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Full text of "The inter-allied games, Paris, 22nd June to 6th July, 1919;"

THE INTER-ALLIED 
GAMES 1919 




ALBERT R. MANN 

LIBRARY 

AT 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



Cornell university Library 
GV 721.16 
Theinter-a.HedM-Si^:?l.ia.fir 





Cornell University 
Library 



The original of tiiis book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924014114353 




(Design of bronze badge described on page 151). 




THE 
i INTER-ALLIED 
GAMES 





pARI5 

ZzWuNE TO 6™JujLy 

pUDLJSjiED By THE GAA\BS COAVM^TTEE 

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Compiled under the direction of 

MAJOR GEORGE WYTHE 
Infantry 



Edited by 

CAPTAIN JOSEPH MILLS HANSON 
Field Artillery 

Art Editor 

CAPTAIN CARL V. BURGER 
Infantry 





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"^ ■ 1 


m 







The Games Committee. Top ?c/<— Lieut. Col. D. M. Goodrich, G. S., Chief Liaison Section. 
Top center— Col. Wait C. Johnson, G. S., Chief Athletic Officer A. B. F. and Chairman of 
Games Committee. Top righi—W. A. Reynolds, Associate Director Dept. of Athletics, 
y. M. C. A. Bottom left— Ueut. Col.T. C. Lonergan, G. S., Chief Technical Section. Bottom 
right— Elwood S. Brown, Director Dept. of Athletics, Y. M. C. A. and Director General of 

the Games. 



ORIGIN OF THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 




o result was ever yet achieved without a cause; no end 
ever accomplished without a beginning. The present 
volume records the history of the Inter-Allied Games ; impor- 
tant in themselves because of their magnitude, unparal- 
leled in the annals of sport by reason of the circumstances under 
which they were held, and memorable for the good feeling, the pre- 
cision of execution and the close adherence to pre-arranged plans 
which marked their progress. These Games signalized to a vast 
number of soldiers of the various -Armies of the Allies the end of the 
Great War and the beginning, in this unique love feast of divers races 
and nationalities, of a greater and more hopeful peace than the world 
had yet known. But how, at the first, was conceived that ultimate 
objective so clearly that it could be kept in constant focus throughout 
a long period of preparation ? How was devised, and through what 
previous experiences was there an agency capable of devising, the 
mechanism by which, from millions of men, strong but weary from war- 
fare, were sifted out the few hundred physically elite who finally stood, 
clean-limbed and lithe, upon the oval of the Pershing Stadium and con- 
tended before tens of thousands of the Allied peoples for the highest 
athletic honors of the armed hosts of civihzation ? If the Inter-Allied 
Games are to be seen in that sort of perspective from which alone events 
can be truly understood, it is necessary that these questions be answered. 

In a sense by no means fanciful the Inter-Allied Games of 1919 
may be said to have originated with a volleyball and an indoor base- 
ball lying in a trunk whieh arrived in the harbor of Manila, Philippine 
Islands, one day in 1910. This trunk, together with the volleyball 
and the baseball, belonged to Elwood S. Brown who at that time 
went to the Philippines as Physical Director of the American Y.M.C.A. 
at Manila to see what could be done in the way of building up sports 
among, the American civilian population in the Philippines and later 
among the natives. 

Naturally, baseball was much in vogue with American civihans 
and soldiers stationed in the Islands. This rather highly specialized 



12 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

game, however, did not reach the great majority of the Filipinos, to 
whom mass sports of any sort were an unknown quantity. That 
summer at Baguio, the mountain " summer capital " of the Philippines, 
where the American officials took refuge from the intense heat in 
^Manila, the Filipino clerks and other attaches of the government 
were, as usual, very discontented and uncomfortable, the cool weather 
of the place being as disagreeable to them as it was refreshing to the 
Americans. They knew nothing of occupying their idle time in vigor- 
ous physical exercises, but, bringing out his volleyball and indoor 
baseball, Mr. Brown induced a group to begin playing with them. The 
sport interested them; very soon it enthused them. Every day more 
and more Filipinos, not only men but women, came out to play and 
more and more wanted to take part. Games between different groups 
representing different departments were very soon in popular vogue. 
More volley balls and indoor baseballs were imported from the United 
States but the supply could hardly keep up with the demand. The 
games were carried back to Manila and, encouraged by Governor 
General Forbes, Mr. Brown introduced them and gradually other sports 
into the Government departments and into the public schools and their 
popularity spread rapidly throughout the archipelago. The Filipinos, 
ignorant of general play, became enthusiastic participants as soon as 
they discovered that skill was not a prerequisite to enjoyment of 
such games. During the seventh year of mass play development, 
one dealer alone in Manila sold 11,000 volleyballs, practically all 
of them to natives, and manufacturers in the Philippines were making 
them in quantity in the cheaper grades. 

Taking advantage of the newly aroused spirit, Mr. Brown organized 
during 1911 and 1912, competitive games between Americans and 
Fihpinos in which the natives performed very creditably. In 1912, 
at the invitation of the Manila Tennis Club, Kumagae, the Japanese 
tennis champion, came to the Philippines and played against resident 
Americans and the few Filipinos who had developed some skill in the 
game. It was a thing unprecedented for no Japanese athlete, as such, 
had ever visited the Phihppines before. In 1913, through efforts 
made in various trips to China and Japan, both nations were induced 
to send small groups of athletes to take part in a series of Far Eastern 
Games, staged at Manila, the Chinese delegation being accompanied 
by Wu Ting Fang, the distinguished former Chinese minister to the 
United States. The distrust and dislike between the three races was 
a matter of tradition; it had never seemed possible that a Filipino, a 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 13 

Chinese and a Japanese could come together except to transact neces- 
sary business. But on the field of sport they found that not only 
could they meet amicably but, each learning that the other was not 
such a bad fellow after all, a new and mutual respect each for the 
other was engendered. 

The first Far Eastern Games consisted of track and field events, 
baseball, volleyball, basketball, swimming and tennis. They were 
so successful that a permanent organization was formed and largely 
through the agency of the Y.M.C.A. and other associations having 
to do with athletics, more extensive activities were begun in each 
country which had participated. The games were made permanent 
biannual events, the second meet occurring at Shanghai in 1915, 
the third at Tokio, Japan, in 1917, and the fourth at Manila in 1919. At 
the Shanghai Games from 15,000 to 20,000 spectators daily attended 
the events, which roused such widespread interest that when 
Mr. Brown and the delegation of athletes from the Phihppines 
arrived at Peking for the purpose of giving some exhibition games, 
they were summoned to an audience by Yuan Shi Kai, the President 
of China. Escorted through a maze of circuitous passages into the 
center of the Presidential palace and surrounded by burly Manchu 
guards whose presence made the visitors anything but at their ease, 
the interview was, nevertheless, highly interesting and the Chinese 
President learned the truth of the report, which previously he had been 
unable to credit, that the medium of athletics had induced Chinese 
from such politically hostile districts as Canton, Shanghai and Peking, 
to stand shoulder to shoulder as the champions of a common China. 
Thenceforward the Far Eastern Games have commanded the hearty 
support of the Chinese Government. In Japan they have aroused 
great popular interest and enthusiasm and in consequence modern 
athletics have made much headway despite the fact that at first they 
had to combat the powerful counter-influence upon the people of the 
school of Judo, the semi-religious combination of philosophy, art and 
individual physical development whose expression, in the last named 
phase, is more or less understood in foreign countries as Jiu-Jitsu. 
Through the men and the agencies working with him and through 
Mr. Brown's own efforts during the latter part of his time in the Far 
East, modern athletics were also introduced and started on the road 
to healthy development in Siam and through the Malay Archipelago. 
In April, 1918, America being in the World War and having a 
rapidly expanding army in Europe, Mr. Brown requested war service 



14 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

and was brought to France as one of the Y.M.C.A. athletic directors. 
At that time little had been done in the way of organizing athletic 
relaxation among the troops resting near the front or waiting to go 
in the line, chiefly because of demands which seemed more pressing 
for work in other lines. But with this physical director from the 
Philippines came wide experience in organizing, full knowledge of 
the psychology of sport and a vision, founded upon practical demon- 
strations, of the possibilities of bringing divers peoples together in 
friendship upon the field of sport. Becoming a Field Secretary the 
new man began urging in influential quarters more widespread and 
systematic athletic activity in the army. There being no difficulty 
in arousing the interest of General Pershing and securing full 
cooperation from the Army and the Y.M.C.A. headquarters, in a com- 
paratively short time the American Expeditionary Forces themselves 
were being fairly well equipped and directed for the enjoyment of the 
sports in which Americans will always indulge if they are given the 
opportunity. 

But his underlying aims far outran the mere encouragement of 
athletics in their most natural field, among the young men of the 
forces of his own country. In the armies of the Allies, struggling 
in varied and widely separated fields all over Europe, Mr. Brown saw 
multitudes of men bound together by strong ties of sympathy in the 
common ideals for which they were fighting, yet often knowing each 
other not at all. He believed that, after the triumph of the cause 
for which they all were striving, as many of these men as possible 
should be brought together in order that they might know each other 
face to face and thus lay the foundations for those enduring friendships 
which can come only from personal contact and which, in this case, 
were of such fundamental importance to the future welfare of the 
world. In what manner could they be brought together which would 
be most revealing, most harmonizing, most natural ? The answer 
was obvious: by bringing them together as athletes. If a Chinese, 
a Japanese and a Filipino could be induced to sink their racial antip- 
athies when they met on the field of sport, men animated in advance 
by interest in and admiration for one another would be certain to find 
such a gathering pleasant and profitable in many ways. 

To bring this basic idea to fruition was not so easy, however. 
But, watching the developments of the war and beginning, early in 
October, to discern the unmistakable signs of coming collapse on the 
part of the Central Powers, Mr. Brown, who in the meantime had 




Membprs of the advisorv committee of the Inter- Allied Games, in the garden of the Cercle 

Xnter-Allies, 33, rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore, May, 25, 1919. after the luncheon given by 

the Americans in honor of the Allied representatives. 



10. 
11. 
12, 

13. 

14. 
1.5 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 



Lt. Col. H. G. Mayes, C. B. E. (Canada). 

Col. Arturo Leone (Italy). 

Maj. J. A. Cameron (New Zealand). 

Lt. Mario da Cunha (Portugal). 

Maj. Andrea Gastaldi (Italy). 

Maj. S. A. Greenwell, S. C. 

Lt. Col. David M. Goodrich, G. S. 

Lt. Col. See (French). 

Maj. Barbier (France). 

Lt. Col. C. Watson, D. S. O. (Australia). 

Col. Wait C. .Johnson, G. .S. 

Maj. Raoul Daufresne de la Chevalene 

(Belgium). 
Capt. Antonio Mascarenhas de Menezes 

(Portugal) . 
Lt. Nelson Pell, A. S. 
Capt. Horace Bremie (Roumania). 
Lt. Col. E. Martin (Belgium). 
Capt. Andritch (Serbia). 
Mr. Popovitch (Serbia). 
Mr. Gradeojovitch (Serbia) 
Capt. Richard H. Waldo, Inf. 
Mr. W. A. Revnolds, Y. M. C. A. 



22. Lt. Col. T. C. Lonergan, G. S. 

23. Capt. E. D. Toland. Inf. 

24. Maj. Charles C. Bull, Inf. 

25. Lt. Col. Norman Marshall (Australia). 

26. Capt. M. Stern (Roumania). 

27. Lt. F. R. Miller, Inf. 

28. Capt. Ray Harrison, P. A. 

29. Mr. Blwood S. Brown, Y. M. 0. A. 

30. Lt. R. R. Townsend, P. A. 

31. Maj. L. B. Rogers, M. C. 

32. Lt. Hajny (Czecho-Slovakia). 

33. Lt. Col. Paul Watson, F. A. 

34. Maj. G. C. Woodruff, Inf. 

35. Capt. W. Delaney, A. G. D. 

36. Lt. Horace R. Palmer. 

37. Lt. Col. .7. A McDermott, Inf. 

38. Lt. Col. R. M. Hardaway, M. C. 

39. Maj. George Wythe, Inl. 

40. Maj. J. J. McConviUe, Inf. 

41. Maj. B. V. Graves, Q. M. C. 

42. Capt. Ken Wang (China). 

43. Maj. N. A. D. Armstrong, O. B. E. 

(Canada). 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 17 

become Director of the Department of Athletics, A.E.F.— Y.M.C.A., 
on the 15th of that month launched his campaign by writing the 
following letter to the First Section of the General Staff, G.H.Q, A.E.F. : 

October 15, 1918. 

From : Elwood S. Brown, Department of Athletics, Y.M.C.A., Paris. 

To : Colonel Bruce Palmer. 

SUBJECT : Proposed Athletic Program for Demobilization Period. 

CONDITIONS. 

Peace, whether it comes tomorrow or many months from now, should find 
us in a state of preparedness against the inevitable period of relaxation that 
must be met when hostilities cease. This period will bring about an increased 
danger from moral temptations, will be a time of impatient waiting for the day 
of departure for America and will call for very constructive and interesting 
bodily activity if the dangers of disorderly physical expression are to be avoided. 

Fundamentally our Army in France is a physical machine. Physical vital- 
ity is the chief element, the most important asset. Two million men are now 
engaged in the strenuous game of beating the Hun. They are in hard daily 
labor, intensive military training or engaged in actual fighting — physical 
expression, nearly all of it. When this is suddenly taken away no mental, 
moral or social program however extensive will meet the need. Physical 
action will be the call; games and play, informal and competitive, will be the 
answer. It is assumed that a certain amount of military work will be contin- 
ued but it is not believed that this will be found either sufficient or the best 
way to offset the certain reaction that will come about when the fighting is 
over. 

SUGGESTIONS. 

Four activities are suggested below for which in co-operation and conjunc- 
tion with the necessary army committees the Y.M.C.A. through its Department 
of Athletics is prepared to assume the initial responsibility in promotion and 
organization. It should be said that the underlying principle would be to 
conduct a two-sided effort coordinating the athletic play program, both informal 
and competitive, for which the Association would be primarily responsible, with 
the strictly military effort looking towards the accomplishment of the same 
results and for which it is recognized the Army will have a program. 

ITEMS. 

1. Great mass games and play for every possible man — " Athletics for 
everybody." 

2. Official A.E.F. championships in a wide variety of competitive sports 
including military events, beginning with elimination regimental contests, 
ranging upwards through the divisions, possibly the army corps, and culminating 
in great finals in Paris. 



18 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

3. Physical pageants and demonstrations to be held in many centers demon- 
strating to our allied friends America's best in sport, her great play spirit and 
incidentally her finest in physical manhood. 

4. Interallied athletic contests— open only to soldiers of the Allied Armies 
— a great set of military Olympic games. 

Item No. 1. 

This item represents the major portion of the program and unquestionably 
the most important part. The Y.M.C.A. is in a strong position to handle a 
purely recreative effort of this kind. It would introduce the play spirit and 
would keep the activities free from a strictly military aspect ; that is, its recrea- 
tive work could be semivolunteer in character and hence would not be regarded 
by the men as one more duty in the military day's order. 

This item involves for the Association : 

1. The immediate arrangement with at least one hundred of its strongest 
and best trained experts in mass play now in France to remain for the entire 
demobihzation period. Most of these men are now on contracts reading "for 
the duration of the war." 

•2. The placing of an order by cable for at least |500,000 worth of additional 
athletic supplies. An order amounting to $1,085,000 for 1919 has already 
been placed. 

3. The immediate preparation of the necessary instruction handbooks and 
other technical printed matter that would be required. 

For the Army is involved : 

1. Plans to detail a considerable group of noncoms whom our trained athletic 
directors could instruct in the promotion, organization and conduct of the 
groups games adopted. 

2. The detailing, after hostilities cease, of a number of trained athletic 
directors now in the Army who would supplement the efforts of, and work in 
cooperation with, the Association directors. 

3. The appointment of a committee of officers with which and through 
which the Association representatives could work. 

Item No. 2. 

Division rivalry of every sort is characteristic of our Army and is a whole- 
some incentive to better effort. This is particularly true in competitive ath- 
letics and, it is understood, in purely military sports as well. It is believed this 
rivalry can be most constructively capitalized through official A.E.F. cham- 
pionships sanctioned and recognized as such by the Commander-in-Chief. 

This item involves for the Association : 

1. Technical direction of the ehmination athletic contests within the regi- 
ments and divisions of their equivalent units. 

2. The securing of suitable grounds, equipment and the necessary prizes 
for the finals. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 19 

3. The general responsibility for the handhng of the many details such as 
entry lists, arrangements of heats, events, officials and the hke. 

For the Army is involved : 

1. Committees of athletic officers within the divisions to conduct the 
strictly military events desired and to coordinate these with the athletic events. 

2. A group of officers to sit as members of a representative A.E.F. Cham- 
pionships Committee in general charge of the finals. 

Item No. 3. 

The French soldiers as well as the civilian population are keenly interested 
in American sports and the fine play spirit that permeates them. There is 
also unusual interest in American calisthenic drills and a number of other of our 
best-known activities. There is particular interest in baseball and track and 
field sports. Through the Foyer du Soldat baseball has been quite generally 
introduced in the French Army. The American Army could make a lasting 
impression on French sports as well as a most definite contribution to them by 
demonstrating in various great centers in France our popular National games, 
and by putting on great pageants such as are frequently used in our munici- 
palities at home to typify the spirit and traditions of the community. If mili- 
tary band concerts or competitions together with male chorus singing could be 
added, the net result would be at once physically stimulating and strongly artistic. 

This would involve for the Association : 

1. Bringing over from America a number of specialists on events of this 
kind. 

2. The drilling of many large groups of men in the various pageants. The 
general conduct of the games and demonstrations. 

3. Furnishing of the necessary suits for the athletic activities and costumes 
for the pageants. 

For the Army is involved : 

1. Committee with authority to treat with the French officials in the loca- 
tions decided upon as to the use of buildings or fields, permission for parades 
and other required items about which it would be necessary to deal with local 
authorities. 

2. A general committee of officers to work in conjunction with a similar 
Association committee. 

Item No. 4. 

A Military " Olympic " would bring together the best athletes in every 
sport from all of the Allied Armies and would undoubtedly be the greatest 
gathering of athletes ever seen. Entry would be restricted to men who had 
seen military service in the present war. The amateur-professional question 
would be ignored. Such an athletic meeting would unquestionably be a great 
factor in cementing on the field of sport those friendly ties between the men of the 



■20 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Allied Armies that have sprung up on the common field of battle. International 
sports of this kind have always developed mutual respect and understanding. 

For the Association this involves : 

1. Securing and arranging a suitable stadium. 

2. The general responsibility for the technical details. 

3. The furnishing of symbolic and artistic prizes. 

For the Army is involved : 

1. Responsibility for the training of its men entered in these International 
events. 

2. As the initiative in promoting the Games would be taken by the American 
Army, the meet should be of an invitation nature and therefore it is suggested 
that if this item is approved, the Commander-in-Chief formally invite the Com- 
manders of the Allied Armies to send entries and to participate extensively 
in the contests. 

3. The organization of a suitable Interallied-Army Committee to work 
with a technical committee from the Association forming a general operating 
unit for the games. 

It will be observed that the adoption of any or all of the above items calls 
for immediate and definite plans and also financial appropriations by the Asso- 
ciation. These things it is prepared to do, as well as to supply further details 
whenever necessary, if the general outline is approved by the Army authorities 
and the definite responsibihty now placed upon the Association by the Com- 
mander-in-Chief for the operation of the volunteer athletic program with 
the A.E.F. be continued to include the period under discussion and the items 
suggested. 

An early reply will be appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elwood S. Brown, 
Department of Athletics. 



As American General Headquarters could not at this time offi- 
cially recognize the possibility of an armistice, no action was taken 
on the letter but it was placed in the files for future reference. Imme- 
diately after the signing of the Armistice, the Director of the Depart- 
ment of Athletics, Y.M.C.A., renewed to G.H.Q. the expression of the 
readiness of his organization to put into effect the plan suggested on 
15 October, and on 27 November, 1918, the following letter was 
written to the Commander-in-Chief, further elaborating the reasons 
not only for holding Inter-Allied Games but for holding them through 
the initiation and at the invitation of the American Expeditionary 
Forces : 




Opening Day. Toy left fo right — Colonel Johnson, General Pershing, President Poineare. 

Center left — General Pershing presenting Stadium to French government. Center right — 

M. Georges Leygues accepting Stadium from General Pershing in name of Pi'ench government. 

Bottom left to right — Colonel Johnson, General Pershing, President Poineare 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 23 

A.E.F.— Y.M.C.A. 

November 27, 1918, 
From : Chief, Y.M.C.A. 

To : Commander-in-Chief, G-1. 

SUBJECT : Inter-Allied Games— "Military Olympics." 

1. In a memorandum previously submitted relative to a general athletic 
program during demobilization, for which the Y.M.C.A. was prepared to under- 
take the responsibility in promoting, directing and financing, one of the items 
suggested was a great set of interallied competitive athletic contests, which 
might be termed "Military Olympics." It was urged that these games be 
held at the invitation of the Commander-in-Chief of the A.E.F. to the 
Commanders-in-Chief of the Allied Armies. Reasons in support of this sugges- 
tion follow : 

a. Invitation games avoid the customary preliminary meetings which, 
experience in international games has invariably shown, involves long-drawn- 
out and difflcult conferences before general agreement is possible. 

b. Inasmuch as the A.E.F. would be prepared to be responsible through 
the Y.M.C.A. for the promotion, direction and financing of the project, imposing 
no financial obligation on the Allied Armies other than that involved in sending 
their athletes, it is perfectly logical for the A.E.F. to take the initiative in extend- 
ing the invitation. 

c. Such games would be invaluable in still further streilgthening mutual 
understanding and friendship amongst soldiers of the Allied Armies. Infor- 
mation is at hand indicating that such games would be welcomed by many 
English, French, Australian and Canadian officers responsible for physical 
training. 

d. Such games would focus the interest of the athletic world both in Europe 
and in America; would give a striking illustration of the place of athletics in the 
military training of the Allied Armies and would be of absorbing interest to 
great numbers of troops during the somewhat restless period waiting their 
return home. 

2. It is recommended that the Commander-in-Chief extend a formal invi- 
tation to the Commanders-in-Chief of the Allied Armies to participate in a 
series of interalhed athletic games, open only to officers and men who have 
served in the Great War; that the games take place in Paris during the month 
of April, 1919; that they be under the joint control of an Executive Committee 
representing the A.E.F. and the Y.M.C.A. and that the Allied Commanders 
be invited each to send two suitable delegates to become members of an Advisory 
Committee charged with the responsibility of suggesting appropriate events. 

3. In response to tentative inquiries the Y.M.C.A. has discovered that the 
Great National Racing Club of France is prepared to place the Colombes Stadium 
at the disposal of the A.E.F. for the proposed games, provided the Y.M.C.A. 
will undertake the financing and responsibility of repairing the stadium and 
putting it in flrst-class physical condition. The stadium, which is fourteen kilo- 
meters from Paris, was the site of the 1900 Olympic Games. 



24 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

4 Speedy action is desirable regarding the whole proposition as it is possible 
that a somewhat similar proposal, but on a less satisfactory basis, may be forth- 
coming from another source. 

We believe that if the Commander-in-Chief were to inform the French 
authorities that he desired to arrange for such games unless the French had 
objection, that an affirmative answer would be forthcoming. 

(Signed) E. C. Carter. 

Chief A.E.F.— Y.M.C.A. 

On 1 December, Colonel Wait C. Johnson, General Staff, an 
expert in athletic matters and in his own person an athlete of wide 
Army repute, was transferred from the Intelligence Section, G.H.Q., 
in which he had been chief of the subsection charged with coordinating 
information concerning the enemy order of battle (G-2-A), and made 
Chief Athletic Officer of the A.E.F. His work in this highly impor- 
tant capacity will be further mentioned presently. But, as connected 
with the present subject, on 16 December, 1918, the Director of 
the Department of Athletics, Y.M.G.A., addressed to him a letter 
making some very clear and definite proposals concerning the projected 
Inter-Allied Games. The exactness with which these proposals were 
executed shows how clearly the Director had thought out the problem 
and how thoroughly conversant he was with the elements of the situa- 
tion. He says : 

It is recognized that, in the event of a favorable attitude on the part of 
the Commander-in-Chief to the proposal that he invite the Commanders-in- 
Chief of the Allied Armies to send men to participate in a series of interallied 
athletic competitions, certain details will need to be available for his information. 

Basis for games. 

The direct invitation of General Pershing to the Commanders-in-Chief of 
each of the Allied Armies to send men to participate in a series of interallied 
athletic competitions to be held in the coming spring at a time and place to be 
designated by the American Army and at no expense to the Armies invited other 
than that involved in the training, transportation and billeting of their own 
representative teams. The various Dominion Units of the British Forces to be 
considered as separate Armies for purposes of these Games. 

Operating unit. 

A General Games Committee of Army Officers and Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association Athletic Directors, totalling not more than five, one of the 
number to act as Director General. This Committee would be the deciding 
agency and the flnal authority on all matters pertaining to the games. 

This Committee would invite the various Armies to send two delegates each 
to an Advisory Council which would be asked to submit any proposals desired 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 25 

to the Games Committee, to make any suggestions it saw fit and to render 
any general assistance possible looking to the success of the competitions. The 
active cooperation of such a council would do much to make the games popular 
and constructive. 

Finances. 

As hereinbefore suggested, the various Armies would be expected to carry 
all of the expense in connection with the training, equipping, transporting, 
housing and rationing of their own competing athletes; this, it is believed, each 
Army would prefer to do. The cost of a suitable site for the Games, the neces- 
sary prizes (other than such trophies as might be donated), printed matter, and 
all miscellaneous expenses would be underwritten by the Y.M.C.A. It is 
expected that the American Army could join with the Association in providing 
the necessary stenographic services, certain office help and like incidentals. 

Site. 

The great Colombes Stadium near Paris, the site of the 1900 World's Olym- 
pic Games, is available. It is equipped with an excellent running track, a 
number of playing fields suitable for baseball, football and other games, has 
grandstands seating more than 20,000 persons, dressing-rooms, and other 
accessories. Certain other sites may be available, notably Longchamps Field. 

Cooperation indicated. 

The Chief Physical Training Officer of the British Army in France, Lieut. 
Col. H. S. Huntington, has made inquiry by letter as to the probability of inter- 
allied games. The Director of Recreative Training, Australian Imperial Force, 
Col. Alderson, has stated in person to the undersigned that the Australian Army 
would welcome an opportunity to enter games such as those suggested, and that, 
if necessary, he was prepared to hold in France the required men to represent 
them. The official French national society, " Comit6 National d'Education 
Physique, Sportive et de I'Hygifene Sociale," of which Premier Clemenceau 
is the Honorary President, is interested in the project and has expressed the 
hope that the American Commander-in-Chief would find it possibe to extend 
the proposed invitations. 

The Games would furnish a splendid incentive to our own American athletes 
to enter largely in the A.E.F. championships as, normally, the winning men 
and teams in these competitions would earn the honor of representing the 
whole American Army in the great interallied competitions. 

This project, if approved, will bring real results in physical efficiency, inter- 
est in athletics in general, pride in physical skill as well as mutual respect and 
understanding between the soldiers of the armies of the Allies. 

The Commander-in-Chief was heartily in sympathy with the 
proposed Games from the day the idea was first presented. But he 
was confronted with one difficulty. Should he accept the suggestions 
of the Y.M.C.A. and invite the Alhed nations to enter their militarized 
athletes in the Games as Commander-in-Chief of an American Army 



26 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

in France, he would be in the position of a person inviting his friends 
to a party in another man's house without first receiving assurances 
that it would be agreeable to the owner. Before any such invitations 
could be extended, therefore, it became necessary to ascertain whether 
such a procedure would be acceptable to the French Army and Govern- 
ment, even though little doubt could be entertained that it would. 
So the Y.M.C.A. entered into communication with the Comite Natio- 
nale d'Education Physique, Sportive et de 1' Hygiene Sociale and 
asked that it ascertain from Marshal Petain his views on the subject. 
On 2 January, 1919, the Comite Nationale addressed the following 
letter to the Marshal : 

We are informed that one of the welfare organizations oflicially connected 
with the physical recreation of the American Army has suggested the idea of 
the organization of athletic competitions between the Allied Armies to take 
place in May or June of 1919. They have presented this idea to the Commander- 
in-Chief of their army, suggesting that he invite the Commanders-in-Chief of 
all of the Allied Armies to authorize the Armies under their command to parti- 
cipate in these games. 

The Comite Nationale d'Education Physique, Sportive et de I'Hygiene 
Sociale, under the high patronage of the President of the Council, Minister of 
War, has the honor to call your sympathetic attention to the importance that 
such a manifestation would have in the diffusion of the wholesome practice 
of physical education and hygiene, which is the basis of their program for the 
regeneration of the French race. 

It will not escape you that independent of the good that France will receive 
from this effort along the lines of general physical education and the brotherhood 
of arms on the field of sport, there would also be happy results in the general 
relations of the various countries. On the other hand the preparation and 
selection are events which would create a wholesome rivalry among our units, 
small or large. They would uphold in physical form and be an excellent moral 
influence to the soldiers, whom the cessation of hostilities has transferred sudden- 
ly from the intensive life of the battle to the waiting period of demobilization. 

The organization of the military games is assured financially and materially 
by our American Allies. The American Army would like the moral support, 
advice and public and private help that might be needed, for example, in the 
matter of obtaining suitable ground. In this latter case the Stadium prepared 
and used would be left without cost at the disposal of the French youth, as a 
permanent witness of the ineffaceable friendship uniting the two democracies. 

Please accept. Monsieur Marechal, the assurances of our respectful consi- 
deration. 

The results of this inquiry were embodied in a letter dated 7 Jan- 
uary from the Comite Nationale to the Director, Department of 
Athletics, Y.M.C.A., as follows : 




Dedication Ceremonies.— Parade of troops. Top— Frcncii Chasseurs. Center— Composite 
regiment of American troops. Bottom — French Zouaves. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 29 

We have the honor to inform you that the Government of the Republic 
in the presence of Mr. Georges Clemenceau, President of the Council, Minister 
of War, on the one hand, and the Commander-in-Chief of the French armies, 
in the person of Mar6chal Petain on the other hand, following a visit made to 
them by a representative of the Comite Nationale d'Education Physique, 
Sportive et de I'Hygiene Sociale have given their entire support to the principle, 
organization and conduct of the great athletic competitions to be opened to the 
soldiers of the Allied Armies as set forth in the attached letter. 

Marechal Petain awaits the invitation and later the program that he under- 
stands are to be presented to him by the American Army. 

We beg you to please inform General Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the 
American Army, of this fact, and we are pleased that the Comite Nationale 
d'Education Physique, Sportive et de I'Hygiene Sociale has been able help- 
fully to aid towards the realization of such a magnificent project. 

The acceptability of the Games to the French on the basis proposed 
being thus warmly assured, the Commander-in-Chief duly issued 
invitations to the Commanders-in-Chief of the various Armies of the 
AlUes to participate, with the happy results set forth in the first chapter 
of this volume following. 

While the present work is designed to be primarily a record of the 
Inter-Allied Games, in order to have a proper background for the 
story, it will be of interest to indicate in a general way the methods 
pursued and the results achieved in the American Expeditionary 
Forces during the preliminary period of training before entering upon 
the narrative of the culminating event, particularly as the American 
preliminaries resembled, to a great extent, those which occurred in 
other competing armies. 

When Colonel Johnson became Chief Athletic Officer of the A.E.F. 
he brought with him the conviction that something was needed to 
replace fighting as the stimulus for united, organized effort. It was 
evident that a schedule of compulsory military drills and exercises 
could not grip the imagination or maintain the enthusiasm of a 
civilian army after the purpose for which the majority of officers 
and men had enlisted had been achieved by the defeat of the Central 
Powers. While waiting to go home, something purely voluntary, 
but forming an integral part of the military schedule to the extent 
of excusing participants from other duties, was needed as an outlet 
for Yankee energies which would absorb the interest of all ranks and 
at the same time be of a beneficial nature. 

Colonel Johnson had informally mentioned his idea to a member 
of the Training Section of the General Staff, G-5, who in turn 



30 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

presented it to Brigadier General H.B. Fiske, head of the Training 
Section. General Fiske sent for Colonel Johnson and asked him to 
elaborate his plan. The outcome of this conference was that on 1 
December, 1918, Colonel Johnson was transferred from G-2 to G-5 
and made Chief Athletic OfTicer of the A.E.F. 

Lt. Col. David M. Goodrich G. S., who had been associated 
with Colonel Johnson in G-2, was transferred with the latter. These 
officers immediately came in contact with the Director of the 
Department of Athletics, Y.M.C.A., and between the three of them an 
athletic program fort,he A.E.F. was worked out which was embodied and 
published in G.O. 241, G.H.0., on 29 December, 1918. The portion 
of the order relating to athletics follows : 

G.H.Q. AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

General Orders 

No. 241 France, Dec. 29, 1919. 

The Commander-in-Chief directs the attention of all concerned to the impor- 
tance of encouraging the development of general and competitive athletics, 
for the purpose of keeping up the morale, fostering and developing organization 
esprit de corps, and improving the physical fitness of the army. 

I. Athletics. 

1. An officer of the 5th Section, General Staff, at these headquarters, has 
been detailed to take general charge of this work. He will further the develop- 
ment and secure the application of a uniform system of athletic training, and 
also coordinate the military efforts along these lines and the work of the several 
welfare agencies throughout the American Expeditionary Forces. 

Each Army, corps and division, and such units in the S.O.S. as the Com- 
mander thereof shall determine, will detail similar officers who shall be respon- 
sible for the general conduct of athletic activities in their units. 

Commanders of regiments and other similar units will also detail suitable 
oflicers to supervise the athletic activities of their units. Company athletic 
officers will in all cases be assigned and in addition company sports managers, 
noncommissioned officers and privates, for each of the various athletic activi- 
ties. 

The attention of all commanders is directed to the desirability of selecting, 
for the various details hereinbefore mentioned, officers and men who in the past,, 
either before or after their entry into the service, have demonstrated their 
special fltness for this work. 

2. Mass Athletics and Competitions. All commanders will, as far as con- 
sistent with mihtary duties, encourage, in every way possible, athletic sports 
and competititons of all kinds, especially those in which the greatest number 
of participants are actively engaged. 

With a view to securing the entry of the entire personnel of companies or- 
similar units, division athletic officers will arrange mass athletics and group- 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 31 

competitive game schedules in which the number of men entering, as well as 
the individual effort of each man in the various events in which he enters, will 
be taken into consideration in determining the company or unit winning the 
event or schedule. 

Programs for games and instructions regarding their conduct will be pub- 
lished from time to time by these headquarters. They will embrace such 
games as volleyball, indoor baseball, tug-of-war, cross-country runs, relay, 
obstacle, rescue, equipment, shuttle, potato, leapfrog races, and other sports. 
The division athletic officers will, however, consider these programs as guides 
only and will supplement the events hsted therein with such other contests as 
may seem to them most suitable to the needs of their organizations. 

In addition to these local games an all-point company championship will 
be held under regulations to be issued later by these headquarters for the com- 
pany championship of the American Expeditionary Forces. A suitable trophy, 
emblematic of this championship, will be presented to the successful unit, and 
individual prizes to those representing that unit. 

3. A.E.F. Athletic Championships. OfTicial championships in the following 
sports will be conducted under rules and regulations to be pubhshed later. 
They will consist of track and field events, baseball, football, basketball, tennis, 
boxing and wrestling. These contests will be conducted in general on an eli- 
mination basis, beginning with the company and progressing through the bat- 
talion, regiment, brigade and division. These events will culminate in a series 
of finals for the athletic championships of the American Expeditionary Forces, 
winners of the divisional championships to be eligible to enter these finals. 

As much latitude as possible, consistent with military duties, should be 
allowed all those representing their units in competition for the purpose of 
training and developing team play. 

The athletic officers of divisions and smaller units will keep careful records 
of the athletic performances of the units under them and these shall be consi- 
dered along with their military record and general efficiency in determining 
upon the selection of units to represent each division called upon to participate 
in any international triumphal ceremonies that may be held upon the conclusion 
of peace. 

4. The Y.M.C.A., with the approval of the Commander-in-Chief, has organ- 
ized a Department of Athletics and is prepared to give every assistance in the 
development of general athletics and the arrangement and management of 
competitions between military units. It has a large number of specially trained 
physical directors with wide experience in mass play and in other athletic activ- 
ities now in its ranks in France. One of these will be attached to the staff of 
each division and separate unit and will be designated in orders as Divisional 
(or Unit) Athletic Director and, under supervision of Division Athletic Ofiicer, 
will be charged with the responsibility for the arrangement, management and 
general conduct of athletic activities throughout the unit. 

5. Offlcers, noncommissioned officers or privates desired for duty in con- 
nection with athletics may be detailed for such duty and ordered to report to 
the division or unit athletic officer. Details of officers are to be made only 
by these headquarters on request stating the special qualifications of the officer 



32 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

requested, the number, if any, already detailed from his command for such 
duty, and that the services of the officer requested can be spared. Details of 
noncommissioned officers and privates may be made by division headquarters 
on similar request. When it is impracticable for soldiers so detailed to be 
assigned for rations or quarters to any organization they may be paid commu- 
tation of rations or quarters in accordance with existing regulations and orders. 
Noncommissioned officers and privates detailed as hereinbefore indicated 
shall not at any time exceed four to the battalion and shall remain on said duty 
not to exceed four months, except as this time may be extended upon 
application to these headquarters. 

II 

III. [ Cooperation of Welfare Agencies. ] 

1. In carrying out the work outlined in this order the Y.M.C.A. will seek 
the participation and assistance of the personnel of the other auxiliary welfare 
agencies in such a way as to obtain the maximum efficiency and results. 

IV 

V. [ Excuses from Military Duty. ] 

1. With a view to making it possible for all the men who so desire to take 
part in the athletic activities herein provided for, G.O. No. 236, c.s., these 
headquarters, is so modified as to authorize all commanding officers to excuse 
from all military training in excess of four hours per day all of the men of their 
commands who take part actively each day in any of the athletic sports approved 
by the divisional or unit athletic officer. The provisions of this paragraph 
shall only apply to those organizations that have completed one month's com- 
plete course of training under G.O. No. 207. 

By command of General Pershing : 

James W. McAndrew, 

Chief of Staff. 
Official : 

Robert G. Davis, 

Adjutant General. 

Athletic officers and welfare workers carried out this order for the 
realization of the same end: to keep the men overseas profitably 
employed, their exuberant energies directed in wholesome channels, 
and most important of all, to carry out the Commander-in-Chief's 
determination to return the citizen army to the United States " pre- 
pared to take an active and intelHgent part in the future progress of 
the country." 

The athletic program itself may be divided into three successive 
phases, the second and third each being a logical outgrowth of the one 
preceding and each designed to accomplish a specific end. These phases 
were : 1, Mass Athletics and Competitions; 2, A.E.F. Athletic Cham- 




Opening Day. Top — U. S. athletes passing in reveiw. Center Ze/<— Australian entrants in 
line. Center right — Dedication ceremonies. Bottom — Serbia's representatives. 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



35 



pionships, and 3, The Inter-Allied Games. From the standpoint of 
the welfare of the A.E.F. alone, the first of these was the most impor- 
tant and the other two phases of the program were the more specta- 
cular features which were the logical outcome of the success of the first 
phase. What was really important was that every man be induced 
to play, and that every man should become so interested in the game 
that he would receive the maximum physical and mental benefit. 
The purpose of the championship games, therefore, was not to single 
out the individual athletic stars from the fighting ranks, not to set 
up comparisons, not to furnish material for newspaper stories, but to 
provide the element of competition which was necessary to furnish 
an incentive to play on a large scale. The Yankee, more than any 
other man, loves to best someone at something, and he puts into his 
game the same fighting spirit, the same unconquerable zeal that he 
displayed at Belleau Woods, at St. Mihiel, in the Argonne and along 
the Meuse. 

While it is impossible to summarize the achievements in statistics, 
it will at least be illuminating to make a note of the fact that figures 
carefully compiled by the Y.M.G.A. Department of Athletics show that 
during the first five months of 1919 the entire A.E.F. was reached 
fifteen times over both as participants and spectators. The tables 
follow : 

PARTICIPANTS 



Activities. 



Baseball, Standard 

Baseball, Indoor 

Basketball 

Boxing 

Football, Intercollegiate. . 

Football, Rugby 

Football, Soccer 

Quoits 

Setting-up Drill 

Tennis 

Track and Field Athletics. 

VolIeybaU 

Wrestling 

Tug-of-War 

CagebaU 

Informal Games 

Walking Trips 

Golf 

Swimming 

Totals 



Jan. 



105,350 
646,066 
331,277 
142,866 
305,467 

43,299 

209,020 

6,770 

40,996 

322,314 

52,596 

8,490 

65,100 

2,170,154 

133,400 



5,140,409 



Feb. 



107,187 

259,365 

225,838 

137,405 

227,993 

1,485 

303,738 

110,992 

1,100,291 

8,584 

73,303 

367,265 

41,859 

800 

196,710 

3,612,519 

39877 

,85 



6,816,066 



March. 



738,841 
603,129 
735,124 
126,263 
176,389 

369,818 

61,801 
162,982 

26,162 
921,436 
348,916 

46,688 
2,986 

88,480 
i,019,964 

46,071 



27,530 



7,502,580 



April. 



1,081,931 

453,146 

210,431 

84,504 

29,276 

245^229 

123,500 

75,054 

57,083 

558,853 

330,980 

33,117 

' isisso 

1,758,203 

25,243 

37 

32,220 



5,112,990 



May. 



1,300,752 

381,190 

98,116 

51,741 

4,571 

690 

81,898 

142,440 

80,938 

66,955 

137,398 

256,233 

6,776 

3,362 

749,561 

20,882 

320 

95,117 



3,478,940 



Total. 



3,334,061 

2,342,896 

1,600,786 

542,779 

743,696 

2,175 

1,557,927 

482,032 

1,628,285 

165,554 

1,731,986 

1,625,708 

181,036 

12,276 

367,502 

11,310,401 

265,473 

1,545 

154,867 



28,050,985 



36 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 
SPECTATORS 



1919 



Activities. 



Baseball, Standard 

Baseball, Indoor 

Basketball 

Boxing 

Football, Intercollegiate.. 

Football, Rugby 

Football, Soccer 

Quoits 

Setting-up Drill 

Tennis 

Track and Field Athletics. 

VolleybaU 

Wrestling 

Tug-of-War 

Oageball 

Informal Games 

Swimming • . . 

Totals...'. 



Jan. 



197,180 

194,496 

453,459 

1,179,260 

1,218,054 

201 [496 
6,548 

18,770 

36,300 
118,936 
250,008 

25,000 
5,800 

79,349 



3,984,656 



Feb. 



237.497 
129,379 
359,094 
844,391 
876,966 
7,120 
250,709 

11,865 
2,460 

29.203 

126,971 

162,012 

422,262 

5,000 

82,550 
144,769 



3,692,248 



March. 



861,241 

320,227 

710,321 

1,237,961 

1,523,063 

357,625 
31,735 

' 54^892 
388,665 
274,630 
473,779 
10,000 
85,500 
332,259 



April. 



2,644,848 
457,757 
548,956 

1,275,864 
116,237 

258,671 

80,712 

182 

96,568 

435,815 

288,330 

271,663 

106,166 

298,745 

1100 



6,661,898 6,881,548 



May. 



4,158,457 

432,932 

265,910 

1,263,443 

11,418 

18,000 

130,435 

204,601 

147,'6i6 
296,009 
289,438 
133,309 

"isigso 

610,667 
15,791 



Total. 



8,0P9,223 

1,534,791 

2,337,740 

5,800,919 

3,745,738 

25,120 

1,198,936 

335,461 

2,642 

346,449 

1,283,760 

1,133,346 

1,551,021 

40,000 

293,900 

1,465,789 

16,891 



7,991,376 29,211,726 



The aim expressed in the slogan, "Every Man in the Game," 
was thus carried out. Every manner of mass games was played, 
volleyball, indoor baseball, oageball, tug-of-war, and a long series of 
nonequipment games for unskilled men. 



A. E. F. CHAMPIONSHIPS SERIES 

Championships series were held in the following sports : Football, 
basketball, boxing and wrestling, golf, shooting, soccer, tennis, track 
and field events, swimming and baseball, roughly in the order named. 
The first general championship event was in Football, the finals being 
held at Paris on 29 March. However, there had been held an officers' 
tennis tournament at Nice prior to that time, 19 February-4 March. 
The Baseball championship was the last to be determined, the " big 
league" opening after the conclusion of the championship events in 
the other sports and continuing through the Inter-Allied Games them- 
selves. The Basketball finals was the second championship event, 
and was held in the Palais de Glace, Paris, 7-11 April. 

The method of conducting the championships was very similar 
in all cases although there were slight variations on account of the 
nature of the sport, the size of the teams and the manner of playing 
the game. The most important fact to be noticed was that the title 
could be won only after long and gruelhng competitions, beginnings 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 37 

in most cases, as low as the company and continuing through larger 
army units until the final arena was reached. The general rule fol- 
lowed at first was the running off of preliminaries in large units which 
were called regions. For the purpose of convenience the A.E.F. 
was divided at the beginning of the program into eight such regions, 
each containing approximately the strength of an Army or about 
175,000 men. Later on, as demobilization proceeded and the 1st and 
2nd Armies ceased to exist, the policy was followed of selecting more 
than one team from the regions which remained in Europe. The eight 
regions were : G.H.O., 1st Army, 2nd Army, 3rd Army, Le Mans For- 
warding Area, District of Paris, Advance Section S.O.S., and the 
Intermediate Section S.O.S. 

After the regional titles had been settled two teams were selected 
by a series of semifinals for the championship game. The rule was 
followed that the teams which went into the semifinals and finals 
were not all-star aggregations picked from the entire personnel of the 
various regions which they represented, but were the original teams 
which had fought their way to victory. The advantage of this method 
was that every organization thus had an equal opportunity to be 
represented by name in the finals — a procedure which greatly fos- 
tered organization esprit de corps, as was manifested by the enthu- 
siasm and loyalty with which the winning teams were backed and 
encouraged by the units from which they were selected. As evidence 
of this, witness the spirit of Wood, Winn and Wright's Middle West- 
erners, who cheered the 89th Division to victory through sternly 
contested prehminaries and the final game against the 36th Division 
at Paris. 

The four months' struggle, from the time the first football teams 
were formed until the question of which was the best in the A.E.F. 
was decided, illustrates the interest which marked every step of the 
various championships series. In the Army of Occupation the com- 
petition was particularly keen as the issue narrowed down to the 
team of the 89th Division, headed by Capt. Paul Withington, the 
team of the 2nd Division captained by Harry Legore of Yale, and 
the team of the 4th Division led by Hamilton Fish, the Harvard 
Captain and ail-American tackle. The games were played before 
crowds so immense that the number of spectators could not have 
been increased except by the use of aeroplanes or observation balloons. 
In the 2nd Army four no-score games were played between the 5th 
and 28th Divisions before the 28th finally nosed out a victory by a 



38 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

field goal; then the 28th was in turn adjudged the loser to the 7th 
Division on a yardage basis because neither division was able to score. 
The St. Nazaire team, representing the S.O.S., presented a galaxy of 
stars, coached by Eddie Hart, the gritty Princeton tackle, and includ- 
ing in the lineup such men as Eddie Mahan, formerly of Harvard, 
and Johnny Beckett, Captain of the University of Oregon team. 

The semifinals at Bar-sur-Aube between the teams of the 1st 
and 2nd Armies were witnessed by General Pershing and the King 
of the Belgians, as well as approximately 25,000 soldiers brought 
by special trains. The outcome of the final game between the 89th 
and 36th Divisions at Auteuil Velodrome, Paris, was awaited by 
thousands in Europe as anxiously as ever the score in the great Harvard- 
Yale or Army-Navy contests was awaited by the American public. 

A feature worthy of note in the football tournaments is that, 
although more than 75,000 officers and men took active part, and 
despite the fact that some games were played on fields covered with 
snow or ice, there was not a single serious accident and only one broken 
bone was reported. 

Games were played wherever Americans were found, whether on 
the rain-soaked fields of France, under the balmy Italian skies, along 
the downs of the Kentish coast, on Luxembourg's neutral soil, or 
on islands in the Rhine with the castles of the Hohenzollerns looking 
down from rugged chfTs. Champs de Mars, where have trod Roman 
legionaries commanded by imperialistic Caesar, or French hosts led 
by the saintly Jeanne d'Arc, were the scenes of friendly gridiron con- 
tests. German prisoners of war laid out straightaways under the 
direction of U.S. Engineers and cleared off grounds for baseball dia- 
monds. Detachments of students at the most famous universities of 
the Continent and England introduced not only their favorite games 
but also their contagious and noisy " ataboys. " 

So widespread did the athletic fervor become that the Paris news- 
papers printed in Enghsh, truly reflecting the topics of the times, 
devoted more space to games than to the Peace Conference, and the 
baseball league, organized in June, held its own as a conversational 
subject in Army circles with the League of Nations. 

The spirit with which all games were conducted was truly sports- 
manlike. When dressed for the game all ranks met on a universal 
plane where "a man's a man for a' that." A general, an assort- 
ment of all grades of field and line officers, first sergeants and " bucks, " 



'•-~'^^^ r. 



|. 




...■■-J..'- '■ 



4l ^ t/-^^ ^^ji^^i 




Openiii'' D^iy— Parade of athletes. Top— Hetljaz. Center Zc/<— Upper, Italy; lower, Serljia. 
' Center rif/Zti — Upper, Belgium; lower, America, Bottom— U:i\j. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 41 

all in golf togs, contended for honors on the Cannes links, eight kilo- 
meters west of Nice in the middle of April. A sergeant emerged as 
champion. 

The results achieved in boxing were particularly gratifying. The 
success with which the matches were conducted under the new A.E.F. 
rules, reducing the length of rounds to two minutes and reclassifying 
fighters with special rules for bouts, established this sport on an 
entirely new plane and gave it an impetus which bids fair to result in 
a cleansing of boxing in the United States. The fact that hundreds 
of officers have received practical experience in managing bouts in 
the A.E.F., and are returning to civil life as warm supporters of boxing, 
will elevate the sport and insure to it an established position. 

The spirit manifested by the contestants was worthy of the highest 
commendation. Voluntarily subjecting themselves to the most gruel- 
ling training, receiving no return other than soldiers' pay, the men 
buckled down to a long series of preliminaries in which all gave a good 
account of themselves. Every bout staged was a real exhibition — 
there was no shamming. Out of the thirty-nine contests in the cham- 
pionship series, twenty-two were decided on points after the full ten 
rounds had been fought; two went to eleven rounds, one to twelve 
rounds, and one to thirteen rounds. Only five men were knocked 
out, one in the tenth round, one in the eighth round, and three in the 
sixth round. Boxing may be called the favorite soldier sport. Packed 
crowds gathered around every ring. Many exhibitions were given 
in France, Germany, England, Italy and Luxembourg in addition 
to the competitions. 

It was within a stone's throw of Napoleon's Tomb that the finals in 
Boxing and Wrestling were held 7-26 April, 1919. They occurred in the 
Cirque de Paris, reserved for the purpose — the place where Georges 
Carpentier, the French idol, won his fame. On the final night 
General Pershing, in a short address, summarized the achievements 
of these sports: "The results of this type of athletics," he said, 
"are sure to create a higher type of athletics at home. Two million 
men are going to carry back home a better notion of what clean sport 
should be." 

The track and field stars of the A.E.F. , picked out wherever they 
could be found by "scouts," whether in the Army of Occupation, 
among the universities, scattered along the S.O.S., or bogged in the 
mud of the Le Mans Forwarding Area, were brought to Paris, organized 
into a training detachment at Chgnancourt Barracks, and put through 



42 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

a period of training and elimination prior to the A.E.F. champion- 
ship event. This procedure made possible the high standard of per-, 
formance in the A.E.F. Championship Series and served as well the 
purpose of seasoning them for the Inter-Allied Games. The finals 
at Colombes Stadium, 30 May-1 June, were spectacular. The indi- 
vidual star of the meet was Lt. Alma W. Richards, who was a member 
of the U. S. team at Stockholm in 1912. The winners received their 
prizes from the hands of General Pershing. 

Shooting and musketry were held at d'Auvours Rifle Range, Bel- 
gian Camp, near Le Mans. There were competitions in rifle, pistol, 
machine-gun and automatic-rifle shooting, and a musketry match. 
The finals were run off 5-17 May. 

Soccer finals began at Colombes Stadium on 12 May and lasted 
four days. As the 1st and 2nd Armies had been broken up, only five 
regions were represented. The Tennis championship was fought out 
at the Racing Club of France 20-26 May. In addition to the A.E.F. 
championship at Paris and the officers' tournament at Nice, strong 
American teams went to England and Belgium to play in those coun- 
tries. Swimming, the last event on the program with the exception 
of baseball, occurred 5-7 June at St. James Lake, in the Bois de Bou- 
logne, Paris. 

ORGANIZATION 

As regards the organization which directed the vast athletic pro- 
gram, it will be necessary to add but little to the official statement 
of General Orders 241. x\t the head of the system was the Chief Athletic 
Officer, a member of the Fifth Section of the General Staff, G.H.Q., 
and the activities were supervised by specially detailed athletic officers 
in units from armies down to platoons. In addition, these athletic 
officers had associated with them quahfied athletic directors repre- 
senting militarized societies serving with the A.E.F. Just as the 
Y.M.C.A. had played a large part in originating the program, so there 
fell to its lot the privilege of having a cooperative share in the conduct 
of the Games themselves. On 1 March there were 327 trained Y.M.C.A. 
physical directors with the A.E.F. The Knights of Columbus devoted 
its efforts particularly to boxing and brought from America some of 
the most prominent boxing managers, trainers and referees. 

The method of using the personnel varied with the different stages 
of development. During the period of mass games the important 
matter was field work; the overhead organization at headquarters 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 43 

was small. But the staff of G-5 Athletics G.H.Q., which consisted 
of Colonel Wait C. Johnson, Lieutenant Colonel Goodrich and an 
enlisted man stenographer only, was greatly expanded, necessarily, 
during the early period of mass games development in order to take 
care of the many details involved in the championships series. As 
practically all finals were held in or near Paris, and because it is liter- 
ally true that " all roads lead to Paris, " the French capital was chosen 
as the logical center for the A.E.F. athletic organization. Accord- 
ingly, about the middle of March, 1919, offices were removed from 
Chaumont, American G.H.Q., to Paris. 

G-5 Athletics G.H.O., played a dual role in that it was charged 
with conducting both the American athletic program proper and, 
through the Games Committee, the Inter-Allied Games. In order 
to adjust the machinery to the requirements of the Inter-Allied Games, 
a reorganization and distribution of duties was made on 19 April. 
The diagram approved by the Games Committee on that date, with 
modifications and additions, remained fundamentally unchanged. 
About the middle of May, as it became increasingly evident that a 
larger force would be necessary to handle the innumerable details 
connected with a meet of such importance, authority was obtained 
to call for such additional personnel as was needed. When the Games 
opened there were 261 officers, 18 field clerks and 168 enlisted men 
on duty with G-5 Athletics, a total Army personnel of 447, aided by 
20 Y.M.C.A. athletic specialists, 26 women secretaries and a large 
number of women assistants at the entertainment huts. 

An operating fund sufficient to cover the cost of prizes, decorations, 
entertainments, printing and Hke general expenses was placed at the 
disposal of the Finance Committee by the Y. M. C. A. This fund was 
used in defraying all expenses which could not properly be met through 
Army channels. 

ATHLETIC GOODS 

Some indication of the popularity of athletics in the A.E.F. is given 
by the figures showing the distribution of athletic goods. Prior to 
15 March the goods were distributed by the Y.M.C.A., the Knights 
of Columbus, and representatives of the Training Camp Commission. 
On that date control of the distribution was given to the Army by all 
of the agencies having athletic goods to supply, approximately 90 
per cent being furnished by the Y.M.C.A. 



44 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Below is an itemized statement of leading types of athletic supplies 
distributed in April and May. 

Baseballs 58,963 

Baseball bats 12,646 

Boxing Gloves, prs 8,359 

Field Gloves 14,385 

Indoor Baseballs and Playground Balls 8,171 





Opening Day at Pershing Stadium as seen from the air. 



CHAPTER I 
AN ATHLETIC TOURNAMENT OF THE ALLIED NATIONS 




RISING out of the epochal circumstances of the greatest 
war of history, the Inter-Allied Games stand out as an event 
unique in the annals of modern sport. Never before 
in recent times has there been such a gathering of athletic 
stars with a setting so unusual, and it is safe to assume that the occa- 
sion will not be duplicated within the niemory of the participants. 
Those who love to draw comparisons or have a passion for searching 
for obscure origins in the dim past may, indeed, find a parallel in the 
classic games of the Homeric age when the armies of Agamemnon, 
"intrenched" before the walls of Troy, amused themselves with games 
and sports not unlike the competitions at Pershing Stadium. 

That an athletic tournament of any sort could have been held 
after fifty-two months of devastating war, with the Allied countries 
impoverished by heavy losses, exhausted by long-sustained effort, 
weary after a seemingly interminable period of fighting, was in itself 
a remarkable exhibition of the sportsmanlike spirit which had distin- 
guished the peoples leagued against the Central Powers. 

Inspired by love of the game, a desire to recognize the share that 
athletics played in making possible the victory, and the wish to con- 
tinue and strengthen the ties of comradeship developed on the battle 
field, the countries which had suffered most from the war's desola- 
tion entered the tournament with the same whole-hearted enthusiasm 
as nations emerging from the conflict in a less exhausted condition. 

The meet was "mihtary " only to the extent that every participant 
had been an officer or enlisted man in one of the Allied armies. The 
question of eligibility was answered by an affirmative reply to the 
interrogation, "Were you a soldier in the Great War ? " The ehgi- 
bility clause of the rules read, " Each nation participating may enter 
any officer, non-commissioned officer or private soldier, who has at 
any time between 4 August 1914 and 11 November 1918 been a 
member of the military forces of that nation." The amateur-pro- 
fessional question, which is usually a fruitful source of argument, was 
not raised. 



48 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Although the meet was directly the outgrowth of the war, was 
designed to serve a need of the Armies, and formed an integral part 
of the military program of the host and guests alike, there was nothing 
about the Games themselves, to suggest the champs de bataille. The 
sports were the standard events usually held in great meets and 
in no way reflected the gigantic contests fought out on the battlefields 
of the Western Front. The only exceptions were the rifle and pistol 
competitions and the handgrenade-throwing contest. 

The invitation to participate in the Inter-Allied Games was issued 
by General Pershing, as Commander-in-Chief of the American Expe- 
ditionary Forces, on 9 January 1919, less than five and one-half months 
before the opening of the events themselves. The letters sent to the 
Commanders of the Armies with which the A.E.F. was associated 
were in all cases the same as the following one addressed to the 
Commander-in-Chief of the Armies of France : 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 
Office of the Commander-in-Chief. 

January 10, 1919. 

Sir : 

The officers and men of the American Expeditionary Forces, being keenly 
appreciative of the splendid relations which exist among those who have borne 
arms in a great, common cause, and which, in the present instance, have so 
happily developed into such deep feelings of mutual respect and admiration, 
are most anxious to preserve and strengthen this relationship in every way 
possible. 

Now that active military operations have ceased, they believe that nothing 
could be more conducive to this end than to gather in friendly competition on the 
field of sport, representatives of the Armies of each of the nations which have so 
long been associated together in the stern struggle for right. 

Accordingly, they have decided to organize an Inter- Allied Athletic Meeting, 
to be held in the Colombes Stadium, Paris, during the month of May or June, 
1919, in which the officers and men of all of these Armies shall be eligible to take 
part. 

As Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces, I have the 
honor, therefore, to invite, through you as their Commander-in-Chief, the offi- 
cers and men of the armies of France to participate in these contests and to 
express the earnest hope that many of them may do so, so that the ties of the 
much cherished spirit of comradeship which have sprung from the gallant joint 
effort of our forces on the battlefield may thus be even more closely cemented. 

Respectfully, 

John J. Pershing. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 49 

The twenty-nine nations, colonies and dependencies receiving this 
letter were as follows : 

Australia, Japan, 

Belgium, Liberia, 

Brazil, Montenegro, 

Canada, Nicaragua, 

China, Newfoundland, 

Cuba, New Zealand, 

Czecho-Slovakia, Panama, 

France, Poland, 

Great Britain, Portugal, 

Greece, Roumania, 

Guatemala, Russia, 

Haiti, Serbia, 

Hedjaz, Siam, 

Honduras, South Africa. 
Italy, 

Eighteen acceptances were received, the other countries finding 
themselves forced to decline the invitation owing to the fact that they 
had a very small number of men in France and the date set for the 
games was too near to allow time for training and transporting others, 
or for the reason that their troops had already left French soil and 
were being demobilized at home. 

The fine spirit which animated all the countries entering the 
games is reflected in the following replies : 

AUSTRALIA 

14 May, 1919. 
My dear General: 

I have to thank you very much for your kind letter of the 6 May, which I 
have not answered earlier as I have been away from my Headquarters seeing 
outlying detachments of the Australian Forces, and, I am glad to say, bidding 
Godspeed to some half dozen transports of men returning to their homes, in 
the knowledge that they have accomplished that which we all set out to do. 

I so fully agree with all you say as regards the splendid relations which have 
existed between all our troops throughout this great fight for freedom, and I 
am very glad to know that you are so anxious, as we all are, to strengthen the 
ties which have been formed in the field. I quite agree that Inter-Allied Games 
of the nature you are organizing will do much to foster the good cause we have 
at heart, and I should be only too glad to do all that I possibly could to help 
in the matter in regard to the Australian troops whom I have the honour to 
command. 



50 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

So many Australian athletes answered the call at the outbreak of hostilities 
— in a great number of cases unfortunately making the supreme sacrifice — and 
so manyalso have been away from home so long, and are above all thmgs anxious 
to return, that I fear our team of athletes will not be as strong as we would all 
like to send you; but every effort will be made to send the most representative 
athletes in the A.I.F. to compete at this classic gathering of warrior sportsmen. 

The matter of selection of teams will be immediately taken up by my Sports 
Control Board, and I think we can count on being represented in some of the 
events under Boxing, Cross-Country Running, Rowing, Rifle Shooting, Swim- 
ming, Tennis, Track and Field Sports, and possibly Wrestling. 

In accepting the invitation on behalf of the officers and men of the A.I.F. 
I wish to express my belief and sincere wish that this great sporting venture 
will be the unquahfied success it so richly deserves. 

Yours sincerely, 

(Signed) W. R. Birdwood. 

BELGIUM 

Brussels, 25 January 1919. 
Dear General Pershing: 

I have been greatly touched by the contents of your kind letter. 
The officers and men of the Belgian army will keenly appreciate the expressed 
desire of their comrades of the American Expeditionary Forces to commemorate 
by an Inter-Allied Athletic Meeting the long struggle in close cooperation on 
the battlefleld. 

They will be proud to meet the representatives of the Allied Armies in these 
peaceful contests. 

Believe me always, dear General Pershing, 

Your affectionate, 

Albert. 

BRAZIL 

Paris, 20 January, 1919. 
My dear General: 

I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your kind letter of the 9th 
instant. If I am still in France at the time of the establishment of the Inter- 
Allied Meeting you may well count on me and rest assured that I shall do all 
in my power to draw closer the bonds that unite our two countries. We have 
just seen what President Wilson has done for Brazil. 

Constant attention to physical and moral development is the most commend- 
able work a country can devote itself to, for it prepares its own future as well 
as that of humanity. 

Please accept, my dear General, in my name and in that of my officers, the- 
expression of my highest feehng of admiration and thanks. 

(Signed) J. Nazoleao Felippe d'Ache, 
General. 




Poster used to advertise the Games. Designed by First Lieutenant J. H. Dulin. F. A. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 53 

CANADA 

Canadian Corps H.Q. 
Oxford Circus House 145, Oxford Street, 
London, W.l. I4th May. 1919. 
G-5. 
The Chairman, 

Games Committee of the Inter-Allied Games, 
53 Avenue Montaigne, Paris. 
Dear Sir: 

In the absence of Lieut. General Sir A. W. Currie, G.C.M.G., K.C.B., I write 
to thank you for so courteously extending to Canadians the privilege of com- 
peting in the Inter- Allied Games organized by you. 

We shall be pleased to send : 

Lt. Colonel H. G. Mayes, C.B.E. 
Major N. A. D. Armstrong, O.B.E. 
as Canadian representatives on the Advisory Committee, and these two officers 
will be in Paris in time to take part in the first meeting of the Committee on 
the 25th inst. 

Most respectfully yours, 

(Signed) J. M. Prower. 
Lieut. Colonel, General Staff, Canadian Corps. 

CZECHO-SLOVAKIAN REPUBLIC 

Ministerstvo Valky, Minist6re de la Guerre. 
34 rue Bonaparte, Paris. 

16 January, 1919. 
My dear General: 

I am deeply touched by the most flattering invitation made in your kind 
letter of 9 January to officers and men of the Czecho-Slovak Army to participate 
in the Inter-Allied Athletic Meeting to be held in the Colombes Stadium, Paris, 
during the month of May or June, 1919. 

Our regiments, which have had the high honor of fighting on the side of 
your splendid boys in Champagne and at Vouziers, have now left for their home, 
and I am, therefore, transmitting your kind letter to our Government at Prague. 

Words cannot express the great deep admiration our whole nation at home 
feels for the unequalled effort and high ideals put forth by American troops in 
France. Your men have been true champions of Right and best friends to ours 
in their hardship. Nothing could fill our officers and men with deeper satisfac- 
tion than your invitation to meet once more here in France with their comrades 
of past common struggle in a friendly competition on the field of sport, and I 
am certain that they will do their best to show themselves worthy of this favor. 

For the Secretary of War, 

(Signed) Dr. Eduard Benes, Jr. 

Secretary of Foreign Affairs. 



54 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

CHINA 

Chinese Military Mission, 
7 Square Thiers, Paris (16^). 

20 January, 1919. 
My dear General: 

I have the pleasure of aclinowledging receipt of your favour of the 9th 
instant. We are certainly appreciative of the splendid relation with you in the 
great common cause and as keenly preserve and strengthen this relationship 
as you do. 

As chief of Chinese Military Mission, I have the honour to forward your 
message and kind invitation of the Inter-Allied Athletic Meeting to be held 
in the Colombes stadium, Paris, during the month of May or June, 1919, to 
our officers here at present. 

With anticipation of the great honor to attend on the field of sport in 
friendly competition, I hope that some of us shall be able to participate in 
these contests. 

Allow us to express our heartiest thanks and earnest hope to the success 
in near future. 

[ am. Yours most sincerely, 

(Signed Tang-Tsai-Li. 

fNo. 2) 

Hotel Lutetia, Paris. 

T. o. 5 May, 1919. 

Dear Sir: ■' 

I have been instructed to present through you three trophies for competition 
during the Inter-AUied Games to be held in June and July. The trophies are 
the following : 

One gold cup on behalf of General Chin Yun Pen, Minister of War. 

One silver cup on behalf of H.E. Lou Lseng Tsiang, Chief of the Chinese 
Peace Delegation. 

One Chinese vase on behalf of H. E. Hoo Wei Teh, Minister to France. 

It is requested that you designate the athletic events for which the trophies 
shall be awarded. 

I regret to say that China will be unable to enter teams. But I beg to assure 
you that we shall always be glad to do everything we can in cooperation with 
the American authorities towards making the Games a success. 

I have the honor to remain. Sir, 

Yours most respectfully, 

(Signed) S. T. Liang, 
Brigadier General Chinese Army. 
Technical Delegate, Chinese Peace Delegation. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 55 

FRANCE 

Grand Quartier G6n6ral des Arm6es Frangaises de I'Est. 
Le Mar6chal de France Commandant en Chef. 

G.H.Q., 17 February, 1919. 
Dear General: 

You inform me that the American Army is organizing a great program of 
sports, to be held in Paris in May, at which it is desirable that the officers and 
men of the French Army take part in as large numbers as possible in order to 
keep up the excellent relations formed in the battle. 

I am entirely of your opinion and I am giving orders that every facility be 
given the Armies under my command. 

It will be necessary, however, that your directing officers establish connec- 
tions with my First Bureau and furnish it the details concerning the sort of 
contests which will take place. 

Most sincerely yours, 

(Signed) Charles P^tain. 

GREECE 

General Headquarters Hellenic Army. 
Salonica, 20 January, 1919. 
My General: 

It is with great pleasure that the officers and other ranks of the Hellenic 
Army received the kind invitation from you to participate in the Inter-Allied 
Games which will take place in Paris in order to cement our glorious victory 
and make more binding the links of our mutual esteem and sacred friendship, 
which grew, sprinkled by the noble blood of those who fell so gloriously during 
the present struggle, the most sacred struggle that Humanity has ever seen. 

The officers and other ranks of the Hellenic Army will be proud to compete 
with the heroes of the Eastern front. The rivalry between the contestants will 
be of the highest order because in these Games will participate the descendants 
of ancient Greece whose antiquity found so many fervent admirers in your 
beautiful country. 

As in ancient times, the barbarous were excluded from the Games, it is the 
same today. In these Games will participate only the soldiers of the nations 
which fought for Right and the Liberty of the World. The thought makes us 
especially proud of your honorable invitation. 

My General, I should be very much obliged if you would kindly give me infor- 
mation concerning the events of the competition. 

It would be an exceptional honor for us, the Greeks, if you would accept a 
branch of Olympia's laurel, and also a branch of the Acropolis olive tree, to be 
among the other prizes which will crown the brows of the victors, considering 
as a continuation of the beautiful games of Ancient Greece, the games of today 
which will be undertaken at your noble initiative. 

L. Paraskevopoulos. 
Commander-in-Chief 
The Allied Forces of Salonica. 



56 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

GUATEMALA 

Paris, 5 May, 1919. 

From: Legation^of the Republic of Guatemala. 

To : General Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the A.E.F. 

The Government of the Republic of Guatemala directs me to thank you for 
the kind invitation you were kind enough to send him, in order to have this 
Government represented at the Inter-Allied Games which will be held in the 
near future, at Colombes Stadium. 

I have also the pleasure to say that the Guatemalan Army, grateful and 
proud to find itself at the side of the gallant American Army, will be represented 
by a Captain of the Staff, Mr. Miguel Ydigoras, Military Attache of the Special 
Mission of Guatemala which is already in Paris. 

I take this opportunity to assure you of my deep respect. 

Matos Pacheso. 

HEDJAZ 

Paris, 20 March, 1919. 
My dear General: 

I am deeply sensible of the honour you paid the troops under my command in 
inviting us to take part in the Inter-Allied Athletic Meeting to be held shortly 
in Paris. It will give us the greatest pleasure to participate. I have sent Gen- 
eral Nuri Pacha Said of my staff to Damascus to choose such team as we can 
supply, and will send you details of our entry as soon as possible. 
I have the honour to be, sir 

Yours very faithfully, 

Faissal. 

ITALY 

Paris, 29 May, 1919. 
Dear General: 

I have greatly appreciated the invitation which I have received from the 
ofiicers and men of the American forces to the officers and men of our forces 
asking them to take part in an Inter-AUied Athletic Meeting. 

It is also my opinion that to gather together in a friendly athletic contest 
the representatives of the courageous armies which contested fraternally on 
the battlefield in a spirit of sacrifice and of military virtue, would contribute 
to uphold and increase these bonds of comradeship, of deep respect and of 
reciprocal admiration which made of the combined forces, different in race, 
language and habits, a united and a most efficient army, and an unbreakable 
bulwark. 

Permit me to express my most lively pleasure for the proposal of your offi- 
cers and soldiers and I beg to inform you that the officers and soldiers of the 
Italian army are pleased to accept the invitation which has been extended to 
them, and that they are proud to participate in the proposed athletic meet. 

Please accept the expression of my most sincere comradeship and regards. 

Yours devotedly, 

(Signed) A. Diaz. 



K^/rt^ 



yriy^^ 



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r/ ^ /Afi <-/lf/"//y ^/ 



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2^ '.'/'^'.y-f^i/f /(//O. 



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CARTE POSTALE 



La correspondance au recto n'esi pas accept ^e par tous les pays e'trangen 



, FACTS ABOUT INTER-ALLIED GAMES 

jfe^ formal Opening : 22 June. 

W'" Closing ceremonies : 6 July. 

Placa ; Pershing Stadium, on outskirts of Paris, in Bois de 

Viaccnnes n*ar Join vtHc-Ie- Pont. 
The Stadium : Erected specially for the Games by the 

Y.M.C.A. and presented to the A.E.F. ; seating capacity 

a5,DCo-, concrete structure completed by U.S. troops ; field . 

graded and tiack laid by French engineers. To be presenied 

to Prance on completion of Games. 
Competltftins in the Stadium : Baseball, baskelbalf, boxing, 

cricket, tyo^s country race, fencing, soccer, Rugby football, 

hand grenade throwing* horse-rid: ng, track and field »port$, 

tug-of-war, wrestUog. 
Competitions not In the Stadium : Tennis^ swimmiug, rifle 

and pistol thootiag^ (owing, 'and golf. 
Nations Partlclpattng : Araerfca, Aumralia, Belgium, Brazil, 

Caoada, Chltut. Czecho-Slovakia, France, Guatemala, 

Hedjaz, Italy, New 2caland, Portugal, Rounun/a, Serbia. 
. CMUans and Scldters of all Allied countries invited ; no 

charge for tickets, Informatron bureaus will be operated at 

all prominent points th l-'.^ris befure and during O&mes. 



ADRESSE 



M. 



DEVAMBCZ, ^ARra 



Top — General invitation to the Games. Bottom — Mailing card for disseminating information 

relative to the Games. 



58 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

NEW ZEALAND 

Administrative Headquarters. 
New Zealand Expeditionary Force. 
29, 30 & 31 Bloomsbury Square, London, 
W.C.I. 

16 May, 1919. 
My dear General Pershing: 

In reply to yours of the 6th inst., I have very great pleasure in accepting, 
on behalf of the ofTicers and men of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, 
the very kind invitation you have extended to them to take part in the Inter- 
Allied Games to be held in Paris from 22 June to 6 July next. 

We have already many friends amongst the American Forces, particularly 
with the 3 1 7th Infantry, who, under the command of Brigadier General Jamieson, 
were attached to us for a considerable period in the Hebuterne Sector. 

It is sincerely to be hoped that these old friendships may be renewed and 
new ones formed. 

Yours sincerely, 

(Signed) C. W. Melville. 

PORTUGAL 

Roquetoise-sur-la-Lys, France, 2 May, 1919. 
Dear General Pershing: 

Having taken over the command of the Portugese Expeditionary Corps a 
few days ago, I beg to be allowed to present to you my compliments as the 
Commander of the American Troops in France, and, above all, to thank you for 
the honour conferred upon us by your letter, sent to the Commander of the 
Portugese Expeditionary Force, inviting us to take part in the coming athletic 
sports. 

It was with the greatest pleasure that I received your invitation, and I 
follow the organization of the sports with the maximum interest and enthu- 
siasm. 

I am at this moment employing all my efforts to ensure that the Corps under 
my command, and my nation, will enter with the highest possible number of 
competitors and in the most brilliant manner. 

With my greatest consideration, believe me. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

AUGUSTO ROCADAS. 

ROUMANIA 
Roumanian General Headquarters. 
My dear General Pershing: ^^^'^^ ^' ^®^®- 

The officers and soldiers of Roumania are profoundly touched by the kind 
attention of their American comrades, who fought so valiantly on the French 
front, by mvitmg them to take part in the Inter-Allied Athletic Contests. 
Although the sports have only recently been introduced in our country, they 
will be glad to participate. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 59 

They pray you to accept for yourself and to transmit to their American 
comrades their cordial thanks for the great honor bestowed upon them and 
the joy which they feel in being considered by the Allied Armies and especially 
yours upon whom the admiration of the entire world has been drawn by the 
superb bravery and exemplary endurance. 

Please accept, dear General, the expression of my best regards. 

(Signed) Presan. 

SERBIA 

General Headquarters of the Serbian Army, 

General Chief of Staff. 

Belgrade, 12 January, 1919. 
My dear General: 

I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 9th inst., by 
which you were kind enough to invite the Serbian officers and soldiers to take 
part in the sport contests which will take place at Paris. 

I send you my hearty thanks for the happy initiative which you took in 
organizing this gathering, and in thus procuring for all the Allied Armies the 
opportunity of linking more closely the bonds of comradeship and friendship, 
by which they are already so closely bound. 

The Serbian Army, in particular, will be very glad to make a more intimate 
acquaintance with their comrades of the great and heroic American Army, 
not having had the honor to fight side by side with them in that epic struggle, 
and always avowing enthusiastic admiration for their chivalrous and nobly 
disinterested intervention, which has contributed so much to the splendid vic- 
tory won over the enemy. 

Please believe in my most affectionately devoted sentiments. 

(Signed) Voivode Michitch. 

The difficulties connected with the making of all arrangements 
for an athletic tournament of such proportions within the short time 
allowed were so innumerable that the very project of an interaUied 
meet seemed almost too audacious. But such a task did not daunt 
the architect of the plan nor the leaders who had given to the world 
a demonstration during the fighting days of how seemingly impossible 
problems can be solved by organization, industry and determination 
appHed to the realization of a dream. All the difficulties melted away 
before that same invincible spirit which had overcome even greater 
obstacles in achieving a military victory over Germany and her allies 
and, in the realm of sport, in estabhshing the Far Eastern Games. 

It will be sufficient to indicate only a few of the many problems 
which had to be solved. The chief difficulty, of course, was that, 
inasmuch as all participants in the games were officers or soldiers 



60 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

the competitors had to be selected from the ranks of troops part of 
whom were still engaged in important military duties on many fronts, 
and the remainder of whom were being returned to their homes as fast 
as possible to be demobilized. Discharge from the service was not a 
disqualification, but the attempt to select and transport men out of 
mihtary control rendered the problem more difficult. 

The state of military affairs on some fronts was so unsettled that 
Allied commanders were unwilling to withdraw many officers or men. 
However, in spite of this handicap, the new-born nationalities in the heart 
of Europe , and in the traditionally turbulent region of the Balkans, recog- 
nized the Games as of sufficient importance to warrant the taking 
of heroic steps to select their athletes from their fighting ranks and 
send them to Paris to participate in the contests at Pershing Stadium. 
Noteworthy was the action of such countries as the Czecho-Slovak 
Republic which entered a strong team in spite of the fact that 
100,000 men were still pent up in Siberia, that the country was almost 
encircled by enemies requiring the maintenance of troops on all fronts, 
and that there were moments when Red armies from the south seemed 
to threaten her very existence. Roumania, after having been overrun 
during the war, and still open to danger from several directions, 
manifested an enthusiastic interest, not only in the Inter- Allied contests 
themselves, but also in the furtherance of sports in every manner 
possible. 

The romantic career during the war of the soldier athletes of the 
smaller countries, the difficulties which their teams encountered in 
equipment, transportation and training, are topics worthy of chapters 
in themselves and will be treated more fully at other places in this 
book. 

All nations felt keenly the absence from the Games of some of 
their best athletes, who, like hundreds of thousands of their comrades 
in arms, had been eliminated forever by death, by wounds or by 
disease, from all the competitions of life. In many cases the series 
of hard-fought competitions, employed by the Armies as the basis of 
selecting their teams, by drawing into the field of sport men who had 
never before participated in championship events, succeeded in filling 
in an equally creditable manner places left vacant by better known 
athletes. The spirit of the Inter-Allied Games was characterized by 
the action of such men as Vermeulen of France, who won the cross- 
country and modified Marathon in spite of numerous wounds one of 
which practically paralyzed an arm and left it limp and useless. 



CHAPTER II 

ORGANIZATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF DUTIES 
OF THE GAMES COMMITTEE 




3 host of the Games the Commander-in-Chief of the 
A.E.F. appointed a Games Committee charged with full 
responsibility for the Games and all matters relating thereto. 
The Games Committee held its first official meeting on 
4 February, 1919, although there had been informal discussions among 
its members prior to that date. It was composed of the same men 
who had been most active in making the A.E.F. athletic program a 
success : Col. Wait C. Johnson, Lt. Col. David M. Goodrich and 
Lt. Col. T. C. Lonergan, representing the Army, and Mr. Elwood 
S. Brown and Mr. W. A. Reynolds, of the Department of Athletics of 
the Y. M. C. A. 

Associated with the Games Committee, which was composed 
entirely of Americans, was the Advisory Committee, formed of two 
representatives of each country participating in the meet. Its duties 
may best be explained by quoting the address by which Col. Wait C. 
Johnson, Chairman of the Games Committee, opened the first meeting 
of the Advisory Committee in his office at 53 Avenue Montaigne on 
25 May, 1919. He said: 

"As Chairman of the Games Committee, I take great pleasure in 
wel-coming you at this opening meeting of the Advisory Committee 
of which you are members. In accordance with the desires of my 
Commander-in-Chief and on behalf of the Games Committee I ask 
of you your hearty cooperation. The Games Committee will no doubt 
frequently, from time to time, call upon you for advice and assistance. 
ReaHzing the pitfalls which have heretofore always lain in the path 
of international athletic competitions, we feel sure that with your 
cooperation and assistance many of these difficulties will be obviated. 
We shall be grateful to receive your suggestions as to reception, enter- 
tainment and attendance of your military and government officials, 
with recommendations as to the ceremonies attending such meeting. 
We have in the past received your suggestions as to added events. 
Where suggestions have come relative to rules and competitions from 



62 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

various sources, we have tried to coordinate them to the fullest degree, 
meeting the desires of all concerned. Your response to our future 
requests for advice or assistance will be deeply appreciated, not only 
by the Committee itself but by our Commander-in-Chief, and the 
forces which he represents, and will materially aid in the success of 
this friendly competition among the Allied Nations at Pershing Sta- 
dium. 

" The organization of our Games Committee, as indicated in the 
charts furnished you all, has three general sections for the conduct 
of the Games and all matters connected therewith. The Liaison 
Section, with which you gentlemen as members of the Advisory Com- 
mittee will come most closely in contact, has been organized as the 
medium through which your written suggestions are to come, also to 
assist and aid you and your competing athletes in all ways possible. 
We trust that you will command its services. " 

Under the direction of General Pershing, the athletic branch of 
the Training Section of the General Staff, G.H.Q., G-5 (Athletics), 
and the Y.M.C.A. Department of Athletics worked as partners in pro- 
moting the Inter-Alhed Games. The available resources of both 
agencies in personnel, finances, and materials, were pooled for the 
common purpose. The joint responsibility was given recognition in 
the membership of the Games Committee itself and also in the roster 
of subordinate departments. 

Having anticipated the athletic program of the American Expedi- 
tionary Forces, the Y.M.C.A. had made provision for its needs by 
increasing its force of trained physical directors, by placing orders 
for the requisite amount of athletic goods, and by setting aside funds 
to defray expenses for prizes, special equipment, and a stadium suit- 
able for the championship games. As regards the Inter-Allied Games 
alone a fund of 1,000,000 francs was appropriated to be expended 
as follows : 450,000 francs for the preparation of a site for the Games; 
150,000 francs additional for necessary expenses in connection with 
the equipping of the Stadium; 50,000 francs for prizes, and 350,000 francs 
for general operating expenses of the Games, including welfare and 
entertainment service to American troops and to competitors of all 
the nations. 

On 22 June the roster of officers of G-5 (Athletics) G.H.Q., and 
members of the Y.M.C.A. Department of Athletics directly associated 
with the Games was as follows 



'■yi^yi/j^ KSM 







Form of personal Invitation to the Games. 



64 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

GAMES COMMITTEE 

Col. Wait G. Johnson, G.S. 
Lt. Col. D. M. Goodrich, G.S. 
Lt. Col. T. C. Lonergan, G.S. 
Mr. Elwood S. Brown, Y.M.C.A. 
Mr. W. A. Reynolds, Y.M.C.A. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICE 

Capt. Richard H. Waldo, Inf., Secretary. 
Major J. J. McConville, Assistant. 
2nd Lt. R. E. Mickel, Engr., Supply Officer. 
R. G. Hinckley, Y.M.C.A., Treasurer, 

TECHNICAL SECTION 

Lt. Col. T. C. Lonergan, G.S. 
Major G. M. Gillet, Jr., Cav. 

GROUND AND BUILDINGS • TRANSPORTATION 

Major Chas. C. Bull., Inf. 
Major M. Browne, Inf. 
Capt. K. J. Boyd, Engrs. 
1st Lt. A. J. Kelly, T.C. 
1st Lt. Robert Orr, Engrs. 
Major P. S. Holmes, M.T.C. 
2nd Lt. J. R. McCluchion, A.S. 





EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 


Majoi 


• E. V. Graves, O.M.C. 


Capt. 


J. S. Switzer, Inf. 


Capt. 


Lamar Jeflers, Inf. 


Capt. 


P. L. Bramblett, Inf. 


Capt. 


W. S. Redhed, F.A. 


Capt. 


H. L. Harllee, F.A. 


Capt. 


E. R. Mclver, F.A. 



1st Lt. E. E. Spencer, Inf. 
1st Lt. Jas. H. Scott, Inf. 
2nd Lt. J. P. Walden, A.S. 
A. M. Gelston, Y.M.C.A. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 65 

COMPETITIONS 

Lt.Co]. Benj. F. Castle, A.S. 

1st Lt. D. A. Montgomery, S.G. 

2nd Lt. F. S. Haberly, C.A.C. 

F. C.Brown, Y.M.C.A. 

C. F. Williams, A.F.C. 

A. G. Estes, A.F.C. 

H. S. Spingler, A.F.C. 

OFFICIALS 

Major Roland F. Walsh, Inf. 
Capt. Sanford, F.A. 
Lt. Krugh. 

FIELD MANAGER 

Colonel J. H. Thompson. 
Capt. E. C. Shively. 
Capt. R. G. Stephens. 
F. C. Brown, Y.M.C.A. 

PROGRAMS AND STATISTICS 

Major Philip Fox. 
Lt. Col. Earl D. Church, Ord. 
Lt. Wallace Campbell, Inf. 
Lt. Wm. H. Jones, Inf. 

BASEBALL 

Major R. F. Hyatt, F.A. 

Al. Orth, Y.M.C.A. 

Capt. G. M. Roudebush, Inf. 

BASKETBALL 

Capt. Morgan, Inf. 

A. E. Marriott, Y.M.C.A. 

Capt. W. Austin Bennett. 

Lt. H. G. Sydenham. 

Lt. C. K. Brownell, M.T.C. 



66 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

BOXING AND WRESTLING 

Capt. 0. B. Cardwell, F.A. 
Lt. W. J. Hall, Inf. 
Jimmie Bronson, Y.M.C.A. 

FENCING 

Capt. F. M. Van Natter, 
Lt. Eugene Cook, Engr. 

GOLF 

Maj. E. L. White, Ord. 
Capt. A. L. Hawley. 

HAND-GRENADE THROWING 

Capt. Wint. Smith, Inf. 

HORSE-RIDING COMPETITIONS 

Col. H. R. Richmond, G.S. 
Col. C. E. Hawkins, Inf. 
Lt. Col. T. M. Knox, Inf. 
Lt. Col. D. D. Gregory, S.C. 
Capt. A. B. Custis, Cav. 
Capt. de Sugny, French Army. 
Lt. W. D. Van Ingen, Cav. 
Lt. Col. Ches. B. Amory, Cav. 
Lt. Col. E. F. Graham, Cav. 
Col. H. J. Bull, Inf. 

ROWING 

Capt. G. D. Wiman, F.A. 
Lt. Albright. 

RUGBY FOOTBALL 

Capt. H. R. Stolz, M.C. 

W. F. Hopkins, Y.M.C.A. 

1st Lt. Sherman, Inf. 

2nd Lt. W. 0. Fletcher, Engrs. 

SOCCER FOOTBALL 

Capt. Lynn Reynolds, A.S. 
Geo. B. Cole, Y.M.C.A. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 67 

SWIMMING AND WATER POLO 

Gapt. W. F. Redfield, Inf. 
Lt. J. A. Ridley, Inf. 
J. E. Beckett, Y.M.G.A. 

TRACK AND FIELD 

Major A. D. Surles, Cav. 
Geo. E. Goss, Y.M.G.A. 
Major G. G. Ghilds, Inf. 
2nd Lt. A. D. Lightbody, F.A. 

CAMPS 

Lt. Gol. 0. W. Griswold, G.S. 
Major G. A. Shannon, Inf. 
Gapt. F. A. Little, Inf. 
Gapt. L. F. Buttolph, Inf. 
Gapt. W. A. Jacques, M.G. 
1st Lt. G. S. Powell, Inf. 
2nd Lt. Achille Ganguet, Inf. 

MEDICAL ARRANGEMENTS 

Lt. Gol. Robert M. Hardaway, M.G. 

Gapt. Wm. A. Jacques, M.G. 

1st Lt. G. F. Gelston, M. G. 

1st Lt, G. Braun, M.G. 

1st Lt. H. A. Moncreif, M.G. 

LIAISON SECTION 

Lieut. Gol. David M. Goodrich, G. S. 

Major Lester B. Rogers, M.G. 

Gapt. William W. Hoyt, M.G. 
Australia: Gapt. Richard N. Piatt, M.G., 1st Lt. L. D. Mordridge, 

A.D.C. 
Belgium : Gapt. Ray Harrison, F. A. 
Brazil : Gapt. George A. Gordon, F.A. 
Canada : Gapt. James Gould, F. A. 
Ghina: 1st Lt. Percy T. Strong, G. of I. 
Czecho-Slovakia : 1st Lt. Roger R. Townsend, F. A. 
France : Gapt. Thomas K. Finletter, F.A., Gapt. J. Andre Feuilhoux, 
F.A., 1st Lt. William S. Reid, F.A. 



68 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Great Britain : Gapt. Edmund L. Kagy, Inf. 

Greece: 1st Lt. Clarence D. Brenner, G. of I. 

Guatemala : 1st Lt. J. B. Carroll, A.S, 

Hedjaz: 2nd Lt. Terence R. Johnston, A.S. 

Italy: 1st Lt. Albert M. C. McMaster, C. of I., 1st Lt. John 

b. Steen, G. of. I. 
Newfoundland : Gapt. James Gould, F.A. 
New Zealand : Gapt. Will Shafroth, F.A.' 
Poland : 1st Lt. Nelson Fall, A.S, 
Portugal: 1st Lt. Harold J. Hotton, F.A. 

Roumania : Capt. Henry 0. Silsbee, F.A., IstLt. Fred R. Miller, Inf. 
Serbia : Gapt. James D. Basey, Inf. 

1st Lt. L. J. Le Tourneau, Inf., Secretary. 

1st Lt. Joseph B. Corboy, Inf. 

1st Lt. Jeremiah J. Hagerty, Inf. 

1st Lt. W. H. Hamilton, F.A. 

1st Lt. Robert H. R, Loughborough, Inf. 

Capt. Allan H. Muhr, A.A.S.-M.C. 

Gapt. Edward D. Toland, Inf. 

GENERAL SECTION 

Lt. Col. J. A. McDermott, Inf. 
Capt. Harry 0. Ware, Cav. 
2nd Lt. W. R. Callaway, Inf. 

RECEPTIONS AND ENTERTAINMENTS 

Col. J. W. Beacham, Inf. 
Lt. Col. Paul Watson, F.A. 
Major W. F. Donnelly, Inf. 
Major Sam R. Epperson, Inf. 
Major N. B. Ewing, Inf. 
Major A. W. Kipling, U.S.A.A.S. 
Major L, F. Stone, Inf. 
Capt. E. S. Donoho, Inf. 
Capt. K. W. Firman, Inf. 
Capt. J. P. Holmes, Inf. 
Capt. E. T. Miller, Inf. 
Capt. F. H. Stafford, Inf. 
Capt. J. M. Whittaker, Inf. 
1st Lt. Melville Booz, Inf. 




a 
> 
'Sb 

a 

a 
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o 



70 THE INTER-ALLIED GAiMES — 1919 

1st Lt. E. G. Burkhead, O.M.C. 
1st Lt. A. F. Carter, Inf. 

1st Lt. Henry Carter, A.S. 

1st Lt. R. Herrick, Inf. 

1st Lt. Wm. Kelly, Inf. 

1st Lt. Charles J. La Marre, U.S.A.A.S. 

1st Lt. J. A. O'Neil, Inf. 

1st Lt. Percival Roberts, U.S.A.A.S. 

1st Lt. E. S. Sandmeyer, Inf. 

1st Lt. 0. F. Triplett, Inf. 

1st Lt. Geo. Warren, U.S.A.A.S. 

2nd Lt. Claud M. McCue, Inf. 

2nd Lt. W. J. Wilkins, Inf. 

Lt. H. Haye, French Army. 

Lt. De Gretry, French Army. 

Wm. M. Berry, Y.M.C.A. 

CEREMONIES AND PARADES 

Major J. B. Wogan, C.A.C. 

Major H. T. Creswell, Inf. 

Major G. H. Gray, Inf. 

Capt. G. H. Bryan, Aviation. 

Capt. H. B. Butler, Inf. 

Capt. C. K. Clark, Inf. 

Capt. L. H. De Baun, Ord. 

Capt. J. D. Matthews, Artillery. 

1st Lt. J. W. Charlton, Inf. 

1st Lt. J. J. Conroy, Inf. 

1st. Lt. H. E. Higginson, Inf. 

1st Lt. H. W. Hildebrand, Inf. 

1st Lt. D. H. Hilliker, Inf. 

1st Lt. N. H. Hunter, Inf. 

1st Lt. H. S. Messick, Inf. 

1st Lt. P. A. Villere, C.A.C. 

1st Lt. Fred Yeager, Inf. 

2nd Lt. L. H. Black, Inf. 

2nd Lt. M. L. Fowler, Inf. 

2nd Lt. H. G. Gosselin, Ord. 

2nd Lt. A. F. Kelly, Inf. 

2nd Lt. Alfred R. Harris, Aviation. 



. PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 71 

2nd Lt. W. S. Taylor, Artillery. 
2nd Li. J. W. O'Brien, Ord. 
2nd Lt. R. Neumuller, Inf. 
2nd Lt. S. B. Galey, Inf. 
1st Lt. Boutieller, French Army. 
J. K. Croft, Y.M.C.A. 

PRIZES 

Major C. C. Woodruff, Inf. 
Gapt. W. B. Sparks, A.C.D. 
Gapt. Clifton W. Toms, Jr., Inf. 
1st Lt. G. Roome, Gav. 
1st Lt. Caster Lowenstein, Inf. 
2nd Lt. Donald V. Shuhart, F.A. 

PRESS AND PUBLICITY 

Major Samuel A. Greenwell, S.C. 
Major Owen J. Watts, A.C.D. 
Gapt. Theo. H. Tapping, Inf. 
Gapt. Robert B. Smallwood, F.A. 
Gapt. Corliss G. Mosely, A.S. 
1st Lt. Errol G. Chase, Inf. 
1st Lt. John F. Williams, Inf. 
1st Lt. Fred M. Williams, F.A. 
1st Lt. Alfred M. Uhler, U.S.A.A.S. 
1st Lt. Archie G. Swanson, Inf. 
1st Lt. John B. Stearns, U.S.A.A.S. 
1st Lt. Samuel D. Smoley, F.A. 
1st Lt. Gregory D. Smith, F.A. 
1st Lt. Earl E. Pardee, U.S.A.A.S. 
1st Lt. Allen E. Peck, A.S. 
1st Lt. Russell M. Page, Inf. 
1st Lt. Adolph S. Ochs Jr., Gav. 
1st Lt. Roujet D. Jenkins, Q.M.C. 
1st Lt. Benjamin H. Hall, Q.M.C. 
1st Lt. Louis H. Frohman, O.M.C. 
1st Lt. Jason C. Easton, C. of I. 
1st Lt. Galen B. Croxton, A.S. 
1st Lt. Gordon W. Cameron, Inf. 
2nd Lt. Minott Saunders, A.S. 



72 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

2nd Lt. Samuel T. Williamson, Inf. 
2nd Lt. Paul Watkins, Inf. 
2nd Lt. J. Smith Thomas, A.S. 
2nd Lt. Horace Ray Palmer, F.A. 
2nd Lt. James Milton Newell, A.S. 
2nd Lt. Wra. D. Hise, Inf. 
2nd Lt. Leshe N. Hildebrand, Inf. 
2nd Lt. John H. Gray, F.A. 
2nd Lt. Hugh ElHott, Engrs. 
2nd Lt. Rollin E. Chapman, A.S. 
2nd Lt. Francis J. Buckley, A.S. 
2nd Lt. Carlton K. Brownell, M.T.C. 
2nd Lt. Walter J. Blum, Inf. 
WiHiam Unmack, Y.M.C.A. 

HISTOmCAL BRANCH 

Major George Wythe, Inf. 
Capt. Joseph Mills Hanson, F.A. 
Capt. Rex Byerley Shaw, F.A. 
1st Lt. Stephen A. Walser, C. of I. 
2nd Lt. Wm. B. Ruggles, Inf. 
Capt. Carl. V. Burger, Inf. 
1st Lt. H. B. Peare, Q.M.C. 
1st Lt. R. M. Rice, Inf. 
1st Lt. A. W. McFarland, Inf. 
1st Lt. R. H. Scannell, Engrs. 
1st Lt. S. H. Moise, Inf. 
2nd Lt. W. C. Halbert, Engrs. 
2nd Lt. A. C. Webb, F.A. 
2nd Lt. H. H. Wertz, F.A. 

TICKETS 

Capt. Ward Delaney, A.G.D. 
Capt. Ralph W. Baker. Engrs. 
Capt. E. H. Spencer, Inf. 
Capt. J. A. Given, Engrs. 
Capt. Howard Warner, Engrs. 
Capt. W. W. Foreman, Inf. 
1st Lt. Kenneth W. Reed, Inf. 
1st Lt. G. I. Lubben, Inf. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 73 

1st Lt. W. S. Hoover, Inf. 
1st Lt, R. I. Poole, Engrs. 
2nd Lt. Wm. B. Blanfuss, A.S. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

America: Brig. Gen. H. B. Fiske ; Brig. Gen. W. W. Harts, Chair- 
man. 

Australia: Lt. Col. C. V. Watson, D.S.O. ; Maj. S- A. Middleton, 
D.S.O. 

Belgium: Lt. Col. E. Martin; Maj. Raoul Daufresne de la Cheva- 
lerie. 

Brazil: Maj. Breant. 

Canada: Lt. Col. H. G. Mayes, G.B.E. ; Maj. N. A. D. Armstrong, 
O.B.E. 

China: Brig. Gen. S. T. Liang ; Brig. Gen. P. T. Dan. 

Czecho-Slovakia: Maj. PierHnger; Capt. Smutny. 

France: Lt. Col. See, Vice-Chairman ; Maj. Barbier. 

Great Britain: Maj. H. C. Hartley; Maj. F. K. Hardy, D.S.O. 

Greece: Maj. George Bellias ; Lt. Jean Rozis. 

Guatemala: Dr. Rodolfo Robles ; Capt. Miguel Ydigoras, 

Hedjas: Mr. Aouni Abdul-Hadi. 

Italy: Col. Arturo Leone; Maj. Andrea Castaldi. 

New Zealand: Maj. J. A. Cameron. 

Portugal: Capt. Antonio Mascarenhas de Menezes ; Lt. Marie de 
Cunha. 

Roumania: Lt. Col. V. I. Badulescu ; Capt. Horace Eremie. 

Serbia: Capt. Andritch ; Lieut. Matitch ; Maj. L. B. Rogers, M.C. 
Secretary. 

The duties of the various departments and the relation of each 
department to other branches of the organization is seen at a glance 
in the table of organization of date of 21 June,1919. — (See diagram, 
"The Games Committee, Inter-Allied Games — Organization and 
Distribution of Work," opposite page 80.) 

The responsible head of the organization was Colonel Johnson, 
chairman of the Games Committee. Closely associated with him was 
Mr. Brown of the Y.M.C.A., who, as the originator of the plan for 
athletics in the A.E.F. and the Inter-AlHed Games, and one of the 
hardest workers for the success of the program, had a clear vision of 
the end to be accomplished and knew the best means to be used for 



74 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

its realization. Mr. Brown was Director General of the Games. 
Lieutenant Colonel Goodrich, who had been charged with the issuance 
of the original invitations to the Allied Armies to participate in the 
meet, retained, throughout, the direction of all matters of liaison. The 
Liaison Section, of which Colonel Goodrich was chief, was the interme- 
diary between the guests of the Games and all the various departments 
of the Games organization. 

In February, 1919, when it was realized that a few officers at Chau- 
mont would not be able to handle the multitudinous details of the 
A.E.F. championship series, Captain Richard H. Waldo was made 
Secretary of G-5 (Athletics) for the purpose of forming the necessary 
organization. G-5 (Athletics) was at that time organized with a divi- 
sion of duties along the same lines as given in the table of organization 
of the Inter-AUied Games, although, of course, modifications and 
enlargements were necessary for the culminating event at Pershing 
Stadium. As Secretary of The Games Committee, Captain Waldo 
acted as the interpreter of the flexible organization, which had rapidly 
developed and expanded, and as the "buffer" between the Games 
Committee and its many points of contact. 

The duties connected with any great athletic meet are naturally 
grouped around two facts: the event and the setting for the event. 
In accordance with this logical division of labor all departments 
charged with the Games themselves such as the competitions, the site 
for the competitions, equipment and supphes, camps for the athletes 
of all countries, and medical service, were put under one chief. Lieu- 
tenant Colonel T. C. Lonergan, the entire group of activities being 
called the Technical Section. But whether " the play's the thing " 
or not, it was by no means sufficient merely to arrange for the competi- 
tions. The stage on which the play was to be given and the specta- 
tors invited to witness the performance had to be given equal consid- 
eration. The Stadium had to be decorated ; the program of sports 
was to be supplemented by parades and ceremonies ; the pubHc must 
be informed through the press, from posters and by information 
booths, of what was to take place; it was a part of the duty of the 
host to receive and entertain athletes and visitors; prizes to be awarded 
the victors had to be prepared; who were to attend the games, how 
they were to receive their tickets and the means of transportation 
they were to use, were problems that had to be solved. This long list 
of duties, coordinated by Lieutenant Colonel J. A. McDermott, was 
embraced under the General Section. 




c4 



76 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



For the most part the established principle of "army channels" 
was followed. Matters of policy were established by the section 
heads ; the execution of details was left to officers in charge of depart- 
ments or subdepartments. Owing to the short time between the 
original step toward holding the Games and the date on which the 
formal dedication was held at Pershing Stadium, it was necessary to 
keep the organization as flexible as possible and to allow great latitude 
and initiative to all subordinate officials. The results justified this 
action. The problems which confronted the head of each department 
at the beginning of the organization, the manner in which the officers 
and Y.M.G.A. officials set about removing difficulties and getting 
everything ready for the big event, and, finally, the crowning success 
of the Games themselves, clearly proved that the coordinated efforts 
of G-5 (Athletics) and the Department of Athletics Y.M.G.A. had not 
been in vain. 





CHAPTER III 
CHOOSING THE SPORTS PROGRAM 

NE of the very first problems faced by the Games Committee 
was that of deciding on the sports in which competitions 
were to be held. There was no precedent. This was to be 
an invitation tournament with the Commander-in-Chief of 
the American Expeditionary Forces in the role of host, and to the 
host in such tournaments, invariably, according to American custom, 
falls the prerogative of arranging the program of competitions. 

But in America there is a recognized set of sports, all or any number 
of which may be chosen with little likelihood of unfairness to any 
competing team. This is not true in making up a program for interna- 
tional contests for the very obvious reason that what is a common sport in 
one country may be comparatively unknown in another. True, the 
Olympic Games had done much before the Great War to standardize 
sports throughout the world, but there had not been enough progress 
made to simplify the selecting of a program of sports for international 
competition. 

When the matter of staging the big tournament had been first 
suggested the term "Military Olympic" was used. The competition 
was to be among soldiers or men who had been soldiers but a few months 
before. Why not arrange a program of military sports only ? But 
what are military sports ? Every known sport can easily be traced 
back to a time when it was an exercise in which a warrior must excel 
and excellence in most of them is just as useful to a soldier in modern 
warfare as it was at any time in the past. There seemed no way to 
make the tournament a distinctively military tournament. 

To compare the methods of warfare in the days when men- first 
banded together against a common enemy, when fleetness of foot 
counted toward victory, with the methods of modern warfare in which 
men walk 100 meters in four minutes behind a curtain barrage and 
even a "runner" seldom runs, may seem far-fetched; but there is 
little difference between the range and accuracy required by our 
ancient forefathers in pelting their enemies with smooth round stones 
and that required by a well trained modern bomber in hurling his 



78 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

hand grenades. The same kind of endurance that enabled Miltiades' 
runner to carry his message from Marathon to Athens was needed 
by the warriors of the Alhes when for weeks, without faltering from 
weariness, they harassed the retreating Germans from the Hindenburg 
Line to the Meuse, the Aisne and the Scheldt. So running and 
throwing, recognized as exercises necessary in the training of the 
early warriors, have always been included in athletic contests in the 
forms of sprints, runs, the shotput and the discus throw. 

Therefore a study of the things lending themselves to athletic 
competition which should be well done by the modern soldier brought 
out but one new event — hand-grenade throwing. 

In one of the early meetings of the Games Committee, in April, 1919, 
the suggestion was made that bayonet competition be included in 
the list of events. This was a form of warfare that had been highly 
developed during the Great War and it was a part of every infantry- 
man's training. After due consideration it was decided that there 
could be no satisfactory manner of judging such a competition and 
the Committee rejected it as an event in the Games. 

Many sports were suggested to the Committee that were not made 
official events, usually on the ground that it would be impossible 
to arrive at satisfactory decisions in judging them. Among those 
rejected were some well known sports including diving for form. This 
is a most attractive event both to the participant and to the spectator, 
but it is decided on a point system based entirely on a consensus of 
opinion of the judges. All sports which involved form were rejected, 

A walking competition was suggested but rejected because of the 
difficulty always encountered in distinguishing between walking and 
running. 

The Games Committee, composed wholly of American officers 
and Y.M.C.A. athletic experts, realized the difficulty of arranging a 
program that would not favor too strongly any one country. Its 
first step, therefore, was to make a list of the best known forms of 
athletic competition which it termed "Recognized Sports." These 
were definitely selected for inclusion in the Games. This list of events 
embraced : 

1. Baseball. 

2. Basketball. 

3. Boxing. 

a. Bantamweight 118 pounds and under 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 79 

b. Featherweight 125 pounds and under 

c. Lightweight 135 " and under 

d. Welterweight 145 " and under 

e. Middleweight 160 " and under 

/. Light Heavyweight 175 " and under 

g. Heavyweight over 175 pounds. 

4. Cross Country Race — 10,000 meters — individual competition. 

5. Fencing — Foils — individual and team competition. 

6. Fencing— Sabers 

7. Fencing— Epee 

8. Football — Soccer. 

9. Football — American Intercollegiate. 

10. Football— Rugby. 

11. Golf — Individual and team competition. 

12. Hand-Grenade Throwing. 

13. Horse-Riding Competition. 

14. Rowing — Single sculls. 

15. Rowing — 4-oared shells. 

16. Rowing — 8-oared shells. 

17. Shooting — Army Rifle — Team competition. 

18. Shooting — Army Rifle — Individual competition. 

19. Shooting — Revolver or Automatic Pistol — Service weapons 

—Team competition. 

20. Shooting — Revolver or Automatic Pistol — Service weapons 

— Individual competition. 

21. Swimming : 

a. 100 meters, free style 

b. 100 meters, back stroke 

c. 200 meters, breast stroke 

d. 400 meters, free style 

e. 800 meters, free style 
/. 1,500 meters, free style 

g. 800 meters, relay, free style— 4 men (4x200). 

22. Tennis — Singles and Doubles. 

23. Track and Field Sports : 

a. 100-meter Dash 

b. 200-meter Dash 

c. 400-meter Run 

d. 800-meter Run 



80 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

e. 1500-meter Run 

/. Modified Marathon — 16,000 meters 
g. 110-meter High Hurdles 
h. 200-meter Low Hurdles 
I. Running High Jump 
k. Standing Broad Jump 
I. Running Hop, Step and Jump 
m. Pole Vault 

n. Throwing the Javelin, best hand 
0. Throwing the Discus, best hand 
p. Putting the 16-lb Shot, best hand 
q. Pentathlon : 

200 meter dash, 

Running Broad Jump, 

Shot put, 16-lb, best hand, 

Throwing Discus, best hand, 

1500 meter run 

r. Relay Race, 800 meters, 4 men (4x200) 
s. Relay Race, 1600 meters, 4 men (4x400) 
I. Medley Relay Race, 4 men 

First man runs 200 meters. 

Second man runs 400 meters. 

Third man runs 800 meters. 

Fourth man runs, 1600 meters. 

24. Tug-of-War, 9-man team. 

25. Water Polo. 

26. Wrestling — Catch-as-Gatch-Gan and Greco-Roman : 

a . Bantamweight 118 pounds and under 

b. Featherweight 125 " and under 

c. Lightweight 135 " and under 

d. Welterweight 145 " and under 

e. Middleweight 160 " and under 

/. Light Heavyweight 175 " and under 

g. Heavyweight over 175 pounds. 

But as there was to be no winner of the Inter-Allied Games, only 
the winners in the separate events being recognized, each country 
had the privilege of entering only such events as it desired. A still 
more liberal provision was included which allowed any sport which 



THE GAMES COMMITTEE 
INTERALLIED GAMES 
ORGANIZATION and DISTRIBUTION ofWORK 



THE GAMES COMMITTEE 

CoL.W.C Johnson, Sen'l 5taff, Chairman. 

Lr.Cot.DM.GoopnicH, Gem'l ^tafp .Vice-Chairm/ 
Lt.Col.TC LoNERGAN, GenY 6taff. 
MR.E.5.5nowN, YM.C.A 
Mr . W./<. Reynolps, Y M.CA. 



>5ECRErAF(T THE GamES ComMITTEI 

Cart, Richard H IValdoJnf. 
Major J.J. McCoNViuLE, iNF ^33istani 

ZndLIEUT. RE. MiCKEL C.OF C. 

M^.R.G.HiNKLEY.Y.MC/^. Tbe»^uref! 



j: 



Technical 6ecTION 
Lt.Col.T.C.Lonersan , Gen'l.Staff. 
Major GM.Qillet, Cav., 



X 



Grounds a Building.^ 

TRANSFORTATIOrs 

Major C.C Bull JnF. 
Major M.Brown , Inf. 
Major R-S HolmE^.MIC, 
Iat.Lt/^.J, Kelley T.Q. 
2d. LrJ.RMc.CLuanioN. 



T 



E 



Liaison ScctjON 
Lt.Col.D-M- Goodrich , Gem'l 
maj.u.b. Rogers , M. c. 
capt. w.w hoyt, m.c 



3taf 



Equipment 8( >5uppliE5 
Major EV.Graves, Q M.C. 
Capt.J.6.Swit2ER, Inf. 
Capt Lamar Jeffers, Inf. 
Capt. P.L B(?amblett, Ihf. 
Ist.LtE.E.-Spencer.Inf. 

WR.A.W.GELiTON, YM.C.A. 



Competitions 
Lt. Col. B.F; Castle , A-S. 
1st. Lt. D.A. Montgomery, S.C. 
Mr. RC. Brown, Y.M.CA. 



CQNSTRuCTkON Work- 
Physical CoKDiTioN OF Stadium 

MOTHER (jflOuNDS USED FO(?TME 
COiVlPeTITiONS , TK^MSPORTATiON^ 
LiQMTS , Phones , QathS , 0(?E55if«5 

Preparation at Erection of Scqi^e 
Soar PS 



OJECURE iif MAINTAIN FOR 

Distribution an EMeRQE^cr ^toc 
OF (Athletic Equipr^ENr 

( Ejicept- WeoiCAL ,5uppLiei.) 



Fk06WM,ic»(tiuL(t.iT«njr>c 
F C 6ftOW/y , T M.C A 



Camps 

L.T,CoL.0.W.GRr5WOL0 G.S.COMMBNOING 
MAJ-GA.ShAHNON, AiilSTANf 

CaptJ.RHolmes, Enter.Off. 

CaPT.LF. BUTTOIPH, CoHST.OfF. 

Capt. F/^ Little, 6uPPLt Off. 
Capt. A Betts, Medical Off. 
Ist.Lt.0.5 Powell, Mess.Off 



jLMOOt Pan OfFtCLALi 

MAJ. R. F. WAVSH , Inf. 
MR. EC BROWN, TMC A. 



T 



1 



MfPICAL Af?RANGEM6NT5 

Lt.Col.RM. Hardaway, M.C. 
I&t.Lt. L.q. Washington , M C 
15t.Lt. C.F. Gelston, M.C. 
st.Lt.H.Vouni, M.C. 



Plan for CAMPii^ND Billets 
Preparation and Establishment 

OF 

C/1MP5, Billets etc. 

/lpM(N(3T«flTlON,5uPPLt AND PoLlCE 
OF ALLC^MPi - 



Medical AtTendawce 
a Supplies 

F«5t Aid STATioNi 
Ambulances, Litters, Etc. 



BASEBALL 
MAJOR R f^TATT 

MR A Oath Y. M C A - 



BASKCr-eALL 

Capt. G.M Morgan, Inf. 
MP. A. e. Marriott , YMCA. 



LT. J.IV. Hall. Inf 

Mk.J. poucuMCRTY, YMCA 



CROSScOU'irRTRUN 

Maj. a D 5uRLE5 , C&V, 

MR. LW. pHiuiPS, Y.M.CA. 



30CCCH-FOOTB«L1. 

CflPT. Retnoloj 

MR. Geo. B Cole, Y.M.CA. 



GO*.F 

Majoa.E.l. White, Oro 



X 



Capt. P.m. VanNatteR , |nF. 



Capt H.R.5T0LZ. 

MR- W F Hopkins, YM.Cfl 



MORSE RiDlNC. COMPCriTiONS 

Col. M.R.RiCHi-ioNO , Gen, Staff 
Col C E.HAWKINS . iNF 

IST lt. Beebe , Inf. 



Ckpt.C D.wiMAN.f a. 



SMOOTINCi 

C0L-A.M.MACNA6 , Qen Staff 
aMr.S.Y Smith. YM C«- 



M^j. GEOR<;e WrennjNf 
MfLE.P.rATe , YM.C.A. 



TiMt. ^«e FIELD 

MflJ. /^.D. 50RLE3 , Cav 
MS.q.E Goss.Y MCA. 



M-^j.A-J.COMiTOCK , Inf. 
MR. T J. KEh.y,YMC a. 



Lt.J.W. H«LL, l»r 

MR K B. NIONT/(c,uE , YM.CA 



Capt. IV F Redfielo,Inf. 
MR J E.Beckett YMCA 



Capt. IViNT vJmitm^ Inf 



Capt w.f f^EoFiELO, if^F- 
MR. J E. Beckett, Y M-Cfl 



CA»T,n>T M»«Rl30' 



CArtAPA 

Jawes GOJ.D P-*- 



ur Pr 5TflONG,Cc.f I. 



CAecMO-5Lor*KM 



fJPT.lK.FlNLETTCR 



GiREAT -BRiTAiK 
CAPT. e.L. KACV. F.A. 



GweECE: 
r.C O.eREHNEA.CoT- 



L'. J 6. CARROLL^ A S. 



i HeAjA? 1 

LT T « JoHMjrOn /I 5 



T. A.M.C .M< WIT EH, Co 



Mw Zealand 

C*^T wiiL SHAFAO'H f./ 



POL»»NO 

■, KELSON FELL, A. 



«PT HO-ilLSeeE, FA 



SEItSI* 
CAPT J B BASEY . I. 



NewFouMOiAND 
OFT JAMES Gould, FA. 



CflPI J A POUiUMOg)t/.fl-"« 
CAPr. A H.MUMH,A A S.-M C. 
CAPT CaTOLftNO, INF. 

Lt ae.coRsor , wF. 
lt. j j, hagertt, wf. 

LJ tVH, HAMILTON, f A- 



LT. L.J. LrrOVUHSfiU.iHUit'i 
LT.R.H(LLOU^e()R<HJ<kr<. lUF 

LT,FR.Wll.LEl )MP(Ro,«w,*| 
LT.LD.A10ltlWtlDi:E,AI)C(Au»" 
tTWiREUI.FA,lfdA"CEl 

LT,j.D.STeEN,C-orl[r»L<l 



'E GAMES COMMITTEE 
5ttN50N, Gen'l Staff, Chairman. 
■ooDPiicH, Gem'l 3tafp, Vice- Chairman 

rOL.TC.LONEflGAN, GenV vStAFF. 

E.5.5nowN, Y.M.C.A 
.W^.ReynolD3,YM.CA. 



THE Games Committee 

Iart. Richard H VValdoJnf. 

1 J.J. McCow^iLLF, iNF Assistant 

lEUT. R.E MlCKEL C.OF E. 

.HlNKLEY,Y. M£/\. Treo^urer 



Aoi/isoryGcjmmittee Interallied Games 

„ „ AMERICA 

BM6 GIN H B FISK8 BRIG.Gei(.W.W.H<RIi, C>l«IIINAIt. 

AUSTRALIA 

Lt. Col C.V.WATSON. D SO. MAJ. 5 A. MIPOLETON OSO 

BELGIUM ' 

MAJ R0AUFBE5NEr)tiACHE»«LEfllE 
BRAZIL 



LT-COL. E. MARTIN 
MAJ. BRfANT 

LT cbL vwes , C6.e. 

Brig GLti. S.J. LIANG. 
Nm.FIERLINSER 
LT. Col. SEE.vim-Chaibmm 
MAJ B.C.HARTLET 
M«J SEORdE KILIAS 
OR RODOLFO ROBLES 
MR.AOUMI ABOUL-HAPI 
COL ARTURO LEOME 
UAJ- J A CAMEflOIV 



CANADA 

MAJ. NAD. ARMSTROHG ORE 
CHINA 

BRIO.Gtri . P T 04N 
ClECriO-6LOVAKIA 

Capt. Swutnt 

FRANCE 

MAj.BAI^BIER 
CREAT-BRITAIN 



LT.JEAN R02IS 
GUATEMALA 



ITALY 

MAJ, AMOREA ■ GA6TALPI 
NEW 2EALAWP 



f/ElVFOUNDLA/<0 

POLANP 
PORTUQAL 
Capt.A.MASCA^ENHASccMENEZES LT MARIO OA CUN HA 

LT. COL.V, I. BAIHJLESCU CART. HORACE ERE^llE 

.SERBIA 

Capt. AMPR.itch lt.matitch 

HAJ L HIIMIIIl i».«.etunHm 



Liaison Section 
,D.|Vl.GooDF?icH , Oen'l 

J.L,B. ROGERS , M. C. 
FT, W. W HOYT, M.C 



Staff. 



I 



Brazil 

PTC, A SORDON, F.fl. 



J«MES GOULO f-fl. 



PT STHONG.CofI. 



ifCHO- Slovakia 

R-ft-TOWMSeNO, FA- 



K.F(«LETTEft,f;A. 



GftEEce 
C O.SREN'VGfl.Co^I' 



Guatemala 
J.B CARROtL A S 



1. 



Sencral Section 
Lt.Col.JA.McDermott , Inf. 



hIUjTT 

LT TH JONN3TOM,/l S 


ir,^Lr 

.T.A.M.C,Mt»*»TeR,C«..I 


NEW ZEALAND 

C*^T WiLi. iH*f(\OTH r.A 


POuANO 
I.T.NELSON fELL,fl.S- 


Post USA L 
LT.H.J terror*, F.A. 


HiTWMAMlA 

C*PT WO.SILSBEE.FA. 


Serbia 

CAPT J e BflSEV.i. 


Newfoundland 

C*Pr. JAMES Gou«J),F-fl. 







APT J A roui^noiir./.a.nmn (.r. L.J. l.eT(H««eAu,i«F(5i.) 



APT. A M.MliMH,A A S.-M C. 

ftPT tarouaNO, INF- 

r. aS.CORBOT, (wF. 
'. J.J. HAGERTr, INF. 

■ WH.nAMlTOH,F:fl. 



LT.i(UR.lOO6Ha0IIO0ftK. IMF, 
n.F.ff-Ml\.l£lt.l'1F[R-'\MtnA[ 
LT. UD. WOUOMiPqE, A. 0. C (Ausja 
tr, W J HEU) . FA, if B.A<«cei 
l.T.J.D.STEEN,C-Ofl(irALr) 



Receptions 8^ Entertainments 

CoL.JWBfACHAW 

Lt Col. Paul W^T50H, FA, 
Capt 6-H. Butler , Inf. 
Mn Walter M- Bef^RY.Y.MCA. 



X 



JL 



I 



CEREMON)e66( Parades 
MAJof\ J.B.Wo6AN , Inf. 
Capt. A. C. Smith , Inf. 
1st. Lt.N.M.Mumter.Inf. 
Mk.J.K.Croft ,YfVI.C.A. 



X 



Pf^I Z E 3 

Mftj.GCWooDRuFF, Inf 

CAPr.W.B-5PARK5.AG.D. 

stLtCRoomeXav. 



Press B{ Publicity 
Maj. 5.A. Greenwell.S-C 
Maj. O.J. Watts, A.G.D 
I5tLt3.Frohman,Q.M.C. 
MkIV Unmack.Y.M.CA. 



X 



Distribution of Tickets 
CAPr.W. Oelanet A.Q.O 
Capt. H.S. Warner. CofE. 
Capt.E.H.Spencer.Inf. 



ftecEPTtONS e(. Entert-^imment of 
competing athletes fl[ orfiaALS 

RECEPTION OF REPRESENTATfVes. 
ftiSISTANCE TOATHL£TIC(^EPfieSENTATI/E5RC&AB0ING 
ME&SINQ,QUAftTER5,TflAINma SftOUMOS. 
TRANSPORTATION - FfEFRESHMENTS ON the 
(^HOUNOJ . 



All CetEMONiEs , Parades , FuNCTior»s, Fetes 

IN COKNEpnON VltTH DEDICATION DAY. OPENIMQ - 

DAY, AWARD or PRJ2ES ETC 
COURTESJES DUtOFFCiAU VISITORS, GOvERN|ttE^fT 

OFFICIALS, ETC 

DECORATION OF 5TAD1UM ■ ANO. SROUNOs 

Music -BANOS. 



Desiqn Fok Official 

Medals , I>ipl.oma5 

Special Awabdj , Badges 

ConrRACTSFOR the aBov^ 

TROPHiEi ,e'MBuCM3 . 



Pj^iNTiNQ , Advertising 
publicity 
Daily Programs 
Official Posters 

PftEhS & PHOTOeRAPMY 
CeNEHAL jriTER-ALLlED QaMES 

PRoqRAM 

InpormAtiom Bureaus 



Di6TOFAOW3SIOrt T>CKETi 
05MERS , OflTEMEN 

IN&TRWCTION OF WME 

fJuMS£R5 Si Arrangement 

OF Seats 
Motor Paj?< g, Roao Traffic 

«T Stawu'vi 



82 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

attracted two entries to become an official event and any spoi-t in 
which there was only one entry to be an exhibition event. Arrange- 
ments were made to allow any country to demonstrate a sport in which 
there was no other entry. 

By this comprehensive plan a country needed only to find a com- 
petitor to have its favorite sport made an official event. The long-drawn 
discussions which preceded each of the Olympic Games were thus 
avoided and no country was unduly favored. This method of select- 
ing sports for a big competition had never before been used in America 
or Europe but the plan had been devised by the Y.M.G.A. in the 
course of development of the Far Eastern Games and had been found 
satisfactory in these competitions several years before the Great War. 

The Games Committee was willing at all times to consider sugges- 
tions concerning changes or interpretations of the rules. In fact, 
the rules that finally governed the games were developed rather than 
adopted arbitrarily. The rules that governed the leading highly 
developed sports, such as football, tennis, fencing and baseball were 
those which governed in the countries or organizations that had 
specialized in these sports. This was true in all but the great sport 
of boxing. In this case the rules were adopted which had been used 
in the American Army since boxing was made a leading sport of the 
United States troops in France. They were called " The American 
Expeditionary Force Rules ." They had been found highly satis- 
factory and contained only a few slight modifications from the usual 
Marquis of Queensbury rules. 

In Cricket the Marylebone Cricket Club rules of England governed. 
The Fencing contests were governed by the 1913 rules of the Federa- 
tion Nationale d'Escrime. The last Olympic Games before the war 
contributed the rules that regulated the Rifle and Pistol competition, 
with very slight changes to meet conditions. Tennis was governed 
by the International rules. America's contribution in the form of 
rules to govern important sports naturally included baseball and Ameri- 
can intercollegiate football. 

The youngster among athletic events that made its first appear- 
ance at the Inter-Allied Games was Hand-Grenade Throwing. This 
event had created considerable discussion before the Games, and 
attracted much interest during their progress. Those who had not 
familiarized themselves with the rules that were to govern the event 
were surprised to see some of the contestants, especially the Americans, 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 83 

throwing the grenade much as they would hurl a baseball from the 
outfield into the diamond. 

When hand-grenade throwing first began to play an important 
part in the Great War the bombs were usually hurled from the narrow 
confines of a deep trench. The ideal form for such a throw was thought 
to be a long, sweeping arm motion with the elbow held almost rigid 
both to save the arm and to avoid the danger of the grenade not 
clearing the trench. When the United States entered the war the 
American soldiers were taught to throw the grenade in this manner, 
but they had strong opinions of their own on the matter and event- 
ually proved that they could throw accurately a long distance from 
the depths of a trench with the arm motion so commonly associated 
with baseball. 

In view of this contention on the part of the American soldiers 
the rules that governed the Hand-Grenade event permitted the use 
of either arm and any form preferred by the contestant. The grenade 
used was the French F-1 weighing 600 grs. loaded. The competitors 
were allowed a run to the scratch line if they chose. The throwing 
was done from the field and the grenade was not thrown over any 
obstruction. 

The great ideal, the real object of the introduction of athletics 
into the American overseas Army, was not lost to view by the Games 
Committee in making up the program. This ideal was, "Every 
Man in the Game." Every event that could possibly be included 
was made an official event. The object sought by the Games Com- 
mittee was many entries rather than extraordinary records although 
everything possible was done to aid in the establishing of new athletic 
records. 

As a result of the no-winner plan teams from countries that had 
never known some of the official events were entered to compete 
against countries that had speciahzed for years in those particular 
games. Many of the countries wanted to introduce certain games 
among their people. With nothing to lose by entering a team they 
gained by actual experience. Men from countries in which basketball, 
for example, had never been played, competed against some of the 
very best players from America where the game originated and had 
become a specialized winter sport. 



CHAPTER IV 

HOW THE TEAMS WERE SELECTED AND TRAINED 
FOR THE GAMES 




iTALLY military as were the Inter-Allied Games from 
many aspects, the imprint of the great World War upon 
their character is nowhere brought more forcefully to the 
attention than through a study of the difficulties encoun- 
tered in the selection of the national teams and in the training of the 
individual competitors. 

The effects of the war and its four years of tragedy were manifest 
when the roll of each nation's athletes was studied in the days during 
which the teams were being formed. Following the names of scores of 
brilliant performers in previous world meets were the words " Killed in 
Action" or " Died for Country." Where the answer, "here," came, 
to the roHcall, only too often it was followed by the discovery of battle 
scars which had made of the former star merely an onlooker in this 
and coming great meets. And finally, even those ultimately selected 
for the teams found that the years spent in trenches and in camp had 
sapped their strength and stiffened muscles which formerly responded 
electrically to the demands of strenuous competition. 

The United States, having suffered smaller losses than her sisters 
among the Allies, found less formidable difficulties to surmount than 
those which were experienced by such nations as France and the 
British Dominions. The sportsmen of little Serbia, torn by eight 
years of Balkan strife and world conflict, found themselves engaged 
in a practically hopeless task when they sought athletes for the Games. 
Czecho-Slovakia, her people ground down for many generations by 
Austrian autocracy, had fostered an ancient gymnastic tradition but 
had long been prohibited by law from reahzing her desire to participate 
in athletics and sports. 

But there was one feature, distinctly military, which aided rather 
than retarded the process of selection and training. This was the 
policy in practically every Allied Army, of promoting, through mili- 
tary channels, a program of athletics and of sports competition among 
all soldiers. Not only was this element of mihtary activity responsible 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 85 

for opening up an avenue for experienced athletes to exercise their 
talents, but in some instances, rare to be sure, it developed new stars 
capable of competing for places on an Olympic team. This was 
particularly true in the American Army where an athletic program 
was a very vital part of the early training of the soldier and also of 
his entire army life. During the early part of America's participation 
in the world conflict athletics were largely under the control and 
supervision of the Y.M.C.A. whose Athletic Director did much toward 
establishing the firm foundation for future development of all types 
of sports and games in the American Expeditionary Forces and among 
the troops in the United States. Later the publication of G. 0. No. 241 
established a cooperative arrangement between the Army and the 
Y.M.C.A. substantially the same as that under which the Inter- 
Alhed Games were later conducted. The A. E. F. competitions, 
which took place after the signing of the Armistice, were carried out in 
accordance with this arrangement. 

The eligibility requirement of the Inter-Allied Games, carrying 
with it the restrictions that the competitors must be men who were 
still wearing, or had worn, the military uniform of one of the Allied 
nations, brought about the adoption, in practically every instance, 
of a system of selecting athletes entirely different from that which 
had been adopted in previous world meets. Since the date of the 
Games was known only months — instead of years as is usual in 
case of great meets — before its actual staging, teams had to be 
chosen and trained quickly. America and the British Dominions 
were also faced with the contingency that the meet would keep soldiers 
in France after their normal date of demobihzation. Even the attrac- 
tion of a world's athletic meet was not sufficient in many cases to 
persuade athletes to forego for a time their homeward trip. For this 
reason the contending nations were necessarily sometimes repre- 
sented by athletes inferior, on the basis of previous performances, to 
others who might have borne their colors in some of the important 
events. America practically overcame this handicap by returning 
to France several athletes who had gone home and by adding to this 
contingent a number of Army athletes who had never had the oppor- 
tunity to come overseas during the two years of the United States' 
participation in the war. 

The story of the selection and training of the athletes of the coun- 
tries which participated in the world's meet brings to light interesting 
histories similar in no two instances. 



86 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Guatemala could not obtain ocean transportation to bring her 
athletes to France. Lt. Aguirre, a Guatemalan who had earned a 
reputation as a sprinter while a student in his native country, was 
studying in Paris at the time the Games were projected, although 
he had not been in training for many months. Captain Ydigoras 
and Dr. Robles of the Guatemalan Peace Commission selected Aguirre 
as the sole member of their nation's team and he carried the Republic's 
colors in the 100-meter sprint on the opening day of competition. 

New Zealand's team, though small, was the result of a carefully 
laid plan of selection and training. Immediately after the Armistice 
the Commanding General of the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces 
appointed Major J. A. Cameron to take charge of an athletic program 
for the whole New Zealand forces. A definite program was outlined 
which had for its principal intent the encouraging of all types of athletics 
and sports competitions during the period when the New Zealand 
soldiers were to be in the English demobilization camps. Inasmuch 
as athletics had been widely cultivated and competition had been 
keen in New Zealand in pre-war days, sports in the twelve demobilization 
camps to which New Zealand troops were assigned immediately took 
definite shape. Major Cameron was able, in view of the comparatively 
small number of troops under his jurisdiction, to become thoroughly 
acquainted with the performances of the best of the New Zealand 
athletes then in the camps. At the time of the Armistice it was 
expected that demobihzation would be a matter of eight or ten months 
and in order adequately to care for the program an Athletics Officer 
was appointed for the New Zealand soldiers in each demobilization 
depot. So, when the word came that New Zealand would enter a team 
in the Inter-AUied Games, the problem was not difficult. On the 
basis of competition the men for the New Zealand track and field 
team were picked in the month of January, 1919, and immediately 
went into training at Stamford, England. There they were given 
many advantages, staying at their Enghsh training grounds until the 
latter part of the week just preceding the Games. They then came 
to France and were quartered for a day or two at Colombes Stadium, 
later moving to Pershing Stadium. The crew which represented 
New Zealand was picked in March, 1919, and used as its training area, 
Putley, England. On 30 April the New Zealanders rowed against 
the American crew on the Seine and bested the United States. The 
other competitive race in which they rowed during their period of train- 
ing was on 21 June at the Marlow Regatta in England, where they 



88 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

were again winners. The New Zealand single sculler won his event 
at this regatta in his preparation for the Games competition, 

Italy's participation in this Military Olympiad was to a striking 
degree the result of American influence. Training in the Italian Army 
did not include a program of athletic competition until after America 
entered the war. When the American Expeditionary Forces first 
entered Italy with a view of fighting beside other Allies on that front, 
the soldiers were accompanied by the Y.M.C.A. athletic directors, 
together with their equipment and their system of competitions. 
Italian Army officers immediately became interested and asked for 
the introduction of the Y.M.C.A. ideas and systems into the Italian 
Army. The request was granted and immediately met with tremen- 
dous success. Basketball was introduced to the Itahan soldier for 
the first time in his life and the result was the selection of a basket- 
ball team for the Games. This team was entered for the purpose of 
competition only and not with any idea of winning the meet against 
the admittedly superior American team. 

The track and field team for the Games was chosen by means of 
an elimination meet which was held at the athletic college near San 
Remo on the Riviera. At this meet the winners of similar elimination 
competitions in various parts of Italy where the Armies were stationed 
came together for the final selection. Immediately upon completion 
of this meet the chosen athletes went into a period of training which 
kept them in Italy until the final week before the Games. They 
then came to Colombes Stadium for a day of limbering up before 
joining the camp at Pershing Stadium. 

The officers who represented Italy in the horse events were chosen 
on the basis of previous performances in competitions which have 
made the Italian cavalry famous the world over. The Nadi brothers 
and the others on the fencing team were chosen in the same 
way. The impression among the Italians previous to the meet that 
it was to be distinctively an amateur event had resulted in the barring 
of professional fencers. Had this impression not prevailed an elimi- 
nation competition would have been held which would have resulted 
in the selection of several notable professional Italian fencers of inter- 
national reputation. The selection of the wrestling team was made 
easy by reason of the fact that this sport had always been promoted 
and fostered in Italy. The Italian swimmers were selected at a com- 
petitive match held at Lake Como where the competition for the 
selection of the rowing crews was also held. The team which 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 89 

represented Italy for the Games shooting matches at Le Mans was 
selected as a result of a large shooting match held at Turin. It 
practiced for two weeks before coming to France. 

Czecho-Slovakia, her armies still in the field against several menac- 
ing forces, was deprived of many of her best athletes by the Army 
order keeping them at the front. Furthermore, the new nation found 
it difficult to readjust her athletic scheme quickly so as to put teams 
into the field for the Games. The boycott against Czech athletics, 
aimed particularly by the Austrian rulers against soccer and rowing, 
had resulted in the suppression of the sport instinct among a people 
normally sport-loving. But in spite of these adverse conditions this 
new nation put a comparatively large team of competitors into the 
Games. The soccer team, the famous Prague squad which had been 
boycotted by the Austrians from 1908 to 1918, represented the nation 
in that competition and won the championship. It was the same 
type of team which, in spite of the Austrian edict, won the amateur 
championship of Europe at Roubaix, France, in 1911, beating the 
Enghsh team in the finals by a score of 2 to 1. 

Because of a dearth of experienced trainers and coaches the Czechs 
have never had any large number of skilled competitors for track and 
field. The athletes who were entered in those events for the Games 
had won their reputations in local competitions. The rowing crews 
were the result of a similarly arbitrary method of selection. The 
tennis players came to the Games without having had any training 
principally because there have been no tennis balls in their country 
since the war broke out in 1914. In fencing the Czechs have won 
honors in many previous world's competitions and the selection of 
the fencers for the Games was made from a comparatively large number 
of possible competitors among Army officers. 

France thoroughly combed her active, reserve and demobilized 
forces for the athletes to uphold the Tricolor in the Games. With 
the great meet scheduled for the French capital, the Ministry of War 
determined that representatives of France should be in practically 
every sport. The result of this determination was that one of the 
largest groups of competitors came from France. The actual selection 
of the participants was made through a process of elimination contests 
and a final choice accomplished by representatives of the Section 
d'Education Physique whose efforts were chiefly bent toward assuring 
every possible athlete an opportunity to qualify for a team which 
eventually competed. A distinguished soldier. Lieutenant Colonel 



90 THE INTER-ALLIED GAiMES — 1919 

Fernand See, was appointed by the Ministry ot War to cooperate 
with the many athletic federations in gathering the athletes and in 
directing France's participation in the Games. 

By reason of this thorough and carefully-planned scheme, France 
was able to put into the field the best of the track and field men in 
her Armies. The ranks of French athletes had been terribly depleted 
by the World War and many of the men who did actually appear in 
the various events bore the marks of wounds received in battle. Three 
distinct channels of obtaining track and field men were used in 
making up the teams. The athletes of the Regular Army on active 
service met in an ehmination meet at Colombes in May and by means 
of this competition the best were chosen and put into training for a 
later selection. 

At St. Cloud on 15 May a meet was held for the athletes from the 
Army of the Interior and the best were chosen. The demobilized 
men trained during this period at the many athletic clubs throughout 
France and were later selected by the officials of the clubs to compete 
in the final selection meet held at Colombes Stadium on 15 June. 
This meet was equal in interest to the American selection meet on the 
same field later in the same week and was watched by a large crowd 
of spectators. The winners in this meet were announced as the 
members of the French team and were put in training at Joinville- 
le-Pont. 

The champion French Army soccer team and the champion Rugby 
team had been determined long before the date of the Games by 
reason of successive victories in the army and even over teams of other 
nations. Three squads were further strengthened for the Games 
matches by players sent to the training camps by the football federa- 
tion which picked some of the most promising players from other 
units in the army. The basketball team was made up from the players 
who had shown the most aptitude for the game during the brief time 
it had been played in the French Army. The team was entered not 
for the purpose of winning laurels for the French but because of the 
desire to have competitors in as many events as possible and also in 
order to acquire a further knowledge of the new sport. The tug-of- 
war team was arbitrarily chosen for the same reason and its personnel 
was taken from among the artillerymen of the 83rd Regiment which 
was stationed near Paris at the time of the Games. The biggest men 
in the Regiment were chosen and given as thorough a course of train- 
ing as was possible under the conditions. The basketball team was 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 91 

later brought to the same training grounds after it had finished its 
practice at Royen near Bordeaux. 

The French swimmers were selected from among the Army stars 
and were reinforced by men sent to the squad by the Swimming Feder- 
ation. The tank men trained for the Games races at Piscine de la 
Gure. The French fencers were picked in the same manner, both 
active and demobilized officers having an opportunity to become 
members of the squad which went into training at Joinville, the scene 
of the majority of the fencing competitions during the Games. For 
the horse-riding competition the various armies sent their best riders 
to the great military school at Saumur and there the final selection 
was made and the training conducted. 

Next to the United States, France probably had the most effective 
system for selecting participants in the rifle and pistol competitions. 
Elimination contests were begun in April throughout the French 
Armies. In May the 200 topmost marksmen were sent to Gamp de 
Genottes, near Orleans, where, after another month's ehminations, 
the actual contestants were selected. Several pistol-shooting societies, 
composed of French war veterans, also sent representatives to the 
Genottes match, some of whom eventually made the international 
team. 

For the crews the squad collected from the armies was added to 
by the men sent up from the Federation and the best eight men were 
selected to represent France. 

The Hedjaz, though not represented in the actual competition of 
the Games, sent a delegation of fifteen men to exhibit the type of com- 
petition most popular in their Armies. The horsemen were Arabs 
and, like the rest of the Hedjaz representatives, were* chosen by Gen- 
eral Noury-Sred. The eight men who gave an exhibition of sword 
dancing were picked from the reserve forces of the army while the camel 
riders and their mounts were selected from among the best in the 
two camel-mounted regiments in the Arabian army. These regiments 
are equipped chiefly for machine-gun and light-artillery combat. 

Greece trained her Games competitors in the great stadium which 
had been in 1906 the scene of an Olympiad such as was held centuries 
ago when Greece was supreme in the athletic world. The selection 
of her competitors was carefully made and thoroughly carried out. 
As soon as the mihtary authorities reached their decision to enter the 
Inter-AHied Games an order was sent to all army corps to select the 
best in each sport and to report their names to headquarters. By 



92 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

this means a designated number of aspirants for the teams were selected 
from each of the regiments of the Greek Army in the two zones of oper- 
ation, Western and Eastern. Those from the Western Zone were 
sent to Salonica for preliminary training while those from the East- 
ern Zone went to Athens and the stadium there. When the period of 
prehminary training had been completed the whole number was con- 
centrated in the stadium and went through a final training course 
lasting one month. An ehmination meet was held and the best three 
men for each event in the track and field contest were nominated for 
the team to go to Paris. 

The selection of the soccer team was not difficult in view of the 
fact that only a few players were found in the Greek Army. There 
were no preliminary eliminations for this event, but the men with the 
best records were chosen to compose the squad. The fencers were 
also picked men, but the number to choose from was large in view 
of the fact that fencing had been for many years a popular sport among 
the Greeks. 

The Greek entries for the rifle and pistol events were determined 
by short elimination contests held within each line regiment and by 
the previous records of some marksmen who were unable to take part 
in these contests. The teams practiced for ten days before coming 
to France. 

Belgium adopted a simple and effective way of selecting her compe- 
titors, a committee being appointed immediately upon the decision 
to enter the Inter-Allied Games, the function of this committee being 
the nomination of contestants. This committee consisted of Majors 
Demarneffe and Dufresne, Lieutenants Chome and Boir, Auditeur 
Anspach and the Commanding Officer of the Camp de Beveloo, each 
one of these officers having particular jurisdiction of some certain 
sport. This committee was called the Comite Sportive de I'Armee; 
its members were all army officers and its method of working mili- 
tary. 

The track and field athletes of the Belgian Army were chosen at 
a large preliminary meet held on 11, 12 and 13 June in the stadium at 
Antwerp which is to be the scene of the Olympic of 1920. The mem- 
bers of the boxing and wrestling team were chosen in a tournament 
held at the same time and in the same stadium. The Rugby team 
which represented Belgium was the one which had played in Army 
games as a unit for some time previous to its Games competition. 
During its training for the Paris contests it defeated England and tied 








Top — The Stadium in process of construction Bottom — The .Stadium as seen from airplane 

on Opening Day. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 95 

France in a triangular contest held in England, 2 to 6 May and it 
also defeated Czecho-Slovakia in a game played at Rome on 15 June. 
The swimming team was chosen in the elimination contests at Ant- 
werp, while the water polo team which later won the Games champion- 
ship was the same one, with a few changes made necessary because 
of the war, which won the Olympic title at Stockholm in 1912. 

Practically every regiment in the Belgian Army sent represent- 
atives to the Camp de Beveloo to compete for places on the shooting 
team. Eliminations were held at the range there and the training 
was staged at that place before the ^quad finally chosen was sent to 
Le ]\Ians after ten days practice at Beveloo. The members of the 
fencing team were chosen on the basis of past records of fencing con- 
tests in Belgium before and during the war. The competitors trained 
at Brussels at the Ecole d'Escrime et de Gymnastique during the 
months of May and June. The horsemen were selected after an 
exhaustive and thorough competition at Brussels 10 to 15 June. 

Canada, because of its plan of army athletics, similar to that of 
the American Expeditionary Forces, found the problem of selecting 
athletes for the Games easy of solution. Competition in the Canadian 
Expeditionary Forces had consisted in a large measure of matches 
between the teams of the different Canadian commands, a rivalry 
which had brought to the forefront the best athletes among the offi- 
cers and men. So when the call went out for men to remain in Europe 
for the Inter-AlHed Games, the men to be appealed to were well known 
and easily reached. Many of those who volunteered to compete 
would have been demobilized long before the date of the Games. 
With hardly an exception the athletes who competed in the Games 
had been wounded during the course of the war. 

The organization which had been responsible for athletics during 
the war and during the period following the Armistice furnished the 
machinery for picking the Games competitors. This organization had 
as its head the Canadian Military Athletic Association, a committee 
appointed by the Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Expeditionary 
Forces. In the preparation for the Inter-Allied Games this committee 
was composed of one representative from each branch of sport m the 
eight Canadian training areas in England. The head of this body 
was Lieutenant Colonel H. G. Mayes, for several years the tennis 
champion of Canada. 

The track and field team was selected at Seaford, England, 7 May, 
when a championship elimination meet was held in which the best 



96 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

athletes from all the Canadian forces then in England were entered. 
The contestants finishing in the first three places in the various events 
were nominated as members of the Canadian track and field team 
and were sent into training at Chiswick Park in London, The tug-of- 
war team finally picked to compete in the Games was the squad of 
the 3rd Canadian Garrison Artillery attached to the 22nd Corps of the 
1st British Army. On 7 May at Seaford, England, it won the right 
to represent Canada in the Inter-Allied Games by defeating six teams 
selected from the training areas. 

The Canadian soccer team which played in the Inter-Allied Games 
was an all-star squad picked from the best in the Canadian Army. 
The team of the 27th Battalion, 2nd Canadian Division, won the 
championship of the Canadian troops in France in a series of games 
staged to determine the champion combination. Subsequently this 
team met and defeated, at Seaford, England, the team which had 
won the championship of the training areas. From these two cham- 
pions an all-Canadian squad was chosen for the Games. The baseball 
team was made up in practically the same way. It was picked through 
the agency of a league composed of a team from each of the training 
areas in England. At Stamford Bridge, Chelsea, on 13, 14 and 
15 May, the Ripon Area team won the championship by defeating 
the London Area nine. From the rosters of the competing teams 
twenty of the best players were chosen and trained as a team for the 
Inter-AUied Games. 

The Canadian boxers were chosen as a result of the Canadian 
championship matches which were staged in March, 1919, at Witley, 
England. The winners and runners up in these contests were held 
for training and later appeared in the Imperial Boxing Association 
championship of England in May. The Canadian swimmers were 
arbitrarily picked by the committee in charge of the team, the choice 
being based on past performances in actual competition. A complete 
elimination tourney resulted in the selection of the shooting team. 
Each training area held a match to choose its team for the final prac- 
tice and competition was held at Bisley, England. The survivors 
of this competitive shoot were nominated as the members of the Cana- 
dian shooting team and after a week's practice at Bisley were sent to 
Le Mans under command of Lieutenant Colonel WiUiam Rae, the 
commanding officer of the team. 

Portugal's competitors in the special events which this country 
entered were selected on the basis of past records. Horsemanship 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 97 

and fencing have long been emphasized in this new repubhc and the 
records of Army officers are matters of universal knowledge. With 
these records as a basis the members of the horse-riding teams and of 
the fencing squads were picked by the officials in charge. The same 
held true of the other competitors who were sent to the Games. 

Australia adopted a system of choosing her team which was similar 
in some respects to that followed by the other British dominions. 
At the head of the Australians sports system, during the war and after 
the Armistice, was a board appointed by the Commanding General, 
known as the Australian Imperial Forces Sports Board of Control. 
At the time of the preparation for the Inter-Allied Games the board 
was composed of two members from the Australian Corps in France, 
one member from the demobilization depots in England, one member 
from Australian Headquarters in London and one member from the 
Austrahan Comforts Fund. The President of this board was Brig. 
Gen. Griffiths, C.M.G., D.S.C., while the organizing secretary was 
Major S. A. Middleton, D.S.O. This board was convened in London 
in January, 1919, to take up the matter of entering an Austrahan team 
in the Inter-Allied Games. The system determined upon called for 
the appointment of a sports officer for each branch of athletics ; this 
officer to be one who had a thorough knowledge not only of the sport 
with which he was concerned but also of the material available for 
that sport. Each one of these officers was given full discretion in the 
choice of men to represent Australia. 

Lieutenant Chalmers had charge of the choice of the track and 
field squad and, after making his selection, took the athletes to Her- 
nehill Grounds, London, and began his training on 5 May. In June 
the Marathon runners participated in the British Championship 
Marathon at Stamford Bridge, this race being the feature event of 
their training period. Lieutenant W. Longworth, an Austrahan 
champion swimmer, was given the task of making up a tank squad. 
He had a large number of titleholders to choose from and after gather- 
ing his men together took them to London for training at the Royal 
Auto Club Baths. Captain G. Coghill, amateur heavyweight cham- 
pion of Australia, was the choice of the board as supervisor of the 
boxing and wresthng team. The many bouts which had held the center 
of the athletic stage in the Austrahan Army during the war gave to 
the supervisor a sound foundation for the picking of his team. He 
took the men to Warwick Square, London, in the middle of April and 
began a careful system of training and competition. 



98 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Huskies from all parts of the Australian overseas forces were 
picked by Lieutenant C. Keliher for the tug-of-war squad. The nine 
men who represented the Dominion averaged 213 pounds per man. 
The squad was picked early in May and on 25 May went into training 
at Queens Club in London. During the conditioning process a match 
pull was held with the London Pohce team, the Colonials winning all 
five pulls of the competition. The Austrahan tennis team, which 
later won the championship in the Games, was chosen by Captain R. 
Lycett. He took as his mates on the team men who had won titles in 
matches in Australia in pre-war times. 

Serbia's prospects for a team, at the time when the decision was 
first made to enter the Inter-AHied Games, appeared to be practically 
nil. Torn by eight years of almost constant warfare and brief recon- 
struction, the people of this little country had had little time for 
promoting and encouraging sports. The result was that the Comite 
Serbi-Croate-SIavine, whose duty it was to seek out and name Serbian 
competitors for the Games, had to go back eight years to determine 
qualifications. They were also confronted with the situation that 
in their country competitive athletics had never been emphasized, 
the passion of the race for sports having been satisfied through the 
medium of the society known as Sokol, a gymnastic organization 
whose function called for the training and exhibition of mass calis- 
thenics. 

To show the Allied nations this form of athletics, a team of Sokols 
came to the Games for exhibition purposes. And in addition to this 
team a duo of track and field athletes were entered. One of them 
was entered for the Pentathlon competition and the other for the 
100-meter dash. Neither had competed in their events since a large 
meet in Prague in 1911 and they entered the Games solely for the 
purpose of carrying Serbia's colors and to gain experience to take 
back to their native country. 

Roumania entered track and field events and several of the other 
contests for somewhat the same reason, that of proving to the AUies 
the interest of Roumania in the Games and for the purpose of learning. 
Track and field sports had never been emphasized in Roumania 
previous to the Games and the entries in these highly specialized events 
were made for the purpose of gaining instruction and experience. 
During the training period of the Roumanians in Paris before the 
Games they asked the American Committee for the assistance of Y.M.C. A. 




Top— Herbert Hoover, tJ. S. Food Commissioner, left, and U. S. Secretary of State Robert 
A. Lansing at the Games. Bottom — Y. M. C. A. girls at their hut, Pershing Stadium. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 101 

coaches and trainers. Two of the best men on the staff of advisory 
coaches were assigned to this duty and did much in the brief time 
allowed in showing to the Roumanians the reasons for American success 
in this type of competition. The members of the Roumanian track 
and field team were picked from the Army by Army officers, the men 
chosen being those expected to make the best showing and to be capable 
of developing into the best instructors when they returned to Rou- 
mania. The fencers and the horsemen were chosen because of their 
past records, both of these sports having been prominent in the Army 
for many years. However, the fact that Germany had taken all the 
best mounts in the conquered Balkan country militated against the 
entry into the competition of the best possible representation. The 
Roumanian tennis players who were available were ordered to compose 
the team and they took part in the Games competition with practic- 
ally no previous training. The soccer team and the Rugby squad 
were picked from army players, those men being chosen who had 
shown the most aptitude for the game. Neither of these games had 
been played in Roumania more than three years before the war 
and for this reason the players had never engaged in competitions of a 
nature to make trained and experienced teams. 

While the Roumanian participants in the rifle and pistol compe- 
titions were selected largely on the basis of previous reputation for 
skill as marksmen — a system generally not so productive of results 
as special ehminations — their early arrival at Belgian Camp enabled 
them to overcome this handicap to a considerable extent by careful 
practice. The Roumanian entries arrived a full fortnight before the 
contest began and after a trial with the Springfield rifle decided to use 
that arm in preference to their own. Accordingly they drew Spring- 
fields and under American coaches practiced assiduously, thus gaining 
much valuable information regarding light, visibility and weather 
conditions pecuhar to the d'Auvours range. 

America, sponsor of the meet, entered the Games with a team 
selected through a series of eliminations which combed the ranks of 
the two million soldiers in France for the best in every event. It was 
estimated by those in charge of the selection of the teams that more 
than 5,000 American officers and soldiers were tried out for places 
on the United States squad. The status of the meet and of the par- 
ticipants were put on a firm basis through general orders from G.H.Q. 
and the athletes and those in charge of them were given all the privi- 
leges and power necessary. 



102 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

The system of elimination contests was universally followed in 
determining the membership of the teams for the various events. 
America entered one or more athletes in every event on the program, 
whether the games were ones well known to Americans or not. 

Semi-final and final elimination meets, following a large number 
of smaller competitions, constituted the scheme of selecting athletes 
for the track and field contests. General orders authorized the remain- 
ing in France of those athletes whose organizations were embarking 
for home. 

In the campaign to procure the strongest possible team a thorough 
canvass of the American Expeditionary Forces was made by those 
acquainted with the records of star American athletes. These men 
were brought to Paris where, from 30 May to 1 June, over 600 athletes, 
the survivors of divisional and army meets and the individual choice 
of officials, contested for places on the team. At that time approxi- 
mately 120 athletes were chosen which number was later reduced 
to 80. A movement was then started to bring back to France a few 
of the A.E.F. stars who had already returned home. This agitation 
resulted in bringing over to France a detachment of about 50 athletes, 
some of them track and field men, some tennis players, a few boxers 
and wrestlers, and some swimmers. This group included not only 
men who had formerly been in the A.E.F. but also soldiers who never 
had the opportunity to win the gold chevron. To place the best of 
these on the squad another selection meet was held the week before 
the Games and the men winning first, second and third places were 
announced as the team. These athletes were then placed under the 
tutelage of Major Dale F. McDonald and his staff of Y.M.C.A. coaches : 
Pipal, Wann, Adams, Finger and Cummings. Harry W. Maloney, as 
trainer, was responsible for the conditioning of the men. He kept 
the survivors of the first elimination contest in training at the Colombes 
Stadium and continued his excellent service throughout the Inter- 
Alhed Games. 

The soccer team was the result of a careful study of the best teams 
of the American Expeditionary Forces which was made possible through 
the championship tournament held at Colombes Stadium in Paris, 
12 to 15 May. At this time the four best teams, champions of their 
respective sections of the A.E.F., met in the tourney for the American 
championship. From these four teams. Coach Jack McKenzie, the 
Y.M.C.A. man in charge of soccer, chose a large squad of the best 
players and added to them others in the Expeditionary Forces who 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 103 

had made good records in the Army matches or in play in the United 
States. Eight practice games were played at the stadium during the 
course of training, three with the French team, two with the Rouma- 
nian team, and the remainder between picked teams of the American 
squad. The Rugby team was picked in much the same way, though 
the elimination process was simple compared to that of soccer, and it 
was necessary for the players to be recruited to the squad through 
the individual efforts of the officers in charge of the sport. 

The swimming team was organized by taking the winners of the 
elimination meet held in the Mare St. James in the Bois de Boulogne 
during the latter part of May. This squad was strengthened by the 
addition of the men brought over from the United States. One 
further elimination meet was held at Neuweid to pick the Games 
entries. The basketball team was a composite organization, chosen 
by Gapt. Bennet and Goach Zahn of the Y.M.G.A. from among the 
best players of the many teams which competed in the American 
Expeditionary Forces championship meet. The training of this team 
took place at Golombes and at Joinville. 

The members of the fencing team were gathered in Paris from 
among the best known fencers with West Point or university exper- 
ience. The horsemen were chosen by elimination from among men 
who had established their supremacy in America in the days before 
America's entry into the war. 

The tennis team was the result of an A.E.F. championship tour- 
nament held on the Riviera during the latter part of February, 1919, 
and the golf tourney which determined both the American champions 
and the Games team was staged at the Nice Golf Club, also on the 
Riviera. The tug-of-war huskies were picked from among the cham- 
pions of the many tug-of-war teams in the various divisions. These 
candidates were brought to Golombes Stadium near Paris and there 
many matches and individual tests were made in the process of picking 
the nine men to pull for the United States. 

The boxing and wrestUng representatives of the American Army 
were largely those who earned their right in the A.E.F. finals. They, 
however, were required to defend their titles against later comers and 
in some instances substitutions occurred. 

The baseball team which represented the United States was the 
nine of the American Embarkation Center, the champions of the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces in the diamond tournament held just pre- 
vious to the Games. The American Embarkation Center team was 



104 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

recruited from men in the 86th, or Blackhawk, Division and carried 
the name of "Blackhawks" during their championship play in the 
A.E.F. 

The signal American victories in the rifle and pistol competitions 
are a trustworthy reflection of the careful selection and painstaking 
training of the American participants. Similarly the foreign teams 
appeared to shoot with about the same consistency as was exercised 
in their selection and training. No nation approached the United 
States in this regard and never in the range annals of the American 
Army has a rifle or pistol team been selected from so great a field of 
original aspirants. 

The American entries were determined after three stages of compe- 
tition, the first fo which were the preliminaries for the A.E.F. shoot 
which began in February and were concluded the last of April. In 
these 400,000 men participated, every organization and service in the 
overseas forces being represented. The 2,000 most capable trigger- 
squeezers of this lot participated in the A.E.F. matches at Belgian 
Camp in May. This match constituted the second elimination. At 
its conclusion the 175 best rifle shots and the 75 highest pistol men 
were retained to try out for the Inter-Allied classic. To these num- 
bers were added a few especially qualified and known shots who had 
not fired in the A.E.F. meet. 

These men began the Inter-Allied team preliminaries on 19 May 
and continued firing every day in all weathers until 20 June, elimina- 
tions proceeding all the while. On that date the actual teams, twelve 
men for the rifle, ten for the pistol, and the lists of twenty-five individ- 
ual competitors with each weapon, were officially announced. 

The members of the American crew were picked up from all parts 
of the Army gathered in Paris and there made into a crew. Frequent 
changes were made both before the race on the Seine which New Zea- 
land won, and afterwards, when the crew went to England to train 
for the Henley and the later race near Paris. 




,r*--r..:-" 




Athletic camp at Pershing Stiuiium. Top— Allied row showing mess halls on right and 
athletic quarters on left. BoUom^Gvcmp of Australian athletes on their street. 




CHAPTER V 
SITE AND CONSTRUCTION OF PERSHING STADIUM 

iloR the permanent use to which it will be put in coming 
years— the practice of athletic sports among the French 
people— the site of the Pershing Stadium was happily 
chosen. Situated* within the eastern edge of the Bois de 
Vincennes, on the ancient highway between Vincennes and Joinville- 
le-Pont, it lies in the midst of what is not only one of the most 
beautiful of the many lovely parks of Paris, but in the one which 
is frequented, perhaps more than any other, by the average classes 
of the city, who, in Paris as elsewhere, make up the body and 
blood of its population. Of the Bois de Vincennes an Englishman 
wrote, a few years ago : "On Sunday afternoons in summer the 
Bois is crowded. Under every tree, along the edge of every lawn, 
by the bank of every stream, are family picnic parties, easily satisfied 
and intensely happy. Stolid Englishmen are astonished at the eager- 
ness with which grown-up people are playing at ball or battledore. 
Nowhere is the light-hearted, kindly, cheery character of the French 
middle classes seen to greater advantage. " 

It is precisely to these classes that a great stadium for the practice 
of athletic sports will be most valuable because from them must 
come the chief strength of generations able to repair the cruel ravages 
of war in the French nation. No parting gift that America could 
have made to her ally would have better attested her deep desire for 
the speedy rehabilitation of France, or have offered greater possibili- 
ties for aiding to that end, than the Stadium which was named in 
honor of the Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

Lying just without the southeastern walls of Paris, whose nearest 
gateway, the Porte de Vincennes, is distant less than four kilometers, 
the Stadium has around it a region rich in reminiscences of the eventful 
history of Paris and of France. In nearly every direction, but partic- 
ularly toward the southeast along the lofty hills which follow the 
picturesque windings of the Marne, are a number of fine old chateaux, 
each with its sheaf of legends from the past. But the Bois de Vincennes 

* See map, page 87. 



108 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

itself is the appropriate center of such a region. The Bois, whose 
dense treetops, forming a pleasant background of green, look over 
the walls of the Stadium on every side save that occupied by the Tri- 
bune of Honor, was, as a fragment of primeval forest, a hunting pre- 
serve of King Louis IX (Saint Louis) in the thirteenth century, and 
the weathered obelisk, which stands near the south corner of the 
Ecole de Polytechnic, beside the main road from the Porte de Vm- 
cennes to the Stadium, is a memorial erected on the spot where, it is 
said formerly grew a great oak tree beneath which the good king was 
accu'stomed to dispense justice to his subjects. The original forest 
was replanted in 1731 by Louis XV and under Napoleon III was 
converted into a public park which at present contains about 
2,275 acres, a great part of this area being given over to the Champs 
de Manceuvres in the center and to the race course of Vincennes imme- 
diately southwest of the Pershing Stadium. This race course is the 
largest and oldest of the several around Paris. 

Immediately north of the Bois is the suburb of Vincennes which 
originally grew up about the Chateau de Vincennes, a royal residence 
founded in the twelfth century and used and enlarged by the royalty 
of France until 1740. In this chateau died several kings of France 
and other famous personages, including Henry V of England, while 
in the great Donjon, 170 feet high, which is the last one remaining 
of nine towers, a long hst of notable prisoners have been confined at 
one time or another. The chateau was defended for Napoleon against 
the Allies in 1814-15 by General Daumesnil, whose memory is perpet- 
uated by a statue in the town and by the largest of the lakes in the 
Bois de Vincennes. Converted into a powerful fort and an artillery 
depot by Louis Philippe in 1832-44, the ancient stronghold still retains 
the lattei' function. The large Champ de Manoeuvres and the Poly- 
gone de I'Artillerie, as well as the Ecole de Pyrotechnic and the Camp 
de St. Maur, occupying the whole central part of the Bois, are all in 
a sense military dependencies of Fort de Vincennes, as the work on 
the site of the old royal chateau is now called. It is, indeed, what 
might be termed the citadel of the powerful system of detached forti- 
fications guarding Paris on the southeast from the crossings of the 
Marne river as it approaches its junction with the Seine at Charenton. 
North and south of Fort de Vincennes are several of the bastioned 
masonry forts which guarded the city during the siege of 1870-71, 
while east of it, on the high hills east of the Marne, lie Fort de ViUiers 
and Fort de Champigny, works considered modern until 1914, and 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 109 

designed to protect the bridgehead of Joinville-le-Pont. On the 
nearer side of the river, entirely covering the loop of its last sweeping 
bend before it enters the Seine, stand the older but once very powerful 
redoubts of Gravelle and Faisanderie, connected by a bastioned cur- 
tain separating the southeastern corner of the Bois de Vincennes from 
the town of St. Maur-les-Fosses, and commanding from their heights 
the whole populous suburban district embraced within the bend of 
the Marne. 

The traditions of St. Maur-les-Fosses lead back to the most remote 
event recorded of this region, for it was here that in the year 287 A. D. 
the Roman emperor, Maximianus, attacked the GaUic peasants, the 
Bagaudae, who had revolted against the oppressions of Rome. The 
rebel leaders, Aelianus and Amandus, lost their lives and their forces 
were utterly crushed, Maximianus thus making good for a while longer 
the waning Roman power. East of St.Maur, on the hills rising along 
the opposite bank of the Marne, stands the village of Chennevieres 
from which the views toward Paris and over the surrounding country 
are so superb that Louis XIV seriously thought of making the place 
his royal residence and expending upon it the vast wealth and labor 
which he eventually lavished upon Versailles. It was at Chennevieres 
that the long-distance and cross-country riding events of the horse- 
riding competitions were held. 

About two kilometers east of Joinville-le-Pont, whose railroad 
station is the one most convenient to Pershing Stadium for sub- 
urban trains from Paris, lies, in the lap of the hills rising eastward, 
Champigny-sur-Marne. It is in the loop of the Marne forming the 
bridgehead of Joinville-le-Pont, previously mentioned. Here, on 
29 November, 1870, Paris being already in the throes of famine, large 
French forces under command of Generals Trochu and Ducret began 
the most formidable of the repeated sorties which, during the four 
months' course of the siege, were made at various points in the hope 
of breaking through the lines of the besieging Germans. Some ground 
was gained on that day and the next, but a bridge needed for the 
crossing of troops at Champigny was not thrown in time to be 
of use, while the French Army of the Loire, directed in dispatches 
sent by balloon to create a diversion in the German rear, failed to 
receive word in time to make the necessary attack. By most violent 
fighting the enemy was able to contain Trochu and Ducret in the 
bridgehead westward of Champigny and, after clinging for a while to 
the inferior positions which they had taken, the French retired on 



110 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

2 December to the west bank of the Marne. Later and less powerful 
sorties elsewhere proving equally abortive, toward the end of January, 
1871, Paris surrendered. 

After the outbreak of war in 1914 the ground now occupied 
by the Stadium was converted into a training area and its surface 
was covered with trenches and wire entanglements which had to be 
cleared away when the work of laying out an athletic field was begun 
in February, 1919. Directly north of the Stadium are the barracks 
of the Ecole Normale de Gymnastique et d'Escrime, the remainder of 
the Ecole Normale being located at the Redoute de la Faisanderie. 

It seems peculiarly fitting that a locahty so intimately associated 
with the martial history of France should have been chosen for the 
athletic meet between the soldiers of the Allied armies, marking the 
close of the greatest war in which France or any of the nations asso- 
ciated with her had ever engaged. It became the site of this memor- 
able celebration, however, only after careful preliminary consideration 
of other possible places. 

The first place considered was the stadium at Golombes, about 
four kilometers northwest of Paris, where the Olympic Games of 
1900 were held. It was well adapted to the proposed object in many 
ways and the Y.M.C.A. secured a lease upon it for the purpose of using 
it both for the A.E.F. finals and for the Inter-Allied Games themselves. 
It soon became obvious, however, that it would not be just to use 
a field for the international events which was familiar to only American 
contestants. Golombes was retained, therefore, only for the A.E.F. 
finals, and another track and field, equally unknown to all competitoi-S, 
was sought. No existing place being found available it was decided 
that the only solution would be to build an entirely new amphitheatre. 

The site finally selected for the new structure was the one in the 
Bois de Vincennes already described. It was beautifully situated, 
presented many easy routes of access from Paris, and could be prepared 
with a minimum of engineering difficulties. The ground belonged 
to the City of Paris but, as has already been mentioned, it was being 
used by the French military authorities. Through the negotiations 
of the Gomite Nationale d'Education Physique et de 1' Hygiene Sociale, 
however, the city, with the approval of the Ministry of War, donated 
it for the purpose contemplated. The Y.M.G.A. undertook to finance 
the structural work. 

The constructive project was divided into two parts. The build- 
ing of the reinforced concrete stadium itself was to be done by a 




Top-Marshal Foch and General Pershing in reviewing stand Cen/er 'f-^^^ff^l^^'^ 

cloLly foUowing an event. Center ri^M-General Pershing addressmg American engneers. 

/otom— Marshal Pooh, General Pershing and General Weygan watching the events. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 113 

civil contractor. The grading of the field and the completion of the 
track was to be the work of French military engineers. The Stadium 
was designed by Buisson and Giffard, a contracting firm of Paris, 
and the contract for the construction under their plans as approved 
was let by the Y.M.C.A. to this firm on 24 February, 1919. 

The assembling of equipment and material began at once. But 
the location was a rather difficult one from the standpoint of water 
supply and railroad transportation for such large building operations. 
The considerable amount of water needed in concrete mixing, however, 
was provided by connecting up a supply line with the Paris mains. 
Sidetracks from the railroad spur running into the artillery depot 
at Camp de St. Maur were laid adjacent to the Stadium site, although 
throughout the building period the shortage of cars, due to the heavy 
military requirements all over the country, necessitated more or less 
use of motor transportation for the hauling of building material. 

Construction work on a large scale had begun 11 April, the contract 
providing for the completion of the Stadium in ninety working days. 
By reason of the earnest and enthusiastic efforts of the contractors 
the construction was about thirty-five per cent completed, a consider- 
able amount of material for further work was on the ground, and 
excellent progress was being made when, about 1 May, unfortunate 
developments of the labor situation put a stop to all civilian work. 

The date for the scheduled opening of the Games was now less 
than seven weeks away. It was evident that if the Stadium was to 
be completed in time heroic measures would be necessary. Accord- 
ingly it was decided to put American troops to work to finish the struc- 
ture and to do whatever other work might be found necessary, such 
-as rendering the place conveniently accessible by the repair or con- 
struction of roads and paths. 

The first American troops to arrive on the ground began work 
on 5 May. The organizations thenceforth employed were as follows : 
Companies G and G of the 22nd Engineers, Companies B, C and F 
of the 55th Engineers, Companies A, B and C of the 122d Engineers. 
Headquarters Detachment and Companies A, B and C of the 128th 
Engineers, Co. C of the 131st Engineers, Companies B, H, K and L 
of the 59th Pioneer Infantry and Companies A and F of the 806th 
Pioneer Infantry (colored) — a total of eighteen companies aggregat- 
ing about 100 officers and 3,300 enlisted men. 

Everyone entered into the spirit of the task with good will 
and, working continuously in three daily shifts of eight hours each, 



114 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — I9I9 

construction was pushed as rapidly as possible considering the time 
that had to be allowed for the proper setting of the concrete. As many 
as eight concrete mixers were often in use at one time. The cement 
used was the product of factories in France, England, and Alsace- 
Lorraine. It was obtained wherever possible on the market and a large 
quantity of it, finally, from the A.E.F. depots at Gievres, Le Mans, 
and Paris. The latter depots also furnished considerable other mate- 
rial, much of which was hauled by American trucks owing to the rail- 
road situation. It was no small problem so to arrange the operations 
that men could be working on all parts of the structure at once and 
still allow time for the concrete, particularly that of the sections of 
the grandstand and the bleachers which would be called upon to sus- 
tain living loads, to set properly before the beginning of the Games. 
Biit the desired result was accomplished. By the last of June the 
sustaining parts of the concrete work were completed and could be 
left to harden until the opening day. Practically until the opening, 
however, work had to continue on the minor parts of the structure 
in order to finish it. 

The completed Stadium has a periphery measurement of 2,100 feet 
and it encloses an area of about nine acres. The total seating capa- 
city is approximately 25,000 of which the grandstand, or Tribune 
d'Honneur, seats 2,500 while the bleachers, or Tribunes Populaires, 
seat about 22,500. The grandstand, which is the only part covered, 
has a concrete roof. It is about one hundred yards in length and 
beneath it are twenty dressing rooms for the use of the athletes. Two 
detached bleachers, separated from the rest of the Tribune Populaire 
by the straight-away track, stand at the ends of the grandstand. 
Shower baths and store rooms are constructed under the Tribune d'Hon- 
neur and detached bleachers. From every part of the seating spaces 
in all the tribunes the view of the track and field is excellent and 
there are ample exits both by exterior stairways descending from the 
back and by passageways passing beneath the structure from the 
ground in front. 

While the American engineers and labor troops, in their olive 
drab uniforms, were working night and day on the Stadium itself, 
a force of French poilus, about 300 in number, in every shade of uni- 
form from the horizon blue of the Infantry and the dark blue of the 
Chasseurs to the yellowish khaki of the Zouaves and the Colonials, 
was working side by side with them on the field and track. Under 
the direction of French engineer officers they had begun work on 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 115 

12 April. Their first task was to level the field, which, in the lower- 
ing of some areas of the surface and the filling of depressions, including 
the old trenches, involved the moving of about 50,000 cubic meters 
of earth. 

Following the levelling came their most important labor, the build- 
ing of the track. This consisted of a circuit for races of long distance 
and a straightaway for the dashes. The straightaway was laid out 
immediately in front of the Tribune d'Honneur, with its center oppo- 
site to the covered grandstand, the track being 232 metres long and 
ten meters wide. The oval track followed practically the shape of 
the amphitheatre itself, having curving ends and two straight sides, 
the one nearest to the Tribune d'Honneur coinciding with the straight- 
away in front of the grandstand. The length of the corde sportive, 
as the French expressively term the theoretical path of a runner on 
the track, is 500 meters, measured at a distance of thirty centimeters 
outside the inner rail of the track. The width of the oval track, except 
during its coincidence with the straightaway, is 6.30 meters. 

Four layers of cinders having a total thickness of 50 centimeters 
were used in the construction of the track. The bottom layer was 
made of very coarse cinders, the next of medium, the next of fine, 
and the last, finishing off the surface, of very fine cinders. Six thous- 
and cubic meters of cinders were used in building the track but their 
bulk was reduced almost one-half by the constant rolling to which 
they were subjected after being laid. Time is as important a factor 
in producing the proper settling necessary for a fast track as it is in 
the setting of concrete in a building. The French engineers consider- 
ably reduced the period ordinarily necessary for settling by contin- 
uously watering and rolling the new track during the two weeks 
that intervened between its completion and the opening of the Games. 
During this time the American engineers also cooperated with them 
in order to make sure that everything would be in readiness in time. 
After the completion of the track a football field, 144 by 70 meters, 
was laid out in the center of the arena and provision was made 
for fields for other games and whatever temporary structures or 
ground preparation might be necessary for the exhibition of other 
sports. 

The labors of the American Engineer and Pioneer troops did not end 
with the completion of the Stadium proper. Before the Games parking 
spaces had to be provided for the large number of motor trucks and 



116 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

other vehicles which were constantly bringing in building materials 
and other supplies. For the automobiles bringing out officials and 
other passengers during the Games, a large parking place was sited and 
levelled behind the Tribune d'Honneur and between that and the 
railroad tracks. From two of the main roadways passing near the Stad- 
ium, the Chemin de Bosquet Montmartre and the Route de la Pyra- 
mide, entirely new connecting roads were built to the Stadium. The 
Chemin de Bosquet Montmartre was repaired and put in good condi- 
tion over its entire length and the Route de la Pyramide from the Stad- 
ium to beyond Fort de Vincennes. Several other shorter stretches 
of roadway were built in various places as required and gravel paths 
laid out around the whole Stadium. Necessary repairs on another 
route of approach, the Avenue Daumesnil, were made by the French. 



DECORATIONS 

The Decoration of the Stadium was placed in charge of the Com- 
mittee on Ceremonies and Parades. The plans which they prepared 
involved the use of large quantities of bunting in the colors which 
appear in the flags of the various Allied nations. The first scheme 
under consideration centered about an ambitious idea which would 
have been very effective had it proved possible to carry it out. This 
was to anchor a balloon above the center of the Stadium, with four 
guy ropes descending from it to the corners of the structure on which 
would be hung Allied flags and streamers. However, the failure of 
Germany to ratify .the peace treaty before the date of the opening 
of the Games deterred the Air Service of the American Army 
from providing a balloon for the purpose and the plan had to be 
abandoned. 

It remained to decorate only the Stadium itself. The flags of many 
of the nations could easily be obtained in quantities and sizes required. 
But the flags of others, particularly those very recently given a 
recognized national existence by the action of the Peace Conference, 
such as Czecho-Slovakia and Hedjaz, were not to be found in the 
markets. In fact, their very designs were not known until after 
inquiry was made of their diplomatic representatives in Paris by the 
Committee. It then became necessary to establish a sewing shop 
in which sixteen French seamstresses were employed for several weeks 




To-p — England's entrants. Middle — Czecho-Slovakian contestants. Boltom — Group o£ U.S. 

track and field athletes. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 119 

in making these and other flags and large quantities of streamers and 
draperies. Not only decorations for the Pershing Stadium were made 
here but also decorations for use at the other places where certain 
events of the Games were to be staged because they could not be put 
on at the Stadium, namely: the Mare de St. James (St. James'Lake) 
in the Bois de Boulogne where the swimming contests were to be held, 
the Colombes Stadium where the Rugby football events were to 
occur, and La Boulie Golf Links, the scene of the golf tournament. 

At the Pershing Stadium itself, as has been said, the decorative 
scheme involved the use of the flags and colors of the Allied Nations. 
Around the inner line of the oval track was a series of flag poles, 
each one carrying a large flag of one of the competing nations, all of 
the flags being of the same size. The flags of France, the United 
States, England, Italy, and Belgium were on the poles immediately 
in front of the Tribune d'Honneur, the flags of the other nations 
extending on around the track. All of these flags were on lanyards 
so that they could be raised in the morning and lowered and furled 
in the evening. The front edge of the roof of the Tribune d'Honneur 
was draped with broad strips of bunting of the colors of the larger 
nations which were looped up at each pillar in order to display a round 
shield bearing the colors of one of the nations surrounded by small 
flags and with strips of bunting descending from it down the face of 
the pillar. 

At regular intervals around the top of the tribunes, poles were 
set, each carrying at its top a ring about six feet in diameter. From 
these were draped streamers of Allied colors looped together at the 
bottom of the pole, thus forming basket-shaped clusters. The entire 
outer rail of the track, from its upper edge to the ground, was 
draped with red bunting. The top rail of each of the ten large 
exit doorways in the Tribune Populaire was similarly decorated. 
In addition each of these doorways had above its center the shield 
of one of the nations with its own and either the American or the 
French flags at its sides. 

The features mentioned were only the major ones of a decorative 
scheme which had many effective minor details. The significance of 
all of them may be said to have centered, in a permanent sense, around 
the tablet on the front of the Tribune d'Honneur at its center, which 
voices in its inscription the origin and the enduring purpose of Persh- 
ing Stadium. The place of this tablet was, occupied during the 



120 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Games by a plaster cast of what will eventually be a bronze plate 
bearing the following words : 

PERSHING STADIUM 

ERECTED FOR THE 

INTER-ALLIED GAMES 
June-July 1919 

BY THE 

AMERICAN YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

AND PRESENTED BY IT THROUGH 

EDWARD C. CARTER 
Chief Secretary 

TO 

GENERAL JOHN J. PERSHING 

Commander-in-Chief 

FOR the 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

and in turn presented by Gen. Pershing 

TO 

Mr. GEORGES CLEMENCEAU 

President of the Council, Minister of War 

AND Honorary President of Comite National de l'Education Physique, 

Sportive et de l'Hygiene Sociale 

FOR THE PEOPLE OF FRANCE 

THAT THE CHERISHED BONDS OF FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN FRANCE AND AMERICA, 

FORGED ANEW ON THE COMMON FIELD OF BATTLE. MAY BE TEMPERED AND 

MADE ENDURING ON THE FRIENDLY FIELD OF SPORT. 

TRANSPORTATION \ 

At the beginning of operations the Motor Transport Service of the 
American Army was requested to make arrangements for furnishing 
transportation for use between Paris and the Stadium to each of the 
three sections of the Games Committee of the Inter-Allied Games ; 
that is, to the Technical Section, the Liaison Section, and the General 
Section. Each of these sections furnished to the transport service 
an estimate of the peak, or maximum, transportation requirements 
which it believed would be necessary for its particular service. The 
sum of these estimates amounted to 95 motor cars and 20 C.M.C. 
ambulances. On this basis transportation was furnished by the Motor 
Transport Service, the Games Committee being given also the privi- 
lege of calling for three-ton trucks for heavy hauling in any number 
up to one hundred. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



121 



More than sixty per cent of the trucks for which provision was 
made were never called for at one time although the engineers working 
on the Stadium once employed twenty-four trucks to assist in hauling 
materials. Of the motor cars the Technical Section, having in charge 
the actual construction work, normally used more than either of the 
other sections. The Liaison Section, particularly during the Games, 
was called upon for much transportation, carrying, among others, 
many foreign civilians and also contestants entered in the Games. 
The contestants were carried, not only on days when they were com- 
peting, but on other days when they wished to attend the Games as 
spectators. Under the conditions the estimated peak requirements 
of the several sections were sometimes exceeded. But they were 
seldom all exceeded at the same time, so the motor transport service 
was generally able to take care of the excess requirements for any 
one section by drawing on the idle transportation of another. Very 
infrequently did an actual shortage occur and in general the transpor- 
tation was ample and satisfactory to all concerned. 





CHAPTER VI 

CAMPS AND ACCOMMODATIONS 

LTHOUGH General Pershing's invitation to the Commanders- 
in-Chief of the Allied Armies included the announcement 
that the American Quartermaster Corps would furnish 
quarters to all visiting athletes and that the United States 
Army ration would be available at the same prices allowed to the 
American Army, it was not expected that all the nations participating 
in the Games would depend solely upon the United States for these 
things. Not that the Quartermaster Corps was not ready and willing 
to supply the wants, but it was believed that some of the teams would 
I^refer to buy their supplies on the open market in Paris. 

But much to the surprise of the Americans, when the teams began 
to arrive at Paris, one by one, they looked to the Americans to handle 
all details as to food, equipment, quarters and transportation. 

It is probable that the United States Army ration has never been 
put to a more severe test than immediately preceding and during the 
Inter-Allied Games when fifteen nations and colonies from every 
part of the world took the regular issue of food — the food that 
composes the "doughboy's" ration — and converted it into training 
table diet. It is true that, after some of the cooks from foreign lands 
had apphed their varied treatments, it would hardly have been 
recognized as the component parts of Yankee "slum." But the ration 
measured up in every way, according to the trainers of all the visiting 
teams, to all the requirements of an athlete's diet. Very few of the 
visiting teams bought food in Paris and what was bought was in such 
small quantities as to be negligible. 

The visiting athletes not only ate American food, but they used 
American equipment to a large extent, slept in American beds in 
American tents, used American cars for practically all their transpor- 
tation,_ depended on the Americans to straighten out any difficulty 
that might arise— in fact, the camp took on more of the American 
atmosphere than was first intended, but only as the result of the incli- 
nation of the visitors to leave these matters to the hosts. 




rop-Frcnch contestants. CVn^er- Serbian athletes and officials. Botiom—Ovoup of Italian 

ccintestants and officers. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 125 

Colombes Field, which belongs to the Racing Club of France, had 
ieen leased and put into shape by Y.M.C.A. experts. The American 
Army erected a well equipped training camp there for the use of all 
teams except the tennis players, golfers, and rowing crews. These 
teams did practically all their training in their respective countries. 

The force to handle the camp was quickly and well organized. 
When the teams began to arrive the first we°k in June they were at 
once taken to Colombes, easily accessible from Paris by train and 
pike. Pyramidal tents, obtained by the supply officer from salvage, 
were erected, streets were laid ofT with a row assigned to each team, 
mess tents were put up and equipped. Enough men were detailed 
to meet all needs. 

The visitors were handled much as any American Army outfits 
would have been handled under the same circumstances. When a 
team arrived the men were taken to their "streets," blankets were 
issued — few teams brought any personal baggage — a hot meal was 
ready and transportation made available to bring any equipment 
they might want from Paris. 

When American rations were first purchased few of the visiting 
teams understood their preparation. To meet this, American Army 
cooks were immediately assigned to each mess and worked under the 
direction of each team's own mess officer or mess sergeant. The 
striking feature of the ration issue was the fact that few of the teams 
were able to use all the food. The French, the Roumanians, the 
Czecho-Slovaks, the Italians and others never learned to eat the cereals 
contained in the American issue and turned them back. They took 
no other food in return, simply asking for a money credit. The Aus- 
tralians, however, wanted a slightly bigger meat issue for their wrest- 
lers and boxers than the American issue allowed. This was easily 
arranged by permitting them to draw the meat which was turned 
back by other teams, for only the Australians, Canadians and New 
Zealanders were able to eat the entire American meat ration. 

Some of the teams used wine on their tables and a cafe at Colombes, 
run by civilians, supplied this want. Some of the teams also cooked 
their meat in wine. This they bought in bulk and it was the largest 
single item purchased outside of the American ration. 

The Quartermaster Corps allowed the visitors to buy clothing, the 
only restriction placed on these purchases being that no cloth in bulk 
was sold. 



126 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Colombes Field proved to be an almost ideal training camp and 
elicited praise from every team. The weather during the training 
period was excellent though it turned somewhat cooler after the Games 
began and caused some discomfort, but extra blankets and clothing 
were issued and none of the teams were handicapped by the change 
of weather. 

Some of the teams, such as the Czecho-Slovaks and Roumanians^ 
coming from countries virtually fighting for existence and suffering 
from a scarcity of food, were surprised at the plentiful supplies. The 
American canteens, with chocolate and other sweets as well as tobacco 
for sale, were open to the visitors on the same basis as to the American 
soldiers. 

The atmosphere of the camp was cosmopolitan, indeed. While 
there had been Olympic games in which more nations entered teams 
than were entered here, never before had there been an athletic meet 
in which each country sent its fighting men in uniform. The variety 
of dress was a most interesting feature and these soldiers, who had 
been fighting for the same cause and who knew of each other by hearsay 
only, fraternized splendidly when thus brought together in friendly 
competition. 

English and French were the official languages of the Games and 
most of the visitors were able to speak one of these languages. To 
facilitate the handling of the details of the camp the Liaison Section 
assigned interpreters in all the languages of the Allies to the Camp 
Commander, but, much to the pleasure of the visiting athletes, they 
found many American soldiers doing duty at the camp who spoke 
their languages. There were men who spoke the rare tongue of the 
Slovaks as well as the more generally known Greek, Italian and others. 
These men were always available in an emergency. The visitors soon 
made their acquaintance and called on them frequently. An Ameri- 
can-Chinese cook, however, waited in vain for a team to whom he 
could talk in his mother tongue, for China was not represented. 

A row of headquarters tents, in which were the officers in charge 
of the different departments with their office forces, was erected near 
the tents of the athletes. These tents housed the Commanding Officer 
and Adjutant, the Supply Officer, the Athletic Supply Officer, the 
Personnel Officer, the Transportation Officer and others. Telephone 
connections were made and telephones were available at all times for 
the officers in charge of the different teams. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 127 

Ample transportation was at all times available to the teams. 

On Saturday, 21 June, most of Colombes Camp was moved to- 
Pershing Stadium. At Colombes were left the Australian swimmers, a 
few other athletes and labor organizations. The move was effected 
without disturbing the routine of training. Kitchens were opened at 
Pershing Stadium before the messes were moved from Colombes. 

The arrangements at the Stadium were similar to those at Colombes. 
The location of the camp was probably not quite so nearly ideal, but 
some improvements were made in other comforts including more room 
for messing. Each team was allowed an officers' mess tent separate- 
from the mess of the men. Kitchen police were assigned to aid the 
kitchen help furnished by the teams. 

The picked regiment from the American Army of Occupation was- 
established in barracks formerly used by French Hindu-Chinese labor 
troops. These barracks were in excellent condition and the smart 
regiment from the Rhine made the camp a model of cleanhness. This 
regiment, picked from the entire Third Army, functioned as an inde- 
pendent unit, had its own battalion and company organizations, and 
drew its supplies through its own Quartermaster. The barracks were 
within two hundred yards of the Stadium. 

The American athletes were quartered at Clignancourt Barracks- 
at the end of the Metro line north of Paris. These barracks had for- 
merly been a French hospital but were used during practically the 
whole period of America's participation in the war as a replacement 
barracks for American troops. The big buildings afforded ample 
room for the athletes to do a large part of their training. A special 
mess, separate from the mess of the troops at the barracks, was estab- 
lished for the athletes. 

The swimmers of all nations except the French did their training 
outside of France and reported at Paris immediately before the aquatic 
events started. The French trained in Paris. 

The American team selected Neuweid, Germany, a town of some 
18,000 inhabitants, situated on the Rhine, for its place of training. 
A very fine natatorium, thoroughly sanitary and well equipped, 
caught the eyes of the trainers while the Third Army team was training 
on the Rhine. When the swimmers from the United States, who 
came to France for the meet, arrived they were sent immediately to 
Germany. In spite of the facilities offered by the big pool, however, 
most of the American team's training was done in a small stream that 
ran into the Rhine at Neuweid. 



128 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

The swimming events of the Games were held at Lake St. James 
in the Bois de Boulogne where the A.E.F. meet had already 
been held. Tents were erected for dressing rooms and other comforts 
were arranged for the swimmers. No messing was done here. 

CAMP NEAR LE MANS 

The problems presented in connection with the Rifle and Pistol 
events, which were held at Belgian Camp, Sarthe, near Le Mans, were 
virtually the same as those which confronted the Games officials at 
Paris and were handled in about the same way. The competition 
camp was an inheritance from the A.E.F. Rifle and Pistol Competi- 
tion, concluded in May, for which it had been constructed. The d'Au- 
vours Range, the world's largest, with a front of 200 targets, was built 
in 1918 when the Le Mans area was an American combat troop training 
center. It was rehabilitated for the A.E.F. shoot and served the 
Inter-Allied competitions without further alteration. 

The Camp itself, while complete in all ordinary requirements of a 
first class cantonment at the time of being taken over, was considerably 
improved and beautified for the reception of the foreign marksmen. 
The competitors were quartered in a characteristically American tent 
city, one street of twenty-eight Sibley tents being assigned to each 
nation. All tents were floored and equipped with doors. At the 
head of each "national street" stood a tall staff bearing a large wooden 
shield with the nation's coat of arms painted in colors. Competitors' 
kitchens and mess halls were adjacent to their streets. Separate 
messes for the officers and enlisted personnel of each contingent were 
provided under the same roof. All kitchen help, barracks police and 
orderlies were supplied by the United States from the two service bat- 
tahons on duty at the camp. 

An American officer had charge of each national street and all 
men assigned to duty therewith were under his command. These 
officers saw to it that every service was rendered and every wish ful- 
filled which the visitors might express. 

Team captains and their adjutants, and in two cases the captains' 
wives, occupied a row of converted Swiss huts which was laid out in 
a pine grove forming Headquarters Street. These huts were painted 
and, with the addition of rustic porches and window boxes filled with 
blooming flowers, bore more resemblance to small hunting lodges 
than the conventional knock-down shelter. Within they were divided 






Top — ^King of Montenegro presenting medals to American atUetes. Center left — General 
Gavaneuser, Roumania, an interested spectator. Center right — General Pilot, France, and 
General de Ache, Brazil. Bottom — King of Montenegro shaking hands with General 

Pershing's son. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 131 

into two rooms and furnished with rustic tables and chairs made by 
American artisans from timber hewn in the grove. 

At the head of the street stood the Headquarters Mess constructed 
and furnished in the same style. It was accessible through a series 
of winding gravel walks laid out in an artistically landscaped garden 
of lawns and flower beds. This was the handiwork of a soldier who 
had been a landscape gardner in civil life. In its construction more 
than two acres of sod were transplanted. Night illumination was 
achieved by colored lights fixed in the boughs of the trees. 

The Headquarters Mess was the scene of much of the social side 
of the camp life. During the day its broad veranda formed a gallery 
for spectators of tennis and golf. Every effort was made to invest 
the free hours of the visitors with a social atmosphere in keeping with 
their traditions of hospitality. The officers of the visiting teams 
were entertained in turn and at the conclusion of the meet the team 
captains were the guests of the Headquarters Staff at a dinner dance. 

There were nightly entertainments for the enlisted men at the 
Y.M.C.A. theater and clubrooms. Tennis courts, a golf course, volley- 
ball courts, baseball grounds and a swimming pool were provided for 
the use of the competitors. 

The officers and part of the enlisted personnel of the camp were 
housed in thirty-eight wooden barracks. The remainder of the enlisted 
men lived in tents. 

HORSE-RIDING COMPETITORS AT FORT DE CHAMPIGNY 

The officers and enlisted men and also the horses of the Allied teams 
entered in the Horse-Riding events were received and quartered at Fort 
de Champigny, one of the outer chain of forts erected for the defense 
of Paris. In it comfortable quarters were arranged for the enlisted men 
of all the Allied teams and messing arrangements and other conven- 
iences estabhshed for them. Stables were immediately built on the 
adjoining public ground for the horses and land was rented nearby 
on which suitable obstacles were quickly constructed so that after 
their arrival the various Allied teams might continue their training 
without interruption until the day of the events in the Stadium. These 
obstacles were duplicates of the obstacles to be placed later in the 
Stadium and were laid out with distances and arrangements exactly 
as they would be found on the day of the events. All the Allied teams 
availed themselves of this obstacle course and continued their training 



132 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

at Fort de Champigny after their arrival. Colonel F. P. Lahm, A.S., was 
designated as Commanding Officer of Fort de Champigny, a suitable 
staff placed at his disposal, and under his direction the Allied officers 
were billetted in the adjoining towns, automobile transportation fur- 
nished for trips to and from the Stadium and to Paris, and, in general, 
every attention possible was given by him towards the comfort and 
pleasure of the officers and men. 

Officers' messes were established by each nation. The enlisted 
men of each nation were rationed and the horses foraged at the expense 
of the United States. A suitable saddling stable, about 1,000 yards 
from the Stadium, was rented and placed at the disposal of all the 
teams for temporary use on the days of the events in the Stadium, 
where the officers might assemble their horses under cover, and where 
suitable conveniences were provided for officers, men and horses 
while waiting their turn to enter, according to their places on the 
starting list. 

ROWING TRAINING CAMP, BOIS DE BOULOGNE 

The departure of a number of military police no longer needed in 
Paris left room in the American Military Police Barracks in Bois de 
Boulogne at Aqueduct Bridge for the 150 Allied oarsmen training for 
the Inter-Allied Regatta on the Seine, 17-18 July. Each of the ten 
competing nations and colonies had separate quarters for their oarsmen, 
trainers and boatmen. All the contestants messed together in one 
of the vacant mess halls, each crew having its own training table. 

Across the street, on the river bank, twelve canvas hangars were 
set up to house the shells and other material required for the races. 
Three landing stages were built on the shore and the shells and tents 
were guarded night and day by American soldiers. The Y.M.C.A. 
provided an entertainment tent where refreshments were served, dances 
held and every opportunity given to the visitors to mingle under 
pleasant conditions. 



CHAPTER VII 
EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 




HiLE the lack of sufficient athletic equipment was a serious 
handicap to the teams of mahy of the competing nations 
during the period of their training in their own land, as has 
been seen in Chapter IV, "How the Teams Were Selected 
and Trained for the Games," practically all difficulties disappeared 
immediately upon arrival in Paris. 

Naturally, the first thought of the coaches and managers after 
their arrival was to complete their stock of athletic goods. The sec- 
tion of the Games Committee charged with Equipment and Supplies 
assisted the visitors in every way possible by advising them as to 
where the needed articles could be purchased, and by furnishing neces- 
sary transportation. In accordance with the general regulations 
governing the competitions, each nation assumed responsibility for 
the equipment for its individual athletes. However, the American 
Expeditionary Forces provided all field equipment and all supplies 
which are not strictly personal, including javelins, vaulting poles, 
discus, 16-pound shot, wrestling mats, tug-of-war ropes, and complete 
baseball, football and basketball equipment, in addition to the more 
permanent fixtures on the field such as stands, poles, bars, hurdles, 
flags and lanes. Prior to the opening of the Games, dumbbells, chest- 
weights, boxing rings and similar supplies were furnished the athletes 
at Colombes Field for training purposes. Personal equipment also 
was furnished to the baseball teams and in certain other cases where 
the visitors were unable to provide for their needs either on account 
of lack of time or the scarcity of the articles required. 

The chief source of supply of athletic goods was the large stock 
brought to France by the Y.M.C.A. in particular, the other welfare 
societies assisting also, in anticipation of the A.E.F. athletic program. 
The Equipment and Supply section of the Games Committee was 
practically the same organization which had been charged with the 
distribution of athletic goods in the A.E.F. Consequently there 
was no difficulty nor delay in procuring the principal articles of 
equipment. However, it was necessary to buy some articles on the 



134 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



French market and even to send to England for special equipment 
required for sports not played among American troops. 

During the Games a supply booth was maintained under the Tri- 
bune d'Honneur in charge of a supply officer who was prepared to 
meet the needs of everyone on short notice. The main supply tent 
was located in the Inter-Allied Camp. In case the required articles 
were not in stock either at the booth or at the tent, the request was 
telephoned to the Paris office where it was immediately taken care 
of by the purchasing officer on duty. 

After the Games the supplies were salvaged for reshipment to the 
United States for use among the troops there. The teams of the 
Allies were allowed to keep some sets of equipment for a number of 
sports, notably baseball. This gift was made for the purpose of encour- 
aging those sports among those nations which would not have been 
able to continue to play the games unless they had received this assist- 
ance from America. 





Top left-Fouv Hfdjaz camels which amused the crowd with a number '''' ^'f ;';■ T"^' 

riahl-A demonstration of Hedjaz swordsmanship. Botom Ze/^-Hedjaz camel and its ride. 

Boilom right— K Hedjaz representative. 



CHAPTER VIII 
MEDICAL ARRANGEMENTS 




HEN a heavy-muscled Greek wrestler stepped from the ring 
at Pershing Stadium with an angry mat burn across his 
broad shoulders, a medical officer was on hand to give him 
proper treatment. If an Arab failed to parry a slashing 
swing of a sabre in the hands of a fellow tribesman and lost a few 
square inches of cuticle as a result, a bandage was promptly apphed 
by the hands of an Army surgeon. If Monsieur Bonhomme became 
excited when a poilu breasted the tape ahead of the other AUies and 
tumbled from the perchy bleachers, a doctor and an ambulance were 
on the spot in anticipation of the accident. 

Medical arrangements to care for the hundreds of athletes and 
the thousands of other officers and men of all nations connected with 
the big games, as well as for the spectators, assumed large proportions. 

The chief surgeon of the District of Paris, American Expedi- 
tionary Forces, was in charge of medical arrangements for the Games. 
This made available the entire machinery of this department and 
through it were operated the dispensaries and dressing stations estab- 
lished at all the sites of competitions. 

While proud of the completeness of their arrangements for medical 
and surgical relief, the attendants were very much gratified that no 
grave cases arose to require their remedial measures. Considering 
the large number of contestants who participated in the Games, and the 
thousands of spectators who crowded the Stadium and grounds for 
fifteen days, the fact that there was not a single really grave accident 
was remarkable. 

Not one participant in the competitions received a serious hurt. 
Several spectators suffered painful and somewhat serious injuries. 
Two of these were due to the press of the crowd on Opening Day. 

A Frenchman who had succeeded in gaining a coigne of vantage 
in a tree, whence he could catch a fleeting glimpse of the marching 
troops and other ceremonials, lost his footing and suffered a bad case 
of shock. In the jam around the gates a woman sustained a dislo- 
cated elbow. These cases were treated by the first aid station and 



138 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

rushed to French hospitals. The most serious accident of the Games 
was sustained by an American soldier on the night of the Fourth of 
July when the trough holding a skyrocket slipped and the blazing 
arrow shot into his face as he sat in the stand. The sight in one eye 
was endangered by this bit of celebration of the Glorious Fourth. 

One of the first acts of the Medical Department was to ofl'er to 
cooperate closely with all the physicians of the visiting teams. At 
the dressing stations soldiers and athletes of all nations were treated > 

The main dispensary for the Games was set up at the camp at Persh- 
ing Stadium. This consisted of a hospital tent divided into an 
operating room, a dressing station, quarters for the enlisted personnel,, 
and a prophylactic station. Three officers and ten enlisted men 
handled all medical work at the Stadium itself. In addition to holding 
sick call daily for 3,500 men, this dispensary kept a medical officer 
in the arena at all times when competition was actually going on. An 
officer also was sent to the Salle-d'Escrime nearby, where much of 
the fencing was held. An officer was at the ringside for every boxing 
bout. An ambulance was held in readiness at the entrance to the 
Stadium during the Games and three others were available. These 
arrangements were in addition to the less elaborate arrangements of 
the medical officers with each of the competing teams. American 
and French hospitals in Paris were ready to take any case that could 
not be handled at the dispensary. 

During the Tennis and Golf tournaments medical officers and a 
sufficient number of enlisted personnel were sent from the Paris Dis- 
trict office. At Mare St. James a first-aid tent was set up and a medical 
officer with enlisted personnel cared for the swimmers. This station 
was also operated from the Paris District. An ambulance accom- 
panied the runners in the Gross-Country race but was not needed. 

While training was in progress at Colombes Field, a dispensary 
was operated there. 

In a word the medical arrangements were marked by unusual pre- 
cautions for every phase of the Games, from the more hazardous, 
such as fencing, to sports in which the probability of injury is almost 
neghgible, such as golf; but the actual duties of the section fortunately 
turned out to be nothing more than the treatment of a few injuries 
and attending to the routine prescriptions of sick call. 



CHAPTER IX 
RECEPTIONS AND ENTERTAINMENTS 




N order properly to play the role of host to guests from 
eighteen parts of the world, whose ideas of entertainment 
differ almost as widely as do their languages, there was 
organized a special department to see that none of the 
participants in the Inter-Allied Games suffered from ennui and that 
their time did not hang heavily on their hands before or during the 
Games. 

This department was composed of officers and welfare workers 
of the Y.M.C.A. who had experience along this line in the American 
Army. These people had already discovered the psychological fact 
that no other entertainment is so enjoyed by the American doughboy 
as that which he furnishes or takes part in himself. This knowledge 
was applied in the plan of entertainment for the Inter-Allied athletes. 
In other words, the entertainment department worked out a scheme 
to make the visitors feel that it was "their show." 

The teams were met when they arrived in Paris, taken to their 
camps and told to "make themselves at home." Of course there 
were formal entertainments, but the greatest stress was laid on the 
plan of having every man meet the rest of the fellows. The scheme 
worked. The cosmopolitan atmosphere of the little groups about 
the pianos proved it. Informal dances that simply started up spon- 
taneously with a Belgian or a Frenchman pounding out the latest 
American foxtrot for a group of all nations to dance by, showed that 
language and customs were no barriers. When the supply of Y.M.C.A. 
and Red Cross girls was not enough to allow each athlete a dancing 
partner, an Australian, with ostrich plume swaying, seized a fellow- 
soldier from Roumania and swung into the rhythm. "Madelon" 
proved to be almost an international song. But everybody knew 
"Tipperary." If they didn't know the words they whistled the 
tune. And the visitors entertained each other. For it must be 
remembered that most of them were as interesting to the others as 
all were to the Americans. When the Arabs stretched a canvas 
across the tennis court at Colombes Field and performed the latest 



140 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — I9I9 

thing in sword dancing, or the Czecho-Slovaks did a folk dance, the 
Poilu athletes were just as interested as the Canadians. These sol- 
diers, fresh from their common victory, made an interesting and varied 
crowd as they formed a circle around the performers. The incident 
at Babel produced no greater variety of tongues than voiced approval 
of a particularly well received stunt. 

Social and club life was provided for all the visiting athletes; a 
hut was erected for the Composite Regiment, one for the casual troops 
and one for the four negro companies. 

The center of main activities was the Y.M.C.A. Inter-Allied Hut, 
90 by 140 feet, rightly called "the melting pot." This hut was 
moved from Brest to the camp at Pershing Stadium. It was here 
that the best of the A.E.F. shows were staged. The stage and lighting 
arrangements were almost perfect. Cinema shows were held nightly 
when other formal entertainments were not scheduled. Four formal 
dances were held. It took twenty-one Y.M.C.A. secretaries and 
ninety-five American girls to operate this hut. Besides making and 
serving lemonade, the women worked in shifts, as they termed it, 
as "floaters." This meant that their duty was to remain in the 
hut, available as dancing partners, to start informal games, give 
information and encourage the visitors to mingle. This plan produced 
a wonderfully homelike atmosphere in the big hut. 

A total of 39,000 litres of ice cream and 200,000 gallons of lemonade 
were served without charge by the Y.M.C.A. during the training period 
and while the games were on. 

In the hbrary corner of the big hut hundreds of letters were written 
home daily in no fewer than twelve languages. All these letters 
could be mailed in the postoffice at the hut. 

Most of the 1,000 athletes and 7,000 other troops in and around the 
Stadium went on sight-seeing trips in Versailles, Paris and vicinity 
with Y.M.C.A. guides and in cars furnished by both the Army and 
the Y.M.C.A. 

Some of the best speakers of the day delivered addresses to the 
visitors and other troops. Such men as former Ambassador Henry 
Morgenthau were on the lecture program. 

Not all the entertaining was done at Colombes and Pershing 
Stadiums. At Chgnancourt, where many American athletes were 
quartered, similar recreation places and programs were arranged 
by the Y.M.C.A. The horsemen were well earned for at Champigny. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



143 



The visitors gasped at the magnitude of the entertainment arrange- 
ments. Free ice cream and other dainties were things that had 
been unknown for a long time in some of their war-ravaged countries. 
Trainers said that at first many of the men showed signs of overindul- 
gence in sweets, but the quality of the cream and the pure lemon juice 
insured no really bad effects. 

Transportation was available at all times for groups that wanted 
to make special trips. The officers of all nations were given the same 
privileges of using automobiles that the American officers enjoyed. 

In addition to the big entertainment huts an officers' tent was 
erected at Pershing Stadium where Allied officers could meet more 
privately. This tent was handled somewhat similarly to the others. 

Pershing Hut was a bungalow erected for the accommodation of 
the Commander-in-Chief, his friends and dignitaries who visited the 
Games. It was the "reception room," so to speak, of the host. 
It was in this hut that all high officials were entertained for a short 
while before and after the Games each afternoon. A private entrance 
led from the bungalow to the Stadium. 

The Games, then, became a sort of huge, three-sided entertainment. 
The athletes entertained the thousands who poured out to see the 
competitions each day ; they entertained each other, and the Y.M.C.A. 
and American Army left nothing undone to supply them with outside 
entertainment. 




CHAPTER X 
MEDALS AND TROPHIES 




ERiT was rewarded and permanent recognition made of the 
part played by victorious athletes through the agency of 
trophies, medals and diplomas. 

Of greatest interest to the individual competitors was 
the Inter-Allied Medal which was awarded to the winners of first, 
second and third places in each event, and to each member of the 
winning teams. Winners in all the principal sports likewise received 
the gold or silver medal of the French Minister of War. 

Trophies were donated by prominent officials of the competing 
nations in the majority of sports. Among the illustrious donors of 
gifts are the names of President Wilson, President Poincare, King 
Albert of Belgium, Marshal Petain, M. Glemenceau, Italy's Minister 
of War, China's Minister of War, and their Excellencies, Hoo Wei 
Teh and Lou Tsong Tsing of the Celestial Republic. 

The Presidential Trophy can well be considered the principal one 
of the list. It is a beautiful bronze by the classic sculptor, Lanson, 
and represents the successful return of Jason after his heroic quest 
of the Golden Fleece. A happier symbolism could scarcely have 
been chosen by President Wilson for his gift, typifying as it does not 
only the supreme attainment of merit at Pershing Stadium, but also the 
attitude — almost that of a Launcelot — of America's participation in 
World War. It was awarded to the nation winning the highest the 
place in the track and field events. 

President Poincare contributed eight trophies — a large bronze 
statue of America's best friend, the Marquis de Lafayette, designed 
by Dolan, and seven small statuettes representing four types of the 
French poilu and three of the Yankee doughboy. The latter group 
in particular is wonderfully well done, full of the poise and action 
that are the characteristics of these fighters. They were awarded in 
the swimming events which were of particular interest to the French 
President. 

King Albert of Belgium interested himself particularly in the art 
of military equitation and accordingly presented a handsome silver 

See illustrations, pages 75 473 481 487 49.5. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 145 

cup, surmounted by the figure of Winged Victory, to be given to the 
team making the best performance in horsemanship. 

Italy's monarch, in commemoration, perhaps, of the safe return 
to Venice of the famous horses of St. Marks, donated a pair of exquis- 
itely wrought silver horses mounted on marble pedestals. The 
workmanship is marvelous and fully carries out the old Itahan guild 
traditions of delicacy and feehng in design and execution. They 
were prizes in the Rowing (Eights) contests. 

True to his constant belief in the importance of individual marks- 
manship as well as organization expertness in musketry, General Persh- 
ing identified his gift with the rifle-shooting competition of the 
Games. His trophy was doubtless the most heroic and inspiring in 
pose of all the varied prizes and yet the bronze statue partakes of the 
classic only in spirit. With true fidelity to the original, the artist, 
Richefeu, caught and molded into his work the indomitable spirit of 
the American soldier in action. With trench knife grasped in his 
left hand and with menacing automatic in his outstretched right, 
with every line and curve of his figure picturing energy and fearless- 
ness, the Doughboy is a symbol of American resolution in time of 
stress and adversity, and of grim American aggressiveness when the 
battle broke in favor of the Allies. 

The trophy given by France's beloved premier, M. Clemenceau, 
sets forth, as nothing else could have done, his country's deep, abiding 
love of ultimate justice and right. In noble gold and bronze, his gift 
portrays what France longed and labored for throughout the years 
since 1870. Virile, exultant, victorious in idealism and justice, the 
Cock stands triumphant at last over the black German Eagle. 
The Boche sword is finally broken, no more to threaten the happy 
homes of France, and the hated Prussian helmet is at last humbled 
to the dust of dishonor and oblivion. The artist, Vacossin, could 
find no more appropriate title for his work than that which he chose, 
"La ;Revanche et le Droit." It was awarded to the winning soccer 
team. 

Marshal Petain gave a beautiful gold stop watch to the winner of 
the Rowing Singles. Another beautifully wrought gold watch was 
the gift of the Italian Minister of War. It was awarded to the winner 
of the 800-meter run. 

Although unable to send a team, China showed her interest in the 
Games by donating three handsome gifts. The Minister of War's 

10 



146 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



gold cup, His Excellency Hoo Wei Teh's exquisite porcelain bowl, 
and Lou Tsong Tsing's silver cup, are beautiful examples of oriental 
craftsmanship. 

The Comite Nationale d'Education Physique et de I'Hygiene Sociale 
contributed a notable bronze statue of General Hoche designed by 
Dalon. 

The French medal was made by the government mint. It shows 
on the obverse side the classic French Liberty head in profile with the 
words "Republique Frangaise," and on the reverse side is the desig- 
nation of the donor, "Prix offert par le Ministre de la Guerre." The 
Inter-Allied medal is of bronze after a design by F. Fraisse and shows 
on one side Liberty bestowing a wreath of Victory upon two Greek 
athletes with the inscription, "Corporis Robur et Habilitas." The 
reverse of the medal, with appropriate ornamentation, bears the name 
of the winner, the event, and place engraved for the various events. 

The schedule of awards of medals and trophies was as follows : 



Event 



Inter-Allied 

Medal 
Isl 2ncl 3rd Tolal 

.36 
.20 



Baseball 18 18 . 

Basketball 10 10 . 

Boxing : 

Bantamweight. . 

Featherweight. . 

Lightweight. . . . 

Welterweight . . . 

Middleweight.. . 

Light-heavyw't . 

Heavyweight. . . 
Cross Country Race . 

Fencing (Foils) Ind.. 
Fencing (Saber) Ind. 
Fencing (Epee) Ind. 
Fencing (Foils) Team 6 6 
Fencing (Saber) Team 6 6 
Fencing (Epee) Team 6 6 



Soccer 14 14, 



1 3 

1 3 
1 3 
1 3 

..12 
..12 
..12 
. . 28 



Rugby 18 18 ...36 



Silv 



French Medal 



er to winner. 



Trophies 

Chin. Porc'rn. Bowl. 

Statue of General 
Hoche. 



1st Place-Gold. 
2nd Place-Silver. 
Gold, to winner. 



Silver lor each mem- Cock and Eagle, 
ber ol team, To- 
tal 11. 

Silver for each mem- Chinese Silver Cup. 
ber of winning 
team, Total 15. 




Fourth of July .'it Pershing Stadium. yop-Airplanf soaring ovr^r field. Center left and 
riyht-Night pageants. J5o«o»i— Airplane flying inside the Stadnau 



Event 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 

Prencli Medal 



149 



Inter-Allied 
Medal 

1st 2id 3ra Total 



Trophies 



Golf, Ind 1 1 2 

Golf, Team 8 8 8 24 

Hand-GrenadeThrow 1113 Silver to winner. 

Horse-riding, Mili- 
tary Team 6 6 6 18 

Horse-riding Ind ... 1113 

Horse - riding Prize 

Jumping, Ind 1 1 1 3 Gold to winner. 

Horse - riding Prize 

Jumping, Prs 2 2 2 6 Silver to winner, to- 
tal 2. 

Rowing (Singles).. . . 1113 Silver to winner 



Silver Cup, King of 
the Belgians. 



Gold watch. Mar- 
shal Petain. 



Rowing (Fours) 5 5 5 15 Silver to each mem- 
ber of winning 
crew, coxswain ex- 
cluded. 

Rowing (Eights). ... 9 9 9 27 Silver to each mem- Two Statues of Hor- 

ber of winning ses, King of Italy, 
crew, coxswain 
excluded. 

Shooting, Rifle Silver to each mem- "Hands Up," Gen- 
Team 15 15 15 45 ber of winning ri- eral Pershing. 

fle team. Silver 
to high individual 
score. 

Shooting, Rifle, Ind. 1113 Gold to winner. 

Shooting, Pistol, Silver to each mem- 
Team 13 13 13 39 ber of winning Chinese Gold Cup. 

team. Silver to 
highest individual 
score. 



Swimming : 

a. 100-M. Free 

style 

6. 100-M. Back 
stroke 

c. 200- M. Breast 

stroke 

d. 400- M. Free 

style 

e. 800 -M. Free 

style 

/. 1500-M. Free 
style 



1 3 Silver to winner. 
13 

1 O 5» )» >> 

13 

1 3 Silver to winner. 

13 



Seven statues of Sol- 
diers, President 
Poincar6. 



150 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Inter-AIlied 








Event 


Medal 






French Medal 


Trophies 


Isl 


2nd 3rd Tutal 






g. 800 -M. Relay, 






Silver 


to each mem- 




Freestyip, 






ber 


of winning 




(4 men) 4 


4 4 


12 


team. 




Tennis : 












a. Singles 1 


1 


o 


Silver to winner. 




b. Doubles 2 


'_) 


4 


J) 


51 )) 




c. Team Singles 












and Doubles. 4 




4 








Track and Field : 












a. 100-M. Dash. . 1 




3 


Silver 


to winner. 


Jason and the Gol- 


b. 200-M. Dash. . 1 




3 


" 


" 


den Fleece, Pres- 


c. 400-M. Dash. . 1 




3 


i) 


51 17 


ident Wilson. 


d. 800-M. Run. .. 1 




3 


)) 


" " 




e. 1500-M. Run. . 1 




3 




" " 


Gold watch, Italian. 


f. Modified Ma- 










Minister of War. 


rathon. 1 




3 


Gold to winner. 




g. 110-M. High 












hurdles 1 




3 


Silver 


to winner. 




/2. 200-M. Low 












hurdles 1 




3 


" 


" 




i. Running High 












Jump 1 




3 


" 


)) w 




/. Running Broad 












Jump 1 




3 


" 


" " 




k. Standing Broad 












Jump 1 




3 


" 


n o 




l. Hop, Step and 












Jump 1 




3 


" 


" 




m. Pole Vault 1 




3 


" 


.> 




n. Throwing Jave- 












lin 1 




3 


" 


.: 




0. Throwing Dis- 












cus 1 




3 


,, 


15 1-) 




p. Putting 16 lb. 








shot 1 




3 


" 


)J 5 J 




q. Pentathlon ... 1 




4 


1st PI; 


ice, Gold. 2nd 





Place, Silver. 
r. Relay race, 800 

M. (4 men) 4 4 4 12 Silver to winner, 
s. Relay race, 

1600-M. (4 

men) 4 4 4 12 " " " 

I. Relay race, 

Medley (4 

men.) 4 4 4 12 ' " 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



151 



Event 



Inter-Allied 
Medal 

1st and Srd Totol 



French Medal 



Tug Of War (9 men) . 11 11 . . .22 



Water Polo 10 10 

Wrestling : 

a. Catch-as-catch- 

can. 
Bantam 

Feather 

Light 

Welter 

Middle 

Light-heavy 
Heavy .... 

b. Greco-Roman : 

Bantam .... 

Feather 

Light 

Welter . . . 

Middle 

Light-heavy 

Heavy 

Special events (Ar- 
my of Occupation 
Only). 

a. 800-M. Relay 

Race (4 men.) 

b. Running broad 

Jump 



..20 



..2 

..2 
..2 

..2 

. .2 
. .2 

..2 
. .2 
. .2 
..2 
..2 
..2 
9 



4 4 4 12 



1113 



Trophies 

Silver to each mem- 
ber of winning 
team. Total 9. 



Silver to winner of 
each wrestling 
event — Greco - Ro- 
man Style, total 7. 



In addition to the medals and trophies prepared for the successful 
competitors, each individual winner and all members of winning teams 
received a diploma signed by General Pershing and by Colonel Wait 
C. Johnson, Chairman of the Games Committee. This diploma bears a 
special design prepared by the American sculptor, Captain Aitken of 
the U. S. Army, and shows the name of the athlete, the country 
represented by him, the place won by himself or his team, the event 
participated in, and the date and place of the event. A similar diploma 
was presented to all members of the Advisory Committee for their 
work in promoting the success of the sports. 

All games and administrative officials and competitors were given 
an artistically wrought bronze badge, which, when worn with variously 



Diploma, page 69. Design of bronze badge, page 1. 



152 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



colored ribbons, identified them and their divers duties. The metal 
emblem bore the legend "Inter-AUied Games, Pershing Stadium, 
Paris, June, 1919." 

Ribbons in the following color combinations and numbers were 
distributed : 

GAMES OFFICIALS 



COLOR OF COLOR OF 

BIBBON INK No. EIBEON INK 

Referee White Gold 10 Red Gold 

Scorer White Gold 10 Red Gold 

Starter White Gold 10 Red Gold 

Judge White Gold 100 Red Gold 

Inspector White Gold 100 Red Gold 

Timer White Gold _. 50 Red Gold 

Clerk of course White Gold 10 Red Gold 

Umpire White Gold Red Gold 

Official White Gold 100 Red Gold 

Manager White Gold 25 Red Gold 



COLOB OF 

No. BIBBON INK No. 

10 Blue Gold 10 

25 Blue Gold 15 

10 Blue Gold 10 

50 Blue Gold 50 

Blue 

10 Blue Gold 25 

6 

75 Blue Gold 25 

100 Blue Gold 100 

25 Blue Gold 25 



GENERAL OFFICIALS 



Games Committee . . . 
Advisory Committee . 

Press 

Photographers 

Courier 

Information 

Usher 

Liaison Section 

Technical Section . . . 
General Section 



BIBBON , INK No. 

Gold Blue 15 

Red, White and Blue Gold 50 

Yellow Black 50 

Yellow Black 50 

Light Green Gold 50 

Red Gold 100 

Yellow Black 300 

Red Gold 75 

Red Gold 100 

Red Gold 100 



Athletes in all events 



COMPETITORS 



COLOB OF 
BIBBON INK 

Blue Gold 



No. 
1,500 





Baseball. Toy — Amprica. Center left — America playing against Canada. Center right — 
Gilpatrlck of Canada scoring on hit to center by Klaehn, beating throw from center. 

Bottom — Canada. 



CHAPTER XI 
ADVERTISING THE GAMES 




s the Inter-Allied Games were organized not only as a test 
of athletic skill but with a view to arousing universal 
interest in organized sports, publicity connected with the 
Games had the double role of sport propaganda as well as 
athletic news. In addition it was the function of the Pubhcity 
Department to stimulate interest in the Inter-Allied Games, not only 
among those fortunate enough to be living in Paris with opportunity 
to witness the Games, but among the people of all Allied nations. 
In the main this was accomplished by the printing press and the 
camera. 

The large crowds filling Pershing Stadium day after day regardless 
of rain and cold were the proof of the persuasive power of the publicity 
campaign. The same is true of the thousands who saw the swimming 
competitions in the Bois de Boulogne or who watched the Rugby matches 
at Colombes. They would not have been there but for the work of 
three sections of the Publicity Department of the General Section of 
the Inter-Allied Games — The Press Section, Printing and Adver- 
tising Section, and the Information Service. And it is the fourth 
section, the Historical Section, which collected the necessary data 
and wrote this history. 

It was through the press that the pubhc first learned of the Inter- 
Allied Games. This information came from the Press Section organized 
for the service of all newspapers and periodicals of the competing 
countries. The Section served Parisian publications both in French 
and English ; Continental papers including French, Belgian, Italian, 
Portugese, Czecho-Slovak, Yugo-Slav, Roumanian, and Greek ; British 
papers in Australia, New Zealand and Canada as well as in the British 
Isles, and also the American press. 

In addition to supplying newspapers with written articles and pho- 
tographs, the Press Section obtained authentic material and offered 
every facility possible to newspapermen writing their own accounts 
of the Games. Composed of officers, soldiers and Y.M.C.A. workers 
who were newspaper writers before the war, the staff of the Press 



156 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Section was organized on the lines of a large American city newspaper. 
There were also several French journalists attached to this Section. 

At the Press Section offices at 1 1 Avenue Montaigne, Paris, Army 
rank was practically discarded. Editors and writers were assigned 
to "cover," the various features of the Games and a second lieutenant, 
for example, edited articles written by captains, lieutenants and enlisted 
men. The object was to get out the news, to get the facts of the Inter- 
Allied Games before Allied readers. 

Both before and during the Games these articles were furnished 
to Paris newspapers printed in English and to British and American 
papers. Here is a record of Inter-Allied Games news items, written 
by the Press Section, which were printed during the week previous 
to the Games in the three English printed Parisian newspapers : 



Sunday June 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 





NBW-TOBK 


CHICAGO 


LONDON 




H£IBAIiD 


TRIBUNE 


DAn.T MATT. 




Mems 


Words 


Items 


Words 


Items 


Words 


15 


5 


1,800 


12 


3,055 


21 


2,340 


16 


5 


1,800 


12 


4,030 


1 


65 


17 


4 


1,800 


13 


3.835 


8 


1,560 


18 


6 


3,180 


12 


3,250 


15 


2,665 


19 


4 


4,355 


13 


4,615 


4 


975 


20 


1 


2,820 


11 


3,835 


3 


1,335 


21 


6 
31 


3,360 


17 
90 


4,160 


11 
63 


1,950 




19,115 


26,780 


10,890 



Grand total : 184 items, 56,785 words. 

Newspapers printed in French received a similar service. French 
articles were written daily by Parisian journalists attached to the 
Press Section and reproduced generously in the sports columns of 
French and Belgian newspapers. Through the generous and unfailing 
cooperation of the American Committee on Public Information, Inter- 
Alhed Games news was transmitted by wireless each day to America, 
Great Britain, Czecho-Slovakia, and the Balkans. 

During the Games a section of the Tribune d'Honneur of Pershing 
Stadium nearest the finish Hne of the track events was reserved for 
the press. Official results were sent here within a few seconds after 
the stopwatch recorded the time of a race. Telephones were installed 
in the press stand for Parisian representatives to communicate results 
to their papers. In this way Paris evening papers were able to print 
an account of athletic events held the same afternoon. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 157 

Just behind Pershing Stadium a building was set aside as press 
headquarters. Here were more telephones and French and American 
typewriters for the use of press representatives. Motorcycle couriers 
were available to deliver "copy" in Paris to newspapers or to the cable 
offices. Army telegraph lines communicating with Paris were installed 
here and through this medium the Games were chronicled event by 
event for the use of French, British, and American news services such 
as Havas, Reuters's, Associated Press, United Press, and the Inter- 
national News Service, 

One branch of the Press Section handled photographs exclusively. 
A staff of U.S, Signal Corps photographers was attached to this branch 
and kept constantly on the field at Pershing Stadium taking pictures 
of every event. The negatives were rushed by couriers to the photo- 
graphic laboratories where prints were made and delivered to Paris 
papers the same day. The next morning the Paris pubhc would see 
a photograph of an exciting finish to the race witnessed the afternoon 
before. A number of interesting photographs of the Games were 
taken from airplanes above Pershing Stadium. The photographic 
branch kept on file copies of photographs of all events and distin- 
guished personages at the Inter-Allied Games. These were furnished 
without charge to Allied publications. The close of the Games saw 
the photographic branch in possession of a complete pictorial history 
of the Inter-AUied Games, not only of the events themselves, but of 
the training for these events before the Games. 

Another important section of the Publicity Department was Print- 
ing and Advertising. This section had charge of the printing of the 
500,000 tickets necessary for the fifteen days at Pershing Stadium, 
the Tennis events at the Racing Club and Stade Francais, the Swimming 
competitions at Mare St. James, and the Rugby matches at Colombes 
Field. A thousand posters in colors were printed and posted on Paris 
billboards. An equal number of placards, bearing the same design 
as the posters, were placed in hotels and shop windows, and 100,000 
postcards, posters in miniature, were distributed to hotels, information 
booths, and rooms of the Y.M.C.A., Red Cross, and Knights of Colum- 
bus. 

This section placed the orders for the engraving of invitations. 
Several thousand handbooks listing the sports of the Inter-AUied 
Games were issued, and copies of the Games Rules and Regulations 
printed with French and English texts. Thousands of information 
folders, with directions as to best routes to reach Pershing Stadium, 

See iUustrations, pages 51 57 63 ; inserts opposite 160. 



158 THE INTER-ALLIF,D GAMES — 1919 

were printed for the Information Service. Other printing items 
included hundreds of signs for Pershing Stadium and other places 
where various events were held, cloth numerals for contestants, and 
brassards. Automobile routes to the Stadium were marked by signs 
through the maze of Bois de Vincennes. It was this section which 
prepared 10,000 souvenir booklets, designed by American students at 
Julien's Academy, which were given to contestants in the Games. 

The Daily Program for the Games required great care as well as 
speed in preparation. This folder listed the day's events, contestants 
entered, and results of events of the preceding day. Copy for the 
next day's program could not be made up until all the afternoon's 
results were available, usually about nine o'clock in the evening. By 
working all night, type was set up at the A.E.F. Central Printing 
Plant, and the Mobile Printing Plant of the 29th Engineers had 
20,000 copies printed by morning ready for distribution at information 
booths in Paris and at the Stadium. 

A threatened strike of Paris newspaper printers led to fears that 
not a daily paper in the city would appear just before and during the 
Games. In case of such a strike taking place, the Publicity Depart- 
ment had all arrangements made to issue a four page daily newspaper 
with items of world news as well as news of the Inter-Allied Games. 
With the Press Section already having an organization similar to 
that of an American newspaper, with arrangements made to secure 
cable and telegraphic news, and with the Mobile Printing Plant avail- 
able, the Pubhcity Department could have brought out a condensed 
paper each morning with little difficulty. 

The Information Service, another section of the Publicity Depart- 
ment, also kept the public informed as to the Inter-AUied Games. 
Through the courtesy of the French Mission in Paris, seventy-five 
noncommissioned officers of the French Army, who spoke Enghsh, 
were attached temporarily to this service. Also, twenty-five non- 
commissioned officers from the Third American Army were attached 
for duty. These men reported 10 June and immediately were sent to 
a school which lasted until the opening of the Games. Here they 
were taught the history, organization, object and other facts concern- 
ing the Inter-Allied Games. 

Authority was sought and given to establish forty-one information 
booths in the city of Paris at the following places : Compagnie Gene- 
rale des Omnibus de Paris bureaux in Place Chatelet, Place Louvre, 
Place de la Republique, Gare de I'Est, Gare de Lyon, Gare du Nord, 



PERSHING STADIUM 



Is Located 2 Kilometers East of Paris. 
Near Joinville-lePont. 



To Reach the Stadium 



STADE PERSHING 



SiTUE A 2 Kilometres a l'Est de Paris. 

PRES de JOINVILLE-LE-PONT. 



Pour Aller au Stadt 



METRO AND CONNECTIONS 

Take line No. 1 in direction Porte Vincennes. From 
Porte Vincennes tramway runs every five minutes direct 
to stadium. Take tramcars marked "Champigny" or "La 
Varenne." 

Taxi-cabs also meet Metro at this point. 



METRO ET CORRESPONDANCES 

De iJ'pTriV^x)-^^ "°- h ^''^"°° P"'*^ <^« Vincennes. 
Ue la i-orte de Vincennes des tramways partem toutes les 
cinq minutes dans la direction du Stadc. PrenieSra,^ 
ways "Champigny"-ou "la Varenne." 

Des taxis se trouveront aussi a la sortie du Metro. 



STEAM RAILROAD 

Chemin de Fer de Vincennes leaves Place Bastille 
every twenty minutes for Joinville-le-Pont. 

Take Metro line No. 1 direction Port Vincennes to 
Gare de Vincennes at Place de la Bastille to board trains. 

Taxi-cabs meet trains at Joinville-Ie-Pont. 



TRAINS 

U fiif ^f"'" ^f ^" ^^ Vincennes part de la Plac- de 
la Bastille toutes les vingt minutes. Prendre metro li;rne 
no. , direction Porte de Vincennes. Descendre a la 
BasUlle pour prendre le train a la Gare de Vincennes. 

TJes taxis se trouveront a la Gare de JoinviUe-Ie-Pont. 



AUTO ROUTES 

1. Go east on Rue de Rivoli. Turn to right at 
Place Bastille onto Rue de Lyon. At Gare de Lyon turn 
to left on Boulevard Diderot. This boulevard becomes 
the Cours de Vincennes and later Avenue de Paris. Then 
on Ave. de la Tourelle, Ave. Esplanade and Rue Pyra- 
mid? to south entrance. 

2. Another and usually less congested route is east 
along the Grands Boulevards (Bds. de la Madeleine, des 
Capucines-des Italiens) through place de la Republique. 
Turn to right on Boulevard du Temple to Place de la 
Bastille through Rue de Lyon to Avenue Daumesnil to 
Fort de Picpus la Demi-Lune — le Fort de Vincennes to 
route de I'Obelisque. then on to South entrance to 
Stadium. 



EN AUTO 

TrnTi"^'' r'^ ''^V *^^ P"'«' P" '^ R"e de Rivoli. 
1 vnn A i^ r'°"^: P.'^*=^ *^^ '« ^««'''l« d«"s 'a Rue de 
DiH«„, rf ^^ ^y**"' P^^^^re a gauche le Boulevard 
uiaerot. Le boulevard devient Cours de Vincennes, puis 
Avenue de Pans. Prendre ensuite I'Avenue de la Tourelle, 

c.JaT f^ ' ^^P'^na'Je et la Rue des Pyramides qui 
conduit a 1 entree sud du Stade. 

intenSl"^ ^"'•''^ '"''"'^°" '^ ^^^"^ ^' generalement moins 
Grand! n T^ J '^i^''^' ^° '^ *^'"8««"' ^«" ''Est, les 
et H. I. r^^^'*^' (Bds. de la Madeleine, des Capucines 
Drenli !"'-^ J"'*^"'^ '^ P''''^« ^^ '« Republique. La, 
fa Pit ^ ?'u ^' ?,^' '^ Boulevard du Temple aller a 
Danlr t'^ ^^'''"^' '"*^^« '« R"e de Lyon, I'Avenue 
Fortf "v ^""^" ^" ^'''' ^« P''=P"«' a 'a Demi-Lune, au 
conlf ^,T^"°«^; prendre la route de I'Obelisque" qui 
conduit a I entree sud du Stade. " 



PARKING SPACE 

Machines will be parked in rear of the Tribune 
'i Honneur and in space just southeast of Stadium. 

ALicliines will be checked and placed under guard. 



GARAGE 



Les 



voitures seront garees derriere la Tribune 

GrardeTrVune'"' "" "^'"^ "'"'' ^" ^"' ^'' '' '^ 

!«., I;"^^ "machines seront gardees et des tickets delivres a 
leur proprietaire. 



INTER-ALLIED GAMES 

PROGRAMME, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1919 



162-A Event — Concours 



Time— Heure 10:00 



PELOTA. 

EXHIBITION BY BELGIAN TEAMS 

163 Event— Concours Time— Heure 11:— 12:00 

MASS GAMES— JEUX D'ENSEMBLE. 

Exhibition o£ mass games as used for training in American Army, given by 2nd Battalion, 
7th Engineers of the 5th Division, American Army of Occupation. 

Demonstration des Jeux d'ensemble comme employee pour I'entrainement de 1 arm6e 
Am^ricaine, donni5e par le 2me Bataillon, 7me Regiment de la 5me Division de I'arm^e d oc- 
cupation Am^ricaine. 

164 Event— Concours Time— Heure 9:, 14:, 17:30 

SABERS, Team Competition — SABRE, Concours par ^quipes. 



BELGIUM 
ITALY . . . . 



CZECHO -SLOVAKIA) 
PRANCE 



AMERICA . 
GREECE .. 



GREECE (12-19) 



PORTUGAL . 



1070 
1092 
1093 
1084 
1090 
1094 



1046 
1048 
1050 
1044 
1047 
1051 



BELGIUM 
CaUe 
Darien 
De Strooper 
Peyerick 
Gillens 
Tom 

ITALY 
Nadi, Nedo 
Urbani 
Cesarano 
Nadi, Aide 
Baldi, Baldo 
Puliti 



CZEOHO-SLOVAKIA 

329 Javurek 2200 

335 Svorelk 2176 
328 Kroupa 2361 
327 Klika 2362 

336 Cipera 2204 
333 PfeifEer 2205 

PRANCE 

542 Ancel 751 

543 Collin 752 

544 de St. Germain 753 

545 Hubert 754 

546 Mendielli 756 

547 Percdom 758 



GREECE 
Botassi 
Notari 
Zarcadi 
TriantafiUacos 
Skotidas 
Tsagaris 

PORTUGAL 
Recha 
Sabbo 
Dias 
Oliviera 
Motta 
Perreira 



165 Event — Concours "r*™^ 

800 M. RUN— (Finales)— 800 M. PLAT. 



-Heure 14:30 



Worlds Record— Record du Monde— J. E. Meridith, America, Im. 51.9s 
Olympic Record— Record Olympique— J. E. Meridith, America, Im. 51.9s. 
French Record — Record Prangais— Henri Arnaud, France, Im. 55.8s. 



1st — lere 


2nd - 2e 


3rd - 3e 


TIME — DUREE 











648 
1183 

831 
1184 
1444 



Mason, New Zealand 
Bergmeier, Australia 
Eby, America 
Praser, Australia 
Heilbuth, Prance 



166 Event — Concours 

iwnnTPTKn MARATHON- 



830 Spink, America 

838 Scudder, America 

1185 Chalmers, Australia 

1272 Delarge, Belgium 



Time — Heure 14:45 
-16.000m.— MARATHON MODIFIE. 



169 Event — Concours 

SHOT PUT— .(Fi 



Time — Heure 14:45 
— LANCEMENT DU POIDS. 



™pfc&t:RTcn^^^ Monde-Rose, America, 15.544m. 



912 Caughey, America 
903 Liversedge, America 





1st 


2nd 


3rd 


No. 








Dist. 









915 Maxfield, America 
1456 Paoli, Prance 



170 Event — Concours 

„„, „ Time — Heure 15:30 

POLE VAULT-(Finales)-SAUT A LA PERCHE 

ort:^^RX^d-i.rrii'^oC7^^^^^ 

French Record-Record Pra^a^-P. GoLT^°:^cett^il^'-''"'- 



itol J^fancquemelle, France 
i-ias Gajan, France 
1412 Girard, Prance 



No. 


Ut 


2nd 


3rd 








Dist. 









898 Ervin, America 

899 Floyd, America 
902 Harwood, America 



171 Event — Concours _. 

_,,-_ Time — Heure 14*00 

TUG-OF-WAR-(Demi-Finales)--LUTTE A LA CORDE. 

FRANCE 

AMERICA 



AMERICA (2-0) 



ITALY , 

CANADA ■■■{ITALY (2-1) 

AUSTRALIA i 

GREECE H^USTRALIA (2-0) . . 



BELGIU.M. 



172 Event — Concours 



BASEBALL. 



Time — Heure 15:00 






I 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


r? 


TOTAL 






1"" 


RUN 


HIT ERROR 


— - 












1 1 




























. J 



BOXING— BOXE. 
Weight— Poids 



BANTAM— coos 

1209 Evans, Australia VS. 969 Marrorati, Italy. 



■^Ivent — Concours 

174 



Time — Heure 14:00 



648 Mason, New Zealand 

1183 Bergmeier, Australia 
831 Eby, America 

1184 Fraser, Australia 
1444 Heilbuth, Prance 



83SI Spink, Aiiwric a 

838 Scudder, Am.MiiM 

1185 Chalmers. Austiali.i 

1272 lJ.-larK"\ Hrlv,num 



166 Event — Concours Time — Heure 14:45 

MODIFIED MARATHON— 16,000m.— MARATHON MODIFIE. 



Ist — lere 


2nd — 2e 


3rd - 3e 


TIME- DUREE 











720 

730 

846 

850 

853 

971 

972 

973 

1103 

1189 

1190 

1191 



Keeper, Canada 
Massey, Canada 
Stout, America 
Faller, America 
Kennedy, America 
Pagliani, Italy 
Negri, Italy 
Sperori, Italy 
Broos, Belgium 
Hewitt, Australia 
Griffiths, Australia 
Dolton, Australia 



1274 Holsbei-ki-, Belgium 

1280 Van Hoey, Belgium 

1383 Vermeulen, France 

1389 Heuet, France 

2143 Djebellia, France 

2185 Dima, Roumania 

2192 Florea, Roumania 

2195 Balan, Roumania 

2257 Tsailas, Greece 

2258 Kovlovberdas, Greece 
23B3 Phillips, Canada 



167 Event — Concours 



Time — Heure 16:30 



MEDLEY RELAY— RELAIS MIXTE. 



hi — lere 


2nd — 2e 


3rd - 3e TIME — DUREE 









First man runs 200 meters 
Second man runs 400 meters 
Third man runs 800 meters 
Fourth man runs 1,600 meters 



lore homine cuurt 200 ni. 
2eme homine court 400 iii. 
3eme homine court 800 ni. 
4eme homine court 1,000 m. 









BELGIUM 










ROUMANIA 


1258 


Wouters 






Substitutes 






2158 


Valianto 


1268 


Smet 






1262 


Boon 






2178 


Marniescu 


1271 


Van Dyck 






1267 


Laen 






217(1 


CriHtia 


1272 


Delarge 






1276 


Devaux 




21115 


Kne Radn 




AUSTRALIA 






ENGLAND 






ITALY 


1180 


Hume 






1223 


Francombe 




1(75 


Croci 


845 


Johnson 






1221 


Tittle 






980 


Candelori 


1183 


Bergmeier 






1226 


Norlton 




081 


Sttlvi 


1188 


Manley 






352 


Atkin 






082 


Bonini 








AMERICA 




KUANCK 








813 


Haas 






1398 


Seurin 










828 


Campbell, T. 




1401 


Devaux 










827 


Campbell, F. 




1407 


Burtin 










922 


Shields 






1406 


Amaud 







168 Event — Concours Time — Heure 14:45 

RUNNING HIGH JUMP— (Finales)— S A UT EN HAUTEUR AVEC £LAN. 

World's Record — Record du Monde — O. L. Horine, America, 2.000m. 
Olympic Record— Record Olympique — A. W. Richards. America, l.li:)m. 
French Record — Record Frantais Geo. Andr^, France, 1.886m. 





Ist 


2nd 


3rd 


No. 






- 


Di.t. 









1432 Labat, France 

1433 Lowden, Prance 
1344 Mathey, Prance 
2284 Ghiringhelli, Italy 



870 Larscn, America 

873 Rice, America 

876 Templeton, America 



Hvent — Concours 

174 



BOXING— BOXE. 

Weight— Poids 



175 

176 

177 

178 

179 

1$0 

181 
188 
183 

184 
185 
186 

187 

188 

189 

190 

191 
192 
193 



BANTAM— COQS 

l-(i!) Kv.-ms, Australia VS. <Hi!l .Marrorati. Italy. 

>u- M , . HEAVY-LOURDS. 

l.M/ Martin, Amon,.,. V.S. nyv Coghill. Australia. 

,„,„ ^ ^ . FEATHER-PLUMES. 

1342 Fundy, America V.S. .•i82 D.Punthieu, Franco. 

i-^^a v^ * . '''^"'^ HEAVY-MI-LOURDS. 

1348 Norton, America V.S. 1199 Pettibridge, Australia. 

LIGHT— LEGERS 

1350 .McNeill, America VS. 1204 \Vat«on, Australia. 

,„„„ _ . . , MIDDLE— MOYENS. 

1338 Eagan, America VS. 373 Thomas, France. 

fl70 Af. .. ^ WELTER-MI-MOYENS. 

679 Attwood, Canada VS. 374 Prunier, France. 

WRESTLING-Catch-as-Catch-can-LUTTE. 

,„., „ ,, . HEAVY-LOURDS. 

13a7 Parcault, America VS. 402 Salvator, France. 

,.,«, ,.,„., , FEATHER-PLUMES. 

1361 Littlej,.hault. America VS. 1215 Taylor, Australia. 

I-^IT V u . ^'*'"'^ HEAVY-Ml-LOURDS. 

13o7 larcault, America VS. 1211 .Meeske, Australia. 

i-^fln M. , LIGHT— LEGERS. 

1360 Mitropohs, America X'S. 576 Mai^hall, New Poundland. 

,..,„ „ , . MIDDLE— MOYENS. 

lSo8 Irehm, America VS. 1213 Palmer, Australia. 

,„.„ ^ , , WELTER— MI-MOYENS. 

13o9 Farley. America VS. 1214 Bridges, Australia. 

WRESTLING— Greoo-Romalne—LUTTE. 

ooft, „, BANTAM— COQS. 

-JB4 \A isenian, America VS. 2305 Belcome, France. 

1>4« r 1 I. , HEAVY-LOURDS. 

1-48 Coel.-s. Belgium VS. 400 Bechard, Prance. 

,n-„ ,. , FEATHER— PLUMES. 

XOdO \aglio, Italy VS. 1256 Dirik. Belgium. 

30-. n . . ^ LIGHT HEAVY- MI-LOUHDS. 

■iOo Dostal. Czecho-Slovakia VS. 306 Kopriva, Serbia. 

,„r- « , LIGHT— LEGERS. 

lOoo Parro, Italy VS. 301 Beranek, Czecho-Slovakia. 

,,,.., _ , MIDDLE— MOYENS. 

1053 Gargano. It.ily VS. 1251 Van Antwerpen, Belgium. 

,.,.., „ WELTER— MI-MOYENS. 

1-53 .Sauvonnet. Belgium VS. 303 Halick, Czecho-Slovakia. 



Time — Heure 14:00 



194 Event— Concours ». 

Time— Heure 17:30 
PARADE OF AMERICAN TROOPS. 

Review of Composite. Regiment, American .4rmy of Occupation. 

195 Event-Concours SOKOL. Tim,^H.ur. 19:00 

GYMNASTIC EXHIBITION BY YOUGO-SLAV8 

FIREWORKS IN EVENING— FEU D'ARTIFICE (SOIR) 



Program June 22 July 6, 1919 



IN STADIUM— DANS L,E 8TADB 



OUTSIDE STADIUM — HORS DU STADE 



Date. 



22 June 
22 Juin 



23 June 
23 Juin 



24 June 
24 Juin 



Track. 
Course. 



100 m. dash (trials) 
100 m. plat (eliminatoires) 
1500 m. run (trials) 
1500 m. course de fond 
(eliminatoires) 
100 m. dash (setni-dnals) 
100 m. plat (ripmi-fln.Tles 



Field. 
Concours Athletiques. 



25 June 
25 Juin 



27 June 
27 Juin 



110 m. hurdles (trials) 
110 m. hales (elimina- 
toires) 
200 m, dash (trials) 
.100 m. plat (elimina- 
toires) 



100 m. dash (dnals) 
100 m. plat (finales) 



28 June 200 m. dash (semi-Hnals) 
28 Juin 200 m. plat (demi-dnales) 
1500 m. run (flnals) 
1500 m. course de fond 
200 m. hurdles Urials) 
200 m. baies (elimina- 
toires) 
200 m. da.sh (Hnals) 
200 m. plat (nnalf>s) 



Hand Grenade 
Lancement de grenades 
Javelin 
Javelrit 



Other Event. 
Autres Concours. 



Baseball 



Boxing 
Boxe 



Soccer 
Football- 
Boxing 
Boxe 
Wrestliiif; 
Lutte 
Fencing 
Escrimu 



association 



Fencing 
Escrlmc 



Discus (trials) 
Disques feliminatoires) 
Running Broad Jump (trials) 
Saut en longueur avec elan 
(eliminatoires) 



29 June I 
29 Juin 



30 June 
30 Juin 



400 m. dash (trials) 
400 m. plat (elimina- 
toires) 
110 m. hurdles (finals) 
110 m. haics (finales) 
800 m. relay (trials) 
800 m. relais (eliminatoires) 



Running Broad Jump (finals) 
Saut en longueur avec elan 

(finales) 



400 m. dash (semi-finals) 
400 m. plat (demi-llnales) 

Cross-Country Run 

Cross-Country (individuel) 
800 m. relay (finals) 
800 m. relais (finales) 



1 July 
1 Juillet 



July 
Juillet 



3 July 
3 Juillet 



4 July 
4 Juillet 



5 July 
5 Juillet 



6 July 



400 m. dash (finals) 
400 m. plat (finales) 
200 m. hurdles (finals) 
200 m. haies (finales) 

PENTATHLON 



Standing Broad Jump(finals) 
Saut en longueur sans tian 

(finales) 
Pole Vault (qualifying) 
Saut a la perche (qualifi- 
cation) 
High Jump (qualifying) 
Saut en hauteur avec 6lan 



800 m. run (trials) 
800 m. course de fond 
(eliminatoire.s) 



1600 m. relay (trials) 
1600 m, relais (elimina- 
toires) 



Modified Marathon 

Marathon modifiA, 16,000 m. 
800 m. run (finals) 
800 m. course (finales) 

Medley relay 

Relais mixte 



800 m. relay (army of 

occupation) 
800 m. relais (armie d'oc 

cupation) 



Postponed Events 



6 Juillet Epreuves remLses 



Standing Broad Jump(trials) 
Saut en longueur sans felan 
Hammer Throw (Exhibition) 
Lancement du marteau 
Discus (finals) 
Disques (finales) 



Soccer 

Football— association 

Basket Ball 

Boxing 

Boxe 

Wrestling 

Lutte 

Fencing 

Kscrirne 



Ba.seball 

Fencing 
F.scrimo 
V Heure 



Soccer 

Football— association 

Boxing 

Boxe 

Wrestling 

Lutte 

Basket nail 

Fencing 

Escrlnii- 



Soccer (finals) 

Football -association 

Fencing 

Escrime 

Basket Ball 



Special Events. 
Divers. 



Events 
Epreuves 



Place. 
Lieu. 



Dedication Ceremonies 
Formal Opening 
Parade of Athletes 
Inauguration 
Defile des athletes 



Informal Opening 



Rugby 



Colombes 



Exhibition Riding, Arabians 
Fantasia Arabe 



Time. 
Heure. 



5 P. M. 
17 Heure 



Rugby 

Swimming — Natation 
400 m. free style (trials) 
400 m. style libre lelinii- 

natoires) 
100 111. back stroke (trials) 
100 m. nagc sur le dos 
900 m. free style (trials) 
800 m. style (libre) 

Water Polo 



Columbes 

Mare St. James 

Bois de Boulogne 



P. M. 17; 
:30 P. M. 

14:30 



Swimming — Natation 

100 m. free style (trials) 

100 ni. style libre 

200 m. breast stroke (trials) 

200 m. brassc 
1500 m. free style (trials 
1500 m. style libre 

Swimming — Natation 
100 m. back stroke (finals) 
100 m. nage sur le dos 

(finales) 
400 m. free style (finals) 
400 m. style libre (finales) 
100 m. free style (semi- 

nnales) 
100 m. style libre (dcmi 

watfff PtJi'o 



Mass Games 
Jeux d'ensemble 



Boxing 

Boxe 

Wrestling 

Lutte 

Fencing 

Escrime 



Mass Games 
Jeux d'ensemble 



Boxing 
Boxe 
Wrestling 
Lutte 
Fencing 
Escrime 

Tug-of-War (trials) 
Lutte a la corde 
(eliminatoires) 



Shot-1'iit (trials) 
Lancement du poids, elim- 
inatoires) 



High Jump (finals) Boxing 

Saut en hauteur avec (Slan Boxe 



Fencing — Escrime 



(finales) 
Pole Vault (finals) 
Saut a la perche (finales) 
Shot-Put (finals) 
Lancement du poids 

(finales) 



Wrestling 
Lutte 
Baseball 
Tug of War 

(semi-finals) 



Running Broad Jump jTug-of-War (finals) 

(Army of Occupation) iLutte a la corde 

Saut en longueur avec ftlan] (finales) 
(armiie d'occupation) Fencing 

Hop, Step and Jump JEscrime 

Triple saut | 



Mass Games 
Jeux d'ensemble 



Morse Competition 
Prize Jumping, Military 
Concours hippique militaire 
Exhibition Riding, Arabians 
Fanta.sia Arabe 



Horse Competition 
Prize Jumping in Pairs 
Concours hippique (saut 

par deux) 
Exhibition Riding, Arabians 
Fantasia Arabe 



Parade of Picked Regiment 
Revue (regiment d'infant- 

erie Americaine) 
Fireworks in evening 
Feu d'artifice (soir) 
(iymnastics by Yougo-Slav 
Pelota, (exhibition by 

Belgian teams) 



Horse Competition 
Prize Jumping (Individual) 
Concours hippique 
Exhibition Riding, Arabians 
Fantasia Arabe 



(;iosing Ceremonies 

(Cloture 

Award of Prizes 

Remises de decorations 



Football — Rugby 



Man- St. James 
Bois de Boulogne 


2:30 P. M. 

14:30 


Mare St. James 
Bois de Boulogne 


2:30 P. M. 

14:30 



10 A. M. 
16.15 



Distance Ride, military 
Concours Hippique (Raid) 
Swimming — Natation 
100 m. free style (finals) 
100 m. style libre (finali-s) 
1500 m. free style (finals) 
1500 m. style libre (finales 
200 m. breast stroke (final 
200 m. brasse (finales) 



Swimming — Natation 
800 m. relay (4 men) 
800 111. relais (4 hommes 
800 m. free style (finals) 
800 m. stvie libre (finales) 

Water Polo 



Maie St. James 

Bois de Boulogne 14:30 



.Mare St. Jami:s 
Bois de Boulogne 



Oidf 



La Boiil 



Golf 



14:30 



La Bniil 



Riflo and IMfltoI Competition — ho Marm, .Tune 2.3. 
FuBil et Pistolet — Le Mans, Juin le 23. 



Tennii? — Completed .Tunc 9. 
Tennis — Complete Juin li; 0. 



Rowing — After July 6. 
Aviron — Aprfe le JuilUt. 



Oolf — To continue after July 6. 
Goll — A continue!' aprds le Juillet. 



ll^I 







i.'^V? ^ ^ ^ 



^'V\ i-^-i 




n: 



V 





3^- / 1/ j 




Top -AmcricaQ basketball toam. Center /./(-French basketball teani. CV'n««- riry/ji-Budiger 
of America throwing basket in game with French. Bo«oJH-Italian bask,>tball team. 



(Sampleof pamphlet in English and French, showing location ot Pershing 
Stadium and giving full directions for reaching it). 






INTER. ALLIED 
GAMES 

Pershing Stadium 

Joinville-le-Pont 






JUNE 22 PARIS JULY 6 
1919 

Conducted jointly by the 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES and the 

Y. M. C. A. 



rMi^iiii^o jiAJuiuiff 



Is Located 2 K. 
Near J 



To Reach the Stadium 



METRO AND CONNECTIONS 

Take line No. 1 in direction Porte Vincennes. From 
Porte Vincennes tramway runs every five minutes direct 
to stadium. Take tramcars marked "Champigny" or "La 
Varenne." 

Taxi-cabs also meet Metro at this point. 



STEAM RAILROAD 

Chemin de Per de Vincennes leaves Place Bastille 
every twenty minutes for Joinville-le-Pont. 

Take Metro line No. 1 direction Port Vincennes to 
Gare de Vincennes at Place de la Bastille to board trains. 



Taxi-cabs meet trains at Joinville-le-Pont. 



AUTO ROUTES 

1. Go east on Rue de Rivoli. Turn to right at 
Place Bastille onto Rue de Lyon. At Gare de Lyon turn 
to left on Boulevard Diderot. This boulevard becomes 
the Cours de Vincennes and later Avenue de Paris. Then 
on Ave. de la Tourelle, Ave. Esplanade and Rue Pyra- 
mids to south entrance. 

2. Another and usually less congested route is east 
along the Grands Boulevards (Bds. de la Madeleine, des 
Capucines-des Italiens) through place de la Republique. 
Turn to right on Boulevard du Temple to Place de la 
Bastille through Rue de Lyon to Avenue Daunaesnil to 
Fort de Picpus la Demi-Lune — le Fort de Vincennes to 
route de I'Obelisque, then- on to South entrance to 
Stadium. 



PARKING SPACE 

Machines will be parked in rear of the Tribune 
<i Honneur and in space just southeast of Stadium. 

Machines will be checked and placed under guard. 



Pour Alter aii Stade 



METRO ET CORRESPONDANCES 

Prendre la ligne no. 1, direction Porte de Vincennes. 
De la Porte de Vincennes des tramways partem toutes les 
cinq minutes dans la direction du Stade. Prendre les tram- 
ways "Champigny"*ou "la Varenne." 

Des taxis se trouveront aussi a la sortie du Metro. 



TRAINS 

Le Chemin de Per de Vincennes part de la Place de 
la Bastille toutes les vingt minutes. Prendre metro ligne 
no. 1, direction Porte de Vincennes. Descendre a la 
Bastille pour prendre le train a la Gare de Vincennes. 

"" Des taxis se trouveront a la Gare de Joinville-le-Pont. 



EN AUTO 

Aller, vers I'Est de Paris, par la Rue de Rivoli. 
Tourner a droite, place de la Bastille dans la Rue de 
Lyon. A la Gare de Lyon, prendre a gauche le Boulevard 
Diderot. Ce boulevard devient Cours de Vincennes, puis 
Avenue de Paris. Prendre ensuite 1' A venue de la Tourelle, 
I'Avenue de I'Esplanade et la Rue des Pyramides qui 
conduit a I'entree sud du Stade. 

Une autre route ou le trafic est generalement moins 
intense consiste a suivre, en se dirigeant vers I'Est, les 
Grands Boulevards (Bds. de la Madeleine, des Capucines 
et des Italiens) jusqu'a la Place de la Republique. La, 
prendre a droite et par le Boulevard du Temple aller a 
la Place de la Bastille, suivre la Rue de Lyon, I'Avenue 
Daumesnil jusqu'au Fort de Picpus, a la Demi-Lune, au 
Fort de Vincennes; prendre la route de I'Obelisque qui 
conduit a I'entree sud du Stade. 



GARAGE 

Les voitures seront garees derriere la Tribune 
d'Honneur et dans un enclos situe au Sud Est de la 
Grande Tribune. 

Les machines seront gardees et des tickets delivres a 

leur proprietaire. 



The U. S. Army and Y. M. C. A. are joint hosts to 
the following allied nations taking part in the Inter- 
Allied games: England, France, Italy, Belgium, Portu- 
gal, Greece, China, Brazil, Serbia, Roumania, Czecho-Slo- 
vakia, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Guatemala, Po- 
land, Kingdom of Hedjaz. 

The French Authorities gave the land for Pershing 
Stadium, the Y. M. C. A. financed the project, and Ameri- 
can Army Engineers constructed it in four months. 

The seating capacity, including the Tribune d'Hon- 
neur, is 20,000. The Tribune d'Honneur is reserved for 
rulers of the nations and other guests of honor. Civilians 
will secure tickets free of charge from information 
booths; none are required for men in uniform. 



L'Armee Americaine et I'Y. M. C. A. reunis sont les 
liotes des nations suivantes qui prennent part aux Jeux 
Interallies: Angleterre, France, Italic, Belgique, Portu- 
gal, Grece, Serbie, Roumanie, Tcheco-Slovaquie, Aus- 
tralie, Canada, Nouvelle Zelande, Guatemala, Hedjaz, 
Chine, Bresil, Pologne. 

Les Autorites francaises ont donne- le terrain du 
Stade Pershing, le Y. M. C. A. a donne les fonds neces- 
saires et le Genie de TArmee Americaine a construit le 
Stade en quatre mois. Le Stade pent contenir 20,000 
spectateurs assis, en comprenant la Tribune d'Honneur. 
Cette Tribune est reservee aux representants des Nations 
engagees et aux autres holes de marque. Les personnes 
civiles pourront obtenir des billets gratuits aux Bureaux 
d'lnformation. L'acces du Stade est gratuit pour les 
militaires. 

PRINTED BY MOBILE PRINTING UNIT, 29tH ENGINEERS 



(Sample of Daily Program slightly reduced in size.) 



ITCiMlIBGAy 

PEiSiING STAil^y 

JOifVlILE=LE"PONT 
fO)Aro 




YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 

Ist-AMEEICA-CCampbeU, T.; C^^P^'^ll' ^^ ^- Ser)' ^^"^^^ 

139 Evenl^SHOT PUT (Trials)-LANCEMENT DU POIDS (Ehmmatoues) 

Worlds Kecord— Record du Monde— 15.544m. 

1st— CATJGHBY, America, 13.357m. 
2nd— LIVERSBDGB, America, 13.33m. 
3rd— MAXFIELD, America, 12.806m. 
4th— PAOLI, France, 12.314m. 

140 Event— HORSE RIDING— CONCOURS HIPPIQUE. 

140 Event- ^^nu^^ ^^ pairs-epreuve de sauts couples. 

(Rider's Name) (Country) ^, (Horse) (Pomts) 

Ist-MajorANTONEIXI Italy Otello 236 

Captain ALVISI Italy Z ■ 

2nd-SxJBERTALLI Italy ST"'.^ 234 

Ma or CAEFARATTI Italy Nabucco 

3rd-Captain COSTA Prance Gazeuse 231 

Lieutenant LARREGAIN France Tapageur 

4th— Colonel MERCHANT America Sandy 226 

Colonel WEST America Frmce I 

BOXING— BOXE. 
Event — Concours Weight — Poids. 

LIGHT— LEGERS. 

142 WATSON, Australia, defeated Zoonens, Belgium, by decision at end of 10 rounds. 

143 McNEIL, America, defeated Alberindo, Italy, knockout in second round. 

WELTER— MI-MOYENS. 

144 ATTWOOD, Canada, defeated Salvu, Roumania, who gave up bout in second round. 

145 PRUNIER, Prance, won from Dusausoit, Belgium, by default. 

MIDDLE — MOYENS. 

146 BAGEN, America, won from Suain, Belgium, by default. 

147 THOMAS, Prance, defeated Harris, Canada, by decision at end of 10th round. 

LIGHT HEAVY— MI-LOURDS. 

1 48 Pettibridge, Australia VS Norton, America, POSTPONED, on account of ram. 

FENCING— ESCRIME. 

EPEE, Individual (Finales)- — Epee, Individuel. 
1st— LAURENT, Prance. 
2nd— PIAVA, Portugal. 
3rd— PEYERICK, Belgium. 

SABER, Team Competition — 1st Round — SABRE, Concours par iquipes. 
GREECE, won from America, 12-19. 

GOLF. 

FOUR BALL FOURSOME (18 holes)— FOURSOMMES A QUATRE BALLES (18 trous). 

Event 151^<}0LIAS and CAVALLO, Prance, won from Bartlet and Morse, America. 
Event 152 — GOMMIER and BOMBOUDIAC, France, won from Part and Pierson, America. 
Event 153 — LAPITTB and DAUGE, Prance, won from Walton and Hurley, America. 
Event 154--DAVIS and RAUTENBUSH, America, won from Massy and Gossiat, Prance. 

SINGLES (18 holes). 
Event 155 — GOLIAS, Prance won from Bartlett, America, 6-4. 
Event 156 — PIERSON, America, won from Cavallo, France, 2-1. 
Event 157 — HART, America, won from Gommier, Prance, 5-4. 
Event 158 — ^BOMBOUDIAC, Prance, won from Morse, America, 6-5. 
Event 159 — WALTON, America, won from Lafltte, France, 1 up 20 holes. 
Event 160 — DAUGE, Prance, won from Hurley, America, 1 up, 1 9 holes. 
Event 161 — GOSSIAT, Prance, won from Davis, America, 5-3. 
Event 162 — MASSEY, France, won from Rautenbush, America, 4-3. 
SCORE— Prance 8; America 4. 
PINAL RESULT TEAM MATCH:— 1 st— France: 2nd America. 

The next Golf event wiU take place at LaBoulie, on Monday July 7th. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 161 

Gare St. Lazare, Gare Montparnasse, Gare d'Orleans, Hotels Conti- 
nental, Ritz, Gastiglione, Chatham, Crillon, Louvre, Maurice, Palais 
d'Orsay, Scribe, St. James et d'Albany, Wagram, Montana, Plaza, 
Terminus et Gare St. Lazare, Lutetia and Grand; Poccardi Cafe, 
Officers Leave Bureau, Red Cross Headquarters at Hotel Regina, 
American University Union, five Y.M.C.A. hotels and meeting places, 
two booths in Place de la Concorde and four booths at Pershing Stad- 
ium and the camp of the athletes. A booth in the pavilion on which 
stands the fine statue representing Strassbourg, gaily bedecked in honor 
of her return to France, attracted wide interest. Posters, pamphliets, 
information data, and tickets were placed in all the leading clubs in 
the city and at all hotels whose size would not warrant an information 
booth. 

The information booths were opened a few days before the Games 
and were served by the noncommissioned officers from the French 
and American Armies, All booths were equipped with sketches 
showing seating arrangements at Pershing Stadium, maps of Paris, 
copies of the information folder, post cards, copies of the Daily 
Program, tickets to the Tribune d'Honneur and the Stadium proper, 
mimeographed slips showing Metro and automobile routes from booths 
to the Stadium, and daily newspapers carrying accounts of the Games. 

In this manner the Information Service was prepared to answer 
all questions as to best routes to the Stadium, including Metro, train, 
tramway, automobile and omnibus services, results of the day before, 
the day's program, the standing of each nation in the various sports, 
prominent people expected to attend the Games, and special events 
taking place. 

The information booths were open from 9 o'clock in the morning 
to 9 o'clock in the evening. Booths in groups of about ten each were 
supervised and frequently inspected by officers, one of whom was 
placed in charge of each group, A message center was organized at 
11 Avenue Montaigne where one man from each booth reported each 
morning for tickets and instructions. 

The Y.M.C.A. operated five booths with their own personnel. Fur- 
thermore, information concerning the Games was placed in the hands 
of sixty Y.M.C.A. secretaries of the information service, who were 
easily distinguished by blue brassards on which "Information" was 
printed. In this manner a large number of enlisted men of the Ameri- 
can Army on leave in Paris received information of the Games, while 
the equal mixture of khaki and French horizon blue testified, with 

11 



162 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

thousands of civilians in the crowded stands of the Stadium, to the 
widespread service of the Information Section of the Publicity Depart- 
ment. 



PROGRAMS AND STATISTICS 

The Committee on Programs and Statistics operated separately 
from the Pubhcity Department, being organized as part of the Com- 
petitions Division. This Committee was assigned very definite duties 
which fell under three heads : Programs, Statistics, and Field Message 
Center. The first general program, covering the whole meet, was 
prepared and submitted to the Officer in Charge of Competitions 
Division, 10 June. This program underwent several revisions, but 
16 June it assumed a form which, except for a very few minor changes, 
was adhered to throughout the meet. In arranging this program 
effort was made to give the spectators an interesting and varied series 
of events each day and so to distribute them that athletes competing 
in closely allied events should find them in logical sequence and have 
adequate rest between their performances. It was also arranged that 
on those days when horse-riding competition was in progress it should 
be given as clear a field as possible so that no swift motions, such as 
might be found in certain field events like pole vaulting, might distract 
the horses and put riders in hazard, and to minimize as far as possible 
the labor involved in preparing the field for different types of sport. 

The general series of events was printed each day in the daily pro- 
gram and was kept revised up to date. This program not only gave 
in detail the events for the day with the exact time of starting, but 
listed in addition all competitors with their nationality and competi- 
tion number and gave, when available, the world's records, the Olympic 
records and the French records, these being embodied as information 
for the spectators and a goal for the competitors. Forms were also 
included for scoring the respective events. 

In preparing the daily program it was necessary to assemble the 
representatives of the various nations to make drawings in all heats 
in races, the pools in fencing and the brackets for team competitions. 
In making these drawings the number of competitors was ascertained 
from the entries, the number of heats and pools determined, whether 
or not semifinals were necessary was stated and the number of men to 
quahfy in various heats was specified. The drawings were made by 
lot in the presence of the representatives. Some readjustment was 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 163 

necessary to minimize the number of contestants of any nation in a 
given heat. These alterations were made in every case in the presence 
of the representatives. 

When these drawings were made the nations were called upon 
to specify which of their entrants should participate in a given heat 
or pool. These choices were submitted and entered on the program 
without knowledge of the distribution of the competitors of any other 
nation. 

The daily program thus contained all information necessary for 
following the day's events in close detail. Each competitor could 
be recognized by his number. Moreover it contained the results of 
the preceding day's sports, showing the event, the winners and nation. 
It also contained, as noted above, the general program so that spec- 
tators present on any day could readily familiarize themselves with 
the program of the games as a whole, seeing at a glance what had 
already taken place and what events were to take place on following 
days. The speed with which the daily program had to be prepared 
each night has already been indicated. 

The statistical subcommittee was charged with the receipt and 
filing of entries, the custody of all records of the results of events, and 
the preparation of scorecards for the judges. Each competitor, as 
his entry was received, was assigned a number which followed him 
throughout his entire participation. The horses entered in the horse 
competition were assigned letters. 

An elaborate system of card files was prepared for this work. They 
were in the following forms : 

1. By events with participants grouped according to nations 
alphabetically. 

2. By competition numbers. 

3. Alphabetically by name irrespective of nation or event. 

4. Similar to the first set except that it was a transitional file 
and from it were taken out daily those contestantswho were from time to 
time eliminated. This file kept abreast of the actual progress of events 
and by reference to it one could determine the contestants who were 
still in. It facilitated the preparation of the daily program so far as 
the semifinals and finals of the various events were concerned. 

The official entry slips, as they were received, were necessarily sub- 
ject to close checking. In many cases they were filled in script and 
were difficult to decipher. On 20 June a hst of entries up to date was 



164 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

submitted to the Liaison Section for revision, with a request that the 
full names and the military rank of contestants be ascertained. 

In some cases nations had entered competitors in excess of the 
number allowed under regulations. It was necessary to interview 
a representative of the nation concerned and have him designate the 
actual competitors. On each day, however, lists of all entries for the 
events of the day were prepared and given to the Clerk of the Course 
with instructions that no substitutions could be allowed except from 
the men named in the list. 

Scorecards were also prepared by this committee. These were 
for the use of the judges in the various events. For track and field 
they were four in number — for horse riding, two, for fencing, two, 
and for boxing and wresthng, one. The form for track and field events 
was also available and suitable for the swimming events. The names 
of the contestants or teams were entered and the records of their per- 
formances. These cards contained in all events space for the signature 
of the officials judging the events, and upon completion of the per- 
formance these were properly signed and turned over to the statisti- 
cal officer. They then became a part of the official record of the meet 
and any statement as to performances in any event was taken from 
them. These official scorecards came to the statistical officer through 
the branch statistical office established at the Stadium. For results 
of events such as swimming and Rugby, which took place outside of 
the Stadium, the scorecards came directly to the statistical office. 

At the branch statistical office at the Stadium, which was really 
a message center, there were typewriters and an office personnel of 
sufficient size to copy rapidly the records from the score cards, as well 
as a group of runners to take the information to the announcers, to 
the scoreboard, to the statistical office and to the box of the ranking 
officer present at the Stadium. In general the pubUcation by the 
announcers followed the completion of the event within two minutes 
and in some cases within one minute. On 4 July, fifty bulletins 
were actually pubHshed for the information of the spectators. 











Basketball. Top left and right— ItaXj iVersus America. Center— America versus France ; 
soccer game in background. Bottom left— France versus Italy. Bottom right— Amenca. 

versus France. 



CHAPTER XII 
TICKET DISTRIBUTION 




HO were to see the Games? How were they to get out to the 
Stadium? How were they to be handled without confusion 
after they had arrived there? These problems were turned 
over to the Ticket Distribution Committee to solve. 

Of course the matter of invitations was largely handled by experts 
familiar with diplomatic courtesy for this was an international affair. 
Mr. William Martin, Chef de Protocol of the American Embassy, and 
also Major Henry Whitehouse, aided greatly in making up the list of 
persons to be invited. Major Whitehouse had handled such matters 
for the American Peace Delegation. General Pershing also had cer- 
tain names he wished included which were not on the other lists. The 
list of box assignments was handled by the Advisory Committee and 
all were finally passed on again by General Pershing. 

Two kinds of personal invitations were sent out — one from the 
Commander in Chief himself which read : 

The Commander in Chief 
of the 
American Expeditionary Forces 
requests the honor of the presence of 

at the opening of 

The Inter- Allied Games 

Pershing Stadium 

Paris 
22nd June, 1919. 



168 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

and another which was issued by officials and members of the Advisory 
Committee, with personal cards inclosed. It read : 

The Commander in Chief 

of the 

American Expeditionary Forces 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the opening of 

The Inter-Allied Games 

Pershing Stadium, Paris 

22nd June 1919. 

Inclosed with these invitations were tickets, some for boxes, 
others for seats good only for a single day, others permanent passes 
to the Tribune d'Honneur. 

Aside from these special invitations and assigned seats and boxes, 
tickets to the Tribune d'Honneur and to the Tribunes Populaires were 
distributed at booths located at the different hotels, Y.M.C.A.'s and 
other well known places in Paris. Every effort was made by those 
in charge of these booths to see that a fair distribution of the tickets 
was made. 

Various clubs, athletic organizations and departments of the Armies 
and high officials were allotted daily a certain number of tickets for 
distribution. 

The Tribune d'Honneur was divided into four sections, from right 
to left — A, B, C and D. The tickets to these sections were of differ- 
ent colors — A red, B blue, G green, D white. All boxes were num- 
bered. 

The Military Police on duty at the entrance could note the color 
of the card in the hands of the guest well before the holder had arrived 
at the gate and could indicate which entrance was to be used. This 
helped to avoid crowding at the entrances. All the cards to the Tri- 
bunes Populaires were white, but the sections were numbered and 
each card bore a number. Military Pohce again helped to avoid con- 
fusion by directing the ticket holders to their sections. Permanent 
cards bore a colored stripe running diagonally from corner to corner. 

In the Tribune d'Honneur a choice section was reserved for mem- 
bers of the French Senate and Chamber of Deputies. No tickets 
were issued to this section, the members being admitted by their offi- 
cial cards. Members of the press had a special section and were 
admitted by badges and by special cards. The French and American 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 169 

Army Engineers, who took over the erection of the stadium after the 
May Day labor disturbances, had an entire section in the Tribunes 
Populaires assigned to them ; the competitors had a section reserved 
in the Tribunes Populaires also. One section of the Populaires was 
reserved for soldiers only and, being directly behind home plate, was 
usually occupied by American and Allied soldiers who were following 
the baseball games. Men in the uniform of the Allied Armies, however, 
were admitted to any part of the Tribunes Populaires without ticket. 
Another section of the Populaires was reserved for the bands. 

On the opening day more tickets were issued than there were seats. 
This was done in accordance with Continental custom in connection 
with sporting events. There was no definite information as to how the 
Games would be taken by the French civilians, it was not beheved 
that every person who received a ticket would attend, and there 
was no way of determining in advance how many soldiers would 
claim places. The popularity of the Games was beyond any early 
estimate. On the first Sunday the crowd could not be accommo- 
dated. Better estimates were made, however, after this first experi- 
ence and comparatively few ticketholders were turned away again, 
except on 4 July, when the military attendance was again very large. 
Not so many civilians were turned away, however, as on the first 
occasion. 

The Ticket Distribution Committee received hearty cooperation 
from the tramway, omnibus and railway companies. Special sche- 
dules were put into effect and except for the night of 4 July the big 
crowds were transported without inconvenience. On that night, 
the occasion of the fireworks display, a number of people were unable 
to obtain transportation back to Vincennes and Paris. 

The Military Police worked in conjunction with the Ticket Distri- 
bution Committee. Besides the men stationed along the roads from 
Vincennes to handle traffic, an elaborate scheme for handling the park- 
ing of cars and traffic in the vicinity of the Stadium was worked out. 

All cars were directed into a one-way road at a point southeast of 
the Stadium and driven up to the main entrance at the Tribune d'Hon- 
neur. Here Military Police handed to the driver a check to correspond 
to the number of the section in which the ticketholder was to sit. A 
corresponding ticket was also handed to the occupant of the car. 
This ticket indicated in what section of the two parking areas the car 
was to be parked. The chauffeur then drove quickly away, displaying 
his ticket conspicuously. Military Police stationed along the short 



170 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

road running in front of the Stadium could tell by the color of the card 
the section in which the car was to be parked. 

When the car was wanted, a man with a megaphone called out the 
number. This was relayed by other men with megaphones, and the 
cars left their parking spaces and drove around the area, approaching 
the Stadium by way of the one-way road again, loading and leaving 
in the same direction. In this way there was no turning of cars near 
the Stadium and a constant stream of automobiles passed rapidly, 
loading and unloading without confusion. 

On the afternoon of 4 July, 600 cars took their passengers at the 
gate and departed in fifteen minutes. French Gendarmes assisted the 
American Military Police. Taxi drivers at first had a tendency to try 
to turn around on the one-way road, but the regulations were strictly 
enforced by both bodies of pohce and no difficulty was encountered. 

Carefully compiled daily reports by the Transportation section of 
the Ticket Distribution Committee show that a remarkable record 
was made in handling the big crowds. On Sunday, 22 June, Opening 
Day, the steam railroads moved 21,600 people from Gare de Vincennes 
to Joinville-le-Pont between 1:00 p. m. and 3:30 p. m.; the Metro- 
politan subway moved toward Vincennes between 1:00 p. m. and 
3:00 p. m. the same day, 44,400 people; the trolley car systems moved 
from points in Paris to the ground near the Stadium, between 12:45 and 
3:30 p. m., 24,900 people; twenty omnibuses moved from Porte de 
Vincennes to the Stadium, between 1:00 p. m. and 3:00 p. m., 6,400 peo- 
ple. Taxicabs to the number of 288 moved from all points in Paris 
and Porte de Vincennes to the Stadium, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 
p. m., 5,700 people; and private cars took out 7,700. 

Figures also show that the total number of passengers moved 
from Paris toward Joinville between the hours of 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. 
during the Games— 22 June to 6 July— was 867,750. 

While all passengers were not for the Stadium, the amount of normal 
traffic from Paris at these hours is small. It can be well considered 
that by far the greater part of this traffic was the result of the Games. 

These passengers were distributed among the different systems as 
follows : 

TOTALS 

Metropolitan subway system 355 000 

Trolley car systems 213350 

Steam railway systems 153 300 

Omnibuses, taxicabs and private cars 146,100 

Grand total 867,750 



CHAPTER XIII 
THE LIAISON SECTION 




N his letter of invitation to the officers and men of the 
various AHied Armies to participate in the Inter-AUied 
Games, General Pershing expressed the hope that "... the 
ties of the much cherished spirit of comradeship, which 
have sprung from the gallant joint efforts of our forces on the battle- 
field, may thus be more closely cemented," 

It is obvious from this that the Commander-in-Chief had in mind, 
as the principal aim of these Games, the bringing together on the 
friendly field of sport of representatives of the various AHied Armies, 
with the object of giving them an opportunity to learn to know and 
understand each other, and to form friendships from such an under- 
standing rather than merely to produce the highest possible excellence 
in athletic performance. 

With this in mind it was clear that in forming the organization to 
conduct the Games there must be a section for the purpose of 
gathering information regarding the wishes and needs of the various 
competitors and to bring them to the attention of those whose duty 
it would be to see that they were promptly provided for. It was 
essential that information regarding provisions which had been made 
for the various teams, rules for the conduct of the competitions them- 
selves, and all other information necessary for the proper handling by 
their chiefs of the individual teams, should be carefully brought to 
the attention of these chiefs and thoroughly explained to them. 

To accomplish this delicate and difficult task the Liaison Section 
was organized. The harmonious conduct of an enterprise so complex 
in nationalities as the Inter-Allied Games required that this organiza- 
tion be invested with a peculiar authority. It had to be elastic, inclu- 
sive and the more nonapparent and undefined the better ; an authority, 
however, none the less actual and firm, but which directed and con- 
trolled without seeming to do so, achieving its ends through skill of 
individual address rather than rehance on the power of clearly consti- 
tuted regulations. 



174 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

A multitude of prickly little problems presented themselves con- 
stantly from American as well as from foreign sources. Largely these 
fell into two categories : (1) International misunderstandings, usually 
small enough in their inception, but, if neglected, capable of visiting 
widespread devastation upon the spirit of fellowship these Games were 
designed to promote. Such instances generally sprang from the 
different national and racial conceptions of the same situation, and, no 
two of them being exactly alike, they could not be handled in the same 
manner; (2) Points of information and service which were of endless 
variety and ranged from requests for the proper form in which to 
notify a monarch of the existence of the Games to such matters as 
supplying a manicurist for a lady of the entourage of a visiting general. 
All of these matters required immediate adjustment and that 
adjustment had to be accomplished so deftly that it would appear 
that no adjustment had taken place. It was the elimination of these 
little frictions, the forestalling of larger disagreements, and the sup- 
plying of every possible want that any of the foreign visitors might 
experience, which contributed largely to the general satisfaction of 
the visitors to the Games. 

An executive stafY of the section was formed and charged with the 
conduct of the organization itself. This staff had in charge all matters 
relating to official correspondence, transportation, supplies, and imme- 
diate contact with all outside sources of information, as well as the 
prompt execution of all business transmitted to it by other elements 
of the greater organization. . 

The second function of the section was to deal with the represen- 
tatives of the Allied Nations and this work was conducted by the 
group of diplomatic junior officers comprising the balance of the per- 
sonnel. All of these officers spoke at least one language other than 
English. They were assigned to permanent duty with the various 
national delegations and to other special duties. 

An assembly was instituted each morning at which all matters 
connected with the Section were discussed in open meeting. Matters 
of interest to visiting foreigners were brought to the attention of the 
proper officers and reports were made upon all matters relating to the 
successful conduct of the Games themselves, or to the proper housing, 
recreation and comfort of our visitors. In this way Liaison officers 
were kept constantly posted regarding one another's activities. Dupli- 
cation of effort was reduced to a minimum and many valuable sugges- 
tions were received from the experiences of others. Throughout the 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 175 

course of the Games the Liaison officers made it their business to inform 
the visiting teams to which they were assigned of the conditions gover- 
ning each event just before it took place and of the reasons for deci- 
sions or for changes or postponements ; they answered numberless 
questions and made plain the many happenings which to a stranger 
might have been baffling without such ready assistance ; in a word, 
the Liaison officers undertook to place at the service of every visiting 
team all the information and all the facihties which had been brought 
together for the A.E.F. competitors. 

The initial problem of the Section concerned the issuing of invita- 
tions to various countries in the hope that they would send represen- 
tative teams or individuals to contest in the Games. The accuracy 
of the text of these invitations was no small problem. Great delicacy 
was exercised in this matter and the result is shown by the fact that 
eighteen countries were represented. While it is to be regretted that 
Great Britain did not find it possible to send a list of general entries, 
it must be noted that the British Dominions were excellently repre- 
sented in the Games, considering the state of demobilization of their 
forces. The entire question of British participation was not the least 
perplexing of the problems which the Section was called upon to 
handle. All preparations for the reception of visiting delegates and 
of the athletes themselves were initiated through the medium of the 
Liaison Section. As each team arrived it was met by a Liaison repre- 
sentative speaking the language of the visitors. This officer was 
definitely detailed to this team and was instructed to grant every 
request, regardless of its character, or, if this was not possible, to 
afford immediate opportunity for so doing. Automobiles were kept 
constantly at hand for the transporting of visitors. Plans for amuse- 
ment were suggested, and, in connection with the Reception and 
Entertainment Section, trips of interest were arranged by the same 
officer. Facilities offered by the Quartermaster Department were 
made available to all the countries and it became the duty of the 
Liaison officer to assist in the purchase of needed supphes. 

After the actual start of the Games the duties of the Liaison Sec- 
tion became more complex. The distribution of tickets alone was 
a matter requiring much attention and tact. The resources of the 
organization were stretched in keeping the various teams informed 
of the events, in supplying them with the materials necessary for their 
own participation, and in looking after the endless details involved 
in constant service. During the period of the actual conduct of the 



176 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Games, Liaison officers were on duty practically eighteen hours out of 
every twenty-four. 

Social activities soon began to assume an important place in the 
daily work of the organization. Liaison officers were frequently called 
upon to act as interpreters and to facilitate social contact between the 
various nations meeting at these functions. 

As practically all correspondence was conducted in French the 
necessity for immediate and accurate translation of every imaginable 
type of document was apparent. These translations, both from 
English to French and from French to English, were made by Liaison 
officers without delay. 

All historical and other data concerning the athletes of the Allied 
Armies in their connection with the Games was gathered by the Liaison 
Section. It collected the special prizes offered by the various nation? 
and handed them to the Prize Committee for distribution. It prepared 
lists of officers meriting decorations. 

One of the lasting benefits of the Inter-Allied Games promises to 
be a recrudescence of sport in lands which have been for five years 
devastated by war. Baseball has made a particularly favorable 
impression on some of the foreign representatives who have conceived 
the idea of introducing it in their countries. The Liaison Section has, 
to this end, put representatives of the various foreign teams in touch 
with the athletic departments of American colleges where they may 
obtain the best information as to how to popularize the game. It also 
suggested that the matter of detailing American officers to various 
nations to act as instructors be considered by the War Department, 




CHAPTER XIV 

SUMMARY OF THE GAMES 




LTHOUGH the conclusion of the competitions at Pershing 
Stadium, Joinville-le-Pont, on the afternoon of 6 July, did 
not bring to an end the complete official program of the 
Inter-Allied Games, the date marked the summary of two 
jrilliant weeks in which sport history was made. There remained 
only the golf and rowing events to be carried through to a cham- 
pionship conclusion of which rowing was still to be contested 
in its entirety. But for the mass of the entrants themselves and for 
the athletic-loving public that followed with intense interest the com- 
petitions at the Stadium, the two weeks of track and field events, of 
boxing, soccer, and the dozen other sports which centered there, more 
or less fully made up the Games. When General Pershing awarded 
the medals to the various winners of events, amid the applauding of 
the crowds he put the seal of official approval on a sport gathering 
unique in the history of athletics. 

The spirit in which the Inter- Allied Games were carried out reflected 
credit upon the sportsmanship of the nations involved. Not only 
did it demonstrate how wholeheartedly the nations that had striven 
shoulder to shoulder on the battlefield could turn to friendly rivalry 
in the stadium, but it showed the indomitable spirit surviving more 
than four years of war which had drained the very lifeblood of almost 
every nation involved. Men who saw as through a glass darkly in 
1916 and 1917 whispered that it would be years before a pitifully 
broken world could create again such heroic epics of athletics as the 
Olympiads of London and Stockholm. But it was the good fortune 
of the Intef-Allied Games to give a rosier hue to that pessimistic 
forecast and to prophecy for the next Olympic competition even 
greater success than has attented the games of the past. The Games 
would have been notable for that one achievement even had the 

11 bis. 



176b THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

events of 22 June-6 July at Pershing Stadium failed to produce as 
brilliant competition as they did. They showed that if old stars of 
track and field, links, court, mat and ring had faded in the red glare of 
war or been rendered incapable of participation, new ones could 
be developed under conditions of active service to take their places. 
Further, the Games served to stimulate interest in sport in coun- 
tries that have come into being in the travail of world war and 
which in the future will take their part in the improvement of 
athletics. 

The Inter-Allied Games were unique, for it is hardly conceivable 
that ever again can there be held a sport contest with the identical 
eligibility requisite that every man competing should have earned 
the right to wear his country's colors in the stadium by having first 
borne them in her service as a soldier. There was no talk of amateurs 
or professionals; no haggling over the status of the competitors. In 
the eyes of the quahfication committee, every entrant had to show 
that he was quahfied in one of the oldest and most honored of all 
professions — that of arms. The records made on the fields of Inter- 
Allied competition stand as Inter-Allied Records. Probably they 
will never be contested and will stand by themselves for all time. 

Nearly 1500 athletes, representing eighteen nations or dominions, 
participated. The list of entrant countries differed of course materi- 
ally from that of any Olympiad as only those nations linked together 
in the commom cause of justice in the war were eligible to compete. 
It was universally regretted that Great Britain decided to send only 
rowing crews and a golf team as, wherever the sport world foregathers, 
the Englishman is a welcome competitor and one whose chances of 
winning must be minutely calculated by his adversaries. Old England, 
however, if absent in the flesh, was present in the spirit, and indeed 
in the blood, for Australia, Canada and New Zealand played an impor- 
tant part in the competitions. The Dominions gave a good account 
of themselves, too. 

The simple plan developed by which a sport might become a point- 
scoring event on the program guaranteed a varied and intensely 
interesting series of competitions. Of the twenty-six forms of sport 
originally designed to fill the major portion of the program, it was 
necessary to abandon but two. Cricket, included as a courtesy to 
expected EngHsh entries, was given up when the three Dominions 
decided not to enter teams against each other; and for a similar reason 
American intercollegiate football failed to take its place with soccer 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 176c 

and Rugby. Nor were exhibitions of these sports held. The Domin- 
ions concentrated their attention on the many events in which they 
were entered, while the warm weather made it undesirable to employ 
the equipment and to undergo the training and practice necessary to 
bring American intercollegiate football up to its standard of presentation. 

In the Games themselves the athletes of the American Expedi- 
tionary Forces made a handsome showing, not only in their chosen 
branch of track and field, a phase of sport in which Americans have 
been particularly successful ever since they have been participants 
in international meets, but often they displayed like ability in other 
major divisions of the program. 

Of the twenty-four separate events listed in the program the 
United States militarized athletes won first place for their country 
in twelve and second in seven more, A.E.F. entrants making clean 
sweeps of all three places in five events and in a sixth having three 
of four men who succeeded in placing. Again in the service shooting 
events the A.E.F. was successful with both rifle and pistol, taking 
four first places. Other first places were gained by the United States 
in baseball, basketball, boxing, prize jumping with horses, swim- 
ming, tug-of-war and catch-as-catch-can wresthng. 

Counting two team championships in fencing not included in the 
major list of the original program, France made the next best showing 
as an event winner. The French entrants annexed first honors in 
six events and second in as many. Their first included three titles 
in fencing, one in horsemanship, the cross-country run, and the indi- 
vidual singles in tennis. France also won both team and individual 
golf events. Italy won two fencing titles, one in riding, and three 
second places. Australia's two brilliant tennis victories were backed 
up by four second places. Belgium won one fencing title and two 
second places. Czecho-Slovakia trimmed all comers in soccer and 
divided a first place with Belgium in Greco-Roman wrestling, while 
Portugal had three second places to its credit and Canada one. 

In the events which might be described as strictly military in char- 
acter, the notable American victories were in the new hand-grenade 
event in which a world's record was created by an A.E.F. chaplain, 
F. C. Thompson, and in the events with the service rifle and revolver. 
In riding and fencing, however, the new world had to give place to 
the old. France, Italy and Belgium took all but one place in horse- 
manship, while the A.E.F. failed to figure at all in the field of foil and 
saber, where France, Italy, Belgium and Portugal divided the six 



176d THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

championships between them. Similarly, while the United States team 
pinned its competitors to the mat in catch-as-catch-can wrestling, 
they were lost in the field of Greco-Roman endeavor in which Czecho- 
slovakia, Belgium and Italy divided the honors. 

America's notable success in winning first and second places in so 
many varied events was due of course in no small degree to the prepon- 
derance of entries and to the consistent preliminary training, not only 
immediately prior to the Games, but also in numerous athletic compe- 
titions fostered in the Expeditionary Forces by Y.M.C.A. experts and 
Army officers before the Inter-Allied classic was undertaken. It is 
no mean tribute to the sportsmanlike spirit of the competing nations 
that they fared gaily into the competitions against this handicap. 
Indeed, the sportsmanship that characterized every nation and every 
individual contender was a prominent feature of the Games. In 
the two weeks at Pershing Stadium there was hardly one untoward 
incident in regard to team conduct on the field, and in general there 
was so little protest against even the official conduct of the Games 
as to make them stand out over every preceding tournament of a 
similar kind where bickering over points and technicalities have 
sometimes left unhappy memories. 

The absolutely new arena at Pershing Stadium discouraged the 
establishing of world records. The cinder path was fairly fast but 
not exceptionally so, and the playing fields, formed of sand, made 
speed difficult in the competitions. It was impossible to provide 
ideal ground in the short time necessarily employed in erecting the 
Stadium. 

In spite of this, one new world's record was established. This 
was Thompson's hand-grenade toss of 245 feet, 11 inches. But for 
a record-smashing performance in the United States a few weeks 
earlier, another world's mark would have been made, as the American 
team in the 800-meter relay, composed of Paddock, Haddock, Tor- 
kelson and Teschner, notched 5 1-5 seconds from the recorded best 
mark for the event by negotiating it in 1 minute, 30 4-5 seconds, In 
the preliminaries of this event, both the American and Canadian teams 
had succeeded in beating the old mark by running the distance in 
1 minute 33 1-5 seconds. 

French records in track and field went by the boards frequently. 
Mason, the dashing New Zealand runner, turned the 800 meters in 
1:50 2-5, while Butler, the broad-smiling American black, went 24 feet, 
9 3-4 inches in the running broad jump. Bob Simpson was no stranger 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 176e 

to Frenchmen who have followed the athletic story of the past three 
years, but he gave them two mementos to keep his memory green 
along the boulevards by setting two new French hurdle records, one 
of 15 1-5 seconds over the 110-meter high sticks, and the other of 
24 4-5 over the 200-meter low ones. 

Paddock equalled the world's record of 21 3-5 in the 200-meter 
dash. Perhaps the most briUiant individual star of the two weeks 
was the American swimmer, Norman Ross. He not only set new 
French marks in the 100-meter free style at 1:04 3-5 and in the 
1500-meter free style at 24:22 2-5, but by negotiating the 400-meter 
free style in 5:40 2-5 in the finals, smashed a record a few days old 
by Stedman of Australia. When Stedman made his register he beat 
a record performance by Ross on the same day. 

While the two weeks' meet brought into prominence many really 
wonderful individual feats — Paddock in the dashes, Butler in the 
jumps, Thompson with the grenade, O'Hara-Wood, Patterson and 
Lycette of Australia in tennis. Major Ubertalli of Italy in riding, Lt. 
Nedo Nadi of Italy with the foils, Vermeulen of France over the 
cross-country and modified Marathon, and outstanding figures in 
boxing and wrestling — no single entry in any sport in the two weeks 
compared with the dazzling performances of Norman Ross, already 
a noted swimmer in American tanks prior to his entry into the Army, 
in which he served as a Lieutenant in the Air service. Indeed, Ross' 
record in the Inter-Allied swimming competition stands out as the 
greatest individual achievement in the history of competitive natation. 

Aside from the actual conduct of the Games, interest during the 
two weeks at Pershing Stadium and the other places where the Inter- 
Allied sports were held, was centered, as is always the case, 
on the crowds themselves. It is a psychological factor of immense 
importance in the sport world that the spectators constitute for them- 
selves a great part of the spectacle. 

In view of the fact that admission was entirely free to all the com- 
petitions, the actual attendance at the Games could not be accur- 
ately checked. Only estimates could be made, but a daily average 
of 20,000 at Pershing Stadium was easily maintained for the fifteen 
days from opening to closing. Between 300,000 and 320,000 saw 
the competitions at the Stadium. As there were several other places 
where events were staged, it is perhaps a very conservative estimate 
to say that the Inter-Allied Games played to a gallery of half a million 
persons. 



176f THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Every available seat in the huge concrete Stadium was occupied 
on Opening Day, and in addition, the throngs overflowed upon the 
field and surged against every entrance. Thousands who found it 
impossible to get inside the barriers spent the afternoon simply walking 
around the vicinity or strolling through the adjacent Bois de Vincennes. 

The scene of Opening Day was repeated on the Fourth of July, and 
on the two Saturdays and Sundays included in the course of the events. 

The tennis competition, which was held more than a fortnight 
before the other Games, also drew splendid crowds in spite of the 
fact that at that time Paris transportation was tied up by the strike 
on the Metro and surface lines. 

Parisian sportlovers had a difficult problem in choosing where 
they wished to go to witness the Inter-Allied Games. The track and 
field, boxing and wrestling bouts, and a major portion of the other 
competitions were held at Pershing Stadium. But on a number of 
days, there were simultaneous" attractions. The swimming events 
were held in the beautiful lake St. James in the Bois de Boulogne. 
The earlier riding events took place at Ghennevieres, most of the 
fencing was scheduled at the Ecole d'Escrime at Joinville, and Rugby 
was at home at Golombes Field north of Paris. The golf matches 
took place on the La Boulie links outside the gates of Paris — -a course 
regarded as one of the best in Europe. The Inter-Allied shooting 
events were not held in Paris at all, but hours away by rail on the 
d'Auvours range near Le Mans. The tennis tournament was divided 
between the Racing Club and the Stad Frangais near Paris. 

Spectators at Pershing Stadium faced an added difficulty in deter- 
mining their preference in sport as several events were conducted 
simultaneously, though games of the type of baseball, soccer and 
basketball were usually halted between periods to permit a track race 
to be run. On the last day of actual competitions, several wrestling 
matches were staged outside the Stadium owing to the needs of the 
riding program. 

Although variable weather was encountered in the course of the 
two week's program, on the whole the weather was good. Rain on 
a few afternoons dampened the enthusiasm of the crowd and necessi- 
tated the postponement of several events to later dates, but no feature 
of the program was permitted to lapse entirely. 

Ceremonies, principally military in character, served to stimulate 
the interest of the show-loving Parisians. The martial splendor of 
both American and French Armies was lent to the occasion. 

* See map of location ol events, page 81. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 176g 

The principal military feature of the A.E.F. was the presence of 
the Composite Regiment formed from the ranks of the first six, or 
Regular, Divisions of the United States Army. Originally intended 
as the Guard of Homor for General Pershing in his planned trip to 
London for Empire Day, which was postponed by the possibility of 
an advance into unoccupied German territory, the Regiment was kept 
together and brought to Paris for the Games. 

Each infantry brigade of the first six divisions supplied a rifle 
company to the Regiment, the men being selected for size, military 
bearing, and excellence in drill. With these requisites as a basis, 
and after an intensive drill program in the training area at Coblenz, 
the Regiment made a splendid showing. One battalion was always 
on duty at the Stadium. A Third Division band accompanied the 
Composite Regiment to Paris. 

After the formal Opening Day ceremonies, the gala event at the 
Stadium took place on 4 July, an Independence Day that will never 
be forgotten by the American Army in Europe or the spectators from 
the French capital. The day was made the occasion of a special 
program at the Stadium in connection with the official celebration of 
the holiday throughout the District of Paris. 

The performances of a squadrilla of military airplanes, low-flying 
and "circusing" over the field, formed a spectacular feature of the 
program. In the afternoon a parade and a series of drill maneuvers 
by the Composite Regiment received vociferous compliments from the 
assembled crowd and were applauded by General Pershing himself. 
The Commander-in-Chief remained on the field but a short time, as he 
was an afternoon honor guest at Maison Lafitte. In the evening there 
was an exhibition of fireworks, a display of Serbian gymnastics, Arabian 
sword dancing, a parade of symbolical floats and living tableaux. 

There were two decoration ceremonies during the Games at the 
Stadium. The picturesque character of the second was augmented 
by the fact that just before it occurred (28 June) an official announce- 
ment was made to the immense Saturday throng that Germany had 
just signed the Peace Treaty; and amid a stirring display of enthu- 
siasm, M. Valdor of the Opera Comique had just rendered the Marseil- 
laise. It was at this moment that several star athletes were summoned 
to the royal box of King Nicholas of Montenegro and were decorated 
by His Majesty in person with the Order of Danilo of Montenegro. 

On the preceding afternoon, before 30,000 cheering spectators, 
M. Henry Pate, president of the Comite National de I'Education 



176h 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Physique, Sportive et de I'Hygiene Sociale, acting for the French 
government, decorated with the Legion of Honor the chief Americans 
who organized the Inter-Allied Games. Colonel Wait G. Johnson, 
chairman of the Games Committee, was made an officer of the Legion. 
The following were made knights: Lt. Col. David M. Goodrich, vice- 
chairman and head of the Liaison Section; Lt. Col. T. G. Lonergan, 
member of the Committee and head of the Technical Section; Lt. Col. 
J. A. McDermott, head of the General Section, and Mr. Elwood S. 
Brown, Y.M.C.A., member of the Committee and Director General 
of the Games. 

The concluding ceremony of the Games took place on Sunday, 
6 July, when the medals were presented to the victors by General 
Pershing, the AlHed flags lowered and the French standard left to 
float alone over Stade Pershing — now the official property of the 
French nation — an abiding monument to the most unique sport 
carnival in athletic history. 




CHAPTER XV 
DEDICATION DAY 




o one of the fifteen eventful days of the Inter-Allied Games 
surpassed in enthusiasm the remarkable scene presented by 
the formal opening of Pershing Stadium on the afternoon 
of Sunday, 22 June, 1919. The glamour of military splen- 
dor, joined with the briUiant changing spectacle of color inseparable 
from a Continental holiday crowd, made the day one long to be remem- 
bered by those fortunate enough to witness it. 

There were distinguished guests from all of the Allied nations, 
mihtary delegations, well-turned speeches and there was the double 
presentation by which Pershing Stadium, planned and built by the 
American Y.M.C.A. and presented to the American Expeditionary 
Forces, became in turn the perpetual property of the French 
people — but above all there was The Crowd. 

Approximately 90,000 people filled every possible seating space 
in the huge concrete stands, overflowed on the grounds, or stormed 
in vain outside the circular walls in efforts to get a glimpse of the 
ceremonies inside. Thousands of American soldiers helped to fill 
the stands, and there was a riot of color ranging from the sober olive 
drab of the A.E.F. and the striking horizon blue of the poilu, through 
the many gradations of shading that can be presented only by Europe's 
numberless uniforms and Paris on a jour de fSte. With the sun of 
ideal summer weather smiling over the scene. Opening Day proved 
a grand success. 

As the inauguration of the Games took place during one of the most 
momentous periods in the diplomatic and political history of the world, 
the two leading figures in the international situation found, at the 
last moment, that they would not be able to attend the dedication 
ceremonies. But while urgent business of the moment prevented the 



176j THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

attendance of President Wilson and M. Clemenceau at the inaugura- 
tion of the Stadium, there was, nevertheless, a notable gathering of 
distinguished people. The President and Mme. Poincare occupied 
the seats in the center of the platform of honor, with General Pershing 
on their right. On General Pershing's right sat Mrs. Hugh Wallace, 
wife of the American Ambassador, and Mme. Jusserand, wife of the 
French Ambassador in Washington. On the left of Mme. Poincare 
sat Mr. Wallace, the American Ambassador, and M. Leygues, the 
French Minister of Marine. M. Leygues was accompanied by M. Pate, 
Deputy, and other officials of the Government. On his left sat General 
Bliss and next to him, Mr. E. C. Garter, Chief Secretary of the A.E.F.- 
Y.M.G.A. Others on the platform were: Mr. W. F. Massey, Prime Min- 
ister of New Zealand; General Sir Charles Rosenthal of the Austra- 
lian forces; General Alby, Chief of the French General Staff; General 
Dubail; M. Politic, Greek Minister for Foreign Affairs; Colonel Wait 
G. Johnson, Chief Athletic Officer of the A.E.F., and the officers of 
his staff; Mr. Elwood S. Brown of the Y.M.G.A., Director of the Games; 
M. Vesnich, the Serbian Minister; M. Jusserand; General Laorat, the 
French officer attached to President Wilson; Rear Admiral Knapp; 
Admiral Long, Naval Attache of the American Embassy, and others 
of the Embassy staff; Miss Sarah Beecher, niece of Ambassador and 
Mrs. Wallace; the Japanese Ambassador and his wife, and officers 
representing all the nations contesting in the athletic field. 

The day's events began at 2:30 in the afternoon when the mili- 
tary parade, headed by the Garde Republicaine band, entered the 
oval and marched past Gol. W. S. Babcock, U.S.A., the Grand Mar- 
shal. The review included companies from the two famous old French 
military schools, the Polytechnic and St. Gyr; detachments from the 
Chasseurs Alpins, Zouaves and Tirailleurs; the 89th Infantry, and a 
battalion from the superb Composite Regiment of the American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. Led by Commandant Rolland and his staff, the 
French contingents carried tattered battle flags, many of them dyed 
in- the blood of campaigns far older than the World War, while the 
American color guard bore the Stars and Stripes and the regimental 
colors. After marching around the oval, the troops were drawn up 
in line facing the central stand and inspected by President Poincare 
and General Pershing. 

On the completion of the review the march around the Stadium 
by the athletes selected to compete in the Games constituted the single 
non-mihtary feature of the day. Headed by the band of the 45th 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 176k 

Infantry, the parade followed the course of the military procession, 
the athletes eventually lining up in front of the serried ranks of 
French and American troops. 

The parade of the athletes was a notable event. Nearly 1500 
men, representing sixteen nations and colonies, participated in this, 
the first ceremony of the kind since the close of the Olympic Games 
at Stockholm in 1912. Despite the four years of world war involving 
countries and men who had helped to make athletic history in the 
last three Olympics, here and there in the march around Pershing 
Stadium might be detected the figures of those who had achieved 
victories on Olympic fields in the years which now seem so far in the 
background. 

To the French was given the honor of heading the parade. The 
teams of other competing nations followed in alphabetical order, 
ranging in number from the lone representative of far Guatemala to 
the 300 or more wearing Uncle Sam's colors. Following France in 
order came Austraha, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czecho-Slo- 
vakia. Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, the Hedjaz, Newfoundland, 
New Zealand, Portugal, Roumania, Serbia, and finally, the United 
States. Once in line in front of the soldiers, the long array of inter- 
national athletes stretched from end to end of the oval. 

The formal double presentation of the Stadium followed, the 
ceremony taking place on the reviewing platform constructed as an 
abutment from the center of the main stand. Mr. E. C. Carter, Chief 
Secretary of the A.E.F.- Y.M.C.A., on behalf of his organization, 
presented the deed to the Stadium to General Pershing in these brief 
and well-chosen words: 

" Mr. President and General Pershing — 

" In America, years ago, France built a noble monument to hberty. 
Today in France, America has here completed a monument to one 
aspect of liberty— the right to play. From the arrival in Europe of 
the very first American troops, the Y.M.C.A. has been in a great 
partnership with the American Expeditionary Forces in making uni- 
versal the best play spirit of our country— of play for all, strong and 
weak, rich and poor. 

" The meaning of the A.E.F. championships hes not in a few 
hundred final competitors, but in the hundreds of thousands of soldiers 
of average skill who unconsciously have established play for play's 
sake, and sport as the possession of all. 



176 1 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

" These Inter-Allied Games, at the invitation of the American 
Commander-in-Chief, mark the culmination of the ideals which have 
been stressed in Europe by the American Army and fostered by the 
Association's Department of Athletics— the democracy of sport and 
the wider internationahzation of athletics. 

" In making this gift to the American Army, as trustees of money 
subscribed by the American people, the Association beheves it has 
used their money for the largest good of the American and Alhed 
Armies. Our thanks are due not only to the American people, but 
also to the Army itself, particularly to the engineer and pioneer troops 
who have completed this structure in so short a time. 

" To you, General Pershing, on behalf of the American people, 
through the Y.M.C.A., I present this Stadium for the American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. I am greatly honored in handing you this certifi- 
cate of the deed of gift." 

The following is the wording of the deed: 

The undersigned, Edward C. Carter, Chief Secretary Young Men's Christian 
Association, under a General Power of Attorney, does hereby give, transfer and 
convey to John J. Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary 
Forces, all and singular the property described herein, the structure known as 
the " Pershing Stadium. " 

Which consists of a building constructed of cement and steel, erected by the 
Young Men's Christian Association of the United States of America, together 
with all appliances, appurtenances and apparatus belonging thereto, and 
erected on land ceded by the City of Paris to the Comit6 National de I'Educa- 
tion Physique, Sportive et del' Hygiene Sociale, situated in the Bois de Vincennes, 
at the place called "Mortemart" for the establishment of a stadium, being more 
specifically described as follows : 

A piece of ground consisting of 200 meters to the side situated upon the 
aforesaid racefield in the part called "Champ de Manoeuvres", adjoining the 
Camp de St. Maur, and the Municipal Nurseries, and comprised within the 
limits traced in red ink on the sketch attached hereto; 

This ground being designed solely for the establishment of a stadium offered 
to the people of France by the Young Men's Christian Association of the United 
States of America. 

The conditions of this transfer are : 

That the grantor conveys the above described personal property to the 
Comit6 National de I'Education Phyisique, Sportive et de 1' Hygiene Sociale, 
as trustee for the people of France and for their sole use and exclusive benefit; 
it being understood that the said properties herein conveyed shall not be 
retransferred by the said Comit6 National de I'Education Physique, Sportive 
et de I'Hygitoe Sociale, to any person, firm, partnership or corporation, or any 
other society, by which the rights of the people of France could in any way be 
curtailed; it being the intention of the grantor herein that people of France shall 
for ever enjoy the rights, benefits and privileges of the property conveyed 
without price; provided, however, that the said Comit6 National may charge 
reasonable admission fees to said Pershing Stadium for sporting events and 
other entertainments conducted directly by said Comit6 National and provided 
further that any other person, agency or organizations, having first obtained 
the right to use said Pershing Stadium, shall also have the right to charge a 
reasonable admission fee, it being understood, however, that in all such cases 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 176m 

said person, agency, or organisation shall be required to pay said Comit6 National 
—or Its successors — a reasonable percentage of the net proceeds where admis- 
sion fees are so charged, to be used for the up-keep of the said Pershing Stadium 
»T , Witness Whereof the said Edward C. Carter, Chief Secretary Young' 
Men s Christian Association has executed the above and foregoine instrument 
this day of July, 1919. 

Witnesses : (Seal) 

Elwood S. Brown Edward C. Carter. 

Cass Connoway 

General Pershing followed with a simple and soldierly speech of 
acceptance of the gift for the A.E.F. The Commander-in-Chief of 
the Expeditionary Forces said: 

" Mr. President, ladies and gentlemen — 

" It is very gratifying to us of the Army to be able to testify to the 
extraordinary results that have come to us through athletics, especi- 
ally since the Armistice. Hundreds of thousands of our officers 
and men have participated in these Games and have received material 
benefit through theni, because of having to prepare for these compe- 
titions. The results have been very gratifying indeed. 

" But we could not be here today to testify to these things if it 
had not been for the assistance, the aid, the encouragement given 
us by the Y.M.C.A. of America, who, by their financial aid and by 
the assistance given us through their trained instructors, have made 
these things possible. 

" Mr. Carter — and I address all your associates as well — we most 
fully appreciate all that you have done. This monument that you 
leave here is a material evidence of what you have accomplished. 
But beyond that you are leaving in our memories something more — you 
are leaving with us a lesson which will benefit not only those of us 
who are here, but we hope will be transmitted to those who are to 
follow. 

" In accepting this deed, I extend to you the most cordial appre- 
ciation of the Army for what you have done for us". 

In turn General Pershing presented to M. Georges Leygues, Minister 
of Marine, acting for Premier Clemenceau, the deed of gift trans- 
ferring the Stadium to France. A touching tribute to the spirit of 
comradeship in arms was paid by the American Commanding General 
in his address. He said: 

" The association of nations and of armies, M. le Ministre, on the 
field of battle, developes ties of friendship which naturally lead, if 
followed to their logical conclusion, to a stronger friendship and 
naturally enable us to accomplish greater things. 



176n THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

" Since the war has happily ended we have been able to assemble 
here athletes from all the Allied Armies, and we feel that this is but 
a beginning of that which will be carried out later by the French 
government and the French people. 

" In transmitting to you this deed for the Stadium, I do so with 
the hope that those bonds of friendship, which have been developed 
by us when fighting side by side, may continue, and that they may 
become everlasting memories." 

The following is the wording of the deed: 

The undersigned, John J. Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the American 
Expeditionary Forces in France, does hereby give, transfer and convey to the 
Comite National de I'Education Physique, Sportive et de I'Hygitae Sociale, 
all and singular the property described herein, the structure known as the 
"Pershing Stadium." 

"Which consists of a building constructed of cement and steel, erected by the 
Young Men's Christian Association of the United States of America, together 
with all appliances, appurtenances and apparatus belonging thereto, and erected 
on land ceded by the City of Paris to the Comit6 National de I'Education Phy- 
sique Sportive et de I'HygiSne Sociale, situated in the Bois de Vincennes, at 
the place called "Mortemart", for the establishment of a stadium, being more 
specifically described as follows: 

A piece of ground consisting of 200 meters to the side situated upon the 
aforesaid racefleld in the part called "Champ de Manoeuvres", adjoining the 
Camp de St. Maur, and the Municipal Nurseries, and comprised within the 
limits traced in red ink on the sketch attached hereto; 

This ground being designed solely for the establishment of a stadium offered 
to the people of France by the Young Men's Christian Association of the United 
States of America. 

The conditions of this transfer are : 

That the grantor conveys the above described personal property to the 
Comit6 National de I'Education Pyhsique, Sportive et de I'Hygitae Sociale, 
as trustee for the people of France and for their sole use and exclusive benefit; 
it being understood that the said properties herein conveyed shall not be 
retransferred by the said Comit6 National de I'Education Physique, Sportive et de 
I'Hygiene Sociale to any person, firm, partnership or corporation, or any other 
society, by which the rights of the people of France could in any way be cur- 
tailed; it being the intention of the grantor herein that the people of France 
shall forever enjoy the rights, benefits and privileges of the property conveyed 
without price, provided, however, that said Comit6 National may charge reason- 
able admission fees to said Pershing Stadium for sporting events and other 
entertainments conducted directly by said Comit6 National, and provided 
further, that any other person, agency or organizations, having first obtained 
the right to use said Pershing Stadium, shall also have the right to charge a 
reasonable admission fee, it being understood, however, that in all such cases 
said person, agency, or organization shall be required to pay said Comit6 National 
— or its successors — a reasonable percentage of the net proceeds, where admis- 
sion fees are so charged, to be used for the up-keep of the said Pershing Stadium. 

In Witness Whereof the said John J. Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the 
American Expeditionary Forces in France, has executed the above and fore- 
going instrument, this day of July, 1919. 

Witnesses : (Seal) 

Quekemeyer John J. Pershing. 

Holmes 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 176o 

M. Leygues' acceptance was brief. The French Minister said: 
" I accept with the greatest of gratitude and joy the magnificent 
gift of the Pershing Stadium which you have just made to the Premier 
of the French nation. This Stadium will be the center of the Inter- 
Allied Games. It will very powerfully contribute to develop the taste 
for physical education which forms strong races and victorious sol- 
diers. It will perpetuate forever the remembrance in France of the 
generosity of the Y.M.G.A. and the American Army. It will also 
remind us of the gracious help of your splendid legions at the most 
dramatic hour of the history of the world, as brought to the defense 
of the sacred cause of liberty and right." 

Upon the completion of the double presentation, General Pershing 
turned and faced the ranks of soldiers and athletes, and in a loud, 
clear voice proclaimed the formal opening of the Inter-Alhed Games. 
The General said: 

" It is very gratifying to the Army of the United States to be 
assembled here and ask all the athletes of the Allied Armies to contest 
in friendly games among themselves and with us. 

" We feel sure that this is a new beginning for the development 
of athletics among the people with whom we have been associated in 
the Great War. 

" I trust that we may all carry in our minds the thought that 
strong men make strong nations, and I predict this as a beginning of a 
new era in such development. 

" I extend to you athletes and your friends a most cordial welcome 
to these Games. 

" I now declare the Inter-AlHed Games opened." 

At this juncture the flags of the competing nations were raised 
to the tops of the tall poles erected at intervals around the Stadium, 
"Old Glory" being the first to float from its pinnacle. 

The athletes then marched off the field in order, followed by all of 
the troops except the two companies selected for the Guard of Honor. 
The departure from the field as signally honored as was the appear- 
ance of the march companies, for at this time the outer barriers had 
been removed, and the huge crowd had overflowed to the field, forming 
a dense fringe of humanity around the oval, through which with diffi- 
culty the French Garde Nationale and American Military Police held 
a passage for the paraders. As the companies filed past, the crowd 
burst into storms of cheers for their favorites, the detachments from 



176p THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

the Ecole Polytechnique and St. Cyr coming in for a share as well 
as the older combat organizations. The American troops went off 
the field at double time. 

The Guard of Honor from the Composite Regiment, led by the 
District of Paris band, was drawn up in front of the reviewing stand, 
-taking the field for its formal inspection. It was late in the afternoon 
at this time and most of the principal guests found it necessary to 
leave the Stadium, a considerable portion of the crowd trailing out 
after them. This left comparatively empty stands to watch the most 
spectacular event of the day — a parade of airplanes which reached 
its climax in a thrilling sham in air, and culminated in an accident 
which luckily proved fatal only to the machine. 

Throughout the ceremonies planes had swooped low over the 
crowded Stadium. Two hugh bouquets which were let fall were recov- 
ered and presented to Mme. Poincare and Mrs. Wallace, wife of the 
American Ambassador. 

Twelve types of machines took part in the air review, displaying 
between them almost a complete series of the dashing feats of the 
airman's repertoire, to the great delight of the spectators. The acci- 
dent occurred when Captain Moseley, United States Air Service, 
wrecked a Fokker he was flying in a mimic fight with a Frelich-piIo|ed 
Spad. Moseley displayed splendid airmanship in his enforced landing 
at Vincennes racetrack but he had so little clearing space that the 
little plane was completely wrecked in a smash against a tree, the 
pilot escaping unhurt. The crowd tore the machine to pieces for 
souvenirs. 

The airplane, exhibition concluded the official ceremonies of the 
Opening Day of the Inter-Allied Games, though it was nearly three 
quarters of an hour before the huge Stadium was finally cleared of the 
tremendous crowd that had helped make the brilliant and colorful 
initial program an unqualified success. 




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PANORAMIC VIEW OF PERSHING STADIUM ON OPENING DAY 




Top left— Van den Eynde, Belgium, counted out in bout with Spalla, Italy. Top nght—Goghill, 
Australia, down in fight with Martin, U. S. Center Ze/i—Checkett Australia, knocked out 
by Harris, Canada. Center right— honncits, Belgium, down m bout with Arnold, Canada. 
Bottom left— Spa.\U, Italy, knocking out Van den Eynde, Belgium. Bottom rtgAi— Martm, U.S., 

knocking out Coghill, Australia. 

12 



CHAPTER XVI 
THE COMPETITIONS 



1 


Baseball 


2 


Basketball 


3 


Boxing and Wrestling 


4 


Equitation 


5 


Fencing 


6 


Football 


7 


Golf 


8 


Rowing 


9 


Shooting 


10 


Swimming 


11 


Tennis 


12 


Track and Field 


13 


Tug-of-War 


14 


Mass Games. 




BASEBALL 





INNING three out of four games, the Le Mans team of the 
A.E.F. League, representing the United States, took first 
place in the Baseball competition against the Canadians in 
the Inter-Allied Games at Pershing Stadium. The Ameri- 
cans took the first, third and fourth games ; the Canadians won the 
second. These two teams were the only entries in Baseball. 

The first game in the series was played on 23 June, the United 
States getting five runs and shutting out their opponents. On 25 June 
the Canadians took their only victory with a 2-to-l score. The third 
game, played on the Fourth of July, was a 10-to-O victory for the 
Americans and the final game, which lasted only seven innings, ended 
in a score of 12 to 1. 

In the four games played the United States showed excellence in 
every feature. The United States team made a total of 28 runs 
against 3 for the Canadian team. There were 24 hits for a total 
of 29 bases made by the United States against 10 hits for a total of 
12 bases by Canada. The United States made 7 errors in the four 
games, Canada 22. Pitchers for the winning team showed their supe- 
riority not only in holding down the number of hits, but also by 
striking out 19 batters to 8 strikeouts by the losing team batteries. 
Base running honors were taken by the United States with 19 stolen 
bases against 6 by Canada. 

Of the men who played in all four games, but one batter reached 
.300 per cent. This was Anderson, shortstop for the United States, 
who made 6 hits out of 13 times at bat. His nearest competitor 
for honors was Marriott, second baseman, who hit 5 times out of 
15 chances. The leading Canadian batter was Gilpatrick, third 
baseman, who hit 3 times with 12 chances and the second on the 
Canadian team was Carmel, left fielder, who got 3 hits out of 
14 chances. 

Two men on each team played in all four games and fielded per- 
fectly. The Canadians who did not make an error during the series 
were Carmel and Thompson, outfielders. The Americans with 1.000 
fielding average were Brausen, third baseman, and Dean, center fielder. 

See page 153 for baseball pictures 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 181 

The United States team had 9 earned runs during the series 
against 2 for the Canadians. Brausen was the best rungetter for 
the winning team, crossing the plate 5 times. Debus came second 
with 4 tallies to his credit. Dean and Marriott made 3 each. 

The second game, won by the Canadians, was the best exhibi- 
tion of baseball shown on the field. The game was close through- 
out and played fast. Tate, pitching for the winners, allowed but 1 
hit and his team gave him strong support, only 1 error being made 
behind him. Taylor, pitching for the United States, allowed a total 
of 5 hits and received perfect support from his fielders. 

In the first game most of the credit for the victory was due to 
Fuller's pitching for the Americans. Although 4 errors were made, 
the former Washington pitcher held his opponents to 1 hit. Loose 
fielding allowed the Americans to pile up their big leads in the third 
and fourth games. In the third contest the Canadians made 6 errors 
and in the last game 10. 

The Canadian team, fresh from a final series against the other 
troops from their country in London, showed themselves to be worthy 
opponents for the Americans in the first two games played. After- 
wards, however, the Le Mans team went to Germany where they 
played three games while the Canadians remained at Pershing Stadium 
without a chance to play. The week of resting showed itself plainly 
in the last two games of the series. 

The Le Mans team, representing the United States, was selected 
after a three-game series with the Third Division team in which the 
former took two of the contests. These two teams were conceded 
to be the best in the A.E.F. League. The Canadian team was selected 
after a series in London with the best baseball teams in the Canadian 
Army. The winning team was reinforced by the best players from 
the two next highest teams in the Canadian finals. 

Although the United States and the Canadian forces were the only 
ones in the Allied Armies to have baseball teams, much interest was 
taken in these games played at the Stadium. Many French soldiers 
and civilians gathered in the stands nearest the diamond and gave 
Baseball first place in their attention over the other events on the 
field. Even the fact that they had no national interest in any of the 
players did not prevent them from following the plays and enjoying 
the exhibition. Although fewer in number, representatives of the 
other Allied Nations also watched the series with evident interest 



182 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



and probably got a new and clearer understanding of this game hither- 
to played almost exclusively in North America. 

Each team had eighteen players entered. Canada used sixteen 
of her men in the four games and the United States eleven. 



First Game : Score by innings 
Canada 000000000 



R H E Batteries 

15 Clayton and Shep- 
pard. 
United States. OOSOOOllx— 5 64 Fuller and Novak. 
Umpires — Orth and Frambes. Scorer- — Thornton. Time of game 

— 1:45. 

Second Game : Score by innings R H E Batteries 

United States. 000000100— 1 1 Taylor and Novak. 

Canada 00020000x— 2 5 1 Tate and Peckham. 

Umpires — Orth and Frambes. Scorer- — Doran. Time of game 

— 1:35. 

Third game : Score by innings R H E Batteries 

Canada 000000000— 1 6 Chalmers and Shep- 

pard. 
United States. 10000126x — 10 9 2 Fuller and Novak. 
Umpires— Orth and Roth. Scorer— Doran. Time of game— 1:45. 

Fourth Game : Score by innings R H E 

United States. 0030324 — 12 81 

Canada 1000000 



Batteries 
Taylor and Novak. 



Umpires — Roth and Orth. 



— 1 310 Tate and Peckham. 







Top left — Lieutpnant Eagan, U. S. middleweight. Top right — Oogliill, Australia, heavyweight. 
Bottom left — Prunior, France. Bottom right — Sal van, Roumania. 




F the Europeans proved superior in soccer, the sport so 
popular on the Continent, the United States quite as 
decisively showed the way in Basketball to Italy and France, 
the only other entries. Since this game is one of the most 
popular in America but almost unknown in Europe, the one-sided 
scores by which the United States won both games from their sports- 
manlike but less practised opponents were not surprising. 

There were three games in the series, the first between Italy and 
the United States, the second between France and Italy and the 
third between the United States and France. The contests were 
held on the site of the baseball infield of Pershing Stadium. Although 
basketball is an indoor sport, the floor of tightly stretched canvas 
and the movable but firmly placed standards formed an excellent 
court. Good weather prevailed during all but the first game in which 
the second half was played in the rain. 

The first game on 26 June resulted in an easy victory for the United 
States over the Italian quintette. The latter was the first team ever 
organized in this sport in Italy and it had enjoyed little opportunity 
for training. The Americans won by a score of 55 to 17 and used 
substitutes in the second half. Their teamwork, short passing and 
condition stood out in contrast to the losers who tried disastrous long 
passes and were weak on scoring. Brennan was the main cog m the 
mechanism of the winning five, scoring six field goals. The players 
of both nations were as follows: United States — Ruddiger (R.F.), 
Greene (L.F.), Brennan (C.), Pelletier (R.G.), Friedman (L.G.), sub- 
stitutes, Kewallis, May and Brown. Italy— Sessa (R.F.), Baccanni 
(L.F.), H. Muggiani (G.), M. Muggiani (R.G.), Pecelle (L.G.). 

Italy defeated France 15 to 11 on 28 June. This game was exciting 
throughout, the play at times being excellent. France led at the end 
of the second half 6 to 5, but Secca, starring for Italy, shot his team 
into victory in the final period with 4 successive baskets from the 
field and one foul goa. Because of unfamiliarity with the rules, 
more fouls were called in this contest than in either of the other two. 
As the low scores indicate, both teams were weak on offensive and 



See pages 159 165 for basketball pictures. 



186 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



often missed easy baskets. The players were as follows : France — 
Bagay (R.F.), Aube (L.F.), Chauvet (C), Aguillaume (R.G.), Turaglie 
(L.G.); substitute, Maurier. Italy — Sessa (R.F.), Baccarini (L.F.), 
H. Muggiani (C), Pecollo (R.G.), Bagnoli (L.G.). 

The final game on 29 June was won by the United States from 
France, 93 to 8. The winners went at top speed all the way and scored 
at will. Brennan was again the mainstay with sixteen goals. He 
seldom lost the tipoff and usually started the ball towards another 
score. The forwards, Ruddiger and Kewallis, found the net for nine 
counters each, while Pelletier, in addition to holding his opposing 
forward scoreless, shot eight baskets. The French players were 
helpless and seldom had the ball. An entirely new American team 
was substituted in the last five minutes. Players follow : United 
States— Ruddiger (R.F.), Kewallis (L.F.), Brennan (C), [Pelletier 
(R.F.), Friedman (L.G.); substitutes, Greene, Clarke, May, Brown, 
and Doing. France — ^Bagay (R.F.), Aube (L.F.), Chauvet (C), 
Turaglio (R.G.), Aguillaume (L.G.). 

Final Standing of Teams : 



United States 

Italy 

France 



Won 

2 
1 




Lost 

1 
2 





BOXING 8.WRESTLING 





HROUGHOUT the Intcr-Allied Games the Y.M.C.A. model ring 
occupied a conspicuous place in Pershing Stadium and 
those who performed in it were the center of interest for 
thousands of spectators always willing to stay late for the 
attractive boxing and wrestling bouts. 

Keener competition than that developed in the Inter-Allied Games 
ring contest will not be seen for a long time. Cleaner sportsmanship 
will never be seen. 

Practically every nation competing in the Inter-Allied Games had 
a list of entrants in the boxing and wrestling tournaments. Next 
to the track and field meet the ring contests were the sports most 
popularly received alike by the competing nations and by the specta- 
tors. Boxing bouts and wrestling matches, both Greco-Roman and 
Gatch-as-catch-can, took place every day that weather permitted. 



BOXING 

In the boxing contests the team competition was exceedingly keen 
and the results close. Although from the .start Australia's string 
of fighters loomed up strong on the fistic horizon, America's team 
bested that of the Dominion. France had counted on winning ; her 
entrants were all veterans and promising contenders for honors. The 
United States entered its A.E.F. champions with two substitutions. 
Belgium and Italy both entered strong teams. 

Difficult is the task of selecting the tournament's star perforniers. 
Perhaps the two winning men at the extreme limits of the weight 
scale stood out throughout the tourney above the other winners. 

"Digger" Evans of Australia cleverly boxed his way to the bantam- 
weight title. His good-natured sportsmanship, his winning and 
cheerful smile, made him a decided favorite with the ring-side fans 
of all nations. He was far and away the cleverest boxer in the tourney. 
The fact that his punches lacked "steam" was overbalanced by the 
fact that he hit almost at will and where he wanted to hit. His favo- 
rite trick was to wait for his opponent to lead and then to step m with 

See pages 171 177 183 189 195 201 207 213 for pictures of boxing and wrestling. 



188 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

a fusilade of rights and lefts to the head or body. All of his bouts 
were won on judges' decisions; all of them but one were by wide 
margins. 

Evans' closest battle was his bout with "Babe" Asher, the A.E.F. 
bantamweight champion. The drawings brought these two boys 
together on the first day of the tournament. Although Asher hit 
harder than Evans, the latter's cleverness kept the American out of 
range for the most part and won for the Australian the decision. Some 
neutrals at the ringside thought that the bout could have been called 
a draw. Evans had no difficulty in his other matches 

The other star uncovered in the tourney was "Bob" Martin, the 
big A.E.F. heavyweight champion. In the A.E.F. tournament 
Martin, a green boxer, won his title by his terrific hitting. His fight- 
ing was devoid of cleverness and he seemed ill at ease. When he 
stepped into the Inter-Allied ring "Bob" seemed a different fighter. 
Schooling subsequent to the A.E.F. matches had given him much 
needed cleverness and style and had taught him something of ring 
generalship. His ability to coordinate muscle and mind, to take 
advantage instantly of any slip on his opponent's part, won him his 
title. Martin's two bouts in the Inter-Allied tourney were short 
affairs. He disposed of the French heavyweight contender in the 
second round of their scheduled ten-round bout. He was more than 
a match for the Frenchman in cleverness and his sledge-hammer 
blows quickly subdued the latter and put Martin in the final heavy- 
weight bout with Captain Coghill of Australia. The latter had been 
judged the equal of Georges Garpentier, France's well-known heavy 
who was unable to fight in the Inter-Allied Games. Coghill lasted 
one minute and thirty-six seconds with Martin in the title bout. The 
American led very cleverly three times to the Australian's stomach 
with left jabs. These three leads caused Coghill to lower his guard, 
which was what Martin wanted. The Australian led with his left 
and Martin's instantaneous counter, a right swing to the face, ended 
the bout and won the American the heavyweight title. Sportsman- 
like, Martin carried Coghill to his corner. 

No better boxing card has ever been witnessed than the cham- 
pionship bouts staged in Pershing Stadium on the Fourth of July 
before a record-breaking and enthusiastic crowd. General Pershing 
was among those who kept their seats until the final bout was conclud- 
ed. The lightweight-championship tilt between "Benny" McNeil, 
United States, and Watson, Australia, was generally proclaimed the 











Top Ze/i — Martin, U. S., heavyweight champion. Top riff/ii-De Ponthieu, France, 
featherweight champion. Cen^^-r if/<-McNeill, U. S. lightweight cliampion C^^^^ "^ht-- 
Al Norton U. S., heavyweight. Bo<tom Ze/i—Atwood, Canada. Bo«om rij/W— Martm, U. h., 
' ' Coghill, Australia; Bronson, referee. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 191 

star bout of the tourney. Both men are clever, hard-hitting boxers , 
and each called into play all the resourcefulness at his command. 
Although the bout was a slashing affair it was not the wild-swinging 
fight of unskilled boxers. Both men gave and received considerable 
punishment. At the end they stood arm-in-arm with broad smiles 
on their battered faces and submitted to the photographic ordeal. 
Here is the lineup of the Inter-Allied champions who won their titles 
by virtue of that day's fighting : 

Bantamweight. — Evans, Australia, outpointed Marzzorati, Italy, in 
10 rounds. 

Featherweight. — De Ponthieu, France, outpointed Fundy, United 
States, in 10 rounds. 

Lightweight. — McNeil, United States, outpointed Watson, Aus- 
tralia, in 10 rounds. 

Welterweight. — Attwood, Canada, outpointed Prunier, France, 
in 11 rounds. (No decision at end of scheduled 10 rounds). 

Middleweight. — Eagan, United States, won from Thomas, France, 
by default. 

Light Heavyweight. — Spalla, Italy, outpointed Pettibridge, Aus- 
tralia, in 10 rounds. 

Heavyweight. — Martin, United States, knocked out Coghill, Aus- 
tralia, in first round of 10-round bout. 

By the scoring system employed under the rules of the Inter-Allied 
Games a nation was credited with 2 points for every bout which was 
won by one of its fighters. The nation whose fighter lost in the bout 
was credited with 1 point. The scoring included both preliminary 
and final bouts. With 20 points to its credit, by Virtue of 8 wins 
and 4 losses, the United States led the field in team scoring. Aus- 
traha was second with 17 points while Canada and France tied for 
third with 16 points each. The tabulated score sheet is as follows : 

Wins Losses Points 

United States 8 4 20 

Australia 6 5 17 

Canada 6 4 16 

France 6 4 16 

Belgium 2 6 10 

Italy 2 6 10 

Roumania 1 1 ^ 

Portugal J? _i _1 

31 31 93 



192 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Lieut. "Ben" Steinel, Red Cross, matchmaker, and his assistant, 
Sgt. "Joe" Levins, handled the ring cards admirably. "Jimmy" 
Bronson, Y.M.C.A., was third man in the ring in most of the bouts. 
The satisfaction that he gave is indicated by the fact that several 
non-American fighters requested that he officiate even when they 
were boxing American fighters. He conducted the bouts with the 
finished hand of the expert that he is. Capt. "Harry" Sharpe, Red 
Cross, and Monsieur Lerda, the French expert, shared the task of 
officiating with Bronson and rendered excellent service, as did Maj. 
Beveridge, Canada, Lt. Kelaher, Australia, and Lt. Maker ,^ Belgium. 

The boxing rules of the American Expeditionary Forces, which 
governed the contests at the Stadium as they had those of the A.E.F. 
finals, were the work of Col. Wait C. Johnson, assisted by Lt. Col. 
J. A. McDermott who had charge of the A.E.F. boxing and wrestling 
championships. These rules embraced some important modifications 
of the standard ring rules, notably the reduction of the length of rounds 
from three minutes to two minutes. Their use during the Inter- 
Allied Games gave universal satisfaction and they achieved a standing 
which very probably will result in their continued and increased 
employment in the future. 

WRESTLING 

From the beginning of the Wrestling tourney the problem of devel- 
oping competitions which would attract both Americans and other 
nationalities was rendered difficult by the fact that of the two styles 
of wrestling recognized, Greco-Roman was unknown to the Americans 
and Catch-as-catch-can equally unknown to the other nationalities. 
The difficulty was never overcome. Twenty-two Greco-Roman bouts 
were staged and only seven Catch-as-catch-can. Slinger, the United 
States Catch-as-catch-can bantamweight, found no opponent and 
hence won undisputed championship title. Whereas, American mat- 
rtien won six of the seven championships in Catch-as-catch-can wrest- 
ling, other nations won six of the seven championships in the Greco- 
Roman style. 

Mat matches started in Pershing Stadium simultaneously with 
the boxing bouts. Each day's ring card included both boxing and 
wrestling. Both the Greco-Roman and the Catch-as-catch-can tour- 
naments were concluded on 5 July. 

Greco-Roman wrestling, which occupied the ring the greater part 
of the time, is not as spectacular as the Catch-as-catch-can form of the 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 193 

sport known to the American ring followers. Nevertheless the mat 
matches vied with boxing in attracting interest from the ring enthusiasts 
who followed the Inter-Allied Games. 

Keen competition was developed in the Greco-Roman tourney. 
The scarcity of entrants in the Catch-as-catch-can did not give the 
American grapplers an opportunity to demonstrate their skill. Some 
of the world's best men competed in the Inter-Allied ring. After the 
preliminary bouts the title matches were staged. The list of the Inter- 
Allied Games title holders is as follows : 

CATCH-AS-CATCH-CAN 

Bantamweight. — Slinger, United States, won title. No challenger 
appeared. 

Featherweight. — Littlejahault, |United States, defeated Taylor. 
Australia . 

Lightweight. — Metropolis, Uaited States, defeated Marshall, New- 
foundland. 

Welterweight. — Farley, United States, defeated Bridges, Australia, 

Middleweight. — Prehm, United States, defeated Palmer, Australia. 

Light Heavyweight. — Parcault, United States, defeated Meeske, 
Australia. 

Heavyweight. — -Salvator, France, defeated Polk, United States. 

GRECO-ROMAN 

Bantamweight. — Wiseman, United States, defeated BeUiomet, 
France. 

Featherweight. — Dierek, Belgium, defeated Vaglio, Italy. 

Lightweight. — ^Beranek, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Parro, Italy. 

Welterweight. — Halick Gzecho-Slovakia, defeated Savonet, Bel- 
gium. 

Middleweight. — Van 'Antwerpen, Belgium, defeated Gargano, 
Italy. 

Light Heavyweight. — Kopriva, Serbia, defeated Dostal, Czecho- 
slovakia. 

Heavyweight. — Bechard, France, defeated Coelst, Belgium. 

Team scoring, as in boxing, ^ave 2 points to the nation whose 
wrestler won each bout, including preliminary matches, and 1 point 

13 



194 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

to the nation whose man was the loser in each bout. The United 
States scored 15 points to 4 points scored by Austraha the second- 
place nation in the Catch-as-catch-can tourney. In the Greco-Roman 
series Czecho-Slovakia and Belgium were tied for first place with 
14 points each ; Italy was third with 13 points; France and the United 
States were tied for fourth place with 7 points each. The complete 
scoring table is as follows : 

CATCH-AS-CATCH-CAN 

Wins Losses Points 

United States 7 1 15 

Australia 4 

France 1 ^ ^ 

Czecho-Slovakia 1 1 

Newfoundland 1 1 

8 7 23 

Shnger, United States, won the bantamweight title when no chal- 
lenger appeared. Hence no nation is credited with a loss and the 
total wins and losses do not balance. 



GRE co-ROM AN 



Wins Losses Points 



Czecho-Slovakia. 

Belgium 

Italy 

United States. . . 

France 

Greece 

Serbia 

Roumania 



6 
5 
5 
1 

2 
1 

2 




2 
4 
3 
5 

3 

2 

3 



14 
14 
13 

7 
7 
4 
4 
3 



22 



22 



66 



To the individual efforts of Capt. Harry Sharpe, Red Cross, was 
largely due the success of the Wrestling tournament. As director, 
judge and referee he worked unceasingly for the smooth running of the 
matches. He was assisted by Maj. Defigier, France, Lieut. Pellerin, 
France, Lieut. Hall, U.S.A., Lt. Pikios, Greece "Jimmy" Bronson, 
Y.M.C.A., Lt. "Ben" Steinel, Red Cross, and Sgt. "Joe" Levins,U.S.A. 









Top left— Digger Evans, Australia, aud Johnnie Ashcr, V. S.. bantamweights. Top riyht— 
Evans and Asher shaking hands before the bout. Center left— Two lightweights in action. 
Center right— Opening round Evans-Asher bout. Bottom left— An exchange of blows in a 
middleweight bout. Bottom Hr/?i«— Norton, U. S., and Herscovitch, Canada, in light heavy- 
weight bout. 





EQUITATION 





AJOR honors in the riding events of the Inter-AUied Games 
went to Italy. The ItaHan riders made a brilliant 
showing in the two concluding features of the program 
and by taking the first two places in the pairs and first 
and third in the individual jumping contest, offset the initial victory 
of France in the team and individual mihtary competitions. 

Owing to the fundamentally military character of the Inter-AUied 
Games, horse-riding competitions, long honored in army sport, were 
recognized from the beginning as among the principal events of the 
program. All of the competing nations manifested the greatest interest 
in horseriding and, while some were prevented from competing by the 
difficulty of finding the necessary mounts and of transporting them 
to Paris, seven countries — America, Belgium, Hedjaz, France, Italy, 
Portugal, and Roumania — entered the lists. 

The great crowds which braved the rain on the first day that prize 
jumping was included in the program at the Stadium, and the almost 
breathless interest with which they followed the course of the riders 
over the obstacles, testified to the fact that the love of horses is keen, 
not only with the Parisian public but also with the rank and file of 
the American Army. 

The organization of the horse-riding competitions was placed by 
the Games Committee in charge of Col. Henry P. Richmond. Through 
the courtesy of the French Ministry of War, quarters and messing 
places for the enlisted men of all competing teams, and stables for the 
horses, were provided at Fort de Champigny on the hills east of the 
Marne, Capt. GaUini of the French General Staff having charge of these 
matters while Col. F. P. Lahm, A. S., U.S. Army, with a suitable staff, 
was designated as commanding officer of the fort. The competing 
officers of the Allied Armies were billetted in adjoining towns. Auto- 
mobile transportation for trips to and from Paris and the Stadium 
and all other desirable conveniences were provided for them, and m 
the vicinity of Fort de Champigny all of the competing teams took 
up their training until the days of the contests. A suitable saddling 
stable, at a distance of about 1,000 yards from the Stadium, was 

See pages 219 327 233 239 245 249 for equitation pictures. 



198 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

placed at the disposal of the teams for use on the days when the riding 
occurred in the Stadium. 

The adoption of the final program for riding was delayed until 
the exact number of competing nations could be known and until 
an accurate judgement could be formed upon the limitations of the 
Stadium for certain events. In the end it was decided that the pro- 
gram should consist of four days of riding, the events themselves 
to be three in number: first, the Mihtary Competition, of which the 
long-distance and cross-country rides should occur on the first day 
and the military prize jumping on the next day; second, prize jumping 
in pairs; third, individual prize jumping. It was found that it would 
be impossible to include the steeple chase in the Military competition 
owing to the impracticability of arranging a suitable course in the 
short time available. The omission of this picturesque and exciting 
event was generally regretted. 

The competitors in the program were all officers of the AUied 
Armies who had been selected by their respective nations, some by 
being picked out as the most favorably known among available riders 
and others, as in the case of the Americans, by elimination contests. 
The rules permitted them to ride either private or government-owned 
horses. The minimum weight of riders in the Military competition 
was placed at 165 pounds, while bitting and saddling in all of the events 
were optional. 

The Itafian team, reaching the practise course only two days 
before the commencement of the program, entered seven riders but 
had twenty mounts. France had ten competitors and nineteen ani- 
mals. Belgium entered nine officers and as many horses. The three 
Hedjaz entries had but one mount, Portugal one entry and one horse, 
and Roumania three riders to five animals. Seven American officers 
competed for the A.E.F. with nine horses. The American team gave 
an unusually fine exhibition of horsemanship but were handicapped 
by the lack of good mount material. They were unable to take advan- 
tage of the privilege of using privately owned stock, because of the 
distance from home, and had to be content with what mounts they 
could pick up in the remount depots and the different organizations 
of the A.E.F. 

During the four days of the Competitions, the weather was excep- 
tionally good save during the Military Prize Jumping competition 
when a heavy downpour of rain temporarily stopped the riding. 
Although the ground afterwards was almost covered with water 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 199 

and the footing was rather soft and slippery the event proceeded 
without apparent difiiculty. 

The riding program began with the Long-distance and Cross- 
country ride on 30 June. The ground was a Httle hard in some 
places on the Long-distance ride but the location selected was the 
best obtainable near Paris. The two courses * covered about 55 kilo- 
meters. Starting at Ghennevieres, about 12 kilometers outside Paris, 
the ride followed a zig-zag course to the Chateau du Piple. From 
there it circled through Chatenay to Pattie d'Oie in the Bois de Meudon. 
At this point began the five-kilometer Cross-country ride which had 
to be completed in fifteen minutes. There were twelve jumps over 
this part of the course, which was not exceptionally difficult, the 
obstacles consisting chiefly of fences, ditches, and imitative stone 
walls, none exceeding three feet in height or eight feet in width. The 
finish point was at Croix de Berny. 

The Long-distance and Cross-country ride was purely an endu- 
rance test but had to be completed within four hours. The weather 
was good and all the horses and nien finished in excellent condition 
without undue physical strain. Every competitor finished within 
the required time. Two of the Arabian team, who were unable to take 
the jumps in the Cross-country because their mounts were untrained, 
were eliminated but finished out the ride. 

The French team supplied the day's star in Major Joseph de Soras 
whose mount, Le Minotier, a 9-year-old gelding thoroughbred, led 
the field in the matter of fast time, completing the course more than 
three minutes ahead of any other entry. With time allowance de 
Soras made the fifty-five kilometers in 3:42:5. His actual time was 
3:47:41 with a total time credit of 5 minutes 36 seconds. He was 
held 2 minutes by the starter in the Cross-country and 3 minutes 
36 seconds at the railroad gate. Major Felip Jacob, Roumania, on 
Beby, a 12-year-old Irish bay mare, was credited with 3:45:27; Lt. de 
Brabanderc, Belgium, on Pilouche, 3:46:33; and Lt. Col. H. D. Cham- 
berlain, A.E.F., on Nigra, 3:47:27. 

The greatest sensation of the Long-distance riding was supplied 
by one of the Hedjaz riders. Captain Fowzi, who at the half-way point 
began to bring his little gray Arabian, Masoud, past opponent after 
opponent until he landed seventh in the field. He held his own until 
the Cross-country course put him out of the running. Captain Faraj 
was the only one of three Hedjaz riders able to take the jumps. 

Every contestant except Major Jacob, Roumania; and Captain 

* See charts of courses, page 249 and insert opposite page 208. 



200 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Van Welssenaers, Belgium, received the maximum number of points, 
130, for the spectacular ride. 

After a day's rest the same horses and riders were entered in the 
third section of the Military competition, the Individual Prize Jump- 
ing, which took place in the Stadium. Although rain fell intermit- 
tently all through the contest the jumping was marked by brilliant 
riding. Major de Soras, France, whose thoroughbred, Le Minotier, 
had registered the best time over the long grind, lived up to his repu- 
tation as one of the finest horsemen on the Continent by literally 
lifting the big gelding into first place and coming within seven points 
of the perfect 240 in spite of the adverse field conditions. 

The American team captured a tie for second place and won fourth 
place. Lt. Col. H. D. Chamberlain on the 7-year-old American mare. 
Nigra, took the fifteen obstacles in brilliant fashion. Nigra had the 
advantage of the rest of the field as she was the only entry to come 
to the post before the start of the rain which left the field in a muddy 
condition. Colonel Chamberlain held her well in hand and gave 
a splendid exhibition of horsemanship. Lt. Col. E. Taulbee came in 
on Raven for the fourth place for the A.E.F. 

Some of the prettiest riding of the day was furnished by the Bel- 
gian, Major Morel, who rode the skittish Miss Daisy into the tie with 
Chamberlain. The Irish mare refused the brick wall and ditch. The 
latter jump occasioned the downfall of nearly every rider and mount. 

It was a day of exciting interest in spite of the weather and one 
that stirred the enthusiasm of the spectators. At the end of the 
contest the Arabian riders gave an exhibition of horsemanship and 
spectacular riding. 

The points in the event for the first four places were scored as 
follows: de Soras, France (Le Minotier), 233; jChamberlain, U.S.A. 
(Nigra), 231; Morel, Belgium (Miss Daisv), 231; Taulbee, U.S.A. 
(Raven), 230. .; , , 

As a result of the three sections of the Military event, de Soras, 
France, was placed first with 29.708 points; Chamberlain, U.S.A. 
and Morel, Belgium, second, 29.625 points; Taulbee, U.S.A., fourth, 
29.583 points. It was agreed that the tie between Chamberlain and 
Morel should be decided by their respective showing in the Individual 
Prize Jumping contest scheduled for 5 July. On that occasion, al- 
though neither finished among the high point scorers, Colonel Cham- 
berlain led the Belgian, taking second place. 

The totals by teams in the Military event gave France the victory 




Wrestlin" Top— Parcaut, America, versus Fristfnsky, Czecho-Slovakia—Parcaut winner. 
Center Z?/<— Same— Parcaut on top. Center riff/ti— Greco-Roman— Wiseman of America 
versus Piere of Italy. BoHom— Heavyweight— Colles of Belgium 



ersus Poll£ of America. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 203 

with 88.707. The United States was second, 88.541, and Italy third 
87.832. 

The Prize Jumping in pairs which took place on 3 July was the 
prettiest exhibition of the Horse-riding competitions. Before the 
event the captains of all competing teams were taken over the course 
of the Stadium and they, in turn, took the members of their teams 
over it, giving each competitor an opportunity to examine the ground, 
the obstacles and the other arrangements. The Prize Jumping deve- 
loped into distinctly an Italian affair, the riders from the South regis- 
tering a clean-cut victory. Two of their pairs, living up to reputa- 
tion and working like machines, came through for first and second 
places. The ditch jump, which gave the Italian team so much worry 
in the military event, no longer seemed a mental or physical hazard. 
Both teams went over it in excellent form. 

There was a dash of Irish in the victory as Voli, Captain Alessandro 
Alvisi's 9-year-old bay gelding, was bred in the Emerald Isle, but 
Otello, ridden by his team-mate, Major Giacomo AntoneUi, was Ita- 
lian. This team finished first with 236. A score of 234 was regis- 
tered for second place by another Irish-Italian combination, Ernani, 
ridden by Major Ruggero Ubertalh, and Nabucco by Major Ettore 
Caffaretti. France won third place with 231, the team being made 
up of Captain Antoine Costa on Gayeuse, and Lt. Paul Larregain on 
Tapageur. The American honors were upheld by Lt. Col. C. L. Ste- 
venson on Raven and Major D. L. Henderson on Moses, who went 
over the jumps for fourth place with a total score of 229.5. Both 
horses were American bred. 

The last day of the meet was taken up with the Individual Prize 
Jumping and was of an exceedingly spectacular nature. The fif- 
teenth and last obstacle on the course, a water jump, had been increased 
to four meters in width and became a Waterloo for many of the con- 
testants. No less than ten horses fell at this point and, failing to 
complete the course, were eliminated, while ten others landed in the 
water although not for a fall. 

The event was a personal triumph for Major Ruggero Ubertalli of 
Italy whose brilliant horsemanship won both first and third places 
for his team. His first score, made on the 10-year-old Jrish bay 
gelding, Treviso, came within one point of the perfect 240, the only 
fault against him being on the dyke. Then on Ernani, Major Uber- 
talli registered a clean-cut 237. Ernani is an Irish veteran of sixteen 
vears service. Incidentally, the Major's other ride over the jumps on 



■204 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — I9I9 

Sprone was scored at 235, a mark beaten only by two other riders of 
the 55 attempts. Second place went to Major Felip Jacob, Roumania, 
on Beby, a 12-year-oId Irish bay mare. He scored 238, losing his 
2 points at the fourth fence. As Caffaratti finished fourth, the Italian 
team won four of the five first places. 

On 6 July at 3:00 p. m. the following prizes were presented to the 
successful competitors in the Stadium : 

Silver Cup, France, 1. Bronze Medals, France, 9. 

Gold Medals, Italy, 1. Bronze Medals, America, 7. 

Silver Gift Medals, Italy, 2. Bronze Medals, Roumania, 1. 

Bronze Medals, Italy, 12. Bronze Medals, Belgium, 1. 

In addition to the general regulations governing the Horse-riding 
competitions, the following general requirements and information 
relative to the Long-distance and Cross-country rides and the Prize 
Jumping Military competition and relative to the Prize Jumping, 
individually and in pairs, were given to all competitors prior to 
their entry upon the events : 

LONG-DISTANCE AND CROSS-COUNTRY RIDES— PRIZE JUMPING 
MILITARY COMPETITION— GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. A map will be given each contestant or the course (road and cross- 
country sections) for the Long-distance ride (55 kilometres). 

2. The course for the Long-distance ride will be shown to contestants 
on the 28 June, 1919. The competitors will meet at 8:30 a.m. 28 June, 1919, 
at Fort de Champigny, where roll call will be held. 

3. In Tests 1, 2 and 3, riders will start according to special starting list 
which will be determined by drawing for places. 

Riders who do not appear at the start at the time fixed, will be excluded 
from the competition unless their excuses are accepted by the committee. 

4. The rider must weigh out at the weighing tent not later than 20 mi- 
nutes before the start. 

5. On weighing out, a number will be pinned on the back of each com- 
petitor by attendants who will be present for the purpose. On weighing in, this 
number must be returned. 

6. Five minutes before the start, the rider shall notify his presence to 
the assistant starter at a point 100 metres from the starting point (cross roads 
at Chennevieres). 

The rider will be notified one minute before the start. 

7. The starting point (Chennevieres) is marked by two (2) yellow flags. 
The start shall be made on the word "Ride" being given and a yellow flag 

being lowered. The time will be reckoned from this instant. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 205 

8. Military guides or arrow indicators will be at all crossways, etc., to 
show the way. 

9. If the railway crossings at 1 and 2 (as indicated on the map) are blocked 
the time lost will be deducted by a timekeeper who will be stationed at 
these points for the purpose. The rider must start again as soon as the way is 
clear, the deduction ceasing from this moment. A man stationed about 
100 metres from the crossing will raise a flag as a signal to stop, the rider thus 
halting at once. The time deduction begins with the halt, and ceases when 
the flag is lowered again. 

10. A competitor who rides more than seventy-five metres from the course 
(Long-distance and Cross-country) will be disqualified. 

11. At Patte d'Oie, the contestants must state their programme number 
to the control official stationed there. 

12. The starting point of the Cross-country ride is marked by two yellow 
flags, between which the rider must pass and, at the same time, state his pro- 
gramme number to the control official there. The taking of time for the Cross- 
country ride will begin when the flags are passed. 

13. The Cross-country course is marked by flags. The obstacles where 
points are counted are marked by red flags, and the obstacles must be taken 
between these flags. 

14. The finish of the Cross-country course is marked by two yellow flags, 
between which the rider must pass. His time wiU then be taken, and he must 
state his programme number to the control ofiicial stationed there. 

15. The finish of the Long-distance ride will be at (X) as indicated on the 
map. The time will be taken when the rider passes the finish. 

16. Immediately after arrival the competitor will ride to the weighing 
tent to weigh in. 

17. During the ride veterinary surgeons and horseshoers may be consulted 
at Chateau du Piple, (X) (as indicated on the map) and Patte d'Oie, and after 
passing the finish of the Cross-country course, horses can also be watered at 
these points. 

18. If a rider retires during the course of the ride, information must be 
given to the nearest control official or judge, stating the rider's programme 
number and approximate time of retirement. 

19. In the event of a competitor not starting, information of the fact 
should be given to the starter before 8:00 o'clock. 

I. — Instructions for Competitors in Test No 3, Military Competition 
(Peize Jumping Competition C) m Stadium 

1. These Instructions wiU be referred to as Instructions No. 1. 

2. On the 2nd day of July, at 1:30 p.m., the competitors wifi meet on foot 
for rollcall at the saddling stables near the Stadium, when the starting 
times will be given. 

First start at 2:30 p.m. 

3. Each rider shall weigh out not later than twenty minutes before the time 
set for his start, and when directed will proceed to the west entrance of the 



•2Q6 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Stadium and notify his presence to an assistant Master of Ceremonies stationed 
thereat (This ofTicial will wear a blue ribbon marked "Official" in gold letters). 

When directed by said official, the rider enters the Stadium, crosses the 
bridge over the running track and proceeds to a point in front of the center of 
the Tribune d'Honneur. 

Attention will be sounded by a bugler stationed near this point whereupon 
the riding begins. 

4. On passing the starting place a flag will be lowered and time will begin 
from this moment. 

5. On passing the finish (marked by two flags 15 meters beyond the 15th 
obstacle) a flag will be lowered at which time will be taken. 

6. Upon notification of elimination or upon completion of the course each 
rider will, without delay, ride directly out of the Stadium through the same 
entrance used upon entering the Stadium and then proceed to the saddling 
stables. 

Those officers about whom there is any possibility of a tie for place should 
not leave the saddhng stables until final instructions are given. 

7. See Instructions for Competitors in the Prize Jumping Competition 
( Individual and in Pairs) hereafter referred to as Instructions No. 2. 

II. — Instructions for Competitors in the Prize Jumping Competition 
(Individual and in Pairs) in Stadium 

1. These Instructions will be referred to as Instructions No. 2. 

2. On the 3rd and 5th days of July, at 1:30 p.m., Competitors in the Prize 
Jumping competitions. III and II, will meet on foot for rollcall at the saddling 
stables, when the starting times will be given. 

The competitors will ride in the order given in the list. 
The first rider starts on July 3rd and 5th at 2:30 p.m. 

3. Each rider or pair will, when directed, proceed to the west entrance of 
the Stadium and notify his or their presence to an Assistant Master of Ceremonies 
(same official as on July 2nd) stationed thereat. 

When directed by said official the rider or pair enter the Stadium, cross 
the bridge over the running track and proceed to a point in front of the center 
of the Tribune d'Honneur. 

Attention will be sounded by a Bugler stationed near this point whereupon 
the riding begins. 

4. On passing the starting point, a flag will be lowered and time will 
begin from this moment. 

On passing the finish (marked by two flags 15 meters beyond obstacle No. 15) 
a flag will be lowered at which moment time will be taken. 

5. Upon notification of ehmination or upon completion of the course each 
rider or pair wifi, without delay, ride directly out of the Stadium through the 
same entrance used upon entering the Stadium and then proceed to the saddling 
stables. 

Those riders or pairs of riders about whom there is any possibility of a tie 
for place should not leave the saddling stables until final instructions are given. 




mnnnnnnmn 



Cross-Oountry Courso. 
Lon{;-Disla,ncc Ooursc. 









5X 






Courses of the liOng-Distance and Cross-Oountry Horae-Kiding Competitions. 




Courses of the Long-Distance and Cross-Country Horse-Riding Competitions, 







Wrestling. Top— Dostal, Czecho-Slovakia, versus Pampuri, Italy— Dostal on top. Center 
left and ria/ti!— Heavyweight bouts— Basha-Dane, France, versus Fristensky, Czecho-81o- 
vakia— Prance the winner. Bottom— Catch-as-catch-can—Parcaut, America, versus Fris- 
tensky, Czecho-Slovakia — America on top. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 209 

6. The following notes are given to elucidate the "Principles for Judging:" 

a. A flying start will be made. 

b. The course must be taken over Obstacle No. 1 first time around and 
outside Obstacle No. 1 thereafter and always on the outside of the flags at the 
end of the course. 

c. Touching or knocking down the fences will be counted only if part of the 
obstacle falls down. 

d. At refusal or falling of the horse at a combined obstacle, the part of the 
obstacle passed need not be taken again. f If, however, the rider elects to again 
take the part of the obstacle passed, additional penalties acquired will be recorded. 

e. If a horse stands still or refuses an obstacle and knocks down the whole 
or part of it, the rider has to ride over the obstacle in the condition it is in. 

/. All ditches must be taken in their whole breadth; the far side is marked 
with two small flags between which the horse (or horses) must pass. 

g. In case of hedges, neither touching nor knocking down will be counted. 

h. No outside assistance is allowed the rider (or riders) if he falls (is unseated) 
or if the horse falls, provided the competition is to be continued. 

LIST OF COMPETITORS A^D HORSES IN MILITARY COMPETITION 

Prog. Prog. 

No. Name of Rider Country Name of Horse Letter 

353 Maj. Joseph de Soras . France Le Minotier, 9y-g-tb. K 

355 Lt. Paul Larregain France Brillant, 8y-g-tb-English-ch. E 

354 Lt.Frangois de Rivoyre France Hebe, lly-m- 14 Anglo-Arab. T 

356 Lt. Alexis Tinel France Poker, Sy-g-^ Anglo-Arab-ch. T 

1,229 Capt. Faraj Hedjaz Masoud, 9y-g-Arab. 

1,228 Capt. Fowzi Hedjaz 

1,231 Lt. Izzet Hedjaz 

949 Capt. Giulio Caccian- 

dra Italy Faceto, lOy-g-b-Ireland-bay. 

952 Capt. Leone Valle Italy Virginia, 9y-m-i/2B. R 

948 Capt. Francesco Amalfl Italy Bifourchette, 12y-m-bI-Ireland I 

946 Maj. RuggeroUbertalli Italy Gioconda, lly-m-gray-Ireland. B 

771 Lt. C. Van Grichen .. . Portugal Volga, 8y-g-bay-American. G 

2,127 Col. D. Soutzo Roumania Happy King, 12y-g-bay-Irel. F 

2,123 Major Filip Jacob Roumania Beby, 12y-m-bay-Ireland. L 

2,262 Lt. Daudouin de Bra- 

bandore Belgium Pilouche, 12y-g-bay-Ireland %B G 

2,261 Lt. Herman de Gaifiier. Belgium Duhaz, lly-g-bay-Ireland. J 

2,267 Cmdt. Edouard Morel . ^ . ,„ r 1 ^ r> 

de Westgaver Belgium Miss Daisy, 12y-m-a, Ireland. O 

2,270 Capt. Pierre Van Wels- 1/13 i7„„ c 

senaers Belgium Karysta, lOy-m-bay-i/gB-Eng. S 

1,067 Col. B. T. Merchant... America Montabaur, 8y-g-br-American Q 

1^068 Col. W. W. West, Jr. . America Prince, 7y-g-ch-American M 

1.069 Lt. Col. H.D. Chamber- „ v,, a • a 
' lain America Nigra, 7y-m-bl-American. A 

1.070 Lt. Col. E. W. Taulbee America Raven, 8y-g-bl-American. H 



D 



N 



210 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

SUMMARY OF SCORE FOR TRIAL 1 LONG-DISTANCE RIDE 

Maximum time, 4 hours. Distance, 55 km. 

S. Prog. Started Arrived Time Time Total 

N. No. Name of Rider h. m. s. h. m. s. Taken Ded. Points 

1 1,069 Chamberlain 8 59 42 12 47 9 3-47-27 10 

2 946 Ubertalli 9 3 16 12 58 8 3-54-52 10 

3; 2,262 De Brabandere 9 8 54 1 6 27 3-47-33* 10 

4 1,229 Faraj 9 13 59 114 43 4-0-44* 10 

5 355 Larregain 9 19 6 1 14 8 3-55- 2* 10 

6 2,127 Soutzo 9 23 55 126 14 4-2-19* 10 

7 771 Van Grichen 9 28 56 125 20 3-56-24 10 

8 1,070 Taulbee 9 34 12 130 29 3-56-17 10 

9 947 Amalfi 9 39 10 137 56 3-58-46* 10 

10 2,261 De Gaiffler 9 44 16 140 57 3-56-41* 10 

11 1,228 Fowzi 9 49 19 144 00 3-54-41 10 

12 353 De Soras 9 54 31 142 12:3-47-41* 10 

13 2,123 Jacob 9 59 00 148 27 3-49-27* 10 

14 1,068 West 10 4 55 159 00 3-54-5* 10 

15 949 Cacciandra 10 9 19 2 1 15 3-51-56 10 

16 2,263 Morel 10 14 21 2 7 38 3-53-17 10 

17 1,231 Izzet 10 19 19 2 1 10 3-51-51* 10 

18 356 Tinel 10 24 21 2 20 26 3-56- 5 10 

19 1,067 Merchant 10 29 39 2 2126 3-51-47* 10 

20 952 Valle 10 34 41 2 29 00 3-54-19 10 

21 2,264 Van Welssenaers 10 39 46 2 35 43 3-55-57 10 

22 354 De Rivoyre 10 44 41 2 4124 3-56-43* 10 

* No 3 held by starter. Cross-country ride, 1 minute. 

* No 4 held by starter, Cross-country ride, 1 minute. 
*' No 5 held at R.R., gate for 15 seconds. 

* No 6 held at R.R., gate 2 minutes, 8 seconds — Additional credit of 12 sec- 
onds given by Judges at finish — Total time credit, 2 minutes, 20 seconds. 

* No 9 held at R.R., gate 3 minutes, 50 seconds. 

* No 10 held at R.R., gate 3 minutes, 45 seconds and held by starter, Cross- 
country ride 2 minutes — Total credit, 5 minutes, 45 seconds. 

* No 12 held by starter. Cross-country ride, 2 minutes; held at R.R., gate 
3 minutes, 36 seconds — Total credit, 5 minutes, 36 seconds. 

* No 13 held by starter. Cross-country ride, 4 minutes. 

* No 14 held at R.R., gate, 2 minutes, 45 seconds. 

* No 17 held at R. R., gate, 2 minutes, 45 seconds. 

* No 19 held by starter. Cross-country ride, 2 minutes. 

* No 22 held by starter. Cross-country ride, 2 minutes. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 211 

SUMMARY OF SCORE FOR TRIAL 2. — CROSS-COUNTRY RIDE. 



Maximum time, 15 minutes. Maximum points, 130. 

Prog. Name Started Arrived Time Deductions Total. 

No. of Rider h. m. s. li. m. s. Taken TimeObstda Pts 

1069 Chamberlain. 11 39 59 11 50 12 10-13 130 

946 Ubertalli .... 11 57 39 12 08 23 10-44 130 

2262 Brabandere.. II 59 57 12 12 24J 12-27| 130^ 
1229 Faraj 12 2 30 12 15 19^ 12-49 J 130^ 

355 Larregain ... 12 4 57 12 16 11 11-14 130 
2127 Soutzo 12 20 15 12 32 17^ 12-2^ 130 

771 VanGritchen. 12 15 16 12 25 37 10-21 130 

1070 Taulbee 12 27 17 12 39 43 12-26 130 

947 Amalfl 12 31 53 12 41 38 9-45 130 

2261 De Gaiffler . . 12 34 I 12 44 36 10-35 130^ 

1228 Fowzi 12 29 31 12 44 23 14-52 ^ 

353 DeSoras.... 12 36 14 12 47 20 11-6 130^ 

2123 Jacob 12 38 22 12 49 38 11-16 2 128« 

1068 West 12 44 9 12 55 17 11-8 130 

949 Cacciandra . . 12 47 21 12 58 10-39 130 

2263 Morel 12 55 50 1 04 28J 8-38^ 130 

1231 Izzet 12 40 22 12 52 44 12-22 ' 

356 Tinel 1 6 57 1 17 56 10-59 130 

1067 Merchant ... 1 9 20 1 19 23^ 10-3J 130^ 

952 Valle 1 18 48 1 29 lOJ 10-22^ 130 

2264 Van Welsse 

naers 1 25 19 1 39 34 14-15 2 128 

354 De Rivoyre . 1 27 19 1 38 2H H-^i 130» 

1 Held by starter 1 minute. 

2 Held by starter 1 minute. 

3 Held by starter 2 minutes. 

* Eliminated— did not complete course. 

^ Held by starter 2 minutes. 

« Held by starter 4 minutes. 

' Eliminated — did not complete course. 

8 Held by Starter 2 minutes. 

' Held by starter 2 minutes. 

INDIVIDUAL PLACING AFTER TRIALS 1 AND 2 30 JUNE, 1919. 

Start Prog. Total 

No. No. Name of Rider Points Placing Remarks 

1 1,069 Chamberlain... 20 1 United States. 

2 946 Ubertalli 20 1 Italy. 

3 2,262 De Brabandere 20 1 Belgium. 



212 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 

Start Prog. Total 

No. No. Name of rider Points Placing 

4 1,229 Faraj 20 

5 355 Larregain 20 

6 2,127 Soutzo 20 

7 771 Van Gritchen.. 20 

8 1,070 Taulbee 20 

9 947 Amalfi 20 

10 2,261 De Gaiffier .... 20 

12 353 De Soras 20 

14 1,068 West 20 

15 949 Cacciandra 20 

16 2,267 Morel 20 

18 356 Tinel 20 

19 1,067 Merchant 20 

20 952 Valle 20 

22 354 De Rivoyre ... 20 

13 2,123 Jacob 19.85 2 

21 2,264 VanWelssenaers 19.85 2 

11 1,228 Fowzi* 

17 1,231 Izzet* 



1919 



Remarks 

Arabia. 

France. 

Roumania. 

Portugal. 

United States. 

Italy. 

Belgium. 

France. 

United States. 

Italy. 

Belgium. 

France. 

United States. 

Italy. 

France. 

Roumania. 

Belgium. 

Arabia. 

Arabia. 



"Eliminated — did not complete Cross-country course. 




Wrestling. Top— Group of American wrcstlf r.s— loft to right : Pvt. Joe Polk, Pvt. Alf 
Parcaut, Pvt. Prank Sliger, Sgt. Paul Prehm, Hgt. Cal Parley. Bottom Ze/i— Savonnet of 
Belgium, welterweight, winner over Banghieri of Italy. Bottom center— Parcaut, U. S., catch- 
as-catch-can wrestler. Bottom rigid— Beranek, Czecho-Slovakia, winner over Mitropohs, U. S. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



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216 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



INDIVIDUAL PLACING AFTER TRIALS 1, 2, AND 3, 
30 JUNE TO 2 JULY, 1919. 



Prog. Total 

No. Name of Rider Points 

353 De Soras 29.708 

1.069 Chamberlain 29.625 

2,267 Morel 29.625 

1.070 Taulbee 29.583 

355 Larregain 29.541 

949 Cacciandra 29.541 

354 DeRivoyre 29.458 

771 Van Gritchen 29.458 

1.067 Merchant 29.333 

952 Valle 29.333 

356 Tinel 29.208 

948 Amalfi 28.958 

2,264 Van Welssenaers.... 28.933 

1.068 West 28.917 

946 Ubertalli 28.583 

2,262 De Brabandere 28.541 

2,261 De Gaiffier 27.958 

2,127 Soutzo 

2,123 Jacob 

1,229 Faraj 



Placing 

1 

2 * 

2 ** 

4 

5 

5 

7 

7 

9 

9 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



Remarks 



Eliminated in Trial 3. 
Eliminated in Trial 3. 
Eliminated. Did not 
ride in Trial 3. 



It was agreed that this tie should be decided in the Prize Jumping. 
Individual contest held July 5, 1919. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



217 



FINAL RESULTS MILITARY COMPETITION. 



S Name ^ ^ ^ ^ | ^| 

£ of Rider - I ^ I ^ S^ 

353 De Soras 10 10 9.708 France 29708 1 

355 Larregain 10 10 9.541 France 29.541 5 

354 De Rivoyre 10 10 9.458 France 29.458 7 

356 Tinel 10 10 9.208 France 29.208 11 

1069 Chamberlain ... 10 10 9.625 U.S. 29.625 2 

1070 Taulbee 10 10 9.583 U.S. 29.583 4 

1067, Merchant 10 10 9.333 U.S. 29.333 9 

1068 West 10 10 8.917 U.S. 28.917 14 

949 Cacciandra 10 10 9.541 Italy 29.541 5 

952 Valle 10 10 9.333 Italy 29.333 9 

948 Amalfi 10 10 8.958 Italy 28.958 12 

946 Ubertalli 10 l6 8.583 Italy 28.583 15 

2267 Morel ; 10 10 9.625 Belgium 29.625 3 * 

2264 Van Welssenaers 10 9.85' 9.083 Belgium 28.933 13 

2262 DeBrabandere .- 10 10 8.541 Belgium 28.541 16 

2261 De Gaiffier 10 10 7.958 Belgium 27.958 17 

771 Van Gritchen. . . 10 10 9.458 Port'I. 29.458 7 



.SS 
o 



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H a a 



88.707 



II 88.541 



III 87.832 



IV 86.099 



29.458 



* In the Prize Jumping Individual Contest, 5 July, 1919, in jumping 
off the tie for second place, Chamberlain of United States won. 



218 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

LIST OF COMPETITORS AND HORSES PRIZE JUMPING IN PAIRS 3 JULY. 

Prog. Where Prog. 

Number Name of Rider Country Name of Horse Foaled Letter 

358 Capt! Antoine Costa. France Gayeuse, 16y-g-br. Unknown W 

bay. 
355 Lieut. Paul Larregain France Tapageur, 8y-g-br. Unknown X 

bay. 

946 Major Ruggero Uber- 

talli Italy Ernani, 16y-g-bay. . Ireland Y 

951 Major Ettore Caffa- Italy Nabucco, I2y - g - Italy Z 

ratti gray. 

1.067 Col. B. T. Merchant. America Sandy, 8y-g-sor. America AA 

1.068 Col. W. W. West, Jr. America Prince, 7y-g-chi America M 
354 Lieut. Frangois de Hebe, lly-m- J An- Unknown T 

Rivoyre France glo-Arab-ch. 

366 Lieut. Tardieu France Gamine, 7y-m-ch-J Unknown AE 

Anglo- Arab. 

364 Lieut. Holland France Joyeux II,12y-g Unknown AF 

bay. 

365 Capt. Wallon France Jolly Jockey, g- bay. Unknown AM 

947 Major Giacomo Anto- 

iielli Italy Otello, 9y-g-bay. Italy AJ 

953 Capt. Alessandro Al- 

^*^' Italy Voli, 9y-g-bay. Ireland AK 

1.073 Lt. Col. C. L. Ste - America Raven, 8y-g-bl. America H 

venson 

Major D. L. Hender- 

1.074 son America Moses, 14y-g-ch. America AX 




Top left — Italian riding team. Top center — Colonfl Soutzo of Roumnnia. Top right — Italian 

contestants. Center — United States riding team. Bottom fe/<— Lieut, de Bivoyre and 

Lieut. Tardieux o£ Prance. Bottom right — Capt. Wullon and Lieut. EoUand of Prance. 



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222 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



LIST OF COMPETITORS AND HORSES PRIZE JUMPING — INDIVIDUAL (ll) 



Prog. 

No. 

358 



359 

360 

361 



948 



949 



951 



954 



Name of Rider Country 

Capt. Antoine Costa. France 

Capt. Franck Tisnes. France 

Capt. Jacques des 

Moutis France 



Capt. August De Lais- 

sardiere France 



356 Lt. Alexis Tinel . 



France 



363 Capt. Count Leonard France 
de Mezamat de Lisle 



771 Lt. C. Van Gritchen . Portugal 
946 Major R. Ubertalli . . Italy 



947 Major G. Antonelli. . . Italy 



Capt. F. Amalfi Italy 



Capt. G. Cacciandra. Italy 



Major E. Caffaratti.. Italy 



Capt. Guado Luigi.. Italy 



1,067 Col. B. T. Merchant. America 



Name of Horse 

Joyeux, 16y-g-bay. 
Tapageur, 8y-g-bay. 
Jacobine, 12y-m-ch. 
Farceur, 16y-g-bay. 
Ugolin, lOy-g-L bay 

Fol-Espoir,lIy-g-ch. 

Energique, lly-g 
ch tb. 

Othello, 16y-g-dk 
bay. 

Loot, 7y-g-br, bay. 

Jap, lOy-g-ch. 

Le Minotier, tb. 

Hebe, lly-m-J AA. 

Poker, 8y-g-chJ AA. 

Noiraud, 8y-g-bl. 

Brilliant, 8y-g-ch tb 

Caporal, 12y-g-dk. 
ch-J AA. 

Volga, 8y-g-bay. 

Sprone, 8y-g-bay. 

Ernani, 16y-g-bay. 

Treviso, lOy-g-bay. 

Ta-Pum, 9y-g-sor. 

Gin-Gin, 9y-g. 

Otello, 9y-g-bay. 

Martellini, lly-g. 

Dodi, lly-g-bay. 

Margherita, lOy-m- 
bay. 

Faceto, lOy-g-bay. 

Claudine, lOy-n-bay 

Scimmiotto, lly-g- 
bay. 

Nabucco, 12y-g-gry 
Neructio, I2y-g-bl. 
Enea, 6y-m-bay-tb. 

Piave, 

Virginia, 9y-m-bay- 

ib 

Montabaur, 7y-g-br 
Sandy, 8y-g-sor. 



Where 
Foaled 

Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 

Norfolk 



Prog. 
Letter 

AF 

X 

BP 

AG 

BD 

BI 



England AQ 



Unknown 


AV 


Normand 


BK 


Unknown 


BR 


English 


BT 


Unknown 


T 


Unknown 


P 


Unknown 


AY 


England 


BN 


Unknown 


BU 


American 


G 


Ireland 


BS 


Ireland 


Y 


Ireland 


BO 


Ireland 


AN 


Ireland 


BD 


Italian 


AJ 


Ireland 


AS 


Ireland 


AI 


Ireland 


BW 


Ireland 


N 


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DL 


Ireland 


BV 


Italian 


Z 


Ireland 


BF 


Unknown 


BS 


Ireland 


BE 


Unknown 


BM 


America 





America 


AA 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 223 

Prog- Where Prog. 

No. Name of Rider Country Name of Horse Foaled Letter 

1.068 Col. W. W. West, Jr. America Prince, 7y-g-ch. America M 

America Sam Browne, 8y-g-b America BC 

1.069 Lt. Col. H. D. Cham- 

berlain America Nigra, 7y-m-bl. America A 

1,074 Maj. D.L.Henderson. America Moses, 14y-g-ch. America AX 

1,076 Lt. Van C. White . . . America Chief, 7y-g-ch. America AT 

2.123 Major Filip Jacob. . . Rouman. Beby, 12y-m-bay. Ireland L 

Lady's Horse I2y- 

g-bay. Ireland BH 

2,127 Col. D. Soutzo Rounian. Happy King, 12y-g- 

bay. Ireland F 

2.124 Maj. N. Madancovici. Rouman. Flirt, 12y-m-sor. Ireland AD 
2,242 Lt. Col. C.L.Stevenson America Lady Helen, gy-m- 

bay. American BJ 

Raven, 8y-g-bl. American H 
2,263 Cmdt. Herman d'Oul- 

tremont Belgium Miss, 12y-m-bay. Ireland AL 

Kitchner, 14y-g- 

bay. Ireland U 

2,265 Lt. F. de la Serna. Belgium Arsinoe, 9y-m-bay. Ireland AW 

2,268 Lt. Henri Laame ... . Belgium Biscuit, 14y-g-bay. Ireland AR 

2.270 Capt. Pierre Van 

Welssenaers Belgium Karysta, lOy-m-J br. England S 

2.271 Capt. Edouard Morel Belgium Miss Daisy, 12y-m- 

deWestgaver bay. Inland O 

2.272 Capt. Nicholas Le Belgium Vif- Argent, ]2y-g- 

Roy bay. Ireland AR 

2,290 Lt. Gh. Sodir Rouman. Tarola, 12y-m-bl. Ireland AU 



224 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



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Top leit—Ueut. Van Gritchen of Portugal. Top right—Ueiit. de Uaiffler of Belgiuiii. 

Center— Q&pt. Costa and Lieut. Larregain of France. Bottom left— Capt. \ alle of Italy. 

Bottom right— Lieut. Tinel of France-. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 229 

2. Individual Placing in Military Competition. 
First— 353 Major Joseph de Soras, . 

France Points, 29.708 

Second— 1069 Lt. Col. H. D. Chamberlain, 

America " 29.625 

Third- 2267 Comdt. Edouard Morel de ' 

Westgaver, Belgium " 29.625 

II. Prize Jumping— in Pairs. 

First— 

947 — Major Giacomo AntonelH - Italy ^ rp , , 

953 - Captain Alessandro Alvisi - Italy j ^"^^^ P'''"'''' ^^^• 

Second — 

946 - Major Ruggero UbertalH - Italy ( 

951 - Major Ettore Caffaratti - Italy | ^"^^^^ ^*^'''^®' ^*' 

Third— 

358 - Captain Antoine Costa - France \ m x i r. • i. r.r,i 
oco T- t n IT • r. Total Points, 231. 

353 - Lieut. Paul Larregain - France | 

III. Prize Jumping — Individual. 

First— 

946 - Major Ruggero Ubertalli - Italy. Total Points, 239. 
(Riding Treviso) 

Second — 

2123 - Major Filip Jacob - Roumania. Total Points, 238. 
(Riding Beby) 

Third— 

946 - Major Ruggero Ubertalli - Italy. Total Points, 237. 
(Riding Ernani). 




FENCING 





o France went the premier honors in the three Fencing events 
of the Inter-Allied Games program, the fencers of the Tricolor 
winning three out of the six possible championships which 
the Games program offered. 
Italy took second place and Belgium third in the matter of cham- 
pionships, the Italians winning two titles and the Belgians one. France 
took team honors by winning two of the team championships while 
the individual titles were evenly divided between the three countries 
named. 

Nine nations participated in the competition which lasted through- 
out the Games with matches set for practically every morning and 
afternoon. With one or two exceptions, the fencers of each nation, 
at one time or another during the events, took high place among the 
leaders. Portugal was the strongest of those countries which did not 
finally capture championships. Her saber team made a powerful 
effort for the title, losing in the finals to the Italian champions. 
The Portuguese epee team also went into the finals, losing to France. 
Her individual contestants always stood high in the single honors. 
Roumania, Czecho-Slovakia, and Greece presented fencers to be 
reckoned with in every contest. America and Poland, the latter with 
but a single entry, seldom went beyond preliminary rounds. 

An Italian was the individual star of the Games though he never 
succeeded in winning a championship for himself. Aldo Nadi partici- 
pated in all save one of the six events and he was a factor in every 
contest. His work in the individual saber competition, during the 
early part of the match, marked him as a probable winner until an 
unfortunate accident unnerved him for the following matches. De 
Strooper of Belgium was a consistent fencer. Nedo Nadi, brother 
of Aldo Nadi and a more brilliant fencer than the younger Italian, did 
not participate in as many events, but made a name for himself during 
the Games. 

As in previous world's fencing meets, the usual conflict between 
the French and the Italian schools was presented during the Games 
events. The French school, by reason of its own success and that 



See page 257 for fencing pictures. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 231 

of its follower, Belgium, scored a distinct victory so far as this meet 
was concerned. Portugal's work, following Italian instruction, was 
a vindication of Latin tenets in fencing, but it is certain that the experi- 
ences of the 1919 Games will have little effect in persuading either 
nation, or school, to change its systems or its beliefs. 

No nation competing presented its strongest possible team. Italy 
brought to the Games a squad composed entirely of amateur fencers, 
the supposition being that no professionals would compete. Puliti, 
one of the best of the Italian team, had not been in training for many 
years. Three of France's best fencers were sick during the days of 
the Games. The ravages of war had thinned the ranks of Belgian, 
Roumanian and Czecho-Slovakian fencers. America's team was com- 
posed principally of novices and repeated failures to appear at matches 
caused many unnecessary forfeitures by the United States team. 
The Italian squad was small and the strenuous competition so taxed 
the strength of its members that on several days the entire Italian 
team was out of the competition. France, on the other hand, pre- 
sented different fencers for different events and in this way was able 
to pit fresh and strong men against tired and, on several occasionsi 
injured men. 

Following the two foils competitions an attempt was made to stage 
the Fencing matches in the arena of Pershing Stadium. But constant 
rains made footing on the improvised platform uncertain and as a 
result practically the whole of the Fencing meet was held in the halls 
of the Ecole de Joinville. These small rooms furnished little accom- 
modation for spectators and those who closely followed the progress 
of the Games were forced to rely almost entirely on the newspapers 
for their information on Fencing. In spite of these difficulties praise 
for the management of the events was unanimous. 

The team foils competition presented the closest contest and the 
hardest fighting of any of the Fencing events. Italy and France defeated 
their opponents in the early rounds and met one another in the finals. 
The French team led throughout the struggle and it was not until 
the last match that the Italians tied the score. It then became neces- 
sary to make a count of touches in order to decide the championship 
and here also France won by a very small margin. These two nations 
duphcated their excellent team play achievements by taking prac- 
tically all places in the individual events. The brilhant Nedo Nadi, 
with his brother, won first and fourth places for the Italians while 
French fencers took second, third, fifth, seventh and eighth places. 



232 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

The strenuous play with its resultant bruises kept Italy out of the 
team play in the epee event. The epee, distinctly a French weapon, 
proved the stronghold for the Tricolor and both championships 
were won. Portugal was bested in the finals of the team play and 
Laurent won the individual event. 

The Italians proved winners in the team saber matches, winning 
with the weapon which they have favored for many years. A Belgian, 
however, won the individual honors with this peculiarly Italian weapon. 

The following are the summaries of the three fencing features as 
carried through during the two weeks of the Games. 

TEAM CHAMPIONSHIPS 

Foil: Trials — Roumania 19, America 3. 
Semi-finals — France 19, Belgium 3. 
Italy 19, Roumania 17. 
Finals— France 18, Italy 18. 
(Tie decided by a count of touches which gave France the decision 127 to 125) 

Epee: Trials — Roumania 17, Greece 15. 

Portugal 17, Czecho-SIovakia 11. 
Semi-finals — Portugal 16, Belgium 9. 
France 9, Roumania 6. 
Finals— France 17, Portugal 10. 

Saber: Trials — Greece 19, America 12. 

France 19, Czecho-SIovakia 8. 
Italy 19, Belgium 8. 
Semi-finals— Portugal 19, Greece 10. 
Italy 19, France 11. 
Finals— Italy 19, Portugal 8. 

INDIVIDUAL CHAMPIONSHIPS 

Foil: Trial Pools— 1st Pool— Aldo Nadi, Italy, first; 

Andrieux, France, second; 
Van de Wiele, Belgium, third ; 
Atanasiu, Roumania, fourth. 
2nd Pool— Piquemal, France, first; 

Deladrier, France, second; 
Gesarano, Italy, third; 
Theodoreau, Roumania, fourth. 












Top left — Capt. Van Valsr-ner of Bflgium riding ., _ 

•Capt. Cacciandra of Italy. Center left — Col. Merchant and 
right — Italian riding contestants. Bottom left — Lieut. Col. T; 

Lieut, de Bivoyre of Fra 



Karysta, his favorite. Top right — 
Col. West of America. Center 
Taulbee of America. Bottom right — 
nee. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 235 

3rd Pool — Gauthier, France, first ; 

Nedo Nadi, Italy, second; 

De Strooper, Belgium, third; 

Cavianu, Roumania, fourth. 
4th Pool— Puliti, Italy, first; 

Renon, France, second; 

Hugnet, France, third; 

Gheorghiu, Roumania, fourth. 
Semi-final Pools — 1st Pool — Nedo Nadi, Italy, first; 

Gauthier, France, second; 

Andrieux, France, third; 

De Strooper, Belgium, fourth. 
2nd Pool — Piquemal, France, first ; 

Aldo Nadi, Italy, second; 

Hugnet, France, third; 

Renon, France, fourth. 
Final Pool — Nedo Nadi, Italy, first, Champion ; 

Piquemal, France, second; 

Gauthier, France, third; 

Aldo Nadi, Italy, fourth; 

Renon, France, fifth; 

De Strooper, Belgium, sixth; 

Andrieux, France, seventh; 

Hugnet, France, forfeited. 

Epee: Trial Pools— 1st Pool— Piquemal, France, first; 

De Strooper, Belgium, second; 
Botassis, Italy, and Pfeiffer, Czecho- 
slovakia, tied for third. 
2nd Pool— Laurent, France, and Feyerick, Belgium, 
tied for first; 
Zavkadis, Greece, and Svorcki, Czecho- 
slovakia, tied for third. 
3rd Pool — Cornereau, France, first; 
Gevers, Belgium, second; 
Valaoritis, Greece, third; 
Piava, Portugal, fourth. 
4th Pool— Anspach, Belgium, and Delerce, France, 
tied for first; 
Aldo Nadi, Italy, third; 
Triantiafilicos, Greece, fourth; 



-236 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



5th Pool— Ochs, Belgium, first ; 

Hugnet, France, second; 

Urbani, Italy, third; 

Skotidas, Greece, fourth. 
6th Pool— Tom, Belgium, and de St. Germain, 
France, tied for first ; 

Paredes, Portugal, third; 

Nunes, Italy, fourth. 
7th Pool — Mascarehas, Portugal, first; 

Garbere, France, second; 

Delongueville, Belgium, third; 

Notaris, Greece, fourth. 
8th Pool — Schmalzer, France, first; 

Durao, Portugal, second; 

Zalacostas, Greece, third; 

Stephens, America, fourth. 
Preliminary Pools — 1st Pool — Laurent, France, first; 

Gardere, France, and Feyerick, Belgium, 
tied for second; 

Tom, Belgium, fourth. 
2nd Pool — Hugnet, France, Nunes, Italy, and De- 
lerce, France, tied for first; 

Ochs, Belgium, fourth. 
3rd Pool — Piquemal, France, first; 

Aldo Nadi, Italy, second; 

Gornereau, France, third; 

Piava, Portugal, fourth. 
4th Pool — De St-Germain, France, first; 

Paredes, Portugal, second; 

Schmalzer, France, third; 

Anspach, Belgium, fourth. 
Semi-final Pools — 1st Pool — Gornereau, France, first; 

Piava, Portugal, Anspach, Belgium, and 

Delerce, France, tied for second. 
2nd Pool — Laurent, France, and Feyerick, Belgium, 
tied for first; 

Nunes, Italy, and Paredes, Portugal, tied 
for third. 
Final Pool — Laurent, France, first, Ghampion; 

Piava, Portugal, second; 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 237 

Delerce, France, and Cornereau, France, 

tied for third; 
Feyerick, Belgium, fifth; 
Nunes, Italy, and Paredes, Portugal, 

tied for sixth ; 
Anspach, Belgium, eighth. 

Safccr: Trial Pools — 1st Pool — Gillens, Belgium, first; 

Svorcki, Gzecho-Slovakia, second; 
Bias, Portugal, third ; 
Peredon, France, fourth. 
2nd Pool— Aldo Nadi, Italy, first; 

Mondielle, France, second; 
Tom, Belgium, and Zavkadis, Greece, 
tied for third. 
3rd Pool — Collin, France, and De Strooper, Bel- 
gium, tied for first; 
Puliti, Italy, third; 
Cipera, Gzecho-Slovakia, fourth. 
4th Pool — Piron, Belgium, Ancel, France, and Oli- 
vieirs, Portugal, tied for qualification. 
Semi-final Pools — 1st Pool — Puliti, Italy, and Gillens, Belgium, tied 

for first; 
Peredon, France, third; 
Cipera, Gzecho-Slovakia, fourth; 
2nd Pool — Aldo Nadi, Italy, and De Strooper, Bel- 
gium, tied for first; 
Ancel, France, third; 
Zavkadis, Greece, fourth. 
Final Pool — Gillens, Belgium, first. Champion ; 

Ancel, France, second; 
Cipera, Gzecho-Slovakia, and Peredon, 

France, tied for third; 
Aldo Nadi, Italy, and De Strooper, Bel- 
gium, tied for fifth; 
Puliti, Italy, seventh; 
Zavkadis, Greece, eighth. 




%i:^%^K^ 



FOOTBALL 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m^^smmammm 




RUGBY 




SERIES of three games was played between teams repre- 
senting France, Roumania and the United States, France 
took the championship, defeating both Roumania and the 
United States, while the United States, by a victory over 
j^oumania, took second place. 

England, the home of Rugby, and the British Dominions, which 
have given to the game some of its most noted exponents, did not send 
entries. 

The French presented a team of experienced players, all of whom 
had participated in international series against teams from England, 
Wales and New Zealand. The Roumanians likewise sent an excellent 
team composed of players from Rugby clubs of Bucharest. 

The American team was assembled from the Army by Captain 
Herbert R. Stolz, M.G. It included California college players and two 
members who had played Rugby at English universities. 

All games were played at Colombes Field. The English Rugby 
Union rules governed. 

In the first contest France defeated Roumania by a score of 
48 to 5. The teams played an even game for the first fifteen minutes 
after which the Roumanians weakened and allowed France to score 
six goals and six tries. In the second half the Roumanians showed a 
flash of form and scored a well-earned goal. 

The second contest, played between Roumania and the United 
States, resulted in a victory for the United States by a score of 23 to 0. 
The superior weight and physical condition of the Americans counted 
in their favor. The Americans scored four goals and one try. 

The final game, in which France and the United States met to 
decide the championship of the Inter-Allied Games, resulted in a memor- 
able struggle. Against the science and experience of the French the 
Americans pitted their youth, perfect physical condition and an extreme 
eagerness to win. 

The Americans opened the game with a rush and kept the offensive 
durmg the first half, the French appearing overawed by the vigor of 

See pages 265 273 281 289 297 for football pictures. 




Top left— liieut. Colonel Chamberlain of America. Top right— Jjiout. de Bivoyre of France. 
Center— General Blague-Belair of France, senior judge in horse-riding competition. Bottom 
left— liient. Colonel Chamberlain of America. Bottom right—Majoi Ubertalli and Major 

Caffaratti of Italy. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 241 

their opponents' attack. Most of the play during this half was in the 
French in-goal territory. The half ended without a score. 

The Americans scored first in the second half. A fine dribbling 
rush brought the ball down from midfield and Clock made the try. 
Hauser attempted to make it a goal but the angle was too great. 

The French, nothing daunted, came back and scored within a few 
minutes. A series of kicks brought the ball within striking distance 
and Struxiano carried it over. He likewise kiqked goal. Score: 
France 5, United States 3. 

An offside by the Americans enabled the French to improve their 
score, Struxiano making a successful free kick. 

The Americans individually played star games, but having had 
only six weeks' team practice, they were unable to overcome the advan- 
tage of longer training and experience which the French had. Under 
these circumstances it was a commendable achievement for the Ameri- 
cans to hold the French team to a low score, and the French sport 
writers, in their accounts of the game, paid tribute to the athletic 
prowess and enthusiasm of the Americans which enabled them, with 
but a short period of intensive training, to match more experienced 
opponents. 

A crowd of about 5,000 persons witnessed the game, and 
the enthusiasm and interest with which they followed the play in- 
dicated the popularity of Rugby in France. 

THE GAMES 

23 June, 1919— France, 6 goals, 6 tries Total 48 

vs 
Roumania, 1 goal Total 5 

26 June, 1919— United States, 4 goals, 1 try Total 23 

vs 
Roumania Total 00 

29 June, 1919 France, 1 goal, 1 free kick Total 8 

vs 
United States, 1 try Total 3 

SOCCER 

The Czecho-Slovakian Republic, represented by the former City-of- 
Prague eleven, won the Soccer championship from the seven other 
teams entered in the Inter-Allied Games. This team had established 
an enviable reputation before the war and its victory caused little 

16 



242 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

surprise to the followers of this great European sport. France was 
the runner-up in the tournament. Italy and Belgium tied for third 

place. 

No sport attracted more interest than did the well-played Soccer 
games. The French — and in fact practically the entire European 
population — know Soccer as the American people know baseball and 
appreciate the finer points of the game. Although several of the 
contests lasted until almost dark the stands were practically filled until 
the final whistle blew in each game. 

The eight entrant countries were divided by the rules of the tourney 
into two groups. The drawings resulted in the following division : 
Group A — France, Italy, Greece, Roumania ; Group B — Czecho-Slo- 
vakia, Belgium, United States, Canada. In each group each team 
played each of the other teams one game. The winners in the two 
groups played for the championship. 

The play started on 24 June and was concluded on 29 June. The 
results of the preliminary group matches and the standing of the teams 
prior to the championship games were as follows : 

24 June — France 4, Roumania 0. 

Czecho-SIovakia 4, Belgium 1. 

25 June — United States 5, Canada 4. 

Italy 9, Greece 0. 

26 June — Italy 7, Roumania 1. 

Belgium 5, Canada 2. 

France 11, Greece 0. 

Czecho-SIovakia 8, United States 2. 
28 June — -Belgium 7, United States 0. 

France 2, Italy 0. 

Czecho-SIovakia 3, Canada 2. 

Greece 3, Roumania 2. 
Group A Won Lost P.C. Group B Won 

France.... 3 1.000 Czecho-SIovakia. 3 

Italy 2 1 666 Belgium 2 

Greece ... 1 2 333 United States ... 1 

Roumania. 3 000 Canada 

The game between Czecho-SIovakia and France, which decided the 
championship, was played Sunday 29 June before a crowd that packed 
the big Stadium. There were no more ardent fans present than the 
American soldiers and at the conclusion of the game they carried Janda, 



Lost 


P.C. 





1.000 


1 


666 


2 


333 


3 


000 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 243 

the hard playing Czecho-Slovak forward, from the field on their shoul- 
ders. Janda, by his aggressiveness and good sportsmanship, became 
one of the most popular players of the tournament. 

The final score was 3 to 2 goals. France led at midtime 2 to 1 and 
maintained that lead until the game's eleventh hour. A shift in the 
regular Czecho-Slovak lineup had put Janda in the backfield with a 
new man, Gerveny, in his place on the forward line. The second half 
saw Janda back in his regular position at inside right and from then 
on the team hit its stride. 

France hotly contested the Czecho-Slovakia bid for supremacy. 
The addition of the Gastiger brothers, Langenove, Devic and Deydier 
had greatly strengthened the team's lineup. Chayrigues, in the 
French goal, put up a spectacular game and electrified the stands 
with his brilliant stops. The contest developed into a battle between 
the Czecho-Slovak forward line and the French defense. Chayrigues' 
phenomenal play and the long kicks of Gueblin, the husky French back, 
all but defeated the brilliant attack of the skilful Czecho-Slovak for- 
ward line. Besides the wonderful work of Janda, the shifty playing 
of Pilat at center was a big factor in giving the victory to Czecho-Slo- 
vakia. 

The Czecho-Slovak team was schooled for several years by "Johnnie" 
Madden, the Scotch international player. With his corn-cob pipe in 
his mouth, "Johnnie" watched his charges from the sidelines through- 
out the series. No one followed the play with keener or more criti- 
cal eye than he. Nor did any receive the victory in the final game 
more joyfully than the little Scotchman. 

The lineup of the Czecho-Slovak team was as follows: Peyr, goal 
Pospisil, left fullback; Hojer, right fullback; Pesek, left halfback 
Fivebr, center halfback; Loos, right halfback; Prosek, outside left 
Vanik, inside left; Pilat, center; Janda, inside right; Sedlacek, out- 
side right. In the final game Klapka played goal in place of Peyr, 
Janda and Gerveny played at right fullback in place of Hojer, Vlk 
played right half back in place of Loos. 




GOLF 





N the Inter-Allied Golf tournament was made the first 
serious effort ever attempted to bring together, in Olym- 
pic form, golfers from every nation which classes the game 
as one of its sports. 
The Inter-Allied gathering at La Boulie links, almost within the 
shadow of the historic Palace of Versailles, near Paris, will probably 
be the predecessor of Olympic golf. During recent years the world's 
golfing enthusiasts have discussed around the "19th hole" the possi- 
bility of placing golf on an Olympic status. But the Olympic games, 
with their wide appeal to the devotees of other sports, have come and 
gone and still golf was absent from the roll. Prophets of the future 
in the Scottish game believe that the Inter-Allied golf tourney was 
the opening wedge for placing golf in the 1920 Olympics. America, 
Great Britain and France hold annual open tournaments in which 
players from other countries are eligible as entries. Each tourney 
in itself constitutes, therefore, a sort of minor Olympic, for it is the 
custom of other countries to send a few of their mightiest wielders 
of the iron-tipped clubs to the various open events. Such tournaments, 
however, are not true international events, but rather home matches 
which are usually won by the home players. 

The idea of interallied golf sprang from the chance gathering of 
golfers from the AUied Armies who, after the coming of peace, met 
upon various links to indulge in their favorite sport. In April, 1919, 
on the sunny Cannes links at Nice, the American Expeditionary Forces 
held a tourney of their own with 130 entries. Later Great Britain 
staged an Army golf tournament and France has also held an informal 
"welcome home" for the Tricolor golfers. 

When the American army golfing event occurred plans were made 
to hold a match between golfers representing the A.E.F. on the one 
hand and the British overseas forces on the other. But France also 
signified her desire to participate for, despite war's ravages among 
the men of the nation, there was still an excellent array of first-class 
players capable of representing the Tricolor. The proposed event 
thus began to assume an international aspect and all other AUied 
nations were invited to take part. 

See pages 305 313 for golf pictures. 




Horse riding. Top — Fi'cnch team. BoUom — Group o£ Australian contestants, Military 
offlcers and Games officials. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 247 

The fact that the Golf tourney did not begin until late in the Inter- 
Allied Games program, 2 July, obhged several prominent golfers 
belonging to various overseas organizations to forego participation 
in the matches. In spite of this fact, the players of three nations 
met upon the La Boulie links on the opening day in team matches, 
eight picked men in each team representing respectively Great Britain, 
France and America. Under all the circumstances this result was a 
worthy achievement on the part of those who had arranged the Inter- 
Allied meet, the organization of which had not even been begun until 
late in April. 

The first men for the American team to arrive in Paris were Sgt. 
William Rautenbush, A.E.F. champion, and Lt. H. R. Walton. Lt. 
Harry Davis, ex-Panama-Pacific champion, became the third member 
of the squad. Within three weeks a presentable list of American 
golfers was in Paris. In addition to those already mentioned they 
were: Col. G. C. Haskell, Capt. W. S. Greene, Gapt. C. W. Middleton, 
Lt. F. 0. Morse, Lt. Harlow Hurley, Lt. S. N. Pierson, Sgt. A. M. Bart- 
lett, Sgt. Pearl 0. Hart, Sgt. George H. Reid, Sgt. James Beveridge, 
and Cpl. E. L. Davison. 

With the American squad established on the links and practicing 
several times each week, efforts were begun to gather teams from 
other countries. France chose her most prominent professional 
golfers, several of them with continental reputations. The Tricolor 
hneup was : Arnaud Massy, Jean Gassiat, Maurice Dauge, Rene Gohas, 
his brother Gustave Golias, M. Gommier, Marius Gavallo, J. Vogliano, 
A. Bernard, M. LafFite, M. Loth and M. Boudiac. 

It was announced that England couldnot enter a team if the matches 
were to begin at the same time as the Inter-Allied Games — 22 June. 
So, although golf was originally intended to start at La Bouhe on 
24 June and to finish on 4 July, the dates were changed to 2 July for 
the opening and 12 July for the closing. 

The British team consisted of professional players, the majority 
of whom were instructors in golf on French courses. The members 
were: W. W. Marks, J. LaFoUy, 0. Martin-Smith, J. Weatherby, 
Harry Fulford, A. Tingey, Aubrey Boomer and his brother Percy. 

As the teams in the team matches were each to consist of eight 
men only, the American squad held an elimination tourney at La Boulie 
with the result that the following were picked to represent the A.E.F. 
in the team event& : Capt. C. W. Middleton, Lt. Harry Davis, Lt, 



248 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

H. R. Walton, Lt. F. 0. Morse, Lt. Harlow Hurley, Lt. S. N. Pierson, 
Sgt. William Rautenbush, Sgt. Pearl 0. Hart and Sgt. A. M. Rartlett, 
the latter being a substitute. 

France got a bye in the draw for play and America met the English 
players on the opening day, 2 July. Four four-ball matches were 
played in the morning with singles making up the program of the 
afternoon. American players were the winners by securing victories 
in three four-ball matches and winning four of the eight singles 
matches. 

The totals: America 7, Great Britain 5. 

The summary: Four-ball matches — La Folly and Marks, Great 
Britain, defeated Pierson and Middleton, America, 3-2; Hart and Morse, 
America, defeated Martin-Smith and Weatherby, Great Britain, 5-4; 
Walton and Hurley, America, defeated Fulford and Tingey, Great 
Britain, 4-2; Davis and Rautenbush, America, defeated Boomer 
brothers, Great Britain, 1 up. Singles — Marks, Great Britain, defeated 
Middleton, America, 5-4; La Folly, Great Britain, defeated Pierson, 
America, 2-1 ; Morse, America, defeated Weatherby, Great Britain, 
4-2; Hart, America, defeated Martin-Smith, Great Britain, 4-3; Hurley, 
America, defeated Tingey, Great Britain, 1 up; Fulford, Great Britain, 
defeated Walton, America, 2 up., Rautenbush, America, defeated 
P. Boomer, Great Britain, 3-1; A. Boomer, Great Britain, defeated 
Davis, America, 3-2. 

Next day America and France met, France taking three matches 
in the four-ball play in the forenoon and winning five of the singles 
events in the afternoon. One of the chief features of this day's play 
was the defeat of Massy and Gassiat, reputed France's best players, 
by Lt. Davis and Sgt. Rautenbush, who were paired for the day. 
But both the Americans went down to defeat in the singles matches 
in the afternoon to the same players. 

The totals: France 8, America 4. 

The summary: Four-ball matches— R. Golias and Cavallo, France, 
defeated Bartlett and Morse, America, 6-5; Gommier and Bomboudiac, 
France, defeated Hart and Pierson, America, 3-2; Laffite and Dauge, 
France, defeated Walton and Huriey, America, 5-4; Davis and Rau- 
tenbush, America, defeated Massy and Gassiat, France, 2-1. Singles 
— Gohas, France, defeated Bartlett, America, 6-4; Pierson, America, 
defeated Cavallo, France, 2-1; Hart, America, defeated Gommier, 
France, 5-4; Bomboudiac, France, defeated Morse, America, 6-5; 
Walton, America, defeated Laffite, France, 1 up 20 holes; Dauge, 






I 

i 



(30 




^1 
51 i: 



/ 
"r- 

\ 

V 

t'^ 5 " I c 









250 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

France, defeated Hurley, America, 1 up 19 holes; Gassiat, France, 
defeated Davis, America, 5-3; Massy, France, defeated Rautenbush, 
America, 4-3. 

The victory gave the French team the team championship of the 
Inter- Allied Golf matches. 

The 3, 4 and 5 July were leisure days for the golfers but on 6 July 
the individual championships commenced with a qualifying round 
of 18 holes. The next day another qualifying round was held, the 
sixteen best totals for the two days' play being entered in the individual 
championships. In the qualifying rounds each nation was permitted 
to have as many as twelve players. France had eleven men, as did 
America, but only five British players appeared. 

Rainstorms deluged the links for the two days of the qualifying 
rounds making it difficult for the players to get their stance and the 
putting greens were heavy. This reduced the scores to a considerable 
degree. One of the results of the storms was to disqualify from fur- 
ther play the Boomer brothers of England, who failed to appear upon 
the first tee within the appointed time limit. Both were among the 
first sixteen scores, A. Boomer having a total of 164 and his brother 
Percy 165. 

The summary of the qualifying rounds, with eight French golfers, 
seven Americans, and one English player constituting the first sixteen, 
follows : 

Name First round Second round Total 

Gassiat (F.) 78 74 152 

Dauge(F.) 76 78 154 

R. Golias (F.) ... 81 75 156 

Gommier (F.) ... 78 80 158 

Massy (F.) 82 77 159 

Rautenbush (A.) . 80 80 160 

Bomboudiac (F.). 85 77 i62 

Bartlett (A.) .... 82 81 163 

Walton (A.) 84 81 165 

G. Golias (F.) ... 80 85 165 

f^art (A.) 84 82 166 

Davis (A.) 84 82 166 

Hurley (A.) 86 81 167 

Gavallo (F.) 87 81 168 

LaFolly (G.B.) .. 87 82 169 

Pierson (A.) 88 82 170 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 251 

Loth(F.) 89 83 172 

Bernard (F.) 87 85 172 

Warren (G.B.) .. . 90 84 174 

Vogliano (F.) .... 91 91 182 

Marks (G.B.) .... 89 94 183 

Davison (A.) 94 90 184 

George H. Reid, C. W. Middleton and W. S. Greene, Americans, 
dropped out of further play. Sergeant Beveridge, an American who 
was eliminated in the American tryouts, was appointed official scorer. 

The French players showed their strength in the next day's games 
— the first round of match play for the individual championship — 
and as a result Massy, holding a 70 for the forenoon round, had his 
opponent, Hart, American, well down at the turn. Massy won 13-12. 
Gassiat, another French player, also showed a card of 70 and defeated 
his American opponent, Pierson, 15-14. 

Only two Americans survived the rounds of the 36 holes, 18 holes 
both morning and afternoon. They were Lieutenants Davis and 
Walton. It was peculiarly unfortunate for America that the draw 
had forced Davis to play Rautenbush and Walton to meet Bartlett, 
as the quartet constituted America's "big four." England's repre- 
sentative was eliminated by default. Six Frenchmen still remained 
in the game. 

The summary : Massy, France, defeated Hart, America, 13-12; 
Bomboudiac, France, defeated R. Golias, France, 1 up; G. Golias, 
France, defeated Cavallo, France, 4-3; Gommier, France, defeated 
Hurley, America, 2 up; Gassiat, France, defeated Pierson, America, 
15-14; Davis, America, defeated Rautenbush, America, 5-3; Walton, 
America, defeated Bartlett, America, 3-2; Dauge, France, defeated La 
Folly, Great Britain, by default. 

Massy's round of 70 follows : 

Out 4 4 3 5 5 3 5 4 4 37 

In 3 5 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 33 - 70 

The following day the American player, Davis, found himself 
matched with Gommier, and Walton met Dauge. The Walton-Dauge 
match was the best of the tourney. Walton carried Dauge through 
forty holes before the French player was able to win. Throughout 
the morning round Walton was far the better shot, being 4 up at 
the mid-day turn of 18 holes. But Dauge found himself in the after- 
noon and squared the match on the 36th hole. 

Davis lacked his usual putting ability and Gommier took the match 
7 and 6 to play. 



252 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

The summary : Dauge, France, defeated Walton, America, 1 up 
40 holes; Gommier, France, defeated Davis, America, 7-6; Massy, 
France, defeated G. Golias, France, 3-2; Gassiat, France, defeated 
Bomboudiac, France, 7-6. 

In the semifinals, with only four French players left to fight for 
the supreme honors, Massy won the feature match of the day against 
Gassiat by 2 up. Gassiat is a figure in continental golf, having held 
the French open championship and also that of Spain. The match 
was a close event with Massy at all times in the lead. Dauge found 
an easy victory in his match with Gommier, winning 10-9. 

The summary: Massy, France, defeated Gassiat, France, 2 up; 
Dauge, France, defeated Gommier, France, 10-9. 

The finals brought Massy and Dauge into the limelight before the 
biggest gallery of the Inter-Allied Golf series. Dauge was looked upon 
as a possible darkhorse for he had traveled the course in several exceed- 
ingly low scores. But Massy played persistent golf while Dauge lost 
heavily through his failure to negotiate short putts. Massy's victory 
was by 5-4. 

However, the game was much more even than the score would 
indicate. Massy laid Dauge stymie four times in the morning round, 
either winning the hole or halving it because of the stymied ball. 
But the sturdy Dauge played on steadily and in the afternoon came 
his opportunity to cut down Massy's lead, although he was four down 
to his opponent when he emerged from his noon-day meal and went 
to the first tee, and to the spectators at that time it looked as if the 
match was practically over. 

Both accepted 5s on the first hole and Dauge won the second with 
a 4 against a 5 for Massy. Two 3s, on a short hole, halved the hole 
while Dauge, playing a straight ball, took a 4 for the fourth hole. 
Massy had a 5. The next two holes were halved and Dauge came 
through and won the seventh. Massy, however, won the eighth in 
perfect golf and the ninth was halved. Massy's lead was now only 
2 up. 

Dauge had a 35 against a 38 for Massy on the opening afternoon 
nine holes. With the thirty-sixth hole in the near distance Massy 
settled down and won the eleventh and twelfth holes. Dauge went 
after the thirteenth hole placing a fine loft shot upon the green on his 
second. Massy played closer to the hole than Dauge and it looked as if 
the match was to end there. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 253. 

But Dauge sank his long putt and Massy missed his shorter try 
with the result that Dauge cut the lead down one. The halving of 
the next hole in 4 gave the match to Massy. 
The summary of the match: 

Morning Round 

Massy out 4 5 3 5 4 3 6 3 4 - 37 

Dauge out 454555645 -43 

Massy in 4 5 4 4 4 3 5 4 4 - 37 - 74 

Dauge in 3 5 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 - 38 - 81 

Afternoon Round 

Massy out 5 5 3 5 4 3 6 3 4 - 38 

Dauge out 543443444 -35 

Massy in 3 4444 

Dauge in 35534 

France thus emerged from the Inter-Allied Golf tourney as winner 
of the team match and also, in the person of Massy, of the individual 
laurel wreath. The champion, a professional at La Boulie course, has 
been for years the idol of French golfers and had already gained dis- 
tinction outside of France, having won the English open in 1907. 

Medals, suitably inscribed, were presented to each of the team 
members representing France, America and England. The winner 
and the runner-up of the individual championship were also given 
medals. 





ROWING 





HE final events of the Inter-AIIied Games were the boat 
races on the Seine 17 and 18 July. With the date of the 
Henley Regatta fixed year after year for the first week in 

, , July, it seemed out of the question to hold the Rowing 

events at the same time as the Games in Pershing Stadium and still 
have a representative gathering of Allied oarsmen. Accordingly, it 
was decided to hold the Inter-Allied Regatta after the Pershing Stadium 
events. Henley contestants thereby would have time to bring their 
crews and shells to Paris. 

The success of the Regatta justified this decision. Ten Allied 
nations and colonies participated in what proved to be the largest 
and most successful service Regatta ever held. 

Belgian, Czecho-Slovakian, ItaHan and Portuguese crews went into 
training for the races early in July, occupying quarters in the American 
Military Police Barracks in the Bois de Boulogne at Aqueduct Bridge. 
By 11 July they were joined by Australian, Canadian, English, 
French, New Zealand and American crews from the Henley Regatta. 
Their shells arrived a day or two later, ferried across the Enghsh 
channel by destroyer to Havre and taken from there to Paris by 
automobile truck and trailer. Rowing championships were to be 
awarded in single sculls, four-oared shells with coxswain, and eight- 
oared shells. Each competing nation was allowed but one entry in 
each of these events. In single sculls, Austraha, Belgium, England, 
France, Italy, New Zealand, and United States were represented. 
Belgium, Canada, France, British Army of the Rhine, New Zealand, 
Portugal, and United States entered crews for the four-oared shell 
races and ten eight-oared shell crews were entered from Australia, 
Belgium, Canada, Czecho-Slovakia, England, France, Italy, New Zea- 
land, Portugal, and United States. 

The elimination heats in the three events were held on the after- 
noon of 17 July on the Seine over a mile and a half course between 
St. Cloud and Suresnes bridges. A cloudless day and a light breeze 
which scarcely caused a ripple in the water made rowing conditions 
ideal. 



See pages 321 329 387 345 for rowing pictures. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 255 

For the first heat of the single sculls eliminations the following 
were entered: Clarence Buxton, England; Major Paul Withington, 
United States; Sergeant D. C. Hadfield, New Zealand; and Alfred 
Felton, Australia. Hadfield jumped to the lead at the start and it 
was evident that the New Zealander, who won the single sculls event 
at Henley, would be the winner, leaving Buxton, Felton, and Withing- 
ton to decide who would be the second to qualify. Hadfield, leading, 
was followed in order by Buxton, Felton, and Withington as far as 
Aqueduct Bridge. Felton, by a spurt, then placed himself abreast 
of Buxton, but he had the misfortune to foul a marking buoy at the 
three-quarters distance. Withington, in the meantime, passed both 
Felton and Buxton and finished a length and a half behind Hadfield 
and a quarter of a length ahead of Buxton. 

Giran, France, Dones, Italy, and Haller of Belgium started the 
second heat of the singles. Giran led Dones by a length the first 
half of the course and then stopped rowing for a few moments. Giran 
then continued rowing with Dones five lengths ahead of him at the 
finish, while Haller, several lengths behind Giran, failed to qualify. 

Canada, Belgium, Italy and France rowed the first heat of the four- 
oared shell eliminations. At the first quarter Italy led, with Belgium, 
France and Canada following closely. At the half Canada, after a 
short spurt, led France by a few feet, the other two boats a length 
behind. France, continuing her spurt, passed Canada 600 yards 
from the finish and shot over the line two lengths ahead, Italy and 
Belgium finishing two lengths behind Canada. 

Although entered for the second elimination heat, the British Army 
of the Rhine four withdrew from the race on account of not obtaining 
a shell fitted with tholepins to which the crew was accustomed. This 
left New Zealand, Portugal and United States in this heat. The three 
boats were practically even at the first quarter, but before the half 
was reached New Zealand led United States by a quarter of a length. 
Portugal, in the meantime catching a crab, was left far behind and 
did not finish the race. By the third quarter New Zealand and the 
United States were side by side again. America spurting early finished 
a length and a half in front of New Zealand. 

Czecho-Slovakia, Australia, and Italy raced the first heat of eight- 
oared shell eliminations. Unlike the singles and fours, where the first 
two in each heat qualified for finals, the eights' elimination heats 
qualified but one for the finals. In this heat Australia had no diffi- 
culty in maintaining the lead throughout, increasing the lead over 





.^ 9 t 





Fencing. Top— Portugal team. Center left— Ameviain fencers. Center right— A strenuous 
contest" on the platform. BoHom— Klimiuation contest on the platform at Pershing StacUuni. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 259 

behind at the half distance. America, with a short spurt, was abreast 
of France at the three-quarter mark only to be passed again a few 
seconds later. Two hundred yards from the finish the Americans 
were not equal to the final spurt and France passed over the line tor 
the Championship by a length and a half. 

The Cambridge eight won a magnificent victory in the eight-oared 
shell finals. Left a half a length behind at the start, the English crew 
crept slowly past Australia and New Zealand to finish a third of a 
length ahead. 

As they paddled upstream to the stake boats the eights showed 
three pronouncedly different strokes. Cambridge had the longest 
stroke of all and one that was capable of being rowed at high speed. 
The Australian was just as high a stroke as the English but shorter 
and more slashing. Although not reaching for so much water, the 
New Zealanders rowed a very pretty, slow, swinging stroke. At no 
time during the race did New Zealand row as high a stroke as either 
Australia or Cambridge. 

Austraha got off first at the start. New Zealand but a yard behind. 
When the eights finished their spurt at the start and settled down 
for the mile-and-a-half row, Cambridge was half a length behind Aus- 
tralia. This difference was made up within the first six hundred 
yards. 

At the half, Cambridge had gained two yards over Australia 
New Zealand was a quarter of a length behind. Then came the pret- 
tiest sight of the day. For over a quarter of a mile Cambridge and 
Austraha, side by side, rowed exactly together. The oars of both 
crews caught and came out of the water together. The extra reach 
of Cambridge was practically equalled in power by Austraha's slashing 
stroke. This continued until the last quarter when Cambridge led 
by a yard. 

Cambridge continued to forge ahead, inch by inch, from here on 
to the finish. Australia, but three quarters of a length ahead of the 
New Zealanders who had rowed a game race throughout, finished a 
scant third of a length behind Cambridge. 

This was the final race of the Inter-Allied Regatta. Champion- 
ships were awarded to D. C. Hadfield, New Zealand, winner of smgle 
sculls; France, winner of four-oar shell race; Cambridge Service Eight, 
representing England, winner of eight-oar shell race. 



260 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

SUMMARY OF ROWING EVENTS 

Thursday, 17 July. 
Single Sculls Eliminations: 

First Heat — D. C. Hadfield, New Zealand, first by 1 i lengths; 
Paul Withington, United States, second; Clarence Buxton, England, 
third; Alfred Felton, Australia, fouled a buoy and did not finish. Time 
7 minutes, 59 seconds. 

Second Heat — Ermino Dones, Italy, first by 5 lengths; Giran, 
France, second; Jacques Haller, Belgium, third. Time 8 minutes, 
18-3/5 seconds. 

Four-Oared Shell Eliminations: 

First Heat — France first by 2 lengths — 
Stroke, Sgt. Bouton 
3, Pvt. Vaganay 

2, Sgt. Cordier 
Bow, Lt. Barrelet 
Cox., Cpl. Barberalle 

Canada, second — 
Stroke, Lt. M. H. Rix 

3, Lt. A. R. Whittier 

2, Capt. C. P. Disney 
Bow, Lt. E. E. Norman 
Cox., Capt. A. S. Poynton 

Italy, third — 
Stroke, E. Olgeni 

3, Vittorio Bruna 

2, E. Scaturin 
Bow, Aldo Bettini 
Cox., Mario Olgeni 

Belgium, fourth — 
Stroke, Pvt. Desaever 

3, Sgt. Tabary 

2, Lt. Chaltin 
Bow, Pvt. de Vise 
Cox., Sgt. Lannoo 

Time, 7 minutes, 18 3-5 seconds. 
Second Heat— United States first by 1 1-4 lengths- 
Stroke, Maj. Paul Withington 

3, Capt. C. D. Wiman 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 261 

2, Capt. Billings Wilson 
Bow, Lt. H. E. Cooke 
Cox., Lt. Guy H. Gale 

New Zealand, second — 
Stroke, G. L. Croll 

3, J. Fry 

2, A. T. White 
Bow, H. B. Prideaux 
Cox., A. H. Tmssell 

Portugal did not finish — 
Stroke, Carlos Burney 

3, Raul Brito 

2, Rodrigo Bessone 
Bow, Jose Serra 

Cox., Augusto Neupart, 

British Army of the Rhine withdrew — 
Stroke, G. M. Penny 

3, C. M.Bere 

2, J. A. Begg 
Bow, A. H. Jackson 
Cox., Lewis Morgan 

Time, 7 minutes, 35 2-5 seconds 

Eight-Oared Shell Eliminations: 

FiM Heat — Australia, first by 3-4 lengths — 
Stroke, Capt. Clive Disher 
7, Gunner George Mettam 

6, Lt. Frederick House 

5, Lt. Thomas McGill 

4, Gunner Arthur Scott 

3, Lyndhurst Davis 
2, Lt. Harold Newall 
Bow, Sgt. A. Robb 
Cox., Sgt. Albert Smedley 

Italy, second — 
Stroke, Emilio Lucca 

7, M. L. Colombo 

6, G. Torlashi 



262 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

5, Nino Castelli 

4, T. R. Salvini 

3, M. 0. Pontiggia 

2, Alfredo Taroni 
Bow, Fabio Clerici 
Cox., Plinio Urio. 

Czecho-Slovakia, third — 

Stroke, Jiri Wihan 
7, Jan Hejda 

6, Dominik Stilip 

5, Jiri Romavacek 

4, Joseph Hungmann 

3, Joraslav Oplt 

2, Vaclav Romovacek 

Bow, Jiri Petr 

Cox., Vallav Paruzek 

Time, 6 minutes, 48 2-5 seconds 

Second Heat — New Zealand first by 1 length — 

Stroke, G. A. Healey 



7, 


D. 


C. 


Hadfield 


6, 


W 


. G 


. Coombes 


5, 


G. 


L. 


Lester 


4, 


W 


. Patterson 


3, 


J. 


Mc 


;Roberts 


2, 


F. 


V. 


Home 


B( 


m, 


G. 


H. Wilson 


Cox., 


A. 


H. Trussell 



Canada, second- 
Stroke, Gapt. F. S. Dyke 
7, Capt. H. A. Dawson 
6, Lt. A. D. Spragge 
5, Lt. C. S. M. Fleming 
4, Lt. G. W. Machan ' 
3, Maj. J. C. McCuaig 
2, Cpl. R. R. Harvey 
Bow, Sgt. W. Gilliborn 
Cox., Capt. A. S. Poynton 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 263 

Belgium, third — 
Stroke, Van Waes 
7, Hegimans 

6, Joux 

5, Boylemans 

4, Demulder 

3, Taymans 

2, Janssens 
Bow, Lalemand 
Cox., Nuytens 

Portugal, fourth — 
Stroke, A. Talone 

7, J. Ferro 

6, V. G. Silva 

5, Carlos Sobral 

4, J. Sasseti 

3, J. Branco 

2, J. M. Silva 
Bow, G. Riberiro 
Cox., R. P. Dias 

Time, 6 minutes, 37 1-5 seconds. 

Third Heat — England, first by 1-2 length — 
Stroke, Hubert Hartley 

7, Clarence Buxton 

6, Maurice Buxton 

5, Arthur Dixon 

4, John Campbell 

3, Alfred Swan 

2, Harold Peake 
Bow, Herbert Boret 
Cox., Robin Johnstone 

United States, second — 

Stroke, Capt. Douglas Kingsland 

7, Lt. J. Amory Jefferies 

6, Maj. H. L. Rogers 

5, Capt. Louis Penny 

4, Lt. Henry S. Middendorf 

3, Lt. J. H. McHenry 



264 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

2, Capt. Royal R. Pullen 
Bow, Lt. Colles J. Coe 
Cox., Lt. Guy H. Gale 

France, third — 

Stroke, M. des Logis Bouton 

7, Pvt. Varanay 

6, Lt. Combarieu 

5, Lt. Barrelet 

4, M. des Logis Cordier 

3, M. des Logis Garnier 
2, Pvt. Poix 

Bow, Sgt. Richard 

Cox., Cpl. Barbarelle 

Time, 6 minutes, 35 seconds. 

Friday, 18 July. 
Single Sculls Finals. 

Won by D. C. Hadfield, New Zealand, by 3 lengths; Giran, France, 
second; Withington, United States, third; Dones, Italy, withdrew. 
Time, 7 minutes, 54 seconds. 

Four-Oared Shell Finals. 

Won by France by 1-2 length; United States, second; New Zea- 
land, third; Canada, fourth. Time 7 minutes, 26 2-5 seconds. 

Eighl-Oared Shell Finals. 

Won by England by 1-3 length; AustraUa, second; New Zealand, 
third. Time 6 minutes, 26 3-5 seconds. 




Top— Amuiicaii Rugljy tcKin. Bottom — Roumanian liugby team. 




SHOOTING 





N no event of the Inter-Allied Games was a more decisive 
success gained than by the American entrants in the rifle 
and pistol marksmanship contests which were held on the 
d'Auvours range, Belgian Camp, near Le Mans, Sarthe. 
Every medal place obtainable by the same nation in every event fell 
to the United States marksmen. The first day's firing sufficed to 
demonstrate the American superiority and thereafter interest in the 
actual competitive feature of the meet shifted to the rivalries of other 
nations for lesser laurels, notably to the Franco-Canadian struggle 
for the runner-up honors. 

In the individual rifle match the United States, with twenty-five 
entries, took the first eighteen places in a field of 176, the lowest Ameri- 
can finishing thirty-fourth on the list. The Americans carried the 
eight topmost places in the individual pistol match, the last of the 
twenty-five participants finishing in thirty-first place among 108 start- 
ers. The rifle and pistol team matches were won with corresponding 
margins, the Americans leading the field in both instances at every 
range. 

The surprise of the meet was the defeat of Canada by the French 
marksmen in both individual events and in the rifle team match. 
The Dominion did not enter the pistol team competition. 

Eight nations— France, Belgium, Canada, Greece, Italy, Portugal, 
Roumania and the United States— participated in the competitions 
which were opened on 23 June by General Pershing. The inauguration 
ceremonies were simple. At 10 o'clock in the morning the competitors 
formed by national groups, armed with the weapons which they were 
to fire, at a designated place in rear of the 330-yard firing point. The 
captains of the eight contingents were presented to the Commanding 
General by Colonel A. J. Macnab, officer in charge of the competi- 
tions. The captains, in turn, presented the officers of their respective 
groups. The Commander-in-Chief inspected the enlisted contestants, 
addressing a few words to each team, after which the teams moved 
to their respective stations. The first order was called up. At a 
signal from the Commanding General the buglers sounded "Commence 
Firing." A line of white targets flashed into the brilliant June sun- 

See pages 353 361 369 377 385 393 for shooting pictures. 



268 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

light and the crack of rifles proclaimed that the greatest of military 
marksmanship matches was on. 

The meet ended on June 28. The ensuing schedule of competi- 
tions was carried out: 

Monday, 23 June — Rifle individual prehminary course: forenoon, 
300 yards slow Are, 200 yards rapid fire; afternoon, 500 and 600 yards 
slow fire, 300 and 500 yards rapid fire. 

Note: No scores recorded. 

Tuesday, 24 June— Rifle individual match: forenoon, 300 yards 
slow fire, 200 and 300 yards rapid fire; afternoon, 500 and 600 yards 
slow fire, 500 yards rapid fire. 

Wednesday, 25 June — Program suspended; rain. 
Note: By firing the combined Wednesday and Thursday schedule 
on the latter day no time was lost, 

Thursday, 26 June— Rifle team match: forenoon, 200, 300 and 
400 yards slow fire; afternoon, 500 and 600 yards slow fire. 

Friday, 27 June — Pistol individual match: 25 and 50 yards slow 
fire, 15 and 25 yards rapid fire; 20 shots at each range. 

Saturday, 28 June — 25 and 50 yards slow fire; 20 shots at each 
range. 

A maximum of twenty-five entries from each nation was eligible 
to compete in the individual matches. Rifle teams were limited to 
twelve men, pistol teams to ten. 

First Sergt. Stanley Smith, U.S., won the Inter-AUied Individual 
Rifle Championship in Tuesday's match, scoring 275 points out of 
300 possible. He made a brilliant score, outshooting the field at 
every range save one. 

Second honors went to Gunnery Sergt. Lester V. Henson, U.S., 
with a total of 266 and Corp. Richard J. Titus, U.S., chnched third 
with a tally of 263. At all times the championship race was virtually 
between these three and other high American contenders. 

Louis Percy, a demobilized French soldier, finished ahead of the 
competitors of the other nations with a score of 245 which yielded 
him nineteenth place. After a bad start on the shorter and less 
difficult ranges Percy exhibited a remarkable eye and at 500 and 600 
yards, both on slow and rapid fire, returned scores that were among 
the best. His strong finish enabled him to pass Major Wilham 0. 
Morris, Canada, who stopped in twentieth place with 243. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 269 

The high competitors of other nations, their scores and standings, 
follow: Major N. Vasile Ghitescu, Roumania, 216, forty-first place; 
Lieut. Licurgo Fabi, Italy, 204, forty-ninth place; Sergt. Andre M. 
Vichos, Greece, 203, fifty-first place; 2nd Sergt. Alfredo da Costa 
Paes, Portugal, 197, sixty-first place; Pvt. Seraphin Cornelius, Belgium, 
191, seventy-third place. 

The United States marksmen took the rifle team match with a 
total of 2,651 points out of 3,000 possible — a margin of 236 over their 
closest opponents. The ease with which they moved into first place, 
with the firing of the initial shots, and speedily fortified themselves 
with an unassailable lead, swung popular interest to the contests 
which developed for second, fourth and sixth places. These were 
exciting in every particular. 

The issue of the individual match had sharpened rivalry between 
France and Canada. Popular opinion favored the Canadians at the 
beginning of the team match, the individual victory being regarded 
more as a personal triumph for Louis Percy than as a national achieve- 
ment. Another factor which lent interest to the Franco-Canadian 
contest was the fact that they were the only two teams firing with 
their own rifles, all others having adopted the American Springfield, 
generally conceded to be the most accurate of service weapons. The 
Canadians remained faithful to their Enfield, using, however, the 
long-barrelled, pre-war model equipped with a windgauge. Two 
Frenchmen adopted the Springfield; the other ten went to the firing 
point with the ancient Lebele model of 1886, the service rifle of the 
French infantry. As a target rifle it is regarded as a very inferior 
weapon. 

When Canada led by 18 points on the completion of firing at the 
200-yard point, it seemed that it would be easy for the Dominion men 
to take the second place honors, for, as the ranges lengthened, the 
advantage of the Enfield riflemen with their wind-gauged weapon, 
would increase. At 300 yards, however, the French outshot the Cana- 
dians by 26 points, giving them a net lead of eight. Thenceforward 
they beat the Canadians at every range, rolling up a total of 2,415 to 
2,351 for Lieut. Col. William Rae's Dominion team. 

Roumania and Italy fired a close score for fourth place and the 
decision in favor of the Balkan team came only in the last few minutes 
of firing. Roumania scored 2,163 to 2,150 for Italy, despite the 
creditable individual work of Vice-Brigadier Amedeo Santena, the 
Italian team's best marksman. 



270 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

The three-cornered struggle which developed between Belgium, 
Portugal and Greece for sixth-place honors was the closest of the 
match. After an all-day contest so close that it gave no indication 
as to which team would be the winner, the three teams went to the 
600-yard firing point at five o'clock in the afternoon with only three 
points separating them. There the Belgians shot a consistent score 
while both the others went to pieces. The finish was in this order, 
Belgium, 2,071; Portugal, 2,023; Greece, 2,016. 

Master Engineer (senior grade) Michael Kelley, U.S., won the 
individual pisiol championship, scoring 669 out of 800 possible and 
defeating his greatest rival in the American preliminaries, Gapt. D. R. 
Raymond, who took second place with 648. Corp. Paul Bird, a young 
shot, was a tight third with 647. 

Sergt. Joseph Pecchia, France, finished at the top of the foreign 
aspirants with a score of 635 which gave him ninth place. Lieut. 
Antonio da Silva Martijis, Portugal, one of the spectacular shots of 
the field, gained twenty-second place with 596. Lieut. Martins shot 
an eccentric score, now firing a remarkable string, and again dropping 
among the poorest. At one time he was tied with Master Engineer 
Kelley for first place, being the only visiting competitor temporarily 
to attain such a high score. 

The following were the high men of the other nations with their 
scores and standings: 

Maresciallo Pacificio Santona, Italy, 575, twenty-eighth place; 
Gapt. Edwin J. Kaufman, Canada's sole entry, 566, thirty-fourth 
place; Lieut. Mathieu Requile, Belgium, 539, thirty-ninth place; Sergt. 
G. Giu Amuzcescu, Roumania, 507, forty-seventh place; Pvt. A. Vras- 
sivanopoulos, Greece, 494, fifty-first place. 

The American team won the pistol team championship with a 
score of 4,080 out of a possible 5,000. One of the features was the 
individual defeat of Master Engineer Kelley by his team mate, Captain 
Raymond— an event without official significance, however. The 
French team, while at no time menacing the lead of the United States, 
was in a class of its own as far as second honors were concerned. It 
scored 3,828. Gapt. de Castelbajac made an individual total of 413 
and tied two Americans for third place on the individual list. 

Italy finished third with 3,369, Portugal fourth with 3,280, Bel- 
gium fifth with 3,204 and Roumania sixth with 2,913. There were 
no Canadian or Greek teams. 

To dissipate any suggestion of advantage accruing to the American 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 271 

competitors by comparison of weapons, the United States rifle, model 
1903, and all types of United States service pistols and revolvers were 
placed at the disposal of the foreign competitors. The Belgians dis- 
carded their Mauser, the Roumanians their Manhcher and the Greeks 
their Steyr rifles through choice and adopted the Springfield. The 
wind-gauge was the principal attraction of the American weapon. 
It is doubtful, however, if the change improved the scores of any 
except the Roumanians who put in two weeks of diligent practice 
with the Springfield under American coaching. The Belgians con- 
fessed the experiment a failure for them though they practiced with 
the Springfield for four days before entering the match. The Greeks 
used it the same length of time. 

The Italians and Portuguese were obliged to adopt the Springfield 
through failure of their arms and ammunition to arrive. Both entered 
the match under a handicap as they had received only a day's instruct- 
ion in the use of the American weapon. 

The Roumanians, French and Greeks used the United States 
38-calibre revolver and the Colt Automatic 45-calibre pistol, in prefer- 
ence to their own weapons which were of various types. The Bel- 
gians used a Colt .32 in addition to the two American service sidearms. 
The Portuguese used their Luger, calibre 9mm. and the Italians their 
Gressenti, calibre 7.9mm. in addition to the American guns. The 
Canadian entry fired a long-barrelled Webley .45. 

INDIVIDUAL RIFLE MATCH 

The follwing results were announced: 



Ord.of Serial 












Merit 


No 


Name 


Rank 


Nation 


Score 


1 


416 


Smith, Stanley. 


1st Sgt. 


United States 


275 


2 


408 


Henson, Lester V. 


Gy. Sgt. 






266 


3 


419 


Titus, Richard J. 


Cpl. 






263 


4 


415 


Smith, Robert W. 


1st Lt. 






262 


5 


417 


Spooner, Lloyd S. 


») 






261 


6 


403 


Crawley, Theodore R. 


Sgt. 






259 


7 


406 


Gray, Leman. 


" 






259 


8 


418 


Stewart, Edward B. 


Cpl. 






258 


9 


412 


Meyers, Walter A. 


Capt. 






253 


10 


400 


Chenowith, Leland A. 


Sgt. 






252 


11 


407 


Grika, John T. 


)J 






252 


12 


423 


Williams, Glen. 


)T 






251 


13 


424 


Windsor, Ardis E. 


Cpl. 






248 


14 


421 


Waller, C. W. Jr. 


Major. 






248 



272 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 

» 



1919 



Ord.of 


Serial 


Merit 


No 


15 


420 


16 


422 


17 


402 


18 


411 


19 


168 


20 


61 


21 


414 


22 


413 


23 


404 


24 


162 


25 


60 


26 


410 


27 


401 


28 


56 


29 


165 


30 


164 


31 


409 


32 


171 


33 


72 


34 


405 


35 


150 


36 


161 


37 


163 


38 


154 


39 


52 


40 


66 


41 


357 


42 


67 


43 


157 


44 


63 


45 


352 


46 


62 


47 


70 


48 


156 


49 


259 


50 


153 


51 


200 


52 


366 


53 


210 


54 


59 


55 


166 


56 


55 


57 


365 


58 


57 


59 


155 


60 


318 



Name 

Walker, Wesley W. 
Wiecek, Joseph Jr. 
Cotton, Richard E. 
Lawless, Joseph T. 
Percy, Louis. 
Morris, William O. 
Scars, Robert. 
Peyton, Leland K. 
Disbrow, Harry M. 
Johnson, Leon. 
Mclnnes, Dugald. 
Kearns, Sylvester. 
Coppedge, James F. 
Hutchinson, Roger G. 
Mahieu, Jules. 
L'Hostis, Jean. 
Hodges, C. H. 
Renard, Leon. 
Vicent, Joseph H. 
Doxtater, Everett. 
Angelini, Charles. 
Hardy, Pierre. 
Lajoie, Jean. 
Bouchenoirre, Rene. 
Francis, Edward D. T. 
Rae, William. 
Ghitescu, N. Vasile. 
Richardson, Fred. 
Fray, Andrae 
Nowman, Nathaniel 
Baluta, Jean 
Mortimer, George. 
Spaulding, Victor. 
Durand, Raymond. 
Fabi, Licurgo. 
Boitout, Emile. 
Vichos, Andre M. 
Vartolomeu, Simion. 
Moraitinis, Georges. 
Martin, Fred R. 
Meniot, Oscar. 
Hay, John. 

Tenescu, J. Constantin. 
Johnson, Frederick G. 
Dupuis, Daul. 
Paes, Alfredo da Costa. 



Rank 

Capt. 

Sgt. 1 cl. 

Capt. 

1st Lieut. 

Demob. 

Major. 

Lt. Col. 

Cpl. 

Capt. 

Demob. 

Sgt. 

1st Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

Major. 

Capt. 

Lt. (demob.) 

Lt. Col. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Sgt. 

Cmt. (demob.' 

Demob. 

2nd Lt. 

2nd Class 

Lieut. 

Lt. Col. 

Major. 

2nd Lt. 

Col. Sgt. 

Cpl. 

Major. 

Lieut. 

Cpl. 

Tenente. 

Demob. 

Sergt. 

Capt. 

2nd Lt. 

Capt. 

2nd Lt. 

Sergt. 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

2nd Sergt. 



Nation 



1 ) )T 

France 
Canada. 
United States 



France 
Canada 
United States 

Canada 
France 

United States 

France. 

Canada 

United States 

France 

France 



Canada 

Roumania 

Canada 

France 

Canada 

Roumania 

Canada 

France 

Italy 

France 

Greece 

Roumania 

Greece 

Canada 

France 

Canada 

Roumania 

Canada 

France 

Portugal 



Score 

248 
247 
246 
245 
245 
243 
243 
242 
242 
240 
235 

233 

232 

231 

230 

230 

229 

229 

228 

226 

226 

225 

225 

224 

221 

220 

216 

213 

213 

213 

211 

210 

208 

204 

204 

203 

203 

201 

200 

200 

199 

199 

198 

198 

198 

197 




Rugby. Top -Scrimmage at lineout. Center left-Evh, V. S., running with the ball. Center 
rit/W -Clock, U. S., receiving ball from lineout. Bottom— Ilauser, U. S., being tackled while 

carrying ball. 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



275 



Ord.of 


Serial 


Merit 


No 


61 


64 


62 


151 


63 


201 


64 


203 


65 


329 


66 


152 


67 


160 


68 


69 


69 


169 


70 


172 


71 


65 


72 


3 


73 


260 


74 


208 


75 


207 


76 


58 


77 


5 


78 


158 


79 


265 


80 


269 


81 


270 


82 


170 


83 


173 


84 


159 


85 


4 


86 


255 


87 


272 


88 


14 


89 


202 


90 


355 


91 


18 


92 


361 


93 


350 


94 


351 


95 


273 


96 


6 


97 


1 


98 


268 


99 


314 


100 


362 


101 


7 


102 


303 


103 


266 


104 


209 


105 


274 


106 


324 



Name Rank 

O'Neill-Daunt, Reginald Corp. 

Arguel, Pierre. Sergt. 

Vlachakia, Denis T. Lieut. 

Sappas, Jean X. 2nd Lt. 
Pereirs, Raul da Costa. 2nd Sgt. 

Beaupere, Maurice Sergt. 
Garotin, Alexandre. " 

Spalding, Frank. Lieut. 

Pinot, Lucien. Adjutant 

Soccaud, Jean. 2nd Lt. 

Payne, Ethelred G. Pvt. 
Cornelis, Seraphin. " 

Fabris, Sante. Brigadiere 

Kosmas, George S. Private 

Kaparos, Eme J. Sergt. 

Kaufman, Edwin J. Capt. 

Demart, Emile. Major 

Fray, Leon. Demob. 

Pastorini, Costantino. Mag. 

Santena, Amedeo. V. Brig. 

Santena, Paciflco. Mares. 

Regnier, Albert. Demob. 
Verain, Bohan P. " 

Gentil, Pierre. " 

Delmas, Frangois. Corp. 

Campus, Peppy. Mag. 

Sartorari, Ferruccio. Tenente 

Neujeau, Francois. Pvt. 
Vrassivanopoulos, A. " 

Ciocan, Gheorghe. Capor. 
Schaepherders, Charles. Corp. 

Mihaesou, loan. Lieut. 

Alexe, V. Vasilo. Soldat 

Baciu, N. Niculae. Plut. Maj. 

Serralunga, Natele. Capt. Mag. 

DuBrucq, Jules. Pvt. 

Adriaenssens, Conrad. 1st Sgt. 

Righi, Fulvic. Capo. 

Martins, Antoie da S. Lieut. 

Tudor, G. H. Plut. 

Frings, Jean. Capt. 

DeCarvalho, Antonio J. 1st Sgt. 

Piersantelli, Emilio. Tene. Col. 

Mafflttas, Miltiades D. Lieut. 

Simonotti, Achille. Col. 

Da Silva, H. Guilherme. 2nd Lt. 



Nation 

Canada 
France 
Greece 

Portugal. 
France 

Canada 
France 

Canada 
Belgium 
Italy 
Greece 

Canada 
Belgium 
France 
Italy 



France 



Belgium. 
Italy 

Belgium 

Greece 

Roumania 

Belgium 

Roumania 

Roumania 

Italy 

Belgium 

Belgium 

Italy 

Portugal 

Roumania 

Belgium 

Portugal 

Italy 

Greece 

Italy 

Portugal. 



Score 

197 

197 

196 

196 

195 

195 

194 

194 

193 

193 

192 

191 

191 

190 

189 

189 

188 

188 

188 

198 

176 

186 

186 

186 

185 

185 

184 

184 

183 

183 

181 

180 

179 

179 

179 

177 

177 

176 

176 

175 

175 

174 

174 

174 

171 

170 



276 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Ord.ot 


Serial 


Merit 


No. 


107 


13 


108 


19 


109 


305 


110 


20 


111 


358 


112 


23 


113 


317 


114 


257 


115 


267 


116 


206 


117 


212 


118 


307 


119 


205 


120 


54 


121 


320 


122 


364 


123 


354 


124 


567 


125 


315 


126 


360 


127 


251 


128 


262 


129 


310 


130 


306 


131 


2 


132 


174 


133 


68 


134 


10 


135 


316 


136 


258 


137 


353 


138 


167 


139 


263 


140 


216 


141 


261 


142 


313 


143 


217 


144 


12 


145 


308 


146 


322 


147 


256 


148 


253 


149 


312 


150 


300 


151 


264 


152 


9 



Name Rank Nation Score 

Nauvelaerts. Corp. Belgium 170 

Schmits, Pierre. Major. " 169 

Damiao, Antonio F. Capt. Portugal 169 

VandenBessche, Armand Sergt. Belgium 169 

Manole, Constantine. Capt. Roumania 169 

Verlinden, Jules. Sergt. Belgium 168 

De Noronha, D. Eugenio Ensign. Portugal 168 

DeRisi, Gabriele. Capo. Italy 168 

Picello, Federico. Sergt. " 168 

Adam, Constantin. Lieut. Greece 167 

Roumelliotis, D. M. Pvt. " 167 

Doras, Amadeu S. 1st Sgt. Portugal 167 

Cogopoulos, Constantin. Lieut. Greece 166 

Goodhouse, Fred J. C.S.M. Canada 166 

Rebelo, Herminio. Capt. Portugal 165 

Petrescu, G. Constantin. Lieut. Roumania 165 

Catana, Octay. " " 165 

Vlasceanu, J. Joan. Sgt. " 163 

Mendonca, Francisco P. 2nd Lt- Portugal 163 

Marinescu, Marin. Sous Lt. Roumania 162 

Ascani, Ascanio. Sot. Ten. Italy 162 

Gressi, Attilio. Mag. " 161 

Gomes, Jose Oliveira. Lt. Col. Portugal 160 

Dias, Carlos. 2nd Sgt. " 160 

Berckmans, Charles. Capt. Belgium 160 

Ygnard, Armand. Sgt. France 159 

Simmonds, William R. Pvt. Canada 159 

Masure, Eduard. " Belgium 159 

Montez, Antonio D. 2nd Lt. Portugal. 158 

Domenis, Vitterio. Carab. Italy. 157 

Bacurel, Constantin. Sous Lt. Roumania 155 

Pelle, Henri. 2nd Lt. France 152 

Manacci, Guglielmo. Mag. Italy 152 

Sioris, Platon A. War. Off. Greece 152 

Ficher, Norberto. Tenente Italy 148 

Machado, Daniel Alberto 2nd Lt. Portugal 147 

Voltaire, Achille C. Pvt. Greece 147 

Michause, Clement. 1st Sgt. Belgium 145 

Ferreira, Antonio S. A. Capt. Portugal 143 

Dos Santos, Antonio. 2nd Sgt. " 142 

Dolfmo, Francesco. Mare. Italy 142 

Bettini, Dario. Tenente " 140 

Lopes, Mario Augusto. 2nd Lt. Portugal 139 

Cannas, Dario. 2nd Lt. " 139 

Musia, Calisto. Mag. Italy 138 

Mandeville, Hector. Pvt. Belgium 138 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



277 



Ord.of 


Serial 


Merit 


No. 


153 


356 


154 


301 


155 


8 


156 


359 


157 


254 


158 


252 


159 


311 


160 


309 


161 


304 


162 


22 


163 


15 


164 


323 


165 


11 


166 


302 


167 


204 


168 


24 


169 


17 


170 


21 


171 


211 


172 


25 


173 


250 


174 


321 


175 


215 


176 


16 



Name 
Dinca, Stefan, N. 
De Carvalho, Jose A. 
Gianora, Georgis. 
Naiorescu, Dumitru. 
Bucci, Amelio. 
Balena, Enrico. 
Jame, Diocleciano. 
Garcia, Antonio. 
Catarino, Antonio. 
VanGoethern. 
Pire, Germain. 
Dos Santos, Antonio. 
Masuy, Oscar. 
De Carvalho, Joaguim. 
Hadzidakis, George. 
Vercamer, Georges. 
Roelens, Hector. 
VandenBossche, Albinus 
Papageorgieu, George. 
Van de Wale, Mathieu. 
Arani, Dario. 
Targento, Sodaino F. G. 
Totomis, George. 
Pyre, Jules. 



Rank 
Caporal 
2nd Sgt. 
1st Sgt. Maj. 
Sous Lt. 
Mag . 

2nd Sgt. 
2nd Sgt. 
2nd Cpl. 
Pvt. 

Command. 
1st Cpl. 
Command. 
2nd Sgt. 
2nd Lt. 
Pvt. 



Lieut. 

Corp. 

Capo. 

Cadet 

Nav. Av'tor. 

Adj. 



Nation 

Roumania 

Portugal 

Belgium 

Roumania 

Italy 

Portugal 



Belgium 

Portugal 

Belgium 

Portugal 

Greece. 

Belgium 



Greece 

Belgium 

Italy 

Portugal 

Greece 

Belgium 



Score 

138 

137 

135 

135 

134 

131 

130 

129 

127 

126 

124 

119 

119 

112 

109 

105 

104 

100 

99 

89 

48 

39 

18 

6 



INDIVIDUAL RIFLE MATCH WINNERS BY NATIONS 

Nation Serial No. Name Rank Score 

United States. 416 Smith, Stanley. 1st Sgt. 275 

France 168 Percy, Louis. Demob. 245 

Canada 61 Morris, William O. Major 243 

Roumania.... 357 Ghitescu, N. Vasile. " 216 

Italy 259 Fabi, Licurgo. Tenente. 204 

Greece 200 Vichos, Andre M. Sergeant. 203 

Portugal 318 Paes, Alfredo da Costa. 2nd Sergeant. 197 

Belgium 3 Cornells, Seraphin. Private. 191 

The relative standing of the teams was as follows : 



Ord.of 
Merit 

1 
2 
3 
4 



Name 

200 

United States 589 

France 538 

Canada 556 

Roumania 489 





Score 






300 


400 


500 


600 


Total 


541 


467 


543 


511 


2,651 


506 


424 


495 


452 


2,415 


480 


377 


500 


438 


2,351 


427 


355 


473 


419 


2,163 



278 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Ord.ot 
Merit 

5 
6 

7 



Name 

Italy 499 

Belgium 449 

Portugal 480 

Greece 481 



Score 



449 


371 


439 


392 


2,150 


438 


344 


445 


395 


2,071 


446 


318 


429 


350 


2,023 


422 


337 


434 


342 


2,016 



The relative standing of the teams with the scores of the individ- 
uals therein was as follows : 



Ord.of 


Serial 










Merit 


No. 


Name 


Rank 


Nation 


Score 


1 


401 


Coppedge, James F. 


2nd Lt. 


United States 


200 


2 


415 


Smith, Robert W. 


1st Lt. 


11 11 


227 


3 


406 


Gray, Leman. 


Sgt. 


11 11 


227 


4 


416 


Smith, Stanley. 


1st Sgt. 


11 11 


226 


5 


403 


Crawley, Theo, B. 


Sgt. 


11 11 


225 


6 


419 


Titus, Richard J. 


Cpl. 


11 


222 


7 


408 


Henson, Lester V. 


Gy. Sgt. 


11 11 


221 


8 


404 


Disbrow, Harry N. 


Capt. 


11 


219 


9 


412 


Meyers, Walter A. 


Capt. 


11 11 


217 


10 


417 


Spooner, Lloyd S. 


1st Lt. 


11 11 


217 


11 


420 


Walker, Wesley W. 


Capt. 


11 11 


215 


12 


423 


Williams, Glen. 


Sgt. 


11 11 


207 


1 


164 


L'Hostis, Jean. 


Lieut, dem. 


France 


219 


2 


168 


Percy, Louis. 


Demob. 


" 


215 


3 


163 


Lajoie, Jean. 


2nd LI. 


" 


214 


4 


156 


Durand, Raymond. 


Cpl. 


" 


208 


5 


162 


Johnson, Leon. 


Demob. 


" 


207 


6 


155 


Dupuis, Daul. 


Capt. 


11 


206 


7 


175 


Colas, 


Demob. 


" 


206 


8 


161 


Hardy, Pierre. 


11 


" 


199 


9 


165 


Mahieu, Jules. 


Capt. 


)) 


192 


10 


150 


Angelini, Charles. 


Com't. dem. 


J» 


191 


11 


171 


Renard, Leon. 


Capt. 


)) 


183 


12 


157 


Fray, Andri. 


2nd Lt. 


li 


175 


1 


62 


Mortimer, George. 


Blajor 


Canada 


216 


2 


67 


Richardson, Fred. 


11 


" 


213 


3 


69 


Spalding, Frank. 


Lieut. 


" 


206 


4 


61 


Morris, William O. 


Major 


•: 


205 


5 


7-> 


Vincent, Joseph H. 


Lieut. 


" 


202 


6 


60 


Mclnnes, Dugald. 


Sgt. 


■)■) 


195 


7 


56 


Hutchison, Roger G. 


Major. 


'> 


193 


8 


52 


Francis, Edward D. T. 


Lieut. 


3) 


190 


9 


63 


Newman, Nathaniel. 


Col. Sgt. 


11 


185 


10 


59 


Martin, Fred R. 


Capt. 


)j , 


185 


11 


55 


Hay, John. 


Sgt. 


1,1. 


184 


12 


57 


Johnson, Frederick G. 


Capt. 


11 


177 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



279 



Ord.ot 


Serial 










Merit 


No. 


Name 


Ranli 


Nation 


Score 


I 


357 


Ghitescu, N. Vasile. 


Major. 


Roumania. 


203 


2 


355 


Ciocan, Gheorghe. 


Cpl. 


" 


197 


3 


352 


Baluta, Joan. 


)) 


" 


196 


4 


350 


Alexe, Vasile. 


Pvt. 


" 


192 


5 


358 


Manole, Constantin. 


Capt. 


" 


185 


6 


366 


Vartolomeu, Simion. 


" 


" 


184 


7 


361 


Mihaescu, loan. 


Lieut. 


" 


182 


8 


353 


Bucurel, Constantin. 


2nd Lieut. 


" 


179 


9 


359 


Maiorescu, Dumitru. 


)) )) 


" 


178 


10 


365 


Tenescu, J. Constantin. 


Lieut. 


" 


167 


11 


354 


Catana, Octav. 


5) 


)) 


159 


12 


364 


Petrescu, G. Constantin. 


" Subsl 


:itulod " 




12 


367 


Vlasceanu, J. Joan. 


Sgt. 


)i 


141 


1 


269 


Santena, Amedeo. 


Vice-Brig. 


Italy 


209 


2 


270 


Santena, Pacifico, 


Mares. 


" 


204 


3 


272 


Sartorari, Ferruccio. 


Tenente. 


" 


194 


4 


251 


Ascani, Ascanio. 


Sotto Ten. 


■>■> 


188 


5 


274 


Simonotti, Achille. 


Col. 


" 


178 


6 


259 


Fabi, Licurgo. 


Tenente. 


)) 


174 


7 


267 


Picello, Federico. 


Sergente. 


" 


171 


8 


263 


Mencacci, Guglielmo. 


Maggiore. 


'* 


170 


9 


266 


Piersantelli, fimilio. 


Tene Col. 


" 


167 


10 


260 


Fabris, Sante. 


Brigad. 


" 


166 


11 


255 


Campus, Peppy. 


Maggiore. 


" 


166 


12 


268 


Righi, Fulvio. 


Capit. 


)» 


163 


1 


1 


Adriaenssens, Conrad. 


1st Sgt. 


Belgium 


185 


2 


19 


Schmits, Pierre. 


Major 


" 


182 


3 


4 


Delmas, Frangois. 


Cpl. 


»» 


181 


4 


7 


Frings, Jean. 


Captain 


1) 


180 


5 


3 


Cornelis, Seraphin. 


Private 


») 


177 


6 


5 


Demart, Emile. 


Major 


" 


175 


7 


14 


Neujeau, Frangois. 


Private 


" 


174 


8 


11 


Masuy, Oscar. 


Comd't. 


" 


169 


9 


2 


Berckmans, Charles. 


Captain 


" 


169 


10 


23 


Verlinden, Jules. 


Sergeant 


" 


163 


11 


10 


Masure, Eduard. 


Private. 


" 


159 


12 


20 


VandenBossche, Arm. 


Sergeant 


1) 


157 


1 


315 


Mendonca, Francisco. 


2nd Lieut. 


Portugal 


188 


2 


319 


Pereira, Raul da Cruz. 


2nd Sgt. 


)i 


184 


3 


316 


Montez, Antonio D. 


2nd Lieut. 


J) 


184 


4 


306 


Dias, Carlos. 


2nd Sgt. 


' ' 


184 


5 


310 


Gomes, Jose Oliveira. 


Lt. Col. 


" 


178 


6 


314 


Martins, Antonio da S. 


Lieutenant 


■!■) 


177 


7 


307 


Dores, Amadeu Salgado. 


1st Sgt. 


" 


175 


8 


318 


Paes, Alfredo da C. 


2nd Sgt. 


>i 


169 


9 


317 


De Noronha, D. Eug. 


Ensign. 




167 



280 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Ord.of Serial 
Merit No. 

10 324 

11 305 

12 303 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



207 
203 
210 
202 
206 
208 
200 
205 
201 
212 
209 
217 



Name 

Da Silva, H. Guilherme. 
Damiac, Antonio F. 
De Carvalho, A. J. 

Kaparos, Erne J. 
Sappas, Jean X. 
Moraitinis, Georges. 
Vrassivanopoulos, A. 
Adam, Constantin. 
Kosmas, Georges S. 
Vichos, Andre M. 
Cogopoulos, Constantin. 
Vlachakis, Denis T. 
Roumelliotis, D. M. 
Mantas, Miltiades D. 
Voltaire, Achille C. 



Rank 


Nation 


2nd Lieut. 


Portugal 


Captain 


»T 


1st Sgt. 


)1 


Sergeant 


Greece 


2nd Lieut. 


" 


2nd Lieut. 


" 


Private 


" 


Lieutenant 


Ti 


Private 


" 


Sergeant 


»i 


Lieutenant 


)) 


Private 


" 


Lieutenant 


)) 


Private 


i) 



Score 

161 
129 

127 

191 
191 
185 
179 
169 
167 
162 
161 
159 
158 
149 
145 



INDIVIDUAL PISTOL MATCH 



Ord.of Serial 
Merit No. 



Name Rank 

1 412 Kelley, Michael. M.E.S.G. 

■2 419 Raymond, D. R. Capt. 

3 401 Bird, Paul. Corp. 

4 400 Beverley, J. R. 1st Lt. 

5 411 Johnson, James F. " " 

6 414 LaMotte, C. K. Lt. Col. 

7 407 Evans, P. W. " " 

8 409 Griffln, Lloyd E. 1st Lt. 

9 165 Pecchia, Joseph. Sergt. 

10 402 Bittel, Edward. Lt. Col. 

11 405 Dell, James W. Col. Sgt. 

12 155 De Castelbajac. Capt. 

13 410 Harant, L. J. 2nd Lt. 

14 404 Crawford, J. A. 1st Lt. 

15 417 Nelson, Henry N. 2nd Lt. 

16 415 Long, A. W. 1st Lt. 

17 420 Scott, S. L. Major 

18 406 Duncan, Melvin E. Sergt. 

19 422 Stauffer, O. B. lst°Lt 

20 424 Snyder, O. F. Lt. Col. 

21 413 Klem, Mat. Col. Sgt. 

22 306 Martins, Antonio da Sil. Lieut 

23 418 Purdue, A. A. Private 

24 167 Renard, Leon. Captain 

25 416 Miller, Ernest C. Corp. 

26 421 Selbie, Charles C. 1st Lt 



Nation 
United States 



France 

United States 
11 11 

France 
United States 



Portugal 
United States 
France 
United States 



Score 

669 

648 

647 

645 

642 

641 

640 

639 

635 

633 

632 

631 

630 

630 

629 

616 

613 

611 

606 

605 

604 

596 

592 

592 

585 

581 




Soccer. Top and center Ze/i— France vfrsus Roumania. Center right— Fvaiiei- versus Czecho- 
slovakia. Bottom— A forward pass in the air— Prance versus Roumania. 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



283 



Ord.of Serial 


Merit 


No. 


27 


423 


28 


263 


29 


403 


30 


172 


31 


408 


32 


162 


33 


158 


34 


58 


35 


157 


36 


159 


37 


161 


38 


163 


39 


7 


40 


160 


41 


260 


42 


265 


43 


166 


44 


3 


45 


164 


46 


156 


47 


351 


48 


352 


49 


10 


50 


262 


51 


201 


52 


311 


53 


151 


54 


355 


55 


353 


56 


264 


57 


; 168 


58 


364 


59 


154 


60 


304 


61 


203 


62 


358 


63 


310 


64 


170 


65 


173 


66 


153 


67 


8 


68 


2 


69 


13 


70 


308 


71 


302 


72 


303 



Name 

Wilder, Benj. H. 
Santena, Pacifioo. 
Claris, Edward L. 
Vaudiau, Pierre. 
Garey, E. B. 
Mazuc, Fernand A. 
Gandon, Henri. 
Kaufman, Edwin J. 
De Varine, Behan P. 
Girard, Pierre 
Barbillot, 
Modot, Joseph. 
Requile, Mathieu. 
Guizien, Louis. 
Piersantelli, Emilio. 
Sarorari, Ferruccio. 
Perrcau, Georges. 
Demart, Emile. 
Moreaux, Leon. 
De Cernowitz, Rem. 
Amuzcescu, G. Giu. 
Balanescu, J. Constantin 
Janssens, Charles. 
Santena, Amedeo. 
Vrassivanopoulos, A. 
Dos Santos, Antonio. 
Bachet, Georges. 
Iliescu, Joan. 
Baciu, N. Ficulae. 
Sanguini, Plinio. 
Roux, Georges. 
Yonoscu, Virgil. 
Cottrelle, Robert. 
Gomes, Jose O. 
Moraitinis, Georges. 
Rosea, Stefan N. 
Rebelo, Herminio. 
Bourgeois, Raphael. 
Vincent, Louis. 
Chocat. 

Schmits, Pierre. 
Glaus, Silvain. 
Thauvin, Jean. 
Montez, Antonio D. 
Dores, Amadeu S. 
Ferreiva, Antonio S. 



Ranli 

2nd Lt 
Maresciallo 
Gun Sgt. 
Captain 
Lt. Col. 
Demob. 

Captain 

Lieut. 
Com't 
Captain 
Lieut. 

Tene. Col. 
Tenente 
Sgt. 
Major 

Comm. dem. 
Captain 
Sergt. 
Sous Lt. 
Sergt. 
Vice Brig. 
Pvt. 

2nd Sgt. 
Mar. Logis 
Lieut. 
Pluto Maj. 
Capitano 
2nd Lt. 
Sous Lieut. 
2nd Lt. 
Lt. Col. 
2nd Lt. 
Caporal 
Captain 
2nd Lt. 
Lieut. 
2nd CI. 
Major 
Capt. 

2nd Lt. 
1st Sgt. 
Capt. 



Nation 

Italy 

United States 

France 

United States 

France 

France 

Canada 

France 



Belgium 

France 

Italy 

France 

Belgium 

France 
If 

Roumania 
)» 

Belgium 

Italy 

Greece 

Portugal 

France 

Roumania 

») 

Italy 

France 

Roumania 

France 

Portugal 

Greece 

Roumania 

Portugal 

France 



Belgium 

»» 

Portugal 



Score 

578 
575 
573 
573 
572 
570 
568 
566 
565 
544 
543 
542 
539 
538 
535 
533 
528 
525 
524 
518 
507 
505 
497 
495 
494 
493 
490 
489 
489 
488 
488 
486 
484 
483 
479 
475 
474 
471 
465 
462 
460 
460 
460 
457 
453 
450 



284 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Ord. of Serial 


Merit 


No. 


73 


171 


74 


250 


75 


152 


76 


251 


77 


250 


78 


174 


79 


4 


80 


307 


81 


267 


82 


253 


83 


301 


84 


309 


85 


350 


86 


361 


87 


259 


88 


169 


89 


360 


90 


300 


91 


150 


92 


354 


93 


266 


94 


1 


95 


9 


96 


252 


97 


366 


98 


12 


99 


363 


100 


5 


101 


261 


102 


305 


103 


258 


104 


359 


105 


202 


106 


11 


107 


200 


108 


367 



Name 

Vache, Jules. 
Ascani, Ascanio. 
Besset, Pierre. 
Borgia, Carlo. 
Campus, Peppy. 
Viry, Eugene. 
Ghoude, Paul. 
Mendonca, Francisco. 
Somma, Umberto. 
Bucci, Amelio. 
Carvalho, Antonio J. 
De Moronha, D. E. 
Adamiu, lllie. 
Sontica, G. Gh. 
Pastorini, Constan. 
Salain. 

Staniu, Joan. 
Cannas, Dario. 
Allain, Auguste. 
Ghitescu, H. Vasile. 
Simanotti, Achille 
Adriaenssens, Conrad. 
Van Otegem, Georges. 
Bettini, Mario. 
Bucurel, Constantin. 
Berlcmans, Charles. 
Sava, Joan N. 
Masuy, Oscar. 
Ruffo, Giuseppe. 
Gouveia, Gustav A. 
Righi, Fulvio. 
Stanoscu, Virgil. 
Mantas, Miltiades. 
Piro, Jules 
Vichos, Andre 
Marinescu, Marin. 



Rank 
Capt. 

Sott. Ten. 
2nd Lt. 
Tene. Col. 
Maresciallo. 
Lieut. 
Lieut. 
2nd Lt. 
Colonello 
Maresciallo 

1st Sgt. 
Ensign. 

Sous Lt. 
Sergt. 

Maggiore 
Cpl. 

Sous Lieut. 
2nd Lt. 

1st CI. 

Major 

Colonello 

1st Sgt. 

Lieut. 
Tenente 

Sous Lieut. 

Capt. 

Caporal 

Comm. 

Tene. Col. 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Sous Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

Adj. 

Sgt. 

Sous Lieut. 



INDIVIDUAL PISTOL MATCH WINNERS 

United States. 412 Kelley, Michael. 

France 165 Pecchia, Joseph. 

Portugal 306 Martins, Antonio da Silva . 

Italy 263 Santena, Pacifico. 

Canada 58 Kaufman, Edwin J. 

Belgium 7 Requile, Mathieu. 

Roumania.... 351 Amuzcescu, G. Giu. 

Greece 201 Vrassivanopoulos, A. 



Nation 
France 
Italy 
France 
Italy 

France 
Belgium 
Portugal 
Italy 

Portugal 

Roumania 

Italy 

France 

Roumania 

Portugal 

France 

Roumania 

Italy 

Belgium 

Italy 

Roumania 

Belgium 

Roumania 

Belgium 

Italy 

Portugal 

Italy 

Roumania 

Greece 

Belgium 

Greece 

Roumania 

BY NATIONS 

M.E.S.G. 

Sergeant. 

Lieut. 

Maresciallo. 

Captain. 

Lieut. 

Sergeant. 

Private. 



Score 

445 

441 

439 

437 

434 

432 

427 

424 

423 

415 

412 

407 

404 

402 

388 

386 

380 

371 

350 

349 

344 

344 

337 

334 

324 

321 

315 

313 

308 

303 

297 

292 

281 

261 

249 

191 



669 
635 
596 
575 
566 
539 
507 
494 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 
The relative standing of the teams was as follows : 



285 



Order of Merit 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



Score 



Name 



United States. 

France 

Italy 

Portugal 

Belgium 

Roumania . . . 



25 yds 


50 yds 


Total 


2,266 


1,814 


4,080 


2,113 


1,715 


3,828 


1^969 


1,400 


3,369 


1,951 


1,329 


3,280 


1,900 


1,304 


3,204 


1,798 


1,116 


2,913 



The relative standing of the teams with the scores of the indi- 
viduals therein was as follows : 



Ord.of Serial 












Merit 


No. 


Name 


Rank 


Nation Score 


1 


419 


Raymond, D. R. 


Capt. 


United States 427 


2 


412 


Kelley, Michael. 


M.E.S.G. 


»» 


421 


3 


407 


Evans, P. W. 


Lt. Col. 


" 


413 


4 


411 


Johnson, James F. 


1st Lt. 


" 


413 


5 


401 


Bird, Paul. 


Cpl. 


" 


412 


6 


409 


Grifiin, Lloyd E. 


1st Lt. 


" 


411 


7 


405 


Dell, James W. 


Col. Sgt. 


" 


409 


8 


400 


Beverley, J. R. 


1st Lt. 


" 


400 


9 


402 


Bittel, Edward. 


Lt. Col. 


" 


389 


10 


414 


LaMotte, C. K. 


Lt. Col. 


" 


385 


1 


155 


De Castelbajac. 


Capt. 


France 


413 


2 


158 


Gandon, Henri. 


Demob. 


" 


412 


3 


172 


Vaudiau, Pierre. 


Capt. 


" 


393 


4 


161 


Barbillat. 


Com't. 


" 


393 


5 


167 


Renard, Leon. 


Capt. 


" 


391 


6 


165 


Pecchia, Joseph. 


Sgt. 


" 


387 


7 


160 


Guizien, Louis. 


Lieut. 


" 


380 


8 


162 


Mazuc, Fernand A. 


Demob. 


" 


372 


9 


164 


Moreaux, Leon. 


Com't demob. 


" 


354 


10 


157 


DeVarine, Bohan P. 


Capt. 


" 


333 


1 


265 


Sarorari, Ferruccio. 


Tenente 


Italy 


384 


2 


260 


Piersantelli, Emilio. 


Tene. Col. 






365 


3 


264 


Sanguini, Plinio. 


Capitano 






354 


4 


262 


Santena, Amedeo. 


Vice-Brig. 






353 


5 


250 


Ascani, Ascanio. 


Sott. Ten. 






349 


6 


267 


Somma, Umberto. 


Colonello. 






330 


7 


251 


Borgia, Carlo. 


Tene. Col. 






329 


8 


263 


Santena, Pacifico. 


Maresciallo. 






329 


9 


266 


Simanotti, Achille. 


Colonello. 






311 


10 


261 


Ruffo, Giuseppe. 


Tene. Col. 


" 


265 


I 


306 


Martins, Antonio da Sil. 


Lieut. 


Portugal 


390 


2 


308 


Montez, Antonio Duarte 


2nd Lieut. 




)) 


367 



286 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Ord.of Serial 


Merit 


No. 


3 


304 


4 


301 


5 


303 


6 


302 


7 


307 


8 


300 


9 


309 


10 


310 


1 


7 


2 


3 


3 


2 


4 


13 


5 


1 


6 


10 


7 


5 


8 


8 


9 


12 


10 


4 


1 


353 


2 


352 


3 


355 


4 


364 


5 


354 


6 


358 


7 


351 


8 


361 


9 


350 


10 


363 



Name Rank Nation Score 

Gomes, Jose Oliveira. Lt. Col. Portugal 341 

Carvalho, Anton. Joaq. 1st Sgt. " 341 

Ferreiva, Ant. Soaros A. Capt. " 336 

Dores, Amadeu Salgado. 1st Sgt. " 323 
Mendonca, Francisco 

Paulo dos Santos. 2d Lieut. " 319 

Cannas, Dario. 2d Lieut. " 309 

DeNeronna, D. Eugenio. Ensign. " 291 

Rebelo, Hirminio. Capt. " 263 

Requile, Mathieu. Lieut. Belgium 371 

Demart, Emile. Major " 370 

Cloos, Silvain. Capt. " 364 

Thauvin, Jean. • Capt. " 328 

Adriaenssens, Conrad. 1st Sgt. " 311 

Jassens, Charles. Sgt. " 310 

Massui, Oscar. Com't. " 304 

Schmits, Pierre. Major. " 302 

Berkmans, Charles. Capt. " 275 

Ghoude, Paul. Lieut.' " 269 

Baciu, N. Niculae. Plut. Maj. Roumania 363 

Balanescu, J. Constant. Sous Lt. " 336 

Iliescu, Jean. Lieut. " 332 

Yonoscu, Virgil. Sous Lieut. " 331 

Ghitescu N. Vasile. Major. " 302 

Rosea, Stefan N. Caporal " 296 

Amuzescu, G. Giu. Sgt. " 275 

Sontica, G. Gh. Sgt. " 252 

Adamiu, Illie. Sous Lt. " 223 

Sava, Joan N. Caporal " 203 




SWIMMING 





HE Inter-Allied Swimming championships did not have all 
the world's greatest swimmers as competitors, but among 
theses participating were enough men of wide international 
reputation to make the series stand out as one of the 
greatest championships in natation that was ever held. 

Nine countries were represented by the aggregation of swimmers 
gathered to compete for the honors of the Inter-Allied Games Cham- 
pionships — a greater number of nations than took part in the natation 
events of the last Olympic Games. Furthermore, the contestants of 
the Allied Armies were more truly representative of nations and races 
than were the contestants at the last Olympiad. True, Austria and 
Germany were strong competitors in the Olympiad mentioned and, 
for obvious reasons, were not represented in the events of 22 June to 
1 July in the Inter-Allied Swimming Championships at Lake St. James, 
Bois de Boulogne, Paris. But other nations, not in the hsts of the 
Stockholm meet, much more than satisfactorily filled their places 
at Lake St. James. 

The countries which sent in entries for the events were France, Bel- 
gium, Italy, Portugal, Roumania, Serbia, Canada, Australia, and the 
United States. 

Most of the best swimmers of these countries were entered as com- 
petitors, though in a few cases certain countries did not have indivi- 
dual champions in all the events, the war having played havoc in the 
ranks of swimmers as among the exponents of other sports. 

The fresh, clear waters of the beautiful Mare St. James in the world 
famous Bois de Boulogne, furnished probably the most picturesque 
setting ever given to a great swimming meet. The natural beauty 
of the lake was enhanced by the artistic decorations of the course 
with festoons of the flags of all nations while surrounding the entire 
cove were boxes built for spectators, these also being handsomely 
decorated. The course itself was of the standard 100-metre length 
used in all international contests of such magnitude. Permanent 
starting and turning platforms were built at each end of the course by 
the American engineers who had also accurately surveyed and attested 



See pages 401 409 417 425 for swimming pictures. 



288 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

to the course itself. The width of each platform was 25 meters. The 
full 100 metres at each side of the course was outlined with ropes, a 
float bearing the flag of one of the competing nations being placed 
every twenty meters to define the course still more clearly. 

The names of such men as Norman Ross, Biddle and Gardner, 
United States, Bacigalupo and Massa, Italy, Longworth, Hardwick 
and Solomons, Australia, Sommer, Lehu and Rigal, France, and 
Boin, Belgium, stand for swimming ability and reputation throughout 
the world. These men were the stars of the meet. Many of the 
European competitors had previously contested and won Olympic 
championships at Stockholm in 1912. 

Without question the greatest individual star of the meet was 
Lieutenant Norman Ross of the United States Air Service. Ross 
was entered in the 100-meter free style, 100-meter back stroke, 400- 
meter free style, 800-meter free style and 1500-meter free style and, 
by winning every one of these races in which he started, set a mark 
hi international swimming that has never before been attained. Besides 
winning these final races, he also had to swim in heats and in some 
instances in semifinals before he defeated the picked natators of 
the world. He was also the star player of the United States water- 
polo team which was defeated by France four goals to three, Ross 
netting two of the United States goals. Besides all this he swam 
the final two hundred meters in the relay race. 

No other swimmer was able to cope with the skill, speed and 
endurance of Ross. The hardest race of the American champion 
was the final one in the 100-meter free style when Solomons of Aus- 
tralia swam into second place three seconds behind him. The Aus- 
tralian team, which took second place in the score column with 
14 points to 21 scored by the United States, was a remarkably 
well balanced aggregation. The Australians, Longworth, Hardwick, 
and Solomons, backed up by Stedman, Dexter, Springfield and 
others, showed striking consistency in taking the second and third places. 

In the heats and semifinals of practically all events the French, 
Italians and Belgians swam well and qualified some of their men to 
go into the finals. But in the last test the swimmers of the United 
States and Australia proved too strong for the entries of their Allies, 
France alone, in the person of Somer, being the only other country 
to register a first place in any of the races. This victory was in the 
200-meter breast stroke, in which Hallard, also of France, took third 
place. Bacigalupo swam into a meritorious third place in the 1500- 





Top— Italian soccer team. Bottom— Czecho-Slovakian soccer team, wimier of championship. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 291 

meter free style by defeating Springfield and Morris, both of Australia, 
in one of the most exciting races for a place held during the meet. 

Belgium, France, Portugal, and the United States were entered 
in the water polo championship, the men from Belgium eventually 
proving themselves the champions at this game. Water Polo is one 
of the great aquatic sports of Europe and the French and Belgian 
teams both appeared to advantage in the games they played. In 
the first contest the United States met France and an exciting struggle 
resulted in the victory of the French whose team work proved too heavy 
a handicap for the Americans. By a series of clever passes and other 
evidences of thorough team coordination the French, through Rigal 
and Lehu, scored four goals, the former netting three. Of the three 
goals scored by the United States two were made by Ross and one 
by Rogers. 

The second game of the series was to have been played between 
Portugal and Belgium, but through an accident to one of its players 
Portugal was unable to go into the game, thus forfeiting to Belgium. 
This brought Belgium and France together for the final contest to 
decide the championship. The game was played on 1 July. At 
half time Belgium had scored one goal through Fleuriex and France 
had been unable to score. In the second period the contest was 
just as close. Towards the end the Belgian teamwork was at its best 
when Gludts and Steffens both secured goals making the final score, 
Belgium three, France nothing. 

The results of the entire program follow: 
100-Meter Free Style, 27 June: 

First Heat — Won by N. Ross, United States; Stedman, Australia, 
second; F. Frassinett, Italy, third; J. Gludts, Belgium, fourth. 
Time, 64 1-5 sec. 

Second Heat — Won by L. Solomons, Australia; M. Massa, Italy, 
second; G. Pouille, France, third. Time, 70 1-5 sec. 

Third Heat — Won by J. Hincks, United States; J. Dexter, Aus- 
tralia, second; M. Pernod, France, third. Time, 67 2-5 sec. 

Fourth Heat— Won by S. Biddle, United States; J. Wuyts, Bel- 
gium, second; G. Kustermann, third. Time, 72 sec. 
100-Meter Free Style, 28 June: 

First Heat — Won by N. Ross, United States; Solomons, Australia, 
second; M. Massa, Italy, third. Time, 1 m. 8 1-5 sec. 

Second Heat — Won by J. Hincks, United States; Stedman, Aus- 
tralia, second; J. Dexter, AustraHa, third. Time, 1 m. 10 2-5 sec. 



292 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

100-Meter Free Style, Finals, 30 June: 

Won by N. Ross, United States; Solomons, Australia, second; 
Stedman, Australia, third. Time, 64 3-5 sec. 
400-Meter Free Style, Trials, 26 June: 

First Heat— Won by N. Ross, United States; Hardwick, Australia, 

second; Frassinett, Italy, third. Time, 6 m. 11 sec. 
Second Heat— Won by Longworth, Australia; Biddle, United 

States, second; Belleza, Italy, third. Time, 6 m. 41 sec. 
Third Heat— Won by Stedman, Australia; Massa, Italy, second; 
Manly, United States, third; Mayand, France, fourth. Time 
6 m. 7 1-5 sec. 
400-Meter Free Style, Finals, 28 June: 

Won by N. Ross, United States; Longworth, AustraHa, second; 
Stedman, Australia, third. Time, 5 m. 40 2-5 sec. 
800-Meter Free Style, Trials, 26 June: 

First Heat — Won by Bacigalupo, Italy; Morris, Australia, second; 

Lang, United States, third. Time, 13 m. 51 1-5 sec. 
Second Heat — Won by Ross, United States, Hardwick, Austraha, 
second; Costa, Italy, third; Nivet, France, fourth. Time, 13 m. 
10 4-5 sec. 
Third Heat — Won by Longworth, Australia; Douglas, United 
States, second; Duvanel, France, third. Time, 14 m. 7 1-7 sec. 
800-Meter Free Style, Finals, 1 July: 

Won by Ross, United States; Longworth, Australia, second; Hard- 
wick, Australia, third. Time, 12 m. 34 sec. 
100-Mefer Back Stroke, Trials, 26 June: 

First Heat — Won by Ross, United States; Lehu, France, second; 

Derwin, Belgium, third. Time, 1 m. 32 2-5 sec. 
Second Heat — Won by Biddle, United States, Gardner, United 
States, second; Dujardin, France, third. Time 1 m. 36 1-5 sec. 
100-Mefer Back Stroke, Finals, 28 June: 

Won by Ross, United States; Gardner, United States, second; Lehu, 

France, third. Time, 1 m. 31 2-5 sec. 
200-Meter Breast Stroke, Trials, 27 June: 

First Heat — Won by Biersack, United States; Hallard, France, 

second; Everaerts, Belgium, third. Time, 3 m. 26 4-5 sec. 
Second Heat — Won by Sommer, France; Delahaye, Belgium, 

second; Hewell, third. Time, 3 m. 26 2-5 sec. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 293 

Third Heat— Won by Neeck, Belgium; Hermant, France, second; 
Monahan, United States, third. Time, 3 m. 28 3-5 sec. 
200-Me/er Breast Stroke, Finals, 30 June: 

Won by Sommer, France; Biersack, United States, second; Hallard, 
France, third. Time, 3 m. 24 2-5 sec. 
I,b00-Meter Free Style, Trials, 27 June: 

First Heat— Won by Bacigalupo, Italy; Springfield, Australia, 
second; Chretien, France, third; Long, United States, fourth. 
Time, 26 m. 2 2-5 sec. 
Second Heat— Won by Ross, United States; Hardwick, Australia, 
second; Morris, Australia, third; Costa, Italy, fourth. Time, 
24 m. 30 1-5 sec. 
1,500-Mefer Free Style, Finals, 30 June: 

Won by Ross, United States; Hardwick, Australia, second; Baci- 
galupo, Italy, third, Springfield, Australia, fourth; Morris, 
Australia, fifth. Time, 24 m. 22 2-5 sec. 
800-Meter Relay, 1 July: 

Won by Australia — Hardwick, Steadman, Longworth, Dexter. 
Second, United States — Ross, Hincks, Biddle, Gardner. 
Third, Italy — ^Bacigalupo, Costa, Massa, Frassinetti. 
Time, 10 m. 11 1-5 sec. 
Water-Polo, 26 June: 

France, 4 goals. — ^United States, 3 goals. 

France — Decium, Pernet, Rigal, Dujardin, Vanlaer, Jourarit, Lehu. 
U. S. — Rogers, Manly, Gardner, Douglas, McDonald, Scarry, Ross. 
Goals — France, Lehu 1, Rigal 3; U. S., Ross 2, Rogers 1. 
Water Polo, 28 June: 

Belgium. — ^Portugal withdrew. 
Water Polo, 1 July: 

Belgium, 3 — ^France, 

France — Dujardin, Perned, Decein, Rigal, Lehu, Meister, Jonault. 
Belgium — Durand, Bein, Steffens, Deman, Cludts, Fleuriex, Derwin. 
Goals — ^France, 0; Belgium, Fleuriex 1, Cludts 1, Steffens 1. 
Lt. Rogers, U.S.A., referee. 
Final Score: 

The final official score made by the contesting countries follows: 
United States, 21 
Australia, 14 

France, 5 

Italy, 2 




TENNIS 





EATURED by brilliant and hard-fought matches in every 
event, the Inter-Allied Tennis competition, contested by 
the court stars of seven nations and completed before 
the actual Games themselves, proved a triumph for France 
and Australia. With the three Antipodean players, Pat O'Hara-Wood, 
G. L. Patterson and Lycett at top speed, the Australians threatened 
to make a clean sweep on the courts. That complete victory was 
denied them, however, when Andre H. Gobert, France's leading player, 






Gobert 

of Prance, 

winner of 

Tennis 

Singles 

championship. 



O'Hara-Wood 
of Australia, 
runner up in 
Tennis 
Singles 
championship. 



defeated O'Hara-Wood forthe individual championship. Australia had 
to be content with the doubles title, team championship, and runner-up 
honors in the individual match. America's best bid was in the doubles 
in which Watson Washburn and Dean Mathey, two old intercollegiate 
and " Big Ten " stars lasted through the finals. 

Gobert and the three Australians stand out in a field of fast players; 
Gobert, former doubles champion of England, has been one of France's 
leading players since 1911. Blessed with great height and an immense 
reach, his ubiquitous racquet is equally disconcerting on either the 

See pages 133 441 for tennis pictures. 



PERSHING STADIUM PARIS 295 

back or upcourt. His play in the individual and team championships 
in singles was unconquerable. 

Pat O'Hara-Wood, Victoria champion in singles, who, paired with 
his brother Arthur, killed during the war, had also been Victoria cham- 
pion in doubles, possesses a speedy forehand drive down the line 
which is disconcertingly accurate and is his most brilliant shot. His 
defeat of Patterson, in a long, five-set match, proved his mettle. 
Lycett, teamed with O'Hara-Wood, lived up to his reputation 
as one of the most dangerous doubles players in Australia. G. L. Pat- 
terson, who contributed materially to the victory in the team event, 
is recalled as the 19-year-old stripling who just before the war was 
runner-up to Arthur O'Hara-Wood in the Australian championship. 
Possessor of a tremendous service and smash and a heavily topped 
drive on both forehand and backhand which he hits with the same 
face of the racquet, his one fault is a bit of unsteadiness off the ground. 
The other Australian entry was Ronald V. Thomas, South Australian 
champion, who plays a sound all-round game. 

The singles and doubles were played on the courts of the Racing 
Club of France, ideally situated in the beautiful Bois de Boulogne. 
The team event was staged at the Stade Frangais, in the Bois de 
Boulogne. Excellent weather prevailed throughout the week of play. 

Australia, France, America, Canada, Roumania, Czecho-Slovakia, 
Serbia and Belgium sent representatives. 

The American entries were Captain Watson Washburn, Lieutenant 
Dean Mathey, Lieutenant Harry C. Breck, Mr. Arthur Sweetser and 
Captain Neil C. Stevens. Washburn and Mathey were known to all 
American tennis enthusiasts as members of the "Big Ten" before 
they came across. Sweetser, a demobilized ofTicer, was at one time 
captain of the Harvard tennis team. Breck, a typically violent Cali- 
fornia player from Leland Stanford University, some years ago played 
Billie Johnston five sets for a sectional championship. The New 
Jersey championship was once won by Stevens. All of these five 
players won the right to represent the United States by eliminating 
other Americans. 

Samazeuilh, of Bordeaux, the best tennis player in the south of 
France, is short and stocky. His play resulted in a dogged backcourt 
game that twice overcame the hard-hitting but erratic Roumanian, 
Mishu. 

Brugnon, one of the most promising French players, who defeated 
Washburn in the French indoor and Mathey in the outdoor cham- 



296 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

pionship, has no peculiar strokes, a well-rounded game with an 
American service being his mainstay. 

The French champion, Decugis, had not shown to advantage 
during the season. He has been one of the leading players of the 
Continent for the past fifteen years but seems to have difficulty in 
coming back. He was teamed with Gobert in doubles. 

Temperament was one of the chief characteristics of the Rouma- 
nians. The team consisted of Nicholas Mishu, Horace Eremie, Rosetti- 
Balanescu, Mihail Stern and Serge Lecca. Mishu, the Roumanian 
champion, has a wide assortment of strokes and jokes often spoken 
of. In the tournament, although he lost matches to Samazeuilh and 
Gobert, his good-natured rivalry and serious actions made him a winner 
with the spectators. 

Captain Horace Eremie, one of Roumania's two delegates to the 
Inter-Allied Games, also represented his country in the courts. Though 
woefully short of practice he endeared himself to all by his enthusiasm 
and sportsmanship. 

Stern, who arrived with Lecca from Bucharest only the day before 
the tournament began, was one of the pioneers of tennis in Roumania 
and held the championship there from 1907 to 1912 inclusive. Owing 
to lack of practice he could not do himself justice. His speech at the 
tennis dinner given to the players quite brought down the house. 
It's text was: "Poland regretted; Greece wrote; Roumania came !" 

Of the Czecho-Slovaks, the Kozeluh Brothers and Burianek were 
professionals. The former showed a very sound backcourt game, 
something on the style of Froitzheim. 

Josef Kozeluh was runner-up in a professional tournament in Ger- 
many before the war. Not having had much experience in match 
play both brothers were inclined to weaken in the pinches. 

Ladislav Zemla won third prize in doubles in the Olympic Games 
in Athens in 1906, played in the Olympic Games Tournament in London 
in 1908, and won fourth prize in singles in Stockholm in 1912. At 
the outbreak of tho war he was an officer in the Austrian Army, but 
deserted to the Russians, like 400,000 of his countrymen, and fought 
as an officer in the Russian-Czeck Legion until the Russian collapse. 
After this he enlisted as a private for service in France with the Czech 
Legion, coming to France by way of Archangel. He earned another 
commission in France. The fifth Czecho-Slovakian entry was Zeman. 

Only one entry, Lt. Col. H. G. Mayes, represented Canada, and 
he defaulted after winning his first match because of orders calling 











Top— French soccer team, runners-up. Boitom— Roumanian soccer team. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 299 

him from Paris. Colonel Mayes represented Canada in the Davis 
Cup preliminaries at Lake Forest in 1914 against Brookes and Wilding. 

The Serbians had Zatka Zagar, Nedric Mirlta, Julie Brucker, and 
Boto Popovitch as representatives. Many of their matches were 
defaulted by them, so little can be judged of their playing. 

Belgium was not entered in the individual championship, but 
Washer and Lammens took part in the team tournament. Washer, 
the Belgian titleholder, played a steady back-court game, seldom 
taking the net. Lammens was his partner in doubles. 

Play in the individual singles began at the Racing Club on 26 May 
with thirty entries. The club, one of the most famous in France, 
possesses splendid courts. These and the stands were decorated 
with flags and bunting of the Allied nations. In spite of transporta- 
tion difficulties occasioned by the subway strike, big crowds were 
always on hand. 

The championship was conducted as an ordinary tournament except 
that no nation could enter more than five singles players and two 
doubles pairs. Matches were won by the best three out of five sets. 

Officials were chosen from contestants in the A.E.F. tournament 
held in Paris in May. Allied players also served as referees and linemen. 
Officials proved satisfactory and there were no disputed decisions. 

Among the distinguished guests and spectators at various times 
throughout the play were General Pershing and the members of his 
staff, Mr. Bonar Law, Mr. Balfour and several officers of the French 
and Roumanian services. 

Gobert won the individual championship of the Allied nations by 
disposing in turn of such experts as K. Kozeluh, Washburn and O'Hara- 
Wood. Although having a reputation for erratic and inconsistent 
play, he belied this and none of his victories were for long in doubt. 
His terrific first serve scored many aces and his beautiful side drives 
won point after point as well as lowering his opponent's morale. Some 
of his returns were made after the opposing player had already counted 
the point as won. 

O'Hara-Wood fought his way to the finals over Sweetser, Patterson 
and Samazeuilh only to fall an easy victim to the champion. His 
play was consistent until this last match in which he displayed his 
poorest tennis. In his five-set match with his team-mate, Patterson, 
the spectators were treated to an exhibition of clever service, driving 
and lobbing from start to finish. The victory was in doubt until 
the final point, for both players are extremely versatile. 



300 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

In the doubles, O'Hara-Wood and Lycett won from Washburn 
and Mathey in the final of four sets. This team worked perfectly 
together and, outside of their thrilling love-set match with the Kozeluh 
brothers, they had clear sailing. Washburn and Mathey gained a 
noteworthy victory over the other Australian team, Patterson- 
Thomas, in the semifinals. The result of this match kept the large 
crowd of enthusiastic rooters until after hours. The fifth set was 
won at 12-10. 

The following are the results of the Individual championship 
played at the Racing Club de France, 26 May-1 June, 1919: 
Singles: 

Preliminary round — 

Gobert, France, defeated Stern, Roumania, 6-2, 6-1, 6-1. 
K. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Mirlta, Serbia, 6-0, 

6-0, 6-0. 
Rosetti-Balanescu, Roumania, defeated Manset, France, 6-1, 

6-4, 6-0. 
Washburn, America, defeated Zeman, Czecho-Slovakia, 6-4, 

7-5, 6-4. 
Brugnon, France, defeated Zagar, Serbia, by default. 
Breck, America, defeated Burianek, Czecho-Slovakia, 6-2, 7-5, 

5-7, 5-7, 6-3. 
Lycett, Australia, defeated J. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, 7-5, 

1-6, 3-6, 11-9, 6-3. 
Patterson, Australia, defeated Sweetser, America, 6-2, 7-5, 

2-6, 7-5. 
Zemla, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Decugis, France, 6-2, 6-4, 
4-6, 6-4. 

O'Hara Wood, Australia, defeated Stevens, America, 2-6, 6-4, 

6-3, 6-1. 
Mathey, America, defeated Brucker, Serbia, by default. 
Mishu, Roumania, defeated Thomas, Australia, 6-3, 7-5, 6-8, 

6-1. 

Samazeuilh, France, defeated Lecca, Roumania, 6-2, 6-0, 6-1. 
First round — 

Gobert, France, defeated Eremie, Roumania, 6-0, 6-2, 6-1. 
K. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Rosetti-Balanescu, Rou- 
mania, 6-0, 7-5, 6-1. 
Washburn, America, defeated Brugnon, France, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. 
Breck, America, defeated Lycett, Australia, 6-1 , 6-3, 8-10, 3-6, 6-3. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 301 

Patterson, Australia, defeated Zemla, Czecho-Slovakia 6-1 
6-4, 6-2. 

O'Hara-Wood, Australia, defeated Mathey, America, 6-3, 6-4 
6-3. 

Samazeuilh, France, defeated Mishu, Roumania, 5-7, 6-4, 7-5 
1-6, 6-4. 

Mayes, Canada, defeated Popovitch, Serbia, 6-0, 6-0, 6-0. 
Second round — 

Gobert, France, defeated K. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, 6-2, 

7-5, 8-6. 
Washburn, America, defeated Breck, America, 1-6, 6-1, 6-4, 

6-2. 
O'Hara-Wood, Australia, defeated Patterson, Australia, 6-4, 

7-9, 6-2, 2-6, 7-5. 
Samazeuilh, France, defeated Mayes, Canada, by default. 
Semi-final round — 

Gobert, France, defeated Washburn, America, 6-2, 6-3, 4-6, 

6-2. 
O'Hara-Wood, Australia, defeated Samazeuilh, France, 6-4, 

6-2, 8-6. 
Finals — • 

Gobert, France, defeated O'Hara Wood, Australia, 6-2, 6-2, 

6-1. 

Doubles: 

Preliminary round — 

Washburn-Mathey, America, defeated Brugnon-Manset, 
France, 6-0, 7-5, 3-6, 6-2. 

Zemla-Burianek, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Mirlta-Popovitch, 
Serbia, by default. 

O'Hara-Wood-Lycett, Australia, defeated Kozeluh-Kozeluh, 
Czecho-Slovakia, 5-7, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. 
First round — 

Thomas-Patterson, Australia, defeated Stern-Lecca, Rou- 
mania, 6-1, 6-1, 6-1. 

Washburn-Mathey, America, defeated Zemla-Burianek, Cze- 
cho-Slovakia, 1-6, 6-3, 6-8, 6-4, 6-2. 

O'Hara-Wood-Lycett, Australia, defeated Mishu-Eremie, Rou- 
mania, 6-4, 6-1, 6-3. 

Gobert-Decugis, France, defeated Breck-Sweetser, America, 
3-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3. 



302 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Semi-fmal round— 

Washburn-Mathey, America, defeated Thomas-Patterson, Aus- 
tralia, 3-6, 6-4, 4-6, 6-1, 12-10. 
O'Hara-Wood-Lycett, Australia, defeated Gobert-Decugis, 
France, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. 

Finals^- 

O'Hara-Wood-Lycett, Australia, defeated Washburn-Mathey, 
America, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1, 6-3. 

The team championship event succeeded the individual event. 

The Stade Francais club is one of the most beautiful in France. 
Its spacious grounds for tennis, cricket, soccer, Rugby and track 
afford a most excellent place for followers of these sports. The courts 
are twelve in number with one well situated for grandstand play. 
This latter court is of red clay. The stands rise up on all four sides. 
The club house is larger than the one at the Racing Club, with spa- 
cious dressing rooms. 

In this tournament there were also seven nations represented. 
Canada dropped out and Belgium placed entries. The play started 
2 June and ended 8 June. Each nation entered two singles players 
and one double pair. The matches were played according to the 
Davis Cup scheme; that is, each singles player played the opposing 
two singles players and there was one doubles contest. In each 
match between nations there were, therefore, four singles matches 
and one doubles unless one nation could win the necessary three out 
of five in the first three or four contests. The nations were drawn 
against each other just as the players in a tournament. 

Austraha proved to have the best balanced team and won by 
defeating Serbia, France and America. O'Hara-Wood and Patterson 
were responsible for the singles victories and the former, teamed 
with Lycett, defeated all opponents in doubles. 

America was represented by Washburn and Mathey, France by 
Gobert, Samazeuilh and Decugis, Roumania by Mishu and Eremie, 
Belgium by Washer and Lammens, and Czecho-Slovakia by K. Koze- 
luh, J. Kozeluh, Zemla and Burianek. 

The Serbians defaulted all matches, although entered, in order 
to fill an earlier engagement to give a demonstration of the Sokol 
system of gymnastics at Nancy. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 303 

The following are the results of team championship tournament. 
Doubles: 

Preliminary round — 

France defeated Roumania by 4 matches to — 

Samazeuilh, France, defeated Eremie, Roumania, 6-0, 6-0, 6-3. 
Gobert, France, defeated Mishu, Roumania, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. 
Samazeuilh, France, defeated Mishu, Roumania, 3-6,7-5,-6-1, 

6-2. 
Gobert-Decugis, France, defeated Mishu-Eremie, Roumania, 

3-6, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4. 
Gobert and Eremie did not play their singles match. 
Australia defeated Serbia by default. 
Czecho-Slovakia defeated Belgium by 4 matches to 1 — 

K. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Lammens, Belgium, 

6-2, 6-2, 6-0. 
J. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Washer, Belgium, 6-8, 

6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2. 
K. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Washer, Belgium, 

12-10, 6-3, 6-1. 
J. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Lammens, Belgium, 

6-2, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2. 
Washer-Lammens, Belgium, defeated Zemla-Burianek, Czecho- 
slovakia, 6-2, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5. 
First round — 
Australia defeated France by 3 matches to 2 — 

Gobert, France, defeated O'Hara-Wood, AustraHa, 6-4, 6-3, 

6-2. 
Patterson, Australia, defeated Samazeuilh, France, 2-6, 6-3, 

6-4, 5-7, 6-2. 
Gobert, France, defeated Patterson, Australia, 6-4, 1-6, 5-7, 

7-5, 6-4. 
O'Hara-Wood-Lycett, Australia, defeated Gobert-Decugis, 

France, 2-6, 2-6, 6-3, 10-8, 6-4. 
America defeated Czecho-Slovakia by 4 matches to 1 — 

Washburn, America, defeated K. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, 

4-6, 11-9, 6-3, 6-3. 
Mathey, America, defeated J. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, 6-3, 

6-2, 6-2. 
Washburn, America, defeated J. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, 

4-6, 8-6, 6-3, 6-3. 



304 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



K. Kozeluh, Czecho-Slovakia, defeated Mathey, America, 6-2, 
6-4, 6-2. 

Washburn-Mathey, America, defeated Kozeluh-Kozeluh, Cze- 
cho-Slovakia, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2. 

Finals — 
Australia defeated America by 3 matches to — 

Patterson, Australia, defeated Washburn, America, 6-1, 4-6, 

6-1, 4-6, 7-5. 
O'Hara-Wood, Australia, defeated Mathey, America, 0-6, 8-6, 

6-0, 6-4. 
O'Hara-Wood-Lycett, Australia, defeated Washburn-Mathey, 
America, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2. 





Golf. Top— French team. Bottom Ze/(~Laflttp, Prance. Bottom center- 
Bottom riijht — J. Bomboudiac, France. 



-K. Golias, France. 




TRACK AFIELD 




FINAL TEAM STANDING 

United States 92 

France 12 

New Zealand 6 

Australia 5 

Canada 4 

Greece 1 




MERiCA's overwhelming victory in the Inter-Allied Track and 
Field meet was not altogether unexpected. Past Olympic 
Games had prepared other competing nations for the supe- 
riority of United States track and field athletes . So complete 
was the victory, however, that from the spectators' viewpoint, thrilling 
finishes and exciting competitions were tempered by the ease with 
which the blue-breeched athletes bested their less experienced 
opponents. 

The results of the Inter-Allied meet were never in doubt. Years 
ago when our forefathers established and developed the athletic 
education of the American youth, the training season began which 
has shown its fruits in many international athletic triumphs as well 
as in the strength and morale of the nation. When Charles W. Pad- 
dock and Edward Teschner drew out ahead of the field of sprinters 
and breasted the yarn across the finish of the 100 and 200-meter 
dashes, when Earl Eby and Phil Spink pulled away from the 400-meter 
champions of other nations, who apparently were more powerfully 
built, when Clyde Stout raced into victory in the 1,500-meter run- 
then could America fully appreciate its public playgrounds, its mass 
athletics and its high school and collegiate athletic programs. For 
each winner had passed through every stage from boyhood tests of 
skill to the finals of the Inter-Allied Games. 

The grace and ease with which Robert Simpson and Fred Kelly 
of the United States team flew over the high hurdles won the admira- 
tion of a multitude of French enthusiasts. Again in the low hurdles 
Simpson excelled, while his teammates, William F. Sylvester and 
Meredith House, ran close behind in a race that missed the world's 
record by a fifth of a second. 



See page 449 for track and field pictures. 



308 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

The field events showed even more plainly the superior training 
of Yankee athletes. With comparatively little effort, and that same 
nonchalant ease of motion, the lithe-limbed Americans made a clean 
sweep of nearly every field event. Far beyond the small national 
flags which marked the distances of other jumpers or weight throwers, 
the star-spangled pennants invariably waved. As the meet pro- 
gressed the spectators were asking, not "Who won?" but "Did he 
break a world's record?" 

On the smoothly rolled field at Pershing Stadium, the American 
athletes stood out above the rest as they went through their paces. 
In their neat, white shirts, red-bordered and bearing a large red 
U.S., and their navy-blue, satin track trousers, cut short enough 
to give thigh muscles full play, they presented a picture that will 
live long in the memories of the thousands of doughboys who learned 
a new appreciation of track and field athletics during those two 
weeks of games. 

In the hand-grenade throw, a new event on athletic programs, 
three Yankee soldiers took the honors among competitors of eight 
other nations, the winner being an Army Chaplain, F. C. Thompson, 
a veteran all-round athlete, who holds the present world's record. 

The discus throw is of Grecian origin, but one would not have 
suspected it after watching Charles Higgins, Richard L. Byrd, cap- 
tain of the American team, and James Duncan, the world's record- 
holder, win the first three places. Again in the pole vault three 
United States athletes soared above the rest and again their graceful 
style cheered the American watchers, proud not only of their favorites 
but of the national system that develops such performers. H. W. 
Floyd cleared the bar at 12 feet even, an impressive height to foreign 
spectators, but an average mark in American competition. 

Three American relay teams captured first place in the 800-meter, 
1,600-meter and medley relays. Directly after the 800-meter relay 
finals it was announced that the mark of 1 minute 30 4-5 seconds, 
established by the American quartette of sprinters, had clipped 
five and a fifth seconds from the world's record made at the Olympic 
Games in 1912, but it was discovered later that even this new mark 
had been eclipsed a month before at the Pennsylvania Relay Car- 
nival in the United States. 

Five years of suffering and privation have not prevented the 
development of a new and larger interest in athletics in France. The 
Inter-Allied Games, coming as they did during the days of the sign- 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 309 

ing of the peace, marked the turning point. Encouraged by their 
showing of placing second, learning much of American methods and 
forms by training with United States athletes and under a Y.M.C.A. 
trainer for weeks before the Games, and urged on by hitherto 
unequalled local press publicity, the track and field athletes of 
France are ushering in the dawn of a new era in the local sporting 
world. The spirit of participation in physical games has even reached 
the youngsters on the streets who watch with wonder crowds of sol- 
diers playing baseball and later make earnest efforts to learn the game 
themselves. 

France's total of 12 points in the Inter-Allied Games does not 
correctly tell the tale of the showing made by the Tricolor athletes. 
Had the American team withdrawn before the meet, the propor- 
tionate score would have been nearly the same with France occupying 
the top position in the point column. In nearly every event, 
especially the jumps and weights, athletes of France were just nosed 
out of the scoring by the more experienced Americans. 

To Jean Vermeulen of France belongs the honor of winning two 
Inter- Allied distance titles. Wounded in battle, one arm hangs 
limp at his side, but in spite of this physical disadvantage the hero 
of many European races outclassed the field and sprinted in many 
yards ahead in the Marathon and Gross-Country races. 

George Andre, a veteran of two Olympic Games and holder of 
many French records, went through the paces of the Pentathlon, but 
was forced to bow to younger blood. His career as a track and field 
athlete, which has probably terminated in the historic Inter-Allied 
Games, is an inspiration to the younger athletes of France. 

The Frenchman's pleasure at winning cannot be disguised by the 
mask of indifference worn by the American winner or loser. He does 
not attempt to conceal his emotions and after a winning race he 
grins proudly and searches the cheering faces in the audience for 
friends to whom he happily waves. 

Australia and New Zealand, .Anglo-Saxon brothers of Americans, 
were not represented by large teams at the Inter-Allied Games. Per- 
haps the score would have been very different if more of their cham- 
pions had taken the long trip to compete in the Games. Those 
athletes who wore the black shirt and white sprig of New Zealand, 
and the sky-blue suits with golden emblem of Australia, demon- 
strated that they had been well coached in the fine points of the game 
by their showing alongside the Americans. Mason, of New Zealand, 



310 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

in his victory over Earl Eby of the United States, proved his quality 
as a champion in the 800-meter run. Lindsay of the same country 
showed well in the sprint events, placing third in the finals of the 
200-meter dash. The Australian 1,600-meter and medley teams 
gave the American quartette a fast brush and finished as runners-up 
in both races only a few feet behind. 

Canada's athletes, too, were similar to the Americans m form 
and style of competition. The closeness of the two countries has 
developed many international sporting competitions which have 
greatly unified their athletic systems. The few Canadians entered 
made a fine showing. 

Roumania and Greece entered in every event. Persistent and 
dogged, their efforts were frequently noticed by the audience, and 
the stocky, short athletes stuck to the finish in every race however 
far they had been outdistanced. The swarthy-complexioned, dark- 
haired men from southeastern Europe proved they were sportsmen 
through and through. 

Italy's track and field athletics are undergoing the same change 
that is evident in France. Although they did not break into the 
point column the Italians were very observing of the performances 
of the winners and the large number who participated in the Inter- 
AUied Games surely took back to their country a better knowledge 
of the training systems that pave the way for victory. 

The trial heats in the 100-meter gave promise of the beautiful 
race which the final developed. In every heat the French record 
of 11 seconds was equalled and as runners seldom extend themselves 
in trials, better time was in prospect for the finish. The first semi- 
final quafified Teschner, U.S., Lindsay N.Z., Butler, U.S., and Seurin, 
France. The second admitted Paddock, U.S., Howard, Canada, 
Caste, France, and Croci, Italy. 

The start in the final was almost perfect and brought the specta- 
tors to their feet in cheers. Flashing down the straightaway to the 
75-meter mark, the sprinters were almost neck and neck; but at this 
point Charles W. Paddock, the brilliant American dash man, drew 
away and raced to the tape in splendid form, making the century 
in 10 4-5 seconds. He clipped a fifth of a second off the French mark 
and came within a fifth of the world's record. Paddock barely beat 
out his teammate, Eddie Teschner, while Howard of Canada took 
third place. Lindsay, the lank New Zealander who had twice run 
the course in 11 flat, winning both his trial heat and his semifinal 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 311 

and who was picked as a favorite against Paddock, finished last, a 
few inches behind Caste of France. 

The furlong brought fresh honors to Paddock who not only won 
the event but equalled the world's record when he sprinted the 200- 
meter distance in 21 3-5 seconds. Teschner again finished second 
and this time Lindsay registered for New Zealand by taking third place. 

The trial heats were run in slow time that hardly presaged Pad- 
dock's final successful burst of speed. The American star finished 
his first heat in 22 4-5, the best time made in any of the five 
preliminaries, but in his semifinal he was outdistanced by the Cana- 
dian, Haliburton, who ran the 200 meters this time in a fifth of 
a second less time. Teschner, the A.E.F. champion, had done his 
trial heat in 23 flat, but in the semifinal finished second to Howard, 
Canada. Lindsay again starred in the preliminaries. He won both 
his trial heat and his semifinal. Yet in the final. Paddock literally 
breezed home a yard in front of Teschner who in turn had an easy 
place. Third honors were in doubt until within five yards of the 
tape when Lindsay prevented a clean sweep for America by forging 
ahead of Haddock. 

By all odds one of the prettiest track contests of the Games, figured 
from preliminary to final, was presented by the 400-metcr dash. 
Good quartermilers seemed to abound. 

Three American runners finished first in three of the five trial 
heats, but the day's honors went to a Frenchman, Devaux, who made 
the best time and registered a clean fifteen-yard win. His teammate, 
Delvart, would have won his heat from Hume of Australia, but mis- 
judged his distance and pulled up ten yards from the finish, barely 
recognizing his mistake in time to qualify in third place. _ 

Earl Eby, the splendid American middle-distance man who finally 
won the event, ran a carefully judged first heat in slow time, but in 
his semifinal extended himself a bit more and ran the quarter in 
51 flat with ten yards of day-Hght showing between his heels and those 
of the New Zealander, Wilton. Spink, U.S., again won his heat while 
Delvart this time took his, dropping Gray of America. 

Eby was forced to fast time to win the final by his teammate, 
Spink, who furnished a surprise in his showing. One hundred meters 
from the finish Eby left the field behind and ended in 50 flat, but 
Spink was at his heels to the close and but three yards behind him. 
Spink's placing dropped Wilton of New Zealand to third place and 
kept the dashing Delvart out of the scoring. 



312 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

The little blonde champion, Eby, however, met his first European 
defeat and his match in the 800-meter run in which Mason of New 
Zealand supplied a brilHantly run and judged victory. While Mason's 
win over the national 600-yard champion was quite unexpected, sur- 
prising the spectators who were looking to see Eby repeat his quarter 
mile triumph, there was no reason to discount the possibilities of the 
Antipodean as a victor. He had already outdistanced Eby in the 
preliminary heat (the latter finished third, with Bergemeier of Aus- 
tralia second) and although neither had extended himself. Mason's 
time of 2 minutes even was good. 

In the final. Mason took an excellently calculated chance and 
practically ran a lead race all the way. Eby had to begin his final 
spurt from sixth place in the field, and did succeed in passing all but 
the New Zealander. Eby, like most of the spectators, probably 
figured that Mason had set too strenuous a pace to have a spurt left 
in him, but the Colonial surprised him. His magnificent flying 
finish brought him home a yard ahead of Eby in 1:55 2-5, breaking 
the French record. The sturdy Antipodean had outguessed and 
outrun Eby. Phil Spink ran third, a good nine yards behind his 
teammate. 

The preliminaries in the 1,500-meter run were not of exceptional 
interest except that Stout's time of 4:16 gave the correct forecast 
of the American's eventual victory. For the final, three Americans, 
Stout, Shields and Schardt, three Frenchmen, Arnaud, Delvart and 
Lacary, two Austrahans, Chalmers and Manley, and La Pierre, Canada, 
and Mason, New Zealand, qualified. 

The final, however, was prettily contested. Stout's beautiful 
spnnt in the last two hundred yards wrested first honors from Arnaud 
of France who had set a terrific pace. The Canadian, La Pierre, 
sprang a surprise on Shields who was contentedly trotting in, appar- 
ently sure of third place. La Pierre sprinted desperately and beat 
the American with his last ounce of speed. Mason, the brilliant 
New Zealander, had to give up at the last turn, utterly exhausted. 
Stout finished ten yards in front of Arnaud, his time being 4 minutes, 
5 3-5 seconds. 

Lovers of one of the prettiest forms of track competition, the short 
dashes over the barriers, had two splendid events at the Games, both 
won by the record performer. Bob Simpson of Missouri. 

In the 110-meter high hurdles event, it was Simpson and Kelly 
all the way, neither a stranger by any manner of means to men who 




Golf. Top— American team. BotUym left—PenTl O.B.SLTt,V. H. Bottom center— B.GommicT, 
France. Bottom right— F. A. Morse, T\ S. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 315 

know the ways of the sticks. The preliminaries were run off in a cold, 
drizzling rain, but in spite of that, Simpson, closely pushed by Ken- 
dell of New Zealand, tied the French record for the event, 14 4-5 
seconds. Fred Kelly, the Californian, ran a slower heat but beat out 
Best of Australia by ten yards, while Waldo Ames, American, lost to 
Wilson of New Zealand in a nose flnish at the tape. 

The final was a prettily fought race between the two Americans, 
Simpson this time clipping three-fifths of a second off the French 
record in 15 1-5, with Kelly on his shoe strings. It was a blanket 
finish, Wilson, the clever New Zealander, taking third. 

The 200-meter low-hurdles event was a clean sweep for the United 
States. In the trial heats, Sylvester, Simpson and House each won 
his race, Meredith House setting a new French record of 26 flat. He 
did it running easily. There was nothing to it but America in the 
final, Simpson, Sylvester and House finishing in the order named. 
Simpson lowered House's French mark to 24 4-5 seconds, only a 
fifth short of a world's record which he might have broken but for 
an error in the placing of the third barrier. This was two meters 
short of its proper location on the track and all ,tliree hurdlers missed 
their step on it. Sylvester is also a Missourian. 

The American entries won all three relay events without much 
difficulty. By far the most spectacular was the shortest, the 800- 
meter event, in which the two brilliant running teams. United States 
and Canada, twice took a shot at the old-world mark. Both of these 
teams ran the 800 meters in 1 minute, 33 1-5 seconds in the trial 
heats. 

In the first, Paddock, the international sprint champion, started 
off for America and gave Haddock a five yard lead. Hume of Aus- 
tralia picked up even with the latter on the third lap, but Torkelson 
took the baton to Eddie Teschner, the last American runner, with 
three yards to spare. Teschner was closely pushed by the last Aus- 
trahan and only two yards separated them at the finish. 

The Canadian heat, run in the same time, was never in doubt 
as the maple-leaf runners secured a long lead over France in the first 
lap and never lost it. On the last lap Seurin of France picked up 
ten yards on Johnson of Canada in a desperate sprint but was still 
five yards behind him at the finish. 

Unaware at the time that a new record had just been set at the 
Penn Relays, race officials were confident that the time clipped 2 4-5 
seconds from the world's record. It was lowered still further m the 



316 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

finals which the American team raced in 1 minute, 30 4-5 seconds, 
after a thrilling contest with the Canadians, barely nosing them out 
by three yards. Although not a new record, the time was a notable 
achievement when it is remembered that the old Stockholm figure of 
1:36 was set by such a great quartette as Shepherd, Reidpath, Mere- 
dith and Lindberg. 

In the final Paddock ran first for America and again touched 
off Haddock with a five yard lead. Fred Zoellin, formerly of the 
Chicago A.A., who carried the baton in the second lap for Canada, 
made up two yards, but Torkelson, another Chicago A.A. man, got 
a perfect exchange and kept his four-yard lead. Teschner ran the 
last relay against the Canadian, Haliburton, and the latter's most 
desperate efforts could not gain on him. 

Not run in as fast comparative time, the 1,600-meter relay pre- 
sented a splendid competition in which America only succeeded in 
winning in the final lap. Four nations withdrew their teams before 
the race, making preliminaries unnecessary, and Australia and France, 
the only other entries, finished in that order. The time was 3 
minutes, 38 4-5 seconds. 

Tom Campbell of the University of Chicago, who ran first, picked 
up a ten yard lead, but the next two "Aussies" evened it up so that 
Teschner was touched off five yards behind Fraser. He lay back 
until within 100 meters of the tape when, being a dash man and not 
a quartermiler, he opened up with the same brand of speed that 
brought him the A.E.F. sprint championship and flashed across 
the tape in front of the Australian. The winning team was composed 
of Tom Campbell, V. H. Campbell, Mehan and Teschner. 

The third relay title won by the United States team was captured 
by the quartette which ran the medley — Carl Haas, William Gray, 
Tom Campbell and M.L. Shields. Touched off for his 1,600 meters 
a yard ahead of Manley of Australia, Shields carried the bamboo 
across the tape ten yards ahead of the Australian. The United States 
team was first, Australia second and France third. 

Few achievements of the Inter-Allied Games proved as popular 
as the double victory of the crippled French war hero, Jean Vermeulen, 
in the cross-country run and the modified Marathon. The former 
did not count as a program event but the latter netted a title for France. 
Notwithstanding his crippled arm, Vermeulen, grizzled veteran of 
many a long-distance grind' found no difficulty in besting the pick 
of the rival teams in the Marathon. He was pitted against many of 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 317 

the best distance runners in the game. Fred Faller, United States, 
ran a plucky race and finished a good second but thirty yards behind 
the flying heels of the broadly grinning Vermeulen. Clyde Stout, 
the Inter-Allied 1,500-meter champion, finished in fourth place, run- 
ning strongly. Masset of Canada was fifth and Giannakapolis of 
America sixth. Third place went to France's other contender, Heuet. 
The modified Marathon was run in 55 minutes, 11 4-5 seconds. 

Robert L. Le Gendre, United States, won the Pentathlon, his 
teammate, Vidal, placing second, and Andr6, the veteran French 
athlete, third. To clearly demonstrate his individual superiority over 
the field, Le Gendre won two first places in the five listed events and 
took second place in the other three. His firsts were in the 200-meter 
sprint and the broad jump. Le Gendre, a Georgetown University 
star in America, holds the Pentathlon title for the Penn Relays. His 
victory in the five-event match was over a very small field of nine 
representing five nations. 

The three programmed weight events resulted in a remarkable 
clean sweep for the United States athletes of all but one third place, 
although the javelin throw was a new event to the American entries. 
The long distance weight heaving of the Americans stood out so 
easily over the others as to deprive the events of real competitive 
interest. 

George Bronder of Cornell, the American recordholder, tossed 
the spear 183 feet, 3 inches for the international javelin title, Liver- 
sedge of the University of California being but a little over five feet 
behind him. Greece won third place in this event, Lt. E. Zirganos 
displacing Wagoner. J. T. Butler, Louisiana College, was disquali- 
fied by failure to enter the event properly. But for this the United 
States team would have won every place in all the weights. 

The shot-put results were certain from the start, three Ameri- 
cans and one Frenchman qualifying for the finals, and in the latter 
finishing in the same order as in the trials. E. R. Caughey, Stanford 
University, won the event with a heave of 45 feet, 2 1-4 inches for 
the 16-pound ball. Second place went to Harry Liversedge of the 
University of California, and third to Wallace C. Maxfield formerly 
of Lafayette College. 

The discus is probably the prettiest of the weight events still 
retained for athletic competition. While the United States again 
took all three places, the finals sprung a slight surprise. Higgins of 
Chicago, who had been consistently distanced by Richard L. Byrd 



318 THE JNTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

of Illinois, Captain of the American team, placed first with a splendid 
throw of 134 feet, 1 inch, Byrd being second. Johnny Duncan, the 
world's recordholder who had risen from a sick bed to qualify, won the 
third place for America. The practice of using the flags of the com- 
peting nations to mark the distances achieved proved popular. 

Although the hammer throw was not on the program, Pat Ryan 
and William McCormick of the United States gave an exhibition, the 
former falling short of his own world's record in the event. 

The running broad jump event proved an ail-American affair. 
Butler, the big negro from Dubuque College, Iowa, was the 
star performer and placed first with a jump of 24 feet, 9 3-4 inches- 
less than 3 inches from the world's record. Harry Worthington, 
A.E.F. champion, took second a few inches behind, and Leo Johnson, 
also of America, finished third. In the trials the three winners 
placed in the same order that they showed in the finals, and Keddell 
of New Zealand, made a good fourth, which was the best he could do 
against the above field on the last lap for the record. 

William H. Taylor, formerly of the Illinois A.C., outjumped his 
rivals in the standing broad jump, chalking up a mark of 11 feet, 
1 inch, while James Humphries of Texas, finished a good second, 
and Moreau of France took third place in the event for the Tricolor. 
In the trials, the above order was slightly different, Taylor and Hum- 
phries being reversed in place, Moreau holding third, and Proux, 
another French athlete, being the fourth man to qualify for the finals. 

Honors in the running high jump went to the United States. 
Larson of the American team easily winning at 6 feet, 7-8 inch. 
His teammates, Templeton and Rice, tied for second place with 
Labat of France. All the winners in the final, together with Lowden 
and Mathey, France, and Ghiringhelh, Italy, had previously quali- 
fied in the trials by clearing the bar at 5 feet 6 1-4 inches. 

America made another clean sweep in the hop, step and jump 
event, Prem placing first with 46 feet, 5 1-2 inches. Bender second 
with 44 feet, 8 inches, and Madden third with 44 feet, 5 1-2 inches. 

Contrary to the showing made in the trails, the American team 
had an easy time taking all three places in the pole vault finals. 
F. W. Floyd's splendid season was brought to a fine close when he 
soared over the bar at 12 feet even. L. S. Ervin, Drake University, 
took second honors, and Harwood secured third place for the U.S. 
All three French contestants were eliminated at the ll-feet-4-inches 
mark, which proved a big surprise in the case of Francquemelle whose 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 319 

wonderful form during the trials had made him a favorite for the 
title. Gajan and Girard of France also qualified by clearing the 
lO-feet-4-inches mark in the trials but they failed to show enough 
to place in the finals. 

Of the unprogrammed events, the, 10,000-meter cross-country 
run over the natural obstacles and barriers in and around Joinville- 
le-Pont, finished in the Stadium, was the most interesting. It was 
this event which was won by Jean Vermeulen, France, with Broos, 
Belgium, second, and Heuet, France, third. The time was 31 minutes, 
38 4-5 seconds. 

. Seven nations competed in the spectacular hand-grenade event, 
in which Chaplain F. C. Thompson of the United States Army set a 
new world's record of 245 feet, 11 inches. S.H.Thompson andWyca- 
vage, both American, took the other two places. There were 24 entries. 

There were two special events for competitors from the Armies 
of Occupation. A jump of 6.60 meters gave Madden of America 
first place in the running broad jump. Nespoh, Italy, was second, 
and Coulon, France, third. 

In the 800-meter relay race Italy protested the initial victory of 
France, but in the runoff the French team finished first again, 
America retaining third place. 

Coming, as it did, coincidentally with peace after five years of 
world conflict, the Inter-Allied meet united the friendly bonds of 
the Allies and gave a new birth to the temporarily forgotten track 
and field athletics. Living together, training together and playing 
together for weeks before the Games at Pershing Stadium, the athletes 
of the different nations developed a sympathetic understanding, 
exchanged knowledge of the game and laid the foundations of a closer 
friendship cemented by the common cause which had brought them 
together. 

The complete summaries of the Track and Field events of the 
Inter-AUied Games follow: 
lOO-rriBter Dash: 

Preliminaries — 

1st heat— Teschner, U.S.; Seurin, France;Valianato, Roumania, 

Time— 0:11. 
2nd heat— Lindsay, New Zealand; Haliburton, Canada; Garter, 

Australia. Time — 0:11. 
3rd heat— Butler U. S.; Hume, Australia; Zoellin, Canada. 

Time— 0:11. 



320 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

4th heat— Howard, Canada; Caste, France; Grigeresco, Rou- 

mania. Time 0:11 1-5. 
5th heat— Paddock, U. S.; Crocci, Italy; Tirard, France. 

Time— 0:11. 
Semi-finals — 

1st heat— Teschner, U. S.; Lindsay, New Zealand; Butler, 

U. S.; Seurin, France. Time — 0:11. 
2nd heat— Paddock, U. S.; Howard, Canada; Caste, France; 

Crocci, Italy. Time — 0:11. 
Finals — 

Charles W. Paddock, U. S.; Edward A. Teschner, U. S.; J. A. 

Howard, Canada. Time— 0:10 4-5. 

200-Meter Dash: 
Preliminaries — 

1st heat — ^Lindsay, New Zealand; Carter, Australia; Crocci, 

Italy. Time— 0:23 1-5. 
2nd heat — Paddock, U. S.; Harrowing, Canada; Gauthier, 

France. Time— 0:22 4-5. 
3rd heat — Haliburton, .Canada; Hume, Australia; Seurin, 

France. Time— 0:23 1-5. 
4th heat — Teschner, U. S.; Tirard, France; Petrovici, Rou- 

mania. Time — 23. 
5th heat — Howard, Canada; Haddock, U. S.; Carroll, Austra- 
lia. Time— 23 1-3. 
Semi-finals — 

1st heat — Howard, Canada; Teschner, U. S.; Carter, Australia. 

Time 22 3-5. 
2nd heat — Lindsay, New Zealand; Haddock, U. S.; Seuriii, 

France. Time— 22 2-5. 
3rd heat — Haliburton, Canada; Paddock, U. S.; Carroll, Aus-^ 
tralia. Time 22 3-5. 
Finals — 

Charles W. Paddock, U. S.; Edward A. Teschner, U. S.; John 
Lindsay, New Zealand. Time — 21 3-5. 
400-Meier Run. 
Preliminaries — ■ 

Istheat— Eby, U. S.; Bernardoni, Italy; Glodariu, Roumania; 

Time— 0:53 3-5. 
2nd heat — Devaux, France; Bergemeier, Australia; Wilton, 
New Zealand. Time— 0:53 4-5. 




Rowing. Top-Portuguese eight. Cmter-Belgian eight. Bo/toni-Czecho-Slovakian eight. 

21 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 323 

Srd heat — Candelori, Italy; Hume, Australia; Delvart, France. 

Time— 0:53 1-5. 
4th heat— Spink, U. S.; Dumont, France; Tittle, Canada. 

Time— 0:53 1-5. 
5th heat — Gray, U. S.; Johnson, Australia; Smet, Belgium. 
Time — 0:54. 
Semi-finals — 

1st heat — Eby, U. S.; Wilton, New Zealand; Hume, Australia. 

Time— 0:51. 
2nd heat — Delvart, France; Gray, U. S.; Candelori, Italy. 

Time— 0:51 4-5. 
3rd heat — Spink, U. S.; Devaux, France; Johnson, Australia. 
Time 0:52 4-5. 
Finals — 

Earl A. Eby, U. S.; Philip M. Spink, U. S.; James H. R. Wilton, 
New Zealand. Time— 0:50. 
800-Meter Run: 
Preliminaries — 

1st heat — Mason, New Zealand; Bergemeier, Australia; Eby, 

U. S. Time— 2:00.. 
2nd heat — -Eraser, Australia; Heilbuth, France; Spink, U. S. 

Time— 2:01. 
3rd heat — Scudder, U. S.; Chalmers, Australia; Delarge, Bel- 
gium. Time— 2:03 4-5. 
Finals — 

Daniel L. Mason, New Zealand; Earl A. Eby, U. S.; Phihp 
M. Spink, U. S. Time— 1:55 2-5. 
1500-Me;er Run: 
Preliminaries — 

1st heat — Mason, New Zealand; Shields, U. S.; Arnaud, 
France; Manley, Australia; La Pierre, Canada. Time— 4:18. 
2nd heat — Stout, U. S.; Delvart, France; Chalmers, Australia, 
Lacary, France; Schardt, U. S. Time— 4:16. 
Finals — 

Clyde J. Stout, U. S.; Henri Arnaud, France; H. E. La Pierre, 
Canada. Time— 4:05 3-5. 

Modified Marathon: 
Finals- 
Jean Vermeulen, France; .Fred, Faller, U. S.; Danton Heuet, 
France. Time — 55:11 4-5. 



324 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

llO-Meter High Hurdles: 
Preliminaries — 

1st heat— Simpson, U. S.; Kendell, New Zealand; Time— 0:16 

4-5. 
2nd heat— Kelly, U. S.; Best, Australia. Time— 0:16 4-5. 
3rd heat — Wilson, New Zealand; Ames, U. S. Time— 0:16. 
Finals — 

Robert L. Simpson, U. S.; Fred W. Kelly, U. S.; Harold E.Wil- 
son, New Zealand. Time— 0:15 1-5. 
200-Meier Low Hurdles: 
Preliminaries — 

1st heat — Sylvester, U. S.; Poulenard, France; Spenrer, Aus- 
tralia. Time— 0:25 4-5. 
2nd heat — Simpson, U, S.; Buchon, France; Best, Australia. 

Time— 0:26 4-5. 
3rd heat — House, U. S.; Andre, France; Smet, Belgium. 
Time--0:25. 
Finals — 

Robert I. Simpson, U. S.; William F. Sylvester, U. S.; Mere- 
dith House, U. S. Time— 0:24 4-5. 
Running High Jump: 
Trials — 

Labat, Lowden, Mathey, France; Rice, Larson, Templeton, 
U.S., and Ghiringhelli, Italy, qualified by clearing the bar 
at 5 feet, 6 1-4 inches. 
Finals — 

Clinton Larson, U. S.; tie for second between Andre Labat, 
France, Carl V. Rice, U. S. and Robert L. Templeton, 
U. S. Height — 6 feet, 7-8 inch. 
Running Broad Jump. 
Trials — 

Butler, U. S. 23 ft. 2 in.; Worthington, U. S. 22 ft. 9 in.; 
Johnson, U. S.; Kendell, New Zealand. 
Finals- 
Solomon Butler, U. S.; Harry T. Worthington, U. S.; Leo 
T. Johnson, U. S. Distance— 24 ft, 9 3-16 inches. 
Standing Broad Jump: 
Trials- 
Humphries, U. S. 10 ft. 6 in.; Taylor, U. S.; Moreau, France; 
Proux, France. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 325 

Finals — 

William H. Taylor, U. S.; James V. Humphries, U. S.; Emile 
Moreau, France. Height — 11 ft, 1 in. 
Hop, Step and Jump: , 

Finals — 

Herbert Prem, U. S.; Charles A. Bender, U. S.; John E. Madden, 
U. S.; Distance — 46 ft, 2 1-8 in. 

Pole Vault: 
Trials- 
Floyd, Ervin, Harwood, U. S.; Francquemelle, Gajan and 
Girard, France, qualified by clearing the bar at 10 ft, 4 in. 
Finals — 

Florin W. Floyd, U. S.; Louis Ervin, U. S.; Robert Harwood, 
U. S.; Height— 12 ft. 
Javelin Throw: 
Finals — 

George Bronder, U. S.; Harry Liversedge, U. S.; Eustathios 
Zirganos, Greece. Distance — 183 ft, 3 in. 
Discus Throw: 
Trials — 

Byrd, U. S. 131 ft. 2 in.; Higgins, U. S.; Duncan, U. S.; Gui- 
seppe, Italy. 
Finals — 

Charles Higgins, U. S.; Richard L. Byrd, U. S.; James Duncan. 
U. S. Distance— 134 ft, 1 in. 
16-pound Shot Put: 
Trials — 

Caughey, U. S.; Liversedge, U. S.; Maxfleld, U. S.; Paoli, 
France. Distance — 13.35 meters. 
Finals — 

Edward R. Caughey, U. S.; H. Liversedge, U. S.; Wallace 
C. Maxfield, U. S. Distance — 45 ft, 2 1-4 in. 
800-Meter Relay: 
Preliminaries — 

1st heat— United States, Australia, Italy. Time— 1:33 1-5. 
2nd heat— Canada, France, Belgium. Time— 1:33 1-5. 
Finals — 

United States, G. W. Paddock,^ Marshall Haddock, Jr., E. A., 
Torkelson, Edward A. Teschner; Canada, J. A. Howard, F.J. 



326 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Zoellin, R. Haliburton, 0. P. Johnson; Australia, E. Carter, 

J. L. Hume, W. Johnson, H.B.Carroll. Time— 1 : 30 4-5. 
1600-Meter Relay: 
Finals — 

United States, Tom Campbell, Edward J. Meehan, Earle 

H. Campbell, Edward A. Teschner; Australia, Charles E. 

Bergemeier, William Johnson, Leslie J. Hume, Thomas Eraser; 

France, Andre Devaux, Henri Delvart, Raoul Dumont, Rene 

Laubertrand. Time— 3:28 4-5. 
Medley Relay: 

United States, Carl F. Haas, William C. Gray, F. F. Campbell, 

M. L. Shields; Australia, Leslie J. Hume, E. Carter, C. E. 

Bergemeier, Clifford Manley; France, J. R. Seurin, Poulenard, 

Dandelot, Lacary. 
Pentathlon: 



No. 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



Name 

and 

Country 

Le Gendre, Amer 
Vidal, America. . . 
Andre, Prance . . . 
Blades, Canada . . 

Salvi, Italy 

Norman, America 

Costa, Italy 

Gaillard, France. . 



Time or Distance 



200 M 
Dash 

22.4 

24.4 

23 

23.6 

24 

24.6 

25.2 

25.4 



Kun. 
Broad 
Jump 
6.575 
6.41 
5.842 
5.918 
6.095 
5.41 
5.272 
5.587 



16-lb 

Shot 

Put 

11.335 

10.825 

11.618 

10.669 

10.5 

10.971 

9.25 

9.485 



Discus 



34.2 
35 83 
29 5 
28.03 
27.42 
32.253 
27^62 
29.05 



Score by Points Total 



1500 
Meter 

Run 
5.10,6 
4.45 
5.10,8 
4.44,4 
4.51 
5.10 
5.25 



ZOOM Runn. 

Dash Braad 
Jump 

120 119 
70 112 

105 90 
90 93 
80 100 
65 72 

, 52 67 
48 79 



16-lb. 

Shot 

Put 

77 

67 

82 

63 

60 

69 

48 

50 



Discos. 



81 
92 
58 
50 
47 
71 
48 
55 



1500 
Meter 
Rio 
64 
90 
64 
91 
84 
65 
50 




461 
431 
399 
387 
371 
342 
265 
232 



EVENTS NOT COUNTING FOR POINTS ^ALL FINALS 



Hand-Grenade Throw: 

F. C. Thomson, U. S.; S. H. Thompson, U. S.; D. C. Wycavage, 
U. S. Distance— 245 feet, 11 inches. 
Cross-Country Run: 

Jean Vermeulen, France; Auguste Broos, Belgium; Gaston 
Heuet, France. Time — 31:38 4-5. 
800-MeZer Relay (Armies of Occupation): 

France, Italy, United States, 
Running Rroad Jump (Armies of Occupation): 

John E. Madden, U. S.; Nespoli, Italy; Coulon, France. Dis- 
tance 21 feet, 8 inches. 



HAND-GRENADE THROWING 

In spite of the fact that the American method of throwing a 
baseball was opposed by instructors in hand-grenade throwing, this 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 327 

style won over all others in the Hand-grenade Throwing contests 
at the the Inter-Allied Games. The Americans took the first three 
places in the event, Greece taking fourth. An Army chaplain made 
the best throw in the finals. The records for the first four places were: 

Chaplain F. C. Thompson (U.S.) 74.929 metres 

S. H. Thompson (U.S.) 73.135 " 

Sgt. D. C. Wycavage (U.S.) 70.40 " 

Zirganos (Greece) 69.31 " 

This was the first appearance of grenade throwing in a great athletic 
meet although grenades have been used in warfare for centuries. It 
is recorded that the pirates of the Mediterranean threw bottles filled 
with powder when they pillaged the villages along the shores. Gre- 
nades, deriving their name because of their shape from the French 
word for pomegranate, came into common use about 1660 and thence- 
forward nearly every war saw some improvements in their fabrica- 
tion or the methods of using, them. First the French and then the 
English, 1670 and 1680, introduced elite companies of grenadiers into 
their regiments, the special duty of these organizations being to cre- 
ate breaches in an enemy's defensive works by the use of grenades 
and axes. At the time of the Napoleonic wars the use of grenades 
had so increased that many independent battahons and in the 
French service even brigades and divisions of grenadiers were formed. 
Later in the 19th century grenades became obsolete but they were 
revived with modern high explosives during the siege of Port Arthur 
in 1904, and soon after the beginning of the Great War in 1914, owing 
to the development of position warfare, their advantages as offensive 
and defensive weapons quickly became apparent and grenade throwing 
was introduced universally in all armies. 

The over arm motion, with the elbow almost rigid, was adopted 
by the Americans from the English. But when the American soldier 
was away from his instructors he invariably threw the hand grenade 
baseball fashion — the method of throwing that he had learned from 
childhood in America and probably the most efficient of all methods 
for hurling objects of any kind. 

One of the chief objections of the first instructors to the American 
baseball throw was that the grenade is heavier than a baseball and 
that therefore the arm could not stand the strain of the whip-hke 
throw. The Americans overcame this by practising with lighter 
objects — usually baseballs — and threw the grenade only thirty- five to 
fifty yards when they did throw it in practice. 



328 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

The finals at Pershing Stadium, held 25 June, did not produce 
the best throw that had been made. In an elimination contest in the 
Third American Army, Sergeant C. D. Radabaugh of the 5th Marines 
had made a throw of 259 feet, while in the eliminations for the selec- 
tion of the American contestants Chaplain Thompson threw the 
grenade 251 feet. 

The rules which governed the event were very liberal, allowing, any 
style of throw to be used. The French F-1 Defensive Grenade was 
adopted as the official grenade. 

Experts who have studied the development of grenade throwing 
claim that future competitions will bring out men who will far exceed 
the records already made. Some claim that a throw of 90 metres is 
not at all improbable in the near future. 

In the throwing Zirganos of Greece demonstrated the form that is 
probably most approved by those who have specialized in grenade 
throwing. He put his body behind the throw. Seriaud of France, 
and Tsevoukas of Greece also used distinctly the body throw. In 
other words the baseball throw won in the first competition over the 
body throw, but supporters of the body throw still contend that 
further development will result in the body throw winning with its 
advantage of avoiding strain, thus enabling the throwers of the future 
to practice more than those who use the baseball style of throw. 

The judges and officials of the javelin throw conducted the grenade 
throwing contests. 

The following were the records made by all the entries in the event : 

Australia FHck 59.95 metres 

C. W. Drysdale. . . 56.23 

Belgium Schaekers 61 .62 

Verpoorter 60.54 " 

Wynaud 59.48 

Canada Clarke 55.71 

Johnson 57.33 

France Bourgeois 67.02 " 

Miramont 54.71 

Seriaud 67.32 

Italy Dreste 51 .68 

Pasquale 66.39 

Greece Tsevoukas 67.41 

Papaioannou . . . . 64.91 " 

Zirganos 69.31 

United States .. . F.C.Thompson. 74.929 
S. H. Thompson . 73.135 
Wycavage 70.40 " 




Rowing. Top— Canadian eight. Center Zc/i— Italian eight. Center riff/ii— Australian eight. 

Bottom — New Zealand eight. 




TUG OF WAR 





HE United States Tug-of-war team won the Inter-Allied 
championship by a clean sweep of victories. Matched 
against the heavy Belgian eight in the finals, the Yankee 
giants made short work of the first bout, pulling the red- 
black-and-yellow athletes to and over the line in fourteen seconds. 
Not by clever trick work was their victory accomplished, but by the 
puUing of a strong team of well-trained, powerful soldiers, who 
could have dragged over the 20-mule borax team had it been entered 
in the Inter-Allied Games. 

The first match pitted the doughboys against the French team. 
In less than a minute in each pull they hauled the Tricolor eight off 
its feet and qualified to meet the ItaUans who had won their way to 
the semifinals by beating the Canadians in two out of three. 

The feature of the Tug-of-war matches was the Canadians' pecuhar 
style of shifting the rope from a front position to a firm grip over 
their shoulders and back without losing ground during the operation. 
Their trick proved successful but it did not conform to the rules and 
the Maple Leaf athletes were disqualified. 

By beating Australia the Belgian team survived the preliminaries 
and qualified to meet the Americans in the final contest. They were 
no match for the United States Army men whose powerful, steady 
heaves earned them the Inter-Allied championship in less than a 
minute. 

The composition of the winning team and the runner-up follows: 

United States: Johnson, Johnston, Fay, Posey, Mathesson, Rouse, 
Shaw, McFarren, Cobb, Moser, Fields. 

Belgium: Gill, Bultuyck, Den Tweck, Van Eecke, Vandeille. 
Nichalaos, Servaes, Vandenborn, Casiers, Lambrecht, Reymen. 



See page 457 for tug-of-war pictures. 




XMMMMMMJ/OimmmmSlMlimiMMiMilMMIMi 



MASS GAMES 





NE of the repeatedly announced purposes of the Inter- 
Allied Games was to revive athletics with their beneficial 
results in all the Allied countries. With this in mind the 
Games Committee arranged a series of demonstrations 
under the direction of Dr. H. F. Kullenberg of the Y.M.C.A. The 
games were those used in the American Army, almost all of thein 
being of the nonequipment variety. The advantage these mass 
games have over more highly specialized athletics is in the fact 
that every man takes part. 

The demonstrations were given in the Stadium and were distri- 
buted throughout the two weeks of competitions. On Sunday, 
29 June, a large crowd of French civilians watched the play with 
interest. It was probably the first time the French had been given 
an insight into the secret of America's wide range of athletics. They 
saw men in great numbers playing games, not specialized, but games 
that required energy, alertness, and coordination. Other countries 
also had men at the Stadium especially studying this plan to bring 
physical recreation to all the people rather than to a few specialists. 

The games demonstrated were chosen to illustrate specific theories. 
For instance, every game used was one that could be introduced 
among employees of industrial plants, into boys' camps, high schools, 
colleges and rural districts, without any outlay for equipment or 
training methods. Throughout all of the mass games the play spirit 
predominated. This made the games more valuable than other 
forms of physical training, as, for example, the setting-up drills so 
tedious to the average man. 

The games included dual competition such as Horseback Wrest- 
ling, Rooster Fighting and Hand Wrestling. The purpose of such 
games is to develop confidence in hand-to-hand encounter aside 
from the other physical benefits. 

Ring games, Three Deep and Three Link, develop quickness of decis- 
ion, agihty and the ability to think on the go. And there were games 
that were played just for the fun. They were strictly recreative and 
mcluded Swat Tag, Spin the Kaiser, and others. Relay races— Leap- 

See page 465 for mass games picture. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 333 

Frog, Horseback, Hat, and Chariot — ^were introduced to develop 
speed, agility and quickness of foot. 

The games were demonstrated by companies of the 111th Pioneer 
Infantry and Second Battalion of the 7th Engineers, 5th Division. The 
men had not been especially trained in the games, but in the big arena 
their play periods ran off with the smoothness of a well-organized 
gymnasium class. They were divided into platoons and the different 
groups, in different parts of the arena, played the same games simul- 
taneously. 

The programs carried in the mass demonstrations follow: 

29^June, 1919, 2:30 p.m. 

A. Demonstrating nonequipment activities. 

I. Relay Races a. Paul Revere. 

b. Horseback. 

n. Ring Games a. Broncho Tag. 

b. Three Links. 

III. Dual Competition a. Dog and Snake. 

b. Horseback Wrestling. 

c. Rooster Fight. 

IV. Special a. Spin the Kaiser. 

b. Blind Man's Swat. 

V. Relay Races a. Skin the Snake. 

b. Hat. 

c. Chariot. 

B. Four Games of Playground Ball. 

30 June, 1919, 4:10 p. m. 

A. Nonequipment. 

I. Relay Race a. Leap Frog. 

b. Paul Revere. 

c. Equipment. 

II. Ring Games a. Three Links Tag. 

b. Broncho Tag. 

III. Dual Competitions... a. Horseback Wrestling. 

b. Rooster Fight. 

IV. Special a- Swat Tag 

b. Skm the Snake. 

c. Blind Man's Swat. 

[V. Relay Races a- Centipede. 

b. Hat. 

c. Chariot. 



334 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

B. Simple Equipment. 

I. Team Games a. Two games of Playground 

Ball. 

b. Three games of Volleyball. 

1 July, 1919, 2:00 p.m. 

I. Relay Races a. Tunnel with Medicine Ball. 

b. Mine Sweeper. 

II. Dual Competition. . . a. Horseback Wrestling. 

b. Rooster Fight. 

III. Special a. Tug of War. 

b. Swat Tag. 

IV. Relay Races a. Centipede. 

b. Three-legged. 

c. Spiral. 




CHAPTER XVII 

CLOSING CEREMONIES 



y^^Z*,^v/'■T,•i 




OMiNG between the two greatest fetes celebrated by liberty- 
loving people — American Independence Day and French 
Bastille Day — the closing exercises of the Inter-Allied 
Games, on Sunday, 6 July, caught Paris in its happiest 
mood. Peace had but recently been signed, and the world was just 
beginning to grasp the fact. The city was taking on the beautiful 
dress it was to wear on the Fourteenth of July. In fact, the people 
who had begun the Fete of Peace with the signing of the treaty accepted 
the closing exercises as a part of the grand fortnight just as they 
accepted the Fourth of July. 

It seemed as though all Paris and the Armies of the Allies tried 
to get into the Stadium, for the people were all in truly holiday mood. 

The two outstanding features of the last afternoon were the pre- 
sentation of the prizes to the winners of the Games by General Pershing 
and the hoisting of the Tricolor over the Stadium. 

With the 30,000 spectators standing at attention and salute, and 
some of the finest soldiers America has ever produced at "present 
arms" in the big arena while the bands played The Star Spangled 
Banner followed by the Marseillaise, the flags of the Allies were slowly 
lowered. At the last notes of the music, Colonel See, chief French 
representative on the Advisory Committee, a distinguished figure in 
blue wearing numerous medals, stood directly in front of the reviewing 
stand where General Pershing and other officers were at salute, and 
hauled the flag of France to the mast head in front of the Tribune 
d'Honneur. The games were over and the Stadium belonged to France. 

Except for this touch of military formality — one of the prettiest 
of all the two weeks' ceremonies— the closing day program was marked 
by its simplicity. A band in front of the Tribune d'Honneur played 
popular and military music between the different parts of the program. 

The baseball game between the United States and Canada to decide 
the championship resulted in the defeat of the wearers of the Maple 
Leaf. In order to clear the arena the Canadians agreed to stop at the 
end of the seventh inning with a one-sided score of 12 to 1 against 
them. A boxing bout that was a slashing affair between Pettibridge 
of Australia and Spalla of Italy resulted in the Italian winning the 
Hght heavyweight title. These two events constituted the only 
competitions of the day. 



336 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

As the Games ended, selected troops from the Army of Occupation 
entered, led by their band, and took a line formation in the field. 
Behind them came the athletes — winners of the different events. The 
hundreds of muscular competitors in track and field garb, as well 
as the sprinkling of officers in uniform who had won in the military 
events, presented a striking picture. 

General Pershing, assisted by M. Henry Pate and a number of 
French and American officers, mounted the reviewing stand which 
had been erected in front of the center of the Tribune d'Honneur. 
Each athlete crossed the stand and received his prize, or prizes, at the 
hands of the Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces. 

Many of the winners were given ovations. General Pershing showed 
himself well posted on the situation and had a word for each man. To 
those who had particularly distinguished themselves he often talked 
earnestly and with enthusiasm. He shook each man by the hand. 
There was little of the military spirit about this part of the program. 
The winners of the military events, of course, saluted, and the Com- 
mander-in-Chief returned the courtesy. Occasionally a man in track 
or football uniform saluted, but most of them received the congratu- 
lations of General Pershing and his handshake with a happy smile. 

To the Czecho-Slovaks, who by winning the championship in soccer 
had brought the first athletic honors to their new country. General 
Pershing talked long and earnestly. The huge trophy, the magnifi- 
cent cock of Verdun, was one of the finest of all. The team was 
accorded a great reception by the crowd. Ross, of America, who 
won the swimming meet practically alone received an ovation when 
he took his armful of prizes from General Pershing. The big crowd 
gave a rousing cheer to Jean Vermeulen, the battered, high-spirited 
veteran of the war, whose pluck won for France the cross-country 
and modified Marathon runs. The smile of Sol. Butler, the American 
negro sprinter, was contagious. The crowd cheered him, The Rou- 
manians, who had proved themselves such thorough sportsmen,: even 
when losing, never failed to receive applause. 

A happy arrangement of the program gave the number of each 
man and his name. A big placard on the chest of every one of the 
winners bore his number. Reference to the program, well arranged 
and grouped, enabled the spectators to know instantly who was receiv- 
ing his prize. 

The Stadium had already been officially presented to the French 
on the Opening Day. The lowering of the Allied flags merely marked 
in a ceremonial sense, the conclusion of the Inter-Allied Games. 




PANORAMIC VIEW OF 




; STADIUM ON CLOSING DAY 




f CLOSING DAY 




Rowing. Top left — New Zealand four. Top right — Canadian four. Center left — Belgian four. 
Center right — Italian four. Bottom left — Alf Pelton, Australian single sculler. Bottom 

right — Portuguese four. 




APPENDICES 




1. Adress by Colonel Wait G. Johnson 

2. General Regulations Governing the Competitions 

3. Officials 

4. Roster of Contestants 

5. List of Winners, Iiiter-Allied Games. 




PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 341 

ADDRESS BY COLONEL WAIT C. JOHNSON 

General Staff, Chairman of the Games Committee, Inter-Allied Games, 
53, Avenue Montaigne, Paris May 24, 1919. 

The officers and men of the American Expeditionary Forces, being 
keenly appreciative of the splendid relations which exist amongst 
those of us who have borne arms in a great and common cause and 
which have so happily developed into feelings of mutual respect and 
admiration, are most anxious to preserve and strengthen this rela- 
tionship. With this idea in view, our Commander-in-Chief has invited 
the officers and men of our Allies to participate in an Inter-Allied 
Athletic meet in order to promote this spirit of comradeship and to 
cement in friendly competition on the field of sport the ties which 
had been formed on the battlefield. The Inter- Allied Athletic meet, 
or more properly called the Inter-Allied Games, will take place from 
June 22 to July 4, 1919, inclusive, at Pershing Stadium, near Paris. 

For the conduct of these and for full responsibility for them our 
Commander-in-Chief has appointed a Games Committee consisting 
of Lieut. Col. T. G. Lonergan, General Staff, Lieut. Col. D. M. Goodrich, 
General Staff, Mr. E. S. Brown and Mr. W. A. Reynolds, Athletic 
Directors of the Y.M.C.A., and myself. I have the honor to represent 
the Games Committee as its Chairman. As above stated, the Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces has charged 
this Committee with full responsibility for the Games and all matters 
relating thereto. 

At the direction of General Pershing, each of the nations par- 
ticipating in the Games has been asked to appoint two representatives 
to act as members of an Advisory Committee. 

As Chairman of the Games Committee, I take great pleasure 
in welcoming you at this opening meeting of the Advisory Com- 
mittee of which you are members. In accordance with the desires 
of my Commander-in-Chief and on behalf of the Games Committee, 
I ask of you your hearty cooperation. The Games Committee will 
no doubt frequently, from time to time, call upon you for advice 
and assistance. Realizing the pitfalls which have heretofore always 
lain in the path of international athletic competitions, we feel sure 
that with your cooperation and assistance many of these difficul- 
ties will be obviated. We shall be grateful to receive your sug- 
gestions as to reception, entertainment and attendance of your mill- 



342 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — I9I9 

tary and government officials, with recommendations as to the 
ceremonies attending such meeting. We have in the past received 
your suggestions as to added events. Where suggestions have come 
relative to rules and competitions from various sources, we have tried 
to coordinate them to the fullest degree, meeting the desires of all 
concerned. Your reponse to our future requests for advice or assist- 
ance will be deeply appreciated, not only by the Committee itself 
but by our Commander-in-Chief, and the forces which he repre- 
sents, and will materially aid in the success of this friendly competi- 
tion among the AUied Nations at Pershing Stadium. 

The organization of our Games Committee, as indicated in the charts 
furnished you all, has three general sections for the conduct of the 
Games, and all matters connected therewith. The Liaison Section, 
with which you gentlemen as members of the Advisory Committee will 
come most closely in contact, has been organized as the medium 
through which your written suggestions are to come, also to assist 
and aid you and your competing athletes in all ways possible. We 
trust that you will command its services. 

In this connection, I feel it proper to tell you of the arrange- 
ments that have been made for camps and accommodations, both prior 
to and during the continuance of the games. 

/. Rifle and Pistol Compeiilion to he held at Le Mans Rifle Range: 

1. The U.S. Army Springfield rifle and Army automatic pistol 
will be supplied upon request to any of the competing nations who 
may desire to employ these arms in the rifle and pistol competition 
respectively. The necessary ammunition for these weapons will be 
furnished. 

2. Teams that are to enter the rifle and pistol competition will 
be received at Le Mans at any time on or after June 1, 1919. Tele- 
graphic notice should be sent to the Commanding Officer, Competitors 
Camp, Rifle and Pistol Range, Le Mans, twenty-four hours in advance 
of the date and time of arrival of a team. 

3. The following accommodations are available for the competing 
teams if they desire to avail themselves of them: 

(a) All range facilities will be supplied. 

(b) Quarters for all teams. Each team captain will be furnished 
with a small Adrian hut for his own quarters. For the team there 
are available pyramidal tents framed and floored — one tent for each 
two or three competitors. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 343 

(c) Gots and blankets are available for issue to team compe- 
titors. 

(d) Bath houses have been installed for the use of teams. 

(e) Cooking and messing shelters are provided as well as the 
necessary mess equipment, such as stoves, dishes, etc., necessary 
in the preparation of the food. 

(f) If desired, rations may be obtained from the American Com- 
missary at the same rate established for the American troops. 

(g) Arrangements will be made to obtain additional suppHes 
as teams may desire from surrounding towns. 

(h) For the entertainment of competitors moving picture shows 
will be staged nightly. Twice a week there will be other forms of 
entertainment. 

(i) For athletic entertainment tennis courts with the necessary 
equipment are being installed and an effort is being made to lay out 
a short golf course. 

4. The camp has been built less than five hundred meters from 
the firing range. Accommodations are available for any number of 
men on a competing team to include one hundred. 

All the necessary camp equipment will be supplied by the Quarter- 
master Department, United States Army. 

//. Arrangement at Colombes Stadium: 

To accommodate athletic teams arriving prior to the days imme- 
diately preceding the opening of the Inter-Allied Games, a camp 
for various teams has been provided at Colombes Stadium. At this 
camp there will be available for the competing teams, if they desire 
to avail themselves of them : 

1. Track and field for training purposes, including all necessary 
paraphernalia. 

2. Quarters for all teams. These quarters will consist of tents 
furnished with cots, mattresses, blankets, etc., which will be available 
for individual competitors. 

3. Bath houses, including rubbing tables, have been installed. 

4. Cooking and messing shelters are provided, as well as the 
necessary mess equipment, such as stoves, dishes, etc., necessary in 
the preparation of food. 

5. If desired, rations may be obtained through the American 
Commissary at the same rate established for American troops. 

6. In addition, arrangements will be made for necessary transpor- 



344 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

tation to enable competing teams to obtain additional supplies in 

Paris or other towns. 

7. This camp at Colombes Stadium will be available for com- 
peting teams any time subsequent to the second day of June. 

8. The preliminary camp is built at Colombes with a view to 
giving competing nations a satisfactory location for practice other 
than the final field at Pershing Stadium, which will not be used by 
any nation prior to the days of the Games. In order that adequate 
accommodation may be suppHed on time, it is requested that ample 
notice be given of the time of arrival and the number of men from each 
competing nation. 

III. Camp al Pershing Stadium: 

For the accommodation of competing teams during the days of the 
Games, a camp is being estabhshed at Joinville, immediately access- 
ible to the Pershing Stadium, upon which the Games will be held. 
This camp will be ready to receive its occupants just prior to the 
opening of the Games. The arrangements will be similar to those 
heretofore described for the field at Colombes. 

IV. Accommodations of the teams, including both men and horses which 

will compete in the mounted events: 

Arrangements including billets for the teams and stables for the 
horses are being perfected at Fort Champigny-sur-Marne, in the 
vicinity of Joinville-le-Pont, about 5 kilometers from the Stadium. 
Accommodations will be available here the first week of June, and the 
same arrangements relative to forage for animals as heretofore out- 
lined and for rations for men will be made. 

In closing let me say that we trust you will find the work in con- 
nection with this carnival as interesting as we have found it. I am 
very glad that we are gathered together, and assure you of how deeply 
we shall appreciate your cooperation, advice and assistance. And 
those of us who have been charged by our Commander-in-Chief with 
the conduct of these Games shall feel that we have failed and the 
great purpose of the Games lost sight of if, through their medium, 
the feehng of good comradeship and friendship engendered on the field 
of battle is not cemented more closely and made more lasting through 
the medium of these friendly sports. 

WAIT C. JOHNSON 
Colonel, General Staff, 
Chairman. 




m-H.C. Hadfleld, New Zealand, single sculling champion. Bottom u^Ai-The French 

champion tour. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 847 

GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING 
THE COMPETITIONS 

Games Committee. — -The Commander-in-Chief of the American 
Expeditionary Forces has appointed a Games Committee consisting 
of three ofTicers of the United States Army and two militarized civil- 
ians, and has charged this Committee with full responsibihty for the 
Games and all matters relating thereto. 

Advisory Committee. — At the direction of the Commander-in-Chief 
of the American Expeditionary Forces, each of the nations partici- 
pating in the Games has been asked to appoint two representatives 
to act as members of an Advisory Committee, to cooperate with, 
advise, and assist the Games Committee. 

Finances. — The American Expeditionary Forces have assumed 
the responsibility for all expenses in connection with the Games 
except those involved in the actual training, equipping, transporting, 
and maintaining of the representatives of the competing nations. 

Competitors, Etigibitity. — Each nation participating may enter 
any officer, noncommissioned officer, or private soldier, who has at 
any time between August 4, 1914, and November 11, 1918, been a 
member of the military forces of that nation. 

Anyone eligible under the foregoing, who has been a member 
of the military forces of more than one nation formally participating 
in the Games, may elect the nation for which he desires to compete. 

Entries. — Entries shall be limited to three for individual events, 
and one for team events, for each nation, except where otherwise 
hereinafter specifically provided. 

All relay races shall be regarded as team events. 

Entries shall be made to the Games Committee by the properly 
accredited individual or Committee for the nation concerned, on a 
special entry form to be issued by the Games Committee. A separate 
form shall be filled in for each individual or team entered. Entries 
will close June 14, 1919. 

Entries by cable will not be accepted, save in exceptional cases, 
the actual entries to follow as provided above. 

Entrance Fee. — There shall be no entrance fee for any event. 

Decisions, Protests. — Decisions of judges as to matters of fact 
shall be final. 

Protests against decisions of judges on other points will be enter- 
tained if made in writing within one hour after decision is announced, 
with reasons stated. All protests and all questions arising from 
interpretation and application of the rules will be referred to the 
Games Committee for final decision. In all such decisions the English 
text will be used as official. Objections on the part of one nation to 
the eligibility of any contestant representing a competing nation 



348 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

must be made in writing by one of the representatives of the protesting 
nation on the Advisory Committee, and filed with the Games Com- 
mittee within twelve hours after the close of the event. 

Sports. — The Inter-Allied Games shall consist of separate cham- 
pionship contests in the following sports. Additional sports may be 
suggested by any nation formally participating. Such suggestions 
must be in the hands of the Games Committee not later than May 1, 
1919. Prompt notice of additions as well as copies of the playing 
rules will be sent all nations participating. 
Events: 1. Baseball. 

2. Basketball. 

3. Boxing. 

Bantamweight 118 lbs. and under. 

Featherweight. . . . 125 lbs. and under. 

Lightweight 135 lbs. and under. 

Welterweight 145 lbs. and under. 

Middleweight 160 lbs. and under. 

Light heavyweight. 175 lbs. and under. 

Heavyweight over 175 lbs. 

4. Cricket. 

5. Cross-Country Race. — 10,000 meters — individual com- 

petition. 

6. Fencing. — Foils, individual and team competition. 

7. Fencing. — ^Sabers, individual and team competition. 

8. Fencing. — Epee, individual and team competition. 

9. Football. — Soccer. 

10. Football. — American, Intercollegiate. 

11. Foof 6a/;.— Rugby. 

12. Golf. — Individual and team competition. 

13. Hand-Grenade Throwing. 

14. Horse-Riding Competition. 

15. Rowing. — Single Sculls. 

16. Rowing. — 4-oared Shells. 

17. Rowing. — 8-oared Shells. 

18. Shooting.-— Array Rifle. — Team competition. 

19. Shooting.— Army Rifle.— Individual competition. 

20. Shooting.— Revolver or Automatic Pistol. — Service 

Weapons. — Team competition. 

21 . Shooting. — Revolver or Automatic Pistol. — Service Wea- 

pons. — Individual competition. 

22. Swimming. 

a. 100 meters, free style. 

b. 100 meters, back stroke. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 349 

c. 200 meters, breast stroke. 

d. 400 meters, free style. 

e. 800 meters, free style. 
/. 1,500 meters, free style. 

g. 800 meters, relay free style, 4 men (4x200). 

23. Tennis. — Singles and Doubles. 

24. Track and Field Sports. 

a. 100-meter dash. 

b. 200-meter dash. 

c. 400-meter run. 

d. 800-meter run. 

e. 1500-meter run. 

/. Modified Marathon — 16,000 meters. 
g. 110-meter High Hurdles. 
h. 200-meter Low Hurdles. 
i. Running High Jump. 
/. Running Broad Jump. 
k. Standing Broad Jump. 
/. Running Hop, Step, and Jump. 
m. Pole Vault. 

n. Throwing the Javelin, best hand. 
0. Throwing the Discus, best hand, 
p. Putting the 16-lb. shot, best hand. 
q. Pentathlon. 

200-meter Dash. 

Running Broad Jump. 

Shot Put, 16 lbs., best hand. 

Throwing Discus, best hand. 

1500-meter run. 
r. Relay Race, 800 meters, 4 men (4x200). 
s. Relay Race, 1,600 meters, 4 men (4x400). 
t. Medley Relay Race, 4 men. 

First man runs 200 meters. 

Second man runs 400 meters. 

Third man runs 800 meters. 

Fourth man runs 1600 meters, 

25. Tug-of-War. — 9-men team. 

26. Water Polo. 

27. Wrestling. — Catch-as-catch-can and Greco-Roman. 

Bantamweight 118 lbs. and under. 

Featherweight 125 lbs. and under. 

Lightweight 135 lbs. and under. 



350 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Welterweight. . . . 145 lbs. and under. 

Middleweight. . 160 lbs. and under. 

Light heavyweight . 175 lbs. and under. 

Heavyweight, over . 175 lbs. 

Two Special Events. — An 800-meter Relay race (4 men, each 
200 meters) and Running Broad Jump — not part of Track and Field — 
open to Armies of Occupation only. 

Competitions will be conducted in all of the above sports attract- 
ing entries from two or more nations. If entry is received from 
only one nation, such event shall be regarded as an exhibition event 
only, and may be demonstrated at the option of the nation con- 
cerned. 

METHODS OF CONDUCTING TOURNAMENTS 

In all round-robin and elimination tournaments, where more 
than two teams are entered, one match shall determine the winner. 

1. Baseball. — With only two competing teams, the champion- 
ship shall be awarded to the team first winning three games. With 
three or more teams, a round-robin tournament shall be conducted. 

2. Basketball. — Same as Baseball. 

3. Boxing. — Entries in all Boxing and Wrestling events shall 
be limited to one entry by each competing nation for each weight. 
The winner in each class shall score two points and the runner-up shall 
score one point, the championship going to the nation which scores 
the greatest number of points. 

4. Cricket. — With only two competing teams, the championship 
shall be awarded to the team first winning two games. With three 
or more teams, an elimination tournament shall be conducted. 

5. Cross-Country Race. — The championship shall be awarded 
to the nation whose representative finishes in first place. Second and 
third places will be recorded. 

6. Fencing — Foils — Individual and team. — Two championships 
will be declared, one for individual and one for team ; the individual 
championship will be awarded the nation winning the individual 
tournament; the team championship will be awarded to the nation 
wmnmg the team tournament. Second place will be recorded in each 
event. 

7. Fencing—Sabers— Individual and team—Same as Foils. 

8. Fencing — Epee — Individual and teamS&me as Foils. 

iu \ Footbalt— Soccer.— {1) With only two competing teams, 
the championship shall be awarded to the team first winning two 
games. With three or more teams, an elimination tournament shall 
be conducted. (2) In case of a tie game, two extra periods of 
htteen minutes each shall be played and if at the end of that time 
the score is still tied, the referee shall declare "No game," in which 
case he shall order the game to be played over at a time decided 
upon by the Games Committee. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



351 



10. Football — American inlercollegiate.— Same as (1) under Soccer. 

11. Football — Rugby. — Same as (1) under Soccer. 

12. Golf. — The championship will be awarded to the nation 
winning the team tournament. Second place will be recorded. 

13. Hand -Grenade throwing. — The championship shall be awarded 
to the nation whose representative wins first place. Second and 
third places shall be recorded. 

14. Horse-Riding competition. — The championship shall be awarded 
to the nation winning the greatest number of points in the three events. 

15. Rowing — Singles Sculls. — The championship shall be awarded 
to the nation whose representative finishes in first place. Second 
and third places will be recorded. 

16. Rowing — Four-oared Shells. — Same as Singles Sculls. 

17. Rowing — Eight-oared Shells. — Same as Singles Sculls. 

18. Shooting — Army Rifle — Team competition. — The championship 
shall be awarded to the nation making the highest score. 

19. Shooting — Army Rifle — Individual competition. — Same as 
Army Rifle team competition. 

20. Shooting — Revolver or Automatic Pistol — Service weapons — 
Team competition. — Same as Army Rifle team competition. 

21. Shooting — Revolver or Automatic Pistol — Service weapons — 
Individual competition. — Same as Army Rifle team competition. 

22. Swimming. — The championship shall be awarded to the nation 
scoring the greatest number of points in the various events. 

23. Tennis. — The championship shall be awarded to the nation 
winning the elimination tournament, which shall be conducted as 
follows: Drawing will be by lot. In each tie, the contest shall consist 
of four singles and one doubles, best three of five advantage sets. Each 
singles player will meet each of the opposing singles players. 

24. Tracli and Field. — The championship shall be awarded to 
the team scoring the greatest number of points in the various events. 

25. Tug-of-War. — With only two competing teams, the cham- 
pionship shall be awarded to the team first winning two pulls. With 
three or more teams, an elimination tournament shall be conducted, 
each match of which shall consist of best two of three pulls. 

26. Water Polo. — With only two competing teams, the champion- 
ship shall be awarded to the team first winning two games. With 
three or more teams, an elimination tournament shall be conducted. 

27. Wrestling — Catch-as-catch-can and Greco-Roman. — Same as 

No. 3. 

SCORING SYSTEMS 

Track and Field — Horse-Riding Competitions— Swimming. 

First place 3 points. 

Second place 2 pomts. 

Third place 1 pomt. 



352 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Boxing and Wrestling. — First place, each weight 2 points. 

Second place, each weight .... 1 point. 

In any event that attracts but two entries, first place only shall 
count. In any event that attracts but three entries, first and second 
places only shall count. 

CHAMPIONSHIPS 

The winning nation in each of the above numbered branches of 
sport shall be recognized as champion in that particular branch of sport. 

PLAYING RULES 

1. Baseball. 

American National Baseball Commission rules shall govern. 

2. Basketball. 

Joint rules adopted by American National College Athletic Asso- 
ciation, Y.M.C.A., and Amateur Athletic Union of the U. S. shall 
govern. 

3. Boxing. 

American Expeditionary Forces rules shall govern. 

RULE I EQUIPMENT 

1. Ring dimensions. — The boxing ring shall be not less than 
16 feet nor more than 18 feet square. 

2. Extension of ring. — The floor of the ring shall extend beyond 
the lower ropes for a distance of not less than 2 feet. 

3. Posts. — There shall be at least four posts, properly padded. 

4. Ropes. — The ring shall be enclosed by at least three rope 
rails with cloth wrappings. 

5. Padding. — The ring floor, if of wood or other hard substance, 
shall be padded at least 1 inch thick with corrugated paper, matting, 
felt, or other soft material. 

Note. — A very good padding for an outdoor ring is dampened 
sawdust covered with tight canvas. 

RULE II RING 

1. Ring during progress of match. — During the rounds the ring 
shall be cleared of all chairs, buckets, etc. 

2. Clear ring. — No person other than the contestants and the 
referee shall, during the progress of the rounds, enter or be in the ring. 

RULE III BOXING GLOVES 

1. Gloves. — ^Five ounce gloves will be used. 

2. Bandages. — Soft surgical bandages will be permitted. The 
referee will inspect all bandages and gloves in the ring. 

RULE IV NUMBER AND TIME LIMIT OF BOUTS AND ROUNDS 

All bouts shall consist of ten (10) two (2) minute rounds with 
one (1) minute intermissions. 




Shooting. Camp streets at the Le Mans range. Top-French. 6'««(er-Bolgian. Bottom^ 

American. 

23 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 355 

RULE V OFFICIALS AND DUTIES OF OFFICIALS 

1. Officials. — The officials shall be a referee, two judges, one 
official timekeeper and one to be appointed by each contestant, one 
medical officer, and one clerk. 

2. Duties of referee — Decision of judges final. — The referee shall 
have general supervision over the match or contest, and shall take 
his position within the ring. The primary duty of the referee shall 
be the strict enforcement of the rules of boxing and of fair play. The 
referee shall, at the conclusion of the bout, abide by the decision of 
the judges in every case, if both agree; if not, he will decide the bout 
himself, or order one, or if necessary more extra rounds to decide the 
contest. 

3. The referee — 

a. Shall have the power to stop a bout at any stage and make 

a decision if he considers it too onesided. 

b. Shall not touch contesting boxers except : 

1. On failure of one or both contestants to obey 

"break" command. 

2. To assist injured contestant. 

4. Introduction handshaking. — The referee shall insist on all 
boxers shaking hands at the commencement of the first and last round. 
No other demonstration shall be allowed. 

Note. — The referee may be assisted by an announcer whose 
duty shall be to announce the names of all contestants and act as a 
go-between between the referee and judges. 

5. Position of judges. — The two judges shall be stationed at 
opposite sides of the ring, preferably on a level with the boxers. 

6. Duty of fudges. — It shall be the duty of the judges to watch 
every phase of the bout and to make a decision upon its completion. 

7. Timekeepers. — All timekeepers will have watches. The ofTi- 
cial timekeeper will have at his disposal a gong with which he will 

ndicate the beginning and end of each round. 

8. Duties of medical officer. — The medical officer shall be in 
attendance at all times. 

9. Duties of clerk. — The clerk will keep a record of all contestants 
and all decisions. 

RULE- VI DRAWING 

1. Drawing. — The drawings shall be governed by the Bagnall- 
Wilde system. 

RULE VII^ — SECONDS 

1. Seconds. — Each contestant shall be assisted by two (2) seconds. 

2. Warning to seconds.— The seconds must not speak, signal, 
or in any way coach their principals during the progress of a round, 
nor may they claim time, or indicate in any way decisions for them. 

3. Any violation of the above provisions may render a principal 
liable to disqualification by the reiferee. . ■, : : 



356 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

4. Limitation of seconds. — The seconds must remain seated 
during the contests, and shall not enter the ring until the timer indi- 
cates the termination of a round. They shall leave the ring five 
seconds before the beginning of a round. 

RULE VIH^WEIGHTS 

1. Contestants will weigh in on the day of their first bout at 
9:00 a.m. for afternoon bouts, or 3:00 p.m. for evening bouts. The 
weight registered at the original weighing-in will be the competitor's 
ofTicial weight for the entire meet. 

2. Competitions in all championships will be held in the follow- 
ing weights and classes : 

Bantamweight 118 lbs. 

Featherweight 125 

Lightweight 135 

Welterweight 145 

Middleweight 160 

Light Heavyweight 175 

Heavyweight, all over . . . 175 

RULE IX FOULS 

1. Disqualification will follow the commission of any of the fol- 
lowing fouls after two previous warnings by the referee : 

a. Holding an opponent or deliberately maintaining a clinch. 

b. Holding an opponent with one hand and hitting with the 
other hand. 

c. Hitting with inside or butt of the hand, the wrist, or the elbow. 

d. Wrestling or roughing. 

e. Hitting or "flicking" with the open glove. 

2. Immediate disqualification will follow the commission of any 
of the following fouls : 

a. Hitting below the belt. 

b. Hitting an opponent who is down or who is getting up after 
being down. 

c. Butting with the head or using the knee. 

d. Going down without being hit. A contestant may go down 
through accident or weakness, but must rise instantly unless sent 
down by a blow, in which case he may remain down until the count 
of "nine" without being disqualified. 

e. Striking deliberately at that part of the body over the kidneys 
during a clinch. 

/. The use of abusive or insulting language. 
g. Using the pivot blow. 

3. If a foul (See Rule IX 2 a.) is claimed by one of the contest- 
ants he will be examined by the medical officer and the referee 
will make his decision from the result of this examination. 

RULE X — "down" 
1. A contestants shall be deemed "down" when : 
a. Any part of his body other than his feet is on the ring floor. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 357 

b. He is hanging helplessly over the ropes. 

c. Rising from "down" position. 

Note.— A boxer hanging on the ropes is not officially "down" 
until so pronounced by the referee, who can either stop the bout or 
count the boxer out on ropes or floor. 

2. Rule for contestant when opponent is down.— When a contestant 
is "down" his opponent shall retire to a neutral corner and shall not 
resume boxing until his opponent is up. 

RULE XI ^FINISH 

1. Bout over when. — The round and bout shall be terminated 
when "down" contestant fails to resume boxing at the expiration 
of 10 seconds, and referee announces decision. 

2. Ten seconds indicated by referee. — -The 10 seconds shall be 
counted aloud, and the expiration of each second shall be definitely 
indicated by the referee. 

RULE XII 

1. Other questions arising. — In the event of any question arising 
not provided for in these rules the referee shall have full power to decide 
such questions, and his decision shall be final. 

4. Cricket. 

Standard rules of England as drawn up by the Marylebone Cricket 
Club shall govern. 

5. Cross-Gountry Race. 

(10,000 meters — Individual competition.) 
The race shall be over country of varying character on a course 
unknown to the competitors, to be designated by the Games Com- 
mittee. The start and finish will be in the Stadium. The first 500 
meters and the last 1 ,000 meters shall be run on the track. 

6, 7, 8. Fencing. 

(Foils, Broadswords, Duelling swords.) 

general rules 
The 1913 Rules of the Federation Nationale d'Escrime shall 
govern. 

TEAM COMPETITION 

Team competition will be composed of three events, namely foils, 
broadswords, and duelling swords. 

(6) Foils. — No nation shall enter more than 6 men in the foils event. 
The opponent making the first three touches during a bout shall be 
declared the winner. If at the end of 5 minutes neither opponent 
has scored a touch, the bout will be halted for one mmute. The bout 
will then be resumed. If at the end of another 5 minutes neither 
opponent has scored a touch the bout will be halted for one minute, 
at the end of which it will again be resumed. If at the end of an 
additional 5 minutes neither opponent has scored, each opponent, 
will then be awarded a touch and the bout ended. If, however, one 



358 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

or more touches have been scored during the entire 15 minutes of 
fencing, the decision shall be awarded to the opponent who has scored 
the greatest number. 

(7) Broadswords. — No nation shall enter more than 6 men in the 
broadswords event. The same rules that govern the foil bouts will 
govern broadswords, except that the last period of the bout, in case 
no touches have been made by either opponent, will be 15 minutes 
instead of 5. 

{8) Duelling Swords. — No nation shall enter more than 8 men in the 
duelling swords event. The opponent making the first touch will be 
awarded the bout. The periods of time will be divided as those in 
broadsword, namely : 5 minutes, 1 minute rest; second, 5 minutes, 
1 minute rest, and third, 15 minutes, at the end of which an award 
of 1 point will be made to each opponent in case no touch has been 
scored by either. 

INDIVIDUAL COMPETITION 

In the individual competition no nation shall enter more than 
5 men for foils event, 5 men for broadswords event, and 8 men for 
duelling swords event. For each event the contestants will be grouped 
into poules of 8 men. Each poule will be composed, as far as practic- 
able, of men representing the different nations. The number of 
poules and the number of individuals contesting will be reduced by 
ehmination until finally only one individual for each event remains 
undefeated. This individual will be awarded the competition in his 
weapon. 

9. Football — Soccer. 

Enghsh Football Association Rules shall govern. 

10. Football — American Intercollegiate. 
American Intercollegiate Rules shall govern. 

11. Football — Rugby. 

The Enghsh Rugby Union Rules shall govern. 

12. Golf. 

The rules of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews shall 
govern. 

13. Hand-Grenade Throwing. 

1. The grenade shall be the French F-1 Defensive Grenade; 
length over all 115 mm., greatest diameter 59 mm., total weight 
600 gr. loaded. 

2. The throwing shall take place from behind a scratch line. 
The thrower may place his foot, or feet, upon the line, but if he steps 
over the line with either foot before the grenade first strikes the ground 
the throw is invahd. 

3. The competitors may throw in any way they wish, with either 
hand, and with or without a run. 

4. The throw shall be measured along a line perpendicular to 
the scratch line, or the scratch Hne extended, from the point where 
the grenade first strikes the ground to the scratch line. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 359 

5. Each competitor shall be allowed three throws, and the best 
four men shall be allowed three more throws. Each competitor shall 
be credited with the best of all his throws. 
14. HoRSE-RiDiNG Competitions. 

1. There will be three events: 

I. Military Competition. 
II. Prize Jumping — Individual. 
III. Prize Jumping — In pairs. 
In each event first, second and third places will be recorded. 

I. MILITARY COMPETITION 

2. Team competilion. — One team of not more than four competi- 
tors from any one country, with not to exceed two substitutes : the 
first three places to count. Individual competition, conducted 
simultaneously. 

SPECIAL REGULATIONS 

3. Competitors may ride either private or government owned 
horses. The minimum weight of competitors shall be one hundred 
sixty five pounds. 

4. The competition is divided into three tests and must not be 
concluded in less than three days. The Committee shall have the 
right to interpose one or more days of rest between those days on 
which competitions are held. 

5. Each rider may enter not more than two horses, but can only 
use one of them, and shall be obliged to ride this one in all the tests. 
No outside help may be received during the progress of the competi- 
tion, except in tests A and B, for the purpose of shoeing, veterinary 
and medical treatment. 

A Long-distance Ride. 

B Cross-country Ride (included with A). 

Uniform: Service, without arms. 

Bitting: optional. 

Saddling: optional. 

Distance: 55 kilometers; 50 kilometers on the road and 
during the latter part of the ride, 5 kilometers on a cross-country 
course of 5 kilometers, marked out with flags. 

Maximum time: For the whole distance, 4 hours, of which 
15 minutes will be counted for the cross-country ride of 5 kilometers; 
shorter time, whether for the whole ride or for the cross-country ride, 
will not be awarded extra points. 
C Prize Jumping competition. 

Undress uniform without arms. 

Bitting: optional. 

Saddling: optional. 

Obstacles: 15 fixed obstacles of not more than 1.3 meters 
in height. The long jumps will not be more than 4 meters m length. 

Other conditions according to propositions for the prize 
jumping competition of the Inter-Allied Games (II). 



360 THE INTER-ALLIED ;;GAMES —1919 

PRINCIPLES FOR JUDGING 

6. Long-distance Ride — This is to be considered as a test of 
endurance. Riders who have covered the distance within the maxi- 
mum time will receive 10 points. For every minute or fraction of a 
minute in excess of this time, 1 point will be deducted. 

7. Cross-country Riding test— Each judge will give 10 points 
for the part of the course under his control, which will be reduced in 
each case : 

For refusing 2 points 

For bolting 2 points 

For the horse faUing 5 points 

For the rider being thrown 5 points 

For every period of 5 seconds or fraction thereof in excess of the 
maximum time the total number of points will be reduced by 2. 

8. Prize Jumping test (see illustrations Competition I and 
details) : To be judged according to the regulations for the Prize Jump- 
ing competition of the Inter-Allied Games (II). 

RULES FOR DETERMINING THE PLACING 

9. After each test the points of each competitor will be totalled. 
In order to give equal importance to the different tests, the final 

result will be determined according to the following principles : 

The maximum number of points possible for each test will be divided 
by 10. The number of points attained by each competitor will then 
be divided in each test by the number thus obtained for the respec- 
tiye tests. This will give a quotient varying between 10 and 0, which 
will be the number of points of the respective competitors in the 
respective tests. 

The total sum of the final points in the three tests will be the final 
number of points of the competitor, and this number will determine 
the order in the individual competition. The rider obtaining the 
highest number of points will be placed as No. 1, the one obtaining 
the next highest number will be placed as No. 2, and so on. 

In the team competition, the nation whose best three competitors 
have obtained the highest total number of points will be the winner; 
the nation obtaining the next highest number will be second, and so on. 

Example — Cross-Gountry Riding. 

Judje Maximum Deductions Points Won 
Points 

1 10 2 8 

2 10 10 

3 10 5 5 

4 10 5 5 

5 10 2 8 

6 10 10 

7 10 10 
7)10 7)56 

Avg. 10 8 points 




rop-^eneral Pershing takes a shot. J7pper cerUer 'f/«-G«"^^^l P<=''*''^,^,;°°S 'I'Sio,^.! 
Romanian team. Ppper center right^Axaevicans on the range. Lower «!"'^^iff«-«Xn.' 
at the matches. Lower center rt^A^-U. S. pistol competitors. i?otom-General Pershm., 

congratulating French team. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 363 

II. PRIZE JUMPING COMPETITION INDIVIDUAL 

1 . Individual competition: Not more than six competitors from 
any one country (substitutes not to exceed three). 

SPECIAL REGULATIONS 

2. Competitors may ride either private or government owned 
horses. 

Each rider may enter not more than three horses, and may ride 
one, two or all of these mounts in class II only. 

The prize jumping competition will take place on an obstacle 
course in the Stadium. 

Dress: Uniform, service, without arms. 

Bitting and saddling: optional. 

Number of obstacles: 15 (see illustrations Competition II and 
details). Maximum height 1.4 meters (fixed). The obstacles will 
have a solid appearance, but will be so constructed that essential 
portions will give way when struck with force. For judging touches 
there will be a loose marking lath. 

Long jump obstacles not to exceed 4 meters in length. 

Riders to cover the obstacle course at the rate of 400 meters a 
minute which will be timed. Less time will not be awarded additional 
points. 

Competitors are not allowed to try the jumps before the compe- 
tition. 

Taking part in a previous competition will not be counted as a 

trial of the jumps. 

PRINCIPLES FOR JUDGING 

3. Points will be given for each obstacle on a basis of 10 which 
will be reduced in each case : d • 4. 

For refusing, the first time, by 2 points 

For refusing, the second time, by 4 points 

For refusing, the third time Eliminated 

For bolting, the first time, by 2 points 

For bolting, the second time, by .4 points 

For bolting, the third time Ehminated 

For the horse falling the first time, by ... . 4 points 

For the horse falling the second time Eliminated 

For the rider being thrown Eliminated 

In taking the high jumps — 

For touching with fore legs by 2 points 

" hind " 1 Popt 

" knocking down the fence with the fore legs. 4 points 
" knocking down the fence with the hmd legs 2 pomts 
" touching or knocking down with both fore and hind legs, 
only the fore legs will be counted. 
For long jumps — 

If the horse lands with his hind legs on the limit 

mark on far side of the ditch, by 1 pomt 



364 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

If the horse lands with his hind legs inside the 
limit mark, or touches the surface of the 

water with his hind legs 2 points 

If the horse lands with his fore legs on the Hmit 

mark on the far side of the ditch 2 points 

If the horse lands with his fore legs inside the 
hmit mark, or touches the surface of the 

water with his fore legs 4 points 

In the case of combined obstacles the above regulations apply- 
to each one separately. 

Each period of 5 seconds or fraction thereof in excess of the maxi- 
mum time will incur a penalty of 2 points. 

Any competitor riding the wrong way or not taking the obstacles 
in their proper order will be disqualified. 

If any alteration in the equipment of the horse takes place during 
the course of the competition, the rider will not, for this reason, be 
allowed another try over the obstacles. 

No outside help may be made use of in the course of the competi- 
tion. 

RULES FOR DETERMINING THE ORDER 

4. The competitors will be placed in numerical order, according 
to the number of points obtained, and thus the one who has obtained 
the highest number of points will be placed No. 1, the next one. 
No. 2, and so on. 

In case of two or more competitors obtaining the same number 
of points, the competition will be continued between them over obs- 
tacles 2, 3, 12, 13, 10 and 11, which, in case of Competition I, 
will not be increased beyond 1.3 meters, and, in the case of the 
Prize Jumping Competition II, not beyond 1.4 meters. In the 
event of the competitors again reaching the same number of points, 
the time occupied shall decide who is to be declared the winner. The 
principles for judging given above shall be in force. 

In team competition, that nation will be declared the winner 
whose best three competitors have obtained the highest total number 
of points; the nation that has obtained the next highest number will 
be second, and so on. 

III. Prize Jumping Competition — In Pairs 

Team Compeiition. — Not more than three teams of two men 
each from each country. 

SPECIAL regulations 

Same as Prize Jumping Competition (Individual). 
Each pair of riders will ride together. 

PRINCIPLES FOR judging 

Faults of each horse to count. 

Points to be one-half those in Event II. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



365 







'i^OBO- 



NO.l. rttPOf. 

ttME. 




NO. 2. rCNCC. 




NO. 3. STOtIC WftU. 

MUR En PIERRE. 



NO. 4. BAlLWaV,OATCS. 
FASSftSE A MIWE^U. 




MO. 5. TGIPLC BAB 

THIPLE BARBE 




NO.e.rcrjcc IN PiKC. , 
Bw\mti\tow»«^tRwitiM. 




rtO.7. nEDOC AHP TQP p/\p. 
MME MttB^Wt, 



NO a.^Ncc-DiKc.-hCPoi:. 

B^RRltRC, fOSSE ET IIAtt. 



366 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 




N9 9. rCMCC. 
Babre. 





N? iO. BCKK WftLL . 
MUR EW BRIQUE . 




N9lj. COUMTCV COAD. rCNCt ON EiThEC SIPC 

FASSAat DE ROUTE ^VEC BARWtRE DE5 DEUX COTES 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



367 




368 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 




-St/ict ^^ 
Prize Jumping Competition 1 — 15 Obstacles 




Prize Jumping Competition 2 — 15 Obstacles 







*? 4^ O ^ ^ 




Shooting. Top— Canadian team. Center— Belgian team. 5oHo/h— Portuguese team. 

24 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 371 

15, 16, 17. Rowing- 
rules 

1. Equipment. — All boats shall have outriggers. Every eight- 
oared boat, and every four-oared boat shall carry a coxswain. No 
coxswain shall steer for more than one crew. 

2. Every boat, at starting, shall carry at the bow the flag of 
the nation it represents. Boats not conforming to this shall be 
liable to be disqualified by the umpire. 

3. Officials. — The Games Committee shall appoint one or more 
umpires, and one or more judges. 

4. The jurisdiction of the umpire extends over a race and all 
matters connected with it, from the time the race is specified to start 
until its termination, and his decision in all cases shall be final and 
without appeal. 

5. Eligibilily. — No person may be substituted for another who 
has already rowed or steered in a heat. 

6. Clothing. — Every competitor must wear complete clothing 
from the base of neck to within four inches of the knee-cap, including 
a Jersey, with sleeves to within four inches of the elbow. 

7. Method of racing and Water Rules. — Heats and stations shall 
be drawn by lot. It shall be open to all competitors to be present 
in such draw. 

8. If there shall be more than two competing crews or scullers, 
they shall row a trial heat, or heats; but no more than two boats 
shall contend in any heat for any event. 

9. In the event of a dead heat taking place, any competitor who 
refuses to row again, as may be directed by the umpire, shall be 
adjudged to have lost. 

10. The whole course must be completed by a competitor before 
he can be held to have won a trial heat unless he is prevented from 
doing so by damage occasioned by a foul. Boats shall be held to 
have completed the course when their bows reach the winning post. 

11. In the event that all boats entered are withdrawn, with the 
exception of one, the crew of the remaining boat must row over the 
course to be entitled to be declared winner of the event. 

12. Starting. — All boats shall be measured and started with 
their bows level. 

13. The umpire may act as starter, or not, as he thinks fit; 
when he does not so act, the starter shall be subject to the control 
of the umpire. 

14. The boat races shall be started in the following manner: 
The starter, on being satisfied that the competitors are ready, shall 
give the signal to start. 

15. If the starter considers the start false, he shall at once recall 
the boats to their stations, and any boat refusing to start again, or 
persistently starting before the signal, shall be liable to be disquahfied 
by the umpire. 



372 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

16. A boat not at its post at the time specified shall be liable to 
be disqualified by the umpire. 

17. Course. — A boat's proper course is such a course as will enable 
it to reach the winning post in the shortest possible time, provided 
that it allows ample water for the other competing boat to steer its 
proper course on the side on which such competing boat started, when 
such competing boat is in a position to enforce its right to such water. 
Any boat failing to keep its proper course does so at its peril in the 
event of a foul occurring. 

18. The umpire shall be the sole judge of a boat's proper course 
during a race, and shall decide all questions as to a foul. 

19. The umpire may caution any competitor when he considers 
that there is a probabihty of a foul occurring and may warn a com- 
petitor of any obstruction in his course, but the umpire shall not under 
any other circumstances direct the course of a competitor. 

20. Fouls and disqualification. — It shall be considered a foul 
when, after a race has been started, any competitor, by his oar, scull, 
boat, or person, comes into contact with the oar, scull, boat, or person 
of another competitor. 

21. In the event of a foul occurring a competitor may claim 
that the other competitor be disqualified. Such claim must be made 
by the competitor himself, before getting out of his boat, to the umpire 
or to the judge. The judge, upon such claim being made to him, 
shall take immediate steps to communicate the same to the umpire. 

22. If the competitor making the claim was in his proper course 
and the competitor against whom the claim is made was out of his 
proper course, the latter shall be disqualified, unless the foul was so 
slight as not to influence the race, in which case the competitor against 
whom the claim is made shall be disqualified only if he has seriously 
encroached upon the proper course of the competitor making the claim. 
In cases under this rule the umpire may reserve his decision, but 
must give it within a reasonable time after the finish of the race. 

23. The umpire in either of the following cases may of his own 
initiative, and without a claim being made, disqualify a competitor 
who is involved in a foul when out of his proper course, provided he 
does so immediately upon the foul occurring : 

a. If such competitor has in the opinion of the umpire 
wilfully encroached upon the proper course of the other 
competitor. 

b. If the foul be of such a nature as clearly to influence the race. 

24. In the case of a foul the umpire shall have power : 

a. To place the boats in the order in which they come in. 

b. To order the boats to row again on the same or another day. 

c. To restart the boats according to his discretion. 

25. Every boat shall abide by its accidents, but if during a race 
a boat shall be interfered with by any outside boat or person, the 
umpire shall have power, if het hinks fit, to restart the boats according 
to his discretion, or to order them to row again on the same or another day. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 373 

26. No boat shall be allowed to accompany or follow any race 
for the purpose of directing the course of any of the competitors. 
Any competitor receiving any extraneous assistance may be disquali- 
fied at the discretion of the umpire. 

27. The judge shall decide as to the order in which the boats 
reach the winning post and such decision shall be final and without 
appeal. 

28. Any competitor refusing to abide by the decision of the 
umpire, or to follow his directions, shall be liable to be disqualified. 

18, 19, 20, 21. Rifle and Pistol Competition. 

RULES 

These rules conform to those used in last Olympic Games as nearly 
as is practicable under the circumstances, and are as follows. 

(18.) Rifle — Team Match. — Arms. — The adopted model of the 
national military arm of any of the competing countries may be used. 

The rifle must be without mechanical alteration or addition. 

Before the competition, the captain of the shooting contingent 
of each country shall certify that this condition is observed. 

Fore and backsights must be regulation, not telescopic or magni- 
fying. 

Ordinary spectacles may be worn if desired. 

The pull of the trigger must not be less than three pounds. 

The triggers will be tested immediately before firing at each dis- 
tance. 

Rifle slings may be used as a support for one arm, but in each 
case they must be of a regulation military pattern. 

A ricochet will be counted as a hit. 

One team may be entered from each nation; each team to consist 
of 12 men, with a minimum of three reserves, but a total of 25 may 
attend. 

After the shooting has begun reserves shall not be permitted to 
replace those competing except in the case of physical disability of 
the member so replaced, which disability shall be certified to by the 
camp surgeon. 

The distances are: 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 yards. 

Any position may be taken without artificial rest, except that 
in all prone positions the head shall be towards the target. 

Each competitor shall fire two sighting shots, and ten shots 

The order in shooting of each team shall be decided by its captain. 

The assignment to targets shall be by lot. 

No protection against light or wind may be employed. 

Any challenges must be made before another shot has been fired 
at the challenged target. 

The time limit is one minute per shot with a total added allow- 
ance of twelve minutes at each range for changing competitors. This 
time is exclusive of successful challenge. 



374 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



The targets are as follows : 




Figure 1— Target for 200, 300 and iOO yards 





Figure 2— Target for 500 
and 600 yards 



All distances — Revolver 
and Pistol competltioii 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 375 

No allowance will be made for a defective cartridge except in the 
case of a missfire. 

The leader of the competition shall have the power to suspend 
the shooting on any day should the weather conditions render that 
step necessary, and to flx another day for the resumption of the 
competition. 

No two competitors may fire with the same rifle, nor may a compe- 
titor change his rifle at any single distance of the competition, unless 
his first rifle shall become unserviceable through an accident. 

No rifle may be cleaned and wiped out between shots fired with 
it at any single distance in the competition. 

The inner edge of the shot hole shall determine the value of the shot. 

The highest aggregate of the scores at all the distances shall deter- 
mine the winning team. 

In the event of a tie in the final totals, the winning team will be 
selected according to the following rule : 

First by considering the greatest number of shots in the target. 

Second, by the greatest number of "visuals" (bullseye), including 
all the black space on the target. 

Third, by the greatest number of 5s, 4s, 3s, etc., for the rifle, and 
of 10s, 9s, 8s, etc., for the revolver. 

(19). Individual Rifle Mafc/i.— Distances, 300, 500, and 600 yards 
slow fire, and 200, 300 and 500 yards rapid fire. 

The competition is Hmited to 25 individual entries from each nation . 

The targets to be the same as in the team match. 

Any position without artificial aid will be permitted, except that 
in all prone positions the head must be toward the target. 

Each competitor must fire 10 shots at each range. 

Two sighting shots must be fired at 500 yards and 600 yards slow 
fire. No other sighting shots shall be allowed. 

Ties will be decided by the same method as in the team match. 

Rapid Fire. — The time limit will be one minute at 200 yards, one 
minute and ten seconds at 300 yards, and one minute and 20 seconds 
at 500 yards. 

The competitors being on the line and ready to fire, the targets 
appear, remain in sight the allotted time, and then disappear. During 
the time the target is in sight the competitor must fire, or attempt 
to fire, his series of ten shots. 

Any competitor, who begins firing when his target appears, will 
not be allowed to enter a protest as to the malfunctioning of the 
target. If he considers that his target has been slow in appearing, 
or in any other way puts him at a disadvantage due to its operation, 
he should not fire, but should call the attention of the range officer, 
to the defect in working the target. He will then be allowed another 

opportunity to fire. • r. • j; i i 

Any target with more than ten hits on it m rapid fire is a fouled 
target and will not be marked or scored, and the competitor assigned 
to that target will repeat his score. 



376 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

(20) Revolver and Pislol Team Ma/cft.— Open to one team from 
each nation. Each team to consist of 10 men, with a mmimum of 
two reserves, but a total of 25 may attend. »^, .„• . 

Anv service revolver or pistol of the type used by any of the Allied 
Troops between 4 August, 1914, and 11 November, 1918, with open 
fore and back sights, may be used. 

The trigger pull must be at least four pounds. 

Distance: 25 and 50 yards slow fire, 15 and 25 yards rapid fire. 

The number of shots will be 10 at each range for each member 
of the team for both slow and rapid fire. 

No sighting shots will be allowed. Scores will be 5 in groups of 
10 shots at a time. In rapid fire, the group of 10 shots will be divided 
into two series of 5 shots each. The time allowance for slow fire, 
5 minutes for each series of 5 shots. 

Position: Standing, with the arm and hand free from the body. 

The inner edge of the shot hole will determine the value of the 
shot. 

Procedure in rapid fire: The target appears, remains in sight 
10 seconds, and then disappears. During the time the target is in 
sight the competitor must fire or attempt to fire his series of 5 shots. 
Unfired shots shall count as misses. 

Once a competitor has commenced to fire he will not be permitted 
to enter a protest concerning the manipulation of the target. 

Target: This shall be for all distances as indicated for "Revolver 
target" in cut. 

Ties: These shall be decided by the same method as indicated 
herein for the rifle match. 

(21). Individual Revolver and Pistol Match — Entries shall be 
limited to 25 from each competing nation. 

Distances : 25 and 50 yards slow fire and 15 and 25 yards rapid 
fire. Twenty shots at each range for each member of the team for 
both slow and rapid fire. 

No sighting shots will be allowed. 

Scores will be fired in groups of 10 shots at a time. In rapid fire, 
the group of 10 shots will be divided into two series of 5 shots each. 

Position: Same as in the team match. 

The inner edge of the shot hole will determine the value of the 
shot. 

Procedure in rapid fire: Same as in the team match. 

Once a competitor has commenced to fire he will not be permitted 
to enter a protest concerning the manipulation of the target. 

Target: Same as in the team match. 

Ties: Same as in the team match. 

22. Swimming. 

1. Officials. — The officials shall consist of one referee, not less 
than three time keepers, three judges, one starter, one announcer, one 
clerk of the course and assistants when necessary. 






Shooting. Top— French team. Center— Kuuiuanian team. Boitom— Italian team. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



379 



2. Breast stroke. — The contestants shall dive and swim on the 
breast. Both hands must go forward and be brought backward simul- 
taneously and must so be used throughout the race. The body must 
be kept perfectly on the breast and the shoulders kept on a line with 
the surface of the water. The carrying of one shoulder higher than 
the other disqualifies the contestant from that race. 

The touch at the ends of the pool and at the finish of the race 
shall be made with both hands simultaneously. 

If the head be carried under the water, it must come up above 
the surface of the water after each stroke. 

The use of any side stroke movement whatsoever, will serve to 
disqualify the contestant. 

For violation of any of the above rules the referee shall disqualify 
the contestant. 

3. Back stroke. — In the back stroke, the contestants shall start 
in the water facing the starting end, with both hands resting on the 
rail or end of the pool. The feet may be resting against the end of 
the pool. At the pistol they shall push off on their backs and commence 
and continue swimming on their backs throughout the race. Con- 
testants may turn on their breasts just as they reach the end of the 
pool, but must "coast" and not use either arms or legs for propulsion. 
Both hands must be placed on the end or rail of the pool at each turn 
before pushing off, the same as at the start of the race. 

For violation of any of the above rules the referee shall disqualify 
the contestant. 

4. Relay races. — The same rules governing individual races will 
apply to relay racing. 

The contestant must touch the rail or end of the pool with one 
or both hands before the next contestant of his team shall leave the 
take-off. 

5. General rules. — a. In all races except the back stroke, each 
contestant shall stand with both feet on the take-off. Stepping back 
before or after the pistol is not allowed and shall serve to disquahfy 
the contestant from that event. 

b. If the contestant leaves the take-off prior to the firing of the 
starter's pistol, it shall be considered a false start. The starter shall 
disqualify any contestant who makes three false starts. No substi- 
tution shall be allowed for such disqualified competitor. 

c. Each contestant shall keep a straight course parallel to the 
other contestants. They shall be started at least six feet apart and 
each one is entitled to a straight lane of water six feet wide from start 
to finish. 

d. Any contestant who, when out of his own lane, shall touch 
another contestant, is liable to disqualification from that event by ref- 
eree. Touching or swimming across or obstructing any contestant m 
anyway so as to impede his progress shall constitute a foul. If m the 
opinion of the referee a swimmer has been fouled to a degree that 
endangers his chance of success, he shall allow him to compete m the 



380 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

next heat or final, and he shall be eligible to take any prize to which 
his position in the final may entitle him. Should a foul occur m the 
final the referee shall order the race reswum. The contestant com- 
mitting the foul shall be disqualified from that event. 

e In all races except the breast stroke and back stroke the 
contestant must touch the rail or end of the pool with one or both 
hands before pushing off. 

/ In all races except the breast stroke each contestant shall 
have finished the race when any part of his person reaches the end 
of the pool or finish line. 

g. The choice of positions shall be drawn for. 

h. In case of a dead heat for first [place the tie shall be decided 
by a swim-off the same day, or the contestant or team refusmg to 
swim shall be given second place. 

i. For violation of any of the above rules the referee shall dis- 
qualify the contestant. 

23. Tennis. 

International Lawn Tennis rules shall govern. 

1. Teams will consist of from two to four men each. 

2. Two players shall be selected for the singles competition and 
one pair of doubles players for the doubles competition. 

3. The contest between competing nations, drawn against each 
other by lot in the elimination tourament, shall consist of four singles 
and one doubles match. The team winning the majority of these 
five matches wins the tie. 

4. The two players of any one country selected for the singles 
competition shall each play against the two singles players of the 
other competing nation in the tie. 

5. After the singles matches once begin, in any one tie no sub- 
stitution shall be allowed during that tie. 

24. Track and Field. 

officials 

The officials shall be: one referee, four or more inspectors to assist 
referee, one scorer, one or more assistant scorers, one clerk of the 
course and assistants, one announcer with assistants if necessary. 

1. For track events — Five judges at the finish, three time-keepers, 
one starter. 

2. For field events — Nine field judges. 

Referee. — The referee shall decide all questions relating to the 
actual conduct of the events whose settlement is not otherwise pro- 
vided for in these rules. His decision shall be final and without 
appeal. 

In case a race has been drawn into heats, and no more contestants 
appear than enough to make one heat, the referee shall be empowered 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 381 

to see that the race is run in one heat; but in all races requiring more 
than one heat he shall see that no second man shall be debarred from 
a chance to qualify in the finals. 

The referee may appoint one of the judges at the finish, head 
judge, one of the timers, head timer, and one of the field judges, 
head judge, who shall assume leadership in the duties of the position. 

Inspectors. — The inspectors shall perform such duties as may 
be assigned to them by the referee, and shall report to him any vio- 
lation of the rules which they observe or of which they are informed. 

Judges of finish. — The judges at the finish shall stand three at 
one end of the tape and two at the other. One shall take the winner, 
another the second man, another the third man, another the fourth 
and another the fifth, as the case may require. In case of disagree- 
ment the majority shall decide. Their decision as to the order in 
which the men finished shall be final and without appeal. 

Field Judges. — The field judges shall measure, judge and record 
each trial of each competitor in all events, whose record is of distance 
or height. Their decision as to the performance of each man shall 
be final and without appeal. 

There shall be three officials in charge of each field event. These 
officials shall be responsible for commencing their respective events 
and for their continuance without unnecessary delays. They shall 
excuse a contestant from a field event in which he is taking part for 
a period long enough to contest in a track event, and allow such 
contestant to take his missed turn or turns in said field event within 
a reasonable time after the track event. They shall see that reason- 
able opportunities are given to contestants who desire to try in two 
field events that are being contested at the same time. To the end 
that there be no unnecessary delay, each competitor shall take his 
trial or turn when called upon to so do by the field judge having 
charge of the contest and if, in the opinion of such field judge, the 
competitor unreasonably delays to do so, such judge may, with the 
consent of the referee, forfeit such trial and have the same tallied 
against the competitor as one miss or failure. 

The field judge shall see that no weight is used in any of the weight 
competitions which has not been approved as conforming to the rules. 

Timekeepers. — There shall be three timekeepers for each track 
event. In case two watches agree, and the third disagrees, the time 
marked by the two shall be the official time. If all watches disagree, 
the time marked by the watch giving the middle time shall be the 
official time. Time shall be taken from the flash of the pistol. Three 
watches must record the time on an event for a record. Each time- 
keeper is required to have his watch tested by an expert watchmaker 
prior to the meet. 

Clerk of course.— The clerk of course shall be provided with the 
names of all entered competitors and their numbers and shall notify 
them at least five minutes before the start of every event m which 



382 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

they are entered. He shall be responsible for getting the contestants 
out at the proper time for each event. He shall place the men in 
their heats and give them positions on the track according to their 
drawings. He shall assign such duties to his assistants as he may 
see fit. 

Scorer. — The scorer shall keep a record of the competitors and 
point winners in each event, with complete results. He shall record 
the laps made by each competitor, and call them aloud, when tallied, 
for the benefit of the contestants. 

He shall notify the starter before the beginning of the last lap in 
each distance race, at which time a signal by gong or pistol shot shall 
be given the competitors. 

The assistants shall do such portions of his work as he may assign 
to them. 

Starter. — The starter shall have entire control of the competitors 
at the marks, except as above provided for in the duties of the clerk 
of course, and shall be the judge of fact as to whether or not any 
man has made a false start. 

He shall be responsible for starting the track events promptly 
after the men have been given their positions by the clerk of the 
course. He shall also be responsible for any unnecessary delay in 
the continuance of said events. He shall give a signal by pistol shot 
or gong at the beginning of the last lap in each distance race. 

Competitors. — Immediately on arriving at the grounds each com- 
petitor shall report to the clerk of the course and obtain his number 
for the event in which he is entered. He shall inform himself of the 
times at which he must compete, and shall report promptly for his 
events, without waiting to be notified. No competitor shall be allow- 
ed to start without his proper number. 

Inner grounds. — No person whatever shall be allowed inside the 
track except the officials and properly accredited representatives of 
the press. Authorized persons shall wear a badge. Competitors not 
engaged in the events actually taking place shall not be allowed 
inside or upon the track. 

RUNNING. 

Track. — The measurement of a track shall be twelve inches from 
the inner edge, which edge shall be a solid curb raised three inches 
above the level of the track. 

Attendants. — No attendant shall accompany a competitor on the 
scratch or in the race. 

Starting signals. —American system of starting track and field 
events shall be official throughout the games. All races shall be 
started by the report of a pistol, the pistol to be fired so that its flash 
may be visible to the timekeepers. A snap cap shall be no start. 
In the case of an unfair start, the starter shall recall the competitors 
by a second pistol shot. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 383 

Siarling. — ^When the starter receives a signal from the referee 
that everything is in readiness, he shall direct the competitors to get 
on their marks. When any part of the person of a competitor shall 
touch the ground in front of his mark before the starting signal is 
given, it shall be considered a false start. 

Penalties for false starting shall be inflicted by the starter as 
follows: 

One meter for the first and one additional meter for the second. 
Three false starts by any contestant shall disqualify him. No substi- 
tution shall be allowed for such disqualified competitor. 

Keeping proper course. — In all races on a straight track each 
competitor shall keep his own position on the course from start to 
finish. In the 100 and 200 meter dashes, course for contestants shall 
be marked out with lime, or preferably by stakes protruding eighteen 
inches from the ground and connected at the top by cord or wire. 

Change of course. — In all races other than the straight track, a 
competitor may change toward the inside whenever he is two strides 
ahead of the man whose path he crosses, with the exception that, 
after rounding the last turn into the straightaway before reaching 
the finish, the competitor must keeep a straight course to the finish 
line and not cross either to the outside or to the inside in front of any 
of his opponents. 

Fouling. — Any competitor may be disqualified by the referee 
for jostling, running across, competing to lose, or in any way impeding 
another. All competitors representing a team in any one event may 
be disqualified by the referee by the act of any one of such compe- 
titors in jostling, running across, competing to lose, or in any way 
impeding another. 

Finish. — The finish line shall be a line on the ground drawn across 
the track from finish post to finish post, and the men shall be placed 
in the order in which they completely cross this line. For the pur- 
pose of aiding the judges but not as finish line, yarn shall be stretched 
across the track at the finish, four feet above the ground. It 
shall not be held by the judges, but fastened to the finish posts on 
either side so that it may always be at right angles to the course and 
parallel to the ground. This yarn should be "breasted" by the com- 
petitor or competitors in finishing and not seized with the hand. 

Ties. — In case of two or more competitors running a dead heat 
for any places which count for points in a running event, the points 
shall be equally divided between these competitors. 

HURDLING 

The 110 meters hurdle race shall be over ten hurdles, each 1.06 
meter (3 feet 6 in.) high. Each competitor must have a separate 
flight of hurdles. The first hurdle shall be placed 13.716 meters from 
the scratch, and there shall be 9.144 meters between each two hurdles. 
The 200 meters hurdle race shall be over ten hurdles, each 0.759 



384 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

meter (2 feet 6 inches) high. The first hurdle shall be placed 18.29 
meters from the scratch and there shall be 18.29 meters between each 
two hurdles. The hurdles shall be pinned or fixed so that the gates 
are rigid. The bases of each hurdle shall be not less than 18 inches 
(456 mm.) wide. Length of hurdle shall be 4 feet (1.22 meter). 

No record shall be allowed in a hurdle race unless each of the 
hurdles, at the time the competitor jumps the same, is standing and 
is not knocked down by such competitor. 

Any competitor who knocks down four or more of the hurdles 
in his race shall be disqualified in that event. A competitor who 
trails his leg or foot alongside any hurdle shall be disqualified in that 
event. 

Any competitor who runs over a hurdle not in his flight or runs 
around a hurdle shall be disqualified in that event. 

RELAY RACING RULES. 

1. Two lines shall be drawn, one ten meters in front of the start- 
ing line and the other ten meters behind the starting line. Between 
these two lines each runner must pass the baton to the succeeding 
runner. The baton must be actually passed, not thrown: or dropped 
by the contestant and picked up by the one succeeding him. Failure 
to do this shall disqualify the team in that event. The inspectors 
shall act as judges of relay racing. Their duties shall be to see that 
all passes are properly made. 

2. The same rules with reference to fouling, or impeding a runner 
in any manner, apply to relay racing as to other running events. 

3. No member of a relay team, in order to relieve his teammate, 
may step outside the twenty-meter zone. No man may run two 
relays in any team in the same race. 

4. Only those are allowed to run in the final heat of relay race 
who have competed in the trial heats. 

5. The relative positions of the teams on the starting line shall 
be drawn for, and these positions shall be kept by the teams at 
each relay point throughout the race. 

6. In all relay races an announcement must be made as to 
what distance each man is to run in his relay. Any man failing to 
run the distance required shall cause his team to be disqualified,, and 
the failmg of any one man to run his full relay shall cause the team 
to be disqualified. 

7. The baton shall be of wood, of a length not more than 300 mili- 
™eters (11.81 mches). Its weight shall be not less than 50 grams 
(1.769 ounces). The circumference shall 120 milimeters (4,724 inches). 

JUMPING. 

No weight or artificial aid will be allowed in any jumping contest 
except by special agreement or announcement. When weights are 




Top—V. S. rifle team. Bottom— V. S. pistol team. 



25 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 387 

allowed, there shall be no restrictions as to size, shape or material. 
Going over the bar by diving, handspring or somersault shall be 
counted a trial but is not a jump. 

Running High Jump and Pole Vault. — The jump and the vault 
shall be made over a bar resting on pins projecting at right angles 
not more than three inches from the uprights. The bar shall be 
placed at right angles to the path and the uprights shall not be moved 
during the competition. 

The height of the bar at starting and at each successive elevation 
shall be determined by the officials in charge of the event. Height 
to be measured from level take off on the ground, to top of cross bar 
in the center between the standards. Three trials are allowed at 
each height. Each competitor shall make one attempt in the order 
of his name on the program, then those who have failed, if any, shall 
have a second trial in regular order. A competitor may omit his 
trials at any height, but if he fail at the next height he shall not be 
allowed to go back and try the height he omitted. Each competitor 
shall be credited with the best of all his jumps or vaults. 

The position of the standards shall not be changed during the 
competition. 

High Jump. — A line to be known as the balk line shall be drawn 
three feet in front of the bar and parallel therewith and stepping 
over this line in any attempt shall be counted as a "balk" and two 
successive balks shall be counted as a "trial" jump. Displacing the 
bar shall count as a trial. 

Pole Vault. — A line to be known as the balk line shall be drawn 
fifteen feet in front of the bar and parallel therewith, and stepping 
over this line in any attempt shall count as a "balk." Two succes- 
sive balks count as a "trial". Displacing the bar or leaving the 
ground in an attempt shall count as a "trial". The poles shall be 
unlimited as to size and weight, but shall have no assisting device, 
except that they may be wound or wrapped with any substance for 
the purpose of affording a firmer grasp, and may have prongs at the 
lower end. 

No competitor shall, during his vault, raise the hand which was 
uppermost when he left the ground to a higher point on the pole, nor 
shall he raise the hand which was undermost when he left the ground 
to any point on the pole above the other hand. 

A competitor shall be allowed to dig a hole not more than one 
foot in diameter at the take-off, in which to plant his pole. 

Running Broad Jump.— The competitors shall have unlimited 
run, but must take-off from or behind the scratch. The scratch Ime 
shall be a joist eight inches wide, set flush with the ground, otep" 
ping over the scratch so as to mark the ground m an attempt shall 
be no jump, but shall count as a "trial." Each competitor shall be 
allowed three trials, and the best four men shall have three more 
trials each. Each competitor shall be credited with the best ot ali 



388 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

his jumps. The measurement shall be from the outer edge of the 
joist to the nearest break of the ground made by any part of his 
person. A line shall be drawn six feet in front of the scratch line 
to be known as the balk line and stepping over this line in an attempt 
shall count as a "balk;" two successive balks count as a "trial." When 
a competitor runs over the scratch line without jumping it shall count 
as a trial jump. 

Running Hop-Step-Jump. — Same rules regardmg scratch line 
take-off as for running broad jump. 

The competitor shall first land upon the same foot with which 
he takes off. The other foot shall be used for the second landing 
and both feet for the third landing. 

WEIGHT THROWING. 

Putting the Shot. — The shot shall be a metal sphere weighing 
sixteen pounds. It shall be put from the shoulder with one hand, 
and during the attempt it shall not pass behind nor below the shoulder. 
It shall be put from a circle seven feet in diameter, four feet of which 
circumference shall be a toe board, four inches in height. The circle 
shall be divided into halves by a line drawn through the center. Foul 
puts, which shall not be measured, but which shall count as puts, 
are as follows: 

1. Letting go of shot in an attempt. 

2. Touching the ground outside the circle with any portion of 
the body while the shot is in hand. 

3. Touching the ground forward of the front of the circle with 
any portion of the body before the put is measured. 

The competitor must remain in the circle until attempt is marked 
(not measured) by the officials. 

„ Each competitor shall be allowed three puts, and the best four 
men shall each be allowed three more puts. Each competitor shall 
be credided with the best of all of his puts. The measurement of 
the put shall be from the nearest edge of the first mark made by the 
shot to the point of the circumference of the circle nearest such mark. 

Discus. — The discus shall be a smooth hard body of any material 
without finger holes or any device that will help to give a grip. Its 
outside diameter shall be eight inches; its thickijiess in the center 
shall be two inches, and its weight shall be four and one-half pounds. 

The discus shall be thrown from a circle eight feet two inches 
in diameter. Foul throws, which shall not be measured, but which 
shall count, are as follows: 

1. Letting go of discus in an attempt. 

2. Touching the ground outside the circle with any portion of 
the body while the discus is in hand. 

3. Touching tlie ground forward of the front half of the circle 
with any portion of the body before the throw is measured. 

The competitor must remain in the circle until attempt is 
marked (not measured) by the officials. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 389 

Each competitor shall be allowed three throws, and the best 
four men shall each be allowed three more throws. Each competitor 
shall be credited with the best of all his throws. The measurement 
of the throw shall be from the nearest edge of the first mark made 
by the discus to the point of the circumference of the circle nearest 
such mark. 

Javelin Throw. — The javelin shall be of wood with a sharp metal 
point. It shall have about the center of gravity a grip formed by a 
binding, six inches broad, of whip cord and shall have no other hold 
than the above mentioned binding. The length of the javelin shall 
be not less than eight feet, six inches, and the weight shall be not less 
than one and three-fourth pounds. 

The javelin must be held by the grip, and no other method of 
holding is permissible. 

The throwing shall take place from behind a scratch line. The 
thrower may place his foot, feet, hand or hands, upon the Hne, but if 
with either foot or hand he touches the ground beyond the hne before 
the javelin first strikes the ground, the throw is invahd. 

The competitors may throw with either hand and with or without 
a run. 

In any throw in which the shaft of the javelin strikes before the 
point, the throw shall not be measured but shall be a trial without 
result. The throw is measured from the point at which the point o f the 
javelin first strikes the ground perpendicularly to the scratch line 
or the scratch line extended. The conditions governing the number 
of competitors qualifying for the finals shall be the same as those 
for the shot put. 

MEASUREMENTS. 

In all weight events and broad jumps, that portion of the tape 
showing the meters and centimeters must be held by an official at 
the take-off or at the circle. 

In the high jump and pole vault, that portion of the tape showing 
the meters and centimeters must be held at the cross bar. 

,TIES. 

In all cases of ties in high jumping the tying competitors shall 
have three additional trials at a height to be determined by the judges. 
The award shall be given to the competitor who cleared the bar m 
the least number of trials. In the event of another tie, the same 
procedure will be followed. , „ ■ , 

In case of a tie in the pole vault, the officials shall raise or lower 
the bar at their discretion, and those competitors who have tied 
shall be allowed one trial at each height. 

In case of a tie in a contest decided by "measurement or distance 
each of the tying competitors shall have three additional tnals and 
the award shdl be made in accordance with the distances cleared m 



390 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



these three additional trials. In case of a second tie, three more 
trials shall be allowed, and so on until a decision is reached. 

PENTATHLON. 

Each event shall be conducted under the foregoing track and 
field rules with the exception that each competitor shall be given 
three trials in the running broad jump, shot put and discus throw, 
and shall be credited with the best of all his attempts. In the 200- 
meter dash and the 1500-meter run he shall be credited with his 
actual time. 

Events shall be scored as per the official scoring tables. 

A competitor bettering the time or distance set as the one hundred 
point mark in any event shall be accredited proportionately. No 
mark less than zero shall be given. Should any competitor fail to 
compete in any event he shall be disqualified and any points he may 
have scored shall be cancelled. 

PENTATHLON SCORING TABLE. 





200 


DISCUS 


RUNNING 


16-LB 


1500 


3INTS 


METER DASH 


THROW 


BROAD JUMP 


SHOT PUT 


METER RUN 




Sec. 


Meters 


Meters 


Meters 


Min-Sec. 


1 


33 


11.0 


2.5 


3.0 


6^8 


2 


32 


12.0 


2.6 


3.25 


6—46 


3 


31 


13.0 


2.7 


3.5 


6 44 


4 


30 3-5 


14.0 


2.8 


3.75 


6-^2 


5 


30 1-5 


14.5 


2.9 


4.0 


6—40 


6 


29 4-5 


15.0 


3.0 


4.2 


6 38 


7 


29 2-5 


15.5 


3.05 


4.4 


6 36 


8 


29 


16.0 


3.1 


4.6 


6—34 


9 


28 4 5 


16.5 


3.15 


4.8 


6 32 


10 


28 3-5 


17.0 


3.2 


5.0 


6—30 


11 


28 2-5 


17.5 


3.25 


5.2 


6 28 


12 


28 1-5 


18.0 


3-3 


5.4 


6 26 


13 


28 


18.5 


3.35 


5.6 


6 24 


14 


27 4-5 


19.0 


3.4 


5.8 


6 22 


15 


— 


19.5 


3.45 


6.0 


6 20 


16 


27 3-5 


20.0 


3.5 


6.1 


6—18 


17 


— 


20.25 


3.55 


6.2 


6 16 


18 


27 2-5 


20.5 


3.6 


6.3 


6 14 


19 


— 


20.75 


3.66 


6.4 


6 12 


-20 


27 1-5 


21.0 


3.7 


6.5 


6—10 


21 


— 


21.25 


3.75 


6.6 


6 8 


22 


27 


21.5 


3.8 


6.7 


6—6 


23 


— 


21.75 


3.85 


6.8 


6^1 


24 


— 


22.0 


3.9 


6.9 


6 2 


25 


26 4-5 


22.25 


3.95 


7.0 


6—00 


26 


— 


22.5 


4.0 


7.1 


5 58 


27 


— 


22.75 


4.05 


7.2 


5—66 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



391 





200 


DISCUS 


RUNNING 


16-LB 


1500 


HNTS 


METER DASH 


THROW 


BROAD JUMP 


SHOT PUT 


METER RUN 




Sec. 


Meters 


Meters 


Meters 


Min-Sec. 


28 


26 3-5 


23.0 


4.1 


7.3 


5 54 


29 


— 


23.25 


4.15 


7.4 


5 52 


30 


— 


23.5 


4.2 


7.5 


5 50 


31 


26 2-5 


23.75 


4.25 


7.6 


5-^8 


32 


— 


24.0 


4.3 


7.7 


5—46 


33 


— 


24.25 


4.35 


7.8 


5-^4 


34 


26 1-5 


24.5 


4.4 


7.9 


5—42 


35 





24.75 


4.45 


8.0 


5—40 


36 





25.0 


4.5 


8.1 


5—39 


37 


26 


25.25 


4.525 


8.2 


5—38 


38 




25.5 


4.55 


8.3 


5—37 


39 





25.75 


4.575 


8.4 


5 36 


40 


25 4-5 


26.0 


4.6 


8.5 


5—35 


41 




26.2 


4.625 


8.6 


5—34 


42 





26 4 


4.65 


8.7 


5—33 


43 





26.6 


4.675 


8.8 


5—32 


44 


25 3-5 


26.8 


4.7 


8.9 


5—31 


45 




27.0 


4.725 


9.0 


5—30 


46 




27.2 


4.75 


9.1 


5 29 


47 





27.4 


4.775 


9.2 


5—28 


48 


25 2-5 


27.6 


4.8 


9.3 


5—27 


49 




27.8 


4.825 


9.4 


5 26 


50 




28.0 


4.85 


9.5 


5—25 


51 





28.2 


4.875 


9.6 


5—24 


52 


25 1-5 


28.4 


4.9 


9.7 


5—23 


53 




28.6 


4.925 


9.8 


5—22 


54 




28.8 


4.95 


9.9 


5—21 


55 




29.0 


4.975 


10.0 


5—20 


56 


25 


29.2 


5.0 


10.1 


5 19 


57 




29.4 


5.025 


10.2 


5—18 


58 




29.6 


5.05 


10.3 


5—17 


59 




29.8 


5.075 


10.4 


5—16 


60 


24 4-5 


30.0 


5.1 


10.5 


5—15 


61 




30.2 


5.125 


10.55 


5 — 14 


62 




30.4 


5.15 


10.6 


5—13 


63 




30.6 


5.175 


10.65 


5 12 


64 




30.8 


5.2 


10.7 


5—11 


65 


24 3-5 


31.0 


5.225 


10.75 


5—10 


66 




31.2 


5.25 


10.8 


5 — 9 


67 




31.4 


5.275 


10.85 


5—8 


68 




31.6 


5.3 


10.9 


5—7 


69 




31.8 


5.325 


10.95 


5—6 


70 


24 2-5 


32.0 


5.35 


11.0 


5—5 
5-4 


71 




32.2 


5.375 


11.05 


72 





32.4 


5.4 


11.1 


5—3 



392 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



200 DICUS RUNNING 16-LB 1500 

POINTS METER DASH THROW BROAD JUMP SHOP PUT METER RUN 

Sec. Meters Meters Meters Mm-Sec. 

73 _ 32.6 5.425 11.15 5—2 

74 _ 32.8 5.45 11.2 5—1 

75 24 1-5 33.0 5.475 11.25 5—00 

76 — 33.2 5.5 11.3 4—59 

77 _ 33.4 5.525 11.35 4—58 

78 — 33.6 5.55 11.4 4—57 

79 _ 33.8 5.575 11.45 4—56 

80 24 34.0 5.6 11.5 4—55 

81 — 34.15 5.625 11.55 4—54 

82 — 34.3 5.65 11.6 4—53 

83 — 34.45 5.675 11.65 4—52 

84 — 34.6 5.7 11.7 4—51 

85 23 4-5 34.75 5.725 11.75 4—50 

86 — 34.9 5.75 11.8 4-^9 

87 — 35.05 5.775 11.85 4—48 

88 — 35.2 5.8 11.9 4—47 

89 — 35.35 5.825 11.95 4—46 

90 23 3-5 35.5 5.85 12.0 4—45 

91 — 35.65 5.875 12.05 4—44 

92 — 35.8 5.9 12.1 4—43 

93 — 35.95 5.925 12.15 4—42 

94 — 36.1 59.5 12.2 4—41 

95 23 2-5 36.25 59.75 12.25 4—40 

96 — 36.4 6.0 12.3 4—39 

97 — 36.55 6.025 12.35 4—38 

98 — 36.7 6.05 12.4 4—37 

99 — 36.85 6.075 12.45 4—36 
100 23 1-5 37.0 6.10 12.5 4—35 

MODIFIED MARATHON RULES. 

16,000 Meters. 

The race shall be run over roads or streets with start and finish 
in the Stadium. The first 1000 meters and the last 2000 meters 
shall be run on the track. 

No competitor either at the start or during the progress of the 
race may accept any service, aid or assistance of any kind what- 
soever from any person, under penalty of immediate disqualification, 
other than such as may be provided for by the Games Committee. 

25. Tug-of-War. 

The rope shall be of such length as to allow of a pull of 3.5 meters, 
a slack of 3.5 meters at each end, and a space of 1.25 meters for each 
competitor. The rope shall be at least 10 centimeters in circum- 
ference and shall have no knots or other holds for the hands. Only 
such ropes shall be used as are provided by the Games Committee. 




Shooting. Top-Rifle pits at the Le Mans range. BoHomZa/i-Camp sta-eet at the range. 
RoLm rioAi-Sergeant Stanley Smith, winner individual rifle match. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 395 

A colored tape shall be affixed to the middle of the rope, with two 
other tapes of another color fastened, one on each side, at a distance 
of 1.75 meters from each side of the central tape. Into the ground 
there shall be driven a central peg and in a straight line with, and 
on each side of this, two other pegs which shall mark the position 
of the side-lines which shall be at right angles to the direction of the 
pulling and at a distance of 1 .75 meters from an imaginary line drawn 
through the center peg. At the start, the rope shall be taut, with 
the central tape over the central peg, and all the competitors shall 
stand behind the side lines. The start shall take place on the follow- 
ing words of command : (a) Take Hold, (b) Ready, (c) Pistol Shot. 
The first position of two opposing teams shall be decided by lot, for 
the second bout the teams shall change places; should a third pull be 
necessary, the positions will again be decided by means of drawing 
lots. The pull shall be won by that team that succeeds in drawing 
its opponent's side-tape over the first named team's "side line." 

No competitor shall wear boots or shoes with sharp projecting 
sides or points of any kind whatsoever. No kind of spiked shoes or 
boots shall be used, nor may the soles have any kind of projecting 
additions. Heel-irons are permitted on the shoes or boots, but they 
shall be so sunk in the heel that the bottom of the heel of the boot 
or shoe shall be smooth and hard. All footgear (shoes and boots) 
shall be submitted for the approval of the referee by the competitors 
before the beginning of the competition. 

Holes in the ground shall not be made before the start. The 
pulling shall take place with the front side of the body turned towards 
the opposing team and with the rope under the arm; the body shall 
not be turned from this front position to such a degree that the line 
of the shoulders passes beyond an imaginary line parallel to the rope. 

The "anchor" may hold the slack of the rope in any way he pleases, 
as long as it is not knotted around his waist. Turning is not permitted. 
For violation of any of the above restrictions by any competitor his 
team shall be immediately disqualified. 

Each team shall have the right to be coached during the compe- 
tition by one individual not forming one of the team. 

There shall be an interval of five minutes between the different 
bouts taking place in one and the same competition between two 
teams. A team which has already competed shall not take part in 
a fresh competition before the expiration of 30 minutes after its last pull. 

The competitions shall take place on ground without sod. 

26. Water Polo. 

Rules of Federation Internationale de Natation of 1913 shall govern. 

27. Wrestling. 

catch- as-catch-can. 
Size of the ring.— In all competitions the ring shall be not less 
than 16 feet nor more than 18 feet square. 



,396 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Ring during progress of match. — During the matches the ring shall 
be cleared of all chairs, buckets, etc. 

Clear ring. — No person other than the contestants and the 
referee shall, during the progress of the matches, enter or be in the 
ring. 

Costume. — The wrestlers shall compete in nothing heavier than 
light, rubber-soled gymnasium slippers or shoes without heels and 
laced with eyelets only, and wear a well fitted supporter, and clothing 
which will be passed upon by the referee. The referee will also see 
that each wrestler's finger-nails are trimmed short and that he has 
nothing on his hands or body likely to cause disaster or injury to his- 
opponent. No bandages of any kind shall be used on hands, arms,, 
or head. 

Weighing In. — Each competitor must present himself at nine 
o'clock a.m. for afternoon bouts and three o'clock p.m. for evening 
bouts on the first day in which he competes. The weight registered 
at the original weighing-in will be the competitor's official weight 
for the entire meet. 

Drawing for bouts. — Immediately before the competition each 
competitor, who has weighed-in, shall draw in person his number 
and compete according to the drawings. 

Bouts. — a. The duration of all bouts will be fifteen minutes each 
unless a fall is registered. A fall terminates the bout. If at the end 
of fifteen minutes no fall has been registered, the referee may decide 
the bout on points of technique and aggressiveness. 

6. If a fall has not been secured within the first fifteen minutes, 
and the referee is unable to decide he will order a second bout of. 
ten minutes after a two-minute rest period. If a fall has not been, 
registered in the second period, the referee will decide the match 
on points. 

c. If at any time any part of either competitor's body touches 
the floor off the mat enough to give an advantage to either the aggressor 
or the man on defense, the referee shall order both competitors to. 
the center of the mat, and they shall resume the same hold. 

d. The competitor who has last been defeated by the winner shall", 
receive second prize. 

Holds ~a. Any hold, grip, lock, or trip will be allowed except the 
hammer lock, strangle, full Nelson, and toe holds. Striking, kicking, 
gouging hair puHing, biting, strangling, or anything that endangers 
life or hmb, will not be allowed. •'a s 

b If a conipetitor refuses to break any hold when so ordered 
by the referee, he may be disqualified by referee. 

• ^'^F^^^ft ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ registered when both shoulders shall be 
pinned to the mat at the same time. A fall will not count if any 
part ot either of the competitor's bodies is touching the floor off the 
mat enough to give either competitor an advantage in offense or 
defense. Flying falls will not be allowed. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 397 

Seconds. — Each competitor shall be entitled to the assistance of 
two seconds only and no advice or coaching shall be given to any 
competitor by either of his seconds or by any other person during 
the progress of any bout. For a violation of this section a referee 
may disqualify the competitor who is so advised or coached. 

Officials. — a. The officials shall consist of a referee, weigher, 
timer, clerk of wrestling and medical officer. 

b. The referee shall have full control of the competition and 
his decisions shall be final and without appeal. The weigher shall 
see that each man is weighed-in stripped, during the prescribed time, 
and he shall give the weight of each competitor to the Clerk. 

c. The timer shall take the time upon hearing the referee say "Go," 
and shall ring a bell to notify the referee of the expiration of the time 
of the bout. 

d. The clerk of wrestling shall keep a record of the names, weights, 
positions, drawings, winners, etc., and shall call each competitor to 
the mat at the beginning of each new bout. 

e. The medical officer shall be in attendance at all times at each 
meeting held under these rules. 

A competitor may enter only the class of his own weight, unless 
he is the only entry in that class, in which case he may be allowed to 
compete in the next class heavier. 

Any competitor entering for any weight and failing to make that 
weight at the required time shall be scratched from the list. 

GRECO-ROMAN STYLE. 

1. Size of ring, costume, weighing-in, weights, drawings for 
bouts, seconds, officials, except as noted hereafter in paragraph 2, 
shall be the same as for "Gatch-as-catch-can" wrestling. 

2. Every contest shall be decided by two judges and a referee. 
The referee wiU announce the decision of the judges if they agree. 
In case the judges disagree, the referee shall cast the deciding vote. 

3. A bout will be limited to twenty minutes, provided no fall 
is obtained within that period, except, when no faU has been obtained 
within the twenty-minute period and the judges are unable to decide 
upon a winner, they shall order an extra bout of twenty minutes. If, 
during the second bout of twenty minutes, no faU is obtained, the 
judges and the referee shall make a decision based upon points, the 
decision going to the wrestler who is most upon the offensive and who, 
during the bout, has his opponent the most times in jeopardy. 

4. The best two of three falls shall determine the match. 

5. A fall is obtained when a wrestler's two shoulders are, to the 
satisfaction of the judges, upon the ground or mat at the same time. 
Pin falls only to count; rolling falls shall not count. 

6. All wrestling shall take place upon the mat. In case the 
wrestlers fall off the mat, the referee shall cause them to resume 
wrestling from the center of the mat, the same hold to be contmued 
as was in force when the wrestlers fell oft the mat. 



398 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



7. The wrestlers are allowed to take hold from the head and 
not lower than the waist. Taking hold of legs, tripping, twisting of 
fingers or thumbs, scratching, striking, grasping ears, hair, flesh, 
private parts, or clothes, are forbidden. Any hold causing fear of 
breakage or dislocation of a limb shall not be allowed. In addition, 
the following holds are barred: double Nelson, hammerlock, strangle, 
and half-strangle, the hang, and the flying-mare with the palms 
uppermost. Grasping with the closed hand of any part of the oppo- 
nent's body except his hands and arms is forbidden. 

8. The use of any of the forbidden holds or practices mentioned 
in the preceding paragraph constitutes a foul. 

9. Following the second warning of a foul, the referee shall 
decide the bout against the man perpetrating the foul. 

10. Disqualification may follow repeated failures to observe 
warnings for forbidden practices. 

11. Disqualification eliminates the offender from the entire tour- 
nament. 

12. Competitor may enter only the class of his own weight, 
except that he may enter in the class next heavier if he so elects. 
Any competitor entering for any weight and failing to make that 
weight at the required time for weighing in, shall be scratched from 
the list. 




PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 399 

OFFICIALS 

The work of selecting officials for the Inter-Allied Games began 
twenty days before the opening of the meet. By communicating 
with officers who had conducted meets in the American Expeditionary 
Forces and for the Y.M.C.A., the Officer in Charge of Officials was 
able to compile a list of names of the men with the American forces 
best qualified to become officials. 

The head of each sport of the Inter-Allied Games was also asked 
to submit the names of competent officials. From these recommen- 
dations and the lists previously obtained the final selection of officials 
was made. 

The language to be used among the officials was English. There- 
fore, nations unable to recommend officials who had a speaking know- 
ledge of the language were provided with interpreters by the Games 
Committee. These interpreters worked in conjunction with the offi- 
cials. 

After the officials had reported, schools of instruction were imme- 
diately commenced. When the Games started the officials were requi- 
red to report each day to the Officer in Charge of Officials, Maj. Roland 
F. Walsh, U. S. Army, one hour before the scheduled time for their 
respective events. 

Foreign officials from the Allied Nations were used as judges, 
inspectors, referees, umpires and the like. The mechanical operation 
of the Games was handled by American officials. The service and 
cooperation of foreign officials was highly satisfactory. All displayed 
interest in their work, and a true spirit of sportsmanship. 

A pool of substitutes was kept on hand at all times in order to 
avoid delay in case a regular official did not appear. 

This section also watched carefully to see that officers in charge 
of the various sports made requisitions and obtained the necessary 
mechanical equipment needed by officials in their respective sports 
such as stop-watches, tapes, whistles and scorecards. 

The following is a complete list of officials working in connection 
with the Inter- Allied Games: 

LIST OF OFFICIALS ACTING IN THE INTER-ALLIED 
GAMES, PERSHING STADIUM, PARIS. 

22 June to 6 July 1919. 

Referee honorary: General John J. Pershing. 

Referee: Colonel S. F. Dallam. 

Field manager: Colonel Joseph Thompson. 



400 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Assistant: 

Officer in charge 
Track and field events: 
Starter: 

Clerk of course: 
Assistants: 



Judges of finish: 



Inspectors: 



Timers: 



Captain R. G. Stevens. 

TRACK AND FIELD 

Major A. D. Surles. 

2nd Lt. J. D. Lightbody. 

Major C. J. Miller, 

Major A. J. Comstock, 

1st Lt. W. Campbell, 

1st Lt. Matt Geis, 

Capt. L. G. White, 

Chaplain C. J. Greene, 

Mr. D. W. Thomas, Y.M.C.A. 

Lt. Col. 0. S. Perry, 

Lt. Col. L. R. Dice, 

Lt. Col. Robt. Smart, 

Major J. W. Bodily, 

Mr. Fred B. Hagaman, Y.k.C.A. 

Capt. de Bellefon, France, 

Capt. Quilgars, France, 

Capt. Mercier, France, 

Sous Lt. Delarge, Belgium. 

Colonel H. B. Hennessy, 

Major Dean Hudnutt, 

Capt. Frank M. Gibson, 

Capt. C. W. Burton, 

1st Lt. R. H. R. Loughborough, 

Mr. F. C. Hill, 

Chef de Bat. Alain, France, 

Lt. Gambley, France, 

Lt. Girard, France. 

Major Bayley, Canada, 

Capt. C. A. Palmer, Canada, 

Capt. Blaydon, Canada, 

Capt. Costa, Italy, 

Capt. Carterigna, Italy. 

Major Robert R. Harper, 

Capt. R. A. P. Holdesby, 

Capt. J. H. Mclntyre, 

Dr. Cummings, Y.M.G.A., 

Mr, Wm. Unmack, Y.M.C.A, 




Top Ze/i— Norman Ross of America. Top rir/M—Ross of America leading m first lap of 
second heat of 800-meter free style. Center lefi-SUvt of 400-meter free style finals. 
Center right^St^Tt of second heat of 400-meter free style. Bottom fe/^-Longworth of Australia, 
winner second heat of 400-mcter free style. Bottom rujht—Biddlc of America finishing hrst 
in second heat 100-meter back stroke. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



403 



Field Judges: 



Scorers: 



Surveyor: 
Announcers: 



Callers: 



Measurers: 



Major C. C. Ghilds, 

Major F. T. Payne, 

Major P. M. Shepard, 

Major C. K. Knox, 

Capt. L. A. France, 

Capt. J. H. Cronly, 

Capt. H. 0. Finley, 

Capt. J. T. Kibler, 

Lt. G. H. Nelson, 

Lt. G. F. Ferguson, 

Lt. J. E. Dougherty, 

Mr. J. Newhall, Y.M.C.A., 

Capt. Genet, France, 

Lt. Robillard, France, 

Major Barbier, France, 

Lt. Delaby, France, 

Lt. Caste, France, 

Capt. Smith, Belgium, 

Capt. Woods, Canada. 

Major W. C. Swain, 

1st Lt. A. J. Walker, 

1st Lt. S. T. Dunlap, 

1st Lt. A. J. Rogers. 

1st Lt. H. J. Latham. 

Lt. M. J. Donoghue, 

Lt. A. R. Dorris, 
Thos. Gallagher, 
F. S. Wyatt, Y.M.C.A., 
Thos. Kelly, Y.M.C.A., 
F. L. Dougherty, Y.M.C.A., 

Capt. Allen H. Muhr. 

Mr. James Clark, Y.M.C.A., 

Mr. F. W. Carpenter, Y.M.C.A., 
A. McCumber, Y.M.C.A. 
Kenneth McDougal, 
J. Allen, Y.M.C.A., 
H. Wood, Y.M.C.A., 
S. Minter, Y.M.C.A., 
P. Lorentz, Y.M.C.A., 
B. Hunt, Y.M.C.A., 



Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



Mr. S. 
1st Lt. 
Mr. H. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



C. 
C. 
0. 
M. 



Mr. 

Mr. Geo. B. Cole, Y.M.C.A. 



404 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — lOIQ' 

BOXING 

1st Lt. Ben Steinel. 

Sgt. Joe Levin. 

Pvt. AI. Herr. 

Capt. Harry Sharpe. 

Mr. James Bronson, Y.M.G.A. 

Mr. L. Lerda, Y.M.G.A. , France. 

Mr. F. Deschamps, Y.M.G.A., France. 

Mr. Ed. Shave, Y.M.G.A. 

Pvt. James League. 

1st Lt. Harry Leighton. 

1st Lt. Albert Pellerin, France. 

Major Leon Defigier, France. 

Major P. A. Beveridge, Canada. 

Major N. A. Armstrong, Ganada. 

Capt. R. A. Braydon, Canada. 

Capt. Mario Carasi, Italy. 

Lt. C. J. Kehaher, Australia. 

1st Lt. Apostolos Pikios, Greece. 

1st Lt. C. J. MaMarre. 

1st Lt. Pierre Makar, Belgium. 

SWIMMING AND WATER POLO 

Major J. S. McTaggart. 
Major G. J. Downing. 
Capt. R. H. Rogers. 
Capt. J. P. Sullivan. 
1st Lt. F. H. Furber. 
1st Lt. S. D. Day. 
2nd Lt. C. D. Berger. 
2nd Lt. H. M. Tishborne. 
2nd Lt. H. B. Conard. 
2nd Lt. Walter Campbell. 
2nd Lt. W. E. Mikell. 
Capt. L. Higgins. 
Mr. A. E. Marriot, Y.M.G.A. 
Mr. H. E. Hoppen. Y.M.G.A. 
Mr. C. E. Beckett, Y.M.G.A. 
Mr. C. E. Peterson, Y.M.G.A. 
Capt. Decoin, France. 
Capt. Degraine, France. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 405 

Lt. Robillard, France. 
Lt. Italo Brenna, Italy. 
Major A. H. Fisher, Canada. 
Col. C. W. McLean, Canada. 

BASEBALL 

Mr. Al. Orth, Y.M.C.A. 
Mr. Walter Frambes, Y.M.C.A. 
Mr. C. E. Robinson, Y.M.C.A. 
Mr. R. 0. Thornton, Y.M.C.A. 
Mr. T. Crawley, Y.M.C.A. 
Mr. 0. T. Doran, Y.M.C.A. 
Mr. Dave Roth, Y.M.C.A. 

SOCCER 

2nd Lt. Fred Wilson. 

Mr. A. Patterson, Y.M.C.A. 

Capt. H. W. Maloney. 

Mr. Jack McKensie, Y.M.C.A. 

Capt. Davilat, Roumania. 

Lt. Savalesin, Roumania. 

Lt. Metiaun, Roumania. 

Lt. Alviresch, Roumania. 

Lt. F. Cejnar, Czecho-SIovakia. 

Lt. Duthiel, France. 

BASKETBALL 

2nd Lt. C. K. Brownell. 

1st Lt. N. B. Delavan. 

Lt. F. T. Hanchett. 

Lt. R. Dunn. 

Mr. John L. Clark, Y.M.C.A. 

CROSS-COUNTRY AND MARATHON 

Capt. C. H. Holcomb. 

Capt. C. D. McLougWin. 

Chaplain F. B. Beal. 

Mr. J. A. Abernathy, Y.M.C.A. 

Lt. Neumayer, France. 

Lt. Robillard, France. 

Sous Lt. Baissac, France. 

Lt. Caste, France. 

Lt. Cauvin, France. 



406 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Lt. Ganbier, France. 
Capt. Grenet, France. 
Lt. Pellerin, France. 
Lt. Ratti Alfredo, Italy. 

RUGBY 

Capt. Allen Muhr. 
2nd Lt. W. D. Fletcher. 
Capt. Bonnefoi, France. 
Major H. G. Deeds, Canada. 

ROWING 

Umpire: Lt. Col. D. M. Goodrich. 

Assistants: Capt. L. Higgins. 

Capt. Allen H. Muhr. 
Regatta Committee and Judges : 

Major C. W. Lewis. 

Lt. Col. Marshall, Australia. 

Major James 0. Spence, Canada. 

Lt. Moncelon, France. 

Lt. Gerbeland, France. 

Lt. Hajny, Czecho-Slovakia. 

Lt. Bazzi Mario, Italy. 

Colonel Martin, Belgium. 

Capt. Fairbain, England. 

Major Hardy, New Zealand. 

Lt. Ferreira, Portugal. 
Timers: Lt. W. A. Simpson. 

Lt. Lightbody. 

TUG-OF-WAR 

Capt. R. A. Holdesby. 
Mr. Thomas Kelly. 

FENCING 

1 . The officials for the Inter-Allied Fencing matches were chosen 
at the time of the competition. Each of the two nations competing 
was represented by two jurymen, and the four jurymen selected a 
neutral president. Many of the following officers have served as 
presidents as well as jurymen: 
Belgium — 

Capt. Van de Viel, Lt. Feverick, 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 407 

Lt. Anspach, Lt. Calle. 

Gzecho-Slovakia — 

Capt. Gruss Lt. Kroupa. 

France — 

Capt. Cazahuc, Adjt. Spinosi, 

Adjt. Haller, Adjt. Dodivers, 

Adjt. Pecheux, Adjt. Vin. 

Adjt. Remay. 

Greece — 

Major Natoris. 

Italy— 

Maj. Gen. Geccherini Capt. Gesanerno, 

Lt. Nedo Nadi. Signer Nunes. 

Portugal — 

Col. Rocha, Lt. Gol. Motta. 

Major Ventura. 
Roumania — 

Lt. Baersou. 

American scorers and timekeepers — 

Capt. K. J. Zinck, Lt. Eugene Cook, 

Lt. G. R. Heflin, Lt. R. A. Knapp. 

L. M. 0. Moran. 

TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

Lt. Col. Robert Smart, 
Capt. Clarence Holcomb, 
Capt. L. A. France, 
Capt. A. P. Withers, 
Lt. G. L. Stocking, 
Lt. Chisholm Garland, 
Lt. Lewis A. Bond, 
Lt. George Faunce Jr., 
Lt. 0. J. Reinthal, 
Lt. Mortimer L. Dietzer, 
Lt. Fred T. Hanchett, 
Lt. William C. Wylie, 
Lt. John A. Krugh, 
Lt. H. A. Leighton, 
Lt. E. C. Goodwin, 
Lt. William G. Williamson, 



408 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Lt. Herbert. D. Bowman, 
Lt. Henry G. Sparks, 
Lt. Raymond H. Wright, 
Chaplain F. P. Beal, 
Sgt. J. K. Miller, 
Sgt. David Zeisler, 
Sgt. Chester L. Hoover, 
CpL L. H. Behney, 
Cpl. A. S. Johnson, 
Pvt. Edgar Tilton, 
Pvt. H. L. Richards, 
Pvt. H. J. Gedney, 
Pvt. A. L. Lindstrom, 
Pvt. Andrew B. Lail, 
Pvt. A. T. Denton. 

HORSE-RIDING 

Assignment of officials for 30 June. 
Long-distance Ride: 
At start — 

Starter Col. H. P. Howard. 

Assistant Starter Major Wheeler-Nicholson, 

Weighing Officer Lt. L. H. Tenney. 

Time Keeper Lt. Col. T. L. Sherburne. 

Assistant Time Keeper .... Lt. EUiott Holt. 

Judge Major d'Auzac (French). 

Control Officer Col. L. H. McKinley. 

Statistical Officer Major H. Kobbe. 

Assistant Statistical Officer . Major D. C. Cabell. 

2 Enlisted Assistants, Starter. 

3 Enlisted Clerks, Weighing Officer. 

1 Enlisted Assistant, Time Keeper. 

Railroad Crossing No. 1 — 

Time Keeper Major N. Ewing. 

Assistant Time Keeper .... Capt. Jack Hastie. 
Assistant Time Keeper Capt. d'Estre (French). 

2 Enlisted Assistants. 
Railroad Crossing No. 2 (Chatenay) — 

Time Keeper Capt. W. W. Powell. 








Top m-hongwoTth of AustraUa. Top right— Biddle of America. <^^"f '^„ ^,'~I";"'^ 
water polo team— Ze/< to right— Decoin, Dujardin, Vanlacre, Lehn, J°'^^\^'^'^f' ^rlnlv 
Center right-AmeTica,n water polo team— left to right-Rosers, Gardmer, Douglas, Manlj, 
Ross, Scarry, McDonald. Bottom Ze/<— Steadman of Australia, winner 
in 400-meter free style. Bottom rifffti— Bacigalupo ot Italy. 



of third heat 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 411 

Assistant Time Keeper .... Lt. W. B. Cobb. 
Assistant Time Keeper .... Capt. Gibert (French). 
2 Enlisted Assistants. 
Railroad Crossing No. 3 — 

Time Keeper Lt. J. H. Lucas. 

Assistant Time Keeper .... Lt. R. S. Clark. 
Assistant Time Keeper .... Lt. Jeanne (French). 
Veterinary Station No. 1 (near Rungis)^ 

Veterinarian Lt. M. E. J. Evans. 

2 Farriers. 
2 Horseshoers. 

Veterinary Station No. 2 (Patte d'Oie)— 

Veterinarian Capt. Wm. D. Odou. 

2 Farriers. 
2 Horseshoers. 
Water Point No. 1— 

Veterinarian Capt. C. M. Cline. 

1 Enlisted Attendant. 
Water Point No. 2. (At Finish)— 
1 Enlisted Attendant. 
Water Point No. 3. (Patte d'Oie)— 

1 Enlisted Attendant. 
Finish. — 

Judge MajorMagdalain(French.) These officials to be 

Assistant Judge Col. H. P. Howard. I from personnel at 

Statistical Officer Major H. Kobbe. \ "^^^""J" t'^^u^nJs Jn 

Ass. Statistical Officer. Major D. C. Cabell. ) fx ^^^ j^g^ qqj^_ 

Weighing-in Officer . . Lieut. L. H. Tenney. "j testant has started. 

Time Keeper Lt. Col. T. L. Sherburne J Not to be included 

Time Keeper Lieut. Elliott Holt. f in total of officials 

Time Keeper MajorWheeler-Nicholson-, necessary. 

2 Enlisted Assistants to Statistical Officer. 
2 Enlisted Assistants to Weighing Officer. 
2 Enlisted Assistants to Time Keepers. 

Cross-counlry Ride. 

Start- 
Starter Col. A. F. Commisky. 

Assistant Starter Capt. W. F. Safford. 

Time Keeper Major D. J. Keane. 



412 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Time Keeper Major Robt. R. Wallach. 

Judge Major Kahlad (Arabian). 

Judge Capt. Raschid (Arabian). 

Statistical Officer Col. Koch. 

Assistant Statistical Officer . Major H. J. M. Smith. 
Control Officer Col. C. E. Stodter. 

1 Enlisted Assistant. 

1 Enlisted Assistant Starter. 

1 Enlisted Time Keeper. 

Jump No. 1 — 

Judge Major Nativelle, 

Judge Capt. Safford. 

1 Enhsted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 
Jump No. 2 — 

Judge Lt. P. S. P. Randolph. 

Judge Lt. Toscano (Itahan). 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 
Jump No. 3 — 

Judge Major J. P. Wheeler. 

Judge Major Lanck Sweert (Belgian) 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 
Jump No. 4 — 

Judge Major John C. Mullenix. 

Judge Major Bonardi (French). 

1 Enhsted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 
Jump No. 5 — 

Jiidge Gmdt. Radu (Roumanian). 

Judge Lt. J. E. Pyke. 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enhsted Attendants. 
Jump No. 6 — 

Judge Major Waring, 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 413 

Jump No. 7— 

Judge Major F. E. Tibbetts. 

Judge Capt. De Serrezin (French). 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 

Jump No. 8 — 

Judge Capt. W. S. Gurley. 

Judge Lt. Muggiani. 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 
Jump No. 9 — 

Judge Vet. Carpentier (Belgian). 

Judge Lt. McCreary. 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 
Jump No. 10— 

Judge Capt. J. J. Waters. 

Judge Lt. Bertrain (French). 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 

Jump No. 11 — 

Judge Major Loupou (Roumanian). 

Judge Lt. Col. J. V. Kuznik. 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 

Jump No. 12— 

Judge Major Abbott Boone. 

1 Enlisted Runner. 

2 Enlisted Attendants. 
Finish — 

Control Officer Lt. Col. J. E. Shelley. 

Judge Capt. Cahusac (French). 

Judge Lt. Marteau. 

Time Keeper Major Walter Frazier. 

Time Keeper Lt. Col. P. D. Carlisle. 

Medical Service — ■ 

Adbulance for the road. ... Lt. Col. W. T. Carstarphen. 



414 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

Dressing Station, Patte d'Oie. Capt. 0. J. Chaney. 
Personnel and equipment to be furnished by 
Commanding Officer at Fort de Champigny. 

Assignment of officials for 2, 3, and 5 July. 

Master of Ceremonies Col. C. E. Hawkins. 

Assistant Master of Ceremonies.. . . Lt. Col. T. M. Knox. 

Assistant Master of Ceremonies. . . . Major D. C. Cabell. 

Timekeeper Major Wheeler-Nicholson. 

Timekeeper Capt. Jack Hastie. 

Weighing Officer Lt. L. H. Tenney. 

Assistant Weighing Officer Lt. W. B. Cobb. 

Statistical Officer Lt. Col. D. D. Gregory, 

Assistant Statistical Officer Lt. Col. Graham. 

Assistant Statistical Officer Capt. A. B. Custis. 

Control Officer Capt. W. F. Safford. 

Assistant Control Officer Capt. W. S. Gurley. 

Medical Officer Capt. 0. J. Chaney. 

Maintenance and Repair Lt. Elliott Holt, 2 carpenters, 2 

assistant carpenters with tools 

At each jump two attendants (with extra material and equipment 
for repairs) and one runner for service between judge and statistical 
officer. 

Chief Judge Genl. Blague-Belair, French. 

Judge, Obstacle No. 1 Lt. Jeanne, French. 

Judge, Obstacle No. 2 Lt. Bertrand, French. 

Judge, Osbtacle No. 3 Lt. Col. Martin-Franklin, Italian. 

Judges, Obstacle No. 4 Lt. Col. Jones, Italian. 

Major Mullenix, U. S. 

Judge, Obstacle No. 5 Comdt. Lancksweert, Belgian. 

Judges, Obstacle No. 6 Lt. Col. Nativelle, French. 

Capt. Gibert, French. 

Judge, Obstacle No. 7 Maj. M. du Chesnoy, Belgian. 

Judge, Obstacle No. 8 Comdt. Bonardi, French. 

Judges, Obstacle No. 9 Maj. R. Waring, U. S. 

Maj. Theodor Radu, Roumanian. 
Judges, Obstacle No. 10 Capt. Gallina, Italian. 

Maj. L. Zalaiche, Roumanian. 

Judge, Obstacle No. 11 Capt. de Monfort, Fref^h. 

Judge, Obstacle No. 12 Capt. Challan Belval, French. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 

Judges, Obstacle No. 13 Col. McKinlay, U.S. 

Gapt. du Passage, French. 

Gapt. Marteau, French. 
Judges, Obstacle No. 14 Major Kobbe, U.S. 

Gapt. Nourrisat, French. 

Gapt. d'Este, French. 
Judges, Obstacle No. 15 Lt. Col. Carlisle, U.S. 

Gapt. de Serrezin, French. 
Substitutes .. , Major Boone. 

Major Smith. 

Major Wallach. 

Major Frazier. 

Lti, Lucas. 

The International Jury of Appeal was as follows: 

United States. Maj. Gen. H. T. Allen, U.S.A. 

France Gapt. Jolibois. 

Italy Col. Alberti. 

Belgium Col. Joostens. 

Portugal Lt. of Cavalry, Mario da Cunha. 

Roumania.... Col. George Comauescu. 
Hedjaz Brig. Genl. Noury Said Pacha. 

SHOOTING, d'aUVOURS RANGE, LE MANS, JUNE 1919. 

Albright, James L. Captain Inf. Range Officer. 

Allen, Edward L. 1st Lieut. Inf. Auto Rifle Board. 

Atkinson, D. D. 1st Lieut. Inf. Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Austin, J. M. Captain Inf. Range Officer. 

Barbee, James S. 2nd Lieut. Inf. Range Officer. 

Barnard, D. D. 1st Lieut. Inf. Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Blackwood, Owen M. 2nd Lieut. Inf. Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Blank, Jackson 2nd Lieut. Inf. Pit Detail. 

Boucher, Irving 2nd Lieut. Inf. Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Bowen, Leo L. 2nd Lieut. Inf. Det. No. 1, Range Officers 

Bower, Addison, 2nd Lieut. Inf. Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Brady, David J. Major Inf. Firing Line. 

Brees, Herbert J. Colonel G. S. Chief Range Officer. 

Brookshire, Hides C. Captain Inf. Firing Line. 

Byerly, Perry E. Captain Inf. Range Officer. 

, Garter, GeoTge H. 2nd Lieut. Inf. Range Officer. 

Christopher, H. 1st Lieut. Inf. Det. No. 1, Range Officers, 



415 



416 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Christie, E. W. 
Clearman, Vaughn H 
Coleman, William P. 
Coss, Harry D. 
Damen, Howard W. 
Darby, G. B. 

Davis, Frank, 

Dickson, Robert N. 

Diggs, Robert L. 

Dilley, James M. 

Dindot, LeRoy W. 

Estes, Arthur J. 

Finley, R. W. 

Fleming, Joseph L. 

Fleming, Thomas J. 

Flood, James J. 

Fray, Albert N. 

Fredendall, L. R. 

Fuller, H. E. 

Galey, S. D. 

Garey, Edward S. 

Gates, Curtis, 

Geisler, George L. 

Gerhardt, Lewis D. 

Gibson, L. L. Jr. 

Geister, Edward A. 

Gillespie, Walter R. 
Gillette, Wade G. 
Gillfillan, Jay E. 
Grigg, Norman D. 
Grimes, Herman L. 
Haessler, Hugo P. 
Hamilton, Jesse P. 
Hann, A. P. 
Hayward, Armond, 
Henoch, Irwin H. 
Herrdegan, A. C. 
Heraty, Francis J. 
Hess, Winefred, 
Hohl, L. E. 



1st Lieut. Inf, 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 
1st Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 
1st Lieut. Inf. 

Captain Engrs. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

Lt. Col. G. S. 

Captain Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
Captain Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
Captain Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
Captain M. G. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
Lt. Col. G. S. 



Range Guard. 
Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 
Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 
Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 
Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 
Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 
Range Officer. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Asst. Range Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Executive Officer. 

Range Officer. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. , 

Adjutant. 

Det. No. 1, Range OfTicers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det: No. 2, Range Officers. , 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Asst. to Executive Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No .2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Auto Rifle Board. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Auto Rifle Board.' 




Tov !«/(— Franco versus IT. S., water polo. Top rtfffti— Howard , \j. 
player. Center left— Ross, V. S., and Hardwick, Australia, at turn, 
versus U. S., water polo. Bottom ZP/<-Sauville U. S., taking the water 

of 1500-meter final. 



S., tackling French 

Center right — France 

Bottom right — Start 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



419 



Holmes, Richard S. 
Hopkins, Russell C. 
Huff, Byron R. 
Hughes, J.-H. 
Hundley, John G. 
Hunt, Elmer W. 
Hunt, Homer E. 
Hunter, Roser L. 
Irwin, Stewart F. 
Jackson, Wyatt, C. 
Johnson, William 0. 
Kenyon, Bradford H. 
Ketchersid, Wm. C. 
Knapp, U. S. 
Lane, F. Wade, 
Layman, W. G. 
Leach, C. G. 
Leaks, N. G. 
Leidy, Harold B. 
Lindgren, G. E. 
Longstreet, W. A. 
Lord, Samuel, 
Lowen, Edwin H. 
McAndrews, J. A. 
McCaine, Joseph N. 
McCarthy, Daniel J. 
McClanhan, Phillip P. 
McCredie, William Jr. 
McNally, Eugene A. 
McNary, James E. 
Macnab, A. J. Jr. 
Markel, Carl J, 
Masters, Mark F. 
Merritt, James A. 
Mohr, Jacob C. 
Moore, Guy A. 
Moss, C. F. 
Motz, Frederick, 
Mulvey, Charles D. 
Murphy, William J. 



2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
Captain Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
Major Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
Lt. Colonel Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
Colonel G. S. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
Lt. Col. Ord. 
Colonel G. S. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 



Range Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Firing Line. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Auto Rifle Board. 

Trans., Mtnence, and Supplies. 

Pit Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Auto Rifle Board. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Ordnance Officer, I-A C. 

Officer in Charge I-A G. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers, 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers, 



420 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Noble, Curtis A. 


1st Lieut. Inf. 


Norton, Paul V. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Oberlin, Harry V. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Oliver, Joseph L. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Olmstead, Loren J. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Owens, Joseph T. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Parmelee, S.D. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Patrick, Clarence R. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Patterson, Arthur L. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Payne, Raymond E. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Pennington, John E. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Peterson, David R. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Pierce, George P. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Pierce, John L. 


Captain Inf. 


Pinkerton, Wm. W. 


1st Lieut. Inf. 


Powell, James C. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Powers, H. H. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Prey or, Allen T. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Prillaman, Lafe P. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Price, Robert I. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Pryor, Norman C. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Rees, Garlyle T. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Reeves, Maurice, 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Register, A. J. 


1st Lieut. Inf. 


Ratzlaff, Fred A. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Richardson, Thom. E 


. 2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Richerson, Archie E. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Richter, Charles H. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Riopor, H. P. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Righter, John C. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Rinchart, Barton T. 


Captain Inf. 


Roberts, Gordon H. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Robinson, Carl A. 


Captain Inf. 


Rose, Oscar C. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Rosenberg, B. 


1st Lieut. Inf. 


Ruff, George G. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Ruhhn, John G. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Ryan, Cornelius E. 


1st Lieut. Inf. 


Ryder, Harry A. 


2nd Lieut. Inf. 


Sarcka, Earl. 


1st Lieut. Inf. 



Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Pit Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 1, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Pit Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Det. No. 2, Range Officers. 

Range Officer. 

Pit Officer. 

Range Officer. 

Auto Rifle Board. 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



421 



Schiftors, P. G. 
Scholz, Arthur I. 
Shoahan, F. E. 
Sholton, Robert H. 
Shopler, Raymond V. 
Sherwood, Myron L. 
Simpson, James E. 
Sipe, Clinton R. 
Smith, Andrew T. 
Smith, Charles F. 
Smith, Edward W. 
Smith, Grant W. 
Smith, Titus K. 
Spirco, William C. 
Stevens, F. G. 
Wallace, G. W. 
AVoden, David B. 
West, John J. 
Whitt, Josso E. 
Whitney, Burt E. 
Whittemore, K. S. 
Williams, James B. 
Wolfe, Byron A. 
Wolf, Fred G. 



1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
Captain Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 
2nd Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 

1st Lieut. Inf. 



Det. No. 1, Range 
Det. No. 2, Range 
Det. No. 2, Range 
Range Officer. 
Range Officer. 
Range Officer. 
Det. No. 2, Range 
Range Officer. 
Det. No. 2, Range 
Det. No. 2, Range 
Det. No. 2, Range 
Det. No. 2, Range 
Range Officer. 
Det. No 1, Range 
Det. No. 1, Range 
Range Officer. 
Det. No. 2, Range 
Pit Officer. 
Det. No. 1, Range 
Det. No. 1, Range 
Const, and repair of 
Range Officer. 
Det. No. 1, Range 
Firing Line. 



Officers. 
Officers. 
Officers. 



Officers. 

Officers, 
officers. 
Officers. 
Officers. 

Officers. 
Officers. 

Officers. 

Officers. 
Officers, 
targets. 

Officers. 




422 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 
ROSTER OF CONTESTANTS 





AUSTRALIA 




Name 


Rank 


No. 


Bergmeier, Chas E. 


Pvt. 1st CI. 


1183 


Best, Arthur F. 


Capt. 


1193 


Bridges, Alfred F. 


Sgt. Maj. 


1214 


Carroll, Harold, V. 


Driver 


1181 


Carter, Ernest 


Sgt. 


1179 



Chalmers, Robt. D. 



Lt. 



1185 



Checkett, H. W. 


Lt. 


1201 


Coghill, Gordon 


Capt. 


1197 


Guskey, R. M. 


Pvt. 


1171 


Daniel, V. W. 


Sgt. 


1167 


Davis Lyndhurst 






Dexter, Jack 


Lt. 


80 


Disher, Clive 


Capt. 




Dolton, Leslie A. 


Pvt. 


1191 


Drysdale, G. W. 




1196 


Evans, Albert 


Ptr. 


1209 


Felton, Alfred 






Flick 




2131 


Flick, B. 


Pvt. 


1172 


Eraser, Thos. 


Sgt. 


1184 


Grose, W. V. 


Cpl: 


1174 


Hallam, Fred. C. 


Cpl. 


1207 


Harding, J. F. 


S.Sgt. 


1175 


Hardwick, Harold H. 


Sgt. 


78 


Healey, M. H. 


Sgt. 


1166 


Hewitt, Thos. S. 


Sgt. 


1189 



Event 

Relay medley (4 men) 

400 meter run 

800 meter run 

110 meter hurdles 

200 meter hurdles 

Catch as catch can- 
welterweight. 

100 meter dash 

200 meter dash 

Relay 800 m. (4 men) 

100 meter dash 

200 meter dash 

Relay 800 m. (4 men) 

Relay medley (4 men) 

800 meter run 

1500 meter run 

Relay 1600 m. (4 men) 

Boxing middleweight 

Boxing heavyweight 

Tug of war 

Tug of war 

Rowing 

Swimming 100m. fr. 
St.; 200 m. br. str.; 
800 m. relay (4 men) 

Rowing 

Cross-country run 

Hand-grenade throw 

Boxing bantamwgt. 

Rowing 

Hand grenade throw 

Tug of war 

800 m. run 

Relay 1600 m. (4 men) 

Tug of war 

Boxing featherweight 

Tug of war 

Swim'g. 400 m. fr.st.; 

800m.fr. St.; 1500m. 
fr. St. ; 800 m. relay 
(4 men) 

Tug of war 

Cross-country run 

Modified Marathon 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 
Hibbard, Colin S. Pvt. 



423 



House, Frederick 
Hume, Leshe J. 



Lt. 
Driver 



1195 
1180 



Johnson, Wm. 


Pvt. 


845 


Kelaher, G. J. 
Longworth, William 


Lt. 
Lt. 


1165 

76 


Lycett, Randolp 


Romb. 


2001 


Manley, Clifford 


Sgt. 


1188 


Masters, G. 
McGill, A. 
McGill, Thomas 
Meeske, WiUiam 


Cpl. 

Driver 

Lt. 

Sgt. 


1176 
1173 

1211 


Mettam, George 
Morris, G. W. 


Gunner 
Staff Sgt. 


79 


Newall, Harold 
Palmer, J. R. 


Lt. 

Spr. 


1213 


Parsons, G. E. 
Patterson, Gerald L. 


Driver 
Lt. 


1177 
2003 


Pettybridge, John W. 
Robb, A. 
Scott, Arthur 
Shumack, E. 
Smedley, Albert 
Smith, G. 
Solomons, Lewis ■ 


Spr. 

Sgt. 

Gunner 

L.Cpl. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Driver 


1199 

1168 

1170 

77 


Sorrell, T. R. 
Soutar, Thos. W. 


Romb. 
L.Cpl. 


1169 
1187 



Running high jump 
Running broad jump 
Rowing 
100 meter run 
200 meter run 
400 meter run 
Relay 1600 meters 
Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
Relay medley 
400 Meter run 
Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
Relay 1600 m. (4 men) 
Tug of war 
Swim'g. 400 m. fr. st. 

800 m. fr. st. 

800m. relay (4 men) 
Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 
Cross-country run 
1500 meter run 
Relay medley (4 men) 
Tug of war 
Tug of war 
Rowing 
Wrestling catch -as - 

catch-can ; light 

heavyweight 
Rowing 

800 m. free style 
1500 meters free style 

rowing 
Wrestling catch -as - 

catch-can welterwgt 
Tug of war 
Tennis Singles 
Tennis Doubles 
Tennis Team 
Roxing light heavy 
Rowing 
Rowing 
Tug of war 
Rowing 
Rowing 
Swimming 1 00m . f r .st . 

800m. relay 
Tug of war 
1500 meter run 



4-24 THE INTER-ALLIED 


GAMES — 1919 


Spencer, Lionel R. V. 


Lt. 


1192 110 meter hurdles 




200 meter hurdles 


Springfield, Sydney 


Driver 


82 Swim'g. 1500m.fr. St. 


Stedman, Ivan C. 


Bomb. 


75 Swim'g. 100m.fr. St.; 
400m.fr. St.; 800 m. 
relay (4 men) 


Taylor, Albert Wm. 


Sgt. 


1215 Wrestling catch-as- 
catch-can lightwgt 


Thomas, Ronald V. 


Stall Sgt. 


2004 Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 


Watson, Thos C. 


Spr. 


1204 Boxing lightweight 


Wood, Pat O'Hara 


Capt. 


2002 Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 


Woolfitt, P. G. 


Cpl. 


1178 Tug of war 


Young, Charles P. 


Spr. 


1203 Boxing welterweight 




BELGIUM 


Name 


Rank 


No. Event 


Adriaenssens, Conrad 


1st Sgt. 


1 Shooting, rifle, pistol 


Anspach, Paul 


Auditeur 


1086 Fencing, ind. epee 
Fencing team epee 
Fencing team foils 


Balyu, Felix 


N. C. 0. 


1149 Football soccer 


Berckmans, Charles 


Capt. 


2 Shooting rifle 


Beylemans, 


Pvt. 


Rowing 


Bogaert, Leon 


Pvt. 


1278 1500 meter run 


Boin, Victor 


Lt. 


68 Water polo 


Boon, Auguste 


Cpl. 


1262 200 m. dash 
Relay 800 m. 
Relay 800m. A. of Oc. 


Bresseleers 




1266 400 meter run 


Broos, Auguste 


Cpl. 


1103 Cross-country run 
Modified Marathon 


Bultuyck 




Tug of war 


(^alle, Pierre 


Major 


1079 Fencing team sabers 


Casiers 




Tug of war 


Cerna, Ferdinand 


Lt. 


2265 Horse riding prize 


Chaltin 
Cill 


Lt. 


jumping, ind. 
Rowing 




Tug of war 


Claeys, Theophile 


Pvt. 


1297 Javelin 

Shot put, 16 lbs. 


Claus, Silvain 


Capt. 


Shooting, pistol 




Top leftSt^vt in finals of 200-meter breast stroke. Top H^M-Finlsh SOO^met^r 
stroke; Biersack, TJ. S., and Sommer, France, winner. Bottom-U. H. L. Berger. 
making exhibition dive from tree. 



breast 
U. S., 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



427 



Cludts, Joseph 



Coelst, Leon 

Cornells, Seraphln 
Cuppens, Joseph 
Darien, Felix 
De Brabandere, 



Sgt. 



Pvt. 

Pvt. 
Lt. 
Gapt. 
Lt. 



De Brucq, Jules Pvt. 

De Gaiffier de Hestroy,H. Lt. 



Deladrier, Clovls N. C. 0. 

Delahaye, Alphonse Cpl. 

Delarge, Frederic Lt. 

Delarge, Jean Lt. 

Delmas, Frangois Cpl. 
De Longuevllle, Robt. D. 

Deman, Frangois Cpl. 

Deman, George Corp. 

Demart, Emile Maj. 

Demol, Joseph N. C. 0. 

Demulder, Sgt. 
Den Tweck 
D'Oultremont, Herman Maj. 



De Pauw 

Desaever, Pvt. 

De Strooper, Emile N. C. 0. 



Deswert, Edward 


Pvt. 


1284 


Devaux, Albert 


Pvt. 


1276 


De Vise 


Pvt. 




Dewin, Pierre 


Cpl. 


70 



Dirick 



69 100 meters free style 
400 meters free style 
Water polo 
1248 Greco-Roman heavy 
weight 

3 Shooting rifle 
1146 Football soccer 
1092 Fencing, ind. sabers 

2262 Horse riding mil. com. 
Horse riding pairs 

6 Shooting rifle 
2261 Horseridingmil.com. 
Horse riding prize 
jumping, ind. 
1078 Fencing foils 

Fencing team foils 
71 Swim'g. 400 m. fr. st. 
200 m. breast stroke 
1296 Javelin 
1272 800 m. run 

Relay 800m. A. of Oc. . 

4 Shooting rifle 
1085 Fencing, ind. epee 

74 Water polo 
1142 Football soccer 
3 Shooting pistol 

5 Shooting rifle 
1144 Football soccer 

Rowing 
Tug of war 

2263 Horse riding mil com. 
Horse riding pairs 
Horse riding prize 

jumping, ind. 
1286 110 meter hurdles 

Rowing 
1093 Fencing foils 

Fencing sabers 

Fencing epee 

Fencing sabers team 

Fencing epee team 

110 meter hurdles 

1500 meter run 

Rowing 

Swim'g. 100m.fr. St. 
100 m. back stroke 

Water polo 
1256 Boxing featherweight 



428 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Dumont, Joseph 
Durand, Albert 
Dussausoit, Frangois 
Everaerts, Edmond 

Feyerick, Robert 



Fierens, Aguste 
Fischlin, Roger 
Fleurix, Georges 

Frings, Jean 
Garray, Joseph 
Gavroy, Lucien 

Gevers, Ernest 

Gheude, Paul 
Gianora, Georges 
Gillens, Vincent 



Godding, Hemi 
Haller, Jacques 
Hanse, Emile 
Hegimans, 
Henrard, Louis 

Henry, G. 
Holsbeeke, Jules 
Janssens, 
Janssens, Charles 
Joux, 
Laame, Henri 

Laconte, Oscar 
Lalemand, 
Lambrecht 
Lammens, Albert 



Lannoo, 

Lefebvre, Jean B. 
Lenoir 
Leroy, Nicolas 



Pvt. 


1249 Boxing light heavy wgt 




65 Water polo 


Pvt. 


1239 Boxing welterweight 


Sgt. Maj. 


84 Swim'g. 200m. br. st. 




1500 m. free style 


Lt. 


1084 Fencing, ind. sabers 




Fencing ind. epee 




Fencing team sabers 




Fencing team epee 


N. G. 0. 


1135 Football soccer 


N. G. 0. 


1132 Football soccer 


Pvt. 


67 Swim'g. 800m. fr. st. 




1500 m. free style 


Gapt. 


7 Shooting rifle 


Pvt. 


1255 Boxing lightweight 


Pvt. 


1285 Running high jump 




Running broad jump 


S.Lt. 


1087 Fencing, ind. epee 




Fencing, team epee 


Lt. 


4 Shooting, pistol 


1st Sgt. Maj. 


8 Shooting rifle 


N. G. 0. 


1090 Fencing, ind. foils 




Fencing, ind. sabers 




Fencing team sabers 


Pvt. 


1104 Gross-country run 




Rowing 


N. C. 0. 


1136 Football soccer 


Bgdr. 


Rowing 


Lt. 


1294 Running broad jump 




Run'gbr. jp. A. of Oc. 




85 Swim'g. 1500m. fr. st. 


Pvt. 


1274 Modified Marathon 


Pvt. 


Rowing 


Sgt. 


10 Shooting, pistol 


Lt. 


Rowing 


Lt. 


2268 Horse riding prize 




jumping ind. 


Major 


6 Shooting pistol 


Pvt. 


Rowing 




Tug of war 


Sgt. 


2005 Tennis singles 




Tennis doubles 




Tennis team 


Sgt. 


Rowing 


Pvt. 


1260 Javehn 




Boxing heavyweight 


Gapt. 


2272 Horse riding prize 




jumping ind. 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



429 



Leyssens, Jean 


Pvt. 


1277 


Mandeville, Hector 
Martou, Firmin 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


9 
1264 


Masure, Eduard 
Masuy, Oscar 

Meysmans, Henri 


Pvt. 
Comdt. 

Lt. 


10 

5 

11 

1293 


Michause, Clement 
Michel, G. 
Michel, Jules P. 
Montigny, Orphile 


1st Sgt. 

N. C. 0. 
Lt. 


12 
1141 
1138 
1077 


Morel de Westgaver 


Capt. 


2267 


Nauvelaerts, 
Neckx, Paul 
Nichalaos 
Noujeau, Francois 
Nuytens, 
Ochs, Jacques 


Cpl. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. 
Cpl. 
S.Lt. 


13 

86 

14 
1082 


Pain, Arthur 
Pire, Germain 
Pirlot 
Piro, Jules 


Pvt. 
Maj. 

Adj. 


1245 
15 

1150 
11 
16 

1095 


Piron, Oscar 


N.C. 0. 


Pirotte, Hubert 


N. C. 0. 


1081 


Presselers 
Requile, Mathieu 
Reyman 
Rigouts, Henri 
Roelens, Hector 
Saens, Maurice 


Lt. 

N. C. 0. 
Pvt. 
N. C. 0. 


2280 

7 

1295 
17 

1267 


Savonet 

Schaekers, Jules 
Schaepherders, Charles 
Schmits, Pierre 


Pvt. 
Cpl. 
Major 


1263 

1098 
18 
19 

8 


Schuller, Louis 
Servaes 


Pvt. 


1244 



1500 meter run 

Relay medley (4 men) 
Shooting rifle 
Relay 800 m. (4 men) 

A. Of Oc. 
Shooting rifle 
Shooting pistol 
Shooting rifle 
Running broad jump 
Running broad jump 

A. of Oc. 
Shooting rifle 
Football soccer 
Football soccer 
Fencing ind. foils 
Fencing team foils 
Horse riding prize 

jumping ind. 
Shooting rifle 
Swim'g 200 m. br. st. 
Tug of war 
Shooting rifle 
Rowing 
Fencing epee 
Fencing epee team 
Boxing bantamwt 
Shooting rifle 
Football soccer 
Shooting pistol 
Shooting rifle 
Fencing ind. sabers 
Fencing team sabers 
Fencing ind. foils 
Fencing team foils 
200 meter dash 
Shooting pistol 
Tug of war 
Pole vault 
Shooting rifle 
400 meter run 
Medley relay (4 men) 
Boxing welterweight 
Hand-grenade throw 
Shooting rifle 
Shooting rifle 
Shooting pistol 
Boxing featherweight 
Tug of war 



430 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Smet, Victor 


N. C. 0. 


1268 100 m. dash; 400 m. 
run; 200 m. hurdles; 
relay 800 m . (4 men) , 
relay medley (4 men) 


Steffens, Fernand 


Sgt. 


66 Water polo 


Suain, Andre 


N. C. 0. 


1237 Boxing middleweight 


Tabary, 


Sgt. 


Rowing 


Taymans, 


Sgt. 


Rowing 


Tom, Leon 


N. C. 0. 


1094 Fencing sabers 
Fencing epee 
Fencing team epee 


Van Antherpen, Louis 


Pvt. 


1251 Boxing middle weight 


Vandeille 




Tug of war 


Vandenborn 




Tug of war 


Vanden Bossche, Armand 


Sgt. 


20 Shooting rifle 


Vanden Bossche, Albinus 


Pvt. 


21 Shooting rifle 


Van de Velde, Jacques 


Pvt. 


1137 Football soccer 


Van De Wiele, Gustave 


Lt. 


1080 Fencing ind. foils 
Fencing team foils 


Van Den Eynde, Ghas. 


Pvt. 


1235 Boxing light heavy 


Van Der Cloot 




1143 Football soccer 


Van Der Gracht 




1145 Football soccer 


Van de Wale, Mathieu 


Gpl. 


25 Shooting rifle 


Van Der Straeten, Aug. 


Pvt. 


1148 Football soccer 


Van Dyck, Henri 


Corp. 


1271 800 m. run 

Relay 800 m. (4 men 
Relay medley (4 men 


Van Eecke 




Tug of war 


Van Goethern 


Pvt. 


22 Shooting rifle 


Van Hoey, Alphonse 


Pvt. 


1280 Modified Marathon 


Van Otegem, Georges 


Lt. 


9 Shooting pistol 


Van Velsenaere, 


Capt. 


2270 Horseridingmil.com. 
Horse riding prize 
jumping, ind. 


Verbeeck, Oscar 


N. C. 0. 


1133 Football soccer 


Vercamer, Georges 


Pvt. 


24 Shooting rifle 


Verlinden, Jules 


Sgt. 


23 Shooting rifle 


Verpoorter 




1097 Hand-grenade throw 


Verstraeten, Louis 


Corp. 


1147 Football soccer 


Vierhaeghen 


N. C. 0. 


1102 Cross-country run 


Vignol, Rene 


Pvt. 


1273 800 meter run 


Vincent, Alphonse 


Pvt. 


1257 100 meter dash 


Vlaeminch, Honore 


Pvt. 


1300 Discus 


Vlaminck, Honore 


Pvt. 


1140 Football soccer 


Washer, Jean 


Lt. 


2006 Tennis singles. 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 


Wertz, Fernand 


Corp. 


1139 Football soccer 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



431 



Wouters, Victor 



Wuyts, Julien 
Wynant, Jean 
Zoonens, Auguste 
Zwartebroeck 



Name 

Begg, J. A. 
Bare, C. M. 
Jackson, A. H. 
Morgan, Lewis 
Penny, G. M. 



S.Lt. 



Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 



1258 100 meter run 
200 meter run 
Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
73 Swim'g 100 m. fr. st. 
1101 Hand-grenade throw 
1241 Boxing lightweight 
1134 Football soccer 



BRITISH ARMY OF THE RHINE 

Rank No. 

Gunner 
Lt. 
Gapt. 
Lt. 

Sgt. 



Name 

Allan, A. 
Arnold, G. W. 
Attwood, Joe 
Balfour, John 
Barker, Fred A. 
Bayley, W. H. 
Beaton, James 
Beggs, Wm. E. 
Blades, Logan H. 

Blake, J. 
Brewster, D. W. 
Carmel, Larry 
Garruthers, Keith L. 
Chalmers, Norman H. 
Clarke, R. 
Clarke, R. 
Clayton, Ralph, E. 
Cole, James 
Daly, Maurice 
Dawson, N. A. 
Dewhurst, Whitney 
Disney, C. P. 
Duncan, S. 
Dyke, T. S. 
Edis, John F. 
Fleming, C. S. M. 
Forsyth, Wm. A. 



CANADA 



Rank 

C. S. M. 

Gnr. 

Sgt. 

Lt. 

Sgt. 

Maj. 

Arm. Q. 

Pvt. 

Gnr. 

Gnr. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Lt. 

Sgt. 

Sgt. 

Gnr. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Gapt. 

Pvt. 

Gapt. 

Cpl. 

Gapt. 

Gapt. 

Lt. 

Sapper 



No. 



Event 

Rowing 
Rowing 
Rowing 
Rowing 
Rowing 



Event 



697 Football soccer 

676 Boxing heavyweight 
679 Boxing welterweight 
50 Shooting rifle 
Baseball 
696 Football soccer 
M. S. 51 Shooting, rifle 

714 Running broad jump 
721 Running broad jump 

Pentathlon 
692 Tug of war 

698 Football soccer 
2307 Baseball 

723 110 meter hurdles 

2299 Baseball 

729 Handerrenade throw 
694 Tug of war 

Baseball 
682 Boxing featherweight 

Baseball 

Rowing 

2300 Baseball 
Rowing 

699 Football soccer 

Rowing 

Baseball 

Rowing 
725 Discus 



432 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Francis, Edward D. T. 


Lieut. 


52 Shooting rifle 


Fraser, Harry 


Pvt. 


53 Shooting rifle 


Fripps, T. W. 


Gnr. 


687 Tug of war 


Garrard, P. C. 


Lt. 


46 Swim'g. 100m.fr. st.; 
800 m. relay. (4 men) 


Gilliborn, W. 


Sgt. 


Rowing 


Gilpatrick, Paul E. 


Pvt. 


2304 Baseball 


Goodhouse, Fred J. 


C. S. M. 


54 Shooting rifle 


Gough, S. 


C. M. S. 


700 Football soccer 


Gunn, A. S. 


Lt. 


684 Tug of war 


Haliburton, LeRoy L. 


C. Q. M. S. 


715 100 meter dash 
200 meter dash 
400 meter run 
relay 800m. (4 men) 
Running broad jump 


Harris, Edwin A. 


Spr. 


678 Boxing middleweight 


Harrowing, Sidney E. 


Sgt. 


716 200 meter dash 


Harvey, T. R. 


Cpl. 


Rowing 


Hay, John 


Sgt. 


55 Shooting rifle 


Herscovitch, M. H. 


Gnr. 


680 Boxing light heavywt 


Hitchen, C. 


Sgt. 


701 Football soccer . 


Home, S. F. 


Sgt. 


702 Football soccer 


Howard, J. A. 


Pvt. 


726 100 meter dash 
200 m. dash 
Relay. 800m. (4 men) 


Hurd, Ernest, 


Pvt. 


Baseball 


Hutchinson, C. G. 


Sgt. 


703 Football soccer 


Hutchinson, Roger G. 


Major 


56 Shooting rifle 


Johnson, A. P. 


Pvt. 


727 Handg-renade throw 
Javelin 
Relay 800m.. (4 men) 


Johnson, Frederick G. 


Captain 


57 Shooting rifle 


Kaufman, Edwin J. 


Captain 


58 Shooting rifle, pistol 


Keeper, J. B. 


Cp. 


720 Cross-country run. . , 
Modified Marathon 


Klaehu, Alfred 


Pvt. 


2302 Baseball 


Kyle, T. 


C. Q. M.S. 


704 Football soccer 


La Pierre, H. E. 


Pvt. 


722 Cross-country run 
1500 meter run . 


Latimer, R. C. 


Pvt. 


2303 Baseball 


Machan, G. W. 


Lt. 


Rowing 


Marr 


Sgt. 


713 Football soccer 


Martin, Fred R. 


Captain 


59 Shooting rifle 


Martin, H. 


Sgt. 


681 Boxing lightweight , 


Mason, C. R. 


Sgt. 


693 Tug of war 


Massey, J. H. 


Sgt. 


730 Cross-country run 
Modified Marathon 


Mayes, H. G. 


Lt. Col. 


2029 Tennis singles 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



435 



Mayson, B. 


Sgt. 


707 


Mc Cuaig, J. C. 


Major 




McGee, S. J. 


Cpl. 


705 


McGrath, Patrick S. 


Pvt. 


683 


Mclnnes, Dugald 


Sgt. 


60 


McLean, A. 


Gnr. 


686 


McKay, 


Cpl. 


706 


Morris, William 0. 


Maj. 


61 


Mortimer, George 


Maj. 


62 


Muir, G. S. 


Lt. 


718 


Newman, Nathaniel 


Col. Sgt. 


63 


Newsam, A. R. 


Capt. 


45 


Norman, E. E. 


Lt. 




Odgers, Richard B. 


Sgt. 


2296 


O'Neill-Daunt, Reginald 


Cpl. 


64 


Payne, Ethelrod G. 


Pvt. 


65 


Peckham, Earl S. 


Pvt. 


2291 


Perkins, H. 


Sgt. 


47 


Phillips, C. T. 


Gnr. 


689 


Poynton, A, S. 


Capt. 




Prest, R. H. 


Col. 


691 


Rae, William 


Lt. Col. 


66 


Richards, J. W. 


Pvt. 


708 


Richardson, Fred 


Maj. 


67 


Rix, M. H. 


Lt. 




Robinson, Clarence W. 


C. F. 




Robinson, F. 


Gnr. 


690 


Robinson, W. F. 


Pvt. 


695 


Sanderson, G. 


Sgt. 


48 


Sheppard, Victor C. 


Cpl. 




Simmonds, William R, 


Pvt. 


68 


Smith, Frank S. 


C. F. 




Spalding, Frank 


Lt. 


69 


Spalding, Victor 


Lt. 


70 


Spouncer, W. A. 


Pvt. 


709 


Spraggs, A. D. 


Lt. 




St6ckwell, John R. 


Pvt. 


71 


Sutherland, D. M. 


Lt. 


724 


Swatton, G. 


B. M. S. 


685 


Tate, Ernest R. 


Pvt. 


2294 


Taylor, G. 


Gnr. 


710 


Thompson, Alexander T. 


Cpl. 


2309 


Thompson, D. 


Pvt. 


711 



Football soccer 
Rowing 
Football soccer 
Boxing bantam 
Shooting, rifle 
Tug of war 
Football soccer 
Shooting rifle 
Shooting rifle 
1500 meter run 
Shooting rifle 
Swim'g. 100m.fr. St.; 

800 m. relay 
Rowing 
Baseball 
Shooting rifle 
Shooting rifle 
Baseball 
Swim'g. 400m.fr. St.; 

800 meter relay 
Tug of war 
Rowing 
Tug of war 
Shooting rifle 
Football soccer 
Shooting rifle 
Rowing 
Baseball 
Tug of war 
Tug of war 
Swim'g. 100m.fr. St.; 

100m. bk. stroke ; 

800 m. relay (4 men) 
Baseball 
Shooting rifle 
Baseball 
Shooting rifle 
Shooting rifle 
Football soccer 
Rowing 
Shooting rifle 
Discus 

Shot put, 16 lbs. 
Tug of war 
Baseball 
Football soccer 
Baseball 
Football soccer 



436 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Vincent, Joseph H. Lt. 

Whittier, A. R. Lt. 

Wilken, Alan Gillies Maj. 

Willis, T. Sgt. 

Wright, William R. Pvt. 

Yule, G. Gnr. 

Zoellin, F. J. Pvt. 



72 Shooting rifle 

Rowing 
719 110 meter hurdles 
712 Football soccer 

Baseball 
688 Tug of war 
728 100 meter dash 

110 m. hurdles 

Relay 800 m. (4 men) 



CZECHO-SLOVAKIA 



Name 


Rank 


No. Event 


Balej, Jan 


Pvt. 


304 Wrestling Greco-Ro 
man welterweight 


Beranek, Joseph 


Corp. 


301 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man featherweight 


Burianek, Frank 


Pvt. 


2007 Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 


Cerveny, Jaroslav 


Pvt. 


319 Soccer team 


Gipera, Joseph 


Lt. 


336 Fencing epee 
Fencing sabers 
Fencing sabers team 


Dostal, Joseph 


Corp. 


305 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man light heavywt 


Fivebr, Antonin 


Pvt, 


315 Soccer team 


Fristensky, Frant. 


Pvt. 


302 Wrestling catch-as- 
catch-can middlewt, 


Fristensky, Gustav 


Pvt. 


307 WresUing Greco-Ro- 
man heavyweight 


Gruss, Joseph 


Capt. 


326 Fencing epee 

Fencing epee team 
Soccer 


Halik, Karel 


Pvt. 


303 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man welterweight 


Hejda, Jan 




Rowing 


Hojer, Antonin 


Pvt. 


312 Soccer team 


Hungman, Joseph 




Rowing 


Janda, Antonin 


Lt. 


538 Soccer football 


Javurek, Joseph 


Capt. 


329 Fencing epee 

Fencing team epee 
Fencing sabers 
Fencing team sabers 
Fencing foils 


Klapka, Rudolph 


Pvt. 


309 Soccer team 


Klika, Milos 


Lt. 


327 Fencing epee 

Fencing epee team 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



437 



Kopriva, Frant. 


Sgt. Maj. 


306 


Kozeluh, Josef 


Pvt. 


2008 


Kozeluh, Karel 


Pvt. 


2009 


Kroupa, Florian 


Lt. 


328 


Loos, Leontin 


Lt. 


314 


Madden, John 




2380 


My slick, Jaroslav 


Lt. 


522 


Oplt, Jaroslav 






Parusek, Vaclav 






Pesek, Karel 


Cpl. 


316 


Petr, Jiri 






Peyr, Frantisek 


Cpl. 


310 


Pfeifl'er, Joseph 


Pvt. 


333 



Pilat, Vaclav 


Pvt. 


Pospisil, Miroslav 


Sgt. 


Prosek, Vaclav 


Lt. 


Raca, Antonin 


Lt. 


Romovacek, Jiri 




Romovacek, Vaclav 




Sedlacek, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Steiner, Karel 


Pvt. 


Stilip, Dominik 




Subrt, Vaclav 


Pvt. 


Svorik, Otokar 


Lt. 


Vanik, Jan 


Pvt. 


Vlk, Karel 


Pvt. 


Wihan, Jiri 




Zeman, Jaromir 


Pvt. 


Zemla, Ladislav 


Lt. 



321 
311 
324 
535 



323 

313 

320 
335 



322 
318 

2021 
2010 



Fencing foils 
Fencing sabers team 
Wrestling Greco -Ro- 
man light heavywt 
Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 
Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 
Fencing epee 
Fencing epee team 
Fencing foils 
Fencing sabers team 
Soccer team 
Soccer team 
Soccer team 
Rowing 
Rowing 
Soccer team 
Rowing 
Soccer team 
Fencing epee 
Fencing epee team 
Fencing sabers 
Fencing sabers team 
Fencing foils 
Soccer team 
Soccer team 
Soccer team 
Soccer team 
Rowing 
Rowing 
Soccer team 
Soccer team 
Rowing 
Soccer team 
Fencing epee 
Fencing epee team 
Fencing sabers 
Fencing sabers team 
Soccer team 
Soccer team 
Rowing 
Tennis singles 
Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 



438 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 





ENGLANE 




Name 


Rank 


No. Event 


Atkin, G. F. 


Sapper 


352 800 meter run 

Medley relay 4 men 


Boomer, Aubrey 




Golf 


Boomer, Parcy 




Golf 


Boret, Herbert 




Rowing 


Buston, Clarence 




Rowing 


Buxton, Maurice 




Rowing 


Calhoun, A. L. 


Sgt. 


772 Shot put, 16 lbs. 


Campbell, John 




Rowing 


Dixon, Arthur 




Rowing 


Farrell, J. A. 


Maj. 


1220 100 meter dash 


Francombe, W. 


2nd Lt. 


1223 Medley relay (4 men) 
Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
A. of Oc. 
Run'gbr'dj'pA.ofOc. 


Fulford, Harry 




Golf 


Hall, B. W. 


Lt. 


1224 Running high jump 
Run'gbr'dj'pA.ofOc. 


Hartley, Hubert 




Rowing 


Johnstone, Robin 




Rowing 


LaFolIy J. 




Golf 


Marks, W. W. 




Golf 


Martin-Smith, 0. 




Golf 


Morton, 


Bomb. 


1226 Relay medley (4 men) 
Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
A. of Oc. 


Peake, Harold 




Rowing 


Phillips 




2363 Modified Marathon 


Puddicombe, W. A. 


Lt. 1 


1217 100 m. dash 

Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
A. ofOc. 


Swan, Alfred 




Rowing 


Tingey, A. 




Golf 


Tittle, J. M. 


Capt. 


1221 400 m. run ; medley 
relay (4 men); relay 
800m.(4men)A.ofOc. 


Warren 




Golf 


Weatherby, A. 


FRANCE 


Golf 


Name 


Rank 


No. Event 


Aguillaume, Stephano 


Corp. 


673 Basketball 


Allain, Auguste 


Pvt. 


150 Shooting pistol 


Ancel 


Adj. 


542 Fencing sabers 

Fencing sabers team 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



439 



Andre 
Andrieux 



S. Lt. 



Angelini, Charles 


Com't (demob.' 


) 150 


Arguel, Pierre 


Sgt. 


151 


Arnaud H. 


Sgt. 


1406 


Aube, Francis 


Sgt. 


670 


Azimard 


Pvt. 


1381 


Bachet, Georges 


Sgt. 


151 


Bagay 


Sgt. 


666 


Bainconneau, Theodore 




394 


Barbarelle 


Cpl. 




Barrelet 


Lt. 




Beaupere, Maurice 


Sgt. 


152 


Bechard, Frangois 


Maitre Pointeur 400 


Bernard, A. 






Beiwech, S. 




36 


Belliomet, Gaston 


Pvt. 


2365 


Besset, Pierre 


2nd Lt. 


152 


Boitout, Emile 


(demob.) 


153 


Bonnet, A. 




17 


Borde, Frangois 


Pvt 


412 


Bouchenoire, Rene 


Pvt. 


154 


Boudiac, M. 






Bouquet, Jules 


Pvt. 


390 


Bourgeois, Georges 


Asp. 


1461 


Bourgeois, Raphael 


2nd Lt. 


170 


Bouton, 


Sgt. 




Buchon, 




1416 


Burtin, Armand 


Pvt. 


1407 


Campagne, Fernand 




370 


Caste 


Lt. 


1395 


Cassayet, Aime 


Pvt. 


408 


Cauvin, 


S. Lt. 


1453 


Gavallo, Marius 






Cayrefourc, Edmond 


Pvt. 


415 


Chauvet, Jean 


Sgt. 


671 


Chayrigues, Pierre 


Pvt. 


443 


Chevalier, Salvador 




402 



Chilo 



1363 Pentathlon 

200 meter hurdles 
570 Fencing foils 

Fencing foils team 

Shooting rifle 

Shooting rifle 

1500 meter run 

Basketball 

Tug of war 

Shooting pistol 

Basketball 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man wlterwgt 

Rowing 

Rowing 

Shooting rifle 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man- heavyweight 

Golf 

Swim'g 1500m.fr. St. 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man*bantamweight 

Shooting pistol 

Shooting rifle 

SwimmingSOOm.relay 

Rugby team 

Shooting rifle 

Golf 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man featherweight 

Hand-grenade throw 

Shooting pistol 

Rowing 

200 m. hurdles 

800 m. run 

Boxing light hvywt. 

Relay (4 men) 800 m. 

Rugby team 

Javelin 

Golf 

Rugby team 

Basketball 

Soccer team 

Wrestling catch -as - 
catch-can heavywt 
1412 Running broad jump 

Hop step and jump 



440 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Chocat 
Chretien, P. 



Pvt. 



Cirard, Rene 


Pvt. 


Clugnet 




Collin, Maxime 


Sgt. 


Combarieu, 


Lt. 


Cordier 


Sgt 


Cornereau, Gaston 


Sgt. 


Costa, Antoine 


Capt. 


Cottrelle, Robert 


2nd Lt 


Coulhon, Gabriel 


Asp. 


Courbatat, Marcel 


Cpl. 


Crabos, Rene 


Pvt. 


Dandelot, Georges 


Lt. 


De Castelbajac 


Capt. 


Decoin, H. 




De Cernowitz, Rene 


Capt. 


Decugis, Max 


Lt. 


Delaby, Marius 


Lt. 


Delerce 


Lt. 


Delias, Alban A. 


Sgt. 


De Louissardiere, August. 


Capit. 


Delvart, Henri 


Sgt. 


Delvart, Maurice 


Gunr, 



De Mezamat de Lisle, Capt. 

Count Leonard 
De Ponthieu, Louis 

De Rivoyre, Frangois Lt. 

Des Montis, Jacques Capt. 

De Soras, Joseph Major 

De St. Germain Capt. 

De Varine, Bohan P. Capt. 

Devaux, Andre Adj. 

Devicq Sgt. 
Devincq, Emelion 



153 
34 



1397 

467 
543 



558 
358 

154 
2586 

1390 
414 

1446 

155 

3 

156 

2011 



1411 
557 

1413 
361 

2600 

1402 

363 



Shooting pistol 
Swim'g.SOOm. fr. St.; 

1500m. fr. st. 

100 m. dash 

200 m. dash 
Relay (4 men) 800 m. 
Relay (4 men) 800 m. 

(Army of Oc.) 
Soccer team 
Fencing saber team 
Rowing 
Rowing 

Fencing epee team 
Riding prize j unpin g 

pairs ; mil. com. 
Shooting pistol 
Running broad jump 

(Army of Oc.) 
Cross-country run 
Rugby team 
Medley relay 
Shooting pistol 
Water polo 
Shooting pistol 
Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 
Tennis team 
110 meter hurdles 
Fencing epee 
Hop step and jump 
Riding prize jumping 
1500 m. run 
Relay (4 men) 1600 m. 

400 m. run 
Riding prize jumping 



382 Boxing featherwt. 
354 Riding mil. comp. 
360 Riding prize jumping 
353 Reding mil. com. 
544 Fencing epee 

Fencing sabers team 
157 Shooting pistol 
1401 Relay (4 men) 1600 m. 

400 meter run 
468 Soccer team 
454 Soccer team 





Brugnon & M&nset, French Doubles Team. Gobert & Decugis, French Doublet Team. 








Wood & Lycett, Australian Doubles Team. Washburn & Mathey, American Doubles Team. 




Kozeluh Bros., Czecho-SIovakian Doubles Team. Mishu & Eremie, Roumanian Doubles Team. 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



443 



Deydier, Paul 


Pvt. 


Dillenseger 


Capt. 


Djebellia 




Douchet 


Sgt. 


Dubly, Raymond 


Pvt. 


Dujardin 




Dumont, Raoul 


Cpl. 


Dupuis, Paul 


Capt. 


Durand, Raymond 


Cpl. 


Durocher, 




Duvanel, P. 




Elichondo, Pierre 


Capt. 


Eymeunier 


Pvt. 


Fangause 




Felice 


Lt. 


Ferrey, Henri 




Fitte, Ernest 


Sgt. 


Fouthoux, Pierre 


Pvt. 


FrancqueHe 


Lt. 


Fray, Andri 


Lt. 


Fray, Leon 


Demob, 


Gaillard 


Lt. 


Gajan 


Adj. 


Ga lay, Paul 


Pvt. 


Gamblin, Lucien 


Lt. 


Gandon, Henri 


Demob, 


Gardere 


Adj. 


Gamier 


Sgt. 


Garotin, Alexandre 


Sgt. 


Gassiat, Jean 




Gastiger, Maurice 


Sgt. 


Gastiger, Pierre 


Cpl. 


GauUier 


Pvt. 


Gauthier, 


Lt. 


Gauthier 


Lt. 


Genet 


Pvt, 


Gentil, Pierre 


Demob 


Giran 


Sgt. 


Girard 




Girard, Pierre 


Lt. 


Gobert, Andre H. 


Lt. 



462 Soccer team 
406 Rugby team 
2143 Marathon 
472 Soccer team 
453 Soccer team 
6 Water polo team 
Swim'g 100 m. bk.st. 
1403 Relay (4 men) 1600 m. 
400 m. run 

155 Shooting rifle 

156 Shooting rifle 
385 Boxing bantam 

31 Swim'g. 400 m. fr. St. 
800m.fr. St. 
418 Rugby team 
1382 Tug of war 
1370 Tug of war 
1452 Running broad jump 
Army of Oc. 
379 Boxing lightwgt. 
1428 Running broad jump 
425 Rugby team 

1437 Pole vault 

157 Shooting rifle 

158 Shooting rifle 
1365 Pentathlon 

1438 Pole vault 
410 Rugby team 
444 Soccer team 

158 Shooting pistol 
563 Fencing epee 

Rowing 
160 Shooting rifle 
Golf 

459 Soccer team 

460 Soccer team 
1380 Tug of war 

1394 Relay 800 m. {4 men) 
200 m. dash 
566 Fencing foils 

Fencing foils team 
1369 Tug of war 

159 Shooting rifle 
Rowing 

1412 110 meter hurdles 
Pole vault 
159 Shooting pistol 
2012 Tennis singles 



444 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Golias, Gustave 






Golias, Rene 






Gommier, M. 






Graveline, Maurice 


Pvt. 


446 


Gregoire, John A. 


Adj. 


1429 


Guizien, Louis 


Lt. 


18 


Hallard, R. 




64 


Hamoy, Henri 


Sgt. 


1454 


Hardy, Pierre 


Demob. 


161 


Heilbuth 




1444 


Hermant, G. 




27 


Huet, Danton 




1389 


Huet, Gaston 


Sgt. 


1391 


Houdet 


Pvt. 


1374 


Hubert 


Adj. 


545 


Hugues, Frangois A. 


Sgt. 


447 


Huguet, Victor 




568 


Jacob 


Pvt. 


1367 


Jaureguy, Adolphe 


Pvt. 


413 


Johnson, Leon 


Demob. 


162 


Jouault 




15 


Joudiou 




392 


Journee, Paul 




368 


Labansat 


Lt. 


1398 


Labat, Andre 


Sgt. 


1432 


Lafitte, M. 






La Flerere 


Lt. 


1431 


Lajoie, Jean 


Lt. 


163 


Lakary, Hamed 


Corp. 


1448 


Lameraud 




23 


Landeau 


Demob. 


161 


Langenove, Eugene 


Pvt. 


464 


Lannaud 




469 


Larregain, Paul L. M. 


Lt. 


355 


Lasserre, Rene F. 


Sgt. 


419 


Laubertrand, Rene 


Pvt. 


1400 


Laurent 


Sgt. 


1368 


Laurent, E. H. 


Sgt. 


556 


Leclerc 


Lt. 


471 


Lecostere 


Pvt. 


1375 



Golf 
Golf 
Golf 

Soccer team 
Running broad jump 
Shooting pistol 
Swim'g. 200 m. br. st. 
Javelin 
Shooting rifle 
800 meter run 
Swim'g. 200m.br. St. 
Modified Marathon 
Gross-country run 
Tug of war 
Fencing saber team 
Soccer team 
Fencing epee 
Fencing foils team 
Tug of war 
Rugby team 
Shooting, rifle 
Water polo team 
Wrestling catch -as - 

catch-can lightwgt 
Boxing heavy wgt. 
Relay (4 men) 800 m. 

(Army of Oc.) 
Running high jump 
Golf 

Running broad jump 
Shooting, rifle 
1500 m. run 
Medley relay 
Swim'g 100m. bk. st. 
Shooting pistol 
Soccer team 
Soccer team 
Riding mil. comp. 

prize jumping pairs 
Rugby team 
Relay (4 men) 1600 m. 
Relay (4 men) 800 m. 

(Army of Oc.) 
Tug of war 
Fencing epee 
Fencing epee team 
Soccer team 
Tug of war 



PERSHING STADIUM 


— PARIS 445 


Lehu, P. 




14 Water Polo team 








Swim'g 100 m. bk.st. 


Lesur, Henri 


Pvt. 


449 


Soccer team 


Lewden, Pierre 


Gpl. 


1433 


Running high jump 


L'Hermitte, Rene 


Sgt. 


457 


Soccer team 


L'Hostis, Jean 


Lt. 


164 


Shooting, rifle 


Lippmann 




560 


Fencing epee team 


Lise 


Pvt. 


1373 


Tug of war 


Loth, M. 






Golf 


Mahieu, Jules 


Gapt. 


165 


Shooting, rifle 


Manco, Louis 


Pvt. 


420 


Rugby team 


Mansett, Georges 


Lt. 


2026 


Tennis singles 
Tennis doubles 


Massy, Arnaud 






Golf 


Mathey, Risene 


Pvt. 


1434 


Running high jump 


Mayaud, G. 




10 


Swim' g. 800m. relay 
Swim' g. 400m. fr.st. 


Mazuc, Fernand A. 


Demob. 


162 


Shooting, pistol 


Meister 




22 Water polo team 


Meniot, Oscar 


Lt. 


166 


Shooting, rifle 


Messerschmitt, Raome 


Sgt. 


1458 


Shot put 


Meunier 




1410 


110 m. hurdles 


Michel, Geo. 




33 


Swim'g 1500m. fr. st. 


Miramont, Rene 




1464 


Hand-grenade throw 


Modot, Joseph 


Capt. 


163 


Shooting pistol 


Mondielli, Jean 


Gapt. 


546 


Fencing sabers 
Fencing sabers team 


Moreau 




559 


Fencing epee team 


Moreau 


Pvt. 


1424 


Standing broad jump 


Moreaux, Leon 


Gom't. 


164 


Shooting, pistol 


Nicolas, Paul G. M. 


Pvt. 


451 


Soccer team 


Nicolai, Jean 


Lt. 


404 


Rugby team 


Nivet, L. 




8 


Swim'g 800m. fr. st. 


Paoli 




1377 


Tug of war 


Paoh 




1456 


Discus 
Shot put 


Pecchia, Joseph 


Sgt. 


165 


Shooting pistol 


Parot, Jean 


Corp. 


1459 


Discus 


Pelle, Henri 


Lt. 


167 


Shooting rifle 


Pernod, M. 




4 Water polo team 








Swim'g 800m. relay 








Swim'g 100m. fr. st. 


Percy, Louis 


Demob. 


168 


Shooting rifle 


Perodon 


Capt. 


547 


Fencing sabers 
Fencing sabers team 


Peronnin, Henri 




561 


Fencing epee team 


Perreau, Georges 


Sgt. 


166 


Shooting pistol 


Pinet, Lucien 


Adj. 


169 


Shooting rifle 



446 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Piquemal, Dedier P. 

Poix 

Pollet, Villard 
Pons, Pierre 
Pouilley 

Poulenard 

Proux, Etienne 

Prunier, Gamille 

Prunier, Maurice 
Ragaine, Etienne 
Ratier, Rene 
Rault, 

Regnier, Albert 
Reine 
Renard, Leon 

Renom, Jean 
Richard, 
Rieu, Paul 
Rigal, IG. 
Roland, Paul 

Rouches 
Roux, Georges 
Salain 
Samazeuilh, Jean 

Schmalzer, Georges 

Seccaud, Jean 

Seriaud 

Seurin, Jean Rene 



Seyis 

Sommer, H. 
Strohl, Emile 
Sturdza, D. Gv. 

Stuyler 

Struxiano, Philipp 
Tardieu, Jean 



Adj. 


555 Fencing epee, team 




epee, foils, team foils 


Pvt. 


Rowing 


Pvt. 


1372 Tug of war 


Asst. Vet. 


405 Rugby team 




16 Swim'g 800m. relay. 




100m. free style 




1417 200 m. hurdles 




Medley relay 


Corp. 


1422 Standing broad jump. 




Hop step and jump. 


Sgt. 


396 Wrestling Greco -Ro- 




man middlewgt 




374 Boxing welterwgt 


Lt. 


1425 Standing broad jump 


Sgt. 


1455 Javelin 


Asp. 


1399 Relay (4 men) 800 m. 




(Army of Oc.) 


Demob. 


170 Shooting rifle 


Sgt. 


450 Soccer team 


Capt. 


171 Shooting rifle 




Shooting pistol 


Lt. 


569 Fencing foils 


Sgt. 


Rowing 


Pvt. 


416 Rugby team 




5 Water polo team 


Lt. 


365 Milit. comp., prize 




jump'g pairs 




465 Soccer team 



Lt. 

Cpl. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 
Lt. 

Pvt. 



Pvt. 

Lt. 
Maj. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Lt. 



2013 

564 

172 

2281 

1396 



1371 

29 

433 

2400 

466 
411 
366 



Tennis singles 
Tennis team 
Fencing epee 
Shooting rifle 
Hand-grenade throw 
Relay (4 men) 800 m. 
Relay (4 men) medley 
100 m. dash 
200 m. dash 
Tug of war 
Swim'g 200 m. br. st. 
Rugby team 
Fencing epee, team 

epee, team foils 
Soccer team 
Rugby team 
Milit. comp. pairs 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



447 



Thierry, Robt. 


Lt. 


407 Rugby team 


Thbnias, Marcel 




373 Boxing middlewgt 


Tinel, Alexis 


Lt. 


356 Riding pr. jumping, 
military comp. 


Tisnes, Frank 


Capt. 


359 Riding pr. jumping 


Trouin 


Pvt. 


1376 Tug of war 


Turaglio, Georges 


Adj. 


669 Basketball 


Vache, Jules 


Gapt. 


Rowing 


Vaganay 


Pvt. 


Rowing 


Vanhuffel, Leon 


Adj. 


571 Fencing foils team 


Vasseur, G. 


Capt. 


1379 Tug of war 


Vasseur, Louis 




1457 Discus 
Shot put 


Vaquer, Fernand 


Adj. 


Tug of war 


Vaudiau, Pierre 


Gapt. 


409 Rugby team 


Verain, Bohan, P. 


Demob. 


173 Shootine riile 


Vermeulen, Jean 




1383 Modifiied Marathon 
Cross-country run 


Vignoli 


Corp. 


470 Soccer team 


Vincent, Louis 


Lt. 




Viry, Eugene 


Lt. 




Vogliano, J. 




Golf 


Wallon, Robert 


Capt. 


364 Milit. comp. 

Prize jumping pairs 


Ygnard, Armand 


Sgt. 

GREECE 


174 Shooting rifle 


Name 


Rank 


No. Event 


Adam, Gonstantin 


Lt. 


206 Shooting rifle 


Athinaios, Marin Basil 




2238 Standing broad jum 


Batrinos, Andre 




2251 Shot put, 16 lbs. 


Botassis, Gonstantine 


Capt. 


2200 Fencing epee 



Calobratsos, Philopimim 

Cantzas, Diamantis 

Caracalos, Spiros 
Castritsis, Const. 
Chatziandreou, Georges 
Cogopoulos, Gonstantin 
Courendis, Evanguelas 
Darivas, Anast. 
Demerzis, Georges 
Demerdzis, Demetre 



Pvt. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Lt. 
Sailor 
Gpl. 
Pvt. 

Sgt. 



Fencing team sabers 
Fencing team epee 

2154 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man lightwt 

2254 1500 m. run 

Modified Marathon 

2199 Cross-country run 

2219 Soccer 

2231 Soccer 

205 Shooting rifle 
2230 Soccer 

2234 Running high jump 
2229 Soccer 

2232 Soccer 



448 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Dentias, Demetre 




2153 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man middlewt. 


Dimitriou, Stylianos 


Pvt. 


2256 800 m. run 

Relay 1600m. (4 men) 


Galafatis, Georges 


Sgt. 


: 2220 Soccer 


Galanis, Ghristos 


Cpl. 


2209 Tug of war 


Georgantopoylos, Jean 


Lt. 


2206 Tug of war 


Grigoriadis, Georges 




2213 Tug of war 


Hadzidakis, George 


2nd Lt. 


204 Shooting rifle 


Isaas, Is 




2227 Soccer 


Kagadis, Evan 


Aspirant 


2208 Tug of war , 


Kaparos, P. J. 


Sgt. 


207 Shooting rifle 


Koltsakis, Const. 


Pvt. 


2233 Running high' jump 


Kosmas, George S. 


Pvt. 


208 Shooting rifle 


Kotoulas, Demetre 




2211 Tug of war 


Kotrotsos, Dem. 


Cpl. 


2223 Soccer 


Koulouberdas, Georges 




2258 Modified Marathon 


Lesieur dit Helle 




398 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man light heavywt. 


Liondas, Agamemnon 


Adj. 


2218 Soccer 


Loucakis, Spiro 


Pvt. 


128 Swim'g 400m. fr. st., 


« 




800m.fr. st., 
1500 m. fr. st. 


Mantas, Miltiades D. 


Lt. 


209 Shooting rifle 


Mantelos, Athanassios 




2198 Cross-country run 


Moraitinis, Georges 


2nd Lt. 


210 Shooting rifle 


Neofitos, Nicolas 


Pvt. 


2255 800m. run, 1500m. run 


Niadas, Jean 




2210 Tug of war 


Nicolakakis, Jason 




2252 100 meter dash 
200 meter dash 
Shot put, 16 lbs. 


Notaris, Sotirios 


Lt. Col. 


2176 Fencing-epee, 
team sabers, 
team epee 


Nouikos, Michel 


Pvt. 


2490 Javelin 


Palavos, iTheodore 




2197 Cross-country run 


Panougias, L, 




2228 Soccer 


Papadopdiilos, Jean 


2nd Lt. 


2240 Shot put, 16 lbs. 


Papagfeorgieu, George 


Lt. 


• 211 Shooting rifle 


Papaioannou, Demetre 


Sgt. 


■ 2156 Hand-greiiade 'throw 
Tug of war 


Papafillipopoulos Evan. 


2nd Lt. 


. 2247 Javelin 


Papathanassiou, Athan 




2226' Soccer 


Petra cos, Alex 


S.Lt. 


, 2207 Tug of. war 


Poncreas, Menelas 


Pvt. 


2237 Hop, step and jump 


Protopoulos, Andre 


S. Lt. 


2217 Soccer 




"At ' 












Top — Start of cross-country run. Center left — Vermeulen, Prance, winner of cross country 

run and modified Marathon. Center right — Vermeulen, center, cro.5sing tape in modified 

Marathon. Bottom — Start of modified Marathon. 

29 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



451 



Psichas, Pandely 



Reveliotis, Georges 
Roumellietis, D. M. 
Rqumbessis, Constantin 
Sappas, Jean X 
Saridakis, Pierre 
Scotidas, Evang. 



Sioris, Platon At^anas 
Soulas, Athanase 

Stavropoulos, Jean 
Terezakis, Joseph 
Totomis, George 
Tragalos, Loucas 
Trangas, Constantin 
Triantafillacos, Triphon 



Lt. 



2nd Lt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

2nd Lt. 

Pvt. 

Cpl. 



Warrant Offlc. 
Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Lt. 

Gad. Nav. Av. 

Sgt. 

Sgt, 

S. Lt. 



Triantafillacos, Demetre 2nd Lt. 

Triantafillacos, Demetre Lieut. 

Trimis, George D. Lieut. 
Tsagas, Const. 

Tsagaris, Spyridon Pvt. 

Tsailas, Liberios Pvt. 

Tsevoukas, Photios Pvt. 

Tsipouras, Nicolas 

Tsolanis, Panjota 

Tzerachis, Jean Aspirant 

Valaoritis, Aristide J. Cpl. 



Vassilounis, Demetre Aspirant 

Viches, Andre M. Sgt. 
Vlachopoulos, Jean 

Vlachaliis, Denis T. Lt. 

Voltaire, Achille C. Pvt. 
Volteras, Estef 

Vrassivanopoules, Alex. Pvt. 

Zalocostas, Christos Capt. 



127 



2250 
212 

2287 
203 

2225 

3204 



216 
2246 

2221 
2216 
215 
2222 
2260 
2202 



2243 

213 

214 

2253 

2205 

2257 
2155 
2151 
2150 
2239 

2203 



2244 
201 

2224 
201 
217 

2212 
202 

2359 



Swim'g 100 m. fr. st. 

200 meters br. st. 

400 meters free st. 

800 meters free st. 

1500 meters free st. 
Discus 

Shooting rifle 
Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
Shooting rifle 
Soccer 
Fencing epee, team 

foils, team sabers, 

team epee 
Shooting rifle 
100m.dash,200m.dash 

relay 800 m . (4 men) 
Soccer 
Soccer 
Shooting rifle 

Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
Fencing epee, team 

foils, team sabers, 

team epee 
100 meter dash 
Hop step jump 
Shooting rifle 
Shooting rifle 
200 meter dash 
Fencing sabers 
Fencing team sabers 
Modified Marathon 
Hand-grenade throw 
Tug of war 
Tug of war 
Standing broad jump 
Relay 800 m. (4 men.) 
Fencing epee 
Fencing team foils 
Fencing team epee 
Pole vault 
Shooting rifle 
Soccer 

Shooting rifle • 

Shooting rifle 
Tug of war 
Shooting rifle 
Fencing epee 



452 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Zarcadis, Basil Lt. 

Zirganos, Eustatchs S.Lt. 



2201 Fencing sabers 
2245 Hand-grenade throw 
Javelin 



Name 
Aguirre, Arthur 



GUATEMALA 

Rank 
2nd Lt. 



No. Event 

575 100 meter run 



Name 

Farag, Ahmer 
Fowzi, Mouhammed 
Izzet, Ahmed 



HEDJAZ 

Rank 



Capt. 
Capt. 
Lt. 



No. 



Event 



1229 Horseridingmil.com. 
1228 Horseridingmil.com. 
1231 Horseridingmil.com. 



Name 

Aebi, Ermanno 
Alberindo, Raffaele 
Alberti, Guiseppe 



Allegrini, Pasquale 
Alvisi, Alessandro 

Amalfi, Francesco 

Andreoli, Carlo 
Angelo, Binaschi 
Antonelli, Giacomo 

Ara, Guide 
Arani, Dario 
Arpe, Oreste 

Ascani, Ascanio 
Baccarini, Vito 
Baldan, Egidio 
Baldi, Baldo 

Balena, Enrico 

Ballau 

Belezza, Virginio 

Bernardoni, Guiseppe 



ITALY 

Rank 



Pvt. 

Sgt. 
Sgt. 



Pvt. 
Capt. 

Capt. 

Sgt. 

Lt. 

Maj. 

Lt. 

Capt. 

Pvt. 

Lt. 
Lt. 
Cpl. 
Lt. 

Major 



Sgt. 



No. Event 

1034 Soccer 
968 Boxing lightweight 
974 100 m. dash, relay 800 
m.(4 men), relay 800 
(4 men) A. of Oc. 
1000 Hand-grenade throw. 
953 Horseridingmil.com., 

prize jump'g pairs 
948 Horseridingmil.com., 
prize jump'g pairs 
2285 Running high jump. 
1042 Soccer 
947 Horse riding mil . c om . 

prize jumping 
1030 Soccer 

250 Shooting rifle 

1057 Wrestling Greco-Rom. 
heavyweight 

251 Shooting rifle 
959 Basketball 
983 1500 meter run 

1047 Fencing team foils 
Fencing team sabers 

252 Shooting rifle 
1060 Tug of war 

58 Swim' g 200 m, br, st. 
400 meters free st. 
978 400 meter run 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



453 



Bergamini, Agusto 


Pvt. 


Betini, Aldo 




Bettini, Mario 


Lt. 


Bonini, Guiseppe 


Pvt. 


Borgia, Carlo 


Lt'Col. 


Bottura, Oprando 


Lt.] 


Bruna, Vittorio 




Bucci, Amelio 


Major 


Cacciandre, Guilio 


Capt. 


Caffaratti, Ettore 


Maj. 


Campus, Peppy 


Maj. 


Candelori, Mario 


Lt. 


Capra, Carlo 


Sgt. 


Carano, Carlo 


Pvt 


Castelli, Nino 




Cavenini, Luigi 


Corp. 


Cesare, Santanaria 


Pvt. 


Clerici, Fabio 


Capt. 


Colombo, M. L. 


Cp. 


Costa, Malito 


Pvt. 


Costa, Vittorio 


Capt. 


Croci, Georgio 


Sgt. 


DeLorenzi, Brunol 


Pvt. 


DeRisi, Gabriele 


Capt. 


Dolfino, Francesco 


Mar. 


Domenis, Vitterio 


Carabiniere 


Dones, Ermino 


Sgt. 


Fabi, Licurgo 


Lt. 


Fabris, Sante 


Brig. 


Ferrashi 




Frassinetti, Francesco 


Pvt. 


Frassinette, Augostino 




Ficher, Norberto 


Lt. 


Gargano, Andrea 


Pvt. 


Ghiringhelli, Carlo 


Pvt. 


Gressi, Attilio 


Major 


Guiseppe, Trivellini 


Sgt. 


Italo, Rosji 


Capt. 


Kustermann, Giovanni 




Lucca, Emilio 


Cpl. 


Luigi, Bacigalupo 


Lt. 



1037 Soccer 
Rowing 

253 Shooting rifle 
982 800 meter run 

Shooting pistol 
999 Javelin 
Rowing 

254 Shooting rifle 

949 Horseridingmil.com. 

prize jumping, ind. 

951 Horse riding mil, com. 

255 Shooting rifle 

980 400m. run, 800m. run 
1028 Soccer 
1031 Soccer 

Rowing 
1036 Soccer 
1040 Soccer 
Rowing 
Rowing 
59 Swim'g 800 m. relay, 
800 meter free st. 
1001 Pentathlon 
975 100m,dash,200m.dash 
800 meter relay 
Medley relay 
996 Javelin 

257 Shooting rifle 
Shooting rifle 

258 Shooting rifle 
Rowing 

259 Shooting rifle 

260 Shooting rifle 
1059 Tug of war 

63 Swim'g 100 m. fr. st, 
129 Swim'g 800 m. relay 

261 Shooting rifle 

1053 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man middleweight 
2284 Running high jump 

262 Shooting rifle 

1038 Soccer 
1043 Soccer 

61 Swim'g 100 m. fr. st. 

Rowing 
57 Swim'g 800 m. fr. st. 
1500 meters fr. st. 
800 m. relay 



454 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Luigi, Gaudo 


Capt. 


954 


Mantevani, Ermannio 


Pvt. 


967 


Mareno, Guiseppe 


Pvt. 


1025 


Maribi 




1064 


Martinenghi, Carlo 


Pvt. 


1026 


Massa, Mario 


Pvt. 


60 


Marzzorati, Enea 


Pvt. 


969 


Menacci, Guglielmo 


Major 


263 


Messano 




1062 


Moukani 




1061 


Muggiani, Arrigo 


Lt. 


954 


Muggiani, Mario 


Sgt. Maj. 


956 


Musia, Calisto 


Major 


264 


Nadi, Aldo 


2nd Lt. 


1044 


Nadi, Nedo 


Lt. 


1046 


Negri, Autenore 


Pvt. 


972 


Negri, Carlo 


Lt. 


966 


Nespoli, Arturo 


Sgt. 


976 


Nunes, Leo . 


Lt. 


1049 


Olgeni, E. 






Olgini, Mario 






Oreste, Pascivti 


Pvt. 


998 


Orlandi, Giovanni B. 


Pvt. 


977 


Pagliani, Armando 


Cpl. Maj. 


971 


Pampuri, Elia 


Pvt. 


1052 


Parodi, Giovanni 


Pvt. 


1032 


Pasciuti, Oreste 


Pvt. 


2259 


Pastorini, Constantino 


Major 


265 


Pecollo, Battista 


Sgt. 


960 


Pezhoni, Carlo 


Pvt. 


995 


Piacenti 




1065 


Picello, Frederico 


Sgt. 


267 


Piero, Vaglia 


Pvt. 


1056 



Riding prize juniping 

Boxing welterweight 

Cross-country run 

Tug of war 

Cross-country run 

Swim'g 100 m. fr. st. 
200m.br. St. 400m. f.s. 
SOOm.f.s. 1500 m. fr. 
st. 800 m. relay 

Boxing bantamwgt 

Shooting rifle 

Tug of war 

Tug of war 

Basketball 

Basketball 

Shooting rifle 

Fencing foils, sabers, 
team foils, t'm sabers 

Fencing foils, epee, 
team foils, t'm sabers 

Modified Marathon 

Boxing middleweight 

100 m. dash, 200 m. 
dash, run'g. br. jp., 
relay 800 m. (4 men) 
run'g br.j. (A.of Oc) 

Fencing epee 

Rowing 

Rowing 

Hand-grenade throw 

200 m. dash, 

Relay 800 m. (4 men 
A.ofOc.) 

Modified Marathon 

Wrestling Greco -Ro- 
man light heavywgt 

Soccer 

Javelin 

Shot put 16 lb. 

Shooting rifle 

Basketball 

Hop, step and jump. 

Tug of war 

Shooting rifle 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man featherweight 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



455 



Piersantelli, Emilio 


Lt. Col. 


Pietro, Leone 


Sgt. 


Pontiggia, M. 0. 


Cpl. 


Porro, Enrico 


Pvt. 


Porro, Orturo 


Pvt. 


Puliti, Oreste 


Sgt. 


Ranghieri, Walter 


Sgt. 


Righi, Fulvio 


Capt. 


Salvi, G. Ercole 


Lt. 


Salvini, T. R. 


Lt. 


Sanguini, Plinio 


Capt. 


Sandrini, Renato 


Lt. 


Santena, Amedeo 


Vice Brig. 


Santena, Pacifico 


Maresciallo 


Sardi, Luigi 


Sgt. Mai. 


Sarorari, Feruccio 


Lt. 


Scaturin, E. 




Serralunga, Natele 


Cpl. Mag. 


Sessa, Guiseppe 


Pvt. 


Silvio, Raso 


Pvt. 


Simonotti, Achille 


Col. 


Simonato 




Somma, Umberto 


Col. 


Spalla, Ermino 


Sgt. 


Speroni, Carlo 


Cpl. 


Tarino, Alfredo 


Sgt. 


Tartaglia, Carlo 




Terzi, Felia 




Torlashi, G. 


Capt. 


Traverla 




Tugnoli, Guiseppe 


Sgt. 


Ubertalli, Ruggero 


Maj. 


Urbani, Dino 


Lt. 


Urio, Plinio 


Sgt. 


Valle, Leane 


Capt. 


Vecchio, Renzo 


Sgt. 


Villa, Giovanni 


Pvt. 


Visconti 





266 Shooting rifle 
1039 Soccer 

Rowing 
1055 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man lightwt 
984 1500 meter run 
1051 Fencing foils, 

sabers, team foils, 
team sabers 
1054 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man welterweight 

268 Shooting rifle 
981 400 meter run 

800 meter run 
Rowing 

271 Shooting rifle 
994 110 m. hurdles 

269 Shooting rifle 

270 Shooting rifle 
1035 Soccer 

272 Shooting rifle 
Rowing 

273 Shooting rifle 
957 Basketball 

1041 Soccer 

274 Shooting rifle 
1063 Tug of war 

Shooting pistol 
965 Boxing lightheavywt 
973 Modified Marathon 

Rowing 
1024 Cross-country run 
1027 Soccer 

Rowing 
1066 Tug of war 
997 Hand-grenade throw 
946 Horseridingmil.com., 

prize jumping 
1048 Fencing sabers, epee, 
team sabers 
team epee 
Rowing 
952 Horseridingmil.com. 
1029 Soccer 
1002 110 meter hurdles 
1058 Tug of war 



456 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 
NEWFOUNDLAND 



1919 



Name 




Rank 


No. Event 


Marshall, F; W. 


Capt 


'• 


576 Wrestling catch -as - 
catch-can lightwgt 




NEW 


' ZEALAND 




Name 




Rank 


No. Event 


Coombes, W. G. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Croll, G. L. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Fry, J. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Hadfield, D. C. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Healey, G. A. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Home, F. V. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Keddell, Gerald Percy 


Sgt. 




645 Running broad jump 
110 meters hurdles 


Lester, G. L. 


Lt. 




Rowing 


Lindsay, John 


Sgt. 




646 200 meter dash 
100 meter dash 
Running broad jump 


Mason, Daniel Leslie 


Sgt. 




648 800 meter run 

Running broad jump 


McRoberts, J. 


Sgt. 




110 meter hurdles 


Patterson, W. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Prideaux, H. B. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


White, A. T. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Wilson, G. H. 


Sgt. 




Rowing 


Wilson, Harold E. 


Sgt. 




647 110 meter hurdles 


Wilton, James H. R. 


Sgt. 




649 400 meter run 




POLAND 




Name 




Rank 


No. Event 


Stachevitch, Alfred de 


Capt 


■• 


1298 Fencing epee, sabers 




PORTUGAL 




Name 




Rank 


No. Event 


Amorin, J. Costa 


Lt. 




770 Fencing foils 


Aquino, Thomas 


Lt. 




54 Water polo team 


Bastos, Bessibe R. 


Lt. 




51 Swim'g 1500 m. fr.st. 
water polo team 
800 m. relay 


Bessons, Rodrigo 


Lt. 




Rowing 


Branco, Jose 


Lt. 




Rowing 


Brito, Raul 


Lt. 




Rowing 








.* '«=-?' 



S-»^ 









J » i- » 1 I 






fug of war. Top — America. Upper center — America pulling against Italy. Lower center 
Italy. Bottom left — Canada. Bottom right — Belgiinn. 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



459 



Burney, Carlos 
€annas, Dario 
Catarino, Antonio 
Correia, Fernando 
Costa, M. Ryder 
Da Silva, H. Guilherme 
De Carvalho, Joaquin 
De Carvalho, Antonio J. 
De Noronha, D. Eugenio 
Dos Santos, Antonio 
Damiao, Ant. Ferreira 
Dias, Jose S. 
Dias, Carlos 
Duarte, Joaquin 



Durao, Americo 
Farinha, Fernando 

Ferreira, Horacio 
Ferreira, Ant. Soares And. 
Ferro, Jorge 
■Garcia, Antonio 
■Gouveia, Gustav Adolpho 
-Gritchen, C. Van 
Jayme, Diocelciano 
Leal, A. Correia 
Lopes, Mario Augusto 
Machado, Daniel Alberto 
Martins, Ant. da Silva 
Mascarenhas, Antonio 

Mendenca, Franc. P. Stos 
Montez, Antonio 
Montez, Antonio Duarte 
Motta, Oscar 

Neupart, Augusto 
Oliveira, Luiz 
Osorio, Antonio 
Paes, Alfredo da Costa 
Paiva, Jorge 

Rebelo, Herminio 
Rocha, Anibal 
Ruivo, Jose S. 
Sabbo, Antonio V. 





Rowing 


2nd Lt. 


300 Shooting rifle 


Cpl. 


304 Shooting rifle 


Lt. 


766 Fencing epee 


Lt. 


130 Water polo team 


2nd Lt. 


Shooting pistol 


Sgt. 


302 Shooting rifle 


1st Sgt. 


303 Shooting pistol 


Ensign 


317 Shooting rifle 


Sgt. 


311 Shooting pistol 


Capt. 


305 Shooting rifle 


Capt. 


753 Fencing sabers 


Sgt. 


306 Shooting rifle 


Lt. 


53 Water polo team 




Swim'g 800 m. relay 




200 m. breast str. 


Lt. 


767 Fencing epee 


Lt. 


765 Fencing epee 




team epee 


Lt. Col. 


758 Fencing sabers team 


Capt. 


308 Shooting rifle 


Lt. 


Rowing 


Sgt. 


309 Shooting rifle 


Lt. 


Shooting pistol 


Lt. 


771 Riding milit. comp. 


Sgt. 


311 Shooting rifle 


Lt. 


1303 100m. dash 


2nd Lt. 


312 Shooting rifle 


2nd Lt. 


313 Shooting rifle 


Lieut. 


314 Shooting rifle 


Capt. 


764 Fencing epee. 




team epee 


2nd Lt. 


315 Shooting rifle 


Lt. 


1607 Fencing sabers 


2nd Lt. 


316 Shooting rifle 


Capt. 


756 Fencing sabers 




team sabers 


Asp. 


Rowing 


Capt. 


754 Fencing epee 


Lt. 


761 Fencing epee 


Sgt. 


318 Shooting rifle 


Lt. 


763 Fencing epee 




team epee 


Capt. 


320 Shooting rifle 


2nd Sgt. 


321 Shooting rifle 


Lt. 


731 Boxing featherwt. 


Capt. 


752 Fencing sabers 




team sabers 



460 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Santos, Basilio 
Scares, Antonio 
Sobral, Carlos 



Ventura, J. Veiga 



Lt. 

Sgt. 
Lt. 



Maj. 



55 Water polo team 

52 Water polo team 

49 Water polo team 

Swim 'g 800 m. relay 

100m. freestyle 

759 Fencing epee team 





ROUMANIA 




Name 


Rank 


No. 


Adamiu, Illie 


Sous Lt. 




Alexo, V. Vasilo 


Pvt. 


35a 


Alvirescu, Constantin 


Lt. 


1479 


Amuzcescu, G. Giu 


Sgt. 




Atanasui, Sc. 


Lt. 


1498 


Baciu, N. Niculae 


PI. Maj. 


351 


Balan, Alexandru 


Pvt. 


2195 


Balanesca, Jean R. 


Capt. 


2022 


Baluta, Joan 


Cpl. 


352 


Bentia, Gh. 


2nd Lt. 


2118 


Bocrescu, Neageu 


Lt. 


1493 


Brabateanu, Victor 


2nd Lt. 


2114 


Bucurel, Constantin 


Sous Lt. 


353 


Catana, Octav 


Lt. 


354 


Catargin, P. 




298 


Cesianu, Dinui 


S. Lt. 


1494 


Ciocan, Gheorghe 


Cpl. 


355 


Constantinescu, Torr. 


Lt. 


2187 


Cratunescu, Const. 


2nd Lt. 


2116 


Cristea, Nicolae 


S. Lt. 


2170 


Davila, Teodor 


Capt. 


1474 


Dima, Hie 


Sgt. 


2185 


Dimancescu, Ion 


2nd Lt. 


2112 


Dimancescu, Dumitru 


Lt. 


2106 


Dinca, Stefan N. 


Cpl. 


356 


Dona, Dumitrui 




1471 


Dona, Petre 


Sgt. 


1468 


Draghici, Aurel 


Lt. 


2111 


Dragomirescu, Gh. 


Lt. 


2108 


Ene, Radu 


Cpl. 


2165 


Eremie, Horace 


Capt. 


2014 



Event 

Shooting pistol 

Shooting rifle 

Soccer 

Shooting, pistol 

Fencing epee team,, 
foils, team foils 

Shooting rifle 

Modified Marathon 

Tennis singles 

Shooting rifle 

Rugby 

Fencing epee, 
team epee 

Rugby 

Shooting rifle 

Shooting rifle 

Swim'g 100 m. fr. st. 

Fencing foils 

Shooting rifle 

Running high jump 

Rugby 

1500 m. run 

Relay medley 

Soccer 

Modified Marathon 

Rugby 

Rugby 

Shooting rifle 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man heavyweight 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man ligtht heavywt 

Rugby 

Rugby 

Medley relay 

Tennis singles, 
doubles, team 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



461 



Filip, Jacob 


Major 


Florea, Scarlat 


Cpl. 


Florian, Theodor 




Georgescu, Constantin 


Lt. 


Georghui, Dan 


Gapt. 


Ghitescu, N. Vasilo 


Major 


Ginita, Vasile 


Lt. 


Glodariu, Anibal 


Lt. 


Grigorescu 


Gapt. 


Hillard, Ernest 




Iconomu, Barbu 


Lt. 


Iconomu, Ion 


Lt. 


Iconomu, Mircea 


Lt. 


Iconomu, Virgil 


2ndLt 


Iliescu, Joan 


Lt. 


loregovan, Saba 


Lt. 



lovanescu, Ladislau 

Lazar, Petre Lt. 

Lecca, Serge Gapt. 

Madancovici, N. Major 

Maiorescu, Dumitru S. Lt. 

Manole, Gonstantin Gapt. 

Manu, Henry Lt. 

Mares, Savu Lt. 

Marescu, Nicolae 2nd Lt. 

Marinescu, Marin S. Lt. 

Marinescu, Stefan Lt. 

Metianu, Eugen Lt. 

Mihaeseu, loan Lt. 

Minescu, Gonst. Lt. 

Mishu, Nicholas Lt. 

Mocanu, Aurel Sgt. 

Moraretu, Alexandru Gpl. 

Murarescu, Vicentiu S. Lt. 

Nencuibescu, N. Gapt. 

Nicolau, Gh. Lt. 

Nicolescu, Gheorghe Gapt. 
Niculescu, Dumitriu 
Petrescu , G . Gonstantin Lt . 



2123 Riding Mil. comp. 

prize jumping pairs 
2192 Modified Marathon 
1487 Soccer 

1480 Soccer 

1492 Fencing foils, 
team epee 

357 Shooting rifle 

1481 Soccer 

2173 400 meter run 

2174 100 m. dash 
Javelin 

Relay 800 m. (4 men) 

1484 Soccer 

2104 Rugby 

2105 Rugby 
2102 Rugby 

299 Swim'g 200 m. br.st. 
Shooting pistol 
2190 Shot put, 16 lb. 
Discus 

Running high jump 
87 Swim'g 100m.fr. st., 
200 m. br. str. 
2159 Javelin 
2024 Tennis singles, doub. 

2124 Riding milit. comp, 

prize jump, pairs 
1483 Soccer 

358 Shooting rifle 
2109 Rugby 

1483 Soccer 
2115 Rugby 

360 Shooting rifle 

2178 400 m. medley relay 
1477 Soccer team 

361 Shooting, rifle 

2169 Relay 800 m. (4 men) 
2015 Tennis singles, 
doubles, team 
2167 1500 m. run 
2164 200 m. dash 
2186 Running broad jump 
1490 Fencing epee 
1497 Fencing foils team 

363 Shooting rifle 

1485 Soccer 

364 Shooting rifle 



462 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Petrovici 


Lt. 


2171 200 m. dash 

Relay 800 m. (4 men) 


Pojogeanu, Petre 


Lt. 


2160 Javelin 


Polizu, Radu 


Capt. 


2101 Rugby team 


Popesen, Alex. 




2182 Discus 


Popovici, Constantin 




1473 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man light hvywt. 


Racovita, Alexandra 


S. Lt. 


1496 Fencing epee 
team epee 


Radulescu, Const. 


Lt. 


1482 Soccer 


Ramniceanu, Mihai 


Capt. 


2126 Riding prize jumping 


Roman, Horia 


Capt. 


1475 Soccer 


Rosea, Stefan N. 


Cpl. 


Shooting pistol 


Sacareanu, Nicolae 




1488 Soccer 


Salvan, Virgil 


Lt. 


1465 Boxing welterweight 


Sasulescu, Alexandra 


Lt. 


1467 Soccer 


Sava, Joan N. 


Cpl. 


Shooting pistol 


Savu, Mehil 


Capt. 


1491 Fencing epee team, 
foils, team foils 


Shmetau, Rudolph 


Sgt. 


2119 Rugby 


Sontica, G. Gh. 


Sgt. 


Shooting pistol 


Sotir, Gh. 




2290 Riding prize jumping 


Soutzo, Demitriu 


Col. 


2127 Riding milit. comp. 
prize jumping 


Spulbor, Jon. N. 


Cpl. 


Shooting pistol 


Staicu, Nicolae 


Sgt. 


2168 1500 m. run 


Staniu, Joan 


S. Lt. 


Shooting pistol 


Stanoscu, Virgil 


S. Lt. 


Shooting pistol 


Stegarvin 




2329 Cross-country run 


Stern, Mihail 


Lt. 


2023 Tennis Singls., dbls. 


Tenescu, J. Constantin 


Lt. 


365 Shooting rifle 


Teodoreanu, C. 


S. Lt. 


1499 Fenc'g foils, tm. foils 


Ticleanu, Gh. 


Ad. S.Log. 


2110 Rugby 


Traian, Butu 


Lt. 


1478 Soccer 


Tudor, Gh. 


Plutenier 


362 Shooting rifle 


Valienato, Panait 


Pvt. 


2158 100 m. dash, 200 m. 
hurdles, relay 800 m. 
(4 men) , medley relay 


Vartolemeu, Simion 


Capt. 


366 Shooting rifle 


Vasilescu, Nicolae 


Sgt. Maj. 


2183 Discus 


Vicol, Stefan 




2193 Gross-country run 


Vidrascu, Mircea 


Lt. 


2113 Rugby 


Vlasceanu, J. Jean 


Sgt. 


367 Shooting rifle 


Voicu, Starr 




2188 Cross-country run 


Vraca, Nicolae 


2nd Lt. 


2117 Rugby 


Vulturescu, Gr. 


Capt. 


2125 Riding prize jumping 


Yonoscu, Virgil 


S. Lt. 


Shooting pistol 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



463 



Name 



SERBIA 



Rank 



Arambachitch, Bogidare 

Atanatzkovitch, Milenko 

Borota, Branco Capt. 

Braditch, Radoslav 

Briklel Youlie 

Brikler, Fragno 

Brucker, Julie 

Danitchitch, Stnicha 

Deditch, Nicola 

Dimitch, Radnilo 

Dinitch, Branko 

Gavanaski, Tocha 

Givanovitch, Vlast. T. 

Govedarevitch, Vitomire 

Gradoievitch, Mihailo 

Ivkovitch, Lyoubicha 2nd Lt. 



Konstantinovitch, Montch. 
Kopriva, Frant Sgt. Maj. 

Kostitch, Milan 
Kovatchevitch, Bogolioube 
-Krstitch, Alexandre 
Krstitch, Andrea 
Krstitch, Dragolioube 
Lazarevitch, Vladale 
Marinovitch, Peter 
Marianovitch, Svetizar 
Markovitch, Miodrague 
Markovitch, Nicola 
Markovitch, Montchilo 
Milochevitch, Mladin 
Miloikovitch, Yovan 
Milovanovitch, Pivota 
Milrta, Nedic 

Miovitch, Miloche 
Mitrovitch, Voukachiche 
Mladenovitch, Mirko 
Momirovitch, Douchan 
Mouchketarovitch Douch. 
Mouritch, Miloche 
Neditch, Vassilie 



No. Event 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 
1 Swim'g 1500m.fr. St. 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 
2027 Tennis singles 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 
578 Javelin 

Discus 

Shot put 16-lbs. 

Sokol team 
306 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man light heavywgt. 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 
2016 Tennis singles, 
doubles, team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 

Sokol team 



464 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Pavolitch, Draguicha 




Sokol team 


Pavlovitch, Lioubivoie 




Sokol team 


Pavlovitch, Miodrague 




Sokol team 


Peitchitch, Miloche 




Sokol team 


Popovitch, Velimire 




Sokol team 


Popovitch, Stanoie 




Sokol team 


Popovitch, Bota 




2017 Tennis singles, 






doubles, team 


Radovitch, Douchon 


Lt. 


519 100 meter dash 


Radovitch, Alexandre 




Sokol team. 


Roujitch, Yovan 


Pvt. 


579 100 meter dash 


Savitch, Nocodie 




Sokol team 


Stanoevitch, Sava 




Sokol team 


Stephanovitch, Yovan 




Sokol team 


Stevanovitch, Yladislave 




Sokol team 


Stoiadinovitch, Simon 




Sqkol team 


Stoiitchevitch, Radoslave 




Sokol tearn 


Tassitch, Dragolioube 




Sokol team 


Tchirovitch, Milorade 




Sokol team 


Tzekitch, Todor 




Sokol team 


Vassitch, Dragomire 




Sokol team 


Yankovitch, Miodrague 




Sokol team 


Yourichitch, Bogidare 




Sokol team 


Yovanovitch, Gonstantine 




Sokol team 


Yvkovitch, Lioubicha 




Sokol team 


Zagar, Zatka 




2028. Tennis singles 


Zlatko Geagai 




Sokol team 




UNITED STATES 


Name 


Rank 


No. ■ Event 


Aaron, Edward 


Gpl. 


2059 Baseball 


Ames, Waldo B. 


2nd Lt. 


859 110 meter hurdles . 


Anderson,' Henning 


Gpl. 


2053 Baseball 


Asher, John' 




1343 Boxing bantamwgt. 


Barker, 


Lt. 


608 Soccer 


Bartlett, A. M. 


Gapt. 


Golf 


Bartol, J.'G. 


2nd Lt. 


2142 Fencing, foils team, 
sabers team. 


Becker; Englebert W. 


Pvt. 


2064 Baseball 


Bender,' GHas. A, ' 


Gapt. 


894 Hop step jump. . 


Beveridge; James 


Sgt. 


. Go f 


Beverley, J. R. 


1st Lt. 


400 Shooting pistol 


Biddle, S. M. ' 


Sgt. 


110 Swim'g;' iOO m . fr. st;. 

100 m. back stroke 
. ..:.. AQO.xn. free style ''^ 

Relay 800 m. 


Biersack, Henry 


Sgt. 


109 Swim 'g. 200 m.br.sfer. 




-^■' - ..^ / ., ■ ^. 



30 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



467 



Bird, Paul 


Corp. 


401 


Bittel, Edward 


Lt. Col. 


402 Shooting pistol 


Brauseu, Simon P. 


Cpl. 


2054 Basebal 


Breck, Henry C. 


Lt. 


2018 Tennis singles, 
doubles team.. 


Brennan, Matthew W. 


Sgt. 


936 Basketball 


Bronder, Geo. 


2nd Lt. 


905 Javelin 


Brown, L. E. 


Sgt. 


940 Basketball 


Butler, Solomon 


Pvt. 


811 100 meter dash 
Running broad jump 


Byrd, Richard L. 


1st Lt. 


889 Discus 


Campbell, Floyd F. 


1st Lt. 


827 Relay medley (4 men) 


Campbell, Tom 


Sgt. 


828 Relay 1600m. (4 men) 


Campbell, Verle H. 


1st Lt. 


829 Relay 1600m. (4 men) 


Caughey, Edgar 


2nd Lt. 


912 Shot put, 16-lbs. 


Chamberlain, H. D. 


Lt. Col. 


1069 Riding mil. comp. 
prize jumping 


Chambers, Ernest 


Sgt. 


2068 Baseball 


Chenoweth, Leland A. 


Sgt. 


400 Shooting rifle 


Clark, H. E. 


Sgt. 


939 Basketball 


Clark, Edward L. 


Gun. Sgt. 


403 Shooting pistol 


Clock, Herbert 


1st Lt. 


1035 Rugby 


Cobb, A. ' 


Sgt. 


806 Tug of war 


Coe, Golles J. 


Lt. 


Rowing 


Collins, Hugh 




604 Soccer 


Collins, Wm. J. 




580 Soccer 


Comeau, Henry A. 


Maj. 


2134 Fencing epee 


Cooke, H. E. 


Lt. 


Rowing 


Copeland, Ed. 


Cpl. 


783 Tug of war 


Coppedge, James F. 


2nd Lt. 


401 Shooting rifle 


Cotton, Richard E. 


Capt. 


402 Shooting rifle 


Coulter, John W. 


2nd Lt. 


1320 Rugby 


Crawford, William 




581 Soccer 


Crawford, J. A. 


1st. Lt, 


404 Shooting, pistol 


Crawley, Theo. B. 


Sgt. 


403 Shooting, rifle 


Creel, Ira 


Sgt. . 


2066 Baseball 


Cunat, Joe H. 




582 Soccer 


Davis, Hairy 


Lt. 


Golf 


Davison, E. L. 


Cpl. 


Golf 


Dean, Lloyd 


Sgt. 


2058 Baseball 


Dell, James W. 


Col. Sgt. 


405 Shooting pistol 


Deyfus, Adam 


Sgt. 


2051 Baseball 


Disbrow, Harry M. 


Capt. 


.•■' 404 Shooting rifle 


Doing, R. T. 


Cp. . 


1162 Basketball 


Dole, Kenneth L. 


Capt. 


1306 Rugby 


Dougall, Robt. S. 




583 Soccer 


Douglas, Raymond E, 


Pvt. 


94 Swim'g. 800 m. fr. st. 
Water polo. 



468 THE INTER-ALLIED 


GAMES — 1919 


Doxtater, Everett 


Sgt. 


405 Shooting rifle 


Downer, J. W. 


Lt. Col. 


1071 Rinding mil. comp. 
prize jumping 


Duben, James 


Cpl. 


2065 Baseball 


Duncan, James 


1st Lt. 


911 Discus 


Duncan, Melvin E. 


Sgt. 


406 Shooting pistol 


Eagan, Edward 




1338 Boxing middleweight 


Eby, Earl 


1st. Lt. 


831 400 meter run 
800 meter run 


Erb, Arthur L. 


1st Lt. 


1334 Rugby 


Erwin, Lucius S. 


2nd Lt. 


898 Pole vault 


Evans, P. W. 


Lt. Col. 


407 Shooting pistol 


Faller, Fred 


Cpl. 


850 Modified Marathon 


Farley, Cal 




1359 Wrestling catch-as- 
catch-can welterwt 


Fay, John 


Wagoner 


776 Tug of war 


Fields, Stephen C. 




2382 Tug of war 


Fields, Thos. S. 


Cpl. 


932 Relay 800 m. (4 men 
A. of Oc.) 


Fish, Geo. W. 


1st Lt. 


1336 Rugby 


Fish, Manns J. 


2nd Lt. 


2062 Baseball 


Fisher, R. T. 


2nd Lt. 


1307 Rugby 


Fitzpatrick, James P. 


Cpl. 


1322 Rugby * 


Fleisher, Louis E. 


2nd Lt. 


2137 Fencing foils, team 
foils, team sabers 


Floyd, Florin W. 


2nd Lt. 


899 Pole vault 


Freidman, Max 


Lt. 


934 Basketball 


Fundy, John 




1342 Boxing featherweight 


Fuller, Wheeler B. 


2nd Lt. 


2061 Baseball 


Gale, Guy H. 


Lt. 


Rowing 


Gallagher, Bernard 




584 Soccer 


Gardner, Harold F. 


Sgt. 


91 Swini'g.l00m.bk.str. 

800 m. relay. 

Water polo team 


Gardner, Robert H. 




585 Soccer 


Garey, E. B. 


Lt. Col. 


408 Shooting pistol 


Giannakapolis, Nick 


Cook 


851 Cross-country run 
Modified Marathon 


Gray, Leman 


Sgt. 


406 Shooting rifle 


Gray, Wm. G. 


Pvt. 


832 400 meter run 

Relay medley (4 men) 


Greene, Geo. R. 


Mast. Engr 


1160 Basketball 


Greene, W. S. 


Capt. 


Golf 


Griffin, Lloyd E. 


1st Lt, 


409 Shooting pistol 


Grika, John T. 


Sgt. 


407 Shooting rifle 


Gross, Jesse 


Sgt. 


2060 Baseball 


Haddock, Marshall Jr. 


Pvt. 


814 200 meter dash 


Hall 


Lt. 


605 Soccer 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



469 



Hampson, John 




609 Soccer 


Hance, R. T. 


1st Lt. 


2136 Fencing foils, team 
foils, team sabers 


Hanly, James T. B. 


Sgt. 


118 Swim'g 1500m.fr. St. 


Harant, L. J. 


2nd Lt. 


410 Shooting pistol 


Hart, Pearl 0. 


Sgt. 


Golf 


Harwood, Robert 


2nd Lt. 


902 Pole vault 


Haskell, C. G. 


Gapt. 


Golf 


Haas, Carl F. 


Pvt. 


813 Relay medley 4 men 


Hausen, J. S. R. 


Pvt. 


1354 Wrestling Greeco-Ro- 
man welterwt 


Hauser, Henry P. 


Hosp. Sgt. 


1324 Rugby 


Heelan, Thomas 




586 Soccer 


Henderson, D. L. 


Major 


1074 Riding, mil. com., 
prize jumping 


Hennigan, James 


Pvt. 


852 Gross-country run 


Henson, Lester V. 


Gy. Sgt. 


408 Shooting rifle 


Higgins, Chas. 


Sgt. 


910 Discus 


Higgins, James F. 




587 Soccer 


Hinks, J. M. 


2nd Lt. 


112 Swim'g. 100m.fr. St., 
relay 800 meters 


Hodges, G. H. 


Lt. Gol. 


409 Shooting rifle 


House, Meredith J. 


1st Lt. 


865 200 meter hurdles. 


Howell, Joshua Zophar 


1st Lt. 


125 Swim'g. 200 m.br.st. 


Hudson, Maurice 




599 Soccer 


Hume, Andy 




602 Soccer 


Humphreys, James W. 


Pvt. 


893 Standing broad jump 


Hurley, Harlow 


Lt. 


Golf 


Jefferies, J. Amory 


Lt. 


Rowing 


Johnson, Garl 


Wag. 


775 Tug of war 


Johnson, G. H. 


Gpl. 


784 Tug of war 


Johnson, James F. 


1st Lt. 


411 Shooting pistol 


Johnson, Leo T. 


1st Lt. 


880 Running broad jump 


Johnston, R. 




804 Tug of war 


Johnston, Victor W. 




588 Soccer ' 


Kearns, Sylvester 


1st Lt. 


410 Shooting rifle 


Keeler, Frank D. 


Gpl. 


1325 Rugby 


Kelly, Fred W. 


2nd Lt. 


860 110 meters hurdles 


Kelly, Michael 


Mesg. 


412 Shooting pistol 


Kingsland, Douglas 


Gapt. 


Rowing 


Klem, Matt 


Go . Sgt. 


413 Shooting pistol 


Knapp, Harry 


Pvt. 


2057 Baseball 


Kewa lis, J. R. 


Lt. 


933 Basketball 


Kryskow, Walter 




1355 Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man middlewt 


LaMotte, C. K. 


Lt. Gol. 


414 Shooting pistol 


Lang, Robert G. 


Gpl. 


120 Swim'g. 800m.fr. St., 
1500 m. fr. st. 



470 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Larsen, Clinton 
Lawless, Joseph T. 
Legendre, Robert L. 
Leon, Harry S. 

Lightfoot, Vernon W. 
Littlejahault, George 

Liversedge, Harry 

Loftis, Isaac D. 
Long, P. W. 
MacElernay, Michal J. 
MacFarlane, John M. 
MacKernan, Hugh 
Madsen H. 



Lt. 

1st Lt. 
Cpl. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. 



1st Lt. 

Cpl. 
1st Lt. 



Mahoney, John T. 


Sgt. . 


Manly, John F. 


2nd Lt. 


Mariott, Wm. E. 


Sgt. 


Martin, Bob 




Matheson, Geo. E. 


Wag. 


Mathey, Dean 


Lt. 


Maxfield, Wallace C. 


2nd Lt. 


May, Wm. Jr. 


Lt. 


McDonald, W. H. 


Cpl. 


McFarren, G. B. 


Cpl. 


McHenry, J. H. 


Lt. 


McNaught, Thos. J. 




McNiel, Bennie 




McTernan, Meredith J. 




Meehan, Edw. J. 


1st Lt. 


Merchant, B.T. 


Col. 


Meyers, Walter A. 


Capt. 


Middendorf, Henry S. 


Lt. 


Middleton, C. W. 


Capt. 


Millington, Seth 


1st Lt. 


Miller, Ernest C. 


Cpl. 


Mitropohs, Peter 


Pvt. 


Monihan, J. Wilson 


1st Lt. 


Moore, Frederic H. 


Pvt. 


Moore, James P. 




Morse F. 0. 


Lt. 


Moser, H. J. 


Pvt. 


Nelson, Henry N. 


2nd Lt 



870 Running high jump 

411 Shooting rifle 
887 Pentathlon 

817 Relay 800 meters (A. 
of Oc.) 
2067 Baseball 
1361 Wrestling catch-as- 
catch-can featherwt 
903 Javelin 

Shot put 
793 Tug of war 

415 Shooting pistol 
607 Soccer 

589 Soccer 
606 Soccer 
603 Soccer 

2138 Fencing epee 

90 Swim'g. 400in.fr. St. 
Water polo. 
2050 Baseball. 
1347 Boxing heavyweight 

786 Tug of war 
2019 Tennis singles, 
doubles, team 
914 Discus 
935 Basketball 
97 Water polo 
799 Tug of war 
Rowing 

590 Soccer 

1350 Boxing lightweight 

601 Soccer 

577 Relay 1600 meters 
1067 Riding miUtary com. 
prize jumping 

412 Shooting rifle 
Rowing 
Golf 

1326 Rugby 

416 Shooting pistol 
1360 Wrestling catch -as - 

catch-can lightwgt 
116 Swim'g 200m.br. St. 
1312 Rugby 

591 Soccer 
Golf 

803 Tug of war 

417 Shooting pistol 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



471 



Novak, Wm. 


Corp. 


Norman, Abraham W. 


2nd Lt. 


Norris, Robert R. 


1st Lt. 


Norton, Al. 




O'Hara, Faber 


Pvt. 


O'Neil, J. T. 


Pvt. 


Oliver, William 




Osborne, Frank 0. 




Osborne, John F. 


Pvt. 


Paddock, Chas. 


2nd Lt 


Pallatier, J. A. 


Sgt. 


Parcaut, Ralph 




Patterson, Robert 




Pedan, Roy F. 


Sgt. 


Penny, Louis 


Capt. 


Peyton, Leland K. 


Cpl. 


Pierson, S. N. 


Lt. 


Polk, Joe 




Posey, H. 


Pvt. 


Prehn, Wm. 





2055 

907 

1327 

1348 

2056 

1328 

592 

593 

872 

822 



938 
1357 



594 
931 

413 



Prem, Herbert 1st Lt. 

Pullen, D. D. Col. 

Pullen, Royal R. Capt. 

Purdue, A. A. Pvt. 

Rautenbush, William Sgt. 

Raymond, D. R. Capt. 

Reid, George H. Sgt. 
Reynolds, Lynn 

Rice, Carl Sgt. 
Robertson, Fred 

Rogers, H. L. Maj. 

Rogers, Herbert W. 1st Lt. 

Ross, Norman 2nd Lt. 



Rouse, James M. Wag. 



778 
1358 



881 
2132 

418 

419 

598 
873 
600 

88 
, 114 



795 



Baseball 

Pentathlon 

Soccer 

Boxing lightweight 

Baseball 

Rugby 

Soccer 

Relay 800 m. (4 men) 

A. of Oc. 
100 meter dash 
200 meter dash 
800 m. relay (4 men) 
Basketball 
Wrestling catch-as- 

catch-can light hea- 

vywt. 

Relay 800m.(A. of Oc.) 

Rowing 

Shooting rifle 

Golf 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man heavyweight, 
catch -as- catch- can 
heavyweight 

Tug of war 

Wrestling catch-as- 
catch - can middle 
weight 

Hop step and jump. 

Fencing team sabers 

Rowing 

Shooting pistol 

Golf 

Shooting pistol 

Golf 

Soccer 

Running high jump 

Soccer 

Rowing 

Water polo 

Swim'g 100 m. fr. st. 
100m.br. St., 400m.fr. 
St., 800m.fr.s., 1500m. 
fr. St., relay 800 m., 
water polo 

Tug of war 



473 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Rudiger, Geo. R. 


Sgt. 


Scarry, John A. 


1st Lt. 


Schardt. Arlie A. 


1st Lt. 


Schrader, C. A. 


Cpl. 


Scott, S. L. 


Maj. 


Scott, Robert J. 




Scudder, Lawrence T. 


Lt. 


Sears, Robert 


Lt. Col, 


Selbie, Chas. C. 


1st Lt. 


Shaw, Earl N. 


Cpl. 


Shepard, Alfred 




Shields, M. Lawrence 


Sgt. 


Simpson, Robert L 


1st Lt. 


Slocum, L. H. 


1st Lt. 


Smith, DeWitt D. 


Sgt. 


Smith, Robert W. 


1st Lt. 


Smith, Stanley 


1st Sgt 


Snavely, Gordon 


2nd Lt. 


Snyder, 0. F. 


Lt. Col 


Solbert, 0. N. 


Col. 


Spink, Phil M. 


Pvt. 


Spooner, Lloyd S. 


1st Lt. 


Stauffer, 0. B. 


1st Lt. 


Stephens, W. B. 


Pvt. 


Stevens, Neil G. 


Capt. 


Stevenson, C. L. 


Lt. Col. 


Stewart, Edward B. 


Corp. 


Stickney 




Storie, Thomas 




Stout, Clyde J. 


2nd Lt, 


Sweetser, Arthur 


Capt. 


Sylvester, Wm. F. 


2nd Lt, 


Taulbee, E. W. 


Lt. Col 


Taylor, B. F. 


Pvt. 


Taylor, Geo. 


Sgt. 


TayloB, Wm. H. 


andLt, 


Templeton, R. C. 


2nd Lt. 


Teschner, Ed. A. 


2nd Lt, 



Thornburn, Jas. H. 



1st Lt. 



937 Basketball 
103 Water polo 

921 1500 meter run 

1314 Rubgy 

420 Shooting pistol 
595 Soccer 

838 800 meter run 

414 Shooting rifle 

421 Shooting pistol 
797 Tug of war 
598 Soccer 

922 1500 meter run 
Relay medley 

863 110m. hurdles 
200 m. hurdles 

1315 Rugby 

425 Shooting rifle 

415 Shooting rifle 

416 Shooting rifle 

1330 Rugby 

424 Shooting pistol 
2133 Fencing foils 
team foils 

839 400m. run, 800m. run 

417 Shooting rifle 

422 Shooting pistol 
2141 Fencing foils, epee, 

team sabers 
2031 Tennis singles 
2242 Riding military com., 

prize jumping 

418 Shooting rifle 
Boxing light heavywt 

1344 Boxing welterweight 
846 1500 m. run 

Modified Marathon 
2030 Tennis singles.doubles 

864 200 meter hurdles 
1070 Horseridingmil.com. 

926 Running broad jump 

(A.of Oc.) 
2063 Baseball 
891 Standing broad jump 
876 Running high jump 
825 100 m. dash, 200 m. 

dash, relay 800 m. 

relay 1600 m. 

1331 Rugby 




Top left — Prize presented by President Wilson for track and field events. Top center — Prize 
presented by National Committee of Physical Education, Sports and Social Hygiene for 
boxing. Top right — Prize presented by General Pershing for Shooting— rifle team. Bottom 
upper left and right — Prizes presented by King of Italy for rowing eights. Bottom center — 
Prize presented by Mr. Clemenceau. Bottom lower left — Cloisonne vase presented by H. E. 
Hoc Wei Teh of China to nation winning cross-country run. Bottom lower right — Silver 
loving cup presented by H. E. Lou Tseng of China to the nation winning the greatest 
number of points in riding competition. 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



475 



Thomas, Marcel 

Thompson, Fred C. Chaplain 

Thompson, S. H. Cpl. 

Titus, Richard J. Corp. 

Torkelson, E. A. Lt. 

Twomby, Irving F. 2nd Lt. 
Vermillion, Bernard B. Pvt. 

Vidal, Gene L. 2nd Lt. 

Vidmir, Geo. W. Col. 

Walker, Wesley W. Capt. 

Waller, C. W. Jr. Maj. 

Walton, H. R. Lt. 

Warren, David J. Cpl. 
Washburn, Watson M. Capt. 

Waters, Fred Cpl. 

Walsh, Harry S. 

West, W. W. Jr. Col. 

Westphal, Wm. C. 1st Lt. 



White, Van C. 


1st Lt. 


Wiecek, Joseph Jr. 


Sgt. 


Wilder, Benj. H. 


2nd Lt 


WiUiams, Glen 


Capt. 


Wilson, Bilhngs 




Wiman, C. D. 


Capt. 


Windsor, Ardis E. 


Cp. 


Wiseman 




Withington, Paul 


Ma . 


Worthington Harry T. 


2nd Lt, 


Wycavage, D. C. 




Zuna Frank F. 


Cook 



373 
2148 
2145 

419 

826 
1317 

924 

878 

2130 

420 

421 

892 
2020 

426 

596 

1068 

2135 

1076 
422 
423 
423 



424 
2364 



883 
2149 

858 



Boxing middleweight 

Hand-grenade throw 

Hand-grenade throw 

Shooting rifle 

Relay 800 meters 

Rugby 

Running broad jump 
(A. of Oc.) 

Pentathlon 

Fencing team sabers 

Shooting rifle 

Shooting rifle 

Golf 

Standing broad jump 

Tennis singles, 
doubles, team 

Shooting rifle 

Soccer 

Riding mil. comp., 
prize jumping 

Fencing foils, team 
foils, epee. 

Riding prize jumpg. 

Shooting pistol 

Shooting pistol 

Shooting rifle 

Rowing 

Rowing 

Shooting rifle 

Wrestling Greco-Ro- 
man bantamwgt. 

Rowing 

Running broad jump 

Hand-grenade throw 

Cross-country run 



476 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



LIST OF WINNERS, INTER-ALLIED GAMES 

BASEBALL 

Series won by U.S., defeating Canada, 3 out of 4 games. 
1st Game — 23 June — Won by U.S., score 5-0 
2nd " —27 June— " " Canada, score 2-1 
Srd " — 4 July— " " U.S., score 10-0 
4th " — 6 July— " " U.S., score 12-1, 7 innings. 



United States. 
Debus, Adam, Sgt., 1st B. 

Harriot, William E., Sgt. 2nd B 
Anderson, Henning, Corp. S.S. 
Brausen, Simon P., Corp. 3rd B. 
Novak, William, Corp. 
O'Hara, Faber J., Pvt. 
Knapp, Harry, Pvt. 
Dean, Lloyd, Sgt. 
Aaron, Edward, Corp. 
Gross, Jesse, Sgt. 
Fuller, Wheeler B., 2 Lt 
Fish, N.J. 2nd Lt. 
Taylor, George, Sgt. 
Becker, Englebert W 
Duben, James, Corp, 
Creel, Ira, Sgt. 
Lightfoot, Vernon W 



Chambers, Ernest, Sgt 



Canada. 

Peckham, Earle S., Pvt. C. 

Sheppard, Victor C, Corp. C. 

Kurd, Ernest, Pvt., P. 

Tate, Ernest R., Pvt. P. 

Clayton, Ralph E., Gnr. P. 

Odgers, Richard B., Sgt. P. 

Daly, Maurice, Pvt. P. 

Barker, Fred A., Sgt. P. 

Chalmers, Norman H., Sgt. P. 

Edis, John, F., Capt. 1st B. 

Dewhurst, Whitney G., Pvt. 1st B. 

Klaehn, Alfred, Pvt. 2nd B 

Wright, William N. Pvt. S.S. 

Latimer, Larry, Pvt. 3rdB. 

Gilpatrick, Paul, Pvt. 3rdB. 

Carmel, Larry, Pvt. L.F. 

Smith, Frank S. G.F. 

Robinson, Clarence W. Spr. C.F. 
Thompson, Alexander T., Cpl. R.F. 

BASKET BALL 

Winner — United States 
Second — Italy. 



Pvt 



Pvt 



Catch. 

F. 

F. 

F. 

F. 

IstB. 

P. 

Catch. 

P. 

P. 

P. 

P. 

Catch. 

P. 



United States 

937 Ruddiger 1160 

933 Kewallis 939 
936 Brennan 935 

938 Pelletier 940 

934 Friedman 1162 



Italy. 

Greene 2391 Muggiani, A.P. 

Clarke 2392 Sessa 

May 2393 Baccarini 

Brown 2394 Pecollo 

Doing 2395 Muggiani, M. 



2396 Bianchi 

2397 Palestra 

2398 Bagnoli 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 477 

BOXING 

Bantamweight — 
Winner — 1209 Evans, Albert, Australia 
Runner-up — 969 Marzzorati, Enea, Pvt. Italy 
Featherweight- 
Winner^ 382 de Ponthieu, Louis, France 
Runner-up— 1342 Fundy, John, United States 
Lightweight — 
Winner— 1350 McNeill, Bennie, United States 
Runner-up — 1204 Watson, Thomas C, Australia 
Welterweight — 
Winner — 679 Atwood, J. Sgt., Canada 
Runner-up — 374 Prunier, Maurice France 
Middleweight — 
Winner— 1338 Eagan, Edward, United States 
Runner-up — 373 Thomas, Marcel, France 
Light Heavyweight — 
Winner — 965 Spalla, Erminol, Sgt., Italy 
Runner-up — 1199 Pettybridge. John W., Spr., Australia 
Heavyweight — 
Winner— 1347 Martin, Bob, United States 
Runner-up — 1197 Goghill, Gordon, Capt. Australia 

CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

First Vermeulen, Jean 1383. . . France 31 m. 38.8 s. 

Second. . .Broos, Augusto, Corporal . .1103. . .Belgium 
Third . . . Heuet, Gaston, Sgt 1391 . . . France 

FENCING, FOILS, TEAM. 

First, France, 127 points. Second, Italy, 125 points. 

555 Picquemal, Didier P., Adj. 1046 Nadi, Nedo, Lieut. 

566 Gauthier, Lieut. 1044 Nadi, Aldo, 2nd Lieut. 

568 Huguet, Victor, Pvt. 1051 Puliti, Oreste, Sgt. 

569 Renon, Jean, Lieut. 1047 Baldi, Baldo, Lieut. 

570 Andrieux, R., Pvt. 1048 Urbani, Dino, Lieut. 

571 Van Huffel, Leon, Adjt. 1050 Cesarano, Frederico, Capt. 

FENCING, FOILS, INDIVIDUAL. 

First 1046 Nadi, Nedo, Lieut. Italy 

Second 555 Picquemal, Didier, Adj. France 

Third 566 Gauthier, Lieut. France 



478 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



FENCING, 

First, France, 17 points. 

555 Picquemal, Didier, Adjt. 

556 Laurent, E.H., Sergeant. 
561 Peronnin, Henri, Lieut. 

558 Gornereau, Gaston, Serg. 
560 Lippmann, A. 

559 Moreau, Emile, Pvt. 



EPEE, TEAM. 

Second, Portugal, 10 points. 
760 Goncalves, Carlos, Lieut. 
759 Ventura, J. Voiga, Major. 

762 Parodes, Frederico, Lieut. 

763 Paiva, Jorge, Lieut. 

764 Mascarhenhas, Antonio, Gapt. 

765 Farinha, Fernando, Lieut. 



FENCING, EPEE, INDIVIDUAL. 

First Laurent, Henri . . . Sgt 556 France 

Second . . . Paiva, Jorge Lt 763 Portugal 

Third . . .Feyerick, Robert 1084 Belgium 



FENCING, SABER, TEAM. 



1046 

1048 
1050 
1044 
1047 
1051 



First, Italy, 19 points. 
Nadi, Nedo, Lieutenant 
Urbani, Dino, Lieutenant 
Gesarano, Frederico, Gapt. 
Nadi, Aldo, 2nd Lieutenant 
Baldi, Baldo, Lieutenant 
Puliti, Oreste, Sergeant 



Second, Portugal, 8 points. 

751 Rocha, E. Vieira, Col. 

752 Sabbo, Antonio V., Gapt. 

753 Dias, Jose S., Gapt. 

754 Oliveira, Luiz, Gapt. 
756 Motta, Oscar, Gapt. 

758 Ferreira, Horacio, Lt. Gol. 



FENCING, SABER, INDIVIDUAL. 

First 1090. . .Gillens, Vincent, N. G. Belgium 

Second. . . .542. . .Ancel, Adjutant France 

Third . . . ( 336. . .Gipora, Joseph, Lieut Gzecho-SIovakia 

I 547. . .Perodon, Gaptain France 

FOOTBALL, SOCCER. 



First, Gzecho-SIovakia, 3 points. 

309 Peyer, Frantisek, Corporal 

310 Klapka, Rudolf, Private 

313 Steiner, Karel, Private 
312 Hojer, Antonin, Private 

311 Pospisil, Miroslav, Sgt. 

314 Loos, Valentin, Aspirant 

315 Fivebr, Antonin, Private 

316 Pesek, Karel, Corporal 
323 Sedlacok, Josef, Private 
538 Janda, Antonin, Sgt. 



Second, France, 2 points. 
449 Lesur, Henri, Private 
457 L'Hermitte, Rene, Sergeant. 
436 Renier, Albert R., Pvt. 
451 Nicolas, Paul G.M., Pvt. 

443 Ghayrigues, P., Pvt. 
462 Deydier, Paul, Pvt. 
453 Dubly, Raymond, Pvt. 

444 Gamblin, Lucien, Lieutenant 
460 Gastiger, Pierre, Corporal 
459 Gastiger, Maurice, Sergeant 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



479 



321 Pilat, Vaolav, Private 

322 Vanik, Jan, Pvt. 

324 Prosek, Vaclav, Aspirant 

319 Cerveny, Jaroslav, Private 
318 Vlk, Karel, Private 

320 Subert, Vaclav, Private 
2380 Madden, John 

326 Gruss, Joe, Captain 



446 Graveline, Maurice, Pvt. 

447 Hugues, Frangoise A., Sgt. 
464 Langenove, E., Pvt. 

454 Devica, Emilien, Private 



FOOTBALL, RUGBY. 



First, France, 8 points. 

412 Bordes, Frangois, Pvt 

408 Cassayet, Aime, Pvt 

415 Cayrefoure, Edmond, Pvt 
414 Crabos, Rene, Pvt 

406 Dillenseger, Rene, Captain 

418 Elichondo, Pierre, Captain 
425 Fauthoux, Pierre, Pvt 

410 Galiay, Paul, Pvt 

413 Jaureguy, A., Pvt. 

419 Lasserre, Rene Felix, Sgt. 

404 Nicolai, Jean, 2nd Lt. 

405 Pons, Pierre, Asst. Vet. 

416 Rieu, Paul, Pvt 

433 Strohl, Emile, 2nd Lt. 

411 Struxiano, Phillip, Pvt 

407 Thierry, Robert, Lt. 

409 Vaquer, Fernand, Adjutant 

420 Manco, Louis, Pvt 



Second, United States, 3 points. 
1303 Cleck, Herbert, 1st Lt. 
1320 Coulter, John W., 2nd Lt. 

1306 Dole, Kenneth L., Captain 
1334 Erb, Arthur L., 1st Lt. 
1336 Fish, George W., 1st Lt. 

1307 Fisher, R. T., 2nd Lt. 

1322 Fitzpatrick, James P., Corp. 

1324 Hanser, Henry P., Hosp. Sgt 

1325 Keeler, Frank D., Corp. 

1326 Millington, Seth, 1st Lt. 
1312 Moore, Frederic H., Pvt. 

1327 Norris, Robert R., 1st Lt. 

1328 O'Neil, J. T., Pvt 
1315 Slocum, L. H., 1st Lt. 

1330 Snavely, Gordon, 2nd Lt. 

1331 Thoburn, James H. 1st Lt. 
1317 Twombey, Irving F., 2nd Lt. 
1314 Schrader, Charles A., Corp. 



GOLF 

Four-Ball (18 holes)— Team Competition. 
First, France. 

Members of Team: 
2336 Golias, R. 
2339 Cavallo, Marius 
2331 Gommier, R. 
2335 Bomboudiac, J. 
2334 Lafitte, E. 
2333 Dauge, M. 



480 THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 

2330 Massy, Arnaud 
2338 Gossiat, J. 
Singles (36 holes) — 

First Massy, Arnaud, 2330 France. 

Score, 5 up, 4 to play 
Strokes, 112 in 32 holes 

Runner-up Dauge, M 2333 France. 

Strokes, 116 in 32 holes 

HORSE-RIDING COMPETITION 

Military Competition — Team (I). 
First, France. 

Total points of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Competitors, 88.707 

Members of Team: 

353 Major Joseph de Soras Points 29.708 

355 Lieut. Paul Larregain " 29.541 

354 Lieut. Frangois de Rivoyre " 29.458 

356 Lieut. Alexis Tinel " 29.208 
Substitutes: 

357 Captain Guy Pinon 

358 Captain Antoine Costa 
Second, America. 

Total points of 1st, 2nd. and 3rd Competitors 88.541 
Members of Team: 

1069 Lt. Col. H. D. Chamberlain Points 29.625 

1070 Lt. Col. E. W. Taulbee " 29.583 

1067 Colonel R. T. Merchant " 29.333 

1068 Colonel W.W. West, Jr " 28.917 

Substitutes: 

1071 Lt. Col. J. W. Downer 

1072 Lt. Col. R. E. Anderson 
Third, Italy. 

Total points of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Competitors 87.832 

Members of Team: 

949 Captain Giulio Cacciandra Points 29 . 541 

952 Captain Leone Valle " 29 .333 

948 Captain Francesco Amalfi " 28.958 

946 Major Ruggero Ubertalli " 28.583 




Presentation of medals l.y General PershinR. Toy Zc/'— Prentli riding team recen-iiig midals. 
Tov right-^MnioT Morel, Belgium, receiving medal. Center left— Giiptiiin Citno Lacciandra, 
lUly, receiving cup. Ceiiler rir//ii— General Wolf presenting winners m shooting competition. 
Bottom left— General Wolf reviving team tr.iphy Xoi- shooting. Bottofn right— G^-nevai 1 ershing 
shaking hands with Blwood S. Brown, Y. M. C. A. Athletic Director. 



31 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 483 

Substitutes: 

951 Major Ettore Caflaratti 
947 Major Giacomo Antonelli 
Winners of individual place in Military competition. 

First 353 Major Joseph de Soras France . Points 29.708 

Second 1069 Lt. Col H.D. Chamberlain.. America " 29.625 
Third 2267 Ct. Ed. Morel de Westgaver Belgium. " 29.625 
Prize Jumping — Individual (II). 

First 946 Maj, Ruggero Ubertalli. Italy Total Points 239 

(Riding Treviso). 

Second 2123 Maj. Filip Jacob Roumania. Total Points 238 

(Riding Beby). 
Third 946 Maj. Ruggero Ubertalli. Italy. . . . Total Points 237 
(Riding Ernani). 

Prize Jumping — In Pairs (III). 

First I ^'^^ ^^J- ^^^'°™° Antonelli. Italy .. 1 ^^^^j p^.^^^ ^36 
( 953 Capt.AlessandroAlvisi . Italy .. \ 

Second ^^^ ^^J- ^''SS'''' Ubertalli. Italy .. j p^^^^^ ^^ 

aecona j g^^ j^^. ^^^^^^ Caffaratti. . Italy .. i 

Third I 358 Capt.Antoine Costa ... France I Total Points 231 
I 353 Lt. Paul Larregain .... France ) 

ROWING, SINGLES SCULLS 

First Hadfield, D. C, . . Sgt New Zealand. 7 min. 54 sec. 

Second Giran, Sgt France 

Third Withington,*Paul, Maj United States 

ROWING, FOUR-OARED SHELLS 

First, France, 7 min. 26 2-5 sec. Second, United States. 

Stroke, Bouton, Sgt. Stroke, Withington, Paul, Maj. 

3, Vaganay, Pvt. 3, Wiman, C. D., Capt. 

2, Cordier, Sgt. 2, Wilson, BiUings, Capt. 

Bow, Barrelet, Lt. Bow, Cooke, H. E., Lt. 

Cox., Barberalle, Cpl. Cox., Gale, Guy H., Lt. 

ROWING, EIGHT-OARED SHELLS 

First, England, 6 min. 26 3-5. Second, Australia 

Stroke, Hartley, Hubert Stroke, Disher, Clive, Capt. 



484 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



7, Buxton, Clarence 
6, Buxton, Maurice 
5, Dixon, Arthur 
4, Campbell, John 
3, Swan, Alfred 
2, Peake, Harold 
Bow, Boret, Herbert 
Cox., Johnstone, Hobin 



7, Mettam, George, Gunner 
6, House, Frederick, Lt. 
5, McGill, Thomas, Lt. 
4, Scott, Arthur, Gunner 
3, Davis, Lyndhurst 
2, Newall, Harold, Lt. 
Bow, Robb, A., Sgt. 
Cox., Smedley, Albert, Sgt. 



SHOOTING 

Army Rifle — Team Competition. 

First, America, 

Members of Team: 

401 Coppedge, James F., 2nd Lt 

415 Smith, Robert W., 1st Lt 

406 Gray, Leman, Serg 

416 Smith, Stanley, 1st Sgt 

403 Crawley, Theo. B., Serg 

419 Titus, Richard J., Corp 

408 Henson, Lester V., Gy. Serg 

404 Disbrow, Harry M., Capt 

412 Meyers, Walter A., Capt 

417 Spooner, Lloyd S., 1st Lt 

420 Walker, Wesley W., Capt 

425 Williams, Glen, Serg 

Second, France, 

Members of Team: 

164 L'Hostis, Jean, Lt Points 

168 Percy, Louis, Demob 

163 Lajoie, Jean, 2nd Lt 

156 Durand, Raymond, Corp 

162 Johnson, Leon, Demob 

155 Dupuis, Paul., Capt 

175 Colas, Demob 

161 Hardy, Pierre, Demob 

165 Mahieu, Jules, Capt 

150 Angelini, Charles, Major 

171 Renard, Leon., Capt 

157 Fray, Andri, 2nd Lt 



Points 2651 



230 

227 
227 
226 
225 
222 
221 
219 
217 
217 
215 
207 
2416 



Points 



219 
215 

214 
208 
207 
206 
206 
199 
192 
191 
183 
175 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 485 

Third, Canada, Points 2351 

Members of Team: 

62 Mortimer, George— Major Points 216 

67 Richardson, Fred — Major " 213 

69 Spalding, Frank, Lt " 206 

61 Morris, William 0., Major " 205 

72 Vincent, Joseph H., Lt " 202 

60 Mclnnes, Dugald, Serg " 195 

56 Hutchinson, Roger G., Major " 193 

52 Francis, Edward D. T., Lt " 190 

Newman, Nathaniel, Col. Sgt " 185 

59 Martin, Fred R., Capt " 185 

55 Hay, John, Serg " 184 

57 Johnson, Frederick G., Capt " 177 

Army Rifle — Individual Competition: 

First 416 Smith, Stanley, 1st Serg Points 275 

Second 408 Henson, Lester V., Gy. Serg " 266 

Third 419 Titus, Richard J., Corp " 263 

Pistol Competition — Individual: 

First 412 Kelley, Michael, M.E.S.G Points 669 

Second 419 Raymond, D. R., Capt " 648 

Third 401 Bird, Paul, Corp " 647 

Pistol Competition — Team. 

First, America, Points 4080 

Members of Team: 

419 Raymond, D. R., Capt Points 427 

412 Kelley, Michael, M.E.S.G " 421 

407 Evans, P. W., Lt. Col " 413 

411 Johnson, James F., 1st Lt " 413 

401 Bird, Paul' Corporal " 412 

409 Griffin, Lloyd E., 1st Lt " 411 

405 Dell, James W., Col. Serg " 409 

400 Beverley, J. R., 1st Lt " 400 

402 Bittel, Edward, Lt. Col " 389 

414 LaMatte, C. K., Lt. Col " 385 

Second, France Points 3828 

Members of Team: 

155 DeCastelbajac, Capt Points 413 

158 Gandon, Henri, Demob " 412 



486 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



172 Vaudiau, Pierre, Capt " 393 

161 Barbillat, Major " 393 

167 Renard, Leon., Capt " 391 

165 Pecchia, Joseph, Serg " 387 

160 Guizien, Louis, Lt " 380 

162 Mazuc, Fernand A., Demob " 372 

164 Moreaux, Leon., Major " 354 

157 DeVarino, Bohan P., Capt, " 333 

Third, Italy Points 3369 

Members of Team: 

265 Sarorari, Ferruccio, Tene Points 384 

260 Piersantelli, Emilio, Tene. Col " 366 

264 Sanguini, Plinio, Capit " 354 

262 Santena, Amedeo, Vice Brig " 353 

250 Ascani, Ascanio, Sott. Ten " 349 

267 Somma, Omberto, Col " 330 

251 Borgia, Carlo, Tene. Col " 329 

263 Santena, Pacifico, Maresc " 329 

266 Samanotti, Achillo, Col " 311 

261 Ruffo, Giuseppe, Tene. Col " 265 



United States 64.6 sec. 
Australia. 



United States 1 m. 31.4 s. 



SWIMMING 

100 Meters, Free Style- 
First 114 Ross, Norman, 2nd Lieut.. . 
Second 77 Solomons, L. T., Driver. . . . 
Third 75 Stedman, Ivan C, Bomber 

100 Meters, Back Stroke— 

I^irst 114 Ross, Norman, 2nd Lieut.. . 

Second 91 Gardiner, H.M., Sergeant . . " " 

Third 14 Lehu, Daniel, Private France. 

200 Meters, Breast Stroke- 
First 29 Sommer France 

Second 109 Biersack, Henry, Sergeant . United States 

Third 64 Hallard, Richard, Private .. France. 

400 Meters, Free Style- 
First 114 Ross, Norman,2nd Lieut.. . . United States 

Second 76 Longworth, W., Lieut Australia. 

Third 75 Stedman, Ivan C, Bomber . " 



3 m. 24.4 s. 



5 m. 40.4 s. 




Athletes receiving medals from General Pershing. Upper Zr/i— Butler, winner in the broad 
jump. Upper riyht — Norman Boss, the American swimming champion. Center left — Spalla, 
Italy, and Martin, U. S. Center right — A line of U. S. winners. Loiver left— R\ido\ph Klapka, 
one of the Czecho-Slovakian soccer champions. Lower rif/Ai— Baseball players receiving medals. 



PERSHING STADIUM 



PARIS 



489 



800 Meters, Free Style- 
First 114 Ross, Norman, 2nd Lieut.. 
Second 76 Longworth, William, Lieut 
Third 78 Hardwick, H. H., Sergeant 

1500 Meters Free Style- 
First 114 Ross, Norman, 2nd Lieut.. 
Second 78 Hardwick, Harold H., Serg 
Third 57 Bacigalupo, Luigi, Lieut. . . 
800 ]kleters Relay, Free Style- 
First, Australia. 
78 Hardwick, Harold H., Sgt. 

75 Stedman, Ivan C, Bomber 

76 Longworth, William, Lieut. 
80 Dexter, J., Private 

Third, Italy. 
57 Bacigalupo, Luigi, Lieut. 

59 Costa, Malito, Private 

60 Massa, Mario, Private 
126 Frassanetti, Angostino, Pvt. 

Time: 10 min. 11.2 sec 



United States 12 m. 34 s. 
Australia. 



United States 24 m. 22.4 s. 

Australia. 

Italy. 



Second, United States. 
114 Ross, Norman, 2nd Lieut. 
112 Hinks, J. M., 2nd Lieut. 
110 Biddel, S. M., Sergeant 
91 Gardiner, H. S., Sergeant 



Singles: Winner 
Runner-up 

Doubles: Winners 
Runners-up 



Teams: Winners 



Runners-up 



TENNIS 

2012 Gobert, Andre H., Lieut. . . 
2002 O'Hara-Wood, Pat, Capt. .. 
2002 O'Hara-Wood, Pat, Capt. .. 

2001 Lycett, Randolph, Bomb. .. 
2020 Washburn Watson, Capt. . . 

2019 Mathey, Dean, 1st Lieut. . . 

2002 O'Hara-Wood, Pat., Capt. . 
2001 Lycett, Randolph, Bomb . . . 

2003 Patterson, Gerald L., Lieut . 

2020 Washburn, Watson, Capt. . 
2019 Mathey, Dean, 1st Lieut. . . 



TRACK AND FIELD 

100-Meter Dash- 
First 822 Paddock,CharlesW, 2nd Lt. U.S.A. 
Second 825 Teschner, Edw. A., 2nd Lt. U.S.A. 
Third 726 Howard, J. A., Private . . . Canada 



France 

Australia 

Australia 



United States 

Australia 

I) 

United States 
)i " 



10.8 sec. 



490 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



200 Meter Dash- 
First 822 Paddock, Gh. W., 2nd Lt.. 
Second 825 Teschner, Edw. A., 2nd Lt 
Third 646 Lindsay, John, Sergeant .. 

400 Meter Dash- 
First 831 Eby, EarlA., IstLt. ... U. 
Second 839 Spink, PhiHp M., Private. 
Third 649 Wilton, James H. R., Sgt . 

800 Meter Run- 
First 648 Mason, Daniel L., Sgt 

Second 831 Eby, Earle A., 1st Lt 

Third 839 Spink, Philip M., Private . 

1500 Meter Run- 
First 846. Stout, Clyde J., 2nd Lt. . . . 
Second 1406 Arnaud, Henri, Sergeant . . 
Third 722 LaPierre, H.E., Private .. . 

Modified Marathon — 
First 1383 Vermeulon, Jean, Private . 
Second 850 Faller, Fred, Corporal .... 
Third 1389 Heuet, Danton 

110 Meter High Hurdles- 
First 863 Simpson, Robert I., 1st Lt. 
Second 860 Kelley, Fred W., 2nd Lt .. 
Third 647 Wilson, Harry E., Sergeant, 

200 Meter Low Hurdles — 
First 863 Simpson, Robert I., 1st Lt. 
Second 864 Sylvester, Wm. F., 2nd Lt 
Third 863 House, Meredith, 1st Lt. .. 

Running High Jump — 

First 870 Larsen, Clinton, 1st Lt 

/ 1432 Labat, Andre, Sergeant. . 
Second 873 Rice, CarlV., Sgt.Major.. 
( 876 Templeton, R. L., 2nd Lt. 
Running Broad Jump — 
First 811 Butler, Solomon, Private. . . 
Second 883 Worthington, HT., 2nd Lt. 
Third 880 Johnson, Leo T., 1st Lt. . . 



U.S.A. 

New Zealand. 

S.A. 
New Zealand. 

New Zealand. 

U.S.A. 

U.S.A. 
France 
Canada 

France 

U.S.A. 
France 

U.S.A. 

New Zealand. 

U.S.A. 



21.6 sec. 



50 sec. 



1 m. 55.4 s. 



4 m. 5.6 s. 



55 m. 11.8 s. 



15.2 sec. 



25.8 sec. 



U.S.A. 


1.864 meters 


France 


) 


U.S.A. 


1.827 meters 


U.S.A. 


7.557 meters 


?J 


7.264 " 


?! 


6.62 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 491 

Standing Broad Jump — 
First 891 Taylor, William H., 2nd Lt U.S.A. 
Second 893 Humphries, James W., Pvt " 
Third 1424 Moreau, Emile, 2nd CI. Pvt France 

Rumning Hop, Step and Jump — 
First 881 Prem, Herbert L., IstLt... U.S.A. 
Second 894 Bender, Charles A. Gapt... 
Third 897 Madden, John E., Capt. . . 

Pole Vault- 
First 899 Floyd, Florin W., 1st Lt. . U.S.A. 
Second 898 Ervin, Lucius S., 2nd Lt. . 
Third 902 Harwood, Robert, 2nd Lt.. 

Throwing the Javelin — • 
First 905 Bronder, George E., 2nd L. United States 55.816 meters 
Second 903 Liversledge, Harry, 1st Lt. " 
Third 2245 Zirganos, Eustathios, 2nd Lt. Greece 

Throwing the Discus — 
First 910 Higgins, Charles Sgt., United States 
Second 889 Byrd, Richard L., 1st Lt... 
Third 911 Duncon, James, 1st Lieut.. " 

Putting the Shot (16 lbs)— 
First 912 Caughey, Edw. R., 2nd Lt. United States 13.776 meters 
Second 903 Liversledge, Harry, IstLt... " 13.576 " 

Third 915 Maxfield, Wallace. C, 2d Lt " 12.873 " 

Hand-Grenade Throw — 
First 2148 Thompson, Fred C. Chap. United SI 
Second 2145 Thompson, S. H. Corp. 
Third 2149 Wycavage, D. C. Sgt. 

Pentathlon — 
First 887 Legendre, Robert L., Corp. U.S.A. 
Second 878 Vidal, Gene L., 2nd Lt. . . . 
Third 1363 Andre, George, Sgt France 

800 Meter Relay Race- 
First, America, 1 min. 30.8 sec. Second, Canada. 
822 Paddock, Charles W., 2ndLt. 726 Howard, J. A.— Private 
814 Haddock, Marshall, Jr.., Pvt. 715 Haliburton, R.— C.Q.M.S. 
826 Torkelson, Howard T, Pvt. 728 Zoellin, F. J.— Private 
825 Teschner, Edward A., 2ndLt. 727 Johnson, 0. P.— Private 



3.400 meters 


3.270 


)J 


3.098 


J? 


14.081 meters 


13.542 


J) 


13.479 


n 


3.675 meters 


3.575 


J J 


3.45 


)7 


55.816 meters 


53.87 


J J 


48.689 


71 


40.883 meters 


40.038 


J1 


36.112 


11 



tates. 


74.929 m. 




11 


73.915 " 




11 


66.552 " 




Total Points 461 




11 


431. 


2 


11 


398.4 



492 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES — 1919 



Third, 

1179 Carter, Ernest, Sgt. 

1180 Hume, Leslie J., Driver 

1600 Meter Relay Race- 
First, America, 3 min. 28.8 sec. 

828 Campbell, Thomas, Sgt. 

829 Campbell, Verle H., 1st Lt. 
577 Meehan, Edward J., 2nd Lt. 
825 Teschner, Edward A., 2nd Lt 

Third, 

1401 Devaux, Andre, Adj. 

1402 Delvart, Henri, Sgt. 

Medley Relay Race — 
First, America, 7 min. 43.4 sec. 
813 Haas, Carl F., Private 
832 Gray, William C, Private 
827 Campbell, Floyd F., 1st Lt. 
922 Shields, M. Lawrence, Sgt. 

Third, 
1396 Seurin, Jean R., Private. 
1417 Poulenard, 



Australia 

845 Johnson, William, Private 
1181 Carroll, Harold V., Driver. 

Second, Australia. 
2399 Chalmers, R. D., Lt. 
845 Johnson, WiUiam, Pvt. 
1180 Hume, Leslie J., Driver 
1184 Eraser, Thomas, Sgt. 
France 

1403 Dumont, Raoul, Corporal 
1400 Laubestrand, R, Private 

Second, Australia. 
1180 Hume, Leslie J., Driver 
1179 Carter, Ernest, Sergeant 
1183 Bergmeier, Chs. B., Private 
1188 Manley, Chfford, Sergeant 
France. 

1446 Dandelot, G., Mai. de Logis. 
1408 Lakary, Hamed, Corporal 



TUG OF WAR 



First, America. 
804 Johnston, R. H., Mast.Engr. 2366 

775 Johnson, Carl J. L., Wagoner 2367 

776 Fay, John W., Wagoner. 2368 
778 Posey, Harley, Private 2369 
786 Mathesen, George E., Wag. 2370 
795 Rouse, James N., Wagoner 2371 
797 Shaw, Earl H., Corporal 2372 
799 McFarren, George B., Corp. 2373 
806 Gobb, Alfred R., Sergeant 2374 
803 Moser, H. R. J., Private 2375 
238 Fields, Stephen C, Sgt. 2376 
784 Johnson, Chester, H., Corp. 2377 
793 Loftis, Isaac, Corporal 2378 
783 Copeland Edmund, Corporal 2379 



Second, Belgium. 
Baltynck, Leopold, Sgt. 
Den Tweck, Alidor, Private 
Van Eecke, Helairi, 
Vandewille, Victor, 
Nicolaes, Alphonse, 
Servaes, Isidore, 
Vandenborn, Jean, 
Casiers, Camille, 
Lambrecht, Jules, 1st 
Cill, Leon, Sgt. Major. 
Reymen, Henri, Private 
DeCuyper, Arthur, Private 
Van Humbeeck, Hector, Sgt. 
Hoever, Albert, Sergeant 



PERSHING STADIUM — PARIS 



493 



WRESTLING, CATCH-AS-CATCH-CAN 

Bantamweight — 
Winner 1362 Slinger, Frank. 

(No other contestants). 
Featherweight — 

Winner 1361 Littlejahault 
Runner-up 1215 Taylor, Albert W., Sgt. 
Lightweight — 
Winner 1360 Mitropolis, Peter 
Runner-up 576 Marshall, F. W., Capt. 
Welterweight — 
Winner 1359 Farley, Cal. 
Runner-up 1214 Bridges, Alfred F., S. M. 
Middleweight — 
Winner 1358 Prehn, William 
Runner-up 1213 Palmer, John R., Spr. 
Light Heavyweight — 
Winner 1357 Parcaut, Ralph 
Runner-up 1211 Meeske, William, Sergeant 
Heavyweight — 
Winner 402 Salvator, Chevalier 
Runner-up 1356 Polk, Joe 



U.S.A. 



United States 
Australia 

United States 
Newfoundland 

United States 
Australia 

United States 
Australia. 

United States 
Australia 

France 
United States 



WRESTLING, GRECO-ROMAN 

Bantamweight — 
Winner 2364 Wisenan 
Runner-up 2365 Behomet 
Featherweight — 
Winner 1256 Dierck 
Runner-up 1056 Vaglio, Pierre, Pvt. 

Lightweight — 
Winner 301 Beranek, Joseph, Corp. 
Runner-up 1055 Porro, Enrico, Private. 

Welterweight — 
Winner 303 Halik, Karol, Private. 
Runner-up 1253 Savonet 



United States 
France 

Belgium 
Italy 

Gzecho-Slovakia 
Italy 

Gzecho-Slovakia 
Belgium 



494 



THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES 



1919 



Middleweight — 
Winner 1251 Van Antwerpen 
Runner-Up 1053 Gargano, Andrea, Pvt. 

Light Heavyweight — 
Winner 306 Kopriva, Frant, Sgt. Major. 
Runner-Up 305 Dostal, Joseph, Corporal. 

Heavyweight — 
Winner 400 Bechard, Frangois, Mtre Point. 
Runner-Up 1248 Goels 

WATER POLO 



Belgium 
Italy 

Serbia 
Gzecho-SIovakia 

France 
Belgium 



First, Belgium. 

65 Durant, Albert, Sergeant 

66 Steffans, Fernand, Sergeant 

67 Fleurix, Georges, Private 

68 Boin, Victor, Lieutenant 

69 Gludts, Joseph, Sergeant 

70 Dewin, Pierre, Gorporal 

71 Delahaye, Alphonse, Corporal 

72 Everaerts, Edmond, Sgt. Maj. 

73 Wyts, Julien, Private 

74 Deman, Frangois, Corporal 



Second, France. 
6 Dujardin, P. 

4 Pernod, M. 
3 Decoin, H. 

5 Rigal, G. 

14 Lehu 

22 Neistei, G. 

15 Jouault, H. 

10 Mayand, Y., Private 

12 Jorre, Private. 
8 Niver, Private 

13 Rodier, Lieut. 



SPECIAL EVENTS, ARMIES OF OCCUPATION. 

Running Broad Jump — 

First 897 Madden, John E., Captain U.S.A. 6.615 meters 

Second 976 Nespoli, Arturo, Sergeant Italy 6.466 " 

Third 1430 Coulon, Aspirant France 6.237 " 

800 Meter Relay (Track)— 
First, France, 1 min. 33.6 sec. Second, Italy. 

1400 Laubestrand, R., Private 976 Nespoli, Arturo, Sergeant 

1397 Girard, Rene, Private 975 Crool, Giorgio, Sergeant 

1398 Labanoat, Raoul, Ml d Logis 977 Orlandi, Gio. Battist, Private 

1399 Rault, Pierre, Aspirant. 974 Alberti, Guiseppe, Sergeant 

Third, America. 
932 Fields, Thomas S., Corporal 817 Leon, Harry S., Private 
931 Pedan, Roy F., Sergeant 872 Osborne, John F., Private 




Top left-Fvesontation of medals. Top riaW-Americun '^f'^\^''^^J^;i-,^t^^^, 
trophie.. Center Ze/i-Soccer trophy won by Cz.cho-Slovakian tram. Center^ ngM Mm 
U.S.,recpiving medal. Bottom Ze/<-Maxfield, U. S., receiving medals. Bottom ng/it iundy, 

XJ. S., receiving medal. 




Lowering the flag on the last day.