ■'• the association as speakers have 
been held in New York at St. Philip's 
Church, at Trinity Baptist Church in Will- 
iamsburg, St. Mark's M. E. Church and the 
Mt. Olivet Baptist Church. At the meet- 
ing held at the Mt. Zion A. M. E, Church in 
Trenton Dr. Spingarn made a stirring ad- 
dress, as a result of which a temporary 
branch organizatien was formed. Miss 
Gruening, representing the association, spoke 
at the meeting of the Newark Emancipation 
Proclamation Commission on January 23. 



THE DEAD MASTER 



(For the memorial stone to Samuel Coleridge-Taylor) 

Sleep, crowned with fame, fearless of change 
or time. 
Sleep, like remembered music in the soul, 
Silent, immortal; while our discords climb 
To that great chord which shall resolve the 
whole. 

Silent, with Mozart on that solemn shore; 
Secure, where neither waves nor hearts can 
break ; 
Sleep, till the Master of the world once more 
Touch the remembered strings and bid thee 
wake * * * 

Touch the remembered strings and bid thee 
wake. — Alfred Notes. 

^ A controversy arose in London over the 
criticism of Novello & Co., the publishers of 
"Hiawatha," for their large profits made 



through the sale of the work, partly dis- 
closed in the published correspondence 
between Novello & Co., Coleridge-Taylor and 
Sir Charles Villiers Stanford. The Society 
of Authors wrote that "It is fair to the 
composer's memory as a hard-working, care- 
ful man that the public should know that 
he did provide with his brain a work which, 
under the royalty method of dealing with 
literary and artistic property, would have 
supported his family after his death while 
making him more comfortable during his 
life." 

Among the memorial concerts given to 
the late Coleridge-Taylor was that in his 
home town by the Central Croydon Choral 
Society. The London Musical Times writes 
that "All seemed inspired by the occasion 
and this made the concert memorable for 
the excellence of the performance." 




E BURDFNl 



H 



ANOTHEE SOUTHERN IDYL. 

Chapter I. 
E received a high-school education and 
taught school. 

Chapter II. 
He got married and here is the family : 




Chapter III. 
He took the civil-service examination and 
entered the postal service, being the first 
colored carrier. 

Chapter IV. 
He received a letter from the "Superior 
Race," who were his "Best Friends," smeared 
with blood and reading: 

"April 12, 1902. 
"To * * *, NegTo Postman 

"you had better not be Seen carrying or 
delivering mail in * * * after to-day 12th 
, day of April. Don't forget. 



"If you should your life will pay the pen- 
alty. A word to the Avise is sufficient. 
"We are yours for trouble." 

Chapter V. 
He received a second letter to the "Nigger 
Mail Carrier": 

"Your days are numbered, leave, leave, 
LEAVE. Death, DEATH." 

Chapter VI. 
He writes us: "I am still in the service!" 
Which is what we call pluck. 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 

"COR the past years Charleston has been 
■*■ considered queen of the Southern cities 
as far as privileges gTanted colored people 
were concerned. But at last she has fallen in 
with the other places over which we used to 
triumph. For years the "Jim Crow" trolley 
car has been in effect all over the South ex^ 
eept in Charleston. But at last our enemies 
have succeeded in getting it here. To-day 
it is the same here as in other towns — white 
people have two-thirds of the car, while we 
have but the two rear seats, yet we pay the 
same fare as our white brothers. The privi- 
leges granted us at the theatre were excel- 
lent. Now the same conditions as elsewhere 
prevail here; only a limited number of 
tickets are sold to us, and then if we are 
overanxious to see the show we pay doable 
what our white brothers pay. 

There are hospitals, sanitariums, libraries, 
etc., for the whites, from which they debar 
us, and when we apply for permits to erect 
buildings we are often denied. I don't know 
what Ave are going to do; something ought 
and must be done. Just think of the number 
of teachers employed in our public schools, 
of which there are three, and only tAvo col- 
ored teachers are employed. If Ave are "Jim 
CroAved" on cars, in theatres, churches, stores, 
then why not in schools'? G'w^q us colored 



THE BURDEN 



247 



trainers; we have a sufficient number of 
women who are capable and efficient to fill 
these positions. 

"THE PLACE FOR THE NEGRO IS ON 
THE FARM." 

Marietta, Ga., January 12. — (Special.) 
Farmers in all the section of Cobb from 
Marietta to the Cherokee line had notices 
sent them through the mails to dismiss their 
Negro tenants. Now notices are posted in 
public places just north of Marietta telling 
Negroes to leave. Several of these run this 
way : 

"Hurry up Niggers and leve this town if 
you dont leve you will wish you hadder got 
out Get out of this town doggone your time I 
am telling you in Plenty of time 
^'truly Yours" 

Punctuation and spelling are preserved as 
in the original. Some of them spell niggers 
"negros." Otherwise the wording is the 
same. 

Marietta, Ga., January 21. — (Special.) 
As a sequel to the many threatening letters 
sent farmers of Cobb County warning them 
to get rid of all their Negro employees, the 
store of W. H. Bivens, who had received one 
of these notices, was totally destroyed by an 
incendiary fire early this morning. 

Monday Mr. Bivins received a note 
threatening the destruction of his store at a 
little town called Elizabeth. Monday night 
two men and a woman entered his store, leav- 
ing after a few minor purchases. The 
woman, he is sure, was a man in disguise." 

Not far from the store is the quarry of the 
Kennesaw Marble Company, which has also 
been ordered to discharge its NegTO em- 
ployees or suffer the consequences. Shortly 
before midnight Monday the watchman at 
the quarrj" noticed two men and a woman 
prowling around the works. He ordered 
them to leave, and they jumped into a buggy 
and drove rapidly toward Marietta. 

Not two hours later the Bivens store was 
a mass of flames, and before help could be 
secured had burned to the ground. It is 
thought that the loss will reach $2,000.— 
Atlanta Constitution. 

m 

SOUTHERN NEWS NOTES. 
A T Memphis, Tenn., H. 0. Douglas, of 
•^^ 450 North Bellevue Street, Sunday 
yanked the "Jim Crow" law from its perch, 
stepped on it with both feet and hoisted an 
unwritten law to the vacated pedestal. Ap- 



])lause from whites who attended Monday 
morning's session of the police court pro- 
claimed Douglas a hero. The verdict was 
sustained when the Negro who was pulled 
from his seat in a street car to make a place 
for Douglas' sick wife was fined $5 on a 
charge of disorderly conduct because he at- 
tempted to resist the- while man's action. — 
Memphis Appeal. 

Nellie and Ina became hysterical, said they 
were slugged by two Negroes, aroused a 
neighborhood until a lynching party was sug- 
gested, went to the General Hospital in a 
city ambulance and cried and screamed and 
were treated there for several hours — all be- 
cause they feared whipping at home because 
they had stayed downtown until after dark. 
— Kansas City Times. 

Because he refused to carry a note, Frank 
Crockett, a Negro, was shot and perhaps 
fatally wounded by an unknown white man 
Saturday night about 8:30 o'clock. The 
shooting took place on Gay Street, between 
Fourth and Fifth Avenues, and after being 
shot Crockett staggered to a nearby allej' 
where he was found by passersby. Two 
shots were fired from a pistol, one bullet 
taking effect in the stomach, passing through 
the bowels. Seeing his victim fall, the white 
man ran up Gay Street into Fifth Avenue 
and disappeared. At an early hour this 
morning he had not been captured nor his 
identity learned. — Nashville Tennessean. 
^ This bit comes from a native paper of 
South Africa: 

"A correspondent sends a pitiful com- 
plaint to the East London Despatch, which, 
however, does not draw the slightest rebuke 
from that great leader of thought. He com- 
plains about the 'throwing stones at native 
and colored girls by European boys when- 
ever they see them in the streets, using all 
kinds of languages. In fact, these boys are 
running after native and colored girls day 
and night. This is a shameful and disgrace- 
ful habit on the part of the whites. Mr. 
Editor, let me tell you, you'll never find a 
native or Kaffir boy in the wide world using 
such bad language to a woman above his age. 
Is this the teaching they get ? If they noticed 
your wife alone they'll come knocking at the 
door and kicking the same. Now, Mr. Edi- 
tor, suppose these were Kaffir boys who 
annoyed a white lady or ladies? What would 
be the result? The native and colored girls 
have no protection against these white hooli- 
gans." 



THE OTHER AMERICAS. 

ToRREON, CoAH, ]\'Iexico, Nov. 11, 1912. 
Dear Sir : 

If you kindly will, I would like to have 
your views on colonization of our people 
in Central and South America and the 
islands. I believe it high time for us to 
quit depending on the charity of the white 
man to pull us out of the rut. The Jews and 
the Irish and many, many others had to leave 
home to solve their economic and race ques- 
tions, but they did it by heaving to and 
accomplishing something. They produced 
something the world wanted; and people will 
surely take off their hats with interest if 
you are making good and producing some- 
thing they want. I know of no field of 
endeavor in Central and South America, no, 
not one, that in any way approaches being 
filled up to capacity. One is able to get most 
favorable concessions for any sort of legiti- 
mate enterprise or factory. And the 
greatest part of it all is a real man can be 
a real man. There is, as you know, no 
prejudice in these countries; but the people 
ask us, and justly so, to prove our worthi- 
ness to be accepted as men and they will help 
us up the hill. A large majority of the 
white men who come here use every oppor- 
tunity to give us a black eye, but if we 
would only spur that dormant ability and 
forge forward concertedly, we could over- 
come all the harm they may do ; we could 
capitalize it just as the politicians have done 
us. I beg you to think over this and speak 
of it to your friends and kindly give me your 
views. Most truly yours, 

(Signed) A. Kirby. 



LoNDON_, England^ November 18, 1912. 
Sir: 

I have twice traveled in the Argentine 
Republic. I am personally acquainted with 
the local managers (who are Englishmen) 
of the Central Argentine Railway, in which 
I am rather largely interested. I was 
recently discussing with the secretary of the 
company, in London, the advisability of 
developing the cultivation of cotton in the 
provinces of Santiago and Tucuman, which 



are situated within the northern zone of the 
company's lines, and which appear to be 
extremely well suited for the growth of cot- 
ton. (At present sugar is the staple of the 
Tucuman district.) I suggested that the 
presidents of the educational institutes for 
colored people in the Southern States of the 
United States should be approached, and 
requested to recommend specialists in the 
cotton cultivation who — if circumstances 
proved satisfactory on examination — might 
be encouraged to settle down as colonists in 
the said districts, in order to establish an 
industry offering every promise of great ex- 
pansion. The secretary was interested by 
the suggestion and submitted it to the local 
board in Buenos Ayres ; it has met with their 
cordial approval, as also with that of land 
owners in the districts proposed. My friend 
Mr. Travers Buxton has kindly communicated 
your address and authorized me to make use 
of his name by way of introduction. I shall 
be spending a short time in the United States 
next March and April, on my return home 
from a trip to Jamaica, and it would be a 
gTeat pleasure to me to be able to meet you 
and to have the occasion of observing the 
actual condition of the colored population in 
the Southern States and of noting what is 
being done to enable them to maintain them- 
selves worthily in the industrial struggle for 
existence. Meanwhile, I should be greatly 
obliged to you if you could recommend me 
some specialists in cotton (as also in rice) 
cultivation, whose names would be submitted 
to the consideration of the Central Argen- 
tine Railway Company. 

With my apologies for any trouble I may 
be causing you by bringing this matter' to- 
your notice, believe me most faithfully 
yours, 

(Signed) P. W. Mallet. 



THE CRISIS. 

I enjoy reading it because it tells the 
truth. It is the voice of ten millions of 
people. 

J. H. Mitchell, 

St. Louis, Mo.. 



250 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Publishers Chat 



Ike EASTER NUMBER 

The EASTER NUMBER will be ready about March 22. 
TTie edition will be 25,000 copies — a record mark. 

The COVER will be beautiful, as Easter covers should be, and 
printed tastefully in colors. 

The contents will include an article by JACOB RIIS, a strong 
story by H. H. PACE and an EMANCIPATION POEM. 



FIFTY THOUSAND" 

We want to thank those friends who responded to our Christmas- 
card invitation and sent in new subscriptions. The newcomers mounted 
to the thousands and nearly swamped our subscription clerk. Pardon 
any mistakes we may have made. We are climbing toward that 
'^50,000." 



CONTRIBUTIONS 

Remember that we are anxious to have clippings and fads from all 
sources. We want photographs of persons, places, groups and par- 
ticularly children. We want good drawings and cartoons on colored 
subjects, full of information and real knowledge. We do not want mere 
opinion and froth. We want stories, but nine out of ten which we 
receive are not worth the paper they are written on. Therefore, all the 
more, we want stories. 



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25! 



Music of the Masters 



We are pleased to announce to the readers of The Crisis and our many 
patrons that we are now able to supply them with all the latest and best 
musical compositions produced by Negro writers. 



Among the lyric writers and composers whose selections we have are 
the following: 



S. Coleridge-Taylor 
Harry T. Burleigh 
Will Marion Cook 
Alex. Rogers 



"Bob" Cole 
J. Rosamond Johnson 
Jas. Reese Europe 
"Chris." Smith 



X'wenty-four Negro Melodies 

Transcribed for the piano by 

S. COLETtlDGE-TAYLOR 

Introduction by 

BOOKER T. WASHINGTON 

In selecting his themes from the 

native song-s of Africa, the West 

Indies and the American Negro during 

slavery days, Mr. Coleridge-Taylor has 

preserved their distinctive traits and 

individuality, while giving them a 

charming depth and spontaneity of 

feeling which places them alongside 

the compositions of Liszt and Dvorak 

as masterly transcriptions of folk 

music. 

Paper binding $1.70 postpaid 

Cloth binding 2.70 postpaid 



Paul Laurence Dunbar 
Cecil Mack 
N. Clark Smith 
Wm. H. Tyers 



Negro Minstrel Melodies 

Edited by 
HARRY T. BURLEIGH 

This book is a collection of twenty- 
five Negro folk songs with piano 
accompaniment. 

Mr. Burleigh has spent much time 
and patient study in assembling this 
collection of entertaining and educa- 
tional selections. To the lover of 
music for its own sake this volume 
will especially appeal. 

Price 55c., postpaid 



Plantation 


Melodies 




Old and 


New 




Words by R. E. 


Phillips, J. 


E. 


Campbell and Paul 


.lurence Dunbar. 1 


Music composed or transcribed 


and 


adapted by Harry T 


Burleigh. 




Price 31.00, 


postpaid 





Musical Directors 

of choral societies, schools and col- 
leges, who write us for solos and 
choral numbers for entertainments and 
commencement exercises, should state 
the number, kind and range of voices 
to be supplied and the experience of 
the principal singers. An idea of the 
general demand of the prospective 
audience will also help us. 



EXHORTATION. 

Rogers and Cook $0.35 

(High in D minor; low in A minor) 

SWING ALONG. 

Will Marion Cook 35 

(High in F ; medium in E flat) 

RAIN SONG. 

Rosiers and Cook 85 

(For high voice) 



BROWN-SKIN BABY JMINE. 

Cook and Mack 35 

(Medium) 

DOWN DE LOVEES' LANE 

Dunbar and Cook 35 

(High) 

WID DE MOON, MOON, MOON. 

Moore and Cook 35 

(High in F; low in D) 



Write us for any information regarding the productions of these or any 
other composers. 

THE DUNBAR CO-, 26 Vcscy St., New York 



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252 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Tke very Business Opportunity for >;vhich i OU 
kave teen looking may possibly oe here on this page. 



HELP WANTED 




AGENTS ^«^™^^^ 

selbna the newly iiatented BRANDT CIGAR 
LIGHTER. Is operated with one hand — 
^i\eb an instantaneous light eveiy time, the 
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ever It is wanted. Works with one hand and 
never fails. Sometliing new. Big demand. 
EveiTone wants one. Write quick for whole- 
5 lie teiTus and prices. 

R. V. BRANDT LIGHTER CO. 
42 Hudson Street New York City 



$50T0$I00AM0NTH 



WANT ACTIVE MAN EACH LOCALITY 

to 60 years. Introduce us to friends, 
nd world-wide Society. Pays largest 
sick, injury, death benefits for small- 
est cost. Helpful, inspiring, PROFIT- 
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prosperous. Why not YOU? Write 
Quick for big Cash-Bonus offer. 
■ I-L-U 238, COVINGTON. KY. 



.^GEXTS. — Big money made selling our new line. 
Can sell one in every home. We guarantee. Write 
to-day. 

WILLIAMS-CROSBY COMPANY 
2730 Wabash Avenue Chicago, 111. 




JUST THINK 



O F 



I T 



Gordon Safety Razors made to retail for 25c. Shaves 
as smoothlj' as some of the highi-pi-iced razors 
Splendid seller. Will last a lifetime. Sample, 10c. 

GORDON COMPANY 
Northwestern Building Chicago, lU. 

RELIABLE, LIVE, 
RESPONSIBLE MEN 

who can sell real estate can MAKE MORE 
than $200 PER MONTH acting as 
AGENTS for the sale of our properties in 
MUSKOGEE and TAFT, OKLAHOMA. 
The real coming country where there are 
opportunities and openings for all. Write 
us to-day, giving your age and experience, 
and we will offer you a FINE PROPOSI- 
TION WHICH WILL MAKE YOU 
MONEY. Address 

REEVES REALTY CO. 

Department C 

217 Flynn-Ames Bldg. Muskogee, Okla. 



AGENTS — ]>ig money. J«ohnson-Flynn 
light and other copyrighted Negro pic- 
tures. Portraits. Pillow Tops. Catalog 
FREE. 30 days' credit. 

PEOPLES PORTRAIT CO. 

Station U, Chicago, 111. 



TYPEWRITERS 




Remingtons, Densmores, 

J e w e t t s, $11.50 each; 
Franklins, Postals, Ham- 
monds, $9 each. Bargains in 
Underwoods, Smiths and all 
others. All guaranteed. 

Supplies. 

Standard Typewriter 
Exchange 

23B Park Row, New York 




PRESIDENTS 

NEGRO REPUBLIC 

in. colors and a short history of Liberia. 16 x 20. 
Ready to hang on the walls; only 50c. prepaid; in 
gold frames $1.25. Everybody wants one. Write 
.VEGRO PRESS, Box 126; Gainesville, Fla., U. S. A. 
1,000 agents wanted. 

»8 BATH TUB 

Costs littla, no plumbing, requires little water. 

Weight 15 pounds, and folds into small roll. 

Full length baths, far better than tin tubs, lasts for 

years. Write for special agents offer and description. Robinson 

Mro. Co., Ill Vance St. . Toledo, 0. Mtrs. Turkish Bath Cabinets. 



REGALIA 

A Race Enterprise 

Manufacturing Badges, 
_ Banners and Supplies 
for all Fraternal and 
Church Societies. Cata- 
logue upon request. 
CENTRAL REGALIA CO. 
Jos. L. Jones, Pres. 
N. E. Cor. 8th and Plum Sts. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



BCKARA DIAMONDS. Agents, everyone, to wear 
and sell our famous Bokara diamonds, Write for 
s;:m;3'o cffer Hnd catiilogue free. 

NORTHWESTERN JEWELRY COMPANY 

Dept. 24 

2141 Siimmerdale Av3. Chicago, 111. 

WANTED 

500 Negro families (farmers pre- 
ferred) to settle on FREE Govern- 
ment Lands in Chaves County, New 
Mexico. Blackdom is a Negro colony. 
Fertile soil, ideal climate. No "Jim 
Crow" Laws. For information write 

JAS. HAROLD COLEMAN 
Blackdom, New Mexico 




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253 



UNDERTAKERS 



Telephone Columbus 3935 



Open All Night 



RODNEY DADE & BROS. 

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Notary Public 

Funeral Parlor and Ohapel Free. 

Licensed Lady Embalmer Prompt Service 

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Between Broadway and 8th Avenue 



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Chicago, 111. 



MOVING 



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Orders by mail or 'phone receive prompt attention 

TRUNKS STORED 25c. PER MONTH 

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PERSONAL CARDS 

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Telephone 5277 Morningside 

DR. GERTRUDE E. CURTIS 

Surgeon Dentist 

188 West 135th Street, New York City 

Telephone 4886 Morningside 

DR. D. W. ONLEY 

Surgeon Dentist 

S. W. Cor. 133d St. and Lenox Ave., New York 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m., 1 to 9 p. m. 

Sundays by Appointment 



LEGAL DIRECTORY 



This is a ready reference of some of the 
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^gy If you are a lawyer and your name is 
not listed here you should write us at once. 



H. 



Residence 2546 Michigan 
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Cor. 8th and Princess Streets 
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Office Phone 
Home 58 Main 

C. H. CALLOWAY 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 
Notary Public 
117 W. 6th Street Kansas City, Mo. 

FRANKLIN W. WILLIAMS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Notary Public 

Real Estate Conveyancer 

206 Parrish Street Durham, N. C. 

Office L. D. Telephone 3297 Market 
Residence L. D. Telephone, 5277-M Market 

GEORGE A. DOUGLAS 

Counselor-at-Law 

Rooms 613-614, Metropolitan Building 

113 Market St., Cor. Washington, Newark, N. J. 

Telephone 5574 Beekman Rooms 905 to 907 

WILFORD H. SMITH 

Lawyer 

150 Nassau Street New York City 

Uptown Office — 136 West 136th Street 

General Practice Notary Public 

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Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

1020 Metropolitan Life Building 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

BROWN S. SMITH 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Offices: Suite 610, Sykes Block. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

GEORGE W. MITCHELL 

Attomey-at-Law 
908 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tel. 2026 Fort Hill Oable Address, Epben 

EDGAR P. BENJAMIN 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 
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Telephone Connection 

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254 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



HAKBIET GIBBS-MABSHAIJi, President 
HARET A. WILLIAMS, Vice-President 



LOUIS G. GREGORY, Financial Secretary 
GREGORIA A. FRASER, Recording Secretary 



The Washington Conservatory of Music 
and School of Expression 

Piano, Violin, Wind Instruments, Piano Tuning, Vocal Expression, History of 
Music Theory and Modem Languages 

The first and only Mission Music School founded and controlled by Negroes 
in America. 

Many scholarships awarded. Talented students never turned away unaided. 

902 T Street, N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



SCHOOL OF BEAUTY CULTURE AND HAIR DRESSING 



KELSEY'S 

328 Lenox Avenue 

Telephone Harlem 1896 

126tli Street, NEW YORK. 



Manicuring, Shampooing, Hair Dressing, Marcel War- 
ing, Facial and Body Massage, Hair Making, CUropody, 
etc., scientifically taught. Unlimited practice in parlor 
day and night. Pupils taught at home, if desired. 
Diplomas. Special Summer Course, $7.50 up. Send foi 
booklet. Mme. A. Carter Kelsey, Gen'l Intr.; Dr. Samaal 
A. Kelsey, Chiropodist, President and Gen'l Manager. 




"SAVE THE PIECES" 

"Mend-All," a clean, white, odorless 
powder, will mend anything perfectly and 
permanentl}'. 

Full directions come with each box of 
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niture; set loose handles or stop leaks and 
mend holes in pots, pans, kettles, hot- 
water bags, etc. 

Send ten cents and a stamp; immediately 
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Book 



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s on >3ociaiisin 



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must take sides either for or ajgainst it 
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date, we can only say this frankly: if it lay 
in our power to make him President of 
the United States we would do so, for of the 
four men mentioned he alone, by word and 
deed, stands squarely on a platform of 
human rights regardless of race or class." 
—The Crisis, August, 1912. 

Woman and Socialism, 

August Bebel $1.50 

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THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE 

Offices: 26 Vesey Street, New York. Incorporated May 25, 191 1 



National President — Mr. Moorfleld Storey, 

Mass. 
Vice-Presidents — 

Eev. John Haynes Holmes, New York. 

Mr. John E. Mllholland, New York. 

Bishop Alexander Walters, New York. 

Rev. Garnet K. Waller, Baltimore, Md. 

Miss Mary White Ovington, Brooklyn, N. Y 



OFFICERS 
Boston, Chairman of the Board of Directors — 



Mr. Oswald Garrison Villard, New York. 
Treasurer — Mr. Walter E. Sachs, New York. 
Director of Publicity and Research — 

Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois, New York. 
National Organizer — Dr. M. C. B. Mason, Cincinnati. 
Secretary — Miss May ChUds Nerney, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Assistant Secretary — Miss Martha Gruening, New 

York. 



This is the Association which seeks to put into 
practice the principles which THE CRISIS puts 
into words. If you believe what we SAY, join this 
Association and help us to put our words into DEEDS. 



MEMBERSHIP BLANK 

I hereby accept membersliip in the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOB THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF COLOBED PEOPLE. 

Please find enclosed dollars and enter my name as a member in OIsm 

paying $ a year, and send me THE CRISIS. 



Name.. 



Address.. 



Glass 1. Life Members, paying $500. 
Class 2. Donors, paying $100 per year. 
aiaaa 3. Sustaining Members, paying 
per year. 



$25 



Class 4. Contributing Members, paying $10, 

$5 or $2 per year. 
Class 5. Associate Members, paying $1 per 

year. 



The subscription to THE CRISIS is $1 extra, except to members paying $5 or more, who 
signify their msh that $1 of their dues be considered a CRISIS subscription. 

All members in good standing have the privilege of attending and voting at the AnnusI 
Conference of the Association. 

PIiEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT 
OF COLORED PEOPLE, 26 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

Mention The Crisis. 



256 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



H 



HALF A MAN 



The Status of the Negro in New York 

By 

MARY WHITE OVINGTON 

With a foreword by Dr. Franz Boas of Columbia University 

Chapter I. How the colored people won their civil and political rights. 

Chapters II. and III. The Negro tenement and the life of the poor. 

Chapters IV. and V. How the colored man earns his living, with a full descrip- 
tion of the professions; the ministry, the stage. 

Chapter VI. The colored woman, her discouragements and successes. 

Chapter VII. A vivid description of the life of the well-to-do Negroes. 

Chapter VIII. The Negro in politics in New York. 

Chapter IX. The author's personal views on the race question. 

Price $1.00; by mail, $1.12. 

LONGMANS, GREEN & CO., Pu blishers, NEW YORK 

This book is for sale in the Book Department of The Crisis, 26 Vesey St., N. Y. 



TELLING A STORY 



II To friends who know you, may be easy, but "putting one over" to 

' strangers is quite different. 

Telling a busy, business man about your services or your merchandise is still less 
a "cinch," for he hears the same story every day a dozen or more times. 

A clever speaker, before a sleepy or hostile audience, puts a good, stiff punch 
into his very first remark. This "knocks 'em off their feet" and they listen. 

Your business letters may be good, but if they lack the "punch" they won't "pull." 
Correct business stationery is the "punch" that hits the busy man "right in the eye" 
and makes him read your letter. 

We'll show you the sort of stationery we create, if you write us. 

We print for Mr. Conde Nast, of Vogue; we print The Crisis. 

ROBERT N. WOOD, Printing and Engraving 

202 EAST 99th STREET NEW YORK 

'Phone 6667 Lenox 

Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



257 



^5 



Brings Oliver 
Typewriter 

Send $5 for The Oliver Typewriter— the 
machine will come a-flying. The newest 
Model — No. 5 — the regular $100 machine — 
with no extra charge for Printype. 

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day. 

This irresistible "$5 offer" is sweeping every- 
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brought about by the same machine that 
introduced visible writing. 

TBe ^ 

OLIVEt^ 

Typ6*ri-l&r 

The Standard Visible Writer 

This is the t\-pewriter whose high efficiency has 
made it the choice of the greatest firms and cor- 
porations. It is the simplest of all standard type- 
writers, yet the swiftest and by far the most 
versatile. The moving parts work freely in a solid 
metal framework, making the machine so strong 
that the hardest usage has no effect upon it. 

No Extra Charge for 
*'Printypc" 

Most people prefer to have the machine equipped 
to write in Printype. This beautiful type is obtain- 
able only on The Oliver Typewriter. 

It is the greatest style- improvement ever evolved 
for typewriters- — the most easily read type in exist- 
ence — the type which conforms to that in universal 
use on the world's printing presses! 

Win Success ivith the Oliver ! 

The Oliver Typewriter aids success-seekers in a 
multitude of ways. The real-life stories of achieve- 
ment that center around it would fill volumes. 

No matter what your work may be — in office, 
store, shop or home — The Oliver Typewriter will 
prove itself a great convenience and an actual 
money-maker. 

It stands for order and system and success. It is 
the visible evidence of the progressiveness of its 
owner. Young people with brains, ambition and 
Oliver Typewriters are succeeding everywhere. Can 
you afford to let $5 stand between you and success^ 

Send for Special Circular and Art Catalog 

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beautiful catalog and a 
specimen letter written in 
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on request. 

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you to your need of The 
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ease _ with which you may 
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Remember — $3 only and on 
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(206) 

The Oliver Typevirriter Company 

310 Broadway NEW YORK. N. Y. 




Skort i alks on 
Advertising and 
Our Advertisers 



"I have found by careful inquiry that the 
advertiser who avoids 'frills,' gets down to 
'brass tacks,' and tells his story in a con- 
cise, 'reason-why' way, gets best returns 
from our magazine because The Crisis 
reader is a thinker." 

This is what I wrote a prospective adver- 
tiser, who doubted that the quality of our 
circulation was on a par with the quantity. 

A recognition of this fact is to my mind a 
very positive answer to those who doubt 
that the Negro is ready for a magazine of 
The Crisis standard. 

It is a common opinion among certain 
advertisers that scarecrow headlines and 
advertisements full of bluster must be em- 
ployed to attract dollars from the Negro 
purse. This is not the case with our readers. 

An advertiser once sent us copy with 
something like this for a headline : 
"TWENTY MEN DROPPED DEAD," 
then went on to tell about the goods he 
had for sale. Of course, we would not 
insult our readers with such tommyrot, and 
returned his copy with suggestions as to 
how it should read — we made it read The 
Crisis way. 

"The old order changeth" in advertising 
as well as in other things and leaves the 
Cohen Fire Sale and Barnum tactics as a 
relic of the past. 

Intelligent magazine readers are seldom 
influenced to answer an advertisement 
unless, in an interesting, attention-compel- 
ling manner, it tells them convincing facts 
about merchandise or service. Exaggerated 
statements, bluster and impossible promises 
do not appeal to them because they know 
that such tactics are employed when there 
is nothing to say about quality. 

To keep the advertising section of a 
magazine or newspaper up to The Crisis 
standard is rather expensive at times, but 
we know that it is the only method of 
making this department a real service to our 
readers. Once in a while we lose a good 
paying contract, but what we lose in money 
we gain in respectability among reliable 
advertisers, and the loss of that one adver- 
tisement will mean the securing of two or 
three others. 

A certain advertiser wanted to guarantee 
our readers that his article would do a cer- 
tain improbable thing. We objected, and 
after the exchange of several letters and a 
telegram (at our expense), the advertise- 
ment went in The Crisis, but it stated 
that the article would do those things only 
under certain conditions. 

ALBON L. HOLSEY. Advertising Manager 



Mention The Crisis. 



258 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



tzx. TRAINED MAN 

IS THE ONE WHO GETS 
THE POSITION HIGHER UP 

If you will give us a small amount 
of your spare time, we will fit you for 
the position higher up — the position that 
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We train men in higher accounting 
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Mitchell, certified public accountant. 

Our graduates are prepared to pass 
any state or territory examination in 
bookkeeping. 

Enroll to-day — the call for com- 
petent bookkeepers cannot be supplied. 

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Box 81 Institute, W. Va. 

BOOK OF GOLD 

Free To Agents 





I 
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\ — otherscan'timitate— in actual gold — 

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i outfits moment they see this dazzling 

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a wonderful chance for you to make 

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Dept.756 iackson Blvd., CHICAGO, ILL. 



The 



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Price $1.50 



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suction, the water 
and soap being 
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clothes. Works 
on the principle 
of the vacuum 
carpet cleaner. 

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beating and bat- 
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With this washer 
it is soap and 
water that do the 
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Lace curtains and the most delicate 
fabrics can be cleaned without the 
slightest damage. Will wash a tub of 
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Any woman, or even a child, can oper- 
ate this washer. 

Sent prepaid on recipt of retail price, 
$1.50. Anybody can afford to buy it; 
nobody can afford to be without it. 

AGARD NOVELTY CO., Distributors 

38 West 136th Street New York 

Good proposition for agents. 



HARMONY AND COMPOSITION 

TAUGHT BY MAIL 
Interesting and Comprehensive Course. 

Small monthly payments. 
Address 

J. HILLARY TAYLOR 

Director The Success Piano School, 
is O Street, N. E. WasMngtftn, D. 

Bell Telephone. 




No. 4 Special Buggy 

$65.00 



A value unequaled. Sold on 
$1.00 Profit Margin. Write 
for prices and other styles. 
Send for catalog. 

C. R. Patterson & Sons 

GREENFIELD, OHIO 

Largest Negro carriage concern in the United States 



Mention The Cnisis. 



DO YOU WANT A PROMOTION? 

Positions filled in every line of educational work. We have a 
special demand for 

Music Teachers Domestic Science Teachers 

High School Teachers Bookkeepers and Stenographers 

Agricultural Teachers Manual Training and Industrial Teachers 

We had calls for teachers in 1912 from 

Alabama Georgia Mississippi South Carolina 

Arkansas Kentucky Maryland Tennessee 

Delaware Louisiana New Jersey Texas 

Florida Missouri North Carolina Virginia 

West Virginia 

School officials are beginning now to select their faculties for 

the coming year. Register early and get in touch with them. 

Blanks and information furnished free upon application. 

MUTUAL TEACHERS' AGENCY 

1335 T Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 



Establishea 1876 



Telephone 1708 Harle 



Tke MANDO 

Mozart Conservatory or Music, Inc. 
2105 Madison Avenue New York 



Branches of Instruction: 

Violin, Violoncelld, Hurmony, Knseinble Playing, 
Chamber Music. The course of instruction adopted 
throughout all departments is thorough and pre- 
cisely the same as taught in the leading conserva- 
tories in this city and in Europe. 

The Conservatory Sextette and Concert Orchestra, 
Mrs. Eliza Mando, Conductor, is open for engage- 
ments for concerts and all occasions where superior 
music is required. Terms reasonable. 

For further information address 

MRS. ELIZA MANDO, Director 



r 



HYDEGRADE PETTICOATS 



Fitted with the Newton Adjustable Top 

Every woman knows and appreciates the sur- 
passing quality of Hydegrade Fabrics, but the 
Newton Adjustable Top is new. It adjusts 
instantly to any size waist, eliminating all 
wrinkles and folds and affording a perfect fit 
around the waist and hips. 

By combining expert workmanship with the 
comforts of this adjustable top and the quality 
of Hydegrade fabrics you get the very most in 
petticoat value. 

All sizes; in black, navy, gray, green, brown, 
champagne and Copenhagen. 

Price $1.25. Postpaid. 

Address : 

THE DUNBAR COMPANY 

26 Vesey St. New York 




Mention The Crisis. 



Don't Strive for Another Complexion 

BEAUTIFY THE 
ONE YOU HAVE 




Perlect Face Powder 



A lady writes us: 

"I have a very dark-brown complexion, and the 
white face powder I use gives me an ashy appear- 
ance. Your brown powder is just the thing. I 
like it." 

Whether the complexion is cream, olive or brown, 
we have a tint to match it. Price 50 cents per box. 
Send 2-cent stamp and name of druggist for sample. 



THE DUNBAR CO., 26 Vesey St., New York 



Provident Hospital and Training School 
for Colored Nurses 

Aim : To keep its technic equal to the best 

Founded 1891 

The first training school for colored 
nurses in this country, Freedman's 
excepted. 

Comprises a training school for 
nurses, hospital, dispensary, and 
thoroughly equipped children's depart- 
ment; when funds are ample, post- 
graduate work may be undertaken. 

The hospital is open to all. The 
races co-operate in the board of 
trustees, in the medical staff and in 
administration; the institution is the 
only one of its kind in which a colored 
man may act as interne. 

Cost of buildings and equipment, 
$100,000; free from debt. Endowment, 
$50,000, contributed mostly by wills 
made by colored men. Additional 
endowment needed, $50,000. 

The nurses' course covers three 

years; training and instruction given 

by both races, according to the highest 

■jc+Ui .,„^ n^^^i^ c«.„ /-u- _ III modern standards. 

3btn and Dearborn Sts., Chicago, III. 




Mention The Ckisis. 



c 



10 sen ^eii^s Ji^oey 



^T> 





. 



No. 4 Special Buggy only $65.00 

HIGHEST GRADE 

A Value Unequaled. Sold on $1.00 Profit Margin. 

FROIVI FACTORY TO USER 
Write tor prices and other styles. Send for Catalogue. 

C. R. PATTERSON & SONS, 

GREENFIELD, OHIO. 




MILES M. WEBB 

Chicago's Expert Photographer 




SweU, Mlly Sull 

FREE! 

Get in Quick I^rt^lS 

offering ever made. Be our sales- 
manager in your town — $250 a 
month. Enough coin to flU your 
pockets. Nifty suits for you to 
wear— ALL FREE. Make $60 tu 
$75 a week selling our nifty 
suits. It's easy! Orders turned 
over to you. No experience, no 
money necessary. 

WE PAY EXPRESS 
ON EVERYTHING 

You pay nothing — absolutely 
nothing. EVERYTHING guaran- 
teed, too. 

Writc-Hurry! l!^tV\ 

v-Mil lii^ht away for tills great 
free offer. Never anything like it. 
Get our book of beautiful samples 
and full particulars — all free. 
You assume no obligations whate\er so write it once 




American 

Dept. 451 



Woolen Mills Co. 
Chicago, 111. 




I speciallzo in eveiT pliaso of artistic iiicluic niiikin,'. 
Send me your plintos fur enlargement. Prices reasoniible. 
Satisfaction guaianteed. 

WEBB STUDIO 

3519 State Street Chicajjo, 111. 



/If acfe $30 First Day 

B. Basha. of Bell Island. New- 
foundland, did this with our 
CHAMPION 
IWinute Photo Machine 

That beginners make such profit 
at the Gtart, shows that no ex- 
nerience is needed in this won- 
derful money-making business. 
Kobt. Bock.Willow Hill. Pa . took 
in$35 inoneday. Vernard Haker. 
Holluook, Neb., $29.90. Jas. E'.Wende. Asliton, Idaho, 
S26. C.V. Lovett.Ft. Meado, Fla.. made $50 in one day. Theso 
testimonials are iust a few of many hundreds we have on nie. 
Pictures in Post Cards and on Buttons all the rage 
at Fairs, Carnivals, Picnics, Resorts, Schools, de- 
pots. Factories, on Streets— anywhere— everywhere. 
Our Champion Camera takes pictures size ZJijxi)^, 
\Xx2)f, and buttons. B'inishes complete photo in dU 
" — • No dark i.'..-:__» „...„\,..^t 



.■conde: 2U0 an hour. No dark room. Lasiost. quickest, 
liiUKost money-maker known. Small investment. About 8Bc 
profiton cich dollar you tak.- in. D,u""r owiibme. Write at 
once for Frc Book. Tistimoniala and Liberal Oflfer. 
AMERICAN MINUTE PHOTO CO. 
2214 Ogden Ave., Dept. E396 Chicago, Illinois 



Metition Thb Crisis. 



THE CRISIS 

A RECORD OF THE DARKER RACES 

PUBLISHED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED 
PEOPLE, AT 26 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

Edited by W. E. BufeCHARDT Du Bois, with the co-operation of Oswald Garrison Villard, 
W. S. Braithwaite, M. W. Ovington, Charles Edward Russell and others. 



Contents for April^ igij 

DEPARTMENT HEADINGS. Drawn by Lorenzo Harris. 
CENTER PAGE DECORATION. Drawn by Louise R. Latimer. 

ARTICLES 

Page 
EASTER— EMANCIPATION. ^ A Poem 285 

THE MAN WHO WON. A Story. By Harry H. Pace 293 

THE BLACK HALF. By Jacob Riis 298 

DEPARTMENTS 

ALONG THE COLOR LINE. 267 

MEN OF THE MONTH 274 

OPINION 276 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

COLORED PEOPLE 296 

THE BURDEN 300 

LETTERS 301 

TEN CENTS A COPY; ONE DOLLAR A YEAR 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS TWENTY-FIVE CENTS EXTRA 

RENEWALS: When a subscription blank is attached to this page a renewal of your 
■ubscription is desired. The date of the expiration of your subscription will be found on the 
wrapper. 

CHANGE OF .ADDRESS: The address of a subscriber can be changed as often as desired. 
In ordering a change of address, both the old and the new address must be given. Two weeks' 
notice is required. 

MANUSCRIPTS and drawings relating to colored people are desired. They must be accom- 
panied by return postage. If found unavailable they will be returned. 

Entered as Second-class Matter in the Post Office at New York, N. Y. 






264 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Agricultural and 
Mechanical College 

State summer scnool for colored 
teackers. Fourteenth annual 
session begins June 23, 1913, ana 
continues rive weeks. Boara, 
lodging' and fees for tne session, 
$14.00. Limited accommodations. 
Send $1.00 m advance and re- 
serve room. For catalog or 
furtner information address : 

STATE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Agricultural and 
Mechanical College 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Southern Business College 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Day and night school, teaching Shorthand, Type- 
writing, Business English, Business Arithmetic, 
Bookkeeping and preparing for Civil Service. A 
high-grade commercial school with competent in- 
structors and healthy surroundings. The only Negro 
school of its kind in the world. For catalogue and 
further information address 

Southern Business College 

4th Avenue and 15th Street 

W. J. ECHOLS, Principal 

J. P. BOND, Secretary-Manager 



.Si'nd yuur boy South — the land of Opportunity. 
The Prairie View State Normal and Industrial 
College of Texas. E. L. Blackshear, Principal. W. 
C, Rollins, Treasurer. Largest State institution for 
colored youth in the United States. Excellent 
literary, scientific and industrial advantages. Ex- 
penses low — ideal climate — new buildings. 

For particulars address: 

H. J. MASON, Secretary 
Prairie View Waller County, Texas 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 

An Episcopal boarding and day school 
for girls, under the direction of the Sisters 
of St. Mary. Address: 

THE SISTER-IN-CHARGE 
609 N. 43d St. W. Philadelphia, Pa. 



Fisk University 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 
Founded 1866 H. H. Wright, Dean 

Thorough Literary, Scientific, Educa- 
tional and Social Science Courses. Pioneer 
in Negro music. Special study in Negro 
history. 

Ideal and sanitary buildings and grounds. 
Well-equipped Science building. 

Christian home life. 

High standards of independent manhood 
and womanhood. 

Atlanta University 

Is beautifully located in the City of Atlanta, Ga. 
The courses of study include High School, Nor- 
mal School and College, with manual training 
and domestic science. Among the teachers are 
graduates of Yale, Harvard, Dartmouth, Smith 
and Wellesley. Forty-two years of successful 
work have been completed. Students come from 
all parts of the South. Graduates' are almost 
universally successful. 

For further information address 

President EDWARD T. WARE 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Knoxville College 

Beautiful Situation. Healthful Location. 
The Best Moral and Spiritual Environment. 

A Splendid Intellectual Atmosphere. 
Noted for Honest and Thorough Work. 

Offers full courses in the following departments: 
College, Normal, High School, Grammar School and 
Industrial. 

Good water, steam heat, electric lights, good 
drainage. Expenses very reasonable. 

Opportunity for Self-help. 

Fall Term Begins September, 1913. 

For information address 

President R. W. McGRANAHAN 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



Uirgiitia Union University 

. RICHMOND, VA. 

A College Department, of high standards and 
modern curriculum. 

A Theological Department, with all subjects 
generally required in the best theological seminaries. 

An Academy, with manual training, giving a 
preparation for life or for college. 

The positive moral and religious aim of the 
school, its high standards of entrance and of class 
work, its flue new buildings and well-equipped 
laboratories and library prepare a faithful student 
for a lifo of wide usofulncRS. 

GEORGE RICE HOVEY, President 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



265 



Atlanta University 

Studies of the 

Nej?ro Problems 

15 Monographs. Sold Separately. 

Address: 

A. G. DILL 

Atlanta University. Atlanta, Ga. 



F A NARRATIVE of f 
R THE NEGRO r 



B 

i 

R 

t 

H 

d 

A 

y 

S 



By Mrs. Leila Amos Pendleton 

A comprehensive history of the 
Negro race from the earliest period 
to the present time; told in pleas- 
ing narrative style; may be read 
and understood by children. Bound 
in cloth and illustrated. 

Address: Price $1.50 

MRS. L. A. PENDLETON 

1824 11th Street, N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 



E 
V 
E 
R 

Y 

D 
A 
Y 



HEAVEN AND HELL 



SsweaeiiDorg s great woric on tne iiie 
death, 400 pages, only 15 cents postpaid. 
Pastor Landsnberger, Windsor Place, St. Louis. l\^o. 



A Race Betw^een Two Straits 

A New Book on Labor Unions and Bad 

Politicians by Rev. W. B. Reed, 

Newport, R. I. 

The book shows that labor unions are the 
greatest menace to-day to American man- 
hood and freedom. Read the book and 
know the truth.. Price 25c. Sold by The 
Crisis. Agents wanted everywhere. Write 

' REV. W. B. REED 
Newport - ----R. I. 

The Curse of Race Prejudice 

By James F. Morton, Jr., A. M. 

An aggressive exposure by an Anglo-Saxon 
champion of equal rights. Startling facts and crush- 
ing arguments. Fascinating reading. A necessity 
for clear understanding and up-to-date propaganda. 
Belongs in the library of every fi-iend of social 
justice. Price 25 cents. Send orders lo 

JAMES F. MORTON, JR. 

244 West 143d Street New York, N. Y. 



«5 



Brings Oliver 
Typewriter 

Send $5 for The Oliver Typewriter— the 
machine will come a-flying. The newest 
Model — No. 5 — the regular $100 machine — 
with no extra charge for Printype. 

For the price of a good fountain pen you 
secure the World's Greatest Typewriter. You 
can pay the balance at the rate of 17 cents a 
day. 

This irresistible "$5 offer" is sweeping every- 
thing before it. The era of universal type- 
writing is coming. The triumph of the type- 
writer over primitive pen-and-ink has been 
brought about by . the same machine that 
introduced visible tvriting. 

TTje *_ 

OLIVCt^ 

The Standard Visible Writer 

This is the typewriter whose high efficiency has 
made it the choice of the greatest firms and cor- 
porations. It is the simplest of all standard type- 
writers, yet the swiftest and by far the most 
versatile. The moving parts work freely in a solid 
metal framework, making the machine so strong 
that the hardest usage has no effect upon it. 



No Extra Charge for 
'Printype' 



«i 



k»> 



Most people prefer to have the machine equipped 
to write in Printype. This beautiful type is obtain- 
able only on The Oliver Typewriter. 

It is the greatest style improvement ever evolved 
for typewriters — the most easily read type in exist- 
ence — the type which conforms to that in universal 
use on the world's printing presses I 

Win Success with the Oliver ! 

The Oliver Typewriter aids success-seekers in a 
multitude of ways. The real-life stories of achieve- 
ment that center around it would fill volumes. 

No matter what your work may be — in office, 
store, shop or home — The Oliver Typewrite^ will 
prove itself a great convenience and an actual 
money-maker. 

It stands for order and system and success. It is 
the visible evidence of the progressiveness of its 
owner. Young people with brains, ambition and 
Oliver Typewriters are succeeding everyivhere. Can 
you afford to let $5 stand between you and success? 
Send for Special Circular and Art Catalog 

Full details regarding th; 
Oliver Easy-Purchase-Plan, 
beautiful catalog and a 
specimen letter written in 
Printype will be sent you 
on request. 

Let this $5 offer awaken 
you to your need of The 
Oliver Typewriter and the 
ease with which you may 
own it. 

Remember — $5 only and on 
comes The Oliver Typewriter! Sales Department 

(206) 

Tlic Oliver Typewriter Company 
310 Broadway NEW YORK. N. Y. 




Mention The Crisis. 



266 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



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Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS 



Vol. 5, No. 6 



APRIL, 1913 



Wtole No. 30 




POLITICS. 

' I 'HE woman's suffrage party had a hard 
time settling the status of Negroes in 
the Washington parade. At first Negro 
callers were received coolly at headquarters. 
Then they were told to register, but found 
that the registry clerks were usually out. 
Finally an order went out to segregate them 
in the parade, but telegrams and protests 
poured in and eventually the colored women 
marched according to their State and occu- 
pation w'ithout let or hindrance. 

^ No direct reference to the NegTO was made 
in President "Wilson's inaugural address, but 
Negroes will read the following passages with 
interest : 

"This is the high enterprise of the new 
day : To lift everything that concerns our life 
as a nation to the light that shines from 
the hearth fire of every man's conscience and 
vision of the right. It is inconceivable we 
should do this as partisans; it is incon- 
ceivable Ave should do it in ignorance of the 
facts as they are or in blind haste. We shall 
restore, not destroy. We shall deal with our 
economic system as it is and as it may be 
modified, not as it might be if we had a 
clean sheet of paper to write upon, and step 
by step we shall make it what it should be in 
the spirit of those who question their own 
wisdom and seek counsel and knowledge, not 
shallow self-satisfaction or the excitement of 
excursions Avhither they cannot tell. Justice, 
and onlj' justice, shall always be our motto. 

"This is not a day of triumph; it is a day 
of dedication. Here muster not the forces 
of party, but the forces of humanity. Men's 



heai'ts wait upon us; men's lives hang in 
the balance; men's hopes call upon us to say 
what we will do. Who shall live up to the 
great trust? Who dares fail to try? I sum- 
mon all honest men, all patriotic, all for- 
ward-looking men, to my side. God helping 
me, I will not fail them if they will but 
counsel and sustain me." 
<5 At the recent Democratic primary in 
Moberly, Ala., the Southern system was 
partially put into use. All white men, whether 
Republicans or Democrats, were allowed to 
vote, but Negroes were barred unless they 
were vouched for as regular Democrats. 
^ The effort within the Republican party 
to eliminate the Southern representation in 
party conventions is still being discussed. 
Southern Democratic Congressmen are very 
enthusiastic for it. 

^ Plans for the complete organization of 
NegTO Progressives were discussed recently 
in Washington and Philadelphia. 

SOCIAL UPLIFT. 

THE Frederick Douglass Memorial Hos- 
pital of Philadelphia is raising $8,000 

for a nurses' home. 

•I A bulletin on age and marriage conditions 

lias been issued by the United States census. 

The age statistics of the colored population 

are as follows : 

1910 

All ages 9,827,763 

Under 5 vears 1,263,288 

5 to 14 years 2,401,819 

15 to 24 years 2.091,211 

2.5 to 44 vears 2,638,178 

45 to 64 years 1 ,108,103 

65 years and over 294,124 



268 



THE CRISIS 



The percentage of Negroes in the older 
age groups is smaller than among the whites, 
due. partly to a higher death rate, but also 
probably to a higher birth rate among the 
colored people. The high infant mortality 
among colored people is shown by a smaller 
proportion under five. 

The percentage as to marriage for 
Negroes 15 years of age and over is as 
follows : 

Single— Male, 35.4; female, 26.6. Mar- 
ried — Male, 57.2; female, 57.2. Married, 
widowed or divorced — Male, 64.0; female, 
73.1. Widowed or divorced — Male, 6.9; 
female, 15.9. 

Colored people marry at a somewhat earlier 
age than the whites, but have also usually 
a larger percentage of the widowed. 

^ The 12,000 colored Masons in Georgia 
have been licensed by the State to do a fra- 
ternal insurance business. They sui^port the 
orphan home and industrial school and have 
in their insurance fund $68,346. 

^ Houston, Tex., has a $15,000 colored 
librar}' nearly ready for tenancy. There are 
rooms for children, reference, lectures and 
trustee meetings. The architect was W. S. 
Pittman, of Washington, D. C. It has 
20,000 volumes. 

9 The second colored branch library of 
Louisville, Ivy., will have a building to cost 
$17,000, a gift of Mr. Carnegie. The $5,000 
already raised is for the site. 

^ The National League on LTrban Condi- 
tions has undertaken to handle ''the big- 
brother movement" in the case of colored 
boys in New York City. It has already had 
fifty-one cases. 

^ The baseball team of Wilberforce Uni- 
versity will make a Southern trip this spring, 
playing white colleges in Ohio and colored 
schools in Kentucky, Alabama and Georgia. 
fl An athletic carnival was held among the 
colored students of Washington at Conven- 
tion Hall. Among the schools represented 
were Howard, Lincoln and Hampton, besides 
many Northern high schools. 
ECONOMICS. 
'T'HE Mutual Housing Company, of 
■*■ Springfield, Mass., has been organized 
to supply good tenements for colored people 
and to encourage investments in real estate. 
They own property to the value of $12,200, 
and have recently declared a dividend of 5 
per cent. 



^ The Colored Stenographers' Association 
has been organized in New York City for 
securing employment and mutual benefit. 

^ The North Carolina Mutual and Provident 
Association, a colored industrial insurance 
company, had a gross income of $313,576 for 
1912, an increase of $50,000 over the pre- 
vious year. 

<I The Knoxville Banking and Trust Com- 
pany, a white institution, recently went into 
the hands of a receiver and hundreds of 
colored people lost their money. Negroes are 
thinking of opening a. bank of their own. 
All the officials have been arrested and held 
in heavy bond. Lawson Irvin, a Negro con- 
tractor, swore out the main warrant. 
^ The Scullin-Gallagher Steel Foundry, of 
St. Louis, Mo., one of the largest steel plants 
in the world, employs several thousand 
colored men in its shops. Negroes are to 
be found working in all but three of its de- 
partments. The wages paid Negroes run 
from $1.75 to $6 per day. Not a few 
Negroes have learned the trade in this 
foundry and are now foremen of their 
departments. 

^ The method of land tenancy in South 
Carolina is thus described by the Columbia 
State: 

"A lawyer in Greenville or Columbia buys 
150 acres twenty miles from his office at $6 
an acre, or $900. He leases it to a Negro 
for 1,500 pounds of lint cotton a year, worth, 
at 10 cents a pound, $150. The Negro buys 
a mule, mortgaging it to the seller, and 
mortgages his crop to a merchant. The 
merchant takes long chances and demands big 
profits for advances. Sometimes both land 
owner and merchant lose everything, but 
in 'good years' th^ir returns are excellent. 
The land owner has a fine investment if he 
collects his rent once in two years, $63, after 
the payment of taxes', being 7 per cent, 
on his investment." 

^ In Toronto, Canada, G. W. Carter, a 
colored man has had the shoe-shining con- 
cession in the Union Depot for seventeen 
years, and manufactures slioe blacking which 
is widely sold. J. F. Gregory has a store and 
imports and sells ladies' and children's hats 
and dresses. Mrs. Decoursey, a colored 
woman, has been employed in the Wool- 
worth store for four years as timekeeper. 

^ Balaytown, Ark., is settled by Negroes. It 
has three stores, a e-inning factory and a saw- 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



269 



mill, and expects a brickj^ard soon. Good 
farming land around about can be bought 
for $15 an acre. The Union Industrial 
School is to be located there. 

^ The Frederick Douglass Center, of 
Chicago, has been trAing to widen industrial 
opportunity for colored people by appeal- 
ing to business men. Many business men 
have responded. 

Julius Rosenwald, who led the movement 
for the establishment of colored Y. M. C. A. 
organizations, wrote : 

"I keenly feel the injustice against the 
colored man, and have for some time past 
been making efforts to convince some of the 
head men of Sears, Roebuck & Co. of our 
duty in that direction." 

Irwin S. Rosenfels, advertising manager 
for Sears, Roebuck & Co., wrote: 

"It will interest you to know that I 
recently have secured a favorable expres- 
sion regarding the admission of colored ap- 
prentices from shop chairmen of three 
different labor unions employed in our print- 
ing plant." 

^ Farmers' Bulletin No. 516 of the United 
States Department of Agriculture tells of 
the remarkable intensive farming of Samuel 
McCall, a colored man of Alabama: 

"Determining upon concentrating his 
efforts upon a small area of land, he selected 
two acres near his cabin and has been de- 
voting time and energy to that small tract 
for the past twenty-one years. His first 
effort was to improve the organic content of 
the soil. Practicalh'^ everything produced by 
the soil, except the lint cotton and a portion 
of the seed, was returned to it. All the 
manure produced by his horse and two cows 
was used, but no commercial fertilizer except 
a little cottonseed meal under oats. Gradu- 
ally the soil was made deeper by plowing 
iintil in a few years it was open and porous 
to a depth of ten or twelve inches. 

"By 1898 the land was producing seven 
bales of cotton to the two acres which had 
first made about two-thirds of a bale each. 
This ex-slave took up seed selection earl}' 
and produced a high yielding strain, knpwn 
locally by his name, as Sam McCall cotton. 
He has practised crop rotation during the 
past few years to advantage. He plants 
one crop while another is maturing, thus 
keeping the land always oceu)>ied, getting 
a crop each of oats, com and cotton from the 
same ground in one year. The goal of his 



ambition is to raise nine 500-pound bales of 
cotton on one acre; he has already suc- 
ceeded in raising a 506-pound bale on a 
measured eighth of an acre. Jn one year 
he has produced, from one acre, three bales 
of cotton, fifty bushels of oats and fifty 
bushels of corn, according to this account." 

^ In Empire, Wyo., there are eight colored 
families. They have a public school and 
a Presbyterian Church. Four of these 
families have deeds to near 900 acres of 
land; all families, save one, have home- 
steads of 320 acres each. 

^ In the town of Gering, Western Nebraska, 
a prospective white juror, hailing from 
Southern Texas, was objected to because he 
acknowledged that in a case of colored men 
against white men he could not give an 
unbiased judgment. The case was that of 
Speese Brothers (colored) versus Nieholls 
(white), claiming $6,000 damages for cattle 
alleged to have been unlawfully taken by 
Nieholls. Judgment was rendered for the 
plaintiff. 

*! In St. Louis, Mo., white stablemen have 
struck because of colored competitors, and 
in Dallas, Tex., white chauffeurs tried to 
drive out the colored men until the owners 
armed their employees. 

EDUCATION. 

/GOVERNOR BLEASE, of South Caro- 
^^ lina, has vetoed a compulsory school- 
attendance bill. 

^ The Phelps-Stokes trustees have appropri- 
ated $10,000 for an endowment of a 
visitation fund at the white Peabody School 
in Tennessee. The purpose of the fund is to 
keep the officers, teachers and students of 
the school in close touch with the actual work 
of Negro educational institutions. 
•I The New Orleans courts have decided that 
the bill to remove the Southern University, 
a colored institution, from the city is 
unconstitutional. 

^ The Virginia Negro State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation has been meeting in Norfolk. There 
were 400 delegates in attendance. 
^ The General Educational Board is offering 
to provide a salary of $3,000 a year for 
a State supervisor of Negro rural schools in 
certain Southern States. There have been 
several Negro applicants, but white men 
have been appointed in Florida and in 
Arkansas. 



270 



THE CRISIS 



^ Another colored Greek-letter school fra- 
ternity, known as the KajDpa Alpha Nu, has 
been organized at the Universities of Indiana 
and Illinois. 

^ The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical 
College, at Tallahassee, has opened a new 
hospital and nurses' training school. 

fl Robert Biggs, an uninfluential school com- 
missioner in Baltimore, has made an 
abortive attempt to reduce the curriculum 
of the colored high school. Another dema- 
gogue is proposing "Jim Crow" street cars. 

MEETINGS. 

'' I 'HE new Andrew Memorial Hospital has 
•*• been dedicated at Tuskegee Institute. 
The hospital cost $50,000 and on the occasion 
of its dedication visitors from the North and 
East were present. Erom Chicago Julius 
Rosenwald took a number of distinguished 
persons. Ella Flagg Young, superintendent 
of the Chicago public schools, said while in 
Tuskegee that she was interested in men and 
not in separate races. 

Dr. Aaron Aaronson, director of the 
Jewish Agricultural Experiment Station in 
Palestine, said : 

"What is the use of the intensification of 
race differences and race qualities? I do not 
believe there are superior or inferior races, 
but different races. There are superior or 
inferior individuals, but the claim of inherent 
race superiority is a conceit. I feel sure that 
the world is the richer and the man is the 
better when we try to bring out in 6very race 
and every individual the qualities and the 
energies they are best fitted to develop." 

•1 A State commission is investigating the 
affairs of the Negro Exposition Company in 
Philadelphia. It is said that' the New Jersey 
people have decided to hold their celebration 
within the State. 

fl A mass meeting of 2,000 persons in the 
Metropolitan Church, Washington, D. C, 
passed resolutions opposing "Jim Crow" 
legislation. They pointed to the fact that 
they paid taxes on .$40,000,000 of real estate 
and that the proi:)Osed legislation was de- 
signed to degrade, in the eyes of the civilized 
world, one-fourth of tiie inhabitants of the 
national capital. They said, among other 
things : 

"Whereas, We colored people of the 
District of Columbia in mass meeting 
assembled, believe that after two and a half 



centuries of slavery and a half century of 
mob violence and insult that we have suffered 
enough. 

"1. Resolved, That we protest most 
emphatically against the attempt to promote 
the growth of a local sentiment for the 
segi'egation of the races in the street cars of 
the national capital. 'Jim Crow' cars are a 
cheat. They do not afford equal accom- 
modation. In all cases wherever local circum- 
stances force a readjustment of the space 
prescribed for the races the colored people 
suffer. 'Jim Crow' cars are plainly in viola- 
tion of the fundamental princiioles of the 
law of the common carrier, a principle which 
even the Supreme Court cannot square with 
the leading cases of the common law of Eng- 
land and of this country. 

"We further protest against the enact- 
ment of a. 'Jim Crow' car law because only 
a reactionary group seeks to introduce here 
customs of commonwealths* in which the 
Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments are a 
dead letter, and where the spirit of liberty is 
suppressed. 

"2. Resolved, That we protest against 
the railroading through the House of Rep- 
resentatives of a miscegenation law as an 
invasion of the most sacred of individual 
rights. Besides drawing a color line based 
on racial prejudice, it is clearly unconstitu- 
tional in that it prohibits people of sound 
mind, proper age and good moral character 
from exercising their common-law rights to 
enter into the marriage status. 

"While the avowed purpose of the bill is 
to preserve the purity of the white race, it 
ignores indiscriminate sexual relations be- 
tween the races, leaves woman unprotected 
against the brutal advances of vicious men 
and p-romotes domestic tragedies that are a 
blight upon our so-called Christian 
civilization. 

"3. Resolved, That we beg leave to call 
the attention of those who are advocating 
this proposed discriminatory legislation to the 
fact that the colored people were induced in 
large measure to drop party lines in the 
recent presidential canvass and give their 
support to the first candidate since the Civil 
War from the South, whose triumph seemed 
a concrete illustration of the fact that sec- 
tional lines were obliterated; a candidate 
who himself expressed surprise that there 
could be the slightest distrust on the part of 
anv citizen as to his security in the exercise 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



271 



of political rights so far as he himself was 
concerned. His incoming ought not to be 
embarrassed by reactionary measures and 
their advocates, especially at the seat of the 
national government." 

fl Farmers' conferences of colored people 
have been held at Lane College, Jackson, 
Tenn., and at Demopolis, Ala. 

^ At the National Federation of Religious 
Liberals recently held at Rochester, N. Y., 
the cause of the Negro was discussed by the 
Hon. John E. Milholland and Mrs. A. W. 
Hunton. 

PERSONAL 

'T'HE centenary of the birth of David 
"*■ Livingstone was celebrated by Lincoln 
University on March 7. The address for the 
occasion was delivered by Mrs. Paul 
Laurence Dunbar. 

^ Grace Morris Hutten, of Omaha, Neb., 
has completed the three-year advanced 
teacher's course in Bellevue College in one 
year and a half, and has received a State life 
certificate. She is the only colored woman 
who ever attended this college. 

^ Mrs. Mary Church Terrell, of Washington, 
D. C, has delivered a second course of lec- 
tures on the NegTo race in the United States 
at the Brooklyn Institute. 

^ A memorial trophy committee, of which 
Dr. Louis E. Baxter is secretary, is collect- 
ing money for a trophy in honor of the 
late John B. Taylor, Jr. The prize will be 
competed for each year until won three 
times by one club or college. 

^ Dr. J. W. Hawkins, a colored physician of 
Dawson, Ga., was the first to report menin- 
gitis in that city. The white city physician 
and a colleague declared that the cases were 
not meningitis and finally sent to Atlanta for 
experts who confirmed Dr. Hawkins' diag- 
nosis. Dr. Hawkins owns a drug store, an 
automobile and considerable real estate. 
fl David J. Gilmere, a colored captain in 
the Spanish-American War, returned to his 
home in Greensboro, N. C, and went into 
business. First he started a grocery store, 
then a drug store, barber shop and a 
restaurant. He also owns a 100-acre farm. 

fl Fred R. Moore, publisher of the New 
York Afje, has been confirmed by the United 
States Senate as minister to Liberia. He 
was nominated by ex-President Taft and will 



hold office until his successor is appointed 
by President Wilson. Moore was formerly 
messenger for a downtown bank. 

fl James Hammond, an Oyster Bay (N. Y.) 
Negro, has died leaving an estate worth 
$30,000. He was 70 years old and could 
not read or write. 

^ Dr. S. S. H. Washington, a practising 
physician of Montgomery, Ala., well known 
throughout the State, died recently. 

^ Dr. C. H. Turner, the colored biologist of 
the Sumner High School of St. Louis, Mo., 
recently delivered three lectures before the 
Academy of Science in that city on bees, 
ants and wasps. 

^ The Right Reverend Henry M. Turner, 
senior bishop of the African Methodist 
Church, has retired from active church work 
at the age of 80. 

^ A modern Catholic church and school for 
colored people has been erected at Atlanta, 
Ga. ; it is a three-story building of brick and 
stone, valued at $16,000. 

^ In Richmond, Va., a Catholic college for 
the higher education of NegToes has been 
established. It has industrial departments. 

fl The new Bethel Methodist Episcopal 
Church in West 132d Street, New York City, 
has been begun. It will cost $75,000. 

MUSIC AND ART. 
'T'HE sum of $2,250 is needed by July 



1 



1 to keep the residence of the late 



Samuel Coleridge- Taylor from being sold. 
It is proposed that the colored American 
admirers of Mr. Taylor and his work should 
raise this money. The Crisis would be very 
glad to give further details to persons in- 
terested in this project. 

^ Mrs. Maud Cuney Hare and Mr. William 
H. Richardson, of Boston, Mass., are giving 
concerts in Texas. 

^ The choral society of the Washington 
Conservatory of Music (Harry A. Williams, 
director) gave a choral concert; assisted by 
Felix Weir, violinist, on February 2, at the 
Howard Theatre, Washington, D. C. The 
soloists were Misses Jeanne Kelly, Alta B. 
Scott and A. Lillian Evans, soprani; Miss 
Enola McDaniels, alto; Mr. Adolph Hodge, 
bass. 

In keeping with the Sunday concerts of 
serious purpose inaugurated this winter in 
New York and Boston, the Washington Con- 



272 



THE CRISIS 



servatory of Music is making the Sunday- 
evening concerts a new feature of this 
season's work. 

The second public concert was given on 
March 1. The choral society presented Miss 
Daisy Tapley, of New York, in the comic 
opera "Mikado." The dances were under 
the direction of Miss Theresa Lee. 

fl A Vietrola has been purchased by the 
Teachers' Choral Society of Louisville, Ky. 
The instrument will be used in all of the 
schools of the city as a medium of acquaint- 
ing the pupils with the best music. 

fl Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois gave a lecture on 
American Negro folk songs, assisted by Mr. 
Harry T. Burleigh, baritone, on Sunday 
afternoon, February 23, at the Ethical 
Culture meeting house. The lecture was 
given under the auspices of the Music School 
Settlement for CoFored People. 
«! Miss Clarice Jones, pianist, of Washington, 
D. C, and Mr. Roland W. Hayes, tenor, 
of Boston, Mass., presented a program at 
Andrew Rankin Memorial Chapel, of How- 
ard University, Washington, D. C, which is 
deser\'ing of mention. Mr. R. Wilfred Tibbs, 
the excellent pianist, was the accompanist. 
Miss Jones is a graduate of the Ithaca Con- 
servatory of Music, of New York. 

^ Since there are no library facilities for 
the colored people at Paris, Tex., the 
Gibbons colored high school of that city, 
t])rough concerts and lectures, has provided 
for the school a well-chosen library of 1,400 
volumes, a piano and eighteen instruments 
for the use of the boys' brass band. 

^ "Majors and Minors," one of the earliest 
of Paul Laurence Dunbar's books, is quite 
rare and is being quoted by dealers at $7.50. 

^ The musical and historical pageant, cele- 
brating the fiftieth anniversary of emancipa- 
tion, was given at Carnegie Hall, New York. 
It was entitled "Historic Scenes at 
Hampton." 

FOREIGN. 

DR. LEO. FROBENIUS, of the German 
Central African exploration expedition, 
has obtained some remarkable terracotta 
work from West Africa and has found some 
unknown ruined cities. 

^ Prof. Carl Pearson, lecturing in London, 
declares that all white races are evolved from 
colored races. 



^ The financial report of the island of St. 
Lucia, B. W. I., shows a prosperous con- 
dition. The revenue amounts to $360,000, 
which was $15,000 more than the expenditure. 

THE GHETTO. 

/CLEVELAND G. ALLEN has been 
^-^ unearthing discrimination in the navy 
against colored sailors. He reports that 
colored men who enlist in the navy are 
barred from all social life aboard the ships; 
as, for instance, smokers, entcKtainments and 
the privilege of the libraries and reading 
rooms. Colored men are only received for 
enlistment in the messmen branch and get 
no chance for promotion except to steward- 
ship — and the steward does not rank as a 
petty officer. The Negro is deprived of the 
regular system of shore leave and in other 
ways so treated that the few that enlist 
desert whenever opportunity offers. There 
are a very few colored petty officers and sea- 
men who enlisted during the time of the 
Spanish-American War. They are for the 
most part isolated in out-of-the-way places. 
^ None of the new set of intermarriage bills 
have yet been passed in the North, but all 
sorts of desperate expedients are being used. 
Forged petitions from alleged colored organi- 
zations have been distributed in Ohio; de- 
feated measures have been reintroduced in 
Kansas and Iowa, and a bill was sneaked 
through the national House of Representa- 
tives during the absence of two-thirds of the 
members. In the State of Washington a bill 
prohibiting intermarriage between white and 
colored races, except where both are citizens 
of the United States, has been passed. It is 
aimed at Asiatics. 

^ The colored fire company of Durham, 
N. C, was disbanded as soon as the new 
fire-engine house was finished. 

fl "Jim Crow" street cars have been proposed 
in Illinois and Delaware. 

^ A segregation ordinance is proposed in 
Atlanta, Ga. 

COURTS. 

THE case of Dr. W. J. Thompkins, of 
Kansas City, Mo., against the railroad 
company for ejection from a Pullman car is 
to be carried to the United States Circuit 
Court. 

^ In Atlanta, when six Negroes were called 
to trial, it was found that the warrants upon 
which they were arrested were forged. They 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE 



273 



had all paid bogus bonds. Ten men have 
been arrested in connection with the scandal. 

^ The public service commission of Mary- 
land has ordered tbat the B., C. and A. 
Company provide, on its trains operated 
from Claiborne to Ocean City and on its 
trains operated elsewhere in the State, ac- 
commodations for colored passengers which 
shall make no difference or discrimination in 
qualitj' or convenience of accommodations in 
the cars or compartments set aside for white 
and colored passengers. 

That whenever a car is set aside for colored 
passengers the same may be divided by a 
substantial partition so as to furnish a smok- 
ing compartment for colored men, provided 
that the number of colored passengers is not 
sufficiently large to give them a just claim 
to an entire smoking car instead of such a 
smoking compartment. 

^ In Alabama it is solemnly declared that a 
white oflScer with a Negro prisoner can ride 
either in the white car or the colored car. 
^ In Massachusetts it has been decided that 
an owner has a right to advertise his 
property as for sale to colored people. 

CRIME. 
^ I 'HE following lynchings have taken 
■*• place since our last record: 

At Elysian Fields, Tex., two colored men, 
for horse stealing. 

At Andalusia, Ala. (where several Negroes 
have been lynched in the past and post- 
cards with the scenes published), a colored 
man was lynched for shooting a white 
woman. 

At Cornelia, Ga., two colored men were 
lynched for killing a policeman. 

At Manning, S. C, a Negro boy was shot 
to death for assault and battery on a white 
man. 

At Drew, Miss., a Negro was lynched (by 
a mob said to be colored people) for murder. 

At Lyrtis, La., a colored preacher was 
lynched. He owed a white merchant $10. 
The merchant demanded his pay, but the 
colored man did not have it. The merchant's 
friends attempted to whip him. The man 
resisted and was killed. 

^ At Clay City, Ky., one of four Negroes 
charged with murder is believed to have 
been lynched. 

^ One of the lynchers of the mob that 
lynched the wrong man at Houston, Miss., 
has committed suicide. 



^ A bill to legalize lynching has been in- 
troduced into the South Carolina legislature. 

^ On account of the race riots at CoUier- 
ville, Tenn., one white man and two colored 
men are dead. 

^ A white man in Memphis, Tenn., has been 
found guilty of wantonly murdering a Negro. 
He was sentenced to twelve years in the 
penitentiary. 

Q In Augusta, Ga., a prominent white man 
remonstrated with another white man who 
was whipping a Negro. The prominent white 
man was killed. 

fl The reign of terror in North Georgia con- 
tinues. The homes of three Negroes were 
recently dynamited. 

fl Frederick L. Hoffman, who distinguished 
himself some years agio by predicting dire 
calamities to the colored race, has declared in 
a letter to the New York Times that lynching 
is decreasing. He bases his conclusions upon 
these figures: 

Lynchings per 

Number of 1,000,000 

Lynchings Population 

1885-1889 762 2.58 

1890-1894 944 2.88 

1895-1899 702 1.95 

1900-1904 537 1.36 

1905-1909 385 0.88 

1910 74 0.80 

1911 71 0.76 

1912 64 0.67 
1885-1912 3,539 1.69 

He adds the following table: 

LYNCHINGS BY STATES. 

1908-1912 

Eate per 
Number of 1,000,000 
States Lynchings Population 

Florida 40 10.63 

Georgia 74 5.67 

Mississippi 46 5.12 

Louisiana 33 3.98 

Alabama 30 2.81 

Arkansas 22 2.81 

Texas 45 2.31 

Tennessee 23 2.11 

South Carolina.... 15 1.98 

Kentucky 22 1.92 

Oklahoma 14 1.69 

West Virginia 3 0.49 

Virginia 4 0.39 

Missouri 6 0,36 

North Carolina 3 0.27 

Illinois 4 0.14 

Ohio 2 0.08 

Ten other States have each had a single 
lynching in this period. 



MN or THE MONTH 




A JUROR. 

■DEATRICE REAMS BALL, of Seattle, 
-*^ Wash., is the second colored woman to 
serve as a juror in the State of Washington. 
Mrs. Ball was educated in the public schools 
of Denver, Col., and at the Elms, Spring- 
field, Mass. She returned to Denver and was 
there appointed to a clerkship in the 




MRS. B. B. BALL. 

recorder's office, a position which she held 
for three years with credit. She moved to 
Seattle, Wash., in 1904. 

In 1910 the constitution of the State of 
Washington was amended so as to give 
■women the right of suffrage, and since that 
time women have been serving on juries in 



all the courts of the State. Not until this 
month did the most populous county, King, 
select for jury service a colored woman, and 
that woman is Mrs. Ball. She is now sitting 
as juror in the court of Seattle. 



THE PASSING OF 
JAMES EDGAR FRENCH. 

JAMES EDGAR TRENCH did not dis- 
tinguish himself to any great degree as 
a man of letters. Death claimed him just 
as he was about to enter upon his life work 
as poet and writer. But manuscripts and 
writings which he left show that he possessed 
talent. 

Mr. French was born at Paris, Ky., in 
1876, and died at Chicago, 111., July 31, 1912. 
After finishing high school at Paris, he 
taught school in the rural districts of Ken- 
tucky, and in 1901 was a member of the 
faculty of the State normal school at Frank- 
fort. At his death he was in the government 
service in Chicago. 

From his youth he was a close and de- 
voted student of the best literature, particu- 
larly poetry. Among his unpublished 
manuscripts there are essays, poems and a 
novel upon which he spent several years, 
and which he was rewriting at the time of 
his death. 

An article of some length on the fourth 
annual meeting of the National Association 
for the Advancement of Colored People, set- 
ting forth "what it is, what it aims to do, 
its method, with a few of the things it has 
accomplished in the three years of its exist- 
ence," was probably his last single literary 
effort; for he died just three months after 
that meeting was held in Chicago last April. 

We close with a line from "The Winged 
Ideal": 

"I would have you observe also that a 
man's success in li^ t.ov be measured not 



MEN OF THE MONTH 



275 




THE LATE J. E. FRENCH. 

by the place he holds in the eyes of men, 
but by the approval he wins from his own 
conscience. And this approval will be in 
proportion to the honor and reverence which 
a man is able to pay to his life's ideal." 



A HUMAN DOCUMENT. 

TWAS born October 5, 1880, in a one-room 
■^ cabin floored by the bare ground. I 
lived the first twelve years of my life in a 
narrow valley at the foot of a big hill which 
guards the waters of the Coosa. I was 
licensed to preach at the age of 12 and 
soon became known as a "boy preacher." I 
rhymed, whined or "whanged" to such an 
extent that' the good old folks soon thought 
that T was a fit subject for ordination. 
Wherefore at the age of 16 I began the 
pastorate of two big country churches, each 
having more than .300 members. 

During these four years of pastoral work 
I recited and wrote many crude things (I 
don't know where nor how I learned any- 
thing-^I was never taught). At the age of 
20 I went to a Methodist theological 
seminary and remained there for nearly three 
years. I was not graduated because the 
Baptist pastors persuaded me to "leave the 



Methodist school Avithout a diploma." I 
spent three years in Chicago and St. Louis 
preaching, writing, working. When I left 
the West I went to a colored university in 
the South, where I spent seven years in 
academic theological and college departments. 
During all these years I accumulated bales 
of manuscripts, from which trash I expect to 
untangle some time a worthy book of stories 
and poems. While in college I was editor- 
in-chief of a paper for three years. My 
poems and stories appeared in its columns 
each week. The paper had a large circulation 
in the city, hence it was not long before I 
was called "Dunbar the Second." Many 
papers have published some of my writings. 
My success in the pastorate here has been 
good. The opinion of the best people added 
to what I have previously achieved has made 
me believe that I could stand wider public 
notice. So you see that I resist the tempta- 
tion no longer when I send you my "cut" 
and some selections from my "rhymes," 
expecting them to appear in The Crisis. I 
hope that you will find space for a few lines 
of commendation. It will prove stimulating 
and encouraging to me and will probably 
help me to become what I never could become 
without your help. 




"A HUMAN DOCUMENT. 




THE ARMY. "^^^ Army and Navy Journal 
publishes a translation of an 
article in the Trench Revue Militaire 
Generale, which says, among other things : 

"Taking everything into consideration, we 
cannot place the number of privates of the 
line, worthy of that name, above ten or 
twelve per company, according to the testi- 
mony of the experts. We must, however, 
make an exception in the case of the Negro 
regiments, which number in the ranks many 
re-enlisted men, and therefore have a large 
proportion of well-disciplined and well- 
trained soldiers. They have indeed given 
proof of this, and particularly in the 
Spanish- American War. More than once in 
Cuba the honor of the day has, in justice, 
been due to them. I have personally seen 
the Negro infantry in Colorado and a regi- 
ment of black cavalry in Vermont; all these 
'colored soldiers/ as they are called, were 
well built and well set up. They had a 
military bearing very unusual in the 
Ameiican army, and they would have taken 
an honorable place in the ranks of European 
troops." 

This testimony is further strengthened 
by a letter from the Secretary of War from 
the mayor of an Arizona town, who says: 

"I wish to give honor to whom honor is 
■due; therefore I wish to state officially, as 
the mayor of this town, that Troops I, K 
and L, of the 9th U. S. Cavalry, have been 
stationed at this place for several months, 
and their actions have been perfectly 
exemplary in (his town, and there has never 
been the slightest cause for any trouble for 
our peace officers." 

Small wonder that the United States is 
not anxious to .get rid of its black troops. 



The Los Angeles Times says in the 
editorial columns : 

"It may be news to some, but the 
wave of ragtime at present sweeping 



NEGRO 
MUSIC. 



America (also, by the way, washing out con- 
siderable starch from the British composi- 
tion) is really a triumph for the colored 
race. Eighteen years ago ragtime was started 
in America and for good or ill it has now 
become an institution. It was really intro- 
duced by a Negro named Will Cook, a 
splendid musician, as so many Negroes are. 
Cook started it with a libretto by Paul Dun- 
bar, whose face was as black as his lines 
were brilliant. The piece was played under 
the direction of Edward E. Kice on the roof 
of the New York Casino. Only eighteen 
years ago; and this African renaissance has 
captured the human race ! 

"The prevalence of the minor key is 
another sign of its primitive origin; all un- 
tutored races naturally express themselves 
in minors. The rollicking exuberance of the 
rhythm is the American note dominating the 
original stock. Presently some expert will 
take the commonness out of ragtime and it 
will take its place among legitimate musical 
compositions. 

"Already it is influencing classical music. 
Dvorak's symphonies and humoresques are 
only sublimated ragtime. Yet they could 
be played not inappropriately on a church 
organ. The extollers of Wagner are in reality 
praising ragtime raised to a dramatic height. 
In fact people generally are beginning to 
think and talk and act in ragtinje. Every- 
thing is being sjmcopated, even conversa- 
tion and political speeches. We talk either 
in shorthand or ragtime. It is a sign of the 
lyric age brought about by American bustle 
and American optimism. It fits in naturally 
with the motor car, the wireless and the 
aeroplane. 

"Old-fashioned conservatives naturally 
fight this innovation, but the younger gene- 
ration is sweeping all before it. In exclusive 
restaurants ragtime has been discarded as 
an aid to digestion — the process of mastica- 
tion at least needs i-Iowirig down, not speed- 



OPINION 



277 



ing up. But it is crowding out the graceful 
waltz and the gliding two-step from the dance 
floor; it is monopolizing light opera and 
pushing its way into the realms of the 
classical. The Salvation Army has long em- 
ployed it to start religious revivals among 
the uncultured. An excellent work. Prob- 
ably the name of Will Cook will be known 
to posterity. Ragtime has come to stay." 

The Richmond Times-Dispatch, comment- 
ing on an article in the New York Age, says : 

"This is as encouraging as is the statement 
that the Negroes still reverence the old folk 
song's and that a society called 'The Frogs' 
is industriously at work collecting them. We 
add to these hopeful signs the fact that John 
Powell, of Richmond, pianist and composer 
of note, has used Negro themes in one move- 
ment of his violin concerto, played recently 
in New York for the first time by Efrem 
Zimbalist. The South is keenly aware of the 
musical value of such original motifs. It 
seems not unlikely that the native genius of 
the Negro for melody will be reflected by 
composers of both races in their endeavors 
to reflect the manifold spirit of America. 
Negro and Indian survivals are all we have 
of what may be called original music. The 
Times-Dispatch does love the old songs, but 
it also believes they may be molded into 
richer and more striking esthetic forms that 
will answer to the hopes expressed by the 
Age in this paragraph. 

"NegTo music is not dead — far from it — 
and it is yet to enjoy the patronage of the 
public. The intentions of the Times-Dispatch 
are of the best, but it, with other Southern 
papers, has the fault of idealizing the Negro 
of slavery days, as well as all things relative 
thereto. We who believe in race progress, 
while thinking kindly, and some of us affec- 
tionately, of what has been, find greater in- 
spiration, interest and hope in the things of 
to-day and to-morrow — things more material 
and which have a more conspicuous bearing." 



MURDER ^* ^^ "°* often that a Negro paper 
in the South speaks out plainly, 
and particularly the Southwestern Christian 
Advocate, which is apt to be overconserva- 
tive in its comments; but lynchings in these 
last days have aroused the editor: 

"As a matter of fact, every Negro walks 
upon 'sinking sand' and can scarcely count 
a day his own. Even the most conservative 
and peaceable and the most humble, if they 



were to recognize insults and infractions, 
would be the chief cause for headlines in 
the daily press. It is against this stifling, 
threatening atmosphere which we breathe, 
that we utter a protest. We impart a secret 
of the Negro's heart life when we say that, 
in spite of the Negro's accumulation of prop- 
erty, which aggregates now more than seven 
hundred million of dollars, no little of this 
has been accumulated with misgivings. Often 
in family council the debate is whether it is 
worth while or not to purchase property, 
and if property is purchased may it not 
have to be sold at a sacrifice on an order to 
move out, and under the most distressing 
circumstances. It is the atmosphere of lynch- 
ing and the absolutely reckless disregard of 
the Negro's life and the powerlessness of the 
government to protect the Negro that con- 
cern us. 

"Let our readers listen while we make 
good our contention: 

"We know of a Methodist preacher who 
desired a change of appointment because 
he preached against illicit relations between 
white men and colored women. A dare- 
devil of a white man placed his hand upon 
the shoulder of this man of God and threat- 
ened him with death if he dared open his 
mouth on that subject again. And this was 
not the first Negro to be intimidated at this 
particular place. 

"A good friend of ours was bullied and his 
life threatened the other day by an under- 
ling in a ticket office, simply because this 
friend of ours, when questioned concerning 
a mileage book, answered 'yes,' instead of 
'yes, sir.' This friend was not at all impolite 
or ill-mannered in his speech, for he is a 
polished, Christian gentleman. But the 
underling wanted it understood that a 
'Nigger' must say 'yes, sir,' or pay the cost. 
And this is not an isolated instance of the 
kind. 

"We have, on our desk, a note signed by 
one of our ministers, which tells of the shoot- 
ing of two Negroes; one was seriously 
wounded and the other killed outright be- 
cause, it was claimed by a young white man, 
the Negroes had driven a buggy wheel over 
the foot of his dog. They plead 'not gi;ilty,' 
but that was of no avail. They saw trouble 
coming and fled and both were shot in the 
back. We reserve the name of the pastor 
and the place, for the protection of the 
pastor. (Think of it! We dare not let it 



278 



THE CRISIS 



be known that he reported the ease. He 
might not be secure.)" 

Even white papers like the Arkansas 
Gazette sometimes tell the truth : 

"The Fort Smith Times-Record points to 
the lesson in the death of a promising son 
of a prominent Fort Smith family at the 
hands of a fear-crazed Negro in Fort Smith 
a few days ago. The lesson as outlined by 
the Times-Record teaches again the dangers 
of allowing irresponsible fellows to go armed 
and to make arrests, and incidentally teaches 
that murder and violent deaths will con- 
tinue to be common in Arkansas untU the 
courts and the peace officers abolish the 
pistol-carrying habit. 

"The young man who was killed in Fort 
Smith, hearing shots, ran to the scene to do 
his duty as a citizen and was killed by a 
Negro who had been beaten by the two men 
sent to aiTest him. The general opinion is 
that the Negro, who has a good reputation 
for industry and peacefulness, did not intend 
to kill the young man, but thought he was 
shooting at the other officer who had 
assisted in beating him. 

"If the statements concerning this affair 
are true the men who arrested the Negro 
are largely responsible for the terrible 
tragedy. It is said that they came to where 
the Negro was working to arrest him for 
some minor offense. They beat him until the 
blood ran from his head and face and he 
begged them not to strike him again, say- 
ing he was going with them as fast as he 
could. It is said further they continued to 
beat him and after they got him out of the 
building where he was employed they 
repeatedly jabbed a pistol into his stomach. 
The NegTO, crazed with fright and with his 
hands over his head, begged them to desist, 
and then, thinking he was going to be 
murdered, wrenched the pistol from the hands 
of one of the men and shot him. The other 
officer gallantly dived to safety. It was at 
this juncture that the young citizen, hearing 
the shots and rushing to the scene to do his 
duty as a good citizen, came before the 
blood-smeared eyes of the Negro and the 
Negro killed him. 

"It requires more than a commission and 
a pistol to make a good officer. It requires 
bravery, honesty and judgment. We hope the 
authorities of Fort Smith and Sebastian 
County and of every city, town and county 
in Arkansas, will benefit by the terrible lesson 
now before them." 



INTERMARRIAGE. 



A professor at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia has 
decided that the mulatto is not necessarily 
a degenerate, which leads the St. Luke's 
Herald (colored) to remark sarcastically: 

"This pronouncement coming from Char- 
lottesville is of peculiar significance. 
Charlottesville is what the University of 
Virginia has made it, especially along the 
lines of her mulatto population, made so by 
the very best of the South's distinguished 
scions." 

The Crown, that excellent church paper 
of Newark, N. J., discusses frankly the pro- 
posed intermarriage bill and says in part: 

"Assembly bill 183, which proposes to 
make it a misdemeanor to issue licenses 
for the marriage of a white person to a 
Negro or mulatto, or for ministers or others 
to perform such marriages, touches upon 
such fundamental principles of good morals, 
as well as of civil and religious rights, that 
a discussion of the subject should be of much 
interest and value. It was drafted by State 
Registrar David S. South and introduced by 
Mr. Marshall. Bills on somewhat similar 
lines have recently been introduced in four 
or five other States and also in Congress for 
the District of Columbia. 

"The bill, if it ever became law, would 
inevitably create in New Jersey a tendency 
to the immorality and bastardy that was a 
curse to blacks and whites in slavery days, 
and which is so to-day in Southern States 
where the prohibition of marriage and other 
relics of the slave-time regime prevail. At 
the time of the Civil "War the extent of the 
mulatto, quadroon and octoroon class showed 
how far the evil had gone. 

The impossibility of marriage would give 
greater immunity and security to licentious- 
ness, as it does in the South. It would offer 
greater temptations and inducements to evil, 
inasmuch as such illicit relations would be 
considered safe. It would make colored 
women a more easy prey and would increase 
their temptations. 

"The prohibition of marriage and the wide- 
spread and publicly condoned concubinage 
of the South make? colored women prac- 
tically helpless. In Turkey there are once- 
beautiful girls with ear or nose or face 
mutilated or disfigured to save them from the 
lust of Turkish officials. That is under 
anti-Christian rule. From the professedly 
Christian South m£"A inmilies with grow- 



OPINION 



279 



ing girls come North to tind safety. Is New 
Jersey to help to spread these evil 
conditions?" 



We cannot too often revert to 
EDUCATION, ^j^g ^.^^^ jl^^j jl^g Southern 

Negro is not receiving a decent chance for 
education. The Scroll, a student paper at 
Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga., says : 

"About four years ago a movement was 
started in Atlanta to float bonds in order to 
obtain money, a large part of which was to 
go for the purpose of improving the schools 
of Atlanta. All the qualified voters in the 
city were urged to vote for these bonds. The 
colored voters were told that if they would 
co-operate with the white people in this 
matter they would be assured of ample and 
improved school facilities. Accordingly 
when the contest was held at the polls the 
qualified voters of both races carried the 
election in favor of bonds. 

"Now after a lapse of about four years 
let us see what conditions we find in our 
city. Last fall, when the public schools 
opened, the superintendent decided not to 
have an eighth grade at the West Mitchell 
Street school on account of the crowded con- 
dition of the schools in this ward. This made 
it necessary for children who live in the first 
ward to walk from two to four miles through 
the downtown district to school. The colored 
citizens of this ward called a meeting to pro- 
test against this arrangement, and in this 
meeting, which I might say right here was 
successful in restoring the eighth grade in 
this ward, much was learned of the condi- 
tions of the public schools of Atlanta. 

"First, it was found that there is hardly a 
white residence in the city which is not 
within six blocks of a public school. With 
the aid of the bond-issue money, all of the 
old buildings have been replaced by modern 
structures which add much to the beauty of 
our city. We find that the white schools 
have only one session daily and that there 
is sufficient room for all white children to 
attend schools which are very close to their 
homes. In fact, in one of the schools which 
is situated near here on Ashby Street, there 
were enrolled last year ninety-five pupils in 
a school which would easily accommodate 
600 pupils, and I am told that there are 
only about 125 pupils in the school this 
year. 

"In contrast to the superabundance of 



white schools we liave but very few colored 
schools. It is often necessary for colored 
children to walk all the away across town 
because there is no school near them or be- 
cause the one which is near them is over- 
ciowded. In addition to this appalling fact, 
it is necessary for the colored public schools 
to have double sessions, which is unfair both 
to the teacher and to the pupils, especially 
those who come to the teacher after she has 
had to worry all morning with a class. From 
the proceeds from the bond issue the colored 
people have received one school, which is 
unsatisfactory in many ways. For instance, 
it is built with only a few entrances and 
exits and is miserably low on the ground. It 
was found that the building occupied by 
the Summer Hill School is in such bad con- 
dition that during a rain it is necessary for 
the teachers to put the children in one 
corner of the room in order that they may not 
get wet. In the Roach Street school, when- 
ever it gets cloudy, lamps must be lighted 
in two of the rooms which are situated in a 
basement. Only the Gray Street school ap- 
proaches in any degree the requirements 
which are necessary for comfort and good 
work in a school." 

The Atlanta Independent, a colored paper, 
goes on to say in reply to the Atlanta 
Constitution : 

"The Constitution talks about our educa- 
tional and moral uplift, and always picks 
up some 'hat-in-hand, yessir, boss,' Negro, 
whom the race has long ago repudiated and 
holds him out as a Moses. The Atlanta 
Normal and Industrial School is held out 
to us as a panacea for all our moral and 
educational diseases. Now why is our con- 
temporary so much more interested in this 
excuse of a school that has its greatest 
existence on paper than it is in reputable 
well-established schools like the Atlanta 
Baptist College, Clark University, Atlanta 
University, Morris Brown College and Spel- 
man Seminary? The explanation is not far 
fetched ; it is evidently at hand and plain. 

"If the Constitution wants us educated 
why does it not throw its great influence 
behind the real Negro colleges within the 
shadow of its dome? Why does it not tell 
the public of the high character and useful- 
ness of Drs. John Hope, W. A. Fountain, 
E. A. Ware, J. W. E. Bowen and the 
faculties of these great schools? Why harp 
and bleat about a little school in the ditch 



280 



THE CRISIS 



that the Constitution itself does not know 
whether or not it really exists in fact? If 
the Constitution is our friend, it would co- 
operate with the agencies struggling for our 
uplift. Who has heard the Constitution 
speak of the character and usefulness of 
the teachers of our colleges, or commend 
their work? If it wants us educated, why 
not get behind Morris-Brown College, 
Atlanta Baptist College, Atlanta University, 
Clark University, and Spelman Seminary? 
All the Negroes cannot be washerwomen, 
cooks, butlers, bootblacks and hat-in-hands 
any more than all white men can be 
preachers, lawyers and doctors." 

The Columbia State, a Southern white 
paper, points out that industrial and agri- 
cultural education may be just as 
"dangerous" to "white supremacy" as com- 
pulsory common school training: 

"The State submits to the Hon. B. R. 
Tillman, who was one of the first men of 
prominence to exploit this reason for op- 
posing compulsory education, that the 
'danger' he saw to 'white supremacy' in a 
compulsory attendance law is far more 
menacing in this voluntary improved farm- 
ing. How do he and others of his school 
of statesmanship propose to meet it? If it 
be wrong or dangerous to force all whites to 
learn to read and write because a few 
Negroes not already attending school may 
be inadvertently squeezed into Negro schools 
at the same time, how much worse, how much 
more dangerous, to encourage the Negro who 
has already learned to read to learn to grow 
a bale of cotton on the land that the unlet- 
tered white man cannot make produce more 
than a quarter of a bale? And if the way 
to help the white boy who does not wish to 
go to school is to let him stay out along with 
the Negro who wishes to stay out, the way 
to help the white farmer who is illiterate 
and in ignorance of farming must be, 
according to that logic, to keep the Negro 
farmer in the same state of ignorance and 
unprogressiveness ! 

"There is no escape from the logic of that 
situation for those unwilling to cut from the 
neck of our white people the millstone of 
illiteracy because they might simultaneously 
free some Negro who does not feel his bon- 
dage a tenth as much as the white man. 

"Shall we help the white farmer of another 
generation by furnishing him the founda- 
tion for an intelligence with which he can 



make land produce fifty bushels of corn to 
the acre; or shall we help him by leaving 
him in that mental state where he cannot 
make fifteen bushels and providing that his 
Negro neighbor shall do no better? 
"That is the question." 

The white teachers of New Orleans, too, 
are discovering that Negro education may 
not be the worst thing in the world. One 
of them recently read a paper before her 
fellows in which she said : 

"The prejudice of the Southern people 
against Negro colleges is so universal that 
it needs no quotation. It is a feeling that 
has come down to us from reconstruction 
days, and one which we have generally 
accepted without question. But the new 
South is beginning to appreciate the gravity 
of its race problem and to realize its respon- 
sibility for the moral and social development 
of the race whose services it cannot spare. 

"The tremendous importance of education 
as a factor in improving social conditions is 
everywhere acknowledged, and hence the first 
question that the new South, with its 
quickened social consciousness, is beginning 
to ask is: 'What are we doing to educate 
our Negroes?' It was from a desire to 
satisfy this questioning that the Southern 
Association of College Women appointed a 
committee to report on the work of the 
Negro schools and colleges of New Orleans. 

"In spite of the prosperous and encourag- 
ing condition of Negro education here we are 
constantly meeting people who are bitterly 
opposed to the education of the colored 
population. Investigatiou shows that their 
chief reason for this opposition is the fear 
that it will lead to race amalgamation when 
the social condition of the Negro is raised. 
Surely no blow could be more fatal to the 
South than race amalgamation, and the fear 
is one that deserves consideration. I per- 
sonally do not believe that education will 
have any such results. I think that as the 
Negroes are educated they will gain more 
self-respect and look less enviously upon 
their white neighbors. They will have leaders 
and advisers among themselves, and while 
amalgamation of the insidious character that 
now exists will no doubt continue to some 
extent, I believe that education of both the 
whites and the blacks will be the greatest 
factor in preventing it. 

"It is remarkable how many intelligent 
Negro men are comi : ^> i le front, and how 



OPINION 



281 



rapidly the rest of their race are turning to 
them instead of to white people. New 
Orleans now has six colored lawyers, twenty- 
one physicians, seven dentists, six editors, 
ninety ministers and 150 teachers, all gradu- 
ates of good schools. The Southwestern 
Christian Advocate is edited and • published 
entirely by Negroes, and it is a rather good 
paper, too. I have talked to the editor and 
his wife, and found them both intelligent and 
well-informed people." 



Mr. Henry W. Wilbur, a Phila- 
THE LAND. ^^^^i^i^ Quaker, has made a 
recent trip to the South and says: 

"The causes which lead the Southern 
Negro to leave the soil, and which must 
be removed, may be summarized as follows: 
The exaction of usurious rates of interest 
on money, whether the money is borrowed to 
help produce a cotton crop or to buy land. 
A virulent local prejudice which annoys, 
threatens and visits brutal treatment upon 
the Negi'o, especially the Negro who suc- 
ceeds. On the aflirmative side the improve- 
ment of the rural colored public schools is 
imperative. These are all matters only 
remotely to be reached by Northern phil- 
anthropy. They largely involve lines of 
conduct which must be applied by the 
Southern whites. 

"The Southern Negro is really indigenous 
to the soil. That he ought to stay on the 
soil is nearly an axiomatic statement. His 
presence in considerable numbers in cities 
anywhere is bad for both races. An 
organized effort to secure for him, and to 
eventually be paid for by him, large blocks 
of the cheap agricultural lands of the South 
is a line of effort which may well interest 
philanthropists and capitalists North and 
South, who are large enough to see that the 
best business and the ideal philanthropy 
must be employed in helping people to help 
themselves. 

"The building up of a feeling of comity 
between the two races in the South involves 
such conditions on the soil as will make the 
Negro economically successful as a farmer 
and self-respecting as a citizen. This means 
an increased disposition on the part of 
Southern white men to treat the Negro as a 
man, if not as a brother. This problem will 
not be solved, however, by performing 
i^iracles, but by creating an atmosphere of 
common justice and sympathy in which it 



can be sanely considered. In any event, the 
Negro will not remain on the soil in Dixie 
because white men want him to, but in the 
last analysis because it is made worth his 
while." 

A BLACK "^ reporter from the St. Louis 
j,Q-^^ Globe-Democrat has been having 

some interesting adventures in 
Boley, Okla. He writes: 

"Boley is what is known in Oklahoma as 
a 'Nigger town.' It has not a single white 
resident .in it. It is interesting. When I got 
off the train I looked around to see if any 
other white man came to Boley with me. I 
was alone. Then I looked around me. The 
platform was crowded with people. There 
was a white man, and I approached him and 
timidly asked him if he lived here. He 
looked pityingly at me and replied in the 
negative, stating that white people were not 
permitted here. 

" 'How about the station agent f I asked. 

" 'He's black,' replied the man. 

"'And the postmaster?' 

"'He's black, too.' 

"My bump of curiosity asserted itself and 
overmastered my loneliness. The more ques- 
tions I asked the more interested I became. 
Here at last I was to find the Negro question 
solved. In a few minutes I found myself 
engaged in delving into the workings of one 
of the most important colonization problems 
ever undertaken in this country, and I am 
glad to say I was pleased with my 
investigation. 

"Here is a town made up entirely of 
colored people — and the experiment is a 
splendid success. These black men and their 
families are happy, prosperous and con- 
tented, and they have a well-ordered and 
well-governed little city. 

"About eight years ago the Fort Smith and 
Western Railroad was built across the State, 
passing here. Contractor Boley was a friend 
of the Negro; he believed he had better im- 
pulses in him than the white man brings out; 
that if put upon his own responsibility he 
would rise to higher levels and better things. 
Boley came to the conclusion that if the 
colored people separated from the whites and 
had their own towns they would make greater 
progress and be happier. 

"Finally Boley laid the matter before the 
officials of his road and prevailed upon them 
to lay out a colored man's town. Then he 



282 



THE CRISIS 



elected the co-operation of T. M, Haynes, a 
bright, intelligent and industrious colored 
man, in the work of gathering a community 
of Negroes for the proposed new town. 

"It was not difficult to get a company of 
colored men together to start the enterprise, 
and in honor of the originator of the idea 
they named the town Boley. That was a little 
over seven years ago. 

"To-day Boley has a population of 2,000 
people; it is thoroughly organized and as 
well governed as any town of its size in 
Oklahoma. It has its own municipal water 
works, fire department, electric-light plant, 
telephone exchange — in fact, everything that 
any other town of 2,000 wotild be expected 
to have. There are three miles of concrete 
sidewalks — ten feet wide in the main street, 
on which there is not a foot of boardwalk. 
There are five aldermen and they have high 
ideals of civic , righteousness. It is a dry 
town; it is a model town; it is a clean town. 
"To give an idea of the morality of the 
people, I need but relate an incident of a 
few days ago. A traveling salesman accosted 
an attractive young colored woman; she 
accepted his advances so promptly his sus- 
picions were not aroused until he found she 
had led him into the police headquarters. 
That experience cost him $42. 

"The people of Boley are high grade, if 
they are colored. The white man who comes 
here cannot but be so impressed. Men and 
women are well dressed and all seem kindly 
disposed toward each other and exception- 
ally courteous. 

"I went up to the Farmers' and Merchants' 
Bank. The assistant cashier, a man named 
Jones, came here from Wheeling, W. Va., 
where he was a schoolteacher. He is enthu- 
siastic over Boley. 

" 'You should be here on a Saturday,' he 
said. 'The town is black; yes,' he laughed, 
'lilerally black with people. They come by 
hundreds from the farming districts, and a 
more orderly lot of people you never saw. 
The streets ring with their laughter and jokes. 
They are happy. And I tell you it is fortu- 
nate the colored people are of this disposition. 
If they were not they would be most miser- 
able and lost. I have never seen a serious 
quarrel here, and there has never been a 
killing in tlie town. We have a police force, 
but very little need of one. Just now we are 
having a little difficulty to keep bootleggers 
out.' '' 



THE NEGRO IN ^^^ ^'^^^ ^ork WorU pub- 
NEW YORK AND ^'^^'^^ ^ P^§'« On what it 

LONDON. means to be a Negro in 

New York: 
" 'The NegTo in New York is under a ban. 
In this great city, where the gates of oppor- 
tunity stand open wide to all men of all 
other races, nearly every field of honest 
employment is closed to any one — man, 
woman or child — who has Negro blood. Not 
only that. It is very difflctilt, if not impos- 
sible, for us to get many of the ordinary 
conveniences — I had almost said necessaries — 
of life. We are not treated as human. That 
is the cold, hard fact !' 

"The Rev. Charles Martin, a Protestant 
clergyman of pure African descent, had been 
telling me how heavily a black skin handicaps 
a man "right here in New York City fifty 
years after the abolition of slavery in the 
United States. I had asked him for facts — 
for specific instances of the disabilities to 
which he had referred. He said: 

" ^Just to take one case. When a Negro is 
downtoivn and wants something to eat there 
is no place he can get food. Very few men 
realize how unrelenting this rule is enforced. 
On one occasion when "Joseph's Brethren" 
was being played at the New Theatre a 
Jewish rabbi who was anxious that I should 
see the play had invited me to go with him. 
He had had nothing to eat, and so we stopped 
at a lunchroom in the neighborhood of 
Columbus Circle. We sat down at a table, 
but no one came to serve us. No more atten- 
tion was paid to our presence than if we had 
suddenly become invisible, and after waiting 
some time in vain there was nothing left for 
us to do but to walk out. 

" 'Outside of domestic employment there is 
very little opportunity for either the men or 
women of my race except within the limited 
circle of their own people. A woman can get 
employment to do washing and a man can 
get a job as elevator boy or store porter, 
but that is about all. Only the other day a 
large department store wliich had employed 
quite a few Negro girls ever since it opened 
dismissed all of them at once for no other 
reason than their color. No fault was found 
with their work, but they were Negroes, and 
probably some customers had objected, and 
so they were thrown out of emploi/ment. 

" 'The attitude of the community toward 
the Negro is this : So long as he is down and 
willing to remain d > • , d does not try to 



OPINION 



283 



enter into any of the higher activities he is 
all riglit, but the moment he aspires to better 
himself he is not all right. So long as the 
Negro is of useful service — useful to the 
white man — he is tolerated; the moment he 
seeks to enter the field of lucrative 
endeavor — lucrative to himself — the whole 
weight of the community is exerted to keep 
him down. It is almost impossible for a 
Negro to obtain commercial or professional 
employment in any firm of good standing in 
New York. Let me give you a couple of 
instances : 

" 'There was a young fellow who had just 
been graduated from Cornell. If I am not 
mistaken, he had won the French medal there. 
He was an excellent linguist, and some white 
people who were interested in him recom- 
mended him strongly to the Standard Oil 
people. They wanted a young man to travel 
for them — some one speaking French and 
Spanish. This young fellow had all the 
necessary qualifications and had an interview 
with the head of the foreign department, but 
was told plainly that he could not be em- 
ployed because he had Negro blood in him. 

" 'Another case which was even harder — 
the young fellow knelt down and prayed 
with me in church over it; he was a graduate 
pharmacist. He had his London diplomas 
and had passed the State examination here. 
I tried to get him employment at a colored 
institution — that is, an institution for 
colored patients, but run by white folks — and 
when he put in an appearance they told him 
point blank that they could not take him in 
their prescription department as a druggist, 
hut they wanted some one to wash the bot- 
tles and they icould he willing to give him 
that. 

" 'I could give you countless such cases 
No matter how good a printer a NegTO is, no 
matter how good a carpenter, or painter, or 
electrician, he can get no employment in New 
York in the open market. The great injustice 
is that there is nothing against these men 
except that they are Negroes. No white firm 
will give them a place any more than it 
would think of employing a Negro book- 
keeper or NegTO sliippiag clerk. Unless he 
is willing to give up his trade and become 
an elevator boy or a store porter, he must 
confine his activities solely to the restricted 
area where Negroes live and where the field 
is so poor that many skilled workmen in it 
can barely make a living.' " 



This revelation causes tlie Southern papers 
great satisfaction and glee, while the foolish 
report of the capture of London by black 
folk arouses them; but the Louisville Courier- 
Journal says : 

"A colonial woman in London is agitating 
against the admission of 'men of color' to 
social equality in London. 

"The term 'men of color' in London means 
Mongolians, American and Afi'iean Negroes. 
West Indians, Turks, Egyptians, brown- 
skinned Aryans from India, Berbers from the 
Atlas Mountains, Arabs from beyond the 
Red Sea, straight-haired blacks of the South 
Sea islands, Malays, Australians, New Zea- 
landers, Kanakas, Somalis, Singhalese, 
Afghans, Abyssinians, Filipinos and men of 
other divisions of the human race, all of 
whom are held by the protesting idealist to 
be brothers under their skin." 

The Boston Transcript adds : 

"The explanation of the alleged invasion 
is creditable to the British. It is that NegToes 
are so well treated that Great Britain is a 
roost attractive country to them, and London 
in particular is the colored man's paradise. 
Herein we find a little trace of British self- 
satisfaction, but it is only a trace after all, 
for unquestionably Negrophobia is compelled 
to lurk in secret corners in Great Britain and 
would not dare to manifest itself in lynch- 
ing. The British have learned tolerance of 
foreign races by the long experience of their 
nation as a great colonial power. There are 
under the British rule millions of Negroes; 
there are other millions of British subjects 
who, if not black, are certainly not white. 
In London every colony, black, brown and 
white or yellow, is represented. At times 
and in particular localities the streets seem 
a moving picture of the ethnology of the 
empire. The Hindoo, the Negro and Malay 
and the Hongkong native may be seen pass- 
ing along the thoroughfares of what is to 
them . the metropolis of a great protecting 
empire. 

"Possibly if the United States were not 
one of the newest apprentices to the art of 
ruling alien peoples it might exhibit the same 
toleration to those whose skins and ways are 
different from ours. It is not alone this 
toleration, however, that makes the Negro 
feel particularly comfortable while under the 
British flag. A most powerful contribution 
to his comfort and safety is found in the 
general determination of the British people 



284 



THE CRISIS 



that law shall be enforced, and that constitu- 
tional guarantees shall be maintained. Here 
and there in some extremely out-of-the-way 
place mob %dolenee directed against Negroes 
might find a victim, but it is unthinkable that 
there should be a succession of lynchings in 
England, Scotland or Ireland." 



DiKGAAN's DAY. ^" ^^outh Africa they 
have been celebrating the 
victory of the Dutch over the Kaffir, and 
the A. P. 0., a colored paper remarks: 

"But a change has come over South 
Africa. The two white races, so we are told, 
are one. They now claim equal shares in 
laying the foundation of a united white 
people. On Monday the language question, 
the immigTation question, the naval contribu- 
tion will all be forgotten. There will be 
perfect liarmony. Dutchmen will magnify 
all the petty deeds of valor of their fore- 
fathers, and will generously grant to English- 
men some share of the honor of having de- 
feated Dingaan ; and Englishmen will slobber 
over Dutchmen, and strain their language to 
belaud their exploits, dishonorable and dis- 
creditable though they may have been in 
Dingaan's country seventy-four years ago. 
No mention will be made of the hundreds of 
colored and natives who fought on the side 
of both English and Dutch, nor of the 
hundreds who shed their blood in the same 
cause. 

"Now, it is very difficult, if not impossible, 
from the available historical records, to 
arrive at any other conclusion but that Din- 
gaan was a monster, and that the Dutch 
emigrants were heaven-sent saviours, whose 
every action was prompted by Christian 
benovolenee toward the native. But it must 
be borne in mind that the history of South 
Africa is a record written by white persons 
from information supplied by white persons 
who had every reason to picture the blacks 
as a cruel, barbarous, traitorous people, and 
their own actions as that of tolerant 
Christians. Nevertheless, by reading between 
the lines, it is quite clear that the farmers 
who migrated from the colony into Dingaan's 
country were as cruel, traitorous, vindictive 
and revengeful as any set of men that ever 
came in contact with colored races." 



As the representation of 

REPUBLICAN ^^^ ^^^^^ -^ ^^^ j^ ^J. 

REPRESENTATION. ^-^^^ convention is 
being agitated anew we may recall the last 
words of the lamented Frederick L. McGhee 
in the St. Paul (Minn.) Vress: 

"The Negro's presence in the national Re- 
publican convention used not to be a thing 
disdained and wanted to be gotten rid of. 
There was a time when the Republican 
national convention honored a Negro by 
making one a temporary chairman of the 
convention. It was the convention that nom- 
inated James G. Blaine, the plumed knight 
of the Republican party, and it should not 
be forgotten that the convention that wrote 
the gold plank in the Republican party plat- 
form wrote it only because it had the solid 
support of the Negro delegates, and that 
convention witnessed the end of right recog-- 
nition to NegTo delegates. It was in that 
convention that the late Mark Hanna was 
presiding over the deliberations concerning 
the credentials from the State of Texas; the 
lily whites, who were first springing into 
existence, contested the delegation headed by 
Wright Cuney, 'Noblest Roman' of all the 
Southern host, NegTo though he was. Then 
it was first urged to willing ears that if the 
Negro was 'cut out,' if white men were put 
on the national committee in their places, 
they would organize in the South a white 
man's party, the solid South would be 
broken; white men would divide on economic 
questions and the Republican party would not 
be compelled to look to the Northern tier of 
States for its elections. Mr. Hanna listened, 
was charmed, was fooled, believed the lie, 
and by reason of his influence the Cuney 
delegation was seated with a half vote; the 
lily whites got the other half. Cuney then 
reminded Mr. Hanna that the Negro in the 
war had shot a full bullet; that since the 
war he had voted the full Republican ticket; 
never scratched it (the shame is that he still 
does it), and that as for himself and the 
Negroes from Texas they would refuse a half 
seat and left the meeting of the committee; 
refused to participate in the convention; 
went home; died of a broken heart and thus 
ended the old order of things and thus began 
the new, that has been a shame, an injustice 
and disgrace to b'~^^^ my race and the 
Republican party." 




f 



>fc«^ 



\\ 




^STEi-En^Pcir^T 



31 



"Woman, woman, woman!" 
I cried in mounting terror. 
"Woman and Child!" 
And the cry sang back 
Thro' Heaven with the 
Whirring of almighty wings 



T AM dead ; 

-'■ Yet somehow, somewhere, 

In Time's weird contradiction, I 

May tell of that dread deed, wherewith 

I brought to Children of the Moon 

Freedom and vast salvation. 

I was a woman born 

And trod that streaming street 

That ebbs and flows from Harlem's hills 

Thro' caves and canons limned in light 

Down to the twisting sea. 

That night of nights 

I stood alone and at the End 

Until the sudden highway to the Moon, 

Golden in splendor. 

Became too real to doubt. 

Dimly I set foot upon the air; 
I fled, I flew, thro' thrills of light, 
With all about, above, below the whirring 
Of almighty wings. 

I found a twilight land 

Where, hardly hid, the sun 

Sent softly saddened rays of 

Red and brown to burn the iron earth 

And bathe the snow-white peaks 

In mighty splendor. 

Black were the men, 

Hard haired and silent slow. 

Moving as shadows 

Bending with face of fear to earthward; 

And women there were none. 



Wings, wings, endless wings, 
Heaven and earth are wings; 
Wings that flutter, furl and fold, 
Always folding and unfolding, 
Ever folding yet again; 
Wings, veiling some vast 
And veiled face. 
In blazing blackness, 
Behind the folding and unfolding, 
The rolling and unrolling of 
Almighty wings! 

I saw the black men huddle 
Fumed in fear, falling face downward; 
Vainly I clutched and clawed, 
Dumbly they cringed and cowered, 
Moaning in mournful monotone: 
Freedom, Freedom, 
Freedom over me; 
Before I'll be a slave 
I'll be buried in my grave 
And go home to my God 
And be free. 

It was as angel music 
From the dead. 
And ever, as they sang. 
The winged Thing of 

Heaven, 
Folding and unfolding, 

again. 
Tore out their blood and entrails 
'Til I screamed in utter terror 
And a silence came: 
A silence and the wailing of a babe 



wings, filling all 
and folding yet 



^J 



^' 




m 



Then at last I saw and shamed ; 

I knew how these dumb dark and dusky 

things 
Had given blood and life 
To fend the caves of underground 
The great black caves of utter night 
"Where earth lay full of mothers 
And their babes. 



Little children sobbing in darkness, 

Little children crying in silent pain. 

Little mothers rocking and groping and 

struggling, 
Digging and delving and groveling 
Amid the dying-dead and dead-in-life, 
And drip and dripping of warm, wet blood 
Far, far beneath the wings, 
The folding and unfolding of almighty 



T bent with tears and pitying hands 
Above these dusky star-eyed children. 
Crinkly haired, with sweet-sad bab}' voices 
Pleading low for light and love and living — 
And I crooned : 



^* 




0^' 






Little children weeping there, 
God shall find thy faces fair; 
Guerdon for thy deep distress. 
He shall send His tenderness; 
For the tripping of thy feet 
Make a mystic music sweet 
In the darkness of thy hair; 
Light and laughter in the air — 
Little children weeping there, 
God shall tind thy faces fair ! 

I strode above the stricken bleeding me 

The rampart 'ranged against the skies, 

And shouted : 

"Up I say, build and slay; 

Fight face foremost, force a way, 

Unloose, unfetter and unbind; 

Be men and free." 



Dumbly they shrank 

Muttering they pointed toward that peak 

Than vastness vaster. 

Whereon a darkness brooded, 

""Who shall look and live," they sighed ; 

And I sensed 

The folding and unfolding of almighty wings 





288 



THE CRISIS 



Yet did we build of iron, bricks and blood; 
We built a day, a year, a thousand years. 
Blood was the mortar, blood and tears 
And, ah, the Thing, the Thing of wings. 
The winged folding wing of Things, 
Did furnish much mad mortar 
For that tower. 

Slow and ever slower rose the towering task 

And with it rose the sun. 

Until at last on one wild day. 

Wind-whirled, cloud-swept and terrible. 

I stood beneath the burning shadow 

Of the peak. 

Beneath the whirring of almighty wings 

While downward from my feet 

Streamed the long line of dusky faces 

And the wail of little children sobbing under 

Earth. 

"Freedom!" I cried. 

"Freedom!" cried Heaven, Earth and Stars, 

And a Voice near-far 

Amid the folding and unfolding of Almighty 

wings 
Answered "I am Freedom — 
Who sees my face is free — 
He and his." 

I dared not look; 

Downward I glanced on deep bowed heads 

and closed eyes, 
Outward I gazed on flecked and flaming 

blue — 
But ever onward, upward flew 
The sobbing of small voices; 
Down, down, far down into the night. 



Slowly I lifted livid limbs aloft; 

Upward I strove: The Face, the Face; 

Onward I reeled: The Pace, the Face! 

To Beauty wonderful as sudden death 

Or horror horrible as endless life — ■ 

Up ! Up ! the blood-built way 

(Shadow grow vaster! 

Terror come faster!) 

UjD ! Up to the blazing blackness 

Of one veiled face 

And endless folding and unfolding. 

Rolling and unrolling of Almighty wings : 

The last step stood! 

The last dim cry of pain 

Fluttered across the stars — 

And then — 

AVings, wings, triumphant wings. 
Lifting and lowering, waxing and waning, 
Swinging and swaying, twirling and 

whirling. 
Whispering and screaming, .streaming and 

gleaming. 
Spreading and sweeping and shading and 

flaming — 
Wings, wings, eternal wings, 
'Til the hot red blood 
Flood fleeing flood, 
Thundered thro' Heaven and mine ears 
While all across a purple sky 
The last vast pinion 
Trembled to unfold. 

I rose upon the Mountain of the Moon ; 

I felt the blazing glory of the Sun. 

I heard the Song of Children crying "Free!" 

I saw the Face of Freedom — 

And I died. 





-tr\ 




EASTER. 

IPT up your heads, ye 
gates and be ye lifted up, 
ye everlasting doors ; and 
the King of glory shall 
come in. 

Who is the King of 
glory ? The Friend strong and faithful ; 
the Friend faithful in little. 

The Friend that seeks neither place 
nor pay; the Friend that does not boast 
nor blame, but sits beside us patiently; 
the Friend who in our weakness knows, 
and in our travail understands; the 
Friend to whom we need not say our 
suffering, for he has suffered even as we 
and with his stripes we are healed. 

The Friend who looks into our tired 
eyes and laughs cheeringly, who grasps 
our hand warmly and is silent; who 
says : ' ' Well done, old man, ' ' and ' ' Good 
work, little sister!" 

The Friend who is no impossible god 
or simpering angel, but human like us, 
hungry as we are and disappointed ; who 
smokes and drinks with us and walks 
beneath the stars. 

The Friend that hath clean hands and 
a pure heart ; who hath not lifted up his 
soul unto vanity nor sworn deceitfully. 
Yes, and the Friend who, looking back 
through jeweled tears, has gone down 
the Way of Shadows to the place that 
is silent and dark. 

Lift up your heads, ye gates; even 
lift them up, ye everlasting doors; and 
the King of glory shall come in. 

Who is this King of glory? The 
Faithful Friend — he is the King of 
glory. Selah ! 




HAIL COLUMBIA! 

■ AIL Columbia, Happy 
Land ! Again the glorious 
traditions of Anglo- 
Saxon manhood have 
been upheld ! Again the 
chivalry of American 
white men has been magnificently vindi- 
cated. Down on your knees, black men, 
and hear the tale with awestruck faces. 
Learn from the Superior Race. We do 
not trust our own faltering pen and 
purblind sight to describe the reception 
of the suffragists at the capital of the 
land. We quote from the Southern re- 
porters of the Northern press: 

"Five thousand women, marching in 
the woman-suffrage pageant yesterday, 
practically fought their way foot by 
foot up Pennsylvania Avenue, through a 
surging mass of humanity that com- 
pletely defied the Washington police, 
swamped the marchers, and broke their 
procession into little companies. The 
women, trudging stoutly along under 
great difficulties, were able to complete 
their march only when troops of cavalry 
from Fort Myer were rushed into Wash- 
ington to take charge of Pennsylvania 
Avenue. No inauguration has ever pro- 
duced such scenes, which in many in- 
stances amounted to little less than 
riots." 

"More than 100 persons, young and 
old, of both sexes, were" crushed and 
trampled in the uncontrollable crowd in 
Pennsylvania Avenue yesterday, while 
two ambulances of the Emergency Hos- 
pital came and went constantly for six 
hours, always impeded and at times 



290 



THE CRISIS 



actually opposed, so that doctor and 
driver literally had to fight their way 
to give succor to the injured." 

' ' Hoodlums, many of them in uniform, 
leaned forward till their cigarettes almost 
touched the women's faces while blowing 
smoke in their eyes, and the police said 
not a word, not even when ever}'- kind of 
insult was hurled. 

"To the white-haired women the men 
shouted continuously : ' Granny ! granny ! 
We came to see chickens, not hens ! Go 
home and sit in the corner ! ' To the 
younger women they yelled : ' Say, what 
you going to do to-night? Can't we 
make a date ? ' and the police only smiled. 
The rowdies jumped on the running 
boards of the automobiles and snatched 
the flags from the elderly women, and 
they attempted to pull the girls from 
the floats." 

Wasn't it glorious? Does it not make 
you burn with shame to be a mere black 
man when such mighty deeds are done 
by the Leaders of Civilization? Does it 
not make you "ashamed of your race?" 
Does is not make you "want to be 
white?" 

And do you know (we are almost 
ashamed to say it) the Negro again lost 
a brilliant opportunity to rise in his 
"imitative" way. Ida Husted Harper 
says : 

"We made the closest observation 
along the entire line and not in one in- 
stance did we hear a colored man make 
a remark, although there were thousands 
of them." 

Another white woman writes : 

"I wish to speak a word in favor of 
the colored people during the suffrage 
parade. Not one of them was boisterous 
or rude as with great difficulty we 
passed along the unprotected avenue. 
The difference between them and those 
insolent, bold' white men was remark- 
al)le. They were quiet and respectable 
and earnest, and seemed sorry for the 
indignities which were incessantly 
heaped upon us. There were few police- 
men to protect us as we made our first 



parade in Washington, and the dignified 
silence of the colored people and the 
sympathy in their faces was a great con- 
trast to those who should have known 
better. I thank them in the name of all 
the women for their kindness." 

Now look at that ! Good Lord ! has the 
Negro no sense? Can he grasp no 
opportunity ? 

But let him not think to gain by any 
such tactics. The South sees his game 
and is busy promoting bills to prevent 
his marrying any wild-eyed suffragette 
who may be attracted by his pusillani- 
mous decency. Already the Ohio legisla- 
ture has been flooded by forged petitions 
from a "Negro advancement society of 
New York" to push the intermarriage 
bill! 

No, sir ! White men are on the firing 
line, and if they don 't want white women 
for wives they will at least keep them 
for prostitutes. Beat them back, keep 
them down; flatter them, call them 
' ' visions of loveliness ' ' and tell them that 
the place for woman is in the home, even 
if she hasn 't got a home. If she is 
homely or poor or made the mistake of 
being born with brains, and begins to 
protest at the doll's house or the bawdy 
house, kick her and beat her and insult 
her until in terror she slinks back to her 
kennel or walks the midnight streets. 
Don't give in; don't give her power; 
don't give her a vote whatever you do. 
Keep the price of women down ; make 
them weak and cheap. 

Shall the time ever dawn in this Land 
of the Brave when a free white American 
citizen may not buy as many women as 
his purse permits? Perish the thought 
and Hail Columbia, Happy Land! 



THE HURT HOUND. 

HE editor has received this 
news note from a colored 
friend : 

' ' January 22 — Revs. 
G. H. Burks and P. A. 
Nichols, returning from 
Louisville to Pad^-'^' Ky., over the 




EDITORIAL 



291 



I. C. Railroad, on being detained from 
5 p. m. to 2 a. m., by reason of a freight 
wreck, were ushered into the dining ear 
and given supper without one single 
word of comment or protest from the 
wliites, who were eating at the same 
time. ' ' 

The editor read this and read it yet 
again. At first he thought it was a ban- 
([uet given to black men by white ; then 
he thought it charity to the hungry poor ; 
then — then it dawned on his darkened 
soul : Two decently dressed, educated 
colored men had been allowed to pay for 
their unobstrusive meal in a Pullman 
dining car "WITHOUT ONE SINGLE 
WORD OF COMMENT OR PRO- 
TEST !" No one had cursed them; none 
had thrown plates at them; they were 
not lynched ! And in humble ecstacy at 
being treated for once like ordinary 
human beings they rushed from the car 
and sent a letter a thousand miles to say 
to the world : ' ' My God ! Look ! See ! ' ' 

AVhat more eloquent comment could 
be made on the white South? What 
more stinging indictment could be 
voiced? What must be the daily and 
hourly treatment of black men in 
Paducah, Ky., to bring this burst of 
applause at the sheerest and most nega- 
tive decency? 

Yet every black man in America has 
known that same plation — North and 
South and West. We have all of us felt 
the sudden relief — the half-mad delight 
when contrary to fixed expectation we 
were treated as men and not dogs; and 
then, in the next breath, we hated our- 
selves for elation over that which was 
but due an}' human being. 

This is the real tragedy of the Negro 
in America : the inner degradation, the 
hurt hound feeling; the sort of upturn- 
ing of all values which leads some 
black men to "rejoice" because "only" 
sixty-four Negroes were lynched in the 
year of our Lord 1912. 

Conceive, poet, a ghastlier tragedy 
than such a state of mind! 




THE "JIM CROW" ARGUMENT. 

HE chairman of the com- 
mittee in the Missouri 
legislature which is en- 
gineering the "Jim 
Crow" car bill has 
evolved this unanswer- 
able syllogism : 

1. Negroes should not object to 
being separated on the trains by "just 
a small railing. ' ' 

2. If they do object it shows that 
tliey are averse to associating with 
themselves. 

3. If they insist on associating with 
whites, it shows that they want "social 
equality ! " 

The argument of our learned and 
astute solon not only proves his case, 
but it proves so much in addition as to 
destroy his argument. 

If poor people object to being sepa- 
rated from rich people, does it prove a 
wild desire for the society of Mrs. 
Ponsonby de Thompkyns or simply 
righteous indignation at having manhood 
measured by wealth? 

If Jews object to the Ghetto and the 
pale, does it . prove them ashamed of 
themselves or afraid of those oppressors 
who find oppression easier when the vic- 
tims are segregated and helpless? 

The modern fight for human freedom 
is the fight of the individual man to be 
judged on his own merits and not 
saddled with the sins of a class for which 
he is not responsible. The favorite device 
of the devil, ancient and modern, is to 
force a human being into a more or less 
artificial class, accuse the class of un- 
named and unnamable sin, and then 
damn any individual in the alleged class, 
however innocent he may be. 

This is the medieval tryanny which 
the South has revived in "Jim Crow" 
legislation and which Missouri is striving 
for. The South fulminates against dirt, 
crime and bad manners and then herds 
in the "Jim Crow" car the clean and un- 
clean and the innocent and guilty and 



292 



THE CRISIS 




the decent and indecent. Separation is 
impossible in a democracy. It means 
segregation, subordination and tyranny. 
Social equality? Of course we want 
social equality. Social equality is the 
right to demand the treatment of men 
from your fellow man. To ask less is to 
acknowledge your own lack of manhood. 

RESOLUTIONS AT COOPER UNION ON 
LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY. 

HE National Association 
for the Advancement of 
Colored People was first 
called into being on the 
one hundredth anniver- 
sary of the birth of Abra- 
ham Lincoln. It conceives its mission to 
be the completion of the work which the 
great emancipator began. It proposes 
to make a group of 10,000,000 Ameri- 
cans free from the lingering shackles of 
past slavery — physically free from peon- 
age, mentally free from ignorance, 
politically free from disfranchisement 
and socially free from studied insult. 
We have refused for a moment to 
contemplate a great democracy like this, 
with all its wealth and power and 
aspiration, turning back in the onward 
furrow when once it set its hand to the 
plow. 

Great as are the forces of reaction and 
race and class hatred at all times, and 
bitter as is the concerted and organized 
effort to increase color prejudice in this 
land and beat back the struggling sons 
of the freedmen, we are still confident 
that the inherent justice and sense of 
fair play in the American people both 
North and South is never going to per- 
mit the past crime of slavery to be 
increased by future caste regulations 
leading straight to oligarchy and 
spiritual death. 

But we know that if this crime of 
crimes is not to be perpetuated this 
nation must immediately take its feet 
from the paths wherein they are now 
set. The horror of 2,600 prisoners 



murdered without trial in twenty-seven 
years, the tens of thousands of un- 
accused black folk who have in three 
years been done to death and worse than 
death, the widespread use of crime and 
alleged crime as a source of public 
revenue, the defenseless position of 
colored women now threatened again in 
six legislatures, the total disfranchise- 
ment of three-fourths of black voters, 
the new and insidious attack on prop- 
erty rights, the widespread, persistent 
and growing discrimination in the 
simplest and clearest matters of public 
decency and accommodation — all these 
things indicate not simply the suffering 
of a mocked people, but greater than 
that, they show the impotence and 
failure of American democracy. 

If it be not possible in the twentieth 
century of the Prince of Peace, in the 
heyday of European culture and world 
revival of brotherhood for a cultured 
people, to extend justice, freedom and 
equality to men whom they have cruelly 
wronged, but who, despite that, have 
done their hard work, fought their bat- 
tles, saved their Union, upheld their 
democratic ideals, and showed them- 
selves capable of modern culture — if it 
be not possible for America to yield 
these men what they have justly earned 
and deserve, then America herself is 
impossible and the vast dreams of 
Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln are 
vain. 

But it is not so. We can be just, we 
can be law abiding, we can be decent. 
All we need to know and realize is the 
truth about this awful failure to live 
up to our ideals; and so on this anni- 
versary of the great man who began the 
emancipation of the Negro race in 
America and the emancipation of 
America itself we, the National Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Colored 
People, again appeal to the nation to 
accept the clear and simple settlement 
of the Negro problem, which consists 
in treating all raea hlfi'k and white, as 
vou would have tin am i ' sat you. 



THE MAN WHO \VON-(A Story) 



By HARRY H. PACE 




1. 

HE keeper of the livery 
stable at Golden, S. C, was 
seriously puzzled. He stood 
in front of the stable door, 
his brow contracted in 
thought, gazing at a top 
buggy fast receding in the distance. Ever 
and anon he emitted an interjection char- 
acteristic of the section and east a curious 
look at the pieces of silver in his hand. 

The midday express from Washington had 
left a solitary passenger, in itself an unusual 
occurrence. The stranger, fair of face, well 
dressed and of commanding appearance, had 
come to his place and requested a buggy to 
take him out into the country. 

"Goin' to Edgefield's, ain't you?" said the 
liveryman genially. 

"No. I'm going to Andy Wyatt's," 
responded the young man, whose name was 
Russell Stanley. 

"Goin' to come right back?" came the 
second question curiously. 

"I'm going to stay," was the positive reply. 

Consequently the keeper was puzzled. 
Wyatt was a Negro, one of the biggest cotton 
planters in the State, owned ten square miles 
of land and had an army of tenants, crop- 
pers and workmen surrounding him. He 
was openly admired and respected by the 
blacks of the entire district, and secretly 
envied and feared by a large portion of the 
whites. But he kept a cool head, raised more 
cotton than anybody else, had the finest 
stock, paid his bills promptly, and his credit 
was gilt edged. His nearest neighbor and 
keenest rival was Col. James Edgefield, the 
Democratic boss of the State and Congress- 
man from the fifteenth district. Edgefield's 
hospitality was well known; so was the 
beauty of his daughter and only child, 
Elsie. It was a common thing for young men 
to drop ot¥ at Golden and run out to Edge- 
field's place for a day or two. One young 
man had stayed two whole weeks. But what 
any white man was doing driving ofif to Andy 
Wyatt's to stay was what puzzled the 
liveryman. 

Nevertheless, the buggy and the driver, 



with its passenger, were soon out on the 
dusty road that led to Wyatt's farm. The 
liveryman had made a careful inspection of 
Stanley to see if he might not be mistaking, 
as he said, "a Nigger for a white man." But 
the features, the pale skin and brown half- 
eurling hair, together with the general air 
of culture and refinement unknown to any 
Negro he had ever seen, confirmed him in 
his first opinion. 

To the driver, on the way out, Russell 
made no effort to conceal the fact of his con- 
nection with the black race, despite his ap- 
pearance. He was an entire stranger to the 
South, its people and its ways, though he 
was born on the very farm to which he was 
now driving. He knew in a general way of 
the prejudices and restrictions of this sec- 
tion. He had never been entirely free from 
them in New York. He remembered well 
how it came to him one day in the street 
not far from the glitter and glare of Broad- 
way. One of his playmates called him a 
"Nigger" and said something about his 
"Nigger" mother. He whipped him merci- 
lessly and then went home crying to her to 
find out what the boy meant. Little by 
little there came to him, with his advancing 
years, the meaning of it all, the situation of 
his race, and more particularly his own 
peculiar condition. He watched the line 
across his mother's brow grow deeper day by 
day and sorrowed with her in the life once 
so full of hope that had been swallowed up 
in the shame of his birth. He almost hated 
his own existence that had brought to her 
such sorrow and distress. To him she was 
always good, pure and noble. His father he 
did not know; only one thing he knew — that 
his father was white. 

Year after year, as soon as he was old 
enough, the lad had struggled along in the 
bustle of New York to support his mother 
and educate himself. And when he sat be- 
side her bed and saw her life come peace- 
fully to a close far away from home and 
kindred and friends, alone, forgotten and 
almost despised, his heart beat furiously and 
he lifted his eyes and prayed for revenge on 
the one who had caused it all. 



294 



THE CRISIS 



Thus it came about that he was on his 
way to Andy Wyatt's farm. For Andy was 
his mother's brother, and it was from here 
she had fled long ago. He was to be Andy's 
bookkeeper and general assistant. The cares 
of his estate were getting too heavy for the 
farmer, despite his robust health and vitality. 
He wanted to train up a younger man to take 
up the burden when he should die, lest his 
wife and daughter be robbed by the un- 
scrupulous of the fruits of his life's toil. 
Consequently, when Russell's letter of in- 
quiry came unexpectedly to him one day, 
Andy asked the boy by return mail to come 
and live with him. 

The buggy turned from the dusty road 
into a sheltered driveway and into the yard 
of Wyatt's home. It was a two-story frame 
building, typical of the old South. Around 
the doorway of the quaint old-fashioned 
porch twined honeysuckle and wild roses. 
Andy's wife, Clara, came out to meet him in 
her plain farmer's white clothes. His ap- 
pearance surprised her. She had expected to 
see a very fair young man. But he was white, 
so w-hite she was afraid she was mistaken. 
Added to his natural complexion was the 
pallor of the city dweller and the indoor life. 
He kissed her in the simple Southern fashion, 
and she led the way into the front room 
which she had opened and aired for this 
occasion. Andy came in at the close of the 
day and the welcome was complete. Sitting 
that night before a wholesome country meal, 
Russell surveyed his new surroundings. He 
could see that these people were lovable, true 
and good, and he rejoiced that he was there. 
The household was small; the little girl, 
Ruby, 10 years of age, was the only other 
member. 

Russell went to work daily with the men 
and worked along beside them. Though his 
bones ached night after night and he went 
wearily to bed, yet he perceived a quicken- 
ing of strength, a healthier color in his face 
and a glow of vigor which he had never be- 
fore known. He worked hard to please his 
uncle and his efforts won him not only 
esteem, but brought from the hearts of those 
two lovable people all that pent-up affection 
they had hoped to lavish on their own lost 
son. 

A short way from the big house were llie 
houses of tenants and immediate employees, 
and scattered here and there over these ten 
square miles were other tenant houses, barns 



and stables. A large ginhouse, around which 
were stored hundreds of bales of cotton, was 
down near the creek. The commissary at the 
back of Wyatt's house from which the whole 
section was fed completed the establish- 
ment. And a happy establishment it was. 
He had often heard of the songs of the 
Negroes on the farm. Coming home late in 
the evenings, as the sun died away to rest 
and all was clear and still, the men used to 
burst out into singing which floated off into 
the distance until the sweetness was absorbed 
by the trees and the flowers. He found him- 
self joining in and singing with them. He 
had never seen such happy, care-free people. 
They were not troubled by any race problem, 
any bugaboo of social or political equality. 
They worked and earned their bread as God 
intended, lived in this out-of-doors all day 
and slept soundly at night and were happy. 
Ah ! what he had missed away from this life 
so long. And now he was into it he meant 
to stay and live, forever and always, simple 
and honest as they. 

Some nights when he came home less 
fatigued in body and mind he would go into 
the front room of Andy's simple home and 
open the quaint old square piano that had 
lost none of its harmony, and accompany 
himself in some plaintive far-away song of 
the heart. His voice was a clear, sweet tenor 
and he had studied some at spare moments in 
New York. Sometimes, when he found him- 
self drifting off into some sorrow song, little 
Ruby would come in quietly and lay her little 
head against him. "Don't play that way," 
she would say. "Do you think nobody loves 
you? Me and mama and papa all love you." 

"He is our boy now," Clara said as she 
laid her hand on her husband's shoulder one 
night; "we must be mother and father to 
him." 

"And such a boy!" responded Andy, his 
eyes glistening with pride. "Ah ! he would 
make my old daddy feel good toward him, 
though he died heartbroken by his birth." 
He wiped away a tear, for the remembrance 
brought him sorrow. 

"He worked in the bottom to-day almost 
knee deep in the mud and water. Jones told 
me how all the men had fallen in love with 
him. It's the same everjrwhere; there isn't a 
man who wouldn't almost die for his mere 
approval. I think he's working too hard. 
To-morrow I'm going t*^ send him off to 
Carter's for a change. " 



THE MAN WHO WON 



295 



Next clay, in the dim gray light of morn- 
ing, Russell set out to Carter's, ten miles 
away, on an errand of minor importance. He 
spent the middle of the day there and made 
an early start so as to be home in time to 
check off the incoming squad and to get the 
work planned for the morrow. 

The ride had done him good and he felt 
at peace with the whole world. His errand 
quickly accomplished, and finding that he 
had plenty of time before him, he had let 
his pony drop into a walk and with his feet 
thrown carelessly on one side of the saddle 
he rode along singing. The woods caught up 
the echoes and sent his song back in grotesque 
snatches that made him laugh. 

"How merry goes the day when the heart 
is young," he sang joyously, and rounding 
a corner of the woods he came upon another 
rider, a girl, fair of face and pretty, 
motionless in the road upon her horse and 
listening intently to his song. At sight of her 
he hesitated, then settling into his saddle pre- 
pared to strike up a faster gait and go on. 
But she stopped him. 

"I heard you singing," she said in a soft, 
mellow voice, "and liked it; please don't 
stop; I want you to sing some more for me. 
I'm going your way, too," she added frankly. 

Her simplicity and directness confused 
him. He scarcely knew how to reply, for 
instinctively he recognized her for whom she 
was : Colonel Edgefield's daughter Elsie. He 
had not seen either of these personages since 
his arrival here, though once in New York he 
had heard Edgefield speak to a large crowd in 
Cooper Union about the inherent inferiority 
of the Negro. 

He tried to stammer out some reply to her 
words, but before he could do so something 
happened that made it unnecessary. Her 
pony, which had grown restless standing so 
long, seeing a rabbit cross the road, shied and 
jumped out of the roadway. He landed in a 
brush heap whose crackling twigs frightened 
him. Instantly he bounded down the road 
at full speed, the girl taken unawares, cling- 
ing desperately to the pommel of the saddle, 
the reins beyond her grasp. 

It had happened so quickly that Russell 
did not take in the situation until horse and 
rider were started and making wildly for 
the steep rocky slope beyond the bend. But 
his own horse had felt the spirit of the 
chase and needed only the quick command, 
"Go, Benny, catch her!" Like a flash he sped 
after her and the woods echoed the clatter 



of horses' hoofs on the rugged road. Benny 
was young and just broken to the saddle and 
he could run. He was gaining on the girl 
every minute. But in the few seconds before 
Stanley took up the chase the girl's horse 
had covered several yards. Only a short 
distance away lay a rocky and treacherous 
slope, and if her horse took it at its present 
pace grim disaster would follow. No horse 
could hold its footing on that slope at even 
half such speed. 

"Go, Benny! Go, boy, catch her!" he cried 
again into Benny's ears. One moment more 
and he dashed swiftly past her, grabbing the 
loosened reins as he went. It was the work 
of a few seconds then to stop both horses, 
dismount and lift her gently to the ground. 
She was nearly exhausted, but bore up 
bravely, refusing to faint, and shortly after- 
ward was readj'^ to resume her journey. 

"How can I thank you?" she said simply. 

"You should not ride so far alone and on 
such an animal," was his practical reply. 

"Belle is usually good and gentle. I don't 
know what possessed her to-day. But I want 
my father to see you and thank you. I'm 
sure he would be happj'^ to do so." 

They had ridden quickly and were almost 
at the road that led off to Edgefield's home. 
"I live in that big house yonder," she said, 
pointing to a large white house half con- 
cealed behind a row of cedars leading up to 
the front door. "Won't you come up there 
now and let me introduce you to my father? 
His name is Colonel Edgefield, and I'm his 
daughter Elsie. But," she said hesitatingly, 
"I don't know your name yet." 

"My name is Russell Stanley," he said 
slowly and firmly as he realized the crisis 
before him. "I live with my uncle, Andy 
Wyatt, across the way yonder. I cannot go 
with you because I'm a Negro and your 
father wouldn't like it." 

She opened her eyes wide in astonishment 
and surprise, and looked at him strangely. 
"Why didn't you tell me this at first?" she 
demanded coldly. 

"You didn't give me a chance," he 
answered. "And then it ought not be neces- 
sary for me to tell it. I once heard your 
father say that there could be no mistaking 
Negro blood." 

"That's quite true," she added, recovering 
her composure and becoming transformed in 
tlie minute. "My father was right. He hates 
Niggers and so do I."' And touching the 
whip to her horse she was soon out of sight. 



(To he concluded in the Ma[/ Crisis) 




NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT 
or COLORED PEOPLE 



i;. 



ENDORSEMENT. 

A T the interdenominational preachers' 
•^^ meeting of New York and vicinity, 
held on February 10, which was addressed by 
Dr. M. C. B, Mason, the following resolu- 
tions were unanimously adopted: 

First: That we endorse the work and 
usefulness of the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored People. 

Second: That we open our churches to 
Dr. Mason and the other representatives of 
this organization and pledge our moral and 
financial co-operation in the promotion of 
its cause. 



SUFFRAGE PARADERS. 

>/fRS. CARRIE W. CLIFFORD, of the 
■'■ ■'■ Washington branch, makes the follow- 
ing report upon the representation of 
colored women in the woman-suffrage parade : 

"The first parade of the National Woman's 
Suffrage Association, held in the capital, is 
now a matter of history. The colored women 
were represented as follows : 

"Artist, one — Mrs. May Howard Jack- 
son; college women, six — Mrs. Mary Church 
Terrell, Mrs. Daniel Murray, Miss Georgia 
Simpson, Miss Charlotte Steward, Miss Har- 
riet Shadd, Miss Bertha McNiel; teacher, 
one — Miss Caddie Park; musician, one — 
Mrs. Harriett G. Marshall; professional 
women, two — Dr. Amanda V. Gray, Dr. Eva 
Ross. Illinois delegation — Mrs. Ida Wells 
Barnett ; Michigan — Mrs. McCoy, of Detroit, 
who carried the banner; Howard University — 
group of twenty-five girls in caps and gowns ; 
home makers— Mrs. Duffield, who carried 
New York banner, Mrs. M. D. Butler, Mrs. 
Carrie W. Clifford." 



One trained nurse, whose name could not 
be ascertained, marched, and an old mammy 
was brought down by the Delaware delega- 
tion. The women all report most courteous 
treatment on the part of the marshals of the 
parade, and no worse treatment from by- 
standers than was accorded white women. 
In spite of the apparent reluctance of the 
local suffrage committee to encourage the 
colored women to participate, and in spite 
of the conflicting rumors that were circu- 
lated and which disheartened many of the 
colored women from taking part, they are to 
be congTatulated that so many of them had 
the courage of their convictions and that they 
made such an admirable showing in the first 
great national parade. 



CONFERENCE. 

'T'HIS number of The Crisis goes to press 
-■• too early to include anything but a 
preliminary notice of the coming conference. 
Dates for the annual conference have been 
set for April 23, 24 and 25, in Philadelphia. 
The conference will devote itself largely to 
the consideration of work, wages and prop- 
erty as affecting the colored people. There 
will be six sessions, beginning Wednesday 
evening, April 23. One session, set for the 
morning of Friday, April 25, will be an 
executive session and largely devoted to the 
work of branches. 



INTERMARRIAGE. 

TllK association has opposed anti-inter- 
marriage legislation in the following 
States: District of Columbia, Illinois, Wis- 
consin, New York, Ohio, IMichigan, Kansas, 
California and Iowa. T"^" bills in Wisconsin 



THE N. A. A. C. P. 



297 



and in Kansas have been defeated largely 
through the eilforts of the local branches. 
Assurances have been received that it is highly 
improbable tlie bills will pass in the District 
of Columbia and in New York State. The 
Chicago branch reports that they are organiz- 
ing for vigorous work against the Illinois 
bill. In Ohio but one vote is needed to 
defeat the measure, and Dr. ]\Iason is to ap- 
pear in person before the legislative com- 
mittee which has it in charge. A letter from 
a friend in Cleveland says that members of 
the Ohio legislature advise him that the legis- 
lature has been flooded with letters from 
some "National Negro Association" with 
headquarters in New York urging the pas- 
sage of the anti-intermarriage bill and say- 
ing that the colored people desire it. 



BALTIMORE. 

'' I 'HE Baltimore branch has been holding 
■*• a series of meetings in the various 
churches for the purpose of setting forth the 
aims of the National Association and its 
work. Among the speakers have been Rev. 
G. R. Waller, Dr. A. 0. Reid, Dr. F. N. 
Cardoza, Mr. W. Ashbie Hawkins, Mr. 
George Murphy and Mr. G. D. MacDaniels. 

The annual meeting has been announced 
for April 1, with Dr. Du Bois, Professor 
Spingarn and Dr. Mason as speakers. 

At the meeting of the school board on 
February 26 Commissioner Biggs introduced 
a resolution calling upon the board of 
superintendents to make an examination of 
the curriculum of the colored high school 
with a view to the ultimate exclusion of 
languages, biology, physics, chemistry, etc., 
and the substitution of a course of study in 
which the industrial branches alone are to 
be found. In Mr. Bjggs' opinion, the sub- 
jects he suggests eliminating are luxuries 
when incorporated in the curriculum of a 
Negro high school, and in support of his 
position he quoted Mr. Booker T. 
Washington. 

The Baltimore branch is prepared to ad- 
dress an open letter to the school board 
condemning the Biggs resolution. 

Mr, Samuel T. West, the author of the 
West segregation bill, is preparing to intro- 
duce into the city council a bill providing for 
"Jim Crow" street cars. 



CHICAGO. 

A COMMITTEE on membership has been 
■^^ formed to start a vigorous campaign 
for new members. A legislative committee 
has been appointed to oppose the bills intro- 
duced into the legislature discriminating 
against colored people. Mr. S. Laing 
Williams has been elected vice-president in 
the place of Mr. Aldis, Avho is out of the 
country. Mr. Packard and Miss Tibbs have 
been elected directors in the places of Mrs. 
Wooley and Mr. Paris, who could not 



DETROIT. 

' I 'HE branch is planning for a large meet- 
ing to be held early in April with Dr. 
Mason as speaker. Resolutions endorsing 
woman's suffrage were adopted by the branch 
and forwarded to the Michigan Equal Suf- 
frage Association. The anti-intermarriage 
bill under consideration by the legislature 
was defeated largely through the efforts of 
the branch. 



INDIANAPOLIS. 

nPHE Indianapolis branch reports meet- 
-*■ ings at Allen Chapel on February 12 
and on February 21, at the home of Mrs. 
Clay, which was addressed by INIrs. 0. B. 
Jameson, a prominent clubwoman of Indian- 
apolis. The subject of the address was 
"Woman Suffrage." The branch has suc- 
ceeded in interesting several influential Avhite 
friends in the matter of local discrimination 
against the colored people. 



NEW YORK. 

'T'HE New York branch has reorganized 
-^ its vigilance committee as follows : 
New headquarters have been opened in room 
111, 203 Broadway, and these headquarters 
will be in charge of Mr. Gilchrist Stewart, 
who is now serving as the executive secretary 
of the committee. The president of the 
branch. Dr. Spingarn, is chairman of the 
vigilance committee, and Dr. Elliott con- 
tinues as vice-chairman. The legal advisory 
l)oard includes the six lawyers already on 
the list and Mr. Arthur B. Spingarn. 



THE BLACK HALF 



By JACOB RIIS 




LITTLE while back I arrived 
in an Arkansas town and 
addressed a large audience. 
I told them several stories 
of the emigrants who come 
to this country, among 
which was the story of the 
Irishman who went to Wall Street in the 
time of the panic. On this day, when we 
were all seared stiff, when the newspapers 
were filled with stories about the panic, this 
Irishman walked down into Wall Street with 
a bundle done up in a yellow bandanna. 
There was something about the man which 
compelled attention. He entered one of the 
offices and opened up the bandanna. Inside 
of the bundle was a long stocking from which 
he pulled all sorts of scraps of money — 
25-cent pieces, 10-cent pieces, and even a 
little gold. When he had it all out it made 
quite a little heap. He said: "Mother and 
me saved this money in the forty-one years 
we have been in this country against the 
time I could not work any more. Last night, 
sitting by the stove, mother read to me that 
the countrj'^ was in great trouble and needed 
money, and so I brought this here." This 
man, a foreigner, who had himself chosen 
to be an American, one not to the manor 
born, one who had chosen freedom for him- 
self, was ready to cast into the Treasury at 
Washington every cent he had. 

My audience was greatly moved by this 
story, which was perfectly natural, and I 
was greatly pleased. I had come quite close 
to them. I liked them and they liked me. 
I was leaving the town on the midnight 
train, and when I reached the station a man 
was there waiting for me, who had come to 
see the town and was leaving at the same 
time. This man drew for me a picture of 
social conditions in that town, of the social 
relationship between the whites and the 
blacks, that beat anything I ever heard of 
or dreamed of in all my days. He told 
me that the blacks there were deliberately 
forced into ignorance and dependency by 
social machinery. I said to him that I hoped 
that this was simply a resurgence of the 



spirit of the war and that the new genera- 
tion would have a different story to tell. 
He replied: "I wish I could think as you 
do, but I have been here forty years and it 
is worse to-day than it was when I came." 

After this I simply could not sleep. I 
thought how strange it was that these people 
who were so moved by the Irishman's story 
had forgotten absolutely the affection that 
they had received in such full measure all 
these years from these black-skinned breth- 
ren, from whom they had no right to expect 
it. I wondered if they had forgotten the 
songs that lulled them to sleep, the devotion 
of the colored mammy, the care and tender- 
ness that watched over the step of the grow- 
ing child. I wondered how all of this could 
have passed out of their minds when they 
were so ready to be stirred by the Irishman's 
story. I was so worked up that night that 
I not only did not sleep, but when I arrived 
in New Orleans I got into the black end of 
one of the "Jim Crow" cars. No sooner was 
I seated than the conductor came to me 
and asked me to go into the other part of 
the car. I told him I preferred jto remain 
where I was, but he insisted that I move, 
saying it was against the law for me to ride 
in the colored portion of the car. 

That thing kept on working on me, and 
when I was visiting a friend that evening I 
gave expression to my mdignation and this 
was the only answer I received : "Well, you 
don't understand." No, I don't understand. 
I didn't then and I don't now. They have 
their problems. I don't understand them 
because I don't live there. But I do live in 
the North, and how about us in the North? 

When we face our Lord and think of the 
problem we have here in the North, we must 
be ashamed when we put the question to 
ourselves whether He makes any difference 
between the blacks and the whites. What 
is the cause of this prejudice? Is it be- 
cause the colored race is a criminal race, a 
vicious race? 

For twenty-five years I was a reporter in 
police headquarters. I saw crime in all its 
forms. That was my business. For almost 



THE BLACK HALF 



299 



a whole lifetime I had to do with crime and 
only crime. In those days the colored popu- 
lation of NeAv York was in what was known 
as "Old Africa," on Thompson Street. This 
section certainly had its share of criminality, 
and ought by right to have been all crime if 
there is any truth in the saying that the 
slums naturally breed vice and crime. This 
was a district where the tenement houses 
were the nastiest ever — not even lit for pigs 
to live in. The landlord made no repairs, 
but took all he could get out of the houses, 
allowing them to stand and rot. But "Old 
Africa'' was just the reverse of what it should 
have been. All the black crime with which 
I had to deal during these twenty-five years 
did not leave a single black mark on my 
memory. 

Since then the population has scattered. 
Wherever these colored people have gone 
they have been good tenants, extra clean and 
always prompt to pay. Any landlord will 
make no bones of telling you about it. They 
ought to be favored some as tenants and 
they are. It reminds me of a conversation 
I had with a man whom I met on the train 
the other day. I was speaking of the large 
colored population in New Jersey. He said : 
"They are good people, but they haven't any 
chance. They are not tolerated in any trade. 
They pay the highest rents." That is pre- 
cisely what the landlord all over is doing. 
He gives them a good name, says they are 
prompt in their payments and sticks $2 extra 
a month on the rent. He acknowledges that 
he does this and gives as his reason: "Once 
a colored house, always a colored house." 
The landlord deliberately exploits the preju- 
dice against the black man to make it pan 
out a profit for him. 

I am here reminded of one of my early 
experiences with the color problem. I came 
from Denmark. Here there is no color 
problem. The colored people coming from 
the West Indies to Denmark are regarded 
as curiosities, and crowds of children will 
follow a colored person up and down the 
streets. 

What is more charming than a colored 
baby? The first time I came across one was 



right here in New York City. It was in a 
nursery where mothers used to take their 
children to be cared for. There were two 
colored babies here among all the whites in 
the nursery. They were fine babies and at 
the age when they are always crying. But 
these little colored babies cried so much that 
the doctors thought something must be the 
matter and tried to find out what it was. 
It turned out that there was in the nursery 
a vicious nurse who had all the prejudice of 
many of her kind concentrated in her. She 
made a practice of pinching the little col- 
ored babies. Had she wanted to, she would 
not dare to pinch the white babies because it 
would show on their flesh, but because the 
skin of the little black babies was dark she 
felt that she was safe. This was many years 
ago, but it left its mark on my soul. 

It does not seem to occur to us that as a 
man soweth so shall he reap. Our misdeeds 
will all be visited upon our children and our 
children's children. These black people did 
not seek to come here. We brought them 
here by force. Every day there are more of 
them, and they are our neighbors. Some- 
times I think that a nation's fitness to live 
will certainly be judged by its treatment of 
its dependents. Suppose we were to be 
judged in the eternal scales by our treatment 
of the Negro and the Indian — that is, the 
civic end of it. As Christians we must be- 
lieve that a man's measure is taken by his 
capacity for service. 

Now, as I am concluding these remarks, 
let me just add this with regard to work in 
our settlements. We often hear of ingrati- 
tude on the part of those whom we are trying 
to help in the white settlements, but I have 
yet to hear of the first instance of this on 
the part of the black man. Never have I 
heard it, and I never will, and you never 
will. The only report that comes back to 
us is that of loyalty, affection and gratitude. 
These black people never utter one word of 
reproach. They are willing to let bygones 
be bygones and say: "Just give us your 
hand and let us all be brothers." Shall we 
withhold that hand? 





THE BURDEN 



THE NEGRO AND THE TRUST. 

THE enterprising colored community at 
Kowaliga, Ala., is threatened by the 
water-power trust. Kowaliga was founded 
forty years ago by John Benson, an ex- 
slave, and has been recently extended and 
developed along modern lines by his son, 
William E. Benson. Not only has Mr. 
Benson succeeded in concentrating here an 
investment in lands and industrial plant 
representing over $200,000, but he had 
actually begun the construction of twenty- 
eight miles of railway from the nearest con- 
necting line through the heart of this settle- 
ment in order to transport and market valu- 
able timber, until they were held up pend- 
ing condemnation proceedings by the Inter- 
state Power Company. This is an English 
company with millions back of it. It bought 
out extraordinary rights under a bill slipped 
through the Alabama legislature ten years 
ago, and is now proceeding to condemn 
60,000 acres of farm land, including Ko- 
waliga. The Montgomery Advertiser is help- 
ing the steal by headlines like this : 
"THE POWER COMPANY, THE NEGRO 
AND THE RAILROAD!" 

Thus the Negro problem having served to 
put the South into political slavery is now 
being used to fasten the chains of a trust 
which, as a CongTessman recently said, will 
make other trusts seem "as mere benevolent 
societies organized for the dissemination of 
Christian charity." 

The Kowaliga community has taken the 
matter to court. 



FROM A WHITE LABORER. 
"••T THINK Alabama has the worst labor laws 
-■■ of any in the States. A man can be sent 
to jail for hiring a worker away from another 
man. A striking workman, under the law, 
has no rights; no need for the employer to 



get out an injunction in the same troublous 
manner as the Northern employer has to do; 
the necessary law is on the statute books now 
which will send the obstreperous worker to 
the coal mines for speaking to a scab or 
picketing or loitering around the master's 
property. 

"Out-of-works are picked up as vagrants 
by deputy sheriffs for the fees there are in 
them, and then railroaded to the coal mines 
or lumber camps for so much a head, where 
they are worked like slaves. In Clarke 
County, Ala., it is a common thing for 
planters to send out agents provocateurs, so 
it is stated, who get stout, husky-looking 
'Niggers' into crap games, card games, or 
sell them a pistol cheap, or get them to boot- 
leg whiskey; then report them to the sheriff, 
who promptly arrests them and a ready judge 
fines them heavily. 

"Then the needy planter offers to pay their 
fine for them if they will make a court con- 
tract to work it out with him at from $5 to 
$10 a month. Of course, the poor devils are 
eager to get out of a jail where they are 
half starved by those who have the contract 
at so much per diem to feed them, and they 
agree. 

"The planter then has what are prac- 
tically, to all intents and purposes, slaves, 
more securely held than before the war be- 
cause he does not even have to catch them 
if they run away. The sheriff does that at 
so much per head, paid by the county, and 
if the man or the men die, then the planter 
ceases his monthly payments on the fine to 
the county. Could anything be more 
diabolical ? 

"I could fill pages with perfectly true 
stories of convicts on the farms and in the 
mines and forests of Alabama which would 
make any real man's blood boil, but this does 
not seem to affect the Southerner." — New 
York Call. 



^-^.^ 



lLM,]lull/nilllllnluiiri;,„»i»>,MMllllll/,.imill.lllllll,liiiii». iiNH. .11 ii ii)„„ i ii iMj ii i i MMi i mn r L i n ii mi i ijiMii i niu i iun i i i nMi i 



II 



ii\i, ',111111, nmi.wiiv.'/^^ 




THE CRISIS 



V*' 



FROM WHITE FOLK. 

To begin, I am a white woman, and have 
loved the colored race from infancy. I hap- 
pened to pick up a copy of The Crisis and 
was truly shocked at its tendency; so far as 
I can see your book only creates discontent 
among your people. 

If you had the least idea of the harm you 
are doing you would stop it. Social equality 
you will never have, but there is chance 
to improve conditions of a race that can be 
magnificent without social equality. 

(Signed) E. J. H. 

Many thanks, my dear Crisis, for your 
prophetic monthly. It started our way as 
a Christmas present a few years ago. The 
bitterness of so many of my people toward 
the problem they themselves brought to this 
country fills me with sadness; but Love 
is Life — there is no other life. It must win 
since God is. God, who sees beneath all non- 
essentials, and the deeper the experience 
passed through the higher the heights at- 
tained. Oh, I sorrow with you, almost I 
believe as one of you, in the insults my race 
heaps upon you. But steady, brother mine, 
nothing can hurt us save our own wrong- 
doing. There is no death. Covered in dark- 
ness for a day,' it will be light for you 
forever. 

God bless you and keep you on the Heights. 
Most gratefully and fraternally, 
(Signed) Victor Lynch Greenwood. 



Lincoln University, March 8, 1913. 
Please discontinue my subscription to 
The Crisis. George Johnson, 

^ Bean. 

FROM COLORED FOLK. 
Dear Sir: 

I wish to say to you that there is much 
truck grown in this section of North Caro- 



lina by the colored people, and the white 
man has been shipping it for us to the whites 
North, etc. Now we are becoming restless 
about it somewhat and want to know if there 
are any colored commission merchants in 
New York. If so, will you kindly put us in 
touch with them? If not any there, can't 
some one come to the front and be one for a 
few months in the year in order that we may 
ship at least some of our truck to them. I 
mean some good man who will deal fair with 
us and give us a living price for it. There 
are many, many thousands of crates that 
are shipped from this point every year, such 
as peas, beans, cabbage, etc., and many 
thousands of dollars are made by the com- 
mission merchants who handle it, and it seems 
to me that there ought to be in New York, 
Philadelphia and Boston at least one colored 
firm of commission merchants who would or 
could handle a portion of the Southern 
colored produce. There is money in it for the 
right man. We will begin to ship about the 
ISth or 20th of April, and if, as I have 
said, you can put me in touch with someone 
whom you think would like to take up the 
matter with me, I will be very glad to hear 
from them. 

Thanking you in advance and anxiously 
waiting to hear from you, I am. 
Yours respectfully. 



I have found truth and the bright side of 
the Negro in The Crisis, from the first 
time of its publication. 

J. W. Fisher, 

Wallingford, Conn. 



Crisis bearing fruit here; one of most 
eagerly sought for of our magazines in col- 
lege library. Harry H. Jones, 

Oberlin, 0. 



302 



THE CRISIS 



While at Miami, Fla., the other day I 
noticed a sign in the postoffiee which read 
as follows: "No NegToes Allowed at This 
Desk." There is another sign, however, which 
informs Negroes that they may use a certain 
desk in the lobby of the office. 

Is such a discrimination constitutional in 
such a place of that kind? If you will look 
into this matter it will be highly appreciated 
by me. Yours very truly, 



^ A letter to The Crisis says : 

"This is only among the few atrocious 
acts committed by white officers down here : 
The fourth Sunday morning in November, 
at Beaumont, East of Hattiesburg (Miss.), 
at the Kansas City Railroad junction, a mar- 
shal killed a young colored man because he 
made a mistake in entering a white waiting 



"IT PAYS TO KICK" 
Deab Sir : 

It may be of interest to you or to some 
of your readers to know that the poem quoted 
iu full in The Crisis for January and said 
to be entitled "It Pays to Kick," and to have 



been attributed by the Woman's Journal to 
Cotton's Weekly, was written by Major 
Holman F. Day, whom I regard as the most 
gifted and original Yankee humorist now 
living. It is to be found on page 87 of his 
volume of verse "Up in Maine" (Small, 
Maynard & Co., Boston, 1904), where it is 
called "The True Story of a Kicker." 

Holman Day was not reared in an atmos- 
phere like that of the classic city of Cam- 
bridge. He was born in the little village of 
Vassalboro, Me., and educated at the "fresh- 
water college," Colby, at Waterville. When 
the writer first knew him he was the editor 
of a typical country weekly called the Dexter 
Gazette, and his genial personality made him 
a universal favorite in that portion of Penob- 
scot County, where at least nine-tenths of the 
population speak Yankee pure and 
undefiled. 

The little poem quoted by you is by no 
means one of Day's best, but it partakes 
somewhat of the general qualities of his 
work, as above outlined. Some of your 
readers might be interested in the foregoing 
estimate. 

Yours truly, 
(Signed) Samuel C. Worthen. 



^'TELLING A STORY 

11 To friends who know you, may be easy, but "putting one over" to 

* 5franorf»rs is niiit'e Hifrprpnt. 



To friends who know you, may be easy, but "putting one over" to 
^ strangers is quite different. 

Telling a busy, business man about your services or your merchandise is still less 
a "cinch," for he hears the same story every day a dozen or more times. 

A clever speaker, before ' "' "" ^--'-'- — '■ — *^- - ' -*-^ ^ 

into his very first remark. 



d aiccpy ui 11U5U1C duuience, puts a good, stiff punch 
This "knocks 'em off their feet" and they listen. 



Your business letters may be good, but if they lack the "punch" they won't "pull. 
^: :. iL_ •• L" i^j^j j^jjg jj^g jj^jgy jjjj^jj "right in the eye' 



Your busmess letters may be good, but if the] 
Correct business stationery is the "punch" tha 
and makes him read your letter. 



you write us. 



and makes him read your letter. 

We'll show you the sort of stationery we create, if 

We print for Mr. Conde Nast, of Vogue; we print The CRISIS. 

ROBERT N. WOOD, Printing and Engraving 

202 EAST 99th STREET NEW YORK 

'Phone 6667 Lenox 



Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



303 



Publishers Chat 

THE GROWTH OF THE CRISIS'^ 

COPIES PRINTED 

I hereby certify that I have printed the following numbers of copies 
of The Crisis for the months indicated: 

1910 — November 1,000 

1911— March 6,000 

July 15,000 

1912— April 22,000 

December 24,000 

1913— April 30,000 

Sworn to before me this 15th day of March, 1913. 

Frank J. Daly, 
Commissioner of Deeds, Neiv York Cii^. 

Robert N. Wood. 



NET CIRCULATION 
« 

The net paid circulation of The Crisis for March was 23,250 
copies. Three days after publication there was not a copy left in the 
office for sale. The Crisis has to-day a circulation iwice as large as 
that of any other Negro publication — weekly or monthly. 



COMING NUMBERS 

The May number will contain the startling climax of H. H. Pace's 
story, an interesting pictorial study of marriage among colored folk, and 
other articles and features. 

In the near future expect the unpublished letters of Robert Gould 
Shaw, a study of crime among Negroes, and a few good short stories. 



Mention The Crisis. 



304 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



Tke very Business Opportunity for >?v^nicn i OU 
kave been looking may possikly ke kere on tkis page. 



EARN 



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tions. Many of them now hold steady positions 
with some of New York's largest business houses. 
The service of the Bureau is FREE. Correspondence 
invited. Address 

Harlem Commercial School 

F. WALTEE MOTTLEY, Principal 
47 Wesi 139th Street New York 




SELLS LIKE HOT CAKES 

Agents wanted 
everywhere to sell 
this ironing wax in 
pad form. It per- 
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with a lasting violet 
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WAX-IN-PAD MANU.FACTUKERS 
Lynbrook . - - New York 

A r F N T S ^*^-^^ *® $80.00 

Thousands of dollars paid to agents 
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«10 



00 A DAY AND MORE 
•== TO LIVE AGENTS 

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INTERNATIONAL SPECIALTIES CO. 
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Colored agents, male or female, are wanted every- 
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terms. 

THE HOUSE OF CROWNING 
Indianapolis . - - . Indiana 



LET US START YOU IN BUSINESS ANY- 
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O F 



I T 



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GORDON COIMPANY 
Northwestern Building Chicago, III. 



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Department C 

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Station U, Chicago, 111. 



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Mention The Crisis. 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



305 



REAL ESTATE 



Buy Brooklyn Property 

Are you a bonafide purchaser? Have 
you money to invest? Now is the time. 
Values are low. $500 cash buys well-built 
brick house. Balance on easy terms. Con- 
venient location, etc. Houses for sale in 
every section of the city. For particulars 
see 

G. JOHNSON 

196 Putnam Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WANTED 

500 Negro families (farmers pre- 
ferred) to settle on FREE Govern- 
ment Lands in Chaves County, New 
Mexico. Blackdom is a Negro colony. 
Fertile soil, ideal climate. No "Jim 
Crow" Laws. For information write 

JAS. HAROLD COLEMAN 

Blackdom, New Mexico 

Telephone 4048 Prospect 

JOHN B. MOSELEY 
REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 



640 Fulton Street 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Oivn Home in the North 

If not, why not ? We have an increasing demand 
for ambitious, progressive colored people who are 
seeking homes in the North. We are the medium 
through which these demands can be supplied. 
Only such as can satisfy us that they are desirable 
will be considered. Get our Property Bulletin. 
It is free for the asking. 



Cor. 



P. H. SYKES, Real Estate 
19tli and Ellsworth Sts. Philadelphia, Pa. 



A PLACE TO STOP 



HOTEL WASHINGTON 

First-class Service for First-class People 

3252 Wabash Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 

FURNISHED BOOMS for respectable people. All 
modern conveniences. Apply 33 West 131st 
Street, Xew York. 



TYPEWRITERS 




Remingtons, Densmores, 

J e w e t t 8, $11.50 each; 
Franklins, Postals, Ham- 
monds, $9 each. Bargains in 
Underwoods, Smiths and all 
otherp. All guaranteed. 

Supplies. 

Standard Typewriter 
Exchange 

23B Park Row, New York 



PRESIDENTS 

NEGRO REPUBLIC 

in colors and a short history of Liberia. 16 z 20. 
Ready to hang on the walls; only 50c. prepaid; in 
gold frames $1.25. Everybody wants one. Write 
NEGRO PRESS, Box 126; Gainesville, Fla., U. S. A. 
1,000 agents wanted. 

UNDERTAKERS 

Telephone Columbus 3935 Open All Night 

RODNEY DADE & BROS. 

Undertakers and Embalmers 

Notary Public 

Funeral Parlor and Chapel Free. 

Licensed Lady Embalmer . Prompt Service 

266 West 6Sd Street New York, N. Y. 

Between Broadway and 8th Avenue 



Smart Men Wanted 

$5 to $10 a Day 

For Men Who Can Talk 



Smart men, clever talkers, good 
mixers — send us your name and 
address. We've got a truly 
wonderful proposition for men 
like you. We start you in 
tailoring business, furnish 
everything, back you to the 
limit. Hustlers make $5 to $10 
a day. 
Be a Money-Maker! Look Prosperous! 

Don't be a wage slave on small pay 
Be your own boss 1 Make money fast 
and easy. Mi.x with prosperous people 
Dress in the height of style. Our men/ 
are pointed out as top-notchers, win 
ners, envied by all. 
Grand FREE Outfit— Write for it To-day 

This big, wealthy tailoring concern 
spares no expense to start you right. 
Furnish Grand Free Outfit, handsome 
color plates, elegant cloth samples, tape 
measure, complete instructions and 
selling helps — everything free. No 
money or experience necessary. Just 
write. 

Start a Fortune in Spare Time 

You can do it. Whole time or spare time. For 
20 years this company has been famous for making 
the swellest, best-fitting, longest-wearing made-to- 
measure clothes. Write to-day for Free Outfit. 

^« Progress Tailoring Co., Dept. 864. Chicago. 111. 




Mention The Crisis. 



306 



THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 



LEGAL DIRECTORY 



This is a ready reference of some of the 
best lawyers in the country. 

gflP'If you are a lawyer and your name is 
not listed here you should write us at once. 



Office Phone 
Home 58 Main 



Residence 2546 Michigan 
Bell Phone E-2161 

C. H. CALLOWAY 
Attorney and Counselor- at-Law 

Notary Public 
117 W. 6th Street Kansas City, Mo. 

FRANKLIN W. WILLIAMS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Notary Public 

Real Estate Conveyancer 

206 Parrish Street Durham, N. C 

Office L. D. Telephone 3297 Market 
Residence L. D. Telephone, 5277-M Market 

GEORGE A. DOUGLAS 

Counselor-at-Law 

Rooms 613-614, Metropolitan Building 
113 Market St., Cor. Washington, Newark, N. J. 

Telephone 5574 Beekman Rooms 905 to 907 

WILFORD H. SMITH 

Lawyer 

150 Nassap Street New York City 

Uptown Office — 136 West 136th Street 

General Practice , Notary Public 

WILLIAM R. MORRIS 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Iiaw 

1020 Metropolitan Life Building 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

BROWN S. SMITH 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

Offices: Suite 610, Sykes Block. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

GEORGE W. MITCHELL 

Attomey-at-Law 
908 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tel. 2026 Fort Hill Cable Address, Epben 

EDGAR P. BENJAMIN 

Attorney and Counselor-at-Law 

34 SCHOOL STREET Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Connection 

W. Ashbie Hawkins George W. F. McMechen 

HAWKINS & McMECHEN 

Attomeys-at-Law 

21 East Saratoga Street Baltimore, Md. 



LEGAL DIRECTORY— Continued 



Telephones : 



I Central 104W 
\ Main 61 



HARRY E. DAVIS 

Attorney-at-Law Notary Public 

1607 WUliamson Bldg. Cleveland, O. 

ELIJAH J. GRAHAM, Jr. 

Attorney-at-Law and Notary Public 
1026 Market Street Wheeling, W. Va. 

ARCHITECTS 



WIGINGTON & BELL 

Architects 

Karbach Block Omaha, Neb. 

H. HENRY HARRIS 

Architect 

Cor. 8th and Princess Streets 

Wilmington, N. C. 



MOVING 



Telephone 4214 Greeley 

BRANIC'S EXPRESS 

PACKING AND SHIPPING 

ANDREW J. BRANIC 

459 SEVENTH AVENUE New York City 

Orders by mall or 'phone receive prompt attention 

TRUNKS STORED 25c. PER MONTH 

Official Expressman for the C. V. B. A. 

PERSONAL CARDS 

Telephone 5277 Morningside 

DR. GERTRUDE E. CURTIS 

Surgeon Dentist 

188 West 135th Street, New York City 

Telephone 4885 Morningside 

DR. D. W. ONLEY 

Surgeon Dentist 

S. W Cor. 1