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_ Cornell University Library 

TX 921.T27 1913 



The practical hotel steward, 





3 1924 002 062 176 




Cornell University 
Library 



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tine Cornell University Library. 

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THE PRACTICAL 
HOTEL STEWARD 

Bi; John bellman 

■III 

REVISED TO INCORPORATE BOTH 

AMERICAN & EUROPEAN PLANS 

Fourth Edition 



COPYRIGHT 1900, BY JOHN TELLMAN 
COPYRIGHT 1913, BY JOHN TELLMAN 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE HOTEL MONTHLY 

443 SOUTH DEARBORN STREET 
CHICAGO :: •: ILLINOIS 



BSiiiiii Ill ing 'Vjl 




John Tellman 



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PEErACE TO THE FIRST EDITION. 
This book, "The Practical Hotel Steward," 
is written from the standpoint of one who has 
had years of practical experience, and reflect 
what, in his judgment, are the best methods 
for a steward to follow. The author does not 
claim to be infallible, or that his methods are 
better than those of many others; but he be- 
lieves them to contain the elements of success. 

John Tbllman. 



PREFACE TO THE FOURTH EDITION. 

When I first wrote "The Practical Hotel 
Steward," thirteen years ago, a great majority 
of the hotels of the United States were con- 
ducted on the American plan, by which room 
and meals is sold for a stated price per day. 

Since that time a great change has come over 
the hotel business, and now, in the larger cities, 
practically all of the hotels are conducted Euro- 
pean plan ; and in the country places the 
tendency is also for European plan, by which 
rooms are sold separate from meals, and the 
meals are sold either for a stated price for the 
full meal, or restaurant style, in which you pay 
only for what is ordered and served to you. 

This great change has made it necessary to 
revise my original book, and to adapt it also 
for the requirements of European plan hotels. 

In the rewriting I have changed the original 
text, as applied to the American plan, only 
where necessary, as the book in its original 
form met with very general approval, and has 
gone thru three editions. About the only 
change is the addition of more menus, and the 
elimination of a few that were superfluous. 

The new reading matter in the book, devoted 
to European plan, will, I trust, prove of es- 
pecial value to houses changing over to the 
European plan, as well as to European plan 
houses already established. 

This fourth edition is printed with the hope 
that the book will meet the same generous 
reception that has complimented all the former 

'■^^'°''^- .John Tellman. 



The Practical Hotel Steward 



Copyriaht 1900. by John Tellman 
Fourth Edition, Revised. Copyrisht 1913, by John Tellman. 



American vs. European or a la Carte System 

For many years, in fact, since the begin- 
ning of our country, there has been in vogue 
a system of hotel and inn keeping which is 
«omnionlj' known as the American plan, and 
which we may also refer to as the ' ' table 
d'hote" system; though differing from the 
latter to the extent that when the traveler 
arrives he is accommodated at a fixed price 
with a room or rooms which includes all of 
his meals, and with deductions or allowances 
for any meals he fails to partake of. 

AVith the table d'hote system (which is an 
old European custom), the guest can engage 
one or more rooms and pay for his meals extra, 
which are of a fixed price, as, for instance: 
breakfast, 75 cents; lunch, 60 cents, and din- 
ner, $1, more or less, according to the style 
of the hotel. 

With the a la carte (or European system, 
as we express it), the guest engages room 
accommodations separately and takes his meals 
in the restaurant or cafe (usually conducted 
in connection with the hotel), selecting his 
meals as best suits his appetite from a bill 
of fare, the price of each separate article of 
food being printed in connection therewith. 

As stated in the beginning, the American 
plan was the general system in operation, and 
many a hotel keeper has become wealthy by 
careful and successful management in running 
hotels on the American plan; but that was 
when this country had not advanced to its 
present state. It is quite doubtful if those 
men could have been so successful under high 
cost of living conditions. 

The system was without a doubt quite waste- 
ful; but food was cheap and plentiful. And 
in the ease of the crude house as built by our 
grandfathers, for lack of modern comfort it is 
not up to our present needs. We must progress 
ever, and hotel keeping has advanced, and still 
is advancing, fully as rapidly as other indus- 
tries. The increase in population and growth 
of our cities makes it necessary to build larger 
hotels which require every modern device that 
will add to the comfort of a discriminating 
traveling public, and at the same time keep 
the expense account within the proper limits. _ 



In building these large hotels it becomes ap- 
parent that the waste increases correspond- 
ingly in the American plan hotel. The amount 
of raw material used to feed the guests be- 
comes a serious question; and with the certain 
and continual increase in prices it means 
eventually a change, or ruin. 

The change came, and is still in progress 
all over this sountry, to the European system. 
In nearly all of the cities the European sys- 
tem has displaced the old custom of room in- 
cluding meals. 

Our country, while still very young has 
passed through a period of extravagance and 
waste not known in recent times of any other 
country. 

We were placed in custody of an immense 
domain of riches; fine land, endless tracts of 
timber; fabulous wealth in mines of precious 
metals, iron and coal; plenty of game and 
fish. The result was like that of a child with 
too many toys for Christmas, the first thing 
it does is to break and ruin them; so our 
settlers, many of them, there being no law 
to regulate, began immediately on a career 
of waste. They took up more land than was 
needed at that time, and began denuding the 
forests of magnificent timber, a vast amount 
of which was absolutely destroyed; and then 
began a method of poor farming, which car- 
ried away the rich surface to the ocean. The 
result was insuflScient crops for the large acre- 
age under cultivation; at the same time game 
was almost exterminated and rivers and lakes 
emptied of their fish. Live stock, cattle, sheep, 
hogs and poultry for a time became plentiful. 
They increased without any material care, being 
permitted to range at large on our public 
lands. Everything was plentiful and cheap in 
this land of plenty; in fact, food, as well as 
everything else, was so plentiful that the plain 
laboring people were not without at least one 
kind of meat at each meal of the day. The 
word economy wag not generally known among 
them. This was not only in families, but in all 
establishments where the domestic art was a 
part of the conducting of a business. Many 
a housekeeper looked upon the idea of saving 
that which was not used at one meal to use in 



2 THE PBACTICAL 

some way for the next with disdain. It also 
made us a nation of meat eaters, which does . 
not prove healthful for us. The rapid growth 
in population and the corresponding increase 
in the price of food in consequence thereof, 
has brought about the necessity of a change. 
The family has found it necessary to econo- 
mize; so also the catering establishments and 
hotels. The latter found that there must be a 
more economical metho._ in order to survive; 
so the European system is gradually supplant- 
ing the American plan. 

This has brought about an important change 
in the responsibilities of the steward. Pri- 
marily the duties of a steward are the same 
as in former years; but he has progressed. He 
buys as he has previously done, but has im- 
proved the grade of goods of his purchase. 
He still buys the best in order to have the least 
waste, at the lowest prices at which he can 
possibly obtain it. But he is now also some- 
what of a merchant. He must now figure 
about how much must be charged for his goods 
in order to gain a reasonable return. To cover 
all loss by shrinkage he must be able to 
equalize his prices so that his goods will sell. 
In like manner the grocery man sells sugar at 
a fraction of a cent profit but increases the 
profit on the fancy novelties to even up. 

The steward's catering should be in the 
direction to draw the guests' attention from 
steak, chops and roast beef, for the prices on 
these articles have advanced to where there is 
almost no chance for an earning on them; 
and it is certain that low priced meats and 
poultry are a thing of the past. So it is the 
steward has begun to be a student of economy 
and a merehandizer with it. He is also begin- 
ning to study the chemical value of foods, a 
knowledge of which is beneficial in his voca- 
tion. 

The system of bill of fare construction is 
much different from the old. Roast beef and 
beef steak, which have always been the target 
for the patron, and from which it is necessary 
to draw them away as much as possible, must 
be his aim. 

The other day I received one of the most 
beautiful books of advertisement which it has 
been my pleasure to behold. It came from the 
Eitz-Garlton sj'stem of hotels and restaurants. 
I read a paragraph in it on the beginning of 
the career of Mr. Eitz, from a humble farmer 
to the most noted hotel man of modern times; 
and another paragraph on the service and food 
offered in the Eitz-Carlton restaurants, espe- 
cially on the Hamburg-American steamers. The 



HOTEL STEWARD 

articles have only a few lines in each para- 
graph, but they express a whole instructive 
book. Mr. Eitz's rise in the business was due 
to his ability as a disciplinarian, and a natural 
taste for the elegant and refined, to serve 
everything in an attractive and tempting way; 
and this is particularly emphasized when speak- 
ing of their restaurant service on the ocean 
steamers. It states the food served in these 
restaurants is light and dainty. Heavy dishes, 
such as steak, chops, etc., are not much called 
for. These light dishes are placed before the 
diner in a manner as attractive and pleasing as 
possible. This should cause the hotel man, 
steward and caterer to study and learn to step 
forward. 

When I wrote the first edition of The Prac- 
tical Hotel Steward it was a common expres- 
sion that it was impracticable to run a hotel 
as they run first-class hotels in Europe. Several 
years have brought a change, and we now have 
one operating successfully in this country (the 
Eitz-Carlton in New York) ; and very soon we 
will have more; and I say if we do not progress 
as we should, get busy and study refinement 
with economy and more economy, we will lose 
out in the end. This also includes the maitre 
d 'hotel and the chef. On the latter much de- 
pends in revolutionizing the kitchen in many 
instances. It means that he should make 
greater efforts in his variety of delectable 
made dishes, served in tasteful manner; and 
it means that the maitre d 'hotel should in- 
struct his waiters to recommend specially pre- 
pared dishes. 

Hotel men should travel. They should visit 
the new places, the hotels and restaurants in 
other parts of the country. It is the best 
educational factor that the people in our busi- 
ness have. We learn from others as others 
learn from us. 

Europe learned its lesson from travelers and 
pilgrims who had visited the Orient and re- 
turned with much fabric of all kinds. Porce- 
lain was introduced into western Europe from 
China. Before that most of the furnishings 
and works of art were known only in a crude 
way. Intercourse with the more advanced 
nations stimulated progress; so does our inter- 
course with hotels and hotel men in other cities 
and other countries stimulate our desire to 
progress. 

The Steward's Duties (American Plan) 

The steward is a man who manages the do- 
mestic concerns of another. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Stewardship is by no means created by the 
advancement of the tiraes^ or improved methods 
of conducting hotels, clubs or restaurants. On 
the contrary, we find this quite an ancient 
position of honor and trust. For instance: in 
Scripture, we find that Abraham had his stew- 
ard; Joseph was the steward of Potiphar; and, 
as we follow history down to the present time, 
all royal households and men of wealth and 
position accustomed to maintaining an estab- 
lishment always have a manager for their do- 
mestic affairs — a steward. 

The hotel steward of today is supposed to be 
the same kind of a man as history describes — 
a manager, and an honest, trustAvorthy, judi- 
cious man on whom the domestic welfare and 
happiness depends. His duties in olden times 
were to supply the wants and necessary serv- 
ants for the entertainment of those by whom 
he was employed. The duties of the hotel 
steward of today are to keep the house prop- 
erly supplied with provisions, to govern the 
help engaged in preparing such provisions, and 
to direct the service. 
Essential Qualifications 

A steward should possess these three qualifi- 
cations — honesty, a fair education and good 
judgment. A man, no matter how efficient, 
will not be retained in position when found to 
be dishonest. The fact that a man has "the 
itching palm" will travel many miles farther 
than himself, and he often wonders why he 
cannot find another job. Education is neces- 
sary, for it goes with judgment. A man with- 
out judgment cannot manage others unless de- 
pending upon brute force; and where force 
must be resorted to there can be no harmony 
and no pleasure in work; and often he will be 
obliged to dismiss help who have proved most 
valuable assistants. 
Adapt Himself to Circumstances 

To be a successful steward a man must be 
able to adapt himself to circumstances, as no 
two hotels will be found just exactly alike in 
every respect — the class, capacity and internal 
arrangements being prime causes. He will find 
some houses not so modern, others not so well 
equipped as some in which he has previously 
been employed. That should be no reason for 
him to insist that "the pantry is in the wrong 
place," "the furniture and utensils are com- 
pletely out of date ; " or, " worn out and 
should be thrown out at once ; " or, "he can- 
not work in such an old rattletrap." While 
a great deal of the above may be true, yet 
others had charge before him and the house 
(may have) made a great deal of money for 



the proprietors; and if he will only try to ac- 
custom himself to the house as he finds it, he 
may find things not so badly arranged after 
all. 
Give Help a Fair Trial 

A steward on entering a new place should 
not do so with the belief that all the help of 
his predecessor must be fired out. Wait and 
give them a trial, for they may be a great 
deal better than those -fohich he can get to fill 
the places so vacated. Should he find by fair 
trial that the old help are undesirable, then by 
all means change as quickly as possible. 
Help Must Kespect Him 

A steward of judgment knows how to main- 
tain the respect of all with whom he may come 
in contact. The position being clothed with 
considerable dignity requires him to be of a re- 
served manner, speaking to those in his charge 
on business only; yet he should not be haughty 
or hard to approach. He can be pleasant to 
the yardman or any of those under him and 
at the same time feel (and have them feel) he 
is their superior. 
Relation to Proprietor or Manager 

The steward's relation to the proprietor or 
manager its that of assistant in the fullest 
sense. The proprietor or manager handles the 
business part; the steward manages the do- 
mestic concerns. The steward has charge of 
the back part of the house, attends to the mar- 
keting, sees that the help are all in their places 
of duty, that the meals are on time, superin- 
tends the preparation of- the bills of fare, is 
particularly careful that economy is observed 
in all branches of his department, and sees to 
it that his expense account does not exceed the 
axed limit for the class of house in which he 
is working. He should feel on terms of utmost 
ease with his employer in order that he may 
converse freely on any topic appertaining to 
the business in which both are interested. — to 
consult freely on all matters. By so doing he 
is certain to learn the ideas and desires of 
those it is to his interest to please and satisfy. 
I believe it proper and businesslike, in most 
instances, for the steward to forego his own 
ideas to those of his employer, for it is his 
employer's money which the steward spends 
for the house. The steward should not go to 
the proprietor or manager with all little trou- 
bles of no consequence. He is surely capable 
of dealing with them judiciously without the 
assistance of the man who is probably more oc- 
cupied than himself. 
Belation to the Guests 

While a steward should at all times treat 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



guests whom he meets with courtesy and re- 
spect, it is not advisable to court acquaintance. 
In some houses it is even better to lieep at a 
distance, for the reason that (especially with 
regular boarders) they often hope to gain 
thereby some personal favor, which, if granted 
and found out by the other guests, they would 
be apt to feel slighted and cause complaint. 
I will say, however, that he should not be deaf 
to suggestions from guests or patrons of the 
house; he may hear something which may prove 
beneficial. If a complaint is made give a fair 
hearing and then promise investigation and 
remedy. It is to be remembered that a stew- 
ard, no matter how old in the business is never 
too old to learn. 
Kelation to the Housekeeper 

The steward's relation to the housekeeper 
should be that of -an associate in business, and 
should be cordial. While in some (especially 
country) hotels the steward is in authority 
over the housekeeper, yet in the well-arranged 
and regulated large city houses they are en- 
tirely independent of each other. But they 
have a great many things in common and can 
help and accommodate each other in a great 
many ways, especially in the management and 
exchange of help. It often happens that the 
steward is short of someone in his department; 
the housekeeper can send him one of her help 
to fill the vacancy temporarily. On the other 
hand, she, for some reason or other, may find 
it necessary to keep one or more of her help 
late in finishing certain work in the house. It 
will not inconvenience the steward to see that 
they are well fed. Also any requisitions of 
necessaries the housekeeper may send to the 
storeroom should be promptly attended to; and 
should the articles not be on hand they should 
be gotten as soon as possible. These little 
attentions sometimes save a great deal of an- 
noyance. 
Relation to the Headwaiter or Maitre d'Hotel 

In all well-regulated hotels the steward is in 
direct authority over the headwaiter and dining 
room forces. But as the headwaiter is usually 
a man of intelligence the steward should use 
caution in his application of such authority, 
lest a, breach of harmony might occur. Quite 
true, if the headwaiter does not try to fulfill 
the steward's directions it is in the steward's 
power to remove him or cause him to be re- 
moved. But this is not always best. The head- 
waiter may be a first-class man. He comes in 
direct contact with all the guests, as well as 
the manager or proprietor, and his eiffieieney 
has (very likely) proven itself in many ways. 



It would be hard for the steward to remove or 
try to have him removed without serious re- 
monstrance. With cool deliberation such fric- 
tion need never occur, for the reason that you 
should not try to fill his place (perform his 
duties) when he is there for that purpose. For 
instance: the steward going into the dining 
room during meal time and usurping the head- 
waiter's duties, such as seating guests, etc. The 
headwaiter is not incapable; or, if he is he 
should not be there, for in that case it would 
surely be impossible for him to maintain dis- 
cipline and the obedience of his waiters. It 
is, however, proper for the steward to call at- 
tention to and criticize the appearance and 
efficiency of the waiters. It is to the steward's, 
as well as to the headwaiter 's interest, that 
waiters are in proper dress, and, above all, 
clean in appearance; also that they serve 
neatly and with all possible dispatch. The 
steward also gives directions to the headwaiter 
of any change or addition in service, that he 
may inform his waiters before meal hours; 
also any new rules in working. When arrang- 
ing for banquets or special service of any kind, 
the headwaiter awaits the directions of the 
steward from beginning to end. All this can be 
done without any breach in harmony. 

When the manager or proprietor finds the 
steward a man of honesty and energetic, en- 
dowed with the qualities as described in the 
foregoing, it will cause him to make a confidant 
of his employee and together they go into the 
needs of a house necessary to modernize it in 
its working departments. 

* * * 

The Organizing, Governing and Feeding of 
Employes (American Plan) 

The most important part of the steward's 
duties is the organizing, governing and feed- 
ing of the help. I will begin this subject by 
dividing the working department into different 
branches, as follows: 

1. The cooks. 

2. Pastry and bakery. 

3. Fruit pantry. 

4. Silver and glass pantry. 

5. Dish service. 

6. Servants' halls. 

7. Storeroom. 

8. Wine room. 

9. Yardmen. 

10. Assistant or inside steward. 
[The latter allowable only in the larger houses.] 

* * * 

For European Plan 

The organization for European plan differs 
somewhat from the regular American plan. 



THE PEACTICAL 
there being an important addition to tlie list, 
viz., that of the system of checking or con- 
trol, as it is called in some houses. The sec- 
tions are about as follows: 

1. Chef's division. 

2. Pastry. 

3. Headwaiter 's division. 

4. Assistant steward. 

5. Head checker and assistant. 

6. Eestaurant cashiers. 

7. Pantry stewards. 

8. Fruit pantry. 

9. Silver and glass pantry. 

10. Dish service. 

11. Commissary. 

12. Wine room. 

13. Night steward. 

14. First officers. 

15. Second officers. 

16. Mess hall. 

■ 17. Watchmen. 

18. Yardman. 

The foregoing list is the average for a large 

European system hotel. For the smaller houses 

on the same plan there may be some of the 

divisions listed which are usually included in 

the Auditor's division, especially the cashiers 

and checkers, as the auditors check their work 

in all cases. 

» * * 

The Feeding of Employes 

OFPICKRS AND SERVANTS' DINING POOMS 

In the large hotels the help's dining rooms 
are divided into three classes. 

First, the officers' dining room, where all 
the employees holding an official capacity, 
namely,- clerks, cashiers, assistant housekeepers, 
head of the laundry, operators and others of 
like standing; ladies' maids, valets and nurses 
also take their meals in this room. 

Second, or sub-officials' hall: In this room 
are the mechanics, paper hangers, painters, par- 
lor maids, head bell-man, head houseman and 
help of like standing. 



HOTEL STEWAED 5 

Third, the mess hall: In this room all other 
help take their meals. It includes the maids, 
housemen, laundry help, porters, doormen and 
all others who belong to this class. 

In hotels where there are both white and 
colored help, they should be fed in separate 
rooms, to prevent any possibility of trouble. 

In the first officers' hall usually there are 
regular dining room waiters, good silver, linens 
and dishes, making the service first-class in 
every respect; although the waiters are usually 
new beginners who have trained as bus boys 
and are glad for the promotion. 

In the second officers' hall I have found 
girls very satisfactory; the service is plainer 
but the food about the same as the first 
officers '- 

In the mess hall I have found it most diffi- 
cult to keep the waiters, as many of the help 
are not very pleasant guests to wait on. But 
girls are the best; they are cleaner and more 
prompt and reliable. 



The question of what it costs to feed the 
employees of a hotel has been very much dis- 
cussed from time to time, and no doubt in all 
hotels it has caused more real study from the 
steward's standpoint than any other branch of 
his work. In December, 1910, I arranged that 
the chefs of the two hotels under my super- 
vision, co-operating with the assistant stewards, 
make a seven-day test of how much it required 
to feed the help we kept at that time. We in- 
cluded in this every person connected with the 
hotel, not excepting those who signed checks 
in the dining room, and made every effort to 
be accurate, with the following result, which 
was almost the sam.e in both hotels: 



FIRST OFFICERS' DINING ROOM. 



Breakfast 



Fresh fruit, 

Ham or bacon, 

Eggs, fried, boiled or scrambled, 

Pbtatoes, fried. 

Oat meal, 

Cakes, 

Rolls, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Dinner 

SDNDAY 

Okra soup. 

Spring onions. 

Boiled lake trout. 

Roast beef. 

Chicken croquette, 

Mashed potatoes. 

Peas, 

Tomatoes, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Supper 



Steak or chops, 
Hungarian goulash, 
Mashed potatoes. 
Peas, 

Succotash, 
Salad, 

Preserved fruit, 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



THE PEACTIGAL HOTEL STEWARD 



The same. 



MONDAY 

Vegetable soup, 

Radishes, 

Lake trout, 

Boiled beef with vegetables. 

Beef braised. 

Scrambled eggs. 

Mashed potatoes. 

Stewed tomatoes, 

Corn, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Bacon and eggs. 
Cold meals. 
Meat stew. 
Mashed potatoes. 
Corn, 
Salad, 

Lima beans. 
Preserved fruit. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



The same. 



TUESDAY 

Tomato soup. 

Radishes, 

Boiled sea trout, 

Roast beef. 

Sweetbread croquettes. 

Southern hash, 

Mashe potatoes, 

Lima beans. 

Peas, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Breaded veal cutlets. 
Cold meat. 
Stewed kidney, 
Mashed potatoes. 
Beets, 

String beans, 
Salad, 

Preserved fruit. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



The same. 



WEDNESDAY 

Vegetable soup, 

Olives, 

Fried perch, 

Roast veal. 

Corned beef and cabbage. 

Mashed potatoes. 

Succotash, 

Kohlrabi, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Pork chop or cold meat, 

Lamb stew, 

Mashed potatoes, 

Beets, 

String beans. 

Salad, 

Preserved fruit, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



The same. 



THURSDAY 

Split peas soup. 

Dill pickles, 

Red snapper, Creole, 

Roast beef. 

Chicken stew, 

Mashed potatoes. 

Beets, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Small steik or cold meat 

Lamb stew. 

Mashed potatoes. 

Peas, 

String beans, 

Salad, 

Preserved fruit, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



The same. 



FRIDAY 

Okra soup. 

Radishes, 

Boiled lake trout, hollandaise. 

Sweetbread croquettes, 

Chicken stew. 

Mashed potatoes. 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Fried eggs or cold meat, 

Southern hash, 

Mashed potatoes. 

Peas, 

Corn, 

Salad, 

Preserved fruit. 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



The same. 



SATURDAY 

Chicken gumbo, 

Olives, 

Fried perch. 

Roast veal, 

Short ribs, 

Irish stew. 

Mashed potatoes, 

Tomatoes with rice, 

Peas, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Liver and bacon. 
Cold meat. 
Goulash, 

Mashed potatoes. 
Stewed corn, 
Lima beans. 
Salad, 

Preserved fruit. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAKD 



SECOND OFFICERS' DINING ROOM 



Breakfast 



Fresh fruit, 

Ham or bacon, 

Eggs, fried, boiled or scrambled, 

Potatoes, fried. 

Oat meal, 

Cakes, 

Rolls, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



The same. 



The same. 



The same. 



The same. 



The same. 



The same 



Dinner 

SUNDAY 

Okra soup, 

Roast beef. 

Leg of mutton. 

Mashed potatoes. 

Peas, 

Tomatoes, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 

MONDAY 

Vegetable soup, 

Boiled beef with mustard. 

Loin of veal. 

Calf brains and scrambled eggs 

Mashed potatoes, 

Stewed tomatoes. 

Corn, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 

TUESDAY 

Tomato soup, 

Roast beef. 

Sweetbread croquettes. 

Southern hash. 

Mashed potatoes, 

Lima beans, 

Peas, 

Dessert, 

Coffe?, tea or milk. 

WEDNESDAY 

Vegetable soup. 

Fried lake perch, 

Loin of pork, 

Corned beef and cabbage. 

Mashed potatoes. 

Succotash, 

Kohlrabi, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 

THURSDAY 

Split peas soup. 

Roast beef, 

Chicken stew. 

Mashed potatoes. 

Beets, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 

FRIDAY 

Okra soup, 

Fried sun perch. 

Shoulders of pork. 

Chicken stew. 

Mashed potatoes, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 

SATURDAY 

Chicken gumbo, 

Olives, 

Short ribs, 

Irish stew. 

Chicken fricasse, 

Ma'hed potatoes. 

Tomatoes with rice. 

Peas, 

Dessert, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Supper 



Small steak. 
Chicken stew. 
Mashed potatoes. 
Peas, 

Succotash, 
Preserved fruit. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Mutton chops 
Cold meats. 
Veal pot pie, 
Mashed potatoes 
Corn, 

Lima beans, 
Preserved fruit. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Pork chop. 
Cold meats, 
Lamb hash. 
Mashed potatoes. 
Beets, 

String beans, 
Salad, 

Preserved fruit. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 

Small steak or cold meat. 

Mashed potatoes. 

Beets, 

String beans. 

Salad, 

Preserved fruit, 

Coffee, tea or milk. 



Lamb stew. 
Cold meat. 
Mashed potatoes, 
Peas, 

String beans. 
Salad, 

Preserved fruit. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 

Bacon and eggs. 
Cold meat. 
Mashed potatoes. 
Peas, 
Corn, 

Preserved fruit. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 

Pork chops, 
Goulash, 
Mashed potatoes. 
Stewed corn, 
Lima beans, 
Salad, 

Preserved fruit, 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Breakfast 

Oat meal, 
Sausage, 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee or milk. 

Hominy grits. 
Liver and bacon. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Cracked wheat. 
Pork necks. 
Boiled potatoes, 
Coffee or milk. 



Oat meal. 
Liver and bacon. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee or milk. 



Hominy grits. 
Sausage, 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee or milk. 



Cracked wheat, 
Breakfast bacon and eggs. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee or milk. 



MEALS SERVED IN MESS HALL. 

Dinner Supper 



Oat meal. 
Liver and bacon. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee or milk. 



SUNDAY 

Wiener wurst and cabbage, 
Boiled potatoes, 
Coffee, tea or milk. 

MONDAY 

Smoked shoulders, 
Pork and cabbage, 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 

TUESDAY 

Lamb stew. 
Boiled beef. 
Boiled potatoes, 
Coffee, tea or milk. 

WEDNESDAY 

Smoked necks. 
Split peas. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 

THURSDAY 

Soup, 

Lamb stew. 
Noodles, 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 

FRIDAY 

Soup, 

Fish, 

Pork shoulders. 

Navy beans. 

Boiled potatoes. 

Coffee or milk. 

SATURDAY 

Corned beef and kale. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Assorted cold meats. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Cervelat sausage. 
Head cheese. 
Boiled potatoes, 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Assorted cold meats. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Stewed evaporated fruit, 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Assorted cold meats, 
Boiled potatoes. 
Stewed evaporated fruit, 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Cold meats. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Stewed prunes. 
Coffee, tea or milk- 



Cold meats. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



Cold meats. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Coffee, tea or milk. 



DECEMBER, 1912. 



Estimated cost of feeding 340 employees, 
days' figures : 



Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 

Sunday, 



Issues, $119 36 

120.54 

98.90 

" 92.29 

115.56 

114.99 

85 72 



Total, $747 36 



Estimated cost at 12^ cents per head : 

One employee, per meal $ .12^ 

"day 37>^ 

" " " week 2.62 J^ 

" " " mon h 11.62^ 

" " year 136.88 



The foregoing was at a time when food was 
still of a reasonable variety and the weather 
not yet very cold; but nature provides the 
human stomach usually with a good and 
healthy appetite at this season of the year; the 
system requires food at the approach of win- 
ter which will build fat tissues as a protection 
against the cold. This is more apparent as 
-we go farther north, where the climate is 
rough and cold for the greater part of the year. 
In the region approaching the polar Arctic cir- 
cles the craving for fatty food becomes so 
great that the blubber of whale, walrus and 
other fat fish are much appreciated as a diet 
by the inhabitants. I speak of this to illus- 
trate that when feeding a number of people, 
the season and climate should be considered. 
Your food is much lighter and more inexpen- 
sive in the summer — the months the stomach 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD i) 

Average Composition and Fuel Value of Common Food Products. 

m 

o 

• I ■ ■ S«rf 

FOOD MATERIALS AS PURCHASED -a .c cS C &•= C 3 0.2 

mo (uo Q)o u gcj o o 

3t. +Jt. *Jt4 -u ^ h ^u •zi^'^ 

"CU biCLi fcift; "ICLi OlCU "(5 ,3(iO 

M^ ^w p^m p^m ^w ^w ^w»^ 

ANIMAL FOOD. 

Beef, Fresh: Porterhouse steak 12.7 52.4 19.1 17.9 ... 0.8 1,100 

Ribs 20.8 43.8 13.9 21.2 ... 0.7 1,135 

Round 7.2 60.7 19.0 12.8 ... 1.0 890 

Fore quarter 18.7 49.1 14.5 17.5 ... 0.7 995 

Hind quarter 15.7 50.4 15.4 18.3 ... 0.7 1,045 

Beef, corned 8.4 49.2 14.3 23.8 ... 4.6 1,245 

Veal: Fore quarter 24.5 54.2 15.1 6.0 ... 0.7 535 

Hind quarter 20.7 56.2 16.2 6.6 ... 0.8 580 

Mutton: Fore quarter 21.2 41.6 12.3 24.5 ... 0.7 1,235 

Hind quarter 17.2 45.4 13.8 23.2 ... 0.7 1,210 

Pork, Fresh: Ham 10.7 48.0 13.5 25.9 ... 0.8 1,320 

Shoulder 12.4 44.9 12.0 29.8 ... 0.7 1,450 

Pork, Salted, Cured and Pickled: Ham, smoked 13.6 34.8 14.2 33.4 ... 4.2 1,635 

Salt pork 7.9 1.9 86.2 ... 3.9 3,555 

Bacon, smoked 7.7 17.4 9.1 62.2 ... 4.1 2,715 

Sausage: Pork 39.8 13.0 44.2 1.1 2.2 2,075 

Soups: Beef 92.9 4.4 0.4 1.1 1.2 120 

Tomato 90.0 1.8 1.1 5.9 1.5 185 

Poultry: Fowls 25.9 47.1 13.7 12.3 ... 0.7 765 

Turkey 22.7 42.4 16.1 18.4 ... 0.8 1,060 

Fish: Mackerel, whole, fresh 44.7 40.4 10.2 4.2 ... 0.7 370 

Shad, whole, fresh 50.1 35.2 9.4 4.8 ... 0.7 380 

Cod, salt 24.9 40.2 16.0 0.4 ... 18.5 325 

Salmon, canned 63.5 21.8 12.1 ... 2.6 915 

Oysters, "solids" 88.3 6.0 1.3 3.3 1.1 225 

Eggs; Hen's eggs 11.2 65.5 13.1 9.3 ... 0.9 635 

Dairy Products, Etc.: Butter 11.0 1.0 85.0 ... 3.0 3,410 

Whole milk 87.0 3.3 4.0 5.0 0.7 310 

Skim milk 90.5 3.5 .3 5.1 0.7 165 

Condensed milk 26.9 8.8 8.3 54.1 1.9 1,430 

Cream 74.0 2.5 18.5 4.5 0.5 865 

Cheese, full cream 34.2 25.9 33.7 2.4 3.8 1,885 

VEGETABLE FOOD. 

Floup Meal, Etc.: Gtaham flour 11.3 13.3 2.2 71.4 1.8 1,645 

Wheat flour, patent roller process, high-grade and 

medium 12.0 11.4 1.0 75.1 0.5 1,635 

Low grade 12.0 14.0 1.9 71.2 0.9 1,640 

Macaroni, vermicelli, etc 10.3 13.4 .9 74.1 1.3 1,645 

Rye flour 12.9 6.8 .9 78.7 .7 1,620 

Corn meal 12.5 9.2 .9 75.4 1.0 1,635 

Oat breakfast food 7.7 16.7 7.3 66.2 2.1 1,800 

Rice 12.3 8.0 .3 79.0 .4 1,620 

Tapioia':::::.:.: 11.4 .4 .1 ss.o .1 i,65o 

starch - •• ■■• ••■ •■■ ^"-^ •■• i,o'E> 

Bread, PastryVEtc.V White bread 35.3 9.2 1.3 53.1 1.1 1,200 

Oraham bread . 35.7 8.9 1.8 52.1 1.5 1,195 

Ryfb^aa.^':.::::::::::..::.. :.:::.•. 35.7 9.0 .6 53.2 1.5 1,170 

Sugars, Etc.: Molasses 7U.0 ... i.i^a 

Sugar, granulated 1»0» ••• I'™ 

viStabu'sT Beansi'dried::::::::::::::::;;:::::: :::::: :: 12.6 22.5 i.s 59.6 3:5 1:520 

■RpatK! TAma. shelled 68.5 7.1 .7 22.0 1.7 540 

§pt?a' ' 20.0 70.0 1.3 .1 7.7 .9 160 

clbbage"::::::::::::;::::::::::;::::::::;::::.: js.o 77.7 1.4 .2 4.8 .9 115 

Celery^ 20.0 75.6 .9 .1 2.6 .8 65 

Com, green, sweet, edible portion ^•. 7&.4 6.L i.i iv.i ■• «" 

Cucunfbers 15.0 81.1 .7 .2 2.6 .4 65 

Lettuce 15.0 80.5 1.0 .i i.o -o no 

Onions .'. .■.■.■.■........ 10.0 78.9 1.4 .3 8.9 .5 190 

"'"°- 20.0 66.4 1.3 .4 10.8 1.1 230 



■paT-«nina 20.0 66.4 1.3 .* !"•» i-J- , i^'i 

pS dried . .. 9.5 24.6 1.0 62.0 2.9 1,565 

Iffl--'-----'"----------:::- fd lli 'i i 'li i 

iS^^^^ ■•■•■••■■■ :::::::::::::::::::::::::;:::: III fd ^:^ :l '\l : 

lEr^' ■•■■■•■•■■•••■ :::■::::::::::::::::::;:::: 3(^6 ?!:? i i i;? 1 

S?°"^'------;;;;;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: -« ^1:! i -.i t:| : J 

watfrmeions-:::::: :::.: 59.4 37.5 .2 .1 .7 a 50 

F;"!t?,'D>'"=<'= App'«^ :: ii i.? i.o ell W m 

^i^^jec^-^chicbiaie-:::::::::::^^ .. 5.9 12.4 48.7 30.3 2.2 5.625 

Cereai coffee^'^lnfuslon,'! part boiled in 20' p^^^^ •■ 98.2 .2 ... 1.4 .2 30 



10 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



rebels at heavy food. We have all, no doubt, 
read, from time to time, a great deal of the 
errois that were reported in feeding the army 
during the war with Spain, where our soldiers 
were sent during the summer into the semi- 
tropics. The officers in charge intended to see 
that the army was well fed and naturally they 
were particular in sending plenty of fresh 
meats in refrigerator cars and boats to the 
point of operation. The result was a great 
deal of it was spoiled and also many men be- 
came sick. A little fresh meat for a change 
was no doubt proper, but had they been sup- 
plied with well cured dried beef (chipped), 
well cured and smoked ham and lean bacon, 
rice, barley, beans, lentils and hard tack and 
good coffee, the fresh materials being supplied 
more sparingly, the men's health would have 
been better and they more satisfied. It is the 
same with the hotelkeeper. I think that corned 
beef and cabbage, mustard or kale greens and 
bacon and other fresh vegetables, or pork and 
beans and fresh meats less frequently, are most 
satisfactory during the warm season, and it 
is less expensive. 

* * * 

It must be understood that meat of some 
kind constitutes the principle upon which the 
meal is built. In connection with this article 
I want to quote the following from the Mess 
Officers' Assistant, by Capt. L. E. Holbrook 
at Eort Eiley, Kan.; 

"Etjel Value: The following general esti- 
mate has been for energy furnished to the 
body: 

' ' Proteins : Fuel value 4 calories per gram, 
or 1,820 calories per pound. 

' ' Carbohydrates : Fuel value 4 calories per 
gram, or 1,820 per pound. 

' ' Fats : Fuel values 8.9 calories per gram, 
or 4,040 calories per pound. 

'■'It is an interesting fact that the energy 
given off from the body as heat when the man, 
is at rest, or as heat and mechanical work to- 
gether, if he is working, exactly equals the 
latent energy of the material burned in the 
body. This has been verified by many accurate 

experiments. ' ' 

» * * 

Method of Determining Approximate Cost of 
Feeding Employes 

We have a system (at the Jefferson and 
Planters Hotels in St. Louis), and I believe 
all first-class hotels have it: At the end of 
the year, when the annual statement is made, 
we allow in our net earnings a certain amount 
for feeding employes, which is simply placed 



to show that the commissary should be entitled 
to a share of the profits that the other jjart 
of the house makes. In our daily and annual 
statements we also carry an account for flowers, 
music and various other items. But they are 
only for the operating force to guide them- 
selves in keeping within proper balance of their 
expense account. 

For instance, on the last day of the year we 
make a statement of how many guests we fed 
m the hotel, at the same time computing the 
entire cost of linen, glassware, china, silver, 
flowers, music, help, fuel (commissary expense), 
and all amounts which constitute an overhead 
charge independent of the cost of commissary 
supplies. We divide the total of this amount 
by the number of guests that we have fed and 
obtain the net cost of serving to each guest 
that has teen served at the hotel during the 
year. We also total up the amount of com- 
missary issued and obtain the average amount 
of food in a raw state that each guest has 
been supposed to have been served with. Then 
we take the total of overhead charges per guest 
and the total amount of issues per guest, add 
the two together and then deduct the amount 
received per each guest that has been in the 
hotel. 

This will show whether the house has made 
any money in the restaurant or not — after first 
allowing 13 cents for raw material for each 
meal served during the year to employes. 

All these figures are for statistical use in 
the hotel and have really no effect, in the earn- 
ings one way or the other. 
Duties of the Assistant Steward (American 
Plan) 

Where the steward has an assistant, the lat- 
ter 's duties are to relieve the steward of the 
immediate supervision of the pantries and the 
servants' halls, to keep an account of all break- 
age, to look to the saving of what food is re- 
turned from the dining room in good condition, 
to keep order in the kitchen when the head 
steward cannot be there. The assistant stew- 
ard is generally clothed with sufficient author- 
ity to dismiss from service any employees un- 
der him. In many instances, however, he is 
restricted and is required to report all cases 
of insubordination to the head steward. The 
inside steward should be a man of some execu- 
tive ability and action, and should not be un- 
decided about every trivial offense. He should 
have a bearing of some dignity. Where there 
is a competent chef who knows how to keep 
his crew in order the inside steward has no 
authority over the cooks. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



11 



Duties of the Assistant Steward (European 
Plan) 

Duties of assistant steward in a modern 
European liotel carry more responsibility than 
in an American plan house. They have imme- 
diate charge over the service during their re- 
spective Avatohes, including the pantries, the 
oyster counter, the dish service, the silver and 
glass pantries. They keep an account of tUe 
linens in the kitchen linen room, and generally 
assist in expediting good serving; keep an eye 
on the food as it passes from the kitchen, 
working in conjunction with the checkers; see 
that nothing passes witiiout an accounting of 
same; look after the yardman, and is in abso- 
lute control of all the minor help, engaging or 
dismissing them when necessary. They are 
real assistants to the chief of the commissary 
department. It will be seen that such a man 
must have governing qualities and be capable 
of fitting himself for the higher position when 
he may be called for promotion. He must 
be an honest, clear-sighted man, with busi- 
ness tact and should have a fair business edu- 
cation. 



* * * 



THE CHEF AND HIS CBEW 
American Flan 

Upon the cooks depends the good name of 
the hotel. No matter how well the rooms are 
kept, how elegant the office and rotunda, or 
what modern conveniences the hotel may 
have, they are all lost sight of when the cook- 
ing is bad. Therefore the steward will see 
that the cooks are the best the house can 
afford. A good many hotel men think that 
when they have a chef with a good reputa- 
tion, that ought to settle the whole matter. 
They surely find themselves invariably mis- 
taken; because a chef can not do all the work 
himself. And when it is expected that a 
chef, no matter how good he is, is supplied 
with incompetent assistants, there will be 
disappointment. When he should instruct 
his men in their work it is best he does it 
himself, and while he does their work his 
own is neglected. He can do only one man 's 
work at a time. More than this: no hotel 
can afford a crew of men who must learn at 
the expense of the house. 

The cooks prepare all food which enters 
the dining room; and in most places the 
chef also directs the serving, as in this way 
he can observe if his men prepare and serve 
most attractively. After the dish passes him it 
is again subject to the scrutiny of the steward. 
With the chef rests the economy of the 
kitchen. He can make the steward's adminis- 



tration an expensive or an economical one, 
as the meats and other material which he 
uses amounts to about three-fifths of the ex- 
pense of the table; and if he is indifferent 
can very easily throw away hundreds of 
dollars almost unnoticed, until the steward's 
monthly statement is made. He has only to 
trim a loin of beef or a rib closer than neces- 
sary and throw the waste into the stock 
boiler where it can not be found. The stock 
boiler never tells tales. For this reason I 
would never force a reduction of salary on 
cooks, without first ascertaining if they will- 
ingly accept it. Should they not, then change 
the crew at the figure which the house can 
afford. 

When a chef resigns, giving the required 
time to secure his successor, and he has shown 
himself faithful and competent, it is well to 
let him remain until his time expires; but 
should it, for any reason, be necessary to re- 
move him, it is not advisable to give too long 
notice, in some cases none at all, but have 
his successor right in the kitchen at the time 
the change it being made. I say this, because 
I have found, almost without exception, when 
notice was given to the chef, the house was 
the loser. No matter how well meaning the 
chef may be his cooks will see that nothing 
is saved. I doubt if there is any other branch 
of business where such waste and destruction 
is practiced by men who are being removed 
from their places in a peaceful way. 
European Flan 

The high-priced chef and his crew of as- 
sistants in a modern European hotel, is in 
most instances a man of high ideals; he is 
proud of his profession and well respected. 
He is quite different from the old-fashioned 
American plan chef; there is more expected 
of him than of the old style, when raw 
material was cheap, and, though his food 
was well cooked, the requirements as to vari- 
ety usually confined to certain limits. 

The chef of a European house must not 
only have an almost endless variety in his 
larder, ready at short notice, but he must 
make every effort to prepare his daily bills 
of fare with the view of drawing the patron 's 
eye from the old customs of beef and mut- 
ton. He must plan to have his dishes delec- 
table and attractive as well as wholesome 
and healthy; he should be practical and be 
a student of economy. It is very necessary 
that he watch his crew and train them into 
saving, for every fraction of a cent amounts 
to many dollars by the end of the month. 



12 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



The chef keeps an account of every loin 
of beef and has the cuts from same counted 
and checked. He knows every steak and 
chop that has been cut and what has be- 
come of them, for they are his principal item 
of expense to the house. He regulates the 
portions as they should be for the price on 
the bill of fare, puts the price on the special 
bill of fare, and, as a rule, checks his issue 
daily with the sheets in the storeroom. 
The Pastry and Bakery 

The pastry and bakery, the second branch, 
is of no less importance than the kitchen. 
When a hotel has poor bread or rolls there 
is complaint, no matter how good the cooks, 
When the pastry cook and baker are com- 
petent, sober men it is generally this branch 
which causes less annoyance than the others. 
Being located in most instances away from 
the kitchen they do their work quietly, as 
they are not interfered with in their labors 
by waiters or other help calling for orders. 
(I will except resort hotels where kitchen and 
bakery are in one room, and the pastry cook 
with his assistant serves his preparations.) 
Their storeroom account is also more easily 
kept in check the material used by them being 
generally cheaper and but little waste. The 
total cost of material, as compared with the 
kitchen, is a little more than 3-16 of the total 
issues of supplies on the average. If the men 
of this branch are not competent more waste 
will result; there will be hardly a day but 
some one thing or another will be a failure. 
The Fruit Pantry (American Plan) 

The fruit pantry is in most houses in 
charge of girls; for that reason it requires 
a great deal of the steward's personal at- 
tention. Here all relishes, fruits, desserts, 
tea, coffee, milk and cream, butter and, in 
fact, everything not served by the cooks, is 
served from the pantry. Good pantry girls 
are not plentiful. When the steward has a 
good .one he is fortunate and should try to 
keep her. It requires a girl who is obedient 
and has a strong will of her own — one who 
will show no partiality, serving waiters in 
turn as they call, and giving portions as 
directed by the steward. Early in the season 
of small fruits the pantry often proves more 
expensive than need be, especially if you 
have girls there who will try to please 
waiters, who always try to prevail on them 
for favors in serving larger portions. 
The Fruit Pantry (European Plan) 

In a European hotel the fruit pantry serv- 
ice does not have as many different items 



under its immediate control. There are 
served from this division usually all relishes 
and fruit salads, also cheese, fruit, conserves 
and melons when in season. This pantry is 
usually in charge of girls, who must be well 
experienced and trained in their work; the 
assistant steward having direct supervision. 

When a steward is so fortunate as to 
have a good crew of pantry girls he should 
lend them all possible assistance by letting 
roustabouts do the heavy carrying for them, 
bringing supplies from the storeroom, as very 
few girls train in well in fruit pantries. The 
steward should also i,nstruct them in giving 
the proper portion, that there be as nearly 
as possible the same quantity of each and 
every portion. 

The serving of butter and bread is often 
in charge of a pantry steward who cuts the 
bread for the dining room, also keeps watch 
over the butter and other food returned from 
the cafe or dining rooms, and reduces loss 
and waste, which in carelessly conducted 
places runs into large figures. 

The Coffee Pantry 

The coffee pantry is usually attended by 
men who make and serve the coffee, serve 
hot milk and cream for the coffee, cream for 
cereals and such fruits as is customary. 

The toast is also in charge of the coffee 
man, as well as the egg boiling apparatus. 
In the morning this is usuiSly the busiest as 
well as the most critical place of the en- 
tire serving department, therefore needs the 
most attention. 
Tea and Coffee Making 

The making of tea and coffee belongs to 
this branch. In large houses there is a man 
who attends to the making of coffee and tea, 
assists at carving at meal time, opens the 
oysters and clams, or helps do so. He serves 
the coffee and rolls and makes the toast and 
griddle cakes. In other houses the work 
of coffe* and tea making devolves on the 
assistant steward; and again in others, there is 
a girl who attends to this, as well as the baking 
of cakes and making toast in a place convenient 
to the dining room entrance. She also has 
charge of the rolls and all breads, serves 
them in portions instead of permitting the 
waiters to help themselves, as in some places. 

Careful attention should be paid to the 
making of coffee. Every hotel man knows 
how much annoyance it has given him, and 
yet it is not a difficult thing to do. It 
takes no more work to make good coffee 
than to make it poorly. In the first place. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



13 



when you have urns for making drip coffee, 
see that they are evenly heated, and be sure 
that water is boiling before pouring it on 
the coffee. I would make the bags of fine 
linen crash: then have the coffee of the best 
quality — ground very fine, using about one 
pound to every two gallons of boiling water; 
let steep, then draw and pour it over a second 
time. It ought to stand about fifteen minutes 
before using. Make only enough at one time 
to last about an hour. Start your second urn 
about fifteen minutes before the first is 
empty. By instructing the coffee maker to 
proceed in this manner there will always be 
good coffee. 

I should never make tea in an urn. When 
there are pots to serve, have boiling water 
continually during meal hours and draw into 
the teapots as taken to the guests, about the 
same way is it is done in first-class restau- 
rants. Tea loses all its good qualities after 
standing over ten minutes and becomes really 
unhealthy as a beverage. 
Serving the Milk and Cream 

Milk and cream should always be poured 
by one of the pantry girls. Where waiters 
are permitted to help themselves they often 
take cream instead of milk for drinking 
purposes. 
Serving the Butter (American Plan) 

Butter is usually prepared for the dining 
room by one of tbfe waiters, and then served 
from the pantry (European plan this work is 
performed in the pantry). 
Economy in the Pantry 

All fruit, bread, crackers, relishes, milk, 
cream, etc., not used, should be returned to 
the pantry from the dining room and not 
taken to the dish pantry, where a great deal 
may be lost. 
The Silver Pantry (American Plan) 

The silver pantry is in accordance with 
the quantity and quality of the service of the 
hotel. In a great many places there is no 
silver pantry at all, the dish-washers washing 
the knives, forks, glasses, etc., at one end 
of the sink; but where a house has a fine 
silver service and cut glass there should be 
a separate room, which it is possible to lock 
after working hours. This should be in 
charge of one, or, if very busy, two girls. 
On Regular silver cleaning days the head- 
waiter generally furnishes men for assistance 
in this work, since it is he who keeps account 
of this ware. 
Silver Pantry (European Plan) 

In large European hotels the silver is a 



department separated from the rest of the 
dishes and glassware. There are experienced 
men who understand the cleaning, polishing 
and repairing of silver. In some hotels an 
electro-plating bath is a part of the equip- 
ment, as, also, electrically-driven buffing 
wheels. It requires fully as much, if not 
more, care and attention to see that the silver 
is kept in good repair and always bright 
than is usually supposed by those not ac- 
quainted with hotel work. Here also the 
record kept. The surplus or reserve silver is 
kept in special lockers in this room. 
The Dish Pantry 

The dish pantry is the place where all 
soiled dishes are taken from the dining room. 
It generally consists of a large sink, one 
sorting table and a draining rack. 

Since the use of electricity has become 
almost general there are few hotels or restau- 
rants, even of the smaller size, who do not 
find it more economical and also more sani- 
tary to use a machine for washing dishes. 
Satisfactory Method of Washing Dishes 

Where a house has no dishwashing machine 
I have found the following method about the 
best to adopt: Have a sink made of two-inch 
pine wood about 14 feet long, 2 feet deep, 
2% feet wide, divided in three parts — one for 
hot soap suds; the second for clean hot rins- 
ing water; the third for soaking dishes which 
do not wash easily, such as egg cups and 
dishes that have been caked. Have a live 
steam pipe placed in the first, so you can 
keep the water at the desired heat; then get 
about six wire baskets sixteen inches long by 
eleven inches wide and eleven inches deep; 
have them lined with thin oak strips to keep 
the wire (which should be galvanized) from 
marking the dishes. After the dishes are 
carefully scraped and sorted have the dish- 
washer (who should be a strong man) place 
them firmly, yet so the water can pass around 
every dish. When the basket is filled he 
should set it in the soap suds and let it stand 
until he has filled a second basket, when he 
should take the first and plunge up and down 
four or five times. This forces the water 
around the dishes. Then they should be 
plunged just as many times in the rinsing 
water. If the water is hot the dishes will be 
thoroughly clean and dry without wiping. 
There is very little chipping. By above de- 
scribed method one man and three girls can 
wash the dishes for 200 people. 
Saving at the Scrap Table, 

There should be arranged at the sorting 



14 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



table a kind of railing on which are sus- 
pended a number of tin vessels made square 
in order to fit closely together, in which 
everything is saved which comes back from 
the dining room. The sorter should not be 
allowed to use his judgment as to what should 
be saved. The steward or inside steward 
should watch this branch very closely and 
after the meal, should deliver these savings 
to the chef, who can dispose of them. 
Help's Meal Hours 

The steward should post in a conspicuous 
place in the halls the hours during which 
the help are to have their meals served. 
The Storeroom 

The storeroom is the real business branch 
of the steward's department. The buying 
and selling is done there, the only difference 
from the regular retail grocery store being 
that goods are sold to the various depart- 
ments of the hotel at cost price, allowing 
nothing for shrinkage. It is in charge of a 
man called the storekeeper — in large houses 
two men, one the receiver, the other the 
bookkeeper who also issues, with the assist- 
ance of the receiver. 
Refrigeration 

In all large modern hotels there is a system 
of refrigeration which is used in many ways, 
but principally for the use of the kitchen, 
storeroom, pantries and pastry room. For- 
merly it was necessary, when the kitchen 
needed cold dishes, a tub of ice or ice 
water was used; now there is a box with 
refrigerating coils in which there is a con- 
tinuous supply of cold dishes dry and ready 
for use. Instead of the old sloppy ice boxes 
in the kitchen for the cook 's use, they now 
have cold rooms in which all their perishable 
food is kept ready, at a moment's notice; 
the same in the pastry room for keeping 
creams and jellies, and in the pantries for 
cheese, fruits and green salads. In the store- 
room there usually is a system of these cold 
rooms built in a row and connecting, divided 
on the inside by non-conducting partitions 
into several compartments, and piped sepa- 
rately, which makes it possible to regulate 
the temperature differently in each one of them. 

There are in many hotels from three to 
four or more of these. One is for the fresh 
meats, another for poultry and game, one 
for dairy products, and another for vege- 
tables, each of which requires a differently 
kept temperature. Fresh meats require more 
cold than other supplies; fresh vegetables less. 

Fish are best kept in the old way with a. 



little broken ice over them. To keep them 

in a dry freezing room causes them to lose 

in quality. -Milk is best kept in ice water; 

the cans standing in a tank of ice water, the 

milk is kept much longer than in any other 

way. 

Regular Hours for Storeroom Issues 

There are regular hours during which 
time the supplies are issued to the different 
branches or departments, who send regularly 
filled requisitions. 
The Steward in the Storeroom 

Here, also, is where the steward can be 
found during the time he is not otherwise oc- 
cupied, looking over his accounts, making up 
his market list and preparing for his next 
day's bill of fare. 
Storeroom Monthly Inventory 

Stock of supplies on hand should be taken 
at the end of every month and submitted to 
the office. 
The Wineroom 

The wineroom is kept entirely separate froih 
the store room and is in charge of the assistant 
steward or wine storeroom man; but in many 
houses the head bartender issues the wines. 
When in charge of the latter the accounts are 
kept in the office and a very filthy and 
neglected wineroom is usually the result. When 
wines are served to the dining room from the 
wineroom direct, the wineroom should be in 
charge of the steward's assistant or a wine 
steward. 

Temperature of Wineroom , 

The wineroom should be located where the 
temperature is most equable — not too warm in 
the summer nor too cold in the winter. There 
should be also a refrigerator arranged with 
racks on which to keep such wines for daily 
use* as champagnes, white still wines, ales, 
beers and mineral waters. Clarets, burgundies 
and all other dry red wines should not be 
chilled before use. 
Wine Issues 

The wine steward should fill no requisition 
for wines or liquors of any kind for guests or 
bar unless the same is first recorded in the 
office. A guest, in ordering, should fill in a 
card, printed for that purpose. The waiter 
takes it to the clerk or cashier, who O. K. 's it, 
which means that it has been charged to the 
guest. Stock is taken once a month. This 
branch is one of the most important factors 
in the success of an American plan hotel, many 
not being able to exist where the traffic in 
wines is prohibited by law. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



15 



The Yardman 

The yardman is needed for all the rough and 
heavy work, helping the storekeeper and i«ceiv- 
ing the groceries, freezing ice cream, keeping 
the yard and sidewalks clean, looking after 
the help's toilet and doing such other work as 

lie may be called upon to do. 

* * * 

Kitchen Equipment for 250-Room Hotel 

The following is a, list of utensils required 
to conduct the back part of a hotel of about 
250 rooms in first-class style (either of Amer- 
ican or European plan) : 

KITCHEN. 
1 16-foot range (4 oven). 
1 30-inch broiler. 
1 24-inch broiler. 
1 bain marie about 2%x4 feet. 
.1 40-gallon stock boiler. 

1 25-gallon stock boiler. 

2 steamers. 

1 12-inch marble mortar and pestle. 

1 12-foot carving stand and bain marie. 

1 egg boiler. 

1 10-foot plate warmer. 

1 toast, wafBe and cake range. 

1 copper fish boiler. 

2 32-quart copper sauce pans. 
2 20-quart copper sauce pans. 
4 16-quart copper sauce pans. 
2 12-quart copper sauce pans. 
2 lO-quart copper sauce pans. 
2 8-quart copper sauce pans. 
2 6-quart copper sauce pans. 
6 4-quart copper sauce pans. 

4 1% -quart copper sauce pans. 
4 1-quart copper sauce pans. 
2 8-inch copper saute pans. 
2 10-inch copper saute pans. 
2 12-inch copper saute pans. 
1 14-inch copper saute pan. 
1 16-inch copper saute pan. 
1 16-inch copper braserie. 

1 13xl8-inch wire broiler. 

2 llxl5-inch wire broilers. 

4 9xl2-inch wire oyster broilers. 

2 French potato fryers. 
1 dozen egg fry pans. 

3 hotel fry pans. 

1 black iron grease pan. 

3 porcelain-lined iron pots for boiling veg- 
etables. 

1 10-ineh potato masher. 

1 Saratoga chip cutter. 

1 large meat cutter. 

2 dozen forged basting spoons. 
2 3-prong steel flesh forks. 

2 6^ -inch flat skimmers. 

6 No. 10 flat handle skimmers. 

6 cake turners. 

1 dozen gravy ladles (small). 

1 dozen gravy ladles (medium). 

1 dozen soup ladles. 

2 egg whips. 

2 flour dredges. 

1 Vs pt., 1 pt. and 1 qt. measures. 

1 nutmeg grater. 

6 14xl8x2-inch flat square pans for steaks. 



2 8-inch Chinese strainers. 
2 6-inch Chinese strainers. 
1 large colander. 
1 puree sieve. 
1 puree brush. 

1 bread crumber. 
6 grease brushes. 

12 union parers and corers. 
6 vegetable knives. 
12 8-ineh and 12 10-inch milk pans. 

2 40-quart dish pans. 
2 30-quart dish pans. 
2 20-quart dish pans. 

2 14-quart dish pans. 

6 roast pans to fit range. 
6 roast pans, half size. 

3 waffle irons. 
1 meat block. 

1 block scraper. 
1 wire block brush. 

1 wire brush fish cleaner. 

2 pot chains. 
1 ice pick. 

1 cork screw. 

6 wooden pails. 

1 cedar tub (for potatoes). 

6 2-gallon bowls for mayonnaise. 

BAKERY AND PASTEY. 
1 oven for bread. 
1 candy kettle. 

1 dumpling steamer. 

2 peels. 

1 mixing trough. 
1 proving box. 
12 bread trays. 
1 scales. 

1 1-quart measure. 
1 1-pint measure. 

1 %-pint measure. 

2 egg beaters. 
1 flour brush. 

1 copper beating bowl. 

1 large and 2 small flour sieves. 

1 strainer (large). 

2 Chinese strainers. 
1 fruit press. 

1 fruit parer. 

6 basting brushes. 

2 large wooden mixing bowls. 

2 medium wooden mixing bowls. 

1 dozen wooden spoons. 

1 felt jelly strainer. 
12 sponge cake pans. 

12 8-inch and 12 10-inch milk pans. 

12 brown bread molds. 

12 bread pans (French). 

12 bread pans (plain). 

12 Russia iron baking sheets. 

12 muffin molds. 

36 deep and 36 shallow pie plates. 

2 ladles. 

2 dippers. 

1 copper custard pie dipper. 
12 dozen jelly molds, individual. 

6 ice cream molds, brick. 
12 dozen charlotte russe rings. 

1 lemon squeezer. 

1 16-quart copper sauce pan. 

1 10-quart copper sauce pan. 

1 pastry range, coke or hard coal. 

1 grease pan for frying. 



16 

1 40-quai't dish pan. 

2 20-quart dish pans. 
2 14-quart dish pans. 
2 rolling pins. 

1 40-quart freezer, power. 

1 packing can. 

1 16-quart freezer complete. 

1 ice tongs. 

1 ice chisel. 

1 ice crusher, power. 

PANTEY. 

1 12-gallon hot water urn. 

2 10-gallon coffee urns. 

1 tea urn, if tea is made in large quantity. 

1 bread cutter. 

2 bread knives. 

1 can opener. 

2 small wooden tubs. 

2 wood pails. 

3 basting spoons. 

2 small ladles. 
1 cork screw. 

6 earthern bowls. 

1 ice pick. 

1 knife polisher. 

1 sugar dredge. 

3 1-gallon pitchers (agate ware). 

2 cream dippers. 

3 preparing knives. 
1 colander. 

1 strainer. 

2 dozen tea strainers, individual. 

Kitchen Ectuipment for 40-Eocm Hotel 

The following is a list of utensils required 
to conduct a forty-room country hotel (either 
American or European plan) : 
KITCHEN. 
1 2-oven range (with water back). 
1 24-inch broiler. 

1 14-gallon stock pot (copper with faucet). 
1 10-foot steam table (with stove). 
1 6-foot plate warmer (with stove). 

1 16-quart sauce pan for soup, copper. 

3 I2-quart copper sauce pans. 
3 8-quart copper sauce pans. 

3 6-quart copper sauce pans. 

2 4-quart copper sauce pans. 

4 1%-quart copper sauce pans. 

2 10-inch saute pans. 

3 9x12 wire broilers. 

2 10-inch wire frying baskets. 
1 grater. 

6 egg frying pans. 

1 black iron grease pan. 

1 potato masher. 

3 porcelain-lined iron cook pots for vegetables. 

2 hotel frying pans, I'fo. 24. 
1 Saratoga chip cutter. 

1 meat cutter. 

1 dozen basting spoons. 

1 3-prong steel flesh fork. 

1 6V2-inch skimmer. 

2 small skimmers. 

2 cake turners. 
6 small ladles. 

3 large ladles. 
1 egg whip. 

1 flour dredge. 
1 nutmeg grater. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



4 flat pans for cut meats. 
1 Chinese strainer, medium. 

1 colander. 

2 grease brushes. 

2 waffle irons. 

1 dozen dairy pans, 8-inch. 
1 dozen dairy pans, 10-inch. 
4 wooden pails. 
1 40-quart dish pan. 

3 20-quart dish pans. 

3 14-quart dish pans. 

4 roast pans to fit range. 
4 roast pans, half size. 

1 vegetable bain marie. 

3 earthen bowls for salads and mayonnaise. 

When the house is not supplied with steam, 
as is often the case, a hot water stove of a 
good size will supply the kitchen with hot 
water, heat the dishes, carving stand and bain 
marie, and at the same time save the expense 
of water backs in the ranges, which is consider- 
able where there is hard well water. 
FOR PASTRY COOK. 
1 portable oven. 

1 stove. 

2 large wooden bowls. 
1 small wooden bowl. 
1 large mixing pan. 

1 small peel (short handle). 
1 scales. 

1 1-quart measure. 
1 1-pint measure. 
1 %-pint measure. 
1 egg beater. 
1 flour brush. 
1 beating bowl. 
1 flour sieve, large. 
1 flour sieve, small. 
1 strainer. 
1 basting brush. 
% dozen wood spoons. 

1 rolling pin. 

% dozen sponge cake pans. 

% dozen iron cake baking sheets. 

4 bread pans. 

2 dozen deep pie plates. 

2 dozen shallow pie plates. 

2 dippers. 

1 custard dipper. 

1 prooving box. 

5 dozen individual jelly molds. 
5 dozen charlotte rings. 

1 fruit press. 

2 20-quart dish pans. 

1 16-quart ice cream freezer. 

1 packing can. 
.% dozen brown bread molds. 

1 cake griddle. 

1 pudding steamer for stove. 
V2 dozen muffin molds. 

PANTEY. 

1 8-gallon cofCee urn. 

2 bread knives. 

1 can opener. 

2 small wood tubs. 

2 preparing knives. 
1 ice pick. 

3 basting spoons. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



17 



2 small ladles. 
1 cork screw. 

1 sugar dredge. 

2 1-gallon pitchers of agate ware. 
1 strainer. 

I dozen individual tea strainers, 
% dozen earthen bowls. 

* * * 

MANAGING- HELP 

The law of military government is alike the 
world over. It is as old as history. Every 
country has civil laws which undergo a revi- 
sion, often a complete change to conform with 
the spirit of the times; but the rules, discipline 
and etiquette, which form the fundamental 
principles of military organization, will ahoays 
remain as they are. The fact that every man 
is recognised in his station only alone makes 
it possible that one general can move the 
armies of a nation successfully. No private 
can seek redress or make a report of any kind 
io any one but the officer immediately above 
him, nor can the captain officially approach a 
general and thereby ignore the intermediate 
officers. On the other hand, the general, when 
giving orders, gives them to the colonel and 
so they pass down from officer to officer, until 
they reach the lowest rank. Every man remains 
in his place and attends to the duties of his 
office, which, in order to attend to properly, 
Iceeps him occupied without any time to look 
after the duties of someone else: in short, every 
man minds his own- business. 

Business concerns and' corporations who or- 
ganize and govern their forces on the above 
basis surely meet with best results, especially 

in large hotels. 

* * * 

Organization for a 250-Booni American Flan 
Hotel 

The steward having just entered upon his 
duties with a full crew of help for an Amer- 
ican plan house with a capacity of about 300 
people and doing a prosperous business, the 
total number of his force is about twenty-seven, 
divided as follows: 

1 carver, who also makes eofEee. 

1 headwaiter. 

II cooks, including: 

1 chef. 

1 second cook. 

1 roast cook, who also broils. 

1 fry cook. 

1 butcher, who also attends the cold meats 
and salads. 

1 vegetable cook (girl). 

1 fireman. 

1 pan washer. 

3 girls for cleaning vegetables. 
1 baker. 
1 pastry cook. 
1 girl to help in bakeshop. 



2 girls in fruit pantry. 

1 girl in coffee and bread pantry. 

1 girl in silver pantry. 

4 in dish pantry (1 man and 3 girls). 

2 yardmen. 

1 storekeeper. 

With such a force of employees at his corn- 
man it requires continued vigilance to see that 
the best possible results are obtained; that all 
do the work alloted to them with efficiency and 
dispatch, as on their prompt and harmonious 
movement, in conjunction with a force of com- 
petent waiters, depends the good service re- 
quired to please the guest. They all look to 
the steward for their orders and any differences 
which may arise among some of them are re- 
ferred to him for adjustment. He is their man- 
ager, advisor and judge and should rule in a 
firm and dignified manner. He has but little to 
say to any of them, except as concerns the 
work, from the time he enters until work is 
done. 

Organization for a 100-Koom European Plan 
Hotel 

Organizations of European hotels differ from 
the American plan houses principally in that 
they usually are open 18 hours a day, and some- 
times longer; for that reason extra men must 
be added. Furthermore, order cooking obtains 
during the hours the cafes or restaurants are 
open for service; there is no closing of dining 
rooms after meal hours; but there must be con- 
tinually men on watch to execute orders as they 
come from the cafe. For this reason there are 
relief men, as men cannot be expected to work 
18 hours a day. I will endeavor to give in 
the following a list of what should constitute a 
crew of a 100-room European hotel in a small 
city: 

1 steward. 

1 headwaiter and captain. 
1 chef and crew, consisting of: 

1 second, 

2 broilers, 

2 fry cooks, 

1 cold meat man, 

1 butcher, 

1 vegetable cook, 

2 girls, 

1 fireman, 
1 pot washer, 

1 coffee man, 

2 fruit pantry, 
4 dishwashers, 

2 silver and glass pantry, 
1 pastry cook, 
1 helper, 

1 baker and helper, 

2 helps' hall, 

1 store room man, 

1 store room porter, 

2 checkers, 
1 yard man. 



18 



THE PBACTICAL 



In this organization it is necessary for the 
senior checker to officiate in supervision in the 
absence of the steward; and for the chef to 
supervise all of the pantries. 

Both the chef and head checker should be 
men of quality. It is in their hands to save 
for the house in strictly regulating the portions 
served for an order. 

The coffee pantry should be adjoining the 
fruit pantry, in order that one employee may 
serve both between meals. 

The cold meat man also attends to the oys- 
ters and shell fish. 

Toast and cakes are made by one of the 
kitchen girls. If the house is busy there should 
be an extra girl for this, and also, an extra 
oyster man. 

The store room porter should be able to do 
the issuing for the last meal, for the reason 
that the regular storekeeper arrives very early 
in the morning. 

BUls of rare for a Country Hotel of 100 Rooms 
(European Plan) 

The following copies of menus are fair sam- 
ples of what is served in a hotel of the size 
above named. 



From The Hotel Monthly of March, 1913, 
under head of "EXPOSITION OF COUiST- 
TEY HOTEL EUROPEAN PLAN. . . the 

SYSTEM EVOLVED BY COL. FEED BARTHOLOMEW 
AT THE FREDERICK HOTEL IN GRAND FORKS. . 
THE A LA CARTE, TABLE d'HOTE AND COMBINA- 
TION cards; INTERESTING INFORMATION REGARD- 
ING THE MANAGEMENT, ECONOMIES, FEEDING OP 
EMPLOYEES, AND THE SERVICE IN GENERAL." 

The problem of the dining-room with coun- 
try hotels, European plan, is one of the most 
difficult for solution ; and failure to solve it 
has caused many a hotel that changed from 
American to European plan to go back to the 
American plan. 

A number of hotel-keepers have solved the 
problem to their satisfaction, in particular as 
to pleasing their patrons. . . . Col. Fred 
Bartholomew, owner and proprietor of the 
Frederick Hotel in Grand Forks, N. D., has 
evolved a system of dining-room operation by 
which his cafe shows a gain every month. We 
asked Col. Bartholomew to favor us with a 
set of his menus, and to give his reasons for 
adopting this particular style of catering, also 



HOTEL STEWARD 
tell of the results, financial and otherwise. Col. 
Bartholomew, in reply, wrote: 

"Under separate cover, I am mailing you 
the cafe menus now in use. 

"The large card is our regular short order 
bill, which is on the table at all times. 

"Card marked No. 2 is our Club Breakfast, 
served until 11 a. m. This is used in connec- 
tion with a la carte menu, and also No. 3, the 
'Breakfast Suggestions' attached in the morn- 
ing. You will find here short orders at reason- 
able prices, and you will find that a very good 
club breakfast can be obtained for 35 cents. 

"We are now running every evening, from 
5 until 8:30, a table d'hote dinner, at 50 cents, 
in addition to the a la carte menu. (I have 
marked this No. 4.) 

"All menus are used in connection with 
No. 1. 

"You will note in the table d'hote that a" 
choice of meat is given, so that only one meat 
order is allowed with this" table d'hote dinner. 
A dinner in this way, eliminating the choice 
to one meat and one dessert, can be furnished 
at a profit for 50 cents, and I believe that this 
is the only way that a 50-cent dinner can be 
served at a profit, at the present high cost. 

"You will note on the bottom of the menu 
that the guest has the opportunity of using the 
'A la Carte Suggestions,' if preferred. These 
are at reasonable prices. 

"I used to run a noonday dinner, but this I 
have discontinued, as I find that most people 
prefer short orders. 

' ' I have made considerable study of this 
cafe question, with the idea of producing a 
good meal as low as possible, in order to in- 
duce , patronage to the hotel. We have 125 
rooms, 50 at $1 ; 50 with connecting bath at 
$1.50, and 25 suites and sample rooms with- 
bath at .$2 and $2.50. At this rate we are able 
to show a nice profit on the investment each 

year. 

■* * ff 

"The cafe opens at 6:45 and clones at 2 in 
the afternoon, reopening again at 5 and clos- 
ing at 8:30. In this way we are able to handle 
the cafe with one shift." 

* # # 

We have photographed the cards numbered 
1, 2 and 3, respectively, No. 1 measures 6x13 
inches; No. 2, 6x11 inches; No. 3, 5M;x9 inches, 
and No. 4, 5%xl0 inches. No. 4 carries the 
table d'hote and condensed a la carte on one 
card. No. 5 is the luncheon card, served from 
12 until 2. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



CAFE 

FREDERICK HOTEL 

GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA 



19 



« 



Slrawtwiries with Cream 
Bluebemes 

^ Crape Fruit. 1 5; Whole 25 
Baked Apples with Cieam, 15 



FRUIT 

Oranges, lOc; with Cream, 15 
Bananas with Cream, 1 5 
Peaches with Cream 
Cranberry Sauce, 1 

BREAD, TOAST AND CEREALS 



Walennelon 
Cantaloups 
Raspberries 
Apple 5auc>:, 10 



Bread, Plain, 05 
DryToaA, 10 

Buttered Toajl, 15 
MilkToaA, 15 
Cream Toafi, 20 
French ToaA, 25 

fioAon Cream ToaA, 25 



Boiled Eggs, two, 1 5 
Fned EgBs, two, 1 5 

Scrambled Eggs, two, 1 5 
Scrambled Cggs- two, 1 5 
Shirred E^s, two, 1 5 



Raw. 25 



Soda Crackers, 05 Oatmeal with Geam, 1 5 

Cake, 1 Shredded Wheat Biscuit, 1 5 

Bowl of Milk and Bread, 25 Crape-Nuts with Cream, 15 

Bowl of Cream and Bread, 25 Cream of Wheat, 1 5 

Bowl ol Hall and HalF, Bread, 20 Force and Cream, 15 

Wheal Cakes, Maple Syrup, 1 5 Mush and Cream. 1 5 

Buckwheat Cakes, Maple Syrup, 15 Fned Mush, tO 

EGGS AND OMELETTES 



Poached Eggs, two, on ToaJI, 25 
Omelette, Plam, 20 
Omelelle, Tomatoes, 25 
Spanish Omelette, 30 

OYSTERS 

Stewed, 30 



Omelette with Mushrooms, 40 
Omelelle with Cheese, 30 
OmelettewithHam, 30 
Omelette, Jelly, 30 
Welsh Rarebit. 75 



Fried. 35 



Fried Whitehsh. 35 

Lake Superior Trout, 35 
Norwegian Fish Balls, 35 



WalUyed Pike, 35 
Broded Salt Mackerel. 35 



Sardines (Imported) per can, 35 
Sardines (DomeAic) per can, 25 



Small Sleak, 35 

Small Sleak with Onions, 40 
Top Sirloin, 30 

Top Sirloiu with Bacon, 60 
Sirloin Steak, 60 

Tenderloin Sleak, 60 - 

Sirloin Sleak, Mushrooms, 75 
Porterhouse Steak for 
three, $225 



French Fried Potatoes, 10' 
Saratoga Chips, 10 
Stewed m Cream, 1 5 
Cottage Fried, 1 5 



STEAKS 

Steaks served with Bacon or Onions, I Oc extra 
Porterhouse Steak, 73 
-Frederick Special Club Steak 
for four, $2.73 

Double Porterhouse, $1 SO 
Spring Lamb Chops, 35 
Pork Chops, 33 
MuUon Chops, 33 
Hamburger Sleak, 35 
bver with Bacon, 30 

POTATOES 

Au Gratin, 20 
Baked Potatoes, 05 
Lyonnaise, 10 



Veal Cudeu (plam), 33 
Veal Cadets (breaded), 40 
Jones Sausage, 33 
Fned Sausage, 25 
Broded Ham, 30 
Broiled Bacon, 30 
Ham or Bacon, 
two Eggs, 35 



Hash Brown, 10 
German Fried, 05 
ShoeAring, 10 



Tomato, 35 
Clam Broth, 25 
Cream Tomato, 35 



Lobiler Salad, 40 
Chicken Salad, 35 
Potato Salad, 1 5 
Shrimp Salad, 35 

Lelluce wiih Eggs. 20 



Asparagus on Toajl, 20 
Domestic Peas, 15 



Chicken, 35 

Pork, 25 



Egg Sandwich, iQ 

Gubhouse Sandwich, 30 
Caviar Sandwich, 25 
Denver Sandwich, 23 



SOUPS TO ORDER 

Clam Chowder, 23 
Chicken. 25 
0« Ta.1, 25 
SALADS AND RELISHES 



Consomme, 23 
Mock Turde. 25 

Cream Clam Chowder, 40 



Radishes 
Young Onions 
Cucumbers 
Tomatoes 
Ohves 
D.II or Mixed Pickles, I 
VEGETABLES ' 

Slewed Sugar Com, 15 
Fried Onions, 10 

COLD MEATS 



Mushrooms, 33 
Spanish Sauce, 20 
Tomato Sauce. 10 
French Peas, 23 
Celery, 13 



Stewed Tomatoes, 1 5 
Baked Beans, 1 3 



Ham. 25 

Pickled Pigs Feet, 25 



Roast Beef, 30 



Veal, 25 



Tongue, 25 



Brick Cheese. 10 



Coffee, per cup, 5: pot, 10 
Green Tea, per cop, 5; pol, 10 



SANDWICHES 

Ham and Egg Sandwich, 15 

Chicken Sandwich. 20 

Bee I Sandwich, IS 

Hoi Roasi Beef Sandwich, '20 

American Cream Cheese. 15 Edar 

COFFEE. TEAS, ETC. 

Eng. BreakfaJI (black), 10 
Cocoa, per cup. 10 
Cream, per glass, 1 3 



Fried Ham Sandwich. 1 5 
Ham Sgndwich, 10 
Pork Sandwich, 10 
Tongue Sandwich, 10 
Sardine Sandwich, 15 
se, 10 Roquefort Cheese, 20 



Glass Ki Cream and \^ Milk. 10 
Milk, per glass, 5 



Frederick $5.00 Commutation Tickets for $4.50 Cash 



CARD NO. I. 



20 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



CLUB BREAKFASTS 



Served from 6:45 to 1 1 a. m. 
ORDER BY NUMBER ONLY 



No. 1— 25c 

Toast 
Sliced Bananas and Cream 
Tea or CoSee 

No. 2— 25c 

Vz Orange or Stewed Prunes 

Wheat Cake with Maple Syrup 

Tea or Coffee 

No. 3— 30c 

V2 Orange or Stewed Prunes 
Cereals with Cream 
Dry or Buttered Toast 
Tea or CoSee 

No. 4— 30c 

V2 Orange or Stewed Prunes 

Eggs, any Style 

Dry or Buttered Toast 

Tea or Coffee 

No. 5— 35c 

V2 Orange or Stewed Prunes 

Fried Ham or Bacon 

Griddle Cakes 

Tea or Coffee 

No. 6— 35c 

V2 Orange or Stewed Prunes 

Farm Sausage with Fried Mush or Gnddle Cakes 

Dry or Buttered Toast 

Tea 01 Coffee 



N0.7- 



-35c 

V2 Orange or Stewed Prunes 

Calf's Liver and Bacon 

German Fried Potatoes 

Tea or Coffee 



No. 8— 40c 

V2 Orange or Stewed Prunes 

Cereal with Cream 

Chipped Beef with Cream 

Griddle Cakes or Dry or Buttered Toast 

Tea or Coffee 

No. 9— 45c 

Vi Orange or Stewed Prunes 

Mutton Chops or Fried White Fish 

German Fried Potatoes 

Dry or Buttered Toast or Griddle Cakes 

Tea or Coffee 

No. 10- 50c 

V2 Orange o Stewed Prunes 

Fried Ham or Bacon with Eggs 

German Fried Potatoes 

Dry or Buttered Toast or Griddle Cakes 

Tea or Coffee 

No. 11— 60c 

V2 Orange or Stewed Prunes 

Small Tenderloin Steak or Pork Chops 

and Cream Gravy 

German Fried Potatoes 

Griddle Cakes with Maple Syrup 

Dry or Buttered Toast or Fried Mush 

Tea or Coffee 



^Grape Fruit, or Canteloupe, when in season, can be substituted for fruit in any of the above 
by paying 10 cents extra. 

FRUIT 



Grape Fruit, half 15; whole 25 

Sliced Orange, 10; with Cream 15 

Sliced Bananas and Cream 15 

Apple Sauce , .. 10 

Canteloupe, half 15; whole 25 



Baked Apple with Cream 15 

Stewed Prunes iO 

Sliced Pineapple 15 

Raspberries with Cream 

Strawberries with Cream 



ALL CEREALS WITH CREAM 15c 



EGGS, DISHES, ETC. 



Boiled Eggs 15 

Fried Eggs 15 

Scrambled Eggs 15 

Plain Omelet 20 



Dry or Buttered Toast 10 

Wheat Oakes with Maple Syrup. 15 

Buckwheat Cakes with Maple Syrup 15 

Coffee, per cup, 5; per pot for one 10 

Cocoa, per cup 10; per pot for one 15 



Poached Eggs on Toast 25 

Broiled Ham 30 

Broiled Bacon 30 

Bacon or Ham and Eggs 35 



Hot Muffins 5 

Com Cakes with Maple Syrup 15 

Fried Com Meal Mush with Maple Syiup 10 



Milk, per glass 

Tea, per cup 5; per pot. 



. 5 

.10 



PLEASE PAY CASHIER 



NO CHECKS LESS THAN 15c 



CARD NO. 2. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

Breakfast Suggestions 



21 



Vz Canteloupe I 5; whole 25 
Sliced Bananas with Cream 1 3 
Stewed Prunes 10 
Blackberries and Cream 1 3 
Sliced Peaches with Cream 1 5 



Fruit 



V2 Grape Fruit 13, whole 25 
Sliced Oranges 1 0, with Cream 1 5 
Sliced Pineapple 1 5 
Blueberries and Cream 1 5 
Iced Watermelon 15 



Cereals 

Oatmeal with Cream 1 5 

Shredded Wheat with Cream 1 5 

Grape Nuts with Cream I 5 

Cream of Wheal and Cream 1 5 

Corn Flakes with Cream 1 5 

Eggs 

Two Egge, Boiled, Fried or Scrambled ! 5 

Two Eggs, Poached, Plain 20, on Toast 25 

Special 

Dry or Buttered Toast 10 Wheat Cakes with Maple Syrup I 5 

Fried Corn Meal Mush with Maple Syrup 1 3 

Home Made Muffins 1 



Chipped Beef in Cream 30 

Swift's Brookfield Sausage 35 
Little Pig's Pork Chops 35 



Ham or Bacon and Eggs 35- 
Calf's Liver and Bacon 35 
Plain Steak 35 



German Fried Potatoes 5 
French Fried Potatoes 10 



Tea 5 Coffee 5 Milk 5 Cocoa 10 

CARD NO. 3. 

LUNCHEON Kiee Cobblers 15 

SERVED FROM 12 TO 2 Prime ribs of beef au jus 40 Extra cut 50 

Dressed celery 15 Dill pickles 10 Pickles 5 Eoast leg of veal, fried sweet potatoes 35 

Young radishes 15 Sliced Spanish onions 10 Mashed or steamed potatoes 

Young pickled beets 10 Sugar corn 10 String beans 10 Stewed torn 'toes 5 

Soup 10 With Meat Order 5 Early June peas 10 Browned sweet potatoes 10 

Cream of chicken, Hanover style Nokomis asparagus tips on toast 20 

risH AND oysters TO ORDER Apple pie 5 Mince pie 5 Pumpkin pie 5 

% doz. blue points on % shell 30 Fruit roll, wine sauce, 10 

% doz. oysters, raw 25 Stewed 30 Fried 35 Baked apples with cream 15 

Fried whitefish 35 Wall-eyed pike 35 Sliced bananas with cream 10 

Sirloin of beef, horseradish 30 % Grape fruit 15 Whole 25 

Braised heart with egg noodles 30 Tea 5 Coffee 5 Milk 5 Cocoa 10 

Lamb hash with fried eggs... 30 _^___ 

Paprika schnitzel 30 

Omelette Hongroise 30 illustration no. 5 : luncheon card. 



22 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 

THE FREDERICK HOTEL CAFE Bills of Fare for a Country Hotel of 40 Rooms 

Table d'Hote Dinner 50 Cents (European Plan) 

SERVED FROM 5 TO 8:30 p. M. From The Hotel Monthly of November, 

Cremede Crecy 1912, under the head of "GLIMPSES OF A 

Dill pickles Chow chow MODEL COUNTEY HOTEL: A 40-room 

Creamed shrimps on toast ^^^^^ ^^ cloquet, Minnesota, credited one 

choice op Boiled frankfurts, potato salad 

^ ,j., , . ' '^ , ^^ HUNDRED POINTS BY THE STATE HOTEL IN- 

Cali 's brains saute, en butter 

Braised beef a 1 'Italian spector— typical pills oe fare for country 

Boast filet of lamb with jelly hotel, European plan. 

Boast loin of pork, apple sauce "As you see, my bills of fare are not very 

Steamed potatoes Mashed potatoes cheap, so nobody can say I spoil prices for 

Stewed tomatoes Sugar corn them; but we give the very best money can 

,,.,,. . „ , . buy. There is only one kind of butter used, 

CHOICE OF Apple pie Mince pie Cranberry pie ^, , , , , , , , , , 

rr- jj- the best creamery; also the best eees, marked. 

Tapioca puddmg . ■' ' ss ; i 

rpgg^ Coffee Milk ™ cartons; and everything else. We make our 

* • • own preserves and pickles. I do not buy the 

A la Carte Menu fruit when it is cheapest, but when it is best. 

Dill pickles 10 Young pickled beets 5 I bought some crates of strawberries when 

■Sour pickles 5 Sweet pickles 5 they were quite high in price, and people 

Queen olives 10 Celery 15 Young lettuce 15 thought I should wait until they were cheaper. 

soup 10c with meat order 5c ^ '^^ ^°* ^"^'"^ "'^ picked* away ten berries in 

Creme de Crecy three crates. When they got cheaper we had 

oysters and fish to order ^0 tlii'O"' ^'■'^''^J q"ite a lot. I pay my butcher 

% doz. little neck clams on half shell 30 good prices. I cannot expect him to give me 

V2 doz. blue points on half shell 30 the best meats and then bargain. We have had 

Oysters — % doz. raw 25 Stewed 30 Fried 35 the loveliest vegetables the whole summer out 

Wall-eyed pike 35 Filet of whitefish saute 35 of my own garden; have only to buy potatoes. 
Boiled frankfurts with potato salad 30 

Calf 's brains, saute en butter 35 „ , , BREAKFAST 

Braised beef a 1 'Italian 30 »rV T"\v^". Breakfast food, 15c 

„ 1 i, i ■ , „^ Stewed prunes, lOe Sliced peaches and cream, 20c 

Veal cutlets, papncka sauce 35 Pancakes, 15c Shirred eggs, 20c 

Jelly roll 10 Poached eggs on toast, 25c 

Prime ribs of beef, au jus 40 Extra cut. . . .50 Scrambled eggs on toast, 25c 

Boast loin of pork, apple sauce 35 Eggs and bacon, 35c 

Boast filet of lamb with jelly 30 Ham omelet, 35c Plain omelet, 25c 

Baked potatoes 5 German fried potatoes 5 Cheese omelet, 25c 

Hashed brown potatoes 10 vr, „ ., *^'""!k ^"'^ .P,"'/*"''' ^°' 

r, ti ji ■ / 4. i ir Minced ham with scrambled eggs on toast, 35c 

Cottage fried potatoes 15 ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ \l^ 

French fried potatoes 10 Au gratin potatoes 20 home-'Made peesekves and pickles 

Stewed tomatoes 5 Diced potatoes in cream 10 Spiced currants, 10c Spiced gooseberries, 10c 

Spinach with egg 10 Spiced crab apple, 10c Spiced cherries, 15c 

Browned sweet potatoes 10 Spiced peaches, 15c Red currant jelly, 10c 

Asparagus tips on toast 20 ^^^'^^ currant jelly, 10c Crab apple jelly, 10c 

Sugar corn 10 Early June peas 10 *^"°'='' ^^"^^ 1°<= Strawberries, 10c Cherries, 10c 

String beans 10 ^ Raspberries, 10c Gooseberries, 10c 

A 1 ■ c ,-. if ■ T 1,1- ■ ^ Qumce marmalade, 10c Lingonberry sauce, 15c 

Apple pie 5 Cranberry pie 5 Mmce pie 5 Doughnuts 10c 

Tapioca pudding 5 Hot" rolls.' 10c 

Sliced oranges 10 With cream 15 tea, coffee, cocoa, etc. 

% Grape fruit 15 Whole 25 Ceylon or Japan, per pot, 10c Cocoa, per cup, 10c 

Baked apple with cream 15 Coffee, 10c Milk, per glass, 5c 

Sliced bananas with cream .... 15 Cream, small pitcher, 5c Cookies, 5c Toast, 10c 

Tea 5 Coffee 5 (pot 10) Milk 5 Cocoa 10 Bread and butter, 5c 

salads potatoes, bread and bitttee sebved only with 

Chicken 35 Lobster 40 Shrimp 40 Potato 20 meat and fish obders 

Lettuce with egg 20 

cheese LUNCHEON 

Full cream 10 Imported Swiss 20 eelishes 

Imported brick 15 Green tomato pickles, 10c Sour pickles, 10c 

Imported Eoquefort cheese 25 Stuffed olives, 10c Queen olives, ioc 

Sweet pickled onions, 10c Chill sauce 5c 

illustration no. 4: (combination table Pickled beets, 5c Watermelon pickles 10c 

D'HOTE and a la CARTE.) Home-made chow chow. 10c ' 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



23 



SOUP 

Creamed vegetable, 15c 

PLATS DU JODR 

Swedish meat balls, 30c 

Baked white fish, 35c 

Eoast beef with braised onions, 40c 

Roast spring chicken, 60c 

Koast duck, 60c 

VEGETABLES 

Home grown wax beans, ' 10c 

Creamed parsnips, 15c 
Fried sweet potatoes, 10c 

SALADS 

Tomatoes, 25c Cucumbers, 25c 

Head lettuce, 20c Fruit salad, 20c 

DESSERT 

Banana cream pie, 10c Green apple pie, 15c 

Pineapple pudding and cream, 15c 
Ice cream and cake, 15c Peaches and cream, 20c 

HOXIE-aiADE PRESERVES AND PICKLES 

Spiced Currants, 10c Spiced gooseberries, 10c 

Spiced crab apple, 10c Spiced cherries, 15c 

Spiced peaches, 15c Red currant jelly, 10c 

Black currant Jelly, 10c. Crab apple jelly, 10c 

Quince jelly, 10c Strawberries, 10c Cherries, 10c 
Raspberries, 10c Gooseberries, 10c 

Quince marmalade, 10c Llngdnberry sauce, 15c 

Hot rolls, 10c 

TEA, COFFEE, COCOA, ETC. 

Ceylon or Japan, per pot, lOe Cocoa, per cup, 10c 

Coffee, 10c Milk, per glass, 5c 

Cream, small pitcher, 5c Cookies, 5c Toast, 10c 
Bread and butter, 5c ... 

POTATOES, BREAD AXD BDTTER SERVED .ONLY WITH 
MEAT AXD FISH ORDERS 



SUPPER 

Stuffed olives, 10c Queen olives, 10c 

Watermelon pickles, 10c Chill sauce, 5c 

Pickled beets, 5c Sour pickles, 10c 

Green tomato pickles, 10c Sweet pickled onions, 10c 

Home-made chow-chow, 10c 
Imperial Soup, 15c Cold ham, 30c 

Small steak, 35c Lamb chops, 40c 

Chicken pie, 40c Fried sweet breads, 45c 

Roast spring chicken, 60c 

Peas, 10c Creamed cauliflower, 15c 

Fried sweet potatoes, 10c 

Ham omelet, 35c Plain omelet, 25c 

Cheese omelet, 25c Sweet omelet, 35c 

Mushroom omelet, 45c 

Poached eggs on toast, 25c 

Scrambled eggs on toast, 25c 

Sardines on toast, 30c 

HOMEJMADB PRESERVES AXD PICKLES 

Spiced currants, 10c Spiced gooseberries, 10c 

Spiced crab apple, 10c Spiced cherries, 15c 

Spiced peaches, 15c Red currant jelly, 10c 

Black currant jelly, 10c Crab apple jelly, 10c 
Quince jelly, 10c Strawberries, 10c Cherries, 10c 

Raspberries, 10c Gooseberries, 10c 

Quince marmalade, 10c Lingonberry sauce, 15c 

Tomatoes, 2oc Cucumbers, 25c 

Banana salad, 20c Head lettuce, 20c 

Lemon pie, 10c Green apple pie, 15c 

Bavarian cream with meringue, 15c 

Sliced peaches and cream, 20c 

TEA, COFFEE, COCOA, ETC. 

Ceylon or Japan, per pot, 10c Cocoa, per cup, 10c 

Coffee, 10c Milk, per glass, 5c 

Cream, small pitcher, 5c Cookies, 5c Toast, 10c 

Bread and butter, 5c 

POTATOES, BREAD AND BUTTER SERVED ONLT WITH 
MEAT AND FISH ORDERS 



The BiUs of Fare for ICain Dining Room, 
Cafe and Lunch Room of the Sherman House, 
Appleton, Wis., a Successful 120-Room Country 
Hotel, European Plan, Rates 75 Cents to $2 a 
Day. 

The hours for meals in the Venetian room, 
or main restaurant are: Breakfast, 6 to 9; 
dinner, 12 to 2; supper, 6 to 8; on Sunday: 
Breakfast, 8 to 10; dinner, 1 to 2; supper, 6 
to 7:30. The cafe is open from 7 in the morn- 
ing until midnight. The lunch room is open 
from 5 a. m. until 1:30 a. m. 

The Venetian room breakfast card is repro- 
duced in facsimile on page 25. 

In the Venetian room there is served a 50- 
cent luncheon, of which this card is typical: 
THE VENETIAN ROOM. 
Luncheon 50 Cents. 

CHOICE OF 

Cream of chicken, Soubise 

or 

English beef broth 

Queen olives or Pickled onions 

Baked lake trout Italienne, potatoes Duchess 

Boiled beef tongue with spinach 

or 

Eoast pork, apple sauce 

or 

Eoast prime ribs of beef 

June peas or Stewed tomatoes 

Mashed or boiled potatoes 

Combination salad 

Apple pie or Mince pie 

Steamed diplomat pudding, rum sauce 

or 

Vanilla or chocolate ice cream 

Club cheese or Sage cheese 

Wafers 

Coffee Tea Milk 

« III • 

A la Carte, The Sherman, Appleton, Wis. 

The a. la carte for the Venetian room and 
cafe occupies six pages of a booklet. This list, 
including beverages, table waters, beers and- 
wines, indicates what can be had to order: 

THE VENETIAN ROOM. 
Soups. 

Consomme in cup 10 

Cream of tomato 10 

Cream of celery 10 

Ox tail 15 

Mock turtle 15 

Relishes. 

Bipe olives 10 

Queen olives 10 

Dill pickles 10 

Chow chow 10 

Mixed pickles 10 

Sweet pickled onions 10 

Sweet gherkins 10 

India relish 10 



24 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Fish ana Oysters. 

Broiled whitefish 40 

Broiled lake trout 40 

Broiled mackerel 40 

Fried oysters 50 

Boasts and Broiled. 

Broiled lamb steak 40 

Young chicken stuffed 40 

Broiled spring chicken (%) 60 

Steaks, Chops, Etc. 

Small tenderloin steak 40 

Extra tenderloin (for two) 80 

Small sirloin 50 

Extra sirloin (for two) 1.00 

Lamb chops 35 

Veal cutlets, plain 35 

Veal cutlets, breaded 45 

Ham fried or broiled 35 

Bacon fried or broiled 35 

Hamburger steak 35 

Pork chops 40 

Vegetables. 

Potatoes French fried 10 

Potatoes German fried 10 

Lyonnaise 15 

Au gratin 15 

O 'Brien au gratin 20 

Hashed brown 10 

June peas 10 

Wax beans 10 

Asparagus 20 

Lima beans 10 

Eggs and Omelets. 

Boiled (2) 15 

Pried (2) 15 

Poached (2) 15 

Poached on toast 20 

Scrambled 15 

Shirred 15 

Omelet (plain) 20 

Bum omelet 30 

Jelly omelet 40 

Spanish omelet 40 

Cold. 

Ham 30 

Beef tongue 30 

Chicken 40 

Eoast beef 30 

Sardines 20 

Salmon 25 

Marrinated herring 30 

Boston baked beans 25 

Assorted meats 40 

Salads. 

Potato 15 

Head lettuce 20 

Tomato mayonnaise 25 

Chicken 30 

Combination 80 

Asparagus vinaigrette 35 

Sandwiches. 

Chicken 25 

Ham (cold) 10 

Ham (fried) 15 

Swiss cheese 15 

American cheese 15 

Egg 20 

Caviar 30 



Toasts and Cakes. 

Dry toast 10 

Buttered toast 15 

Cream toast 25 

French toast 25 

Wheat cakes 15 

Corn cakes 15 

Preserves. 

Comb honey 15 

Apple sauce 15 

Stewed prunes 15 

Strawberries 15 

Pears 15 

Cherries 15 

Green gages 15 

Pineapple 15 

Peaches 15 

Blackberries 15 

Apricots 15 

Orange marmalade 15 

Currant jelly 15 

Strawberry jam 15 

Bar le due jelly 15 

Dessert. 

Pie (per cut) 05 

Assorted cake 10 

Vanilla ice cream 10 

Cheese. 

American 10 

Roquefort 20 

Club 15 

Pimento 15 

Waukesha cream 15 

Brick 15 

Coffee, Tea, Etc. 

Coffee (per cup) 05 

Coffee (per pot) 10 

Iced coffee 10 

Tea (per pot) 10 

Iced tea 10 

Milk (per glass) 05 

Cream 15 

Cocoa or chocolate 10 

Table Waters. 

Apollinaris (splits) 15 

Apollinaris (pints) 25 

White Eock (splits) 15 

White Eock (pints) 25 

Eed Eaveu (splits) 15 

Pluto (splits) 15 

Mountain Valley water (glass) 10 

Mountain Valley (pint) 15 

Beer and Ales. 

Pabst Blue Eibbon 15 

On draft and bottled. 

Budweiser 15 

Bass Ale (splits) 15 

Bass Ale (pints) 25 

Burke 's Stout (splits) 15 

Wines. 

% Bott. Bott. 

Mumm's (extra dry) $2.50 $4.50 

White seal 2.50 4.50 

Pommery sec 2.50 4.50 

Cook's (imperial) 1.00 2.00 

Sparkling Burgundy 1.00 2.00 

Vir.ginia Dare 75 I.OO 

ViB brut splits 1.25 



THE PKACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



25 



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26 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



The regular Cafe bill is divided into three 
parts: "Special To Day," "Cooked to 
Order," and "Ready to Serve." The selec- 
tion is: 

THE SHEEMAN CAFE. 

Special Today. 

Blue points 25 

Cream of chicken, soubise 10 

English beef broth 10 

Celery 20 Sliced tomatoes 15 

Queen olives 10 

Cooked to Order. 

Baked lake trout, Italienne 40 

Broiled whitefish, potatoes Julienne 40 

Eried spring chicken, pan gravy 50 

Sweetbreads a la Poulette 45 

Planked tenderloin steak 65 

Chicken livers en brochette 40 



Ready to Serve. 
Creamed chicken, mushrooms.... 
Boiled beef tongue with spinach. 

Boast pork, apple sauce 

Boast prime ribs of beef 



60 

35 

35 

25 

Asparagus 20 June peas 10 Stewed tomatoeslO 

Asparagus 20 June peas 10 

Stewed tomatoes 10 

Boiled potatoes in cream 10 

Fried sweet potatoes 10 

Head lettuce, sliced tomatoes 35 

Celery tomato Mayonnaise 35 

Apple pie 5 Mince pie 5 

Vanilla or chocolate ice cream 10 

Lemon peaches 15 

Grape fruit 15-25 Assorted fruit 20 

Roquefort cheese 20 

Waukesha cream cheese 15 



In the Lunch Boom the regular bill of 
fare is similar to that of the Cafe, except 
that the prices are a little lower for some 
dishes, and the "ready to serve" section 
lists fewer dishes, as may be noticed in 
comparing this with the preceding card. 

THE SHEEMAN LUNCH EOOM. 
Special Today. 

Blue points 25 

Cream of chicken, soubise 10 

English beef broth 10 

Queen olives 10 Sliced tomatoes 10 

Chow chow 5 

Cooked to Order. 

Fried fillet of trout Italienne 35 

Broiled whitefish, Saratoga chips 35 

Broiled spring chicken with bacon 45 



Calf 's liver, fried onions 25 

Hamburger steak, mushroom sauce 35 

Veal cutlets breaded, tomato sauce 35 

Eeady to Serve. 

Boiled beef tongue with spinach 35 

Roast prime ribs of beef :. 25 

Fried sweet potatoes 10 French fried 10 

Cucumber and celery salad 20 
Pie a la mode 10 Assorted cake 10 

Vanilla or chocolate ice cream 10 

Green gage plums 10 Bananas with cream 10 

* * * 

In the lunch room, however, there is a 
special business lunch for twenty-five cents, 
which is popular. This lunch is printed on 
a card listing a few "cooked to order" 
dishes, and, with the combination, the cheeks 
average considerably higher than twenty-five 
cents. This is a typical card: 

THE SHEEMAN LUNCH EOOM. 

Business Lunch. 

Cream of chicken, Soubise 

or 

English beef broth 

Baked lake trout, Italienne 

Boiled beef tongue, with spinach 

Roast pork, apple sauce 

Boast prime ribs of beef 

Stewed tomatoes 

Mashed or boiled potatoes 

Steamed diplomat pudding, rum sauce, or pie 

Coffee or milk 
Queen olives 10 Sliced tomatoes 10 

Cooked to Order. 

Veal cutlets, saute, Marengo 40 

Spanish omelette 35 

Creamed eggs with asparagus 35 

June peas 10 Wax beans 10 

Fried sweet potatoes 10 
Apple pie 5 Mince pie 5 

Vanilla or chocolate ice cream 10 
Grape fruit 15-25 Green gage plums 10 

The lunch room does quite a heavy break- 
fast and after-theatre business. It also serves 
to suit the convenience or purse of guests 
of the hotel who may not wish to patronize 
the restaurant for all their meals, but to 
get a light lunch at moderate cost, without 
leaving the hotel to find it in an outside 
restaurant. The lunch room has proved to be 
one of the most profitable departments of 
the house. 

The service is altogether by waitresses. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



27 



LABOR JVLAEKET TO BE CONSIBBBED 

When the hotel is located at or near a labor 
market, where the steward can easily select new 
help on short notice, they can be more severely 
dealt with than if he must send to other towns, 
thereby depending entirely on employment agen- 
cies, necessitating an expense of railroad fare, 
and when they come are often found to be not 
so good as what you have. The good help do not 
as a rule want to leave the cities, if they can 
help it, unless exceptional good salaries are 
offered. 

Some Help Need More Watching Than Others 

There is seldom a time when all the help is 
just what they shovild be. Some need more 
watching than others, but by using proper 
efforts it is often the case that some who prove 
poorly at first can be made to do good work. 

In order that the steward manages with suc- 
cess, he should set a good example by being a 
man of good moral habits and retain an even 
temper, not use profane or obscene language, 
abstain from tobacco in any form on duty and 
use no intoxicants. 

Bules Must Be Enforced 

It is well to have a printed code of rules 
posted in a conspicuous place, which should be 
strictly enforced. Any rule is a laughable 
farce when no attention is paid to it, especially 
if the steward violates it himself. 

Too much can not be said against the use of 
tobacco. Think of the manager of the hotel 
showing a guest around, and, when entering 
the kitchen, to see a cook at work with a pipe 
or cigar in his mouth! another a chew of 
tobacco, spitting all over the floor! or a waiter 
carrying a meal with a mouth full of tobacco! 
It will not improve the visitor's appetite to see 
such a thing, and his good opinion of the house 
will be much lessened. 

Cleanlifless should be one of the first and 
most important rules of the house. The work- 
ing department should always be in such a con- 
dition that the steward or manager can be 
proud to show visitors in every corner of the 
kitchen, pantries, ice boxes, bakery, storerooms 
or cellars, and say, ' ' we always keep it so. ' ' 

I will here enumerate a table of rules for the 
government of help as an illustration: 

Bules for Government of Help 

1. — All employees must he punctual in report- 
ing for duty. 

^. — Every one must he clean in hahit and in 
worlc. 

3. — There shall he no loud, hoisterous or pro- 
fane language, nor whisHling or singing. 



4. — Employees coming late for their meals will 
not he served unless good cause is shown 
to the steward, who, if satisfied, will or- 
der service. 
Notice of meal hours will he found posted 
in dining rooms. 

5. — Any one wishing to see an employee during 
wcrTiing hours must first ohtain permis- 
sion from, the steward. No visiting per- 
mitted otherwise. 

6. — No one alloiued to stand or sit around in 
the kitchen when of duty. 

7. — There shall he no smoTcing or chewing of 
tohacco. 

8. — All hreaTcage will he charged to hreaker at 
cost price. 
The penalty for violation of any of the above 

rules will he a fine or discharge from service, 

as the case may warrant. 

The above rules are simple, and yet suffi- 
ciently embrace all needs for any house large or 

small. 

Early Morning Duties 

The steward should be an early riser and be 
about in time to see that the help's meals are 
ready and promptly served, in order that they 
may be ready for duty when time requires them 
to be at their respective places, after which he 
passes to the ranges to see if the chef has 
everything needed. From there he inspects 

The Dish Heaters 

the dish heaters, sees if they have been prop- 
erly attended to. The dish heater is occasion- 
ally a source of annoyance, especially in houses 
where the steam fitting is badly done; it may 
happen that just at a time when the dishes are 
needed they are cold, and nothing is more un- 
satisfactory than to serve a meal on cold dishes. 
It should therefore be the first thing looked 
after in the morning. By opening full both 
the supply and return valves, waiting about 
two minutes, and then closing the return down 
to about half a turn; and then, if it does not 
work, have the engineer open the traps, which 
will always start a circulation that may have 
become stopped during the night. 

The Egg Boiler 

After this comes the egg boiler, of which we 
find a great many different kinds in use. Of 
late there are patent ones by which the time 
required for boiling is regulated by clock or 
electricity. Where none of the latter are in 
use, I would suggest a simple and good one 
made of sheet copper about 20 inches long by 
10 inches wide by 8 inches deep, resting on an 
iron frame about 2 feet high, in which place 



28 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



a perforated pipe lengthwise, supplied with live 
steam. With this, water can be brought to a 
boil in a very short time. The waiters place 
the eggs in small wire baskets, submerge in the 
boiling water, and watch time by a clock, which 
should have a place near by. 

Then the steward sees if the toast and cake 
ranges are in order. He then hands the serv- 
ing lists for the day to the pantry and gives his 
directions for the service, in order that requisi- 
tions can be made on the storerooms in good 
season. 

Then he goes to the bakery and pastry and 
sees that bread and rolls are on time. 

He sees if the yardmen are attending to their 
morning work. 

The steward then goes to the storeroom and 
arranges his bills of fare for the printer (often 
this latter work is done the evening before). 

He then goes to his breakfast, and after that 
superintends the serving of the best part of the 
morning meal before going to market. 

[Where there is an assistant or inside stew- 
ard it is the latter 's duty to attend to the de- 
tail of the inside work above referred to, while 
the steward attends to the bills of fare and 
then goes to market.] 

Steward Superintend Carving and Service 
(American Plan) 

The steward should be back from his trip 
to the market in time to superintend the serv- 
ing of the midday meal, especially where din- 
ner is served at that time. At breakfast the 
guests come in the dining room more scattered 
from the opening to the closing of the door, 
but not so with the other meals of the day. 
For these the guests usually come in a rush, 
and the steward should be on hand to avoid any 
confusion likely to arise in the serving depart- 
ment on account of the impatience of the 
waiters, and, also to see that a full supply of 
everything on the menu is constantly on hand; 
also that the carving and serving of the proper 
quantity for a portion is in accordance with his 
directions. 

In order to direct the serving from the carv- 
ing stand economically, and at the same time 
attractively, the steward should himself be a 
master of the art of carving. 

TO BE A GOOD CARVER IS AN AOGOM- 
PLISHJIENT WHICH EVERY STEWARD 
IS PROUD OF. 

Where a competent and trustworthy carver ia 
not permissible, the steward should by all 
means take a personal interest in this work, 
and he will thereby save many a dollar for the 
house. 



After the midday meal is over the steward 
attends to his special work, such as banquets, 
collations, luncheons, etc., if there be any on 
that day, and arranges his menus for such 
spreads as may be ordered or in prospective. 

After this he checks and O. K. 's his previous 
day's bills and sends them to the office. 

The Checker 

There are many systems of checking which 
may be selected from to suit special require- 
ments. I will not here recommend any special 
cheeking system, as all have their good points, 
and it is largely a matter of proper applica- 
tion of the system as to whether it be satis- 
factory or not. I will say, however, that 
among the systems very generally used are the 
Kuhn, Lock-Stub, Whitney, Hicks, Cash Regis- 
ter, and a number of others, some of them con- 
trolled by letters patent, and many of them 
elaborate and more or less expensive to operate. 

The comptroller's department of a hotel is 
of very great importance, however, as without 
it there is great opportunity for dishonest em- 
ployees to steal from the house. 

A check should be kept on all articles of food 
which leave the kitchen to be served to guests, 
and, also, foods taken out of the house, as 
traveling lunches, or foods sold in the manner 
of groceries to be taken out of the house in 
unprepared form. 

The checker 's office is usually situated at some 
point most convenient between the kitchen and 
dining rooms or cafes. Here the man in charge 
registers the names of the waiters and their 
numbers. (The headwaiter or captain in charge 
usually provides each waiter with a number in 
form of a brass check or other denotor which 
the waiter exchanges for a numbered badge 
after his name has been registered by the 
comptroller. ) 

After the waiter has been given his num- 
bered badge, the comptroller supplies him with 
the required number of guest checks-, on which 
the order for food or drinks is written either 
by waiter or guest, as the house rule may be. 

When the check is made out, the waiter takes 
it to the kitchen, and orders the items from 
the several divisions in the kitchen. When his 
service is completed, the waiter takes his tray 
and stops at the checker's stand, where it is 
inspected by the checker, and the inventory 
compared with the written order on the check. 
When all is correct, the checker verifies, and 
the waiter passes on to the dining room and 
serves his guest. 

When the waiter has finished his watch, he 
returns to the comptroller with his clearance 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



29 



stub and unusued checks, which are checked 
with the number with which he was issued. 
(The checks are issued in consecutive number, 
of course.) If he is clear the comptroller gives 
him an O. K. check, which passes him out of 
the house. 

This division is checked daily by the auditor 
or his assistant, and is compared with the re- 
turns of the cashier. 

The Morals Must Be Looked After 

The steward should try to maintain the high- 
est possible standard of morality among his 
help, for there is nothing more disgusting than 
to come in the kitchen and find the help using 
language of intimacy and profanity. There 
should be no familiarity between the male and 
female help while at work, or anjTvhere as long 
as in the house. Where a rule to this effect 
is not strictly enforced the organization be- 
comes corrupt and short-lived. 

Reprimands 

If the steward find any of his help violating 
a rule he should call the offender to one side, 
away from the hearing of the rest, and repri- 
mand in a firm manner, with injunctions and 
the penalties you will invoke at its repetition; 
unless the offense is of serious nature, when 
the penalties are applied at once. No offense 
should be overlooked more than once. Such 
treatment as the above results much better than 
where they are reprimanded in the presence of 
other help with a torrent of threats and oaths. 
When the offender is a man he will invariably 
resent it, and at times leave the house at once. 
And it is not manly to swear at helpless girls 
— only a bully would do so. Furthermore, such 
proceedings create disturbances which cause the 
rest to neglect their work while it occurs, and 
the help lose respect for such a manager. 

As to Intoxicants 

The use of intoxicating drinks should not be 
permitted in the kitchen. The custom of it 
being furnished to the cooks is entirely foreign, 
and I know of no instance wherein it has 
proven beneficial; and when the American edu- 
cated cook comes to rule the kitchen, I have no 
doubt the use of beer, wine or whisky as a 
beverage in the kitchen, will pass away. Its 
effect on the cooks while before the range has 
a tendency to excite, and often trouble has 
been traced to this source. Where cooks are 
allowed to drink, others feel they have the same 
right and will try to get it in some way. Where 
there is drunken help there is also profanity: 
both go hand in hand, and both offenses should 
be strictly dealt with. An example should be 



made o¥ the first offender; if the others value 
their places they will be more careful. 

Impartiality in Decisions 

Strict impartiality should be the steward's 
motto. In all his dealings he should not fine 
or discharge one and excuse another guilty of 
the same offense, unless the one is the cause of 
both. 

When there is complaint of a waiter not 
receiving proper attention, or any other difi'er- 
ence which may arise, both parties concerned 
should be brought together, and the cause wili 
soon be ascertained and can be adjusted. 

A decision when once made should not be 
changed. It is like a judge of a court, in whom 
the public soon loses faith if he can be per- 
suaded to reverse his own decisions. 

The Breakage and Fines Book 

The steward should have a book in which an 
account of all breakage is kept, the name of 
breaker, articles and cost thereof, also such 
fines as he may have imposed for violating 
rules. Every evening a transcript of the day 's 
charges in this book is sent to the bookkeeper, 
so that the amount may be charged to their 
account and deducted from their wages. In all 
cases the ones so charged or fined should be 
notified at once, as it avoids complaints and dis- 
appointment. 

No Visiting During Working Hours 

There should be no visiting of help during 
working hours, and no strangers should be per- 
mitted to enter the working department, except 
on very urgent matters; then only with a pass 
from the oflSce. Such visits always cause a 
disturbance or hindrance of some kind. There 
should be only one entrance to the working 
part of the house, where all help must enter 
and leave. At this entrance is usually a guard 
or watchman who admits no one but employees, 
and inspects all packages coming and going — 
this is to prevent any attempt at dishonesty. 

Evening Duties (American Plan) 

When work is done at night the steward sees 
that the chef has his meat rooms and ice boxes 
properly locked; that dishheaters, pantries, etc., 
are in good order for the next day. 

Warning Signs 

There should be signs at all entrances that 
none but employees are allowed to enter their 
respective departments; then only during work- 
ing hours. The steward cannot be too strict 
in the enforcement of this rule; it helps to 
avoid leakages, which will occur in any house 
where help is permitted to come and go at will. 



30 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



Quality of Help 

The help in the house should be the best that 
can be had for the wages the house can afford. 
Help can be had of all classes and all prices. 
It is seldom that a good hand is found willing 
to work for extremely lew wages, and then he 
only stays until something better is found. 
No Profit in Cheap Help 

I have never as yet found an instance wherein 
a steward has met with lasting success, whose 
custom it is, upon newly entering on his duties, 
to try to impress the management of the house 
that he can reduce the expenses below those of 
his predecessor by discharging all forces in his 
control and replacing them with cheaper help, 
which often (I may say, invariably) results 
in a house sheltering a lot of material who can 
find work nowhere else. Such a method has 
not only the effect to lower the standard of the 
help, but it also lowers the service, which, after 
this steward loses his position, his successor 
cannot readily improve, unless the original 
scale of wages is restored. 



Organization of a 40-Boom Country Hotel 
(American Flan) 

I will endeavor to illustrate the organizations 
of several houses that have come under my 
notice, from a small forty-room country hotel 
to a large summer resort, all of them success- 
fully managed and making money for their 
proprietors. 

First: A forty-room covmtry house, cater- 
ing to transients at $2.00 a day, the force is as 
follows : 

The proprietor, who acts as his own steward. 
There are in the oiBce — 

1 clerk. 

1 porter, who also does the housework. 

1 boy, who makes the calls and answers bells 

and keeps the ofiSce clean. 

2 bartenders. 

The kitchen crew, colored, as follows — 
1 head cook, man. 
1 pastry cook, woman. 
1 assistant cook (man), who also does pan 

washing. 
1 vegetable cleaner. 
1 yardman (colored), who kills the poultry, 

makes the soap, and keeps the kitchen 

supplied with fuel. 
1 bar porter, who also acts as storekeeper. 
1 dishwasher. 

In the dining room are three girls. They 
keep the dining room in order, wash silver and 
glasses, scrub the dining room floor twice a 
week, say "Wednesdays and Saturdays, and mop 
the same all other days. They are reinforced 
at meal times by two chambermaids. "When 
business is rushing an extra dining room girl 



is engaged. The proprietor acts as head waiter ; 
his wife is housekeeper. She has 3 girls, includ- 
ing the two helping at the tables; they keep 
the rooms in order and attend to the cleaning 
of paints. Two colored women do the laundry 
work. The house is noted for cleanliness and 
setting a good table, and has always been a 
money maker. 

The proprietor of the above house has a con- 
tract with the butcher to furnish all meats at 
a fixed rate — steaks, chops, roasts, boiling beef, 
etc., at uniform price, the same butcher pre- 
paring all meats ready for cooking. 

The following breakfast, dinner and supper 
bills are fair specimens of meals served at this 

house: 

BREAKFAST. 
Oranges and apples. 

Oatmeal mush. 
Dry, buttered or milk toast. 

Fried chicken. 

Beef steak. Ham. Pork chops. 

Fried apples and bacon. 

Eggs tried, boiled or scrambled. 
Potatoes stewed, fried or baked. 

Hot rolls. ' Plain bread. 
Tea. Coffee. Milk. 

DINNER. 

"Vegetable soup. 

Fried Mississippi River catfish, tomato sauce. 

Pickled beets. Chow chow. Olives. 

Boiled mutton with turnips. 

Roast beef, brown gravy. 
Leg of veal with dressing. 

Baked chicken pie. 
Apple fritters, brandy sauce. 

Boiled and mashed potatoes. 

Sugar corn. Tomatoes. 

String beans. 

Cabinet pudding. 

Peach pie. Custard pie. 

Wine jelly. 

Fruit. 

Coffee. Milk. 

SUPPER. 

Corn meal mush and milk. 

Cream toast. 

Baked bananas. 

Sirloin steak. Liver and bacon. 

Sausage. 

Fried or boiled eggs. 

Stewed plgsfeet. 

Cold roast beef. Ham. Mutton. 
German fried potatoes. Baked potatoes. 



Hot waffles. Biscuits. Plain bread. 

Apple sauce. 

Tea. Coffee. Milk. 

The bills are changed daily and are written 
by the clerk for each meal. 

There are often served at this house lodge 
installation and ball suppers, when as many as 
a hundred couples are entertained. The pro- 
prietor never has any trouble to secure wait- 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



31 



resses for an occasion of this kind, as there are 
always plenty of girls of respectable families 
pleased to give a helping hand. The chef and 
the pastry cook begin to prepare about two 
days in advance, and when the time comes and 
all is ready you will see as nice a table deco- 
rated with a profusion of flowers, stands of 
fruit and ornamentals of salads, jellies, cakes, 
etc., as you could wish for. 



Organization of a 100-Boom $2.50-arday Hotel 
The organization of a 100-room hotel at $2.50 
per day in a small city is about as follows: 
1 steward. 
1 headwaiter. 
Chef and crew consisting of: 

1 second, 

1 broiler, 

1 fry cook, 

1 vegetable cook, 

1 fireman and pan washer. 
3 dishwashers. 
1 silver washer. 
1 fruit pantry girl. 
1 baker and pastry cook combined. 
1 baker 's helper. 
1 scrubber who does all the kitchen cleaning. 

1 storekeeper. 

2 girls in help's hall. 

The fruits, etc., are served direct from the 
storeroom, which is located on the same floor 
with and adjoining the kitchen, there being 
direct communication. The coffee making is 
done by one of the waiters, the baking of grid- 
dle cakes and toasting bread is done by the 
baker's helper. The carving is done by the 
head cook and his assistant. 

There is no cream bought for the house, but 
the dairyman brings the milk fresh from the 
farm in the morning. It is then placed in cans, 
which are supplied with air-tight covers, the 
milk is then placed in a box filled with ice 
water continually flowing from the large re- 
frigerator. The next morning the cans are 
taken out and the milk drawn off by means of 
a faucet, leaving the cream in the can. There 
is no pantry, everything is served from the 
kitchen, bakeshop and storeroom, which makes 
bookkeeping rather difScult. 

The following are fair samples of breakfast, 
dinner and supper bills: 

BREAKFAST. 
Fruit In season. 

Rolled oats or Farina in cream. 

Radishes. Young onions. 

Broiled bluefish, parsley butter. 

Fried panflsli. 

Sirloin or tenderloin steak, plain or with onions. 

Ham. Calves liver and bacon. 

Mutton chops. 

Lamb hash on toast. 

Chipped beef in cream. 

JCggs as ordered. 



French fried or stewed potatoes. 
Rolls. Muffins. Toast. 

Griddle cakes, maple syrup. 



Tea. 



Apple butter. 
Coffee. 



Cocoa. 



DINNER. 

Split pea soup. 

Boiled lake trout, anchovy sauce. 

HoUandaise potatoes. 



Olives. 



Young onions. 



Pickles. 



Boast beef, drip gravy. 
Tame duck stuffed, apple sauce. 

Irish stew, Dublin style. 
Spanish puffs, wine sauce. 

Mashed potatoes. Boiled potatoes. 

Stewed tomatoes. Green peas. 

Sugar corn. 

Sago pudding, lemon sauce. 

Mince pie. Cocoanut pie. 

Almond ice cream. Assorted cake. 

Nuts and raisins. Fruit. 

Cheese crackers. 

Coffee. 

SUPPER. 
Sardines on toast. 

Mangoes. Olives. 

Cracked wheat or pearl barley. 

Fried yellow pike, tomato sauce. 
Potatoes au Gratin. 

Broiled oysters on toast. 

Sirloin or tenderloin steak. 
Pork chops. 

Cold : Roast beef, ham and tongue. 

Eggs as ordered. 

Potatoes, baked, boiled or Saratoga. 
Potato salad. 



Tea rolls. 



Plain bread. 



Toast. 



Strawberry Jam. Cake. 

Coffee. Chocolate. Tea. 

At this house were served numerous ban- 
quets, luncheons and collations. One of these 
was a repast for 450 Knights of Pythias at 
one seating, price 50 cents a plate. The dining 
rooms would only accommodate 200, and in 
order to seat the balance all adjoining sample 
rooms, parlors, and hallways had to be utilized. 
In this way room for all was found and every- 
body served and satisfied. There was no 
printed menu, and everything, excepting ice 
cream, oysters and coffee was on the tables be- 
fore the guests were seated. The following 
was served: 

Stewed oysters. 

Crackers. 

Relishes. 

Assorted sandwiches. 

Chicken salad. 

Sardines. 

Deviled eggs. 

Ice cream. Cake. 

Coffee. 

This was a successful house and made money 
for the proprietor. The help was not always 



32 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



the best. There was one bad feature with this 
house, and that was the help roomed all in one 
hall regardless of color or sex; the result can 
be imagined! 



Organization of a Two-Hundred-Room City 
Hotel of the First Class. 
The following is the organization of a 200- 
room house in Chicago, rates $3.50 to $5.00 
per day, located in the business district: 
1 steward. 
1 inside steward. 
1 headwaiter. 

Kitchen crew of ten, including: 
1 chef, 
1 second, 

1 roast cook and broiler, 
1 fry cook, 

1 butcher and cold meat man, 
1 vegetable cook, 
1 fireman and chicken butcher combined, 

1 pan washer, 

2 kitchen girls. 
1 pastry cook. 

1 baker. 

1 girl to help in bakeshop. 
1 girl in fruit pantry. 
1 girl in coffee pantry. 

1 girl in silver pantry. 

2 dishwashers (men) with machine. 
1 storekeeper. 

1 yardman. 

The help is all of the best class and well 
paid. The service is of the finest that money 
can buy. The whole organization works to per- 
fection. The inside steward superintends the 
serving of all meals. The chief steward spends 
but little time in the pantries; he buys the 
supplies, to last not over a week. The milk 
and cream are supplied from a herd of .Jerseys 
bdonging to the owner of the hotel. The bills 
of fare are perfect, the following being fair 
samples : 

BREAKFAST. 
Strawberries. Oranges, Baked apples. 



Oatmeal. Corealine. 

Fried oysters. 



Craclied wheat. 
Stewed oysters. 



Fried — Perch, smelts, codfish cakes. 

Broiled — Blueflsh, fresh mackerel, shad, 

Salt mackerel, whitefish smoked salmon. 

Lamb steak with bacon. 

Tenderloin steak. Sirloin steak. 

Breakfast bacon. Ham, Pig's feet. 

Calf's liver and bacon. 

Veal cutlet. Honeycomb tripe. Mutton chops. 

Pork chops. 

Oconomowoc sausage, broiled or fried. 

Stewed lamb kidne.vs. Broiled chicken. 

Chipped beef in cream. Fried onions. 

Fried bananas. 

Browned corned beef hash. Fried hominy. 

Potatoes — Baked, French fried Lyonnaise, 

Mashed brown. Saratoga, stewed in cream, au 

gratin, German fried, fried sweet potatoes. 

Eggs a la Meyerbeer, Eggs poached. 
Omelette with rum. Scrambled eggs with oysters. 



Graham rolls. French rolls. Corn bread. 

Crescents. \Yheat muflJns. Toast to order. 

Wheat and rice cakes, 

English breakfast, Ceylon, Oolong and green tea. 
Coffee, Cbotolate. Cocoa. 



LUNCH. 

Blue points. 

Bouillon with rice. 

Welsh rarebit. 
Dill pickles. Radishes. 



Olives. 



Fillet of Pomano au Vin Blanc, 
Cucumbers. Potatoes vendome. 

Chicken livers saute a la Financi6re. 
Macaroni, Milanaise. 

Roast ribs of beef. 

Roast fricandeau of lamb, tomato sauce, 

COLD : Roast beef, ham, mutton, turkey, veal. 

Beef tongue, boned pig's feet, lamb's tongue. 

Sardines. 



Lobster mayonnaise. 



Lettuce. 



Mashed potatoes. Fried sweet potatoes. 

Succotash, Boiled potatoes. Tomato fritters. 

Butter rolls, 

Apple pie. Pumpkin pie. ■ Silver cake. 

Black cherries. Assorted cake. 



Fruit. 
Neufchatel, Swiss, 

Coffee. 



Fruit sherbet. 

Figs. Dates. 

Young American and 
cheese. 
Tea. Milk, Sweet cider. 



Edam 



Radishes. 



Salted almonds. 



Olives. 



Cream of terrapin, Baltimore. 
Consomme Printani6re, 

Deviled crabs en coquilles. 

Baked roe shad, sauce 'Venitienne, 
Cucumbers, Potatoes Marquise, 

Roast tenderloin of beef larded, sauce B^arnaise. 
Roast turkey, cranberry sauce. 

Croquettes of sweetbreads, sauce Supreme, 
Oyster patties a la Romaine, 

Beignets of pineapple, sauce Chartreuse, 

Mashed potatoes. 
Sweet potato croquettes. 
Asparagus . Kohl-rabi. 



Boiled potatoes. 

Spinach with egg. 
Parsnip fritters. 



Rum punch. 

Broiled squab on toast. 
Lettuce and tomato. 

Steamed apple roll, wine sauce. 

Apricot pie. Cream glac«. Lemon custard pie. 

Lady cake. Assorted cake. 

Bisque ice cream. 



Fruit. Dates. 

Assorted nuts. 



Figs. 
Raisins. 



Roquefort and Imperial cheese 
Coffee. 



Working Force of Large Resort Hotel 

The following constitutes the working force 
of a large and fashionable summer resort of 
about 500 rooms, the nearest base of supplies 
being 350 miles distant: 

1 steward. 

1 headwaiter. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



33 



Kitchen crew of 17, including: 
1 chef, 
1 second cook, 

1 assistant second, 

2 roast cooks and broilers, 

2 fry cooks, 
1 butcher, 

1 cold meat man, 

1 coffee man, 

1 vegetable cook, 

1 help's cook, 

1 fireman and chicken butcher, 

1 pan washer and fish cleaner, 

3 girls. 
1 baker. 

1 pastry cook. 

2 helpers. 

(Bread, pastry and ice cream served by them.) 
2 girls in fruit pantry. 
2 storekeepers (one the printer). 
5 yardmen; 

1 to help receive goods, 
1 to handle ice, 

1 to keep yard and lawn in order. 
1 to handle the garbage. 
1 roustabout. 
10 dishwashers, including: 1 man who oper- 
ates the machine, 3 men sorters and 6 
girls. 
4 waiters in helps' hall. 

When the house is running full capacity, the 
headwaiter's crew consists of himself, second 
and third assistants, and about 100 waiters. 



A Check on the American Plan Dining Koom, 
and an Analysis of Twenty-Seven Orders 
to Elustrate the Economy of This System 
of Control, as in Operation at The Elms, 
Excelsior Springs, Mo. 
The Elms is operated American plan, and the 
dining room orders are unrestricted from menu 
cards that afford abundant selection. In this 
hotel, however, very little food goes to waste 
from over-ordering by guests or bringing in 
what is not ordered by the waiters. This 
economy is accomplished by having the guests 
write their orders on a check, similar to the 
way it is done in the average first-class res- 
taurant. 

The writing of the order by the guest appears 
to have the same effect, or very nearly so, that 
it does in the restaurant, where every dish has 
its separate price. In other words, those who 
write their order put onto the card only what 
they want, and seldom, if ever, over-order; and 
the waiter brings from the kitchen exactly what 
is written on the check, no more, no less. If 
he attempts to bring more the checker who in- 
ventories his tray detects the steal. And the 
diner is better served for the reason that there 
is no guesswork about what is coming to him 
from the kitchen. He does get what he orders. 



He is not bothered by the waiter having for- 
gotten this or that, or brought something else 
instead of what was ordered. 

Analysif of the Checks. 

We asked Manager Newhart how this check- 
ing system worked. He replied : ' ' Tine ! The 
guests, as they get used to it, prefer it. It 
certainly improves the service, and is a great 
economy for the house. ' ' We then asked Mr. 
Newhart if he would permit us to take a dozen 
or more checks of a single meal, selected at 
random, and analyze them to learn the average 
number of dishes ordered by each guest — 
checks used for the dinner of that day, for in- 
stance (Sunday, November 10). Mr. Newhart 
immediately produced the bunch of dinner 
cheeks, and eleven were lifted from it and given 
to us for analysis. Here is the result : 

The eleven checks carried orders for twenty- 
seven persons, and a comparison of the checks 
with the menu card (after the portion sheet 
idea) showed the follows orders: 

Blue points on half shell, 19. 

Consomme Princess, 3. 

Chicken gumbo with rice, 15. 

Eadishes, 9. 

Celery, 14. 

Queen olives, 10. 

Steamed Columbia Eiver salmon, 2. 

Orange fritters, benedictine sauce, 10. 

Chicken, fried, Maryland style, 18. 

Sweetbreads glace, with champignons, 3. 

Oysters, a la Newburg, 1. 

Sphaghetti an parmesan, 2. 

Dinner rolls, 7. 

Corn bread, 6. 

Prime ribs of beef, au jus, 2. 

Stuffed turkey, cranberry sauce, 13. 

Hashed potatoes, 12. 

Candied sweet potatoes, 17. 

Asparagus tips, polonaise, 19. 

r"rench peas in cream, 3. 

Lettuce salad, 6. 

Chicken salad, 1. 

Punch Victoria, 17. 

Lemon meringue pie, 5. 

Apricot pie, 5. 

Marascino ice cream, 16. 

Roquefort cheese, 14. 

Neufehatel cheese, 1. 

Saratoga flakes, 1. 

Coffee, 14. 

Tea, 2. 

Milk, 5. 

Buttermilk, 3. 

This shows that 27 guests were served with 
275 dishes, or an average of ten and one-fifth 
dishes to the person; this including soups, 
relishes, entrees, meats, vegetables, salads, pas- 
tries and beverages. 



34 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



It must be born in mind that the portions 
served were American plan portions; that is, 
the small, or rational portion. 

Putting the price of this dinner at $1.00, the 
analysis shows these dishes were sold at an 
average of ten cents each. 

A further analysis, by pricing the different 
items on the bill on the ''modified a la carte" 
plan, ranging the items from five cents each 
for beverages, relishes, breads, potatoes, piesj 
ten cents for ice creams, punch, asparagus tips, 
soups; fifteen cents for fritters and oysters; 
twenty cents for fish; twenty-five cents for 
chicken Maryland and sweetbreads; thirty cents 
for roast beef and turkey, and other dishes in 
proportion, shows a total of $29.65, as against 
the $27.00 that would be paid at the flat dol- 
lar-a-meal price. 

If this card was priced according to the 
average first-class restaurant bill of fare the 
receipts from the number of dishes ordered 
would have been more than double. But, if the 
twenty-seven orders were made from a restau- 
rant card, instead of averaging ten dishes to 
each check per person, the number would be 
considerably less, and the portions, of course, 
very much larger. 

"With this method of American plan service 
check in vogue at the Elms Hotel, the service is 
simplified. The ice boxes are more easily con- 
trolled, and the matter of using up all good 
food to advantage is accomplished without the 
danger of spoilage that comes from carrying the 
great variety necessary to back up the restau- 
rant card. With this method of service, it is 
easier to estimate and provide about the right 
quantity of food for the meals; also to manage 
so that the cost of the meals can be very nearly 
determined in advance, and a profit made on the 
dining room. 

One feature in particular that will be no- 
ticed, and that will impress itself forcefully on 
all those who are considering ways and means to 
reduce the cost of feeding their guests, is that 
of the twenty-seven diners, only fifteen ordered 
the highest priced dishes, and only two of them 
ordered ieef. 

The checks at the Elms are specially ruled 
and consecutively numbered. This is a sample 
ruling : 



Typical Menus. 

Typical breakfast, dinner and supper cards 
are herewith presented: 

BREAKFAST 

Grapes Grape fruit Baked apple with cream 

Stewed prunes Comb honey Sliced orange 

Stewed flgs Apple jelly 

Oat meal Hominy grits Grape nuta 



Cream of wheat Boiled rice Corn flakes 
Broiled Lake Superior whitefish, parsley butter 

Broiled or boiled salt mackerel, lemon butter 

Stewed codfish in cream 

Sirloin steak Tenderloin steak 

Lamb chops Pork chops 

Country cured ham or bacon 

Farm sausage 

Eggs as ordered 

Plain omelet Ham omelet 

Jelly omelet Parsley omelet 

Calf's liver and bacon 

Browned corned beef hash 

Fried apples with salt pork 

Fried corn meal mush 

Baked potatoes Potatoes stewed in cream 

German fried potatoes 

Breakfast rolls Graham mufllns 

Dry toast Milk toast Buttered toast Dipped toast 

WalDe or wheat cakes with maple syrup 
Coffee Tea Milk Cocoa Postum 



DINNER. 

Blue points on half shell 

Consomme princess Chicken gumbo with rice 

Eadishes Celery Queen olives 

Steamed Columbia River salmon, hoUandaise sauce 

Parisienne potatoes 

Chicken fried, Maryland style 

Sweetbreads glaced with champignons 

Oysters a la Newburg 

Spaghetti, au parmesan 

Orange fritters, Benedictine sauce 

Dinner rolls Corn bread 

Prime ribs of beef, au jus 

Stuffed turkey, cranberry sauce 

Mashed potatoes Candied sweet potatoes 

Asparagus tips, polonaise French peas in cream 

Lettuce salad Chicken salad 

Punch Victoria 

Lemon meringue pie Apricot pie 

Maraschino ice cream Assorted cakes 

Roquefort cheese Neufchatel cheese 

Saratoga flakes Bent's water crackers 

Coffee Tea Milk Cocoa 

Postum Malted milk Buttermilk 



ELMS HOTEL 
Excelsior Springs, Mo. 



No. 12345 



No. Persons 



Date 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWAKD 



35 



SUPPER 

Blue points on half shell 

Clam bouillon Strained chicken gumbo en tasse 

Cream of Wheat Boiled rice 

Broiled fresh mackerel, lemon butter 

Steamed finnan baddie, parsley butter 

Broiled sirloin steak Lamb chops 

Broiled bacon 

Eggs : fried, scrambled, meyerbeer 

Omelettes : plain, Spanish, rum 

Minced turkey with green peppers 

German fried potatoes Baked potatoes 

Potatoes hashed in cream 

Cold roast beef Cold tongue Cold bam 

Lettuce with egg Potato salad 

Hot tea biscuit Corn bread 

Grapes Oranges Bananas 

Orange sherbet Assorted cakes 

Cocoanut custard pie 

Roquefort cheese Imported Swiss cheese 

Bent's water crackers Saratoga flakes 

Tea Coffee Cocoa Postum 

Milk Malted milk Buttermilk 

The drinking water served is from the famous 

lithia No. 1 springs 

* * * 

Organization of a 500-Eoom Busy European 
Flan Hotel Located in the Theatre District of 
a Large City. 

In many instances the size of the hotel or 
number of rooms it contains has no direct bear- 
ing on the kitchen organization; for instance, 
in many hotels in the cities none but the kitchen 
help receive their meals; all the others are en- 
gaged with the understanding that they eat at 
home or elsewhere. Also many hotels are so 
situated that but few guests are there to cer- 
tain meals. Then, too, there are what is known 
as "apartment hotels," where many guests 
seek the neighboring restaurants for a change; 
and for these it requires differently arranged 
crews. Therefore, rules of organization which 
apply well in one instance will fail in another. 

The following represents the organization of 
a 500-room busy hotel in the theater district of 
a large city: 

1 chef, 

1 second cook, 

1 night chef, 

1 butcher, 

1 roast cook, 

1 assistant second cook, 

3 garde manger, 

1 car%'er, 

2 fry cooks, 

1 chicken butcher, 

1 helps' cook, 

2 pot washers, 
1 fireman, 

1 sewer man, 

1 head vegetable cook, 

3 assistant vegetable cooks, 
1 day steward, 

1 night steward. 



1 pantry steward, 

4 checkers, 

3 fruit pantry, 

3 coffee pantry, 

3 first officers' waiters, 

2 second officers' waiters, 

5 helps' hall waiters, 
2 helps' hall dishers, 

2 chicken cooks. 

7 silver pantry, 

6 dishes, 

1 ice man, 

1 oyster man, 

1 linen man, 

5 pastry (including ice cream), 

1 bookkeeper, 

3 storekeepers, 

1 maitre d 'hotel, 

4 captains, 
3 cashiers, 

30 waiters, 
16 bus boys, 

8 cafe pantry, 

5 bakers, 

1 mechanic. 

The foregoing list represents the minimum of 
working force during the light season. When 
the hotel is busy there may be additions in 
places where needed. The waiters and bus boys 
I do not enumerate accurately, as their number 
fluctuates almost continually. T will add, how- 
ever, that there may be about 30 to 50 waiters, 
and from 16 to 24 bus boys. This applies to a 
first-class hotel. 

All employees fill the position for which they 
are engaged. They have but little time for 
anything else. 

Whenever possible I apply the system of pro- 
motion from the ranks. 

In engaging help I endeavor to select men 
who seem willing to learn the business and show 
the quality that may be developed. You should 
begin training them immediately; show them 
everything that you can ; you have no secrets 
in the business. If they comprehend from the 
beginning, and put their heart into it, you 
have the right man (if he proves honest). 

The coming men are from two sources: from 

the receiving room and from the control stand. 

These men should be shown recognition when 

possible. 

* * * 

Boards of health recommend "Solution for- 
maldehyde, U. S. P.," as the most useful, sim- 
ple, and cheap remedy against flies. .This is 
vouched for as a good fly poison: one pint of 
milk, one pint of water, one tablespoonful of 
formaldehyde, and one tablespoonful of sugar. 
The formaldehyde is not as poisonous as the 
usual fly paper, tho it embalms and kills all 
kinds of bacteria flies may carry around. 



36 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



SPECIAL EGG BILL OF FARE 



A LA CARTE MENUS 

In preparing and arranging a la earte bills 
of fare several points of importance should 
not be overlooked. In the first place there are 
usually three bills used — ^Breakfast, Luncheon 
and Dinner. The breakfast is nearly always 
standing, and is printed and changed as the 
stock of them becomes exhausted; the luncheon 
and dinner bills are changed daily. Then there 
is the general bill of fare which, as in the ease 
of the breakfast bill, is changed occasionally, 
as food novelties are received; and then in 
busy houses there are the special bills, such as 
quick lunch service and after theater special- 
ties. 

In making these menus from day to day it 
is necessary not to lose sight of consistency in 
your prices. There should be a self-evident 
reason why a dish or certain article of food 
should be charged differently on one bill of 
fare from another, which so often happens in 
all hotels. The general bill of fare should be 
the base for the prices charged in that particu- 
lar establishment or hotel, and the prices placed 
on the same should be based on a proper esti- 
mate of the cost of seating and serving the 
guest, regardless of the cost of the raw mate- 
rial. The latter is the merchandise with which 
you do your trading, the same as the grocery 
man. You must first find out, if possible, your 
expense account; then you will be better able 
to put the price on the goods you offer for sale, 
and make a living profit where such a thing is 
possible. 

During the seasons it often happens that an 
unexpected supply of fresh fish, game or poul- 
try may arrive, that by reason of its unex- 
pected abundance can be bought for a very low 
price. In such cases the caterer can take ad- 
vantage of the fact, and offer his patrons spe- 
cial dishes at a reasonable reduction. Such 
dishes are placed on the lunch, dinner or special 
bills, but the general bill is not interfered with 
— only the bills which are changed from meal 
to meal and are the bargain advertisements, 
so to speak. 





(PLEASE ORDER BY NUMBER) 


Boiled. (2) 25 (3) 35 


Fried, (2) 25 Shirred, 30' Poached, 30 




Scrambled. 30 Plain Omelet, 30 






POACHED EGGS 


1. 


Soubise . 


. puree of onion and cream, on toast, 40 


2. 


Mirabeau 


. on anchovy toast, 40 


3. 


Perigord . . 


. on toast with truffle sauce, 50 


4. 


O'Shaughncssy 


with fried tomatoes on toast, 50 


5. 


Benedict .... 


on toasted muffin, ham, Hollandalse, 50 


6. 


Jockey Club 


Bearnaise sauce, julienne of bacon, 50 


7. 


Strasbourgeoise . 


.. on toast, with slice of goose liver. ^0 


8. 


Reine . . 


chicken forcemeat, Allemande sauce, 40 


9. 


Gambetta 


. with fried calf brains, on toast. 40 


10. 


Martha . 


on toast, with lobster butter, 40 


11. 


Argenteuil 


. with puree of asparagus, on toast, 40 


12. 


Chevalier 


with puree of spinach, on toast, 40 


13. 


Prince of Wales 


. with bloater herring, 40 


14. 


Fin de Siecle . -. 


. on artichoke bottom, Hollandalse sauce, 50 


15. 


Robinson . . . 


. with chicken livers on toast, 40 


16. 


Nelson . 


. on codfish cake. 45 
OMELETTES 


17. 


Portugaise . T 


with fresh tomatoes. 40 


18. 


Fines Herbes ., , 


with chives, shallots, parsley, 40 


19. 


Chartuctiere . ^ i 
Spanish . ' 


, with onion and bacon, 40 


20. 


onion, green pepper, tomato,mushroom,50 


21. 


Maitre d' Hotel . 


. sweetbreads and fine herbs, 50 


22. 


Parisienne . 


chopped ham, green peas and onions, 50 


23. 


Lorenzo . 


crabmeat. cream sauce, 45 


24. 


Mexicaine 


shrimps, onion, green peppers, 50 


25. 


Clamard .... 


with puree of peas, cream sauce, 40 


26. 


Flamande • 


. with spinach and calfs brains, 40 


27. 


Parmentiere . 


. diced potatoes bacon, tomato sauce, 40 


28. 


Provencale . 


cepes saute, 40 


29. 


Dumas . . 


. cepes. shallots, garlic flavor, 40 


30. 


P^rigordine . . 


. truffles, cream sauce. 50 


31. 


Princesse 


. fresh mushrooms, allemande sauce, 45 


32. 


Saute 


. with sorrel. 40 


33. 


Nesselrode . 


. with puree of chestnuts, 40 


34-. 


Du Barry . 


puree of cauliflower, '40 


35. 


Pre Sale . . . 


, with minced bacon. 40 


36. 


Argenteuil , . 


. with asparagus tips, 40 


37. 


Yarmouth . 


with boneless bloater, 40 


38. 


Quaker Style . . 


. with shad roe. 40 




SWEET OMELETTES 


39. 


-Celestine . 


- macaroons, jelly, cream, sugar, 60 


40. 


Melba . . 


, peaches and raspberry sauce, 60 


41. 


Confiture . . . 


with preserves, 50 


42. 


German Pancakes 


. with apple sauce. 40 


43. 


Omelette Russe . , 


. with minced apples, 60 


44. 


Rum or Kjrsch Omelette. 50 




SCRAMBLED EGGS 


45. 


Creole . . . 


. on.on. green pepper, tomato. mushroom, .40 


46. 


Virginia Style . 


with Virginia ham. minced. 45 


47. 


Claypool . . 


. goose liver and mushrooms, 50 


48. 


Viscomtesse . , 


. asparagus tips, lobster, on toast. 50 


49. 


Pecheuse .... 


. with oysters, 40 


50. 


Mariniere . 


with crabmeat 40 


51. 


Montagniard . 


. with kidney, 40 


52. 


a r Opera . 


. chicken liver and fried tomatoes, 40 


53. 


Duchesse . 


in pattie shell, cream sauce. 40 
SHIRRED EGGS 


54. 


a la Turque . . , 


. with chicken livers. 40 


55. 


Virginia Style . 


. with Virginia ham, 50 


56. 


Maison Blanch . 


. fresh mushrooms under glass, 50 


57. 


De Lesseps . 


calfs brains, capers, brown butter over, 40 


58. 


Hunter Style . .. 


. chicken livers, olives, madeira sauce, 40 


59. 


Grande Duchesse 


asparagus tips, sherry wine sauce, 40 


60. 


Bonne Femme . 


.Julienne of salt pork, tomato sauce, 40 


61. 


Myerbeer 


with kidney, d'emi glace, 50 


62. 


Suisse 


. grated Swiss cheese, baked in oven, 40 


63. 


Montmorency . 


artichoke, asparagus tips, cream sauce, 50 


64. 


Flnanclere . 


. chicken livers, olives, mushrooms, 40 


65. 


Mornay 


baked, cream sauce, Parmesan cheese," 40 


66. 


Portuguaise . . 


. with fried fresh tomatoes, 40 


67. 


aux Fines Herbes 


. with eMves, shallots, parsley, 40 


68. 


au Beurre Noir . 


. with brown butter and capers. 40 




PROM THE 


CLAYPOOL, INDIANAPOLIS. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 





SERVICE PER PERSON 

FRUITS AND PRESERVES 

Grape Fruit 25 Orange 15 Orange sliced 20 Apple 15 Malaga Crapes 25 

Bananas 15 Sliced Bananas in cream 25 Orange Marmalade 20 Preserved Figs 25 

Hot House Grapes 1 50 lb. Orange Juice (glass) 25 Baked Apples 25 

Hawaiian or Fresh Pineapple 25 Casaba Melon 40 

Prunes in Claret 25 Individual Honey 20 Bar le Due 30 

CEREALS, CAKES. ETC. 

Oat Meal 25 Hominy 25 Petitjohn 25 Cream of Wheat 25 

Force 25 Shredded Wheat Biscuit 25 Toasted Corn Flakes 20 

Com, Wheat, Riee, Buckwheat Cakes served with Maple Syrup 25 

English Muffins 15 Buttered Toast 15 Milk Toast 20 Cream Toast 30 

Waffles (3) 30 Crescents 10 

FISH 

Salmon Steak 55 Whitefish 60 Filet of Sole Tartare 45 Finnan Haddie 40 
Salt Mackerel 40 Codfish Cakes 40 Kippered Herring 40 Yarmouth Bloater 40 

READY 

Steamed Haddock 40' Lobster Cntlet 50 

Halibnt Steak Sante Menniere 55 Creamed Oyster on Toast 40 Eggs Mornay 45 



Calves Head Orly 40 CMcken Livers en Brochette 45 

Rmnpsteak with fried Potatoes 50 Lamb Hash with Green Peppers 55 

EGGS AND OMELETTES 

Boiled (2) 25 Fried (2) 30 Poached on Toast 30 Scrambled plain 40 

Ham or Bacon 20 cents extra Shirred 30 with Browned Butter 4fl 

Omelette plain 40 with Parsley 40 Fresh Tomatoes 50 with Chicken Livers 50 
Fresh Mushrooms 55 a la Turque 50 Spanish Style 50 Asparagus Tips 55 

STEAKS, CHOPS, ETC. 

Breakfast Steak 50 Small Sirloin for one 1 15 for two 1 50 

Extra Sirloin 225 Hamburger Steak 60 Mutton Chop (1) 40 Pork Chop ( 1 ) 40 
Lamb Chops (2) 50 English Chop 75 (20min.) Veal Cutlet plain or breaded 55 
Lamb Kidneys (3) 50 Broiled Bacon 30 Jones' Farm Sausages 40 

Broiled Sweetbreads 65 CalPs Liver and Bacon 45 Razorback Ham (2 slices) 45 

Corned Beef Hash browned 45 Chicken Hash with Green Peppers 60 
Lamb Kidneys saute au Madere 55 

POTATOES 

Baked 15 Fried 20 Saute 20 Lyonnaise 25 Saratoga 15 

Hashed Cream 20 Hashed Brown 20 Au Gratin 20 

COFFEE, TEA, ETC. 

Co£fee, small pot 15 : large pot, for two 30 

Chocolate, small pot 20 ; large pot 30 Cocoa, small pot 20 ; large pot 30 

Horlick's Malted Milk 15 Postum Cereal 20 35 

English Breakfast, Green, Young Hyson or Orange Feacoe Tea 

small pot 15; large 30 

Mltk— Especially Bottled—From Belle-Vemon Mapes Farm 

JUtttA ^Istlcr, CIe6i!lan!> 
Sanuinrg 2, 1013 



38 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 




'^unrl] 



OYSTERS AND CLAMS 

Blue Points 25 Little Necks 25 Cotuits 30 Cocktail 5c extra 

Crab Flake Cocktail 65 Lobster Cocktail 65 

RELISHES 

Anchovies 40 Stuffed Mangoes (2) 15 Bismarck Herring 40 Beluga Cayiar 1 00 

Tomato a la Ruese 40 Grape-Fruit Supreme 75 California ripe Olives 30 

SOUPS 
Cup of strained Gumbo 20 Chicken Okra 25 Essence of Tomato 20 Clam Broth 20 
Hot or Cold Consomme 20 Cream of Tomatoes 25 Mongole 25 

Consomme Sevlgne 25 Minestrone Milanalse 25 Pnree of ^paragns 25 

FISH 

Lobster Thermidor 75 Mussels Mariniere 60 English Sole Colbert 1 00 

Planked WMtefish 60 English Sole Bonne Fenune 1 10 Soft Clams Canadienne 65 

FlUet of Flounder Mornay 55 Broiled Pompano Colbert 60 

EGGS 

Poached Eggs Lorenzo 45 

ENTREES 

Terrapin a la. Baltimore (20 min.) 3 00 Escargots (10) Bourguignonne 60 

English Mntton Chop Combination 65 Spring Lamb Kidneys an Gratin 55 

Stewed Sweetbread and Turkey Mikado 60 Braised Short Ribs Napolitalne 55 

Spring Chicken Stanley 75 Cold Chicken and Virginia Ham Pie Asparagus tip salad 80 

Pork and Beans Boston Style 45 Cold Jeannette Strasbonrgeoise 65 

ROAST READY 

Roast Leg of Mutton with String Beans 55 

Roast Ribs of Beef 50 Roast Young Turkey Cranberry Sauce 75 

COLD MEATS 
Virginia Ham and Turkey 65 Ham 40 

Smoked Tongue 50 Lamb 50 

VEGETABLES 
Baked special Bitter Root Valley Potatoes 20 
French Peas au beurre 30 Brussels Sprouts 30 

Potatoes Boiled 15 Baked Sweet 20 Mashed 15 Hashed in cream 20 Baked 15 
New Bermuda Potatoes 25 Asparagus HoUandaise 35 Parsnips in cream 25 

SALADS 

Lettuce and Tomato 30 Romaine 25 French Endive 35 Escarole 25 

Statler 30 Alexandra 30 Diplomate 30 Opera 45 

DESSERTS 
Assorted French Pastry 10c a piece Eclairs 15 



Half Roast Chicken 75 

Assorted Cold Meats 60 

Asparagus 40 
Artichoke hot or cold 50 



Cream Caramel 15 

Lemon Merlngne Pie 15 

Franchipan Tart 20 

Vanilla 20 Chocolate 
Orange Water Ice 20 
Buiscuit Tortoni 25 

Bananas 15 Apple 15 



Meringue Chantilly 15 
Baba au Rhum 15 
Deep dish Fig Pie 25 
Conpe Mirlvaine 35 



Hot House Grapes 1 50 lb. 



Charlotte Russe 20 
Apple Pie IS 
Savarin Sabayon 20 

ICE CREAM, ICES 
20 Pistache 20 Coffee 20 
Lemon Water Ice 20 
Coupe St. Jacques 40 
FRUIT In Season 
Orange 15 Pears 20 Grape-Fruit 25 Malaga Grapes 30 



Sorbet au Marasquin 20 

Punch Romaine 20 

Meringue Glacee 30 



Casaba Melon 40 



Sliced fresh Pineapple 25 
CHEESE 
Edam 25 English Stilton 25 Gorgonzola 25 
Camembert 25 Fresh Cream 20 Roquefort 25 

COFFEE, TEA, ETC. 
Tea -Coffee with Cream 15-30 Cocoa -Chocolate 20 Milk 

Buttermilk 10 Cream 15 Demi Tasse 10 Cafe Turc 25 

3Bol«l JStathr, (Hhiielanb 
aHlurBiag, 3an. 2, 19X3 



Pont I'Evecque 30 
Cheddar 20 Swiss 20 



10 




THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 39' 

inntx 



? 



Parfeit Amour 25 "Mab" Liquor de la Vielle Cure 25 

Statler Cocktail 20 Souvenir Cocktail 50 Country Club CocktaU 20 
' MORS D'OEUVRES 

Oysters Cotnite 30 Lynnhavens 30 Blue Point 25 Cherry Stone 30 

Little Neck Clams 25 Lobster old fashion 75 Cocktail or Mignonnette see. 5c ext. 
Sterlet Cayiar on Ice 1 00 Crab Meat Cocktail 65 Hors d'oenvres a la Russe 45 
Stuffed Mangoes (2) 15 Canape of Caviar (2) 40 Tomato Suedoise 40 

Celery 25 Olives 20 Radishes 20 Anchovy Salad 40 Sardines in Oil 40 

SOUPS 
Chicken Okra 25 Cup of strained Gumbo 20 Essence of Tomato 20 Clam Broth 20 
Hot or Cold Consomme 20 Cream of Tomatoes 25 Clear Green Turtle 50 
Petite Marmite 35 Puree Longchamp 25 Mongole 20 

Consomme Sevlgne 25 Minestrone MUanaise 25 Puree of Asparagus 25 

FISH 

Soft Clams Canadienne 65 

Mussels Mariniere 60 Lobster Thermidor 75 English Sole Colbert 1 00 

Braised Kennebec Salmon Royale 65 FUlet of Soles KlUamey 70 

Scallops Ponlette 60 BroUed Sea Bass Sance Flenrette 60 

ENTREES 

Terrapin a la Baltimore (20 min.) 3 00 Escargots (10) Bourguignonne 60 

Soprcme of Chicken Medlds 80 Larded Tenderloin of Beef Jnsslen 65 

Veal Cntlet Mllanalse 55 Sweetbread nnder belle Eugenie 65 

Bonchees Mont Glas 55 Mignonnette of Lamb Henry IV 70 

Cold Boned Philadelphia Capon Alma Salad 65 Cold Chandf rold of sqnab orange salad 90 

ROASTS 

Roast Venison Cranberry Sance, Potato Croquettes 60 

VSbs of Beef 50 Roast Young Turkey Cranberry Sauce 75 

VEGETABLES 
New Bermuda Potatoes 25 Baked special Bitter Root Valley Potatoes 20 

Potatoes Boiled 15 Baked 20 Baked Sweet 20 Maehed 15 Hashed in Cream 20 
SoufBees 40 Anna 30 Lyonnaise 25 Lorette 30 Macaire 20. 

French Artichokes hot or cold 50 Brussels Sprouts 30 California Asparagus 40 
Broiled Egg Plant Steak (30 min.) 30 French Peas 25 String Beans 25 

Broiled Fresh Mushrooms 60 New Beets 25 Cauliflower Hollandaise 30 

CarroU Vichy 25 French Peas 25 

SALADS 

Lettuce and Tomato 30 Romaine. 25 French Endive 35 Escarole 25 

Fresh Okra 30 Statler 30 Alexandra 30 Diplo^late 30 Opera 45 

DESSERTS 
Omelette Son£9ee Vanilla 60 Alaska 60 Cream Caramel 15 

Assorted French Pastry 10c a piece Baba au Rhum 15 Eclairs (2) 15 

Omelette CelesUne 60 Charlotte Russe 20 Meringue Chantilly 15 

Lemon Meringne Pie 15 Apple Pie 15 Deep dUh Fig Pie 25 

Franchlpan Tart 20 Savarin Sabayon 20 Conpe Mirivalne 35 

ICE CREAM, ICES 

Vanilla 25 Chocolate 25 Pistache 25 Coffee 25 

Orange Water Ice 20 Lemon Water Ice 20 Meringue Glacee 30 

Punch Romaine 20 Wesseh-ode Pudding 25 Sorbet Yvette 25 

Biscuit Tortoni 25 Coupe St. Jacques 40 Sorbet au Marasquin 20 

FRUITS In Season 

Bananas 15 Apple 15 Orange 15 Pears 20 Grape Fruit 25 Malaga Grapes 30 

Hot House Grapes 1 50 lb. Sliced fresh Pineapple 25 Casaba Melon 40 

CHEESE 
Edam 25 English Stilton 25 Gorgonzola 25 Pont I'Evecque 30 

Camembert 25 Fresh Cream 20 Roquefort 25 ' Cheddar 20 Swiss 20 

COFFEE, TEA, ETC. 

Tea -Coffee with Cream 15-30 Cocoa -Chocolate 20 Milk 10 

Buttermilk 10 Cream 15 Demi Tasse 10 Cafe Turc 25 

JMotel JStiitlnr. (Otfaizmb 
tttlptrstag, ^axt. 2, 19X3 



40 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



^/7 la L^arte 



ZHors S)' Oeuvres, Shelt 3-ish, Crustaceaax and Qockfails 

Blue Points 25 Cotuits 30 Lynnhavens 30 Cherry Stone 30 Little Neck 25 
Lobster old fashion 75 Crab Meat Cocktail 65 Cocktail or Mignonnette sauce 5c extra 
Hors d'oeuvres a la Russe 45 Sterlet Caviar on Ice 1 00 Blinis 50 Caviar Canape ( 2 ) 40 
Tomato Suedoise 40 Sardines in Oil 40 Anchovy on Toast 35 ■ Anchovy Salad 40 
Antipasto 50 Carciofini 50 Artichokes a la'Grecque 85 Kieler Spratten 40 Mangoes 15 
Sancisson de Lyon 40 Pickled Onions 15 Chow Chow 15 Chutney 15 Gherkins 15 
Mustard Pickle 15 Pickled Walnuts 15 Radishes 15 Celery 20 Olives 20 

Lobster Cocktail 65 Smoked Salmon 40 

Soups 

Chicken Consomme cup 20 -basin 25 Beef Consomme cup 20- basin 25 

Essence of Tomato 20 Clear Green Turtle cup 40 -basin 50 Chicken Okra 25 

Strained Gumbo cup 20 -basin 25 Clam Broth plain, cup 20 Petite Marmite 35 

BsUevue 25 Pea Soup 25 Tomato 25 Longchamps 25 Mongole 25 Colbert 35 
Vermicelli 25 Julienne 25 Croute au pot 30 Onion Soup au Gratin 35 Chicken Tea 50 
Beef Tea 50 Beef Blood 100 Cold consommes in cup 20 Garnishes of grated cheese 10 

S'ish 

Broiled Whitefish 60, planked 65 Bluefish 60 Halibut Steak 50 Brook Trout (2) 85 
Live Lobster 1 25 Maryland or Newburg 1 50 Broiled Salmon 55 Frog Legs plain 65 
Black Sea Bass Meuniere 65 Poulette 90 English Sole, boiled or fried 1 00 

Scallops, fried, brochette, sautes 50 Au Vin Blanc 75 Oysters a la Diable (12) 60 

Casino (6) 40 A I'Ancienne (6) 40 Brochettes (12) 60 Cream Stew 40 Milk Stew 35 
Soft Clams Canadienne 65, Steamed 50 

Gggs 

Boiled (2) 25 Fried 30 Poached 30 Scrambled, plain 35 Au Beurre Noir 35 

Shirred 30 Hard boiled (2) 25 Omelette, plain 40 Parsley 40 Fresh Tomatoes 50 

Asparagus Tips 55 Spanish style 50 Mushrooms 55 Kidneys 50 

Benedict 50 Capucine 510 

Steaks, Chops and Q>/c. 

Mutton Chops (2) 65 Lamb Chops, each 25 English Mutton Chop 75 

Mixed Grill 75 Veal Cutlet, plain or breaded 50 Lamb Kidneys (3) 50 

Bacon (6 slices) 30 Sweetbreads, plain 60 Calf Liver and Bacon 40 

Lamb Mignonnette (2) 75 Ham (2 slices) 40 Farm Sausages 40 Pigs Feet (3) 45 
Half Chicken 75 Squab Chicken 1 25 White Jumbo Squab 1 10 

Squab Guinea 1 25 Half Spring Turkey 2 50 Chicken Livers en Brochette 40 

Pork Chops (each) 30 Porterhouse Steak 2 25 (for 3) 3 25 Tournedo 75 

Small Steak 75 Small Sirloin 1 15 Sirloin (for 2) 1 50 Extra Sirloin 2 25 

SmaU Tenderloin 1 00 ' Tenderloin (for 2) 1 50 Porterhouse 2 50 

Chateaubriand 3 00 Club Steak 3 25 Honey Comb Tripe 40 Bacon 30 

Deerfoot Sausages 40 Peanut Ham 45 Virginia 70 

Planked Service 40c per person 

LEFT HAND PAGE, A LA CARTE CARD, HOTEL STATLER, CLEVELAND. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 41 

Yegetables 

French Peas 25 French String Beans 25 Flageolets 25 Spinach and Egg 30 

Cauliflower 25 Beets in cream or butter 20 Boiled Onions 20 Stewed Tomatoes 25 
Boiled Tomatoes 15c apiece Stufied Peppers 15c apiece Broiled fresh Mushrooms 60 
In cream Sous Cloche 65 Macaroni a ITtalienne or au Gratin 30 Milanaise 40 Rizetto 35 
Cal. Asparagus 40 Artichokes 50 Stuffed Tomatoes 15c apiece Fried Egg Plant 25 
Egg Plant Steak 40 Brussels Sprouts 30 French giant Asparagus 1 25 Cepes Bordelaise 45 

Potatoes 

Bermuda plain boiled 15 Cream sauce 20 Baked 15 RissoIIees 20 Berlinoises 25 
Fondantes 25 Sautees 20 Lyonnaise 25 Saratoga 15 Sarah 30 Fried 20 Lorette 30 
Hashed brown 20 Hashed in cream 20 Macaire 20 Soufflees 40 Croquettes 30 
Anna 30 Parisienne 25 O'Brien 25 Julienne 20 Sweet potatoes boiled, baked, fried 20 
Grilled 25 SoufiBees 40 Candied 30 Southern style 30 

Cold •^n.eafs and ^anduilcAes 

Half Roast Chicken 75 Turkey 75 Roast Squab 1 10 Whole Squab Chicken 1 25 
Guinea Squab 1 10 Pate de Foie Gras 1 00 Roast Beef 60 Roast Lamb 50 Ham 45 
Corned Beef 35 Beef Tongue 45 Pickled Lamb Tongue 40 Galantine 65 Assorted 60 

Virginia Ham 55 Veal and Ham Pate in crust 50 

Sandwiches — Beef, Ham, Tongue or Corned Beef 25 Club 40 Chicken 35 Caviar 40 

Sardine 30 Foie Gras 60 Egg 30 Cheese 20 

Sa/ads 

Lettuce or Lettuce and Tomato 30 Romaine 25 Chiffonnade 30 Beet 25 Statler 30 

French Endive 40 Cucumber 30 Waldorf 30 Diplomate 30 Opera 45 Shrimp 60 

Alexandra 30 EscaroUe 25 Crab Flakes 65 Lobster 65 

Sjesserfs 

Baba au Rhum or Kirsch 15 Carmel Custard 15 Petit Fours 25 Eclairs (2) 15 
Omelette Soufflee Vanille 60 Omelette Celestine 60 Omelette Surprise 60 Alaska 60 
Meringue Chantilly 15 Glacee 25 Assorted French Pastry 10c apiece Charlotte Russe 20 
Vanilla Ice Creara 20 Chocolate 20 Pistacbe 20 All Fruit Cream 20 Sorbet Yvette 20 
Lemon Water Ice 15 Orange 15 Coffee 20 Coupe St. Jacques 40 Biscuit Tortoni 25 
Fancy Souvenir Ices 60 Nesselrode Pudding 25 

^avorys 

Welsh Rarebit 35 Golden Buck 45 Yorkshire Buck 50 Long Island Rarebit 45 
Scotch Woodcock 50 Cheese Souffle 50 Angels on Horseback 45 Sardines on toast 40 



2>> 



reserves 



Orange Marmalade 20 Apple Sauce 20 Currant Jelly 20 Figs 25 Bar le due Jelly 35 
Honey 20 Brandy Peaches 30 Strawberry or Raspberry Jam 20 Dry Malaga Grapes 20 

Honey in Comb 30 

GAeese 

Brie 30 Edam 25 Hilton 25 Gorgonzola 25 Camerabert 25 Pont TEvecque 30 
Fresh Cream 20 Roquefort 25 Cheddar 20 Swiss 20 ^ 

Coffee, tTea and Gtc. 

Tea-Coffee with cream 15-30 Cocoa -Chocolate 20 Milk 10 Buttermilk 10 

Cream 15 Demi Tasse 10 Cafe Turc 25 

RIGHT HAND PAGE, A LA CARTE CARD, HOTEL STATLER, CLEVELAND. 



42 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 




^nakfoi^t 



Ottawa- Canada 



FRUITS AND PRESERVES 
Strawberries 20 Cantaloupe 20 

Grape Fruit 25 Orange 15 Oranges Sliced 15 Malaga Grapes 20 Apples 15 
Bananas 15 Sliced Bananas in cream 20 Orange Marmalade 20 

Orange Juice per glass 25 Grapes 25 Baked Apples 20 Rhubarb 15 

Prunes in Glaret 25 Hone/ 20 Bar le Due 25 

INDIVIDUAL. 20 O, 

Black Currant Jam, Raspberry Jam, Strawberry Jam, Plum Jam, Damsons Jam 
Greengage Jam, Bramleberry Jam, Black Currant Jelly. Red Currant Jelly 

CEREALS, CAKES, &c 

Oat Meal 25 Hominy 25. Petit John 25 Cream of Wheat 25 Grape Nuts 20 

Force 20 Shredded Wheat Biscuits 20 Toasted Corn Flakes 20 Post Toasties 20 

Corn, Rice, Wheat, Buckwheat Cakes served with Maple Syrup 25 

(AllCereals Served With Cream) 

English Muffins 15 Buttered Toast 15 Milk Toast 20 Cream Toast 25 WafHes (3) 30 



Sal -non Steak 45 Whitefish 40 
Salt Mackerel 30 Codfish Cakes 35 
Creamed Smoked Salmon 35 
Brook Trout Meuniere 60 



FISH 

Filet of Sole Tartare 40 Finnan Haddie 35 

Kippered Herring 35 Yarmouth Bloaters 35 

Filets of Turbot Portugaise 55 

Fresh Scallops Newbnrg 55 



EGGS AND OMELETTES 

Boiled (2) 25 Fried (2) 30 Poached on Toast 30 Scrambled Plain 35 

Ham or Bacon 15 cents extra Shirred 30 il la Turque 45 with Brown Butter 35 
Omelette plain 35 with Parsley 33 Fresh Tomatoes 45 with Chicken Livers 45 
Fresh Mushrooms SO Spanish Style 45 Asparagus Tips 50 

Poached Benedict 45 Chateau 45 Capucine 45 

STEAKS, CHOPS, &c 

Sirloin Small 75 Sirloin (2) 1.50 Small Tenderloin 80 Tenderloin (for two) 1.50 
Hamburg Steak 60 Mutton Chops (2) 60 Lamb Chops (3)75 

English Chop 75 (20min) Veal Cutlet plain or breaded 50 Lamb Kidneys (3) 50 
Broiled Bacon (5 slices) 30 Jones'Farm Sausages 35 Broiled Sweetbreads 60 



Calf's Liver and Bacon 40 
Chicken Hash with Green Peppers 45 
Corned Beef Hash Browned 40 
Chicken Cutlet with Asparagus Tips 45 



Beechnut Ham (2 slices) 40 

Lanlb Kidneys saut^ au Maddre 50 

Pork Chop (1) 35 

Chicken Livers en Brochette 40 



Baked 15 Fried 15 

Hashed Cream 15 



POTATOES 

Saut4 15 Lyonnaise 15 

Hashed Brown IS 

COFFEE, TEA, &o 



Saratoga 15 
au Gratin 15 



"^ea per pot for one 20 for two 35 Coffee per pot for one 20 for two 35 
.Cocoa 15 Demi-tasse 10 Chocolate 20 Milk 10 Buttermilk 10. Cream 15 

Special Coffee 25 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



43 



m 




^mid^zon 



Ottawa- Canada 

COCKTAILS 

Lobster Cocktail old fashiou G5 Grab-meat Cocktail 60 

Lobster Cocktail 60 

HORS D'OEUVRES 



August 20. 1913 



Shrimp Cocktail 35 



Wine Merriag 60 Filet of Anchovies 40 Celery 25 Manzanilla Olives 25 
Radishes 20 sweet Mangoes 20 Chutney 20 Ghow-Chow 20 Pickled Walnuts 20 
Sardines in Oil 40 Smoked Sardines 40 Pearl Onions 25 

SOUPS 

Coisomme in cup 20 Chicken Broth in :up 20 Hot or Cold essence of Tomatoes 20 
Split Pea 20 Mongole 20 Mock-Turtle 20 

Lream of New Corn 20 Consomme Croute au Pot 20 Cold Essence of Tomatoes 20 

FISH 

Fried Frog Leg^ and Scallops, Tartare Sauce 55 Boiled Sea Trout, Sauce Hotlandalse 45 
Cold, Paupiettes of Turbot Venitienne 45 

BGGS 

Eggs en Cocotte a la Create 40 
ENTREES 

Whole Broiled Squab Chicken with Bacon 80 Irish Lamb Stew with Barley 45 

Smoked Beef Tongue Polonaise SO Veal Cutlets a la Holstein SO 

Duckling Saute with New Turnips 65 
Cold, Sliced Turkey, Virginia Ham a la Gelee 65 Cold, Beef a la Mode Nivemalse 45 

ROAST 

Roast Ribs of Beef au Cressoo 55 
VEGETABLiES 

Cauliflower Cream Sauce 35 Com on Cob 25 

Stewed Tomatoes 20 Potatoes Pont-Neuf 15 
Cepes Ijordelaise 30 French Peas 2S 

boiled IS Baked 15 Baked Sweet Potatoes IS' 
Hashed Cream IS 

SALADS 

Lettuce aud Tomato 30 a la Rnsse 30 Romaine 25 Princesse 45 

Chateau Lanrier 30 Cucumber 30 Beets 25 String Beans 25 Chicken 60 



Stuffed Qreen Peppers 25 

Potatoes O'Brien au Gratin 20 

Spinach with Egg 30 

O'brien 20 Mashed IS 

French Fried IS 



Lubster 60 

Sago Pudding 20 
Apple Pie IS 
Rice Pudding 15 
Gateau Moka 15 



Vanilla 20 
Orange 15 



Lemon Water Ice 15 
Punch Romaine 20 



ChiiTonade 30 Shrimp 45 

DESSERTS 

Orange Custard Pie 15 

Custard Pie 15 Pudding Diplomate 15 Caramel Cream 15 

Deep Apple Pie 15 Assorted French Pastry 10c a piece 

Coffee or Chocolate Eclairs (2) 15 

ICE CREAM. ICES 

Peach 20 Chocolate 20 Pistache 20 Coffee 20 

Meringue Glace 30 Sorbet au Maraskin 20 

FRUITS In Saaun 

Bananas 15 Apples 15 Oranges 15 Grape . Fruit 25 Malaga Grapes 40 

Cherries 25 Sliced Piueapple IS 

CHEESE 

McLaren's 15 English Stilton 25 Gorgonzola 25 Swiss 20 

Camembert 25 Trappist 20 Canadian' Twin IS Roquefort 25 

COFFEE, TEA, ETC. 

Tea per pot for one 20 for two 35 Coffee per pot for one 20 for two 35 

Gocoa 20 Oemi'tasse 10 Cbocolate 20 Milk 10 Buttermilk 10 Cream 15 

Soecial Coffee 25 



44 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 




^inriet 



Ottawa - Canada 

Crab Meat Cocktail 60 



August 21, 1912 



COCKTAII^S 



Lobster Cocktail 60 Lobster Cocktail old fashion 65 
Shrimp Cocktail 35 

IIORS D'OEUVRES 

Celery 2") Olives 25 I<adishes20 Canapes Moscovite (5) 35 Tomato Waldorf 35 

Anchovies :!o Bismark Herring 40 Beluga Caviar in glass 1 00 

Canape of Caviar (2) 60 Sardine in Oil 40 

SOUPS 

Chicken Okra with rice 25 Cream of Tomatoes 20 Mock Turtle, English style 20 
Strained Gumbo in cup 20 Consomme in cup 20 Clam Broth in cup 20 

Clear Green Turtle 50 Consomme Julienne 20 Split Peas 20 Mongple 20 
Pure Jackson 20 Consomme Jardiniere 20 Cold Chicken Broth in Jelly 20 

FISH 

Lobsters and Clams Newburg 1.25 Crab Flakes Maryland 70 Whitefish 40 

Broiled Live Lobster 1.00 Stuffed Lobster (1) 50 Lobster saute a I'Americaine 1.25 
Brook Trout Meuniere 60 Baked Whitefish a I'ltalienne 45 

Aiguillettes of Salmon Victoria 45 Cold, Supreme of Bass a la Russe 43 

RNTRKRS 

Spring Chicken Saute Signora 75 Braised Sweetbreads Doria 63 

Leg of Lamb a rOiientale 60 Calf's Brains en Matelotte 5U 

Beef. Mignon Banquiere 75 Deviled Marrow on Toast 50 

Cold, Veal and Ham Pie a la Gelee 50 

ROASr 

Roast Ribs of Beef 55 Roast Stuffed Squab Guinea Hen, R. C. Jelly 75 

SALADS 

Komaine 25 Lettuce and Tomatoes 30 CnonTiihpr 30 Chiftonade 30 Beets 25 
Chateau Laurier 30 Waldorf 30 Chicken 60 Lofister 60 Crab Flake 60 

VliGKrAllLUS 



Boiled Potatoes 15 
Potatoes O'Brien 20 
Fried Egg Plant 25 
Corn on Cob 25 
Stuffed Green Pepper 



Baked 15 Mashed 15 Grilled Sweet Potatoes 20 

Ha.shed in Cream 15 Sautees 15 Stuffed Tomatoes (2) 30 

F rench Peas 25 
Whole Spinach 20 
'.'> Potatoes Parlsienne 15 



Artichokes Vinaigrette 45 
Potatoes Croquettes 15 



Qelee aux Liqueurs 20 

Omelette Cplestine 60 

Charlotte Russe 20 

Eclairs (2) 15 



DESSERTS 

Pudding aux Noisettes 20 

Baba au Rhum 15 Omelette Souffle Vanille 60 

Caramel Custard 15 Alaska 60 Meringue Chantilly 15 
Assorted French Pastry 10 a piece 

ICE CREAM. ICES 

Peach 20 Vanilla 20 Chocolate 20 Pistache 20 Coffee 20 Lemon Water Ice 15 

Orange 15 Meringue Glace 30 Sorbet au Maraskin 20 Punch Romaine 20 

Nesselrode Pudding 35 Sorbet Yvette 25 Biscuit Tortoni 25 Coupe St Jacques 40 

FRUITS IN SEASON 

Bananas 15 Apples 15 Oranges 15 Grape Fruit 25 Malaga Grapes 40 
Sliced Pineapple 15 Cantaloupe 20 

CHEESE 
McLaren's 15 English Stilton 25 

Camembert 25 Roquefort 25 

COFFEl 

for two 35 



Tea per pot for one 20 
C^ociia 20 Demi tasse 10. 



Gorgonzola 25 Canadian Stilton 13 

Canadian Twin 13 Swiss 20 

TEA. &o 

Coffee per pot for one 20 for two 35 

Chocolate 20 Milk 10 Buttermilk 10 Cream 15 
Special Coffee 25 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



45 



m 




tcpper 



Ottawa- Canada 



HORS D'OEUVRES 

Celery 25 Tomato Neva (1) 40 Kipe Olives 30 Queen Olives 25 

Mignardises Moscovite (5) ;!5 Anchovies lHy Smoked Salmon 40 

Beluga Caviar in glass 1.00 Sardine in Oil 40 Bismark Herring 40 

Hors d'Oeuvres varies 50 

OYSTERS, CUAMS, COCKTAILS, IN SEASON 

Bluepointa 25 Malpecques 30 Little Necks 25 Cocktails 5 cents extra 

Milk Stew 35 Cream Stew 40 Fried (10) 40 Broiled (10) 40 Casino (6) 45 
A I'Aneienne ((n 40 A la Maryland 50 Patties (2) 50 A la Manhattan 40 
Crab Meat Cocktail (iO Lobster Cocktail (iO Lobster Cocktail old fashion 65 

HOT 

Clear Green Turtle [cup] 35 Chicken Broth [cup] 20 Strained Gumbo [cup] 20 
Essence of Tomatoes [cup] 20 Coasomme Armenonville [cup] 20 

Consomme [cup] 20 Lobster Newburg 1.25 Cardinale 75 

Deviled stuffed Lobster [I] 50 . Stuffed Crab (1) 35 

Broiled Live Lobster 1.00 Large 1.50 
Crab Meat Chateau Laurier 75 Newburg 70 Dewey 75 Patties Regence (2) H5 
Supreme of Chicken Marie Christine 75 Minced Chicken a la King 1.50 

Sliced Sweetbreads Mikado 1.50 Long Island Rarebit 45 Welsh Rarebit 40 

Yorkshire Buck 50 Golden Buck 45 Scotch Woodcock 50 Souffle Fromage 50 
Anges a Cheval 45 Sardines Diablees 40 

Broiled Milk Fed Chicken 75 Broiled Spring Lamb Chops 75 

Brea.«t of Guinea Hen with Virginia Ham on Toast 95 
Fillet Mignon Bearnaise SS Broiled Royal Squab 85 



Game in Season 



Artichokp.s Hollandaise 45 



German Asparagus 60 



Sliced Turkey 65 
Spring Lamb 60 
Boned Capon (iO 



Tongue 25 



Broiled Fresh Mushrooms 75 

COLD 

Tongue 50 Roast Chicken (half) 75 Roast Beef 55 

Virginia Ham 50 Assorted Cold Meats 65 

[Individual] Pate de Foie Gras 65 

SANDWICHES 

Chicken 35 Club 40 Ham 25 Sardine 30 Caviar 60 Cheese 25 

SALADS 

Chateau Laurier 30 Alexandra 40 Romaine 3T Russe 30 Crab Meat 60 
Chicken 60 Lobster 60 Tomato Surprise [1] 40 Lettuce 30 French Endive 35 

CHEESE 

McLarens 15 Stilton 25 Gorgonzola 25 Trappist 15 Swiss 20 

Camembert 25 Neufchatel 20 Roquefort 25 

DESSERTS 

Omelette Celestine 60 Omelette Soufflees Vanille 50 Omelette Surprise or Alaska 60 
Meringue Chantilly 15 Eclairs [2] 15 Charlotte Russe 20 Biscuit Tortoni 25 
Ice Cream Vanilla 20 Chocolate 20 Coffee 20 

Lemon Wat^r Ice 15 Tutti-Frutti 20 Sorbet Yvette 20 Nesselrode Pudding 25 
Assorted French Pastry 10 a piece Souffle Benedictine 30 Coupe St. Jacques 40 

FRUITS 

Bananas 15 Oranges 15 Grape Fruit 25 

Sliced Pineapple 15 

COFFEE, TEA, ETC. 

for two 35 Coffee per pot for one 20 for two 35 

Chocolate 20 Milk 10 Buttermilk 10 Cream 15 
Special Coffee 25 



Sultana Raisins 25 



Tea per pot for one 20 
Cocoa 20 Demi-tasse 10 



46 THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

•<,„.• •<3i(4JSr FRANCISCO. LunJ; I« 15 Aofit. 1910 

HMn$ ie CiUonue 35 Pornte Blcue 35 Little Neck Claau 35 

Cocklaib d'Huitrea 35 Je Clanu 35 is HonurJ 50 

Pelaga Conwtami aax Quenelles ic Broeliet 60. 40 A|(ne«a, Winclieater 60. 40 
JaCenne Cliitfoimole 40. 25 Tomate. Cbantilly 50. 30 Petite Matmite 60 
CoaMnune en ta«e 30 Essence ie Volatile en TaMC 40 

Puree de Pois Sec aux Croutons 40. 25 Fausse Toriue a rAnjlaiae 40. 25 

CrJme it Coneomlres. Windsor 60, 40 Poulet an Combo Praia 60. 40 

Hon d'Oeuvres Amandes Salees 30 Oeu^s de Truite a I'Huile 60 de Lyon 35 
Caviar Frais d'Astrakan 2.00. 1.00 Hon d'Oeuvres. Palace Hotel 25 Olives 25 
Harenifa Marinea. Biamarck 50 Celeri 25 Maquereau au Vin Blanc 60 

MaJia Maille 40 Comets de Saumon Gourmet 50 Tkon Marine en verre 75 

Vobaona Truite de Lac. sur Plancke, Palace 1.25 Sand Dabs. GrenoUoiae 75. 50 

Pompano. Florida 1.00. 60 Aiglefin de Finlande 75. 50 Carrelet. Cbauckat 75 
Saumon. Dufflere 75. 50 Baase Rayee, Beaufort 60. 40 

Eperlans au Rieslinf; 75, 50 Saumon Froid. Hii^k Life 60. 40 

Grenouilles. Sautees. Proven;ale 2.50 Filets de Sole, Marjuery 1.00. 60 

Ctitreea Ai^uillettes de Filet de Boeuf aux Ckampitfnons Frais 1.25. 75 
Canapes de R-is de Veau. Lorenzo 1.00. 60 
Cotelettes d'Agneau. Victor Hu^o 1,00. 60 
Demi Caneton Poele aux Petits Pois. Bonne Fcmme 1-25 
Brocbettes de Foies de Poulet. Nesselrode 1.00. 60 
Homard Farcis. Xavier 1,50, 75 
Beijnets dc Pommes Glacee au RJium 60 
Rotb Preb Cote de Boeuf 65 Ajneau de Printemps 75, 50 Dinde 1.00. 60 

Poulet 2.00. 1.00 
^olbal'Ordre Pigeonneau Royal 1.00 Pi^eonneau 75 Caneton 2.50 

Poussin 1.25 Poul-t de Salson roti ou grille 2.00. 1.00 

Fmid Roti de Boeuf 65. 40 Agneau de Printemps 75. 40 Jambon 60. 40 

Lanjue de Boeuf Fumee 60. 40 Boeuf Sale 40. 25 Viande Assortie 75 

Jambmde Virginie 1.25, 75 Jambon de Hambourg Importe a la Gelee 1,25,75 

Pate de Foie Gras 1 00 Galantine de Cbapon 1.00. 60 Dinde 1,00, 60 

Legumes Jets de Houblon 60 Mai's Nouveaux 50. 30 Articbauts 50, 25 

Asperses 75. 50 Haricots Verts Nouveanx 50. 3C Pois Nouveaux 60 

Cbampignons Frais 1.00 Cbouxfleurs, \ ollandaise 40 

Haricots de Lima Nouveaux 60, 30 Patates au Four 50 

Pommes Nouvelles 25 Epinards 30; a 1 Anglaise' 40 Aubergines 50, 30 

Xomates Farcies 60 Poivrons Verts Farcia 60 Macaroni 30 Gepes, Bordelaise 75 

Pommea de Tern Palace Grill 40 Maitre d'Hotel 30 Sarab Bembardt 40 

Parisienne 30 Soufflees 40 Ducbesse 40 au Four 20 Souillies 15 Frites 20 

Puree 15 Saratoga 20 Hackees a la Creme 30 Sautees 30 Lyonnaise 30 

Palales au Four 50 25 Frits 50 Soutkern 60 Soufflees 60 

Salades Crabe 75. 40 Poire d'Avocat75, 40 Riverside 50 Waldorf 50 

Palace Grilt 50 Homard 75 Jardiniere 50 Pointes d'Asperges 75 

Volaille 1.00 Concombre 50 25 Tomate 50.30 Celeri 50, 30 Laitue 25 

Homard 60 Romaine 25 Escarole 25 Ckicoree 25 Cresson 25 Panacke 60 

dessert Pouding de Riz et Pommes, Sauce Vamlle 25 Tarte aux Cerises 15 

Gateau aux Fraises, Ckantilly 50 Pecke Flambee 60 Baba au Rkum 20 

Tourte a I'Allemande aux Myrtilles 20 Napolitaine Ckarlotte 40 

Plan a la Crsme d'Orange 15 Rii Imperatrice 30 Gateau Noix de Coco 25 

Ckarlotte Russe 30 Tarte aux Pommes 15 Flan au Potiron 15 

Patisserie Parisienne 10 eack I-etita Fours 25 Matrons Glaces 30 

Sorhela Romaine, Kirscb. Curasao. Marasquin. Lalla Rookk, Creme de Mentke 30 

Creme Qlacee Banane Vanille, Fraises, Pistacke, Cafe ou Ckocolat 25 

Fraisees Ecrassees 35 
Qlaee d'Eau Orange 25 Citron 25 

Fantdsie Bomke Sultana 40 Coupe Mexicaine 40 Surprise aux Praises 2, 1,00 

Nutmeg Alice 50 Fraises Mes-Reves 60 Napolitaine 30 

Pecke Melba 60 Ponding Nesselrode 35 Cafe Parfait 30 

Biscuit Tortoni 30 Biscuit Glace 25 Tutti Frutti 30 Meringue Glacee 30 

Fmits Oranges 25 Bananes 25 Pamplemouaae 30 Pommea 25 Poirea 25 Praises 40 

Mures 40 Framboises 50 Figues 40 

Fmmage Edelweiss 35 Camembert 25 Sierra 25 Edam 25 Crime d'Oregon 25 
Roquefort 25 Nenfcbatel 25 Gruyere 25 Brie 25 Americain 25 Ananas 25 
Crfe tt The Demi Taise 10 Cafe Turc 15 Special 1 taaae 30: 2 tasses 50 
On ne aert de demi-portiona qu a une personne 
DINNEE CARD, THE PALACE, SAN FKAKCISCO. PRINTED ON FOLDED CARD: IN FRENCH ON ONE PAGE, 
IN ENGLISH ON THE OTHER; TYPE FACE OF CARDS 5x10 INCHES. 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 47 

(Palm 4pU ^'"^^ 

"V,.^ •<ii,;5AN FRANCISCO. Monity. Au«art 15, 1910 

OsdrnfTc CaUiorn^SS Blue Pointi 35 CUnu 35 

Codt/dfb Little-neek Clun 35 Oyrter 35 Clam 35 Lolutcr 50 

5ai4M Coniomme witk Qoenelln de Brocket 60. 40 Lamli. 'Winclcrter 60. 40 

Jnlienne CluHaimade 40. 25 Split Peu witk Croatou 40. 29 

Tonuito. Ckantaiy 50. 30 Mock Turd*. Enjlik Style 40. 25 

Ckicken Essence in Cup 40 Petite Marmite 60 Consomme in Cup 30 

Cream of Cucumken, Windsor 60. 40 Ckicken witk Fresk Gumko 60. 40 

S((/e Doha Trout Roe in Oil 60 Celery 25 Tkon Marine in <Iass 75 

Freak Aitrakan Cayiar 2.00. 1.00 Hon J'Oeuvres, Palace Hotel 39 

Lyons Sausage 35 Radiskes 15 Sardines 35 Kieler Sprottcn 50 

Comets of Salmon, Gourmet 50 Olives 25 Salami 35 

Fisk Planked Takoe Trout. Pakice 1.25 Sand Daks. GreroUoiie 75. 50 

Pompano. Florida 1.00. 60 Striped Bass. Beaufort 75. 50 

Salmon. Dufjlere 75. 50 Finnan Haddie 75. 50 Flounder, Ckanckat 75 

Smelts witk Rieslintf 75. 50 Cracked Crak. Vincennette 80 50 

Frogs. Saute. Provencale 2.50 Fillets of Sole, Marguery 1,00, 60 

Enlrea Aiiiuillettes of Fillet of Beef, witk Fresk Muskrooms 1.25. 75 
S^reetkreads on Toast, Lorenzo 1.00, 60 
Lunk Ckops. Victor Hugo 1.00, 60 
Potted Duckling -witk Peas. Bonne Femme, kalf 1,25 
Brockettes of Ckicken Livers, Wesselrode 1.00. 60 
Stuffed Lokstsr. Xavier 1,50, 75 
Glaced Apple Fritters witk Rum 40 
Ready Roasts Riks of Beef 65 Ckicken 2.00.1.00 Spring Lamk 75,50 Turkey 1.00, 60 
Roasts to Order Royal Squak 1.00 Squak 75 Squak Ckicken 1.25 Duckling 3.50 

Spring Ckicken. Roast or Broiled 2.00. 1.00 
Cold Roast Beef 65. 40 Spring Lamk 75, 50 Smoked Beef Tongue 60, 40 

Ham 60. 40 Corned Beef 40, 25 Assorted Cold Meats 75 Turkey 1.00, 60 
Pate de Foie Gras 1.00 Galantine of Capon 1.00. 60 

Virginia Ham 1.25. 75 Special Imported HamkurgHam 1.25, 75 

Vegetables Asparagus 75. SO New Com 50, 30 Fried E^g Plant 50. 30 

New String Beans 50, 30 ^ New Peas 60. 40 

Summer Squask bO, 40 Ne^r Lima Beans 60. 30 Hop Sprouts 50 

Artickokes, HoUandaise 50. 35 Spinack, Englisk Style 40 Spinack witk Cream 30 
Cauliflower. Hollandaise 40 Frenck String Beans 50 Flageolets 50 

Carrots witk Cream 50 Baked Macaroji 30 Cepes. Bordelaise 75 

Potatoes Baked 20 Boiled 15 Fried 20 Masked 15 Saratoga 20 Saute 30 
Hasked and Browned 30 Hasked witk Cream 30 Lyonnaise 30 Souffle 40 
Palace Grill 40 Lorette 40 Macaire 35 O'Brien 30 
Sweet "Potatoes Baked 50 25 Fried 50 Sontkem 60 Soufflee 60 

5a/ail Crak 75. 40 Lokster 75 Tomato 50, 30 |Cucumker 50, 25 

Palace Grill 50 Alligator Pear 75, 40 Riverside 50 

Waldorf 50 Ckicken 1.00 Lettuce 25 Romain 25 Escarole 25 

Ckicory 25 Doucette 25 Asparagus Tips 75 Frivole 60 Cress 25 
Pastry Rice and Apple Pudding. Vanilla Sauce 25 Strawkerry Skort Cake 50 

Peack Flamkee 60 Neapolitan Charlotte 40 German Hucklekerry Tart 20 

Ckerry Pie 15 Baki witk Rum 20 Orange Custard Pie 15 

Rice Imperataice 30 Port Wine Jelly 20 Coocanut Cream Cake 35 

Apple Pie 15 Ckarlotte Russe 30 Pumukin Pie 15 Glaced Ckestnuts 30 

Frenck Pastry 10 eack Assorted Fancy Cakes 35 Fiesta Sugar Wafers 15 

Sorbets Roman, Kirsck, Curasao. Maraschino. Lalla Robkk or Creme de Mentke 30 
/c« Cream Banana. Vanilla, Strawkerry. Pistacke. Coffee or Ckoeolate 35 

Crusked Strawkemes 35 
JVater Ice Orange or Lemon 25 

fancy Ice Cream Bomke Sultana 40 Mexican Cup 40 Strawkerry Surprise 3. 1.00 

Strawkerry Mes-Reves 60 Peack Melka 60 _ Neapolitan 30 

Nutmeg Alice 50 Biscuit Tortoni 30 Meringue Glacee 30 

Nesselrode Pudding 35 Cafe Parfait 30 Biscuit Glace 25 Tutti Frotti 30 

Fruits Plums 35 Oranges 25 Bananas 35 Grape Fruit 30 Apples 25 Pears 35 

Cantaloup 40 Sliced Peackes and Cream, for one 30 Seedless Grapes for one 25 

Nutmeg Melon 35 Strawherries for one 40 

Figs for one 40 Blackkerries for one 40 ^Vatermelon 50 

Cbeese Edelweiss 35 Brie 25 Camemkert 35 Stilton 35 Sierra 35 Oregon Cream 25 

Roquefort 25 Gruyere 35 American 35 Neufckatel 25 Pineapple 35 MaeLaren 35 

Cojffee, Tea Special Black Coffee, one cup 30; two cups 50 

Demi Taase 10 Turkisk Coffee 15 Fresk Buttermilk 10 

Half portions served to one person only 
DINNER CARD, THE PALACE, SAN IHANCISCO. PRINTED ON FOLDED CARD: IN FRENCH ON ONE PAGE, 
IN ENGLISH ON THE OTHER; TYPE PACE OF CARDS 5x10 INCHES. 



48 THE PKACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 

^^ce^£^l Room Service Luncf)eon 

San Francisco. Monday August 15. 1910 
Oysters, etc California 40 Blue Points 40 Little Neck Clami 40 

Cocktail Little-neck Clam 40 Oyster 40 Clam 40 Lobster 60 
Soups Consomme -witt Quenelles de Broetet 70 Lamb. WincLester 70 

Julienne Chiffonnade 45 Split Pea with Croutons 45 Tomato, Cbantilly 60 

Mock T.irtle, English Style 45 Cbicken Essence in Cup 45 

Petite Marmite 70 Consomme in Cup 35 

Side Dishes Cornets ot balmon. Gourmet 60 Olives 30 Celery 30 

Fresb Astrakan Caviar 2,20, 1.10 Salami 40 Thon Marine in glass 85 

Lyons Sausage 40 Radisbes 20 Sardines 40 Kieler Sprotten 60 

Fish Planked Taboe Trout, Palace 1.40 Sand Dabs, Grenebloise 85 

Pompano, Florida 1,10 Salmon. Duglere 85 Flounder, Cbaucbat 85 

Striped Bass, Beaufort 85 Finnan Haddie 85 Smelts witb Riesling 85 

Cracked Crab, Vincennette 90 Cold Salmon, Higb Life 70 

Eggs Poached Eggs, Index 85 Sbirred Eggs, Bercy 70 

Entrees Aiguillettes of Fillet of Beef, witb Fresb Musbrooms 1.40 

Sweetbreads on Toast, Lorenzo 1.10 

Lamb Chops, Victor Hugo 1,10 

Po'ted Djckling witb Peis, Bonne Femme 1.40 
Ready Dishes Ham Knuckles with Brussels Sprouts 90 

Min;ed Roast Beef. Creole 85 
Headqliumls Ribs of Beef 70 Spring Lamb 85 Turkey 1.10 Chicken half 1.10 
Hnasts to Order Royal Squab 1.10 Squab 85 Squab Cbicken 1,40 

Spring Cbicten. Roast or Broiled 2.20, half 1,10 Rack of Lamb 1,70 

( old Roast Beef 75 Spring Lamb 85 Smoked Beef Tongue 70 

Ham 70 Corned Beef 50 Assorted Cold Meats 85 Turkey 1.10 

Pate de Foie Gras 1.10 Galantine of Capon 1,10 

Vn-ginia Ham 1,40 Special Imported Hamburg Ham 1.40 

'3)egetahles New Corn 60 Asparagus 85. 60 New Peas 70 

Summer Squash 70 . Neiv String Beans 60 

Lima Beans 60 Spinach, English Style 45; with Cream 35 Carrots and Cream 60 
Fried Egg Plant 60.35 Artichokes, HoUandaise 60.30 Cauliflower. Hollandaise 45 
French String Beans 60 Cepes. Bordelaise 85 Flageolets 60 Baked Macaroni 35 

•Pnlntoes Baked 25 Boiled 20 Fried 25 Mashed 20 Saratoga 25 Saute 35 

Hashed and Browned 35 Hashed \vith Cream 35 Lyonnaise 35 Souffle 45 

Pala<-e Grill 45 Lorette 45 . Macaire 40 O'Brien 35 

Sweet Potataes Baked 60 Fried 60 Southern 70 Soufflee 70 

Salads Palace Grill 60 Riverside 60 Waldorf 60 Crab 85 

Tomato 70 Alligator Pear 85 Lobster 85 Cucumber 60 

Chicken. 1. 10 Lettuce 30 Romain 30 Escarole 30 Chicory 30 

Celery 60 Doucette 30 Asparagus Tips 85 Frivole 70 Cress 30 

Pastry Strawberry Sbmi: Cake 60 Neapolitan Charlotte 45 Cherry Pie 20 

German Huckleberry Tart 25 Baba %vitb Rum 25 Rice Imperatrice 35 

Apple Pie 20 Pumpkin Pie 20 Charlotte Russe 35 Glaced Chestnuts 35 

French Pastry, each 15 Assorted Cakes 30 Fiesta Sugar ^^afers 20 

Sorbets Roman, Kirsch. Curagao, Maraschino, Lalla Rookh or Creme de Menthe 35 

Ice Cream Banana, Vanilla. Strawberry, Pistache. Coffee or Chocolate 30 
Crushed Stra'n^bernes 40 

iVater Ice Orange or Lemon 30 

Fancy he Cream Bomb Sultana 45 Mexican Cup 45 Nutmeg Alice 60 

Strawberry Mes Reves 70 Peach Melba70 Biscuit Tortoni 35 Meringue Glaeee 35 
Nesselrodt Pudding 40 Cafe Parfait 35 Biscuit Glace 30 Tutti Frutti 35 

Frails Strawberries 45 Olranges 30 Bananas 30 Grape Fruit 35 Apples 30 Pean 30 
Nutmeg, Melon 35 Raspberries 60 Figs 45 Seedless Grapes for one 30 

W^atermelon 55 Peaches and Cream for one 35 Plums 30 

Cheese Edelweiss 40 Brie 30 Camembert 30 Sierra 30 Oregon Cream 30 

American 30 Neufcbatel 30 Pineapple 30 Roquefort 30 Gruyire 30 

Coffee, "Cea Special Black Coffee, one cup 35; two cups 60 Demi Tane 15 

Turkish Coffee 20 Fresh Buttermilk 15 

No single order less than 25 cents 
ROOM SERVICE LUNCHEON CARD, THE PALACE, SAN FRANCISCO; TYPE 5x10 INCHES. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 49 

Shell Oysters received daily from Jacob Okers Co.. Sayville, Long Island 
Bluepoints, 25 Oyster Cocktail, 25 Cape Cods, 30 Little Necks, 25 Cocktail 25 

Steamed in Shell. Maitre d' Hotel ... 40 Fancy Pan Roast. Claypool 50 

Roast in Shell. Chili Sauce 50 Broiled, Celery Sauce 50 Fried in Crumbs . .40 

Oysters, Casino, (baked with sweet peppers, chili sauce and piece of bacon) 60 

Oysters en Brochette. (with bacon and mushrooms) .... . . . . ! 50 

Oysters a la Diable. (broiled on toast with butter, lemon juice and pepper) -. ! . 50 

Creole Style, (rolled in (lour, fried in butter, Creole sauce) . . . . . .... 50 

Baked Oysters au Gratin, (cream sauce and Parmesan Cheese) . . ... .50 

Baked Oysters, Italian Style, (with spaghetti, yolk of egg. bread crumbs, tomato sauce) . 50 
Oysters, Louisiana Style, (scalloped, with okra. tomatoes and grated cheese) , . . . 40 

Curry of Oysters. East Indian Style, (chafing dish) ' i.25 

Oysters a la Poulette. (stewed in cream and white wine, chafmg dish) .' . 1.25 

drab ffiahcs 

Crabs and Crabmeat received daily from S. S. Coston, Crisfield, Maryland 
Crab Cocktail , . 40 Crab Flakes, Maryland , . . .1.50 

Deviled in Shell, each ... 36 Crab Meat Pattie. each .... .40 

Baked in Shell, Mornay, each 35 Crab Flakes, Newburg . .... 1.50 

Crab Flakes Saute. Meuniere. (fried in nut brown butter, parsley and lemon juice) . . . 50 
Crab Flakes. Creole, (with okra. tomatoes, siweel peppers, diced ham. white wine) chfg d. 1.50 

Xpb9tCl0 

Lobsters received daily from Thorndike & Hix. Rockland. Maine 
Broiled Live Lobster 1,00 Lobster Cutlets, Claypool Style . . . 60 

Steamed Lobster with Drawn Butter l.OO Baked Lobster in Shell 60-1.00 

Lobster Cocktail 50 Lobster Newburg . . . 1.50 

Broiled Deviled Lobster 1.00 Lobster Bordelaise .... ... 1.50 

Stuffed Lobster ,,6QiL-.PP' Curried Lobster a 1' Indienne 1'50 

Baked Lobster, Casino, (baked in shell, sauce of chopped bacon, green peppers and chili 

sauce) .75-1.25 

Lobster American, (saute in shell with burned brandy and fancy cut vegetables) .... 1 50 
Claypool Special Combination Chafing Dish, (scallops, oysters, lobster, crab meat and 

shrimps, Newburg sauce) . . . 2 00 

Scallops 

Scallops received daily from Penobscot Fish Co., Rockland, Mair.e 

Fried Scallops, Remoulade Sauce . 40-75 Scallops Newburg . . 1.25 

Scallops Saute, Brown Butter 40-75 Scallops en Brochette 50 

Scallops Creole, (with green peppers, mush-rooms, tomatoes and onions, chafing dish) . 1,25 
Scallops Saute, Vin Blanc, (with white wine and mushrooms, chafing dish) .... 1.25 

Fried Scallops, Maryland, (with sweet corn and rasher of bacon) 50 

Scallops en Coquille, Mornay, (in shell, with cheese and cream sauce) 50 

Sbrtmps 

Shrimps Saute, Creole, (with mushrooms, green peppers, olives, onions and tomatoes and 

timbal of rice) ..... 1 .25 

Shrimps Saute, Mexicaine, (with olives, chili peppers, tabasco and rice) 1.25 

Shrimps a la Poulette, (stewed in cream and white wine) . . 1.25 

Shrimps Saute a 1' Americaine, (saute with burned brandy, vegetables, etc.) . „ 1.50 

Shrimp Pattie, Claypool, each ... 40 

JfroG %CQ0 

Fried Baby Frogs, Tartar Sauce 50-90 Frog Meat Saute.PouIette, (chafing dish) 1.50 

Fried Jumbo Frogs,RemouladeSauce,60- 1.00 Frog Meat, Newburg, (chafing dish) . . 1.50 
Frog Meat, Club Style, (in chafing dish with mushrooms) .... ...... 1.50 

Frog Meat, Louisianaise, (with okra, tomatoes and mushrooms) , chafing dish ..,.,.. 1.50 

terrapin 

Terrapin Maryland, (in chafing dish) 1.75 Terrapin a la Creme. (chafing dish) 1)75 
Terrapin Saute au Champagne, chfg d. 1.75 Terrapin Pattie, each 5C 

SHELLFISH MENU, THE CLAYPOOL, INDIANAPOLIS. DESIGNED TO BOOST SALES OP MOLLUSCS AND 
crustaceans: the card with border ILLUSTRATIONS DONE IN COLORS FROM LIFE. 



50 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



(Beneral JSitI of jfare 



Mil 



CLAMS -Stuffed, Nantelsa 60 



I Ham 60 Waitphalla Ham 76 



Uttia Naoks Cocktail 30 



Uttla Naeks (half riot.) 26 
IReltdbeS-Per Perton 
Maloisel Caviar 76 Antlpaate Lueullus 60 



Careloflnl In oil 30 



Celery 30 

Olives 20 

Radishes 20 

Caviar 60 

Anchovies 40 

Pin Money Pickles 25 



Melon Mangoes 25 Canape Lorenzo 40 Sardellen 40 

Dill Pickles 15 Broiled Sardines on Toast 50 - Cervalat Sausage 35 

Bengal Chutney 20 Bismark Herring .....40 Salted Almonds 30 

English Walnuts 25 Maatjes Herring 30 Chow-Chow. 25 

Canape pate de (ole gras 60 Artichokes in oil 30 

Canape Russe -• 30 India Chutney 20 Salami Sausage 35 



Soups— Per PersoD 



Mock Turtle au Madere 20 Chicken Broth in cup.. 

Consomme Natural 20 

Royal 25 

" Colbert .30 

Vermicelli 20 

" Julienne 20 



.20 



Spanish Mackerel, broiled SO 

Fried Halibut Steak SO 

Bluefish, broiled SO 

Whltefish, broiled 60 

Whltefish; planked 75 



Lobster, broiled. Chili sauce half 75 

" deviled, a la Jefferson " 75 

'• cold " 75 

" a la Newburg 1 25 



Small Steak for one 90 

with onions " 110 

" mushrooms " 1 10 

Creole " 1 10 

BorJelaise " 110 

Sirloin " for two 2 00 



2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 SO 
2 50 

Small Tenderloin Steak for one 90 

1 10 
1 25 
1 10 
1 10 



with onions 

with mushrooms. . 

Creole 

Bordelaise 

casserole 

Stanley. . 



with onions... 

" truffles... 

" mushrooms 
Bearnaise 



with Rice -. 25 

Strained Gumbo en tasse (hot or cold) 25 

Green Sea Turtle a J'Anglalse ,..40 

Clear Green Turtle, Victoria 40 

Puree of Tomatoes 20 

f iSb-Per Pcrsoa 

Salmon Steak, broiled. 60 

Salmon, Hollandalse ; 60 

Salt Mackerel, broiled or boiled 50 

Black Bass, broiled 60 

Filet of Black Bass, Meuniere 75 

Pompaiio, broiled 60 

^Sbell fieb-Per Person 

Lobster a I'Americalne 1 50 

" Bordelaise 1 25 

Fresh deviled Crab meat (2) fn shell 

Fresh Crab Flakes, Maryland, in chafing dish 

Steatts 

Small Tenderloin, Bordelaise for one 1 10 

Tenderloin for two 1 50 

" casserole " 2 00 

Bordelaise : . '** 2 00 

" mushrooms ** 2 00 

Extra Sirloin 3 00 

" " Bordelaise 3 75 

" *' with Marrow 3 75 

'* " Bearnaise 3 75 

" " with mushrooms 3 75' 

(Jlub " Service for four 4 00 

" " Creole 4 75 

" " Bordelaise 4 75 

" "^ Bearnaise 4 75 

" " Forestiere 4 75 

" " Service for six 5 00 

" " Creole 6 00 

" " , Bearnaise 6 00 

CbOp0 anb Cutlets— per person 



Onlon'Soup au gratin (20 min.) 40 

Clam Broth (hot or cold) 35 

Potage Mongol 20 

Chicken Okra, Creole 20 

Bouillon lo cup 20 

Tomato Bouillon, per cup 20 



Frog Legs, fried, tartare 

Frog Legs, poulette, chafing dish.. 

Grapple, Meuniere. 

Brook Trout au bleu, Hollandalse.. 
Brook Trout, Meuniere 



Crab Flakes and fresh Mushrooms In chafing 

dish I 00 

Crab Meat au gratin 60 



Club Sirloin with mushrooms 6 00 

" " Bordelaise 6 00 

" " Cepes 6 00 

Yale Steak (service for sfTx) 5 00 

" "* Bearnaise 6 00 

" " Bordelaise 6 00 

Porterhouse <....2 00 

Extra Porterhouse 3 SO 

Tenderloin. Chateaubrlant 3 00 

Pilet MIgnon. saute 75 

*' '* " Bearnaise 90 

" '* Bordelaise 90 

" " ■' Forestiere 90 

** " *' Stanley 90 

Salisbury 1 00 

with onions 1 00 

Beefsteak, tartare 1 25 

Hamburger Steak, plain 1 00 



Mixed Grill..- 75 

English Mutton Chop (1) 75 

Mutton Chops (2) 60 

Lamb Chops (2) 60 



Lamb Chops saute aux petits pois.75 

Veal Cutlet (1) 50 

Veal Chop, plain or breaded 60 

Veal Chop, tomato sauce 75 



Calf Sweetbreads, broiled 75 

■Paprika Sclyiitzel 60 

Wiener Schnitzel 60 

Holstcin Schnitzel 65 



Pork Chops, plain or breaded (2) . . 60 

Charcutiere (2) 75 

*' Tenderloin, broileilorfried(l) 60 
*' *' piquante (1) 75 



Fried Chicken, savory (20 m) half 90 

Fried Spring Chicken, Maryland (20 m) half. . . 90 

Fried Chicken, country style (half) 90 

Spring Chicken saute, Creole 90 

" " " Marengo 90 

Minced ' ' in cream 60 

" " with poach egg 75 

Chicken Croquettes a la creme (2) 50 

" '* with green peas (2) 60 



Broiled Ham 40 

Breakfast Bacon 40 

Fried Ham and 2 Eggs, country style 50 

Fried Bacon " " " 50 

Honeycomb Tripe 40 



. JEntreeS— Per Person 

Emincee of Chicken, Portugaise 60 

Spring Chicken curried, au riz (20 min) half..l 00 

Chicken a la King ., 1 00 

' ' Liver en brochette 60 

Turkey Hash a la creme 60 

Fresh Mushrooms saute au Madere 75 

" " sous cloche 75 

Broiled Fresh Mushrooms 75. 

Sweetbread larded $0 

flDi0Ce»anCOWS-Per Person 

Fresh Tripe saute, Creole 50 

Lamb Kidneys (3) 50 

Broiled Veal Kidney (1) 5O 

*' Calf Liver and bacon 50 

Baked Pork and Beans 40 



Calf Sweetbreads a TEugenle 1 00 

" " Maryland, in chafing dish..! 00 
" " saute with asparagus tips, . 90 
" , ," larded, with fresh mush- 
rooms 1 (W 

Corned Beef Hash, browned 40 

" " " poached egg 50 

Veal Kidney saute aux fines herbes (1) 50 

" - - " with mushrooms 60 



Fresh Pigfeet 40 

Calfhead Vinaigrette 50 

Scotch Woodcock 60 

Welsh Rarebit 45 

Golden Buck 50 



Articles not priced will not be served 

FROM HOTEL JEFFERSON, ST. LOUIS. (FOLIO CARD MEASURES 18x13 INCHES.) 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



51 



Boiled (2) 25 

Fried (2) 30 

Fried au beurre noir (2) 3S 

Fried with marrow 50 

Poached (2) 30 

'* on anchovy Toast (2) 50 

I Shirred, plain (2) 30 

^Special BarcetOne 50 



Broiled Chicken (half) 75 

Chicken en casserole .' 2 00 



3Ead0 mh ^melettee.-Per person 

Belle Helene SO 

Omer Pacha 50 

Perlgourdine 50 

Scrambled, plain 35 

" with ham or bacon 50 

" chipped beef 50 

' ' with tomatoes 50 

' ' with asparagus tips 50 



Offlelette, plain js 

" with Tomatoes sp 

" " Bacon ,.50 

" " Ham 50 

" " Cheese 50 

■• " Chicken Livers SO 

■^ " Onions 50 

Spanish Omelette , 50. 



String Beans 25 

Stewed Tomatoes 25 

Sugar Com 25 

French Peas 40 

French String Beans ^ 35 

German Asparagus 1 00 

Flageolets 35 

Brussels Sprouts 30 

Broiled Spanish Onions 30 

Domestic Asparagus 75 



Game an& poultrv 

Philadelphia Squab 75 

Squab Chicken , 1 25 

Ueoetables-perpersin 

Boiled Onions a la creme. . .' 

Green Peas 25 

Lima Beans.. 25 

Succotash 25 

Com Fritters ...40 

C^m au gratin 30 

Asparagus Tips 60 

Stuffed Tomato , 40 

Stuffed Green Peppers 40 

-French Mushrooms au Madere SU 



Baked Potatoes IS 

French Fried... ^ 20 

Lyonnadse -. 25 

Hashed in cream , 25 

Gaufrette 40 



potatoes 

Saute 20 ~ 

Parisiennc 25 

Au Gratin - 25 

Pomme Rissolee 25 

Hashed Brown ....20 

COK)— Per Person 

Spring Lamb 60 Thon Marine 40 ' 

Roast Beef 60 Turkey, sliced 60 

Lamb Tongue SO Comed Beef 40 

Tongue, 50 Sardines, per box v. 40 

Sandwtcbes 

.Chicken, sliced... 2S Turkey 25 

Oub 35 Ham 20 

Toasted Sardines 30 Toasted Caviar 30 

Eggs 30_SardelIen 30 

Salads— Per Person 



Roast Chicken, whole to ordtr \ So 



Caulillower. . . .- 40 

Broiled Tomatoes 40 

Cepes, Bordelalse SO 

Fried Eggplant .30 

Boiled Rice a la creme 25 

Spinach with egg 35 

Spaghetti au gratin 40 

' ' Italienne 50 

" Mllanaisc ■ SO 

Macaroni au gratin 40 



Saratoga Chips 20 

Potatoes maitre d'hotel 25 

Potatoes O Brlen 30 

Julienne 25 

Sweetpotatoes grilled 30 



Roast Chicken, half ?S 

Ham SO 

Pate de Pole Gras .....1 00 

Kalter-Aufschnilt. , . , 75 



Roast Beef 30 

Tongue _ 20 

§wiss Cheese 20 

Pate de Pole Gras , *60 



German Asparagus, vinaigrette 1 00 

Lettuce 40 

Tomato en surprise (1) 40 

Celery 30 

Russe 60 

Lobster '. — 60 

Shrimp. . „ .' 

) pastttF anid Sweet £ntremets 

Meringue ChantiUy 20 Jelly du jour ....20 

Lady Fingers 25 Charlotte Russe 20 

Macaroons 25 Cold Rice Pudding 15 

Assorted Cakes 25 German Pancake 50 

Pie, per cut 15 Omelette with Jelly 50 



Tomato • '-40 

Watercress 

Tomato, frozen (1) 35 

Chicken 60 

Combination 45 

Macedoine 50 

Domestic Asparagus, vinaigrette 75 

Waldorf 50 



Cucumber 35 

Tomato, -princesse (1) , 40 

Fresh. Artichoke , 

Jefferson Nut Salad 40 

Grapd Fruit 

Asparagus Tips vinaigrette 60 

Lettuce and Tomato > ,- 45 

>, Romaine.. ,. .40 



Omelette au Kirsch ' ,., 60 

' ' Celestine , , . - 75 

- ' ' Robespierre 60 

' Soufflce .J, I 00 

" Isabelle -75 



VanUla (French) 25 

Chocolate .....25 

Strawberry ._ 25 

Pistachio '. 25 

Coffee. 25 



Preserved^Strawberries 25 

" Peaches 20 

'* Mirabeiles 25 ' 

" Atelange 25 



Provolo 30 

Philadelphia Cream 20 

Roquefort 20 



Ice Cream* Sberbets, f anc? fee Cream and ptmcbes-per person 

Tutti Frutti 30 

Lemon Sherbet 20 

Raspberry Sherbet 20 Parfalt (all kinds) 30 



Meringue Glac£e 35 

Nessclrode Pudding 35 



Peach Melba 50 Biscuit Tortoni .^SO 

Baked Alaska 1 00 Punch Benedictine 30 

Apricotiiie 30 

ali Kirsch. 3.0 

Romaine..' 30 



Coupe Jefferson .'.SO 

Cuope St. Jacques 50 



IfrUitS-Per Person 

Preserved Raspberries 20 Jelly— Orange Marmelade 20 

Cherries 20 " — Bar-Ie-Duc ...50 

*' Pears 20 •' — Guava 25 

" Apricots 20 Brandied Peaches 35 



Brandied Pears. , 20 

Imp. German Strawberries 45 

" " Cherries 40 



CbeeSC— Per person 



-Brie 20 Edam 

Gorgonzola 20 Gruyere 

Cottage 20 Camembert... 



,.20 Toasted Roquefort 30 

, . 20 Neufchatel , 20 

.20 Young America...,; 20 



fit Caffee (2) 26; (3) 36, Coffee Cop Pot 16 Cocoa 25 Chocolaie 26 Tea per Pot 26 Hot Milk per Pot IS Fer-MKac 10 Cream per glass ta 
Special Colfes, par pot (I cap) 25— add HI orin I cup 25 Russian Caravan Tea, per pot 40 

Jl etiarge of 10 ceals for rolls or bread where no meat or eggs are served. 
Jn additional charge ol 10 cents for all principal dishei, Fire cenli for all minor dlshci when sened In rooms. Auif. to 



CONTINUATION OF GENERAL BILL OF PARE, HOTEL JEFFERSON, ST. LOUIS. 



52 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 




R reakfas T 



Aui. 26 



FRUIT— (per person) 

WalermeloD, slice.. 25 New Peart 25 New Plums.. 25 New Peaches wifli Cream.. 30 Sliced Pineapple.. 25 

New Cantaloupe, hall. .25-40 New Baked tpple with cream 25 Grape FroH (half) . .20 

Orange (1) 10 Orange Juice 25 Grape Fruit Juice SO 

Orange Grape-Fruit Style 20 Sliced Oranges (1) 20 Sliced Bananas and Cream 25 

Preserved 

Wild Plum Jelly 25 Melange 25 Strawberries.. .20 Raspberries... 20 

Orange Marmalade 20 Cherries 20 Preserved Figs JS 

Brandy Peaches 35 Pears .- 20 



Peaches... 20 

Jams- 



Stewed Prunes. ..25 
-Gooseberry.. 20 Greengage.. 20 



Apple Batter. 
Raspberry.. 20 



.25 



DAIRY DISHES— (per person) 

Oatmeal 25 Gluten Bread 10 CoJfabread 10 Corn MufBns 10 Shredded Wheat Biscuit 21- 

FriedMush 25 Indian Mush 25 Assorted Rolls 10 Mapl-Flake 25 

Griddle Cakes 20 Fried Hominy 25 Puffed Rice 25 

Comb Honey 25 Toasted Com Flakes 25 

Jefferson Waffles 25 Gjape Nuts 25 Pettijohn Breakfast Food 25 

Cracked Wheat 25 Post Toasties 25. New Puffed Wheat 25 

Rice Biscuit with Cream iS' Ralston Wheat Food 25 

Toast— Dry.... 10 Buttered .... 15 Milk....20 Dipped... .20 CrMun 30 

EGGS— (per person) 

Missouri or Virginia Ham and Eggs 75 

Boiled (2) 25 Shirred (2) 30 

Fried (2) 30 au Beurre Noir (2) 35 

Scrambled 

Plain 35 Duvivier SO 

Scrambled with Smoked Beef, ....'50 with Kippered Herring 60 

Fancy E^^s (2) 

CoQuelicot SO Perigourdine 50 

Omelette 

Asparagus Tips SO Spanish 50' 

Chicken Livers SO Chives 50 

Fresh Mushrooms 60 Cheese 50 

FISH — (per person) 

Black Bass 60 Whitefish SO Crappit SO Pompano 60 

Kippered Herring 40 Bluefish 50 Halibut Steak 50 Smelts iso 

Finnan Haddie SO Yarmouth Bloaters ... SO Kieler Sprotten 40 Mackerel Roe 40 

Salted Codfish in Cream or Cake.s..50 Boiled or Broiled Salt Mackerel (half). .50 

MISCELLANEOUS (per person) 



Mornay SO 

Plain 35 

Kidney SO 

Jelly, 50 



Poached (2) 30 

Ham or Bacon with Eggs (2) .... SO 

with Ham or Bacon SO 

with Calf Brains so 



Bohemienne 50 



Tomatoes 

Mushrooms. 
Bread 



.50 
.50 
.50 



Pork Tenderloin 50 

English Mutton Chop (1) 75 

Mutton Chops (2) 60 

Lamb Chops (2) 60 

Liver and Bacon 50 

Veal Chop (1) 50 

Pork Chops (2) SO 

Broiled or Fried Ham 40 

Bacon 40 



Veal Cutlet Breaded, Tomato 

Sauce (1) SO 

Fried Calf Brains Beurre Noir. .50 

Rump Steak 60 

Small Steak 90 

Sirloin Steak 2.00 

Hamburger Steak 75 

Small Tenderloin Steak 90 

POTATOES 

Baked ^. 15 Saute 20 Julienne 

French Fried 20 Lyonnaise 25 Saratoga Chips. 

Fried Sweetpotatoes 30 German Fried 25 



Honeycomb Tripe 40 

Virginia Ham 60 

Smoked Beef in Cream . . .■ 50 

Corned Beef Hash 40 

" " " Poached Egg 50 

Lamb Hash Green Peppers 60 

Chicken Hash Green Peppers.. 60 
Fresh Pig Feet 40 



Pot Coffee (1 cup) l5 

" " (2 " ) 25 

" (3 " ) 35 

reaper Pot 25 



BEVERAGES— 

Postum Cereal 35 

Small Pot Chocolate or Cocoa 25 

Russian Caravan Tea, per pot ...40 

Walker Gordon Buttermilk 10 

Fer-IVIII-Lac Milk lO 



....20 au gratin 25 

...20 Hashed Brown 20 

Hashed in Cream 25 



Pint Bottle of Milk 10 

Hot Milk Per Pot IS 

Horlick's Malted Milk 15 

Certified Milk (I bottle) 15 



FROM THE JEFFEBSON, ST. LOUIS: 7x11 INCHES. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD :>:\ 



Omner St Louis, Nlo. April 25, 1912 

Oysters and Clams 

OysUr Stew 35, witli Cream HO, Fried (6) HO Blue Points 25, Cocktail 30 

Ca(>e Cods 35 RocUawai)s 35 

Little NecUs, Ual{ dor. 25 Cocktail 30 Stu{{ed Nontaise 50 

Relishes 

WestpVialia Hann 75 Malossol Caviar 75 Delicatessc Herring 30 Rntipasto LucuUus 50 



Soups 



Fish 



Consomme Xavier 20 Potage Parmentier 20 

Ckicken Okra 20 Green Turtle HO Split Peas 20 Essence o{ Ckicken 25 Tomato 20 



Fried Smelts a I'koteliere 60 Broiled Skad witk Roe maitre d'kotel 60 

TO ORDER— Fried Scallops Tartare 60 Fresk Crab Meat Newburg 75 

Softsliell Crabs (2) 60 Fried Frog Legs Ravigote 1.00 
Plats du Jour — Ready Dishes 

Cocur dc filct dc Boeuf, Trianon 75 Sweetbread braiscr LucuUus 80 

Rooster Fries saute -fines .kerbcs (10 m) 80 Ckicken saute Forcstierc 80 

Englisk Mutton Ckop, Jockey Club (15 m) 75 Rirotto Piemontais HO 

Roasts Prime Ribs o{ Beef au jus 60, Extra cut 1.00 Stuffed Capon, ckestnut dressing 65 
TO ORDER— Fried Ckicken Soutkern style (kal{) 75 Cornbread in 10 min. 10 

Broiled — Ckicken (kal^) 75 Guinea Hen (kalf) 75 Homer Squab 75 

Fresk Muskrooms 75 Squab Ckicken 1.25 

Vegetables 

Cauliflower 30 Broiled Spanisk Onions 30 Spinack 25 

California Asparagus 75 Wild Rice 25 Green Peas 25 Louisiana Swectpotatoes 30 

New Peas HO New String Beans 30 New Buttered Beets 25 

California Artickoke HO New Asparagus,. Hollandaise sauce 50 

POTATOES— Au Gratln 20 New 20 In Cream 25 Masked 15 Baked 15 

Boiled 15 Hasked in Cream 20 Baked Sweetpoiatoes 25 Candied Yams 30 

Salads 

Watercress 30 Romaine 35 Frozen Tomato 35 Dandelion 30 Field Lettuce 30 

Cucumbers 35 Combination HO Tomato HO Lettuce and Grapefruit 50 Lettuce 35 
Desserts 

PIES— Apple 15 Lemon Custard 15 Boston Cream 15 Hot Mince 15 

Butterbread Pudding, brandy sauce 15 Oldfaskion Strawberry Skortcake 30 

German Huckleberry Cake, wkippcd cream 15 

Peack Tart 15 Ckampagne Jelly 20 Ckocolatc Eclairs 15 

Cold Rice Pudding 15 Cold Cup Custard 15 Ckarlotte Russe 15 

ice Creams 

Mixed 30 Vanilla 25 Ckocolate 25 Coffee 25 Pistackio 25 Strawberry 25 

Nesselrode Pudding 35 Coupe St. Jacques 50 Parfait aux Marrons 30 

Cafe Parfait 30 Meringue Glacee 35 Peack Melba 50 Punck Benedictine 30 

Frozen Tom-and-Jerry 30 Skerbets — Lemon 20 Raspberry 20 

Fruit Fresk Pineapple 25 New Strawberries witk cream HO Apples 15 

Neufckatel 20 Port du Salut 20 Roquefort 20 Brie 20 Provolo 30 Cream 20 
Englisk Stilton 30 Gorgonzola 20 Imp. Ckiffemann Camembert 20 

Sassafras, glass 10 Russian Caravan Tea, per pot HO 

Coffee or Tea per pot 25 Special Coffee per pot, 1 cup 25; additional cup 25 

DemiTassel5 Sweet Milk 10 Fer-Mil-Lac 10 Buttermilk 10 

DINNER CARD. THE JEFFERSON, ST. LOUIS. 



54 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 




SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1905 




Cocktail 30 



dlame aiio S<eetcte 

Shinnecock Bay Clatns 25 Oak Islands 25 

Soups 

Consommt Vermicelli 30 20 Soupe Flamande 30 20 

Hot or cold Chicken Consommt or Gumbo, cup 25 Hot or cold Clam Broth, ciip 25 

HOI!) 

^ Breast of Veal, Jardiniere 40 
Tripe Salad, Creole 40 Crabmeat, ravigote 40 



READY DISHES 

f I0b 

Broiled Fresh Mackerel, mustard sauce. Julienne potatoes 40 

Joints, etc. 

Roast Rib of 'Prime Beef au cresson 75 40 

'Braised Ox-tail, Boaqaetiere 40 

Carry of Chicken tuith rice 45 

Lamb Hash tuith green peppers 40 

Ham with spinach 40 

Eggs, Fontainebleaa 40 
VeaelnbUs 

New Beets sauted aa bearre 20 JVeTp Succotash 20 

Portions of Pish, Entrees, Joints, etc., are Intended for one person only and tlie price of a 
portion will be added to bill for eacli additional person 



SalnOs 

Oriental 80 Alligator Pear je Asparagus Tip 40 Grape Fruit 50 

Potato 20 Cold Slaw 1*5 Tomato 50 30 Lettuce 50 30 Cucumber 50 30 

Romaine 50 30 Moderne 40 Chiffonnade 50 Jardiniere 40 

Lettuce and Tomato 50 30 a I'Astor 40 Tomatoes stuiTed with cucumbers 50 

Celery 50 30 Lobster 1 00 60 Chicken i 00 60 Crab 1 00 60 

Chicory 50 30 Salade de Boeuf, Parisienne 50 Escarole 50 30 

Mayonnaise 10 cents extra 

Deeeect 

(Hot) — Steamed Fig Padding, apricot sauce 15 (Cold) — "PlamVie 15 

Almond Jalousie 15 Caramel Custard 15 'Brioche Parisienne 15 

Orange Custard Pie tS Peach Shortcake 35 Rice Padding 15 

Apple, 'Peach, Pineapple or 'Pear Tartlets t5 

Chocolate, Vanilla or Coffee Eclairs 15 

Hot-hous; Cantaloupe 75 40 Charlotte Russe 25 Assorted Cakes 20 

Cantaloupe 50 30 Peach Melba 40 

Ice ilream 

Vanilla, Chocolate, Strawberry, Pistache or Fresh Peach 25 

Cafe or Chocolate Parfait 30 Mixed 30 Biscuit Tortoni 30 

Iced Asparagus on toast, sauce chartreuse .35 Biscuit Glaci 30 

Tutti Frutti 30 Charlotte Glacee 30 Biscuit Astor 35 

Meringue Glacee 30 Coupe St. Jacques 40 

Plomblere Astor 60 



Sorbete 



Roman, Siberian, Cardinal, Lalla Rookh 30 



(tbeese 

Port du Salut 25 15 

Edam 25 15 
American 15 

Stilton 30 



Lemon, Orange, Strawberry or Raspberry 25 



Yvette 30 



ilotfee 



Demi-Tasse 10 

Iced Tea 15 



HOTEL 
ASTOR 




Gorgonzola 25 15 Gruyere 25 

Cameiiibert 25 15 Roquefort 25 15 

Philadelphia Cream 25 NeuchMel 25 

Gervais 20 with Bar-le-Duc jelly 50 

Turkish Coffee 2o Special 25 A I'Astor 30 

Iced Coffee 15 



Electric Cabs at a charge of 50 cents Id any Theatre between 30th 
aaJ 59lh Streets, are in jeadinesj at the 45th Street Entrance 




FROM HOTEL ASTOR, NEW YORK. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 55 



(Duftters anb ®I(tnte 



Shinnecock Bay Clams 25 
Oak Islands 25 Cocktail 30 



^ot 



Sweetbread & la Maryland with fresh mushrooms i 50 
Jumbo Squab k I'etouffd 1 25 Poussin en cocotte i 25 



Soft Shell Crabs (each) 30 Stuffed Clams, Florentine 60 

Lobster Cutlets, Victoria 75 Crab Flakes a I'Astor i 25 

Canape, Marie Antoinette 60 Lobster, Bordelaise i 50 
Lobster a la Newburg .1 25 Lobster, broiled i 00 deviled I 15 

Lobster, stuiTed, each 40 Lobster en brochette i 25 

Scotch Woodcock 50 Grilled Sardines 50 

Welsh Rarebit 35 Golden Buck 45 

Yorkshire Buck 50 Pig's Feet, broiled 40 

Stewed Tripe, Creole 50 Canap£, Lorenzo 60 

Deviled Crabs, each 40 Deviled Lamb Kidneys 50 

Grilled Bones 50 Deviled Bones 60 
Long Island Rarebit 45 

Crayfish Salad 1 OO 

Crab farci, ravigotte 40 Boned Capon, truffe i 00 60 

Beefsteak, tartare 70 Filet of Smoked Herring 40 

Club Sandwich 35 Sardine Sandwich 30 

Sandwich Regalia 30 Crab Salad i 00 60 

Lobster Salad i 00 60 Chicken Salad i 00 60 

Chiffonnade Salad 50 Caviar Sandwich 30 

Asparagus, vinaigrette 60 French Artichoke 50 



Caf4 Parfait 30 Biscuit Astor 35 Biscuit Tortoni 30 

Coupe St. Jacques 40 NeSselrode 30 



Denii-Tasse 10 Cafe Turc 20 Caf6 Special 25 

Caf6 Astor 30 

SUPPER SPECIALTIES, HOTEL ASTOR, NEW YORK. 



56 THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 




5tt|j|j«r 



Blaepoints as Lynnhavens 35 

Bielnga Caviare i 50 Celery 50 Lyon Sausage 50 

Nova Scotia Salmon 50 Antipasti 40 

Pickled Lamb's Tongue 40 Spiced Cantaloupe 30 

HOT 

Chicken Eroth per cup 30 Chicken Broth, Bellevue per cup 30 

Consomme cup 25 Clam Broth cup 25 

Terrapin 3 00 Snails 60 

Oyster Crabs i 00 

Stuffed Lobster 60 Crab Meat crgme gratin 1 00 

Lobster, Cutlets, Cream sauce 75 Lobster, Bordelaise 1 25 

Stuffed Crab 50 Broiled Lobster i 00 Devilled Kidneys 50 

Bouchee Capuciiie i co Chicken d la Waldorf i 50 

Noisettes &f Lamb, Armentiers i 00 Sweetbreads, Pompadour r 25 

Canape Lorenzo, 60 Canape Waldorf 60 

Scotch Woodcock 50 Welsh Rarebit 40 Yorkshire Buck 60 



Broiled Chicken 2 00 half l 00 Broiled Squab 90 Broiled Sweetbread I 00 
Tournedos of Filet, Cherron i 50 

Canvasback Duck 4 oc English Snipe 75 Mallard Dnck i 50 

Red Head Duck 3 50 Imported Partridge 2 50 Ruddy Duck 2 00 



Potatoes: — Fried 30 Saut^ 30 Paille 30 Waldorf 30 

COLD 

Salmon Pie i 25 Half Boned Imported Partridge i 25 Crabs, Ravigotte 60 

Beef a la Mode 75 Lamb 75 Plover 80 Boned Capon i 00 

Westphalian Ham 75 Squab 90 Virginia Ham 75 

Mixed Cold Meat 75 with Chicken i 00 

Chaudfroid of Imported Partridge i 25 

Sandwiches: — Tongue 25 Chicken 30 Caviare 40 

Sardine 30 Fate de foie gras 50 Club 35 

Canape d la Rex 50 - Ham 25 

Crab 75 Romaine 60 Japonaise i 50 Russian i 00 Cucumbers 60 
Lettuce 60 Chicken 1 00 Tomato 60 Florida 75 Lobster i 00 



ICES rN SOUVENIRS 75 

Nesselrode Pudding 40 Lallah Rookh 40 Mixed Cakes 25 

Cafe Parfait 25 Eclairs 25 Coupe St. Jacques So 

Biscuit Tortoni 30 Tutti Frutti 40 



Vanilla, Strawberry, Pistache, Coffee or Chocolats Ice Cream 25 Mixed 30 

Apricot, Raspberry, Lemon, Orange or Pineapple Water Ice 25 

French Coffee, Cup 15 Caramel Custard 30 Turkish Coffee 20 

PKOM THE WALDOEF-ASTOMA, NEW YORK. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



57 



LitUa Neck Clunt 80 



Staffed Mangoei as 

Pickted Walnats 30 

Andputo «0 

Smd[«d Salmon ia Oil 60 

CM) Flatos, Sapreme 60 

Asiort«lRelith«8,Bellevae p. p. 60 

Cbielnm Broth, ia cop, fact or cold SO 
CoDionim^, plain, in cap, hot or 

cold SO 

Coaiommi Jolienne .60-80 



GENERAL BILL OF FARE 

Oifaters and Plants 

Clam Btolb, in cup 80 Clam Fritters.. 



, CO Cljim Cocktail .. L i..<.,.. 85 



Aitrachan Caviar 1.7i 

Salted Almonds or Pecans 30 

Pieklcd Oysters 60 

Queen Olives 26 

Tomato Neva. 75 



Coosommj Madrilene 60-86 

ConBomm£ Printanier 60-30 

Par6eot Peas with Croutons. 60-SO 



^ie/iaA^s 



20 



California Olives 

Celery 

Pimolas. SO 

Kieler Sprotten fiO 

Carciofini GO.' 

7UpS 

Cbicken Gambo 76-40 

Chicken Okra 60-36 

Tomato with Rice 60-80 



BoDed 

Shirred 

Fried 

Fried, with Bacon or Ham . 



26 



Scrambled 

" with Truffles 75 

" with Mushrooms 60 

Eggi, BiDedictine 75 



Brown Butter 10 

Poached on Toast 35 

Omelette with Asparagus Tips. . GO 



Brook Tront 1.00-60 

Broiled Spanish Mackerel, 

Colbert , 90-50 

Broiled Salt Mackerel 80-46 

Black Bass, broiled or sauted. 90-60 
Striped Bass, Hollaodaise. . . 90-60 



Snail Steak 76 

Sirloin Steak 1 .26 

Extra Sirloin Steak 2.60 

Porter House Steak 2.35 

Extra Porter Honse Steak 1.00 



Chicken en Casserole, Black- 

itooe 3.00 

Supreme of Cbidcen, Toalonse.1.25 
Chiekeo Crognette, with 

Peas 1.00-60 

Breaded Veal Cutlet 60 

Sweetbreads i la Becker 1.75-1.00 

60 



Broiled Bluefisb 80-45 

Broiled Salmon Steak 90-60 

Fried Frog's Legs, Tartar 

Sauce 1.00-60 

Pompano, bro.iled 1.00-60 

Filet of English Sole, Jolnville. 1.36 



S^lak 



Steakaf (BAods, Ste. 



Broiled WfaiteGsb 90-50 

Halibut Steak 80-15 

Fresh Codfish 80-46 

Broiled Live Lobster 1.35-76 

Lobster Saut^ & rAiaericaine.. .1.76 
Lobster Mewburg 1.7&-1X)0 



Lamb Steak (1) 1 .36 

Tenderloin Steak 1.25 

Chateaabriaod 3.50 

Canada Mutton Chop, one 60 

Native Matton Chop 76-40 

Entrees to Ore/er 



Uimb Chops 75-60 

Spring Lamb Chops <3) 90 

Veal Chops, broiled 90-60 

Pork Chops 60-85 

Calf's Liver with Bacon 76-10 



Cepas, Bordelaise.. 
Stanley..: 



Sweetbreads in Shell 1 .26-65 

Welsh Rarebit 60 

Golden Buck 60 

Scotch Woodcock 66 

Veal Kidneys, Deviled 85 

Calf Brains, Brown Batter... 70-10 

Sfarniturea 

Beamaise 36 

Truffles 76 



Broiled Sweetbread 1.36-66 

Migoon of Filet of . Beet, 

plain 1 , 26-66 

MignoQ of Filet of Beef, 

Cfaeron 1. 60-SO 

Calf's Head it la Vinaigrette.. 90-60 

and y^aueea 

Bordelaise. 60 

Fresh Mushrooms. 60 



Boiled PQUtoes. 20 

Haibad in Cream or Browned. 

Potatoes 25 

Potataea,FrencfaFriedorSaut£es 25 
"' Lyonaise or Hashed 

Browned 26 

*' Parisieone 10 

" Sarah Bernhardt 10 

" Hashed in Cream an 

Gratin 10 

" Julienne 26 



VeQetaSlea 

Fresh Mushrooms under Betl.I,60-80 

Boiled Rice 25 

Beets, stewed in Butter 30 

Lima Beans 60-80 

Fried Egg Plant ....60-80 

Cauliflower Hollandaise 60-35 

Cauliflower Saut£ Fines Herbs 60-S5 

Spioachs ■ 50-80 

Stuffed Otteeu or Red Pepper5.60-86 

Cepes k la Bordelaise.. .' 76 

Broiled Tomatoes 40 



Pftt^ de Foie Graa 1.60-80 

Boned Capon with Jelly. . . 1.50-80 

Roast Beef 90-60 

Spring Lamb. 1 .00-60 

SANDWICHES: Ham 26 



- eat 

Potatoes Saratoga.. , 46 

" Stuffed 10 

' ' Byroo 40 

'' Lorette 40 

■' O'Brien 40 

" Fried Country Style. . . 40 

" Gaufretle 10 

" Mai tre d' Hotel 15 

Spaghetti k I'ltalieone 10 

Spaghetti au Gratin 10 

Fresh Moshrooms on Toast.l, 26-66 

Qoltl ^^teats 

Smoked Beef ToogUe,.,.^. ..75-10 Corned Beef.....' 76-40 

Chicken and Ham Pie 1.00-60 Westphalia Ham 1.00-60 

Assorted Meats 1.25-76 Virginia Hara 1.00-60 



Sardines 50 

Radishes 25 

Anchovies 50 

Bismarck Herring 10 

Herring in Wine 60 

Lobster, Supreme 76 

Onion au Parmesan au Gratin 60-30. 

Green Turtle, clear 1.00-60 

Mock Turtle 60-SO 

1 

Omelette 35 

" with Fine Herbs 36 

" with Kidneys 60 

Spanish 60 



Crab Flakes, Maryland 1.75 

Stuffed Deviled Crabs 1 .00-60 

Deviled Stuffed Lobster.... 1. 00-60 

Scallops, fried or broiled 76 

Finnan Haddie 60>4& 



Sqnab Guinea Hen 1.50 

Roast Chicken 1.50-80 

Broiled Chicken 1.60-80 

Broiled Royal Squab 1.26 

Dockling 2 .50-1 .60 



Vol-an-Vent of Chicken 4 la 

Reine 1 . 50 

Canape Lorenzo 60 

Chicken Hash 1.36-70 

Lamb Kidneys Saut^ Maddro 90-50 
Lamb Kidneys, en Brochelto 7fi-60 
Chicken a la King 1 .60 

Printaniere 60 

Asparagus Tips. 60 



Broiled Onions 40 

Artichoke, Hot, Hollandaise... 60 

French Flageolets 50-80 

Small Carrots in Cream 60-80 

French Asparagus, large 1 . 26 

German Asparagus 1.00 

American Asparagus 60 

Stewed Fresh Tomatoes, 60-80 

Bermuda Onions in Cream 10 

Artichokes Bottom Sautes, , . .75-40 
French Peas 60-86 



Tongue, , 



,25 



Roastbeef 86 Chicken 35 



Beef & la Mode 76-40 

Ham 60-40 

Smoked Beef 75-40 

Half Roast Cbicken 80 

Club 40 Sardine ,, 86 



Potato SO 

Tomato en Surprise, one 40 

Celery 50-80 



Omelette Celesttne 76 

Omelette Sonffl^e 76 

Omelette an Rhum 60 

Omelette vrith Jelly 60 

Vanilla 36 

Cbocdate: 25 

Pistachio 26 

Strawberry 30 

Tutii Frutii 86 

Raspberry 80 



Oranges, each 16 

Grapefruit 60-30 

Apples,each 16 



Lettuce and Tomatoes 60-^ ^ftSi Flake 1 .25-65 

Cucumber 60-30 Russian 1.00 

Chicken 1.26-65 Special Blackstone.' 1.00-60 

, Lobster 1.36-66 Watercress 50-30 

3?aatpu 

' Peach or Apple Fritters '. . 40 A^Ie Meringue au Kirsch. ,....' 60 

Soufflees : Vanillc, Chocolate, ;' Charlotte 60 

Rothschild, Hazelnut 60 Apricot Cond^ 60 

French Pancake 60 



Nesselrode 35 

Neapolitan 80 

-Fancy Form Ice Cream 86 

Peach Melba 60 

Biscuit Glace '86 

Tortoni 86 



ream and tllcea 

Meringue Glacee, 



Vanille 10 



leringue < 
Caf£ Farfait. 

Coupe Eugenie 60 

Conpe St. Jacques 60 

Lemon Sherbet 26 

Orange Sherbet 26 



^rulta . 

Fears, each. 20 Stewed Prunes ?. . 

Hot House Grapes 2.00 Fresh Stewed Fruit 

Stewed Rbnbarb SO 



Lettuce 6()-S0 

Alma 1.00-60 

Alligator Pear 90-60 

Romaine 60-36 



Bar te Due 40 

Assorted Pastry, each 10 

Eclairs, each 10 



Raspberry ^Sherbet 26 

Pineapple Sherbet 26 

Rum Sherbet 85 

Maraschino Sherbet 86 

Kirsch Sherbet 86 

Lalla Rookh 85 



Kings of Siam 80 

Assorted Fruits 1.00 



Camembert.-. 
Brie 

Roquefort. , 



SAe 



- JieiBam 

, 80 Imported Swiss SO. Edam 

, SO Neufchatel v 30 -Port do Saint 

. 30 Gorgonzola , 80 Stilton 

COFFEE: Blackstone Special, Mandohling Java and Arabian Mocha. 85-25 Turkish Coffee 

TEAS: Blackstone Special, English Breakfast, Oolong, Green, Ceyloo, Sun Dried Japan, Orange Pekoe . 

HALF PORTIONS SERVED TO ONE PERSON ONLY 
^Ao Additional chirge of ten cents on all items qf flfty cants or orar, ud fiva casts on all items ondsr fifty cents will be 

FROM THE BLACKSTONE, CHICAGO. CARD MEASURES 10x13 



Herkimer County 26 

Canadian 80 



.36 Demi Tasse 16 

.35-26 



made when served in priMta tooui 
INCHES. 



58 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Saturday, 18th May, 1912 



DILL or FARE. 



SIMPSON'S FISH DINNER, consisting of 

three kinds of Fish . . - - 

(Including Cheese, Butter, S^lad, Etc.) 

Dinner from the Joint . . - • 

(Including Vegetables, Cheese, Butter and Salad.) 

Dinner from one Special Dish . - • 

(Including Vegetables, Cheese, Butter and Salad.) 

Dinner from one Special Dish, with Joint to follow 

Dinner from two Special Dishes - - - 



3 9 
2 6 
2 6 



3 
3 



JOINTS, 2/6 

A succession of Fresh Joints served daily from 12 noon to 9.30 p m. 
(Including Vegetables, Bread, Cheese, Butter and Salad.) 



12.0 (Saddle JWutton 

TO j 

9.30 I Roast Sirloin Beef 

(Saddle Mutton. Roast Sirloin Beef 
1.0 ] Boiled Beef 

(Fore Quarter Lamb 
Calves' Head and Bath Chap 



5.30 
6.0 

7.30 



Boiled Beef 

Roast Sirloin Beef. Saddle iWutton 

Saddle Mutton 

Roast Sirloin Beef 

Fore Quarter Lamb 

Rump Steak and Kidney Pudding 

Saddle Mutton 



Turtle, clear or thick - 3 

Scotch Hotch-Potch l 

Asparagus - - 1 6 

Ox Tail, clear or thick - - 1 0, 

Chesterfield - - - - 1 



SOUPS. 

5. d. 



Clear Mock Turtle 

Julienne 

Macaroni 

Gravy - - - 

Vermicelli 

Tomato 





6 
























a 



NOTE.— If served with Joint or Special Dish to follow, 6d. less will be charged for each of the above. 

FISH. , , 

Salmon and Lobster Sauce 

Turbot and Lobster Sauce 

Curried Turbot - - - - 

Fried Turbot 

Sole Souchet 

Salmon Cutlets and Piquant Sauce 

Curried Prawns 

Freshly cooked Salmon and Turbot (the wtiole fish) served daily from 12 noon to 9.30 p.m. 

dl 

Stewed Eels, Port Wine or 
Parsley and Butter Sauce - 1 

2 



2 


6 


2 





2 





2 





2 





2 





1 


6 



Fish Pie - - 
Fish Balls or Cakes 

Fried Whiting ... 
Whitebait - - - - 



Fillet of Sole, Fried or Boiled 
Sole, Fried, Grilled, or Boiled 



NOTE. — If served with Join< or Special Dish ti follow, 6d. less will be charged for each of the above. 

Plain Lobster - 2/6 Lobster Salad - 3/- 

Lobster Mayonaise 3/6 Salmon Mayonaise 3/- 

Cold Salmon and Tartare Sauce 2/6 



TYPICAL BILL OF FARE OF THE FAMOUS SIMPSON'S TAVERN, LONDON. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



59 



SPECIAL DISHES, 2/6 

(Including Vegetables, Cheese, Butter, Bread and Salad.) 

Stewed Neck Lamb and Peas 

Curried Chicken Chicken Marengo Haricot Mutton 

Fricassee Chicken Stewed Pigeon Curried Fillets of Mutton 

Stewed Rump Steak Stewed Kidneys 

rKOM THE GKILL (IS to 30 minutes). 

Mutton Cutlets, Tomato or Piquant 
Sauce - - - . . 

Rump Steak - . . . 

Grilled Fowl and Mushroom Sauce 

(Above including Vegetables, Bread, Butter and Salad.) 
Chump Chop - - - - 1 6 I Two Kidneys 
Loin Chop 1 3 I 



s. 


d. 


Porterhouse Steak - --46 


2 


t> 


„ „ for two - 7 6 


2 
3 


tj 




Mixed Grill— Chop, Kidney and 

Sausage - - - -26 



- 1 3 



VEGETABLES. 

NEW PEAS I/, per portion 

ASPARAGUS I/- per portion 

GRILLED MUSHROOIVIS ON TOAST I • 

Beetroot, 3d. Tomato, Plain, 3d. Tomato, Grilled, 4d. 

Cucumber, 3d. New Potatoes, 3d. 





SWEETS. 




Sago Pudding 

Mixture of Fruit ... 

Figs and Rice - - - - 

Orange Fritters 

Apple Fritters - - - - 

Madeira Jelly - 

Rhxibarb Pie 


- 6d. 

- 6d. 

- 6d. 

- 6d. 
6d. 

- 6d. 
6d. 


Prunes and Rice - - - 

Apple Pie .... 

College Pudding - 

Sweet Omelette 

Lemon Pudding 

St. Clair Pudding - 

Rum Omelette ... 

Stewed Rhubarb and Rice 


• 6d. 

- 6d. 

- 6d. 

- 11- 
■ 6d. 

- 6d. 

- 1/8 

- 6d. 


Raspberry Cream 
Lemon Water 


ICES 

9d. 
- - - - - - 9d. 

SUNDRIES. 


- 


Anchovy Toast, Fish or Paste 


- 9d. 


Anchovies, Plain - - • 


- 6d. 


Macaroni with Cheese - 


- 6d. 


Poached Eggs on Toast - 


- 9d. 


Macaroni with Tomatoes 


6d. 


Sardines on Toast - 


- 9d. 


Welsh Rarebit- 


6d. 


Bloaters Roes on Toast, 


- 9d. 


Buck Rarebit 


- 9d. 


Stewed Cheese . - - 


- 6d. 


Scotch Woodcock - - - 


1/3 


Red Currant Jelly • - - 


- 3d. 



Olives 



6d. 



TEA AND COFFEE. 

Tea, per cup, 6d. Tea, per pot, 1/- Coffee, small cup, 4d., large, 6d. Cream, 3d. 

DESSEHT, 

STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM 1/6 per portion 

Oranges, 3d. each Almonds and Raisiris, 9d. Apples, 3d. each 



Attendance, 3d. Cacb person, Charged in the Bill. 

Half-pint. Vint. 

SOURCE PERKIER, the Champagne of Ti^ibfe Waters 4d. 6cl. 
FINE OLD TAWNY PORT, 8d. per glass. 
BASS & CO.'S PALE AI.E on Draught. 



Quart. 

1/- 



TYPICAL B:LL of FARE OF THE FAMOUS SIMPSON'S TAVERN, LONDON. 



60 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



Uttle Neck Clams 
Cocktail 30 



OYSTERS AND CLAMS 

Clam Cocktail 30 Clam Fritters 40 

Baked Little Neck Clams Little Neck Clams, 
in Shells, "The Rice". 60 Newburg 60 



RELISHES 



OliTes 15 

Grape Fruit Cocktail. . .50 

Stuffed Celery, Eva 35 

Celery 25 

Bismarck Herring 30 

Anchovies 30 

SOUPS 

(Id Cap) 

Chicken Broth 20 

Consomme 20 

Essence of Tomato 25 

Clam Broth -20 

(per person) 

Puree of Green Peas 20 

Cream of Tomatoes 25 

Mongol 25 

Petite Marmite 35 

Gumbo Creole 25 

Green Turtle 35 

EGGS (per person) 

Boiled 20 

Poached 30 

Fried 25 

Ham and Eggs *0 

Bacon and Eggs 40 

Shirred 30 

Shirred & la Bercy 40 

Scrambled 30 

Scrambled with Truffles.. 60 
Scrambled with Asparagus 

Tips BO 

Poached Specials 

Benedict (1) 40 

Florentine (1) 35 

Grand Due (1).,..'. 45 

OMELETTES 

Plain , . -35 

With Ham 40 

W«h Fine Herbs 40 

With Mushrooms 45 

With Fresh Mushrooms 60 

With Kidney 50 

WlthChicken Liver 60 

Spanish 50 

Breakfast Steak 60 

Small Sirloin Steak 76 

Sirloin Steak (for 2).. 1.25 
Sirloin Steak, Minute... 60 

Extra Sirloin Steak 2.00 

Extra Sirloin Planked, 

"Hotel Rice" 2.75 

Club Sirloin Steak 2.00 

Club Steak Planked, 

"Hotel Rice" 3.00 

Porterhouse 2.00 

Filet Mignon 75 

Half Broiled Spring 

Chicken on Toast. . .75 

Whole 1.50 

Squab Chicken 1.00 

Half Milk-Fed Chicken.. 90 

Imperial Squab 75 

Capon 4.00 

Lamb Kidney Saute 40 

Ijomb Kidneys with 

Fresh Mushrooms 60 

Croquettes of Chicken, 

with Peas 50 

Breaded Veal Kidney... 50 
Sweetbread, Financiere.90 



Sardines 30 

Antipasto 45 

French Lyon Sausage.. 35 

Clams Marinee 30 

(German Salami 30 



Tomato. "The Rice"... 30 
Assorted Hors d'Oeuv- 

res, per person 40 

Ripe Olives 20 

Russian Caviar on Toast. 50 



i'^ |gaf^B^ ^ l^'giS^ ^ ^B^g^, c^ 



READY 

MAY 17. 1913 

(per person) 

SOUPS 

Okra Creole 20 

Cream of Texas Com, Houston 20 

FISH 

Broiled Spanish Mackel, 

Maitre d'Hotel 40 

Red Snapper, Livoumaise 40 

ENTREES 

Individual Planked Mignon Steak 
with Vegetables "The Rice" 75 

Half Spring Chicken Maryland, 

Asparagus Tips 75 

Larded Sweetbreads, with 

Mushrooms, Garden Peaft; 60 



1 



il 



1 



^ }^a^ g }aaiM@^ ^ ^^a^ 



STEAKS, CHOPS, ETC 



Tenderloin Steak 1.00 

Chateaubriand 2.50 

-Garniture and Sauces for 
Steaks. 

Bordelaise 20 

French Mushrooms 20 

Truffles 35 

Planked 50 

Bearnaise 20 

Anchovy Butter . . - 25 

Smothered or Fried 
Onions 15 



Hamburger Steak 60 

EngUsh Mutton Chop... 75 
Mutton Cliop (1) 30 

With Strip of 6acon..35 
Lamb Chop (1) 30 

With Strip of Bacon. .35 

Lamh Chops (2) 50 

Veal Chop (1) 30 

With strip of Bacon.. 35 
Veal Chops, Plain (2).. 60 
Veal Chops, Milanaise. .65 
Wiener ^Schnitzel 50 



POULTRY 



Celery-Fed Duckling . . 2.00 

Spring Turkey 3.75-1.90 

Half Guinea Chicken 85 

Whole 1.60 



Minced Chicken Sl la 



King 



.70 



Patties of Chicken &-ta- 
Reine (2) 60 

Breast of Chicken with 
Virginia Ham, Sous 
Cloche Favorite 1.00 

Chicken Casserole 
Bourgeoise (for 2).. 2.00 



ENTREES TO ORDER (per person) 



Broiled Sweetbread, 
Maitre d'Hotel 75 

Sweetbread, Brais6, 
with Peas 75 

Escalope of Sweetbread, 
Virginia 8.t 

Ragout Lucullua 85 



Calf Brains, Brown 

Butter 40 

Toumedos, Mousque- 

taire 90 

Tournedos, Beraud 1.00 

Toumedos, Marchand 

de V!n 90 



Clam Poulette 60 

Shinecock Clams 30 

Clams Moscovite 30 

Fresh Caviar de 

Beluga 1.25 

Lobster Cocktail 50 

Crab Flakes Cocktail. ..50 
Canape Demidoff 35 

FISH (per person) 
Boiled ro Fried 

Rock Bass 40 

Sheepshead 35 

Red Snapper 35 

Filet of Gulf Trout 35 

Tenderloin of Gulf Red 

Fish 35 

Pompano 60 

Broiled Spanish Mackerel. 40 

Extra Sauces for Fish. 

Anchovy Butter 15 

Hotelier^ 10 

White Wine Sauce I... 15 

Laguipiere 25 

Arlesienne 20 

Fin de Siecle 25 

Mornay .15 

Duxellea Grating 25 

Oab Flakes Windsor 50 

Crab Provensale .50 

Fried Scallops, Tartare 40 

Scallops, Nimoise 40 

Scallops, Polignac 50 

Broiled Lobster 1.25 

Plain, with Mayonnaise, 

half 65 

The Rice 75 

Cardinal 75 

Newburg (for 2) 1.50 

Oyster Crabs, Fried ...... .60 

Little Neck Clams- Casso- 
lette. Maryland 60 

Deviled Oyster Crabs and 
Clams 60 

piamond Back Terrapin. .2.50 

Veal Cutlet a la Na- 

politaine 60 

Pork Chop (1) 30 

Pork Chop, Italian 40 

Pork Chop, Sauce Robert.40 

Escalope of Veal 50 

Lamb Kidneys with 

Bacon 40 

Broiled Veal Kidney.... 40 
Calf Liver with Bacon.. 30 
Hotel Rice "Mixed 
Grille" ^70 

Breast of Chicken 1.00 

Supreme of Guinea Chick- 
en, Cafe de Paris... 1.25 

Guinea Chicken en Cas 
serole (for 2) 2.00 

Guinea Hen Mascotte, 
(for 2.) 2.00 

Sweetbread Sous Cloche 
with Fresh Mushrooms.1.00 
Pigs' Feet, Deviled 

Sauce 45 

Calfs Head, Vinaigrette.45 
Calf's Head, Turtle 

Style 55 



KICK HOTEL, HOUSTON, TEXAS; LEFT HAND PAGE. SPECIALTIES CARD ATTACHED. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



61 



Crab Ravigotte (1) 40 

Veal and Virginia Ham 

Pie 40 

Terrine ot Goose Liver 
with Truffles, Strass- 
bourg 60 



COLD DISHES (per person) 



Steak Tartare 75 

Boned Capon with Port 

Wine Jelly 60 

Ham 35 

Virginia Ham 50 

Westphalian Ham 50 



Club 
Ham 



.35 
.20 



Roast Beef 
Tongue . . . 



Nesselrode Pudding 30 

Biscuit PralinS 30 

Biscuit Tortoni 30 

PlombiSre Glacfie 30 

Meringue Glacfie 30 

Parfait, "The Rice" 30 



Strawberries with 

Cream 30 

Compotier of Assorted 

Presh Fruit 40 



Brandied Peaches, Cher- 
ries or Figs 35 



Gorgonzola 20 

Gervais with Bar-le-duc.40 
Edam 20 



Smoked Beef Tongue... 40 

Corned Beef 35 

Roast Beet 60 

Roast Lamb 45 

Assorted Cold Cuts 
a la Gel6e 60 

SANDWICHES 

25 Chicken 25 

20 Cheese 20 



ESnpress Squab 75 

Sliced Chicken SO 

Sliced Turkey 60 

Roast Spring 

Chicken 76-1.60 

Half Lobster 75 



VEGETABLES (per person) 

Artichoke 50 

New Peas 25 

New String Beans 25 

Lima Beans 20 

Spinach 25 

Cauliflower 25 

Egg Plant 20 

Stuffed Tomato 20 

Stuffed Green Pepper 20 

BruEsel Sprouts 25 

Fresh Mushrooms 50 

French Peas 25 

French String Beans 25 

French Flageolets 25 

Artichoke Bottom 30 

Cepes, Provencale 35 

California Asparagus 35 

French Asparagus 75 

German Asparagus 75 

Macaroni or Spaghetti, 

Parmesan 25 

Napolitalne 25 

Au <Jratin 30 

POTATOES 

Baked '. 10 

Hashed or Stewed in Cream.20 

Boiled Bermuda 10 

Au Gratin 25 

Hashed Browned 20 

Sautg 20 

Lyonnaise 25 

French Fried 15 

German Fried 20 

SoufflSes 35 

Gaufrette 25 

Broiled Sweet 25 

Fried Sweet 20 

Sou(fl€es Sweet 35 

O'Brien 25 

Special StuSed, Baked 25 



READY 



(CONTINUED) 



ROASTS 

Roast Prime Ribs of Beef 50 

Roast Stuffed Turkey 

Cranberry Sauce 50 

Half Roast Celery Fed Duckling, 

Sweet Potato Croquettes 80 

VEGETABLES 
New Peas Bonne Femme 15 

New Asparagus, HoUandaise 25 
New Wax Beans, Poulette 15 

Stuffed Tomato, Provencale 20 

DESSERT 
Pear Conde, Cognac Sauce 25 
Fresh Strawberry Shortcake, 

with Cream 25 
Green Apple Pie 10 
Lemon Meringue Pie 15 
Alicante Wine Jelly 20 

Baba au Rhum 15 
Coupe "Rice Hotel" 30 



WP^ 



S3G 



Sardines 25 

Caviar 35 

SALADS (per person) 

Lettuce 25 

Lettuce and Tomato 30 

Romaine 25 

Escarole 25 

Endive ,'.30 

Cucumber ' . 30 

Tomato 30 

Potato 25 

Fetticus, Beets and Celery. 30 

Chiffonade 30 

Macedoine 35 

Combination 30 

Watercress 35 

Fresh Fruit 50 

Lobster or Chicken 50 

Crab Flakes 50 

Mayonnaise of Lobster or 

Chicken 75 

PASTRY AND DESSERT 
Omelette Surprise, Virginia. 50 
Omelette Surprise, Louise. 50 

With Bar-le-Duc 50 

Omelette SouftlSe, Roth- 
child 50 

Peach A la Prunelle 50 

Crepes, Suzette 30 

Macaroons . . .'. 20 

French Pancakes 30 

Parisien Apple Tart 15 

Vienna or French 

Pastry (1) 10 

Mixed Cakes 25 

Rice Pudding 20 

Cup Custard 20 

Custard Pie 15 

Cream Puff 15 

Napoleon 15 

Brioche 10 

Pecanisques 15 

Hickoryisques 15 



ICE CREAM, ICES, CUPS, ETC (per person) 



Parfait Coffee 30 

Parfait Tosca 30 

Mandarine Granite 25 

Raspberry Sherbet 20 

Lemon Sherbet 20 

Sherbet k la Prunelle. . .20 



Sherbet Yvette 20 

Sherbet Chartreuse 20 

Coupe "The Rice" 30 

Coupe Loies Matthews.. 30 

Coupe Jacques 30 

Coupe Mirette 30 

FRUIT (per person) 

Orange 15 Tangerines 20 

Apple 10 Grapes, Malaga 25 

Grape Fruit 20 Fresh Apple Compote.. 25 

Pineapple 20 

BRANDIED FRUIT, ETC. (per person) 

Brapdied Pear 35 Bar-le-Duc 25-40 

Marrons in Brandy 35 California Cherries 25 



Vanilla 20 

Moka 20 

Caramel 20 

Cniocolate 20 

Strawberry 20 

Mixed 25 



Baked Apple, Plain 15 

With Cream 20 

Fresh Rhubarb 15 



Peaches or Pears. 



.25 



CHEESSE (per persoTi) 



Gruyere 

Camembert . . . 
Midget Gonda 



.20 Mtont d'or 50 

.20 Port du Salut 20 

.50 Brie 20 



COFFEE, TEA, ETC. (per person) 

Pot Coffee, small 15 Arabian Moka Java with i la Diable 30 

targe-Pot 25 Cream 20 (for 2) 35 Young Hyson 15 

Demi Tasse 10 Turkish 25 English Breakfast 15 

Special Certified Milk.. 10 Special Cream.. 



Roquefort .".20l 

Stilton 20 



Ceylon, Oolong or 

Grange Pekoe 15 

Chocolate or Cocoa 15 

25 



Sffe ^fottt 33uttcr srrfieb m QTItc JRut ^ntsunmts i« wmbt ^irily in lire ^otel, nsurin^ airsuluic }niTii^ attb mmjut ifwdHy^ 
KICK HOTEL, HOUSTON, TEXAS; RIGHT HAND PAGE. SPECIALTIES CARD ATTACHED. 



62 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



STOREEOOM BOOKKEEPING (AMERICAN 
PLAN). 

There is no fixed method for storeroom book- 
keeping. Nearly every steward has some idea 
of his own in which he desires this branch of 
his department conducted. When it devolves 
on him to start a new system in some house 
that is just being opened for business, he goes 
to the stationer and has a set of books made 
to suit his plans, and if the method is practical 
will be the adopted system of that particular 
house. He usually adopts a plan which will 
enable him to keep well informed in regard to 
expense of his department and make prompt 
and accurate reports to the management. How- 
ever, of late years, the march of progress in 
this department has kept pace with the ad- 
vancement of modern hotel keeping, and sys- 
tems are being evolved by well-known stevvards 
which are practical and comprehensive and are 
met with approval by hotel men in general. 
This will have the effect to make hotel store- 
room bookkeeping more uniform. 

The steward is proud to have a well-kept set 
of books in his storeroom. They show business 
tact and are invariably subject to comment. 

The object of storeroom bookkeeping is to 
enable the steward to observe from day to day 
the receipts and disbursements of supplies and 
whether properly and economically handled, and 
also to guard against leakages. 

A simple yet comprehensive system which I 
have found to meet all requirements, and is 
extensively used, is a set of three books, name- 
ly, a receiving book, an issue book and a stock 
book. 

The receiving book is a plain day book or 
journal (such as is used in all business houses), 
in which is entered the quantity, kind and price 
of goods as they are received. Afterward these 
entries are compared with the regular invoices, 
and the latter approved (or returned for cor- 
rection if necessary) by the steward and sent 
to the office to be audited. 

The issue book is for entering in the requisi- 
tions as they come from the different depart- 
ments and are filled. 

The stock book is used to record all goods on 
hand on the day of stock taking — usually once 
a month. A plain journal answers for this 
work, unless it is desirable to keep a continual 
check on the stock from day to day, for which 
purpose there are some very complete ones in 
the market (notably the Fulwell stock book), 
which will enable the steward to check any 
part of his stock in a very short time. 



The Hotel Monthly System of Storeroom Book- 
keeping. 

For a clear and concise illustration of these 
books (receiving, issue and stock) I know of 
no better way than to reproduce the article on 
store room bookkeeping ' ' Hotel Monthly sys- 
tem, ' ' which appeared in the Hotel Monthly 
of date May, 1895 (as regards the receiving 
and issue books), and a part of a similar article 
in the issue of May, 1893 (as regards the stock 
book) : [In this latter illustration an extra 
book for the wineroom is referred to and illus- 
trated.] 

The books, etc., needed: 

A receiving book. (An ordinary two-column 
wide page journal answers the purpose.) 

An issue book. (A book ruled similar to the 
one illustrated on page 63, the page measuring 
about 14x16 inches.) 

A stock on hand book. (An ordinary manilla 
paper copying book, with index, answers the 
purpose.) 

A hook or spindle for the requisitions. 
The Receiving and Issue Books. 

All goods received must be accompanied with 
the invoice, and the invoices, after being 
O. K. 'd, should be copied and itemized into the 
receiving book. At the close of each day foot 
up the total value of the goods received. This 
will illustrate : 

May 1st, 1895. 
F. M. SMITH, 

3 gals. Selects, @ $1.25 $3.75 

20 lbs. Salmon, @ 15c 3.00 

$6.75 

ABMOUE & CO., 

200 lbs. Beef Loin, @ 12c. . .$24.00 
60 lbs. Mutton, @ lOYoC 6.50 

$30.50 

COEBIN, MAY & CO., 

140 lbs. Granulated Sugar, 

@ 5c $ 7.00 

10 gals. Vinegar, @ 12c. . . . 1.20 

1 doz. Olive Oil 2.00 

$10.20 



$47.45 



At the beginning of the month take an in- 
ventory of the storeroom and enter the total 
value of the stock on hand in the place pro- 
vided for it in recapitulation column of the 
issue book. In this case say the stock on hand 
inventories $800. 

All requisitions must be signed by the head 
or the acting head of the department from 
which they come. At the close of day these 
are assorted and entered into the issue book, 
each under its particular head, after the man- 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 

Storeroom Issue Book, Hotel Monthly System. 



63 





Date, 
































KITCHBH' 








DrniNG BOOM 








OFnOB 








BAR 






s*.^ 


Suftirmdt 


I 


60 


eiat. 


Craam 


3 






IM 


1 


50 


seal. 


Sourbgn 


9 


SO 


Ml** 


fToHr 




30 


sou.. 


a*Sar 


3 




16«. 


7»* 




.TO 


3 doc. 


Lemon 




60 


S*>j. 


Sist 




60 


ibu. 


A<ieA«« 


I 


,« 


(! 


TtiiUt Paper 




41 


Sib,. 


CIlMM 




30 


SOlb,. 


Soaet 


7 


SO 


1 lb. 


Tm 




« 






a 


2'i 




$10 


40 






(10 


00 






$s 


05 




































































































































































































































































































































L.IU.TORY 






























i€ {6a. 


&ap 




6i 




























£liurint7 




10 
































.84 




































































































INDIVIDUAL ACCT8. 






























libl. 


Flour (Proprvitor, 
































famUv rendanet ) 


$s 


00 










































































. 










































HOJSEKEEPER 






























2 


irooitM 




36 




























I^timice 




25 
































.61 


















BAKERY AND PASTRY R 


COM 




























edoz. 


Egg- 


J 


20 


























lOlbt. 


Butt^ 


? 


25 












RECAPITULATION 


















}3 


i5 












Kitohea 


10 






























DinimK Room 


5 


as 




























Bakery k Paatrj Rocai 


5 


is 




























Office 


2 


et 




























Laundry 




84 




















SERTAN'Ki' HALL 








Housekeeper 




61 


















12 lb,. 


Sugar 




60 




Semuifs Hall 


i 


so 


















an,. 


CbfjM 




go 






























tl 


SO 






2J 


57 




























































Bur 


10 


40 




























ludividual Accounia 


5 






























Total, 


?S0 


97 




























8tock ou Hand thii a.u. 


BOO 


00 




























Received to-day 


47 


15. 






























847 


iS 




















SEISOELLA.VEOUS 








lesucB to-day 


39 


97 




























Stock on Hand this F.U^ 


807 


48 




























































































QouH count 25 
































Cost per capital CtS. 





































































































































ir_- 



ner shown in the accompanying illustration. It 

is an easy matter to foot np the totals of the 

issues to the different departments and enter 

them in the recapitulation column, where the 

sum total of the issues for each day is obtained- 
« # jt 

With these figures and the house count it is 
an easy matter to find the cost per capita for 
the day. For instance, by dividing the total 
amount of the issues in dollars and cents by 
the number of the house-count, the cost per 
capita is obtained (see in illustration: $24.57 
of the recapitulation divided by 28, house 
«ount, the cost per capita is shown to be 87 



cents. Issues to the bar, or to individual 
account — that is, issues for outside the hotel, 
as to the owner's private residence, etc. — do 
not figure in the per capita, and therefore are 
separated in the recapitulation). The value of 
the stock on hand is also ascertained from day 
to day by adding to the stock on hand in the 
morning the total amount of the receipts for 
the day, and deducting from the figures so ob- 
tained the amount of the day's issues, when 
the figures show the value of stock that should 
be on hand next morning when the storeroom 
opens. 

By this system an inventory of the storeroom 



64 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



taken at the end of the month should give 
figures corresponding very closely with the stock 
on hand entry in the issue book at the end of 
the month. 
The Stock on Hand Book. 

Stock taking and keeping track of stock on 
hand is facilitated by two indexed blank books, 
one for the reserve storeroom and the other for 
the wine room. (If no wine room then one 
book is sufficient.) Ordinary copying books of 
manilla paper, costing from 75 cents to $1.50 
each, according to size and quality, are satis- 
factory for this purpose. In these books a page 
is given to each article and the articles are 
indexed so that they can be readily referred to. 

To illustrate: Suppose there are three bar- 
rels of Bourbon whisky in the wine room. 
These would each have .a page and be num- 
bered, say, 2,458, 2,459 and 2,460, respectively. 
One page would be headed ' ' Bourbon 2,458 ' ' 
and under it so many gallons as the barrel con- 
tains, say, 56%, and also the price paid for it 
and the date it was received. In using from 
the barrel each separate amount as drawn from 
it is subtracted and debited to the department 
to which it goes, together with date, etc., as 
shown below: 

BOUEBON, 2,458 Page 246 

June 9, 1892, 56% gals. @ $1.90 

Sept. 9, 1892, 3 " Bar, 



Sept. 10, 1892, 



531/2 
11/2 " 



Kitchen 



52 



Articles added to the stock on hand are en- 
tered on the stock book. For instance : Sup- 
pose there are 4 boxes of P. & G. soap in the 
reserve storeroom. A page of the stock book 
would show that. Ten other boxes of P. & G. 
soap are received. These would be entered 
on the same page and added to the stock on 
hand, giving a total of 14 boxes on hand. 

These stock on hand books keep the steward 
and the proprietor informed daily of the vari- 
ety and quantity of the stock on hand, and 
are also invaluable for reference when buying 

supplies. 

* * * 

Daily Report to the Management. 

The daily report to the management is made 
every morning for the previous day's transac- 
tions, and is practically a. copy of the totals 
from the "Daily Issues" book, about like the 
following illustration, the figures on which are 
taken from the Hotel Monthly issue book, 
except that they are somewhat differently ar- 
ranged. 



The sheet is about 4 inches wide by 6 inches 
long. The items are divided in three depart- 
ments, namely: first. Commissary; second, 
General Expenses and third Individual accounts. 

Under the head of Commissary are placed 
Kitchen, Dining Eoom, Bakery and Pastry, 
Helps Hall and Miscellaneous, which latter in- 
cludes ice, banquets, etc. Under General Ex- 
pense are included Bar, Housekeeper, Office 
and Laundry; and under Individual are such 
items as are charged to the proprietors or 
parties favored and not chargeable to the per 
capita of supplies. These individual account 
issues are, however, charged to the parties from 
the office and the storeroom credited with the 
amounts. 

HYDE PARK HOTEL, York, Pa. 

May 2, 1895. 

DAILY REPORT OF STOREROOM ISSUES. 



Commissary. 










Kitchen 


10 








Dining Room 


5 


95 






Pastry and Bakery 


3 


45 






Helps Hall 


1 


50 






Miscellaneous 






20 


90 


General Expense. 










Bar 


10 


40 






Housekeeper 




61 






Office 


2 


22 






Laundry 




84 


14 


07 


Individual. 






34 




Total 


97 


Stock on hand 


800 








Purchased 


47 


45 






Total 


847 


45 






Less issues as above 


34 


97 






Bal. stock on hand this day 


812 


48 







Signed, J. T. stewaid. 

The total of the commissary only is taken 
to ascertain the per capita cost of supplies, 
but the grand total of all the departments 
should be taken (as shown in the issue book) 
to ascertain the stock on hand. 

Keeping and Issuing Stores. 

The storeroom should be in charge of a com- 
petent and trustworthy man, one who will at- 
tend strictly to his work and not become famil- 
iar with the help. He should be punctual in 
keeping the hours for issuing the supplies to 
the different departments. Notice of such 
hours should be posted in a conspicuous place 
in every department, that the various heads 
thereof may be governed thereby. The hours 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



65 



between the time for issuing are occupied by 
tlie storekeeper to attend to his books. He 
should keep his goods nicely arranged, a per- 
manent place for everything so that not too 
much time need be taken up in finding any- 
thing in his absence. 
How to Avoid Shrinkage. 

In issuing stores the storekeeper should pay 
especial attention to avoid too great a shrink- 
age in his stock, which is sure to occur where 
all perishable goods are weighed, measured or 
counted without making allowance for some 
waste, as in fresh or salted meats, milk and 
cream or fruit. For instance, a loin of beef 
■weighs 67 pounds at the time received; it is 
hung in the refrigerator and after two or three 



days, when taken out and weighed again, it will 
have lost say two pounds, and if one loin is 
used every day, at the end of the month there 
would be a loss of 60 pounds. Allow the same 
average of loss in all meats and at the end 
of the month there will be a shortage in stock 
for which it is hard to accoimt. A similar 
result will be met with in all perishable sup- 
plies. 

I have found the safest way is, when issuing 
to add a fraction of a cent to the cost price, 
this being done in order to make due allowance 
for the natural shrinkage. For milk and cream, 
charge each department its proper proportion 
from the invoice; fruits by the whole or frac- 
tion of a package, instead of by the dozen. 



A WAY TO KEEP TRACK OF THE STORE ROOMS 



£rnst Clarenbach's Improved Ruling for Store Room, Wine Room, Bar and Cigars Inventory Books, 

with Supplemental Sheets for Showing Daily Receipts and Issues and Continuous Inventory. 

From the Hotel Monthly, June, igi2. 

Ernst Clarenbach has devised a new ruling 
for his system of keeping track of the wine 
room and storeroom, so that one can tell the 
quantity and value on hand at the first of each 
month, and very quickly ascertain quantity and 
value on hand of each item at any time during 
the month. 

We asked Mr. Clarenbach to fill in a leaf of 
his Inventory Book with a few items showing 
method of keeping it; also to fill in one of the 
Receiving-Issues Sheets used in connection with 
the Inventory Book, so that we could illustrate 
his method in The Hotel Monthly. He very 
kindly consented, and we have had engravings 
made from the pages he filled in. 

The engraving at the top of pages 66 and 
67 is that of the Inventory Book a^ used for 
the storeroom. The single page of this book 
is 12 by 12% inches. There are twenty-five 
numbered lines to the page, and the open page 
is shown as on pages 68 and 67, the binding 
space in The Hotel Monthly representing the 
binding space in the Inventory Book. Thus, 
on the left hand page, the market list is en- 
tered as, "Peas" on line 1, "Corn" on line 2, 
"Tomatoes" on line 3, etc. The line extends 
across the double page, and is keyed on the 
right hand page by corresponding line num- 
bers, for convenience in making the entries. 
The peas are in gallon packages: on January 
1 priced 33% cents; on April 1 priced 45 cents. 
That is, there is a space available for record- 



ing changes in price. This space, under head 
ef "Cost and Selling," in the illustration, is 
utilized to suit the convenience of the party 
making the entries. The headings may be ig- 
nored; or used for the wine room, in particu- 
lar, to show both cost and selling prices. The 
ruling is such that it can be adapted to both 
the storeroom and wine room. 

Following along Line 1 we find 102 gallons 
of peas on hand January 1, valued at $34, and 
144 gallons on hand February 1, valued at $48. 
The ruling carries the inventory the first of 
each month for all year. 

On the first of each month the Receiving- 
Issues Sheet, ruled to align with the Inventory 
Book, is fastened into the Inventory Book, as 
shown in the middle illustration on pages 66 
and 67. This illustration shows the upper part 
of one of these sheets as it appears fastened 
into the open page of the Inventory Book. The 
sheet in the illustration is that used for the 
month of January. It will be noted that six 
gallons of peas were used on the first, twelve 
gallons on the second, six gallons on the fourth, 
six gallons on the sixth, twelve gallons on the 
eighth, and so on, and for the full month 174 
gallons of peas issued. 

And, it will be noted, that 36 gallons of peas 
were received on the sixth, 36 gallons on the 
twelfth, and so on, and for the full month 216 
gallons received. The "Issues" entries are 
all entered on the lower half of the divided 



66 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Year m s- 



NAMF AKD 0€SCIII|rTION 



_J2jC>A-jo^>SMr~J-.. - Inventory 



CLARENBACH'S 



COST AND SELLINO 



.J^i 



I TtTwwt/. 



^4^ 



j^ 



c:<»-.i 



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4i 



-fct^ 



CLARENBACH S IMPROVED RULING FOR STORE ROOM INVENTORY 

















Year 191 a _^fei>-._«^>a>,s. — )__ 


Sheet N 


n / 


Month of— 4a...,«_!_I9La. 




NAME AND DESCRIPTIO:* 


LlK 


p.ai,. 


COST AND SEUINO 




RECEIVED AND ISSUED 










' 


• 


■ 


' 


• 


• 


' 


• 


• 


'• 


" 


'■ 


" 


" 


•• 






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2 






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4 


I, 




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T^^ 






































6 




















































































-M^ 


6 






















































































T 






















































































e 



















































































ILLUSTRATION OF RECEIVING-ISSUES SHEET AS FASTENED IN INVENTORY BOOK 



numbered Line indicated by I, and the "Re- 
ceived ' ' goods are on the upper half of this 
divided line, indicated E. This is a clever idea 
for separating goods issued and goods re- 
ceived for quick action in totaling for con- 
tinuous inventory. 

By referring to entries illustrated on the In- 
ventory Book at top of pagesfc6&67it will be 
seen that there were 102 gallons of peas on 
hand January 1; that during the month (re- 
ferring to the Receiving-Issues sheet) 216 gal- 
lons were received, which, added to 102, shows 
a total of 318 gallons. The Receiving-Issues 
sheet showed 104 gallons issued. Subtract this 
from 318 and it leaves 144 gallons on hand 
the first of February, which is shown in the 
Inventory Book as valued at $48. 

To more clearly explain the Receiving-Issues 
sheet a separate engraving is made illustrat- 
ing it as detached from the inventory book. 
See foot of pages 66 and 67. 

In his letter to the editor, Mr. Clarenbach 
writes : 



' ' I have filled in the sheets as they would be 
used for Storeroom Inventory and Storeroom 
Receipts and Issues. When the book and sheets 
are used for Wine Room and Bar we also use 
the column in the Issue-Receiving Sheets headed 
'Selling Price of Issues,' which is not used 



Sheet No 1 






Month of Vrr— . . mis. 










RECEIVED AND issu'^D 




' 


" 


" 


• 


• 


• 


' 


• 


■ 


,. 




.1 


.* 


I* 


■■ 








































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/3 




f. 




(, 




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't 


( 








1 T 
















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ILLUSTRATION OF RECEIVING-ISSUES 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



67 



-^ijrtj,jS£«r»vJl Inventory 


CLARENBACH'S 




K 


l.»>^ 


... o.„j_, 


.»^^ 


1,K 


.«. ccu<i.i 1 i)«.5^>vM-''ll iu»<3«-+- 1 II M-'y-^.'^-i 


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2 






























2 






3 






























3 






A 






























4 






6 






























6 






6 






























6 






T 






























7 






8 






























a 





THE BOOK ALSO ADAPTED FOR WINE ROOM, BAR AND CIGARS. 









CLARENBi" 

RECeiV.ED AND 


iCH'S 






n*. ■ 




ISSUED 


TiUI 


c-^sja 


C«til5lNk 


StlUfPrtu 
iIUmm 


UK 

Ho. 


II 


II 


1 


1 


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d 


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'• 


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n 


M 


M 


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m 


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4 






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6 


















































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6 








































































































7 




















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TO SHOW CONTINUOUS INVENTORY OF EACH ARTICLE DURING THE MONTH. 

for storeroom work." deep by 16% inches wide. The binding space 

On the back of each of the Eeceiving-Issues is the same as indicated by the binding space 

sheets is printed a form for recapitulation. in The Hotel Monthly illustration. 

This is shown on page 68, as used for Bar and The Inventory Books are printed on buflf 

Cigars only. paper, and the Issues-Receiving Sheets on blue 

The Eeceiving-Issues Sheet is 12% inches paper. In operation, as many Inventory Pages 



CLARENBACH'S 
















liH 

Fte. 


RECEIVED AND ISSUED 


Tml 


Cmi >r si*di 

BCOlTBl 


CM >l SlMk 
U1M4 


5cn[D[PrIu 
oIUho 


Lkit 


II 


11 


1 


i 


6 


1 


1 






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It 


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as 


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w 


n 


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■■" 




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72 






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4 






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6 




















































































































7 




















































































































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SHEET DETACHED FROM INVENTORY 



68 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

RECAPITULATION 



ket, as they meet the requirements of most 
hotels. 




Saving in American Plan Dining Eoom 

A successful hotel manager operating on 
the American plan, in a conversation with the 
editor, told how he had changed the fortunes 
of his dining room from a loser to a winner; 
the difference aggregating six thousand dol- 
lars a year. 

"It was a house that I had recently taken 
the management of. One morning I sat at 
breakfast with one of the guests and observed 
that the waitress brought several more items 
than the guest had ordered, and some of it 
was wasted. The guest called my attention 
to this, saying, 'I think if the waitress 
brought only what I ordered that several 
• cents a meal could be saved to the house, 
and the meal be just as well, and perhaps 
better, served.' 

"I immediately- took the matter up with 
the head waitress, and the head waitress in 
turn with each of her girlSj and emphasis 
was placed on the instruction that waitresses 
must not bring more than the guest ordered. 

' ' I observed when this new rule went 
into effect, which it did right away, that the 
guests were equally well served, and it made 
a difference of four and a half cents on a 
meal in the saving for the house; which 
you can readily understand, with any amount 
of business, would mean a saving of thou- 
sands of dollars in the course of a year. 
That is how the change from a loser to a 
winner was accomplished." 



RECAPITULATION FOR CLARENBACH RECEIVING- 
ISSUES SHEET (used for BAR AND CIGARS ONLY). 



are used as is necessary to carry the entire in- 
ventory, three, four, five, six, or more, as the 
case may be. 

The time and labor-saving possibilities with 
the use of Inventory Book and Issues-Eeceiv- 
ing Sheets can be appreciated when it is real- 
ized that the names of articles in stock, to- 
gether with size and package of each article, 
need be written into Inventory Book tut once 
eacli year for the purpose of taking a monthly 
inventory, the keeping of an actual record of 
all goods received and issued daily, a perpetual 
inventory, and a positive proof on each article 
at each inventory taking period. 
« w » 

These rulings have been placed on the mar- 



The Eoach Ban Up the Spout 

The manager of one of the leading golf clubs 
in the vicinity of Chicago, speaking, the other 
day, on the subject of being careful in the 
cleaning of silver, said: 

"I learned my great lesson several years 
ago, when after the coffee pot had been rinsed, 
a cockroach who had sought shelter in the 
spout, went to table. 

"Yes, sir, it actually happened. 

"From that day to this, no matter whether 
it is myself, or any employe whom I direct, 
every coffee-pot and tea-pot that is cleaned is 
finally rinsed by pouring out thru the spout. 

"The cockroach incident which I refer to 
was where the coffee pot had been rinsed all 
right, but the water emptied from the body of 
the pot instead of from the spout. 

"Mr. Cockroach had run up into the spout 
and staid there until the pot was refilled, when 
the tragedy at table followed. ' ' 



Accounting System of a Country Hotel, European Plan 



The Forms Devised by Miss McGillan, Bookkeeper of Hotel Sherman, Appleton, Wis., 

by which She is Enabled to Make Satisfactory Daily and Monthly 

Reports of the Business of All Departments. 



Exposition Showing Entries for a Montli (Dunrniy Figures Used) and the Sheets Photographed so as 

to Give Readers of The Hotel Monthly the Best Possible Insight to the Method of Accounting. 

(From the June, Jgij, Hotel Monthly.) 

Miss McGillan, bookkeeper at Hotel Sher 



man, Appleton, Wis. (a hotel operated on the 
European plan with rates from 75 cents to 
$2 and with departments of rooms, restau- 
rant, cafe, lunch room, bar, cigar and news 
stand and laundry), has evolved a system of 
accounting that shows in detail the complete 
action of the house and enables her to produce 
a daily statement in about as satisfactory 
and concise a form as any hotel proprietor can 
wish for. 

Miss McGillan has studied the problem for 
three years with the object of incorporating 
in her accounting system all expense items 
right from the original foundation, so as to 
ascertain, not approximately, but actually, the 
cost of operation; and, also, by keeping close 
track of the receipts from all sources, is 
enabled to strike a true balance. 

In brief Miss McGillan 's system is: Two 
sheets of paper of the same ruling, and meas- 
uring about 18 inches square. These are for 
Department Reports and Issues. They - are 
ruled with 30 cross lines and 34 columns to 
the sheet, 31 of the latter headed in figures 
I to 31 for the days of the months. 

SHEET NO. 1 is a detailed report on meals 
for the month. The first column on sheet 
No. 1 is for the department, the next 31 col- 
umns for the days of the month, and the last 
two columns are dollars and cents columns for 
the total. 

The sheet is ruled off horizontally in sec- 
tions to show, in the first section of it, occu- 
pying four lines, the number of meals served 
in each department and the average receipt 
per meal in each department. .The first of 
these horizontal lines shows the Venetian 
room or Main Eestaurant; the next line for 
the Cafe; the next line the Lunch room; the 
fourth line Total Number of Meals Served 
for the day. These figures are carried day 
by day throughout the month and afford op- 
portunity for comparison. 

Miss McGillan has reports from the cash 
register and the head waitress in each depart- 



ment; also the used checks, by which she is 
enabled to compute accurately the number of 
checks for each meal served, the average 
amount received per meal, and, by totaling 
all, gets the average amount of the checks 
from every source in the feeding end. For 
comparison with this (following on the next 
horizontal line) she has her Issues to Kitch- 
ens, giving separate cross lines each for veg- 
etables, fruit, meats, poultry, fish, lard, but- 
ter, milk, cream, eggs, flour, yeast, cheese, 
potatoes, store room and wine room. These 
are all carried from day to day to show the 
cost of supplies for the meals served above. 

The next line is for "meals to help," which 
are given approximate figures and carried out 
from day to day, totaling at the end of the 
month to indicate a credit on the issues. 

The next line shows ' ' net issues. ' ' 

The next line "fixed expense." The next, 
"net cost"; and the next, "net receipts." 

The next line is devoted to "loss or gain"; 
the loss entered in red figures, the gain in 
black figures. 

The next line, "average cost per meal," 
and the last line, "average receipt per meal." 

SHEET NO. 2: The second sheet is de- 
voted to detail on Rooms, Bar, Cigars and 
Laundry. The first column is ruled for De- 
partment and the balance as of sheet No. ]. 
The first line on this sheet is devoted to the 
number of rooms occupied; the second line to 
estimated receipts from same; the third line 
average receipt per room; the fourth line 
issues to rooms; the fifth line daily expense 
in operating rooms; the sixth line total cost 
of rooms per day; the seventh line total re- 
ceipts from rooms per day. The next line is 
devoted to loss or gain, the loss entered in red 
figures, the gain in black figures. 

This report is also filled out daily and af- 
fords splendid comparison. 

The next line of this sheet is devoted to 
the Bar. The first cross line is for "sup- 
plies"; the second, "cigars," and the third, 
"store room issues to bar"; then there is a 



70 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

SHEET NO. 1— Detailed Report on Meals for March, 1913 



DEPARTMENT 
No. OF MEALS 
AVERAGE RECE>PTS 



8 






10 



11 



IS 



13 



14 



Venetian Room 









Cafe 






Taj 



13^ 



"3- 



7^ 






in. 












-5^ 









<r3 















^ 
^ 



'3^ 



-Tif- 



-v5 



1r3 






Lunch Room 



-5/ 






7^ 












;2/ 






-2± 



9-1 



-?7 



TOTAL MEALS 



31 if 



3(.i 



337 



$ik. 



•36"^ 



SOk. 



3M_ 



Jra 



$rr 



3^_ 



Say 



5/6 



36,9 M(f 



ISSUES TO KITCHEN 



Vegetables 



,<T/^ 



^■f<' 



r££ 



■?.V^ 



,^;Zg 



X.;t^ 



^■-y^ 



5..?^ 



3.aff 



i^..?V 



»</i? 



Fruit 



.?.^g 



■^ 



s./£ ;zxi'sJi 



/■^^ 



A/^ 



.^./<3 



i^ 



£:£; 



s^;£. 



Meats 



g;?.^j 



g-./f Jje-A'T Hii-^ 



S^/a 



X^//. a/-'/t 



^£££.. 



3iSi> 



^/■ai 



33 T^ if.il, 



S/.4C 



i.'^./. 



Poultry 



ii>¥ 



Jijic 



JY-f 



¥J^ 



7-3 f 



r/o 



/pi, J-a.'f i.79 ^■»/ 



-y-/^ 



£^ 



3.e/ 



Fish 



2^ 



/::3^ 



.,V 



J.^e 



/■V> 



.^.,«< 



/fiC. 



Zi^l 



/££ 



^./^ 



^./J 



S^« /■ 9 



Lard 



-^. 



Buttet . 



ffl /■' 



TV: 



-.£^ 



7./ '/.eS -/- 



^ 



_2^ 



-^ 



v^-^ 



i^.ya 



^'■ 



i^--^^/-^/ 



;?/? 



■c^ 



?-i^ 



vr-»^ 



^Vi! 



^.;Zg /-/^^-j :^.Aa 



U^ 



Milk 



/4^ 



<as /.i'S^./s 



/■/J 



^ 



X^^r 



//j> 



/■.2.<» 



/:sj 



/■/o 



:21. 



/■id- 



Cream 



/./lA^y^ 



/■TV 7. i/g 



?xr/^-/3 



iii2 



z^:^ 



.y-^<f 



/a^^ 



ZLZ£:i}Z£'iL. 



Eggs 



./jl' -v/? 



. v^/ 



^ 



.u 



f<i' .'/y .fg- — 



;&- 



Flour 



IML 



AA[i 



/■^(, 



/■V^ 



/^^ 



'.Vi 



/.^<i 



A'/i 



aM 



aa 



■■jAL 



Yeast 



./'A 



■/y 



'»' -"» 



_^ 



_^: 






AVC/Vi!, 



A^ 



Cheese 



^a°. 



/.£f o 



-5*^ 



/. 0^ 



X/-- 



/^. 



St/a 



Potatoes 



Store Room 



^ 



Y 



A7r 



? .■A~r 



Aic 



/■i^ 



Z^ 



^Z^- 



A/.Ay 



y^.AT A>A.f<: 



'£_f^ 



i^i9 



Ai,w^ 



,f/ 



Af-3i 



A^A 



7-^f/9-i^ 



Wine Room 



j£± 



/.C^ 



/■Ha 



.c?^ 



±^. 



AiS-t 



^c<- 



f± 



TOTAL ISSUES 



^ 



■fs.^j 



7S..Sd f^Si 



^£i6 



i/.AJ 



JAil, 



2£^^ 



fATh 



2^^ 



ZZAl. 



6/- 7a 



z^ 



Meals to Help 



JT^TI 



^AAn 



ir.An if.^ 



^7. AS 



i-7-y^ 



NET ISSUES 



i-7.^ 



i^-'' 



f^-\ni 



i^'m 



if-'T' 



a^~v 



^ 



27:-n 



•na/a 



Js:f3 



MiS 



-^S'CS i'f,/-'r Ca.a / 



S^-Tit 



^/■^?- 



39. f7 3airy 



Daily expense 



imi. 



¥ii-!-i. 



'/il.l/il.J. 



■^lixl 



NET COST 



•i'i.^z 



■i'^ii ^/i. 



j^-jta 



fA^-Al. 



W.^^ 



Mz> 



^i!/.i,-2. 



ix/^ 



'A^iy 



RECEIPTS 



■i^ 



Tf-^^AA 



-7?.'^ /aj./^ 



77. / S- 



ii^Ai. 



Z£lL?i 



Hfz 



/jTSAa 



GAIN 
LOSS 



z^ 



/^./e 



ASf.Al /iA.iAi /Jjy./fl 



AJAU AiT/.. 



/^./2 /J9.Sa /ii 



iZL. 



'Ml 



/fg-A, 



o.^y tf'if^ 



3¥.fJ 



1AM. 



hMf.SA 



jj^.fu kL4J S'3 



lf3i, 



Average cost per meaf 



/7 ftp 



Sl.ti 



3 / 



^ 



■31 



3¥ 



40 



^l-h 



d/ 



ZZ. 



;»/ 



^? 



Jo 



3V 



^o 



Average receipt per meal 



M± 



4i 



4(, 



4S' 



A/O 



'/f 



l/-i, 



i/r ^ 



/// 



¥3 



/<& 



^£ 



^ 



IN THE "GAIN OR LOSS" LINE, LOSS FIGURES ARE 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



71 



Detailed Report on Meats for March, 1913 



15 






16 



7^ 



17 






18 






19 






20 



727: 



21 



^ 



22 






23 



TTTJ 



24 



^ 

.j^!. 



25 



26 



27 



28 



•V- 



29 



£2i 



30 



7^ 



31 



7VI 



TOTALS 



^gg 



Tt 
<f3 



Z4. 



7|7 






t3. 



<i1 









C3 



'77 









St?- 



'ikl 



^1 



%. 



:i-r' 



'3- 



131 



(33 





















/•'J 



/^ 









/it 






/5/ 



3 n 



3>9 



gro 



3S$3/9 



^ 



4^ 



i^ 



^^ 



Mi. 



Sft 



tfai tfotf S93 



iSg, 



i^ 



1^ 



79 ^0 



J!./^ 6.y. 



t/.;le 3.^£ 3. -Ta 



S'-^o 



i>-/ff 



<r/a 



¥-i'f 



izfi 



iL2£:s<^:2^ 



&y/-A<,6 ^i-fi ti-ie /a-C 



^lL. 



S^c S./£- 



»C /J ^-^S /- jPa 



^-77 



^/^ 



-y.>/ 



Zi 



rj' /'^ 



-^z.^ 



-^.c>g 



g^V 



--jgyg 



27-^^ 



3/.</J V/.^ 



■37. i/ 



— • — r 



■^/■•/^ 



3/.^S^ii-nSJii^ 



/».!/» 



M£ii 



£SJ2. 



JJ.i 



■^■'■' 



uA 970 



2:2. 



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i££_ 



y->c»', 



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f^- to 



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/36 



£if_ 



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££> J2^. 



■;>Tr 



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x^t# " x/>r 



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2Z£l 



•2^ 



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¥'^,fe^. 



i/.iU 



dsXMiZ^ 



zz^ 



Ti/s/ 



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:if^^''r 



^ 



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■^>^ 



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>g;avy 



;g^v: A^-'^ 



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^i^JJTV^ -^ 



^i?-^ 



.f^tf.^.S .»^/.^^ 



il;^ 



«'y-'^^ 



£;zi;z 



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2^£^ 



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»^^/< ■/•;? 



jy/e 



yg./jV/->^ 



v-g/^ 



V-»<^ J>.i>7 



Z/a ^ ^^ 



#*:«« 



^■Z!Li^ii. 



y^-m. 



■/^■in 



^jj. ¥iji^ 



iV-;ii 



i^i-a-i v^:!,i -i^iii. ifitzi. 



I'i-llA 



/</■>■■> 



f^ff tr.^/ 



•f-fi '/-vrfy: >i;^^ 



^£/ 



^^ 



4?/;/? 



■e?// f/.j^ ^.ii 



^ 



fei^ 



J^^s 



/^)?/i /^^- 



<^/_ 



/yy-^ 



//)?<!). 



W-3o/9i'- ^^~ ^a^^fa 



Xjg^, 



/»V- 



Z^- 



^^ 



/^^ 



^ 



;^ 



'll'Si TCo-f !i'>^l'> 



jiU 



7-i^'l 3->^-4<f 



bl.'S'o 



■/^., 



JJ-ie 



///■f 



S'7.91 ji^i -y yS.y> ti3. i^ 






£:. 






3^ ^f 



sr 



'Z" 



3/ 



^ln 



^3 



//i 



d- 



SA. 



dH. 



>t 



n- 



3/ 



s-s f^ 



^£l 



J J 



y'>- ^/ 



'/" 



^i 



V^ 



4^6 



^•r 



«r/ 



^c 



^/ 



j/.-!^ 



¥'• 



«</ 



'ZS- 



'/i^ 



-^e 



>// 



ENTERED IN RED INK. (aLL GAIN IN ABOVE ILLUSTRATION.) 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 

SHEET NO. 2— Detailed Report on Rooms, Bari 



ROOMS 



6 



8 



10 



fi 



12 



13 



14 



No. of rooms occupied 



22. 



^/ 



Z£: 



S3 



f6 



// 



g£. 



f^ 



g'f jy 



ZL 



ZL 



Estimated receipts from same 



il£o 



/a().7i '/^ 



- /<?/- 



//.T- 



?^ 



//S,rt)/e?-- 



/Af- 



f/n 



tt. 



Average receipt per roBm 



A^ 



j^TA -ffi-o 



/■fi-i 



/■JiS 



/.^i /. /9 /■ 



:ji.S 



^^ 



/^ 



/^ 



/.iu. 



tf^ 



Issues to rooms 



/./o 



.:& 



MjS^ 



/J' .J'S Ac 



./i 



■^/ 



/<& 



/2£'-^^. 



^ 



Daily expense 



•nAa/ 



2^ 



v^-^/ 



•^o 



>2^ 



:2fW 



^36si 



>y^/ 



i^»^/ 



>»^/ 



/y.o 



ry^/ 



yf^/ 






Cost 



i£M. 



y7t.fl 



J-4-/I. 



■fV-Jj^ 



>^^/ 



;^;i^^ 



■ry./j 



Attv 



^iT^ 



■V-7(. 



j-ri/ 



Receipts 



f££ii 



'0'7J 



■£Zj^ 



/of- 



ii^L 



9'~ 



/Wirt 



uo- 



99- 



^9- 



f/<n 



GAIN 
LOSS 



■/V- 



v;z- 



oy. 



BAR 



#^^ 



^ 



jfsia 



jy- 



;»y- 



Supplies 



i^'i' ~ 



'//'/ii 



/ML 



^££Zi: 



^rfTf? -t^y rf 



^■>'-^'> 



2^ 



gJV? 



Cigars 



££jC. 



i:^ 



Storeroom issu^ to bar 
Total issues 



'y-:is- 



i-X" 



■f-xl. 



^M. 



dJdi. 



i/a 



^-g-77 



■g^^'.^j, J^y; 



iV-Jj 2^.76 



3'/i, .a/v; 



ySj^ 






Daily expense of operating bai 



;^c<t; 



f'.^n. 



^^ 



^■^ 



z;*^): 



.gvg 



.£:::£ 



^:2 



£LLE 



y.^ 



^■^ 



Cost 



■A.?/ 



t*- »/ 



Receipts 



■>yyy3-/j3 



■3V.3'- 



2<£s 



i^iSJ 



2lt2S 



f^^ 



3»., 



it-i-r^-U 



GAIN 
LOSS 



#2— 



»y^ J -^'i,. 



vyjta .f;g-v<; 



^£2^ 



iiiri 'ri-^^tf/^t 



<^-j&i 



i7./i t'/.«i 



l£i3. 



d£U 



/^. 



CIGARS 



^ 



^1^ 



7^^, 



|j£2 



z^ 



'><g/l 



Ai, 



^ 



.^V'': 



lini 



Ui 



.£t 



Supplies 



7. o o 



S^Jjo 



£/.j-o 



y-" 



i^y'ii 



Daily Expense 



'?■'/¥ 



/2££ 



/ry/ 



2f:2i 



'ZfiL 



^,Z±!L 



!B^ 



'TV/ 



■Z±i. 



■f^vM 



■Zi^ 



■Zi± 



iZ^ 



Cost 



W.M4 



' ?-/ . V 



■3":^^ 



;?yy 



^/■^^ 



Receipts 



^ 



■//■■»/ ^^'.^y 



■aM32ihs.l^LJjiJM^\Mia^ 



^■a-v 



^2^ £2^^^^ 



22^21 



S7/.,rj j/J,i, 



GAIN 
LOSS 



-»C?^o 



J^./J 



£V^ 



/g^ 



^'/■99 3t/.i>1 4il-S/ 



V.^l. 



^^^''^^ 



^ 






^^A^ 



^) TM^if/ 



Zg^ 



y^>; 



LAUNDRY 



No. pieces laundered daily 



f^-i 



/v/ 



/DJi 



/a^ 



/■^/^ 



No. hours laundry in operation 



v^^,y 



<^-/.? 



/i-jS 



i^o 






Oda. 



7 



£^JL 






/'I^Y ///.g- 



^az/ 



/^ 



^./tf 



^.S-o 



Supplies 



S^jfLi. 



/ '2," 



i-/" 



?.//^ 



^V^ 






Daily expense 



iS^ 



ux. 



Cost 



'-^ 



6- $7 . 



V-/7 



^;Z2 



^^7 



Cost per 100 



s/ 



4 / 



^ 






£^ 



£221 



£^21 



;?^7 



££Z 



.22. 



£22: 



■■22. 



^97 



az^ 



£^ 



2£7- 



?:Z2. 



^ 



^y? 



AA 



j^ 



n- 



M. 



ILL 



IN THE "GAIN OR LOSS" LINE THE LOSS FIGURES ARE ENTERED 



THE PKACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



73 



Cigars and Laundry for March, 1913 



15 



16 



17 



18 



19 



20 



21 



22 



23 



24 



25 



26 



27 



28 



29 



30 



31 T0TAI5 



<f/ 



St 



^7 



^7 



^ 



^ 



S-i 



Ss- 



F3 



ra 



P? 



r& 



r2_ 






ii. 



9A/9^. 



fUi 



f£i 



922.', 



/as- 



//i,- 



//S-ei 



^ 



/"?- 



£6; 



rf- 



f^r.-fz-iKfi- 



iSs: 



//j- 



Sa^^C^i- 



^ 



/.St./, 



/:i^ /:<fa 



/i3/ 



/3<> 



A&a 



LjIZ. 



;a« 



/■iM 



/■JlJ,- /. H./ 



/xy/ao/e/ 



££ " /< a/ 



yj ^^ 



-2/ 



,*<!> 



.-«•« 



.-«/ 



/& 



/4 



^ZZ 



/^. 



5/ 



/o 



>2f^ 



i^i^ yyay 



^?^y 



S^o/ 



'y-o/ 



l/j^/ 



gg; 



.??*«/ 



tfy.»/ 



v/^^> 



SVej ^tj 



/^3'>-3?- 



^■" 



^^'1 



•^'f 



■W-l 



^iJ± 



iCi±t 



>ri.t, 



v%t.Sc 



//"£<} 



HJL 



ff.sn ^ 



a^/-/4 



X/lt- 



£^£j 



^-/■^ry- 



^^- 



^J?'- 



■iT/- 



rr- 



^22: 



Z2- 



L.«?;z 



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^o^^^ 



yir7t 'ss-91 



t,i-7i 



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VV.7' 



^^ V 



yj-- 



t^j3> 



3^2 



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rf^-»f .Q.Ji ^'J.fc 



//. 



"/ 



j,rf 



^■¥S 



iSJZ 



^0-73 



*«<-/« 



■J^f? jS^a3 



xi-ri 



i7:'o 



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^x^ , 



Jl£. 



j.x-s 



ii4££ 



/^■^<> ' 



9- fir 



/^M 



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Z;^ 



y "/..^ 



..&& 



j£& 



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g^yj 



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siijiS 



M.rt ^.9S 



j£Mi_ 



iv.fIL /^3S ' 



Ug 



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£^ 



^•a 



^•^ 



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^•^ 



^-t; 



fi-i-y 



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^•f'/y -/i 



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ii2 



yj'-r^ 



jy.3< ^j.;« 



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£?<£ 



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Vo.^A ^_ ffa '^JT/g 



■^y^ 



^^ 



tfy/a ^f:/s^y;7^ 



¥ZX-S ^3.t^i 



'S9.F<I 



££^ 



I'/^a^'f;^ 



iA& 



teJ. 



/f./iS-yCaS 



3-11 



7.H 



Ji'"* 



jg.t. 



iH. ■■?/ 



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■'"■^z 



^^ 



^^ 



^^i^OS 



d£S« 



yj'g 



fyy 



'¥-'/a' ^^.^tr 



zS-^< 



za-s /f./J" 



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■^f-f^ . 



Xi4,a ^_£2l 



421^ 



^.iir» 



oTaS 



i^i^ 



'£^^^:£sLiL 



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2L2i 



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^ T'tj <j"y 



4,*Zi: 



tf-^t) 3a. ^9 



ms. 



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442^ 



UAOtj-ya <t ,^ 



/7wag.>y 



Jrf'.3<' 



^ 



^£j£ 



y.?g 



^ 



J/yr 



AC/^ 



J-g-yt »'/y<<' ^ /a 



X^..?J 3/. f-> 



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Ui. 



^■/a '/j/./o^xJ^ 



^/■^t 



(ISlZi 



if"> 



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Ali. 



■«* 



H^ 



£^ 



i^ 



^M 



/<>X^ 



<y/^ 



■a/g, 



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i ?.li '/2J7 



k. 



Ui. 



/^aS /33/ 



f-i? 



Z^ 



(3/7 



U£Ji 



2^ 



<^^£_ 



^■f/y 



/2^7 



.y/->" 



jUp^^^n^ 



S7i'> t2^ 



•:.?■ 



I'^^j';?/^ 



(^./<> 



> / 



<i-3. 



C/a 



dd^ 



^■fi^l 



£./a 






'TX.v^./o 



i./o 



3W,3 



J^a 



3.'/a 



^■/o 



3^7^ 



3^ 



St 



PZZ. 



izz. 



£^ 



£^ 



^IZ. 



^■f7 



^rz 



iJZ. 



^■f/ 



f^ 



f-rz 



9'/ ^f7 



^■rz ^rz 



£?2:^_^ 



fZL 



£2^ 



?-y7 



■^e'7 



Pk 



Uo_ 



-^^7 
^ 



& 37 



^■rr 



i.3- 



i-3 ■ 



aJU- 



ti± 



^ 



^■v 



Jk± 



f?r 



^a 



-^97 



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d^ 



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pi. 



J*^■ 



¥<= 



M 



i/S 



IN RED INK. (shown BY EXTRA BLACK FIGURES IN ABOVE ILLUSTRATION.) 



74 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



SHEET NO. 3— Table of Fixed Expenses for Each Dept 






MEALS 


*. 


/ 


&. 




TU-^iUy 


/ 
















Equipment 




ai. 






/y^ 


" V 
















Repairs 


^v~ 


^/ 


:2-6. 


Zo 


3^ 


f'r 
















Pay roU 


i,f3 


7^ 


-7 A" 


/•v 


Ur. 


V. 
















Laundry 


/■.r 


/o 


^^ 


'-a 


^/ 


s-g 
















Gas 


/" 7 


Zo 


//^ 


_ 


/>v 


"/ 
















light 


/6, 


'^'i 


/7 


'7 


/ 3 


/-> 
















Pawer 


\r- 


^a 


sy 


^a 


V 


/o 






i- 










Cdhe 


/Xr 


^1 


/^ 


rn 


/3 


V,. 
















Steam 


^r 


// 


Xi, 


/a 


;2-^ 


/z. 
















Water 


1 C 


</> 


f 


f" 


// 


i^-, 
















Ice 


^7 


(a 


' A& 


_ 


^f- 


y. 
















Printing 


5:u 


?-> 


Xo 




3 


7', 
















Advertising 





_ 


-7 


o o 


_ 


















Helps meals 


c?y-.r 


a m 


^7^ 


rr * 


y^is- 


' oa 
















Total Monthly Expense 


/^Xi- 


^7 


/i,jy 


y^ 


//^/ 


Si 


' 












Daily Fixed Expense 


y/ 


f^ 


u^ 


i-i 


■ &V 


i^ 
















ROOMS 




























Equipment 


/ 


Vr 


^^ 


:>~B 


J2-i> 


7" 










' 






Repairs 


V 


^^ 


/ 


2-0 


y 


rv 
















Pay roll 


i: ^V 


\r<t 


- 6>^o 


^■5 


^ (.¥S 


'76 


- 














Laundry 


7<r 


V 


. 7^ 


"? 


7^ 


3o 
















Light 


v/ 


^o 


-p-o 


?-» 


4(o 


.!_ 
















Heat 


3</~'/ 


U 


3'^S 


^/ 


3^/ 


xo 
















Water 


^/ 


fi 


Sv- 




' P-6 


Vo 
















Ice 


/ 


'a 


/ 


So 


/ 


S^ 














Helps meals 


^^^' 


_ 


Vf/ 


?o 


y7/- 


















Guests' laundry 


/^s- 


'± 


r^ 


^ 


7-3 


'7 
















Guests' tailor 


S.U 


2f 


' ^s 


/^ 


3i 


fs 
















Total Expense 


/<^/f 


L 


/<^7. 


'/c 


/?// 


oC 














■ 


Daily Fixed Expense 

























































line for "total issues," to which is added on 
the next line the "daily expense of operat- 
ing." The next line is "total costs"; fol- 
lowing that is "total receipts." The next 
line shows the "loss or gain" daily, and for 
the month. 



The next section of this sheet is given to 
Cigars. The next line, "supplies"; the next, 
"daily expense"; the next line for "cost"; 
the next, "receipts," and then for "total 
loss or gain. ' ' 

Following this is shown the action of the 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



75 



SHEET N0.4^Monthly Summary for 1913 












>c 




%l 




Jah 


j4fyi. 


I 
















MEALS SERVED 






7M10 


\l.nio 






















Ck)st 


5,*^?/ 


H-Z 


i.lGo 


/fO 


SXiS 


w 




















Receipts 


iog^o 


<tr 


zsyo 


10 


UOiti 


7.f| 




















Average cost per meal 




3if 




^A- 




i'> 




















Average receipts per meal 




U 




ho 




ifi 




















PROFIT ON MEALS 


m. 


^5 


AI5 


20 


!)3.y 


tl 




















Ho. of rooms occupied 


/M 




/57j- 




ms 






















Cost 


/zn 


^0 


/2/3 


So 


/r^i 


^f 




















Receipts 


/97^ 


00 


/8/0 


/s 


z^n 


^9 




















Average cost per room 




)h 




n 




yr 




















Average receipt per room 


1 


/.r 


/ 


11 


/ 


3/ 




















PROFIT ON ROOMS 


m 


60 


m 


^5 


9>)l 


00 


















BAR 
































Cost 


^o'r 


,> 


f^n 


loS 


llZf 


f3 




















Receipts 


lyw 


^•s 


pes- 


ft^ 


/m 


9f^ 




















Average per cent 




PC 




f3 




fo 




















PROFIT 


SXk 


1^ 


m 


^C 


150 


01 




















CIGARS 
































Cost 


(oil 


u 


rob 


io 


IP 


yr 




















Receipts 


/iSH 


y^ 


1122 


10 


/m 


yo 




















Average per cent 




fr 




^7 




^5 




















PROFIT 


AKT 


^1i 


h}S 


% 


m 


"js 




















LAUNDRY 
































No. of pieces 


sms 




riwiC) 




3?n2 






















Cost 

Cost per 100 


"is 


5f 


f / 


06 

33 


/26 


37 
3/ 




















TOTAL PROFIT 


two 


^0 


^7 


8,f 


mk 


s*? 




















Less rental 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


CO 


I.00O 


00 




















NET PROFIT 


ISOO 


to 


ISTl 


J5- 


205U 


ff 




























































































_ 

























Laundry. The first line ' ' total number of 
pieces laundered daily"; the next line "num- 
ber of hours laundry is in operation"; third 
line, "supplies"; the next line "daily ex- 
pense ' ' ; next ' ' cost, ' ' and the next ' ' cost 
per hundred" daily and monthly. 



The object of putting in the time of opera- 
tion is to show how long it takes to do the 
given number of pieces, and the report shows 
the variation from day to day; also affords 
opportunity to inquire why more is done one 
day than another, and the reason therefor. 



76 



THE PEACTICAL 



It might be of interest to learn from figures 
talien from the laundry report for January, 
1913, that 28,848 pieces of flat work were done 
in the hotel laundry at a cost of 34 cents the 
hundred pieces. 

SHEET NO. 3 is ruled in columns for one 
column to the mouth to show Fixed Expenses 
for Each Department as determined from card- 
fully tabulated reports; these apportionments 
determine, first, fixed expense for producing 
meals, and include meals to help, equipment, 
repairs, pay-roll, laundry, cost of light, power, 
coke, steam, water, ice, printing and adver- 
tising. Then comes the total for all of these, 
which, divided by the days of the month, 
gives the average daily expense. 

Sections are devoted in this manner to 
Rooms, Bar, Cigars and Laundry. 

SHEET NO. 4: Then, all the meat in a 
nut shell, is given on the next sheet headed 
"Total Summary" for each particular 
month, as January, February, etc. The sum- 



HOTEL STEWARD 
mary lists in lines, one following the other: 
Meals Served, cost, receipts, average cost per 
meal, average receipt per meal, profit on 
meals (which profit is entered in red ink). 
Following this, Rooms Occupied, cost, receipts, 
average cost per room, average receipt per 
room, profit on rooms (put in red ink). Then 
follows Bar, cost, receipts, average per cent, 
and profit on bar (in red ink). Then Cigars, 
cost, receipts, average per cent, and profit. 
Then Laundry, number of pieces, cost per 
hundred. 

The letters in red ink denoting profit are 
totaled, showing total profit for the month; 
from this is deducted the estimated rental, 
and the balance shows the net profit. 

It might be well, in this connection, to state 
that Miss McGillan o. k. 's every purchase 
made for the hotel. In other words, there is 
nothing bought for any of the departments 
except upon requisition through her oflSce. 
In this way she controls the business in all 
departments. 





AUDITOR'S SHEET 
■r««u^ ton Drnnuor is» iionih m, ion u^M,K^ loa 


o 

o 


».T«. 


fll¥ 


UITW 


.«o>,». 


S5"o 


.u=„,o 


FILE 


^n„ 


^»., 


FOLIO 




NO 


™ 


AHOUliT 


F^,S 


AUDIT NO. 


NO 


^ 


.-0«T 


CAW 


99DI 












9920 












9951 












9976 












990! 












9927 












9952 












9977 












9903 












9928 












9953 












9978 












9904 












9929 












9964 












9979 












9905 












9930 












9955 












99)0 












990E 












9931 












9956 












9961 












9907 












9932 












9957 












9:12 












990S 












9933 












995! 












9983 












9909 












9934 












9999 












9984 












9910 












9935 












9960 












9985 












9911 












9936 












9961 












9986 












9912 












9937 












9962 












9987 












9913 












9338 












9963 












9988 












9914 












9939 












9964 












9989 












9915 












9940 












9965 












9990 












9916 












9941 












9966 












9991 












9917 












9942 












9967 












9992 












9918 












9943 












9968 












9993 












9919 












99M 












9969 












9994 













Illustration of Auditors Sheet for checking off numbered checks or cards. The sheets numbered 
consecutively from t to lo.coo. Used in Hotel Monthly Rack and Card System of Accounting. , 



THE PRACTICAL HO lEL STEWARD. 



77 



Requisition Blanks. 

These Storeroom Requisition Blanks are in use m 
a first class hotel, and are printed here to give a 
general idea of a form which, with slight alterations 
to meet particular demands, will be found satis- 
factory. The size of sheets can be made to suit the 
convenience of the printer, It is well to distinguish 
the different blanks by having the paper for each of 
a diff.'irfcnt color. 



NORTHERN HOTEL. 



_189 



STORE ROOM Deliver to Kitchen: 



Wanted 



NORTHERN HOTEL. 



MARKET ROOM Deliver to Kitchen: 



B'f, ah'tl'ns 
ribs 
liver 
kidney 
corned 
ox tails 
skins 
tonpues 
M't" n racks 
saddles 
lees 
loins 
Lamb, racks 
kidneys 
fries 
pkd tng 
Veai.h'd'q'tr 
foreq't'r 
Calf's head 
' brains 
' feet 
' liver 
Pork, loins 
t'od'rlns 
sausage 
Pig's feet 
Sweetbreads 
Tripe 
Hams 
Bacon 
Fowls 
Lard 



POULTRY & 

GAME 

Eggs 

E'glisli snipe 

Greese 

Grouse 

Partridge 

Plover 

Quail 

Duck, red h'd 

cvas b"k 

mallard 

teal 

tame 
Ricebtrds 
Reed birds 
SquabBitame 
'* wild 
Turkeys 
Woodcock 
Sp'ng chick'n 
Fowls 

FISH AND 
SHELL F'SH 

Codfish 
" salt 

Blaefish 

Blackflsh 

Halibut 

Haddock 

Mack'r'lfrsh 
" salt 

Smelts 

Shad 

Bass, strtped 
sea 
black 
lake 

Whitefish 

Salmon 

smoked 

Sheep's head 

Flounders 



Wanted 



Rom pan 
Vfeakflsh' 
KjWife^h- = 
T"roiit,4a^e 

, " brook 
Lobster 
Crabs, soft 

" oyster 
H'r'ng kip'rd 
I " Holland 

" marinlrt 
Shrimps 
Crawfish 
Frog's legs 
Scallops 
Help's fish 
Terrapin 
Green turtle 
Red snapper 
Perch 
Pickerel 
Pike 
Turbot 
Soles 
Rale or skate 
Oysters 
L'tle n'k elms 
Anchovies 
Sardines 

Russian 
boneless 
domestic 
Caviare 
Salt sard'len 



V'G'T'BLES 

Apples 

Asparagus 

Beets 

Brussels spts 

Cabbage 

Carrots 

Cauliflower 

Celery 

Chicory 

Chives 

Cranberries 

Cucumbers 

Bgg plant 

Escarole 

Green corn 

Green peas 

Green pep'rs 

Horse r'dish 

Kale 

Leeks 

Lettuce 

Lima beans 

Mint 

Onions 

Oyster plant 

Parsnips 

Parsley 

Potatoes 

" sweet 
Radishes 
Slomaine 
Sorrel 
Spinach 
String beam 
Squash 
Tomatoes 
Turnips 
Fresh 

mushrooms 
Watercress 



_189 



CANNED 

GOODS 
Artichokes 
Asparagus 

American 
French 

Beans, Lima 
String 
' Wax 

Brussels spts 

Caviare 

Corn 

Lobster 

Mushrooms 

Peaches 

Pears 

Peas, French 
", American 

Pitm apples 

Sardines 

Shrimps 

Sorrel 

Succotash 

Truffles 

peelings 



Apples 
Anchovies 
Allspice 
Beans, white 
Barley 
Brooms 
Brushes 
Cassia, whole 

' ground 
Cloves, whole 

' ground 
Corn starch 
Curry, pwdrd 
Capers 
Citron 
Chocolate 
Cheese 
Cracker dust 
Currants 
Cr'ked wheat 
Clams 
Flour 
Farina 
Gineer 
Geiiitine 



Wanted 



Herbs, 

Sage, w hie 

" gr'nd 

Thyme 

whole 

" gr'nd 

Bay le'ves 

Hominy 

Jelly 

Lemons 

Port wine 

Sherry 

Whiskey 

Brandy 

Rum 

Alcohol 

Claret 

Mustard 

Muce. whole 
ground 

Macaroni 

Meal, corn 
' oat 

N'tm'gs.whle 

Olive oil 

Olives 

Pails 

Pepper, gr'd 
" whole 
•' white 
" cayenne 

Pea meal 

Pickles 

Raisins 

Rice 

Rice flour 

Sugar, 
" powdered 
•' gr'nul'fd 
" brown 

Salt 

Sago 

Soap 

Saltpetre 

Twine 

Tapioca 

Tomatoes 

Vermicelli 

Vinegar 

Worcester- 
shire sauce 

Sapolio 

Italian paste 



NORTHERN HOTEL. 



STOREROOM Deliver to 


Fruit Pantry: 




Wanted 






— 


Wanted 










lbs B'st coffe 






Doz. eggs 








" Help " 








Current jelly 








" Oolong tea 








cans Apric'ts 








" Green '' 








■' Cherries 








■' Bng.bre'k- 








" Peaches 








f ast tea 








" Pears 








" Help tea 








" Pineapple 








■' Chocolate 








'■ Plums 








"T'blebufr 








" Quinces 








' Help " 








" Sardines 








" Almonds 








" Salmon 








" KUberts 








box Lemons 








■' Pecans 








" Raisins 








" vvalnuts 








" Tootbp'ks 








" Cut sugar 








" Mat*ihes 








•' Pow'd " 








bot. Worees. 








" Gran " 








sauce 








■' Salt 








" Half'd " 








• Pepper 








■' anch'vi " 








" Mustard 








" tob'sco " 








" Water 








'• choffchow 








crackers 








" Gherkins 








" Soda " 








"M'x'dp'k's 








" Oyster " 








•• Olive oil 








'• Whitening 








Bath bricks 








*' Creamery 








Bars soap 








cheese 








gals. Olives 








" Boqueft 








" Vinegar 








cheese 








• M'plesy'p 








" Swiss " 








" R'cko'ndy 








■' Edam " 








• syrup 








■■ Brie 








" Cream 








" Camenb'rt 








" Milk 







78 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

Tellman's Prices Beference Book. 



The object of this book is to supply a ready 
reference to quantity, price and total value of 
supplies purchased for the year, and afford 
opportunity for comparison with the marketing 
of previous years; also to present in tabulated 
form the cost per capita, the commissary pur- 
chases and issues, the cost of service, the oper- 



ating expenses and receipts of the cafe, the 
stock used by the bar, and figures relating to 
expense, milk, cream, salt, ice, coal, transporta- 
tion, freight rates, etc. The illustration here- 
with shows one page of the book, natural size. 
This book is marketed at one dollar in The 
Hotel Monthly Handbook series. 





BRAND 


MIN. 

PKioa 


MAX. 

PRica 


SIZa OUANTITV 
pack's PUnOHASID 


Bakers Supplies. 

Almond paste 












Baking powder. 













Chocolate 












Citron 












Cocoanut whole 












' ' shredded 












Cream of Tartar 












Currants 












Gelatin 












Glace fruit assorted 












' ' cherries . 












' ' angelique 












Lemon peel 












Orange " 












Mazoil 












Marrons 












Soda 












Yeast 












' ' compressed . . 












Mince meat 




































Extracts, etc. 

Almond 












Banana 












Jamaica ginger 












Lemon 













THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



79 



BUYING. 

On the methods employed in buying depends 
the welfare of the hotel to a great extent. To 
go buying with a well-filled purse, or for a 
large and prosperous concern with good credit, 
who settle their bills promptly, and where the 
cost need not be taken into consideration, it 
is an easy task. Anybody can buy for such a 
house. But where a house depends on the close 
and economical buying of the steward, it is 
not so easy, and it requires a man who has a 
knowledge of the qualities of different brands 
of goods as well as of the grades of meats, 
poultry, game, fish, and, in fact, everything 



that is needed in a hotel. 

When the merchant buys he figures if his 
class of trade can afford to pay the price he 
will be required to charge to make a living 
profit, and if he can dispose of said goods 
before they prove a loss by reason of long 
exposure, or, if perishable, are spoiled from too 
much handling. 

To buy for a hotel is different in some ways. 
Everything the steward buys is for current use 
and it is not necessary to figure on a direct 
profitable return, but to procure all articles at 
a justifiable price, and at the same time satisfy 
and i^lease the guests. 



191. 



± 


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c 


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I 


1 


[ 


i 


s 


Artl^ 


r 
I 




1 


£ 




■Mf 












Help'* SuiMie 












rwt 












VaiatakiM 












Hw(;} 






































. 


— 






































Pannlp* 

PDta*)ei, new-.. 




— 
















Wiener 






















— 
































































„ 




..... 




...._ 





















M«tMt 










— 






Hmdlshes 

RoMlne. 


— 


— 




L»*TrT 










Oyster Craba. 










— ■■"" 
















R«ck«_ . 




— - 


._... 














"" ■ 


























L 


...... 






















— 


...^_ 












1 






CMBldBMf 

Ntlpi 




— 




























" Hubbard 
















— 


Lamlj 












" boiled. 
Soft ClaiBS- 

























— 


— 








~. 


















: 


-- 


— 


Frwh Mackerel 
V«fl«taklM 


I 


__ 


— 





' 






21 
























r::: '"" 


— 










— 





-- 






W«t«CTMS 


..... 






VmI 




-: 








trees 






SmMIis 

Stew Meal 

FMHfy 






















Fni[f 

Apples, baking.. 










Quancn 






Arttdwkei. 





— 


— - 


— 










-- 




















KUoera 




— 


— 


— 
















""""■ 






■ 
















































Fo»I 




— 


















'R..nh...t.. 










































" 


























Cabbaie. 












dim 





























• 

































Pwft 












Sqoab Chicken. . 
Sprtiv Turkey . 














--■ 






















„„.. 


— 




































































__.. 
























_.. 


Cucumbers _ 


















. .... 




■Hawaii HUL. 





































Jtlhnoa HUL. 

WMtplulu ■■ 
Hdp-a HMMt _ 




...._ 


— 


— 




Squabs 

Rocwler Friea — 
Flah 
















— 




















: 






— 


Escarole. 

Garlic . 


— 


— 











.._.._ 










— ; 


.11 



























— 


— 




— 


„.... 


■' atflped.. 


— 


_,. 














Help-i B«eon.„ 











PlUBS..„ 























Leeks 




— 


._.,., 






Pit Feet 


~ 


-- 




:faw(ft„ 

F«f Leja 
















Mint 

Hushrooms 

Mustard Greens 
^itona, youni. 
" old,. 




" 






^Jlnt Pork — 















— ■ 


■" 


— 














1 













































0.lr, 













































































*" ■ 












•' SpanUh 


























































'• tub 













ver'flSMUM. 






















.. 


>rMnF<Hl 
















MJM' ■■ 





— - 




' . "^- 1 


















1 
















i 




















1 


1 




1 





MARKET LIST. SHEET 11x13 INCHES. 



80 



THE PEACTICAL 



In preparing to go to market the question is, 
what to buy, how much is needed and how long 
will the goods keep; also the kind of goods, if 
for a $2.00 a day house or for a $3.00 to $5.00 
a day house; if for a first-class restaurant, or 
fashionable club, as every one of the above 
requires goods of a different quality. 

When a house engages a man to buy who is 
not possessed of the required knowledge it will 
pay school money, which in some instances 
amounts to quite a sum until he has learned. 

A steward in buying should always ask the 
price of the goods wanted before taking them, 
no matter -how regular-he gets the same article, 
or reliable the firm. Prices change on all 
goodsj tfiey may have advanced to a- figure too 
high,, jn fwhich ease it would require the selec- 
tion of anotheJ brand. A good firm appre- 
ciates the strict business methods in a buyer 
and and will take better care of his orders 
than if he comes in, reads off his list of 
articles wanted in a careless way, with an " I- 
don 't - ask-prices ; my-house-can-pay-f or-them, ' ' 
air. The steward -should buy just like the mer- 
chant, who first figures on the probable profit. 
The steward on his tour of marketing often 
meets with what are called bargains, which he 
should take advantage of if they are staple 
and non-perishable goods, but, if perishable, 
should consider well before buying. The goods 
may be all right if used at once, but if it is 
necessary to carry them for several days, and 
in the meantime become unfit for use, the bar- 
gain becomes a total loss. Among the staple 
articles which can not be found at bargains 
are coffee and fiour. When a house has a blend 
of coffee which pleases, it should be continued 
right along, and so with flour; to insure good 
bread there should be kept a brand that runs 
even the year around. 

The standard lines of canned goods can often 
be bought cheap — lower than the market is 
likely to be. It is well in such a case to buy. 

There should be a regular day every week for 
buying groceries and at no time should the 
steward buy goods to last longer than one 
month, no matter how cheap, especially where 
the market is near at hand. 

In buying perishable goods, such as fresh 
meats, poultry, fish, oysters, game, vegetables, 
fruit and dairy products, he should himself 
make all selections at the time of purchase, 
and should be able to judge for himself whether 
the butter is just what he needs, the fish is 
really fresh, or the poultry is young, and, above 
all, if the beef is just the quality he wants. 

The steward should be able to calculate how 



HOTEL STEWARD 
much he needs for his guests without having 
a lot left over that can not be put to good use. 
A great many things, if not all used at one 
meal, can be carried until, by adding a little 
more, will make another meal. But there are 
many things it will not do to buy more than 
enough for a day at the time, such as berries 
in season, etc. 

The steward should also know how to take 
care of the supplies which he buys, meats, of 
course, requiring most attention. 

Where there is a good ice box or system of 
j'efrigeration, and proper attention given, there 
is practically no loss. 
To Market. 

The steward should not use tobacco or strong 
drink before going to market, as such indul- 
gence easily affects the fine sense of taste 
necessary. I will endeavor to illustrate a trip 
to the market for a $3.00 per day hotel, with a 
house count of 200, starting at the head of the 
list: 

OYSTERS IN SHELL— A very desirable 
dish in season and about four-fifths of the 
guests will call for them. Allowing five to the 
order makes eight hundred. Where they are 
used more than once a week it is cheapest to 
buy them by the barrel; they will keep for 
several days in a cool place with cracked ice 
over them. Oysters in bulk for stewing, if not 
frequently served, will take about three gal- 
lons solid measure per meal; when served daily 
for breakfast, half that quantity is sufficient. 
Large oysters for frying, when used every day, 
one and one-half gallons; but when served 
twice a week about three gallons are required. 
Oysters to be in good condition should not float 
nor have a strong odor, and should be kept in 
a cool place and pieces of ice placed in the tub. 
They spoil very quickly in warm air. 

CLAMS — Little necks; not so many are used 
as of oysters, only about half the guests will 
call for them. They sell at about the same 
price as shell oysters and are kept the same 
way. For Friday's dinner for chowder it will 
require about 350 ^large clams. 

FISH — Where fish is served at every meal 
the ratio per guest is not over one-sixth of a. 
pound for each. This applies to the varieties 
which are to be had the year around, such as 
whitefish, bluefish, trout, Spanish mackerel, 
halibut, etc. Ratio gross weight will run al- 
most double, or a trifle over one-quarter pound 
on such fish as red snapper, bass and pike, on 
account of the increased waste in cleaning 
them, mainly large heads. The shad being a 
very desirable fish when it first comes in the 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 81 

market the ratio will run about one-quarter was $8.64. Deduct 92 cents, value of waste 

pound per guest. I place my fish order : cuts, leaves $7.72, the cost of 49 steaks or 15.5 

If for whiteflsh, 33 pounds. cents each. The first loin was killed and used 

If for bluefish, 33 pounds. in Chicago ; the latter in the South and was 

If for red snapper, 50 pounds. of inferior quality compared with the former. 

If for shad, 12 single or 48 pounds. It will require two loins of well fed young 

If for smelts, 15 pounds. steer. 

If for pan fish, 8 pounds. RIBS— Next I need ribs; how many? I will 

In selecting fish: To tell if fresh the gills see. A good carver can cut from 55 to 65 

should have a natural red color, the eyes clear, cuts out of a rib of 35 pounds. About 70 per 

and, by pressing the finger behind the small cent of the guests call for roast beef, and since 

upper fin nearest the tail, the fish should feel the chef has no cold beef for tomorrow's lunch 

firm; but if the finger strikes the backbone the i will take four ribs. Tomorrow I can take one 

the fish is old. After the fish is delivered at less. The difference bet-neen a steer" rib and 

the hotel it should be cleaned, then ice should that of a cow is, the bones of the former are 

be broken fine, place in layers the fish and ice smaller, not so curved, and carry thicker meat 

alternately, but the fish should not be cut or on tiig back. 

split before it is to be used, as by cutting fish MUTTON— When mutton is young and rea- 

and then icing, the best of the fish, its flavor, sonably fat it is always a desirable dish, es- 

is lost. pecially as chops. It will require about half 

FRESH MEATS — Next on the list are the pound to the guest, or fourteen racks of seven 

fresh meats. Seldom are they bought from pounds each, or 98 pounds and you get ten 

day to day. The steward usually buys ahead chops to each rack. Short racks are cut about 

for several days, but this time we will buy one inch below the lower rib. The neck is cut 

enough for one day only. away at the other end and the short or breast 

LOINS OF BEEF— This house serving no ribs are cut away. In serving lamb chops 

supper it will be required for breakfast only. (of which the per cent, required for each guest 

About 70 per cent of the guests eat steak, is far greater than mutton) I have found that 

where a good quality is served; that will it is more profitable to buy the whole front 

require 140 steaks. In order to find how many quarters. For instance, if it takes tv/enty racks 

loins are needed I will give my experience of of lamb at five pounds each — one hundred 

cutting two loins different in size and quality. pounds, we will say, at thirteen cents per 

The first loin weighs 68 pounds, first class, well pound, would be a cost of $13.00. Now take 

fed young steer: twenty fore-quarters weighing eight pounds 

Pounds. Steaks. ^.^^^^ ^ould be a total of 160 pounds at eight 

Sirlom ' cents r)er pound, $12.80. After trimming there 

Tenderloin 5 lb • \ j * u ^ j , X <.\, 

jjj_ 10 24 are sixty pounds of breast and neck worth three 

Fat 8 cents per pound, or $1.80. Deduct this from 

Flank 4 ^^^ gj,g(. ^ost and the twenty racks will cost 

H°'^^f r hei 10 J"®* $11.00, a gain of $2.00. There is no profit 

in buying heavy mutton this way. Where either 

Total 68 72 mutton or lamb chops are served every morn- 
Loin cost 16 cents per pound gives a total of ing the quantity used will be much less. 
$10.88. Deduct from this $1.98, the highest in buying lamb for roasting it requires about 
value of parts not used as steaks, and you have half a pound to the guest ; fresh pork three- 
$8 90 net value of seventy-two steaks, which eighths pound; fresh pork sausage, for break- 
makes each steak worth about 12.3 cents. fast, about twenty pounds. 

The second loin weighed only 54 pounds and I now go to the poultry dealer. First on the 

cost 16 cents per pound: ^ , list are TURKEYS; it will take about 150 

Pounds. Steaks. pounds, or three-quarter pound for each" guest, 

Sirloin ._ ^ ^^ of undrawn well fattened young turkeys for a 

Tenderloin ^^ /^ ^^ dinner. They should be even in size and weigh 

Fl'ank .'.'.'.'.'.'..'..'...! ! ! 10 about fifteen to sixteen pounds each. 
Bones 1° CHICKENS, old, when used for pie, wUI re- 
Fat ^^/2 q^jj,g about eighty-five pounds; when for boil- 

, 54 49 ing, about one hundred pounds. Young chick- 
Cost of Ln 54 pounds" at' 16 cents per pound ens for roasting, about 150 pounds. To tell 



82 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



when a chicken is young, press on the point of 
the breast bone; if it gives it easily proves that 
it is not matured, but if firm and sharp it is 
an old chicken. 

DUCKS AND GEESE— It requires the same 
quantity as turkeys for roasting. A sure way 
to tell when a duck or goose is young is to 
press the wind-pipe between thumb and finger; 
if it crushes with ordinary effort they are 
young; the old ones will not crush. 

OLD PIGEONS for pie will require about 
seven dozen. 

SQUAB for broiling are served whole and 
nearly every guest orders it. It is a most ex- 
pensive dish. 

SPEING CHICKENS for broiling should 
weigh about eighteen pounds to the dozen and 
serve half a chicken for an order. As nearly 
every guest is sure to order spring chicken, 
about eight dozen will be required. It is safest 
to buy them by weight as it insures a more 
even size. 

CAPONS, or gelded cocks, are among the 
most desirable of domestic fowl in the market. 
The fact of their being altered when about two 
months old they are easily fattened and grow 
quite large; their flesh is of a most delicate 
flavor, and the breast, when roasted and nicely 
carved, very much resembles that of a pheasant. 
They are usually served boiled. They are easily 
told by a scar in front of the leg and near the 
back. For boiling I buy in the same ratio as 
for chicken. 

GAME — The season being very short on some 
varieties, it is served as often as the house can 
afford while the season lasts. 

MALLAED DUCKS, when properly cooked, 
are well liked by the average guest. There are 
about six small orders in one duck, and as 
nearly every guest calls for mallard, I buy 
three dozen. 

TEAL being very small, only two orders to 
each duck, I buy eight dozen. 

QUAIL — About ninety per cent, of the 
guests will call for them; also snipe and 
plovers. It requires fifteen dozen to make a 
meal of any of the above, allowing one to an 
order. 

PAETEIDGES— In first-class houses par- 
tridges, are served a half to an order, usually; 
but in a $3.00 per day house I make four 
orders, and in that way four dozen will serve 
a dinner. 

PEAIEIE CHICKEN will cut in six orders, 
so three dozen will do of them. 

OTHEE GAME, such as venison, elk, ante- 
lope and bear, one saddle is enough for a din- 
ner. 



BUTTEE can not be bought without trying. 
The color should be even, the flavor sweet, and 
contain about one ounce of salt to the pound. 
Butter should be kept in a separate box, away 
from fruits or cooked foods of any kind, as it 
easily absorbs foreign odors and becomes 
tainted. 

Vegetables (excepting asparagus) will 
keep for several days and can therefore be 
bought in quantities as bargains present them- 
selves. Asparagus being the most desirable 
vegetable in the market, when in season, more 
than enough for one or two meals should not 
be bought, as they will not keep. 

APPLES are usually packed in barrels. In 
buying them I always have them opened, one, 
and sometimes both ends; then inspect to the 
depth of several layers before taking them. 

OEANGES are the most desirable fruit that 
we have for the table; they are healthful and 
the average guest prefers them to any other 
fruit, and every good house of any standing 
should have them for breakfast as long as they 
are to be had at a reasonable price. Florida 
oranges art the best in the American market, 
but Mexico and California also produce large 
quantities of the fruit of fairly good quality. 
Oranges two hundred to the box are just the 
right size for an American plan hotel. It re- 
quires about one and a half boxes for a break- 
fast. 

SMALL FEUITS— The berry season is al- 
ways looked forward to with great delight by 
the hotel guest, and the steward takes pride in 
serving them as early as possible; but as there 
is nothing on the bill of fare which they take 
the place of, it also means an increase in store- 
room expenditures, until they are plentiful, 
when they are served daily in different styles, 
they then take the place of other fruit. The 
first to reach the market are from the South, 
and of poor quality. There are about five or- 
ders to every quart; it will take about thirty- 
six quarts. 

GEOCEEIES are usually bought in quanti- 
ties to last from two weeks to a month and 
selections are made by samples, mainly. A 
poor observer can spend more money than 
needed; for example I want: 

CANNED PEAS, paid last $1.35 per doz. 
The salesman shows a sample very good for the 
above figure, but, he says, ' ' I have a lot in for 
ten cents per dozen less which are fully equal to 
this sample." He brings a sample, which, 
upon opening, I find as good, and it suits me 
first rate. By taking twenty cases I gain $4.00, 
which, if I had given the order without further 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



83 



inquiry, would not have been made; and so with 
everything I buy. 

TEA requires the most attention, as the 
dealer must be relied on to a great extent. 
There are three varieties of tea which are suflfi- 
cient for any American plan house to carry; 
they are Oolong, English Breakfast and Young 
Hyson. With these in stock many different 
blends can be made by mixing different pro- 
portions and the guest suited. 

In buying teas I have samples drawn of the 
kind wanted. Plenty of time should be taken 
in passing upon the qualities. Five or six 
dollars is easily saved and at the same time 
have a tea that is just what is wanted. 

COFFEE — The principal element of success 
in making coffee is good material to make it 
with. Coffee for breakfast should be stronger 
than for lunch and dinner, for the reason that 
every coffee drinker is a connoisseur at break- 
fast. I find a blend of three-quarter Old Gov- 
ernment Java and one-quarter Mocha will make 
a very satisfactory coffee for the average hotel. 
When a blend is found which is satisfactory to 
the house it should be continued. Frequent 

changes are not commendable. 

* * * 

The ratio which I have applie.\ in my Olus- 
trations in buying is not intended for houses of 
all grades and localities; for instance: hotels 
by the seashore and northern lake resorts use 
a great deal of fish, where it is just fresh out 
of the water; and hotels in the South require 
large quantities of fresh fruits and vegetables, 
but less meats, ily approximations apply only 
to centrally located hotels catering to transient 
patronage, rate from $2.00 to $3.50 per day, 
and where a condensed bill of fare is in use. 

A steward, no matter how well he under- 
stands his business, must first learn the wants 
of the guests of the house for which he is to 
buy before he can do so intelligently; mathe- 
matical calculations are of little use without 
practical knowledge of the requirements of the 
table in the particular locality in which he 

buys. 

* * * 

In cities there are many establishments who 
deal in goods needed in hotels and are in com- 
petition for -patronage. This is the means of 
fair prices on certain commodities. 

It is a true saying that "competition is the 
life of trade." This is especially so with re- 
gard to dealers in perishable goods. The stew- 
ard or buyer bearing this in mind can, by close 
watching, often buy very cheaply. It should be 
one of his chief aims to Tceep posted on condi- 
tion of the market. But I do not believe it a 



good idea to keep the patronage too much 
divided and uncertain. To select a few reliable 
firms who may depend on selling you a certain 
amount of goods is commendable, as they will 
find it to their interest to take good care of 
you, and will give any advantage that may 
offer both in prices and quality. If you are 
nobodys customer they will all try to take ad- 
vantage of you, and if the particular goods you 
want are scarce, ivill not care to sell you at all, 
unless for exorbitant prices, as they prefer to 
keep them for their regular patrons. The fact 
that a firm is larger or wealthier than another 
is no evidence that they handle the best goods 
for the lowest prices; nor is it any reason why 
there should be discrimination in their favor; 
but the man who tells you in plain language 
the best he can do and then sticks to his 
promise is the right party to patronize. Look 
out for the man who wants to be too nice to 
you: he may cause you to pay for all of his 
polite honors and smiles. 

Where the buying must be done by mail or- 
ders it is far more difficult to attain desired re- 
sults. You are entirely dependent on the 
dealer; he can send what he sees must be first 
disposed of, and occasionally one gets goods 
from some (otherwise) reliable firms that would 
hardly be looked at where a choice can be had. 
Here, again, it is most necessary to select u, 
reliable house who have a good business stand- 
ing. Write and tell them what class of goods 
you need, and then, if what is sent is not up 
to the required standard, notify them that the 
goods are held subject to their order. They will 
soon find that they must send what is desired 
or lose your patronage. 

Last, but not least, buy from no one who is 
ready to offer personal inducements, and don't 
let a man sell you goods that you have no need 
of. Buy just what you want and no more. 

I have found it a good custom to talk mat- 
ters over with the chef before ordering or going 
to the market. For the steward and chef to act 
in conjunction in all such matters saves the 
house many a dollar. 

Preservation of Meats. 

A refrigerator in which an equable tempera- 
ture of from 36 to 40 degrees can be main- 
tained will keep meats for over three weeks. 
I found in taking a trip through the principal 
packing houses of Chicago that in the large 
chill rooms where all fresh killed cattle, sheep 
and hogs are hung for cooling, the temperature 
ranged from 32 to 40 degrees. These rooms 
(which it is worth any hotel man 's time to see) 
cover acres of floor space, and hundreds of 



84 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



dressed cattle liang in rows so exact that the 
sight is beautiful to behold. The cooling is 
done by coils of pipe placed side by side about 
fourteen feet overhead and extending the en- 
tire length and width of the ceiling. These are 
regulated by vents by which the cold blast can 
be increased or diminished at will. The meat 
dealer goes into these rooms and makes his 
selections and then has the privilege to let his 
beef purchase hang there until sufficiently aged, 
which is not less than ten days and sometimes 
as long as three weeks. The meat when taken 
from this storage appears as fresh as if just 
killed. 

I believe where small refrigerators are built, 
using the above plan, the best results are met 
with. 

BEEF should always hang and be kept free 
from ice. 

POULTEY should also hang and be kept as 
dry as possible. 

COENED BEEF— To make corned beef 
(sweet pickle) : Make a salt brine, strong 
enough to carry a potato; then add a quarter 
pound saltpetre and three pounds sugar to two 
hundred pounds beef; then place the beef in 



this and leave thirty days before using. 

DEY, SALT OE SMOKED BEEF— Place in 
layers in a square tank or vat, using coarse salt 
only. After leaving the meat in the salt for 
thirty days take out and place in fresh water 
to draw for twelve hours; take the beef, wipe 
with a cloth, then hang up to dry and smoke. 

HAMS — The same process as corned beef 
is employed, but they should remain in the 
brine for six weeks to be well cured, than wash 
in fresh water, wipe with a cloth, hang up to 
dry and smoke. 

BACON requires about half the time of hams. 

Preservation of Dressed Game. 

Take a flat square tin pan not over two 
inches deep ; lay the birds or other game, flat, 
packing close side by side until the pan is full; 
then cover with another pan a size larger that 
fits closely when inverted; set in a box; then 
bury in fine broken ice to a depth of about 
three inches, and scatter a little salt over the 
ice. In this way game will keep a long time 
in perfectly fresh condition, but it should be 
used immediately after exposure. Game should 
never touch the ice, always keep dry. 



Tables From Farmers' Bulletin, 391. 

The following tables taken from the Farm- 
ers' Bulletin No. 391, Department of Agricul- 
ture, will be found of interest to the student, 
and I believe of considerable worth. The first 
relates to the Estimated Cost to the Whole- 
saler of Different Cuts when the Carcass is 
Purchased. Prices of the carcass range from 
a minimum of 4% cents to 8 cents per pound. 

The second table gives the Average Com- 
position of Edible Portion of Different Cuts 
of Meat. 

The third table gives the Net Cost of Edible 
Portion of Different Guts of Meat as Compared 
with Assumed Market Price per Povmd. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

Eatimated Cost to the Wholesaler of Different Cuts When the Carcass is Purchased at 
Certain Prices per Pound, Dressed Weight. 



ASSUMED SALE PRICE PER POUND 


ESTIMATED COST OF CUT 


OF CARCASS 




















Ribs 


Loins 


Chucks 


Plates 


Slianks 


Rounds 


Flanks 


Suet 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


4^ 


7 


8 


3>^ 


2% 


2 


4^ 


3 


3 


5 


7V2 


9 


4 


3 


2 


5 


3 


3 


SX 


7K 


Qsr 


4 


3J^ 


2 


5 


3 


3 


5}i 


8 


lo 


4 


S5^ 


2 


5 


3 


3 


-,¥. 


sy. 


io>^ 


45^ 


3K 


2 


SX 


3 


3 


6 


9 


II 


45< 


3?^ 


2 


5^. 


3 


3 


&H 


9M 


12 


4X 


3J^ 


2 


SM 


3 


3 


6'A 


ID 


12% 


4K 


3K 


2 


5M 


3 


3 


7 , 


II 


14 


5 


3J^ 


2 


5*C 


3 


3 


1%. 


I2>^ 


IS 


SX 


3K 


2J4 


6« 


3 


3 


8 


14 


i6 


5% 


4 


3 


6^2 


4 


4 



Average Composition of Edible Portion of Different Cuts of Meat. 



KIND OF MEAT 



Beef: 

Brisket 

Chuck rib 

Flank 

Porterhouse 

Neck 

Ribs , 

Round 

Shank 

Side 

Veal: Side with kidney, fat and 

tallow 

Mutton: Side without tallow . . . 

Lamb: Side without tallow 

Pork: Tenderloin 

Chops 



Per cent 
54-6 
66.8 

59-3 
6o.o 
66.3 

57. o 
67.8 

70-3 
62.2 

71-3 
53.6 
58.2 
66.5 
50.7 



PROTEIN 



Per cent 
15.8 
19.0 
19.6 
21.9 
20.7 
17.8 
20.0 
21.4 
18.8 

20.2 
16.2 
17.6 
18.9 
16.4 



Per cent 
28.5 

13.4 
21. 1 
20.4 
12.7 
24.6 
10.6 
8.1 
18.8 

8.1 
29.8 

23.1 
13.0 
32.0 



Per cent 
0.9 
i.o 

.9 
1.0 
1.0 

• 9 
I.I 

.9 

• 9 

1.0 

.8 

l.i 

1.0 



FUEL VALUE 
PER POUND 



Calories 

1.495 
920 

1.255 

1,270 

920 

1.370 

835 

740 

1.14S 

715 
1,560 
1,300 

900 
r.655 



Net Cost of Edible Portion of Different Cuts as Compared with Assumed Market Price per Pound 



KIND OF MEAT 



Beef: 

Brisket 

Rump 

Flank 

Chuck rib 

Porterhouse 

Neck 

Ribs 

Round 

Shin 

Heart 

Tongue 

Veal: Cutlets 

Breast 

Mutton: Leg 

Chops 

Forequarter cut for stew 
Pork : Loin 

Salt pork 

Bacon 

Ham 



Proportion of 

Bone or Waste 

in Cut 



Per 
23 
19 
5 
53 
12 

31 
20 

8 
38 

S 

26 

3 
24 
17 
M 
21 

19 
8 
8 

12 



cent 

3 
.0 

5 
8 

7 

2 
I 
5 
3 
9 
5 
4 
5 
7 
8 

.2 

3 

I 

7 

2 



Proportion 
Edible Materi- 
al in Cut 



Per cent 

76.7 
81.0 

94-S 
46.2 

87-3 
68.8 

79-9 
91.3 
61.7 

94-1 
73. 5 
96.6 

75-5 
82.3 
83.2 
78.8 
80.7 
91.9 

91.3 

87.8 



Assumed Mar- 
ket Price per 
Pound 



Cents 
7.0 
10. o 
7.0 
10. 
20. 
7- 
IS- 
3- 
5-0 
22.0 
20.0 
12.5 
15.0 
15.0 



12. 

IS. 
12. 
20. 



Net Price per 

Pound of Edi' 

ble Portion 



86 



THE PEACTICAL 



BILLS OF FARE (AMERICAN PLAN). 

The arrangement of bills of fare is a most 
important part of the steward's duties, and in 
the undertaking of this work he should be 
possessed of good taste as well as a knowledge 
of- different kinds of dishes, so that he may 
be enabled to arrange them in the order in 
which they ought to be eaten, and at the same 
time give them an artistic appearance. 

The bills of fare of a hotel are often sent 
away by the guests to their friends, as well as 
to guests and landlords of other houses in dif- 
ferent parts of the country. The traveling 
public is interested in them for the reason that 
they may have occasion to stop at the house 
where the bill is from and begin to judge the 
house by what it offers the guest to eat. The 
hotel man studies the bill from a business 
standpoint ; he criticises the ability of the stew- 
ard, and he looks for new ideas, which if he 
considers good, would try to emulate. 
The Bill of Fare Reflects the House. 

Bills of fare are subject to much comment 
^nd are, in many instances, considered in the 
light of a reflector of the manner in which the 
house is conducted. They certainly do reflect 
the stewarding of the same. 

Well arranged bills of fare come only from 
a house where the back part is harmoniously 
conducted. To serve a well-selected and ar- 
ranged bill of fare with required changes every 
day is essential, and can be done in the cheaper 
houses just as well as in the high-priced ones. 
In treating this subject it is not my aim to 
formulate anything original or to offer any- 
thing that is not known to the veterans in the 
profession. 

I will endeavor to illustrate as well as possi- 
ble the methods adopted in making bills of fare 
which I believe will meet with general ap- 
proval. There Avill appear herewith a large 
and well-arranged collection of models from 
houses ranging from $2.00 per day upward, 
representing all localities, and may be taken 
as a fair average, the major part of them hav- 
ing been favorably commented upon by various 
prominent hotel papers. 

Influence of the Press in Bill of Fare Reforma- 
tion. 

To the hotel press is due all the credit for 
the progress which has been made in the im- 
provement in bill of fare making. All the 
older men in the profession well know how 
irregular the style of making bills of fare was 
only a few years ago, and what monstrosities 
were often met with, which undoubtedly would 
exist at the present time had the press not un- 



HOTEL STEWARD 
dertaken the task of reformation. Even now 
one can plainly see where papers treating on 
this subject are not read in some of the coun- 
try districts. 
Steward and Chef Work Together. 

In making bills of fare the steward and chef 
should work together; it can be done with bet- 
ter advantage to the house than is possible 
where the steward makes the whole bill and not 
consult any one. The soups and entrees belong 
to the chef; he always has something in his ice 
box left over which he can use best according 
to his own ideas, while if the steward tries to 
dictate to him what he (the chef) should make 
out of the articles the chef may have on hand, 
the same pains will not be taken as if he were 
permitted to follow his idea. 
Important Considerations in Bill of Fare 

Making. 

The principal consideration in arranging bills 
of fare are: first, what class of house; second, 
the class of patronage to be catered to, whether 
transient or family ; and, third, where located. 
Rate, Patronage, Locality, 

It is necessary to consider the class house 
because it is out of reason to use the same kind 
of bill for a $2.00 a day hotel as that used in 
a house that charges $5.00 a day for accommo- 
dation. It would be ruinous to the cheaper 
house. 

By "class of patronage" I mean, whether 
they are of the transient, such as professional 
traveling men of all nationalities patronizing 
the same house; or if they are permanent resi- 
dents in a, family hotel. It is well known that 
the American eats his food only mildly sea- 
soned — no strong heavy sauces; he eats his 
roast beef and steaks mostly rare; while the 
German prefers well done roasts, heavy soups 
and sour sauces, with plenty of seasoning. 

In family hotels where there are a great 
many ladies and children to satisfy, the stew- 
ard's position is a most trying one. What 
pleases one displeases the other. Not long ago, 
while standing in the rotunda of the hotel in 
which I was engaged, a lady came to me and 
said, ' ' I wish to compliment you on your nice 
meals, but my husband does not like the coffee, 
he says it is not good." And while expressing 
my regrets along came a second lady with 
profuse compliments and especially praising 
the coffee. Of course this created considerable 
merriment at the expense of both parties. This 
will give only a faint idea. These houses re- 
quire more radical changes in cookery than any 
other class. 

By "locality" is meant whether the house 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



87 



is located convenient to a good market, with 
ample variety of material easily procured at 
reasonable prices. 

When a steward from a city goes to take 
charge of a hotel in a country town he finds 
it necessary to study all the conditions referred 
to above, learn prices and what there is at his 
command, before he can make a bill of fare 
to suit the house. 
Bills of Fare to Be Even in Quality. 

Another very important item that should be 
considered in making bills of fare for houses 
of any class is that the expensive articles are 
evenly distributed during the week with the 
cheaper ones; for instance, taking a dinner for 
Tuesday, there are on the bill: 
DINNEE 
Consomme Colbert Split peas 

Celery Olives 

Broiled pompano 
Saratoga potatoes 
Boiled capon 
Roast beef 
Spring lamb 
Sweetbreads 
Lobster Newburg 
Mashed and boiled potatoes 
New asparagus New peas 

Corn 
Cardinal punch 
Lettuce and tomato mayonnaise 
Indian pudding 
Pie Strawberries 

Ice cream 
Cake Nuts and raisins Cheese and crackers 
Coffee 
Cost for 200 people: 

Celery $ 5.25 

Pompano 12.00 

Capon 27.00 

Beef 14.00 

Lamb 8.60 

Stweetbreads 5.64 

Lobster '. . 5.00 

Asparagus 6.00 



$83.49 
And on Wednesday the bill would be as fol- 
lows: 

DINNER 

Consomme Julienne Cream of barley 
Radishes Olives 

Boiled lake trout 

Hollandaise potatoes 

Boiled Corned Beef and Cabbage 

Roast beef 

Turkey 

Lobster croquettes 

Spaghetti 

Mashed and boiled potatoes 



String beans Tomatoes Turnips 

Orange ice 

Vegetable salad 

Pudding 

Pie Wine jelly 

Ice cream 

Cake Fruit Nuts and raisins 

Cheese and crackers 

Coffee 

Cost for 200 people: 

Radishes $ 2.00 

Trout 2.10 

Corned beef and cabbage 4.50 

Beef 14.00 

Turkey 16.50 

Spaghetti 44 

String beans 1.80 

Lobster croquette 



$41.34 
It will be noticed that the bill of Tuesday 
contained all high-priced material and prob- 
ably would make a satisfactory bill; but 
Wednesday is slighted. The material is all 
cheaper. Calculations should be far enough 
ahead to avoid such contrasts. The same mate- 
rial will make two bills more evenly balanced 
and meet with better results. For instance, I 
will give on Tuesday: 

DINNEE 

Consomme Colbert Split peas 

Radishes Olives 

Boiled trout 

Hollandaise potatoes 

Boiled capon 

Eoast beef 

Spring lamb 

Lobster Newburg 

Spaghetti 

Mashed and boiled potatoes 

Green peas Corn Tomatoes 

Cardinal punch 

Lettuce and tomato mayonnaise 

Indian pudding 

Pie Strawberries 

Ice cream 

Cake Nuts and raisins 

Cheese and crackers 

Coffee 

Cost for 200 people: 

Radishes $ 2.00 

Trout 2.10 

Capon 27.00 

Beef 14.00 

Lamb 8.60 

Lobster 5.00 

Spaghetti 44 

Peas 2.60 



$61.74 



88 THE PEACTJCAL 

Aud for Wednesday E should give: 

Consomme Julienne Cream of barley 

Celery Olives 

Broiled pompano 

Saratoga potatoes 

Corned beef and cabbage 

Eoast beef 

Turkey 

Sweetbreads 

Lobster croquettes 

Mashed and boiled potatoes 

New asparagus Turnips 

String beans 

Orange ice 

Vegetable salad 

Pudding 

Pie Wine jelly 

Ice cream 

Cake Fruit Nuts and raisins 

Cheese and crackers 

Coffee 

Cost for 200 people: 

Celery $ 5-25 

Pompano 12.00 

Corned beef and cabbage 4. .50 

Beef 14.00 

Turkey 16.50 

Sweetbreads 5.64 

Asparagus 6.00 

$63.89 

In comparing the figures it will be readily 
seen the summary of each bill has greatly 
c'hanged, and, besides, the first bill has lost less 
in quality than the second one gained. 
French Not Wanted on American Bills of 

Fare. 

I do not believe in the use of French in 
making bills of fare; it should be confined to 
the fewest words. French is not wanted, least 
of all in country hotels, and not needed in the 
city houses. It will be noticed that when the 
chef makes a dish with a French, name it has 
but little call, and often when it is called for 
by some guests out of curiosity, they taste of 
it; and then if they like it, good; bvit often 
it is a waste, simply because they do not under- 
stand French. 

In looking over my collection of bills of 
fare, it is easily seen that the greatest progress 
has been made in dispensing with French. Some 
first-class houses in the East have bills without 
any French, and there is no reason why they 
cannot be set forth entirely in the English 
language, as well as other nations can make 
theirs in their tongue. Up to the time of the 
late Franco-Prussian war it (the French) on 
the German bill of fare seemed indispensable, 
French being the court language. After the 



HOTEL STEWARD 
formation of the Empire one of the reforma- 
tions the old Emperor made was to banish the 
use of French at the court. Now all meals are 
ordered from a, bill of fare printed in the lan- 
guage of the land. 
Bill of Fare Headings. 

I do not believe in the use of headings for 
the different courses on an American plan bill 
of fare. They are proper on restaurant or 
a la Carte bills, where a large variety is offered 
for sale. Large headings over the different 
classes of dishes enable the patron to find more 
quickly what he wants; but where the con- 
densed table d'hote bill is in use the items are 
so few that they are easily found. 
Stock Eelishes Out of Place on the Card. 

The placing of such relishes as chow chow, 
pickles, sauces, mustard, etc., on the bill of 
fare is out of date. Every well conducted 
house has them subject to the call of the guest. 
Method of Bill of Fare Making. 

My method of making a bill of fare is, I 
believe, entirely in harmony with present ad- 
vanced ideas. It is of the condensed form 
using as little French as possible. I think 
that few dishes, well selected and well pre- 
pared, give the best satisfaction. 
Use No Ambiguous Words. 

I believe it improper for a steward to use 
an expression on the bill without first ascertain- 
ing the meaning and how to spell it correctly. 
Use and Abuse of the Word Menu. 

I do not believe in the use of the word 
' ' Menu " on an everyday American dinner 
bill. It is too much like affectation. The name 
of the meal on the bills is simple and more_ 
pleasing to the average hotel patron, as Break- 
fast, Lunch and Dinner or Breakfast, Dinner 
and Supper or Tea. On holiday or special 
bills for dinner, I believe it is proper to use no 
heading at all, especially where artistic folders 
are used and the proper announcement is made 
on the outer cover, which is quite sufficient. 
The word ' ' Menu ' ' is proper in making a ban- 
quet bill; no other word would answer so well 
for that purpose. 

BREAKFAST. 
Arrangement of the Breakfast Bill. 

When clam broth is served for breakfast, in 
my judgment it should be the first item on the 
bill. My reason for this is that clam broth 
has a stimulating effect, especially when the 
stomach is feverish. It is an excellent restora- 
tive. 

Then comes fruit. In nearly all American 
hotels it is served, and in every one the guest 



THE PRACTICAL 
looks for it. I do not believe in enumerating 
the different kinds; simply the word "fruit" 
or "fruit in season" — except when the berry 
season begins when the different kinds should 
be named, as strawberries, oranges, etc. My 
reason for preferring the generic term is that 
one is not obliged to have a full supply of the 
different kinds in stock. Should apples and 
grapes run short oranges and bananas fill the 
bill. 

Next, the guest usually looks for a cereal 
of some kind; therefore I would place the oat- 
meal or cracked wheat or whatever kind there 
is to offer. 

The third dish on the bill is fish, fresh and 
salt, accompanied with what fresh relishes 
there are. 

Then to enumerate about five different kinds 
of meat, which should differ in variety as much 
as possible. One day there could be broiled 
sirloin and tenderloin steak, ham, liver and 
bacon, fried mush, stewed kidney and fried 
chicken. The next day broiled tenderloin 
steak, mutton chops, fried sausage, ham, hom- 
iny, stewed chicken, etc. A limited number of 
dishesmakes it easy to have an entirely differ- 
ent bill every day in the week. 

After this comes the potatoes; then breads 
and rolls of different kinds, griddle cakes and 
preserves; then beverages. 
No Waste in Preparing. 

In high-priced city hotels it is not good to 
limit the dishes to so small a number as above 
given ; a greater variety is necessary ; and as 
a great part of this meal is prepared as or- 
dered, waste need not be necessarily greater 
than where a small variety is offered. 
Breakfast Good at Any Hour. 

Where the proper attention is given Break- 
fast should be as good at eleven o'clock as at 
seven in the morning, as nothing ought to be 
prepared to last through the entire meal. 
Specimen Breakfast Bills of Fare. 

The following specimens will give a fair 

idsa of breakfasts as served in different 

hotels : 

Fruit in season 

Stewed prunes Baked apples 

Oatmeal with cream 

Salt mackerel 

BROILED 

Sirloin steak Sugar cured ham Mutton chops 

Tenderloin steak, plain or with tomato sauce 

ENTREES 

Calf's liver and bacon Corned beef hash 



EGGS 
Boiled Fried Shirred 

Omelet as ordered 



Scrambled 



HOTEL STEWAED 89 

POTATOES 
Baked pried 

BREADS, ETC. 

riot rolls 

Dry, French, buttered or milk toast 

Cakes 

Tea CoJEee Milk (.'ocoa 

„ „ , Fruit in season 

Rolled oats Boiled rice 

Broiled or fried bass, pike or pickerel 
Tenderloin or sirloin steak, plain or with onions 
Calf's liver and bacon 
Broiled ham 
Stewed chicken 
Corned beef hash 
Fried mush 
Codfish in cream 
Eggs as ordorud 

Potatoes : Baked French fried Stewed 

Breakfast rolls Muffins 

Milk, cream and dry toast 

Griddle cakes 
Coffee Chocolate Tea 
The above are two stock bills for breakfast, 
used in places where no printer is nigh, or it 
does not justify to have them printed. The 
blank lines are for writing in what extra dishes 
ur changes there may be. 

Fruit 

Oatmeal 

Broiled whitefish 

Tenderloin steak Mutton chops 

Fried oysters 

Spareribs Sausage 

Eggs — as ordered 

French fried, baked, hashed in cream 

Hot rolls 

Toast 

Buckwheat cakes 

Maple syrup 

Coffee Tea Chocolate 

This breakfast is a bill of choice dishes, well 

arranged, but the pruning process overdone. 

Oranges 

Clam broth 

Oatmeal with cream 

Broiled live lobster Smoked whiteflsh 

Sirloin steak 

Filet of venison Calf's brains. Belvedere 

Ham Bacon 

Fried chicken, cream sauce 

Eggs as ordered 

I'otatoes — Baked French fried Lyonnaise 

Vienna rolls Muffins Toast 

Griddle cakes, maple syrup 

CofTee. Tea Chocolate 

This is well selected. Will do for holiday 

occasions. 

Oranges Apples Grapes Bananas 

Oysters — raw, stewed and fried 

Radishes 

Oatmeal and farina with cream 

Broiled white fish a la maitre d'hotel 



90 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Fried smelts, sauce tartare Saratoga potatoes 

Fried spring clilcken, cream sauce 

Mutton or lamb chops plain or a la Creole 

Sirloin or tenderloin steak with mushrooms 

Ham Broiled pig's feet Menehould 

Calf's liver and bacon 

Veal cutlets crumbed, sauce tomato 

Pork chops, sauce Robert 

Country sausage 

Hamburg steak, sauce piquante 

Stewed honeycomb tripe a la Lyonnaise 

Stewed kidneys au madere 

Calves brains au beurre noir 

Potatoes in cream Sautee potatoes 

Baked potatoes Lyonnaise potatoes 

French fried potatoes 

Fried mush Corned beef hash Codfish cakes 

EGGS — Poached Scrambled Boiled Shirred 

Fried : a la Buckingham a la Meyerbeer 

OMELETTES — Plain or with parsley, cheese, ham, 

onions, kidneys 
French rolls Coffee cake Pop overs Corn bread 

Wheat cakes German toast Corn cakes 
Peach preserves Comb honey New maple syrup 
Coffee Tea Chocolate Cocoa Broma 
This is a specimen of overcrowding. A third 
less would make equally as good a bill. 



Tangerines Apple glace 

Sliced bananas with cream 
Water cress 
Clam bouillon 
Rolled oats with cream 
Eggs to order 
Easter omelet with preserves 
Mountain trout, butter sauce 
BROILED 
English mutton chops Quail on toast 

Tenderloin steak with mushrooms 
Fried oysters 
New potatoes in cream 
French fried and baked potatoes 
German popovers Milk biscuits French rolls 
Toast to order Griddle cakes Hot waffles 
Comb honey Maple syrup 

Cocoa Tea CofEee 

This, an Easter breakfast, is a first class 
bill, except the repetition of the words "with 
cream," which should be avoided; also I be- 
lieve waffles are best for supper. 

Fruit of the season 

Stewed prunes 

Young onions Radishes 

Hominy Cracked wheat 

Clam broth 

Salt mackerel Smoked herring 

Blueflsh Lake trout 

Sirloin or tenderloin steak, plain or with onions 

Mutton chops Liver and bacon Ham 

Frog legs, breaded, tartare sauce 

Corned beef hash Broiled or fried tripe 

Fried mush Stewed chicken, a la creme 

EGGS — Boiled Poached Shirred 

Fried Scrambled 

Omelet, plain or with parsley, ham, cheese or jelly 

POTATOES — Baked, Saute, Chips, Hashed In 

cream 

French rolls Vienna rolls Corn muffins 

Graham rolls Toast Rice muffins 



Griddle cakes Corn cakes 

CoCfee Tea Chocolate Buttermilk 

This is an excellent bill for a high class 
resort, where good prices are received. 

Apples Malaga grapes Oranges 

Radishes 
Clam broth 
Cracked wheat or boiled rice 

Eggs to order 

Omelet, with asparagus tips 

Broiled brook trout, Montpelier butter 

BROILED 

Tenderloin steak, with mushrooms 

Lamb Kidneys with bacon 

Quail, with water cress 

Sausage Fried oysters 

POTATOES — Baked French fried 

Stewed in cream 

Vienna rolls Toast Corn bread 

Cream biscuits Buckwheat griddle cakes 

Preserved strawberries 

Coffee Tea Cocoa 

This is a model which commends itself. 



Cantaloupe 

Oatmeal 

Sliced cucumbers 

Broiled trout Salt mackerel 

Broiled tenderloin or sirloin steak 

Fried spring chicken, cream sauce 

Ham Bacon 

Boston baked beans, brown bread 
Eggs as ordered 
Omelets plain or with ham 
POTATOES — Baked Stewed in cream 

French fried 
Wheat cakes 
Parker house rolls Horn rolls 

Corn muffins 
CofEee Tea Chocolate 

This breakfast was served in a medium- 
priced family hotel. A good bill. 

Strawberries 

Rolled oats with cream 

Sliced tomatoes Young onions 

Radishes Cucumbers 

Fried pike 

Broiled tenderloin or sirloin steak 

Breakfast bacon 

Beefsteak with onions Broiled sugar-cured ham 

Fried softshell crabs, tartare sauce 

Eggs and omelets as ordered 

Potatoes French fried 

Hot rolls Blackberry butter Wheat cakes 

Tea Chocolate Coffee 

This is an excellent breakfast served at a 

$2.00 per day commercial hotel. 

Bananas Oranges Apples 

Oolong, English breakfast or green tea 

CofEee Milk Cocoa Chocolate 

Raw oysters Fried oysters 

Oat meal Breakfast food 

Broiled pickerel Finnan haddie 

Broiled white flsh 

Sirloin or tenderloin steak, plain, 

with onions, or with mushrooms 
Mutton chops Ham Bacon Lamb kidneys 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWABD 



91 



Quail Corned beel hash Codfish balls 

Orange fritters Sausage Baked beans and pork 

Eggs — Boiled Fried Poached 

Plain or Spanish omelette 

Potatoes — Baked, hashed browned, 

French fried, hashed in cream 

Buckwheat, wheat or corn cakes 

French rolls or flutes 

Bread — Home-made, Boston brown, rye or graham 

Muflans — corn, egg or graham 

Dry or buttered toast Waffles 

California oranges Baked apples 

Oatmeal or boiled rice with cream 

Broiled white shad trout, steward sauce 

Codfish in cream Salt mackerel, boiled or broiled 

Radishes 

Calf's liver and bacon Broiled sugar cured ham 

Broiled mutton chops 

Eggs to order 

Omelettes with tomatoes, ham or cheese 

Broiled sirloin or tenderloin steak, 

plain or with muslirooms 
Hamburger steak with fried onions 
Calf brains scrambled with eggs 
POTATOES — Baked, Lyonnaise, stewed in cream 

French rolls Graham and rye bread Biscuits 

Oatmeal flakes Corn muffins Graham wafers 

Buckwheat cakes Hot waffles 

Cherry preserves Comb honey 

Maple syrup New Orleans molasses 

Cocoa Coffee Tea Chocolate 

Raspberries 
Preserved cherries Stewed prunes 

Co£Eee Tea Chocolate 

Grits Rolled oats 

Broiled black bass Salt mackerel 

Broiled — Sirloin or tenderloin steak 
Spring chicken 
Calfs liver Bacon 

Fried corn 
Veal cutlet, breaded Mush 

Tripe in batter 
Corned beef hash, browned 
Eggs — Boiled, fried, scrambled, poached or shirred 
Omelets — Plain, with cheese, ham, jelly, 
parsley or Spanish 
Potatoes — Boiled, French fried, Saratoga, Lyon- 
naise, stewed in cream 
Breads, etc. — French, Vienna, graham, rye, corn 
Muflins — Corn, flannel 
Syrup — Maple Rock candy drip 

Clam broth 

Radishes Cantelopes Sliced tomatoes 

Oatmeal or cornmeal mush with cream 

Fried mountain trout 

Salt mackerel 

Sirloin or tenderloin steak, plain or a la carte 

Ham Veal cutlets Lamp chops Bacon 

Oysters in any style 

Fricassee of spring chicken 

Boston baked pork and beans, with brown bread 

Broiled snipe on toast 

Eggs as ordered 

POTATOES — Baked Saute Stewed 

Fried sweets 

Plain, Vienna or graham bread 

French rolls Toast Corn muffins 

Currant buns 

Wheat cakes, maple syrup 

Coffee Tea Chocolate 



Consomme Olives Sliced onions 

Stuffed perch, a I'Anglaise 

Dressed cucumbers Potatoes, a la St. James 

Green turtle steak. Reform club style 

Chicken livers, saute a la Turinolse 

Roast saddle of mutton, Rosemary sauce 

COLD 

Roast beef Sardines Kippered herring 

Lettuce Chicken salad 

Potatoes Spaghetti Stewed tomatoes 

String beans 

Peach pie Angel food Pineapple salad 

California cherries Edam and American cheese 

Coffee Tea Milk Chocolate 

Rockaways 

Boston brown bread 

Fruit 

Coffee Chocolate 

Hyson, Oolong and English breakfast tea 

Cracked wheat Hominy Oatmeal 

Fresh flsh Salt mackerel 

Broiled sirloin and tenderloin steaks 

Lamb chops Calf's liver Ham 

Breakfast bacon 

Frizzled beef 

Veal cutlet, plain or breaded 

Stewed kidney 

Eggs — Shirred, poached, scrambled 

Omelets 

Potatoes — Lyonnaise, fried and saute 

Hot rolls Corn bread 

Dry, buttered, milk and dipped toast 

Griddle cakes 

Baked apples with cream 

Fruit Canteloupe 

Cracked wheat Rolled oats 

Fried oysters Fried flsh Codfish balls 

Broiled sirloin steak, plain or tomato sauce 

Calf's liver with English bacon Country sausage 

Broiled ham Lamb chops 

Corned beef hash Fried mush 

Sliced tomatoes 

Ham, jelly or oyster omelette 

Eggs to order 

Potatoes — Boiled, French fried or stewed in cream 

French rolls Toast Corn bread 

Rice or wheat griddle cakes 

Maple syrup Honey 

Coffee Chocolate 

The six specimens above are all models and 

commendable. 

Lunch (American Flan). 

Lunch is a slight repast between breakfast 
and dinner. It is not meant to be a full sub- 
stantial meal, but simply to appease the appe- 
tite which would result in faintness where the 
time between the regular meals is too far 
apart. This is especially so in the large cities, 
where occupation takes people too far away 
from their homes to enable them to return for 
a midday meal without losing a great deal of 
time. They take their breakfast at home and 
a light lunch in some restaurant near at hand, 
returning home in the eVening to a Substantial 
dinner to which they can take their time. 



92 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



raniily hotels serve a lunch at midday be- 
cause the men are all away and the women and 
children do not care for substantials at that 
time of the day. ^t has always been the custom 
in the most fashionable Eastern hotels so to 
do, also along the Pacific slope among all 
classes of hotels and restaurants; it is only 
of recent years that the custom is being adopted 
in the Middle and Southern states. 

Lunch is the most economical meal of the 
house. It seldom contains more than two and 
often not more than one hot dish, the balance 
consisting of cold meats from previous days, 
some salads and pastry. In arranging I would 
begin about as follows: one soup or a stew 
of oysters or clams; next, two fresh relishes, 
such as radishes, young onions, etc. (fish is 
not essential excepting on Fridays, it comes 
next on the bill) ; after this about two kinds 
of hot dishes — a veal cutlet or a boiled fowl 
and a croquette; then about three kinds of hot 
vegetables, including potatoes; then cold meats; 
then salads. After this a sherbet, pastry, and 
last comes the beverages. 

The following specimen luncheon bills of fare 
are all good. There is some difference in their 
arrangement but any of them are commendable : 

Puree of caiiliflower au croutons 

Olives Radishes Spicecl onions 

Baked whiteflsh, tomato sauce 

Potatoes au gratin 

Roast tenderloin of beef, Jardiniere 

Mashed potatoes Potatoes boiled 

Stewed tomatoes Boiled rice 

■Tuivj Rabbit pot pie 

. .' Banana fritters, glace 

Hot brown bread 

COLD — Roast beef -"■ ' Turkey 

Sugar cured ham Pig's feet 

Pickled lamb's tongue Dried chipped beet 

Vegetable salad. 

Peach pie Custard pie 

Home made doughnuts Lunch cake 

Pineapple sherbet 

Preserved strawberries Cranberry sauce 

Crackers American cheese 

English breakfast and Oolong tea 

Coffee Buttermilk 

Consomme, in cups 

Radishes Sardines Sliced tomatoes 

Brook trout, a la Vatel 

Potatoes, brabanconne 

Boiled pickled tongue, sauce piquant 

Stewed tomatoes 

Roast sirloin of beef 

Mashed potatoes Asparagus 

Compote of domestic duck, with mushrooms 

Cream fritters, wine sauce 

COLD — Roast lamb Bologna sausage 

Boiled ham Potato salad Chicken salad 

Compressed corned heef 

Edam and American cheese 

Cranberry pie Pineapple sorbet Assorted cakes 

Fruit Coffee 



Fresh okra with chicken 

Hot rolls 

Cucumbers Pickles Radishes 

Gulf trout, a la Portugaise 

Fried sweet potatoes 

Hamburger steak, sauce piquante 

Chicken livers with mushrooms 

Roast pork, apple sauce 

Boiled potatoes Mashed potatoes 

Stewed tomatoes Boiled rice 

COLD — Roast beef Corned beet Beet tongue 

Boned turkey Ham 

Tapioca custard pudding 

Apricot pie Ginger bread 

Assorted cake Frozen egg nogg 

Watermelons 

Preserved fruits 

American cheese Crackers 

Honey 

Buttermilk Coffee 

Blue points 

Croute au pot Consomme vermicelli 

Fried scallops, ravigot sauce 

Hashed browned potatoes 

Radishes Stuffed mangoes Olives 

Broiled tenderloin steak, Bordelaise 

Braised turkey wings, a la Parisienne 

Baked macaroni with cheese 

Boiled potatoes Stewed tomatoes 

New beets Boiled rice 

COLD 

Lamb Chicken Ham Roast beef 

Pig's feet Dried beef Sardines 

Pickled lamb's tongue Beef tongue 

Salads_ Macedoine Potato Cold slaw 

Baked cup custard Peach pie 

Assorted cake Preserved figs Canned cherries 

Sherbet d'Ananas 

Bananas 

Tea Chocolate Coffee 

Crackers Cheese 

Oysters 

Consomme 

OYSTERS — Stewed Fried Broiled Pickled 

Stewed clams Fried clams 

Oat meal Cracked wheat 

COLD 

Roast beef Ham Corned beef Chicken 

Lamb Turkey Beef tongue 

Sardines Chipped beef Boned capon 

Pickled lamb's tongues 

SALAD 

Shrimp Chicken Lobster Lettuce 

DESSERT 

Ice cream Assorted cake Pies Water ice 

Fruit Crackers Cheese 

Coffee, cocoa, tea 

Hors d'oeuvres, assortls, club style 

Mulligatawny 

Young onions Olives Sweet mixed pickles 

Fresh shrimp, a la Newburg 

Ham with eggs, country style 

Veal cutlets, saute, a la Jardiniere 

Minced turkey, a la creme 
Mashed potatoes Browned sweet potatoes- 

Rice Beets 

Stewed new turnips Fresh string beans 

Boston brown bread 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



93 



COLD — Ham Chipped beef Pigs feet 
Coi-ned beef Tongue Roast beef 

Kippered herring Marinated herring 

Chicken salad Lettuce Salad, a la Eusse 

Pate de foie gras 

Congress pudding, brandy sauce 

Cocoanut wafers Assorted cakes 

Banana sherbet 

Pineapple in syrup 

American or Edam cheese Crackers 

Tea Buttermilk Chocolate Coffee 

Oyster 

Celery Olives 

Roast beef Baked pork and beans 

Browned potatoes Brown bread 

Lobster salad 

Cold tongue Cold roast pork 

Apple pie Cocoanut pudding 

Ice cream Cake Fruit Coffee Gingerbread 

Vegetable, country style Consomme, hot or cold 

Olives Spanish onions Lettuce 

Minced chicken, Romaine 

Haricot of mutton, Parisienne 

Baked pork and beans 

Leg of veal with dressing 

Mashed potatoes Browned potatoes stewed 

Green peas Steamed rice 

COLD MEATS 

Roast beef Ham 

Corned beef Turkey Beef tongue 

Boneless pig's feet 

SALADS 

Potato Lobster Mayonnaise Cold slaw 

Wheat muffins Corn cakes 

Banana pudding, a la Conde 

Pineapple cream pie Appl3 pie 

Chocolate ice cream Fruit Assorted cake 

Home made preserves New comb honey 

Brie, Swiss and English cheese 

Saratoga flakes Michigan butters 

Bent's crackers 

English breakfast, green and Oolong tea 

Chocolate Cocoa Coffee Milk 

Blue points 

Consomme, en Tasse 

Broiled whitefish, steward sauce 

Sliced tomatoes Julienne potatoes Radishes 

Prime roast beef, demi glace 

Mashed potatoes Boiled potatoes String beans 

Pork chops, breaded, tomato sauce 

Deviled crab, in shell, baked 

COLD 

Roast beef Turkey Ham 

Swiss cheese Tongue Sardines 

Mayonnaise of lobster 

Cranberry pie Lemon custard pie 

Orange water ice Assorted cakes 

Mixed nuts Fruit Layer raisins 

Cheese Crakers 

Coffee Tea Cocoa Buttermilk 

Olives Sliced tomatoes Young onions Radishes 

Tomato soup 

Plain lobster Sardines 

Baked beans with pork 

Baked potatoes String beans 

Pickled beets and red cabbage 

Corned beef Cold roast beef Tongue 

Chicken salad 



Plain and dressed lettuce 

Custard souffle, peach sauce 

Apple pie Jelly roll 

Assorted cake Preserved crabapples 

Grape sherbet 

Crackers Cheese 

Tea CoffeA 

Bananas Oranges Apples 

Cream of asparagus 

Sweet pickles Radishes 

Broiled whitefish maitre d'hotel 

Small brown potatoes 

Roast spring lamb 

Sugar corn New potatoes in cream 

Stewed veal with dumplings 

Chicken livers saute, native mushrooms 

Orange sherbet 

Cold roast beef Ham Tongue 

Turkey Pig's feet 

String bean salad 

Rolls Ginger bread 

Plain rice pudding, wine sauce Assorted cake 

Blackberry jam 

Cheese Crackers 

Tea Iced tea Coffee Milk 

Mulligatawny 

Tomatoes Celery Olives 

Baked fillets of trout, fine herbs 

Saratoga potatoes 

Boiled fowl and pork, celery sauce 

Boiled potatoes Green peas Mashed potatoes 

Stewed tomatoes Boiled rice Asparagus 

Walsh rarebit 

Banana fritters, wine cream sauce 

Hot brown bread Ginger bread 

Combination salad Pickled beets Spiced salmon 

Pigs feet Sardines Pickled lamb tongues 

Cold roast beef Lamb Pork and beans 

Sugar cured ham Pork Tongue 

Huckleberry roly polv 

Pineapple sherbet 

Assorted cake 

California apricots in syrup Currant jelly 

Cream cheese Crackers 

Figs Dates 

Tea Coffee 

Dinner (American Flan). 

There is considerable difference of opinion 
in regard to the placing of the joints and en- 
trees on the bill of fare, some claiming that 
the French method of placing the entrees be- 
fore the roasts is the proper way, supporting 
their claim with good arguments; but the ma- 
jority, I believe, favor the American way of 
placing the roasts above the entrees, giving 
equal good reasons in support of their side of 
the argument, and I should almost feel inclined 
to say that the steward might suit himself, 
since neither way has ever been declared wrong 
on the American bill by good authority. 

But I prefer the placing of the roasts before 
the entrees. It is the adopted American style 
and is most.ly in favor in hotels all over the 
country. Furthermore, I do not see how a 
sweet entree — which is quite popular in many 



94 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



hotels — can be placed above the roasts consis- 
tently; but it has been done. I believe it 
wrong. Sweets should come after meat dishes. 
It seems to me where the French style of plac- 
ing the entree before the roast is customary, 
there should be no sweet entree, and, if they 
are desired, should follow the roast as "entre- 
met" or dainties and classed with all kinds of 
fritters and daintily prepared vegetables, as 
stuffed tomatoes, etc. 

Table d'Hote. 

Table d'hote (according to the Standard 
Dictionary) is a full meal for a price. This, 
I believe, is about the most proper definition 
of the word as applied in America, a meal 
practically selected by the caterer, from which 
the guest may choose what he desires, for a 
certain fixed price, as in all American plan 
hotels. The literal definition of the word is 
"The landlord's table; a common table for 
guests. ' ' 

There is a general impression that a table 
d'hote meal (menu) consists of a limited 
variety, the guest having the choice of only 
one (Hobson's) or two articles in each course. 
In my opinion, however, any bill of fare which 
is served at so much for the meal, whether 
breakfast, lunch, dinner or supper, is a table 
d'hote meal. The following bills are fair speci- 
mens of regular American plan (table d'hote) 

dinners : 

Blue points, on deep shell 

Salted almonds 

Mock turtle, au Madeira Chicken bouillon 

Fresh lobster, Maryland 

Sliced tomatoes Olives Radishes Cucumbers 

Fillet of pompano, vin blanc 

Potato croquettes 

Boiled capon, oyster sauce 

Spinach Asparagus tips 

Roast ribs of beef 

Boiled Bermuda potatoes Mashed potatoes 

Spring lamb, mint sauce 

New spring beets, butter sauce 

Baked sweet potatoes 

Sweetbreads glace, French peas 

Frog legs, fried tartar 

Orange fritters, Benedictine 

Champagne punch 

Broiled plover, on toast 

ISweet potato chips 

Chicken salad 

Charlotte, a la Hollenden 

Orange cream pie Almond macaroons 

Vanilla wafers Tutti frutti, glace 

Strawberries, with whipped cream 

Oranges Apples Bananas Bartlett pears 

American, Brie and Roquefort cheese 

Nuts Raisins Figs 

Coffee 

Little neck clams 

>Iock turtle, a I'Anglaise Clear okra with chicken 

Cold consomme in cups 



Soft shell crabs, sauce Ravigote 

Olives Radishes 

Sliced tomatoes 

Filet of Spanish mackerel, Bearnaise 

Sliced cucumbers ,' Potatoes Hollandaise 

Ribs of beef 

Stewed tomatoes Mashed potatoes 

Spring lamb, mint sauce 

New potatoes Cauliflower 

Sweetbread glace, Perigord 

Green peas 

Punch, a la Romaine 

Plover with English bread sauce 

Dressed lettuce 

Currant pie Raspberry short cake 

Vanilla ice cream Petits fours 

Raspberries with cream Peaches Watermelon 

Stilton and Brie cheese 

Cafe noir 

The Vegetables. 

Vegetables should be grouped together and 
not be placed with the different meat dishes, 
excepting where it is intended to serve the meal 
in courses, or for a banquet. The guest usually 
orders all such vegetables as he may desire 
at one time and where they are spread all 
over the bill it takes them too much time to 
find what they wish; or if they are not clqse 
students miss just what they would like, and 
are not aware that it is on the bill until they 
see their neighbor served with it. 

Punch. 

Punch is served in many hotels every day, 
and where once started it is like a bad habit, 
"hard to be broken and yet almost indispensa- 
ble when the habit is once contracted. ' ' I doubt 
the commendability of this addition because of 
its injurious effect on the digestive organs. In 
placing it on the bill of fare it should be im- 
mediately above the game. In arranging a 
dinner bill I should begin about as follows: 

Arrangement of the Dinner Bill of Fare 
(American Plan) . 

When oysters or clams, they should begin; 
in their absence some relish (hors d'oeuvres). 

1 — oysters or clams. 

2 — 1 relish of some kind. 

3 — 2 soups (1 clear, 1 heavy). 

4 — ^relishes. 

5 — 1 fish with one kind of potatoes. 

6- — 1 boiled dish, if desired. 

7 — 2 roasts. 

8 — 2 kinds of potatoes. 
3 kinds of vegetables. 

9 — 2 entrees. 
10 — 1 punch, if desired. 
11 — 1 game. 
12 — 1 or 2 salads. 
13 — 1 pudding. 
14 — 1 pie, cake. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



95 



15 — 1 iee eream, 1 jelly or charlotte russe, 
etc. 

16 — fruit, nuts, raisins. 

17 — cheese and crackers. 

18 — black coffee (with cognac, if desired). 

It is optional to place the cheese and crack- 
ers before or after the fruit, nuts and raisins, 
but as a great many epicures call for cheese 
and crackers with black coffee at the end of the 
meal I believe the above arrangement proper 
and in the order in which the different courses 
are usually called for. 

Strive For Variety in the Bill of Fare. 

Another important item in making a bill of 
fare is that all dishes form a distinct variety, 
no two kinds should be alike, for instance: 
Consomme with rice and cream of barley do not 
belong together — the rice and barley being 
both cereals, forms a similarity. Consomme 
Jardiniere and cream of barley wUl form a 
better contrast. The same with roasts and en- 
trees. With roast turkey need not be chicken 
or any other kind of fowl in the entrees. 

Among the vegetables, lima beans and string 
beans or succotash ought not to be on the bill 
at the same time; also turnips and beets, or 
parsnips, or oyster plant are too much alike. 

Attention should also bo paid to aauces and 
garnishes; they should not be all white or all 
yellow, nor brown. For instance: There is 
fish with tartar sauce; the sauce with the first 
entree can be brown and the second white or 
red. 

Nor does it look well to have tomato soup, 
then sliced tomatoes, fish with tomato sauce 
and possibly stuffed tomatoes among the en- 
trees on the bill at the same time, no matter 
how cheap they are. 

I would not have the same article more than 
once on the bill if possible. Of course there 
are exceptions in some instances. The follow- 
ing specimen dinner bills of fare from different 
hotels are good models: 

Blue points 

Celery 

Pigeon broth 

Mangoes Salted almonds 

Terrapin, Maryland style 

Brook trout, tartar sauce 

Sliced tomatoes Julienne potatoes 

Roast sirloin of beef 

Green peas Roast sweet potatoes 

Wild turkey stuffed, chestnut dressing 

German asparagus 

Supreme of prairie chicken, truffle sauce 

SOOTHEBN HOTEL PUNCH 

Canvas back duck, currant Jelly 

Game salad, Julienne 

English plum pudding, hard and brandy sauce 



Tutti-frutti ice cream 

De brlc Toasted crackers 

Fruit Cider Coffee 

Blue points 

Cream of partridge, a la Mt. Vernon 

Chicken clear, okra 

Queen olives Salted almonds 

Petits bouchees, Duchesse 

Broiled Spanish mackerel, maitrc d'hotel 

Potatoes a la Russe 

Boiled capon, sauce chipolate 

Asparagus 

Prime cut of beef Spring lamb, mint sauce 

Mashed potatoes Carolina croquettes Green peas 

Stewed terrapin, Maryland style 

Baked apples, with rice conde 

LALLA ROOKH PUNCH 

Eoast quail, stuffed, Perigord 

Dressed lettuce 

Washington pudding, lemon sauce 

Sliced apple pie Pumpkin custard pie 

Fancy cakes Neapolitan ice cream 

Confections 

Nuts Fruits Figs 

American, Roquefort cheese Crackers 

Coffee 

Caviar on toast 

Cream of capon, Richmond Consomme royale 

Lettuce Radishes Tomatoes 

Broiled pompano a la Tanty 

Potatoes duchesse 

Boiled reindeer tongue, chasseur 

Ribs of prime beef, demi glace 

Mashed browned potatoes Stuffed egg plant 

Roast spring chicken, dressing 

Candled yams Asparagus, Hollandalse 

Filet of beef, a la Bernaise 

Sweetbreads braise financiere 

Baba au rum 

ANGELICA PUNCH 

Roast saddle of venison, Tyrolienne 

Celery salad 

Steamed fruit pudding, brandy sauce 

Lemon meringue pie Green apple pie 

Rhine wine jelly 

Delmonico ice cream Assorted cake 

Nuts Raisins 

Crackers Cheese 

Coffee 

Fish chowder Consomme, au riz 

Boiled salmon, anchovy sauce 

Cucumbers Hollandalse potatoes 

Roast ribs of beef, dish gravy 

Boiled sweet potatoes Stewed oyster plant 

Roast young turkey, cranberry sauce 

Mashed potatoes Hubbard squash 

Roast veal, brown sauce 

Lima beans a la Veloute 

Tennessee corn pone Buttermilk 

Boiled calf's head, vinaigrette 

Scalloped oysters 

Compote of pears, Richelieu 

Cocoanut pudding, lemon sauce 

Apple pie Pumpkin pie 

Rum jelly Assorted cake 

Vanilla Ice cream 

Watermelon Apples 

Edam and American cheese Crackers 

Coffee 



96 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Puree of green peas Bouillon 

Sliced tomatoes Young onions 

Broiled Spanish mackerel, anchovy butter 

Pommes Farisienne 

Beef tongue, tartar sauce 

Roast ribs of beef, demi glace 

Mashed potatoes Spinach with egg 

Domestic duck stuffed, currant jelly 

Stewed new tomatoes New succotash 

Sweetbreads glace a la flnanciere 

Fresh lobster a la Newburg 

Orange fritters, Curacao 

CARDINAL PUNCH 

Chicken salad 

Pineapple soufHe with whipped cream 

Peach pie Raspberry meringue pie 

Almond ice cream Assorted cake 

Fruits Nuts Raisins 

Watermelon 

Edam and American cheese Water crackers 

Coffee 



Saddle rocks 
Consomme, Deslignac 

OliTCS 

Baked shad, Italienne 

Boiled tongue, tomato sauce 

Sirloin of beef, brown gravy 

Loin of veal, browned potatoes 

Turkey stuffed, cranberry sauce 

Small patties of oysters, bechamel 

Chicken croquettes, peas 

Sweetbreads larded, Toulouse 

Rice with peaches, a la Conde 

POET WINE SHEEBEI 

Lobster salad 

Mashed potatoes Fried parsnips 

French baked potatoes 

Stewed tomatoes Cold slaw Creamed onions 

English fruit pudding, hard and brandy sauce 

Apple pie Lemon meringue pie Mince pie 

Vanilla ice cream Baked apples, powdered sugar 

Fancy cakes Fruit Layer raisins 

Lemon jelly Coffee 



Bluepoints 

Celery 

Green turtle 

Russian caviar Olives 

Broiled Spanish mackerel, maitre d'hotel 

Duchesse potatoes 

Boiled beef tongue with spinach 

Boast ribs of beef Turkey, cranberry sauce 

Chicken pie. New England style 

Oyster pattie, a la Leland 

Charlotte of apricots, sauce chartreuse 

BOCK PUNCH 

Roast quail, au cress Broiled teal duck 

Boned turkey, aspic jelly 

Fresh shrimp mayonnaise 

Asparagus tips Sweet potatoes Green peas 

Mashed potatoes String beans 

Mince pie Plum pudding, hard sauce 

Pumpkin pie Assorted cake 

Tutti frutti ice cream Fruit 

Hickory nuts and cider 

Roquefort, DeBrie and cream cheese 

Water crackers Coffee 



Tomato, a la Creole Consomme 

Sliced tomatoes Olives Sliced cucumbers 

Broiled whiteflsh, a la maitre d'hotel 

Saratoga chips 

Roast chicken, giblet sauce 

Cauliflower Green corn 

Roast sirloin of beef 

Mashed and boiled potatoes 

Roast saddle of Iamb, currant jelly 

String beans Spinach 

Pigeon stuffed, a I'Anglaise 

Soft shell crabs, fried, Bearnaise 

Pine apple fritters, rum sauce 

PUNCH AU KIESCH 

Salads 

Lettuce Pickled beets Chicken 

Boned capon Pate of fat livers 

Raspberry roll, brandy sauce 

Custard pie Apple pie 

Assorted cake Wine jelly 

Charlotte russe Confectionery 

Ice cream royale 

Roquefort, Edam and American cheese 

Water crackers 

Nuts Raisins Fruit 

Ceffee Watermelon Buttermilk 

Blue points 

Puree of chicken a la Reine 

Queen olives Pepper relish 

Boiled turbot, Estragon 

Windsor potatoes 

Cold slaw Dressed lettuce Pickled onions 

Boiled native turkey, sauce supreme 

Pressed calf's head Potted tongue 

Filet of beef, larded, flnanciea 

Chicken saute, Marengo 

Spanish puffs, glace au cognac 

Roast prime ribs of beef, dish gravy 

Loin of lamb, brown gravy 

Mallard duck, currant jelly 

Steamed and mashed potatoes 

Green peas Stewed tomatoes Shelled beans 

Spaghetti a I'ltalienne 

PUNCH ROMAINE 

Salmon salad 

Baked Indian pudding with whipped cream 

Sliced apple pie Raspberry tart pie 

Sherry wine jelly Golden cream 

Lemon ice cream 

Assorted cake Bon-bons Fruits Nuts 

Confectionery Raisins 

Graham and water crackers 

Sage and American cheese 

Coffee 

Consomme a la Victoria 

Baked St. Lawrence river salmon, maitre d'hotel 

Queen olives Celery Sliced tomatoes 

Boiled capon, cream sauce 

Young turkey, oyster dressing, cranberry sauce 

Prime cuts of beet, Yorkshire pudding 

Fillet of beef aux Champignons 

Charlotte of peaches, sherry wine 

Baked sweet potatoes Sugar corn 

Mashed potatoes 

Cabinet pudding, brandy sauce 

Apple pie Strawberries with cream 

Port wine sherbet Assorted cake 

Nuts American cheese Wafers Figs 

Raisins Dates 

Tea Chocolate Milk Coffee 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



97 



Mock turtle Consomme Koyal 

Filet of sole, sauce remoulade 

Serpentine potatoes 

Radishes Pickled beets Green onions 

Small boucbees, a la Montglas 

Boiled chicken, sauce supreme 

Prime ribs of beef, au jus 

Asparagus Mashed potatoes 

Spring lamb with mint sauce 

Sifted peas Spinach Boiled potatoes 

Calves head en tortue 

Fresh mushrooms, sautee on toast 

Hard shell fritters, glace au rum 

SOKBET A L'ANANAS 

Fresh lobster en Mayonnaise 

Apricot pie Orange meringue pie 

Boiled lemon pudding, sauce Sabayon 

Strawberry short cake Chocolate cream 

Almond ice cream Assorted fancy cake 

Fruit Raisins Nuts 

Cream cheese Coffee Butter crackers 

Clam chowder Consomme 

Radishes Lettuce Queen olivea 

Boiled Lake Superior trout, parsley sauce 

Julian potatoes 

Boiled tongue, piquant sauce 

Prime roast beef with gravy 

Roast loin of veal with dressing 

Fricassee chicken with dumplings 

>.'ew boiled potatoes Mashed potatoes 

Green peas Hot slaw 

Stewed kidneys, wine sauce 

Farina cake with jelly 

Shrimp salad 

Apple pie Peach pie 

Rice pudding, hard sauce 

Orange sherbet Wine jelly 

Oranges Apples Bananas 

Assorted cake American cheese Assorted nuts 

Swiss cheese 

Tea Coffee Milk 

Bent's water crackers Boston brown bread 

Home made bread 

SUPPER. 

Supper, the evening meal, is served in nearly 
all country commercial houses and in a great 
many city houses as well. It should consist 
mainly of light foods, cereals of some kind, 
some stewed or fried oysters, when in season, 
or clams in some way; a fritter, some cold 
meats, breads, toast, waffles, fruit, sauces and 
beverages. But where dinner is served at mid- 
day in houses depending upon the traveling 
public, it is necessary that the supper be more 
substantial, especially where a man has been 
traveling all day and is tired and hungry, 
something more than the above-named items is 
wanted. Even to the regular boarder the wait 
from noon to evening has been long enough to 
fit him for a substantial meal. I do not be- 
lieve, however, that it is necessary to enumerate 
nearly all available meats in the market; four 
or five hot meat dishes and eggs ought to be 
quite sufficient. 



In my opinion fruits should never begin the 
supper ; it ' seems out of place. ' ' Fruit first 
in the morning and last at night" is the old 
saying, and I believe it a good rule. 

In arranging a supper I should make it about 
as follows: 

1 — Stewed oysters or cold consomme. 
2 — Some fresh relishes. 
3— -Cereals. 

4 — 2 fishes — a broiled and a fried. 
5 — 1 or 2 broiled meats. 
6 — 1 or 2 fried dishes. 
7 — 1 or 2 made dishes. 
8— Eggs. 
9 — Potatoes. 
10 — Cold meats and salads. 
11 — Breads, toasts, etc. 
12 — Fruits, cake. 
13 — Beverages. 

The following specimen is a supper which I 
believe first class: 

Consomme in cups 

Cucumbers Sliced tomatoes Pickled beets 

Chowchow 

Cracked wheat or cerealine, with cream 

Eggs to order 

Omelets, plain or with jelly 

Baked lake salmon, Chevaliere 

Broiled tenderloin steak, plain or with piquant 

sauce 

Veal cutlets breaded, Milanaise 

Rissoles of chicken, Madeira sauce 

Baked, domestic fried and hashed brown potatoes 

String beans Saratoga chips 

COLD 

Roast beef Bologna sausage Roast fowl 

Pig's feet Boiled ham Ox tongues 

Lettuce Baked pork and beans Lobster salad 

Finger rolls Toast 

New England griddle cakes Tea buns 

Vienna, Graham and rye bread 

Boston brown bread Home made bread 

Maple syrup Rock candy drips 

Watermelon Red raspberries Blackberries 

Sherbet Assorted cake 

Coffee Iced tea Milk Tea 

The following specimens are commendable: 

Blue points 

Spanish onions Olives Salami 

FISH — Broiled trout, a la maltre d'hotel 

Saratoga chips 

BROILED — Sirloin or tenderloin steak 

Lamp chops with bacon 

Ham 

ENTREES — Venison steak, club style 

Stewed green turtle in cases 

Fried oysters, a la tartare 

Banana fritters, rum sauce 

Eggs and omelets as ordered 

COLD — Roast beef Ox tongue Ham 

Sardines Kippered herring Lettuce 

Celery mayonnaise 

POTATOES — Saute or French fried 

Oatmeal porridge with cream 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Griddle cakes with mayle syrup 

Compote of peaches Preserved cherries 

Strawberry jam 

Coffee llilU Chocolate 

Oolong, Congo or Young Hyson tea 

Cracked wheat 

Olives Celery Mangoes 

Fried yellow perch 

Potatoes a la Iteitz 

Tenderloin or sirloin steak 

Pork spare ribs 

Broiled or fried ham Steak with onions 

Baked potatoes I'otatoes Chateau 

French toast 

Eggs as ordered 

Omelette 

Cold roast beef, ham and fowl 

Chicken salad 

Tea biscuits . Jenny Lind pancakes 

Baked apples 

Assorted cake 

Tea Chocolate Coffee 

Consomme in cups 

Pickled beets Olives 

Coffee Cocoa Tea 

Cracked wheat 

Tenderloin steak Kidneys Bacon 

Cold roast beef Tongue Ham 

Eggs and omelets as ordered 

Potato salad Cold slaw 

Potatoes — French fried, saute 

Finger rolls Flannel cakes 

Assorted cake 

Syrup — maple Rock candy drip 

Lemon cling peaches 

American cheese Crackers 

Consomme 

Green gages Stewed prunes 

Oyster stew 

Broiled — Jack salmon Fried smelts Whiteflsh 

Sliced tomatoes 

Sirloin or tenderloin steak, plain, with onions, or 

drip gravy 

Mutton chops Ham Bacon Tripe 

Chicken hash on toast 

Calf's feet, fried in batter 

Eggs — Boiled Fried Shirred 

Plain or kidney omelette 

Cold — Roast beef Ham Marinated herring 

Turkey Smoked tongue Veal 

Salad a la Russe Dressed lettuce 

Potatoes — Baked German fried French fried 

Saratoga chips 

Bread Toast Rolls 

Oat meal and Indian meal, with cream 

Corn or wheat cakes 

Assorted cakes Ginger bread 

Oolong, English breakfast and green tea 

Baked apples 

Chocolate Coffee Milk 

Bouillon en tasse 

Salted wafers 

Broiled sardines on toast 

Sliced cucumbers Sliced tomatoes 

Filet of turkey, sliced oranges 

Baked potatoes 

Cold — Tongue Salmon Ham 

Boned chicken en aspic Jelly 



Russian punch 
Fresh lobster salad en mayonnaise 

Red raspberry shortcake 

Hot waffles with pure maple syrup 

Plain and rye bread Tea biscuit 

Toast to order 

Assorted cake 

Crackers Edam cheese 

Coffee Tea Iced tea 

Shell oysters 

Celery Mangoes 

Fried smelts 

Hominy grits Apple tapioca 

BROILED 

Tenderloin steak Sirloin steak 

Plain or with onions 

Tripe Pig's feet 

Chicken croquettes, with green peas 

Calf's head in omelette 

Veal cutlets, plain or breaded 

Pearl paste, with jelly 

POTATOES 

Baked Shoestring 

Old fashioned fried Potato cakes 

Smearkase 

Eggs to order 

COLD 

Roast beef Lunch tongue 

Baked beans 

Toast — all ways 

Currant buns French horns 

Corn or buckwheat cakes 

Honey Maple syrup 

French sherbet 

Quince preserves Cup custard 

Assorted cake ' 

Tea Coffee 

Bluepoints 

Sliced tomatoes Pickled peaches Radishes 

Consomme Oyster stew 

Cracked wheat or farina mush with cream 

Broiled bluefish, _ lemon butter 

Saratoga chips 

Broiled tenderloin or sirloin steak, plain or with 

French peas 

Veal cutlets, tomato sauce 

Minions of beef, financiere 

Welsh rare-bit an gratin 

Eggs as ordered 

Caviar omelets 

Baked, French fried and hashed brown potatoes 

String beans with bacon 

Cold — Boiled ham Roast beef Lamb's tongue 

Fowl Marinated herring Sardines 

Chicken salad 

Graham, rye or Boston brown bread 

Crown rolls Rusks Egg muffins Toast 

Wheat or buckwheat griddle cakes 

Flemish waffles 

Lemon cling peaches Preserved peaches 

Assorted cake Stewed rhubarb Sherbet 

Coffee Tea Cocoa 

Beef bouillon 

Water cress Lettuce Caviar 

Corn meal mush 

Baked salmon, butter sauce 

Baked giblet pie, Maryland 

Breaded veal cutlets, cream sauce 
Corn fritters, rum sauce 



THE PRACTICAL 

Broiled — Tenderloin steak Sirloin steak 

Lamb chops. Kidneys with bacon 

Eggs, as ordered 

Cold — Roast beef Mutton Ox tongue 

Chipped beef. Sardines 

Summer sausage 

Salmon salad 

Potatoes — Steamed Domestic fried Shoestring 

Hot rolls Assorted cake Brown bread 

Ice cream 

Cherries in syrup Sliced bananas 

Comb honey 

Griddle cakes, with maple syrup 

Club house coffee Cocoa Tea 

Consomme 

Wheat flakes or rolled oats with cream 

Fish — Broiled lake fish Fried catfish steak 

Cold Meats — Ox tongue Ham Roast beef 

Lamb Bologna Veal 

Sliced tomatoes Potato salad Chow chow 

Broiled — Sirloin or tenderloin steak, plain 

or with fresh mushroom sauce 

Bacon Pork chops Ham 

Dried beef in cream 

Lamb tongue, au Risoto 

Fried hominy 

Eggs, to order 

Omelettes plain with ham or tomatoes 

Potatoes — baked hashed brown Saratoga 

Breads — Hot biscuits Boston buns Ginger bread 

Graham bread Rye bread 

Wheat cakes Toast to order Corn cakes 

Rock candy drips Honey Assorted cake 

Soda waferettes Graham wafers 

Fruit — Baked apples Apricots 

Coffee Tea Chocolate Butter milk 

Little neck clams 

Consomme in cups 

Cracked wheat Mush and milk 

Broiled lalie trout, maitre d'hotel 

Radishes Cucumbers 

Prime roast beef, au jus 

California grass birds, on toast 

German fritter, with stewed prunes 
Boiled rice Baked tomatoes 

Broiled sirloin or tenderloin steak, plain or Creole 
Mutton chops, plain or breaded, with peas 

Welsh rabbit, or golden buck 

POTATOES — Baked Hashed in cream 

Lyonnaise Fried sweet French fried 

Eggs to order 

Omelette, plain, with ham or cheese 

COLD — Ox tongue Ham Lamb Corned beef 

Pork and beans Sardines Pickled herring 

Mayonnaise of chicken 

Bye and graham bread French rolls 

Tea biscuit Wheat cakes Corn cakes 

Ginger snaps Assorted cake Stewed pears 

Coffee ice cream Sliced peaches, with cream 

Pineapple preserves 

Tea Coffee Chocolate Cocoa Buttermilk 



HOTEL STEWARD 99 

Cold meats, or sandwiches. 

Salads. 

Breads, cakes and conserves. 

Tea is generally served on Sundays and holi- 
days, when a specially appetizing midday din- 
ner having been partaken of, a light meal is all 
that is necessary. It makes it convenient, also, 
to relieve a number of the help after dinner. 



Tea. 



Is a light evening meal — lighter than the 
regulation supper — and usually consisting of 
Tea, coffee or chocolate. 
Dry, milk or cream toast. 
Tea biscuits — wafers. 



Buffet Luncheons. 

The meaning of the word Buffet is a side- 
board. As applied in connection with the above 
it is one or more large tables, upon which 
everything that is on the menu (which is in- 
tended merely as souvenir) is placed on the 
table before the arrival of the guests. There 
are no chairs, everybody stands and each one 
either helps himself or is served by the waiter, 
with what he chooses on a small plate with 
fork. They are always informal affairs and are 
much enjoyed by the participants. 
The following menus will illustrate: 
Grilled sardines Anchovy toast 

Mardadella sausage 
Celery Olives fracie Radishes 

Ham, goose breast, chicken 

and Swiss cheese sandwiches 

Lobster salad Lettuce salad Potato salad 

Salmon Mayonnaise Pate de foie gras 

Eggs a la bonne femme 

Punch curacoa 

Chaud froid de cailles Galantine de dinde 

Assorted cakes Tutti frutii ice cream 

Fruit 

Edam cheese Crackers 

Coffee 

A luncheon to the H. M. M. B. A. 

Ham and chicken sandwiches 

Cold turkey Beef tongue Chipped beef 

Stuffed eggs, a la St. James 

Chicken salad Potato salad Lobster salad 

Queen olives , Sweet pickles Radishes 

Punch Oriental 

Strawberries and sweet cream 

Neapolitan ice cream 

Assorted cakes Fruits 

American cheese Swiss cheese 

Crackers 

Tea Coffee 

Soothers for the Troubled Spirits of Ye Landlords, 

Te Ladies and the Strangers within 

Our Gates. 

Luncheon to the H. M. M. B. A. 

CHAUD 

Bouillon de lucines, en tasse 

Croquettes de grenouilles, Parisienne 

His de veau, Coquillot 

FROID 

Saumon, decoree 

Pigeonneaux en bastion, Semonler 

Jambon, gatti 

Langue de boeuf, Rocheford 

Aspic de homard 

Mayonnaise de volallle 



100 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Salade epicurienne 

Sandwich assortis 

ENTREMETS SDCRES 

Fruits glace de saison 

Cliarlottes, aux noisettes 

Petits fours 

Cafe noir 

G. H. Mumm's extra dry Copley Square punch 

Poland Spring water Cigars 

A eold luncheon served at the opening of the 
new Hotel Burlington, at Boscombe, Bourne- 
mouth, England: 

Swanage prawns 

Filet de sole en aspic 

Mayonnaise de Homard a la Burlington 

Saumon a la Christchurch 

Saumon a la Montpelier 

Pain de Volaille a la Mosaique 

Chaud-froid de Cailles 

Chaud-frold de Cotelettes d'Agneau 

Galatine de Poulard aux truffes 

Chapon a la Bechamel 

Boeuf braise a la Gelee 

Poulet Eoti 

Langue de bceuf 

Jambon de York 

Quartier d'Agneau 

Pates de Gibier 

Sandwiches 

ENTKEMETS 

Trifle 

Petits babas aux Cerises 

Nougats a la Chantilly 

Meringues a la creme 

Patisseries yariees 

Gelee au Vin 

Gelee a la Macedoine de fruit 

Mousse aux fraises 

Charlotte a la Eusse ' 

Gateau a la Nepolitaine 

GLACES 

VanlUe Citron Ananas 

DESSERT 
CARTE DE VIN 

Sherry Champagne, 1884 Claret, 1886 

Champagne cup Claret cup Lemonade 

Johannis natural mineral water 



To the H. M. M. B. A. 
CHADD. Gombaut Passe en Tasse 

Croquette Panachee a la Waldorf 

Ris-de-Veau a la Surdez 

Souffle au Fromage 

Brissotin de Volaille Fantaisie 

FEOID Consomme en Gelee 

Crabes a la Diable 

Pigeonneau de Philadelphie 

Timbale de pate de foie gras 

Mayonnaise de volaille 

Salad de homard 

Sandwich de Crabes Mous 

Sandwich assortis 

ENTREMETS SUCRES 

Glaces fruits varies 

Biscuit Bellevue 

Petits fours 

The glace 

Cafe frappe 



A buffet luncheon. 

Bouillon in cups 

Celery Pickles Olives 

Oyster patties, Romaine 

Sandwiches 

Ham Tongue Turkey Sardine 

Cold meats Salads 

Turkey Ham Shrimp Potato 

Lamb tongue Chicken 

PIECES MONTEES 

Pate of game a la Diana Dindonneau 

Ham decore a la Gatti 

Galantine de Cochon de Lait en dauhe 

Boned turkey a la Berger 

Frozen cream sherbet Assorted cake 

Cheese and toasted crackers 

Cafe 

Buffet lunch. 

SERVICE CHADD 

Consomme en tasse Clam broth 

Bouchees aux champignons frais 

Homard a la Columbus 

Croquettes de ris de veau a la Princesse 

Cafe Chocolate 

SERVICE FROID 

Celery Olives 

Saumon a I'avenlane Filet de boeuf a la Eusse 

Jambon truffe a la fiorian 

Langues de boeuf Rocheford 
Ballotines de poulets en chaudfroid 

Timbales de foie-gras en bellevue 

Galantines de dinde a la Elizabeth 

Pates de perdreaux a la U. L. C. 

Mayonnaise de volaille Salade de homard 

Rillettes Sandwiches assortis 

Entremets de douceur 

Paniers de nougat garnis de fruits 

Charlottes fontanges 

Gelees Moscovite Glace historic 

Sorbet fin de siecle 

Petits fours Bon bons 

Mottoes Fruit 

Champagne 

These luncheons afford skilled cooks an op- 
portunity to show their ability, as everything 
is set on the table in large dishes, ornamented. 

Economy in Kitchen Utensils. 

Fewer and better kitchen utensils advocated 
by Chef Antoine Dupraz, quoted by the New 
York Sun: 

"Most kitchens are too crowded. The ten- 
dency is to want too many utensils, great 
numbers of pots and pans used seldom and 
always occupying valuable space. It should 
not be the boast that one has a complete as- 
sortment of kettles and tins; it should be 
the pride that few are needed. 

' ' Shelves lined with aluminum, granite ware 
and pottery are difficult to keep clean. They 
collect dust and are a nuisance. The adept 
in cookery does his work easily without many 
utensils. He knows exactly what he wants 
and he never lets the things he uses collect so 
that he has the sense of being crowded. 

"Here again is another instance of waste, 
waste of room and waste of money. The day 
is coming when the costliest of wares will be 
employed in the kitchen. There will be fewer 
utensils and they will be better constructed." 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



101 



BANQUETS. 

A banquet is a repast or a rich entertain- 
ment given in honor of some memorable event 
or celebration, usually attended with formality, 
all participants attending in proper dress for 
the occasion. During the meal the guests are 
entertained with music, afterwards suitable 
toasts, speeches, etc., which complete the feast. 

The menu consists of a full hot meal, like a 
table d'hote dinner, served in courses, usually 
accompanied with wines. 

In some instances the price of the repast for 
each plate includes the wine, music and flowers ; 
in others the wine and flowers without the 
music, but in the majority of cases the caterer 
serves the meal only, for a price, and receives 
extra pay for wines, flowers and music. Some- 
times the host provides his own flowers and 
music. 

Banquets are served in two different styles. 
The French service (a la Francaise) and the 
Eussian service (a la Russe). 

The French service is not popular. Occa- 
sionally small parties not to exceed ten or 
twelve are served in this manner. Artistic chefs 
prefer it as it gives them an opportunity to 
show their skill to better advantage, everything 
being served on large (usually) decorated dishes 
in the most attractive manner, each dish con- 
taining as many orders as there are guests to 
be served by one waiter, who passes the dish 
around to the guests, helping them to their 
portion. The time required to serve a banquet 
in this style is necessarily slow and it requires 
thoroughly trained waiters to avoid any mis- 
haps. Waiters in this country who understand 
this service are not plentiful, which may ac- 
count for the French service being less in 
demand. 

The Eussian service is the most satisfactory; 
it is simpler and much quicker. All meats, 
pastry and dessert are prepared in single por- 
tions nicely garnished and ready for the guest 
to eat. It is different from the French style, 
as in this case the cooks and waiters do all the 
work for the guests; they are served with just 
about the size order desired and in a much 
more appetizing way than if they were obliged 
to help themselves. 

Where there is a well conducted kitchen and 
properly drilled waiters the various courses are 
set before the guest almost within a minute of 
the time that they are taken from the range 
or pantry. To serve the hot dishes steaming 
hot, and cold dishes with a fresh and cool ap- 
pearance is a very important feature. 

The steward's generalship comes to good use 



in the serving of parties ; on him really depends 
the success of the affair. If he is a man who 
becomes rattled he is in danger of confusing 
everybody else. It devolves on him to see that 
every course, from oysters to coffee, are served 
in regular order, and to keep harmony among 
the help during the service. He should see 
before the time comes that everything needed 
is on hand and ready. 

The steward can avoid a good deal of con- 
fusion by announcing what course to be served 
(to the ones who are to dish up) just at the 
right moment; it sometimes corrects an error 
in time. 

In preparing and estimating on the price of 
a banquet the following should be taken into 
consideration : 

The number of covers. 

The class of people. 

The skill of the cooks at the caterer's com- 
mand. 

Locality. 

The season. 

The quality of the tableware to be used on 
the occasion. 

In the first place the cost of feeding of a 
number of people reduces correspondingly as 
the number of guests increases, therefore, when 
a banquet for twenty-five covers is ordered the 
material used should be less expensive than if 
one-hundred are to be fed at the same price. 
And when a banquet is intended for men who 
are accustomed to work in fresh air, such as the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, for in- 
stance, the repast should consist of food of a 
more substantial nature than if the same is for 
a bar or press association, as the latter are 
usually men leading sedentary lives, have a 
more delicate appetite, and their food should 
be more daintily prepared. 

Many a cook in a country hotel cannot be 
beaten for plain and palatable cooking, but he 
is not well posted on fancy dishes. Where such 
is the case only such dishes which he is familiar 
with should be placed on the menu, and no 
others. 

Locality and season often have a great deal 
to do with the cost of a banquet, one may be 
served with profit in one section at two dollars 
while money would be lost at three dollars in 
another section for the same banquet. 

The price of labor, rent and the products of 
the land are all factors to be considered. 

Last, -when fine china, cut glass, silvers, etc., 
are to be used, the risK of breakage in the use 
of them must also be considered. 

The steward should always know within a 



102 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



few dollars how much it will cost the house to 
serve a banquet after the menu is decided 
upon. 

When a banquet is to be served the head 
waiter should be notified in time, tliat he may 
have the room put in order and the tables 
arranged to suit the occasion, and that the 
waiters best suited for the work are selected 
and given an extra drilling, allowing one waiter 
to five, six or eight guests, according to the 
quality of service required. They should be 
properly dressed "black full dress suit, white 
tie and no jewelry displayed. Where only girls 
are available they should wear a plain white 
dress, neatly done with white linen collars and 
cuffs — no lace or frills of any kind should be 
allowed. 

A table set with linens of fine texture, per- 
fectly laundered, cut glass, silver and fine dec- 
orated china needs but few ferns, smilax and 
flowers to look rich and beautiful. The floral 
decorations are usually attended to by a florist, 
who makes a study of such work; but in his 
absence it devolves upon the steward to see 
that it is done properly. The setting of the 
table depends on what there is to work with. 
The best appearance possible should be made 
with what there is on hand. The table should 
not be overcrowded with dishes and stands 
which are of no service. 

There should be no announcements or ad- 
vertisements of any kind on the menu such as 
appertaining to quality of water, brands of 
foods, etc. 

For ideas in setting a banquet table, I will 
take for illustration an article on this subject 
printed in The Hotel Monthly of September, 
1894, which attracted much favorable com- 
ment at the time, the men who contributed the 
ideas being all well known in the catering 
world. 

The Banquet Menu. 

The word menu in French means something 
small (as of small in size or dimensions). 

"Menu d'un repas ' means a bill of fare. 
The words "d'un repas" are unnecessary, 
from the fact that the repast is announced on 
the card, which suflSciently explains it. 

Technically, the word "menu" means any 
kind of a bill of fare and can be used where 
the French expression is preferred to the Eng- 
lish, as Breakfast menu. Luncheon menu. Sup- 
per menu, etc. But the word as adopted in 
the English is popularly understood to mean a 
limited, choicely selected meal, as for a table 
d'hote dinner, a banquet, etc. 

The word "menu" is most appropriate for 



a banquet or anything distinct from the regular 
meals, such as when an announcement of the 
occasion is made on the card as ' ' Sixth Annual 
Banquet of the Hamilton Club," "The Six- 
teenth Annual Dinner of the H. M. M. B. A., ' ' 
' ' Farewell Luncheon in honor of James Blank 
by his Friends," etc. 

On regular bills of the day it should be 
' ' Table D 'Hote Dinner at the Auditorium ' ' 
or ' ' Dinner at Kinsley 's " or " Breakfast The 
Southern Hotel. ' ' An announcement something 
in the nature of the above should always be 
made to distinguish the repast from those 
given at the other intervals of the day, which 
the term ' ' menu ' ' fails to do. 

The arrangement of the menu is like a table 
d'hote dinner excepting that the entrees are 
usually placed above the roast (French fashion) 
and some appropriate vegetable accompanymg 
the meat dishes about as follows : 

1 course — oysters or clams. 

2 " —soup. 

" — relishes (hors d'oeuvres). 

3 " — 1 fish with 1 fancy potato. 

4 " — 1 entree dainty such as pattie of 

terrapin, etc. 

5 " — 1 roast or heavy entree such as 

sweetbreads or cutlets, chops, 
etc. 

6 " — 1 punch (sorbet). 

7 ' ' — 1 game or broiled young fowl, et^. 

8 " — 1 salad, dressed lettuce, etc. 

9 ' ' — dessert. 
10 " —coffee. 

Or a cheaper one as follows: 

1 course — 1 hors d'oeuvres (relish). 

2 " —1 soup. 

— 3 relishes. 

3 " — 1 fish with fancy potato. 

4 " — 1 entree. 

5 " — 1 punch (sorbet). 

6 " • — 1 game roast. 

7 " —1 salad. 

8 ' ' —dessert. 

9 " -coffee. 

The following specimen menus are arranged 
in accordance with the foregoing, the first rep- 
resenting a high class banquet such as would be 
given at a hotel men's convention; the second 
is cheaper, consisting of one less course, the 
material is less expensive and the wines are 
of a cheaper grade. 



Menu No. 1. 

Bluepoints 

STEINBEEGER CABINET 

Clear green turtle 

EOYAL EESEItVE 

Small patties, Financiere 
Stuffed olives Salted nuts 

Planked shad 
Cucumbers Saratoga chips 

BARSAC 1878 
Diamond back terrapin, Maryland 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



105 



Lamb chops, Princesse 
Green peas 

CHATEAU LAFITE 1874 
BENEDICTINE PUNCH 

Broiled Philadelphia squab 

Asparagus HoUandaise 

Dressed lettuce Celery salad 

ROEDEIiER BKUT 

Neapolitan ice cream Assorted cake 

Strawberries 
Roquefort cheese Crackers 

Coffee 

COGNAC 

Menu l>Io. 2. 

Caviar on toast 
Consomme Princesse 

VINO DE PASTO 

Stuffed olives Salted nuts Tomatoes 

Broiled Spanish mackerel, steward sauce 

Potatoes Duchess 

HAOT SAUTEKNE 

Sweetbread patties, Financiere 

Green peas pontet caket 

KIKSCHWASSEB PDNCH 

Broiled spring chicken on toast 
Lettuce 

POMIIEET AND GEENO SEC 

Ice cream in forms 

Cake Fruit 

Brie cheese Crackers 

Coffee LIQUEURS 



In serving oysters or clams I would place 
them on shaved ice in a small deep plate. Never 
put ice over them, it spoils the flavor. All 
relishes such as olives, salted nuts, sliced toma- 
toes, celery, etc., should be nicely arranged on 
the table just before the guests are seated; 
also roUs, bread and one shell of butter. To 
serve an extra plate under the one containing 
the food saves the linens from soiling and adds 
to the appearance of the service. 

The men serving the wine (about one to 
every twenty guests) should not be the regular 
table waiters. When removing the wines they 
should pour the residue of the glasses in pitch- 
ers which can be saved and for which there is a 
possible use. If tha help is permitted to 
empty the glasses as they go to the pantry 
there may be disagreeable results, which it may 
take several days to overcome. 

The following specimens of banquet and 
luncheon menus include a number of annual 
banquets given by the Hotel Men 's Mutual 
Benefit Association. I do not submit these 
latter as models (though the majority of them 
are), but as an interesting feature to many old 
hotel men who had the pleasure to partake of 
them. They are served at $5 per cover, includ- 
ing wines. 

The other menus will appear on their merits 
as models of well arranged specimens. 



[In an article on wines which will appear 
later, the subject of serving and placing them 
on the menu will be discussed.] 

H. M. M. B. A. Menus. 

Blue points on shell 

sacterne. Compliments of John A. Rice 

Green turtle soup Chicken a la Royal 

Small patties a la Financiere 

Broiled vvhiteflsh with small potatoes 

CLARETj compliments of Alvin Hubbert 

Filet of beef, larded, with mushrooms 

Asparagus Potatoes a la Suisse 

Calfs sweetbreads, pique with French peas 

Cutlets of patridge, truffle sauce 

CHAMPAGNE, compliments of Scott & Rice 

Roman punch 

Saddle of Venison, Marinee larded a la Brioche 

Baked mashed potatoes Green peas 

CHAMPAGNE, Compliments Chicago members 

Roast quail on toast, jelly 

Saratoga potatoes 

Boned turkey Chicken salad Pate of liver 

Assorted cake Neapolitan ice cream 

Charlotte Russe 

Roquefort cheese Edam cheese 

Fruit Coffee Cigars 

Huitres chablis 

Tortue Verte a I'Anglaise 

POTAGES AMONTILLADO 

Creme de celeri aux croutons souffles 
Varies Varies 

HORS D'OEUVRES 

Petits Bouchees a la puree Faisan 
aux truffe Perigord 

POISSON KUEDESHEIMER 

Bass rayee an gratiu a la Chambord 
Pommes de terre a la Duchesse 
RELBVB Filet de boeuf pique a la Godard 

CHATEAU BOUILLAC 

Poitrine de Dindonneau Farcie a I'lmperatrice 

ENTREES CHAMPAGNB 

Croquettes de ris de veau aux champignons 

Galatine de poularde en Bellevue 

Pate de Strasbourg a la moderne 

FROID Voliere de Cailles a la forrestierre 

Salade de volaille a la Russee 

Mayonnaise de crevettes en aspic ^ la Ristorla 

SORBET A LA CARDINAL 

ROTI Selle de mouton a la gelee de groseille 

CHAMBERTIN 

Perdreau barde sur canape au cresson 
GIBIER 

Coeur de laitue Salade de celerl 

Petitis pois a la Francaise 
ENTREMETS 

Asperges en branches Epinards au jus 

Haricots verts saute au beurre 
Charlotte Russe a la vanille decoree 
Gelee au champagne, petits fours 

LIQUEURS DIVERS 

SUCRES 

Glace Napolitaine en pyramlde 

Pieces montees Fruites et dessert 

Fromage Cafe Cigars 

Oysters on half shell 
Green turtle soup 

SHERRY 

Boiled Kennebec salmon 
Mashed potatoes, Burnet House fashion 

SAUTEKNE 



104 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



Baked sweetbreads with French peas 

CLAKET 

Tenderloin of beef with mushrooms 

CHAMPAGNE 

Roast quail 

Baked mashed sweet potatoes 

Cold boiled lobster Shrimp salad 

Turkey salad 

Ice cream Assorted cake Fruits 

Cheese Crackers Coffee 

Cigars 

Little neck clams 

HAUT SAUTEKNB 

SOUP 
Cream of Asparagus 

AMONTILLADO 

FISH 

Baked Penobscot salmon, Genoese sauce 

Cucumbers Bermuda potatoes Sliced tomatoes 

REMOVES HOCKHEIMEB 

Boiled Philadelphia capon, Estragou sauce 

Roast spring lamb, mint sauce 

Asparagus tips Rice String beans 

ENTREES CHAMPAGNE 

Tenderloin of beef, trnfBe sauce 

Sweetbread patties, Parisian style 

Chicken croquettes New peas 

MAYONNAISE pontet canet 
Lobster Chicken Shrimp 

KOMAN PUNCH 
GAME 

Broiled snipe on toast, Colbert sauce 
Dressed lettuce Water cresses 

DESSERT KOMANEE 

Assorted cake Macaroons 

Champagne jelly Fruit ices Frozen pudding 

Apples Oranges Bananas 

Malaga grapes Strawberries 

Coffee 

Little "heck clams 

HADT SAHTEENB 

Consomme Colbert 
Timbale of fowl 

Cucumber salad Amontillado 

Columbia River salmon HoUandaise 

Potato croquettes 

Sweetbreads larded 

Green peas Asparagus 

PONTET CANET 

Broiled spring chicken 
String beans Cauliflower 

PUNCH IMPERIAL 

Roast snipe 
Dressed lettuce Water cress 

VEUVE CLIQUOT 

Charlotte Russe Champagne jelly 

Assorted cake Confectionery 

Tuttl frutti ice cream 

Fruits Strawberries Bon bons 

Fromage de Brie 
Cognac Coffee Chartreuse 

Little neck clams 
Chicken bouillon 

CHATEAU YQUEM 

Cutlet of whitefish — larded — mushrooms 
New potatoes String beans 

MUJIM'S EXTRA DKY 

Breast of spring chicken 
Asparagus 
Sweetbreads pique — green peas 



Rice croquettes — Claret sauce 

CHAMPAGNE SORBET 

Broiled snipe — dressed lettuce 

CHATEAU LA ROSE 

Fancy cakes Confectionery 

Strawberries 

Fruit Coffee 

Roquefort 



Green turtle clear 



Little neck clams 

HAUTE SAUTERNB 

Cream of asparagus 

AMONTILLADO 

Small patties a la Renaissance 
Radishes Olives 

STEINEEEGER 

Baked striped bass a la Chambord 
Cucumbers Potatoes Parisienne 

CHATEAU LA ROSE 

Filet of beef pique. Prince Carl 

Potatoes a la Dauphine 

Capon stuffed a la Ambassadrice 

String beans 

Sweetbreads in cases, Lavalliere 

Green peas 

Squabs braise a la Rothschild 

Spinach with poached eggs 

CHAMPAGNE 
KIKSCH PUNCH 

Saddle of spring lamb mint sauce 
Asparagus HoUandaise 

CHAMBEETIN 

English snipe on toast water cress 

Lettuce 

Charlotte Russe a la Chantilly 

LIQUORS 

Assorted cake Mottoes 

Ice cream in forms Jelly Macedoine 

Dessert Divers 

Fruit Cheese Coffee 

Cigars 

Little neck clams 

HAUT SAUTEENB 

SOUP Green turtle Printaniere Royale 

AMONTILLADO 

FISH Potomac striped bass, HoUandaise sauce 
Sliced tomatoes Potatoes Julienne 

Cucumbers 

JOHANNISBEEGEB 

REMOVES Philadelphia capon, Estragon sauce 
Bermuda potatoes Asparagus 
Tenderlain of beef, mushroom sauce 
German potatoes String beans 

CHATEAU MAEGAUX 

ENTREES Potted squab, Jardiniere 

Sweetbreads pique, St. Cloud 

Soft shell crabs, Maryland 

Lobster salad Shrimp salad 

CHAMPAGNE 
■MAEASCHINO PUNCH 

GAME Snipe on toast Colbert sauce 

Dressed lettuce Water cresses 

EOMANNB 

DESSERT Frozen pudding Champagne jelly 

Macaroons Tutti frutti Assorted cake 

Neapolitan ice cream 

Oranges Malaga grapes Bananas 

Strawberries with cream 

Roquefort cheese Water crackers 



Coffee 



COGNAC ET LIQUEURS 
CIGAES 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



105 



SACTEBNB 



Little neck clams 
Mock turtle 



SHERRY 

Kennebec salmon a la Hollandaise 

RHINE WINE Potatoes, Hollandaise 

Cucumber Olives 

Salpicon en calsse 

Fillet of beef aux Champignons 

CLARET 

Green peas Baked mashed potatoes 

Asparagus 

SORBET A LA JIONONGAHELA 

Roast Jack snipe currant jelly 

CHAiiPAGNE Lettuce 

Lobster Mayonnaise 

Tutti frutti ice cream 

Charlotte Russe 

Fruit 

LIQUORS 

Roquefort and American cheese 
Coffee 

Little neck clams 

AMONTILLADO 

Consomme Royal 

Small pattie of chicken 

Pompano 

Sliced cucumbers. Curled potatoes chablis 

Tenderloin of beef with trufflies 

PONTET CANET 

Sweetbreads 
Green peas 

SIBERIAN PUNCH 

Broiled plover on toast 
Lettuce salad Saratoga chips moet & chandon 

(WHITE SEAL) 

Assorted cake Bisque glace 

Fruit 

Crackers Roquefort cheese 

Coffee Brandy 

CIGARS 



SAUTEBNS 

Olives 

AAIONTILLADO 



Blue points 



Celery 



Consomme Macedoine 

Broiled whiteflsh 

Dressed cucumbers 

PONTET CANET 

Broiled spring chicken 
Curled potatoes French peas 

CIGARETTES H. M. M. B. A. puuch 

JULES MUMM & CO.'S "GRAND SEC." 

Roast plover 

Lettuce Fromage de brie 

Macaroons 

Coffee 

LIQUEURS AND CIGAES 

Little neck clams 

Caviar sandwiches 

Cream of asparagus 

AMONTILLADO 

Olives Radishes Salted almonds 

Small patties of chicken 

Filet of salmon, new peas 

HAUT SAUTERNB 

Dressed cucumbers 
Tenderloin of beef, with truffles 

PONTET CANET 

Stuffed tomatoes Potato croquettes 

Fresh mushrooms on toast 

BENEDICTINE PUNCH 
MOET & CHANDON RoaSt quail G. H. MUMMi'S 

WHITE SEAL Sliced potato chips extra DRI 
Lettuce salad 



Chartreuse of strawberries 

Ice cream Assorted cake 

Fruit 

Roquefort Crackers 

CIGARS COGNAC 

Coffee 



Little neck clams 

Caviar sandwiches 

Clear green turtle soup 

AMONTILLADO 

Broiled Pompano, steward sauce 

Dressed cucumbers Potato croquettes 

Potpouri of chicken with truffles 

HAUTE SAUTERNB 

Larded sweetbreads braise 
French peas 

CHATEAU LA ROSE 
ROMAN PUNCH 

Roast Philadelphia squab on toast 
Asparagus, Hollandaise sauce 

u. H. MUJIM'S EXTRA DRT 

Tomatoes, mayonnaise dressing 
Tutti frutti Strawberries 

Assorted cake 

Roquefort Brie Crackers 

CIGARS Coffee COGNAC 1885 



Little neck clams 

HAUTE SAUTERNES 

Consomme Trianon 

Hors d'oeuvres 

Broiled mountain trout, maitre d'hotel 

Potatoes Laurctte, cucumbers 

Sweetbreads en casseroles 

CHATEAU PONTET CANET 

Lamb chops, Maison Dore 
Stuffed green peppers 

PUNCH THER.MIDOR 

Roast jack snipe 
Lettuce salad 

POUMERY SEC 

Nesselrode ice cream 

Assorted cakes 

Strawberries 

Cheese ■ Coffee 

LIQUEURS CIGARS 

Vermouth cocktails 

California oysters 

Clear green turtle, aux Champagne 

SUNNY SLOPE SHERRY 

Timbales of chicken, a la Talleyrand 
Salted almonds Celery Olives 

Barracouda, a la Hoteliere 
Potato croquettes Cucumbers 

CRESTA BLANCA, HAUTE SAUTERNES 

Larded tenderloin of beef, aux truffes 

Stuffed tomatoes a la Creole 

Sweetbreads in cases a la Contl 

New peas 

CRESTA BLANCA, IMARGAUX 

Asparagus a la Hollandaise 
Roasted squab, barde, with cresses 

G. H. MUMM'S EXTRA DRY 

Mayonnaise of fresh shrimps 

Fancy forms ice cream Assorted cake 

Fruit 

Camembert cheese 

Coffee COGNAC 



106 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 




Luncheon 

TO THE 

HOTEL MEN'S 




UTUAL BENEFIT 
ASSOCIATION 



OF THE 

United States and Canada 

GIVEN BY 

J. K. WHIPPLE COMPANY 

VALLEY VIEW FARM 

JUNE 8, 1911 




THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



107 




SOFT-SHELL CRABS PENOBSCOT SALMON, MAYONNAISE 

YOUNG PIG CHICKEN TONGUE HAM 

DEVILLED LOBSTER BAKED BEANS 

HAM SANDWICHES CHICKEN SANDWICHES TONGUE SANDWICHES 

CHICKEN SALAD LOBSTER SALAD POTATO SALAD 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING 
MINCE PIE CUSTARD PIE 



FROZEN PUDDING 



ICE CREAM 



AMERICAN CHEESE 

STRAWBERRIES CAKE 

TEA MILK COFFEE 

POMMEP.Y 6- CKENO SEC MOET 6- CHANDON WHITE SEAL 







108 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



Little neck clams 

Clear green turtle 

Cream of fresh mushrooms 

Boiled fresh Penobscot salmon a la Victoria 

Broiled bluefish, sauce Bercy 

Sliced cucumbers New green peas 

Potatoes Sultane 

Spring lamb, Morlaisienne 

Supreme of checken a la Toulouse 

Fresh asparagus Potato croquettes 

Braised sweetbreads, Berthier 

Soft shell crabs, Remoulade 

FROZEN TOM AND JERRY 

Golden plover sur canape 

Fresh vegetable salad 

Sweets 

Cheese Coffee 

Clams 

Consomme Plumerey Bisque of lobster 

Brissotins aux Supreme 

Striped bass, Joinville 

Cucumbers 

Saddle of lamb, Victoria 

Tomatoes stuffed with egg plant 

Breast of chicken, Lucullus 

Peas Parisienne 

Asparagus, cream sauce 

SHERBET TEBMIBEE 

Squabs, water cress 

Lettuce salad 

Terrine of foie gras jelly 

Crust, pineapple 

Fancy ice cream Fruit Cakes 

Pyramids Coffee 



Rocky Mountain Association banquet at the Brown 

Palace, Denver. 

Canape special 

Mock turtle a I'Anglaise 

Celery Nuts Olives 

Fried mountain trout, mueniere 

Breast of chicken, Virginia 

Fluted potatoes Asparagus hollandalse 

Head lettuce, French dressing 

Tutti fruitti ice cream 

Assorted cake 

Coffee 

MARTINI COCKTAIL 
AMONTILLADO 
MUMMM'S EXTRA DRY 
MANITO0 GINGER CHAMPAGNE 
APPOLLINARIS 













Rocky Mountain Association at the Shirley Farm cow 
barn. 

Hard cider 

Beau soup 

Celery Cucumbers 

Pickles Radishes 

Boiled capon, egg sauce Sweet cider 

Roast suckling pig 

Preserved apples 

Boiled potatoes Red beets 

Turnips Slaw 

Buttermilk 

Lettuce and tomato salad 

Doughnuts 

Cottage cheese 

Pumpkin pie Sweet milk 



Rocky Mountain Association luncheon at the Brown 
Palace, Denver. 

MARTINI COCKTAIL 

Bluepoint cocktail 

Celery Nuts Olives 

Consomme, printanier 

Sweetbreads en ramekin 

SADTERNB 

Boast squab on toast 

Julienne potatoes French peas 

Lettuce and tomato salad 

French dressing 

Biscuit tortoni 

Assorted cake 

Demi tasse 

MANITOn GINGER CHAMPAGNE APOLLINAEIS 





Kansas-Missouri-Oklahoma Association banquet at the 
Baltimore, Kansas City. 

Baltimore hors d'oeuvres 

Grape fruit baskets 

Clear green turtle, Victeria 

Cheese straws 

Celery Salted almonds Olives 

Paupiette of salmon 

Cucumbers imperial Pommes fleurette 

Sweetbreads pique, a la gourmand 

Haricots panache 

Baltimore punch 

Broiled breast of hazel hen, sur canajptf 

Potato souffle Fresh mushrooms 

Tomato farcie 

Swedish wafers 

Glace de fantaise 

Petits fours 

Roquefort 

Toasted water crackers 

Cafe 

PERFBCTOS D. LIEDEN'S EISMABCK 

APRICOT LIQOEUK POMMERY SEC 

BALTIMORE SPECIAL COCKTAILS 



Missing Page 



Missing Page 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



109 



The luncheon at the Savoy, Denver, (Rocky Mo u" 
tain Hotel Association). 

Puree of chicken, Elisa 

Paschal celery Ripe olives 

Grilled lobster, parsley butter 

Deviled sauce 

Julienne potatoes 

Assorted cold meats a la bu£Eeti6re 

Boned turkey Virginia ham 

Jellied heel tongue 

Salad belle fermlftre 

Savarin 3, la Chantilly 

Coffee 

Canton ginger 

FALSTAFP BEER MANITOU WATER 

MANITOU GINGER CHAMPAGNE OSMnNDO CIGARS 



Miscellaneous Banquet Menus. 

The thirty-eighth annual banquet of the Na- 
tional Wholesale Druggists' Association, held at 
The Pfister, Milwaukee, was in form of a BEEF- 
STEAK DINNER. This- was the menu : 
Canape Pfister 
Clear green turtle, vino de pasto 
Celery Olives 

Broiled XX sirloin steak, au Jus 
Brussels sprouts Cottage fried potatoes 

Salad chiffonade 
Ice cream in forms 
Assorted cakes 
Roquefort 
Crackers 
Coffee 

MARTINI APOLLINARIS 

MOSELLE PALL MALL CIGARETTES 

G. H. MDMM'S EXTRA DRY CIGARS 

General sales convention automobile dealers at 

the Claypool, Indianapolis ; 400 covers : 

Accelerator Bronx 

Chassis of blue points, dans cocktail 

Celery 

Olive ball bearings and radish spark plugs 

Low test turtle soup 

Baked halibut packed in Norway lubricant 

Chain drive lobster Newburg, en cassolette 

Claret punch Cooling system 

"Chicken" with vegetable equipment 

Cold asparagus a la prospect, Vinaigrette 

Ice cream 

Full line of models — color optional 

Roquefort — deodorized mixture Aver cafe 



In honor of Capt. Raold Amundsen, at University 
Club, Detroit : 

Buffet Russe martini 

Romanoff caviar sur socle de glace 

AMONTILLADO 1824 

Clear green turtle aux quenelles de moelle 
Cheese sticks 

chateau yquem 
Fillet of pompano, Marguery 
Cucumber boat Polar 
Potatoes, Florentine 

SPARKLING MOSELLE 

Supreme of English pheasant aux truffes 
Pommes soufile in nest 

Pctits pois nouveau a la Francaise 
trench endive, chiffonade dressing 

MOET & CHANUON IMP. CROWN BRUT 

Siberian omelette on surprise, volcanic 

Fresh strawberry tartlet, Norwegienne 

Fromage de camembert 

Toasted crackers 

Cafe diable martell * * * 



The Chicago Dinner Club at the Congress Hotel. 

Lynnhaven Bays 

Clam broth, Bellevue 

Celery Olives 

Fillet of pampano, Congress style 

Potatoes laurette 

Breast of mallard duck 

Currant Jelly Wild rice 

Romaine salad 

Frozen egg nog 

Petits fours 

English Stilton cheese 

Toasted wafers 

Buster Brown apples 

Coffee 

POMMERY SEC APOLLINARIS 



A dainty menu of the University Club, Phila- 
delphia : 

Lynnhavens 

Clear mock turtle 

Terrapin Maryland 

Sweetbreads Virginia 

Sorbet ' 

Red-head duck 

Hominy 

Green salad 

Cheese 

Ices Cake 

Coffee 

1870 SHERRY CORDIALS 

boquet et fils 1900 cigars 



The American Association of Dining Car Super- 
intendents at their annual meeting in Denver 
These three menus — two luncheons and a banquet 
were served to them at the Albany Hotel : 
LUNCHEON, OCT. 18 
Grape fruit en surprise 
Hors d'oeuvres varies 
Mountain trout, saute meuniere 
Cucumbers Parisienne 
Grilled boneless milk-fed chicken au cresson 
Baked Colorado potato French peas 

Mountain and plain salad 
Ice cream a la Benjamin 
Assorted pastries 
Demi tasse 



Luncheon, Oct. 19 : 

Canape Lorenzo 

Hors d'oeuvres varies 

Chicken gumbo, clear, en tasse 

Planked Lake Superior Jumbo whiteflsh 

Punch a la dining car 

Filet Mignon a la Armour 

Potatoes grilled French string beans 

Asparagus vinaigrette 

Terrine de foie gras Strasbourg 

Camembert 

Demi tasse 



Banquet, Oct. 19 : 

Canape en masque 

Hors d'oeuvres varies 

Green turtle clear en tasse 

Roast royal squab- -chestnut dressing 

Wild rice croquette Sweet potato nest 

Hearts of lettuce 

Carnival special souvenir 

Ice cream 

Cream cheese bar le due 

Demi isisae 

Bonbons 



11(1 



THE PKACTICAL HOTEL 8TEWAE1") 




BANQUET TABLE WITH DECORATION BLENDING THE REAL SOD, REAL ROCKS, AND LIVE MOUNTAIN STREAM 



This menu, from Hotel Utah, Salt Lake, was 
stamped on a sheet of pure copper ; at the top of 
the menu was a medallion of the hotel, and at the 
foot a picture in relief of a smelter plant. The 
card was a genuine novelty : 

Canape modcrne 

Relishes a la Utah 

Clear green turtle, Rachel 

Fresh lobster en papillote 

Sliced cucumbers 

Sweetbreads a la Ryan 

Pommes surprise 

Punch creme d'Yvette 

Champagne wafers 

Royal English pheasant, bread sauce 

Salade, coeur dc laitue 

Fancy ice cream 

Assorted cakes 

Cream cheese with bar le due 

Saline wafers 

Coffee 

COCKTAIL POL ROGER VIN BRUT 1900 

AMONTILLADE PASADA POUSSE CAFE 

CHATEAU YQUEM CIGARETTES 

CLOS DE VOUGEOT CAROLINA PERFECTOS 



Medallion of whitefish, Maltaise 

Potatoes lorette 

Vol au vent of sweetbreads, Veronique 

French peas 

Sherbet benedictine 

Roast turkey, cranberry sauce 

Sweet potatoes, flambee Asparagus, polonaise 

French endive 

Terrine de foie gras 

Biscuit glace, frou frou 

Friandises 

^luster raisins 

Oregon cider 

Camembert 

Coffee 



Mixed nuts 



The St. Paul, of St. Paul : 

Hors d'oeuvres, varies 

Martini 

Rlue points 

Celery Olives Almonds 

Essence of chicken, Olga 



Hotel Tacoma. Tacoma, Wash. : 

Toke points, Tacoma 

Cream of chicken, Louise or consomme renaissance 

Hors d'oeuvres 

California sandabs, sauto meuniere 

Braised rack of lamb, Montmorency 

French string beans, panachee 

Potatoes marcchal 

Roast turkey with chestnut dressing 

Lettuce and tomatoes 

Plum pudding, brandy sauce 

Mince pie Pumpkin pie 

Bisquit tortoni Confectionery 

Cafe 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



111 




INTO PAINTED SCENERY AT FAR END OF TABLE (COURTESY OF GEO. O. RELF, HOTEL UTAH SALT LAKE.) 



A dinner griven by the Cbicago Dinner Club in honor of 
the publishers of The Daily National Hotel Reporter, The Hotel 

World and The Hotel Monthly at the Blackstone Hotel. 

Blue Points 

Pepper Pot 

Celery Mixed Salted Nuts Olives 

Lobster a la Moderne 

Breast of Chicken. Southern Style 

Sweet Potato Chips 

Corn Fritters 

Asparagus, Hollandaise 

Bombe Mercedes 

Assorted Cakes 

Coffee 

POMMERY AND GRENO SEC 

APOLLINARIS 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTES 



CHICAGO DINNER CLUB AT THE VIRGINIA 

Buffet Russe 

Lobster cocktail in green pepper 

GumVjo madrilaine. whipped cream 

Celery Olives Salted almonds 

Filet of sea bass, Richelieu 

Potato hollandaise Pressed cucumber 

Croustade of fresh mushrooms a la Duval 

Sherbert Marie Brizard 

chicken, sur canape 
Bermuda potato rissole 
Salad Astoria 
form ice cream Petits fours 

Roquefort and Port du Salut 
Toasted crackers 
Demi tasse 
Martini Pommery Sec. Apollinaeis 



Boned milk-fed 
New peas au beurre 



Fancy 



HOLIDAY CARDS. 

New Year's Eve Selections. 

The custom of a special card for New 
Year's Eve is growing in favor, and caterers 
are striving for unique selections and out- 
of-the-ordinary cards for the revels ushering 
in the new year. The following selections 
illustrate the different ideas as to what is 
appropriate: 

Savoy Hotel, Denver: (.$2.50) 

Canape de caviar 

Celery hearts Mixed olives 

Broiled live eastern lobster, butter sauce 

Roast quail, sur grouton, orangerie 

I*ommes allumettos 

Lettuce-asparagus vinaigrette 

Cheese straws 

Biscuit glace souvenir 

Special coffee 

After dinner mints 



Hotel Statler, Cleveland : 

Nouveautees Russes 

Consomme riche a I'okra 

Homard saute a I'Americaine 

Pigeonneaux Bobemienne 

Asperges sauce mousseline 

Surprises de Noel 

Friandlses 

Cafe 



112 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Hotel Warner, Chicago : 

Blue points 

Hearts of celery Queen olives 

Clear green turtle en tasse 

Saratoga wafers 

Fresh lobster, newburg, en caisse 

Broiled breast of butter ball duel: sur canape 

Julienne potatoes French peas 

Florida salad 

Nesselrode pudding Petits lours 

Camembert cheese. Toasted taltines 

Cafe noir 



The Jefferson, Peoria : 

Canapa 20th century 

MARTINI 

Celery Salted nuts Mixed olives 

Strained chicken gumbo 

Fresh crab flake, Newberg en ramekin 

RHINE WINE 

Breast of mallard duck, lemon jelly 
Potatoes au gratin, O'Brien String bean panache 

CREME DE MENTHE PUNCH 

Lettuce and tomato salad 

Imperial ice cream Jefferson fruit cake 

Cheese souffle Toasted crackers 

Coffee 

Souvenirs Candies 



The St. Nicholas, Decatur, 111. ($2.00) 

Blue points 

Consomme 

Relishes 

Fresh lobster, Newburgh, en caisse 

Roast jumbo squab, au cresson 

New potatoes, rissole Petits pois 

Asparagus viniagrette 

Wafers 

Nesselrode ice cream 

Petits fours 

Roquefort Mints Toasted wafers 

Coffee 



Westholme Grill, Victoria, B. C. . 

RELISHES 

Queen or stuffed olives 20 Celery 25 

Stuffed eggs a la Gorgona 30 
Yacht Club sardines 35 
Chari-vari of appetizers on toast a la West- 
holme 35 

OYSTERS (ESQDIMALTS) 

Selects on half shell 40 Cocktail 50 

Roasted in shell a la Arlequine 50 

Fried on toast 50 

OYSTERS (OLYMPIAS) 

Cocktail 35 Fried 50 Milk stew 50 
Crabmeat cocktail 40 

SOOPS 

Clear green turtle 30 Essence of chicken in cup 15 

FISH AND SHELL FISH 

Crab flakes in cocotte a la J. B. Martin 50 

Filet of flounder au vin sauterne 50 

Cold mignons of salmon in aspic 'i la Moscovite 45 

ENTREES 

Calf's sweetbreads a la Clamart en bordure 80 

Lamb chops' saute a la Reforme 65 

Emince of goose livers a la Chasseur 50 

Sliced breast of turkey, demldofE 80 

Point steak, clubhouse style 60 

COLD MEATS 

Turkey and ham 75 

Sliced ribs of beef, potato ealad 50 

Ox tongue and ham mi.T(!d 45 

SALADS 

Combination 50 A la Russe 50 

Sliced cucumber or tomato 30 

DESSERT 

■Vanilla ice cream 25 

Meringue glace a la Melba 25 

Special : Westholme frozen New Year's punch 30 

Demi tasse 10 



Claremont Cafe, Chicago: ($2.00) 

Blue point cocktail 

Celery Queen olives 

Chicken bouillon en tasse 

Crab flakes, a la Maryland 

Pomme julienne 

Breast of mallard duck, Cumberland, or 

Filet mignon, Claremont 

French peas Grilled sweet potatoes 

Sherbet a la Florentine 

Alexander salad 

Roquefort cheese Toasted crackers 

CoCEee 



Robin Hood Inn, New Rochelle, N. T. . ($3) 

Lobster cocktail 

Consomme, Robin Hood 

Saltines 

Crab flakes, Robin Hood 

Hot biscuits 

Punch 

Roasted jumbo squab au cresson 

Julienne potatoes Fresh string beans 

Endive salad, French dressing 

Wafers 

Neapolitan ice cream 

Assorted cakes 

Demi tasse 



Brigham's Hotel, Boston: ($2.50) 

Blue points Cotuits 

Consomme Milanaise, creme d'asperges 

Olives Nut meats Celery 

Saumon hollandaise 

Concombres Pommes Windsor 

Filet mignon financiere 

Pommes surprise harlcotsverts 

FROZEN EGG NOGG 

Jumbo squab, grille au cresson 

Pommes Saratoga Currant jelly 

Sparkling nebiolo 

Salad 1913 

Creme a la macaroon Assorted pastries 

Fromage de roquefort or camembert 

Parmesan crackers Bon-bons 

Cafe noir 

No orders for liquors taken after 10 :55 p. m. 



Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis : 

Tartlnes de caviar 

Hors d'oeuvres varies 

Tortue verte en tasse 

Crabes farcies a la Diable 

Perdreau grille, sur canape 

Asperges hollandaise 

Pommes julienne 

Parfait en corbeille 

Mignardises 

Fromage Demi-tasse 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



lis 



Hotel Oregon, Portland, Ore. (Specials) : 
Buffet Russe 75 Celery 25 Canape Cavair 50 

Romanoff caviar 1.00 
Toke Points 40 Xaquina Bays 40 Little Neck 

Clams 40 

Clear green turtle, cup 50 Chicken consomme, 

cup 20 Chicken broth, Bellevue, cup 35 

Clam broth, cup 15 

Broiled Empress squab 1.00 

Guinea chicken 1.25-2.00 

Cold : Sliced turkey 75 Assorted Meats 85-1.50 

Roast beet 50 
Salads : Alligator pears 60-1.00 Chlckory 35 

Crab meat 50 

Sandwiches : Club 50 Special Oregon grill 60 

Chicken 35 Caviar 50 Sardines 35 

Imported Swiss 25 

Desserts : Coupe St. Jacques 50 Biscuit tortoni 50 

Peach Melba 50 Parfait Tosca 50 

Meringue glace 25 Nesselrode 25 

Vanilla, coffee, tutti frutti, Neapolitan, chocolate, 

ice cream 25 

Demi tasse 15 



Hotel Sterling, Wilkesbarre, Pa. : 

Canape caviar or 

Blue point oysters or Little neck clams 

Clear chicken gumbo, en tasse 

Celery Olives Radishes 

French dinner rolls 
Maine lobster, a la Newberg, en casserolets 
Pommes Saratoga 
Roast royal stuffed squabs, en croustade or 

Broiled squab guinea, parasilda 
New Bermuda potatoes Asparagus 

Roman punch, nabisco wafers 

French endive salad, roquefort dressing 

Toasted saltines and bent crackers 

Bisque tortoni ice cream 

Fancy cakes Coffee. 



Celery 



Easter Cards. 

Easter at Hotel Rogge, Zanesville, 0. : 
Anchovy baskets 

MANHATTAN 

Lynhaven Bays 

Salted almonds 
Cucumber sandwich 

NIEESTEINEE 

Cream Reine Margot 

Sliced tomatoes Olives 

Planked roe shad 

Potatoes julienne 

ZINFANDEL 

Roast young turkey, oyster dressing 
Snow flake potatoes 
Asparagus tips 
Lobster salad 
Easter desert 
Discus biscuit 
Demi tasse 

CEEME DB APKICOT. 



Easter Sunday dinner de luxe at The Adolphus, 

Dallas, Tex. 

Salted mixed nuts 

Frivolities printaniere 

The fruit of the sea 

Blue Points or little neck 

Bethlehem sauce 

Essence of celery, Maison Doree 

Paillettes toscane 



Filet of striped bass, a la Russe 
Mousseline of Prague ham. Princess 

Asparagus tips, mayonnaise 

Saddle of baby spring lamb, Pascal 

Basket of primeurs 

Sorbet ojen 

Cog de Bruyere, farci et roti 

Pommes paille 

Salade Juillard 

Easter chicken on nest 

Mignardises Parisienne 

Demi Moka 



Easter at The Rockingham, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Canape Lorenzo 

Crcme de volaiUe, a la Reine, souflBe croutons 

Steamed Paupiette of Halibut, sauce Hollandaise 

Chilled cucumbers Easter potatoes 

Braised sweetbread en caisse, flnanclere 

Timbale de creme, aux fleurs d'orange 

Stuffed milk-fed duckling, apple sauce 

Koast spring lamb, brown or mint sauce 

Boiled potatoes Mashed potatoes 

Fried egg plant Early June peas 

Asparagus tips, vinaigrette 

Cold roast beef Cold boiled ham 

Tomato and endive, en mayonaise 

Custard pudding, sauce au risin 

Lemon Meringue pie Chocolate eclair 

Assorted cake Tutti frutti ice cream 

Bananas 

Coffee Tea 



Thanksgiving Cards. 

The Livingstone, Dwight, 111. : 

BREAKFAST. 

Clam bouillon 

Grape fruit Oranges California grapes 

Smyrna figs Orange marmalade 

Fried corn meal mush French toast 

Malta vita Corn flakes Oatmeal 

Shredded wheat Grape nuts 

Boiled salt mackerel Codfish cakes with bacon 

Windsor farm sausage Sugar cured ham 

Calf's liver and bacon Fried pork chops 

Chicken hash, green peppers 

Minced ham with scrambled eggs 
Boiled eggs Fried eggs Omelette, plain 

Baked potatoes German fried potatoes 

Vienna rolls Buckwheat cakes 

Tea Coffee Cocoa Milk 



SUPPER 

Oyster stew 

Chow chow 

Tomato bouillon Rice en cream 

Fried spring chicken, cream gravy 

Japanese crab meat in cases. Oriental 

Venison cutlet, sauce piquante 

Boiled eggs Fried eggs Scrambled eggs 

Omelette, with strawberry preserves 

Baked potatoes German fried potatoes 

Boned chicken en aspic 

Lettuce, French dressing Spiced beets 

Tea biscuits Assorted cake 

Sliced California peaches 

Coffee Cocoa Tea Milk 



114 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



DINNER. 
Oyster cocktail Anchovy canape 

Celery Raflishes Sliced Tomatoes 

Cream of chicken, Margot 

Consomme, princess 

Boiled Oregon salmon, sauce admiral 

Pommes Bermuda 

Patties of fresh mushrooms, Livingston 

Fresh pineapple fritters, diplomate 

Roast young turkey, stuffed with 

Chestnuts, cranberry sauce 

Roast saddle of venison, St. Hubert 

Mashed potatoes Candied sweet potatoes 

Brussels sprouts Cauliflower, hollandaise 

Salmi of mallard ducks, bigarade 

White asparagus, viniagrette 

Home-made mince pie Pumpkin pie 

Thanksgiving plum pudding, hard sauce 

Ice cream, mayflower Fruit cake Egg kisses 

Mixed nuts Layer raisins 

Cream cheese Wafers 

Coffee 



Hotel James, Ashtabula, Ohio (?1) : 

Select oysters 

Consomme royal Cream o£ tomato 

Celery Olives Sweet midgets Chow chow 

Baked white fish with parsley sauce 

Roast turkey with dressing and cranberry sauce 

Pineapple sherbet 

Baked squab with giblet sauce 

Roast prime ribs of beef au jus 

Roast pork with apple sauce 

Roast spring lamb with caper sauce 

Fruit salad Corn salad 

Escalloped oysters 

Mashed potatoes Baked sweet potatoes 

Sugar corn Hubbard squash Stewed tomatoes 

Apple pie Orange pie Pumpkin pie 

Home-made mince pie 

English plum pudding with brandy sauce 

Vanilla ice cream 

Assorted cake Assorted fruit Mixed nuta 

York state cheese Sage cheese 

Tea Sweet milk Butter milk Coffee 



Rock Island Club ($1) . 

Grape fruit 

Canapes of caviar on toast 

Mock Turtle Consomme chantelier 

Celery Olives Dill pickles 

Fillet of sole, Dieppoise sauce 

Sliced cucumbers Pommies Parlsienne 

Lobster Newburg, in shell 

Tenderloin beef, bordelaise sauce 

Banana fritters, vanilla sauce 

Maraschino punch 

Roast young turkey, cranberry sauce 

Roast duckling with jelly 

Roast Watertown goose, baked apple 

Boiled potatoes Mashed potatoes 

Baked hubbard squash French peas 

Waldorf salad 

English plum pudding, brandy sauce 

Mince pie Pumpkin pie 

Vanilla ice cream 

Cafe noir 



The St. Nicholas, Albany, Ga. : 

Supreme of grape fruit 

Blue points on half shell 

Green turtle, Anglaise Consomme princesse 

Celery Salted almonds Olives 

Boiled pompano, matre d'hotel 

Julienne potatoes 

Baked Georgia opossum, sweet potatoes 

Creamed guinea in timbale 

Prime ribs of beef au jus 

Roast young turkey, cranberry sauce 

Creamed potatoes Carolina rice Corn on cob 

Asparagus French peas 

Roast mallard duck, guava jelly 

Chicken salad 

English plum pudding, hard or brandy sauce 

Hot mince pie 

Vanilla ice cream Assorted cakes 

London layer raisins Mixed nuts 

Cheese Saltine wafers 

Coffee 



Hotel Englebright, Ripon, Wis. : 

Oyster soup 

Chow chow Celery Pickled pears 

Sliced cucumbers 

Boiled corned ox-tongue, spinach 

Roast prime ribs of beef with pan gravy 

Roast young turkey with cranberry sauce 

Roast young goose with apple sauce 

Boiled potatoes Mashed potatoes 

Mashed rutabagas Baked hubbard squash 

Fruit salad 

English plum pudding, brandy sauce 

Home-made mince pie Pumpkin pie 

Assorted cake American cheese 

New York Ice cream 

Oranges Grapes Apples Bananas 

Bent's water crackers Salted wafers 

Coffee Milk Tea 



The American, Kalamazoo, Mich. . 
Grape fruit cocktail 
Salted almonds 
Blue points Canape, caviar 

Golden heart celery Ripe olives 

Mock turtle, amontlUado Consomme, princesse 

Chilled cucumbers Round radishes 

Individual planked whltefish with bacon 

Pommes, bordure 

Roast autumn turkey, oyster filling. 

With cranberry sauce 
Whipped potatoes Candied yams 

Roast suckling pig, sage dressing 

Cauliflower, drawn butter Brussels sprouts 

Frozen Tom and Jerry 

Nabisco wafers 

Calf's sweetbreads a la Toulouse 

Code of peaches au madere 

The American special salad 

Salted flakes 

Roast domestic goose, glaced apples 

Browned potatoes Early June peas 

English plum pudding, hard and brandy sauce 

Home-made mince pie Golden pumpkin pie 

Maple sundae Assorted cake 

Sweet cider 

Assorted fruits Mixed nuts 

American, Imperial and roquefort cheese 

Long Island wafers Water crackers 

Coffee Japan or oolong tea Cocoa 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



115 



Duquesne Hotel, Pittsburgh : 

Canape of caviar 
Blue points on shell 

Clam cocktail in green peppers 
Chilled celery Pin gherkins Olives 

Deep sea green turtle, amontreado 

Bouillon en tasse 

Broiled pompano in parsley butter 

Sliced cucumbers Sliced tomatoes 

Button radishes 

Cases of fresh lobster a la Newhurg 

Baron of beef, brown potatoes 

Milk-fed turkey, chestnut dressing, cranberry sauce 

Snow potatoes Asparagus au gratin 

Frozen punch 

Caribou steak, French peas 

Prairie chicken, bread sauce 

Red headed duck, currant jelly 

Endive, French dressing 

Deep pumpkin pie Hot mince pie 

English plum pudding au cognac 

Layer raisins Assorted fruit Mixed nuts 

Fancy cakes Charlotte russe, Italian cream 

Camembert or roquefort cheese 

Salted wafers 

Cafe noir 



Hotel Baldwin, Hagerstown, Md. : 

Blue points on half shell 

StuHed olives Celery Mixed pickles 

Clear green turtle Cream of asparagus 

Sliced tomatoes Salted almonds Iced cucumbers 

Baked red snapper, southern style 

Potato croquettes 

Terrapin, Maryland style 

Sweetbreads, larded and braised 
Fruits a la conde 
Thanksgiving egg-nogg 
Roast young turkey, oyster dressing 

With cranberry sauce 
Baked Smithfield ham, spiced, wine sauce 
Oyster Bay asparagus Candied yams 

French peas Succotash Creamed potatoes 

Lobster salad 

Hot mince pie New England pumpkin pie 

Charlotte russe 

Neapolitan ice cream Fancy assorted cake 

Roquefort cheese Bent's water crackers 

After dinner mints 

Fruit Demi tasse 



Pennsylvania Lines dining car service : 
Canape SouvarotE 30c 
Cotuit cocktail 30c 
Chicken gumbo 25c Green turtle, clear 40c 
Stuffed mangoes 20c celery 25c 

Ripe olives 25c Salted almonds 15c 

Baked whiteflsh, provencale 65c 

Sliced cucumbers 25c 

Braised sweetbreads, Lafayette 70c 

Orange fritters, fruit sauce 20c 

Roast prime beef 60c 

Mashed potatoes 15c Tomatoes, farcie 30c 

Candied sweet potatoes 25c 

Asparagus au gratin 85c 
Boiled Spanish onions 20c 
Champagne punch 20c 
Roast young turkey, chestnut dressing 

with cranberry Jelly 75c 



Celery and pineapple salad, French dressing 35c 

Steamed flg pudding, hard and brandy sauce 25c 

Mince pie 15c Pumpkin pie loc 

Nesselrode ice cream 20c Assorted cake 10c 

Bar-le-duc jelly 40c 

Crystallized ginger 15c 

Imported marmalade 20c 
Camembort or roquefort cheese 

with toasted wafers 30c 
Assorted fruit 25c 
Cafe noir 10c 



The Otsego, Jackson, Jlicb. . 

Blue points 

Salted almonds Cheese wafers 

Cream of asparagus Consomme, amber 

Olives Celery hearts Radishes 

Fillet of Penobscot salmon, Priscilla 

Sliced cucumbers Potatoes, Cape Cod 

Fresh mushroom patties 

Thanksgiving turkey, stuffed, cranberries 

Jersey sweets, browned Early June peas 

Old fashioned barbecued pig, apple compote 

Mashed potatoes 

Frozen Tom and Jerry 

Roast squab guinea, red currant jelly 

Cauliflower, hoUandaise String beans 

St. George special salad 

Steamed plum pudding, hot whisky 

Fresh pumpkin pie Home made mince pie 

Charlotte russe 

Harlequin ice cream Fancy cakes 

Oranges Bananas Grapes Apples 

Mixed Nuts Layer raisins Confections 

American, camembert and roquefort cheese 

Whole wheat water crackers Salted wafers 

A. D. mints 

Sweet Cider 

Coffee 



New American Hotel, Mauch Chunck, Pa. (75c) : 
Bluepoint oyster cocktails 
Clear green turtle, American 

Consomme a la tosca 
Queen olives Iced celery hearts 
Salted almonds 
Baked white fish, Mexican style 

Pommes julienne 
Patties of sweetbreads, supreme 

Queen fritters, vanilla sauce 

Sweet cider 

Roast ribs of prime beef au jus 

Roast young native turkey, stuffed, cranberry sauce 

Mashed potatoes Boiled potatoes 

Candied sweet potatoes 

French peas Baked corn pudding 

Oyster Bay asparagus on toast 

Lettuce, plain or dressed 

Lobster salad, mayonnaise 
Home made mince pie Pumpkin custard pie 
English plum pudding, • brandy and hard sauce 

Tutti frutti ice cream 

Fruit cake Lady fingers French kisses Macaroons 

Oranges Grapes Bananas 

Assorted nuts 

Cheese, Roquefort American Imperial Cream 

Saltine wafers 

Bent's toasted crackers 

Demi tasse 



116 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



The Palace, Cincinnati : 

Canape catiar 

Oyster cocktail 

Michigan celery 

Olives Young onions Sweet gherkins 

Salted almonds 

Consomme national 

Chicken gumbo a la Creole 

Baked Potomac shad, royal sauce 

Sliced cucumbers Saratoga chips 

Patties of fresh lobster a la Newburg 

Saute of mushrooms aux croutons 

Sweetbread glace, truffle sauce 

Frozen egg nogg 

Roast ribs of Western beef au jus, 

Yorkshire pudding 
Thanksgiving turkey, chestnut dressing, 

Cranberry sauce 

Snowdrift potatoes 

Eoast suckling pig. Southern style 

Roast haunch of venison, mountaineer 

Cauliflower in cream French peas en cases 

California asparagus, drawn butter 

Louisiana flint rice Candled sweet potatoes 

Cold roast beef Sugar cured ham Tongue 

Chicken mayonnaise Palace fruit salad 

Hot mince pie Yankee pumpkin pie 

New England plum pudding, hard or brandy sauce 

Tutti fruitti ice cream 

Fancy cakes Fruit cake 

Mixed nuts Fruit 

Tea Iced tea Coffee Milk Buttermilk 

St. Julien wine 



Chittenden Hotel, Columbus, Ohio : 
Canape Astrakhan 
Salted almonds 
Little neck clams Blue Point cocktail 

Celery Olives 

Cream of terrapin, Crisfleld Essence of chicken 

Broiled whiteflsh, persillade 

Sliced cucumbers Saratoga chips 

Crab cider 

Bouchecs moderne 

Green peas 

Tenderloin steak, exquisite 

Creamed cauliflower 

Roast suckling pig, sage dressing 

Baked apple 

Jersey sweet potatoes Brussels sprouts 

Young turkey stuffed, chestnut flavor 

Cranberry sauce 

Mashed potatoes Buttered asparagus 

Frozen egg nogg 

Roast haunch of venison, forester 

Cinnamon bear, huntress 

Grape fruit salad 

Cheese souffle 

English plum pudding, brandy sauce 

Mince pie Pumpkin pie 

Frozen charlotte russe 

Harlequin ice cream Fruit cake 

California flgs Fruit English walnuts 

Roquefort cheese 

Toasted water crackers 

Coffee 



Imperial Hotel, Portland, Ore. ($1.50) : 

Toke points on half shell 

Celery Ripe olives Salted almonds 

Cream of chicken, Sevigne 

Mock Turtle aux quenelles 

Consomme Florentine 

Fillet of sea bass, Chambord 

Potatoes fondantes 

Braised calves' sweetbreads a la Nina 

Chicken patties a la reine 

Prime ribs of beef au jus Yorkshire pudding 

Stuffed young turkey, cranberry sauce 

Spring goose with jelly 

Suckling pig and baked apples 

Candied sweet potatoes Roast new potatoes 

French peas in butter 

Louise salad 

Neapolitan ice cream Assorted French pastry 

Plum pudding, hard and brandy sauce 

Mince or pumpkin pie 

Camembert Bents water crackers 

Assorted nuts and raisins 

Demi tasse 



Miscellaneous Holiday Cards. 

Washington's birthday at Creve Coeur Club, 
I'eoria : 

Canapes Bohemian 

Blue points 

Celery Olives 

Clear green turtle 

Salted nuts Kumquats 

Fillet of mountain trout, Aurora 

Potatoes julienne 

Patties of sweetbreads and mushrooms 

Washington punch 

Broiled squab chicken, guava jelly 

Glazed sweet potatoes 

Head lettuce, roquefort dressing 

Strawberries in baskets 

Cake Mints 

Camembert cheese 

Toasted crackers 

Coffee ' ' 

WINES : MAKTINI, SAUTERNE, VEUVE CLICQUOT DRY, 
COGNACj APOLLINARIS. CIGARS. 



Cead Mille Failthe 

St. Patrick's Day at the McKlnzie, Bismarck, 

N. D. (Menu card in form of hat with dudeen) : 

Clam chowder, lipperary Consomme, Shannon 

Olives Celery 

Boiled chicken halibut, O'Reilly 

Natural Murphys 

Westphalian ham, favorite sweet potatoes 

Oysters a la Killarney 

Apple fritters, fairy wands 

Sullivan punch 

Roast prime ribs of beef, Cork gravy 

Roast young turkey, sage dressing, cranberry 

sauce 

Mashed potatoes Murphys with their jackets on 

Seventeenth of March spinach Green peas 

Salad shillelahs 

Hot Rolls 

Apple pie Custard pie 

Emerald ice cream Assorted cake 

American cheese Wafers 

Coffee 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



117 



St. Patrick's day at The Ilutchins, San An- 
tonio, Texas : 

Cream of green peas 

Pat's bouquet Mike's pickles Green olives 

•Pertaties and fishes are mighty good dishes 

St. Patrick's Day in the morn In' " 

Irish stew, Dublin style Green gages with rice 

County Clare pot roast, Shillelah trimmln's 
Spuds from the "Ould Sod" Green okra in cream 
Spinach from Killarney Green beans fromTipperary 

Shamrock salad 

Green grape pie Emerald Isle Sherbet 

Blarney-stone kisses 

A Slice of the Moon 

Green tea Black coffee 



St. Patrick's day at the Grunewald, New Or- 
leans. (Served in a green and gold room ; flowers 
green-dyed carnations, menu printed in green ink 
and listing green foods and green garnishings ; 
the ice cream in form of Brian Boru's harp ; the 
music Irish melodies, vocal and instrumental) : 
Olives Salted almonds Celery 

Lake Pontc'uartain crab meat, Eavigote 
Okra consomme 
Filet of pompano. Florentine, 
Brabauconne potatoes 
Milk fed chicken, Irlandaise 
Prunelle punch 
Eoast crown of lamb, Grunewald 
Water cress salad 
lee cream, surprise 
Petits fours origlnale 
Coffee 
■WISES : Cocktail, Sherry, S'auterne, St. Julien, 
Louis Eoederer GVS, London- 
derry Lithia, Liqueurs. 



A Nicht ■wi' But ns. 

At the Touraine, Buffalo. (SI. 50 per cover.) 

Torbay oysters 

Cockle leekie Hotcb potch 

Celery Olives Salted nuts 

Tawtles and flnnan haddie 

HAGGIS WI' A' THE HONOURS 

"Fair fa' your honest sonsie face. 

Great chieftain o' the puddin' race," 

Baron o' Strathmore beef roastit 

an' mair o' it 

Cauliflower an' ither orra vegetables 

New tatties nice and broon 

Gordon aiple wi' a bit o' cheese 

Oatmeal cakes 

Frozen puddin' wi' a steck 

Shortbread wi' sweeties on't 

Coffee 

Note — Ye can order a dram if y'er minded, aye 

an' anither tastin gin the flrst yin tasted guid. 

For Teetotal folk an' sickllke, soordock cuddle ma 

dearie. Fair new maskit tea. skeichan, Treacle Yil, 

an' ither drink o' that ilk 

Miscellaneous Cards. 

Chicken dinner ($2) at Kobin Hood Inn, New 
Rochelle, N. Y. ; 

(Everything Prepared to Order) 

(Chickens from Our Farm) 

Robin Hood cocktail 

Grape fruit 

Hot Dixie biscuits Crab flakes, Robin Hood 

Steamed soft clams 



Spring chicken a la Maryland 
Broiled spring chicken with Virginia ham 

Fried spring chicken a la Robin Hood 

Hot Virginia corn bread Potatoes 

Vegetables from garden 

Head lettuce salad, French dressing 

Vanilla ice cream Assorted cakes 

Fresh apple pie a la mode 

Demi-tasse 



Union League Club, Chicago : 

Cream of asparagus 

Ripe and green olives 

Breast of pheasant, U. L. C. 

Fried sweet potatoes 

Lettuce, orange and grape fruit salad 

Strawberry ice cream, club style 

Assorted cakes 

Camembert and Roquefort 

Toasted biscuits 

Coffee 

LEMONADE 

CLABET PUNCH 

CHAMPAGNE PUNCH 



The Hartman, Columbus, Ohio : 

Blue point cocktail 

Celery 

Tomato bouillon 

Queen Olives Salted almonds 

Fillet of redsnapper, hoteliere 

Sliced cucumbers Potatoes duchesse 

Braised haunch of venison, Cumberland 

California asparagus, drawn butter 

Frozen egg nogg 

Roast young turlcey, chestnut dressing 

Candied sweet potatoes Jellied cranberry sauce 

Sweet cider 

Hearts of lettuce, French dressing 

English plum pudding, brandy sauce 

Mince pie Pumpkin pie 

Neapolitan ice cream 

Assorted cake 

noquefort or Philadelphia cream cheese 

Toasted crackers 

Coffee 



Seventy-flve cent luncheon served at the Ger- 
man Grill Room of Hotel La Salle, Chicago : 
CHOICE or : 
Blue points Little necks 

Consommg Nizam Purge of lentils 

CHOICE OF : 
Wiener schnitzel mit sardallen 
Boiled ^muskalonge, mustard sauce 
Esterhazy rostbraten, browned potatoes 
Spring lamb hash with green peppers, corn fritters 
(Cold) smoked beef tongue, potato salad 
Tomato stuffed with chicken salad 
York ham boiled with cabbage 
Bluefish baked, Portugaise 
Roast lamb, mint sauce 
Boston baked beans, brown bread 
Boiled potatoes Succotash 

Celery salad 

CHOICE OF : 

French pastry Plain rice pudding 

Strawberry ice cream Orange sherbet 

Vanilla or chocolate eclair Cup custard 

Apple or cocoanut pie Peach tart 

Farina pudding, orange sauce 

La Salle cheese 

Coffee, tea or milk 



118 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



The famous dollar dinner served on the Chi- 
cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul diners between Chi- 
cago and Milwaukee : 

Cotuit cocktail 

Olives Tomatoes Celery 

Split pea Consomme, Duborg 

Suowflako crabmeat au gratin 

Braised sweetbreads, mushrooms 

Roast prime beef, natural 

Roast jumbo squab, currant jelly 

Mashed potatoes Turnips in cream 

Baked hubbard squash Brussels sprouts 

Combination salad, French dressing 

Fresh pumpkin pie 

Apple cobbler, bard and brandy sauce 

Ice cream Assorted cake 

Camembert, edam, roquetort and Waukesha cream 

cheese. Bent's water crackers, toasted 

Coffee Tea 



The Cawtbon, Mobile (shore dinner; nothing but 
sea food ; 85c) : 

Oyster cocktail 

Celery 

Young onions Radishes 

New England clam chowder 

Tenderloin of trout, tartar 

Potatoes, Long Branch 

Crab Meat a la Maryland 

Shrimp salad 

Fruit pudding, brandy sauce 

Cheese, crackers 

Coffee 



"Game" table d'hote dinner. The Grand Pacific, 
Chicago : 

Potage of venison, St. Hubert 

Chocolate cakes 

Coffee 

Salted pecans Olives 

Parmesan straws 

Pattie of wild goose liver, montglass 

Cranberry sherbet 

Roasted butter ball duck, sage dressing 

Risolle sweet potatoes Fried hominy 

Steamed wild rice Currant jelly 

Lettuce salad, mayonnaise 

Neapolitan ic^ cream 

Opening dinner, The Martin, Sioux City : 

Green turtle 

Celery Olives 

Filet of pickerel, normande 

Pommes perslllade 

Larded tenderloin of beef, bouquetiere 

Pommes chateau 

Petits Pois a la Francaise 

Pineapple sherbet 

Hearts of lettuce, French dressing 

Biscuit glace 

Petits fours 

Camembert Roquefort 

Toasted crackers 

Demi tasse 



Breakfast Prescriptions 

The newest idea in club breakfasts comes 
from Hotel Casey, Scranton, Pa. It is in book- 
let form, and gives eighteen selections ranging 
from thirty-five to eighty cents. Each breakfast 
is given a special head in large type, to suggest 
the meal suited to inclination. In this repro- 
duction we omit, to save repetition, the lines 
' ' Served to one person only ' ' and ' ' Cereal with 



cream 15 cents extra. ' ' In the book the cards 
are displayed in the customary fashion : 
A Breakfast "Fit for the Gods" (80c) : 

Grape fruit; Small sirlom with rasher of 
bacon ; Hashed brown potatoes ; Cream toast ; 
Pot of tea or coffee; (or instead of Steak have 
Lamb chops or half a broiled chicken). 
A Substantial Breakfast (75c) : 

Fruit in season ; Combination chop ; Potatoes 
Julienne; Hot rolls; Tea or coffee; (or Pork 
chops or Lamb chops or Veal cutlet). 
A Breakfast for any Kind of a Morning (65c) : 

Fruit in season ; Veal steak fried plain in but- 
ter ; Hashed in cream potatoes ; Hot waffles ; 
Maple syrup or honey ; Pot of tea or coffee. 
A Breakfast for the Blase "Who Don't Know 
What to Eat" (65c) : 

Fruit in season ; Boiled salt mackered swimming 
in hot milk and butter ; Hot fresh baked potatoes ; 
Crisp brown toast ; (or Hotel Casey perfection 
rolls) ; Tea or coffee. 
A Breakfast from the Old Farm (60c) : 

Baked apples with cream ; Fried salt pork ; Hot 
baked potatoes ; Shirred eggs ; Perfection rolls ; 
Tea or coffee. 
A Satisfy ingr Breakfast (60c) : 

Fruit ; English mutton chop split and broiled 
with kidney ; Potatoes au gratin ; Perfection rolls ; 
l^ea or coffee. 
Breakfast Hashes (60c) : 

Grape fruit ; Chicken hash with poached eggs 
or (Lamb hash with green peppers), or (Roast 
beef hash with chopped onions), or (Hamburger 
steak), or (Chopped fresh porterhouse saute) ; 
Baked potatoes ; Hot Rolls ; Tea or coffee. 
A Breakfast for the Epicure (SOc) : 

Baked apple ; Genuine (country) sausage ; 
Baked potatoes ; buckwheat cakes and New Or- 
leans molasses ; Tea or coffee. 

A Breakfast for the Morning When You Don't Feel 
Like Eating Much (SOc) : 

Sliced pineapple ; Spanish omelette (or Omelette 
with chicken livers) ; Saute potatoes ; Perfection 
rolls ; Pot of tea or coffee. 
A Breakfast Always Good (SOc) : 

Orange ; Genuine corned beef hash ; Poached 
eggs; Toasted muflans ; (or Calf's liver and bacon 
or Codfish cakes). 
A Dainty Breakfast (SOc) : 

Fruit ; Veal kidneys, stewed or saute ; (or 
Chicken livers, en brochette) ; Saute potatoes ; 
Dipped toast ; Tea or coffee ; (or Chicken hash 
or Codfish and cream). 
A Breakfast for Friday or Any Day (SOc) : 

Fruit ; Broiled fresh fish ; (or Filet of sole) ; 
Baked potatoes ; Perfection rolls ; Tea or coffee. 
Omelette Breakfast (SOc) 

Fruit ; Eggs Benedictine ; (or Plain omelette) ; 
Hashed brown potatoes : Waffles and honey : Tea 
or coffee; (or Ham omelette or Parsley omelette). 
Breakfast — Out of the Ordinary (SOc) : 

Fruit ; Finnan haddie. Epicure ; Baked potatoes : 
Perfection rolls: Tea or coffee; (or Yarmouth 
bloaters or Kippered herring). 
A Breakfast That is Always Palatable (60c) : 

Fruit ; Ham fried nice and brown with eggs 
fried in ham gravy ; Grilled sweet potatoes ; 
Toasted corn bread ; (or Perfection rolls) ; Tea or 
coffee. 
An English Breakfast (SOc) : 

Orange marmalade ; Cream toast ; Eggs any 
style, with Crisp bacon ; Baked potatoes ; Rolls ; 
Coffee or English breakfast tea. 
A Breakfast — And That's All (40c) : 

Prunes ; Broiled, fried or scrambled eggs ; Per- 
fection rolls ; Tea or coffee. 
A Hurry-Up Breakfast (3Sc) : 

Boiled eggs ; Hot rolls ; Cup of coffee or tea. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 
INCORPORATED 1841 




1 .000,000.00 



For 1913 



■Ii}Siirai^cc(t)inpar^y 



OF NewHaven.Connecticut 

WESTERN DEPARTMENT ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 



xj^'n/ c&nSu/ercUion/ o/ - 



OOOD WORK 



_ Cx3««-wtfr«^«^ cco^^ i/ndu/ite' 



SECURITY PRODUCERS 



—/or^ j^«^ /eit^m' ^O FOUR t.yc<tU'rd< fi^ofn'/ne^ 



2l5t 



.<^c 



/ 



"T' 



JANUARY 



. /9 JL5. a/- 6.J0 /u mi (o>//te . 



.^. 



«^ 



JANUARY fg \Z_ ^^ fO 30/u -ml aaai-nil'^Uj^m'nve</iaU^-nt^-,tUKec/ 

,nofiexeee</t^a4 A OOOD PINNER ^£/Ae Jo^otwna A2^c««4a^j^»^«*^ 

ORAPE FRUIT Cocktail 

The only sour about the Security 

Celery Olives Salted Almonds 

CLEAR OREEN TURTLE 

The only place for Delinquent Agents 

Potatoes Parisienne 

BROILED LIVE LOBSTER Tarter Sauce 
Not a Company product. There are no Security lobsters 

BREAST OF MALLARD DUCK En Virginia Ham 

Caught seeking a warm place- -possibly a steam heated hotel 

French Peas Potatoes Au gratin Asparagus Tips. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET 
A serious water damage 

£NDIVE SALAD Cream Cheese Bar le due 
This is not alfalfa, so not on prohibited list 

ICE (HOUSE) CREAM Neapolitan 
Prohibited- -always a total loss 

DEMI TASSE 
Cigars Cigarettes 

K Bad Smoke damage 

if the risk be increued bv any means within the knowledge of the aasiued, or if any change take place in the appetite or di> 
'fleatlon of the assared; or if the assured is not able to be the sole and imconditional owner of the eatables consumed; or if once 
•vaten this dinner be asaigned; or if foreclosure proceedings be commenced without the consent of this company; then- this policy 
•haJI be null and void. l ^l ^ .. m 

This company shall not be liable for any loss or damage to the dinner eaten caused by foreign invasion or by the neglect of 
the assart to use all practicable means to save and preserve the same from damage. 

This policy cannot be cancelled by the return of edibles eaten. 

In case of loss or damage to this dinner the assured shall give immediate notice thereof and shall at once separate the dam- 
aged and undamaged articles and shall furnish if required verined plans and speciScations of all totally lost property and shall, 
Itrequired, suhmit to examination for the purpose of ascertaining the cause of said loss and the extent of aame. Any fraud or 
attempt at fraud or any awearing (false or otherwise) on the part of the assured shall cause a forfeiture of all claims under tbis 
policy. This company reserves the right to restore and / or replace any property upon which damage is claimed. No Special 
Af ent. Examiner, or Officer of this Company shall have the power or authority to waive any of the conditions of this policy. 



'3n Wtfnesa ^hsxttA this Company has executed and attested these presents this 



21°t ,.^„, Jan. 



-191 



3. 



^^^«,t«^L<M-^ 



Secretary. 



1/ PresidcTit 

Ma7M£eT, 



119 



MENU FOR AN INSURANCE BANQUET SERVED AT THE NELSON, ROCKFORD, ILL. 



120 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Motel Mens 

MUTUALBEMni 



?^SOaATION 




UJ WE ARE HERE TO PLEASE III 



^^^^^ 



CUISINE FAMOUSLY GOOD 



T 



HE ATTENTION of our patrons is especially 
directed to our "home-grown" products. 



The eggs, milk and cream served are from the Northern 
Pacific's Dairy and Poultry Farm at Kent, Washington. 
We operate our own bakeries and butcher shops in 
both St. Paul and Seattle where all our bread, cakes 
and pastry are made and our meats are cut and wrapped 
ready to cook. Creamery butter is served exclusively, 
as is also Pokegama Spring Water bottled at the Springs 
on our own line at Detroit, Minnesota. 



< Originators of the ''Great" 
Big Baked Potato," Feb- 
ruary 8th, 1909, "CoM 
Dishes for Hot Days,'" 
June, 1910, "Hot Dishes 
for Cold Days," en Casse- 
role, October. 1911. 




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iiiiLiiiiiiii uiiiiiiiniii[|iiiiii)iiiii[|iiiiuiiiiii[iiiiiuiniiir+] iumnn!i[4> 



.f iimuninu+niiiiniininiiiiiii nuiairniDuuitiDiiuiDiiiain iiniiiiiaiiiaiiuniciiniiDniHDiiiiininii nininiDiiifiniiniiiHiDunainiuifi] mnnmu t 
i I 

I "Just a Cold Bite for Luncheon" t 



Comptimentary 



DINNER 



Hearts of Lettuce with Hard Boiled Egg, 25 
Sliced Tomatoes, 25 



Combination i;.ettuce and Tomato Salad. 
Pickled Mangoes. 



Smoked Fillet of Boneless Herring, 20 
Lyons Sausage, 20 Salami, 20 

Japanese Crab Meat Cocktail, 40 

Cold Boiled Lobster, Sauce Ravigote, /s 

Cold Boiled Salmon, Ma'rinaded, 50 



Fried Jumbo White Fish, Lemon Butter. 

Saratoga Chipi. 



Fillet Mignon, Trianon. 



f Cold Tomato Bouillon, 20 

I Cold Consomme in Cup. 20 

I 9 

I Cold Roast Beef, Aspic, 50 

I Cold Ribs of Pork, 50 

1 .Leg and Loin of Lamh, Mint Jeily, 50 

I <J 

I Chicken Salad, 50 

I Asparagus Vinaigrette, 40 

I Lemon Cream Pie, 15 Sour Cherry Pie, 

§ Fruit Cake, 15 Ice Cream, 25 

I Vienna Bread, 10 Graham Bread, 10 

I Sweet Rye Bread with Raisins, 10 



California Claret, 15 
Iced Coffee, 15 



Lemonade, 15 



Orange Sherbet. 



Roast Duckling, Farm Style. 

Great Big Baked Potato. 



New Peas with Green Mint. 



Ice Cream with Crushed Strawberries. 
Cake. 



Graham Bread. Sweet Rye Bread. 



California Claret. 
Coffee. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



121 



BREAKFAST 



Mntnnuiat^iiiiminni] HiDiiiiunnuuLntuniiiLiiiiniiniiniiiiiiiitiiHiiitniiitiiiiiiiiiriuiiiiiiiiiiiutnuiiininritK'iiaiuiiin iiiiirnini[*]iinnniBit+ 



BREAKFAST 



Red Raspberries with Cream, 25 

Sliced Hawaiian Pineapple, 25 

Chilled Cantaloupe, 25 

Rolled Oats with Cream, 20 Dry Cereals, 2S 

V 
Broiled Jumbo White Fish, 50 * 

J • 

Tenderloin Steak, 90 
Veal Chops with Bacon, SO 
Ham or Baccn with Eggs, 60 
Chicken Liver and Fresh Mushroom Omelette, 50 
French Toast with Currant Jelly, 25 

Potatoes: French Fried, 15 Saute, 15 In Cream, 20 

Wheat Cakes with Maple Syrup, 25 

9 

E3ry or Buttered Toast, 10 -Vienna Rolls, 10 

a 

Tea, 15 Coflee, 10 Cocoa, 15 



Chilled Orange Juice, 20 

Rockyford Cantaloupe, 25 

Red Raspberries with Cream, 25 

Rolled Oats with Cream, 20 

Cream of Wheat with Cream, 20 

Dry Cereals with Cream, 25 

Salmon Trout, Saute, 50 

3 

Grilled Veal Kidneys with Bacon, 50 

Half Spring Chicken, 60 

Broiled Lamb Chops, 60 

Fried Ham or Bacon with Eggs, Country Style, 60 

Fried Salt Pork, Cream Gravy, 50 

Potatoes O'Brien, 20 German Fried, 15 Hashed Brown, 20 

Wheat Cakes with Maple Syrup, 25 
Wheat Muffins, 10 Rolls. 10 Dry or Buttered Toast, 10 



BREAKFAST 



Chilled Welch's Grape Juice. IS 

Red Raspberries with Creaip, 25 

Stewed Pr\ines, 20 

Baked Apples with Cream, 25 

Oatmeal with Cream, 20 Vitos with Cream. : 

Dry Cereals with Cream, 25 



Fried Lake Trout, SO 

Grilled Mutton Chops, 50 

Broiled Breakfast Sirloin, 90 

Half Spring Chicken Saute, 60 
■i 
Cairs Liver with Bacon, 50 

Ham Steak with Currant Jelly, 60 

Scrambled Eggs with Pimentos. 35 

New Potatoes, 20 Hashed Brown, IS German Fried, 

3 I 
Wheat Cakes, Maple Synip, 25 
9 
Wheat Muffins, 10 Dry or Buttered Toart, 

Tea, 15 Coffee, 10 Cocoa, 15 



'° I 




of the 



OUVENIR Q 
RIP 




/HOTELMEN'S MUTUAL 
BENEFIT ASSOCIATION 

Via the Northern Pacific Railtcay 
From St. Paul, July gth to YELLOW 
STONE PARK, July nth, 1912 

MAY YOUR JOURNEY BE 
ONE OF UNBROKEN PLEASURE 



122 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STBWAED 



Collected by Charles McHugh of the Lexing- 
ton, Chicago, in a Tour Around the World. 

Here are some menus to illustrate Eating 
Aroimd the World. The menus of the steam- 
ship Cleveland were printed in German and 
with English translation ; always on illuminated 
cards, and varied from day to day, so there 
was never a sameness. This dinner card is 
typical : 

HAUPTMAHLZEIT 

Schwedische Vorspeise 

Hiihnersuppe nach Konigin Hortense 

Kraftbruhe mit nudeln 

Gebratener Madeira flsch mit butter 

KartoHeln 

Rehkeule a, la jardini6re 

Glasierte kalbsschweser mit spargel 

Gebratener liapaun 

Kompott Salat 

Nesselrode-eis, maraschino-sauce 

Baumkuchen 

Nachtiscb 

* * * 

DINNER 

Hers d'oeuvre & la Sufidoise 

Chicken soup ^ la Reine Hortense 

Consommfi with noodles 

Fried Madeira flsh with butter 

Potatoes 

Leg of venison a la jardinifire 

Glazed sweetbreads with asparagus 

Roast capon 

Compote Salad 

Nesselrode ice cream, maraschino sauce 

Pyramid cake 

Dessert 

Here is a dinner card of Shepheard's Hotel, 

Cairo : 

DINEE 

Cr6me de riz a I'anglaise 

Loup de mer see. cipres 

Pointe de boeuf a la bourgoise 

Petits pois au beurre 

Poulets rOtis au cresson 

Salade de saison 

Crolltes joinville 

Fruits 
CafS a la turque 

This is B, luncheon card at the Taj Mahal 
Palace Hotel at Bombay (three-fourths of the 
card devoted to advertisements of liquors, 
theaters and curio stores) : 

LUNCHEON. 

Saucisses au vin blanc 

Quartier d'agneau, Boulangftre 

Braised cabbages 

Fish molay & rice 

Cold joints 

Salade 

Banana fritters, custard sauce 

Here is the card of a dinner on a dining car 
of the Great Indian Peninsula Bailroad, served 
between Bombay and Agra. (The attendants 



brought coffee and cakes to the passengers for 

early breakfast.) : 

DINNER 

Royal soup 

Fillets' of flsh au chablis 

Poulet saute, demidoff 

Green vegetables 

Roast mutton 

Salad 

Caramel cream 

Cheese 

Coffee 

Here is the tifiSn card of the Galle Face 
Hotel, of Colombo, Ceylon. You will note the 
dishes are numbered to facilitate the ordering. 
Also note the charge of fifty cents per glass 
for iced tea and iced coffee: 
TIFFIN. 

1 Hors d'oeuvre 

2 Consommg en tasse 

3 Filets de poisson a la Russe 

4 Mousse de foie gras, Alsacienne 

5 Mixed grill 

6 Lggumes 

7 Buffet froid 

8 Salade 

9 Glace a la vauille 

10 Malacca pudding 

11 Fruits 

ICE TEA AND ICE COFFEE AT 50 CTS. PER GLASS 

This luncheon was served at Queen's Hotel, 
Kandy, Ceylon. 

LUNCH. 

SOUP 

Cockie leekle 

FISH 

Fish mowlie 

HOT 

Grilled chicken, Robert see 
Irish stew 

VEGETABLES 

Potatoes, pumpkin 

COLD. 
SALAD 

Potato salad 

SWEETS 

Juggery pudding 

Here is a luncheon card of Minto Mansions 

Hotel, of Eangoon, Burma. You will note the 

chef's name is printed at the foot of the card. 

(The musical program printed on the page 

opposite the menu listed, among other pieces, 

Alexander's Eag Time Band.): 

LUNCH 

Fruits 

Vermicelle soup 

Mayonnaise of fish 

Boiled chicken and rice 

Vegetables 

Mashed potatoes 

COLD. 

Roast beef 

Pressed beef 

Ox tongue 

Stewed fruits en compote 

Punch a la Romaine 

Cheese Coffee 

Le Claie, Chef de Cudsine. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



123 



Here is a dinner card of the Grand Hotel 

D' L 'Europe, of Singapore: 

1 Pea soup 

2 Mullet a la Portugalse 

3 Chicken and ham pic 

4 Baron d'agneau and spaghetti 

5 Mutton curry and brinjal 

6 Cold oxtongue, salade Russe 

7 Tartelette aux pommes 

8 Glace Moscovitte 

9 Cheese 10 Fruit 11 Coffee 

And here is a tiffin card of the Hong Kong 
Hotel, of Hong Kong, a menu we thoroly en- 
joyed: 

TIFFIN 

HOT 

1. — Oxtail soup 

2. — Salmon mayonnaise 

3. — Roast sirloin of beef and horseradish 

4. — Roast chicken and bread sauce 

5. — Cabbage 6. — Potatoes 

7. — Singapore curry 

COLD 

8. — Roast lamb 9. — Pork pies 

10. — Roast wild duck 11. — Bologna sausage 

12. — Mixed salad 

SWEETS 

13. — Sago pudding 

14. — Vanilla charlotte russe 

15. — Oranges 16 — Coffee 

Here is the luncheon card of Hotel Prinz 

Heinrich at Tsingtau, Northern China, printed 

both in German and in English : 

LUNCHEON 

Kraftbiihe in tassen 

Mulligatawny suppe 

Geraucherter lachs mit rilhreier 

Hiihner fricassee mit brechspargel & reis 

Eoastbeef, meerrettig 

Splnat mit ei, Shantung salat 

KALTES BUFFET I 

Wild pastete, Yorkshire schinken 

Landsknecht salat 

Bngllscher plum pudding, rhum see 

Berliner pfannkuchen 

Kase : Schweizer, Roquefort 

Friichte, Kaffee 

# * * 

Beeftea in cups 

Mulligatawny soup 

Smoked salmon & scrambled eggs 

Chicken fricassee with asparagus & rice 

Roastbeef, horseradish 

Spinach with eggs, Shantung salad 

COLD BUFFET I 

Game pie, Yorkshire ham 

Landsknecht salad 

Plum pudding with rhum 

Berlin fritters 

Cheese : Gruyere, Roquefort 

Fruits in season, Coffee 

And here is a typical Japanese menu of the 

Kyoto Hotel in Kyoto, an excellent dinner: 

DINNER 

Consomme a la Paricienne 

Boiled tai fish, HoUandise see 

Fillet of beef and jardiniere 



Boiled chicken, supreme see 

Oyster pate 

Celery au jus 

Cauliflower, cream see 

Boast stuffed turkey, cranberry see 

Plum pudding 

Vanilla ice cream 

Gateaux assortis 

Fruits 

Coffee 
-* 
This card is a luncheon at the Japanese sum- 
mer resort Nara near Kyoto. Note the 
"Vegetables from our farm" announcement at 
the foot of the card: 

LDNCHEON 

Consomme with Italian paste 

Cold lobster & mayonnaise 

Fricassee of chicken with champignons 

Broiled beefsteak & julienne potatoes 

COLD JlIEATS 

Roast beef & chicken 

York ham & pork pie 

Radish salad 

Apple pie 

Cheese 

Fruits 

Tea or coffee 

FKESH VEGETABLES SUPPLIED FROM OUK OWN FAE.U 

And here is the menu of a dinner served to 
eighty-five people at the Moana Hotel, of Hono- 
lulu, given by Mr. J. H. Hanan, who had sent 
his order by wireless. This was an expensive 
meal. The bill was $1,250. The extras in- 
cluded 100 bottles of champagne at $5.00, and 
a profusion of flowers: 

Poi cocktail 
Olives Salted almonds Radishes 

Filet of kumu au vin blanc 
Potatoes Parisienne 
Roast lamb 
Green peas New potatoes in cream 

Banana fritter 
Hawaiian fruit salad 
Pineapple ice a la Ivier 
Toasted biscuits with guava jelly 
Cafe noir 
The table fare was good most everywhere, ex- 
cept India, where it was curry and rice, curry 
and rice, three times a day. We enjoyed the 
best hotel foods in Japan. 

This is the menu for the opening dinner, 

served at Hotel Ansley, Atlanta, June 30. 

Hors d'oeuvres varies 

Clear green turtle, royale 

Celeri Amandes Olives 

Filets of fresh mackerel, Bonnefoy 

Pommes persillade 

Kroraeskies of sweetbreads 

Punch a la Ansley 

Roast royal squab, American style 

Petit pois Guava jelly 

Tomatoes anehois 

Biscuit Tortoni 

Petits fours 

Roquefort 

Toasted crackers 



Cafe noir 



Apollinaris 



124 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



AN EXFOSITION OF THE CONDENSES 
' nCENU IDEA. 



Specimen Breakfast, I^uncheon, Dinner and 

Supper Cards Compiled by Practical 

Stewards. 

(From The Hotel Monthly, April, 1907.) 

We present in this issue a number of menus 
selected from those that have reached our desk, 
as illustrating the predominant idea of what is 
most acceptable in the selection and style of 
presentation of the present day cards for 
American plan houses. It will be noticed that 
the condensed menu is growing more in favor. 
Also that some of the menus of meals-for-a- 
price are worded so that expensive dishes un- 
der head of Roasts, or Entrees, or Game, or 
Pastry have the words "choice of" alongside 
these departments, so that the guest ordering 
may, in a measure, be restrained from the 
wickedly wasteful plan of ordering more than 
he can eat (for the simple reason that he has 
the privilege of ordering all that is listed set 
before him, whether he wants it or not). 

Most hotelkeepers are afraid to print the 
words "choice of" on their bills-of-fare, for 
fear of appearing to be stingy; but there seems 
to be no real grounds for such fears. 

The waiters can be instructed to serve all 
that is ordered, if necessary, and the putting 
of the words on the cards simply acts as a 
sort of brake, or restraint, and suggests to the 
man who is ordering that the hotelkeeper ex- 
pects him to be rational; and the appearance 
of the words "choice of" has the desired effect 
in nine out of ten cases. 

The thing to do, however, when "choice of" 
appears on the card, is to, by all means, serve 
liberal portions and, if it be possible, improve 
the quality of service consequent upon the 
fewer dishes ordered and the less work for 
cooks, waiters and dishwashers. 

Of course it requires more ability to make a 
small and consistent bill-of-fare than it does 
to make a big bill, where all to do is to put 
on everj'thing in the market. 

The test of a man's ability as a caterer can 
best be judged from the concise and rational 
selection of his menus. 

* * * 

The breakfast, dinner and supper cards fol- 
lowing this paragraph are of a popular and 
prosperous hotel with rates of $2 upward, lo- 
cated in a western city of over 20,000 popula- 
tion. The proprietor of this hotel is a man 
whose opinion we value. He writes; "You will 
note I do not use the word 'choice' or 'or' on 
them, as I consider my bill rather light, al- 
though it is as heavy today as any man can 
run for a fifty-cent meal." [As evidencing the 
difference that high prices of provisions make, 
this gentleman says that in 1906 he did $4,000 
more business than in 1905, but made $2,000 
less, which shows that everything costs more 
now than heretofore. — Ed.] 

Brealcfast 

Oranges Stewed plums 

Hot clam bouillon in cups 

Toasted corn flakes Oat meal Puffed rice 

Broiled sirloin or tenderloin steak 

Pork chops Fried sausage 



Stewed chicken 

Broiled ham Broiled bacon 

Eggs, as ordered 

Plain boiled potatoes French fried potatoes 

Potatoes in cream 

Fried mush Milk toast 

Plain bread Hot biscuit Wheat muffins 

Buckwheat cakes, log cabin maple syrup 

Tea Coffee Cocoa Milk 

Dinner 

Soup; sifted pea 

Lettuce Mangoes India relish 

Baked lake trout, egg sauce 

Boiled fresh tongue with spinach 

Prime roast beef, dip gravy 

Roast turkey, dressing, cranberry sauce 

"Veal fricassee with peas 

Braised beef tenderloins with mushrooms 

Apple tapioca pudding, brandy sauce 

Mashed potatoes Boiled potatoes 

Stewed tomatoes Creamed hominy 

Corn bread 

Apple pie Pumpkin pie 

Apricot ice 

Assorted cake, crackers, cheese 

Tea Coffee Cocoa Milk 

Supper 

Boston clam chowder 

Corn meal mush Force Grape-nuts 

Broiled sirloin or tenderloin steak 

Plain or with mushroom sauce 

Baked pork spare ribs with horseradish 

Cold; Roast beef Tongue Pork Corned beef 

Eggs, as ordered 

Baked potatoes Saratoga chips 

Potatoes In cream 

Hot ginger bread Pickled beets 

Plain bread Parker House rolls Dry toast 

Hot waffles, log cabin maple syrup 

Assorted cake California grapes 

Tea Coffee Cocoa Milk 

* * * 

N. J. Ross, Avenue House, Evanston, 111., in 
submitting the following samples of his 
menus, says that he condenses his cards to the 
best of his ability, and they are so much boiled 
down that he does not like to insert the words 
"choice of." "If I ran greater variety I would 
adopt the words 'choice of,' " he said, "but 
under present conditions, In my house, It would 
be impracticable. You will note that my break- 
fast bill is rather long. I use a larger break- 
fast bill because most everything on it is 
cooked to order, and the guests are usually 
more fastidious at breakfast time. I regard 
breakfast the hardest meal to serve, notwith- 
standing most people eat the simplest foods. 
My experience is that good corned beef hash is 
the greatest breakfast favorite." 

Breakfast 

Fruit: Oranges Stewed prunes 

Oyster stew Clam bouillon in cup 

Shredded wheat biscuits 

Oat meal Grape nuts Cracked wheat 

Fried oysters 

Broiled: 

Sirloin steak Tenderloin steak Mutton chops 

Breakfast bacon Ham 

Eggs; Shirred Poached Boiled Fried 
Omelets: Cheese Tomato Parsley 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



125 



Potatoes: Baked Stewed Fried 

Bread: Plain Toast Brown Graham Corn 

Tea: Oolong English breakfast Lipton's Ceylon 

Cocoa Coffee 

Iiuucheou 

Puree of English split peas 

Fried Spanish mackerel, potatoes diagonal 

Fried ham, cream gravy 

Welsh rarebit on shredded wheat biscuit 

Baked potatoes French fried potatoes 

Cold roast beef Cold roast veal 

Spiced pigs' feet Salmon 

Grape-nut pudding, lemon sauce 

Mixed cake Cherry sauce 

Tea Coffee 

Dinner 

Oysters 

Celery Sailed peanuts Olives 

Puree of tomato, aux croutons 

Broiled whitefish, maitre d'hotel 

Potatoes diagonal 

Prime roast beef, demi-glace 

Roast young turkey, giblet sauce 

Boiled potatoes New potatoes in butter 

Spinach New beets 

Braized sweetbreads, financiere 

Pineapple glace, curacoa 

Lettuce salad 

Cranberry pie Lemon cream pie 

Chocolate ice cream 

ilixed cake Edam cheese 

Coffee 

* * * 

August Stocker, of Hotel Lahr, Lafayette, 
Ind., writes: "I am very glad that you are 
agitating the advisability of commercial hotels 
on the American plan adopting a more con- 
densed bill-of-fare, which Is, as I find it, also 
meeting more and more with the approval of 
the guests. Our bills have been of about the 
same composition for the last six years, the 
dishes, of course, changing with the seasons, 
and we have been complimented oftener than 
criticised by our patrons, regarding the ar- 
rangement of the bill and selection of the 
dishes." 

Breakfast 

Fruit: Baked apples Stewed prunes 

Sweet cider 

Rolled oats Grape-nuts 

Shredded wheat biscuits 

Fried flsh: Finnan haddie, Delmonico 

Broiled: Tenderloin steak, plain or tomato sauce 

Breakfast sausage Bacon 

Mutton chops Fried mush 

Eggs to order 

Omelet: Plain Cheese Ham Jelly Parsley 

Baked potatoes Saute potatoes 

Toast as ordered 

French rolls Farina muffins Vienna rolls 

Rice cakes Buckwheat cakes 

Comb honey Maple syrup 

Coffee Tea as ordered Cocoa 

Dinner 

Caviar, canape 

Consomme printaniere Chicken, a la Reine 

Young onion Radishes Sweet pickles 

Fillet of red flsh, court bouillon 

Potatoes Parislenne 

Calf's head, Andalouse 

Tenderloin of beef, bordelaise 



Orange cream fritters au cognac 

Marguerite punch 

Prime native beef, au jus 

Roast chicken, giblet sauce 

Boiled potatoes Mashed potatoes 

White asparagus Green peas 

Lettuce salad with egg 

Steamed spice pudding, sauce au rum 

Clierry pie Lemon meringue pie 

Neapolitan ice cream 

Assorted cake 

Fruit Mixed nuts Sweet cider 

Royal and American cheese 

Saratoga wafers 

Cafe noir 

Supper 

Bouillon 

Grape-nuts Shredded wheat Corn meal rnush 

Chow chow Dill pickles 

Fried fish 

Broiled: 

Tenderloin or sirloin steak, 

plain or mushroom sauce 

Sugar cured ham 

Boston baked pork and beans 

Chicken giblets, saute, with mushrooms 

Eggs as ordered 

Omelet: Plain Ham Cheese Rum 

Steamed potatoes Saute potatoes 

Cold: Roast beef Ox tongue Corned beef 

Ham Lambs' tongues Sardines 

Pig's feet Bermuda onions Salmon salad 

Tea rolls Gingerbread Fruit ice 

Rice cakes Toast as ordered 

Stewed prunes Apple sauce 

Royal or American cheese 

Sweet cider 

Tea to order 

Coffee Cocoa 

♦ * It 

Charles G. Moore, Windermere Hotel, Chi- 
cago, writes: "I have met with much success 
by using the condensed menu, but as you say, 
the selection and quality must be correct. I 
don't much like the idea of using the words 
'choice of.' The waste of material can be gov- 
erned by the size of the portion and the qual- 
ity of the food. People are not wasteful as a 
rule. But at many houses one is forced to 
order quite a number of dishes to insure get- 
ting enough to eat of the right sort." 

These cards of the Windermere express Mr. 
Moore's ideas of the condensed menu: 
Breakfast 
Fruit 
Whipped cream Cherry preserve Hominy grits 

Bordeau flakes 

Shredded wheat biscuit Quaker rolled oats 

Rolls: French Vienna Parkerhouse 

French toast 

Broiled fresh mackerel Kippered herring 

Eggs: 

Fried Boiled Shirred Poached Scrambled 

Omelets: 

Plain, Spanish, with olives, parsley or jelly 

Sugar cured ham Tenderloin steak 

Sirloin steak Breakfast bacon 

Lamb chops 

Breakfast sausage 

Roast beef hash, browned 

Potatoes: Baked German Fried Saratoga 

Moca-Java coffee Cocoa English breakfast tea 

Wheat cakes, with maple syrup or comb honey 



126 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



^nnclieou 

Cream of celery, comtesse Beef tea 

Queen olives Corn relish 

Broiled fresh mackerel, lemon butter 

Potatoes, Saratoga 

Boiled mutton, caper sauce 

Mashed potatoes 

Baked onions Stewed tomatoes 

Chicken pie, individual 

Cold: Roast veal Boiled ham Roast beef 

Pickled lamb's tongue 

Raspberry sherbet 

Celery and apple salad 

Cabinet pudding, brandy sauce 

Assorted cakes Hot Philadelphia rusks 

Cherry preserve Cranberry tarts 

American and Neufcliatel cheese 

Hard crackers 

Tea Cocoa Coffee 

Dinner 

Blue points 

Green turtle soup, sherry 

Beef tea, whipped cream 

Boiled salmon, Norraande 

Potatoes, bonne femme 

Roast prime beef au jus 

Roast Philadelphia capon, stuffed 

Lamb sweetbreads en casserole 

Calf's head a la vinaigrette 

Rice croquettes, lemon sauce 

Mashed potatoes Fried sweet potatoes 

German hot slaw String beans 

Turkish sherbet 

Lettuce and sliced tomatoes 

Charlotte russe 

Apple pie Rhine wine jelly 

New York ice cream Assorted cakes 

American, Roquefort and Camembert cheese 

Hard crackers 

Fruit 

Claret cup 

Coffee Tea Co^'oa 

Supper 

Sardines on toast 

Queen olives 

Clam bouillon, whipped cream 

Sweet pickles Salted peanuts 

Deviled crabs, stuffed in shells 

Broiled sirloin steak, fried onions 

Ham and eggs, country style 

Chicken livers, Richelieu 

Pork tenderloin, fried apples 

Chipped beef in cream 

Baked potatoes Hulled corn 

Sliced tomatoes 

Flannel griddle cakes, maple syrup 

Neapolitan ice cream Assorted cakes 

Cabinet pudding, wine sauce Peaches in syrup 

Camembert cheese 

Toasted crackers 

Coffee Tea Cocoa 

* # # 

F. W. Sink, manager of Hotel Downey, 
Lansing, Mich., writes: 

"Dear Sir: — In answer to your letter of 
March 15, I enclose two bills of fare from the 
Downey, which will illustrate the 'choice' idea 
spoken of. 

Iiuuclieoii 

(75 cents) 

Chicken broth with rice 

Olives Dill pickles Chow chow 



Baked salmon trout a la bordelaise 

Potatoes princesse 

Boiled salt pork witii spinach 

Ragout of lamb Parisienne 

Pineapple ice 

Roast prime beef 

Mashed potatoes Stewed corn 

Roast leg of veal, brown gravy 

Boiled potatoes 

Hot biscuits 

Cold meats 

Pickled pigs' feet Kippered herring 

Chipped beef 

Boiled ham Lamb hearts Roast pork 

Sardines 

Chicken salad 

Rice custard, hard sauce 

Rhubarb pie 

Fruit Canned pears Cake 

Walnut dates Turkish figs 

American and Swiss cheese 

Coffee Tea Milk 

Table d'Hote 

(60 cents) 

From 12 to 2 p. m. 

Blue points 

Chicken broth with rice 

Olives or dill pickles or chow chow 

Baked salmon trout a la bordelaise 

Potatoes princesse 

Roast prime beef or 

Roast veal, brown gravy 
Pineapple it.c 
Boiled salt pork with spinach or 
Ragout of lamb Parisienne 
Hot biscuits 
Mashed potatoes or boiled potatoes 
Stewed corn 
Chicken salad 
Rice custard, hard sauce or Rhubarb pie 

Tea Coffee Milk 

"These bills are used where the American 
plan and cafe are run from the same kitchen 
and a table d'hote served in the cafe from the 
American bill without the work of extra prep- 
aration. Note that the table d'hote is selected 
from the luncheon with the word 'or' inserted, 
the only extra being 'blue points.' This allows 
a reasonable selection and quantity sufficiently 
large without the opportunity for waste af- 
forded by the American bill. We charge 50c 
for the table d'hote, and 75c for the American 
luncheon. 

"This is not an example of a carefully se- 
lected bill-of-fare, but rather one of econom- 
ically serving the cafe from the American plan. 
luncheon 
(35 cents) 
Cream of tomatoes Pin-money pickles 

Breaded veal cutlet 
Mashed potatoes String beans 

Sliced peaches 
Coffee Tea 

Sinner 
(75 cents) 
Beef broth a I'Anglaise 
Celery 
Fried frog legs Tartar sauce 

Potatoes julienne 
Broiled spring chicken 
French fried potatoes Corn on cob 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



127 



Quartered tomatoes 

Cantaloupe a la mode Cake 

Coffee 

"The above are examples of condensed bills 
of fare without choice, (These are practical 
examples, as I operated the Detroit Boat Club 
on this plan last summer, with evident satis- 
faction.) 

"In selecting a bill of fare of this kind, it is 
necessary to exercise the utmost care to serve 
only dishes that EVERYONE likes. The best 
way to ascertain this is to watch the guests 
carefully, and note what dishes are eaten and 
what are not. Inquire among the guests with 
whom you feel at liberty to converse on the 
subject, and get their ideas; they may not all 
think alike, but their likes and dislikes will 
give a very good line on the foods which are 
most favored. Put yourself in the place of a 
man who is taking a friend or two out to 
dinner, or perhaps to his home. The menu 
will be carefully prepared beforehand; he will 
not ask his guests what they prefer, but will 
have given the matter careful consideration 
and have selected such things as are most 
certain to please them. 

"Here are a few hints which experience has 
taught me will generally hold good; 

"Always serve a thick soup; not one in ten 
will care for consomme; he may eat it, but he 
will not say, 'My, that's a good soup.' 

"Almost everyone eats celery, olives, and 
good sweet pirkles. Never use onions, sour 
or dill pickles. 

"Frogs are always a favorite when fried 
nicely in butter, not breaded or thrown into 
the deep grease. Whitefish comes next, then 
perch and pickerel. A fried fish is preferable 
to a baked one. Few people care for boiled 
fish. Cut out the cod, mackerel and fish of 
that kind. Crabs and lobsters are doubtful. 

"The dinner roast should always be a fowl; 
chicken, fried, broiled or roasted, turkey or 
duck. Goose Is not in such favor as the 
others. Chicken always has the lead. The 
luncheon meat must be reasonably hearty, as 
it is practically the whole meal. Such things 
as veal cutlets, roast veal, small broiled 
steaks, or any hearty fowl entree are reason- 
ably certain to find favor. Never use pork or 
mutton, and croquettes and patties are not 
hearty enough. 

"Almost all the common vegetables are ac- 
ceptable when well prepared. A great many 
people do not care for parsnips, oyster plant, 
onions, turnips or eggplant. 

"Tomato, lettuce, and fresh salads are al- 
most always sure to please. Have the dress- 
ing served on the side, as this is the subject 
of many likes and dislikes. 

"Never use canned vegetables for salads; 
nor do I favor a heavy salad with such a meal. 

"In desserts there is a wide variety of 
opinion, but everyone eats ice cream and cake, 
and this can te served in endless variety. 
Berries and melons are most always eaten and 
are also acceptable when served with ice 
cream. Cantaloupe a la mode is a special 
favorite. Pies and some puddings, too, are 
good at luncheon, but I do not favor them 
for dinner. A nicely decorated stand of fruit 



may be served when there is another dessert, 
but not alone. 

"It is advisable to allow choice of drinks." 

* « « 

Charles Kriel, steward of the Oriental in 
Dallas, Tex. (rates $3 to $5J, writes that the 
accompanying bills of fare, sent upon our 
request, really do not do justice to the hotel, 
on account of the enormous crowds the house 
has entertained the past two weeks. Com- 
menting on the condensed menu idea, he says: 

"Your object is a very desirable one and I 
trust it will do some good. My experience 
and aim has been in the past to buy the best, 
have small menus, good selections that all 
can find enough to make a good meal of, have 
it well cooked and served in liberal portions 
and as nicely as possible and quick. A great 
many people get nervous and lose their appe- 
tite by having large bill to select from. 
Again I say, large bills do not count for any- 
thing. It is the way it is cooked and served, 
and quality. A large bill is a daily repeater, 
whereas a small bill can be changed daily. It 
is always in keeping with the market, also the 
eatables can be kept fresher before and after 
preparing, and cooked more appetizingly. Par- 
don my lengthy comment, but I could enu- 
merate other features in favor of a small, 
select menu bill for the American plan hotel." 

Breakfast 

Grape-fruit 

Oranges Pineapple 

Cream cheese 

Stewed prunes Honey 

Cream of wheat Oatmeal 

Clam bouillon 

Shredded wheat biscuits 

Maple flake Quaker pufE rice Grape-nuts 

French rolls Finger rolls 

Corn muffins Coffee cake Hot cakes 

Corn cakes Toast Buckwheat cakes 

Boiled or broiled salt mackerel 

Broiled fresh fish 

Eggs as ordered 

Omelette: Plain, Spanish, Ham, Parsley 

Sirloin steak Tenderloin steak 

Pork chops 

Breakfast bacon Sugar cured ham 

Fried calf's liver 

Country sauSage Brown corned beef hash 

Creole sauce Mushroom sauce 

Fried onions 

Potatoes: 

Baked French fried Stewed Lyonnaise 

Maple syrup Honey Molasses 

Tea: Oolong English breakfast Gunpowder 

Cream Milk Coffee Cocoa Chocolate 

I^nnclieon 

Caviar on toast 

Bouillon 

Potage a I'Andalouse 

Dill pickles Green onions Chow chow 

Baked trout a I'ltalienne 

Potatoes duchesse 

Lamb chops with schnittbohnen 

Filet de beef a la piquante 

Minced fowl a la Creole 

Mashed potatoes Stewed corn Cream of Tyheat 

String beans salad 

Ginger bread 



128 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



Cold: Roast beef Ham Tongue Turkey 

Corned beef Veal loaf Head cheese Sardines 

Apple roll, cream sauce 

Rhubarb pie Assorted cake 

Green gage sherbet 

American and 'Swiss cheese 

Coffee Tea Ice tea Milk 

Buttermilk Chocolate Cocoa 

Dinner 

Consomme Neapolitan 

Cream of asparagus 

Olives Chow chow Dill pickles 

Baked white fish a I'ltalienne 

Potatoes Anglais 

Salmi of game, hunter style 

Stuffed tomatoes a la Creole 

Fried hominy with English breakfast bacon 

Roast prime beef au jus 

Mashed potatoes Wax beans 

Roast spring chicken with currant jelly 

Fried sweet potatoes Stewed corn 

Endive salad 

Royal pudding, brandy sauce 

Peach pie Almond custard pie 

Assorted cake 

Caramel Ice cream 

Fruit: Nuts Raisins Figs Dates 

Cheese: Roquefort Edam Pineapple 

Crackers 

Tea Chocolate Coffee 

* * * 

The executive committee of the Western 
New England Hotelkeepers' Association held 
a meeting at Hotel Wendell in Pittsfleld, Mass., 
March 15, and decided to advise the adoption 
of the American plan "under control" system 
in the hotels of the smaller cities where it does 
not seem advisable to adopt the "modified Eu- 
ropean plan" as in operation at Hotel Wen- 
dell. "American plan, under control" system 
means to limit (control) the amount of food a 
guest may order by using the term "choice of" 
on the menus, as is now used on the menus of 
the table d'hote meals at the Wendell. [See 
specimen menus in exhibit. — Ed.] 

* * * 

Steward Milo E. Westbrook, of Hotel Wen- 
dell, who has contributed a set of his bills of 
fare for this exhibit of condensed cards in 
Hotel Monthly, writes: 

"When the Wendell Hotel changed to the 
'modified' European plan, June 1, 1906, the 
term 'choice of was one of the modifications 
along with the club breakfast and the table 
d'hote lunch and dinner. In making up the 
bill-of-fare we always aim to have such an as- 
sortment of dishes that the average man would 
be able to select a substantial meal. Owing to 
the simplicity of the menu the cooks have 
plenty of time to prepare it well. Great care 
is -use^d in selecting the ingredients for the 
soup, using nothing but the best materials and 
especially a strong clear stock, distinctive in 
taste to what the name implies, whether it be 
chicken,' ox-tail, mutton, etc.; well seasoned 
but not to excess. A well made soup is a hint 
to the diner of what he may expect in the 
dishes that are to follow, and with a liberal 
plate of such soup and plenty of bread and 
butter it would almost make a meal. 

"Equally as much attention is exercised In 



selecting the fish and the preparation of same. 

"Two entrees and and one roast for lunch, 
each entirely different from the other both in 
appearance and preparation. As the guest can 
only have the 'choice' of one of the three, 
there should be enough difference in them so 
that he would in reality be able to have a 
choice; and we give a liberal portion of that 
one, which of course has been prepared with 
the utmost care, of the best quality, neatly 
served and tastily garnished. 

"We give the 'choice' of two vegetables: the 
potato (if ordered) counts for one. The prep- 
aration of the vegetables is not left entirely 
with the vegetable cook, unless it be some 
particular kind that he has proven himself 
entirely competent to handle alone. 

"The salad usually is some simple one, pref- 
erably a vegetable, which is not 'thrown' to- 
gether. 

" 'Choice of one of the desserts (consisting 
of two pies, a pudding and fruit, with a piece 
of Edam or American cheese). 

"One cup of coffee, tea or milk. 

"For this meal we get 50 cents. For dinner 
we get 75 cents, but give them a 'choice of 
one of two entrees, 'choice of one of two roasts 
and 'choice of two of the desserts, making one 
more meat dish, and one more dessert that we 
give for the extra 25 cents for dinner. 
Combination Breakfast 

Order by numbers, stating what your choice 
is, thus avoiding any misunderstanding. 

No. 1 — 15c. 

Two rolls and butter 

Clioice of Cup of coffee Tea Milk 

Cereal with cream with No. 1 combination, 

10 cents extra 

No. 2 — 25c 

Two boiled eggs 

Choice of Rolls Dry toast 

Choice of Cup coffee Tea Milk 

Cereal with cream with No. 2 combination, 

10 cents extra 

No. 3 — 40c. 
Cereal with cream 
Choice of Country sausage Liver and bacon 
Corned beef hash Pork chops 
Broiled fish Codfish cakes 
Scrambled eggs. 

Poached eggs on toast 
Choice of Baked potatoes Fried potatoes 

Choice of Assorted rolls Dry toast 

Choice of Cup coffee Tea Milk 

No. 4 — 50c 
Choice of Cereal with cream Orange 

Stewed prunes Apple sauce 
Bananas with cream 
Baked apples with cream 
Choice of Two lamb chops 

Breakfast sirloin steak 

Ham and eggs Chicken hash 

Choice of Baked Fried Stewed 

Choice of Assorted rolls Dry toast 

Choice of Cup coffee Tea Milk 

Griddle cakes with maple pure syrup 10c 

Banana 5c Orange 10c 

Stewed prunes 5c Apple sauce 5c 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



129 



Baked apples with cream 10c 

Extra cup coffee 5c 

The above prices prevail in connection with the 

Combination Breakfasts only 

Table d'Hote Knnclieon 

(50 cents) 
To avoid any misunderstanding waiters are 
instructed to serve a regular table d'hote lunch 
unless otherwise ordered. 
Choice Cream of chicken a la creme 20o 
Consomme 20c 
Baked weakfish a I'Espagnole 
Potatoes Fantaise 35c 
Choice of Boiled potatoes 5c 

Choice Veal pot pie with dumplings 35c 

Salisbury steak with dumplings 35c 
Roast ribs of beef au jus 25c 

Mashed potatoes 5c 
Two aishes Stewed celery 5c Lima beans 5c 

Cold slaw 15c 
Choice Apple pie 5c Cranberry pie 5c 

Tapioca pudding, port wine sauce 10c 
Banana 5c Orange 10c 

Choice Edam cheese 5c American cheese 5c 

Choice Tea 10c Coffee 10c Milk 10c 

Substitution in dishes will be charged for 
Those who do not wish to order table d'hote 
lunch may order any portion they choose by 
paying the amount that appears opposite the 
item ordered. 

Table d'Hote Dinner 

(75 cents) 
To avoid any misunderstanding waiters are 
instructed to serve a regular table d'hote din- 
ner unless otherwise ordered. 
Choice Vegetable 20c Consomme 20c 

Boiled fresh mackerel, maitre d'hotel 
Potatoes 35c 
Boiled calf's head, 

sauce vinaigrette 40c 
Choice of Emince of tenderloin a la Creole 50c 
Choice of Boiled potatoes 5c 

Two dishes Roast leg of mutton, 

currant jelly 35c 
Roast ribs of beef au Jus 25c 

Mashed potatoes 5c 
Two dishes String beans 5c Squash 5c 

Mixed salad 15c 
Choice of Apple pie 6c Pumpkin pie 5c 

Two dishes Orange 10c Bananas 5c 

Cottage pudding, rum sauce 10c 
Choice Edam cheese 5c American cheese 5e 

Choice Tea 10c Coffee 10c Milk 10c 

Substitution in dishes will be charged for 
Those who do not wish to order table d'hote 
dinner may order any portion they choose by 
paying the amount that appears opposite the 
item ordered. 

"There is no deviating from the strict sense 
of the term 'choice of.' Substitution in dishes 
are charged for. This rule was established at 
the start, and of course met with disapproval; 
but now we seldom find one who will find fault 
with it; and I might add, when we do find such 
a man, experience has taught us that we can 
well afford to lose him. 

"In conclusion let me suggest that the reader 
take his bill-of-fare, figure up the cost (in- 
cluding service) of such a meal as I have out- 
lined, then ask yourself if you can afford to 



give more, and if it would not be money in 
your pocket to lose such guests as would ob- 
ject to confining themselves to the 'choice of 
one of the meats, etc., whether your hotel be 
conducted on the 'modified' European plan, or 
the plan suggested at the meeting of the West- 
ern New England Hotelkeepers' Association, 
held at the Wendell, March 15th, and called the 
American plan under control, and which Mr. 
Minahan is trying so hard to have the mem- 
bers adopt." 

* * * 

In another letter to the editor, Mr. West- 
brook writes regarding using the term "choice 
of" and permitting the waiter to serve extra 
dishes at the request of the guest, without 
extra charge: 

"Before making the change, we looked on all 
sides of the question, and the 'choice of was 
one that was rather hard for us to decide. We 
believed that if it was left to the waiters, they 
would soon teach the guest that there was no 
'fast rule' about it, and when a good tip was 
In sight he would say 'The man ordered it,' 
and carry in the full bill. So we decided to 
make this rule one not to be broken; and the 
waiters were instructed to tell the guests, when 
they did not understand, that it would be use- 
less for them to attempt to pass the checker 
with anything the guest was not entitled to. 
The waiters experienced considerable difliculty 
at first, and many of the guests came ^to the 
office to complain, and each was foid in a nice 
way that, if they could not get enough from 
the bill-of-fare to satisfy them, 'we could not 
afford to feed them for the money.' " 

He recited instances, in which, when expla- 
nations have been made, guests have favored 
the plan, as receiving larger portions of best 
quality foods, carefully prepared. 

The Wendell is a pioneer of the modified 
European plan, and the club breakfast, the 
lunch and dinner cards, herewith reproduced, 
will, no doubt, infiuence the adoption of such 
a system in many other houses. 

* * * 

Fred Van Orman, the Otsego, Jackson, Mich., 
and the St. George, Evansville, Ind. : 

"I favor the term 'choice of or the word 'or' 
between two or more roasts, entrees, etc., so 
that the guest may have a selection, instead 
of the whole list at his will. My bills are 
heavy, I know, much more so than they ought 
to be, and there should be some curtailment. 
You will notice that the table d'hotes in the 
swell hotels have 'choice of between the 
dishes, even when the meal costs more than a 
dollar. I do not see why the hotel that sells 
a meal for 75 cents should give unlimited se- 
lection when the caterers who make a specialty 
of table d'hote limit the selection." 
+ * * 

P. L. Goerling, of Hotel Bellis, Wausau, 
Wis.: "I favor the condensed bill of fare, but 
think the first consideration should be to raise 
the rates; for the good hotels in our section 
all give too much for ?2 a day. We had a 
guest, the other day, order eggs, three kinds, 
boiled, fried and scrambled, all for the same 
meal, and he was served with six eggs. In 
addition to that, he had a. meat order and sev- 



130 



THE PSACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



eral other things from the card. This, liow- 
ever, is tlie only instance where so many eggs 
were ordered for one person. The waitress 
aslced me if she should serve them. I said, 
'Yes, a guest is served anything and every- 
thing he orders from the card!' " 
J- * * 

An ex-steward, now manager of a promi- 
nent eastern liotel, European plan, writes: ' 
". . . You know I have always been ham- 
mering the bills down, and insisted on smaller 
bills witli more frequent changes; and I still 
maintain that it is tlie proper method, even in 
the small country hotels; and I believe the 
agitation of the subject is on the increase, and 
the time is coming when there will be no 
American plan." 

* « « 

It is not all of those who favor the con- 
densed menu that can put it into effect. One 
very bright and capable steward writes: "I 
am entirely in sympathy with your idea, and 
believe that the American plan bill of fare, as 
It is presented at this time, is entirely over- 
done. I regret, however, that in my opinion, 
there is no immediate opportunity for a change 
in the bill here, as competition is very strong, 
and the niajority of the hotels are American 
plan, and it seems to be the general idea that 
the more you can get on the bill, the better. 
Personally, I long for the day when every hotel 
will be run on the European plan, as it seems 
to be much more desirable in every respect." 

* * * 

The Canadian Pacific Railway dining car 
service has inaugurated the condensed menu 
for the dollar dinner, and also for the a la 
carte breakfast, luncheon, and supper. With 
the a la carte bills the minimum order for 
each person is 25 cents; and bread and butter 
is served free with meat and flsh orders. These 
are sample cards: 

Breakfast 

Sliced bananas 20 Sliced oranges 20 

Preserved flgs 20 Baked apples 20 

' Breakfast cereals with cream 20 

Broiled flsh 40 

Fish cakes with bacon 40 

Tenderloin steak 65 Sirloin steak 70 

Club sirloin steak (for two) 1.25 

Lamb chops (3) 60 

Hamburger steak 45 

(With mushrooms 20 extra; with bacon or 

tomato sauce 15 extra) 

Calf's liver with bacon 40 Country sausauge 35 

Sugar cured ham or breakfast bacon 

plain 40, with 2 eggs 50 

Eggs, boiled, fried or scrambled (3) 20 

Eggs, poached on toast (2) 25 

Omelettes plain 25; 

with ham, parsley or jelly 30 

Baked potatoes 10 French fried potatoes 10 

Hashed brown potatoes 10 

Hot rolls 10 Toast 10 

Plain or graham bread with butter 10 

Marmalade or jam 15 

Griddle cakes with maple syrup 20 

Tea Coffee Chocolate 

Cup 10 Pot 20 Cup 10 Pot 20 Cup 15 Pot 25 

Milk, per glass 10 Cream, per glass 20 



luncheon 

Soup, with bread and butter 25 

Broiled flsh 40 

Queen olives 15 Stuffed olives 15 

Assorted pickles 10 

ENTREES 

See "Special" Slip 

Tenderloin steak 65 Sirloin steak 70 

Club sirloin steak (for two) 1.25 

Lamb chops (3) 60 

Hamburger steak 45 

(With mushrooms 20 extra; with bacon or 

tomato sauce 15 extra) 

COLD MEATS 

Roast beef 40 Ham 40 Tongue 40 Sardines 35 

Baked potatoes 10 Fried potatoes 10 

Peas 10 Corn 10 Stewed tomatoes 10 

Baked beans (hot or cold) 25 
SALADS 
Lettuce 25 Celery 25 Potato 20 

DESSERT, EACH, 10 
Pudding Pies 

Canadian cheese with crackers 20 
Sliced oranges 20 Sliced bananas 20 

Baked apples 20 
Canton preserved ginger 20 
Hot rolls 10 ■ Toast 10 

Plain or graham bread 10 
Tea Chocolate 

Cup 10 Pot 20 Cup 15 Pot 25 

Coffee 
Cup 10 Pot 20 
Milk, glass, 10 Cream, glass, 20 

Dinner 
(One dollar) 
Stuffed olives 
Consomme clear Scotch broth 

Celery Salted almonds Olives 

British Columbia salmon 
Baked ham, champagne sauce 
Queen fritters 
Prime roast beef Roast turkey- 

Boiled and mashed potatoes 
Beets Turnips Green peas 

Macedoine salad 
Steamed fruit pudding 
Lemon cream pie Cherry tart 

Pineapple jelly Assorted cakes 

Canadian cheese 
Canton preserved ginger 
Fresh fruits 
Cafe nolr 

Supper 

Soup, with bread and butter 25 

Broiled fish 40 

Tenderloin steak 65 Sirloin steak 70 

Club sirloin steak (for two) 1.25 

Lamb chops (3) 60 

Hamburger steak 45 

(With mushrooms 20 extra; with bacon or 

tomato sauce 15 extra) 

Sugar cured ham or breakfast bacon 

plain, 40; with 2 eggs, 50 

Cold meats 40 — roast beef, ham, tongue 

Eggs, boiled, fried or scrambled (3) 20; 

Eggs, poached on toast (2) 25 

Omelettes plain 25; 

with ham, parsley or jelly 30 
Potatoes — baked, fried or lyonnaise 10 
Salads 25 
Toast 10 Hot biscuits 10 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



131 



Plain bread 10 Graham bread 10 

Sliced oranges 20 Baked apples 20 

Sliced bananas 20 Marmelade or jam 15 

Preserved figs 20 

Griddle cakes with maple syrup 20 

Tea or coffee, per cup 10, per pot 20 

Chocolate, per cup 15, per pot 25 

Milk, per glass 10 Cream, per glass 20 



Hotel Exclusively for Women 

The Trowmart Inn, Abingdon Square, New 
York, expresses a new idea in a woman's hotel. 
It is not operated for profit, and is intended 
only for women of modest Incomes, as, for 
instance, less than $10 or $12 a week. The 
rate is $4.50 a week with breakfast and supper 
six days, and three meals Sundays, this when 
two occupy a room; and $5 if guest rooms 
alone. The lodging rate is 50 cents. The con- 
ditions are that boarders must come with ref- 
erences, and transients are received without 
references. The restriction is that a guest 
must be under thirty-five years of age. The 
hotel has bath rooms with hot and cold run- 
ning water on each floor, but in the rooms are 
bowl and pitcher. Every bedroom has clothes 
closet and is comfortably furnished. There is 
a laundry, with dry room, where guests may 
do their own work free of charge; and a 
library, parlor, and reception rooms where 
guests can meet their friends. Also there is 
a sewing room with sewing machines and 
other popular equipment. The elevator service 
is excellent. The house is fireproof. A fea- 
ture out of the ordinary is a trunk storage 
arrangement: A separate steel cage is pro- 
vided in the basement for trunks for every 
occupant in the house with a first-class lock. 
The girls are not permitted to keep the trunks 
in their rooms. The food apparently is excel- 
lent and well cooked by a competent chef, par- 
ticularly the bread. The following are sample 
menus : 

Breakfast 

(Weekday) 

Hominy Force 

Broiled steak 

Hashed brown potatoes Corn muffins and rolls 

Coffee Tea Milk 

Dinner 

(Weekday) 

English beef soup with barley 

Braized ham champagne sauce 

Prime roast beef Baked potatoes 

Macaroni au Gratin 

Pickled beets Cranberry tarts 

Coffee Milk Tea 



Oat meal 



Puffed rice 



Scrambled eggs 

French fried potatoes 

Graham muffins 

Brown and white bread 

Coffee Tea 

Dinner 

(Sunday) 

Consomme royal 

Friz, of chicken with rice 



Milk 



Prime roast beef Mashed potatoes 

Stringless beans 

Romaine salad Neapolitan ice 

Coffee Milk Tea 



Tea 

(Sunday) 

Cold roast mutton 

Boston baked pork and beans 

Brown and white bread 

Red currant jelly and cake 

Chocolate Milk Tea 



Special breakfasts at Cafe Richelieu, Colonial 
Annex, Pittsburgh : 

NO. 1 

Orange, oat meal, rolls or wheat cakes, 

cup cotEee, 25 

NO. 2 

Boiled eggs, rolls or wheat cakes, cup coffee, 25 

NO. 3 

Ham or bacon with fried egg, cup cotEee, 30 

No. 4 

Breakfast steak with potatoes, rolls, 35 

NO. 5 

One-half grape fruit ; sausage, rolls or wheat 

cakes, cup coffee, 40 



Special suppers at Cafe Richelieu, Colonial 
Annex, Pittsburgh : 

NO. 1 
Blue points or clams ; crab meat au gratin, with 
green peppers ; chocolate or vanilla 
ice cream ; cup coffee, 75 
NO. 2 
Blue points or clams ; half cold lobster, mayon- 
naise ; chocolate or vanilla ice cream ; 
cup coffee, 75 
NO. 3 
Blue points or clams ; small sirloin, fresb mush- 
rooms ; friend sweet potatoes ; asparagus 
tips ; Neapolitan ice cream ; 
cup coffee, $1 
NO. 4 
Blue points, or clams ; half broiled chicken ; 
wafle potatoes ; sliced tomatoes ; Neapolitan 
Ice cream ; cup coffee, $1 



Typical 35-ceDt luncheon, served from 11 :S0 
a. m. to 2 p. m. in the Cafe Richelieu Colonial 
Annex, Pittsburgh : 

CHOICE 

Baked ocean trout, Creole 

Spring lamb stew, French style 

Chicken cutlet with creamed peas 
Stuffed veal, brown gravy 

Ribs of beef, hot or cold 
Boiled or masbed potatoes 

CHOICE 

Butter beets Celery in cream 

CHOICE 

Farina pudding Vanilla ice cream 

CHOICE 

Coffee Tea Sweet cider Milk 

A LA CARTE SPECIAL 

SERVED WITH LUNCHEON ONLY 

Cream of tomatoes with rice 10 

Consomme julienne (vegetables) 10 
Celery 15 Radishes 10 

Apple pie 10 Lemon water ice 10 



132 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Meet Competition of Lunch Rooms. 

How to meet the competition of the quick and 
dairy lunch rooms is a problem that many hotels 
both small and large would solve. Here is an idea 
Erom the Colonial Annex in Pitisburgh. The 
card is tacked in each bedroom. 

NOTICE 

X^'^hy hunt for Bargains 'when you can get 

them in the Hotel. 



SPECIAL BREAKFAST 
6 a. m. to 11:30 A. M. 



No. I. Orange, Oatmeal, Rolls or 

"Wheat Cakes, cup Coffee, 25c 

No. 2. Boiled Eggs, Rolls or Wheat 

Cakes, cup Coffee, 25c 

No. 3. Ham or Bacon with Fried Egg, 

Rolls or Wheat Cakes, cup Coffee, 30c 

No. 4. Breakfast Steak, with Potatoes, 

Rolls or Wheat Cakes, 35c 

No. 5. Half Grape Fruit, Sausage, 

Rolls or Wheat Cakes, cup Coffee, 40c 



SPECIAL NOONDAY LUNCHEON 35c 

11:30 A. M. TO 2 P. M. 



EVENING DINNER DISHES AT 
POPULAR PRICES 

6 TO 8 p. M. 



Club Breakfast Served in Rooms 25c extra 
All other Service 5c per portion extra 



Shore dinner, one dollar, at the Jefferson, 
Peoria: 

Blue points 

Crab gumbo, Creole 

Olives Pickles 

Stuffed fresh lobster, Cardinal 

Julienne potatoes 

Claret 

Troncons of bluefish, a 1 'Italienne 

Early June peas 

Shrimp salad 

Tipsy parson pudding 

Coffee 



Sunday table d'hote dinner, $1.00 per person, 
at the Jefferson, Peoria: 

Oyster cocktail 

Consomme, vert pre Homemade noodle soup 

Olives Radishes 

Filet of striped bass, Marguery 

Potatoes, Olivette 
Braised loin of beef, cultivateur 

RUEDESHEIMER PUNCH 

Roast Long Island duckling with dressing 

or 

Roast spring lamb, mint sauce 

French fried potatoes New brussell sprouts 

Waldorf salad 

lee eream supreme Assorted cake 

Peanut cheese 

Coffee 



Family Style. 

BREAKFAST. 

Stewed prunes 

Oatmeal and milk 

Scrambled eggs, saute potatoes 

Wheat cakes and maple syrup 

Tea CofEee 

LUNCH. 

Split pea soup 

Roast ribs of beef 

Boiled potatoes, carrots in butter 

Cold meat 

Baked apple 

Tea Coffee 

DINNER. 

Vegetable soup 

Roast fresh pork, apple sauce 

New York beans, boiled potatoes 

Cold meat 

Lettuce salad 

Tea Coffee 



Three H. M. M. B. A. Louisville Feasts. 

Dubonnet Cocktail 

Grape fruit au maraschino 

Celery Olives Salted almonds 

Cream of chicken a la Reine 

Paupiette of lake trout, Marguery 

Parisienne potatoes 

Sauterne 

Sweetbread patties, Cumberland 

French peas 

Punch cardinal 

Roast squabs sur canape au cresson 

Apollinaris 

Stuffed tomatoes, Suedoise 

Biscuit glace, Trocadero 

Petits fours 

Roquefort cheese Toasted crackers 

Demi tasse 

Creme de Menthe 



Mints 



Dubonnet cocktail 

Canape harlequin 
Celery Olives Almonds 

Vin de graves 
{Barton Sr Guestier) 

Potage, Jenny Lind 
Filet of Ohio River salmon a la Seelbaeh 
Potato laurette 
Chateau pontet canet 
(Cunlife Dobscn 4' Co.) 

Sweetbreads a la choiseuil 
New asparagus hollandaise 
Punch a la boniface 
Boned squab chicken a la gourmet 
Fommery if Greno, sec. 
Veuve Clicquot, dry 
Krug 4" Co., private cuvee 

Tomato en surprise 

Roquefort and cream cheese 

Coffee Cigars 



Cantaloupe 

Soft shell crab, tartare 

Cucumbers 

Celery Olives Almonds 

Broiled chicken with bacon 

New peas Potatoes au gratin 

Tomato en surprise 

Fresh strawberry ice cream 

Cake Cafe 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



133 



Sensible Hearty Banquet Menu 
John A. Hill, manager of Stock Yard Inn, 
Union Stock Yard, Chicago, is catering along 
original lines, and his place is the scene of 
some of the best banquets served in Chicago. 
He sidesteps the fancy dishes and produces 
banquets that list but few dishes, but these of 
the choicest materials and the most wholesome 
kind. The following menu was served the 
Bankers' Club of Chicago 

Caviar on ice 

"Stock Yaed Lemonade" 
Cotuits 
Celery Olives 

Cream of chicken 
Planked whitefish 

Duchesse potatoes 

Sirloin steak 

Fresh mushrooms Potatoes au gratin 

Lettuce and grape fruit salad 

Mince and Pumpkin pie 

English Cheddar cheese 

Coffee 

Amontillado 

EUDESHEIMER, BEEG, VaLCKENBERQ 

G. H. Mumm's Gordon Rouge 



Chicago Dinner Club's Banquet of All Nations 
Held at Hotel La Salle. 

FLAGS 
Canape Czarina 

Russian 
Lynnhaven oysters 

American 
Clear green turtle 
Celery Olives Almonds 

Mexican 
Diamond-back terrapin, Maryland 

American 
Breast of partridge en casserole. Nature 
Currant jelly Potatoes croquette 

English 
Tomato salad a la Francaise 

French 
Italian vanilla ice cream 
Petits fours Mignardises 

Italian 
Roquefort Camembert 

Crackers 

Japanese 
Coffee 



At the Hoffman House, New York. 

PICCADILLY DINNER. 

Relishes Onion soup Muffin toasted 

Marmalade 

Beefsteak and kidney pie 

or 

Chicken pie 

Fruit salad English plum pudding 

Stilton cheese Turkish coffee 

6 to 9 p. m. 

ENGLISH SUPPER, 

Relishes 

Albermarle broth 

Tea biscuits Marmalade 

English mutton chop 

Pickled walnut Stuffed potato 

Waffles Honey in comb 

6 to 1. Coffee 



This banquet of the Tacoma Fire Insurance 
Association at the Tacoma, Tacoma, Wash., 
was catered for by Fred W. Stein, the price 
$7.50 per plate; the menu card in form of a 
policy to "A. Welkum Guest." 
Buffet Eusse' 
Scotch — Rye — Bourbon — Martinis — Shasta 
Toke Points, Tacoma 
Neirsteiner 

Tomato bouillon en tasse 

Celery Radishes Ripe olives 

California sand dabs. Saute Meuniere 

Potatoes Parisienne 

Rack of spring lamb with brussels sprouts 

Potatoes Gastronome 
Veuve Clicquot Sec 

Roast English pheasant 

Salad chiffonade 

Fancy ice cream and confectionery 

Cafe 



TIPS 

There are about 100 single pots of tea to 
the pound high grade. 

There are 19 single cup pots of high grade 
coffee to the pound, at five quarts water to the 
pound, and about 28 pots at eight quarts to 
the pound. There are 14 regular pots to the 
pound at five quarts to the pound, and about 
18 at eight quarts to the pound. 

Cream 40 per cent about 1% ounces to the 
cup or 84 to the gallon. 

The average guest uses one-half ounce but- 
ter to the meal. 

There are 75 a la carte portions of mashed 
potatoes in one bushel. 




c^=^ Gkafe fllUIT 






rXj E55ENCE o]r Tomato 

'j^ Vou-au-Vent 

\J 7ANCY ICE3 



J 







134 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Some Cards of Hotel Je£ferson, St. Louis. 

Individual and club breakfast, The JcCEerson, St. 
Louis : 

(An extra charge o£ 25 cents for each person 
when served to room). 
No. 1—25 Cents " 

Small pot coffee or cup tea 
Rolls and butter 

No. 2 — 30 Cents 

Cereal 
Small pot cofiEee or cup tea 
Rolls and butter 
No. 3 — 30 Cents 

One orange or banana 

Small pot coffee or cup tea 

Rolls and butter 

No. A — 40 Cents 

Orange or banana 

Cereal or griddle cakes 

Small pot coffee or cup tea 

Rolls and butter 

No. 5 — 50 Cents 

Orange 

Slice ham or bacon and 1 egg 

Small pot coffee or cup tea 

Rolls and butter 

No. 6 — 50 Cents 

Stewed prunes or sliced bananas 
Boiled eggs (2) 

Cereal 
Rolls and butter 
Small pot coffee or cup tea 
No. 7—50 Cents 

Orange 

Cereal 

Liver and bacon 

Rolls and butter 

Small pot coffee or cup tea 

No. 8 — 50 Cents 

Orange or stewed prunes 

One lamb chop 

Rolls and butter 

Small pot coffee 

No. 9—60 Cents 

Orange or stewed prunes 

Corned beef hash with poached egg 

Rolls and Butter 

Small pot coffee 

Mo. 10—60 Cents 

Orange 

Cereal 

Two poached eggs on toast 

Rolls and butter 

Small pot coffee 

No. 11—75 Cents 

Canteloupe 

Cereal 
Rump steak 
Rolls, small pot coffee 
No. 12—75 Cents 

Orange or canteloupe 

Cereal 

Pork chop 

Wheat cakes 

Small pot coffee 

No. 13—75 Cents 

Watermelon or orange 

Cereal 

Chicken hash 

Rolls and butter 

Small pot coffee 



No. 14—75 Cents 

Orange or banana 

Cereal 

Omelette with chives or 3 slices of bacon 

Rolls and butter 

Small pot coffee 

No. 15—75 Cents 

One orange whole or sliced banana 

Two boiled, fried or shirred eggs 

Breakfast bacon 

Rolls and butter 

Small pot coffee 

No. 16—90 Cents 

Orange or grapefruit 

Cereal 

One mutton chop with bacon, Sautee potatoes 

Griddle cakes 

rolls and butter 

Small pot coffee 

No. 17—90 Cents 

Peaches with cream or orange 

Cereal 

Lamb chops 

Hashed brown potatoes 

Griddle cakes 

Small pot coffee 

No. 18— $1.00 

Orange or grapefruit 

Cereal 

Broiled chicken (half) 

French fried potatoes 

Rolls and butter 

Small pot coffee 



After theatre supper, Hotel Jefferson, St. Louis : 

BIV.VLVES 

Rockaways 35 Cape Cods 35 Casimir 50 

Blue points 25 ; cocktail 30 Lynnhavens 35 

Cotuits 35 

Little neck 25 , Cocktail 30 Nantaise 50 

BROTHS EN TASSE 

Consomme Manhattan 25 Strained gumbo 25 

Chicken broth Chantllly 25 

KELISHES 

Antipasto Lucullus 50 Malossol caviar 7."i 

Westphalia ham 75 

SPECIALTIES 

Softshell crabs (2) 60 Frog legs remoulade 1.00 
Crab meat Delmonico 75 Lobster Newburg 1,25 
Scallops, sauce ravigotp 60 Broiled lobster (V^) 80 

TO OEDEK 

Squab chicken 1.00 
Fresh mushrooms 75 Sweetbread a I'Eugenie 1.00 

Young guinea hen (half) 75 Squab 75 

Chicken a la king 1.00 

Capon and lobster, Neptune 1.00 

SALAnS 

Tomato (1) 35 Lettuce 35 Chicory 35 

Imp. endive 40 Watercress 30 

Field lettuce 30 Romaine 35 Escarole 35 

ICE CREAM, ETC. 

French Ice Creams — 

Vanila 25 Chocolate 25 Strawberry 25 

Parfaits-aii cafe 30 ; aux marrons 30 

Charlotte glacee 35 Meringue glacee 35 

Assorted cakes 25 Peach Melba 50 

Coupe St. Jacques 50 Nesselrode pudding 35 

BEVERAGE.S 

Pot coffee for one 15 : two 25 

Special coffee, per pot 2 cups 50 ; each additional 

cup 25 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



135 



For the Tea Room, Hotel Jefferson, St. Louis : 
TEA ROOM CARD 

TEA 

Oolong 25 

Young Hyson, green 25 

Ceylon 25 

Russian caravan, per pot 40 

COFFEE 

Hotel Jefferson 25 

French 25 

Vienna. 25 

Cocoa 25 

Chocolate 25 

HOT 

Consomme Mikado 20 
Clam broth in cup 35 
Essence of chicken 25 

Gumbo passee 20 

Bread and butter 10 

Dry toast 10 

SALADS 

Lobster 60 

Chicken 60 

Fruit 50 

Demi-deuU 50 

Waldorf 50 

SANDWICHES 

Lettuce and nut 25 

Sardine 25 

Chicken 25 

Club 35 

PASTRY 

Peach tart 15 

Lady fingers or macaroons 20 

Assorted cakes 25 

Meringue chantilly 20 

Cold cup custard 15 

Charlotte russe 20 

ICE CREAM AND SHERBET 

Chocolate 25 Vanilla 25 

Coffee 25 Strawberry 25 

Pistachio 25 

Raspberry 20 Lemon 20 

Peach Melba 50 

Parfaits, all kinds 30 

Nesselrode pudding 35 

Coupe St. Jacques 50 

Meringue glacee 35 

IMPORTED CONSERVES 

German raspberries 40 

German strawberries 40 

Preserved Canton ginger 30 

Luncheon, Hotel Jefferson, St. Louis : 

OYSTERS AND CLAMS 

Lynnhavens 35 Oak Island 35 Cape Cods 35 

Cotuits 35 Rockaway 35 Casimir 50 

Oyster stew 35 ; with cream 40 ; fried (6) 40 

Blue Point 25 ; cocktail 30 

Little neck cocktail 30 Little Neck (half doz.) 25 

Mantaise 50 

SOUP 

Consomme brunoise 20 Potage parmentier 20 

READY DISHES 

Broiled pompano, fleurette 60 

Fried brook trout, meuniere (1) 50 

Roast prime ribs of beef 60 ; extra cut 1.00 

Stuffed chicken au cresson (half) 75 

Sugar-cured bacon with mustard greens 50 

Veal saute marengo 50 

Southern hash, corn fritters 50 

Eggs Meyerbeer 50 



Cauliflower 30 Hubbard squash 25 Spinach 25 

Spring chicken. Southern style, half 7.j ; Cornbrcad 

in 10m. 10 

SALADS 

Imp. endive 40 Lettuce 25 Escarole 25 

Chicory 35 Lobster 60 Chicken 60 

Lettuce and grapefruit 50 Combination 40 

Cucumber 35 Watercress 35 Frozen tomato 35 

Sliced tomatoes 40 

DESSERT 

Pies — Sliced apple 13 Pear 15 Cocoanut custard 15 

Ji'fferson mince 15 

Pineapple souffle pudding, claret sauce 15 

Madeira jelly 15 

Layer cake, hazelnut cream filling 15 

Raspberry tart 15 Peach tart 15 

Almond tart 15 Jefferson strawberry shortcake 40 

Chocolate eclaire 15 

German apricot cake, whipped cream 15 

Cold rice pudding 15 Cold cup custard 15 

Charlotte russe 15 

New strawberries in cream 40 Apples 15 

Malaga grapes 25 

ICE CREAM 

Plain 20 Mixed 30 Parfaits, all kinds 30 

Meringue glacees 35 Nesselrode pudding 35 

Peach Melba 50 Coupe Jefferson or St. Jacques 50 

Sherbets — Lemon 15 Raspberry 15 

CHEESE 

Cream 20 Imp. Chiffemann camembert 20 
Roquefort 20 Provola 30 Imp. Brie 20 

' Royal English Cheddar 30 

COFFEE 

Coffee 25 

Special coffee per pot, 1 cup, 25 ; additional cup 25 

Demi tasse 15 Russian caravan tea, per pot 40 

Iced tea 10 Fer-mi-lac 10 Buttermilk 10 

Hotel Jefferson Steam Table Service (from 
11 :30 to 2). Mashed or boiled potatoes with all 
meat orders ; 10 cents charged for bread and but- 
ter with soup if no meat order is given : 
Consomme macedoine 15 
Cream of fresh mushrooms 15 
Mettwurst, Bavarian kraut 45 
Southern hash, fried tomato 45 
Loin of veal Boulangere 45 
. Prime ribs of beef 50 
String beans 15 Succotash 15 

German huckleberry cake, whipped cream 15 
Chocolate eclairs 15 
Lemon custard pie 15 
Apple pie 15 
Cup of coffee 10 
Portions on this bill will be served (without ex- 
ception) to but one person. 



An H. M. M. B. A. Banquet. 

Little neck clams earsac 

Consomme Royale 

Planked shad viN de pasto 

Cucumbers Potato balls 

Broiled spring chicken 

MUMM'S EXTRA DRY 

Bermuda potatoes New peas 

Fresh asparagus 

Roast English snipe 

Tomato salad Crackers and cheese 

Strawberries 

Vanilla and strawberry Ice cream 

CORDIALS 

Cakes Coffee 



136 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

The Banquet Book Miscellaneous Banquet Menus. 

There should also be kept a book to record Huitres 

all banquets, luncheons, collations, etc. A long Salted almonds 

, , , . , ... J i, ■ Consomjne Printanicre, Colbert 

day book or journal will answer for this pur- Amontillado 

pose. On the left hand page of the folio may Celci-i Olives Farcie 

be noted the name of the association or party Polsson de Pompano, Remoulade 

giving the same with time, price and the num- LiEBPHAUMiLcn 

, Z , /„ „,, T i, Concombres Pommes Hollandaise 

ber of covers, also a copy of the Menu. In the p;,^^ ^^ g^g^,_ Piq^^^ Perigord 

opposite, or right hand page, the issues and Tomato a la Diable 

steward's memoranda. Such a record will pontet canet 1874 

prove of great benefit in serving future ban- Tvycn a l'ameassadeuk 

, ° ^ ,, , , , Timbale de Dinde, Ecossaise 

quets, and one can tell very nearly how much is Asperges Allemande 

made on every spread served by the house. chambertin 1878 

The following illustration, which is self ex- Poitrine de Perdreux, aux Truffes 

planatory, will give a fair idea of what I be- "'"'^ * chandon imperial eeot 

,. . , , , i- , iu T Petlts pois Gelee 

lieve a very simple and most practical method: salade 

(See opposite page.) Biscuit glace a la Tosca 

The High Cost of Living Gateaux Assortis liqdeoks 

As illustrative of the increased cost of raw Fromage 

material I call attention to the issues of the ^^'^ 

foregoing banquet, which was served on De- Qy^t^^.^ ~^lj ^^^11 

cember 12, 1895, at a cost of $48.14; and should Amontillado 

,1 , . T • T^ , 1 m -, Consomme Chatelaine 

the same have been served m December, 1911, ^^^^ sacternes 

the cost would have been about $76.83, or an Baked lobster au-gratin, a la ereme 

advance of $28.69. The increase is noted in Broiled mushrooms on toast, maitre d'hotel 

the following list of issues w-hich is in quan- chateau belgeave 

,., -, ., J! 4.V 1- i J. ■ i Filet of beef larded with truffles 

tity and items a copy of the list of sixteen ., , , r^ ., j. ■ u 

•' fj^-j^ p^Tg^ potatoes French string beans 

years ago. Asparagus 

LIST OF ISSUES. Punch Cardinal 

400 blue points $ 3.00 English snipe on toast 

5 doz. celery 3.00 peeeiek jouet 

1 qt. olives 40 Lettuce salad 

2 lbs. shelled almonds 80 "® "^^" liqueues 

20 white fish 3.60 Cafe 

% pk, potatoes 20 

2 doz. cucumbers 1.20 Blue points 

48 lbs. lamb racks, at 25e 12.00 Cress Celery 

20 lbs. fowls 2.80 Cream of Terrapin 

75 palties 1.25 Hors d'oeuvre varies 

6% doz. quails, at $4 26.00 Whitefish, au gratin 

1 box lettuce J. 25 haut sauteknes 1874 

lA crate tomatoes 1.50 Mangoes Parisienne potatoes 

i qt. oil 60 Filet of turkey with martens 

V2 doz. eggs 15 CHACTEAU LINAS 

1 pt. vinegar 03 Sweet potato Chateau 

1/2 gal. cream 40 caedinal punch 

2 lbs. jelly 42 Breast of prairie chicken 

2 lbs. hominy 06 Fried hominy Olives farcies 

2 lbs. cook butter 56 ". h mdm.m's extea dey 1884 

4 lbs. salt pork 52 Asparagus Vinaigrette 

12 cans peas 2.40 Glaces Cake 

9 Iho flnni- m COGNAC 

- JDS. nour U/ Cheese Coffee Crackers 

1 pt. sherry 20 

4 cans mushrooms 92 

2% gal. punch 1.75 Consomme in cups 

2% gal. ice cream 2.25 Celery Radishes 

15 qts. strawberries 7.50 Oyster patties, sauce Poulette 

Vi lbs. cheese 20 Fillet of beef with mushrooms 

2 lbs. crackers 26 Julienne potatoes 

1 cake 1.20 Roast quail au Cresson 

1 lb. coffee .34 Potato salad French peas 

*7g g3 Neapolitan ice cream 

Issues 1895 48!l4 Macaroons Kisses 

Select fruit 

Advance . $28.69 Coffee 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 

BANQUET BOOK ^ 

THE ARLINGTON HOTEL 



137 



Banquet Served to .•. .•. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

BAR ASSOCIATION 

December 12, 7896^ 

Number of covers 75. 

Price per cover $2.50. 

To be served at 9:30 P. M. 

Music and flowers extra. 

Wine to be charged as follows : 

Sauternes - - per quart $2.00 

Claret, Pontet Canet " " 2.30 

Champagne • " " 4-00 



- MENU - 

Bluepoints 
Celery 

Consomme Princesse 
Olives Roasted nuts 

Planked whitefish, parsly butter 
Sliced cucumbers Potatoes Saratoga 

Lamb chops, French peas 
Small patties of chicken 

Punch, Benedectine 

Larded quail with jelly 
Fried hominy 

Lettuce and tomato mayonaise 

Tutti-frutti ice cream 

Hot-house strawberries 

Assorted cake 

Roquefort 
Black coffee 



ISSUES. 

400 Bluepoints, 
7 doz. celery 

1 qt. olives 

2 lbs. shelled almonds 
20 lbs. whitefish 

J^ pk. potatoes 

2 doz. cucumbers 
48 lbs. rax lamb 
20 lbs. chicken 
7S patties 
6J^ doz. quail 

I case lettuce 
X crate tomatoes 

I qt. oil - - - 

K doz. eggs 

1 pt. vinegar 

}4 gal' cream • • 

2 lbs. jelly 

2 lbs. hominy - - • 

2 lbs. cooking butter 
4 lbs. salt pork 
12 cans peas 
2 lbs. flour 

1 pt. sherry 

4 cans mushrooms 
2j^ gal. punch 
2}4 gal. ice cream 

15 qts. strawberries 

J^ lb. cheese 

2 lbs. crackers 
Cake 

1 lb. coffee 

Total issues 
10 waiters, $1.00 each 
Extra cook, i day 



75 covers a Sz 50 

Less issues and expense as above 



7SC. 




«ioo 


20c. 


• 


r 40 


- 


■ 


20 


30c. 


■ 


60 


IOC, 


- 


2 00 


• 




10 


20C. 




40 


ISO. 


- 


7 20 


I2C. 


- 


2 40 


ISC. per doz. 98 


$i.So 




9 7S 


- 


- 


75 






I 50 






SO 






07 






02 






40 






28 






04 






- 26 






48 






■^ 40 






06 






• 13 






- 60 
• I 20 






I 95 






■ 7 SO 




- 


20 






24 




- 


[ 20 






33 




$ 48 14 


- 


• 


10 00 


• 




3 00 




$ 61 14 


. 


. 


$187 SO 


e 


■ 


61 14 



$126 34 



STEWARD'S MEMORANDA. 



The spread was satisfactorily served; all guests 
pleased. 
Waiter James Brown broke two bouillon cups. 
Waiter H. Samson is too slow and lacks training. 
Balance, all O. K. 

WINE SERVED. 



8 quarts Sauterne 


$ 16 00 


12 " Pontet Canet 


30 00 


18 " Champagne 


72 GO 



$118 00 

Mendelsohn Quintette $is 00 
Flowers • 20 00 

Time to serve: one hour and twenty mmtites. 



138 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

BANQUET PROSPECTUS, HOTEL BALTIMORE. 

.^.,...S- ...■^/^-/m' 

Wlnes,4^^. Time ^.^^■. ." . . 

Cigars.<^*V?^ Room cM^A^J^^ > 



Decorations, S>KM^. .r-.'^.Z. No. Plates Guaranteed .. ~fv 



V\.usU,cMt.^Mcd4^..^. Hotel Arrange for sf<? 

Menus. cS^g^C'r^, V^r^V.or.M^^.4^.^^-.. 



Total, 



By 



f^ 



Menu- 






GEO.O.RELF. 



Wines. 



^^^i**.*-^ 



Banquet Prospectus, Hotel Baltimore 

One of the best ideas for a Steward's Ban- 
quet Book is that devised by George 0. Eelf, 
now of the Hotel Utah, Salt Lake City. Each 
leaf has a "banquet prospectus" in duplicate 
(detachable at perforated line) ; also detachable 



from stub at perforated line. One copy is for 
the party giving the banquet ; the other is for 
the steward. The stub contains all the infor- 
mation on the prospectus sheet. The illustra- 
tion herewith of a leaf is kindly furnished by 
Mr. Eelf. It is self-explanatory. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



139 



CAEVING. 

There are a number of culinary works in 
•which the subject of carving is scientifically 
treated for the purpose of self instruction, giv- 
ing illustrations and comprehensive explana- 
tions. While these articles are all very good 
and give a man a theory to work by, 1 do not 
believe one can learn how to carve in any other 
way than by actual practice. For in carving, 
as well as in a regular profession where skill 
and dexterity of the hands is required, theory 
is of some value, of course, but practice is the 
only way to learn and to become proficient. 

The question whether a steward should know 
how to carve can be answered only by saying, 
yes. He should not only know how to carve 
but should be an expert, and, as I have said 
in a previous article, be proud of the accom- 
plishment. 

Jessup Whitehead, in The Steward's Hand 
Book, says, ' ' All stewards are agreed that it is 
their duty to carve," and surely we must all 
admit that it is an accomplishment of a gentle- 
man. 

The art belongs to the host or landlord, to the 
giver of entertainments, and it belongs to the 
man of fashion as well. It is only a modern 
custom which has arisen Avith the system of 
feeding large numbers of people at one meal, 
which has made it necessary to adopt the more 
expedient and economical method of carving 
the roast in the serving room and serve to the 
guest in proper proportion, instead of placing 
the whole roast on the table and the host doing 
the carving. 

It not very seldom happens now that a guest, 
wishing to entertain friends at dinner, requests 
the steward to send in a whole turkey, duck, 
chicken or even a two or three-ribbed roast of 
lieef, as he wishes to do the carving himself. 

It -is evident then, that the steward in carv- 
ing is filling a place of honor. He in that 
capacity fills the ofSce which was formerly held 
by the landlord at the table. 

Murrey, in the preface to his book on Carv- 
ing, says, ' ' From my earliest recollections I 
was taught that a thorough knowledge of carv- 
ing was an important part of my education." 
Applying it not only as I take it, to stewards, 
but to men of all positions in life. 

When I first came to the city looking for a 
position as steward, I went to the office of the 
most prominent hotel journal and placed an 
advertisement for such a position. The first 
question that was asked of me by the managing 
editor, I believe, was, "Can you carve? If so, 
I know of a man who wants an inside steward 



who can carve. " As I could not I had to reply 
in the negative. I felt that I lacked the knowl- 
edge of an important branch of the steward's 
duty, and made up my mind that I would learn 
at the first opportunity. Not long after I took 
a position as a storekeeper in one of the first- 
class hotels, and one of the conditions on going 
to work was that I be taught to carve. It took 
me but a short time to become fairly proficient 
with the knife and fork, and now I would not 
be without this knowledge for anything. 

A good carver can easily more than doubly 
save his wages for the house he works in. Not 
only this, but on the manner in which he serves 
depends, to a great extent, the reputation of 
the hotel's table. For no matter how well a 
cook may prepare the food, if it is slovenly 
served the best effects are lost to the partaker. 
A dish is always complimented when nicely 
served. A roast when mutilated in carving has 
not only a tendency to disgust a sensitive appe- 
tite, but it proves expensive and wasteful. 

A good carver tries to give the best possible 
appearance to the dishes he serves. In this 
way he pleases both the guest and the house, 
because his work will result economically. 

One of the most important points in carving 
is in knowing how to keep the knife in good 
condition. Nobody can carve with a dull knife. 
Before the hour for work arrives, the knives 
used for this work should be inspected, and 
sharpened if necessary. The roast beef knife, 
for which I prefer the English slicer (it has a 
thin blade about sixteen or eighteen inches 
long; I consider sixteen inches long enough). 
When thin and flexible, as it should be, and of 
proper temper, it seldom requires a grindstone, 
a good oil stone being sufficient. But when the 
edge becomes too thick and grinding is neces- 
sary, then see that the grindstone is evenly bal- 
anced and that it has an even face. Hold the 
blade flat against the stone, drawing it very 
slowly across the face from one end to the 
other. Then turn over and repeat the same on 
the other side ; continue this until evenly sharp- 
ened. This work can not be hurried, in an 
effort to do so the knife will be spoilt. After 
the knixe is sufficiently sharpened, take an oil 
stone and smooth the edge. This makes it 
stand much better than if the steel is used at 
once. When used for nothing but for roast 
beef it will remain in good condition for a long 
time, with an occasional use of the steel. For 
poultry and game the Sabatier, or the French 
style carver, is most serviceable, and will with- 
stand the bones better than the slicer. There 
should also be a trimming knife to use for the 



140 



THE PEACTICAL 



purpose of cutting off the crispy parts of the 
beef, and which can also be used in dissecting 
lamb, suckling pig, turkey, etc. The other tools 
are a steel and a good fork. Thus equipped 
the steward is ready for work, for which he 
wears a white bib apron reaching to his shoe 
tops, and has at hand several clean side towels. 

EOAST BEEF — Begin first by preparing the 
roast beef, which we will say is, as usual in this 
case, a seven-rib cut. Set it on end, thick or 
shoulder end down, in the carving dish on a 
well-heated stand. Care should be taken that 
the roast sets firm and as near level as possible. 
Then trim off all surplus fat and crisp, the 
parts of the backbone which may be left on the 
roast by the butcher; and then with the fork 
draw out the sinew which runs along the entire 
length in the thick part of the meat. This if 
permitted to remain, hinders smooth carving 
and dulls the knife. After this, cut close to 
and parallel with the first or upper rib and 
about one inch deep ; then take the slicer, which 
should be held in a firm but free grasp, not too 
stiff, all the fingers closed around the lower 
broad side of the handle, the thumb extending 
on the upper broad side, holding in a flat posi- 
tion. Take off the first slice and lay it aside 
for the guest who calls for the outside cut. 

If business is light and only one seven-rib 
roast has been prepared, divide it between the 
second and third rib. Then take the two-rib 
part, lay it on the well-done end. In this way 
you will be enabled to carve that which is 
medium well done from the thick end. Turn 
over and carve from the small end if well 
done is wanted. The remaining five ribs should 
carve rare providing the joint was properly 
roasted. Always cut thin slices unless thick is 
called for. As the slice is cut place it on the 
dish with the flat blade of the knife. Use the 
fork only for steadying the roast by resting it 
against the ribs. No expert uses his hand in 
holding roast beef. 

In regard to the other joints, such as lamb, 
veal, pork and venison, a great deal depends 
on how they are prepared before roasting. In 
many hotels the butcher removes the large 
bones, which makes it very easy to carve them, 
very little skill being required. But where this 
is not the ease, the carver must know the 
location of the bones and how best to remove 
them without any waste. 

THE LEG OF VEAL— Weighing eighteen 
pounds and over, being too heavy to be roasted 
thoroughly well done without becoming too 
crisp on the outside within a given time, is 



HOTEL STEWARD 
usually separated from the bone by the cook 
before placing in the oven. This is the most 
economical, as there is less waste and the cook 
has the bones for his soups and sauces. But 
where the whole leg is roasted, begin by cut- 
ting slices from the thick or hip end across 
grain, using the fork with your left hand as a 
stay, giving each portion a slice from the 
haunch and a small piece from the fore side 
of the leg. In this way the more desirable as 
well as that which is less so will be evenly 
served and used. Another way is to take the 
bone out by first standing on end holding with 
a clean cloth by the bone and cutting the thick 
part off, beginning at the thin end and run- 
ning the knife close to and along the full length 
of the bone. The haunch separated, then with 
the point of the knife cut down on both sides 
of the bone, beginning at the thin end. After 
this draw the bone out with one hand and with 
the knife separate the adhering meat from the 
bone. This done, you have two pieces of meat 
to cut from. By the latter method it is hard to 
keep the meat from the fore part of the shank 
from falling apart, which is more wasteful than 
the first method, that of carving from the bone. 

LEG OF MUTTON AND LAMB— Are best 
carved right from the bone. With a clean cloth 
take a firm hold of the shank bone, then begin 
carving at the hip end by cutting thin slices 
diagonally towards the bone. The other way 
is just like that described in the foregoing on 
veal, by first removing the bone, which in this 
instance I find preferable, as the haunch sepa- 
rated can be cut in slices squarely across the 
grain much nicer with assistance of the fork. 
In serving lamb or mutton a little of the fat 
should always go with the lean. 

SADDLE OF MUTTON— The part includ- 
ing both loins beginning at the lower rib and 
extending full up to the hips, is best carved 
lying with the back up. Cut with a sharp 
knife at full length along the center of the 
backbone ; then cut away one side by beginning 
at the cut made at the back and separate it 
from the bones to which it still adheres. You 
then have saddle in one solid piece, from which 
nice slices can be carved. Take the other part 
of the saddle the same way when needed. 

SHOULDER OF MUTTON OK LAMB— 
These joints are usually prepared by the 
butcher by removing the shoulder blade and 
rolling and tieing, then which, after being 
roasted, requires no skill in carving. But I 
believe the meat does not have as fine a flavor 
where the bone is removed before roasting as 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



141 



when it remaiaa, and it is well ivorth the 
carver's time to leave the bone for him to re- 
move. It is not such a difficult task after one 
knows how, especially when the joint is thor- 
oughly well done. No effort should be made 
to carve until the blade has been removed. 
Separate the meat from the leg to where the 
blade begins, then lay flat with the rib side 
down. This places the ridge of the blade up, 
which can be easily found by feeling with the 
back of the knife. Beginning at the leg cut 
the full length of the blade on both sides of 
the ridge. After this is well loose- pass the 
knife, which should be a small one, without 
mutilating, under loose meat and around the 
end of the blade, where there is usually a gris- 
tle, if the animal was young. Separating this 
with your fork you can extricate the blade and 
place the loose ends back in place. The brisket 
or breast rib having been removed previously, 
you are then ready to carve. As the ribs are 
mostly called for by the guests, there will not 
be enough of them if two ribs are given to 
every order; I therefore believe it best to give 
one rib and a slice of the leg when serving a 
full order. Serve each order with one rib; if 
the shoulder is small, two ribs. 

The foregoing rules will apply also to the 
LEG AND SADDLE OP VENISON. 

IN CARVING A HAM the skin should first 
be removed. Then trim off the fat, leaving 
about three-fourths of an inch. Then split as 
described in leg of mutton. Carve the part 
without the bone, beginning at the thick end, 
cutting nearly square across grain in thin 
slices. 

ROAST PIG — ^When placed on the carved 
stand whole, begin first by cutting off the head. 
Divide this by separating the lower from the 
upper jaw and split them. Cut off the shoul- 
ders with the blade and then the hind quarters. 
Divide the body in two lengthwise at the back, 
lay halves with the skin side up and carve in 
portions, cutting across grain parallel with the 
ribs. Place a little of the stuffing on the dish 
with the meat. If baked apples, serve on same 
dish, but apple sauce should be served sepa- 
rately. 

THE TURKEY — Begin by removing the 
legs. First find where the second joint is at- 
tached to the back. Cut squarely down to the 
joint, then pass the knife between the body 
and leg to the end of the second joint. By 
giving a slight outward pressure the leg will 
fall off. Then separate the drum stick from 
the second joint; then divide the latter in two, 
three, or more parts, recording to the size, cut- 



ting lengthways, and separate the meat from 
the drum stick. The half of the back with 
the pope's nose is then removed. The bone on 
either side of the backbone is very thin; cut 
through parallel but not too close to the back- 
bone on both sides. This will give you the two 
side bones and pope's nose of the turkey. You 
now have the breast. I was taught to take a 
strong fork, inserting it across the backbone, 
which, if it is well set, will enable you to hold 
firmly while slicing. This is a very good 
method, but it has the effect to spoil the ap- 
pearance of several pieces through which the 
fork happens to pass. So I believe to remove 
the entire back, by cutting through the thin 
ribs connecting the breast and back, is the bet- 
ter way, as you then have the solid breast, 
which, after having removed the wings, slice 
with a sharp knife, simply steadying with the 
fork. In serving turkey give each guest part 
white and part dark meat. First place the 
stuflSng, then the piece of dark meat, laying 
the white meat over the whole. Gravy should 
not be poured over the white meat, as it dis- 
colors it. Cranberry sauce or jelly are best 
served on a separate sauce dish. 

The same rules which apply to turkey will 
answer for the CAPON and also to LARGE 
ROAST CHICKEN. 

SMALL ROAST CHICKEN— First remove 
the wings and the legs. Remove the stuffing, 
then lay on the side, the back from you and 
split in two, beginning at the neck. Then cut 
the breast in two lengthwise. Separate the 
drumstick from the second joint. First place 
some stuffing, then place a piece of the leg and 
a piece of the breast for an order. Always try 
to keep both colors of meat served as evenly 
as possible. 

THE GOOSE— I believe this the most diffi- 
cult of fowls to carve, and unless young and 
tender is very little pleasure to serve. In carv- 
ing first begin by removing the legs, the same 
as for turkey, then insert the fork across the 
center of the breast. Hold it firmly and cut 
thin slices from the breast, holding the knife 
flat against the breast. After cutting several 
slices remove the wing. Proceed the same way 
on the opposite side, then remove the wish 
bone by cutting across down to the shoulders. 
This does not serve nicely as a whole and is 
best cut in two at the curve and served with a 
slice or two of the breast. The second joint 
should be separated from the leg and divided 
in two portions, cutting parallel with the grain. 
Many prefer the drumstick served whole on 
the bone, but, as a rule, the meat is removed 



142 



THE PEACTICAL 



from the bone. Place a little dressing on the 
dish, then a piece of the leg or second joint and 
one or two slices of the breast. Tart fruit 
sauce, such as apple, gooseberry or plum, are 
best served on a sejjarate small sauce dish. 

TAME DUCK in carving, unless it is very 
large and fat, you can hardly make more than 
six full orders out of each bird. Proceed much 
like carving a goose. First remove the legs, 
but do not separate from the second joint, as 
the two together will not make a full order, 
then remove the wings, then the wish bone and 
make two orders out of each side of the breast. 
When the duck is large and fat three orders 
may be made from each side. Serve the same 
as goose. 

MALLAED DUCK — In an American plan 
hotel a mallard duck should make about four 
to five good orders, not including the legs, 
which are not desirable, though often served. 
The best way in carving is to remove the legs 
first, then the wings, if they are not already 
cut off by the cook. If it is intended to make 
but four orders: cut along one side of the ridge 
bone the full length of the breast; then, with 
your knife, free the meat clear down the side 
to the wing or shoulder bone and separate from 
around the wish bone. This gives you the 
whole side, which can sometimes be cut in three 
portions, but more often only two, owing to 
the condition of the duck and the size or por- 
tions it is desired to serve. Proceed the same 
way with both sides and serve with a small 
spoonful of jelly on the side. CANVASBACK 
and RED HEAD DUCK are served about the 
same way. 

TEAL DUCK— A nice plump teal duck will 
make two portions. Cut through the center 
lengthways, thus dividing it into equal parts. 
Place on dish with the cut or hollow side down. 
Serve with a little jelly placed on the side. 

The foregoing are the most important roasts 
which come to the carving stand. Such dishes 
as BOILED TONGUE, CORNED BEEF, 
FILLETS OF BEEF, etc., require very little 
instruction, as one's natural intelligence will 
prove a sufficient guide. 
What Dishes to tTse in Serving 

SHELL OYSTERS OR CLAMS to appear 
most attractive should be served on deep plates, 
the hollow of which should be filled with cracked 



HOTEL STEWARD 

ice, accompanied by a quarter of lemon. 

BOUILLON when clear should be served in 
cups, but if it contain \egetables or garnishes 
of any kind regular soup plates should be used. 

HORS D'OEUVRES should be served ou 
five-inch plates, usually with a leaf of lettuce, 
parsley or some other little garnish suiting the 
occasion. 

FISH should always be served on a six-inch 
plate, whether breakfast, dinner or supper, as 
it does away with the bringing of an extra 
change of plates. No other food can well be 
eaten from the same plate on which fish has 
been. A small portion of potatoes nicely placed 
ou one side, with a leaf of lettuce or a small 
sprig of parsley and a small slice of lemon. 
An order of fish served in this manner will be 
found very attractive and appetizing. 

ROAST BEEF appears best when served on 
what is known as an eight-inch dish. There 
should be but little gravy unless otherwise or- 
dered. 

VEAL, LAMB, MUTTON, TURKEY and 
all other roasts and boileds should be served 
on a seven-inch dish, or a size smaller than 
that for roast beef. 

SINGLE STEAKS, A PAIR OF CHOPS, 
HAM, FRIED EGGS on seven-inch dishes. 

MOST ENTREES appear best served on 
six-inch dishes. All VEGETABLES unless 
served as entrees or entremets, should be served 
in what are known as bakers, or deep oval 
dishes. 

All SALADS make the neatest appearance 
when served on five-inch plates on a leaf of 
lettuce. 
Garnishing 

A little parsley or water cress, when it is 
possible to get them, using in their absence a 
leaf of lettuce, and, in addition, sometimes a 
slice of lemon adds wonderfully to the appear- 
ance of many dishes, and often has the effect 
of creating an appetite in those cases where we 
find it necessary to cater to a delicate stomach, 
and always enlists a favorable comment. The 
idea that some may have that it is wasteful or 
extravagant is, to my mind, erroneous, because 
the amount of patronage gained for the house 
through their attracti\e table service will doubly 
repay them for any money spent in that direc- 
tion. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



143 



PARTY CATERINa. 

In some places, the providers or purveyors to 
society 'a entertainment have attained for them- 
selves enviable positions, which their gradually 
acquired knowledge — how to please and be 
original, what is new and elegant in decora- 
tions, what and hoiv to serve at a party, a wed- 
ding or a birthday, a ball or a reception of any 
kind or style have attained for them. 

The caterer, keeping himself constantly in- 
formed of the doings in society principally 
through the means of papers and periodicals 
devoted to those interests, is prepared to meet 
the demands made of him, and not seldom his 
ideas are first taken into consideration when 
some social affair is contemplated. In order 
for a man to acquire such a stand the aspirant 
should be possessed of refined tastes and man- 
ners, an affable disposition, and he must be a 
firm manager, and as his business, of course, 
brings him principally in contact with ladies 
he should also be an urbane gentleman. 

For his own success he must be a good cal- 
culator. To get started in this business (un- 
less one has some friendly acquaintances in 
society, or can buy an already established con- 
cern) requires tenacity and a large sum of 
money, even where there is no such business in 
town. The most successful that we meet with 
is usually the man who started out in a small 
way, probably with a small restaurant and 
bakery, where he was occasionally called on to 
prepare some special dishes by ladies prominent 
in their circle, the nicety of which created such 
favorable impression that it caused others to 
give him their orders for similar articles, and 
the prestige he so gained was taken advan- 
tage of. 

The first important bit of catering which 

brought Mr. A successfully to the notice 

of the fashionables was, let us say, as follows: 
Mrs. B 's daughter was about to be mar- 
ried. Now Mrs. B was a very prominent 

leader of the ultra fashionable set, so to speak. 
"While living in a large and elegant mansion 
on the boulevard, luxuriously furnished, yet 
she was not prepared to entertain some four 
or five hundred guests without some assistance. 

She mentioned the matter to Mr. A (who 

usually supplied her with salads, ice creams 
and sometimes roasts, etc., on holiday occa- 
sions). He seemed so well informed that it 
•was decided he should take charge of the 
decorations and the conducting of the supper. 

Before leaving, however, Mrs. B discussed 

a recently given reception by Mrs. J , 



where Mr. Smith happened' to'^be the caterer 
in charge, telling him what features of. that 
affair she thought very nice and unique, and of 
others she disliked. She also informed him 
where she had seen a certain nice piece of 
statuary and a pair of antique vases, and some 
other articles of decoration which she thought 
would look very beautiful, and would harmon- 
ize well with what she had for the occasion, 
and, if possible, for him to secure the loan of 
them, or others like them, for the evening. 

Mr. A undertook to furnish the desired 

articles, which, as a man of good qualities, and 
being well known, he had no trouble in renting^ 
at a low price, hg assuming the risk of breaks 

age or loss. The next moriimg Mr. A in 

company with a -florist, went to the residence 
of the lady to inspect the interior arrange- 
ments and the lay of the drawing rooms, din- 
ing room, kitchen, etc., which was a necessity, 
in order to know all that was necessary to 
skillfully manage the affair without any possi- 
ble mishap; also what style of decorations 
would be most appropriate, -and what precau- 
tions were necessary to protect the guests from 
a possible inclemency of the weather. When 
there he found that the house extended back 
from the street a certain distance, with an 
entrance from the alley, which made it con- 
venient for unloading all supplies in the rear. 
In front it required the building of a tem- 
porary canopy from the curb to the entrance, 
and also extending a short distance parallel 
with the sidewalk, enabling several carriages 
to land at the same tiifle. A strip of carpet 
for the protection of the ladies' dresses and 
slippers from being soiled, in passing to and 
from the carriages was necessary from the 
landing to the guests' entrance; it was also 
necessary to have some light. He contracted 
with a tent manufacturer for making and 
placing the canopy (who also supplied the can- 
vas for covering the carpets in the rooms where 
necessary) ; also with an electrician to place a 
row of incandescent lights under the canopy, 
and change and place what lights were needed 
in the different parts of the house. 

After having decided on where the bridal 
couple should stand to receive, and what floral 
decorations were necessary for all purposes, 

the florist submitted his estimate to Mr. A , 

who also then ascertaiiied what tables, chairs, 
table linens, etc., were needed, and what the 
supper should consist of. It was found that 
he required help about as follows: One man 
at the carriages; one man at the door; one man 



144 



THE PRACTICAL 



at the gentlemen's coat room (the hostess de- 
cided to have several of her maids take charge 
of the ladies' dressing room); one headwaiter 
and his crew of assistants; four dishwashers 
and cleaners. As most everything was cooked 

at Mr. A 's restaurant he needed only a, 

small kitchen crew for serving. He also en- 
gaged a private detective, who appeared in full 
dress as if a guest, whose duty it was to no- 
tice any unbidden visitors that often appear 
in large crowds. The policeman who was on 
that beat was asked to remain around and see 
that no crowds collected to annoy the guests 
in passing in and out. 

On the day of the wedding Mr. A was 

given entire charge of the house. All arrange- 
ments and decorations were left to his own 
judgment. In the dining room the tables were 
arranged in place, suiting the size and shape 
of the room. On the side of the dining room, 
opposite the entrance, was the bride's table, 
about ten feet long, on which was placed the 
bride's cake. The center of the side facing 
the dining room entrance were placed two seats 
for the bride and groom. Next to the bride, 
the groom's father; next to the groom, the 
bride's ijiother. The clergyman sat next to the 
bride's mother, and his wife next to the 
groom's father. The groom's mother next to 
the clergyman, and the bride's father next to 
the clergyman's wife. The balance of the 
tables were small, seating but four guests. In 
the hall was placed a table upon which were 
some paper boxes containing pieces of wedding 
cake neatly tied up with tiny ribbons, which 
were to be handed to the guests by a young 
lady as they passed out. 

In the pantry the headwaiter with his as- 
sistants, receiving and unpacking all the crock- 
ery, silverware, cut glass, linens, the coffee and 
hot water urns, punch bowl, etc., counting and 
cleaning them, setting the hot water and coffee 
urns and placing under them gas burners. The 
silver urns and punch bowl were placed on the 
sideboard in the dining room. They then set 
the tables, using very little and simple decora- 
tions. 

In the kitchen the cooks have charge of pre- 
paring such dishes as could not be done at the 
restaurant, also heating such dishes as were 
necessary. The menu consisted of 
Bouillon in cups 
Bread sticks and sandwiches 
Chicken patties 
Lamb cutlets with peas 
Fresh lobster mayonnaise 
Russian salad 

Ice cream Cake Violet charlotte 

Cheese and crackers Coffee 



HOTEL STEWARD 

The bouillon was served in heated cups, and 
bread sticks were placed on folded napkins in 
front of the guest. One chicken pattie and 
one lamb cutlet were placed on the same plate 
and passed to each guest. Then punch was 
served. The other articles excepting coffee and 
ice cream were already on the table, where 
each guest was helped to what he wished by 
an attending waiter. The coffee passed td the 
guest in a cup and spoon was served (without 
saucers) with some whipped cream ready to 
drink. 

After the guests had left, the headwaiter and 
assistants began to clear up, cleaning all the 
dishes, glass and silverware, counting and re- 
packing urns in chamois bags, making a 
memoranda of everything that was damaged 
or missing. The other help removed the canopy, 
and in short, the entire house was placed in its 

normal condition before Mr. A 's help left 

it. In the days following, Mr. A received 

many compliments from those who had been 
there. The supper was served to perfection, 
nothing had been lost, and very little broken, 
and by his skillful management had relieved 
the hostess of a great deal of annoyance. 

On another occasion, shortly afterwards, 
Mr. A served a buffet breakfast at a wed- 
ding where everything w'as placed on the tables 
(similar to a buffet luncheon). These and 
several subsequent undertakings which, like the 
first, above described, all managed successfully, 
brought him prominently before the public as a 
skilled caterer of good taste. His reputation 
was established. No society affair was strictly 
up to date unless he was in charge of the 
service. He now has an elegant office and 
sample room located in the fashionable district 
of the city, in connection with an elegant cafe 
and restaurant located on the ground floor. 
He has a full line of samples of everything 
pertaining to the business, and carries a stock 
of porcelain, silver and cut glass tableware of 
the latest designs, from which his patrons may 
choose when engaging him, and for which he 
charges accordingly. In the working depart- 
ment he is fully equipped to meet all demands. 
He can send out and have several parties served 
at the same time. His furniture, such as 
chairs and tables, are made to fold, so they 
will take but very little room in transportation. 
His coffee and water urns, of which he has a 
number of different sizes, are all provided with 
alcohol and gas burners. His packing cans, 
in which creams, ices, etc., are packed for 
transport are all enameled, that nothing so 
packed can contract a foreign taste. 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWABD 



145 



Mr. A ^has a most admirable system of 

counting and checking everything before leav- 
ing his place; again on arrival at the house 
where the serving is done; and then again on 
being returned. He always knows when and 
where anything is lost or broken and on whom 
to place the responsibility for loss or breakage. 

He has quite a library of books on every- 
thing pertaining to the culinary art, and of 
tl.'e catering business. He keeps informed on 
all the latest events of society. The most 
difSeult part of his business, he finds, is in de- 
vising new ideas with which to meet the general 
approval in his patrons' efforts. to outdo one 
another in entertaining their friends. 

The foregoing is an illustration of conduct- 
ing the catering business on a large scale, such 
as few can afford, and only in large cities. It 
is usually conducted in a more moderate way. 
In most all communities you will find both 
men and women, usually good cooks, who make 
a living by going to private houses to do the 
cooking and preparing for parties. 

A Great Catering Feat 

The following account of a catering feat, in 
which a Chicago establishment distinguished 
itself in Canada soil, is reproduced from the 
National Hotel Beporter: 

The scene of the service is a beautiful spot. 
It lies between the ornate offices of the Messrs. 
"Walker and the river, and is laid out in the 
shape of a lawn three hundred by one hundred 
pnd fifty feet, divided by a gravel walk from 
river to offices, and flanked on three sides by 
a box hedge, and on the office side by a mam- 
moth fountain and bed of tropical plants. 

Two tents were used on this occasion ; one 
sixty feet in diameter, the other forty feet in 
diameter, to suit the proportions of the lawn 
on either side of walk. Surmounting one tent 
was the American flag, while the Union Jack 
floated proudly from the pinnacle of the other. 
The tables in either tent surrounded the cen- 
ter pole, and here the chefs and waiters had 
produced the marvelous effect which so cap- 
tivated the guests on their arrival. The plan 
of decoration was somewhat similar in either 
tent, enough difference of arrangement being 
made to avoid absolute sameness. Smilax and 
asparagus ferns encircled the center pole, and 
tall vases of American Beauty roses were 
placed around its base. Wide red, white and 
blue ribbons in alternate colors were stretched 
from the edge of the table, and carried half 
way up the center pole, where they were fas- 
tened in festoons. Candelabra with vari-col- 
ored shades were placed upon the table, and 



the blending of color with that of the ribbons 
was harmonious and beautiful. 

The ornamental pieces consisted of Cornu- 
copias, five feet from mouth to tip, and a foot 
in diameter at the mouth, made of white aud 
gold pasteboard, and tied with wide ribbons 
of red, white and blue alternately; these were 
laid against the center pole, and extended out 
upon the table to within a foot or two of the 
edge. They were filled with fruits and added 
greatly to the appearance. 

Large baskets and punch bowls made of 
nougat were also filled with fruits. On op- 
posite sides of the table were enormous plat- 
ters, each containing a salmon, weighing 
twenty-five pounds, en mayonnaise. One of the 
most beautiful pieces was a crown (the emblem 
of Messrs. Hiram Walker & Sons, Limited) 
made of beef tongues, en jellie, and sur- 
mounted with an anchor of stearine, tied with 
narrow red, white and blue ribbon, and sup- 
porting the American and British flags in silk, 
one on either side. 

Other pieces were lobster en aspic, jellies 
filled with small fruits, boned chicken and 
game in aspic, beef a la mode, ornamented 
hams, salads, etc. Besides an elaborate menu 
of bouillon, salads, cold meats, fruits, sand- 
wiches, ices, lemonade, coffee, punches, etc., 
Mumm 's extra dry was served with lavish hand. 
Added to this a special brand of cigars was 
served, made exclusively for the Messrs. 
Walker by Bock & Co., Havana, and encircled 
by a band bearing the Walkers ' namfe. 

The guests were lavish in their praises of the 
unbounded hospitality of the Messrs. Walker, 
and of the very excellent service rendered by 
Kinsley's, and this affair must rank as a truly 
remarkable one, when it is stated that it took 
two carloads of paraphernalia and material, 
and forty-five cooks and waiters to serve it, all 
of which Messrs. Kinsley & Baumann took with 
them from Chicago, entering each item in their 
lengthy invoice through the Canadian customs, 
and again through the American customs re- 
turning. Some little difficulty was experienced 
in passing the customs at Detroit on the re- 
turn trip, the collector insisting upon the pay- 
ment of duty on all foreign made articles in 
the outfit, although they had been used for 
some time by the caterers, and duty had been 
paid on them when imported. But upon ap- 
plication to the Hon. Lyman J. Gage, Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, this difficulty was re- 
moved. 

The English as Commercial Caterers 

As commercial caterers, the English have at- 



146 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



tained within certain limits to the highest ex- 
cellence. This, sa^fs the National Hotel lie- 
porter, is an outcome of the incessant eager- 
ness of the Briton to engage in some sort of 
outdoor function in which eating occupies a 
conspicuous place. Whether for boating par- 
ties on .the Thames, thg races^ or games of any 
kind, the inevitalDle hamper of provisions is an 
essential part of the equipment. Facility and 
certainty of transportation make London the 
center of alimentary supply for such occasions. 
Years of experience and practice have taught 
English caterers a system, which for compact- 
ness and completeness has attained absolute 
perfection. One London establishment provides 
a luncheon hamper, from Avhich are evolved a 
table, the comestibles and table furnishings to 
be placed upon it. This package may be 
opened, and in less than five minutes the table 
is set up, dressed with linen and a service of 
silver, china and cutlery. The eatables, which 
are included in the hamper, consist of bffiuf 
braise, of which six tons are sold weekly by 
one caterer; mayonnaise of salmon, chaud- 
froid de foie-gras, aspic of ortolans, perdreaux 
a la gelee, etc., according to the price paid, 
which does not exceed $1 a head, all of the 
accessories included. This package is delivered 
free of charge within a reasonable distance of 
London. Another firm of caterers likewise 
provide hampers for boating and picnic par- 
ties, but they do not include a table as an 
adjunct. Their hampers contain linen, china 
and plate, pigeon pies, ox tongue, pressed beef, 
salads, bread and butter and cheese, all of 
which are furnished at a cost of 80 cents a 
head. This firm not only feeds its patrons, but 
also owns steam lanuches and house boats for 
use on the Thames, which may be engaged at a 
moment 's notice, equipped for occupancy for 
any length of time. The firm's agents call 
every day for orders, and all that the lessees 
need consider is the enjoyment of the moment; 
every complication of housekeeping being 
eliminated by the payment of a fixed sum. 



Beady for Gridiron Dinner 
From The Hotel Monthly 

An interesting feature of our Washington 
visit was a, tour of the New Willard with As- 
sistatnt Manager H. E. Bates. We were there 
just in time to see the ,big tenth floor ball room 
decorated and set up for the Gridiron Club 
banquet, at which President Wilson was to get 
his first jolly roast. The tables were set for 
250; the floral decoration profuse; the room 
staged for the versatile stunts of journalistic 
genius, and the make-up room, adjoining, with 
all the paraphernalia ready for the clever 
"take-ofes." 

A clever feature of this banquet, to insure 
good service, was observed in the service hall. 
Here was printed in large type, occupying a 
space two by four yards, the menu, together 
with special instructions for the service of each 
course, so that there was no excuse for any mis- 
take or irregularity of any kind in delivering 
service as it should be. (See description of tiiis 
service on pages 146 and 147.) 



SCHEDULE OF SERVICE 
for Gridiron Dinner 

In a letter from Washington, mention is made of 
the famous Gridiron Dinner served in the New 
Willard Hotel, where the most brilliant wits of 
America toast and roast to their hearts' content. 

In the letter reference is made to the precau- 
tions taken by the hotel to insure good service; in 
particular, the " bulletin of instructions'' for the 
waiters, which is printed in such large letters that 
it can easily be read from a distance. 

We asked for a copy of this bulletin, and Man- 
ager Hight has very kindly given permission for it 
to be printed in The Hotel Monthly, together 
with the following explanation why such a sched- 
ule is carried out : 

"Owing to the peculiar nature of the Gridiron 
dinners, where service must be prompt and exactly 
on the minute, it has been found, after many years 
of study, that instructions should be given to the 
waiters before each dinner; and, in order to carry 
out this idea, the management inaugurated the 
system of the printed schedule on oil cloth, which 
you saw at the time you where here." 



NOTICE 

WAITERS & HELPERS 

Must line up in numerical 

order each time before 

entering room. 

WAITERS & HELPERS 

Must all leave room 
between courses. 

NOTICE TO WAITERS 

In every case when there is a 
change of plates ; 

THE HELPER will carry the tray 
with 10 clean plates on it. 

THE WAITER will take the plates 
from the tray, one at a time, and 
put them on the table, removing at 
the same time the plate that has 
been used, and putting it back on 
tray. After the 10 plates of the sta- 
tion have been changed, the HELPER 
will carry the tray to pantry. 

The tray must never be placed 
on the floor, but must be held bv the 
helper in his hands, all through the 
operation. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



147 




148 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 

A FIVE DAYS' TRIP TO NEW ORLEANS The first banquet was on the first night out, 

ON THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER to the President, who was on another boat 

"When, in the fall of 1909, President Taft with other invited guests. There were seated 

accepted the invitation of. the Deep Waterway about 125. The second banquet was to the 

Association to attend their annual convention, senators and congressmen on the second boat 

to take place at New Orleans, and participate under our charge. The other meals were 

in a trip down the river for the purpose of regular. 

ascertaining the condition of the Mississippi After these menus were finished I duplicated 

Eiver as a na\igable stream, the Deep Water- the same for the second boat, which, in addi- 

way Association, and the Business Men's tion to the senators and congressmen aboard, 

League of St. Louis joined hands in equipping included members of the Deep Waterway Asso- 

two boats. One of the boats was equipped by elation, in all about 250. The meals were all 

the league, to carry the governors from various regular with exception of one banquet on the 

states who had accepted an invitation to be- ^ight of the 28th of December to the President 

come guests on this occasion. The Deep gn^ ^is party. After having finished the bills 

Waterway Association equipped tlie second ^f f^re we had to estimate the food supplies 

boat, on which they were to accommodate a necessary for each meal. In this had to be 

number of U. S. senators and congressmen who included the feeding of the help and the regu- 

had similarly accepted to become guests on j^^ ^^^^ ^^.^^^ ^^^^ oflScers to deckhands; 

that occasion. Ijnt this could not be done until the boats ar- 

Now, as there were no regular steamboats in j.;^g^ ^^g^ ^^^3 p^^^g^ ^^ ^^^^ disposal. When 

service that could be chartered for this pur- ^^^^ g^^^jj^ arrived, three days before sailing 

pose, it was necessary to arrange with a com- ^-^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^j^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^ .^ 

pany plying to the northern end of the stream, accordance with the laws of navigation, were 

and owing to the lateness of the season these ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^_ 

boats had been placed in winter quarters, but ^ master 

arrangements were soon m»de and they were ^ gcst officer, 

chartered. 1 second officer. 

We were then called on by the Business 2 pilots. 

Men's League, and the president of the Deep 1 "oat steward or property man. 

Waterway Association to take charge and ^ oilers 

equip these two boats and see that their guests i carpenter. 

were not only fed, but, also, to see that they 2 captains of the watch. 

were supplied with all the comforts of a guest 1 watchman. 

„ .^ , , . , 8 firemen and deckhands. 

in a first class hotel. ^ ^g.^^^^. ^^jj^^. 

It required a complete outfit. The only items 9 deckhands, 

of use for the occasion on the boats were the Crew necessary for the cabin and kitchen on 

ranges, broilers, bake shop outfit, a few pots ^^^ A^'st boat : 

and pans and the ice boxes. The linens were \ wTitos".'' .' *J 00 ""'' ""'' 

not of the necessary quality or quantity. The 3 bugses . 2.00 •■ 

dishes, glassware and silver were not as de- 2 porters 1..50 " 

sired, also the bedding was short. For the 1 <^t"?f 7.00 " 

regular steamboat steward there would have ] ^^™°'' '^"f"' ^-O^ 

^ ,.„ , ■ , i. J iu 1 f^'^d cook n.OO '• 

been nothing difiScult to equip a boat tor the j pastry cook 5 00 " 

regular season passenger business, but for a 1 helper 

hotel man to undertake this at a time when 1 coffee man 2.00 " 

he is otherwise a busy man, requires consider- „ fireman 2.00 

^. „ ' . , 3 pantrymen 2.00 " 

able work over time, for all emergencies must -^^ barman 7 00 " " 

be prepared for. 1 second barman 4.00 " 

As it was several days before the steamer - porters , 2. 00 " 

would be delivered to us, I began first by raak- ^ ^"'''^ <^»''la steward 2.00 " " 

4 cabin boys 1 2."i ' " 

ing the bills of fare, beginning with the boat ., j^pj] ^ j ■,- .. 

on which the governors were io be entertained. 1 barber 

There were to be, all told, about 85 men, in 1 valet 

addition to the executive, a committee on en- ^ laundry women (colored) 1.50 " " 

, i .,.,.,, T 1 i.1, ''' musicians 

tertainment from the League, and the press. ^ ^^^^^ 

There were to be two banquets, five breakfasts, The crew on the second boat were the same, 

five lunches and three regular dinners. with exception of five extra waiters and three 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



149 



■buss boys and two extra dish washers. 

This is not a crew to make money with in a 
restaurant or cafe, as far as the wage scale is 
concerned, but simply a ease of getting the 
very best men for first class service at a time 
of the year when all good help is busy. Most 
of the men obtained furloughs for the occasion 
from other houses, and as this was an enter- 
tainment from beginning to end no expense 
could be spared to give the best possible serv- 
ice, which is not possible with a class of help 
that is always looking for a job. 

Here are 71 employes which must be taken 
care of in addition to the guests, and in mak- 
ing up the supply list due allowance had to be 
made for the class of food usually fed to 
steamboat hands. 

After the menus were completed the work 
of making up the supply list and engaging the 
help was next in order. The task of making 
up the supply list is no doubt very much like 
a dining car superintendent does it. I tabu- 
lated the items as they appeared on the bills 
of fare, which gave me the opportunity to esti- 
mate how many steaks, portions of chops, eggs, 
etc., would be served. The menus were very 
brief, which assured good cooking and first 
class service. The ice cream was taken and 
re-iced daily, and so kept for the needs of the 
trip. In order to have fresh milk and cream 
I had ordered these to be delivered at several 
of the landing places; also fresh bread at 
Memphis and Vicksburg. At the latter landing 
I had arranged for a delivery of fresh gulf 
fish and oysters for Friday. The menus were 
so arranged that as we came farther South 
Southern dishes were offered, and for the last 
morning I arranged that the coffee-man make 
Creole coffee. The waiters carried a tray with 
a cup of black Creole coffee to the state room 
of each guest, knocking on the door, and 
offered a cup. Many of the guests were up 
rather late the night before and felt more 
like sleeping, incidentally telling the waiter 
something which he did not consider drawing 
room language. After we landed at New Or- 
leans the trip on both boats under our charge 
was voted the most delightful they had ever 
taken. 

The following are the menus which were 
served at each meal during the trip : 

THE BANQUET TO PRESIDENT TAFT. 

Huitres mignonette 

Crgme de volaille, chantilly 

Olives Celery Amandes SalSe Radis 

Eiz-de-veau braisS Toulouse en croustade 

Supreme de pintade, bigarade 

Choux fleur Petits pois 

Pommes rissolee 



Laitue et pamplemousse 

Boinbe nesselrode 

Friandises 

Cafe 

VINO DE PASTO 

FORSTER JESUITEN GARTEN 1897 

POM.MEEY BEL'T 

APOI.LINARIS 

CIGARS 



THE BANQUET TO THE GOVERNORS AND 
CONGRESSMEN. 

Blue Points 

Pin money pickles Salted almonds 

Celery Olives Radishes 

Potage St. Germain 

Filet ot red snapper, Creole 

Cucumbers Potatoes, Mark Twain 

Braised sweetbreads, forestiere 

June peas Sweet potatoes 

Spring turkey, cranberry sauce 

Okra and tomatoes Mashed potatoes 

Endives, roquefort dressing 

Ice Cream Assorted cakes 

Camembert 

Coffee 

MARTINI COCKTAIL 
RUDESHEIMER 
CHAMPAGNE : 

KROG BRUT PRIVATE, CDVEE 
CIGARS 



BREAKFAST— OCTOBER 26, 1909 

Grape fruit 

Cereal 

Omelet aux fines herbes 

Lamb chops 

Cape Girardeau farm sausage 

Fried potatoes 

Missouri corn cakes with molasses 

Hot bread 

Coffee 

WHITE ROCK 

CATERING UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OP MR. LYMAN 

T. HAY, OF THE PLANTERS AND JEFFERSON 

HOTELS. MR. J. D. TELLMAN, 

S UPERINTEN DENT. 



BREAKFAST— OCTOBER 27, 1909 

Fruit 

Cereal 

Sirloin steak 

Ham and eggs 

Southern hash with green peppers 

Hot bread 

Griddle cakes 

Coffee 

WHITE ROCK 



BREAKFAST— OCTOBER 28, 1909 

Fruit 

Cereal 

Omelet Creole 

Tennessee farm sausage 

Lamb chops 

Potatoes 

Egg bread 

Hot bread 

Coffee 



WHITE ROCK 



150 



THE PEACTICAL 



BREAKFAST— OCTOBER 29, 1909 

Sliced oranges 

Cereal 

Fried or stewed oysters 

Spanish mackerel 

Fried potatoes 

Rolls 

Corn cakes 

Creole coffee 

WHITE EOCK 



BREAKFAST— OCTOBEK 30, 1909 

Grape fruit 

Cereals 

Bacon and eggs 

Jambalaya Creole 

Corn cakes 

Rolls 
Creole coffee 

WHITE EOCK 



LUNCHEON' — OCTOBEE 26, 1909 

Caviar on toast 

Mississippi river soft shell turtle soup 

Relishes 

Mutton chops, pickled walnuts 

Potatoes 

Apple pie 

Ice cream 

Coffee 

WHITE ROCK 



LUNCHEON— OCTOBER 27, 1909 

Bouillon 

Relishes 

Minced tenderloin, bordelaise 

Fried chicken, Southern style 

Corn pones 

June peas 

Bread pudding 

Pie 

Coffee 

WHITE EOCK 



LUNCHEON— OCTOBEE 28, 1909 

Scotch broth 

Relishes 

Turkey hash, Southern style 

Small tenderloin, bernaise 

Stringless beans, Normande 

Indian pudding 

Pie 

Coffee 

WHITE EOCK 



LUNCHEON — OCTOBEE 29, 1909 

Hors d'oeuvres 

Red snapper, New Orleans 

Pork chops, soubise 

Browned potatoes 

Succotash. Southern style 

Pastry 

Coffee 

WHITE ROCK 



HOTEL STEWARD 

DINNER— OCTOBER 20, 1909 

Beef broth with barley 

Relishes 

Roast beef au jus 

Broiled chicken 

Candied yams June peas 

Salade de saison 

Ice Cream Cakes 

Cheese 

Coffee 

WHITE ROCK 



LUNCHEON. — OCTOBER ?,0, 1909 

(All ready to land at New Orleans five hours 

overdue. Served! : 

Sandwiches assorted 

Cold meats 

A salad 

Bowl of punch 

Coffee 

APOLLINARIS 



DINNER— OCTOBER 27, 1909 

Army bean soup 

Relishes 

Sweetbread braise, princess 

Young turkey 

Cranberry sauce Potatoes 

Lima beans 

Tomato salad 

Ice cream 

Cake Cheese 

Coffee 

WHITE EOCK 



DINNER — OCTOBEE 28, 1909 

Puree Jackson 

Celery Radishes Pickles 

Braised lamb, currant Jelly 

Browned potatoes 

Roast chicken, bread sauce 

Turquoise salad 

Ice Cream Cake 

Coffee 

WHITE KOCK 

The following is the list- of supplies taken 
on the first boat for 85 guests and for about 
71 employes who drew pay (also there were 
several men not counted, as they gave their 
service for the trip), making a total of about 
160 to be fed for five days going down the 
river, and about 50 in all returning with the 
boat, which took seven days to St. Louis. 

80 qt. ice cream 

4 gal. olives 
10 doz. celery 

5 lbs. salted almonds 
.5 doz. radishes 

1 doz. cauliflower 

3 c/s June peas, 6 doz. 
180 bu. potatoes 

6 bu. lettuce (heads) 

i bx. grape fruit (54) 

2 bu. sweet potatoes 

2 doz. young onions 

5 lb. Swiss cheese 

."> lb. American cheese 

Im. navy beans 

3 doz. gal. tomatoes 

3 c/s lima beans 

4 gal. cranberry sauce 
800 blue points 

1 doz. fowls 

6 doz. pair sweetbreads 
43 guinea fowls 

6 beef shanks 

120 broiling chickens 

80 lb. turkey 

80 lb. lamb 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



151 



S mutton racks 
20 beef tenderloins 

5 beef loins, cheap, for help 
8 beet ribs, " " " 

6 beef butts, " ' " 
100 pork loins 

1 whole veal, 75 
50 lb. sausage 

3 No. 1 ribs 
100 lb. corned beef 
30 lb. farm sausage 
25 lb. sausage tor help 
100 lb. lamb stew 

1 doz. brains 
50 lb. lard 

6 star hams 
12 star bacons 
20 California hams 
6-t dry salt belly 
50 spare ribs 

3 lb. caviar 
25 lb. rice 

35 lb. red snapper 

35 lb. Spanish mackerel at Yicksburg 

5 gal. oysters at Yicksburg 

1 doz. gal. peaches 
% doz. gal. pumpkins 
% doz. gal. blueberries 
15 tins mushrooms 

1 doz. fresh pineapple 

5 gal. com. vinegar 
% doz. pt. tarragon 

4 lb. comr. yeast 

6 brooms 

1 doz. scrub brushes 
Vi doz. pastry brushes 
38 bu. charcoal 

1 bx. clothespins 

3 pks. toothpicks 

1 c/s soap and lye 
3 bx. common soap 
3 gross toilet soap 

i/i doz. mops, 32 oz. 

2 gross safety matches 
1 bx. toilet paper 

6 galv. iron pails 

5 lb. whitening 
1 gal. pickles 

1 gal. currant Jelly 

2 bx. chicory 

3 c/s tomatoes (6 bsk. each) 
2 qt. pin money pickles 

% bu. dry peas 
2 doz. cucumbers 

1 c/s okra 

2 roquefort cheese 

1 doz. camembert cheese 

1 gal. fresh soft turtle meat 

1 qt. pickled walnuts 

4 bx. apples 

1 doz. gal. apples 
300 lb. cornmeal 

3 lb. pearl barley 

1 c/s stringless beans 
% doz. boneless sardines 

5 c/s corn 

3 bx. oranges 

1 bcb. bananas 

1 e/s green peppers (4 bsk.) 

5 gal. N. O. molasses 

1 gal. maple syrup 



G pkg. cream of wheat 
1 doz. oats 

1 set calf heads and feet 
120 lb. be.st butter 
1 tub common butti'r 
24 gal. milk, packed in ice 
8 gal. cream, packed in ice 

gal. cream (40'/, ), packed in ice 
150 doz. eggs 

14 tons ice 

1 gal. horseradish 
12 lamb racks, 60 lb. 

1 bx. h(>lp bacon (extra) 
1 bx. carrots 
1 bbl. cabbage 
1 doz. chives 
1 lb. garlic 
1 hot. sage 
1 hot. thyme 
120 lb. onions 
6 doz. parsley 

1 bx. turnips 

2 bx. lemons (360 each) 
100 limes 

2000 lace doylies 

1 bbl. dairy salt 

2 lb. cotton twine 
2 lb. hemp twine 

2 lb. roast beef twine 
1 bx. dried peaches 

1 pt. vanilla 

2 cans wafer crackers 

3 lb. water crackers 
% doz. gumbo fill 

3 1-lb. tins paprika 
1 lb. poultry seasoning 

3 lb. black pepper 

1 tin baking powder (5 lb.) 
Vi doz. pkg. raisins 

2 lb. sago 

% lb. Durkee's salad dressing 
Vi doz. L. & P. sauce 

2 lb. soda 

1 doz. corn starch 
25 lb. pkg. domino sugar 

1 bbl. granulated sugar 
20 lb. powdered sugar 

2 lb. oolong tea 

2 sx. packing salt 
1000 julep straws 
25 lb. graham flour 

2 pkg. tacks 

4 iron tubs 

1 doz. dairy salt 

1 bx. oyster crackers 

1 hot. currie powder 

3 lb. gelatine 
% lb. ginger 
50 lb. hominy 
50 lb. macaroni 

2 lb. mustard, dry 
% nutmegs 

4 gal. olive oil 
Vi cayenne pepper 

4 jars German mustard 
2 bbl. flour 

% gr. cinnamon 
% cloves, whole 
% cloves, gr. 

5 lb. shred cocoanut 



lo-2 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



300 lb. coffee. 
1 doz. pt. catsup 
1 qt. capers 
1 gal. catsup 
5 lb. buckwheat 

Over 180 items, not including the bar serv- 
ices, which included everything that men might 
call for. Upon returning to St. Louis almost 
everything was used up. Some fresh meat had 
to be bought on the way up the river; some 
potatoes and beans were left over, as well as 
a few dry groceries. Fresh bread and milk were 



taken aboard at every landing, as stated before, 
otherwise the list proved to be liberal, and yet 
not too much to be wasted. On the second 
boat I used the same quantity of supplies for 
the help, and at a ratio of 2^2 to 1 for the 
guests, for the increase, and it worked out 
quite well. I want to say, in conclusion, that 
my selection of help was very good, every one 
knew his part, one assisted the other wherever 
needed, and perfect harmony prevailed through- 
out the trip, which made it the most delightful 
trip I have had the pleasure to participate in. 



Keeping Track of Room Service 
Frank Henry, caterer of the Claypool, In- 
dianapolis, has devised a rooms service sheet, 
herewith illustrated; the italics indicating 
written in. He writes: 

"This sheet is kept by the head room 
waiter, an<3 shows at a glance just what rooms 
are doing, keeping check on trays in rooms, 
etc. 

"I have tried books and ruled sheets for 



this purpose, but find that this sheet, with 

self-explanatory rulings and headings, kept 

a dozen at a time in a little holder similar 

to desk blotter holder, to keep the corners 

from turning up, is the most satisfactory 

method I have yet found. 
* * * 

"Account of china, etc., is kept on another 
sheet by checker. (See illustration on next 
page.)" 



CLAYPOOL HOTEL 

ROOM SERVICE 



No Order* Taken Over Phone 



Date fo-2j 191. .2. . 



Room 


Persons 


Time 


Rec'd 


Order Received by 


Served by No. 


Time Ret'd 


A.M.| P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


SOS 


2 

.... / 

..../ 

.... / 


..6.40.. 
..7 30.. 




Back 


28 


..7:30.. 
.10:20.. 
.11-15.. 




607 .... 




5 

5 




.418 .... 


..7 55.. 








....615.... 


..8:05.. 




Caldwell. 


34 


.11:00.. 




....51H .... 


....1 

.... / 


..8:55.. 
..9:30.. 




Caldwell. 


34 


11-00 




....430 .... 


Caldwell. 


34 


.11:15.. 




....430 .... 


..../ 


.11:15.. 




Caldwell. 


M 




.12:15.. 


....307 .... 


..../ 


11:55.. 




Henry 


24 




1-40 


....304 .... 


....2 




..2:00.. 


Henry 


24 




..3:45.. 


....415 ... 


....2 




..2:50.. 


Henry 


60 




..3:45.. 


....310 ... 


....2 




..4:00.. 


Henry 


24 




..6:30.. 


....430 .... 


....2 




..5:30.. 

700 




24 




..9:50.. 
..8:45.. 
..8:45.. 


306 


Caldwell 


34 

// 


....402 .... 


.... / 




..7:20.. 


Caldwell. 




....304 .... 


... 1 




..8:45.. 


Hall 


13 




.10:50.. 


....433 .... 


... / 




11:30.. 


Caldwell. 


34 




.12:15.. 




































THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



153 



ROOM SERVICE 



10-24 191-?.... 

Room No 51S No. Persons / 

Order Received by Ckierhall. 

From Gutst t^t..9:/0 A..M. 

Waiter's No 5 No. Check J92 

Passed by Checker a,t..9:?S A.M. Checker's Name. 0/m. 

Tray returned at../?.?5P.M. Articles counted by ".. 

Articles missing 0. IC. 

Order inspected by Baker before going up. 



Table Cloths 


./.. 
./.. 


.V. 
.V. 


Tea Pots 






Table Tops 


Cream Pitchers. .. 


./.. 


. V. 


Napkins , 


./.. 


. V. 


Milk Pitchers 


./.. 


. V. 


Salts-Peppers 


1 


V 


Tureens 








./.. 
./.. 


V. 

.V. 


Ladles 






Silver Knives 


Covers 


./.. 


.V. 


Forks 


./.. 


.V. 


Dishes (all kinds). 


.7.. 


. V. 




t 


V 








Tea Spoons 


? 


V 


Oil 
























Sauces (all kinds). 






Sugars 


.1.. 


. V. 
















Coffee Pots 


.r . 


V 









RULES GOVERNING ROOM SERVICE 



Room service 25c per person. Coffee & rolls (only) 15c. 

No room orders must be taken over the 'phone; inform 
guest that a waiter will be sent immediately to take order. 

This slip to be filled out by checker, and all silver, china. 
linen, etc.. charged to waiter who will be held responsible 
for same until returned. 

Use china platters, cream pitchers and vegetable dishes. 

Do not use silver bread trays, sugar bowls or any large 
silver where china can be substituted. 

NO SMALL SILVER TRAYS ARE TO BE TAKEN 
TO ROOMS. 



Figures from Country Hotel, American Plan 
The proprietor of a fifty-room American plan 
hotel, rates $2.00 to $2.50, in a Missouri town of 
5,000 population: "I operate at a profit, and 
hesitate on going European plan for the reason 
that I might not be able to give such general 
satisfaction to my patrons. As it is, I have a 
house count averaging about 45, and serve about 
a hundred meals a day. The average length of 
stay is three-quarters of a day, and the average 
receipts per capita $1.75. I figure that my din- 
ing-room service, including overhead charge for 
rent, averages 10 cents for each meal served, 
and 30 cents for provisions. I sell meals for 50 
cents, and do not make over 10 cents profit on 
each meal served. ' ' 



Steaks, Weight and Price 

Louis Prada, steward of the Sliirvin Hotel, 
Oklahoma, sends a combination a la carte break- 
fast, club breakfast, aud American breakfast 
menu, all printed on the inside pages of a fold- 
ing card, and an egg bill of fare on one of the 
outside pages. The American breakfast card, 
ho writes, is ordered from by the guest writing 
his order on a cheek, restaurant style, and that 
it is economical for the house to have them do 
so. Another thing Mr. Prada has originated is 
a card headed "Price and Weight of Meat 
Cuts. ' ' We reproduce it to show how his steaks 
are cut to standard weights, and the price he 
gets for them. 

% lb. Boston rump steak $ .50 

1 lb. I-Limburgcr steak tor one 50 

1 lb. T. B. steak 60 

1 lb. Small sirloin steak for one 7.^ 

2 lb. Sirloin steak for two 1.50 

2% lb. Sirloin stpak for three 2.25 

3% lb. Sirloin steak for four 3.00 

4 lb. Skirvin club sirloin steak 4.00 

5 lb. Extra special Skirvin club steak for 

six 7.00 

1 lb. Planked sirloin steak tor one 1.25 

% lb. Filet mignon for one 50 

1 I'd. Small tenderloin steak for one 75 

2 lb. Tenderloin steak for two 1.50 

2% lb. Tenderloin steak for three 2.25 

3% lb. Tenderloin steak for four 3.00 

4 lb. Club tenderloin steak, Chateaubriand 5.00 

5 lb. Extra club tenderloin steak pJanked. 7.00 
2 lb. Small porterhouse steak for two.... 2.00 
4 lb. Porterhouse steak for tour 3.50 

6 lb. Extra porterhouse steak for six 8.00 



Drink Tea, Be Healthy and Good Natuted. 

From the Chicapo Tribune. 

Did you know that tea drinking is a splendid 
aid to one's morals? At least that is the opinion 
of an English scientist who not long ago com- 
piled a learned treatise to show the beneficial 
effects of tea drinking from a spiritual, physical 
and moral standpoint. 

A meal in the morning, he says, with tea as 
the beverage will enable a man to pursue his 
day's work with faculties unclouded, temper un- 
ruffled and a generally amiable state of nerves. 
Besides that, It makes the body active, it clears 
the sight, it strengthens the appetite and the 
digestion and is particularly wholesome for men 
of corpulent bodies and great meat eaters. 

It vanishes dreams, increases the memory anfl 
prevents sleeplessness. It has been observed that 
it has contributed more to the sobriety of the 
Chinese than the severest laws, and most eloquent 
harangues and the best treatise on morality. 

But, in addition to all this, he claims for tea 
a strengthening effect on morality. .\. man who is 
stimulated by a generous cupful of tea,, moderate- 
ly strong, will be able to withstand more success- 
fully the manifold temptations that assail him In 
the business and social world into which he is 
plunged than the man who is not sustained by the 
same beverage. 



154 



THE PEACTICAL 



Control of Ameiicau Plan Dining Koom in 
Dual Plan Hotel. 

The f.>]lowiiig inquiry is one of many of 
similar kind received by The Hotel Monthly. 

"We would like to know what system you 
have for keeping check on an American dining 
room, in case your house is operated on both 
the European and American plans. In other 
words, how can you tell whether your cus- 
tomers are registering on the European plan 
and taking their meals in the American din- 
ing room?" 

Our suggestion is that patrons registering 
for American plan be supplied with a card of 
admission to the American plan dining room. 

The form of card most generally used is 
similar to the accompanying illustration, 
which was designed for use with The Hotel 
Monthly rack and card system of hotel front 
office accounting. This card, it will be noted, 
bears date of issue, the name of holder, the 
number of the room he occupies, and a space 
for writing in the time the card is sur- 
rendered, or when he pays out. This card is 
intended to be punched every time the guest 
enters the dining room to take a meal. It 
is ruled so that its life can be only one week, 
and the days and meals are designated. Sup- 
pose, for instance, the holder registered after 
dinner on Tuesday: the first meal to be 
punched would be supper on Tuesday (ac- 
cording to sample ruling), and by the time 
the seven days are up, the guest's bill would 
be a week old, and he could not enter the 
dining room again until he had been sup- 
plied with a new card from the office. The 
reading matter in the center of the card is 
self-explanatory. 

In addition to this card for the holder. 



HOTEL STEWARD 
there is other protection desired, and for that 
purpose the front office has books of coupon 
meal tickets numbered consecutively. The 
coupon tickets are printed for ' ' cash meals, ' ' 
"extra meals," and "complimentary meals"; 
these distinguished by being of different 
colors, as white for cash, blue for extra, and 
red for complimentary. And there is a fourth 
coupon ■ book printed in yellow for service, 
this under the control of the head waiter for 
extras or meals sent to rooms, etc. The 
meal tickets are time-stamped when issued, 
and taken up either at the door or table, and 
returned to the front office for cheeking pur- 
pose; the white ones representing cash, the 
blue ones to be charged, etc. 

With this system of control every one who 
enters the American plan dining room must 
have admission ticket of some form. 

The American plan hotels that first started 
to use this system of control found that 
many patrons objected to this "red tape," as 
they called it, but when explained to them 
that it is only a business precaution to pre- 
vent the hotelkeeper from being imposed upon 
they complied with the rules of the house; 
and now in most all well-regulated American 
plan hotels it is matter of course to show 
credentials when entering the dining room. 

There are other systems, as, for instance, a 
checker at the dining room door, who takes 
the guest's card of admission to the dining 
room, marking the name and number of room 
on her sheet and returns it when he leaves 
the dining room; and this verified at the office 
in the scheme of checking. But the first sys- 
tem seems to be the most satisfactory, in par- 
ticular as it not only limits the life of the 
ticket to one week, but prevents it being used 



ISSUED J9 


SURRENDERED 


ROOM 


ADMIT to DINING ROOM 

MB... . _ _ ... 


> 
< 
a 

CO 


CO 


Q 


FILE NUMBER 


HOTEL QUINCY 

QUINCY, ILL. 
NOT tba.nsfi:ka.bk,e 

This card must be surrendered t« cashier vrhen 
holder ceases to he a guest of the hotel, 

I* Kuest stays lonser than a week this card will 
be taken up and a new one Issued. 


CQ 


>- 
a 

u. 


09 


Q 


CD 


SUNDAY 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


B 


D 


S 


B 


D 


S 


B 


D 


S 


B 


D 


S 


B 


D 


s 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



155 



more than once for any one meal, as witli a 
confederate, for instance. 

There is no way to prevent an American 
plan guest from eating in the European plan 
dining room, and we have not heard of any 
hotel that makes a practice of canceling 
charge for American plan dining room when 
the patron entitled to eat in that room orders 
from the restaurant card. 

It is not good policy to serve American 
plan and European plan in the same dining 
room. 

It is a most dificult matter to serve Amer- 
ican plan and European plan from the same 
kitchen and pantry, as the different sized 
portions confuse, even when the waiter for 
European plan, for instance, may wear a spe- 
cial designating badge that what is served 
to him must be a la carte portions. 

From many interviews with hotel men who 
have operated on the dual plan we are in- 
clined to believe it is best to operate either 
all American or all European in the interests 
of ecenomy. 

The distinction between American and 
European plan guests is effectively made on 
the room rack by having the room slips of 
designating color, as white for American plan 
and blue for European plan. In this way it is 
a conspicuous signal when consulting the room 
rack for this information. 



"TEONC"— WHAT IT MEANS 

' ' Tronc " is a new word that has become 
common in England, and will soon find its way 
into the dictionaries. The recent waiter trou- 
bles in London gave prominence to the word, 
which is used to indicate the difference be- 
tween restaurants where the waiters keep the 
tips given to each one individually, and the 
places where the tips are pooled and distributed 
pro rata daily. 

To illustrate the meaning of the word 
' ' Tronc ' ' we reproduce from the Caterer and 
Hotelkeeper's Gazette of London, part of a 
proposed agreement between the Incorporated 
Association of Hotels and Eestaurants, and the 
Kartels societies, by which the Kartel is to be 
given preference by employers over private em- 
ployment agencies. 

SUGGESTED TEEMS OF EEMUNEEATION. 

dining-rooms and kestaukants with 

"tronc." 

Minimum guaranteed earnings. 

Commis waiter, 22s 6d per week. 

Chef waiter, 30s per week. 

dining-rooms and restaurants without 
"tronc." 
Minimum weeTcly wages. 
Commis waiter, four months' probation, sleep 
in 12s 6d, sleep out 18s. 



Commis waiter, after four months, sleep in 
15s, sleep out 20s. 

Chef waiter, arrangement left to waiter and 
proprietor. 

Apprentice by arrangement with the house. 

Extra aides where tips taken 5s per day, 3s 
per job. 

HOTEL floors. 

Minimum guaranteed weekly earnings. 
Commis waiter, sleep in 17s 6d, sleep out 
22s 6d. 

Chef waiter, sleep in 25s, sleep out 30s. 
Ko waiter to be asked to pay for his station. 
kitchen. 
Minimum weekly wages. 
Commis, 20s. 
Chef de parti, 40s. 
Apprentice by arrangement. 
Kitchen porter, adult, of every kind, 20s. 
Extra : 

Commis, 6s per day. 
Chef de parti, 10s 6d per day. 
Porters, 3s 6d per day. 

Night work extra by arrangement. 

* * * 

And the following from Food and CooJcery 
and the Catering World, London: 

During the past few weeks the public have 
been enlightened considerably on the ins and 
outs of hotel life, but there are doubtless few 
who realize what a tremendous amount of 
money passes through the ' ' tronc ' ' — or the box 
wherein the tips are placed for purposes of 
pooling. In some of the largest hotels there is 
probably as much as £4,000 and £5,000 paid 
into this "tronc" account during the year — 
although of course it is distributed daily and is 
not a cumulative fund. 

The method of distribution is quite simple — 
each employee having shares, or part of a share, 
according to his or her rank in the hotel, and 
drawing in proportion. Thus from the highest 
to the lowest position, each receives daily ' ' a 
dividend on his status," or in other words, 
four shares, one share, or a fraction of a share, 
in accordance with his rank. In this manner 
those who perform the menial duties of re- 
moving the dirty plates, etc., are able to par- 
ticipate in the tips as much as the head waiter, 
and when the system is properly worked it is, 
without doubt, a commendable one. 

The "tronc" also provides, in many places, 
a breakage fund, but it is unfortunately often 
taken advantage of at a too great extent by 
restaurants proprietors. Happily such is not 
the case with the biggest restaurant proprietors, 
who encourage the system rather than mar it. 
The Eitz Carlton restaurants, for instance, 
which have an enviable reputation, and are 
under the supreme direction of Mr. W. Harris, 
a gentleman foremost among the world's hotel 
administrators, deduct only 20 per cent from 
the "tips" for breakages, and if an employee 
is fined, the money is placed back into the 
' ' tronc ' ' fund. 

The system can only make for the best in- 
terests of the hotel, for it is to the staff's ad- 
vantage to increase the number of visitors and 
give them their best attention. 



156 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



UNITED STATES ARMY RATIONS 



At a recent Cookery and Food Exhibition in 
Horticulture Hall, London, there was an army 
and navy food exhibit made by several of the 
European powers, and also by the United 
States. Conspicuous in the United States ex- 
hibit were the following tables of the Army 
and Navy Ration, one showing the amounts 



of the component articles and of their substi- 
tutive equivalents, the other the table of ra- 
tions for one man one week. The tables, we 
believe, will prove of considerable interest to 
caterers as showing to what a scientific basis 
the ammunition for the inner man behind the 
gun is furnished. 



THE ARMY RATION. 

Table sho'wiatf the amounts of the component articles of the army ration and of their substitutive equivalents. 
(Amounts of the component articles in italic figures}. 

Garrison Field Haversack Travel 

ARTICLES. Ration. Ration. Ration. Ration. 

Ounces. Ounces. Ounces. Ounces. 

Beef, fresh 20 k so 

Mutton, fresh 20 a 20 

Bacon b 12 12 12 

Beef, corned, canned c 16 16 

Beef, fresh, roait, canned ci6 16 12 

Hash, corned beef c 16 16 12 

Fish, dried 14 

Pish, pickled 16 

Fish canned i6 

Fish, fresh 

Chicken , dressed d 16 

Turkey, dressed di6 

Flour '8 18 

Soft Bread 16 16 i(, 

Hard Bread < E 16 16 j6 16 

Corn meal . : 20 

Baking powder .oS n .64 

Yeast H .04 

Beans 2.4 ^.4 

Beans, baked . 

Rice 16 16 

Hominy 16 

Potatoes, fresh j 20 k 16 

Potatoes, canned j 15 12 

Onions, fresh ik 20 ak 16 

Tomatoes canned ik 20 k 16 g 

Other frash vegetables (not canned) IU20 

Prunes (m) 1,28 

Apples, evaporated 1.28 

Peaches, evaporated i. 28 

Jam A 1.28 J.4 J 

(CONTINUED ON FdLLOWING PAGE) 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



157 



THE ARMY RATION. 

Continued ffom previous patfe. 



ARTICLES. 

Coffee, roasted and ground. . . . 

Coffee, roasted 

Coffee, green 

Tea 

Sugar 

Mi]k, evaporaied 

Vinegar , 

Pickles, cucumber 

Salt 

Pepper 

Cinnamon 

Cloves 

Ginger 

Nutmeg 

Lard 

Butter 

Oleomargarine 

Sirup 

Flavoring extract, lemon 

Flavoring extract, vanilla 



Garrison 
Ration. 


Field 
Ration. 


Haversack 

Ration. 


Travel 
Ratioa. 


Ounces. 


Ounces. 


Ounces. 


Ounces. 


1.12 


1.12 


1.12 


1.12 


1. 12 








1 4 








•32 


v32 






3 ^ 


3-2 


14 


'4 


■5 


■S 




■S 


Gill. 
.lb * 


Gill. 

.lb 


Gill. '^ 


Gill. 


N .1.6 


N .16 






Ounces. 


Ounces. 


Ounces. 


Ounces. 


M 


.64 


.16 




.04 


.04 


02 




.14 








14 








.014 








014 








.(>4 








■5 








•5 








Gill. 


Gill. 


Gill. 


Gill. 


■3^ 








Ounces. 


Ounces. 


Ounces. 


Ounces 


.014 








.014 









A — When procurable locally. 

B — In Alaska 16 ounces, or when desired, 16 ounces salt pork or 32 ounces salt beef. 

c — When impracticable to furnish fresh meat. 

D — On national holidays, when practicable. 

E — To be ordered issued only when impracticable to use flour cr soft bread. 

F — When ovens are not available. 

G — When in the field and ovens are not available. 

H — When ovens are available. 

I — In Alaska 24 ounces. 

J — In Alaska 18 ounces. 

K — Not exceeding 20 per cent of total issue. 

L — Not exceeding 30 per Cent of total issue. 

M—At least 30 per cent of the issue to be prunes, when practicable. 

N— Not exceeding 50 per cent of total issue. 



13S 



THE PKACTiCAL HOTEL STBWAED 



TABLE OF RATIONS FOR ONE MAN ONE WEEK. 



ARTICLES OF RATIONS. 



Quantity 
One Ration. 



Lbs.'Ozs. 

*Fresh meat 20. 

Ba:on 12 

Flour 20. 

Biking powder .08 

Beans '^■^ 

•Potatoes 20. 

•Onions 20. 

or 

Tomatoes 20. 

Prunes 1.28 

Apples, evaporated i . 28 

Peaches, evaporated i . 28 

Coffee. R. & G 1.12 

Sugar 3.2 

Milk, evaporated .5 

Vinegar .16 gill 

Pickles, cucumber .16 gill 

Salt .64 

Pepper .04 

Cinnamon ■014 

Lard .64 

Butter .5 

Sirup .32 gill 

Extract of lemon .014 



Quantity 

in bulk. REMARKS. 

Lbs. Ozs. 

6 2. 7-10 meat ra. fresh meat 

I 5-75 3-iq " " sa" " 
8 12. 

•56 
I .80 

7 80 per ct. of ra. potatoes 

I 12. 20 per ct. of ra. onions 

or 
I 12. 20 per ct. of ra, tomatoes 

2.688 30 per ct. of ra. prunes 

3.656 35 per ct. of ra. apples 

3.656 35 peret. of ra. peaches 

7.84 

6.40 

3-5 

.56 gill 

.56 gill 
4.48 

.28 

.098. 
4.48 

3-5- 

2.24 gill 
.098 



}i ration in vinegar 
}4 •' " pickles 



•Not furnished, owing to perishable nature. 



Vegetable Marrow for American Tables. 

The bills -of fare of several American 
hotels are now listing Vegetable Marrow in 
season. This is a succulent and delicious 
vegetable that has always been extremely 
popular in England, and is now being grown 
in several parts of the United States. Vege- 
table marrow resembles somewhat an elon- 
gated pumpkin, is of a greenish yellow color, 
and is easily prepared for the table by sim- 
ply peeling, cutting in two, removing seeds, 
cutting up into chunks and boiling in water, 
using only a little salt for seasoning. Some 
chefs spoil the vegetable by mashing it into 
a paste, creaming it, and the like; but to be 
thoroughly enjoyed it should be eaten in the 
more simple way above described. A little 
butter served with it improves for some 
tastes. 



Whitewash 

How to prepare a lime whitewash for wood, 
iricTc or stones: 

Slack one bushel of lime with boiling water, 
keep covered during the process, then strain 
through a sieve and add 

One peek salt dissolved in warm water. 

Three pounds of glue dissolved in boiling 
water. 

Two pounds of Spanish whiting. 

Six pounds rice flour boiled to a thin paste. 

One pound ultramarine blue, moistened first 
with a little water. Stir well after adding all 
the above ingredients to the lime, then leave 
the mixture stand a few days. 

Should be heated before applying. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



159 



LVNCHEONETTE SPECIALS 



LINDELL SPECIAL LUNCH, 11:00 A. M. TO 2 P. M., 25c 

Soup ■ ■ Combination Sandwich - - Pie ■ ■ Coffee 



Consomme, Hot oT Cold. 



SOUPS 10c 

Cream Tomato. 



Cream of Chicken. 



CAKE: 



SALADS 

Chicken 15^. Comhination 15/. Lobster 20j/. Shrimp 20/. 

PIE: Apple, Cherry, CocoanW^Cream, loganberry 10/. 

Angel Food or Choc Iiayer 10/. Douraiuts 10/. 



Cheese, Club Style IS 

Caviar 13 

Veal Loaf. _ 10 

Club House 25 



HOT ROAST BEEF SANDWICH 15c (11 a. m. to 2 p.m.) 







SANDWICHES 




Chicken ~ 


16 


nh^P'!i>, Amprffftn 


in 


Ham 


10 


Sardine _ 


. IB 


I.«ttncn 


10 


Peanut Butter _ 


10 


Tongue 


10 


Toast 


, 10 


Bread and Butter- 


. 05 


Chicken, Club Style 


... 20 


Sliced CUcken „ 


20 


Swiss Cheese -. . 


,., 15 



Coffee 

Hot Chocolate .. 

Hot Egg, Malted MUk._ 

Hot Egg Phosphate 

Hot Orange Phosphate. 


.... 05 Iced Tea •. 05 Hot Malted MUk 

_•- 10 Milk „.... 06 Hot Egg Lemonade 

— 15 Lactone Buttermilk 05 Hot Cocoa Cola 

.15 Hot Lemonade 10 . Hot Milk & Egg. 

10 Hot Egg Tonic :.-. . '5 


,. 10 

,.. 15 

,. 10 

l.'i 


Tea, Pot 


— 10 Hot Peppermint 10 

PHOSPHATES AND PLAIN SODAS 5c 




Lemon 

Orange 

Claret 

Cherry 

Strawberry 


Celery Creme De Menthe 
Angostura Root Beer 
Calisaya Coca Cola 
Grape Glngerale 
Ginger Plezol 

ICE CREAM SODAS, ALL FLAVORS, 10c 




Vanilla . 
Strawberry 
Orange 
Lemon 


Cherry Banana 
Pineapple Coffee 
Raspberry. Claret 
Chocolate Maple 

FRAPPES AND PARFAITS, 15c 




Strawberry 

Orange 

Chocolate 


Plneapplerbet Coffee 
Fruit Caramel 
Orangerbet 

SUNDAES— (Plain lOe, Whipped Cream 15c) 




Butterscotch 
Dutch Chocolate 
Cherry 
Bittersweet 


MarshmaUow Chocolate Marshmallow 
Pineapple Raspberry 
Strawberry 
Maple 

FANCY SUNDAES 




Lindellet _ 

Carnation ..„ 

Happy Thought ... 

American Beauty 

Tuttl Frulttl .... 


16 NeopoUtan .._ 20 Variety 

..... 15 Chocolate Mint _. ._ 16 Newport .- 

— 20 Cream Pecan 15 Honeywell -. 

— 15 Almond Nongat .... _ 16 Three Graces , 

^. IS Chocolate Nougat 15 

EGG DRINKS 


.. 20 
.. 15 
.. 15 
. 20 


Egg Chocolate ... ~ 

Egg Lemonade 

Egg Tonic 

Egg Angostura 


-.. 16 Egg Phosphate 10 Egg Malted Milk 

-.. 16 Egg Coffee _ 16 Frosted Coffee 

_ 15 Egg MHk Shake 16 

15 Egg Frappe 20 

LINDELL THIRST QUENCHERS 


.. 15 

.. 16 , 


Tourlits' Delight 

Lime Fteeie 

Gtapeade 

Mint Cooler .: 

Claret Punch _ 

SelUer Lemonade 


.._ 16 Zinasla Punch 15 Plain Lemonade 

™ 16 Grape Cobbler 15 Fruit Lemonade 

10 Claret Lemonade . 15 Cherry Cobbler 

16 Mint Freeze _.. __ 16 Limeade -... 

,._ 15 Grape Freeze „. 15 Iced Ceylon Tea and 

._ 16 Pineapple Rickey 16 Lime Juice 


. 10 
. 16 
. 15 
. 10 

. 10 


Excelsior Springs Soterlan Glngerale, Clubs 16c 






SODA SPECIALS 




One half Cantaloupe 15/ Whole 25/ 
Presh Peach Sundae 15/ 
Fresh Raspberry Sundae 15^ 
Cantaloupe Sundae 20/ 





LUNCHKONETTB BILL OP FARE, THE LINDELL, LINCOLN, NEB. CARD 7 X 12! INCHES. 



160 



THE PKACTICAL 



WINES. 

(rrench, Vin; German, Wein.) 
The word wine is a German term. When 
used alone it applies to the fermented juice of 
grapes. Other fermented beverages extracted 
from fruit and vegetables are also called wine, 
but the name from which the same is made 
is prefixed, such as Elderberry, Gooseberry, 
etc. 

Wine is made by taking the fruit when thor- 
oughly ripe and the juice extracted by means 
of a press. The product in the fresh state, 
which is called Must is placed in large casks 
to ferment; and after the wine is settled and 
cleared it is drawn from the lees (which is the 
thick muddy sediment separated by fermenta- 
tion) and placed in clean casks in cellars of 
equable temperature, where it is permitted to 
remain for some time and completed for the 
market. 

The art of making and treating wines is a 
profession which requires study and practice. 
There are several comprehensive books written 
on this subject, one of them Thudicum, where 
everything is fully explained; and while it 
may not be necessary for a wine steward to 
know how wine is made and treated I have 
found it a very pleasant study and have ob- 
tained a great deal of valuable information, 
which came in good place on several occasions. 
I shall in a brief sketch endeavor to give my 
own experience in the handling of Native 
American Still Wines, which covers only a very 
small field. Their treatment, however, I find 
is very much the same the world over. In some 
localities, of which California is one, they are 
handled with less danger of loss owing to the 
larger per cent of alcohol contained in them 
than are those of the Middle 'Eastern States 
and of Europe. 

In Europe, all large- establishments, both 
public and private, have their well regulated 
wine cellars, which is the pride of the keeper. 
He pays personal attention. To the inn keeper 
it is the most important part of his business. 
When the cellars are extensive he has a man 
(master of the cellar or wine steward) in 
charge of it. In large wine houses the cellar 
master has a number of assistants who are 
kept busy every day in the year issuing, draw- 
ing and bottling the different kinds of wine. 
In well-to-do families where the owner has a 
small cellar a man comes around at regular in- 
tervals, who looks after the wine, draws and 
bottles what his patron may require until he 
returns. He may have several cellars in charge 
and thereby makes a comfortable living. 



HOTEL STEWARD 

The cellars where wines are kept in the wood 
(barrels or casks) should be located in a place 
where an equable temperature with the least 
possible variation the year round can be main- 
tained, which should be not over 60 degrees 
maximum. Sudden changes are most dangerous 
to wines; even when in bottles this should be 
avoided. New wines, and especially the heavy- 
bodied ones, can stand a higher temperature; 
it is even beneficial to them while new, as it 
has a tendency to hasten maturity. Damp or 
foul air is to be avoided, as it has the effect 
to produce a moldy taste of the wines; for that 
reason the cellar should be perfectly dry and 
well ventilated. The ventilators should be 
either in the ceiling, or, this being mostly im- 
possible, in the walls as near the ceiling as 
possible. The place should be kept scrupulously 
clean and no foreign matter, such as vege- 
tables, kept in the same. 

In the center and full length of the room or 
cellar there should be a rack made of two tim- 
bers laying parallel about two or two and a 
half feet apart, upon which the barrels are to 
rest. The barrels should lay perfectly level, 
with bung at the top. On the sides of the cel- 
lar should be partitioned shelving, in which the 
bottled wines are kept, each partition being 
numbered or labeled showing what kind of wine 
it contains. These partitions are divided into 
sections, one to contain all the champagnes, 
another Bordeaux, another Burgundy and so 
on, giving each distinct type of wine a section. 

All ales, beers, porters, distilled goods and 
minerals waters should be kept in a separate 
room, as the temperature does not affect them 
so quickly. This latter room is best situated 
so as to answer as an anteroom for the wine 
cellar. In this can also be kept the implements 
and utensils necessary in the cellar, such as 
several syphons (of different sizes) which are 
used to draw the wine from the barrels through 
the bunghole; an assortment of long tapered 
bungs; a bung starter; some bottle racks 
(which are boards with large round holes in 
which the bottles can be placed to drain after 
washing) ; a corking machine ; several fau- 
cets; sulphur; -labels for your bottles, and a 
variety of copper measures and funnels. 

When receiving wine in casks or barrels it 
should be placed in the cellar on the rack 
which should be there for the purpose, as be- 
fore stated; then, after leveling it, wedge- 
shaped blocks should be placed on both sides, 
well propped, so that the barrels rest on them 
instead of the timbers direct. The next thing 
to be done is to remove the bung, which is done 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



161 



■with the bung starter (this is a tool like a flat 
long handled mallet). Several strong blows 
on the stave near the bung will start it. After 
removing, examine as to the condition of the 
Avine, and also if the barrel is entirely full; 
if not, take some wine of a similar kind and 
fill clear up, then close up again with a long 
bung, which can be more easily removed at 
future inspections. 

It is very important that as long as wine is 
kept in the wood the package should be kept 
full to the bung hole, for if there is any room 
for air it will act on the wine and a white 
scum to rise on the top, which will cause it to 
become sour in a short time. If in bottling 
there should be more than what it takes to fill 
the bottles on hand, the remainder should be 
immediately drawn into a smaller barrel or 
keg, so that they are full, always using wines 
of the same kind to refill. Never use water, 
as it may cause the wine to turn to vinegar. 
Wine should always remain for some time in 
the casks in the same position described above 
before bottling, in order to get over the effect 
of transportation; and then, when it has been 
decided to bottle the same, select if possible a 
clear day, as" the lees or settling of wine act 
very much like a barometer, slightly rising on 
a stormy day and being settled in clear 
■weather. A matter of greatest importance is 
the condition of the barrels, jugs, bottles or 
other vessels in which wine is drawn or kept, 
no barrels in which vinegar has been kept, or 
in ■which wine has become sour, or barrels in 
which vinegar, acid or mold can be detected, 
should be used. Fresh empty whisky or wine 
barrels are the best. 
Cleaning Barrels 

The best method of cleaning barrels is as 
foUoTi'S: First take about eight or ten gal- 
lons of scalding hot water (soft), adding about 
one ounce of sal-soda, or the fourth of an 
ounce of caustic soda. When dissolved put it 
in the barrels to be cleaned; then drive the 
bung lightly, shake this for about five minutes, 
washing the barrel thoroughly; then let run 
out, then put the same quantity of clean cold 
water in the barrel and rinse in the same man- 
ner. If on discharging this the water is per- 
fectly colorless and no foreign odor remains, 
this will be sufficient; if the contrary is the 
case repeat the rinsing two or three times and 
then fill the barrel with water and let it remain 
for a day, and then, after having emptied the 
same, take a blade of sulphur about three 
inches long and one inch wide for a forty to 
fifty-gallon cask, attach to a wire hook fastened 



to a long bung, light and place it in the bar- 
rel, driving the bung. After having allowed 
enough time for the sulphur to consume, re- 
move the bung, also the charred parts which 
remain attached to the hook. The barrel is 
then ready for use. The object of sulphur is 
to destroy any possible remaining germs, retard 
premature fermentation and act as a preserva- 
tive in cases where wines are very weak. 

Barrels should be always sulphured after 
being emptied and washed, as it keeps them 
from becoming sour or turning moldy and they 
are ready for immediate use at any time. 

To prepare sulphur blades, put one pound of 
sulphur in an iron pan and melt over a fire, 
then cut some manilla or brown paper into 
strips of one inch wide, and dip them into the 
melted surplur; when well immersed draw them 
out again and let cool. One pound will make 
a suflicient quantity for a long while. 

Cleaning Bottles 

In cleaning bottles use soft warm water with 
a little sal-soda (and glass beads where neces- 
sary), rinse with clean cold watel-; then place, 
bottom up, on a rack that they may drain thor- 
oughly. When bottling is intended, first in- 
spect your wine; if perfectly clear, set all the 
bottles it is intended to fill in even rows three 
or four deep. Get your corks ready by first 
washing in clean tepid water, as it softens 
them and they are easier to handle with the 
machine. It is well to have about three as- 
sistants in order that the work move rapidly. 
One dra-ns with the syphon, one fills the bottles, 
the other corks, caps and labels them. When 
all is finished the bottles should be placed on 
the sides, inclining toward the cork and re- 
main in that position until they are to be used, 
then they ought to stand up a day or more to 
permit the sediment, if any, to go to the bot- 
tom. 

Wine less than two years ought not to be 
bottled unless for immediate use. Usually 
when bottled too young, a sediment forms on 
the lower side of the bottle; where this inter- 
feres with the serving it should be rebottled 
and if this becomes necessary place the bottle 
in an inclining position with the neck or cork 
up. After being fully settled draw the cork, 
shaking the bottles as little as possible, then 
pour into other clean bottles very carefully so 
as not to disturb the sediment. Wine improves 
more rapidly if well treated while in wood than 
after it is in bottles, though it is best not to 
use it directly after bottling. It should lay 
several months at least after bottling. 



162 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL JriTEWAED 



Blending 

It sometimes happens that an old wine lack- 
ing in quality can be improved by blending 
with another which possesses in abundance that 
which is insufficient in the former; for in- 
stance, a "weak" wine with a "heavy-bodied" 
containing an abundance of alcohol; red wines 
lacking in color, with the deep red. Where the 
per cent, of alcohol is not high enough, pure 
grape alcohol may be added. Harsh white 
wines are refined by the use of gelatine and 
adding distilled water. Harsh red wines are 
improved with mild wines of the same but 
lighter color. A white wine Avhich is too pale 
can be given the golden color by the use of a 
little caramel, etc. However, blending or doc- 
toring, is not to be encouraged, as only expert 
judges of wine can really tell what may im- 
prove a wine that is not up to requirements, 
and an amateur can too easily make an expen- 
sive blunder. 

If there are several casks of young wine in 
the cellar it should be drawn about twice a 
year — in the spring and fall — and put into 
clean casks, using a syphon or faucet, being 
careful not to disturb the sediment. By pay- 
ing proper attention to the treatment of them 
the proprietor or manager can lay in a large 
quantity of good new wines and in the course 
of a few years have better goods in his cellar 
at a reasonable cost than he can buy already 
bottled, paying proportionately a high price 
for them. Liqueur or sweet wines, such as 
Port, Sherry, Madeira, Malaga, Angelica, etc., 
do not require any of the careful treatment as 
above mentioned, as the abundant quantity of 
alcohol preserves them. 



A Classification of Some of the Most Famous 
Wines, Where Grown and How Made 

Beginning with the sparkling or effervescent 
(Mousseux) wines: This was first made in 
the Province of Champagne, and is said to have 
been discovered by a Benedictine monk named 
Dom Perignon, chief eellarman of the Abbey 
of Haut^iUers, a little village in the prefecture 
of Eeims, one of the principal wine producing 
districts of Champagne toward the close of the 
17th century. It was he who first conceived 
the idea of blending or marrying the product 
of one vineyard with that of another; that is, 
he found a great difference in the quality of 
the wines produced; some were light-bodied, 
with abundant fragrance; others were more 
generous but possessed very little bouquet. By 
mixing these wines together in certain propor- 
tions, and even adding wines of some previous 



superior vintage, he gave each what was lack- 
ing, and so improved all. It also occurred to 
him that a piece of cork would make a more 
suitable stopper than tow of hemp or flax 
dipped in oil, which was used for that purpose 
up to that time. While experimenting in this 
way he discovered how to make an effervescent 
wine that was delicate and pleasing to the 
taste; and today no swell repast anywhere in 
the civilized world is complete without spark- 
ling champagne. 

The wines of Champagne were recognized 
among the finest known long before Dom Perig- 
non 's discovery. As far back as the fifth cen- 
tury, St. Eemi, baptiser of Clovis, the first 
Christian king of France, bequeathed to various 
churches the vineyards he owned at Eeims and 
Laon, together with the men ^vho attended to 
their cultivation. [Henry Vizetelly in Facts 
About Champagne.] 

Along in the middle ages champagne, the 
w'ine of kings and nobles, and so highly prized 
by them, was a heavy-bodied red wine resem- 
bling the Burgundies, and for many years there 
was quite a sharp tilt among the medical 
fraternity as to the relative merits of the prod- 
ucts of the two provinces of Champagne and 
Burgundy, the faculty of Paris, to whom the 
matter was referred, finally deciding in favor 
of Champagne. 

The best wines grown in Champagne are 
those of the prefecture of Eeims and Epernay 
on the hills sloping toward the banks of the 
Eiver Marne. It is said that the inclination 
of these hills, together with the soil, which con- 
sists principally of chalk, clay and sand, are 
most favorable to the growth of fine wine, and 
there is no doubt but what location and soil 
together are the factors to be reckoned with in 
any latitude where wines are raised; as every 
Avine grower knows what a great difference there 
is in the quality of the same kind of grapes 
in the same vineyard. 

Effervescent champagne is principally made 
from a black grape, identical with that from 
which red Burgundies are made, and are known 
as Plant dore "black graped. " [Thudieum 
Treatise on Wines.] There are also other suit- 
able varieties, such as the grape known as the 
Meunier, which is of inferior quality, but gives 
abundance in quantity. Only about one-fourth 
of the entire crop of Champagne wines are 
transformed into sparkling wines; the balance 
is made into still wines, mostly red. 

When the season is at hand to gather the 
grapes, great numbers of laborers of both sexes 
are engaged, who, with arm-baskets, proceed 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



163 



to cut them carefully, picking off all bad or 
inferior berries, and when the arm-baskets are 
filled they are carried to the roadway and emp- 
tied into large hampers in which the grapes 
are transported to the presses. This work is 
done with great care to avoid breaking or 
crushing the fruit before being pressed, for the 
reason that as soon as the grapes are crushed 
incipient fermentation begins to dissolve the 
coloring matter ou the husks of the black 
grapes, and has the effect to give the wine a 
reddish tint. The grapes should be pressed as 
soon as possible after picking, and the time 
for pressing them is not longer than two hours. 
The must so produced is placed in vats and 
allowed to remain for sometime — not exceeding 
one day. This, after being allowed to clear, 
is then drawn into barrels of ordinary size and 
placed into cellars to ferment and is not dis- 
turbed until winter. About the middle of 
December, the wine having become perfectly 
clear, is drawn from the lees. After this, manu- 
facturing houses carry the wine to their own 
cellars, where they do the mixing and prepare 
the wine to suit the taste of their patrons, 
which is done by taking different qualities of 
wine in carefully estimated proportions, mix- 
ing them together thoroughly in large vats 
called ' ' making a cuvee. ' ' In these the wine 
is thoroughly stirred with fan-shaped paddles 
and then again put into barrels. Usually about 
four-fifths of the wine from black grapes is 
mixed with one-fifth of white grape wine. 

The expert wine maker must know at this 
time the amount of carbonic acid gas it con- 
tains, as on this depends the strength of effer- 
vescence, which, if too strong, will burst too 
many bottles, or, if too weak, the wine will not 
sparkle. They now have an instrument called 
glucometer, whereby the exact amount of sac- 
charine is ascertained. If it shows a lack of 
the latter pure sugar candy is added. If an 
excess of sugar is shown, bottling must be de- 
ferred until it has been absorbed through fer- 
mentation. The fineing or clearing is done by 
the use of gelatine dissolved in wine and small 
quantities added in each barrel and thoroughly 
mixed with a kind of paddle which can pass 
through the bunghole. It is during this stage 
of fineing and blending that the wine is really 
made and requires the greatest care to pre- 
vent spoiling. 

After this comes the bottling. Owing to the 
tremendous pressure of the gas generated dur- 
ing fermentation, which ensues after bottling, 
the bottles used for the purpose must be per- 
fectly round and the glass of even thickness. 



They are all tested by an expert and none are 
ever used a second time. Every precaution is 
used in order to keep the percentage of bottles 
bursting during fermentation down as low as 
possible. 

The washing is done mostly by women. They 
use glass beads instead of shot, and after the 
bottles are clear they are again examined. The 
ueason for bottling is usually between April 
and August. When the work begins the barrels 
<if wine are brought up from the cellar and 
emptied into large vats; from there it flows 
through pipes into reservoirs, to which are con- 
nected a number of faucets or taps, which close 
automatically as soon as the bottle is full. 
They are then removed and passed to the men 
who cork them and place an iron fastener 
(called an agrafe), which can be easily re- 
moved when the time comes for disgorging or 
removing the yeast. The bottles are then 
placed in a cellar for future fermentation, dur- 
ing which time there is some loss occasioned 
by the bursting of the bottles; and the men 
working in these cellars when handling the bot- 
tles are obliged to wear wire masks and leather 
gloves to protect them from injury. After 
fermentation ceases the bottles are placed in 
an inclined position, neck down, and are often 
6urned, which causes the sediment which has 
settled on the side of the bottle to deposit 
itself down to the cork. Then the disgorging 
begins, which is done by removing the cork 
and, by expert manipulation, expels the lump 
of yeast and the raising foam carrying all re- 
maining impurities with it, with but little loss 
of wine. The bottles then pass to the finishers, 
who add what liqueur may be required, cork, 
wire and label them. The wine prepared as 
above is perfectly dry (Brut), there is no per- 
ceptible taste of sugar; and as the taste of 
consumers differ, some desiring more sweet 
than others, the process of liqueuring is re- 
iorted to. This is done by the addition of a 
liqueur prepared of spirits of wine and sugar, 
small quantities of which are added in varying 
proportions to each bottle as desired. In some 
eases the addition of a little spirits of wine 
without sugar is all that is required. This 
done, the bottle passes to the men who do the 
corking, then on to others who attach the 
strings and wire to secure the corks, then to 
others who apply the foil, and finally they pass 
to the labelers. The wine is then ready for 
shipping. 

Champagne is produced in four qualities, 
namely : 

1 — Non Mousseux. 



164 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL 



2 — Crement. 

3 — Mousseux. 

4 — Grand Mousseux. 

The first, NON MOUSSEUX, is fined, drawn 
into bottles, corked and tied in the usual man- 
Eer, but does not become effervescent; it is the 
original method of making bottled champagne. 

(2) CREMENT is moderately sparkling; 
there is only a slight effervescence when poured 
into the glass. 

(3) MOUSSEUX— This wine when the bot- 
tle is opened projects the cork with an audible 
report and rises gently to the mouth of the 
bottle. 

(4) GEAND MOUSSEUX projects the cork 
with a loud report and the wine overflows the 
bottle. 

The prices on wines for the market are ac- 
cording to the different grades, which are: 
Ordinary wines. Fine wines and Cabinet wines, 
Pale wines and Reddish wines. By the term 
<lry or extra dry (brut) is meant wines to 
which no sweetening has been added and is in 
its natural state. Sec or Grand Sec is used 
for wines which have been added to with sweet 
liqueur. 

The first man to introduce sparkling cham- 
pagne bearing the manufacturer's name (be- 
coming immediately a popular wine with the 
French nobility) was the Marquis De Sillery. 
Since then the number of champagne makers 
has constantly increased. Among the older and 
most prominent houses now manufacturing 
cparkling champagnes (the majority of whom 
make both natural, intermediate or Grand Sec 
wines), are the following: 

Veu-ne Oliquot (now Cliquot-Werle). 

Meet & Chandon. 

G. H. Mumm & Co. 

Pommery & Greno. 

Deutz & Gelderman. 

Heidsiek & Co. 

Ernest Irroy. 

Ruinart Pere & Fils. 

Perrier Jouet. 

George Goulet. 

Krug & Co. 

Louis Roederer. 

Delbeck & Co. 

Dagonet & Fils. 

Bouche Fils & Co. 

Giesler & Co. 

Fisse Thirion & Co. 

Due de Montebello. 

Pol Roger. 

Mercier. 

Binet Fils & Co., and others. 



Most of these are located at Keims, Epernay, 
Ay, Avize, Mareuil and Billy. Some of them 
do not ship, but sell to shippers who attach 
their own labels. 

All sparkling wines (of which a variety are 
made in all producing countries of Europe and 
America) are with few exceptions made like 
those of Champagne. In many instances men 
who have learnt in the cellars of Champagne 
are usually imported where an effort is being 
made to make effervescent wines. Some of 
these wines are: 

In France: SPARKLING SAUTERNES, 
made by E. Normandin & Co., near Bordeaux, 
in a little town of Chateauneuf. 

In the Province of Anjou (the cradle of the 
Plantagenet kings) SPARKLING SAUMUE is 
extensively made. This section ranks next to 
Champagne in importance of making efferves- 
cent wines and they are largely sold as the real 
champagne. 

In Burgundy we find the SPARKLING 
CHAMBERTIN, VOUGEOT, BOMANEE, 
NUITS and VOLNEY. 

In Lower Burgundy the effervescent VIN 
D'ARBANNE is made at Bar Sur Aube; near 
that place the VIN D'ARBOIS is also made; 
but the latter wines retain their effervescence 
only a few years. 

In the South of France the SPARKLING 
ST. PERAY is a wine of good reputation. The 
method of making it differs somewhat from 
champagne. The grapes from which these 
wines are made are very sweet and require no 
addition of sugar, which enables the manufac- 
turers to dispense with some of the operations 
necessary in making champagne, which requires 
fermentation both in the cask and afterwards 
in the bottles. In making Sparkling St. Peray 
only one fermentation is necessary, the must 
being bottled as it comes from the presses. In 
years when the grapes contain too much sugar 
a little dry white wine is added after disgorg- 
ing, which is done the same as in champagne. 
This wine is of a pale golden color and said to 
be of fine flavor. It is said that it is so strong 
in alcohol that one glass of it has an equal 
exhilarating effect of three glasses of cham- 
pagne. This wine improves in keeping a few 
years but finally loses all of its effervescence. 
It is marketed in England, Russia, Belgium, 
Holland and Germany. There is made also a 
wine known as CLARIETTE BE DIE, which 
when newly made is a sweet sparkling wine, but 
loses all of its effervescence in about two years. 
At Limoux near the base of the Pyrenees they 
make the SPARKLING BLANQUETTE, which 



HOTEL STEWAED 



165 



^C\JL JZX Luat OCV^LX^^JU axiLL 



classed with the Saint Peray, but does not com- 
pare with champagne. 

In Germany, on the Rhine, they make success- 
fully sparkling HOCK and MOSELLE very ex- 
tensively, both sweet and dry, the latter find- 
ing much favor in England. 

In Austria-Hungary are made the sparkling 
VOSLATJEE, a Eiesling champagne and others. 
It is said that in Austria-Hungary the best 
sparkling wines outside of France are made. 

In Spain, Italy, Greece and Switzerland 
sparkling wines are made with varying success. 
In the United States we have first of all 
SPARKLING CATAWBA, chiefly known 
among which a're: The Cooks Imperial of St. 
Louis, the Great Western of New York, Gold 
Seal of Ohio. 

The sparkling Sonoma of California (in the 
making of which are used grapes of foreign 
origin) is considered by many the finest spark- 
ling wine made in this country and large quan- 
tities of it is shipped to China, Japan, Aus- 
tralia, etc. 

Good champagnes are of a pale straw color, 
but not yellowish. When it is pinkish it indi- 
cates some of the coloring matter was extracted 
from the black grapes in pressing. Dry cham- 
pagne contains about 18 degrees of proof 
spirit, the sweet or liqueured ones contain as 
high as 30 degrees and over. Grand vintages 
do not occur oftener than twice and seldom 
more than once in ten years. Such wines if 
properly kept by laying, down in a cool dry 
cellar will keep on improving for ten to twelve 
years, but after that it will begin to lose its 
effervescence. Tine champagne should never 
be iced in the glass nor iced to the extent that 
they usually are, says Henry Vizetelly in Facts 
and Bints. 

Eeally fine dry champagne should not be 
chilled below fifty degrees Tahr.; but the 
sweet champagnes can be iced to freezing and 
be most palatable. 



STILL DRY WINES— "FRANCE" 
Eordeaux 

The finest still red wines in the world are 
grown in a district in France known as the de- 
partment of Gironde, of which Bordeaux is the 
principal market and port from which it is 
exported. For this reason these wines are 
commonly called Bordeaux wines. The fact 
these wines are so much in demand in foreign 
markets has caused the merchants to send 
agents to many parts of France to buy such 
wines as can be used as a substitute or to blend 



with the home product ; this is the reason' that 
the annual exportation of Bordeaux wines is 
many times greater than the Gironde can pro- 
duce. 

The Gironde is divided into several prov- 
inces, the principal ones of which are the 
Medoc, Sauternes and Graves. Of these, the 
Medoc is noted for its excellent red, and Sau- 
ternes and Graves for white wines. 

The vines which principally produce the red 
wines of the Gironde are known as the Caber- 
net Sauvignon, bearing small bluish black fruit. 
The Franc Cabernet, a small dark berry, and 
the Malbec, a dark bluish berry; the latter pro- 
duces a wine so dark that it is often used in 
mixing white wines, so that many white wines 
are transformed into red. 

The time for making wine in this district be- 
gins in August, when the season is good, but 
more often it does not begin until after the 
middle of September and lasts until October. 
When the time for harvest begins, large num- 
bers of men, women and children gather the 
grapes in a similar way as described in the 
article on champagnes; but after they are de- 
livered at the wagon they are thrown into vats 
and a man stamps them down. When this is 
full the load is taken to the press house, where 
the berries are removed from the stalks and 
trodden on platforms, after which grapes, husk 
and stems are thrown into large vats, where 
they are allowed to ferment from four to six 
days, according to the temperature. The must 
has by this time lost its sweet taste and as- 
sumed that of wine. It is then drawn off and 
placed in casks; after all that flows freely is 
drawn off, the mure is pressed. It should not 
require over three days to fill a cask. This is 
then placed in a moderate cellar to ferment 
and care is taken that what is lost by evapora- 
tion is replenished every three or four days, 
so that the casks are always full. In Decem- 
ber or January the wine is racked for the first 
time, then again in April and the following 
September; after that the wine is drawn twice 
a year until it is bottled, which is usually done 
after the fourth year. 

The wines are classified into first, second, 
third, fourth and fifth growths and bear the 
names of the estates at which they are grown. 
To the first growths belong the following: 
Chateau Margaux 
' ' Lafitte 
' ' Latour 
" Haut Brion 
They lead all other red Bordeaux wines for 
fineness, bouquet and body. 



166 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



To the second growths belong: 
Chateau Mouton Eothschild 

' ' Eouzan Segla 

' ' Eouzan Gassies 

' ' Leoville Lascases 

' ' Leoville Poyf erre 

' ' Leoville Barton 

' ' Durlurt Vivens 

" Laseombes 

' ' Gruard Larose Sarget 

' ' Gruard Larose 

' ' Braune Cartenac 

' ' Pichon Longueville 

' ' Pichon Longueville Lalande 

" Ducru Beaucaillou 

Cos d'Estournel 
Chateau Montrose. 
Among the third growths are: 
Chateau Becker 

' ' Ferriere 

" Colon Segur 

' ' Desmirail 

' ' Lagune 

' ' Palmer 

' ' Brown 

' ' Malescot 

'•' Giseaurs 

' ' Lagrange 

' ' Isson. 

Of the fourth growths I will mention: 
Chateau St. Pierre 
' ' Branaire 
' ' Talbot 

Duhart Milon 
' ' Poujet 
' ' Eoehet 
' ' Beyeheville 
Marquis de Therme. 
The fifth growths: 
Chateau Pontet Canet 

Batailley 
Grand Puy Lacoste 
Chateau Lynch Bages 
" " Moussas 

' ' Labarde 
" Mauton d'Armailhoeq 
' ' Haut Bages 

' ' Tertre 

' ' Belgrave 
" Camensae 

Co 's Labory 
Chateau Clere Milon 
' ' Craizet Bages 
' ' Contemerle 

and many others comprising the product of 
nearly two hundred vineyards. The system of 
classifying Bordeaux wines Is a very old one, 



but was revised by the "Chambre Sindieale" 
of wine brokers in 1855, resulting in as above 
listed, there having been but few changes since 
excepting the addition of new names. 

Other red wines of the Gironde which have 
high rating in the market are the 

St. Emilion 

St. ilartin de Mazerat 

St. Christophe 

St. Laurent 

St. Hyppolyte 

St. Eti«nne de Lisse. 
The fine white wines produced in Sauternes 
and Graves are made from white grapes 
known as the Semillons and the Sauvignone. 
The mode of making these wines differs from 
that of the red wines very materially. In the 
first place, the grapes are allowed to hang on 
the vines until they are thoroughly ripe and 
begin to show signs of decay of the husk imme- 
diately around the stem. The gatherers then 
collect them by taking the single berries only, 
such as answer the description. This makes 
several gatherings necessary, until they are all 
collected. The grapes are pressed and the 
must, which is extremely sweet, is placed in 
casks and allowed to ferment in a shed, each 
day's vintage being kept by itself. The wines 
made from the first collection is called head 
wine, it is the sweetest; the second collection 
middle wine, and the third and subsequent col- 
lections the tail wines; they are the driest. 

During fermentation the yeast is not expelled 
from the bunghole but is forced to the bottom, 
thus retaining more alcohol. 

The first growths of Sauternes and Graves 
white wines are: 
Chateau Yquem 

" La Tour Blanche 
' ' Peyraguey 

' ' Vigneau 
' ' Suduiraut 

' ' Coutet 

' ' Climens 

" Bayle 
' ' Eieussee 
' ' Eabaut. 
The second growths are: 
Chateau Mirat 
' ' Doisy 

Peyxatto 
" d'Arche 

' ' Filhot 

" Broustet Nerao 
' ' Caillou 

' ' Sauau 

Malle 
' ' Eomer 

' ' Lamothe. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWASD 



167 



Burgundy 

These wines belong to the finest of France 
and in the middle ages were considered the 
standard table wines of notable people. 
" Burgundy is situated in the middle east of 
France and is one of the oldest wine growing 
districts in Europe. The principal varieties 
of vines grown are the Pineau and the Gamy; 
these are black grapes from which the red 
Burgundies are made. The white grapes are 
Chardeney. The process of making the Avine 
is very much like in the Gironde district for 
the red wines. The grapes are crushed and 
fermented in vats and after five or six days 
the wine is drawn off and the mure pressed, 
the whole placed in casks for final fermenta- 
tion in cellars and is not drawn from the lees 
until about February. It requires about four 
years before it is ready for bottling. The 
principal growths of red Burgundies are: 

Eomanee Conti (red and white) 

Clos de Vougeot 

Ghambertin (red and white) 

Eichebourg 

Musigny 

La Tache 

Clos de Tart 

Nuits St. George 

Beaujolais (red and white) 

Pommard 

Nuits 

Volney 

Beaune 

Aloxe 

Monthelie 

Puligny 

Gorton 

Macon (red and white) 

Meursault (red and white) 

Savigny 

Auxey 

Bas 

Santenay — Haut 

Noley 

Gassagne. 

Montrachet and Chablia are the leading 
white wines of the district. 

Where, white and red wines are made from 
the same (black) grapes they proceed as in 
champagne, by first pressing the grapes before 
they are vatted for fermentation and the mure 
is placed in the vats afterwards. 



many of them compare favorably with those of 
Bordeaux. The bett among them are the red 
and white Hermitage, made from grapes known 
as the ' ' Petite Sirrah ' ' for red wines, and the 
Eaussanne and Marsanne for white wine. The 
Petit Sirrah bears a very sweet, dark violet 
colored grape well packed; the Eaussanne and 
JIarsanne bear small white grapes. Wine mak- 
ing is done about the same as in Bordeaux. 

The red Hermitage wines are of a very beau- 
tiful color and fine boquet. 

Of the principal growths I will mention: 
RED, Le Greffieux 
' ' La Chantalouette 
' ' Les Lands 
' ' Les Burges 
' ' Muret 
" Le Meal 
' ' Beaume 
" Les Bessas 
' ' Eoucoule 
" Guiognieres 
" Cote Eotie 
WHITE, Clairette de Die. 
Well-known wines of the Department of 
Isere are: 

EED, St. Saom 
" La Terasse 
" St. Chef 
" St. Verand 
" Euy 
' ' Jarrie 
' ' Eevention 
WHITE, those of Condrieu. 
The following are made from black grapes 
known as Terret Picpoule and Grenache: 
EOSE COLORED, Tavel (very dry) 
" " Lirac (very dry) 

" " Chusclan (sweet) 

" " St. Genies (sweet) 

" " Eoquemaure (dry) 

RED, Orsan (dry) 

" St. Laurent des Arabes (dry) 
Another once famous wine adjoining the 
above district is the 

Chateauneuf du Pape. 
It is of intensely deep color, heavy bodied 
with a sweet, slightly bitterish taste. 

On the right side of the Rhone are situated 
the vineyards of St. Peray, where the white 
dry St. Peray is made; as also the sparkling 
wine of the same name, mention of which was 
made in a previous article on champagnes. 



The Wines of the Cotes du Rhone 

This section is along the left border of the 
River Rhone in the department of Drome. The 
wines grown there are of superior quality and 



The Wines of the South of France, Compris- 
ing the Departments of Herault, Gard, 
Aude and Pyrenees Orientals 
The wines produced in this section are 

mostly sweet, containing a great deal of alco- 



168 



THE PRACTICAL 



hoi, both from nature (the grapes being very 
sweet when ripe) and by the addition of spirits 
at different stages to fortify them against 
spoiling. The grapes grown principally are 
the Grenaehe noir, producing a large blueish- 
black fruit; Muscat, Maecabeo, Malvoise and 
Eaneio, the wines made from these bearing the 
same name. 

Dry wine is made from the Carignane. 

Muscat wine is made by placing the grapes 
on trays in the sun until they begin to appear 
like raisins; they are then crushed and pressed, 
which gives a must almost like a syrup, which 
is placed in barrels to ferment. The barrels 
are not entirely filled. After fermentation the 
wine is racked, becoming clear after the second 
year and has a decided muscat boquet. 

In many other instances the wines, such as 
Malvoise, the grapes are handled with the 
greatest care to prevent them from becoming 
bruised, which would cause them to lose much 
flavor. The must from these is mixed with 
some wine spirits and allowed to ferment. 
After completion the wine is racked and more 
spirits added. A dry Malvoise is made by 
allowing a full fermentation, no spirits added. 

The other sweet or liqueur wines are made 
by placing the must in pans over a fire until 
a scum rises, which is removed. The juice is 
then allowed to cool, afterward put in barrels 
with the. addition of spirits and is racked every 
four weeks for six months, thus preventing 
fermentation. 

Still another method is that of making the 
Grenaehe, where fermentation is suppressed by 
frequent racking, sulphuring the barrels very 
strongly and adding a little spirits at each 
racking, no yeast being allowed to remain, the 
wine being racked as soon as any has accumu- 
lated. 

Most noted among the wines grown in this 
section are: 

EED, St. Georges (sweet) 

' ' St. Drezery ' ' 

" St. Chrystol " 

' ' Vin Rancio ' ' 

" Pieaidin (dry) 

" St. Gilles, spirituous (dry) 

" Langlade (sweet) 

' ' Florae ' ' 

" Costiers " 

" Uchard " 

' ' Jonquieres ' ' 

' ' Vauvert ' ' 

' ' Ledenon ' ' 

' ' Eoussillon ' ' 

(dry) 



EL 


3TEWAED 




RED Opoul 


(sweet) 


' 


Salces 


1 1 


' 


Monnai 


IS 


' 


Estargel 


1 1 


' 


Frontignan 


it 


' 


Eivelsaltes 


i ( 


' 


( i 


(dry) 


' 


Malvoise 


(sweet) 


I 


Maecabeo 

OrpTinclip 


( c 



EED AND WHITE, Muscat (sweet) 
WHITE, Clairettes 

" Blanquette de Limoux " 

(dry) 
" Lunel (sweet) 
Large quantities of the sweet red wines are 
exported as vintage Port. 

The alcoholic strength of the different 
growths of wines of France are: 

Bordeaux from 13^4 to 17 per cent, proof 
spirit. 

Burgundy (red) of the finer growths contain 
from 19 to 24 per cent, proof spirit; while the 
fine white Burgundy contains from 20 to 30 
per cent. 

Hermitage wines contain from 21 to 25 per 
cent, spirits. 

White St. Peray as high as 27 per cent. 
Some of the wines of the South of France 
contain as low as 10 and from that up to 30 
per cent, of proof spirits. 



Germany- 
While the wine growing area of Germany is 
quite small compared with other countries, it 
ranks with the first in the quality of some of 
its white wines produced along the banks of the 
Ehine. They are famous the world over and 
no high-class wine list is complete without 
either a Steinberger Cabinet, a Johannisberger 
Schloss, or a Marcobrunner. 

The system of raising and making wine here 
is the same as in Bordeaux, and the principal 
vines grown are the Eiesling, Traminer, Burger, 
Grosser Eeuschling and Eulander. The blacb 
Burgundy grape Pineau are grown for red 
wine, but very little of the latter is made in 
Germany; they make mostly white wines. 

The principal growths of the section known 
as the Ehinegan are: 



Wh 



te Steinberger 
Johannisberger 
Marcobrunner 
Eauenthaler 
Euedesheimer 
Kiedricher Grafenberg 
Eothenberger 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



169 



White Geisenheimer 
' ' Hattenheimer 
" Hallgartener Auslese 
' ' Schiersteiner 
' • Winkeler 
" Oestricher Auslese 
' ' Erbacher ' ' 

' ' Eibingen 
" Eltviller Sonnenberg 
Bed Assmamshauser 
' ' Ingelheimer 
' ' Heidelsheimer 
' ' Kreutzberger 
' ' Dattenberger 
' ' Walportzheimer 
' ' Ahrweiler 
' ' Bodendorf er 
At Hochheim the celebrated wine by that 
name is grown. It was one of the first Ehine 
wines known in England, where they applied 
to it the term Hock, by which all Ehine wines 
are now called, or rather, miscalled. 

The principal wines from Hochheim on the 
Main are the 

White Hochheimei 
' ' Neroberger 
' ' Kostheimer 
' ' Wickerer 
In the Ehine and Nahe Valley, well known 
growths are the 

White Itzsteiner 
' ' Schlossberger 
' ' Scharlachberger 
' ' Kausenberger 
' ' Norheimer 
' ' Monzingener 
' ' Erbenburger 
' ' Bosdenheimer 
In the Ehine Hesse section the best known 
wines are: 

White Liebfraumilch 
' ' Niersteiner 
' ' Laubenheimer 
' ' Nackenheimer 
' ' Bodenheiraer 
' ' Oppenhimer 
The greater part of the above wines appear 
in the market as Niersteiner. 
In Ehine Bavaria they raise the 
White Deidesheimer 
' ' Duerkheimer 
' ' Eorster 

" Koenigsbacher, etc. 
On the Main are the 
Steinwein 
Leistenwein 
Moenchsberger 



Aschaffenburger 
White Eschendorf er 
' ' Holburger 
' ' Homburger 
' ' Hoersteiner 
' ' Karlburger 

' ' Klingenberger and many others. 
The best known Moselle wines are : 
White Bernaoastler doctor 
Braunberger 
Piesporter 
Graach 
Josephshofer 
Thiergaertner 
Odelsberger 
Olewig Neuberger 
Zeltinger. 
The Saar Valley produces the 
Kanzemer 
Wiltinger 
Oberemmeler. 
In Baden the following wines are best 
known : 

White Markgraefler 
" Ihringer Auslese 
' ' Cle^ener 
' ' Klingelberger 
' ' Hubberger 
' ' Kirchberger 
" Hemsberger and 
Bed Affenthaler. 
Alsace Loraine: 

White Eappoltsweiler 
' ' Hunaweiler 
' ' Osterberger 
' ' Zahnacker 
' ' Sultzmelt 
" Chateau Salins 
" Longeville, etc. 
In this section they also make a straw wine, 
in the making of which the grapes are placed 
on straw after gathering them and left there 
until quite dry, almost like raisins, and then 
pressed. This makes a very sweet, but only 
partially fermented wine. 

Auslese wines are made from over ripe 
grapes, the harvesters carefully picking all over 
ripe berries from the bushes and placing them 
in a separate receptacle as they gather the 
crop. These over ripe berries when pressed 
give a very heavy must similar to that de- 
scribed in making sauterne wines and gives a 
rather sweet liquorous product. 

The Steinberger cabinet wines are made in 
a separate hall from the balance, the main 
presses being in an old chapel of what was 
formerly the Closter Erbach. A short distance 



170 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



from this is the press hall for the cabinet wines, 
and close by is built the so-called cabinet, a 
cellar or vault above ground in which all the 
fine wines of this vineyard are kept. For this 
:eason they are called Cabinet wines. 

The alcoholic strength of the leading German 
wines range between 15 and 25 degrees of 
proof spirit. 
Wines of Austria 

Wine growing and making is an important 
industry in many parts of Austria, but it is 
owing to the fact that in some instances the 
wines are very poor and will not last that most 
of them are consumed at home. In some sec- 
tions very good wines are produced, especially 
in the southern part of Austria the red wines 
are so dark and full bodied that when mixed 
with an equal part of water they still have the 
color and strength of ordinary Bordeaux wines, 
while in the less favorable sections they are 
extremely poor, rasping the tongue like the 
roughest cider. " B. Vigetelly in Wines of the 
World." 

The principal grapes grown are the blue 
Portuguese and are said to have been imported 
from Portugal. The wines grown in Lower 
Austria belong to the better qualities and are 
well known throughout Europe, the leading ones 
of which are: 

Bed and white Voslauer 
White Goldeck 

' ' Gumpoldskirehner 

' ' Klosterneuburger 

' ' Weidlinger 

' ' Nussdorf er 

■ ' ' Grinzinger 

' ' Perehtolsdorf er 

" Brunner and 

' ' Eiesling. 
Of the above varieties the Voslauer is the 
best known. The market for these wines is 
Eussia, Turkey, Egypt, Germany and England. 
The general character of Red Voslauer is like 
Bordeaux but stronger and rather more sweet- 
ish, while the white somewhat resembles white 
Burgundy. The white wines are made mostly 
from the Riesling grape and most of the wines 
are ready for bottling after three years. 
Other wines of good quality are: 
White iVIailberger 

' ' Haugsdorfer 

' ' Guntramsdorf er 

' ' Enzerdorf er 

' ' Strausser 

" Shiebbs 
Eed Matzner 

' ' Merkensteiner 



Red Palkensteiner and 
' ' Schrattenthaler. 
The principal growths of Styria are first the 
White Lullenberger 
' ' Wallershack 
' ' Kaisersberger 
' ' Grunauer 
' ' Jerusalemer 
' ' Eadkersburger 
' ' Schmitsberger 
■ ' ' Eittersberger 
" Eichberger and others. 
The above wines are made from the Malvas'ia 
and Hosier grapes and are rather sweet and 
syrupy, with a fine spirituous flavor. Some of 
the other wines are : 

Eed and white Marburger 
Eed Gonobitzer. 
The Styrian Schiller wines (so called because 
of having a light red color) are: 
Hochenburger 
Schwanberger. 
Mr. Vizetelli says there are some two hun- 
dred different kinds of wines grown in Styria, 
which differ in flavor, quality and time of 
ripening. 

The wines of German Tyrol are on the aver- 
age similar to the Bordeaux. I will name the 
Eed St. Magdealene 
' ' Leitacher 
' ' Hoertenberger 
Eed and white Salurner 
White Terlauer 
' ' Eppaner 
' ' Kalterer 
' ' Seewein 
" Sehloss Eametzer 
' ' Kuechelberger. 

Italian Tyrol produces large quantities of 
fine red wines from grapes known as the Bur- 
gundy, Cabernet and Portugese "imported" 
and Rassara, Gropello di Revo, Pavana and 
other "natives." Some of the wines of this 
section are the 
Eed Isera 

" Calliand 

" Ala 

' ' Eovereto 

' ' Ngrara 

' ' Mezzolombardo 

" San Michele 

' ' Maizemino. 

The names of some of the Moravian wines 
are: 

White Poleschowitz 
' ' Pollau 
' ' Bratelsbrunn 



THE PKAGTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



171 



Wihte Klentnitz 
" Baumoehl 
' ' Eauschenbruch 
' ' Schattau. 
Of Bohemia: 
Eed Melnicker. 
Eed and white Labin 
" " " Trogslaver 
" " " Berkowitzer 
White Cerneseker 
' ' Trojer 
In lUyria they produce a deep red full bodied 
wine known as Sittersdorfer, others: 

Stadtberger, a Schiller (light red) wiue 
Bigama, golden 
St. Cancian, white 
And the Picolit, a thick sweet straw wine, 
the latter is quite a favorite in Turkey and 
Southern Russia, to where it is extensively 
shipped. 
Near Trieste are grown the 

Prosecco, reddish yellow straw wine 
Merzaminos, dark red 
Eef ascos " " 

Piantadella " " 
Wines from this section do not grow old, 
most of them being used when less than a year 
old. 

Dalmatia produces some very good wines, 
ranking above the average of Austrian wines. 
The grapes principally grown are mostly of 
Italian origin. Some of them are the Kadarka, 
the Crelenjack, the Plavec and Madrulj. All 
of them dark varieties. Among the white are 
the Vugava and Maraschino, a very sweet grape 
from which a sweet liqueur wine is made by 
that name (but this must not be mistaken for 
the liqueur by that name which is a distillation 
of cherries). 

The Vugava wine is of a bright golden color, 
sweet and spirituous. 

Cerljenacer, color and taste like Malaga 
Madrina, deep red, sweet 
Zlatarizza, rose color 
Rusivica, deep red, sweet 
Muscat di Rosa, white. 
The latter from the Almissa Muscat grape, 
which gives delightful sweet wine of delicate 
rose scent. The Dalmatian wines are the most 
spirituous of all Austrian wines, in some years 
containing over thirty per cent, of proof spirit, 
the strength of the other wines ranging from 
as low as 12 to as high as 28 per cent, of proof 
spirits. 

Hungaria 

The wines of Hungaria have been renowned 
for many centuries. History states that the 



Romans introduced the cultivation of the vine 
about the beginning of the Christian era. Of 
the many excellent varieties produced, the 
Takey and Rust wines are the most famous, 
the former commanding a higher price than any 
other wine in the world. 

Takey wine is made from several kinds of 
grapes, the Purmint or white Hungarian, the 
Weissling, the white Takey and white Malvasia. 
The grapes remain on the vine until they are in 
a shrivelled condition, and when gathered the 
perfectly dried berries are selected and placed 
in tubs with perforated bottoms. The grapes 
exude from their own weight upon each other. 
The drippings pass into a receptacle placed un- 
der the tubs. The liquid so collected contains 
a large amount of sugar. This is called essence. 
It passes through a very slow fermentation and 
contains but little alcohol. It must be very old 
before being ready for market, and is not con- 
sidered fully matured until about thirty years 
old in the barrel. 

Takey Ausbruch is made by adding to the 
must of the plump ripe grape a certain per cent, 
of dry berries. The wine made without any 
addition of dry berries is called ordinary wine; 
and where the grapes are pressed as they come 
from the vineyard (dry and plump together) 
is called natural wine ' ' Szamorodni. ' ' 

The imperial Takey grows at a small town 
named Tarczal and never appears in trade. 

Among the wines of the first class I will men- 
tion: 

Takey, essence, sweet white 

' ' Ausbruch, sweet white 
Ruster Ausbruch, sweet white 
Menes Magyarat Ausbruch, sweet, red and white 
Bakacsonyer Bratenwein, white 
Somlauer Bratenwein, white 
Szamorodnyer Bratenwein, white 
Neszeling, table and dessert wines, white 
Villany, like Burgundy, red 
Adelsberger, dinner and dessert wine, red 
Erlauer, light bodied, red 
Szegzardi, table wine, red 
Baraya, dinner wine, red 
Stembruch, dinner wine, white 
Ermellicker, Bratenwein, white 
Eisenberger, dinner, white 
Odenberger, sweetish, white 
Somogy, red and white 
Simonthurn, sweetish, red 
Meneser, Ausbruch "like Port," red 
Menesch, white 
Magyarater, white 
Karlowitzer, red 
Tetenyer, slightly sweet, deep red 



172 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



and many others. 

The alcoholic strength of Hungarian wines 
averages from 18 to 28 per cent, proof spirits. 
Takey has from 20 to 25 per cent. 

Wines of Spain 

In Spain they do not have cellars in which to 
make and keep wine, but instead they have 
large buildings above ground with doors and 
windows. In these "Bodegas," as they are 
called, the wine is made and kept until it is 
sold. The wine has no protection from the sud- 
den and sometimes extreme changes of tem- 
perature; it is no wonder, then, that many a 
butt becomes sick and has to be sent to the 
distillery to be turned into alcohol, which is 
the case in that country. 

While wines are grown to a great extent all 
over Spain, the sections where this industry 
forms a most important item in their source of 
revenue are Jerez, Manzanilla, Malaga, Gra- 
nada, Valencia and Terragona. Of these Jerez 
heads the list in producing fine sherries. In 
the other districts named they make, besides 
sherries, also white and red wines, both sweet 
and dry, some of them resembling those of 
Bordeaux. 

Of the principal varieties of grapes from 
which sherry is made are the Mantuo Castel- 
lano, prolific large berries; the Polomino Me- 
dium, green color; the Perruno, small yellow, 
and the greenish white Pedro Jimenez. 

In making wine they first place all the ripe 
grapes in a lagar (which is a trough of wood 
in which the wine is pressed) and dust them 
over with plaster of paris, which has the effect 
to neutralize the acid contained in the grapes. 
After this they are pressed. The weaker musts 
are then sulphured, which is done by filling a 
vat in the top of which is a sieve through which 
the must flows after being poured into the vat 
by a pump from below; the must flowing 
through the sieve spreads it like a shower and 
causes it to freely absorb the sulphurous acid. 
This is done to prevent the wine from becom- 
ing sour while still imperfectly fermented. 

The barrels in which the must is placed are 
never entirely filled, but there is always a 
vacuum of several gallons. In the winter the 
wine is racked from the lees and afterward a 
certain amount of spirits added to each butt, 
the fine wines receiving much less than the 
common ones at this time. To the latter class 
Vin de Color is added, which is a quantity of 
must boiled down to one-fifth its original bulk 
in a copper kettle; this makes a brown liquid 
almost the consistency of thin molasses, with 
an unpleasant bitter taste. Quantities of this 



is added until the wine is of the desired color. 

Sherry is naturally a dry wine, but as a 
large per cent, of the export trade demands 
some sweet and some slightly sweet sherry, 
Dulce is added in various proportions. This 
is a preparation made from the must of over- 
ripe grapes checked in its fermentation by the 
addition of a large quantity of strong spirits 
with cane sugar. 

High class sherries are seldom shipped out of 
Spain. They use them principally in improv- 
ing the new or more inferior qualities, which 
are exported. 

The fine sherries are made of separately 
selected grapes, which are placed on mats to 
dry in the sun until they become shriveled and 
then pressed. This class of wine is neither sul- 
phured, colored nor sweetened. 

The terms used for the different stages of 
the wine is as follows: 

Wine aged 1 year is ' ' Vin dun Anno ' ' or 
' ' Annadas. ' ' 

Prom the 5th to the 8th year it is "Pino.'' 

Prom the 8th to the 14th year it becomes 
Amontillado. 

Prom 14th to the 20th year it becomes 'Olo- 
roso. 

They are graded according to quality as fol- 
lows: 

Palma is fine and dry. 

Double Palma: same as above, but more de- 
veloped. 

Treble Palma: the highest grade, best of 
Amontillado. 

Palo Cortado is Oloroso, having developed a 
fine perfume. 

Double Palo Cortado: finer than the above. 

Treble Palo : the finest Oloroso. 

Eaya is the third quality. It is in its natural 
state a good dry wine and is mostly prepared 
for exportation to England and America. 

Dos Eayas is a common wine. 

Tres Eayas, very poor, not fit to sell. 

Besides sherries other wines of good quality 
are the 

Gold colored Pajerete, full flavored, sweet 

Eed Tinto de Eota, natural dry 
" Malaga, dry and sweet 
. " Tarragona, like Port 

" Val de Penas, dry sub-bitter 

White Val de Penas, sweet 

Eed Malmsey, sweet 
" Muscat, sweet 
" Valencia, sweet, used for Port 
" Vin Eaucio, dry natural 
" Ojo de Gallo, light aromatic 

White Imperial Blanco, light aromatic. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



173 



Alcoholic strength of Spanish wines are: the 
unfortified from i2 to 28 per cent.; others 
with spirits added range from 30 to 37 per 
cent, proof spirits. 

In concluding the subject of Wines of Spain 
it may be ^^•ell for me to explain the use of the 
term Solera, which we occasionally meet with, 
as in quoting "Private Solera," referring to 
quality. 

After the wine has passed through the stage 
of development, we will say, some of it is 
Palma, double Palma, Palo or Eaya. The 
dealer or merchant separates them; he takes 
the Palma, or, rather, Amontillado, and places 
them with others which he has of the same 
quality; and the same with all the other classes. 
Now if he has a hundred butts of Amontillado 
and some one buys twenty-five, he draws an 
equal quantity from each of the hundred butts 
to make up the twenty-five and then goes to the 
nursery, Criadera (the part of the Bodega 
where his wine lies until it shows quality) and 
selects twenty-five butts; or, if he has none 
of his own, then he buys of some other grower, 
some, of the same quality, and proceeds to refill 
the butts from which he has drawn, thus keep- 
ing his Solera intact. They never sell an entire 
butt if it can be avoided, nor do they empty 
them. This has the effect to destroy the effect 
or individuality of any one year's vintage, the 
quality of the wine depending entirely on the 
kind and quality of grapes. 



Wines of Portugal 

As in Spain, wine is made and stored above 
surface, but the buildings are called Adegas 
instead of Bodegas. The system of making 
wine is also very much like the Spanish. 

As a wine producing country Portugal holds 
a most interesting place, owing to the famous 
Port which has found its way to the markets 
of the world, England and its colonies being 
the largest consumers. Port is made both 
white and red; the former is mostly shipped 
to northern Europe, Eussia and Scandinavia. 
The red when first made is of a deep color, but 
with age changes to a brownish purple. 

The section known to produce the finest Port 
is the Alto Douro, and comprises the mountain 
slopes bordering on the Douro Eiver. In some 
places the hills on which the vineyards are 
located are so steep that it is necessary for 
men to carry the must, after being extracted, 
to lower and more accessible places in goat 
skins; it is then placed on the backs of don- 
keys, who carry it to such places still farther 
down, where wagons are in waiting to take it 



to the Adegas. The soil is so poor and so lit- 
tle of it that nothing else could be raised but 
grapes; sometimes even they die for want of 
moisture in warm weather. 

The principal varieties of grapes grown are 
the Alvaielhao, the Bastardo, the Touriga, the 
Gouveio and the Souzao. As stated above the 
general treatment of wines is the same as in 
Spain. The lagares (in which the grapes are 
placed to be crushed by the bare feet of men 
and are left to ferment before extracting) are 
principally of stone about six yards square. 
While it is said that the system of wine mak- 
ing could be improved upon in the Oporto dis- 
trict the fact remains that pure old Port wine 
is known to be one of the most wholesome 
stimulants for feeble persons. 

Besides Port wines Portugal produces large 
quantities of other white and red varieties, 
many of them dry similar to Bordeaux, but 
very little of them shipped abroad on their 
own merits, principally because they will not 
stand travel. I will mention those of 
The Province of Estramadura, the 
White, Lissubon, dry 

" Muscat Calcavella, sweet 
" Bueellas, good table wine. 
The country surrounding Lissabon: 
White, Setural 

" Terma, light bodied, fruity 
Eed, Colares 

' ' Barra-a-Barra 
' ' Paro 
' ' Lamego 
' ' Salarem 
' ' iloncaon 
Euby tint, Monsao, slightly astringent 
Eose, Monsao, tart 
Golden, Monsao, sweet, acidulous 
Eed, Areas, slightly sweet and acid 
' ' Lamalonga, slight sweet, aromatic 
' ' Gouvio, full flavored 
' ' Malvasia 
' ' Conaif esto 
" Mouriseo 
Topaz, Villa Flor, spirituous, aromatic, 

both dry and sweet 
Eed, Lavardio, dry 
' ' Azambuja, full bodied, tart, spiritu- 
ous 
Pale, Torres Vedras, soft, sweet 
Euby, Calvel, balmy perfume 
And many others. 

The alcoholic strength of the wines of Por- 
tugal varies from as low as eleven to forty per ' 
cent, proof spirits. 



a74 



THE PEACTICAL 



Wines of Madeira 

The -wines of the island of Madeira are no 
less famous than the Port, and have held their 
prominence for several centuries. The same 
method of wine making is followed there as in 
Portugal, the finest vineyard on the island be- 
longing to the Eoyal family of that country. 
It is a very delightful wine, somewhat re- 
sembling Port, and their color is amber and 
pale red. 

The grapes from which Madeira is made are 
the Malvasia, imported from Candia and 
Cyprus Islands. It is said that they make the 
best wine. Other grapes are the Vidogna, the 
Bagoual, the Muscatel and Alicante, all bear- 
ing white fruit. The black are the Batardo, 
the Negramal, the Ferral and the Tinta, all 
but the latter being used in making white wine. 
In former years the custom for improving the 
wine was to ship it as ballast on a long jour- 
ney to warm climates, to the East or West 
Indies, this having the effect to hasten the de- 
velopment of the wine. Such wines would 
then be quoted in the market as Madeira twice 
passed the line; Madeira East India, etc. At 
present they use heated buildings with glass 
roofs, called estufas. The wine is fortified 
with spirits at different stages, without which 
it would be too weak to keep or travel. The 
following are the names best known in trade: 

Bual 

Malvasia 

Sercial 

Terdeihe. 
Produced at Cama do Lobos, Campanario, 
San Eoque, and Funchal, the latter being the 
principal port. 



Wines of the Canaries 

Formerly a great deal of the wine grown 
there was marketed as Madeira, but now they 
are principally sold as sherries to Central 
America and Brazil. It is on these islands 
where the once famous Sack, a light sweet 
wine, was raised, the expression having been 
taken from Sec or Secco. 



Wines of Italy 

Next to France, Italy is probably the most 
important wine growing country of Europe and 
some very fine varieties are produced there. 
The system of making wine in most localities 
is similar to that of France and Germany, to 
which large quantities are exported. 

Some very fine wines of Northern Italy are 
those of the district of Piedmont, where they 
are called by the name of the grape from which 



HOTEL STEWARD 

it is made, some of which are: 
Eed Barbera, Table wine, dry 
" Bonarda " " 

" Fresa " " 

" Grignolino " " 

" Dolcetto " " 

Wine made from a mixture of grapes is 
called : 

Uvaggio. 
Eed Borolo is a heavy full bodied wine of 
excellent quality. 

Eed Nebbiolo Secco, dry table wine. 
Lombardy wines, considered of rather poor 
quality. Well known growths from that sec- 
tion are: 

Eed Corvino dry 

' ' Malvasia ' ' 
' ' Erbametto ' ' 
" Bordagno /' 
White Casalmaggiore, dry 
Eed Sassella, dry 
In Venetia we find the following wines en- 
joying a good reputation: 

Eed Corvini, dry, rather harsh 

" Valpolicelio, dry, pleasant table wine 
Eed and white Prosecco, dry 

" " " PiccolJt dolce, sweet 
White Montu 
' ' Aleonzo 
Eed Vini de Paste 
' ' Cesena 
' ' Forli 
' ' Eimini. 
The finest wines in Italy are said to be 
grown in Tuscany, some of the best among 
them are: 

Brilliant purple Montepulciano, spirituous 

aromatic, rather sweet 
Eed Asti, dry 
" Chianti, dry, delightful table wine 
" Pomino " " " 

" Artimino " " " 

" Carmignano " " " 

Eed and white Montalcino, dry, delightful 

table wine 
Eed Eipa, dry, delightful table wine 

" Poggiosecco, sweet 
White Nippozzono, dry 
' ' Altomiuo ' ' 

' ' Castelruggero ' ' 
In the South of Italy the far-famed 
Eed and white Lacryma Christi, sweet 
Eed Falerno, rather sweet 
" La Cryma Tiberii, rather sweet 
" La Cryma di Castellamare 
White Capri bianco, dry like sauterne 
" Baja 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



175 



White Furia d'Isehia 
" Capo di Miseno 
" Falerno Faustiana 
and many other sweet and dry varieties. The 
La Cryma Christi is extensively made into 
sparliling wine and is said to be very popular 
in that country as such. 

In Sicily many good wines are produced of 
which the best known are the 

White Marsala, sweet, lilie Madeira 
" Malvasia, sweet 
" Moscato di Stramboli 
Eed Marsala, dry 
Malmsey 

Amber color Villa Solto, like sherry 
" San Sidero " " 

" Amareno " " 

Ued tawney Mont Matrissa, tonical flavor 
" brilliant Santa Venera, soft, pleasant 
Amber, Daearella, sweet, sharp 
Deep amber Cavallaro, dry 
" " Albanello, slightly sweet, sharp 

" " Alcantara, spirituous pungent 

The alcoholic strength of the wines of Italy 
are from 22 to 24 degrees proof spirits in the 
North to as high as 29 to 30 in the South. 



and others. The system of wine making is the 
same as in France and Germany. The alcoholic 
strength of Swiss wines ranges from 10 to 25 
per cent, proof spirits. 



Wines of Switzerland 

The best wines in Switzerland are grown at 
Neufchatel; they are the 

Buby color Cortaillod, dry like Burgundy 

" Faverge " " " 

" " Boudry " " " 

" " Concise " " " 

" " Colombier " " " 

From the Canton of Vaud the 

White Deselay, fine, strong, aromatic 
" St. Saphorin, dry 
" Chebres, " 

" La Cote, " 

Among other rich wines are the 

Bed St. Prex, dry, highly spirituous 
" Salvaquin " " " 

' ' Gringet 
Gold colored Aigle, dry, sub acidulous 

agreeable 
•Gold colored Yvorne, dry, sub acidulous 

agreeable 
Gold colored Glacier, rich liqueur wine 
Eed Visp, dry, full bodied 
" Baillio " " " 
' ' Oberlander, 
' ' Costamser, 
White Completer 

' ' Sieblingener 
.Bed Hallauer 
' ' Karthauser 



Wines of Greece 

Greece occupies a most interesting place 
among wine growing countries. In most in- 
stances the cellars are level with the groujd, 
like in Spain, but the French system of wine 
making is most general. Owing to the semi- 
ropical climate great care is required to pre- 
vent formation of acetic acid. The white grapes 
must be pressed as rapidly as possible; and in 
making red wines the skins must be kept under 
the surface of the must, and, as far as possible, 
the air excluded. 

Eesin is applied to all wine made for home 
use. It is said that this is done to make the 
wine a protective against malaria fever; but 
the wines for export are unresined, especially 
those grown in the Islands Santorin, Cepha- 
lonia, Zante and the peninsula of Morea. I 
will mention some of the best known and most 
favored varieties: 

St. Elie, pale, original flavor resembling 
somewhat fine Amontillado 

Hyraettus, rich ruby color. Burgundy flavor 

Hymettus, white, ruby color, like Sauterne 

Noussa, red, ruby color, dry fruity 

Kephisia, red and white, decided boquet, 
delicate and dry 

Patras, color and flavor like fine Port 

Patras, white like Bhine wine 

Mavrodaphne, a liqueur wine 

Come, pale red, sweetish 

Sautorin, red, becomes topaz with age 

Night wine, a poetical turn for St. Elie 

Sauto wine, delicious muscat made from 
partly dried grapes like straw wine; 
made in purple and white 

La Cryma Christi, delicious, sweet like wine 
of same name in Italy. 

The alcoholic strength of the wines from 
Greece ranges from 15 to 26 degrees proof 
spirits. 

Excellent sparkling wines are also made in 
that country. 



Wines of Russia 

The wine production of Eussia is very lim- 
ited and is confined to the southern part, along 
the Black Sea; though it is said that in Cau- 
casia wine has been produced for ages past 
and that the wines of Europe have their origin 
there. The best wine is produced in Crimea. 
The liqueur-wines are of a delicious taste and 



17G THE PEACTICAL 

Tjoquet, and the red dry wines of a beautiful 
color and all contain a high per cent, of al- 
cohol. 

Sparkling wines like champagne are also 
made. 

Vines principally grown thgre now are from 
Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Rhine, Austria and 
Hungaria. 

The wines are named after the grape from 
which they are produced, like Sauterne, Bur- 
gundy, Riesling, Tokay, etc. The alcoholic 
strength of Russian wines averages from 14 
to 25 per cent, of proof spirits. As a rule they 
do not fortify wines in that section. 



HOTEL STEWARD 

Eine Malmseys and Muscat wines are also 
grown on this Island. 

On the Island of Rhodes grows the wine 
v/hich was much favored by Byron, called 
Samian. It is a muscat. On Seiv grows the 
wine which Pliny praised over eighteen cen- 
turies ago. The wines grown near Smyrna and 
Jerusalem very much resemble rich Muscadines. 
Erom Mt. Lebanon comes the 

Red Vin doux Rosu, sweet roi=« tinted 
Vino d'Oro, bright dry wine. 



Wines of Turkey and Eoumania 

Roumania produces some very good wines on 
the southern slopes of the Carpathian Moun- 
tains, resembling in quality the Hungarian and 
Southern Austrian products, being mostly 
white, of good reputation for delicacy of flavor 
and boquet. 

Best known varieties: 
White Croznovano 
Red Vigue de Monsieur 

' ' Jassy-Nieorestic 
Dealul Mare, Tohanic Scharata and others. 

Although the Koran prohibits the use of 
wine, there is nevertheless considerable pro- 
duced in Turkey, its climate being most favor- 
ably suited for wine making, and before Mo- 
hammedanism took possession of the country 
centuries ago, in fact about the beginning of 
the Christian Era, the Romans derived large 
quantities of their best wines from what is now 
Turkey, especially the Islands of Cyprus, Crete 
or Candia and Malta. 

But very little of the wines made there reach 
the outside market. One reason for this is that 
in the making of wine they have the custom 
of coating their wine vessels with resin, and 
also add mastic and turpentine to the must, 
which they claim is preventative against lung 
troubles; this gives it a most disagreeable 
flavor and a foreigner would consider it unfit 
to drink. This applies principally to conti- 
nental Turkey. 

Some of the wines produced on the Islands 
are quite pleasant. The industry is confined 
principally to the Christian population. The 
old-fashioned coned-shaped vessel is still used, 
which is partially buried in the ground. 

In Candia is where the wines extolled by 
ancient historians, Diodorus and others, are 
grown. Some of them are: 

Topaz, colored Passum, sweet 

" Pramnian Malvasia, sweet 



The Wines of Persia 

The wines best known in ancient times in 
Persia were of Ariana, Bactriana, Hycrania 
and Margiana, grown on the slopes south of 
the Caspian. But the best there at the present 
time are those of Shiraz and Eerdistan. The 
wines in that country are made in amphoral- 
shaped vases holding a little more than a hogs- 
Iiead, glazed both in and outside, and are cov- 
ered with mutton tallow. When ready for use 
rt is put in large glass flasks, using wax and 
pressed cotton instead of a cork for a stopper. 
The wine dealers often mix Raki and saffron 
or extract of hemp to make it more quickly 
intoxicating; they also perfume the wine. 
The best known wines of Persia are : 
Red and white Shiraz, sweet 

" " " Eerdistan, sweet 

" " " Haneadan, sweet 

" " " Tabris 

" " " Teher and 

" " " Kasbin. 



Wines of Africa 

It is said that before the advent of the 
Mohammedan religion wine was extensively 
produced along the entire North coast of 
Africa, but since then and up to the time that 
Erance began colonizing Algiers and Tunis, the 
industry was entirely destroyed. Now, how- 
ever, the Erench are raising considerable quan- 
tities of good wines, principally from vines 
brought there from the South of Erance, the 
product resembling that of the mother country. 

In Morocco what little wine is made is done 
principally by Jews. They apply the system 
similar to that of Southern Spain, Grapes are 
said to grow larger and sweeter there than 
most anywhere else. The wine is kept in large 
jars or vases and in goat skins. 

In ancient times the Nile Valley produced 
large quantities of wine, considerable of which 
was shipped to Rome. They were those of 
Arsinoe, Mendas, Koptos and Mareotis; but 
since the reign of Islam only grapes and raisins 
are raised. 



THE PEACTICAL 

In Cape of Good Hope some very good wines 
are made. The industry began almost with the 
colonization under the Dutch, about the year 
1650. They imported from different European 
countries the finest vines as well as expert 
vintners; the result was that for many years 
the Cape wines which found their way to the 
markets in Europe were much sought and 
brought good prices; but of late years, owing 
to large production and changes in English 
tariff laws, prices have fallen to a normal 
value. The principal wines produced are 
Sherry, Port, Madeira, Erontignac (so called 
for the reason the same class grape used and 
a similar method pursued in the making as in 
the countries from which the vine was 
brought) ; also large quantities of Cape Hock 
is made. But the most renowned from that 
section are the red and white Constancia, a 
sweet liqueur wine, and the Pontac, fruity and 
dry. 



HOTEL STEWAEB 



177 



Wines of Australia 

Vine culture in Australia is of comparatively 
recent date. Until the year 1840 the industry 
was not known there. At that time, however, 
vines were imported from Erance, Germany, 
Italy, Spain, Portugal and of the best from 
other wine producing countries, by the colonies, 
namely: Victoria, New South Wales, Queens- 
land, South and West Australia. Since then 
the industry has grown rapidly and with grati- 
fying results. The wines made there are of 
superior quality and many of them have gained 
considerable recognition of importance in Euro- 
pean markets. Red and white, dry and sweet 
liqueur, as well as some sparkling varieties, are 
produced which are in most instances named 
after the vine or the locality from which they 
were imported. 

The wines most favorably spoken of are the 
Bed Glenpora, dry 
" Hermitage, dry like wine of same 

name in Erance like Medoe 
" Cabernet, dry 
" Burgundy, dry 
" Irrewang, dry 

" Kapunda, resembling young port 
" Yering, dry delicate 
" Sunbury, dry delicate 
" Matavo, dry like port. 
Tawney red Beaumont, soft, sweet, spiritu- 
ous 
Tawney red Tintara, strong alcoholic 
White Eiesling, dry like Ehine wine 
Eich golden Pedro Jimenez, dry, pleasant 
Light golden Temprano, dry, soft 



White Highercombe, dry, sub acid 
' ' Auldana, dry, like Rhine wine 
" Carwarra, dry, like Sauterne 
' ' Muscat. 
The average alcoholic strength of Australian 
wines ranges from 16 to 28 per cent, proof 
spirits. 



WINES OF AMERICA 

Regarding the raising and making of wine 
in this country, it has been found, after many 
efforts, that European vines will not thrive 
east of the Rocky Mountains; consequently all 
grapes for wine making are native varieties 
found growing wild in various sections of the 
country, which have been improved by culti- 
vation and hybridizing with foreign species. 

It is said that wine was made in this country 
by Spanish settlers in Elorida as early as 1565 
from a nati\e grape found in that section. But 
the first attempt to establish a vineyard was 
in the Colony of Virginia, about the year 1620, 
with vines and skilled growers from Europe. 
Eor a while it seemed as if their labors would 
be rewarded with success. Subsequent failure 
of the undertaking caused the promoters to 
accuse the growers of ruining the vines; but 
in later trials it was made evident that Euro- 
pean vines can not be cultivated, except on 
the Pacific slope. The prevalence of the phyl- 
loxera east of the Rockies caused every attempt 
to fail. 

Wm. Penn made many attempts in Pennsyl- 
vania; Swiss colonists tried in Kentucky and 
Indiana; the French in Tennessee, Ohio and 
Alabama. After failure in all of these very 
little was attempted until about 1826, when 
attention was called to the Catawba vine in 
Virginia, which was derived from the Northern 
Eox grape {Vitis Labrusca) , one of the numer- 
ous species of vines growing wild, the most 
important of which is the Vitis Vinifera and 
grows in the old world from 55 degrees North 
to 40 degrees South latitude, and from which 
are derived the European varieties; in reality 
said to be a native of Turkey, Tartary, Greece, 
Persia and as far East as the Himalayas. There 
are instances in which the vine has attained 
trunks nearly three feet in thickness in warm 
climate. In this country the conditions are 
not so favorable except in California. 

While many varieties are obtained from the 
propagation from seeds, the original varieties 
can only be perpetuated by grafting, cuttings, 
layers, or inoculation. 

Wild species are most abundant in this coun- 
try, the greatest number being in Texas; but 



178 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



the Atlantic States are said to have more useful 
ones than any other part of the world, four 
of the eight varieties found in that section hav- 
ing given rise to valuable vines. 

From the Vitis Labrusca, above referred to, 
which was found growing along the New Eng- 
land coast from Maine through the Atlantic 
states to Tennessee, and from Japan to the 
Himalayas in Asia, producing a large purple 
black berry with a musty or foxy flavor, are 
derived the Catawba, Concord, Isabella, Hors- 
ford, Clinton and many others. There is a be- 
lief that an Asiatic hybrid between the Vitis 
Labrusca and the Vitis Sotundifolia was the 
original Vitis Vinifera. 

Vitis Bicolor, the blue or winter grape found 
from New York to Wisconsin and southward; it 
has a sky blue color and is smaller than the 
Labrusca. 

Vitis Aestivalis, ' ' summer grape ' ' also 
' ' chicken grape ' ' found growing in Virginia 
and south to Texas; small pale blue berries. 
Erom it was derived the Delaware, the Cyn- 
thiana and Norton's Virginia; the latter two 
are the most promising wine grapes east of the 
Eocky Mountains. 

Vitis Biparia or ' ' river grape ' ' found all 
through the north from Canada to Colorado. 
The vines from this species are known to be 
proof against the ravages of the phylloxera. 
In view of this, large quantities have been 
shipped to France for stock on which to graft 
the finer wine producing varieties of the Vitis 
Vinifera. 

The North Atlantic species Vitis Cordifolia, 
known commonly as the "frost," "chicken" 
or ' ' possum ' ' grape, grows from New York to 
Iowa, south to Gulf of Mexico; produces small 
blackish fruit. 

Vitis Botundifolia or "Muscadine" of the 
South, known also as the "Bullace" grape, the 
source of the Seuppernong, is the largest fruited 
species in this country. It is found growing 
from Virginia to Texas and from Japan to the 
Himalayas. 

Other distinct species in this country are 
found to be local, such as the Vitis Californica, 
known as the ' ' Vaumee ' ' of the Indians, has 
large clusters; purple, rather pleasant fruit. 

Vitis Caudicaus is the Mustang grape of 
Texas. 

Vitis Arizonica, the canon grape of Arizona. 

Vitis Caribaea, the grape found in West 
Indies and Eastern Mexico; also known as 
water withe. 

Vitis Blaucon of the Sierra Madres in Mexico 
and Central America, and many others which it 



will hardly be of interest to mention. 

Experiments have been made with all the 
foregoing species by hybridizing, with a view 
of thereby obtaining vines suitable for wine 
making and for table grapes, with good results 
in many instances. Especially in the past fif- 
teen years has great progress been made in dis- 
covering grapes which prove, desirable for both 
purposes. I will mention some of the most 
productive varieties suitable for wine making 
and for table use. 

From TEE LABRUSCA, we have: 

THE CATAWBA: an abundant and reliable 
bearer; fruit of medium size, round and of a 
dark purple color; both good for wine making 
and a popular table grape; keeps well. When 
well packed they will keep until the latter part 
of January. 

THE CONCOED : large well packed bunches 
of bluish black fruit, very extensively used for 
the table; they are today our most delicious 
grape for eating. 

The COLEAIN: very sweet and light green 
with delicate bloom when ripe;' has but one 
seed ; not much known as a table grape but con- 
sidered a good wine maker. 

The DIAMOND : a large white grape about 
the size of the Concord; very juicy and free 
from foxiness. 

The EATON: like the Concord but less 
sweet and not so foxy. 

EAELY VICTOE: large white and juicy; 
fine eating grape and ripens quite early. 

The GEEBN MOUNTAIN: found in the 
Green Mountains of Vermont. Said to more 
nearly resemble the Vinifera species than any 
other native variety. It bears medium sized 
fruit, well filled bunches, greenish white when 
ripe; is very early, rather sweet and tender 
and free from foxiness. 

The HAYES: medium sized, full bunches, 
greenish white when ripe, of fine flavor; good 
for the table. 

HOESFOED : like the Concord, but ripens a 
little earlier. ~ 

The JUMBO: a large blueish black variety, 
bearing heavy bunches, being earlier than the 
Concord; pleasant eating and is therefore very 
popular in the New York market. 

The KEYSTONE: large bunches and com- 
pact berries about the size and color of Con- 
cord, but skin more tough and keeps much bet- 
ter. It is said in cool temperature it will keep 
until latter part of February. 

The MILLS: a very large compact bunch, 
round large black berry with blueish bloom; 
fruit firm and juicy, adheres well to the stem, 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



179 



ripens later than Concord and keeps well. 

NIAGAEA: good sized compact bunches, 
fruit medium sized, white, rather sweet, pleas- 
ant flavor ; good for the table but does not keep 
well. 

The OSWEGO: large black tender fruit; 
keeps and looks better than the Concord. 

The ULSTEE PEOLIFIC: medium sized 
bunches with fruit somewhat smaller than Con- 
cord; very sweet; good table grape and keeps 
well. 

The VEEGENNES: medium sized bunch, 
large black fruit, ripens quite late and is there- 
fore desirable for market. It ships well. 

WILLIE: large showy fruit, black, with 
thick skin; an excellent grape for wine making. 

From VITIS AESTIVALIS: 

The NOETON'S VIEGINIA: large bunches 
of compact fruit; small blueish black berries 
which are very sweet and pleasant; ripen quite 
late but adhere well to the stem; yield abun- 
dantly. 

CYNTHIANA: like Norton's Virginia both 
in appearance and productiveness, but ripen 'a 
little earlier. 

DELAWARE : small compact bunches of 
reddish purple fruit; berries rather small but 
are a most delicious table grape; they keep 
and ship well. 

OZARK: large compact bunches with good 
sized black berries of rich taste; considered an 
excellent wine and table grape; ripens quite 
late and keeps well. 

From EOTVNDIFOLIA: 

The SCUPPERXOXG: this vine cannot be 
successfully grown north of 35 degrees parallel 
of latitude. I am told that it is most produc- 
tive when trained as for an arbor, and indeed 
it is the only way that I have seen it grow, 
each vine covering some fifty square yards over 
wooden frame work. It has numerous small 
branches, seldom having more than five large 
greenish white berries to a bunch. When ripe 
they spread large sheets of cloth or canvas, 
while with long poles the vines are lightly 
beaten from above, which causes the ripe ber- 
ries to drop into the sheets; afterwards the ber- 
ries are run through a kind of fan — a machine 
which blows away all leaves and dead wood 
found plentifully mixed with the berries by the 
peculiar process of gathering, and which must 
be removed before pressing. While these grapes 
are of a real pleasant taste and make good 
wine they cannot be used for the table because 
of the small bunches. 

Other hybrid vines which are well known in 
some localities are: 



MOOEE'S EAELY: like the Concord, but 
several weeks earlier. 

LADY GRAPE: white, a little larger than 
the Concord and ripens about ten days earlier. 
It has a rich sweet taste; is a good table grape. 

POCKLINGTON: a very large white grape; 
it is hardy, a fairly good table fruit and ships 
well. 

EMPIRE STATE : very much favored in the 
East. It has large handsome bunch, berries of 
medium size, white, with a rich sweet taste; 
ships well. 

There are a great many other varieties, some 
of them old and well known; to mention them 
all would require too much space and be of but 
little interest. 

The method of wine making in this country 
is exactly as in France and Germany for dry, 
still and sparkling wines; and the Spanish sys- 
tem is adopted in making such wines as resem- 
ble sherry and port, and for liqueur wines. 

In many instances the name under which a 
native wine is placed on the market is the same 
as the vines from which the same has been pro- 
duced, as Catawba, Norton's Virginia, Concord, 
Scuppernong, etc.; but more often they are 
sold under a foreign label of some wine to 
which it may bear a slight resemblance, as St. 
Julienne, Medoe, Pontet Canet, Burgundy, 
Derkheim.er, Port, Sherry, etc. 

It does seem that if any wine made in this 

country is of a quality which merits it being 

sold as similar to some foreign growth, it is 

surely worthy of having a name of its oi-in, 

original with the surroundings where it is 

produced. 

* # * 

States where wine is extensively made are: 
New York, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, 
Virginia, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, 
Arkansas and Missouri. Of these New York 
State has probably made the greatest progress 
within the past twenty years. Mr. Bander, of 
the Pleasant Valley Wine Company of Eheinis 
Station, New York, says: "The advance in 
American wines during the last twenty years 
has been marvelous. A number of new varieties 
of grapes have been developed and old varieties 
discarded. The great complaint against Amer- 
ican wines, on account of what they call foxi- 
ness, has largely disappeared, from the fact 
that, as we have improved the vine and the 
soil becoming older, much of the roughness is 
eliminated; and I venture the assertion that 
when our vineyards have become as old in 
cultivation as those in France our grapes will 



180 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



be equally as good and perhaps some of them 
better." 

Continuing, Mr. Bauder says: "Our spar- 
kling ^Yines are in all essential things a well 
made American champagne; and 1 venture the 
assertion that, had we started to make cham- 
pagne two hundred years ago our wine would 
enjoy the preference which that of France does 
today. 

' ' Production and sales have increased five- 
fold in the past twenty years and we find 
American wines growing more in demand every 
year. ' ' 

In CENTRAL NEW YOEK, where the 
Pleasant Valley Wine Co., The Urbana Wine 
Co., and a number of others have their vine- 
yards, about ten thousand acres are devoted to 
the raising of grapes. The varieties grown are 
Concord, Catawba, Delaware, Isabella, Niagara, 
Norton 's, Moore 's Diamond, Ionia, Diana and 
a number of others. The Concord and Catawba 
form the bulk of the market or table grapes. 

A large per cent of the finer varieties form 
the basis for the champagne couvee. Two 
hundred thousand gallons, or about one million 
bottles, are annually made into sparkling wine; 
the balance of the grapes are made into still 
wines, which are: 

Catawba, white, dry 
Catawba, rose tint, sweet 
Concord, red, sweet like port 
Sherry, white, dry and sweet 

The CHAUTAUQUA grape belt is a strip of 
land in the extreme Northwestern part of the 
state, near Lake Erie; in this section grapes, 
mostly Concord, are raised for the market; and 
it is said that the Concord obtains a richer 
flavor in the Chautauqua grape belt than any- 
where else in the country. The annual produc- 
tion amounts to from 40,000 to 50,000 tons, 
they having shipped as many as 3,500 car loads 
in one season. 

Grapes are extensively raised in the HUD- 
SON EIVEE VALLEY, consisting of such 
varieties as Concord, Catawba, Empire State, 
Ked Ulster, Elvira, Niagara, Delaware and 
others, nearly all of which are shipped to 
market. 

The next state of importance is OHIO, along 
the coast of Lake Erie, including several 
islands. Varieties finding most favor are the 
Lady Grape, Martha, Worden (which is like 
the Concord), the Catawba, Moore's Early, 
Lady Washington, Pocklington, Delaware, Con- 
cord and others. 

White and red dry wine and sparkling wine 



are extensively made. A large per cent of 
Catawba grown are made into sparkling wine 
in Sandusky, Cincinnati and St. Louis, Mo. 
The dry Catawba, made in NOETHEEN OHIO 
and adjacent islands in Lake Erie, is the best 
white wine produced in this country, comparing 
very favorablj' with the better class of Ehine 
wines. The black grapes are extensively made 
into clarets and sweet wines, the latter sold as 
native port. 

MISSOURI: The principal sections of this 
otate where vineyards are planted for wine 
making are Herman, Augusta, Blufton, Boone- 
fille, on the banks of the Missouri Eiver, and 
of late years grapes are beginning to be ex- 
tensively grown in the south and southwestern 
parts of the state. 

Until about twenty years ago Concord and 
Catawba were among favored vines and were 
largely planted in many vineyards, but it waa 
found that they were not suited to that locality, 
and while they are still represented more re- 
sistant vines have in most places taken theil 
places. Norton's Virginia, Cynthiana, Dela- 
ware, Herbemont (of large compact bunches 
having small deep purple berries with a de- 
licious sweet taste), and a large number of 
hybrids derived from Texas and native Mis- 
souri vines compose the main stock. 

Most of the grapes are used for wine making, 
of which a great deal is made, and some of 
which is of excellent quality, especially that 
made from the Norton and Cynthiana, resem- 
bling in every respect a first rate Red burgundy, 
a sample of the latter having been exhibited 
at the World's Fair, Chicago, under the name 
of Blade Hose and received first prize among 
American red wines. 

Wines of Missouri production are: 
Eed Concord (claret) dry 
White " " 

' ' Catawba ' ' 

Rose ' ' sweet 

White Herbemont, dry like Mauzanilla 

' ' Delaware, dry like Rhine wine 
Eed Norton's | {Black Ease) 
" Cynthiana jdry like Burgundy. 

Also wines resembling port and sherry. 

Sparkling Wines are made in Herman and 
m St. Louis, the latter, from the Catawba 
grown in Ohio, known as Cook's Imperial. 

In NORTH CAEOLINA, VIEGINIA, TEN- 
NESSEE and AEKANSAS a very pleasant 
white wine is made from the Scuppernong, 
which has some resemblance to dry Catawba. 
In MISSISSIPPI, TEXAS, KANSAS, MICHL 
GAN, INDIANA and ILLINOIS some grapes 



THE PEACTICAL 

are raised for the market. NEW MEXICO 
also raises grapes for the market. In this 
territory as well as m parts of Arizona, Euro- 
pean vines are successfully grown. 

CALIFOENIA: In this state we find that 
the European vine is grown successfully and 
but few American vines are planted. 

Over two hundred years ago the vine was 
planted by Spanish monks in the section where 
now are Los Angeles and San Diego. The va- 
rieties brought over by them are still culti- 
vated in old Mission Valley and country sur- 
rounding San Diego, where they are known as 
Mission grapes. Of late years, however, the 
phylloxera has been very destructive, and so 
far the only remedy has been to graft the 
Europtan varieties on native or resistant stocks. 
The vines most favored for wine making are: 
For EED WINE: 

' ' Cabernet Sauvignon " or " Cabernet, ' ' 
small black berries and bunches, juicy and 
sweet; the wine from it being very robust is 
often used for blending and improving milder 
varieties. 

' ' Cabernet Franc ' ' very much resembling 
the Sauvignon, but inferior. 

•'Beelan" small clusters but compact; berry 
small, black, thick skinned, makes a very choice 
red wine. 

" Valdepenas, " Spanish, makes a fine full- 
bodied claret of a high character. 

' ' Petit Syrah, ' ' large clusters, berries of 
medium size, makes a choice red wine. 

They have also "The Gamay," "The Pinot 
Koir, ' ' and many others, including ' ' The Zin- 
fandel. " The latter is by far the most pro- 
ductive and is therefore planted to a very 
great extent in most of the vineyards. When 
properly handled it will make one of the most 
desirable red wines grown in this country. 
For WHITE WINE. 

"The Melon Blanc," the same from which 
white Burgundy is made in France. 

"Cadillac," small white berry of medium 
bunches, very sweet; its high flavor makes it 
valuable for blending. 

"Semillion, " the same as from which Haut 
Sauterne and Chat Yquem are made of in 
France. 

' ' Sauvignon Blanc, ' ' similar to the above. 
"Eeisling, " same as from which fine Ehine 
wines are made. 

"Savignon Verte, " "Orleans Eiesling," 
"Verte Longue, " "Folle Blanche," and many 
others, including some of the most successfully 
grown grapes from all parts of the wine grow- 
ing sections of Europe. 



HOTEL STEWAED 181 

For SHEEEY : 

"The Palomina" from Spain is most popu- 
lar; it is very prolific, makes a fine dry wine of 
good fiavor. 

"Formit, " same as from which fine Hun- 
garian white wines are made. 

"Sultana," a delicate white seedless grape 
from wliich also tlie seedless raisins are pro- 
duced. 

Other white varieties, some of which are used 
in making sweet wines, are the ' ' Clairette 
Blanche, " " Muscat de Frontignau, " " White 
Elben, " also some varieties of American origin. 
The foregoing is only a partial list of wine 
producing vines. I mentioned the varieties 
planted for that purpose only. While these 
•would also be the best for the market they 
will not stand shijiping. For this purpose 
different kinds are- grown which are firmer and 
can be sent to most any part of the world. I 
have no doubt but that nearly every hotel man 
in the country knows some if not all of these 
varieties, as at certain times of the year one 
can find them for sale by the fruit dealers. 

The most f a\ored of these is the ' ' Tokay ' ' ; 
it has very large bunches of pale red color, 
large oblong berries, quite firm, and is alto- 
gether of an attractive appearance. 

' ' Black Cornuchon ' ' has large bunches, the 
berries large, bluish black with lighter spots, 
ripens quite late. 

' ' Emperor, ' ' has long loose bunches, large 
oblong berries of purple black color, ripens 
very late. 

' ' White Cornichon, ' ' large loose clusters with 
oblong yellow berries, ripens late. 

' ' Malaga, ' ' large bunches, berries long, oval, 
j^ellow, ripens early. 

"Black Ferbara, " medium sized cluster, 
berry round, black with a blue bloom. 

' ' The Sultana, ' ' described above, ' ' The 
Black Damascus, " " The Black Morocco, ' ' and 
' ' Muscat, ' ' the latter a good shipping grape is 
also used in making Sweet Muscat and An- 
gelica wine, and is one of the best raisin 
grapes; it has long loose clusters and large 
yellow berries, is very sweet and has a promi- 
nent flavor. 

The principal wine producing districts of this 
state are: 

In the southern part, Los Angeles, San Ber- 
nardino and San Diego, where large quantities 
of sweet or liqueur wines are made, which ap- 
pear in the market as Angelica, Muscatel, 
Tokay, Sherry, Port, Madeira, etc. The dry 
wines made in this district are too heavy and 
contain too much alcohol. The sweet wines are 



182 



of a superior quality and in some respects 
resemble the original wine after wiiieh they are 
named. 

Further North in the Napa and Sonoma 
valleys are the largest vineyards in the state, 
the climate being more moist and cooler. Dry 
wine, both red and white, are made. St. 
Helena, Santa Eosa, Cloverdale and Heralds- 
burg are the shipping centers. 

The system of wine making in California, 
while conducted on a large scale, is the same 
as the most approved methods in France, and 
the quality in most instances is of a high 
standard, surely much better than the cheaper 
imported varieties from Europe. 

The following are some of the favored prod- 
ucts: 

White Aliso, dry like Sauterne 
' ' Gutedel, dry like Rhine wine 
" Eiesling, " " " 

" Piueau Blanc, dry like Burgundy 
" " Gris " " " 

" Cresta Blanea " " Sauterne 
Bed Pineau Xoir " " Burgundy 

" Zinfandel " " Bordeaux 

" Mataro " " " 

" Barbera " " Asti 

" Claret " " Bordeaux 

and white, rose colored and red sweet wines as 
before mentioned. 

In most instances the wine is given the name 
of the vine from which it is derived, but a great 
deal is also sold under foreign labels, or as the 
type of the same, like 
Medoc Type 
St. Julian Type 
St. Estephe Type 
Typo Chianti, etc. 
Before the formation of the California wine 
association wines of that state were sold at 
prices which were ruinous to the growers, but 
now this is regulated by concerted action of 
the association. However, the prices of good 
native wines are still low enough that every 
family could afford to have a glass of this 
health-giving beverage with their dinner. 

Most American wines are fully matured when 
two years old and very few of them will im- 
prove any more after being four to five years 
old. 

K ^ » 

MEXICO: Some three hundred years ago 
the vine was brought from Europe into Mex- 
ico and there grown successfully; but the in- 
dustry received no attention, and very little 
wine w'as made. Of late years, however, grape 
growing has received some encouragement un- 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

der patronage of the government. 



SOUTH AMERICA: In Argentina a great 
deal of wine is made from European vines and 
is said to be of very good quality; also Chili, 
Peru, Uruguay and Brazil in the Southern part 
some wine is made from European vines which 
grow in the temperate sections of South Amer- 
ica successfully. 
Alcohol 

Alcohol is a product derived from fruits, 
grain and vegetables which contain glucose. The 
sugar is converted into alcohol by fermentation 
and then extracted by distillation. 

All fruits in a ripe state are crushed, and 
when placed in a mild temperature will ferment 
without the assistance of any foreign substance. 
After the fermentation is completed, all sugar 
contained in such fruit has changed to alcohol 
and is ready for the still. The product obtained 
by passing through the still once is BRANDY, 
but by redistilling the same over again several 
times PURE ALCOHOL will result. When grain 
or vegetables, such as rye, corn, barley, potatoes, 
beets, etc., are to be used, the same must be 
first macerated and fermentation induced by 
the addition of yeast. 

Alcohol forms the active or intoxicating part 
in all fermented beverages. When pure it should 
register 200 degrees, but it is very difficult 
to produce it perfectly anhydrous or absolute. 
Most alcohol we buy will register about 190 
degrees or 95 per cent. pure. 

Until the eleventh century, alcohol was not 
known in Europe. It is said that the Arabs 
were the first who knew the art of extracting 
it; and it was not until the early part of 
the eighteenth century that a French professor 
first found the way of making alcohol. It was 
not long afterward that it became the base 
of medicines and of liquors for the table. Since 
then the popularity of the same has increased 
with the pace of civilization. It is useful in 
many ways, and while its use is often abused, 
yet such cases are insignificant compared with 
the many ways in which it has proven beneficial. 
Brandy (Cognac) 

Brandy (Cognac) is a distillation from wine. 
By far the larger portion is being made in 
France, where, in the province of Charente, 
vast vineyards are cultivated, the product of 
which is converted into cognac. The valuation 
placed on wine in this district is according to 
the quantity of brandy that can be made out 
of it; in good years, for instance, about five 
bottles of wine will make one of brandy; in 
bad years it will take double the quantity. Dis- 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



183 



tilling is begun immediately after fermentation 
is complete, and by the beginning of Mareli 
the brandy is all made. 

Brandy or eau-de-vie, as it is commonly called 
in France, is divided into five classes, namely: 

FINE CHAMPAGNE is the best. 

LITTLE CHAMPAGNE, 'second class. 

LES BOEDERIES OU PEBMIEKE BOIS, 
for third class. 

LES DEUXIEMES OU BOUS BOIS, fourth 
class, and 

TEOISIEME BON BOIS, fifth class. 

The town of Cognac is the most central 
shipping point, where also the prices are regu- 
lated once a month. 

"When brandy is first made it is almost with- 
out color and is quite disagreeable to tJLSte; 
but with age it becomes darker, also assuming 
a sweetish and more pleasant taste. 

The strength of brandy is from 106 to 130 
degrees proof, or from 53 to 65 per cent, 
absolute. 

Almost every large vineyard in this country, 
as well as in Europe, has a distillery connected 
with it for the purpose of converting to brandy 
such wines as will not answer for the market; 
also to distill the lees taken from the wine 
after racking. 

OTHEE FEUIT BEANCIES. 

Other fruit brandies are: 

KIESCHVv'ASSEE, made from cherries, both 
wild and cultivated. 

PLUM BEANDY, (Zwetschkenwasser), from 
prunes; made principally in Germany, Hun- 
garia and Eoumania. 

CIDEE 3EANDY (apple brandy) and 

PEAR BEANDY, made principally in Nor- 
mandy 
• BUM and 

TAFTA is made from sugar cane in the 
West Indies. 

AEEACK is from sugar cane in the East 
Indies. 

MAEASCHINO, from cherries. Made in 
Zara. 

GOLDWASSEE, from grains, in Dantzig. 

WHISKEY is from rye, corn, oats and bar- 
ley. Made in Scotland, Ireland, United States 
and Canada. 

EAKIA, from grapes perfumed. Made in 
Hungaria. 

SCHIEDAM SCHNAPPS, (Gin), made from 
grains flavored with juniper berries. Made in 
Holland. 

BEANDY, from beets; made in Northern 
Europe. 

BEANDY is also made from lees of potatoes 
in Northern Europe. 



AZAKA, AEZA, AEKA, made from mare's 
milk, in Tartary. 

A BEANDY is made from the juice of the 
agave in Mexico and South America. 

PEACH BEANDY, made from ripe peaches 
in the United States. 
Iiic|.ueurs 

Liqueurs and cordials are made by taking 
various aromatic herbs of which they may be 
composed, reduce the same to fine particles, 
and are then macerated with sugar, alcohol and 
water for several days until thoroughly digested, 
then distilled and rectified. The product is 
then treated with syrup and proof spirits, also 
the proper coloring. The usual strength of 
cordials is about 120 degrees proof, or 60 per 
cent, pure alcohol. 

ABSINTHE is made from dried absinthe 
(wormwood), dried hyssop, balm mint, green 
anise, Chinese anise, fennel and coriander seeds. 
This cordial is made in several localities in 
France and Switzerland, and in each place it 
is made differently. In Switzerland is where it 
was first produced. 

CEEAM OF ANGELICA is made from an- 
gelica roots, angelica seeds, fennel, and cori- 
ander. 

ANISETTE is made from green anise, star 
anise, coriander, fennel, and hyson tea. 

CEEME DE MOKA is made from cofiEee and 
bitter almonds. 

PAEFAIT AMOUE, grated skins of cedrats, 
grated skins of lemons and cloves. 

CHAETEEUiSE GEEEN is made from cinna- 
mon, mace, lemon balm, dried hyssop flower 
tops, peppermint, thyme, costmary, arnica 
flowers, genepi, and angelica roots. 

CHAETEEUSE YELLOW. Similar to above, 
adding cardamon seeds and soectrine aloes. 

WHITE CHAETEEUSE is made from cinna- 
mon, mace, cloves, nutmegs, tonka bean, leraon- 
balm-hyssop, genepi, angelica roots and seeds, 
cardamom, and sweet-flag. 

BENEDICTINE is from cloves, nutmegs, cin- 
namon, lemon-balm, peppermint, angelica roots, 
Bweet flag, and genepi. 

TBAPPISTINE is from absinth, angelica, 
mint, cordamom, lemon, myrrh, sweet flag, cinna- 
mon, clo%'es and mace. 

EAU DE VIE DANTZIG is from cumin 
seed, caraway seed, celery seed, green anise, 
f/oves and cinnamon. ' 

KUMMEL is from cumin seeds, coriander and 
orange peel. 

CEEME DE MENTHE is from peppermint- 
balm, sage, cinnamon, ginger, and orris root. 

MAEASCHINO is from ripe, wild cherries, 
raspberries and cherry leaves. 

CUEACAO is from skins of oranges, cinna- 
mon and mace. 

VEEMOUTH is made from absinth, gentian, 
angelica root, holy thistle, calamus, nutmegs, 
sliced fresh oranges, cinnamon, germander, ele- 
campane, and sweet wine of Picopaul. 

There are several varieties of VEEMOUTH, 
each of which contain some different ingred- 
ients. The above are contained in the vermouth 
of Turin (Italian). 



184 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

* Vintages 



Year 



1869 
1870 

1871 
1872 

1873 

1874 
1875 

1876 
1877 

1878 

1879 
1880 

1881 
1882 
1883 

1884 



Port 



Fairly good, light; 
very few shipped. 



Very, fine, rich and 
ripe ; one of the best of 
the last half century : 
universally shipped. 



Wet vintage, thin, but 
clean. 

Rather small, but fine 
flavor, and turned out 
very successfully. 



Very large quantity, 
very good, with high 
color, dry as a rule ; 
universally shipped. 

Small in quantity; 
good, light; not generally 
shipped. 

Plentiful, light, sweet 
and smooth; shipped by a 
few houses and develop- 
ed better than expected. 

Very poor vintage ; 
grapes did not ripen. 

Better than foregoing, 
but not fine, and not 
shipped as a vintage. 

Plentiful, very fine, big 
wines ; shipped by all 
houses. 

Small, but useful for 
lodge purposes; not 
shipped. 

Medium color and 
body ; not shipped. 



Not big, but dry, clean 
wines; shipped generally 
and turned out well. 

Small, but useful lodge 
wines; sound, clean; not 
shipped. 

Similar to foregoing, 
but rather bigger. 



Rich and of fine 
quality, although rather 
small in body ; univer- 
sally shipped; a great 
success in bottle. 



Claret 



Plentiful and very cheap; 
medium body; turned out 
well, and very useful to 
the English trade. 

Large yield of big 
wines, which have only 
recently beg^in to de- 
velop, and caused both 
Bordeaux and British 
firms to lose money. 

Very light, but after- 
wards developed into 
fine wines. 

More color than fore- 
going, and was originally 
more appreciated, but 
never showed much 
quality. 

Still more color, but 
turned out less successful 
than the two previous 
vears. 

Plentiful, good color 
without excessive body ; 
very good wines. 

Very abundant, ele- 
gant and cheap; in every 
respect a perfect Claret. 

Fair color, but not 
good. 

Rather less color, 
light, useful, elegant. 

Rather full-bodied ; 
very useful among cheap 
varieties; higher growths 
developed well. 

A. thin, poor vintage. 



Medium color, clean, 
useful as beverage wines, 
but not fine. 

Full-bodied, rather 
coarse, and did not main- 
tain early promise. 

Very light and thin ; 
wines affected by mil- 
dew. 

Light; many wines 
mildewed. 



Medium color ; some 
parts escaped mildew, 
and better results obtain- 
ed in consequence. 



Champagne 



Fair quantity ; good 
wine. 



Excellent wines, with 
good body. 



Fair vintage as regards 
quality and quantity. 

Ordinary vintage in 
both respects. 



Small quantity ; bad 
quality. 



Plentiful, very full- 
bodied and ripe; uni- 
versally shipped. 

Abundant, lighter 
than the foregoing, but 
very useful. 

Fair quantity and qual- 
ity. 

Fair quantity and qual- 
ity. 

Light and elegant; 
universally shipped. 



Bad year. 

Good body and style, 
with elegance; shipped 
by all houses. 

Fair quantity and qual- 
ity. 

Small quantity ; bad 
quality. 

Better than preceding 
year and not very high 
class, and prices very 
dear ; shipped by several 
houses. 

An excellent year of 
fine quality, with great 
elegance ; have develop- 
ed well; prices again 
high; shipped uni- 
versally as a vintage. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 
VINTAGES-ConHnuc*/ 



185 



Yew 



Port 



Claret 



Champagne 



1885 
1886 

1887 

1888 
1889 

1890 

1891 
1892 

1893 

1894 
1895 

1896 

1897 
1898 

1899 
1900 



Rather small, but clean 
and sound; not quoted 
generally. 

Lat^ting both in 
quantity and quality. 



Very good ; fairly big ; 
universally shipped. 

Not abundant; small, 
sound, useful. 

Better than foregoing, 
but not big and not 
generally shipped. 

Very g.ood, rather 
light, fairly abundant, 
and universally shipped. 

Light, clean, ' useful ; 
not shipped. 

Rather better than 
foregoing, but only 
shipped l>y a few houses 
in limited quantities. 



Grapes suffered from 
mildew; thin, poor qual- 
ity ; not shipped. 



Light; mostly mil- 
dewed. 



More body than fore- 
going, but mostly tainted 
with mildew. 



Big, useful wines 
which appear to be now 
developing. 

Light, elegant, origin- 
ally cheap, and repaid 
bottlers well. 

Somewhat similar, but 
scarcely so popular. 



Small 
quality. 



yield, medium 



Grapes mostly^ gath- 
ered in the wet; very 
few good wines made. 

Fairly abundant; good 
quality; has been univer- 
sally shipped as a 
vintage, turning out well. 

Quantity short, but 
some good wines made. 



Full-bodied, very 
useful; give good 
promise. 

Light, elegant. 

Medium color, not gen- 
erally considered to be 
well succeeded; the vines 
of the higher-classed 
wines suffered very much 
from sirocco. 

Very abundant, with 
good body; certain to be 
useful as beverage wines, 
but too early yet to speak 
of the higher growths. 

Much less in quantity; 
not particularly well suc- 
ceeded. 

Quantity not large, but 
grapes ripened well, and 
the new wines show some 
promise. 

Very abundant ; wines 
clean and with good body 
and color. 

One of the smallest 
yields of recent years; 
quality, as a rule. bad. 



Light, but rather ele- 
gant ; shipped by certain 
houses. 

Full-bodied; many 
wines tainted with mil- 
dew; shipped by a few 
firms. 

Rather Hght and ele- 
gant ; shipped by several 
houses. 

A poor vintage. 



Not a large yield; 
rather delicate wines of 
good style ; prices high ; 
universally shipped. 

Fairly abundant; use- 
ful, but not high class. 

Rather limited quan- 
tity, thin. 

Limited yield, but ex- 
ceptionally good quality; 
prices very high. 



Very abundant 
good; cheaper. 



and 



Quantity shorter than 
foregoing, owing to 
drought, but some good 
wines made ; quality ir 
regular. 

Quantity fairly abun- 
dant; quality irregular; 
shipped by some houses, 
but not fine. 

Quantity good; wines 
mostly light, but clean. 



Quantity limited, al- 
though in excess of 1897, 
especially in classed 
growths; quality expect- 
ed to turn out good. 

Abundant, and are ex- 
pected to become fine, 



Exceptionally large 
quantity; the quality 
promises to be only mod- 
erate. 



Less succeeded than 
the foregoing, but sound; 
prices lower. 

Moderate quantity, 
but promises well; prices 
low on account of heavy 
stocks, and many wines 

Quantity small; grapes 
gathered in wet weather; 
wines thin and green. 

Moderate both as to 
quantity and qualitv, 
but better than preced- 
ing year. 

Quantity better than 
anticipated, and quality, 
expected to be good. 



Limited yield, but 
young wines bid fair to 
turn out well. 

Large yield of sound 
wines, which promises 
well. 



186 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STBWAED 
VINTAGES-Continued 



Year 


Port 


Claret 


Champagne 


1901 


Irregular in quality ; 


Fairly plentiful, but 


Quantity limited; 




not shipped as vintage. 


owing to wet weather are 


wines thin, owing to 






lacking in body and color. 


excessive rain. 


1902 


A certain quality of 


Quantity small; wines 


Yield small and quality 




useful wine made, but 


light and of poor quality. 


very moderate, owing to 




not shipped as vintage. 




wet. 


1903 


Yield small and quality 


Yield again small; 


Yield below average; 




moderate ; best results 


quaUty useful, without 


very useful for ordinary 




obtained in lower Douro. 


pretension to figure as 


purposes; niot likely to be 






vintage wines. 


shipped as vintage. 


1904 


Large yield, but wines 


Quantity large ; wines 


Plentiful; grapes gath- 




somewhat lacking in 


at present show good 


ered in good condition 




body ; fair color, good 


body and color. 


and practically certain to 




flavor. 




be shipped as vintage. 


1905 


Fair quantity, wines 


Fairly large yield ; 


Medium in quantity 




unevenly somewhat 


wines light, but much im- 


and quality; uneven 




green. 


proved since the vintage. 


owing to mildew in many 
vineyards. 

Fair average quantity^ 


1906 


Quantity less than 


Rather small yield; 




1905, a few good wines 


both red and white wines 


quality expected to turn 




made. 


expected to turn out well. 


out good. 


1907 


Moderate yield wine ; 


Fairly large quantity; 


Good wine made at 




deficient in saccharine 


wines light, but useful. 


commencement; but rain 




and body owing to rain 




set in, spoiling quality 




at time of vintage. 




of wine made later and 
greatly reducing yield. 


1908 


Good quantity and 


Quantity not large ; 


Quantity small and 




quality wines; show good 


wines have fair color and 


quality not satisfactory. 




body and color; one of 


bouquet and promise well 






the best vintages in 








years. 






1909 


Quantity small; quality 


Quantity small ; wines 


Quantity small ; wines 




below average. 


light in body and color ; 
but agreeable ; late gath- 
ering the best. 


lack body. 



*The foregoing list of vintage wines is reliable. It is from the "Book of Prices" of W. A. Taylor 
& Co. of New York, and the Jefferson Importation Co. of St. Louis. 



An Illustration of Frank G. 'Warden'* Method of Control of His Eight Hotels. 

Prank G. Warden, who operates eight hotels located in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Ala- 
bama, and who receives daily a detail statement from each of his managers to such a fine point 
that he knows, perhaps better than if he were present in the several houses, the true condition of 
the business, has things so systematized that he is able to determine very closely the maximum 
earning capacity of each house. For illustration of his methods, the accompanying figures show 
the basis of his control of his bars (the figures varying according to the geographical location 
and class of trade of the several houses). Goods are issued to barmen at approximate retail 
value. The issues and bar receipts figures should be about the same; if not, there is investigation 
as to reason why: (See opposite page.) 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

APPROXIMATE RETAIL VALUES, OR 

The amount that certain goods should bring over bar: 

NAME. RETAILING AT Should bring over bar, 

Bulk whiskey 10c per glass 1 gal. 

Bulk whiskey 15c or 2 for 25c 1 gal. 

Whiskey 15c or 2 for 25c 1 full qt. 

Whiskey 15c or 2 for 25c 1 bot. 

Beer 5c per glass 1 bbl. 

Beer 5e per glass J bbl. 

Beer 5c per glass i bbl. 

Port wine 10c per glass 1 gal. 

Gin 15c or 2 for 25c 1 gal. 

Gin 15c or 2 for 25c 1 bot. 

Blackberry lOe per glass 1 gal. 

Riun 10c per glass 1 gal. 

Rhine wine and others, 5 bot. to gal. . . .lOe per glass 1 bot. 

Brandy and all drinks retailing at 20e; (5 bot. to gal.) 1 bot.. 



187 



The following goods are from 
issued to the bar, of which you 
«ost price and selling price : 

Retail- 
Name, ing at 

1 gal. Rye 10c 

1 gal. Large.. 13 c; 2 tor 23c 

1 gal. Bourbon 2 for 25c 

1 gal. Gordon gin 15c 

1 gal. Gin 10c 

1 bot. Sherry (5 to gal.) .10c 

1 gal. Port 10c 

1 bot. Blackberry 10c 

1 bot. Hennessy brandy.. 15e 
1 bot. Hennessy XXX... 20c 
1 bot. Plymouth 

gin 2 for 25c 

1 bot. Tom 

gin 15c; 2 for 25c 

1 bot. Large (4 to gal.). 13c 

1 bot. Boonekamp 

1 bbl. Weidcman 5c 

1 bot. 1890 .15c; 2 for 23c 
1 bot. Three 

feather .20c; 3 for 50c 

1 doz. % pt. flasks 

1 doz. Weideman 10c 

1 doz. Budweisser 15c 

1 doz. Blue Ribbon 15c 

1 bot. Seltzer 25c 

1 bot. Dom. ginger ale 

1 bot. Black and 

White . . .15c; 2 for 25c 
1 doz. splits ApoIIinaris. .15c 
1 bot. Claret (5 to gal.). 10c 

1 hot. Vermouth, It 

1 bot. Vermouth, French . . . 

1 doz. Consumers 10c 

1 doz. Hosiers 10c 

1 bot. Lithia water 

1 hot. Old Crow (5 to 

gal.) 15c 

1 bot. Geneva gin (4 to 

gal.) 15c 

1 bot. Scupernong 10c 

1 gal. Cabinet rye 10c 

1 bot. Apricot brandy 

(5's) pony glass.... 15c 



time 
herein 



Cost. 

$2.00 
2.85 
2.00 
2.25 
2.00 
.30 
1.50 
1.50 
1.29 



.80 
1.00 

.80 
7.00 
1.00 

1.33 
.25 
.55 
.88 
.80 
.09 
.08 

1.08 
1.14 
.85 
.55 
.65 
.55 
.55 
.25 

.88 



to Lime 
find the 

Selling 

Price. 

$ 7.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

7.00 

.75 

4.00 

5.00 

2.00 

2.50 

2.00 

2.00 

2.50 

.80 

28.80 

2.50 

3.00 

.50 

1.20 

1.80 

1.80 

.25 

.25 

2.50 

1.80 

1.50 

.55 

.65 

1.20 

1.20 

.75 

2.00 



1.33 


2.50 


.55 


1.00 


2.00 


7.00 



.65 



2.00 



Retail- 
Name ing at 

1 doz. Nipsale 15c 

1 bot. Iron brew 

1 bot. Hunyadi water 

1 bot. Creme de Menthe, 

pony glass loe 

1 bot. Sp'g Garden rye.. 15c 

1 doz. Stout 25c 

50 Arie kind cigars 5c 

23 Preferencia 10c 

30 General Arthur 10c 

1 doz. Splits white rock. .15c 

1 doz. Bass ale 23c. . 

1 gal. jockey Club. 3 for 25c 

1 bot. Gordon gin 15c 

1 bot. Overholt (4 to 

gal.) 15c 

1 doz. Pop 

1 bot. Cherries 

1 bot. Dry Catawba 

1 bot. Can. Club (5 to 

gal.) 15c 

1 qt. Mumm's 

1 pt. Mumm's 

1 pt. Mumm's, split 

1 pt. White Seal 

1 qt. White Seal 

1 pt. Sparkling Burgundy. . . 

1 qt. Peacock Sauterne .... 

1 bot. Sweet Catawba 

1 bot. Old Charter 

1 bot. Oscar Pepper 

1 bot. King W'm Scotch .... 

1 bot. Sloe gin 

1 bot. Muscatel 

1 bot. DeWar Scotch 

1 bot. Old Key rum 

1 bot. Seagram 

1 bot. Mt. Vernon 

1 bot. Cardinal 

1 bot. Juniper gin 

1 bot. Kummel 

1 Split Red Raven 

1 bot. Domestic champ., pt.. 

1 bot. Ushers' Scotch 

1 bot. Irish whiskey 

1 bot. Imp. ginger ale 

1 bot. Haut Sauterne 

1 bot. St. Julian 

1 bot. Rock and rye 

1 qt. Sherry wine 





$ 7.00 




10.00 




2.50 




2.00 




28.80 




14.40 




7.20 




4.00 




10.00 




2.00 




8.00 




8.00 




.75 




3.50 




Selling 


Cost. 


Price. 


1.25 


1.80 


.08 


.25 


.18 


.35 


1.00 


4.00 


.88 


2.30 


2.00 


3.00 


1.75 


2.50 


1.58 


2.50 


3.15 


5.00 


1.08 


1.80 


2.00 


3.00 


1.75 


5.00 


.78 


2.00 


.87 


2.50 


.25 


.60 


.75 


.75 


.34 


.75 


1.05 


2.00 


2.50 


4.00 


1.33 


2.00 


.75 


1.00 


1.33 


2.00 


2.50 


4.00 


1.28 


2.00 


.66 


1.50 


.33 


.75 


1.00 


2.00 


.75 


2.00 


1.48 


3.00 


1.17 


1.50 


.33 


1.00 


1.00 


2.50 


1.17 


2.50 


1.00 


2.50 


1.13 


2.50 


.90 


2.00 


.75 


2.00 


.75 


2.00 


.10 


.15 




1.25 


1.00 


2.25 


1.00 


2.00 


.13 


.25 


.50 


1.00 


.42 


1.00 


.50 


2.00 


.35 


1.00 



188 



THE PRACTICAL 



Illustration of the Bailey System of Keeping 
Track of Bar and Wine Koora, Showing a 
Simple and Effective Method of Securing 
Information as to Receipts, Issues, Inven- 
tory and Percentage. 

In The Hotel Monthly for September, 
1899, we printed a system of keeping track of 
the bar and wine room, devised by Fred J. 
Bailey, at that time manager of the "Winder- 
mere Hotel, Chicago. This article attracted 
a great deal of attention because of the simple 
and satisfactory method of determining the 
percentage, detecting leaks and affording con- 
tinuous and almost instant information regard- 
ing stock on hand, the value of each article 
handled, and of the stock as a whole, both in 
Bar and in the Wine Eoom. In one small 
book, now commonly known as THE BAILEY 
BOOK, and in another small book (an or- 
dinary day book), which he calls THE BAK 
ACTION, all of this information is contained. 
There have been so many requests for us to 
reprint this article that we take pleasure in 
doing so at this time, making but few changes 
from the original article. The figures in the 
illustration are fictitious, of course, and serve 
only to convey an idea of how the system works. 

The Bar Stock Allowance 

The BAR is allowed so much stock to do 
business with,-- enough so that there is very 
little likelihood of having to send to the Wine 
Eoom oftener than once a day, and that only 
when the Daily Requisition is sent in. The 
Bar is furnished a list of the articles, with the 
quantities of each kind, and it is inventoried 
at the selling price. The barman is supposed 
to watch his stock closely, and by his Daily 
Requisition to keep it replenished, so that the 
Stock Value averages the same every day after 
the Requisition is filled. 

Instead of taking an Inventory of the Bar 
in connection with the Wine Eoom stock, the 
manager considers the Bar Stock as entirely 
separate, and it does not figure in the Wine 
Eoom statements. He keeps track of the bar 
by counting the packages at frequent and un- 
certain intervals and seeing that the quantities 
on hand compare closely with the quantities 
allowed. 

A broken package is considered a whole pack- 
age. 

An allowance of, say, ten per cent, is made 
in favor of the barman for broken packages 
when a Cash Value Inventory of his stock is 
taken; but as the Stock in Bar runs about the 
same all the time, it does not need a frequent 
"Cash Value Inventory," the fact that the 



HOTEL STEWARD 
"Count" of packages is right, sufiScing for 
reasonable requirements. 

For convenience of illustration we give the 
following as the BAR WOEKING STOCK, 
the number of packages of each allowed, and 
the estimated selling price of each package; or, 
rather, what each package is expected to re- 
turn in cash: 

BAB WORKING STOCK. 

Selling price per 
package. 

8 Marquette rye $2.50 

8 Eeserve bourbon 3.00 

8 Tom gin 3.50 

7- Budweiser , 15 

12 Pepsin ginger ale 15 

6 Pontet Canet— qts 2.00 

12 Pontet Canet — pts 1.00 

12 Cresta Blanea— qts 1.00 

12 Cresta Blanca — pts 50 

72 I\ed raven splits 15 

36 ApoUinaris — qts 30 

36 ApoUinaris — pts 20 

24 Seltzer 10 

1 jN'laraschino 1.50 

Daily Requisition on Wine Room 

Illustrations of the BAE EEQUISITIONS 
on Wine Eoom, daily, for the week ending 
Saturday, July 8. (These Eequisitions, item- 
ized, are entered in the Wine Eoom Stoek- 
Receipts-Issues Book and by Day 's Totals in 
the Bar Action Book.) The barman has noth- 
ing to do with the extensions and footings, 
that is done in the Wine Eoom, for conveni- 
ence in making the Weekly and Monthly state- 
ments: 

BAR REQUISITIONS ON WINE BOOM. 

July 2, 1899. 

Selling 

price. 

4 Rye $10.00 

48 Budweiser 7.20 

6 P. Ginger ale 90 

4 Pontet C— qts S.OO 

6 Cresta B.— qts 6.00 

36 E. Eaven splits 5.40 

12 ApoUinaris— qts 3.60 

24 ApoUinaris — pts 4.80 

$45.90 
July 3, 1899. 

3 Bourbon $ 9.00 

4 Tom gin 10.00 

36 Budweiser 5.40 

3 P. ginger ale 45 

2 Pontet C, pts 1^.00 

3 Cresta B., qts 3.00 

6 Cresta B.,. pts 3.00 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 189 

48 E. E. splits 7.20 elaborated somewhat on Mr. Bailey's books 

6 ApoUinaris, qts 1.80 and received a good-natured criticism for our' 

12 Seltzer 1.20 pains. For instance, in illustrating the Eequi- 

1 Maraschino 1.50 sitions itemized we extended against each item 

both the cost and selling price (extensions sup- 

T 1 4 ISqq posed to be made in the Wine Eoom). "That's 

c -D ' ' ti t; nn where you 've done a lot of figuring to little 

.-, -J, , ' „'„„ purpose, ' ' said Mr. Bailey. ' ' What it tooli you 

n rn ■ c'nn '^alf ^n hour to ascertain can iust as well be 

2 Tom gm 5.00 . •' 

, , T, , . „ „„ got at m half a mmute, thus : 

21 Budweiser 3.60 * „. , , , ^ ' ^„, „ 

„ p , -p. , , _„ Stock on hand July 2 $31 (.17 

24 e!^E^ splits^. ^ .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '. '. '. '. ". ". '.'.'.'. '. ". 3^60 ^^"^^ purchased during w eek . . . 119.72 

6 ApoUinaris, qts 1.80 

12 ApoUinaris, pts 2.40 ^^ , ^, Z,'Z. 

^ ' ^ Deduct stock on hand July 9.. 373.00 

$38.90 

July 5, 1899. Gives the net cost of issues. . .$117.89 

2 M. Eye $ 5.00 " This itemized cost price takes time, means 

1 Bourbon 3.00 increased detail and cuts no ice on my system, 

24 Budweiser 3.60 jf the weekly balance is made properly. One 

6 P. ginger ale 90 can extend the daily bar requisition at any 

3 Pontet C, qts 6.00 time for his satisfaction to learn exact cost to- 

24 ApoUinaris, qts 7.20 fasten a leakage; but it is misleading to in- 

12 Seltzer 1.20 elude it as an explanation of the workings o£' 

$26.90 *''<' system."] 

July 6, 1899. The Bailey Book 

3 Bourbon $ 9.00 Mr. Bailey uses a book, the leaf of which 

1 Gin ^-^^ measures 11 inches wide by 14 inches long. It 

36 Budweiser 5.40 jg ^uled oflf into eleven vertical columns, eacb 

3 P. ginger ale 45 ^f these bisected with a vertical line. It is 

3 Pontet C, qts 6.00 j-uled with fifty horizontal lines, one line for 

24 R. R. splits 3.60 gagh ^ay of the month, with special red ruled 

S26 95 lines to separate the weeks. [In the illustra- 

July 7 1899. tions (pages 190 & 191) the dark horizontal 

6 Eye $15.00 lines indicate red lines.] 

9 Bourbon 6.00 It will be noted that each column is headed 

3 T ain 7-50 with some particular article of stock, as ' ' Mar- 

36 Budweiser 5.40 quette Eye," "Reserve Bourbon," "Tom 

4 Pontet C. pts 4-00 Gin, ' ' etc. Immediately under the heading are 

3 Cresta B. pts 1-50 two red lines, the top line for entry of quantity 

18 E. E. splits 2.70 of stock on hand at end of the previous month ; 

6 ApoUinaris qts 1-80 the second line for the value of stock on hand 

24 ApoUinaris pts 4.80 at end of previous month. Down the page ■ at 

12 Seltzer 1-20 intervals of seven lines, are two red-ruled lini;s 

■ for entering the quantity and value of ear:h 

$49.90 article of stock on Saturday night, or whoa- 

July 8, 1899. * „ en ever the Week-end inventory is made. I'or 

24 Budweiser $ 3.b0 ^^^^,^^-^^^^ pf illustration we will sav these 

6 Pontet Canet, pts. b.UO ^.^^^ represent Sunday. The dates are entered 

3 Cresta B., pts 1.50 .^ ^^^ column at the extreme left for the left 

24 Red Raven splits 3.60 ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^.^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

12 ApoUmaris, qts 3.60 ^.^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^_ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ second, 

6 ApoUmaris, pts " ^-^" third, fourth, etc., are entered in to fit the par- 

$19.50 ticular month. For instance in the dates en- 

A Good-Natured Criticism tries shown in the illustrations, the first day of 

[In preparing this iUustration of the Bailey the month happens to be Saturday and the 

System (before revision by the author) we second day of the month is Sunday. The 



190 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 













































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ILLUSTRATION OF A FOLIO PAGE OF THE BAILEY KECEIVING-ISSDES-INVBNTOST BOOK FOR WINE ROOM 
STOCK. (THE DAMAGED FIGURES IN "TOTAL" COLUMN IN ABOVE ILLUSTRATION SHOULD READ $245 89.) 



eighth day of the month is Saturday again, 

coming directly before the week's total figures. 

Sunday is the 9th, and so on down the page. 

» * * 

Note the entries in the column headed Tom 
Gin. The .80 in box with Tom Gin means 
"cost 80 cents a quart." The 14 on the first 
line indicates 14 quarts on hand at the end of 
the previous month; and 11.20 on the next line 
means 14 quarts at 80 cents is $11.20. All the 
issues are entered on the right hand side of 
each column. Thus there will be noticed no 
issues of Tom Gin on the first of the month; 



consequently the value in Sunday inventory 
(July 2) .was unchanged from the Brought 
Forward figures. On the third of the month 
four quarts were issued to the Bar. On the 
fourth of the month two quarts were issued to 
the Bar. On the fourth of the month, also, 
there is an entry of twenty-four quarts re- 
ceived into the Wine Eoom stock. On the sixth 
of the month one quart was issued to the Bar; 
on the seventh of the month, three quarts.' By 
footing up the issues it will be seen that there 
were ten quarts issued during the week. Now, 
by adding the twenty-four quarts received on 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



191 



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the fourth to the fourteen quarts on hand the 
previous Sunday, making thirty-eight quarts in 
all, and deducting from this the ten quarts 
issued, leaves twenty-eight quarts on hand Sun- 
day, the 9th. Twenty-eight quarts at 80. cents 
is $22.40. Thus we have the Inventory Figures 
and Issues and Eeceipts all together on the 
same page. 

By adding the Value figures across the page 
you have the sum total value of the different 
value figures on that page. And this item is 
entered in the left hand column (as shown in 
the illustration page 190) as $245.89. For the 
right hand page the "total value" figures are 
entered in the right hand column. (See illus- 



tration page 191) as $127.11. 
* * * 

By copying these totals onto a blotter, from 
the several pages necessary for the entire wine 
list, and footing them up, the GEAND TOTAL 
of STOCK ON HAND value is ascertained. 

These figures should compare with the regu- 
lar inventory figures. 

For convenience of making entries, a PUE- 
PLE guide line (indicated by a dotted line 
in the illustration) is always Wednesday; so 
that no counting of lines up or down from the 
Sundays, or tracing any line from the date 
column across the page, is necessary in making 
"middle of week" entries. 



192 



THE PKACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



In making entries in the goods received col- 
umn it is well to have these figures in red ink, 
or something different from the issues column 
entries. It serves to keep the narrow columns 
of figures distinct and prevents any possibility 
of confusion. The "quantities" entries in the 
illustration (receiving columns) it will be no- 
ticed are in heavy black figures, for the pur- 
pose of giving an idea how much a different 
style of figure simplifies the system for refer- 
ence purposes. 

* * * 

The writing in of the headings and the days 
of the month can be done in less than half an 

hour each month. 

# * * 

The itemized Daily Eequisitions (see page 
188) are distributed in their proper columns and 
date lines in the Stoek-Eeceipts-Issues Book; 
(BAILEY BOOK) like^Yise the Purchases as 
per itemized invoices (see Bar Action) will 
also be found correctly distributed. With the 
aid of this book, together with the requisition 
blanks, the memoranda of invoices and the 
cash receipts of the Bar, it is an easy matter 
to get at any desired information quickly and 
satisfactorily. For instance, to find percent- 
ages: 
Getting at the Percentages 

The PEEOENTAGE on GEOSS PEOFIT is 
arrived at by subtracting the Cost Price of the 
Issues ($117.89) from the Cash Eeceipts of 
the Bar ($2.'55.90), and dividing the remainder 
by the Cost Price of the Issues, thus: 

Bar receipts $225.90 

Net cost of issues 117.89 

117.89) 138.01(117. per ct 
These figures are reduced for the NET 
PEOFIT showing by subtracting all the fixed 
charges of operating the Bar from the above 
Dividend figures before dividing by the Cost. 
The Bar Action Book 

The above illustration of the second book of 
his system Mr. Bailey explains as follows: 

You will find it necessary in order to give 
full value to system to show the working of 
the SECOND BOOK which is in control of 
Wine Eoom-Issues-Eeceipts Book, as well as 
Bar Action and Weekly and Monthly Bar 
Statements. 

If you take a small journal ruled book 
(petty cash book I use) and enter Daily, op- 
posite given dates, the amount of Issue in one 
column, on same line in next column you have a 
space for the same day's Bar Eeceipts, when 
they come in. There you have at a glance on 
one page THE WHOLE BUSINESS; ISSUES 



AND EECEIPTS AT THE END OP MONTH 
BY DAYS. 

Every Sunday you line off in EED and total- 
ing you have Weekly Issues and Weekly Ee- 
ceipts to handle in your Balance with the Wine 
Boom Stock for Weekly Balance. 
PUECHASE8. 

Opposite page as you open book you have a 
page to enumerate the Purchases During Month, 
which, lined off in red ink at end of week, 
gives New Stock Added in dollars and cents. 

Starting out each week you head new entry, 
simply for convenience as memoranda, the 
Amount of Stock in Wine Boom in money. 

I use in this way two pages of book a month. 
BALANCES. 

Back of book I use for Balances. 

Monthly Balance differs only in that I in- 
clude Bar Eoom Stock, which, being a fixed 
amount, might as well be included weekly. 

On WEEKLY BALANCES the amount of 
Stock on hand end of week deducted from 
stock on hand at beginning of week, plus the 
purchases gives TOTAL COST OF ISSUES. 
Thus in an instant you have at end of week . 
what you may have spent half an hour a day 
in figuring out for no special advantage. A 
COMPAEISON OE MENTAL ESTIMATE 
OF EEQUISITIONS AND BAE EECEIPTS 
DAILY OUGHT TO CONVINCE AN INTEL- 
LIGENT MANAGEE HOW THE BAB IS 
GOING— therefore the book headed BAE 
ACTION. 

One can figure out a Daily Bequisition as 
often as he pleases, but the Weekly Balance 
shows exactly what he is after, concisely and 
quickly. 

Keeping up this BAE ACTION BOOK takes 
no more time than to write down the figures 
from Bequisition and Cashier's Daily Eeport. 

Bar is governed iy selling prices and Wine 
Zoom and results hy value of Stock on hand. 

There can be no mistake in these results ex- 
cept of a clerical kind; and all mistakes may 
be run down by a careful examination of Stock 
Book at any time. 

I regard this SECOND BOOK as of quite 
as much importance as the Stock Book and as 
' ' supplementary ' ' to it. 

You can thus throw away your Stock Books 
as fast as filled; and a thirty-cent Statement 
Book will give you a year's record of your en- 
tire Bar transactions IN DETAIL, DAILY 
AND WEEKLY AND MONTHLY, AT A 
GLANCE. 

It condenses your work in the Stock Book, 
shows where each item came from and at what 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 193 

time. (I also keep the Billiards separate on same line and page as Daily Workings of Bar.) 

The Bar Action Book 



July, 1899. 

BAE PURCHASES. 
*July 1, stoch on hand $390.15 {Sat.) 



July S $371.17 

July 3, 4 doz. Seltzer $ 3. 84 

July 3, 12 doz. Budweiser 10.08 

July 4, 2 doz. Tom gin 19.20 

July 4, 200 R. Raven splits.. 20.00 

July 5, 6 doz. Budweiser 5.04 

July 6, 12 doz. Apollinaris, pts. . 20.16 
July 6, 12 doz. Apollinaris, qts. . 28.80 

July 7, 3 doz. P. gin ale 2.50 

July 7, 12 doz. Budweiser 10.08 



(Sun.) 



July 9, Stock on hand 



$119.7S 



.00 



July, 1899. 



July 1 



BAE ACTION. 

Selling Price. 
$38.20 



Bar 

Receipts. 
$40.50 



July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 



2 45.90 

3 44.55 

4 38.90 

5 26.90 

6 26.95 

7 49.90 

8 19.50 



$252.60 
'Italics indicate red ink entri 



■48.20 
36.10 
25.15 
29.20 
50.25 
20.25 
46.75 

$255.90 



BALANCE. 

Week Ending July 9, 1899. 

De. 

July 9 To stock on hand $373.00 

To Bar Receipts for 

week 255.90 

$628.90 

Cr. 

July 2 By stock on hand $371.17 

July 9 By purchases during 

week 119.72 

By salaries 30.00 

By license 10.00 

530.89 

Net profit $98.01 

(Or eighty -three percent on the cost of the 
issues.) 





SERVICE PLATES, THE RICE, HOUSTON — PICK S LAMBERTON. 



194 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 





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FACE OF STOCK CARD, SHOWING GOODS RECEIVED 



A Simple System of Wine Boom Accounting 
that Affords Ready Reference to Date, Quan- 
tity and Value of All Goods Received and 
Issued; Also to Quantity and Value of 
Stock on Hand 

The Illinois Athletic Club of Chicago, James 
T. Clyde, manager, have adopted a rack and 
card system for keeping track of the Wine 
Boom, the goods received, issued, and continu- 
ous inventory. 

The rack used is the double standard type of 
the H. M. rack and card system for front ofQce 
accounting, and the cards measure 4 inches 
wide by 4% inches deep. The rack has pockets 
to hold the cards and these pockets are num- 
bered to correspond with the bin numbers. For 
each pocket there are two cards, one of a red 
color, known as the Stock Card, the other of 
manilla color, known as the Daily Issues Card. 
The stock card is utilized both face and reverse 



sides, as shown in the accompanying illustra- 
tions. The face is used for entering goods re- 
ceived, the entries on the illustration self-ex- 
planatory. The reverse of the stock card is 
used for statements of issues of each month, 
the figures taken from the daily issues card. 
The illustration is self-explanatory. 

The daily issues card is ruled for thirty-one 
days, the horizontal line opposite each day 
divided into five spaces, four of these for enter- 
ing the quantities as issued, and the fifth for 
the total issues for the day. The illustration 
(see page 197) shows the total issues of Mumms 
quarts for the month of June to be 216 quarts. 
This entry is shown opposite July 1, on the re- 
verse of the stock card, where it was posted 
the first of the month when a new card was 
substituted for the daily issues of July. 

In use the stock card stands in the rack 
behind the daily issues card. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



195 



BIN No. 



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COST PI 



Date 1910 


Inventory 


Received 


TOTAL 


Issued 


On Hand 


Value 


JAN. 

FEB. 

MAR. 

APRIL 

MAY 
JUNE 
JULY 
AUG. 
SEPT. 
OCT. 
NOV. 
DEC. 


60 




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BEX ERSE OP STOCK CAED, SHOWING MONTHLY INVENTORY 



This system of wine room accounting is in- 
expensive and labor saving, the cost of opera- 
tion after the first installation being merely 
nominal. 

The illustration of the rack (see page 196) 
shows a section of six pockets. The name of 
the wine, written on the card, is exposed over 
the top of the pocket. 

This rack is kept in Mr. Clyde's office as a 
daily inventory for ready reference as to stock 
on hand, quantities used during the day, week, 
month or year, together with a notation of cost 
price changes. 

An inventory sheet that can be conveniently 
used for this system is a ruling with the bin 
numbers printed on, and space opposite each 
number for name, size of package, quantity, 
cost, and total cost. 

This system will also be adapted for the 
Store Boom and Cigar Stocks at the Illinois 
Athletic Club. 



The Art of Drinking Wine 
By H. V. Bemis 

To know how to drink wine belongs only to 
a cultivated taste; to know how to tempt guests 
to indulge in it with pleasure belongs only to 
the host gifted with rare tact and artistic dis- 
crimination. 

A painting from the hand of a master must 
be placed in a favorable light, and with appro- 
priate surroundings to set off its excellence; 
the most beautiful woman despises not the art 
of enhancing her charms by harmonious aux- 
iliaries or by Judicious contrasts. 

There is, in the same manner, an art and a 
science in drinking celebrated wines. 

After studying the menu, one can decide on 
a choice of wines, and on the order in which 
they are to be served. 

The following rules should be observed: 

With fish, white wines. 

With meats, rich red wines. 



196 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



24 

25 
26 

27 
28 
29 


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ILLUSTRATION OF THE BIN NTJMBEEED RACK (SEE PAGE 195) 



At tile conclusion of the repast, the oldest 
red wines. 

After the dessert, white, sweet and sparkling 
wines. 

In regard to the gradation of red wines, the 
rule is to commence with the newest and least 
celebrated. 

"We shall see how these rules are followed by 
a generous liver: 

A few spoonfuls of soup, by their agreeable 
warmth, prepare the palate and stomach to 
fulfill their wholesome functions; a drop of 
golden Madeira or of old sherry, gives these 
organs all the necessary activity. 

With the oysters, which are followed by the 
fish, come the fine Moselle and Ehine wines, and 
the white Bordeavix or white Burgundy wines, 
half dry or sweet, far preferable to Champagne 
frappe. When the fish and oysters are removed, 
so are these wines. 



When meat is on the table, the proper ac- 
companiment is the red Bordeaux wine, mellow 
and rich, clad in resplendent purple and with a 
perfumed bouquet. 

With canvas back, mallard and teal duck, 
richer meats — roast beef, wild boar, roebuck — 
is served excellent, heady, rich red Burgundy. 

When midway in the feast, the guests have 
arrived at that satisfactory stage when the 
stomach, still docile, manifests no fvirther de- 
sires; when the taste prepared, by a judicious 
gradation of sensations is susceptible of the 
most delicate impressions, the noble red Bor- 
deaux wines make their triumphal entry, and 
the "maitre d 'hotel" proudly announces their 
illustrious names: Chateau Margaux! Chateau 
Lafite! Chateau Latour! Chat. Haut Brion! 
Chat. Larose! 

After these wines, one can enjoy sweet sau- 
ternes and quaff a few glasses of foaming 
champagne. 







THE PEACTK.'AL 


HOTEL STEWARD 








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MONTH 


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197 



ILLUSTRATION OP THE DAILY ISSUES CAED (SEE PAGE 194) 




BURLEY GLASSWARE FOR THE ADOLPHUS, DALLAS. 



198 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 




BORLEY GLASSWARE FOR THE ADOLPHUS, DALLAS. 




BURLEY GLASSWARE FOR THE ADOLPHUS, DALLAS. 



Wine Room and Cigar Room Accounting 



The Rulings Designed by JohnTellman for His Use in the Planters and Jefferson Hotels of St. Louis. 









1 


91 399 








No. 


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BeceiviBg Book: This book is handled in the office of the store room. Every invoice 
is properly copied for future reference. There is the ledger folio and date column on the 
left and regular journal columns on the right side, aiding the bookkeeper in distributing 
the amounts. Leaf measures 10 x 16 inches. 



H- 



Bar 1. Isiues. 
















January, 


1912 


















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Bar Issue Book: This book contains the issues from the wine room to the bar. Each 
page is ruled for one month. Each day's issues are placed in the columns and totaled 
at the end of the month. Then this total is entered in the issue column of the wine room 
stock book; and after adding to the stock on hand on the first of the month the goods 
which have been received, and deducting from this the above mentioned total of the issues, 
the balance on hand at the end of the month is left. The leaf measures 8x14 inches. 



199 



200 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 





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Wine Room Stock: The above is an illustration of our wine room stock book, which 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



201 



runs twelve months to the folio. It measures 38 inches across and is 14 inches deep. It is 
the most convenient method of lieeping accurate stocli that I have ever used. It is self- 
explanatory so far that each month has its division, beginning first with the column on 
hand, to which the column received is added, giving the total; the issues are entered in 
the next column, leaving balance on hand. This is done on the last day of the month. 
One only needs to transfer the names of the wines and liquors once in twelve months. 



wim mm@m mmmmsj 



C&f) 



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V^^-^iwt / 



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Daily Wine Eoom Issues: This sheet is filled out every morning by the bartender on 
watch and sent to the wine room for requisition. The first column contains the cost of the 



202 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 

liquors at wholesale, then follow the Gal., Qts., Pts. and % Pt. columns, then the column 
for the name or number of the wine wanted, and finally the column for the selling price 
of the bar. The issues indicated on this sheet are distributed daily in the bar issue book. 
The sheet measures 6 by 11 inches. (The requisitions only are written by the bartender. 
The cost figures are carried out by the bookkeeper.) 

CIGAR REQUISITION 




..HOTEL 



Date.. 



f^-Ccyi^jt. / 



.m9^. 



gUAHTITT 



NAME 



SIZE 



RHAIl 



' TOTAL AH'T 



30 



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Cigar Requisition Sheets (Daily) : This sheet contains the number of cigars of various ' 
sorts and sizes sent from the humidor to the cigar stands. The cost price and the retail 
price is figured out by the bookkeepers and totals of each requisition are entered in the 
cigar issue book for the monthly report. The size of the sheet is 6% by 9i^ inches. (The 
money figures on illustration are put in by auditor. The person making the requisition 
writes in only the quantity figures.) 




This trademark is known wherever there are 
good hotels and restaurants. It is the cover 
design of The Hotel Monthly, published at 
Chicago. The Practical Hotel Steward was 
first printed in serial form in The Hotel Monthly. 



THE i-BACTlCAL HOTEL STEWAED 



203 





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Monthly Cigar Issue Book: The above report represents one month's transaction on. 
the cigar stand. There are columns for the dates of the issues, also for the cost value of 
same, and for the retail price, that is, the estimated price for what we expect the issues 
to be sold. The size of this book is 10x13% inches. (Reserve stock in humidor is entered 
in recapitulated form in lower right-hand corner — only the value of said stock given.) 



204 THE PRACTICAL 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT 

DAILY STATEMENT 

















— 


_ 


191 


^^ 






Stores Issued to Cafes, 




^ 






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.. 


■ ■■ Kitchen, 




















' " Pantrv, 




















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■ " Bar 1. 




















' " Bar 2. 


















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' " Bar 3. 




















' " Rales. 


















,. 






































Exiwnse Issued to Steward's Depl., 


















■■ ■' Office, 


















H. Keeper, 








































































" Bars 1. 2. 3. 


















aaar & Nm Slani). 


















" Miscellaneous, 




































^flrmnerv iin<j Prinlina IssuH to Offlct 


















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Bars. 








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" Bars. 




















" Store Room, 








































Mechanics, 




















- 




















" Trinler, 




















Dhibm 1 Witrkna. 
















































































Toul. 














No. of Checks IssueU, 






Average Value. 







Daily Statement of the Commissary Depart- 
ment: This report is made every day by tlie 
commissary bookkeeper and shows the transac- 
tion of the issues in almost every section of the 
hotel; also the wages scale and the number of 
employees, and such other information as neces- 
sary to impart to the auditing department. The 
sheet measures 5%xl4 inches. It is self-ex- 
planatory. 



HOTEL STEWARD 

RETAIL BUYING OF BEEPi 

From the V. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Farmer's Bulletin 527, Experiment Station 
u-orl; LXXIV. 

In a previous bulletin of this seriesa market 
classes and grades of meat were described. An 
understanding of the meat-trade requirements 
enables tho stockman to judge the carcass 
yield and the quality of his animals. The 
breeder, by processes of selection, endeavors to 
produce a product which shall appioach as near 
as possible an ideal type, and he recognizes 
the utility of the finished beef ;iroduct as an 
important factor in his breeding operations. 
The practical feeder likewise requires an inti- 
mate knowledge of the market requirements 
of meat, and no doubt serious financial losses 
have often been experienced through a lack 
of knowledge of the proper degree of fatness 
and hence the amount of food required for each 
class to enable it to be sold to the best ad- 
vantage. Thus the study of market require- 
ments as to different wholesale cuts of meat 
has been given prominent yet by no means un- 
due consideration. 

As a contrast to this, the study of the rela- 
tive proportion of the different kinds of meat 
in the retail cuts and the cost thereof on the 
basis of actual food value has been given very 
little attention in spite of its importance, to 
which the current high prices of beef have 
added a special significance. As L. D. Hall 
and A. D. Emmett, of the Illinois station point 
out, precise knowledge of the final market 
product into which beef cattle are converted 
is essential to both the producer and the con- 
sumer of beef. The consumers have to deal 
directly with the market and have occasion al- 
most daily to make use of information con- 
cerning the relative values of dilierent retail 
cuts. To buy meat intelligently it is necessary 
to know the nature of the cuts, especially with 
reference to the proportions of lean meat, fat, 
and bone they contain, and the food value of 
meat from different parts of the carcass. 

A large majority of meat consumers have 
no knowledge whatever of these matters, but 
make their selctions of meat soleiy according 
to habit or fancy. In fact, but little accurate 
data along this line have hitherto been avail- 
able to those who wished to buy meats on a 
rational basis. As a result, a few well-known 
cuts are greatly in demand, and the remainder 
of the carcass is a " drug on the ]narket. ' ' To 
such an extreme has this condition developed 

' Compiled from Illinois Sta. Bui. 158. 

= U. S. Dept. Agr., Farmers' Bui. 435, p. 16. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



205 



that a portion of the carcass (loins and ribs), 
forming only about one-fourth of its weight, 
represents nearly one-half of its retaii cost. 
.In view of the large place which meat occu- 
pies in the American diet, amounting to nearly 
one-third of the average expenditure for all 
food, the importance of an intelligent under- 
standing of the subject on the part of the con- 
sumer is readily apparent. 

Kot only are the foregoing statements true 
of meat producers and consumers as individuals, 
but it is highly essential to the entire beef- 
cattle industry, on the one hand. End the eco- 
nomic welfare of the beef-eating public on 
the other, that a more intelligent understanding 
of the different cuts of meat be acquired by 
consumers generally. An increased demand for 
those portions of the carcass which are now 
dificult for the butcher to dispose of would 
contribute largely toward a more stable con- 
dition of the trade and thus enable ihe producer 
to operate with greater confidence .".nd economy. 
At the same time it would effect a tremendous 
saving to the consumer himself by more nearly 
equalizing the market values of the various 
cuts and by enabling the retailer to operate 
with a smaller margin of profit. 

In the experiments at the Illinois station, 
three each of choice and prime steers from 
the university herd were slaughtered and deter- 
minations made of (1) the relative proportions 
of lean, visible fat, and bone in each of the 
retail and wholesale cuts of beef; (2) the chem- 
ical composition and nutritive value of the bone- 
less meat of the various wholesale cuts; and (3) 
the net cost to the consumer of the lean, the 
gross meat, and the food nutrients in each cut 
at current market prices. 

The relative cost of the lean and of the total 
meat in the straight wholesale curs at market 
prices is shown in the following table: 

Cffsi of lean and of total meat in the straight wholesale cuts 
at market trices. 



Straight wholesale cuts. 


o U 

IS, 

^ " u 

^ no 


0-1 

in cd 
o <a 

o- 


•s.s 

S°3 




Cents 
18.5 
15.0 
11.5 
9.5 
8,0 
8.0 
5.0 


Cents 
31.6 
27.1 
17.8 
13.7 
15.8 
22.0 
10.5 


Cents 
20.5 


Rib 


17.5 




13.9 




10.8 


Plate 


8.7 




8.0 




8.4 







The net cost per pound of lean is, in general, 
greatest in the cuts which command the highest 
prices, and vice versa. The flank is an excep- 
tion to this rule, and the chuck is more eco- 



nomical in this respect than th*; plate. Ee- 
ferring to the last column, it is also observed 
that the more expensive the cut the greater the 
cost per pound of visible fat and lean combined, 
the flank being the only exception. Trom these 
figures it is apparent that food values of beef 
cuts do not correspond to their wholesale nirir- 
ket prices, and that the cheaper cuts are by far 
the most economical sources of both lean and 
fat meat. On the whole, the different cuts vary 
more widely in net cost of food ingredients than 
in market price per pound of gross meat. The 
following discussion tends to confirm these 
statements. 

The manner of cutting and the location of 
the different retail cuts are shown in the illus- 
tration. 

RETAIL CUTS. 
Loin Cuts, — Loin steaks averaged 59 per 
cent lean, 32 per cent visible fat, and 9 per 
cent bone. Sirloin steaks in general contained 
a greater proportion of lean and smaller pro- 
portion of fat than porterhouse and club 
steaks. 

Rib Cuts. — Bib roasts contained, on .the 
average, 55 per cent lean, 30 pel cent visible 
fat, and 15 per cent bone. The greatest per- 
centage of lean was found in the sixth rib 
roast, and the smallest in the eleventh and 
twlefth rib cut. 

Round Cuts. — The various cuts made from 
the round averaged 65 per cent lean, 18 per 
cent visible fat, and 17 per cent bone. Round 
steaks contained 74 to 84 per cent lean, the 
rump roast 49 per cent, round pot roast 85 per 
cent, and soup bones 8 to 66 per cent. The 
maximum percentage of fat was found in the 
rump roast, and the maximum percentage of 
bone in the hock soup bone. 

Chuck Cuts. — These contained an average 
of 69 per cent lean, 19 per cent fat, and 11 
per cent bone. Chuck steaks varied from 62 to 
82 per cent lean and from 6 to 22 per cent fat. 
The shoulder clod contained 80 per cent lean 
and only 5 per cent bone. Relatively more lean 
and less fat were found in the chuck rib roast 
than in those cut from the prime rib. 

Plate Cuts. — The brisket, navel, and rib 
ends averaged 51 per cent lean, 41 per cent 
fat, and 8 per cent bone. The brisket and 
navel were similar in proportions of- the differ- 
ent constituents, but the rib ends were slightly 
higher in percentage of bone and lower in 
lean. 

Flank Cuts. — The flank steak contained 83 
per cent lean and 16 per cent fat; and the 
flank stew, 64 per cent lean and 35 per cent 
fat. 

Fore Shank Cuts. — Soup bones from the 
fore shank varied from 17 to 69 per cent lean 
and from 25 to 75 per cent bono. The bone- 



206 



THE PBACTIGAL HOTEL STEWARD 




Rump 
/ ffump 

3-/3 /?ciu/?c/s/ea/r-s. ' 
/4 ffounc^ s/st^A, Ai^s/c^i//. 
/S /<^ucA/e .scx/p^/Je. 
/6 Po^ rvef-sA 
M/7a/ .s/ja/yA: 
/7,/ff Soup A0/7&S. 
/9 /YocA scx/p 6o/?e. 
/.O/A/ 

/ Bu//-e/?c/ s/r/o/h s/^ea/r. 
2 iVe(^e -io/7e s/r/o//7 s/e^Ar. 

S,6 £)oudi/&-/?o/?e ~s//'/o//7'S^a'/r. 
V Mp-^ci/?e S//-/0//7 sAs-a/r. 
8 ///p-/)o/?epor/<sr/'Ouse .s/exfA: 
9-/5 /fe^u/if/- poz-Zey/Jouss- s/ea/r, 
/6-/8 C/QA> s/sa/cs. 

/ P/a/7ps/e<^/r. 
2 S/si^ 



/=?/S 

/ //^'* <* /a^/' /P/A n^asA 

2 9^/'&/a//' P/Z> roasA 

3 7^^&ff^'^ P>/A> rotfsA 
<? er^ P/J!> ro£rsA 

CA/aCA<- 

/ ^^^ /?/A /'Oo'sA 

2-9 CAucAr sAeaA'S. 

/0-/3 A^oAraasA^. 

/4 crAc?£/. 

/S AAecAr. 
A=Z.^T£r 

/ Br/sAr<s-A 

2 •/W•^'t?/. 

3,4 A?/4> erfoAs^ 
/n::>A?£- s/A^AA/< 

/ SAeky. 

2 Ax??iycArAe soi^ £>a/?e. 

3-6 3oup ^o/?iss. 



'^eck 



RETAIL CUTS OF BEEF. 



less shank stew contained 83 per cent lean and 
.17 per cent visible fat. 

Eetail Trimmings. — Trimming the loin 
stealjs reduced their weight 12 per cent, and 
the trimmings were about four-fil'tha fat and 
one-fifth bone. Bound and chuck steaks were 
reduced but* 5 per cent in weight by trimming, 
only fat being taken from the former as a 
rule and principally bone from the latter. 
Other cuts that were materially affected by 
cutting off surplus fat and bone were the rump, 
shoulder pot roast, and neck. 

EELATIVE ECONOMY OF THE VARIOUS 
EETAIL CUTS. 

From the proportions of lean, fat, and bone 



in the different cuts, thi^ir relal.ive economy 
at retail market prices may bo determined. 
The net cost of lean meat is an approximate 
index of the relative economy of steaks and 
roasts, since they are purchased and used pri- 
marily for the lean they contain; but in com- 
paring boiling, stewing, and similar meats the 
cost of gross meat, or fat and lean combined, 
should be more largely considered, because the 
fat is more completely utilized, as in the case 
of meat loaf, hash. Hamburger, and corned 
beef. Soup bones, being valued for flavoring 
matter as well as for the nutritive substance 
they contain, are more difficult to compare with 
other cuts in respect to relative economy. They 
vary materially, however, in proportions of 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



207 



edible meat and waste, and sliould therefore be 
studied in this connection. 

The following table shows the cost of lean 
and of total meat in the various retail cuts 
at market prices: 

Cost of lean and of total meat in the variotis retail 
cuts at ntarket prices. 



Retail cuts. 



Steaks : 

Porterhouse, hip bone. . . 

Porterhouse, regular.... 

Club steak 

Sirloin, butt end 

Sirloin, round bone 

Sirloin, double bone 

Sirloin, hip bone 

Flank steak 

Round, first cut 

Round, middle cut 

Round, last cut 

Chuck, first cut 

Chuck, last cut 

Roasts : 

Prime ribs, first cut 

Prime ribs, last cut 

Chuck, fifth rib 

Rump 

Boiling and stewing pieces 

Round pot roast 

Shoulder clod 

Shoulder pot roast 

Rib ends 

Brisket 

Navel 

Flank stew 

Fore shank stew 

Neck 

Soup bones: 

Round knuckle 

Hind shank, middle cut 

Hind shank, hock 

Fore shank, knuckle. . .. 

Fore shank, middle cut. . 

Fore shank, end 





OJ ^ 


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Cents 


Cents 


8 


25 


38.6 


10 


25 


40,2 


18 


20 


32.1 


1 


20 


25.3 


3 


20 


28.3 


5 


20 


28.7 


7 


20- 


33.3 


1 


16 


19.3 


2 


15 


17 


6 


15 


17.3 


14 


15 


19.3 


2 


12 


18 3 


9 


12 


15.7 


1 


20 


40 5 


4 


16 


26 1 


1 


15 


33 8 


1 


13 


19.4 


16 


10 


11 6 


14 


10 


13 3 


11 


10 


14.3 


3 


8 


16.2 


1 


8 


15.0 


2 


7 


12 8 


2 


7 


10.9 


1 


7 


8.5 


15 


6 


8 5 


2 


5 


26.3 


18 


5 


7.5 


19 


5 


62.5 


2 


5 


17.2 


4 


5 


13 5 


6 


5 


28.8 



o rt -M 

b c e 

(D cfl"^ 
Q, *J 

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(n cd 3} 

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Cents 
28.9 
27.2 
22 6 
20.6 
21.1 
22.7 
24.2 
16.0 
15.3 
15.6 
16.0 
14.1 
13.1 

22.9 

18 8 
17.3 
12 8 

10.1 
10 5 
11.6 
9.2 
8.7 
7.7 
7.1 
7 
7.0 

12.5 
6 3 

26.6 

12 5 
9 4 

20.9 



Taking the net cost of the lean meat as a 
basis of comparison, we learn from these data 
that the most expensive steaks .'it the prices 
given are the porterhouse cuts, followed by the 
club, sirloin, flank, round, and chuck steaks. 
Of the different roasts, the first-cut prime ribs 
are the most costly in terms of Isan meat, and 
the rump roast is the most economical. The 
various boiling and stewing pieces furnish 
lean meat more ecomonmically at market prices 
than either the roasts or steaks, the rib ends 
and brisket being the dearer cuts of this class, 
while the neck and shank stews sre relatively 
cheapest. Several of the soup bones are very 
economical sources of lean meat, particularly 
the middle cuts of both shanks, and only one 
of them is extremely expensive even on this 
basis. In general the wide variation between 
the various cuts in ne^ cost of lean is remark- 
able, ranging from 7.5 cents in one of the soup 
bones to 40.5 cents in a prime rib roast, and up 
to 62.5 cents in the hock soup bone, the latter, 
Bowever, being used primarily for its flavoring 



substance rather than for lean meat. It will 
be observed, also, that the market prices of the 
cheaper cuts correspond much more closely to 
their net cost of lean meat than is true of the 
higher-priced steaks and roasts. 

The net cost per pound of gross meat, or lean 
and fat combined, varies much less as between 
the different cuts than does the net cost per 
pound of lean, because the proportions of total 
meat are more nearly uniform than the per- 
centages of lean. The various steaks and roasts 
rank in substantially the same order as to rela- 
tive economy on this basis as on the basis of 
lean meat. The rib roasts, however, are con- 
siderably more economical as compared with 
the porterhouse and sirloin steaks when all the 
edible meat is considered. The rump shows a 
very low cost per pound of edible meat, due 
to the large proportion of fat it contains ; and 
a still further difference is noticed in the case 
of the rib ends, brisket, navel, flank, neck, and 
several of the soup-bone cuts. The stewing 
meats are generally the most economical sources 
of edible meat at these prices, T.bile porter- 
house steaks are the most expensive. 

On the whole, the data clearly show that 
the cheaper cuts of beef are by far the most 
economical sources both of lean and of total 
edible meat, including fat and lean. * * * 
No correlation exists between market prices 
and the proportion of flavoring substances con- 
tained in various portions of the carcass, and 
cooking tests indicate that the proportion of 
waste and shrinkage is not necessarily greater 
in the cheaper than in the more expensive 
cuts. It is evident, therefore, that retail prices 
of beef cuts are determined chiefly by consider- 
ations other than their food value, such as 
tenderness, grain, color, general appearance, 
and convenience of cooking. * * * 

Relative Economy. — There seems to be no 
relation between market prices and the per- 
centages of fat, protein, extractives and ash. 
The cheaper cuts appear to be as valuable and 
in some cases actually more so th:in the higher 
priced cuts from the standpoint of protein of 
energy. These statements do not take into 
account the factors of tenderness nor the in- 
fluence the degree of fatness may have upon 
the palatability of cooked meat. In purchasing 
meat for protein primarily, the neck, shanks, 
and clod are the most economical cuts; the 
plate, chuck, flank, and round follow; with the 
rump, rib, and loin as the most expensive. 
From the standpoint of fuel value, the flank, 
plate, neck, and shank cuts are the cheapest, 
while the rib, loin, and round M-e the most 
expensive. Considering both factors, protein 
and fuel value, and along with these the adapt- 
ability of the meat for general use the clod, 
chuck, and plate are the most economical cuts 
at the retail prices given. 



THE LUNCH COUNTER IN A FIRST CLASS HOTEL 



An Exposition of tlie Arrangement, Equipment and Method of Operation of the Lunch Room in the 

Lincoln Hotel, Lincoln, Neb., Together with Figures of the Approximate Sales, 

Percentages and Profit as Compared with the Cafe in Same Hotel. 

Address made by F. J. Richards before the Northwestern Hotel Men' s Association at Duluth. 

rear of it we connected it with our liitchen 
with an electric dumb waiter, which is worked 
automatically. We put about eleven thousand 



I am down to talk on the question of a lunch 
counter in a first-class hotel. Now, as for a. 
first-class hotel, I can't imagine anybody less 
qualified than I am to talk on that subject. But 
if you can figure out what class the Lincoln 
Hotel belongs in, I will do the best I can for 
that class. 

Taking up now the lunch counter question, 
I will preface it with a brief description of 
the Lincoln Hotel. The Lincoln is among 
the largest hotels of Nebraska. It is located 
three blocks from the Burlington depot, which 
has the principal traffic in and out of Lincoln. 
We are not on a busy street, and for that rea- 
son we cannot figure ordinarily to get a cafe 
business off of the street, or from the town, 
except some casual customer that makes it a 
point to come over there. Our cafe is located 
in the old American plan dining room on the 
second floor, and outside of the regular guests 
of the hotel we very seldom saw anyone that 
belonged in the town, unless they happened to 
"blow themselves" a little, from their stand- 
point; but it didn't look that way to us. The 
high cost of provisions which is climbing every 
day set me to thinking that we would have to 
find some ways and means to increase our 
revenue in some way, and to give our kitchen 
force more work to do. I came to the conclu- 
sion that in some way we ought to give our 
kitchen force more work to do that we might 
reduce our overhead expense in proportion to 
the total volume of business done. When our 
Annex was buUt we left a room which could be 
connected through an open eourtway, with a 
dumb waiter, with the idea of eventually using 
it for a high-class cafe. We thought such a 
thing might be practicable, but after studying 
the situation for two or three years and no- 
ticing the manner in which people did not pat- 
ronize the cafe, and avail themselves of the 
higher priced items on the menu, we decided 
that a high priced cafe was not what they 
wanted. We came to the conclusion that 
they wanted something cheap; so this room 
instead of being converted into a handsome 
little cafe on the ground floor, where we 
might expect to get some outside business, 
we made into a lunch room. The room is 
twenty-four by eighty all told; and in the 



dollars into this room in the way of fixing it 
up with tile floors, and seven foot tiled wain- 
scoting, and heavy plaster, ornamental ceil- 
ings, and with some plaster work on the side- 
walk. We have an indirect lighting, and a 
good ventilating system. The eleven thousand 
dollars included the cost of fixing up the 
room, installing the fixtures, and equipping 
the room. Our lunch counter is white tile 
both front and back, and absolutely there 
isn't a place for dirt or vermin, or anything 
else to lodge. They can't get away from us 
if we go after them. The top of the counter 
is an inch and a quarter white carrara glass, 
which I think is the most beautiful material 
made for that purpose. It is absolutely im- 
pervious to stains or the absorption of any 
material that yon can put upon it; which is 
not true of marble. Our table tops have the 
same material, seven-eights of an inch thick. 
The base of our cigar stand is white tile, and 
the screen back of our grill is built of rein- 
forced concrete covered with white tile. So 
there is practically nothing in the room ex- 
cept a painted portion above the wainscoting 
that will require anything but a little elbow 
grease and soap and water to be kept per- 
fectly clean. Consequently, our upkeep should 
be very small. In the eight months that it 
has been operated I cannot see that there is 
any deterioration at all. It looks as fresh 
and clean and sanitary as it did the day we 
opened it, barring a few slight scratches of 
the glass top which, of course, are inevitable. 

In the operation of the lunch room my 
idea was to cut down the cost of operation 
to a minimum. I was willing to put lots of 
money into the installation of the room to 
make it attractive. I then wanted to give 
the people that patronized it good things to 
eat at a moderate price, but I did not want 
to try to give them the nice service that 
goes with some of the little frills that we 
are all apt to put on. , 

We are not fussy over the appearance of 
our service, as we are mixing in with the 
regular plain white dishes the odds and ends 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



209 



accumulated thru several changes in our cafe 
patterns, and in this way will use up several 
hundred dollars' worth of good dishes that 
■we could not sell at a price worth consid- 
ering. 

The place was started primarily as a cheap 
place, and we couldn't give it every service, 
and maintain a cheap price, and make money. 
For that reason the few little economies that 
I started out with, we have stuck to. One 
of these economies is that we furnish no 
saucers for our cups, and nothing but paper 
napkins. Now these are two items of consid- 
erable importance. Paper napkins cost about 
forty-five cents a thousand, and the launder- 
ing of ordinary napkins costs anywhere from 
forty-five to fifty cents a hundred, and with 
the volume of business that we do in a day 
that means quite a saving every month in the 
laundering, not to say anything about the 
wear and tear on your linen. The cost of 
washing all the saucers for the cups is 
quite an item in a lunch room. Practically 
everybody has a cup of coffee, and when you 
feed four or five or six hundred people a day 
the washing of the saucers and the conse- 
quent breakage through handling of four or 
five or six hundred saucers is quite an item 
at the end of the year. 

We started out with a bill of fare that ex- 
perience taught us was a little bit too cheap, 
and it didn't leave us much margin of profit. 
It didn't leave us the margin of profit that 
we should have, and after five or six months 
I commenced to increase it a little bit on a 
good many of the items. Take the item of 
stews; we increased that from fifteen to 
twenty cents; the entrees we raised from 
twenty to twenty-five; and some things from 
twenty-five to thirty; thiry-five cents is about 
the limit of anything we have on our dinner 
bill cooked to order. I can't see that our 
patrons have resented that slight gradual 
increase at all, nor has our patronage dropped 
ofE by reason of this increase. Our business 
seems to be growing rather than decreasing, 
and for that reason I believe we were a little 
bit too modest in asking the public to pay 
the price that we should get for the items 
that we served to them. 

I appreciate that we have not run the lunch 
counter in the most up-to-date manner, but 
I am looking around for improvements con- 
stantly, and I hope to establish a good many 
checks in the next month or so that I believe 
will give us good results. 

Until two or three weeks ago I permitted 



the waitresses to do all their own checking. 
We used a lock-stub system, and after blun- 
dering across a good many instances of under- 
charges I concluded to adopt a different sys- 
tem. Strange to say, the uuder-charges are 
never called to your attention, but of course 
the over-charges always are mentioned. I 
believe that the two checkers necessary are 
just as much justified in checking out the one 
hundred and fifty to two hundred dollars a 
day in the lunch room as they are to check 
one-half or two-thirds of that in the cafe. 
Later on I will know the effect of the check- 
ers on our percentage, but at present I can- 
not say anything about it. 

In refrenee to the idea of a lunch counter 
in a hotel of our class, or better, or less pre- 
tentious, I am reminded of Mr. Bradt's hotel 
in Lincoln, the Victoria. Mr. Bradt opened that 
up about eighteen months ago, as I recollect, 
possibly not that long. Before doing so, we 
talked the matter over very freely. Mr. 
Bradt and I are considerably in accord in 
our ideas, and he was rather at sea as to what 
kind of a feeding arrangement to put into his 
hotel. I advocated rather strongly for a 
combination such as we were then putting 
in the Lincoln Hotel, a lunch counter and 
dining room. He did not agree with me for 
quite a while, but I contended that it would 
be advisable, and yesterday when I was talk- 
ing with Mr. Bradt he told me he was satis- 
fied that the amount of business he received 
in his lunch counter and cafe combined was 
at least double what he would get if he de- 
pended entirely on a straight cafe business. 
Unfortunately, the ararngement of his build- 
ing is such that he is obliged to locate his 
cafe and lunch room off of the street and 
back of the office where it is not seen, but at 
that he gets a large amount of business from 
people who know his location, and know 
the excellence of his lunch room and cafe off 
of the street. 

He figures that his breakfasts proper from 
the ordinary source of revenue in the house 
would not be over twenty-five per cent of 
what his breakfast business is right now, on 
account of so much of it coming in off of the 
street. And I think that the lunch counter 
combined with the cafe is bound to be the 
solution of running small hotels to a profit 
on the eating side of it; and I think it will 
mean a decided increase in the ultimate net 
profits of even the larger hotels. Even Mr. 
Eome Miller's hotel, a flrst-class hotel, I 
think he could do it in that to advantage. 



210 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 




THE LINCOLN. 



if his location was just a little bit different, 
or if he had a room that was available to 
put in a lunch counter. If he had that kind 
' of a location he could put in the lunch counter 
combination from his kitchen service with 
practically no increase in his pay-roll, so his 
overhead expenses for operating that lunch 
room would be less than his competitors, by 
the overhead expense of his kitchen and his 
storeroom and general management, and for 
that reason at the same prices would make 
a good deal better net profit at the end of the 
year. 

I think that is applicable to almost any 
hotel. Of course, some of them have a little 
too much pride in the class of their hotel, 
and they never could see it in that way, but 
those of us who are out for net results are 
willing to overlook our pride in our establish- 
ment. I think all of us eventually will see 
that if the man next doo~ can fit up a place 
and run it independently of a hotel and make 
money, there is no reason under the sun why 
a hotel man cannot include it in a department 
of his hotel. The hotel man has a bar and 
a news stand, and he does not hesitate to in- 
corporate those in his organization, and why 
_ should he hesitate to put a lunch counter in 
his organization. In my opinion he will 
eventually get to it. 

I will give you the figures of the first 
six months of our operation. Possibly some 
people might think I was a little bit foolish 
to give here in the presence of three competi- 
tors these figures, but our object here is not 
to be selfish, but to be broad and liberal, 
and what is designed to help one should help 
another. 

The general information I have given re- 
garding the Lincoln Hotel is to enable you 
by a comparison to determine if the idea is 
applicable to your particular business. My 
figures cover a six months' period — cover the 
operation of our house since the installing of 
the lunch counter, compared with the same 
months for the two previous years. Our lunch 
counter was opened in November, and the six 
months' period would include April. Now, 
from that period since the lunch counter was 
opened, November, 1912, to April, 1913, our 
room earnings were increased 14.9 per cent. 
That is a pretty nice increase, consider- 
ing the fact that our business has been in- 
creasing practically every year for the thir- 
teen years tnat I have been in Lincoln. That 
increase of 14.9 per cent is over the years of 
1910 and 1911, which was also a legislative 



_/ 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAEI) 



211 




THE LTXCOLX HOTEL LUXCH EOOM occvpies a room 24x80, with a 15-foot ceil- 
ing. THE CEILING IS DECORATED IX CREAM AND OLD IVORY, ALL PLASTER RELIEF WORK IN OLD 
IVORY AND PANELS IN CREAM. THE SIDE WALLS ABOVE THE TILE WAINSCOTING ARE FINISHED IN A 
LIGHT GOLDEN BROWN LEATHER EFFECT OUTSIDE OF THE PANELS. AND PL.\IX CREAM PANELS, 
THE PLASTER MOULDINO FORMING PANELS IS FINISHED IN VERDE ANTIQUE. ALL PLAIN SURFACES 
ON WALLS AND CEILING WERE COVERED WITH CANVAS BEFORE DECORATING. . . . THE 7-FOOT 
TILE WAINSCOTING CONSISTS OF A 6-INCH SANITARY BASE AND A 6-INCII CAP MOULDING OF LIGHT 
MOTTLED GREEN. THE FIELD OF A LEMON CREAM, ALL SATIN FINISH. . . . THE ICE BOX IS 
TREATED AS PART OF THE WAINSCOTING. THE CAP MnuLIiING EXTENDS ACROSS THE DOOR AND 
STEAM TABLE OPENING, FORMING AN UNBROKEN BAND OF SOFT GREEN AROUND THE ENTIRE ROOM. 
. . . CHAIRS. STOOLS AND TABLE FRAMES QUARTER-SAWED OAK FINISHED IN GREEN. SHELVES 
OF CARRAR.V GLASS IN DISPLAY' TABLES ARE CARRIED BY LOOSE SPINDLES OF OAK. . . . URN 
STAND, HEATERS AND STEAM TABLE ARE OF RUSSIA IRON AND GERMAN SILVER FURNISHED BY THE 
JOHN VAN RANGE CO. . . . ELECTRIC FANS AND FIXTURES, COAT AND HAT RACKS, TABLE LEG 
SOCKETS AND STOOL BASES ALL IN VERDE ANTIQUE, ALSO THE FOOT RAIL. . . . THE COUNTER 
IS OF WHITE TILE BACK AND FRONT, WITH CARRARA GLASS TOP. 



year, as the pciiod quoted was, and we natur- 
ally think, as probably all hotel men do in 
capital cities, that the legislative period is 
productive of a great increase in the volume 
of business. But when compared with other 
years the increase is not as great as you 
might think it would be, because the year 
1911-12, the increase of the last six months 
was only 16.7 per cent more than the year 
without the legislature, so the legislative year 
of 1910-11 was only 2.2 per cent better than 
1912-1.3. So it is possible that we lay a little 
too much stress on the value of the legisla- 



ture. 

Now, the unanswered question as to the 
lunch counter open twenty-four hours a day 
is as to whether it attracts adilitional busi- 
ness or not. That question is one tliat I can- 
not answer. I know of a great many specific 
instances where people have told me they 
have stopped at the Lincoln Hotel simply 
because they could get something to eat when 
they got in late. We have a great many 
trains getting into Lincoln anywhere from 
eleven to one o'clock, and very often men 
will come in from some more remote ))ranch 



212 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



line town, and possibly do not get their sup- 
per before they leave, and it is pretty nice 
to drop into the hotel when they get to Lin- 
coln and to be able to get something before 
they go to bed, rather than to stop in some 
of the little all night joints that you find 
around the depots. And that also, I think, 
has an influence on them when they have to 
get up and catch an early morning train. 
They can telephone down to the night clerk 
and specify what they want for breakfast, 
and give themselves the -minimum amount of 
time to catch their train, and when they get 
down to the lunch room they find what they 
•have ordered is on the lunch counter, or the 
table, as they request; and they start out 
with a full stomach. As a rule, a man on an 
empty stomach, you know, has a grouch. 
Most of our grouches, and most of our kicks, 
according to my observation, are early in 
the morning, before a man has had his cup 
of coffee and his toast. Starting a man out 
on a full stomach does not benefit us partic- 
ularly, but it perhaps benefits our neighbors 
that the man comes in contact with a little 
later on in the day, so that we may perhaps 
pride ourselves on being public benefactors. 

While this gratifying increase in room 
earnings may be attributed to the lunch coun- 
ter, we are confronted with a decrease in our 
regular cafe business for 1912 and '13 of 14.2 
per cent under 1910 and '11. That is in our 
cafe upstairs. It showed a decrease (which 
undoubtedly was taken by the lunch room) 
of 14.2 per cent. 1911-12 showed a decrease 
of 9.8 per cent. That decrease is not nearly 
as large as I thought it was going to be. Yet 
where Wi, combined the lunch counter and 
the cafe business it shows, as a whole, an 
increase of 59 per cent in 1912-13 over 1910- 
11, and 67.8 per cent over 1911 and 1912. 

Now, when you increase the output of your 
kitchen a total of 67.8 per cent without in- 
creasing the kitchen expense, it means an 
increase in your profits. In our case the 
kitchen expense was increased by only two 
people, one dummy man to look after the 
electric dummy, and another dishwasher. That 
is all that we have had to increase our up- 
stairs pay-roll, and I doubt very much if we 
could have decreased our upstairs pay-roll, 
or the kitchen pay-roll any more, even had 
the loss in the regular cafe business been no 
greater than that cited, an average of 13 or 
14 per cent. So there seems to be a decided 
advantage in increasing the volume of our 
business. 



That is what all of our big stores are after, 
to increase the volume of their business. 
We know that they cannot make much out of 
50 per cent on five hundred dollars' worth 
of business, but we know that they can make 
a whole lot of money out of 3 per cent on a 
million dollars' worth of business. And for 
that reason we all recognize that we must in- 
crease the volume of our business. 

Now, in the final analysis of dollars and 
cents, it shows an increased net profit of 
$3,040.37 for 1912 and '13 over 1910 and 1911; 
and it shows an increased net profit — that 
is for the whole feeding part of the business 
—of $2,741.18 over 1911 and 1912. This, in 
our case, indicates a clear increase in net 
profits of between five and six thousand dol- 
lars per year, which is attributable to the 
lunch counter proposition. Now, that is a 
pretty nice profit on an investment of $11,- 
000 — a profit of nearly 50 per cent. If we 
can in two years wipe out our investment of 
$11,000, why, from then on, we can figure a 
pretty nice net profit on that investment; 
and that says nothing whatever as to the 
probability that the lunch counter has at- 
tracted additional room business; and addi- 
tional room business over and above a cer- 
tain sum, of course, is all net profit, prac- 
tically so, because your overhead expenses, 
your rent, and your heat, and your light and 
your other items go on, whether you have 
one vacant room or a hundred vacant rooms 
— it is up and down so you cannot adjust 
your pay-roll to the changes in your volume 
of business. And I think that applies to 
almost any line of business, whether it is 
the hotel business, or mercantile, or railroad, 
or public service, or any other kind of busi- 
ness. 

I anticipate a better percentage of profit on 
the lunch counter in the future on account of 
the increased prices which we have made, the 
gradual increase that I referred to. This in- 
crease, as I said before, has been making no ap- 
preciable difference in the volume of business. 
Our cafe business has never been good in com- 
parison with our room earnings. Now, I say 
that simply from the knowledge of the Lincoln 
Hotel; I don't know what percentages other 
hotel men have. I never had the nerve to ask 
them what percentage their cafe bore to the 
room earnings ; but I will say this— that for the 
year 1911 (I am taking the entire year now) 
our cafe earnings were 46.2 per cent of our room 
earnings. In 1912 our cafe earnings, that is, 
the gross earnings all the way through, were 



THE PEACTICAL 

46.3 per cent of our room earnings. You see, a 
considerable less than one-half of our room earn- 
ings was taken in on our dining-room. (In the 
old American plan hotel, I know a great many 
people used to divide their receipts, and credit 
three- fourths of the gross receipts to the kitchen 
and one-fouith to the house. So this would look 
rather deplorable in a comparison of that kind.) 
They were both 46 per cent practically, while 
during the sis months of the lunch counter 
period our cafe earnings and lunch counter earn- 
ings combined have been 102.6 per cent of our 
room earnings. That is a pretty nice increase, 
from less than 50 per cent to go up to 102 per 
cent. It means a god big increase in the volume 
of business, and at the same time we have in- 
creased the volume of our room earnings by 
between 8 and 14 per cent, compared with those 
two years. 

I cannot believe that this is all attributable 
to the lunch counter, because competition in Lin- 
coln has never been as strong as it is now. We 
have never had anybody but the Lindell Hotel, 
which is recognized as our competitor, with all 
due respect to the others. None of our other 
competitors give us quite as strong a run for 
the other fellow's money as Mr. Jeiinslon does. 
Ilis house is in better condition than it ever 
was, and our house is in better condition than 
it ever was. Mr. Braut, who luns the V.ctoria, 
has a hotel that has been recently revamped 
from top to bottom and thoroughly mouernized. 
He has ninety rooms. His house is not pre- 
tentious to be anything but a second-class house, 
according to our classification in Lincoln. It is 
as good a first-class second-class house as you 
will find anywhere. Mr. Lindsay, of the Savoy, 
has a hotel that has about eighty rooms, and, 1 
might- say, without any disrespect to 3Ir. Lind- 
say, that he is in the same class; he has a first- 
class second-class hotel. Mr. Lindsay's cafe 
business for some reason, unbeknown to me, ex- 
cept superior management and better fellowship, 
has been much better comparatively than ours. 
He dees a much better straight cafe business 
in comparison with his house business than we 
do. Of course I wUl have to take into considera- 
tion, to sort of flatter myself a little, that his 
location is much better. He is where he is in 
closer touch with business men, and on the 
ground floor practically. 

But the competition that we now have is 
keener and stronger, and I hope our increase 
is due to the increase in the popularity of the 
city of Lincoln rather than to the fact that we 
are taking away from some of our competitors, 
because wc wish them all the same degree of 



HOTEL STEWARD 



213 



success that we are getting, and I think they 
are all getting their share. 

I don't think there is anything else that I 
care to say along those lines, except that I 
would be glad to answer any questions that may 
be put to me. 

Mr. Borne Miller (Omaha): "Mr. Eic-hards, 
I vrould lilro to ask you hov yo\i propose to use 
?. cheeking sj'stem with cliccliers for your cus- 
tomers, to your cashier? How do you expect to 
use a checking system with a distribution of 
materials from one end of the lunch counter to 
the other, and expect to get efiicient and proper 
service?" 

Mr. Richards: "I will give you an idea of 
the layout of our lunch room as best I can by 
a description of the room. The main entrance 
corresponds to the entrance to this room. Our 
lunch counter is along this side (indicating) ; 
our grill corresponds with the location of the 
platform; our tables are on this side (indicat- 
ing) ; we have sixteen four-chair tables and 
twenty-seven seats at the lunch counter — ninety- 
one seats all told. I had located the checkers 
about here (indicating), directly in front of the 
carving table and the grill, where the big vol- 
ume of business naturally comes from, outside 
of the pastry and the coffee which is served 
back of the lunch counter. The checker sits 
there and can naturally scrutinize everything 
that goes by just as readily as they would in 
any kitchen or dining-room. The only problem 
which Mr. Miller has raised in his question is 
the checking of the lunch counter proper. We 
have to simply issue strict instructions that all 
the girls behind the lunch counter must check 
their things. They have got to go to this end 
of the room, to the steam table, and the grill, 
to get the major part of their order, and then 
it is up to the head waitress and those in charge 
of the room to see they obey instructions, and do 
not try to go by the checkers. Of course there 
is a possibility that they might do that, but the 
possible loss there is nothing compared with the 
inaccuracy that most of the waitresses show in 
checking. They are not mathematicians; they 
are not lightning calculators. We all know 
that, and it is easier to say thirty cents when 
the customer gets a cup of coffee and a piece of 
roast beef and a vegetable and a piece of pie — 
it is easier to say thirty cents than it is to stop 
and figure. As I say, they are not lightning cal- 
culators, and they all know that if they get it 
low enough there will be no kick, and if they 
get it too high it will be called to their atten- 
tion. Of course in all things we have got to take 



214 THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 

Soups 

Obnsomme in cup 10 Mock Turtle - 16 

Chicken with Rice _ 15 Mulligatawney 15 

Tomato Puree 15 Vegetable - -15 

Soils or Bread and Butter served with aboro 

Relishes 

Sliced Tomatoes 15 Dill Pickles 5 

Sliced Cucumbers 15 Sweet Midgets 5 

Celery 15 Sour Midgets 5 

Pickled Walnuts 15 Pickled Onions 10 

Olives 10 Chow Chow 5 

Picalilli 6 Sliced Onions 5 



Dairg Dishes 



Plain 

Rice 5 

Soda Crackers 5 

Oyster Crackers 5 

Graham Crackers 5 

Bread 5 

Oat Meal 5 

Shredded Wheat (1) 5 

Flaked Cereals 5 

Grape Nuts 5 



With 




With 


With 


Bowl 


With 


Bowl 


Bowl 


Milk 


Cream 


Half & Half 


Cream 


10 


15 


15 


20 


10 




15 


20 


10 




15 


20 


10 




15 


20 


10 




15 


20 


10 


15 


15 


20 


10 


15 


15 


20 


10 


15 


15 


20 


10 


15 


15 


20 



Sandwiches 



Ham, boiled 10 Club House 25 

Ham or Bacon fried 10 Salmon 10 

Ham or Bacon fried with fried egg 15 Sardine, Domestic 10 

Hamburger 10 Sardine, Imported _ 20 

Corned Beef 10 Caviar 30 

Fried Egg 10 Swiss Cheese 10 

Roast Beef 15 American Cheese 10 

Chicken, sliced 15 Hot Roast Beef '20 



Eggs 



Boiled, Fried, Scrambled, Poached or Shirred two 15, three SO 

Poached on Toast _ two 20, three 25 

Scrambled, with Chipped Beef, Hain or Bacon _.._ two 25, three 30 

Omelette, plain _ two 15, three 20 

Omelette, with Ham, Bacon, Parsley or Onion two 20, three 25 

Omelette, with Cheese or Jelly two 20, three 25 

Omelette, with Chicken two 30, three 35 

Rolls or Bread and Butter served with above 

Hot Cakes, Bread and Rolls 

Griddle Cakes with Syrup 10 Dry Toast 5 

English Muffin with Syrup 10 Buttered Toast 10 

ture Cream Toast 20 Milk Toast 10 

Creamed Toast 10 Bread and Butter 5 

French Toast 20 Rolls and Butter 6 



PLEASE PAY CASHIER ONLY 

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY PERSONAL PROPERTY 
ONE ORDER SERVED FOR TWO, TEN CENTS EXTRA 

NO ORDERS SERVED AT TABLE LESS THAN TEN CENTS 

REPORT ANY CAUSE FOR COMPLAINT TO HOTEL OFFICE 



LUNCH ROOM BILL OF FARE, THE LINCOLN, LINCOLN, NEB. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 215 

Ogsters in Season 

Half Doz. Raw 20 Half Doz. Plain Broil 26 

Half Doz. Half Shell 25 Half Doz. Crumb Broil ._ 26 

Half Doz. Milk Stew 25 Half Doz. Crumb Broil, Bacon or 

Half Doz. Cream Stew 30 Celery Sauce 35 

Half Doz. Box Stew 25 Half Doz. Roast 25 

Half Doz. Dry Stew 25 Half Doz. Roast on Toast 30 

Half Doz. Fry 25 Half Doz. Escalloped 30 

Half Doz. Fry with Bacon 36 Half Doz. Au Gratin „ 30 

Crackers, Rolls or Bread and Butter served with above 
Side order of Cold Slaw with above, 5 



Vegetables 



Hot Rice with Butter 10 Potatoes, German Fry 6 

Stewed Com 5 Potatoes, French Fry 10 

Stewed Tomatoes 6 Potatoes, Hashed Brown 10 

E. J. Peas 5 Potatoes, Lyonaise 10 

Onions, Fried 5 Potatoes, in Cream 10 

Onions, sliced raw. 5 Potatoes, Saratoga 10 

Potatoes, a la Lincoln 20 Potatoes, Au Gratin 15 

Pastry and Desssrt 

Pie 5 Stewed Prunes, 5jwith Cream 10 

Pie a la Mode 10 Apple Sauce, 5jwith Cream 10 

Pie, with Cheese 10 Baked Apple, 5;with Cream 10 

Doughnuts,-^nbree 5 Com Starch, Vanilla, 5; Cream 10 

Cup Custard 10 Com Starch, Chocolate 5; Cream....lO 

Ice Cream 10 Rice Pudding, 6; with Cream 10 

French Pastry 5 and 10 

Baked Apple.. in bowl of Milk 10; in bowl of Ore&m 20 

Fruit— Fresh and Preserved 

&aw Apples, each 5 Grape Fruit, half 16 

branges, each 10 Orange, sliced 10 

Bananas, each 6 Preserved Peaches 6 

Banana and Cream 10 Preserved Strawberries 6 

(Reese 

Imported Swiss 10 Roquefort ;..15 

American 5 Neufchatel ^-.. 6 

Philadelphia Cream 5 Brick 6 

Wafers or Water Crackers extra, 6 

Drinks 

Coffee, cup 5, pot 10 Half and Half, bottle 10 

Tea, cup 5, - pot 10 Cream, bottle 15 

Postum 6 Ice Tea 6 

Cocoa 10 Ice Coffee 5 

Chocolate 10 Buttermilk, in season 6 

Milk, bottle 5 Lactone, in season 5 

Milk, Hot 10 Lemonade 10 

For Hot and Cold Meats and Salads, over 



PLEASE PAY CASHIER ONLY 

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY PERSONAL PROPERTY 
ONE ORDER SERVED FOR TWO. TEN CENTS EXTRA 

NO ORDERS SERVED AT TABLE LESS THAN TEN CENTS 

REPORT ANY CAUSE FOR COMPLAINT TO HOTEL OFFICE 



LTTNCH BOOM BILL OF FARE. THE LINCOLN, LINCOLN, NEB. 



216 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

HotJIfteats 

Baked Pork and Beans 15 Ham and two Fried Eggs. 25 

Corned Beef Hash, steamed 15 Bacon and two Fried Eggs 25 

Corned Beef Hash, steamed, with Hamburger Steak .20 

one Poached Egg . . . .20 Hamburger Steak with Onions. 25 

SmaU Steak 25 



Corned Beef Hash, browned in^ 
pan 15 



SmaU Steak with Onions 30 

Sirloin Steak 45 



Corned Beef Hash, browned in pan ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ 0^^,^ ^ 

with one Fried Egg 20 Tenderloin Steak 45 

Corned Beef Hash, browned in pan Tenderloin Steak with Onions 50 

with two Poached Eggs 25 Creamed Chipped Beef. 15 

Calves Liver and Bacon 25 Pork Chops, plain (2) .25 

Calves Liver and Onions .20 Pork Chops, breaded (2) .30 

Ham, Fried or broiled 25 Imported Frankfurter with Potato 

Bacon, fried or broiled. 25 Salad .35 

Fried Sausage 20, with Buckwheat Cakes, 26 

Bolls or Bread and Butter served with above 
German Fried Potatoes served with items of 20c or over 
Side order of Baked Beans served with any of above, 10 

Cold JfCeats, Stc. 

Cold Boiled Ham _ 20; with Potato Salad 25 

Cold Corned Beef _ 20; with Potato Salad 25 

Cold Roast Beef 25; with Potato Salad 30 

Cold Chicken 30; with Potato Salad 35 

Cold Roast Pork 20; with Potato Salad 25 

Cold Pork & Beans, individual 16 

Sardines, per can, Domestic _ 20 

Sardines, j)er can, Imported. „ 35 

Bolls or Bread and Butter served with above 



Salads 



Egg .20 Tomato .20 

Salmon 25 Lettuce .20 

Chicken 30 Cucumber 20 

Rolls or Bread and Butter served with above 
Potato Salad, 10 Pickled Beets, 10 Cold Slaw, 10 

Drinks 

Coffee, cup 5, .pot 10 Half and Half, bottle. 10 

Tea, cup 5, pot 10 Cream, bottle _ 15 

Postum 6 Ice Tea 5 

Cocoa 10 Ice Coffee 5 

Chocolate 10 Buttermilk, in season _ 6 

Milk, bottle 5 Lactone, in season 6 

Milk, Hot _ 10 Lemonade 10 



PLEASE PAY CASHIER 0^a.Y 

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY PERSONAL PROPERTY 
ONE ORDER SERVED FOR TWO. TEN CENTS EXTRA 

NO ORDERS SERVED AT TABLE LESS THAN TEN CENTS 

REPORT ANY CAUSE FOR COMPLAINT TO HOTEL OFHCE 



LUNCH ROOM BILL OF FARE, THE LINCOLN, LINCOLN, NEB. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 217 

Ready to Serve 

Aug. 8-1913 
Sliced Cucumber ---------...._.. .^q 

Coney Island Clam Chowder- ---------^ 10 

Consomme Oelestine- -----------.. .10 

Boiled New England Codfish Dinner- -----. 25 

Stuffed Tomatoes, Andaluvian- --------- 20 

Boiled Pork Spareribs with Sauerkraut- - - - - -25 

Lamb's Tongue with Spinach- ----------25 

Old J'ashion Stewed Chicken with Dumplings- - - 35 
Breaded Veal Cutlets, Sauce Tomato- ----- - 20 

Boiled Salmon Steak, Anchovy Sauce ------ 25 

Individual Baked Beans- ----------.-15 

Prime Ribs of Beef, Pan Gravy- ---- ---_25 

Loin of Pork, Apple Sauce- ---------- 25 

Corn on Cob ------------------ 15 

String Beans 5; Boiled Onions in Cream ----- 5 

Iced Watermelon - - -- - - - - ---------15 

Iced Cantaloup,-^ 15; whole ---------- 25 

Sliced Peaches with Cream -----------15 

Red Raspberries with Cream- ----------15 

Loganberries with Cream -----------.15 

Apple, Apricot, Pumpkin, or Cocoanut Custard Pie- 5 
Banana Cream Pudding 5; Plum Tarts -------5 

Ice Cream -------------------10 

LUNCH BOOM BILL OF PAEE, THE LINCOLN, LINCOLN, NEB. 



218 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



into consideration the human element of ac- 
curacy, and good intentions and bad intentions. 
But I really believe that we will get very de- 
cided results. 

' ' Our business since we opened that room, 
with ninety-one seats, has averaged over a hun- 
dred and fifty dollars a day in that little room. 
Our location is not good at all, and if we did not 
have an attractive lunch room, if we had not 
fitted it up as nicely as we have, if we had fitted 
it up the same as a lot of the smaller lunch 
rooms around in our neighborhood, which were 
practically living off of the patrons of the hotel, 
of course we could not have made the success 
that we have. It is just like building a new 
store building or a new hotel in a community. 
The people all like to go and see it, and if it 
proves satisfactory they come around again, and 
if it does not prove satisfactory they go back 
to their old haunts. We do it, and the public 
naturally does it. I am a firm believer in in- 
stallations of a permanent character, installa- 
tions of a character that require a minimum 
amount of upkeep, because the upkeep, the keep- 
ing fresh and clean and bright of a lunch room 
is no inconsiderable item, and the minute it 
begins to look dingy and worn and old, why the 
people are inclined to lose their liking for it. 
I cannot help but figure that it is a good in- 
vestment if you have got the money, and if you 
haven't got the money it is a good investment 
to borrow it if the business is there. 

' ' I believe that even the small country hotel 
could afford, and should put in the European 
plan with a little combination lunch-room and 
dining-room. I noticed in St. Paul the other 
night while waiting for a train * * * there 
is a little lunch counter on a corner near the 
depot and we stood there looking in the window. 
There were probably ten people at the little 
lunch counter, and there was one man back of 
the counter, in the window right at the end of 
the counter. He had a cake griddle, a couple 
of hot plates for gas, and he was taking care 
of all that business himself. He was frying 
hamburger steak, and making sandwiches, and 
coffee, and dishing up pie, and one man was 
doing the work that three people would have 
to do in a regular cafe, where they have to 
leave the room and consult, and the cook will be 
doing one thing and the dishwasher will be 
doing something else. But this one man was 
doing it all and doing it well. . He was a hustler. 

' ' I think that every small hotel, by putting 
on a limited bill of fare and by letting every 
man pay for all that he got, and by the hotel 
man condensing his operating department, that 



it would show a great deal better results than 
many of them now show. It would show better 
results than are shown now in trying to give 
them all they can eat for thirty-five or fifty 
cents, as the case may be. It is not an expensive 
experiment to try, and I should think that 
almost every man would be willing to take his 
gamble on it and make a try of it, because we 
have all got to come to some more economical 
manner of feeding people. We have got to have 
greater economy in handling our food, because 
we are handling gold dollars now instead of gold 
bricks that we handled ten or fifteen years ago. 
We have got to handle our food products very 
much like they handle the cash in the cash 
drawer of a mercantile establishment or a bank. 
We have got to know what goes in, and we 
ought to know what goes out, and we ought to 
strike a balance. 

Mr. Bacon (Grand Forks): "About what is 
your average check?" 

Mr. Richards: "We divide up our day into 
fifteen-minute periods, and time-stamp on the 
back every check as it comes in. That is with 
the idea of cheeking out and seeing whether 
all the people that come in there pay their 
checks. I have taken averages for those fifteen- 
minute periods, but that, of course, will be too 
much detail here. I have taken averages also 
beginning at 6 a', m. in the morning until 12 
noon, which covers your breakfasts. Our aver- 
age is about 28 cents for the breakfasts. From 
12 noon to 6 p. m. it averages about 30 cents; 
from 6 p. m. to midnight, which includes supper, 
is 32 cents, and from midnight to 6 in the morn- 
ing is 18 cents. ' ' 

Mr. Bacon : "Is there no linen whatever? ' ' 
Mr. Eichards: "No linen, no tablecloths, and 
no napkins." 

Mr. Bacon: "Do you furnish waiters?" 
Mr. Eiehards: "Waitresses; it is not a self- 
serving place at all. The best day that we have 
had is $260.00. We haven't had many days as 
large as that, but expect them during state fair 
week. ' ' 

Mr. Bacon : ' ' How many girls on an average 
do you use?" 

Mr. Eiehards: "Covering the twenty-four 
hours, we have been using twelve waiters and 
waitresses. Of course at night we have to use 
waiters — ten waitresses during the day and two 
waiters at night. We could cut it a little bit 
closer, but we have tried to give them quick and 
prompt service, and we figure that that was 
more desirable than the small saving in the pay- 
roll. ' ' 

Mr._ Bacon: "You say that you don't add 
anything to your expense; how do you figure 
that out? Did you run your cafe all night?" 

Mr. Eiehards: "No; our cafe only runs until 
eight o'clock." 

Mr. Bacon: "And previous to your going 
into the lunch counter, did vou run it iust the 
same?" 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



219 



Mr. Eichards: "Yes." 



Mr. Bacon : ' ' How do you get away from the 
expense from eight o'clock until morning?" 

Mr. Eichards: "I am referring to the extra 
expense in the kitchen. We have our icebox in 
the hinch room and it is stocked up before 
the kitchen closed with all necessary items for 
short order work during the night. We have 
right now during the night a night cook and 
a night waiter, and the night cook will act 
as a waiter when the rush gets a little bit 
too strong, so there is only those two men 
that are part of our lunch room expense 
proper. The increase in the kitchen expense 
is in the two people that I spoke of before, 
the man to look after the dumb waiter and 
one dishwasher." 

Mr. Bacon: "What portion of the cooking 
do you do in the lunch room?" 

Mr. Eichards: "The meats are all cut and 
sent to the lunch room ; all the dinner soups, 
the roasts, the fish and the entrees are cooked in 
the kitchen. It simply added to the work of 
the kitchen that much additional work without 
any increase whatever in the pay-roll, and before 
we put that on I couldn't see any possibility of 
a decrease in the pay-roll. Our business is rather 
erratic ; Lincoln is a university town and a state 
capital town. Today we may be very quiet, and 
tomorrow we may have a houseful of people. We 
get a great many so-called banquets, running 
from sixty cents to sixty-two and a half cents 
(laughter), but the people want the service just 
the same. ' ' 

Mr. Bacon: "What part of the cooking do 
you do in the lunch room ? ' ' 

Mr. Eichards : "I have a partition across the 
end of the room, we will say that corresponds 
with this (indicating). The steam table is set 
in the center of it, and the entrance on this 
side, to go in behind there. Our dishwashing 
and things that we don't want the people to see 
is behind the partitions and where they can have 
access to the dumb waiter, which is in a court off 
here (indicating). We have a gas broiler, a 
three-hole hot plate for frying eggs and pota- 
toes; we have an electric cake griddle; two 
electric broilers; one electric French fryer; an 
electric toaster, and an electric waffle iron. With 
the exception of the waffle iron, the electric 
fixtures have all been absolutely satisfactory. 
The waffle iron has not been satisfactory. The 
manufacturers claim that they have never been 
able to make one that is satisfactory on account 
of the action of the grease in turning over the 
waffle iron. In turning the waffle iron over the 
grease will get into one side of it. This they 
do not seem to be able to seal up tight enough 
to prevent the entrance of the grease, on account 
of the expansion and contraction that naturally 
takes place. One side is a solid 'casting, and the 
other side has resistance coils for 'heating, and 
they do not seem to be able'to seal that up tight 
enough. 

A Member: "You stated you did not use 
any linen in the lunch room?" 

Mr. Eichards: "Nothing at all; paper nap- 
kins. The first week, I will venture to say, 
ninety per cent of the people kicked, and it 



gradually decreased until I have not for two 
or three months heard the word napkins men- 
tioned, nor the word tablecloth, or saucers to 
the cups. We have what is called a ship cup; 
it is not like these shaving mugs that are some- 
times more suggestive of lather rather than 
whipped cream." 

Mr. Bacon : ' ' What type of people do you get 
into your lunch room, the class that usually 
stays at a first-class hotel?" 

Mr. Eichards : ' ' We get the very best people 
that stay in the hotel; a great many of them 
have breakfast there in a hurry; they don't 
vrant very much breakfast and they drop in 
there. At noontime or in the evening the better 
class of our patrons will go to the main cafe." 

Mr. Bacon: "How does the price for that 
breakfast compare with the one that they would 
get in the main cafe?" 

Mr. Eichards: "The comparison is practi- 
cally the same. If they did go up in the main 
cafe they would squeeze it down just as much 
as they could." 

Mr. Bacon: "For instance, a man goes in 
to the lunch counter and gets coffee and cakes, 
or toast?" 

Mr. Eichards : ' ' He eats more in the lunch 
room than he does upstairs." 

Mr. Bacon: "How much more does it cost 
upstairs ? ' ' 

Mr. Eichards: "It doesn't cost much more, 
probably forty or forty-five cents is the average 
up there. He doesn 't get as much for it. 
Our prices are not high, they are very reason- 
able." 

Mr. Bacon: "Do you have any minimum 
price for service?" 

Mr. Eichards: "None whatever; the only 
minimum we have is when a fellow goes out 
without paying his check. ' ' 

A Member: "What do you charge for 
coffee?" 

Mr. Eichards: "Five cents; and five cents 
for pie, six cuts to the pie. We get thirty 
cents out of a pie." 

A Member : "Of what are the tops of your 
tables composed?" 

Mr. Eichards: "Our table tops are white 
glass. ' ' 

A Member: "Are they liable to break a 
dish?" 

Mr. Eichards : " We have never had the glass 
broken. If you drop a dish, of course you will 
break it, but we have not had one of our tops 
broken. We have had some shelves under- 
neath, about six feet long that were broken. 
In all probability somebody wanted to reach the 
top shelf and climbed up on one of the lower 
shelves; and if you put a hundred and fifty or 
hundred and sixty pound person on glass, you 
are going to break it. ' ' 

A Member: "How long is the lunch 
counter?" 

Mr. Eichards: "The lunch counter is about 
fifty-four feet long. It is in two sections. 
We divided the lunch counter in the center, and 
located the coffee urn directly back of this 



220 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



opening'. That "was fu ne \vouliln 't have to go 
clear around the end of it to ,t,et roli'ee to 
serve to the people. ' ' 

A ^rpniliev: "Yon do your cooking in view 
of the people?" 

ilr, ]\i*-iiards: ' ' ^^'e do our cooking in view 
of the people. ' ' 

A Jileniber: "Where is the checker?" 

Jlr. Eicliards: "The cliecker is near the 
greatest source of sn[)ply; that is, the grill end 
of it, the steam table and the broiler. Practi- 
cally all of the people wdio sit at the lunch 
counter have to be served from the steam table 
and broiler. The arrangement of your room 
dciiencis (iitirely upon the shape of your room. 



if you ha\(' got a wide enough room, I would 
say by all means get it as near the center as 
you can. ' ' 

A Jlcmljer: "Do you have a pi'inted IjiU of 
fare ! ' ' 

i\lr. Pichards: "We have a special Ijill for 
dinner and supjier. ' ' 

A ilemlier: "Do you have anything on the 
American plan?" 

Mr. Eirhards: "We have absolutely noth- 
ing on the American jdan. There was some 
tliought of giving a plate dinner, but I wouldn't 
stand for tiiat. I believe in letting them pay 
for every item that they get. ' ' 




BARTON SILVERWARE, FOR THE ADOLPHUS, DALLAS. 




REED & BARTON SILVERWARE, FOR THE ADOLPHUS, DALLAS. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



221 



Chefs Portion Sheet, McAlpin Hotel. 

Chef Panchard explained his method of kit- 
chen control to prevent loss or waste of ex- 
pensive foods. He has devised a desk upon 
which are wire posts for holding pads of 
coupon checlss. These cheeks measure 2i^ by 
5 inches, including coupon. The check de- 
tached from coupon measures ZYo by 3 inches. 
The coupon is perforated to set on the wire 
posts. The check is perforated to set on to 
other posts for future assorting. Each check 
is printed on both check and stub with the 
name of an article on the bill of fare as 
(see illustration) "Sirloin steak," and the 
waiter number duplicated on stub and check 
These correspond to one item on the bill of 
fare, which is listed on a sheet measuring 8 
by 11 inches, and is printed (see illustration 
of portion sheet). The checks are arranged 



on the desk in the order as listed on the por- 
tion sheet, and as a waiter calls for an article, 
he is given a check from the post carrying it, 
the checker writing waiter's number on both 
check and stub. The waiter then takes this 
check to the kitchen where his order is filled. 
In this way the house controls the waiters' aud 
cooks' work, as the check is time-stamped, and 
surrendered when order is filled. The check 
audit is compared with inventory. Thus, in 
the morning, the ice box count is so much of 
each item. During the day the issues are so 
much, and the number of issues must compare 
with the number sold, as evidenced by the 
checks, plus the stock remaining unsold. "It 
has served as a first-class detective," said the 
chef, "for in the only two instances where we 
have missed articles we have caught the culprit 
within twenty-four hours. ' ' 



HOTEL McALPIN Main Kitchen 


ITEM 


LUNCH 


DINNER 


SUPPER 


TOTAL 


Steak Minute 
Small Steak 


















Sirloin Steak 










Extra Sirloin Steak 
Porter House 


















Extra Porter House 








1 






Club Steak 

Tournedos 

Small Tenderloin 

Large Tenderloin 

Chateaubriand 

Lamb Chops 

Mutton Chops 

English Chops 

Veal Chops 

Pork Chops 

Mixed Grill 

Combination of Chops 

Escalope of Veal 

Broilers 

Milk-fed Chicken 

Breast of Chicken 

Squab Chicken 

Squab 

Duckling 

Spring Turkey 

Guinea Hen 

Breast of Guinea Hen 

Partridge 

Pheasant 

Grouse 

Quail 

Plover 

Venison Steak 


o o 

SIRLOIN STEAK 

Waiter No. 




O 

SIRLOIN STEAK 

Waiter No. 


Mallard Duck 
Lob'^ter 













chefs' portion SHiEX; ALSO A COUPON CHECK FOR WAITER. iUPPER PART OF PORTION SHEET SHOWING 
STYLE OF RULING, THE BALANCE SHOWING WHAT IS LISTED.) 



DINING CAR SERVICE 



The Standard of Portions, Prices and Table Service Adopted by W. A. Cooper on the 

Canadian Pacific Railway. 



The Following Instructions Printed in Booklet For Guidance of the Dining Car Employes, with the 
Object of Giving a Uniform Service Thruout the System. 

Printed by permission of Mr. W. A. Cooper 



CANADIAN PACIFIC RAIL"WAY 



DINING CAR SERVICE 



STANDARD OF PORTIONS. PRICES 
AND TABLE SERVICE 

Montreal. August Igt, 1913. 



Each Steward, Walter, Chef and Second Cook 
is required to have a copy of this boolilet and 
to familiarize himself with instructions con- 
tained herein. Each Steward is required to 
have a copy of Book of Instructions for Em- 
ployees on Dining and Cafe Cars. Stewards 
are responsible for seeing that members of 
their crew live up to instructions. 

Slvieion of Duties of Waiters and Fantry- 
men: Tlie following general division will be 
found to work to the best interest of the serv- 
ice: — 

Waiter No. 1. — To look after buffet stands, 
fruit, and silver. 

Waiter No. 2. — To be responsible for condi- 
tion, count, and general handling of linen, and 
maintaining of records in connection therewith. 

Waiter No. 3. — Water bottles, sugars, salts, 
pepper, oil, vinegar, etc. 

Waiter No. 4. — Clean and rub down wood 
worlt, remove finger marks from chairs, panels, 
etc., and such other duties as Steward may as- 
sign. 

Waiter No. 5. — To perform such duties as 
may be assigned by Steward. 

Pantryman to be responsible for genei-al con- 
dition of pantry, and care and handling of pan- 
try supplies, wash crockery, glassware and 
silver, and perform such other duties as may 
be assigned by Steward. 

All Waiters and Pantryman will assist in 
cleaning of silver. 

Stewards, by observing division of duties 
above outlined will maintain uniformity in 
service on all cars. 

FANTRT SERVICE. 

Before meals, cover the shelves in pantry 
with glass towels and place thereon all glass- 
ware and crockery necessary for service. All 
silver dishes to be given to Idtchen in time 
to be placed in heater. 

Batter: Butter is to be cut with cutter in 
cubes, 28 to a pound, and kept in porcelain bowl 
with cracked ice. When placing butter on 
saucer, use a fork. 

GarnisMngr: Have a bowl with cleaned pars- 
ley or water cress on ice and a plate with 
quartered lemons ready to garnish dishes ac- 
cording to instructions. 



Presh Fruit: Special attention is to be paid 
to fresh fruit and proper care will save con- 
siderable waste and unnecessary work. Fresh 
fruit, especially berries, should be selected 
every morning by going over the entire stock 
and picking out the ripest. Fruits that have 
become too soft to be served at table must 
be turned over to the chef to be cooked imme- 
diately. This material can be used to great 
advantage for making pies, short cakes, fruit 
sauces for puddings, etc., and is far superior 
to all extracts, flavorings and colorings. 

Salads: The salad locker must be well filled 
with ice and all heads of lettuce, celery, etc., 
placed on rack above the ice. Smaller articles, 
such as bunches of parsley, radishes, mint, 
etc., must be wrapped up in clean, dry cloths. 
Salads, etc., to be washed in bowl provided for 
the purpose. Alv/ays have some cracked ice 
in the water. This will immediately revive 
any leaves that may be soft. Never use the 
running faucet, sink or wash basin for wash- 
ing salad. 

Ice Cream: Ice Cream container must be 
well packed with crushed ice and rock salt 
alternately and care taken that the brine is 
not drained off except when re-packing the con- 
tainer, which should be done as often as nec- 
essary, especially at night and .early in the 
morning. To absorb any moisture inside the 
container place a cloth on the bottom. To 
prevent salt and water from entering con- 
tainer place a cloth between the rack and the 
cover of the container. 

Cleaning- Bottles: Water bottles to be cleaned 
with rock salt, vinegar and water at least twice 
a week. Vinegar bottles to be cleaned like- 
wise. Vinegar from old bottles to be strained 
through glass cloth. 

Cleaning- Steel Knives: Steel knives to be 
cleaned with knife polish between carpet. Car- 
pet must be dry. A little moisture on blade 
will help greatly. Handles to be rubbed with 
silver polish, washed, dried and polished with 
chamois. 

To prevent steel knives from turning black or 
rusting, place Itnives immediately in a bucket 
containing a solution of soap, dissolved with 
boiling water and allowed to cool off. Soap will 
then form a soft jelly-like substance which 
can be used indefinitely. 

linen: In cars having linen locker next to 
pantry, tablecloths and napkins must not be 
allowed to enter the pantry at any time. 

Table cloths, table tops, napkins and doilies 
must be handled separately from the other linen 
and must be treated with utmost care. They 
must not be used for any cleaning or personal 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



223 



purposes. Table linen, including underoovers, 
must not be used to wrap clean silver or used 
as covers on shelves, etc. 

In the cars with linen locker at heater end 
the upper shelf in the linen locker is to be used 
for table linen exclusively. 

Put away all linen with the fold in front 
to facilitate counting and handling. 

No personal effects of any kind must come in 
contact with table linen. 

Doilies: Small doilies are used as stoppers 
in water bottles and 'beneath cheese, etc. Large 
doilies for buffet, toast, hot bread, fruit, etc. 

CleanlniT Cloths can be had in generous 
quantities from any linen room. 

Coat Buttons: Detachable buttons for wait- 
ers' and cooks' coats must not be left in soiled 
coats, but must be well taken care of. Un- 
reasonable shortages of buttons will be 
charged against the crew. 

Bedding-: Bedding or bed linen must not be 
marked with indelible pencil. 

Hand and Face Towels: Are for personal 
use exclusively, and must not be used on equip- 
ment of any kind or for cleaning purposes. 

All linen for personal use, clean or soiled, 
must be kept separate from other linen. 

Straining Bags. Etc.: Must be specially 
taken care of, washed separately and hung 
up to dry over night. Never put them away 
In a damp condition, which would quickly ren- 
der them useless. 

Pish Cloths: Must never be mixed with the 
other cloths. 

EirCHEN SEBVICB. 

To have uniform service on all of the Com- 
pany's lines it is necessary for every chef to 
strictly adhere to the following instructions 
relating to standard service. 

The instructions contained herein are gen- 
eral in their character and will, therefore, by 
no means restrict a chef or hamper him in 
displaying his abilities. 

It is most essential that every cook should 
liave the interests of the service at heart, 
and exert himself to the utmost to earn the 
reputation of doing only flrst-class work, 
with the exercise of reasonable economy. 

Careless and indifferent work will not be 
tolerated. Soups and sauces, especially, must 
be well made. They must have right consist- 
ency, be of good color and proper taste, and, 
in all cases, they must be well strained and 
contain no impurities, lumps, etc., etc. 

In managing his kitchen the chef must be 
methodical, systematic and cleanly. A great 
deal of time and effort can be saved by sys- 
tematic work and preparation. 

The hours of the forenoon should not be 
allowed to pass away without having all the 
routine work for the whole day advanced as 
much as circumstances will allow. The rest 
of the day will then be easy, and you will 
be prepared to meet any volume of business. 
A chef who does not employ such methods 
will fail at the first severe test. 

Chefs will be held responsible under the 
steward for the condition of supplies, clean- 
liness of kitchen, the quality of orders turned 
out of kitchen, and the condition of kitchen, 
Ice-boxes, refrigerators, lockers and equipment. 



Chefs are to report to Stewards when re- 
pairs are needed or new equipment required. 

Kitchen Utensils: Keep copper pots above 
the warmer ovens over the range. All other 
kitchen utensils, when not in use, are to be 
stored beneath the steam table. 

DINING BOOM SBBVICE. 

Before setting up, tables must be dusted, 
chairs wiped, and window sills and panels 
cleaned. Place clean undercovers on table, 
lay table cloths and napkins as herein de- 
scribed. 

Place sugar bowls in center of table close 
to window, crest visible; sugar tongs and 
spoon close to front of bowls, flat on table. 
Flower vase about three inches from sugar 
bowls towards the center of the table. Salt 
and pepper shakers closely together in cen- 
ter of large tables, towards window, on small 
tables. Large fork on left, close to napkin, 
dessert fork next. On the right, close to the 
napkin, in the order named: Large knife, des- 
sert spoon, small knife, tea spoon, all flat- 
ware to touch the bead on edge of the table. 
Bread plate on the left, water glass on the 
right, water bottle, with crest towards the 
aisle, about three inches from the edge of 
the table, water bottle doilies rolled up as 
stoppers. Set up remains unchanged for lunch- 
eon and dinner. For breakfast, provide one 
additional teaspoon. 

Menu between the sugar bowls and window 
sill folded and leaning against window. Tables 
must be set up in systematic manner. First 
waiter to see to flowers, etc., second waiter 
to lay all linen, third waiter to attend to sug- 
ars, salt, peppers, water, etc. The other 
waiters to distribute flatware, carrying tlie 
articles on salvers, distributing from table 
to table. All tables must be kept fully set 
up in this manner until all passengers have 
been served. No torn linen, broken crockery 
or glassware which is chipped and no soiled 
articles must be placed on tables. All mono- 
grammed equipment to be placed in readable 
position. 

Sauces, mustard, etc., must be kept ready 
for service. 

Sauces, ketchup, horseradish, mustard, etc., 
must be served with meat orders, etc. Do not 
wait for the guest to ask for same. Sauce 
bottles must be kept fllled and must be care- 
fully wiped in all cases before serving. 

The buffet is to be covered with a folded 
table cloth. All silver necessary for service 
during the meals is to be arranged nicely on 
the buffet, flower vase in the center, the 
salvers, covered with large doilies, and crumb 
knife and tray against the wall. Cash trays 
and finger bowls on either side. All varieties 
of flat tableware sorted and arranged around 
the center, ready for service. Tooth picks in 
finger bowl. No dirty dishes, glasses, etc., 
to be deposited on the buffet during the serv- 
ice. Avoid disarranging of silver on buffet. 

Napkins: Are to be placed on table flat, 
as folded, between flatware, and close to edge 
of the table, crested end towards passenger. 

Table Cloths: Place on table by holding 
cloth in the center, crease on the outside. Lay 
cloth with the inside of crease resting on the 



224 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



edpe of table, then cover table entirely. On 
small tables the cloth must be folded in suffi- 
ciently to fit the table. 

Cliang-ing- of Cloths: To change table cloths 
when guests are seated, move all equipments 
on the table as far as possible towards the 
outside edge. Have the fresh table cloth in 
readiness and hold it in the usual way in the 
center, and lay it down covering the ob- 
jects on the table. Then roll up the old table 
cloth as far as the articles on table will per- 
niit. Then spread the new cloth over the 
entire table, covering the old one, and remove 
all articles from underneath the cloth placing 
them immediately in the proper place on the 
new cloth. Then roll up the old cloth in such 
a way as to gather all the crumbs, making 
sure that there is no silver, etc., left in the 
old cloth, then smooth out the fresh one. 

Use of Silverware, Crockery and Glasses: 
Always serve all bowls, fruit saucers, medium 
or large bakers, casseroles, pudding cups, etc., 
with suitable dish beneath but without any 
linen or paper doilies. 

Soup bowl on dessert plate. 

Cereal bowl on dessert plate. 

Finger bov/1 on bread plate. 

Fruit saucer on bread plate. 

Sauce boat on fruit saucer. 

2 small bakers on 9-inch silver platter. 

2 medium bakers on 9-inch silver platter. 

1 large baker on 9-inch silver platter. 

1 small baker, no underlining. 

Pudding cup on bread plate. 

Coftee and tea pots on bread plate. 

Soda glass on bread plate. 

Liqueur glass on bread plate. 

All other glasses and bottles served upon 
salver and placed on the table without under- 
lining. 

Dessert fork and spoon, or spoon alone, 
must be provided as servers with each order 
requiring the same. Carvers with all orders 
of poultry, game, steaks, etc., etc. 

The bread plate is intended to be a side 
plate and an underliner. It must never be 
served as a plate with salads, toast, marmal- 
ade, desserts, or any other minor dishes. 

Large and medium platters only to be used 
for service. 

The finger bowl is to be served upon a bread 
plate after the meal and also during the meal 
in such cases as specified. Serve it empty 
directly in front of guest, fill one quarter full 
with water from the bottle at the table. After 
use take it away immediately. 

Cash Trays: Silver cash trays must, in all 
cases, be used for presenting checks, making 
collections and returning change to passen- 
gers. 

Check must be presented face down. Two 
antiseptic toothpicks to be served on cash 
tra^' v/ith change and passengers portion of 
check. 

Silver Crnml} Service: Must be used in 
gathering all the crumbs, etc., from table 
before serving the finger bowl, and also be- 
tween the courses, if necessary, without dis- 
turbing passenger at table. 

Waiter's Tray: Must be used always for 
service to passengers. The carrying of dishes. 



etc., to and from tables in the hands is not 
permitted. For all small objects, such as 
glasses, bottles, forks, knives, etc., etc., the 
salver should be used. 

The large tray must be carried on the fin- 
ger tips of the left hand. Care must be taken 
not to soil plates and glasses while they are 
being carried on the tray. 

Service Clotli: The use of towel or napkin 
as service cloth in Dining Room for wiping 
dishes, etc., has many objectionable features, 
and the use of such cloth in Dining Room is 
strictly prohibited. 

Dishes, etc., must be properly wiped in the 
pantry, and If after leaving the pantry wait- 
ers find anj^ article in need of wiping, such 
articles must be taken back to the pantry and 
there wiped or exchanged for articles proper 
in condition. 

No y/iping of dishes, etc., etc., in front of 
guests will be tolerated. In case of necessity 
the waiter may use a clean napkin off an 
adjacent table to use on a dish (should it be 
too hot, for instance) and then immediately 
discard the napkin. 

Broom: Is not to be used when tables are 
set up. During meals waiters must keep car- 
pet and floor free from crumbs, etc., by use 
of carpet sweeper. 

On cars having cork floors, before tables are 
set up for breakfast, the entire floor must be 
mopped and scrubbed as often as necessary. 

Bills of Fare and Prices of Dishes: The 
"Ready to Serve" menus and the "Extra Spe- 
cial Slips" are for the purpose of adding va- 
riety and freshness to the a la carte menu 
card. 

No deviation from prices given on the bills 
of fare will be permitted without direct au- 
thority from the Manager's office or by special 
bulletin from time to time. 

It must be clearly understood, however, 
that if at any time prices shown on the 
menu cards are for any reason higher or 
lower than the prices quoted elsewhere for the 
same dishes the menu prices will govern. 

Children must be charged full prices at 
a la carte meals. However, judgment must 
be used on the part of the Steward not to 
compel a party to pay for two full portions 
for two children when one portion would suf- 
fice. 

Passengers are not to be refused double 
service of plates, etc., when a single portion 
is desired to be shared between them, always 
bearing in mind, however, the foot note on 
menu card: "No order to be served for less 
than 25c. to each person." 

Serving' Wines, Etc.: No liquor is to be 
served on Sunday, except with meals, nor on 
Saturday night after 7:00 p. m. 

It is a general rule when serving bottled 
goods of any kind to always show the bottle 
before opening. This will not only avoid errors 
and losses to the crews, it will also satisfy 
the patrons as to the condition of the bottle. 
Always serve the proper glasses with each 
article. After uncorking the bottle carefully 
wipe the neck before pouring contents. Corks 
or caps must not be thrown on floor. 

Corks of wine bottles must be kept for in- 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



225 



spection by the customer if he desires. 

Always serve champagne in wine cooler with 
cracked ice. When pouring out wine wrap a 
clean napkin around the bottle. Cooler must 
he served on a plate within easy reach of the 
customer. Cooler must be removed as soon as 
the bottle is empty. In serving all kinds of 
wine pour out a little wine in the glass of 
the party ordering it, then All the glasses of 
the other members of the party, after which 
fill the glass of the party who ordered the 
wine. Waiters should serve the ladies of the 
party first and then the gentlemen, finishing 
with the host. 

Glasses must not be poured too full. Wine 
must be poured slowly without shaking the 
bottle to stir up the contents. 

In serving Bass or any other ale keep the 
bottle in upright position while uncorking. 
Do not shake up contents. Use beer glass. 
When pouring, tip the glass about forty-five 
degrees towards the neck of the bottle so that 
ale will touch side of the glass first. Hold 
the bottle in same position all the time. Never 
tip it back until you pour out all the con- 
tents, be it one, two or three glasses. Never 
pour ale clear down to the bottom of the 
bottle.- 

"n'hen serving liqueur frappe, provide short 
sippers. 



Oig-ars and Cigarettes: Cigars must be 
served from box. Serve cigarettes in un- 
opened box on silver tray. Cigars must be 
carried in humidors, but not cigarettes. 

GENERAI^ 

Waiters and other employees must be oblig- 
ing, courteous and polite at all times, must 
anticipate the patron's wishes; must always 
be on the alert to notice instantly any de- 
ficiency in the service and look after those 
small details which go so far to make service 
perfect. 

Avoid coming too close to patrons. 

When patrons speak, listen attentively. Do 
not make them repeat their words, but repeat 
the order yourself if you are not quite sure. 
Do not place your hands on the back of the 
chair. 

When there are two diners on one train, 
stewards must reach a clear understanding 
of the exact time for the meal call. They 
must announce the meal simultaneously and 
must inform the passengers of the location of 
car on train. 

W. A. COOPER, 
Manager Sleeping, Dining, 

Parlor Cars and News Service. 
Montreal, August 1, 1913. 



CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY DINING CAR SERVICE 

Standard of Portions, Prices and Table Service. 

Montreal, August 1, 1913. 

[TTie prices quoted herein are for the ^publication issued August i, igrj only. Market 
conditions make them subject to revision ] 



ORDERS. SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



When in fresh fruit season, serve one orange with two 

Assorted Pruit: Generally, one apple, one other fruits such as plums, peaches, pears, etc., on 

orange, one banana (25 cents) large linen doily, in silver fruit-dish with dessert 

plate, fruit knife and fork, also finger bowl. 



Apples, baked: One or two, as ordered 
(1 — 15 cents; 2 — 25 cents) 



Large ones only. Core and bake with sugar and little 
water. Serve cold (hot only if desired) one on 9-inch 
two on 10-inch silver platter with a small amount of 
natural juice; cream. Fruit saucer on bread plate, 
dessert fork and .spoon. 



Orang-es, whole : Size 126, two (20 cents) 



On large linen dolly in silver fruit dish with dessert 
jilate, fruit knife, orange spoon and finger bowl. 



Orang'es, sliced: Size 126, two (20 cents) 



Peel, remove white skin, cut in half lengthwise, slice 
thin crosswise. Serve on dessert plate with fruit 
saucer, fruit knife and fork. 



Oiang'e juice: Size 126, two (20 cents) 



Squeeze and strain into whiskey glass embedded in 
cracked ice in soup bowl on dessert plate. Short sip- 
pers on plate. 



_ ,- , m .J! , ii. ..o Peel, slice crosswise. In bowl on dessert plate. Fruit 

Bananas, sliced: Two if large; three if ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ pj^^^ ^^^^^ Dessert spoon and 

fork for service. 



small (20 cents) 



Bananas, whole: Two if large; three if 
small (20 cents) 



Same as assorted fruit. 



Peaches, sliced: Two If large; three if Cut into thin slices lengthwise; serve in fruit saucer 
small (25 cents) on bread plate. Dessert spoon, cream. 



Peaches, whole: Two if large; three if 
small (25 cents) 



Same as assorted fruit. 



226 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Cautalonpe: Size 36, one half. Two 

halves, if smaller. (Before June: Chilled; cut in half crosswise, remove seeds, but put 
half, 20 cents; whole, 30 cents, no ice In fruit. Serve on cracked ice in bread tray. Des- 
After June: half, 15 cents; whole, sert plate; teaspoon; finger bowl. 
25 cents) 



Melon (Montreal) : Five portions to 

S-lb. melon (Price fixed by special 
bulletin) 



a Chilled; cut each portion lengthwise, remove seeds from 
melon. Serve on cracked ice in bread tray. Dessert 
plate, dessert spoon and finger bowl. 



Chilled; cut in half crosswise. Bach half cut length- 
Watermelon: 6 or 8 portions, according wise in four, or three, equal portions according to size, 
to size (25 cents) Serve same as Montreal melon. Fruit knife and fruit 

fork. Finger bowl. 



Crrapes: One pound (20 cents) 



Must be cold. Remove imperfect grapes. Serve on 
large linen doily in silver fruit dish, with dessert 
plate and finger bowl. 



Grapefruit: One half or two halves, as 
ordered. 46 size (Yz — 15 cents) 



Chilled; cut in half cross"wise, remove seeds. Cut out 
each section starting at the core, following closely the 
sectional divisions and rind, back to core. Serve on 
cracked ice in bread tray; dessert plate, orange spooii, 
finger bowl. Core not to be cut out. Never put ice on 
fruit. 



Raspberries: Fruit saucer full (20 cents) 



Pick carefully and wash in porcelain bowl with cracked 
ice. Serve in fruit saucer on bread plate. Cream. 



Blackberries: Fruit saucer full (20 cents) Same as Raspberries. 



Blueberries: Fruit saucer full (20 cents) Same as Raspberries. 



Strawberries: Fruit saucer full (In 
March, 35 cents; in April, 30 cents; 
in May, 25 cents; after May, 20 
cents) 



Remove stems, pick over, and serve same as Raspberries. 



Rhubarb, stewed (fresli) : Fruit saucer 
full (15 cents) 



Cut in 1-inch pieces, pour boiling sugar syrup on it, allow 
to cool, season with very little lemon. Serve in fruit 
saucer on bread plate. Cream. 



Preserved Prult, Marmalade, Jam, Jelly, 
etc. (in glass or jars) : Individual 
(25 cents) 



Wipe vrell, serve in original package on bread plate; tea 

spoon for service. 
Dessert plate and knife for marmalade and jam. Fruit 

saucer on bread plate and spoon for fruits in syrup. 

Cream for syrup fruits. 



Fruit in cans : Individual (25 cents) 



Empty into fruit saucer and serve on bread plate. 
Cream. 



Grape Juice: Individual (15 cents) 



Bottle chilled; opened and emptied into whiskey-glass; 
serve same as orange juice. 



Honey: Individual (20 cents) 



In original package on bread plate; package spread 
partly open. Dessert plate and knife. 



Honey with Biscuits: Individual honey 
with 3 hot biscuits (30 cents) 



Serve honey as above. Serve hot biscuits inside folded 
large linen doily on dessert plate. 



Bread: Six slices (10 cents) 
(See footnote on menu) 



Round (Vienna) white bread, Raisin bread and Graham 
bread. Two slices of each about % inch thick. Cut 
white bread through and graham and raisin bread in 
triangle. Serve in silver bread tray on paper doily. 



Toast: Six triangular pieces (10 cents) 



Three slices from square loaf, toasted, cut diagonally, 
trimmed, making six triangular pieces; dry or buttered. 
Serve on dessert plate with large linen doily folded 
over to keep warm. 



Rolls, Muffins and Biscuits: Three pieces 
(10 cents) 



Heated. Serve same as Toast. 



Cream or Milk Toast: Six pieces toast 
(20 cents) 



Arrange toast in soup bowl on dessert plate; fill three- 
quarters full with boiling cream or milk. Soup spoon, 
dessert fork and spoon. 



Griddle cakes: Three (25 cents) 



On hot dessert plate with cover. For service hot dessert 
pl.ate, dessert knife and fork; syrup in silver syrup cup. 
Double portion of butter. 



Griddle cakes (-with sansag'e) : Two cakes, 
four sausages (50 cents) 



Serve sausages on 9-inch silver platter; cakes same as 
above. Large plate. 



Sandwiches, Beef, Ham or Tong-ne: Two 

triangular pieces (15 cents) 



Two slices from square loaf, buttered. Slices of meat. 
Trimmed, cut diagonally, making two triangular 
pieces. Servo on 9-inch silver platter. Dessert plate 
and knife and fork for service. Mustard in pot. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



227- 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



diicken Sanawich: Two triangular pieces 
(25 cents) 



Same as other sandwiciies. 
meat. 



About tliree ounces of white 



Club Sandwlcli: Two triangular pieces 
(40 cents) 



Same as other sandwiches, except toast instead of bread. 
Rasher of bacon and two lettuce leaves alternately 
with chicken meat and mayonnaise. Serve dessert 
plate separate, hot. 



Batter: (Free of charge) 



To be served on lettuce leaf with cracked ice in fruit 
saucer. Supply to be replenished as often as necessary. 



Shredded Wlieat : Two biscuits (20 cents) 



In individual envelopes on 9-inch silver platter. Oatmeal 
bowl on dessert plate. Dessert spoon. Cream, 



Com Flakes, Force, etc.: Individual (20 
cents) 



Serve on dessert plate. Use sharp knife; cut individual 
package crosswise, but not through bottom cover. This 
enables guest to empty package into oatmeal bowl. 
Served Oatmeal bowl on dessert plate. Cream. Des- 
sert-spoon. 



Oatmeal and other cooked cereals: Me- 
dium silver baker full (20 cents) 



Serve in baker; hot oatmeal bowl on dessert plate, 
dessert-spoon. Cream. 



Boiled Egg's: Two eggs (25 cents) 



Strictly fresh clean eggs only. Serve in small baker. 
Heated water glass and egg cup on dessert plate. 
Eggs must not be opened by waiter unless guest so 
requests. 



Scrambled Eggs: Two eggs (25 cents) 



Beaten well, add spoonful milk or cream, salt, scramble 
in omelet pan, serve in medium silver baker. Large 
plate. 



Poached Eggs: Two eggs (30 cents) 



Poach In fiat pan in water with a few drops of vinegar. 
Serve on trian.gles of toast on 9-inch silver platter; 
parsley garnish. 



Fried Eggs: Two eggs (25 cents) 



Fried in omelet pan; serve on 9-inch silver platter; 
garnish with parsley. 



Fried Eggs and Ham: Two eggs, two cuts 
ham (50 cents) 



Two horse-shoe cuts of ham weight 8 ozs., fried, two 
eggs on top on 9-inch silver platter. 



Fried Eggs and Bacon: Two eggs, four 
slices of bacon (50 cents) 



Same as ham and eggs. Four slices bacon, weight 6 ozs. 



Omelet, plain: Three eggs (35 cents) 



Eggs well beaten, table spoon water, only salt; make in 
omelet pan, using clarified butter. Serve on 9-inch 
silver platter. Garnish with parsley. 



Bacon Omelet: Three eggs (50 cents) 



Same as plain. Four slices bacon cut in dices, saute, 
mixed with eggs. Bacon, 6 ozs. Garnish with parsley. 



Omelet with Bacon: Three eggs (50 
cents) 



Plain omelet with rasher bacon, 
omelet. 



Serve same as plain 



Ham Omelet: Three eggs (50 cents) 



Same as Bacon Omelet. 6 ozs. of ham saute, cut in dices, 
mixed with eggs. Garnish with parsley. 



Spanish Omelet: Three eggs (50 cents) 



Same as plain. Omelet filled with a spoonful of "Creole 
Garniture" (Spanish sauce); little garniture on both 
ends of omelet. 



Parsley Omelet: Three eggs (45 cents) 



Sam© as plain. Parsley chopped fine and mixed with 
eggs. Garnish with parsley. 



Cheese Omelet: Three eggs (45 cents) 



Same as plain. About three ounces of grated Parmesan 
or Canadian cheese; mix with the eggs. Garnish with 
parsley. 



Tomato Omelet: Three eggs (45 cents) 



One raw tomato chopped (concassee) seasoned, saute 
filled in omelet, tomato sauce around omelet. No 
parsley. 



Omelet, with Telly; Three eggs (45 cents) 



Filled with one spoonful jelly; powdered sugar on 
omelet; glaze with red hot poker. 



Mushroom Omelet: Three eggs (50 cents) 



Mushrooms sliced, saute lightly in butter, mix with 
eggs. Parsley garnish^ 



Bum Omelet: Three eggs (50 cents) 



Plain omelet sugared on top and glazed with red hot 
poker. Hot rum poured over omelet; and omelet when 
on table lighted with a burning match. No garnish. 
Serve on 9-inch platter, with 10-inch silver platter un- 
derlining. 



Eggs Meyerbeer : Two 

neys (65 cents) 



eggs, two kid- Two lamb kidneys split and broiled; served on round 
croutons, on 10-inch silver platter with a poached egg 
on each kidney. Madeira or truffle sauce on platter. 



228 



THE PEACTIGAL HOTEL STEWARD 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Omelet with Kidney: Three eggs (50 
cents) 



Omelet filled with kidney prepared as for saute, madeira 
sauce around omelet, on 10-inch silver platter. 



Egrgs au Crratin: Two eggs (40 cents) 



Place piece of toast in small brown crockery baker, upon 
which place two poached eggs. Add cream sauce, 
sprinkle with grated cheese and brown quickly in hot 
oven. Serve in baker on 9-inch silver platter. No 
garnish. 



Egg's a la Turk: Two eggs (50 cents) 



Shirred in small earthen baker, 
and Madeira sauce on iop. 



Chicken livers saute 



EggsBercy: Two eggs (50 cents) 



Shirred in small earthen baker. Two small sausages 
saute, tomato sauce on top. 



Pancakes (German) : One piece (35 cents) 



Three eggs, spoon flour, milk, salt, bake in large omelet 
pan in oven. Serve on 13-inch china platter. 



Pancakes (French): Four pieces (35 
cents) 



Same as German Pancakes, baked in small egg pan on 
fire. Pancakes must be tliiu and rolled up. Serve 
on 10-inch silver platter, filled with Jelly and glazed 
w-ith sugar, if specified. 



Spaghetti and Macaroni: Large brown 
crockery baker full (25 cents) 



Boiled, seasoned, saute in butter. 



Sphagetti and Macaroni with Cheese: 

Large brown crockery baker full 
(25 cents) 



Same as plain. Grated Parmesan or Canadian cheese. 



Sphagetti and Macaroni with Ham : Large 
brown crockery baker full (25 
cents) 



Ham cut in julienne, plenty cheese. 



Sphagetti and Macaroni with Tomatoes: 

Large brown crockery baker full Same as with cheese, with tomato sauce. 
(25 cents) 

Sphagetti and Macaroni an G-ratin: Large „ „ i, ™ v * li^n x. ^ 

brown crockery baker full (fg Same as cheese; cream sauce; cheese on top, little but- 



cents) 



ter and crumbs, baked in oven, brown crust on top. 



Coffee and Tea: 



Good coffee and tea are essential, and constitute one of 
the most important parts of a meal. Great pains must 
be taken to have these good always. Chefs and stewards 
must satisfy themselves that they are so before serving. 

Coffee and tea pots must be thoroughly cleaned and 
scalded after each meal. 

Coffee must be made fresh before and as often as 
necessary during each meal. 

Printed instructions displayed in kitchens must be fol- 
lowed in the making of coffee and tea. 

Tea for passengers must be made individually as called 
for. Care must be exercised that passengers are served 
with the kind of tea they order. Each kind of tea must 
be kept in separate canister, plainly marked. 

The latest type of cars have coffee urns set into steam 
table. These must be thoroughly cleansed after every 
meal; faucets must be given special attention. Coffee 
must not be allowed to remain in these urns after meals 
are over. Coffee then remaining in urn must never 
be used a.gain, nor fresh coffee mixed with the old. 



Coffee: 



Small pot (10 cents) 
Large pot (20 cents) 



For making coffee, see speqial instructions posted in car. 
Always use %-lb. (one tin) per gallon water. For dinner 
coffee use 1 lb. per gallon. Cream on side, hot milk in 
cream pitcher if desired. Serve hot on bread-plate. 
Ask guest if coffee is desired with or after meal. 



Tea: Small pot (10 cents) 



Half fill tea strainer with tea, pour on boiling water and 
allow to draw. Serve pot on bread-plate. Cream. 



Cocoa: 



Cup (10 cents) 
Large pot (20 cents) 



Serve in chocolate pot on bread plate. Must be made 
with milk unless ordered made with water. 



Special Milk: Individual bottle % pint 

. (10 cents) Open in front of guest by pushing ring down and 

Special Cream: Individual bottle % pmt moving cap. Serve milk with water glass 
(10 cents) 



Cream: Per glass (15 cents) 



Serve in water glass. 



Hot Milk: Small pot (10 cents) 



Serve in chocolate pot on bread plate, with tea cup and 
saucer. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



229 



ORDEItS. SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



Iced Coffee or Cocoa: Small pot (15 cents) 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Serve coffee hot in pot. Instead of cup serve thin soda 
glass on bread plate, filled with cracked ice. Bar spoon, 
powdered sugar, cream on side. Never any lemoji. 
Long sippers. 



Iced Tea: Small pot (15 cents) 



Serve in same manner as coffee, except one-quarter 
lemon on plate with glass. 



I^emona^e: Per glass (15 cents) 



Juice of one lemon. Soda glass with cracked ice, on 
bread plate; powdered sugar. Long sippers, 1 maras- 
chino cherry; one slice of lemon. 



Orang'eade: Per glass (15 cents) 



Same as Lemonade; except juice of one orange and slice 
of orange. 



Celery: Two heads (25 cents) 



Each head quartered. Trimmed and carefully cleaned 
in porcelain bowl with cracked ice and water; serve 
on cracked ice in bread tray. Dessert plate. 



Chow Chow: Individual (15 cents) 



In original bottle on bread plate; oyster fork. 



Fickles, mixed: Individual (15 cents) 



In original bottle on bread plate; oyster fork. 



Olives: Individual (20 cents) 



Carefully extract from bottle, serve on lettuce leaf in 
fruit saucer, cracked ice on top. 



Badishes: Bight (15 cents) 



Cleaned, roots off, stems of leaves cut oft but long 
enough to serve as handle, serve on lettuce leaf with 
cracked ice in fruit saucer. 



Sardines: Individual tin (35 cents) 



Lid of box to be entirely removed. Serve in tin on 9-inch 
silver platter with lettuce leaf and one-quarter lem.on; 
dessert plate, fork and knife. 



Spring' Onions: Ten (15 cents) 



Carefully cleaned and trimmed. Serve same as Celery. 



Sliced Cucumlbers: 15 slices, (in summer 
25 cents; in winter, 30 cents) 



Peel cucumber thin, starting from stem down to flower, 
which should be cut off. Slice thin about thickness of 
back of steel knife. Serve on lettuce leaf on dessert 
plate. 



Sliced Tomatoes: One if large. Two if 
small. (In summer, 25 cents; in 
winter, 30 cents) 



Slice on lettuce leaf on dessert plate. 



AJmIm SOUPS: Tureen nearly full, or soup 
bowl % full, or one individual tin. 
(See price on regular menu. Usu- 
ally 25o v/ith bread and butter; 15c 
with meat or fish order. In no case 
must charge for "Special" Soup 
differ from that on regular menu, 
except as specified herein.) 

CIiEAB SOTIFS: 



When so equipped, tureen full, soup ladle, with soup 
plate on large plate. Soup spoon. Dinner biscuit in 
individual envelope on bread plate. 

When soup tureen not provided serve in bowl on dessert 
plate. 



All clear soups to be made with consomme. 
CONSOMME — One gallon bouillon stock, about 4 lbs. 

of ground beef trimmings, vegetables, chicken or fowl 

trimmings, white of eggs, carefully strained through 

straining cloth. 
Bouillon Stock is supplied from Storerooms or obtained 

by boiling beef bones in water, at about 6 lb. or more 

to a gallon. 
All vegetables, etc., for clear soups must be prepared 

separately and put in soup at the moment of serving. 



Consomme Bouqaetieie : 



With fresh fancy vegetables. 



Consomme Brunoise: 



Various vegetables cut in very fine dices. 



Pancakes, cut in julienne. 



Consomme Celestine: 

Clear Soup, Country Style (Paysanne) : Sliced vegetables, sliced bread, salt pork. 

Consomme Farina: 

Consomme Julienne: 



Farina cooked in consomme, chervil or parsley chopped. 

Vegetables cut in julienne; chiffonade of chervil or 
parsley. 



Consomme with Otra: 
Old Fashioned Vegetahle: 
Consomme Tapioca: 
Consomme Printanier: 



Okra plain or stuffed. 



Pot-au-feu. Vegetables cut in dices, bread crusts. 



Tapioca cooked in consomme. 



Spring vegetables, fancy cut, chervil. 



Consomme Boyal: 



Custard (of chicken) cut in oblong small pieces, vege- 
tables, fancy cut. 



230 



THE PBACTICAL HOTEL STEWAKD 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Clear Turtle: (Not less than 25 cents) 



Dissolve turtle stock, sherry, cayenne, meat in large 
dices. 



SEMI-CIiEAB SOUPS: 



Chicken broth: 



Broth of chicken, meat cut in dice, rice. 



Cock-a-I^eekie: 



Chicken (and veal) broth. Leek, celery, meat cut in 
julienne. 



Creole Soup: 



Chicken stock, green peppers, ham, onions, tomatoes, 
chicken cut in dice, rice. 



Gihlet Soup: 



Cliicken giblets and vegetables in small dice, barley. 



Gumbo Creole: 



Same as Creole, with okra. 



Hodg'e Podsre: 



Mutton broth and puree of peas, mutton cut in dice. 



Pepper Pot: 



Potatoes, onions, green peppers, tripe in dice, crushed 
whole pepper, thyme. 



Scotch Mutton broth: 



Mutton broth with barley, vegetables, mutton in dice. 



Tomato broth: 



Consomme, puree of fresh tomatoes, strained, hot or 
cold. (Served cold in cup). 



CBEAM SOUPS: 



All cream soups to be made of white stock, meat and 
bones blanched, white roux, vegetables except carrots, 
broth or water, strained, liaison of cream, milk and yolk 
of eggs. CROUTONS, i. e. fresh bread cut in small 
dice, browned in butter. 



AspaiaiTus or Arg-euteuil soup: 



Cream of Asparagus, with asparagus tips. 



Barley: 



Cream of barley, witli barley and croutons of chicken. 



BiscLue: 



Of lobster, of crabs, of crawfish, of shrimps, of oyster 
crabs, of flsh. 



Celery : 



With croutons. 



Cream of Cauliflower: 



With cauliflower and croutons. 



Crecy Soup: 



Cream of fresh carrots with rice and croutons. 



Cream of Veg'etable : 



Cream of vegetables; various garniture. 



Nivernaise : 



Cream of carrots with pearls of carrots and turnips. 



Seine : 



"Queen Soup," Cream of chicken and rice, chicken in 
dice, quennelles of chicken forcemeat. 



Cream of Tomatoes (or puree) : 



Cream or puree of tomatoes, croutons. 



Cream of Potatoes, Parmentier: 



Puree of potatoes, croutons, chervil. 



Puree of Peas: 

Puree of Presh Peas, (or Puree St. Ger- 
main) : 



Split peas with croutons. 

Puree of fresh peas with peas in soup and chervil. 



Cream Virginia: 



Cream of sweet potatoes, sweet potatoes in dice, fried. 



OTHER THICK SOUPS: 



For thick brown soups use brown stock, the use of which 

is specified in each case. 
BROWN STOCK: Brown roux, meats and bones saute, 

with vegetables and aromatics, cooked with brown jus 

de viande, strained, wine. 



Bavarian soup: 


Puree of lentils, sliced sausage, fried bread crumbs. 


Chowder : 


Of clams, of fish, etc. Made with flsh stock (essence of 
fish). 


Puree Paubonne: 


Puree of white beans, leek, croutons. 


Puree Jackson: 


Puree of potatoes with tapioca, leek cut in julienne. At 
the moment of serving add one spoon of Puree of Toma- 
toes in the center. 


Mock Turtle: 


Brown stock. Calfs' head, quenelles, sherry. 


Puree Mong-ol: 


Puree of split peas and tomatoes, vegetables cut in juli- 
enne, chervil. 


Thick Mutton soup: 


Thicken with barley, meat and vegetables cut In dice. 
Liaison of milk and yolk of egg. 



Mullig'atawney : 



Chicken stock, thickened with curry, onions, chutney 
and cocoanut, apples strained, chicken cut in dice and 
rice in soup. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



231 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Oxtail soup: 



Thick: with brown stock. 
Clear: with consomme. 

Oxtail, sliced, saute and braised, vegetables in dice. 
Sherry. 



Puree St. Hubert: 



Puree of game, thickened with brown stock, julienne of 
game and truffles. 



Beal Turtle soup: (Not less than 25o.) Like clear turtle, thickened, with quennelles of egg, 

peeled lemon. 

Fish served on 10-inch silver platter. Fish fork and iish 
FISH: 1 lb trimmed, if large fish; Brook knife for service. Large plate. 

trout size, two per portion; three Fish is served in various styles; fried, boiled, baked. 



If smaller, unless specified (50 
cents, unless otherwise specified.) 



braised, poached, broiled, au gratin, etc., and the gar- 
niture and service depends on the manner of prepara- 
tion, which is specified in each case. 
To obtain a good sauce with fish, the various stock 
sauces should be finished with a good fish essense (not 
the fish water) obtained from the bones of fish. It 
can be kept in a reduced state (court bouillon). 



Place fresh water fish in boiling water seasoned with 
Boiled Fish: 1 lb trimmed, if large fish; vinegar, salt, slice of lemon and parsley. Some fish 
Brook trout size, two per portion; require stronger seasoning with "bouquet garni." 
three if smaller, unless specified Sea Fish, Halibut, Cod, Turbot, Haddock and other white 
(50 cents, unless otherwise speci- fish placed in cold water seasoned with salt and "Bou- 
fied.) quet garni" and little milk. Let water come to boiling 

point and withdraw pan from the open fire and keep 
it on the side until flsh is done. 
Serve boiled fish on 10-inch silver platter garnished with 
parsley. No lemon. Sauce separate. 

Pish saute: 1 lb trimmed, if large fish; Fish well seasoned, passed in flour, fried in clarified but- 



Brook trout size, two per portion; 
three if smaller, unless specified 
(50 cents, unless otherwise speci- 
fied.) 



ter in pan, served on 10-inch silver platter, fresh pars- 
ley and quarter lemon. No Sauces of the kitchen to be 
served with fish saute. Only the butter poured over it 
in which it was fried. (Hazelnut or Noir butter). 



Fried Fish: 1 lb. trimmed, or one or two 
small fish (50 cents unless other- 
wise specified) 



Fish for Prying is prepared in the French and the 
English styles, the latter predominating in most cases. 
However, small fish like "Whitebait, Smelts, etc., should 
always be prepared in the French style. 

French Style: Season, pass in milk and fiour. 

English Style: Season, flour, beaten eggs, fresh bread- 
crumbs. 

Serve on 10-inch silver platter garnished with fried 
parsley and quarter of lemon per person. 

Tartar Sauce always served with fried flsh (unless 
another sauce is specified) separate in sauce-boat. 



Broiled Fish: 1 lb. trimmed, or one or two 
small flsh (50 cents unless other- 
wise specified) 



For broiling, fish is seasoned and buttered. Serve on 
10-inch silver platter, garnish with fresh parsley and 
quarter of lemon for each person. Two ounces of 
Maitre d'Hotel Butter placed on the fish when leaving 
the grill. 

No other sauces from kitchen served with broiled flsh, 
unless specified. 



Braised (poached) Pish: 1 lb. trimmed, or 
one or two small fish (50 cents un- 
less otherwise specified) 



Place fish in pan, well buttered and garnished as for 
essence of flsh, sprinltle with white wine, cover with 
buttered paper and braise in oven. The juice is to be 
utilized for the sauce. 

Serve on 10-inch silver platter, always covered with the 
sauce. No garniture of parsley or lemon. A great 
number of various garnitures can be served with the 
fish, each being specified. 



, ., ,, i . , i Baked flsh is flrst braised in the manner described, then 

Baked Pish: 1 lb. trimmed, or one or two pj^^.^^ j^^ special earthen dish (gratin dish) covered 
srnall Ash (50 cents unless other- .^^^^.j^ gamiture and sauce, sprinkled with grated cheese 
wise specified) ^jj^ breadcrumbs, buttered and glazed in oven. 



Pish au gratin: 1 lb. trimmed (50 cents) 



Boiled fish of any kind, or various kinds together, cov- 
ered with Cream sauce mixed with grated cheese, or 
flsh covered with Italian Sauce, sprinkled with grated 
cheese and breadcrumbs, glazed in oven in special 
earthen dish, chopped parsley on top when serving. 
Also meat glaze, if available. A border of Duchess 
potatoes adds greatly to its attractiveness. 



Flsh Cakes: Two cakes (40 cents); with Boiled flsh and potatoes, rolled Into cakes or balls, flour, 
two strips of Bacon, (50 cents) fried. 



232 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE PREPARATION AND SERVICE 

Boiled, fried or saute as specified. 



Brook Trout: Two flsii; three or four fish, 
if quite small (65 cents) 



Smelts: Three to five smelts (50 cents) Any style. 



Croquettes of Pish: Three (50 cents) Salpicon of fish rolled into croquettes about 2%" long 

and 1%" thick, breaded, fried, with sauce as specified. 

Kromeskies: Three (50 cents) Same as Croquettes, dipped in batter. 

SHEI^I^riSH: live lobsters only to be used for broiling. (Lobster 

showing decreasing vitality should be immediately 

lobster, broiled: Half or whole as or- boiled.) Claws cracked. Lobster split open from nose 

dered. (Half 60 cents; two halves, to tail and halves broiled, well seasoned, with clarified 

^X.OO) ' ' ' batter. Serve on 13% inch china platter, garnish with 

parsley and quarter lemon, Plenty of Maitre d'Hotel 
Butter on lobster when leaving grill. Finger bowl, 
nut crackers, oyster fork. Drawn butter, if desired, 
in sauce boat. 

Boiled lobster: Half or whole as ordered. ^°'^ '^^°^^ "^^^" ^"'^'^ 5" "^^" seasoned water. Let cool 
(Half, 60 cents; two halves, $100) °" *" ""=^'^^''- ^®''"''<= °°^'^' ^^""^ ^® broiled, Mayon- 
naise in sauce boat. 

lobster Patties: Two (50 cents) Salpicon of boiler lobster, cardinal or cream sauce, 
chopped mushrooms or truffles. Heat the shells. 

lobster Croquettes: Three (50 cents) Same as fish croquettes. Salpicon thickened with re- 

duced veloute or cardinal sauce. 

lobster Cocktail: Glass full (35 cents) Sufficient meat to fill whisky glass % full. Cocktail 

sauce to cover. Serve in soup bowl embedded in ice 
on medium plate. Oyster fork. 

Meat sliced, saute, Newburg sauce. Serve in medium 
lobster, Newburg*: Half or whole as or- silver baker on 9" silver platter. 

dered. (Half, $1.00; whole, ?1.50) Newburg Sauce: Hollandaise diluted with essence of 

lobster and sherry. Strained. 

Crab Cocktail: Glassful (35 cents) Same as Lobster Cocktail. 

Crab Meat au gratin: One crab (50 cents) Same as Pish au gratin. 

Crab Patties: Two (50 cents) Same as Lobster Patties. 

Crabmeat, Newburg*: One crab (75 cents) Meat of crab shredded, same as Lobster Newburg. 

Hard Shell Crabs: One (35 cents) Boil crab same as lobster. Claws cracked. Body cut 

in four pieces; serve on lettuce leaf on 13%" china 
platter. Oyster fork. Finger bowl. Mayonnaise in 
sauce boat. 

Soft Shell Crabs, Pried: Two if large; Breaded, fried, serve on 12-inch silver platter, fresh 
three if small (60 cents) parsley, Vj lemon. 

Soft Shell Crabs, Broiled: Two if large; Serve on 12-inch silver platter, fresh parsley, % lemon, 
three if small (60 cents) Maitre d'hotel butter on the crabs. 

Salads of Shellfish: 9 inch silver platter » o"- i"«at, 3 oz. celery in dice. Mayonnaise, decorated 
full (50 cents) with hard boiled eggs, beets, etc. Serve on lettuce leaf. 

Crab Salad: 9 inch silver platter full (50 Crab meat shredded. 

cents) 

Shrimp salad: 9 inch silver platter full g.^j^ ^^^^^^g, 
(50 cents) 



lobster Salad! 9 inch silver platter full ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ scalloped. 



_ . ,.,*,.„ oc- i /on On deep shell, unless ordered otherwise. Serve on 

Oysters on half shell: Six oysters (30 cracked ice in oyster plate; large plate for underlining; 

''^"'■^' % lemon in centre. Crackers in individual envelope," 

horse-radish in mustard pot, Tobasco sauce, all to- 
gether on large linen doily on dessert plate. Oyster 
fork. 

Oyster Cocktail: Six oysters (35 cents) Same as on half shell; instead of lemon, punch glass 

with cocktail sauce in centre. 

Pried Oysters: Six oysters (40 cents) Breaded, fried, in friture finished in butter, serve on 

toast on 9-lnch silver platter, parsley, % lemon. 



Pried Oysters with Bacon: Six oysters 
(50 cents) 



With rasher bacon. 



Oyster patties: Two (40 cents) Six oj^sters poached; creamed. Serve on 9-inch silver 

platter. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 233 

ORDERS. SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE PREPARATION AND SERVICE 

Oyster stew: Six oysters (35 cents) Stewed lightly in half milk, half cream, salt and 

cayenne pepper, butter. Serve immediatelj^ in soup 
tureen, if carried, with deep plate; otherwise serve in 
bowl on dessert plate. Oyster biscuits in indi\idual 
envelope on bread plate. Soup spoon. 

Clams on half shell: Six clams (30 cents) Serve same as oysters on half shell. 

BEEF: One large slice it size of rib will permit, otherwise two 

slices, six ounces each. Natural gravy. Serve on 12- 

Boast Beef a« jus: 12 ozs. (50 cents) inch silver platter. Worcestershire "Al" sauce and 

mustard. 

Roast Beef with Browned Potatoes: 12 Two medium potatoes, browned. Serve on ends of 
ozs. (60 cents) platter with meat. 

Pilet of Beef: 9 ozs. (65 cents) Roasted. Filet larded. Three slices 3 oz. each. Serve 

on 12-inch silver platter. 

met of Beef with Mushrooms: 9 ozs. (85 Filet roast, three slices masked with Madeira sauce and 
cents) sliced mushrooms. 

Ox Tonofue with Spinach: 6 ozs. (50 cents) Boiled and peeled. Three slices on a bed of spinach. 

Serve on 10-Inch silver platter, gravy or demi-glace. 
Mustard and vinegar to be served. 

Corned Beef with Ca'bljag'e: 12 ozs. (50 Boiled with cabbage; beef sliced. Serve on bed of cab- 
cents) bage with bouillon, 10-inch silver platter. Always 

serve mustard and vinegar. 

Beef a la mode: 12 ozs. (50 cents) Rump, larded thickly, braised, with small glazed onions 

and carrots, gravy. Two slices on 10-inch silver plat- 
ter. 

Rump, larded thickly, marinade (pickled) of vegetables. 
Braised Beef, German style, with Potato vinegar and spices. Braise; use marinade to finish 
Dumpling': 12 ozs. (50 cents) sauce. 

POTATO DUMPLING: — Potatoes mashed dry, thicken 
with flour and eggs, season, nutmeg, bread croutons, 
balls cooked in water; brown butter with breadcrumbs 
over ball. One dumpling size of small egg. Serve on 
12-inch silver platter. 

Rib Ends of Beef: 12 ozs. (50 cents) Three pieces, 4 oz. each, saute and braised with various 

vegetables. Browned potato. Serve on 10-inch silver 
platter. 

Rib Ends of Beef, Creole: 12 ozs. (50 Saute and braised with Creole garniture (Spanish 
cents) sauce). 

Hamburg-er steak: Two steaks, 6 ozs. each Plain. Beef chopped fine, seasoned, rolled into cakes, 
(50 cents) saute rare. Serve on 10-inch silver platter. 

Hamburger Steak with Mushroom.s: Two ^^^^^^ ^^^^ Madeira sauce and sliced mushrooms. 

steaks, 6 o zs. each (70 cents) 

Corned beef, cabbage, salt pork, carrots, turnips, onions. 
Boiled New England dinner: 12 ozs. meat beets boiled together. Slice beef and pork and place 
(50 cents) ^^ o" ^^'^ °^ th® vegetables. Arrange nicely on 12- 

inch silver platter. 



Beef stew: 12 ozs. meat (50 cents) Beef in large dice, vegetables, nicely shaped, potatoes, 

large round shape, boiled, with dumpling if specified. 
Ser^■e in inedium silver baker on 9-inch silver platter. 



Hungarian Goulash: 12 ozs. meat (50 Beef cut in large dice, saute, roux, braised brown, pap- 
cents) rika, strain, finish beef in sauce. Serve in medium 

silver baker on 9-inch silver platter. 



Boiled Short Ribs of Beef: 14 ozs. incl. Pieces about S oz. boiled, serve with vegetables and 
bones (50 cents) bouillon on 10-inch silver platter. Cream sauce with 

grated horseradish on the side in sauce boat. 

Minced Beef Creole: 12 ozs. (50 cents) Roast or boiled beef, minced, large pieces, braised in 
' brown gravy in, Creole garniture (Spanish sauce). 

Ser\ e in medium silver baker masked with sauce, 9- 
inch silver platter for underlining, 

' ' ■ ' ~ Rump, cut in steaks, saute, braised in brown gravy in 

Carbonnade of Beef with Veg'etables: One pan with cabbage, onions, vegetables. Serve masked 
steak, 12 ozs. (50 cents) with vegetables on 12-inch silver platter (gravy fin- 

ished with beer or red wine). 

Roast Beef Hash: 14 ozs (50 cents) Roast beef cut in dice (not ground), potatoes, onions, 

well seasoned, thickened with brown broth. Serve 
moist or browned, as specified. Chopped green pep- 
pers or poached egg on top as specified. Omelet shape 
for dry hash; serve on 10-inch silver platter. 



.234 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Corned Beef Hash with Foachea Eg-gs: 14 

ozs. (50 cents) 



Same as Roast Beef Hash, with poached egg on top. 



I.AMB AND MXTTTON: 



Spring- Iiamb, Boast: 8 ozs: (March-.Tune, 
75 cents; after July 1st, 55 cents) 



Assorted cuts on 10-inch silver platter masked with 
gravy. Mint sauce separate in sauce boat. Fresh 
mint sauce must be served when in season. 



Roast lamb: 8 ozs. (50 cents) 



Same as Spring Lamb. 



lamb stew: Medium silver baker (50 
cents) 



Plain. Meat cut in dice, vegetables and potatoes, nicely 
shaped. Serve in medium silver baker on 9-inch silver 
platter. 



Irish stew: Medium silver baker (50 
cents) 



Same as Lamb stew, only potatoes and onions. 



lamb saute: Medium silver baker (50 
cents) 



Saute, brown, roux, vegetables. Serve same as lamb 

stew. 



Navarln of lamb: Medium silver baker 
(50 cents) 



Same as Saute, with brown and white turnips, nicely 
shaped. 



Haricot of lamb: Medium silver baker 
(50 cents) 



Lamb saute, with white beans. 



Curry of lamb or Mutton: Medium silver 
baker (50 cents) 



Meat in dice, blanched, white sauce from broth, thicken 
with curry, finish in sauce. Rice served separately in 
small silver baker. 



Minced lamb, Creole: 8 ozs. (50 cents) 



Roast lamb, minced, braised in brown gravy with Creole 
garniture (Spanish sauce), masked with garniture. 
Ser\e in medium silver baker on 9-inch silver platter. 



Roast Mutton: 8 ozs. (50 cents) 



Same as roast lamb but no mint sauce, 
in sauce boat. 



Currant jelly 



Boiled Mutton: 8 ozs. (50 cents) 



Leg of mutton, caper sauce made with broth. Three 
slices meat on 10-inch platter; little broth. Caper sauce 
separate in boat. 



Muttoi. Pie: Individual (50 cents) 



Mutton and kidney saute, vegetables, brown gravj^, in 
large earthen dish, cover with paste, bake. Serve in 
dish on 9-inch silver platter. 



lamb Hash: 10 ozs. (50 cents) 



Roast or boiled lamb cut in dice (not ground in ma- 
chine), potatoes in dice, thicken with brown broth, 
season well, moist or browned as specified, in omelet 
shape, on 10-inch silver platter. 

With chopped green peppers or one poached egg on 
top, as specified. 



Fricassee of lamb: Medium silver baker 
full (50 cents) 



Meat in large dice, blanched; veloute sauce made from 
broth, green peas sprinkled over. Chopped parsley. 



Fried Breast of lamb with String Beans: 

10 ozs. meat (50 cents) 



Breast of lamb, boned, cut in large dice, blanched, 
dipped in baiter, fried, serve on 10-inch silver platter, 
garnish with string bean saute. 



Roast Shoulder of lamb with Wax Beans : 

10 ozs. meat (50 cents) 



Shoulder boned, stuffed with force-meat and dressed, 
roast, braised, brown gravy, sliced. Serve on ] 0-inch 
silver platter garnished with wax beans buttered. 



Braised Shoulder of lamb with Teg-eta- 
bles: 10 ozs. (50 cents) 



Shoulder dressed, roast and braised, sliced, brown 
gravy. Serve on 10-inch silver platter, garnished with 
vegetables. 



Rack of lamb with String Beans: 8 ozs. 
(60 cents) 



Two ribs as cut from rack, on 9-inch silver platter, 
brown gravy. Braised or roast, as specified. 



lamb Pie: Individual (50 cents) 



Same as Mutton Pie. 



PORK: 



Roast Pork: 10 ozs. (50 cents) 



Rack and loin roast and braised, two ribs as cut from 
rack, brown gravy, on 10-inch silver platter. Hot 
apple sauce in sauce boat. Also Robert sauce, if speci- 
fied. 



Pork Chops: As ordered (2 — 45 cents; 3- 
60 cents) 



Plain or breaded, saute or broiled as ordered (not 
breaded in the latter case), serve on 10-inch silver plat- 
ter, frills on bones, garnished with parsley. 



Fork Chops with sauce piciuante: As or- 
dered (2 — 50 cents; 3 — 65 cents) 



Plain saute, demi-glace sauce with chopped pickles and 
fine herbs, vinegar, strongly seasoned, garnished with 
parsley, sauce in sauce boat. 



Fork Chops -with Robert sauce: As or- 
dered (2 — 50 cents; 3 — 65 cents) 



Same as above, demi-glace, with French mustard, thick- 
ened, and chopped onions. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



235 



ORDERS, SIA'GLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Boiled Kam with Spinach: S ozs. (50 
cents) 



Ham well soaked and boiled, two or three slices on a bed 
of spinach, plain. Serve on 10-inch silver platter, 
little deml-glace around. Serve with vinegar and 
mustard. 



Braised Ham: S ozs. (50 cents) 



Ham well soaked, braised, glazed with sugar, sliced. 
Serve on 10-inch silver platter, on bed of spinach, if 
specified, masked with Madeira sauce. No parsley. 



Boast Presh Ham: 10 ozs. (50 cents) 



Ham roast and braised, well done. Three slices on 10- 
inch silver platter, brown gravy, piece of brown skin. 
Hot apple sauce in sauce boat.. 



Slinced Ham: 10 ozs. (50 cents) 



Boiled ham, minced fine, thickened with brown gravy. 
Serve on 10-inch silver platter, omelet shape, poached 
egg in centre, if specified. 



Sausages: Six (40 cents) 



Plain grilled or saute, as specified, 
ver platter. 



Serve on 9-inch sil- 



Sausag-es -with Pried Apples: 4 small or 3 
large sausages, 1 apple (50 cents) 



Serve on 9-inch silver platter with two rings of fried 
apples about 3 inches in diameter. 



Sansag'es with Mashed Potatoes: 4 small 
or 3 large sausages (50 cents) 



Bake sausages and serve on bed of mashed potatoes, on 
10-inch silver platter with demi-glace surrounded. 



FOUI.TBY' AND GAMB: 



(General rule for poultry: — All poultry must be drawn 
as soon as received from store rooms, singed; heads, 
necks and feet cut oft, dressed with needle and string 
and arranged in refrigerator, ready for use. 

Carving set to be served with all poultry. Tags, if any, 
to be remo"\'ed. 



Boast Chicken: Half or whole, as ordered. 
(% — SO cents; 1— $1.50) 



Large broilers only. No dressing unless specified. 
Brown gravy. Ser^'e on 12-inch silver platter. Serve 
cut in half or whole, as ordered. Gravy and bread 
sauce separate in sauce boat. No parsley. 



Pried Chicken: Half or whole, as ordered. 
(1/2 — SO cents; 1 — $1.50) 



Milk-fed broilers, legs separated from wings, breaded, 
fried in deep fat, passed in butter. Serve on crouton 
on 12-inch silver platter. 



Pried Chicken, Maryland: Half or whole, 
as ordered. (% — $1.00) 



Serve on 12-lnch silver platter, with cream sauce on 
platter, two corn fritters, rasher of bacon, and two 
croquettes of potatoes. 



Boast Turkey: 8 ozs. (60 cents) 



4 oz. white, 4 oz. dark meat; one spoonful of dressing. 
Gravy. Serve on 12-inch silver platter, cranberry 
sauce in sauce boat. Place dark meat on dressing, 
sliced white meat on top. 



Boast Suck, domestic: S ozs. (60 cents) Same as Turkey. Hot apple sauce instead of cranberry. 



Boast Suckling', domestic: Half or whole, 
as ordered: (% — 65 cents; 1 — $1.15) 



No stuffing, unless specified. Serve on 12-inch silver 
platter, gravy. Serve half or whole, as ordered. Hot 
apple sauce in sauce boat. No parsley. 



Boast Goose: 8 ozs. (60 cents) 



4 oz. breast, 4 oz. leg, on dressing on 12-inch silver 
platter, gravy. Hot apple sauce in sauce boat, or 
gooseberry sauce when in season. 



Chicken fricassee: Half broiler (85 cents) 



Disjoint limbs, cutting wing and carcass in two. Stewed 
broth used for veloute sauce; serve in medium baker 
on 9-inch silver platter. 



Minced Chicken: 8 ozs. (60 cents) 



Various styles. In cream: boiled, minced, in cream 
sauce. Season well, serve on a piece of toast in 
medium baker. 



Minced Chicken with Poached EeS'- S ozs. 
chicken, 1 egg (70 cents) 



Same as above, with poached egg. 



Chicken saute: Half or whole, as ordered. 
(% — 80 cents; 1 — $1.50) 



Chicken cut raw, pieces saute in butter, finished in 
gravy. "Various styles and garnitures, as specified. 
Serve in medium silver baker. 



Chicken Hash: 8 ozs. meat (60 cents) 



Cooked chicken or fowl, mushrooms, in fine dice, thick- 
ened with cream or veloute sauce. Serve in medium 
silver baker. 



Chicken Hash with Poached Egg or Green 
Peppers: 8 ozs. meat (70 cents) 



With chopped green peppers or poached egg on top, 
as specified. Serve on piece of toast in medium silver 
baker. 



Chicken croquettes: Three (50 cents) 



Same as Hash. Reduced, thickened, with yolk of egg, 
rolled croquette shape 2% inches long, IV^ inches 
thick, breaded, fried. Serve on 10-inch silver platter. 
Do not fry in advance. 



236 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



ORDERS, SIN(;LB PORTION AXD PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Chicken cutlets: Three (50 cents) 



In cutlet shape. 



Chicken cutlets with Peas: Three (60 
cents) 



With green peas oh same platter. 



Chicken Kromeskies: Three (50 cents) 



Same as Croquette.?, 
crisp. 



No crumbs; dip in batter; fry 



Salpicon of chicken similar to chicken hash in heated 
patty shells. Serve on 9-inch silver platter garnished 
vpith parsley. N o sauce. 

Prepare as Fricassee in large earthen dish vrith thin 
veloute sauce, salt pork and mushrooms, sliced, a tew 
Parisian potatoes, small onions, covered with paste, 
baked. Serve in dish on 9-inch silver plalter. 



Chicken patties: Two (50 cents) 



Chicken Pie: Individual: 4 ozs. chicken 
(50 cents) 



Chicken with Bice: Half or whole, as or- 
dered (1/2 — 85 cents; 1 — $1.60) 



Chicken boiled as for Fricassee, not taken apart, veloute 
.sauce, rice finished with broth, sliced mushrooms. 
Serve on 12-inch silver platter on bed of rice, masked 
with veloute sauce. 



Curry of Chicken: Same as Fricassee Like Fricassee, veloute thickened with curry, serve in 
(% — S5 cents; 1 — $1.60) medium silver baker. Rice served separately in small 

silver baker. 



Boast Wild Duck: Half or whole, as or- 
dered (l^ — 60 cents; 1 — $1.10) 



Mallard size. Do not cut off feet. Dress with head 
between the shoulders and roast rare unless otherwise 
ordered. Waiters must notify chef when customer is 
ready to have the duck. 

Serve on thick crouton, whole or half as ordered, on 10- 
inch silver platter; natural juice prepared, seasoned, 
.strained and served separatelj'. Currant jelly in sauce 
boat. Garnish with parsley. 



Salmi of Wild Duck: Medium baker (50 Roast wild duck minced and braised in demi-glace and 
cents) essence gained from carcass, seasoned, finished with 

red wine, olives turned, garnished with small croutons; 
cut in triangles. 



Illnced Turkey: 8 ozs. meat (50 cents) 



Same as Chicken. 



Minced Turkey with Poached Egg's: 

meat (60 cents) 



Same as Chicken, with poached egg 



„ , _ .. , „ X, X m, ,r.n Same as Chicken Croquettes. Serve with peas saute on 

Turkey Croquettes and Cutlets: Three (60 plotter, if specified. Cream or tomato sauce on plat- 

'^®"'®' ter, if specified. 

Boast Haunch of Venison: 8 ozs. (60 Venison larded, leave in marinade as long as possible. 



cents) 
Saddle of Venison: 8 ozs. (60 cents) 



roast in marinade, rare, unless otherwise specified. 
Sauce finished with red wine. and essence gained from 
the bones, trimmings and juice of marinade. Thicken 
with cream soured with lemon juice. Serve sauce in 
boat. Slice meat on 12-inch silver platter. Currant 
jelly separate. Garnished with sliced lemon. 



Venison Saute, Chasseur: Medium silver 
baker (60 cents) 



Meat cut in large dice, saute and stew in sauce finished 
as for Venison (no creani), garnish with glazed onions, 
salt pork and sliced mushrooms. 



CrBII.i;i:i> DISHES: 



All articles prepared on the broiler are to be served with 
Maitre d'Hotel butter, except in such cases where its 
use is obviously wrong, as crisp bacon, for instance. 
The Maitre d'Hotel butter is especially useful in the 
case of meats, poultry and fish in order to preserve 
the juiciness of the article and to add to its flavor. 
In the case of beef and game a few drops of liquid 
meat glaze will also add to the attractiveness of the 
article. 

Maitre d'Hotel Butter: — 1 lb. fresh butter, pepper, red 
pepper, salt, juice of two lemons, plenty of chopped 
parsley; mix well, roll into stick of diameter of about 
half a dollar. Keep the sticks on ice all the time, and 
they will keep indefinitely, slice oft pieces of about 

• half an inch tliickness. 



Sirloin steak: 1 

trimmed 



lb. 4 oz., including bone, ^-^^^^ ^'/^ ^"'^'^^^ ^^'"^^^ garnish with maitre d'hotel 
(80 cents) butter, water cress or parsley. Serve on 13H-mch 



f'hina platter; carvers. 



Tenderloin steak: 
cents) 



1 lb. 



trimmed (85 (Cut about 1% inches thick), same as Sirloin. Serve on 
13% -inch china platter. Carvers. 



Club Sirloin (for two) : 2y2 lbs., trimmed, (Cut about 2% inches thick.) Serve on 15i^-inch china 
including bone ($1.25) platter, garnish same as sirloin; carvers. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



237 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Small steak, witli Onions: 12 ozs. (50 
cents) 



Cut from rump, about 1 inch thick, grilled or saute, 
witli onions, masked saute brown. Serve on 10-inoli 
silver platter. 



Filet Slig'non: 6 ozs. (70 cents) 



Cut from tenderloin, about 1 inch thick. Serve always 
on croutons. Garnish as usual. Serve on 9-inch silver 
platter. 



Small Tenderloin steak witli Iluslixooms : 
9 ozs. (85 cents) 



Steak saute or grilled, on round piece of crouton, 
masked with Madeira sauce and sliced mushrooms. 
Serve on 10-inch silver platter. 



Spring Iiamlb Chops: Two or three, as 
ordered (2 — 60 cents; 3 — 75 cents) 



Serve on triangles of crouton, frills on bones. Serve 2 
chops on 9-inch; 3 chops on 10-inch silver platter. 
Garnish with parsley or cress. 



I^amb Ckops: Two or three, as ordered 
(2 — 45 cents; 3 — 65 cents) 



Serve same as Spring Lamb Chops. 



Eng-lish Mutton Chop: One chop, 16 ozs., 
including kidney (50 cents) 



Cut from loin 2 inches thick, including bone, un- 
trimmed, rolled up with a kidney in centre, keep to- 
gether by means of a skewer. Garnish as usual. 
Serve on 1 0-inch silver platter; no Saratoga chips un- 
less specified. 



FTench Mutton Chops: Two or three, as 
ordered (2 — 45 cents; 3 — 60 cents) 



Same as Lamb Chops. 



Itamh steak: One piece, 12 ozs. (60 cents) 



Cut from leg, including bone, about 1 inch thick, 
on 10-inch silver platter. Garnish as usual. 



Serve 



I^amb Cutlets: Two pieces, 6 ozs. (60 
cents) 



Slice from leg, about % inch thick. Serve on 9-inch 
silver platter, garnish as usual. String beans, saute, 
if specified, on same platter. 



Pork Chops: Two or three, as ordered 
(2 — 45 cents; 3 — 60 cents) 



Grilled or saute, as ordered. Serve 2 chops on 10-inch; 
3 chops on 12-inch silver platter. Frills on bones; 
garnish as usual. 



Pork Tenderloin: Two slices (60 cents) 



One tenderloin split in two, trimmed, 
silver platter. 



Serve on 10-lnch 



Kam: 8 ozs. (40 cents) 



Two horseshoe cuts, 4 oz. each, broiled or fried, as or- 
dered. No maltre d'hotel butter. Serve on 10-inch 
silver platter. Parsley. 



ozs. (40 cents) 



Six slices bacon broiled or fried, as ordered. No maitre 
d'hotel butter. Serve on dry, hot 10-inch silver plat- 
ter. Parsley. 



Basher Bacon: 3 ozs. (20 cents) 



Two slices, broiled or fried, 
other dish. 



Only served with some 



Broiled Chicken: Half or whole, as or- 
dered (H — 80 cents; 1 — $1.50) 



Half broiled chicken, raw milk-fed broiler cut in two. 
leg stuck in lower part of carcass to prevent stretch- 
ing. Serve on 12-inch silver platter. 

Whole broiled chicken: — Split open in back, flatten with 
meat clea.ver, fasten legs and broil whole. Serve on 
13%-inch china platter. 

Serve broiled chicken on large square crouton. Maitre 
d'hotel butter, garnished with cress or parsley. Carv- 
ers. 

Other fowl, domestic or wild, treated in similar way. 



Venison steak: 12 ozs. (60 cents) 



Cut from leg, same as Lamb Steak. 



Mixed Grill: (65 cents) 



Calf's Liver and Bacon: Three slices liver, 
p'our half slices bacon (50 cents) 



One lamb chop, one lamb kidney, rasher of bacon, two 
sausages, one tomato split and all broiled together. 
Serve on 12-inch silver platter, garnish as usual. 

Liver sliced thin, seasoned, passed in flour, both saute, 
grilled only if so ordered. Serve on 10-inch silver 
platter with original butter; garnish with parsley. 



Broiled (Veal) Kidney with Bacon: Kid- 
ney two slices, 3 oz. each. Four half 
slices bacon (50 cents) 



Kidney sliced, seasoned, buttered, broiled; serve on 
crouton with bacon over it on 10-lnch silver platter. 
Maitre d'hotel butter. 



Veal Kidneys saute: Medium silver baker 
(50 cents) 



Kidneys sliced very thin, saute quickly with chopped 
onions and sliced mushrooms, finished with reduced 
Madeira sauce, chopped parsley on top. 



Veal Kidney, saute, Creole, Etc.; Same as 
saute (50 cents) 



Same as saute, with garniture Creole (Spanish sauce). 



238 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



ORDERS, SINGLE I-'ORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Calf's Head, vinaigrette: 8 ozs. (50 cents) 



Calf's head soaked, blanched, boiled, served lukewarm 

in pieces on 10-inch silver platter. 
SAUCE VINAIGRETTE separate in sauce boat. Sauce 

made of vinegar, oil, chopped onions, pickles, fines 

herbes, strongly seasoned. 



Calf's Head, poulette: Medium silver 
baker (50 cents) 



Blanched and braised, white poulette sauce with sliced 
mushrooms, chopped parsley. 



Calf's Head, tortue: Medium silver baker 
(50 cents) 



Blanched, broised, Madeira sauce, with garniture of 
olives, quenelles of forcemeat, mushrooms. 



Calf's Brains, saute: 6 ozs. (50 cents) 



Brains boiled in well garnished water, cool oft in water, 
sliced, seasoned, passed in flour, saute in butter. Serve 
on 9-inch silver platter masked with black butter and 
vinegar. 



Calf's Brain, Pried with Green Feas: 6 

ozs. (50 cenLs) 



Same as saute, except slices breaded and fried quickly. 
Serve on croutons on 9-inch silver platter; peas on 
same platter. 



Beef and Kidney Pie: Individual (50 
cents) 



Beef cut in dice, kidneys sliced and prepared as. for 
Kidney saute, in large earthen dish, covered with 
paste, bake. Serve in dish on 9-inch silver platter. 



COI.I> DISHES: 



Always serve cold meats on cold 10-inch silver platter, 
garnished with cress or parsley and chopped meat 
jelly. A large cold plate for service always. Serve 
various sauces and mustard. 



Soups, cold: (Price sanae as for hot soups) 



Double Consomme in Jelly: Per cup 

(Price same as for hot soups) 



Serve in cup on medium size plate; dessert spoon. 



Cold Tomato Broth: Per cup (Price same 
as for hot soups) 



Serve in cup on medium size plate; dessert spoon. 



Cold Strained Chicken Grumlio: Per cup 

(Price saine as for hot soups) 



Serve in cup on medium size plate; dessert spoon. 



Cold Egg's in Jelly, Chartres: Two eggs 
(40 cents) 



Poached, on toast, jellied with taragon. 
inch silver platter. 



Serve on 9- 



Stuffed Eggs: Two eggs (40 cents) 



Hard boiled, yolk taken out, prepared, seasoned, filled 
and jellied, with tartar sauce. Serve on 9-inch silver 
platter. 



Cold Eggs, ravigote: Two eggs (40 cents) 



Stuffed, jellied, with cold Ravigote sauce, 
inch silver platter. 



Serve on 9- 



Cold Iiake Trout: 1 lb. trimmed (50 cents) 



Boiled. Serve on 10-inoh silver platter; sliced cucum- 
bers and tomatoes on same platter. Vinaigrette sauce 
separate in boat. 



Cold Salmon steak: 1 lb. trimmed (50 
cents) 



Serve on 10-inch silver platter on bed of lettuce, with 
sliced cucumbers, garnished with parsley and quarter 
lemon, mayonnaise in sauce boat. . 



Salmon in Jelly: 1 lb. (50 cents) 



Steak cold, jellied, tartar sauce separate; served same 
as Cold Salmon. 



Mayonnaise of Pish: 1 lb. (50 cents) 



Boiled cold fish, prepared same as Lobster or Crab 
Salad, capers sprinkled over it; serve on lettuce leaf 
on 1 0-inch silver platter, garnished with fllets of an- 
chovies. 



Assorted Cold Meat: (50 cents) 



Ham and roast beef one slice each, ox tongue two slices 
(if small), little chicken; serve on 10-inch silver plat- 
ter, garnished with water cress or freish parsley and 
chopped meat jelly. Large cold plate. 



Cold Beef: 12 ozs. meat (50 cents) 



One or two slices. Garnished as usual, 
inch silver platter. 



Serve on 12- 



Cold Beef with Potato salad: 12 ozs. meat 
(60 cents) 



Potato salad on lettuce leaf, must be served on the same 
platter. 



Cold Ibamh: 8 ozs, (From July 1st, 50 
cents; from March to July, 65 
cents) 



With meat jelly or with mint jelly If specified. Serve 
on 10-inch silver platter. 



Cold Iiamh with String Beans salad: 8 

ozs. (From July 1st, 60 cents; from 
March to July, 75 cents) 



String beans seasoned with French dressing on lettuce 
leaf on same platter with lamb. 



Cold Ham: 10 ozs. (40 cents) 



Same as Beef. 



Cold Pork: 10 ozs. (50 cents) 



Same as Beef. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



239 



OEDEHS, SINGLE PORTION AND PEICE 



rKEPARATION AND SERVICE 



Cold Beef Tongue: 10 ozs. (40 cents) 



Same as Beef. 



Cold Cliicken and Ham: 6 ozs. ham, 4 ozs. 
chicken (60 cents) 



Chicken and ham sliced, garnished as usual. 



Jelliecl Chicken: Individual (60 cents) 



Chicken and forcemeat, jellied, decorated, unmoulded 
on 9-inch silver platter, garnished with chopped jelly 
and parsley. Carvers. 



Jellied Turkey: Individual (60 cents) 



Same as Jellied Chicken. 



Cold Turkey: S ozs. (60 cents) 



Sliced, 
usual. 



Serve on 10-inch silver platter, garnished as 



Cold Turkey and Ham: 6 ozs. ham, 4 ozs. 
turkey (60 cents) 



Same as Cold Chicken and Ham. 



Cold Boast Chicken: Half or whole, as 
ordered (% — SO cents; 1 — $1.50) 



Served half or whole or sliced, as ordered, on 12-inch 
silver platter. Garnish as usual. 



Cold Ham and Beef Tong'ue: 6 ozs. ham, 
4 ozs. tongue (40 cents) 



Sliced. Serve on 10-inch silver platter, garnish as usual. 



GAME, ETC., FIBS: 

Cold Chicken or Ham Fie (Galantine) 

One slice (50 cents) 



One slice as cut from pie, one-half inch thick, weight 
about 10 oz. Serve on 12-inch silver platter, garnished 
as usual. 

GALANTINE OF CHICKEN:— Chicken boned, stuffed 
with forcemeat, seasoned and garnished with ham, 
tongue, truffles, etc., larded, poached, pressed. 

HAM PIE: — Ham. Forcemeat baked in crust, in terrine. 
Serve same as Galantine. 



Meat salad: 10 pzs. (50 cents) 



Salpicon of meats and cold vegetables, with mayon- 
naise, decorated on bed of lettuce. Serve on 10-inch 
silver platter. 



Asparagnis, Cold: 10 stalks or one can 
(Fresh, early season, 45 cents; 
Later, or canned, 35 cents) 



Fresh or canned on bed of lettuce. Serve oh 10-inch 
silver platter. Vinaigrette sauce or French dressing 
in sauce boat. 



Vegetable salad: 12 ozs. (30 cents) 



Vegetables of all kinds, cut in pearls or small dices, 
cooked, seasoned with mayonnaise. Serve on lettuce 
leaf on 10-inch sllA'er platter. 



Chicken salad: 10 inch platter full (50 
cents) 



Cooked chicken cut in dice, celery cut in dice, mixed 
with well-seasoned mayonnaise, garnish with hard- 
boiled e.ggs, beets, etc., etc. Serve on lettuce leaf on 
10-inch silver platter. 



VEGBTABKES: Single orders in 5% inch 
silver baker; double orders in SM: 
inch silver baker (15 cents per or- 
der, unless otherwise specified) 



General: — All fresh vegetables must be cooked to pre- 
serve natural color. They must be cooked in boiling 
salt water and kept boiling until done, and if not used 
immediately, cooled off in fresh water. 

Canned vegetables must be extracted from can, the 
water discarded. Under no circumstances must they 
be heated in the tin or cooked in the tin water, or 
allowed to stand in the can. 

See special Instructions re underlining bakers. 



Asparag'us: Individual tin or ten fresh 
stalks. (Fresh, early season, 45 
cents; later, fresh and canned, 35 
cents) 



Serve on 10-inch silver platter on toast, if specified, 
drawn butter always or hollandaise sauce, if specified, 
in sauce boat. 



Artichokes (French): One (20 cents) 



Trimmed with sci.5sors and tied together, boiled, served 
hot on 9-inch silver platter with hollandaise sauce. 
Cold with vinaigrette sauce. 



Jerusalem Artichokes: Baker full (20 
cents) 



Peeled, turned nicely, boiled, in cream, serve in baker. 



Beans (fresh): Baker full (15 cents) 



Various kinds of beans, boiled, saute in butter, or cream 
sauce, as specified. 



Beans (dry): Baker full (15 cents) 



Dry beans must be well soaked before boiling; various 
sauces and preparation, as specified. 



Beets: Baker full (15 cents) 



Boiled, buttered, creamed, pickled, etc. 



Brussells Sprouts: Baker full (15 cents) 



Boiled (not overdone), saute, creamed, ^^'ith chestnuts, 
etc., as specified. 



•Catiliflower : Silver baker full or, if baked, 
in small crockery baker (15 cents) 



BOILED: — Various styles, saute, creamed. 

PLAIN: — With hollandaise sauce. 

POLONAISE: — Saute, with brown butter, breadcrumbs 

and chopped hard egg over. 
AU GRATIN: — Creamed with cheese, crumbs, butter, 

small earthen dish, glazed. 



240 THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE PREPARATION AND SERVICE 

Cabbage, Kale, Etc.: Baker full (15 cents) BOILED, various styles as specified. 

Savoy CaTbtoag-e- Eng-lish Style: — Plain, buttered and seasoned. 

White Cabbage: ^""""^ Style :-BoiIed, chopped fine, roux, gravy or 

v..iiii,o \,auua,s<!. cream as specified. 

Rea Cabbage: Balier full (15 cents) Always prepared French style, braised with sour apples 

and red wine. 

Carrots: Baker full (15 cents) Peeled, turned, boiled, saute, or creamed, little sugar. 

Various styles. Vichy: — Sliced thin, white roux and 
gravy, butter, chop ped parsley. 

_ , _. . „ ,. , , ^^ ^ Blanched and braised in cream or demi-glace, served 

Celery, Chicory, Endives (cooked) : One ^j^^j^ „„ ^.j^^^^ ^d^e^ platter, if specified. If cut in 

stalk (15 cents) pieces one inch long, serve in baker. 

Knob Celery: Baker full (15 ceni s) Boiled, braised or stewed, £s specified. Cold for salads. 

Corn, on cob: One large ear, or two small ^ ,, ^. u. ■ t r,-ijc5 j n s„„^ 

ones. (Early season, 20 cents; O"^"^' l^':f ""^ "="* '\\^'°- """'Y-, ^^^^"^ °" ^-'"^"^ 
later 15 cents) silver platter; cover with large doily, or napkin. 

Corn, off cob: Baker full (15 cents) Scraped off (not cut off), creamed, buttered, au gratin, 

as specified. 

Succotash: Baker full (15 cents) Scraped corn, creamed, with lima beans. 

Cucumbers (cooked): Baker full (15 Blanched, braised in demi-glace, or fried, breaded, or 
cents) stuffed and braised, as specified. 

Egg Plant (fried): Two or three small As cut off plant, breaded, fried in friture; serve on 9- 
slices (15 cents) inch silver platter. 

Gumbo (Okra): Baker full (15 cents) Cut in pieces about two inches long, boiled, braised, 

creamed, as specified. 

Zieeks: Valuable as ingredient for soups, etc. 

I^entils: Baker full (15 cents) Well soaked, boiled, stewed in gravy, etc.; as side dish 

for game, etc., mashed, strained. 

Mushrooms (fresh broiled): Eight large Buttered, broiled; serve on crouton with quarter lemon 
or ten medium (60 cents) and parsley, on 9-inch silver platter. 

.„ , , , ^, ^ , ^ „ , Fresh mushrooms, turned, rubbed with lemon, placed 

Presh Mushrooms (other styles): Baker i„,^eaiately in water with lemon; braised, saute or 
full (50 cents) creamed, as specified. 

Onions, boiled: Baker full (15 cents) Boiled, buttered, creamed, as specified; one large or two- 

medium. 

Onions, braised: One large or two mediuin Blanched, stuffed "with forcemeat, braised in demi-glace; 
(15 cents) serve on 9-inch silver platter. 

Oyster Plant, Parsnips: Baker full (15 Scraped, placed in water with lemon, blanched, stewed 
cents) in cream; cut in pieces about three inches long. 

Oyster Plant, fried: (15 cents) Treated and blanched as above, marinaded, dipped in 

batter, fried in friture, serve on 9-inch silver platter. 

Peas, fresh or canned: Baker full (15 Coiled, saute, buttered, little powdered sugar and salt, 
cents) ^^ cream, as specified. 

Prancaise: — Fresh, blanched, braised in gravy with 
salt pork and lettuce in chiffonade, thickened with 
Meuniere butter. 

Peas, split and dry: Baker full (15 cents) Soaked, boiled, puree strained. 

Blanched, cut in centre, stuffed with forcemeat, braised. 
Peppers (Pimentos) green and red: Two brown gravy. Serve on 9-inch silver platter. Garnish, 
peppers (30 cents) with parsley. 

Peppers are used mostly chopped fine or en chiffonade, 
with other garnitures. When for hash of all kinds 
chopped green peppers are used raw, sprinkled on 
top of dish at moment of serving. 

Rice: Baker full (15 cents) Soaked, boiled or braised, as specified. 

Risotto: Baker full (15 cents) Raw rice, fried in butter with chopped onions, gravy; 

steam in oven until done. Various styles. 

Sorrel and Spinach: Baker full (15 cents) Prepared same as Cabbage in English and Prench 

styles. 
Squash: Baker full (15 cents) Mashed, fried or baked. ' 



Tomatoes (cooked) : Baker full C15Z77I~, I ', ~. 7T~. 

cents) Stewed, saute, creamed au gratm, as specified. 

Tomatoes (cooked): Two pieces, if large; Baked, broiled, braised or stuffed, as .specified. Serve 
three pieces, if small (25 cents) on 9-inch silver platter. 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 241 

ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AM) PRICE PREPARATION AND SERVICE 

Truffles: Used only sliced or chopped fine as accessories to sauces, 

etc., as specified. 

Turnips: Baker full (15 cents) Mashed, boiled, creamed, etc., as specified. When in 

cream turn nicely in regular uniform pieces size ol new 
carrot. 

Potatoes, boiled: Two large potatoes (10 „ T~, 

cents) Pgglg'^- 

Potatoes, mashed: Baker full (10 cents) Peeled, boiled, mashed and strained. Sea.son with salt 

only; butter, worlc well, diluting the potatoes with hot 
milk. 

Potatoes, baked: One potato (10 cents) Special large potato only. Baked in skin. Do not bake 

too many at one time, but renew the supplies at In- 
terv.-\ls during meals. Serve on 9-inch silver platter, 
potatoes being cut open lengthwise and crosswise, piece 

of butter dropped in opening. Paprika if desired. 

New Potatoes: Two or three, according Boiled with skin always. Remove skin, rissole, in 
to size. Early season (20 cents) cream, browned, etc., as specified. 

Sweet Potatoes, mashed, hoiled, baked: 

One or two, according to size (15 Mashed, serve in baker. Boiled and baked on 9-inch 

cents) silver platter. 
G-rilled Sweet Potatoes: One or two, ac- Boiled, cut in square slices about % inch thick, but- 
cording to size (20 cents) tere d, grilled. Serve on 9-inch silver platter. 

Sweet Potatoes, saute: One or two, ac- Sliced in round thick slices, saute in butter, served in 
cording to size (20 cents) medium silver baker. 

„ 4. — 4. 4. ,, . . _ . Same as saute, placed in pan, well buttered, plenty of 

Sweet Potatoes, Louisiana: One or two, ^ojasses; butter on top, bake in oven. Serve in 
according to size (20 cents) medium silver baker, with the syrup reduced. 

Sweet Potatoes, g-lazed or candled: One or Prepare as for grilled, place in buttered pan sprinkled 
two, according to size (20 cents) heavily with powdered sugar and glaze in hot oven. 

Prench Pried Potatoes: 9 inch silver Cut raw in uniform sticks not thicker than Vi inch in 
platter full (15 cents) diameter. Blanched in friture and fried crisp; salt 

and dry in towel; serve immediately on platter. Do 
not fry in advance. 

Potatoes, saute, (German fried): 9 inch 

silver platter full (15 cents) Boiled in skin, peeled, sliced, saute in butter. 

Lyonnaise: 9 inch silver platter full (15 

cents) Same as Sauie, with chopped onions. 

Stuffed Potatoes: One large potato (15 Large, baked, top cut off, inside taken out, mashed, 
cents) seasoned with paprika and cream, butter, potato filled, 

cheese and butter on top; bake in oven. Serve on 9- 
inch silver platter. 

Potatoes in Cream: Medium baker full 

(15 cents) Boiled, cut in dice, sliced, reduced in cream. 

Potatoes au 0ratin: Small earthen dish Same as creamed with grated cheese, in earthen dish, 
full (20 cents) grated cheese, crumbs, butter on top, glazed. 

Sashed broxim; 9 inch silver platter full Boiled in skin, peeled, cut in small dice, saute In butter, 
(15 cents) rolled in omelet shape, browned. 

Boast Potatoes: Medium baker full, two Peel, blanche, butter, roast in oven. 

medium potatoes (15 cents) ^ 

Pondaute Potatoes: Medium baker full, Same as Puoast Potatoes; lightly browned in plenty of 
two medium potatoes (15 cents) butter. 

Chateau Potatoes: Medium baker full. Raw potatoes turned in uniform, oblong shapes, saute 
two medium potatoes (15 cents) in butter, finished brown in oven. 

Farisienne: Medium baker full, two medi- Cut in medium round balls, browned or boiled. 

um potatoes (15 cents) 

Kissoles: Medium baker full, two medium Potatoes of small size or cut In large dice, roast quickly 
potatoes (15 cents) brown in butter. 

Croquettes of Potatoes: Three (20 cents) "DUCHBSSB" MASSE: — Mashed, thickened with yolk 

of egg, butter, seasoned, rolled in croquette shape, 
breaded, fried. Serve on 9-inch silver platter. 

Potato Dumpling: Two medium dump- Mashed, flour, eggs, season, bread croutons, poached,, 
lings (20 cents) browned, butter with breadcrumbs on top. Serve in 

medium silver baker. 

Julienne or String Potatoes : Medium plat- Raw cut in julienne, fried crisp. Salt and dried in 
ter full (20 cents) towel. 



242 THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 

ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE PREPARATION AND SERVICE 

Saratog-a Chip Potatoes: Medium platter 

full (15 cents) Raw, sliced in round th in slices, fried crisp. 

Maitre d'Hotel Potatoes: Medium baker Sliced raw, stewed in bouillon, butter, plenty chopped 
full (20 cents) parsley. 

Boston Baked Beans: Individual tin full Serve hot or cold, as ordered, in 7-inch silver baker; 
(25 cents) condiment as de sired. 

All salads to be served on 10-inch silver platter on bed 
SAI^ASS, General: 10 inch platter full; of lettuce, with cold dessert plate for service. Mayon- 
(during summer, unless otherwise naise or French dressing as desired in sauce boat, 
specified, 30 cents) FRENCH DRESSING: — % olive oil, Vi vinegar, Eng- 

lish mustard paprika, white pepper, salt, lemon juice. 

I^ettuce salad: One head (30 cents) Quartered, if not otherwise ordered. 

Iiettuce and Tomato salad: Half head let- Lettuce and tomatoes quartered, 
tuce, one tomato. (Summer, 30 
cents; winter, 40 cents) 

Cucumber^salad^lS ^''g°^^^^^;<=;;""3^^^^g^^^^ Cucumbers sliced thickness of back of steel knife; let- 
winter, 40 cents) tuce quartered. 

Beet and Eg-gr salad: Half head lettuce, 

one beet, one egg (30 cents) Lettuce quartered, beet sliced, egg quartered. 

Potato salad: 10 inch silver platter full Two lar.ge potatoes minced and dressed; no onions un- 
(30 cents) less ordered; dress on two large lettuce leaves, chopped 

parsley on top. 

Celery and Apple salad: One apple, half Apple cut in dice, celery cut julienne. Mix and dress on 
head celery (30 cents) *-^° lettuce leaves. Mayonnaise separate in boat. 

Tomato Surprise: One tomato (35 cents) Cut off top, emptied, filled with celery and apple cut In 

dice and mixed with mayonnaise, cover with the top, 
and serve on lettuce leaf. 

Tomato salad: Two tomatoes. (Summer,' 

30 cents; winter, 40 cents) Quartered on bed of lettuce. Sliced only if desired 

/H„„i,-„.4.-„ , 1 in • I, -1 I J. 4. Bed of lettuce leaves on platter, five slices of cucumber, 

Combination salad: 10 inch silver platter ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ tomato, quarter head celery cut in % inch 

u (, cen s) pieces, a few radishes, half beet sliced, few rings of 

sliced onion and green pepper on top (no eggs). A 
little cress, rOmaine or chicory rnay he added if avail- 
able. ■■ '■ 

Grape Fruit salad: Whole grape fruit on Gr^Pe-^ruM cut in way prescribed, pieces taken out and 
bed lettuce (40 cents) f''*'=/<^ °" '^^'^ °* lettuce. French dressing m sauce 

boat. 

Grape Prult and Orange salad: Half — 

grape fruit and one orange (40 Same as Grape Fruit salad; orange cut in sections, 
cents) 

Pruit salad: (40 cents) Same as Grape Fruit and Orange; add little apple cut in 

dice, and grapes, cut in half, grated walnuts sprinkled 
over. 

Celery and Potato salad: 10 inch silver One large potato, half or whole knob celery, according 
platter full (30 cents) to size; minced, dressed, chopped onions and chopped 

parsley. 

BBSSBBTS: 

Pruit Compotes: Saucer full (20 cents) All compotes served ice cold, with cream in pitcher, 

separate. 

Banana Compote: Two or three, according Bananas sliced, and covered with boiling syrup, various 

to size (20 cents) flavors, vanilla best suited for banana. Cool off gradu- 

ally^ 

Pig' Compote: Saucer full (20 cents) Figs stewed in syrup, flavored with lemon. 

Apple Compote: Saucer full (20 cents) Apples peeled, placed immediately in water with lemon, 

cored and quartered, stewed in sugar water flavored 
with lemon juice and peel, strained. 

Macedoine of Pruit: Saucer full (20 ,, . ^ , , , ^ .^ , . ,. . 

ggjj(g) Various fresh and canned fruits cut m dice, m syrup. 

Apple Pie and other ordinary pies: Indi- Butter pie dish, line with thin layer of paste as lur- 
vidual or quarter large size (15 nished by storerooms, sliced apples or other fruits 
cents) placed inside, flavored, covered with paste and baked. 

Serve on dessert plate, back of cut against the mono- 
gram so that point is facing guest. 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



343 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Deep Disb Apple Pie and other deep Apples blanched and flavored; in small earthen dish, 
fruit pies: Individual, in small covered with paste. Dessert plate, dessert spoon and 
earthern dish (20 cents) fork; cream. Serve in dish on 9-inch silver platter. 



Apple Pritters: Three (20 cents)' 



Apples sliced thick, cored; marinade of sugar, cinna- 
mon, lemon juice and rum or brandy; dip in batter, 
fried in friture. Sprinkled with powdered sugar. 
Various sauces in sauce boat. Serve on 9-inch silver 
platter. 



All other Fritters: Three (20 cents) 



Treated same, or similar, to Apple Fritters. 
Banana, pear, peaches, apricots, pineapple, etc.. 



etc. 



Apple DumpliuETs: One (20 cents) 



V^'hole apple peeled, cored, marinade as for Fritters; 
clothe in thin layer of puff paste, bake slowly; serve 
with both hard sauce and whatever other sauce is 
specified. Brandy sauce or fruit sauce preferred. 

HARD SATJCB (fresh butter, washed in ice water, 
whipped with fine powdered sugar, flavor with brandy 
or rum) on top of dumpling. Serve on dessert plate. 



Fruit Tartlets Two (20 cents) 



All kinds of fruits, in bottom of paste, about 3 inches in 
diameter. Serve on 9-inch silver platter. 



Feacli Cobbler: Individual (20 cents) 



Deep dish peach pie turned out. Made in metal dish, 
to get bottom brown. Peach Syrup, flavored with 
cinnamon. Serve hot on 9-inch silver platter. 



Fruit stewed, flavored; rice boiled in milk, sugared and 

Peaches, Fears, Apples, Apricots with flavored with vanilla and lemon peel. Mould rice in 

Rice: 9 inch silver platter full (20 a small earthen dish; unmould on platter; place fruit 

cents) on top, masked with the fruit syrup. Hot dessert 

plate. 



Fruit Short Cakes: One flfth cut (Price 
varying according to season. Gen- 
erally 2'5 cents) 



One-flfth cut of pie size, cake. Two layers cake with 
fruit and whipped cream alternately. 



Strawberry Short Cake: (In March and 
April, 30 cents; May and June, 25 
cents) 



One-flfth cut of pie size, cake. Two layers cake with 
fruit and whipped cream alternately. 



Assorted Cakes: Individual box (15 cents) 



Remove from box and place on silver bread tray without 
tissue wrapper being opened, this beini? left to the 
passenger; cake to be placed on tray so that when 
opened long wrapper will be lengthwise on tray. Des- 
sert plate for service. Paper doily on bread tray. 



Plum Pudding-: Individual tin (25 cents) 



With hard or brandy sauce. Serve in fruit saucer on 
bread plate. Sauce in sauce boat. 



Pudding's: (Individual, 15 cents; saucer, 
10 cents) 



All puddings served with either cream or sauce sepa- 
rate. All puddings served in individual cup, on bread 
plate; fruit saucer on bread plate for service. Tea- 
spoon. 



Cornmeal, Rice, Sag-o, Tapioca, Farina, 
Noodles Vermicelli Puddings: (In- 
dividual, 15 cents; saucer, 10 cents) 



Diplomat Puddingf: (Individual, 15 cents: 
saucer, 10 cents) 



All cereals and farinaceous compositions for these pud- 
dings to be cooked thoroughly with milk, sugared and 
flavored with vanilla and peel of lemon, etc., the yolks 
of the eggs to be mixed with 'the butter and sugar, the 
whites beaten separately and mixed in before cooking 
the pudding. Bake in pan with water in oven. 

Various cakes cut in dice, fruits, peels, etc., in dice; 
place in pudding cup, flll with custard. 



Cup Custard: Individual (15 cents) 



One quart milk, % pound sugar, 8 eggs, flavored. 



Caramel Custard: Individual (15 cents) 



Mould lined with brown caramel; otherwise same as 
Cup Custard. 



Bice Croquettes: Three (20 cents) 



Steamed Pudding's: Saucer (10 cents) 



Rice cooked In milk, flavored, eggs and butter, roll in 
croquettes, breaded, fried in friture, sugared. Sauce 
separate. Serve on 9-inch silver platter. Hot dessert 
plate. 

English style; of apple, figs, etc., roly-poly of dumpling 
paste, cooked in dish or boiled in cloth. 



Rissoles of Fruit: One (15 cents) 



Of apples, etc. Turn-over style, 
fruit sauce. 



rlazed, served hot, with 



Jellies: Individual (15 cents) 



Wine Jelly: Individual (20 cents) 



Various styles a,nd flavors. Follow instruction on pack- 
age of Jelly powder. Mould in pudding cup, unmould 
and serve in fruit saucer on bread plate. 

Flavor with various wines. 



244 



THE PRACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



ORDERS, SINGLE PORTION AND PRICE 



PREPARATION AND SERVICE 



Pruit Jelly: Individual (20 cents) 



Wine jelly containing macedolne of fruit. 



Ice Cream: Individual (15 cents) 



Serve in chilled fruit saucer on bread plate. 



Water Ices: (15 cents) 



Same as Ice Cream. 



SJierliet, Fundi: Glass (25 cents) 



Various flavors and styles. Water ice mixed wines or 
liquors, whipped white of egg. Serve in punch glass 
on bread plate. 



CHEESE WITH CBACKEBS: (25 cents) 



Individual envelope cheese biscuits on bread plate with 
all orders. 



Canadian Club Cheese: Individual pot (25 
cents) 



To be served in original pot on small linen doily on 
bread plate. Dessert plate for service. Dessert knife. 



Stilton Cheese: (25 cents) 



On dessert plate; clean napkin rolled around the cheese. 
Cheese scoop. Dessert plate and dessert knife. 



Camemhert: Individual tin (25 cents 



Taken out of tin, top crust cut off. Serve on bread 
plate on lettuce leaf. Dessert plate and knife for 
service. 



Other Inaividual Cheese: (25 cents) 



Same as Canadian Club. 



Welsh Barehit: Individual (40 cents) 



Canadian cheese diluted with beer, seasoned, poured on 
a square piece of toast in large earthen baker. Serve 
very hot. 



INDEX TO DINING CAR SERVICE. 



Bacon 237 

Beef 233 

Beverages 228-229 

Bread, Toast, Eolls 226 

Calves Brains, etc 238 

Cereals 227 

Cheese with Crackers 244 

Cigars and Cigarettes 225 

Cofeee, Tea, Cocoa, Milk 228 

Cold Dishes 238-239 

Desserts 243 

Dining Eoom Service 223 

Eggs and Omelets 227-228 

Eish 231-232 

Fruits 225-226 

Game Pies, etc 239 

Grame and Poultry 285 

Grilled Dishes 236 

Kidneys 237 

Kitchen Service 223 

Lamb and Mutton 234 



Lamb and Mutton Chops 237 

Lemonade, etc 229 

Oysters, C!rabs, etc 232 

Pan Cakes 228 

Pantry Service 222 

Pies 242 

Pork and Ham 234-235 

Potatoes 241-242 

Poultry and Game 235 

Relishes 229 

Salads, Meat and Vegetable 239 

Salads, Vegetable and Fruit 242 

Sandwiches 226-227 

Sausages 235 

Shell Fish 232 

Soups 229-230 

Spaghetti, Macaroni, etc 228 

Steaks 236-237 

Vegetables 239-240 

Wine Serving 234 




Index to The Practical Hotel Steward 



Accounting, bar and wine room (Bailey) . . 188 
Accounting system of country hotel, 

European plan 69 

A la carte, The Blackstone 57 

A la carte, Chateau Laurier cards 42-45 

A la carte. Hotel Astor luncheon 54 

A la carte, Hotel Jefferson cards, St. 

Louis 50-53 

A la carte menus 36 

A la carte. Palace Hotel cards, San Fran- 
cisco 46-48 

A la carte. The Eice, Houston 60 

A la carte, room service card 48 

A la carte, shell fish menu 49 

A la carte, Simpson's Tavern, London. .. . 58 

A la carte, special egg bill 36 

A la carte, Statler cards 37-41 

A la carte, supper, Waldorf-Astoria 56 

A la carte, supper specialties, Hotel Astor 05 

A la carte system, American vs. European. 1 

All nations' dinner menu 133 

Ambiguous words, use no 88 

American vs. European, or a la carte sys- 
tem 1 

Analysis of cheeks, American plan dining 

room 33 

Army ration 156 

Art of drinking wine 195 

Assistant steward, duties of, American plan 10 
Assistant steward, duties of, European 

plan 11 

Auditors ' sheet 76 

Average composition and fuel value of com- 
mon food products 9 

Bachelors ' ball supper 133 

Bailey Book, the 189 

Bailey Book, ruling for bar 190 

Bailey system of keeping track of bar and 

wine room 188 

Bake shop equipment for 40-room hotel ... 16 

Bake shop equipment for 250-room hotel. . 15 

Banquets 101 

Banquet book, the, Tellman's 136 

Banquet menus, miscellaneous 109-136 

Banquet prospectus, Eelf 's 138 

Banquet table decoration, Hotel Utah.... 110 

Bar action book (Bailey) 192 

Bar, Bailey book, ruling for 190 

Bar, detailed report on 72 

Bar issue book. Tollman 199 

Bar percentages, getting out (Bailey) .... 192 

Bars, Warden's control of 186 

Bar and wine room, Bailey system 188 

Barrels, cleaning 161 

Beef, retail buying of 204 

Beef, retail cuts of (illustrated) 206 

Bills of fare (see a la carte). 

Bills-of -f are, American plan 86 

Bill-of-fare, dinner, American arrangement 94 
Bills-of-fare for 40-room country hotel, 

European plan 22 

Bills-of-fare for 100-room country hotel, 

European plan 18 

Bills-of-fare for 120-room country hotel, 

European plan 23 



Bill-of-fare headings 88 

Bill-of-fare, lunch, American, specimen. ... 91 

Bill-of-fare, luncheonette 159 

Bill-of-fare making, method of 88 

Bills-of-fare, miscellaneous, American plan. 96 

Bill-of-fare reflects the house. . .^ 86 

Bill-of-fare, Simpson's Tavern, London. . . 58 

Bills-of-fare, supper, American plan 97 

Bills-of-fare to be even in quality (illus- 
trated) 87 

Bill-of-fare, variety in, strive for 95 

Blackstone, general bill-of-fare 57 

Blending wines 162 

Bookkeeping, store room, American plan. . 62 

Bottles, cleaning 161 

Brandy 182 

Breakage and fines book 29 

Breakfast bill, American plan, arrange- 
ment of 88 

Breakfast cards, American plan, specimens. 89 

Breakfasts, club 20-25-118-134 

Breakfast, good at any hour 89 

Breakfast, no waste in preparing 89 

Breakfast prescriptions, club 118 

Breakfast suggestions 21 

Buffet luncheons 99 

Burgundy wine 167 

Business lunch, country hotel 26 

Butter, serving the, American plan 13 

Buying 79 

Canadian Pacific Eailway dining car service 222 

Card system wine room accounting 194 

Carving 139 

Carving and service, American plan, stew- 
ard superintend 28 

Carver, steward should be expert 28 

Catering on Mississippi Eiver 148 

Catering, party 143 

Chef, the, and his crew, American and 

European plans 11 

Chef's portion sheet, Hotel McAlpin 221 

Check, American plan, ruling for 34 

Cheek on American plan dining room 33 

Check for portion sheet, McAlpin 221 

Checker, the 28 

Choice of, on menu cards 128 

Cigars, detailed report on 72 

Cigar issue book, monthly. Tollman 203 

Cigar requisition sheets, daily, Tellman. . . 202 

Cigar room accounting system, Tellman . . . 199 

Claypool room service 152 

Clarenbach's receiving issues sheet 66 

Clarenbach's store room inventory 66 

Classification of wines 162 

Cleaning barrels and bottles 16] 

Club breakfasts 20-25-118-134 

Clyde's wine room accounting (card).... 194 

Coffee pantry 12 

Coffee and tea making 12 

Combination breakfast, choice of, idea. . . . 128 
Commissary department, daily statement, 

Tellman 204 

Condensed menu, exposition of 124 

Control of American plan dining room in 

dual plan hotel 154 



345 



246 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWAED 



Control of bars, "Worden's method. ...... 186 

Cooper W. A., dining car service 222 

Cost of feeding employees estimated 8 

Country hotel, European, accounting system 69 
Country hotel, European plan, exposition 

of 18 

Country hotel, glimpses of a model 22 

Cream and milk, serving the 13 

Daily report of store room issues 64 

Daily statement, commissary department, 

Tellman 204 

Daily wine room issues, Tellman 201 

Decisions, impartiality in 29 

Department expenses, table of 74 

Detailed report on meals 70 

Detailed report on rooms, bar, cigars and 

laundry 72 

Dining car service, Canadian Pacific 222 

Dining car service, special index for 244 

Dining room, American plan, saving in. . . . 68 
Dining rooms, control of dual plan hotel. . 154 

Dinner, American plan 93 

Dinner bill-of-fare, American, arrangement 

of 94 

Dish heaters, the 27 

Dish pantry 13 

Dish washing, satisfactory method of 13 

Duties of assistant steward, American and 

European plans 10 

Early morning duties 27 

Easter cards, menus 113 

Egg^ boiler, the 27 

Egg bill-of-fave, special 36 

Employees, cost of feeding, estimated.... 8 

Employees, the feeding of 5 

Employees, feeding, method of determining 

approximate cost of 10 

English as commercial caterers 145 

Equipment, kitchen for 250-room hotel. ... 15 

European vs. American or a la carte system 1 

Evening dvities, American plan 29 

Feeding of employees 5 

Feeding employees, method of determining 

approximate cost of 10 

Figures from country hotel, American plan 153 

First oiEeers' dining room menus 5 

Five days on Mississippi Eiver 148 

Fixed expenses, table of 74 

Food products, average composition and 

fuel value of 9 

Fruit pantry, American and European 

plans 12 

French not wanted on American bills .... 88 

Fruit brandies 183 

Fuel value of common food products 91 

Game, dressed, preservation of 84 

Garnishing 142 

Glassware (illustration) 197-198 

Guests, steward 's relation to 3 

Gridiron dinner 146 

Headwaiter, steward 's relation to 4 

Help, cheap, no profit in 30 

Help, give a fair trial 3 

Help, managing 17 

Helps' meal hours 14 

Help must respect steward 3 

Help, quality of 30 



Help, rules for government of 27 

High cost of living 136 

Holiday cards HI 

Hotel, first class lunch counter in 208 

Hotel Monthly system, store room account- 
ing 62 

Housekeeper, steward 's relation to 4 

Impartiality in decisions 29 

Important considerations in bill-of-fare 

making 86 

Index to dining car service chapter 244 

Influence' of the press on bill-of-fare.... 86 

Intoxicants, as to 29 

Inventory, storeroom monthly 14 

Inventory, storeroom, wineroom, bar, and 

cigars 66 

Issue book. Hotel Monthly system 63 

Issue book, bar, Tellman 199 

Issue book, cigars, monthly, Tellman 203 

Keeping and issuing stores 64 

Kitchen equipment for 40-room hotel 16 

Kitchen equipment for 250-room hotel. ... 15 

Kitchen utensils, economy in 100 

Labor market to be considered 27 

Laundry, detailed report on 72 

Liqueurs 183 

Lunch, American plan menus 91 

Lunch counter in a first class hotel 208 

Lunch room bills of fare, The Lincoln. .214-217 

Lunch room checking 209-213 

Lunch room, country hotel 26 

Lunch room plan. The Lincoln 210 

Lunch room. The Lincoln (illustrated) .... 211 

Lunch rooms, meet competition of 132 

Lunch room, percentage of profit on 212 

Luncheons, buffet 99 

Luncheon, a la carte 21 

Luncheon, a la carte. Hotel Astor 54 

Luncheon, a la carte, Jefferson 135 

Luncheonette bill of fare 159 

McGillan 's accounting system, country hotel, 

European 69 

Maitre d 'hotel, steward's relation to 4 

Manager, steward's relation to 3 

Managing help 17 

Market list 79 

Market, to 80 

Meals, detailed report on 70 

Meal hours, helps' 14 

Meal tickets 154 

Meat, average composition of edible por- 
tion of different cutsi 85 

Meat, estimated cost (Farmers' Bulletin) . 85 
Meat, net cost of edible portion (Farmers' 

Bulletin) 85 

Meats, preservation of 83 

Menus a la carte 36 

Menus, American plan 34 

Menus for American plan hotel $3.50-$5.00 32 

Menu, after theater supper 134 

Menus, around the world, McHugh collec- 
tion 122 

Menus, 40-room country hotel, American 

plan 30 

Menus for $2.50-a-day hotel 31 

Menu, the banquet, arrangement of 102 

Menus, banquet suggestions 102 

Menus, club breakfast. Hotel Jefferson. ... 134 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



247 



Menus, exposition of condensed idea 124 

Menus, family style 132 

Menus, first officers ' dining room 5 . 

Menus, foreign, McHugh collection 122 

Menu, game, table d 'bote 118 

Menus, holiday cards Ill 

Menus, H. M. M. B. A 103 

Menu, Hotel Somerset, pictorial 108 

Menu, insurance, in policy form 119 

Menu, luncheon, Whipple Farm, pictorial. 106 

Menus, lunch, American plan 91 

Menus, mess hall 8 

Menus, miscellaneous banquet 109 

Menus, Northern Pacific, H. M. M. B. A. 

excursion 120 

Menus, second officers' dining room 7 

Menu, shore dinner 118-132 

Menu, tea room card, Jefferson 135 

Menu, use and abuse of the word 88 

Mess hall menus 8 

Milk and cream, serving the 13 

Monthly cigar issues book, Tellman 203 

Monthly summary of country hotel busi- 
ness, European 75 

Morals must be looked after 29 

New Year's eve selections, menu Ill 

Nicht wi Burns, menu 117 

Orders, single portion, and prices, dining 

ear service 223 

Organizing, governing and feeding em- 
ployees, American and European plans. . 4 

Organization for 40-room hotel, American 

plan 30 

Organization for 100-room European plan 

hotel 17 

Organization for 100-room $2 50-a-day hotel 31 

Organization of 200-room first class Amer- 
ican plan hotel 32 

Organization for 250-room American plan 

hotel 17 

Organization of 500-room European plan 

hotel 35 

Organization of large resort hotel 32 

Pantry, economy in the 13 

Pantry equipment for 40-room hotel 16 

Pantry equipment for 250-room hotel 16 

Party catering 143 

Pastry and bakery 12 

Portions and service of foods for dining 

ear 225 

Portion sheet, McAlpin Hotel, New York. 221 

Preservation of dressed game 84 

Preservation of meats 83 

Prices reference book. Tollman's 78 

Proprietor, steward's relation to 3 

Punch, American plan dinner card on 94 

Qualifications essential for steward 3 

Eecapitulation, Clarenbaeh ruling 68 

Eeceiving book, store room 62 

iEeceiving book, wine and cigar room 199 

Eef erence book, prices, Tellman 's 78 

Eef rigeration 14 

Eeport daily to management, store room . . 64 

Eeprimands 29 

Eequisition blanks 77 

Eesort hotel, organization of 32 

Eetail-Jaiying of beef 204 



Eice, Houston, specialties card 60 

Eoach ran up the spout 68 

Eooms, detailed report on 72 

Eoom service, keeping track of, Henry. . . 152 

Rules for government of help 27 

Rules must be enforced 27 

Saving in American plan dining room. ... 68 

Schedule of service, gridiron dinner 146 

Scotch, Burns, menu 117 

Scrap-table, saving at the 13 

Second officers' dining-room menus 7 

Service plates (illustration) 193 

Service, schedule of, for gridiron dinner. . 146 

Serving, what dishes to use in 142 

Shellfish bill of fare 49 

Shrinkage, how to avoid 65 

Silver pantry, American and European 

plans 13 

Silverware (illustrated) 220 

Simpson 's Tavern bill-of-fare 58 

Special breakfast and suppers, club 131 

Standard of prices, portions, and table 

service, dining car 222 

Statement, country hotel business, monthly 75 

Steaks, weight and price 153 

St. Patrick's day, cards 116 

Steward adapt himself to circumstances. . 3 

Steward and chef work together 86 

Steward 's duties, American plan 2 

Steward must set good example to help ... 27 
Steward's relation to proprietor, manager, 
guests, housekeeper, headwaiter, maitre 

d'hotel 3 

Stock on hand book 64 

Stock relishes out of place on the card. . . 88 

Stores, keeping and issuing 64 

Store room, the 14 

Store room accounting, Clarenbaeh 's 65 

Store room bookkeeping, American plan. . 62 
Store room issue book. Hotel Monthly sys- 
tem 63 

Store room issues, regular liouis for 14 

Store room receiving book 62 

Store room, the steward in the 14 

Supper 97 

Supper a la carte, Waldorf Astoria 56 

Supper specialties. Hotel Astor 55 

Table decoration. Hotel Utah 110 

Table d'hote 94 

Tea 99 

Tea and cofEee making 12 

Tea, virtues of 153 

Thanksgiving cards, menus 113 

Tips 133 

Tronc, what it means 155 

Vegetables, American plan dinner card on. 94 

Vegetable marrow for American tables. . . . 158 

Vintages, table of 184 

Visiting, no, during working hours 29 

Warning signs 29 

Washing dishes, satisfactory method of . . 13 

Washington's birthday cards 116 

Whitewash 158 

Wines 160 

Wine, art of drinking 195 

Wines, classification of, where grown and 

how made 162 

Wine issues 14 



248 



THE PEACTICAL HOTEL STEWARD 



Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines 
Wines. 
Wines 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines. 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 
Wines, 



Africa 176 

America 177 

Austria 170 

Australia 177 

Burgundy 167 

California 181 

Canaries 174 

Central New York 180 

Cotes du Ehone 167 

France (still dry) 165 

Germany 168 

Greece 175 

Italy 174 

Madeira 174 

Mexico 182 

Missouri 180 

Ohio 180 

Persia 176 

Portugal 173 

Roumania 176 

Russia 175 

South America 182 

South of France — Herault, Gard, 



Aude and Pyrenees Orientals 1G7 

Wines, Spain 172 

Wines, Switzerland 175 

Wines, Turkey 176 

Wine room, the 14 

Wine room accounting, Bailey system 188 

Wine room accounting, card system 194 

Wine room accounting, Tellman system . . . 199 

Wine room issue, daily, Tellman 201 

Wine room stock book, Tellman 200 

Wine room, temperature of 14 

Women, hotel for, and menus 131 

Yardman, the 15 




The House of John Willy 

Marketer of 
The John Willy Creations 



The Hotel Monthly. (Est- 
ablished in 1892.) A tech- 
nical journal of world-wide 
circulation, devoted to the 
hotel and catering trades. 
Subscription price one dollar 
the year. No free list. Sam- 
ple copy ten cents. 



The Hotel Monthly Hand- 
book Series. (Hotel Monthly 
Press.) Comprising twenty- 
one standard publications. A 
reference library for caterers. 



The John Willy Specially 
Ruled Hotel Blank Books 
and Loose Leaf Devices. 

(The House of John Willy was 
the first to market specially 
ruled account books for 
hotels.) 



The John Willy Patented 
Rack and Card Devices for 
Keeping Hotel Front Office 
Accounts (the guest ledger 
card kept in the room rack). 
Used by more than 2,000 
hotels. 



The John Willy Hotel Direc- 
tory. Revised annually and 
mailed free, each year, to 
more than 14,000 hotels and 
2,000 clubs ; the free distrib- 
ution paid for by cooperative 
advertising of hotels and bus- 
iness houses. A page an- 
nouncement, 5x8 inches, 
costing $100, is bound into a 
book that is kept alive for 
reference purposes for a year. 
This Directory retails for $1 
the copy. 18,000 circulation 
guaranteed. No other adver- 
tising medium is so numer- 
ously referred to, or so thoroly 
covers the United States. 



The Hotel Monthly Handbook Series 

Also Other Technical Books, Forming a Selected Library of the 
Standard Works of Reference for the Hotel and Catering Trades 

For Sale by The Hotel Monthly. John Willy. Publisher, 443 South Dearborn St., Chicago 



A Selection of Dishes and the Chef's Reminder. By 
Chas. Fellows, Is tbe most popular of Hotel Monthly 
handbook series. Contents includes: 450 entrees of 
meats, fowl and game. 200 entrees suitable for Fridays 
and vegetarians. S9 sweet entrees. 78 hors d'oeuvres — 
hot and cold. 85 salads. 131 soups, broths and bouillons. 
67 consommes. 40 kinds of fisb and 400 ways of cook- 
ing them. 182 sauces, showing their ingredients. 12j 
garnishes, showing their composition. 7 fancy butters. 
10 flavoring vinegars. 8 fritter batters. 50 fancy potato 
dishes for garnishing. 24 miscellaneous recipes. 46 valu- 
able hints to cooks and stewards. BREAKFAST, includ- 
ing fruits in season, cereals, fish (37); fried meats (15); 
entrees and miscellaneous (59) ; omelets (28) ; eggs (35) ; 
cold meats; potatoes (19); hot breads and cakes; 
drinks; specimen breakfast menus. LUNCHEONS, in- 
cluding soups (37) ; relishes ; fish ; luncheon entrees 
(157); luncheon menus. SUPPER, including vegetable 
salads and their dressings (47); chafing dish service and 
cookery (36); wine service. A pronouncing glossary of 
culinary terms giving 734 translations. The book is vest 
pocket size, printed on bond paper, bound in leather. 
Price, postpaid, $1. 



The Lunch Room, by Paul Richards, supplies' a long- 
felt want, not alone for the proprietors of lunch 
rooms as a guide to making and marketing their foods 
and beverages, but also is of great value to hotel- 
keepers; in particular those that have been on the 
American plan and are changing over to European plan; 
or others, established European plan, that are following 
the now very general custom of putting in a lunch room 
in addition to the restaurant. Contains plans, book- 
keeping forms and specimen bills of fare. Price, post- 
paid, $2. 



The Culinary Handbook. By Charles Fellows. The most 
complete reference book for all things culinary that 
has ever been produced in single volume of 200 pages. 
Recipes and explanations for upwards of 4,000 different 
articles and dishes. The book is of especial value be- 
cause entirely in English, and tbe contents are so grouped 
as to be easily found; also there is to tbe book a care- 
fully compiled index so that reference to any particular 
item can be bad on tbe instant. This index also is of 
particular value as a reminder. The book is handsomely 
bound in leather and printed on bond paper. Price, post- 
paid. $2. 



Fellows' Menu Maker with Appendix Menus and Bills of 
Fare. Contains suggestions for selecting and arranging 
menus for hotels and restaurants, with object of changing 
from day to day to give continuous variety of foods in 
season. A reminder for the breakfast, luncheon, dinner 
and supper cards, together with brief notations of inter- 
est to the proprietor, steward, headwaiter and chef. An 
exposition of catering ideas calculated to popularize pub- 
lic dining halls. A chapter devoted to tbe most popular 
soups, fish, boiled meats, roasts, and entrees; also a de- 
partment for banquet bills of fare and suggestions for 
dinner party menus. An appendix of 100 pages of sample 
menus and bills of fare. Price, postpaid, $2. 



Vest Pocket Pastry Book. By John E. Meister. The 
most useful book for pastry cooks and bread bakers 
ever published. The author has produced in condensed 
form a series of receipts for breads, cakes, pies, pud- 
dings, creams, ices, jellies, etc., especially adapted to 
the requirements of the average American hotel, restau- 
rant, bakery, club and institution. The book contains 
five hundred receipts, including hot puddings, pudding 
sauces, etc. (57 receipts) ; cold puddings, side dishes, 
jellies, etc. (77 receipts) ; ice creams, water ices, 
punches, etc. (90 receipts) ; pasties, patties, pies, tarts, 
etc. (68 receipts) ; cakes (77 receipts) ; icings, colorings, 
sugars, etc. (17 receipts); bread, rolls, yeast raised 
cakes, griddle cakes, etc. (60 receipts) ; miscellaneous 
receipts (55 receipts). This book is printed on linen 
paper and bound in leather. Price, postpaid, $1. 



Paul Richards* Pastry Book includes practical recipes 
for breads, rolls and buns of all kinds: puddings, hot 
and cold, oC all kinds; pudding sauces, cakes of all kinds, 
icings, cake ornamenting, pies of all kinds, with tbe 
different pastes and fillings, tarts of all kinds, creams of 
all kinds, ice creams and ices, cups, sherbets, frappes, 
frozen punches, glaces, timbales, charlottes, sweet 
omelets, fritters, compotes, jellies, jams, syrups, ex- 
tracts, sugar boiling, colors the popular candy and con- 
fectionery goods, egg preserving; German, English, 
French, Scotch, and other specialties ; together with 
many useful hints, supplemented with about three thou- 
sand indexed reference lines. It is without doubt the 
most complete and best pastry book ever written. One 
hundred and eighty pages. Leaf measures 6^^x91^ inches. 
Printed on buff linen ledger paper, hand sewed, and 
bound in leather. Price, postpaid, $2. 



Vest Pocket Vegetable Book. By Chas. G. Moore. Is 
the first and only book of the kind championing a 
reformation in vegetable cookery as necessary to the 
great improvement of the average hotel and restaurant 
cuisine. Is in many respects the most important culinary 
book for hotel requirements ever written. One hundred 
and twenty-six pages; an index of over a thousand refer- 
ences; gives the history and the English, French and 
German names of the different vegetables; receipts for 
the vegetable salads, sauces and garnishes. The book is 
not, as its title might infer, an advocate of the vege- 
tarian theory, but, rather, is an earnest plea for a more 
general recognition of the vegetable kingdom, in com- 
bination with the animal kingdom, as a prolific source 
of supply of appetizing, wholesome and nutritious foods 
for mankind. The book is printed on bond paper; bound 
in leather. Price, postpaid, $1. 



The Fish and Oyster Book, by Leon Kientz. Contains 
'400 recipes, including fish of all kinds; shell fish of 
all kinds; frog's legs, turtle, terrapin, snails, scallops, 
shrimps, mussels; tbe stocks, essences, roux and sauces; 
the butters; the garnishings; the forcemeats, batters, 
borders, etc. The book also contains thirty choice menus 
for luncheons, dinners and banquets. The book is so thor- 
oughly indexed that any recipe can be located on ciie 
Instant. The author has been chef of Rector's famous 
Oyster House in Chicago for many years, and is a man 
of international reputation. The book is vest pocket size, 
printed on linen paper, and bound in leather. Price, 
postpaid, .p. 



Vachon's Economical Soups and Entrees. Contains re- 
ceipts for one hundred soups, and two hundred entrees. 
Is a serviceable book for those catering for hearty eaters, 
where cost of meal is first consideration from the cater- 
er's standpoint. All the receipts are for wholesome, 
palatable dishes, and many of them for dishes that can 
be served to advantage in high class catering establish- 



ments. Book Is yest pocket size, printed on bond paper 
and bound in leatlier. Price, postpaid, $1. 

The Practical Hotel Steward. By John Tellman. Forms 
the most complete exposition of the steward's duties 
that has appeared in print. Contains articles on the 
management of help, bill of fare making, banquets, party 
catering, buying, carving; storeroom and wineroom book- 
keeping (illustrated) ; kitchen, bakeshop and storeroom 
equipment (with lists of utensils) ; organization for 
small, medium and large hotels; plan of working depart- 
ment, specimen bills of fare, menus, requisition blanks, 
market lists, etc. ; also an exhaustive article on the 
wines and liqueurs of the world. Price, $2. 

Pocket Prices Reference Book. By John Tellman, For 

use of proprietors, managers and stewards. A classified 
ari-angemont of about 1,500 different articles of a cater- 
er's market list, including provisions, wines and cigars, 
china, glass, silverware, bar, billiards, painters', laundry, 
■engineers' and miscellaneous supplies, kitchen utensils, 
Jnens, carpets, stationery, drugs and general expense, 
witi) space for entry of brand, minimum, and maximum 
price, size of package and quantity purchased. Several 
pages of wax engraved rulings for table compilation of 
quantity, price, averages, etc., by day, month and year 
for comparison with preceding year. These tables are 
ready reference for quantity and cost of coal, charcoal, 
sawdust, milk, cream, salt, ice; stock used by bar; 
amount of commissary purchased; transportation charges; 
house count; cost per capita; total cost of all supplies 
and sorv ice each month ; issues of commissary to the 
various departments; cafe operating and cafe receipts; 
table of freight rates, etc. An exhaustive index listing 
a thousand different articles, is a valuable compilation 
for "i'emiuder" purposes. Book is printed on bond paper 
and bound in leatlier. Price, postpaid, $1. 

Clifford M, Lewis' American Plan Checking System has 
demonstrated its effectiveness in hotels conducted by 
Mr. Lewis during the last six years. Its introduction 
has effected a great saving both in storeroom issues 
and dining-room service. The system is elaborated to 
provide for the meals check system between the front 
office and the dining-room, and between kitchen and 
dining-room; also the system is adapted for hotels 
conducted on both tlie American and European plans. 
Price, postpaid, $1. 

Applegreen's Bar Book, or How to Mix Drinks. By 
John Applogreen, formerly of Kinsley's, Chicago, and 
Holland House, New York. Third edition, revised. This 
little book is intended to serve a useful purpose as a vest 
pocket ready reference where high class bar or catering 
service is demanded. By a careful compounding of the 
different receipts as directed, and the use of only first- 
clasa ingredients, success is assured. The departments 
incliulo: Cocktails, Collins, Coolers, Daisies, Fizzes, 
Frappes, High Balls, Hot Drinks, Mint Juleps, Miscel- 
laneous Drinks, Party Drinks, Punclies, Rickeys, Smashes, 
Sours, Temperance Drinks and Toddies; also menu and 
wine list suggestions. The book is printed on linen 
paper, Jiound in leather. Price, postpaid, ?1. 

The American Waiter. By John B. Goins. Instructs in 
the different branches of a waiter's work from bussman 
to head waiter. Over forty illustrations. The only book 
that shows by means of diagrams table setting, tray 
setting, table building; how to serve different foods and 
wines; and specimen menus, with instruction on service 
for American plan dining-room, restaurant, cafe, buffet, 
and private party. There is a valuable chapter on 
restaurant work. The book is carefully indexed. Vest 
pocket size. Printed on bond paper, bound in leather. 
Price, postpaid, §1. 

The Frank E. Miller Pocket Wages Book for 2S-, 30-, and 

31-day montlis. A series of wax engraved tables on 

bond paper, bound in leather. Invaluable for ready refer- 



ence. Used by railroad systems and large employers of 
labor. Price, 50 cents; or on cloth sheets, 75 cents. 

Preston's Hotel Calculator for computing board bills, 
wages of help, room rent, etc., by the day, week and 
month. 120 pages. Price, postpaid, fifty cents. 

The Rankin Calculating Tables. Price, 10 cents. 

Clarenbach System of Hotel Accounting (Second Edition). 
Describes a complete system of bookkeeping for the 
average hotel of the American plan; and with slight 
changes can be adapted for all kinds of liotels. It util- 
izes the Hotel Monthly patented room rack ledger system 
for the front office, and provides simple and effective 
methods of keeping track of the different departments, 
as store room, wine room, cigar room; also explains 
method of keeping the private office books, including 
.ioui-nal, ledger, and private office cash book. The only 
complete system of hotel bookkeeping in print; profusely 
illustrated. Printed on linen ledger paper; bound in 
leather. Price, $3. 

The Pattison Loose Leaf and Card System for Hotel 
Front Oifice Bookkeeping. By W. C. Pattison; Util- 
izes the Hotel Monthly Patented Room Rack Ledger 

System for its base, and elaborates with cash sheets, 
auditor's sheets, methods of handling mail and express, 
keeping track of bills due, etc., etc. The only book of 
its kind in print. Profusely illustrated. Printed on 
linen ledger paper, bound in leather. Price, $3, 

Hospitality, By John McGovern, A tribute to mine host 
from the time of Babylon to the age of the aeroplane.. 
Price, postpaid, $1, 

The American Pastry Cook. By Jessup Whitehead, A 

most complete work on breads, pastries, ices, etc. 
The recipes have been tested for the last 25 years and 
found to be reliable. The contents include; Part 1^ 
The Hotel Book of Fine Pastries, Pies, Patties, Cakes, 
Creams, Custards, Charlottes, Jellies and Sweet E'ntre- 
ments in variety. Part 2 — The Hotel Book of Puddings, 
Soufiles and Meringues. Part 3 — The Hotel Book of 
Breads and Cakes; French, Vienna, Parker House and 
other rolls, muffins, waffles, tea cakes; stock yeast and 
ferment; yeast raised cakes, etc, as made in the best 
hotels. Part 4 — The Hotel Book of Salads and Cold 
Dishes, Salad dressing, with and without oil. Salads 
of all kinds, bow to make and bow to serve them*; 
boned fowls, galantines, aspics, etc. Price, postpaid, $2. 

Hotel Meat Cooking. By Jessup Whitehead. A book in 
which the instructions for cooking and garnishing are 
so fully and clearly given that a novice can work from 
them successfully. It is considered the best book for the 
average country hotel. The contents include: Part 1 — 
The Hotel Fish and Oyster Book; showing all the best 
methods of cooking oysters and fish, for restaurant and 
hotel service, together with the appropriate sauces and 
vegetables. Part 2^How to Cut Meats and Roast, Boil 
and Broil. The entire trade of the hotel meat cutter, 
roaster and broiler, including "short orders," omelets, 
etc. Part 3 — The Hotel Book of Soups and Encrees. com- 
prising specimens of French, English and American 
menus, with translations and comments. Showing how 
to make up hotel bills of fare, with all the different 
varieties of soups and consommes in proper rotation, and 
a new set of entrees or "made dishes" for every day. 
Part 4— Creole Cookery and Winter Resort Specialties. 
Part 5 — Cook's Scrap Book — ^a collection of stray recipes, 
etc., etc. Index and translation of all the French terms 
used in the book. Price, postpaid, $2. 

The Steward's Handbook and Guide to Party Catering. 
By Jessup Whitehead. Contains a large amount of 
practical and reliable information, and has benefitted 
thousands of stewards in the last twenty-five years. Con- 
tents, include: Part 1 — Hotel stewarding and composi- 
tion of bills of fare. Part 2 — Restaurant stewarding and 
public party catering. Part 3— Catering for private 
parties, and head waiters and their troops. Part 4 — A 
Dictionary of Dishes and culinary terms and specialties. 
Part 5 — How to fold napkins. Price, postpaid, $3. 

Cooking for Profit.and Eight Weeks at a Summer Resort. 
By Jessup Whitehead. This is an all-around book for 
country hotels, restaurants, lunch rooms and the like, 
where it is essential to consider the cost, make the best 
of everything, and adapt one's self to circumstances. It 
is a remarkable volume which shows how money is made 
by boarding people and what it costs to live well. The 
contents include: Part 1— Some articles for the show 
case. The lunch counter. Restaurant breakfasts, 
lunches and dinners. Hotel breakfasts, dinners and sup- 
pers. Oyster and fish house dishes. The ice cream 
saloon. Fine bakery lunch. Quaker dairy lunch. Con- 
fectionery goods. Home-made beers, etc. Part 2 — Bight 
Weeiis at a Summer Resort. Presents a vast fund of 
information regarding the preparing of breakfasts, din- 
ners and suppers, ordinary and extraordinary, stating 
quantities and estimated cost of provisions required. 
Kitchen oquipment. Cold storage. One hundred differ- 
ent bills of fare. Eleven hundred recipes. A dictionary 
of cofkory. Artistic cookery illustrated. Price, $3. 



The Family Cook Book (Whitehead's). Price, $1.50. Hueg'a Art of Baking, condensed. Price, 50 cents. 



The Epicurean. By Charles Ranhofei*. A Franco- 
American culinary encyclopedia. Illustrated with over 

KUO engravings Tliis extensive work (nearly 1,200 

pages) is the result of a lifetime's experience. The 
author, for thirty years the chef of Delmonico's, has 
included iu this massive volume the recipes for the 

dishes, etc., which have made that house famous The 

best and most effectual manner of providing healthy, 
enjoyable, and nutritious food, economically, without 

waste, is a leading feature of the volume It Is so 

written and arranged as to be clearly and fully appre- 
ciated, even by the simplest reader of the English lan- 
guage The work is. in all detail, up to date; all 

recipes have been fully and satisfactorily tested No 

other work of the kind in existence is nearly as thorough 
and extensive as is this one, which may be considered to 

have practically exhausted the subject There are over 

3,700 recipes, in all, in the book An exhaustive index 

occupying 44 pages: also an index for marketing every- 
thing in season A valuable chapter on ice creams.... 

The titlos of dishes, etc., are given both in French and 
Knirlish. Prict^. cloth binding, $S; in half morocco, $10; 
full moropoo. .'S12. 

The Franco-American Cookery Book. By Felix Delioe. 
This is one of the best, most complete and most satis- 
factory cook books ever published. In compiling tbis 
book, the antlior, a chef of international reputation, 
divided it inio 365 parts, each part containing a bill of 
faro complete, with recipe for every disb contained 
therein. These are designed to afford a separate menu 
for ^very day in the year, and with due regard for the 
season and the supplies afforded by the American mar- 
kets. Each recipe is calculated for eight persons, but 
can he varied by simply increasing or decreasing the 
quantities giv en. Price, postpaid, $3.50. 

The International Cook Book. By Filippini. presents 
breakfast, luncheon and dinner menus for each day of 
the year. One thousand pages; three thousand recipes; 
dishes of all countries. Price, postpaid, $1.00 

Guide to Modern Cookery. By -AI. Escoffier of the Carl- 
ton and Ritz hotels, London. SCO pages. The newest 
of the large cook books. Price, postpaid, $4. 

The Creole Cook Book. Price, postpaid, $1.25. 

The Waldorf Cook Book. By Oscar. Postpaid, $2.50. 

Eggs and How to Use Them. By Adolph Meyer. More 
than 500 recipes. Price, $1, 

Dainty Dishes, by Adolphe Meyer, includes hors d'oeuvres 
and savories (hot and cold); fish and shellfish, cold 
entrees, miscellaneous entrees; vegetables; egg dishes; 
cheese dishes. Price, postpaid, $1. 

The American Salad Book, By Max De ILoup. The most 
complete work of its kind. The contents include: 
America the land of salads; the mixing of salads; 
decorating and garnishing salads; salad accompani- 
ments; condiments; serving salads; salad dressings 
and sauces; fish salads: shell fish salads; tapie and 
wild fowl salads; various egg salads; meat salads; 
vegetable salads: fruit salads; fancy salads; miscel- 
laneous salads. Over 200 recipes. Price, postpaid, .?!. 

Salads, Sandwiches and Chafing Dish Dainties. By Janet 
McKenzie Hill. Has thirty-two illustrations, all made 
from photographs of the original dishes and showing a 
ta«?teful way of serving them. The book is in three 
parts. Part one tells how to make aromatic vinegars, 
to keep vegetables and to prepare garnishes; salad 
dressings, vegetable salads with French dressings, other 
vegetable salads, and fish, various compound, and fruit 
and nut salads ; how to prepare and use aspic jelly ; 
cheese dishes served with salads. Part two tells of 
savory sandwiches, sweet sandwiches, bread and chou 
paste and beverages. Part three, of oyster dishes, lob- 
ster and other sea fish, cheese, confections, eggs, vege- 
tarian dishes, etc. Price, postpaid, $1.50. 

Book or Entrees. By Janet M. Hill. Price $1,50. 

Salads and Sauces. By Thomas J. Mtirrey. A little 
handbook of the gourmet's nicest art. Price, post- 
paid. 50 cents. 

Bakers Bread, by Paul Richards, is the best bread 
book published. Price, $1. 

Ice Cream and Cakes. By an American. A standard 
and very useful work. Price, $1.50. 

The American Candy Maker. By Charles C. Hnling. 
Acknowledged to be tl-e best book of its kind. Price, 
postpaid, 35. 

Hueg's Ornamental Confectionery and Art of Baking 

(English and German). Price, $2.50. 



GiU's Complete Practical Pastry Cook. $3. 
GilPs Complete Bread and Cracker Baker. $3. 
Gill's Complete Practical Confectioner. .?4. 



The John TTllly Hotel directory- Pric 



1.00. 



Carving and Serving (by Mrs. Lincoln). Price, 75 cents. 

Preserving and Pickling (Lerake). Price, 75 cents. 

Universal Dictionary of Menus with French, English and 
German translations. Price, fifty cents. 

Menu Terms. By Joseph Cancel. A compilation of 5.000 
lill of fare names with e?iplanatiou in condensed form. 
Price, postpaid, $1. 

Remco's Manual of Apartment House Service. Instriie- 
tions for thi- most part applicable to hotel service also; 
particularly in the maintenance. 300 pages, illiistratt d. 
carefully indexed. Price, $1 

Refrigeration Memoranda. Price, 75 cents. 

The TTp-to-Date Waitress. By Jane McKenzie Hill. An 
exceedingly useful book on table service, which, while 
primarily intended for the private family, the informa- 
tion serves also for hotel work. Price, $1.50. 

Quotations for Occasions (handy for menus). $1.50. 

The Banquet Book. A new book of quotations and ap- 
propriate toasts for menus. Price, $1.75. 

Modern American Drinks. By Geo. J. Kappeler. Con- 
tains recipes for tlie proper mixing of all kinds of 
drinks, suoli as nbsiiithes. cocktails, cups, crustas, cob- 
bk'rs, couh'rs. egg-ncgs. fixes, fizzes, flips, juleps, lemon- 
ades, punches, pousse cafe, frozen beverages, etc. 

Prire. $1. 

Dubelle's Soda Fountain. 490 recipes for summer drinks 
comprising natural and artificial fruit syrups; fruit 
essences; concentrated fruit phosphates; malt phos- 
phates; wine phosphates; soluble flavoring extracts or 
essences; modern punches; milk punches; fruit punches; 
fruit meads: fruit champagnes: fruit juice shakes; egg 
phosphate shakes; fancy egg phosphates; soluble wine 
bilters extracts: Italian lemonade; ice cream sodas; non- 
poisonous colors; foam preparations: latest novelties in 
soda fountain formulas; miscellaneous formulas, etc. 
Price, $1. 

The Menu Book: Practical Gastronomy. By C. Herman 
Senn. A reminder book of especial value to managers, 
stewai'ds. chefs and all who have to compile menus. 
Gives the English and French names of foods and made 
dishes, the pronunciation of the principal words used 
in French menus, and much other useful information. 
Piice, postpaid, $2. 

Senn's Twentieth Century Cook Cook contains over 1,000 
pages, covering all branches of cookery. It is the 
standard cook book of England. Profusely illustrated. 
Price. $8. 

Senn's Art cf the Tahle. Price, $1. 

Senn's Dictionary of Foods, Price. 75 cents. 

Senn's Recherche Entrees. Price. 31-25. 

Senn's Hors D'Oeuvres and Sandwiches. 50 cents. 

Senn's Potato Cookery. Price. 50 cents. 

Book of Salads (Suzanne-Senn), Price, 50 cents. 

Senn's Ices and How to Make Them. Price, 75 cents. 

Senn's Cooking in Stoneware. Price. 50 cents. 

Rottenhofer's Cook Book. Printed in the German, 
Profusely illustrated. Imported. Price, postpaid. .*B5. 

German National Cookery for American Kitchens. By 
Davadis. Printed in English. Price, $1.25. (Same 
book prmted in German). $1.25. 

German Cooking and Baking, by Meier, in German and 
English. Price. $2.50. 

Food Products of the World (Green's). Price, $1.50. 

Senrre's New Fra.ctlca.1 Cookery Guide Price $2. 

The Blue Grass Cook Book, Is made up principally of 
the savory dishes peculiar to Kentucky, and cooked 
by neirro women of tlie "Aunt Dinah" type. Many of 
the retjpps are contributed by Kentucky housewives. 
Price, postpaid, .'pl.50. 

The Hotel Red Book, Lists 15.000 hotels. Price, $3. 

A Year's Suhscrip^ion for Hotel Monthly. $1. Bound' 
volumes of the Hotel Montiiiy for 19O0, 1910, $1.50; 
for previous years, $1 each. 



All the Above Books for Sale by John Willy, 443 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 
Bask) cfsiit by naiil or express, char^fes prepaid, upon receipt of price.