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Full text of "New York and the war with Spain : History of the Empire state regiments"

THE GIFT OF 



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New York and the war with Spain :History 




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lew York anfl the Warwitli Spain 



HISTORY 



OF THE 



EMPIRE STATE REGIMENTS 



Published under the Direction of the State Historian 



AI,BANY : 
THE ARGUS COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1903 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Preservation of Kecords S 

Our State Flags 3 

Preservation of Historical Structures -. 4 

The Sword of Washingfton in the State Library 5-9 

New York in the Spanish War 9-305 

History of the First Regiment, New York Volunteers 17-44 

History of the Second Eegriment, New York. Volunteers 45-82 

History of the Third Kegiment, New York Volunteers 83-137 

History of the Sixty-ninth Eegiment, New York Volunteers 128-151 

History of the Seventy-first Kegiment, New York Volunteers .... 153-305 

Gallantry of a New York Naval Officer 306-313 

Newspaper Correspondents and the War 314-318 

Index . , 319-439 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



I. Governor Frank 8. Black Frontispiece 

Oprosm PAoa 
n. General Thomas H. Barber 18 

in. Field Officers, First Regiment 84 

IV. The First Regiment, New York Volunteers Raising the First 

American Flag at Honolulu 23 

V. Departure of the Tenth Battalion from Albany 30 

VT. First Regiment — Evening Parade 34 

VII. First Regiment Camp at Honolulu 38 

VIII. Colonel Edward E. Hardin 46 

IX. Colonel James H. Lloyd 70 

X. General Edward Morris Hoffman 84 

XI. Field Officers, Third Regiment 98 

XII. Camps, Third Regiment 104 

Xin. Field and Staff, Third Regiment 120 

XIV. Colonel Arthur MacArthur 150 

XV. Colonel Wallace Abel Downs 178 

XVI. Henry L. Stoddard 194 

XVn. Henry "S. Brovra 226 

XVIII. The Sommers N. Smith 316 



State of New York 



No. 68. 



IN ASSEMBLY, 



April 18, 1903. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



STATE HISTORIAN 



STATE CAPITOL, 

Albany, N. Y., April 17, 1903. 

Hon. S. Fred. Nixon, Speaker of the AssetnbVy, State of New 

York: 

Sir. — I have the honor herewith to enclose the Annual Report 

of the State Historian. 

Respectfully yours, 

HUGH HASTINGS, 

State Historian. 



PRESERVATION OF RECORDS. 
The matter of preservation of local records has lately been 
extensively considered by persons and societies interested in 
this important subject. The neglect with which priceless records 
have been treated and abused in certain towns and counties has 
long been a notorious disgrace. Many custodians have shown 
utter indifference to the sacred character of the trust reposed 
in them while others without a shadow of right have wantonly 
destroyed documents of the most valuable character. A systematic 
investigation lately pursued under private sources has brought 
to light a condition of affairs that calls for legislative coopera- 
tion and legislative remedy. A bill has been introduced into 
your honorable body which proposes to change the title of the 
ofBoe of State Historian to that of State Record Commissioner. 
In the preparation of the bill or in the proposed change of title, 
the head of this department was not consulted. The bill was 
submitted and with the exception of two minor details was 
approved by this department under the general policy to 
cooperate in the development of any plan or proposition 
that tended to promote greater care in the preservation 
of oflScial records, State, county, city or town. Considered 
in committee of General LaAvs of the Assembly and Finance of 
the Senate, opposition developed against the bill mainly because 
of the radical determination to change the title of a State de- 
partment that had been in existence for eight years and because 
of the apprehension that the bill, if not in principle, in intention 
at least, infringed upon the doctrine of home rule by permitting a 



State Historian. 3 

State officer to invade the rights of local authorities. The matter 
will no doubt be renewed next year. It is recommended that the 
Record Commissioner should be attached to the oflQce of Secretary 
of State, the constitutional keeper of State archives, rather than 
to this department, which, is not an office of record, and which 
was originally created for purposes radically different from those 
suggested by the Record Commission bill. 

OUR STATE FLAGS. 

The preservation of our State battle flags for all time to come 
should appeal to the patriotism of every citizen. A battle tlag 
is a sacred part of the history of a State and represents all that 
is noble and self-sacrificing in human nature. European coun 
tries preserve their battle scarred standards by mounting each on 
wire to insure their pi-eservatiou as long as the county endures. 
We have been satisfied to herd our flags together in a con- 
glomerate mass in air tight compartments which time has shown 
to be most fatal to the life of emblems of this character, instead 
of arranging each flag by itself with a distinct and suitable in 
scription underneath, detailing its history and the battles in 
which it took part. Again, standards that should have been 
placed in the Capitol are permitted to remain in the hands of 
private individuals and societies, until it has been discovered that 
a number of regimental organizations that served during the war 
of the Rebellion are not represented in the collection of flags in 
the State Capitol. This would seem to be not only an act of in- 
justice to the organizations themselves, but to the men who fought 
under the colors, living and dead. The time has come when this 
matter should receive the careful attention of every surviving 
soldier of the war of the Rebellion who is at all interested in the 



4 Annual Report of the 

preservation of the standards which 1>elonged to the regiment or 
organization with which he was connected during the trying days 
from 1861 to 1865. The decimation among the veterans of the 
war between the States is sorrowfully increasing from year to 
year. The youngest man capable of bearing arms when hostilities 
ceased, long ago passed his half century birthday. The sugges- 
tion should not be ignored or delayed, but prompt and vigorous 
investigation should be prosecuted for the purpose of collecting 
all outstanding battle flags except those that have been disposed 
of by legislative enactment, bringing them together under the 
roof of the Capitol where they will remain undisturbed and as an 
object lesson for future generations. 

More generous provision should be ordered by the Legislature 
for the care of the flags already possessed. Year by year under 
the system with which they" are cared for by the State, these 
precious relics are disintegrating and slowly crumbling to pieces. 

PRESERVATION OP HISTORICAL STRUCTURES. 
Nearly every year the Legislature is requested to .make an 
appropriation for the purchase of an historical landmark. Some- 
times these propositions contain merit, often are open to criti- 
cism. The question of historical importance is in many cases 
rendered subservient to the influence of the legislator having the 
bill in charge. In consequence the State is exposed to the in- 
justice of purchasing and maintaining structures whose value 
is insignificant compared with others that for reasons that are 
well understood never appear in the market. The possibilities 
of abuses developing out of methods so ragged and unbusiness 
like, are apparent at a glance. Options on property are easily 
obtained but the price the State pays for the investment is rarely 



State Historian. 5 

the price of the option. Public sentiment in support of so praise- 
worthy a purpose as the preservation of an historical structure 
can be manufactured as a rule for the asking. Careful investi- 
gation is regarded as superfluous. This threatened abuse can be 
overcome in a simple manner through the medium of a State 
Board of Historical Commissioners — two state oflBcers and the 
president of the local historical society of the town or city in 
which the property under consideration is situated — who shall 
serve without compensation. All bills introduced into the legis- 
lature for the purchase of historical dwellings or structures shall 
be referred to this Commission, who shall make a report on the 
advisability of buying or rejecting to the legislative committee 
having charge of the bill. 

THE SWORD OF WASHINGTON IN THE STATE LIBRARY 
AND ITS HISTORY. 
For years more or less discussion has occurred over the history 
of the sword in the State Library in Albany that originally was 
bequeathed by will by General Washington, to a relative. A 
legend has drifted along from source unknown in effect that Baron 
Steuben brought the sword from Frederick the Great and pre- 
sented it to George Washington with a message from the " oldest 
general in the world to the greatest." In the winter of 1902 when 
Prince Henry of Prussia, brother of Emperor William, visited 
Albany the sword was placed on exhibition in the Executive 
Chamber and was handed by Governor Odell to the distinguished 
caller. Prince Henry drew the sword from the scabbard and 
vainly scrutinized it for a mai'k of identification to establish the 
place where the weapon was manufactured. It is needless to 
say that all marks had been obliterated by constant polishing; 



6 Annual Report of the 

even the color of the scabbard had been changed from its original 
color white to -green. Those conversant with the subject have 
averred that from its general appearance the sword was made at 
Solingen, but whether it was a present from the greatest soldier 
Prussia ever produced, is open to more or less skepticism. In the 
attempt to determine the authenticity of the sword, under date 
of March 27, 1902, a letter was sent to the Hon. Andrew D. White, 
United States Embassj', Berlin, Germany, which read: 

" State Historian's Office, Albany, N. Y., 

March 27th, 1903. 

Hon. Andrew D. White, United States Embassy, Berlin, 
Germany : 

Sir. — ^As you no doubt have seen, considerable discussion has 
been raised in certain of our American newspapers, over the 
question whether Frederick the Great really gave to General 
Washington the sword now on exhibition in the State Library 
in this city. There is no direct proof to sustain the position 
that Frederick the (ireat actually presented it, or that he did 
not. The sword is supposed to have been received by Wash- 
ington in 1780. 

At the suggestion of several persons, among whom is included 
Mr. Charles B. Miller, editor of the New York Times, I write to 
ask if it be possible to institute an investigation among either 
the financial or diplomatic archives, in order that this discussed 
and uncertain question may be settled for all time. I am well 
aware of the difficulties that even the American Ambassador 
may encounter in the prosecution of this investigation, but I do 
not know of a happier time than the present to carry it to a 
fulfillment if it be possible. 

Prince Ilenry handled the sword, which had been brought from 
tlie State Library to the Executive Chamber, and looked in vain 
for the name of the city where it was constructed. 

I have the honor to forward you several newsi)aper clippings in 
regard to the sword. 

With assurances of the highest esteem, believe me to remain, 
Yours very respectfully, 

(Signed) HUGH HASTINGS, 

State Historian." 



State Historian. 7 

In reply the subjoined was received on May 3, 1902: 

" Embassy of the United States of America, Berlin, April 22, 1902. 
Hugh Hastings, Esq., Albany, N. Y. : 

My dear Sir. — Returning to Berlin, I open your letter of 
March 27. It would give nie pleasure to be of use in the way you 
suggest; but, with the time at my disposal and various duties 
pressing upon me, and in view of the intricacy and difficulty 
of such an investigation as that proposed, I should not feel at 
liberty to undertake it without special instructions from the 
Department of State. 

Should any American scholar of proper standing be properly 
accredited here for the purpose, it would give me pleasure to in- 
troduce him in the right quarters and to do what I can to make 
his quest successful. 

I remain, dear Sir, 

Very respectfully yours, 

(Signed) AND. D. WHITE, 

Ambassador." 



In the meantime the Hon. John B. Jackson, who was the Sec- 
retary of the American Embassy aud at that time Charg6 
d'Affaires, in the absence of Mr. White, had sent the following: 

" Embassy of the United States of America, Berlin, April 7, 1902. 

Hon. Hugh Hastings, State Historian, Capitol, Albany, New 
York : 

Sir. — In the absence of Ambassador White, who is in Italy on 
l('a\ e, I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th 
ultimo, and to inform you that I have at once requested the 
Geiiiian Foreign Office to cause an investigation to be made for 
the purpose of ascei'taining whether or not Frederick the Great 
ever presented a sword to General Washington. I shall gladly 
inform you as to the nature of any reply which may be made to 
this request. 

I am, Sir, Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) JOHN B. JACKSON, 

Charge d'Affaires." 



8 Annual Rbpoex oe' the 

The then German Minister in Washington, Doctor A. von Hol- 
lenben was interested in the subject and was presented through 
this office with enlarged photographs of the sword and its reputed 
history. Up to the present time nothing has been heard from Dr. 
von Hollenben's investigation. Under date of June 26, 1902, Mr. 
Jackson, whose eflEorts to cooperate with this Department in 
establishing the identity of the sword were worthy of all com- 
mendation, transmitted the accompanying communication: 

" Embassy of the United States of America, Berlin, June 26, 1902. 

Hon. Hugh Hastings, State Historian, Capitol, Albany, New 
York : 

Sir. — Eeferring to previous correspondence I have now to in- 
foi-m you of the receipt of a note from the German Foreign Office, 
in which it is stated that with r^ard to the — " angeregte Frage 
einer Schenkung Friedrichs des Grossen an den General Wash- 
ington eingehende Ermittelungen in den Koniglich IPreussischen 
Staatsarchiven angeordnet worden sind, diese indess bisher zu 
einem befriedigenden Ergebniss nicht gefiihrt haben." Transla- 
tion — [" question submitted of a presentation by Frederick the 
Great to General Washington, searching investigation in the 
Royal Prussian State-archives has been ordered, this so far to a 
satisfactory result has not led]." 

Hoping that the Prussian authorities may still be able to find 
out sojuething positive with regard to the reported gift, I am, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) JOHN B. JACKSON, 

Sec'y of Embassy." 

Under date of September 23, 1902, Mr. Jackson wrote as 
follows : 

" Embassy of the United States of America, Berlin, September 

23, 1902. 

Hon. Hugh Ha,stings, State Historian, Capitol, Albany, New 
York : 

Sir. — Referring to my letter to you of June 26th last, M. No. 
4425. I have now to inform vou that, to mv recret. +ha Wnwvi<rT. 



State Historian. 9 

OflSce states that no record can be found of the matter in ques- 
tion, — the presentation of a sword to General Washington, by 
Frederick the Great of Prussia. Consequently, I am afraid that 
the tradition that such was the case, was not founded on fact. 
I am. Sir, Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) JOHN B. JACKSON, 

Sec'y of Embassy." 



And in the language of diplomacy the episode was closed. 

NEW YORK ORGANIZATIONS IN THE SPANISH WAR. 

At the outbreak of the Spanish War, profiting by the over- 
sights of officers and remissness of subordinates who were respon- 
sible for keeping the records of military organizations during the 
War of the Rebellion, this Department forwarded to every 
commanding officer of a New York Regiment and Troop a sug- 
gestion to maintain a system of recording events as they occurred 
from time to time. Old soldiei's of the War of the Rebellion will 
recall the indifference of many volunteer commanding officers 
to file reports even in the face of peremptory orders from head- 
quarters. These omissions or faults were conspicuously in evi- 
dence during the last two years of the war by the frequent 
shifting of officers of high rank and because of the constant 
fighting and marching to which the troops were exposed, leaving 
officers responsible for the purely historical record of organiza- 
tions but little time, inclination and material to perform this 
necessary and important work. 

When the last war — with Spain — occurred it was hoped that 
a system would be established by which the true histories of 
the New York organizations that went to the front would be 
compiled in a manner creditable alike to the officers and men 
who participated and suitable for posterity. Acting upon this 



10 Annual Kepoet of the 

idea this office sent to every regimental commander a copy of the 
following communication : 

Dear Sir.^ — By this mail I send you a chapter of the forth- 
coming report of the State Historian on the subject of the cre- 
ation of a recorder for every regiment of New York Volunteers. 
Of course, no provision is made for such an office either by the 
Military Code or by the Hull Military Bill. At the same time, 
if you can see your way clear to have an itinerary prepared by 
some one of your staff, or a diary kept, and to furnish this office 
at the close of the campaign with a copy, you will confer a lasting 
obligation upon yourself, your command and posterity. 

In this way New York State ought to possess the fullest and 
most trustworthy information relative to her brave sons who 
have volunteered. 

Trusting you may see your way clear to cooperate with this 
office, I have the honor to remain. 

Very sincerely yours, 

HUGH HASTINGS, 

State Historian. 

In order to overcome any criticism that might arise from the 
Federal authorities, the following paragraph was added : 

Should your command go into action, if it be not inconsistent 
with army regulations, I would earnestly beg of you to forward 
to this office a copy of the report you make to the War Depart- 
ment ; if it be not regarded as violation of army regulations, will 
you send to this office a statement of the operations of your com- 
mand, in order that future generations may know that the sons 
of New York were present and performed their duty like soldiers? 
During the War of the Eebellion many of the most gallant 
organizations from New York never received just credit because 
of the failure of commanding officers to make reports on engage- 
ments in which their regiments participated. This appeal is 
issued with a view to prevent, if possible, that drawback. 

Subjoined is a copy of the communication which was sent from 
this office to the commander of every organization that was 
formed in the State of New York for service during the Spanish- 
American war: 



State Histoeian. 11 

Sir. — A careful examination of the Official Records of the Re- 
bellion discloses throughout a deplorable absence of detailed 
information necessary to the complete history of the various vol- 
unteer organizations that served throughout the War of the 
Rebellion. This condition of afEaii;s can readily be understood — 
through casualties to officers who kept regimental books, by the 
capture, by death and wounds, and to the capture and destruction 
of trains, army and railway, to the greenness of new officers and 
by the negligence and indifference of commanders of regiments, 
and especially of detachments. The valuable material thus lost, 
so useful in perfecting the historical records of regiments, is 
incalculable. 

With a view of profiting by the errors of our last war, and of 
establishing a system that would obviate in the futuS*e the loss of 
such valuable material, and of insuring the perpetuation of every 
detail of a regiment or detachment in the field, the following 
proposition is submitted for whatever criticism you may see fit 
to make: 

Attached to every regiment shall be a commissioned officer 
who shall be known as the Recorder of the Regiment; who shall 
be under the general authority of the adjutant-general of the 
army ; whose work shall be separate and distinct from that of the 
adjutant of the regiment; who shall be a non-combatant; who 
shall devote himself to preparing and keeping all records involv- 
ing the movements of the regiment or any part thereof while in 
the field; who shall forward direct to the adjutant-general daily, 
or as frequently as events justify, all movements of the regiment 
or detachments thereof, filing the name of the commanding officer 
of the regiment, or of the detachment, with the number of men 
actually engaged, or if a detachment the number carried with 
the detail from every company or troop that constitutes such 
detachment; who, before a regiment or a detachment goes into 
action, shall personally learn the number of men to be engaged, 
and at the close of said action shall compile a list of casualties, 
by companies ; 

He shall have such assistants, who shall also be non-combat- 
ants, as, in the judgment of the adjutant-general, may be neces- 
sary. Upon the termination of any engagement or skirmish, he 
shall formulate a succinct report, without comment or recom- 
mendations, except as to his own department, giving in each 
case the name of the officer in command of the regiment or detach- 
ment, the number of the brigade, division and corps to which the 
regiment or detachment was attached, and the part said regiment 
or detachment took, the said report to be indorsed by the com 
niander of the regiment or detachment. 



12 Annual Repokt of the State Historian. 

The recorders of regiments and their assistants shall be care- 
fully selected men, conspicuous for good penmanship and general 
intelligence,, and shall be held to the strictest accountability for 
accuracy of statement, particularly in the matter of dates, the 
spelling of proper names and of oflficers, men, and geographical 
places. 

With great respect, I have the honor to remain, sir. 
Yours very truly, 
(Signed) HUGH HASTINGS, 

State Historian. 

A number of officers promptly acquiesced in the suggestion and 

made the necessary detail for the purpose. Particular credit 

should be given to Colonel, afterward General, Thomas H. Barber 

of the First Regiment; Colonel Edward E. Hardin, now Major 
Seventh Infantry, U. S. A., Colonel Second New York Volunteers ; 

Colonel, afterwards General, Edward M. Hoffman, Colonel Third 

New York; Colonel Edward Duffy of the Sixty-ninth New York; 

General Francis V. Greene and Colonel Wallace A. Downs of the 

Seventy-first Regiment. The reports prepared under the direction 

of these officers are herewith subjoined. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

HUGH HASTINGS, 

State Historian. 



HISTORY OF FIRST REGIMENT 
NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS 



FIRST REGIMENT NEW YORK 
VOLUNTEERS. 



THOMAS H. BARBER, Colonel Commanding. 

PAGE 

Record 17-30 

Letters in Regard to Duty in N. Y. Harbor 31 

Telegram from General Wesley Merritt 32 

Telegrams from Adjutant-General U. S. A. and General Otis 

in Regard to Duty at Honolulu, H. 1 32-34 

Report of Major Edward Field, Acting Inspector General 

U. S. A 34-37 

Report Civil Sanitary Commission at Honolulu 38-39 

Military Records of Field Officers 39-44 



FIRST REGIMENT, INFANTRY, NEW YORK 
VOLUNTEERS. 

In accordance with section 1, General Orders No. 8, General 
Headquarters, S. N. Y., dated A. G. O. Albany, April 27th, 1898, 
the Commanding Oflftcer of the Third Brigade, N. G., Brigadier 
General Robert Shaw Oliver, ordered to organize 1?wo Regiments 
from organizations of his Brigade, formed one of these two Regi- 
ments of the Tenth, Twelfth and Seventeenth Battalions and the 
44th Sep. Company of his Brigade, and designated it the " First 
Regiment, National Guard, composed of organizations of the 
Third Brigade." The Raiment thus organized consisted then of 
Companies A, B, C and D of the Tenth Battalion, the 5th, 14th, 
16th and 24th Separate Companies of the 12th Battalion, the 3d, 
20th and 33rd Separate Companies of the 17th Battalion and the 
44th Separate Company. It appearing that the 16th Separate 
Company would find it difficult to recruit the required number 
of men, it was relieved and replaced by the 15th Separate 
Company. 

The organizations above named were located at the time : Com- 
panies A, B, C and D, Tenth Battalion, at Albany, the 3rd Sepa- 
rate Company at Oneonta, the 5th Separate Company at New- 
burgh, the 14th Separate Company at Kingston, the 15th Separate 
Company at Poughkeepsie, the 20th Separate Company at Bing- 
hamton, the 24th Separate Company at Middletown, the 33rd 
Separate Company at Walton and the 44th Separate Company at 
Utica. 



18 Annual Eepoet of the 

Upon the recommendation of the Brigade Commander, Greneral 
Oliver, the Grovernor of the State, appointed on April 29th, 1898 : 

General Thomas H. Barber, formerly Inspector General of the 
State, Colonel, and Major Horatio Potter Staopole, Tenth Bat- 
talion, Lieutenant-Colonel of this Regiment. 

Pursuant to Special Orders, Nos. 70 and 72, dated Adjutant- 
General's Ofilce, Albany, April 30th, and May 1st, respectively, 
the organizations of which this regiment is composed left their 
home stations in time to take trains for Camp Black at Hemp- 
stead Plains, Long Island, as follows : 

The 20th Separate Company at 11 p. m. May 1st; the 33rd 
Separate Company at 12.15 a. m. May 2nd; the 24th Separate 
Company at 3 a. m. May 2nd; the 3rd Separate Company at 
3.55 a. m. May 2nd; the 44th Separate Company at 5.30 a. m. 
May 2nd; the 10th Battalion at 8.30 a. m. May 2nd; the 15th 
Separate Company at 9.30 a. m. May 2nd, and the 5th Separate 
Company at 10.45 a. m. May 2nd, 1898. 

At Camp Black the component parts of the regiment received 
regimental company designations as follows : Companies A, B, C 
and D, Tenth Battalion, became corresponding companies of the 
regiment; the 44th Separate Company, Company E; the 33rd 
Separate Company, . Company F; the 3rd Separate Company, 
Company G; the 20th Separate Company, Company H; the 24th 
Separate Company, Company I; the 15th Separate Company, 
Company K; the 5th Separate Company, Company L, and the 
14th Separate Company, Company M. 

The medical examination of the ofScers and enlisted men de- 
veloped the fact that a number of men could not be accepted, and 
others were sent from the home stations of organizations to re- 
place them. 



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GENERAL THOMAS H. BARBER, 
Colonel."First New York Volunteer Infantry. 



BTATB JtllSTORIAN. XV 

The regiment was mustered in the United States service and 
became in accordance with General Orders No. 11, A. G. O., S. 
N. Y., series 1898, the " First Regiment, Infantry, New York 
Vols." May 20th, 1898, and remained at Camp Black until June 
11th, 1898. 

On the 6th of June, Colors were presented to the regiment by 
Mr. Talbot Olyphant, representing the society of " The Sons of 
the Kevolution " in presence of the Command and of a large 
assemblage of citizens. The colors were formally accepted by 
Colonel Barber with appropriate ceremonies. 

Special Orders, No. 122, Headquarters, Department of the Bast, 
dated June 7th, 1898, assigned the regiment to the following 
stations: The Colonel, headquarters and two companies to Fort 
Columbus, New York Harbor ; the Lieut.-Colonel, a Major ajid five 
companies to Fort Hamilton, and a Major and five companies 
to Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island. 

June 11th, the regiment, except Company H, then in measles 
quarantine, left Camp Black at noon, and the Colonel, regimental 
headquarters, Major Scott, Assistant Surgeon Griffith, and Com- 
pany G, proceeded from Long Island City in the Government boat 
" General Meigs " to Fort Columbus. 

Major Emmet and Assistant Surgeon Ashley, and Companies 
A, B, C, D and F went in a government transport to Fort Wads- 
worth, and Lieutenant-Colonel Stacpole, Major Chase, Surgeon 
Davis, Chaplain Schwartz and Companies E, I, K, L and M 
went in a government transport to Fort Hamilton. 

June 15th, Company H joined headquarters at Fort 
Columbus. 



20 Annual Report of theI 

The regiment performed the usual duties incident to occupa- 
tion of garrisons, and received while at these garrisons 301 
recruits. 

July 7th, in accordance with Special Orders, No. 141, Head- 
quarters, Department of the East, dated June 28th, 1898, the 
Colonel with Headquarters and Companies G and H left 
Fort Columbus, Lieutenant-Colonel Stacpole and Companies E, 
I, K, L and M left Fort Hamilton and Major Emmet, with Com- 
panies A, B, O, D and F left Fort Wadsworth and proceeded in 
transports to Jersey City, pier 6, Erie Railroad. At 5 p. m. of 
that day the regiment left Jersey City en route for San Fran- 
cisco, via Erie Railroad, in four sections. The first section con- 
sisted of one Pullman sleeper for the Colonel, Surgeon Davis, the 
Adjutant and Quartermaster, and the offloers of Companies G, H, 
I, K, L and M, nine tourist sleepers occupied by Companies I, K 
and L ; the second section consisted of nine tourist sleepers occu- 
pied by Companies G, H and M, in charge of Lieutenant Decker ; 
the third section consisted of one Pullman sleeper, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Stacpole, Majors Chase, Scott and Emmet, Assistant 
Surgeon Grifflth, Chaplain Schwartz and the oflScers of Com- 
panies A, B, C, D, E and F, and nine tourist sleepers, occupied 
by Companies C, E and F; the fourth section consisted of nine 
tourist cars occupied by Companies A, B and D, under charge of 
Lieutenant Staats, accompanied by Assistant Surgeon Ashley 
The baggage was carried in cars attached to each section. 

July 8 at 10 p. m. to July 9 at 3 a. m. the regiment arrived at 
and left Chicago, 111., the sections having been transferred to the 
Chicago and North Western Railroad. 

July 9th at 6 p. m. to July 10th at 4 a. m. the regiment arrived 
at and left Omaha, Neb., on the Union Pacific Railroad, without 
change of cars. 



State Historian. 21 

July 11th at 1 p. lu. to 10 p. m. the regiment arrived at and left 
Ogden, Utah, on the Southern Pacific Railway. 

July 13th at 3 and 11 a. m. the first and second sections of the 
trains arrived at San Francisco, Cal., and the troops carried in 
them proceeded to Camp Merritt. On the same day the regiment 
was assigned to the First Brigade, Independent Division, Eighth 
Army Corps. 

July 14th, 8 a. m., the third and fourth sections arrived and the 
troops joined these at Camp Merritt. 

July 15th, at 8 a. m., on the representation of Col. Barber to 
the Major-General Commanding, the regiment was moved to the 
Presidio of San Francisco, the change being made owing to the 
bad sanitary condition of its former camping ground. 

July 29th, Colonel Barber, Quartermaster Winthrop and Assist- 
ant Surgeon Griffith sailed from San Francisco on steamer 
" St. Paul " for Honolulu in order to select a camp for the regi- 
ment, assigned for garrison duty at Honolulu, and to choose a 
site for the New Hawaiian Post. They arrived at Honolulu, 
August 6th. 

Colonel Barber was in command of the transport " St. Paul," 
having on board 850 officers and men of South Dakota, Colorado 
and Minnesota troops en route to Manila. 

August 5th, Companies I, K, L, M and C, commanded by Major 
Chase, with Sergeant-Major Burton, Assistant Surgeon Ashley, 
Hospital Steward Hogan, Hospital Corps, Privates Oowles, 
Company H, and Rappe, Company B, left Camp Presidio, Cal., 
and boarded packet " Charles Nelson," bound for Honolulu, and 
sailed August 6th. 

August 14th at 6 p. m. the vessel arrived at Honolulu, and 
August 15th they disembarked and established a temporary camp 
upon the groimds of the race track, Kapiolani Park, about five 
miles from Honolulu. 



22 Annual Rbpoet of the 

August 10th, Adjutant Strevell, Company E, and Second 
Lieutenant Smith and 48 enlisted men of Company D embarked 
on the steamer " Mariposa." The ship left San Francisco harbor 
about 6 a. m., August 11, and arrived at Honolulu about 11 a. m. 
August 17th ; the detachment aboard her disembarked and joined 
the first detachment of Companies at the race track, Kapiolani 
Park. 

August 18th, Chaplain Karl Schwartz, Siurgeon Davis and 
Companies F, G and H, under command of Captain U. A. Fergu- 
son, Company G, boarded the steamship " Alliance " and sailed 
at 4.30 p. m. arriving at Honolulu Harbor 11.30 a. m., and August 
27th Companies F, G and H disembarked and camped upon the 
" Irwin Tract " at the foot of Diamond Head, three or four 
hundred yards from " race track " camp of the first two detach- 
ments. 

August 27th, 11 a. m., United States troopship " Scandia " left 
San Francisco with the remainder of the regiment, consisting of 
headquarters band, Lieutenant-Colonel Stacpole, Major Scott, 
Major Emmet, Companies A, B, and the remainder of Company D, 
and arrived at Honolulu, September 3rd, at 8.30 a. m. The 
troops aboard her left and joined the regiment on the " Irwin 
Tract." August 30th, camp of Companies C..E, I, K, L, M and 
detachment of Company D, removed from race track grounds 
to " Irwin Tract," upon which Companies F, G and H were 
already encamped. This camp was named " Camp McKinley." 

The camp site was chosen by a Board convened for the purpose, 
consisting of officers of the 1st Regiment, New York Volun- 
teers, and of the 2nd Regiment, Volunteer Engineers, 
and approved by Colonel Barber. It was near the only 
Ocean bathing beach on the Island and the reported site 



State Historian. 23 

of a proposed Sanitarium selected by the resident physicians 
and in the immediate vicinity of the best residential quarter of 
the Island. In addition it had shade in the Park, a drill and 
parade ground on the race course, city water, and was accessible. 

On the 12th of August, Colonel Barber, accompanied by Lieut. 
Bronson Winthrop, 1st Lieut, and Surgeon L. T. GriflSth, both 
of the 1st New York Volunteers, and Major William C. Langfitt, 
2nd Regiment, Volunteer Engineers, represented the Army at the 
Annexation ceremonies of transfer of the Hawaiian Islands to 
the United States. 

On the 28th of August Major-General Henry C. Merriam and 
Brigadier-General Charles King arrived at Honolulu on the 
" Arizona." On the 2nd of September General King was by 
virtue of his rank placed in command of the District of Hawaii 
by General Merriam. He was relieved on the 28th of October 
when Colonel Barber again assumed command. 

Owing to the prevalence of malarial and typhoid fever in the 
command, it was deemed advisable to move the regiment to a 
camp more remote from the unsanitary conditions of and in the 
immediate vicinity of Honolulu, accordingly Company E was, 
on October 22nd, moved to Waielae, on the north side of 
" Diamond Head," about seven miles from Honolulu and three 
miles from " Camp MoKinley." Company H was moved 
October 27th and Companies A, B, C, D, P, G, I and L about 
November 4th; Companies K and M on November 8th sailed to 
" Hilo," Island of Hawaii, and from there made a march to the 
Volcano of "Kilauea" and returned to "Camp McKinley" Nov. 
27th; Company H started on a practice march October 5th 
around the Island of " Oahu " returning to " Camp McKinley " 
October 15th, having marched 92 miles. 



24 Annual Rbpoet of the 

The regiment was inspected in the end of November by Major 
Edward Field, 3rd Artillery, Acting Inspector General, Depart- 
ment of California. (Extracts from Major Field's Inspection 
report will be found at the end of this report.) 

The regiment having been ordered to San Francisco per Special 
Orders No. 201, Headquarters Department of California, Colonel 
Barber, Lieutenant Colonel Stacpole, Major Scott, Lieutenant 
Strevell, Eegimental Adjutant, Lieutenant Winthrop, Regimental 
Quartermaster and Companies A, B, D, I and L embarked for 
San Francisco on the mail steamer "Australia " November 30th, 
arrived at San Francisco December 6th and camped at the 
Presidio. Major Emmet with Companies C, E, F and G em- 
barked on mail steamer "Alameda" December 7th, arrived at 
San Francisco December 14th and camped at the Presidio. 

Major Sague with Companies H, K and M embarked on U. S. 
hospital ship " Scandia " December 10th, arrived at San Fran- 
cisco December 18th. 

On December 15th, orders having been received directing the 
regiment to return to its home station and there await muster 
out of the Federal service. Colonel Barber, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Stacpole, Major Emmet, Adjutant Strevell, Quartermaster Win- 
throp and Assistant Surgeon Griffith with Companies A B D 
and L left for New York, arriving December 22nd. 

December 19th Major Scott with Companies C, E F and G 
left for home station, arriving December 26th. December 20th 
Major Sague with Companies H, K and M left San Francisco and 
arrived at home station on December 27th. 

Officers and men were given leave of absence and furlough till 
February 26th, 1899, when the regiment was finally mustered out 
of the service of the United States. 




Lieut.-Col. Walter Scott. Major Robert t. Emmet. 

Lieut.-Col. Horatio;p. Staopole. 
Major James T. Chase. Major John K. Sague. 

FIELD OFFICERS FIRST REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.: 



State Historian. 25 

COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 
At date of Muster Out of Regiment. 

FIELD AND STAFF. 

Colonel, Horatio Potter Stacpole. 
Lieutenant-Colonel, Walter Scott. 
Major, Robert Temple Emmet. 
Major, John K. Sague. 
Regimental Adjutant, Clarence Strevell. 
Regimental Quartermaster, Bronson Winthrop. 
Surgeon, Lewis Theopliilus Griffith. 
Assistant Surgeon, Maurice Cavileer Ashley. 
Chaplain, Karl Schwartz. 

COMPANY' A. 

Captain, Frank R. Palmer. 
1st Lieut., Adrian W. Mather. 
2nd Lieut., Howard U. McMillan. 

CO.MPANY B. 

Captain, William D. Mansou. 
1st Lieut., Harry C. Staats. 
2nd Lieut., Edward H. Burton. 

COMPANY C. 

Captain, James E. Roach. 

1st Jjieut., Christopher Gresham. 

2nd Lieut, Edward Oliver. 

COMPANY D. 

Captain, William B. Gracie. 

1st Lieut., William F. Wheelock (acting battalion adjutant). 

2nd Lieut., James E. Smith. 



26 Annual Report of the 

company e. 
Captain, Arthur W. Pickard. 
1st lieoit., Franklin T. Wood. 

2nd Lieut., James E. Goodale (afterwards A. D. C. to Gen. 
Clias. King). 

COMPANY F. 

Captain, James 0. Martin. 
1st. Lieut., Charles H. Boice. 
2nd Lieut., Arthur E. Oothoudt. 

COMPANY G. 

Captain, Ursil A. Ferguson. 
1st Lieut., Hei'man A. Tucker. 
2nd Lieut., Fred W. Boardman. 

COMPANY H. 

(^a plain, Charles H. Hitchcock. 
1st Lieut., Harry P. Worthing. 
2nd Lieut., Charles N. Hinman. 

COMPANY I. 

Captain, Amos E. Mclntyre.' 
1st Lieut., Abraham L. Decker. 
2nd Lieut., Albert E. Nickinson, 

COMPANY K. 

Captain, Wilbur Vossler. 
1st. Lieut., Clarence Sague. 
2nd Lieut., Lucius J. Slater. 

COMPANY L. 

Captain, James F. Sheehan. 

1st Lieut., Alexander G. Baxter. 

2nd Lieut., William H. Mapes (acting battalion adjutant). 



State Historian. 27 

company m. 
Captain Kobert F. Tompkins. 
1st Lient., John A. Huhne. 
2nd Lieut., Joseph M. Fowler. 

Resigned Prior 1o Muster Out of Regiment. 

Major James T. Chase, October 21st. 1898. 
Major Chas. E. Davis. Surgeon, December, 1898. 
Captain Charles B. Staats, September 12th, 1898. 
First Lieutenant David Terry, September 30th, 18^. 
Second, Lieutenant George E. Wallace, September 30th, 1898. 

Transferred Prior to Muster Out of Regiment. 

Captain Ivewis E. Goodier, promoted Major, 203 New York 
Vols., July 7th, 1898. 

Captain George D. Ramsey, Asst. Surgeon, promoted to be 
Surgeon of 69th \J. S. Vols., ifay 16th, 1898. 

First Sergeant Edward T. Newcomb, Co. A, promoted 2nd 
Lieutenant, 203 N. Y. Vols., July 7, 1898. 

Private J. J. Callanan, (^o. A, promoted 2nd Lieutenant, 203 
N. Y. Vols., August 8, 189S. 

Corporal M. J. Reagan, Co. B,-^i«omoted 2nd Lieutenant, 202 
N. Y. Vols., July 20th, 1898. 

Battalion Adjutant Frank B. Edwards discharged, as super- 
numerary to organization, July 6th, 1898. 

Promoted Prior to Muster Out of Regiment. 

Colonel Barber to be Brigadier General U. S. Vols., Feb. 6, 1899. 
Lieut.-Col. Stacpole to be Colonel 1st N. Y. Vols., Feb. 7, 1899. 
Major Scott to be Lient.-Col. 1st N. Y. Vols., Feb. 7, 1899. 



28 Annual Rbpoet ov the 

Capt. Sague to be Major let N. Y. \'ols., Oct. 22, 1898, vice 
Chase i-esigned. 
1st Lieut. Strevell to be Regimental Adjutant May 24, 1898. 
1st Lieut. Manson to be Captain Co. B, Dec. 8, 1898, vice 
Staats resigned. 

2nd Lieut. Staats to be 1st Lieut. Co. B, Dec. 8, 1898, vice 
Manson promoted. 

Sergt. Maj. Burton to be 2nd Lieut. Co. B, De? S, L8:)S, vice 
Staats promoted. 

1st Lieut. Pickard to be Captain Co. E, July 7, 1898, vice 
Goodier transferred. 

2nd Lieut. Wood to be 1st Lieut. Co. E, July 7, 1898, vice 
Pickard promoted. 

Sergt.-Maj. Goodale to be 2nd Lieut. Co. E, July 7, 1898, vice 
Wood promoted. 

2nd Lieut. Decker to be 1st Lieut. Co. I, Sept. 30, 1898, vice 
Wallace resigned. 

Sergt. Nickinson to be 2nd Lieut. Co. I, Sept. 30, 1898, vice 
Decker promoted. 

1st Lieut. Vossler to be Captain Co. K, Dec. 6, 1898, vice 
irague promoted. 

2nd Lieut. Sague to be 1st Lieut. Co. K, Dec. 6, 1898, vice 
Vossler promoted. 

1st Sergt. Slater to be 2ud Lieut. Co. K, Dec. 6, 1898, vice 
Sague promoted. 

2nd Lieut. Huhne to be 1st Lieut. Co. M, Oct. 12, 1898, vice 
Terry resigned. 

1st Sergt. Fowler to be 2ud Lieut. Co. M, Jan. 31, 1899, vice 
Huhne promoted. 




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State Historian. 29 

ENLISTED MEN WHO DIED IN THE SERVICE. 
Taken from Muster Out Rolls. 

COMPANY A. 

Private Webster McCarty, October 26th, 1898, of typhoid 
fever. Camp McKinley, H. I. 

Private Thomas F. Lennou, November 3, 1898, of typhoid 
fever, Camp McKinley, H. I. 

Private Carlton W. Taylor, Feb. 17, 1899, of typhoid fever, 
Presidio, Cal. 

COMPANY B. 

Private Edward A. Bailey, Nov. 26, 1898, of typhoid fever, 
Eonolulu, H. I. 

COMPANY C. 

Sergeant William Goodrich, Oct. 30, 1898, of disease, 
Eonolulu, H. I. 

Private Robert Wanda, Nov. 14, 1898, of disease, Hono- 
ulu, H. I. 

COMPANY D. 

Private James H. Sawyer, Dec. 11, 1898, of disease, 
Ubany, N. Y. 

COMPANY K. 

Private James H. Bead, Jr., of double pneumonia, August 
I, 1898, Presidio, Cal. 

Private Oscar E. Wheeler, Nov. 6, 1898, of typhoid fever, 
lonolulu, H. I. 

COMPANY p. 

Private Bui-ton M. Beardslee, Nov. 26, 1898, of typhoid 
jver, Honolulu, H. I. 

COMPANY G. 

Private Charles F. Carter, Oct. 30, 1898, of typhoid 
;ver, Honolulu, H. I. 



30 Annual Kkport or the 

Private Burton ^^'oodbeck, Nov. 11, 1898, of typhoid 
fever, Honolulu, H. I. 

Private John V. Springsteen, Dec. 4, 1898, of typhoid 
fever, Honolulu, H. 1. 

Private George L. Peet, January 9, 1901, of typhoid fever, 
Fort Logan, Col. 

COMPANY H. 

Private Charles H. Thompson, Oct. 15, 1898, Camp 
McKinley, H. I. 

Private Clarence H. Porter, Oct. 2, 1898, Camp McKin- 
ley, H. I. 

Private George H. Cowles, Nov. 12, 1898, Honolulu, H. I. 

Private Albert Glasby, Nov. 21, 1898, Honolulu, H. I. 

COMPANY I. 

Private Alfred C. Waller, Nov. 26, 1898, disease, Hono- 
lulu, H. I. 

COMPANY K. 

Private Fred Wardell, Nov. 30, 1898, carbolic acid poison- 
ing, Honolulu, H. I. 

COMPANY L. 

Private Hudson B. Moore, Dec. 23, 1898, typhoid fever, 
Honolulu, H. I. 

COMPANY M. 

Private George Van Keuren, Nov. 4, 1898, disease, H. I. 

Private Granville L. Wells, Dec. 1, 1898, disease, Hono- 
lulu, H. I. 

Sergeant Walter E. Van Gaasbeek, Dec. 20, 1898, disease, 
Hilo, H. I. 

Corporal Herbert A. Oi'ouch, May 30, 1898, disease, Camp 
Black, N. Y. 




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State Historian. si 

OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO THE 

REGIMENT. 
The following is a copy of the correspondence in respect to the 
assignment of the regiment to the Forts in New York Harbor. 

Governors Island, New York, 
May 27, 1898. 

My dear Colonel. — In regard to station of your regiment, 
there is at present some uncertainty, as General Frank has not 
fully determined the allotment of Infantry supports to the forti- 
fications in this Harbor but from conversations with him I am of 
opinion he would be pleased to have the Headquarters and two 
or three companies of your regiment garrison Governors Island, 
sending tlie battery now there to man the guns at some other 
point and divide the remainder of your regiment between Hamil- 
ton and Wadsworth. The supports in contemplation for these 
points would just about require youi- command. This would 
give you command of this important post, command of your 
regiment for its administration and supervision of drill and in- 
structions and to my mind is the nearest approach in sight to 
keep your command intact as you desire and it promises more 
permanence than anything else in view. If this would suit you, 
I suggest that you see the General and I think it wiU be gratify- 
ing to him to so arrange it. 

With kind regards, very truly yours, 

M. BARBER, 

(Colonel and Asst. Adjt. General, U, S. A.) 

To Col. T. H. Barber, 

1st. N. Y. Vol. Inf. 

Camp Black, Hempstead, Ix)ng Island, 
New York, May 28, 1898. 

My dear Colonel. — Thank you very much for your letter. My 
first wish is to take part in any active operations and secondly 
to keep my regiment together or as nearly so, as practicable. 

I do not want to take any station where my chances for activity 
will be eliminated. I believe that I will be as near any point of 
debarkation in New Y'ork Harbor as I would be in Chickamauga 



32 Annual Report of the 

or Washington (Camp Alger). I would be glad to go to Gov- 
ernors Island and especially to be with General Frank. 

Will you kindly show this letter to the General and I will let 
the matter rest. I am, yours very truly, 

T. H. Barber. 
To Colonel Merritt Barber, U. S. A. 



TELEGRAMS RELATING TO FIELD SERVICE. 

In respect to the assignment of the Regiment to the Hawaiian 
Islands the following telegrams are of interest: 

COPY. 

June 29th, 1898. 

Received at Governor's Island, N. Y. Dated San Francisco, 
Cal. 29. 

To. Col. Thos. H. Barber, Ist N. Y. Vols., 

Governor's Island, N. Y. 
Have just sent telegram to Adjt. Genl., Washington, recom- 
mending you for Brigadier General and asking your assignment 
to my command. 

WESLEY MERRITT, Maj. Genl. 



Washington, I). C, July 11th, 1898. 
Major General Otis, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

If you should find that the First New York is not suitable for 
service in Honolulu and Colonel Barber would prefer to go to the 
Phillipines, the Secretary of War says you can then select the 
(Jalifornia Regiment. It was desired to send the First New York 
for the reason that Colonel Barber was an educated soldier, and 
a man of such character and ability as commended him for this 
delicate and important duty. It is desired you confer with him 
before making final selection. 

By order Secretary War. 

H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant General. 



State Historian. 33 

San Francisco, Gal., 

July 13, 1898. 
Adjutant General, U. S. Army, 
Washington, D. C. 

Colonel Barber's regiment fully equipped except in the matter 
of light clothing which can be obtained hei*e. He desires to go 
to Honolulu provided it does not prejudice his chances of going 
to the Phillipiues ultimately. Have contracted for transpor- 
tation and one half of regiment can be embarked this month 
remaining early in August. Shall this regiment be sent 

(Signed) OTIS, 

Major General U. S. Volunteers, 
Commanding. 



Washington, I). C, July 13, 1898. 
Major General Otis, 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Youi- telegram of this date asking if the First New York shall 
be sent to Honolulu received : and the answer is in the afiBrmative. 
Yoifr action in contracting for transportation and one half regi- 
ment embarked this month, rejuaining, early in August, is also 
approved. It is further remarked that Colonel Barber's station 
at Honolulu will not prejudice his chances in going to the Phil- 
lipines later on. May have to remain some three or four months 
however. 

By order of the Secretary of War. 

H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant General. 



Washington, D. C, July 14, 1898. 
Major General E. S. Otis, 

San Francisco, Calif. 

It is reported here that Colonel Barber objects to going to 
Honolulu. If this is true you will designate another regiment. 
It is the desire of this department to meet Colonel Barber's 
wishes as far as consistent with the interests of the service. 

H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant General. 
True copies, Thomas H. Barry, A. A. V. 



34 Annual BEroET op the 

Copy of telegram. 

San Francisco, California, July 14, 1898. 

Adjutant General, U. S. Army, 

Washington, D. C. 

Colonel Barber is a good soldier and says he cannot object to 
any service which Government assigns. He is preparing his 
regiment for Honolulu and will doubtless sail with a portion 
of it in a very few days. 

(Signed) OTIS, Major General, U. S. Vols., 
Commanding. 

REPORT OP MAJOR EDWARD FIELD, U. S. A. 

copr. 
Subject : 4157. I. G. O. 

All official communications to this oifice should be addressed 
" To the Inspector General, 

U. S. Army, Washington, D. C." 

War Department, Inspector General's Office, ■ 

Washington, March 1, 1899. 
Commanding Officer, 

1st New York Vol. Infantry, 
New York City. 

Sir. — The following extracts from the report of an inspection 
of the Post of Honolulu, H. I., made November 21st, to December 
2, 1898, by Major Edward Field, Acting Inspector General, De- 
partment of California, are furnished for your information. 

Very respectfully, 

THOS. T. KNOX, Acting Inspector General. 

REVIEW .\ND INSPECTION. 
" Ten companies of the 1st New York Volunteer Infantry were 
reviewed at their camp on Waielae Beach, in light marching 
order, formed in two battalions. The passage in review was the 
best of any volunteer regiment I have seen since the war began 
and I have seen nearly all the regiments that passed through 



State Historian. 35 

California. Salutes excellent, dress almost perfect, rear ranks 
strictly closed up. 

" Militarj' appearance and bearing very fine, active, clean 
built, well set up for volunteers. 

" The arms and equipments were, considering their age, in 
really wonderful condition. I inspected them quite minutely and 
did not find a poor musket in the ten companies. Many of them 
were faultless and almost all in first class condition. This of 
course refers to their care. 

" The uniforms were, considering their wear, well cared for 
and generally well fitting. Helts, brasses and scabbards were in 
the same uniformly smart condition, many of' them up to our 
orderly standard. 

DRILLS, EXERCISES, ETC. 

" The First New York Volunteer Infantry were drilled in regi- 
mental, battalion, company drills, bayonet exercise, individual 
drill and extended order. They show tlie same excellence in 
drill as they did at review and inspection. 

" Their ofiScers are all thoroughly up in their duties. The Cap- 
tains can drill the regiment, Second Lieutenant can driU the bat- 
talion. I regretted that the limited ground did not give more 
scope for the regimental drill in which I imagine this regiment 
is the equal of any volunteer organization that has been raised. 
Battalion and company drills were equally good. 

" The volley firing was excellent. 

POLICE. 

" The camp was scrupulously clean and all approaches and 
surroundings thoroughly policed. 



36 Annual Report of the 

behavior. 
" The behavior and general appearance of officers and men 
during the stay of the Inspector at the post was commendable. 

INSTRUCTION. 

" This command has been unusually well instructed in drills 
and tactics, probably as well as any volunteer organization in 
the service. 

"All the companies are exceptionally well up in tactics and are 
composed of intelligent and willing men, many of them educated 
and representing an excellent class in the communities where 
they were raised". 

" They would make excellent field soldiers. They are young, 
intelligent, spirited, patriotic, especially well drilled and some 
who have served in the National Guard, excellent shots. 

COPY. 

Subject: 4157. I. G. O. 

All official communications to this office should be addressed 
" To the Inspector General, 

U. S. Army, Washington, D. C." 

War Department, Inspector General's Office, 

Washington, March 1, 1899. 
Col. T. H. Barber, 

First N. Y. Vol. Inf., 

]S^ew York City. 

Sir. — The following extract from the report of an inspector of 
the Post of Honolulu, H. I., made iS^ovember 21st, to Dec. 2, 1898, 
by Major Edward Field, Acting Inspector General, Department 
of California, is furnished for your information. 
Very I'espectfully, 

THOS. T. KNOX, 

Acting Inspector General. 



State Historian. 37 

" Colonel Barber has boeu an excellent commander under the 
most trying circumstances and has been the victim of much un- 
deserved attack. He is devoted to his men, untiring in trying to 
further their welfare and interests, of good judgment and the 
most sterling integrity. Aluch of the abuse to which he has been 
subjected is the result of a systematic attempt on the part of the 
local board of health and that part of tlie press controlled by 
them to maintain the position that Honolulu is normally healthy 
and free from typhoid and malarial fevers in face of the facts 
that there is not a sewer in the town, all drainage beii% by cess- 
pool, that the climate is practically tropical, that the town is 
mostly low and is surrounded by a perfect network of wet ditches, 
rice, banana and taro plantations, and that Kapiolani Park, on 
the edge of the town, is intersected in every direction by canals 
which are simply big ditches. To maintain this improbable 
thesis the army and army administration have been persistently 
and venomously attacked to show that all sickness is due to 
neglect on their part." 

Extract from report of Major E. Field, Acting Inspector, 
General Department of California: 

" Chaplain Schwartz, First New rork Volunteer Infantry, was 
on duty in the Post Hospital, where his services have been most 
valuable. He is highly spoken of by every one, offlcers and men, 
and instead of being the fifth wheel that a Volunteer Chaplain 
usually is, has been doing excellent work on behalf of humanity." 

For the five months preceding the arrival of the regiment in 
Honolulu and shortly thereafter, viz. : from May 1st, to Oct. 2nd, 
the Eegiment had lost two men, one at Camp Black and one at 
San Francisco. 



38 Annual Ebport of the 

At a special meeting of tlie Board of Health of Honolulu held 
Friday, Dec. 29th, 1899,- the report of the Civil Sanitary Com- 
mission was read, accepted and the recommendations of the three 
commissioners adopted. The following extracts will account for 
the illness among the regular and volunteer troops contracted 
at Honolulu during the preceding year, 1898. President Dole 
of the Hawaiian Islands, Minister Mott-Smith, Minister Young, 
etc., were reported present with the Board during the meeting. 

" We are not surprised at the indignation expressed when a 
citizen finds he is living* in a community where fresh meat is 
exposed for sale in shops within a few feet of which are cess- 
pools reeking with fllth and vermin, from which come clouds of 
flies; where restaurants have cess-pools with no other covering 
than the kitchen floors, into which cockroaches crowd by the 
thousand after a night of foraging over tables and dishes; where 
poultry is kept huddled for weeks in small coops one above the 
other; where poi is manufactured and sold in shops sour with 
fermented slime; where kitchens are built next to foul smelling 
privies, and so arranged that a ray of light never enters them; 
where sinks are maintained with long, leaking drains ; where cess- 
pools and privy vaults are crowded together or combined and left 
unopened year after year to saturate the ground with filth and 
germs ; where cess-pools are often without ventilation of any kind 
excepting the crevices of the floors above or perhaps a rickety 
wooden vent ending within two feet of a sleeping apartment 
window, which is overcrowded at night with occupants, and 
where the ground is often without drainage, so that the seepage 
from the surroundings accumulates and becomes stagnant. 

" Nothing should be forced to the front in the discussion of 
projier sanitation of this city more vigorously than the water 




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STATE JilSTOaiAN. SW 

supply. With a system of reservoirs collecting its surface water 
for distribution to our houses, there is now absolutely no atten- 
tion jiaid to the purifying of the water before it reaches the 
consumer." 

" Whereas the increase of typhoid fever and other febrile dis- 
eases offers a dangerously favorable ground for such further 
spreading which is and, unless counteracted, will continue to be 
a menace to the lives of our people, etc., etc." 

MILITARY RECORD 

Of Thomas H. Barber, First Lieutenant, First Artillery, U. B. 
A.; Colonel 12th Regt., N. G. N. Y. ; Inspector, General, with the 
rank of Brigadier General, National Guard, New York; Colonel 
First K. Y. Volunteer Infantry and Brigadier General, U. S. V., 
taken from oflicial sources in the Adjutant General's oflfice, Wash- 
ington, D. C, and Adjutant General's office, Albany, N. Y. 

Cadet at U. S. Militai-y Academy from July 1st, 1863, to 
June 17th, 1867. Graduated and promoted in the Army to 2nd 
Lieutenant, First Artillery, June 17th, 1867. Appointed from 
First Congressional District, New York. On graduation leave 
of absence June 17th, to September 30th, 1867. 

Served in Garrison at Fort Hamilton, N. Y. H., Oct. 1st, 1867, 
to February, 1870. 

Served as Post School Teacher for non-commi,ssioned officers 
and privates. On duty with Company at suppression of illicit 
distilleries in Brooklyn, N. Y. Acting Post Adjutant and in 
addition served on Courts-Martial, Boai'ds of Survey and in all 
other capacities incident to garrison duty. At the Military 
Academy at West Point, as Assistant Professor of the French 
language, February 28th, 1870, to January 17th, 1873, and prin- 



40 Annual Report of the 

cipal Assistant Professor July 10th, 1872, to August 21st, 1876. 
Promoted 1st Lieutenant 1st Artillery, July 10th, 1872. 

Spent summer leave of 1872, granted officers on duty in 
Academic Department, U. S. Military Academy, in Europe. 
Traveled in Ireland, England, ITrance, Belgium, Holland, 
Germany and Switzerland. From August 28th, 1874, to April 
30th, 1875; in charge of the Department of French during the 
absence of the Professor of the Fi-ench Language in Europe. 

On Signal duty at Fort Whipple, .Va., from Sept. 4th, 1876, to 
June 21st, 1878. 

Special Orders 134, par. 2, A. G. O., Appointed Instructor of 
Signalling, etc., at Fort Whipple, Va., January 17th, 1878. 
Special Orders No. 8, War Department, Office of the Chief Signal 
Officer, Washington. Eelieved from duty as Instructor by 
Special Orders Xo. 84, War Department, Office of the Chief 
Signal Officer, Washington, June 17th, 1878. On duty with Com- 
pany at Fort Adams, E. I., until May 1st, 1880. Detailed during 
summer of 1879 to make surveys of certain government military 
reservations in Newport Harbor, R. I. On year's leave of absence 
in Europe extended one month. Special Orders 12, A. G. O., Jan- 
uary 17th, 1880, I. O. 79, April 7th, 1881. 

Traveled extensively in England, Scotland, Prance, Spain, 
Italy, Germany and Switzerland. 

Returned to duty with Company at Fort Adains, R. I. 

Directed to report in person for special duty at Yorktown, 
Va., Special Order 42, par. 3, Division of the Atlantic, Sept. 
22nd, 1.881. 

Detailed as Aide-de-Camp to Major-General W. S. Hancock, 
General Orders 11, Div. of the Atlantic, Oct. 22nd, 1881, York- 
town, Va. 



State Historian. 41 

Endorsement of Major-General Winfleld Scott Hancock on 
letter of resignation: 

" Lieutenant Barber has proved to be an intelligent and 
accomplished staff officer of an exceptional class, and one diffl- 
cult to be replaced. He was recommended to me by his superior 
officers for the excellent reputation he bore as a line officer and 
was in consequence appointed to the position of A. D. 0. on my 
staff." 

Detailed as Acting Assistant Quartermaster and Acting Oom- 
missary of Subsistence at Fort Columbus, N. Y. H., by Special 
Orders No. 15, dated Headquarters Military Division of the 
Atlantic, Governor's Island, N. Y. H., April 6th, 1882. 

Relieved as Acting Asst. Quartermaster and Acting Commis- 
sary of Subsistence by Special Orders No. 18, Head- 
quarters Military Division of the Atlantic, dated Gover- 
nor's Island, N. Y. H., May 1st, 1882. While on leave 
of absence during the summer of 1883, accompanied the 
Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology of the 
.U. S. Military Academy on a geological examination of the 
Big Horn and Shoshone Mountains and Yellowstone Park, es- 
corted by a cavalry detachment with pack train. During various 
leaves of absence traveled in (he Dominion of Canada, British 
Columbia and in all the States and Territories of the United 
States, except Alaska and Idaho. Resigned July 1st, 1885. 

National Guard service. State of New York: Lieutenant- 
Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General 1st Brigade, Nov. 30th, 
1886; resigned and honorably discharged Oct. 5th, 1887; Colonel 
12th Regiment, Dec. 31st, 1888 ; Brigadier-General and Inspector- 
General, Sept. 12th, 1889. 



42 Annual Report of the 

Offered re-appointmeiit as Inspector-General by Governor 
Flower, Nov. 30th, 1891. Declined the appointment. 

April 29th, 1898, appointed Colonel, 1st N. Y. Vols, during war 
with Spain. 

Resigned, February 6, 1899, as Colonel, on acceptance of com- 
mission of Brigadier General, TJ. S. V. 

Appointed Brigadier General, U. S. Vols., January 10th, 1899. 

Mustered out February 28th, 1899. 

SUMMARY. 

Four yeai-s a cadet at the United States Military Academy. 
Eighteen years a commissioned officer in the 1st Artillery, United 
States Army. Thi*ee years and ten months and six days in the 
National Guard, State of New York. Nine months and eight 
days U. S. Volunteers service. Total service 26 years, 7 months 
and 14 days. 

LlEU'lENANT-CoLONEL HORATIO Po rTBR StACPOLE, ApRIL 29, 1898. 

In I'nited States Service. — Lieutenant-Colonel, 1st Regt., N. Y; 
Vols., May 20, 1898. Colonel Feby. 6, 1899, to Feby. 26, 1899. 

In State Service.— Private, Co. B, 10th Regt, May 6, 1867; 
Corporal, March 9, 1868; Quartermaster-Sergeant, March 23, 
1869; First Sergeant, April 16, 1870; Adjutant, 10th Regt, Dec. 
16, 1871; resigned, Feb. 20, 1873; First Lieutenant, Co. B, 
iOth Regt., Feb. 28, I87(i; Captain, Dec. 19, 1877; Brevet Major, 
Dec. 31, 1881; Major 10th Battalion, June 20, 1891; Lieutenant- 
Colonel, 1st Regt., April 29, 1898; resigned to return to 10th 
Battalion as Major, Feb. 24, 1899. Resigned, September 11, 
1899. Died, June 3, 1901. 



State Historian. 43 

Major James T. Chase, March 29, 1898. 

In United States Service.— Sergeant, Co. D, 19tli Militia; 
mustered in U. S. Service, May 26, 1862, for three montlis; dis- 
charged, Sept. 6, 1862; First Lieutenant, Co. G, 168th IS'. Y. Vols. 
(19th Militia), Jan. 12, 1863, nine months ;, mustered out, Oct. 
31, 1863; Private, Co. A, 56th N. Y. Vols., Feb. 23, 1865; honor- 
ably discharged, Oct 17, 1865; Major, 1st. Eegt., N. Y. Vols., May 
20, 1898, to Oct. 21, 1898. 

In State Service.— Private, Co. D, 19th N. Y. S. Militia, 
Sept. 22, 1858; Sergeant, May 26, 1862; First Lieutenant, March 

28, 1866; Captain, Feb. 12, 18C8; discharged by disbandment. 
May 9, 1878; Adjutant, 17th Battalion, Oct. 10, 1878; Captain, 
Co. A, March 17, 1881, which company became the Fifth 
Separale Company, Jan. 1, 1882; Major, 12th Battalion, March 

29, 1898. Retired, March 9, 1899. 

Majoe Walter Scott, April 1, 1898. 

In United States Service. — Major, 1st Regt., N. Y. Vols., May 
20, 1898; Lieutenant-Colonel, February 6, 1899, to February 
26, 1899. 

In State Service. — Private, Third Separate Company, Dec. 29, 
1880; Second Lieutenant, Aug. 1, 1881; First Lieutenant, Jan. 
25, 1886; Captain, Sept. 28, 1886; Major, 17 Battalion, April 
1, 1898. Retired, March 9, 1899. 

2693 (Born N. Y.) Robert T. Emmet (Ap'd at Large) 53 
Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, Sep. 1, 
1873, to June 14, 1877, when he was graduated and promoted in 
the Army to Second Lieut., 9th Cavalry, June 15, 1877. 



44 Annual Repokt ov the 

Served: on leave of absence and awaiting orders, June 15, to 
Dec. 26, 1877; on frontier duty at Ojo Caliente, N. M., Dec. 26, 
1877, to Mar. 18, 187S,— on Ute Expedition, to Sep. 10, 1878,— 
at Ft. Union, N. M., and commanding Indian Scouts in the field, 
to Feb. 10, 1881, being engaged in Fights with Apache Indians, 
Sep. 18 and 29, 1879, and Apr. 12, 1880, —Acting Engineer Officer 
of District of New Mexico, Mar. 5 to Oct. 26, 1881,— and in Chief 
Engineer's OflSce, Department of the Missouri, to Nov. 21, 1881; 
on leave of absence, to Jan. 7, 1882; as Aide-de-Camp to Major- 
General Pope, Jan. 7, 1882, to Oct. 21, 1885; on frontier duty 
(First Lieutenant, 9th Cavalry, Jan. 20, 1883 at Ft. Niobrara, 
Neb. (leave of absence. May 20, to Sep. 23, 1887, and Dec. 20, 
1887, to Feb. 21, 1888), to Mar. 22, 1889; and on recruiting Ser- 
vice. Resigned, April 6th, 1891. 

Awarded Medal of Honor for distiug-uished gallantry in fight 
with hostile Indians at Las Animsis Canon, N. M., Sept. 18th, 
1879. 

Volunteer Service. — First Lieutenant and Regimental Adju- 
tant, 1st Regt., N. Y. Vols., May 20th, 1898; Major, May 24th, 
1898, to Feb. 26th, 1899. 

Major J. K. Sague. 
Enlisted private, 15th Separate Company, June 1st, 1899; Cor- 
poral, March 24th, 1890; Sergeant, Jany. 18th, 1893; 2nd Lieu- 
tenant, Jmly 2nd, 1894; 1st liieuteuant, March 17th, 1896; 
Captain, May 5th, 1896; Capt. Co. K, 1st N. Y. Vols., May 20th, 
1898; Major, 1st Regiment, N. Y. Vols., Feb. 19th, 1899. Mustered 
out, Feb. 22nd, 1899. 



OTATB rLlBTUKlAM. %0 

HISTORY OF THE SECOJJD REGIMENT, NEW YORK 

VOLUNTEERS. 

On the 2d of May, 189S, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and 
Fifteenth Battalions of the Third Brigade of the National Guard 
of the State of New York, pui-suaut to orders received from the 
Adjutant-General's ofiice, proceeded, with such of their enlisted 
men as were willing to serve for two years in the Volunteer 
Army of the United States, from their home stations to Hemp- 
stead I'lains, where a camp of mobilization was to be established. 
These battalions were to be formed into a raiment to be known 
as the Second New York Volunteers, under command of Captain 
E. E. Hardin of the Seventh United States Infantry, who was to 
receive a commission as Colonel of Volunteers. Major James H. 
Lloyd of the Thirteenth Battalion was designated as Lieutenant- 
Colonel. 

Each battalion proceeded by a special train to its destination 
and all arrived between three and five o'clock. Camp was laid 
out by the Engineer and as soon as the lines were given, the 
tents sprang up like a mushroom growth; This camp was named 
" Camp Black " in honor of the Governor of the State. 

Colonel Hardin joined the Regiment and assumed command 
on the 3d of May, and the work of preparation for muster was 
immediately undertalien. Dr. Henry C. Baum of the Forty- 
first Separate Company of Syracuse was mustered in and as- 
signed to the Regiment as Assistant Sui'geon on the 5th. Major 
Lewis Balch, Acting Assistant Surgeon-General, State of New 
York, who had been absent on leave since the arrival of the 
Regiment, returned on the 5th and was mustered in pn the 6th as 
Surgeon. 



46 Annual Report of tSU 

The Surgeon, assisted by Dr. Albert F. Brugraan of the Second 
Battery, N. G.,' N. Y., who was subsequently assigned to the 
Regiment as Assistant Surgeon and mustered in on the 16th inst., 
immediately commenoed the work of physically examining the 
men of the Regiment. From four to twenty-two men were 
thrown out of each company. Their places were filled by recruits 
sent from the home station.s, and on Saturday, the 14th, the work 
of examination of both officers and men was practically con- 
cluded, and the Regiment ready for muster. 

On The 11th day of May, 1898, all the regiments of infantry 
were formed in line of masses for review by the Commander-in- 
Chief, the Honorable Frank . S. Black, Governor of the 
State of New York, Troops A and C acting as escort. 
On the 16th of May the Third Battalion, composed of 
men from the Forty-sixth, Thirty-first, Thirty-sixth and Thirty- 
seventh, designated respectively as Companies H, G, E 
and F, were mustered in, and Major Austin A. Yates 
was mustered in and placed in command of them; after 
which the companies composed of men from the Eighteenth, 
Thirty-second, Twenty-second and Ninth, designated respectively 
as Companies K, M, L arid I. were mustered in, and Major James 
W. Lester was mustered in and placed in command. Part of the 
other battalion being absent on provost guai'd duty, only two 
companies from it were mustered in, viz. : the Seventh and 
Twenty-first, designated as Companies B and D. Lieutenant- 
Colonel James H. Lloyd was mustered in and placed in command 
of the ten companies. On the 17th inst. the companies composed 
of men from the Twelfth and Sixth, designated respectively Com- 
panies C and A, were mustered in, after which the Regiment was 
formed in line of masses and the oath was administered to 
Colonel E. E Hardin, who was placed in command thereof. 



State Historian. 47 

No change was made in the officers of the Eegiment as they 
came from their home stations except in the following cases: 
Lieutenant B. L. Aldiich of K Company, who came from the 
home station with his company, was not mustered in owing to his 
physical condition ; Lieutenant Michael Sullivan of D Company 
was mustered in, in place of Lieutenant Sylvester W. Wright, 
who came from the home station with his company; Chester G. 
Wager of the Twenty-first Separate Company, N. G., N. Y., 
Quartermaster- Sergeant, was not mustered in; First Lieutenant 
John S. Wilson, who was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the 
Regiment, resigned, to accept the position of Surgeon of the 
Twenty-second Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry. 

The officers of the Regiment and the companies constituting it 
were as follows : 

Colonel, Edward E. llardiu, Seventh U. S. Infantry. 

Lieutenant-Colonel, James H. Lloyd, Thirteenth Battalion, 
National Guard, New York. 

Major, James W. Lester, Fourteenth Battalion, National 
Guard, New York. 

Major, Austin A. Yates, Fifteenth Battalion, National Guard, 
New York. 

Surgeon, Lewis Balch, Major and Acting Assistant Surgeon 
General. 

Chaplain, Hector Hall, D. D. 

Adjutant, James J. Phelan, Adjutant Thirteenth Battalion, 
National Guard, New York. 

Quartermaster, George M. Alden, Quartermaster, Thirteenth 
Battalion, National Guard, New York. 

Sergeant-Major, W. Swift Martin, Sixth Separate Company, 
National Guard, New York. 



48 Annual Report of the 

THIRTEENTH BATTALION. 

COMPANY B. 

Seventh Separate Company, Colioes. — Captain, T. Campbell 
Collin; First lieutenant, John J. McGaffin; Second Lieutenant, 
Edward J. White. 

COMPANY C. 

Twelfth Separate Company, Troy.^ — Captain, John P. Treanor; 
First Lieutenant, Rufus M. Townsend; Second Lieutenant, 
William Baker. 

COMPANY D. 

Twenty-first Separate Company, Troy.— Captain, Merrill M. 
Dunspaugh; First Lieutenant, William J. Galbraith; Second 
Lieutenant, Michael Sullivan. 

COMPANY A. 

Sixth Separate Company, Troy. — Captain, E. Oourtland Gale ; 
First Lieutenant, Henry P. Sherman; Second Lieutenant, Carroll 
L. Maxcy. 

FOURTEENTH BATTALION. 
Major James W. Lester, Commanding. 

COMPANY K. 

Eighteenth Separate Company, Glens Falls. — Captain, Loyal 
L. Davis; First Lieutenant, Seldon W. Mott. Bishop L. Aldrich 
was the Second Lieutenant in the National Guard and went to 
Camp Black, was taken sick and not mustered. 

Daniel J. Hogan was appointed Second Lieutenant by tele- 
gram from Governor on day of muster. Telegram received 
too late and Hogan was mustered as Sergeant. He imme-diately 
began duty as Lieutenant and later on was commissioned and 
mustered as Lieutenant, with rank as of the date of the original 
muster of the company. 



State Historian. 49 

company i. 
Ninth Separate Company, Whitehall. — Captain, Ernest A. 
Greenough ; First Lieutenant, Emiuet J. Gray ; Second Lieuten- 
ant, Alanson D. Bartholomew. 

COMPANY M. 

Thirty-second Separate Company, Hoosick Falls. — Captain, 
Frank L. Stevens; First Lieutenant, Walter A. Wood, Jr. ; Second 
Lieutenant, Louis E. Potter. 

COMPANY L. 

Twenty-second Separate Company, Saratoga Springs. — Cap- 
tain, Amos 0. Eich; First Lieutenant, John A. Schwarte; Second 
Lieutenant, Obed M. Coleman. 

FIFTEENTH BATTALION. 
Major Austin A. Yates, Commanding. 

COMPANY H. 

Forty-sixth Separate Company, Amsterdam. — Captain, Darwin 
E. Vunk; First Lieutenant, George Hughes; Second Lieutenant, 
Daniel Masten. 

COMPANY p. 

Thirty-seventh Separate Company, Sclienectady. — -Captain, 
Frank Bander; First Lieutenant, George M. Crippen; Second 
Lieutenant, Albert Wells. 

COMPANY G. 

Thirty-first Separate Company, Mohawk. — Captain, Horatio 
P. Witherstine; First Lieutenant, Delos M. Dodge; Second Lieu- 
tenant, Wilbur Eddy. 

COMPANY E. 

Thirty-sixth Sepai-ate Company, Schenectady.— Captain, J. M. 
Andrews, Jr.; First Lieutenant, George de B. Greene; Second 
Lieutenant, Donald Hutton. 



50 Annual Report of the 

Notwithstanding almost incessant rain during the entire time 
at Camp Black, the Regiment received gi-eat benefit from the 
drills at this camp and the men hardened down into real soldiers. 
It was jocosely remarked by some of the men that the physical 
examination to which they were subjected was unnecessary, as 
any man who was alive at the time the Regiment was mustered 
in, must be without any doubt. physically sound. 

On the 18th of May the Regiment started, pursuant to orders 
received May luth, for Chickamauga, Ga. The large Sibley tents 
were taken down; breakfast was had early and the tents, camp 
equipage and rations were hauled to the railroad station and 
loaded onto the trains. Two days travel rations were issued to 
each of the companies and at 9.30 a. m. the Regiment moved out 
of camp. At 10.30 a. m. the fli'st section, carrying one-half of the 
Regiment, pulled out from the station, followed in a few moments 
by the second section with the rest of the Regiment. The trains 
were run to Long Island City, where the troops were put aboard 
a large ferryboat, which, landed them at the pier of the Central 
Railroad of New Jersey in Jersey City. Here a train of three 
sections, composed of antique oars of the Philadelphia & Read- 
ing Railroad, freshly painted on the exterior, were found waiting 
for the Regiment. One battalion was put aboard each section 
and after a delay of nearly two hours, during which an additional 
car was added to each section so as to give each man a whole 
seat, the sections pulled out of the station. The first section was 
in charge of Colonel Hardin and carried Companies A, B, C and 
D. The second section v\as in charge of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Lloyd and carried Companies E, F, O and H; and the third sec- 
tion was in charge of Major Lester and carried Companies I, K, 
L and M. Although the sections left Jersey City less than ten 



State Historian. 51 

minutes apart, they became three or four hours apart before 
long. 

The route taken was over the Central Kailroad of New Jersey 
and the Philadelphia & Reading to Philadelphia; thence, via the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, through Baltimore and Washington 
to Parkersburg, and thence, via the Baltimore & Ohio South- 
western Railway to Cincinnati. From Cincinnati the route lay 
over the Queen & Crescent to Chattanooga, and the Chattanooga 
Valley, Rome & Columbus Railroad to Lytle Station, Chicka- 
mauga Battlefield. When the first section arrived at Washing- 
ton an order was received from the Wai" Department directing 
that Private Edward Murphy, 2d, of A Company, be detached 
from the Regiment, and that he report at once to the War Depart- 
ment to receive a Commission as Captain and Assistant Adju- 
tant-General. 

The first and second sections arrived at Lytle, Ga., late in the 
evening of the 20th, and the third section about ten a. m. of 
the 21st. 

The first section came through without much trouble, but sev- 
eral cars in both the second and third sections were condemned by 
the inspectors for broken flanges, defective air brakes or flat 
wheels, and each car, as it was condemned, was replaced by 
another old car. The third section, which arrived at Chattanooga 
at dusk on the 20th, was side-tracked in the city and pulled out 
to Lytle the next morning, where it joined the rest of the Regi- 
ment. The Regiment went into Camp on Saturday, the 21st, in 
the southeastern part of the National Military Park just north 
of the intersection of the Thedford Ford Road with the Dalton 
Ford Road. 

At first the Regiment suftered from a lack of good water, but 
after three or four days the pipe line was laid out in rear of the 



52 Annual RBPOftT of THE 

Camp and good water was at hand for washing and cooking. 
Coming as they did from the cold of Hempstead Plains, the men 
of the Eegiment suffered much from the intense heat of Chicka- 
mauga, and there were a number of cases of sickness caused by 
the bad water of the first few days. 

Here the Regiment was brigaded with the Fifth Maryland 
and the Second Nebraska, under command of Colonel Hardin, 
as the Second Brigade, and attached to the first di^dsion com- 
manded by ColoneJ Frederick Dent Grant of the Fourteenth 
New York Volunteer Infantry and the First Army Corps under 
Major-General James F. Wade. Colonel Hardin was succeeded 
subsequently by Colonel Bills of the Second Nebraska Volunteer 
Infantry, and Colonel Grant, by Brigadier-General Louis H. 
Carpenter. 

Major Lewis Balch was detached and assigned to duty as 
Acting Chief Surgeon of the First Division. He organized a 
Division Hospital and Ambulance Company. 

Lieutenant George de B. Greene of Company E was appointed 
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General of the Brigade under Colonel 
Hardin, and Lieutenant Walter A. Wood, Jr., was appointed 
Brigade Commissary. 

On May 31st Corporal Purman of E Company was transferred 
to the First U. S. Volunteer Engineers. 

Here the Regiment recruited one hundred and seventeen mules 
and twenty-nine wagons to carry camp equipage and rations. 

The Regiment received orders on May 30th to proceed on June 
1st to Tampa, Florida. 

The large tents were talien down on the 31st and everything 
packed that could be, and the men spent that night in their 
shelter tents. Promptly at six a. m. on June 1st the command 



State Historian. 53 

" Forward ! " was given and the Eegiment marched to Bossville, 
Tenn., a distance of about nine miles, arriving about nine a. m. 
Here the Eegiment had to combat with inadequate railroad 
facilities. After much backing and filling a train of flat cars 
was pulled up, the wagons were loaded upon it, and the train 
was dispatched. A train of cattle cars was, after long waiting 
and much shifting of cars, finally drawn alongside of the plat- 
form and then the work of loading the horses and mrales was 

undertaken. This work caused much merriment among the men, 

* 
but was expeditiously accomplished. General L. H. Carpenter 

and stafl' accompanied the first section of the troops, composed 
of Companies E, F, G and H, in charge of Colonel Hardin. This 
section left Rossville about six p. m. The second section, carrying 
Companies I, K, L and M, in charge of Major Lester, left about 
eight-twenty p. m., and the third section, carrying Companies A, 
B, C and D, in charge of Major Collin, left about ten p. m. The 
route taken lay over the Southern Railroad and Florida Central 
& Peninsular Railroad. Owing to the large number of troops 
transported over these lines and the inadequate facilities for 
handling them, — the Florida Central & Peninsular being a single 
track road, — the progress was very slow. Long waits were made 
at sidings for trains to pass. One section, the second, was side- 
tracked and remained nearly twelve hours at a place called 
Turkey Creek, only about seventeen miles from Tampa. Had it 
not been for the fact that the men bought food all along the line, 
thereby making a saving on their travel rations, the two days 
travel rations issued would have given out long before the troops 
reached their destination. As it was, the second section went 
hungry at Tui'key Creek and the third section lived on short 
rations during the last part of the trip. The first section arrived 



54 Annual Report of the 

at Tampa on June 3d at two or three o'clock in the afternoon and 
opened Camp at Fort IBrooke, an old army garrison on Hills- 
borough Bay. The second section arrived about three a. m. on 
the 4 th of June, and the third section about eleven a. m. the 
same day. On the way down the troop train got ahead of the 
wagon train and the mule train, so that the troops were obliged 
to go into Camp without their rations and cooking utensils, which 
were in the wagons. Some rations were drawn from the Com- 
missary Department for temporary use and, with improvised 
cooking utensils, the hunger of the men was appeased. The 
wagons and mules arrived later the same day, much to the grati- 
fication of the men. 

The Regiment retained its same Brigade formation as at 
Chickamauga, except that the Fifth Maryland took the place 
of the Second Nebraska, and the Sixty-ninth New York was 
added. The Sixty-ninth New York was soon afterwards detached 
and the Brigade consisted of the Second New York, the Fifth 
Maryland and the First District of Columbia, under command 
of Brigadier-General L. H. Carpenter, and known as " Carpen- 
ter's Brigade," afterwards the Second Brigade. This Brigade 
was a part of the Second Division under command of Brigadier- 
General Simon Snyder and the Fourth Army Corps under 
Major-General John J. Coppinger. 

Camp was made with the shelter tents and it was not thought 
worth while to put up the large tents as the Regiment expected 
to go aboard the transports at Port Tampa as a part of the first 
Cuban expedition under General William R. Shatter. Ten days' 
travel ration were issued and ammunition at the rate of one hun- 
dred rounds per man, and the ofiBcers' horses were sent aboard the 
transports. The Regiment then waited orders to mova The 



State Historian. 55 

orders did not come, but after two days, back the horses came, 
and at the same time information that the capacity of the trans- 
ports had been overestimated and they were already crowded. 
So the expedition left, much to the regret of the entire Regiment, 
leaving the Second New York behind. 

After experiencing one of the typical storms of the rainy season 
in which the rain falls in sheets, the large tents were put up. The 
shelter tents in such a storm were of little protection and the men 
were all soaked. 

On June 6th the resignation of Lieutenant Carroll L. Maxcy 
of A Company, who had returned to Troy from Camp Thomas 
on May 29th, was, by direction of the Secretary of War, accepted 
and he was honorably discharged from the United States service, 
his discharge to take effect May 31, 1898. 

Private John Flynn, Jr., of A Company was also on June 7th, 
by order of the Assistant Secretary of War, discharged to accept 
a position as Lieutenant in the Engineer Corps. 

On the 8th day of June Private Michael F. Sheary of A Com- 
pany was directed to be discharged by the Assistant Secretary of 
War to accept a commission as Paymaster with rank of Major 
in the U. S. Volunteers, and on the same day Private Sanford 
L. Cluett was transferred to the First Regiment U. S. Volunteer 
Engineers and expected to receive a commission as First Lieu- 
tenant. 

On the 14th of June Private Eugene Warren, also of A Com- 
pany, was directed to be discharged by the Assistant Secretary of 
War to accept a clerkship in the Paymaster's office under Major 
Sheary. 

On the 15th of June, by order of the Secretary of War, the 
resignation of Hector Hall as Chaplain was accepted and he was 



56 Annual Report of the 

honorably discharged from the United States service, and on 
June 21st Private George W. Kinne, of D Company, was trans- 
ferred to the First Regiment U. S. Volunteer Engineers. 

On the 10th of June Major Lewis Balch, Surgeon of the Regi- 
ment, was appointed Chief Surgeon of the Division by an order 
issued from Division Headquarters, and on the same order First 
Lieutenant Rufus M. Townsend, First Lieutenant C Company, 
was appointed Chief Commissary of Subsistence of the Division. 

Pursuant to orders issued by Major-General Coppinger under 
date of June 15, 1898, Major Austin A. Yates, Captain Loyal L. 
Davis, of K Company, and Captain Menill M. Dunspaugh, of D 
Company, with one man from each company, left Tampa on the 
same day on recruiting service. These ofBcers wete instructed to 
recruit each company up to the maximum strength of one hun- 
dred and six enlisted men. 

The Regiment was hampered very much at this Camp because 
there were no facilities for Regimental, Battalion or Company 
drills. The drill hours were consumed by the Company com- 
manders in instruction in arming and firing, and in the Manual 
of Arms. The other Regiments of the Brigade, the First District 
of Columbia and Fifth Maryland, being hampered in the same 
way. General Carpenter ordered that each Regiment of the 
Brigade in turn go out to Tampa Heights two afternoons each 
week, bivouac there over night and have Regimental drill for 
three or four hours in the early morning, marching back to Camp 
after it was over. 

On the 24th of June the Regiment left for its drill at Tampa 
Heights at four p. m. The day was terrifically hot and the dark 
clouds along the horizon betokened a coming storm. Supper was 
-served to the men and the shelter tents were soon up and trenche^. 



STATE tllSTORIAN. 01 

Shortly after seven o'clock the storm broke in all its fury. The 
vivid lightning was followed by the crashing and booming of the 
thundei". About 7.45 a flash of lightning descended right into the 
Oamp, striking a tall pine tree at the foot of the C Company 
street and, leaving the tree about thirty feet from the ground, 
shot obliquely off toward the tents. The noise of the thunder 
was deafening. Instantly every one who could sprang out of his 
tent, and the Camp, which had quieted down for the night, was a 
scene of the utmost tumult and confusion. In every street some 
men were senseless or partially paralyzed. Some of theee, how- 
ever, quickly regained consciousness. There were few lights in 
Camp and no place to take the unconscious men where they would 
be pi-otected from the fury of the storm. Three or four hundred 
yards away could be seen tents which were said to be the General 
Field Hospital, and thither their comrades carried the apparently 
lifeless men. These tfents, however, were found to be the tents of 
the administrative part of a measles hospital. The men were 
carried in here, and, under the direction of the doctors and hos- 
pital men, efforts were made to restore them to consciousness, 
which were successful in all but one case. Private Edward 
Nichols, of C Company, who was sitting on the ground under 
his tent reading, probably never knew what struck him. Al- 
though he was pulseless and without heart action when he was 
brought in, he was worked over for nearly an hour, but without 
success. 

Near the hospital tents there was a large number of ambulances 
packed with hospital necessaries. These were backed around 
and as the men regained consciousness and the partial use of 
their limbs they were laid on stretchers and put into the am- 
bulances so as to give more room for the others. It was decided 



58 Annual Keport op the 

then to take them to the General Field Hospital and the first 
ambulance loaded was taken by the men to this hospital, which 
was about a quarter of a mile away. Mules were hitched to the 
other ambulances and they were drawn over to the hospital until 
the fourteen men most seriously injured had been taken over. 
These fourteen men came principally from Company. They 
were Corporals Wm. A. Hamilton and John J. Barnival, and 
Privates John Harper, F. C. Simmons, Wm. Scidmore, Wm. P. 
Ryan, Wm. Blanchard, Andrew F. Groebecker, Andrew McBride 
and Charles I. Case of C Company; Private Edward Wales of A 
Company and Privates J. S. Jones, Delvert ShefBeld and Lewis 
C. Schermerhom of F Company. 

In addition to the men taken to the hospital. Private James 
Goo of G Company, Henry Gould of F Company, Fred Brezee 
of L Conipany and Sergeant E. M. Allen of 1 Company, were 
injured, but taken care of in their own company street. All 
these men recovered in a day or two and were returned to duty, 
except Private Charles I Case, of C Company, who was a tent 
mate of Private Nichols who was killed. 

So far as it was possible to ascertain it was found that nearly, 
if not quite, all of the men seriously injured, as well as Private 
Nichols, who was killed, did not have their rubber ponchos under 
them. 

The remains of Private Nichols, after funeral services had been 
held, were on June 25th escorted to the depot and sent to his 
home at Troy for interment. 

After the Regiment was mustered m at Camp Black notifica- 
tion was received that it would be entitled to another Major and 
three Battalion Adjutants. Attempts were made to have the 
oflBcers appointed to fill these positions mustered in at Camp 
Alger by the mustering officer there because the oflBcers had not 
received their formal commissions. 



OTATB J1I8T0RIAN. 0» 

On June 20th, at Tampa, the following officers of the Regiment 
were mustered in : 

Thomas C. Collin, Captain B Company, as Major of the Third 
Battalion, with rank from May 23, 1898. 

George de B. Greene, First Lieutenant E Company; Thomas 
W. Hislop, Private A Company, and William S. Martin, Regi- 
mental Sergeant-Major, as Battalion Adjutants, with rank from 
May 23, 1898. 

Daniel J. Hogan, Sergeant K Company, as Second Lieutenant 
K Company, with rank from May 18, 1898, and 

Calvin S. McChesney, Quartermaster-Sergeant A Company, as 
Second Lieutenant of A Company, with rank from June 13, 1898, 
vice Maxey resigned. 

On the 28th day of June the following additional officers were 
mustered in : 

John McGaffln as Captain K Company, vice Collin promoted, 
with rank from June 22d. 

Edward J. White as First Lieutenant B Company, vice 
McGaffin promoted, with rank from June 22d. 

William Leiand Thompson, a private of A Company, as Second 
Lieutenant B Company, vice White promoted, with rank from 
June 22d, and 

Donald J. Hutton as First Lieutenant of E Company, vice 
Greene appointed Battalion Adjutant, with rank from June 22d. 

On the 25th of June orders were received that the Regiment 
be fully equipped to be loaded onto transports. 

On June 28th, pursuant to orders issued by General Coppinger, 
Lieutenant W. Swift Martin, with Corporal Francis Carr and 
Private Wright Van Deusen, both of D Company, left for Port 
Tampa, where they were to be placed in charge of some field 



W ANNUAL KEPORT OF THE 

shields for use of the invading army, which they were to take 
on the first transports to be sent. 

On June 29th Privates John W. Maley and E. F. Bauth of B 
Company, P. J. O'Brien and James L. Casey of C Company, and 
Alson L. Jones of M Company, were transferred to the Division 
Hospital Corps. 

June 30th the entire Regiment was mustered by Colonel Hardin 
after it had been inspected by the field officers. 

On the first day of JuJy several men in the Regiment were 
discharged to accept Commissions as Second Lieutenants in the 
new Volunteer Regiments to be formed in the State of New York, 
as follows : 

Private George L. Hare, Jr., of A Company, in the Two hun- 
dred and second Regiment. 

Private Esek B. Williamson of A Company, and Private Winsor 
B. French of L Company, in the Two hundred and first Regi- 
ment, and 

Privates Griswold Green and George Alford Cluett of A Com- 
pany, in the Two hundred and third Regiment. 

The first batch of recruits arrived on June 28th from Major 
Yates : — twelve for E Company ; twelve for P Company ; twelve 
for G Company, and twelve for H Company; and July 2d these 
were followed by Captains Davis and Dunspaugh with thirty- 
four recruits for A Company ; twenty-six for B Company ; twenty- 
six for C Company ; twenty-six for D Company ; twenty-four for I 
Company ; twenty-seven for K Company ; twenty -eight for L Com- 
pany, and twenty-eight for M Company. They arrived about 
half past twelve o'clock and were vociferously cheered by the 
Regiment. On the 2d of July the First District of Columbia left 
for Port Tampa to take transports. 



OTATB niSTUKlAiN. 



On the 5th day of July Second Lieutenant William L. Thomp- 
son, of B Company, was, by direction of the Secretary of War, or- 
dered to " report to the Governor of the State of New York to ac- 
cept promotion in another regiment." The promotion obtained 
by Lieutenant Thompson was a commission as Second Lieutenant 
in the Two Hundred and First Regiment, which he resigned Sep- 
tember 7, 1898. 

On the 5th day of July Second Lieutenant A. D. Bartholomew, 
of I Ck)mpany, was relieved from duty at the Quartermaster's De- 
pot, where he was ordered on June 10th, and ordered to rejoin 
his regiment. 

Private Hiram C. Todd, of L Company, was, by direction of the 
Assistant Secretary of War, discharged to accept a commission. 
Private Todd left the regiment July 5th and was subsequently 
commissioned second lieutenant of A Company in the Two Hun- 
dred and Second Regiment, New York Infantry, and went with 
his regiment to Pinar del Rio, Cuba, in December, 1898. 

On the 6th of July notification was received from Corps Head- 
quarters that transportation would be ready to move two battal- 
ions of the regiment by transport to Santiago. The First Bat- 
talion, commanded by Major Lester, and the Third Battalion, 
commanded by Major Collin, were designated as the battalions 
to go. The Second Battalion was to follow as soon as transporta- 
tion was ready. The recruits were to be left at Tampa and Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Lloyd was detailed to remain to see that the 
recruits were drilled and put into shape as soon as possible.. 

Everybody got rid of their superfluous baggage and everything 
was packed up as much as possible so that the designated battal- 
ions could be moved on a few hours' notice. As time went on the 
chances for the regiment to see service under this order gradually 
faded away and the men fell back into the old rut. 



62 Annual Report of the 

First Sergeant Thomas J. McNeill, of B Company, was com- 
missioned Second Lieutenant of B Company vice Thompson trans- 
ferred, with rank from July 2d, and was mustered in July 5th. 

Sergeant Charles K Parsons, of E Company, was commissioned 
Second Lieutenant of E Company vice Hutton promoted, with 
rank from July 2d, and was mustered in July 5th. 

On July 8th an order was received directing the discharge of 
Private Edward Murphy, Jr., who had been carried on the rolls of 
A Company since he left the regiment at Washington on May 
19th. The discharge was to take effect as of May 22d. 

On July 8th Private Leland T. Lane, of A Company, was trans- 
ferred to the First Regiment United States Volunteer Engineers, 
and was afterwards commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Two 
Hundred and Second Regiment. (Lieutenant Lane resigned his 
commission Sept. 23, 1-898.) 

On the 10th day of July Brigadier-General Louis H. Carpen- 
ter was relieved from the command of the Brigade and assigned 
to the command of the Third Division of the Fourth Army Corps, 
and Brigadier-General Joseph K. Hudson, United States "Volun- 
teers, was assigned to the command of the Second Brigade of the 
Second Division. General Carpenter left on the 12th and Gen- 
eral Hudson assumed command of the Brigade the same day. 

About 7 o'clock on the evening of July 12th orders were re- 
ceived for the regiment to be in readiness to go aboard transports 
for Santiago on the 13th. The pix)cess of packing ujj was again 
undertaken, and early in the morning of the 13th the tents of the 
First and Second Battalions were struck and the tentage, rations 
and camp equipage put aboai'd the train for Fort Tampa. 

Matters came to a standstill at this point and the regiment 
waited. It was understood that the delay was occasioned by the 



State Historian. 63 

fact that the transports had not been properly cleaned and put in 
order for the troops and that they could not be made ready before 
noon of the 14th. Accordingly the men were directed to put up 
their shelter tents and make themselves as comfortable as possible 
for the night. Enough rations were brought back to feed the 
troops, which the men prepai'ed for themselves as well as they 
could. About 11 o'clock on the evening of the 13th a notice came 
to the Commanding Officer that the expedition would not be 
started, presumably owing to the fact that yellow fever had 
broken out among the troops at Santiago. This was a gi^at dis- 
appointment to the men, who had hoped not only to get away 
from the unsanitary camp ^t Tampa, but also to do its part in 
the work of the Army at the front. 

When it was found that tlie regiment was not to be moved, an 
attempt was made to find a new camp in the vicinity of Tampa., 
which would have superior sanitary advantages, but without suc- 
cess. The large tents were, therefore, again put up in the hope 
that the Tampa Camp would be soon broken up and the troops 
removed to a distance from the typhoid and malaria of Tampa. 

On the 19th day of July, 1898, Private Charles L. Thayer, of 
D Company, died at the hospital at Fort McPherson, Ga., of 
typhoid /ever. No notification of his death was received by the 
regiment or the family of the deceased at Troy, N. Y., until the 
matter was brought to th^ attention of the officers of the regi- 
ment by the return of a letter written to Private Thayer and 
returned to the writer on the 23d inst., indorsed, " Dead, July 18." 
This information was subsequently verified by telegraphic com- 
munication with the hospital. Why no notice was ever sent to 
the regiment, or Ite family of the soldier, of his death or burial, 
by the authorities at the hospital, has not been explained, and 



04 Annual Kkport of the! 

probably cannot be explained without showing gross negligence 
on the part of the hospital authorities. 

On the evening of July 20th an order was received for the regi- 
ment to proceed to Fernandina, Fla., on the 21st inst. Packing 
up of camp equipage, rations, etc., was immediately commenced 
and prosecuted with vigor until a late hour in the evening, when 
word was received that the Quartermaster was unable to provide 
transportation for the regiment owing to telegraphic instructions 
received from Washington that the road of the Plant System was 
not to be used for transportation because of some trouble which 
the Department had with this road. 

Thus again were the hopes of the regiment doomed to disap- 
pointment. 

However, on the 26th day of July, the Quartermaster's De- 
partment notified the commanding ofiScer of the regiment that 
transportation over the Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad 
would be ready for the regiment early in the morning of the 27th, 
and the necessary orders were issued to pack up and break camp. 
Reveille was sounded at 3.45 and tents were struck at the sound- 
ing of " The General " at 5 a. m., and by 8 a. m. everything had 
been hauled to the station, except what the men were carrying on 
their backs. Then a long period of waiting followed. At last 
the railroad company produced a train of flat cars and the 
wagons were quickly loaded. Then another long wait, and then 
a train of cattle cars for the horses and mules. Finally at 5 p. ni. 
word was received that the passenger coaches for half the regi- 
ment, which were to constitute a train, were at the depot. The 
First Battalion and Companies A and C of the Third Battalion 
were immediately formed and marched to the depot where four- 
teen cars were found to accommodate the six hundred and fifty- 



State Historian. 65 

six men assigned to them. The cars were dirty, foul smelling and 
unfit for occupation. Forty-seven men, with their packs, haver- 
sacks, canteens, blankets and rifles, had to be crowded into each 
car. This the men accepted without much objection, prefen-ing 
to sufifer any sort of hardship rather than lose this chance of get- 
ting away from Tampa. 

The other section, carrying the Second Battalion and Compan- 
ies Tl and D, got away about two hours afterward. The trip to 
Fernandina was made over the Florida Central and Peninsula 
Railroad and the first section arrived between 7 and 8 o'clock in 
the morning of July 27th, and were immediately marched to the 
location where the camp was to be made about three-quarters of a 
mile east of the village of Fernandina. The rest of the regiment 
arrived a few hours later and proceeded to the camp, and before 
dark the tents were pitched and the men under cover. The entire 
camp ground was covered with a dense growth of brush from 
three to six feet high. Enough of this was cut the first day so as 
to permit the tents to be erected. The men suffered a great deal 
from the myriads of mosquitoes which hid during the day in the 
dense undergrowth, but as the brush was cleaned away they grad- 
ually disappeared. 

The effects of the typhoid camp at Tampa which had been 
gradually increasang for some time seemed to get a new impetus, 
Everybody had more or less of aches and pains and the sick call 
was very largely attended. At one time the number of sick ii 
hospital and in quarters was one hundred and forty-two, beside a 
great many more who were sick, but still able to do duty. 

On July 30th Private John J. Whalen was transferred fron 
Company to B Company. He was transferred back to C Com 
pany August 13th. 



66 Annual Ebfort of the 

On Sunday, July 31st, Frank S. Legnard, of Saratoga Springs, 
a private in L Company, died at the Eegimental Hospital in con- 
vulsions, caused by malaria toxaemia, the evident result of our 
Tampa camp. His body was sent to Saratoga Springs for 
interment. 

On the 24th of July the regiment was transferred to the First 
Brigade, commanded by Brigadier- General Jacob Kline in the 
Third Division, commanded by Brigadier-General Louis H. Car- 
penter, of the Fourth Army Corps, under General Coppinger. 
This brigade included, besides the Second New York, the Fifth 
Ohio and the Thirty-second Michigan. 

On the 28th day of July Charles W. Frear, a private of A Com- 
pany, was transferred by order from the War Department, 
dated July 26th, 1898, to the Two Hundred and Third Regiment, 
New York Volunteers, and subsequently made Sergeant-Major 
in that regiment. He was promoted and commissioned second 
lieutenant of E Company in the same regiment September 25th, 
1898, and resigned his commission November 11th, 1898. 

On the 1st day of August Major Lewis Balch was relieved 
from duty as chief surgeon of the Second Division of the Fourth 
Army Corps and ordered to report to his regiment at Fernandina, 
Florida. 

On the 2d day of August Private Frederick C. Morton, of 
C Company, was discharged. 

On the 3rd day of August Captain E. C. Gale left on a fifteen 
days' leave for his home in Troy. On the 4th of August Walter 
A. Wood, first lieutenant of M Company and regimental com- 
missary, left on .a ten days' sick leave. Lieutenant Thomas W. 
Hislop, battalion adjutant, was appointed regimental commis- 
sary in his place. 



State Historian. e< 

The facilities for salt-water bathing were excellent here owing 
to the hard sand beach and the fine surf. The men of the regi- 
iiieut took advantage of the permission given them to bathe and 
went in squads and companies almost daily to the beach, a dis- 
tance of about a mile, to take a dip in the ocean. 

The military camp at Fernandina was augmented daily by the 
arrival of new regiments. The regiment's neighbors here were 
the 1st, 3rd and 5th Ohio, 3rd Pennsylvania, 32nd Michigan, 1st 
Florida, 157th Indiana and 69th New York, besides detachments 
of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 9th and 10th Cavalry. 

On August 3rd Brgadier-General Louis H. Carpenter, in com- 
mand of the Third Division of the Fourth Army Corps, was 
directed by General Coppinger to assume command of the Army 
Corps as soon as General Coppinger should leave the country 
under the orders he had received to proceed to Porto Rico. 
General Carpenter, however, never assumed command of the 
corps as General Coppinger was delayed in his departure and 
finally never got away. 

On August 4th drills, which had not been held since the arrival 
of the regiment in Fernandina, were again resumed, but con- 
tinued only through the next day, the 5th, for the men seemed 
to be without strength or vitality. Drills were, therefore, given 
up until the 10th, when short ones were held each morning and 
afternoon. 

On August 6th the oflflcers of the regiment gave a dinner at 
the Eegimental Mess to the division, brigade and regimental 
commanders who were at Fernandina. By this means the oflfloers 
were enabled to become better acquainted with the general offi- 
cers and the officers of the other regiments. The guests included 
General Carpenter, who was in command of the division, and 



68 Annual Report ob' the 

Generals Lincoln and Hall, in command of brigades. General 
Kline, the commanding officer of the First Brigade, was pre- 
vented by illness from being present. 

Nearly every regiment at Fernandina was represented by its 
commanding oflQcer, and the dinner reflected great credit not only 
upon the committee in charge of it, but also upon the Japanese 
cook, Frank Kittayama, who had been with the offlcers of the 
regiment since the early days at Oamp Black. 

August 7th Dr. Brugman was detailed to assist the surgeon 
of the Second Division Hospital at Fernandina. 

The fourth death in the regiment occurred on the 7th of 
August, when Private Tracy E. West, of L Company, died at the 
Regimental Hospital. 

On August 8th Major Lester and Captain Trainor left for 
home, the former on a leave for twenty days, and the latter for 
ten days, and the same day E Company was detailed as a guard 
at Division Headquarters. 

On the 9th the new chaplain, Rev. Edwin P. Easterbrook, 
joined the regiment and immediately commenced his ministra- 
tions to the regiment, particularly to those who were sick. 

On August 9th Private Charles W. Allen, of M Company, 
and Private Charles N. Baker, of C Company, died at the Fort 
McPherson Hospital at Atlanta, and on the 10th Private Charles 
H. Morrison, of D Company, died at the same hospital. All 
three of these men died of typhoid fever. 

This brought the number of deaths in the regiment up to seven. 
These deaths were not reported by the hospital authorities to the 
regiment, but the news was received from the homes of the men. 

During all this time the sick roll of the regiment continued so 
large that additional tents were obtained and put up to accommo- 



State Historian. 69 

date the large number of sick. A very large number of men too 
ill to do duty, but able to travel, secured furloughs and went 
home to try a change of air and scene. Many of these after their 
arrival hom« became worse and were never able to rejoin their 
companies until after the regiment was sent home to be mus- 
tered out. 

On August 12th the hearts of the men of the regiment were 
gladdened by the appearance of Major M. B. Curry, of the Pay- 
master's Department, who gave the men their July pay. 

On the same day orders were received for the regiment to go 
to Huntsville, Alabama, as soon as necessary transportation could 
be provided. It was the announced intention of the government 
to make the camp at Huntsville a camp for the accommodation 
of all the troops at Fernandina, in the hope that, among the 
mountains of Northern Alabama, the men could regain the 
strength which they had lost in the hot and pestilential camps 
of Southern Florida. 

On the 13th day of August hospital supplies for the regiment 
were received from the friends of the men in the North, and on 
the 15th another large consignment was received. 

The number of men sick and unfit for duty in the regiment had 
become so large, and the facilities for caring for them had 
become so inadequate, that on the 15th additional hospital 
accommodations were secured in the school building of the Sis- 
ters of St. Joseph, in Fernandina, for the sick of the regiment. 
This hospital, in recognition of the munificent gift of Hon. Ros- 
well P. Flower, of New York, to the regiment, which had made 
it possible to equip and maintain such a place, was called the 
"Flower Hospital," 



70 Annual Bbpoet op the 

On the 15th of August, Privates LeRoy E. Walker and. 
George F. Collette were transferred from E Compajiy to the 
Hospital Corps of the United States Army. 

On August 16th Private Elmer J. Jordan, of L Company, died 
at the Fort McPherson Hospital, Atlanta, Ga. 

On the 17th day of August, 1898, Private Clarence W. Betts, 
of A Company, was appointed regimental sergeant-major, and 
on the same day Musician Henry E. LeflSngwell, of the same 
company, was transferred to the regimental non-commissioned 
staff as a principal musician. 

On August 18th Private William H. McArthur, of A Com- 
pany, died at the Third Division Hospital at Femandina, Fla. 

The same day William A. Sheffold, of F Company, deserted. 
He subsequently, and on September 14th, surrendered himself 
to a justice of the peace, and was mustered out November 2, 1898. 

On the 18th day of August Adjutant Phelan was mustered in 
as captain and adjutant, and on the 19th Quartermaster Alden 
was mustered in as captain and quartermaster, in both instances 
to date from May 11th, 1898. 

On the 19th two other members of the regiment died at the 
Third Division Hospital at Femandina, PSrivate Michael J. 
•O'Brien, of Company, and Private William J. Searing, of 
L Company, both of typhoid fever. 

On the 19th news was received that the regiment would not 
be sent to Huntsville, but instead would go to Sand Lake, a 
beautiful spot about ten miles from Troy, N. Y. 

On the 21st of August, pursuant to telegraphic orders from 
the Secretary of War, Private Worden A. Watson, of G Com- 
pany, was discharged. 




[Colonel JAMES H. LLOYD, 
Second Regiment, N. Y, Vol. Infantry. 



State Historian. 71 

On the 21st day of August, Private Aner E. Powers, of M 
Company, died at the Fort McPherson Hospital, Atlanta, of 
typhoid fever, his being the twelfth death in the regiment. 

On the 21st day of August the regiment received orders dated 
the 19th, relieving it from duty with the Third Division of the 
Fourth Army Corps, transferring it to the Department of the 
East and directing it to proceed to Troy, N. Y. This order for 
the regiment to go into camp near its own home was the result 
of efforts made by the friends of the regiment who secured, 
through the War Department, an order to have the camp sites 
in the vicinity of Troy inspected. Major J. P. Story, acting 
inspector on the staff of General Gillespie, commanding the 
Department of the East, was detailed for that duty, and on 
Augxist 20th he inspected and located a camp at Averill Park, 
about nine miles southeast of Troy, which was subsequently 
accepted by General Gillespie. 

The feeling of friendship which had always existed between 
the Sixty-ninth New York and the Second New York increased 
very greatly about this time. 

One day, as the Sixty-ninth New York, returning from a prac- 
tice mai-ch, were passing along the road between the camps of the 
Second New York and Third Pennsylvania, they were made the 
objects of a volley of jibes, jeers and insulting remarks by a large 
number of the men of the Pennsylvania regiment. To offset these 
remarks, and to show the Pennsylvanians the kindly feeling which 
they had for the Sixty-ninth, the men of the Second New York, 
who had gathered in numbers along the opposite side of the road 
from the Pennsylvanians, cheered and applauded their friends 
from New York. This act, so quickly and gracefully performed 
by the men of the Second New York, strengthened the feelings 



72 Annual Report of the 

of comradeship and good will between these two New York 
regiments. 

On the 24th of August the Quartermaster's Department having 
arranged for the necessary transportation of the regiment, the 
tents were taken down and the camp equipage was loaded onto 
the cars. The wagon train belonging to the regiment was 
divided among the regiments left at Fernandina. The Sixty- 
ninth New York, with their military band, escorted the regiment 
from their camp to the cars and gave them a rousing send off. 

The first section, carrying the First Battalion, with Colonel 
Hardin and the staff officers, under command of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Lloyd, left at 4.20 p. m., the second section, with the 
Second Battalion aboard, commanded by Major Yates, following 
about 5.30, and the third section, in charge of Major Collin, leav- 
ing about 6.45. The regiment had supper at Everett City, Ga., 
and the first section reached Columbia, S. C, at 7 a. m. the next 
day for breakfast, reaching Charlotte, S. C, at noon, and Dan- 
ville, Va., at 8 p. m., where the train remained for several hours 
and until about 1 a. m. The second section andved about four 
hours later at Columbia, S. C. The third section arrived at 
Denmark, S. C, about 9.30 a. m., where a stop for breakfast 
was made, and Columbia about 3 p.' m., with supper at Char- 
lotte, N. C. 

The first section, whicli left Danville about 1 a. m. on Friday, 
the 27th, was sidetracked at Franklin Junction during the night, 
and until the second section overtook the first, when both pro- 
ceeded to Lynchburgh, Va. Breakfast was issued to the men 
after the train had left Lynchburgh, and the officers secured 
breakfast at Charlottesville, Va., where the train arrived about 
1 o'clock. The three sections of the train arrived at Washington 



State Historian. 73 

Friday afternoon and evening, and were entertained by the New 
York ladies of the Pension Bureau, who had provided a delicious 
supper for the returning soldiers. 

The first section arrived in Albany Saturday, the 27th, at 10.47 
a. m. Owing to the desire of the citizens of Troy to have the 
three sections of the train enter the city as nearly together as 
possible, this section was sidetracked about midway between 
Albany and Troy, where it was joined about 2 o'clock by the 
second section. The third section arrived at Albany about 3 
o'clock. The three sections were then started for Troy where 
they arrived about ten or fifteen minutes apart, the last section 
getting in soon after 4 o'clock. 

At Troy the regiment was accorded a welcome that will always 
remain a bright spot in the memory of those who were fortunate 
enough to participate in it. The cordiality and unbounded 
enthusiasm of the immense crowds which lined the streets showed 
in what high esteem the members of the regiment were held by 
their fellow-townspeople. The crowds from Troy were augmented 
by people from Cohoes, Schenectady, Saratoga, Hoosick Falls, 
Glens Falls and the other home stations of these volunteer 
troops. The regiment was formed as rapidly as the dense crowds 
would permit, and, escorted by the local militia companies, the 
G. A. K. veterans and the police and fire departments of the city, 
made a short parade through the streets. Every step of the way 
the regiment was received with rousing cheers and tumultuous 
applause. At the State Armory in Troy long tables were loaded 
with delicious refreshments for the returning soldiers, and no 
trouble or expense was spared to make the members of the regi- 
ment comfortable. 



74 Annual Report of the 

Owing to the late hour the regiment had arrived it was decided 
to have the men remain in the city that night. The First Bat- 
talion was quartered in Germania Hall and the Second and 
Third Battalions in the Armory. Early Sunday morning, the 
28th, a start was made for the camp ground at Averill Park, 
whither the members of the regiment were conveyed by the elec- 
tric roads. 

The. camp was located on a high hill overlooking Sand Lake. 
Here the men found that, through the munificence of the people 
of Troy, a complete system of water-works, with pumping station 
and tank, had been put in for their use, and each tent had been 
provided with a board floor. The tents were rapidly put up and 
by nightfall the camp was well established. Fresh meats and 
vegetables had been provided for the men by the Trojans, and a 
hot dinner was enjoyed by all the men that night. 

The baggage and camp equipage of the regiment had been 
brought out in wagons from Troy Saturday afternoon, but owing 
to the lack of oi^anization on the part of the persons engaged 
in the work it was all dumped by the road side some distance 
from the camp in almost inextricable confusion. To add to this 
unfortunate condition one of the freight cars of the first section, 
which had been left at Franklin Junction because of a broken 
bumper, did not arrive with the last section, to which the rail- 
road authorities had promised to attach it. This car contained 
the regimental books and papers and the oflScers' baggage and 
bedding, and did not reach Troy for several days. 

The naming of this camp was intrusted by General Gillespie to 
the Adjutant-General of the State of New York, who called it 
Camp Hardin, thus paying a well-deserved compliment to the 
colonel of the regiment, who had from the first been untiring in 



State Historian. 75 

On August 25th John L. Wylie, a sergeant of D Company, 
died at the hospital at Fernandina, Fla., of typhoid fever. 

On Sunday, August 28th, Private William S. Kennedy, of 
A Company, died at his home in Troy of typhoid fever, and on 
Tuesday, August 30th Private Warren A, Wilson, of K Company, 
died at Fort McPherson Hospital, Atlanta, Ga., thus bringing 
the death roll of the regiment up to fifteen. 

Camp Hardin was the apparent Mecca of all the inhabitants 
for a hundred miles around. The camp was crowded from early 
morning until late at night by people who wanted to see " how 
the soldiers lived," and it is not the province of this historian to 
narrate the many ludicrous encounters between the soldiers and 
the civilians. Suffice it to say that a lunch box was considered 
by the owner as a sort of carte blanche to inspect every nook and 
cranny in the camp. This continuous inspection proved so 
annoying to the men who were sick that a guard had finally 
to be put over the hospital tents to keep out the crowd of inquisi- 
tive sightseers. 

The change from the heat of Florida to the cool air of Averill 
Park was so great that the men suffered at first during the cold 
nights from insufficient clothing and covering. This was, how- 
ever, speedily remedied, most of the men receiving from their 
homes warmer clothes and additional blankets. The overcoats 
which had been an encumbrance in Tampa and Fernandina 
proved a blessing to all who had them, and the Sibley stoves, 
which had not been in use since the regiment was at Camp 
Black, were a positive luxury. 

On August 30th occurred the first evening parade which the 
regiment had held since leaving the burning sands of Tampa. 

When the regiment reached Troy they found that Captain E. 
R. Hills, of the Fifth Artillery, and Lieutenants George W. 



76 Annual Report of the 

Gatchell and Philip R. Ward, of the same regiment, who had been 
detailed to muster out the regiment, had preceded them and work 
was immediately begun on the books and papers of the regiment. 

On August 31st Private Frank A. Putnam, of M Company, died 
at the Third Division Hospital, Fernandinai Fla., of typhoid 
fever, making a total of sixteen deaths in the regiment at this time. 

On August 31st Private William J. Lockhart, of G Company, 
was transferred to the U. S. Volunteer Signal Corps by 
"Special Orders No. 200, A. G. O., August 29th, to date from July 
5th, 1898, and on September 1st Private John Killian, of E Com- 
pany, was discharged from the regiment, as of August 19th, 
the day on which he had been discharged from the General Hos- 
pital for the Insane at Washington, D. C. 

On August 31st occurred the bi-monthly inspection and muster 
of the regiment by Colonel Hardin. 

On September 1st Private Felix Bahuie, of D Company, died 
of typhoid fever at the Third Division Hospital at Fernandina, 
Fla., and on September 4th the number of deaths was increased 
to eighteen by the death of Private Edgar J. Olena, of D Com- 
pany, who died at his home in the city of Troy. 

On September 3d Private Hugh P. Blackington, of M Com- 
pany, formerly regimental. sergeant-major, received his discharge 
from the United States service for physical disability. 

On September 6th Private Robertson Parker, of L Company, 
died at the Third Division Hospital at Fernandina, Fla., of 
typhoid fever, and on the same day Private Thomas W. 
McNamara, of the same company, died at the Troy City Hospital, 
bringing up the number on the death roll to twenty. 

On the 7th of September the twenty-first death was recorded; 
it was that of Private Frank Dewey, of D Company, who died at 
the Third Division Hospital at Fernandina, Fla. 



State Histoeian. 77 

During the stay of the regiment at Camp Hardin short drills 
were prescribed for the purpose of maintaining the discipline of 
the regiment, but so many men were absent and so few of the 
men present were physically able to do' any such duty that the 
battalions could scarcely turn out enough men to make one full 
company. 

On September 9th Private Herbert Chapel, of M Company, 
died at the Flower Hospital, Fernandina, Fla., of typhoid fever, 
and on September 13th Private James A. Holden, of L Company, 
died at the Troy City Hospital, making a total loss bj* death to 
the regiment of twenty-three. 

On September 13th was witnessed the last evening parade of 
the Second Eegiment, New York Volunteers. It was generally 
known before the parade that "it would be the last time this 
beautiful ceremony would be gone through with by the regiment, 
and the men, although happy at the thought of going home, felt 
a sadness at the thought of parting from the companions with 
whom they had been so intimately associated for so long. At the 
close of the ceremony and before the companies marched past in 
review, Colonel Hardin said a few words to the men of the regi- 
ment and bade them good-bye and God-speed. The affectionate 
regard in which the colonel was held by all the oflfloers and men 
was apparent in the hearty and ringing cheers which greeted his 
remarks, and in the way in which they subsequently gathered 
around to cheer and applaud him. 

It is doubtful if the scene witnessed at Camp Hardin on the 
morning of September 14th ever has been duplicated. That day 
the guard was mounted without rifles, belts or other equipment. 
The men felt silly and foolish and they looked it. All the rifles, 
belts and ordnance (except mess kits and cutlery) had been 



78 Annual Report ob^ the 

turned in to the ordnance officer. The sentinels that day and the 
next carried sticks and stones as their insignia of office. 

On the same day Major J. J. Edson, Jr., United States Volun- 
teers, paid the men to September 1st, and on the next day Camp 
Hardin passed into history. 

On the evening of September 14th the officers messed for the 
last time together. At the close of the dinner Colonel Hardin 
made a short address to the other officers, wishing them all good 
things in the future, and closed by presenting to Lieutenant Wil- 
bur Eddy, of G Company, who had been the caterer for the offi- 
cers' mess (luring all the time it had been in existence, a very 
handsome set of table silver and cutlery, to the purchase of which 
nearly all of the officers of the regiment had contributed. 

Private James S. Magill, of A Company, was, on the 14th day 
of September, 1898, discharged for disability. 

On September 15th the men entered on their thirty day fur- 
loughs granted by the War Department. Tents were taken down 
and all government property turned in, and the First Battalion 
was the first to leave the camp under command of Major Lester, 
Major Yates followed with the Second Battalion, and the Third 
Battalion left soon afterwards. The companies proceeded to 
their home station and were dismissed, with orders to report on 
the 14th of October. 

The ovations received by the various companies at their home 
stations testified to the keen interest which had followed the men 
during their absence and the high regard which was entertained 
by those at home for the men who had " volunteered to go to the 
front." 

On the 20th day of September, 1898, Corporal Horatio H. 
Hayner, of A Company, died at his home in Tvoj, N. Y. of 
typhoid fever. 



State Historian. 79 

On the 21st day of September Private Webster W. Nellis, of 
H Company, died at his home in Amsterdam, N. Y., of typhoid 
pneumonia, and on the 27th day of September Private Frederick 
W. Jessup, of D Company, died of typhoid fever at his home in 
Troy, N. Y., and on the 1st day of October Private Frank H. 
Daniels, of E Company, died of pneumonia at Mount Pleasant, 
near Schenectady, and on the 4th day of October the regiment 
lost by typhoid fever its twenty-eighth member by the death of 
Corporal Samuel C. Woodcock, of A Company, which occurred 
at his home in Troy, N. Y. 

On the 6th day of October, 1898, pursuant to orders from the 
War Department, Lieutenant Rufus M. Townsend, of Com- 
pany, was honorably discharged from the service of the United 
States as first lieutenant by reason of his appointment as com- 
missary of subsistence, with the rank of major, in the United 
States Volunteer service. 

On the 13th day of October Corporal Frank L. Parks, Jr., of 
K Company, died at his home in the village of South Glens Falls. 

During the period of furlough Colonel E. E. Hardin was 
detailed by the War Department to muster out the regiment, 
taking the place of Captain Elbridge R. Hills, who was sent 
elsewhere. 

On the 14th of October the several companies of the regiment 
assembled at their respective armories and awaited the pleasure 
of the oflBcers detailed to muster them out. 

The company commanders, in most instances, had one roll call 
each day, holding the men so that they could be had on short 
notice for the physical examination to which each man was 
required to submit. 

To conduct these examinations the War Department detailed 
Captain James Stafford, assistant surgeon. Seventy-first Regi- 



80 Annual Report of the 

ment, New York Volunteers; Captain Ernest L. Ruflner, assist- 
ant surgeon, Sixty-fifth Regiment, New York Volunteers, and 
Captain Harry Mead, assistant surgeon, Sixty-fifth Regiment, 
New York Volunteers. 

In the meantime the officers were busily engaged in preparing 
their muster-out rolls, which proved a tedious, as well as a diffi- 
cult, task. 

On the 18th of October Corporal Frederick P. McNair, of 
L Company, died at his residence in Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Prior to, his death, but after he was too ill to know of it. Corporal 
McNair received a commission as second lieutenant in the Two 
Hundred and Second Regiment, New York Volunteers. 

On the 22d of October Private Andrew W. Bleakley, of D 
Company, died of typhoid fever at the Fort McPherson Hospital, 
Atlanta, Ga., and on the 23d day of October Private Royal T. 
Roach, of K Company, died at his residence in Saratoga Springs, 
bringing up the number on the death roll to thirty-two. 

The surgeons began the physical examinations of the men in 
Troy, examining the members of the Third Battalion in Troy 
and Cohoes. 

On the 25th of October Major Lester, Chaplain Esterbrook, 
the non-commissioned staff, and A, C and D Companies, were paid 
by Major E. S. Fowler and mustered out of the United States 
service by Colonel Hardin in the State Armory in Troy, and on 
the same day B Company was paid and mustered out by the same 
officers in Cohoes. 

On the 26th of October M Company was paid and mustered 
out in the armory in Hoosick Falls. 

On the 27th day of October L Company was paid and mustered 
out in their armory at Saratoga Springs, and on the next day 



State Historian. 81 

I Company was paid and mustered out in tlieir armory at 
Whitehall. 

On Saturday, the 29th of October, K Company was visited by 
the mustering officer and paymaster and mustered out of the 
United States service in their armory at Glens Falls. 

On Monday, the 31st, the mustering officer proceeded to muster 
out the Third Battalion, on which day Major A. A. Yates and 
Lieutenant G. de B. Green were mustered out. E and P Com- 
panies were mustered out on the 31st day of October, 1898, by 
the mustering officer and paid by the paymaster at the State 
Armory in Schenectady, and on the 1st day of November H Com- 
pany was paid and mustered out in the State Armory in Amster- 
dam, and G Company was, on the same day, paid and mustered 
out in the State Armory in Mohawk. 

The thirty-two deaths in the regiment, heretofoi;e chronicled, 
were divided among the companies as follows : 

A Company, four; B, none; C, three; D, eight; E, one; 
P, none; G, none; H, one; I, none; K, three; L, eight, and 
M, four. 

The First Battalion lost fifteen; the Second Battalion two, 
and the Third Battalion fifteen. 

Nineteen of the deaths in the regiment were of men who left 
their home stations with their respective companies on May 2d, 
1898, three of the deaths were of men who joined the regiment at 
Camp Black before it was mustered into the United States service, 
and only ten of the deaths were among the recruits who joined 
the regiment in Tampa during the latter part of June. 

Reports of the various commanding officers show that 5 officers 

and 373 men of the regiment were seriously sick during their 

service, 173 of whom, including officers, were guardsmen April 
6 



82 Annual Report of the 

1st, 1898; 100 of whom, including officers, joined the guard 
between April 1st, 1898, and May 19th, 1898, and the rest, 105, 
were recruits who joined about the 1st of July. 

On the 2d day of November Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Lloyd, 
Major T. C. Collin, Captain G. M. Alden, Lieutenant T. W. 
Hislop and Lieutenant W. S. Martin were mustered out. 

Four of the officers of the regiment continued in the military 
service of the United States. Chaplain Esterbrook was com- 
missioned chaplain in the Two Hundred and Second Eegiment, 
New York Volunteers; Captain Greenough, of I Company, 
accepted a commission as first lieutenant of I Company in the 
Twelfth New York Volunteers, and Lieutenant Wilbur Eddy, of 
G Company, accepted a commission as lieutenant in the Twelfth 
Regiment, New York Volunteers. 

Major Baleh resigned his commission as major and surgeon of 
the Second Regiment on the 10th day of October, 1898. His 
resignation was accepted November 2d, 1898, and he was com- 
mission by the President brigade surgeon, with rank of major 
in the volunteer army of the United States, as of November 3d, 
1898. 

Captain Henry C. Baum was commissioned as major and 
surgeon of the Second Regiment, New York Volunteers, on the 
10th day of October, 1898, but was never mustered as such. 

Captain Albert F. Bmgman was mustered out of the service 
on the 10th day of December, 1898, and Captain Henry 0. Baum 
was mustered out on the 13th day of December, 1898. 

On the 27th day of December Captain James J. Phelan was 
mustered out by Colonel Hardin, and on the same day Colonel 
Hardin relinquished his commission and became again a captain 
of the Seventh Infantry. 



State Historian. 83 

THE THIRD REGIMENT INFANTRY, NEW YORK 
VOLUNTEERS. 

War between the United States and Spain being declared, 
Congress passed an act to increase the army by volunteers and 
authorizing the President to call for one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand men. The President made his requisition upon the 
Governor of the State of New York for twelve regiments of in- 
fantry and two troops of cavalry, that being its quota, and 
expressed a desire that the regiments of the National G«iard be 
used as far as possible and to be fully armed and equipped ready 
to take the field. 

General Orders No. 8, Headquarters State of New York, dated 
Adjutant-General's Office, Albany, April 27th, 1898; Brigadier- 
General Peter C. Doyle, commanding the 4th Brigade, National 
Guard, New York, was directed to organize one regiment from 
the separate companies of his Brigade to be designated The Third 
Regiment Infantry, National Guard, New York. 

The regiment was organized pursuant to the above order, and 
upon the suggration of the brigade commander, Brigadier-General 
Edward M. Hoft'man, Inspector-General, S. N. Y., and Brigadier- 
General William M. Kirby, General Inspector of Rifle Practice, 
S. N. Y., were detailed by the Governor to act as Colonel and 
Lieutenant-Colonel respectively; twelve separate companies of 
the brigade constituted the regiment formed into three bat- 
talions, and Captain William Wilson, 34th Separate Company, 
and M. B. Butler of the 42nd Separate Company, were nomi- 
nated as Majors. 

Special Orders Nos. 70 and 72, Adjutant-General's Oflftce, 
Albany, April 30th, 1898, directed the moving of the several com- 



84 Annual Report of the 

panics of the regiment from their home stations to Oamp Black, 
Hempstead Plains, Long Island, N. Y., companies to consist of 
one captain, one first lieutenant, one second lieutenant, and 
eighty-one enlisted men, to be fully uniformed, armed and 
equipped, tents, cooking outfit, medicine chests and ammunition. 

The companies embarked on May 1st, 1898, from their home 
stations as follows, via the Erie Railway, under charge of Brig.- 
Gen'l E. M. Hoffman : 

42nd Separate Company, of Niagara Falls, Captain M. B. But- 
ler, 4 p. m. 

25th Separate Company, of Tonawanda, Captain H. M. Fales, 
4.20 p. m. 

4.3rd Separate Company, of Olean, Captain Richard H. Fran- 
chot, 5.20 p. m. 

47th Separate Company, of Hornellsville, Captain Frank G. 
Babcock, 7.10 p. m. 

30th Separate Company, of Elmira, Captain John T. Sadler, 
9.30 p. m. . 

Via the New York Central Railway under charge of Brig.- 
Gen'l W. M. Kirby. 

29th Separate Company, of Medina, Captain S. A. Ross, 
5.30 p. m. 

1st Separate Company, of Rochester, Captain B. L. Smith, 
7.00 p. m. 

8th Separate Company, of Rochester, Captain Henry B. Hen- 
derson, 7.00 p. m. 

34th Separate Company, of Geneva, Captain William Wilson, 
8.00 p. m. 

2nd Separate Company, of Auburn, Captain C. James Barber, 
9.20 p. m. 




General EDWARD MORRIS HOFFMAN, 
Colonel, Third New York Volunteer Infantry. 



Stath Histoeian. 85 

48th Separate Company, of Oswego, Captain A. M. Hull, 9.20 
p. m. 

41st Separate Company, of Syracuse, Captain John G. Butler, 
9.20 p. m. 

The detachment that went over the N. Y. C. R. E. was the first 
troops to march into Camp Black, arriving at about 9 o'clock 
a. m. on May 2nd and occupied the second camp from the left of 
the line. The other detachment arrived in camp at 3 o'clock p. m. 
of the same day. Battalions were organized and companies were 
assigned as follows: 

FIRST BATTALION 

Company D, 48th Separate Company, Oswego, Captain A. M. 
Hall. 

Company I, 43rd Separate Company, Clean, Captain R. H. 
Franchot. 

Company L, 30th Separate Company, Elmira, Captain John 
T. Sadler. 

Company K, 47th Separate Company, Hornellsville, Captain 
Prank G. Babcock. 

SECOND BATTALION. 

Company A, 8th Separate Company, Rochester, Captain H. B. 
Henderson. 

Company M, 2nd Separate Company, Auburn, Captain C. 
James Barber. 

Company B, 34th Separate Company, Geneva, Captain J. G. 
Stacey. 

Company C, 41st Separate Company, Syracuse, Captain J. G. 
Butler. 



86 Annual Keport of the 

third battalion. 

Company F, 29tli Separate Company, Medina, Captain S. A. 
Ross. 

Company H, 1st Separate Company, Eochester, Captain B. L. 
Smith. 

Company E, 4:2nd Separate Company, Niagara Falls, Captain 
H. W. McBean. 

Company G, 25th Separate Company, Tonawanda, Captain 
H. M. Fales. 

The surgeons. Major W. M. Bemis, Lieutenants E. B. Howland 
and A. F. Hodgman, were mustered into the United States ser- 
vice May 6th and commenced the physical examination of the 
officers and men on the 10th. About 5 per cent of the men failed 
to pass the examination which necessitated filling vacancies thus 
caused which was promptly done; about 85 per cent of the 
members of the regiment as mustered into tJie United Service 
were members of the National Guard, State of New York, before 
the necessity for volunteers was apparent and were made up 
from the best young men of the communities from which they 
came. 

On May 17th, 1898, the physical examination having been com- 
pleted and muster rolls prepared, the regiment was paraded in 
" line of masses " for muster at 2 o'clock p. m. when Captain 
Walter S. Schuyler, 5th U. S. Cavalry, administered the oath. 

Company D of Oswego being the first company of the first 
battalion was mustered first, and as the men took off their hats 
and raised the right hand, the oath w-as taken, and as the men 
answered to the mustering officer's questions " We will," they were 



State Historian. 87 

cheered by the rest of the regiment; each company as mustered 
received the same approval from their comrades. After the four 
companies of the first battalion were mustered, Lieutenant- 
Colonel W. M. Kirby was mustered with John A. Quigley as 
battalion adjutant. Captain William Wilson was mustered as 
major of the second battalion, and Captain* M. B. Butler was 
mustered as major of the 3rd battalion, and 1st Lieutenant James 
G. Stacey, 34th Separate Company, Company B, and Hector W. 
McBean, 42nd Separate Company, Company E, were mustered 
as captains of their companies to fill the vacancies caused by pro- 
motions of their captains. 

Captain and Adjutant Stephen F. Hart of the 22nd Regiment, 
N. G., N. Y., was detailed by the Governor for duty as adjutant, 
but his regiment being ordered to Camp Black, he was relieved 
and returned to his regiment for duty. 

Colonel Albert J. Myer, A. D. C. to Governor Black, being 
nominated was mustered as adjutant on May 18th, 1898. 

Captain A. M. Hall, Company D, was mustered as Major May 
20th, 1898, being the third major; designations of battalions 
being changed. Major Wilson to the first. Major Butler the sec- 
ond and Major Hall the third, retaining these designations dur- 
ing the service of the regiment. 

On the 24:th day of May orders were received from the War De- 
partment for the regiment to move at once to Dunn Loring, Va., 
Camp Russell A. Alger. After the muster-in of the regiment 
considerable uncertainty prevailed among members as to what 
disposition was to be made of the organization. Upon the re- 
ceipt of the orders to move, all were pleased and anxious to leave 
Camp Black, knowing little and caring less of the situations they 



88 Annual Kei'ort of ^he 

were to meet. Owing to severe lain storlns that were prevailing 
at the time, it was impossible to break camp until August 28th, 
at 10 a. m., when the regiment marched tQ the railroad station on 
the Long Island Eailway where it embarked on three trains for 
LoD^ Island City, when it was loaded on a ferryboat to be trans- 
ferred to Jersey City. The regiment was received with enthu- 
siastic demonstrations on every hand. 

At Jersey City the regiment was embarked on three 
trains to go over the Baltimore and, Ohio Eailway. The 
oflScers were entertained at luncheon, by the officials of 
the Railroad and at 7 o'clock the first train moved 
out of the station with the Field and Staff of the regi- 
ment and the first battalion, followed at ten minutes apart 
by the other two battalions. The trains arrived in Washington, 
D. C, at about 4 o'clock a. m. of the 29th, leaving the latter place 
passed over Long Bridge over the Soutl)ern Railroad to Dunn 
Loring, Va., arriving at about 8 o'clock a. m. same day. When 
the regiment disembarked and formed " Hue of masses " stacked 
arms and details loaded baggage and camp equipage on wagons 
after which the march for Camp Alger w*as taken up, a distance 
of about three miles, located on the farm of a man by the name 
of Campbil, and about thrc* miles southwest of Falls Church, 
Va. The roads being good, a lii;ht r.ain during the night having 
settle*! the dust, tlie men being in exicllent condition, the march 
was made with but one halt. The troops that had already arrived 
at the camji accorded the new-comers a* hearty welcome. The 
cajiil' ■^■'if made in a field co\ered with underbrush and weeds, 
facing s(mth, with headquarters on rising ground in the edge of 
the woods. The country near the camp was nearly wild land. 



State Historian. 89 

very little under cultivation ; the fences were so covered by bushes 
and young trees that they were nearly invisible; the woods were 
impenetrable from vines, undergrowth and swamps. The regi- 
ment was assigned to the first brigade (the other two regiments 
being the 22nd Kansas and 159th Indiana) second division, 
second army corps. The corps commander was Major-General 
William M. Graham, Division commander Brig.-General George 
W. Davis, Brigade commander Brig.-General Mark W. Sheafe. In 
a very short time the grounds throughout the camp were graded 
into streets; the brush was cleared away, bridges w«re built 
across the stream on the left of the camp, roads constructed in 
various directions from the camp. When the camp was made 
there was only one way to leave the field in which it was, and 
that was the route the regiment took to enter it. 

The 3rd Missouri Infantry Volunteers came into Camp in the 
p. m. of the same day and camped in the same field which was 
said to contain sixteen acres. This regiment was not uniformed 
or equipped. The colonel, George P. Gross, had served in the 
Confederate service during the civil war. Both regiments were 
obliged to use the same parade ground; the warmest friendship 
sprang up between the two " Third Regiments " (Missouri and 
New York), which was continued until the regiments were mus- 
tered out of the service. Before leaving Camp Black, Colonel 
Hoffman was notified that the society of the Sons of the Revolu- 
tion would present a set of colors (State and National) to the 
regiment. Colors were not issued to the organizations by the 
State. Owing to delay in the manufacturing the colors were not 
received until after the arrival of the regiment at Camp Alger, 



90 Annual Report off the 

to which place they were forwarded, accompanied by the follow- 
ing letter: 

" OfBce of the Secretary, Sons of the Revolution, 

146 Broadway, New York, June 6th, 1898. 

Col. Edward M. Hoffman, 

3rd Regt. Infantry^ N. Y. Vols., 

Camp Alger, Falls Church, Va. : 

Sir. — I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your favor of 
the 2nd instant. My letter of the 3rd iden. will have informed 
you of the cause of delay in sending you the set of colors accepted 
by yoti on the 14th ultimo. I am very glad to advise you now 
that the colors were sent to you by Southern Express on Saturday 
afternoon, all charges paid, and I trust they will reach you in 
good order. On behalf of the Society let me say that we give 
these flags into your hands as an evidence of our admiration and 
our accord for and with men who go forth to maintain the prin- 
ciples of Truth, Justice and Liberty, of which our flag is an em- 
blem. We know that though trials and hardships shall come 
they will be borne as only brave men do meet and endure them 
and if need be die for their Country. 

We wish you God speed. Respectfully, 

TALBOT OLYPHAJsTT, 

Chairman Committee." 

Colonel Hoffman acknowledged the receipt of the letter and 
colors on June 8th expressing to the society the sincere thanks 
of the regiment for their most beautiful gift and trust. The 
colors were ofQcially turned over to the regiment at the regi- 
mental parade on the evening of June 7th by the ceremony of 
" Escort to the Colors," Company L being the escort ; Com- 
pany H (1st Separate Company) being the color company. 

The first payment made to the regiment for service in the U. S. 
Army was received on the 8th day of June ; it was a welcome day 
and paymaster. 

The work of instructions and preparing the regiment for active 
service was continued with much vigor. The camp was not 



State Historian. 91 

favorably located and the small drill grounds were divided with 
the 3rd Missouri Volunteers. Not more than one battalion of each 
regiment could occupy the drill grounds at a time. As a result two 
battalions of the regiment went out on short marches each day 
and were instructed in extended order, drill through the woods 
and over rough ground, by which much valuable experience was 
gained. Water for both drinking and cooking was for some 
time carried by the men in boilers, kettles and canteens nearly 
a mile. There were no facilities in camp for bathing; malaria 
was more or less prevalent; the water for drinking purposes was 
not of the best and there were other unhealthy conditions which 
resulted in much sickness and an outbreak of typhoid fever, from 
which cause the regiment suffered a heavy loss of its oflSoers and 
enlisted men. 

Aliout June 7th orders were promulgated by the War Depart- 
ment that the volunteer regiments should be increased to the 
maximum strength of 106 men to the company. To comply with 
the order an oflScer and four non-commissioned offlcers (one from 
each company) from each battalion, were directed to proceed to 
their home stations for the purpose of securing the required num- 
ber of recruits. They departed on June 9th; Captain John G. 
Butler from the 1st Battalion with headquarters at Syracuse; 
Captain Hector W. McBean of the 2nd Battalion with head- 
quarters at Niagara Falls, and Captain John T. Sadler of the 
3rd Battalion with headquarters at Elmira. The details found no 
diflBculty in obtaining the recruits, ten, men offering their services 
where one could be accepted. Something over three hundred 
men were added to the strength of the regiment by the 26th of 
June and assigned to their several companies and in a very short 
time were lost sight of as recruits. 



92 Annual Kbport of the 

To give all an opportunity to bathe and to change the monotony 
of camp life, the first brigade excepting the 22nd Kansas regi- 
ment was ordered to march to the Allen farm on Difficult Run^ 
distance about eleven miles, near the Potomac River where 
there was a large spring and to remain there two days. 

The brigade under command of Colonel Barnett of the 159th 
Indiana moved early on the morning of June 22nd, men carrying 
knapsacks, canteens, blankets, ponchos and shelter tents. The 
weather was extremely warm; about four hours were consumed 
in the march out; it was conducted the same as though the com- 
mand was passing through an enemy's country, one battalion as 
advance guard, one for rear guard, the entire column being 
covered by flankers. A few of the men were overcome by the heat 
but rejoined their companies shortly after the arrival. 

Much unjust criticism was afterwards passed on the "severity" 
of this march by newspapers at the home stations of the com- 
panies, growing out of the ridiculously false stories sent home 
by one or two of the men in a spirit of mischief, and which were 
much exaggerated in publication. It was stated among other 
things that several of the men died as a result of the strain to 
which they were subjected and that many were made sick. The 
facts are that not one man was in the hospital during the absence 
of the regiment, and only one who did not make the return march, 
he being disabled by cutting his foot while bathing. At the Allen 
farm out post duty was performed by each battalion. The men 
were camped under shelter tents for the first time, and much 
practical good was accomplished for the men and organizations. 
The return march was made in about five hours and in good shape. 
There was not a breach of discipline in either regiment during 
the tour. 



State Historian. 93 

About June 28th Company O, 41st Separate Company, and 
Company F; 29th Separate Company, under command of Cap- 
tain John G. Butler, the senior ofiQcer, were detailed for guard 
duty over commissary stores at Dunn Loring, taking their camp 
equipage and were on that duty until July 19th when they were 
relieved and joined the regiment. 

June 29th Adjutant Albert J. Myer received notice of promotion 
to major of the 202nd Regiment Infantry, New York Volunteers, 
and instructions to report for duty as such and took his leave 
of the 3rd Raiment that day, much to the regret of the many 
friends he had made by his courteous and gentlemanly conduct 
to all. 

July 5th, Lieutenant-Colonel Kirby was detailed as Provost- 
Marshal General of the 2nd Army Corps with station at Corps 
Headquarters. 

On July 19th the brigade was reviewed by Brig.-Gen'l Mark 
W. Sheafe. 

July 26th the Third Battalion, Major A. M. Hall commanding, 
was placed on detached duty as a portion of the corps provost 
guard. Three battalions then constituting the guard (48th 
Separate Company) Company D, and the (47th Separate Com- 
pany) Company K, doing duty in and about the camp; the (43rd 
Separate Company) Company I, was camped at Falls Church; 
the (30th Separate Company) Company L, was camped at the 
Aqueduct Bridge, with a detachment at the Chain Bridge near 
Washington, D. C. This battalion remained on this duty until 
August 12th on which day they were relieved and returned to 
the old regimental camp. 

The Commanding General, W. M. Graham, caused the following 
communication to be addressed to Colonel Hoffman : 



94 Annual Report of the 

" To the Commanding Officer, 

3rd N. Y. Vols. 

Sir. — The commanding General desires me to express to you 
his satisfaction at the conduct of the Third Battalion of your 
regiment while on duty as provost guard. He has several times 
personally observed the bearing and manner of the men at Falls 
Church and at the Aqueduct Bridge and has been pleased to 
notice that they have performed their onerous and often disagree- 
able duties with tact and firmness which deserves the highest 
commendation. He wishes these x'emarks to be published to your 
regiment and a copy of this paper furnished Major A. M. Hall, 
3rd N. Y. Vols., Commanding Third Battalion. 

Very respectfully, 

0. S. ROBERTS, 

Adjutant-General." 

The above letter was published to every regiment in the corps 
and complimentary communications from the corps commander 
being the exception, it was especially gratifying; the duty was 
not a pleasant one, but being selected for such work was an 
assurance of confidence which the letter justifies. 

During the last days of July sickness in all organizations con- 
tinued to increase to such an extent tliat it was determined to 
abandon Camp Alger. The first Division of the Corps was moved 
to near Dunn Loring, each organization was given sufficient 
ground to make a proper and healthful camp, which was the 
contrary at Camp Alger. 

The Second Division was to move to or near Manassas, Va., 
with the view of " shaking off the fever " and finding a suitable 
camping round for the corps. 

About 8 p. m. on August 2nd, under S. O. 70, Headquaxters, 
2nd A. C, the regiment was directed to break camp on the morn- 
ing of August 3rd and to march at 6 o'clock in the direction of 
Manassas Junction, taking five days' rations in wagons. (See 
G. O. No. 13, Headquarters, 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd A. C, 



State Historian. 95 

Augiist 2iid, and S. O. 70, Headquarters 2nd Army Corps.) 
Instruction was given that the men march as light as possible. 
The extra baggage of the regiment to be sent to Dunn Loring to 
be shipped by rail to Manassas Junction. The work of packing 
the extra baggage proceeded immediately, though the heaviest 
thunder storm of the season was raging at the time. The Quarter- 
master's Department was up all night drawing and issuing sup- 
plies, in order that there might be no delay when the order for 
march was given on the 3rd inst. By 6 o'clock on August 3rd 
the regiment, with the exception of the Third Battalioq,, con- 
sisting of Companies I, K, L and D, who were detailed 
for provost duty under Major Hall, were ready to march. 
Shortly after 8 o'clock word was received from Corps Head- 
quai'ters that something was wrong with the wagon trains, and 
to prepare noon mess in camp. At 10 o'clock this order was 
countermanded and assembly sounded. At 10.05 a. m. the com- 
mand to march was given, and the regiment as part of the First 
Brigade, Second Division, marched to the camp of the 159th 
Indiana, and took position as rear regiment of the First Brigade.' 
The heavy rain of the night previous had settled the dust, so the 
main cause for complaining on the recent march to Allen's farm, 
or DiflScult Run, was removed, but the temperature was high, in 
the neighborhood of ninety, and the humidity near the point of 
saturation. Under the circumstances, the rests were frequent 
and of sufficient duration to allow for recovery from the heat 
and fatigue. 

The regiment had not marched more than two miles from camp 
before the stragglers from the preceding commands began to line 
both sides of the road, due to temporary exhaustion and lack of 
discipline. 



96 Annual Report of the 

At 12.25 a halt was made and arms were stacked in an open 
field wi tliout a vestige of shelter from the snn. There was five min- 
utes rest at 10.35 ; eleven minutes rest at 10.55 ; two minutes rest 
at 11.25 ; five minutes rest at 11.35 ; twelve minutes rest at 11.48 ; 
halted for dinner at 12.25 and the march resumed at 1.45 p. m. 

Up to this time very few men from this regiment left the ranks, 
but as the afternoon wore on and the heat increased, men were 
dropping every few moments, though in a great many instances, 
they did so under instructions from their commanding offtcers, 
in order to look after men who, more or less, were in need of as- 
sistance. The record of the rests in the afternoon shows, con- 
clusively, that the greatest care was taken to save the men as 
much as possible under the circumstances. Rests were as 
follows: eighteen minutes rest at 2.05; sixteen minutes rest at 
2.49 ; twenty minutes rest at 3.19 ; ten minutes rest at 8.52 ; ten 
minutes rest at 4.32. 

The regiment arrived at Burkes Station at 5.25 p. m., in better 
condition physically and numerically than any other regiment of 
the Second Division. The Captains of the eight companies re- 
ported a total of only thirty five men missing at retreat roll call. 

Camp was pitched in an open field, abutting the embankment of 
the main line of the Southern Railroad, at the bottom of a slight 
slope, adjoining the Marshall estate on the east. Water was 
scarce and of questionable purity. The main source of supply 
was from the tank at Burkes Station, ordinarily used to supply 
the locomotives. This was soon riled by men indiscriminately 
dipping their canteens into it, which made it unfit for further 
use. There was a small stream about one-eighth of a mile west 
of the camp with water three feet deep, in which the men bathed. 



State Historian. 97 

The regiment was called upon for a large number of details 
for outpost duty, fully one hundred and fifty officers, non-com- 
missioned officers and men, being dispatched to surrounding 
estates, to prevent depredations. 

On the morning of the 4th the First Battalion under Major 
Wilson, were ordered out as provost guard. They were relieved 
in the afternoon by the Second Battalion under Captain J. G. 
Butler, Major M. B. Butler being detailed as Brigade Officer of 
ihe Day, and Colonel Hoffman as Division Officer of the Dav. 
The regiment continued on Provost duty until the ma^ch was 
, taken up the next day. 

The wagon trains reached camp early in the morning of the 
4th, so there was an abundance of supplies of hard-tack and 
coffee, potatoes and canned meats. Company F under Cap- 
tain Tales and Lieutenant Nice were detailed to round up the 
stragglers, who had journeyed to Manassas by train, their in- 
tention being to remain until the arrival of the Division. They 
succeeded in capturing about eighty of the wayward ones from 
different commands, among which, the Third New York was not 
represented. 

The rain descended in torrents from 9 p. m. on August 4th 
until 3 a. m. August 5th. 

The regiment left camp at Burkes Station Friday, August 5th, 

as rear guard to the Second Division, at 6.45 a. m., moving in a 

southwestward direction. The morning was clear and cool, and 

the preceding commands had worked the roads into an excellent 

condition. The regiment was halted at 7.05, and resumed march 

at 7.18,, a thirteen minute rest; rested again at 7.27, and started 

at 7.54, a rest of twenty-seven minutes ; rested again at 8.04 and 

started at 8.39, a rest of thirty-five minutes. 
7 



98 Annual Eeport of the 

Up to this point there lay considerable up-hill marching. 
Bests were more than sufiQcient to allow the men to recover. 
Rested from 9.05 to 9.08. At 9.10 passed the Happoldt estate 
on the right. At 9.24 reached gangsters Cross roads, where the 
troops rested until 9.45, and then swung around to a north of 
west direction, in an opposite direction to the road leading to 
Wolf Run Shoals. Halted at 10.10, started at 10.25, and 
marched through a mountainous defile, over a heavy and hilly 
road. Rested from 10.57 to 11.17. At 11.51 halted at the Crouch 
estate, where the men filled their canteens. Started at 12.22 and 
halted at 12.38. Arrived at Bull Run Field at 12.50. A resume 
shows that the regiment was actually marching three hours and 
seven minutes and resting two hours and fifty-eight minutes. 
That the day was an ideal one for marching is proved by the fact, 
that all the men answered to their names at roll call, immediately 
after reaching camp. 

Tents were pitched on a slight bluff, adjoining the woods, which 
aligned the east bank of Bull Run Creek. The efficiency of the 
Quartermaster's Department is conclusively proved by the fact 
that though the regiment was the rear guard of the Division, 
the supply wagons were parked close to the raiment not later 
than 3.30 p. m. and the hue and cry about lack of food was 
entirely without foundation. Headquarters was situated close 
to an old redoubt, at the northwesterly end of the line of in- 
trenchments, thrown up by the Confederate General Jubal A. 
Early in 1861. The whole Second Division was encamped in one 
large field, this being made feasible by the nature of the ground, 
which was undulating. Considerable difficulty was again en- 
countered in the water supply. Drinking water was only 
obtained after carrying it from points from a half mile to two 




Field Officers, Tlnird Regiment, New Yorl< Volunteer Infantry. 



State Histoeian. 99 

miles distant. There was one spring a short distance from the 
camp, but the run on it was so great that it was soon exhausted. 
Bull Run Creek was considerably swollen by the recent rains 
and saturated with yellow clay. The men used it for bathing 
and washing purposes. 

The camp presented an exceedingly picturesque appearance at 
night. The lights from the shelter tents of nearly all the regi- 
loents were visible and resembled a good sized town as viewed 
from a distance. After " taps," the mess fires dotted the land- 
scape, and the lurid flames from the burning logs, which listened 
the white shelter tents, formed a glorious sight. Company G 
was detailed, while at this camp, as Provost Guard at Clifton. 

The regiment broke camp and started as vanguard to the First 
Brigade at 5.55 a. m., Sunday morning, August 7th. Owing to 
the swollen state of Bull Rrm Creek, the fording of it was im- 
possible, and a detail of engineers and men from the Division 
under command of former Lieutenant J. B. Mitchell, and Second 
Lieutenant Frederick T. Eigabroadt, constructed a bridge, using 
dismantled array wagons for piers. This was made at Yates 
Ford, which the regiment reached at 6.12 a. m. Marched across at 
6.18, rest of six minutes. Ascended a very steep hill on the other 
side and reached opposite the Peet House from 6.35 to 6.50; 
rested from C.o5 to 7.16; rested again from 7.48 just outside 
Manassas and resumed march at 8.22, through Manassas at 8.45 
and past the Manassas battlefield and monument at 8.50 to the 
tune of " Mama's little pumpkin colored Coon." A halt was 
made at 9.10 after the rear guard was clear of the town. 

The roads the other side of Manassas were very dusty and the 
almost total absence of water for drinking purposes caused a 
good deal of complaining in the ranks. It was impossible to 



100 Annual Report op thh 

obtain' water from the few inhabitants along the line of march, 
as the provost guard at each place had definite instructions to 
refuse admittance to ofScers and men alike to the grounds. 

The march was resumed at 9.25 and the regiment halted at 
9.58 for twenty minutes on account of the extreme heat, 
straggling being prevalent in both battalions. Colonel Hoffman 
made a personal tour in search of water, but it was impossible 
to obtain any. 

Guilfords Mills reached at 10.25. At 10.27 the regiment forded 
Broad Run in two places, the march being taken up after the 
last company had crossed, and at 10.55 the regiment reached 
camp in a field near Bristoe. Some of the men showed signs of 
fatigue, which was mainly due to the excessive heat and to thirst. 
A resume shows that the regiment marched for three hours and 
seventeen minutes and rested one hour and forty-three minutes. 
Tents were pitched in the open field, bordering Broad Run Creek, 
which was even muddier than Bull Run had been. This was 
without exception the most favorable and the most convenient 
camp ground for bathing of all the sites occupied by the Division, 
and the regiment was singularly fortunate in being so situated. 

Considerable difficulty was met with in driving the mules 
through the creek at Guilfords Mills, but in spite of this the last 
wagon reached camp before 7 o'clock. 

On Monday, the 8th, the entire regiment was in bathing during 
the day, which greatly refreshed the men and removed all evi- 
dence of fatigue from the march the day previous. As usual the 
supply of drinking water was very limited, and what there was 
of it was situated two miles from camp, which fact caused con- 
siderable grumbling. 



State Historian. 101 

A very heavy wind storm visited the camp on the afternoon of 
the Sth and Colonel Hoffman and his staff spent about an hour 
holding on to the adjutant's office to keep it from being blown 
out of camp. About 8 p. m. a heavy rain set in and lasted well 
through the night. Many of the men were driven out of their 
shelter tents and spent the long hours drying themselves before a 
huge camp fire, which they managed to start. Officers and men 
alike heaped maledictions upon the weather god and the mut- 
terings of the men acted as an accompaniment to the echoes 
that the thunder awakened among the hills. Company M was 
detailed as Provost Guard at this camp. 

Tuesday, August 9th, was cloudy and threatening. The regi- 
ment marched out of camp as the rear guard of the First Brigade, 
at 8 a. m., taking a southwesterly direction. The roads were 
muddy and very heavy. A halt was ordered at 8.12, and the 
march resumed at 8.23 ; again halted at 8.36, and a thirty minute 
rest given. March was resumed at 9.06, and the direction 
changed to north northwest. Another halt occurred at 9.17 and 
the march resumed at 9.37. At 10 o'clock Broad Run was 
reached and all dismounted officers and men were instructed to 
remove all clothing except shirts and hats, the water being waist 
deep. Considerable merriment was caused by this proceeding 
and amateur photographers busied themselves taking snap shots. 
The band got safely across and then sat on the opposite bank and 
helped the regiment across to the tune of " Suwanee River " and 
" On the Banks of the Wabash." A solitary rabbit was started 
out of the bushes when a couple of hundred men, clad in blue 
shirts, dried themselves by chasing him across the field. The 
march was resumed at 10.50 a. m. and at 11.16 the regiment halted 



W2 Annual Report of the 

for a twelve minute rest. At 11.30 a. rh. it began to rain. At 
12.05 a halt was ordered, and scanty lunches consisting prin- 
cipally of hard tack were eaten in a heavy downpouring rain. 
The roads grew worse at e\ery step, the mud was always ankle 
deep, and in many instances over the shpe tops. A great many 
pairs of government shoes showed that their principal ingredient 
was brown paper. The soles were ripped off by the sticky mud. 
The uppers were removed and thrown away and bare feet sub- 
stituted. 

Gainesville was passed at 1 o'clock p. m. in a pouring rain. 
There were no dry places in the road, so the men were ordered to 
hold their fours intact and cover files, the result being the entire 
command was splashed with mud from head to foot. Between 
Broad Run and Gainesville a color sergeabt of Mosby's guerillas, 
clad in Confederate uniform and carrying a banner with a coat 
of arms of the state of Virginia and its motto, '' Sic Semper 
Tyrannis " emerged from the roadside, and allied himself with 
the band, which tuned out the stirring '' Dixie " in his honor. 
This gentleman lent his presence to the* regiment for some dis 
tance, then stepped from the ranks while the regiment passed in 
review, each company cheering him in turn. Haymarket was 
reached at 1.40 p. iii. At 1..50 a halt for seventeen minutes was 
made. The Delaney Homestead was passed at 2.25. The regi- 
ment was again halted at 2,45 to 2.56. and the men sat by the 
roadside, and whistled and sang, with thte rain still pouring. 

Thoroughfare was reached at 2.50, and a halt made in the 
wood^, the other side of the town, at 3.15. The march was re 
sumod at 3.30 up hill and in three inches of mud. A small strean 
with the water knee deep ^^■as forded at thil-i point. 



State Historian. 103 

The camp ground was reached and arms stacked at 4.20 p. m. 
A resume shows that the regiment marched five hours and four 
minutes, and rested three hours and sixteen minutes, covering 
a distance of about fourteen miles. Shelter tents were imme' 
diately pitched on the side of a hill, which had been ploughed 
less than six months previous, and the ground was so soft 
that the tent pegs hardly took hold. Such trenches as could 
be dug with the limited supply of implements at hand were 
about half completed when the heaviest rain of the day set in. 
All the mess fires were drowned out. The company streets were 
a perfect quagmire, and the mud anywhere from three to nine 
inches deep. 

Company H was the only company of all to keep a mess 
fire burning, which they did by detailing men to hold ponchos 
over it. All of the rest of the companies and ofQcers went to 
sleep in wet clothes, on the wet ground, supperless. The efficiency 
of the Quartermaster's Department was again demonstrated by 
the presence of the entire regimental wagon train in camp not 
later than 6 o'clock. Everyone in camp was miserable the next 
day. Very few men had a change of underwear and still fewer 
a change of outside clothes, so that they were forced to remain 
encased in their saturated garments until they were dried by heat 
frum the body. 

The regiment wallowed in the sea of mud for three days, and 
then transferred camp to a pine grove, adjoining the Third 
Missouri regiment. The spot was an ideal one and a paradise 
in comparison with the place that had just been left. The water 
supply for drinking and cooking and washing was abundant and 
pure. Drills were resumed on the usual hours and the daily 
routine of camp life once more went into effect. 



104 Annual Rei-ort of the 

Every evening after parade an immense camp fire was lighted 
near Colonel Hoffman's tent. The band discoursed sweet music 
and Headquarters were enlivened by the presence of Brigadier- 
General Sheaf e, his staff and bevies of the fairest maids in Vir- 
ginia. Dances, dinner parties and private theatricals were held 
in the surrounding homesteads at which a goodly portion of the 
oflScers of the Third New York Volunteer Infantry were always 
to be found. Enough Virginia " moonshine " found its way into 
camp to cheer, but not inebriate the heroes of the forty-two mile 
march from Camp Alger to Thoroughfare Gap. 

On August the 22nd the regiment was ordered to relieve the 
Second Tennessee, which had been detailed to Provost Guard 
duty. All of the men were well housed and fed while doing 
provost duty and Captain McBean and twenty-five men from 
Company E were royally entertained by the hospitable citizens 
of Warrenton, at which they were stationed. 

The regiment broke camp at 7.15 a. m. on August 29th and 
proceeded in two sections via Washington to Camp Meade at 
Middletown, Pa. The first section reached Camp Meade the 
same night; the second section under command of Major Butler 
reached Washington at noon and remained until 3 p. m. ; the 
Woman's Relief Corps fed the men so well that they distributed 
their hard tack and other rations to the people gathered at the 
stations of the towns through which the Battalion passed. 

As stated in the foregoing the Third Battalion of the regiment 
remained on duty at Camp Alger as provost guard until August 
12, when it was relieved by a battalion from the Seventh Ohio 
regiment. On the same day a tremendous rain storm prevailed, 
swelling all the streams to such an extent that all the bridges 
in tlie neighborhood were washed away. A raging torrent came 




Camps of Third Regiment, New Yorl< Volunteers. 



State Historian. 105 

down from the hills, and the lowlands were overflowed to a depth 
of from four to five feet. It was with the greatest difficulty that 
the Ohio troops relieved the outposts and detachments of the 
Third Battalion were obliged to wade in water to their arm pits 
to get into camp. An ambulance from the First Division hoi>- 
pital, transferring four sick men to the camp, was overturned lu 
one of the streams. The mules were drowned and the men in 
the ambulance were rescued with diflSculty by a detachment from 
the Third Missouri regiment that had been left behind to care for 
the tentage and baggage of that command. As a result of this 
storm and the consequent exposure and the long stay in the in- 
fected camp many ^ases of typhoid fever developed. Some of 
the sick men were sent to the hospital at Fort Myer, others to 
Garfield Hospital, Washington, and still others were taken to 
Camp Meade and from there transferred to hospitals in Phila- 
delphia. On August 16 the detachments left behind, by the 159th 
Indiana and the 22nd Kansas regiments, were placed under com- 
mand of Major Hall and on August 18th the Brigade broke camp 
and marched to Dunn Loring. General Graham, the corps com- 
mander, had in the meantime transferred his headquarters to 
Camp Meade. It was with difficulty that enough wagons were 
secured from the surrounding country to transfer the great 
amount of baggage, all the tentage, many extra uniforms and 
other property left behind when the Division marched to Thor- 
oughfare Gap. In the work of transfer the Regimental Quarter- 
master, Lieutenant Anthime W. La Kose, was assisted 
by First Lieutenant F. J. Miller, of Company G, both 
of these officers showing much energy and efSciency in 
the work. The Battalion, with detachments from the other 
two regiments arrived at Camp Meade, near Middletown, 



106 Annual Rei-ort of the 

Pa., on the morning of August 19, and went into camp 
in a large field on the Young farm on high ground, 
overlooking the Susquehanna river. There was an abundance of 
good water. The next few days were consumed in preparing the 
camp for the other troops that were expected from Thoroughfare, 
in piping the water from company kitchens and digging sinks and 
drains. This work was accomplished under the direction and 
supervision of Lieutenant Thurber A. Brown, of Company L. On 
Aii!?;nst 29th Colonel Hoffman, with the First Battalion, arrived 
at Camp Meade and the Second Battalion, under Major Butler, 
arrived the following day. Battalion drills were at once re- 
sumed. The regiment remained here until September 12th, at 
which date the companies started for their home stations. At 
Elmira, on the morning of September 13th, the regiment dis- 
embarked and paraded, and partook of a substantial breakfast 
prepared by the ladies of the city. Here also two beautiful loving 
cups were presented, one each to Colonel Hoffman and Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Kirby, by the officers of the regiment. Before leaving 
Camp Meade the regiment had a joint evening parade with the 
Third Missouri, the warmest friendship having been maintained 
between the two regiments. On this occasion a very handsome 
and costly loving cup was presented to the Third Missouri by the 
enlisted men of the Third New York. The cup now occupies a 
conspicuous place in the public library building at Kansas City. 
At Elmira good-byes were said and the companies departed for 
their home stations, enthusiastic demonstrations of welcome 
being made at each city. On arrival at home stations officers and 
men were furloughed for thirty days. This furlough was after- 
wards extended and the companies were mustered out of the 
service on the following dates, by Captain Elbridge R. Hills, of 



S'l'ATE Historian. 107 

the Fifth U. S. Artillery, assisted by Lieutenant George W. 
Gatchell, of the same regiment. 

feecond and Forty-flrst Separate Companies, November 30; 
Forty-eighth Separate Company, December 1st; Thirty-fourth 
Separate Company, December 3d; First, Eighth and Twenty- 
ninth Separate Companies, December 5; Forty-second Separate 
Company, December 6; Twenty-fifth Separate Company, Decem- 
ber 7; Forty-third Separate Company, December 8th; Forty- 
seventh Separate Company, December 9th; Thirtieth Separate 
Company and field and staff, December 10, 1898. 

The roster, officers and enlisted men of the regiment at the 
date of muster out were as follows : 

The following is the military record of the officers and non- 
commissioned staflt' oflicers : 

Colonel Edward Morris Hoffman. 

Private, Co. D, 110th Battalion, N. G. N. Y,, Oct. 1, 1874; 
second lieutenant, April 7 1877; first lieutenant, 30th Separate 
Company, November 29, 1881; lieutenant-colonel and assistant 
adjutant, 7th Brigade, December 6, 1884 ; supernumerary, August 
5, 18&(5; first lieutenant, 30th Separate Company, May 11, 1887; 
captain, September 4, 1890 ; inspector general, S. N. Y., December 
31, 1S96; colonel, 3rd Regiment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 17, 
1898; mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. Died at 
Albany, N. Y., May 15, 1901, while adjutant general of the State 
of New York. 

Lieutenant-Colonel William Maurice Kiriy. 

Private, 3rd Regiment, Artillery, N. Y. Vols., January 1, 1862 ; 
second lieutenant, March 10, 1862; first lieutenant, July 3, 1863; 
captain, February 17, 1865 ; was honorably discharged with regi- 



108 Annual Report of the 

ment, July 8, 1865; wounded, December 16, 1862, at Whitehall, 
N. C. ; made prisoner of war, February 2, 1864, at Beach Grove, 
N. C. ; escaped from prison and reported for duty, January 16, 
1865. First lieutenant and adjutant, 49th Regiment, N. G. N. Y., 
November 29, 1876; lieutenant-colonel, February 20, 1880; cap- 
tain, 2nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 11, 1881 ; inspector 
of rifle practice, S. N. Y., January 1, 1897; lieutenant-colonel, 3rd 
Regiment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 17, 1898; mustered out 
with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Major William Wilson. 

Private, 34th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., January 21, 1880 ; 
first lieutenant, February 23, 1882; captain, October 6, 1884; 
major, 3rd Regiment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 17, 1898; mus- 
tered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Major Mighells Bachman Butler. 

Second lieutenant, 42nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., 
November 9, 1885; captain, January 13, 1891; major, 3rd Regi- 
ment, Infantry, N. ,Y. Vols., May 17, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Major Albert Mortimer Hall. 

Private, 29th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 10, 1882; 
dropped, December 24, 1884; taken up, May 23, 1886; sergeant. 
May 4, 1887; first sergeant, June 5, 1888; first lieutenant, Feb- 
ruary 10, 1890; captain, October 14, 1890; transferred to 48th 
Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 13, 1892; major, 3rd Regi- 
ment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 20, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, December 10, 1898. 



State Histokian. 109 

Captain and Adjutant Frank Eugene Smith. 

Private, 30th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., March 1, 1883; 
corporal, April 21, 1885 ; sergeant, January 3, 1888 ; first sergeant, 
May 5, 1894; second lientenant, December 30, 1895; second lieu- 
tenant, 3rd Begiment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 17, 1898; first 
lieutenant and battalion adjutant. May 20, 1898; captain and 
adjutant, August 20, 1898; mustered out with regiment, Decem- 
ber 10, 1898. 

Captain and Adjutant Albert James Myer. 

Cadet, U. S. Military Academy, September 1, 1881, to July 1, 
1882; private, First Corps Cadets, Boston, Mass., December 10, 
1884, to June 24, 1885; first lieutenant, 65th Eegiment, N. G. 
If. Y., November 15, 1887; captain, November 14, 1889; major, 
May 22, 1893 ; honorably discharged, February 12, 1895 ; aide-de- 
camp to Governor Black, January 1, 1897; adjutant, 3rd Regi- 
ment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 17, 1898; resigned to accept 
promotion as major, 202nd Eegiment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., June 
29, 1898. 

Captain and Adjutant John Aloysi/us Quigley. 

Private, Co. E, 22nd Regiment, N. G. N. Y., April 6, 1883; 
corporal, September 22, 1884; sergeant, January 27, 1886; first 
aergeant, January 25, 1887; first lieutenant. May 4, 1887; honor- 
ably discharged, February 7, 1894; private, 2nd Separate Com- 
pany, N. G. N. Y., June 5, 1894; sergeant, November 24, 1894; 
second lieutenant, March 6, 1890; first lieutenant and battalion 
adjutant, 3rd Regiment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 17, 1898; 
captain and adjutant, June 29, 1898 \ not mustered. Died, August 
19, 1898. 



110 Annual Eeport of the 

Captain and Quartermaster Anthime Watson La Rose. 

Private, Co. D, 10th Battalion, October 16, 1883; first ser- 
geant, October 20, 1883; second lieutenant, July 10, 1884; first 
lieutenant. May 30, 1888; resigned, January 19, 1892; major and 
assistant in Inspector-General's Department, September 20, 1892; 
captain and quartermaster, 3rd Regiment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., 
May 17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Major and Surgeon WilUam Marvin Bemis. 

First lieutenant and assistant surgeon, 13th Separate Company, 
N. G. N. y., September 23, 1887; major and surgeon, 3rd Regi- 
ment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 6, 1898; mustered out with regi- 
ment, December 10, 1898. 

Captain and Assistant Fiurgeon Reeve Beecher Bowland. 

Private, 30th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., January 9, 1897 ; 
first lieutenant and assistant surgeon, March 4, 1898; captain 
and assistant surgeon, 3rd Regiment, Infantry, N. Y. Vols., May 
6, 1808 ; mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Captain and Assistant Surgeon Alfred Frederick Hodgman. 

Private, 2nd Septirate. Company, N. G. N. Y., December 30, 
1890; first lieutenant and assistant surgeon, February 20, 1893; 
captain and assistant surgeon, 3rd Regiment, Infantry, N. Y. 
Vols., May 6, 1898; mustered out with regiment, December 10, 
1898. 

First Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant John A. Quigley. 
See captain and adjutant. 

First TAeutenant and Battalion Adjutant Frank E. Smith. 
See captain and adjutant. 



State Historian. Ill 

First lAeutenant and Battalion Adjutant Jam,es B. Mitchell. 

Private, 41st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., July 14, 1893; 
dropped, Sei)teinber 28, 1893; taken up, September 28, 1895; sec- 
ond lieutenant, February 19, 1896 ; mustered into the U. S. service 
as second lieutenant, May 18, 1898; first lieutenant and battalion 
adjutant, June 20, 1898 ; resigned to accept commission as second 
lieutenant in U. S. Army, July 24, 1898. 

Chaplain James Wilson Brainard. 

Mustered into the U. S. service. May 17, 1898; mustered out 
with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

NON-COMMISSIONBD SXAPF. 

Sergeant-Major George A. WardlaiC. 

Private, 41st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 16, 1898; 
mustered as private, Co. C, May 17, 1898; appointed sergeant- 
major, September 23, 1898; vice Clarence E. Brayton, died; 
mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Sergeant-Major Clarence E. Brayton. 

Private, 41st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., March 12, 1893; 
corporal, December 5, 1893; sergeant, December 1, 1897; mus- 
tered into the CJ. S. service as sergeant-major, May 17, 1898; 
second lieutenant, September 1, 1898; died, September 20, 1898. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant Albert M. Steele. 

Private, May 1, 1898, 1st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y.; 
mustered into the U. S. service as private, Co. H, May 17, 1898; 
appointed corporal, July 2, 1898; appointed regimental quarter- 
master-sergeant, September 8, 1898; vice Herbert A. Morgan, 
discharged; mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 



112 Annual Report ov the 

Quartermanter-fiergeant Herbert A. Morgan. 

Private, 2nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., December 17, 
1889; promoted to company quartermaslei'-sergeant, September 
5, 1893; mustered into the U. S. service as regimental quarter- 
master-sergeant, May 17, 1898; discharged, June 22, 1898, to 
accept position of clerk in commissary department. 

Hospital Steward Oscar H. C Towne. 

Private, 25th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., July 30, 1895; 
mustered into the U. S. service as hospital steward. May 17, 
1898; died, September 10, 1898. 

Hospital Steward Alexander C. Tuck, 

Private, 25th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., July 8, 1891; 
detailed as musician, May 10, 1893: honorably discharged, Octo- 
ber 17, 1896; re-enlisted, October 17, 1896; mustered into the 
U. S. service as private. May 17, 1898; promoted to hospital 
steward. May 20, 1898; mustered out with reginient, December 
10, 1898. 

Hospital Steward George J. Lewis. 

Private, 1st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., December 5, 1895; 
mustered into U. S. service as private, May 17, 1898; promoted 
to hospital steward, May 17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, 
December 10, 1898. 

Chief Musician Arnold, F. Hager. 

Private, 30th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., March 29, 1898; 
mustered into the U. S. service as chief musician, May 17, 1898; 
mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 



State Historian. 113- 

Principal Mv^iciaoi Lewis V. S. St. Clare. 

Musician, 5th U. S. Infantry, December 19, 1871; honorably 
discharged, June 13, 1876; re-entered in 8th U. S. Cavalry, 
August 10, 1879; honorably discharged, February 10, 1884 j 
re-enlisted in 10th U. S. Infantry, April 3, 1889; honorably dis- 
charged, June 30, 1891 ; musician, 47th Separate Company, N. G. 
N. Y. ; mustered into U. S. service as principal musician, May 
17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Principal Musician John E. Frazer. 

Musician, 30th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y. ; mustered into 
the U. S. service as musician, Co. L, May 17, 1898; promoted 
to principal musician with regimental band, August 1, 1898; mus- 
tered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Color Bearer William B. Young. 

Private, 1st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y. ; corporal, Febru- 
ary 16, 1894; sergeant, December 16, 1895; mustered into the 
U. S. service. May 17, 1898 ; appointed color sergeant, June, 1898 ; 
mustered out with regiment, December 5, 1898. 

Color Bearer Serjeant Emmet M. Could. 

Private, 43rd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 11, 1887; 
corporal, November 21, 1891 ; dropped, June 16, 1893 ; taken up, 
March 28, 1898; honorably discharged, April 16, 1898; re-enlisted, 
April 25, 1898; mustered into U. S. service, May 17, 1898; ser- 
geant. May 19, 1898; appointed color bearer, June, 1898; mus- 
tered out with regiment, December 8, 1898. 

The Regimental Band was organized August 1, 1898, with 
Arnold F. Hager as chief musician, and John B. Frazer as prin- 
cipal musician. The following men were transferred to the 
8 



114 Annual Eei'ort of the 

band; Musician Frank A. Yattan, Co. A; Privates Frank B. 
Pritchard and John Stearns, Co. K; Musician A. A. Westcott, 
Co. L; Private Leonard K. Myers and Musicians Ed. J. Nicht 
and Fred H. Stout, Co. M. The following men were obtained by 
enlistment: Frederick R. Cotton, Daniel Henderson, Albert J. 
King, C. W. A. Marks, John McBride, George W. Maynard, 
Edward E. Orr, William Wadner. On the return of the com- 
panies to their home stations the members of the band were 
transferred back to their companies for the purpose of subsist- 
ence till muster-out. 

Company Officers. 
Company A. 
Captain Henry B. Henderson. 

Private, Co. E, 54th Regiment, August 24, 1863; second 
lieutenant, March 2, 1864; one hundred days' service, U. S. V., 
July 26, 1864; discharged, November 10, 1864; captain, July 12, 
1865; 8th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., December 10, 1880; 
mustered into U. S. service, May 17, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, December 5, 1898. 

First L-ieutenant Fredericlt W. C Bailey. 

Private, Co. E, 54th Regiment, N. G. N. Y., October 2, 1878; 
corporal, 8th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 5, 1881; ser- 
geant, April 5, 3886; second lieutenant, March 2, 1887; first 
lieutenant, September 22, 1890 ; mustered into U. S. service, May 
17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, December 5, 1899. 

Second Lieutenant Fred T. Eigabroadt. 

Private, March 18, 1885; corporal, February 25, 1889; ser- 
geant, March 11, 1890; second lieutenant, February 13, 1891; 
mustei'ed into U. S. service. May 17, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, December 5, 1898. 



State Historian. 115 

Company B. 
Gaptam James 6. Stacey. 

Private, 34th Separate GompaBy, N. G. N. Y., January 7, 1882 ; 
quartermaster-sergeant, May 21, 1883; honorably discharged, 
February 8, 1887 ; re-enlisted, December 1, 1888 ; honorably dis- 
charged, February 7, 1891; first lieutenant, September 4, 1893; 
mustered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898 ; mustered out with 
regiment, December 3, 1898. 

First Iiieutejiant William L. McKay. 

Private, 34th Separate Gompany, N. G. N. Y., March 
second lieutenant, September 4, 1893; mustered into the 
vice, May 17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, Dec 
1898. 

Becond Lieutenant George E. Gasper. 

Private, 34th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 29, 1880 ; 
corporal. May 21, 1885; sergeant, July 6, 1886; mustered into the 
U. S. service as first sergeant. May 17, 1898 ; promoted to second 
lieutenant, December 2, 1898, vice Webster, resigned; mustered 
out with regiment, December 3, 1898. 

Second Lieut&nant Horace WeTister. 

Private, 34th Separate Gompany, N. G. N. Y. ; corporal, June 
2, 1894; second lieutenant, October 15, 1896; mustered into the 
U. S. service. May 17, 1898; resigned, October 26, 1898, to accept 
second lieutenancy in 203rd Kegiment, N. Y. Vols. 

Company C. 
Gaptam John G. Butler. 

Captain, 3rd Raiment, N. Y. Vols., April 21, 1861 ; lieutenant- 
colonel, 147th Regiment, N. Y. Vols., September 13, 1862 ; colonel. 



.116 Annual Rkfort of the 

Pebruary 4, 1S63; honorably discharged, November 5, 1863; 
•captain, 41st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 12, 1888; 
mustered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, November 30, 1898. 

First Lieutenant Prank J. Miller. 

Private, 41st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., July 14, 1893; 
■first lieutenant, June 9, 1896; mustered into the U. S. service. 
May 17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, November 30, 1898. 

■Second Lieutenant Harry V. Pierce. 

Private and non-commissioned officer of the 41st Separate 
-Company, N. G. N. Y. ; mustered into the TJ. S. service as ser- 
.rgeant, May 17, 1898 ; promoted to second lieutenant, June 5, 1898, 
vice Mitchell, promoted to battalion adjutant. 

Second Lieutena/nt Jarnies B. Mitchell. 

See First Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant. 

Company D. 
•Oaptam De Solvo H. Tifft. 

Private, Co. A, 48th Regiment, N. G. N. Y., March 17, 1870; 
■discharged, January 31, 1879; private, Co. F, 48th Regiment 
(38th Separate Company), May 2, 1879; corporal, July 26, 1881; 
«ergeant, April 25, 1883 ; first sergeant. May 10, 1884 ; discharged, 
September 2, 1884; first lieutenant, July 12, 1886; transfetred 
to 48th Separate Company, May 13, 1892; mustered into the 
U. S. service as first lieutenant. May 17, 1898; captain. May 20, 
1898; mustered out with regiment, December 1, 1898. 

daptairt Albert M. Hall. 
See Major. 



State Historian. 117 

First Lieutenant Frederick L. Patthurg. 

Private, Co. H, 4th Regiment, N. J. N. G., May, 1893; cor- 
-poral, September, 1894; dropped, December, 1895; second lieu- 
-tenant, 48tL Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., June 9, 1896; 
mustered into the U. S. service as second lieutenant. May 17, 
1898 ; first lieutenant. May 20, 1898 ; mustered out with regiment, 
December 1, 1898. 

Second Lieutenant John McDonald. 

Private, 29th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., March 22, 
1889 ; corporal. May 12, 1890 ; transferred to 48th Separate Com- 
pany, May 13, 1892; first sergeant, December 16, 1892; mustered 
into U. S. service as first sergeant, May 17, 1898; second lieuten- 
ant. May 20, 1898; mustered out with regiment, December 1, 
1898. 

Company E. 
■Captain Hector McBean. 

Private, 4:2nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 30, 1888; 
corporal, February 25, 1892; sergeant, January 3, 1895; first 
lieutenant, February 3, 1897; mustered into the U. S. service 
as captain. May 17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, December 
«, 1898. 

First Lieutenant Samuel J. Mason. 

Private, 42nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., November 20, 
1885; sergeant, December 31, 1885; first sergeant, February 27, 
1892; second lieutenant, June 3, 1896; mustered into tha U. S. 
service as first lieutenant, May 17, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, December 6, 1898. 



118 Annual Kbport of the 

Second Lieutenant Francis C. Deveaux. 

Enlisted in the 42nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y.; mus- 
tered into the U. S. service as first sergeant, May 17, 1898; sec- 
ond lieutenant, ilay 20, 1898; mustered out with regiment, De- 
cember 6, 1898. 

Company F. 
Captain Sanderson A. Ross. 

29th Separate Company. N. G. N. Y., December 28, 1891; mus- 
tered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, December 5, 1898. 

First Lieutenant James S. Brahtard. 

29th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., December 28, 1891 ; mus- 
tered into the T). S. service. May 17, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, December 5, 1898. 

Second Lieutenamt Algernon B. Shattuck. 

Private, 29th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., December 28, 
1891; sergeant. May 2i, 1894:; returned to ranks, June 7, 1897; 
sergeant, January 3, 1898 ; mustered into the U. S. service as sec- 
ond lieutenant. May 17, 1898; mustered cut with regiment, De- 
cember 5, 1898. 

Company (f. 
Captain Henry M. Fales. 

Private, 42nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 5, 1887; 
first lieutenant, 25th Separate Company, May 25, 1891; captain, 
November 28, 1892; mustered into the U. S. service. May 17, 
1898; mustered out with regiment, December 7, 1898. 

First Lieutenant John L. Nice. 

Private, 25th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 25, 1891; 
sergeant. May 26, 1891 ; first lieutenant, February 3, 1893 ; mus- 



Statpe Historian. 119 

tered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898; mustered out with 
regiment, December 7, 1898. 

Second Lieutenant Charles B. Lentz. 

Private, 25th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 25, 1891; 
corporal, April 2, 1892; sergeant, May 13, 1893; dropped, July 
21, 1 894 ; taken up as private, October 17, 1896 ; corporal, Novem- 
ber 7, 1896; sergeant, October 25, 1897; second lieutenant, De- 
cember 17, 1897; mustered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898; 
mustered out with regiment, December 7, 1898. 

Company E. 
Captain Murray W. Crosiy. 

Private, 1st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., October 8, 1891; 
corporal, November 2, 1894; sergeant, July 25, 1895; second 
lieutenant, February 19, 1896; mustered into the U. 6. service 
as first lieutenant. May 17, 1898; captain, September 10, 1898, 
vice Smith, died; mustered out with regiment, December 5. 
1898. 

Captain Lester B. Smith. 

Private, 1st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 19, 1890; 
sergeant, August 11, 1890; second lieutenant, April 19, 1893; 
captain, June 13, 1894; mustered into the U. S. service. May 17, 
1898; died, August 17, 1898. 

First Lieutenant Frank G. Smith. 

Private, 1st Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 19, 1890; 
corporal, August 11, 1890; sergeant, July 3, 1891; mustered into 
the U. S. service as second lieutenant, May 17, 1898; first lieu- 
tenant, September 10, 1898; mustered out with regiment, Decem- 
ber 5, 1898. 



120 Annual Report of the 

Second Lieutenant George A. Grenville. 

Private, 2iid Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., February 27,. 

1884 ; dropped, March 26, 1885 ; private, 30th Separate Company, 

November 17, 1885; corporal, March 30, 1888; transferred to 1st 

Separate Company, February 14, 1891; sergeant, June 1, 1891: 

mustered into the U. S. service as first sergeant. May 17, 1898; 

second lieutenant, October 1, 1898; mustered out with regiment, 

December 5, 1898. 

Company I. 

Captain Riclmrd H. Franchot. 

Second lieutenant, 43rd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., July 

14, 1890; captain, December 14, 1894; mustered into the U. S, 

service. May 17, 1898; mustered out mth regiment, December 

8, 1898. 

First Li^tenant George M. Mayer. 

Private, 43rd Separate Company, September 1, 1891; sergeant, 
April 30, 1892; first sergeant, May 19, 1894; second lieutenant, 
June 27, 1895 ; mustered into the U. S. service as first lieutenant, 
May 17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, December 8, 1898. 

Second Lieutenant Henry H. Weber. 

Private, 43rd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 7, 1889; 
sergeant, April 30, 1892; returned to ranks at his own request, 
April 1, 1893; corporal, June 16, 1893; sergeant, October 9, 
1895; mustered into the U. S. service. May 17, 1898; mustered 
out with regiment, December 8, 1898. 

Company K. 
Captain Francis G. Babcock, Jr. 

First lieutenant, 47th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., Septem- 
ber 30, 1891; captain, March 9, 1897; mustered into the U. S. 




Field and Staff, Third Regiment, N. Y. V. I. 



State Historian. 121 

service, May 17, 1898; mustered out with regiment, December 
«, 1898. 

First lAeutenant \Villda/m 8. Charles. 

Private, 47th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., September 29, 
1891; second lieutenant, December 23, 1891; first lieutenant, 
May 22, 1897; mustered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898; 
mustered out with regiment, December 9, 1898. 

Second Lieutenant George H. Grosoenot: 

Private, 47th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., Septenjber 30, 
1891; corporal, May 6, 1893; sergeant,, April 25, 1896; first ser- 
geant, January 17, 1898; mustered into the U. S. service. May 
17, 1898; mustered out with regimeut, December 9, 1898. 

Company L. 
<!aptain John T. Sadler. 

Corporal, Co. D, 110th Battalion, N. G. N. Y., October 1, 1874; 
sergeant, March 3, 1876; first sergeant, April 7, 1877; second 
lieutenant, 30th Separate Company, N. (i. N. Y., November 29, 
1881; major and inspector, 7tli Brigade, December 6, 1884; 
supernumerary, August 5, 1886 ; second lieutenant, 30th Separate 
Company, May 17, 1887; first lieutenant, October 24, 1890; cap- 
tain, April 3, 1897; mustered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898; 
mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

First Lieutenant TMirier A. Brown. 

Private, 30th Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., April 28, 1885 ; 
<5orporal, April 27, 1886; sergeant, September 16, 1890; second 
lieutenant, November 25, 1890; first lieutenant. May 27, 1897; 
mustered into the U. S. service. May 17, 1898 ; mustered out with 
regiment, December 10, 1898. 



122 Annual Report of the 

Second Lieutenatit Leon A. Merrill. 

Private, 30th Separate Company, ]^. G. N. Y., April 19, 1887; 
corporal, December 20, 1890; sergeant, November 4, 1893; first 
sergeant, January 25, 1896; mustered into the U. S. service as 
first sergeant, May 17, 1898; second lieutenant, May 20, 1898; 
mustered out with regiment, December 10, 1898. 

Company M. 
Captain Clarence J. Barber. 

Private, Co. H, 54th Regiment, N. G. N. Y., August 29, 1877; 
corporal, December, 1877 ; sergeant, 1878 ; discharged by disband- 
ment; private, 2nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 24, 1881; 
corporal, June 14, 1881 ; sergeant, December 30, 1882 ; second 
lieutenant, May 3, 1887 ; first lieutenant, April 25, 1890 ; captain, 
June 22, 1897; mustered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898; 
mustered out with regiment, November 30, 1898. 

First Lieutenant Edgar S. Jennings. 

Private, 2nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., March* 20, 1891 ; 
corporal. May 19, 1894; sergeant. May 19, 1896; first sergeant. 
May 1, 1898 ; mustered into the U. S. service as second lieuten- 
ant. May 17, 1898; first lieutenant, September 19, 1898; mus- 
tered out witib. regiment, November 30, 1898. 

First Lieutenant George W. NelUs. 

Private, 2nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 24, 1881; 
corporal, June 14, 1881; sergeant, June 17, 1886; discharged, 
November 22, 1887; re-enlisted, September 26, 1889; second lieu- 
tenant, January 27, 1894; first lieutenant, December 23, 1897; 
mustered into the TJ. S. service. May 17, 1898; resigned to accept 
promotion as captain and commissary U. S. Vols. 

First Lieutenant John B. Holland. 

Private, Co. H, 7th Regiment, N. G. N. Y., November 13, 1865 ; 
corporal, August 14, 1871 ; sergeant, December 13, 1875 ; first 



State Historian. 123 

sergeant, February 15, 1S79; first lieutenant, December 4, 1888; 
major and A. D. C, February 25, 1898; mustered into the U. S. 
service, June 30, 1898 ; resigned, September 3, 1898. 

Second Lieutenant Alton W. Montgomery. 

Private, 2nd Separate Company, N. G. N. Y., May 19, 1889; 
corporal, October 21, 1893; sergeant, February 22, 1896; mus- 
tered into the U. S. service, May 17, 1898; first sergeant, June 
20, 1898; second lieutenant, September 16, 1898; mustered out 
with regiment, November 30, 1898. 

KosTE'R OF Field, Staff and Non-Commissioned Staff at Date 

OF MUSTEE-OUT. 
Kank. Names. 

Colonel Edward M. HofiEman. 

Lieutenant-Colonel William M. Kirby. 

Major ^ William Wilson. 

Major .Mighells B. Butler. 

Major •. Albert M. Hall. 

Regimental Adjutant Frank Eugene Smith. 

Regimental Quartermaster Anthime W. LaRose. 

Surgeon. William M. Bemus. 

Assistant Surgeon Alfred F. Hodgman. 

Assistant Surgeon Reeve B. Howland. 

Chaplain James W. Brainard. 

Sergeant-Major George A. Wardlaw. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant Albert M. Steele. 

Hospital Steward George J. Lewis. 

Hospital Steward Alexander C. Tuck. 

Chief Musician Arnold F. Hager. 

Principal Musician Lewis V. S. St. Clare. 

Principal Musician John E. Frazer. 



124 Annual Report op 'ehe 

Discharged. 

Regimental Adjutant ; Albert J. Myer. 

Battalion Adjutant James B. Mitchell. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant Herbert A. Morgan. 

Died. 
Regimental Adjutant Jobn A. Quigley, August 19, 

189.S ; typhoid fever. 

Sergeant-Major Clarence E. Brayton, September 

20, 1S98 ; typhoid fever. 

The casualties of the regiment while in tlie service numbered- 
33. The first officer to die was Captain L.estcr Boardman Smith, 
of Company H (First Separate (Jompany, Rochester), who died 
of typhoid fever at Rochester, X. Y., on August 17, His death 
was announced in the following order: 

Headquarters 3rd Regiment, N. Y. V. I., 

(\imp near Thnroiighfare Gap, Va., in the Field,. 

August 19, 1898. 
Or^ders I 
No. 69. j 

li is with tlie dcrpesi grief that lli.c Commanding Ofiflcer 
annouii'es the drath of Captain Lester Boardman Smith of this 
regiiiirut, wlio died at his homi^ in Rochester on the 17th day 
of Aniiiist. ISOS, of disea.-:e iiicuritd in the line of duty with his 
reciiiient. 

CiiTitain Smith entered tlie service of the, State of New York as 
a iirivute in tlie 1st Separate (^^onipany, >'. G. X. Y., May 19th, 
18!)(l, was proiiiiited to Sergeant August; 11th. 189(1, to Second 
Liemenant Oel.iber llth, 189-, to First Lieutenant April 19th, 
18(tT:, and to Captain -June IStli. 1894. Upon the first call for 



State Historian. 125- 

troops by President McKinley he volunteered with his company 
on May 1st, 1898, and was mustered into the service of the- 
United States as Captain in the 3rd Regiment, N. Y. V. I., on the 
17th of May, 1898. 

The death of Captain Smitlx is a severe loss to the regiment, 
he having, by his industry and study, become an exceedingly 
competent officer by his attention to duty and high character, 
and by the example he set to his men he has been of great benefit 
in raising and keeping up the high standard of the regiment. Of 
a most genial and happy disposition socially, and possessing to 
such a large degree the most lovable traits of character, he 
endeared himself to every member of this regiment. 

The usual badge of mourning will be worn by the officers of 

the regiment for thirty days. 

By order of Colonel Hoffman; 

FRAJs'K B. SMITH, 

Acting Regimental Adjutant. 

On August 19th occurred the death of Regimental Adjutant 
John Aloysius Quigley, Avho died of typhoid fever at Auburn,. 
N. Y. His. death was announced in the following order: 

Headquarters 3rd Regiment, N. Y. V. I., 

In the Field near Thoroughfare Gap, Va.,. 

August 19th, 1898. 
Orders ) 
No. 70. j 

It is the painful duty of the Commanding Officer to announce 
the death of First Lieutenant and Adjutant John Aloysius 
Quigley of this regiment, who died at his home in Auburn, 
N. Y., to-day of typhoid fever, which disease he contracted while 
on duty with his regiment. 



126 Annual Ebpoet of the 

Lieutenant Quigley entered the military service as private, 
Company E, 22ud Regiment, N. G. N. Y., April 6tli, 1883, was 
promoted to Corporal September 22nd, 1884, to Sergeant January 
27th, J886, to First Sergeant January 25th, 1887, First Lieuten- 
ant May 4th, 1887, and honorably discharged February 7th, 
1894. He enlisted in the 2nd Separate Company June 5th, 1894, 
was promoted to Sergeant November 24th, 1894, and to Second 
Lieutenant March 6th, 1896, and volunteered with his company 
on the first call for troops by President McKinley on May 1st, 
1898, was mustered into the service of the United States as First 
Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant May 17th, 1898. Appointed: 
Regimental Adjutant August 1st, 1898. 

Lieutenant Quigley's military service has been characterized 
by a wonderful fidelity to duty and loyalty to the service in 
which he was engaged. Of high military attainment, filling to 
the fullest extent every position he occupied and every duty 
assigned to him with honor and credit to himself and to his 
organization. Personally of a retiring disposition, but withal 
a most genial and companionable man, honorable and brave to 
the highest degree and fulfilling the highest ideal of a man and 
soldier. By his genial and happy ways and the many friendly 
acts he has performed he has endeared himself to every member 
of the regiment. 

The usual badge of mourning will be worn by the officers of the 
regiment for thirty days. 

By order of Colonel Hoffman: 

FRANK B. SMITH, 
Acting Regimental Adjutant. 



State Histoeian. 127 

Tlie deaths of these two excellent officers caused great sorrow 
throughout the command. Both were exceedingly popular among 
officers and men alike. The only other officer to give up his life 
in the service was Second Lieutenant Clarence E. Brayton, who 
died of typhoid fever on September 20th, at Harrisburg, Pa., 
after the regiment left Camp Meade. He died without knowing 
of his promotion to Second Lieutenant, he having served with 
great efficiency as Sergeant-Major. 

Several other deaths occurred among the enlisted men after 
the companies were mustered out of the service, typhoid fever 
having developed during the period of furlough. Private Thomas 
D. Gill, of Oswego, Company D, died of quick consumption the 
day after his company left the service. 

This completes the record of the 3rd New York Volunteer 
Infantry, unquestionably one of the best that New York sent 
into the service. Made up, as it was, of separate companies, 
which always maintained the highest standard, it followed that 
the regimental standard should be high also. As an evidence 
of the esprit da corps in the regiment it is noted that it was in 
service more than three months before it became necessary to 
discipline a single member through the medium of a summary 
or delinquency court. Officers and men alike worked to a com- 
mon end. It attained a high degree of efficiency in drill and disci- 
pline, and, had the fortunes of war thrown it into conflict, it 
would have acquitted itself with honor and credit alike to the 
National Guard and to the State of New York. 



128 Annual P'^port of the 

HISTOEY OF THE SIXTY-NINTH REGIMENT, NEW YOEK 

VOLUNTEERS. 

Headquai'ters 69th N. Y. Vol. Infy, 

Camp U. S. Troops, Tampa, Florida, 
June 23rd, 1898. 
Hugh Hastings, Esq., State Historian, Albany, N. Y. : 

Dear Sir. — Inclosed please find a report of our doings for the 
first month that we have been in camp. I send this in compli- 
ance with your suggestion of the 31st ult., and will continue to 
«end reports in monthly. 

Very respectfully yours, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 
Colonel 69th N. Y. Vol. Infantry, Commanding. 

On Monday, April 25th, I received a telegram from General 
Charles F. Roe, commanding Fifth Brigade, National Guard 
New York, requesting information as to the number of officers 
and men of the Sixty-ninth who would volunteer to serve in the 
armies of the United States for a period of two years, unless 
sooner discharged. On the following day at noon I reported, 
personally, to General Roe that the Sixty-ninth Regiment would 
volunteer to a unit to serve anywhere that the country might 
require its services. The regiment at that time consisted of 
eight companies, numbering 31 officers and 529 enlisted men. 

I was at once directed by Adjutant-General Tillinghast to 
recruit the regiment to twelve companies, of three officers and 
eighty-one men each. 

The work was begun without delay, and on Monday morning, 
May 2nd, the regiment marched from its armory with full ranks 
and proceeded to Camp Black at Hempstead Plains, Long 



State Historian. 129 

Island, New York, reporting to General Roe. On arrival at that 
point tents were pitched and tlie work of drilling and equipping 
the regiment for active service was begun. The roster of the 
oflScers of the regiment at this time was as follows: 

Edward Duffy, Colonel. 

Joseph L. Donovan, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Thomas P. Lynch, Major First Battalion. 

Michael J. Spellman, Major Second Battalion. 

John A. Davidson, Regimental Adjutant. 

John A. Delaney, Regimental Quartermaster. 

George W. Collins, Surgeon. 

Frank L. R. Tettamore, Assistant Surgeon. 

William J. B. Daly, Chaplain. 

COMPANY A. 

Michael Lynch, Captain. 

Patrick M. Haran, First Lieutenant. 

William F. Guilfoyle, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY B. 

Edward T. McCrystal, Captain. 
John J. Henry, First Lieutenant. 
Mortimer M. O' Sullivan, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY c. 

, Captain. 



Thomas J. Quinn, First Lieutenant. 
Patrick McKenna, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY D. 

James Plunket, Captain. 

Christopher H. R. Woodward, First Lieutenant. 

James J. Tuite, Second Lieutenant. 
9 



130 Annual Report of the 

company e. 
John E. O'Brien, Captain. 
Nicholas J. Ryan, First Lieutenant. 
John F. Bolger, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY p. 

Thomas J. Griffin, Captain. 
Philip E. Reville, First Lieutenant. 
, James H. Little, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY G. 

John E. Duffy, Captain. 

James M. Cronin, First Lieutenant. 

Bernard F. Cummings, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY H. 

Daniel C. Devlin, Captain. 

T. Hill Leary, First Lieutenant. 

Peter W. Maguire, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY I. 

Charles Healy, Captain. 

Patrick J. Molahan, First Lieutenant. 

Granville T. Emmett, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY K. 

Daniel McCarthy, Captain. 

Francis J. Keaney, First Lieutenant. 

Edward P. Gilgar, Second Lieutenant. 

COMPANY L. 

Hugh J. Barron, Captain. 

William J. P. McCrystal, First Lieutenant. 

Francis J. Cronin, Second Lieutenant. 



Stai-b Historian. 131 

company m. 
John J. Eoche, Captain. 
John J. Kennedy, First Lieutenant. 
John P. Devane, Second Lieutenant. 

During the next twenty-two days much was accomplished, 
notwithstanding the unprecedented inclemency of the weather. 
For the season of the year the cold and almost continuous rain 
was unparalleled in the history of the vicinity, and, consequently, 
worked many hardships that were entirely unexpected at that 
time. That no serious illness resulted from the long exposure 
proves the hardiness of the command, and that its numerical 
strength never lessened gives additional evidence that in case 
of need its services to the country would be such as to sustain 
its rioble traditions. 

On Monday, May 16th, the first list of recommended promo- 
tions while in the field was sent to Governor Black, being 
intended to fill vacancies in the field and staff of the regiment. 
This list read as follows: 

First Lieutenant John J. Kennedy to be Captain of Company C. 

First Lieutenant John J. Eyan to be Captain of Company E. 

Second Lieutenant Edward P. Gilgar to be First Lieutenant 
and Battalion Adjutant. 

Second Lieutenant John F. Bolger to be First Lieutenant of 
Company E. 

John P. Devane to be First Lieutenant of Company M. 

Sergeant-Major John P. Scanlon to be Second Lieutenant of 
Company E. 

First Sergeant L. J. F. Eooney to be Second Lieutenant of 
Company M. 



132 Annual Report ob'' the 

On Thursday, May 19tli, the regiment was mustered into the 
service of the United States by battalions amid the greatest 
enthusiasm of officers and men, an especial pride being shown 
in the fact that every member of the regiment who had passed 
the Surgeon's physical examination answered his name as the 
Musiering Ofiicer called it and took the oath of fealty to the 
Government. The Mustering Officer on this occasion was Cap- 
tain Schuyler, United States Army. 

After the ceremony of mustering on May 19th the regiment 
was presented with a handsome stand of colors by " The Friendly 
Sons of St. Patrick," of the city of New York, the presentation 
address being made by Judge James Fitzgerald, of New York 
city. The stand consisted of the National and State emblems 
and the historic gretm flag of Ireland. 

On Friday, May 20 th, the regiment received with enthusiasm 
the order to proceed to Ghickamauga and report to General 
Brooke, U. S. Army, and on Tuesday, May 24th, it moved, passing 
en route through the streets of New York city from the Thirty- 
fourth street ferry on the East river to the Twenty-third street 
ferry on the North river. During this parade the citizens of New 
York city showed by their many marks of appreciation that the 
course of the regiment in volunteering so unreservedly was 
valued to the full extent. The demonstrations of approval, it 
must be said, had not been equalled since the Civil War, and 
officers and men again determined that the Empire State should 
not be disappointed in its faith in the Sixty-ninth. 

Embarking on Baltimore and Ohio cars at Jersey City, the regi- 
ment started forward in three sections. En route it passed 
through Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wheeling, W. Va. ; Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and Lexington, Ky., the citizens of Lexington and Cincin- 
nati especially receiving the regiment with many honors. 



State Historian. 133 

On Friday, May 27, the regiment arrived at Ohickamauga 
National Military Park and reported to General Brooke and was 
assigned camp site at about two miles from Lytle Station on 
the Southern Railroad. 

Here tents were pitched the same evening, the men showing 
remarkable proficiency in caring for themselves, considering that 
many of them had been in the field but three weeks. 

During the six days' stay at Ohickamauga Park the regiment 
improved greatly, special attention being given to the extended 
order drill. The regiment was here equipped with a wagon 
train, consisting of thirty wagons and 121 mules. While at 
CMckamauga the Sixty-ninth was attached to the Second Divis- 
ion, Third Army Corps. 

From this point I again sent to Governor Black a list of 
names for promotion as follows: 

Oaptain Edward T. McOrystal, Company B, to be Major, 
original. 

Second Lieutenant Edward P. Gilgar, Company K, to be First 
Lieutenant (Battalion Adjutant), original. 

Second Lieutenant John P. Scanlon, Company E, to be First 
Lieutenant (Battalion Adjutant), original. 

Sergeant-Major William G. Massarene, to be First Lieutenant 
(Battalion Adjutant), original. 

Second Lieutenant Peter W. Maguire, Company H, to be Cap- 
tain Company B, vice McOrystal promoted. 

Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant Bernard J. Glynn, to be 
Second Lieutenant Company E, vice Scanlon promoted. 

First Sergeant Michael O'Connell, to be Second Lieutenant 
Company K, vice Gilgar promoted. 

First Sergeant William W. Bryant, to be Second Lieutenant 
Company H, vice Maguire promoted. 



134 Annual Report of the 

On Monday, May SOtli, I received orders from Major-General 
Brooke to proceed with the regiment to Tampa, Florida, and 
there report to General Carpenter, Commanding the Second 
Brigade, Second (General Snyder's) Division, Fourth Army 
Corps, Major General John J. Coppinger. Thuraday, June 2nd, 
the regiment struck camp and embarked on cars of the Southern 
Railroad, being divided into three sections. The march from the 
camping ground to the point of embarkation at Rossville was 
about six miles, but the men carried their heavy equipments 
through the suffocating dust and intense heat' with a sturdiness 
that would have done credit to troops long immured to the 
fatigues of campaigning. 

It was with much sorrow that the regiment was obliged to 
leave behind it in hospital Major Thomas F. Lynch and Lieuten- 
ant John P. Devane, of Company M. This brings us to the end 
of the first thirty days of the regiment's service in this campaign. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 
Colonel 69th N. Y. Vol. Infantry, Commanding. 

Headquarters 69th N. Y. Vol. Inf'y, 

Tampa, Fla., July 20th, 1898. 
Hugh Hastings, Esq., State Historian, Albany, N. Y. : 

Sir. — In compliance with your request of May 31st, 1898, I 
herewith transmit an itinerary of. our regiment for the month 
of June, 1898. 

Very respectfully, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 
Colonel 69th N. Y. Vol. Inf'y, Commanding. 



State Historian. 135 

My last report to .you closed on Thursday, June 2nd, the regi- 
ment having on that day embarked on board cars at Eossville, 
near Ohickamauga, to proceed to Tampa, Florida. 

By Saturday afternoon following we had arrived at Ocala, 
Florida, after a very fatiguing journey, and I detailed Lieutenant 
Eoouey to proceed to Tampa by fast train and report to General 
Carpenter for assignment to camp site. On his arrival there he 
was directed by General Shafter to report to General Guy V. 

Henry, Commanding Third Division, the Sixty-ninth having 

« 
been transferred to that Division. At General Shafter's Head- 
quarters the Sixty-ninth was highly complimented for having 
thus reported in advance of its arrival in Tampa, as much delay 
would consequently be avoided in placing ; in camp. General 
Henry assigned camp site at Palmetto Beach, which lies about 
four miles east of Tampa. 

On Monday afternoon, June 6th, after many delays, occasioned 
by the crowded condition of the railroad tracks for many miles 
north of Tampa, the regiment marched into camp. Beside it, to 
the eastward, lay the Thirty-second Michigan, Colonel MoGurrin ; 
on the south the First Florida, Colonel Williams, and the Second 
Georgia, Colonel Brown, while a quarter of a mile to the north 
were encamped the Third Ohio, Colonel Anthony, and the Fifth 
Ohio, Colonel Kennan. 

Palmetto Beach is a sandy neck of land a few feet above sea 
level, about half a mile in width, shaded here and there by pine 
and palmetto trees and covered thickly under foot with the 
gnarled roots of the palmetto. After much labor we succeeded 
in digging out nearly all the roots within our camp lines and also 
cleared a large plain which we use for a drill ground. Up to the 
present date the rains have been so light that little or no incon- 



136 Annual Ekpoet of the 

venience has been suffered, notwithstanding the low level of our 
encampment, but it is quite probable that when the heavier 
rains begin later in the month poor drainage will compel a move 
to higher ground. Light showers fall nearly every afternoon, 
and we are informed that the -'rainy season " is nearly upon us. 
The proximity of the beach is a source of great comfort, as it 
permits bathing to be indulged in with but slight effort. OfScers 
and men are gradually becoming acclimated and find their duties 
easier to perform and are able to use a greater variety of food. 
The drinking water is piped from an artesian well near at hand, 
but is so warm that it must be iced before it is fit to drink. 
Like all artesian water in this neighborhood, it is very hard, 
but is strongly indorsed by the Army Surgeons on account of its 
freedom from impurities. 

Shortly after our arrival the Sixty-ninth was merged with 
the Fourth Army Corps, commanded by General John J. Cop- 
pinger. He has expressed himself as highly pleased with the 
work and appearance of the regiment, as did also General Henry 
while in command of the Third Division. 

A week after our arrival in Tampa Brigadier-General John N. 
Andrews, formerly Colonel 12 th U. S. Infantry, assumed com- 
mand of our Brigade, the Second. The regiments composing 
this Brigade are the Third Ohio, the Second Georgia and the 
Sixty-ninth New York. 

On Saturday, June 18th, we were ordered to prepare to pro- 
ceed to Jacksonville, Florida, and on the following Monday 
we received instructions to be ready to embark on board ships 
at Port Tampa. Both of these indications of active service were 
received by the regiment with much satisfaction, and a corre- 
sponding regret was felt on their cancellation a short time after 



State Historian. 137 

each came to us. The regiment reported as being, ready tg move 
promptly on receipt of the above-mentioned orders. . 

On June 25th we were greatly pleased to welcome Colonel 
MacArthur,* not only for the substantial evidence of our service 
which he brought, but also that his kindly oflQces, we knew, 
would enable us to pass over the first pay-day out of the State 
with no friction and great promptness. His unvarying courtesy 
was as delightful to us as it seemed pleasurable to himself, and 
he carried with him on his departure the sincerest and heartiest 
God-speeds of officers and men. The State has now paid this 
regiment in full, as you, no doubt, are aware. 

On June 24th General Howard Oarrollt visited the Sixty-ninth 
during his tour of inspection, and expressed his satisfaction with 
the condition of the regiment. The officers and men were glad 
to see General Carroll and to extend to him, as Governor Black's 
representative, their most hearty marks of appreciation for the 
care for our interests and welfare which the Governor was thus 
showing. We had hoped that General Carroll might be able 
to stay with us longer than he found it possible, but we trust 
that he may again be detailed by Governor Black on like import- 
ant service to the State and her soldiers in the field. 

On June 27th Brigadier-General James Rush Lincoln assumed 
command of our Brigade, General Andrews having been trans- 
ferred to a brigade at Chickamauga. General Lincoln is a 
volunteer officer from Iowa, where he has been connected with 
the- National Guard for over twenty years and Inspector-General 
of its forces for the past eight years. Under his command the 
Second Brigade has become known as the most active in Tampa. 

*Colonel Arthur MacArthur, Assistant Paymaster-General, on the Staff of Governor Frank S. 
Black. — State Histokian. 

t Chief of Artillery on the Staff of Governor Black. — State Historian, i 



138 Annual Report of the 

Brigade and regimental drill, together with theoretical instruc- 
tion, have their full share of attention under his direction. 

An important change in the standing of the regiment since 
my last report to you has been the addition of 303 recruits from 
New York, made necessary by the order to bring all companies 
up to a standard of three offlcers and eighty-one men. 

Since my last report we have constructed a rifle range and 
rifle practice now' constitutes a part of each day's work. 

The health of the men during the past month has been excel- 
lent, there having been no serious illness whatever, and in this 
connection I am glad to be able to say that Major Lynch and 
Lieutenant Devane have reported for duty, having recovered 
from the illness which confined them in hospital at Chickamauga. 

The above report includes the principal happenings from June 

2nd to July 2nd. 

Very respectfully, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 

Colonel 69th N. Y. Vol. Infantry. 

Headquarters 69th N. Y. Vol. Inf y, 

Fernandina, Florida, August 22, 1898. 
Hugh Hastings, Esq., State Historian, Albany, N. Y. : 

Dear Sir. — Inclosed please find the itinerary of this regiment 
for the month of July, 1898. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 
Colonel 69th N. Y. Vol. Infantry, Commanding. 

Referring to my last report, ending July 2nd, I beg to ask 
that you correct the paragraph relating to the addition of three 
hundred and three (303) recruits, to read : " An impo;rtant change 



State Historian.. 139 

in the standing of the regiment since my last report to you has 
been the addition of three hundred and three (303) recruits 
from New York, made necessary by the order to bring all com- 
panies up to a standard of three officers and one hundred and 
three (103) men, from the former standard of three officers and 
eighty-one (81) men." In the copy sent to you last month the 
above paragraph may have been as above, and, therefore, correct, 
but the copy retained by me (not a carbon copy) is not correct, 
and I, therefore, am in doubt as to whether a clerical error has 
been made or not. By comparing above correct psfragraph with 
copy sent you the change may be made, if necessary. 

Shortly after my last report a decided change in the weather 
occurred, and, from being a pleasant and healthful camp site, 
Palmetto Beach, at Tampa, became a dangerous and uncomfort- 
able place. The former light showers increased in number and 
finally turned into torrents of rain. The level ground failed to 
absorb it quickly enough, and, there being no considerable fall 
for drainage, the water stood deep in places, and, in fact, made 
a swamp of the encampment. 

For nearly three Aveeks, with short intermissions, this con- 
tinued, the sick list increasing gradually through malarial, 
typhoid and kindred fever developments. My strong requests 
to the proper officers resulted finally in our being ordered to 
move to Pernandina, Florida, and on July 24th the regiment 
embarked on board cars at Tampa and next day arrived at 
Femandina. We encamped about a half mile north of the 
town on a sandy plateau, covered by a sparse growth of grass 
and with sufficient fall for drainage purposes. The ocean lies 
about two miles to the east and affords excellent facilities for 
bathing. The camp is supplied with water by mains and the 



140 Annual Eeport op the 

water itself, although strongly impregnated with sulphur, is not 

unpleasant and is recommended for its purity and medicinal 

qualities. 

It is to be regretted that no large level drill ground is near 

at hand and that there is no place in the vicinity where target 

practice might be safely carried on. Extended order drills in 

the undulating and brush-covered country in the neighborhood 

of the camp, however, afford very good practice, although the 

J' 
work is necessarily light on account of the heat and the heavy 

marching through the deep sand. 

Our Brigade on leaving Tampa parted with the Second Georgia 
Regiment, Colonel Brown, which was ordered to remain at 
Tampa. The Second Brigade, therefore, contains but two regi- 
ments, the Third Ohio and our own. 

Although we have been here only a week we have been very 
comfortably established and find the climate pleasant and -as 
healthful as any to be found in this part of the country. The 
germs of disease which were unquestionably generated during the 
last three weeks of cur stay at Tampa have resulted in many 
cases of very malignant typhoid, and our Surgeons and Hospital 
Corps are fighting day and night to overcome them. We have 
taken every precaution possible with the limited means at our 
disposal, but have been obliged, notwithstanding, to send many 
men to Division Hospital for treatment and care, and some of 
these men have been transferred to hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia; 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and Newport, Kentucky. 

Leaves of absence for sickness have been granted to Captains 
Lynch and Kennedy, and Captain Healy is absent on a sixty 
days' leave granted by the War Department. 

There has been one death. Private Flynn, of Company 0, from 
typhoid fever at Fernandina, although we learn unoflacially that 



State Historian. 141 

several other comrades who have been transferred to outside 
military hospitals have met with the same fate. We have four 
other critical cases of typhoid fever now under our care in this 
camp and all efforts are being made by our Surgeons to save 
these lives. 

Assistant Surgeon Oswald has been appointed Surgeon, with 
rank of Major, vice Eamsay resigned. 

Private Martin Crimmins, First Volunteer Cavalry, has re- 
ceived a commission as Second Lieutenant in our regiment, but 
has been detailed to duty on the Staff of GenA'al Coppinger, 
commanding Fourth Army Corps. The vacancy was created by 
the resignation of Second Lieutenant O'Sullivan, Company B. 

This brings me to August 2nd. 

Very respectfully yours, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 
Colonel, Commanding 69th N. Y. Vol. Infantry. 

Headquarters 69th N. Y. Vol. Inf y. 

Cajnp Wheeler, Huntsville, Ala., 
September 12th, 1898. 
Hugh Hastings, Esq., State Historian, Albany, N. Y. : 

Sir. — Inclosed please find the itinerary of this regiment for the 
month of August, 1898. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 
Colonel 69th N. Y. Vol. Infantry, Commanding. 

On Wednesday, August 10th, Governor Shaw,* of Iowa, visited 
the regiinent, escorted by our Bridage' Commander, General 
Lincoln. 

* Leslie M. Sliaw, who subsequently succeeded Lyman J. Gige as Secretary of the Treasury. — 
State Historian. 



142 Annual Keport of the' 

Governor Shaw remained with us several hours and expressed 
himself as greatly pleased with the appearance of the men and 
our encampment. Before leaving he delivered a short address 
full of admiration and kindly sentiment towards the Sixty-ninth. 
These were fully indorsed by General Lincoln later when he 
paid a high tribute to the soldierly qualities of our organization. 

This visit was one of the pleasantest we have had since coming 
into the field. It was unexpected and so cordial in its nature 
that both officers and men were not prepared to fully express 
the appreciation which they felt for the honor the Governor 
did the Sixty-niuth in thus practically spending the greater part 
of his visit to Fernandina within its lines. A hearty welcome 
will certainly be given him if he can find the opportunity to visit 
us in New York sometime, as he anticipates. 

After arriving in Fernandina the health of the regiment began 
to improve gradually and so continued up to the date of our 
departure for Camp Wheeler, Huntsville, Alabama. The citi- 
zens of Fernandina did everything in their power to insure our 
comfort, and we broke camp with a feeling of regret at being 
obliged to sever many pleasant associations which had been 
formed during our short sojourn. 

On August 12th the regiment received orders to proceed to 
Huntsville, Alabama, and there go into camp. 

Accordingly, on Saturday morning, August 27th, we embarked 
on board cars. The regiment was separated into two sections as 
it left Fernandina, but at Montgomery the railroad found it 
necessary to form three sections on account of the heavier grades 
to be encountered. On arrival at Montgomery on Sunday morn- 
ing nearly tlie whole of the command attended church services. 
On leaving Montgomery Companies E and G occupied the first 
five cars of the first section and had proceeded about eight miles 



State Historian. 143 

west of Birmingham, Alabama, to a point near the town of 
Newcastle on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, when sud- 
denly at about five o'clock in the afternoon the five cars above 
mentioned left the rails while at a high rate of speed and were 
dashed to pieces. 

The wreck occurred in a " cut," and the cars were thrown 
against the side of it with such force that they shot high into the 
air and then turned bottom up. 

It was found on examination that Private Peter Farley, Com- 
pany G, had been instantly killed and that Sergeant Frank 
Glennon, Company G, was dying. In addition twenty-six other 
non-commissioned ofiScers and privates and one civilian teamster 
were more or less injured. Sergeant Glennon died on the train 
while being sent to hospital at Birmingham. In this terrible 
scene there were many instances of heroism, both on the part 
of the wounded and of those who aided in the work of allevia- 
tion. Surgeons Fichsius and Daley, assisted by Sergeant 
Connellan, of the Hospital Corps, deserve special mention for 
the able and expeditious manner in which they handled the 
wounded under very unfavorable conditions. 

The injured men were immediately sent back to Birmingham 
for treatment and were installed at Wilson & Brown Infirmary, 
a private institution. Fifteen of them were found to be in such 
condition as to make their detention there necessary; all but 
three of these have since rejoined their regiment. 

Considering the complete manner in which the five cars were 
wrecked, it is providential that the casualty did not assume 
greater proportions. I have reported the accident to my superior 
oflBcers according to prescribed methods and have also filed 
claims, through Messrs. Bowman & Harsh, of Birmingham, Ala- 
bama, and John E. Duffy, of New York, attorneys, on behalf 



144 Annual Report oi<'vThb 

of the relatives of the killed and for the wounded. The names 
of the men and other particulars connected with the accident 
you will find attached. 

It is needless for me to say that this terrible experience has 
cast a gloom over the entire regiment, coming, as it did, in the 
trace of other harrowing, if less sudden, afflictions. 

I am greatly grieved to have to announce the death by typhoid 
fever of Corporal Edward Dwyer, Company K, on August 10th, 
at Fernandina, Florida, and Private Nicholas Duffy, Company B, 
in hospital at same place. 

On Monday, August 29th, the regiment reached Huntsville and 
were put- into camp about a mile west of the town in a beautiful 
farming valley. The soil is a red shale and is covered with a 
short thick growth of grass. The encampment drains well, and, 
judging from appearance, the location should prove a healthy 
one. The water is particularly good, being furnished through 
mains from a magnificent spring, which is one of the principal 
attractions of this part of the State. 

Captain Lynch rejoined the regiment, having entirely recovered 
from the illness w^hich compelled his return to New York some 
weeks previously. 

On Wednesday, August 31st, Governor Black visited our 
encampment, but was compelled to continue his journey after a 
very short stay. He expressed himself as much pleased with the 
condition of the regiment and its present camp site, and spoke 
some encouraging words to those who had the honor to see him. 
He was very sorry that unforeseen delays on the railroads did 
not permit him to remain some hours with us, as he had expected. 

As we had arrived but two days previously, our camp was not 
in such condition as 1 would have liked it to have been for his 



State Historian. 



145 



reception, but I am glad to note that he has spoken since his 
return to New York in terms of satisfaction as to the health and 
equipment of oflScers and men and the general standing and 
record of the regiment. 

Very respectfully, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 
Colonel 69th N. Y. Vol. Infantry, Commanding. 

EETURN OF CASUALTIES IN 69tH N. Y. VOL. INFANTRY, IN WRECK AT 
NEWCASTLE, ALA., ON L. & N. R. R., ON AUGUST 28tH, 1898. 



No. 



NAMES. 



Rank. 



Co. 



Regiment or 
Corps. 



Nature of casualty. 



6 
7 
S 
9 
10 
11 

12 

13 

14 
15 
16 

17 

IS 
19 
20 

21 

22 

23 
24 

25 

26 



27 
28 



20 



Glennon, Frank* . . 

Farley, Petert . 

Lawlor, Patriok W, 
O'Keefe, Gerald 



Carey, John 

Reardon, Thomas . 
Wright, Nicholas. . 
Pentonv, John .... 
Merritt, Samuel. . . 
Guthrie, Jacob. ... 
Daley, Thomas 



Meade, James 

Sherlock, .Tames . . 

Crowley, Timothy. . 
Kilclive, Thomas. . . 
O'Connell, Michael. . 



Noon, George. . . 

McMahon, Thomas. 
Lewis, Charles .... 
Donahue, Henry J. 



Eeilly, Patrick. 
Lane, Thomas.. 



Gordon, William . . . 
JUlanning, John J . . , 

Vaughan, Michael . . 

Skelly, Thomas J. . . 



O'Keefe, William. 
Moran, John 



Doran, Michael. . 



Sergeant.. 

Private. . 
Sergeant. 
Corporal. 

Private-. 

Private.. 
Sergeant. 
Sergeant. 
Corporal. 
Musician . 
Private. . . 

Private.. . 

Private.. . 

Private.. . 
Private. . . 
Private.. . 

Private. . 

Private.. . 
Private. . . 
Private. . . 

Teamster. 

Private. . . 

Corporal, . 
Sergeant.. 

Private.. . 

Private.. . 



Private. . 
Private. . 



Private. . 



69th N.Y. V.I.. 

69th N. Y. V. I. . 
«9thN. Y.V.L. 
69th N. Y. V. I. . 

69th N. Y. V. 1. . 

69th N. Y. V. I. 
69th N. Y. V. I. 
69th N. Y. V. I. 
69th N.Y. V.I. 
69th N.Y. V.I. 
69th N. Y. V. I. 

69th N. Y. V. I. 

69th N. Y. V. I. 

69th N. Y. V. I. 
69thN.Y. V. I. 
69thN. Y.V.I. 

69th N. Y. V. I. 

69th N. Y. V. I. 
69th N. Y. V. 1. 
69th N. Y. V. I. 

Wagon Train. . . 

69th N. Y.V.I., 

69th N. Y.V.I., 
69th N. Y. V. I. . 

69th N. Y.V.I.. 

69thN. Y.V.I.. 



69thN. Y.V.I. 
69th N V.V.I 



69th N. y. V. I. 



Compound fracture (R) and 
(L; thighs and hemorrhages 

compoimd fracture (R) leg. 
Compression brain and sca^ 

wounds. 
Ankle sprained, contusion 

back head. 
Laceration (R) hand, contu- 
sion back and (R) :^de, and 

little finger dislocated (R). 
Contusion across chest and 

head. 
Wrenched knee cap (L). 
Contusion (L) leg. 
Scalp wound, left side head. 
Scalp woimd, left side head. 
Contusion, right leg. 
Contusion (I.) knee and back . 

head. 
Contusion on chest and stom- 
ach. 
Abrasion on face and hands, 

back wrenched. 
Contusion on chest. 
Contusion on face and chest. 
Contusion on back and left 

hip. 
4 and 5 ribs left side fractured 

and contusion left elbow. , 
Contusion abdomen and back. 
Wrenched left knee and thigh. 
Back and (L) leg covered with 

bruises. 
(L) elbow dislocated and 

shoulder. 
Scalp woimd forehead and 

contusion. 
Wrenched right knee. 
(L) shoulder dislocated and 

contusion over spine. 
Scalp wound and large wound 

over (R) forehead. 
Large wound over left eye and 

contusion left thigh, left 

arm dislocated. 
Back and stomach bruised. 
Scalp wound, contunon (R) 

knee. 
Ankle sondned and contusion 

left knee. 



*Died on way to Birmingham, 

10 



tDied at wreck. 



146 Annual Report of the 

Headquarters 69th N. Y. V. I. 

Camp Albert G. Forse, Huntsville, Ala., 
November 19tli, 1898. 
Mr. Hugh Hastings, State Historian, Albany, N. Y. : 

Sir. — I have the honor to hand you herewith copy of historical 
report of our regiment from September 2nd to October 2nd ; also 
copy of similar report from October 2nd to November 2nd. I 
regret that these reports could not have reached you sooner, but 
we have so been overburdened with current work that it has been 
impossible for me to put the data in such shape as you now find 
it. I hope in the future I will be able to hiind you such reports 
more promptly. 

I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully yours, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 

Colonel 69th N. Y. V. I. 

Huntsville, Ala., October 2nd, 1898. 

On Monday, September 5th, a heavy wind storm, accompanied 
by rain, visited our encampment and did some damage and 
caused much discomfort. On the following day the Government 
began to issue lumber for flooring all the tents and the work 
was quickly completed and has added greatly to the comfort of 
the men, and, no doubt, improved the sanitary condition of the 
camp. 

The Third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which has been brigaded 
with us since June, has returned to its home rendezvous, Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and the Sixty-ninth Regiment, therefore, is the sole 
remaining regiment in the Second Brigade, Third Division, 
Fourth Army Corps. 



State Historian. 147 

Secretary of War Alger reviewed the Fourth Corps on the 
streets of Huutsville on September 23rd, in the presence of many 
thousands of people. The Sixty -ninth had recently been reuni- 
formed, and, as each company was able to turn out thirty-two 
files, the regiment presented a handsome and solid appearance 
that brought commendation from everyone. Colonel DuflEy re- 
ceived from our Brigade Commander, General Lincoln, a note of 
congratulation, which read as follows: 

" I desire to express my admiration of the magnificent appear- 
ance made by your regiment to-day. The Sixty-ninth is certainly 
a fine example of the volunteer soldier, and you can well, with 
your brother officers, feel proud of so effijcient a regiment. 
Promptness is the foundation of all military efficiency; your 
command was halted in position assigned for the formation for 
review exactly on time. With best wishes for yourself and splen- 
did command. 

Respectfully, 

(Signed) JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Brigadier-General, Vols." 

The above, and the fact that we paraded nearly 1,000 officers 
and men, speak for themselves of the standing and efficiency of 
our organization to-day. 

I am sorry to have to record the resignation of Regimental 
Adjutant John A. Davidson, Captain Barron, of Company L, and 
Captain Plunket, of Company D. Second Lieutenant Martin 
Crimmins, of Company B, has passed the Examining Board and 
entered the Regular Army as Second Lieutenant. Second Lieu- 
tenant Emmet, of Company I, has been promoted Regimental 
Adjutant; First Lieutenant McCrystal, of Company L, Captain 
of Company L, and Second Lieutenant Tuite, of Company D, Cap- 



148 Annual Report op the 

tain of Company D. Second Lieutenant Francis J. Cronin, of 
Company L, has been promoted to the First Lieutenancy in Com- 
pany L, and First Sergeant Thomas F. Keogh to the Second 
Lieutenancy of Company L. First Sergeant Charles J. Crowley, 
of Company D, has been promoted Second Lieutenant of Com- 
pany D, and Regimental Sergeant-Major Daniel P. Sullivan to 
the Second Lieutenancy of Company I. 

The deaths in the regiment diiring the month of September are 
as follows: 

Privates James Tracey, Company A; William Sweeney, Com- 
pany C; Thomas Young, Company O; Charles Gallagher, Com- 
pany G; John J. O'Brien, Company K; John Reilly, Company 
M; John Kennedy, Company M. 

Of the above list, William Sweeney died in New York and the 
remainder at the Corps Hospital at Huntsville, Ala. The ter- 
rible railroad accident in which the regiment was involved and 
mentioned in my last report has not resulted in further deaths, 
I am happy to say. 

This brings my report to October 2nd, 1898, and I trust it will 

be satisfactory. 

Very respectfully, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 

69th Regt, N. Y. V. I. 

Huntsville, Ala., November 2nd, 1898. 
So many changes have taken place during the past month 
that it is almost impossible to designate those particular ones 
which may be of interest and use in the records which you are 
compiling. First of all, it may be noted that during September 
we have experienced some cold nights for which we were not 



State Historian. 149 

quite prepared. During the hours of the days the weather was 
bracing and for the most part very pleasant. Now, that we have 
been supplied with heavier clothing and new tents, we expect to 
be entirely comfortable. 

We were all greatly grieved when we learned of the changes 
made necessary by the measures adopted for the reorganization 
of the army. So many friendships had been formed during our 
wanderings that it seemed as if we had known our friends in the 
Corps, Division and Brigade for years instead of for months. 

General John J. Coppinger, always a warm friend and admirer 
of our regiment, retired at the age limit during October, and Gen- 
eral Joseph Wheeler assumed command of the Corps. Before leav- 
ing Huntsville General Coppinger accepted a review, which our 
regiment tendered him, and afterward expressed his thanks for 
the manner in which the regiment had, while a member of his 
Corps, done its duty. General Carpenter, our former Division 
Commander, and General Lincoln, our Brigade Commander, also 
honored us by accepting reviews before leaving their old com- 
mands. I cannot help quoting here Special Orders No. 29, 
handed down by General Lincoln a few days prior to his de- 
parture from Huntsville for his new brigade command : 

" In severing my connection with the Sixty-ninth N. Y. V. I., as 
their Brigade Commander, I desire to express my appreciation of 
their soldierly qualities and my regret in having them taken 
from command. We have been denied a soldier's desire for ser- 
Tice in battle, but together we have served under trying circum- 
stances, and it is a pleasure to remember the cheerful response 
jou have ever made to duty's call. May God bless you and pro- 
tect you. 

(Signed) JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Brigadier-General, U. S. V." 



150 Annual Keport of the 

I hope you will not think me over-zealous in incorporating 
such encomiums in my reports to you, but I take it that these 
evidences of appreciation, coming, as they do, from our superior 
officers, who see our work every day in the field and know us 
in many lights, form part of a chain of our regimental history, 
which it would be careless to overlook. In fact, it seems to me 
that any praise our regiment may receive redounds to the credit 
of our State in such great measure that none of it should be 
permitted to pass by unnoticed by a regimental historian. 

At this writing there are present for duty 38 officers and 915 
men. 

I regret to announce the following resignations during October: 
Captain and Regimental Quartermaster James M. Cronin, First 
Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant Massarene, First Lieutenant 
C. H. R. Woodward, all for business reasons. Second Lieutenant 
W. H. Bi"yant's resignation has also been accepted. 

Captain J. J. Kennedy and First Lieutenant Francis J. Cronin 
have returned to duty, after having undergone severe illness in 
hospital. 

We are now serving in the Second Brigade, First Division, 
Fourth Corps, the Division being under command of General 
Chaffee,* and the Brigade under General Richard Comba. It 
will be noted that now the Corps, Division and Brigade is each 
commanded by officers who achieved distinction in Cuba during 
the late active campaign there. In fact. General Comba, our 
Brigade Commander, while in command of the Twelfth U. S. 
Infantry at Santiago, won his brigadiership. 

*\dna R. Chaffee, subsequently Lieutenant-Geaeral, United States Array. — State 
Historian, t , 



State Historian. 151 

During the montli of October our death list was as follows: 
Privates John F. Donnelly, Company D, at Huntsville, of typhoid 
malaria; Private B. Pyne, Company B, died at Huntsville; Pri- 
vate Thomas Casey, Company F, of typhoid fever. 

On October 27th the War Investigating Commission reached 
our camp and inspected, and I have no doubt that their report 
as to condition of this command, both in the matter of health 
and equipment, vnll be found to have been satisfactory. I spared 
no pains to give the Commission all the information within my 
power in answer to their questions. 

Under General Orders No. 77, Corps Headquarters, General 
Wheeler has given this encampment the name of Camp Albert G. 
Forse, " in honor of Major Albert G. Forse, First U. S. Cavalry, 
who was killed in the gallant charge of the Cavalry Division at 
Fort San Juan July 1st, 1898." 

This report includes the matters pertaining to the regiment's 
history from October 2nd to November 2nd, 1898. 

I trust that the data may prove of interest and that all neces- 
sary points will be found covered. 

I have the honor to be very respectfully, 
Your obedient servant, 

EDWARD DUFFY, 

Colonel 69th N. Y. V. I. 



152 Annual Eepoet of the 

HISTORY OF THE SEVENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, NEW 
YORK VOLUNTEERS. 
Explanatory Note. 
A commtini cation having been received by Colonel Downs on 
the 1st of June, 1898, from the Hon. Hugh Hastings, State His- 
torian of the State of New York, with accompanying printed 
pamphlet setting forth reasons why a complete history of every 
command in field service in time of war should be carefully kept 
and subsequently put in the State archives for preservation, the 
Chaplain of the regiment was detailed to prepare an itinerary 
of the Seventy-first Infantry, New York Volunteers. Due to 
breaking camp, moving and subsequent changes of orders, it was 
not possible to begin this work until the 10th of June, when the 
regiment was on board the transport ship " Vigilancia," lying 
off Port Tampa. For full particulars of regimental rosters and 
such information as would by military law be transmitted by 
the Adjutant to brigade or division headquarters and subse- 
quently preserved in places ready of access, one will not naturally 
expect a repetition in the following history. It must also be 
borne in mind that memory must be largely put under requisi- 
tion in compiling an account of the reigiment since the time of 
the declaration of war with Spain and this present date of writ- 
ing. For those who are interested it will be easy to supplement 
these records by accompanying statistics and regimental returns. 
It may also be stated here, by way of explanation rather than 
extenuation, that with limited facilities for writing in camp life, 
frequent transportation and service in the field anything more 
than a brief resum6 of actual occurrences and these indit'ed under 
trying and disturbing circumstances may not be expected. 



State Historian. 153 

With this prelude we begin our work and commend its reading 
by those who may subsequently become interested in the daily 
life of over a thousand men, who, at their country's call in its 
time of need, readily responded and entered the United States 
service. 

Contemporaneous newspaper cuttings, not possible in these 
pages wholly to reproduce, will confirm and add to the import- 
ance of all statements made in this itinerary. 

Lastly, it should be stated that at the Chaplain's request Pri- 
vate John W. French, of Company F, was detailed by Colonel 
Downs as amanuensis, and will do all the writing .of this history. 

Subsequently it was found impossible for us to carry this book 

into Cuba, and when time came for us to leave our copy had to 

be made of slips prepared during the active campaign. Private 

French was unable, on account of having yellow fever, to finish 

his work. 

GEORGE E. VAN DEWATER. 

HISTORY. 
After war between the United States and Spain was virtually 
begun by the refusal of the latter nation to receive a communica- 
tion from President McKinley at the hands of General Woodford 
on the 21st day of April, 1898, and was subsequently declared 
to have begun at this date by a resolution of Congress, passed 
four days later, the President called for 125,000 volunteers, nam- 
ing the quota expected from New York State, and expressing his 
preference for troops already enlisted in the National Guard. 
At the earliest possible moment, after being thus informed by 
the Adjutant-General of the State of New York, and request 
being made of the commanding ofiicers of the several regiments 



154 Annual Bkpoet of the 

to ascertain how many of their command were ready to enlist, 
Colonel Francis Vinton Greene, then commanding the 71st 
Regiment, N. G. iN. Y., summoned a meeting of all officers and 
men, assembled them upon the drill floor, addressed them briefly, 
stating merely the facts as above recorded and asking for ex- 
pression of opinion in response. The scene was inspiring; with- 
out a dissenting voice, by acclamation, a hearty " Aye," with an 
accompanying " Hurrah " that showed its undoubted sincerity, 
the 71st Regiment, imposing no conditions, asking no terms, in 
the simple enthusiasm of its old-time wonted loyalty, proved 
true to every tradition, and, not without much anticipated sacri- 
fice, gave generous and hearty response to its country's call for 
service. As the following records will show the Seventy-first was 
the first regiment, not only in the Empire State, but in the whole 
United States, thus favorably to respond to its ruler's request, 
and that it did it unanimously is greatly to its credit and renown. 
As further records will testify, it was also the first regiment in 
the United States to proceed to a camp for mobilization and 
muster. It was the first also to be mustered into the volunteer 
service of the country, and the first New York troops to leave for 
the seat of war. 

Agreeable to the terms of the Hull bill, requiring a three bat- 
talion formation of four companies each for every regiment, it 
was necessary to add two companies to make the Seventy-first, 
which had been a regiment of ten companies, of 100 men each, 
to conform to new requirements. In six days all twelve com- 
panies were enlisted to their full strength, and in readiness to 
obey the order of the Adjutant-General to proceed to Oamp 
Black, near Hempstead. Arrangements had been made previous 
to these sudden and unforeseen war orders for the regiment to 



State Historian. 155 

attend divine service, as is its annual custom, in St. Andrew's 
Church, Harlem, but consideration for the comfort and con- 
venience of the men, who had so quickly to make ready to leave 
home and business for an extended tour of duty, caused the 
Colonel to give orders at a late hour on the Saturday previous 
that the service would be omitted. On Monday morning, May 
the 2nd, promptly at' eight o'clock, the hour named for assembly, 
in the presence of thousands of people, filling the halls and 
galleries of the armory and extending into the streets, the regi- 
ment was formed on the drill floor. The Colonel %ave command 
" Uncover " and directed Chaplain Van Dewater to advance sev- 
eral paces and offer prayer. That was a moment never to be for- 
gotten by those present. Perfect stillness reigned while prayer 
for Divine protection was said. The moment it was finished 
the order rang out, " Column of fours, first company, first bat- 
talion, right forward fours right," and amid the tumultuous 
applause of enthusiastic friends the regiment proceeded west on 
Thirty-fourth street to Fifth avenue, down Fifth avenue to 
Twenty-second street and proceeded by ferry to Long Island 
City where train w^as taken at once to Camp Black. 

On Saturday morning, SOtli of April, Company H, Captain 
Walter I. Joyce commanding, had proceeded to Hempstead and 
broken camp. To this, company must, therefore, be given the 
honor of being the first . National Guard troops in the United 
States to encamp for the purpose of examination and mustering 
into the service of the Volunteer Army. 

The Seventy-first Kegiment was given the place of honor at 
the extreme right of the State camp, subsequently named in 
honor of the Governor, at which were mcbilized at one time some 
14,000 troops. Detraining one mile east of Garden City and 



156 Annual Eeport of the 

marching about one-half mile to the entrance of the camp, 
Colonel Greene had the companies march to the site of their re- 
spective streets. The tents, poles and pegs were duly distributed 
in their proper places, and orders were at once given to pitch 
tents and put the camp in proper condition. By four o'clock 
the work was completely finished and declared well done, and 
the regiment settled down to its life on the tented field. Within 
three days there were encamped the First and Second Provisional 
Regiments, made up of companies of the Third Brigade, the 69th, 
the 47th, the 14th, the 13th and the 65th Regiments of the 
National Guard. Brigadier-Generals George Moore Smith and 
McCoskry Butt and Major-General Roe, with their staflEs, were 
also encamped with the troops. Arrangements were at once made 
by United States ofiQcers, appointed for the purpose, Major Maus, 
Surgeon, and Captain Walter S. Schuyler, for the physical exami- 
nation of every oificer and enlisted man who offered himself for ser- 
vice in the Volunteer Army. Speedily to effect this purpose three 
surgeons were examined and mustered into the United States 
service. They were Major William D. Bell, Captain James Staf- 
ford and Captain H. Eugene Stafford, who, with the assistance 
of several officers who did lay work preparing the papers, thor- 
oughly examined every officer and man, supplied every data re- 
quired of personal histoi-y, height, weight, complexion and marks 
of individual identity, until a sufficient number had been passed 
to constitute a legally complete command. A very friendly 
rivalry, increasing in intensity as the days wore^on, sprang up 
between the several regiments, each one earnestly anxious for the 
honor of being the first to be mustered in. By constant atten- 
tion and persistent activity the Colonel and Major Bell, sparing 
no time nor pains to finish this work as speedily as possible, 



State Historian. 157 

erecting special tents, supplying them liberally with tables and 
stationery, and utilizing the services of staff officers for this 
important work, papers at last were completed, and on the after- 
noon of the 10th of May the regiment was assembled by com- 
panies, each man's name was called by Captain Schuyler, of 
the United States Army, and when every man in the company 
had responded, advanced thirty paces to the right and the full 
companj' formation reformed, order was given by Captain Schuy- 
ler to uncover, raise the right hand, the oath of allegiance was 
read, each man responded " I do." The musteidng officer then 
declared, " You are now in the service of the United States." In 
this manner all twelve companies were mustered in, when, in the 
presence of the entire regiment and some three thousand persons 
witnessing the solemn ceremony, staff officers, other than the 
surgeons, advanced to the front, were duly added to the number 
of volunteers, and then followed the mustering in of the Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel and the Colonel of the regiment. When Colonel 
Greene responded solemnly and firmly " I do," and the last offi- 
cial act in the ceremony of muster had finished a shout went up 
from all present that could have been heard for miles around. 
Few instances of such rapturous expression of patriotism and 
loyalty have been experienced. The regiment at once returned 
to its camp, every man in it realizing his changed relation to his 
country, understanding full well the sacrifices that would be re- 
quired and resolutely resolved unflinchingly to make them. 

During these days when attention seemed chiefly directed to 
the preparations for muster full camp duty was required of 
every man and regular routine of drill and other exercises were 
observed. There was scarcely an idle hour of the day. Discipline 
from the beginning was rigid ; none were allowed to leave the camp 



158 Annual Report of the 

or to go to New York, except for specific duty or on special detail. 
Criticism of such rigorous discipline was plentiful and severe, 
newspapers joined with friends of the regiment in their con- 
demnation of what seemed unnecessary severity. But Colonel 
Greene, with his varied and extensive experience in the United 
States and other armies, persistently declined to make discipline 
more lax; and, as a result, in ten days' time the very people 
and the newspapers most loud in condemnation of these disci- 
plinary measures were loudest in their praise of the magnificent 
militarj' bearing and condition which these very measures had 
effected. The boys never allowed themselves to forget that the 
Seventy-first, the first regiment in the United States favorably 
to answer the President's call to duty, was also the first in the 
Empire State to be mustered into the service of the volunteer 
army. Scarcely one of the ten days that the regiment was at 
Camp Black was pleasant or clear; besides being most unsea- 
sonably cold there were rain storms, the like of which the memory 
of the oldest inhabitant failed to recall. The stormiest day of 
all was Sunday, the 8th of May, when, from morning till night, 
without a moment's cessation, it blew a forty-mile gale and 
rained in torrents. The Chaplain had hoped to have a com- 
munion service at an early hour of the morning and subsequently 
a general service, with a sermon for the regiment in the open 
air. Neither was possible. The best that could be done was to 
have brief service in the Hospital tent for the sick, in which 
the Hospital Corps gladly and cordially joined, and subsequently 
in the Adjutant's tent, where several had huddled in a vain effort 
to ke^p dry, hymns were sung and prayers said. During the day 
many of the tents of the different regiments blew down and 
hundreds were drenched to their skins, but in the Seventy-first 



State Historian. 159 

the work of pitching tents had been so wisely directed and so 
thoroughly well done that, though many wavered, not one fell. 
For this the regiment received a special commendation from 
Major-General Roe, commanding the troops in the encampment. 
From the very beginning rations were served to companies ; each 
was obliged to do its own cooking, and exactly the same condi- 
tions which prevail in the life of the regular army existed here. 
Naturally enough, time was required and much grumbling en- 
dured before anything like satisfaction was secured in the Com- 
missary Department. Indeed, weeks later complafnts were not 
infrequently heard from the men that the food was insufllcient, 
of poor quality, no variety and generally unsatisfactory. Com- 
munications were, unfortunately, sent to home papers by mem- 
bers of the regiment, which, though containing some truth, were 
likely to give very wrong impressions and cause no end of need- 
less worry. 

After six weeks' experience one is enabled to tell the truth 
about this matter. Whatever may have been the faults of the 
Government, commissary supplies have been generous from the 
beginning. R'henever men have gone hungry it has been un- 
avoidable, for one meal only, and officers have shared hunger 
with the men. This has not happened, except when the regiment 
was in transitu. No doubt there have been cases when coffee 
has been bad, meat poorly cooked, some men had too little to 
eat and some even nothing; but the fault has invariably been 
ignorance on the part of the Quartermaster- Sergeants, ineffi- 
ciency of company cooks or lack of proper attention by company 
commanders. Generations of exjierience have taught the Govern- 
ment what kinds and how much of food are best for soldiers; 
and those who rigidly conform to its conditions, however hard 



160 Annual Ebpoet of the 

may be the discipline at first, make the best soldiers. The 
experience of surgeons in any regiment warrants the statement 
that the healthiest men in the command are those who had 
nothing but what the Government supplies. They may do a 
lot of grumbling — this is a soldier's prerogative — but they also 
do a lot of work, and this is a soldier's duty. Soldiers who are 
crying for sugar-plums and dainties from home are the quickest 
to report with colic or something worse at the sick call. Bat- 
talion messes were established from the beginning, and the officers 
of the field and staff constituted a separate mess, of which the 
Colonel detailed the Chaplain to act as caterer. At the Colonel's 
request and by his preference the fare of the latter mess was 
exceedingly simple and substantial, and the same army biscuit 
that was supplied to the soldiers was used by him and the oflScers 
solely for bread. 

From the beginning of the encampment near Hempstead visit- 
ors from all portions of the country adjacent were numerous, 
nothing but storm deterring them. Up to the time the regiment 
left camp for the South the largest number of visitors assem- 
bled in the afternoon of May 11th, when Governor Black reviewed 
the troops, assisted in this function by Major-General Koe and 
his entire staff. The band of Squadron A furnished the music 
for this occasion. None but those who had seen large armies 
in the Civil War had ever seen so large a number of troops 
together, full fifteen thousand participating in this review. Of 
all the regiments there assembled, the Seventy-first was the only 
one belonging to the volunteer army of the United States. 
Major-General Eoe, therefore, designated the right of line as its 
proper place in review, thus bestowing upon it both deserved 
and distinguished honor. As the regiment passed other com- 



State Historian. 161 

mands in the process of formation abundant applause of oflScers 
and soldiers testified to the cordial appreciation of its merits 
and the esteem in which it was held. As the regiment passed 
in review the deafening applause of thousands of citizens who 
sun'ounded the troops on both sides showed what place we had 
in the hearts of the citizens. The sight of a solid body of troops 
extending along the prairie surface for some four miles gave eye- 
witnesses the first ocular indication they had of the reality of the 
impending struggle with Spain. 

Nothing of sufficient importance to justify record occurred 
until after " taps " of Wednesday, the 11th instant, when Major 
Avery D. Andrews, Commandant of Squadron A, temporarily 
detailed to General Roe, came to headquarters and gave orders 
to proceed to Tampa, taking train the next afternoon at four 
o'clock. The Chaplain happened to be in the Colonel's tent at 
this time, and was particularly impressed with the coolness and 
good judgment of the Commanding Officer, who, knowing what 
work and labor were involved in striking tents, handling goods 
and moving to transports, decided at once to say nothing about 
the orders until " reveille," and suggested that we at once say 
good night and retire to our rest. Officers' call was almost simul- 
taneous vith " reveille " the next morning. Scarcely had the 
officers assembled and the news been imparted when it was quickly 
spread throughout the streets of the camp and shouts of approval 
were heard from every quarter. 

Before detailing the removal of the regiment from Camp 
Black, the method by which water was permanently intro- 
duced into the entire camp deserves mention. In a body 
of a thousand men it will always happen that the several pro- 
fessions and vocations of life will be more or less represented. 
11 



162 Annual Eeport op the 

Writing now, after an experience of six weeks, under circum- 
stances that have called into requisition every variety of occupa- 
tion, it seems to us that the personnel of the Seventy-first Regi- 
ment is most remarkably representative. One might well give the 
challenge to name any profession, occupation or trade that is not 
represented by more than one competent man in the command. 
Even a locomotive engineer could be detailed, if required ; lawyers, 
doctors, dentists, school teachers, carpenters, joiners, tailors, 
barbers, electricians, veterinary surgeons and civil engineers sup- 
ply such a quota of strength that the Seventy-first might be said 
to be cosmopolitan. Water is a great consideration in a well- 
equipped camp. It is, indeed, the first thing thought of by one 
selecting a site for an encampment. In the limited time allowed 
for preparation at Camp Black before the arrival of troops the 
contractor to supply the camp with water conducted from the 
reservoir at Hempstead, in pipes laid along the surface of the 
plains, had been utterly unable to finish his work. Colonel 
Greene discovered soon after arriving at camp that this work 
must be speedily done, and that the contractor was incompetent 
to do it. The Colonel at once communicated with Major-General 
Roe, and, knowing what material he had at his command, sug- 
gested that a competent detail be made at once to attend to this 
matter. Major-General Roe detailed Captain Wells, of Com- 
pany F, a civil engineer, as well as lawyer, by profession, who, 
with a force of one hundred and twenty men, sixty-five of whom 
were from our own regiment, and most of them engineers, by 
working day and night, in less than twenty-four hours had the 
pipes all laid and an abundant supply of water introduced all 
along the four miles' length of camp. 



State Historian. 163 

Everyone began to make ready to move immediately after mess 
on the morning of the 12th, anticipating the impossibility 
of doing much work, when relatives and friends would flock in 
early trains to say final farewells. Could all the subsequent 
delays have been anticipated and the many repeated opportuni- 
ties to say good-bye been known, the farewells of that afternoon 
would have lost much of their unction. Promptly at the time 
mentioned in orders the regiment proceeded in heavy marching 
order, preceded by Squadron A band, to the Long Island Rail-, 
road terminus near Camp Black, there to discover that a large 
supply of ammunition had just arrived and must be transferred 
to train before its departure. It was seven o'clock before the 
trains finally moved out and ten o'clock before we reached Long 
Island City. It was here that we began first to experience the 
absolute- incompetency of Government quartermaster ofiicials, 
which has since, on several occasions, been the occasion of much 
needless fatigue and an ever-increasing surprise. It is the duty 
of a good soldier not to criticise superior officers ; but, at the risk 
of being court-martialed, we venture the opinion that a com- 
mittee from a kindergarten school could better arrange for the 
transiwrtation of troops- and luggage than those in authority 
have done since the beginning of our war with Spain. It is the 
general belief throughout the country, entertained mostly by 
those who have had most experience with the army, that the 
managers of this department of the Government are either fools 
or knaves, or maybe both. Transport ships of the Ward Line 
had been engaged to convey the 2nd Massachusetts Infantry and 
the 71st New York to Tampa. No arrangements whatever had 
been made for transporting the Seventy-first from the depot at 



164 AxxuAL Report of the 

Long Island City to the transport ships. It was subsequently 
rumored that these ships had been ordered to the ferry slips at 
Long Island City to take troops direct from the trains. If any 
such orders were ever given, the captains did perfectly right to 
ignore them. Anyone with a child's knowledge of naval archi- 
tecture and local surroundings knows how impossible it would 
be to obey such orders. It was not until 3.30 a. m., on Friday, 
the 13th instant, that we were able to secure transportation by 
a ferry-boat to the transport ships lying ofE Bedloe Island. The 
labor of handling all the luggage from train to ferry-boat and 
subsequently to transfer it all to transport was immense. It was 
daylight when everyone, absolutely tired out, who possibly could 
get away to rest, retired for needful slumber. 

Instead of proceeding to Tampa by sea, word soon came that 
Spanish ships had been sighted off the Massachusetts coast, and 
that the Government, fearing serious consequences to the troops, 
had decided to transport them by rail. It is unnecessary here 
to describe in detail the provoking delays, the weary waiting, the 
many inconveniences of temporized bunks, lack of water, poorly 
cooked food, two further transferences of luggage, before finally 
our trains pulled out from Jersey City at 11 o'clock on Saturday 
night, the 14th of May, when, as everyone supposed, we were 
going directly to Tampa. This trip was not especially eventful. 
The regiment went in three sections. Colonel Greene in charge 
of the first, Lieutenant-Colonel Downs of the second and Major 
Clinton H. Smith of the third. 

Subsequent investigation showed that, notwithstanding all the 
companies were somewhat recruited the week before we started 
for Camp Black and the two new companies, L and M, entirely 
so, notwithstanding the severe physical examinations, but ten 



State Histoeian. 165 

per cent of all applications for enlistment in the Seventy-first 
Eegiment were rejected. Just before leaving the armory on the 
morning of May 2nd word came from division hedquarters as- 
signing to the special care of the armory the then Senior Major 
of the Regiment, Augustus T. Francis, Avho subsequently, in ac- 
cordance with special orders from the Adjutant-General's office, 
recruited a new regiment, mustered in as the One Hundred and 
Seventy-first and was commissioned Colonel of the same. The 
officers for this new regiment were made up largely of men of the 
Seventy-first who found it impossible to go to the war and are 
veterans of the regiment. In this way many junior officers at- 
tained high rank instanter, so to speak. To those who, not 
without much sacrifice, in a spirit of generous patriotism and 
honest loyalty, had enlisted and gone to the war, retaining former 
rank, or, as in some instances, accepting a lower rank rather 
than decline a duty, such rapid advancement of the stay-at-homes 
seemed very unjust and provoked much ill-feeling. While first 
and second lieutenants of years' standing in the regiment were 
risking their lives in defense of their country, with little prospect 
of promotion, and small chance of gratifying a reasonable ambi- 
tion, mere boys at home were made lieutenants, beardless youth 
promoted to captaincies, and those reveling in the luxury of their 
business rewarded with high rank. There is but one solace for 
this sad state of affairs. It lies in the joyful anticipation when 
" Johnny comes marching home " of clearing out the novices who 
have taken possession of our armory and reinstating ourselves in 
our rightful possessions. 

Major E. T. T. March, who had been Surgeon of the 71st Regi- 
ment for thirteen years, and who, for excellent reasons, was 
unable to go with the regiment to the front, and Major Augustus 



166 Annual Report ok the 

T. Francis, who had been connected with the regiment for over 
forty years, did honorable duty in connection with the regiment 
in the Civil War, who wanted to go to the front and was seriously 
disappointed that he could not because of the special detail 
referred to above, form honorable exceptions to the oflScers re- 
ferred to as " stay-at-liomes.'' 

During the trip to Tampa, or as was supposed to Tampa, nien 
subsisted on travel rations, securing hot cofifee at stations three 
times a day or endeavoring to, at which times they were allowed 
to leave the trains and line up in companies to receive it. The 
officers, for whom a sleeper was provided with each section, pro- 
vided their own mess. An-iving in Washington early Sunday 
morning, after waiting one hour, trains proceeded through the 
country on to Richmond, almost every spot of which had been 
made sacred by important events connected with the Civil War. 
Beyond Richmond there is nothing in the terrestrial prospect 
particularly to please. Delays were more or less frequent after 
leaving Savannah, and it was not until Tuesday, the 17th of May, 
that this journey ended — not at Tampa, as was originally de- 
signed, but at Lakeland, thirty-tive miles this side of Tampa, 
in the most mountainous district of Florida, some 2."i() feet above 
the level of the sea, in a region of lakes and pine forests, which 
made it, as a place of encampment, exceedingly healthful and 
picturesque. As soon as the first section lauded, the Colonel 
detailed the Chaplain to proceed to Tampa by ordinary passenger 
train, which left shortly, to provision for the officers' mess. Lake- 
land, a town of ],0O0 inhabitants, having already exhausted its 
resources in sujiplying the wants of several cavalry regiments 
there encamped. On train to Tampa the Chaplain was deli^■htcd 
to meet Brigadier-* leneial Young,* of 2nd Cavalry Brigade, with 
which the Seventy-first had been temporarily brigaded, and also 



•S.uji'-'el B. M. Young, siibseqin-ntly Lieu terjaut -General, L'nited states Army, who succeeded 
General NcUmi A. Mile-. -State Historian. 



State Historian. 167 

Major Hayes, of the 1st Ohio Cavalry, an old acquaintance as a 
fellow-student at Cornell and son of ex-President Hayes, both 
of whom spoke enthusiastically of the excellent reputation the 
71st Regiment had among the regulars, and in what high esteem 
its Colonel was held by the authorities at Washington. 

The Second Massachusetts Volunteers had preceded the 
Seventy-first by a few hours and pitched camp by the side of 
Lake Morton nearest to the village. Immediately adjacent to 
them and on the shore of the same lake the camp of the Seventy- 
first was located. Due to the congested condition of the railroad, 
a little one-horse affair of the Plant System, built for winter traffic 
only, the entire regiment did not arrive at camp until too late 
in the afternoon to pitch any tents, but one for the Colonel and 
one for the Hospital. Lying in the open, sleeping on terra flrma, 
under the azure was no preventative of rest. Long before " taps," 
which were sounded at an early hour, everybody was bivouacking 
and asleep, but a portion of the guard and the fellow that blew 
the horn. The Chaplain, arriving from Tampa by a belated train, 
found the camp, though not without some difficulty, trudging ia 
the dark, in a strange country, to a spot not in his mind definitely 
located. Immediately upon passing the sentry lines and stumbl- 
ing upon the Hospital Corps quarters, through the kindness 
of one of the corps, who at once rolled out of his cot and in- 
sisted upon his Chaplain's occupying it, the latter removed his 
boots and at once retired, sleeping soundly until 4.30, when 
awakened by the music of the birds — a picture of sky and 
landscape presented itself which language can scarcely describe. 
The most beautiful blue sky was seen between the branches of 
the pines, from which hung pendant swinging clusters of Florida 
moss, and in the distance the rippled surface of a beautiful lake 



168 Annual Repoet of the 

some two miles in circumference. A stay of nearly two weeks 
in this camp did not detract from this original picturesqueness, 
though the longer we stayed the more were all convinced that 
the dirtiest kind of dirt was to be found in this vicinity. Un- 
fortunately in policing the camp a scrupulous sense of neatness 
led the men to remove the pine needles which brought us into 
immediate contact with the native sand mingled somewhat with 
the charred or burned pines and decaying vegetation. This con- 
spired to make the camp at Lakeland a spot 

" Where every prospect pleases 
And only man is vile." 

It is perfectly safe to say that during our sojourn in this beau- 
tiful spot there was not a man at any moment whose face and 
hands were clean. 

Daily drills were at once instituted, a target erected and rifle 
practice inaugurated for new recruits, and everything done most 
quickly to make new soldiers eflficient and the entire command 
one of uniform excellence. In strange contrast to the daily 
routine of other camps in the neighborhood, both regular and 
volunteer, the daily drills, the rifle practice, the dress parade 
and the passing in review were both unique and conspicuous. 
Here, as at Camp Black, discipline was rigid, men were not 
allowed to leave the camp, except at stated times and for special 
reasons. Eigorous as this may have seemed to the enlisted men 
and maybe to some officers who did not think deeply, results 
became at once apparent. The most casual witness saw daily 
improvement in every way. Newly enlisted men became quickly 
to understand that they had not come on a summer excursion, 
but, having gone to war, were expected to prepare for it. At 
once the Seventy-first Regiment attracted favorable attention 



State Historian. 169 

from those whose extensive militai'y experience made them com- 
petent to judge of its merits, and words of becoming praise were 
frequently heard from those whose positions gave worth to their 
expressions. The New York papers at this time made daily 
mention of the excellent condition of what, by general consent, 
had come to be called " the Gallant Seventy-flrst." Their files 
may at any time be consulted to justify this statement. It is 
much to be regretted that the idea of preparing this itinerary 
did not occur until six weeks after the regiment enlisted. At 
this time of writing, and in the field, it is next to impossible 
to accumulate the contemporaneaus literature which would have 
added to the value of this story. It may be that in the future 
some one will be sufficiently interested in this story to supple- 
ment it with such extracts. Almost daily letters were written 
at this time, and for weeks subsequently, by such eminent writers 
as Henry L. Stoddard, for the " Mail and Express," and Mr. Steg- 
man, for the " New York Tribune." Even Mr. Poultney Bigelow, 
who made a great sensation at the time of the first expedition 
to Ouba by sending a communication to the " Herald," in which 
he speaks of the volunteer army as wholly unequipped and 
unready for service, makes generous exception of the Seventy- 
first and accords to it liberal praise. 

Naturally enough change of location and climate, with largely 
increased temperature, and watei', though pure, different in its 
constituent elements from that which troops have been accus- 
tomed to, drink, will produce physical disorders until troops are 
acclimatized. After an experience of ten days of unusually cold 
and stormy weather at Camp Black the regiment was suddenly 
confronted with an average daytime temperature of 95 degrees, 
at times mounting up to 104 degrees, but, fortunately, the nights 



170 Annual Report of the 

sufficiently cold to give refreshing sleep. The lake gave 
abundant facilities for bathing to the men, and, except for the 
character of the dirt above referred to, the camp was generally 
satisfactory. Some little difficuHy was experienced by the com- 
panies roasting and grinding their own coffee, and, for a time 
until this was remedied, diarrhosal difficulties were frequent. 
The first death in the regiment was due to this disorder, Private 
Philip Hubschmidt, of Company I, dying suddenly from inani- 
tion in the arms of his brother at midnight of May 20th in a tent 
of his company street. A few days previous to this one of the 
Massachusetts regiment had died from pneumonia. The funerals 
of both these privates gave a touch of sadness to the experiences 
in Lakeland. Both were members of the Episcopal Church, and, 
fortunately, for the convenience of many who wished to attend 
and the more seemly surrounding for the public service, a very 
beautiful little Episcopalian chapel was adjacent, lying between 
the two camps on the main highway. The funeral of the Massa- 
chusetts private was held on Sunday, the 22nd instant, and that 
of Private Hubschmidt on the following Saturday. The body 
lay in the church guarded by a special detail from the company 
until the hour of sei-vice, 4 p. m., when the entire company and 
many from the regiment attended in a body, the chaplain officiat- 
ing. The hymns sung at this service were most heartily rendered. 
Mention here is proper of the kindness of women friends in the 
town who almost exhausted the sparse flora of the dry season 
appropriately to decorate the coffin. The scene was one which 
all present will long remember when the hearse, with body guard 
and many troops following, proceeded to the station, from which 
the coffin was sent to New York city. It is no part of the pur- 
pose of this itinerary to record the suitable services of a public 



State Historian. 171 

and prominent nature held in St. Thomas' parish over the re- 
mains of our departed comrade, replete notices of which were 
published in the several papers at the time. 

About noon of the 28th of May several congratulatory tele- 
grams were received by Colonel Greene giving intimation that 
he had been nominated Brigadier-General by the President. Offi- 
cers' call was sounded about 3 p. m., when Colonel Gre«ne an- 
nounced that he had just received a telegram informing him 
that his nomination as Brigadier-General of volunteers had 
been confirmed by the Senate and ordering him* to proceed 
at once to California and report to General Merritt for the 
Philippine expedition. The Colonel also announced most feel- 
ingly his sentiments of affection for and pride in the Seventy- 
first Regiment, his regrets on many accounts at leaving the com- 
mand, his firm belief that officers worthy the name ought to 
accept promotion when it comes unbidden, his earnest wishes 
for the welfare of the regiment, his affectionate esteem for 
its officers, his confidence that they and the men would acquit 
themselves creditably, and that his last official act would be the 
nomination by telegram to Governor Black, of the State of New 
York,' of Lieutenant-Colonel Wallace A. Downs to the Colonelcy. 
Sad as the officers Avere to receive the intelligence, they were 
proud that their commander had thus been deservedly honored, 
and ended the meeting with an appropriate general cheer and 
personal congratulations. It never takes long for news to get to 
the company streets. In this instance it must have been antici- 
pated, for before the Captains could reach their quarters the 
men were cheering, company after company was formed and each 
proceeded to the Colonel's tent to give three cheers for Brigadier- 
General Greene and receive a few words it might appropriate 



172 Annual Report of the 

especially to itself. Adjutant William G. Bates was requested 
by the Colonel to accompany him. 

In a few hours both were packed, their tents were empty and 
they had left camp, escorted by the entire regiment, which was 
lined up in front of the depot, continuously cheering until the 
train departed. The sentiment of the returning regiment was 
unanimous, every man in it regretting the departure of Colonel 
Greene, and every man equally confident that his successor, 
both in personal oharactc-r and military ability, was worthy of 
the Colonelcy. 

The Chaplain of the regiment, desiring to minister to the 
spiritual needs of every man in the regiment, had decided when- 
ever practicable to have on every Lord's day, in addition to the 
stated and expected service and sermon, a service of the Holy 
Communion, to which he would invite every baptised Christian, 
duly prepared to receive it. These services had been previously 
held in one of the small walled tents of the oiBoers' row and 
had been well attended. Frequent services of song were held 
at different places in the camp through the week, and in front 
of the Hospital tent on Sunday nights. In this way effort was 
made to reach all classes, and we are glad to say that the effort 
was " in every way successful. The officers very generally at- 
tended the public services and assisted in the same, their worthy 
example proving contagious and influencing a good attendance 
of the men. The regiment is as varied in its religious con- 
stituency as in its social and vocational life. It is estimated 
that there are at)i»ut 150 Romanists. 

While at Camp Black Ch-aplain Van De Water, of the Seyenjty- 
flrst, had frequently talks with Father Dftly, Chaplain of the 
Sixty-ninth New York Regiment, wholly Irish and almost exolu- 



State Historian. 173 

sively Eoman Catholic. As a result of these conferences and 
in accordance with his own proposition the Seventy-first Chap- 
lain invariably made inquiry wherever the regiment might be 
and whenever possible arranged for Eoman Catholics to go to 
confession on Saturday afternoon and to mass on Sunday morn- 
ing. Both Chaplain Daley, of the Sixty-ninth, and two Roman 
Catholic chaplains, who paid a visit to the Chaplain of the 
Seventy-first when the regiment was encamped at Tampa Heights, 
expressed their opinion that in regiments where such liberal ar- 
rangements were provided for the Romanists, it was their duty 
regularly to attend the stated service and sermon of their own 
command, a condition being one that any chaplain of common 
sense could easily conform to, viz., that nothing be said in ser- 
mon of matters that created vital difference or contention between 
Protestants and Catholics. 

Both at Lakeland and at Tampa Heights the Colonel allowed 
all Roman Catholics to attend mass, leaving and returning to 
the camp in a body and under a non-commissioned officer. It 
was observed on both occasions that a number proclaimed them- 
selves Catholics who gave no other evidence that they were such, 
and that some marched to and from town who either did not 
attend the mass at all or who were observed to attend very 
indifferently. Give a soldier a chance to leave camp, and for 
the time he is willing to be anything. 

Christians of other names and sorts were fairly dealt with, 
and after the regular regimental services on Sunday were 
allowed to attend their own places of worship in towns or places 
adjoining ttie camp, always, however, in squads under some non- 
commissioned officer. In vain were objections uiged by those 
who wanted more personal liberty; both Colonel Greene and 



174 Annual Ebport op the 

Colonel Downs were positive on the subject of preventing men 
running about loosely in strange places. Though regulars had 
much more liberty than the volunteer troops, at least of the 
Seventy-first could have, it ought to be borne in mind that the 
average age among the latter is much less than that among 
the former, and that, under any circumstances, lax discipline 
cannot make good soldiers. 

Very early in our camping experience near Hempstead the 
Chaplain, observing that the Y. M. C. A. tent, placed near 
General Eoe's Divisional Headquarters for the social use and 
spiritual benefit of the men in the difl'erent commands, whatever 
good it might do others, it was of no use whatever to the Seventy- 
first Regiment, since the men were not allowed to leave the camp 
in order to use it. Appreciating the value of such a tent, he 
made application to Mr. Cleveland H. Dodge, President of the 
Y. M. C. A., of New York city, for a tent to be used exclusively 
by the Seventy-first Regiment. Mr. Dodge responded most favor- 
ably, and, co-operating with Mr. Charles D. Brower, secured 
from the Army Commission, not only the tent, but free stationery 
for the men and a clerk to manage the property so long as the 
regiment remained in the United States. By the time the tent 
was secured the regiment was about to leave Camp Black. 
Directions were accordingly given, to send the tent on the trans- 
port ship by which the Seventy-first was to set sail. This was 
done; but, unfortunately, subsequent orders transferring the 
regiment from the ship to the Pennsylvania Railway caused the 
tent to be overlooked and afterward to be carried to Key West, 
where, midst the general confusion of troops and luggage, all 
trace of it ended and the tent was lost. It was not until the 
regiment was about to leave Tampa Heights to take transport 



State Historian. 175 

ship to Cuba that, as a result of much correspondence and con- 
siderable anxiety, the Commission decided to give another tent, 
which was at this time received. How much good might have 
been done, could this tent have been erected during our stay 
in Lakeland and Tampa, we can never know. No regiment of a 
thousand men is properly tented or housed that has not at least 
one tent capable of holding at least fifty men, where troops can 
resort to write their letters, hold social meetings, give evening 
entertainments and attend religious services. Indeed, without 
such a tent in clear weather there is no suitable pMce to admin- 
ister the sacraments of the church, and in stormy weather no 
place whatever for public worship. A thousand men away from 
home deserve to have some pitched tabernacle among them. In 
the Chaplain's judgment, not to provide such a place is a neglect 
of duty. Fortunately, as was said before, the Episcopal Church 
in Lakeland served for our camp chapel. The services on the 
29th of May were especially interesting. At 8 o'clock, in the 
presence of a congregation that quite filled the nave, the Chap- 
lain first baptized Private Brandt Engelke, whose mother died 
while the regiment was aboard transport ship " City of Washing- 
ton " in New York Harbor, and whom Colonel Greene declined 
to allow to attend his mother's funeral. At the time the Colonel 
was severely criticised by the press for what it called an act 
of unnecessary cruelty. At this very time the Colonel's father, 
General Greene, oldest living graduate of West Point, famous 
for his gallantry in the Civil War and seriously wounded at 
Wauhatchie, was dying in Morristowu, N. J. Subsequently, while 
at Lakeland, the Colonel was informed by telegram that his 
youngest child was quarantined with scarlet fever with its 
mother in New York, and that his other children, except his 



176 Annual Eepoet of the 

son, who was an enlisted man on board the cruiser " Yankee," 
were distributed about in houses of friends. On neither occasion, 
though feeling as deeply as any man could the pain of separa- 
tion. Colonel Greene never thought for one moment of leaving 
the regiment, with which he had been continuously from the 
morning it left the armory to go to Camp Black. What 
he did himself he expected others to do. The end justified the 
means. Through private ministrations to and talks with 
young Engelke he was led to take new and higher ideals of duty, 
became an excellent soldier, and, best of all, devoted Christian. 
After his baptism, communion was at once administered — -it 
was Whitsunday, the presence of the Holy Spirit was manifest. 
Some eighty oflScers and men received their sacrament, among 
them Colonel Downs, who seemed to be consecrating himself to 
his new and arduous labors in the best way possible. Captain 
Townsend, of Company A, played the little organ, and the way 
the men sang the three hymns of the service and chanted the 
" Gloria in Excelsis " would have thrilled the hearts of a con- 
gregation in St. Paul's, London. The presence of several Captains 
and the Quartermaster, together with a large number of enlisted 
men, gave the Chaplain assurance that, however difQcult might 
be his work in the regiment, there were a goodly number, and 
these the most influential, ready to hold up his hands in every 
effort. 

It was a pleasure also for the Chaplain to have for assistants 
in the preparation for the service two of his own young men 
from St. Andrews, and to see in the congregation some dozen or 
more from his parish at home. At 10 o'clock, to a large number 
of men seated on the ground in front of the Colonel's tent, the 
Chaplain held service and preached a sermon from St. James, 



State Histoeian. 17T 

1-26, " Pure religion is to keep ourself unspotted from the world."^ 
Colonel Downs at once, on assuming command, appointed Alfred 
H. Abeel, Lieutenant of Company M, Adjutant of the regiment. 
On the 30th of May word was received by Colonel Downs and. 
transmitted by him to the officers that the 71st Regiment, New 
York Volunteers, had been permanen tly brigaded with the Sixth 
and Sixteenth Infantry, Regulars, which constituted the First 
Brigade of the First Division of the Fifth Army Corps, under 
General Shafter, and that it would proceed the next day to 
Tampa and there encamp waiting further orders, fhe last week 
of the camp at Lakeland was largely occupied by officers seek- 
ing and procuring their respective mounts. Florida oflEers a 
poor market for officers; their horses, like their men, are chiefly 
runts. They run small and thin. Cracker horses, like the 
cracker men, are, as a rule, long, lean and gaunt. The moment 
it was known that the officers wanted horses the country for 
miles around was put under requisition, and quadrupeds, numer- 
ous and various, invaded the camp. One Jehu from the town, 
with a high tenor voice and no conscience, is said to have made 
a fortune out of the Spanish War by selling horses exclusively 
to Seventy-first New York and Second Massachusetts, and to 
have retired with competence sufficient to enable him to live in 
Lakeland without work. Most men do this, anyway, but he will 
do it in luxury. The way this man could shave the truth would 
shame Munchausen. He could even perform miracles, this man. 
He deceived the very elect. Mounting a roan steed he sped away 
at a furious gait, wheeled quickly about and returned as if on 
a charger. The Chaplain was so overcome by this exhibition, 
that, attracted by the only big horse he had seen, he bought him 

instanter. The horse has never since been known to do more 
12 



178 Annual Report of the 

than walk. A spur cannot persuade him to change his reverent 
gait. The patient reader might suppose from this that the Chap- 
lain was the most unfortunate speculator in horse flesh among 
air the oflScers. But not so. It is the express conviction of 
Boss, the chief hostler, who was in the United States Cavalry 
Service for ten years, and if he doesn't know a horse, knows 
nothing, also of George, the oflScers' valet, who was brought up 
among horses and was coachman for twenty years, that the 
Chaplain's horse, named Quoque (Quoque means clam) is the 
best of the equine outfit. These words are written about a 
month after the horses of the field and staff were purchased. 
Respect for the feelings of my fellow-officers forbids my descrip- 
tion in detail of the horses they chose to call their own. Of all 
my extensive experiences in larger parishes of large cities, 
these horses remind me most of visits to the home for the 
ruptured and crippled. If this war lasts long and there are found 
no horses of Spanish gentlemen in Cuba on which to forage, it 
may be regarded as a fixed certainty that requisitions for offi- 
cers' mounts will have to be made upon the mules. 

Not in any spirit of fault finding, but merely to record facts, 
it should be state* here that, though the regiment had been 
in the United States service for nearly one month, the entire 
necessities of its Hospital Department had been provided by the 
regiment and at its own expense. The Surgeon himself was 
obliged to advance considerable money to procure necessary medi- 
cines. At his request the Chaplain was detailed by the Colonel 
to proceed to Tampa on the 26th instant, with a formal requisi- 
tion for medical supplies and endeavor to secure them at once. 
He went directly to Army Corps Headquarters at Tampa Bay 
Hotel, was most courteously treated and sent to one of the supply 




Cl, lljti^tntr^ 



State Historian. 179 

stores in the town with an order to have supplies that were 
needed furnished at once. Only a meagre portion of the requisi- 
tion could be obtained, supplies in stock being most inadequate 
to the demands. But a greater difficulty than this, even, con- 
fronted the Hospital Department. It seems that soldiers in the 
regular army by self-imposed flues and by saving their rations, 
accumulate a fund with which to purchase delicacies for their 
sick. Volunteers in this, as in other matters, suffer from their 
inexperience. Soon it was found that sick men needed something 
more than medicines, and that convalescents even could neither 
relish nor assimilate bacon, beans and hard tack. A serious 
condition soon confronted the regiment. We were in a country 
where milk was diflacult to procure and ice not to be had in 
large quantities. The latter had to be made artificially, and 
the large number of troops poured into the little town of Lake- 
land demanded daily more than the limited plant could supply. 
It had not rained for six months. There was no grass to be seen 
anywhere in the fields, and- such thin cows as were trying to 
graze had nothing withal to squeeze from their udders. After 
consulting with the Surgeon the Chaplain telegraphed to several 
of his parishioners and friends of the regiment in New York, 
who immediately and generously responded to such an extent 
that within a week the hospital stores resembled a grocery shop, 
and anybody in the regiment needing other food than that pro- 
vided could be libepally supplied with malted milk, in powder or 
tablet form; bouillon capsules, beef extract, lime juice, soups 
of every sort, jams, biscuit and crackers of various kinds, whiskey 
of the best quality, condensed milk and quantities of Dover's 
powders and bismuth. Sun Cholera Mixture, and many other 
things which the liberal hearts devised. 



180 Annual Eepokt of the 

Among these general contributors from New York city may 
be mentioned: Mrs. Walter H. Wagstaff, Mrs. Emmet R. Oleott, 
Mr. Lyman B. GarJield, Mr. Cleveland H. Dodge, Mr. Eugene 
Cktnklin, representing the Seventy-first Veteran Association ; Mrs. 
Archibald Watt, Colonel Henry P. Martin, War Colonel of the 
■Seventy-first in '61, and Mr. Irving P. Fisher. Many others, no 
doubt, contributed whose names do not here appear, notably 
parishioners of St. Andrew's, Harlem, and the Broadway Taber- 
nacle, Thirty-fourth street. The regiment will hold these in 
lasting remembrance; they certainly ministered unto our 
necessity. Sick calls lessened the moment these goods arrived; 
:and all felt that the painstaking labors of the Surgeons were 
uow properly supplemented with needed medicines and foods. 

For the last few evenings before the breaking up of the camp 
.at Lakeland, to avoid the terrific dust of the neighboring fields, 
the regiment was paraded and reviewed by the shore of the lake, 
and, while to do this in the somewhat constrained quarters it 
was necessary for the staff to stand perilously near, if not into, 
the water during parade and the regiment to pass in review by 
■columns of fours, the picturesqueness of the scene at sunset 
caused every inconvenience to be overlooked, leaving a memory 
sweet to recall. 

On the evening of the 30th of May there was given by the 
Lakeland Lodge of Free Masons a reception and banquet to the 
Masonic brethren of the regiment, and, though it was the night 
before the regiment was to break camp and many found it im- 
possible to leave, about thirty officers and twenty men attended. 
The exercises were exoeeidingly interesting. Addresses were made 
by the Worshipful Masteir and an old member of the Lakeland 
Lodge, and responses to these were giv* by Dr. H. Eugene Staf- 



State Historian. 181 

ford, Assistant Surgeon, and Chaplain Van Dewater, of the 
Seventy-first. 

Recognition of the spirit which had prompted the men to leave 
their homes and volunteer for foreign war, together with an 
especial tribute to the worth of the Seventy-first Regiment, was 
much appreciated by the visiting brethren. It would be interest- 
ing to know how many Masons there are in the regiment. Most 
all the officers are members of the order, and, it is believed, also 
many of the men. It has even been suggested that a warrant 
be obtained from the Grand Lodge of New York for a traveling 
lodge, with power to hold ofiScial communications and confer 
Masonic degrees. 

In due time news came, both by personal letter and through 
the public press, that the President had nominated our former 
Adjutant, William G. Bates, to be a Captain of Volunteers; 
that the Senate had confirmed the nomination, and that he had 
been assigned to the position of Assistant Adjutant-General upon 
the stafiE of Brigadier-General Greene, and that both were on the 
way to San Francisco to report to General Merritt and proceed 
to the Philippines. By this transfer of Mr. Bates the Seventy- 
first Regiment lost a most efficient officer. Coming from K Com- 
pany of the Seventh, Mr. Bates served as Adjutant of the 
Seventy-first during the six years of Colonel Greene's adminis- 
tration. It is safe to say that naver did this or any other regi- 
ment have an adjutant ^ho worked harder, or who did his work 
better than he. Those of us who had served long in the staflE, 
proud as we were to see our friends promoted, reftdy as we always 
are to welcome new and worthy men to our companionship, 
sighed deeply as we recalled recent losses of men like J. Kennedy 
Tod, Commissary; J'. Kensett dyphant. Quartermaster; E. T. T. 



182 Annual Report of the 

Marsh, M. D., Surgeon, and now of Francis V. Greene, Colonel, 
and W. G. Bates, Adjutant. It is a compliment to their suc- 
cessors to say that they are worthy to succeed such men. We' 
would be less than worthy men did we not praise their 
predecessors. 

The following changes were made in the ofiQcers of the regiment 
at once upon the promotion of Colonel Greene and Adjutant 
Bates, and their commissions in due time arrived from Albany: 

Colonel, Wallace A. Downs. 
Lieutenant-Colonel, Clinton H. Smith. 
Majors, John H. Whittle, J. HoUis Wells, Frank Keck. 
Captains, Malcolm J. EafCerty, Company F; Edward A. Sel- 
fredge, Jr., Company K. 

Subsequently, under date of June 9th, the following were 
appointed officers in the Seventy-first Regiment, under Special 
Orders No. 109 from General Headquarters, State of New York : 

• First Lieutenant William J. Crockett, Company A, to be First 
Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant, original. 

Second Lieutenant Harris B. Fisher, Company M, to be First 
Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant, original. 

Second Lieutenant Fred. H. Weyman, Company B, to be First 
Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant, original. 

Second Lieutenant John M. Thompson, Company K, to be First 
Lieutenant, vice Selfredge promoted. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant Lester J. Blauvelt, Company B, to be 
Second Lieutenant, Company K, vice Thompson promoted. He 
has since been detailed by Colonel Downs as Commissary of 
the Regiment, Lieutenant Bcekman, of Company B, having 
served briefly as Commissary, and, at his own request, returned 
to his place in the line. 



State Historian. 183 

Sergeant Peter H. Short, Jr., Company A, to be First Lieuten- 
ant, Company A, vice Crockett detailed Battalion Adjutant. 

Sergeant James M. Hutchinson, Company M, to be Second 
Lieutenant, vice Fisher promoted. 

Sergeant Charles F. Boynton, Company B, to be Second Lieu- 
tenant, vice Weyman promoted. 

All dates of these several commissions and rank are from June 
5th, 1898. 

On Tuesday, 31st of May, reveille was sounded at 3.30 a. m. ; 
everybody in camp on the qui vive making ready to move. Due 
to other's delays we begun the day at much too early an hour, 
for both at Lakeland and at Ybor City hours were wasted need- 
lessly waiting for trains to start or different sections to be 
brought together that goods might be transported. 

Just before pulling out from Lakeland a passenger train from 
the north arrived at the station. Mrs. Babcock, wife of a private 
in Company B, who, having heard that her husband was sick in 
hospital, came in this train with her brother, Mr. Bostwick. 
Much surprised to find the regiment about to leave for further 
south and anxious to avoid stopping in Lakeland, by permission 
of the Colonel was allowed to proceed with the regiment to 
Tampa. The Chaplain escorted her to the officers' car and enter- 
tained her on the journey, much pleased to find that they had 
many mutual acquaintances, and that Mr. Bostwick, her brother, 
was in the gi?aduating class at Columbia University, of which 
the Chaplain of the Regiment is also the Chaplain. As an illus- 
tration of what sacrifices have been made by many in this com- 
mand, and what a spirit of patriotism possesses the best of 
American youth. It is interesting to record that Mr. and Mrs. 
Babcock were on their wedding tour, having proposed to spend 



184 Annual, Report op the 

a year abroad. Six months of the time had passed. They were 
at Florence. Learning of the possibility of volunteers being 
called to the front, they returned home at once, Mr. Babcock. 
resuming his place in Company B and mustered in as a private, 
Mrs. Babcock at once on arriving at Ybor City, an adjacent Cuban 
settlement to Tampa, took trolley with her brother to Tampa 
Bay Hotel, where she remained for two weeks until the regiment 
left by transport ship with the fleet going to West Indies. 
During this time, by entertaining several oJBScers at the Tampa 
Bay Hotel, frequently visiting the camp at Tampa Heights and 
for a week daily coming to the transport ship " Vigilancia," as 
she lay in Tampa Bay three miles from shore, this good, kind 
and discreet woman, by a kind^ heart, generous purse and extra- 
ordinary discretion, ministered to the welfare of many in the 
regiment and made herself in every way helpful. 

The train conveyed the regiment from Lakeland in two sec- 
tions. As usual, the management of this one-horse road mixed 
things up in such a way that men and goods could not be brought 
together for hours. Mules were found in one section a mile 
and a half away from the wagons to which they were to be 
attached; tents and provisions were so confused that nobody 
could tell where either could be found; horses were miles from 
their saddles and the hostlers were with neither. No matter 
whose fault all this was, and maybe all of it was not the Gov- 
ernment's nor the railroad's, the results were distressing. After 
, lying around in the broiling sun for several hours, the men hav- 
ing lunched from traveling rations, and the ofiBcers faring as 
best they could in cheap, nasty adjacent lager beer saloons, of 
the dirtiest and wickedest town in all the country, the regiment 
finally, with but two mounted ofiQcers, the Colonel and the Chap- 



State Historian. 185 

lain, the others, unable to get their horses, taking journey on 
foot, began the march for camp, the men carrying knapsack 
and blanket, the average weight of which was sixty-two pounds. 
An ofQcer of the Sixth Infantry, Regulars, o'ne Lieutenant 
Shindle, had been detailed by Colonel Cochran, in charge of 
the brigade, to meet the regiment on its arrival and conduct it to 
its assigned location for camp; but, like all things in Florida, 
this regular army officer moved slowly and arrived at the station 
^ half hour late. It was also subsequently discovered that 
this Lieutenant Shindle conducted the regiment by a round- 
about road, at least one-half mile longer than one much more 
frequented, easier of access and along the border of which, for 
almost its entire length was a good wooden sidewalk on which 
the men might have marched. The men themselves discovered 
this when leaving camp at Tampa Heights, a week later; they 
quietly and comfortably walked down this board sidewalk to 
Ybor City, and wondered why in the name of something I can- 
not write here they had not first come by this path. The march 
to Tampa Heights will never be forgotten by those who took it. 
The day was very hot, the hour of the day its hottest, every man 
had been up since half-past three, and most of the time on his 
feet. The road was in such a dry condition that fully eighteen 
inches of dust finer than powder had to be trudged through along 
its entire course. Comparatively few halts were given, the 
Colonel thinking it best to get the regiment to camp at an early 
tour in order to become settled before dark. As we passed by 
several camps of the regular troops the men rushed out to the 
side of the road and gave the gallant Seventy-first cheers of 
hearty welcome and approval. At the time, and many times sub- 
sequently, by both officers and men of the regular army, admira- 



186 Annual Eepoet of the 

tion for the magnificent bearing of the volunteer regiment^ 
marching steadily under their heavy packs, enduring the heat 
and dust without one man falling out of the ranks, keeping \:j> a 
quick route step for a three miles' march, by some regajded in the 
light of a forced march, was enthusiastically expressed. Several 
were prostrated by the heat on arriving at camp, but were 
quickly restored. The effects, however, of the march were seen 
for several days, in cases of general weakness and obstinate 
diarrhoea. It was very soon discovered that there was no prospect 
of procuring tents or provisions to any considerable extent before 
the following morning. To provide something to eat as every man 
best could and some finding blanks except at the Colonel's tent 
and a few scattering ones in one or two company streets, the 
regiment bivouacked that night, every man in it, except the 
guard, sleeping soundly a full eight hours and some of the guard, 
no doubt, catching a wink or two on their weary sentry rounds^ 
It needs no touch of poetry to express the sentiment of devotion 
to duty shown by a man who has been up since half-past three 
the preceding morning, has traveled three miles under conditions 
such as we have described, who must then undertake guard duty 
for the night. "Tommy Atkins" has our sympathy. 

By early afternoon of the next day our scattered tents and 
goods, except a few boxes of oranges and other delicacies of tlie 
field and staff officers' mess, which Lieutenant Williams and his 
detail, which had been left at the depot, had consumed without 
let or leave of the owners, were all secured and the regiment 
comfortably settled in its new abode. The usual experience of 
water, not yet introduced, was encountered, and for forty-eight 
hours, until the pipes were laid and the Artesian wells sunk,^ 
heavy requisition was made upon our colored neighbors, who, to 



State Historian. 187 

their credit, came generously to our relief. It was very soon 
discovered that in every respect, excepting, perhaps, the single 
element of picturesqueness, this camp at Tampa Heights was 
much superior to the one at Lakeland. Within a half mile of 
the river that flows into Tampa Bay, on a promontory just eight 
feet above sea level, which, in Florida, counts for heights and 
gives to it its name, reasonably wooded with rather spreadii.g 
pines, adjacent to several fine orange groves, the waver very 
pure and wholesome, the soil sufficiently hard to i)ack, this camp 
was really ideal. Its healthfulness showed in the rapidly reduc- 
ing number at sick call. Daily routine of drill and instruction, 
with rifle practice for raw recruits, was again resumed, and every 
day, but one, when it rained severely at the time, the evening 
guard mounting was at once followed by an assembly for dress 
parade and review. Contrast between this discipline and the 
laxity in regular camps where raw recruits were numerous, 
there was nothing to do and men had perfect liberty from mess 
call in the morning to " retreat " at night, the contrast, I repeat, 
reflected creditably upon the Seventy-first, showed in its con- 
tinued improvement, and was the Subject of favorable remark by 
those who daily witnessed its public functions. 

It was felt from the beginning that our stay here would not 
be long. As each day wore on, however, and men became better 
fi.atisfled with the surroundings the longer they remained, hope 
was expressed on every side that the regiment might be fortunate 
enough to be left at Tampa Heights for at least three weeks 
before it should be summoned to leave for the front. Not but 
what it wanted to go to the front, nothing it wanted more, but 
its best officers and men wanted to go thoroughly equipped and 
prepared, and this they knew every day made more possible. 



188 Annual Report of the 

Their good wishes in this respect were not destined, however^ 
to be fulfilled, for in exactly one week's time orders came sud- 
denly to strike camp, proceed to Ybor City, take train to Port 
Tampa, and there board transport ships for the Island of Cuba. 
Nothing of especial importance occurred during the week'& 
stay at Tampa Heights not already noted, save the visit of the 
United States Paymaster, who took the best part of two days 
to settle with the regiment, and made us all somewhat more 
happy. He paid the men uniformly from the date of the muster- 
ing into the United States service to the 1st of June, leaving the 
State to pay the troops from the date of leaving the armory,. 
May 2nd, to the time of the mustering in, which, up to this time 
of writing, June 16th, it has not yet done. New York papers,, 
received by us daily until we left our native shores, speak of this 
delay on the part of the State in terms of reprehension and cite 
instances of needless suffering by families of enlisted men due 
to this inexplicable delay. Fortunately for us such instances- 
of suflfering abound in regiments other than the Seventy-first 
encamped chiefly at Chickamauga, now awaiting orders for sub- 
sequent mobilization and invasion. The Veteran Association of 
this regiment at home organized as soon as the regiment left its 
armory, and since has added to its organization an auxiliary 
of women, both of whom are actively engaged in providing for 
the needs of the regiment in the field and their families who are 
in need of assistance at home. Prom letters recently received it 
would seem the number of the latter in the Seventy-first is happily 
very few. There are numerous instances of organizations and 
firms with suflBcient patriotism to enable them to continue the 
salaries of their employes while such are engaged in the United 
States service. Indeed, in cases where such generous treatment 



State Historian. IBS' 

has been refused it is considered incontestable evidence of their 
inherent meanness. 

The Paymaster finished his work on Friday afternoon, the 
3rd of June, and, no doubt, before night some of the senseless 
ne'er-do-wells had by ways best known to themselves parted 
with their money. It seems sad to state that the Colonel thought 
it was necessary to warn the men through their officers that 
gambling was forbidden by the Articles of War. On the other 
hand, it is pleasing to cite, among other evidences of the common 
sense and estimable character of many, maybe most in the regi- 
ment, that large amounts of money were sent home by bank, 
drafts and post-oflBce exchanges by officers and men of the 
Seventy-first who had just received their pay. 

The day after being Saturday, and the Colonel being desirous- 
to relax a little the previous discipline, gave the men the privi- 
lege of going to town from 1 to 5 p. m. It would be pleasing here- 
to state that not a man abused that privilege, but, 

" All mankind is unco' weak, 
And little to be trusted, 
If self the ■wavering balance shake 
It's rarely right adjusted." 

If everybody in the regiment were good, the Chaplain would 
lose his vocation. As proof, therefore, that he has vocation still, 
mournfully it must be stated that not an inconsiderable number 
came in that night at a late hour and a few stretched their leave 
to the next day or the day after. These men were punished for 
their inexcusable infraction of discipline. The general feeling 
in the regiment was disgust for men who would thus deliberately 
abuse a privilege so generously granted. 



190 Annual Eeport of the 

On Saturday evening, the 4tli of June, the band from brigade 
headquarters came to our encampment and favored us with an 
excellent instrumental concert. A similar mark of attention was 
paid by the Brigade Band while we were in Lakeland. While 
we were lavishing our appreciation of such attentions the thought 
was constantly recurring that somebody had made a big blunder 
by not bringing sufficient band music of our own. A band is 
of greatest value to a regiment. Music that hath charms to 
soothe a savage breast, hath solace and inspiration to soldiers 
away from home. It is the Chaplain's earnest belief that had 
a regimental band accompanied us, many a time there would be 
less sick in the hospital and less disconsolate ones out of it. 
Men stop thinking about bacon and beans and forget all about 
grumbling and growling when listening to the strains of martial 
music or the rhapsody of homely hymns with which they associate 
most cherished sentiments. Many a time when we heard music in 
neighboring camps, or sailing for days in southern seas on trans- 
port ships, we heard night and morning the inspiring tones of 
well-drilled bands, we became envious, even covetous, and won- 
dered why the Seventy-flrst should be treated like a lot of 
Quakers, who object to music, or as savages, supposed to have no 
music in their souls. Let us be fair. Much as we regret the 
absence of a band, and can never quite understand why the 
bass drums were left behind at Long Island City, it ought to be 
stated by way of honor to whom honor be due that the members 
of our Drum Corps do very well, are improving every dJiy; that 
our trumpet calls are excellent and that, considering the num- 
bers, the result is all that one could reasonably expect from such 
limited resources. 

The services in camp at Tampa Heights on Sunday, the 5th of 
June, were very well attended, exceedingly interesting and evi- 



State Historian. 191 

dently much blessed. A communion service, held in the field and 
staff officers' mess tent, was attended by over sixty officers and 
men, and subsequently at 9 o'clock under a clump of trees at 
the end of the officers' row. After a brief, apocopated service 
of morning prayer the Chaplain preached to a goodly number 
from the parable of the Prodigal Son, closing with an earnest 
appeal for officers and men to become sober in a serious cause 
and as fit preparation for any emergency that might confront 
and any result that might ensue to prepare to meet their God. 
Aftei* the service two privates presented themselves^or baptism — 
William C. Lawrence, of Company G, and Richard Martens, of 
Company G, who were baptised a few moments in the presence 
of their chosen witnesses in the Chaplain's tent. 

The visitation of General Miles and his staff one evening 
previous to dress parade and the frequent visitations of aides 
from both Brigade and Division Headquarters kept everyone 
on the qui vive, hourly expecting orders to join the first expedi- 
tion to Cuba. Such news as could be obtained from newspapers 
strictly censored by the Government, which was anxious that its 
movements of troops should be unknown to Spain, informed us 
of Schley's effective blockade of Havana with his fleet of war- 
ships, of little guerilla expeditions communicating with the in- 
surgents, supplying these latter with food and ammunition, of 
Sampson's fleet bombarding Santiago, the heroic exploit of Hob- 
son in sinking the Merrimac at the mouth of the harbor and the 
imperative need of troops at once to second these brilliant efforts, 
made everybody who had ever heard of the- possibility of our 
going on the first expedition most anxious to start there. Added 
to all this we kept hearing daily of the increasing number of 
ships in Tampa Bay waiting for the troops. At last we heard 
of troops encamped immediately adjacent to us receiving orders 



192 Annual Eepoet of the 

"to move; then came the orders to the Sixth Infantry, Regulars, 
and to the Sixteenth, which, we knew, were brigaded with us, 
to proceed to the transports at Port Tampa. We knew that the 
only volunteer troops in the first expedition were to be the 
Seventy-first New York and the Second Massachusetts, which 
had in a few days begn turned into a light artillery regiment, 
and Roosevelt's Rough Eiders, under command of Colonel Wood. 
Every blow of the trumpet was thought to be oificers' call, and 
every man in the regiment was on the expectant. Already 
preparations for leaving had begun to be made. Every man had 
rolled his overcoat attached to his knapsack, to be turned into 
the Quartermaster and left behind under guard. Shelter tents 
had been issued, one-half of which was rolled by each man with 
Tils poncho and blanket to be borne upon his person. Captain 
Stoddard, of Company E, was relieved of the command of his 
company and assigned to the care of the sick that had to be 
left behind and the semi-sick and tender-feet that it was thought 
well to leave behind, nineteen in all. The sick, to their credit, 
•sincerely regretted a condition that compelled their absence from 
the regiment, and none among them more than Private Kopper, 
■of Company E, son of a former Colonel of the regiment, and 
joung Hubschmidt, of Company I, brother of the young man 
who died in Lakeland. Kopper had the measles and Hubschmidt 
liad ruptured himself falling over a beam at the sinks. Of the 
men with cold feet, who feigned illness to be left at home, or, who, 
not feigning illness, were good for nothing abroad, we will not 
speak, save to say that few things in farce or comedy could 
equal the assumed sorrow with which these men expressed their 
regrets at being left at home. It was enough to make a cat 
laugh, and a kitten might have shamed them with courage. We 
:Sorbear to mention their names; may future history give them 



State Historian. 193 

the oblivion tliey deserve. If it should happen that at: auv 
future time one reading these lines might think this judgmcMit 
harsh, and that mamma's boys had been sorely misjudged, it is 
recommended that they consult with Major Bell, Surgeon of the 
Regiment., and, after hearing his description, ours will be re- 
garded as very tame. 

At precisely 4.30 of the afternoon of June 7th, the anticipated 
order was received. Officers' call was at once sounded, solemn 
stillness reigned throughout the camp, men assembled in the 
company streets ready to receive their orders as ^oon as they 
might be received from their First Sergeants. The terms of the 
order were: Prepare at once to remove men, tents and luggage; 
mules and wagons will be ready to move you, leaving Ybor City 
at 6.30 p. m., proceeding to Port Tampa, where transport ships 
await ; provide twelve days' travel and fourteen days' field rations. 
By anyone at all familiar with military affairs it will readily be 
seen that to execute this order literally was impossible. Even 
had mules and wagons been sent, which they were not for hours, 
all our own having been sent with tiie horses to Port Tampa to 
be shipped, and had the train been ready at 6.30 p. m., which it 
was not until 6.30 the following morning, to have struck tents, 
packed them and other luggage, loaded all and marched the 
troops for three miles to Ybor City in two hours was ridiculous, 
even to suggest. 

To one who has heard all his life of military precision and 
has had an idea that orders were like the voice of heaven speak- 
ing, always executed with regularity, like return of night and 
day, a campaign experience is very likely to furnish some remark- 
able disappointments. Impossible orders are issued, trains are 
never on time, transport ships come hours after troops are 
landed on docks; you never know where you are going or when 
13 



194 Annual Report of the 

you will get there. The truth is, war is weary waiting, and until 
a soldier learns not to think he cannot be said to be truly happy. 

The " general " was sounded at the earliest practical moment, 
6.30 p. m., tents all dropping together in a very satisfactory man- 
ner. Through the failure of mules and wagons to arrive at camp 
to transport the luggage it was after midnight before the regi- 
ment took up its three-mile march to Ybor City. The night was 
hot and close, and the road very dusty for a mile until we 
reached the sidewalk leading into the city. The march was un- 
eventful enough, but its weirdness in the early morning hours 
and passing by United States ai'my wagons drawn by six mules 
conveying luggage from several camps in the neighborhood made 
it memorable. Lieutenant Williams, of Company I, with a detail, 
had preceded us with orders to ascertain our train and load it 
with our luggage. It was not until 11.30 that any train at all 
appeared upon the track, and it was only then that this train, 
said by the authorities to be assigned to the Thirteenth Infantry, 
was literally captured, loaded and held for our benefit. The 
whole regiment was indebted to Lieutenant Williams for this 
assimiption of authority and dignity which he neither officially 
nor naturally possessed. A detail of Company F, under Captain 
Rafiferty, went to Tampa to load ammunition which had been 
left there and was to be picked up by us en route to Port Tampa. 
It was not until 6.30 o'clock the following morning that the 
train moved out and we proceeded to Port Tampa. 

Copy of official order of fleet vessels, transports and convoys 
leaving Tampa Bay, Quarantine Station, Tuesday, June 14th, 
1898, at 6 p. m., the Indiana and several of the war ships meeting 
us ofif Key West early Thursday morning: 




l^^^cc^t^c^y^ . J^^^uAj3Ul^ 



State Historian. 



195 



o 



1600 



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01 

02 
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026 

01 

N-^, 027 
b34 



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1600 



800 



I = INDIANA. 
T = DETROIT. 
AO = sCORPION. 
V -VESUVIUS. 
E -HELENA. 
N = CASTING. 



1600 YDS 



N 



o 



800- 



09 
OlO 

05 

012 

029 



o 



800 



028 
013 

o3e 

025 
014 
033 

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1600 

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Oaw.^ 



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1600 



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600 Qi 



017IST Drv^ 

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O20V 

06 \ 
O30 0\ 



0-800 



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022 

023 AE- 

024 - 
031^ 

03 2^'*00 -.. 

021 

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AT = PANTHER. 
IV = BANCROFT. 

N Wi = WOMPATUCK, 
AE^=EAGLE. 
AW =WASP. 
1 = YOSEMITE. 



o = 



NAVAL VESSEL. 



o== 



TRANSPORT SHIP. 



196 Annual Report of the 

Port Tampa, a distance of nine miles from Tampa city, was 
reached about 9 o'clock, a long wait having been made at the 
Tampa station to take on the car in which the ammunition had 
been stored, and to give opportunity for the men to eat their 
breakfasts. On arriving at Port Tampa a condition analogous 
to Bedlam presented itself; train after train filled with troops 
and luggage pulled into the long pier. There passed us on a 
Bide track before we detrained the Roosevelt Rough Riders, from 
whom we learned that they had received orders to go to Cuba 
dismounted. Such a set of disappointed men one seldom has 
seen. The fates of war have certainly their disappointments. To 
think of Theodore Roosevelt leaving the position of Assistant 
Secretary of the Navy and organizing a regiment of expert 
cavalrymen, at least one company of which is made up of young 
men of high social standing in New York, every man in the 
command having furnished himself with expensive mounts, sud- 
denly by an order to be dismounted is certainly hard luck. Our 
entire regiment, like scores of others, had to stand or sit for six 
or seven hours in hot sand, with no shelter, before the transport 
ships, which were in the outer bay, sailed up to the dock and were 
ready to receive the troops. Both Major-Generals Miles and 
Shafter were there with their staffs; but arrangements seemed 
utterly ineffectual for the work in hand. The whole affair was, 
as one of the officers characteristically described it, '• a game of 
grab." Fortunntely for the Seventy-first Regiment its Colonel, 
ordinarily modest, persistently pushed his claims, conformed to 
conditions, and what he needed and could not secure through 
the ordinary channels took unappropriated. At the last moment 
he was told that only a limited number of hoiscs CDuld be 
allowed to go; what they expected to do with the others nobody 



State Historian. 197 

seemed to know. One officer would turn you over to another 
officer, he to a third, and finally it would be discovered that no 
one knew what boat you were going on, what time the boats 
would come to the pier or anything else which a little system 
and some management might have provided. Under these con- 
ditions Colonel Downs concluded to do what was best for the 
regiment despite orders or the lack of theni. Indeed, he was told 
by one officer to go ahead and arrange for his regiment without 
reference to orders. Accordingly, he selected the " Vjgilancia," 
the finest boat of the whole fleet, the newest boat of the Ward 
Line; and to secure it he sent Lieutenant-Oolonel Smith and a 
detail of twelve men in a small boat down the bay, hired for the 
purpose, who, on arriving, informed the captain that the " Vigi- 
lancia" must at once proceed to the dock and take aboard the 
Seventy-first New York Volunteers. It was most fortunate that 
this ship was secured, because not a single command in the fleet 
was as large as this regiment, and not another boat in the fleet 
could have held this regiment. As soon as it came to the pier 
the regiment was boarded and immediately, though the men were 
fatigued with the day's heat and tiresome waiting, they at once 
turned in and loaded the boat with tents, provisions, luggage 
and ammunition ; finally the horses were put on board — all of 
them, too — no officer forbidding. This kind of work had been 
going on all day, and, indeed, all the night and part of the day 
before, until, when the work was finished, there were thirty-nine 
transport ships, carrying eighteen thousand troops, their lug- 
gage and ammunition, horses and mules, wagons and carts, and 
all other paraphernalia of a moving army of invasion. When 
the fleet had started there were seen, in addition, twelve United 
States vessels as convoys, floats for transferring troops and 



198 Annual Kkport op the 

horses in tow of several of the vessels, a small steam, yacht, with 
reporters and representatives of foreign governments, the Hos- 
pital Ship and the flagship, on which were General Shafter and 
his staff. Just as the officers were being seated at their first 
meal in the saloon of the "Vigilancia" the Division Quarter- 
master came aboard and announced that the expedition to Cuba 
had been temporarily suspended. More weary waiting followed. 
Indeed, we remained lashed up to the railroad dock until the 
following afternoon, when, fortunately for our comfort, we sailed 
three miles down the bay and anchored and there remained until 
the following Tuesday night before the fleet set sail for Cuba. 
Nobody knew, but everybody guessed, the reason for the delay. 
The best guess, because the one confirmed by newspapers, was 
that President McKinley's great anxiety, to protect the troops, 
having heard that the Spanish fleet had been sighted outside the 
bay, had caused a temporary suspension of the order to pro- 
ceed. This, the gentle reader will recall, was the reason why we 
were transferred from transport ships in New York Harbor to 
trains in Jersey City. Subsequent events proved that there had 
been no Spanish ships seen off the Massachusetts coast, and 
that the President's anxiety was unfounded. In the opinion of 
the writer of this story the President's anxiety is a myth, the 
story of the Spanish warships a fake, and the reason for delay 
in sending the fleet to Cuba was simply its unreadiness to go. 
During the five days' waiting at dock and in Tampa Bay the men 
of the regiment did little else, when they were not drilling or 
otherwise engaged in detail work, but loaf, eat, sleep and grumble. 
Such an extraordinary amount of fault-finding had never before 
developed in the command. OflScers were as bad as the men in 
finding fault. Food was bad and not enough of it, meals were 



State Historian. 199 

poorly served, the service of stewards was defective, there were 
DO chairs to sit on, exorbitant charges were made for beer, 
hours for meals absurdly inconvenient, nothing, in fact, was 
right or as it should be. For a few days and until the fleet got 
under way this grumbling was incessant. The truth is the men 
wanted to go; and constant delays and no reason given for them 
became vexatious. All became happy the moment the word was 
given to start. The truth also was that the "Vigilancia" was 
the finest boat of the fleet, the men of the Seventy-first had 
roomiest and best-ventilated quarters of any in the fleet, and 
that, much as both men and officers grumbled at the food, the 
former were provided with travel rations of such liberal and 
excellent a quality that at no time for two weeks were there 
six sick men out of the thousand; and the latter, considering 
that they paid but a dollar a day, ought to have been ashamed 
of themselves to have found any fault. A stranger might some- 
times think, in hearing soldiers talk, that going to war they 
had expected no hardships, and that boarding a transport ship 
of the United States Government they had reason 'to expect fare 
similar to that of an Atlantic liner. The few that did not grumble 
were quite ready and frank to assert that the voyage on the 
Atlantic, furnished gratuitously by the Government, was a very 
agreeable diversion, and that, as far as the officers were con- 
cerned, the meals, both in quality and quantity, were quite up 
to the average of those they had in their own homes. Of course, 
men accustomed to Delmonico's for daily meals were disappointed 
with what they found on the ship. These were the growlers. 
They always are. They are spotted before they speak. 

Services were held on board ship on Sunday, June 12th, at 
the early hour of 7.30, the only hour that could be found con- 



200 Annual Report of the 

venient with other appointments. A goodly number attended the 
service; hymns were heartily sung and a sermon preached, in 
continuation of that of the Sunday before on the parable of 
the Prodigal Son. While we were in the bay mails were sent and 
received daily, the last mail leaving the " Vigilancia " on Wednes- 
day evening at 5.30, when the fleet duly formed off Quarantine 
Station at the entrance of Tampa Bay and started upon its 
mission to Cuba. The daily military routine was observed aboard 
ship from the beginning, including inspection and drill in the 
manual of arms. On Monday, the 13th of June, the Chaplain 
baptised Private Alexander Jeanisson, of Company G, in the 
presence of his Captain and a member of his company. The 
weather for three days was continuously beautiful, everything 
that could be desired for a pleasant voyage. The course of sail- 
ing was southward in the Gulf of Mexico and through Kebecca 
Channel, along Dry Tortugas, past Key West; thence south- 
easterly along the northerly coast of Cuba, standing out about 
twenty miles. Land was sighted on the morning of the 17th, 
and during the day light-houses were seen, both starboard and 
port, as we passed through the Great Bahama Channel. Gun- 
boats kept a continual lookout, but nothing occurred to make the 
journey especially eventful, at least until this time of writing, 
4.15 p. m., when we have caught up in our itinerary with the 
progress of events. Hereafter, so far as is possible, we shall 
record each day's events, writing a real itinerary, and not, as 
in the nature of things this must have been, a partial history. 
What a day will bring forth no one knows. Where we are going 
is, even at this moment, a mystery; whether Santiago or Porto 
Rico to-morrow will determine. 



State Historiam. 201 

Any old traveler knows that days at sea are much alike; and, 
though this was an expedition to a foreign country for purpi.ises 
of invasion and war, the experience on board ship after the first 
trials and hardening processes had been endured was much like 
that of an ordinary sea voyage. Days were considerably alike. 
The weather was happily disappointing, since we had heard so 
much of the rainy season having begun, and, with the exception 
of one or two showers, and these at night-time, we enjoyed, day 
after day, blue skies, comparatively smooth sea and everything, 
excepting the food, to make everyone happy. With every desire 
to make the best of everything, having intimated that at the 
start there was no occasion for grumbling — the truth compels 
us to state that the sameness of fare after the first week aboard 
ship became both distasteful and discouraging. The experience 
of the officers in the saloon was not unlike this. It grew worse 
each day, and when finally everything, for some unknown reason, 
became tinctured with coal-oil, it was nauseating. Notwith- 
standing all this, to the credit of the regiment it may be said 
that all made the best of what confessedly was a poor predica- 
ment. Though any comparison with the lot of men in other 
ships was favorable to ours, tedious delays, day after day, when, 
for hours, for no apparent reason, the ships' propellers would 
cease to revolve and the entire fleet would lay idle, floating on 
a listless sea, became most distressing. Each morning, as we 
would rise, we were doomed to disappointment to learn that we 
had sailed but a few knots in the night, and the days of waiting 
or slow sailing were still before us. If only we could learn not 
to think and add to this a little ingredient of not to care, our 
mental condition would be that of a perfect soldier. But 



202 Annual Eeport of the 

» 

Seventy-first men are not regulars; and not to think nor guess, 

but simply rest satisfied with conditions, whatever they may 

be, caring nothing for results, is a, state of mental inertia not 

easily attained by the thoughtful young men who make their 

living in New York. 

When the voyage is over and we forget its disquietudes we 
will happily recur to events as principal that are now regarded 
as mere incidents. Who, indeed, can ever forget the ultra- 
marine of the southern seas, bluer than sapphire as far as the 
eye could reach, or the gorgeous colors of the spectrum seen all 
over the western sky, as daily the sun seemed to sink into the 
sea, or the mock sun that seemed to rise immediately after, occa- 
sioned by refraction through the attenuated layers of atmosphere 
resting on the horizon. Tedious as the voyage seemed as a whole 
there was scarcely an hour without its diversion, not a time of 
day or night when nature was not exhausting its beauties for 
our constant entertainment. 

Anticipating the possibilities of landing by small boats, the 
Colonel arranged that daily while the regiment was waiting 
for the fleet to sail from Tampa Bay every company was drilled 
in boarding, manning and rowing the small boats of the ship; 
in this way in less than a week giving to every man some experi- 
ence with small craft, and making of most of them sufficiently 
skilled oarsmen to insure safety in event of being obliged to use 
them. Colonel Downs, with characteristic foresight, also ordered 
the companies, during this period of waiting in Tampa Bay, to 
row to the shore, there disembark, wade to the beach and so 
further perfect themselves in the art of landing on a beach 
with a keel boat that cannot be itself beached until emptied of 
its cargo. Unfortunately some of the companies exceeding orders 



State Historian. 203 

foolishly stripped and bathed while their clothes were drying, 
and paid a heavy penalty for their thoughtlessness by suffering 
for several days with excessive sunburn that, in some instances, 
skinned them to the waist. 

During all the voyage inspection was held every day, when 
company after company would form on the side promenade 
decks, and on several mornings the offlcers and men, with belts, 
but not arms, were made to march in quick-step around the 
ship's decks suiBcient times to make the exercise liberal and per- 
sonally profitable. No commanding officer could have given more 
constant care and personal attention to the interests of his 
men than did Colonel Downs, who, not until retreat was sounded^ 
ever allowed himself on any day to sit down and enjoy that 
luxury of rest which most of the other oflScers, not to their dis- 
credit, but much to their comfort, luxuriantly indulged. If 
fault is at all to be found with our new Colonel, it must be 
against his failing to detail work to other ofScers, all of whom 
were ever willing, but seldom able, to assist him. The most 
minor detail of military duty and personal care of every man 
in the regiment seemed to be to Colonel Downs a matter of 
personal concern. To this we are confident that the men owe 
more than they ever will comprehend, more than they ever can 
express. 

But, do one's best, there are inevitable hardships, especially 
to enlisted men, in transporting troops across the seas. It 
does seem hard to deny any one who is thirsty a glass of ice- 
water; and yet to prevent a thousand men running to one little 
tank in the saloon, the only one providing ice- water in the ship, 
a guard has to be placed at the door preventing intruders from 
approaching. It also seems hard that enlisted men cannot have 



204 Annual Report of the 

the privileges of the saloon of the ship and must sleep in their 
bunks in the hold or along the open decks, while colored ser- 
vants of officers run back and forth, and, despite orders to 
the contrary, will, when oflScers are asleep, rest on the settees. 
It has been somewhat distressing also to know that while our 
enlisted men are confined to their plain Government rations, the 
colored servants eat the same things that are served to the oflS- 
cers, but, presumably, these things cannot be helped, if discipline 
is to be observed. The only boat thus far seen, not of our fleet, 
was a little Norwegian craft bound for New Orleans that passed 
us in the Great Bahama Channel. We presume that the small 
number of ships seen is due to commerce being injuriously 
affected by the present war. From time to ti^ie during the 
voyage classes of instruction for non-commissioned oflScers were 
held and everything done that could assist in the proper prepara- 
tion for anticipated contests. 

Sunday, the 19th of June, was a perfect day at sea, trade- 
winds blowing steadily, cooling the temperature, the sea suflB- 
ciently rough to give life to sailing, but not causing much dis- 
comfiture. Some, however, succumbed to mal-de-mer, and a con- 
siderable number lay about the decks looking disconsolate. 
Inspection drills and marching about the decks took place as 
usual at an early hour, policing was carefully attended to 
throughout the ship and everything soon settled down for the 
pleasantest and most interesting day of the voyage. Shortly 
before noon Great Inagua Island was sighted to the northward, 
and two boats, the " Olivette " and the " Helena," changed 
course, turned aside from the fleet and made for the coast. They 
were not seen again until Monday morning. The object of their 
putting into this island is yet unknown to us. Were it not that 



State Historian. 205 

it is known that there is no cable commxmication to be found 
there, we might think that it was for the purpose of sending 
or receiving news. As it is, guesses are numerous and knowl- 
edge scarce. 

Divine service was held in the saloon at 1 p. m., the hour 
decided upon by the Colonel as most convenient for all con- 
cerned, and, though at this time the sea was fairly rough and 
the motion considerable, a goodly number of oflScers and men 
attended. Statistics of the religious predilections and other im- 
portant information concerning the regiment have been obtained 
during this voyage by order of the Colonel, which, as soon as 
they are tabulated, will be copied in this book for permanent 
record. Anticipating conclusions drawn from such, we would 
say that fully two hundred and fifty (250) of the regiment are 
Roman Catholics, Protestants of every name and kind are fully 
represented, and, as will always happen where a large number 
of young men are hastily recruited for war, there are many who 
give to religion little or no concern. Again, though the number 
may be small, there are those whose lives are such that they 
become antagonistic to religion of any kind, and may even, with- 
out any reason, resent the intrusion of an officer whose function 
it is to preach and to minister to their spiritual needs. Consider- 
ing these things, attendance upon Divine service, held always 
at an hour when some who would like to attend cannot because 
detailed to other duties, has been excellent and satisfactory. 
After the service of morning prayer, which was heartily rendered, 
the Chaplain preached a sermon from Psalms LXXIII, 15, at the 
conclusion of which he cordially invited all baptised Christians 
who were duly prepared to receive the Sacrament of the Lord's 
Supper, which at once followed. There were seventy-six who 



206 Annual Ebpokt of the 

remained to receive, a most gratifying number, highly encourag- 
ing to one who, not without difQculties and discouragements, is 
in the command solely to do good. 

The rest of the day passed uneventfully, but very pleasantly, 
the Hospital being visited by the Chaplain later in the day, 
hymns sung in the after-deck i,n the early hours of the evening. 
Though the voyage has been long and tedious and delays fre- 
quent and vexatious, the men are standing the strain very well, 
and, considering causes for reasonable complaint, are behaving 
very creditably. On Saturday evening the enlisted men from the 
several companies entertained the officers and others with a very 
creditable entertainment, the same men who managed a similar 
concert in the Lakeland camp superintending this. Private Harry 
Johnson and Corporal Myer, of Company F. The following was 
the program: 

Monologue Private William Murtagh, Company B, 

Song Selections Private Jack Shaw, Company F, 

Song Private William Eoby, Company O. 

Recitation Private G. Ferguson, Company E. 

" Eag Time Jimmy " Private J. Canning, Company I. 

Songs and Stories Private Tony Ess, Company H. 

On the morning of the 20th the highlands off the southern coast 
of Cuba were plainly visible, the fleet having passed through the 
Windward Passage during the night. It was found at 8 a. m. 
that we were off the Port of Guantanamo, where it was supposed 
we should land, but soon orders came to proceed on our course 
towards Santiago. All began to prepare to disembark after 
inspection, there being no further drills during the day. 

About 9 a. m. the fleet came to a halt about twelve miles off 
the entrance to Santiago, when the " Seguranca," on which waa 



State Historian. 207 

General Shafter and his staff, was seen to put in to the shore. 
The fleet lay oflE the port, evidently awaiting orders. The steam- 
ship " Olivette," headquarters for newspaper correspondents, 
steamed alongside the " Vigilancia," as did also several small 
tugs, discovered to be despatch boats for the Sun, Journal and 
Associated Press. Fortunately we were able to signal to them 
that the Seventy-first were in good condition, and, with few 
exceptions, none serious, all well. We were somewhat dis- 
appointed that none of these despatch boats came to us for 
further information, but gratified that they movgd away in the 
the direction of Jamaica, about 120 miles to the southwest, and 
that, perhaps, an evening edition of that day and certainly a 
morning edition of the morrow would give to our friends at home 
the news of our reaching Santiago and the excellent physical 
condition of the regiment. The fleet lay idly drifting about all 
day long. Towards evening orders were received for the fleet 
to move out from the shore, which it did some twelve or fifteen 
miles to the southward, where it remained over night. Travel 
rations are becoming exhausted. Up to this time the ship has 
been using its own stores, supplying food for the oflScers at the 
rate of one dollar each per day — a sum, considering that the 
quality of the food has been deteriorating from the start, re- 
garded by all as extortionate. What will be done if we are to 
remain on board much longer is a subject of deep concern to the 
Colonel and Commissary and of much speculation by all. 

The beautiful sunset brought the day to an end, and the brief 
hours of twilight were spent in listening to an excellent concert 
by our Drum Corps and Buglers, who, with their limited re- 
sources, having improved daily during the campaign, now play 
very creditably. All retired at an early hour, having prepared 



208 Annual Report of the 

to leave the ship during the day and somewhat limited, therefore, 
in provision for proper retirement and sleep. On awaking in 
the morning requests were numerous for combs, brushes and 
other needed articles which had been safely packed away the 
previous day. The fleet was found relatively in the same posi- 
tion as when lights were put out, except that the " Seguranca " 
had returned. Rumors, at all times frequent, began to multiply. 
Everybody had a theory of what would take place. Nothing 
actually did take place. If the propeller turned a few times 
to enable the ship to hold its relative place in the fleet, there 
were those, who, speaking with quasi-authority, would claim that 
we were starting for Porto Rico. If the boat happened for a 
second to point in the other direction, these same prophets an- 
nounced that we were going to Jamaica. When we did not 
move at all, they said wait and see. We did wait, but we did 
not see. Surgeon Bell was as prolific with his rumors as with 
his pills, but not as efiScient. No word came to us from shore. 
Nothing was signaled from headquarters. Removed but a few 
miles from Santiago, we lay drifting all day long, the usual 
routine of inspection, march about the decks and guard duty 
being observed. There is not a man on board that would not 
prefer to land and face the uncertainties of a campaign in a 
strange and foreign country to this listless drifting in the open 
sea. Considering that over a thousand men had been aboard 
over two weeks and in this time have journeyed but a thousand 
miles, now, having reached our destination, our lying about day 
after day awaiting orders to land, the physical health and gen- 
eral condition of the regiment are remarkably good; but three 
men are in bed in the Hospital, one of these has a cut in his 
foot, the others suflfering slightly from diarrhoea. This is due 



State Historian. 209 

to the constant care and excellent attention of the Surgeons, 
also to the simple fare of travel rations, which, however much 
disliked, cannot be unwholesome. 

It poured in showers, both last night and this morning, and 
rumor has it that we are likely to have such weather as this 
daily until autumn. During the shower in the early afternoon 
a fine water-spout was visible on the Santiago shore, and for a 
brief half hour became the attraction and diversion of many. 

Colonel Greene, when first appointing the Chaplain caterer 
to the field and staff officers' mess, regarded the appointment 
as temporary, to last until the regiment would get into the field. 
The Chaplain himself soon discovered that the work was not 
wholly congenial, involving business relations with the servants 
and men which might interfere with the exercise of his personal 
influence and oflBce. On boarding the steamer, arrangements 
having been made for the ship to furnish food to the oflScers, 
it happened several times that the Chaplain was requested to 
convey orders from the commanding officer to the stewards and 
cooks, which placed him in the position of seeming to be respon- 
sible for all arrangements made, for feeding both oflBcers and 
men. This quickly giving rise to mistaken ideas, the Chaplain 
suggested to the Colonel the impropriety of a clergyman holding 
such a position and executing such a detail, and at his own re- 
quest Colonel Downs at once relieved him, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Smith succeeding him as caterer to the ofiicers' mess. This is 
as it should be. A business man does a business man's work, 
and the Chaplain's time is given to the preparation of the regi- 
mental history, writing of a large correspondence in connection 
with his oflSce in the regiment and such other suitable work to 
which the commanding officer may assign him. 
14 



210 Annual Report of the 

A member of the regiment, having thoughtlessly sent a com- 
munication to the Herald stating that we had insufScient food, 
was the occasion of a man in the city, conspicuous as a veteran 
of a regiment which had refused to enlist at the President's call, 
sending a check for fifty dollars (?50) to the Chaplain, with 
explicit directions " to feed the starving men of the Seventy- 
first." In this same copy of the Herald that stated the men 
were starving in the Seventy -first we read, with some sense of 
shame, a telegram from Colonel Duffy stating that no one was 
starving or grumbling in the Sixty-ninth; that all were satisfied 
with what the Government was doing for them and were ready 
to go and fight for their country. Influenced by the considera- 
tion that even in an open market, away from the extortions of 
the villains aboard ship, fifty dollars applied to feeding a regi- 
ment of a thousand men would give each man an allowance of 
five cents, indignant that anybody should whine to the news- 
papers that men of the Seventy-first were starving, above all 
unwilling that any stay-at-home soldiers should have credit for 
feeding those whose patriotism had presumbaly lead them to 
leave home, and, if necessary, do some starving, the Chaplain 
at once indorsed this check to the man who sent it and returned 
it to him with thanks. For this act he was publicly commended 
by the Colonel, who remarked that he had done exactly right. 

The story of the fleet lying idle ofC shore where fleld glasses 
plainly descry Commodore Sampson's fleet and the partially 
demolished Morro at the entrance to the harbor is much the 
same from day to day. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith has, on various 
occasions, given most interesting and profitable instructions of 
greatest value to non-commissioned officers. Overhearing a por- 
tion of one of these instructions has suggested to us a fleld of 



State Historian. 211 

great influence, not only for lieutenant-colonels in general, but 
for ours in particular, who seems unusually qualified for such 
service. Captains have from time to time instructed their offi- 
cers in possible complications of the field and how to master 
them; the time of voyaging has thus been utilized to its fullest 
extent for the benefit of the command. 

While the regiment was aboard the transport ship " Seneca "" 
in New York Bay Private Dattwyler, Company F, went ashore 
without leave on a lighter, as was subsequently learned from him 
to see his dying sister, not one word of which was liiscovered to- 
be true, his mission really being to see some living sister in 
Hoboken. A week later his father reported to the commanding 
officer at Camp Black, near Hempstead, that his son was ready 
to report again for duty. General Eoe commanded him to be 
placed under charge of Colonel Hardin, of the Second Provisional 
Regiment, New York Volunteers, who would take him south 
when his regiment went to Chickamauga, and when convenient 
transfer him to the authorities of the Seventy-first. He, accord- 
ingly, turned up at Tampa Heights, having been sent there from 
Chickamauga, was court martialed, tried and sentenced to a 
fine of thirty days' pay and ten days' imprisonment. The best 
of regiments will have some bad and some indifferent men in it. 
The Seventy-first claims to be among the best, and its own 
record, together with the popular estimation of it, tend to con- 
firm the claim. It does not however, pretend that all its men 
are what they ought to be, even to make them average good 
men, say nothing of good soldiers. Living under the constrained 
condition of ship revealed the existence among us of those, not 
many, to be sure, but some who did not know the difference 
between " meum " and " twwm/' or, knowing, were not above de- 



212 Annual Eepoet of the 

meaning themselves as professional crooks. Articles were miss- 
ing from the soldiers' bimks which could not have been taken by 
others than soldiers — money and other valuables purloined from 
oflBcers' rooms which may have been taken by colored servants, 
all too many of which quickly and without suificient care engaged 
at Port Tampa. So anxious were these ne'er-do-wells to go to 
Cuba that several stowaways were subsequently discovered and 
returned to their homes before the fleet sailed.* 

At 5 o'clock Thursday, June 23rd, the " Seguranca " steamed 
alongside the "Vigilancia" and General Shafter, commanding 
Fifth Army Corps, standing upon the bridge, summoned Colonel 
Downs, ordering him to begin unloading his men at once, to work 
all night, each man to take one hundred rounds of ammunition 
and rations for three days. 

The great applause of the men. anxious to get on shore, almost 
prevented the orders being heard. 

Siboney is a small village, lying directly on the coast back of 
an abrupt sandy beach, about sixteen miles east of Santiago. 

Some other troops had previously been disembarked at Baiquiri 
which was made a principal base of supplies; both of these 
places had previously been bombarded by the naval vessels, 
preparatory to the landing of troops. A feint was made to land 
troops at Aquadores, which was also bombarded, the attempt 
here being made to deceive the Spaniards as to the real place 

If! Ota Bene:* 

I. Nothing was written in this book until August twelfth, aboard the 
S. S. " La Grande Duchesse," records meanwhile having been kept upon 
scraps of paper in pencil both by the Chaplain and Private French, his 
amanuensis, while in Cuba, and separated from all books, tables and 
facilities for permanent writing of records. 

II. Private French of Company " P," being seriously ill with yellow 
fever, Captain Eaflerty of this company appointed Private Booth to 
assist as amanuensis. 



State Historian. 213 

of landing; this attempt proved entirely successful, as all the 
troops were landed ;y^ithout any opposition from the enemy. 

Preparations began at once, and by 7 o'clock all was bustle 
on board the " Vigilancia." 

Little knew we to what we were going or how much we should 
experience before again we should see the luggage which we 
left on shore. 

The work of landing and loading the troops continued all 
night; not until four o'clock in the morning were the last of them 
on shore. • 

The large yawls and steam launches of the war ships would 
draw alongside the companionways, down which men went singly 
in heaviest marching order, and stood in the yawls until suflfl- 
ciently near to the shore to jump from the bow into the surf 
and make for dry laud ; the shore at this point was a very abrupt 
beach, the surf ran high and the undertow was severe. The 
wonder is that this whole army corps was thus landed with but 
the loss of two men, members of a colored regiment, drowned in 
the attempt to board the yawl. 

It was early dawn of Friday, June 24th, when the Seventy- 
first, now entirely landed, bivouacked on the Siboney beach and 
at once breakfasted. 

One saw stretching back from the beach a series of foothills, 
terminating everywhere in lofty mountains; these were all 
thickly wooded, rank wth luxuriant underbrush. The mountain 
trails were poorly developed and could accommodate but one 
foot passenger, not being room for two abreast in any place 
along their tortuous windings. 

Back of the little plain at Siboney and extending up the valley 
was the only road to Santiago, a most miserable affair, abso- 



214 Annual Report of the 

lutely incapable of accommodating the ordinary country traflSc 
and utterly inadequate to the needs of army transportation. 

So bad was this road that after weeks of engineering opera- 
tions troops at the front could not be fed because of the impos- 
sibility of transporting commissary supplies. 

At Siboney one found a visit to the little miserable reed huts 
close by the shore very interesting. Notwithstanding the squalor 
which one there witnessed, there was a picturesqueness about 
the group of thatched huts in a grove of cocoanut palms which 
made the scene long to be remembered. 

There were instances of landing numerous and amusing. 
Everybody expected to get his feet wet; some were surprised by 
getting their whole bodies wet. The sight of Adjutant Abeel 
sprawling on all fours and clambering through the slimy surf 
was a theme for an artist. Especially humiliating was this to 
the doughty Adjutant, when the corpulent Chaplain immediately 
made a successful and dry landing, amid the surprise and ap- 
plause of those on shore who witnessed the spectacle. 

After breakfasting on the beach, where there were several 
regiments of regulars, the men wandered about the little Cuban 
hamlet and witnessed in the huts destitution and starvation, such 
as absolutely beggars description. The fathers of these families 
were Cuban insurgents, soldiers out in the mountains, doing 
guerilla work under General Garcia. 

For miles about the country houses had been burned, prop- 
erty destroyed, homes desecrated and pillaged and all women and 
children concentrated in town, like this at Siboney, were called 
" Eeconcentrados," were miserably treated and nearly starved. 

This was General Weyler's plan to exterminate the insurgent 
spirit in Cuba, involving necessarily the extermination of the in- 
surgents themselves. 



State Historian. 215 

Beyond this Siboney beach, to the west, at the base of the first 
foothills and directly upon the bluff, coral coast, there was a 
collection of houses, cheap and poorly built, in which had lived 
the workmen on the railroad running from the mining camp at 
Firmeza, some three miles distant in the mountains through 
Siboney, and along the coast to Santiago; there were also here 
a large engine house, with several lathes and other machinery 
within its walls, adjoining which was another building of con- 
siderable size uspd as an ofiRce, tool-house and railway station. 

The Seventy:flrst pitched camp in the large engine house, the 
Adjutant took the tool-house as his office, and the Colonel and 
his stafi! and field oflScers established headquarters in the house 
adjacent, where, until the time of bombardment, the Spanish 
Colonel in charge of all forces at Siboney had resided. 

Everywhere one could see at the summit of the hills the promi- 
nent, . securely built and strongly fortified block-houses, which 
had been used effectively in the war with the insurgents and were 
destined to play such an important part in the subsequent engage- 
ments with the American forces; our naval bombardment had 
been so effectual that all the houses had been wholly deserted, 
much stuff in them being left, and not a sign of a Spaniard was 
visible. 

Men of best judgment, liowever, were not mislead by the un- 
opposed landing of our troops, even when they learned from the 
remaining Cubans at Siboney that the Spanish Colonel had been 
torn asunder in the midst by an exploded shell, and that all 
Spanish troops had fled toward Santiago ; our oflScers still feared 
and felt that they were not far distant in the mountains and 
that they could and would soou be found. 

These expectations were sadly and unfortunately realized, for 
in a very few hours after landing the enemy fired upon our 



216 Annual Kepoet of the 

troops, and the first engagement of the United States army on 
Cuban soil took place at Las Guasimas. 

There had been a battle a few days previously at Guantanamo 
when some marines from one of our war vessels landed and had 
a successful scrimmage with some Spaniards, not escaping with- 
out some loss, though slight, in killed and wounded. But the 
engagement of Las Guasimas was the first of the United States 
army on the Island of Cuba. 

Shortly after breakfast we saw ascending the mountain path, 
to the west of Siboney beach, the First United States Volunteer 
Cavalry, commonly and famously known as Eoosevelt's Rough 
Riders, though Colonel Wood commanded them, and, like all 
cavalry troops in this campaign, the riders were dismounted; 
there was no place for horses in a country like this. These Roose- 
velt Rough Riders were Wood's Rough Walkers, and, as was sub- 
sequently learned, walked right into a body of Spanish troops 
thicketed in the jungle some four miles along the trail toward 
Sevilla. Orders came to us about 9 o'clock for the Seventy-first 
Regiment at once to proceed along the trail where had gone 
the First United States Cavalry and reinforce them, our troops 
having encountered the enemy, met with heavy losses and been 
repulsed. When we learned the real truth of the rumor all but 
the repulse proved to be so. The Seventy-first got under way in 
a few moments. Every man in it was ready for any duty he 
might confront. We had gone but a little way, when returning 
wounded men confirmed our fears of a stern battle, and made 
us fearful that victory would not be ours. General Hawkins* 

• *Haimlton Smith Hawkins. Born in South Carolina. Appointed from New York. Cadet, 
United States Military Academy, July 1, 18.52, to .January 31, 1855; second lieutenant 6th 
infantry April 26, 1861 ; first lieutenant May 14, 1861 ; rejiimental quartermaster December 
25, 1861, to September 20, 186.3; captain September 20, 1863; major 10th infantry October 31, 
1883; lieutenant-colonel 23d infantry February 17, 1889; commandant of cadets. United States 
military academy, 1888-1892; colonel Iflth infantry August 13, 1894; transferred to 20th 
infantry September 15. 1894: brigadier-general volunteers May 4, 1898; major-general vol- 
unteers November .TO, 1898; brigadier-general United States army September 28, 1898; retired 
October 4, 1898. — State HiSToni.vN. 



State Histobian. 217 

ordered the Seventy-first to precede the First Regiment of the 
brigade, and followed himself with the Sixth and Sixteenth 
Infantry, Regulars. On went the Seventy-first Regiment over 
rocks and through thorns and past cacti and struggling in thick 
underbrush for some four miles, when just beyond a block-house 
that had been depopulated, in which Captain Heindsmann, of 
Company C, having been affected by the sun, took temporary 
shelter, word came for the regiment to halt and await further 
orders. These came in about half an hour, much to the dis- 
appointment of our men, directing the brigade to return in route 
step to Siboney, which it at once proceeded to do. 

Ui» to this time no horses bad been put ashore. Had they 
been landed, they could not have been used in this march. No 
horse could have gone along that trail. All oflBcers made the 
hot and weary march, the Chaplain, much to his own gratifica- 
tion and the surprise of some thin ones who dropped by the way, 
having successfully finished the journey. Along in the afternoon 
wounded men were brought in, filling several of the houses along 
the shore, which were hastily turned into use for hospitals, and 
further particulars of the Las Guasimas battle were learned. 

It seemed that Brigadier-General Young's Second Brigade of 
Cavalry had gone up the valley road with instructions to sur- 
round the enemy, if possible, and prevent their retreat into Santi- 
ago. The First United States Cavalry was directed to proceed 
along the mountain trail to the southward with a similar object 
in view. As these latter proceeded along the path and through 
thick bushes, quite unmindful of the nearness of the enemy, they 
received a volley of shots, which at once proved destructive and 
demoralizing. The Spanish using smokeless powder, it was not 
possible to discover their position. Volley after volley came 



218 Annual Kbport op the 

into the ranks of the First Cavalry, and simultaneously, as I 
have heard, though of this there is lacking information, the 
Spanish engaged General Young's Cavalry Brigade along the 
valley road to the northward of Las Guasimas, between Siboney 
and Sevilla. Our troops fought bravely and well.* Hamilton 
Fish, Jr., of New York, Sergeant of Company K, was killed 
instantly among the first. Captain Allyn Capron* also lost his 
life in this battle. The Adjutant of Eoosevelt's Rough Eiders 
ran back to the rear and reported that Colonel Wood was dead. 
This proved to be false. It is commonly believed that this Adju- 
tant lost his head on this occasion. There were some twenty 
killed and seventy wounded in this engagement. All night long 
the Surgeons worked over the wounded, our own Major Bell 
rendering most valuable assistance until by early dawn all had 
been transferred to the steamer " Olivette," where they were 
comfortable and received every ministration needed for their cure. 
On Saturday Lieutenant-Colonel Smith was detailed to board 
the " Vigilancia " and get our horses on shore. The whole day 
was spent at the work. The captain of the " Vigilancia," an 
old man and over-cautious, was timid about taking his boat near 
enough to shore for the horses to swim there. Another transport 
having jammed into his port bow made him more cautious. At 
last Captain Goodrich, United States Navy, commanding the 
"Harvard" (formerly "New York," of the American Line), who 
had full charge of all the transportation of troops and stores, 

came on board, proceeded to the bridge, and with masterly skill 
ft 
brought the ship, though a good sized vessel, very close to the 

*A.llyn Kissam Capron. Bom in New York. Appointed from the arniy. Private, cor- 
poral and sergeant troop B, 4th cavalry, October 20, 1890, to November 3, 1893; second lieu- 
tenant Sth infantry October 7, 1893; transferred to 7th cavalry November 30, 1894; captain 
1st United States volunteer cavalry (Rounh Riders) May 10, 1898; killed Juno 24, 1898, in 
battle of Ijas Guasimas, Cuba, aged 27 years. — State Histobiak. 



State Historian. 219 

windward shore, and at last, turning her bow seaward, anchored 
her about one-fourth of a mile from the Siboney coast. Each of 
the eleven horses was then swung in a sling and dropped by 
derrick alongside the ship, when men in a yawl led it by a halter, 
only letting it go when near enough to shore to feel sure that the 
horse would at once make for it. In this way all were landed 
without accident. It was then discovered that several had 
developed very sore backs during the sixteen days that they had 
been in the hold of the vessel, and that, though there were hostlers 
enough to do it, they had not taken good care of their charges. 

Sunday, the 26th, was a very busy day, so many details from 
our regiment being required for brigade and division duty, even 
whole companies having been sent to bring from the boats to the 
shore and thence to the different commands additional ammuni- 
tion, needed commissary stores and other things evidently being 
got together for an early contemplated attack upon the enemy. 
We sent Sergeant Howe, of Company E, a locomotive engineer, 
to make alive a dead engine, which the Spanish had sought to 
destroy, and which was afterward extensively used for trans- 
ferring both troops and luggage into Santiago, also yellow fever 
patients to their excluded station in Firmeza. Of professional 
men, or men with any unusual ability, the enlisted soldiers of the 
regular army numbered very few, but the Seventy-first Regiment 
had plenty. Statistics on this subject, a copy of which Adjutant 
Abeel has promised to supply for this history, show how diversi- 
fied is the talent, how well represented are the various profes- 
sions and how completely equipped with everything necessary 
for the various vocations of life is the Seventy-first of New York. 
Unfortunately, in a spirit of reasonable pride, but without con- 
sidering the consequences, our Colonel Downs made this known 



220 Annual Report of the 

to Division and Brigade Headquarters, whereupon details for 
men for every purpose under lieaven began to pour in from 
General Hawkins and Kent* until it became intolerable and 
seemed somewhat like an imposition. 

This continued until the end of the campaign; clerks, stenog- 
raphers, physicians, interpreters, druggists, etc., etc., were to 
be found in every command of the corps with the uniform of the 
Seventy-first. Dismissing all consideration of proper remunera- 
tion for professional work, to take a man who enlisted to become 
a soldier, and take advantage of his brains to deprive him of the 
experience he sought, is injustice to the man and a violation 
of the spirit of the contract made with the Government. 

General Wheeler, in charge of the Cavalry Division, had rallied 
his troops along the left and taken encampments just beyond 
Sevilla, where from the tops of the hills one could plainly see 
Santiago at the left, nearest the coast, and back of it, about four 
miles to the northeast, the little, well-fortifled town of El Caney. 

The Sunday services of June 26th were exceedingly interesting 
and deserve brief mention. They proved the last that could be 
held with the assembled regiment for three weeks. It was found 
at an early hour, due to many details required of our regiment 
and active preparation that had to be made for our early march 
the following morning, ordered to begin at 3.30 a. m., impossible 
for the Colonel to name any definite hour for a service. Later it 

>' ♦Jacob Ford Kent. Born in Pennsylvania. .Appointed from Pennsylvania to the United 
States Military Academy July 1, 18ri6 (tm-aduated No. 31); second lieutenant Hd infantry May 
fif 1861; first- lieutenant July 31. 1861; lieutenant-colonel, assistant inspector-general, assigned 
January 1, 1863, to August 31, 1865; captain 3d infantry January 8, 1864; major ■1th infantry 
July 1, 1885; lieutenant-colonel 18th infantry, January 15, 1891; colonel 24th infantry April 
25, 1895; brigadier-general volunteers May 4, 1898; major-general volunteers July 8, 1898; 
honorably discharged from volunteers November 30, 1S98; brigadier-general United States 
army October 4, 189S; brevet-major May 3, 1863, for gallant and meritorioua services in the 
battle of Marye's Heights, Virginia; lieutenant-cnlunel May 12, 1864, for gallant and merito- 
rious services in the battle of Spottsylvaria, Virginia, and colonel volunteers October 19, 
1864, for faithful and meritorious services in the field during the campaign before Richmond, 
Virginia; retired October IS. 1898. — State Histohia.n. 



State Historian. 221 

was decided that 2 p. m. might prove convenient for the boys 
to assemble on the floor of the engine house, where they were 
encamped, but as late as 1.45 the whole First Battalion was 
ordered to report to Division Headquarters, and several com- 
panies of other battalions were also depleted by special assign- 
ments to work. Somewhat discouraged in the attempt appro- 
priately to observe the day and anxious to have a talk with the 
boys before they went into battle, which all knew they were sure 
to do before the close of the week. Chaplain Van Dewater went 
over to the round-house to inform the boys that the service would 
have to be postponed until night. He started to sing a familiar 
hymn, " Nearer My God to Thee," the better to secure attention, 
when so many at once gathered about him that he went right 
on, held a service, made a brief address and then announced that 
another service would be held later in the evening. At 7 o'clock 
such a service was held, and it is not too much to say that few 
like it ever were attended. It was too dark to read. Hundreds 
of our own men stood about und«r the roof of the building, 
with open sides, while all about and beyond were gathered regu- 
lars of every command and rank, all reverently attentive and 
evidently deeply interested. Chaplain Van Dewater had the 
Episcopal service of evening prayer, depending upon his memory 
for the rendering, even saying a psalm and reciting a lesson 
from Holy Scripture. Such hymns as " Jesus, Lover," " Just As 
I Am " and " I Need Thee Every Hour '■' were sung with a hearti- 
ness that told of an intense earnestness. Sobs were heard dur- 
ing the prayer. Sobs, not of weak men nor cowards, but reverent 
men who afterward proved the bravest at the front and under the 
trying stress of shot and shell. These were men, some of them 
who fell before the week was ended, many of them whose bodies 



222 Annual Eepokt of the 

now lie buried in Cuban soil, or are maimed forever, who believed 
in God, valued life, had no fear of danger, but who would not 
foolishly court destruction. They were our bravest men, who 
■did their whole duty and had nothing to say derogatory of others 
who tried to do theirs. The Chaplain preached upon the text 
"How Shall We Escape if We Neglact so Great a Salvation?" 
Whatever others may have thought or may think, that service 
and sermon were to him the most memorable of his life, and 
there are many reasons to make him think that it was also the 
most fruitful. There were wounded men who spoke of the im- 
pressions received that night when they were in the thickest of 
the fight, and one man, interviewed by a Sun reporter after his 
return to New York, kindly made reference to the helpfulness 
of this service in the round-house on the Sunday night preceding 
the battle. 

These are the compensations a chaplain has for much work 
that seems fruitless and some sacrifices that go unappreciated. 
Record is here made of this incident solely for the encouragement 
of chaplains in the army, whose lives necessarily must be lonely, 
whose sorrows are keen because they lack sympathy, and whose 
work is of such a kind that the average officer or soldier thinks 
it abstract, perhaps ornamental, certainly not needful. Early 
in the morning of the 27th of June we started upon our march. 
No transportation of any kind was provided for our regiment, 
since we were ordered to take with us 200 rounds of ammunition, 
and no man could carry more than 100 of Springfield cartridges ; 
all of the officers' horses had to be turned in for pack mules, axe 
handles, found fortunately in the round-house, being ingeniously 
utilized by "Boss," our chief hostler, and officers had to walk. 
The march was made easily, frequent stops being ordered for rest, 



State Historian. 223 

the Seventy-first marching behind the Sixteenth and the Sixth, 
and by General Hawkins' orders turning to the right at a place 
called Sevilla, about five miles from Siboney, pitched camp where 
a company of Cubans had been previously. Along the route 
there were many evidences of the recent Las Guasimas 
engagement. 

Bullets were found everywhere, some of the Spanish ones of 
brass, though brass bullets are definitely regarded as out of the 
pale of civilized warfare. Just outside of the little graveyard 
along the road were newly made graves in which Vere interred 
two Corporals and several privates of the Tenth Cavalry, their 
names being neatly cut on boards placed at the head of the 
mounds. Subsequently the gathering of many vultures indicated 
the presence of dead in secluded places in the woods. Near the 
road was seen the body of a Spanish soldier so scarcely interred 
that parts of his body were visible. Evidence confirmed the con- 
viction that the Las Guasimas engagement had been a bloody one. 

The camp was a most picturesque little plain, backed by lofty 
mountains, at the highest peak of which was seen a Spanish 
block-house; a glass clearly revealed several Spaniards walking 
about. About five hundred yards from the camp was found a 
running stream of pure mountain water, descent to which by a 
narrow path was easy. Not so much can be said for the return 
journey. 

Before night came on the Second Battalion was detailed to 
encamp on the other side of the road at the top of a hill about 
one mile distant, from the summit of which one could easily see 
Santiago, some ten miles distant. Major Wells reported next 
morning that they had had a stormy night of it on the hill, that 
bullets were occasionally whizzing about and that men on picket 



224 Annual Eepoet of the 

duty found frequent occasion for firing. That every refusal to 
answer a sentry's challenge came from a Spaniard was very 
doubtful. Neither a land crab nor a mule can answer a challenge. 
The former were plentiful in this vicinity and particularly lively 
at night-time, and a loose white mule was in evidence at day- 
light. Near this battalion camp Avere found trenches where were 
buried Spanish wounded who had evidently died returning to 
Santiago from the field of Las Guasimas. The regimental camp 
was very orderly and quiet until 3 a. m. when a shot was heard, 
immediately followed by No. 16 sentry calling for Corporal of the 
Guard. In a moment every man was awake and most of them 
out of their shelter tents and on their feet. Investigation proved 
that No. 17, hearing a noise like footsteps in the bushes, most 
likely a land crab, challenged, and, receiving no reply, fired his 
rifle; at once No. 16 cried for the Corporal of the Guard. Much 
may be said by way of explanation, if not excuse, for a man 
who in an enemy's country, on sentry duty in the hours of the 
night, hearing unusual noises in the thick woods, will, when his 
challenge goes unanswered, shoot his gun. It was not wholly 
unfortunate that this occurred, for it gave the Colonel oppor- 
tunity to issue orders that under similar circumstances everyone 
would remain quietly sleeping where he was until assembly 
sounded. 

Nothing occurred the following day worthy of mention until 
afternoon, when a terrific thunder storm, lasting an hour, com- 
pletely deluged everything and everybody not wholly sheltered. 
For some reason or other, comprehended by nobody, our men were 
all supplied with shelter tents while officers had not any. It is 
perfectly intelligible, however, under these circumstances that 
most of the men kept dry while the officers were drenched. 



State Historian. 225 

As the day went on delay in moving to the front became irli- 
some ; there was every reason for speedy action ; the rainy season 
had begun, fever that always accomparies it would soon attack 
our troops, the Spaniards had already retreated to their entrench- 
ments before El Caney and Santiago. But we could do no 
effective work without artillery. All our guns were at Baiquiri; 
condition of the roads made their transit almost impossible. 
Sixteen guns passed here in the morning of Thursday, but they 
were all light ones, our heavy siege guns never really reaching 
the front. At 2 p. m., the usual hour for the daily storm, there 
came a terrific shower, drenching everything. The rain is be- 
ginning to be our most dreaded enemy ; with lightest apparel and 
little of it, no tents whatever for officers and only shelter ones 
for men, daily soaking is a trying ordeal. At 8 o'clock on 
Thursday morning General Garcia passed along the road at the 
side of our camp with his staff, his army having advanced toward 
Santiago in the night. , Such a wretched looking body of Cuban 
looters one could scarcely imagine. Every experience with the 
Cubans from the beginning to the end of this campaign justifies 
us in thinking that whatever may be the intellectual status 
or moral qualifications of the leaders, their followers are a mob, 
composed mainly of illiterate, unkempt and unworthy men; they 
are neither good citizens nor good fighters. It will take several 
generations to lift them above the consequences of their recent 
slave condition and render them fit for self-government. 

Eumor had it that an attack was contemplated on El Caney 
the following day, the engagement to begin promptly at 10 
o'clock. The especial mission of the Cuban army was to inter- 
cept reinforcements of 5,000 coming from the west to the aid of 

the Spaniards at Santiago. We were fortunate in having at our 
15 



226 AxxuAL Eepout of the 

camp at Sevilla several representatives of prominent newspapers 
and journals of New York, who gave us information of a kind 
which can only be obtained by this profession alone and whose 
company was at all times delightful; among them may be 
mentioned Mr. John C. Kline, of the Herald; Mr. Henry K. 
Stegman, of the Tribune, and Mr. Henry L. Stoddard, of 
the Mail and Express, each of whom at this time and sub- 
sequently was helpful to the regiment. The health of the 
regiment at this time was excellent, not one man sick; every- 
one was doing his utmost to keep well and our efficient 
Surgeons did their utmost to keep us so. The universal senti- 
ment, without a single exception, was favorable to the Seventy- 
first being at its best and doing its best. Quartermaster Stevens 
went into Siboney with two horses to try to secure needed tents 
or tarpaulins or something, but returned unable to accomplish his 
mission. We certainly realized that we were then beginning to 
feel the hardships of war. Word came early in the evening that 
reveille would be sounded at 3.30 in the morning and that the 
regiment would march toward Santiago, engaging the enemy in 
battle. They all retired at an early hour, fully realizing the 
seriousness of events immediately before us. 

July 1st was the most eventful day of the whole Cuban cam- 
paign; on i(. were fought the greatest battles of recent times. 
Both at El Oaney and San Juan, for reasons that can easily be 
named, there took place battles of a kind most unusual, with 
results marvelously victorious for our forces. Reverent men 
entered on this campaign believing in the righteousness of their 
cause and that God would prosper it. Few came out of this 
campaign, we venture to believe, without firm conviction that 
had not God been on our side, the enemy would have swal- 



State Historian. 227 

lowed us. Santiago is a city with natural fortifications of 
hills and mountains on every side; such entrenchments as the 
Spaniards had made in the last five years, with such a block- 
house system for spy and signal service, cannot be found in the 
history of wars. After the action at Las Guasimas the Spanish 
army had retired to their block-houses and entrenchments, mak- 
ing a solid phalanx of troops of every arm of the service, extend- 
ing from San Juan on the right toward the sea in an unbroken 
line three miles to the left, and at this point occupying the 
strongly garrisoned town of El Caney. The mountain road from 
Sevilla to San Juan Hill, where the principal engagement took 
place, was in no place wide enough for two wagons comfortably 
to pass, frequently crossed streams without bridges and for most 
of the entire distance ran through thickets of underbrush of 
rankest growth, which would naturally have been almost impene- 
trable, but which, strung all along with barb wire, coiled like a 
spider's web, became absolutely impassable. After marching 
three miles along the road our regiment was ordered to turn 
into a thickly bushed field behind the Sixth, who had just arrived 
before us. Field and staff dismounted and had a brief conver- 
sation with General Hawkins and his staff, who had clustered 
around beneath a large cocoanut palm. But a few moments 
elapsed before orders were received to move on and the whole 
brigade took up its march. Just before starting Lieutenant Ord,* 
the eflScient Brigade Quartermaster, from whom our regiment 
had received many favors, removed his undershirt, the better to 
endure the heat of the day, which was fast becoming oppressive, 
jokingly saying to the Chaplain of the Seventy-first: "Now I am 

♦Jules Garesche Ord, son of Major-General Edward O. C. Ord. Bom in Michigan. Ap- 
pointed from the Army. Private and quartermaster-sergeant 1st infantry August 16, 1887, 
to November 9, 1890 ; second heutenant 18th infantry November 6, 1890 ; first lieutenant 6th 
infantry August 7, 1897; killed July 1, 1898, at the battle of San Juan, Santiago, Cuba. — 
State Histobian. 



228 Annual Report of the 

ready for whatever may come." He ,was among the very first 
officers to be shot, dying on the field but a few hours later. 

We had scarcely proceeded two miles, having crossed one 
stream, where men had to wade in water more than ankle deep, 
before the sound of light artillery was heard ahead, and occasion- 
ally, as we could easily distinguish by the difference in sound, 
there would be a return fire of the enemy. Before very long we 
rounded a little turn in the road, just before reaching El Poso 
Hill, where a light artillery battery had been stationed on the 
site of an old sugar mill, and whose firing we had previously 
heard. We subsequently learned that Eoosevelt's Rough Riders 
had also been on this hill and had not escaped without several 
losses in killed and wounded. The Spanish aim upon this gun 
was so accurate that it had to be moved, but was not shifted 
until very serious damage had been done. 

Later, and further along the road, when the Rough Riders 
and other cavalrymen passed by our brigade, we having been 
ordered to rest, and our men cheered the popular Colonel Roose- 
velt, now in command of the First Volunteer Cavalry, Colonel 
Wood acting as Brigadier-General, vice Young disabled by ill- 
ness since the Las Guasimas action, and Colonel Roosevelt said 
almost pettishly, " Don't cheer, but fight, now's the time to 
fight," we understood the relations between the recent El Poso 
experience ■ and his impetuosity in hastening to confront the 
enemy. Just as our regiment reached the stream at the foot 
and the east of El Poso Hill there rushed back upon us a perfect 
stampede* of Cubans with several men on litters, who had been 
seriously wounded by shells aimed at the battery guns of El Poso 

*The Chaplain of the Seventy-first, while the regiment came to a halt, 
dismounted and had prayers -with one Cuban, shot in the head, and 
fatally wounded, saying the Latin " In nomme patris," when the poor 
fellow gasped and clasped his hand, showing warm appreciation. 
Later, on the second, the Chaplain found his body at Division Hospital 
and buried him. 



State Historian. 229 

and exploding over them in the road at its rear. One of the 
Cuban officers who could speak broken English vociferously pro- 
claimed against the injustice of sending Cuban troops before ours 
to slay them. 

Subsequent events may prove my mistake, but present opinion, 
confirmed by all I saw in Cuba, is that Cubans are totally unfit 
either to light for their liberties or to appreciate them when they 
are secured. These people have been neglected and oppressed 
so long, left uneducated and to run wild, so to speak, that now 
they are mostly a band of guerillas, good, maybe, for bushwhack- 
ing, but afraid as babies the moment there is danger and fighting 
in the oijen. About a mile from the foot of El Poso, the road 
meanwhile passing through two streams of considerable width 
and about four inches deep, there is a thick gulch fully one- 
half mile ahead surrounded by high banks of thickest under- 
growth. After waiting for the cavalrj' troops to pass us at the 
entrance of this gulch, which our soldiers subsequently named 
" the Bloody Bend," our brigade resumed its march, the field 
and staff of the Seventy-first Regiment mounted. 

Scarcely had we taken up our march and entered the bend 
when bullets and shell began to pour in thick and fast upon us, 
not at any time demoralizing, but somewhat interfering with the 
steady march forward. Human nature is the same the world 
over. It is absurd either to speak of regulars as impervious to 
fear or of volunteers as incapable of courage. The writer of this 
history rode mounted for a full half mile where the shot and 
shell were thickest and returned the same distance walking on 
the same road and under the same conditions, and can testify that 
men in every command naturally winced a bit, or, while march- 
ing, might try to creep along the bushes at the side of the road. 



230 Annual Report op the 

but not in a single instance was there a company or a squad even 
out of its place or behind in its pace moving forward. 

Before and above us went a balloon under the direction of Cap- 
tain George McC. Derby, Engineer Corps, U. S. A. What pur- 
pose it ever served, except to indicate to the enemy the exact 
location of our troops, nobody has ever discovered. At last, rid- 
dled by shot, the old thing collapsed, and certainly nobody in the 
Fifth Army Corps, outside of the Signal Corps and a few back at 
headquarters, some four miles distant, regretted its destruction. 

This firing along this road was peculiar and constitutes a 
feature of the San Juan engagement. Everybody had to go 
through it. Everyone, therefore, of the regiment who started out 
from Sevilla that morning, including colored servants, must 
have been under fire. Some remained under it longer than others, 
but nobody was wholly beyond its danger. The Seventy-flrst as 
a regiment was for at least one hour under continuous fire, 
under the following conditions, which made the experience par- 
ticularly distressing: The Spanish used smokeless powder. They 
knew we must come by this one road. Their scouts and spies, 
or, if not these, our balloon, told them just when. They put sharp- 
shooters in the tall cocoanut palm trees along this portion of 
the road. They fired from their block-houses and entrenchments 
at the top of the hills, and besides volleys of musketry and single 
bullets of the sharpshooters, there was frequently the bursting 
of sliell over our heads and shrapnel flying in every direction. 
Under these conditions one would think pandemonium would 
have reigned. Nothing of the kind. There was a silence that was 
ominous. Other than " ping," " ping," the noise of Mauser bul- 
lets and the sound of hundreds of leaves pierced instantaneously, 
a sound all its own, and the mournful " whirr," " whirr " of 



State Historian. 231 

passing shells, it was like a funeral march. We couldn't see anj 
smoke. We couldn't tell where the enemy were. We were march- 
ing into the jaws of death. Men fell dead and wounded on every 
side. The marvel still is that so few were killed. One would 
think that half a regiment under these conditions would have 
been extinguished. It cannot be recalled by anyone there with- 
out a thought of the marvelous mercy of God. Not a return shot 
was fired. None was ordered. Nobody could tell where to shoot. 

Occasionally we would hear the report of one of our light artillery 

« 
guns which would encourage us, but for all too long a time 

we marched in columns of fours, under the trying conditions here 

faithfully narrated. 

Colonel Downs rode quiet and dignified at the head, followed 
by his staff, all mounted, and then followed the three battalions 
in regimental order, not a break occurring in the ranks, except 
when some one Avould drop dead, as did Privates Skinner, of 
Company B, and Scofield, of Company K; Corporals Immen, of 
Company F, and Scheid, of Company C; or were wounded, as 
were Lieutenant Trull, of Company K; Private Deutchberger, 
of Company C, and many others whose names will be found in 
the official list of the casualties of this engagement. 

At last reaching a trail that turned into this road at the left, 
on a little eminence by the turn stood General Kent, who said — - 
the writer of this history distinctly heard the order — " Colonel 
Downs, you will take your regiment along this trail and follow it 
to the ford of the stream and there rest." The Colonel said : 
" How far, General, is this ford from here ? " The General re- 
plied: "I do not know." "Very well, sir," said Colonel Downs, 
Vfho at once dismounted, ordered staff to do likewise, said to the 
Chaplain, " Your place is with the Surgeons looking after sick 



232 Annual Report of the 

and wounded,'' then ordering his regiment to column left, he 
boldly and bravely and confidently led them, shot and shell still 
and for hours subsequently continuously pouring in upon them. 

The regiment was led along this trail as far as it seemed pos- 
sible to the coumnanding officer to take them without unneces- 
sarily exposing them to a shower of bullets crossing an open 
space in the road, and there was halted, waiting further orders. 
Other regiments, either of infantry or of dismounted cavalry, 
Iiaving received different orders than those given to our Colonel, 
marched by our troops while halted, and some of them, with an 
impertinence unsuited to gentlemen and disorder unbefitting 
regulars who pride themselves upon being soldiers, cried out to 
some of our troops " to go forward." 

The Seventy-first Regiment oieyed its orders and was obeying 
orders when, there it halted. As subsequently it proved that the 
whole engagement was in no sense a general's battle; that the 
original plan of an attack upon El Caney, with the troops on 
the left under General Kent, held in reserve, was absolutely 
changed by the turn of events, it might have been well for the 
Colonel of the Seventy-first to have done what Captains and 
Majors did, go forward without orders. There is no doubt about 
it, much as was the success of this famous engagement of San 
Juan due tO' regiments and battalions and even companies going 
independently to the hill without orders from Brigade and 
Division Commanders; had not success crowned these efforts, and 
nothing succeeds like success, these very officers whose gallantry 
we admire might have been court-martialed for acting independ- 
ent of orders. 

Colonel Downs waited for orders, and not receiving any pre- 
ferred to wait rather than move a regiment forward without 



State Historian. 233 

orders. Any military man worthy the name cannot find fault 
with a technical obedience of orders or a refusal to act without 
them. It will be found by anyone who takes the trouble to make 
the investigation that General Kent's order to Colonel Downs 
was in strict accord with General Shatter's idea for General 
Kent's division to be held in reserve, and that Colonel Downs' 
strict obedience of his orders was carrying out the plan. 

It was not the original plan of General Shaffer to take San 
Juan Hill that day. Indeed, as late as 2 p. m. of the following 
day lie was seriously considering the withdrawal of our troops 
to the rear. The first intention was to enter Santiago by the 
El Caney road. All this was subsequently modified to suit 
changed conditions, rendered possible by the brilliant charge and 
occupation of the San Juan Hill, which, be it remembered, was 
done, not simultaneously, but successively, some troops going up 
under regimental commanders, some as battalions, some even as 
companies and even parts of companies. 

Who were the first to get to the top of San Juan Hill, where 
was the block-house, and where were the entrenchments from 
which the Spaniards fled in retreat as soon as they saw our troops 
advancing, it is not possible to say. When the regulars get 
through their talk about it, and settle it, it may become known. 
It really matters little. The honor lies either with the Thirteenth, 
Sixth, Sixteenth or Tw^enty-fourth Infantry. But among these 
troops to arrive first upon the hill, where the enemy had been 
entrenched, were Company F or a part of it, led by Captain 
Raflferty, who behaved in a quiet, dignified and gallant manner. 
Company L, led by Captain Austin, who, when asked by some 
superior officer at the top of the hill, " How did you come up 
here all by yourself?" answered. " I came as an advance guard 



234 Annual Kbport of the 

of the Third Battalion, sir," thus ingeniously avoiding the charge 
of bringing up his company without orders ; the Third Battalion, 
mostly intact, led by Major Frank Keck, whose courage and 
impetuosity nobody can ever doubt; Company M, led by Captain 
Goldsborough, and Company I, led by Captain Meeks. > 

There is no doubt whatever that during the day troops became 
somewhat mixed. It was inevitable and due to the extraordinary 
character of the engagement. When companies leave battalions 
and battalions leave regiments and oflScers act independently of 
the commands of their superiors confusion must result, though, 
as in this instance, success having crowned their efforts, there 
is nothing but praise for the courage that inspired them. Some 
of our men went up with the regulars, some of the regulars went 
up with us. That all got there is occasion for reverent congratu- 
lation and thanksgiving, especially when it is remembered that 
it was a game of haphazard from beginning to end. 

It is difficult for the writer of this history at this time to give 
a complete story of this engagement. Details of a fresh and im- 
portant character are daily being revealed. It will take time to 
sift from the reports things true and undeniable. With best 
intentions now men in the engagement tell different stories of 
it or the part they took in it. The official reports are reliable. 
To these the Seventy-flrst Regiment refers with pride. Modest 
men in it think it might have done better, the best men of it 
are proud that it did so much, and every man in it, from Colonel 
to humblest enlisted man, knows that he did his duty as he 
regarded it. 

Being a soldier is obeying orders. The man who stayed at 
Siboney watching blankets and drums, if ordered there by his 
Colonel, was doing his duty, and as good a soldier doing it as the 



State Historian. 235 

one who stood in the trenches on San Juan Hill. The Drum 
Corps, detailed to the duty, who carried wounded men on litters 
for days and nights for miles back to Division Hospital and there 
assisted in making suffering men more comfortable, worked as 
hard and were just as good soldiers as hundreds who lay in 
bushes all day long and never fired a gun. 

The conceit, more ridiculous than sublime, that accompanies 
some soldiers who think because they carry a gun that anybody 

in a regiment who goes unarmed is something less brave than 

« 
they, needs rebuke. The man, who with nothing to defend him- 
self but a rag with a red cross on it, which, in this war, received 
neither regard nor respect from Spaniards, who toiled carrying, 
or relieving, or ministering to the wounded and dying, was just as 
good a soldier, did just as necessary a work, and will have from 
people whose opinion is Avorth anything just as much credit and 
regard as the one, who, no matter where he really was, persists 
in saying and even in thinking that he was always at the front. 

Before night had passed the regiment was brought together, 
and ere morning had dawned all the officers were present and in 
command of their men. 

If there has been any omission of any particular company or of 
any particular battalion, it has been due to the fact that after 
a month of ready listening and calm consideration the writer has 
been unable to add anything, the accuracy of which seems to him 
undoubted. . 

Since Major Keck took the Third Battalion up the hill. Com- 
pany L having preceded it as an advance guard, led by Captain 
Austin, it is well that we state what we have been able to gather 
of the action of our First and Second Battalions, or at least 
of portions of them. 



236 Annual Report op the 

The following is Major Wells' report of the First and Second 
Battalions in action on July 1st, 1898: 

" After crossing the ford Companies M, H and a portion of P 
were formed in a line on the bank of the stream and were joined 
by Companies A, D and G, of the First Battalion, and also by 
about fifty men from the Sixth and Sixteeth Infantry, Regulars — 
which latter regiments were supposed to have ascended the hill. 
These companies were then organized into two battalions, M anil 
H, with the two left squads of F, and the regulars above men- 
tioned, forming the Second, and A, G and D-the First Battalion. 
These battalions were commanded by Captains Goldsborough 
and Linson, respectively, and, under my command, were marched 
in columns of fours to the foot of Saa Juan Hill, where the two 
battalions were formed in two lines, all by bugle call, the bugler 
being a man from one of the regular regiments who had lost 
his command. I went to the top of the hill and received orders 
from General Hawkins through his A. A. G. to send up at once 
one battalion, who were to be deployed on the firing line at the 
right of the block-house. Captain Goldsborough's battalion was 
designated for this purpose and at once deployed and were joined 
by Company F. Companies F and M were on the firing line, with 
H held in support. 

" The losses of the two companies were most severe because 
on that portion of the hill the fire was the hottest, and these 
companies, advancing some distance over the brow of the hill, 
were most exposed. During this time the First Battalion, held 
until now iu reserve, was brought up the hill and took position 
about fifty feet in rear of the crest. After M and F had accom- 
plished the purpose for which they were ordered forward they 
retired just under the crest of the hill and were there joined by 



State Historian. 237 

Company I, which had ascended the hill some time before, gal- 
lantly led by Captain Meeks and Lieutenant Williams, when 
the battalion was then completed. The firing lasted until dark, 
when M and F were withdrawn 'from the crest and sent to the 
reserves, and Companies A and G to take their places while 
other companies were in support. At this juncture, or rather, 
during the fiercest of the action. Adjutant Fisher was ordered 
to the rear by General Hawkins to draw fresh ammunition, and 
crossed the open fields bravely and creditably under a galling 
fire." * 

Since every important offlcer of the regiment in field and line 
has made his oflQcial report of this day's action, it is possible 
for anyone wishing to know any detail of the same to ascertain 
it by consulting these reports. It is nothing to the discredit of 
any one historian of such a battle as this to say that in minute 
detail and incidental particulars that no two oflBcers in any 
regiment could write separate accounts and have all their records 
agree. Enough that at the close of this first day's fight every 
man in the Seventy-first Kegiment felt that he had done his 
duty as he had clearly seen it, and that while some had oppor- 
tunities denied to others for conspicuous gallantry, all, without 
exception, from humblest drummer, litter carrier and officer's 
valet up to the Colonel himself, were under heavy fire for long 
periods of time, and from front to rear, all along the line where 
brave and hard work had equally to be done, the regiment was 
conspicuous for its absolute faithfulness to duty. The work of 
our Surgeons, Drs. Bell and Stafford ; our Hospital Corps, among 
whom our personal knowledge enables us to mention, not dis- 
paragingly to others, but creditably to themselves, Privates 
Edwards, Dunning, Potter, Messer and Lucas, and Dr. Levy, who 



238 Annual Eeport of the 

were conspicuously helpful on the field in bringing the wounded 
to the rear. 

Understanding, however, the great difQculty of mentioning by 
name all who deserve it, the Chaplain asks leniency from those 
who read these records and may not see their names and feci 
.themselves sufficiently honored to be among the unmentioned 
heroes of the San Juan fight. After all, the only permanent 
pride and pleasure which one who was there can possibly have 
comes from an abiding consciousness that first, last and all the 
time he unflinchingly did his duty. 

The wounded were carried to the rear or marched there from 
the very beginning of the action, and for forty-eight hours the 
road for four miles back to the Division Hospital was filled with 
wounded men walking or Avith litters conveying both wounded 
and dead. The result at the end of the first day's fight was in 
every way favorable to our side. We had captured their block- 
houses, forced them out of their first line of entrenchments and 
driven them back towards Santiago. Had we had a sufiScient 
force of artillery, we could then have bombarded the city and 
taken it at once. 

From a military standpoint we had accomplished a miracle 
already in driving troops from strong entrenchments with infan- 
try only. The lack of any artillery in this battle was a conspicu- 
ous feature. The fighting began the following day and continued 
until sundown, the fire being continuous and intense. The 
enemy's shells were fired five miles in the rear, making work at 
all the emergency hospitals dangerous and freedom from fire as 
far back as the Division Hospital exceedingly uncertain. At 
midnight of Saturday the enemy made their last daring attempt 
to destroy us, suddenly pouring into our trenches a terrific fusi- 



State Historian. 239 

lade of musketry and firing shells in every direction. Our troops, 
not wholly taken by surprise, returned the fire with the heaviest 
musketry fire heard during the whole engagement. In this 
attack the enemy lost very heavily, some 3,000, it was reported, 
having been slain. The Springfield rifle, against the use of which 
the regulars had reasonably complained, because of the black 
powder, which drew the fire of the enemy, could be fired safely at 
night. The Seventy-first utilized their muskets with disastrous 
effect upon the enemy. 

On Sunday morning orders having been given to Admiral 
Cervera by Captain-General Blanco to take his entire fieet out 
to sea, he endeavored to run our blockade ofiE Morro, at the 
mouth of Santiago Harbor, in doing which he lost every vessel in 
his command, not a single one escaping destruction. The noise 
of the bombardment was very welcome to our troops in the en- 
trenchments. We knew well what was going on, though we were 
not prepared for the magnificent victory, particulars of which we 
afterwards heard. 

As soon as we could we obtained the official list of our own 
dead and wounded, which, though not complete, was the best that 
at this time could be secured. Fourteen were killed in the 
Seventy-first and sixty-seven wounded. Of the killed, there were 
several buried back of the trenches, several along the road from 
the front to the Division Hospital and the others in trenches 
at the Hospital. In every instance care was taken to have per- 
manent marks of identification either attached to the bodies 
or placed at the heads of the graves. It was impossible for the 
Chaplain to bury all because bis duties called him all along the 
road from the front to the Division Hospital, over which, back 
and forth, until the day of the surrender, his work demanded 
his presence. 



240 Annual Report of the 

Privates Brown, Holland, Daly and Boss, of Company M; 
Booth, of Company L; Decker, of Company I; Preger, of Com- 
pany A, and Booth, of Company F, were buried near the front 
beyond the road that turns to the ford below San Juan Hill. 
Privates Skinner, of Company B, and Scofleld, of Company K, 
are buried by the side of the road at the edge of the stream run- 
ning at the foot of El Poso Hill. Corporals Immen, of Company 
C, and Scheid, of Company F, were buried in the trenches at the 
Division Hospital, with many others, records of which were kept 
at the Hospital. 

Nothing but desultory firing, and mostly by our side, occurred 
now until the 14th, the day of the surrender. It was weary work 
enough for men lying in the trenches without shelter, at no 
time well fed, and much of the time insufficiently fed, and most 
all of the time on the " qui vive," expecting an attack. Their 
comfort in these days was in no way enhanced by frequent 
showers that filled the trenches with four feet of Avater, and left 
twelve inches of slimy mud all the country around. During 
thit' time work of a severe and serious nature was going on in 
both the Division Hospitals five miles from the front, and in the 
General Hospital at Siboney, ten miles fnrthiH" back toward the 
sea. On the night of the 1st of July, and all night long, lay 
one hundred and fifty (150) men, officers and soldiers unsheltered 
in pools of their own blood, anxiously, and to their credit be it 
said, uncomplainingly, awaiting operations. In this condition 
fully this number lay till noon of the following day, many of 
them for hours under a blistering sun, the power of which only 
those who have been in semi-tropical regions can ever know. 

Were it not that a Chaplain's relations with men under these 
conditions are of too personal a nature for public records, it 



State Historian. 241 

would be interesting here to relate scenes and circumstances 
dearest and most touching in all his experience. These relations 
were not alone with those of his own "regiment, but at the front, 
through " Bloody Bend " and all along the road, in emergency 
hospitals, dressing stations, Division and General Hospitals, 
with hundreds of men, ofScers and soldiers of every arm of the 
service, and from most every command he dealt intimately and 
personally, and established relations of the most affectionate and 
enduring character. 

The only change in the monotony referred to at "the front was 
a detail of the First Battalion, under Major Whittle, and the 
Second Battalion, under Major Wells, to build bridges and 
improve the road. Subsequently, Major Wells having engineer- 
ing experience, was put in charge of a detachment of Michigan 
troops, who, with some of our own men, did excellent work in 
cutting trees, clearing the chapparal and building bridges to 
withstand the freshets of the streams. As an answer to the 
sneers indulged in by. those, fully as conceited as they are 
brave, and who think that the only work done by a regiment is 
that by those in the trenches, though confessedly they were here 
for hours and days doing nothing, the labors of men who cut 
down trees, build bridges and repair roads, along which ammuni- 
tion and rations must be brought, are, to say the least, the very 
important. Indeed, without their labors the brave men in the 
front would amount to nothing at all. The man who blows the 
organ, if not as conspicuous, is fully as important as the man 
who plays it, and the drummer who carried the litter on the day 
of the San Juan battle did just as good work and was just as 
good a soldier as the man who carried his gun. A soldier is 

a man who does his duty when, where and how he is told to do it. 
16 



:242 Annual Kepoet of the 

A coward is a man who neglects to do his duty, and he can 
neglect it in the trenches, as well as building bridges. 

After the 3rd flags of truce M-ere repeatedly raised, by €he 
enemy, and it was evident that negotiations were pending for a 
surrender. 

On the Gth Lieutenant Hobson and his famous crew were 
exchanged, notable generals on both sides meeting in the open 
before the trenches, bauds playing the " Star Spangled Banner," 
Spanish prisoners of equal rank exchanged for ours, troops shout- 
ing all along five miles of entrenchments from San Juan to 
El Caney, making a scene forever memorable. 

Until the 14th siege guns were being armed and put in posi- 
tion, troops from various States came by transports to Siboney 
and were sent to the front as reinforcements, and when flags 
of truce were not up firing was indulged in, but mostly by our 
side. It was evident that General Shafter wished to avoid 
bombardment of the city for humanitarian reasons, though on the 
:2nd of July it was not at all certain that we could hold our posi- 
tion and the Commanding General seriously considered a retreat ; 
by the 5th it was evident that the enemy was ours. Much to 
General Shafter's credit measures from this time on were more 
Tnerciful than drastic. Famine faced the enemy with every 
passing hour. It was only a question of time when they must 
surrender. The city could be taken at any time by bombard- 
ment, but not without a very heavy loss in charging our troops 
upon their secure entrenchments. 

Delay was, however, most discouraging for our soldiers because 
the dreaded fever was beginning already to deplete our troops. 
During this time the Chaplain was detailed to Siboney to look 
after the transportation of our wounded men on ships to north- 



State Historian. 24S 

em hospital or homes, and generally to assist in the work of 
the Hospital on the coast. By Saturday night, the 9th of July, 
all of our wounded men, except several who were able when 
cured to return to the front, had been carried to the ships, not 
an easy task, and on their way home on Sunday morning. Yellow 
fever made its appearance, and in a few days, the numbers in- 
creasing to one hundred. Through the influence of Dr. Guiteras, 
an expert in the disease, a special quarantine hospital was estab- 
lished for these patients two miles along the line (jf the railroad 
in the mountains of Firmeza. Among others sick and recuperat- 
ing at Siboney were Captain Joyce, of Company H, who in a 
few days was sent to New York for recovery, and Lieutenant 
Beekman, of Company B, and Eegimental Quartermaster-Captain 
Stephens, who, subsequently recovering from mailarial fever, 
joined the regiment at the front. 

A United States post-office was at this time opened at Siboney, 
and, with the hope that mails might be received more regularly, 
Quartermaster-Sergeant John H. Beatty was detailed to Siboney 
to handle mail for the regiment; this hope was sadly dispelled, 
however, by the death of Mr. Brewer, United States Postmaster 
in Cuba, from an attack of yellow fever before a week had passed. 
Every wooden house in Siboney was now ordered to be burned to 
the ground. All wounded men and all business departments 
were at once put under tents, and mail was not thereafter dis- 
tributed until several days after the surrender, July 14:th, when 
the post-oflSce was re-established in Santiago. 

Little now of unusual character occurred until the 14th of 
July, when Santiago, worn out with starvation and siege, finally 
surrendered, relinquishing the entire eastern province of Santiago 
de Cuba, laying down their arms and stipulating merely that the 



244 Annual Ebpoet of the 

Spanish army be returned to Spain. The other terms of the 
surrender, all favorable to the United States and merciful to 
Spain, were mutually settled by a council of six, three United 
States officers and three attaches from foreign governments to 
represent the side of Spain. 
We append here a list of the wounded : 

Lieutenant William E. Trull, junior. Company G. 
Sergeant George B. Youngs, Company I. 
Sergeant Charles W. Cutting, Company L. 
Sergeant John J. Mara, Company M. 
Sergeant Max Pitzel, Company P. 
Corporal William T. Ahera, Company I. 
Private Lewis B. Youngs, Company M. 
Private Charles W. Goodman, Company A. 
• Private Thomas J. Dixon, junior. Company A. 
Private Frederick V. V. Shaw, Company A. 
Private Henry W. Zitnik, Company A. 
Private Prank A. Schaller, Company E. 
Private Donald C. McClelland, Company E. 
Private James P. Carroll, Company M. 
Private Washington B. Clarke, Company B. 
Private Alfred B. Conger, Company M. 
Private Charles Deutschberger, Company C. 
Private James Murphy, Company M. 
Private Eobert E. Murphy, Company H. 
Private William S. Valentine, Company C. 
Private Harry S. Watson, Company M. 
Private Earl B. Hall, Company P. 
Private Louis B. Poley, Company K. 



State Historian. 245 



Private Malcolm Barrett, Company M. 
Private Leo J. Donnelly, Company M. 
Private Bloomfield B. Mills, Company M. 
Private Charles J. Weeks, Company C. 
Sergeant Jam^s J. McDermott, Company P. 
Private Leander G. Biseman, Company F. 
Private Charles Andre, Company K. 
Private Peter J. Cunningham, Company L. 
Private Henry J. Holzkamp, Company L. 
Private Eobert E. Gannon, Company L. 
Private Sinclair H. Kirby, Company G. 
Private Joseph Dunwoody, Company D. 
Private John W. Jeffrey, Company B. 
Private Edward D. Hall, Company C. 
Private Henry P. Kichardson, Company A. 
Private John K. Brown, Company D. 
Private Maurice Euster, Company E. 
Private George F. Featherstone, Company F. 
Private Ernest E. Potter, Company M. 
Private William B. Sheppard, Company M. 
Corporal Lewis W. Carlisle,' Company M. 
Musician Frederick Wolters, Jr., Company G. 
Private Frederick O. Kuehnle, Company D. 
Private Joseph F. Althause, Company G. 
Private John M. Botts, Company A. 
Private Frank L. Flint, Company H. 
Private Ferdinand Hebrank, Company P. 
Private Leonard Westerberg, Company C. 
Private James L. Marlow, Company H. 
Private John McGeechan, Company M. 



246 Annual Report of the 

Private Samuel Mclntyre, Company G. 
Private John E. Mercer, Company F. 
Private John H. Miller, Company C. 
Private Louis E. Hess, Company H. 
Private William Humbert, Company A. 
Private George M. Hurley, Company C. 
Private James E. Keller, Company A. 
Private William H. Mackenzie, Company E. 

The inability to secure company or regimental boats from the 
transport " Vigilancia " all the time we were in Cuba, the man- 
ner in which men were hastily transferred from Eegimental to 
Division Hospital while encamped near Santiago, the haste with 
which, once yellow fever was discovered, on reaching Montauk 
more than one hundred were despatched to Detention 
Camp and there strictly quarantined; the removal of the regi- 
ment from Santiago to Montauk in three detachments by differ- 
ent vessels, sailing at different times, the leaving of many sick 
and unable to proceed further than the dock at Santiago in the 
different hospitals of that city, the encamping of the regiment 
in three different sections, miles apart over the roaming hills 
of Montauk, with no communication allowed between them, 
together with confessedly inaccurately kept records at the Gen- 
eral Hospital at Camp Wikoff, make anything like a perfect 
record of our dead at this time at any rate absolutely impossible. 

The writer of this history disclaims all responsibility for this 
lamentable result, nor will he attribute blame to anyone for it; 
he merely states the fact that at this time of writing it is impos- 
sible to answer definitely the heart-rending appeals that come 
for information concerning many of the sick, wounded, missing 



State Historian. 247 

:and dead of the Seventy-first Regiment. Confronted by such a 
condition, we are compelled to annex a newspaper clipping of 
August 23rd,* giving more definite information than anything 
we have been able to secure from the official records : 

XIST OF SBVBNTY-FIEST EEGIMENT MEN LIVING, ILL, MISSING, DEAD. 

Camp Wikoff, Aug. 22, 1898.— Following is a list of the mem- 
"bers of the Seventy-first Regiment, either in Cuba, in the hospital 
here, missing or dead. Many of these men have heretofore been 
unaccounted for: • 

Staff Officers. 

James Stafford, Assistant Surgeon, is on duty in Cuba. 

George H. Stevenson, Hospital Steward, in hospital at Santiago. 

Company A. 

First Sergeant Edgar W. Root, died of typhoid malarial fever 
•September 8, 1898, at Yonkers, N. Y. 

Hubbard W. White, died of yellow fever September 1, 1898, at 
CJamp Wikoflf. 

William Preger,t killed at the battle of San Juan, July 1, 1898. 

Frederick V. V. Shaw, wounded, San Juan battle. 

Company B. 

Corporal Louis B. Small, died of disease September 3, in hos- 
pital, New York City. 

Washington B. Clarke, wounded, in New York. 

Reuben N. Dodd, accidentally killed, October 28, 1898, at New 
York City. 

* From the very nature of things more or less inaccuracy is expected in a newspaper article 
of the character inserted here by Dr. Van Dewater. But, by comparison and verification with 
the muster rolls in the o£5ce of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York, a reasonably 
full and accurate Hst of the casualties in the Seventy-first regiment has been obtained. — State 
Historian. 

tAlso borne on the rolls as Prayer. —State Histohian. 



248 Annual Ebpoet ow the 

John W. Jeffrey, wounded, in New York. 

Louis B. Skinner, killed in action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 
1898. 

Edward Y. Thorp, died of disease, September 4, 1898, in St. 
Luke's Hospital, New York. 

Company C. 

Arthur D. Burhans, died of disease, September 1, 1898, at Ba- 
yonne, N. J. 

John Howitt, died of disease, August 25, 1898, at Santiago, 
Cuba. 

Charles P. F. Gushing, killed in action, July 1, 1898, at San 
Juan Hill. 

Thomas H. Fitzgerald, died of disease, September 13, 1898, at 
Montauk Point, N. Y. 

George L. Immen,* died, July 4, 1898, of wounds received in 
action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 1898. 

William S. Valentine, committed suicide while temporarily 
deranged at his home. Sing Sing. 

Samuel J. Walton, died of disease at Camp Wikoff, August 
20, 1898. 

Charles J. Weeks, wounded and at home. 

Company D. 

Alexander Clark, died of typhoid fever, August 27, 1898, at 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Walter J. Brown, died of dysentery, August 11, 1898, in hos- 
pital near Santiago, Cuba. 

Joseph Dunwoody, wounded in action, July 1, 1898, at San 
Juan Hill ; died of wounds, September 12, 1898, at New York Gity. 

*Al80 borne on the rolls as George R. Immens. — State Hibtohian. 



State Historian. 249 

Daniel K. Keynolds, died of dysentery, August 30, 1898, on 
board transport " Roumania," at sea. 

William J. Walsh, died of fever, September 19, 1898, at New 
York City. 

Emil Wendland, died of typhoid fever, September 21, 1898, at 
New York City. 

Company E. 

Sergeant HermajQ Ziegner, died of fever, September 9, 1898, 
in St. John's Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sergeant William D. S. Young, died of fever, July 29, 1898, at 
Santiago, Cuba. 

William E. Carmer, died of fever, September 8, 1898, on board 
transport " Missouri," at sea. 

George W. Cook, died of malarial fever, September 11, 1898, at 
Hackensack, N. J. 

Stanley H. Forsyth, died of fever, October 12, 1898, at Water- 
town, N. Y. 

Paul W. Freidman, died of fever, September 4, 1898, aboard 
transport " Missouri," at sea. 

John P. Hogan, died of malarial fever, September 16, 1898, at 
New York City. 

Arthur M. Messiter, died of fever, September 2, 1898, at Boston, 
Mass. 

Edward Pfister, died of fever, August 28, 1898, at Montauk 
Point, N. Y. 

John J. Quilty, died of disease, August 26, 1898, at Camp 
Wikoff. 

Edgar E. Williams, died of fever, August 23, 1898, at Mon- 
tauk Point, N. Y. 



250 Annual Kbport of the 

Company F. 

Lieutenant Alfred I. Roberts, died of pneumonia, September 
20, 1898, in hospital, Montauk Point, A'. Y. 

Prank W. Booth, killed in action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 1898. 

Harry F. Cax*penter, died of typhoid malaria, September 12,. 
1898, at his home, Monroe, N. Y. 

John J. Dinan, died of fever, August 26, 1898, at Montauk. 
Point, N. Y. 

Leander G. Eiseman, home, wounded. 

Frederick L. Engels, died of malarial fever, August 14, 1898^ 
aboard transport " La Grande Duchesse." 

Joseph Howard, died of typhoid malaria, September 21, 1898,. 
at New York City. 

Edward C. Kroupa, died of pernicious malarial fever, August 
11, 1898, at Santiago, Cuba. 

Thomas J. O'Brien, died of disease, September 4, 1898, at St. 
John's Hospital, borough of Queens, New York. 

John A. Shaw, died of fever, August 11, 1898, at Santiago,. 
Cuba. 

Heni"y J. Scheid, died, July 3, 1898, of wounds received in 
action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 1898. 

Goinpany (?. 
First Sergeant Eugene L. Sharrott, died of typhoid fever,. 
August 13, 1898, at Santiago, Cuba. 

Corporal William A. Rusk, died of entero colitis fever, Sep- 
' tember 10, 1898, aboard transport " Missouri." 

John M. Barnum, died of dysentery, August 17, 1898, at Camp- 
Wikoff. 

Lewis C. Heath, died in Santiago, Cuba, August 8, 1898, of per- 
nicious malarial fever. 



State Historian. 251 

James E. Nagle, died of fever and bronchitis, October 15, 1898, 
at New York City. 

Richard Martens, died of malarial fever, August 28, 1898, at 
'Santiago, Cuba. 

Comjyany H. 
Lieutenant William Longson, died of typhoid fever, September 
1, 1898, at New York City. 
John Bourke, died of typhoid fever, September 10, 1898, at 

Hew York City. 

* 

Company I. 

Sergeant Elmer C. Meeks, died of typhoid malarial fever, Sep- 
tember 19, 1898, at New York City. 

William E. Cheevers, died of fever, xVugust 1, 1898, at San- 
tiago, Cuba. 

Joseph S. Decker, killed in action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 
1898. 

Eugene W. Goflf, died of fever, September 3, 1898, at Camp 
Wikofif, Montauk Point, N. Y. 

Philip S. Hubschmitt, died at Lakeland, Fla., of gastric fever, 
May 27, 1898. 

Richard Quevedo, died of typhoid malarial fever, September 3, 
1898, at New York City. 

Frank H. Zoller, died of intermittent fever, September 22, 1898, 
at New York City. 

Company K. 

Corporal James L. Rodgers, died of fever, September 8, 1898, 
at Camp Wikofif, Montauk Point, N. Y. 

Joseph I. Black, died of entero colitis, September 2, 1898, at 
Santiago, Cuba. 



252 Annual Report of the 

Norman W. Crosley (Crosby), died of fever, September 3, 
1898, at New York City. 

JoHn H. Haller, died of fever, August 24, 1898, at Camp Wikoflf, 
N. Y. 

William McClurg, died of pleuro pneumonia, November 9, 1898, 
at New York City. 

Edward Percy McKeever, died of fever, August 31, 1898, at 
New York City. 

John E. O'Connor, died of fever, August 11, 1898, at Santiago, 
Cuba. 

Frank E. Bouse, died of fever at Montauk Point, August 15, 
1898. 

August F. Schroter, died of fever, August 25, 1898, at Camp 
Wikoff. 

Arthur Von Ette, died of fever, September 5, 1898, aboard 
transport " Missouri," at sea. 

Charles Gombert, died of fever, August 16, 1898, at Santiago, 
Cuba. 

Sidney A. Scofleld, killed in action <at San Juan Hill, July 1, 
1898. 

Company L. 

Frank E. Alden, died of malarial fever, August 12, 1898, at 
Field Hospital, Santiago, Cuba. 

John Booth, killed in action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 1898. 

Nathan H. Oarswell, died of malarial fever,' August 25, 1898, 
at his home, New York City. 

John F. Cavanaugh, died of fever, Camp WikofE, August 29, 
1898. 

Alexander Conroy, deserted. 



State Historian. 253 

Ebbe Ebbeson, died of typhoid fever at sea and was buried at 
Montauk Point, September 10, 1898. 

Corporal Eobert G. Everett, died of typhoid fever, September 
5, 1898, at New York City. 

John J. Fitzgibbon, died of typhoid fever, September 10, 1898, 
aboard transport " Missouri," and was buried at sea. 

Gus Grahn, died of disease before Santiago, July 20, 1898. 

Christopher Jorgensen, accidentally killed en route to Camp 
Wikoff, Montauk Point, N. Y., from Camp Black, Au^st 24, 1898. 

Gustav C. Schutz, died of disease aboard transpoA " La Grande 
Duchesse " in transit to Montauk Point, N. Y., and was buried 
at sea Sunday, August 14, 1898. 

James T. Williams, died at Santiago, Cuba, July 28, 1898, of 
fever. 

Company M. 

First Sergeant William D. Pierson, died of fever, August 23, 
1898, at Montauk Point, jS'. Y. 

Sergeant John J. Mara, died of fever and dysentery, Septem- 
ber 11, 1898, at Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, N. Y. 

Corporal Lewis W. Carlisle, died July 28, 1898, at St. Peters 
. Hospital, Brooklyn, of wounds received in action July 2, 1898. 

George M. Babbitt, died of heart disease aboard ship in transit 
to Montauk Point, and was buried at sea August 13, 1898. 

Clinton B. Brown, killed in action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 
1898. 

Charles E. Craigie, died of fever, August 27, 1898, at Montauk 
Point. 

Michael Daly, killed in action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 1898. 

Thomas G. Dunning, died of fever, August 23, 1898, at Montauk 
Point, N. Y. 



254 Annual Keport of the 

David M. Earl, died of fever, August 26, 1898, at Montauk 
Point, N. Y. 

John H. Geoghegan, died of fever, September 8, 1898, at Glen 
Cove, N. Y. 

Norman J. G. McWilliam, died of yellow fever, August 20, 1898, 
at Siboney, Cuba. 

William A. Talcott, Jr., died of fever and peritonitis, Septem- 
ber 1, 1898, at Watch Hill, E. I. 

Charles D. Holland, killed in action at San Juan Hill, July 
1, 1898. 

Beuben Boss, killed in action at San Juan Hill, July 1, 1898. 

Maurice B. Kane, killed by the cars, August 24, 1898, near 
Westburg, N. Y. 

Casualties. Officers. Men. 

Killed in action .... 11 

Died of wounds received in action . . ,- y. .... 4 

Wounded ..> 1 60 

Accidentally killed '. . < .... 3 

Died of disease 2 73 

Committed suicide .... 1 

— State Historian. 



State Historian. 255> 

The wholly unique character of the San Juan engagement^ 
infantry for hours doing the work of artillery, no regiment, either 
regular or volunteer, having been wholly kept intact, the battle, by 
the acknowledgment of everyone, not a general's, nor a colonel's, 
nor scarcely a major's, but a captain's and even a private's 
engagement, it is no wonder that there were many conflicting, 
reports of the work done by the several commands or that the 
honor of being first at the top of the San Juan Hill was claimed 
by at least sixteen companies and six regiments of the Fifth Army 
Corps. 

When home papers very naturally enlarged upon the work done 
and the bravery shown by the volunteer regiments and illus- 
trated their somewhat exaggerated accounts with some extra- 
ordinary pictures, one paper going so far as to give away an 
illustrated supplement containing a march dedicated to " The 
Hero of San Juan," as though any man could be the hero of such 
a battle, the regulars, reading these reports and seeing these 
pictures, having no press in any city to laud their individual 
efforts, became naturally jealous, resented what they called in- 
justice, and were, some of them, responsible for an article whicb 
appeared in one paper of New York city, too unworthy to be 
mentioned, reflecting upon the bravery of the Seventy-first Eegi- 
ment. The facts were so undeniably a refutation of this charge 
that the entire press and the whole community instantly wreaked 
its vengeance upon this libelous sheet, and brought its managers 
upon their knees for mercy in less than twenty-four hours. 

Not to answer any charge of cowardice, to do which would be 
unworthy, the following from the pen of one of the ablest war 
correspondents in the field is here submitted as a perfectly accu- 



256 Annual Ebpoet of the 

rate account of the engagement of the Seventy-first at San Juan 
Hill. A careful study of all the oflQcial reports of that battle 
under the strongest light which study and research will throw 
upon it in the future can but conflrm every statement made here 
by Mr. Stoddard : 

" It is not a matter of great surprise to those who went 
through the Santiago campaign to find on coming home here 
that the Seventy-first New York is the subject of wide discussion, 
for there was never a moment from the time in May when it 
landed in Lakeland, B'la., until after Santiago had fallen that 
the appearance and standing of the regiment were not the every- 
day talk of both regulars and civilians in the expedition. Roose- 
velt's men excited the curiosity of everyone, but, as two-thirds 
of them had been under fire in one way or another, and were 
hardened to roughing it, they were not regarded as a type of the 
TOilumteer soldier. The Seventy-first men were so regarded, 
however, from the outset. Many regular officers made the trip 
from Tampa to Lakeland to look them over and make comparison 
with the regulars, and all returned with highest praise for the 
men and for the spirit they showed. 

" It was because of this fact that they were the only volunteers 
except the Eoosevelt Regiment, assigned to the perilous work of 
taking San Juan Hill, and the only ones employed in the first 
day's battle at that point. 

" The Second Massachusetts was a part of Brigadier-General 
Ludlow's* command at El Caney, and, though it suffered from 

♦William Ludlow. Born in New York. Apriointed from New York to the United States 
Military Academy .luly 1, 1800 (graduated No. 8!; first lieutenant engineers June 13, 18S4; 
captain March 7, 1867; major June 30, 1882; lieutenant-oolonel August 13, 1895; brigadier- 
general volunteers May 4, 1898; major-general volunteers September 7, 1898; honorably dis- 
charged April 13, 1899; brigadier-general volunteers April 13, 1899; brigadier-pfeneral United 
States army January 21, 1900; brevet-captain July 20, 1864, for gallant and meritorious 
services in the defence of Allatoona Pass; major December 21, 1864, for gallant and merito- 
rious services in the campaign through Georgia, and lieutentant-colonel March 13, 1805, for 
gallant and meritorious serWces in the campaign of the Carolinas; died at Convent Station, 
New Jersey, August 30, 1901, agsd 53 ysirs. — State Hi9ToaiA.N. 



State Histokia.n. 257 

Spanish fire, it was not engaged in the intense fighting at El 
Caney, nor, of course, did it get into the San Juan engagement 
until the second daj', when the firing on both sides was from 
behind entrenchments. This was no fault of the Massachusetts 
men, for they did the work assigned them elsewhere with valiant 
spirit, but it was Chaffee's brigade of regulars, and not Ludlow's, 
which General Lawton* ordered into the final charge upon El 
Oaney, and the Massachusetts men were utilized as a support, 
rather than as the assailing column. 

" To the critics of the Seventy-first the reply nfay well be 
made that there must have been something in the make-up of 
the New York boys to lead the commanding general to order 
them into a charge at which even veteran troops might 
falter, and where the daring of our men, regulars and volunteers 
alike, excited the wonder and admiration of the military experts 
of all nationts. Had the San Juan engagement been an ordinary 
battle, Avith no unusual advantage in position for either side, the 
selection of a regiment as part of the advancing column would 
be no special indication of confidence, but at San Juan, to go 
into the fight as part of the charging column, meant that one 
out of every four men was to drop, wounded or killed. 

♦Henry Ware Lawton. Born in Ohio. Appointed from ladiana. Sergexnt Co. E, 9th 
Indiana infantry, April ]8 to July 29, 1861; first lieutenant 30th Indiana infantry August 20, 
1861 ; captain May 17, 1862; lieutenant-coionel November 15, 1864; brevet -colonel volunteeri 
March 1.3, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services during the war; honorably mustered out 
November 25, 1865; second lieutenant 41st infantry July 23, 1866; fir.st lieutenant July 31, 
1867; regimental quartermaster .Tune 1, 1868, to November 11, 1869; transferred to 24th 
infantry November 11, 1869; regimental quartermaster November 11, 1869, to January 1, 
1871; transferred to 4th cavalry January 1, 1871; regimental quartermaster May 1, 1872, to 
March 20, 187.5, and September 1, 1876, to March 20, 1879; captain March 20, 1879, to October 
2, 1888; major inspector-general September 17, 1888; lieutenant-colonel inspector-general 
February 12, 1889; colonel inspector-general July 7, 1898; brigadier-general volunteers May 4, 
1898; major-general volunteers July 8, 1898; received Congressional medal of honor for dis- 
tinguished gallantry in leading a charge of sMrmishers again.st the enemy's rifle pits, taking 
them with their occupants and stubbornly and successfully resisting two determined attacks 
of the enemy to retake the works; in front of Atlanta, Ga., August 3, 1S61, while serving as 
captain Co, A, ,SOth Indiana volunteer infantry and brigade officer of the day: killed in action 
at the battle of San Mateo, Philippine Islands, December 19, 1899, aged 56 years. — State 
Historian. _i 

17 



258 Annual Report of the 

" It was for such courageous work as this that the Seventy-first 
men were awakened before dawn on the morning of July 1st. 
I know something of their spirit and pluck as they prepared 
for the march from camp at El Poso, five miles away, for I had 
pitched my tent in their camp two days before and was the only 
newspaper correspondent with them that night before the battle 
and who marched out with them toward the front that morn- 
ing. Few of the men knew just what they were going to do, 
for the orders were simply to follow the Sixth and Sixteenth 
Regulars wherever they went, but all knew that a battle of some 
kind was at hand, and that the regiment was to be in it. This 
was exactly what they wanted, and all hands marched out that 
morning proud of the fact that they had been chosen part of the 
fighting force. 

" The orders to prepare to advance had come to Colonel Downs 
late the day before, and at ' retreat ' that night had been com- 
municated to the men. They were to take the road at 4 o'clock 
in the morning, falling in after the Sixteenth Regulars. That 
night there were bustle and hurry and excitement throughout 
the camp, and when I reached there about 8 o'clock, after an 
afternoon's journey for rations down to Siboney and back, every- 
one was talking of to-morrow. It was not the first time that 
the men had prepared for battle, for they had been ordered 
into the Las Guasimas fight as reinforcements the first day they 
were on shore — another evidence, by the way, that they were 
to do the duty of veterans — and on the night of July 27th, the 
picket line began a firing that brought the entire regiment into 
formation to resist a midnight surprise. On that occasion every 
man jumped from his tent at word of command and was at his 
place of duty ready for the foe in less than two minutes' time. 



State Historian. 259 

" The probability of a fight next day, therefore, was not an 
entirely new thought for the Seventy-first as they turned in for 
a night's rest, though few of them got much sleep, there was so 
much packing up, letter writing by candle and singing to do. 
Promptly at half-past three, however, before dawn had yet 
streaked the skies or the chill night air was tempered by the sun, 
the call to rise was sounded by the bugler. It was a strange 
sight' to see the dark figures of the men moving about, like 
shadows on a curtain, and getting ready for the departure. Fires 
were lit and coffee boiled in much less time than ever before, 
the three days' rations were packed away in haversacks and each 
man rolled his bed-roll and keepsakes in his half of the shelter 
canvas. Altogether, with 105 rounds of ammunition in his 
cartridge belt, every man in the regiment started out on that 
historic day with fully fifty pounds on his back. In addition, 
every fourth man carried a spade or axe. 

" Promptly at 4 o'clock of July 1st Colonel Downs had his 
First Battalion halted on the roadside awaiting the passing of 
the two regiments he was to follow. The regulars were so far 
behind, however, that after waiting half an hour Colonel Downs 
ordered his men to proceed and I went with them. We marched 
at slow pace, about two miles, I should say, when the regulars 
caught up and the Seventy-first drew up on the side of the road 
to allow them to pass. By that time Capron's* artillery had 
opened fire on El Caney, and the sound of the guns was as dis- 
tinct in the morning air as if they were within half a mile of us, 
instead of being nearly five miles away. It was hard marching 

*Allyn Capron, father of Capt. Allyn K. Capron of the Rough Riders, who was killed in 
action at the battle of T-as Guasimas, was born in Florida. Appointed from North Carolina 
to the United Htate;^ Military Academy September 1, 1R63 (graduated No. 3.3); second Ueu- 
tenant Ist artillery June 17, 1867; first lieutenant .\ugust 19, 1873; captain December 4, 1888; 
participated in the operations around Santiago during the Spanish war: died September 18» 
1898 near Fort Myer, Virginia, aged 52 years. — ST^Tt: Histori.\n. 



260 Annual Report of the 

that morning in the muddy roads, especially as most of it had 
to be done in columns of two's, and I concluded to go ahead with 
the regulars so as to cover as much ground as possible before 
the sun became too hot. I left the Seventy-first, therefore, at 
their halting place opposite General Shatter's headquarters, in- 
tending to await them farther on. 

" Musketry fire could now be heard distinctly from the direction 
of El Caney, mingling with the booming of cannon, and we all 
understood that Lawton's division was engaging the enemy there. 
Our path, however, lay in a different direction — toward El Poso. 
First with the Sixth and then with the Sixteenth I trudged along 
with fast wearying step, for carrying thirty odd pounds on one's 
back in such a climate and on such a road is no easy task. Finally 
we came in sight of Grimes' battery up the El Poso Hill, with 
part of Roosevelt's Regiment strung along the trail and on the 
crest. Here I left the infantry on the valley road and started 
for the hill top. Half way up the hill I looked back on the valley 
road and for the first time realized that a big movement was to 
take place. The road was packed with troops as far as one could 
see, all halted for the word of command. On the El Poso Hill, 
gathered around the battery, were General Sumner, Colonel 
Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Roosevelt, Lieutenant Miley and Lieu- 
tenant-Oolonel John Jacob Astor, of General Shafter's staff, and 
Captain Grimes. It was then about 7.30. Everybody who had 
field glasses had them leveled at San Juan Hill, where the Span- 
iards were, but not a sign of life could be detected there. It was 
not over a mile and a half from the crest of one hill to that of 
the other. 

" The first shot from our cannon, fired just before 8 o'clock, fell 
into the trees and foliage at San Juan without disturbing the 



State Histoeian. 261 

quiet and repose of the place in the slightest. Another and 
another shot went crashing over there, followed by our hurrahs 
and cheers, but the scores of field glasses we were using gave 
no indication that San Juan was other than a wilderness. Negrly 
a score of solid shot had been fired and the range reduced from 
2,800 to 2,400 yards when General Sumner ordered a change to 
shrapnel. A group of twenty of us watched the loading of the 
gun and hurrahed loudly as the deadly stuff went whistling and 
twirling on its way toward the Spanish entrenchments, but we 
did not try to locate it with our glasses. Indeed, it had scarcely 
landed on San Juan Hill before the Spaniards greeted us with 
a reply in kind — the first shot of the battle from them — and 
our hurrahs jjromptly changed into something else. No one 
stopped to locate where our shrapnel landed, for we were all 
too busy trying to get out of the way of tljie Spanish shrapnel. 
The first shot flew through the air about fifty yards over our- 
heads, but the third one struck three Cubans standing against 
a half destroyed sugar mill. 

" For the next fifteen minutes the interchange &f shrapnel be- 
tween the batteries on the two hills was quite lively and Grimes'^ 
Hill, as it was called, was anything but a comfortable place. All 
the hurrahing had' ceased and almost everyone was lying on his 
stomach or behind cover. Quite an exodus had taken place, too, 
from the summit of the hill, since the Spaniards had deigned to 
reply to our gunners. I fail to recall whether I led or followed 
the retreating column, for there were a few minutes just then 
which are a blank to quite a number of people, including myself, 
except the recollection of shrill sounds in the air all about you, 
horses and men tangled up on the hillside and everybody dodging 
and yelling. 



262 Annual Report op the 

" In the midst of the confusion the Roosevelt Regiment was 
ordered to go down the hill and advance on San Juan. It is said 
this order never came from headquarters, but was Roosevelt's 
own idea. I do not know whether it was or not, but the men 
obeyed with alacrity, for almost anything was better than lying 
flat in the bushes around Grimes' battery, as if awaiting one's 
turn to be hit with the flying shell. 

" It was half an hour after the Roosevelt men had begun to 
move on San Juan that I again met the Seventy-first. I had gone 
down the hill with several others, including Colonel Astor, whose 
orderly had disappeared with his horse, and at the point in the 
road where the San Juan creek or river had to be crossed I found 
the Seventy-first halted. They had been there for an hour or 
more, in their assigned place back of the Sixteenth Regulars. 
Both regiments were wating for Roosevelt's men and the cavalry 
to go by. No orders to advance had yet been given by General 
Kent to his division, but Lieutenant Miley had just ridden over 
from Grimes' battery with orders for Kent to take his division 
into action. So, at least, those of us who were on the road under- 
stood from the talk we heard there. Meanwhile, however, every 
man on that road was under the shrapnel fire of the two opposing 
batteries, for the valley lay between the two hills, and the fatal 
volley firing of the Spaniards had just opened up on the men 
who were fording the stream. The Seventy-first men got there in 
the thick of it. They hesitated. Who did not? No enemy was 
in sight, yet scores of enemy's bullets were falling among them, 
and shrapnel shells were making the air overhead hideous with 
their terrorizing sound. Though by no means as dangerous as a 
volley of bullets, yet no sound in the two days' battle was as 
much dreaded as that of shrapnel. General Kent, in his report, 



State Historian. 263 

says : ' The fire of the enemy's sharpshooters was being distinctly 
felt at this time.' He might have added that the New York boys 
had their first killed and wounded here. General Kent goes on : 
' The enemy's infantry fire, steadily increasing in intensity, now 
came from all directions, not only from the front and the dense 
tropical thickets on our flanks, but from sharpshooters thickly 
posted in trees in our rear and from shrapnel apparently aimed 
at the balloon.' 

" It was into such a maelstrom of shot from hidden sources that 
General Kent ordered the Seventy-first to go, not straight ahead 
of them in the open, but up a blind mountain trail, hemmed in 
on both sides by the tropical thickets of which he speaks. 

" I was not with the First Battalion when it fell back from the 
creek, as General Kent says in his" official report that it did, 
but it certainly did not throw the two other battalions into 
worse disorder, as General Kent would have known, if he had; 
been there, which he was not, than existed along the entire line- 
exposed to fire. I heard at the time that someone had ordered 
the regiment up a newly discovered by-path or trail on San Juan 
Hill, and that, as they tried to get up, moving in two's, the First 
Battalion met such a fire, following that crossing the stream, that 
it believed it had been ambushed. If any of General Kent's staff 
made a cordon back of the regiment, in order to force them into 
action, no one among the dozen or more with whom I stood saw 
or spoke of such action. They were around there giving con- 
tradictory orders, and in their haste not very definite ones, and 
it would not be surprising if the misunderstanding among the 
Seventy-first's officers was largely due to the excited state of 
mind of General Kent's staff. 



264 Annual Eepokt op the 

" It was never intended, as I understood the situation that 
morning, that the Ninth, Thirteenth and Twenty-fourth Regulars, 
who were behind the Seventy-first on the road, should follow it 
into battle, and the fact that General Kent ordered the Seventy- 
first, as he says, up this by-path, while the other regiments went 
farther to the left, proves that the temporary hesitation of the 
Seventy-first in no way affected the general movement. The other 
regiments, or part of them, pushed on, according to plan, and the 
Thirteenth and Twenty-fourth made that gallant charge on the 
block-house at the extreme left. Major Keek's battalion of the 
Seventy-first recovered itself within five minutes and was on its 
way up the hill before a single man of the regulars behind them 
had passed on the road. I do not know, but was told then that 
one company had also gone up with Keek's battalion, and I have 
heard since that Captain Rafferty commanded it. The regiment, 
of course, was split up by this movement, but I doubt whether 
a single regiment, regular or volunteer, went up that hill intact. 
It was an impossible task, for it was every man for himself after 
the firing became so intense, and oflicers with whom I have talked 
tell me that they were unable to hold their men together. It was 
useless to give commands, for no voice could be heard in the din, 
and no one knew what company was charging up the hill by his 
side. General Kent himself, in his first official report, gave credit 
for capturing the hill to the Sixth and Sixteenth Regulars, but 
in his report six days afterward acknowledged that this was an 
error, and that five regiments are to be credited with that feat. 
This shows the confused state of things, when even the Division 
Commander did not know that five regiments, not two, were in 
the victorious charge, though all five i*egiments were part of his 
own command. 



State Historian. 265 

" The period of hesitation, if that word can be used, among the 
Seventy-first men was so brief that one wonders that a more 
just and generous course toward the regiment was not pursued 
by General Kent, and reference made by him to their splendid 
work after that first baptism of fire from a hidden enemy. The 
men themselves, in their frank letters to their parents, tell the 
story in their' own way, and if one will but read them all, he will 
find that they fit in together in a way that ends all argument 
as to their reliability. 

" General Kent might, with truth, have said, first, that the 
Seventy-first got up the hill in ample time to have a list of loss 
as heavy as any other regiment; second, that it went into action 
realizing that every shot fired from its Springfield rifle made it a 
target for the enemy w^ith smokeless powder; and, third, that it 
made a target of itself and went into the charge, though whole 
companies of regulars, armed with Krag-Jorgensens, which are 
almost smokeless, yelled to ' get out of here with those Spring- 
fields.' 

" Time and again that cry was heard by the men of the Seventy- 
first, and late on the second day, when the Spaniards had ceased 
their heavy firing, the order was given for the regiment to stop 
shooting entirely. The Spaniards were locating them at every 
shot. Meanwhile I met more than a score of Seventy-first men 
who had picked up Krag-Jorgensens on the hillside and were 
pleading for permission to use them instead of their black powder 
rifies. They were not allowed to do so, however, and had to turn 
their ncAV-found Krags over to the ordnance ofiicer. Nevertheless, 
as I stated in a letter to The Mail and Express from San Juan, 
General Hawkins, riding along the lines on July 2nd, compli- 



266 Annual Report of the 

men ted the Seventy-first for its good work that day — a fact 
which General Kent might also have included in his report. 

" It was impossible for anyone to know what was going on 
beyond his immediate neighborhood during that first day's bat- 
tle — at least until after the hill had been taken and the regi- 
ments had been lined up; but the impression, gathered from 
observation and discussion that day and since then regarding 
the Seventy-first's action, is that a volunteer organization was 
sent in the foremost column to charge a fortified hill, and it was 
armed with a rifle known by every man to be inferior to that used 
by its associates, as well as that used by the enemy. It also 
had the disadvantage of using black powder, as against the 
smokeless powder of its enemy. Despite these heavy handicaps, 
disheartening in themselves, it was halted in a valley road for 
over an hour under a desultory shrapnel and musketry fire, to 
which it could not reply, and finally ordered into a hillside trail, 
where it was met with a storm of bullets from no one knew where. 

" Soldiers who had fought through many battles and had beep 
ambushed time and again might, and probably would, have re- 
covered themselves and reformed their lines before the Seventy- 
first did; but they could not have met that hidden fire without 
a recoil, nor could they have made more rapid and courageous 
progress up the hill after they once started and understood just 

what was expected of them. 

HENRY L. STODDARD." 

The following letter speaks for itself and is all the more valu- 
able because received unexpectedly and unsolicited by our com- 
manding oflScer, Colonel Downs, a few days after the surrender 
of the Spaniards: 



State Historian. 267 

"H'd'qVs. Inf.,U. S. A. 
Fever Gamp, Siboney, Cuba, 
July 17, 1898. 
Colonel W. A. Downs, Oom'd'g. 71st Eegt., N. Y. Vols. 

Dear Colonel. — Having been more or less thrown with the 
71st N. Y. Vols., since its arrival in Tampa, Florida, and having 
served with it directly in the engagement at Fort San Juan, July 
1st, 2nd and 3rd, 1898, I wish to say that I consider it one of 
the very best volunteer regiments I have seen since 1861. The 
conduct of the men under fire was admirable, their patriotism 
and courage were undoubted; but fully as much to their credit 
was their cheerful endurance of the privation, suffering and hard- 
ship which fall to the lot of the new soldier in the long and 
dreary intervals not enlivened by actual contest and which all 
must endure. 

Very truly yours, 
(signed) A. C. MARKLEY, 

Major, Com'd'g. 24th Inf'y." 

On the 10th of July the regiment was moved further to the 
right and temporarily assigned to the command of General Law- 
ton. Subsequently the Sixth and Sixteenth Regular Infantry 
were similarly removed to the right, when the First Brigade was 
restored and General Kent's headquarters established in the vicin- 
ity. Here the regiment remained encamped until it left the 
island. Now that Santiago had surrendered, there was nothing 
to do but to settle down as comfortably as possible and to care 
for the health of the men, all too many of whom were already 
afllicted with fever, prevalent in these semi-tropical climates 
during the months of the rainy season. 



268 Annual Report of the 

Criticism is here withheld, but facts are stated. Not until 
the 20th of July were we supplied by the Government with any 
rations other than hard bread, the fatty grease appropriately 
called throughout the army " sow belly " and green coffee. Our 
Quartermaster tried in vain to secure a single mule team and 
pack wagon for transportation. The regiment, as such, never had 
this reasonable allowance of transportation supplied to it from 
the time of its arrival in Cuba until the day it left Santiago. 
Up to this time the oflScers' horses had been used, rather abused, 
and most of them wrecked by using them for pack mules to carry 
ammunition,' stores and mail. 

At the request of Major Louis A. LaGarde, Surgeon in Charge of 
Siboney, the Chaplain was assigned to duty there from July 11th 
to July 18th, where he attended the sick, buried four men who 
died from yellow fever, superintended the digging of pits for the 
burial of the dead and exercised supervision as senior ofticer oyer 
twelve convalescent wounded men of our regiment and a detail 
■of two men who had been left at Siboney June 27th to guard 
large amounts of regimental property. There were also there at 
this time several from the regiment who were recuperating from 
swamp fever. Swamp or calentura fever began now to de- 
velop among the troops at the front. Apprehension was great, 
now that the dangers of battle had subsided, we should lose more 
by disease than we had already lost by bullets, an apprehension, 
alas, that proved reasonably fateful. 

The terms of the surrender of the Province of Santiago hav- 
ing been decided upon, some twenty-four thousand soldiers hav- 
ing laid down their arms, it became necessary to transport these 
troops to Spain. To do this in their own vessels, according to 
terms of contract, took considerable time. Meanwhile the Fifth 



State Historian. 269 

Army Corps remained on the hills three miles from Santiago, 
fever daily afflicting more and more of the troops, who were very 
insufficiently sheltered from tropical heat and daily storms, 
removed one and one-half miles from running water, with food 
of the simplest character, barely suflScient for the well, and wholly 
inadequate to the needs of the sick. Up to the 18th of July there 
were not three wall tents in the entire camp, the Surgeons them- 
selves slept under shelter tents and no provision whatever could 
be made for a hospital. Like benison from heaven there arrived 
in our camp on the 18th of July Mr. Charles F. Barrett and his 
assistant, Mr. Charles A. Brittain, representing the Army Com- 
mission of the Y. M. C. A. They had come that day from Bai- 
quiri, having sailed from Tampa with a light artillery command 
on the 4th. Never were strangers more welcome. Subsequent 
«vents attested their worth and proved that they were devout 
Christian friends. They reported from the headquarters of the 
Army Commission that they had received orders to report to the 
Chaplain of the Seventy-first and to do all in their power to sup- 
ply the needs of that regiment. Inasmuch as it had been impos- 
sible for us to transport the tent kindly given us by this Army 
Commission, which we received at Tampa, but were obliged to 
leave on the vessel at Siboney, the two tents these brothers 
brought proved veritable Godsends. The smaller one, at the re- 
quest of our Colonel, was immediately given for a hospital for the 
regiment, while in the other one, a good-sized square tent, ser- 
vices were held, oflScers assembled during the day, using it as a 
social hall, and any oflScer who was sick was allowed to remain 
here till he recovered. There was no time when there were not 
seven officers of the regiment living and sleeping in this tent 
by the courtesy of two men who had the right to claim it for their 



270 Annual Eepoet op the 

own personal use. TLe Chaplain makes a special acknowledg- 
ment of the kindness of these men, without which he would have 
had no shelter whatever during the most trying period of the 
Cuban campaign. Never for any home he ever possessed was 
he so grateful as for the privilege here accorded of swinging his 
hammock between the main poles of this generous Y. M. C. A. 
tent. By this time one's wardrobe had become depleted. A 
haversack could hold all belongings and not be full. This, with 
the hammock, constituted the Chaplain's outfit. Not only was 
he given a roof over his head, but he was also the recipient of 
some useful articles of underclothing and a good-sized box, to 
which Avas subsequently attached hinges and hasp, and which, for 
three weeks, ser.ved admirably for trunk, desk, couch and chair. 
In this were also placed some cigarettes and cigars, kindly sent 
by Mr. Fonseca, of New York, which ministered much to actual 
necessity, and enabled many in the regiment to be made very 
happy when they thought such luxuries were miles away. It is 
a fact, though, perhaps, not creditable, that to enjoy those 
things yourself and have your friends enjoy them, the hasp had 
to be locked after each distribution. Note paper and envelopes 
were freely distributed, not only to those of the Seventy-first, 
but to all adjacent commands. In the three weeks that this 
Commission did its Avork in Cuba there were distributed over 
20,000 sheets of paper and 10,000 envelopes — why more people 
at home did not receive letters is a wonder. On the 19th the 
Chaplain, accompanied by Messrs. Barrett and Brittain, the 
horses' backs being too sore to ride them, started on foot for 
Santiago to procure needed provisions and medicines for the sick 
and also to provide something for the officers^ mess. Up to this 
time it must be stated that, due to insufficient lighterage facili- 



State Historian. 271 

ties at Siboney, inadequate transportation and most wretched 
roads, especially five miles out from Siboney, where, due to 
swampy soil and narrow gulches, it baffled the Engineer Corps 
either to make or keep the roads in proper condition for traffic, 
medicines for the sick were most scant, and anything but hard- 
tack, bacon and coffee was wanting in all our camps. 

This walk to Santiago was dreadfully muddy half the way 
until we came upon the Queen's Road, and it was intolerably 
hot all the way into the city ; never did it seem to me was a walk 
more hot or fatiguing. From 10 until 3 daily the effect of the 
sun upon your head is like that of a Spanish-fly blister. All 
ialbng the Queen's Road for a distance of two miles were pil- 
grims, pauper-stricken and starving Cubans journeying toward 
Santiago. As we entered the city and passed by the great Mili- 
tary Hospital flanking its eastern end we saw what strong en- 
trenchments and fortifications had been built by the Spaniards. 

In front of trenches five feet deep, stretching all around this 
end of the city, there were huge wine casks filled with rocks, and 
fully twenty feet in front of these were spiral nets of barbed 
wire fence. Back of the ditches at intervals of twenty feet were 
mounted cannon and dynamite guns. Happily for us the sur- 
render on the 14th of July made an attack upon such outworks 
as these unnecessary. 

For some distance along the outskirts of the city we found 
company after company of Spanish soldiers, evidently receiving 
froni large pots set in the middle of the road each his portion 
of the morning's mess. This was the first visible evidence, though 
by no means the last, that we were treating our enemies better 
than we were treating ourselves. 



272 Annual Report op the 

In this " Andalusian " quarter, a sort of suburban entrance 
to the city itself, where Spanish soldiers were housed on both 
sides of the street for at least a mile, everj'thing was unclean 
and untidy. The streets of the city itself had evidently been 
recently swept, but evidences of filth abounded everywhere. 
The city itself is built on a side hill sloping towards 
the sea, surrounded on three sides by most beautifully ter- 
raced hills graduating in the distance into mountains and 
terminating on its western front in an attractive plaza 
and wide promenade, extending for three miles in view of 
the magnificent seemingly land-locked harbor. Had any atten- 
tion been paid to sanitary arrangements, Santiago de Cuba would 
be one of the cleanest cities in the world. We went right through 
the principal street, " Euramadas," a narrow, poorly paved lane, 
with sidewalks on each side, not two feet wide, flush with the 
inner edge of which rose the stuccoed facades of continuous 
buildings, the lowest windows of which were uniformly barred 
and projected a few inches from the front forming a bay. 
" Euramadas '' street terminated in the plaza almost directly in 
front of the principal wharf. Reaching the wharf we found we 
had walked a good six miles, three of which had been in the city 
over the roughest kind of pavement, and along sidewalks in 
wretched condition. All along the way Spanish ofdcers and 
soldiers were most courteous, saluting us constantly and giving 
other evidences of their good will. We went into a store-house 
near the wharf, where we wei-e cordially received by Spanisli 
merchants, who gave us at once a glass of deliciously cool claret, 
for which we were most grateful. Here we learned that General 
Shatter had forbidden the sale of liquors for three days, some 
of our soldiers having gotten drunk and acted disgracefully on 



State Historian. 273^ 

the occasion of their entrance. The Provost Guard was busy 
about the streets looking up these delinquents. One of our sol- 
diers was mean enough to pass a worthless one hundred dollar 
($100) Confederate note upon a poor starving merchant. Acts 
of debauch and depredation were committed by some of the sol- 
diers, much to their discredit, and resulting in a needless depriva- 
tion of pleasure and profit to many others. A general order wa? 
issued on the 19th forbidding enlisted men to enter the city, and 
allowing only such officers to do so who had passes from Division 
Headquarters. It was delightful to see at the wharf, ships we 
had been accustomed to see at Siboney. At one side was the 
Red Cross Steamer, the " State of Texas," the first to enter the 
harbor after the surrender, and on the other side the transport 
" Concho," both discharging their cargoes. Several other trans- 
ports, with their big numbers on their sides, lay further out in 
the harbor. Crowds of starving people surged about the wharf 
waiting to be fed. Thousands of indolent vagabond Cubans, and 
less, but far more respectable looking Spaniards, made up the 
motley mob begging for daily bread. Pity we thought before 
we saw these, that some of the 1,400 tons of food sent for the 
Cubans could not be given to our own troops now encamped be- 
yond the trenches, surely as deserving and perhaps more needy 
than" these reconcentradoes, or their recent merciless rulers ; but 
after seeing these we agreed with Miss Barton, who said she 
never could discriminate between men suffering for food. Know- 
ing the condition of our own men, while agreeing with Miss Bar- 
ton, the ministering angel in every war of the last half century, 
we could but say: "May the United States authorities soon be 
able to provide for the first great care of its army, and see that it 

be properly fed." 

IS 



274 Annual Report of the 

It must be confessed that while creditable to themselves, it 
was far from creditable to the two departments of the Govern- 
ment, the incompetency of which made it necessary on the first 
possible entry to the city, for several commanding officers to stand 
in the broiling sun on the dock at Santiago, beseeching the Eed 
Oross Society to give them needed food, delicacies and medicines 
for their sick soldiers. It was a great delight again to see Miss 
Barton, Mr. George Kennan, Dr. Egan, Dr. and Mrs. Thurston 
and others of the Eed Cross party. It was especially delightful 
to talk a few moments with Mrs. John Addison Porter, who, 
from her own purse, provided a liberal supply of medicines and 
food for the sick of the Seventy-first. These, augmented by sev- 
eral gifts from the Red Cross Society, with other supplies pur- 
chased in the city we had carted to the camp by a donkey and a 
little two-wheeled rig called an " Ulla," secured for us by the 
kindness of the British Consul and costing us three dollars and a 
half. Had the Government furnished us with reasonable trans- 
portation, this expense, repeated at least fifteen times, would not 
have been necessary. 

A little thought will convince one that unpaid officers needed 
to be fairly well suplied with funds to provide for themselves 
uniforms, horses, wages of servants, their mess at all times, and 
in addition such medicines and delicacies as they could not beg, 
and then pay for their necessary transportation. All this is not 
said by way of criticism, but as a plain statement of actual facts 
made in the hope that out of past miserable blunders and mis- 
takes success in the future may be organized. 

A canteen of ice water let down from the side of " State of 
Texas " was a veritable G6dsend, not one drop of ice water hav- 
ing been tasted for a month. A liberal supply of cigars and 



State Historian. 275- 

cigarettes was purchased at the suggestion of severaj and after- 
wards sold at cost in the camp. That it was quickly disposed of 
shows how great was tlie need of this comfort. Tobacco has its 
uses. 

The walk back behind the donkey cart was so hot and fatiguing 
that prickly heat resulted, to recover from the effects of which 
two days' quiet and rest were necessary. The " Ulla " of the 
Spanish driver and the frantic efforts of the poor little donkey 
to get his load over the dreadful roads would have been amusing,, 
were it not so distressing. These two days of quiet and rest 
were spent chiefly in visiting the sick in the camp, writing letters- 
to their relatives and friends and distributing such delicacies- 
as tea and guava jelly ia small quantities among the invalids.. 
Articles like malted milk, beef bouillon, yellow meal, dried, 
peaches, etc., etc., were, by Colonel's orders, given to the Sur- 
geon for distribution among the sick. For several days now the 
story continued, differing nothing daily, except that each day it 
grew worse. Where there had been universal satisfaction and 
contentment, now there were murmurings and homesickness- 
among all. As long as there seemed any reason for remaining, 
in Cuba, any fighting to do, or work to be done, no one thought 
of leaving, or was there any grumbling of any account, no mat- 
ter how short the rations, how wet the trenches, or how severe 
the other hardships; but here time hung heavily, fever was in- 
creasing daily more at the sick call. A pall came over the entire 
camp, the entire community of camps, we may say. Volley firing 
and taps were heard all too frequently among our neighbors,, 
until finally orders were received not to fire the customary salutes 
at the graves. At least one dozen died around us before death 
visited us. Our record on the 23rd, here copied, reads briefly 



276 Annual Repokt of the 

thus : " Fever increasing, insuificient tentage, meagre food, clothes 
tattered, several hatless, many bare-footed, at least a score with 
trousers so rent and hanging upon their legs that it is well only 
men are here. Major Bell, Chief Surgeon, sick, with tempera- 
ture 106 degrees; Dr. Stafford, Assistant Surgeon, weak from 
overwork, and working all the time. Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel 
tmA one Major down with the fever. Everybody wanting to go 
home. Nobody knowing when he can, ' things are growing 
blue.' " 

On the 24th we held Divine service at 10 a. m. and again at 
7 p. m. Conditions made the service most reverent and earnest. 
Our men did not lack courage, there was not one less than brave, 
but everybody felt depressed. The few who were well had so 
much work to do in the way of camp duty that attendance was 
necessarily small. Every drop of water for drinking, cooking 
and bathing had to be brought in canteens from a stream a mile 
and a half distant. On the 25th of July the Commissary Depart- 
ment began to show signs of improvement, and from this time 
on, though nobody lived in luxury, those who were well had no 
reason to complain of their food. How many were then sick 
or afterwards became seriously sick from depletion, which an in- 
creased food supply at this late day could not overcome, we shall 
never know. During these most trying days, when men were 
dying all about us, and our own were seriously ill, it was at least 
an occasion for thanksgiving that though the dreadful fever called 
"cailentura," Dangui, Cuban, or yellow fever — doctors did not seem 
to know what it was and disagreed so among themselves that lay- 
men had free field for guesswork — however distressing, it had 
in our regiment as yet in no case proved fatal. On the 24th 
Colonel Downs went into Santiago, and by strenuous efforts se- 



State Historian. 277 

«ured from our ship, the " Vigilancia," lying well out in the 
harbor, some thirty tents. Orders were given for these to be used 
by the sick. In a few instances these were made use of by offi- 
cers. Those who criticised this seeming selfishness had the satis- 
faction of seeing these officers sick in a very short time and the 
original purpose of the tents practically fulfilled. The tempera- 
ture each day was intense; walking in the sun from 10 a. m. 
to 3 p. m. was both painful and unsafe. The thermometer ranged 
from 110 to 123 degrees daily. 

The sight at early sick call of men dragging themselves to the 
Surgeon's headquarters was distressing, many, most indeed, of 
the sick were entirely unable to leave their quarters. The whole 
atmosphere was depressing. Nobody was well. Half were seri- 
ously ill. All were homesick. Rumors were numerous and of all 
kinds. It was necessary to buoy up the men with the hope that 
soon we would leave and go to the States. All wished that they 
might go home and longed to hear that peace was declared and 
the end at hand. The Chaplain going daily to the Hospital and 
frequently making the rounds of the sick tents in the company 
quarters, witnessing the suffering and seeing the regiment con- 
verted from a body of athletes into a command of hospital 
patients, some without shelter, many without blankets or pon- 
chos, all with clothing torn and underclothing dirty, many with 
but one suit of such in their possession, none sumptuously fed, 
and many poorly fed, felt like crying : " Usque ad Domine." 

On the 25th mails began to arrive with more or less frequency 
and to leave with some regularity for New York. This cheered 
the men very much, indeed, though it was discouraging for us to 
receive letters from home dated as late as July 10th, saying that 
our friends had heard nothing from us since we left Tampa. 



278 ' Annual Report of the 

There seems to be difficulty in getting relief intended for us. 
We hear constantly of boxes being sent to us from the States^ 
of large amounts of money haying been contributed to the Relief 
Society of the Seventy-first in New York. Boxes have not reached 
us at the time of writing, but one hundred dollars ($100) has 
been received by Colonel Downs from the Seventy-first Regiment 
Relief Society, and small amoi^nts from the personal friends of 
offlcers, all of which has been used directly for the sick. It is 
currently reported that the Seventy-first Relief Society con- 
tributes through the agency of the Red Cross Society. Also that 
the Red Cross Society has declined to receive money specifically 
for the relief of any particular regiment. This being so, we re- 
ceive the filtration of a general charity from the Red Cross 
Society, which amounts to very little, so little that thus far, not- 
withstanding urgent efforts, what we have received in provisions 
and medicines has been out of all reasonable proportion to what 
we know has been contributed in moneys by our friends at home 
for our immediate relief. Blame is attached to nobody, to no 
society, but these facts ought to have a satisfactory explanation. 

Requisition was made for kahki suits for the regiment by 
Quartermaster Stephens, at the suggestion of the Brigade Com- 
mander, on the 25th of July. We were wait^g a week later with 
some interest to see when we would get them. Meantime hatless 
men were buying hats in Santiago, a gross injustice. The Govern- 
ment ought to supply these and at once. 

On the 20th the joyful news officially came to us that Spain 
had sued for peace. On receiving the official notification the 
Colonel shouted " Attention " to the Second Battalion, encamped 
directly before him, and gave the news. As showing the depleted 
condition of the men it was significant that a weak hurrah was 



State Historian. 279 

heard. It was to me singularly surprising that the news of what 
is practically the reaching of the goal of all our endeavors and 
sacrifices from the very beginning of this enterprise met with 
such slight expression of enthusiasm; It is all to be explained 
by the weakened and sad condition of our troops. We are at this 
time, July 20th, practically a regiment of convalescents, and most 
of us scarcely convalescent even. The Government ought to get 
us out of these miasmic regions, and get us out soon, or we shall 
lose many more from fever than we have lost hj bullets. 

It is hard to make bricks without straw. The Government 
supplies no transportation for our regiment, which practically 
makes the whole Quartermaster Department a nullity. It ought 
to be said that Quartermaster Stephens, when he had the facili- 
ties for his work, did his work well. This is sufficient answer 
to critics, who can always talk and scold, and will be so unrea- 
sonable that they expect a man to perform miracles. All officers 
did their best under most trying circumstances of serious illness 
and depleted strength. Some were physically better to do tlieir 
work than others. It is the peculiarity of some to think thaf 
their work is the most important of all work done. Such will 
always magnify their own work and minify others' work. They 
will think that sick men ought to do the work of well ones, and 
these when they are sick will whine like babies and want more 
attention that King Charles' spaiiiels. 

Experiences such as these we are going through develop char- 
acters and test characters. We observe much that will never be 
written, and find in the little amenites, or want of them, both 
at mess and in quarters, sufficient to write a volume. The un- 
written history of this dismal experience would, if ever revealed, 
be startling. 



280 Annual Ebport of the 

It is gratifying under these circumstances and conditions that 
try men's souls to see that most of the officers are considerate 
of one another's feelings, and that those who are ever " seeking 
their own " are rightly estimated at their true value. Added to 
other diiJSculties at this trying time was the serious illness for 
several days of our hostlers and several other servants whose 
worth was appreciated the more as they were missed from ser- 
vice. Nobody could be more faithful to duty than George, one 
of the officers' servant, and Louis, the excellent chef, when there 
was anything for the chef to cook. For days our horses wan- 
dered about with none to look after or care for them. For days 
no oats were provided for them, and there was nothing for them 
to eat but grass, and none to lead them to water. Due more to 
good luck than good management they took care of themselves, 
and to the credit of their owners they returned each morning to 
their quarters. Poor brutes ! How useful they have been ! What 
would the regiment have done without them? They have carried 
everything from canteens to ammunition, served as pack mules 
on every possible occasion and supplied the lack of Government 
service for transportation. All this not without severe galling 
and a thinness of body pitiable to behold. 

On the 20th the Chaplain went into Santiago and secured from 
the Red Cross Society some condensed milk, malted milk and 
rice for the sick. Returning in the evening he learned that 
through the day there had died Sei'geant William D. S. Young, 
of Company E, and Private Gus Grahn, of Company L, from 
exhaustion, due to a severe attack of mountain fever. They 
were buried at sundoAvn just west of the entrenchments and in 
front of their company streets, a volley being fired three times 
and taps sounded after the Chaplain had finished the brief ser- 



State Historian. 281 

vice of committal. The singing of one verse of tlie familiar 
hymns " Jesus, Lover of My Soul " and " Nearer, My God, to 
Thee" was particularly impressive and solemn. It was also 
reported at this time that Private Williams, of Company L, had 
died at the Yellow Fever Hospital; this report comes from one 
of our men, a victim of yellow fever, now happily recovered and 
returned to the regiment. 

Among other senseless stories told by the careless press at 
home come to-day a picture published in the World in which, 
among the victims of the El Caney battle, the Ohaplain of the 
regiment figures conspicuously in the center. Nobody in the regi- 
ment feels really well at this time, but the Chaplain is furthest 
removed from the condition of a corpse. 

Invitation came this morning for the Chaplain to oflSciate at 
the funeral of a private of the Seventh Regiment, but yellow fever 
having broken out in that command Colonel Downs considered 
it unwise for any risk to be taken that would be likely to add any- 
thing to present misery. 

Sunday, July 21, held Divine service and preached at 8.30; 
good attendance, eighty (80), and then service at 6.30, conducted 
by Mr. Barrett, an evangelist of Moody Institute, in charge of 
Army Commission work in Cuba. Service of song attended by 
about one hundred and fifty (150) men. Many men sick and well 
ones tired doing so much detail and necessary work. 

We are glad at last to be able to get the tent presented to the 
regiment by our friends in New York from ike ship " Vigilancia " 
and brought out to the camp. It will prove very valuable for our 
convalescent and our well enlisted men. 

Large numbers continue to be affected by fever. Sick re- 
ports show a daily increase. It is reported that pay oflficers are 



282 Annual Repoet op the 

on the way here to pay the men for two months' service. The 
men will be glad to see them. 

Colonel Homer sent to the regiment a gift of five gross of 
pipes from moneys collected by the Merchants' Central Club, 
and General McAlpin and Messrs. Bemheimer sent five hundred 
(500) pounds of tobacco, all of which was equally distributed 
among the men and made them very happy. 

Colonel Downs, Senior Colonel, is now in command of the 
First Brigade — Sixth and Sixteenth Regulars and Seventy-first 
New York Infantry — and Lieutenant-Colonel Smith is in com- 
mand of the regiment. 

We hear by mails arriving now pretty regularly from the 
United States of packages and bundles coming to us by express 
or mail and are anxiously waiting for them to arrive. It is 
worthy of mention that at this time of serious need and trouble 
the activity of Mr. Barrett in going almost daily to Santiago and 
shopping for the men, doing various commissions for them, and 
providing liberally of iced lemonade, water, limes and ice, which 
he had to bring out from the city, freely dispensing note paper 
and envelopes, giving his tent for well officers during the day and 
sick ones at night, all the kindly ministrations that we receive 
coming from the love of Christ constraining — now is the time 
to put unbelief and fanciful theories of life to the test. 

At this moment Christianity is the power back of every tender 
ministration in this camp. 

The large tent given^us by the Y. M. C. A. friends in New York 

^ was brought out and erected for the use of enlisted men. Colonel 

Smith, Sergeant Beatty and Private Rabing and others use it for 

sleeping quarters. It is thus at last doing much good. The 



State Historian. 283 

regiment had thus far not been able to get hold of the tent, and 
have not been hitherto in one place long enough to justify putting 
it up. We appreciate very much the kindness of our friends in 
giving us this tent and regret that hitherto we could not at any 
time make use of it. At the present time there are in our camp 
this large tent for general use of enlisted men, another large 
tent, headquarters of Army Commission of Y. M. C. A., where 
officers may assemble during the day, and in which several sleep 
at night; another walled tent of good size brought by Mr. Bar- 
rett and Mr. Brittain, and generously turned over by them for a 
hospital at a time when we had not a tent other than little 
shelter ones, except one that vas used by the Colonel and Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel for their headquarters. 

On Tuesday, August 2nd, Private William Cheevers, of Com- 
pany P, was buried at 1.20 just beyond the entrenchments by the 
side of Sergeant Young's grave. Sad as it is to lose any of our 
men, it is an occasion for gratitude that with such distressing 
fever and serious illness as we have had but four of our men have 
died. In every instance of death in our regiment the Chaplain 
notified the parents in New York of their son's death and ex- 
pressed suitable sympathy on behalf of the regiment for those in 
affliction. Sadder even than the loss of a son in battle is that 
•death by illness after the battle. 

On the afternoon of the 2nd of August we heard officially that 
Spain had agreed to all the terms of peace imposed by the United 
States and that a formal declaration of peace had been made, and 
war ended. There were many doubters among us, and at first 
«uch misgivings interfered with the exultation one might expect 
from such an announcement. Gradually, however, the men came 



284 Annual Ebport of the 

to believe the truth of the message, and an improvement in the 
tone and temper of the regiment at once ensued. Eumor has it 
that General Sternberg, Senior Surgeon of the United States 
Army, has arrived at Santiago and has ordered the whole corps 
to leave this week. God grant it may prove true. Half of the 
regiment is sick and all are homesick. Our men look years older. 
They walk with measured gait and a lingering tread. They feel 
the injustice of keeping them here in rain and mud, half covered,, 
miserably clothed and wretchedly uncomfortable. Some kahki 
coats came a week ago, the trousers are in Santiago. Many men 
are wearing trousers so torn that it would not be decent for a. 
woman to visit the camp. Yet the Quartermaster sits here day 
after day doing absolutely nothing, all because the United States 
Government does not supply wagons and mules. He is incapable 
of bringing the clothes to us. Why the regiment does not have 
conveyances as the Y. M. C. A. does and bring out needed things, 
men naturally ask, and keep asking, and nobody gives a satisfac- 
tory answer. The regiment that looks out for itself, at its own 
expense, fares fairly well and others do not. 

The Chaplain visits the General Hospital tents twice daily, 
and the seriously ill ones more frequently, and three times a week 
goes the entire length of the entrenchments visiting the sick in 
walled tents, which have now been erected in every street. One 
at home can never know the slippery, slimy condition of the land 
about here and how difficult it is to move from place to place. 
There is everything here to make life miserable. Whatever a 
good Lord intends to work out of this wretched experience, we 
trust devotedly and pray earnestly that it may speedily be 
wrought, then what is left of us be quickly delivered from it all. 



State Historian. 28& 

General Ludlow said a day or two since that, speaking as a. 
military student, never have troops in any campaign been called 
upon to work harder, fight under more disadvantageous condi- 
tions and endure more strain, sickness, hardship and fatigue than 
ours in this since they landed in Cuba. If this be so, we may 
safely say never has any National Guard regiment been called 
upon to endure a three months' struggle like this the Seventy- 
first has had from the day it entered Camp Black. The more we 
think of it the more positive we are that in every work it has 
been called upon to do the Seventy-first has acquitted itself most 
creditably and earned its title of gallant and hrave. Never was 
it more brave or gallant than now, facing fever and waiting, 
waiting, waiting to go home. 

Among other and many acts of kindness shown us and neighbor- 
ing regiments, especially us, may be mentioned the bringing to- 
ns in two donkey carts hired for the purpose from Santiago two 
large casks of water, in which were placed two large pieces of 
artificial ice and limes and sugar enough to give a . generous 
quantity of excellent lemonade to all the boys. It was really 
pathetic to see the well ones line up with cups in hand and 
messengers with extra cups of the sick to take them some of the 
coveted beverage. Men of the Sixth and Sixteenth who are 
brigaded with us and encamped at our right further along the 
entrenchments came over and tried to get a little for their 
parched throats. We did all we could to supply them, also 
remembering the Sixteenth on the following morning, when addi- 
tional gifts of tobacco and parcels came from the Relief Society 
and the Seventy-first Aid Society of the Bronx Borough, which 
were then duly distributed. 



"286 Annual Report ov the 

The welcome news that we were soon to get out of this dread- 
fully malarial place came on the morning of the 4th of August, 
"When upon the proclamation by the Colonel that General Shatter 
liad been directed by authorities at Washington to remove all 
the troops to the United States as soon as transportation could 
l»e provided, was received by a cheer and the singing of the long 
metre Doxology by the men then assembled in front of the 
Y. M. C. A. tent. This tent is used by the officers and the other 
tent, exclusively the property of the regiment, is used now very 
generally by the enlisted men. 

Rations are now beginning to be very good, fresh and ex- 
<;ellent beef and bread proving very acceptable. Less at sick call. 
Things are beginning to look up for us, though many still are 
sick, very sick, with fever, and most of our men who are sick 
lie on ponchos on the ground, and are wet whenever it rains, 
"which, with rarest exception, is once daily and frequently twice. 

If friends at home could only see the happy faces of soldiers 
"when gifts are received from home, they would feel amply repaid 
for all their interest and trouble taken. 

There never was any time when our hospital tents were suflS- 
-cient to care for all of our seriously sick men, nor a time when 
every sick man in the Hospital could have a cot. Most of the 
time the sick slept on the ground, some of them without ponchos 
under them, and on several occasions without even a blanket to 
throw over a man perishing with a prolonged chill. 

The Quartermaster can testify that it was impossible for a 
time, and too long a time, to procure necessary ponchos and 
l)lankets for sick men. Things were at their worst when our 
Surgeon, Bell, was stricken with fever, and for several days lay 



State Historian. 287 

with a dangerously high temperature, under a little shelter tent, 
and miserably cared for, try as we might to do our very best to 
care for him. 

It is especially creditable to Dr. Eugene Staflford, who at this 
time was himself far from well, that, contrary to good judg- 
ment, he persisted in ministering all day and night to the needs 
of our sick soldiers. 

Finally it became necessary to request that our Second Assist- 
ant Surgeon, Dr. James Stafford, who had been detailed to serve 
with the Fourth Regular Infantry before we landed at Siboney, 
be returned to the Seventy-first, where he belonged. At once on 
returning to us he worked assiduously and successfully for the 
good of our men. 

News of other regiments leaving for the north made us anxious' 
for our orders to move. 

Subsequently we learned that it was due wholly to a round- 
robin letter, signed by several of our Generals, urging the Gov- 
ernment to return the soldiers to their homes in the States, or 
rather to camps in the States for necessary recuperation, that 
Surgeon-General Sternberg and General Alger, Secretary of War,, 
had decided to have us removed to Montauk Point, Long Island. 

We also learned that General Sternberg had at first advised 
that the troops remain in Cuba until fever had wholly dis- 
appeared. 

It would not have been pleasant for General Sternberg to visit 
the camps after this report became generally known and believed. 

The character and strong language of a telegram, prepared 
to be sent to Senator Piatt, of New York, and signed by most 
of the offlcers of the Seventy-first Regiment, afterwards recalled 



288 ANjN'VrAL EePORT OF THE 

when news came that we were soon to be removed to Montauk, 
-are proofs of the general impression at this time that longer to 
keep the troops in Cuba .would be a heartless and merciless 
destruction of valuable lives. 

Divine services were held on August 7th in the regiment 
Y. M. C. A. tent, the Chaplain administering the Holy Com- 
munion at 8 o'clock to a goodly number under circumstances 
that made the simplicity and ruggedness of the service peculiarly 
impressive. All who stood about in the mud, unable really to 
ineel, and received the Blessed Sacrament at this service will 
recall the solemnity of which we speak, but can never really 
in detail adequately describe. Again at 10 o'clock the Chaplain 
held a brief service and preached from Ephes. IV, 32, to a good 
congregation, though absent ones, too sick to attend, were so 
numerous that the attendance seemed unusually slim. Several 
officers and men of adjoining regiments attended this service. 
Another brief service of song was held in the early evening. 

About 6 o'clock p. m. there passed through our camp the Sixtn 
Regiment on their way to Santiago and Montauk, the few men 
of our regiment who were able going to the road and cheering 
them as they marched along the way. Everyone now was on the 
qui vwe waiting for orders to leave camp, the sick especially 
distressed and anxious about the possible inability to accompany 
the regiment home. 

On Monday, August 8th, the long expected orders came, 
happily for those who were to go, disappointing for those who 
' liad to remain. 

The order was for the Second Battalion and two companies 
of the Third Battalion, B and L, to leave camp that afternoon 
-and march into Santiago, there taking transport for Montauk. 



State Historian. 289 

Major Wood, Division Surgeon, came into camp about noon, 

examined the sick and designated about one hundred and fifty 

who were too ill to leave and must remain to get well. Theit 

disappointment was keen, but most of them, with the promise 

and expectation of speedy release, bore up very bravely. 

A few too ill to march by some means succeeded in securing 

permission to leave with this first detachment, and some of them 

with some others, who were supposed to be well, were obliged to 

go to hospital in Santiago, being too ill when they*got there to 

proceed further on their journey. 

On arriving at Santiago it was necessary to detail men to 

unload the wagons, to put all needed rations on board lighters 

and to transport these again to the ship " La Grande Duchesse," 

lying in the harbor a full mile from the main wharf. 

Company M was detailed to this duty. It was sad to see 

these men, none well, some too sick to work at all, all of them 

weak and wretched, labor until midnight putting boxes and goods 

on a car, running this hand-car down the long pier, unloading 

and carrying to a lighter, and again putting these goods, long 

after midnight, aboard the transport. 

There was not a man among them really able to do this work. 

It was pitiable to see them urged on to almost impossible and 

inhuman tasks by superior oflflcers, who must have regretted to 

speak as they did in order to make their men do the work they 

required. Due to defective machinery, want of coal and other 

necessary equipment the ship never sailed until the morning of 

the 10th; then at 6 o'clock the ship passed out of the harbor, 

sailing with a Spanish pilot, passed the "Merrimac" and the 

« Beina Mercedes," sunk in the harbor, and the " Morro," from 

which flew to the breeze " Old Glory," while our band, that of 
19 



290 Annual Report op the 

the Sixteenth Regular Infantry, which accompanied us, played 
appropriate martial airs, and we swung into the blue Carribean. 
Nothing of note occurred until off Hatteras, when machinery 
broke down and we ^vere obliged to lay to for some fourteen 
hours for repairs. 

The voyage was slow and uneventful enough, save that sick- 
ness among the troops seemed to increase with each day's voyage, 
and before the light off Shinnecock was sighted, indicating that 
our voyage was nearing its end, three of our men had died. 

Private Babbitt, of Company M, died of dysentery, conse- 
quent upon an attack of fever and was buried at sea Saturday, 
the 13th instant, at noon. Chaplain Bateman, of the Sixteenth 
Regular Infantry, assisted the Chaplain of the Seventy-first, 
who read the church service for a burial at sea. Solemn, indeed, 
was the service and especially the committal, when, with the 
Colonel and other officers standing beside the Chaplains, and 
soldiers all about, the board on which the body rested was raised 
and the earthy remains of a dear comrade were heard to strike 
the water, which at once closed over their treasure, now in the 
watery grave. 

Private Gustav C. Schutz, of Company L, died of fever the fol- 
lowing day and was buried at sea in a similar manner on Sunday, 
the 14th. 

Just as evening came on there passed away Private Fred 
Engels, of Company F, whose body, at the earnest request of the 
Chaplain, was allowed to remain on deck until we landed, when 
it was interred at Montauk, and subsequently was removed by 
his family to New York. 

When we arrived at Fort Pond Bay, within the hook of Mon- 
tauk Point, at 4 p. m., on Tuesday, the loth of August, we 



State Historian. 291 

learned that both the other detachments of our regiment, which 
had sailed after we did in two separate transports, had already 
arrived and had been transferred to detention camps. 

All troops went, upon landin'g, to the detention camps, where, 
after a stay of four to ten days, those then well were removed 
to permanent encampments and allowed reasonable freedom. 

Strictest quarantine regulations were imposed upon those 
among whom, upon their arrival, yellow fever was discovered. 

Our Surgeons reported two cases of death fro|n yellow fever 
during the voyage and several suspects aboard, which report 
was confirmed by the inspection of the quarantine ofBcers. We 
were then obliged to ship to the detention hospital on shore all 
of our sick, some two hundred, and all the others of us remained 
until Thursday, when each individual was obliged to leave all 
his belongings, pass on to one of Starin's barges, go below, 
, strip, pass to a smaller steamer, be bathed, fumigated, blanketed 
and then aboard still another boat, where new outfit, including 
hat and shoes, were supplied. After all had undergone this 
operation, at about 5 o'clock, we marched a full two miles over 
the hills to the detention camp and then turned in for the night, 
feeling pretty hungry and forlorn and thankful, notwithstanding 
that once again we were in God's own country and nearly at. home. 

Fortunately for the ofiScers Mrs. Downs had thoughtfully sent 
one hundred sandwiches and a can of milk to the camp by the 
ambulance, which was utilized to bring a few officers, not actu- 
ally sick, but too weak to walk. 

It was fully twenty-four hours before the Government supply 
of provisions was sufficient for our needs, and even then and 
until we left this camp, on Monday, we had not a knife, fork, 
spoon or cup with which to eat our food. 



292 Annual Eeport of the 

Extemporizing these instruments by the aid of sticks, pocket 
knives, cork screws and condensed milk cans we managed to get 
on, though as late as the following Monday noon the Chaplain 
recalls doing the best he could pulling a beefsteak apart with 
his cork screw and drinking his coffee from an old tin can found 
in the grass about the camp. 

On Sunday, rations being short, the CoJonel detailed the 
Chaplain to see what he could do to secure something from the 
Red Cross friends. He went to the station with the Quarter- 
master of the regiment and that of the brigade, neither of whom 
was able to secure either transportation or supplies. 

The Chaplain was, however, kindly met and assisted by Cap- 
tain Guilfoyle, in charge of affairs at the landing, who ordered 
a mule team, wagon and driver to go wherever the Chaplain 
directed. 

The Bed Cross supply tent being at the General Hospital, 
the Chaplain mounted the box with the mule driver and went, 
there, some two miles over the hills, where, presenting to the 
Superintendent' a letter just received from Mr. Cleveland H. 
Dodge, intimating that the request of the Seventy-first Chaplain 
would be at once honored with a liberal supply of needed food; 
a most liberal answer to the request was at once granted. 

This addition to our meagre rations made all the officers 
feel better. Prom this time on whatever were the occasions 
for complaint not one could be lodged against the food. 

While in detention camp it was not so easy for express pack- 
ages to be received, but the moment we were in the permanent 
camp we were all in constant receipt of boxes from home, and 
supplied with every needed delicacy. 

At least such was true of the well in the camps, and the sick 
in the hospitals. Such as were sick in camp and not sick enough 
perhaps to be sent to the hospital, or owing to its crowded condi- 



State Historian. 293 

tion could not be received there, did not fare so well, for, though 
none were starved, none could receive needed delicacies nor have 
food properly prepared for sick men to eat it. These also suf- 
fered from insufficient covering for the cold nights at Montauk at 
the end of August, and not one of them had anything better 
than a thin rubber poncho stretched out upon the ground to 
lie on. 

The Chaplain went to the General Hospital on Saturday, 
crossing but a short distance from the detention camp, and 
offered his services there among the sick. He was told to i-eturn 
at once to the camp of detention, that Chaplain Bateman, of the 
Sixteenth BegTilar Infantry, and Father Hart, a Roman Catholic 
Regular Army Chaplain, with whom at Division Hospital Chap- 
lain Van Dewater had had most pleasant relations in the work 
of ministering to the wounded and burying the dead, were ap- 
pointed to serve as Chaplains in the General Hospital at Mon- 
tauk Poioat. 

On Sunday afternoon, the 21st of August, Colonel MacArthur 
came to our detention camp and paid such as were there for ser- 
vices rendered to the State of New York from May 2nd to May 
10th at Camp ^IJlack. 

With the exception of money received at Tampa Heights from 
the United States Government for our services from May 10th 
to June 1st, this is the only money, which, to this time, anyone 
in the regiment had received. 

One had to be well provided with personal funds and while 
in Santiago have banking facilities to provide for personal 
needs or to give needed fiscal assistance to the men of the regi- 
ment. 

How, in the face of these facts, several commanding officers 
of regiments requested that men should not be paid in Santiago, 
it is difficult to understand. 



294 Annual Report of the 

Indeed, it is questionable whether when soldiers have done 
their work, their oflScers should have tJie right to treat them like 
children, and, by pr<)flfering a request, withhold from them their 
due. 

On Monday, the 22nd of August, our detachment removed from 
its detention camp by orders from headquarters to the permanent 
camp at the extreme right by Port Pond Bay. 

The order was received at 2 p. m., and by 6 o'clock all were 
removed, with everything of the outfit. 

Here we found the rest of the regiment which had come to 
Montauk in two ^detachments, neither of which had been obliged 
to undergo quarantine fumigation, and so had avoided several 
days' delay. 

Furloughs had already begun to be liberally granted, and 
many men had gone home. Not over ten men remained in Com- 
pany A, for example, and these had been retained merely for 
camp duty. 

The newspapers in the city had been making such ado about 
the inefficient management of Camp Wikoff, especially of its 
hospitals, that the military authorities were doing all they could 
to get soldiers away and to their homes. 

The volunteers receiving so much from friends in New York 
and vicinity fared better than regulars, who at once made their 
wants known, whining not a little their complaints, and very 
soon they, too, were the recipients of so many delicacies and 
dainties that tents everywhere looked as if their occupant kept 
stands outside a county fair. 

Well men at Camp Wikoff after August 22nd had no reason 
to complain. 



State Historian. 295 

General Wheeler kindly sent a leave of absence of thirty days 
to Chaplain Van Dewater, whose summer home was at Quogue, 
nearby, and he left on the 24th, returning on the 28th, spending 
the day visiting the sick, both in hospitals and at camp, and 
judiciously distributing aid to worthy and needy men. Thanks 
are here tendered to those individuals and organizations who 
made such distribution possible, and did much good work where 
good was much needed. 

General Edwin A. McAlpin and other Seventy-first veterans 
visited the camp on Sunday, the 28th, to make final arrangements 
for the great parade which had been ordered to take place in 
New York on the following day. 

At this time there came to the camp, August 24th, the two com- 
panies which had been recruited through the summer according 
to orders received from Washington, or rather the two hundred 
(200) men to bring the twelve companies up to the standard 
number of one hundred each. These recruits had been encamped 
at Camp Black, near Hempstead, and under the command of 
Captain Stoddard, who had been sent from Tampa to enlist 
them, and Lieutenant Frederick Kopper, formerly a Colonel of 
the Seventy-first Eegiment, N. G. N. Y., who had enlisted in June 
and taken a commission from Governor Black as First Lieuten- 
ant, Company M, by recommendation of our then retiring Colonel 
Greene. 

These recruits were very welcome and did excellent work in 
the camp, saving the strength of the sick and those who said 
they were well, but were too exhausted to do much work. 

These recruits were a fine looking body of men, and had they 
ever been summoned to do duty in Cuba, would have acquitted 
themselves creditably. 



296 Annual Report of the 

Comparison between the physical appearance of these and 
these who had come from Cuba, worn and depleted, yellow and 
haggard most of them, was pitiable and distressing. 

As transports were continually arriving at Montauk with 
troops from Santiago, those of the sick of the Seventy-first which 
we were obliged to leave behind in hospitals as fast as they re- 
. covered sailed for Camp Wikofif . 

Alas, that with the messages of such arriving there came also 
the news of many, who, succumbing to the illness, had died on 
foreign shores. 

We have spoken of the diiflculty of securing at any time an 
accurate list of killed and wounded. Greater still was the diffi- 
culty of securing an accurate list of those who had died from 
wounds or from fever. 

A small portion of the regiment, some thirty, was left in Tampa 
to guard property, left there by orders from superior officers. 

Some of our sick were in Camp Wikoff, some at Siboney 
Hospital, some in the yellow fever camp at Firmeza, some in 
the hospital at San Juan Heights, some in Santiago City Hos- 
pital, some in the General and a few in the detention hospitals 
at Montauk, and a large number had been furloughed to go to 
their homes to recover from their illness. Daily we heard of 
deaths occurring in one or in all of these places, and no doubt 
some occurred, reports of which we would not receive for several 
weeks; add to this a few of our regiment who were detailed to 
serve in various capacities in other regiments, some of them still 
in Santiago, and it will be easily seen that the difficulty was 
great to secure at any time anything like an accurate list of our 
dead. 



State Historian. 297 

At 4 o'clock of the morning of the 29th of August reveille was 
sounded, the regiment breakfasted, all things were made ready, 
and the march was made of such of the Seventy-flrst as were able 
to return to New York to the station of the Long Island Railroad 
at Montauk, where, after considerable delay, a train was made 
up specially to convey the regiment to Long Island City. 

But few stops were made along the route, and at every one 
friends were assembled in large numbers, with milk and cakes 
and fruit in abundance, which were most generously distributed. 

At last the train pulled into the terminus yard'at Long Island 
City at half after 11 o'clock. 

Here some sick men were removed to ambulances and several 
were conveyed to the ferry boat by litter carriers. 

There were here to meet us Colonel Francis, of the One Hun- 
dred and Seventy-flrst, with his new regimental oflflcers, an excel- 
lent looking body of sturdy men, beautifully arrayed in new and 
shining uniforms, who were to act as our escort on the further 
journey homeward and parade to the armory. 

A large committee of the Veteran Association of the Seventy- 
first was also here to greet us, among whom are quickly perceived 
such eminent officers and Civil war veterans as Colonel Homer, 
Colonel Conkling, General McAlpiu and Adjutant Hamilton 
Pride and many other worthies of " Ye Olden Tyme," who, if not 
as high in rank as these, were equally high in worth. 

The ferry boat " Flushing " conveyed the regiment, with their 
escorts, to the foot of Whitehall street. All along the route 
there were continuous shouts of welcome from the shores, and 
other vessels in the river, the shrill whistles of tugs and the 
sirens of pleasure craft, and it seemed that from every available 



298 Annual Report of the 

spot on docks or upon buildings crowds had gathered to do us 
honor and give us a royal welcome. 

As we passed under Brooklyn bridge we saw that all trains 
had stopped, traific had ceased and upon the footpath were thou- 
sands frantically waving flags and shouting joyously their 
plaudits of praise. 

The veterans had thoughtfully provided a generous luncheon 
for us while we sailed down the river, but even with this added 
strength the returning Cuban troops were not strong enough to 
withstand the effects of such a magnificent welcome as they re- 
ceived all along the route from Montauk, and especially upon 
the East river, in the journey from Long Island City to White- 
hall street ferry. 

Tears filled most eyes and some actually wept for joy. 

As the boat came into the slip the body of Seventy-first vete- 
rans were seen on the wharf and directly in front of us stood 
our regimental band, second to none, led by its incomparable 
leader, Professor Fanciulli, playing " Home, Sweet Home." 

Words can never describe the feelings of our Cuban soldiers 
of the Seventy-first at this moment. If there was one man among 
them who did not shed a tear, there must have been 

"A soul so dead 

That never to itself had said 

This is my own, my native Land." 

After a little delay in seating the field and staff officers in 
carriages and placing company ofQcers and men in cable cars 
the parade began. 

The pi'ogress up Whitehall street and along Broadway to 
Waverly place was impeded by the crowds of people who filled the 



State Historian. 299 

streets at every step of the journey. Besides these, the sidewalks, 
every window and roof of every building along the entire dis- 
tance were filled with people. Bunting waved everywhere. 
Streamers of telegraph and ticker machines stretched in pro- 
fusion from roof to street in front of several buildings, notably 
the Exchanges and the Western Union Telegraph Company. Old 
Trinity rang its chimes. Cheering was incessant. It seemed to 
us that there never could have been such a reception in New 
York city as this. The spontaneity and heartiness of this welcome 
proved its sincerity. 

The sad note in the joyous refrain was that of sympathy for 
the weak, wan, sad, yellow faces of the sick and what these signs 
stood for. 

At times as the procession moved along the sudden change 
of joyous cheers to something like a suppressed sob by the on- 
lookers was painfully apparent. 

The regiment left New York oyer 1,000 strong, a regiment of 
magnificent, healthy looking athletes. It paraded on its return 
less than 350 men, and of these not fifty who could say they had 
not been seriously ill or that at the prraent time they were 
wholly well. Where were the others? Those not dead were 
almost all sick, either in hospitals all over the country or on 
furloughs at their homes. 

For weeks there was not a day when the papers did not record 
at least one dead of the Seventy-first, and on many of these days 
as many as six of the Seventy-first, who, in various places, had 
ceased to be among the living. 

For any adequate description of the parade of the Seventy- 
first, which parade, technically speaking, began at the Washing- 
ton arch and ended at the armory, corner of Thirty-fourth street 



300 Annual Eepoet of the 

and Park aventie, the newspapers of the following day must he 
eonsixltedy though even these, their writers will confess, are 
wholly inadefquate to portray the memorable march and its ac- 
companying scenes. 

It will not be expected that the one detailed to write this his- 
tory, who in this procession rode in the first carriage with the 
Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel and the Adjutant, and in the parade 
marched behind the Colonel with the staff (there were but three 
staff officers in the parade), will be able to describe whalt took 
place behind him. 

From the moment that the Colonel gave orders to march and 
the band struck up its martial music to the tune of " Way Down 
South in Dixie" to the time of the arrival at the armory there 
was a continued ovation from thousands. Frequent halts were 
made for the benefit of the "weak ones marching and those unable 
to march rode in carriages provided for them. 

The escort of the Civil War veterans was most agreeable to 
us, and very gracious in them, and added a feature to the parade, 
at once unique and universally gratifying. 

Adjutant Pride, the well-known Adjutant of Colonel Henry P. 
Martin, Colonel of the Seventy-first in 1861, marched the entire 
distance, and won plaudits of recognition and approval by his 
military bearing and attention to every detail of the parade. No 
less conspicuous were the other veterans, whose presence and 
carriage seemed like an approving benediction from worthies of 
the past. All who knew the past history of the Seventy-first, 
and especially those who had the pleasure and advantage of a 
personal acquaintance with the Civil War Colonel Martin, were 
pained to hear that he was too ill to be present at any of the 
exercises of the day. This pain was intensified when they learned 



State Historian. 301 

that the occasion of this illness was a severe cold caught a few 
days previous when the dear old veteran commander had jour- 
neyed all the way to Montauk, and not without much fatigue and 
exposure had visited his grandchildren assembled in (sunp there 
on their return from the campaign in Cuba. 

After the ceremonies were over at the Armory the Chaplain! 
went at once to Brooklyn to see Colonel Martin, whom he found 
suflfering great pain from an acute trouble, but who at once arose 
and participated eagerly in a conversation that turned exclusiveliy 
upon the experiences of the gallant Seventy-fiTst. 

This great day of the regiment's return to its home and parade 
in New York had not been complete without this oflScial visit 
to the one man living, to whom more than to any other, the 
Seventy-first owes its worth and greatness. 

Let the gallant command ever remember that nothing of glory 
in the living present ought for one moment to eclipse the great- 
ness of its worthy past. 

The " American Guard," the motto of which reads " Pro Avis 
Elpro Focis/' has ever proved faithful to its ideal, and first, 
last and all the time has been ready for service whenever called 
upon to render it. All who in any way have contributed to the 
uncommon glory conceded to the command have been honored, and 
no less those who served it years ago than they who in the present 
day are considered active members. 

When finally the armory was reached the applause was deafen- 
ing; added to the hurrahs of the multitudes in the streets, upon 
the sidewalks and steps, in the windows and upon the roofs 
of the houses and hotels, were the booming of the cannon fired 
as salute and the music of the band playing " Home, Sweet 
Home " as the troops marched within the walls of their official 
home. 



302 Annual Eepokt of the 

Formation having been made upon the armory floor, Ck)lonel 
Downs made a brief and appropriate address to the raiment, 
apologizing for keeping the men even a few moments from the 
arms and welcome of dear ones, expressing the sentiments appro- 
priate to the occasion and reminding them, as prayer was offered 
when they left the armory to undertake their duties as volunteers, 
praise would now be appropriate, and called upon Chaplain 
Van Dewater to give thanks to God for His mercies. Scarcely 
had the brief words of thanksgiving been uttered when the band 
played " Old Hundred," and the words " Praise God, from Whom 
All Blessings Flow " were sung by those who felt the force of 
every word they uttered, as seemingly they had never felt it 
before. 

The armory floor and galleries were filled with relatives and 
friends of the returning soldiers, who were at once personally 
received with a cordiality, in some instances mingled with an 
untold sorrow, as the weakened forms and sickened faces told 
the story of severe suffering and wasted strength. 

The Women's Aid Society, composed chiefly of the wives and 
sisters of the soldiers, was soon busily engaged in giving hearty 
refreshments to the troops. 

After an hour or so of much rejoicing and feasting Colonel 
Downs formally announced that the Seventy-first Regiment was 
now on leave for sixty days, and was ordered to reassemble at 
Camp Black on the 26th of October for muster-out of the United 
States volunteer service. 

On the 25th of October the Chaplain received a communication 
from a Greenport, L. I., undertaker, saying that the following 
dead of the Seventy-first were then lying buried at Montauk 



State Historian. 303 

(Camp WikoflE), and asking for addresses of relatives, if pos- 
sible, that he might comiaunicate with them regarding removal 
of the remains. He was referred to Major Abeel at the armory, 
Thirty-fourth street and Park avenue, New York city,, viz. : 

Edward Pflster, Company E, died August 28th. 

Frank E. Rouse, Company K, died August 15th. 

Ebbe Ebberson, Company L, died September 10th. 

On the evening of the 26th of October Messrs. Hawk and 
Wetherbee, of the New Manhattan Hotel, gave a dinner to the 
ofQcers of the regiment, most all of whom assembled at 8 o'clock 
and sat down to a richly furnished and well-decorated table. At 
the right of Colonel Downs, who presided, sat Colonel Francis, 
of the One Hundred and Seventy-first Regiment, and at the left 
of the presiding oflacer was Captain Lloyd M. Brett, of the Third 
United States Cavalry, detailed as the mustering-out officer of the 
Seventy-first Regiment. Beautiful orchestral music added to the 
enjoyment of the occasion. 

After the coffee was served the Colonel of the Seventy-first made 
a happy address, which was followed by a speech from Mr. Hawk, 
who expressed satisfaction in being able to execute a cherished 
idea through the summer to give the Seventy-first officers a sup- 
per on their return. Speeches were made by several officers, all 
bearing upon the common experiences of the summer, the mutual 
affection ofiScers had for one another and the prospects of re- 
organization of the regiment as a part of the State's National 
Guard. A toast was drunk in silence to the memory of Lieuten- 
ants Longson and Roberts, who died in the service. 

On the morning of the 27th of October the regiment assembled 
at 9 o'clock in the armory, and at once examination of the men 
was begun by battalions. This process continued for days, the 



304 Annual Report of the / 

/ 

final muster-out not taking place until all had been examined 
and all records duly passed upon and certified as correct. 

On the 3rd of November those who wished to vote voted at the 
armory for city, county and State officers, orders having been 
received for the members of the regiment to vote as in time of war. 
On the 14th of November the regiment assembled in the armory, 
numbering, with the two companies of new recruits, which had 
been recruited by Captain Stoddard and were encamped first at 
Camp Black and subsequently for a brief period at Montauk 
Point, about 900 men. The work of mustering out, paying the 
men and giving to them their discharge papers was then begun 
and continued until the last man was discharged. Thus ended 
the service of the Seventy-first Regiment Infantry, New York 
Volunteers. 

Much might be said in concluding this history, writing and 
compiling which has been a labor of love by the Chaplain, to 
express the feelings of those who now for more than six months 
have been in the service of the United States volunteer army. 
This may be said, and perhaps it is enough to say : 

The Seventy-first Regiment, New York Volunteers, in the war 
with Spain enlisted promptly, recruited quickly, went to the seat 
of war rapidly and in a patriotic, devoted spirit, did every duty 
assigned to it cheerfully, obeyed orders implicitly, fought 
valiantly, suffered heroically and now retires from active service 
with becoming modesty, confident that it has served its State and 
country well. 

FINIS. 



, State Historian. 305 

subscription. 

Colonel Wallace A. Downs, Commanding 71st Regiment, N. Y. 
Vol. Infty. : 

Dear Colonel. — I herewith submit to you the itinerary or his- 
tory of the Seventy-first Regiment during its time of service in 
the United States volunteer army for the war with Spain, to 
prepare which you detailed me while on transport " Vigilancia " 
on our way to Cuba. 

There have been great diflSculties in writing ^ connected his- 
tory and in keeping an itinerary for subsequent copy. 

The book had to be left on the transport when we landed on 
the enemy's country. Carrying nothing but a haversack, it" was 
impossible to h«,ve much paper at hand and difficult to preserve 
the written copy upon separate sheets. Some of these were lost. 
It was very difficult at all times to write, and sometimes separ- 
ated from the regiment to do detailed duty at hospitals I could 
not describe what was taking place elsewhere. I have tried to 
do a difficult task the best I could under the circumstnnces. I 
now submit the result to you, as we are severing the ties of 
aflEectionate and mutual service in the United States' war with 
Spain. 

In doing this, jpermit me to express my devoted appreciation 

of you as a man and a soldier, and to thank you for many acts 

of kindness without which war would have been for me more of a 

hell than it was. 

I am, dear Colonel and friend, yours affectionately, 

(Signed) GEO. R. VAlf DEWATER, 

Captain and Chaplain 71st Regt., N. Y. Vols. 
20 



306 Annual Report of the 

GALLANTEY OF A NEW YOEK NAVAL OFFICER. 

THE GLOUCESTER AND THE PUERTO RICAN CAMPAIGN. 

The expedition to Puerto Rico under General Miles was de- 
signed to land at Cape. San Juan, but on the 2d:th of July it was 
determined to change the landing to Guanica. Captain Higgin- 
son, Commander of the Naval Convoy, in his report to Admiral 
Sampson, says: 

* * * "I proceeded with the convoy through the Mona 
Passage and arrived off Port Guanica at 5.20 a. m., July 25th, and 
standing in with the Gloucester in advance came to an anchor 
at 8.45 a. m. 

" Finding no batteries bearing on the entrance, the Gloucester 
approached the mouth of the harbor, and Lieutenant-Commander 
Wainwright asked permission to enter. This I granted with some 
hesitation, not knowing, of course, what mines or torpedoes 
might be in the channel — and knowing that I would be power- 
less to render the Gloucester any assistance after she had pene- 
trated the harbor and was lost to sight." (Captain Higginson's 
ship drew too much water to enter Guanica Harbor.) 

Prom " The Log of the Gloucester " we learn that between 
5.30 and 8 a. m. the Massachusetts — Captain Higginson's 
ship — wigwagged to Gloucester : " Do you see any signs of a 
fortification?" 

Answer : " No. See Spanish flag on warehouse." 

Between 8 a. m. and noon Wainwright signaled to Massa- 
chusetts: "Shall I go in?" 

Answered : " Yes, you can try it." 

"At 9 a. m. entered harbor in advance of the fleet. Lieutenant 
H. P. Huse and Lieutenant T. C. Wood went ashore with an 



State Historian. 307 

armed boat's crew, lowered the Spanish flag and hoisted oura. 
The men aboard ship cheered to see our flag ashore. Almost 
immediately after this a rapid firing of rifles was heard, and we 
became aware that our men had been attacked; many rifle bul- 
lets struck the w^ater alongside us and went singing past. Lieu- 
tenant Huse hailed U8_ requesting us to fire over him. Lieutenant 
Huse signaled that 250 men were needed to hold the place. 
Another armed boat was sent in charge of Lieutenant Norman 
and Assistant Engineer Procter, and by this time some boats 
of the Massachusetts had entered the harbor. Lieutenant Huse 
returned with landing party, having left Lieutenant Wood on 
shore with the Colt gun, at request of General Gilmore, U. S. A. 

"After our work was done General Miles came on board and 
complimented Captain Wainwright." (.Log of the Gloucester.) 

" Large sugar lighters were captured by the Gloucester, which 
were of great importance in landing men and supplies from the 
army transports. The only reference to this service in the 
Gloucester's Log is the modest entry : " July 26th, 4 to 8 a. m., 
transports with boats from the Massachusetts and lighters se- 
cured by us busily engaged in landing men and stores." 

In his official report on the capture of Guanica, Lieutenant- 
Commander Wainwright says: 

• * * " We entered the harbor by permission of the Senior 
Officer present and fired at some fleeing troops, then landed a 
party to seize the available landing places and prevent the 
destruction of lighters. 

" Reinforcements were discovered coming from Yauco, but were 
driven by fire from this vessel. 

" The army transports came in sight with launches and boats 
from the vessels in the outer harbor. At my request Colonel 



SOS Annual Report of the 

Black immediately landed a portion of his Engineer Battalion, 
and the village was tui'ned over to the army. 

" General Miles visited the Gloucester and thanked us for the 
services rendered. 

" The landing party was well handled by Lieutenant Huse and 
the men behaved extremely well, particularly when it is remem- 
bered that it was their first experience on shore.^' 

Lieutenant Huse, in his report to Captain Wainwright, saysr 

" The force under my command consisted of 28 men, embarked 
in the cutter. * * » 

" The Spanish flag was hauled down and our colors hoisted in 
its place. 

" This drew the enemy's fire, who opened from the underbrush 
on the right flank, and from about three hundred yards' dis- 
tance on the highway. • » » 

" From a countryman, the only man in the village, I Jearned 
that we were opposed by thirty regulars and that reinforcements 
were momentarily expected from Yauco, about four miles 
distant. 

" I signaled to you for reinforcements and pushed forward our 
center along the highway. « • ♦ 

"At the northern limit of the village we built a wall across the 
Iiighway and placed there the new Colt gun you had sent ashore. 

" We also strung two barbed wire fences fifty and one hundred 
yards to the front across the road. Meanwhile a boat under the 
command of Assistant Engineer Procter was engaged in cutting 
out a large lighter, which came into immediate use in landing 
troops. 

"About this time the Gloucester opened fire from her three- 
pounders and six-pounders, and the enemy retreated. A few 



State Historian. 309 

minutes later the first contingent of the regular army, Colonel 
Black's Regiment of Engineers, landed and rapidly pushed for- 
ward beyond our lines. In obedience to your orders the landing 
party then returned to the ship. At the special request of C4en- 
eral Gilmore I left Lieutenant Wood and a party ashore with 
the Colt gun. 

" I wish especially to commend the gallant conduct of Lieuten- 
ant Wood and of Chief Yeoman Lacey." 

The above extracts from official reports and the equally au- 
thoritative Log of the Gloucester show that the prompt action 
of Wainwright in pushing into the inner harbor of Guanica, with 
a contempt for mines and torpedoes worthy of Parragut, and the 
vigorous work of the landing party under Huse, made the sur- 
prise of Guanica a complete success. 

A safe landing place for the army was secured without any 
loss, and the crew of the Gloucester had the enviable satisfaction 
of capturing the first Spanish flag and hoisting in its place the 
first American flag on the island of Puerto Rico. Wainwright 
generously presented the Spanish flag to Huse, the commander 
of the landing party, but the Navy Department required it 1o be 
turned in as a public trophy. It now hangs among other naval 
tropiiies in the Naval Academy Museum at Annapolis. 

The American flag which the landing party hoisted at Guanica 
was presented to the city of Gloucester on the occasion of the 
Gloucester's visit there in September, 1898, and it now hangs 
over the Mayor's chair in the City Hall of Gloucester, Mass. 

The modesty of the Gloucester's Captain and offlcer^j makes 
it necessary to look for adequate accounts of their exploits in the 
ship's Log-book and the reports of other officers rather than in 



310 Annual Report of the 

their own. For example. Captain Higginson in his report to 
Admiral Sampson says: " In fact, the Gloucester captured the 
place (Guanica) single handed, and I take pleasure in commend- 
ing Lieutenant-Commander Wainwright and his officers and men 
for their gallantry and daring." 

And Commander Davis in his report to Captain Higginson 
says: 

* * * "While negotiations for the surrender (of Ponce) 
were in progress the Gloucester came into port, and Lieutenant- 
Commander Wainwright collected all the lighters in the harbor. 
amounting to about fifty, and held them ready to place akmy- 
side the transports upon their arrival in the morning " — July 28. 

No mention of this work appears in any report by Wainwright 
or his Executive, Huse, but in the Gloucester's Log-book is the 
following for 8 p. m. to midnight, July 27: 

" * * " All lights aboard were extinguished or screened, 
and in silence, with the crew at quarters and with a local pilot 
on the bridge, we moved into the inner harbor as near the lighters 
as possible and anchored. 

" Two armed boats' crews, under the Executive Officer (Lieuten- 
ant Huse) and Lieutenant George H. Norman, pulled in and se- 
cured nine large lighters for use of army in landing, and towed 
them alongside. Then, at 10 o'clock, got up anchor and slowly 
drifted back to the outer harbor and to our anchorage near the 
Dixie. 

"All through the manoeuvre the crew on board were kept at the 
guns, but our movements were not detected by the enemy." 



State Historian. 311 

DESTEUCTION OF THE SPANISH FLEET AT SANTIAGO. 

When Cervera's ships attempted to run the gauntlet of Samp- 
son's squadron on the morning of July 3rd, 1898, all the American 
war vessels, except the Gloucester, pursued the four Spanish 
cruisers. The Gloucester waited for the two destroyers, which 
were known to be a part of the Spanish fleet. They followed 
about 1,500 yards astern of the Oquendo. ( See Commander Wain- 
wrighfs Report.) 

They were each superior to the Gloucester in artillery and 
both were equipped with torpedoes, of which the Gloucester had 
none. Together they carried four fourteen-pounders, four six- 
pounders and four one- pounder Maxim (machine) guns, and 128 
officers and men. 

Both ships and guns were of English construction and up-to- 
date in all respects. 

The Gloucester carried four six-pounders, four three-pounders 
and two Colt (machine) guns of six millimeters calibre (about 
one-fourth inch) and a crew of eighty-five officers and men. 

The Spanish vessels were, therefore, greatly superior in arma- 
ment, while their combined crews out-numbered the crew of the 
Gloucester fifty per cent. 

To engage an enemy whose destroying power was so superior 
to the Gloucester's required on the part of the Gloucester's Com- 
mander bravery of the highest order and unbounded confidence 
in the courage, skill and devotion of his officers and men. 

Success was possible to the single ship only if her fewer men 
served her weaker battery with such quickness and accuracy as 
promptly to silence the enemy's guns and make it impossible to 
launch his torpedoes. And this the gallant Wainwright believed 
his little band of eighty-four would do. 



312 Annual Keport of the 

It was only six weeks since the Gloucester sailed from the 
New York Navy Yard with her untrained crew hard at -work 
stowing away the stores that had been hurried on board as rapidly 
as possible. All the training of "both ofiflcers and men on which 
the salvation of the Gloucester finally depended was accomplished 
during these six weeks and under great disadvantage. For the 
speed and general reliability of the Gloucester made her invalu- 
able as a daspatch boat, and from the day of her arrival on the 
coast of Cuba till the day of her great flght she was almost con- 
stantly in motion during the day, while every night she took her 
position near the Morro and watched the harbor entrance, well 
in advance of all the larger ships. ( See published " Log of the 
Gloucester.") 

During the continuance of the blockade Commander Wain- 
wright and his Executive Offlcer, Lieutenant Harry P. Huse, 
divided the night work equally. Every night, from the time the 
Gloucester took her position at dark till she moved farther out 
at daylight, one of these two officers was constantly on the 
iridge. 

When the Pluton and Furor appeared the supreme moment 
had arrived. Wainwright and his Executive were on the bridge, 
the latter eagerly listening for the order to attack. It came in 
the simple words: "Close in, Huse." And "Full speed ahead" 
was the order of the Executive to McElroy, the devoted and faith- 
ful Chief Engineer, who had everything in his department in such 
superb condition that, although the Gloucester was driven at a 
speed she had never known before, it was done " without causing 
a tube to leak or a brass to heat." (Wainwright's report.) 

During the action Wainwright frequently repeated his order: 
" Close in, Huse," •" Close in, Huse," and Huse closed in, and the 



State Historian. 313 

attack was so fwrious and persistent that within twenty minutes 
the Pluton lay on the rocks in the surf an utter wreck which 
could not he hoarded, and the Furor lay on the hottom in deep 
water, and all that was left of the two destroyers and their guns 
and torpedoes and crews was a mass of humanity struggling in 
the water, which, when rescued by the men of the Gloucester, 
numbered four officers and forty-one petty officers and enlisted 
men. 

The Gloupester was uninjured. She had not beei^ once hit, and 
the survivors were brought in and cared for under the awnings, 
which completely covered the deck when, while Sunday morning 
inspection Was going on, the first of the Spanish ships appeared. 
There had not been time to make the usual preparation for 
battle, and the Gloucester's men served their guns, and after the 
battle cared for those of their enemy that were left alive under 
awnings that had been spread in expectation of an uneventful 
Sunday. 

Commander Wainwright in his official report accounts for the 
wonderful escape of the Gloucester without injury to the ship or 
her crew as follows : 

" The escape of the Gloucester was due mamly to the accuracy 
and rapidity of the fire: The efficiency of this fire, as well as of 
the ship generalh/, was largely due to the intelligent and unre- 
mitting efforts of the Executive Officer, Lieutenant Harry P. 
Euse. The result was more to his credit when it is remembered 
that a large proportion of the officers and men were untrained 
when the Gloucester was commissioned (May 16, 1898). Through- 
out the action he was on the bridge with me and carried out my 
orders with great coolness." 



314 Annual Report of the 

THE NEWSPAPER CORRESPONDENTS. 
Mr. Henry L. Stoddard, part of whose correspondence from 
Cuba regarding the Seventy-flist Regiment, is included in Chap- 
lain Vandewater's history of the Regiment, was one of the New 
York newspaper writers whose service as war correspondent 
began with the mobilization of the army in Florida early in April, 
1898, and continued until our national flag floated over the Morro 
at Santiago and the Governor-General's palace at Havana. Most 
of his time was spent with the regular troops, but it so happened 
that he camped with the Seventy-first Regiment the night before 
the battle of San Juan, and marched with them to the battle line 
that morning. He was thus able to give an accurate account of 
the day's events from his own observation, especially so far as 
the Seventy-first Regiment was concerned. 

Mr. Stoddard is a native of New York. He was born in New 
York City October 7, 18G1. Three generations of his family have 
made their home in Hudson, Columbia County, this State, where 
they have owned and edited various publications, beginning as 
far back as 1787. Mr. Stoddard early learned the printer's trade, 
but subsequently became a reporter, making political writing his 
chief work. He has served at Washington and Albany as corre- 
spondent, and when he went to Cuba with the army was part 
owner and chief editorial writer of The Mail and Express, in 
New York City. He has since become the principal owner and 
director of that newspaper, and is president of the corporation. 

In a letter to tlie State Historian under date of April 13, 1904, 
Mr. Stoddard writes: 

" I remember that I had some good words to say of the Seventy- 
first after my return home and when I found them unfairly 



State Historian. 315 

attacked. ' He jests at scars who never felt a wound,' you 
know. That is why I have no patience with those who, while 
attempting nothing themselves, criticise the conduct and question 
the courage of those who dare and try to do. Many reasons other 
than lack of courage compel a man to stay at home when the 
call to arms is heard, and I have no criticism, therefore, for those 
who chose the fireside instead of the battlefield; but when they 
make their choice, they should not question the courage or rail 
at the embarrassments of those who go out to battle for them ; 
and who try to do their best. 

The man who can stand firm under his first volley of musketry, 
and amid the shriek of shrapnel, is rare indeed. If he rallies 
and goes on, he is to be hailed as a hero; his first moment of 
thought for his life and for those he may leave behind is not to 
be magnified into an act of cowardice. It shouldn't be necessary 
that his life blood should have to attest his patriotism and his 
courage, at least in the eyes of his countrymen. 

Thus believing, I wrote as I felt about the Seventy-first. I saw 
them that day under that cruel fire from a concealed enemy, 
heilplessly huddled together in a road not fifteen feet wide. I did 
not know that my letters had been given a place in Dr. Vande- 
water's history of the regiment. Someone told me casually a 
year or so ago that the regiment had the letters in their scrap- 
book ; that is all I ever heard." 

Enterprise ow the Correspondents. 

The New York Herald, long before the war, had made arrange- 
ments for covering events in the Caribbean sea, the Philippines 
and on the coast of Spain. When war was declared it had two 
despatch boats moving between Cuba and Key West, and another 



316 AxNUAL Report of the 

at St. Thomas watching developments in Porto Rico. The bom- 
bardment of the fortifications at Matanzas was the first engage- 
ment of the war, and Herald men witnessed it at close range 
from the deck of the steam pilot boat Svmiuers N. i^iiiith. They 
scored tlie first " beat " of the war. When Cervera's squadron 
sailed from the Canaries the Herald chartered a steamship and 
followed it for a day, the course showing that it was bound across 
the Atlantic. It had a man on the bridge of the Olympia when 
Dewey fought the battle of Manila Bay. The despatch boat 
Mindora i-arried the only story printed in the States next day 
of the landing of Shatter's army and the only news of the fight- 
ing l)efore Santiago on July 1 that was printed anywhere on 
July 2. The despatih boat Golden Rod brought to Port Antonio, 
Jamaica, the first story of the destruction of Cervera's squadron, 
which was covered at an expense of |5,500, and reai'hed New 
York ten hours ahead of any other newspaper report. The 
Herald's forces in the West Indies were in charge of Henry S. 
Brown, who was called from his work as Albany correspondent 
the day after the Maine was blown up. The other members of 
the Herald's war staff were: Walter S. Meriwether, Leo L. Red- 
ding, Hamilton S. Peltz, E. W. McCready, E. H. Sheehan, John 
Mitchell, Richard Harding Davis, Thomas F. Millard, Nicholas 
Biddle, E. K. Coulter, Ramon Alvarez, P. H. Xirhols, Rutherford 
('orbin and Houlder Hudgins. J. L. Stickney was with Dewev. 
H. Ct. Dart and W. O. Wilson were artists at the front. As show- 
ing the amount of travel necessary to transport disjiatches, it 
can be stated that the despatch boat Sinitli, ("apt. F. JI. Dunn, 
was continuously in service for more than five months, and in 
all kinds of weather covered more than 25,000 miles, carrying 



State Historian. ^ 317 

news or searching for it. The Herald sent the first boat into 
Santiago after the surrender and the first into Havana. In 
all it had seven steamships chartered at one time and another, 
and the total expenses were nearly |250,000. 

The work performed by the principal newspapers throughout 
the country during the progress of the Spanish War, not only in 
the Atlantic, but in the Pacific, is unparalleled, in enterprise in 
the history of journalism. Many newspapers, daily, weekly, illus- 
trated and serial, were represented at the front by its own special 
correspondent and their own chartered vessel. 

Very, often the navy impressed newspaper vessels as despatch 
■ boats, and commanders of American warships spoke invariably 
of the cheerful willingness and alacrity with which the corre- 
spondents lived up to naval regulations and in their faithful 
observance of naval restrictions. In fact, the co-operation be- 
tween the newspapers and the naval department reflects the 
highest credit upon both, when it is considered the natural anti- 
pathy that army and navy oflQcers entertain toward dissemina- 
tors of news in time of war. In addition to the names already 
mentioned in the narrative of the Seventy-first Regiment, credit 
should also be given to brilliant correspondents who achieved, 
great distinction for the papers which they represented and who 
added to their own reputations. Among the men included in 
this class were the late Julian Ralph of Harpers Weekly, Stephen 
Crane and W. J. Chamberlain of the 8wi. 

Others who survived the war, having added to their reputations 
as able newspaper men were : Louis Siebold of the World, James 
Creelman Who was wounded at El Caney; George Edward Gra- 
ham of the Associated Press, who described the loss of the 



318 annuatj Repoet op the State Historian. 

Spanish fleet from the deck of the Brooklyn, where he repeatedly, 
recklessly exposed his life against the warnings of Admiral 
Schley; Edward Marshall of the Journal, who was seriously 
wounded in the spine, at San Juan Hill, and whose both legs 
were subsequently amputated; Franklyn Clarkin of the Evening 
Post; Anthony Fiala of the Brooklyn Eagle; Ervin Wardman 
of the Press; Stephen Bonsai, Grover Flint, the venerable Murat 
Halstead, Alexander C. Kenealy, Oscar King Davis of the 8un, 
John Fox jr. Posterity will be indebted to such distinguished 
artists as Frederick Remington, Rufus F. Zogbaum, Carlton T. 
Chapman, for the excellent illustrations that will forever per- 
petuate the magnificent work of the navy and the glorious deeds 
of the army during this war. 



Finis. 



INDEX 



1st Regiment New York State Volunteers. 



For the sake of convenience, each one of the five military organizations included in this 
report, haa been indexed separately. The general index which embraces the entire report 
begins on page 381, — State Historian. 



PAGE 

ALAMEDA, mail steamer.... 24 

Albany, New York/. 18, S9, 39 

Tenth Battalion, com- 
panies A, B, C & D, of . . . 17 

Alliance, steamship 33 

Annexation ceremonies, of 
transfer of Hawaiian Islands 

to United States 23 

Apache Indians 44 

Arizona, ship 23 

Ashley, Maurice Cavileer, as- 
sistant surgeon... 19, 20, 21, 25 

Atlantic, division of the 40, 41 

Australia, mail steamer 24 

BAILEY, PRIVATE EDWARD 

A., company B, died 29 

Barber, Colonel Merritt, as- 
sistant adjutant-general, U. 

S. A 31, 32 

Barber, Colonel Thomas H 20 

21, 22, 23, 24, 31, 32 
33, 34, 36, 37, 41 
appointed colonel First 

Eeg., National Guard.... 18 
formally accepted colors 
presented to his regi- 
ment 19 

promoted brigadier-gen- 
eral. United States Vol- 
unteers 37 

abuse of, uncalled for.... 37 

military record of 39-42 

mustered out United 

States service 42 

Barry, Thomas H., A. A. G., 

U. S. A 33 

Baxter, First Lieutenant Alex- 
ander Gillespie, company L.. 26 
Beardslee, Private Burton M., 
company F, died 29 



PAGE 

Belgium 40 

Big Horn mountains, Wyo- 
ming ^ 41 

Binghamton, New York, Twen- 
tieth Separate Company, 

Seventeenth Battalion of 17 

Black, Governor Frank S 18 

Boardman, Second Lieutenant 

Fred W., company G 2G 

Boice, First Lieutenant Ghas. 

Henry, company F 26 

British Columbia 41 

Brooklyn, New York 39 

Burton, Sergeant-Major Ed- 
ward H 21 

second lieutenant, com- 
pany B 25 

sergean1>-major, promoted 
to second lieutenant, 
company B '. . . 28 

CALIFORNIA 35 

California regiment 32 

Callanan, Private John J., Jr., 
company A, promoted sec- 
lieutenant, 203rd New York 

Volunteers 27 

Camp Alger, Virginia 32 

Camp Black, Hempstead 

Plains, Long Island 18 

19, 30,. 31 37 
Camp McKinley, Hawaiian 

Islands 22, 23, 29, 30 

Camp Merritt, California 21 

Camp Presidio, San Francisco, 

California 21 

Canada, Dominion of 41 

Carter, Private Charles F., 

company G, died 29 

Charles Nelson, packet 21 

Chase, Major James T 19 

20, 21, 28 



320 Ind 



ST Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Chase, James T., resigned 27 

military record of 43 

mustered in United States 

service 43 

retired 43 

Chicago, Illinois 30 

Chicago and Northwestern 

Kailroad 20 

Chickamauga, Georgia 31 

Colorado troops 21 

Commissioned officers of First 
Regiment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers, list of... 25-29 
Company A, Tenth Battalion, 
became company A, First 
Eegiment National Guard... 18 
Company A, First Regiment, 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 19 

30, 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 29 
became Fifth Separate 

Company : . 43 

Company A, Fifty-sixth New 

York Volunteers 43 

Company B, Tenth Battalion, 
became company B, First 
Regiment, National Guard... 18 
Company B, First Regiment, 

New York Volunteers 39 

20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29 
Company B, Tenth Eegiment. . 42 
Company C, Tenth Battalion, 
became company C, First 
Eegiment, National Guard.. 18 
Company C, First Eegiment, 

New York Volunteers 19 

20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 29 
Company D, Tenth Battalion, 
became company D, First 
Eegiment, National Guard.. 18 
Company t), First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 29 

Company D, Nineteenth New 

York State Militia 43 

Company E, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers . : 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 29 
Company F, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19, 20, 23, 23, 24, 26, 29 

Company G, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19, 30, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29 

Company G, One Hundred 
Sixty-eighth New York 

Volunteers 43 

Company H, First Regiment 
l7ifantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 30 

21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 30 



PAGE 

Company H, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers, in measles quar- 
antine f9 

joined headquarters at 
Fort Columbus, New 

York harbor 19 

Company I, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 30 
Company K, First Eegriment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

30, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 30, 44 
Company L, First Eegiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers. . 19, 30, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 30 
Company M, First Eegiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

20, 31, 22, 33, 24, 37, 30 
Corbin, Henry C, adjutant- 
general, U. S. A 32, 33 

Cowles, Private George H., 

company H 21 

died ' 30 

Crouch, Corporal Herbert A., 
company M, died .' 30 

DAVIS, SURGEON CHARLES 

E 19, 20, 23 

resigned 37 

Decker, Second Lieutenant 
Abraham Lincoln, com- 
pany I 20, 26 

promoted to first lieuten- 
ant, company 1 28 

Department of California 34 

36, 37 
Department of the East... 19, 20 
Department of the Missouri ... 44 
Diamond Head, Hawaiian Isl- 
ands 22, 33 

District of Hawaii 23 

Division of the Atlantic... 40, 41 
Dole, Sanford B., President of 

Hawaiian Islands , 38 

EDWARDS, BATTALION AD- 
JUTANT FRANK BURCH, 

discharged 27 

Eighth Army Corps, First 
Brigade, Independent Divi- 
sion 21 

Emmet, Major Eobert Tem- 
ple 19, 20, 22, 24, 25 

military record of 43-44 

award medal of honor 44 

resigned 44 

England 40 



Index — First Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 321 



PAGE 

Erie Eailroad 20 

Europe 40 

FERGUSON, CAPTAIN URSIL 

A., company G 2S, 26 

Field, Major Edward, U. S. 

A . . . 24, 36 

report of, regarding First 

Regiment 34-39 

extract from report of . . 37-39 
Field service, telegrams relat- 
ing to 32-34 

Fifth Separate Company, 
Twelfth Battalion, of 

Newbnrgh : 17 

became company L, First 

Kegiment 18 

Fifteenth Separate Company, 
Twelfth Battalion, of 

Poughkeepsie 17 

became company K, First 

Eeglment 18 

Fifteenth Separate Company.. 44 
First Regiment, artillery, U. 

S. A 3'9, ^0, 42 

First Regiment, infantry. New 
York National Guard, 
composed of organiza- 
tions of the Third Brig- 
ade 17, 18, 156 

medical examination of of- 
ficers and enlisted men . . 18 
mustered into United 

States service 19 

became First Regiment In- 
fantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

First Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 22 

23, 32, 33, 34, 36 
37, 39, 42, 43, 44 

history of 17-45 

colors presented to, by 

Talbot Olyphant 19 

colors accepted by Colonel 

Thomas H. Barber 19 

except company H, left 

Camp Black 19 

in New York harbor forts, 

received 301 recruits 20 

inspected by Major Ed- 
ward Field, U. S. A 24 

ordered to return to home 

station 24 

mustered out of United 

States service 24 

commissioned officers of.. 25-29 

field and staff officers 25 

list of officers who re- 
signed prior to muster- 
out of regiment 27 

21 



PAGE 

First Regiment . Infantry, New 
York Volunteers: 
list of those transferred 
prior to muster-out of 

regiment 27 

list of those promoted 
prior to muster-out of 

regiment 27-29 

enlisted men of, who died 

in the service 29-31 

official correspondence re- 
lating to 31 

review and inspection... 34-37 

drills, exercises, etc 35 

police ., 35 

behavior 36 

instruction 36 

company A: 

commissioned officers 

of 25 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service . . 29 
company B: 

commissioned officers 

of 25 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service.. 29 
company C: 

commissioned officers 

of 25 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service . . 29 
company D: 

commissioned officers 

of 25 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service . . 29 
company E: 

commissioned officers 

of 26 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service . . 29 
company F: 

commissioned officers 

of 26 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service . . 29 
company G: 

commissioned officers 

of 26 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service.. 29-30 
company H: 

commissioned officers 

of 26 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service ... 30 
company I: 

commissioned officers 

of 26 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service ... 30 



322 Index — Fikst Regiment, N. Y. State Voluntehes. 



PAGE 

First Kegiment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers: 
company K: 

commissioned officers 

of 26 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service ... 30 
company L: 

commissioned officers 

of 36 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service... 30 
company M: 

commissioned officers 

of 27 

enlisted men of, who 
died in the service... 30 
Flower, Governor Koswell P. . 42 

Fort Adams, Ehode Island 40 

Fort Ckjlumbus, New York har- 
bor 19, 20, 41 

Fort Hamilton, Long Island 

side of the Narrows 19 

20, 31, 39 

Fort Logan, Colorado 30 

Fort Niobrara, Nebraska 44 

Fort Union, New Mexico 44 

Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island 
side of the Narrows. . 19, 20, 31 

Fort Whipple, Virginia 40 

Forty-fourth Separate Com- 
pany, of Utica 17 

became company E, First 

Begiment 18 

Fourteenth Separate Com- 
pany, Twelfth Battalion, 

of Kingston 17 

became company M, First 

Kegiment . . 18 

Fowler, Second Lieutenant 

Joseph M., company M.. 27 
first sergeant, promoted to 
second lieutenant, com- 
pany M 28 

France 40 

Frank, General Koyal T., TJ. S. 
A 31, 32 

GENERAL MEIGS, govern- 
ment boat 19 

Germany 40 

Glasby, Private Albert, com- 
pany H, died 30 

Goodale, Second Lieutenant 

James K., company E... 26 
sergeant-major, promoted 
to second lieutenant, 

company E 28 

Goodier, Captain Lewis E., pro- 
moted major 203d New 

York Volunteers 27 

mentioned 28 



PAGB 

Goodrich, Sergeant William, 
company C, died 29 

Governors Island, New York 
harbor 31, 32, 41 

Gracie, Captain William B., 
company D 25 

Gresham, First Lieutenant 
Christopher, company C 25 

Griffith, First Lieutenant and 
Assistant Surgeon Lewis 
Theophilus. . 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25 

HANCOCK, MAJOR-GENERAL 

WINFIELD SCOTT 40, 41 

Hawaii, district of 23 

Hawaiian Islands 32 

annexation ceremonies of 
transfer to United 

States 23 

Hempstead Plains, Long Isl- 
and, New York 18, 31 

Hilo, Island of Hawaii 23, 30 

Hinman, Second Lieutenant 

Charles N., company H 26 

Hitchcock, Captain Charles 

Henry, company H 26 

Hogan, Hospital Steward 

Joseph Frederick 21 

Holland 40 

Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 21 

22, 23, 29, 30, 32, 33, 34, 37 

Board of Health of 38 

Civil Sanitary Commission, 

report of 38-39 

post of 34, 36 

Honolulu harbor 22 

Hospital corps 21 

Huhne, First Lieutenant John 

A, company M 27 

second lieutenant, pro- 
moted to first lieuten- 
ant company M 28 

IDAHO 41 

Independent Division, First 

Brigade, Eighth Army Corps, 21 

Indian scouts 44 

Ireland 40 

Irwin Tract, Hawaiian Islands, 22 

Italy 40 

JERSEY CITY, NEW JER- 

SEV 20 

KAPIOLANI PARK, Hawaiian 
Islands 21, 22, 37 

Kilauea, Hawaiian Islands, 
volcano of 23 

King, B r i g a d i e r-General 
Charles 23, 26 

Kingston, Fourteenth Separate 
Company, Twelfth Battalion 
of 17 



Index — Fiest Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 323 



PAGE 

Knox, Assistant Inspector- 
General Thomas T., U. S. 
A 34, 36 

LANGFITT, MAJOR WILLIAM 

c, u. s. A as 

Las Animas canon. New Mex-! 

ico 44 

Lennon, Private Thomas F., 

company A, died 29 

Long Island City 19 

MANILA, Philippine Islands.. 21 

Manson, Captain William 

Dixon, company B 35 

first lieutenant, promoted 
captain company B 38 

Mapes, Second Lieutenant Wil- 
liam H., company L 26 

Mariposa, steamer 33 

Martin, Captain James Curtis, 
company F 26 

Mather, First Lieutenant Ad- 
rian W., company A 23 

McCarty, Private Webster, 
company A, died 29 

Mclntyre, Captain Amos E., 
company 1 36 

McMillan, Second Lieutenant 
Hovsrard Udell, company A. . 25 

Merriam, Major-General Henry 
C, U. S. A 23 

Merritt, Major-General Wesley, 
U. S. A..". 32 

Middletovvn, Twenty-fourth 
Separate Company 17 

Minnesota troops 21 

Moore, Private Hudson B., 
company L, died 30 

Mott-Smith, Minister 38 

NATIONAL QUARP, NEW 

YORK, Third Brigade... 17 
First Eegiment Infantry, 
composed of organi- 
zations of the Third 

Brigade 17, 18, 156 

medical examination 
of officers and en- 
listed men 18 

mustered in United 

States service 19 

became First Eegiment 
Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 19 

Twelfth Eegiment 39 

Newburgh, Fifth Separate 
Company, Twelfth Battalion 

of 17 

Newcomb, First Sergeant Ed- 
ward T., company A, pro- 
moted second lieutenant 
203nd New York Volunteers, 27 



PAGE 

New Hawaiian post 21 

New Mexico 44 

Newport Harbor, Rhode Island, 40 
New York: 

harbor 19, 31 

city 34, 36 

New ■^ork National Guard: 

Third Brigade 17 

First Eegiment Infantry, 
composed of organiza- 
tions of the Third Brig- 
ade 17, 18, 156 

medical examinations of 

officers and enlisted men, 18 
mustered into United 

States, service 19 

became First Eegiment In- 
fantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

Twelfth Eegiment 39 

New York State 17 

18, 19, 24, 31, 39 

adjuLant-general 39 

Nineteenth Militia, com- 
pany D _. 43 

New York Volunte"ers: 

First Eegiment Infantry. . 23 
23, 32, 33, 34, 36 
37, 39, 42, 43, 44 

history of 17-45 

colors presented to, by 

Talbot Olyphant 19 

colors accepted by 
Colonel Thomas H. 

Barber 19 

except company H, left 

Camp Black 19 

in New York harbor 
forts, received 301 re- 
cruits 20 

inspected by Major Ed- 
ward Field, U. S. A.. 24 
ordered to return to 

home station 24 

mustered out of United 

States service 34 

commissioned officers 

of 25-39 

field and stafE officers, 25 
list of officers who re- 
signed prior to mus- 
ter-out of regiment, 37 
list of those trans- 
ferred prior to mus- 
ter-out of regiment, 27 
list of those promoted 
prior to muster-out 

of regiment 27-29 

enlisted men of, who 

died in the service.. 29-31 
official correspondence 
relating to 31 



324 Index — First Regiment, N. Y. State Voldntebes. 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers: 

First Regiment Infantry: 
review and inspec- 
tion , 34-37 

drills, exercises, etc... 35 

police 35 

behavior 36 

instruction 36 

company A: 

commissioned ofS- 

cers of 25 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 29 

company" B: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 25 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 29 

company C: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 25 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 29 

company D: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 25 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 29 

company E: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 86 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 29 

company F: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 26 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 29 

company G: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 26 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 29-30 

company H: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 26 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 30 

company I: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 26 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 
service 30 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers: 

First Regiment Infantry: 
company K: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of ~6 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 30 

company L: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 26 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 30 

company M: 

commissioned offi- 
cers of 27 

enlisted men of, 
who died in the 

service 30 

202nd Regiment 37 

Nickinson, Second Lieutenant 

Albert E., company 1 26 

sergeant, prombted to sec- 
ond lieutenant, com- 
pany I 28 

Ninth Cavalry, U. S. A 43, 44 

OAHU, ISLAND OF 23 

Ogden, Utah 21 

Ojo Caliente, New Mexico .... 44 
Oliver, Second Lieutenant 

Edward, company C 25 

Oliver, Brigadier-General Rob- 
ert Shaw, commanding 

Third Brigade 17, 18 

ordered to organize two 

regiments 17 

Olyphant, Talbot, presented 
colors to First Regiment In- 
fantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

Omaha, Nebraska 20 

Oneonta, Third Separate Com- 
pany of 17 

Oothoudt, Second Lieutenant 

Arthur E., company F 26 

Otis, Major-General Elwell S., 
U. S. A 32, 33, 34 

PALMER, CAPTAIN FRANK 

ROCKWELL, company A 25 

Peet, Private George L., com- 
pany G., died 30 

Philippines 32, 33 

Pickard, Captain Arthur W., 

company E 26 

first lieutenant, promoted 
to captain, company E. . 33 
Pope, Major-General John, U. 
S. A 44 



Index — Fikst Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 325 



PAGE 

Porter, Private Clarence H., 

company H, died 30 

Post hospital, Hawaiian Isl- 
ands 37 

Poughkeepsie, Fifteenth. Sep- 
arate Company 17 

Presidio, San Pranclsco, Cali- 
fornia 24, 29 

regiment moved to 21 , 

camp 21 

RACE TRACK, CAMP, Ha- 
waiian Islands 22 

Eamsay (Eamsey), Captain 
and Assistant Surgeon George 
D., promoted surgeon Sixty- 
ninth U. S. Volunteers 27 

Eappe, Private Charles G., 
company B 21 

Eead, Private James H., Jr., 
company B, died 29 

Eeagan, Corporal Michael J., 
company B, promoted sec- 
ond lieutenant 202nd New 
York Volunteers 27 

Kevolution, Sons of the, pre- 
sent colors to the regilnent, 19 

Eoach, Captain James Edward, 
company C 25 

SAQUE, FIRST LIEUTEN= 
ANT CLARENCE, com- 
pany K 26 

second lieutenant, pro- 
moted to first lieutenant 

company K 28 

Sague, Major John K 24, 25 

captain, promoted to 

major 28 

military record of 44 

mustered out 44 

St. Paul, steamer .-. . 21 

San Prancisco, California 20 

21, 22, 24, 32, 33, 34, 37 

harbor 22 

Sawyer, Private James H., 

company D, died ,. 29 

Scandia, United States troop- 
ship 22 

hospital ship 24 

Schwartz, Chaplain Karl., 19 

20, 22, 25, 37 

Scotland 40 

Scott, Major Walter. . 19, 20, 22, 24 

lieutenant-colonel 25 

promoted ■ to lieutenant- 
colonel 27 

military record of 43 

retired 43 

Second Eegiment, Volunffeer 

Engineers : 22, 23 



PAGE 

Seventeenth Battalion: 

Third Separate Company, 
Twentieth Separate Com- 
pany Thirty-third Separ- 
ate Company 17, 43 

Sheehan, Captain James P., 

company L 26 

Shoshone rtiountains, Wyom- 
ing 41 

Sixteenth Separate Company, 

Twelfth Battalion 17 

Slater, Second Lieutenant Lu- 
cius J., company K 26 

first sergeant, promoted 
to second lieutenant 

company K 28 

Smith, Second Lieutenant 

James Ezra, company D. . 22, 25 
Sons of the Eevolution, present 

colors to the regiment 19 

South Dakota troops 21 

Southern Pacific Eailway 31 

Spain 40, 42 

Springsteen, "Private John V., 

company G, died 30 

Staats, Captain Charles 

Bleecker 28 

resigned 27 

Staats, Pirst Lieutenant Harry 

Caleb, company B. . . 20, 25 
second lieutenant, pro- 
moted to first lieutenant 

company B 28 

Stacpole, Major Horatio Pot- 
ter 19, 20, 22, 24 

appointed lieutenant-colo- 
nel .... : 18 

mentioned 25 

promoted to colonel 27 

military record of 42 

died 42 

Staten Island 19 

Strevell, Lieutenant Clarence, 
regimental adjutant com- 
pany E 22, 24, 25 

promoted to regimental 

adjutant 28 

Switzerland 40 

TAYLOR, PRIVATE CARL= 

TON W., company A, died. . . ,29 
Tenth Battalion, companies A, 

B, C, D, of Albany.... 17, 18, 42 
Tenth Eegiment, National 

Guard 42 

Terry, Pirst Lieutenant David, 

company M 28 

resigned 27 

Third Eegiment Artillery, 

United States Army 24 

Third Separate Company, of 

Oneonta 17, 43 



326 Index — Fiest Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



• PAGE 

Third Separate Company, of 
Oneonta, became company 

G, First Kegiment 18 

Thirty-third Separate Com- 
pany, of Walton 17 

became company P, First 

Eegiment 18 

Thompson, Private Charles H., 

company H, died 30 

Tompkins, Captain Eobert Ful- 
ton, company M 87 

Tucker, First lientenant Her- 
man Alvln, company G 36 

Twelfth Battalion: 

Fifth, Fourteenth, Fif- 
teenth, Sixteenth and 
Twenty-fourth Separate 

Companies 17, 43 

Twelfth Kegiment, National 

Guard, New York 39 

Twentieth Separate Company, 

of Binghamton 17 

became company H, First 

Eegiment 18 

Twenty-fourth Separate Com- 
pany, of Middletown... . 17 
became company I, First 

Eegiment 18 

Two Hundred and Second, 
New York Volunteers 27 

UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD. . 30 

United States 41 

Adjutant-General 33 

33, 34, 39 
annexation ceremonies of 
transfer of Hawaiian 

Islands to 33 

United States Army 33, 34, 36 

First Artillery. . 39, 40, 43 

Third Artillery 34 

United States Military Aca- 
demy 39, 40, 41, 43, 43 

United States service 43, 43 

United States Volunteers 33 

34, 43 

Ute expedition 44 

Utica, Forty-fourth Separate 

Company of 17 

VAN GAASBECK (Van Gaas- 
beek), Sergeant Walter E., 
company M, died 30 



PAGE 

Van Keuren, Private George, 

company M, died 30 

Volimteer Engineers, Second 

Eegiment 22, 23 

Vossler Captain Wilbur, com- 
pany K 26 

first lieutenant, promoted 
to captain Company K. . 28 

WAIELAE, Hawaiian Islands, 

23, 24 
Wallace, George Ernest, com- 
pany I 28 

second lieutenant company 

I, resigned 27 

Walton, Third-third Separate 

Company 17 

Wands, Private Eobert, com- 
pany C, died B9 

War Department 34, 36, 40 

War, Secretary of 33, 33 

Warden, Private Fred, com- 
pany K, died 30 

Washington, D. C 33 

33, 34, 36, 39, 40 
Weller, Private Alfred O., 

company I, died 30 

Wells, Private Granville I., 

company M, died. 30 

West Point, Military Aca- 
demy 39, 41, 42, 43 

Wheeler, Private Oscar E., 

company Et died 39 

Wheelock, First Lieutenant 

WilUam F., company D 25 

Winthrop, Lieutenant and 
Eegimental Quartermaster 

Bronson SI, 23, 34, 25 

Wood, First Lieutenant Frank- 
lin Thomas, company E, 26 
second lieutenant, pro- 
moted to first lieutenant 

company E 28 

Woodbeck, Private Burton, 

company G, died 30 

WortHng, First Lieutenant 
Harry P., company H B6 

YELLOWSTONE PARK, Wy- 
oming 41 

Yorktown, Virginia 40 

Young, Minister 38 



INDEX 



2d Regiment New York State Volunteers. 



For the sake of convenience, each one of the five military organizations included in this 
report haa been indexed separately. The general index which embraces the entire report be- 
gins on page 381.— State HisToKiAN. 



FAGB 

ALBANY, New York 73 

Alden, Quartermaster George 
M., Thirteenth Battalion, 
National Guard, New 

York 47 

mustered in as captain and 
quartermaster, Second 
Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 70 

mustered out of United 

States service 82 

Aldrich, Lieutenant Bishop L., 

company K 47 

second lieutenant National 
Guard, not mustered into , 

company K 48 

Allen, Private Charles W., 

company M, died 68 

Allen, Sergeant Elisha M., 

company I, injured 58 

Amsterdam, New York 79 

Second Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers, 
company H, Forty-sixth 
Separate Company of... 49 

State armory 81 

Andrews, Captain James M., 

Jr., company E 49 

Atlanta, Georgia 68, 70, 71 

Averill Park, New York 71 

74, 75 

BAHME, PRIVATE FELIX, 

company D, died 76 

Baker, Private Charles N., 

company C, died 68 

Baker, Second Lieutenant 

William, company C 48 

Balch, Major Lewis, assistant 
surgeon-general. New 
York, mustered in as 
surgeon 45 



FAOE 

Balch, Hajor Lewis, major and 
acting assistant surgeon- 
general 47 

assigned to duty as acting 

chief surgeon 53 

organized Division Hospi- 
tal and Ambulance Com- 
pany 52 

surgeon, appointed chief 

surgeon 56 

ordered to report to his 

regiment 66 

commissioned brigade sur- 
geon. United States Vol- 
unteers 82 

resigned 82 

Baltimore, Maryland 51 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 51 
Baltimore and Ohio Southwest- 
ern Railway 51 

Barnival, Corporal John J., 

company C, injured 58 

Bartholomew, Second Lieuten- 
ant Alanson U., company I.. 49 

61 
Bauder, Captain Frank, com- 
pany F 49 

Baum, Dr. Henry C, Forty- 
first Separate Company, 
Syracuse, mustered in as 

assistant surgeon 45 

captain, commissioned 

major and surgeon, Sec- 
ond Regiment, New York 

Volunteers. 82 

mustered out 82 

Bauth, Private E. F., company 
B, transferred to Division 

Hospital Corps 60 

Betts, Private Clarence W., 
company A, appointed regi- 
mental sergeant-major 70 



328 Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Bills, Colonel, Second Ne- 
braska Volunteer Infantry . . 52 
Black, Governor Frank S.. 45, 48 
reviewed Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 46 

Blackington, Private Hugh P., 
company M, discharged from 

United S'tates service 76 

Blanchard, Private William A., 

company C, injured 58 

Bleakley, Private Andrew W., 

company D, died 80 

Brazee (Brezee), Private Fred- 
erick A., company L, in- 
jured 58 

Brugman, Dr. Albert F., Sec- 
ond Battery, National 
Guard, New York, mus- 
tered in as assistant 

surgeon 46 

detailed to assist at Sec- 
ond Division Hospital... 68 
captain, mustered out 82 

CAMP ALGER, Virginia 58 

Camp Black, Hempstead 

Plains, New York. 45 

48, 50, 58, 68, 75, 81 
Camp Hardin, Averill Park, 

New York 74, 77 

sick soldiers at, annoyed 

by sightseers 75 

passed into history 78 

Camp Thomas, Kentucky 55 

Carpenter, Brigadier-General 
Louis H., U. S. A., Fourth 

Army Corps 52, 53, 54 

56, 62, 66, 67 

Carpenter's Brigade 54 

Case, Private Charles Irving, 

, company C, injured 58 

Casey, Private James L., com- 
pany C, transferred to Di- 
vision Hospital Corps 60 

Central Railroad of New Jer- 
sey 50, 51 

Chapel, Private Herbert S., 

company M, died 77 

Charlotte, South Carolina 72 

Charlottesville, Virginia 72 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 51 

Chickamauga, Georgia.. 50, 52, 54 
Chickamauga Battlefield, Geor- 
gia 51 

Cincinnati, Ohio 51 

Cluett, Private George Alford, 
company A, appointed sec- 
ond lieutentant, 202d Regi- 
ment, New York Volunteers, 60 
Cluett, Private Sanford L., 
company A 55 



PAGE 

Cohoes, New York 73, 80 

Second Regiment Infantry, 
company B, Seventh 

Separate company of 48 

Coleman, Second Lieutenant 

Obed M., company L 49 

Collette, Private George F., 
company' E, transferred to 
Hospital Corps, United 

States Army. 70 

Collin, Captain Thomas Camp- 
bell, company B 48 

major 53,61, 72 

mustered in as major. 

Third Battalion 59 

mustered out of United 

States service 82 

Columbia, District of. First 

Regiment 54, 56, 60 

Columbia, South Carolina 72 

Commissary Department, 

United States Army 54 

Company A 48, 50, 53, 59, 60 

61, 62, 64, 66, 70, 75, 78, 79 

thirty-four recruits f or . . . 60 
paid and mustered oiit of 

United States service ... 80 

four deaths 81 

Company B 48, 50 

53, 59, 60, 61, 62, 65 

twenty-six recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service... 80 

no deaths 81 

Company C 48, 50, 53 

57, 60, 64, 65, 68, 70, 79 

twenty-six recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service ... 80 

three deaths 81 

Company D.. 47, 48, 50, 53, 59, 63 

65, 68, 75, 76, 79, 80 

twenty-six recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service... 80 

eight deaths 81 

Company E 49, 50, 53, 59 

62, 68, 70, 76, 79 

twelve recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service ... 81 

one death 81 

Company F 49, 50, 53, 70 

twelve recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service... 81 

no deaths 81 

Company G 49, 50 

53, 70, 76, 78, 82 

twelve recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service... 81 



Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 329 



PAGE 

Company G, no deaths 81 

Company H 49, 50, 53, 79 

twelve recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service... 81 

one death 81 

Company 1 49, 50, 53, 82 

twenty-foiir recruits for.. 60 
paid and mustered out of 

United States service ... 81 

no deaths 81 

Company K 47, 48, 50 

53, 59, 75, 79, 80 

twenty-seven recruits for, 60 
paid and mustered out of 

United States service... 81 

three deaths 81 

Company L 49, 50, 53, 61 

68, 70, 76, 77, 80 

twenty-eight recruits for, 60 • 
paid and mustered out of 

United States service... 80 

eight deaths 81 

Company M 49, 50, 53 

66, 68, 71, 76, 77 

twenty-eight recruits for, 60 
paid and mustered out of 

United States service ... 80 

four deaths 81 

Coppinger, Major-General John 

J., U. S. A 54, 56, 59, 66 

ordered to proceed to 

Porto Kico 67 

Corr (Carr), Corporal Francis 

J., company D 59 

Crippen, First Lieutenant 

George W., company F 49 

Cuban expedition, first 54 

Curry, Major M. B 69 

DALTON FORD ROAD, 

Chickamauga battlefield .... 51 
Daniels, Private Frank H., 

eompan.y E, died 79 

Danville, Virginia 72 

Davis, Captain Loyal L., com- 
pany K 48, 56, 60 

Denmark, South Carolina 72 

Department of the East 71 

Dewey, Private Prank, com- 
pany D, died 76 

District of Columbia, First 

Regiment 54, 56, 60 

Division Hospital Corps 60 

Dodge, First Lieutenant Delos 

M., company G 49 

Dunspaugh, Captain Merrill 

M., company D 48, 56, 60 

EASTERBROOK, CHAPLAIN 
EDMUND P., commenced 
ministrations to the 

Regiment 68 



PAGE 

Easterbrook, Chaplain Edmund 
P., paid and mustered 
out of United States ser- 
vice 80 

commissioned chaplain 

202nd Regiment, New 

York Vohmteers 82 

Eddy, Lieutenant Wilbur, 
company G, commissioned 
lieutenant Twelfth Regi- 
ment, New York Volun- 
teers 49, 78, 82 

Edson, Major J. J., Jr., United 

States Volunteers 78 

Eighteenth Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, 
New York, designated as 

company K . .^ 46 

of Glens Falls, TVew York 48 

Engineer Corps 55 

Everett city, Georgia 72 

FERNANDINA, FLORIDA.. 64, 65 

66, 67, 68, 69, 70 
72, 75, 76, 77 
Fifteenth Battalion, Third 
Brigade, National Guard, 

New York 45, 47, 49 

Fifth' Regiment Artillery.. 75, 76 
Fifth Regiment Infantry, 

Maryland 52, 54; 56 

Ohio 66, 67 

First Army Corps 52 

First Battalion, Second Regi- 
ment, National Guard 

Volunteers 61 

62, 64, 72, 78 
Second Regiment Infantry, 
New Yotk Volun- 
teers, quartered in 
Germania Hall, Troy, 

New York 74 

fifteen deaths 81 

First Regiment Artillery, U. 

S. A 75 

First Regiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 67 

First Regiment Infantry, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, 54, 56, 60 

Florida 67 

Ohio 67 

First Regiment United States 

Volunteer Engineers 53 

55, 56, 62 

Florida 75 

First Regiment 67 

Florida Central and Peninsular 

Railroad 53, 64, 65 

Flower, Hon. Roswell P., gift 

of, to regiment 69 

Flower Hospital, Fernandina, 
Florida 69, 77 



330 Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State Voltjntebks. 



PAGE 

Flyitn, Private John, Jr., com- 
pany A 55 

Port Brooke, Florida 54 

Fort McPherson, Georgia 63 

Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia, 68 
70, 71, 76, 80 

Fort Tampa, Florida 63 

Forty-sixth Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 
York, designated com- 
pany H 46 

of Amsterdam, New York, 49 
Fourteenth Battalion, Third 
Brigade, National Guard, 

New York 45, 47, 48 

Fourteenth Eegiment Infan- 
try, New York Volunteers.. 52 
Fourth Army Corps. . 54, 63, 66, 67 

Second Division 66 

Third -Division 66, 71 

Fowler, Major E. S 80 

Franklin Junction, Va 73, 74 

Frear, Private Charles W., 
company A, commis- 
sioned second lieutenant 
company E, 203rd Eegi- 
ment, New York Volun- 
teers 66 

resigned 66 

French, Private Windsor P., 
company L, commissioned 
second lieutenant in 201st 
Eegiment, New York Volun- 
teers 60 

Q. A. R. VETERANS 73 

Galbraith, First Lieutenant 

William J., company D 48 

Gale, Captain Edward Court- 
land, company A 48, 66 

Gatchell, Lieutenant George 

W., Fifth Artillery 76 

'General Field Hospital 57, 58 

General Hospital for Insane at 

Washington, D. C 76 

Germauia Hall, Troy, First 
Battalion, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers, quartered in 74 

Gillespie, General George L., 

U. S. A 71, 74 

Glens Falls, New York 73 

Second Kegiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers, 
Fourteenth Battalion, 
company K, Eighteenth 
Separate Company of... 48 

State armory 81 

Goo, Private James W., com- 
pany G, injured 58 

Gould, Henry W., company P, 
injured 58 



PAGE 

Grant, Colonel Frederick Dent, 
Fourteenth New York Vol- 
unteer Infantry 53 

Gray, First Lieutenant Emmet 

J., company 1 49 

Green, Private Griswold, com- 
pany A, appointed second 
lieutenant 301st Eegiment, 

New York Volunteers 60 

Greene, First Lieutenant 

George deB., company E, 49 
appointed acting assistant 

adjutant-general 52 

mustered in as battalion 

adjutant 59 

mustered out of United 

States service 81 

Greenough, Captain Ernest A., 

company I .- 49 

commissioned first lieuten- 
ant company I, Twelfth 
New York Volunteers ... 82 
Grobecker (Groebecker), Pri- 
vate Andrew F., company C, 
injured 58 

HALL, HECTOR, D. D., chap- 
lain . . . 47 

resigned 55 

honorably discharged from 
United States service... 56 
Hall, General Robert H., U. S. 

A 68 

Hamilton, Corporal William 

A., company C, injured 58 

Hardin, Colonel Edward E 47 

50, 52, 53, 73, 75, 76, 79, 211 
captain Seventh United 
States Infantry, ap- 
pointed colonel volun- 
teers 45 

oath administered to and 
assumed command of 

regiment 46 

bids regiment good- 
bye , 77, 78 

relinquished commission.. 83 
Hare, Private George L., Jr., 
company A, appointed sec- 
ond lieutenant 303nd Eegi- 
ment, New York Volunteers, 60 
Harper, Private John, com- 
pany C, injured 58 

Hayner, Corporal Horatio H., 

company A, died 78 

Hempstead Plains, New 

York 45, 82 

Hills, Captain Elbridge R., 
Fifth United States Artil- 
lery 75, 79 

Hillsborough bay, Florida .... 54 



Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 381 



PAGE 

Hislop, Private Thomas W., 
company A, mustered in 
as battalion adjutant... 59 
lieutenant, battalion adju- 
tant, appointed regi- 
mental commissary 66 

lieutenant, mustered out of 
United States service.... 83 
Hogan, Daniel J., mustered in 

as sergeant company K, 48 
appointed second lieuten- 
ant . 48 

sergeant, mustered in as 

second lieutenant .. 59, 

Eolden, Private James A., 

company L, died 77 

Hoosick Falls, Nevy York 73 

Thirty-second Separate 

Company of 49 

Sitate armory at 80 

Hospital Corps, United States 

Army ^ 70 

Hudson, Brigadier-G e n e r a 1 
Joseph K., United States 

Volunteers 62 

Hughes, First Lieutenant 

George, compa'ny'H 49 

Hunisville, Alabama 69, 70 

Hutton, Second Lieutenant 
Donald J., company 

E . , 49, 62 

mustered in as iEirst lieu- 
tenant 59 

JERSEY CITY, NEW JER= 
SEV . . . 50 

Jessup, Private Frederick W., 
company D, died. 79 

Jones, Private Alson L., com- 
pany M, transferred to Di- 
vision Hospital Corps 60 

Jones, Private John S., com- 
pany F, injured 58 

Jordan, Private Elmer J., com- 
pany L, died. 70 

KENNEDY, PRIVATE WIL= 

LIAM S., company A, died.. 75 
Killian, , Private John, com.- 

pany E 76 

discharged from regiment, 76 
Kinne, Private George W., 
company D, transferred to 
First Eegiment, United 
States Volunteer Engineers, 56 
Kittayama, Frank..'........... 68 

Kline, Brigadier-General Jacob, 

U. S. A.. :'.:.....:... 66 

ill '.:'..'.' 68 



FAQE 

LANE, PRIVATE LELAND T., 

transferred to First 
Eegiment, United States 
Volunteer Engineers ... 63 
company A, comrdissioned 
second lieutenant 202nd 

Regiment 63 

resigned 63 

Leffingwell, Musician Henry K., 

company A 70 

Legnard, Private Frank S., 

company L, died 66 

remains of, sent to Sara- 
toga Springs for inter- 
ment . . . .: 66 

Lester, Major James W 50 

53, 61, 68, 78 

mustered in. 46 

commanding Fourteenth 
Battalion, National 

Guard, New Ydrk 47 

paid and mustered out of 
United Sttates service ... 80 
Lincoln, General , James Kush; 68 
Lloyd, Lieutenant-Colonel 

James H 50, 61, 72 

major Thirteenth ..Bat- 
talion, appointed lieuten- 
ant-colonel . . , 45 

mustered in • , 46 

commanding Thirteenth 
Battalion, National 

Guard, Nevy York 47 

mustered out of United 

States service 82 

Lockharl, Private "William J., 
company G, transferred to 
United States Volunteer 

Signal Corps . . .' 76 

Long Island City, Long 

Island 50 

Lynchburg, Virginia. , . 73 

Lytle Station, Georgia.. 51 

MAQILL, PRIVATE JAMfeS 

S., company A, discharged . . 78 
Maley, Private John W., com- 
pany B, transferred to Di- 
vision Hospital Corps 60 

Martin, Sergeant-Major Wil- 
liam Swift, Sixth Sepa- 
rate Conipany 47 

sergeant-major, mustered 

in as battalion adjutant, 59 
mustered out of United 

States service 83 

Masten, Second Lieutenant 

Daniel W., company H 49 

Maxcy, Second Lieutenant Car- 
foil Lewis, company 

A .48, 59 

resigned 55 



332 Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Maxcy, Second Lieutenant Car- 
roll Lewis, honorably dis- 
charged from United States 

service 65 

McArthur, Private William H., 

company A, died 70 

McBride, Private Andrew, com- 
pany C, injured 58 

McChesney, Quartermaster- 
Sergeant Calvin S., company 
A, mustered in as second 

lieutenant company A 59 

McGaffin, First Lieutenant 

John J., cQmpany B 48 

mustered in as captain 59 

McNair, Corporal Frederick 
Park, company L, com- 
missioned second lieu- 
tenant, 202nd Regiment, 
New York Volunteers... 80 

died 80 

McNamara, Private Thomas 

W., company L, died 76 

McNeil (McNeill), First Ser- 
geant Thomas J., mustered 
in as second lieutenant com- 
pany B 62 

Mead, Captain Harry, assist- 
' ant surgeon Sixty-iSfth 
Kegiment, New York Volun- 
teers SO 

Mohawk, Thirty-first Separate 

Company of 49 

State armory at 81 

Morrison, Private Charles H., 

company D, died 68 

Morton, Private Frederick E., 

company C, discharged 66 

Mott, First Lieutenant Seldon 

W., company K 48 

Mount Pleasant, New York... 79 
Murphy, Private Edward 2d, 

company A 51 

commissioned captain and 
assistant adjutant-gen- 
eral 51 

discharged . . . . , 62 

NATIONAL GUARD, NEW 

YORK 36,39,41,43, 45 

Second Battery. 46 

Second Begiment Infantry: 

Thirteenth Battalion . . 47 
Fourteenth Battalion, 

Third Brigade..^. 45, 47 
Fifteenth Battalion, 

Third Brigade.... 45, 47 
Sixth Separate Com- 
pany 47 

Twenty-first Separate 
Company 47 



PAGE 

National Military ' Park, 

Chickamauga, Georgia 51 

Nebraska Volunteers, Second 

Regiment Infantry 53 

Nellis, Private Webster W., 

company H, died 79 

New Jersey, Central Railroad 

of 50 

New York, ladies of Pension 
Bureau, Washington, en- 
tertained regiment 73 

National Guard 36 

39, 41, 42, 45 

Second Battery 46 

Second Regiment In- 
fantry: 
Thirteenth Bat- 
talion 47 

Fourteenth Bat- 
talion, Third 

Brigade 45, 47 

Fifteenth Bat- 

talion, Third 

Brigade 45, 47 

Sixth Separate 

Company 47 

Twenty-first Separ- 
ate Company.... 47 

New York State 45, 46 

60, 61, 69, 71, 72, 74 

adjutant-general of 74 

New York Volunteers, Second 

Regiment Infantry 51 

54, 55, 56, 58, 62, 63 
66, 69, 72, 76, 77, 156 

history of 45-83 

composed of three bat- 
talions of National 

Gvfard, New York 45 

physical examination of . . . 46 
., reviewed by Governor 

Frank S. Black 46 

list of officers and com- 
panies of 47-50 

started for Chickamauga, 

Georgia 50 

ordered to Tampa, Florida, 53 
marched to Rossville, Ten- 
nessee 53 

list of officers of, mustered 

in at Tampa, Florida ... 59 
mustered by Colonel Har- 
din 60 

ordered to Fernandina, 

Florida 64 

dinner given by oificers of, 67 
received hospital supplies 

from friends 69 

to go to Sand Lake, New 

York 70 

transferred to Department 
of the East j\ 



Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State VoiUNTBEES. 333 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers, Second 
Eegiment Infantry: 
welcome at Troy, New 

York 73 

last evening parade of 77 

officers messed for last 

time 78 

companies assembled at 
respective armories to 

await muster-out. ... 79 

physical examination of 

members of ; . 80 

Thirteenth Battalion, list 
of officers and com- 
panies of 48 

company A, Sixth Sep- 
arate Company, 

of Troy 48 

list of officers of, 48 
company B, Seventh 
Separate Com- 
pany of Cohoes . . 48 
list of officers of, 48 
company C, Twelfth 
Separate Com- 
pany of Troy. . . 48 
list of , officers of, 48 
company D, Twenty- 
first Separate 
Company, of 

Troy 48 

list of officers of, 48 
Fourteenth Battalion, list 
of officers and com- 
panies of 48—49 

company I, Ninth Sep- 
arate Company 

of Whitehall 49 

list of officers of, 49 
company K, Eig-hteenth 
Separate Com- 
pany, of Glens 

Falls 48 

list of officers of, 48 
company L, Twenty- 
second Separate 
Company, of 
Saratoga Springs 49 
liSit of officers of, 49 
company M, Thirty- 
second Separate 
Company, of 
Hoosick Falls .. 49 
list of officers of, 49 
Fifteenth Battalion, list 
of officers and com- 
panies of 49 

company E, Thirty- 
sixth Separate 
Company, of 

Schenectady 49 

list of officers of, 49 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers, Second 
Regiment Infantry: 
Fifteenth Battalion: 

company F, Thirty- 
seventh Separate 
Company, of 

Schenectady 49 

list of officers of, 49 
company G, Thirty- 
first Separate 
Company, of 

Mohawk 49 

list of officers of, 49 
company H, Forty- 
sixth Separate 
Company, of 
Amsterdam .... 49 
list of officers of, 49 
Twelfth Regnnent Infan- 
try 82 

Fourteenth Regiment In- 
fantry 52 

Twenty-second Regiment 

Infantry 47 

Sixty-fifth Regiment In- 
fantry 80 

Sixty-ninth Regiment In- 
fantry 54, 67, 72 

Seventy-first Regiment In- 
fantry 79 

Two Hundred and First 

Regiment Infantry 60 

Two Hundred and Second 

Regiment Infantry 60 

80, 82 
Two Hundred and Third 

Regiment Infantry 66 

Nichols, Private Frederick P. 
(Edward), Company C, 

killed 57 

remains of, sent to Troy 

for interment 58 

Ninth Separate Company 

designated company 1 46 

Ninth Regiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 67 

Ninth Separate Company, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, of 

Whitehall, New York 49 

Northern Alabama 69 

O'BRIEN, PRIVATE MI- 
CHAEL J., company C, died. 70 

O'Brien, Private Pierce J., com- 
pany C, transferred to Di- 
vision Hospital Corps 60 

Ohio, First Regiment 67 

Olena, Private Edgar J., com- 
pany D, died 76 

One Hundred and Fifty-seventh 
Regim^ent, Indiana 67 



334 Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

PARKER, PRIVATE ROB= 
ERTSON A., company L, died 76 

Parkersburg, Virginia 51 

Parks, Corporal Frank L., Jr., 

company K, died 79 

Parsons, Sergeant Charles E., 
company E, mustered in as 
second lieutenant company 

E 63 

Paymaster's' Department 69 

Pension Bureau, Washington, 
New York ladies of, enter- 
tained regiment 73 

Phelan, Adjutant James J., 
Thirteenth Battalion, Na- 
tional Gua-rd, New York, 47 
mustered in as captain and 

adjutant 70 

mustered out 82 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.... 51 
Philadelphia and Reading Rail- 
way 50, 51 

Pinar del Rio, Cuba 61 

Plant System, road of the 64 

Port Tampa,- Florida. ... 54, 59; 60 

Porto Rico 67 

Potter, Second Lieutenant- 
Louis E., company M 49 

Powers, Private Auer E., com- 
pany M, died 71 

Purman, Corporal William M., 
company E, transferred 
First United State Volunteer 

Engineers — 58 

Putpam, Private Frank A., 
company M, died 76 

QUARTERMASTER'S DE- 
PARTMENT 72 

Queen and Crescent Railway.. 51 

RICH, CAPTAIN AMOS 
COOKE, company L, 49 

Roach, Private Royal T., com- 
pany K, died.. SO 

Rome and Columbus Railroad, 51 

Rossville, Tennessee, Reginient, 
marched to S3 

RufEner, Captain Ernest L., as- 
sistant surgeon Sixty-fifth 
Regiment, New York Volun- 
teers , 80 

Ryan, Private William P., com- 
pany C, injured 58 

SAND LAKE, NEW YORK. ... 74 

Santiago, Cuba 61, 62 

yellow fever at. 63 

Saratoga Springs, New York, 
Twenty-second Separate 

Company of...;.. 49, 66, 73 

State armory at 80 



PAGB 

Schenectady, New York... 73, 79 
coiapany E, Thirty-sixth 

Separate Company of . . . 49 
company F, Thirty-seventh 
Separate Company of . . . 49 

State armory at 81 

Schermerhorn, Private Louis 

C, company F, injured 58 

Schwarte, First Lieutenant 

John A., company L 49 

Scidmore, Private William W., 

company C, injured 58 

Searing, Private' William J., 

company L, died 70 

Second Battalion 61 

62, 65, 72, 78 
Second Infantry, two deaths.'. 81 
Second and Third Battalions 
quartered In Statfe armory, 

Troy 74 

Second Battery,. National 

Guard, New York 46 

Second Division, Fourth Army 

Corps . . 66 

hospital at Fernandina, 

Florida . . 68 

Second Regiment Cavalry, U. 

S. A 67 

Second Regiment Infantry, 

Nebraska . . 53, 54 

Second Regiment Infantry, 

New York Volunteers. . . 51 

54, 55, 56, 58, 62, 63 

66, 69, 72, 76, 77, 156 

history of 45-83 

composed' of three battal- 
ions of National Guard, 

New York 45 

physical examination of 

members of 46 

reviewed by Governor 

Prank S. Black 46 

list of ofBcers and com- 
panies of 47-50 

started' for Chickamauga, 

Georgia 50 

ordered to Tampa, Florida, 53 
marched to Rossville, Ten- 
nessee 53 

list of officers of mustered 

in at Tampa, Florida.... 59 
mustered by Colonel Har- 
din 60 

ordered to Fernandina, 

Florida 64 

dinner given by officers of, 67 
received hospital supplies 

from friends 69 

to go to Sand Lake, New 

York 70 

transferred to Department 
of the East. ..'... 71 



Indbx — Second Rhgimhnt, N. Y. State Volunteers. 335 



PAGE 

Second Begiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers: 
accorded a welcome at 

Troy, New York 73 

last evening parade of.... 77 
officers messed for last 

time 78 

companies assembled at 
respective armories to 

await muster-out 79 

physical examination of 

members of 80 

Thirteenth Battalion, list 

of officers and 

companies of . . . 48 

company A, Sixth 

Separate Co., 

of Troy 48 

list of officers 

of 48 

company B, 

Seventh Sep- 
arate Com- 
pany, of 

Cohoes 48 

list of officers 

of 48 

company C, 

Twelfth Sep- 
arate Com- 
pany, of 

Troy 48 

list of officers 

of 48 

company D, 

Twenty-first 
Separate Co., 

of Troy 48 

list of officers 

of 48 

Fourteenth Battalion, 
list of officers 
and companies 

of 48-49 

company I, Ninth 
Separate Co., 
of White- 
hall 49 

list of officers 

of 49 

company K, 

Eighteenth 
Separate Co., 
of Glens 

Falls 48 

list of officers 

of 48 

company L, 
Twenty-sec- 
ond Separ- 
ate Company, 
of Saratoga 
Springs 49 



PAGE 

Second Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers: 
Fourteenth Battalion: 
company L, list of 

officers of 49 

company M, 

Thirty-s e c- 
ond Separ- 
ate Com- 
p a n y, of 
Hoosick Falls 49 
list of officers 

of 49 

Fifteenth Battalion, 
list of offi- 
cer s and 
companies of 49 
company B, 
Ttirty-sixth 
Separate Co., 
of Schenec- 
tady 49 

list of officers 

of 49 

company F, 

37th Separate 

Company, of 

Schenectady 49 

list of officers 

of : 49 

company G, 

Thirty-first 
Separate Co., 
of Mohawk.. 49 
list of officers 

of 49 

company E, 
Forty-sixtli 
Separate Co., 
of Amster- 
dam 49 

list of officers 

of 49 

Seventh Begiment Infantry, U. 

S. A 47, 82 

Seventh Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 
York, designated com- 
pany B 46 

of Cohoes, New York 48 

Seventy-first Regiment Infan- 
try, New York Volunteers.. 79 
Shafter, General William R., 

U. S. A 54 

Sheary, Private Michael F., 
company A, commissioned 
paymaster, with rank of 
major. United States Volun- 

ShefEold (Sheffield), Private 
Delvert, company F, injured, 58 

Sheffold, William A., company 
F, deserted 70 



33C Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Shermali, First Lieutenant 

Henry P., company A 48 

Signal Corps, United States 

Volunteers 76. 

Simmoria (Simmons), Private 
Frederick C, company C, in- 
jured 58 

Sisters of St. Joseph, building' 

of turned into a hospital ... 69 
Sixth Regiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 67 

Sixth Separate Company, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 
designated company A . . 46 

of Troy, New York 47, 48 

Sixty-fifth Regiment Infantry, 

New York Volunteers 80 

Sixth-ninth Regiment Infan- 
try, New York Volun- 
teers 54, 67, 73 

and Second New York, 
friendship between in- 
creased 71 

Snyder, Brigadier-General Si- 
mon, U. S. A 54 

South Glens Falls, New York, 79 

Southern Florida 69 

Southern Railroad 53 

Stafford, Captain James, as- 
sistant surgeon Seventy-first 
Regiment, New York Volun- 
teers 79 

State armory at Amsterdam, 

New York 81 

Glens Falls, New York 81 

Hoosick Falls, New York, 80 

Mohawk, New York 81 

Saratoga Springs, New 

York 80 

Schenectady, New York... 81 

Troy, New York 80 

refreshments served to 
returning soldiers at, 73 

Whitehall, New York 81 

Stevens, Captain Frank L., 

company M 49 

Story, Major John P., U. S. A., 
inspected and located camp 

at Averill Park 71 

Sullivan, Second Lieutenant 

Michael, company D 48 

mustered in 47 

TAMPA, FLORIDA. . 53, 54, 56, 61 

63, 65, 75, 81 

regiment ordered to 52 

terrific thunder storm 

at 57-58 

Tampa Camp, Florida 63, 66 

Tampa Heights, Florida 56 

Tenth Regiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 67 



Thayer, Private Charles j L., 
company D, died. 



•/■. 



63 



Thedford Ford Road, Chicka- 

mauga battlefield / 51 

Third Battalion, Second iRegi- 

ment Infantry.. 61, 64, 78, 80 

mustered in 46 

mustered out of United 

States service 81 

fifteen deaths..., 81 

Third Division, Fourth Army 

Corps 62, 66, 67, 71 

hospital, Fernandina, Flor- 
ida 70, 76 

Third Regiment, Cavalry, U. S. 

A 67 

Infantry, Ohio 67 

Pennsylvania 67, 71 

Thirteenth Battalion, Third 
Brigade, National Guard, 

New York 45, 47, 48 

Thirty-first Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 
York, designated com- 
pany G 46 

of Mohawk, New York 49 

Thirty-secon-d Regiment, In- 
fantry, Michigan 66, 67 

Thirty-second Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, 
New York, of Hoosick 

Falls 49 

designated company M 46 

Thirty-sixth Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, 
New York, designated 

company E 46 

of Schenectady, New York, 49 
Thirty-seventh Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, 
New York, designated 

company F 46 

of Schenectady, New York, 49 
Thompson, Second Lieutenant 

William L., company A, 62 
mustered in as second lieu- 
tenant company B 59 

commissioned second lieu- 
tenant 201st Regiment, 
New York Volunteers... 61 

resigned 61 

Todd, Private Hiram C, com- 
pany L, appointed second 
lieutenant company A, 202nd 
Regiment, New York Infan- 
try 61 

Townsend, First Lieutenant 
Rufus Martin, company 

C 48 

appointed chief commis- 
sary of subsistence 56 



Index — Second Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 337 



PAGE 

Townsend, First Lieutenant 
Rufus Martin, appointed 
commissary of subsist- 
ence. United States Vol- 
unteer service 79 

discharged from United 

States service 79 

Treanor (Trainor), Captain 
John Patrick, company 

C 48, 68 

Troops A and C acted as es- 
cort 46 

Troy, Nevi' York. . 55, 63, 66, 70, 71 
73, 74, 75, 76, 78, 79, 80 

City Hospital 76, 77 

Second Kegiment Infan- 
try, New York Vol- 
unteers, Thirteenth 
Battalion: 
company A, Sixth 
Separate Company 

of 48 

company C, Twelfth 
Separate Company 

of 48 

company D, Twenty- 
first Separate Com- 
pany of 48 

State armory, refresh- 
ments served to return- 
ing soldiers at 73 

Turkey creek, Florida 53 

Twelfth Regiment Infantry, 

New York Volunteers 82 

Twelfth Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 
York, designated com- 
pany C 46 

of Troy, New York 48 

Twenty-first Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, 

New York 47 

designated company D.... 46 

of Troy, New York 48 

Twenty-second Regiment In- 
fantry, New York Volun- 
teers 47 

Twenty-second Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, 
designated company L. .. 46 
of Saratoga Springs, New 

York 49 

Two Hundred and First Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 60, 61 

Two Hundred and Second 

Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers.. 60, 61, 80, 82 

Two Hundred and Third Regi- 

ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 66 

22 



PAGE 

UNITED STATES ARMORY, 

Hospital Corps 70 

Seventh Infantry 47 

service 55 76, 79, 80, 81, 82 

Volunteer Army 45 

Volunteer Engineers, First 52 

55, 56, 63 

volunteer service 79 

Volunteer Signal Corps 75 

Volunteers 39 

42, 45, 55, 62, 78 

VAN DEUSEN, PRIVATE 

WRIGHT, company D 59 

Vunk, Captain Darwin E., com- 
pany H 49 

WADE, MAJORoQENERAL 
JAMES F., U. S. A., First 
Army Corps 53 

Wager, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant Chester G., Twenty- 
first Separate Company, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, not 
mustered in 47 

Wales, Private Edward D., 
company A, injured 58 

Walker, Private LeRoy E., 
company Ei, transferred to 
Hospital Corps, U. S. A 70 

War Department.. 51, 66, 71, 78, 79 

War, Secretary of 55, 61, 70 

Ward, Lieutenant Philip R., 
Fifth Artillery 76 

Warren, Private Eugene, com- 
pany A 55 

Washington, D. C 51, 62, 64, 72 

general hospital for insane 
at 76 

Watson, Private Worden A., 
company G, discharged 70 

Wells, Second Lieutenant Al- 
bert, company F 49 

West, Private Tracy E., com- 
pany L, died 68 

Whalen, Private John J., com- 
pany C 65 

White, Seccfnd Lieutenant Ed- 
ward J., company B 48 

mustered in as first lieu- 
tenant company .B 59 

Whitehall, New York, Ninth 

Separate Company of... 49 
State armory 81 

Williamson, Private Esek B., 
company A, appointed sec- 
ond lieutenant 201st Regi- 
ment, New York Volun- 
teers .: eft 



338 Index — Second Ehgiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Wilson, First Lieutenant John 
S., appointed assistant 
surgeon Second Kegi- 
ment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers . , 47 

resigned 47 

appointed surgeon Twenty- 
second Begiment Infan- 
try, New York Volun- 
teers 47 

Private Warren P., com- 
pany K, died 75 

Witherstine, Captain Horatio 

P., company G 49 

Wood, First Iiientenant Walter 

A., Jr., company M 49 

appointed brigade commis- 
sary S2 

on ten days' sick leave.... 66 



PAGE 

Woodcock, Corporal Samiiel 
C, company A, died ; . . . 79 

Wright, Lieutenant Sylvester 
W., not mustered in 47 

Wylie, Sergeant John L., com- 
pany D, died 75 

YATES, MAJOR AUSTIN 

A 60, 72, 78 

mustered in 46 

commanding Fifteenth 

Battalion, National 
Guard, New York.... 47, 49 
, left Tampa on recruiting 

service 56 

mustered out of United 
States service 81 



INDEX. 



Sd Regiment New York State Volunteers. 



For the 'sake of oonTenience, each one of the five military orfcanizations included fa> this 
report, has been indexed separately. The general ind«z which embraces the entire report 
begins on pajce 381. — State Histoiuan. • 



PAGE 

ALBANY, New York 83, 107 

Allen farm, Virginia 92, 95 

on Difficult Bun, 'First 
Brigade, excepting 
Twenty-second Kansas 
Begiment, ordered to. . . . 93 
Aqueduct bridge, Virginia.. 93, 94 

Auburn, New York 85, 125 

Second Separate Company 
of 84 

BABCOCK, CAPTAIN FRAN- 
CIS G., JR., Forty-sev- 
enth Separate Com- 
pany 84, 85 

company K, military rec- 
ord of... 120-121 

mustered out 121 

Bailey, First Lieutenant Fred- 
erick W. G., company A, 

military record of 114 

mustered out 114 

Baltimore and Ohio Eailway. . 88 
Barber, Captain Clarence 
James, Second Separa,te 

Company 84, 85 

military record of 122 

mustered out 122 

Barnett, Colonel John T., 150th 

Indiana 92 

Beach Grove, North Carolina. . 108 
Bemus (Bemis), Major and 

Surgeon William Marvin, 123 
mustered into United 
States service as sur- 
geon 86 

military record of 110 

mustered out 110 

Black, Governor Frank S.. 87, 109 
Boston, Massachusetts, First 
Corps Cadets 109 



FAOK 

Brainard, First Lieutenant 
James S., company F, 

military record of 118 

mustered out 118 

Chaplain James Wilson... 133 
military record of.... Ill 

mustered out Ill 

Brayton, Sergeant-Major Clar- 
ence E., military record 

of Ill 

died 124 

commissioned second lieu- 
tenant 127 

Bristoe, Virginia 100 

Broad Bun, Virgfinia '. . 101, 102 

creek, Virginia 100 

Brovm, First Lieutenant Thur- 

ber A., company L 106 

military record of 121 

mustered out 121 

Bull Bun creek, Virginia 98 

99, 100 
temporary bridge con- 
structed over 99 

Bull Bun field, Virginia, regi- 
ment arrived at 98 

Burkes Station, Virginia, regi- 
ment arrived at 96 

left camp at 97 

Butler, Captain John G., com- 
pany C .'. 85, 93, 97 

Forty-first Separate Com- 
pany 85 

to Syracuse to receive re- 
cruits 91 

military record of 115-116 

mustered out 116 

Butler, Captain Mighells Bach- 
man, Forty-second Sepa- 
rate Company, nominat- 
ed major 83, 84 



340 Index — Third Eegimbnt, N. Y. State Voluntbees. 



PAGE 

Butler, Captain Mighells Bach- 
man, mustered into 
United States service as 

major 87 

major 97, 104, 106, 123 

military record of 108 

mustered out 108 

CAMP ALGER (RUSSELL 

A.), Falls Churcli, Vir- 
ginia 87, 88, 89, 90, 104 

abandoned on account of 

increase of sickness 94 

Camp Black, Hempstead 
Plains, Long Island, New- 
York 84, 85, 87, 89 

Camp Meade, Middletown, 

Pa.. 104, 105, 127 

First Battalion arrived at, 106 
Second Battalion arrived 

at 106 

Campbil farm, Virginia, on 
vyliicli Camp Alger wsls lo- 
cated 88 

Chain Bridge, Virginia 93 

Charles, First Lieutenant Wil- 
liam S., company K, mili- 
tary record of 121 

mustered out l2l 

Clifton, Virginia 99 

Company A 85, 114 

Company B 85, 87, 115 

Company C 85, 105, 111, 115 

detailed for guard duty at 
Dunn Loring, Virginia.. 93 
Company D. . . 85, 86, 87, 93, 95, 137 
mustered in United States 

service 86 

Company E 86, 87, 117 

tv^enty'five men of and 
Captain McBean enter- 
tained by citizens of 

Warrentown 104 

Twenty-second Eegiment, 
National Guard, Neve 

York .^ 109, 136 

Fifty-fourth Eegiment, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 114 
Company F, Third Eegiment 
Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 86, 118 

• detailed for guard duty at 
Dunn Loring, Virginia , . 93 
detailed to round up the 

stragglers 97 

Forty-eighth Eegiment 116 

Company G, Third Eegiment 
Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 86, 118 

detailed as provost guard, 99 

Company H... 86, 103, 111, 119, 124 

acted as color company, 90 



PAGE 

Company H, Seventh Eegiment, 
National Guard, New 

York 123 

Fifty-fourth Eegiment, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 122 
Fourth Eegiment, National 

Guard, New Jersey 117 

Company I, Third Eegiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 85, 93, 95, 120 

Company K 85, 93, 95, 120 

Company L.. 85, 93, 95, 106, 114, 121 
acted as escort to colors . . 90 

Company M 85, 114, 132 

detailed as provost guard.. 101 
Congress passed an act to in- 
crease the army 83 

Cotton, Frederick E., enlisted, 114 
Crosby, Captain Murray Was- 
son, company H, military 

record of ; 119 

mustered out 119 

Crouch estate, Virginia 98 

DAVIS, BRIQADIER=QEN= 
ERAL GEORGE W., U. S. A., 89 

Delaney Homestead, Virginia, 102 
Deveaux, Second Lieutenant 
Francis C, company E, 

military record of 118 

mustered out 118 

Difficult Eun, Virginia 95 

Doyle, Brigadier-General Peter 
C, Fourth Brigade, National 
Guard, directed to organize 

one regiment J 83 

Dunn Loring, V irginia 87 

88, 94, 95, 105 

regiment ordered to 87 

companies C and F detailed 
for guard duty at 93 

EARLY, JUBAL A., Confeder- 
ate general in 1861 98 

Eigabroadt, Second Lieutenant 

Frederick T., company A, 99 

military record of 114 

mustered out 114 

Eighth Eegiment Cavalry, U. 

S. A 113 

Eighth Separate Company, of 

Eochester 84, 114 

became company A, Third 

Eegiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Elmira, New York 85 

Thirteenth Separate Com- 
pany of 84 

breakfast served to at, 106 
Erie Eailway 84 



Index — Third Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 341 



PAGE 

Escort to the colors, ceremony 
of 90 

FALES, CAPTAIN HENRY M., 

company G 86, 97 

Twenty-fifth Separate 

Company 84 

military record of 118 

mustered out 118 

Falls Church, Virginia 88 

90, 93, 94 
Field and stafE of regiment 
mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Fifth Kegiment Artillery, U. 

S. A 107 

Cavalry, U. S. A 86 

Infantry, U. S. A 113 

Fifty-fourth Regiment, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 

company E 114 

company H 123 

xirsso Battalion, Third Kegi- 
ment 88, 91 

ordered out as provost 

guard 97 

arrived at Ciimp Meade.,.. 106 

First Brigade, excepting 

Twenty-second Kansas 

Regiment, ordered to 

iiUen farm on Difficult 

Run 92 

march of to Allen farm un- 
justly criticised 92 

reviewed by Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Mark W. Sheaf e 93 

First Corps Cadets, Boston, 

Massachusetts 109 

First Division, Second Army 

Corps 94 

hospital ambulance from, 
overturned in a stream. . 105 
First Separate Company, Third 
Regiment Infantry, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 

of Rochester 84, 90, 111 

112, 113, 119, 120, 124 
became company H, Third 

Regiment Infantry 86 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Fort Myer, Virginia, hospital 

at 105 

Forty-eighth Regiment, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 

company A 116 

company F 116 

Forty-ninth Regiment, Na- 
tional Guard, New York.... 108 
Forty-first Separate Company, 

of Syracuse 93, 111, 116 



PAGE 

Forty-first Separate Company, 
became company C, 

Third Regiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Forty-second Separate Com- 
pany, of Niagara Palls.. 83 
84, 87, 108, 117, 118 
became company E, Third 

Regiment 86 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Forty-third Separate Com- 
pany, of Clean 84, 93 

113, 120 
became company I, Third 

Regiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Forty-seventh Separate Com- 
pany, of Hornellsville. .. 84 
93 113, 120, 121 
became con3.pany K, Third 

Regiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Forty-eighth Separate Com- 
pany, of Oswego 85 

93, 108, 116, 117 
became company D, Third 

Regiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Fourth Regiment, New Jersey 

National Guard, company H, 117 
Franchot, Captain Richard H., 
Forty-third Separate 

Company 84, 85 

military record of 120 

mustered out 120 

Fraser (Prazer), Principal Mu- 
sician John E., company 

L 133 

military record of 113 

mustered out 113 

GAINESVILLE, Virginia 102 

Garfield Hospital, Washington, 

D. C 105 

. Gasper, Second Lieutenant 
George E., company B, 

military record of 115 

mustered out 115 

Gatchell, Lieutenant George 
W., Fifth United States Ar- 
tillery 107 

Geneva, New York 85 

Thirty-fourth Separate 

Company of 84 

Gill, Private Thomas D., com- 
pany D, died 127 



342 Index — Third Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Gould, Color Bearer Sergeant 
Emmet M., military rec- 
ord of 113 

mustered out 113 

Graham, Major-General Wil- 
liam M., U. S. A 89, 93, 105 

Grenville, Second Lieutenant 
Geojge A., company H, 

military record of 120 

mustered out 120 

Gross, Colonel George P., Third 
Missouri Infkntry Volun- 
teers in Confederate service 

during Civil War. 89 

Grosvehor, Second Lieutenant 
George H., company K, 
military record of ..... . 121 

mustered out 121 

Guilfords Mills, Virginia 100 

creek at 100 

HAOER, CHIEF MUSICIAN 

ARNOLD F 113, 123 

military record of........ 112 

mustered out 112 

Hall, Captain Albert Morti- 
mer, company D 85, 116 

mustered as major 87 

major 93, 94, 95, 105, 123 

commanding Third Bat- 
talion 87 

military record of 108 

mustered out 108 

Happoldt estate, Virginia 98 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 137 

Hart, Captain and Adjutant 
Stephen P., Tvyenty-second 
Eegiment, National Guard, 
detailed by Governor as ad- 
jutant 87 

Hempsted Plains, Long Island, 

New Y^rk 84 

Henderson, Daniel B., company 

D, enlisted ..,. 114 

Henderson, Captain Henry B., 
Eighth Separate Com- 
pany 84, 85 

military record of 114 

mustered out .• . 114 

Hills, Captain Elbridge E., 
Fifth United States Artil- 
lery '. 106 

Hodgman, Assistant Surgeon 

► Alfred Frederick 133 

lieutenant, mustered into 
United States service as 

surgeon 86 

military record of 110 

mustered out , 110 

Hoffman, Colonel Edvyard Mor- 
ris 89, 93, 97, 100, 101 

104, 106, 123, 135, 126 



PAGE 

Hoffman, Colonel Edveard Mor- 
ris, appointed colonel, 
Third Eegiment, Na- 
tional Guard 83 

mentioned . ■ ,. 84 

acknowledges receipt of 
colors presented to his 

regfiment 90 

presented with loving cup, 106 

military record of 107 

adjutant-general, New York 

State 107 

died 107 

Holland, First Lieutenant John 
B., company M, military 

record of 122-123 

resigned . . ■ 123 

Hornellsville, New York 85 

Forty-seventh Separate 

Company of 84 

Howland, Captain and Assist- 
ant Surgeon Eeeve 

■ Beecher 123 

mustered into United 
States service as surgeon 86 

military record of 110 

mustered out ,... 132 

INDIANA, One Hundred and 
Fiftieth Eegimsnt Infantry, 89 
92, 95, 105 

Inspector-General's Depart- 
ment 110 

JENNINGS, FIRST LIEUTEN= 
ANT EDQAR S., com- 
pany M, military record 

of 123 

mustered out 132 

Jersey City, New Jersey 88 

KANSAS, Twenty-second Eegi- 
ment Infantry 89, 93, 105. 

Kansas City, loving cup pre- 
sented by regiment tp Third 
Missouri regiment, now in 
public library building at. . . 106 

King, Albert J., enlisted 114 

Kirby, Lieutenant-Colonel Wil- 
liam .Maurice 133 

general inspector rifle 
practice, appointed lieu- 
tenant-colonel Third 
Eegiment, National,. 

Guard . . .., ; 83 

brigadier-general ......... 84 

mustered in United States 

service .,..., \ 87 

detailed as provost mar- 
shal-general. Second 

Army Corps . . . .' 93 

presented with loving cup, 106 



Index — Third Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 343 



PAGE 

Kirby, Lieutenant-Colonel Wil- 
liam Maurice, military 

record of 107-108 

mustered out 108 

LA ROSE, CAPTAIN AN= 

THIME WATSON.. 105, 123 

military record of 110 

mustered out 110 

Lentz, Second Lieutenant 
Charles B., company G, 

military record of 119 

mustered out 119 

Lewis, Hospital Steward 

George J 133 

military record of..' 112 

mustered out 112 

Long Bridge, Virginia 88 

Long Island City, Long Island, 88 
Long Island Kailway 87 

MANASSAS, Virginia.. 94, 97, 99 

battlefield 99 

Manassas Junction, Virginia.. 95 
Third Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers, 

ordered to 94 

Manassas monument, Virginia, 99 
Marks, Charles W., enlisted, 

company L 114 

Marshall estate, Virginia 96 

Mason, First Lieutenant Sam- 
uel J., company E., mili- 
tary record of 117 

mustered out 117 

Mayer, First Lieutenant George 
M., company I, military 

record of . .' 120 

mustered out 120 

Mayrand (Maynard) , George 

W., enlisted. Company C 114 

McBean, Captain Hector Wil- 
liam, company E 86 

mustered into United 

States service 87 

to Niagara Palls to receive 

recruits 91 

and twenty-five men of 
company E entertained 
by citizens of Warren- 
ton 104 

military record of 117 

mustered out 117 

McBride (MacBride), Private 
■ John, company A, enlisted . . 114 
McDonald, Second Lieutenant 
John, company D, mili- 
tary record of 117 

mustered out 117 

McKay, First Lieutenant Wil- 
liam L., company B, mili- 
tary record of 115 

mustered out 115 



PAGE 

McKinley, President William.. 

135, 126 
authorized to call for 

125,000 men 83 

made requisition on Gov- 
ernor New York State . . 83 

Medina, New York 86 

Twenty-ninth Separate 

Company of 84 

Merrill, Second Lieutenant 
Leon A., company L, 

military record of 122 

mustered out 128 

Middletown, Pennsylvania, 104, 105 
MiUer, First Lieutenant Frank 

J., company C 105 

\ military recqfd of 116 

mustered out lie 

Missouri Volunteers, Third 

Regiment Infantry 91 

103, 105 

came into Camp Alger 89 

presented with loving cup 
by Third New York Regi- 
ment 106 

Mitchell, First Lieutenant 

James B 99 

first lieutenant and battal- 
ion adjutant, military 

record of Ill 

resigned ill 

commissioned second lieu- 
tenant, U. S. A Ill 

promoted to battalibn ad- 
jutant 116 

discharged 124 

Montgomery, Second Lieuten- 
ant Alton W., company 
M, military record of . . . 123 ' 

mustered out 123 

Morgan, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant Herbert A Ill 

military record of 112 

appointed clerk commis- 
sary department 112 

discharged 124 

Mosby's Guerillas 103 

Myer, Colonel Albert James, 

mustered in as adjutant, 87 
promoted to major 202nd 
Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 93 

military record of 109 

aide-de-camp to Governor 

Frank S. Black 109 

resigned 109 

promoted as major 202nd 
Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers ., 109 

discharged 124 



344 Index — Third Ebgiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Myers, Private Leonard K, 
company M, transferred to 
band 114 

NATIONAL GUARD, NEW 

JERSEY, Fourth Regiment, 

company H 117 

National Guard, New York, 86, 127 
Third Regiment Infantry, 
composed of organi- 
zations of Fourth 

Brigade 83 

ordered to Camp Black, 84 
list of companies and 

officers of 84-85 

became Third Regi- 
ment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 85 

One Hundred and Tenth 
Battalion, Company D.. 

107, 131 
First Separate Company. . Ill 
112, 113, 119, 134 
Second Separate Company, 108 
109, 110, 112, 120, 122, 123 
Eighth Separate Company, 114 
Thirteenth Separate Com- 
pany 110 

Twenty-fifth Separate Com- 
pany 112, 118, 119 

Twenty-ninth Separate 

Company 108, 117, 118 

Thirtieth Separate Com- 
pany 109 

110, 112, 113, 121, 122 
Thirty-fourth Separate 

Company 108, 115 

Forty-first Separate Com- 
pany Ill, 116 

Forty-second Separate 

Company 108, 117, 118 

Forty-third Separate Com- 
pany 113, 120 

Forty-seventh Separate 

Company 113, 120, 121 

Forty-eighth Separate 

Company 108, 117 

Seventh Regiment, Com- 
pany H 122 

Twenty-second Regiment.. 87 

company E 109, 126 

Forty-eighth Regiment, 

company A 116 

company F 116 

Forty-ninth Regiment 108 

Fifty-fourth Regiment, 

company E 114 

company H 132 

Sixty-fifth Regiment 109 

Nellis, First Lieutenant George 
1 W., company M, military 
record of 122 



PAGE 

Nellis, First Lieutenant George 

W., resigned 122 

promoted as captain and 
commissary. United 

States Volunteers 132 

New Jersey National Guard, 
Fourth Regiment, company 

H 117 

New York Central Railway, 84, 85 

New York city 90 

New York National Guard ; . 83 

86, 127 
Third Regiment Infantry, 
composed of organi- 
zations of Fourth 

Brigade S3 

ordered to Camp Black, 84 
list of companies and 

officers of 84-85 

became Third Regi- 
ment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 85 

One Hundred and Tenth 
Battalion, Company D.. 

107, 121 
First Separate Company. . Ill 
112, 113, 119, 124 
Second Separate Company, 108 
109, 110, 112, 130, 123, 123 
Eighth Separate Company, 114 
Thirteenth Separate Com- 
pany 110 

Twenty-fifth Separate Com- 
pany 113, 118, 119 

Twenty-ninth Separate 

Company 108, 117, 118 

Thirtieth Separate Com- 
pany 109 

110, 113, 113, 121, 122 
Thirty-fourth Separate 

Company 108, 115 

Forty-first Separate Com- 
pany Ill, 116 

Forty-second Separate 

Company 108, 117, 118 

Forty-third Separate Com- 
pany 113, 120 

Forty-seventh Separate 

Company 113, 120, 131 

Forty-eighth Separate 

Company 108, 117 

Seventh Regiment, Com- 
pany H 122 

Twenty-second Regiment.. 87 

company E 109, 136 

Forty-eighth Regiment, 

company A 116 

company F 116 

Forty-ninth Regiment 108 

"Fifty-fourth Regiment, 

company E 114 

company H 122 



Index — Third Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 345 



PAGE 

New York National Guard: 

Sixty-fifth Reg-lment 109 

New York State 83, 108, 127 

New York Volunteers: 

Third Regiment Artillery, 107 

Third Regiment Infantry. . 94 

102, 104, 107, 108, 109, 110 

112, 113, 115, 124, 125, 127 

history of 83-128 

physical examination of 
members of 86 

ordered to Dunn Lor- 
ing, Virginia ....... 87 

starts for Camp Alger, 88 

colors presented to by 
Talbot Olyphant ... 90 

receives payment for 
service in United 
States Army 90 

ordered to be increased 
to maximum strength, 91 

over 300 recruits added 
to 91 

suffered heavy loss of 
men from typhoid 
fever 91 

ordered to Manassas 
Junction 94 

except Third Battalion, 
ready to march 95 

arrived at Burkes Sta- 
tion 96 

left camp at Burkes 
Station 97 

arrived at Bull Run 
Field 98 

time consumed in 
march 103 

ordered to relieve Sec- 
ond Tennessee 104 

presented loving cup 
to Third Missouri 
Regiment 106 

started for home sta- 
tions 106 

breakfast served to at 
Elmira, New York. . 106 

furloughed for thirty 
days 106 

military record of offi- 
cers and non-com- 
missioned stafE offi- 
cers 107-133 

military record of non- 
commissioned stafE. . 

111-114 

military record of 
company officers, 114-123 

roster of field, stafE 
and non-commis- 
sioned StafE 123 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers: 

Third Regiment Infantry: 
list of battalions and 
officers of 85, 86 

First Battalion, list of 
companies and officers 
of 85 

Second Battalion, list of 
companies and officers 
of 85 

Third Battalion, list of 
companies and officers 
of 86 

company A, military rec- 
ord of officers of 114 

company B, military rec- 
ord of officers of.... 115-116 

company D,- military rec- 
ord of officers of 116-117 

company E, military rec- 
ord of officers of 117-118 

company F, military rec- 
ord of officers of 118 

company G, military rec- 
ord of officers of 118-119 

company H, military rec- 
ord of officers of 119-120 

company I, military rec- 
ord of officers of 120 

company K, military rec- 
ord of officers of 120-121 

company L, military rec- 
ord of officers of 121-122 

company M, military rec- 
ord of officers of 122-123 

One Hundred and Forty- 
Seventh Regiment In- 
fantry 115 

Two Hundred and Second 
Regiment Infantry. . 93, 109 

Two Hundred and Third 

Regiment Infantry 115 

Niagara Falls, New York 86 

Forty-second Separate 

Company of 84 

Nice, First Lieutenant John L., 97 

military record of ... . 118-119 

mustered out - 119 

Nicht, Musician Edward J., 
company M, transferred to 
band 114 

OHIO, Seventh Regiment, In- 
fantry 104 

Ohio troops 105 

Olean, New York 85 

Forty-third Separate Com- 
pany of 84 

Olyphant, Talbot, presents col- 
ors to regiment 90 



346 Index — Third Regiment, N. Y. State Voluntbees. 



PAGE 

One Hundred and Tenth Bat- 
talion, National Guard, New 

York, company D 107, 131 

One Hundred Forty-seventh 
Eegfiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 115 

One Hundred Fiftieth Eegi- 

ment Infantry, Indiana 89 

92, 95, 105 
Orr, Edward Emerson, enlisted 

company K 114 

Osweg-o, New York 86, 127 

Forty-eighth Separate 
Company of 85 

PATTBERQ (Pattburg), First 
Lieutenant Frederick L., 
company D, military rec- 
ord of 117 

mustered out 117 

Peet House, Virg-inia 99 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania . . . 105 
Pierce, Second Lieutenant 
Harry C, military record of, 116 

Potomac river 92 

Pritchard, Private Prank B., 
company K, transferred to 
band 114 

QUARTERMASTER'S DE- 
PARTMENT 95 

its efficiency proved ... 98, 103 
Quigley, First Lieutenant and 
Battalion Adjutant John 

Aloysius 110, 126 

mustered in United States 
service as battalion adju- 
tant 87 

military record of 109 

died . . 109 

announcement of his 
death 125-126 

REGIMENTAL BAND, account 

of 113-114 

Eevolution, Sons of the, pre- 
sent colors to the regi- 
ment 89, 90 

Eoberts, Cyrus S., Colonel, U. 

S. A., letter from. 94 

Eochester, New York. . . 85, 86, 124 
First Separate Company 

of 84 

Second Separate Company 

of 84 

Eoss, Captain Sanderson A., 
Twenty-ninth Separate 

Company 84 

company F 86 

military record of 118 

mustered out 118 



PAGE 

SADLER, CAPTAIN JOHN T., 

Thirtieth Separate Com- 
pany 84 

company L 85 

ordered to Elmira to re- 
ceive recruits . , 91 

military record of 121 

mustered out 121 

St. Clare, Principal Musician 

Lewis V. S 123 

military record of 113 

mustered out 113 

Sangsters Cross Eoads, Vir- 
ginia 98 

Schuyler, Captain Walter S., 
Fifth United States Cavalry, 
administered oath to regi- 
ment 86 

Second Army Corps 93, 95 

first division 94 

second division 89 

94, 96, 97, 98 
Second Battalion, Third Eegi- 
ment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 87, 91 

ordered out as provost 

guard 97 

arrived at Camp Meade... 106 
Second Division, Second Army 
Corps...... 89, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 

Second Eegiment Infantry, 
Tennessee, detailed to pro- 
vost guard ; 104 

Second Separate Company of 

Auburn 84, 108, 109, 110 

112, 120, 122, 133, 126 
became company M, Third 

Eegiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States seryice 107 

Seventh Eegiment Infantry, 
National Guard, New York, 

company H 122 

Seventh Eegiment Infantry, 

Ohio 104 

Shattuck, Second Lieutenant 
Algernon B., company F, 

military record of 118 

mustered out 118 

Sheaf e, Brigadier-General Mark 

W , 89, 104 

First Brigade reviewed by, 93 
Sixty-fifth Eegiment Infantry, 

National Guard, New York.. 109 
Staiith, Eeg'im.ental Adjutant 

Frank B 125, 126 

Smith, Captain and Adjutant 
Frank Eugene, military 

record of 109 

mustered out 109 

battalion adjutant 110 

regimental adjutant 123 



Index — Third Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 347 



PAGE 

Smith, First Lieutenant Frank 
G, company H, military 

record of 119 

mustered out 119 

Smith, Captain Lester Bord- 

naan, company H. . . . 86, 125 
First Separate Company.. 84 

military record of 119 

died 119 

announcement of his 

death 134^-135 

Sons of the Revolution, pre- 
sent colors to the regi- 
ment 89, 90 

Southern express 90 

Southern Bailroad 88, 96 

Spain 83 

Stacey, Captain James George, 

Jr., company B 85 

mustered into United 
States service as captain 

company B 87 

military record of 115 

mustered out 115 

Steele, Quartermaster-Sergeant 

Albert M 123 

military record of Ill 

mustered out Ill 

Stevens (Stearns), Private 
John, company K, trans- 
ferred to band 114 

Stout, Musician Frederick H., 

transferred to band 114 

Susquehanna river, Pennsyl- 
vania 106 

Syracuse, Nevsr York, Forty- 
first Separate Company of.. 85 

TENNESSEE, Second Regi- 
ment detailed to provost 

guard 104 

Tenth Battalion, Third Regi- 
ment, company X) 110 

Tenth Regiment Infantry, U. 

S. A 113 

Third Battalion, Third Regi- 
ment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 87 

91, 93, 105 
praised for conduct vyhile 
on duty as provost 

guard 94 

companies I, K, L and D 
detailed for provost 

duty 95 

on duty as provost guard, 104 
Third Regiment Artillery, 

Nevr York Volunteers 107 

Third Regiment Infantry, 

Missouri 91, 103, 105 

at Camp Alger 89 



PAGE 

Third Regiment Infantry, 
Missouri, presented with 
loving cup by Third New 

York Regiment 106 

Third Regiment, National 
Guard, New York, com- 
posed of organizations 

of Fourth Brigade 83 

ordered to Camp Black 84 

list of companies and offi- 
cers of 84^-85 

became Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 85 

Third Regiment, New York 

Volunteers 94 

102, 104, 107, 108, 109, 110 
112, 118, 115, 124, 125, 127 

history of 83-138 

physical examination of 

members of 86 

ordered to Dunn Loring, 

-Virginia 87 

starts for Camp Alger 88 

colors presented to by Tal- 
bot Olyphant 90 

receives payment for ser- 
vices in United States 

Army 90 

ordered to be increased to 

maximum strength 91 

over 300 recruits added to, 91 
suffered heavy loss of men 

from typhoid fever 91 

ordered to Manassas Junc- 
tion 94 

except Third Battalion, 

ready to march 95 

arrived at Burkes Station, 96 
left camp at Burkes Sta- 
tion 97 

arrived at Bull Run field.. 98 

time on march 103 

ordered to relieve Second 

Tennessee 104 

presented loving cup to 
Third Missouri Regi- 
ment 106 

started for home stations, 106 
breakfast served to, at El- 

mira. New York 106 

f urloughed for thirty days, 106 
military record of officers 
and non-commissioned 

stafE officers 107-123 

military record of non- 

commissiioned stafE.. 111-114 
military record of com- 
pany officers 114-123 

roster of field staff and 
non-commissioned staff, 123 



348 Index — Third Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Third Eegiment, New York 
Volunteers: 

list of battalions and offi- 
cers of 85-86 

First Battalion, list of 
companies and oificers 
of 85 

Second Battalion, list of 
companies and officers 
of 85 

Third Battalion, list of 
companies and officers 
of 86 

company A, military rec- 
ord of officers of 114 

company B, military rec- 
ord of officers of 115 

company C, military rec- 
ord of officers of 115-116 

company D, military rec- 
ord of officers of.... 116-117 

company E, military rec- 
ord of officers of..'.. 117-118 

company F, military rec- 
ord of officers of 118 

company G, military rec- 
ord of officers of 118-119 

company H, military rec- 
ord of officers of 119-130 

company I, military rec- 
ord of officers of 120 

company K, military rec- 
ord of officers of 120-121 

company L, military rec- 
ord of officers of 121-123 

company M, military rec- 
ord of officers of 112-123 

Thirteenth Separate Company, 

National Guard, New York, 110 
Thirtieth Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 

York 93, 107, 109, 110, 113 

113, 130, 131, 132 

of Elmira 84 

became company L 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Thirty-fourth Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, 
New York 83, 87, 108, 115 

of Geneva 84 

became company B, Third 
Eegiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Thirty-eight Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, New 

York 116 

Thoroughfare, Virginia 103 

Thoroughfare Gap, Virginia.. 104 
105, 106, 134, 125 



PAGE 

TifEt, Captain DeSolvo H., 
company D, military rec- 

of 116 

mustered out 116 

Tonawanda, New York S6 

Twenty-fifth Separate 

Company of 84 

Towne, Hospital Steward 
Oscar H. G., military rec- 
ord of 113 

died 112 

Tuck, Hospital Steward Alex- 
ander C, company G.... 133 

n[iilitary record of 112 

mustered out 112 

Twenty-second Eegiment In- 
fantry, Kansas 89, 93, 105 

National Guard, New York, 87 

company E 109, 126 

Twenty-fifth Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, New 

York 113, 118, 119 

Twenty-fifth Separate Com- 
pany,' of Tonawanda 84 

became company G, Third 

Eegiment 86 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Twenty-ninth Separate Com- 
pany, of Medina 84, 93 

108, 117, 118 
became company F, Third 

Eegiment 86 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Two Hundred and Second 
Eegiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 93, 109 

Two Hundred and Third 
Regiment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers 115 

UNITED STATES 83 

Army Ill, 132 

Fifth Artillery 107 

' Fifth Cavalry 86 

Eighth Cavalry 113 

Fifth Infantry 113 

Tenth Infantry 113 

Military Academy 109 

service 86, 111, 112, 113 

114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119 

130, 131, 123, 133, 125, 126 

Volunteers 114, 123 

VIRGINIA 103, 104 

WAQNER (WADNER), WIL- 
LIAM (Christian F. W.), en- 
listed 114 

War Department 87, 91 



Index — Third Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 349 



PAGE 

Wardlaw, Sergeant-Major 

George A 123 

military record of Ill 

mustered out Ill 

Warrenton, Virginia, citizens 

of 104 

Washington, D. C 88, 93, 104 

Garfield Hospital at 105 

Weber, Second Lieutenant 
Henry H., company I, 

military record of 120 

mustered out 120 

Webster, Second Lieutenant 
Horace, company B, ap- 
pointed second lieuten- 
ant Two Hundred and 
Tbird Eegiment, New 

York Volunteers 115 

military record of 115 

resigned 115 

West Point Military Academy, 109 
Wescott (Westcott), Alfred A., 
company L, transferred to 
band 114 



PAGE 

Whitehall, North Carolina 108 

Wilson, Captain William, 
Thirty-fourth Separate 
Company, nominated 

major 83. 84 

mustered into United 
States service as major, 87 

major 87, 97, 123 

military record of 108 

mustered out 108 

Wolf Kun Shoals, Virginia 98 

Woman's Relief Corps, served 
refreshments to the men . . 104 



YATES FORD, Virginia 99 

Yattau (Yattan), Musician 
Prank A., compaliy A, trans- 
ferred to band 114 

Young, Color Bearer William 

B., military record of... 113 

mustered out 113 

Yotmg farm, Pennsylvania 106 



INDEX 



69th Regiment, New York State Volunteers. 



For the sake of oonvenience, each one of ,the five znilitaiy organizations included in this 
report has been indexed separately. The general indes which embraces the entire report 
begins on page 381. — 9tatb Histobiah. * 



PAGE 

ALBANY, New York 128, 134 

138, 141, 146 
Alger, Kussell A., Secretary of 

War 147 

Andrews, Brigadier-General 

John N., U. S. A., Second 

Brigade 136, 137 

Anthony, Colonel Charles, 

Third Ohio 135 

Atlanta, Georgia 140 

BALTIMORE, Maryland 132 

Baltimore and Ohio Bailway. . 132 
Barron, Captain Hugh J., com- 
pany Ij 130 

resigned 147 

Birmingham, Alabama 143 

Black, Governor Frank S 131 

133, 137 
visited encampment of 

Sixty-ninth Regiment 144 

Bolger, Second Lieutenant 

John F., company E. . . . 130 
recommended to be first 
lieutenant company E . . . 131 
Bowman and Harsh, Messrs. 

Birmingham, Alabama 143 

Brooke, General John B., U. 

S. A 132, 133, 134 

Brown, Colonel Oscar J., Sec- 
ond Georgia 135, 140 

Wilson, and infirmary. . . . 143 
Bryant, First Sergeant William 
W., recommended to be 
second lieutenant com- 
pany H 133 

resigned 150 

CAMP BLACK, Hempstead 
Plains, Long Island, New 
York 188 



PAGE 

Camp Forse (Albert G.), 
Huntsville, Alabama.... 146, 151 

Camp Tampa, Florida 128 

Camp Wheeler, Huntsville, 

Alabama 141, 142 

Carey, Private John, company 

E, injured in wreck 145 

Carpenter, Brigadier-General 
Louis H., U. S. A., Fourth 

Army Corps 134, 135, 149 

Carroll, General Howard, in- 

spected regiment 137 

Casey, Private Thomas, com- 
pany F,- died 151 

Chaffee, General Adna E., 
lieutenant-general U. S. A.. 150 

Chickamauga, Georgia 135 

137, 138 
Sixty-ninth Regiment In- 
fantry, New York Volun- 
teers, ordered to 132 

National Military Park, 
Georgia, regiment ar- 
rived at 133 

Cincinnati, Ohio 133, 140 

Civil War 132 

Collins, Surgeon George W. . . 139 

Columbus, Ohio 146 

Comba, General Richard, U. S. 

A 150 

Company A 129, 148 

Company B ; 129, 133 

141, 144, 147, 151 

Company C 129, 131, 140, 148 

Company D 129, 147, 148, 151 

Company E.. 130, 131, 133, 142, 145 

Company F 130, 151 

Company G.. 130, 142, 143, 145, 148 

Company H 130, 133 

Company 1 130, 147, 148 

Company K 130, 133, 144, 148 



352 Index — Sixty-ninth Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Company L 130, 147, 148 

Company M 131, 134, 148 

Connellan, Sergeant John J... 143 
Coppinger, Major-General Jolin 

J., U. S. A 134, 136, 141 

retired 149 

Corps Hospital, Huntsville, 

Alabama 148 

Crimmins, Private Martin L., 
First Volunteer Cavalry, 
commissioned second 

lieutenant Sixty-ninth 

Regiment 141 

appointed second lieuten- 
ant Regular Army 147 

Cronin, Second Lieutenant 

Francis J., company L . . 130 
promoted first lieutenant 

company L 148 

recovered from illness 150 

First Lieutenant James M., 

company G > . 130 

regimental quarter- 
master, resigned 150 

Crowley, First Sergeant 
Charles J., company D, 
promoted second lieu- 
tenant company D 148 

Private Timothy F., com- 
pany E, injured in 

wreck 145 

Cuba 150 

Cumming (Cummings), Second 
Lieutenant Bernard F., Jr., 
company G ' 130 

DALEY, SURGEON ROBERT 

M .143 

Daly (Daley), Private Thomas, 
company E, injured in 

railway wreck 145 

Chaplain William J. B 129 

173, 173 
Davidson, Regimental Adju- 
tant John A 139 

resigned 147 

Delaney, Regimental Quarter- 
master John A 129 

Devane, Second Lieutenant 
John P., recommended to 
be first lieutenant com- 
pany M 131 

in hospital 134 

recovered from illness.... 138 
Devlin, Captain Daniel C, com- 
pany H 130 

Division Hospital 140 

Donahue, Private Henry G., 
company E, injured in 

wreck 145 

Donnelly, Private John F., 
company D, died 151 



PAGE 

Donovan, Lieutenant-Colonel 

Joseph L 129 

Doran, Private Michael J., 
company E, injured in rail- 
way wreck 145 

Duffy, Colonel Edward 129 

145, 151, 210 
report of his regiment for 

first month 128-134 

report of his regiment for 

second month 134-138 

report of his regiment for 

third month 138-141 

report of his regiment for 

fourth month 141-145 

report of his regiment for 

fifth month 146-148 

report of his regiment for 

sixth month 148-151 

congratulated on appear- 
ance of his command... 147 
DufEy, Captain John E., com- 
pany G 130 

DufEy, John E., attorney, New 

York 143 

DufEy, Private Nicholas H., 

company B, died 144 

Dwyer, Corporal Edward J., 
company K, died 144 

EAST RIVER, New York 132 

Emmet, Second Lieutepant 

Grenville T., company I, 130 
promoted regimental ad- 
jutant 147 

FARLEY, PRIVATE PETER, 

company G, killed in wreck, • 

143, 145 

Fernandina', Florida 138 

140, 142, 144 
Sixty-ninth Regiment or- 
dered to 139 

Fifth Regiment Infantry, Ohio, 135 
First Battalion, Sixty-ninth 
Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 129 

First Division, Fourth Army 

Corps 150 

First Regiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 151 

U. S. V ._.. 141 

First Regiment Infantry, 

Florida 135 

Fitzgerald, Judge James, 
makes presentation address 

to regiment 132 

Florida, First Regiment Infan- 
try 135 

Flynn, Private Maurice J., 
company C, died 140 



Index — Sixty-ninth Regiment, N. ,Y. State Volunteers. 35!? 



PAGE 

Forse, Major Albert G., First 
U. S. Cavalry, killed at Fort 

San Juan, Cuba 151 

Fort San Juan, Cuba 151 

Fourth Army Corps.. 136, 141, 147 

First Division 150 

Second Bivision 134 

Third Division 146 

Friendly Sons of St. Patrick 
preisented colors to regi- 
ment 132 

Fushsius, Surgeon John H 143 

GAGE, LYMAN J., Secretary 

of . Treasury 141 

Gallagher, Private Charles A., 

company G, died 148 

Georgia Second Regiment In- 
fantry 135, 136, 140 

Gilgar, Second Lieutenant Ed- 
ward P., company K, 130, 133 
recommended to be first 
lieutenant and battalion 

adjutant 131 

Glennon, Sergeant Frank, com- 
pany G, injured in wreck, 143 

died from^ injuries 145 

Glynn, Eegimental Quarter- 
master-Sergeant Bernard J., 
recommended to be second 

lieutenant company E 133 

Gordon, Corporal William F., 
company D, injured in 

wreck . . 145 

Griffin, Captain Thomas J., 

company F 130 

Guilfoyle, Second Lieutenant 

William F., company A 139 

Guthrie, Musician John 
(Jacob), company G, injured 
in vsTCck 145 

HARAN, LIEUTENANT PAT= 
RICK M., company A 139 

Harsh, Messrs. Bovsrman and, 

Birmingham, Alabama 143 

Healy, Captain Charles, com- 
pany 1 130, 140 

Hempstead Plains, Long Isl- 
and, New York 138 

Henry, General Guy V., U. S. 

.A 135, 136 

Henry, First Lieutenant John 

J., company B 139 

Huntsville, Alabama 141 

146, 147, 148, 149, 151 

regiment ordered to 143 

sketch of camp at 144 

IOWA 141 

National Guard 137 

Ireland 132 

23 



PAGE 

JACKSONVILLE, Florida, Six- 
ty-nintJh. Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers, or- 
dered to 130 

Jersey City, New Jersey 132 

KEANEY, FIRiST LIEUTEN= 
ANT FRANCIS J., company 

K 130 

Kennan, Colonel Cortland- L., 

Fifth Ohio , 135 

Kennedy, Private John, com- 
pany M, died ■ 148 

First Lieutenant John J., 

company M 131 

recommended to be 

captain cmnpany C. 131 
absent ■ on sick leave . . 140 
recovered from illness, 150 
Keogh, First Sergeant Thomas 
F., promoted second lieuten- 
ant company L 148 

Kilclive, Private Thomas, com-i 
pany G, injured in wreck... 145 

LALOR (LAWLOR), SER- 
GEANT PATRICK W., com- 
pany E, injured in vyreck 145 

Lane, Private Thomas, com- 
pany E, injured in wreck... 145 
Leary, First Lieutenant Tim- 
othy Hill, company H ■. . 130 

Lexing-ton, Kentucky 133 

Lewis, Private Charles, com- 
pany E, injured in vyreck. . . 145 
Lincoln, 'Brigadier-General 

James Rush.... 137, 141, 142 
congratulates Colonel 
Duffy on appearance of 

his regiment 147 

praises the Sixty-ninth 

Regiment 149 

Little, Second Lieutenant 

James H., company F 130 

Long Island, New York 138 

Louisville and Nashville Rail- 
road 143, 145 

Lynch, Captain Michael, com- 
pany A 139 

absent on sick leave 140 

rejoined regiment, com- 
pany A 144 

Major Thomas F., First 

Battalion 139 

in hospital 134 

recovered from illness, 138 
Lytle Station, Gfforgia 133 

MacARTHUR, COLONEL AR- 
THUR, Paymaster 137 



354 Index — Sixty-ninth Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Maguire, Second Lieutenant 

Peter W., company H. . . 130 
recommended to be cap- 
tain company B 133 

Manning, Sergeant John J., 

company E, injured in wreck, 145 
Massarene, Sergeant-Major 

WiUiam G., recommended 
to be first lieutenant, 

battalion adjutant 133 

resigned 150 

McCarthy, Captain Daniel, 

company K 130 

McCrystal, Captain Edward T., 

company B 129 

recommended to be major, 133 
First Lieutenant WilUam 

J. 5^., company L 130 

promoted captain com- 
pany L 147 

McGurrin, Colonel William T., 

Thirty-second Michigan 135 

McKenna, Second Lieutenant 

Patrick J., company C 12a 

McMahon, Private Thomas, 
company E, injured in 

wreck 145 

Meade, Private James, com- 
pany E, injured in wreck..... 145 
Merritt, Corporal Samuel, 
company E, injured in 

wreck 145 

Michigan, Thirty-second Regi- 
ment Infantry 135 

Molahan, First Lieutenant Pat- 
rick J., company 1 130 

Montgomery, Alabama 142 

Moran, Private John P., com- 
pany G, injured in wreck 145 

NATIONAL GUARD, Iowa.... 137 

New York 128 

Sixty-ninth Kegiment 

Infantry 156 

National Military Park, Chick- 
amauga, Georgia, regiment 

arrived at 133 

Newcastle, Alabama 145 

Sixty-ninth Regiment in 

railroad wreck at 143 

Newport, Kentucky 140 

New York city 132, 138, 139 

142, 144, 145, 148 
New York National Guard... 128 
Sixty-ninth Regiment In- 
fantry 156 

New York State 137, 150 

New York Volunteers, Sixty- 
ninth Regiment Infan- 
try 54, 67, 72 

134, 136, 138, 141, 146 
147, 148, 151, 172, 173, 210 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers, Sixty- 
ninth Regiment Infantry: 

history of 128-152 

composed of eight com- 
panies 128 

ordered recruited to twelve , 

companies 128 

roster of ofEcers of... 129-131 
list of recommended pro- 
motions in 131, 133 

mustered into United 

States service l.'?2 

colors presented to 132 

ordered to Chickamauga, 

Georgia 132 

arrived at Ocala, Florida. . 135 
•ordered to Jacksonville, 

Florida 136 

inspected by General Hovs^ 

ard Carroll 137 

303 recruits added to 138 

ordered to Fernandina, 

Florida 139 

many cases of typhoid 

fever in 140 

visited by Governor Leslie 

M. Shaw 141 

ordered to Huntsville, Ala- 
bama 142 

in railroad wreck at New- 
castle, Alabama 143 

encampment of, visited by 
Governor Frank S. 

Black 144 

return of casualties in 

wreck of 145 

list of deaths for fifth 

month 1 48 

praised by General James 

Rush Lincoln 149 

list of resignations in, for 

sixth month 150 

camp of, inspected by War 
Investigating Commis- 
sion 151 

list of deaths in during 

sixth month 151 

company A, officers of 129 

company B, officers of 129 

company C, officers of 129 

company D, officers of ... . 129 

company E, officers of 130 

company F, officers of 130 

company 6, officers of 130 

company H, officers of 130 

company I, officers of.... 130 
company K, officers of.... 130 
company L, officers of.... 130 
company M, officers of . . . . 131 
Noon, Private George, com- 
pany E, injured in wreck. . . 145 
North river, New York 132 



Index — Sixty-ninth Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 355 



PAGE 

O'BRIEN, CAPTAIN JOHN E., 

company E 130 

Private John J., company 

K, died 148 

Ocala, Florida, Sixty-ninth 
Regiment, New York Volun- 
teers, arrived at 135 

O'Connell, First Sergeant 
Michael, recommended 
to be second lieutenant 

company K 133 

Private Michael, company 

G, injured in wreck 145 

Ohio, Third Regiment Infan- 
try 135, 136, 140, 146 

Fifth Regiment Infantry.. 135 
O'Keefe, Corporal Gerald J., 
company E, injured in 

wreck 145 

Private William, company 

G, injured in wreck 145 

O'Sullivan, Second Lieutenant 
Mortimer M., company 

B 129 

resigned 141 

Oswald, Assistant Surgeon 
Francis L., appointed sur- 
geon 141 

PALMETTO BEACH, Florida, 

sketch of 135 

camp at 135-136 

unsanitary condition of 

camp at 139 

Pentony, Sergeant John, com- 
pany E, injured in wreck. . . 145 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 132 

Plunket, Captain James, com- 
pany D 129 

resigned 147 

Port Tampa, Florida 136 

Pyne, Private William, com- 
pany B, died 151 

QUINN, FIRST LIEUTENANT 
THOMAS J., company C..., 129 

RAMSAY, SURGEON GEORGE 

D., resigned 141 

Beardon, Private Thomas J., 
company E, injured in 
wreck 145 

Reilly, Private John, company 

M, died 148 

Patrick, teamster, injured 
in virreck 145 

Eeville, First Lieutenant 
Philip E., company F 130 

Roche, Captain John J., com- 
pany M 131 

Roe, General Charles F., Fifth 
Brigade, National Guard, 
New York 128, 129 



PAGE 

Rooney, Second Lieutenant 

Leo J. F., company M. . . . 135 
first sergeant, recom- 
mended to be second 

lieutenant 131 

Rossville, Tennessee 134, 135 

Ryan, First Lieutenant John 
J., recommended to be 

captain company E 131 

First Lieutenant Nicholas 
J., company E 130 

ST. PATRICK, FRIENDLY 
SONS OF, presented colors 

to Regiment 132 

Santiago, Cuba... 150 

Scanlon, Sergeant-Major John 
P., recommenced to be 
second lieutenant com- 
pany E 131 

second lieutenant, recom- 
mended to be first 'lieu- 
tenant, battalion adju- 
tant 133 

Schuyler, Captain Walter S., 

U. S. A 132 

Second Battalion, Sixty-ninth 
Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 129 

Second Division, Third Army 

Corps 133 

Fourth Army Corps 134 

Second Regiment Infantry, 

Georgia 135, 136, 140 

Shafter, General William R., U. 

S. A 135 

Shaw, Governor Leslie M., 
visited Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment , 141 

addressed Sixty-ninth 

Regiment 142 

Sherlock, Private James J., 
company E, injured in 

wreck 145 

Sixty-ninth Regiment Infan- 
try, National Guard, 

New York 156 

New York Volunteers 54 

67, 72, 134, 136, 138 
141, 146, 147, 148 
151, 172, 173, 210 

history of 128-152 

composed of eight 

companies 128 

ordered recruited to 

twelve companies 128 

roster of officers 

of 129-131 

list of recommended 

promotions in.. 131, 133 
mustered into United 
States service 132 



356 Index — Sixty-ninth Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Sixty-ninth Regiment Infan- 
try, National Guard, New 
York: 
NeT7 York Volunteers: 

colors presented to... 132 
ordered to Chicka- 

mauga, Georgia 133 

arrived at Ocala, Flor- 
ida 135 

ordered to Jackson- 
ville, Florida 136 

inspected by General 

Howard Carroll..... 137 
303 recruits added to . . 138 
ordered to Fernandina, 

, Florida 139 

many cases of typhoid 

fever in 140 

visited by Governor 

Leslie M. Shaw 141 

ordered to Huntsville, 

Alabama 142 

in railroad vsreck at 

Newcastle, Alabama. 143 
encampment of, visited 
by Governor Frank 

S. Black 144 

return of casualties in 

vrreck of 145 

list of deaths for fifth 

month 148 

praised by General 

James Kush Lincoln, 149 
list of resignations in 

for sixth month 150 

camp of, inspected by 
War Investigating 

Commission 151 

list of deaths in during 

sixth month 151 

company A, officers of, 129 
company B, officers of, 129 
company C, officers of, 129 
company D, officers of, 129 
company E, officers of, 130 
company F, officers of, 130 
company G, officers of, 130 
company H, officers of, 130 
company I, officers of, 130 
company K, officers of, 130 
company L, officers of, 130 
company M, officers of, 131 
Skelly, Private Thomas J., 
company E, injured in 

wreck 145 

Snyder, Brigadier-General Si- 
mon, U. S. A 134 

Southern Kailroad 133, 134 

Spelhnan, Major Michael J., 

Second Battalion 129 

Sullivan, Regimental Sergeant- 
Major Daniel P., promoted 
second lieutenant company I, 148 



PAGE 

Sweeney. Private William, 
company C, died 148 

TAMPA, Florida 128, 134, 135 

136, 137, 139, 140 

Tettamore, Assistant Surgeon 
Prank L. K 129 

Third Army Corps, Second Di- 
vision 133 

Third Division, Fourth Army 
Corps . . 135, 136, 146 

Third Regiment Infantry, 
Ohio 135, 136, 140, 146 

Thirty-second Regiment In- 
fantry, Michigan 135 

Thirty-fourth street ferry, 
New York 132 

Tillinghast, Adjutant-General 
C. Whitney, ordered regi- 
ment recruited to twelve 
companies 125 

Tracy (Tracey), Private 
James, company A, died 148 

Tuite, Second Lieutenant 

James J., company D... 129 
promoted captain 147 

Twelfth Regiment Infantry, 
U. S. A 136, 150 

Twenty-third street ferry. 
New York 132 

UNITED STATES 128 

Army 132 

First Cavalry 151 

Twelfth Infantry.. 136, 150 

service 132 

troops 138 

VAUQHAN, PRIVATE MU 
CHAEL, company E, injured 
in wreck 145 

WAR DEPARTMENT 140 

War Investigating Commission, 
inspected camp of Sixty- 
ninth Regiment 151 

Wheeler, General Joseph, U. S. 
A 149, 151 

Wheeling, West Virginia 132 

Williams, Colonel William F., 
First Florida 135 

Wilson and Brown Infirmary. . 143 

Woodward, First Lieutenant 
Christopher H. R., company 

D 129 

resigned 150 

Wright, Sergeant Nicholas, 
company E, injured in 
wreck 145 

YOUNG, PRIVATE THOMAS, 

company C, died 148 



INDEX 



71st Regiment, New York State Volunteers. 



For the sake of coDvenience, each oue of the five military organizations included in this 
report has been indexed separately. The general index which embraces ttie entire report 
begins on page 381 . — State Histortan. 



PAGE 

ABEEL, ADJUTANT ALFRED 

HAVENS 219, 303 

lieutenant company M., ap- 
pointed adjutant '. ... 177 

difficulty in landing 214 

Ahern, Corporal William J., 
company I, wounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 244 

Aid Society, Bronx borough . . 285 

Albany, New York 183 

Alden, Frank E., company L, 

died of malarial fever 252 

Alger, General Russell A., de- 
cided to have troops re- 
moved to Montauk Point... 287 

AUatoona Pass, Georgia 256 

Althause, Private Joseph F., 
vrounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

American forces 315 

Andalusian quarter, Santiago, 

Spanish soldiers housed in.. 272 
Andre, Private Charles, com- 
pany K, wounded in action 

at San Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Andrews, Major Avery D 161 

Aquadores, feint made to land 

troops at 312 

Army Commission, Y. M. 

G. A 174, 175, 283 

work in Cuba 281 

Army Corps, headquarters at 

Tampa Bay Hotel, Florida.. 178 
Artesian wells sunk to supply 
water for camp at Tampa 

Heights 186 

Articles of war 189 

Associated Press 207 

Astor, Lieutenant-Colonel John 
Jacob 260, 262 



PAGE 

Atlanta, Georgia 257 

Atlantic liner 199 

Austin, Captain Elmore Far- 

rington, company L 235 

with company L, among 
first troops to arrive on 
San Juan Hill, Cuba 233 

BABBITT, GEORGE M., com- 
pany M, died on board ship 
and buried at sea ....... 253, 290 

Babcock, Private George L., 

company B 183, 184 

Babcock, Mrs. George L. . 183, 184 
Bahama channel. Great... 200, 204 
Baiquiri (Daiquiri), Cuba.. 213, 269 

artillery at 225 

Barnum, John M., company G, 

died of dysentery 250 

Barrett,. Charles F., repre- 
sented Army Commission, 

Y. M. C. A 269 

270, 381, 283 
Barrett, Private Malcolm, com- 
pany . M, wounded in action 

at San Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Barton, ]Miss Clara 273, 274 

Bateman, Chaplain Cephas C, 
Sixteenth Infantry 
Regulars, assisted chap- 
lain 290 

appointed chaplain at Gen- 
eral Hospital, Montauk 

Point , 393 

Bates, Adjutant William 

Graves . . 173, 183 

appointed captain volun- 
teers 181 

Bayonne, New Jersey 348 

Beatty, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant John H 282 



358 Index — Seventy-fibst Regt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

B e a 1 1 y, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant John H., detailed 
to Siboney to handle 
mail for the regiment. . . 343 

Bedloes Island, New York 164 

Beekman, Lieutenant William 

Schuyler, company B . . . . 183 
recuperating at Siboney, 

Cuba 243 

Bell, Major and Surgeon Wil- 
liam Duffield 193 

308, 218, 237 
mustered into United 
States service as sur- 
geon 156 

sick 276 

things at their worst when 
he was stricken with 

fever 286 

Bigelow, Poultney, Herald cor- 
respondent 1 169 

Black, Governor Frank S .155 

171, 295 

reviewed troops 160 

Black, Joseph I., company K, 

died of enter o colitis 251 

Blanco, Captain-General, or- 
dered Admiral Cervera to 
take his entire fleet out to 

sea 239 

Blauvelt,~ Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant Lester J., company 
B, appointed second lien- 

■ tenant company K 182 

detailed commissary of 

regiment 182 

Bloody Bend, a thick gulch 

near El Poso, Cuba 339, 241 

Booth, Private Frank W., 
company F, appointed 

amanuensis 312 

buried near the ford be- 
lovir San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 250 

Booth, Private John, company 
L, buried near the lord 
below San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 252 

Boston, Massachusetts 249 

Bostwick, Mr 183,184 

Botts, Private John M., com- 
pany A, wounded in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Bourke, John, company H, 

died of typhoid fever 251 

Boynton, Sergeant Charles F., 
company B, appointed sec- 
ond lieutenant company B . . 183 



PAGE 
Brett, Captain Lloyd M., Third 
United States Cavalry, 
detailed as mustering- 
out officer of the 
Seventy-first Eegiment... 303 
guest at dinner given to 
Seventy-first Regiment 

officers 303 

Brewer, Eben, United States 
postmaster in Cuba, died of 

yellow fever 343 

Brittain, Charles A 269, 270 

gave tent to regiment for 

hospital 283 

Broadway, New York 298 

Broadway Tabernacle, Thirty- 
fourth street, New York 180 

Bronx borough, New York.... 285 

Brooklyn, New York.... 248 

249, 253, 298, 301 

Brower, Charles D.. 174 

Brown, Private Clinton B., 
company M, buried near 
the ford, below San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 253 

Brovyn, Private John K., com- 
pany D, wounded in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Brown, Walter J., company D, 

died of dysentery 248 

Burhans, Arthur D., company 

C, died of disease 248 

Butt, Brigadier-G e n e r a 1 
McCoskry 156 

CALENTURA, or yellow fever, 376 

California 171 

Camp Black, Hempstead 

Plains, New York 154 

155, 158, 161, 163 
164, 168, 169, 172, 174 
176, 311, 253, 385, 304 
account of water supply 

at 163 

Colonel MacArthur paid 

the men at 293 

200 recruits had been en- 
camped at 395 

regiment ordered to, for 
muster-out of United 
States volunteer service, 302 
Camp Wikofl, Montauk Point, 

Long Island 246, 247, 248 

249, 250, 351, 358, 353 
inefBcient management, es- 
pecially of hospitals 294 

sick of regiment sailed for, 396 
list of regiment dead at.. 303 



Index — Seventy-first Rbgt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 359 



PAOE 

Canning, Private George C, 
company I, " Eag-Time 

Jlnany" 206 

Capron, Allyn, U. S. A., mili- 
tary record of 259 

died near Fort Myer, Vir- 
ginia 259 

Capron, Captain Allyn Kissam, 

military record of 218 

killed In action at lias 

Guasimas, Cuba 259 

Caribbean Sea 290 

Carlisle, Corporal Lewis W., 
company M, wounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 245 

died from wounds received 
in action at San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 253 

Carmer, William R., company 
E, died on board Mis- 
souri, at sea 249 

CaroUna, South 216 

Carolinas, The, campaign of . . 256 
Carpenter, Harry F., company 

F, died of typhoid malaria.. 250 
Carroll, Private James F., 
company M, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. 244 
Carswell, Nathan H., company 

L, died of malarial fever 252 

Cavanaugh, John F., company 

L, died of fever 252 

Cervera, Pasqual (Pascual), 
Admiral, ordered to take 

his fleet to sea. . .- 239 

lost every vessel at Santi- 
ago .• 339 

Chaffee's brigade of regulars, 
ordered into final charge on 

El Caney, Cuba 257 

Cheevers, Private William E., 

company I, died of fever, 251 
buried beyond entrench- 
ments near Santiago, 

Cuba 283 

Chickamauga, Georgia . . . 108, 211 
City of Washington, transport 

ship 175 

Civil War 160, 166, 175 

veterans, escort of 300 

Clark, Alexander H, company 

D, died of typhoid fever 248 

Clark (Clarke), Private Wash- 
ington B., company B, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Cochran, Colonel Melville A., 

U. S. A 185 

Columbia University, New 

York 183 

Commissary department 159 



PAGE 
Commissary department, signs 

of improvement in 276 

Company A, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 176, 182, 183 

184, 236, 237, 240 
244, 245, 246, 247 
only ten men remained for 

camp duty 294 

Company A, Thirtieth Indiana 

Volunteer Infantry 257 

Company B, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment. . . 182, 183, 184, 206, 231 
240, 243, 244, 245, 247 
ordered to march to Santi- 
ago and take transport 
for Montauk, New York, 288 
Company C, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment , 206,, 217, 231, 240 

244, 245, 246, 248 
Company D, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 236, 245, 248 

Company E, Seventy-first Regi' 

ment 192, 206, 219, 244 

245, 246, 249, 280, 303 
Company E, Ninth Indiana In- 
fantry 257 

Company F, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 153, 162, 194, 306 

211, 212, 231, 236, 237, 240 
244, 345, 246, 250, 383, 290 
led by Captain Rafferty, 
among first troops to ar- 
rive on San Juan Hill... 333 

losses severe 236 

Company G, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 191, 236, 237 

244, 245, 246, 350 
Company H, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment, first company to en- 
camp for examination and 
muster into volunteer ser- 
vice 155 

Company H, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 306, 236, 343 

344, 345, 346, 251 
Company I, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 170, 193, 194, 306 

237, 240, 244, 251 
led by Captain Meeks, 
among first to arrive on 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 234 

Company K, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 183, 318, 331, 340 

244, 245, 251, 303 
Company K, Seventh Regiment, 181 
Company L, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 164, 235, 340, 244, 345 

252, 280, 381, 390, 303 
led by Captain Austin, 
among first troops to ar- 
rive on San Juan Hill, 
Cuba 233 



360 Index — Seventy-first Regt., N. Y. State Voluntebes. 



PAGE 

Company L, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment, ordered to march to 
■ Santiago to take transport 

for Montauk 288 

Company M, Seventy-first Begi- 

ment 164, 177, 18a, 183 

236, 237, 240, 244 
245, 253, 290, 295 
led by Captain Goldsbor- 
ough, among first troops 
to arrive on San Jnan 

Hill, Cuba 234 

losses severe 236 

detailed to unload wagons 
and put goods aboard 

transport 289 

Concho, transport 373 

Conger, Private Alfred B., 
company M, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. 244 
Congress, resolution of, de- 
clared war between United 

States and Spain.' 153 

Couklin, Eugene, representing 
Seventy-first Veteran Associ- 
ation . 180 

Conkling, Colonel, Civil War 

veteran 297 

Conroy, Alexander, company 

L, deserted 253 

Convent Station, New Jersey. . 356 
Cook, George W., company E, 

died of malarial fever 349 

Cornell University, Ithaca, 

New York 167 

Craigie, Charles E., company 

M, died of fever 253 

Crockett, First Lieutenant Wil- 
liam Francis, company 
A, appointed first lieu- 
tenant and battalion ad- 
jutant 182 

battalion adjutant 183 

Crosley (Crosby), Norman W., 
company K, died of fever... 252 

Cuba 153, 169, 175, 178 

191, 196, 198, 206, 212, 214, 216 
227, 229, 243, 246, 247, 348, 249 
250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 267, 268 
272, 385, 388, 295, 296, 301, 305 

regiment ordered to 188 

order of advance of Ameri- 
can transports from 

Florida to 195 

expedition to, temporarily 

suspended . . 198 

fleet again starts on its 

mission to 200 

army commission work in, 281 
troops and yellow fever . . . 287 
Cuban Army, a wretched look- 
ing body of men 225 



PAGE 

Cuban Army, to intercept re- 
inforcements 225 

Cuban campaign, July 1st, 1898, 

most eventful day of.... 326 

most trying period of 270 

Cuban or yellow fever 276 

Cuban hamlet .'. ; 214 

Cuban insurgents 214 

Cuban settlement, Ybor City, 

Florida 183, 184, 185, 183 

Cuban troops, complaint of of- 
ficers 329 

Cubans, The 315 

Cubans, company of 223 

Cubans 235 

stampede of, at foot of El 

Poso Hill, Cuba 223 

unfit to fight for liberty or 

appreciate it 229 

three, struck by Spanish 

shrapnel 261 

pauper-stricken and starv- 
ing, journejdng toward 

Santiago, Cuba 271 

1,400 tons of food sent by 

United States for 273 

thousands of them- starv- 
ing, surged about the 
wharf, waiting to be fed, 273 
Cunningham, Private Peter J., 
company L, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, i 345 
Cushing, Charles P. P., com- 
pany C, killed in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 348 

Cutting, Sergeant Charles W., 
company L, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 344 



DAIQUIRI (Baiquiri), Cuba... 

212, 269 

artillery at 225 

Daly, Private Michael, com- 
pany M, buried near the 
ford below San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 253 

Daly, Father William J. B., 
chaplain Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry 172, 173 

Dangui fever, or yellow fever. . 276 

Dattwyler, Private Oscar.. 211 

Decker, Private Joseph S., com- 
pany I, buried near the 
ford below San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 
Juan Hill, Cuba '. . 251 



Index — Seventy-first Rbgt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 361 



PAGE 

Berby, Captain George MoC, 
U. S. A., balloon, which indi- 
cated to the enemy exact lo- 
cation of our troops 330 

Deutschberger, Private Charles, 
company C, ■wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 231, 244 

Dinan, John J., company F, 

died of fever 250 

Division Hospital 228, 235, 238 

239, 240, 846 
Dixon, Private Thomas J., Jr., 
company A, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 244 
Dodd, Reuben N., company B, 
accidentally killed at New 

York city 247 

Dodge, Cleveland H., president 
Y. M. C. A. of New York 

city 174, 180, 292 

Donnelly, Private Leo J., 
company M, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba . . 245 
Downs, Lieutenant-Colonel 

Wallace Abel 164, 171 

mustered into United 

States service 157 

promoted colonel 182 

colonel.. 152, 153, 174, 176, 177 
178, 184, 185, 186, 189 
196, 202, 203, 205, 207 
209, 210, 212, 215, 219 
220, 224, 233, 234, 237 
267, 269, 283, 290, 3O0 
selects Vigilancia to trans- 
port regiment to Cuba.. 197 
received orders from Gen- 
eral Kent and obeyed 

them 231 

led his regiment, under 
heavy fire, along the 

trail to the ford 232 

with regiment, halted at 
ford, awaiting further 

orders 232 

received orders to prepare 

to advance 258 

halted on roadside, await- 
ing passage of two regi- 
juents he was to follow, 259 
received a, letter, praising 
the bravery of the regi- 
ment 266 

ordered delicacies dis- 
tributed among the sick, 275 
secured tents for the sick, 276 

down with fever 276 

received $100 from Relief 
Society of Seventy-first 
Regiment 278 



PAQE 

Downs, Lieutenant-Colonel 

Wallace Abel, received 

official notification that 

Spain had sued for peace, 278 

senior colonel, in command 

of First Brigade 282 

brief address, at armory.. 302 
regiment on leave for sixty 

days 302 

presided at dinner 303 

address at dinner given to 

ofBcers 303 

Downs, Mrs. Wallace Abel.... 291 
Drum Corps, Seventy-first 
Regiment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers ... 190, 20T 
took care of the wounded 
at San Juan HiS, Cuba... 235 
I Dry Tortugas, island southwest 

of Florida 200 

1 Duffy, Colonel Edward, condi- 
I tion of Sixty-ninth Regi- 

i ment 210 

: Dunning, Private Thomas G. 
(Thomas J.), company 

M 237 

died of fever 253 

Dunwoody, Private Joseph, 
company D, wounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 245 

died from wounds received 
in action at San Juan 
Hill, Cuba 248 

EARL, DAVID M., company M, 

died of fever 254 

East river. New York 298 

Ebbeson (Ebberson), Ebbe, 
company L, died at sea and 
buried at Montauk, New 

York 253, 303 

Edwards, Private Charles, 

company I 237 

Egan, Dr 274 

Eighteenth Regiment Infan- 
try 220, 227 

Eiseman, Private Leander G., 
coiupany F, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 

245, 250 

El Caney, Cuba 220, 233 

242, 256, 257 
Spaniards retreated to en- 
trenchments 225 

attack contemplated on . . . 225 

battle at 226 

strongly garrisoned and 
occupied by Spanish 
troops 227 



362 Index — Seventy-first Regt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

El Caney, Cuba, original plan 
of attack upon, changed 

by turn of events 332 

Capron's artillery opened 

fire on 259 

Lawton's division eiigaging' 

enemy at 260 

Chaplain Van Dewater er- 
roneously published as 
among the victims of 

battle at 2S1 

El Poso, Cuba. 240, 25^,' 360 

sketch of road leading to.. 239 
Seventy-first Regiment 

marched tovyard 260 

light artillery battery sta- 
tioned on £.38 

stampede of Cubans at 

foot of 238 

where Kough Eiders had 
several losses in killed 

and wounded 228 

Engelke, Private Brandt H 176 

baptized by chaplain of 

regimunt 175 

Eiigels, Frederick L, company 
P, died on boatd La 

Grande Duchesse 350 

buried at Montauk Point.. 290 

Engineer Corps, U. S. A 330 

unable to make or keep 
roads in proper condition 

for traffic 371 

Episcopalian chapel, at Lake- 
land, Florida 170, 175 

Ess, Private Anton 206 

Euramadas, principal street in 
Santiago, Cuba, sketch 

of 372 

Euster, Private Maurice, com- 
pany E, wounded in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

Everett, Corporal Robert G., 
company L, died of typhoid 
fever 353 

FANCIULLI, PROF. FRAN= 
CISCO, leader of Seventy- 
first Regimental Band 298 

Featherstone, Private George 
F., company P, wounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, 
Cuba . , 245 

Ferguson, Private G. company 
E, recitation 306 

Field Hospital, Santiago, Cuba, 353 

Fifth Army Corps... 213, 330, 355 
remained on the hills three 

miles from Santiago 269 

first division 177 

Fifth avenue. New York 155 

Fifth Regiment Infantry 318 



PAGE 

Firmeza, Cuba 315 

excluded station for yelr . 

low fever patients. . 219, 243 
yellow fever camp, same 
sick of Seventy-first 

Regiment at 296 

First Battalion, Seventy-first- 

Regiment 221, 235, 236 

detailed to build bridges 

and improve roads 241 

halted on roadside 259 

believed it tad been am- 
bushed 263 

First 'Division, Fifth Army 

Corps ; 177 

First Regiment 217 

First .Regiment Artillery 359 

First Regiinent Cavalry, Ohio, 167 
Fii-st Regiinent Cavalry, United 

States Volunteers 317 

218-, 228 
encountered Spanish troops 

in the jungle. 216 

commonly knovra as Roose- 
velt Rough Riders.. 216, 218 

First Regiment Infantry 227 

National Guard, New 
York, or First Provis- 
ional Regiment 156 

Fish, Sergeant Hamilton, Jr., 
company K, instantly killed 

at Las Guasimas, Cuba 318 

Fisher, First Lieutenant Har- 
ris Baldwin, company M, 183 
appoiil-fed first lieutenant 

and battalion adjutant.. 182 
ordered to rear to draw 
ammunition under a 

galling fire 239 

Fisher, Irving P., of New 

■ York 180 

Fitzgerald, Thomas H., com- 
pany C, died of disease 248 

Fitzgibbon, John'"J\, company 
L, died on boar^ Missouri 

o aijd buried at sea 253 

V'Flint, Private Frank L., com- 
pany H, wounded in action 

at San Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Florence, Italy 184 

Florida 166, 167, 177 

185, 187, 259, 367 
order of advance of Ameri- 
can transports to Cuba 

from 195 

Foley, Private Louis B, com- 
pany K, wounded in action 

at San Jxian Hill, Cuba 244 

Fonseca, Francisco E 270 

Forsyth, Stanley H., company 

E, died of fever 24^9 

Fort Myer, Virginia 359 



Index — Seventt-fiest Eegt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 363 



PAGE 

Fort San Juan, Cuba 267 

Fort Tampa, Florida 153 

Fort Pond Bay, within the 
hook of Montauk Point, 

regiment arrived at 290 

regiment removed from 
detention camp to per- 
manent camp at 294 

Forty-first Regiment Infantry, 257 
Forty-seventh Begiment Infan- 
try, Kational Guard, New 

York 156 

Fourteenth Regiment Infan- 
try, National Guard, New 

York 156 

Fourth Begiment Cavalry 257 

troop B 218 

Fourth Regiment Infantry 220 

regulars 287 

Francis, Major Augustus T 166 

assigned to special care of 

armory 165 

commissioned colonel 171st 

Regiment 165 

recruited new regiment... 163 
with his officers met Sev- 
enty-first Begiment at 

Long Island City 297 

gruest 303 

Vree Masons, Lakeland Lodge 
of, give reception and ban- 
quet to Masonic brethren of 

regiment 180 

Free Masons, New^ York, Grand 

Lodge of 181 

Freidmann (Freidman), Pri- 
vate Paul W., died on board 

Missouri at sea 249 

French, Private John W., com- 
pany P 212 

detailed as amanuensis. . . 153 
ill with yellow fever. 153 

QANNON, PRIVATE ROBERT 

E., company L, wounded in 
action at San Juan Bill, 

Cuba '. . 245 

Garcia, General Y. luiquez 

Oalixto 214 

VTith his sta# passed by 
the canip of regiment . . . 225 

Garden' City, Long Island 155 

Garfield, Lyiijan B,. of New 

Yprk , . 180 

Genial hospital. Camp Wik- 
pff, Koptauk Point, Long 

iBlflnd 246, 292, 293 

Siboneir, Cuba 240 

tenia ' 284 

<ieoghega.n, John H., company 

M, died of fever 254 

Georgia, campaign through... 256 



PAGE 

Glen Cove, New York 254 

Goff, Sergeant Eugene W., 

company I, died of fever .... 251 
Goldsborough, Captain Wash- 
ington Laird, company 

M 236 

with company M, among 
the first to arrive on San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 234 

Gombert, Charles, company K, 

died of fever 252 

Goodman, Private Charles W., 
company A, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 244 
Goodrich, Captain Caspar F., 

United States Navy 218 

Grahn, Private Gus, company 
L, died of mountain 

fever « 253, 280 

buried west of entrench- 
ments near Santiago.... 280 
Grand Lodge of Free Masons 

of New York 181 

Great Bahama Channel... 200, 204 
Great Inag^a Island, Bahama, 204 
Greene, Colonel Francis Vin- 
ton 155, 156 

158, 160, 161, 162, 164 
166, 167, 172, 173, 175 
176, 181, 182, 209, 295 
called meeting of regi- 
ment 154 

mustered into United 

States service 157 

nominated brigadier-gen- 
eral 171 

brigadier-general 181 

Greene, General George S., old- 
est living graduate of 

West Point 175 

dying at Morristown, New 

Jersey 175 

Grimes, Captain George S., 

U. S. A 260 

battery in action at El 

Poso 260, 262 

Guantanamo, Cuba, United 
States marines had suc- 
cessful scrimmage vTith 

Spaniards at 216 

Port of 206 

Guilfoyle, Captain John F., 

U. S. A 292 

Guiteras, Dr. John, expert on 

yellow fever 243 

Gulf of Mexica 200 

( 
HACKENSACK, NEW^ JER- 

SEY 249 

Hall, Private Earl B., company 
F, wounded in action at San 
Juan Hill, Cuba 244 



364 Index — Seventy-first Begt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Hall, Private Kdward D., com- 
pany C, wounded in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

Haller, Private John H., com- 
pany K, died of fever 252 

Hardin, Colonel Edward E 211 

Harlem, New York, St. An- 
drew's church 155, 176, 180 

Hart, Patrick J., appointed 
chaplain at General Hospital, 

Montauk Point 293 

Harvard, formerly New York, 

of the American line 218 

Hatteras, North Carolina, ma- 
chinery broke down and ves- 
sel lay to for 14 hours 290 

Havana, Cuba, Commodore 
Schley's efEective blockade 

of 19] 

Hawk, William S 303 

Hawk and Wetherbee, Messrs., 
dinner to officers of regi- 
ment . . . 303 

Hawkins, General Hamilton 

Smith, U. S. A.. 220, 223, 237 

military record of 216 

retired 216 

held brief conversation 
with fieJd and staff offi- 
cers . 227 

ordered one battalion to 
top of San ^uan Hill to 
be deployed on firing 

line 236 

complimented the regi- 
ment for its good work, 366 
Hayes, Major Edward M., First 

Ohio Cavalry 167 

Hayes, ex-President Ruther- 
ford B 167 

Heath, Levrts C:, company G, 
died of pernicious ma,larial 

fever . . . .: 250 

Hebrank, Private. Ferdinand, 
company P, vyounded in ac- 
tion at Sau Juan Hill, Cuba. . 245 
Heindslnann, Captain Ferdi- 
nand, company C. 217 

Helena, boat 204 

Hempstead, New York 174 

211, 295 
.Hempstead Plains, 'New Xork. . 154 
155, 160, 162 
Herald, newspaper... 169, 210, 226 
Hess, Private Louis E., com- 
pany H, wounded . in a,otion 
at San Juan Hill, Cuba ...... 246 

Hoboken, New Jersey 211 

Hphspri, .Iiieutenant ' RJchmond ' 
Peatson, sinking the 

Merrimac . . . , 191 

ct.ew es;qhanged 242 



PAGE 

Hogan, John P., company E, 

died of malarial fever 249 

Holland, Private Charles D., 
company M, buried near 
the ford below San Juan 

Hill 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 254 

Holzkamp, Private Henry J., 
company L, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 245 
Homer, Colonel, Civil War vet- 
eran 28S, 297 

Hospital Corps 158, 167, 237 

Hospital department 178, 179 

Hospital ship 198 

Hospital tent, brief service 

held in 158 

Howard, Joseph, company F, 

died of typhoid malaria 250 

Howe, Sergeant Russell G., 

company E 219 

Howitt, John, company C, died 

of disease 248 

Hubschmitt (Hubschmidt) , Pri- 
vate Philip, company I, 
died of gastric fever.. 170, 251 
body sent to New York 

city for burial 170 

Hubschmitt (Hubschmidt), Pri- 
va,te William P., company I, 

injured 192 

Hull, military bill 154 

Humbert, Private William, 
company A, woundied in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 246 
Hurley, Private, George M., 
company C, wounded in ac- 
tio at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 246 
Hutchinson, Sergeant James 
M.^ company M, appointed 
second lieutenant 183 

IMMEN (IMMENS), COR- 
PORAL GEORGE L. 

(R.), company C, wound- 
ed in action at San Juan 
Hill, Cuba 231 

buried in trenches at Di- 
vision Hospital 240 

died of wounds received in 
action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba . ■. , .. . 348 

Inauga Island, Great, Bahama, 204 
Indiana ; •. . . 257 

Ninth ■ Regiment Infantry, 
company E. 257 

Volunteers, Thirtieth Regi- 
ment Infantry, company 
A . . ,..•..-....•... 257 

warship . . 194 



Index — Sbtentt-fibst Rbgt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 365 



PAGE 

JAMAICA 307, 308 

Jeaniiisson, Private Alexander, 

company G 300 

Jeffrey, Private John W., com- 
pany B, wounded in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

Jersey City, New Jersey. . 164, 198 
.Tohnston (Johnson), PriTate 
Henry C, company F, super- 
intended entertainment 306 

Jorgensen, Christopher, com- 
pany L, accidentally killed.. 353 

Journal, The, newspaper 307 

Joyce, Captain Walter Irving, 

company H 155 

sent to New York for re- 
covery 343 

KANE, MAURICE B., company 

L, killed by cars 354 

Keck, Captain Frank, pro- 
moted major 183 

with Third Battalion, 
among first to arrive on 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 334 

235, 364 
Keller, Private James E., com- 
pany A, wounded in action 

at San Juan Hill, Cuba 346 

Kennan, George 374 

Kent, General Jacob Ford, U. 

S. A 333, 333, 366 

military record of 330 

retired 330 

orders to Colonel Downs.. 331 
•ordered to take his divi- 
sion into action 362 

extract from his report of 
the San Juan engage- 
ment 263 

charged with unjust treat- 
ment toward Seventy- 
first Eegiment 365 

headquarters established 
in vicinity of San Juan, 

Cuba 267 

Key West, Florida... 174,' 194, 300 
Kirby, Private Sinclair H., 
company G, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba,' 245 
Kline, John C, Herald corre- 

spolident . . ..-. ...i 326 ' 

Kopper, Private Edward,, coni- 

pany E, sick with nleasles . . 193 
Kopper, Lieutenant Frederick, 
formerly colonel Sev- 
enty-first Kegiment 395 

in command of 200 recruits 

at Camp Black 395 

Kroupa, Edward C, company 
P, died of pernicious mala- 
rial fever 250 



PAGE 

Kuehnle, Private Frederick C, 
company D, wounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, • 
Cuba 345 

LA GARDE, MAJOR AND 
SURGEON LOUIS A., in 

charge of Siboney, Cuba 268 

La Grande Duchesse, trans- 
port 313, 350, 353 

rations transported at 

Santiago 389 

Lakeland, Florida 173, 175 

177, 179, 180, 183, 187 
190, 193, 306, 351, 356 

regiment arrived at 166 

sketch of camp at 167, 168 

Episcopalian chapel at.... 

• 170, 175 

lodge of Free Masons and 

regiment 180 

regiment leaves 184 

Las Guasimas, Cuba 218 

234, 337, 328, 358 

battle of 317, 318, 359 

United States Army en- 
gages in first ^battle on 

Cuban soil at 216 

evidence of bloody engage- 
ment at 323 

Lawrence, Private William C, 

company G 191 

Lawton, General Henry Ware, 
U. S. A., military record 

of 257 

congressional medal of 
honor for gallantry in 
front of Atlanta, 

Georgia 357 

killed in action at battle 
of SanvMateo, Philippine 

Islands 257 

Lawton's division at El Caney, 

Cuba ; 260 

Levy, Dr. Joseph M 337 

Linson, Captain William 

Henry, company D , . 336 

London, St. Paul's Church 176 

Long Island City 155, 163 

164, 190, 398 
special, train conveyed 
Seventy-first' Eegiment 

to . . 397 

• Loijg Island Kailroad.. . . ; 163 

steition, Montauk, regiment 

-parched to . . .; 297 

Longson, Lieutenant William, 
cqmpany H, died of ty- 
phoid fever 351 

toasj; drunk in ' silence to 
memory of 303 



366 Index — Seventy-first Regt., N. Y. State VolUntbeks. 



PAGE 

Lucas, Private William, H., 

company H 337 

» Ludlow, Brigadier-General 
William, U. S. A., mili- 
tary record of 256 

died at Convent station, 

New Jersey 256 

praised the Seventy-first 

regiment 285 

brigade of regulars 257 

MacARTHUR, COLONEL AR= 
THUR 293 

Mackenzie, Private William 
H., company E, vyounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 246 

MacMillan (Mc William) , Nor- 
man J. G., company M, died 
of yellow fever at Siboney, 

Cuba 254 

Mail and Express, newspaper . . 

169, 226 
letter written to, in favor 
of regiment, by Henry L. 

Stoddard 265 

Mara, Sergeant John J., com- 
pany M, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 244 

died of fever and dysen- 
tery 253 

Markley, Major Alfred C, U. S. 
A., his letter to Colonel 
Downs praising regiment 

. for its bravery 267 

Marlow, Private James L., 
company H, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 245 
Marsh (March), Surgeon and 

Major Edward T 165, 183 

Martens, Private Eichard, com- 
pany G, baptized by 
chaplain of regiment. . . . 191 

died of malarial fever 251 

Martin, Colonel Henry P., 
colonel of Seventy-first 
Eegiment in 1861... 180, 300 
too ill to be present at any 

of the exercises 300 

visited his grandchildren 
at Montauk on their re- 
turn from Cuba 301 

Seventy-first Eegiment 
owes its worth a,nil 
greatness especially to,. 301 
Maryes Heights, Virginia., bat- 
tle of ,, 220 

Massachusetts, Second Eegi- 
ment Infantry 163 

167, 170, 198 
officers buy horses 177 



PAGE 

Massachusetts!, Second Eegi- 
ment Infantry: 
part of Ludlow's command 

at El Caney 256 

utilized as a support at 

El Caney engagement ... 257 
not in San Juan engage- 
ment until second day.. 257 
suffered from Spanish fire, 
but not in fighting at El 

Caney 257 

Massachusetts coast 198 

Spanish ships sighted off.. 164 
Mans, Surgeon-MajoiT Louis M.. 156 

McAlpin, General Edwin A 

283, 297 
visited camp to make ar- 
rangements for parade 

in New York city 295 

McClelland, Private Donald C, 
company E, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 244 
McClurg, William, company K, 

died of pleuro pneumonia... 252 
McDermott, Sergeant James J., 
company E, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 245 
McGeechan, Private John, 
company M, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 245 
Mclntyre, Private Samuel, 
company G, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 246 
McKeever, Edward Percy, 

company K, died of fever... 252 
McKinley, President William.. 

158, 171, 210 
called for 125,000 volun- 
teers 153 

his anxiety to protect the 

troops 198 

Meeks, Sergeant Elmer C, 
company I, died of typhoid 

malarial fever . ; 251 

Meeks, Captain William Fur- 
man, company 1 237 

with company I, among 
first to arrive on San 

Juarc Hill, Cuba 234 

Mercer, Private" John E., 
company E, wounded in ac- 
tion at .San Juan Hill, Cuba, 246 

Merchants' Central Club 282 

Merrimfio, sinking of, by Hob- 
son l'91 

snnjc in harbor 289 

Merrltt, General Wesley, U. S. 

A 171, 181 

Messer, Private John P., com- 
pany G 237 

Messiter, Arthur M., company 
E, died of fever 249 



Index — Seventy-first Eegt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 367 



PAGE 

Mexico, Gulf of 200 

Meyer (Myer), Corporal John 
C, company F, superin- 
tended entertainment 206 

Michig-an 227 

troops assisted in cutting 
trees and biiildiiig 

bridges 241 i 

Miles, General Nelson A., lieu- 
tenant-general, U. S. A 166 

191, 196 
Miley, Lieutenant Jolin D., U. 

S. A 260, 263 

Military Hospital, Santiago, 

Cuba 271 

Miller, Private John H., com- 
pany C, wounded in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 246 

Mills, Private Bloomfield B., 
company M, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 245 
Missouri, transport.. 249, 252, 253 

Monroe, New York 250 

Montauk, Long Island 298 

yellow fever patients 

strictly quarantined at.. 246 
sick of regiment suffered 
from insuificient cover- 
ing during cold nights, 

at 293 

transports, with troops 
from Santiago, continu- 
ally arriving at 296 

detention hospitals, few 
sick of Seventy-first 

Regiment at 296 

general hospital, sick of 
Seventy-first Kegiment at, 296 

railroad station at 297 

Camp WikofE, list of Sev- 
enty-first Regiment dead 

at 303 

Montauk Point, Long Island.. 248 
249, 250, 251, 252, £(53 
254, 288, 290, 294, 304 

troops removed to 287 

Moody Institute, Charles P. 
Barrett, evangelist of, in 
charge of Army Commission 

work in Cuba 281 

Morrlstown, New Jersey 175 

Morro castle, Havana harbor, 

Cuba 210, 239 

from which flew American 

flag 289 

Morton, Lake, Florida 167 

Murphy, Private James, com- 
pany M, wounded in action 

at San Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Murphy, Private Robert E., 
company H, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 244 



PAGE 

Murtaugh (Murtagh), Private 
Thomas B., company B 206 

NAGLE, JAMES E., company 
G, died of fever and bron- 
chitis 251 

National Guard, Seventy-first 

Regiment 155, 285 

New York 155, 303 

first regiment mustered 

into volunteer service... 154 
two companies added to . . 154 
proceeds to Camp Black, 
Hempstead Plains, New 

York 155 

given place of honor in 

State camp 155 

physical examination of 

members of • 156 

settles down to life in 

camp 156 

mustered into United 

States service 157 

became Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New 

Y^ork Volunteers 157 

Lieutenant Frederick Kop- 
per, formerly a colonel 

of 295 

First Regiment Infantry, 
or First Provisional 

Regiment 156 

Thirteenth Regiment In- 
fantry 156 

Fourteenth Regiment In- 
fantry 156 

Forty-seventh Regiment 

Infantry 156 

Sixty-fifth Regiment 

Infantry 156 

Slxty-nlnth R e gi m e n t 

Infantry 156 

One Hundred and Seventy- 
first Regiment Infan- 
try 165, 303 

New Manhattan Hotel, propri- 
etors, dinner to ofBcers of 

regiment 303 

New Orleans, Louisiana 204 

New York, of the American 

Line, now Harvard 2.18 

New York Bay. 211 

New York city. New York 158 

169, 170, 175, 179, 196, 202, 218 
222, 226, 243, 247, 248, 249, 250 
251, 353, 253, 255, 270, 377, 278 
281, 383, 290, 294„295, 303 
contributors from, to com- 
forts for sick in .regi- 
ment 180 

reception to regiment on 
return from Cuba 299 



368 Index — Sbventt-fiest Regt^ N. Y. State Volunteers. 



FACE 

New York City, New York: 
State armory. Thirty- 
fourth street and Park 

avenue 165, 297, 299 

300, 301, 302, 303, 304 
New York, Grand Lodge 6f 

Free Masons 181 

New York harbor 175, 198 

New York National Guard, 153, 303 
Seventy-first Regiment . . . 154 
first regiment mus- 
tered into volunteer 

service 154 

two companies added 

to 154 

proceeds to Camp 

Black 155 

given place of honor in 

State camp 155 

physical examination 

of 156 

settles down to life in 

camp 156 

mustered into United 

States service 157 

became Seventy-first 
Eegiment Infantry, 
New York Volun- 
teers 157 

Lieutenant Frederick 
Kopper, formerly a 

colonel of 295 

First Eegiment Infantry, 
or First Provisional 

Eegiment 156 

Thirteenth Eegiment In- 
fantry 156 

Fourteenth Eegiment In- 
fantry 156 

Forty-seventh Eegiment 

Infantry 156 

Sixty-fifth Eegiment 

Infantry 156 

Sixty-ninth E e gi m e n t 

Infantry 156 

One Hundred and Seventy- 
first Eegiment Infan- 
try 165, 303 

New York, representatives of 
■prominent newspapers and 
journals of, at camp at Se- 

villa, Cuba 236 

,New York State 152, 171, 183 

188, 216, 287, 304 
Colonel MacArthur paid 

men 293 

adjutant-general of 153 

154, 165, 247 

New York Tribune 169 

New York troops 154 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers, Seventy- 
first Eegiment Infantry, 79 
158, 159, 160, 163, 165, 166 
167, 168, 169, 171, 172, 173 
176, 179, 181, 183, 185, 187 
192, 194, 198, 199, 201, 205 
208, 209, 210, 211, 217, 219 
323, 228, 234, 237, 241, 243 
282, 285, 305, 314, 317 
explanatory note, to his- 
tory of ; 152-153 

history of 152-305 

ordered to Tampa, Flor- 
ida 161, 177 

every variety of occupa- 
tion represented in 162 

arrived at Lakeland, Flor- 
ida 166 

religious freedom given to, 173 
Y. M. C. A. tent given to . . 174 

oflicers buy horses 177 

furnished supplies for hos- 
pital department at its 

own expense 178 

list of officers appointed 

in , . 182, 183 

leaves Lakeland, Florida.. 184 
exhausted by march to 
Tampa Heights, Florida, 186 

ordered to- Cuba 188 

receive pay 188 

Veteran Association of 188 

given the privilege of go- 
ing to town 189 

drum corps 190, 207 

entertained by Brigade 

Band 190 

ordered to proceed to 
transports at Port Tam- 
pa, Florida , 193 

arrived at Port Tampa, 

Florida 196 

boarded the Vigilancia 197 

sketch of life on Vigil- 
ancia 198-213 

drilled in boarding, man- 
ning and rowing small 

boats of the ship 203 

program of entertainment 

given by 306 

reaches Santiago, Cuba... 307 
landed at Siboney, Cuba... 213 
pitched camp at Siboney, 

Cuba 215 

ordered to reinforce First 

United States Cavalry... 216 
horses of, safely landed at 

Siboney, Cuba 219 

started upon march for Se- 

villa, Cuba 222 

pitched camp at Sevilla, 
Cuba 223 



Index — Seventy-first Regt., N. Y.' State Volunteers. 369 



PAGE 

New York Volmiteers, Seventy- 
first Eegiment Infantry: 

all in excellent health 336 

ordered to march toward 
Santiago, Cuba 336 

with entire brigade, re- 
sumed march to San 
Juan, Cuba 337 

to receive further orders.. 287 

under continuous fire on 
march to San Juan, 
Cuba 239, 230 

obeyed orders and halted, 332 

brought together, all ofB- 
cers in command of their 
men 235 

fourteen killed and 67 
wounded in San Juan en- 
gagement 239 

utilized their muskets with 
disastrous effect upon 
the enemy 339 

removed from Santiago to 
Montauk in three detach- 
ments 346 

staif officers 347 

list of men; living, ill, 
missing, dead 247-354 

list of casualties in 254 

praised for bravery in 
home newspapers 255 

regulars reflect on bravery 
of 355 

only volunteers assigned to 
perilous work of taking 
San Juan Hill, Cuba 256 

only volunteers employed 
in first day's battle at 
San Juan Hill, Cuba 256 

accurate account of its en- ^ 
gagement at San Juan 
Hill, Cuba 256-&66 

inspected and praised by 
regular army officers 256 

subject of wide discussion 
in New York 256 

brought into formation to 
resist a midnight sur- 
prise - 258 

awakened before dawn to 
take part in battle of 
San Juan Hill, Cuba 258 

started on march for San 
Juan Hill, Cuba 259 

marched toward El Poso, 
Cuba 260 

in thick of Spanish volley 
firing 262 

halted at San Juan creek, 
awaiting orders 263 

ordered by General Kent 
into thickest of fight 263 

24 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers, Seventy- 
first Begiinent Infantry: 

misunderstanding among 
its officers 263 

up the hill in time to have 
list of loss as heavy as 

any other regiment 265 

. realized that every shot 
from its Springfield rifle 
made it a target for the 
enemy 265 

ordered to stop shooting 
when Spaniards had 
ceased heavy firing 265 

picked up Krag-Jorgen- 
sens, but were not al- 
lowed to use them 265 

fought courageously 
through whole engage- 
ment 366 

complimented by General 
Hawkins for its good 
work 366 

temporarily assigned to 
s command of General 
Lawton 367 

a letter from Major A. C. 
Markley, U. S. A., prais- 
ing bravery 267 

no allowance of transpor- 
tation 368 

officers' horses used for 
pack mules 36f> 

two tents presented to, by 
representatives of Y. M. 
C. A. Army Commission, 869 

received gifts from Red 
Cross Society ., 374 

Mrs. John Addison Porter 
provided liberal supply 
of medicines and food 

for sick of 374 

yellow fever ^ . . 376 

insufficient food and cloth- 
ing 276 

arrival of mails 377 

difficulty in getting relief, 278 

requisition for khaki suits . 
for 278 

unwritten history of 379 

supplied with khaki 384 

improvement in tone and 
temper of, after declara- 
tion of peace 284 

many sick with fever 386 

Dr. James Stafford re- 
quested to be returned 
to 387 

officers prepared a tele- 
gram to be sent to Sena- 
tor Piatt, of New York, 
but recalled it 387 



370 Index — Sbventy-fibst Eegt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers, Seventy- 
first Regiment Infantry: 

cheered Sixth Eegiment of 
regulars . . 288 

the hospital in Santiago.. 289 

deaths at sea 390 

at Fort Pond Bay, Long 
Island 230 

in detention camps from 
four to ten days 291 

liberal supply of food by 
Red Cross Society 292 

supplied with needed deli- 
cacies 292 

insufficient . covering at 
Montauk 293 

pay for services from May 
2nd to May 10th, while at 
Camp Black 293 

removed from detention 
camp to permanent camp 
near Fort Pond Bay, 
Long Island 394 

furloughs 294 

veterans visit camp 295 

many detailed to serve in 
other regiments .^ 296 

many had died on foreign 
shores 296 

sick of, scattered in many 
places 296 

met by Colonel Francis, of 
171st Regiment, -with his 
officers 297 

conveyed by special train 
to Long Island City 297 

Veteran Association com- 
mittee greeted regiment 
at Long Island City 297 

marched to Long Island 
railroad station 297 

greeted on wharf by veter- 
ans of regiment 298 

sketch of parade 298-302 

left New York over 1,000 
strong and on its return 
paraded less than 350 
men 399 

but three staff officers in 
the parade 300 

briefly addressed by 
Colonel Downs 302 

leaves of absence for sixty 
days 303 

ordered to reassemble at 
Camp Black October 26 
for muster-out 303 

served with refreshments 
by Woman's Aid Society, 303 

a dinner to officers of 303 

assembled at State armory 
for muster-out 303 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers, Seventy- 
first^ Regiment Infantry: 
voted at armory as in time 

of war 304 

together with two com- 
panies of new recruits, 
numbered about 900 men, 304 
First Battalion... 331, 335, 336 
under Major Whittle, 
detailed to build 
bridges and improve 

roads .- 341 

halted on roadside. . . . 259 
believed it had been 

ambushed 263 

Second Battalion. . 235, 336, 378 
encamped at top of hill 

in sight of Santiago, 333 
under Major Wells, de- 
tailed to build 
bridges and improve 

roads 241 

ordered to march to 
Santiago and take 
transport for Mon- 
tauk. Long Island . . . 288 

Third Battalion 235 

led by Major Keck, 
among first troops 
to arrive on San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 234 

companies B and L 
ordered to march to 
Santiago and take 
transport for Mon- 
tauk, Long Island... 288 

. company A 247 

company B 247, 248 

company C 248 

company D 248, 249 

company E 249 

company F 250 

company G 350, 251 

company H 351 

company! 351 

company K 351, 253 

company L 352, 253 

company M 353, 354 

New York Volunteers, Second 
Regiment Infantry, or Sec- 
ond Provisional Regiment. . 311 
New York Volunteers, Seventh 
Regiment Infantry, company 

K 181 

New York Volunteers, Sixty- 
ninth Regiment Infantry 173 

173, 310 
New York World, newspaper.. 381 
Ninth Regiment Infantry, 

company E, Indiana 357 

Ninth Regiment Infantry, 
regulars 264 



Index — Sbventy-fihst Eegt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 371. 



PAGE 

North Carolina 359 

Norwegian craft 304 

O'BRIEN, THOMAS J., com- 
pany F, died of disease 250 

O'Connor, John E., company E, 

died of fever 253 

Ohio 357 

First Eegiment Cavalry... 167 

Olcott, Mrs. Bmmet E 180 

Olivette, steamer 304, 318 

headquarters for newspa- 
per correspondents 807 

Olyphant, Quartermaster J. 

Kensett 181 

One Hundred and Seventy-first 
Eegiment, Infantry, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 

165, 303 
acted as escort to Seventy- 
first on parade to 

armory 297 

Ord, Major-General Edward O. 

C, U. S. A 227 

Ord, Lieutenant Jules Garesche, 
U. S. A., military record 

- of 337 

killed at battle of San 

Juan, Santiago, Cuba 227 

one of the first ofiicers 
shot at San Juan, Cuba, 338 
Order of advance of American 
transports from Florida to 
Cuba 195 

PARK AVENUE, New York 

city 300, 303 

Peace, formal declaration of, 

and war ended 383 

Pennsylvania 220 

Eailway . . . , ' 174 

Pfister, Edward, company E, 

died of fever 249 

buried at Montauk, Long 

Island 303 

Philippine expedition 171 

Islands 181, 357 

Pierson, First Lieutenant Wil- 
liam D., company M, died- of 

fever ,253 

Plant system 167 

Piatt, Senator Thomas, of New 
York, telegram prepared by 
Seventy-first Eegiment offi- 
cers to be sent to, but re- 
called 387 

Port Tampa, Florida.. 188, 194, 212 
regiment ordered to trans- 
ports at 193 

arrived at 196 

Sixth and Sixteenth Infan- 
try, regulars, ordered to 
transports at 193 



PAGE 

Port of Guantanamo, Cuba .... 206 
Porter, Mrs. John Addison, 
provided liberal supply of 
medicines and food for sick 
of Seventy-first Eegiment . . 274 

Porto Eico 200, 208 

Potter, Private Ernest E., 

company M 337 

wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba. 245 

Preger (Prayer),. Private Wil- 
liam, company A, buried 
near the ford below San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 247 

Pride, Adjutant Hamilton, 

Civil War veterap 297, 300 

Provisional Eegiment, first, or 
First Eegiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers... 156 
Second, or Second Eegi- 
ment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers 156 

QUOQUE, Long Island 395 

Quartermaster Department, 
practically a nullity 279 

Queens, New York, borough of, 350 

Queen's Eoad, pilgrims all 
along', journeying toward 
Santiago, Cuba 271 

Quevedo, Eichard, company I, 
died of typhoid malarial 
fever 251 

Quilty, John J., company E, 
died of disease 349 

RABINQ, PRIVATE ALBERT 

J., company D 283 

RafEerty, Captain Malcolm 

Anstice, company F, 194, 312 
lieutenant, promoted cap- 
tain . . , 183 

among first to arrive on 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 233 

led his company up the 
hill with Major Keek's 

battalion 264 

Eebecca Channel 200 

Eeconcentradoes, meaning of.. 214 
Eecruits, two hundred, at 

Montauk, Long Island 295 

excellent work of "395 

comparison between 296 

Red Cross Society, gave several 

gifts to regiment 274 

declined to receive money 
specifically for any par- 
ticular regiment 378 

gave liberal supply of food 
to regiment 392 



372 Index — Seventy-first Rbgt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

Red Cross steamer, State of 
Texas, first to enter Santi- 
ago harbor after surrender, 273 

Regrimental Hospital 246 

Keina Mercedes, ship, sunk in 

Santiago harbor 289 

Relief Society of the regiment, 278 
gifts of tobacco and par- 
eels received from 385 

Reynolds, Daniel K., company 
D, died on board Roumania, 

at sea 249 

Richardson, Private Henry P., 
company A, wounded in ac- . 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba. . 245 
Richmond, Virginia ....... 166, 220 

Roberts, Lieutenant Alfred I., 
company V, died of pneu- 
monia 250 

toast drunk in silence to 

memory of 303 

Roby, Private Robert J., Jr. 

(William), company C, song, 206 
Rodgers, Corporal James L., 

company K, died of fever 251 

Roe, Major-General Charles F., 156 
159, 160, 161, 162, 174, 211 
Roosevelt, Theodore, assistant 

secretary navy 196 

lieutenant-colonel . . ..260, 262 
colonel, in command of 
First Volunteer Cavalry 

Regiment 260 

ordered down the hill and 
to advance on San Juan, 

Cuba . 262 

Root, First Sergeant Edgar W., 
company A, died of tjrphoid 

malarial fever 247 

Ross, Chief Hostler 178, 222 

Ross, Private Reuben, company 
M, buried near the ford 
below. San. 3[uan Hill, 

Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba.. 254 

Rough Riders, Roosevelt 192 

196, 218, 259 
also known as First United 
States Volunteer Cav- 
alry . . 216, 218 

excited curiosity of every- 
one 256 

had several losses in killed 
and wounded on El PoSo 

. Hill, Cuba 228 

Roumania, transport ; 249 

Rouse, Frank E., company K, 

died of fever. 252 

died, and buried at Mon- 
tatik. Long Island 303 



PAGE 

Busk, Corporal William A., 
company G, died on board 
Missouri 250 

ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH, 

Harlem, New York. . 155, 176, 180 
St. John's Hospital, borough 
of Queens, Brooklyn, New 

York 249, 250 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 248 
St. Paul's Church, London. . . . 176 
St. Peter's Hospital, Brooklyn, 

New York 253 

St. Thomas' parish. New York, 171 
Sampson, Commodore William 

Thomas 210 

fleet, bombarding Santi- 
ago, Cuba 191 

San Francisco, California 181 

San Juan, Santiago, Cuba 238 

241, 242, 247, 265 
regiment and entire bri- 
gade under continuous 

fire on march to 230 

battle of 227 

success of engagement 
due to regiments, 
battalions and even 

companies 232 

of a unique character, 255 
one out of every four 
men in charging col- 
umn at, killed, or 

wtfunded 257 

San Juan creek, Santiago, 
Cuba, regiment halted there 

awaiting orders 262 

San Juan Heights, Hospital, 
Santiago, Cuba, sick of regi- 
ment at 296 

San Juan Hill, Santiago, Cuba, 233 
235, 240, 248, 250, 251 
252, 253, 254, 261, 263 
account of the battle 

of .. , ... 227-240 

list of wounded in battle 

of . . . f ; 244-246 

brillla,nt charge and occu- 

, pation of 233 

hqnor of its capture lies 
with Thirteenth; Sixth, 
Sixteenth or Twenty- 
fourth regular Infantry, 233 
honor of being first at top 
of hill claimed by sixteen 
companies and six regi- 
ments, Fifth Army Corps, 255 
accurate account of the 
engagement of Seventy- 
first Regiment at... 256-266 
no sign of life detected... 260 



Index ^ — Seventy-first Kbgt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 373 



PAGE 

San Juan Hill, Santiago, Cuba, 
five regiments of United 
States troops in victorious 

charge up 264 

San Mateo, Philippine Islands, 

battle of 357 

Santiago, Cuba 200 

206, 208, 209, 213, 213, 317 
219, 220, 223, 224, 225, 233 
346, 247, 348, 249, 350, 251 
252, 253, 256, 259, 267, 26S 
369, 376, 382, 385, 288, 296 
Sampson's fleet bombard- 

iiig 191 

Seventy-first Regiment In- 
fantry reaches 207 

troops fled toward 315 

Spaniards had retreated to 

entrenchments before . . 385 
Seventy-first Eegiment or- 
dered to march toward. . 336 
a city with natural fortifi- 
cations 327 

Spaniards had been driven 

back toward 238 

surrendered 14 July, 1898.. 343 
post-ofBce re-established in 

after. July 14, 1898 343 

pilgrims all along Queen's 

Eoad, journeying toward, 371 
pauper-stricken and starv- 
ing Cubans journeying 

toward .' 371 

strong entrenchments and 
fortifications built by 

Spaniards . 271 

sketch of 272 

General Shatter forbids 

sale of liquors ,, . . . 372 

enlisted men of the United 
States troops forbidden: 

to enter 273 

food and medicines, be- 
sought for sick soldiers, 274 
milk and rice" for the sick, 380 
many obliged to go to hos- 
pital at 389 

transports,, with troops 
from, continually arriv- 
ing at Montauk ; . . . 296 

city hospital, sick of Sev- 
enty-first Eegiment at.. 296 
Santiago harbor, Cuba, Ad- " 

mir'al. Cervera lost every ves- 
, sel in his command at the 

■'month of 239 

Savannah, Georgia 166 

Schaller, Private Prank A., 
company E, wounded in ac- . 
tion at S^n Juan Hill, Cuba, 244 



PAGE 

Scheid, Corporal Henry J., 
company P, wounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 831 

buried in trenches at Di- 
vision Hospital, San 

Juan, Cuba 240 

died of wounds received in 
action at Sah Juan Hill, 

Cuba 250 

Schindel, S. J. Bayard, Lieu- 
tenant, U. S. A 185 

Schley, Winfield Scott, effect- 
ive blockade of Havana, 

Cuba 191 

Schroter, August P., company 

K, died of fever 252 

Schutz, Gustav C, company L, 
died on board 'La Grande 
Duchesse and buried at 

sea 253, 290 

Schuyler, Captain Walter S., 

United States Army 156, 157 

Scofield, Private Sidney A., 
company K, buried at 
edge of the. stream at 
foot of El Poso Hill, 

Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 231, 252 

Second Battalion, Seventy-first 
Eegiment Infantry, New 

York. Volunteers 235 

236, 278 
encamped at top of hill 

in sight of Santiago 223 

under Major Wells, detailed 
to build bridges and im- 
prove roads 241 

ordered to march to Santi- 
ago and take transport 
for Montauk, Long Is- 
land 288 

Second . Brigade, Cavalry 166 

Second Provisional Eegiment, 
or Second liegiment Infan- 
try, New York Volun- 
teers 156, 211 

Second Eegiment Infantry, 
Massachusetts Volun- 
teers -. 163, 167, 170, 192 

officers biiy horses 177 

part of Ludlow's com- 
mand at El Caney, Cuba, 356 

utilized as a support 357 

Seguranca, ship 206, 208, 213 

Selfridge, First Lieutenant Ed- 
ward A., Jr., company K, 

promoted captain 183 

Senate, United States 171 

Seneca, transport ship 211 

Seventh Eegiment Cavalry 218 



374 Index — Seventy-first Regt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 
Seventh Regiment Infantry, 

funeral of private of 281 

Seventh Eegiment, New York 

Volunteers, company K 181 

Seventy-first Regiment Infan- 
try, National Guard, New 
York. (See National Guard 
and New Yurk Volunteers.) 
Seventy-first Regiment Veteran 

Association 180 

Seventy-first veterans on 
wharf to greet Cuban sol- 
diers of Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 298 

Sevilla, Cuba 216, 218, 220, 230 

Seventy-first regiment 

■ pitched camp at 223 

Spanish block house near 

camp at 223 

two corporals and several 
privates of Tenth Cav- 
alry interred near 223 

camp at, representatives 
of prominent newspapers 
and journals of New 

York at 226 

sketch of road to San 

Juan Hill, from 227 

Shafter, General William R., U. 

S. A., Fifth Army Corps, 177 
196, 198, 207, 212, 233, 260 
wished to avoid bombard- 
ment of the citj' 242 

had forbidden sale of 
liquors for three days in 

Santiago, Cuba 272 

directed by authorities at 
Washington to remove 
all troops to United 

States 286 

Sharrott, First Sergeant Eu- 
gene L., company G, died of 

typhoid fever 250 

Shaw, Private Frederick V. V., 
company A, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 244, 247 

Shaw, Private John A., com- 
pany F, song selections, 206 

died of fever 250 

Sheppard, Private William B., 
company M, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 245 
Shinnecock, Long Island, light 

off 290 

Short, Sergeant Peter H., Jr., 
company A, appointed first 

lieutenant 183 

Siboney, Cuba 212, 214 

215, 216, 217, 218, 223 
234, 240, 242, 243, 254 
258, 267, 268, 273, 287 



PAGK 

Siboney, Cuba: 

sketch of 21H 

Seventy-first Regiment 

landed at 213 

pitched camp at 215 

United States post-office 

opened at 24;i 

every wooden house burned 
to ground on account of 

yellow fever 243 

first tent given to regi- 
ment by Y. M. C. A. 
army commission, left on 

vessel at 269 

insufficient lighterage fa- 
cilities at 271 

wretched roads five miles 

out from 271 

hospital, some sick of Sev- 
enty-first Regiment at. . . 295 

Signal Corps 230 

Sing Sing, New York 248 

Sixteenth Regiment Infantry, 

regulars 177, 216, 217 

223, 233, 236, 258, 260 
262, 264, 282, 285, 293 
ordered to proceed to 
transports at Port Tam- 
pa, Florida 192 

moved to the right 267 

band of, played martial 
airs as vessel swung into 

the Caribbean 290 

Sixth Regiment Infantry, regu- 
lars 177, 185 

216, 217, 223, 227, 233 
236, 258, 260, 264, 28S 
ordered to proceed to 
transports at Port Tam- 
pa, Florida 192 

moved to the right 267 

started for Santiago and 

Montauk 288 

Sixty-fifth Regiment Infan- 
try, National Guard, New 

York 156 

Sixty-ninth Regiment Infan- 
try, National Guard, New 

York 156 

Sixty-ninth Regiment Infan- 
try, New York Volunteers. . 172 
173, 210 
Skinner, Private Louis I?., com- 
pany B, killed in action 
at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 231, 24S 

buried at edge of stream 
at foot of El Poso Hill, 

Cuba 240 

Small, Corporal Louis B., com- 
pany B, died of disease 247 



Index — Sbvbnty-fikst Eegt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 375 



PAGE 

Smith, Major Clinton Haptt... 164 
promoted lieutenant- 
colonel 182 

lieutenant-colonel .... 197, 210 
283, 300 

appointed caterer to offi- 
cers' mess 209 

down with iever 276 

in command of regiment.. 282 
Smith, Brigadier-General 

George Moore 156 

South Carolina 216 

Spain 152, 163, 191 

war between United States 
and 153, 305 

reality of impending strug- 
gle with, realized 161 

all terms of surrender 
merciful to 244 

its army to be returned to, 
only stipulation in sur- 
render of Santiago, Cuba, 244 

24,000 Spanish troops to be 
transported there in 
their own vessels 268 

had sued for peace 278 

had agreed to all the 
terms of peace imposed 

by the United States 283 

Spanish, The 212 

217, 218, 219, 266 

had retreated to entrench- 
ments before El Caney 
and . Santiago 225 

their excellent system of 
fortifications, etc., in 
Cuba 227 

fled in retreat as they saw 
United States troops 
advancing 233 

neither regarded nor re- 
spected the Red Cross 
Society 235 

had been driven back 
toward Santiago 238 

made their last attempt to 
destroy United States 
troops 238 

lost about 3,000 troops 239 

sent their first shot of bat- 
tle 261 

returned the fire with 
shrapnel 261 

volley. firing on men ford- 
ing stream 262 

strong entrenchments and 
fortifications built by 
along eastern end of 
Santiago 271 

starving, surged about the 
wharf waiting to be fed, 273 

brass bullets used by 223 



FAOi: 
Spanish, The: 

wounded at Las Guasimas 
who died returning to 
Santiago buried in trench, 224 
fired from block houses 

and entrenchments 230 

had sharpshooters in tall 
cocoanut trees along the 

road 230 

sent shrapnel flying in 

every direction 230 

used smokeless powder 230 

aim, upon gun on El Poso 

Hill very accurate 228 

army, made a solid pha- 
lanx of troops from 
San Juan, three miles 

to the^eft 227 

to be returned to 
Spain, only stipula- 
tion in surrender of 

Santi.igo 244 

block house, near camp at 

Sevilla 223 

colonel, killed by an ex- 
ploded shell 215 

entrenchments, fired upon 

with shrapnel 261 

fire. Second Massachusetts 

suffered from 257 

fleet . . 198 

■prisoners, of equal rank, 

exchanged for ours 242 

ships 198 

sighted off Massachu- 
setts coast 164 

soldiers along outskirts of 
city receiving morn- 
ing messs 271 

housed on both sides 
of street in Andalu- 

sian quarter 272 

troops, had fled toward 

Santiago, Cuba 215 

in jungle, attack First 
United States -Volun- 
teer Cavalry 216 

24,000 transported to 
Spain in their own 

vessels 268 

war 177, 259 

Spitzel (Pitzel), Sergeant Max, 
company F, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 244 
Spottsylvania, Virginia, battle 

of ." 220 

Squadron A 161 

band 163 

furnished music for re- 
view of troops 160 

Stafford, Surgeon Harry Eu- 
gene 237 



376 Index — Sevbxtx-fiest Eegt., N. Y. State Voluntbers. 



PAGE 

Stafford, Harry Eugene, 

Captain, mustered into 

United States service as 

surgeon 156 

responded to address 180 

weak from o'verwork 276 

Stafford, Captain and Assist- 
ant Surgeon James 79 

mustered into XTnited 
States service as surgeon, 156 

on duty in Cuba 247 

had been detailed to serve 
with Fourth Regiment 

Infantry 287 

requested to be returned 
to Seventy-first Regi- 
ment 287 

Starin's barges, used in get- 
tlngf soldiers ready for 

camp 291 

State Armory, New York city, 
Thirty-fourth street and 
Park avenue... 165, 297, 299, 300 
301, 302, 303, 304 
State of Texas, Eed Cross 

steamer 274 

first to enter harbor after 

surrender 273 

Stegman, Henry !{., of the 

New York Tribune 169, 220 

Stephens (Stevens), Quarter- 
master Amos H 22G 

recuperating at Siboney, 

Cuba 243 

made requisition for khaki 

suits for regiment 278 

Sternberg-, General George M., 

U. S. A 284, 287 

decided to remove troops 

to Montauk Puint 287 

Stevenson, Hospital Steward 
George H., in hospital at 

Santiago 247 

Stoddard, Captain Charles Her- 
bert, company E 304 

assigned to take care of 

sick 192 

in comiuand of 200 recruits 

at Camp Black 295 

Stoddard, Henry L., of the 

Mail and Express 169 

226, 266 
account of the engagement 
nf rei,'^iment at San Juan 

Hill 256-266 

Sumner, General Samuel S., 

U. S. A 260 

ordered shrapnel to be 
used instead of solid 

shot 261 

Sun, the newspaper 207,223 



PAGE 

TALCOTT, WILLIAM A., JR., 

company M, died of fever and 

peritonitis 254 

Tampa, Florida 163, 164 

166, 167, 175, 183, 184, 194 
196, 356, 267, 269, 277, 295 
regiment ordered to.. 161, 177 
thirty of regiment left to 

guard property in 29& 

Tampa Bay, Florida 184 

187, 191, 194, 198, 200, 202 
Tampa Bay Hotel, Tampa, 

Florida 184 

army corps headquarters 

at" 178 

Tampa Heig-hts, Florida. . 173, 174 
184, 185, 187, 18S, 190, 211 
Tenth Regiment, United States 

Cavalry 223 

Tenth Regiment, United States 

Infantry 216 

Third Battalion, Seventy-first 

Regiment Infantry 235 

led by Major Keck, among 
first troops to arrive on 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 234 

companies B and L or- 
dered to march to Santi- 
ago and take transport 
for Montauk, Long Is- 
land 288 

Third Regiment Cavalry, U. 

S. A 303 

Infantry 220 

Thirteenth Regiment Infantry, 

U. S. A 194, 23a 

made gallant charge on 
block house at extreme 

left 264 

Thirteenth Regiment, National 

Guard, New York 156 

Thirtieth Regiment Infantry, 

Indiana, company A 257 

Thirty-fourth street, New 

York 155. 299, 303 

Thompson, Second Lieutenant 
Jcihn M., company K, pro- 
moted first lieutenant 182 

Thorp, Edward Y., company B, 

died of disease 248 

Thurston, Dr 274 

Thurston, Mrs 274 

Tod, Commissary J. Kennedy, 
formerly of Seventy-first 

Regiment 181 

Townsend, Captain Eugene 

De Kay, company A 176 

Transports, order of advance 
of American transports 

from Florida to Cuba 195 

Tribuu'^ The, newspaper 226 



Index — Sbvbnty-fiest Rbgt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 377 



PAGE 

Trinity church, rang its 
chimes as Seventy-first Kegi- 

ment parade passed 299. 

Trull, Lieutenant William E., 
Jr., company G, wounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 231, 244 

Twentieth Regiment Infantry, 

U. S. A 216 

Twenty-third Eegiment Infan- 
try, U. S. A 216 

Twenty-fourth Eegiment In- 
fantry, regulars i . . 220 

233, 257, 267 
made gallant charge on 
block house at extreme 

left 264 

Twenty-second street. New 
York 1S5 

UNITED STATES 154, 155 

158, 174, 304 
war between, Spain and.. 153 

305 

three oJfBcers of, and three 

attaches from foreign 

governments, settled 

terms of surrender of 

Santiago, Cuba . .' 244 

all terms of surrender 

favorable to 244 

mails arrive from 282 

Spain agreed to all the 
terms of peace imposed 

by 283 

authorities at Washington 
directed General Shafter 
to remove all troops to, 286 

United States Army '. 157, 158 

194, 2ip, 220, 256, 267, 284 
engages in first battle on 
Cuban soil at Las Guasi- 

mas 216 

United States Engineer Corps, 230 
United States First Volunteer 

Cavalry 217, 218, 228 

commonly known as Roose- 
velt Rough Riders 216 

encountered Spanish troops 

in the jungle 216 

United States Third Regiment 

Cavalry 303 

Fourth Regiment Infan- 
try 287 

Sixth Regiment Infantry, 177 
185, 217; 223, 227, 236 
258, 260, 264, 282 
ordered to proceed to 
transports at Port 

Tanipa, Florida 192 

moved to the right 267 

Ninth Regiment" Infantry,. 264 



PAGE 

United States Thirteenth Regi- 
ment Infantry, made 
gallant charge on block 
house at extreme left. . . 2C4 
Sixteenth Regiment Infan- 
try 177, 217 

223, 236, 258,-260 
264, 282, 285, 293 
ordered to proceed to 
transports at Port 

Tampa, Florida 192 

moved to the right 267 

band of, played mar- 
tial airs as vessel 
swung into the Carib- 
bean 290 

Twenty-fourth Regiment 

Infantry 367 

made gallant charge 
on block house at 

extreme left 264 

United States authorities 273 

United States cavalry service, 178 
United States generals, sent 
letter to government urging 
return of troops to their 

homes 287 

United States government, 

transport ship 199 

supplied no means of 
transportation to the 

I'egiment / . 284 

paid Seventy-first Regi- 
ment while at Tampa 

Heights 293 

United States marines, had 
successful fight with Span- 
iards at Guantanamo, Cuba, 216 
United States Military Acad- 
emy 175, 216, 220, 256, 259 

United States Navy 218 

United States ofBcers 156 

beseech Red Cross Society 
for food and medicine 

for sick soldiers 274 

United States paymaster, 188, 189 
United States postmaster of 
Cuba, Mr. Brewer, died of 

yellow fever 243 

United States post-office, 

opened at Siboney, Cuba 243 

United States regulars 294 

United States Senate 171, 181 

United States service 153, 156 

157, 178, 188, 303 

United States soldiers 231, 373 

fell dead and wounded on 

every side 231 

lay in trenches expecting 

an attack 240 

yellow fever made its ap- 
pearance among 343 



378 Inhex — Sbvbnty-fiest Eegt., N. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 
United States soldiers: 

lirst shot from their can- 
non fired at San Juan 
without effect 260 

and volunteers mixed, in 
charge up San Juan Hill, 
Cuba 264 

five regiments of, in vic- 
torious charge up San 
Juan Hill, Cuba 264 

swamp fever began to de- 
velop among those at 
front 268 

enlisted men of, forbidden 
to enter Santiago, Cuba, 273 

only such officers as had a 
pass allowed to enter 
Santiatjo, Cuba 273 

so many deaths among, 
that customary salutes 
at graves were not fired, 275 

water carried in canteens 
from a stream a mile 
and a half away 276 

news of peace 279 

United States vessels 197 

United States Volunteer Army, 160 

304, 305 

VALENTINE, PRIVATE WIL= 
LIAM S., company C, wound- 
ed in action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 244 

Van Dewater, Chaplain George 

Roe 153, 158, 160, 161 

166, 167, 172, 173, 174, 176 
178, 183, 184, 189, 190, 191 
205, 206, 212, 217, 222, 227 
228, 238, 239, .240, 247, 269 
detailed to prepare an itin- 
erary of regiment 152 

offers prayer for Divine 

protection 153 

detailed to act as caterer 

to officers' mess 160 

swindled in buying a horse, 177 
to Tampa for medical sup- 
plies 17S 

telegraphs to friends for 
delicacies for the sick.. 179 

responded to address 181 

relieved of duties as ca- 
terer to officers' mess... 209 
receives check for $50 to 
feed Seventy-first men 
and promptly returns it 

with thanks 210 

a dry landing 214 

held evening service 221 

memorable Sunday ser- 
vice 221, 222 



PAGE 

Van Dewater, Chaplain Georgre 
Koe: 

ordered to take his place 
with surgeons 231 

detailed to Siboney on 
transportation of wound- 
ed men 242 

assigned to duty at Sib- 
oney 268 

wardrobe pretty well de- 
pleted 270 

kindness of Charles F. 
Barrett and Charles A. 
Brittain 270 

started on foot for Santi- 
ago to procure provis- 
ions and medicines for 
the sick 270 

went into Santiago and 
secured from Red Cross 
Society milk and rice for 
the sick 280 

erroneously published by 
New York World as 
among victims of El 
Caney battle 2S1 

invited to officiate at the 
funeral of a Seventh 
United States Re^^iment 
private 281 

notified the parents when- 
ever a death occurred in 
the regiment 28'.i 

visits general hospital 
tents twice daily and 
those seriously ill more 
frequently 284 

held divine service in Y. M. 
C. A. tent 2SS 

assisted by Chaplain Bate- 
man in church service 
for burial at sea 290 

detailed by Colonel Downs 
to secure food from Red 
Cross Society 292 

offered his services at gen- 
eral hospital 293 

given 30 days' leave of ab- 
sence by General 
Wheeler 295 

gave thanks to God for His 
mercies 302 

received a communication 
from Greenport, Long 
Island, undertaker con- 
cerning dead of Seventy- 
first Regiment 302 

writing and compiling his- 
tory of regiment 304 

his subscription to Colonel 
Wallace Abel Downs 305 



Index — Seventy-first Rbgt., N. Y. State Voldntebes. 379 



FAOIS 

Veteran Association, Seventy- 
first Kegiment 180, 188 

committee of, greeted regi- 
ment at Long Island 

City 297 

Vigilancia, transport ship 152 

184, 198, 199, 200, 207, S12 
213, 218, 246, 277, 281, 305 
selected by Colonel Downs 
to transport regiment to 

Cuba 197 

boarded by regiment 197 

Volunteer Army 155, 156, 158 

Von Ette, Arthur, company K, 
died on board Missouri, at 
sea 252 

WAQSTAFF, MRS. WALTER 

H., of New York 180 

Walsh, William J., company D, 

died of fever 249 

Walton, Samuel J., company C, 

died of disease 248 

War, articles of 189 

War, Secretary of, Gene];a,l 

Alger . . ' 887 

Ward Line 163, 197 

Washington, D. C 166, 167, 295 

authorities at, directed 
General Shafter to re- 
move all troops to 

United States 286 

Washington Arch, New York 
city. Seventy-first Kegiment 

•parade began at 299 

Watch Hill, Rhode Island 254 

Watertown, New YorkJ 249 

Watson, Private Harry S., com- 
pany M, wounded in action 

at San Jnan Hill, Cuba 244 

Watt, Mrs. Archibald, of New 

York 180 

Wauhatchie, Tennessee 175 

Waverly place, New York city, 298 
Weeks, Private Charles J., com- 
pany C, wounded in action 

at San .Tuan Hill, Cuba 245 

Wendland, !Emil, company D, 

died of typhoid fever 249 

Wells, Captain James HoUis, 
company F, superintend- 
ed laying of water pipes 

at Camp Black 162 

promoted major 182 

major 223 

report of First and Second 
battalions in action at 
San Juan Hill, Cuba, 236-237 
with Second Battalion de- 
tailed to build bridges 
and improve roads 241 



PAGE 

West Indies 184 

West Point Military Academy, 175 
216, 220, 256, 259 

Westburg, New York 254 

Westerberg, Private Leonard, 
company C, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 245 
Wetherbee, Gardner, Hawk &, 
Messrs., dinner to officers of 

regiment 303 

Weyler, General Don Valeriano 

Y. Nicolau 214 

Weynian, First Lieutenant 

Frederick H 183 

second lieutenant, appoint- 
ed first lieutenant and 

battalion adjutant 182 

Wheeler, General Joseph, U. S. . 
A., rallied cavalry troops, 220 
sent leave of absence of 
thirty days to Chaplain 

Van De Water 295 

White, Hubbard W., company 

A, died of yellow fever 247 

Whitehall street. New York 

city 298 

Seventy-first Kegiment 
conveyed to foot of, 297, 298 
Whittle, Captain John Henry, 
company A, promoted 

major . . . , 182 

with First Battalion de- 
tailed to build bridges 

and improve roads 241 

Williams, First Lieutenant 
Alexander Scott, company I, 186 
194, 237 
Williams, Edgar E., company 

E, died of fever 249 

Williams, Private James T., 
company L, died of yellow 

fever 253, 281 

Windward passage 206 

Wolters, Musician Frederick, 
Jr., company G, wounded in 
action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 245 

Women's Aid Society, served 
refreshments to the troops, 302 

Wood, Colonel 'Leonard 192 

216, 260 
false report of his death.. 218 
acting as brigadier-gen- 
eral 228 

Wood, Major Marshall W., 

U. S. A 289 

Woodford, General Stewart L., 153 

World, the, newspaper 281 

Worshipful Master, Free Ma- 
sons ISO 



380 Index — Seventy-first Kegt., K. Y. State Volunteers. 



PAGE 

"YANKEE," cruiser 176 

Ybor City, Florida, Cuban set- 
tlement 183 

184, 185, 188, 193, 194 
Yellow fever, called Calentura, 

Dangui, or Cuban fever, 376 

hospital 281 

Y. M. C. A 384 

large tent given by, 
brought out and erected 
for use of enlisted men.. 283 
army commission, repre- 
sented by Charles F. 
Barrett and Charles 

A. Brittain 369 

its small tent used as 
hospital for regi- 
ment 269 

divine services and so- 
cial gatherings Of 
regiment .held in its 

large tent 369 

distributed over 20,000 
sheets of paper and 

10,000 envelopes 270 

headquarters of 883 

Yonkers, New York 247 



PAGE 

Young, Brigadier-General Sam.- 

uel B. M., U. S. A 166 

disabled in Las Guasimas 

action 238 

Second Brigade of Cav- 
alry 217, 318 

Young, Sergeant William D. S., 283 
company -E, died of moun- 
tain fever .. 349, 280 

buried west of entrench- 
ments near Santiago, 

Cuba 280 

Youngs, Sergeant George B, 
company I, wounded in ac- 
tion at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 344 
Youngs, Private Lewis B., com- 
pany M, w^ounded in action 
at San Juan HIU, Cuba 244 

ZIEQNER, SERGEANT HER= 

MAN, company E, died of 
fever 349 

Zitnik, Private Henry W., com- 
pany A, wounded in action at 
San Juan Hill, Cuba.. 344 

Zoller, Frank H., company H, 
died of intermittent fever... 351 



GENERAL INDEX. 



For the individual index of regiments see page 319 et seq. 



PAGE 

ABEEL, ADJUTANT ALFRED 

HAVENS 219, 303 

lieutenant, appointed ad- 
jutant 177 

his difficulty in landing... 314 
. Ahem, Corporal William J., 
■wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Aid Society, Bronx borough... 285 
Alameda, mail steamer 24 

Albany, New York 18, 29, 39 

73, 83, 107, 128, 134 
138, 141, 146, 182, 316 
Henry L. Stoddard, served 

as correspondent at 314 

Tenth Battalion, com- 
panies A, B, C and D, of, 17 
Alden, Quartermaster George 
M., Thirteenth Battalion, 

National Guard 47 

mustered in as captain 
and quartermaster, Sec- 
ond Kegiment 70 

captain, mustered out of 
United States service ... 82 
Alden, Frank E., died of ma- 
larial fever 252 

Aldrich, Lieutenant Bishop L., 47 
second lieutenant. National 

Guard, not mustered 48 

Alger, Eussell A., Secretary of 

War . . 147 

w^ i t h Surgeon-General 

Sternberg, decided to 
have troops removed to 

Montauk Point 287 

Allatoona Pass, Georgia 256 

Allen, Private Charles W., died, 68 
Allen, Sergeant Elisha M., in- 
jured * 58 

Allen farm, Virginia 92, 95 

on Difficult Eun, First Bri- 
gade, excepting Twenty- 
second Kansas Kegiment, 

ordered to 92 

Alliance, steamship 22 



PAGE 

Althause, Private Joseph F., 
wounded in action at San 
Juan Hill, Cuba.j, 245 

Alvarez, Kamon, on New York 
Herald war staff 316 

American commanders of war- 
ships, spoke well of newspa- 
per correspondents 317 

American flag, first hoisted on 
Puerto Eico, by crew of 

Gloucester 309 

hoisted at Guanica, pre- 
sented to city of Glouces- 
ter 309 

American forces 215 

American Line 218 

American war vessels, all ex- 
cept. Gloucester, pursued 
four Spanish cruisers 311 

American youth, patriotism 
of 183 

Amsterdam, New York, Forty- 
sixth Separate Company 

of 49, 79 

State Armory 81 

Andalusian quarter, Santiago, 
Spanish soldiers housed in.. 272 

Andre, Private Charles, wound- 
ed in action at San Juan 
Hill, Cuba 245 

Andrews, MajoE Avery D 161 

Andrews, Captain James M., 
Jr 49 

Andrews, Brigadier-General 
John N., Second Brigade, 136, 137 

Annapolis, Maryland, Naval 
Academy Museum, Spanish 
flag captured at Puerto Kico, 
hangs in 309 

Annexation ceremonies of 
transfer of Hawaiian Islands 
to United States 23 

Anthony, Colonel Charles, 
Third Ohio 135 

Apache Indians 44 

Aquadores, feint made to land 
troops at 213 



382 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Aqueduct bridge, Virginia, 93, 94 

Arizona, ship <J;i 

Army Commission, Y. M. C. A., 174 

175, 28!! 

work in Cuba 381 

corps, headquarters, at 
Tampa Bay Hotel, Flor- 
ida 178 

Artesian wells sxink to supply 

water for camp 186 

Articles of war 189 

Ashley, Assistant Surgeon 
Maurice Cavileer.. 19, 20, 21, 25 

Associated Press 207, 317 

Astor, Lieutenant-Colonel John 
Jacob, on General Shafter's 

staff 260, 262 

Atlanta, Georgia 68 

70, 71, 140, 257 

Atlantic, Division of the 40, 41 

Atlantic liner, mentioned 199 

Atlantic Ocean 316, 317 

Auburn, New York 85, 125 

Second Separate Company 

of 84 

Austin, Captain Elmore Far- 

rington 235 

among first troops To ar- 
rive at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba <233 

Australia, mail steamer 24 

Averill Park, New York 71 

74, 75 
BABBITT, GEORGE M., died 
on board ship and buried at 

sea 253, 290 

Babcock, Captain JFraiik G., 
Jr., Forty-seventh Sepa- 
rate Company 84 

company K 85 

military record of.... 130, 131 

mustered out 13J 

Babcock, Private George 

L 183, 184 

Babcock, Mrs. George L.. 183, 184 
Bahama Channel, Great. . 200, 204 

Bahme, Private Felix, died 76 

Bailey, Private Edward A., 

died 29 

Bailey, First Lieutenant Fred- 
erick W. G., military rec- 
ord of 114 

mustered out 114 

Baiquiri (Daiquiri), Cuba, 313, 369 

artillery at 335 

Baker, Private Charles N., died, 68 
Baker, Second Lieutenant 

William 48 

Balch, Major Lewis, assistant 
surgeon-general. New 
York, mustered in as 
surgeon 45 



PAGE 

Balch, Major Lewis: 

acting assistant surgeon- 
general 47 

assigned to duty as acting . 

chief surgeon 52 

organized Division Hos- 
pital and Ambulance 

company 53 

surgeon, appointed chief 

surgeon 56 

ordered to report to his 

regiment 66 

commissioned brigadier- 
surgeon. United States 

Volunteers 82 

resigned 82 

Baltimore, Maryland 51, 132 

Baltimore and Ohio Eailway, 51 

88, 132 
Baltimore and Ohio Southwes- 
tern Eailway — '. . 51 

Barber, Captain Clarence 
James, Second Separate 

Company 84 

company M 85 

military record of 133 

mustered out .' 133 

Barber, Colonel Merritt, as- 
s i s t a n t adjutant-general. 

United States Army 31, 32 

Barber, Colonel Thomas H., 20, 21 
22, 23, 24, 31, 33 
33, 34, 36, 37, 41 
appointed colonel, First 
Regiment, National 

Guard 18 

formally accepted colors 
presented to his regi- 
ment 19 

promoted brigadier-gen- 
eral. United States Vol- 
unteers 37 

abiise of, uncalled for 37 

military record of 39-43 

mustered out United States 

service 43 

Barnett, Colonel John T., 159th 

Indiana 93 

Bamival, Corporal John J., 

injured 58 

Barnum, John M., died of dys- 
entery 250 

Barrett, Charles F., repre- 
sented Army Commis- 
sion, Y. M. C. A 369 

evangelist of Moody Insti- 
tute, in charge of army 
commission work in 

Cuba 281 

kindly ministrations to 
Seventy-firsl; Regiment . . 282 



Gbnhral Index. 



383 



PAGE 

Barrett, Private Malcolm, 
■wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Barron, Captain Hugh J 130 

resigned 147 

Barry, Thomas H., A. A. G., U. 

S. A 33 

Bartholomew, Second Lieuten- 
ant Alanson D 49, 61 

Barton, Miss Clara \.. 273, 274 

Bateman, Chaplain Cephas C, 
Sixteenth Infantry, regu- 
lars 290 

ajipointed chaplain at gen- 
eral hospital, Montauk 

Point . . .. :......... 293 

Bates, Adjutant William 

Graves . . 172, 182 

appointed captain volun- 
teers 181 

Bander, Captain Frank 49 

Bauni, Dr. Henry C, Forty- 
first Separate Company, 
Syracuse, mustered in as 

assistant surgeon 45 

captain, commissioned ma- 
jor and surgeon, Second 
llegimeut, New York 

Volunteers 82 

mustered out 83 

Hauth, Private E. F., trans- 
ferred to Division Hospital 

Corps 60 

Baxter, First Lieutenant Alex- 
ander Gillespie 26 

Bayonne, New Jersey 248 

Beach Grove, North Carolina . . 108 
Beardslee, Private Burton M., 

died 29' 

B e a 1 1 y, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant John H 282 

detailed to Siboney to han- 
dle mail for the Seventy- 
first Regiment 243 

Bedloes Island, New York 164 

Beekman, Lieutenant William 

Schuyler 182 

recuperating at Siboney, 

Cuba 243 

Belgium 40 

Bell, Major and Surgeon Wil- 
liam Duffield 193 

208, 218, 237 
mustered into United 
States service as sur- 
geon 156, 276 

Bell, Surgeon William Duf- 
field 286 

Bemus (Bemis), Major and 
. Surgeon William Mar- 
vin 123 



PAGE 

Bemus (Bemis), Major and 
Surgeon William Marvin, 
mustered into United 
States service as sur- 
geon . . 86 

military record of 110 

mustered out 110 

Bernheimer, Messrs 282 

Betts, Private Clarence W., ap- 
pointed regimental sergeant- 
major 70 

Biddle, Nicholas, on New York 

Herald war staff '. 316 

Big Horn Mountains, Wy- 

oniing 41 

Bigelow, Poultney, Herald cor- 
respondent 169 

Bills, Coloinel Charles J., Sec- 
ond Nebraska Volunteer In- 
fantry 52 

Bingliamton, Twentieth Sepa- 
rate Company 17 

Birmii'igham, Alabama 143 

Black, Governor Frank S 18 

45, 48, 87, 109, 131 
133, 137, 155, 171, 295 
reviewed Second Regiment, 

New York Volunteers ... 46 
visited encampment of 
Sixty-ninth Regiment . . 144 

reviewed troops 160 

Black, Joseph I., died of entero 

colitis 251 

Black, Colonel William M., 
landed a portion of engi- 
neer battalion 308 

regiment of engineers, 

landed 309 

Blackington, T?rivate Hugh P., 
discharged from United 

States service 76 

Blanchard, Private William A., 

injured . . 58 

Blanco, Captain General Ra- 
mon, ordered Admiral Cer- 
vera to take his entire fleet 

out to sea 239 

Blauvelt, • Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant Lester J., ap- 
pointed second lieuten- 
ant 182 

detailed commissary of 

regiment 182 

Bleakley, Private Andrew W., 

died 80 

Bloody Bend, a thick gulch 

near El Poso, Cuba 229, 241 

Boardman, Second Lieutenant 

Fred W 26 

Boice, First Lieutenant Charles 
Henry 26 



384 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Bolger, Second Lieutenant 

John F 130 

recommended to be first 

lieutenant 131 

Bonsai, Stephen, of the Sun... 318 
Booth, Private Frank W., ap- 

. pointed amanuensis . 312 

buried near the ford below 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 340 

killed in action at San 
Juan Hill, Cuba......... 350 

Booth, Private John, buried 
near the ford below Sail 

Juan Hill, Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 252 

Boston, Massachusetts 349 

First Corps, Cadets 109 

Bostwick, Mr 183, 184 

Botts, Private John M., 
wounded in a,ction at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Bourke, John, died of typhoid 

fever 351 

Bowman and Harsh, Messrs., 

Birmingham, Alabama 143 

Boynton, Sergeant Charles F., 

appointed second lieutenant, 183 
Brainard, First Lieutenant 
James S., military record 

of 118 

mustered out 118 

Brainard, Chaplain James Wil- 
son 123 

military record of Ill 

mustered out Ill 

Brayton, Sergeant-Major Clar- 
ence E., military record 

of Ill 

died ; 134 

commissioned second lieu- 
tenant 137 

Brazee (Brezee), Private Fred- 
erick A., injured 58 

Brett, Captain Lloyd M., Third 
United States Cavalry, 
detailed as mustering- 
out ofiicer of the Sev- 

enty-iirst Regiment 303 

guest at dinner given to 
Seventy-first Regiment 

oificers . . 303 

Brewer, Mr. Eben, United 
States postmaster in Cuba, 

died of yellow fever 343 

Bristoe, Virginia 100 

British Columbia 41 

British consul at Santiago, 

kindness of 374 

Brittain, Charles A., represent- 
ed Army Commission, Y. 
M. C. A 369 



PAGE 

Brittain, Charles A.: 

with the chaplain and 
Charles F. Barrett, ef- 
forts to procure provis- 
ions and medicines for 

the sick 270 

gave tent to Seventy-first 
Regiment for a hospital, 383 

Broad Creek, Virginia 100 

Broad Run, Virginia. . . . . ^ 101, 102 

Broadway, New York 298 

Broadway Tabernaolej Thirty- 
fourth street. New York 180 

Bronx borough,' New York.... 385 
Brooke, General John R., U. 

■S. A 133, 133, 134 

Brooklyn, The, United States 

cruiser 318 

Brooklyn, New York: 39 

348, 249, 353, 301 

Brooklyn bridge 398 

Brooklyn Eagle 318 

Brower, Charles D 174 

Brovyn, Private Clinton B., 
buried near the ford be- 
low. San Juan Hill, Cuba, 240 
killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 353 

Brown, Henry S., in charge of 

Herald forces in West Indies, 316 
Brown, Private John K., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

Brown, Colonel Oscar J., Sec- 
ond Georgia 135, 140 

Brown, First Lieutenant Thur- 

. ber A 106 

military record of 121 

mustered out 131 

Brown, Walter J., died of dys- 
entery 348 

Brovyn, Wilson and. Infirmary, 143 
Brugman, Dr. Albert F., Sec- 
ond Battery, National 
Guard, New York, mus- 
tered in as assistant sur- 
geon 46 

detailed to assist at Sec- 
ond Division Hospital. . . 68 

captain, mustered out 83 

Bryant, First Sergeant Wil- 
liam W., recommended to 

be second lieutenant 133 

second lieutenant, re- 
signed . . 150 

Bull Run Creek, Virginia 98 

'99, 100 
temporary bridge con- 
structed over 99 

Bull Run Field, Virginia, Third 
Regiment, New York Volun- 
teers, arrived at. . . , 98 



General Index. 



385 



PAGE 

Burhans, Arthur D., died of 

disease 348 

Burkes Station, Virginia, Third 
Kegiment, New Yorii Vol- 
unteers, arrived at 96 

Third Regiment, New Yorlc 
Volunteers, left camp at, 97 
Burton, Sergeant-Major Ed- 
ward H 2t 

Second Lieutenant, com- 
pany B 25 

promoted to second lieu- 
tenant 28 

Butler, Captain John G 85 

93, 97 
Forty-first Separate Com- 
pany 85 

to Syracuse to receive re- 
cruits 91 

military record of 115-116 

mustered out IIC 

Butler, Captain Mighells Bach- 
man, Forty-second Sepa- 
rate Company 84 

nominated major 83 

mustered into United 
States service as major . . 87 

mentioned 97, 104, 106, 123 

military record of 108 

mustered out 108 

Butt, Brigadier-General McCos- 
kry, National Guard, New 
York 156 

CALENTURA, or yellow fever, 276 

California 35, 171 

regiment 32 

Callanan, Private John J., Jr., 
promoted second lieutenant, 
203rd New York Volunteers, 27 
Camp Alger (Russell A.), Falls 

Church, Virginia 33, 58 

87, 88, 89, 90, 104 
abandoned on account of 

increase of sickness 94 

Camp Black, Hempstead 
Plains, Long Island, New 

York 18, 19 

30, 31, 37, 45, 48, 50 

58, 68, 75, 81, 84, 85 

87, 89, 138, 154, 155, 158 

161, 163, 164, 168, 169, 172 

174, 176, 311, 253, 285, 304 

account of water supply 

at 163 

Colonel Arthur MacArthur 

pays troops 393 

200' recruits encamped at.. 395 
Seventy-first Reg i.m e n t 
New York Volunteers, 
ordered to reassemble 
at for muster-out of 
United States service... 303 



PAGE 

Camp Forse (Albert G.), H\ints- 

viUe, Alabama 146, 151 

Camp Hardin, Averill Park, 

New York 74, 77 

soldiers at, annoyed by 

sightseers 75 

passed into history 78 

Camp McKinley, Hawaiian 

Islands 22, 23, 29, 30 

Camp Meade, Middletown, 

Pennsylvania .. 104, 105, 137 
First Battalion, Third New 
York Volunteers, arrived 

at 106 

Second Battalion, Third 
New York Volunteers, 

arrived at 106 

Camp Merritt, Calif omiia 31 

Camp Presidio, San Francisco, 

California 21 

Camp Tampa, Florida 128 

Camp Thomas, Kentucky 55 

Camp Wheeler, Huntsville, Ala- 
bama 141, 143 

Camp WikofE, Montauk Point, 

Long Island 246, 247, 248 

249, 350, 251, 352, 253 
inefBcient management, es- 
pecially of hospitals 394 

well men here had no rea- 
son to complain.... 394 

sick of Seventy-first Regi- 
ment left in Santiago, as 
soon as recovered, sailed 

for : 296 

sick of Seventy-first Regi- 
ment in 296 

list of Seventy-first Regi- 
ment dead at 303 

Campbil farm, Virginia, on 
which Camp Alger was lo- 
cated 88 

Canada, Dominion of 41 

Canaries, The 316^ 

Canning, Private George C 206 

Cape San Juan, Porto Rico, 
expedition to Porto Rico 
under General Miles de- 
signed to land at 306 

Capron, Captain Allyn, U. S. A., 
military record of, foot- 
note ; 259- 

died near Fort Myer, Vir- 
ginia 359 

Capron, Captain Allyn Kissam, 
Rough Riders, military 

record of 218 

killed in action at Las 

Guasimas, Cuba 259 

Capron's artillery opened fire 

at El Caney, Cuba 259 

Carey, Private John, injured 
in railway wreck 145 



386 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Caribbean Sea 290, 315 

Carlisle, Corporal Lewis W., 
■wounded in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

died from wounds received 

in action 253 

Carmer, William K., died on 

board Missouri, at sea 249 

■<!arolina. South 316 

Carolinas, The, campaign of.. 256 
Carpenter, Harry F., died of 

typhoid malaria 250 

Carpenter, Brigadier-General 
Louis H., Fourth Army 

Corps 52, 53, 54, 56, 63, 66 

67, 134, 135, 149 

Carpenter's Brigade 54 

Carroll, General Howard, in- 
spected Sixty-ninth Eegi- 

ment 137 

Carroll, Private James F., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 344 

Carswell, Nathan H., died of 

malarial fever 353 

Carter, Private Charles F., 

died 29 

Case, Private Charles Irving, 

injured 58 

Casey, Private James L., trans- 
ferred to division hospital 

corps 60 

Casey, Private Thomas, died.. 151 
Cavanaugh, John F., died of 

fever 252 

Central Railroad of New Jer- 
sey 50, 51 

Cervera, Admiral Pasqual 
(Pascual), ordered to 

take his fleet to sea 239 

lost every vessel at the 
mouth of Santiago Har- 
bor, Cuba 239 

attempt to run the gaunt- 
let of Sampson's squad- 

, ron 311 

fir^t story of destruction 
of his squadron brought 
to Port Antonio, Ja- 
maica, by Golden Eod, 

dispatch boat 316 

Chaffee, General Adna E., lieu- 
tenant-general, U. S. A., 150 
brigade of regulars, or- 
dered into final charge 

at El Caney, Cuba 257 

Chain Bridge, Virginia 93 

Chamberlain, William J., of the 

Sun 317 

Chapel, Private Herbert S., 

died 77 

Chapman, Carlton T., artist... 318 



PAGE 

Charles, First Lieutenant Wil- 
liam S., military record 

of 131 

mustered out 121 

Charles Nelson, packet 31 

Charlotte, South Carolina 73 

Charlottesville, Virginia 73 

Chase, Major James T 19 

20, 21, 28 

resigned . . . . j 27 

military record of 43 

mustered in United States 

service 43 

retired 43 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 51 

Chattanooga Valley, Tennes- 
see 51 

Cheevers, William E., died of 

fever 251 

buried beyond entrench- 
ments near Santiago, 

Cuba 283 

Chicago, Illinois 20 

Chicago and Northwestern 

Eailroad 20 

Chickamauga, Georgia.. 31, 50, 53 
54, 135, 137, 138, 188, 311 
Sixty-ninth New York 
Volunteers ordered to... 132 

battlefield of 51 

National Military Park, 
Sixty-ninth Regiment ar- 
rived at 133 

Cincinnati, Ohio 51, 133, 140 

City of Washington, transport 

ship 175 

Civil War 133, 160, 166, 175 

veterans, escort of, added 
a feature to parade of 
Seventy-first Regiment, 300 
Clark, Alexander H., died of 

typhoid fever 243 

Clark (Clarke), Private Wash- 
ington B., wounded in action 

at San Juan Hill, Cuba 344 

Clarkin, Franklyn, of the Even- 
ing Post 318 

Clifton, Virginia 99 

Cluett, Private George Alford, 
appointed second lieutenant 
202nd Regiment, New York 

Volunteers 60 

Cluett, Private Sanford L 55 

Cochran, Colonel Melville A., 

U. S. A 185 

Cohoes, New York, Seventh 

Separate Company of, 48, 73, 80 
Coleman, Second Lieutenant 

Obed M 49 

Collette, Private George F., 
transferred to Hospital 
Corps, U. S. A 70 



General Index. 



387 



PAGE 

Collin, Captain Thomas Camp- 
bell 48 

major 53, 61, 7a 

mvistered in as major 59 

mustered out of United 

States service 82 

Collins, Surgeon George W.... 139 

Colorado troops 31 

Colt gun, on shore, in charge 
of Lieutenant T. C. Wood. . . 307 
308, 309 
Columbia county. New York.. 314 
Columbia, District of, First 

Regiment 54, 56, 60 

Columbia, South Carolina 78 

Columbia University, New 

York 183 

Columbus, Ohio 146 

Comba, General Bichard, U. S. 

A 150 

Commissary department 139 

U. S. A 54 

signs of improvement in. . 276 
Commissioned oiEcers of First 
Kegimeut, New York Volun- 
teers, list of 35-39 

Company A, Tenth Battalion, 
became company A, First 

Regiment 18 

Company A, First Regiment In- 
fantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19, 30, 23 

33, 34, 25, 37, 29 
Company A, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 48, 50, 53 

59, 60, 61, 63, 64 

66, 70, 75, 78, 79 

thirty-four recruits for ... 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service.... 80 

to\\T deaths in 81 

Company A, Third. Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 85, 114 

Company A, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 139, 148 

Company A, Seventy-first 
Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 176, 182 

183, 236, 237, 240 
244, 245, 346, 247 
only ten men remained for 

camp duty 294 

Company A, Thirtieth Indiana 

Volunteer Infantry 257 

Company A, Forty-eighth Regi- 
ment, National Guard, New 

York 116 

Company A, Fifty-sixth New 
York Volunteers 43 



PAGE 

Company B, Tenth Battalion, 
became company B, First 
Regiment, National Guard.. 18 
Company B, First Regiment, 
New York Volunteers... 19, 20 
31, 33, 23, 24 
25, 37, 38, 39 
Company B, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 48 

50, 53, 59, 60, 61, 62, 65 
twenty-six recruits for... 60 
paid and mustered out of 

United States service 80 

no deaths in 81 

Company B, Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers < . 85, 87, 115 

Company B, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 139 

133, 141, 144, 147, 151 
Company B, Seventy-first 
Regiment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers ... 182, 183 
184, 306, 331, 340 
243, 344, 345, 347 
ordered to march to Santi- 
ago and take transport 
for Montauk, New York, 388 
Company B, Tenth Regiment, 42 
Company C, Tenth Battalion, 
became company C, First 
Regiment, National -Guard. . 18 
Company C, First Regiment, 

New York Volunteers 19 

30, 21, 32, 23, 34, 35, 39 
Company C, Second Regiment, 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 48, 50, 53 

57, 60, 64, 65, 68, 70, 79 

twenty-six recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service 80 

three deaths in 81 

Company C, Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 85, 105, 111, 115 

detailed for guard duty at 
Dunn Loring, Virginia . . 93 
Comjpany C, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 129, 131, 140, 148 

Company C, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 206, 217 

331, 240, 244, 245, 346, 248 
Company D, Tenth Battalion, 
b'ecame company D, First 
Regiment, National Guard.. 18 



388 



General Index. 



PAG|! 

Company D, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

SO, 22, 23, 24, 25, 29 
Company D, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 47, 48 

50, 53, 59, 63, 65 

68, 75, 76, 79, 80 

twenty-six recruits for. ... 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service.... 80 

eight deaths in 81 

Company D, Third. Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 85 

86, 87, 93, 95, 127 
mustered in United States 

service 86 

Company D, Sixty-ninth Regfi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 129, 147, 148, 151 

Company D, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers ; . . 236, 245, 248 

Company D, Nineteenth New 

York State Militia 43 

Company D, 110th Battalion, 
National Guard, New York, 107 

121 
Company E, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 19 

20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 29 
Company E, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 49 

50, 53, 59, 62, 68, 70, 76, 79 

twelve recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 
United States service. ... 81 

one death in 81 

Company E, Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 86, 87, 117 

men of, entertained by 
citizens of Warrenton... 104 
Company E, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 130 

131, 133, 142, 145 
Company E, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 192, 206, 219 

244, 245, 246, 249, 280, 303 
Company E, Ninth Indiana In- 
fantry 257 

Company E, Twenty-second 
Regiment, National Guard, 
New York 109, 126 



PAGE 

Company E, Fifty-fourth Regi- 
ment, National Guard, New 

York 114 

Company F, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29 
Company F, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 49 

50, 53, 70 

twelve recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 
United States service.... 81 

no deaths in 81 

Company F,- Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 86, 118 

detailed for guard duty at 

Dunn Loring, Virginia.. 93 
detailed to round up 

stragglers 97 

Company F, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 130, 151 

Company F, Seventy-first Regfi- 
ment Infantry, New York 
Volunteers, 153, 162, 194, 206 
211, 212, 231, 236, 237, S40 
244, 245, 246, 250, 283, 290 
led by Captain RafEerty, 
among first troops to ar- 
rive on San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 233 

losses most severe 236 

Company F, Forty-eighth Regi- 
ment 116 

Company G, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29 
Company G, Second Regiment 
Infantry,' New" York Vol- 
unteers 49 

50, 53, 70, 76, 78, 82 

twelve recrmts for 60 

paid and mustered out of 
United States service. ... 81 

no deaths in 81 

Company G, Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 86, 118 

detailed as provost guard, 99 
Company G, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 130 

142, 143, 145, 148 
Company G, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers i9i 

236, 237, 244, 245, 246, 250 



General Index. 



389 



PAGE 

Company G, 168th New York 

Volunteers 43 

Company H, ITirst Eegiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 20 

31, 22, S3, 24, 26, 30 

in measles quarantine 19 

joined headquarters at 
Fort Columbus, New 

York harbor 19 

Company H, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 49, 50, 53, 79 

twelve recruits for 60 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service 81 

one death in 81 

Company H, Third Eeglment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 86 

103, 111, 119, 124 
acted as color company. . . 90 
Company H, Sixty-ninth Eegi- 
. ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 130, 133 

Company H, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, National 
. Guard, New York, first 
company to encamp for 
exam.ination and muster 
into volunteer service. . . 155 

New York Volunteers 206 

236, 243, 244, 245, 246, 251 
Company H, Seventh Regiment, 

National Guard, New York. . 122 
Company H, Fifty-fourth Regi- 
ment, National Guard, New 

York 122 

Company H, Fourth Regiment, 

National Guard, New Jersey. 117 
Company I, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teer? 19, 20 

21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 30 
Company I, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 49, 50, 53, 82 

twenty-four recruits for.. 60 
paid and mustered out of 

United States service 81 

no deaths in 81 

Company I, Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 85, 93, 95, 120 

Company I, Sdxty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 130, 147, 148 

Company I, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 170, 192 

194, 206, 237, 240, 244, 351 



PAGE 

Company I, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers: 
led by Captain Meeks, 
among first troops to 
arrive on San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 234 

Company K, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19, 20, 21 

22, 33, 24, 26, 28, 30, 44 
Company K, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 47 

48, 50, 53, 59, 75, 79, 80 
twenty-seven recruits for. . 60 
paid and musteaed out of 
United States service... 81 

three deaths in 81 

Company K, Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 85, 93, 95, 130 

Company K, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 130, 133, 144, 148 

Company K, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 183, 318 

331, 240, 244, 245, 251, 303 
Company K, Seventh Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 181 

Company L, First Regiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 80 
Company L, Second Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 49, 50 

53, 61, 68, 70, 76, 77, 80 
twenty-eight recruits for . . 60 
paid and mustered out of 
* United States service .... 80 

eight deaths in 81 

Company L, Third Regiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 85 

93, 95, 106, 114, 121 
acted as escort to colors.. 90 
Company L, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 130, 147, 148 

Company L, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 
Volunteers, 164, 335, 340, 344 
245, 252, 380, 381, 290, 303 
led by Captain Austin, 
among first troops to ar- 
rive on San Juan Hill, 
Cuba 233 



390 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Company L, Seventy-first Kegi- 
ment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers: 
ordered to march, to Santi- 
ago and take transport 
for Montauk, New York, 2S8 
Company M, First Eegiment 
Infantry, New York Volun- 
teers 19 

20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 30 
Company M, Second Eegiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 49 

50, 53, 66, 68, 71, 76, 77 
twenty-eight recruits for . . 60 
paid and mustered out of 

United States service 80 

four deaths in 81 

Company M, Third Eegiment 
Infantry, New York Vol- 
unteers 85, 114, 122 

detailed to act as provost 

guard 101 

Company M, Sixty-ninth Eegi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 131, 134, 148 

Company M, Seventy-first Eegi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 164, 167 

182, 183, 236, 237, 240 
244, 245, 253, 290, 295 
led by Captain Goldsbor- 
ough, among first troops 
to arrive on San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 234 

losses most severe 236 

detailed to unload wagons 
and put goods aboard 
transport La Grande 

Duchesse 289 

Concho, transport 273 

Conger, Private Alfred B., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Congress, passed an act to in- 
crease the army 83 

resolution of, declared war 
between United States 

and Spain 153 

Conklin, Eugene, representing 
Seventy-first Veteran Associ- 
ation 180 

Conkling, Colonel, Civil War 

veteran 297 

Connellau, Sergeant John J... 143 
Conroy, Alexander, deserted.. 252 
Convent Station, New Jersey.. 256 
Cook, George W., died of ma- 
larial fever 249 

Coppinger, Major-General John 

J., U. S. A 54 

56, 59, 66, 134, 136, 141 



PAGE 

Coppinger, Major-General John 
J., U. S. A., 
ordered to proceed to 

Porto Eico 67 

retired 149 

Corbin, Henry C, adjutant- 
general, U. S. A 33 

Corbin, Eutherford, on New 

York Herald war staff 316 

Cornell University, Ithaca, New 

York 167 

Corps Hospital, Huntsville, 

Alabama 148 

Corr (Carr), Corporal Fran- 
cis J 59 

Correspondents, enterprise of, 

in Spanish War 315-318 

Cotton, Frederick E., enlisted, 114 
Coulter, Ernest Kent, on New 

York Herald war staff 316 

Cowles, Private George H 21 

died 30 

Craigie, Charles E., died of 

fever 353 

Ci-ane, Stephen, of the Sun 317 

Creelman, James, of the World, 

wounded at El Caney, Cuba, 317 

Crimmins, Private Martin L., 

First Volunteer Cavajry, 

commissioned second 

lieutenant. Sixty-ninth 

Eegiment 141 

appointed second -lieuten- 
ant, regular army 147 

Crippen, First Lieutenant 

George W 49 

Crockett, First Lieutenant Wil- 
liam Francis, appointed first 
lieutenant and battalion ad- 
jutant 182, 183 

Cronin, Second Lieutenant 

Francis J 130 

promoted first lieutenant.. 148 

recovered from illness 150 

Cronin, First Lieutenant James 

M 130 

captain and regimental 
quartermaster, resigned, 15(1 
Crosby, Captain Murray Was- 
son, company H, military 

record of 119 

niustored out 119 

Crosley (Crosby), Norman W., 

died of fever 258 

Crouch, Corporal Herbert A., 

died 30 

Crouch estate, Virginia 98 

Crowley, First Sergeant Charles 
,T., ])ro)noted second lieuten- 
ant 148 

Crowley, Private Timothy F., 
injured in railway wreck.... 145 



General Index. 



391 



PAGE 

Cuba 150, 153, 169, 175, 178 

191, 196, 198, 206, 212, 214 
216, 227, 229, 243, 246, 247 
248, 249, 350, 251, 252, 253 
254, 267, 268, 272, 285, 288 
295, 296, 301, 305, 312, 314 
Seventy-first Regiment In- 
fantry, New York Volun- 
teers, ordered to 18S 

order of advance of Ameri- 
can transports from 

t'lorlda to 105 

expedition to, temporarily 

suspended 198 

fleet again starts on its 

mission to 200 

Charles V. Barrett, evange- 
list of Moody Institute, 
in charge of Army Com-: 

mission work in 281 

Cuban Army, a wretched look- 
ing body of men 225 

to intercept reinforcements 
of 5,000 coming to aid 
Spaniards at Santiago, 

Cuba 225 

campaign, July 1st, 1898, 

most eventful day of, 226 
most trying period of, 270 

Cuban expedition, first 54 

fever, or yellow fever 276 

insurgents 214 

officers, proclaimed against 
sending Cuban troops 

ahead 229 

settlement, Ybor City, . 

Florida 183 

184, 185, 188 

Cubans, The 215 

company of 233 

stampede of, at foot of El 

Poso Hill, Cuba 228 

three, struck by Spanish 

shrapnel 261 

pauper stricken and starv- 
ing, journeying toward 

Santiago, Cuba 271 

1,400 tons of food sent by 

United States for 273 

thousands of them starv- 
ing, surged about the 
wharf, waiting to be fed, 273 
Cumming (Cummings), Second 

Lieutenant Bernard F., Jr... 130 
Cunningham, Private Peter J., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba., 245 

Curry, Major M. B 69 

Gushing, Charles P. P., killed 
in action at San Juan Hill, 
Cuba 248 



PAGE 

Cutting, Sergeant Charles W., 
wounded in action at San 
Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

DAIQUIRI (Baiquiri), Cuba.... 

212, 269 

artillery at 225 

Daley, Surgeon Kobert M 143 

Dalton Pord Road, Chicka- 

mauga battlefield 51 

Daly, Private Michael, buried 
near the ford below San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 240 

killed in action at San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 253 

Daly (Daley), Private Thomas, 

injured in wreck 145 

Daly, Chaplain William J. B... 129 

172, 173 
Father, Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment, New York Volun- 
teers 172, 173 

Dangui fever, or yellow fever, 276 
Daniels, Private Frank H., 

died 79 

Danville, Virginia 72 

Dart, Henry G., artist at the 

front 316 

Dattwyler, Private Oscar 211 

court-martialed 211 

Davidson, Regimental Adjutant 

John A 129 

resigned 147 

Davis, Surgeon Charles E 19 

20, 22 
major and surgeon, re- 
signed 27 

Davis, Commander Charles H., 
Jr., report of the capture of 
Guanica to Captain Higgin- 

son 310 

Davis, Brigadie r-G e n e r a 1 

George W 89 

Davis, Captain Loyal L., 48, 56, 60 
Davis, Oscar King, of the Sun. . 318 
Davis, Richard Harding, New 

York Herald war staff 316 

Decker, Second Lieutenant 

Abraham Lincoln ... 20, 25 
promoted to first lieuten- 
ant 28 

Decker, Private Joseph S., 
buried near the ford be- 
low San Juan Hill, Cuba, 240 
killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 251 

Delaney, Regimental Quarter- 
master John A 129 

Delaney Homestead, Virginia, 108 

Denmark, South Carolina 72 

Department of California 34 

36, 37 



392 



Geneeal Index. 



PAGE 

Department of the East, 19, 20, 71 

Department of the Missouri. . 44 

Derby, Captain George McC, 

XT. S. A., his balloon, which 

unfortunately indicated to 

' the enemy the exact location 

of our troops 230 

Deutschberger, Private Charles 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 231, 244 

Devane, Second Lieutenant 
John P., recommended to 
be first lieutenant, com- 
pany M , 131 

first lieutenant, in hospital, 134 
recoTered from illness, 138 
Deveaux, Second Lieutenant 
Francis Q., military rec- 
ord of lis 

mustered out 118 

Devlin, Captain Daniel C 130 

Dewey, Private Frank, died... 76 

Dewey, Admiral George 316 

Diamond Head, Hawaiian 

Islands 22, 23 

Difficult Run, Virginia 95 

Dinan, John J., died of fever.. 250 
District of Columbia, First 

Eegiment 54, 56, 60 

District of Hawaii 23 

Division of the Atlantic 40, 41 

Division Hospital 140 

228, 235, 238, 239, 340, 246 

Corps 60 

Dixie, The 310 

Dixon, Private Thomas J., Jr., 
wo\inded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Dodd, Eeuben N., accidentally 

killed at New York city 247 

Dodge, Cleveland H., president 
Y. M. C. A., of New York 

city 174, 180 

and Eed Cross Society 292 

Dodge, First Lieutenant Delos 

M 49 

Dole, Sanford B., president of 

Hawaiian Islands 38 

Donahue, Private Henry G., 

injured in wreck 145 

Donnelly, Private John F., died, 151 
Donnelly, Private Leo J., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Donovan, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Joseph L., Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment, New York Volunteers, 129 
Doran, Private Michael J., in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Downs, Lieutenant-Colonel 

Wallace Abel 164, 171 

mustered into United 
States service 157 



PAGE 

Downs, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Wallace Abel: 

promoted colonel 182 

colonel 152 

153, 174, 176, 177, 178, 184 
185, 186, 189, 196, 202, 303 
205, 207, 209, 210, 212, 215 
219, 220, 224, 233, 334, 237 
267, 369, 283, 290, 300 

selects Vigiiancia to 
transport Seventy- 
first Regiment to 
Cuba 197 

received orders from 
General Kent and 
obeyed them 231 

led his regiment, under 
heavy fire, along the 
trail to the ford 232 

halted at ford, await- 
ing further orders . . 232 

orders to prepare to 
advance 258 

halted on roadside 259 

received a letter from 
Colonel Markley, U. 
S. A., praising the 
bravery of the Sev- 
enty-first Regiment, 266 

ordered delicacies dis- 
tributed among the 
sick 275 

secured tents for the 
sick 276 

down with fever 276 

received $100 from Re- 
lief Society of Sev- 
enty-first Regiment, 278 

received official notifi- 
cation that Spain 
had sued for peace.. 378 

yellow fever interferes 
with the fimeral of 
Seventh (regular) 
Regiment private . . . 381 

senior colonel, in com- 
mand of brigade 382 

announced to the men 
that they were to go 
home 386 

detailed chaplain to 
secure food from 
Red Cross Society. . . 392 

brief address at arm- 
ory 302 

announced that regi- 
ment was on leave 
for sixty days 302 

presided at dinner 
given to officers of 
the Seventy-first 303 

address at dinner given 
officers of regiment, 303 



General Index. 



393 



PAGE 

Downs, Wallace Abel: 
colonel: 

subscription of Chap- 
lain Van Dewater to, 305 
Downs, Mrs. Wallace Abel, sent 

food to camp 291 

Doyle, Brig-adier-General Peter 

C, directed to organize one 

reginient from his brigade.. 83 

Drum Corps, Seventy-first 

Eegiment, New York 

Volunteers 190, 207 

care of woixnded at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 235 

Dry Tortugas, island south- 
west of Plorida 200 

Duffy, Colonel Edward, Sixty- 
ninth liegiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers. . . 129 
145, 151, 210 
report of regiment for 

first month 128-134 

report of regiment for 

second month 134^138 

report of regiment for 

third month 138-141 

report of regiment for 

fourth month 141-145 

report of regiment for 

fifth month 146-140 

report of regiment for 

sixth month 148-151 

congratulated on appear- 
ance of his regiment;... 147 
excellent condition of Six- 
ty-ninth Eegiment 310 

Duffy, Captain John E 130 

Duffy, John E., attorney 143 

Duffy, Private Nicholas H., 

died 144 

Dunn, Captain F. M., of dis- 
patch boat Sommers N. 

Smith 316 

Dunn Loring, Virginia 87 

88, 94, 95, 105 
Third Regiment, New York 

VoUmteers, ordered to.. 87 
companies C and F de- 
tailed for guard duty at, 93 
Dunning, Private Thomas G. 

(Thomas J.) 237 

ffifed of fever 253 

Dunspaugh, Captain Merrill 

M 48, 56, 60 

Dunwoody, Private Joseph, 
wounded in action at 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

died from wounds received 
in action at San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 248 

Dwyer, Corporal Edward J., 
died 144 



PAGE 

EARL, DAVID M., died of 

fever 254 

Early, Jubal A., Confederate 

general , 98 

Easterbrook, Chaplain Ed- 
mund P 68 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service.... 80 
commissioned chaplain 
202nd Eegiment, New 

York Volunteers 82 

East river, New York 132, 298 

Ebbeson (Ebberson), Ebbe, 
died at sea and buried at 

Montauk, New York 253, 303 

Eddy, Second Lieutenant Wil- 
bur M. 49, 78 

commissioned lieutenant. 
Twelfth Eegiment, New 

York Volunteers 82 

Edson, Major J. .7., Jr., United 

States Volunteers 78 

Edwards, Private Charles 237 

Edwards, Battalion Adjutant 

Prank B., discharged 27 

Egan, Dr 274 

Edgabroadt, Second Lieutenant 

Frederick T 99 

military record of 114 

' mustered out 114 

Eighteenth Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 
York, of Glens Falls, 

New York 48 

designated company K 46 

Fighteenth Eegiment Infan- 
try, U. S. A 220, 227 

Eight Army Corps, First Bri- 
gade, independent division. . 21 
Eighth Separate Company, of 

Eochester 84, 114 

became company A, Third 
Eegiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Eighth Eegiment Cavalry, U. 

S. A 113 

Eiseman, Private Leander G., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245, 250 

El Caney, Cuba 220 

233, 242, 256, 257, 317 
an attack contemplated on, 225 
Spaniards retreated io en- 
trenchments before .... 225 

battle fought at 226 

strongly garrisoned and 
occupied by Spanish 
troops 227 



394 



General Index. 



PAGE 

El Caney, Cuba: 

original plan of attack 
upon, changed by turn of 

events 232 

Gapron's artillery opened 

fire on 259 

Lawton's division engaging 

the enemy at 260 

battle of 281 

Elmira, New York 85 

Thirtieth Separate Com- 
pany of 84 

breakfast served to Third 

Begimeiit at 106 

El Poso, Cuba 258 

sketch of road leading to, 229 
Seventy-first Regiment 

marched toward 260 

El Poso Hill 240, 260 

light artillery battery sta- 
tioned on 228 

stampede of Cubans at 

foot of 228 

Eoosevelt Rough Riders, 
losses in killed and 

wounded 228 

Emmet, Second Lieutenant 

Grenville T 130 

promoted regimental adju- 
tant 147 

Kmmet, Major Robert Temple, 19 
20, 22, 24, 25 

military record of 43-44 

awarded medal of honor.. 44 

resigned 41 

Engelke, Private Brandt H.... 176 

baptized 175 

Engels, Private Frederick L., 
died on board La Grande 

Duchesse 250 

died at sea and buried at 

Montauk Point 290 

remains removed to New 

York 290 

]Sngineer Battalion, Colonel 

Black landed a portion of... 308 
Engineer Corps, U. S. A... 55, 230 
unable to make or keep 
roads in proper condi- 
tion for traffic 271 

Episcopalian chapel, at Lake- 
land, Florida 170, 175 

Erie Railroad 30, 84 

Escort to the colors, ceremony 

of 90 

Ess, Private Anton 206 

Euramadiis, principal street in 

Santiago, Cuba, sketch of... 372 
Eiister, Private Maurice, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

Everett City, Georgia 72 



FAG« 

Everett, Corporal Robert G., 
died of typhoid fever 253 

FALES, CAPTAIN HENRY 

M., Twenty-fifth Sepa- 
rate Company 84 

company G 86, 97 

military record of 118 

mustered out 118 

Falls Church, Virginia 88 

90, 93, 94 
FanciuUi, Professor Francisco, 
leader of Seventy-first Regi- 
mental Band 298 

Farley, Private Peter, killed in 

railway wreck 143, 145 

Farragut, David G., Admiral, 
contempt for mines and tor- 
pedoes 309 

Feathei^stone, Private George 
F., wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

li'erguson, Private G., recita- 
tion 206 

Ferguson, Captain Ursil A., 22, 26 

Fernandina, Florida 64 

65, 66, 67, 68, 69 
70, 72, 75, 76, 77 
138, 140, 142, 144 
Sixty-ninth Regiment or- 
dered to 139 

Fiala, Anthony, of the Brook- 
lyn Eagle 318 

Field, Major Edward, U. S. 

A 24, 36 

report of, regarding First 

Regiment 34-39 

extract from report of.. 37-39 
Field Hospital, Santiago, Cuba, 252 
Field service, telegrams relat- 
ing to 33-34 

Field and staff. Third Regi- 
ment, New York Volunteers, 
mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Fifteenth Battalion, Third Bri- 
gade, National Guard, New 

York 45, 47, 49 

Fifteenth Separate Company, 

of Poughkeepsie .... 17, 44 
became com.pany K, First 

Regiment 18 

Fifth Army Corps 212, 330, 355 

First Division 177 

remained on the hill, three 
miles from Santiago .... 269 

Fifth avenue. New York 155 

Fifth Regiment Artillery, U. 

S. A 75, 76, 107 

Fifth Regiment Cavalry, U. S. 
A 86 



Genbeal Index. 



395 



78 



74 



PAGE 
Fifth Regiment Infantry, U. S. 

A 113, 218 

Fifth Maryland 52, 54, 56 

Fifth Ohio 66, 67, 135 

Fifth Separate Company, of 

Newburgh 17 

became company L, First 

Eegiment 18 

Fifty-fonrth Regiment, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 

company E 114 

company H 122 

Firmeza, Cuba 215 

excluded station for yellow 

fever patients 219, 243 

yellow fever camp, some 
sick of Seventy-first 

Regipaent at 206 

First Army Corps 52 

First Battalion, Second Regi- 
ment, New York Volun- 
teers 61, 62, 64, 72, 

quartered in Germania 
Hall, Troy, New York.. 

fifteen deaths 81 

First Battalion, Third Regi- 
ment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 88, 91 

ordered out as provost 

guard 97 

arrived at Camp Meade 106 

First Battalion, Sixty-ninth 
Regfiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 129 

First Battalion, Seventy-first 
Regiment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 221 

235, 236 
under Major Whittle, de- 
tailed to build bridges 

and improve roads 241 

halted on roadside 259 

fears of an ambush 263 

First Brigade, excepting 
Twenty-second Kansas 
Regiment, ordered to 
Allen farm, on Difiicult 

Run 92 

march of, unjustly criti- 
cised 92 

reviewed by Brigadier- 
General Mark W. Sheaf e, 93 
First Corps Cadets, Boston, 

Massachusetts 109 

First Division, Second Army 

Corps 94 

hospital ambulance from, 
overturned in a stream.. 105 
First Division, Fourth" Army 

Corps 150 

First Division, Fifth Army 
Corps 177 



PAGE 

First Separate Company, of 

Rochester 84, 90 

111, 112, 113, 119, 120, 124 
became company H, Third 

Regiment 86 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

First Artillery, D. S. A 39 

40, 42, 259 

First Cavalry, U. S. A 67, 151 

First Ohio Cavalry 167 

First Regiment Cavalry, United 
States Volunteers, Rough 

Riders 141, 217, 218, 228 

encountered Spanish troops 

in the jungle 216 

commonly known as Roose- 
velt Rough Riders.. 216, 218 
First Engineers, United States 

Volunteers 52, 55, 56, 62 

First Infantry, District of 

Columbia 54, 56, 60 

Florida 67, 135 

irirst Regiment Infantry, New 
York National Guard. (See 
Index, First Regiment, page 
320.) 
First Regiment Infantry, New 
York VoUinteers. (See In- 
dex, First Regiment, page 
319.) 
First Regiment Infantry, Ohio, 67 
Fish, Sergeant Hamilton, Jr., 
instantly killed in battle at 

Las Guasimas, Cuba 218 

Fisher, First Lieutenant Har- 
ris Baldwin '. 183 

aijpointed battalion adju- 
tant 182 

ordered to rear to draw 
ammunition under a 

galling fire , 239 

Fisher, Irving P., of New 

York 180 

Fitzgerald, Judge James, 
makes presentation address 

to Sixty-ninth Regiment 132 

Fitzg-erald, Thomas H., died of 

disease 248 

Fitzgibbon, John J., died on 
board Missouri, and buried 

at sea 253 

Flint, Private Frank L., wound- 
ed in action at San Juan 

Hill, Ctiba 245 

Flint, Grover, of the Sim . 318 

I?lorence, Italy 184 

Florida 75, 166, 167 

177, 185, 187, 259, 267, 314 

First Regiment 67' 

Infantry 135 



396 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Florida : 

order of advance of Ameri- 
can transports to Cuba 

from 195 

Central and Peninsular 

Eailroad 53, 64, 65 

Flower Hospital, Fernandina, 

Florida 69, 77 

Flower, Governor Eoswell P. . . 43 
gift of, to Second Eegi- 

ment 69 

Flushing- ferry-boat, con- 
veyed Seventy-first Regiment 
to foot of Whitehall street, 

New York ,. 397 

Flynn, Private John, Jr 55 

Flynn, Private Maurice J., 

died 140 

Foley, Private Louis B., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Fonseca, Francisco E 270 

Forse, Major Albert G., First 
United States Cavalry, killed 

at Fort San Juan, Cuba 151 

Forsyth, Stanley H., died of 

fever 249 

Fort Adams, Ehode Island.... 40 

Fort Brooke, Florida 54 

Fort Columbus, New York 

harbor 19, 20, 41 

Fort Hamilton, Long Island 

side of the Narrows 19 

-20, 31, 39 

Fort Logan, Colorado 30 

Fort McPherson, Georgia, 63 

hospital, Atlanta 68 

70, 71, 75, 80 

Fort Myer, Virginia 259 

hospital at 105 

Fort Niobrara, Nebraska ,44 

Fort Pond Bay, within the 
hook at Montauk Potijt, 
Seventy-first Eegiment 

arrived at 390 

Seventy-first removed from 
detention camp to per- 
manent camp at 294 

Fort San Juan, Cuba 151, 267 

Fort Tampa, Florida 62, 153 

Fort Union, New Mexico 44 

Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island 
side of the Narrows.. 19, 20, 31 

Fort Whipple, Virginia 40 

Forty-first Eegiment Infantry, 

U. S. A 257 

Forty-seventh Eegiment Infan- 
try, National Guard, New 

York 156 

Forty-eighth Eegiment, Na- 
tional Guard, New York 116 



PAGE 

Forty-ninth Eegiment, Na- 
tional Guard, New York 108 

Forty-first Separate Company, 

of Syracuse 93, 111, 116 

became company C, Third , 

New York Volunteers. . . 85 
mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Forty-second Separate Com- 
pany, of Niagara Falls.. 83 
84, 87, 108, 117, 118 
became company E, Third 

New York Volunteers... 86 
mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Forty-third Separate Com- 
pany, of Olean , 84 

93, 113, 120 
became company I, Third 

New York Volunteers... 85 
mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Forty-fourth Separate Com- 
pany, of Utica 17 

became company E, First 

Eegiment 18 

Forty-sixth Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, 
New York, of Amster- 
dam, New York 49 

designated company H..... 46 
Forty-seventh, Separate Com- 
pany, of Hornellsville. . . 84 
,93, 113, 120, 131 
became company K, Third 

New York Volunteers. . . 85 
mustered out- of United. 

States service 107 

Forty-eighth Separate Com- 
pany, of Oswego 85 

93, 108, 116, 117 
became company D, Third 

New York Volunteers-. . . 85 
mustered out of United 

States ^ervice — 107 

Fourteenth Battalion, National 

Guard, New York.... 47, 48 

Third Brigade 45 

Fourteenth Eegiment Infantry, 
National Guard, New 

York 156 

New York Volunteers 53 

Fourteenth Separate Com- 
pany, Twelfth Battalion, 

of Kingston 17 

became company M, First 

Eegiment 18 

Fourth Army Corps 54 

62, 66, 67, 136, 141, 147 

First Division , 150 

Second Division 66, 134 

Third Division 66, 71, 146 



General Index. 



397 



PAGE 

Fourth Eeg-iment Cavalry, 

U. S. A 257 

troop B 318 

Fourtli Infantry, U. S. A., 230, 387 
Fourth Eegiment, New Jersey 
National Guard, company H, 117 

Fowler, Major E. S 80 

Fowler, Second Lieutenant 

Joseph M 37 

promoted 28 

Fox, John, Jr 318 

Franchot, Captain Bichard H., 
Forty-third Separate 

Company 84 

military record of 120 

mustered out 130 

Francis, Major Augustus T. . . 166 
assigned to special care of 

armory , ,. , , :165 

commissioned colonel 17lBt 
Kegiment, National 

Guard, New York 165 

recruited new regiment. . . 165 

at Long Island City 397 

Franklin Junction, Virginia, 73, 74 
Frank, General Royal T., TJ. 

S. A 31, 33 

Fraser (Frazer), Principal Mu- 
sician John £ ' 133 

military record of 113 

mustered out .'. 113 

Frear, Private Charles W., 
commissioned second 

lieutenant 66 

resigned ; — 66 

Free Masons, Lakeland Lodge 
of, reception and ban- 
quet to Masonic breth- 
ren of Seventy-first...... 180 

New York, Grand Lodge of, 181 
Freidmann (Freidman), Pri- 
vate Paul W., died on board ■' 

Missouri, at sea 349 

Fi-ench, Private John W 313 

detailed as amanuensis 153 

ill with yellow fever 153 

French, Private Windsor P., 
commissioned second lieu- 
tenant 60 

Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, 
presented colors to Sixty- 
ninth Regiment 133 

Fuchsius, Surgeon John H. . . . 143 

Furor, Spanish destroyer 313 

completely wrecked by 
U. S. S.' Gloucester 313 

I 

GASPER, SECOND LIEUTEN- 
ANT QEOROE E., mili- 
tary record of 115 

mustered out 115 



PAGE 

Gage, Lyman J., Secretary of 

Treasury 121 

Gainesville, Virginia 102 

Galbraith, First Lieutenant 

William J 48 

Gale, Captain Edward Court- 
land 48, 66 

Gallagher, Private Charles A., 

died 148 

Gannon, Private Robert H., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

G. A. E. veterans 73 

Garcia, General Y. Iniquez Cal- 

ixto 214 

with his staff, passed by 
the camp of the Seventy- 

fii-st Regiment 225 

Garden City, Long Island, New 

York 155 

Garfield Hospital, Washington, 

D. C 105 

Garfield, Lyman B., of New 

York . . 180 

Gatchell, Lieutenant George 
W., Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., 76 

107 

General Field Hospital 57, 58 

Geueral Hospital for Insane at 

Washington, D. C 76 

Camp Wikoff, Montauk 

Point, Long Island. 246 

292, 293 

Siboney, Cuba 240 

tents 284 

General Meigs, government 

boat 19 

Geneva, New York 85 

Thirty-fourth Separate 

Company of 84 

Geoghegan, John H., died of 

fever . . 254 

Georgia, campaign thr ough . . . 256 
Georgia, Second Regiment In- 
fantry 135, 136, 140 

Germania Hall, Troy ; ; 74 

Germany . . . ; 40 

Gilgar, Second Lieutenant Ed- 
ward B 130, 133 

recommended to be bat- 
talion adjutant 131 

Gill, Private Thomas D., died. . 127 
Gillespie, General George L., 71, 74 
Gilmore, General John C, U. 

S. A 307, 309 

Glasby, Private Albert, died. . . 30 

Glen Cove, New York 254 

Glennon, Sergeant Prank, in- 
jured in railway wreck. . 143 

died from injuries 145 

Glens Falls, New York 73 



398 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Glens Falls, New York: 

Second Regiment, New 
York Volunteers, Four- 
teenth Battalion, com- 
pany K, Eighteenth 

Separate Company of 48 

State armory, at 81 

Gloucester, man-of-war, and 
the Puerto Kican cam- 
paign 306-311 

log of 306, 307, 309, 310, 313 

entered Gnanica .harbor in 

advance of the ileet 306 

captvired large sugar light- 
ers 307 

opened iire and enemy re- 
treated SOS 

crew of, hoisted first 
American ilag on Puerto 

Rico 309 

captured first Spanish flag 

in Puerto Rico 309 

in command of Captain 
Wainwright, collected all 
lighters in Guaniea har- 
bor 310 

captiired Guaniea single- 
handed 310 

followed about 1,500 yards 
astern of " Oquendo," at 

Santiago 311 

harbor entrance 313 

brief training of her crew, 313 
attacked and destroyed 

Pluton and Furor 313 

her escape due to accuracy 

and rapidity of fire 313 

rescued crews of Pluton 

and Furor 313 

Bninjured in the battle.... 313 
waited for two destroyers 

of Spanish fleet „. 311 

Gloucester, city of, Ainerican 
flag hoisted at Guaniea, 

presented to 309 

hangs over mayor's chair 

in city hall of 309 

Glynn, Bernard J., recommend- 
ed to,be second lieutenant. . . 133 
Goff, Sergeant Eugene W., died 

of fever 251 

Golden Rod, dispatch boat, 
brought story of destruc- 
tion of Cervera's squadron.. 316 
Goldsborough, Captain Wash- 
ington Laird, among first to 
aiTive on San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 334, 236 

Gombert, Charles, died of 

fever 353 

Goo, Private James W., in- 
jured 58 



PAGE 

Goodale, Second Lieutenant 

James R 26 

promoted 28 

Goodier, Captain Lewis E 28 

promoted major, 203rd 
New York Volunteers ... 37 
Goodman, Private Charles W., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Goodrich, Captain Caspar F., 

U. S. N 218 

Goodrich, Sergeant William, 

died 29 

Gordon, Corporal William P., 

injured in railway wreck 145 

Gould, Emmet M., military rec- 
ord of 113 

mustered out 113 

Gould, Henry W., injured '58 

Governor-General's palace at 

Havana 314 

Governors Island, New York 

harbor 31, 32, 41 

Gracie, Captain William B 35 

Graham, George Edvrard, de- 
scribed loss of Spanish fleet, 
from deck of the Brooklyn. . 318 
Graham, Major-General Wil- 
liam M., U. S. A 89, 93, 105 

Grahn, Private Gus, died of 

mountain fever , 253, 280 

buried west of entrench- 
ments near Santiago 280 

Grand Lodge of Free Masons 

of New York 181 

Grant, Colonel Frederick Dent, 

Fourteenth New York 53 

Gray, First Lieutenant Emmet 

J 49 

Great Bahama Channel... 200, 204 
Great Inagua Island, Bahama. 204 
Green, Private Grlswold, ap- 
pointed second lieutenant, 
301st Regiment, New York 

Volunteers 6 

Greene, Colonel Francis Vin- 

ton 155, 155 

158, 160, 161, 162, 164 
166, 167, 172, 173, 175 
176, 181, 182, 209, 295 
called meeting of Seventy- 
first Regiment 154 

mustered into United 

States service 157 

nominated brigadier-gen- 
eral 171 

brigadier-general 181 

Greene, First Lieutenant 

George de B 49 

appointed acting assistant 
adjutant-general 52 



General Index. 



399 



PAGE 

Greene, Mrst liieutenant 
George de B.: 
mustered in as battalion 

adjutant 59 

mustered out United States 

service 81 

Greene, General George S., old- 
est living graduate of West 

Point 175 

Gyenough, Captain Ernest A. . 49 
commissioned first lieuten- 
ant, Twelfth NevF York, 82 
Grenville, Second Lieutenant 
George A., military rec- 
ord of 120 

mustered out 120 

Gresham, First Lieutenant 

Christoplier 25 

Griffin, Captain Thomas J 130 

Griffith, Assista,nt Surgeon 

Levyis Theophilus 19 

20, 21, 23, 24, 25 
Grimes, Captain George S., 

TJ. S. A 260 

Grimes' battery 260, 262 

Grimes Hill 261 

Grobecker (Groebecker), Pri- 
vate Andrew F., injured 58 

Gross, Colonel George P., Third 
Missouri Infantry Volun- 
teers, in Confederate ser- 
vice during Civil War 89 

Grosvenor, Second Lieutenant 
George H., military rec- 
ord of 121 

mustered out 121 

Guanica, determined to change 
the landing of Puerto 

Sican expedition to 306 

Captain Wainwright's of- 
ficial report on the cap- 
ture of 307, 308 

Lieutenant Huse's report 
to Captain Wainwright 

on capture of 308, 309 

vigorous v7ork of landing 
party under Lieutenant 

Huse 309 

captured by the Gloucester 

single handed 310 

P^arbor, the " Massachu- 
setts " drevy too much 

water to enter 306 

Guantanamo, Cuba, Port of.. 206 
United States marines' sucr 
cessful fight with Span- 
iards at 216 

Guilfords Mills, Virginia 100 

creek at 100 

Guilfoyle, Captain John F., U. 
S. A 292 



PAGE 

Guilfoyle, Lieutenant William 

F 129 

Guiteras, Dr. John, expert on 

yellow fever 243 

Gulf of Mexico 200 

Guthrie, Musician John (Jacob, 

injured in wreck 145 

I 
HACKENSACK, NEW JER- 
SEY 249 

Hager, Arnold F 113, 123 

military reford of 112 

mustered out 112 

Hall, Captain Albert Mortimer 

85, 116 

as major 87, 93, 94 

95, 105, 123 

military record of 108 

mustered out.% 108 

Hall, Private Earl B., wounded 
in action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 244 

Hall, Private Edward D., 
w^ounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Hall, Chaplain Hector 47 

resigned 55 

honorably discharged from 
United States service. . . 56 
Hall, General Robert H., U. S. 

A 68 

Haller, Private John H., died 

of fever 252 

Halstead, Murat, of the Sun. . 318 
Hamilton, Corporal William A., 

injured .■ 58 

Hancock, Major-General Win- 
field Scott 40, 41 

Happoldt Estate, Virginia 98 

Haran, First Lieutenant Pat- 
rick M 129 

Hardin, Edward E 47, 50 

53, 72, 75, 76, 79, «11 
Captain Seventh United 
States Infantry, ap- 
pointed colonel of Sec- 
ond New York Volun-' 

teers .45 

assumed command of..... '45-'' 

oath administered to '46 

bids regiment good-bye. j.'^' 77 
short address to other offl-'i'"^'' 

cers 78 

relinquished commission.'. • 82' *-' 
Hare, Private George L., Jr., 
appointed second lieutenant 
Two Hundred and Second 
Beglment, New York Volun- 
teers 50 

Harlem, New York, St. An- 
drew's Church. .... . 155, 176, 110 

Harper, Private John, injured, 58 



400 



GenbeAl Index. 



PAGE 

Harpers Weekly 317 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 137 

Harsh, Messrs. Bowman and, 

Birmingham, Alabama 143 

Hart, Patrick J., regiment 

army chaplain 393 

Hart, Captain Stephen F., de- 
tailed by Governor as adju- 
tant 87 

" Harvard," formerly " New 

York," of the American Line, 218 
Hatteras, North Carolina, ma- 
chinery broke down and ves- 
sel lay to for fourteen 

hours 290 

Havana, Cuba, Commodore 
Schley's effective block- 
ade of 191 

Governor-General's palace 

at 314 

New York Herald sent first 

boat into 317 

Hawaii, District of 23 

Hawaiian Islands 32 

annexation ceremonies to 
transfer to United States 33 

Hawk, William S.. 303 

Hawkins, General Hamilton 

Smith, U. S. A.. 220, 323, 337 

military record of 316 

retired 216 

ordered one battalion to 

top of San Juan Hill... 236 
coinplimented the Seventy- 
first Begiment for its 

good work 266 

Hayes, Major Edward M., First 

Ohio Cavalry 167 

Hayes, ex-President Ruther- 
ford B 167 

Haynor, Corporal Horatio H., 

died 78 

^Healy, Captain Charles... 130, 140 
~'Heath, Lewis C, died of per- 
nicious malarial fever 250 

Hebrank, Private Ferdinand, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Heindsmann, Captain Ferdin- 
and 217 

" Helena," boat 204 

Hempstead, New York 174 

211, 29S 
Hempstead Plains, Long Isl- 
and, New York 18, 31 

New York 45, 52 

Long Island, New York... 84 
128, 154, 155, 160, 162 
Henderson, Daniel E., enlisted, 114 
Henderson, Captain Henry B., 
Eighth Separate Com- 
pany 84, 85 



PAGE 

Henderson, Captain Henry B.: 

military record of 114 

mustered out 114 

Henry, General Guy V., U. S. 

A 135, 136 

Henry, First Lieutenant John 

J 129 

"Herald," The, newspaper 

169, 210, 226 
Hess, Private Louis E., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 246 

Higginson, Captain Francis J., 

enters Guanica harbor.. 306 
report to Admiral Samp- 
son 306, 307 

extract from report 310 

report of Commander 
Davis of capture of 

Guanica, to 310 

Hillsborough bay, Florida 54 

Hills, Captain Elbridge E., U. 

S. A 75, 79, 106 

" Hilo," island of Hawaii. . 23, 30 
Hinman, Second Lieutenant 

Charles N 26 

Hislop, Private Thomas W., 
mustered in as battalion 

adjutant 59 

appointed regimental com- 
missary 66 

mustered out of United 

States service 82 

Historical structures, preser- 
vation of 4, 5 

Hitchcock, Captain Charles 

Henry 26 

Hoboken, New Jersey 2ii 

Hobson, Lieutenant Richmond 
Pearson, sinks the Mer- 

rimac i9i 

crew exchanged 342 

Hodgman, Lieutenant Alfred 
Frederick, mustered into 
United States service as 

surgeon 8S 

captain and assistant sur- 
geon, military record of, 

110, 133 

mustered out lie 

Hoffman, Brigadier-General 

Edward M 89, 93, 97 

100, 101, 104 
106, 133, 135, 136 
appointed colonel Third 
Regiment, New York In- 
fantry 84 

colors presented to his 

regiment 99 

presented with loving cup, 108 
military record of 107 



General Index. 



401 



PAGE 

Hoffman, Brigadier-General 
Edward M.: 
adjutant-general, New York 

State 107 

died 107 

Hogan, Daniel J 48 

appointed second lieuten- 
ant 48, 59 

Hogan, John P., died of mala- 
rial fever 249 

Hogan, Hospital Steward 

Joseph Frederick 31 

Holden, Private James A., died, 77 

Holland 40 

Holland, Private Charles D., 
buried near the ford be- 
low San Juan Hill, Cuba, 340 
killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 354 

Holland, First Lieutenant John 

B., military record of.. 122, 133 
Holzkamp, Private Henry J., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

Homer, Colonel, Civil War 

veteran 297 

Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands.. 31 
23, 33, 39, 30, 33, 33, 34, 37 

Board of Health of 38 

Civil Sanitary Commission, 

report of 38. 39 

post of 34, 36 

Hoosick Falls, New York, com- 
pany M, Second Eegi- 
ment. Thirty-second Sep- 
arate Company of 49 

State armory at 80 

Homellsville, Neiw York 85 

Forty-seventh Separate 

Company of 84 

Hospital Corps 21 

United States Army 70 

158, 167 237 

Hospital Department 178, 179 

Hospital ship 198 

Hospital tent, brief service 

held in 158 

Howard, Joseph, died of ty- 
phoid ^malaria 250 

Howe, Sergeant Kussel G 319 

Howitt, John, died of disease, 348 
Howland, Assistant Surgeon 

Eeeve B 133 

mustered into United 

States service 86 

military record of 110 

mustered out 110 

Hubschmidt, Private Philip, 

died of gastric fever 170, 251 

Hubschmidt, Private William , 

P., injured 192 

26 



PAGE 

Hudgins, Houlder, on New 

York Herald war staff 316 

Hudson, Columbia county. New 
York, three generations of 
Stoddards made their home 

in 314 

Hudson, Brigadier-General 

Joseph K., United States 

Volunteers 62 

Hughes, First Lieutenant 

George 49 

Huhne, First Lieutenant John 

A 27 

second lieutenant, pro- 
moted 38 

Hull, military bill 154 

Humbert, Private William, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 346 

HuntsviUe, Alabama 69, 70 

141, 146, 147, 148, 149, 151 
Sixty-ninth Regiment or- 
dered to 142 

sketch of camps at 144 

Hurley, Private George M., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 246 

Huse, Lieutenant Harry P 306 

and Lieutenant Wood low- 
ered Spanish flag and 

hoisted ours 307 

hailed the " Massachu- 
setts " to fire over him, 307 
signaled that 250 men were 

needed to hold Guanica, 307 
report to Captain Wain- 
wrig-ht of the capture of 

Guanica 307, 309 

surprise of Guanica a com- 
plete success 309 

in command of armed 

boat 310 

and Captain Wainwright 

during the blockade 312 

attacked and completely 
destroyed " Pluton " and 

"Furor" 313 

Hutchinson, Sergeant James 
M., appointed second lieuten- 

. ant 183 

Hutton, Lieutenant Donald J. . 

49, 59, 62 

IDAHO 41 

Independent Division, First 

Brigade, Eighth Army Corps, 21 
Immen, Corporal George L., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 231 

buried in trench at Divi- 
sion Hospital 249 



402 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Innnen, Corporal George L.: 

died of wounds received in 

action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 348 

Inauga Island, Great Bahama, 204 

Indian scouts 44 

Indiana 357 

"Indiana," battleship 194 

Indiana, Ninth Eegiment In- 
fantry, company E 257 

Indiana, One Hundred and 
Fiftieth Eegiment Infantry. . 89 
93, 95, 105 
Indiana, Volunteers, Thirtieth 
Begiment Infantry, company 

A 257 

Inspector-General's Depart- 
ment 110 

Iowa 141 

National Guard 137 

Ireland 40, 133 

" Irwin Tract," Hawaiian Isl- 
ands 23 

Italy 40 

JACKSONVILLE, Florida, Six- 
ty-ninth New York, ordered 

to 136 

Jamaica 207, 208, 316 

Jeannisson, Private Alexander, 300 
Jeffrey, Private John W., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

wounded . . 248 

Jennings, First Lieutenant Ed- 
gar S., military record 

, of 122 

mustered out 133 

Jersey City, New Jersey 20 

50, 88, 133, 164, 198 
Jessup, Private Frederick W., 

died 79 

Johnston (Johnson), Private 
Henry C, superintended en- 
tertainment 206 

Jones, Private Alson L., trans- 
ferred to Division Hospital 

Corps 60 

Jones, Private John S., in- 
jured 58 

Jordan, Private Elmer J., died, 70 
Jorgensen, Christopher, acci- 
dentally killed 253 

"Journal," The, newspaper... 207 
Joyce, Captain Walter Irving, 

company H 155 

sent to New York for re- 
covery 243 



FAOE 

KANSAS, Twenty-second Regi- 
ment Infantry 89, 92, 105 

Kansas City, Missouri, loving 
cup presented to Third Mis- 
souri Eegiment, now in pub- 
lic library at lOS 

Kapiolani Park, Hawaiian Isl- 
ands 21, 22, 37 

Kane, Maurice B., killed by 

cars 354 

Keaney, First Lieutenant Fran- 
cis J 130 

Keck, Captain Frank, pro- 
moted major 182 

with Third Battalion, 
among first to arrive on 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 

234, 235 
Keek's battalion on its way up 
the hill before one of regu- 
lars had passed on the road, 264 
Keller, Private James E., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 246 

Kenealy, Alexander C, of the 

" Sun " 318 

Kennan, Colonel Cortland L., 

Fifth Ohio 135 

Kennan, George 374 

Kennedy, Private John, died. . 148 
Kennedy, Lieutenant John J. . 131 
recommended to be cap- 
tain 131 

absent on sick leave 140 

recovered from illness 150 

Kennedy, Private William S., 

died 75 

Kent, General Jacob Ford, U. 

S. A., military record of, 330 
232, 233, 266 

retired 230 

orders to Colonel Downs.. 331 
ordered to take his divi- 
sion into action 362 

extract from his report of 
the San Juan engage- 
ment 363 

his course toward the 

Seventy-first Eegiment. . 365 
his headquarters efetab- 
lished in vicinity of San 

Juan, Cuba 367 

Keogh, First Sergeant Thomas 
F., promoted to lieutenant.. 148 

Key West, Florida 174 

194, 200, 315 
" Kilanea," Hawaiian Islands, 

volcano of 23 

Kilclive, Private Thomas, in- 
jured in vrreck 145 

Killian, Private John 76 

discharged from regiment, 76 



General Index. 



403 



PAGE 

Kingr, Albert J., enlisted 114 

King, Brigadier-General Chas., 

,U. S. A 23, 86 

Kingston, Fourteenth Separate 

Company of 17 

Kinne, Private George W., com- 
pany D, transferred to First 
Begiment, United States 

Volunteer Engineers 56 

Kirby, Private Sinclair H., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Kirby, Brigadier-General Wil- 
liam Maurice, inspector 
rifle practice, State of 
New York, appointed 
lieutenant-colonel Third 
Regiment, National 

Guard 83 

brigadier-general 84 

lieutenant-colonel, mus- 
tered in United States 

service 87 

detailed as provost-mar- 
shal-general. Second 

Army Corps 93 

presented with loving cup, 106 
lieutenant-colonel, military 

record of 107, 108 

mustered out 108, 123 

Kittayama, Frank, Japanese 

cook 68 

Kline, Brigadier-General Ja- 
cob, U. S. A 66 

ill , 68 

Kline, John C, Herald news- 
paper correspondent 226 

Knox, Thomas T., assistant 
inspector-general. United 

States Army 34, 36 

Kopper, Private Edward, sick 

with measles 192 

Kopper, Lieutenant Frederick, 
formerly colonel 71st 

Regiment 295 

in command of 200 recruits 

at Camp Black 295 

Kronpa, Edward C, died of 

pernicious malarial fever... 250 
Kuehnle, Private Frederick C, 
wounded in action at San 
Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

LACEY, CHIEF YEOMAN, 

his gallant conduct com- 
mended 309 

La Garde, Major and Surgeon 
Louis A., in charge of Sib- 
oney, Cuba 268 

" La Grande Duchesse," trans- 
port 212, 250, 253 



PAGE 

" La Grande Duchesse," trans- 
port: 
all needed rations trans- 
ported to at Santiago... 289 
passed out of the harbor 

with Spanish pilot 289 

Lakeland, Florida 173, 175, 177 

179, 180, 183, 187 
190, 192, 206, 251, 256 
Seventy-first, New York, 

arrived at 166 

sketch of camp at.... 167, 168 

Episcopalian chapel at 

170, 175 
Lodge of Free Masons give 
reception and banquet to 
Masonic brethren of 

regiment . . •. 180 

Seventy-first, New York, 

leaves 184 

Lalor (Lawlor), Sergeant Pat- 
rick W., injured in wreck. . . 145 
Lane, Private Leland T., 
commissioned second 

" lieutenant Two Hundred 
and Second Regiment... 62 

resigned 62 

transferred to First Regi- 
ment, United States Vol- 
unteer Engineers 63 

Lane, Private Thomas, injured 

in wreck 145 

Langfitt, Major William C, 

United States Army 23 

La Rose, Captain Anthime 

Watson 105, 123 

military record of 110 

mustered out 110 

Las Aniinaas canon, New Mex- 
ico 44 

Las Guasimas, Cuba 218, 224 

227, 228, 258 

battle of 217, 218, 259 

United States Army en- 
gages in first ^battle on 

Cuban soil 216 

evidence of bloody engage- 
ment at 223 

Lawrence, Private William C. 191 
Lawton, Major-General Henry 
Ware, U. S. A., military 

record of, foot-note 257 

received congressional 
medal of honor for gal- 
lantry in front of At- 
lanta, Georgia 257 

killed in action at battle 
of San Matio, Philippine 

Islands 237 

his division at El Caney, 
Cuba 268 



404 



General Ixdex. 



PAGE 

Leary, First Lieutenant Tim- 
othy Hill 130 

LefBngwell, Musician Henry E., 70 
Legfnard, Private Frank S., 

died 66 

Lennon, Private Thomas ¥., 

died 29 

Lentz, Second Lieutenant 
Charles B., military rec- 
ord of 119 

mustered out 119 

Lester, Major James W 50 

53, 61, 68, 78 

mustered in 46 

commanding Fourteenth 
Battalion, National 

Guard, New York 47 

paid and mustered out of 

United States service 80 

Levy, Dr. Joseph M 237 

Lewis, Private Charles, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Lewis, Hospital Steward 

George J 123 

military record of 112 

mustered out 112 

Lexington, Kentucky 132 

Lincoln, General James Bush, 68 
brigadier-general.. 137, 141, 142 
congratulates Colonel Ed- 
ward DufEy on appear- 
ance of the Sixty-ninth 

Regiment 147, 149 

Linson, Captain William Henry 336 
Little, Second Lieutenant 

James H 130 

Lloyd, James H 50, 61, 72 

appointed lieutenant- 
colonel, Second New 

York Volunteers 45, 47 

mustered in 46 

mustered out of United 

States service 83 

Lockhart, Private William J., 
transferred to United States 

Volunteer Signal Corps 76 

"Log of Gloucester, The".... 

306, 307, 309, 310, 312 

London, St. Paul's Church 176 

Long Bridge, Virg^inia 88 

Long Island, New York 128 

railway 87, 163 

Long Island City, Long Island, 

New York 19, 50, 88 

155, 163, 164, 190, 298 
special train conveyed 
Seventy-first Regiment 

to 397 

Longson, Lieutenant William, 

died of typhoid fever 251 

toast drunk in silence to 
memory of 303 



PAGE 
Louisville and Nashville Rail- 
road 143, 145 

Ludlow, Brigadier-General Wil- 
liam, U. S. A., military 

record of 256 

died at Convent station, 

New Jersey 256 

his brigade of regulars... 257 
praised the Seventy-first 

Regiment 385 

Lucas, Private William H 237 

Lynch, Captain Michael 129 

absent on sick leave 140 

rejoined regiment 144 

Lynch, Major Thomas F? 129 

in hospital 134 

recovered from illness .... 138 

Lynchburg, Virginia 73 

Lytle station, Georgia 51 

57, 133 

MacARTHUR, COLONEL AR- 
THUR 137, 393 

Mackenzie, Private William H., 
wounded In action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 346 

MacMillan (Mc William), Nor- 
man J. G., died of yellow 

fever at Siboney, Cuba 254 

Magill, Private James S., dis- 
charged . . 78 

MagTiire, Lieutenant Peter W.. 130 
recommended to be cap- 
tain 133 

Mail and Express, The, news- 
paper . . 169, 226, 314 

letter written to, in favor 
of Seventy-first Regi- 
ment, by Henry L. Stod- ' 

dard 265 

Maine, the '. 316 

Maley, Private John W., trans- 
ferred to Division Hospital 

Corps 60 

Manassas, Virginia 94, 97, 99 

Manassas battlefield, Virginia, 99 
Manassas Junction, Virginia . . 95 
Third Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers, 

ordered to 94 

Manassas monument, Virginia, 99 

Manila, Philippine Islands 21 

Manila bay, battle of 316 

Manning, Sergeant John J., 

injured in railway wreck. . . 145 
Mans on. Captain William 

Dixon 35 

lieutenant, promoted 38 

Mapes, Lieutenant William H.. 36 
Mara, Sergeant John J., 
wounded in action at 
San Juan Hill, CuKa 244 



General Index. 



405 



PAGE 

Mara, Sergeant John J.: 

died of fever and dysen- 
tery 253 

Markley, Major Alfred C, U. S. 
A., letter to Colonel Downs 
praising Seventy-first Eegi- 

ment for its bravery 267 

Marlow, Private James L., 
wounded in action at ■ San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Mariposa, steamer 22 

Marks, Charles W 114 

Marsh (March), Surgeon and 

Major E. T. T 165, 182 

Marshall, Edward, of the 
Journal, wounded at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 318 

Marshall estate, Virginia 96 

Martens, Private Kichard 191 

died of malarial fever 251 

Martin, Colonel Henry P., 
colonel of Seventy-first Regi- 
ment in 1861 180, 30.0, 301 

Martin, Captain James Curtis, 36 
Martin, Sergeant-Major Wil- 
liam Swift 47 

mustered in as battalion 

adjutant 59 

mustered out of United 

States service 83 

Maryes Heights, Virginia, bat- 
tle of 220 

Mason, First Lieutenant Sam- 
uel J., military record 

of 117 

mustered out 117 

" Massachusetts," Captain Hig- 

ginson's battleship 306, 307 

Massachusetts coast 198 

Spanish ships sighted off. . 164 
Massachusetts, Second Eegi- 

ment Infantry 163 

167, 170, 192 

ofEcers buy horses 177 

part of Ludlow's command 

at El Caney, Cuba 256 

utilized as a support at El 

Caney engagement 257 

not in San Juan engage- 
ment until second day. . 257 
suffered from Spanish fire, 
but not in fighting at El 

Caney 257 

Massarene, Sergeant-Major 
William G., recommend- 
ed for promotion 133 

resigned 150 

Masten, Lieutenant Daniel W.. 49 
Matanzas, bombardment of 

fortifications at 316 

Mather, Lieutenant Adrian W. . 25 
Maus, Surgeon-Major Louis M.. 156 



PAGE 

Mayer, Lieutenant George M., 

military record of ^ 120 

mustered out 120 

Mayrand (Maynard), George 

W., enlisted 114 

Maxcy, Second Lieutenant 

Carroll Lewis 48, 49 

lieutenant, resigned 55 

honorably discharged from 
United States service... 55 
McAlpin, General Edwin A., 
visited camp of Seventy- 
first Kegiment 282, 295, 297 

McArthur, Private William H., 

died 70 

McBean, Captain Hector Wil- 
liam 86 

mustered into United 
States servife as cap- 
tain 87 

sent to Niagara Palls to 

receive recruits 91 

military record' of 117 

mustered out 117 

McBride, Private Andrew, in- 
jured 58 

McBride (MacBride), Private 

John, enlisted 114 

McCarthy, Captain Daniel. . . . 130 
McCarty, Private Webster, 

died 29 

McChesney, Quartermaster- 
Sergeant Calvin S., mus- 
tered in as lieutenant 59 

McClelland, Private Donald C, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

McClurg, William, died of 

pleuro-pneumonia 253 

McCready, E. W., on New York 

Herald war staff 316 

McCrystal, Captain Edward T.. 129 
recommended to be major, 133 
McCrystal, Lieutenant William 

J. P 130 

, promoted 147 

McDermott, Sergeant James J., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

McDonald, Lieutenant John, 

military record of 117 

mustered out 117 

McElroy, George W., chief en- 
gineer on " Gloucester " 312 

McGaflin, Lieutenant John J.. 48 

mustered in as captain. 59 

McGeechan, Private John, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

McGurrin, Colonel William T., 

Thirty-second Michigan 135 

Mclntyre, Captain Amos E.... 26- 



406 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Mclntyre, Private Samuel, 
wo'imded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 346 

McKay, First Lieutenant Wil- 
liam L., military record 

of 115 

mustered out 115 

McKeever, Edward Percy, died 

of fever 353 

McKenna, Second Lieutenant 

Patrick J 139 

McKinley, President William.. 135 
136, 158, 171, 210 
made requisition on Gov- 
ernor of New York State, 83 
authorized to call for 

135,000 men 83 

called for 135,000 volun- 
teers 153 

his anxiety to protect the 

troops 198 

McMahon, Private Thomas, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

McMillan, Lieutenant Howard 

Udell 25 

McNair, Corporal Frederick 
Park, commissioned lieu- 
tenant Two Hundred and 
Second Kegiment, New 

York Volunteers 80 

died 80 

McNamara, Private Thomas 

W., died 76 

McNeil (McN eill) , Sergeant 
Thomas J., mustered in as 

lieutenant 62 

Mead, Captain Harry, assistant 
surgeon Sixty-fifth Regi- 
ment •. . 80 

Meade, Private James, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Medina, New York 86 

Twenty-ninth Separate 

Company of 84 

Meeks, Sergeant Elmer C, 
died of typhoid malarial ' 

fever 251 

Meeks, Captain William Fur- 
man 237 

among first to arrive on 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 234 

Mercer, Private John E., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 346 

Merchants' Central Club 282 

Meriwether, Walter S., on 

New York Herald war stafE, 316 
Merriam, Major-General Henry 

C, U. S. A 23 

Merrill, Second Lieutenant 
Leon A., military record 
of 122 



PAGE 

Merrill, Second Lieutenant 

Leon A., mustered out 122 

Merrimac, sinking of by Hob- 
son 191 

sunk in Santiago harbor.. 289 
Merritt, Corporal Samuel, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Merritt, Major-General Wesley, 

U. S. A 32, 171, 181 

Messer, Private John P 337 

Messiter, Arthur M., died of 

fever 249 

Mexico, Gulf of 300 

Meyer (Myer), Corporal John 
C, superintended entertain- 
ment 306 

Michigan 227 

Thirty-second Eegiment In- 
fantry 135 

troops, assisted in cutting 
trees and building 

bridges 241 

Middletown, New York, Twen- 
ty-fourth Separate Company 

of 17 

Middletown, Pennsylvania, 

Camp Mea:de, at 104, 105 

Miles, General Nelson A., Lieu- 

tenant-General, U. S. A., 166 
191, 196, 308 
expedition to Puerto Rico 

under 306 

complimented Captain 

Wainwright 307 

Miley, Lieutenant John D., U. 

S. A 360, 263 

Military Hospital, Santiago, 

Cuba 271 

Millard, Thomas P., on New 

York Herald war staff 316 

Miller, First Lieutenant Frank 

J 105 

military record of 116 

mustered out 116 

Miller, Private John H., wound- 
ed in action at San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 246 

Mills, Private Bloomfield B., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Ciiba 245 

Mindora, dispatch boat, car- 
ried first account of fighting 

before Santiago 316 

Minnesota troops 31 

Missouri, transport. . . 249, 252, 253 
Volunteers, Third Eegi- 
ment Infantry 91 

103, 105 
came into Camp Alger, 89 
presented with loving 
cup by Third New 
York Eegiment 106 



General Index. 



407 



PAGE 

Mitchell, First Lieutenant 

James B 99 

military record of Ill 

resigned Ill 

commissioned second lieu- 
tenant, U. S. A Ill 

promoted to battalion ad- 
jutant 116 

discharged 1S4 

Mitchell, John, on Ne\^ York 

Herald war stafE 316 

MohaT^k, New York 49 

State armory at 81 

Molahan, First Lieutenant Pat- 
rick J 130 

Mona passage 306 

Monroe, New York 350 

Montauk, Long Island 398 

yellow fever patients 

strictly quarantined at . . 346 
sick of regiment, suffered 
from insufficient cover- 
ing during cold nights at, 393 
transports, with troops 
from Santiago, continu- 
ally arriving at 396 

detention hospitals at 396 

general hospital at 396 

list of Seventy-first Kegi- 

ment dead at 303 

Montauk Point, Long Island. . 348 

349, 350, 351, 353, 353, 354 

387, 388, 390, 394, 304 

Montgomery, Alabama 143 

Montgomery, Second Lieuten- 
ant Alton W., military 

record of 133 

mustered out 123 

Moody Institute 381 

Moore, Private Hudson B., 

died . . 30 

Moran, Private John ¥., in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Morgan, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant Herbert A Ill 

appointed clerk, commis- 
sary department 113 

military record of 112 

discharged 134 

Morrison, Private Charles H., 

died 68 

Morristown, New Jersey. ..... 175 

Morro Castle, Havana Harbor, 

Cuba 210, 339, 289 

Morro Castle-, Santiago... 313, 314 
Morton, Private Frederick E., 

discharged 66 

Morton Lake, Florida 167 

Mosby's guerillas 103 

Mott, First Lieutenant Selden 

W 48 

Mott-Smith, Minister 38 



PAGE 

Mount Pleasant, New York... 79 
Murphy, Private Edward, 3d.. 51 
commissioned captain and 
assistant adjutant-gen- 
eral 51 

discharged 63 

Murphy, Private James, wound- 
ed in action at San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 344 

Murphy, Private Robert E., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Murtaugh (Murtagh), Private 

Thomas E 306 

Myer, Colonel Albert James, 

mustered in as adjutant, 87 

promoted to major 93, 109 

A. D. C. ]f> Governor 

Frank S. Black 109 

military record of 109 

resigned 109 

discharged 134 

Myers, Private Leonard K., 
transferred to band 114 

NAQLE, JAMES E., died of 

fever and bronchitis 351 

National Guard 155, 385 

Iowa 137 

New Jersey, Fourth Eegi- 

ment 117 

New York 39, 41, 42, 45 

86, 127, 138, 153, 303 

Third Brigade 17 

First Eegiment In- 
fantry, composed 
of organizations 
of the Third Bri- 
gade 17, 18, 156 

First Eegiment In- 
fantry, medical 
examination of 
officers and en- 
listed men 18 

First Eegiment In- 
fantry, mustered 
in United States 

service 19 

First Eegiment In- 
fantry, became 
First Eegiment 
Infantry, New 
York Volunteers, 19 
Twelfth Eegiment, 39 
Second Battery. . 46 
Second Eegiment 
Infantry, Thir- 
teenth Bat- 
talion 47 

Fourteenth Bat- 
talion, Third 
Brigade.. 45, 47 



408 



General Index. 



PAGE I 

National (Uiard: ! 

Xew Y<irk: 

Third Brigade: 

Second Eejiiment: 
Fifteenth Bat- 
talion, Third i 
Brigade.. 45, 47 
Sixth Separate 

Company .... 47 
T w e n t y - firsst 
Separate Com- 
pany 47 j 

Third Eegiment Infan- 
try, composed i^f 
organizations nf 
Fourth Brigade.. S3 
ordered to Camp 

Black S4 

list of companies 

and otlicers of, 84, 85 
became Third Eei;i- 

meiit Infantry... S5 
(See Index of, page 
339.) 
One Hundred and Tenth 
Battalion, company 

D 107, 121 

First Separate Com- 
pany Ill 

112, 113, 119, 124 
Second Separate Com- 
pany 108, 109 

'no, 112, 120, 122, 123 
Eighth Separate Com- 
pany 114 

Thirteenth Separate 

Company 110 

Twenty-tifth Separate 

Company . . 112, 118, 119 
Twenty-ninth Separate 

Company ... 108, 117, 118 
Thirtieth Separate 

Company 109 

110,'^ 112, 113, 121, 122 
Thirty-fonrth Separate 

Company 108, 115 

Forty-first Separate 

Company Ill, 116 

Forty-second Separate 

Company- 108 

ll7, 118 
Fortv-third Separate 

Company 113, 120 

Forty-seventh Separate 

Company 113 

120, 121 
rorty-eip:hth Separate 

Coiripanj- 108, IIT 

Seventh Keginient. com- 
pany H 123 

Twenty-second Regi- 
ment S7 



PAGE 

National Guard: 
New York: 

Twenty-second Regi- 
ment : 

company E 109, 126 

Forty-eighth Regiment, 

company A 116 

company F 116 

Forty-ninth Regiment, 108 
Fifty-fourth Regiment, 

company E 114 

company H 122 

Sixty-fifth Regiment.. 109 
Seventy-first Regiment. 
(See Index of, page 
357.) 
First Regiment Infan- 
trj', or First Pro- 
visional Regiment... 156 
Thirteenth Regiment 

Infantry 156 

Fourteenth Regiment 

Infantry 156 

Forty-seventh Regi- 
ment Infantry 156 

Sixty-fifth Regiment 

Infantry 156 

Sixty-ninth Regimient 

Infantry 156 

(See Index of, page 
351.) 
One Hundred and Sev- 
enty-first Regiment 

Infantry 165, 303 

National Military Park, Chick- 

amauga, Georgia 51 

regiment arrived at 133 

Naval Academy Museum, An- 
napolis, Spanish flag cap- 
tured at Puerto Kico hangs in, 300 

Naval convoy 306 

Naval Department, co-opera- 
tion between it and the 

newspapers 317 

required Sp.anish flag cap- 
tured, to be turned in as 

public trophy 309 

Nebraska Volunteers, Second 

Regiment Infantry 52 

Newcomb, First Sergeant Ed- 
ward T., promoted lieuten- 
ant 27 

Nellis. First Lieutenant George 

W., military record of... 122 

resiL'iied 122 

promoted :is capt.nin 122 

Nellis, Privatr Webster W., 

died 79 

Newburfjh, Fifth Separate 

Company 17 

Newcpstle, Alabama 145 

Sixty-ninth Ref^i^iment in 
railroad wreck at 141 



General Index. 



409 



PAGE 

New Hawaiian post 31 

New Jersey, Central Kailroad 

of 50 

New Jersey National Guard, 
Fourth Regiment, company 

H 117 

New Mexico 44 

New Orleans, Louisiana 304 

Newport Harbor, Bhode Island, 40 

Newport, Kentucky 140 

Newspaper correspondents, in 

Spanish War 314-318 

New York, organizations in 

Spanish War 9-12 

harbor 19, 31, 175, 198 

ladies of Pension Bureau, 
iu Washington, enter- 
tained Second Eegriment, 73 

troops of 154 

Grand Lodge, Free Masons, 

of 181 

representatives of promi- 
nent newspapers and 
joiirnals of, at camp at 

Sevilla, Cuba 326 

naval oflicers, gallantry 

of 306-311 

Navy Yard 313 

New Y^ork, of the American 

Line, now Harvard 318 

New Y'ork Bay 311 

New York Central Eailway, 84, 85 

New York Citv 34, 36, 90, 133 

138, 139, 143, 144, 145, 148 
158, 169, 170, 175, 179, 180 
196, 202, 218, 233, 336, 343 
347, 348, 249, 250, 351, 353 
353, 355, 370, 377, 278, 381 
383, 390, 394, 395, 399, 303 

New York Evening Post 318 

New York Herald 315 

316, 317 

New York Journal 318 

New York Press 318 

New York Sun 317, 318 

New York Tribune 169 

New York World 381, 317 

New York National Guard.... 36 

39, 41, 42, 45, 83, 86 

127, 128, 153, 303 

Third Brigade 17 

First Kegiment Infan- 
try, composed of or- 
ganizations of the 

Third Brigade 17 

18, 156 
First Eegiment Infan- 
try, medical exami- 
nation of officers and 

enlisted men 18 

mustered into United 
States service 19 



PAGE 

New York National Guard: 
Third Brigade: 

became First Eegiment 
Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 19 

Second Eegiment In- 
f a n t r y, Thir- 
teenth Battalion, 47 
Fourteenth Battal- 
ion, Third Bri- 
gade 45, 47 

Fifteenth Battal- 
ion, Third Bri- 
gade 45, 47 

Sixth Separate Company. . 47 
Twenty-first Separate Com- 
pany 47 

Third Eegiment Infantry, 
composed of organi- 
zations of Fourth 

Brigade 83 

ordered to Camp Black, 84 
list of companies and 

ofEcers of 84-85 

became Third Eegi- 
ment Infantry, New 

York Volunteers 85 

One Hundred and Tenth 
Battalion, company D. . . 107 
131 
First Separate Company. . Ill 
112, 113, 119, 134 
Second Separate Company, 108 
109, 110, 113, 130, 132, 123 
Eighth Separate Company, 114 
Thirteenth Separate Com- 
pany . . i 110 

Twenty-fifth Separate 

Company 112, 118, 119 

Twenty-ninth Separate 

Company 108, 117, 118 

Thirtieth Separate Com- 
pany 109 

110, 112, 113, 131, 133 
Thirty-fourth Separate 

Company 108, 115 

Forty-first Separate Com- 
pany Ill, 116 

Forty-second Separate 

Company 108, 117, 118 

Forty-third Separate Com- 
pany 113, 120 

Forty-seventh Separate 

Company 113, 120, 131 

Forty-eighth Separate 

Company 108, 117 

Seventh Eegiment, com- 
pany H 133 

Twenty-second Eegiment. . 87 

company E 109, 126 

Forty-eighth Eegiment, 

company A 116 



410 



General Index. 



PAGE 

New York National Guard: 
Forty-eighth Begiment: 

company F 116 

Forty-ninth Eegiment 108 

Fifty-fourth Eegiment, 

company E 114 

company H 122 

Sixty-fifth Eegiment 109 

Seventy-first Eegiment In- 
fantry. (See Index to 
Seventy-first Eegiment, 
page 370.) 
First Eegiment Infantry, 
or First Provisional 

Eegiment 156 

Thirteenth Eegiment In- 
fantry 156 

Fourteenth Eegiment In- 
fantry 156 

Forty-seventh Eegiment 

Infantry 156 

Sixty-fifth Eegiment In- 
fantry 156 

Sixty-ninth Eegiment I n- 

f antry 156 

One Hundred and Seventy- 
first Eegiment Infantry, 165 
303 

New York State 17 

18, 19, 34, 31, 39, 45, 46 

60, 61, 69, 71, 72, 74, 83 

108, 127, 137, 150, 152, 171 

182, 188, 216, 287, 304 

Adjutant-General of 39 

74, 153, 154, 165, 247 
Colonel MacArthur paid 
men for services ren- 
dered, from May 3nd to 
May 10th at Gamp Black, 293 
Nineteenth Militia, com- 
pany D 43 

Nevr York Volunteers, First 
Eegiment Infantry. (See In- 
dex, First Eegiment, page 
319.) 
New York Volunteers, 202nd 

Eegiment 27 

New York Volunteers, Second 
Eegiment Infantry. (See In- 
dex Second Eegiment, page 
327.) 
New York 'Volunteers, Twelfth 

Eegiment Infantry 82 

Fourteenth Eegiment In- 
fantry 52 

Twenty-second Eegiment 

Infantry 47 

Sixty-fifth Eegiment Infan- 
try 80 

Sixty-ninth Eegiment In- 
fantry 54, 67, 72 



PAGE 

New York Volunteers: 

Seventy-first Eegiment In- 
fantry 79 

Two Hundred and First 

Eegiment Infantry 60 

Two Hundred and Second 

Eegiment Infantry 60 

80, 82 
Two Hundred and Third 

Eegiment Infantry 66 

Third Eegiment Artillery, 107 
New York Volunteers, Third 
Eegiment Infantry. (See In- 
dex Third Eegiment, page 
339.) 
New York Volunteers, 147th 

Eegiment Infantry 115 

Two Hundred and Second 

Eegiment Infantry. . 93, 109 
Two Hundred and Third 

Eegiment Infantry 115 

New^ York Volunteers, Sixty- 
ninth Eegiment Infantry. 
(See Index Sixty-ninth Eegi- 
ment, page 351.) 
New York Volunteers, Seventy- 
first Eegiment Infantry. (See 
Index Seventy-first Eegi- 
ment Infantry, page 357.) 
New York Volunteers, Second 
Eegiment Infantry, or Sec- 
ond Provisional Eegiment. . . 211 
New York Volunteers, Sev- 
enth Eegiment Infantry, 

company JK 181 

Niagara Falls, New York 86 

Forty-second Separate 

Company of 84 

Nice, Lieutenant John L 97 

military record of ... . 118-119 

mustered out 119 

Nichols, F. H., on New York 

Herald war stafE 316 

Nichols, Private Frederick P. 

(Edward) , killed 57 

remains of, sent to Troy 

for interment 58 

Nicht, Musician Edward J., 

transferred to band 114 

Nickinson, Lieutenant Albert 

E 26 

sergeant, promoted 28 

Ninth Eegiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 43, 44, 67 

Ninth Eegiment Infantry, 

Indiana 257 

Ninth Eegiment Infantry, 

regulars 264 

Ninth Separate Company, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 
of Whitehall, New York, 49 
designated company 1 46 



General Index. 



411 



PAGE 

JNoon, Private George, injured 

in wreck 143 

Norman, Lieutenant George 
H., in command of armed 
boat which captured light- 
ers in Guanica Harbor 310 

Norman,* Lieutenant ' and As- 
sistant Engineer Proctor, in 
charge of armed boat sent to ■ 

aid Lieutenant Huse 307 

North Carolina 259 

Northern Alabama 69 

North river. New York 132 

OAHU, ISLAND OF 23 

O'Brien, Captain' John E 130 

O'Brien, Private John J., died, 148 
O'Brien, Private Michael J., 

died . . ; . . 70 

O'Brien, Private Pierce J., 
transferred to Division Hos- 
pital Corps 60 

O'Brien, Thomas J., died of dis- 
ease .,, 250 

Ocala, Florida, Sixty-ninth 
Kegiment Infantry, New 
York Volunteers, arrived at, 135 
O'Connel], First Sergeant Mi- 
chael, recommended to be 

second lieutenant 133- 

O'Connell, Private Michael, in- 
jured in vyreck 145 

O'Connor, John E., died of 

fever 233 

Ogden, Utah 21 

Ohio . 257 

First Regiment ;.... 67 

First Regiment 'Cavalry... 167 
Third Regiment Infantry, 133 
136, 140, 146 
Fifth Regiment Infantry.. 135 
Seventh Regiment Infan- 
try 104 

troops 105 

Ojo Caliente, New Mexico 44 

O'JJeefe, Corporal Gerald J., 

injured in wreck 145 

O'Keefe, Private William, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Olcott, Mrs. Emmet R 180 

Olean, New York 85 

Forty-third Separate Com- 
pany of 84 

Olena, Edgar J., died. . ; 76 

Oliver, Second Lieutenant Ed- 
ward 25 

Oliver, Brigadier-General Rob- 
ert Shaw, I bommanding 
officer >« of Third Bri- 
gade 17, 18 

ordered to organize two 
regiments . . .... , 17 



PAGE 

Olivette, steamer 204, 218 

steamship, headquarters 
for newspaper corre- 
spondents 207 

Olyphant, Quartermaster J. 

Kensett igi 

Olyphant, Talbot, presents col- 
ors to New York Volun- 
teers 19, 90 

Olympia 316 

Omaha, Nebraslca 20 

One Hundred and Tenth Bat- 
talion, National Guard, New 

York, company D •» . 107, 131 

One Hundred and Fifty-sev- 
enth Regiment, Indiana 67' 

One Hundred and Forty-sev- 
enth Regiment ji Infantry,- 

New York Volunteers 115 

One Hundred and Fifty-ninth 
Itegiment Infantry, Indiana, 89' 
92, 95, 105 
One Hundred and Seventy- 
first Regiment Infantry, 
National Guard, New 

York 165, 303 

acted as escort to Seventy- 
first Regiment on parade 

to armory 297 

Oueonta, Third Separate Com- 
pany of 17 

Oothoudt, Second Lieutenant 

Arthur E 26 

Oquendo, Gloiicester followed 
about 1,500 yards astern 

of 311 

Ord, Major-General Edward O. 

0- U. S. A 227 

Ord, Lieutenant Jules Gar- 
esche, military record 

of . . 227 

Icilled at battle of San 

Juan, Santiago, Cuba . . . 227 
one of the first ofHcers 
shot, at San Juaji, Cuba, 228 
Order of advance of American 
transports from Florida to 

Ciiba 195 

Orr, *f Edward Emerson, en- 
listed . . 114 

O'Sullivan, Second Lieutenant 

Mortimer M 129 

resigned 141 

Oiswald, Assistant Surgeon 
Francis L., appointed sur- 
geon 141 

Oswego, New York 86, 127 

Forty-eighth Separate 

Company of 85 

Otis, Major-General Elwell S., 
U. S. A 32, 33, 34 



412 



General Index. 



PAGE 

PALMER, CAPTAIN FRANK 
ROCKWELL 25 

Palmetto Beach, Florida, 

sketch of 135 

sketch of camp at 135-136 

unsanitary condition of 

camp at 139 

Park avenue, New York city. . 300 

303 
Parker, Private Eobertson A., 

died 76 

Parkersbiirg, Virginia 51 

Parks, Corporal Frank L., Jr., 

died . . .* 79 

Parsons, Sergeant Charles E., 
mustered in as second lieu- 
tenant 62 

Pattberg (Pattburg), First 
Lieutenant Frederick L., 

military record of 117 

miistered out 117 

Paymaster's Department 69 

Peace, formal declaration of, 
had been made and war 

ended 283 

Peet, Private George L., died, 30 

Peet House, Virginia 99 

Peltz, Hamilton S., on New 

York Herald war staff 316 

Pennsylvania 220 

Pennsylvania Railway 174 

Pension Bureau, New York la- 
dies of, entertained regi- 
ment 73 

Pentony, Sergeant John, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Pfister, Edward, died of fever, 249 
buried at Montaut, Long 

Island 303 

Phelan, Adjutant James J., 
Thirteenth Battalion, Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 47 
mustered in as captain and 

adjutant 70 

mustered out 82 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ... 51 

105, 132 
Philadelphia and Beading 

Bailroad 50, 51 

Philippine expedition 171 

Philippine Islands 32 

33, 181, 257, 315 
Pickard, Captain Arthur W. . . 86 
first lieutenant, promoted 

to captain 28 

Pierce, Second Lieutenant 

Harry C, military record of, 116 
Piersoil, First Sergeant Wil- 
liam D., died of fever 253 

Pinar deJ Rio, Cuba 61 

Plant System, Road of the, 64, 167 



PAGE 

Piatt, Senator Thomas C, of 
New Y'ork, telegram pre- 
pared by Seventy-first Regi- 
ment officers to be sent to, 

but recalled 287 

Plunkett, Captain James 129 

resigned 147 

Pluton, Spanish destroyer 313 

completely wrecked by the 

Gloucester 313 

Ponce, negotiations for surren- 
der of, in progress 310 

Pope, Major-General John, 

U. S. A 44 

Port Antonio,, Jamaica, first 
story of destruction of Cer- 
vera's squadron brought to, 
by Golden Rod, dispatch 

boat 316 

Porter, Private Clarence H., 

died 30 

Porter, !Mrs. John Addison, 
provided liberal supply of 
medicines and food for sick 
of Seventy-first Regiment... 274 

Port Guanica 306 

Port of Guantanamo, Cuba .... 206 

Porto Rico 67 

300, 208, 316 

Port Tampa, Florida 54 

59, 60, 136, 188, 194, 212 
Sixth and Sixteenth Infan- 
try, regulars, ordered to 
proceed to transports at, 192 
Seventy-first Regiment In- 
fantry, New York 
Volunteers, ordered 
to proceed to trans- 
ports at 193 

arrived at 196 

Post Hospital, Hawaiian Is- 
lands 37 

Potomac river 92 

Potter, Private Ernest R 237 

wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill 245 

Potter, Second Lieutenant 

Louis E 49 

Poughkeepsie, Fifteenth Sepa- 
rate Company, Twelfth Bat- 
talion of 17 

Powers, Private Auer E., died, 71 
Preger (Prayer), Private Wil- 
liam, buried near the 
ford below San Juan 

Hill, Cuba 240 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 247 

Presidio, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia 34, 29 



General Index. 



413 



PAGE 

Presidio, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia: 
First Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers, 

moved to 21 

Pride, Adjutant Hamilton, 

Civil War veteran 297, 300 

Pritcliard, Private Frank B., 

transferred to band 114 

Proctor, Assistant Engineer, 
on armed boat, sent in 
aid of Lieutenant Huse, 307 
boat in command of, cut 

out large lighter 308 

Provisional regiments, New 

York Volunteers 156 

Provost Guard 273 

Puerto Eico, expedition to, un- 
der General Miles, designed 
to land at Cape San Juan. . . 306 
Puerto Eico, first Spanish 
flag captured in, by crew 

of Gloucester 309 

first American flag hoisted 
in, by crew of Glouces- 
ter 309 

Purman, Corporal William M., 
transferred First United 
States Volunteer Engineers, 53 
Putnam, Private Frank A., 

died 76 

Pyne, Private William, died. . . 151 

QUARTERMASTER'S DE= 

PARTMENT 72, 95 

its efficiency proved 98, 103 

practically a nullity.. 279 

Queen and Crescent Eailway.. 55 
Queens, New York, borough of, 250 
Queen's Eoad, pilgrims all 
along, journeying toward 

Santiago, Cuba 271 

Quevedo, Eichard, died of ty- 
phoid malarial fever 251 

Quigley, First Lieutenant and 
Battalion Adjutant John 

Aloysius 110, 126 

mustered in United States 
service as battalion adju- 
tant 87 

military record of 109 

died 134 

announcement of his 

death 125-126 

Quilty, John J., died of dis- 
ease 249 

Quinn, First Lieutenant 
Thomas J 129 

RABING, PRIVATE ALBERT 
J 282 

Eace Track Camp, Hawaiian 
Islands 22 



PAGE 

EafEerty, Captain Malcolm 

Anstice 182, 194, 212 

with company F, among 
first to arrive on San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 233 

led his company up the hill 
with Major Keek's bat- 
talion 264 

Ealph, Julian, of Harper's 

Weekly 317 

Eamsay (Eamsey), Assistant 
Surgeon George D., pro- 
moted surgeon 27 

resigned 141 

Eappe, Private Charles G 21 

Eead, Private James H., Jr., 

died 29 

Eeagan, Corporal J*Iichael J., 

promoted lieutenant 27 

Eeardon, Private Thomas J., 

injured in wreck 145 

Eebecca Channel 200 

Eeconcentrados, meaning of.. 214 

Eecords, preservation of 2-3 

Eecruits, at Montauk, Long 

Island 295, 296 

Eed Cross Society 274 

278, 380, 292 
Eed Cross steamer, State of 
Texas, first to enter Santi- 
ago harbor after the surren- 
der 273 

Eedding, Leo L., on New York 

Herald war staff 316 

Eegimental Band, account 

of 113-114 

Eegimental Hospital, Second. . 66 

68 

Regimental Hospital 346 

Eeilly, Private John, died 148 

Eeilly, Patrick, teamster, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Reina Mercedes, ship, sunk in 

harbor 289 

Belief Society of the Seventy- 
first Eegiment, $100 re- 
ceived from, ^by Colonel 

Downs . . ..*. 278 

gifts of tobacco and par- 
cels received from 285 

Eemington, Frederick, artist.. 318 
Eeville, First Lieutenant Philip 

E 130 

Revolution, Sons of the pre- 
sent colors to the First 

Eegiment 19 

present colors to the Third 

Eegiment 89, 90 

Eeynolds, Daniel K., died on 

board Eoumania, at sea 349 

Eich, Captain Amos Cooke 49 



414 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Eich.ardsoii, Private Henry P., 
woimded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Eichmond, Virginia 166, 230 

Boach, Captain James Edward, 25 
Roach, Private Eoyal T., died, 80 
Roberts, Lieutenant Alfred I., 

died of pneumonia 250 

toast drunk in silence, in 

memory of 303 

Roberts, Cyrus B., adjutant- 
general, IT. S. A., letter from, 94 
Eobt, Private Robert J., Jr. 

(William), song 206 

Roche, Captain John J 131 

Rochester, New York. . . 85, 86, 124 
First Separate Company 

of 84 

Eighth Separate Company 

of 84 

Eodgers, Corporal James L., 

died of fever 251 

Eoe, Major-General Charles F., 156 

159, 160, 161, 162, 174, 211 

Eifth Brigade, National 

Guard, New York. . . 128, 129 

Eome and Columbus Railroad, 51 

Eooiiey, Second Lieutenant 

Leo J. P 135 

sergeant, recommended to 

be lieutenant 131 

Roosevelt Rough Riders 192 

196, 218, 259 
also known as Eirst United 
States Volunteer Cav- 
alry 216, 218 

had several losses in killed 
and wounded on El Peso 

Hill, Cuba 228 

excited curiosity of every- 
one 256 

Roosevelt, Theodore, Assistant 

Secretary Navy 196 

lieutenant-colonel .... 360, 262 
colonel, in command of 
First Volunteer Cavalry, 228 

Roosevelt Regiment 360 

ordered do^n the hill and 
to advance on San Juan, 

Cuba 262 

Eoot, First Sergeant Edgar W., 
died of typhoid malarial 

fever 247 

Ross, Chief Hostler 178, 222 

Boss, Private Reuben, buried 
near the ford below San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 340 

killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 254 

Ross, Captain Sanderson A., 
Twenty-ninth Separate 
Company , 84 



PAGE 

Ross, Captain Sanderson A.: 

company E 86 

military record of 118 

mustered out 118 

Rossville, Tennessee 134, 135 

Second Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers, 

marched to 53 

Rough Riders, Roosevelt 193 

196, 218, 259 
also known as First United 
States Volunteer Cav- 
alry 216, 318 

excited curiosity 256 

had several losses in killed 
and wounded on El Poso 

Hill, Cuba 238 

Roumania, transport 349 

Rouse, Frank E., died of 

fever 353 

died and buried at Mon- 

tauk, Long Island 303 

RufEner, Captain Ernest L., 

assistant surgeon 80 

Rusk, Corporal William A., 

died on board Missouri 350 

Ryan, First Lieutenant John 
J., recommended to be cap- 
tain 131 

Ryan, First Lieutenant Nicho- 
las J 130 

Ryan, Private William P., in- 
jured 58 

SADLER, CAPTAIN JOHN T., 

Thirtieth Separate Com- 
pany 84, 85 

ordered to Elmira to re- 
ceive recruits 91 

military record of 121 

mustered out 131 

Sague, Eirst Lieutenant Clar- 
ence 31i 

second liexitenant, pro- 
moted to first lieuten- 
ant 38 

Sague, Major John K 24, 35 

captain, promoted to ma- 
jor. First New York 

Volunteers 28 

military record of 44 

mustered out 44 

St. Andrew's Church, Harlem, 

New York 155, 176, 180 

St. Clare, Principal Musician 

Lewis V. S 123 

military record of 113 

mustered out 113 

St. John's Hospital, borough of 
Queens, Brooklyn, New 
York 249, 250 



General Index. 



PAGE 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 248 
St. Patrick, The Friendly Sons 
of, presented colors to Sixty- 
ninth Eegiment Infantry, 

New York Volunteers 133 

St. Paul, steamer, American 

Line 81 

St. Paul's Church, London 176 

St. Peter's Hospital, Brooklyn, 

New York 253 

St. Thomas 316 

St. Thomas' parish. New York, 171 
Sampson, Commodore William 

Thomas 210 

his fleet bombarding Santi- 
ago, Cuba 19] 

report of Captain Higgin- 

son to 306-307 

extract from report of 

Captain Higginson to... 310 
Cervera's ships attempted 
to run the gauntlet of 

his squadron 311 

Sand Lake, New York 74 

San Trancisco, California 20 

21, 22, 24, 32, 33, 34, 37, 181 

harbor 22 

Sangsters Cross Koads, Vir- 
ginia 98 

San Juan, Santiago, Cuba 238 

241, 242, 247, 265 

battle at 226, 227, 314 

Seventy-iirst Eegiment and 
entire brigade under 
continuous fire on march 

to 230 

success of engagement due 
to regiments, battalions, 

and even companies 232 

battle of, a unique char- 
acter 255 

one out of every four men 
in charging column at, 

killed or wounded 257 

San Juan Creek, Santiago, 
Cuba, Seventy-first Regiment 
halted there, awaiting or- 
ders 262 

San Juan Heights, Santiago, 

Cuba, hospital 296 

San Juan Hill, Santiago, 

Cuba 233, 235 

240, 248, 250, 251, 252 
253, 254, 261, 263, 318 
account of the battle 

of 227-240 

list of woimded in battle 

of 244-246 

brilliant charge and occu- 
pation of 233 



415 
i 

PA.GE 

San Juan Hill, Santiago, 
Cuba: 

honor of its capture lies 
with Thirteenth, Sixth, 
Sixteenth or Twenty- 
fourth Regular Infantry, 233 

honor of being first at top 
of hill claimed by six- 
teen companies and six 
regiments. Fifth Army 
Corps 255 

accurate account of the 
engagement of Seventy- 
first Regiment at 256-266 

five regiments of United 
States troops in victori- 
ous charge up 264 

San Mateo, Philippuie Islands, 

battle of 257 

Santiago, Cuba 61, 62 

150, 200, 206, 208, 209, 212 
213, 217, 219, 220, 223, 224 
225, 233, 246, 247, 248, 249 
250, 251, 252, 253, 256, 259 
267, 268, 269, 276, 282, 285 
288, 296, 314 

yellow fever among troops 
at 63 

Sampson's fleet bombard- 
ing 191 

Seventy-flrst Regiment 
reaches 207 

Spanish troops fled toward, 215 

Spaniards retreated to en- 
trenchments before 235 

Seventy-first Regiment or- 
dered to march toward, 226 

a city with natural fortifi- 
cations 227 

Spaniards had been driven 
back toward 2o8 

surrendered 14 July, 1898.. 243 

post-office re-established 
in 243 

pilgrims all along Queen's 
Road journeying toward, 271 

pauper-stricken and starv- 
ing Cubans journeying 
toward 271 

strong entrenchments and 
fortifications built by 
Spaniards along eastern 
end of 271 

sketch of 272 

might have been one of the 
cleanest cities in the 
world 272 

sale of liquors forbidden 
in, for three days 272 

enlisted men of United 
States troops forbidden 
to enter 273 



416 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Santiago, Cuba: 

United States officers on 
dock at beseeching Ked 
Cross Society for food 
and medicines for sick 

soldiers 274 

all needed rations had to 
be transported to La 

Grande Duchesse 2S9 

men not paid 293 

city hospital 296 

destruction of Spanish 

fleet at 311-314 

fighting before 316 

Santiago Harbor, Cuba, Ad- 
miral Cervera lost every ves- 
sel in his command at the 

mouth of 239 

Saratoga, New York 73 

Saratoga Springs, New York, 
Twenty-second Separate 

Company of 49, 66 

State Armory 80 

Savannah, Georgia 166 

Sawyer, Private James H., 

died 29 

Scandia, United States troop- 
ship, hospital ship.. 22, 24 

Scanlon, Sergeant-Major John 
P., recommended to be 

second lieutenant 131 

recommended to be bat- 
talion adjutant 133 

Schaller, OPrivate Frank A., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba.: 244 

Scheid, Corporal Henry J., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 231 

buried in trenches at Di- 
vision Hospital, San 

Juan, Cuba 240 

died of wounds received in 

action S50 

Schenectady, New York, Thir- 
ty-sixth Separate Com- 
pany of 49, 73, 79 

Thirty-seventh Separate 

Company of 49 

State Armory at... 81 

Schermerhorn, Private Louis 

C, injured 58 

Schindel, S. J. Bayard, lieu- 
tenant, U. S. A 18S 

Schley, Admiral Winfield Scott, 318 
his effective blockade of 

Havana, Cuba 191 

Schroter, August !F., died of 

fever S58 

Schutz, Gustav C, died on 
board La Grande Duchesse 
and buried at sea 253, 290 



PAGE 

Sichiiyler, Captain Walter S., 

U. S. A 132, 156, 157 

Fifth United States Cav- 
alry, administered the 

oath to regiment 86 

Schwarte, First Lieutenant 

John A 49 

Schwartz, Chaplain Karl 19 

20, 22, 25, 37 
Scidmore, Private William W., 

injured 58 

Scofield, Private Sidney A., 
killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 231, 253 

buried at edge of the 
stream a,t foot of El 

Poso Hill, Cuba 240 

Scotland 40 

Scott, Major Walter ' 19 

20, 22, 24 

lieutenant-colonel 25 

major, promoted to lieu- 
tenant-colonel 27 

military record of 43 

retired 43 

Searing, Private William J., 

died 70 

Second Army Corps 93, 95 

First Division 94 

Second Army Corps, Second 

Division 89, 94, 96, 97, 98 

Second Battalion, Second Kegi- 

ment 61, 62, 65, 72, 78 

two deaths 81 

Second and Third Battal- 
ions qviartered in State 

Armory, Troy 74 

Second Battalion, Third llegi- 

ment 87, 91 

ordered out as provost 

guard 97 

arrived at Camp Meade... 106 
Second Battalion, Sixty-ninth 

Begiment 129 

Second Battalion, Seventy-first 

Regiment 235, 236, 278 

encamped at top of hill in 

sight of Santiago 223 

under Major Wells, de- 
tailed to build bridges 

and improve roads 241 

ordered to march to Santi- 
ago and take transport 
for Montauk, Long Is- 
land 288 

Second Battery, National 

Guard, New York 46 

Second Brigade Cavalry 166 

Second Division Hospital at 
Fernandina, Florida 68 



Gbneral Index. 



417 



PAGE 

Second Division, Second Army 

Corps... 89, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 

Third Army Corps 133 

Fourth Army Corps... 66, 134 
Second Provisional Begiment, 
or Second Segiment Infan- 
try, New York Volunteers. . 156 

Sll 
Second Kegfiment Cavalry, U. 

S. A 67 

Second Kegiment Infantry, 

Georgia 135, 136, 140 

Second Massachusettts Volun- 
teers... 163, 167, 170, 177, 198 
part of Ludlovy's command 
at El Caney, Cuba.. 256, 257 
Second Regiment Infantry, 

Nebraska 52, 54 

Second Eegiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers. (See 
Index Second Eegiment, page 
327.) 
Second Eegiment Infantry, 
Tennessee, detailed to pro- 
vost guard 104 

Second Regiment, Volunteer 

Engineers 22, 23 

Second Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 

York 108, 100 

110, 112, 120, 122, 123, 126 
mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Second Separate Company, 

of Auburn 84 

became company M, Third 

Eegiment 85 

Self ridge, First Lieutenant 
Edward A., Jr., promoted 

captain 182 

Senate, United States 171 

Seneca, transport ship 211 

Sequranca, ship .". 206, 208, 212 

Seventeenth Battalion, Seventh 

Eegiment Cavalry 218 

Seventh Regiment Infantry, 

U. S. A 47, 82, 281 

Seventh Regiment Infantry, 
National Guard, New York, 

company H 122 

Seventh Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volunteers, com- 
pany K 181 

Seventh Eegiment Infantry, 

Ohio 104 

Seventh Separate Company, of 

Cohoes 48 

designated company B 46 

Seventy-first Eegiment Aid So- 
ciety, Bronx borough 285 

27 



FACE 

Seventy-first Eegiment Infan- 
try, National Guard, New 
York. (See Index Seventy- 
first Regiment, page 357.) 

Sevilla, Cuba 216 

218, 220, 230 
Seventy-first Eegiment, 
New York Volunteers, 

pitched camp at 223 

Spanish block house near 

camp at 223 

two corporals and several 
privates of Tenth United 
States Cavalry interred 

near 223 

representatives of promi- 
nent newspapers and 
journals of ^^ew York 

at 226 

sketch of road to San 

Juan Hill, from 227 

Shatter, General William R., 

Fifth Army Corps 54 

135, 177, 196, 198 
207, 212, 233, 260 
wished to avoid bombard- 
ment of Santiago city. . . 242 
had forbidden sale of 
liquors for three days in 

Santiago, Cuba 272 

directed by authorities at 
Washington to remove 
all troops to. United 

States 286 

Shafter's army, Mindora, dis- 
patch boat, carried first ac- 
count to United States of 

landing of 316 

Sharrott, First Sergeant Eu- 
gene li., died of typhoid 

fever 250 

Shattuck, Second Lieutenant 
Algernon B., military 

record of 118 

mustered out 118 

Shaw, Private Frederick V. V., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 344, 247 

Shaw, Private John A 206 

died of fever 250 

Shaw, Governor Leslie M., vis>- 
ited Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment 141 

addressed Sixty-ninth Eegi- 
ment 142 

Sheaf e, Brigadier-General Mark 

W 89, 104 

First Brigade reviewed by, 93 
Sheary, Private Michael F., 
commissioned paymaster 
with rank of major, United 
States Volunteers 55 



418 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Sheehan, E. H., on New York 

Herald war staff 316 

Sheehan, Captain James F 36 

Sheffold (ShefBeld), Private 

Delvert, injured 58 

Sheffold, William A., deserted, 70 
Sheppard, Private William B., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Sherlock, Private James J., 

injured in wreck 145 

Sherman, FirS't Lieutenant 

Henry P 48 

Shinnecock, Long Island, light 

off 290 

Short, Sergeant Peter H., Jr., 

appointed first lieutenant... 183 
Shoshone Mountains, Wy- 
oming 41 

Siboney, Cuba 212, 214 

215, 216, 217, 218, 223 
234, 240, 242, 243, 254 
258, 267, 268, 273, 287 

sketch of 213 

Seventy-first Regiment 

landed at 213, 219 

pitched camp at 215 

Quartermaster Amos H. 
Stephens went to, for 
tents, but was not suc- 
cessful 226 

United States post-office 

opened at 243 

every wooden house burned 
to ground on account of 

yellow fever 243 

first tent given to regi- 
ment by Y. M. C. A. army 
commission, on vessel at, 269 
insufficient lighterage fa- 
cilities at 271 

wretched roads five miles 

out from 271 

hospital at 296 

Siebold, Louis, of the World.. 317 

Signal Corps 230 

United States Volunteers . . 76 
Simmoria (Simmons) , Private 

Frederick C, injured 58 

Sing Sing, New York 248 

Sisters of St. Joseph, building 

of, turned into a hospital. . . 69 
Sixteenth Regiment Infantry, 

regulars 177 

216, 217, 223, 333, 236, 258 
260, 262, 264, 283, 385, 293 
ordered to proceed to 
transports at Port 

Tampa, Florida 192 

moved to the right 367 



PAGE 

Sixteenth Regiment Infantry, 
regulars: 
band of, played martial 
airs as vessel swung 

into the Caribbean 290 

Sixteenth Separate Company. . 17 
Sixth Regiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 67 

Sixth Regiment Infantry, regu- 
lars 177, 185 

316, 317, 233, 327, 333 
336, 258, 260, 264, 283 
ordfered to proceed to 
transports at Port 

Tampa 192 

moved to the right 267 

started for Santiago and 

Montauk 288 

Sixth Separate Company,' Na- 
tional Guard, New York, 

of Troy 47, 48 

designated company A 46 

Sixty-fifth Regiment Infantry, 
National Guard, New York, 109 

156 
Sixty-fifth Regiment Infantry, 

New York Volunteers 80 

Sixty-ninth Regiment. (See 
page 357.) 
Skelly, Private Thomas J., in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Skinner, Private Louis B., 
killed in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 231, 248 

buried at edge of the 
stream at foot of El 

Poso Hill, Cuba 240 

Slater, Second Lieutenant Lu-. 

cius J 36 

first sergeant, promoted to 

second lieutenant 38 

Small, Corporal Louis B., died 

of disease 347 

Smith, Major Clinton Hartt. .. 164 
promoted lieutenant- 
colonel 182 

lieutenant-colonel 197 

210, 283, 300 
appointed caterer to 

officers' mess 309 

detailed to get horses 

on shore 218 

down with fever 276 

in command of regi- 
ment 282 

Smith, Regimental Adjutant 

Frank B 125, 136 

Smith, Captain and Adjutant 
Frank Eugene, military 

record of 109 

mustered out 109 



General Index. 



419 



PAGE 

Smith, Frank Eugene: 

first lieutenant and battal- 
ion adjutant 110 

regimental adjutant 123 

Smith, First Lieutenant Frank 

G., military record of... 119 

mustered out 119 

Smith, Brigadier-General 

George Moore 156 

Smith, Second Lieutenant 

James Ezra Z2, 25 

Smith, Captain Lester Bord- 
man. First Separate 

Company 84, 86, 125 

military record of 119 

died 119 

announcement of his 

death 124^125 

Smith, Sommers N., steam pilot 

boat 316 

Snyder, Brigadier-General Si- 
mon, U. S. A 54, 134 

Sons of the Kevolution pre- 
sent colors to the First 

Kegiment 19 

present colors to the Third 

Regiment 89, 90 

South Carolina 216 

South Dakota troops 21 

Southern Express 90 

Southern Florida 69 

South Glens Falls, New York, 79 

Southern Pacific Railway 21 

Southern Railroad 53 

88, 96, 133, 134 

Spain 40 

42, 83, 152, 163, 191 
war between United States 

and 153, 305 

reality of impending strug- 
gle with, realized 161 

all terms of surrender 

merciful to 244 

its army to be returned to, 
only stipulation in sur- 
render of Santiago, Cuba, 244 
24,000 Spanish troops to be 
tran sported there, in 

their own vessels 268 

had sued for peace 278 

had agreed to all the 
terms of peace imposed 

by the United States 283 

Seventy-first Regiment, in 

war with 304 

Spanish, The 217, 218, 219 

brass bullets used by 223 

wounded at Las Guasimas, 
who died returning to 
Santiago, buried in 
trench near Second Bat- 
talion, Seventy-first Regi- 
ment camp 224 



PAGE 

Spanish, The: 

fired from block houses 

and entrenchments 230 

sent shrapnel flying in 
every direction 230 

used smokeless powder.... 230 

had sharpshooters in tall 
cocoanut trees along the 
road 230 

aim upon gun on El Poso 
Hill, very accurate 228 

army, made a solid phalanx 
of troops from San Juan, 
three miles to the left.. 227 

army, to be returned to 
Spain, only stipulation 
in surrender of Santiago, 244 

block house, n^r camp at 
Sevilla 223 

colonel, killed by an ex- 
ploded shell 215 

cruisers, pursued by all 
American war vessels 
except Gloucester 311 

destroyers, combined crew 
outnumbered crew of 
Gloucester fifty per cent, 311 

entrenchments, fired upon 
with shrapnel 261 

flag, on warehouse 306 

flag, when lowered a rapid 
firing of rifles was heard, 307 

flag lowered and ours 
hoisted in its place 307 

flag hauled down 308 

flag, flrst one captured by 
crew of the Gloucester. . 309 

fleet 198 

fleet, Gloucester waited for 
two destroyers of....... 311 

fleet, two destroyers of, 
superior in artillery to 
the Gloucester 311 

fleet, two destroyers, of 
English construction and 
up to date in all respects, 311 

fleet at Santiago, destruc- 
tion of 311-314 

merchants, . at Santiago, 
cordially received Ameri- 
can soldiers 272 

pilot on La Grande Duch- 
esse 289 

prisoners, of equal rank, 
exchanged for ours 242 

reinforcement, coming 
from Yauco, driven back 
by fire from Gloucester, 3P7 

reinforcement expected 
from Yauco 308 

ships 198 

ships, reported sighted off 
Massachusetts coast .... 164 



420 



General Index. 



PAGE 
Spanish, The: 

ships appeared 313 

soldiers, along' outskirts of 
Santiago, receiving morn- 
ing mess S71 

soldiers, housed on both 
sides of street in Anda- 
lusian quarter, Santiago, 272 
troops, fled toward Santi- 
ago, Cuba 21S 

troops, in jungle, attack 
First United States Vol- 
unteer Cavalry 216 

troops, 24,000 to be trans- 
ported to Spain in their 

own vesses 368 

Spanish War 177. 259 

New York organizations 

in 9-12 

newspaper correspondents 

in 314-318 

enterprise of correspond- 
ents in 315-318 

work performed by news- 
papers during progress 
"' of, unparalleled in his- 

' tory of journalism 317 

Spellman, Major Michael J 129 

Spitzel (Pitzel),^ Sergeant Max, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Spottsylvania, Virginia, battle 

of . . 220 

Springsteen, Private John V., 

died 30 

Squadron A 161 

band 163 

furnished music for re- 
view of troops 160 

Staats, Captain Charles 

Bleecker 38 

resigned 27 

Staats, First Lieutenant Harry 

Caleb 20, 25 

second lieutenant, pro- 
moted to first lieutenant, 28. 
Stacey, Captain James George, 

Jr 85 

first lieutenant, mustered 
into United States ser- 
vice as captain.- 87 

military record of 115 

mustered out 115 

Stacpole, Lieutenant-Colonel 

Horatio Potter 19 

30, 32, 24 
major, appointed lieuten- 
ant-colonel. First Eegi- 

ment Infantry 18 

colonel 35 

lieutenant-colonel, promot- 
ed to colonel. First New 
York Volunteers 27 



PAGE 

Stacpole, Horatio Potter; 

military record of 42 

died 42 

Stafford, Surgeon Harry Eu- 
gene 237 

captain, mustered into 
United States service as 

surgeon 156 

responded to address 180 

weak from overwork, 276, 287 
Stafford, Captain James, as- 
sistant surgeon 79 

mustered into United 
States service as sur- 
geon 156 

on duty in Cuba 347 

detailed to serve with 
Fourth Eegular Kegi- 

ment 287 

requested to be returned 
to Sevefity-first Regi- 
ment 287 

Starin's barges, used in getting 

soldiers ready for camp 291 

State Armory: 

at Amsterdam 81 

Glens Falls 81 

Hoosick Falls 80 

Mohawk 81 

New York city, Thirty- 
fourth street and Park 

avenue 165, 297 

299, 300, 301, 303, 303, 304 

Saratoga Springs 80 

Schenectady 81 

Troy 80 

refreshments served to 

returning soldiers at, 73 
two battalions. Second 
Regiment, New York, 

quartered in 74 

Whitehall 81 

State flags, necessity for bet- 
ter preservation of 3-4 

Staten Island, New York 19 

State of Texas 274 

Red Cross steamer, first to 
enter harbor after sur- 
render 273 

Steele, Quartermaster-Sergeant 

Albert M 123 

military record of Ill 

mustered out Ill 

Stegman, Henry R., of the 

New York Tribune 169, 226 

Stephens (Stevens), Quarter- 
master Amos H., went to 
Siboney for tents, but 

was not successful 226 

recuperating at Siboney, 

Cuba , 243 

made requisition for khaki 
suits for regiment 278 



Genbeal Index. 



42i 



PAGE 

Stephens (Stevens), Quarter- 
master Amos H.: 
when he had the facilities, 

did his -work well 279 

Sternberg, Surgeon-General 

George M 284 

liad first advised that 
troops remain in Cuba 
till fever had disap- 
peared 387 

decided to have troops re- 
moved to Montauk Point, 

Long Island 287 

Stevens, Captain Frank L., 

company M 49 

Stevens (Stearns), Private 

John, transferred to band.. 114 
Stevenson, Hospital Steward 
George H., in hospital at 

Santiago, Cuba 247 

Stickney, J. L., with Dewey. . . 316 
Stoddard, Captain Charles Her- 
bert 304 

assigned sick 192 

in command of 200 recruits 
at Camp Black, Hemp- 
stead Plains 295 

Stoddard, Henry L., of the 
Mail and Express, of 

New York city 169 

226, 266, 314 
his account of the engage- 
ment of Seventy-first 
Eegiment at San Juan 

Hill 256-266 

letter from 314-315 

sketch of 314 

Story, Major John P., U. S. A., 
inspected and located a 

camp at Averill Park 71 

Stout, Musician Frederick H., 

transferred to band 114 

Strevell, Lieutenant Clarence, 

regimental adjutant 22 

24, 25 
promoted to regimental 

' adjutant 28 

Sumner, General Samuel S., U. 

S. A 260 

ordered shrapnel to be 
used instead of solid 

shot . . .' 261 

Sullivan, Begimental Sergeant- 
Major Daniel P., promoted 

lieutenant 148 

Sullivan, Lieutenant Michael. . 48 

mustered in 47 

Sun, the newspaper 307, 333 

Susquehanna river, Pennsyl- 
vania 106 

Sweeney, Private William, 
died . . 148 



PAGE 

Switzerland 40 

Syracuse, New York, Forty- 
first Separate Company of . . 85 

TALCOTT, WILLIAM A., JR., 

died of fever and peritonitis, 254 

Tampa, Florida. . . 53, 54, 56, 61, 63 

65, 75, 81, 138, 134, 135 

136, 137, 139, 140, 163, 164 

166, 167, 175, 183, 184, 194 

196, 356, 267, 269, 277, 295 

Second Eegiment, New 

York Volunteers ordered 

to 52 

terrific thunder storm at, 57-58 
Seventy-first Eegiment or- 
dered to 161, 177 

Tampa Bay .•. 184 

187, 191, 194, 198, 200, 202 

Tampa Bay Hotel, Florida \184 

Army Corps headquarters 

at 178 

Tampa Camp, Florida 63, 66 

Tampa Heights, Florida 56 

173, 174, 184, 185, 187 
, 188, 190, 211, 293 
Taylor, Private Carlton W., 

died 29 

Tennessee, Second Eegiment, 

detailed to provost guard. . . 104 
Tenth Battalion, companies A, 

B, C, D, of Albany 17, 18, 42 

Tenth Eegiment, National 

Guard 43 

Tenth Eegiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 67 

two corporals and several 
privates of, interred near 

Sevilla, Cuba 333 

Tenth Eegiment Infantry, U. 

S. A 113, 216 

Terry, First Lieutenant David, 28 

resigned 27 

Tettamore, Assistant Surgeon 

Frank L. E 129 

Thayer, Private Charles L., 

died 63 

Thedford Ford Eoad, Chicka- 

mauga battlefield 51 

Third Army Corps, Second Di- 
vision 133 

Third Division 135, 136 

Third Artillery, United States 

Army 24 

Third Battalion, Second Eegi- 
ment, New York Volun- 
teers 61, 64, 78, 80 

companies H, G, E, F mus- 
tered in 46 

mustered out of United 

States service 81 

fifteen deaths 81 



422 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Third Battalion, Third Eegi- 
ment, New York Volun- 
teers 87, 91, 93, 105 

praised for conduct while 
on duty as provost 

guard 94 

companies I, K, L and D 

detailed for provost duty, 95 
on duty as provost guard, 104 
Third Battalion, Seventy-first 

Eegimeiit 335 

led by Major Keck, among 
first troops to arrive on 

San Juan Hill, Cuba 334 

companies B and L or- 
dered to march to Santi- 
ago and take transport 
for Montauk, Long Is- 
land 388 

Third Division, Fourth Army 

Corps 62, 66, 67, 71, 146 

Third Division Hospital, Fer- 

nandina, Florida 70, 76 

Third Eegiment Artillery, 

New York Volunteers 107 

Third Regiment Cavalry, U. S. 

A 67, 303 

Third liegiment Infantry, 

U. S. A 220 

Third Regiment Infantry, 

Missouri 91, 103, 105 

came into Camp Alger 89 

presented vidth loving cup 
by Third New York Eegi- 
ment 106 

Third Eegiment Infantry, 

Ohio 67, 135, 136, 140, 146 

Third Eegiment Infantry, 

Pennsylvania 67, 71 

Third Separate Company, of 

Oneonta 17, 43 

became company G, First 

Eegiment 18 

Thirteenth Battalion, National 

Guard, New York 47, 48 

Third Brigade, National Guard 

of 45 

Thirteenth Eegiment Infan- 
try 194, 233 

made gallant charge on 
block house at extreme- 

left 364 

Thirteenth Eegiment Infantry, 

National Guard, New York, 156 
Thirtieth Eegiment Infantry, 

Indiana, company A 257 

Thirtieth Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 

York, of Elmira.. 84 

93, 107, 109, 110, 113 
113, 120, 121, 122 



PAGE 
Thirtieth Separate Company, 
National Guard, New 
York: 
became company D, Third 

Eegiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Thirty-second Eegiment In- 
fantry, Michigan 66, 67, 135 

Thirty-first Separate Company, 

of Mohawk, New York. . 49 

designated company G 46 

Thirty-second Separate Com- 
pany, of Hoosick Falls, 

New York 49 

designated company M 46 

Thirty-third Separate Com- 
pany, of Walton 17 

became company F, First 

Eegiment 18 

Thirty-fourth Separate Com- 
pany, of Geneva 83 

84, 87, 108, 115 
became company B, Third 

Eegiment 85 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Thirty-sixth Separate Com- 
pany, of Schenectady. . . .49 
designated company IS.... 46 
Thirty-seventh Separate Com- 
pany, of Schenectady 49 

designated company F.... 46 
Thirty-eighth Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard, New 

York 116 

Thirty-fourth street, New 

York 155, 299, 303 

Thirty-fourth street ferry, 

New York 132 

Thompson, Private Charles H., 

died 30 

Thompson, Second Lieutenant 
John M., promoted first lieu- 
tenant '. . 183 

Thompson, Second Lieiitenant 

William Leland 63 

private, mustered in as 

second lieutenant 59 

commissioned second lieu- 
tenant, 301st Eegiment, 
New York Volunteers... 61 

resigned 61 

Thoroughfare, Virginia 103 

Thoroughfare Gap, Virginia.. 104 
105, 106, 134, 135 
Thorp, Edward Y., died of dis- 
ease 248 

Thurston, Dr 274 

Thurston, Mrs 274 

TifEt, Captain DeSolvo H., mili- 
tary record of 116 



General Index. 



423 



PAGE 

TifEt, Captain De Solvo H.: 

mustered out 116 

Tillinghast, Adjutant-General 
C. Whitney, ordered regi- 
ment recruited to twelve 

companies 128 

Tod, Commissary J. Kennedy, 
formerly of Seventy-first 

Regiment 181 

Todd, Private Hiram C, ap- 
pointed second lieutenant, 
202nd Regiment, New York 

Infantry 61 

Tompkins, Captain Robert Ful- 
ton 37 

Tonawanda, New York 86 

Twenty-fifth Separate 

Company of .' . 84 

Towne, Hospital Steward Os- 
car H. G., military record 

of 112 

died 112 

Townsend, Captain Eugene De 

Kay 176 

TowQsend, First Lieutenant 

Ruf us Martin 48 

appointed chief commis- 
sary of subsistence 56 

appointed commissary of 
subsistence. United 

States service 79 

discharged from United 

States service 79 

Tracy (Tracey), Private James, 

died 148 

Transports, order of advance 
of American transports from 

Florida to Cuba 195 

Treanor (Trainor), Captain 

John Patrick 48, 68 

Tribune, the newspaper 226 

Trinity, rang its chimes as 
Seventy-first Regiment pa- 
rade passed 299 

Troops A and C, acted as es- 
cort 46 

Troy, New York 55, 63 

66, 70, 71, 73, 74 
75, 76, 78, 79, 80 

city hospital 76, 77 

company A, Sixth Separate 

Company of 48 

company C, twelfth Sepa- 
rate Company of 48 

company D, Twenty-first 

Separate Company of... 48 
State Armory., refresh- 
ments served to return- 
ing soldiers at 73 

Trull, Lieutenant William E., 
Jr., wounded in action at 
San Juan Hill, Cuba 231, 244 



PAGE 
Tuck, Hospital Steward Alex- 
ander C 123 

military record of 112 

nauster ed out 113 

Tucker, First Lieutenant Her- 
man Alvin 26 

Tuite, Second Lieutenant 

James J 129 

promoted captain 147 

Turkey Creek, Florida 53 

Twelfth Battalion, First Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 
Volunteers, Fifth Sepa- 
rate Company 17, 43 

Fourteenth Separate Conx- 

pany 17, 43 

Fifteenth Separate Com- 
pany 17, 43 

Sixteenth Separate Com- 
pany 17, 43 

Twenty-fourth Separate 

Company 17, 43 

Twelfth Regiment, National 

Guard, New York 39 

Twelfth Regiment Infantry, 

New York Volunteers 83 

Twelfth Regiment Infantry, 

U. S. A 186, 150 

Twelfth Separate Company, of 

Troy 48 

designated company C 46 

Twentieth Regiment Infantry, 216 
Twentieth Separate Company, 

of Binghamton 17 

became company H, First 

Regiment IS 

Twenty-first Separate Com- 
pany, of Troy 47, 48 

designated company D 46 

Twenty-second Regiment, of 

New York 47, 87 

company E 109, 126 

Twenty-second Regiment In- 
fantry, Kansas 89, 92, 105 

Twenty-second Separate Com- 
pany, of Saratoga 

Springs, New York 49 

designated company L 46 

Twenty-second street. New 

York 155 

Twenty-third Regiment Infan- 

'try, U. S. A 216 

Twenty-third street ferry. New 

York 133 

Twenty-fourth Regiment, regu- 
lars 220. 

233, 257, 267 
made gallant charge on 
block house at extreme 

left at San Juan 264 

Twenty-fourth Separate Com- 
pany, of Middletown. . . . 17 



424 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Twenty-fourth Sepai-ate Com- 
pany: 
became company I, First 

Kegiment 18 

Twenty-fifth Separate Com- 
pany, of Tonawanda. ... 84 
112, 118, 119 
became company G, Third 

Eegiment 86 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Twenty-ninth Separate Com- 
pany, of Medina 84 

93, 108, 117, 118 
became company F, Third 

Begiment 86 

mustered out of United 

States service 107 

Two Hundred and First Kegi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 60, 61 

Two Hundred and Second Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 

Volunteers 27 

60, 61, 80, 82, 93, 109 
Two Hundred and Third Regi- 
ment Infantry, New York 
Volunteers 66, 115 

UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD. . 20 

United States 41, 83 

128, 154, 155, 158, 174, 304 

Adjutant-General 32 

33, 34, 39 
all terms of surrender 

favorable to 244 

annexation ceremonies of 
transfer of Hawaiian 

Islands to 23 

Army . . 33, 34, 36 

111, 132, 157, 158, 194 
216, 220, 256, 267, 284 
engages in its first bat- 
tle on Cuban soil at 

Las Guasimas 216 

Engineer Corps 230 

First Artillery. . 39, 40, 42 

Third Artillery 24 

Fifth Artillery 107 

First Cavalry 151 

Fifth Cavalry 86 

Eighth Cavalry 113 

First Regiment Cav- 
alry, commonly 
known as Roosevelt 

Rough Riders 216 

217, 218, 228 
encountered Spanish 

troops in the jungle, 216 
Third Regiment of 

Cavalry 303 

Fifth Infantry 113 



PAGE 
United States: 
Army: 

Seventh Infantry 47 

Tenth Infantry 113 

Twelfth Infantry, 136, 150 
Fourth Regiment In- 
fantry, regulars .... 287 
Sixth Regiment Infan- 
try, regulars 177, 185 

217, 223, 227, 236 
258, 260, 264, 282 
ordered to proceed 
to transports at 
Port Tampa, 

Florida 192 

moved to the right 

at San Juan 267 

Ninth Regiment Infan- 
try, regulars 264 

Thirteenth Regiment 
Infantry, regulars, 
made gallant charge 
on block house at 

extreme left 264 

Sixteenth Regiment In- 
fantry, regulars, 177 
217, 223, 236, 258, 260 
264, 282, 285, 293 
ordered to proceed 
to transports at 
Port Tampa, Flor- 
ida 192 

moved to the right 

at San Juan 267 

band of, played 
martial airs as 
transport swung 
into the Carib- 
bean 290 

Twenty-fourth Regi- 
ment Infantry, 

regulars 267 

made gallant charge 
on block house at 

extreme left 264 

Hospital Corps 70 

United States authorities 273 

at Washington, directed 
General Shafter to re- 
move all troops to 286 

United States Cavalry service, 178 
United States generals, sent 
letter to government urging 
the return of troops to their 

homes in the States 287 

United States Government, 

transport ship 199 

United States marines had 
successful scrimmage with 
Spaniards at Guantanamo, 
Cuba 216 



General Index. 



425 



PAGE 

United States Military Acad- 
emy 39 

40, 41, 42, 43, 109, 175 
216, 820, 256, 259 
United States, Mindora, dis- 
patch boat, carried first ac- 
coiint to, of landing of Shatt- 
er's army 316 

United States Navy 218 

United States Postmaster, of 
Cuba, Mr. Brewer, died of 

yellow fever 243 

United States post-ofBce, 

opened at Siboney, Cuba 243 

United States Regulars, made 
their wants known and re- 
ceived all kinds of delicacies, 294 

United States Senate 171, 181 

service 42 

55, 76, 79, 80, 81, 82, 86 
111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116 
117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122 
123, 125, 126, 132, 153, 156 
157, 178, 188, 302 
United States Troops, returned 
the fire with heaviest 
musketry fire of whole 

engagement 239 

lay in trenches, expecting 

an attack 240 

yellow fever made its ap- 
pearance among 243 

first shot from their can- 
non fired at San Juan 

without effect 260 

and volunteers mixed, in 
charge up San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 264 

five regiments in victorious 
charge up San Juan Hill, 

Cuba 264 

swamp fever began to de- 
velop among those at the 

front 268 

enlisted men of, forbidden 

to enter Santiago, Cuba, 273 
only such ofBcers as had 
a pass allowed to enter 

Santiago, Cuba 273 

so many deaths among, 
that customary salutes 
at the graves were or- 
dered not to be fired 275 

brought water in canteens 
from a stream a mile 

and a half distant 276 

who went ashore at Guan- 

ica, attacked 307 

United States vessels 197 

United States Volunteer Army, 45 
160, 304, 305 



PAGE 

United States Volunteers 33 

34, 39, 42, 45, 55 
62, 78, 114, 122 

First Engineers 52 

55, 56, 62 

service 79 

Signal Corps 76 

United States, war between 

Spain and 153, 305 

Ute expedition 44 

Utica, Forty-fourth Separate 
Company of 17 



VALENTINE, PRIVATE WIL- 
LIAM S., company C, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba. . .*. 244 

Van Deusen, Private Wright, 

company I) 59 

Van De Water, Chaplain George 

Roe 153 

158, 160, 161, 166, 167, 172 
173, 174, 176, 178, 183, 184 
189, 190, 191, 205, 206, 212 
217, 222, 227, 228, 238, 239 
240, 247, 269, 314, 315 
detailed to prepare itiner- 
ary of regiment 152 

offers prayer for Divine 

protection 155 

detailed to act as caterer 

to officers' mess 160 

went to Tampa for medical 

supplies 178 

telegraphs to friends for 
delicacies for the sick... 179 

responded to address 181 

relieved of duties as ca- 
terer . . 209 

his successful landing 214 

impressive evening service, 221 
memorable Sunday service 
with assembled regi- 
ment 221, 222 

ordered by colonel to take 

his place with surgeons, 231 
detailed to Siboney to look 
after transportation of 

wounded men 242 

assigned to duty at Sib- 
oney, Cuba 268 

his wardrobe well depleted, 270 

with Messrs. Barrett and 

Brittain, started on foot 

for Santiago to procure 

provisions and medicines 

for the sick 270 

secured from Red Cross 
Society, milk and rice 
for the sick 280 



426 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Van De Water, Chaplain George 
Eoe: 
invited to oificiate at the 
funeral of a Seventh 
Eegiment regular, pri- 
vate 281 

divine service in Young 
Men's Christian -Associa- 
tion tent 288 

assisted by Chaplain Bate- 
man in church service 

for burial at sea 290 

detailed by Colonel Dovsrus 
to secure food from Ked 

Cross Society 292 

offered his services at Gen- 
eral Hospital 293 

given thirty days' leave of 
absence by General 

Wheeler 295 

Van Gaasbeck, Sergeant Wal- 
ter E., died 30 

Van Keuren, Private George, 

died 30 

Vaughan, Private Michael, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Veteran Association, Seventy- 
first Regimental Infan- 
try, National Guard, 

NevF York 180, 188 

committee of, greeted Sev- 
enty-first Regiment at 

Long Island City 397 

" Vigilancia," transport ship.. 153 
184, 198, 199, 300, 307, 213 
213, 218, 246, 377, 381, 305 
selected by Colonel Dovsrns 
to transport Seventy- 
first Regiment to Cuba, 197 

Virginia 103, 104 

Volunteer Army 155, 156, 158 

Engineers, Second Regi- 
ment 33, 33 

Von Ette, Arthur, died on 

board " Missouri," at sea 352 

Vossler, Captain Wilbur 26 

lieutenant, promoted .... 28 
Vunk, Captain Darwin E 49 

WADE, MAJOR=QENERAL 
JAMES F., First Army 
Corps 52 

Wager, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant Chester G 47 

Wagner (Wadner), William 
(Christian F. W.), enlisted.. 114 

Wagstaffi, Mrs. Walter H., New 
York 180 

Waielae, Hawaiian Islands.... 23 

Waielae Beach, Hawaiian Is- 
lands 34 



PAGE 
Wainwright, Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Richard, of 
Gloucester, asked per- 
mission to enter Harbor 

of Guanica 306 

complimented for his work 

by General Miles 307 

his official report on the 

capture of Guanica, 307, 308 
Lieutenant Huse's report 
of the capture of Guan- 
ica, to 308, 309 

siirprise of Guanica a com- 
plete success 309 

his contempt for mines and 
and torpedoes worthy of 

Farragut 309 

his modesty in account of 

capture of Guanica 309 

presented Spanish flag 
captured at Guanica to 

Lieutenant Huse 309 

commended for his gal- 
lantry and daring 310 

collected all the lighters 

in Guanica Harbor 310 

his report on the Santiago 

fight 311, 312 

wonderful escape of Glou- 
cester at Santiago fight, 313 
Wales, Private Edward D., 

company A, injured 58 

Walker, Private Le Roy E., 
company Ei, transferred to 
Hospital Corps, United 

States Army 70 

Wallace, George Ernest, com- 
pany I. . . .' 28 

second lieutenant, re- 
signed 27 

Walsh, William J., died of fe- 
ver 249 

Walton, Samuel J., died of dis- 
ease 348 

Walton, Thirty-third Separate 

Company 17 

Wands, Private Robert, died.. 29 

War, Articles of 189 

War, Secretary of 32 

33, 55, 61, 70 

War Department 34, 36, 40 

51, 66, 71, 78, 79, 87, 91, 140 
Investigating Commission, 
inspected camp of Sixty- 
ninth Regiment 151 

Ward, Lieutenant Philip R., 

Fifth Artillery, U. S. A 76 

Warden, Private Fred, died 30 

W a r d 1 a w, Sergeant-Major 

George A 123 

military record of Ill 

mustered out Ill 



General Index. 



427 



PAGE 

Ward Line 163, 197 

Wardman, Ervin, of the Press, 318 
Warren, Private Eugene, com- 
pany A S5 

Warrentown, Virginia, gener- 
osity of citizens of 104 

Washington, D. C 32 

33, 34, 36, 39, 40, 51, 63 
64, 72, 88, 93, 104, 166 
167, 295 
authorities at, directed 
General Shafter to re- 
move all troops to United 

States 286 

Garfield Hospital, at 105 

General Hospital for In- 
sane, at 76 

Washington Arch, New York 
city. Seventy-first Regi- 
mental parade began at 299 

Washington's Sword and Fred- 
erick the Great, history of, 5, 9 

Watch Hill, Rhode Island 254 

Watertown, New York 349 

Watson, Private Harry S., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Watson, Private Worden A., 

discharged 70 

Watt, Mrs. Archibald, New 

York 180 

Wauhatchie, Tennessee 175 

Waverly Place, New York city, 298 
Weber, Second Lieutenant 
Henry H., military rec- 
ord of 120 

mustered out 120 

Webster, Second Lieutenant 
Horace, appointed sec- 
ond lieutenant 115 

military record of 115 

resigfned 115 

Weeks, Private Charles J., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 345 

Weller, Private Alfred C, died, 80 
Wells, Second Lieutenant Al- 
bert 49 

Wells, Private Granville I., 

died 30 

Wells, Captain James Hollis, 
superintended the laying 
of water pipes at Canip 

Black 162 

promoted major 182 

major 223 

his report of action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 236, 237 

detailed to build bridges 
and improve roads 241 



PAGE 
Wendland, Emil, died of ty- 
phoid fever 249 

Wesoott (Westcott), Alfred A., 

transferred to band 114 

West, Private Tracy E., died.. 68 

Westburg, New York 254 

Westerberg, Private Leonard, 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

West Indies 184 

West Point Military Academy, 39 
41, 42, 43, 109, 175 
216, 220, 256, 259 
Wetherbee (Gardner) and 
Hawk, Messrs., dinner to ofS- 
cers of Seventy-'first Regi- 
ment 303 

Weyman, First Lieutenant 

Frederick H 183 

appointed battalion adju- 
tant 182 

Weyler, General Don Valeri- 

ano y Nicolau 214 

Whalen, Private John J 65 

Wheeler, General Joseph, U. S. 

A 149, 151, 295 

rallied cavalry troops 320 

Wheeler, Priva^^e Oscar R., 

died 29 

Wheeling, West Virginia 132 

Wheelock, First Lieutenant 

William P... '. . 25 

White, Secpnji Lieutenant Ed- 
ward J 48 

mustered in as first lieu- 
tenant 59 

White, Hjil^barfi W., company 

, A, di.e.d of yellow fever 247 

Whitehall, North Carolina 108 

Whitehall, New York, Ninth 

Separate Company of . . . 49 

State Armory at 81 

Whitehall street, New York 

city '.' 398 

Whittle, Captain John Henry, 

promoted major 182 

detailed to build bridges 

and improve roads 341 

Williams, First Lieutenant 

Alexander Scott 186 

194, 237 
Williams, Edgar E., died of 

fever 249 

Williams, Private James T., 

died of yellow fever 253, 381 

Williams, Colonel William P., 

First Florida 135 

Williamson, Private Esek B„ 
appointed second lieutenant, 
201st Regiment, New York 
Volunteers 60 



428 



General Index. 



PAGE 

Wilson and Brown Infirmary. . 143 
Wilson, First Lieutenant John 
S., appointed assistant 
surgeon Second Kegi- 
ment, New York Volun- 
teers 47 

resigned to accept position 
of surgeon, Twenty-sec- 
ond Regiment 47 

Wilson, W. O., artist at the 

front 316 

Wilson, Private Warren P., 

company K, died 75 

Wilson, Captain William, Thir- 
ty-fourth- Separate Com- 
pany 38, 84 

major 87, 97, 123 

military record of 108 

mustered out 108 

Windward Passage 206 

Winthrop, Lieutenant and Kegi- 
ment Quartermaster Bron- 

son 21, 23, 24, 25 

Witherstine, Captain Horatio 

P 49 

Wolf Eun Shoals, Virginia 98 

Welters, Musician Frederick, 
Jr., wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 245 

Women's Aid Society, served 

refreshments to troops 303 

Women's Relief Corps served 

refreshments to the men . . . 104 
Wood, Major, Division Sur- 
geon 289 

Wood, First Lieutenant Frank- 
lin Thomas 26 

promoted 28 

Wood, Colonel Leonard 192 

216, 260 
false report of his death. . 218 
acting as brigadier-gen- 
eral 228 

Wood, Lieutenant T. C, left 

on shore with Colt gun, 307 
309 

conduct commended 309 

and Lieutenant Huse low- 
ered Spanish flag and 

hoisted ours 307 

Wood, First Lieutenant Walter 

A., Jr 49 

appointed commissary . 52 

on ten days' sick leave 66 

Woodbeck, Private Burton, 

died 30 

Woodcock, Corporal Samuel C, 

died 79 

Woodford, General Stewart L., 153 
Woodward, First Lieutenant 

Christopher H. R 129 



PAGE 

Woodward, First Lieutenant 
Christopher H. R.: 
resigned 150 

World, The, New York news- 
paper 281 

Worthing, First Lieutenant 
Harry P 26 

Wright, Sergeant Nicholas, in- 
jured in wreck 145 

Wright, Lieutenant Sylvester 
W., not mustered in 47 

Wylie, Sergeant John L., died, 75 

"YANKEE," cruiser 176 

Yates, Major Austin A. . 60, 72, 78 

mustered in 46 

commanding Fifteenth 
Battalion, National 

Guard 47, 49 

left Tampa on recruiting 

service 56 

mustered out of United 

States service 81 

Yates Ford, Virginia 99 

Yattan (Yattau), Musician 

Frank A 114 

Yauco, Spanish reinforcements 
coming from, driven back by 

fire from Gloucester 307, 308 

Ybor City, Florida, Cuban set- 
tlement 183 

184, 185, 188, 193, 194 
Yellow fever, called " Calen- 
tura," Dangui, or Cuban fe- 
ver 276 

Yellow Fever Hospital 281 

Yellowstone Park, Wyoming. . 41 
Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation 284 

Army Commission, its 
small tent used as hos- 
pital for regiment 269 

divine service and social 

gatherings of regiment 

held in its large tent. . . . 269 

represented by Charles F. 

Barrett and Charles A. 

Brittain 269 

distributed over 20,000 
sheets of paper and 

10,000 envelopes 270 

Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation Army Commis- 
sion, headquarters of . . . 2S3 
large tent given by, 
brought out and erected 
for use of enlisted men, 282 
tent given to Seventy-first 
Regiment Infantry, 
New York Volun- 
teers 174 



General Index. 



429 



PAGE 

Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation : 
tent: 

divine services held in, 
by Chaplain Van 

De Water 288 

270, 286 

Yonkers, New York 247 

Yorktovyn, Virginia 40 

Young, Minister 38 

Young farm, Pennsylvania.... 106 
Young, Brigadier-General Sam- 
uel B. M., United States 

Army 166 

his brigade of cavalry 218 

disabled in Las Guasimas 

action 228 

Young, Private Thomas, died.. 148 
Young, Color Bearer William 

B., military record of... 113 
mustered out 113 



PAOE 

Young, Sergeant William D. S., 283 
died of mountain fever, 249, 280 
buried west of entrench- 
ments near Santiago, 

Cuba 280 

Youngs, Sergeant George B., 
wounded in action at San 

Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

Youngs, Private Lewis B., 
wounded in action at San 
Juan Hill, Cuba 244 

ZIEQNER, SERGEANT HER- 
MAN, died of fever 249 

Zitnik, Private Henry W., 
wounded in action at San 
Juan Hill, Cuba...^ 244 

Zogbaum, Bufus ¥., artist 318 

Zoller, Frank H., died of inter- 
mittent fever 251 



THE END. 



IVIY NIBMOIRS 

OF THB 



Military History of the State of New York 

DURING THE 

WAR KOR THE UNION, 1S61-65 



BY 

COLOKBL SILAS W. BURT 

Former Assistant Inspector General, National Guard, State of New York. 

Edited by the STATE HISTORIAN, and Issued as War op Thi{ 
Rebellion Series — ^Bulletin, No. 1. 



PREFACE. 



WHILE serving in the military establishment of the State 
of New York during the war of 1861-65 and later — 
in all about eight years — I kept occasional notes of such events 
and transactions as I had any connection or acquaintance with, 
and copies of printed reports and other literature pertaining to 
military matters. I had then no formulated purpose as to the 
future use for these data. 

After the war ended I frequently urged upon Governor Morgan 
the preparation by some competent literary man of an account of 
the remarkable military accomplishment by the State of New York, 
during his second administration in 1861-62; saying that, both from 
a public and a personal view, he could well afford to pay liberally 
for such a permanent record. I think he did engage Dr. Cornelius 
R. Agnew of this city, who had been a member ofi his staff in 
1859-60, to prepare such an account, but for some reason it was 
never done, nor was I ever called upon for my data, which I had 
placed at the Governor's disposal. 

Unfortunately the greater part of my diaries, memoranda and 
other papers were lost in the fire that destroyed the Morrill Storage 
Warehouse in this city in October, 1881. This loss and the death 
of Governor Morgan in the spring of 1883 for a while put the 
matter out of my mind. Three years later, having collected some 
material but with a larger dependence on my memory, I began to 
write my memoirs of the relation of the State to the whole war 
and had concluded the part covered by Governor Morgan's admin- 



4 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

istration when other more urgent matters diverted my attention 
and the subsequent misplacement of the manuscript, etc., wholly 
arrested my completion of the work. The recent recovery of the 
manuscript and its acceptance by Mr. Hastings, State Historian, 
for incorporation in his annual report will preserve some aspects of 
an important part of the history of our State. In revising it now 
I have added a few notes and appendices regarding matters of inter- 
est that have recently occurred to me. These memoirs make no 
pretention to literary merit, and the desultory manner in whichthey 
were prepared has bred some repetitions that seemed necessary to 
illustrate topics in hand, but I trust they may furnish some material 
to the future historian who shall tell in fullness and in fitting phrase 
the glorious story of how the Empire State met a great crisis in the 
fate of the Nation. 

As in most of the events and transactions mentioned I had a part, 
their recital may have a personal or even egotistical flavor, but this 
I assume is so natural or incidental to such memoirs as not to require 
apology. 

I cannot determine whether I shall be able to continue the 
memoirs to the close of the war. The later period is not so impor- 
tant or interesting, except as to the draft riots of July, 1863, and to 
ihe extraordinary and excessive expenditures of bounties to fill 
quotas of localities or furnish substitutes for drafted men. Very 
few regimental or other organizations were begun or completed 
during this later period and most of the enlistments were for the 
recruitment of regiments in the field. 

It is a somewhat melancholy thought that I am the sole survivor 

of those who served on Governor Morgan's "War" Staff; I am 

however becoming used to finding myself " the last leaf ", that 

Holmes depicts, on quite a grove of trees. 

S. W. B. 
New York City, April 25, 1902. 



INTRODUCTORY. 



As these memoirs are necessarily personal to some extent, I 
will give a very brief account of how, without any previous 
military training or connection, I became absorbed ijj that branch 
of the New York State service for nearly eight years and during 
the most critical period of our national history. 

The project of a trans-continental railroad, first actively pressed 
by a Mr. Whitney, had in 1858-9 gained such strength in Congress 
as to make its early prosecution seem imminent. As a consequence, 
and at the instance of Mr. Horace Greeley, I spent a large portion 
of the year i860 in that part of the Rocky Mountain regicai then 
popularly known as " Pike's Peak," though extending a hundred 
miles north of it. It was my idea that I could so acquaint myself 
with the larger topographical features of that region, which seemed 
to present the most formidable obstacle to the railway, as to make 
my engagement as locating engineer probable, if not indispensable, 
when the work began. Mr. Greeley in October wrote me that the 
coming Presidential election and the conditions of popular feeling, 
North and South, would indefinitely postpone the railroad scheme. 
We therefore returned to my father's house in Kinderhook, N. Y., 
about January i, 1861. I was without employment and very anx- 
ious to obtain some business engagement, but the threatening 
attitude of the Southern States and the consequent business dis- 
tractions and paralysis were insuperable impediments. 



6 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

On the 1 6th of February the New York State Legislature had 
appropriated the sum of $50,000 for the relief of the people of Kan- 
sas Territory suffering from the great drought of the previous year 
and my father had been selected as the agent to dispense this 
bounty. This task he completed in March and was settling his 
accounts with Comptroller Denniston at Albany, when, on April 
i6th, the law was enacted, appropriating $3,000,000 for the organi- 
zation and equipment of volunteers to aid in repressing the rebellion. 
My father was requested to aid in auditing the accounts for expendi- 
tures under this act. 

In the meantime I remained at Kinderhook, my impatience with 
lack of work, being mitigated by some temporary employment and 
by that absorbing interest in the great national drama that held 
every one's attention more or less. Perceiving that the immediate 
field of the contest would be in Virginia, I cast about for a good 
map of that State on such a scale as would give a clear idea of mili- 
tary positions and movements, but could find none in the village. 
In the pursuit of my profession as a civil engineer I had collected 
many railroad and other maps, and fortunately had a series of the 
U. S. Coast Survey reports, containing charts of the Chesapeake 
Bay and other Virginia and Maryland waters, and of the rivers flow- 
ing into them. I was thus enabled to construct a map on a scale 
of eight miles to the inch, permitting the representation of such 
topc^aphical details as were known to me. On one of his visits 
home my father insisted on taking this map to Albany, and he 
showed it to the Inspector General, Marsena R. Patrick, a former 
officer of the regular army, who took it to Governor Morgan and 
asked permission to appoint me as a clerk in his office, saying that 
while I would not be needed for map-making he believed that my 
education and experience would be very useful in the work of 



War of the Rebellion Series. 7 

organizing and equipping troops. The result was my appointment 
as a clerk in the Inspector General's office at a salary of one thou- 
sand dollars a year. 

I fepaired to Albany to report for duty on Monday, May 27th, 
and found the city in great excitement on account of the funeral 
services of Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth of the nth N. Y. S. Vol. Infan- 
try, assassinated at Alexandria, Va., on the previous Friday, and 
whose body was then en route to Saratoga County to be interred 
there. 

I was very kindly received by General Patrick and began my 

service in the State military department, little thinking that it would 

continue for nearly eight years, and was also the beginning of a long 

term in the public service extending to this date. 

SILAS W. BURT. 
April 25, 1887. 



No. J. 
FIRST LEVY— APRIL 15 TO JUNE 30, 186 J. 



IN the history of the great rebellion of 1861 no incident has been 
more dwelt upon than the absolutely unprepare^ condition of 
the Free States to meet the shock. There had been for many years 
premonitions of the great revolt, but successive compromises had 
relieved the situation, and the public mind at the North had finally 
concluded that despite the outcry there was no wolf across the bor- 
der. The Federal army was insignificant in numbers and whether 
by chance or design, its largest collected force was in Texas and 
so early as February i8th was treacherously surrendered to the 
rebel forces by General David E. Twiggs, its commanding officer, 
and was released only upon a parole that disarmed many loyal offi- 
cers at a time when they were sorely needed. By evident design 
the greater part of the small arms and munitions of war had been 
transferred to Southern arsenals before actual hostilities were begun. 
Very few of the Free States had an organized militia and where 
there was any such organization it was very feeble compared with 
the great mass of population. The Adjutant General of the Army 
reported on the ist of January, 1861, that the enrolled militia in the 
Free States (excepting Iowa and Oregon, from which there were 
no returns) comprised 2,197,236 men,* but of this formidable army 
on paper, not over one per cent was in. any respect efficient for mili- 
tary purposes. The return from New York was 418,846, but not 

* Army Register for 1861, p. 39. 



lo Annual •Report of the State Historian. 

more than 15,000 of this number were uniformed and drilled and 
this State was in this respect far in advance of any other. 

Directly after .the war of 1812-15 with Great Britain, the New 
York militia was organized upon a very pretentious plan which 
contemplated the annual muster and instruction of the whole arms- 
bearing population. But gradually as public interest abated, there 
crept in exemptions and commutations and such a perfunctory 
observance of the law as became farcical and indeed injurious to 
the public interests. The military allegiance of the citizens is the 
very cornerstone of the republic and in the words of the Federal 
Constitution " a well regulated militia " is " necessary to the security 
of a free state ". This political canon had been some fifteen years 
earlier more positively enunciated in the fortieth article of the first 
constitution of the State of New York, where after stating that " it 
is the duty of every man who enjoys the protection of society, to be 
prepared and willing to defend it ", the constitution " doth ordain, 
determine and declare, That the militia of this State, at all times 
hereafter, as well in peace as in war, shall be armed and disciplined, 
and in readiness for service." A long period of peace had naturally 
weakened the force of this principle and probably the isolation of 
our country from the other great political powers and our tran- 
scendent increase in population and might will always be accounted 
a release from the burdens of military preparation such as rest on 
other nations. But in 1861 what was worse than lack of provision 
existed in the general contempt for military affairs encouraged by 
the ridiculous manner in which the great principle of military service 
had been treated. It was bewildering to suddenly find the very 
existence of the nation depending upon the derided militia of the 
country. 

In New York there were some fifteen infantry regiments, most of 
them comprised in the great cities, that could be immediately called 



War of the Rebellion Series. ii 

into service with some assurance of their efficiency. Of cavalry or 
artillery there was nothing available that was of value. The general 
staff had a paper organization and the chiefs of the departments, 
known as the " Governor's staff ", occupied positions more orna- 
mental than useful. Some attention to military affairs was given by 
the Adjutant General, Inspector General and the Commissary, General 
of Ordnance, but the only service rendered by other officers of the 
staff was an attendance upon the Governor at all ceremonial occa- 
sions when their gorgeous uniforms enlivened the ge|ieral sombre- 
ness of male attire in these sad-colored days. 

The session of the New York Legislature began on January i, 
1861, and from the very first day its proceedings were strongly 
colored by the great political events in the South, though no mili- 
tary legislation was accomplished until four days after the firing of 
the first gun at Fort Sumter, when a law was passed providing 
for an army of 30,000 men. On April 15th President Lincoln 
issued his proclamation calling into service 75,000 militia. This 
proclamation was accompanied by a circular letter to Governor 
Morgan, requesting him to detach from the militia of the State its 
quota of 13,280 officers and men to serve as infantry or riflemen 
for a period of three months to be rendezvoused at New York, 
Albany and Elmira. On the next day, April i6th, was enacted the 
law, subsequently known as Chapter 277, Laws of 1861, authorizing 
the enrollment and muster of the 30,000 volunteers " in addition to 
the present military organization, and a part of the militia thereof ". 

On the 18th Governor Morgan issued a proclamation making a 
call for seventeen regiments to serve three months to fill the quota 
of the State under the requisition of the Secretary of War of the 
iSth. The proclamation provided that these regiments should be 
organized under the recent law, and by General Orders No. 13 of 



12 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

same date the details of organization were published. In fact none 
of the regiments so organized was mustered for three months to 
fill the quota under the call of April 15th; this was accomplished 
by the muster-in of the uniformed militia regiments for that period. 
On April 19th the famous Seventh Regiment left New York 
city for Washington with a total of 990 men and officers, a marvel- 
ous example of speedy recruitment. This notable event was suc- 
ceeded the next evening by a grand mass meeting in Union Square 
which presented such a unanimous and fervid demonstration of 
patriotism as to permanently fix the attitude of the metropolis dur- 
ing the contest and to have a great moral effect throughout the 
whole North. An outcome of this significant meeting was the 
organization of the Union Defense Committee, composed of promi- 
nent and active citizens and provided with funds from the city treas- 
ury and private contributions. This patriotic body materially aided 
the recruiting and equipment of the , militia and volunteer regi- 
ments sent from New York city before June ist and extinguished 
the last hope of the secessionists that they would find substantial' 
sympathy there.* Besides the Seventh Regiment of militia there 
went from New York city the Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, Twelfth, Sixty- 
ninth and Seventy-first Regiments, from Brooklyn the Thirteenth 
and Twenty-eighth, from Kingston the Twentieth and from Albany 
the Twenty-fifth. All of these regiments left the State during April, 
most of themi before the 23d. There is now no doubt but that the 

* I find from data kept by me that all the expenditures by this committee 
were made between April 21st and July 31st, 1861, and there were paid from 
the City Fund $771,933.10 and from funds contributed by citizens $58,338.63, 
or a total of $830,271.73. Of this, $226,589.27 were ' spent for arms and 
accoutrements; $188,204 for account of the militia regiments, and $415,478.46 
for account of volunteer regiments. No part of this amount has ever been 
refunded by the United States because of defects and informalities in the 
accounts. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 13 

prompt movement of the militia regiments from Massachusetts and 
New York prevented the capture of Washington, which, otherwise 
almost defenseless, could have been readily taken by the Virginia 
rebels. It is useless to speculate as to the possible course of the 
war had the capital of the Union been captured at the very outset 
of the rebellion or as to the result on foreign countries of such a 
disaster. The militia forces of two loyal Statefe prevented such a 
disaster and restored to public confidence and respect that long coti- 
temned organization.* 

* The promptitude with which the New York militia regiments were for- 
warded to the relief of Washington was warmly acknowledged by the Presi- 
dent, as shown by the following letters : 

War Department, 

Washington, April 26, 1861. 
To His Excellency E. D. Morgan, Governor of New York: 

Dear Sir: I have to repeat the acknowledgments of this Department for 
your very prompt and energetic action in sending forward the troops of your 
State. 

Very truly yours, 

Simon Cameron, 
Secretary of War. 

War Department, 
Washington, April 29, 1861. 
His Excellency E. D. Morgan, Governor of New York: 

My Dear Sirs I have yours of the 24th inst. This Department has again 
to acknowledge its many obligations to your Excellency for the promptness 
and despatch, with which you have sent forward your troops for the defence 
of the capital. I have to request that you will not send any more to this 
point until you are further advised. I have the honor to subscribe myself, 

Very truly, 

Simon Cameron, t 
: Secretary of War. 

t Simon Cameron was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, March 8, 
1799. He learned the printers' trade and at 21 years of age was editor of a 
paper in Doylestown and in 1822 was editing a paper in _ Harrisburg, Pa. 
He embarked in the banking business and constructed railways in central 
Pennsylvania where he laid the foundation for the great fortune which he 
subsequently accumulated. He was elected to the United States Senate in 
1845 as a Democrat, but later become identified with the " People's Party " 



14 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

The act of April. i6, 1861, " to authorize the embodying and 
equipment of a Volunteer Militia and to provide for the public 
defense", was a very faulty law and I think of doubtful constitu- 
tionality in devolving upon a board the authority and power to 
enroll, muster and discharge from service the troops to be raised. 
I believe this power resided solely in the Governor as Commander- 
in-Chief, but whether it did or not, the law should have recognized 
it in him or conferred it upon him. Instead of this the Governor 
was cojoined with the Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, 
Comptroller, Attorney General, State Engineer and Surveyor and 
State Treasurer, an awkward, incongruous and irresponsible body. 
The attempt to administer military affairs by a council or com- 
mission has seldom, if ever, been successful. In the present instance 
there were from the beginning a lack of harmony and an official 
jealousy that interfered with the satisfactory administration of the 
law. The officers comprising the board were Governor Edwin D. 
Morgan, Lieutenant-Governor Robert Campbell, Secretary of State 
David R. Floyd- Jones, Attorney General Charles G. Myers, State 
Engineer Van Rensselaer Richmond and Treasurer Philip 
Dorsheimer. 

The Governor's staff as appointed on January ist were Adjutant 
General J. Meredith Read, Inspector General William A. Jackson, 
Engineer-in-Chief Chester A. Arthur, Judge Advocate General 
William Henry Anthon, Surgeon-General S. Oakley Vander Poel, 
Quartermaster General .Cuyler Van Vechten, Paymaster General 

which subsequently consolidated with the Republicans. He was candidate 
for President in i860 and Mr. Lincoln recognized his power and ability by 
calling him to his Cabinet as Secretary of War. He resigned his position, 
however, January n, 1862, and was appointed as Minister to Russia, which 
position he held until the following November, when he resigned. In 1866 
he was again returned to the United States Senate and returned for the 
fourth time in 1873, but resigned in favor of his son, James Donald Cameron. 
For forty-five years he was the acknowledged Czar of Pennsylvania politics. 
He died June 26, 1889. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 15 

Thomas B. Van Buren, Aides-de-Camp Edwin D. Morgan, Jr., 
Samuel D. Bradford and Elliott F. Shepard; Military Secretary 
John H. Linsly. 

The Legislature adjourned on April i6th, the very day that the 
bill became a law. The board of State officers formed by the act 
was immediately convened, the Governor being made its chairman 
and Mr. Linsly its secretary. The Governor's proclamation, already 
referred to, was made on the i8th, on which date the General Orders 
(No. 13) were issued providing for the immediate organization of 
seventeen regiments in four brigades and two divisions to fill the 
quota upon the requisition for three months men, but the orders 
provided that the force should be enrolled for the term of two years, 
unless sooner discharged. The organization of companies and regi- 
ments was that prescribed as the minimum in the regular army, 
except that the rank of second lieutenant was named ensign and 
assistant surgeon as surgeon's mate (and so continued to January, 
1863). The unit of organization was the company, which might be 
accepted when the rolls had been signed by not less than thirty-two 
nor more than seventy-seven persons and then transmitted to the 
Adjutant General, who, if the inspection ordered by him was satis- 
factory, might accept the company and order an election of the 
commissioned and non-commissioned officers by the members of 
the accepted company. This election was necessary because the 
law having necessarily recognized the force as a part of the militia,* 
it was subject to the second section of the eleventh article of the 
State Constitution, which provided for the election of all company 
and field officers and brigadier generals. After the election the 

* The U. S. Constitution contemplates the militia as a State institution and 
forbids any State " to keep troops in tiipe of peace " without the consent of 
Congress. It is manifest that the only military force that can be authorized 
by a State is a part of the militia of that State. 



i6 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

accepted company was ordered to one of the three military depots 
and the officers of any six or more companies, not exceeding ten, 
assembled at any depot, and indicating the choice of the same per- 
sons as field officers could hold an election for the same, who being 
commissioned would be put in command. 

The issue of the orders caused a general excitement throughout 
the State and recruiting was started in eyery county by active men 
aspiring to become commissioned officers. At the capitol at Albany 
there was a constant concourse of interested men from every part 
of the State, anxious to encourage or advise, or to procure commis- 
sions or the acceptance of companies on their own account or on 
behalf of friends. The Adjutant Getieral's quarters were enlarged 
by adding the adjacent room, used as the Assembly Library, and 
a corps of clerks was employed to undertake the new and enlarg- 
ing affairs of that office. Adjutant General Read was a man of 
good Philadelphia parentage who had married an Albany lady of 
wealth. He had an excellent education and had been prominent 
in local political matters as a leader of the Republican " Wide- 
awakes " the previous autumn. He would have made a fair officer 
in the piping times of peace, but the sudden exigencies of 1861 were 
too much for his capacity, mental or physical. His assistant, 
Colonel Duncan Campbell, was an indolent man who declined any 
part in the new work, addicting himself entirely to the old militia 
routine matters. General Read was industrious and zealous, and 
had as an official adviser Captain Edmund Schriver,* of Troy, and 

* Edmund Schriver was a native of Pennsylvania; graduated from 
West Point in the class of 1833 and was assigned to the Second 
Artillery. In 1838 he was appointed captain and assistant adjutant- 
general. Four years later he was commissioned captain in the Second 
Artillery, where he remained until July 31, 1846, when he resigned. 
From '47 to '52 he was treasurer of the Saratoga & Washington 



War of the Rebellion Series. ^^ 

late captain of the Second Artillery and Assistant Adjutant General, 
United States Army, who had resigjie'd. Captain Schriver on May 
13th was made an aide-de-camp of the Governor vice Colonel 
Edwin D. Morgan, Jr., resigned. Later Major Lorenzo Sitgreaves,* 
United States Topographical Engineers, became attached to the 
headquarters as an adviser. Some aid was also received from Cap- 
tain Frank Wheaton, First U. S. Cavalry, on duty at Albany as 
recruiting officer .f 

Railroad Company, now a part of the Delaware & Hudson system, and from 
'47 to '61 he was treasurer of the Saratoga & Schenectady «Railroad Com- 
pany and of the Rensselaer & Saratoga. He was president of the Rensselaer 
& Saratoga Railroad Company from '51 to '61. At the outbreak of the war 
he was appointed hy Governor Morgan as an aide-de-camp with the rank of 
colonel. May 14, 1861, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 
Eleventh United States infantry and a year later was transferred to the staff 
with the rank of colonel. March 13, 1863, he was commissioned inspector- 
general and participated in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, 
being deputized by General Meade to carry to the War Department thirty- 
one battle flags and other trophies from that field. He was brevetted as 
brigadier-general and major-general of the United States army for merito- 
rious and distinguished services. He was retired January 4, 1881, and died in 
Washington, D. C, February 10, 1899. 

* Lorenzo Sitgreaves was a native of Pennsylvania. He graduated from 
West Point in the class of 1832, and served several years in the" First artil- 
lery; he was out of the service two years; reappointed second lieutenant of 
topographical engineers in 1838, served through the Mexican War with dis- 
tinguished credit; was mustering officer at Albany at the outbreak of hos- 
tilities, but was transferred to the west, where he remained until July 10, 1866, 
when he was retired with the rank of lieutenant-colonel of engineers. Died 
May 14, 1888, at Washington, D. C, aged 78 years. 

t Captain Wheaton was the son-in-law of Col. Samuel Cooper, Adjutant- 
General of the U. S. Army, who on the outbreak of hostilities resigned that 
position to accept the similar one in the Confederate army. Col. Cooper was 
the son-in-law of the Confederate agent, ex-U. S. Senator Mason (Virginia), 
who, with his associate, ex-U. S. Senator Slidell (Louisiana), being on his 
way to England on the British passenger steamer, the Trent, was forcibly 
taken from it by Capt. Wilkes, commanding the U. S. steamer San Jacinto, 
and conveyed to Boston. The disavowal of this act by our government pre- 
vented the declaration of war by England. 

Captain Wheaton was born in Providence, R. I., May 8, 1833. He was 
educated as a civil engineer and was occupied in California and in the Mexi- 
2 



i8 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

The three depots were put under command of brigadier generals 
of the militia: General Charles Yates at New York, General John F. 
Rathbone at Albany and General Robert B. Van Valkenburgh at 
Elmira.* These officers were provided with ample stalifs for all pur- 
poses of administration. The headquarters of the Quartermaster 
General were at Albany and his department was represented at 
New York by General Chester A. Arthur, Engineer-in-Chief, and at 
Elmira by Captain Charles C. B. Walker. There being no com- 
missary officers in the militia organization in those days, the com- 
missariat was administered by the Quartermaster General's 
department. 

In every part of the State there was an excitement and bustle such 
as never had been known. Personal ambition and local pride and 
rivalry added their stimulus to the painfully vagne promptings of 
patriotism. For the first time in half a century this sentiment was 
strongly aroused; we had been proud of our country's attractions, 
wealth and progress and! aggressively sensitive to all criticism of 
our resources, government, society, manners, etc.; but safe from 
foreign assault and in the conceit of our omnipotence and immuta- 
bility, our love of country had only a superficial expression and we 
knew neither its depth nor strength. TKere was much of pathos 
in the almost impotent rage of this passion when it was suddenly 

can boundary service from 1830 until he was appointed first lieutenant of 
the United States Cavalry, March 3, 1855. In July, 1861, he was commis- 
sioned lieutenant-colonel of the Second Rhode Island Volunteers, and as 
such participated in all the early engagements of the Army of the Potomac, 
until his promotion to the command of a division of the Sixth corps, and as 
such saw much active service in the Shenandoah Valley. For gallant and 
meritorious services at the Opequon, Fishers Hill and Middletown, Va., he 
received several brevets, including that of major-general. In July, i866, he 
was presented with a sword by his native State for gallant services in the 
battle of the Wilderness, Cedar Creek and Petersburg. He was retired the 8th 
of May, 1897, as major-general of the United States Army. 
*See Appendix B. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 19 

aroused by the assault upon Fort Sumter; the reverberations of 
those guns sent a tremor to every true heart in the North and crys- 
taUized there the diluted and solvent sentiment of patriotism. Men, 
women and children with feverish ardor sought some means of 
expressing this newly roused passion which for a while over- 
whelmed all other feelings and interests. The starry flag of the 
Union was everywhere displayed and within a week or two every 
yard of bunting of appropriate hues in the country was exhausted. 
The old familiar airs, "Yankee Doodle", "Hail Columbia", etc., 
had a new and thrilling significance that brought tejfrs to the eye 
and tremors to the voice. But all this enthusiasm and exaltation 
lacked the depth, the sincerity and tenacity that defeat, deferred 
hope, suffering, death and affliction subsequently breathed into it. 
The first ebullitions of patriotic fervor were somewhat frothy, and 
as will be hereafter noted it affected the character of the first levies 
of troops from this State. 

The board of State officers advertised for proposals to furnish 
uniforms and equipments which were to accord with those pre- 
scribed by the State regulations for the militia. It consisted of a 
jacket of dark army-blue cloth, cut to flow from the waist and to 
fall four inches below the belt; trousers of light army-blue cloth; 
overcoat of same, patterned after that of the United States Infantry; 
a fatigue cap of dark blue cloth, with a waterproof cover having a 
cape attached; two flannel shirts; two pair of flannel drawers; two 
pair of woolen socks,- one pair of stout cowhide pegged shoes and 
one double Mackinac blanket. 

The first opportunity that the women found for a practical dis- 
play of their patriotic ardor was in making a gratuitous addition 
to this uniform in the shape of a white linen cap-cover with large 
cape attached falling over the shoulders. Such a headgear had 



20 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

been used by the English troops in India and was called a " Have- 
lock " after that celebrated general. It was thought our boys would 
need them under the fervid rays of the Southern sun, and sewing 
societies were organized that soon produced an ample supply, but 
I do not think they were much used by our troops. The women 
soon found an occupation more necessary, if less pleasant, in the 
preparation of lint and bandages for use in field and hospital. 

The sudden demands by both general and state governments for 
military supplies soon exhausted the stocks on hand and much dif- 
ficulty was met in procuring uniforms and blankets. Messrs. 
Brooks Brothers of New York city made a contract to furnish 
12,000 sets of uniforms, consisting of jacket, trousers and overcoat, 
at $19.50 per uniform. In filling this contract and finding the sup- 
ply of army kerseys exhausted, they substituted other materials 
which proved in active service to be so inferior that great com- 
plaints were made and much scandal arose. It was at this time that 
we began to apprehend the meaning of the word " shoddy " which 
had recently come in vogue. It appeared that the 7,300 poor uni- 
forms had been made of gray satinet of poor quality and the gar- 
ments had been shabbily trimmed and sewn. The Military Board 
wrestled with this matter for some time and made formal inquiries 
that disclosed great indifference on the part of the contractors. It 
was further shown that four citizens of New York, of high character 
for integrity, who were selected by General Arthur to inspect these 
uniforms, namely, Wilson G. Hunt, George Opdyke, Charles Buck- 
ingham and John Gray, had given certificates of inspection after 
a most cursory and inadequate examination. The result was that 
Brooks Brothers furnished 2,350 additional uniforms to make good 
their deficiencies. The contracts made by the Military Board for 
army supplies gave cause for some scandals regarding the State 



War of the Rebellion Series. 21 

Treasurer, Dorsheimer, and Attorney General, Myers. Amid the 
mass of rumors and objurgations regarding the matter I never saw 
any reason to doubt the honesty of these officers. The desire to 
push the troops forward, the dearth of suitable materials and the 
general inexperience of all concerned would account for many 
defects without recourse to impugning personal motives. Never- 
theless these stories seriously injured the reputation of the officers 
named. 

There was great difficulty also in obtaining good blankets, and 
some of the specimens submitted were ridiculous mixtures of the 
coarsest wool, shoddy, hemp and cotton — I recall some that were 
actually dangerous as a source of slivers in handling. I brought to 
Albany as a sample a pair of five-pound blankets used by my wife 
and self on " the Plains " the previous year, but the contractors said 
they were unapproachable in quality in the market. 

There was not much trouble in obtaining the other clothing, or 
the leather accoutrements, and camp equipage, but the question 
' cf proper arms was a very troublesome one. Those that the United 
States had gradually accumulated in its arsenals had been slyly 
transported to the Southern States by the late Secretary of War, 
John B. Floyd, an ardent secessionist. The output of our armories, 
public and private, was then comparatively small — indeed one of the 
former at Harpers Ferry, Va., was dismantled in June, having been 
in the hands of the rebels since April. It was evident that recourse 
to the European arsenals would become necessary, and agents were 
sent thither by the general and state governments to purchase 
muskets, and speculators also repaired thither to control if possible 
these needful weapons and " corner the market ". It was not a 
very creditable enterprise — this trading upon the necessities of an 
imperilled fatherland— but the man who has the money-making 



22 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

instinct generally slakes his auri sacra fames without scruples. All 
through the war there was no quality that exceeded in intensity the 
avidity of the military contractor, whether dealing in materials or 
men. Some of these private transactions in arms resulted in great 
public scandals, notably one connected with supplies to troops in 
Missouri in 1861, and they certainly were a boon to foreign nations 
in clearing their arsenals of antiquated and condemned weapons. 
New York escaped these scandals and bad bargains ; so early, as the 
24th of April an arrangement was made to send Mr. Jacob R. Schuy- 
ler of the firm of Schuyler, Hartley & Graham (of New York) to 
Europe to purchase 25,000 stands of arms. Governor M6rgan wrote 
at the same time to Lord Palmerston, then the British premier, ask- 
ing him under the existing conditions of affairs in this country to 
sanction the purchases Mr. Schuyler was authorized to make. The 
refreshing simplicity of this letter is a notable illustration, of our 
ignorance and anxiety in those first days of warfare. Lord Palmer- 
ston doubtless consigned the letter to the wastebasket and conceived 
Governor Morgan's avoidance of our minister at the court of St. 
James as an evidence that the principle of " State rights " was quite 
as orthodox in the Northern as in the Southern States. Under this 
arrangement Mr. Schuyler purchased for the State nineteen thou- 
sand Enfield muskets which were issued to the two years regiments. 
About the same date of the letter to Lord Palmerston an applica- 
tion was made to Governor General Head of Canada for leave to 
purchase Minie rifles there, who answered that he was prohibited 
by law from allowing arms and accoutrements to be taken out of 
that Province. 

One of the minor incidents of this early period was the excite- 
ment at Troy over the discovery that a man, named F. W. Par- 
menter, in that city was making a bullet machine upon the improved 



War of the Rebellion Series. 23 

ordnance patterns used at the United States Arsenal at Watervliet, 
N. Y., where Parmenter had been previously employed. Upon the 
rumor that he was a "traitor" and was making the machine for 
the use of the rebels, a committee of citizens took possession of it 
and the matter was brought before the Governor and his associates. 
After much investigation it was concluded that Parmenter was inno- 
cent of treason and his machine was purchased by the State for 
$1,700 and subsequently offered to the United States. I cannot 
now recall its ultimate disposition. 

Although it was intended that the thirty-eight regiments raised 
under the State law should all be organized as infantry, some 
arrangements were made under the advice and direction of Major 
Richard Delafield, United States Engineers, to procure for the State 
some rifled Parrott field pieces, and sixteen such were finally received 
and I believe are still in the State arsenals, having never been in 
service. There were some ambitious young men who desired 
authority to raise cavalry regiments, but this was refused. 

The recruiting throughout the State was very active, and so soon 
as the proper number were gathered at any point, being not less 
than thirty-two nor more than seventy-seven persons, they were 
inspected by order of the Adjutant General, usually by some militia 
officers, under whose supervision was held an election of the com- 
pany officers, commissioned and non-commissioned, and with rolls 
and elections duly certified, the company was given transportation 
to the nearest of the three general depots. In the enthusiastic feel- 
ing of the day, the Hudson River Railroad proposed to carry all 
the State troops free and other roads proposed a considerable abate- 
ment from! the usual fares. Later this ardor was supplanted by 
strictly business views, but under the orders of the War Depart- 
ment a maximum rate of two cents per recruit per mile was fixed. 
As will be hereafter shown, this ra.^ was reduced in one instance. 



24 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

Upon arrival at the depots, these companies were sent to the 
respective barracks; at Albany these consisted of a large brick build- 
ing in the southwestern suburbs of the city, originally built for an 
industrial school, and to which were added sundry wooden struc- 
tures. The old city soon assumed the aspect of a garrisoned town; 
companies were arriving by trains or boat daily and proceeding in 
ordinary garb and unarmed but preceded by drum and fife, they 
passed to the front of the Capitol, and being there reviewed by the 
Adjutant General or some member of the Military Board, marched 
thence to the barracks. These finally proved to be inadequate, and 
my first official duty on May 28th was to select a camp for two 
regiments; after a survey to the north of the city, where nothing 
suitable was found, a choice was made of a plot on the land of a Mr. 
William E. Haswell, three miles south of the city,* and under the 
direction of General Patrick, assisted by the diagram in the United 
States Army Regulations, I succeeded in laying out the camp in 
excellent shape, being aided by my experience as engineer. The 
Sixteenth and Twenty-eighth Regiments were camped here for a 
short period and were the only ones at Albany ever under canvas. 
But it did not need tents to remind us of the great strife before us; 
the usually quiet streets were enlivened by soldiers on leave and 
officers, bright in fresh uniforms and bearing themselves with the 
air of heroes. A constant throng of visitors poured in and out of 
the Capitol' intent upon every shade of interest, personal or public. 

Governor Morgan was then in his prime; a man of great bodily 
vigor, a sound judgment, of large business experience and also in 
public administration, being then in his third year as Governor. At 
this period he was hampered by the act that conferred joint powers 
in raising troops upon several officers besides himself, and it was 

* On what was known as the upper river road in the town of Bethlehem. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 25 

not until later that he was enabled to display to the best advantage 
his rare executive ability. Though Governor Morgan was more 
able as a politician than as a statesman, he possessed those business 
qualifications that were most useful in his position in those disturbed 
and distressful times. Much of interest and value and also much of 
twaddle has been written about the " War Governors ", but it is 
undeniable that success in the great contest for the Union depended 
very largely upon the ability and disposition of the men at the head 
of the State governments when that contest began. In the value 
of the services thus rendered Governor Morgan was second to none. 
On April i8th Major Marsena R. Patrick, President of the State 
Agricultural College at Ovid, came to Albany at the Governor's 
request and consented to act as general supervisor of disbursements 
and auditor of accounts payable from the fund of $3,000,000. (Chap. 
277, Laws of 1861.) He was a graduate of the West Point Academy 
in 1835 ^i^d had served in the Florida and Mexican wars, having 
been in the latter contest chief commissary officer on General Wool's 
staf?. He was a man of great firmness and integrity of character, 
well versed in military affairs and having friendly personal relations 
with all the army officers. He had resigned from the army and 
been engaged in other business for about ten years. His advice in 
regard to the propriety of purchases on military account, form of 
vouchers and their proper certification and on all matters concern- 
ing the equipment of troops was invaluable. My father was assigned 
as an expert accountant to assist General Patrick about May ist and 
I was engaged as an additional clerk on May 27th. Upon my 
father's resignation on August isth to become a payrpaster in the 
army, I succeeded as auditor of military accounts, serving as such 
until January i, 1869, and thus becoming acquainted with all matters 
connected with the raising of troops in the State of New York 
during the whole war. 



26 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

General William A. Jackson having resigned the position of 
Inspector General to take the colonelcy of the Eighteenth Regiment 
Infantry, New York State Volunteers, Major Patrick was appointed 
to the vacancy on May 17th. 

Although seventeen regiments would fill the President's requisi- 
tion on the State, there was no thought of relaxing efforts to raise 
all of the thirty-eight authorized by the law. So early as April 22d 
Governor Morgan proposed to the " Military Board " that the full 
complement of 30,000 troops named in the law be organized at 
once, saying " it was no time to delay organization until the enemy 
is at our door", and his motion was unanimously carried. It was 
however very difficult to induce the Washington Administration to 
recognize the excess beyond the call. Secretary Seward's opinion 
that the war would be closed within a few months was probably not 
shared by the President and the remainder of the Cabinet, still 
there was a great reluctance to accept the generous proffers of aid 
that came from the people and the States. It is true that these 
proffers were to some extent extravagant and that some were im- 
possible of fulfillment, but the conservatism at Washington went 
beyond this. There was from the start a lack of confidence in the 
people, a fear that the burdens of the war would be deemed intoler- 
able.* The discontent and threats of the comparatively few copper- 
heads at the North were deemed of an alarming importance and 
these rebel sympathizers had the satisfaction at least of making the 
war cost hundreds of millions and thousands of lives on both sides 
that might have been spared had the Administration absolutely dis- 

* The fact tl^at the Governors were nearer to the people than the President 
and his official advisers in their isolation at Washington, will account in part 
for the greater zeal of the former in providing adequate military forces since 
they knew the prompt patriotic response the people would give to such 
demands upon them. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 27 

regarded their presumed influence. All through the war the people 
were far ahead of their rulers in this respect, and history exhibits 
no more signal instance of popular response to every appeal to 
patriotic endeavor than was shown by our people in those four 
years. The proffer of twenty-one regiments more than had been 
formally called for was not an illusory or irresponsible act ; the regi- 
ments were authorized by a State law that provided for their enlist- 
ment, equipment and support until ready for muster into the United 
States service, yet two weeks of earnest importunity were required 
before any favorable reply from the Secretary of War could be got. 

On April 29th Governor Morgan received a telegram from Gov- 
ernor Dennison of Ohio inviting him to a conference at Cleveland 
with Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania, Governor Morton of In- 
diana and Governor Yates of Illinois, and General McClellan in 
command of the Ohio troops. Governor Morgan could not attend. 
The result of the conference was unimportant. 

All through the month of May recruiting continued quite lively. 
On the 1st the enlistment rolls of four Canadian companies were 
received, but which could not be accepted. The lack of competent 
instructors in drill and tactics led to an application to Secretary 
Cameron that the highest class of cadets at West Point be assigned 
for such purpose ; but though the regular time of graduation of this 
class was anticipated, the members were assigned immediately to 
active service in the field. 

There now arose another disagreeable and prolonged controversy 
with the War Department. The call of the President of May 3d 
indicated three years as the term of enlistment, while the State law 
had provided for a term of two years, but the Secretary of War on 
May 3d accepted the whole force of thirty-eight regiments for two 
years. Three days later the Secretary telegraphed that three-years 



28 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

men were wanted, and on the isth wrote that it had been his inten- 
tion on the 3d to accept twenty-eight and not thirty-eight regiments 
and thus the whole controversy was reopened. Governor Morgan 
again represented the peculiarity of these regiments, raised, equipped 
and sustained under a State law and pointed out the great damage 
to the Union cause should it become necessary to disband ten regi- 
ments and have the State lose the moneys expended on them. It 
was not until June 12th that a definite order was given by Secretary 
Cameron to Colonel Wm. B. Franklin* to muster in these r^ments 
for two years. This long uncertainty caused many complications, 
some of which may be mentioned beyond, and one of them was the 
popular confusion concerning the respective militai-y jurisdictions of 
the general and State governments and the weakening of the author- 
ity of the latter. Among the reginnenlts organized under the State law 

♦General William B. Franklin was appointed to West Point from Penn- 
sylvania and graduated number one in the celebrated class of 1843, which 
contained such representative men as General Grant, Father Deshon, Gen- 
erals William F. Raynolds, Isaac F. Quinby, John J. Peck, Joseph J. Rey- 
nolds, James A. Hardie, Henry F. Clark, Christopher C. Augur, Joseph H. 
Potter, Charles S. Hamilton, Frederick Steele, Rufus Ingalls, Frederick T. 
Dent and Roswell S. Ripley. He served through the Mexican war as lieu- 
tenant of engineers, and as superintending engineer had charge of the exten- 
sion of the Capitol at Washington, including the new dome, until the out- 
break of the Rebellion, when he was appointed colonel of the Twelfth Infan- 
try and immediately thereafter brigadier-general of volunteers. May 17, 1861. 
He was engaged in the battle of Bull Run and held commands in the vicinity 
of Washington and its defenses until the spring of 1862, when he was placed 
in command of a division of General McClellan's Army of the Potomac, and 
was promoted to command of the Sixth Army Corps, and as such partici- 
pated in the combat at West Point May 8, 1862, action at Goldings Farm 
June 28th, battles of White Oak Bridge, Savage Station, Malvern Hill. July 
4, 1862, he was appointed major-general United States Volunteers, and took 
part in the battles of Cramptons Gap, South Mountain, September 14, 1862, 
Antietam September 17, 1862, and Fredericksburg, where he commanded the 
left grand division consisting of the First and Sixth corps. Immediately 
after the battle of Fredericksburg General Franklin was selected as one of 
the victims for the failure of that disastrous affair. Burnside claimed that a. 
number of his generals, who were strong friends of General McClellan, had 



War of the Rebellion Series. 29 

was the Eleventh Infantry, known as the " Fire Zouaves " and com- 
manded by Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth, who had attracted some 
attention the previous year by the exhibition of a Chicago company 
drilled by him in what he called the " Zouave " tactics, introducing 
some novel acrobatic feats quite interesting to view, but of little real 
military value. Our journals had often contained articles concerning 
the French Zouave troops, their picturesque uniform, courage and 
elan in battle, and insouicance and deviltry amounting almost to 
insubordination. Great interest had been taken in Captain Ellsworth's 
exhibitions, and in the ignorance of the day he was accounted such 
a military genius that he had no trouble in rapidly recruiting a 
regiment in New York city, particularly from among that mass of 
reckless dare-devils who largely composed the volunteer fire corps of 
that day. These were habited in one of the brilliant, picturesque and 

not given him proper support, and on this frivolous and whimsical accusa- 
tion General Franklin was relieved of command and for a time discredited 
by the national administration. He was then transferred to the southwest- 
ern department and took part in the expedition of Sabine Pass; he was in 
command of the Nineteenth Army Corps and of the troops in Western Louis- 
iana from August 16, 1863, to April 29, 1864; participated in the Red River 
expedition and the battle of Sabine Cross Roads April 8, 1864, where he 
was wounded. From April 29 to December 2, 1864, he was on sick leave, 
but when on his way to Washington in order to obtain a command from his 
old classmate, General Grant, he was captured by rebel raiders at Gun 
Powder Creek between Philadelphia and Baltimore, but escaped the 
next night, July 12, 1864. He was president of the board for retired and 
disabled officers from December 2, 1864. He was breveted major-general 
of the United States Army for gallant and meritorious services in the field 
during the rebellion. He resigned from the volunteer service November 
ID, 1865, and from the regular army March, 1866, having been appointed vice- 
president and general agent of the Colts Fire-Arm Manufacturing Company 
of Hartford, Conn., a position which he still retains. From January i, 1877, 
to December 3.1, 1878, he was Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut. 
Since July 8, 1880, he has been president of the board of managers of the 
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. He was appointed com- 
missioner^general of the United States for the International Exposition at 
Paris, October 20, 1889, and later became grand officer of the French Legion 
of Honor. 



30 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

preposterous garbs that were so attractive during the first year of 
the war. This regiment elected its officers and proceeded to Wash- 
ington without orders from the Governor as Commander-in-Chief, 
and it required much vigilance to restrain further endeavors to 
ignore State authority. 

The predilection for gaudy and unusual styles of uniform did not 
last long and during the second and succeeding years of the war 
the plain, serviceable and inconspicuous light and dark-blue kersey 
clothing was adopted without demur. 

The decision of the government to accept troops for a period not 
less than three years bore heavily upon certain of our militia regi- 
ments that had been delayed in their equipment or in their recruit- 
ing to full ranks. These regiments expected to be accepted for 
three months on the same terms as those mentioned on page 12, 
but the rapid organization of volunteer regiments made it inexpe- 
dient to accept any short term troops. Our Second, Ninth, Four- 
teenth and Seventy-ninth regiments of militia reached Washington 
too late to be included in the call of April 15th and they were mus- 
tered into service " for the war", which was subsequently construed 
as for three years. These regiments were renamed as the Eighty- 
second, Eighty-third, Eighty-fourth and Seventy-ninth Regiments 
Infantry, New Ydrk State Volunteers. Their unexpected extension 
of service was very embarrassing to many of the privates and non- 
commissioned officers, who left homes and business with the expec- 
tation of a three months' absence only. My youngest brother had 
enlisted as a private in the Ninth Militia, presumptively for that 
short period and was quite disconcerted to find himself bound to 
serve " for the war". 

The military forces of the United States had been limited to the 
regular army and to the militia and so continued up to March, 1863. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 31 

The volunteers were considered a part of the militia ; the two years' 
regiments from New York were expressly designated as militia in 
the law that authorized their organization. They were thus subject 
to the provisions of the United States Constitution " reserving to 
the States the appointment of the officers " of the militia. By the 
Constitution of the State of New York all company, field and gen- 
eral officers below the rank of major-general were elective, the 
major-generals being appointed by the Governor. In times of 
peace this method of selection is not very objectionable ; the officers 
are usually elected from those having some experience in the ser- 
vice, and if this is lacking they obtain it after election without any 
great risk to the general welfare or to the comfort and safety of 
their commands. It is also probable that this democratic method of 
selection is essential to the very existence of our organized militia 
in the form of uniformed companies and regiments. It was not 
however a successful method in these thirty-eight regiments, except 
as aiding their rapid recruiting and as not introducing any new 
principle at a time when it was deemed of prime importance not to 
shock public sentiment in the sUghtest degree. The officers elected 
were not examined as to competency or conditioned in any respect; 
they were commissioned without question. The result was that 
about two-thirds of these officers failed to serve their full term of 
two years, having been discharged or having resigned/ in the mean- 
time ; at least one-third of them resigned within the first six months. 
These results were not wholly attributable to the mere fact of elec- 
tion; the qualities that are most efficient in recruiting soldiers are 
gienerally those least desirable in their commanders. The good 
nature, sociable, easy manners, good-fellowship and other such traits 
as attract the great mass of mankind are generally incompatible with 
the power to enforce subordination and discipline. This failure in 



32 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

active service of those officers most successful in recruiting was 
not confined to these early regiments but obtained in all the subse- 
quent levies where commissions were conferred upon inexperienced 
men who had simply recruited the requisite number of privates. 
Of course the least qualified of these officers, sooner or later, 
" dropped out " in the field, but it was an expensive process in 
many ways. While such officers did remain in command their men 
suffered through their inefficiency, and the injurious results con- 
tinued in force after they had resigned or been discharged. To the 
foreign critic the greatest defect in our volunteer armies was the 
laxity of discipline, and it is doubtful if this were wholly counter- 
balanced by the higher intelligence or motives of our troops as 
compared with those of European armies. 

Not only were these unversed officers unable to properly dis- 
cipline, drill and instruct their men, or to conduct and maneuvre 
them in the field, but with few exceptions they were ignorant as to 
all matters touching the health and comfort of the' men under their 
charge. There were among their number, men who had had some 
training or had the ability to quickly acquire the requisite knowledge 
and to enforce military discipline, and as the' " law of survival, etc.," 
operated these were recognized, promoted or transferred to other 
commands. From these thirty-eight regiments about twenty brig- 
adier generals were selected and some of these again promoted to 
be major generals. 

In harmony with the general plan adopted, General John A. Dix 
had been appointed major general and on May 17th a General 
Order (No. 41) was issued by Adjutant General Read, organizing 
the First Division of State Volunteers under command of General 
Dix, to consist of two brigades and directing General Dix to hold 
an election for brigadier general of each brigade by the field officers 



War of the Rebellion Series. 33 

therein respectively. This brought about a distinct collision between 
the State and General Government, in which the former had the 
right and the latter the victory. There can be no doubt but that 
all the volunteers accepted from the States were so accepted as 
militia, and that as such the appointment of their officers was 
reserved to the States and so exercised as to regimental officers up- 
to the end of the war. There can be no doubt but that the authority 
of appointment reserved to the States extended to general officers 
also." It was however seen at an early day that this jyas one of the 
points where strict adherence to the text of the Constitution must 
give way to the supreme safety of the nation. All through the war 
it was apparent that there must be a certain elasticity of construction 
and perhaps a certain disregard of the text of the Constitution, if 
the union of the States was to be preserved. It was fortunate that 
the cases where such a strain wa's necessary were very few, since 
infrequent as they were they gave a coherence to the hollow and 
despicable clamor of the " Copperheads " during the struggle, and 
have since encouraged a tendency toward centralization in our 
governmental system that is fraught with evil possibilities. 

It was evident that if the troops of each State were organized into 
brigades and divisions commanded by generals elected by these 
constituencies and commissioned by the State authority, the control 
of them by the general administration would be seriously weakened. 
The several armies instead of being each a compacted force would 
represent mere localities, while the jealousies and rivalries between 
the several brigades and divisions would be shared by their respec- 
tive States and counteract the closer union that the war was con- 
ducing to. There would have been repeated the weakness of the 
allied armies of the old German Empire, when a score of potentates 
furnished their distinct quotas. In general orders from the War 
3 



34 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

Department issued May 4th, giving the plan of organization of the 
volunteer forces called into the service of the United States by the 
President, it was announced that the general officers and their staffs 
(except aides-de-camp) would be appointed by the President with 
the advice and consent of the Senate. This assumption of authority 
caused much discussion and even alarm on the part of patriotic 
men, who feared that it was the precursor of such encroachments 
by the central government as would in the end destroy our federal 
system as originally constructed under the Constitution. The vast 
increase of patronage by the President was also represented and 
by some it was held that the States would resent such a deprivation 
of their constitutional rights. On the other hand some attempts 
were made to show that the volunteers were not a part of the militia 
and therefore that the constitutional reservation to the States did 
not apply to their officers. I was much interested in this discussion 
and finally became convinced that these troops were a part of the 
militia; the Constitution gives Congress the power " to raise and 
support armies " and " to provide for calling forth the militia to 
execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel 
invasions," and these are the only powers granted to the United 
States in regard to land forces. The violation of the laws of the 
Union and the insurrection by the Southern States strongly indi- 
cated a resort to the militia, and the result was that while the 
increase of the regular army was almost inappreciable, there were 
millions of volunteer militiamen engaged in suppressing the 
rebellion. The very fact that the appointment of all regimental 
officers was left with the States indicates the nature of the force. 
It was plainly an exigency when the rigid lines of the Constitution 
had to swerve in the interests of self preservation. There was now 
quoted the old axiom, soon to become trite, " inter arma silent leges." 



War of the Rebellion Series. 35 

The Governor had appointed as major generals of the State 
volunteers, John A. Dix and James S. Wadsworth, and Lieutenant 
Governor Campbell was sent to Washington to procure their recog- 
nition, but the President through Secretary Cameron, announced 
his irrevocable determination to appoint general officers, and not 
to accept troops under any other conditions. 

So rapid were the enlistments for these first regiments that the 
entire number of 30,000 men was accepted within three weeks from 
the first call, and on May 7th the Governor issued a general order 
announcing such consummation and that no additional force could 
be accepted, and advising that " no further expenditure of time or 
means may be needlessly incurred by the patriotic citizens of the 
State in further efforts for organization." The members of the 
Military Board were not unanimous in approval of such an 
announcement. Mr. Jones, Secretary of State, insisted that in view 
of the probability that troops would be required beyond existing 
calls, it would be bad policy to discourage or disband any organi- 
zations, and that It was not wise to weaken, any patriotic endeavor. 
However, these irregular organizations were being recruited with-, 
out the authority of the State, and the Board felt compelled to 
discountenance them. They were subsequently a source of much 
trouble to the State and Federal administrations. 

Before all of the two-years regiments reached the field, there were 
two tragical events in which some of them were concerned. Some 
allusion was made on page 29 to the Eleventh Reg-iment, known as 
the Fire Zouaves, commanded by Colonel Ellsworth; This regi- 
ment being on May 24th at Alexandria, Va., Colonel Ellsworth 
directed one Jackson to take down from the stafif on top of his 
hotel a secession flag flying there, and not being obeyed, the 
Colonel went himself to haul it down and was shot by Jackson and 



Z^ Annual Report of the State Historian. 

immediately avenged' by his men, who riddled the assassin with 
bullets. Ellsworth was the first victim of the war, and his body was 
conveyed with much ceremony for burial at his father's home at 
Mechanicville, N. Y. Although much was popularly expected of 
him, he was simply a drill-master, and so far as fame is concerned 
was fortunate in his early death, but that event made a marked 
impression that the war was a stern reality. This impression was 
deepened by the unfortunate affair at Big Bethel, Va., on June 
loth, where the First, Second, Third, Fifth and Seventh Regiments, 
New York Volunteers, were prominently engaged. General 
Butler, in command of the Union forces at Newport News, had 
intended to surprise the rebels under General Magruder, and the 
New York regiments were put in motion before daybreak, when 
there occurred such a calamity as might have been expected from 
troops and officers so green. The Seventh Regiment, under 
Colonel Bendix, coming upon the Third under Colonel Townsend 
in the dawn, mistook it for a rebel force and fired upon it, killing 
several men and wounding more. This iiasco gave the alarm to 
the enemy and so upset the Union plans that the subsequent attack 
was not only a failure but a signal disaster. Among the killed were 
Major Theodore Winthrop,* New York Volunteers, acting on 
General Butler's staff, and a young author of great promise, and 
Lieutenant John T. Greble,t Second Regiment, United States 

• * Theodore Winthrop was born in New Haven, Conn., September 22, 1828. 
He graduated from Yale 1848, and the following year went to Europe, where 
he remained until 1851. He was admitted to the bar in 1855. Then visited 
California and Oregon and made a survey of a canal road across the Isthmus 
of Panama. In the campaign of 1856 he was an ardent and eloquent Fre- 
mont orator. Before the war he had established his reputation as an author, 
but at the outbreak of hostilities he enlisted in the Seventh New York. For 
a time he acted as military secretary to General B. F. Butler, with whom he 
planned the attack on Little and Big Bethel, at the latter of which he lost 
his life while rallying his men June 10, 1861. 

tjohn T. Greble was a native of Pennsylvania. He graduated. from the 
military academy in 1854 and was assigned to the Second Artillery and as 



War of the Rebellion Series. 37 

Artillery. Although the whole affair in its dimensions and casual- 
ties was a mere skirmish compared with the great battles to come, 
it was in that early day an engagement of the first importance and 
the deaths of the two estimable young men above mentioned brought 
a chill to many a home where the son had put on the blue uniform 
or was preparing to do so. It gave a shocking realism tO' a contest 
that so far had been an ebullition of excitement without the dark 
shadow of sudden death on the battlefield to overcast it. It was 
the reaction from this that made us magnify the successes of 
General McClellan in the western part of Virginia, which, however 
important in themselves or as inspiring our hopes, were not such 
guarantees of military qualities as were assumed. 

By the end of June the thirty-eight regiments authorized by the 
State law were in the field; nineteen from the New York depot, 
nine from the Albany and ten from the Elmira depot. Their 
organization was that of the regular army with some tincture of 
the old militia forms and nomenclature. Reference has been made 
to the term " ensign " for second lieutenant; the assistant regimental 
surgeon was termed " surgeon's mate; " both these were afterwards 
given the regular title. Surgeon General Samuel O. Vander Poel 
exhibited high administrative qualities, both in regard to the exami- 
nation of recruits and their sanitary conditions in barracks, and also 
in the selection of surgeons and their mates. Of course through 
inexperience these matters fell short of what was subsequently 
accomplished. Less than thirty-seven per cent of the medical 
officers of these regiments resigned or were discharged before the 
end of their terms, a very favorable contrast with the other com- 
missioned officers. 

first lieutenant covered the retreat of our defeated troops with the fire of his 
own battery at Big Bethel. He was killed June 10, 1861, aged 27 years. For 
the service he rendered in this engagement he was brevetted captain, major 
and lieutenant-colonel. 



38 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

Each regiment was entitled to a chapliin, and all but one or two 
took one to the field, though many did not retain them. It was a 
fact that some of these chaplains were frauds, not being even 
ordained ministers, but rollicking acquaintances of the officers or 
newspaper reporters who sought this easy and well paid position 
in order to have favorable opportunities for reportorial observation. 

Each regiment also had a paymaster to pay the troops and officers 
while in the State service and not accompanying them to the field. 
Paymaster General Thomas B. Van Buren was not a good business 
manager and the pay-rolls were the most confusing and difficult 
of the vouchers that I examined. 

Considering all things, I think the supplies for these troops were 
of fair quality, and their commissariat while in barracks was well 
selected and managed. I kept at general headquarters a running 
account of military property, crediting the contractors with all 
deliveries to the quartermaster and ordnance departments, and 
those departments with their issues to the troops. There was 
great difficulty in having all these issues conducted in accordance 
with the army regulations, which were unknown and even 
unattainable to the great mass of officers concerned. In the subse- 
quent adjustment of accounts between the State and general 
governments many defects and omissions in the forms had to be 
disregarded. 

Though neither John A. Dix nor James S. Wadsworth, who had 
been appointed by. the Governor as major generals of these troops, 
was recognized as such by the United States authorities, (general 
Dix was appointed major general of volunteers with rank from May 
i6th by the President, and General Wadsworth* was appointed a 

* James Samuel Wadsworth was born at Geneseo, N. Y., October 30, 1807. 
He was educated at Harvard and studied at the Albany Law School, com- 



War of the Rebellion Series. 39 

brigadier general of volunteers with rank from August 9th, so that 
both these accomplished gentlemen entered the active service. 

I had official opportunities to acquaint myself with the character 
of all the successive levies for the service made in New York and 
found them naturally affected in character by the changing con- 
ditions and spirit of the times. These first regiments werg raised 
during the foaming excitement of the early days when it was 
generally thought that the war would be concluded within a few 
months, and its serious aspects of privation, discomfort, danger, 
suffering and death were scarcely contemplated, ft was to be a 
picnic on a grand scale, with brass buttons, tinsel, silk banners and 
music to enliven it, and the fun to be hallowed by its patriotic pur- 
pose. The adventurous and frolicsome were attracted while the 
apparently temporary needs of the country did not demand any 

pleting his course with Daniel Webster. He never practiced his profession, 
however, but devoted his time exclusively to the management of his vast 
estates in Livipgston county, which amounted to 15,000 acres. In 1852 he 
was elected president of the State Agricultural Society, with which up to the 
time of his death he was conspicuously identified. He supported the Free 
Soil party in 1848, but was a presidential elector on the Republican ticket 
1856 and i860. He was a delegate to the peace convention in Washington in 
1861, and at the beginning of the war was one of the first men who was 
willing to surrender the comforts of a luxurious home to the deprivations 
and suflferings of the field. When communication with Washington was sus- 
pended, he- chartered two ships at his own expense, loaded them ^with provi- 
sions and accompanied them to Annapolis. He was at the battle of Bull Run 
as volunteer aide to General McDowell. March 15, 1862, he was appointed 
fliiKtary governor of the District of Columbia. That fall he was the unsuc- 
cessful candidate for Governor of New York, nominated by the Republicans. 
He took part in the battle of Fredericksburg as a division commander and 
displayed great military judgment. At Gettysburg his division was the first 
to engage the enemy and his losses aggregated 2,400 out of '^4,000 
men. He was one of the few generals who voted in favor of pursuing the 
enemy after Pickett's disastrous charge on the 3d of July. On the reorgan- 
ization of the Army of the Potomac he was assigned to the command of the 
fourth division of the Fifth Corps, which constituted part of his old com- 
mand. May 6, 1864, at the battle of the Wilderness, he was shot in the head 
and lingered for two days. 



40 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

sacrifice from the steady and thoughtful men, who had other 
responsibilities upon them. There were some few who, foreseeing 
the deadly character, if not the duration of the strife, put aside all 
business, social and domestic claims and entered ^the ranks or 
accepted commissions in April and May, 1861. The greater num- 
ber, 'however, did not expect or were not prepared for the stem 
ordeal of defeat, delay, suspense and painful toil that awaited them. 
But when these regiments were later subjected to drill and to 
the discharge of everyday duties and were seasoned by skirmishes 
and battles, by yictories and defeatg^they rendered good service and 
sustained the honor of the State. 

When the levy was completed there was a large number of 
enlisted men in detached companies and other fragmentary organi- 
zations throughout the State, which subsequently became part of 
the second levy, though the actual recruitment should be credited 
to the first levy. 



No. 2. 
SECOND LEVY- JULY J, J86I, TO MARCH 3J, 1862. 



BY the 1st of July all of the thirty-eight regiments jaised under 
the State law had been mustered into the United States 
service and had been despatched to the seat of war. There remained 
the settlement of many accounts for materials and service, and these 
under the general direction of General Patrick were carefully 
audited and paid mostly within a month's time. The Military Board 
continued its sessions, which were largely engrossed by attempts 
to fix or evade the responsibility for the inferior uniforms accepted 
under the contracts. As before said, I have never believed that any 
of the members of this Board or any other State officers were 
corrupt in these transactions. The failure to secure the best 
clothing, etc., may' be fairly attributed to the extent of the pur- 
chases, the hurried manner of their initiation and completion and 
the almost absolute inexperience of all concerned in them. To 
this may be added the divided and personally vague responsibility 
of a cumbrous board which the Legislature had constituted through 
that jealousy of the " one-man power " of the Executive which 
has been so characteristic in our State governments. Within the 
board itself this jealousy raged and did further public injury. It 
was evident that certain military authorities could be far better 
exercised by the Governor alone as commander-in-chief than by 



42 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

this motley board, but on several occasions resolutions to confer 
such authority upon him were voted down. It is not strange that 
of the members of that board the Governor alone retained his 
political influence. 

About the middle of the month, Attorney ' General Myers and 
Treasurer Dorsheimer, as a committee of the board, visited the 
regiments -about Washington and reported certain deficiencies in 
equipment which were repaired. 

I can recall vividly those three first weeks in July which foUow.ed 
our engrossment in military preparation. There was nothing very 
exciting going on in the field; General McClellan continued' his 
several successes in Virginia and defeated tlie rebels in an engage- 
ment at Carricks Ford on July 12, thus clearing Virginia west 
of the Blue Ridge. These events were cheerful, but their larger 
importance was in the establishment of McClellan!s fame that led 
to his subsequent promotion as general-in-chief. Tlie concentra- 
tion of troops about Washington under General^McDowell was the 
most significant event, and we how believed that city safe and the 
suppression of the rebellion certainly at hand. Our Albany officials 
were mostly strong partisans of Secretary Seward and probably 
imbibed his optimistic opinion that the contest would npt exceed 
a few months. We underlings, whose retention in service depended 
upon continued hostilities, met in the Adjutant-General's office in 
those summer evenings and discussed the probabilities of early, dis- 
missal and the need of searching for employment. Daily in my 
own office in the southeastern corner of the second story of that old 
capitol I sat by the windows looking out upon the trees and lawn, 
meditating what means of livelihood I should adopt when the brief 
rebellion collapsed. I was a type of so many others soon to be 
stricken and shocked. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 43 

The papers began now to announce the early movement of our 
army upon the force of rebels massed a few miles west of Wash- 
ington, commanded by General Beauregard. I have mentioned 
that these first levies of troops contained some light material, the 
scum of patriotic ferment, the adventurous and thoughtless who 
viewed the contest as an exciting picnic. So now we heard of the 
Congressmen and others who were going to accompany our army 
in carriages, supplied with lunch baskets and wine, as if on a 
pleasure jaunt. What indeed could be more satisfactory and 
pleasurable than to see our valiant troops " bag " these ill-advised 
rebels? What could resist our army panoplied in the majesty of 
the Union, the power of the Right, the invincibility of Freedom? 
The war correspondents with glowing phrase — alas so soon to 
become trite and inexpressive — depicted the advance of the army 
on July 1 6th, accompanied by its hordes of non-combatants, mov- 
ing slowly as became its stateliness, its irresistible power. Since 
May 27th, when placed in command. General McDowell had been 
disciplining his troops as best he could, though as the larger portion 
had reached him within four weeks before his advance, the drilling 
had been meagre. We, however, had such absolute confidence in 
our cause that any such lack of preparation seemed very trivial. 
Day by day the papers gave us the picturesque incidents of the 
march with flattering prognostications of victory. Even our news 
on the morning of Monday the 22d was very encouraging, but 
about noon of that day dispatches reached Albany first that there 
had been a check and then the terrible announcement of defeat — a 
rout — a retreat— then in an exaggeration quite as vivid as that of 
our invincible advance came the intelligence of disorganization and 
panic, of the flight towards Washington, of a demoralized mob, of 
intermingled " warriors " and civilians crying " the devil take the 



44 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

hindmost", and of the probable capture of the capital. What an 
agonizing shock! At the first there was humiliation, shame, 
despair. We were still in the frothy sentimental stage of patriotism 
of those early days — quickly depressed, but fortunately as quickly 
recovering from the dejection. In a day or so, our thoughts were 
again bent on the future and the means to shape it. 

Now that we look back upon the war as a whole, the significance, 
indeed the fitting purpose of Bull Run as the first great link in the 
chain of events can be recognized. The panic of our troops was 
no stain upon our manhood; fresh, undrilled troops, many of them 
with terms of service about expiring, led by regimental and com- 
pany officers quite as fresh and uninstructed, did not in any proper 
sense make an army. We know now that the rebel troops were 
quite as panicky and disorganized and unable to take any advantage 
of the retreat of our men. The ridiculous features , of that rout 
can now be enjoyed — the capture of the picnicking Congressmen; 
the early retreat of the troops whose service expired in the midst 
of the battle and as General McDowell reported, " marched to the 
rear of the sound of the enemy's cannon." Such was the cowardly 
feat of a New York city battery commanded by Captain James 
Lynch, and it is a signal, evidence of the catholic charity and liber- 
ality of the Tammany party that less than four months later it 
elected Captain Lynch to the lucrative office of sheriff of New York 
city and county. 

The disaster at Bull Run convinced us that a single battle would 
not extinguish the rebellion, and that the majesty of the right must 
be sustained by well organized and trained battalions. We now 
extended the probable term of the war from six months to a whole 
year. 

Congress had on July 4th convened in special session ending on 
August 6th, the legislation being almost wholly military and fiinan- 



War of the Rebellion Series. 45 

cial. Provision was made for the calling of a volunteer force not 
to exceed five hundred thousand men, for an increase and reorgani- 
zation of the regular army and for the employment of the militia 
upon the call of the President. The first of these acts passed July 
22d, two days after the disaster at Bull Run, and under its pro" 
visions the President made an immediate call for volunteers, and 
Governor Morgan issued on the 25th a proclamation calling " for 
a volunteer force of twenty-five thousand men to serve for three 
years or during the war." 

At this time the three-months militia from this State had either 
returned or were on their way home. The volunteer regiments 
in the field comprised the thirty-eight two-years regiments organ- 
ized under the State law, the four militia regiments (Second, Ninth, 
Fourteenth and Seventy-ninth) that had been forced to enlist " for 
the war (vide page 30, supra) and eight irregularly organized regi- 
ments subsequently remanded to the State supervision, of which 
more anon; and three batteries of light artillery, a total force of 
about 40,000 men. Of this force there had been engaged at Big 
Bethel five of the two-years regiments (vide page 36, supra) and 
at Bull Run seven of the two-years regiments, viz.: the Eighth, 
Eleventh, Thirteenth, Eighteenth, Twenty-seventh, Thirty-first and 
Thirty-eighth, and one of the irregular regiments (subsequently the 
Thirty-ninth Infantry) were engaged, but the aggregate casualties 
in all these would not reduce the number on July 25th much below 
the 40,000 above given. 

Much care was given to the preparation of the general orders 
for the organization of the additional regiments, in which I had 
a share. Fortunately the Governor was supreme now, the function 
of the Military Board appertaining only to the 'two-year troops. 

General Order No. 78, issued on July 30th, provided for a regi- 
mental organization of ten companies as fixed by General Order 



46 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

No. 15, U. S. Army (May 4, 1861), for the regular army. The 
depots of organization at New York, Albany and Elmira were con- 
tinued.* When thirty-two volunteers had been inspected and 
accepted, they were authorized to elect by ballot a captain and 
lieutenant of the company, the remaining officers to be nominated 
when the company was completed. The field officers were to be 
appointed by the Governor, as commander-in-chief, and all officers 
had to pass a military examination before acceptance. It will be 
observed that so far as the company officers were concerned the 
plan of election by- the recruits was continued. There was still 
a general recognition that all the volunteer troops were a part of 
the militia of the State. Then, too, there was the advantage that 
this contingency of a commission was a great incentive to recruiting, 
and in every instance within my observation the person who 
enlisted the necessary number of recruits, received their votes for 
the office. Recruiting was in many cases expensive; though the 
general government reimbursed the officers for a part of these 
expenses it was usually the minor part only. The declination of 
the general government by general orders of May 7th to receive 
any further troops, had discouraged recruiting in the rural districts, 
as also did the organization in the cities of many irregular organi- 
zations which for awhile occupied an anomalous position, their serv- 
ices in many cases being accepted by the United States, into whose 
service the enlisted men were mustered, while the officers remained 
without commissions. Among these regiments were those included 
in what was called the " Sickles' brigade," composed of five regi- 
ments raised in New York, of one of which Daniel E. Sickles was 
the colonel (subsequently the Seventieth Infantry), and who was 
appointed by the President a brigadier general on September 

* See Appendix B. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 47 

3d. General Sickles and other officers connected with these 
regiments were contemptuous of the State authority, in the 
belief that they would be accepted as United States Volun- 
teers and thus be superior to the State troops. Of course this 
was absurd, since there were only three recognized classes of 
troops — ^the regular army, the militia, volunteer or drafted and 
mustered into service for three years, and the ordinary militia 
organizations called into service for short periods. There was evi- 
dently some looseness of opinion on this subject in the War Depart- 
ment since authorizations were issued thence to pers(5ns to raise 
regiments independently of the State authority, but such author- 
izations ceased after May 31st, and on September 3d general orders 
(No. 95) of the War Department directed all persons who had 
received authority to raise volunteers in the State of New York, to 
report unreservedly to Goyernor Morgan, and that all officers of 
regiments, etc., " raised in the State of New York, independent of 
the State authorities " could receive commissions from the Gov- 
ernor. Thus was fortunately terminated a practice that would have 
brought most embarrassing results. The conflict between the two 
governments in recruiting in each State, the jealousies of the 
officers and other complications would have been disastrous, irr'e- 
spective of the grave constitutional questions raised. Subsequently 
the colored troops raised in the insurrectionary States were termed 
United States Volunteers, but were in fact a temporary increase of 
the regular army. Sixteen infantry regiments were thus remanded 
to the State authority, and so far satisfied the quota allotted to New 
York on the President's calls. Many of these regiments were 
almost wholly composed of men of foreign birth, a fact amply illus- 
trated by the names of the colonels — as D'Utassy, Von Gilsa, 
Kozlay, Kryzanowski, De Trobriand, Von Amsberg, Rosa, D'Epi- 



48 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

neuil and Betge. Several regiments of cavalry and batteries of 
artillery that were being recruited under authorizations from 
the War Department were remanded by the same general 
orders to the State authority. The recruiting Under the latter 
authority was not very active during this period; the conflict 
between the two sources of authority had a depressing effect, 
and the disaster at Bull Run was not relieved by any successes in 
the east, while the defeat at Wilsons Creek, Missouri, terminating in 
the death of the gallant General Lyon,* on August loth, was fol- 
lowed about a month later by the surrender of Lexington in the 
same State by Colonel Mulligan. A month later (October 20th), 

* Nathaniel Lyon was born at Ashford, Conn. His granduncle, Colonel 
Knowlton, was killed in action at Harlem Heights. Lyon graduated from 
West Point in the class of 1841, and was assigned to the Second Infantry. 
He served through the Seminole and Mexican Wars. Was woiinded at the 
Belen Gate of the capital. For several years thereafter he saw considerable 
Indian service in California. He took part in the Kansas struggle as captain 
in the Second Infantry, and was stationed at Fort Scott when Sumter was 
fired upon. He was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers May 17, 
1861, and through his knowledge, energy, determination and sagacity Mis- 
souri was held to the Union. At the conference of July 11, 1861, between 
Governor Jackson and General Price on one side and Colonel Blair and 
General Lyon on the other, Lyon brought the proceedings to a close at the 
end of four or five hours by declaring: " Rather than concede to the State 
of Missouri the right to demand that my Government shall not enlist troops 
within her limits, or bring troops into the State whenever it pleases, or move 
its troops at its own will into, out of or through the State; rather than con- 
cede to the State of Missouri for a single instant, the right to dictate to 
my Government in any matter, however unimportant, I would " (rising as he 
said this, and pointing in turn to every one in the room) " see you, and you,' 
and you, and every man, woman and child in the State, dead and buried." 
Then turning to the Governor he said: "This means war. In an hour one 
of my officers will call for you and conduct you out of my lines." Subse- 
quently he captured the State militia at Camp Jackson, drove the Governor 
from the capitol and all his troops to the farthest corner of the State, held 
Price and McCullouch until the Union men had time to assemble, deposed 
the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor and all of the members of the Gen- 
eral Assembly. He was killed at Wilsons Creek August 10, 1861, aged 42 
years. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 49 

occurred the calamitous aflfair at Balls Bluff on the Potomac and the 
killing of Colonel Baker,* the Oregon Senator and soldier. A week 
or so later the capture of the forts at Hilton Head and -Phillips 
Island by the expedition under General T. W. Shernian and Com- 
modore Dupont gave us a valuable lodgment on the Atlantic coast 
and a depot of supplies and base of operations at Port Royal, S. C, 
but this achievement was not sufficient to encourage enlistments. 
These, however, steadily continued during the fall and winter, par- 
tially during the latter part of the time for regiments in the field. 

The militia Brigadier Generals Yates, Rathbone and Van Valken- 
burgh, who had respectively commanded the depots at New York, 
Albany and Elmira, under the previous call, were continued in com- 
mand, and each was provided with a full staff of assistants.! The 
War Department, by general orders (No. 58) issued on August iSth, 
proposed to establish near New York and Elmira camps of 
rendezvous and instruction for volunteers under the command of 
officers of the army, but these orders were never carried out; in 
fact there was too great a lack of such officers to permit such a 
scheme. So, early as April 26th, Governor Morgan had requested 

* Edward Dickenson Baker was born in London, England, February 24, 
l8i.l. At the age of five years he came to America. Later he moved to 
Springfield, 111., where he studied law and was admitted to the bar. In 1837 
he was elected a member of the Legislature. Three years later promoted to 
the Seriate; 1844 sent to Congress. He fought with great distinction at the 
head of his regiment during the Mexican War and commanded a brigade 
after General Shields was wounded at Cerro Gordo. He served again in 
Congress from December, 1849, until March 3, 1851, declining renomina- 
tion. The gold fever found him in California, where he at once took rank 
as a leader of the bar. In i860 he was elected to the United States Senate 
from Oregon. When Sumter, was fired upon, he repaired to New York and 
raised what was called the California Regiment, several companies having 
"been recruited in Philadelphia. At Balls Bluff he commanded a brigade arid 
iell mortally wounded. 

tSee Appendix B. "Headquarters, Depots, etc." 

4 



50 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

the Secretary of War to assign the West Point cadets of the first 
class from this State to duty with the regiments of volunteers as 
military instructors. The answer was that the early graduation of 
the first class of cadets was under consideration, and that if possible 
the Governor's request would be granted, but the scarcity of army 
officers might render it necessary to assign these cadets immediately 
to active commands in the service, and indeed this necessity was 
so overwhelming that these newly-fledged warriors were soon in 
high commands, even as colonels and generals, reaching in a few 
months the rank that was attained by few during life-long service 
in peaceful days. 

Adjutant General Read, who had been overburdened by his 
duties, both through bodily weakness and lack of qualifications, 
resigned on August 15th, and was succeeded by Thomas Hillhouse, 
of Geneva, late senator from that district, who proved to be an 
earnest and untiring official. 

By a letter on August 3d to Governor Morgan, the Secretary of 
War authorized him to make requisitions upon the various bureaus 
of the War Department for expenses incurred in the organization of 
troops under the recent call, and this letter was the basis for the 
subsequent adjustment of accounts covering a large aggregate 
sum, payable from the appropriation by Congress on August sth 
of twenty millions for the expenses of collecting, drilling and organ- 
izing volunteers. A large part of this fund was disbursed through 
army officers stationed in the principal cities, most of them being 
of that unfortunate number paroled when General Twiggs treacher- 
ously surrendered his army in Texas. These officers trained in 
the rigid requirements and formalities of the army, insisted upon 
vouchers and forms that most of the recruiting officers could not 
furnish, since they were ignorant of these requisites at the time 



War of the Rebellion Series. 51 

when their accounts accrued and could not repair their defects. 
These disbursing officers at a later day were more liberal and con- 
siderate, under orders of the War Department relaxing the strict- 
ness of regulations. An edition of the General Regulations of the 
United States Army was published by the State in June, 1861, for 
the use of its own officials, but very few of the persons engaged 
in enlistments ever saw it. 

There' was from the very beginning of the war a clashing with 
the regular military establishment. The militia, the volunteers, 
the State officials and the people, full of patriotic aspirations and 
ardor, eager each to do his utmost to aid their assaulted country, 
found their efforts hampered and entangled in the web of military 
formalism; this latter had its uses and value, perhaps never more 
strongly than in this period of dizzy effervescence, but it might have 
been, yet was not, tempered by a just discretion. The iron wall of 
military discipline and precedent would not yield even to the fervid 
importunity of patriots rushing to arms. The most exasperating 
of these army officers were those attached to the staff departments, 
particularly the quartermaster's. The officer in charge of that 
branch at New York when the war began was Colonel Daniel D. 
Tompkins, one of the assistant quartermasters general, who 
delighted in scolding, abusing and cursing the unfortunate volun- 
teer officers who had business with him, ancj in this respect was 
a type of many of his fellows. I recall a ludicrous incident in 
the autumn of 1862 when he was finally discomfited. The One 
Hundred and Eleventh Regiment Infantry (of the third levy), 
raised at Auburn, was commanded by Colonel Jesse Segoine, an old 
brigadier general of militia, noted for his bruskness and vituperative 
fluency. His regiment should have gone to the Army of the 
Potomac via Elmira and Harrisburg, Pa., as the shortest route, but 



52 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

Colonel Segoine for some reason wanted to pass through New 
York, and by the influence of his distinguished fellow townsman, 
Secretary Seward, got leave to do so. When he applied to Colonel 
Tompkins, at his ofifice on State street, opposite the Battery, for 
his transportation papers for Washington, that officer began his 
usual tirade, damning Colonel Segoine for h^ round-about route 
and objurgating in red-hot terms all volunteer colonels. The 
imperturbability of Colonel Segoine inflamed the irascible quarter- 
master, and he cursed until the air was blue and until, out of breath, 
he had to desist. Then the volunteer colonel began in a cool but 
stentorian voice to return the malediction, in such new and endless 
flow of execration that the old regular stood aghast and finally over- 
come by the interminable array of new phrases of denunciation and 
blasphemy he begged his master in Billingsgate and imprecation 
to go out and take a drink. When at our headquarters in Walker 
street we heard of Colonel Tompkins' ignominious discomfiture in 
the field of filth where he had reigned supreme there was general 
rejoicing, and for many days thereafter volunteer officers found 
the late truculent quartermaster quiet and even courteous in his 
official demeanor. 

The attitude of the United States authorities regarding facilities 
for recruiting was various; it was adverse in the difficulty or 
impossibility of obtaining reimbursement for expenses, so costly was 
it that only the hope of obtaining a commission gave encourage- 
ment. At first it was proposed to pay the enlisted men only from 
date of muster, but this was soon abandoned and payment made 
from date of enlistment, but even so late as June, after the minute- 
men from our militia had been several weeks guarding Washington, 
there was required some urgence to obtain their payment from the 
date they abandoned family and business to protect the threatened 



War of the Rebellion Series. 53 

capital. There were discouragements in the frequent decisions that 
no more troops were required, followed at intervals, by an urgent 
call for them; and the unsettled question as to whom application 
for authority should be made for several months disturbed the 
military mind. I have called attention to several New York regi- 
ments (p. 47, supra) composed almost entirely of foreigners, and 
by a general order of July 19th the War Department announced 
" in future no volunteer will be mustered into the service who is 
unable to speak the English language." There were many such 
foreigners ready for enlistment, generally Germans wifh a military 
training, and this injudicious order was modified on August 3d so 
as to permit the muster of foreigners into regiments of their own 
nationality. The order of August 12th that all regiments should 
be for a term of three years was a sound one, but it sensibly 
arrested enlistments. There was also some discouragement regard- 
ing the period for muster-in of officers, which, however, was modi- 
fied in September. The State General Orders of July 30th (No. 78) 
provided that the pay of the captain and first lieutenant of a com- 
pany might date from their acceptance with 32 men, and the United 
States Pay Department subsequently ratified this ordet", but it was 
not extended to officers of organizations raised under later orders 
who received pay only from date of their muster-in to the United 
State service. 

On the other hand Congress increased the pay of privates from 
$11 to $13 per month, but this additional $24 for a year's service 
could not be accounted an inducement. A beneficent arrangement 
under the law was made for the allotment of an optional part of a 
private's pay for the benefit of his family, such allotments being 
secured at the time of enlistment, when domestic attachment was 
strong and before the demoralizing effect of military life had im- 



54 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

paired it. These allotments served an excellent purpose, not only 
in aiding the support of the dependent families, but in preserving 
even in that slight form the' tie with home that might in many cases 
have been severed by absence and the degrading effect of warfare.* 
It was provided by the act of July 22, 1861, that not only should 
the volunteers receive the same pay, allowances and pensions as 
soldiers in the regular army, but ajso that a bounty of one hundred 
dollars should be paid to the widow or heirs of any volunteer who 
was killed or who died in the service. This was doubtless an 
inducement, though overshadowed soon by the increasing bounties 
paid at time of enlistment, and not after date of discharge, which 
in many cases would be post-mortem, like a life insurance. Another 
act considerably increased the army ration during the period of 
" the present insurrection," and a general order of August reduced 
the minimum stature of recruits from the standard of five feet four 
and a half inches to five feet three inches. The War Department 
also gave its attention to many details hitherto Ofverlooked, such 
as the record of evidences on which pensions might be granted, 
and to the interment of deceased soldiers and proper identification 
of the places of their burial. 

The State in August made an offer of a premium (miscalled 
" bounty ") of two dollars per man on every thirty-two recruits 
presented and passed at the depots; this was intended as a partial 
reimbursement of expenses, but it was found that the United States 
would not recognize nor probably refund such advances, having 
by law (§ 9, Act Aug. 3) abolished such premium. The State, 
therefore, rescinded its order on October 17th, but I cannot now 
recall the aggregate amount of these premiums. 

On August 22d, with the purpose of stimulating enlistments, 

* See Appendix A. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 55 

Governor Morgan issued a vigorous proclamation, appealing to 
the patriotism of the people arid urging the pressing necessities of 
the United States Government. 

The staff organization remained the same, except that Colonel 
Edmund Schriver resigned on September i as aid-de-camp to 
accept the position of inspector general in the regular army, and 
was succeeded by Colonel Thomas B. Arden,* also a West Point 
graduate; General Chester A. Arthur continued to act as assistant 
quartermaster-general at New York. Captain H. C. Hodges,t of 
the United States Quartermaster's Department, was assigned, to 
duty under the War Department letter of August 3d, already referred 
to, conferring authority on Governor Morgan to equip volunteers. 
At first the accounts under this authority were payable either by 
drafts, on the Treasury or by Treasury notes bearing interest at 
six per cent. This option was rescinded, however, on August 8th, 
and payments made by draft only. 

* Thomas B. Arden was appointed from New York and graduated from 
West Point in the class of 1835. He served during the Florida war; resigned 
December 31, 1842, and acted as president of the Putnam County Agricul- 
tural Society from 1831-1856. From April 26th to August, 1861, he served 
as an aid-de-camp to Major-General Sandford, New York State Militia, with, 
the rank of major in the defenses of Washington, D. C, and subsequently 
as aid-de-camp to Governor Morgan with the rank of colonel, acting as mili- 
tary agent of New York State troops in the field September 2, 1861, to Jan- 
uary I, 1863. 

t Henry C. Hodges was born in Vermont, graduated from West Point 
class of 'si and was assigned to the Fourth Infantry, in which he served in 
California, Oregon and Washington until the outbreak of the war, when he 
was appointed assistant quartermaster, with the rank of captain, and acted as - 
purchasing and disbursing quartermaster on the staff of Governor Morgan, 
August, '61, to January, '63, in clothing and equipping New York volun- 
teers. He was then assigned to the center grand division of the Army of the 
Potomac as quartermaster with the rank of colonel, and subsequently served 
as chief quartermaster on'' Major-General Rosecrans' staff in the Ten- 
nessee campaign, participating in th^ battle of Chickamauga. He was 
appointed to the various grades and to the rank of colonel, assistant quarter- 
tnaster-general arid was retired January 14, 1895. 



S6 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

On a previous page I have spoken of the many resignations of 
officers from the early regiments; the glamour of military glory 
was soon dissipated by the stern realities; some found themselves 
physically unable to endure the privations of the camp or the 
fatigues of the march; others failed in qualities of discipline and 
command, and a few were lacking in courage. On August 3d 
(G. O. No. 51) the War Department called attention to the numer- 
ous resignations of commissioned officers and the probability of 
their abuse, and on August 15th directed th^t no person who had 
resigned his commission should be again mustered in as an officer 
of another regiment. So, too, the discharges of enlisted men for 
disability were so numerous as to demand the most stringent meas- 
ures, not only by greater vigilance in the medical examination of 
recruits, but by the order that all men discharged for disability 
within three months from date of enlistment should not receive 
pay for any period of service. Discharge of minors who had failed 
to produce the permission of their parents or guardians, through 
deception or forgery, was also prohibited. In fact, the stern, inex- 
orable facts of war were being enforced and realized. The exami- 
nations of persons aspiring to be officers (under War Dept. G. O. 
No. 47 and State G. O. No. 78) had salutary effects. The State 
examinations were made by military officers and were not calcu- 
lated to secure any large degree of military knowledge or efficiency, 
but they did deter to some extent the application of conspicuously 
unfit men, particularly as they suggested that there might be fur- 
ther examinations in the field under more rigid conditions. 

Before taking up the incidents of this period seriatim the charac- 
ter of this levy may be reviewed in mass. It includes all the regi- 
ments mustered into the Unite^ States service between July i,. 
1861, and March 31, 1862. In this levy were included much mate- 



War of the Rebellion Series. 57 

rial similar to that of the earlier regiments, the adventurous and 
thoughtless; it comprised several regiments composed almost en- 
tirely of men of foreign birth, mostly Germans and Irishmen. The 
proportion of men of foreign birth in the Union armies has been 
absurdly exaggerated; they formed a very small percentage of the 
aggregate. From this State, where the influx of immigration and 
the large number of foreign residents in the large cities gave more 
than the average opportunities for recruiting from this class, I do 
not think the percentage exceeded ten in a hundred. Despite the 
military education of these German officers from this State, none 
of them reached the distinction of their Western counterparts, Gen- 
erals Sigel and Schurz. 

The Eighth Volunteer Infantry Regiment was one of the first 
of the two-years regiments in the field, and was commanded by 
Colonel Louis Blenker, who had been an officer in the German army, 
and I recall the ridiculous anticipations of his military career and 
the newspaper puffs showered upon him. In the summer of 1861 
Ave were made to believe that .Washington was safe because Blenker 
was there. He was one of the first batch of brigadier-generals of 
volunteers appointed by the President on August 9, 1861, but he 
never became distinguished. Julius Stahel, the lieutenant-colonel 
of this regiment, was made a brigadier-general on November 12, 
1861, and did good service in that rank. Prince Felix Salm-Salm 
was a major in the same regiment, and he and his wife were among 
the picturesque features of the Army of the Potomac. None of the 
German officers in this second levy reached the rank of brigadier- 
general. 

There were many military fantasies in this period. Colonel 
William A. Howard began to raise a regiment of " marine artil- 
lery," and I recall him as a handsome, plausible man with a breezy 



58 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

salt-water manner and in neat, semi-nautical attire, but I never 
could grasp the purpose or utility of his amphibious regiment, which 
he claimed would serve with equal facility on land and water. He 
never completed his task, and the companies raised were disbanded 
in March, 1863. Then there was the " rocket battalion," which was 
to use Congreve rockets, an " exploded " missile, but it never did 
so and was, at an early day, transformed into two battalions of artil- 
lery. One of the first irjfantry regiments raised under the Gov- 
ernor's call of July 25th was the Forty-fourth, called by the melo- 
dramatic title of " the Ellsworth Avengers," referring to the assassi- 
nation of Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth (see page 35, supra). It was' 
proposed that this regiment should consist of one representative 
from each of the thousand town^ in the State, and though this 
project was not fully carried out, many selections were made by 
towns. When this regiment left Albany " for the field " in Octo- 
ber its full ranks of stalwart men, marching down that grand ave- 
nue. State street, made a deep impression upon all spectators. 
During its three years it served continuously in the Army of the 
Potomac, being engaged during that period in all the battles of 
that much-belabored host. In the first levy there had been two or 
three infantry regiments clad in Zouave uniform, and in this second 
levy there were one or two more, being the last, since the United 
States was aiverse to the supply of anything but standard articles 
of every kind, since any exceptional type led to great confusion. 
The most fantastic, brilliant and outre of these uniforms was that 
of a proposed regiment of Zouaves attempted by a French officer, 
Colonel Lionel J. D'Epineuil, and largely French in its composi- 
tion (Fifty-third Infantry), but which was a failure, and was dis- 
banded March 21, 1862. Another regiment (Fifty-fifth Infantry) 
was given the same number as the French military regiment in 



War of the Rebellion Series. 59 

New York city, known as the Guard Lafayette.' This regiment 
was largely French in material, and was commanded by Colonel 
Regis De Trobriand, a well-known writer, who, in January, 1864, 
was made a brigadier-general of volunteers, in June, 1866, colonel 
of the Thirty-first Regiment of regulars, and is 'now on the retired 
Ust of the Army.* In the first levy there were no cavalry and only 
three batteries of artillery. The First Regiment of Artillery was 
mustered in on September 25, 1861, and its colonel was First 
Lieutenant Guilford R. Bailey, of the Second Regiment Artillery, 
United States Army. Colonel Bailey was a fine-looking, enthusi- 
astic and gallant young man and very popular when at West Point. 
He was killed in action at Fair Oaks, Va., on May 31, 1862. 

There had been much hesitation on the part of the War Depart- 
ment to authorize the raising or accepting of cavalry, which was 
considered the least desirable arrti 'of the service for a volunteer 
force; more costly and requiring a higher and prolonged training. 
The pressure of events overcome this reluctance, and nine regi- 
ments of cavalry from this State were included in this second levy. 
One of the earliest attempts in this direction was made at Troy to 
raise a regiment known as the " Black Horse Cavalry ,"f but its 
pretentious name did not aid it, since it was disbanded within four 
months, being mustered out of service on March 31, 1862. Tliere 
is a certain glamour of chivalry in mounted troops, and in those 
early days there was the more practical idea that this branch of 
' the service is less fatiguing. Thus there was a strong drift toward 
cavalry, the proportion of which was reduced, however, in our 

* General De Trobriand has died since the above was written.. His death 
occurred 15 July, 1897. 

t This name was probably borrowed from the popular designation of a 
syndicate of legislative lobbyists who had been successful in previous ses- 
sions at Albany. But why the secretive and insidious tactics of this body 
suggested the dashing onset of a " Black Horse Cavalry " is now difficult to 
explain. 



6o Annual Report of the State Historian. 

volunteer forces by the consideration that the occasions -woulcl be 
rare when mounted troops could be employed in mass. Our rough, 
wooded country, intersected by deep streams, particularly in the 
regions where the war was chiefly waged, prevented those grand 
charges of massed squadrons that greatly influenced and in some 
cases decided the Napoleonic battles. First Lieutenant Judson Kil- 
patrick, of the First Artillery, United States Army, was appointed 
lieutenant-colonel of the Second New York Cavalry, promoted to 
its colonelcy, made a brigadier-general of volunteers in June, 1863, 
and subsequently appointed major-general, and was one of tlie 
most conspicuous cavalry leaders of the war.* He was a signal 
example of the rapid rise of officers in that great contest. ' Two 
regiments of engineers were raised in this period, and subsequently 
a two-years infantry regiment (the Fifteenth) was changed to the 
same arm of the service. These regiments, largely composed of 
skilled artisans and officered by experienced civil engineers, ren- 
dered excellent service during the war in pontoon and bridge build- 
ing, dismantling and repairing railroads and in other operations, 
constructive and destructive. 

Including the irregular organizations remanded to the State 
authority, New York raised in this levy of three-years volunteers 
sixty-five regiments of infantry, nine of cavalry, two of. engineers, 
three of artillery and four battalions and nine batteries of artillery, 
all being sent into the field before April i, 1862. From the officers 

of these regiments twenty-three were promoted to be brigadier- 
/ 
generals. 

* The cavalry force during the war, both in the east and west, was most 
valuable in skirmishing and protection of the army flanks. It also by its 
rapid raids demoralized the enemy. In these directions mounted troops 
were employed by both sides. On our own side the most distinguished 
cavalry leader was General Sheridan, a native of Albany, N. Y. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 6i 

In addition to these troops there had been considerable recruit- 
ment of regiments in the service. On April i, 1862, the account 
of troops furnished by the State stood about as follows, inclusive 
of the recruits as above: 

Militia for three months in 1861 13,906 

Two-years volunteers in 1861 30,950 

Three-years volunteers in 1861-62 89,000 

Total 133,856 



This levy was the last one organized by concentration of super- 
vision at three depots and the first one under the sole and supreme 
control of the Governor. It was in many ways relieved from the 
difficulties attending the organization of the previous levy. Instead 
of the diluted responsibility of a military board there was the proper 
military supervision by a single officer. There was a more thorough 
and efficient organization of the staff departments and a larger 
experience in the details of recruiting by those engaged in it. 

Nearly all the accounts connected with the first levy, amounting 
in the aggregate to nearly $3,000,000, had been audited in the 
Inspector-General's office, and that experienced officer, General 
Patrick, had charge of all expenditures for supplies under the sec- 
ond levy, until relieved by the officers detailed to that service by 
the War Department in October (1861). All the contracts for 
these supplies were made by the Governor, under the authority 
conferred August 5th. There was kept in the Inspector-General's 
office by me a record of all contracts, of the receipt and issue of 
supplies under them and of payment on account. Under Adjutant- 
General Hillhouse's systematic supervision the personal records 
were greatly improved. Two hundred and six candidates for the 



62 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

positions of regimental surgeon and assistant surgeon were ex- 
amined by Surgeon-General Vander Poel. The general health of 
the recruits in barracks was much better, partly owing to cooler 
weather and more particularly to better arrangements and greater 
experience. At New York General Arthur continued to represent 
the Quartermaster's Department. 

During this period there were no great military events, though 
some at the time were regarded as of signal importance. On Au- 
gust 2oth General George B. McQellan was placed in command 
of the Army of the Potomac, the first page in the varied history 
of that body. Under his supervision the chain of forts encircling 
Washington was completed, and in a great camp of instruction 
were gathered the regiments then in that vicinity and arriving there 
from time to time. In defensive works and in the organization and 
drilling of armies General McClellan had no superior in our service. 
On the same day that he took command of that army there sailed 
from Fortress Monroe a joint naval and military expedition under 
Commodore Goldsborough and Generjd Butler, which captured 
Fort§ Hatteras and Clark at the mouth of Pamlico Sound, thus 
obtaining lodgment on the North Carolina coast that was never 
relinquished to the end of the war. These successes somewhat 
counterbalanced the defeat of forces in the battle at Wilsons Creek, 
Mo., when our commanding officer, General Nathaniel Lyon, was 
killed, the first officer of high rank lost on either side. The rebel 
General Price subsequently invested the town of Lexington, occu- 
pied by Colonel Mulligan of Illinois and his Irish Brigade, who 
surrendered on September 20th. Colonel Mulligan was at Albany 
a few weeks later, and I recall how we lionized him as a hero. I 
had been slightly acquainted with him at Chicago some six years 
earlier but lost sight of him after this meeting. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 63 

On October 21st occurred the disastrous battle at Balls Bluff 
on the Potomac, perhaps, considering the force engaged, the most 
disastrous battle of the war. Colonel Baker, the United States Sen- 
ator from' Oregon, led our forces and was killed before the end of 
the engagement, which comprised on our part a little less than 
2,000 men, of whomi at least one-half were lost as killed, drowned 
or missing. There were palpable evidences of mismanagement — 
indeed General Charles P. Stone was arrested and incarcerated in 
Fort Lafayette on this charge, and, though subsequently released, 
never recovered his position.* This second disaster on the Poto- 
mac, though not as important as the previous one at Bull Run, was 
very disheartening. Our Forty-second Infantry, known as the 
"Tammany Regiment," was engaged in it and lost heavily, and 
its colonel, Milton Cogswell, was in command after the gallant 

* General Charles P. Stone was born September 30, 1824, at Greenfield, 
Massachusetts; graduated from West Point July i, 184S, and was assigned 
to the ordnance corps. During the Mexican War he was attached to the 
only siege battery in the army. He served on the staff of General Scott, and 
distinguished himself throughout the campaign which ended in the capture 
of the city of Mexico. He resigned from the army November 17, 1856, to 
go in the banking business in San Francisco. To General Stone, more than 
to any other officer, is due the credit of saving Washington from falling into 
the hands of the insurgents in the spring of 1861. He was commissioned 
colonel of the Fourteenth Regular Infantry May 14, 1861, and brigadier-gen- 
eral United States Volunteers three days later; assigned to the Shenandoah 
Valley and commanded at the battle at Balls Bluff. He was selected as the 
victim for the blunders committed at that slaughter, and was incarcerated at 
Fort Lafayette, N. Y., February 9, 1862, to August 16, 1862, without charges 
being preferred against him. Subsequently he served in the southwest for a 
time, but returned to the Army of the Potomac and commanded a brigade 
before Petersburg in the latter part of the summer of 1864. He resigned 
from the army September 13th of that year and eventually became- attached 
to the Egyptian Army, where for " his valuable services in commanding, 
organizing and administration," he was decorated by the Khedive several 
times. He constructed the pedestal and colossal statue of " Liberty En- 
lightening the World," on Bedloes Island, New York Harbor, 1886-7. 
He died at New York city January 24, 1887, aged 62 years. 



64 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

Colonel Baker's death, and conducted the melancholy and deadly- 
retreat across the Potomac. 

On September 26th the President appointed Governor Morgan a 
major-general of volunteers, the only appointment of the kind that 
was made during the war. Governor Morgan accepted this posi- 
tion with great reluctance, and only yielded to the urgency of the 
President and Secretaries Cameron and Seward. The military 
importance of New York in many respects, and particularly as the 
source of armies, suggested the endowment of its Governor with 
every possible token of authority. On October 26th the War 
Department, by General Orders No. 92, created the Military Depart- 
ment of New York, under the command of Major-General Morgan, 
to whom all United States officers reported for duty within the bor- 
ders of the State. General Morgan subsequently appointed Captain 
George Bliss as his assistant adjutant-general and Lieutenant John 
H. Linsly his aid-de-camp. The former had been in 1859-60 his 
private secretary as Governor and subsequently was paymaster-gen- 
eral on the State staff. Lieutenant Linsly was. his military secretary 
as Governor. 

On November ist was announced the retirement from active 
service of Brevet Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott, then in his 
seventy-sixth year, having served over fifty years, in the last twenty 
of which he was in command of the army. It is not derogatory to 
General Scott's fame to say that the unique character of the war 
and his age and physical condition made his retirement necessary. 
It will be to his lasting honor that, though like General Lee he 
was a native of Virginia, he had a clearer conception of his alle- 
giance as a citizen of the United States, and never wavered in his 
loyalty. He died in May, 1866, having seen the Union fully re- 
stored. The same order that announced General Scott's retirement 



War of the Rebellion Series. 65 

published the, President's appointment of Major-General McClellan 
to the command of the army. He was in his thirty-fifth year when 
he thus began his interesting military career as' the general-in-chief. 
His past life had been in all respects creditable. As one of the 
military commissioners sent by our Government to the Crimea dur- 
ing the war there in 1855 he had written a valuable treatise upon 
the " Organization of European Armies and Operations in the 
Crimea," which was published by the Government. Resigning from 
the army two years later to engage in railway management he vol- 
unteered in the Ohio forces at the outbreak of the rebellion, and 
on May 14, 1861, was appointed a major-general in the regular' 
army that he had left two years earlier with the rank of captain. I 
shall not attempt to describe a career about which so much has been 
written and from such different standpoints. Whatever may have 
been General McClellan's defects or shortcomings, he in the end 
suffered most from that national craze of hero-worship that, pre- 
vailing throughout the entire war, was more frantic in its earlier 
period. This tendency was always capricious and unreasonable; 
feeding upon deceptions and illusions, it was quite as unjust in its 
adulation as in its condemnation. Some allowance must be made 
for the natural excitements of those days of peril and uncertainty, 
but it now seems strange that we believed such unfounded reports 
and were so readily deceived concerning the vices or the virtues of 
those in high position. I have mentioned (p. 57, supra) our faith 
in the invincibility of " General Blenker." For a year after the 
disaster at Bull Run it was generally believed that our defeat was 
owing to the intoxication of General McDowell, in command, who 
was represented as an habitual drunkard and anathematized even 
from the pulpits, and though the truth was that he had always been 
S 



66 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

a man of scrupulously sober habits, he never recovered from the 
effects of these baseless scandals. 

General McClellan attained the generalship of the army at a 
remarkably early age. His successes in Virginia, west of the Blue 
Ridge, had been accounted very brilliant amid the almost universal 
disasters to our cause elsewhere. He was a man possessing many 
elements of popularity in his personal appearance and address, and 
had the power of attaching firmly to him those near his person and 
to whom he gave his confidence. The task he had undertaken in 
the organization, or rather the creation, of a grand army, so far as 
drill and discipline could accomplish that end, was a work for which 
he was peculiarly fitted by his temperament and training. The 
national appetite for a hero was stimulated by our many reverses. 
We did not as yet appreciate the transcendant character of that 
patient, overburdened and faithful occupant of the " White House," 
who bore the responsibility of those dreadful days. General Mc- 
Clellan was the champion, the warrior-defender of the Union, the 
gallant chieftain who was to lead us to certain and early victory. 
As I have observed above, the conditions were all favorable for an 
exhibition of that hero-worship that as a nation we are so addicted 
to,, and in this instance the fire was fed by the foolish adulation of 
the hero's friends, who began to call him " the young Napoleon," 
and otherwise to associate him in the public mind with all the 
famous soldiers of the past. The newspaper correspondents with 
the army took up the theme and gave loose reins to their laudations 
and imaginations. Many of General McOellan's misfortunes may 
be fairly attributed to this universal folly and weakness. 

On Tuesday, November 5th, occurred our State election, which 
resulted in a complete change of all the State officers except the 
Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, whose terms expired over a 



War of the Rebellion Series. 67 

year later. None of the other members of " the military board " 
was renominated, and what was known as the " Union ticket " was 
elected by the unprecedented majority of more than one hundred 
thousand votes. The two prominent men so elected were Daniel 
S. Dickinson, as Attorney-General, and Lucius Robinson, as Comp- 
troller. Mr. Dickinson had been a State Senator, 1837-41; Lieu- 
tenant-Governor, 1841-42, and United States Senator, 1844-51; also 
holding other offices, all of them as a Democrat. In the division 
of that party he was a " Hunker; " but the rebellion had opened his 
eyes and, like Douglas and many others, he became an uncompro- 
mising Unionist, and was the competitor of Andrew Johnson for 
the nomination as Vice-President in 1864. Mr. Robinson was one 
of the Free-soil Democrats who had acted with the Republican 
party. He had been a member of the Assembly from Elmira in 
the sessions of i860 and 1861, was reelected Comptroller in 1863 and 
again on the Democratic nomination in 1875, and was elected Gov- 
ernor in 1876, being tHe first officer in that position to serve three 
instead of two years under the recent change in the Constitution. 
At this same election there was chosen a Legislature that in both 
bodies, particularly the Assembly, was representative in character 
and energy of the patriotic exaltation of that first year in our cruel 
war. 

On November 8th we heard of the battle at Belmont, Mo., on the 
previous day, where our forces were commanded by Brigadier- 
General U. S. Grant, this being the first occasion when that officer's 
name became generally known, a name thenceforth to be associated 
only with victories. Several days later General McQellan issued 
a congratulatory order (G. O. No. 99) in which he grouped this 
battle of Belmont, the recent successes of General Nelson at Pike- 
ville, Ky., and the reduction of the forts at Port Royal and capture 



68 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

of Beaufort, on the South Carolina coast, by the naval and army 
expedition under Commodore Dupont and General T. W. Sher- 
man. In contrast with the later and larger events of the war these 
seem to afford scanty material for a War Department cry of exulta- 
tion, but at that time we needed an encouraging tonic, and the 
order was of great value in its influence upon the troops being col- 
lected and converted into an army near Washington. 

General Patrick had believed for some time that his proper post 
of duty as inspector-general on the Governor's stafif was with that 
army containing the largest part of the troops from this State. 
There were many reasons why a representative of the State should 
be near the troops — the volunteer organization preserved the dis- 
tinction of States and appealed to State pride. All promotions to 
the company and regimental offices were made by the Governor, 
who needed unprejudiced information and advice as to the quali- 
fications or conspicuously good service of those in line of pro- 
motion; the presence of a State official of suitable rank would 
strengthen the home attachment of the State troops, encourage 
their esprit de corps and their contentment, while it also secured 
a prompt means of communication between them ^d their friends 
at home. Many other obvious reasons might be given, but Gen- 
eral Patrick was content with an occasional visit " to the front " 
until General McClellan began the work of organizing a grand 
army. By November ist there were over twenty regiments of 
infantry from this State in that body and many more almost ready 
to join it. General Patrick's relations with General McClellan were 
very cordial, and he had been at West Point with General Marcy, 
the father-in-law of General McClellan. He convinced the Gov- 
ernor that his place was now in the field, and on November 15th 
reported to General McClellan and, as he wrote me, was accepted 



War of the Rebellion Series. 69 

as a volunteer aid on his staff. It was a brilliant staff, and in addi- 
tion to the administrative officers comprised many distingfuished 
persons appointed aides-de-camp under the recent act of Congress. 
Aiftong these, with the rank of captain, were Louis Philippe 
d'Orleans (Compte de Paris) and his brother, Robert d' Orleans 
(Due de Qiartres),the former the Orleanist heir to the French throne. 
About the middle of November we heard of the "Trent affair." 
The Confederate government had commissioned Mr. Mason as dip- 
lomatic commissioner to England and Mr. Slidell to France. They 
got through our blockade and reached Havana and embarked in 
the British steamer Trent for Nassau, where they would connect 
with the regular line thence to England. Captain Wilkes, in com- 
mand of the United States vessel San Jacinto, overtook the Trent 
and forcibly took from it the rebel commissioners and brought 
them to Boston, where they were incarcerated in Fort Warren, in 
the harbor of that city, as " contraband of war." In our then ex- 
cited condition there was general exultation over Captain Wilkes' 
violent capture of the rebel emissaries. We had no idea of inter- 
national law, and we viewed this violation of it as a proper exercise 
of our right to suppress the rebellion. Almost without exception 
the public expression was jubilant and laudatory. But soon came 
the menacing echoes from England, the outcry against the violation 
of neutral rights, the rapid military and naval preparations and the 
prospect of a foreign war superadded to our domestic troubles. 
There was some foolish ebullition of defiance, but to the thoughtful 
the prospect was very threatening and almost fatal. In case of war 
with Great Britain the brunt would have to be borne by New York. 
Its long sea coast, its great vulnerable metropolis, its long boundary 
at the north, coterminous with Canada, and its important ports on 
the great lakes, were all points of probable attack or invasion. So 



JO Annual Report of the State Historian. 

soon as the intelligence of hostile preparations in England reached 
this country, we who were engaged at the Governor's headquarters 
recognized the gravity of the situation, and that under existing 
conditions our State would have to provide largely for its own 
defense. Indeed there were many official and semi-official intimations 
from Washington that the threatened safety of that city would re- 
quire the retention there of all the troops then near it, and that 
few could be spared from other quarters should there occur a dec- 
laration of war by England, as then seemed imminent — ^in other 
words, that we would have to take care of ourselves. This was a 
very serious consideration. Our organized militia, very feeble at 
the best except in New York city, had everywhere been weakened 
by the volunteering of a large part of its best element, since a 
considerable share of the officers in the new regiments had been 
drawn from the militia. There were several regiments within the 
State not yet completed, but they were comparatively few and at the 
best were raw and undrilled, and would count for little in a sud- 
den contest with the disciplined soldiers of the regular British 
army. So far as the approach from Cariada was concerned there 
was some relief in the imminence of winter, which would lock up 
the St. Lawrence in ice and make an invasion by land very diffi- 
cult. We were more particularly concerned about New York city, 
which, as the largest and most important of our commercial cities, 
would be the principal objective point of a hostile navy, and Eng- 
land was then the best equipped naval power in the world. Major 
John G. Barnard, of the United States Engineer Corps, had in 
1859 addressed a paper to the Secretary of War entitled " The 
Dangers and Defences of New York," in which he demonstrated 
the pressing need of stronger defensive works. There was in pro- 
cess of construction a great granite fortress on Sandy Hook, which 



War of the Rebellion Series. 71 

was to control the entrance to the ship channels leading into the 
outer bay, but this work was in a very incomplete condition, in 
fact scarcely advanced beyond the foundations. The great change 
in aggressive and defensive conditions since that day has led to 
an abandonment of the plans and materials of this work. At the 
Narrows there were two shore batteries and Fort Richmond, on 
the Staten Island side, and Forts Lafayette and Hamilton, on the 
Long Island side, but the armament both in number of pieces and 
in their caliber was deficient. As there were no guns at Sandy 
Hook, the engineers had decided that at least 300 pieces at the 
• Narrows should be so mounted as to concentrate their fire upon 
a vessel passing between them, but not half that number were then 
available. At Governors, Bedloes and Ellis Islands only three- 
quarters of the armament had been supplied, though it is now 
evident that a fleet that had passed the Narrows might disregard 
these inferior works and readily destroy the city. There were also 
no works at all to prevent the disembarkation of a hostile army in 
Gravesend Bay, and a repetition of the British advance from there 
in August, 1776. The eastern entrance to the harbor by Long 
Island Sound was defended only by Fort Schuyler on Throgs 
Neck, where only 95 guns out of a complete armament of 300 had 
as yet been supplied, while no works or guns had been prepared 
for the opposite shore of Long Island at Willets Point. In fact, 
the conditions of defence of the city were very faulty, and though 
the United States engineers had plans for completing the works 
and armaments so as to bring them fully up to the times, these 
would require years, and the dangers we were confronting were 
imminent. It was decided that shore batteries in earthworks might 
be hastily constructed to prevent disembarkation in Gravesend Bay 
and at Willets Point to further secure the natural gate at Throgs 



"72 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

Neck. As for the regular harbor channel entrances earthworks at 
Sandy Hook mounted with heavy guns would guard the outer bay, 
but as the Narrows were the real gateway to the upper bay and to 
such an approach as would enable the bombardment of Brooklyn 
and New York, there was a concentration of attention upon that 
point. Besides consultations with General Totten and Major Del- 
afield of the Corps of Engineers, the Governor appointed a com- 
mission of eminent civil engineers to cooperate with General Ai;- 
thur, engineer-in-chief on the staff, in devising some plan of defence 
at this point and particularly to consider the methods of temporarily 
closing the channel. This commission made an elaborate report 
in April, 1862, recommending the closing of the passage by a float 
of heavy timbers bound together by iron bolts and cables and secured 
by cables to the shores and anchorage.* In the imminence of our 
Trent troubles about half a million cubic feet of pine timber was 
purchased at New York in the latter part of December, by order 
of the Governor, at a cost of about $80,000, and arrangements were 
made for the supply of a much larger quantity.! The Governor 
also directed the purchase of 100,000 pounds of cannon powder, 
which was stored in the United States miagazines on Ellis Island 
in the harbor. Some attention was also given to the defences on 
the lakes and northern frontier, though nothing practical was 
attempted. Under the treaty of April, 1818, neither the United 
States nor Great Britain could have upon the boundary lakes^ includ- 
ing Lake Champlain, any naval vessels, except a single one on each, 
of small burden armed with a single gun. At the time of the orig- 
inal treaty it placed the two powers on equal terms, but since that 

* The cost of such float was estimated at $1,118,915.60. 

t The timber so bought was sold later at a large profit because of the great 
advance in prices of all commodities. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 73 

date the construction of canals around the several rapids of the St. 
Lawrence river and of the Welland canal, connecting Lakes Ontario 
and Erie, would enable the British Government to place upon the 
great lakes a fleet of war vessels at the very outbreak of hostilities. 
These canals had locks that would admit gunboats from the lower 
St. Lawrence river to Lake Ontario having a length of i86 feet, 
a width of 44 1-2 feet and a draught of 9 feet, or of 600 tons, 
and the Welland canal would admit vessels from Lake Ontario to 
the upper lakes having a length of 162 feet, 26 feet beam and a 
draught of 10 feet, or of 350 tons. 

Our Erie canal locks would not admit boats with more than 98 
feet of length, 17 3-4 feet width and 6 feet draught, or of less than 
100 tons. We would therefore have to depend upon fitting out 
the mercantile lake craft for naval purposes, and though I do not 
doubt that had the pressing occasion required such a recourse, we 
would have rapidly improvised an excellent navy on the lakes, we 
would still have been at a great disadvantage with our antagonist, 
who could have brought upon those waters its sea-going naval ves- 
sels of small tonnage. 

Such was the high pressure under which we served in those days 
that the whole question of coast and frontier defence was rapidly 
considered and the general line of conduct determined within a com- 
paratively brief period. The terrible emergency never came, and 
the threatening war cloud that had so suddenly gathered from over 
the sea as suddenly passed away, but none of those who partici- 
pated in the anxieties and discussions and bore a part of the respon- 
sibilities in those portentous days can forget them. Had the con- 
flict ensued we should have been in a terribly unprepared condi- 
tion, our harbor and frontier forts in bad condition, with very inade- 



74 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

quate armament for them or for our improvised navies, and with 
only a raw, hastily gathered militia to encounter the British regu- 
lars seasoned in the Crimea and India. With little aid from the' 
forces of the General Government, the menaced States would have 
had to depend upon such resources as each could gather within its 
borders and upon that peculiar American aptitude and inventive 
faculty that have so often responded to the occasion. As . an 
instance of the latter I recall a proposition made by an old Hudson 
river steamboat captain, as suggested by his own practical experi- 
ence. All the British naval vessels of any moment were propellers 
and our captain advised that all the many shad-nets owned along 
the Hudson should be gathered and arranged in the ship channels 
abreast Sandy Hook and Fort Schuyler on the Sound. These nets 
were to be both anchored and buoyed so as to float a few feet below 
the surface, where the propeller blades would entangle and then 
wind up the nets so tightly as to disable the propeller, while a 
reverse motion would fail to disengage these hidden obstacles. 
The captain said that on the Hudson, in the shad season, propellers 
were thus disabled every year and he would engage that the Brit- 
ish vessels would be unmanageable and kept within the range of 
our shore batteries until well perforated. 

During these exciting days the Trent " affair " was being diplo- 
matically treated, and the negotiations 'ended in the release of Messrs. 
Mason and Slidell on January i (1862), and placing them on a 
British man-of-war, which conveyed them to Nassau, thus restoring 
so far as possible the status quo. A perusal of the dispatches and 
other State papers in this notable case does not disclose any appar- 
ent settlement of the larger aspects of the matter at issue. The 
discussion revived among our people the vexed and painfully sore 



War of the Rebellion Series. 75 

questions connected with that " right of search " that England 
brutally enforced so long as our national weakness tempted it. 
There were those living who could recall the national feeling during 
and after the "war of 1812," and the avoidance of a fair settlement 
of this dispute in the treaty that ended that war. It did seem to 
the passionate and thoughtless that this right of search- was a very 
one sided affair and I think that the prevalence of this sentiment 
somewhat governed Secretary Seward in his negotiations. There 
was no direct break-down on our part, but a flaw in our case was 
conceded in that Captain Wilkes did not -papture the Trent as con- 
traband of war and convey it to one of our ports for regular con- 
denmation. However, the gist of the settlement was that passen- 
gers in a neutral vessel could not be forcibly taken from her by a 
naval vessel of a nation at war, even if such passengers were engaged 
in concerns affecting the interests of that nation. 

There was in the matter a plain reminder of the weakness of our 
Coast and frontier defences that has never been practically heeded 
and of which I may speak again. 

On January ist the new State officers entered upon their duties in 
the usual quiet way, except in the case of the treasurer, concerning 
whose induction into office there was an unprecedented and ridicu- 
lous opposition. Philip Dorsheimer, whose term as treasurer 
expired on that day, was a typical German politician, having the 
normal quantity of irascibility and obstinacy. He was rnuch 
irritated by the fact that he had not been renominated and held 
that Mr. Xewis who had been elected to his office having failed to 
file his official bond prior to January ist was precluded from enter- 
ing upon 'the office and that he (D.) was constrained to hold it. 
It was a veritable tempest in a teapot, and there was the scandal 



76 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

of two treasurers — Mr. Lewis, who was recognized by the new comp- 
troller, Mr. Robinson, and Mr. Dorsheimer, supported by Canal 
Auditor Benton. There was much fun in this official contention 
which fortunately for the public interests was settled by the decision 
of Attorney-General Dickinson in such strong terms as compelled 
the irate DoVsheimer to yield. 

On January 7th -the Legislature convened in a session remark- 
able in one respect at least, and that was in the almost absolute 
limitation of its action to public purposes and in the absence of 
jobbery. The immediately previous two or three sessions had been 
notorious for the corrupt enactment of New York street railroad 
charters and other like schemes — it was credibly asserted that what 
is known as " the lobby " was never before so well organized, so 
arrogant, so successful. For the previous half century the political 
corruption in our State had been largely confined to the adminis- 
tration, repair and enlargement of its canal system which had been 
the principal bone of contention between the two parties so far as 
touched our State concerns. The power of the Legislature to grant 
franchises for the horse railways in the cities, particularly in New 
York and Brooklyn, disclosed new and rich placers which were 
worked to their full extent. When I went to Albany in May, 1861, 
these corruptions were still discussed in spite of the distant but 
audible thunder presaging the direful lightnings of four years of 
war^ 

There were two reasons for this exceptional character of the 
Legislature of 1862, and for its purity compared with its immediate 
predecessors and its successors to this day. It was elected in the 
early period of the war when we were all exalted by the vivification 
of patriotism, and it performed this work while this exaltation was 



War of the Rebellion Series. 77 

bright and clear, as yet undimmed by the meaner motives and pur- 
poses that at a later date tarnished and vitiated it. There were also 
elected to the Assembly or lower house a larger proportion of pub- 
lic spirited, experienced and honorable men than had been chosen 
in recent years. Among these were Henry J. Raymond, the 
brilliant editor of The New York Times, who had been a member 
of the same body in 1850 and 1851, being its Speaker in the former 
year and was in 1855 and 1856 Lieutenant-Governor of the State. 
Calvin T. Hulburd, of St. Lawrence county, and subsequent mem- 
ber of Congress for two terms; Charles L. Benedict, of Brooklyn, 
United States District Judge since 1865; Lemuel Stetson, of Clinton, 
who besides other offices held by him was a member of Assembly 
in 1835, 1836 and 1842; Peter A. Porter, of Niagara, son of Peter 
B. Porter, who was Secretary of War in 1828; Thomas S. Gray, 
of Warren; Ezra^ Cornell, of Tompkins; Benjamin Pringle, of 
Genesee; Tracy Beadle, of Chemung; Royal Phelps, of New York; 
Benjamin F. Tracy, of Tioga, now* Secretary of the Navy; Chauncey 
M. Depew, who thus began his public career, and many others of 
similar high character, were among the members of this body, of 
which Mr. Raymond was elected Speaker. The Senate, while not 
containing so many distinguished men, was a highly reputable 
body. The Governor's message was largely occupied by questions 
connected with the conduct of the war, and these of course occupied 
a great part of the attention of the lawmakers. 

Theje had been for several weeks an increasing misunderstanding 
on the part of the Governor and Inspector-General Patrick. The 
latter said that he had been promised the rank of major-general in 
the State service and every possible aid and support in his project 

* This material was written in 1889. 



78 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

to represent the State troops in the field and carry out the several 
purposes hitherto mentioned (page 68, supra). My official relations 
to General Patrick as his acting assistant at Albany made me well 
acquainted with his grievances, though I was never satisfied as to 
the sufficiency of their grounds. He was a sincerely upright and 
honorable man, but better qualified to deal with military than with 
civil affairs. He was methodical, industrious and one of the most 
open and transparent characters I ever knew. I think that there 
was some secret influence operating against him either of a personal 
or political nature and that Governor Morgan was anxious to get 
rid of him, though I cannot believe that the Governor would have 
wilfully deceived him. The controversy was a very disagreeable 
incident to me, particularly as General Patrick, in his irascibility, 
wanted to appeal from the Governor to the Legislature at a time 
when harmony between those distinct authorities was more than 
usually desirable. General Patrick's appointment as a brigadier- 
general of volunteers led to his resignation from the Governor's 
stafif early in February and fortunately ended the dispute. He subse- 
quently became famous as provost-marshal-general of the Armies of 
the Potomac and the James. His successor as inspector-general 
was General C. A. Arthur, who was promoted from the position of 
engineer-in-chief. 

The recent danger of a foreign war suggested the lack of 
defensive preparations upon our part, and several legislative com- 
mittees considered this proposition, particularly in regard to our 
naval forces on the lakes. The subject most discussed was the 
enlargement of the canals and their locks so as to admit the passage 
of gun boats, and several reports were made on this subject. State 
Engineer Taylor reported that to convert the Champlain canal into 



War of the Rebellion Series. 79 

a ship canal would cost $3,750,000, and the enlargement of the locks 
on the Erie and Oswego canals so as to admit the passage of gun- 
boats of 400 tons would cost $3,500,000. Nothing practical came 
of this discussion, but it was obvious that time would be required 
for these enlargements that could not be spared in a sudden 
emergency. I made the proposition that it would be much easier 
to convey vessels from the Hudson to Lakes Erie and Ontario 
by means of the double tracked Central railroad; the vessels to 
rest in cradles supported by trucks running on each track with 
proper inclined planes at the Hudson river and the lakes for draw- 
ing out and again launching the vessels. This would require the 
substitution of temporary tressel-work bridges for such as had the 
track running on their lower chords and the temporary removal 
of the canal viaduct near Syracuse, but these constructions and 
removal could be simultaneously conducted and would occupy but 
a short time. Mr. Taylor thought my plan feasible and I believe 
it could have been carried out had occasion required. 

There was some talk of taking the partially constructed Stevens 
steam batte;-y at Hoboken and converting it into an efficient means 
of harbor defense. The Hoboken Stevens family had a hereditary 
interest in steam navigation through John Stevens and Robert L., 
his son. The former had rivaled Fulton in the practical construction 
of steamboats and had proposed iron-clad batteries; the latter had 
been commissioned by the United States government in 1842 to 
construct according to his father's plans, improved by himself, a 
floating iron-clad battery for the defence of New York harbor. 
Work was immediately begun upon it, but the rapid alternative 
development of ordnance and defensive armor interrupted its 
progress and finally appropriations were withheld. Robert L. 



8o Annual Report of the State Historian. 

Stevens died in 1850, and his battery about half finished was on the 
stocks at Hoboken when the war broke out. Our naval author- 
ities were disinclined to recommend its completion and the success 
of Ericsson's " monitor " naval vessels further diverted attention 
from it. After the war a final effort was made by the Stevens family 
to have it finished, but this failing it was broken up. Though it 
never reached a practical trial it is interesting as an example of the 
early appreciation of the modern iron-clad naval system by a dis- 
tinguished and public spirited American engineer. 

There were the usual number of inventors and projectors impor- 
tunately pressing upon the notice of the Legislature their various 
engines of war or novel means for defense. Nothing was done 
however but to listen. 

One of the earliest lessons of the war had been the inadequacy of 
our State militia laws, and by the Governor's direction General 
Wm. H. Anthon, judge-advocate-general on his staff, had prepared 
the draft of a new law, which being introduced in the Assembly 
was referred to the military committee. This bill provided for the 
enrollment of able-bodied citizens between the ages of eighteen and 
forty-five years as liable to military duty and forming the militia 
of the State. This was divided into two classes — first the organized 
voluntary force to be known as the National Guard, to be armed, 
uniformed, equipped and otherwise aided at the expense of the State; 
detailed and definite provision was made for the organization and 
government of this force which under the terms of the Constitution 
was entitled to the election of its own officers. The remainder of the 
militia formed the reserve force subject to a draft of such number for 
active service as the public exigencies might demand from time to 
time, and detailed provisions were made for the conduct of such 



War of the Rebellion Series. 8i 

drafts when so required. General Anthon was a lawyer of ability, 
and had carefully prepared this bill and discussed it before the com- 
mittees of both houses. It was also considered, section by section, 
in the houses, and after the amendment of details was passed by 
a large vote in substantially the same general form as when intro- 
duced. This law provided for the appointment of an assistant 
inspector-general with the rank of colonel, to which place I was 
appointed on April 23, 1862, the day after the passage of the law 
which provided that the duties of the office should include the 
auditing of all accounts for military purposes. My general duties 
were the same as I had theretofore rendered, but were now recog- 
nized as worthy of high rank. 

Beyond the appropriation for the regular military establishment 
no allotment of funds for future expenditures were made at this 
session comparable with those for 1861. The sum of $50,000 for 
reijnbursement of the militia regiments for their uniforms lost or 
destroyed in active service in the last year and the sum of $500,000 
for the payment of military expenses incurred in the State and not 
oth,erwise provided for were appropriated. I was secretary of the 
two boards of audit for claims payable from these appropriations. 

It was now evident that the conduct of the war so far as con- 
cerned expenditures for the organization and equipment of the 
troops must be controlled by the United States, the States limiting 
their outlay to the support of the militia not in the general service, 
to works of benevolence, to such matters as concerned the appoint- 
ment and promotion of regimental officers and the preparation and 
preservation of the records of all troops from each State, to which 
was added subseqviently the cost of bounties for enlistment. The 
6 



82 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

State of New York had exceeded all others in its appropriation of 
funds for the war. In April 1861, in addition to the $3,000,000 for 
raising two years volunteers (Chap. 277), there was appropriated 
$500,000 to provide arms and equipments for the militia and pro- 
vide for the public defence (Chap. 292). Under the former appro- 
priation a contract was made with Schuyler, Hartley and Graham, 
of New York, on April 24,, 1861, whereby the senior partner, Mr. 
Jacob R. Schuyler, was to proceed to Europe and purchase 25,000 
stand of Enfield or Minie rifles or rifled muskets with bayonets 
and fixed ammunition for the same, and on August 20th a similar 
contract was made with the same parties to procure 10,000 stand 
of like arms for the militia payable from the fund appropriated for 
that end by Chapter 292. At the very outbreak of hostilities the 
dearth of arms at the North had been a grave matter for considera- 
tion. The national arsenals had been surreptitiously depleted and 
their contents sent to the slave States. There were but two armories 
making small arms, one at Springfield, Mass., and one at Harpers 
Ferry, Va., and the latter was captured by the rebels in April (1861) 
and destroyed by them when they evacuated that place two months 
later, and the capacity at Springfield was probably not more than 
100 muskets per diem, but a drop in the bucket, while the private 
armories were not adapted to the making of military arms. There 
was, therefore, a great demand upon the European stocks of these 
articles, and agents of the United States and the various loyal States 
were early abroad competing with speculative buyers and agents 
of the insurgent States. Not only were arms of recent and improved 
kinds bought, but the stores of discarded arms in every country 
were gathered and sent to us. Old muskets from France, Austria, 
Belgium and England were shipped in large quantities up to the 



War of the Rebellion Series. 83 

middle of 1863, and many scandalous transactions resulted from 
the sale of these both to the United States and the States, and there 
was also the danger of such an introduction into active service of 
arms of different calibres as would confuse the proper distribution 
of ammunition and lead to disasters. On June 17th a general 
notice was issued by the chief of ordnance, that ammunition of the 
calibre of the United States muskets would alone be issued. From 
all these scandals and mishaps our State escaped through the good 
management of its officials, and no arms were purchased except 
Enfield rifled muskets of the regulation United States calibre of 
.58 inch. Of these Mr. Schuyler obtained for the two years volun- 
teers 19,000 stand, and for the militia 6,080 stand at an average cost 
of about $17.60 delivered at New York. The competition in Europe 
between the various agents became so strong and prices advanced 
so rapidly, both through the demand for America and several 
other countries, and the bids of speculators, that in November 
Secretary Cameron requested the States to withdraw their agents, 
leaving the procurement and supply of arms to th6 United States. 
Of course there was a general compliance with this request. There 
were purchased forty field pieces of 3.67 inch bore, rifled and rein- 
forced at the breech on the " Parrott " principle, with carriages, 
caissons, short battery and forge wagons, with solid and hollow 
ammunition for the same. The guns known as " Parrott guns " 
were contracted for and made under the supervision of Major 
Richard Delafield, United States engineers, stationed at New York, 
whose advice and active labor were always at our disposal. I may 
add here that in the last two years of the war there was no dearth 
of rifled muskets. The Springfield armory turned out 1,000 of them 
daily, and the aggregate product by private armories equalled this. 



84 Annual Report of the State Historian. 

The period of the second levy by the State beginning July i, 1861, 
may be considered as ending on March 31, 1862,* and the force 
was distributed among the various arms of the service as follows : 

65 regiments infantry 59.183 men 

9 regiments cavalry. 8,742 " 

2 regiments engineers 1,880 " 

3 regiments artillery 

4 battalions artillery > 6,584 

9 batteries artillery 



Total in new organizations 76,389 

Recruits sent to regiments, etc., in the field 12,500 



Total *88,889 " 

On December 3, 1861, was issued General Order No. 105 
of the War Departmient, announcing that no more regiments, 
batteries or independent companies were to be raised by the 
States except upon special requisition, and providing an elabor- 
ate system of recruiting for regiments, etc., in the field. 
During the winter General McClellan and his division and 
brigade officers were actively engaged in drilling into effective 
condition the troops assembled at and near Washington, the 
greater part of them on the Virginia side of the Potomac. Not 
only were there regular daily exercises in company, regimental 
and brigade tactics, but frequent reviews whereby the army 
became conscious of its size and condition, and gained the con- 

* In this levy is included much the greater part of the effective cavalry, 
engineers and artillery organized in the State during the whole war. The 
regiment composing the levy had a longer service and on the whole more 
severe service than the others. 



War of the Rebellion Series. 85 

fidence impaired by the disasters of 1861. General McClellan 
deserves great credit for his abihty to convert these raw troops 
into an army, and he gained by it that admiration and enthusiastic 
attachment that survived his usefulness and was the cause of many 
cabals and conspiracies injurious to the cause of the Unionists. The 
muddy and impracticable condition of the Virginia roads was given 
as the cause of inactivity, and no engagements occurred during the 
whole winter, General Lee's line being in front of Manassas, so 
that the two armies confronted each other for two months. Our 
long remembered daily announcement in the papers "was "All is 
quiet on the Potomac." This monotonous news irritated the 
ardent and impatient and soon there was a counter demand for an 
advance upon the enemy — " On to Richmond " was the cry that 
became vociferous when we heard of the capture of Forts Henry 
and Donelson on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers. When 
we heard our commanding officer's reply to General Buckner's pro- 
posal for a capitulation of Fort Donelson on February i6th in 
these words : " No terms except an unconditional and immediate 
surrender can be accepted. / propose to move immediately upon your 
works," there was a thrill of exultation and pride in the heart of 
every patriotic citizen, and thenceforth the name of " Ulysses S. 
Grant " was a household word beneath every loyal roof-tree. The 
demand for prompt and vigorous action on the Potomac was now 
overpowering; the knowledge that the army was in excellent con- 
dition and provided in every respect gave added strength to the 
demand. Succumbing to the popular pressure an advance was 
made on March 6th only to find the Rebel' army gone, the earth- 
works provided with " Quaker " guns, the cantonment destroyed 
and the whole plan of the campaign f