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Full text of "How to cook eggs and omelets in 300 different ways"

HQW-TO COOK 
EGGS 

AND- OMELETS 

IN -300 

DIFFERENT 

WAYS 



CHERMANSENN 



^4 



Cornell University Library 
TX 745.S4 

How to cook eggs and omelets in 300 diff 



3 1924 000 693 931 



FROM THE LIBRARY OF 



James B. Herndon, Jr. 



PRESENTED BY HIM TO THE 

School of Hotel 
A dminhtration 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 




Cornell University 
Library 



The original of tliis book is in 
tine Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924000693931 



HOW TO COOK 
EGGS AND OMELETS 



HOW TO COOK 
EGGS AND OMELETS 

IN 300 DIFFERENT WAYS 



By 

C. HERMAN SENN, O.B.E., G.C.A., 

F.R.H.S. 

Author of 

"The Century Cookery Book," "The Menu Book," 

"Luncheon and Dinner Sweets," "Breakfast 

Dishes and Savouries," " Summer and 

Winter Drinks," etc. 



NEW EDITION 



WARD, LOCK & CO., LIMITED 

tONDON AND MELBOURNE 



-S4 






KADB IN ENGLAND 

Printed in Great Britain by 
Butler & Tanner Ltd., Frome and London 



EGGS AS FOOD 

THERE is perhaps no other article of 
diet which is more important as 
a food than eggs, and few articles 
are served in a greater variety of ways 
or more largely consumed. Besides those 
of the domestic fowl, the eggs of the duck, 
the goose, the guinea fowl, the plover, 
the ostrich and several other birds, and 
the turtle, are also used for cooking pur- 
poses. Hens' eggs are, of course, the 
most popular, and for ordinary use are 
therefore most common. 

Dr. Langworthy, in his article, " Eggs 
and their Uses," gives the following inter- 
esting information : — 

" Other eggs besides those of birds are 
sometimes eaten. Turtle eggs are highly 
prized in most countries where they are 
abundant. They were once more com- 
monly eaten in America than now, possibly 
owing to the more abundant supply in 
former times. The eggs of the terrapin 
are usually served with the flesh in some 
of the ways of preparing it for the table. 
Fish eggs, especially those of the sturgeon, 
are eaten in large quantities, preserved 
5 



6 EGGS AS FOOD 

with salt, under the name of caviare. Shad 
roe is also a famiUar example of the use of 
fish eggs as food. Mention may also be 
made of the use of the eggs of alligators, 
lizards, serpents, and some insects, by 
races who lack the prejudices of Western 
nations. However, in general, the term 
' eggs,' when used in connection with 
food topics, refers to the eggs of birds, 
usuaUy domestic poultry, and is so used 
in this article. 

" The appearance of an egg — ^the shell 
with its hning of membrane, enclosing the 
white and yolk — ^is too familiar to need any 
discussion. The physiological structure of 
the egg is perhaps less familiar. A fer- 
tile egg contains an embryo, and is at the 
same time a storehouse of material for the 
development and growth of the young 
individual from the embryo, until it has 
reached such a stage that life is possible 
outside the narrow limits of the shell. 
The embryo is situated quite close to the 
yolk, which furnishes the nutritive mate- 
rial for its early development, the white 
being used later." 



CONTENTS AND INDEX 



PAGS 

A 



Almond Eggs (moulded) 28 

Anchovy Eggs (oold) gg 

Anchovy Eggs (another way) 40 

Aspic or Savoury Jeily 131 



B 



Baked Eggs 4 la Princesse <j 



Bechamel Sauce 



129 



Brown Sauce 130 

Buttered Eggs 26 

Buttered Eggs with Anchovies 27 

Buttered Eggs with Truffles 28 

C 

Caviare Eggs 90 

Chaud-froid of Eggs (cold) ,..,., 93 

Cheese, Creamed ........ 63 

Cheese Eggs 82 

Chestnut Pur^e, Savoury ..,..., 52 

Coddled Eggs 126 

Creamed Eggs with Mushrooms 39 

Curried Eggs 33 

Curried Eggs (another way) ...... 62 

Curry Sauce ......... 130 

O 

Devilled Eggs 84 

Devilled Egg Toast 64 

Digestibility of Eggs, The 14 

Dropped Eggs 62 

E 
Egg Bouchees ....... .42 

„ Bouillon 124 

„ Cannelons .43 

„ Cofiee 125 

„ Coquilles with Spinach 45 

„ Croquettes 53 

„ Croustades 28 

„ Crofttes with Game 72 

„ Cutlets 43 

„ Cutlets with Spinach 44 

„ Darioles 86 

„ Fillip ......... 126 

„ Flip 127 

„ Fritters It la Magdaltoe 6r 

„ Fritters k la Milanaise 44 

„ Frittere i la Royale 78 

„ Jelly (sweet) 124 

7 



CONTENTS 



PAGB 

Egg Jumbles 89 

„ Kromeskis ........ 45 

„ Nog (cold) 126 

„ Nog (hot) .126 

„ NouUles 128 

„ and Oyster Boucb6e5 42 

„ Patties 41 

" Pie 66 

„ Ragoflt h la Frao^aise 88 

,, Ragoftt k la Piiocesse ...... 85 

„ Rarebit 87 

„ Rolls, Fried 53 

„ Salad 94 

„ Salad (hot) 95 

„ Sauce 128 

„ Souffl6 54 

„ Tartlets 89 

„ Tea 125 

„ Timbales with Anchovies ...... 86 

„ Tomato Ramakins .75 

„ Water 127 

„ Wme 125 

Eggs & I'Africaine 46 

„ 4 TAmericaine ........ 46 

„ Baked k la Princesse ...... 52 

„ ea Banquettes ........ 36 

„ 4 la Belloy 36 

„ au Beurre Noir ....... 85 

„ 4 la Boisellier 46 

k la Bombay . 34 

„ k la Boston 88 

„ 4 la Bretonne ........ 47 

„ Buttered 26 

„ Buttered, with Anchovies ...... 27 

„ Buttered, with Truffles 28 

„ k la Capucine 30 

„ i la Chantilly 49 

„ k la Cartoe 38 

„ k la Carnot 70 

„ in Cases 61 

„ Chaud-froid of (cold) 93 

„ Cheese ......... 82 

„ with Cheese 82 

„ with Creamed Cheese 63 

„ k la Chiffonade 76 

„ k la Chimay 50 

„ k la Chipolata 80 

„ en Cocottes 87 

_ Coddled ......... 126 

„ Ilia Colbert 47 

„ 4 la Coque en Surprise 41 

„ a la Coquette 30 

„ k la Cosmopolite 36 

„ 4 la Courtet 30 

„ Creamed, with Mushrooms 39 

„ with Cucumber 38 

„ Curried 33 

„ Curried (another way) 6a 

„ Devilled 84 

„ k la Dreux ■ 55 

„ Dropped 63 

„ k I'Eugtoie .37 

„ 4 la Fermi^re Sr 

„ k la Florentine 37 

„ Freshness of , to test 15 

,, Fricassee of 35 



AND INDEX 9 

PAOX 

Eggs, Fried, k la Ci^cAb 65 

Fried Crofttes of (sweet) 123 

Fried, Curried 63 

Fried k la Fermidre 31 

Fried k la Romaine ■.••... 77 

Fried, with Savoury Rice 51 

on Rice CroQtes 77 

Frosted . . , . , . , , .125 

k la Gagnor , , . . , , , - 3i 

k la Garfield ........ 73 

k la Gourmet ...,.,,. 37 

k la Grand Due ....... 37 

k la Granville ........ 38 

au Gratin 81 

Gruyfire . . , , . . . , .82 

k la Hussard 78 

Ham (cold) 63 

Hard-boiled . 16 

k rindienne ..,..,.. 33 

k ritalienne ........ 74 

k la St. Jacques . . . . . . .56 

Lobster 67 

k la Lucullus 76 

k la Lyonnaise, ....... 83 

k la Madame ........ 88 

k la Maire 79 

k la Marianne ........ 32 

k la Marie ........ 76 

k la Marie Louise 72 

k la Marigny . . 30 

en Matelote ........ 79 

k la M6dicis ........ 57 

with Melted Cheese 82 

k la Messina ........ 73 

k la Meyerbeer. , , , , . . , 7i 

k la Mirelle 71 

k la Mode de Caen ....... 38 

k la Montpensier . 79 

k la Momay 31 

k la Neige . . ..... 79 

k la Nesselrobe 51 

k la Nigoise ........ 72 

k la Norfolk ........ 79 

with Nouilles k la Carola ...... 20 

with Nut Brown Butter 85 

k rOrientale 34. 

k la Pacha 38 

au Paprika ........ 32 

k la Parmentier ....... 48 

in Parsley Sauce ....... 66 

k la Pasqual 32 

k la Piemontaise ....... 74 

sur Plat 62 

Poached ......■.• 16 

Poached k la Garibaldi 17 

Poached k I'Espagnole .17 

Poached, Imperial Style .20 

Poached in Savoury Jelly ..... 22 

Poached in Potatoes . ..... 30 

Poached k la Proven^ale ...... 19 

Poached k la Reine 17 

Poached with Spinach 18 

Poached with Tongue 21 

Poached in White Wine 19 

Poached k la R6moulade 22 

k la Polonaise ........ 74 

& la Poulette 75 

^' ^ la Princesse 85 



10 



CONTENTS 



Eggs, in Pug Pastry 
„ k la Reine 
„ ik la Reine Itargot 
„ k la Rialto 
„ ^ la Richelieu 
„ ^ la Rossini 
„ & la Russe 
„ k la St. Cloud 
„ k la St. Geimain 
„ & la Salamandre 
„ i la Santos (cold) . 
„ Sandwiches 

Sardine . 

Savoury, and Tomatoes 

Scalloped with Spinach 

Scotch 

Scrambled 

Scrambled with Asparagus Tips 

Scrambled, in Cases . 

Scrambled with Cfipes 

Scrambled with Ham 

Scrambled with Herbs 

Scrambled with Mushrooms 

Scrambled with Peas 

Scrambled with Rice 

Scrambled with Salmoa 

Scrambled with Tomatoes 

Scrambled with Tongue 

in Shells . 

Soft-boiled 

k la Soubisc 

Spanish . 

Shirred . 

with Shrimp Sauce . 

Steamed , 

Steamed k la Bichamel 

Stuffed k I'Aurore (cold) 

Stuffed with Anchovies 

Stufied on Croates . 

Stuffed on Croiltes k la Madras 

Stuffed with Ham (cold) 

Stuffed with Prawns. 

Stuffed with Spinach 

Stuffed Swiss style . 

Stuffed k la Volga (cold) 

k la Tomate 

Tomato . 

and Tomato Custard 

and Tomato Savoury 

k la Tripe 

k la Turque 

k la VUleroi . 

k la Waldimir . 



PACK 

8a 
77 
76 
92 
39 
71 
91 
39 
37 
43 
40 
94 
69 
87 
40 
69 
23 
26 
26 
25 
36 
24 
24 
25 

23 
25 
25 

2S 

83 

t6 
84 
68 
62 
21 
126 
87 
92 
57 
58 
59 
91 
70 
57 
6a 
59 
32 
69 
64 
54 
8r 
29 
34 
81 



F 

Food Value of Eggs ...•.,,, 13 

Freshness of Eggs, To test 15 

Fricassee of Eggs ........ 35 

Fricassee of Eggs (another way) 35 

Fricassee of Eggs with Muslirooms ..... 35 

Frosted Eggs 125 

a 

Giuyire Eggs g2 



AND INDEX 



II 



PAGB 
H 

Ham Eggs 65 

Hard-boCed Eggs 16 

Hollandaise Sauce . . , , , , , ,129 

How to Turn out Omeleti 99 

How to Preserve Eggs 15 

How to Shape an Omelet ....«•, 9S 

L 

Lobster Eggs 67 

M 

Mayonnaise of Eggs ....,.,. go 

Mayonnaise Sauce ...,,.., 128 

O 

Omelet, How to Shape an 98 

Omelets, How to Turn Out 99 

P 

Paprika Sauce 127 

Poached Eggs .16 

Pyramids of Eggs k la Reforme 73 

R 

Rules for Making Omelets. , 97 

8 

Salmon Eggs 67 

Salpioon of Eggs 41 

Savoury Egg Cream on Toast ,,,.,. 54 

„ „ Custard 124 

Scalloped Eggs with Spinach 40 

Scotch Eggs i . , 6g 

Scrambled Eggs 23 

Shirred Eggs 62 

Snow Eggs 123 

Soow Eggs au Citron 123 

Soft-boiled Eggs 16 

Spanish Eggs . . . 68 

Steamed Eggs . . . . f . . . . 126 

Steamed Eggs k la B6chamel 87 

Supreme Sauce .131 

Sweet Omelets, Notes on 116 

T 

Tc»nato Eggs . 69 

Tomato Sauce 130 

OMELETS 



American Omeleti 

Amourettes 

Anchovy 

Asparagus 

Bayonne 

BSamaise 

Berooise 

Bonne Femme 

Brain 

BruzeUoise 

Chareotidn 



ZI3 

112 
log 
106 
108 
107 

lOI 

100 
108 
Z12 
10 z 



12 CONTENTS AND INDEX 

PAGB 

Chasseur Omelets 102 

Ch&telaine „ ziz 

Cheese „ ....... 106 

Clamart , ....... 102 

Cucumber „ ....... 109 

Curry „ 109 

English „ ....... 99 

Fish Puff „ 115 

Friar's „ ....... 121 

Frosted „ ....... 121 

Ginger „ 117 

Ham „ , . , . . , .III 

How to Shape „ 98 

Itahenne „ , . , . , , .112 

am „ 117 

_ardim6re „ 113 

With jelly „ 118 

Kidney „ , . , . . , . ri6 

Kirsch „ ....... 116 

Leek „ 103 

Lentil „ ....... 104 

Lobster „ . , . . , , .no 

Madras „ 112 

Mar6chale „ ....... 103 

Marmalade „ , . , . . , . nS 

Milanaise „ 108 

Mousseline „ . . , . , , . 1 19 

Mushroom „ ....... 105 

Maintenon „ ....... 107 

Notes on Sweet „ 116 

Onion „ . , . . . , . 1 10 

Orange Puff „ , , . , . ', ! 121 

Oyster „ no 

Parisienne „ , , , , , . .113 

Pannentier „ -....!! 1 13 

Parmesan „ [ 104 



i; 



Peach 



119 



Paysaime „ ii3 

PMgord „ 113 

Plain „ go 

Portugaise „ 114 

Princesse „ • uj 

Puffed or Sonfflfe,, 114 

Raphael „ ....... loa 

R6forme „ ....,!' 114 

Reine (Queen) „ ! . iii 

Robespierre „ 118 

Robert „ ' ] jj. 

Rules for Making,, 07 

R"™ : 116 

Salmon „ . . . , . ^ .no 

Sardine „ ...!!** loo 

Savoury ...!!'.' 100 

Shallot Flavour „ ... oo 

Soufflte „ ....!'' iio 

Spinach „ ...!!!' 100 

1^"^?° "" 

OWCCL ^ ^ tt7 

j^-p^to ; : : : io5 

To turn out an „ . . . . -„ 

Tfuffle .: ...:::: r^l 

Vienna . „, 



Food Value of Eggs. 

The average weight of a hen's egg is 
about two ounces avoirdupois. 

The composition of the white of an 
ordinary hen's egg is : — 

Nitrogenous matter 20.4 

Fatty matter 10.0 

Mineral matter 1.6 

Water 68.0 

Composition of the yolk : — 

Nitrogenous matter 16.0 

Fatty matter 30.7 

Mineral matter 1.3 

Water 52.0 

It will thus be seen that eggs are almost 
a complete food, being particularly rich 
in nitrogenous elements. 

Dr. Parrott, in writing on the chemistry 
and dietetic value of eggs, states that, as 
compared with other articles of food, eggs 
contain on an average 4 per cent, less pro- 
tein and 6 per cent, less fat than sirloin 
steak, half as much protein and one-third 
as much fat as cream cheese, and twice as 
much protein, with ten times as much fat, 
as oysters. Their fuel value is about two- 
thirds that of beef, and but one-third that 
of good cheese. Compared with wheat 
flour, eggs contain an equal amount of pro- 
tein, ten times as much fat, but less than 
half as much fuel value. Eggs contain 
13 



14 HOW TO COOK 

practically no carbohydrates, while wheat 
flour contains 75 per cent. 

Chemically speaking, therefore, eggs are 
rich in building and repair material, but do 
not furnish a proportionate percentage of 
energy. This is why it is now admitted 
that eggs do not furnish perfect nutrition 
for the adult body. It must, however, be 
remembered that Nature endows the diges- 
tive organs with a considerable degree of 
vital discretion, or power of transforma- 
tion ; so that both proteids and carbohy- 
drates are to a certain extent commuted 
into energy, and vice versa. The white 
of egg is comparatively free from fat ; 
fat, however, is found in the yolk. 

The egg is a concentrated economic form 
of wholesome human food, which supplies 
at times a desirable substitute for flesh 
food. The cost of eggs compares most 
favourably with other food products, being 
about 25 per cent, per pound cheaper than 
rump steak ; whilst their food value ranks 
as high, if not higher than meat. 

The Digestibility of Eggs. 

The digestibility of eggs is about the 
same whether raw, lightly cooked, or 
thoroughly cooked. The time required to 
digest a cooked egg varies from 3-4 hours. 
This will seem incredible to those who have 
always been accustomed to insisting upon 
their eggs being "soft-boiled," or lightly 
cooked. - Digestibility, says Dr. Parrott, 
however, does not imply so much the 
rapidity with which food leaves the stomach 
as the completeness of its absorbability 
and appropriation by the system. Ex- 
periments in this have demonstrated 
that a healthy stomach digests a hard- 



EGGS AND OMELETS 15 

boiled egg quite as thoroughly as a soft- 
boiled one ; but this does not prove that 
the process is as qiiickly accomphshed 
or that the hard-boiled egg does not com- 
pel a somewhat greater effort on the part 
of the digestive organs. With healthy 
persons the degree of cooking may there- 
fore be made wholly a matter of taste. 
Any process of cooking will harden the 
albumen of the egg. 

To Test the Freshness of 
Eggs. 

There is but one opinion as to this, eggs 
should be perfectly fresh, else they are not 
worth using at all. 

The easiest way to ascertain the fresh- 
ness of eggs is to hold the egg between the 
thumb and forefinger, before a strong Ught. 
If fresh it will be transparent at the centre, 
and the outline of the yolk should be 
plainly seen ; when stale, it will appear 
cloudy and dark. Another way to test 
eggs is to make a solution of one part of 
salt and two of water. Good eggs will 
sink to the bottom, whilst stale ones will 
float. 

How to Preserve Eggs. 

There are several methods of preserving 
eggs, and of these salt and lime has proved 
the most reUable. Put into a pan | lb. of 
salt and lime the size of an egg; boil a 
gallon of water and pour over hot. When 
cold strain it over the eggs to be preserved. 
The best time to preserve eggs is in April 
and August. Eggs thus preserved will keep 
good for several months. 



HOW TO COOK EGGS. 

Soft-boiled Eggs. 

Place the eggs, which should be new laid, 
into water, which should be just below 
boiling point (about 165 deg. Fahrenheit). 
Keep the water at this temperature and 
allow the eggs to remain in it for 10 min- 
utes. If so treated, eggs will be of a soft 
and jelly-like consistency. When required 
rather more cooked, allow 20 minutes, 
but do not let the water get to the boiling 
point, or if required in a hurry boil the eggs 
for three 'minutes and serve. 

Hard-boiled Eggs. 

Put the eggs in cold water and bring to 
the boil, allow to cook fast for 10 minutes, 
and place them into cold water to cool, and 
remove the shells carefully. 

Poached Eggs. 

{CEufs pochis.) 
Use a shallow pan, and half fill it with 
water, add salt to taste, and the juice of 
half a lemon or a table-spoonful of vinegar ; 
when boiling, break each egg carefully into 
a cup and slip gently into the boiling 
water. Allow to simmer till the white of 
the egg and the yolk are set ; then take 
up each carefully with a skimmer or slice, 
drain and trim the edges and serve on 
16 



EGGS AND OMELETS 17 

plain or buttered toast, cut to the desired 
shape. Dish up and garnish with crisp 
parsley. 

Poached Eggs k I'Espagnole. 

Cook four ounces of washed and drained 
rice in half a pint of stock, add to it one 
ounce of fresh butter, and season to taste. 
Arrange a neatly shaped bed of the rice 
(which should be almost dry when cooked) 
on a hot dish, and upon it place five or 
six neatly trimmed poached eggs. Pour 
a little hot tomato sauce round the base 
of the dish and serve. 

Poached Eggs a la Garibaldi. 

Poach carefully six to eight new-laid 
eggs ; drain them well, and stamp out 
each with a round cutter. Reduce half 
a pint of rich bechamel, into which in- 
corporate a table-spoonful of grated Par- 
mesan cheese and three yolks of eggs. 
Mask each egg with this sauce. When 
set and cold, egg and crumb them twice. 
Fry them in deep fat, drain, and dish up 
on a hot dish covered with a lace paper 
or napkin. Garnish with fried parsley, 
and serve with a boat of tomato sauce. 

Poached Eggs a la Reine. 

Mince rather finely half a pound or 
more of cold cooked chicken or turkey, 
freed from skin, bone, and gristle. Fry 
this in a little butter, and moisten with 
sufficient bechamel sauce to form a light 
salpicon. Keep hot. Poach in slightly 
salted water six new-laid eggs ; trim them 
neatly. Put the mince in a round dish, 

B 



18 HOW TO COOK 

and place the eggs neatly upon top. Glaze 
them with liquefied meat glaze, or Lemco, 
and surround the dish with eight small 
halfmoon-shaped slices of bread fried in 
clarified butter. Garnish with sprigs of 
parsley, and serve hot. 

Poached Eggs with Spinach. 

(CEufs pochSs aux Epinards.) 
Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Six fresh eggs, a teaspoonful of lemon 
juice or white vinegar, one and a half 
pounds of spinach, one and a-half ounces 
of butter, one table-spoonful of rich brown 
sauce, salt, pepper, nutmeg, two slices of 
toasted bread. 

Pick and wash the spinach, put it in a 
copper stew-pan with very little water and 
cook for half an hour. Put it in a colander 
and drain well, squeezing out all the 
water. Rub the spinach through a sieve. 
Melt the butter in a stew-pan, put in the 
spinach puree, season with pepper, salt, 
and a pinch of grated nutmeg ; moisten 
with the sauce and cook gently for twenty- 
five minutes or so. Have ready a shallow 
stew-pan with boiling water, slightly salted ; 
add the vinegar or lemon juice. Break 
each egg carefuUy into a cup and gently 
slide into the boiling water (great care 
must be taken so that they do not scat- 
ter). Allow the eggs to cook until per- 
fectly set, but without allowing the yolks 
to get hard. Have the spinach dressed 
neatly on a hot dish ; take up each egg 
by means of a slice or small skimmer ; 
trim each a little and place on the spinach. 
Pour a little demi-glace sauce or gravy 
round the dish ; garnish with sippets of 
toasted bread and serve immediately. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 19 

Poached Eggs a la Provenqiale. 

{(Eufs pochis a la Provengale.) 
Peel and slice three small onions, fry 
them to a nice light brown colour in an 
ounce of butter, drain off the butter and 
add a sliced and peeled ripe tomato, six 
chopped mushrooms, and a teaspoonful 
of chopped parsley ; moisten with a little 
brown sauce, and keep simmering for a 
few minutes. Season with salt and pepper 
and keep hot. 

Poach carefully six to eight fresh eggs, 
as directed on p. 16. Prepare six to eight 
rounds of toasted or fried bread, about 
the size of the eggs ; butter them and 
spread them thickly with the onion purie ; 
place a poached egg on each round of 
bread. Dish up, pour a little hot brown 
sauce over the eggs, and serve hot. 

Poached Eggs in White Wine. 

{CEufs pochis au tin blanc.) 
Poach carefuUy six to eight eggs in 
slightly salted water, flavoured with white 
wine (Chablis or Sauterne) and a few 
drops of lemon juice. Have ready as 
many fried bread croutons as there are 
poached eggs. Take up the eggs, trim 
them neatly, and place them on the 
croutons, then dish up. Have ready a 
sauce prepared with one gill of reduced 
white wine, an ounce and a half of meat 
glaze, and one ounce of butter ; the latter 
must be whisked in in very small quan- 
tities, and must not boil. Season with 
a good pinch of cayenne or Krona pepper. 
Mask the eggs with the sauce, which 
must be thick enough to coat them nicely, 
sprinkle a little chopped parsley over each 
egg, and serve. 



20 HOW TO COOK 

Eggs with Nouilles a la 
Carola. 

Prepare some nouille paste (p. 128), 
cut it into very thin strips, and blanch in 
salted water for three minutes ; drain and 
toss in butter. Season with nutmeg and 
pepper, and put some on a buttered fire- 
proof dish. Upon this range a layer of 
slices of hard-boiled eggs, then a layer of 
nouUles, and lastly a layer of fresh mush- 
rooms, seasoned and tossed in butter. 
Dredge well with grated cheese. Cover with 
a well-reduced bechamel sauce. Sprinkle 
over some grated cheese and a little oiled 
butter. Bake in a sharp oven for ten 
minutes. 

Poached Eggs, Imperial style. 

{CEufs poches a VImperiale.) 
Poach six to eight fresh eggs, and trim 
them neatly. Drain them on a sieve and 
let cool. Fill as many preserved artichoke 
bottoms, slightly hollowed out, with some 
reduced and seasoned tomato pulp. Upon 
this place slices of ripe vegetables. Coat 
the eggs with prepared remoulade sauce, 
and dress them upon the tomato slices. 
Sprinkle over some finely-cut strips of 
tongue and chopped parsley. Dish up, 
garnish with crisp parsley, and serve. 

Poached Eggs in Potatoes. 

[CEufs pochis a la Suzette.) 
Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Four large oval even-sized potatoes, half a 
gill of well-reduced bechamel sauce (p. 
129), one ounce grated Parmesan cheese, 
half an ounce of Gorgona cheese (grated), 



EGGS AND OMELETS 21 

eight small poached eggs, a table-spoonful 
of " Panurette " or brown bread crumbs 
seasoning. 

Wash and scrub the potatoes, and bake 
them in a fairly sharp oven till tender. 
Cut them in halves lengthways with a 
sharp knife, and scoop out the soft part by 
means of a dessert-spoon. Incorporate the 
grated Parmesan cheese into the bechamel 
sauce. Rub half of the potato puree 
obtained through a sieve and mix with a 
little bechamel sauce, etc. ; season with salt 
and pepper, and line the shells of potatoes 
with this ; then put in a layer of sauce, and 
upon this place a neatly-trimmed poached 
egg. Sauce over carefully with more be- 
chamel, sprinkle freely with grated Gruy^re 
cheese, a pinch or two of Paprika pepper, 
and some fried breadcrumbs. Place them 
on a buttered baking tin or saute-pan and 
brown in a hot oven or under the salaman- 
der. Dish up on a hot dish, covered with 
a folded "napkin, and serve at once. 

Poached Eggs with Shrimp Sauce. 

{(Eufs pochis sauce crevettes.) 
Poach the required number of eggs, trim 
them or stamp out, and place each on a 
round of toasted buttered bread. Dish up 
neatly on a hot dish, and pour over each a 
hot rich white sauce mixed with sufficient 
shrimp paste to taste, and a few drops of 
anchovy essence. 

Poached Eggs wi± Tongue. 

{(Eufs pochis a VEcarlate.) 
Take six new-laid eggs, six slices of 
cooked ox-tongue, one gill gravy or rich 
brown stock, one small glass of sherry or 



22 HOW TO COOK 

Marsala, salt, pepper, lemon juice, one and 
a half giUs of rich bechamel sauce (p. 129). 
Poach the eggs in boiling water, slightly 
salted and flavoured with lemon juice. Cut 
the slices of tongue into neat shapes, about 
the size of the egg, when poached. Chop 
the trimmings of tongue very finely. Put 
the slices of tongue in a saute-pan with the 
gravy and wine, and heat up thoroughly. 
Take up the eggs, drain and trim them ; 
place each upon a slice of tongue and 
arrange on a hot dish ; season with salt 
and pepper, sauce over carefully with hot 
white or brown sauce. Put a little chopped 
tongue in the centre of each egg, and 
serve hot. 

Poached Eggs a la Remoulade. 

Poach six or seven small eggs, dress 
them on artichoke bottoms ; garnish with 
vegetable macedoine and julienne strips 
of tongue and tomatoes ; sauce over with 
cold remoulade sauce or mayonnaise mixed 
with chopped gherkins, capers, and tomato 
pulp. Serve cold. 

Poached Eggs in Savoury 
JeUy. 

{(Eufs pocMs en aspic.) 
Poach the required number of new-laid 
eggs in salted water containing a little 
lemon juice or vinegar. Stamp out each 
egg neatly and let cool on a cloth or a 
sieve. Mask the inside of a number of 
china or silver-plated cocotte or ramakin 
cases with clear aspic jelly, and place 
one egg in each ; mask or coat the surface 
with aspic, then decorate the top neatly 
with thinly-cut slices of truffle and chervil 



EGGS AND OMELETS 23 

leaves. When the decoration is set, pour 
over a layer of aspic. Place the filled 
cases on the ice till required, then dish up 
and serve. 

Scrambled Eggs. 

(CEufs brouillSs.) 
Beat up four or five fresh eggs, add a 
table-spoonful of milk or cream and a 
table-spoonful of rich gravy, pour this into 
a saucepan, add an ounce of fresh butter, 
and stir over the fire until the eggs begin 
to set. Have ready two slices of toasted 
and buttered bread, place them in a hot 
dish, and pour the egg mixture upon them. 
Serve hot. 

Scrambled Eggs (another way). 

(CEufs brouillSs.) 
Beat up four fresh eggs and add to 
them two table-spoonfuls of cream and 
two table-spoonfuls of stock, season to 
taste with salt, pepper and a grate of nut- 
meg. Pour this into an dhamelled sauce- 
pan or fireproof earthenware pan, add 
half an ounce of fresh butter and stir ovei 
a moderate fire till the eggs just begin to 
set and are of a cream-like appearance. 
Have ready some squares of toasted and 
buttered bread, pour over the eggs, and 
serve hot. 

Scrambled Eggs with Rice. 

(CEufs brouillSs au riz.) 
Fry three table-spoonfuls of cooked rice 
in an ounce of butter, add to it four well- 
beaten eggs and a table-spoonful of cream, 
season to taste, and stir in a stew-pan 
over the fire till the eggs thicken. 



24 HOW TO COOK 

Dish up on rounds of buttered toast, 
pour a little brown or tomato sauce round 
the base of the dish, and serve. 



Scrambled Eggs with Herbs. 

{OEufs brouilUs aux fines herhes.) 

Add to four beaten eggs and one table- 
spoonful of cream one dessert-spoonful of 
finely chopped parsley, chervil, and chives, 
also three to four chopped preserved mush- 
rooms, season with salt and pepper, cook 
and serve as directed for scrambled eggs. 



Scrambled Eggs with 
Mushrooms. 

{CEufs brouillis aux champignons.) 

Glet ready the following ingredients : — 
Five eggs, two ounces fresh butter, six 
to eight preserved mushrooms, a table- 
spoonful of cream, salt and pepper, two 
rounds of toasted bread. 

Break the eggs into a basin, season 
with pepper and salt, beat up well and 
add the cream, and the mushrooms (chopped 
finely), melt the butter in a stew-pan, 
pour in the mixture of eggs, cream, etc., 
and stir over the fire till the eggs begin 
to set. Have ready the toasted bread, 
weU buttered, on a hot dish, pour the 
prepared eggs over the toast and serve 
hot. Great care must be exercised not to 
over-cook nor under-cook the mixture, 
otherwise the dish will be spoilt. A few 
thin sUces of streaky bacon, nicely fried, 
served round this dish will be found a 
great improvement. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 25 

Scrambled Eggs with Salmon. 

{OEufs brouillis au Saumon.) 

Remove the skin and bones from about 
four ounces of cooked salmon and flake 
finely ; fry this in an ounce of butter, and 
pour in four weU-beaten and seasoned 
eggs ; stir the whole over the fire till the 
eggs thicken or begin to set, then dish 
up and place six thinly-cut slices of frizzled 
bacon on top. Serve hot. 

Note. — In place of salmon, any other 
kind of cooked fish may be used ; smoked 
haddock is particularly nice done this way. 

Scrambled Eggs with Cepes. 

{GEufs brouillis aux cepes.) 
Proceed the same as directed for scram- 
bled eggs, adding six to eight preserved 
cdpes (a species of mushrooms), finely 
chopped, before scrambling the eggs. 

Scrambled Eggs with Tomato. 

{CEufs hrouilUs aux tomaies.) 
Toss in butter two small, ripe, peeled 
and sliced tomatoes, then pour in the 
seasoned egg mixture and proceed the 
same as directed for scrambled eggs. 

Scrambled Eggs with Peas. 

{CEufs brouilles aux petits pais.) 
Adopt one of the formulae for scrambled 
eggs, and when the eggs begin to set add 
half a giU of cooked green peas, well drained 
and tossed in a little fresh butter, and 
seasoned with salt, pepper, and a pinch 
of sugar. Mix well and serve on rounds 
of buttered toast. 



26 HOW TO COOK 

Scrambled Eggs with 
Asparagus Tips. 

{CEufs hrouilUs aux pointes d'asperges.) 
Proceed the same as explained in the 

foregoing recipe, but use cooked asparagus 

tips in place of green peas. 

Scrambled Eggs with Ham. 

{CEufs hrouilUs au jambon.) 
Fry in an ounce of butter two ounces 
of chopped lean ham (cooked or raw), 
pour in the egg mixture (same as for 
scrambled eggs), stir over the fire till just 
setting, then dish up on croutons of bread, 
fried or toasted, garnish with sprigs of 
parsley, and serve. 

Scrambled Eggs with Tongue. 

{CEufs hrouilUs d VEcarlate.) 
Proceed the same as directed in the pre- 
ceding recipe, but substitute for the ham 
cooked ox-tongue, which must be fried 
very lightly. 

Scrambled Eggs in Cases. 

{CEufs hrouilUs en caisses.) 
Scramble four eggs the same as directed 
for scrambled eggs with herbs (see p. 24). 
Fill the cooked mixture into small china 
or paper ramakin cases (buttered), insert a 
tiny sprig of parsley on top of each, dish 
up and serve. 

Buttered Eggs. 

Break four fresh eggs into a basin, add 
sufficient salt and pepper to taste, beat 



EGGS AND OMELETS 27 

up with a fork, so as to thoroughly mix 
the whites with the yolks, put one and 
a half ounces of butter into a small stew- 
pan, add the eggs and a table-spoonful 
of milk, stir over the fire until the mix- 
ture begins to thicken and is hot through 
(it must not on any account be allowed to 
boil). Have ready a slice of hot buttered 
toast, put this on a hot dish or plate 
Put the egg mixture on to this, garnish 
with a few sprigs of parsley, or sprinkle 
over with chopped parsley, and serve 
quickly. 

Buttered Eggs with Anchovies. 

{CEufs hrouilUs aux anchois.) 

Take six eggs, one teaspoonful anchovy 
essence, one and a halt ounces butter, 
two table-spoonfuls cream, six Gtorgona 
anchovies, a pinch of cayenne pepper and 
salt, toasted slices of bread. 

Wipe the anchovies with a damp cloth, 
remove the fillets, and cut into strips. 
Cut the toast in oblong slices about three 
inches long and two inches broad, and 
butter them. Beat up the eggs ; put them, 
together with the anchovy essence, ail 
ounce of butter, and the cream, in a small 
stew-pan ; add a pinch of cayenne, and 
salt to taste. Stir over the fire until the 
mixture begins to set ; put an equal 
quantity on the buttered side of each piece 
of toast, and lay the strips of anchovies 
across each in the shape of lattice-work. 
Place a caper in each cavity, dish up, put 
the dish in the oven for a few minutes, 
garnish with sprigs of parsley, and serve 
hot. 



28 HOW TO COOK 

Buttered Eggs with Truffles. 

{CEufs brouilUs aux Truffes.) 
Get ready the following : — Six eggs, 
one and a half ounces butter, one large 
truffle, half a glass Marsala, salt, pepper, 
nutmeg, and a small slice of toasted bread. 
Cut the truffle into fine shreds ; put in 
a stew-pan with the wine and a tiny piece 
of butter ; cover and reduce the liquid to 
about half its quantity. Break the eggs 
into a basin ; season with salt, pepper, 
and a pinch of grated nutmeg ; mix thor- 
oughly. Melt the butter in a stew-pan, 
pour in the eggs, stir over the fire until 
the mixture begins to set ; then add the 
truffle, etc., quickly. Mix well together ; 
stir over the fire for another minute ; 
then turn on a hot dish on a slice of but- 
tered toast ; dress in a heap, garnish with 
u few sippets of toast, and serve. 

Almond Eggs, Moulded. 

Butter six to eight small bouche or cup 
moulds and scatter the bottom with shreds of 
almonds, previously peeled and baked to a 
fawn colour. Break a fresh egg into each, 
season with salt, pepper, and a tiny grate 
of nutmeg, and sprinkle over each some 
chopped baked almonds. Bake in the 
oven till just set, then turn out on small 
round croutons of fried bread, and dish up. 
Pour a nicely seasoned tomato or demi- 
glace or Mad^re sauce round the base of 
the dish and serve. 

Egg Croustades. 

Prepare a salpicon of eggs as described 
on p. 41, and fill with it some small 
croustade cases made of rice, potato. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 29 

semolina or bread ; when filled place them 
in a hot oven for a few minutes, then dish 
up, garnish with fried parsley, and serve. 



Egg Pie. 

Peel five to six hard-boiled eggs and cut 
them into slices. Melt an ounce of butter 
in a stew-pan, stir in a table-spoonful of 
fiour, and cook a little ; moisten with 
one and a half gills of milk, and let boil 
for five minutes, stirring all the time. Stir 
in a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, season 
to taste with salt and pepper, and keep hot. 
Fill a buttered pie-dish with alternate 
layers of slices of eggs, sauce, and bread- 
crumbs, and when full pour over enough 
white sauce to cover. Sprinkle over with 
breadcrumbs, place a few tiny bits of 
butter on top, and bake for fifteen minutes 
in a moderately heated oven. Serve hot. 



Eggs a la Turque. 

Break six to eight eggs into a basin, 
season with pepper and salt and a tea- 
spoonful of chopped parsley. Whisk them 
well and stir into a stew-pan containing 
an ounce of melted butter ; stir over the 
fire till the eggs are set enough to be turned 
out, then dress them in the form of a 
border on a hot round dish. Have ready 
a saute of chicken livers (finely sliced 
and tossed in butter, flavoured with shal- 
lot and parsley, and suitably seasoned) ; 
put these in the centre of the dish, pour 
some hot tomato sauce (p. 130) round 
the base of the dish, and send to table 
immediately. 



30 HOW TO COOK 

Eggs a la Coquette. 

Take six to eight new-laid eggs, one 
ounce butter, about half a gill cream, three 
ounces lean ham or tongue, salt, cayenne, 
and nutmeg. ' 

Procure six to eight small china souffle 
cases ; butter them well ; put a small 
piece of butter in each of them, also a 
table-spoonful of cream, a pinch of salt, 
and a little grated nutmeg ; place them on 
a baking-sheet in a hot oven or on the top 
of the stove. When the contents com- 
mence to simmer break carefully into each 
one egg ; put a tiny pinch of cayenne 
pepper in the centre of each yolk ; put 
back on the stove or in the oven, and allow 
the eggs to set lightly. Have ready the 
ham or tongue finely chopped, sprinkle 
over the white part, so as to leave the 
yolks free ; serve hot. 

Eggs a la Marigny. 

Scald and peel four to six ripe tomatoes, 
cut them into slices, and toss them in an 
ounce of butter in a saute-pan over a 
moderate fire. Season to taste with salt 
and pepper, cover, and let stew gently for 
about twenty minutes. Put the prepared 
tomatoes in an oblong dish, and carefully 
break on top four fresh eggs ; place the 
dish carefully in a hot oven long enough 
to set the eggs, then sauce over the white 
part of the eggs with a well-fiavoured 
lobster sauce. Put a tiny pinch of Paprika 
in the centre of each egg yolk, and send 
to table at once. 

Eggs a la Courtet (Cold). 

Cut some even-sized ripe tomatoes in 



EGGS AND OMELETS 31 

halves, scoop out the interior carefully, 
and fill with scrambled egg, nicely sea- 
soned. When cold, mask carefully with a 
stiff mayonnaise and a thin layer of aspic 
jelly. Dish up in a circle and garnish with 
shoes of gherkins and pickled beetroot cut 
into fanciful shapes ; fill the centre of the 
dish with lettuce and tomatoes cut into 
juUenne strips, suitably seasoned with an 
oil and vinegar or mayonnaise dressing. 
Serve cold. 

Eggs a la Gagnor (Cold). 

Shell five hard-boiled eggs, cut them 
in halves crossways, cut a small piece off 
the end of each to make them stand, re- 
move the yolk and fill the cavities with 
Russian caviare. Pound the yolks and 
mix with an ounce of fresh butter, a pinch 
of cayenne or Paprika pepper, rub it 
through a sieve, and put it in a forcing 
bag with a fancy tube. Decorate each 
half of egg tastefully with the butter, etc., 
place them on small croutons of fried 
bread, fixed on with a little of the puree. 
Dish up, and garnish with fancifully cut 
slices of lemon and parsley. 

Eggs a la Momay. 

Butter a fireproof or gratin dish, and place 
in it six hard-boiled eggs, cut into thick 
slices. Season with salt, pepper and a grate 
of nutmeg. Mix a gill of bechamel sauce 
with an ounce of grated Parmesan cheese, 
pour this over the eggs, and besprinkle the 
top with grated cheese. Place here and 
there small bits of fresh butter, using 
about a pat for this. Put the dish in a 
very hot oven to brown the top, which 



32 HOW TO COOK 

should be of a pale brown colour when 
done. Send the dish to table, and serve 
very iiot. 

Eggs a la Tomate. 

Proceed as directed in the preceding 
recipe, using slices of hard-boiled eggs 
and slices of peeled tomatoes. Season to 
taste and pour over half a giU of rich 
tomato sauce. Besprinkle with grated 
cheese and oiled butter, then bake in a 
sharp oven, to brown the top, and serve. 

Eggs a la Pasqual. 

Poach six small eggs in seasoned milkt 
trim, drain and mask them when cold 
with white chaud-froid sauce ; dress them 
in a nest made of baked nouUles, and 
serve. 

Eggs a la Marianne. 

Prepare a puree of green peas, to which 
add a Uttle cream and the needful season- 
ing ; with this puree make a neat border 
on a well-buttered " gratin dish," put one or 
two table-spoonfuls of cream in the dish, and 
upon this break carefuUy four or five fresh 
eggs. Season to taste with salt and pepper, 
and cook in the oven just long enough to 
set the eggs, then serve at once. 

Eggs au Paprika. 

Mix a pound of hot mashed potatoes with 
two yolks of eggs and one ounce of butter, 
season with salt and pepper, then put the 
mixture into a forcing bag and shape a 
number of rounds with border the size of 
a large dariole mould. Bake in a fairly 



EGGS AND OMELETS 33 

hot oven. Butter the required number of 
plain dariole moulds, besprinkle the inside 
of each with finely chopped chives or 
parsley, then break an egg in each, and put 
a tiny piece of butter or a teaspoonful of 
cream on top of each egg. Poach the 
darioles carefully in the oven for about ten 
minutes, then unmould the shapes and put 
each on the prepared baked potato border. 
Place them on a hot dish, put a little finely 
grated horse-radish on top of each, pour 
over some hot Paprika sauce, and send to 
table immediately. 

Eggs a rindienne. 

Prepare an onion puree, same as directed 
for Eggs k la Soubise (see p. 84). Add 
to it a level dessert-spoonful of curry 
powder mixed with a little cream, and let 
the sauce simmer gently for another ten 
minutes. Poach in seasoned milk six 
fresh eggs, drain and trim them neatly ; 
put the onion puree in a dish and range 
the eggs on top ; garnish with sippets of 
toasted or fried bread, and serve with a 
small dish of plainly cooked rice. 

Curried Eggs. 

Boil four eggs till hard, remove the shells, 
cut two into eight parts, and chop up the 
others not too finely. Fry half a small 
onion in an ounce of butter to a golden 
brown, add one dessert-spoonful of curry 
powder, and moisten with half a pint of 
rich stock ; add also half a minced apple 
(small), or a few chopped green goose- 
berries. Cook for twenty minutes, and 
strain, then put in the chopped eggs. Sea- 
son to taste, and heat up thoroughly. 

c 



34 HOW TO VUUis. 

Place a border of cooked rice on a round 
dish, put the curry in the centre, and 
arrange the remaining two hard-boiled 
^ggs, cut in sections, round it. Serve hot. 

Eggs a la Bombay. 

Cook the required number of new-laid 
eggs till soft (not hard), and shell them 
carefully. Put in a dish a bed of savoury 
rice, flavoured with a little curry paste or 
powder. Upon this place the eggs, pour 
over some hot curry sauce, and serve hot. 

Eggs a rOrientale (Cold). 

Shell four hard-boiled eggs, fry half a 
small onion, minced finely, in half an ounce 
of butter, then add to it a dessert-spoonful 
of curry powder and a gUl of stock, and 
let all simmer for fifteen minutes. Add 
a dessert-spoonful of Bengal Club or other 
good chutney, mix it well, and rub through 
a sieve. Cut the eggs in halves and take out 
the yolks ; cut off a little of the bottom of 
each part of the whites to make them 
stand. Put the yolks into the mortar with 
the curry puree, pound and mix thoroughly. 
When mixed fill up the whites of the eggs 
with it, piled up high, and insert a tiny 
sprig of watercress in each. Dish them up 
on a bed of nicely seasoned small salad, 
and serve. 

Eggs a la Villeroi. 

Poach six to eight small eggs in sea- 
soned stock or milk ; take up, drain, and 
trim neatly, then put them on a wire tray 
and coat them well with thick HoUandaise 
sauce ; dip in breadcrumbs and let set. 
Next egg and crumb them and fry in hot 
fat. Dish up and serve with tomato sauce. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 35 

Fricassee of Eggs. 

{Fricassee d'oeufs.) 

This dish can be made in three ways — 
by steaming the yolks and whites of eggs 
separately and cutting them out into cubes, 
dice, or other shapes ; by slicing three 
or four hard-boiled eggs ; or by poaching 
small eggs in stock or seasoned milk. In 
each case the eggs must be heated up in 
a rich white sauce and allowed to simmer 
for a short time. Season with salt, pepper, 
and very little nutmeg. Use bechamel, 
supreme, or veloute sauce for this purpose. 

Fricassee of Eggs (another way). 

BoU six eggs for twelve minutes, lay 
them in cold water, take off the shells, cut 
them in halves crosswise, take out the 
yolks for garnish. Peel a shallot and chop 
finely. Melt an ounce of butter in a stew- 
pan, add the shallot, and fry a golden 
colour. Add half a gill of bechamel sauce, 
let it come to a boil, mix in one gill of 
cream ; when hot put in the whites of eggs, 
and season to taste. Stir gently, or 
better, shake the pan so as not to break 
the slices, and keep on the fire until hot. 
Warm up the yollK in a little thin white 
sauce, dress them in the centre of a dish, 
put the whites neatly round the yolks, 
sprinkle over with chopped parsley, and 
garnish with a few croutons of fried bread. 

Fricassee of Eggs with 
Mushrooms. 

Remove the stems from six fresh cup 
mushrooms, peel and wa^sh the latter, 
then drain them, and cut them into dice- 



36 HOW TO COOK 

shaped pieces. Next toss them, i.e. fry 
them lightly in half an ounce of butter, 
season with salt and pepper, and keep hot. 
Peel five hard-boiled eggs and cut them into 
dice. Prepare about three-quarters of a pint 
of bechamel or other good white sauce, and 
add to it a little cream. Put it into a 
shallow pan and heat it up, then add the 
eggs and mushrooms, season to taste, 
adding a grate of nutmeg and a tiny pinch 
of cayenne or Nepaul pepper. Let it get 
thoroughly hot whilst stirring, care being 
taken not to break up the eggs. Put the 
preparation in a deep round dish, decorate 
or garnish the top with thinly-cut strips of 
Spanish pimiento, and send to table hot. 

Eggs a la Belloy (Cold). 

These are hard-boiled eggs cut in halves, 
yolks removed, and the whites filled with a 
salpicon composed of chopped truffle and 
lobster, and stiff mayonnaise. Dish up 
on croutons of fried bread, and garnish 
with creamed anchovy butter. 

Eggs en Banquettes. 

Line some little oval tartlet moulds with 
nouille paste crust (see p. 128), bake them 
and fill with chopped hard-boiled egg, 
mushrooms, parsley, grated cheese, mixed 
with white sauce. Bake for ten minutes 
in a sharp oven, and serve. 

Eggs a la Cosmopolite. 

Poach six small fresh eggs and trim and 
drain them carefully. Egg and crumb and 
fry them in olive oil or clarified butter. 
Insert a slice of truffle in centre of each ; 
and serve with demi-glace sauce. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 37 

Eggs a rEugenie. 

These are composed of small peeled cup 
mushrooms, scooped out, tossed in butter, 
then filled with a mixture of smoked finely 
shredded salmon, truffles, and foie-gras, 
heated up in HoUandaise sauce. Place a 
poached egg on top of each, decorate with 
lobster cor^ and trufiBe ; reheat and serve 
hot. 

Eggs a la Florentine. 

These are poached eggs placed into small 
baked paste croustades lined with spinach 
puree, sauced over with Mornay sauce, and 
browned in a sharp oven or under the 
salamander. 

Eggs a la St. Germain (Cold). 

Shell four hard-boiled eggs ; cut in 
halves and remove the yolks ; rub through 
a sieve and mix with mayonnaise and 
chopped shrimps ; refill the eggs and dress 
them on a bed of chopped aspic, with a 
bearded oyster on top of each egg. 

Eggs a la Gourmet. 

These are halves of hard-boiled eggs 
stuffed with crayfish tails, chopped truffles, 
and smoked salmon, mixed with rich an- 
chovy sauce, and baked for a few minutes. 

Eggs a la Grand Due. 

Scramble four fresh eggs, put this neatly 
on small croutons of fried bread, sauce 
over with rich bechamel mixed with re- 
duced tomato pulp, garnish with asparagus 
tips and shredded truffles. Dish up neatly 
and serve hot. 



38 HOW TO COOK 

Eggs a la Granville. 

Shred coarsely four hard-boiled eggs ; 
heat them up in a little brown onion sauce, 
flavoured with finely chopped gherkins and 
lemon rind ; dish up neatly and serve hot. 

Eggs a la mode de Caen. 

Slice four hard-boiled eggs, cook them 
in a rich white cream sauce, with slices 
of Spanish onion (previously cooked in 
milk and stock) ; dish up and serve. 

Eggs a la Careme. 

Shell four hard-boiled eggs, cut them in 
halves, remove the yolks, and stuff with 
a mixture composed of fried chopped 
shallots, parsley, sorrel, and yolks of eggs. 
Bake them for five minutes, dish up, and 
serve. 

Eggs a la Pacha. 

Slice four to five hard-boiled eggs, mix 
with mushroom heads, and heat up care- 
fully in tomato sauce (p. 130) ; arrange 
a rice border on a hot dish and put the 
egg mixture in the centre ; serve hot. 

Eggs with Cucumber. 

{OEufs aux concombres.) 

Peel thinly a large-sized cucumber, cut 
off the ends, and divide the rest into IJ in. 
to 2 in. pieces. Take a column cutter and 
stamp out carefully the centre portion of 
each piece of cucumber. Place them in a 
buttered saute-pan with a little stock ; 
cover with a buttered paper and cook in 
the oven till just tender. Great care must 
be taken so as not to break the shapes. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 39 

Beat up three eggs, add to this a table- 
spoonful of tomato pulp and half an ounce 
of butter ; season nicely and stir over the 
fire till creamy and just set. Place the 
cucumber shapes on a hot dish and fill the 
cavities with the prepared eggs. Sauce 
over with tomato sauce, and serve hot. 

Creamed Eggs with Mushrooms. 

(CEufs aux champignons.) 

Beat together five eggs, season them 
with salt and pepper, add two table-spoon- 
fuls of cream and half an ounce of butter. 
Stir over the fire in a fireproof casserole 
till nearly set, then add twelve finely 
chopped or sliced mushrooms (previously 
tossed in butter), and a little chopped 
parsley. Continue to stir the mixture over 
the fire for another minute or two, then 
dish up on buttered pieces of toast and 
serve. 

Eggs a la St. Cloud. 

Cut four hard-boiled eggs into slices 
about half an inch thick remove the yolks 
and place the whites carefully on to small 
rounds of toasted bread, or plain mQk 
biscuits ; fill the cavities with a salpicon 
composed of dice-shaped pieces of gherkin, 
fillets of herring (marinaded) and stoned 
olives, seasoned with mayonnaise sauce. 
Arrange this neatly and put a small round of 
Spanish pimiento or half a red radish on 
top of each. Dish up, garnish with sprigs 
of fresh parsley, and serve cold. 

Eggs a la Richelieu. 

Select four even-sized (but not too 
large) ripe tomatoes, remove the stems 



40 HOW TO COOK 

and cut each in halves crossways ; remove 
the core and pips, and fry them lightly in 
an ounce of butter in a saute or frying-pan. 
Cut out some rounds of buttered toast to 
a little larger than the tomatoes. Beat 
up three eggs in a stew-pan, add to it a 
table-spoonful of cream, some chopped 
pimientos (about a table-spoonful) and 
half an ounce of butter ; season to taste, 
and stir over the fire till creamy and just 
setting. Place each half tomato on a 
round of toast, fill the tomato with the 
egg mixture, dish up, garnish with parsley, 
and serve. 

Eggs a la Santos (Cold). 

Shell four hard-boiled eggs and cut them 
in halves lengthways. Cut four ripe toma- 
toes in halves, put them on a baking tin 
and bake them in the oven until they are 
just tender, then let them get cool, arrange 
them in a row on a dish, and season with 
salt and pepper. Place half an egg cut 
side downwards on each tomato. Flavour 
some mayonnaise sauce with a little tar- 
ragon vinegar, and coat the eggs and 
tomato smoothly with it. Decorate the 
dish with pimiento and beetroot cut in 
small fancy shces, garnish the base of the 
dish with chopped aspic jeUy, and serve. 

Scalloped Eggs with Spinach. 

[Cotelettes d'oeufs aux Epinards.) 

Pick and wash a pound of spinach, and 
cook it with very little salted water till 
tender, then drain, press well, and chop 
finely, or pass it through a sieve ; season 
nicely and reheat with a little cream or 
butter. Poach six or seven eggs as directed 



EGGS AND OMELETS 41 

on p. 16. Butter the same number of scal- 
lop shells and put a table-spoonful of 
spinach in each ; upon this place a poached 
egg and spread over with more spinach. 
Sprinkle the top with grated cheese and 
breadcrumbs ; place here and there a 
tiny piece of butter, and bake in a hot 
oven or brown under a salamander for a 
few minutes. Dish up, garnish with pars- 
ley, and serve. 

Eggs a la Coque en Surprise. 

For this dish fresh eggs are carefully 
emptied, and refilled with scrambled egg 
mixture, blended, when cold, with Mayon- 
naise (p. 128). Dish them neatly on a 
bed of crisp cress, and serve cold. 

Salpicon of Eggs. 

Separate the yolks and whites of three 
eggs, beat up the former with a little 
cream, and poach each separately in 
buttered moulds or cups. When firm 
and cooled, turn out and cut into cube 
shapes, dice or julienne strips. Put these 
into a small stew-pan and add six sliced pre- 
serve mushrooms, one large truffle cut in 
small dice or strips, and a slice of tongue 
or ham cut similarly. Heat up in a little 
well-seasoned bechamel sauce. Dish up, 
when quite hot, on a round or oval dish, 
garnish the salpicon with triangular slices 
of toasted or fried bread, and serve. 

Egg Patties. 

{Petits Pates aux oeufs.) 

For this a salpicon as described in the 
preceding recipe may be prepared, or plain 



42 HOW TO COOK 

hard-boiled eggs can be cut into dice or 
strips, in place of the custard ; the truffle, 
ham, or tongue may, if liked, be added, 
in which case use rather less mushrooms. 
Have ready some small puff-paste patty 
cases, fill them with the salpicon, place 
the lid on each, dish up, reheat, then 
garnish with sprigs of parsley, and serve. 



Egg Bouchees. 

Cut three hard-boiled eggs into small 
dice or slice them and chop rather coarsely. 
Chop also six preserved mushrooms and, 
if liked, a truffle. Mix these all together 
carefully, and moisten with a little well- 
reduced and seasoned bechamel sauce. 
Keep the mixture hot in a bain-marie 
until required. Have ready some small 
puff -paste bouchee cases, and fill them 
with the above preparation, put the lid 
on each, reheat in the oven. Dish up, 
and garnish with sprigs of parsley. Serve 
hot. 



Egg and Oyster Bouchees. 

Cut the whites of three hard-boiled 
eggs into small strips or dice. Rub the 
yolks through a sieve, and mix with about 
half a pint of well-seasoned white sauce. 
Blanch and beard six or more oysters 
and cut each into four. Put these with the 
oyster liquor and the egg white into the 
prepared sauce, then reheat without letting 
it actually boil, and season to taste. Fill 
some hot puff-paste bouchee cases with the 
mixture, dish up neatly, and serve hot. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 43 

Egg Cannelons. 

{Cannehns d'ceufs.) 
Cut six to eight hard-boiled eggs in 
halves, remove the yolks, and rub them 
through a sieve. Chop the whites finely. 
Soak a crustless roll of milk bread (cut up 
very small) in milk, then squeeze it well, 
and mash up finely. Mix this with the 
^ggs (yolk and white), and add enough 
bechamel sauce to bind the mixture. Di- 
vide it up into small even-sized portions, 
shape each into a roll, then egg and crumb 
them carefully, and fry in hot fat. Drain, 
dish up, garnish with sprigs of fresh or 
fried parsley, and serve hot. 

Egg Cudets. 

{Cotelettes auas ceufs.) 

Boil four eggs till hard (allow ten min- 
utes), cool them and remove the shell, 
then chop them, not too finely. Chop 
likewise, but rather finer, two ounces of 
cooked bacon or ham, and about a dessert- 
spoonful of parsley. 

Prepare a white sauce with 1 oz. butter, 
I oz. of flour, stirred in and cooked slightly, 
then add a gill of milk, full measure. Cook 
it for a few minutes and stirring all the time 
to prevent lumps forming. Now add the 
above-named ingredients, mix well and 
season with salt, pepper and a grate of 
nutmeg. Spread on to a dish and let cool. 

Divide the mixture into eight or nine 
portions and shape each into a cutlet. 
Egg and crumb them carefuUy, and fry 
them in deep hot fat. Drain well, insert 
a small piece of macaroni at the end of 
each cutlet, to represent the bones. Dish 
up, garnish with fried parsley, and serve. 



44 HOW TO COOK 

Egg Cutlets with Spinach. 

{Cotelettes d'oeufs aux Epinards.) 

Take four hard-boiled eggs, two raw 
eggs, half a pint of bechamel sauce, three 
ounces lean ham, six mushrooms, one tea- 
spoonful chopped parsley, one pound 
cooked spinach, one ounce butter, one 
table-spoonful cream, salt, pepper, nut- 
meg, two shallots, mashed potatoes for 
border, breadcrumbs, frying fat to fry. 

Reduce the sauce to about 1^ giUs, chop 
coarsely the hard-boiled eggs, ham, and 
mushrooms. Stir two raw yolks of eggs 
into the sauce, let it bind without boiling ; 
then add the chopped eggs, ham, mush- 
rooms and parsley ; season to taste with 
pepper, salt and nutmeg. Spread on a 
dish or plate and let cool. Pass the spinach 
through a sieve, peel and chop the shallot, 
and fry in the butter to a golden colour, put 
in the spinach, then season to taste. Mix 
the cream with a little flour and stir into 
the spinach and cook for ten minutes. 
Shape the egg-mixture into neat cutlets, 
then egg and crumb them. Fry in hot fat, 
drain, dish up on a border of potatoes on 
a hot dish, fill the centre with the prepared 
spinach, and serve. 



Egg Fritters a la Milanaise. 

(Beignets d'aeufs d la Milanaise.) 

Cut four hard-boiled eggs into halves 
lengthwise, and carefully remove the yolks. 
Melt half an ounce of butter in a stew-pan, 
and add half -ounce of flour ; moisten with 
half a gill white stock or milk, stir till it 
thickens ; then add one raw egg-yolk and 
allow to bind. Incorporate one ounce of 



EGGS AND OMELETS 45 

chopped lean ham or tongue and four 
ounces chopped cooked chicken or veal, one 
teaspoonful finely chopped parsley, one 
small shallot, chopped and fried in butter, 
lemon juice, pepper, salt, and the yolks of 
the hard-boiled eggs. Fill up each white 
with this, egg and crumb them carefully, 
and fry in hot clarified butter. Dish up, 
garnish with fried parsley, and serve with 
a rich tomato sauce. 

Egg Kromeskis. 

{Cromesquis (Tceufs.) 

Take three hard-boiled eggs, half a 
gill of bechamel sauce, half an ounce of 
chopped ox tongue, frying batter, two raw 
yolks of eggs, half a teaspoonful finely 
chopped truffle, five thin pancakes (un- 
sweetened), frying fat, seasoning. 

Peel the eggs, cut them into slices and 
chop rather coarsely, put them in a stew- 
pan, moisten with the sauce and the egg- 
yolks, season to taste with salt, pepper 
and nutmeg, stir over the fire till hot, and 
add the truffles and tongue ; mix well, and 
turn on to a plate to cool. Shape into even- 
sized corks, wrap each in a square piece of 
pancake, dip into frying batter, and fry 
in hot fat. Drain, dish up on a folded 
napkin, and garnish with crisp parsley. 

Egg Coquilles with Spinach. 

(Coquilles d'ceufs aux Epinards.) 
Butter the inside of eight china coquille 
moulds or else ordinary souffle cases, put 
a table-spoonful of prepared and seasoned 
spinach in each ; upon this put about a 
dessert-spoonful of cream. Break a fresh 
egg, season with pepper and salt, place 



46 HOW TO COOK 

the cases on a baking sheet and bake in a 
moderately heated oven for about eight 
minutes. Dish up, and serve quickly. 

Eggs a rAfricaine. 

Cook four ounces of rice, previously 
washed and drained, in sufficient well- 
seasoned rich stock and mix when finished 
with a little chopped ham and grated cheese. 
Prepare some oval-shaped bread croutes 
(fried in butter), and spread one side of 
each thickly with the prepared savoury 
rice, and keep hot. Next beat up five eggs, 
season to taste with salt and pepper. Peel 
two small ripe tomatoes, slice and chop 
them coarsely, drain, and cook in a saucepan 
with half an ounce of butter ; then add the 
eggs, also a tablespoonful of cream, and 
stir over the fire until the eggs begin to 
thicken. Dish up the prepared croutes of 
rice, and spread the egg mixture roughly 
on each croute. Garnish with sprigs of 
fresh parsley, and serve hot. 

Eggs a rAmericaine. 

Prepare and bake some paste croustades, 
oval or round, half fill each with a dehcately 
prepared ragout composed of oysters, 
bearded and cut in halves, mushrooms 
(champignons) cut in slices, and well- 
seasoned bechamel sauce. Place a neatly 
poached egg on top of each, pour over a 
little rich brown sauce, then dish up, and 
serve at once. 

Eggs a la Boisellier. 

Line some previously buttered small 
bouche or cup moulds carefully with thin 



Eggs and omelets 47 

slices of preserved mushrooms, placing a 
mushroom head in the centre, then break 
a fresh egg in each, season to taste, place 
them on a baking tin, and poach in the 
oven. Dish up neatly, pour over some hot 
mushroom sauce or Italian sauce, and 
serve. 

Eggs a la Bretonne. 

Cook till tender some previously soaked 
haricot beans in well-seasoned stock, and 
rub them through a sieve. The puree may 
if liked be mixed with a little chopped ham 
fried with finely minced onion. Put the 
prepared puree on a dish, and place some 
nicely poached eggs, neatly trimmed, on 
top. Poui over some hot cream sauce, 
and serve. 

Eggs a la Colbert. 

This is a simple and delicious dish emi- 
nently suitable as an after-dinner savoury, 
but requires great care and careful atten- 
tion in order to make the eggs presentable 
and of good shape during the process of 
frying. 

Take four or six new-laid eggs, break 
each very carefully in a cup, season with 
pepper and salt, and sprinkle over about 
half a teaspoonful of grated Gruy^re or 
Parmesan cheese, drop each very gently 
into a pan of hot fat or frying oil — the latter 
if of good quality is preferable for this 
purpose. Keep the eggs in shape, and 
turn frequently by means of a wooden 
spoon. Fry them to a pretty golden 
colom:, then take up and drain them on a 
cloth or kitchen paper. Dress them neatly 
on a hot dish, sprinkle over with grated 
cheese, and serve quickly. 



48 HOW TO COOK 

Eggs a la Paraientier. 

Take three large potatoes, one gill of 
rich cream, one ounce of grated cheese, 
six small eggs, sauce (bechamel or supreme), 
half an ounce of butter, breadcrumbs. 

Wash and scrub the potatoes, dry them, 
and bake them in the oven, cut them into 
halves and scoop out the mealy parts. 
Poach the eggs in slightly salted water 
flavoured with lemon juice, trim them. 
Put a little sauce in each half of the pota- 
toes, place an egg in each. Mix the re- 
mainder of sauce with half the cheese. 
Cover with the sauce and cheese, sprinkle 
over with breadcrumbs, add grated cheese ; 
divide the butter in little bits and place on 
top, brown in a very hot oven, dish up, 
and serve quickly. 

Eggs a la Salamandre. 

Take six to eight eggs, six to eight slices 
of toasted bread, two ounces of cooked ham 
or beef-tongue, one ounce of butter, one 
gill well-reduced bechamel sauce, three 
ounces of grated cheese, salt, pepper, 
cayenne, one teaspoonful chilli vinegar, or 
one table-spoonful French wine vinegar. 

Have ready a saute-pan half filled with 
water ; add the vinegar and sufficient salt 
to taste. Pound the meat in a mortar tiU 
smooth, add half the butter, 1 oz. cheese, 
and sufficient sauce to form a smooth paste, 
season it with pepper, and rub through a 
sieve. Stamp out as many oval shapes of 
toasted bread as there are eggs, butter 
them well, and spread one side thickly 
with the puree above prepared ; place 
them on a dish when ready and keep hot 



EGGS AND OMELETS 49 

at the mouth of the oven. Break the 
eggs carefully into the saute-pan containing 
the seasoned water (boiling), poach for 
three minutes, take up with a sUce, trim 
and place on the prepared toasts, mask 
quickly with bechamel sauce, sprinkle well 
with cheese, brown them under a red-hot 
salamander, dish up, and serve. 

Anchovy Eggs. 

Shell four hard-boiled eggs and cut each 
in half crossways, using a sharp knife. 
Remove the yolks and pound them in a 
mortar with a table-spoonful of anchovy 
paste or six anchovy fillets ; when smooth 
add a little anchovy essence and a table- 
spoonful of double cream. Season with a 
pinch of cayenne or Paprika. Rub this 
puree through a fine sieve, and fill with 
it the eggs. Have ready eight rounds of 
toasted or fried bread croutes the size of 
the half egg, spread these over with the 
remainder of the puree, and place half 
an egg on each, cut side upwards (a little 
portion of the white of egg can be cut off 
so as to make them stand firm on the 
croutes). Place a star-shaped piece of 
tongue in the centre of each egg. Dish 
up, garnish with parsley, and send to table. 

Eggs a la Chantilly. 

Line some oval shaped tartlet pans with 
thinly rolled out puff paste, and bake them 
" blind." Fill these crusts with a well- 
seasoned green pea puree, and place on top 
of each a nicely poached egg. Have ready 
some hot Mousseline or HoUandaise sauce 
coloured with a little spinach puree to give 
it a greenish tint. Sauce over the eggs 
with this, dish up, and serve hot. 



50 HOW TO COOK 

Eggs a la Chimay. 

(Stuffed Eggs au Gratin.) 

Boil the required number of eggs for 
about twelve minutes, cool and shell them 
carefully ; then cut each in half lengthways 
and take out the yolks. Rub the yolks 
through a medium fine sieve, and mix with 
a little anchovy essence, oiled butter, 
chopped tarragon and parsley. Season 
with salt, pepper and a suspicion of cayenne. 
Fill the whites of egg with this preparation, 
then arrange the eggs neatly, cut sides 
downwards, on a well-buttered gratin or 
other baking dish. Sauce over carefully 
with well-reduced bechamel or other good 
white sauce, sprinkle over some grated 
cheese (Gruyere or Cheddar), also some 
fine brown breadcrumbs, and lastly a 
little melted butter. Finish the dish in a 
sharp oven or under the salamander and 
serve hot. The surface of the eggs must 
be nicely browned by the time the dish 
leaves the oven. Send to table hot. 



Eggs a la Capucine (Cold). 

Flake some cooked white fish, mix it 
with sufiicient aspic jeUy to set, and well- 
seasoned mayonnaise sauce to flavour, then 
fill up a previously aspic coated plain border 
mould. Poach six to eight eggs in the 
usual way, drain, trim them neatly, and 
when cold mask over each with white 
chaud-froid sauce, then decorate the surface 
of each with thinly-cut strips of trufHe and 
pimiento. Unmould the fish border on to 
a cold dish, place the prepared eggs neatly 
in the centre, and serve. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 51 

Fried Eggs a la Fermiere. 

Grill or broil eight thin slices of lean 
bacon or ham, fry the same number of 
eggs in a little butter or bacon fat, trim 
each neatly and place on a slice of bacon 
or ham. Range these in the form of a 
border round a dish, fill the centre with 
a mixture of vegetables (macedoine de 
legumes) heated and mixed with a little 
white sauce. Garnish the centre with 
Parisian potatoes (marble-shaped potatoes, 
blanched, drained, and baked in the oven, 
or fried). The dish is then ready for serv- 
ing. 

Fried Eggs with Savoury Rice. 

Cook four ounces of Fatna rice in about 
a pint of rich stock, add enough well- 
reduced tomato sauce to colour it, then 
add two table-spoonfuls of grated cheese, 
and two slices of fried bacon cut into small 
strips. Season to taste with salt, and 
reduce a little until sufficiently firm to 
shape. Melt about an ounce of butter in 
an omelet pan, and fry in it five or six fresh 
eggs, trim each neatly, or else stamp out 
with a plain round pastry cutter. Put the 
rice in a buttered flat mould, press it in 
well, and turn out quickly on to a hot dish. 
Place the fried eggs in the form of a circle 
on the rice shape, then put a tiny pinch of 
red or black pepper on the centre of each 
yolk of egg, and serve hot. 

Eggs a la Nesselrode. 

Prepare a savoury chestnut puree as 
described below, put it in a forcing bag, to 
which have attached a plain or fancy tube, 



52 HOW TO COOK 

and make a fairly bold border on a buttered 
gratin dish. Put about two table-spoonfuls 
of cream in the dish; upon this break 
carefully four or five fresh eggs. Season with 
salt and pepper, and bake in the oven 
until the eggs are set. Serve hot. 

Savoury Chestnut Puree. 

{For Eggs a la Nesselrode.) 

Boil half a pound of large chestnuts for 
about twenty minutes, remove both skins, 
boil again in a little stock, and when quite 
tender rub through a fine wire sieve. 
Season to taste with salt and pepper, and 
moisten with a very little brown sauce, 
tomato sauce, or else rich gravy stock. 
Mix well, so as to produce a smooth paste. 

Baked Eggs a la Princesse. 

Have ready the following materials : — 
Six eggs, six rounds of fried bread, one 
ounce of butter, two ounces of cooked 
ham or tongue, parsley, the yolk of a 
hard-boiled egg, asparagus-point ragout, 
salt and pepper. 

Melt the butter in a saute-pan ; break 
the eggs one by one into a basin and slide 
them into the pan, and cook them in the 
oven until the whites are set ; season 
lightly with white pepper and salt. Cut 
them out with a plain round cutter and 
place each on a crouton of fried bread. 
Ornament the eggs with alternate little 
groups of chopped ham or tongue, chopped 
parslej', and chopped yolk of egg (hard- 
boiled). Dress them neatly on a round 
dish ; put them in the oven just a second 
or two ; fill the centre with a ragout of 
asparagus points, and serve. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 53 

Egg Croquettes. 

{Croquettes d'CEufsr^ 
Chop rather coarsely four hard-boiled 
eggs ; chop Ukewise, but rather finer, two 
ounces of cooked tongue or ham, and 
about a dessert-spoonful of parsley. Pre- 
pare a white sauce with one ounce of 
butter, three-quarters of an ounce of flour 
stirred in and blended, and a gill of milk. 
Cook it for a few minutes, stirring all the 
time to prevent lumps from forming. Now 
add the above-named ingredients ; mix 
well, and season with salt, pepper, and a 
grate of nutmeg. Spread the mixture on 
to a dish and let it cool. Divide the mixture 
into eight or nine portions and make each 
into a ball or cork shape ; egg and crumb 
them carefully, and fry them in deep hot 
fat. Drain them on a paper or cloth. 
Dish up, garnish with fried parsley, and 
serve. 

Fried Egg Rolls. 

Cut six or eight hard-boiled eggs into 
slices, and rub them through a coarse wire 
sieve, then mince coarsely a dozen pre- 
served mushrooms and slightly fry them in 
an ounce of butter. To this add the egg 
puree, stir well, season with salt and pepper 
and a grate of nutmeg. Moisten with 
suflRcient well-reduced bechamel sauce to 
bind the mixture. When thoroughly hot, 
spread the mixture on to a dish or plate 
and let cool. Shape the mixture into 
croquettes, even-sized balls, or cork shapes, 
and dip each into beaten egg, cover with 
coarse-grained fiorador or semolina (the 
former is preferable), and fry in hot fat a 
golden colour ; dish up neatly and garnish 
with fried parsley. 

Note. — The above-made egg rolls, 



54 HOW TO COOK 

dressed round a bed of cooked spinach 
nicely seasoned, makes a very tasty dinner 
or supper dish. 



Egg SouflEle. 

(Souffle aux (Eufs.) 

Melt two ounces of butter in a stew-pan, 
fry, i.e., blend in it, a peeled and finely 
chopped shallot, and stir in three-quarters 
of an ounce of Brown and Poison's corn- 
flour. Cook for a few minutes, but do not 
allow it to get brown. Next incorporate 
five yolks of eggs and place the pan in an- 
other containing boiling water, and whisk 
over the fire till the mixture thickens, then 
add eight chopped preserved, mushrooms 
and let it cool a little. Whisk to a very 
stiff froth the whites of four eggs, and stir 
carefully into the mixture of yolks, etc., 
previously seasoned with salt, pepper, and 
a good pinch of Paprika. Pour this into a 
lajge buttered souffle case or several small 
ones (china ramakin cases will do nicely). 
Place in a saute-pan containing some boil- 
ing water, cover with a buttered paper, and 
cook in the oven for about fifteen minutes 
if small cases are used, or twenty-five 
minutes when a large case is used. Dish 
up and serve quickly. 

Savoury Egg Cream on Toast. 

{Crime aux (Eufs sur CrolUes.) 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
One ounce of butter, half an ounce of 
flour, one gill of cream, about half a gill 
of milk, four eggs, one teaspoonful chopped 
parsley and savoury herbs (tarragon and 



EGGS AND OMELETS 55 

cherVil), salt, pepper, a pinch of cayenne, 
three or four sUces of toasted bread. 

Melt the butter in a stew-pan, add the 
flour and let it cook a little over the fire 
and add the cream and milk. Stir con- 
stantly until it thickens, let it simmer very 
slowly, taking care that it does not bum 
or curdle. Separate the whites from the 
yolks of the eggs, beat up the whites to a 
stiff froth, mix the yolks with the sauce, 
season with salt, pepper and cayenne ; 
stir in carefully, or rather fold in the 
whisked whites of eggs and add the parsley 
and savoury herbs at the same time. Have 
ready the toast cut into convenient sUces ; 
put the mixture on these heaped up ; 
smooth over with the blade of a knife. 
Pass in a hot oven until of a golden colour, 
dish up, and serve quickly. 



Egg and Tomato Savoury 
(Cold). 

Scald three or four ripe tomatoes, and 
remove the skin, cut them into round 
slices, place each slice of tomato on to a 
neatly cut slice of brown bread, cut out 
with a round paste cutter and spread over 
with creamed butter. Put a slice of 
hard-boiled egg on top of the tomato, 
and cross two fillets of anchovy over each. 
Sprinkle a little chopped parsley and lob- 
ster coral on the top. Dish up neatly, and 
serve. 

Eggs a la Dreux. 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Six eggs, quarter of a pound of lean ham 
(cooked), one dessert-spoonful chopped 



56 HOW TO COOK 

parsley, half an ounce of butter, half a gill 
of cream, six rounds of buttered toast. 

Butter thickly six deep patty-pans, chop 
the ham finely and mix with the parsley, 
sprinkle well the patty-pan? with this, so 
as to completely cover the inside of each, 
break an egg carefully into each patty-pan, 
season with a pinch of salt, pepper and 
cayenne, and divide the cream equally on 
top of each egg ; put also a tiny piece of 
butter in each. Put the tins in a saute- 
pan three-parts full of boiling water, place 
in the oven, and poach until the whites are 
completely set. Have ready some rounds 
of buttered toast as nearly as possible 
the size of the patty-pans, turn out the 
egg-shapes, and place them carefully on 
the toast. Dish up and serve hot. 

Eggs a la St. Jacques (Cold). 

Line eight to nine small bouche moulds 
with puff paste or rough puff paste (roU 
out the paste rather thinly, and stamp out 
the rounds necessary for lining with a 
fluted cutter). Prick the bottom of the 
paste with a fork. Fill them with rice or 
dried peas, and bake them in a moderate 
oven to a golden colour. Unmould whilst 
hot. Brush over the outside and inside 
with beaten yolk of egg mixed with meat 
glaze, and return to the oven for a few 
minutes, then let cool. Poach, in smaller- 
sized bouche moulds than those first used, 
as many eggs as are necessary. Unmould 
them and let cool, then mask them with 
aspic, and set each in one of the prepared 
paste crusts. Decorate with chopped aspic 
tinted with a little spinach greening. Dish 
up tastefully, and serve. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 57 

Eggs a la Medicis. 

Drain a handful of slices of pickled 
beetroot on a cloth, and saute them in a 
saute-pan with fresh butter over a moder- 
ate fire. To this add four hard-boiled 
eggs cut into slices, season with pepper 
and salt, add a good teaspoonful of chopped 
parsley and moisten with half a gill of 
cream, cover the pan and place it in the 
oven for about ten minutes. Dish up 
neatly, and serve hot. 

Stuffed Eggs with Anchovies. 

{OEufs farcis aux Anchois.) 

Take four hard-boiled eggs, four Gor- 
gona anchovies, one ounce of butter, a few 
sprigs of parsley, tomato sauce, bread- 
crumbs, eight rounds of toasted bread, cut 
to the size of the eggs. 

Peel the eggs, cut them in halves long- 
ways, take out the yolk, remove skin and 
bones from the anchovies, put them in a 
mortar and pound ; add the butter, a 
little blanched parsley, also a pinch of 
pepper ; pound this until quite smooth, 
then take out and rub through a sieve. 
Fill the halves of whites of eggs with this 
preparation, and stand each on a round 
piece of toast. Sprinkle over with some 
fresh breadcrumbs, place on a buttered 
silver or china dish, and put in the oven 
for a few minutes, so as to get thoroughly 
hot ; sauce over with tomato or Italienne 
sauce, and serve quickly. 

Stuffed Eggs with Spinach. 

{(Eufs farcis aux Epinards.) 

Boil six eggs for ten minutes, peel them, 
cut them in halves crossways, stamp out 



58 HOW TO COOK 

the centre with a half-inch cutter. Cut out 
some croutons about the size of the base 
of an egg, and fry them in clarified butter ; 
have ready some cooked and seasoned 
spinach puree and enriched with cream. 
Cook for a few minutes whilst stirring, fill 
the egg-halves with spinach, close the top 
with the pieces cut out, and place each, 
cut side down, on a crouton. Dish up, 
garnish with the yolk, minced coarsely, and 
thin shces of tongue. Serve with a Uttle 
* brown sauce. 

Stuffed Eggs on Croutes. 

{CEufs fargis sutj CroiUes.) 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Three hard-boiled eggs, two Gorgona 
anchovies (boned), one teaspoonful Echa- 
lote vinegar, half a teaspoonful Worcester 
sauce, one ounce butter, a few sprigs of 
finely chopped tarragon and chervil, six 
round slices of fried or toasted bread 
about If in. in diameter, chopped parsley 
and some Paprika pepper. 

Remove the shells from the eggs, cut 
them in halves, crossways, take out the 
yolks and pound them in a mortar with 
the anchovies ; when smooth add the butter, 
mix thoroughly and add by degrees the 
Echalote vinegar and the Worcester sauce. 
Rub this through a sieve and fill the cavi- 
ties of the whites of eggs with the puree, 
cut the points off the eggs so as to make 
them stand. Put the remainder of the 
puree in a forcing bag with a plain tube. 
Put a little of it in the centre of each 
croute, place the eggs upon it, decorate 
round and on top of the eggs with 
the savoury puree, sprinkle some finely 
chopped parsley and Paprika pepper over 



EGGS AND OMELETS 59 

the surface; this must be done rather 
artistically so as to make the dish effective. 
Range them on a dish covered with a 
fancy paper. Garnish with sprigs of water- 
cresses or crisp parsley, and serv*;. 

Stuffed Eggs a la Madras. 

Take four hard-boiled eggs, two and a 
half ounces butter, one ounce anchovy 
paste, one teaspoonful curry paste, one 
teaspoonful chutney, one table-spoonful 
cooked spinach, eight small round slices 
of bread, also two pickled red chillies or 
pimiento for garnish. 

Peel the eggs, cut them in halves crossways, 
scoop out the yolks and put in a mortar, 
add to this one and a half ounces butter, the 
anchovy paste, curry paste, and chutney ; 
pound until quite smooth, and rub through 
a sieve. Fill the hollows of the whites of 
eggs with this. Have ready eight rounds of 
bread a little larger than the cut sides of 
the eggs, fry them to a golden colour in but- 
ter or lard, when drained and cold spread 
one side with the remainder of the mixture, 
cut the points off the eggs so as to make 
them stand firmly, and place each half in 
the centre of a croute. Cut out fanciful 
pieces of the chilli pod or pimiento, put one 
in the centre of the stuffing, mix the spinach 
with the butter, rub all through a fine sieve, 
put this into a forcing-bag or paper cornet, 
and ornament the sides and tops of croutes 
according to fancy. Keep in a cool place. 
Dish up when required for table. 

Stuffed Eggs a la Volga (Cold). 

Boil six small eggs till hard ; when cooled 
shell them, cut them in halves and carefully 



6o HOW TO COOK 

remove the yolks. Rub the latter through 
a sieve, and mix with a gill of remoulade 
or tartare sauce. Prepare a salpicon of a 
quarter jar of Russian caviare, three or 
four anchovy fillets cut into small dice, 
twelve prawn-tails cut into small dice. 
Add sufficient remoulade sauce to bind 
this mixture, and fUl the cavities of eggs 
with this. Place each on oval-shaped 
croutons of bread fried in butter. Sauce 
over each carefully with remoulade sauce, 
dish up, and garnish neatly with prawns 
and cresses or parsley. Serve as hors- 
d'oeuvre or side dish. When a large quan- 
tity of eggs dressed in this style is needed 
it is advisable to incorporate a sheet of 
dissolved gelatine into each gill of remou- 
lade or tartare sauce. 

Stuffed Eggs, Swiss style. 

{(Eufs far f is a la Suisse.) 

Boil six small fresh eggs till hard, and 
when cold peel them. Cut each through 
the centre with a column cutter and so 
remove the yolk portion. Next make a 
mixture as follows : Chop an ounce of 
ham or tongue, or a similar quantity of 
cold chicken or veal, one small truffle or 
some truffle trimmings, three or four stoned 
olives, and six to eight preserved mush- 
rooms, all chopped up finely. Season with 
salt and pepper, and moisten with a little 
bechamel or other good white sauce. Fill 
the cavities of the eggs with this, and 
replace at each end the small round of 
white of egg cut oft to remove the yolk. 
Brush over the stuffed eggs >vith a beaten 
up raw egg, and roll in breadcrumbs. 
Have ready some hot fat, in which fry 
the eggs to a nice golden brown. Drain 



EGGS AND OMELETS 6i 

them on a cloth or paper. Dish up, gar- 
nish with fried parsley, and serve. 

Eggs in Cases. 

(CEufs en Caisses.) 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Six small eggs, a teaspoonful of chopped 
parsley, two table-spoonfuls of bread- 
crumbs, one of grated Parmesan cheese, 
half a gill of cream, one ounce of butter, 
pepper and salt, six paper cases, one 
shallot, sweet olive oil. 

Oil the inside of paper cases, and place 
them on a baking-tin in the oven for a few 
minutes. Peel the shallot and chop finely, 
fry a little in olive oil, then drain and put 
it, equally divided, into the cases. Mix the 
breadcrumbs, half the parsley, and Par- 
mesan cheese, adding a little pepper. Put 
about a dessert-spoonful of this and a tiny 
piece of butter into each of the cases ; 
carefully break an egg into each case ; sea- 
son with pepper and salt. Divide the cream 
equally and pour over each egg, sprinkle 
with a little Parmesan cheese, and bake in 
a moderate oven for about six minutes. 
Take out, and brown the surface under a 
salamander or hot shovel, sprinkle with a 
little chopped parsley, dish up on a folded 
naplcin, and serve quickly. 

Egg Fritters a la Magdalene. 

Peel five hard-boiled eggs and cut each 
in half. Remove the yolks and rub through 
a fine wire sieve. Grate enough Gruy^re 
cheese to weigh the same as two eggs, and mix 
with the sieved yolks ; to this add a dessert- 
spoonful of finely chopped herbs (parsley, 
tarragon and chervil) and a little French 



62 HOW TO COOK 

mustard. When thoroughly mixed fill 
each egg with this, and spread enough of 
the mixture on top to give it the same shape 
as a whole egg. Brush over carefully 
with beaten egg, cover with breadcrumbs, 
and fry in hot fat. Serve with hot piquante 
sauce. 

Shirred Eggs. 

Butter three or four small round gratin 
dishes holding about three eggs each, and 
besprinkle with brown breadcrumbs. 
Break carefully two or three fresh eggs on 
each dish, and place them in the oven, 
with a tiny bit of butter on top of each 
yolk of egg, and allow to just set the eggs ; 
season with salt and pepper, and send to 
table. 

(Eufs sur plat. 

Proceed the same as directed in the pre- 
ceding recipe, by merely omitting the 
breadcrumbs. In place of using gratin 
dishes, ordinary plates can be made do 
for this purpose. 

Dropped Eggs. 

These are poached eggs cooked in sea- 
soned milk. Allow them to poach for 
barely five minutes, then take up each 
with a skimmer, trim neatly or stamp out 
with a round cutter. Place the eggs on 
nicely-toasted and buttered slices of bread, 
dish up, and serve. 

Curried Eggs (another way). 

Peel, slice, and chop a small onion, and 
fry to a pale golden brown in half ounce 
of butter ; then add one dessert-spoonful 
of curry powder and one of flour ; fry 



EGGS AND OMELETS 63 

both a little and moisten with a gill of 
gravy or rich stock ; stir till it boils, then 
simmer for fifteen minutes and strain. 
Cut into rather thick slices four hard- 
boiled eggs, put them into a saute-pan 
and pour over the strained sauce. Season 
with salt and pepper, add a tablespoonful 
of cream and the juice of a quarter of a 
lemon. Heat up gently but thoroughly, 
taking care not to break up the egg slices. 
Serve with plainly boiled rice. 

Eggs with Creamed Cheese. 

(CEufs au Fromage.) 
Cut up into thin shreds or strips while 
warm, the white part of six hard-boiled 
eggs. Pile this up neatly on a hot dish, 
pour over some creamed cheese as de- 
scribed below, and serve hot. 

Creamed Cheese. 

(Frontage d la Crime.) 
Beat up two eggs and mix with three- 
quarters of a pint of boiling milk, then stir 
in a saucepan over the fire until the egg 
liaison is formed, but do not let it actually 
boil. Lastly add three to four table-spoonfuls 
of grated Gruydre or Cheddar cheese. The 
cream should be reheated, but not boiled, 
a second time before it is served. 

Fried Curried Eggs. 

Boil four or five eggs till hard, cut them 
in halves crossways, remove the yolks, 
pound them in a mortar, adding sufficient 
well-seasoned white sauce to form a smooth 
paste ; add a dessert-spoonful curry or 
mulligatawny paste and a dessert-spoon- 



64 HOW TO COOK 

ful of cream. Refill the whites of the 
eggs with the mixture, smooth it over 
with a knife, and cover each with a layer 
of cooked rice which has been boiled 
until quite soft, mixed with butter, and 
seasoned with pepper, salt and nutmeg. 
Put the curried eggs aside until the rice 
is cold and set, then dip each into beaten 
egg, roll in soft breadcrumbs, and fry 
them in deep, hot fat. Drain them well, 
dish up and garnish with fried parsley. 
This dish is also nice cold. 

Egg and Tomato Custard. 

Break four eggs into a basin, beat up 
and add three table-spoonfuls of tomato 
pulp (that is, fresh ripe tomatoes rubbed 
through a fine sieve), one table-spoonful of 
cream and one table-spoonful of grated 
cheese. Season with salt, pepper, and nut- 
meg. Butter six or seven small souffld 
cases, fill them with the prepared custard, 
and bake them slowly in a fairly hot oven 
for about ten minutes. Dish up and serve 
quickly. 

Devilled Egg Toast. 

(CroMes d'ceufs a la Diable.) 
Shell three hard-boiled eggs, cut some of 
the white part into fine strips to be used 
for garnish, and chop up the remainder 
rather finely. Mix with one table-spoonful 
of chutney, one teaspoonful of mustard, 
and one table-spoonful of curry paste ; 
mix well and season with cayenne and 
Paprika pepper. Heat this up in a fire- 
proof casserole. Have ready eight to ten 
oblong slices of toasted and buttered 
bread ; spread each with the prepared 



EGGS AND OMELETS 65 

mixture ; arrange the strips of white of 
egg in the form of lattice work on top of 
each slice of toast. Dish up, reheat, gar- 
nish with parsley, and serve. 

Ham Eggs (Cold). 

{CEufs au Jambon.) 
Shell four hard-boiled eggs, cut them in 
halves crossways and scoop out the yolks. 
Chop finely two ounces of lean cooked 
ham, and pound it with the egg yolks. 
Season nicely with Krona or Paprika 
pepper and a grate of nutmeg. Incorpor- 
ate one or two table-spoonfuls of rich cream 
and pass through a fine sieve. Fill the 
hollow part of the whites of eggs with 
the prepared puree, and place each, cut side 
down, on oval-shaped slices of ham or 
tongue, previously spread over with ham 
puree ; then range them on slices of toasted 
bread a little larger than the egg-halves. 
Put the remainder of ham puree in a 
forcing bag and decorate the sides of the 
eggs with this, also fancifully cut slices 
of gherkins and tomatoes, or beetroot. 
Dish up and surround with finely shredded 
seasoned salad. 

Fried Eggs a la Creole. 

Cook enough rice (about three to four 
ounces) in rich white stock to fill a good- 
sized border mould. Before moulding, 
mix it with half an ounce of grated cheese 
and one ounce of chopped ham, and season 
to taste. With this fill a buttered border 
mould and place it in the oven to keep hot. 

Heat up half a pint of olive oil in a 
small shallow pan, drop in five or six 
eggs, frying only one at a time ; great 



66 HOW TO COOK 

care must be taken that the yolk of egg 
is kept well coated with the white part, 
in fact each egg should be just like a 
poached egg, only that it is cooked in hot 
oil, instead of water. As the eggs are 
fried drain them carefully and trim nicely, 
then place them in the centre of the rice 
border, which must be turned out on a hot 
dish. Pour over the rice some nicely sea- 
soned hot tomato sauce, and serve. 



Eggs in Parsley Sauce. 

{(Eufs a la Poulette.) 

Boil six new-laid eggs for just five 
minutes, and shell them carefully ; cut off 
one end of each and range the eggs on a 
hot dish. Pour over a nicely seasoned 
parsley sauce — ^that is, bechamel or other 
good white sauce, with finely chopped 
parsley and a little lemon juice — ^and serve. 

Egg Pie. 

{Pate aux CEufs.) 

Shell five hard-boiled eggs and cut them 
into slices not too thin. Mash a pound of 
cooked mealy potatoes and mix with an 
ounce of butter, and a little cream. Sea- 
son well with salt, pepper, and very little 
nutmeg. With this line the bottom of 
a buttered pie dish and place in a layer 
of sliced eggs. Scatter over some chopped 
parsley and cover with a little white sauce. 
Continue this till the eggs are used up. 
Let the last layer be a coating of sauce, 
and cover the top with mashed potatoes, 
smooth this over carefully with a wetted 
knife and mark a neat pattern on top with 



EGGS AND OMELETS 67 

the point of a knife or a fork ; brush over 
with beaten egg and bake in a moderately- 
heated oven for about half an hour. 

Salmon Eggs. 

{(Eufs au Saumon.) 

Shell four hard-boiled eggs and place 
them in cold water. Flake half a pound 
of cooked salmon, freed from skin and 
bones, then chop it, not too finely. Melt 
half an ounce of butter in a stew-pan, stir 
in half an ounce of flour, and let it cook 
for a few seconds ; moisten with half 'a 
gill of fish stock, and stir till it boils and 
thickens. Cook whilst stirring for a few 
minutes longer, then add the chopped 
salmon ; mix thoroughly with half a 
beaten egg ; season to taste with salt, 
pepper, and a grate of nutmeg. When 
thoroughly hot put the mixture on to a 
cold plate and set to cool. 

Divide the mixture into four even-sized 
portions, flatten out each portion and wrap 
it round each egg ; this must be done 
very neatly. Brush over the eggs with 
beaten egg, and roll in breadcrumbs, then 
fry in hot fat to a golden brown. Take 
them up and drain ; cut each egg in half 
crossways and dish up on croutons of 
fried bread. Put a tiny pinch of chopped 
parsley in the centre of each yolk and gar- 
nish the dish with fried parsley and thin 
slices of lemon. 

Lobster Eggs. 

{(Eufs a I'Homard.) 
Proceed the same as directed in the fore- 
going recipe, but use lobster in place of 
salmon, or, if preferred, take half lobster 
and half salmon. 



68 HOW TO COOK 

Spanish Eggs. 

{CEufs a VEspagnole.) 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Four hard-boiled eggs, four ounces of 
tongue, a few capers and gherkins, lemon 
juice, parsley, three Spanish olives, two 
anchovy fillets, a few drops of salad oil, 
toasted buttered bread. 

Cut the eggs in halves across, take out 
the yolks and rub through a sieve. Cut 
off a small piece of the tips of the whites 
to make them stand even. Chop half the 
tongue rather finely, and mix with half the 
yolks of eggs. Stamp out six nice rounds 
of buttered toast about the size of the 
cut side of the eggs. Sprinkle over thickly 
with tongue and yolks. Cut the remainder 
of tongue, and gherkins, olives, and an- 
chovies, into fine shreds ; mix gently 
with a few drops of oil and lemon juice ; 
add a little chopped parsley and the capers, 
also a pinch of white or red pepper, which- 
ever is preferred. . Fill up the cups of 
white of egg, fill up rather high but loosely. 
Stand each on a round piece of prepared 
toast, dish up, garnish, and serve as cold 
savoury or breakfast dish. 

Anchovy Eggs (Cold). 

(CEufs a VAnchois.) 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Four hard-boiled eggs, one teaspoonful of 
chopped parsley, one table-spoonful an- 
chovy essence or paste, two ounces of 
butter, pepper, small cress for garnish. 

Remove the shells from the eggs, cut 
them in halves and take out the yolks. 
Put the yolks in a mortar, add the butter 
and anchovy essence or paste, pound well. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 69 

season with a little pepper, mix with the 
chopped parsley, and fill the eggs with this. 
Cut off the tips so as to make them stand, 
arrange them neatly on a dish, surround 
with small cress or other small salad, and 
serve. 

Sardine Eggs. 

{CEufs a la Sardine.) 

Proceed in the same manner as de- 
scribed in the foregoing recipe, but use 
boneless sardines or sardine paste in place 
of anchovies or anchovy paste. 

Tomato Eggs. 

{CEufs a la Tomate.) 
Boil four eggs till very hard, then place 
(n cold water, and remove the shells. Cut 
each egg in half, and spread the cut side 
with anchovy paste. Butter a fireproof 
china dish, range the eggs on the dishj 
cut side down, on slices of tomato. Pour 
over enough tomato sauce to cover the 
eggs completely, and sprinkle over with 
well-seasoned breadcrumbs. Cook in a 
hot oven for eight minutes, and serve im- 
mediately. 

Scotch Eggs. 

(CEufs a VEcossaise.) 

Boil four eggs for ten minutes, cool and 
shell them. Skin one pound of pork 
sausages, and mix with one yolk of egg. 
Dip each hard-boiled egg in flour, then 
coat each over with a thin layer of the 
sausage meat. Beat up a raw egg on a 
plate, brush over the covered hard-boiled 
eggs, then roll them in breadcrumbs and 
fry them in hot* fat to a golden brown. 



70 HOW TO COOK 

Drain them on paper or a cloth. Cut each 
neatly in half crossways. Dish up on 
rounds of fried or toasted bread, and gar- 
nish with fried parsley. Serve hot with 
tomato sauce, or cold with mayonnaise 
sauce. 

Stuffed Eggs with Prawns. 

(CEufs fargis aux Crevettes.) 
Take four hard-boiled eggs, twelve large 
or eighteen small prawns, three Gorgona 
anchovies, one and a half ounces of butter, 
one table-spoonful bechamel sauce. 

Remove the shell from the eggs, cut 
them in halves crosswise, scoop out the 
yolks and put them in a mortar, add the 
boned anchovies and picked prawns, and 
pound very fine. Rub all through a wire 
sieve ; return to the mortar, add the 
butter and bechamel sauce, mix thoroughly, 
and season to taste. Fill up the hard- 
boiled whites of egg, place a prawn-head 
in the centre of each, sprinkle the surface 
with a little grated Parmesan cheese ; 
put them on a buttered dish or saute-pan, 
and bake in a hot oven for about five 
minutes. Dish up neatly, sauce round 
with hot tomato sauce, and serve. 

Eggs a la Camot. 

Trim neatly some artichoke bottoms of 
a nice white colour, cut the edges into a 
fancy border, and keep warm in some dis- 
solved meat glaze and stock. Have ready 
some rather rich chicken puree, and blend it 
over the fire with a little fresh butter. 
Poach a new-laid egg for each fond, put 
a table-spoonful of chicken puree in the 
fond, trim the eggs nicely, place on top, 
dish up, sauce over with gravy, and serve. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 71 

Eggs a la Rossini. 

Butter a large fireproof gratin-dish, and 
break into it six fresh eggs, season with 
salt and pepper and put a tiny piece of 
butter on each egg. Place the dish in the 
oven and cook till the eggs are barely set. 

Toss some finely sliced chicken liver in 
a little butter, season with salt and pepper 
and add a piece of foie-gras pate, cut into 
small slices, moisten with a little truffle 
sauce, and dish up. Cut out by means of a 
paste cutter the baked eggs, place them 
neatly on top of the Uver, return to the 
oven for a few seconds and serve. 

Eggs a la Meyerbeer. 

Fry or bake the required number of eggs 
as directed for " Eggs sur plat." Slice 
some sheep's kidney, season with salt and 
pepper, and toss in butter previously 
blended with two or three finely chopped 
shallots. Moisten with a little Mad^re 
sauce. Arrange the kidneys as a border 
on a hot dish, and place the fried eggs in 
the centre of the dish. Serve hot. 

Eggs a la Mirelle. 

Fry some freshly laid eggs in deep olive 
oil (shaped like poached eggs), drain care- 
fully, and trim them neatly. Spread some 
oval-shaped fried bread croutes spread over 
with a layer of cooked savoury rice flavoured 
with saffron, and place an egg on each. 
Dish up neatly, and garnish with a border 
of chopped peeled tomatoes previously 
tossed in butter. Serve hot. 



72 HOW TO COOK 

Eggs a la Ni9oise (Cold). 

Poach some new laid eggs in acidulated 
water, drain and trim each carefully. When 
cold, mask them with pink chaud-froid 
sauce, then decorate the surface of each 
neatly with tarragon leaves. Arrange a 
well-seasoned vegetable salad in a shallow 
dish, range the eggs neatly on this, and 
serve. 

Eggs a la Marie-Louise. 

Poach six small fresh eggs as directed 
on p. 16. Range them in an entree dish 
and sauce over with Madere sauce. Have 
ready some finely shredded ox-tongue, 
truffles and preserved mushrooms, heat 
them up first, and sprinkle over the eggs 
just before serving. 

Egg Croutes with Game. 

{Croutes aux oeufs poches a la Chasseur.) 
Get ready the following ingredients : 
Six fresh eggs, a loaf of stale bread, six 
ounces cooked game, one shallot, half an 
ounce of butter, six preserved mushrooms, 
three table-spoonfuls brown sauce (Espag- 
nole or Madeira), pepper and salt, frying 
fat, parsley. 

Prepare some oval croutes of bread, the 
size of an egg, 2 in. by IJin., and about an 
inch in thickness. Fry these in hot fat 
a pale brown ; drain and scoop out the 
centre of each croute so as to form cases 
(this must be done whUe the croutes are 
hot). Pound the game in a mortar, add 
the shallot, chopped finely and blended in 
a little butter, the mushrooms, previously 
chopped, when smooth add the brown 
sauce. Season to taste and rub the whole 



EGGS AND OMELETS 73 

through a wire sieve. Keep the puree 
hot until required. 

Meanwhile poach the eggs very care- 
fully in slightly salted water containing a 
few drops of lemon juice or vinegar. Fill 
the cavities of the croutes with the pre- 
pared puree, trim the eggs to an oval 
shape, and place one on each of the croutes. 
Dish up on a hot dish, with a folded nap- 
kin, put a tiny pinch of Paprika pepper 
on the centre of each egg, garnish the 
dish with sprigs of fresh parsley, and 
serve. 

Egg Pyramid a la Reforme. 

These are stuffed halves of hard-boiled 
eggs, dished up in a pyramidal form, sprin- 
kled over with finely shredded ham and 
truffles. Sauce over with a rich brown 
sauce, and bake in a quick oven. 

Eggs a la Garfield. 

These are very similar to Scotch eggs, 
p. 69. Take some hard-boiled eggs, re- 
move the shells, and cover them with a layer 
of chicken farce or sausage meat, egg and 
crumb them with crushed vermicelli, fry 
in deep fat or clarified butter, and serve 
with piquante sauce. 

Eggs a la Messina. 

Toss in fresh butter as many small arti- 
choke bottoms (preserved) as may be re- 
quired, and drain them. Poach carefully 
the same number of eggs, and trim them. 
Range the artichoke bottoms in the form 
of a border on a round dish, and place 
a poached egg in each. Mask the whole 



74 HOW TO COOK 

with a well-reduced Bordelaise sauce, put 
a thin slice of cooked beef marrow and a 
slice of truffle in the centre of each egg. 
Sprinkle with chopped parsley, and serve 
hot. 

Eggs a la Piemontaise. 

Cook four ounces of Italian rice in rich 
stock, and add enough tomato sauce to 
colour the rice, then put in two table- 
spoonfuls of grated Parmesan cheese and 
two slices of fried bacon, cut into small 
strips. Season to taste and reduce to a 
puree firm enough to shape. Fry in clari- 
fied butter six or seven fresh eggs, trim 
each neatly or stamp out with a round 
paste cutter. Put the rice in a greased 
flat mould, and turn out on a hot dish. 
Place the fried eggs in a circle round the 
edge of the rice shape, put a tiny pinch 
of black pepper in the centre of each yolk 
of egg, and serve. 

Eggs a ritalienne. 

Cook some rice as directed in the pre- 
ceding recipe ; when ready add to it four 
to six chicken livers, previously cleaned 
and drained and tossed in butter. Make 
a border of this and turn it out on a hot 
dish. Fill the centre with scrambled eggs, 
as directed in recipe on p.23, pour a little 
tomato sauce over and round the rice 
border, and serve. 

Eggs a la Polonaise. 

Fry a teacupful of small dice of bread 
in clarified butter; when of a pale brown 
colour take up and drain them. Beat up 
six eggs in a basin, add to it a teaspoonful 



EGGS AND OMELETS 75 

of finely chopped parsley and chives, a 
table-spoonful of cream, and season with 
salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly and pour 
into a small stew-pan containing two 
table-spoonfuls of clarified butter; add, 
also, the fried bread croutons. Stir over 
the fire till the mixture is thick enough 
to spread. Drop it by means of a spoon 
into hot clarified butter, and fry nicely. 
Take up, drain, and dish up. Serve hot. 

Eggs a la Poulette. 

Shell some soft boiled eggs whilst still 
warm. Have ready some oval-shaped fried 
bread croutons, spread over one side of 
each with a little well-reduced cream sauce, 
place the eggs on these. Dish up, sauce 
over with hot Supreme sauce, then sprinkle 
over a little finely chopped chervil, tarragon 
and parsley, and serve hot. 

Egg and Tomato Ramakins. 

Butter the inside of six small china rama- 
kin cases, sprinkle the bottom of each with 
chopped ham and parsley. Break an egg 
into each ramakin case. Place them in 
a saute-pan half filled with boiling water, 
cover with buttered paper, and steam in 
the oven for about five minutes, or until the 
eggs are set. Cut three ripe and peeled toma- 
toes in halves, season, and put them in 
a saute-pan in a hot oven ; put a very small 
piece of butter on each and cook tUl they 
are tender. Lay half a tomato on a round 
of buttered toast, and unmould the egg 
ramakins on to the tomatoes. Arrange 
these neatly on a hot dish with six slices 
of fried bacon round the tomatoes, and 
serve. 



76 HOW TO COOK 

Eggs a la Marie. 

Prepare six poached eggs, drained and 
cut out with an oval cutter ; place them 
on oval croutes of fried bread, dish up, 
and besprinkle the eggs with finely shredded 
ox- tongue, mixed with fine shreds of black 
trufHe. Pour a little Mad^re sauce round 
the base of the dish, and serve. 

Eggs a la Lucullus. 

Cut three hard-boiled eggs into quarter- 
inch slices, crossways, and spread them 
over with a thin layer of " Lucullus " 
puree. Upon the paste place a round 
of cooked ham or bacon, cut thinly and 
of the same size as the eggs ; next dip 
the prepared slices (sandwiched together 
as directed) into a light frying batter ; 
drop them into hot fat or clarified butter, 
and fry to a nice golden brown. Drain, 
dish up, garnish with fried parsley, and 
serve. 

Eggs a la Chiffonade. 

Boil up a quart of seasoned water, con- 
taining a little lemon juice, in a stew- 
pan, and poach in it six fresh eggs ; pour 
off the water, then take a whisk and beat 
up the eggs lightly ; next pour in about 
half a pint of nicely seasoned tomato 
sauce and half an ounce of fresh butter. 
Stir this over the fire till thoroughly heated. 
Have ready on a hot dish a border of 
cooked and seasoned rice, put the egg mix- 
ture in the centre, and serve. 

Eggs a la Reine Margot. 

Proceed the same as directed for Scram 
bled Eggs, adding to the mixture a little 



EGGS AND OMELETS Tj 

well-reduced Veloute sauce, also some 
chopped truffle, some chopped cooked 
chicken breast, and finely chopped parsley. 
Dish up on neatly cut slices of toasted and 
buttered bread, and serve hot. 

Eggs a la Reine. 

Prepare and fry six rounds of croutons 
of bread about 2| in. in diameter and \ in. 
thick. Spread one side rather thickly 
with a light chicken farce, previously 
poached and cut to the required size. Upon 
these place six nicely trimmed poached 
eggs. Dish up, pour some rich cream sauce 
round the base of the dish, and besprinkle 
the eggs with a little chopped truffle, then 
serve. 

For cream sauce use either supreme, 
veloute or bechamel enriched with cream. 

Fried Eggs a la Romaine. 

Fry the required number of eggs in hot 
olive oil or best nut oil, drain and trim 
each, and range neatly on a dish containing 
a bed of spinach cooked whole (not chopped 
up), previously seasoned and tossed in a 
little butter. Garnish the dish with thinly 
cut slices of Salami sausage and slices of 
cooked ham. Pour a little gravy round 
the base of the dish, and serve. 

Fried Eggs on Rice Croutes. 

(CEufs frits sur croMes de Riz.) 
Wash four ounces of Patna rice and 
cook it in seasoned stock till tender. It 
must be reduced to a fairly firm texture 
and seasoned rather liberally with Paprika. 
Spread it on a greased dish and set to 



78 HOW TO COOK 

cool. Stamp out six rounds by means of 
a paste cutter, then egg and crumb them 
and fry the rounds of rice in clarified 
butter. 

Melt half an ounce of butter in a fry- 
ing or large omelet pan, break in six fresh 
eggs, season with salt and pepper, and 
fry till just set, then cut out the eggs with 
a paste cutter and place each on the pre- 
pared croutes. Dish up, garnish with 
parsley, and serve. The rice croutes can 
be baked crisp in the oven if Uked. 



Egg Fritters a la Royale. 

Break six fresh eggs into a basin, sea- 
son with salt and pepper, and stir in two 
table-spoonfuls of cream. Beat up to mix 
yolks and whites of eggs thoroughly, then 
strain into a weU-buttered flat tin mould. 
Put this in a saute-pan containing a little 
water and cook in the oven for about 
fifteen minutes or till the custard is set. 
When done and cooled, unmould the shape 
and cut it into | in. thick strips 2J in. long. 
Have ready a light frying batter ; dip 
the egg strips in this and fry in hot fat 
to a delicate brown colour. Drain, dish 
up, and serve with spinach or other suit- 
able vegetables as garnish, or separately. 



Eggs a la Hussard. 

This dish consists of rounds of fried bread 
spread over on one side with pounded ham 
and mushrooms, with a slice of tomato on 
top. Place a poached egg on top of each, 
coat well with HoUandaise sauce. Dish up 
neatly and serve hot. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 79 

Eggs a la Maire. 

These are poached eggs trimmed and 
dressed on rounds of fried or toasted bread, 
garnished with finely shredded ox-tongue, 
ham, and truffles. Dish up and sauce over 
with hot Mad^re sauce. 

Eggs a la Montpensier. 

Poach five or six new-laid eggs, trim 
neatly and dress them on fried bread 
croutons previously spread over with foie- 
gras puree. Dish up and garnish the centre 
with green peas and truffles. 

Eggs a la Neige. 

Whisk four whites of eggs to a stiff 
froth, season with salt and pepper, and 
steam in small buttered moulds. Unmould 
the shapes and dish them up neatly. Serve 
with hot cream sauce. 

Eggs a la Norfolk. 

These are halves of hard-boiled eggs, 
egged, crumbed, fried in butter, and served 
with piquant sauce. 

Eggs en Matelote. 

Peel and slice thinly two small onions 
and fry a delicate brown in one ounce of 
butter, then drain and add a glass of 
claret and a gill of brown herb sauce ; re- 
duce the whole and keep hot. Poach six 
eggs as directed on p. 16. Dish up the 
eggs on croutes of fried bread or rounds 
of toast, previously spread with anchovy 
paste. Pour over the prepared sauce, and 



8o HOW TO COOK 

garnish the dish with curled up anchovy 
fillets and turned olives, previously heated 
in a little stock. Serve hoi. 

Eggs in Puff Pastry. 

(CEufs en Feuilletage.) 
Get ready the following materials : — 
Five hard-boiled eggs, half a pound of 
puff-paste, one raw egg, pepper and salt, 
breadcrumbs, clarified butter or lard for 
frying. 

Remove the shells from the eggs, mix 
a little white pepper with some fine dry 
salt, roll four eggs in this. Roll out the 
puff-paste about one-eighth of an inch 
thick, wrap up each egg in the paste, 
brush the edges of the paste so as to close 
the ends securely, egg and breadcrumb 
over twice, place them in a wire basket, 
and fry in hot butter or lard a nice light 
brown (this must be done very carefully 
to ensure the paste getting done through). 
Cut some rings about a quarter of an 
inch thick of the remaining hard-boiled 
egg. Take out the yolk, put each fried 
egg on a ring so that they may stand up- 
right ; dish up in a circle on a folded 
napkin ; fry a handful of picked, washed, 
and dried parsley, put this in the centre of 
the dish, and serve. 

Eggs a la Chipolata. 

Prepare and fry six oval croutes of 
bread, hollowed out in the form of an egg. 
Boil for five or six minutes six fresh eggs, 
then plunge them in cold water for a 
second and remove the shell very carefully. 
Brush over the croute of bread with Uquid 
meat glaze or Lemco, and place on each a 



EGGS AND OMELETS 8i 

boiled egg. Dish up, surround the egg with 
groups of bread and glazed button onions, 
slice-shaped pieces of fried bacon, small 
fried potato balls (pommes parisienne), 
glazed young carrots and small glazed 
chestnuts. These must be heated up in 
Mad^re sauce. Pour over enough of the 
said sauce to coat the eggs, and serve. 

Eggs a la Tripe. 

Make a rich onion sauce, and add a 
gill of cream. Boil four to six eggs hard, 
shell them and cut up in slices, heat these 
up in the sauce. Dish up, and sprinkle 
with finely chopped parsley. 

Eggs au Gratin. 

Butter a fireproof baking or gratin dish 
and spread over a table-spoonful of cold 
bechamel sauce. Cut into fairly thick 
slices six hard-boiled eggs, and range 
them on the dish, spreading bechamel 
sauce and grated cheese between the 
layers of egg. Season each layer with salt 
and pepper, and coat the top completely 
with white sauce. Sprinkle over soft 
breadcrumbs, grated cheese, Gruy^re or 
Parmesan, and place a few tiny bits of 
butter here and there. Bake in a hot 
oven for about fifteen minutes, then serve. 

Eggs a la Waldimir. 

Break four new-laid eggs in a well- 
buttered fireproof dish, sprinkle over with 
chopped truffles and asparagus points, 
seasoned, strewn with grated Parmesan 
cheese, slightly browned in the oven, then 
send to table. 



82 HOW TO COOK 

Cheese Eggs. 

(CEufs au Fromage.) 
Beat up four eggs in a basin, and add 
to it two ounces of grated cheddar cheese. 
Season with salt and pepper. Pour this 
into a saucepan containing half an ounce 
of butter, and stir continually over the fire 
till the mixture begins to set, and looks 
like scrambled eggs. Have ready some 
slices of buttered toast, placed on a hot 
dish, pour or spread the egg mixture over, 
and send to table. 

Gniyere Eggs. 

{CEufs d la Gruyere.) 
Cut half a pound of Gruyere cheese into 
thin slices and line with it a buttered 
shallow dish. Break over it carefully five 
or six eggs ; season with salt and pepper. 
Add two or three table-spoonfuls of cream, 
and cover with the remainder of slices of 
cheese, grated or finely chopped. Strew 
over some breadcrumbs, and place a few 
tiny pieces of butter here and there on 
top. Bake in a quick oven for about ten 
minutes and serve hot. 

Eggs with Melted Cheese. 

(CEufs au beurre fondu.) 
Cut two ounces of Gruyere cheese into 
small pieces or slices, put these in a sauce- 
pan with half an ounce of butter and half 
a glass of chablis or sauterne wine ; sea- 
son with salt, pepper, and a pinch of 
Krona seasoning. Stir ovet the fire tiU 
melted, then pour into a buttered fu"e proof 
dish. Break in carefully five or six fresh 
eggs (new laid if possible), season to taste, 
and put a tiny bit of butter on each. Put 



EGGS AND OMELETS 83 

the dish carefully into a hot oven and 
bake till the eggs are set, then serve. 

Eggs in Shells. 

{CEufs en Coquilles.) 

Butter eight small scallop shells, and 
besprinkle with finely chopped ham or 
breadcrumbs ; put a table-spoonful of 
white sauce in each and place in slices 
of hard-boiled eggs ; season with salt 
and pepper, and cover with finely chopped 
ham. Mask the top with white sauce, and 
sprinkle over breadcrumbs and grated 
cheese ; also a few drops of oiled butter, 
and bake in a fairly hot oven for about 
ten minutes. Dish up, garnish with crisp 
parsley, and serve. 

Eggs a la Lyoimaise. 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Five hard-boiled eggs, six preserved mush- 
rooms, one small onion, one teaspoonful 
of flour, half an ounce anchovy paste, 
one ounce butter, half a giU of brown 
stock, one dessert-spoonful of Worcester 
sauce, toasted bread, pepper and salt. 

Peel the eggs, take out the yolks whole, 
cut the white part into strips julienne 
fashion, cut the mushrooms in the same 
way, peel and slice the onion finely, melt 
half an ounce of butter in a stew-pan, fry 
the onion a nice light brown, add the 
white of egg and mushroom, toss (shake) 
them for a few seconds over the fire, 
sprinkle them with flour, and add the 
stock and Worcester sauce ; season with 
pepper and salt, and let the whole simmer 
for about two minutes ; place the yolks 
carefully on top, so as to get warm. Have 



84 HOW TO COOK 

ready some nice sippets bi toast, spread 
them on one side with the anchovy paste, 
mixed with the remainder of the butter, 
put the white of egg, mushrooms and 
onion upon them, arrange the yolks in 
the centre, pour the rest of the ragout 
round the yolks, garnish with a few sprigs 
of parsley, and serve. 

Eggs a la Soubise. 

Peel and slice three medium-sized onions, 
blanch and drain them, then cook in mUk 
till tender, and pass through a fine sieve. 
Reduce this with sufficient white sauce, 
(bechamel) to produce a puree of moderate 
consistency ; add lastly a table-spoonful 
of cream, salt, pepper, and a teaspoonful 
of castor sugar. Poach carefully six new- 
laid eggs, drain and trim them, and 
place them on rounds of toast, previously 
spread thickly with the soubise or onion 
puree. Dish up and serve hot. 

Devilled Eggs. 

{CEufs a la Diable.) 

Put half a gill of rich brown sauce into 
a stew-pan, or saute-pan, and add two 
table-spoonfuls of Worcester sauce, a 
table-spoonful of Harvey sauce, half a 
teaspoonful of red currant jelly, a tea- 
spoonful of curry or mulligatawny paste, 
a table-spoonful of sharp chutney, and a 
dessert-spoonful of chilli vinegar. Reduce 
this to about half its original quantity ; 
season liberally with pepper, cayenne, 
or Paprika, strain and return to the pan. 
Place in it six poached eggs, or the same 
quantity of hard-boiled eggs cut into 
thick slices, heat up carefully, then dish 



EGGS AND OMELETS 85 

up, pour the sauce over the eggs, garnish 
the dish with sippets of toasted bread, 
and serve. 

Eggs a la Princesse. 

Remove the shells from five hard-boiled 
eggs, and keep them hot in seasoned milk 
or white stock. Cut into dice half a cold 
boiled or roast fowl, freed from skin and 
bones. Heat this up in half a gill of 
bechamel or other good white sauce, then 
add five or six table-spoonfuls of cooked 
asparagus points, previously drained ; sea- 
son to taste with salt, pepper and a grate 
of nutmeg, and keep hot. Cut some slices 
of cooked ox-tongue into rounds the size 
of an egg, heat these up in a little stock or 
gravy. Now put the prepared puree 
(salpicon) on a round dish, range the 
rounds of tongue neatly on top, cut the 
eggs in halves and place one on each round 
of tongue. Chop the trimmings of the 
tongue finely and sprinkle this neatly over 
the eggs or around them. Serve hot. 

Eggs au beurre noir. 

Poach carefully six fresh eggs as directed 
on p. 16. Drain and trim them neatly 
and place on a hot dish. Melt an ounce 
of butter in a frying-pan ; when hot and 
of a nut-brown colour add a dessert-spoon- 
ful of tarragon vinegar, and a heaped-up 
teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley. 
Poiur this over the eggs, and serve. 

Eggs with Nut-brown Butter. 

{CEufs au beurre noisette.) 
Melt half an ounce of butter in a fireproof 
dish, break four to five eggs into it, place 



86 HOW TO COOK 

in a hot oven for about five minutes. Then 
pour over hall an ounce of butter cooked 
to a nut-brown colour with a dash of 
tarragon or chilli vinegar. Sprinkle with 
a few fried breadcrumbs and send to 
table. 

Egg Darioles. 

{Darioles d'CEufs.) 

Butter six to eight small dariole moulds, 
chop finely two small truffles, a slice of 
cooked ham, and a slice of cooked tongue. 
Mix these on a plate and besprinkle with it 
the inside of the moulds so as to com- 
pletely coat them. Break an egg into each 
and add the necessary seasoning of salt, 
pepper and Paprika ; on top of each egg 
put a very small piece of butter. Next 
place the moulds in a saute or braising 
pan half filled with boiling water ; cover 
the pan with its lid and poach in the oven 
for about six minutes, by which time the 
eggs should be set. Turn out the moulds 
on little rounds of toast ; dish up and 
pour over sufficient brown sauce, demi- 
glace, or Madere to well coat the egg shapes. 
Serve hot. 

Egg Timbales with Anchovies 
(Cold). 

(Timbales d'CEufs d VAnchois.) 
Mask the inside of six small timbale 
moulds with a thin coating of semi-liquid 
aspic jelly. Shell five hard-boiled eggs, and 
cut them into slices of even thickness. 
Mix about half an ounce of anchovy paste 
with a dessert-spoonful of Oxo, and a little 
aspic just enough to spread, then spread a 
little of this mixture on both sides of each of 
the slices of egg. Put a spray of chervil 



EGGS AND OMELETS 87 

in each timbale, upon this put a slice 
of egg, then a layer of aspic, next an 
anchovy fillet, and continue thus till the 
timbales are filled ; the last layer should 
be of aspic. Put the moulds on crushed ice 
to set. To serve, turn out the shapes 
and place neatly on to a cold dish. Gar- 
nish with little sprigs of endive or lettuce, 
and send to table. 

Savoury Eggs and Tomatoes. 

Peel and slice six small ripe tomatoes ; 
fry in a saute or stew-pan one minced 
shallot in one ounce of butter, and add the 
tomatoes. Season with pepper and salt 
and cook for twenty minutes, then strain. 
Reheat it, and when boiling stir in three 
beaten eggs, add also one ounce of shredded 
ham or tongue ; cook whilst stirring 
over the fire till the eggs begin to set. 
Then serve on a hot dish. 

Egg Rarebit. 

Shell four hard-boiled eggs and slice 
them lengthways. Range them in a but- 
tered gratin dish in layers with grated 
cheese and seasoning between the layers. 
Cover the top well with grated cheese, 
and place a few tiny bits of butter over the 
cheese. Brown in a hot oven and serve at 
once. 

Eggs en Cocottes. 

Butter six or eight fireproof china cases 
or cocotte cups, put a table-spoonful of 
cream in each, then break in carefully a 
new-laid egg. Season with salt and pepper, 
and a tiny pinch of Paprika or Krona 
pepper. Place the cups in a saute-pan 



88 HOW TO COOK 

containing a little water, cover with a 
buttered paper and cook the eggs in the 
oven till they are just set. Dish up and 
serve quickly. 

Steamed Eggs a la Bechamel. 

{(Eufs mollets a la Bechamel.) 

Boil six new-laid eggs in water for five 
minutes. Shell them and place them on 
croutons of fried bread ; pour some rich 
bechamel sauce (p. 129) over them. Dish 
up carefully and serve. 

Egg Ragout a la Fran9aise. 

Slices of hard-boiled eggs, with sliced 
truffles and morels or mushrooms, stewed 
in brown sauce flavoured with red wine. 

Eggs a la Madame. 

Take six to eight eggs, a little butter, 
one table-spoonful finely chopped parsley, 
six to eight dessert-spoonfuls of cream. 

Butter six to eight small fireproof pip- 
kin pans or ramakin cases, and sprinMe 
with chopped parsley. Break an egg care- 
fully into each, and add a dessert -spoonful 
of cream. Bake slowly till set. Send to 
table in the pans or cases, or turn them out 
and dish up. 

Eggs a la Boston. 

Take six eggs, one and a half ounces of 
butter, half a large onion, one teaspoon- 
ful of flour, one gill of milk or cream, two 
ounces chopped cooked ham, half a gill 
of Mad^re or other rich brown sauce. 

Peel and slice the onion and fry it in 



EGGS AND OMELETS 89 

an ounce of butter to a golden colour, 
sprinkle in the flour, and stir long enough 
to cook the flour. Moisten with the milk 
or cream, season with a pinch of salt and 
half a pinch each of pepper and nutmeg. 
Separate the yolks from the whites of eggs 
and put the yolks with the onion, etc., 
stir well and add one ounce of chopped 
ham. Beat the whites of eggs to a stiff 
froth and mix carefully with the above. 
Butter a round baking-tin or gratin-dish, 
dress the mixture neatly on it, sprinkle the 
top with chopped ham, bake in a hot oven 
for fifteen minutes ; when done, place it 
on a hot dish, and serve with Mad^re or 
other good brown sauce. 

Egg Jumbles. 

Break four fresh eggs into a basin and 
whisk them lightly, then add an ounce of 
finely chopped cooked ham or tongue and 
a good pinch of mixed savoury herbs, also 
a teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley ; 
then beat up the mixture and season with 
very Uttle salt and pepper. Have ready 
three or four slices of toasted bread, cut 
them to size and butter them. Melt three- 
quarters of an ounce of butter in a sauce- 
pan, put in the egg mixture and stir it 
over the fire till just setting ; then spread 
it on the prepared toast and serve hot. 

Egg Tartlets. 

{Tartlettes mix CEufs.) 
Line eight to ten tartlet moulds with 
trimmings of puff-paste. Prick the paste 
with a fork, fill with uncooked rice or 
dried peas, and bake in a moderate oven. 
Remove contents of tartlets and place 



go HOW TO COOK 

crusts on sieve to cool. Next poach as 
many eggs as there are tartlet crusts, trim 
each egg very neatly as near as possible 
to the shape of the tartlets. Have ready 
some HoUandaise sauce, into this incor- 
porate a table-spoonful of spinach puree, 
some finely chopped tarragon and chervil. 
Place each egg into a tartlet crust, and 
sauce over carefully with the above sauce. 
Reheat in a sharp oven just a few moments. 
Dish up quickly and serve hot. A tiny 
pinch of Paprika or Krona pepper seasoning 
put in the centre of the tartlets will im- 
prove the dish. 

Caviare Eggs (Cold). 

(OEufs au Caviar.) 
Cut three or four hard-boiled eggs into 
slices about a quarter of an inch thick. 
Remove the yolk and place each ring of 
white of egg on a round of buttered toast 
about the size of the egg. Fill the cavity 
with Russian, Hygienic or Astrachan 
caviare forced through a bag with a plain 
tube. Dish up, and garnish with sUces of 
lemon and parsley. 

Mayonnaise of Eggs. 

Boil five fresh eggs till hard, shell them 
and cut each in half lengthways ; remove 
the yolks and mix with a Uttle mayonnaise 
sauce ; season and refill the halves of 
eggs. Place them on a wire tray and coat 
them with mayonnaise sauce, previously 
mixed with a little Uquid aspic. When the 
eggs are well coated and set range them 
on a bed of seasoned salad (shredded 
lettuce or endive) on a dish. Decorate 
the top of each with tarragon leaves, thinly 



EGGS AND OMELETS 91 

cut strips of chilli or pimiento and gherkin, 
and serve. 

Eggs a la Russe (Cold). 

Shell four hard-boiled eggs, and cut 
each in half lengthways : remove the yolk 
carefully and cut off a small portion of the 
whites to make them stand. Fill the 
cavities of the whites of egg with sea- 
soned caviare (Hygienic or Astrachan) ; 
rub some of the yolks through a coarse 
sieve and cover the filled eggs with it. 
Place each on a slice of ripe tomato, pre- 
viously seasoned with salad oil, salt, pepper 
and vinegar. Dish up on a bed of small 
cress or other suitable green salad. 

Stuffed Eggs with Ham (Cold). 

{(Eufs fargis au Jambon.) 
Shell six hard-boiled eggs, cut them in 
halves crossways, and scoop out the yolks. 
Chop finely about four ounces of lean cooked 
ham and pound it with the egg yolks. 
Season this nicely with very little salt and 
a good pinch of Paprika pepper, also a 
grate of nutmeg. Incorporate about two 
table-spoonfuls of rich cream, and pass 
the whole through a fine sieve. Fill the 
hollow parts of the whites of eggs with 
this puree and place each, cut side down, 
on oval-shaped slices of ham or tongue 
which have been previously spread over 
with the ham puree. Next place each 
on a neatly-cut oval-shaped slice of toast, 
these must be a little larger than the eggs. 
Put the remainder of ham puree in a 
forcing bag and decorate the sides of the 
eggs with this, also with fancifully cut 
slices of gherkins and tomatoes peeled 



92 HOW TO COOK 

and cut into strips. Dish up neatly and 
surround the side of the dish with finely 
shredded seasoned salad. 

Stuffed Eggs a I'Aurore (Cold). 

Cut four hard-boiled eggs in halves 
crossways and remove the yolks carefully. 
Mix the latter with a teaspoonful of tarra- 
gon vinegar, a little mustard, a table- 
spoonful of fresh butter and a similar 
quantity of cream. When weU mixed and 
seasoned rub this through a fine sieve. 
Put the mixture into a forcing bag with a 
rose tube and fill with it the prepared 
halves and whites of eggs. Surmount each 
with a star-shaped slice of pimiento. Dish 
up and garnish the dish with seasoned 
salad, lettuce, endive, cress, etc. 

Eggs a la Rialto (Cold). 

Remove the shells from four hard-boiled 
eggs, halve them and remove the yolks ; 
put these in a mortar and pound with a 
quarter of a gill of picked shrimps, one 
teaspoonful of curry paste, and a table- 
spoonful of mayonnaise sauce. When quite 
fme rub the puree through a coarse sieve 
and make up into balls about the size of 
egg yolks. Cut some rings about half an 
inch high from the whites of eggs ; place 
these on a wire tray and put one of the 
prepared balls in the centre of each. 

Have ready a mayonnaise sauce (p. 128) 
mixed with a little aspic, coloured with 
tomato and flavoured with curry paste and 
mustard. Coat the egg shapes with this 
twice or three times, until they are com- 
pletely covered, and keep the tray on the 
ice till required. Dress them neatly on a 



EGGS AND OMELETS 93 

round dish on a bed of small cress (sea- 
soned), surrounded with very small let- 
luce hearts. Put a star-shaped slice ot 
pimiento on the centre of each egg shape, 
and serve. 

Chaud-froid of Eggs (Cold). 

{CEufs en Chaud-froid.) 
Take six or more new-laid eggs, one 
and a half gills bechamel sauce (p. 129), 
half a gill of tomato sauce (p. 130), one 
gill of aspic jelly (p. 131), quarter of an 
ounce of leaf gelatine, one large truffle, 
shces of cooked ox-tongue or ham, salad 
and dressing. 

Poach the eggs carefully in slightly 
salted water, containing a little lemon 
juice ; when set take up and trim and set 
them on a sieve to cool. Heat up the 
white sauce ; add to it the gelatine, pre- 
viously dissolved and strained. Season 
to taste and mix with a couple of table- 
spoonfuls of aspic. When nearly cold 
mask half the number of poached eggs. 
This must be done twice, allowing the first 
coating to set before the second one is 
added. Now heat up the tomato sauce, 
and mix in an eqtxal quantity of white 
sauce and some aspic jelly ; when nearly 
cold mask the remainder of eggs in the 
same manner. Cut out as many rounds 
of tongue or ham as there are eggs ; the 
slices should be as near as possible the size 
of the eggs. Place one egg on each sUce, 
mask them over with a thin coating of 
aspic ; decorate tastefully with fancifully 
cut slices of truffle. Dish up on a cold 
dish in the form of a border, fill the centre 
of the dish with a nicely prepared salad, 
and serve. 



94 HOW TO COOK 

Egg Sandwiches. 

Chop finely two hard-boiled eggs, pre- 
viously shelled ; mix with it half a tea- 
spoonful of mustard, half an ounce of 
fresh butter, and season to taste with salt 
and pepper. Have ready some thin slices 
of brown or white bread, thinly buttered, 
spread the mixture on the buttered side 
of half the slices. Scatter over some 
chopped watercress or small cress, and 
cover with the other slices or bread, and 
so sandwich them together. Press them 
lightly, trim oft the crusts and cut into 
desired shapes. Dish up, garnish with 
sprigs of fresh parsley or watercress, and 
serve. 

Egg Sandwiches (another way). 

Cut some thin slices of brown bread, 
and butter them lightly ; cover half with 
thinly cut slices of hard-boiled egg ; sea- 
son with salt and pepper and lay over a 
Uttle mustard and cress, shredded lettuce, 
or slices of cucumber. Make up into sand- 
wiches, trim them and cut them to the 
required size. Dish up and garnish with 
parsley or watercress. 

Egg Salad. 

{Salade aux CEufs.) 
Shell four or five hard-boiled eggs and 
cut them into slices. Range them in 
layers in a salad bowl or glass dish, sea- 
son each layer with salad dressing or 
mayonnaise (p. 128) and chopped parsley. 
Cover with a thin layer of mayonnaise, 
and garnish with stoned olives, anchovy 
fillets, tiny bunches of watercress or let- 
tuce hearts, and serve. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 95 

Hot Egg Salad. 

Melt an ounce of butter in an omelet-pan, 
when hot drop in six fresh eggs, each being 
first broken into a saucer to ascertain its 
freshness. Season with salt and pepper. 
Beat up the eggs with a fork, and stir 
over the fire until they are set. Put the 
eggs thus cooked in a hot shallow salad dish, 
pour over a little nut-brown butter flavoured 
with vinegar or lemon juice, and sprinkle 
over with some finely chopped chives, 
garnish with seasoned lettuce leaves, then 
serve. 



OMELETS. ^ 

To be able to make an omelet to per- 
fection is said to be an art, and which 
many admit is better mastered on the Con- 
tinent than in England. Considering that 
omelets are classed as highly nourishing, 
appetising, and quickly made dishes, few 
things should appeal more strongly to the 
cook and housewife to master thoroughly 
than omelets. That essential care and 
delicacy of manipulation so important to 
produce a perfect omelet can be mastered 
by any one, if he or she wiU take sufficient 
pains to read up carefully the directions 
given and then set to work and practise 
the art of omelet making until the desired 
success is attained. " Practice makes the 
master " can be very forcibly applied here. 

After two or three trials any one should 
be able to produce an excellent omelet. 
There are, of course, many kinds and 
varieties of omelets — the plain, souffle, 
stuffed or fouree, savoury vegetable, and 
the sweet omelets ; but any omelet should 
as soon as it is cooked be immediately 
served, for if allowed to stand about before 
serving, it will inevitably eat tough, in- 
stead of crisp and yet moist. 

The addition of a very smaU quantity of 
milk or cream, that is, about a table-spoon- 
ful of either to four or five eggs, will 
ensure the omelet keeping moist longer 
than is the case when neither is added. 
The added cream certainly increases the 
96 



EGGS AND OMELETS 97 

richness of an omelet. Some connoisseurs, 
however, claim that this addition rather 
destroys the character of a true French 
omelet ; this had therefore better be left 
an open or disputed question. 

The actual process of making a French 
omelet, plain, savoury or sweet, as one 
reads the directions seems difficult to 
lome, but it is infinitely easier than it 
reads, and if one knows how to make one 
" omelette," it is an easy matter to intro- 
duce varieties ad infinitum, because by the 
addition of certain suitable materials stirred 
in with the egg mixture before frying, or 
filling them with either savoury or sweet 
mixtures, purees, ragoiits, salpicons, etc., 
the name and character of an omelet is 
at once altered, whereby a great many 
varieties can be introduced. 

The actual cooking of an omelet has, 
as the following rules will show, a great 
deal, if not all, to do with its success. The 
pan used and the fire required are likewise 
important factors. 

Rules for Omelet Making. 

There are five rules which must be 
strictly observed in order to produce a 
successful omelet. 

1st. — Eggs and Butter. 
The eggs and butter, being the chief 
ingredients for an omelet, must be as fresh 
as possible. 

2nd. — The Omelet Pan. 

The omelet pan must be kept clean 

and not used for any other purpose. It 

must never be washed, but is best cleaned 

by heating it and rubbing it with paper 



98 HOW TO COOK 

or a coarse towel and salt, and then wiping 
it with a clean cloth. 

3rd. — Mixing and Seasoning. 

Beat up the eggs thoroughly with a 
fork, not a whisk. The eggs need not 
be frothy, but mixed so as to amalgamate 
the yolks with the whites. It is well to 
add a little milk or cream at the time of 
beating up the eggs ; this makes the ome- 
let moister and lighter. Season moder- 
ately. Do not use pungent spices. 

ith. — Heating the Butter. 

See that the butter used is hot but not 
oily before the egg mixture is poured into 
the omelet pan. One ounce of butter is 
usually ample to make an omelet of six 

eggs. 

5th. — Cooking the Omelet. 
An omelet must be cooked over a bright, 
brisk fire because it needs to be made 
quickly ; the process of stirring and shak- 
ing the pan whilst the omelet is made 
must also be quickly performed. Use a 
spoon in preference to a fork for stirring. 

How to Shape an Omelet. 

Once the egg mixture begins to set, 
that is when the eggs appear sufficiently 
cooked, which means light and yet moist 
or soft, shape it by folding in the ends, so 
as to give it the form of an oval cushion. 
This must be done at the side opposite 
the handle, for which purpose the pan 
should be tilted. Shake or Imock the pan 
gently, so as to loosen the omelet. Let 
it take colour, viz. : a golden brown. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 99 

How to Turn Out an Omelet. 

To do this correctly and successfully, 
hold the pan by its handle with the right 
hand, the palm of the hand being under- 
neath the handle. Hold an oblong warm 
dish in the left hand, bring the outer edge 
of the pan close to the centre of the dish, 
turn out the omelet by turning the pan 
upside down, and then quickly remove the 
pan. The process of making a plain omelet 
should not take more than five minutes. 

Plain Omelet. 

{Omelette Naturelle.) 
Take four or five eggs, one ounce of but- 
ter, one table-spoonful of milk or cream, 
pepper and salt. Break the eggs into a 
basin, beat them well with a fork, add 
if liked a table-spoonful of milk, or cream, 
and season with salt and a tiny pinch of 
pepper. Dissolve the butter in an omelet 
pan ; when quite hot pour in the mix- 
ture, stir slowly with a fork over a quick 
fire, shake the pan, when set, shape the 
omelet on one side of the pan, allow it 
to take colour, then turn quickly on a 
hot dish, and serve. 

Omelet with Shallot Flavour. 

{Omelette a I'Echalote.) 
Fry two or three finely chopped shallots 
in a little butter, when of a pale brown 
colour {not dark) pour in the beaten and 
seasoned eggs and proceed the same as for 
plain omelet. 

English Omelet. 

{Omelette d VAnglaise.) 
Prepare an omelet as above, adding two 



100 HOW TO COOK 

thin slices of streaky bacon cut in strips 
and fried in butter to the egg mixture, or 
else garnishing the omelet when made with 
thin slices of fried or grilled bacon. 

Savoury Omelet. 

(Omelette aux fines herhes.) 
Take four or five eggs, one table-spoon- 
ful cream, two dessert-spoonfuls chopped 
parsley, including a leaf or two of green 
tarragon, and a sprig of chervil, a pinch of 
sweet herbs, one ounce of butter, a small 
clove of garlic, pepper and salt. 

Break the eggs into a basin, add the 
cream, and beat up well ; add the chopped 
herbs and seasoning. Cut the clove of 
garlic and wipe the inside of the omelet pan 
with the cut side. Melt the butter in this 
pan, and when hot pour in the egg mixture. 
Stir over a brisk fire with a fork until the 
eggs begin to set, then roll towards the 
side of the pan opposite the handle, and 
give it the shape of an oval cushion. Allow 
it to take colour (a golden brown). Turn 
out on an oval dish (hot), and serve. 
Tarragon and sweet herbs, or the flavour 
of garlic, may be omitted. A small chopped 
shallot may be added to the butter and 
fried a little, if liked. 

Omelette a la Bomie Femme. 

Take six eggs, one ounce bacon, a boiled 
potato, a breakfast roll, one teaspoonful 
chopped parsley, half teaspoonful chopped 
chives, salt and pepper. 

Break the eggs into a basin, beat up for 
five minutes ; add the parsley and chives, 
also a pinch of salt and pepper to taste. 
Cut the bacon into small squares, likewise 



EGGS AND OMELETS loi 

the thin crust of the roll ; melt the butter 
in a frying or omelet pan, fry the bacon 
slightljf brown, then add the bread-crust 
and the potato cut into dice, toss over 
the fire for a few minutes, pour in the egg 
mixture, stir with a fork gently over a 
bright fire for two minutes. Then fold up 
in the shape of a cushion, towards the side 
opposite to the handle of the pan, hold it 
in a slanting position for a minute also over 
the fire to colour it lightly ; take a hot dish 
in your left hand, holding up the pan with 
your right, bring the centre of the dish 
towards the edge of the pan with the 
omelet, and then turn the pan over quickly 
so that the omelet will come right in the 
centre of the dish. Serve hot with two 
or three table-spoonfuls of tomato sauce 
poured round the base of the dish and serve. 

Omelette a la Bemoise. 

Proceed as in the preceding recipe, omit- 
ting the bacon and adding about two 
ounces of Gruy^re cheese, cut into small 
dice. Fry the shallots in an ounce and a 
half of butter, pour in the mixture with the 
cheese, and finish cooking in the usual 
manner. 



Omelette a la Charentiere. 

Beat up six eggs in a basin, add the 
necessary seasoning (pepper, salt and nut- 
meg), a table-spoonful of milk or cream, 
and a heaped-up teaspoonful of French 
mustard. 

Cut two or three ounces of lean bacon 
into small dice, and fry in an omelet pan 
with an ounce of butter for a few minutes. 
Add two finely minced shallots and fry 



102 HOW TO COOK 

like'wise, but do not allow them to get 
quite brown. Pour in the egg mixture, 
and stir over a brisk fire till it commences 
to set, then shape quickly into the form 
of an oval cushion, allow it to take colour, 
and turn out quickly on to a hot dish and 
serve. 



Omelette a la Clamart. 

Prepare a plain or savoury omelet. 
When about to shape it, fill the centre of 
the omelet with a nicely seasoned green pea 
puree, fold in the ends, and dish up. Pour 
a little white sauce flavoured with lobster 
or crayfish butter round the base of the 
omelet, and serve hot. 



Omelette a la Chasseur. 

Prepare an omelet as before directed, 
but in place of green peas fill the centre 
with a delicately prepared ragout of game, 
cut up small, and freed from skin and gris- 
tle, mixed with chopped or sliced mush- 
rooms and truffles, and moistened with a 
little well-seasoned brown sauce. Pour a 
little demi-glace sauce or gravy round the 
base of the omelet, and serve hot. 

Omelette a la Raphael. 

Make a savoury omelet with six eggs, 
and place in the centre a fine stew of fillet 
of beef (goulash de bceuf) and truffles ; then 
fold the omelet. When browned slightly, 
turn on to a hot dish, and pour some demi- 
glace sauce round the base of the dish. 
Serve quickly. 



EGGC AND OMELETS 103 

Leek Omelet. 

{Omelette aux Poireaux.) 
Take six eggs, one and a half ounces of 
butter, one table-spoonful grated cheese, 
salt and cayenne, one table-spoonful of 
milk or cream, two leeks, well washed, 
trimmed, and stewed in brown sauce. 

Break the eggs into a basin, add the 
cheese, sufficient salt and cayenne to taste, 
and the milk or cream ; beat well to amal- 
gamate the yolks and whites of eggs and 
other ingredients. Cut the cooked leeks 
into slices, and keep hot in a small stew-pan 
with just enough sauce to moisten. Melt 
the butter in an omelet pan ; when thor- 
oughly warm (not too hot) pour in the 
egg mixture, and stir over a bright fire 
until the eggs begin to set. Shape quickly 
into the form of a cushion, place the stewed 
leeks in the centre, and fold in the ends. 
Allow the omelet to take colour, then turn 
out on a hot dish, pour a little brown 
sauce round the base of the dish, and serve 
quickly. 

Omelettes a la Marechale. 

Take eight eggs, eight slices of cooked 
smoked ox-tongue, a dessert-spoonful of 
chopped parsley, quarter gill of cream, one 
and a half ounces of butter, salt, pepper, 
Colbert sauce. 

Break the eggs into a basin, add parsley, 
pepper, salt, and beat up well, add the 
cream and mix thoroughly. Divide into 
eight equal portions ; melt a little of the 
butter, and prepare a very small omelet 
with each portion of the mixture ; place 
it on the slice of tongue, trimmed to re- 
quired size, and proceed thus until the 



104 HOW TO COOK 

eight omelets are made. Dish up on a hot 
dish in the shape of a border {en couronne), 
pour Colbert sauce round the dish, and 
serve. 

Parmesan Omelets. 

{Omelettes gratinees au Parmesan.) 
Take six eggs, one large table-spoonful 
cream, two table-spoonfuls grated Par- 
mesan, one and a half ounces of butter, 
white pepper, a few brown crumbs, tomato 
sauce. 

Break the eggs into a basin, add rather 
more than half of the grated cheese and a 
pinch of pepper (no salt), mix well with a 
fork, add the cream, and beat well. Melt 
half the butter in an omelet pan, pour in 
half the egg mixture. Stir over a brisk 
fire until the eggs begin to set (it requires 
generally three minutes to stir), then fold 
into a cushion shape, let it cook for one 
minute to take colour ; turn on to a hot 
dish. With the other half of the mixture 
and butter prepare a second omelet, and 
put it along with the first. Trim the 
omelets neatly, sprinkle over with a few 
breadcrumbs and grated Parmesan, also a 
few drops of oiled butter, put the dish in a 
sharp oven or under a hot salamander for 
a few minutes, and serve with nicely- 
seasoned hot tomato sauce poured round 
the omelets. 

Lentil Omelet. 

{Omelette aux Lentilles.) 
Cook half a gill of lentils in stock or 
salted water till tender and drain them. 
Melt an ounce of butter in a stew-pan, fry 
in it a peeled, minced shallot, put in the 
lentils, and fry for a few minutes. Moisten 



EGGS AND OMELETS 105 

with two or three table-spoonfuls of brown 
sauce, season with pepper and salt, and 
keep hot. 

Break six eggs into a basin, beat up well 
with two table-spoonfuls of milk or cream, 
season with salt and pepper, and pour into 
an omelet pan containing about an ounce 
of butter (hot). Stir over the fire with a 
fork till the mixture begins to set. Spread 
the cooked lentils over the omelet and fold 
in the sides. Let it take colour, a nice 
golden brown, and turn out carefully into 
a hot dish. A little tomato sauce may be 
poured round the base of the dish if liked. 

Kidney Omelet. 

(Omelette aux Rognons.) 
Skin two sheep's or half a small veal 
kidney, cut it into thin slices, season, and 
fry with one ounce of butter blended with a 
very small chopped shallot ; add a little 
brown sauce, and keep hot. Beat five eggs 
together with two table-spoonfuls of milk ; 
season with salt and pepper. Melt one 
ounce of butter in an omelet pan, pour in 
the omelet mixture, and stir it over the fire 
until it begins to set ; then put in the 
stewed kidneys and fold in the ends of the 
omelet over. When nicely browned, slip 
the omelet on to a hot dish, pour a little 
hot tomato or brown sauce round the base 
of the dish, and serve at once. 

Mushroom Omelet. 

(Omelette ancc Champignons.) 

Wash and peel three or four fresh cup 

mushrooms, chop them and fry in half an 

ounce of butter, blended with a small 

chopped shallot. Season with salt and 



io6 HOW TO COOK 

pepper to taste, and keep hot. Prepare a 
plain omelet, when ready to fold put the 
mushroom puree in the centre, then fold 
in the ends and allow the omelet to take 
colour. Turn it out on to a hot dish and 
serve. 

Asparagus Omelet. 

{Omelette aux Asperges.) 
Cut into inch or half-inch lengths the 
soft portion of twenty-five to thirty heads 
of cleaned asparagus ; blanch them and 
cook in salted water tiH tender. When 
done, drain them on a sieve, then toss thera 
in a little butter, add a little stock or white 
sauce, season with pepper and keep hot. 

Beat up five or six eggs, add a table- 
spoonful of mUk or cream, salt and pepper 
to taste, and pour into an omelet pan con- 
taining about an ounce of butter (melted). 
Stir over the fire till the eggs begin to set ; 
shape to an oval cushion, placing the pre- 
pared asparagus in the centre, fold n the 
ends of the omelet, let it take colour, and 
turn out carefully on to a hot dish. 

Cheese Omelet. 

{Omelette au Fromage.) 
Beat up six eggs, with one ounce of grated 
Gruy^re cheese and two table-spoonfuls of 
milk. Melt one ounce of butter in an ome- 
let pan and cook the omelet as directed for 
plain omelet. Sprinkle over the surface of 
the omelet with a little grated cheese. 

Tomato Omelet. 

{Omelette aux Tomxites.) 
Steep two or three small ripe tomatoes 
in hot water and skin them, cut them into 



EGGS AND OMELETS 107 

slices and toss them in a little butter over 
a quick fire, season well and fill with it a 
plain or savoury omelet. Pour a little 
tomato sauce round the base of the dish. 



Truffle Omelet. 

{Omelette aux Truffes.) 
Proceed the same as for mushroom 
omelet, using six truffles in place of the 
mushrooms. 

Omelets a la Maintenon. 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Six eggs, three table-spoonfuls grated Par- 
mesan cheese, toasted bread, one table- 
spoonful of cream, pepper, one and a half 
ounces of butter, about half a gill of tomato 
sauce. 

Break the eggs into a basin, beat up 
well with a table-spoonful of grated Par- 
mesan cheese, and the cream, add a pinch 
of pepper ; divide this into four equal 
parts ; melt a little butter in an omelet 
pan ; pour in one part and make into a 
small omelet, taking care that the omelet 
is of a nice cushion shape. Proceed thus 
until four omelets are made ; roll each 
in Parmesan cheese, put them on an oval 
shape of buttered toast. Sprinkle the sur- 
face with more Parmesan, put them on a 
baking sheet and place in a hot oven for 
five minutes. Dish up on a hot dish, pour 
over the hot tomato sauce, and serve. 

Omelette a la Beamaise. 

Prepare a plain omelet, fill it before fold- 
ing in the sides with a mixture of artichoke 
bottoms and mushrooms, cut into dice and 



io8 HOW TO COOK 

heated up in tomato and Beamaise sauce. 
Pour a little sauce round the base of the 
dish. 

Omelette a la Bayonne. 

Prepare a plain omelet, fill it before fold- 
ing in the sides with cooked ham and Span- 
ish pimientos cut in strips and heated up in 
tomato sauce. Pour a little of the latter 
round the omelet. 

Omelettes a la Milanaise. 

Take six eggs, three table-spoonfuls grated 
Parmesan cheese, one table-spoonful cream, 
toasted bread, about half a gill tomato 
sauce, and one and a half ounces of butter. 

Break the eggs into a basin, beat well 
with a table-spoonful of grated Parmesan 
cheese and the cream, add a httle salt to 
taste and a pinch of pepper. Divide this 
into four equal parts. Melt a httle butter 
in an omelet pan, pour in one part and 
make into a small omelet, taking care that 
the omelet is of a nice cushion shape. Pro- 
ceed thus until four omelets are made, roll 
each in grated Parmesan cheese, and put 
them on an oval-shaped piece of buttered 
toast. Next sprinkle over the surface a 
little more cheese, put them on a baking 
sheet, and place in a hot oven for about 
two minutes. Dish up on a hot dish, pour 
some hot tomato sauce round the base of 
the dish, and serve. 

Brain Omelet. 

(Omelette d la Cervelle.) 
Prepare and cook a plain omelet filled 
with cooked calf's brains, cut in small pieces 



EGGS AND OMELETS 1O9 

and previously stewed in seasoned white 
sauce. 

Cucumber Omelet. 

(Omelette aua; Concombres.) 
Peel half a cucumber, cut it in halves 
lengthways, scoop out the seedy part, cut 
up into slices, stew in cream sauce. Fill 
with it a plain omelet. 

Spinach Omelet. 

{Omelette aux Epinards.) 
Rub half a pound of cooked spinach 
through a fine sieve, heat it up with a little 
bechamel or brown sauce, season to taste, 
and fill into the centre of a plain omelet. 
Pour a little gravy or thin brown sauce 
round the omelet. 

Anchovy Omelet. 

(Omelette aux Anchois.) 
Prepare a plain omelet by adding one 
teaspoonful of anchovy essence and three 
filleted Gorgona anchovies, cut into small 
strips or dice, to the egg mixture and cook 
as directed. 

Sardine Omelet. 

(Omelette aux Sardines.) 
Procefed the same as for anchovy omelet, 
using four boned and skinned sardines in 
place of the anchovies, but allowing the 
anchovy essence to be incorporated. 

Curry Omelet. 

(Omelette d Vlndienne.) 
Peel and mince finely half a small Span- 
ish onion, fry it a light brown colour in one 



no HOW TO COOK 

ounce of butter, add a dessert-spoonful of 
curry powder and one table-spoonful of 
bechamel sauce. Cook for ten minutes, 
remove the fat, if any, fill this into a 
plain omelet. Turn the omelet on a bed 
of boiled rice dressed on a hot dish and 
surround with curry sauce. 

Lobster Omelet. 

(Omelette de Homard.) 
Prepare a plain omelet, fill it, before fold- 
ing in the sides, with creamed lobster, or 
with minced lobster warmed up in bechamel 
sauce. 

Onion Omelet. 

{Omelette aux Oignons.) 
Proceed the same as for curry omelet, 
omitting the curry and rice ; the onion can 
be cooked in white or brown sauce. 

Oyster Omelet. 

(Omelette aux HuUres.) 
Blanch one dozen oysters in their own 
liquor, drain them and remove the beards 
(preserve the liquor), and cut into small 
dice, beat up six eggs with one table-spoon- 
ful of milk and a table-spoonful of oyster 
liquor, season to taste with salt and pepper ; 
add the oysters. 

Melt an ounce of butter in a chafing dish, 
pour in the egg mixture and stir over a 
quick fire till the eggs begin to set. Fold 
over and shape neatly (oval cushion shape), 
allow the omelet to take colour and serve. 

Salmon Omelet. 

{Omelette de Saumon.) 
Free four ounces of cooked salmon from 
skin and bones and flake it finely, heat it 



EGGS AND OMELETS iii 

up in a little butter and white sauce, just 
enough to moisten. Season with salt and 
pepper and keep hot. Make an omelet as 
above directed, omitting the oysters and 
the oyster liquor. When ready to fold, 
put in the hot salmon mixture, fold in the 
ends and shape neatly. Turn out on a hot 
dish and serve. 



Ham Omelet. 

{Omelette au Jambon.) 
Beat up four fresh eggs and season to 
taste with pepper and Paprika or Krona 
seasoning, but no salt. Chop or cut into 
small dice two ounces of cooked ham and 
fry a little in an ounce of butter in an 
omelet pan, then pour in the eggs and finish 
cooking as before directed for a plain or 
savoury omelet. 

Viemia Tomato Omelet. 

{Omelette a la Viennoise.) 
Whisk up four to six fresh eggs in a basin, 
season with salt and pepper, and pour the 
eggs into a well-buttered fireproof souffle 
dish. Bake in a fairly hot oven till the 
omelet is set and of a nice golden brown. 
Make an incision in the centre of the ome- 
let and fill the cavity with a tomato stew 
which is made as follows : — 

Peel three or four small ripe tomatoes, 
this is best done by dipping each into hot 
water for a few seconds, then cut them into 
quarters and toss in a Uttle butter over a 
quick fire. Season with salt and pepper 
and use as directed. This omelet should 
be served in the dish or pan in which it is 
baked. 



112 HOW TO COOK 

>s American Omelet. 

(Omelette d V Americaine.) 

Beat up five eggs, add a table-spoonful 
of cream, half a teaeupful of grated bread- 
crumbs, a few drops of onion juice, a tea- 
spoonful of chopped parsley, and season 
with salt and pepper. Stir this over the 
fire, in an omelet pan containing an ounce 
of heated butter. When sufficiently cooked 
shape it, allow it to set, and colour, then 
turn out on a hot dish and serve. 

Omelette aux Armourettes. 

Prepare a plain or savoury omelet, and 
fill the centre. When it is shaped with 
previously poached slices of beef marrow, 
serve with a little demi-glace sauce poured 
round the base of the dish. 

Omelette Bruxelloise. 

This is a plain omelette filled with braised 
Belgian endive, cut into small pieces, with 
a little cream sauce poured round the base 
hot. 

Omelette Chatelaine. 

Mix some chestnut puree with a little 
soubise (onion) sauce. To this add finely 
sliced artichoke bottom. Beat it up and 
use as filling for a plain omelet. 

Omelette a I'ltaliemie. 

This is a plain omelet, stuffed with a 
salpicon of chicken liver, ham, and mush- 
rooms previously tossed in butter ; serve 
with tomato sauce. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 113 

Omelette a la Jardiniere. 

Prepare a plain or savoury omelet, fill 
it with mixed cooked vegetables (mace- 
doine or jardiniere), previously heated up in 
a little white sauce or butter, and seasoned. 
Turn out and serve hot. 

Omelette a la Madras. 

Prepare a plain omelet, flavoured with 
chutney or curry ; when ready for folding 
fill with cooked rice, seasoned with a little 
finely chopped mint and chives. Pour a 
little curry sauce round the omelet and 
serve hot. 

Omelette a la Parisiemie. 

Plain souffle omelet, filled with hot duxelle 
puree (chopped mushrooms, shallots, parsley, 
etc.), and folded. 

Omelette a la Parmentier. 

This is a plain or savoury omelet, 
stuffed with dice-shaped potatoes previously 
blanched, and fried in butter. 

Omelette a la Paysanne. 

This is a savoury omelet, containing 
chopped and blanched sorrel ; before fold- 
ing it is stuffed with braised lettuce and is 
served with demi-glace sauce. 

Omelette a la Perigord. 

This is a plain omelet, mixed with chopped 
truffles and served with truffle or Perigueux 
sauce. 



114 HOW TO COOK 

Omelette a la Portugaise. 

This is a savoury omelet, mixed with 
chopped anchovy fillets. Serve with tomato 
sauce poured round the base of the dish. 

Omelette Robert. 

Fry some slices of streaky bacon, cut up 
small and sliced onion till brown. Then 
add beaten eggs and make into an omelet 
in the usual way. Dish up and serve 
with Sauce Robert. 

Omelette a la Princesse. 

This is a plain omelet mixed with cooked 
asparagus points, or filled with asparagus 
puree just before folding the omelet. 

Omelette a la Reine. 

This is a savoury souffle omelet, filled 
with chicken puree or salpicon of chicken. 
Allemande or supreme sauce is poured 
round the omelet. 

Omelette a la Reforme. 

This is a plain omelet filled with shredded 
truffle, hard-boiled white of egg, gherkins 
and mushrooms ; heated in rich brown 
sauce. 

Savoury Puff Omelet. 

{Omelette Soufflee mix fines Herbes.) 
Beat very lightly the yolks of six eggs 
and the whites of three ; stir into this one 
table-spoonful of Brown and Poison's corn- 
flour, mixed with half a gill of cream or 
milk, season with salt and pepper, and stir 
in one teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 115 

Melt half an ounce of butter in a small 
soufflee or omelet pan, pour in the mixture, 
and set the pan into a hot oven. When 
it thickens pour over the remaining whites 
of eggs, weU beaten, with a pinch of salt, 
and return to oven until a delicate brown. 
Turn it out on to a hot dish, and serve at 
once. 

Fish Puif Omelet. 

(Omelette Soufflie au Poisson.) 
Shred finely one small cooked whiting 
or a slice of cooked cod, heat it up in a 
little butter and season to taste. Stir this 
into a mixture made as directed in the 
preceding recipe, and bake in a well-but- 
tered pan in a fairly hot oven for about 
twenty minutes, and turn out on to a hot 
dish and serve with tomato sauce. 



SWEET OMELETS AND 
OTHER SWEET EGG DISHES 

Of these there are several kinds, the 
plain, sucr6e, those fiUed with a fruit com- 
pote or puree, preserved, or conserve fruit, 
and the puff or soufflee omelettes. 

It is usual to call these omelets accord- 
ing to the kind of garniture used in their 
preparation. 

Rum Omelet. 

{Omelette au Bhum.) 

Beat up four eggs with a table-spoonful 
of cream, a tiny pinch of salt and a tea- 
spoonful of castor sugar. Melt about three- 
quarters of an ounce of butter in an omelet 
pan, when hot pour in the mixture and 
cook whilst stirring, until it will not run in 
the pan or tUl it begins to set, then roU 
carefully and turn out on a hot dish, sprin- 
kle freely with powdered sugar, pour round 
the sides half a glass of rum, set it on fire 
and with a spoon pour the burning liquid 
over the omelet as long as it will blaze, 
then serve. 

Kirsch Omelet. 

{Omelette au Kirsch.) 

Proceed the same as for rum omelet, but 
use Kirschwasser in place of the rum. 
116 



EGGS AND OMELETS 117 

Ginger Omelet. 

{Omelette au Gingembre.) 
Beat up four eggs, add half ounce of 
castor sugar, the grated rind of half a lemon, 
and a grating of nutmeg. Turn into an 
omelet pan, containing three-quarters of an 
ounce of butter. Stir over a quick fire till 
it sets, then shape and let the omelet take 
colour. Have ready a table-spoonful of 
chopped preserved ginger mixed with two 
table-spoonfuls of syrup and a table-spoon- 
ful of cream ; put in the centre of the 
omelet, roll, turn out on a heated dish, 
then pour a little ginger syrup round the 
base of the omelet, and serve hot. 

Sweet Omelet. 

{Omelette Sucrie.) 
Beat up five fresh eggs, add a tiny pinch 
of salt and a table-spoonful of castor sugar. 
Melt in an omelet pan three-quarters of 
an ounce of fresh butter, when hot pour 
in the beaten eggs and stir over a quick 
fire till they commence to thicken and set ; 
then shape quickly into an oval cushion- 
like form by folding in the ends. Allow 
the omelet to acquire a golden brown 
colour, turn out on to a hot dish, dredge 
over with castor or icing sugar and brown 
under a salamander or mark with a red- 
hot skewer. 

Jam Omelet. 

{Omelette au Confiture.) 
Proceed the same as for sweet omelet as 
directed in the foregoing recipe ; just before 
folding in the sides of the omelet, put in 
two table-spoonfuls of fruit jam, previously 
heated ; then roll it into shape and turn 



ii8 HOW TO COOK 

out on a hot dish. Dredge with sugar and 
brown under a salamander. 



Omelet with Jelly. 

{Omelette d la Gelie.) 
Prepare a sweet omelet and have ready 
some red currant jeUy just heated up. 
Before beginning to roll the omelet into 
shape, spread it with the jelly, then shape 
as directed. Dish up, sprinkle over with 
castor sugar, and mark the top with a red- 
hot skewer like lattice work. Pour a little 
jelly at the base of the omelet and serve. 

Marmalade Omelet. 

Proceed the same as directed in the 
preceding recipe, using apricot or orange 
marmalade in place of red currant jelly. 

Omelette Robespierre. 

Prepare a plain sweet omelet in the 
usual way, using six to eight eggs, adding 
pinch of salt, a tablespoonful of castor 
sugar, a tablespoonful of cream, and 1^ 
ozs. of butter. When made, fill the centre 
with a salpicon composed of fresh or pre- 
served fruit, preferably the former, such 
as ripe cherries (stoned and halved), apri- 
cots (stoned and cut up small), and straw- 
berries cut in quarters or slices. Mix 
with a very smaU quantity of syrup of 
maraschino to flavour. Turn out the ome- 
let on to an oblong dish, sprinkle over the 
top with castor or icing sugar, then with a 
red hot iron mark the surface into lattice- 
work or other fancy design. Pour a little 
liqueur-flavoured fruit syrup round the 
base of the dish, and serve quickly. 



EGGS AND OMELETS 119 

Peach Omelet. 

(Omelette aux Peches.) 
Cut six preserved peaches into quarters 
or dice shape, and heat up in a little s)rrup, 
flavoured with a dessert-spoonful of mara- 
schino or Kirsch. Meanwhile make a sweet 
omelet, as directed on p. 117, adding a table- 
spoonful of cream before beating the eggs. 
Prioi" to folding or rolling the omelet, put 
in the prepared peaches, then shape and 
turn on to a hot dish. Dredge with sugar, 
glaze, and serve. 

Omelette Mousseline. 

Separate the yolks from four fresh eggs, 
stir them in a basin, adding a good pinch of 
salt, and incorporate by degrees half a gill 
of rich cream. Season with white pepper 
and a grate of nutmeg. Whisk the whites 
of three eggs to a stiff froth and add this 
carefully with the above. 

Melt an ounce of fresh butter in an 
omelet pan, when hot pour in the egg mix- 
ture and stir with a small whisk over a 
bright fire till the butter is absorbed and 
the eggs begin to set. Shape it nicely by 
folding in the ends, and let the omelet 
acquire a golden colour. Turn it out on 
a hot dish, and send to table. 

Puffed or Souffle Omelet. 

{Omelette Souffiie.) 
Separate the yolks from six eggs and 
cream them with three ounces of castor 
sugar ; then add a dessert-spoonful of 
Brown and Poison's cornflour, half a tea- 
spoonful of vanilla essence. Whisk till 
quite firm the whites of four eggs, adding 



120 HOW TO COOK 

a pinch of salt before beginning to whisk, 
and incorporate the froth to the above 
mixture. The object of whisking the 
whites, as well as the creaming of the yolks 
of eggs, is of vital importance, for when 
properly done the mixture wiU rise to 
perfection whilst it is cooked. 

Have ready a buttered gratin or souffle 
dish, either in fireproof china or silver- 
plated. Pour in half the mixture and 
spread a little strawberry, apricot or rasp- 
berry jam in the centre. Spread the re- 
mainder of the mixture on top, smooth 
over with the blade of a knife, dredge with 
castor or icing sugar and make a few in- 
cisions with the point of a knife, so as to 
form a pretty design. Bake in a fairly 
hot oven from twenty to twenty-five min- 
utes. Place the dish on a folded napkin 
or lace paper, and send to table immediately. 

Omelette en Surprise. 

Prepare a pint of rich vanilla cream ice, 
and get ready an omelet souffle mixture as 
directed in the preceding recipe. Cut out 
a border shape of Genoese pastry, besprinkle 
it with a little fruit syrup, and place it 
on a round or oval dish (fixed with white 
of egg or batter). Put the ice in the cen- 
tre of the dish and spread over the omelet 
mixture as quickly as possible so as to 
cover the ice completely, shape neatly with 
the blade of a pallet knife, dredge with 
castor sugar and bake in a quick oven just 
long enough to brown the top, then send 
to table quickly. 

The success of this omelet depends on 
the speed of manipulation, baking and 
serving. If liked, a Httle brandy, rum or 
Kirsch may be poured round the base of 



EGGS AND OMELETS 121 

the dish, which must be lighted just before 
serving, the effect, if properly carried out, 
is quite a surprise. 

Frosted Omelet. 

{Omelette Meringuie.) 
Whisk the white of an egg to a stiff 
froth and sweeten with half an ounce of 
vanilla sugar. Prepare a jam omelet as 
directed on p. 117. As soon as it is dished 
up, cover the top with the whisked whites 
of egg, spread it over smoothly and dredge 
with sugar, then bake in a quick oven or 
brown under a salamander, and serve. 

Friar's Omelet. 

Peel, core and slice four sour cooking 
apples, cook them with a little sugar to a 
pulp, flavour with half a teaspoonful of 
ground cinnamon, and stir in half an ounce 
of fresh butter. Beat up five fresh eggs, 
whisk the whites, add to it respectively the 
apple puree and two table-spoonfuls of 
brown breadcrumbs. Butter a fireproof 
baking or souffle dish, pour in the mixture. 
Dredge the top with castor sugar and bake 
in moderately heated oven from twenty to 
twenty-five minutes. Serve in the dish 
in which the omelet is cooked. 

Orange Puff Omelet. 

{Omelette Soufflee d I'Orange.) 
Separate the yolks from three eggs and 
cream them with an ounce of castor sugar, 
add the juice of an orange and the stiffly- 
whisked whites of three eggs, to which a 
pinch of salt should be added. Melt three- 
quarters of an ounce of butter in an ome- 



122 

let pan, when hot pour in the egg mixture, 
and allow to cook whilst stirring for two or 
three minutes, then let it take colour and 
by means of a pallet knife carefully turn 
it over so as to brown the other side. SUt 
the omelet in the centre and insert two 
table-spoonfuls of orange compote, that is 
sUces of orange stewed in syrup, or failing 
this use orange marmalade. Fold over care 
fully, dredge with sugar, and serve. 



SWEET EGG DISHES. 

Fried Egg Croutes (Sweet). 

{Plain Perdu.) 
Cut some milk rolls into neat slices, dip 
each in sweetened milk, and then in beaten 
egg. Drop the slices into hot clarified 
butter, and fry a golden brown. Take up, 
drain the slices or crofites, dredge with 
castor sugar mixed with a little ground 
cinnamon, then dish up and serve hot. 

Snow Eggs a la Vanille. 

Put a pint of milk, a gill of cream, and 
two ounces of loaf sugar and vanilla pod in 
a saute-pan and boil up. Whisk the whites 
of four fresh eggs to a stiff froth and sweeten 
slightly. When the milk, cream, etc., is 
boiling drop it into the whites of egg, pre- 
viously shaped with a tablespoon (the shape 
of quenelles) ; dip the spoon into boiling 
water each time it is used, and poach only 
a few at a time. Turn the shapes as they 
are being poached. Each quenelle will 
take about six minutes to cook. When 
done take up and drain, range them nicely 
in a hot dish. Pour a little custard over 
and round the quenelles, and serve. Use 
vanilla pod if possible, as it gives a better 
flavour than the essence. 

Snow Eggs au Citron. 

Proceed the same as directed in the fore- 
going recipe, omit the vanilla and add a 
thin strip of lemon rind to the milk. Chop 
or grate the rind of half a lemon and mix 
with the whisked whites of eggs. Shape 
and poach in sweetened milk as directed. 
123 



FOR INVALIDS AND 
CONVALESCENTS. 

Egg Bouillon. 

Put two yolks of eggs into a small basin, 
beat up a little, add a tiny grate of nutmeg 
and pour in slowly three-quarters of a pint 
of boiling hot seasoned beef stock or broth. 
Serve it in cups and scatter a little chopped 
parsley or chopped chives on top. 

Savoury Egg Custard. 

Mix two table-spoonfuls of Lemco with 
half a gill of hot water, beat up four yolks 
of eggs and add to the above. Boil up a 
gill of milk and stir it with the eggs, etc. 
Season with pepper and salt, and strain 
into a buttered mould or basin. Place 
this in a stew-pan containing a little hot 
water, cover with buttered paper, and cook 
in a hot oven for about twenty minutes. 
When done turn out on a hot dish or plate 
and serve. 

Egg Jelly. 

Put an ounce of gelatine in a stew-pan 
with the juice of two lemons and about 
half a pint of water (to make one pint of 
liquid) ; to this add the finely cut rind of 
half a lemon and four ounces of loaf sugar. 
Stir over a slow fu-e, and when the gelatine 
is dissolved add two eggs, well beaten, 
124 



EGGS AND OMELETS 125 

allow it to get hot whilst stirring, but not 
boiling, then strain into a pint mould and 
place in the cool to set. To serve, immerse 
the mould in warm water for a few moments 
and turn out on a cold dish. 

Frosted Egg. 

Beat up on a plate the white of a new- 
laid egg till stiff ; add to it a tiny pinch of 
salt before or after beating it, and flavour 
with a few drops of lemon juice. Pile it 
on a clean plate or saucer, dredge over with 
castor sugar, and serve. 

Egg Coffee. 

Beat up the yolk of an egg in a cup and 
pour in slowly two parts of boiling milk and 
one part of freshly-made coffee. Sweeten 
to taste or serve without sugar as desired. 

Egg Tea. 

Cream the yolk of an egg with a dessert- 
spoonful of castor sugar and add to it 
the stiffly whisked white of an egg ; pour 
on half a breakfast cupful of boiling mUk 
and a little freshly made tea, just enough 
to flavour. Strain into a smaller cup, put 
a suspicion of grated nutmeg on top, and 
serve. 

Egg Wine. 

Beat up a new-laid egg, add to it a 
dessert-spoonful of castor sugar and a 
small glass of sherry or marsala ; then 
pour over slowly half a pint of boiling water. 
Stir over the fire to bind the egg, but do 
not let it boil. Strain into a cup, and 
serve. 



126 HOW TO COOK 

Steamed Eggs. 

This is considered the most digestible 
way of cooking eggs. Place the required 
number of new-laid eggs in a warm basin, 
large enough to hold the eggs and water 
to well cover them. Pour over boiling 
water (the usual proportion being one gill 
to each egg). Allow the basin to stand on 
the side of the stove or in the oven for six 
or eight minutes. They are then ready 
for serving. 

Coddled Eggs, 

Proceed the same as directed in the 
foregoing recipe, eggs cooked in this way 
being frequently known as " coddled." 

Egg Fillip. 

Beat up with a fork a new-laid egg, add 
to it a table-spoonful of brandy or rum, 
sweeten with one dessert-spoonful of castor 
sugar. Stir and serve in a small cup or 
glass. This makes an excellent stimulant 
and restorative drink. 

Egg Nog (Cold). 

Whisk the white of a new-laid egg, when 
stiff add a table-spoonful of castor sugar. 
Mix the yolk with a table-spoonful of iced 
water and three of milk, flavour with a 
small glass of sherry or marsala. Pour 
this into a ttimbler or cup, then add the 
whisked white of egg. Stir gently and 
serve. 

Egg Nog (Hot). 

Boil up half a pint of milk, and pour 
it, whilst stirring, into a beaten yolk of 



EGGS AND OMELETS 127 

egg, and add a table-spoonful of castor 
sugar. Reheat, but do not let it boil ; 
put in a table-spoonful of old brandy, rum, 
or whisky, and serve very hot. 

Egg Water. 

Stir lightly with a fork the whites of 
two new-laid eggs into half a pint of iced 
water. Sweeten to taste with castor sugar, 
then serve. 

This is said to be an excellent remedy for 
diarrhoea, and is also good for children 
teething. 

Egg Flip. 

Stir the yolk of a new-laid egg with a 
dessert-spoonful of castor sugar till creamy, 
add a table-spoonful of brandy or two of 
sherry. To this add two table-spoonfuls 
of boiling water, and lastly the whisked-up 
white of the egg. Serve in a cup or tumbler. 

Paprika Sauce. 

This is made by adding sufficient red 
Hungarian pepper to good white sauce 
(Allemande or Veloutee) to colour and 
flavour same. 



SUNDRY RECIPES. 

Egg Sauce. 

Shell and chop not too finely one hard- 
boiled egg. Make a sauce by melting one 
and a half ounces of butter in a saucepan, 
blend in it one ounce of flour and stir in 
half a pint of white stock and half a pint 
of hot mUk ; allow it to boil whilst stirring, 
and cook for about ten minutes. Strain 
the sauce, put in the chopped egg, and 
keep hot tUl required for serving. 

Egg Nouilles. 

Sift half a pound of flour and add two 
yolks of eggs, a pinch of salt, and a table- 
spoonful of oiled butter, and work into 
a stiff but smooth dough. After being well 
kneaded roll out the paste and cut it into 
six portions. Fold the rolled out pieces 
longways and cut crossways into narrow 
strips, loosen the strips and boU in salted 
water, dress and place in a stew-pan with 
one ounce of butter, one ounce of grated 
Gruydre cheese, and two table-spoonfuls 
of bechamel sauce (p. 129), and season with 
pepper and grated nutmeg. Stir over the 
fire untU thoroughly hot, dish up, sprinkle 
the top with freshly fried breadcrumbs, and 
serve. 

Mayonnaise Sauce. 

Put two yolks of eggs into a clean and 
dry basin, add a heaped-up saltspoonful 
of salt, and stir with a wooden spoon, 
128 



EGGS AND OMELETS 129 

adding little by little (drop by drop) one and 
a half giUs of best salad oil, and at inter- 
vals a tablespoonful of French vinegar 
(Orleans). Continue to stir vigorously till 
the mixture acquires a creamy substance, 
then add another table-spoonful of vine- 
gar, a teaspoonful of mixed mustard, and 
lastly a few drops of chilli vinegar, and use 
as directed. 

Hollandaise Sauce. 

Take two yolks of eggs, half a gill of 
bechamel sauce, one ounce of butter, one 
teaspoonful of French wine vinegar, salt 
and pepper. 

Heat up the sauce in a small saucepan, 
stir in the yolks of eggs, stand the sauce- 
pan in a pan of boiling water over the fire 
and whisk until nearly boiling ; add the 
butter in small quantities, also the vinegar. 
Season to taste, and whisk until the sauce 
has the consistency of a light cream. This 
sauce is excellent with boiled fish, aspara- 
gus, cauliflower, artichokes, etc. 

Note. — When a still richer sauce is required 
omit the bechamel and use more egg yolks 
and more butter. 

Bechamel Sauce. 

Melt one ounce of butter in a small 
stew-pan, stir in one ounce of flour (bare 
weight), and cook for a few minutes with- 
out browning, then add half a sliced carrot, 
half a small onion stuck with a clove, half 
a bay leaf, and a small blade of mace, 
and dilute with one gill of good white stock 
and half a pint of milk. Stir till it boils 
and let simmer gently for about twenty 
minutes to half an hour. Strain the sauce 
and season to taste. 

I 



130 HOW TO COOK 

Tomato Sauce. 

Slice three or four small ripe tomatoes 
and fry them in a small stew-pan with 
two ounces of raw ham or bacon cut into 
dice and one ounce of butter. Next add 
a few slices of carrot, onion, and very little 
celery, a small bay leaf and a blade of 
mace. Then add half a pint of brown 
sauce or bechamel, also a few mushroom 
trimmings if handy, and cook gently for 
twenty minutes or longer, adding a Uttle 
stock, if found too thick. Reheat it, 
remove the scum, strain the sauce, and 
season to taste. 

Brown Sauce. 

Take half a pint of brown stock, one 
small onion, one carrot, one ripe tomato, 
one ounce of butter or dripping, one ounce 
of flour, one dessert-spoonful of mush- 
room ketchup, one teaspoonful of vinegar, 
salt and pepper. 

Peel and chop the onion, scrape and slice 
the carrot, and slice the tomato. Melt 
the butter or dripping in a saucepan ; when 
hot add the flour and fry a little, then add 
the vegetables. Stir over the fire until 
nicely browned, then add the tomato, the 
vinegar, ketchup, and stock, stir until it boils, 
skim well, and allow to simmer for about 
half an hour. Strain and season to taste. 

Curry Sauce 

Peel and slice a small onion, scrape and 
slice a small carrot, fry both together in 
half an ounce of butter ; when the onion 
has acquired a light brown colour, add one 
table-spoonful of mild curry powder and 
stir for a few seconds. Next add a small 



EGGS AND OMELETS 131 

peeled and chopped apple, moisten with 
half a gill of tomato pulp and a gill of 
brown sauce. Allow to boil for a few 
minutes. Season to taste, and pass it 
through a fine strainer. Reheat and stir 
in last of all a finely chopped gherkin. 

Supr&ne Sauce. 

Melt an ounce and a half of butter in a 
stew-pan ; stir in an ounce of flour and 
allow it to fry a little without browning. 
Add gradually a pint of chicken stock, stir 
until it boils, and allow to simmer for 
fifteen minutes. Add one gill of cream, a 
teaspoonful of lemon juice, a pinch of salt, 
and a pinch of grated nutmeg, and cook 
gently. Pass through a tammy cloth, re- 
turn to a clean stew-pan, and whisk in 
half an ounce of fresh butter. 

Aspic or Savoury Jelly. 

Get ready the following ingredients : — 
Two ounces of gelatine, one bay leaf, half 
a leek, half a carrot sliced, a quart of white 
stock or water, ten peppercorns, one table- 
spoonful of French wine vinegar, one table- 
spoonful of tarragon vinegar, the thin rind 
and juice of half a lemon, and the white 
and shell of one egg. 

Put all the ingredients in a stew-pan, 
add a good pinch of salt and the white and 
shell, previously beaten, and whisk into 
the stew-pan ; bring the contents slowly 
to the boll, whisking all the time, and boil 
slowly for about ten minutes ; allow to 
stand for ten minutes and strain twice or 
three times through a cloth or jelly bag. 



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