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Full text of "The Worshipful Company of Musicians"

CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 




BOUGHT WITH THE INCOME 
OF THE SAGE ENDOWMENT 
FUND GIVEN IN 189I BY 

/IIXIAMS SAGE 



HENRY WI 



university Ubrary 





^lu3tdarts amttftii Irg (!]mttii.ml5*^'©ct!" 1604- 



The 

Worshipful Company 

of 

Musicians. 



SECOND EDITION. 



Issued by the Livery Club of the Company for Private 
Circulation. 

1905. 

[Entered at Stationers' HALt.] 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Preface ... ... ... ... ix. 

Introduction to 1902 Edition ... ... xv. 

Master, Wardens and Court of Assistants 

(190S) ••• ... ... ... T 

Pages from the History of the Company ... 3 

Charter of Edward IV. ... ... ... 21 

Charter of James I. ... ... ... 29 

Bye-Laws, 1606 ... ... ... 47 

The Arms of the Company ... ... 82 

Act of Common Council relative to Musicians 

and Dancing Masters, 1700 ... ... 83 

Laws and Orders, reprinted from a Book 

issued by the Company in 1825 ... 89 

Fines and Fees ... ... ... 100 

Masters of the Company from 1800 to 1905 loi 

A Past Member of the Company ... ... 105 



Contents — Contd. 



Page 



The Company's Medal. 

The Gold Medal ... ... ... 107 

The Silver Gilt Medal ... ... 107 

The Silver Medal ... .,. ... 107 

Medallists from the Schools of Music ... 107 
Awards in recognition of services to the 

Company ... ... ... 109 

Miniature Medals ... ... ... no 

The Company's Scholarships. 

Composition Scholars ... ... in 

The Carnegie Scholars ... .., 112 

The Ernest Palmer Scholarships ... n 3 

Prize Competitions 

The Coronation March ... ... 115 

The "Grace" ... ... ... 117 

Prize Setting by Dr. Charles Wood 
Prize Setting by Mr. Arthur Henry 
Brown (for Male Voices) 

The Rev. Henry Cart's Prizes ... 118 

The Cobbett Prize Competition ... 119 



Contents — Contd. 

Page 
Recent Gifts to the Company. 

The Rube Cup .. ... ... 120 

The Crews Cup ... ... ... 122 

Gowns for Master and Wardens ... ij2 

The Banner ... ... ... 123 

Portrait of Handel .. . ... ... 124 

Gift for poor Students ... ... 124 

Commemoration of the Tercentenary. 

The Music Loan Exhibition ... ... 125 

The Master's Banquet ... ... 140 

The Honorary Freemen. 

H.R.H. Prince Christian of Schleswig 

Holstein, K.G., G.C.V.O. ... 141 

Mr. Andrew Carnegie ... ... 142 

Mr. S. Ernest Palmer ... ... 143 

Dr. W. H. Curamings, and the Rev. 

F. W. Galpin ... ... ... 144 

The Maske of "The Golden Tree." ... 145 



VI. 

Contents — Contd. 

The Musicians Company and Stationers' Hall 

Roll of the Company, 1905, 
The Livery 
Honorary Freemen .. . 
Apprentices 
Index to the Roll ... 

The Livery Clue. 
Officers (1905) 

History 
Rules 
Presidents 
Members ... 



Page 


148 


151 


168 


169 


I 70 


173 


173 


176 


177 


178 



Vll. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 





Page 


Arms of the Company .. 


Frontispiece 


Master and Wardens 


1 


The Beadle's Mace 


... 89 


Sir John Stainer 


lOI 


Charles J. Ashley 


... 105 


The Medal 


107 


The Rube Cup 


121 


The Crews Cup 


122 


The Banner 


123 


Portrait of Handel 


124 


The Tercentenary Exhibition Poster 


... 125 


The Maske of " The Golden Tree " 


MS 


The Company's Form of Invitation 


148 



PREFACE. 



The President and Committee of the Livery 
Club have much pleasure in issuing this new 
Edition of the Handbook, wherein will be found 
historical notes concerning the Company, its 
ancient Charters, Bye-laws, Roll of Members, 
etc., together with a record of some recent 
occurrences. 

Since the issue of the first edition of this 
volume in October, 1902, events of the highest 
importance in the history of the Musicians' Com- 
pany have taken place, and the whole period has 
been one of continued progress. The Livery has 
increased until its numbers have nearly doubled. 
The Tercentenary of the granting of the 2nd 
Charter by James I. has been commemorated by 
the holding of a Music Lo^an Exhibition which is 
believed to have surpassed in completeness any 
that has hitherto been held. A member of the 
Royal family and other distinguished persons 
have been presented with the Honorary Free- 
dom ; the system of Apprenticeship has been 
revived ; Musical Scholarships have been 



founded ; prize competitions held, and valuable 
gifts made to the Company. Moreover, an 
arrangement has been entered into with a 
sister Company, the Worshipful Company of 
Stationers, whereby the latter have conceded 
the use of their fine old Hall for the official 
gatherings of the Musicians' Company. These 
events are all fully recorded. 

The interesting notes contained in the Guide 
Book to the Tercentenary Exhibition of 1904, 
entitled, "Pages from the History of the Com- 
pany," are reproduced. 

The translations of the Charter of James I. 
and the Bye-laws of 1606 have been carefully 
compared with the text of the originals, and 
sundry errors have now been eliminated. 
Marginal notes have been added to the copies 
both of the Charter and the Bye-laws. 

The Act of Common Council of 1700 con- 
firming the jurisdiction of the Company over 
dancing masters is now included, and throws 
some light on the position of the Company in 
London at that period. 

The information concerning the general his- 
tory of the Company, at present available, is 
very limited and of a more or less fragmentary 



XI. 



character ; a detailed history must be still left to 
the future. It may, however, be mentioned that 
the Company's jurisdiction was enforced as late 
as 1763. In that year an action was successfully 
brought by the Company before the Recorder 
of London against Barton Hudson for employ- 
ing persons not free as musicians at a Lord 
Mayor's Banquet. 

The list of Masters of the Company has been 
carried back to 1 800, and the compilers consider 
that by further enquiry it may be possible to 
obtain much interesting information concerning 
past Members of the Company. 

The Roll of the Livery has been revised and 
brought up to date. The number of Members 
shown to be directly interested in Music is very 
satisfactory. It must not, however, be 
supposed that Members against whose names no 
notes appear are lacking in activity in Music. It 
is known that many of them are enthusiastic 
amateurs giving great support to musical art, 
and that others are accomplished instru- 
mentalists. The Compilers invite the assist- 
ance of Members to make this list as complete 
as possible, and to forward particulars from 
time to time to the Clerk of the Company. 



The Illustrations in this Book form a feature 
of new interest. 

The Portrait of Sir John Stainer, from Her- 
komer's painting (exhibited at the Loan 
Exhibition at Fishmongers' Hall in 1904), is 
reproduced by kind permission of Lady Stainer, 
to whom the President and Committee tender 
their sincere thanks. 

Thanks are also due to Mr. C. T. D. Crews, 
Master of the Company, for the Illustration of 
The Maske of "The Golden Tree"; to Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill, for the Portrait, from a painting 
in his possession, of an old Member of the 
Company, Charles Jane Ashley ; to Messrs. 
James Truscott and Son., Ltd., for the Illustra- 
tion of the Company's Medal ; to Messrs. 
Metzler and Co., Ltd., for permission to include 
copies of the Prize Settings of The Grace ; and 
to Mr. C. R. Rivington, Clerk of the Stationers' 
Company, Mr. T. L. Southgate and Mr. J. F. R. 
Stainer for assistance in completing this work. 
The beautifully-designed form upon which 
the Court issues its invitation to the Livery and 
guests is thought worthy of reproduction in this 
book. It is almost an exact copy of the 
Invitation used by the Company in 175 1, as 



Xlll. 



discovered by Mr. Arthur F. Hill in one of 
the Company's old books. In the original the 
motto upon the scroll was "Harmony/' but at 
the suggestion of Sir John Stainer it was altered 
to "Preserve Harmony." The plate was pre- 
sented by Mr. Hill to the Court, and the thanks 
of the Company are therefore due to him for 
restoring the use of this handsome form. 

■3)rd October, 1905. 



Introduction to the First Edition. 



' I '^ HIS book has been compiled with the 
-^ object of placing in the hands of the 
Livery of the Worshipful Company of Musicians, 
a translation of the Charter granted by 
James L, (under which the Company is at present 
constituted,) together with the Bye Laws of the 
Company, and other particulars, including a List 
of the Livery at this date. 

A copy of the earlier Charter granted by 
Edward IV. to the Guild originally constituted 
as a Fraternity of Minstrels, is also included. 
This Charter is not in the possession of the 
Company, but is preserved at Hereford, and the 
text is printed in Rymer's Fcedera. 

The List of Liverymen is arranged in order of 
seniority according to the dates of their Admis- 
sion on the Livery. Particulars are given, as 
far as known to the Compilers, showing in what 
directions Members of the Livery are actively 



XVI. 



interested in the Art of Music. It is hoped that 
in a future issue these notes may be amplified, 
and the Compilers invite the assistance of Livery- 
men in making this List as complete and correct 
as possible, while bespeaking their kind indul- 
gence for any errors that may have crept into 
the present edition. 

6th October, 1902. 




w ^ 



■^ -c 



Til face paee i 



THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY 
OF MUSICIANS. 



1905. 



Master. 
C. T. D. CREWS, Esq., D.L., J.P., F.S.A. 



Wardens. 
E. E. COOPER, Esq. 
Sir HOMEWOOD CRAWFORD. 



T. P. JONES, Esq. 

H. R. FRISBY, Esq, 

J. H. SKILBECK, Esq. 

R. B. WARRICK, Esq. 

Sir J. F. BRIDGE, M.V.O., Mus. Doc 

J. C. COLLARD, Esq. 

C. D. HOBLYN, Esq. 

F. HARWOOD LESCHER, Esq. 



Assistants. 

WM. CORDY HERRING, Esq. 

A. C. HUNTER, Esq. 

T. L. SOUTHGATE, Esq. 

The REV. R. H. HADDEN, M.A 

ALFRED H. LITTLETON, Esq. 

ARTHUR F. HILL, Esq. F.S.A. 

W. P. FULLER, Esq. 

Col. T. B. SHAW-HELLIER, J. P. 



Honorary Chaplain. 

The REV. ROBINSON DUCKWORTH, D.D., C.V.O. 

Sub-Dean and Canon of Westminster. 



Clerk. 
T. C. FENWICK, Esq., 

1 6, Berners Street, W. 



Beadle. 
Mr. S. HILLS, 

i6, Berners Street, W. 



PAGES FROM THE 
HISTORY OF THE COMPANY.* 

The story of the Company of Musicians, 
could it be fully told, would hardly fail to prove 
one of the most interesting chapters in our 
national annals, considering how intimately 
music was associated, particularly from the 
twelfth to the sixteenth century, with the life of 
the EngHsh people. It carries us back in fact 
to the days of the Minstrels, of whose guild the 
Company may claim to be the lineal descendant 
and modern representative. Unfortunately, 
however, its history can never be fully written, 
for its records have been hopelessly scattered 
and lost. Industrious researches, which it is 
hoped to continue, have nevertheless resulted in 
bringing to light some more or less disjointed 
records of the Company, which offer interesting 
glimpses of the state of the Musical Art and of 
the condition of its practitioners up to the open- 
ing of the seventeenth century. Incomplete as 
they are, it is felt that a glance at them will be 
acceptable to the reader. 

• Reprinted from the Catalogue of the Loan Exhibition held by the 
Company at the Fishmongers' Hall, 1904. 

B2 



An Early Charter. 

The earliest extant Royal Charter as yet 

known, by which musicians in England were 

incorporated into a fraternity or guild, was that 

granted by Edward IV. to his Minstrels on April 

24th, 1469. That ecirlier Charters must have 

existed, however, may be inferred from the fact 

that in this instrument reference is made to 

similar fraternities founded "in times past." It 

may also be inferred from the text of the 

document that the Minstrels were already fallen 

from the honourable position they held in the 

twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and were on the 

road to the unhappy condition in which we find 

them a century later, when they were classed with 

"rogues and vagabonds." Indeed, the Charter, 

the Latin text of which has been preserved for 

us by Rymer, was granted at the prayer of the 

King's Minstrels (of whom Walter Haliday was 

the Chief or Marshal) to remedy the low state 

into which their fortunes were fallen. Their 

grievances are thus set forth in the preamble to 

the Charter : — 

" Be it known that we have learned from the 
" complaint of our beloved Walter Haliday 
"(Marshal), John Cliff, Robert Marshall, Thomas 



5 

"Grene, Thomas Calthorn, William Cliff, William 
"Christean, William Eynsham, our Minstrels, 
" that certain ignorant rustics and craftsmen of 
" various callings in our Kingdom of England have 
" falsely represented themselves to be Minstrels, 
" of whom some, assuming our licence, which has 
" in no way been granted to them, represent 
" themselves as our Minstrels ; under the coloui 
" of which licence and of the said art or occupation 
" of Minstrels they in various parts of our 
" Kingdom collect and receive large sums of 
" money from our subjects. 

" And although they are in that art or occupation 
" by no means learned or skilled, and practise 
" divers arts and callings on holidays and ordinary 
" days and derive a sufficient living therefrom, they 
" nevertheless move from place to place on festival 
" days and collect all those profits by means of 
" which our aforesaid Minstrels and our other 
" Minstrels for the time being, sufficiently learned 
" and instructed in the aforesaid art or occupation 
" and practising no other craft, trade, or calling, 
" should obtain their living. 

" Furthermore, we learn that much disgrace 
" is thus brought upon that art or occupation 
" and manifold and manifest deterioration of our 
" Minstrels practising the said art or occupation, 
" and moreover no slight loss and grievance to our 
" people engaged in agriculture or otherwise." 

To remedy this state of things the King 

granted to his Minstrels power to establish a 

perpetual brotherhood or guild (" such as we learn 

that brothers and sisters of the Fraternity of 

Minstrels of our Kingdom in times past formed, 

established and ordained ") into which they 

might admit such persons, whether men or 



women, as were likely to adhere loyally by them. 
The guild was constituted one body and com- 
munity with perpetual succession and was em- 
powered to elect from among themselves a 
marshal (to hold office for Hfe) and two wardens 
yearly for the governance of the fraternity. To 
it were committed full powers for the supervision, 
examination and control of all Minstrels in the 
Kingdom (except those in the county of Chester), 
together with the appointment, subject to the 
Royal approval, of the King's Minstrels. It is 
characteristic of the age that in addition to these 
duties the guild was 

" specially bound to pray for the well-being of 
" us and of our most dear Consort, Elizabeth, 
" Queen of England, so long as we live, and for 
" our souls when we shall have departed from 
" this world, as also for the soul of our most 
" dear lord and father, Richard, late Duke of York, 
" and for the souls of our renowned progenitors, 
" and for all the faithful departed, both in the 
" Chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary within the 
" Cathedral Church of St. Paul in London, and in 
" our Royal Free Chapel of St. Anthony in our 
" same City of London.'' 

Moreover, part of the fines levied upon offend- 
ing brethren was assigned to the provision by 
the Guild of "wax candles, commonly called 
tapers," in the Chapels named. 



A Picturesque Incident. 

It will be noted that the Minstrels of the 
county of Chester are exempted from the juris- 
diction of the Guild. The exemption is due to a 
curious incident in English history, upon which 
Mr. G. P. R. James based a pretty little story 
entitled " The Fight of the Fiddlers." A copy of 
the book, which is probably now somewhat rare, 
is exhibited in the present Exhibition. An 
account of the event referred to, taken from Sir 
Peter Leycester's "Historical Antiquities of 
Cheshire," is printed both by Sir John Hawkins 
in his "History of Music," and by the author of 
the "Memorials of the Buttons of Button in 
Cheshire," in which family was vested juris- 
diction over the Minstrels and "other Vagrants " 
of the county. This authority was conferred 
upon Hugh de Button in the time of King John 
by Randle, third Earl of Chester, under the 
following circumstances : — 

" Randle among the many conflicts he had was 
" distressed by the Welsh and forced to retreat 
" to the Castle of Rothlent in Flintshire about 
" the reign of King John, where they besieged 
" him. He presently sent to his Constable of 
" Chester, Roger Lacy, surnamed Hell for his 
" fierce spirit, that he would come with all speed 
" and bring what forces he could to his relief. 



8 



" Roger having gathered a tumultuous rout of 
" fiddlers, players, coblers, both men and women, 
" out of the City of Chester (for it was then the 
" fair time in that City) marched immediately 
" towards the Earl. The Welsh, perceiving a 
" great multitude coming, raised the siege and 
" fled. The Earl coming back with his constable 
" to Chester gave him power over all the fiddlers 
" and shoemakers, but John, his son, conferred 
" this authority on his steward, who was then 
" Hugh de Button, and his heirs." 

Out of this concession arose a custom of 
licensing the Minstrels of the county, for which 
purpose a Court was held annually at Chester on 
St. John the Baptist's Day (Midsummer Day), 
when each Minstrel who sought for a licence had 
to give four flagons of wine to the representative 
of the Dutton family, who presided, and pay 
4^d. The right of the Duttons in this matter 
was tested by the Crown by writ of Quo 
Warranto and was admitted, and it was sub- 
sequently recognised in various Acts of Parlia- 
ment relating to Vagabonds. The last Court 
was held in the year 1756. 

The Minstrels of the City of London. 

How long the Fraternity of Minstrels estab- 
lished by the Charter granted by Edward IV. 
endured, or whether it wrought any improve- 
ment in the condition of the Minstrels, there is 



9 

nothing to show. Search has brought to Hght 
entries in various records of the Corporation of 
the City of London relating to the employment 
of Minstrels as far back as the year 1334, but 
they contain no mention of the guild. About 
the year 1500, however, we find in existence a 
"Fellowship of Minstrels and Freemen of the 
City of London," and we see that they too were 
suffering under precisely the same grievances as 
those of which the Minstrels of Edward IV. had 
complained. For in a petition to the Lord 
Mayor and Aldermen they set forth that owing 
to the " Continuell recorse of foreign* Minstrells 
daily resorting to the Citee out of all the contrays 
of England " they are "brought in such povertie 
and decaye that they be not of power or habilitie 
to have charges to pay lote and scot and do their 
dutie as other freemen doon." The plaint is 
thus in substance a repetition of that made by the 
King's Minstrels some thirty years or so before. 
And for a remedy the fellowship demand that it 
shall be ordained that "no maner of foreigner of 
whatsoever condition he be " shall under penalty 
of paying a fine of 3 s. 4d. to the Fellowship be 



* By "foreign" here is clearly meant not only aliens, but all 
musicians who came into the City from other Englisn towns and had 
not been admitted to the freedom of the Fellowship of Minstrels. 



10 

permitted to "occupie any Minstrelsy, singying, 
or playeng upon any jnstrument," within the city 
or its franchises. They also ask for the approval 
of certain rules and regulations which they had 
framed for the better government of the Fellow- 
ship. By these the members are forbidden to 
"rebuke, revile or greve each other with any 
sclanderous wordes or wordes of velanys " ; they 
are not to " tech or inform any other person than 
their own apprentices in any point of this feat of 
Minstralsy," and no freeman is to take any 
servant for any term " otherwise than by appren- 
tishode for vij. yeres according to the laudable 
custome of this Citie." This petition was 
granted by the Court of Common Council. 

This revision of the fellowship rules apparently 
failed to overcome the abuses which it was in- 
tended to repress; for in 15 18 the Master and 
Wardens again appeared before the Lord Mayor 
with a petition for further alterations in the 
statutes. Powers were now sought to slightly 
change the method of electing the governing 
body, and rules were introduced to prevent any 
freeman from proceeding against another at law 
until he had first laid his grievance before the 
Master and Wardens, who "for the honestie of 



II 

the ffeliship shall charitably call the parties 
before them if they can or may to settle the said 
parties at reest and peace." Members are further 
forbidden to induce servants to leave their 
masters during the time they are under covenant 
to serve; to "rebuke, revyle, or smyte each 
other " ; no freemen, unless they have been 
master or wardens, are permitted to take more 
than one apprentice, "to the intent that the 
apprentice may thus better be applied, lerned, or 
sette at work " ; no minstrell " shall supplante or 
get out another being hired or spoken to " for 
any musical engagement ; and no apprentice is 
allowed till he is declared free of the Fellowship 
to "use or occupie his instrument openly or 
privately " in any tavern or at any ceremony. 

With all the efforts made to repress them, the 
"foreigners " were clearly a source of perpetual 
trouble to the Fellowship. In 1555 the Master 
and Wardens again complain of the " dyverse and 
many foreyn Mynstrells " who "exercise the 
scyence of Mynstralsie within the Cytie and 
Lyberties thereof, to the great losse and 
hindraunce of the gaines and profits of the poore 
mynstrells being fremen of the same Cytie." 
Rules were accordingly enacted forbidding all 



12 

such "foreign Minstrells " to exercise their craft 

under a penalty of 3s. 4d. The rule against the 

employment of more than one apprentice is 

renewed, and it is further forbidden to play upon 

any instrument in the open streets, lanes or alleys 

of the City between the hours of ten at night and 

five in the morning, though the City "waits " are 

permitted to play and keep their "accustomed 

watches as thei at their accustomed tymes and 

howres vse and heretofore have vsed the same." 

And forasmuch as 

" dyverse and menie artyfycers and handye crafts 
" men, as tayllers, showmakers, and such others, 
" leving the vse and exercyse of their crafts and 
" manuell occupacions and giving themselves 
" wholy to wandering abrode, ryott, vyce, and 
" idlenes, doe commonly vse nowe a dayes to 
" singe songs called Thre mens songs in the 
•' Taverns, ale houses, Innes, and such other 
" places of this Cytie and also at vyeadings, &c.," 

they are forbidden so to do, inasmuch as the 

practice tended to the "greate losse, preiudyce, 

and hindraunce of the said poore felowship of 

the Mynstrells of the said Cytie." It is also 

forbidden to^ any person " f oren or f reman " to 

keep or teach any school of dancing. In 1561 

an order was issued calling upon Minstrels, not 

being free of the City Fellowship, to be obedient 

to its Wardens. 



13 

In the course of the next twelve years the 
members of the fellowship had clearly fallen 
away from the standard of conduct which their 
rulers were striving to maintain among them ; 
for in June 14, 1574, another scheme of reforma- 
tion was propounded. It begins by reciting that 
the ancient Company of Minstrels 

" hath of late tyme not only much decayed but also 
" hath bynne brought into contempt and hatryd by 
" occasion of sondry disorders and inormyties vsed 
" by persounes exercisinge that arte being not sub- 
" jecte to the good lawes and ordinaunces of the 
" Company, to the great dishonour of the Cittye, 
" disfurniture of that service, pestering of the 
" Cittye with multitudes of apprentices, dishonest- 
" inge of the said arte and greate occasion of 
" vnchast, wastful, lewde and dangerous practises 
" amonges good citizens children and apprentices." 

With a view therefore to remedy this state of 
things, the rules contained in the former 
ordinance are strictly re-enacted, and members 
of the fellowship are warned to be obedient to 
the laws and rules passed for its good 
governance. 

A New Charter. 

In spite of the efforts which we have thus seen 
continually renewed to infuse new life into the 
Fellowship, it appears to have been unable to 
keep its members wholly in hand. And so it 



14 

comes that in 1604 we find the Society of 

Minstrels in London petitioning the Crown for a 

new Charter of Incorporation. This was granted 

by the King, James I., on the 8th July of the 

year named. The company thus constituted is 

styled "The Master, Wardens and Commonalty 

of the Art or Science of the Musicians of 

London." They are erected into one body 

politic with perpetual succession and a common 

seal, and are invested with all the privileges 

usually bestowed upon such corporations. They 

are to be governed by a Master, two Wardens 

and thirteen or more (not exceeding twenty) 

assistants. The first Master (Phillip London), 

first Wardens (Isaac Thorpe and Thomas 

Carter) and fourteen assistants were nominated 

by the Charter. (It is interesting to note, as 

showing the continuity of the new Fellowship 

with its predecessor, that amongst the assistants 

was William Warren, who had been Master of 

the old Company in 1 594). Provision was made 

for the annual election of officers, and powers 

were given for the governance of the Fellowship. 

These powers included authority to make all 

" reasonable laws, statutes, constitutions, decrees 
" and ordinances whatsoever, in writing which 
" shall be necessary for the good rule and govern- 



15 

" ment of the Company and of all other Minstrels 
" and Musicians of the City of London and within 
" three miles of the same city ; and for the decla- 
" ration in what manner the Master, Wardens and 
" assistants, and all persons of the Company, shall 
" behave themselves in their ofl&ces, art and 
" science." 

Power is further given to make and provide 
pains, punishments and penalties by imprison- 
ment and fines or by both, against offenders 
against the said laws and ordinances. 

To the Company is also committed "the 
survey, search, correction, and government of all 
and singular Musicians and Minstrels within the 
City of London and within three miles thereof." 

How the Company was governed. 

In accordance with the authority thus con- 
ferred upon them, the Company adopted by-laws, 
which were confirmed by the proper legal 
authority, the Lord Chancellor and the Judges. 
Some of these regulations are curious and 
interesting. 

After providing for the election of the Master 
and Wardens and the proper discharge of their 
duties, rules are laid down for the conduct of the 
ordinary members. They are not permitted to 
exercise their art within the jurisdiction of the 



Company without having first obtained written 
permission under the common seal. 

No person of the Fellowship " shall unseemly 
revile, rebuke, smite, or abuse any brother of the 
same Fellowship, either by facing, bracing, evil 
reproaching or affraying." 

It is forbidden to "supplant, defeat or put out, 
or wittingly practice to supplant, defeat or put 
out any musician free of the said Fellowship, 
being first hired and spoken to to serve at any 
triumphs, marriages, revels, feasts," &c., &c. 

A most important rule, which many would 

like to see generally followed at the present day, 

provided that 

the Master and Wardens, or such other discreet 
and skilful persons as shall be appointed, shall 
and may at all times call before them to the 
Common Hall or to other convenient place 
appointed, all persons, as well free of the 
Fellowship as all others, which use or exercise 
the Art or Science of Musicians in the teaching 
of musick or dancing within the City of London 
and three miles thereof, and there examine, 
approve, and allow the said parties for their 
sufficiency and skill in the said Art or Science 
and to reject or disallow of any party for his 
insufficiency and want of skill. And that no 
person being disallowed as insufficient and unfit 
shall presume to exercise the Art or Science. 

Fines were imposed for disorder and abuse 

tending to the hurt or prejudice of the art ; for 



17 

introducing any foreigner to use or practise it, 
and upon all persons not being free of the 
Company who used or exercised it. Strict rules 
were enforced with regard to the fitness of the 
apprentices and their number. After an order 
forbidding dancing on Sundays we find the 
following: — "Neither shall any person sing any 
ribaldry, wanton or lascivious songs or ditties 
at any time or place whereby God may be dis- 
honoured, or any slander or infamy may arise or 
be given of or to the said Science ; " and this 
under pain of fine and imprisonment. 

It was further ordained "that no persons free 
of the said art or science, or any of their servants 
or apprentices, or any other persons professing 
the art or science, either in consort or otherwise, 
shall at any time play upon any kind of 
instrument either evening or morning, at or 
under any nobleman, knight, or geiitleman's 
windows or lodging in the street, or the window 
or lodging of any other person whatsoever, 
without license or leave " of the Company. 

A similar law forbids the same persons to play 
at any weddings, feasts, banquets, revels, or other 
assemblies or meetings, under the number of 
four, in consort or with violins. 

c 



i8 

A fine of twelve pence is imposed upon any 
person "who shall go himself, or suffer his 
servant or apprentice to go, in ciny open street 
from house to house with an instrument uncased 
or uncovered, to be seen by any passing by." 

The next law dealt with strangers, who were 
clearly as unwelcome in those times as in many 
quarters we know them to be to-day. By this 
rule musicians were forbidden "by themselves, 
their servants, or apprentices, to play upon or 
with any instrument, or use the said art or science 
of music, or any other thing concerning the same 
in consort, or any kind of instrument whatsoever 
of or with any foreigner or foreigners, servants, 
or apprentices, upon pain to forfeit for every such 
offence three shillings and four pence." 

Then comes a regulation with regard to 
apprentices and servants. It enacts that no 
musicians 

" shall suffer their servants or apprentices to serve 
" by themselves with any music at any feasts, 
" banquets, weddings, hunts up, or at any other 
" assemblies, triumphs or occasions, either to go 
" abroad in the streets or to play at any taverns, 
" victualling houses or any other place whatsoever, 
" except they do go in with the Company of two 
" freemen at the least, well and sufficiently exer- 
" cised and experienced in the said art or science 
" of music, whereof one to be the Master of some 



19 



" one of tlie said apprentices or servants. As also 
" foreigners shall in like manner observe the same 
" orders as the freemen, v?hereby they may be the 
" better guided and directed in that science for the 
" laud, honour, and commendation thereof ; and 
" that the freeman or foreigner being Master of the 
" said apprentice or servant shall himself, or the 
" other freemen or foreigner master, offer or present 
"the music, and not any other his apprentice or 
" servant, upon pain to forfeit for every offence 
" three shillings and four pence." 

That the Company had an eye to the morals 
of apprentices is sufficiently attested by the 
following enactment : " Be it also ordained that 
if any person professing the said art or science 
of Music shall at any time by any means, directly 
or indirectly, by himself or willingly know or 
suffer his servant or apprentice to use or practice 
any manner of unlawful games at any time or 
in any place with any freemen's servants or 
apprentices either of the said art or being free 
of any other Company whatsoever, or any 
foreigners, shall in any wise or by any means 
countenance him or them therein," he shall for 
every such offence forfeit ten shillings or suffer 
imprisonment. 

Other regulations provide for the adjustment 
of grievances between members by the Master 
and Wardens, whose permission is necessary for 
the institution of lawsuits. 



Translation of 
CHARTER OF EDWARD IV.* 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE KING'S 
MINSTRELS. 



THE KING TO ALL THOSE TO 
WHOM, &c., GREETING. 

Be it known that we have learned from 
the complaint of our beloved Walter Haliday 
(Marshall), John CHff, Robert Marshall, Thomas 
Grene, Thomas Calthom, William Cliff, William 
Christean, William Eynsham, our Minstrels, thai 
certain ignorant rustics and craftsmen of various 
callings in our Kingdom of England have falsely 

* This Charter is still extant, and is printed in Rymer's *' Foedera " 
(XI. 642). 



22 



represented themselves to be Minstrels. Of 
whom some assuming our Hcence which has in 
no way been granted to them, represent them- 
selves as our Minstrels ; under the colour of 
which licence and of the said art or occupation of 
Minstrels they in various parts of our Kingdom 
collect and receive large sums of money from 
our subjects. 

And although they are in that art or occupa- 
tion by no means learned or skilled, and prac- 
tise divers arts and callings on holidays and 
ordinary days and derive a sufficient living there- 
from, they nevertheless move from place to place 
on festival days and collect all those profits by 
means of which our aforesaid Minstrels and our 
other Minstrels for the time being, sufficiently 
learned and instructed in the aforesaid art or 
occupation, and practising no other craft, trade 
or calling, should obtain their living. 

Furthermore, we learn that much disgrace is 
thus brought upon that axt or occupation, and 
manifold and manifest deterioration of our 
Minstrels practising the said art or occupation, 
and moreover no slight loss and grievance to our 
people engaged in agriculture or otherwise. 

Therefore, our Minstrels have humbly be- 



23 

sought us that we would of our grace and special 
favour deign to provide for them a suitable 
remedy in this matter. 

We, considering the foregoing and being 
favourably inclined to their reasonable supplica- 
tion in this matter, have of our own favour, 
certain knowledge and of our own motion, 
granted and given our licence and by these 
presents do grant and give licence for ourselves 
and our heirs as far as in us lies to the said 
Walter Haliday (Marshall), John Cliff, Robert 
Marshall, Thomas Grene, Thomas Calthom, 
William CHff, WiUiam Christean and WilHam 
Eynsham, our Minstrels, that they to the praise 
and honour of God, and that they may be the 
more specially bound to pray for the well-being 
of us and of our most dear Consort Elizabeth 
Queen of England so long as we live and for 
our souls when we shall have departed from 
this world; as also for the soul of our most 
dear lord and father Richard late Duke of York, 
and for the souls of our renowned progenitors 
and for all the faithful departed, both in the 
Chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary within the 
Cathedral Church of St. Paul in London and in 
our Royal Free Chapel of St. Anthony in our 



24 

same City of London, to found, to continue and 
to increase a certain perpetual Brotherhood or 
Guild (such as we learn that brothers and sisters 
of the Fraternity of Minstrels of our Kingdom 
in times past formed, established and ordained), 
and that they may be enabled to^ receive, to 
admit and to accept as brothers and sisters of 
the said Brotherhood or Guild, whatsoever 
persons, both men and women, adhering to them 
with loyal intention ; 

And that our aforesaid Marshall and Minstrels 
are and shall be in law and name a body sole 
and community sole and perpetual, able and 
capable at law, and shall have perpetual suc- 
cession ; 

And that the aforesaid Minstrels who now are 
as well as our other Minstrels and those of our 
heirs in perpetuity, shall be able at their pleasure 
to name, elect, ordain and successively constitute 
from among themselves, a Marshall capable and 
fit to remain in that office for the term of his 
life, and also each year two Wardens to rule and 
govern the said brotherhood or guild ; 

And furthermore we will and by these presents 
grant for the support and increase of the said 
brotherhood or guild that no Minstrel of our 



25 

Kingdom, even though he be sufficiently in- 
structed in the art or occupation, shall hence- 
forth in any way practise or publicly exercise 
the art or occupation within our Kingdom afore- 
said, unless he belong to the said Brotherhood 
or Guild and shall have been admitted to the 
same and shall have contributed to it with the 
other brethren (provided that none of the afore- 
said brethren or those to be admitted shall pay 
for entrance or admission more than three shil- 
lings and four pence) ; and if he should do other- 
wise or should in any way contravene he shall 
by the aforesaid Marshall and Minstrels of our- 
selves or our heirs for the time being be fined 
according to their discretion ; 

And that our aforesaid Marshall and Minstrels 
and their Wardens and their successors shall 
be able lawfully and with impunity to summon, 
make, and ordain lawful and orderly meetings 
and communications among themselves and 
lawful statutes and rules for the proper govern- 
ment and the advantage of the Brotherhood or 
Guild when and as often as it may be necessary ; 

And if any of our Minstrels or those of our 
heirs should depart or die or should on account 
of shortcomings or offences or other cause what- 



26 

soever be released, removed or deposed from our 
service, then the Marshall and other Minstrels 
at the time existing shall on our behalf elect and 
nominate another Minstrel, fit and sufficiently 
learned and skilled in the art or occupation 
wherever in our Kingdom, whether within or 
without the Liberties, they may chance to find 
him (the County of Chester excepted) in the 
stead and place of the one departed, released, 
removed or deposed, and to instal him. as one of 
our or our heirs' Minstrels to- be retained in our 
service, to receive our pay, or royal assent thereto 
having been obtained. 

And moreover we will and by these presents 
grant to the aforesaid Marshall and Minstrels 
that they and their successors shall have the 
power and faculty to- inquire by all reasonable 
and lawful ways, methods and means throughout 
the whole of our aforesaid Kingdom, as well 
within as without the Liberties (the aforesaid 
County of Chester excepted) concerning each 
and every person pretending to be a Minstrel 
and falsely claiming our Licence and improperly 
and illegally professing or exercising the afore- 
said art or occupation, or not belonging to the 
aforesaid Brotherhood or Guild ; and concerning 



27 

all other matters and circumstances regarding 
the foregoing ; 

And from time to time, as often as may be 
necessary, as well within as without the Liberties 
(the County of Chester excepted) to supervise, 
to examine, to rule and to govern all and each 
of those persons practising the art and occupa- 
tion of Minstrels and to justly and properly 
correct and punish any one of them for offences 
or shortcomings in respect of the foregoing. 

And all penalties, fines, forfeitures, or damages 
whatsoever (if in accordance with the foregoing 
any such should be properly or probably ad- 
judged, assessed or imposed by reason of such 
inquisition, examination or scrutiny, upon any 
one pretending to be Minstrels or otherwise 
offending) shall be collected, applied and ex- 
pended for the use and advantage of the 
Brotherhood, for the continual and perpetual 
maintenajice of certain wax candles (commonly 
called tapers), for the expenses in the aforesaid 
Chapels of the Brotherhood at present existing 
or which may come to exist in the future. 

Shall be held, occupied, exercised, enjoyed 
all and singly the aforesaid inquisition, scrutiny, 
supervision, rule, government, correction, punish- 



28 

ment, and other things aforesaid in the ways 
and forms above cited by the aforementioned 
Walter, John, Robert, Thomas Grene, Thomas 
Calthorn, WilHam Cliff, William Christean and 
William Eynsham our Minstrels and -their suc- 
cessors for ever without let, hindrance, impedi- 
ment, molestation, disturbance, or injury of us, 
our heirs, justiciaries, escheats, ministers or 
others whatsoever. 



Translation of 
CHARTER OF JAMES I. 



Taken front the contemporary copy in the 
Possession of the Company. 



James, by the Grace of God King of England, 2 jsmes 1. 
Scotland, France, and Ireland, Defender of the 
Faith, &c. To all to whom these present letters 
shall come, greeting : Know ye that of our 
special grace, certain science, and mere motion, 
and at the humble petition of our faithful Petition ot 
subjects the freemen of the Society of Minstrels Minstrels 
of our City of London, we have willed, ordained, °' ''°"''°"- 
constituted, declared, and granted, and by these 
presents for us, our heirs and successors, do 
will, ordain, constitute, declare, and grant, that 
they, the foresaid freemen of the Society afore- 



30 



Incorporation 
and Title of 
Company. 



Power to 
acquire and 
deal with 
Property 



said, or by what other name or names the same 
Society is called or named, and their successors, 
from henceforth for ever may be and shall be 
by force of these presents one body corporate 
and politic in substance, deed, and name, by the 
name of master, wardens, and commonalty of 
the Art or Science of the Musicians of London, 
and them, by the name of the master, wardens, 
and commonalty of the Art or Science of the 
Musicians of London, one body corporate and 
politic in substance, deed, and name, really and 
fully for us, our heirs and successors) we do 
erect, make, ordain, appoint, confirm, and declare 
by these presents ; and that by that name they 
shall have perpetual succession, and so from 
henceforth shall be named, called, and accepted 
in our City of London and elsewhere, and not 
otherwise : And that they and their successors, 
by the name of the master, wardens, and com- 
monalty of the Art or Science of the Musicians 
of London, be and shall be at all times for ever 
to come persons able and capable in law to 
have, purchase, receive, and possess messuages, 
lands, tenements, hberties, privileges, jurisdic- 
tions, franchises, and hereditaments, of what 
nature, kind, or property soever the same shall 



31 

be, to them and their successors in fee and 
perpetuity, or for term of year or years, or other- ■'o"' "«»' '"'* 

Personali 

wise howsoever, and also goods and chattels and 
other things whatsoever, of what kind, name, 
nature, quality, or property they shall be : And 
to give, grant, demise, alien, assign, and dispose 
lands, tenements, and hereditaments, and to 
do and execute all and every other deeds and '° "'^"' 

^ Corporate 

things, by the name aforesaid ; and that by the Name. 
same name of the master, wardens, and com- 
monalty of the Art or Science of Musicians of 
London they shall be able and may plead and 
be impleaded, make answer and be answered, 
defend and be defended in whatsoever courts „ 

Power to sue 

and places, and before whatsoever judges and andbesuei. 
justices, and whatsoever other persons and 
officers of ours, our heirs and successors, in all 
and singular actions, pleas, suits, plaints, causes, 
matters, and demands whatsoever, of what kind, 
nature, quality, or form they be or shall be, in 
the like manner and form' as any other our 
liege people of this our realm of England, 
persons able and capable in law, or any other 
body corporate and politic within our realm of 
England, can or may have, purchase, receive, 
possess, enjoy, retain, give, grant, demise, 



Common Seal. 



32 

alienate, assign, and dispose, plead and be 
impleaded, answer and be answered, defend and 
be aefended, do, permit or execute : And that 
the master, wardens, and commonalty of the 
Art or Science of Musicians of London aforesaid 
shall have for ever a common seal to serve for 
the dispatching of the affairs and business what- 
soever of them and their successors; and that 
it shall and may be lawful to the same master, 
wardens, and commonalty of the Art or Science 
of Musicians of London aforesaid from time to 
time, at their pleasure, to break and change that 
seal, and to make a new one, as to them shall 
be thought meet : And, moreover, we will and 
Election oi ^y these presents for us, our heirs and suc- 

Master, 

cessors, do grant to* the foresaid master, wardens, 
and commonalty, and their successors, that 
there may be and shall be for ever one of the 
commonalty aforesaid, to be chosen in form 
hereafter in these presents mentioned, who shall 
be and shall be named the master of the said 
Art or Science of Musicians of London : And 
that likewise there may be and shall be two of 
two Wardens, the commonalty of the same art or science, to 
be named and chosen in form hereafter in these 
presents mentioned, who shall be and shall be 



33 

named wardens of the Art or Science of 
Musicians of London aforesaid : And that like- 
wise there may be and shall be thirteen or more, '"'' '^ or more, 

notexceediDg20 

not exceeding the number of twenty in the Assistants, 
whole, to be chosen of the commonalty aforesaid 
in form hereafter in these presents mentioned, 
who shall be and shall be named assistants of 
the Art or Science of Musicians of London, and 
shall be from time to time aiding ajid assisting to 
the same master and wardens for the time being 
in all causes, business, and matters touching or 
concerning the said commonalty ■- And, more- 
over, we will and by these presents for us, our 
heirs and successors, do grant to the foresaid 
master, wardens, and commonalty of the Art or Power to mike 
Science of Musicians of London aforesaid, and Jl- '"*"" 

' Ordinances. 

to their successors, that the master, wardens, and 
assistants of the Art or Science of Musicians of 
London for the time being, or the greater part 
of them, upon summons of the master and 
wardens for the time being, or the greater part 
of them (being gathered together for this pur- 
pose), in that behalf to be made, may have and 
shall have full power and authority to frame, 
appoint, ordain, and make from time to time 
reasonable laws, statutes, constitutions, decrees, 

D 



u 



or the 

government of 
the Company 
and of all 
Minstrels and 
Musicians of 
the City of 
London and 
within 3 miles 
thereof. 



and to impose 
fines and 
penalties 



and ordinances whatsoever, in writing, which to 
them, or the greater part of them, according to 
their good discretions, shall seem to be good, 
wholesome, profitable, honest, and necessary for 
the good rule and government of the master, 
wardens, and commonalty of the art or science 
aforesaid, and of all other minstrels and 
musicians of the City of London, and within 
three miles of the same city, for the time being, 
and for the declaration in what manner and 
form the same master, wardens, and assistants, 
and all and singular persons of the commonalty 
aforesaid, shall bear and behave themselves in 
their office, art, and science, for the further public 
weal and common profit of the same master, 
wardens, and commonalty of the art or science 
aforesaid, and in all other affairs and causes 
whatsoever touching or in anywise concerning 
the art and science aforesaid : And that the 
same master, wardens, and assistants of the art 
and science aforesaid for the time being, or the 
greater part of them, as often as they shall make, 
frame, ordain, or establish such laws, statutes, 
institutions, ordinances, and constitutions in 
form aforesaid, shall and may make, limit, and 
provide such pains, punishments, and penalties, 



3^ 

by imprisonment of body, or by fines and ameir- 
ciaments, or by both of them, towards and upon '<"■ breach of 

11 a- 1 • , , ^'^"^ Bye-Law 

all oltenders against the same laws, statutes, 
institutions, ordinances, and constitutions, or any 
of them, as to the same master, wardens, and 
assistants for the time being, or the greater part 
of them, shall be thought necessary or requisite 
for the observation of the same laws, ordinances, 
and constitutions; and the same fines and 
amerciaments to have to the use of the said 
master, wardens, and commonalty, and their 
successors, without impediment of us, our heirs 
or successors, or of Einy officers or ministers of 
us, our heirs or successors, and without any 
account therefore to be yielded to us, our heirs 
or successors: All and every which said laws, 
ordinances, statutes, and constitutions so as 
aforesaid to be made we will shall be observed 
under the pains therein contained, so that the 
same laws, ordinances, constitutions, imprison- provided they 

. 1 1 b' reasonable. 

ments, fines, and amerciaments be reasonable, 
and not repugnant, nor contrary to the laws, 
statutes, customs, or rights of our realm of 
England : And for the better execution of our 
will and grant in this behalf we have assigned, 
named, created, constituted, and made, and by 



36 



MASTER . 
Phillip London, 
till 2gth Sept., 
1604. 



FIRST 

WARDENS. 

Isaac Thorpe 

and 

Thomas Carter, 

till 29th Sept., 

1604. 



these presents for us, our heirs and successors, 
do assign, name, create, constitute, and make, 
our beloved PhiUip London to be the first and 
present master of the foresaid Art or Science of 
the Musicians of London : Willing that the same 
Phillip London shall be and continue master of 
the art or science aforesaid from the date of 
these presents untO' the Feast of St. Michael the 
Archangel next following after the date of these 
presents, and from the same feast until one 
other to the office of master of the art or science 
aforesaid shall be in due form chosen and 
elected according to the orders and provisions 
hereafter in these presents expressed and de- 
clared, if the Scune Phillip London shall so long 
live : We have also assigned, named, and 
appointed, and by these presents fox us, our 
heirs and successors, do assign, name, and 
appoint, our well-beloved Isaac Thorpe and 
Thomas Carter to be the two first and present 
wardens of the said Art or Science of the 
Musicians of London, to continue in the said 
office of wardens of the said art or science from 
the date of these presents unto the foresaid 
Feast of St. Michael the Archangel next coming 
after the date of these presents, and from the 



37 

same feast until two others to the same office 
of wardens of the same art or science shall be 
elected and chosen according to the ordinances 
and provisions in these presents expressed and 
declared, if the said Isaac Thorpe and Thomas 
Carter shall so long live, unless in the mean- 
time they, or either of them, shall be removed 
from that office for their evil government or evil 
behaviour in that behalf, or for some reasonable 
cause: And we have assigned, named, created, 
and constituted, and by these presents for us, 
our heirs and successors, do assign, name, con- 
stitute, and make, our well-beloved Anthony p,„^j, 
Tindall, James Sherman, Walter Lowman, assistants 
WilHam Warren, Arthur Norton, Tristram Anthony xindaii 

and 13 others, 

Waters, William Benton, Rowland Robedge, appointed for 

life. 

Robert Baker, John Mitchell, John Popson, 
Vincent Johnveryn, John Bickley, and Simon 
Hopper to be the first and present assistants 
of the same master, wardens, and commonalty 
of the art or science aforesaid, to continue in 
the same offices during their natural lives, unless 
they or any of them shall be in the meantime 
amoved from thence for their evil government 
or evil behaviour in that behalf, or for any other 
reasonable cause: And that it shall and may 



38 



The Court from 
time to time to 
elect 

'* Ancientest 
'and most 
'* worthy 
"Freemen of the 
** Commonalty" 
lobe Assistants. 



Oath of 
Assistants. 



Master and 
Warden to be 
elected 
annuallvi 



be lawful to the same master, wardens, and 
assistants for the time being, or to the greater 
part of them for the time being, at their 
pleasure, to elect, name, and admit from time 
to time such and so many of the ancientest and 
most worthy freemen of the same commonalty 
as to them shall be thought meet to be the 
assistants of the same master and wardens, and 
their successors ; and that he or they, after he 
or they shall be so elected and named, shall 
take a corporal oath before the master and 
wardens for the time being to execute that 
office rightly, well, and honestly in all things 
touching that office (so that the number of the 
said assistants do not at any time exceed the 
number of 20 persons) ; and to remove any of 
the said assistants for the time being, or which 
hereafter shall be, for any reasonable cause, and 
to choose, appoint, and admit others of new : 
And, moreover, we will and grant by these 
presents for us, our heirs and successors, to the 
said master, wardens, and commonalty, and 
their successors, that the said master, wardens, 
and assistants of the art or science aforesaid 
for the time being, or the greater part of them, 
from time to time, at all times to come, shall 



39 

and may have power and authority every year 

for ever at the Feast of St. Michael the Arch- •' Michaelmas, 

or within 

angel, or within 20 days after that feast, to name 20 days atter. 
and choose, and that they shall and may name 
and choose, one of the freemen of the common- 
alty aforesaid, the which shall be master of the 
Art and Science of the Musicians of London for 
one whole year then next following : And that 
he which shall be elected and named to be 
master of the art or science aforesaid shall, 
before his admittance into that office, take his 
corporal oath before the last master, his prede- O""' "' Master 
cessor, and the wardens of the art or science 
aforesaid for the time being truly, well, and 
faithfully to execute that office in all things 
touching the same office ; and also two others 
of the foresaid commonalty of the art or science 
aforesaid which shall be wardens of the same 
art or science aforesaid for one whole year then 
next ensuing: And that he which shall be 
elected and chosen as aforesaid into the office Master and 

Wardenstohold 

of the master of the art or science aforesaid office for one 
shall and may execute the office of the master '"'"'■ 
of the art or science aforesaid for one whole year 
then next following ; and that they which shall 
be elected and chosen as aforesaid into the 



40 



Oath of 
Wardens. 



office of the wardens of the art or science afore- 
said shall execute the office of the wardens of 
the same art or science for one whole year then 
next following, and take a corporal oath before 
the master of the art or science aforesaid, the 
last wardens, their predecessors, smd so many of 
the assistants as shall be then present, to 
execute the office of wardens of the art or science 
aforesaid well, uprightly, and honestly in all 
things touching that office : And, further, we 
will and by these presents grant for us, our 
heirs' and successors, to the foresaid master, 
Proviso m event yy^rdens, and commonalty, and their successors, 

of vacancy by "^ 

that if the master and wardens of the com- 
monalty aforesaid, or any of them, shall happen 
to die or to be removed from their office at any 
time within one year after they or any of them 
shall be elected and chosen as aforesaid to the 
office of the master or to the office of wardens 
of the art or science aforesaid (which said master 
and wardens and every of them we will shall 
be to be removed for evil government or for 
any other reasonable cause, by the greater part 
of the same master, wardens, and assistants), 
that then and so often it shall and may be 
lawful for such and so many of the same master, 



r vacancy by 
death or 
removal of 
Master or 
Wardens. 



41 

wardens, and assistants who shall then survive 
or remain, or the greater part of them, at their 
pleasure, to elect and choose one other to be 
master, and one other or two others to be warden 
or wardens of the art or science aforesaid, accord- 
ing to the ordinances and provisions before by 
these presents declared, to execute and exercise 
the said office of master or the said office or 
offices of warden or wardens aforesaid until the 
Feast of St. Michael the Archangel then next 
following, the like corporal oath being taken 
as aforesaid in form aforesaid, and so as often 
as any such occasion shall happen : And, more- 
over, of our more abundant special grace, certain 
science, and mere motion we have given and Licence to hold 

. land in 

granted, and by these presents for us, our heirs Mortmain, 
and successors, do give and grant, to the said 
master, wardens, and commonalty, and their 
successors, special free license, lawful power, 
faculty, and authority to have, purchase, receive, 
and possess to them and their successors for ever 
messuages, lands, tenements, meadows, feed- 
ings, pastures, woods, underwoods, rectories, 
tithes, rents, reversions, and other hereditaments 
whatsoever within our realm of England or else- 
where within our dominions, as well of us, our 



42 

heirs and successors, as of any other person or 
persons, which are not immediately held of us, 
our heirs or successors, in capite or by knight's 
service, so as the same messuages, lands, tene- 
ments, meadows, feedings, pastures, woods, 
underwoods, rectories, tithes, rents, reversions, 
services, and other hereditaments do not exceed 
Net nnnusi in the wholc the yearly value of twenty pounds 
exceed twent '^^^^ ^^'^ above all charges cind reprises, (the 
pounds. statute of lands and tenements not to be put 

into mortmain, or any other statute, act, ordi- 
nance, or provision heretofore had, made, or pro- 
vided, or any other cause, matter, or thing what- 
soever to the contrary thereof in anywise not- 
withstanding) : And also we give and grant for 
us, our heirs and successors, by these presents 
to every subject and subjects of us, our heirs 
and successors, free and special license, lawful 
power, faculty, and authority that they or any 
of them may give, grant, sell, bequeath, or 
alienate messuages, lands, tenements, meadows, 
feedings, pastures, woods, underwoods, rectories, 
tithes, rents, reversions, services, and other 
hereditaments whatsoever, which are not held 
of us, our heirs and successors, in capite or other- 
wise by knight's service, unto the said master, 



43 

wardens, and commonalty of the Art or Science 
of the Musicians of London, and to their suc- 
cessors, so that all the same messuages, lands, 
tenements, meadows, feedings, pastures, woods, 
underwoods, rectories, tithes, rents, reversions, 
services and other hereditaments so to be given, 
granted, bequeathed, or alienated to the said 
master, wardens, and commonalty, and their 
successors, by virtue of these presents do not 
exceed in the whole the clear yearly value of 
twenty pounds by year above all charges and 
reprises ; the statute of lands and tenements 
not to be put into mortmain, or any other thing, 
cause, or matter whatsoever before this time 
had, made, ordained, or provided to the con- 
trary thereof in anywise notwithstanding: 
And, moreover, we will and by these presents 
for us, our heirs and successors, for the better 
rule and government of all those which in our 
City of London, and within three miles of the 
said city, do profess and exercise and here- 
after shall profess and exercise the art or 
science of music, we give and grant to the said 

TheCompanyto 

master, wardens, and commonalty of the Art or have the control 
Science of Musicians of London, and to their """ «''^""'""" 
successors, that the said master and wardens. 



44 



and Minstrels 
in London and 
witiiin 3 miles 
thereof. 



and their successors for the time being, at all 
times to come shall have the survey, search, 
of all Musicians Correction, and government of all and singular 
musicians and minstrels within our said City of 
London, or within the suburbs, liberties, and 
precincts of the same city, or within three miles 
of the same city, and within all liberties, fran- 
chises, jurisdictions, and places, as well exempt 
as not exempt, situate and being within the said 
city, suburbs, and three miles of the same city : 
Also we will and by these presents grant to the 
said master, wardens, and commonalty of the 
Art or Science of Musicians of London that they 
may have and shall have these our letters patents 
under our great seal of England in due manner 
made and sealed without fine or fee, great or 
small, to be yielded or paid unto us in the 
Hanaper of our Chancery, or otherwise to our 
use howsoever, albeit express mention of the 
true yearly value or certainty of the premises, 
or any of them, or of other gifts or grants by us 
or any of our ancestors or progenitors before 
this time made to the foresaid master, wardens, 
and commonalty of the Art or Science of 
Musicians of London be not mentioned in these 
presents, or any statute, act, ordinance, provision, 



This Charier 
granted free 
from fine or fee- 



45 

proclamation, or restraint to the contrciry thereof 
before this time had, made, ordained, or pro- 
vided, or any other thing, cause, or matter 
whatsoever in anywise notwithstanding. In 
witness whereof we have caused these our letters 
to be made patents. Witness ourself at West- 
minster, the eighth day of July, in the second Dated 

8th July, 1604. 

year of our reign of England, France, and 
Ireland ; and of Scotland the seven and 
thirtieth. 

By Writ of Privy Seal, 

T. RAVENSCROFT. 



BYELAWS: 

Confirmed by the Lord Chancellor on 
the 25th August 1606. 



Taken from the contemporary copy in 
the possession of the Company. 



To all people to whom these presents shall 
come, Thomas Lord Ellesmere, Lord Chancellor 
of England ; Thomas Earl Dorset, Lord Trea- 
surer of England ; and Sir John Popham, 
Knight, Lord Chief Justice of the Pleas before 
His Majesty to be holden, send greeting in our 
Lord God everlasting. Whereas in a certain 
Act or Statute in the Parliament holden at 
Westminster the five and twentieth day of 
January, in the nineteenth year of the reign of 
the late King of famous memory after the 
Conquest, Henry the Seventh, made and 
ordained for the weal and profit of the sub- 
jects, it was, amongst other things, ordained, 
established, and enacted that no master, 
wardens, or fellowships of crafts or mysteries. 



48 

or any of them, nor any rulers of guilds or 
fraternities should take upon them to make any 
act or ordinance, or to execute any acts or ordi- 
nances by them theretofore made, in disheritage 
or diminution of the King's prerogative, or any 
other, or against the common profit of the 
people, but if the same acts and ordinances 
were examined and approved by the Chancellor 
Treasurer of England, the chief justices of either 
bench, or three of them, or else before both the 
justices of assize in their circuit or progress in 
that shire where such acts or ordinances be 
made, upon pain of forty pounds for every 
time that they do the contrary, as in the said 
Act of Parliament more plainly doth and may 
appear. Know ye that Tristram Waters, master 
of the Art or Science of Musicians of London, 
and William Benton and Vincent Janvrin, now 
wardens of the said art or science, with the 
whole assent and consent of the assistants of 
the same, willing and desiring the said Act of 
Parliament in all and every thing to be duly 
observed and kept, the first day of August, in 
the year of the reign of Our Sovereign Lord 
James, by the Grace of God King of England, 
France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, the 



49 

Fourth, and of Scotland the Fortieth, have 
exhibited a certain petition containing divers 
articles for acts and ordinances for the better 
rule and government of the Art or Science of 
Musicians of London dwelling and inhabiting 
or which hereafter shall dwell or inhabit in the 
said city, the suburbs thereof, and within three 
miles of the said city, in the Art or Science of 
Musicians of London aforesaid, and for the com- 
mon weal and conservation of the good estate 
of the said Art or Science of Musicians, and 
have instantly desired us that we all and every 
their acts and ordinances hereafter mentioned 
to us exhibited would examine and approve, and 
those and every of them correct and amend in 
due and convenient manner and form as the 
said recited Act of Parliament requireth -. We 
well perceiving and considering their said sup- 
plication to be good and acceptable according 
to their desires, and by authority of the said 
Act of Parliament to us given, all and every their 
acts and ordinances to us exhibited, have seen, 
read, and well understood, and all and every of 
them examined, corrected, and reformed, the 
tenor whereof hereafter followeth : The Election 

Imprimis, be it ordained that from henceforth, wapjens. 



so 

yearly, at the Feast of St. Michael the Arch- 
angel, or within twenty days next after the same 
feast, the master and wardens of the said Art 
or Science of the Musicians of London, with 
the assistants of the same fellowship, or the 
greater part of them, shall from time to time 
elect and choose out of the freemen of the said 
Company one master and two wardens of the 
same art and science to rule and govern the 
same fellowship for one whole year then next 
ensuing : And if any of the master or wardens 
so chosen or to be chosen shall hapf)en to die or 
for reasonable cause be removed or deprived 
from his place and office within one year next 
after he shall be so elected, that then, within 
fourteen days next after such death, deprivation, 
or removing of any of the said master or 
wardens, one other or others of the freemen of 
the said Company shall be in like sort elected 
and chosen by the rest of the wardens and 
assistants of the same fellowship to serve in the 
place or stead of such of them as shall so happen 
to die, be deprived, or removed until the Feast 
of St. Michael the Archangel then next ensuing : 
And the said master and wardens so newly 
elected and chosen shall take a corporal path for 



51 

ihe due execution of their offices and places in 
manner and form hereafter prescribed, and 
according to the limitation of the letters patents 
granted to the said master, wardens, and com- 
monalty by our now Sovereign Lord the King : 
And whatsoever person or persons of the said 
fellowship being chosen by the said wardens 
and assistants, or the more part of them, to be 
master or any of the wardens of the said art or 
science, if he shall refuse to take upon him the 
said office of master or warden and the charges 
thereunto belonging, or to take the said oath, 
being thereunto required, he shall then presently 
pay to the commonalty and fellowship of the 
said Art or Science of Musicians for his or their 
refusal for every time he or they shall so refuse 
the sum of five rciarks, to be levied of his or 
their goods and chattels, and to be employed 
as hereafter is specified. 2. 

Item : be it ordained and established that, ''''"' Election ot 

the Livery, etc- 

according to the ancient custom of the City of 
London, the master and wardens and assistants 
of the foresaid Art or Science of Musicians of 
London for the time being, and their successors, 
may and shall elect and choose, at all such times 
as shall seem good unto them, so many of the 



52 

said fellowship into the livery and clothing of 
the same fellowship as shall seem unto them 
meet and convenient for the worship of the 
said City and the credit of the said Art, Science, 
and Commonalty of the Musicians of London : 
And whatsoever person or persons of the said 
science or fellowship shall be at any time here- 
after enabled and called by the said master and 
wardens and assistants for the time being, or by 
the said master and wardens and eight of the 
said assistants at the least, to be one of the livery 
of the said fellowship, and of his obstinacy and 
frowardness shall refuse and deny to take the 
same upon him at the time appointed unto him 
by the said master and wardens and assistants, 
that then he so refusing shall forfeit and pay as 
often as he so refuseth forty shillings ; and that 
also all and every person and persons being 
called and chosen into the assistants or livery as 
aforesaid, and taking upon him or them the said 
clothing, shall pay to the said master and 
wardens of the said fellowship, to the use of the 
said fellowship, twenty shillings at his admit- 
tance. 
3- Item: be it ordained that if any person or 

Change of 

Company. persons of the said Art, Science, or Fellowship 



53 

of Musicians, of his own motion or frowardness, 
or by the procurement of any other person or 
persons, at any time hereafter shall go out of 
the said fellowship to any other mystery, fellow- 
ship, or occupation without the express consent 
of the master, wardens, and assistants of the 
fellowship of the said Art or Science of the 
Musicians of London for the time being, or the 
more part of them, in writing under their 
common seal to be had and obtained, shall 
forfeit and pay ten pounds of good and lawful 
money, to be levied of his or their goods and 
chattels. 

4. 

Item: be it ordained and established that Attendance 

upon warning. 

every person and persons of the said art or 
science shall be obedient to all manner of lawful 
summons and warnings given to him or them 
in the master and wardens' names for the time 
being by the beadle or other common of&cer of 
the said art or science and commonalty, or other- 
wise in the behalf of the said master and 
wardens of the said art or science for the time 
being, and shall be always ready to come and 
shall come unto them in such lawful and decent 
manner as he shall be assigned to do, at the hour 
and place to him conveniently appointed, for 



54 

such causes and matters, either concerning the 
affairs of the King's Majesty, his heirs and 
successors, Kings and Queens of this realm, or 
the estate of the City of London, or anything 
concerning the said art or science or any 
brother or sister of the same fellowship, whereof 
he shall have further knowledge at his coming, 
or for the burial of a brother or sister of the 
said fellowship ; and if he will not come upon 
such warning, and in such manner, at his hour 
and place appointed him, that then he shall 
forfeit and pay for every default, for not keeping 
his hour and place, twelve pence ; and if he shall 
not come at all upon such warning to the place 
of assembly while the master or wardens and 
assistants shall be there together, but shall 
wittingly absent himself without a reasonable 
excuse, to be allowed of by the said master and 
wardens, he shall forfeit and pay for every such 
offence two shillings. 

Item : be it ordained if any person or persons 
the Science of of the said fellowship, art, or science, or any 

MusiC' 

other person whatsoever, shall use or exercise 
the said Art or Science of Musicians, or any 
faculty thereof, or make that any means toward 
the getting of his living within the said City 



5. 
License to use 



55 

of London and suburbs thereof, or three miles 
compass of the said city, without the Hcense or 
consent of the said master, wardens, and assist- 
ants, or the more part of them, in writing under 
their common seal first had and obtained, or 
shall not observe and obey the orders to be set 
down by the said master, wardens, and assist- 
ants, or the more part of them, every one so 
offending shall forfeit and pay such sum or sums 
of money or fines as shall by the said master, 
wardens, and assistants, or the more part of 
them, be imposed upon them for every such 
offence, so as the same exceed not the sum of 
forty shillings. 

Item : it is also ordained that the master and Quarter and 
wardens of the said Art or Science of Musicians 
of London for the time being shall or may yearly 
keep four quarter days in the year; and also 
within every quarter of the year quarterly for 
ever two other courts or assemblies, or more if 
need so require, at their common hall or other 
convenient place of meeting, as well for reforma- 
tion of the defaults or abuses used in the said 
art or science as to hear the complaints of all 
such as shall find themselves grieved con- 
cerning the same, and determine thereof accord- 



56 

ing to their knowledge, wisdoms, and discre- 
tions ; all which quarter days, courts, and 
assemblies shall be kept at convenient times to 
be appointed at the discretion of the said master 
and wardens of the said art or science for the 
time being: And every brother or widow of 
the same art or science shall pay for quarterage 
at every of the said quarter days quarterly for 
ever sixpence : And if any of the said master 
and wardens absent themselves and come not 
unto the common hall of the said fellowship at 
every such quarter day, and to every of the said 
other courts or assemblies, or if they shall not 
keep every of the said courts or assemblies ac- 
cording to the times or in form abovesaid, that 
then for so doing or neglecting to do as aforesaid 
he or they shall forfeit at every time in the name 
of a pain five shillings, without a reasonable 
excuse proved and allowed by and before the re- 
sidue of the said master, wardens, and assistants 
of the said art or science, or the more part of 
them : And also every one of the said assistants 
that shall be at any time hereafter lawfully 
warned to come to such day and place appointed 
for the said courts and shall make default shall 
forfeit and pay for every such default, without 



57 

a reasonable excuse proved and allowed by and 
before the said master and wardens, two shillings 
and sixpence. 

7. 

Item : be it ordained that no person of the Ajiinst reviling, 
said fellowship shall unseemly revile, rebuke, °'°' 
smite, or abuse any brother of the same fellow- 
ship, either by facing, bracing, evil reproaching, 
or affraying, in the presence of the said master 
and wardens or elsewhere, nor in anywise dis- 
order or misbehave him or themselves toward 
the master or wardens of the said fellowship, 
nor to any other of the said fellowship, upon 
pain to forfeit for every such offence forty 
shillings. 

8. 

Item : be it ordained if any person or persons Against 
that do or shall use the said art or science shall, »"pp'»"'"« 
at any time or times, in any place, by any means, 
directly or indirectly, supplant, defeat, or put 
out, or wittingly practice to supplant, defeat, 
or put out, any musician free of the said fellow- 
ship, being first hired or spoken to to serve at 
any triumphs, marriages, revels, feasts, dinners, 
suppers, banquets, meetings, guilds, or brother- 
hoods, or for any such like occasions, to the 
hindrance of any brother of the said fellowship 
that was formerly bespoken, that then every 



9. 



58 

person so offending shall forfeit and pay for 
such offence forty shillings, and suffer imprison- 
ment of his or their bodies till he or they do 
pay the same. 

Apposers. Moreover, be it ordained that the master and 

wardens of the said art or science, or such other 
discreet and skilful persons of the said Company 
as for the time being shall be by the said master 
and wardens assigned or appointed, shall and 
may at all times hereafter, so often as they shall 
think needful and requisite, call before them to 
the common hall of the said Company, or to 
such other convenient place of meeting as the 
said master and wardens or the parties by them 
assigned shall appoint, all persons, as well free 
of the said fellowship as all others, which do or 
shall use or exercise the said Art or Science of 
Musicians, or the teaching of music or dancing, 
or any faculty belonging to the said art or science 
of musicians or music, and used for their main- 
tenance, gain, or living within the City of London, 
and in the liberties thereof or within three 
miles of the same city, and there to examine, 
approve, and allow the said parties and every 
of them for their sufficiency and skill in the 
said art or science, or to reject and disallow of 



59 

any pairty for his insufficiency and want of skill ; 
and that no person or persons, whether he be 
master, servant, or apprentice, so called before 
the said master and wardens, or before the 
parties by them assigned, and being by them 
disallowed as insufficient and unfit, shall pre- 
sume to use or exercise the said art or science, 
thereby to make any gain or have any reward 
for the same, until he shall afterwards be 
allowed, upon pain to forfeit for every time he 
shall so offend the sum of twenty shillings : 
And it is ordained that if the said master or Against 
wardens, or their deputies, shall find any abuse '°°'' "^' 
or disorder used or practised in the said art or 
science, or any the faculties or qualities afore- 
said, within the limits aforesaid, to the slander, 
hurt, or prejudice of the said art or science, or 
shall find any foreigner to use or practise the 
said art or science within the freedoms and liber- 
ties of the said city, or three miles compass of 
the same ; or if any person summoned or Wcurned 
to appear at the said common hall or other 
convenient place of meeting to be examined, 
apposed, approved, allowed, or disallowed as 
aforesaid shall refuse to appear or obey what 
shall be done and set down by the said master 



11. 

Qnarteraee. 



60 

and wardens, or the persons that by them shall 
be assigned, that then all and every such person 
and persons so offending shall forfeit and pay 
to the said master and wardens and commonalty 
for every such offence twenty shillings, and shall 
suffer imprisonment of his and their bodies, at 
the discretion of the said master and wardens : 
And that the same penalty of twenty shillings 
for every offence cormnitted by any apprentice 
or servant contrary to this ordinance or the 
ordinance next preceding with the privity and 
allowance of his or their master, shall be levied 
and paid of and by the master of the said 
servant or apprentice. 

Item : it is ordained that all persons not being 
free of the said Company that shall use or exer- 
cise the said art or science, or any faculty or 
quality touching and concerning the same, 
toward the getting of his or their living within 
the said city or liberties thereof, and all others 
allowed to use the same within three miles of 
the said city, and getting his or their living 
thereby to their own use, shall forfeit and pay to 
the said master, wardens, and commonalty at 
the four quarter days, at or in their common 
hall or other convenient place in that behalf 



6i 

assigned, sixpence quajterly : And if any of 
them shall fail to present themselves or pay the 
said quarterage at the said common hall or other 
place aforesaid at the said quarter days, having 
such sufficient warning thereof as the freemen 
of the said Company are to have, then he or 
they so failing shall forfeit and pay for every 
such default one shilling, except he show such 
reasonable cause in excuse of his default as shall 
be allowed of by the said master and wardens. 

12 

Item : it is ordained that all and every persons presenting 
free of the said commonalty that shall entertain Apprentices 
or take any apprentice shall, at the assembly 
of the said master and wardens at the court or 
quarter day next and immediately after the 
sealing of the indentures to be made between 
them, present the same his apprentice to and 
before the master and wardens of the said Art 
or Science of Musicians of London for the time 
being, to the intent the same master and 
wardens may have due examination of the said 
apprentice whether he be free born or not, and 
to see that he be clean and whole limbed ; also 
to know what age he is of, and, further, to imder- 
stand the number of years that the said appren- 
tice shall serve, and when the same shall begin 



13. 



62 

and end ; and that every master shall pay to 
the master and wardens and commonalty of the 
said art or science two shillings sixpence for the 
presentment of every such apprentice, according 
to the ancient custom of the said city ; and that 
every person that shall do contrary to this 
ordinance shall pay for every time offending 
twenty shillings. 
Number of Item : it is ordaincd and established that 

from henceforth no person or persons whatso- 
ever that now or hereafter shall be master or 
wardens of the said Art or Science of Musicians 
of London shall take, have, or keep above two 
apprentices using the said art or science at any 
one time : And that none other person or persons 
of the same art or science not being or having 
been warden of the said Company shall either 
take, have, or keep above one apprentice at once 
using the said art or science tmtil the said 
apprentice hath served with his master unto the 
last half year of the term of his apprenticeship 
mentioned in his indenture, and then the same 
master may take one other apprentice : And 
that no person or persons which are not free of 
the said commonalty that do or shall use the 
said art or science within this city or the liberties 



63 

thereof, or within three miles of the same city, 
shall at any time hereafter, directly or indirectly, 
have, take, or retain to be brought up in the said 
art or science any more apprentices than only 
one apprentice at one time, unless the master of 
such apprentice shall have continually used the 
same art or science to his own use for his main- 
tenance and living by the space of fourteen 
years after the expiration of his term of appren- 
ticehood : In which case it shall be lawful for 
any such person to have and keep two appren- 
tices at one time, and not above ; and that every 
person which shall offend against the true 
meaning of this act shall forfeit and pay the sum 
of twenty shillings for every month that he shall 
continue the keeping of any such apprentice. 

Item : it is ordained that no person using the Against abuse 
said Art or Science of Musicians of London, or si„ging, 
any quality or faculty of dancing, shall teach, 
keep, or play, nor haunt, exercise, or use, any 
dancing in any school of dancing upon any 
Sabbath Days within the said city or liberties 
thereof, or within three miles of the same city, 
upon pain to forfeit for every such offence forty 
shillings. 

Neither shall any person sing any ribaldry, 



64 

wanton, or lascivious songs or ditties at any 
time or place within the City of London or 
liberties thereof, or within three miles of the 
same city, whereby God may be dishonoured, 
or any slander or infamy may arise or be given 
of or to the said science, upon pain that every 
person offending against the true meaning of 
this branch of this act shall forfeit for his oifence 
ten shillings, and suffer imprisonment of his or 
their bodies for such convenient time as shall 
be thought fit by the discretion of the master 
and wardens of the same society for the time 
being. 

Ordering of Item : it is ordained that no person or persons 

the end oj their '^^ the Said scicnce or fellowship from henceforth 
shall present any of his apprentices before the 
Chamberlain of London, or his deputy, to be 
made free of the said city after his years be 
expired, until he have presented his said appren- 
tice before the master, wardens, and assistants of 
the said Art or Science of Musicians of London, 
or the more part of them, for the time being at 
their common hall or meeting place to be 
examined of his service and continuance of the 
same : And if upon due proof, as in such case is 
used, it shall appear unto the said master and 



15. 



term. 



65 

wardens that the said apprentice hath duly 
served and continued as an apprentice during 
the term of his years, as in such case is used, then 
the same apprentice to submit himself to the 
rules and ordinances of the same fellowship in 
maimer and form hereafter specified, and then 
to lay down and pay for his admission to the 
said master and wardens three shillings and 
fourpence : And after that the same master 
and wardens shall present the same late appren- 
tice before the said chamberlain, or his deputy, 
for the time being, and thereupon shall cause the 
said late apprentice to be admitted into the 
said society and into the freedom of the said 
city, upon pain to every master of such appren- 
tice doing contrary to this ordinance to forfeit 
for every such offence forty shillings. 

And it is further ordained that if hereafter seiiing 
any person or persons of the said Art or Science App""""^- 
of Musicians of London, being a freeman of the 
said commonalty, or any other using or that shall 
use the said art, science, faculties, and quahties 
aforesaid, or any of them, within the said city 
and liberties, or within three miles compass 
thereof, having an apprentice bound unto him 
in the science or mystery aforesaid, be minded 



66 

and will sell the term of years of the same 

his apprentice to any other man of the same 

art or science, or to any other, that 

then he shall first bring the same his 

apprentice to and before the master and 

wardens of the said Art or Science of Musicians 

of London for the time being that they may 

note and write the selling and turning over .of 

the same apprentice in their hall book : And the 

master that so shall make sale of his apprentice 

shall forfeit and pay two shillings ; and that 

every person of the said art or science that shall 

offend contrary tO' this ordinance shall pay for 

every such offence twenty shillings. 
17. 
Playing under Item: it is Ordained and established that no 

windows. person or persons free of the said art or science, 

or any their servants or apprentices, or any 
other person or persons professing the said art or 
science, or any their servants or apprentices, 
either in consort or otherwise, shall at any time 
or times hereafter play upon any kind of instru- 
ment or instruments, either evening or morning, 
at or under any nobleman, knight, or gentleman's 
window or lodging in the street, or the window 
or lodging of any other person or persons what- 
soever within the City of London, suburbs, 



67 

liberties, and precincts aforesaid, without license 
and leave of the master, wardens, and eight 
of the assistants at the least of the said Art or 
Science of Musicians of London for the time 
being, upon pain that the master of every such 
servant or apprentice shall forfeit and pay for 
every person so offending and for every time 
that he or they shall so offend the sum of three 
shillings and fourpence. 

1 8- 

Item : it is likewise ordained and established ordering of 
that no person or persons free of the said Art Consorts, 
or Science of Musicians, nor any their servants 
or apprentices, nor any other person or persons 
using or exercising the said art or science, or 
any their apprentices or servants whatsoever, 
shall play at any weddings, feasts, banquets, 
revels, or other assemblies or meetings within the 
City of London, suburbs, or precincts aforesaid, 
under the number of four, in consort or with 
violins, upon pain that the master of every such 
servant or apprentice shall forfeit and pay for 
every person, servant, and apprentice, and for 
every time he or they shall offend contrary to 
this ordinance, the sum of three shillings and 
fourpence. i9. 

Item : it is ordained and established that the O''''"'"^ "' 

Leases. 



68 

master and wardens of the said Art or Science 
of Musicians of London for the time being shall 
not at any time hereafter demise, grant, let, or 
set any lands or tenements which shall here- 
after belong to the Company of the said Art or 
Science of Musicians of London to any person 
or persons by lease for term of years or other- 
wise, nor shall receive any fine or fines or 
incomes, nor shall do any act whatsoever which 
shall bind, charge, or hinder the said Company, 
and the master, wardens, and commonalty 
thereof, without the special agreement, will, 
consent, and assent of all the assistants of the 
same Company for the time being, or of eight 
of the same assistants at the least, and of the 
same master and wardens, upon pain of for- 
feiture of twenty pounds for every time they or 
any of them shall do contrary to the meaning 
of this ordinance .- And that all and every 
demise, grant, act and acts hereafter to be made, 
procured, or done by the master or wardens to 
the contrary shall be utterly void and of no 
force. 

20. 

Neeiigence of Item : it is Ordained that if hereafter the 

master and wardens of the said Art or Science 
of Musicians for the time being, or any of them. 



69 

during the time of their continuance in their 
office, shall be found partial, remiss, negligent, 
or not indifferent in executing any of the said 
acts or ordinances comprised in this book, or else 
shall favour any person or persons in his or their 
offences, or for meed, favour, affection, or dread 
shall not execute the said ordinances and every 
of them indifferently to and upon every person 
after their offences according to the meaning 
of this book and the ordinances herein com- 
prised, that then, upon a due proof thereof had 
before the other wardens and the assistants 
of the said art or science for the time being, 
or before the other wardens and eight of the 
same assistants at the least, every person so 
found partial, negligent, or not indifferent as is 
aforesaid, shall forfeit and pay for every time 
so offending forty shillings, more or less, at the 
discretion of the other wardens and of the said 
assistants. 

21. 

Item: it is ordained that the master and Account, 
wardens of the said Art or Science of Musicians 
of London for the time being, and their succes- 
sors master and wardens of the said art or 
science for ever, shall, within one month next 
and immediately after the expiration of their 



70 

office of wardenship and the admission and oath 
of the new master and wardens that shall supply 
their place, make and yield up yearly unto the 
same new master and wardens for the time 
being, and to the assistants of the same company 
or fellowship or eight of the same assistants at 
the least, a true, whole, plain, and perfect 
account, payment and delivery of all and all 
manner sums of money and of all other things 
whatsoever which have been delivered unto 
them, or otherwise by any whatsoever means 
come or ought tO' come tO' the hands, possession, 
order, or custody of them, or any of them, to 
the use of the commonalty of the said Art or 
Science of the Musicians of London during the 
year of their office and charge, and of the office 
and charge of every or any of them, upon pain 
to forfeit and pay at every time for doing con- 
trary to this ordinance ten pounds. 

22. 

Auditors. Item: it is also ordained that every year, 

yearly, against the foresaid day of account to 
be made to the new master and wardens of the 
said Art or Science of Musicians of London for 
the time being by them that last were in the 
same office before, there shall be chosen by the 
same new master and wardens, with the advice 



71 

of the said assistants, four or more to audit, 
hear, try, and examine the same account, which 
auditors shall be chosen out of the foresaid 
assistants of the said art or science ; and such 
person or persons being chosen as aforesaid 
which shall refuse to take upon him or them the 
said office of auditor shall forfeit and pay every 
of them five shillings. 

*= 23. 

Item : it is ordained and established that all Disposition of 

fines. 

and every of the same penalties, fines, amercia- 
ments, forfeitures, and sums of money by these 
ordinances limited and appointed to be taxed, 
forfeited, or paid shall be sued for, levied, and 
recovered by the said master, wardens, and 
fellowship to the use of the said master, wardens, 
commonalty, and fellowship of the said Art or 
Science of the Musicians of London, to be 
employed by the said master and wardens of the 
said art or science for the time being in and 
about the relief of the poor of the commonalty 
and fellowship of the said Art or Science of the 
Musicians of London, and to the sustentation of 
the charge to be borne by the master, wardens, 
and commonalty of the said art or science in the 
common occasions of the said Company: And 
if any person or persons, of his or their froward 



72 

disposition or otherwise, shall hereafter refuse 
or deny to pay in good and lawful money of 
England any quarterages, penalties, fines, forfeit- 
ures, or other amerciaments whatsoever, set or 
assessed, or to be set or assessed, upon him or 
them, that then it shall be lawful to the said 
master and wardens, and their successors 
master and wardens of the said art or science, 
to command and commit all and every such 
person and persons to ward until he shall agree 
with the master and wardens for the time being 
for his contempt and misbehaviour in that 
behalf, and have paid the same : Provided 
always that the said master, wardens, and assist- 
ants for the time being, by their discretions, may 
mitigate, diminish, or abate the said forfeitures, 
penalties, and amerciaments, or any of them, as 
the case shall require, according to equity and 
good conscience : Provided also that these acts 
or ordinances, or anything herein contained, 
shall not in anj^vise extend or be construed to 
extend unto the King's Majesty's musicians in 
ordinary being not free of the said commonalty 
of the musicians of London, anything herein 
contained or expressed to the contrary in any- 
wise notwithstanding. 



73 

24. 

Item : it is ordained that all and every person Submission to 

1 • (• 1 r 11 r ''" orders. 

and persons, being of the full age or 2i years, 
which now are or hereafter shall be of the said 
Art or Science of Musicians of London, now 
using or exercising or which hereafter shall use 
or exercise the said art or science, as well masters 
as journeymen and apprentices, and every of 
them, within the places and precincts aforesaid, 
shall, upon reasonable warning and monition to 
them given personally, appear at the common 
hall, at the time and times for that purpose ap- 
pointed, before the said master, wardens, and 
assistants, or the greater part of them, and then 
and there shall in willing and obedient manner, 
under their hands, submit themselves and yield 
their consents to the true and due performance 
of all and singular the ordinances, laws, constitu- 
tions, and orders above in these presents, upon 
and under the pains in them and every of them 
mentioned, specified, contained, and set down. 

Ye shall swear that ye shall be true to our me Masier and 
Sovereign Lord the King, and to his heirs and '^"''"'' °''"' 
successors Kings and Queens of the realm of 
England : And that you and every of you, 
effectually and diligently, during the time and 
season you shall be or remain in your said office, 



74 

shall, as far forth as you lawfully and conveni- 
ently may, see to and keep the said Art and 
Science of the Musicians in good order and rule, 
and execute your office in every case thereunto 
appertaining truly, justly, and indifferently. So 
help you God, and by the contents of this Book. 

The Assistants' Ye shall swear that ye shall always, in what 
lawfully and conveniently you may, to your 
power faithfully aid and assist the master and 
wardens of the Art or Science of Musicians of 
London for the time being, and every of them, 
as well in the execution of the rules and ordi- 
nances made and ratified for the good order 
and government of the said art as in all other 
affairs whatsoever concerning the same cirt. Good 
and faithful counsel to the best of your know- 
ledge from time to time shall ye give unto them. 
You shall not procure nor consent that the lands, 
revenues or goods of the foresaid Company 
shall be inordinately spent, consumed, or em- 
bezzled, but to the best of your skill and power 
ye shall the same let and withstand. So help 
you God, and by the contents of this Book. 

The Ratification All which acts. Ordinances, constitutions, and 
oaths in manner and form aforesaid, as well at 
the request of the said Tristram Waters, now 



75 

master of the said Art or Science of Musicians of 
London, and of the said WilHam Benton and 
Vincent Janvrin, now wardens, and the com- 
monalty of the same, by the authority and virtue 
of the same Act of Parhament made in the 
nineteenth year of King Henry the Seventh, we, 
the said Chancellor, Treasurer, and Chief Justice 
aforesaid, have seen, perused, read, examined, 
and approved, and for good, laudable, and lawful 
ordinances, constitutions, and oaths we do allow 
and approve. In witness whereof to these 
presents we, the said Lord Chancellor, Lord 
Treasurer, and Chief Justice, have subscribed 
our names and set our seals, the five and 
twentieth day of August, in the fourth year of 
the reign of our Sovereign Lord James, by the 
grace of God King of England, France, and 
Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and of Scotland 
the fortieth. 

Ye shall swear that ye shall be faithful and xheOathofs 
true to our Sovereign Lord the King's Majesty, freeman 
and to his heirs and successors Kings and Queens 
of England; ye shall not do nor consent 
to be done any treasons or felonies, but all such 
as you shall know ye shall duly to your power 



1^ 

do to be revealed and known to the King or 
his Council : And ye shall be obedient unto the 
master and wardens of the Art or Science of 
Musicians of London for the time being in all 
things concerning the same art and science, 
being agreeable to the ordinances of the said art 
and customs of the City of London, and shall 
come duly and truly upon every lawful sum- 
mons to any assembly to be made for any matter 
or cause to be treated and communed upon by 
the master, wardens, and assistants of the said 
art or science, except ye reasonably or lawfully 
be letted, or else to pay such penalties and fines 
as ye shall forfeit by reason of your default : And 
also ye shall be at all times contributory to all 
manner of charges done or to be done by them 
in and about the weal and continuance of the 
said art or science to your power : Also well 
and truly after your power ye shall in all things 
obey, keep, and observe all the acts and ordi- 
nances made for the governance and good order 
of the said art and science, and confirmed 
according to the laws and statutes of this realm 
in that case provided. So help ye God, and by 
the contents of this Book. 

Item : be it ordained if any person or persons 



77 
of the said fellowship, art, or science, or any For not 

. _ . - - covering of 

other person, either free or not free, whatsoever, instruments, 
that shall use or exercise the said art or science 
of music or musicians, or any faculty thereof, 
shall go himself, or suffer his. servant or appren- 
tice to go, in any open street within this city or 
liberties thereof, or within three miles of the 
same city, from house to house with any instru- 
ment or instruments uncased or uncovered in 
any part, to be seen by any passing by, upon 
pain of forfeiture of twelve pence for every such 
offence. 

Item : be it ordained that if any person or Against playing 
persons of the Art, Science, or Fellowship of 
Musicians, or any other person whatsoever that 
shall use the said Art or Science of Musicians 
within this city or liberties thereof, shall by 
themselves, their servants, or apprentices play 
upon or with any instrument, or use the said art 
or science of music or any other thing concern- 
ing the same in consort or any other kind of 
instruments whatsoever of or with any foreigner 
or foreigners, their servants, or apprentices, 
within the city or liberties thereof and not else- 
where, upon pain to forfeit and pay for every 
such offence three shillings and fourpence. 



78 
For government Item : be it Ordained if ciny person or persons, 

of goers abroad. . r i a o • 

free or foreign of the Art, Science, or Fellowship 
of Musicians, shall suffer their servants or appren- 
tices to serve by themselves with any music 
within this city or liberties thereof, or three miles 
of the same, at any feasts, banquets, weddings, 
huntsup, or at cuiy other assemblies, triumphs, or 
occasions, either to go abroad in the streets or 
to play at any taverns, victualling houses, or 
any other place whatsoever, except they do go 
in or with the company of two freemen at the 
least well and sufficiently exercised and experi- 
enced in the said art or science of music, whereof 
one to be the master of some one of the said 
apprentices or servants ; As also foreigners 
without the city and liberties and within the 
three miles of the same city shall in like manner 
observe the same orders as the freemen of the 
same city doth, whereby they may be the better 
guided and directed in that science for the laud, 
honour, and commendation thereof; and that 
the freeman or foreigner being master of the 
said apprentice or servant shall himself, or the 
other freeman or foreign master, offer and pre- 
sent the music, and not any other his apprentice 
or servant, upon pain to forfeit for every offence 



79 

contrary to this act three shillings and four- 
pence. 

Item: be it also ordained that if any person An Act against 

. • 1 A n ■ unlawful games. 

or persons professing the said Art, bcience, or 
Fellowship of Musicians of the City of London 
or the liberties thereof, or three miles of the same 
city, shall at any time hereafter by any means, 
directly or indirectly, by himself or wittingly 
know or suffer his servant or apprentice to use 
or practice any manner of unlawful games at 
any time or in any place with any freeman's 
servants or apprentices, either of the said art or 
science or being free of any other company 
whatsoever, or any foreigners, within three miles 
of this city, shall in anywise or by any means 
countenance him or them therein, upon pain of 
forfeiture of every such offence being justly 
proved against them or him, shall for every 
time he or they shall so offend forfeit and pay 
to the master and wardens and commonalty ten 
shillings, or suffer imprisonment of his or their 
bodies till he or they have paid the same. 

It is also ordained and established, consented. Not to arrest 

, , , .. , . without license. 

and agreed that if hereafter any person of the 
said art or science be grieved with any other 
person of the same art or science, that then he 



8o 

that is so grieved shall first complain to the 
master and wardens of the said Art or Science 
of Musicians of London for the time being, and 
show his cause of grief unto them without any 
his further complaint, to the intent that the same 
master and wardens may understand the same 
and the circumstances thereof, and thereupon 
to take order for good agreement, peace, and 
concord to be had between the said parties, 
according to the right, equity, and good con- 
science, either by mutual agreement of the 
parties themselves or else by way of arbitra- 
ment : And also that no person of the said art 
or science maintain any matters or quarrels 
against or between any persons of the same art 
or science, nor that any of the same art or science 
shall arrest, sue, or molest any other of the said 
art or science for any matter of controversy, evil 
words, or debt not exceeding ten pounds, before 
such time as the master and wardens of the 
said art or science for the time being do give 
licence unto the same parties to enter into the 
law, if reasonable order cannot be by them 
therein taken, upon pain that every person that 
shall do contrary to the intent and meaning 
hereof shall pay for every such offence twenty 
shilhngs. 



8i 

It is also enacted, ordered, consented, and An Act tor the 

choice of 

decreed that there shall be chosen every year stewards, 
two stewards, to provide for one whole year 
upon the four quarter days four dinners for the 
master, wardens, and assistants of the said Com- 
pany, unto which charge it is also enacted, 
ordered, consented, and agreed that every assist- 
ant that shall come to every or any of the said 
dinners shall contribute and pay to the stewards 
towards the charge of the said quarter dinners 
twelve pence : And also it is further enacted, 
ordered, consented, and agreed that every person 
refusing to hold steward as aforesaid shall pay 
unto this Company the sum of forty shillings for 
his fine for every time that he shall so refuse 
the same stewardship, being thereunto chosen 
by the master, wardens, and assistants, or the 
greater part of them : And it is further ordered, 
consented, and agreed that the said four quarter 
dinners, and every of them, shall be from time 
to time kept and held at such place as the 
master and wardens for the time being shall 
think fit, meet, and convenient, and shall nomi- 
nate the same place unto them the said 
stewards. 



82 

SDije ^rms of t!je (fCompans.t 

The Arms of the Company granted by Camden, 
15th October, 1604, and approved by Sir Henry St. 
George Richmond, 1634. — Philip Pikeman being 
Master, Walter Clarke and Philip Janvrin, Wardens, 
and Nicholas Pinny, Clerk. 

Arms: — Azure within a double tressure flory 
counterflory Or a Swan rousant Argent, on a chief 
Gules a Pale between two Lions passant guardant 
of the second thereon a Rose of the fourth barbed 
vert and seeded gold. 

Crest : — On a wreath of the colours An ancient 
Lyre Or. 

The following is an extract from the " The Epistle 
Dedicatorie " in ' The Principles of Musik, etc.,' by 
" Charls Butler Magd. Mafter of Arts," published in 
London, 1636 : — 

"*Hence is it, that the learnedft of Kings (your moft 
" Noble Progenitor) hath graced the Profeffors of this 
" profound Myftery, with an Emblematicall Coat of 
"Armes: and made them a free Company of the great 
" Citti, or third Univerfiti." 
to which is attached the following note. 

"*This is recorded by S"" George Buck 
" (Gentleman of the Kings privi Chamber) in his 
" Treatice of the third Vniver/iti, annexed unto Stows 
" Chronicle. Cap. 38. 

' ' In this third Vniverfiti ar the beft Muficians of 
" this kingdom : and equall to any in Europ for their 
' ' skill, either in Compofing and Setting ; or in Singing 
'•' and Flaying upon any kinde of Muficall Inftrume7its . 

" whereupon it foUoweth, 

" The Muficians have obteined of the King Letters 
'■'■patents., for a Societi and Corporation. And, for 
'■'■their Arms, they bare Azure, a Swan Argent, 
" within a treffure Counterflour Or : and, in a chief 
" Gules, a Rofe between two L'yons Or. And, for 
" their Creft, the Signe called, by the Aftronomers, the 
" Orphean Lyre." 

t See Frontispiece. 



ACT OF COMMON COUNCIL 

Relative to Musicians and Dancing 
Masters, Ilth September, 1700. 



Whereas the Master, Wardens, Assistants and 
Commonalty of the Art or Science of Music in 
the City of London freemen of the said City, 
have been an ancient Brotherhood and Com- 
pany, and whereas by the ancient custom of 
the City of London (confirmed by divers Acts of 
ParHament) no person not being a freeman of 
the said City ought to use or exercise any Art 
occupation or Mystery for lucre or gain within 
the said City and liberties thereof. Notwith- 
standing which many persons as well aliens, as 
other foreigners to the said City, do take upon 
them to teach, practise and exercise the Arts of 
Music and dancing; and also keep Public 
Schools in Halls and other places within this 
City and the liberties thereof, and do publicly 
use, exercise and teach the art, mystery or 
occupation of dancing, not being free of this 
City, nor Member of any Company or fraternity 



84 

and so not subject to any of the rules or govern- 
ment of the same. Whereby debauchery and 
many disorders are much promoted and in 
danger of being committed, and the youth of 
the City much abused in their education, to the 
great dishonour of the good government of this 
City. And whereas the dancing masters have 
of ancient times, and for many years past, been 
under the rule, inspection and government of 
the Company of Musicians ; but being under no 
obligation to be free, or members of the same, 
the Company hath no power to correct or punish 
the abuses by them committed. For remedy 
and redress whereof for the future, and to the 
intent the aforesaid inconveniences and mis- 
chiefs may be prevented for a time to come, and 
that the said Company may have the oversight 
and punishment of all offences committed by 
any of the members professing and keeping of 
schools for teaching of music or dancing within 
this City and liberties thereof for the future. 

Be it enacted, ordained and established, by 
the Right Honourable the Lord Mayor, Alder- 
men and Commons of the City of London in 
Common Council assembled, and by the 
authority of the same, that an Act of this Court, 



8s 

made the eleventh day of September, in the 
Mayoralty of Sir Wm. Ashurst, Knight and 
Lord Mayor of this City, relating to the said 
Musicians and Dancing Masters, and every 
clause, matter and thing therein contained, shall 
be and is hereby absolutely repealed and made 
void ; and be it further enacted and ordained 
that all and every person or persons, using, 
practising or exercising, or which shall here- 
after use, practise, exercise or teach, the arts, 
mysteries or occupations of music or dcincing, 
or either of them for lucre or gain within the 
City of London or liberties thereof, who hath 
already served an apprenticeship in the said 
arts and mysteries, or in either of them, and not 
yet made free of this City, and having a right 
to his freedom in any other company within this 
City. And also cdl and every other person or 
persons, using, exercising or teaching the said 
arts or either of them, for lucre or gain as afore- 
said, who shall procure his freedom of this City by 
redemption shall be made free of the said Com- 
pany of Musicians ; and if any such person shall 
be made free of any other company by patri- 
mony or service, and shall exercise the said 
arts, mysteries or occupations, or either of them 



86 

for lucre or gain, that then all and every such 
person and persons so doing and offending, in 
all, or any, or either of the said cases, shall 
forfeit and pay for every such offence, the sum 
of forty shillings of lawful money of England. 
And be it ftxrther enacted by the authority 
aforesaid that from and after the twenty-fifth 
day of December, 1700, if any person or persons 
not being free of the said City and Company, 
nor free of the said City and any other Com- 
pany within the said same City shall for lucre 
or gain, publicly use, exercise or teach the, said 
arts, mysteries or occupations, or either of them 
within the said City or liberties thereof; that 
then all and every such person or persons so 
doing or offending shall forfeit and pay for 
every such offence the sum of four pounds of 
lawful money of England. And be it further 
enacted and ordained by the authority afore- 
said, that all dancing masters and musicians 
as shall take apprentices or servants to teach 
them the said arts, or either of them, and all 
others that are free of the said Company shall 
from henceforth bind their servant and 
servants apprentice and apprentices in the said 
Company to a freeman thereof under the 



87 

penalty of forty shillings for every apprentice 
he shall bind in any other Company. And no 
freeman of the said Company shall teach and 
instruct any such intended apprentice in the 
said arts or either of them above the space of 
three months before he be bound an apprentice 
to a freeman of the said Company as aforesaid 
under the like penalty of forty shillings. All 
which pains, penalties, forfeitures, sum and sums 
of money to be forfeited by this Act shall be 
recovered by action of debt, bill or plaint, 
to be commenced and prosecuted in the 
name of the Chamberlain of the City 
of London for the time being in some 
one of His Majesties Courts of Record 
within the said City, and that the Chamberlain 
of the said City for the time being in all such 
suits to be prosecuted by virtue of this present 
Act against any offender, shall recover his 
ordinary costs of suit to be expended in and 
about the prosecution of the same. And be it 
further enacted by the authority aforesaid that 
one moiety of all forfeitures to be recovered by 
virtue of this Act (the costs of suit for the 
recovery of the same being first deducted and 
allowed), after recovery and receipt thereof, 



88 

shall be from time to time peiid into the 
Chamber of the City of London for the 
use of the Mayor, Commonalty and Citizens 
of the said City of London, and the other 
moiety to the Master Wardens and Assistants 
of the said Company for the time being for the 
use of the poor of the said Company. And be 
it further enacted by the authority aforesaid. 
That no person or persons, using, practising or 
exercising for lucre or gain the said arts, 
mysteries and occupations of music and dancing, 
or either of them, who shall have a right by 
patrimony or service, shall from henceforth be 
admitted by the Chamberlain of this City into 
the freedom thereof, in any other Company than 
the said Company of Musicizms. And that the 
said Chamberlain shall not admit any using or 
exercising the said arts of music or dancing 
for lucre or gain, commonly known by the name 
of musicians or dancing masters into the free- 
dom of this City, until such persons are first 
admitted into the freedom of the said Company 
of Musicians any usage or custom to the 
contrary in anywise notwithstanding. 

Journal 53, fos. 358-9, 




THE BEADLE'S MACE. 
Presented by RICHARD LOYDE, Master of the Company in 1726. 



To face page J 



LAWS AND ORDERS 
of 
THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF 
MUSICIANS* 



The Charter of Incorporation was granted by 
King James I. July 8. anno 1604, and Bye Laws 
confirmed by the Lord Chancellor, 25 th August, 
1606, upon which the following Articles or 
Extracts are made and established for the 
Government of the Master, Wardens, and Com- 
monalty of MUSICIANS of London, who may 
have a legal Seal for Despatch of Business. 

I. The Master and Wardens shall be chosen Election o( 

Master and 

yearly on the Feast of St. Michael the Arch- wardens, 
angel, or within twenty days after the same; 
and upon any refusal to hold either of the said 
Offices and take the Oath prescribed, the refus- 
ing Party shall forfeit Three Pounds Six °"'."' "" 

° •' refusing, 

Shillings and Eightpence. In Case of Death ^^ es. sd. 
or Removal others are to be elected in their 
Stead. 

• Reprinted from a book issued by the Company in 1825. 



90 



Election of 
Assistants. 



Refusing to 
serve» each 
time, 40s. 



Two years' 
Non-Attend- 
ence deemed 
a Resignation- 



II. The Court of Assistants to consist of not 
less than Thirteen Members, or more than 
Twenty, to be chosen by the Court ; and upon 
Resignation or Demise, others are to be elected ; 
and upon Refusal to serve, the offending Party 
is to pay a fine of Forty Shillings, as often as he 
refuseth. The said Assistants, upon neglecting 
to attend the Duties of the Office for Two Years 
successively, are to be considered as having re- 
signed, and new Members are to be chosen in 
their Room. 



Cal] upon 
the Livery 



Fine ;£IS 15s. 



Refusing 
each Time, 
40s. 



III. The Master and Wardens, and Eight 
Assistants, may call so many Freemen of the 
Company upon the Livery, as shall seem unto 
them meet and convenient for the Worship of 
the City, and Credit of the Art. And every 
Freeman taking upon him the Cloathing, shall 
pay a fine of Fifteen Pounds Fifteen Shillings, 
including all Charges. Every person who shall 
obstinately and frowardly refuse to take the 
Cloathing, shall, every Time he offends, forfeit 
Forty Shillings. 



N.B. Such Members who have paid a Part 
only of Fifteen Pounds Fifteen Shillings, are 



91 

still liable to the Payment of the Remainder of 
the Fine. 

IV. Any Person who shall, of his own motion g^^ ^^^ Law, 
or Frowardness, desire or demand to be trans- '^''"■"i'le " 

to £15 15s 

lated to any other Company, shall forfeit and foUo 9. 
pay Ten Pounds, which may be levied on his 
Goods or Chattels. 

V. Four Quarterly Courts are to be held in p^^^ q^,^. 
every Year for ever ; viz. : in the Months of "■''>' Courts 
January, April, July and October (or more, if 
Occasion shall require), for reforming Defaulters 

and Abuses in the said Science. Master and Master and 
Wardens not attending forfeit Five Shillings ; [^"^(^"ss. 
Assistants Two Shillings and Sixpence : the 
same on every other Court Day. 

N.B. The Second Wednesday after every 
Quarter Day is fixed for holding Courts, and Six 
Days previous Notice by Summons is to be 
issued. 

VI. Every Member of the Company not p^^,,^,, j^ 
appearing upon Summons at the Hour ""■ ^^^ 
appointed, shall forfeit One Shilling ; if he does 

not appear at all. Two Shillings for every 



92 

Offence ; and every Member is required to pay 
Sixpence per Quarter. 

VII. All the Accounts of the Company are 
to be Audited at every Quarterly Court by four 
Members, made up annually, and yielded to the 
new Master and Wardens. 



Common VIII. By the Act of Lord Mayor and 

Council and „ - „ ., , , i -r^ i 

Charter Common Council, dated nth December, i;!00, 

Grant con- relative to Musicians and Dancing Masters it is 

solidated. 

enacted that all Musical and Dancing Men, play- 
ing for Hire in the City of London and Liber- 
ties (the King's Musicians excepted), shall take 
upon them the Freedom thereof, and in the 
Company of MUSICIANS, and none other, con- 
otfenders £.\. formable to the said Act. Offenders herein 
forfeit Four Pounds, and may be sued in the 
Name of the Chamberlain. 



Power of 
Court of 
Assistants. 



IX. Masters and Wardens, the Court of 
Assistants (not less than Eight) may purchase, 
demise, grant, possess or sell Lands, Tenements, 
etc., for Term of Years; may execute Deeds, 
make Laws or Ordinances for Rule and good 
Government; may sue in any Court of Law; 



93 

plead, or be impleaded; answer and defend; 
may inflict Pains and Punishments on offenders. 

All Fines, Penalties and Forfeitures re- pingg ,„ ^^ 
covered, shall be applied to the Use of the Poor ^^^^^Vot 
of the Company ; the Sustenation and Charge the poor, 
of the Recovery to be borne by the Master and 
Court. 

ORDERING APPRENTICES. 

X. A Master on taking an Apprentice Apprentices. 
should by original Charter, present him to the 
Court, and pay Two Shillings ; and when out of 
his Time, report his having duly served, and pay 
Three Shillings and Fourpence ; then present 
him with their Approval, before the Chamber- 
lain for his Freedom of the City. Selling or 
turning over an Apprentice should be noted in 
the Court Book, and the Master pay Two Shil- 
lings. Offenders against this Law, forfeit 
Twenty Shillings. 

And for the more effectual carrying into 
Execution the said several Acts, Clauses, or 
Articles, the following further Rules and Orders 
are made standing and fixed Decrees, for the 
Management and good Government of the Wor- 
shipful Company of MUSICIANS. 



94 

ORDERED. 

I. That a Clerk and Beadle be appointed and 
elected annually on the Master's Day, to collect 
Quarterage, issue Summonses, to attend the 
Master and Court, and execute the necessary 
Business of a Clerk and Beadle, as is the Custom 
in other Companies. 

II. That all the Business of the Company be 
regularly entered in proper Books, and the Pro- 
ceedings of the last Court and intermediate 
Business be read and confirmed. 

III. That a Treasurer be appointed an- 
nually, to keep the Accounts of the Company, 
and enter all Receipts and Payments in a Book ; 
to be audited Quarterly by the Committee, and 
annually made up and delivered to the Master 
and Court, with all Sums of Money and other 
Things placed in his Possession. 

IV. That the Master do receive all Monies 
for Fines and Fees during the Year; that he 
make up his Account thereof Quarterly, which 
shall be audited at a Committee, and the Ac- 
count and Balance transferred to the Treasurer. 



95 

V. That a Receipt Book in Manner of a 
Banker's Cheque, on Copper-plate, be constantly 
used, and the Christian and Surname, Residence, 
and Business, be entered in the Margin ; the 
receipt signed by the Master and witnessed by 
the Clerk. 

VI. That no Member bind, make free, turn 
over, or withdraw from the Company, without 
first paying all Arrears of Quarterage. 

VII. That the Expense and Charge for hold- 
ing the Quarterly Court, and every other Meet- 
ing holden on the Company's Affairs, be paid 
out of the Company's Stock. The Master and 
Wardens to appoint Time and Place of Meeting. 

VIII. That the Company's Cash be vested 
in some of the Public Funds ; transferred to 
Three Members of the Court, with Power to 
appoint a Receiver of the Interest; upon the 
Death or Resignation of either, a new one to be 
chosen. 

IX. That Ten Shillings and Sixpence be 
allowed each Member of the Court who shall 



96 

attend at Twelve o'clock precisely and Five 
Shillings to each of such Members as shall attend 
within One Quarter of an Hour after that Time ; 
but that no allowance be made to any member 
who shall attend after that Time. 

X. That the Laws and Orders, and a correct 
List of the Company, with the Name, Date of 
Admission, and other Additions, be printed in 
a Book for the Use of the Court, and a Sheet 
List of the Livery, as often as the Court shall 
see Occasion. 

XL That no Person admitted on the Court 
of Assistants shall in future be elected a Warden 
until he has been on the Court two years ; and 
that the Wardens in case of necessity shall be 
chosen out of the Members, that have passed the 
Chair. 

XII. That no Person be translated to any 
other Company, until he pays the Livery and 
Steward's Fine, together with the Clerk and 
Beadle's Fees. Vide fol. 5 for the Penalty. 



97 



The Master and Wardens' Oath. 

YE Solemnly and sincerely declare, that ye 
will be true to our Sovereign Lord the King, 
and to his Heirs and Successors, Kings and 
Queens of the Realm of England. And that 
you and every of you effectually and diligently, 
during the Time or Season you shall be, or re- 
main, in your said Office, shall as far forth as you 
lawfully and conveniently may, see to, and keep 
the said Art and Science of the MUSICIANS 
in good Order and Rule, and execute your 
Office, in every Case thereunto appertaining, 
truly, justly, and indifferently. 

I do. 

The Assistants' Oath. 

I or we sincerely declare that we will faith- 
fully aid and assist the Master and Wardens of 
the Art or Science of MUSICIANS of London, 
for the time being, and every of them ; as well 
in the Execution of the Rules and Ordinances 
made and ratified for the good Order and 
Government of the said Art, as in all other 
Affairs whatsoever concerning the same Art ; 
That you will not procure or consent that the 

H 



98 

Lands, Revenues of, or Goods of the aforesaid 
Company, shall be inordinately spent, con- 
sumed, or embezzled, but to the best of your 
Skill and Power ye shall the same let and with- 
stand. 

I do. 

The Oath of a Freeman 

of the 

Worshipful Company of Musicians. 

You solemnly and sincerely declare, that you 
will be faithful and true to our Sovereign Lord 
the King's Majesty, and to his Heirs and Suc- 
cessors, Kings and Queens of Great Britain. You 
will not do nor consent to be done, any 
Treasons or Felonies ; but all such as you shall 
know, you shall duly to your Power do to be 
revealed and known to the King or his Council. 
And you will be obedient unto the Master and 
Wardens of the Art or Science of Musicians of 
London for the Time being, in all Things con- 
cerning the same Art or Science being Agree- 
able to the Ordinances of the said Art and 
Customs of the City of London. And you shall 
come duly and truly, upon every lawful Sum- 



99 

mons, to any Assembly to be made for any 
Matter or Cause to be treated and communed 
upon by the Master, Wardens, and Assistants 
of the said Art or Science. Also well and truly, 
after your Power you will in all things obey, 
keep and observe all the Acts and Ordinances 
made for the Governance and good Order of the 
said Art or Science, and confirmed according to 
the Laws and Statutes of this Realm, in that 
Case provided. 

I do. 



H 2 



lOO 



FINES AND FEES. 



On Admission to the Livery. 






£ 


s. 


d. 


Fine on Admission 35 








Freedom Fine 


13 





Clerk's Fees 2 


19 


6 


Beadle's Fee 


2 


6 


Stamp Duty on Admission by Redemption 3 








(Stamp Duty on Admission by Servitude 






or Patrimony, ;£i.) 






£41 


15 






Admission to the Freedom of the City 
of London ... 



£42 16 o 

On Admission to the Court. 

£ s. d. 

Court Fine 50 o o 

Clerk's Fee i iS o 

£5^ IS ° 




SIR JOHN STAlNhK', 

A\ASTER of the WoRSHlPFL'L Cu.^\HA^V OF AlUMClANS, I.'S'J4-,^, 1900-1. 
(Fr<mi the Paintini^ hy HfrknnK-r.) 



To lace paf;e loi. 



lOI 

MASTERS OF THE MUSICIANS' 
COMPANY 

From 1800 to 1905. 



1800- 


— I. 


William Huson 


I80I- 


—2. 


Thomas Gross 


1802- 


-3- 


James Smith 


1803- 


-4- 


John Ashley 


1804- 


-5- 


Job Williams 


1805- 


-6. 


Thomas Fellows 


1806- 


-7- 


Thomas Ashby 


1807- 


-8. 


John Rutler 


1808- 


-9- 


William Moore 


1809- 


-10. 


Joseph Gough 


I8I0- 


-II. 


Thomas Wood 


i8n- 


-12. 


John Axford 


l8l2- 


-13- 


Joseph Staines 


1813- 


-14. 


Joseph Green 


1814- 


-15- 


Job Williatns 


181S- 


-16. 


John Axford 


1816- 


-17- 


Joseph Staines 


1817- 


-18. 


Joseph Green 


1818- 


-19. 


Joseph Delagons 


1819- 


-20. 


Alexander Glennie 


1820- 


-I. 


John Chaplin 


1821- 


-z. 


Richard Jones 


1822- 


-3- 


Thomas Bingham 


1823- 


-4- 


Alexander Glennie 



I02 



1 824— 5. 


Joseph Todd 


1825—6. 


William Suttaby 


1826—7. 


Frederick William Collard 


1827—8. 


Thomas Fellows 


1828—9. 


Edward Batten 


1829— 3G 


1. John Joseph Skilbeck 


1830— I. 


William Ward, M.P. 


1 83 1— 2. 


Thomas Fellows, Jnr. 


1832—3- 


i John Strachan Glennie* 


\ Henry Wadd 


1833—4- 


Thrower Buckle Herring 


1834—5- 


Giddes Mackenzie Simpson 


1835-6. 


WilHam Chaplin 


1836—7. 


Robert Albron Fellows 


1837—8. 


Thomas Herring 


1838—9. 


Henry Patteson 


1839—40. 


William Ward 


1840 — I. 


John Evans 


1841—?. 


Edward Wiggins 


1842—3. 


James Southby Bridge 


1843—4. 


John Skilbeck 


1844—5. 


James Wedderburn Simpson 


1845—6. 


Frederick William Collard 


1846—7. 


Frederick William Collard 




(re-elected) 


1847—8. 


William Ward 


1848—9. 


Thomas Fellowes 



1849 — 50. Thrower Buckle Herring 



J. S. Glennie went abroad, and in July, 1833, 
Hy. Wadd was elected Master in his place. 



103 

1850 — I. William Chaplin 

1 85 1 — 2. Thomas Herring 

1852 — 3. Thomas Herring (re-elected) 

1853 — 4. John Evans 

1854 — 5. Edward Wiggins 

1855 — 6. James Southby Bridge 

1856 — 7. Joseph Skilbeck 

1857 — 8 Robert Philip Jones 

1858—9. John Wood 

1859 — 60. Thomas Fellowes 

i860 — I. William Chaplin 

1861 — 2. Thomas Herring 

1862 — 3. James S. Bridge 

1863 — 4. John Evans 

1864 — 5. Charles Lukey Collard 

1865 — 6. Charles Lukey Collard (re-elected) 

1866 — 7. John Hilditch Evans 

1867 — 8. Robert Philip Jones 

1868 — 9. John Peter Theobald 

1869 — 70. John Barnwell Herring 

1870 — I. Thomas Prowett Jones 

1 87 1 — 2. Joseph Sidney Lescher 

1872 — 3. George Wood 

1873 — 4. William Costall May 

1874 — 5. Henry Richard Frisby 

1875—6, William Chappell 

1876 — 7. John Henry Skilbeck 

1877 — 8. William Stuartson Collard 

1878 — 9, Walter Meacock Wilkinson 

1879 — 8°' Robert Betson Warrick 

1880 — I. John Hilditch Evans 



104 

i88i— 2, John Peter Theobald 

1882 — 3. John Barnwell Herring 

1883 — 4. Thomas Prowett Jones 

1884 — 5. George Wood 

1885 — 6. Henry Richard Frisby 

1886—7. William Costall May 

1887—8. William Chappell 

1888—9. John Henry Skilbeck 

1889 — 90. William Stuartson Collard 

1890— I. Walter Meacock Wilkinson 

i89r — 2. Robert Betson Warrick 

1892 — 3. Professor John Frederick Bridge 

1893 — 4- John Clementi Collard 

1894 — 5. Sir John Stainer 

1895 — 6. Henry Richard Frisby 

1896 — 7. William Stuartson Collard 

1897 — 8. Walter Meacock Wilkinson 

1898 — 9. Sir John Frederick Bridge 

1899 — 1900. John Clementi Collard 

( Sir John Stainer* and 
r9oo — I. J ■' 

' John Clementi Collard 
1 901 — 2. Charles Dennis Hoblyn 
1902 — 3. Frank Harwood Lescher 
1903 — 4. William Cordy Herring 
1904 — 5. Charles Thomas Daniell Crews 



* Sir John Stainer died 31st March, ipoi. 




CHARLES JANE ASHLEY. 
1773-1S43. 

Frou a Painting in the Possession of ARTHUR F. HILL, Esq. 



To Jacu page 105. 



105 

A Past Member of the Company- 
Charles Jane Ashley. 



Charles Jane Ashley (1773-1843) was the son 
of John Ashley, who was Master of the Com- 
pany in its Bicentenary year 1804. He was a 
performer of considerable excellence on the 
violoncello, and had great reputation as an 
accompanist. He was one of the founders of 
the Glee Club in 1793, an original Member of 
the Philharmonic Society, and for some years 
Secretary of the Royal Society of Musicians. 
John Ashley and the members of his family are 
well known to musical historians. 

The Portrait is from a painting in the posses- 
sion of Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 





MEDAL OF THE Company. 



Tu foce page 107. 



I07 
THE COMPANY'S MEDAL. 

INSTITUTED 1SS9. 



The GOLD MEDAL of the Company was 
graciously accepted by 

H.M. KING EDWARD VII. 

(then Prince of Wales) on the 19th July, 1893. 



The SILVER GILT MEDAL was unani- 
mously voted to Sir Homewood Crawford, 17th 
January, 1905, for his services as Chairman of the 
Committee of the Company's Tercentenary 
Exhibition, 1904. 



The SILVER MEDAL of the Company is 
presented annually to the most distinguished Student 
at the Royal Academy of Music, the Royal College of 
Music, or the Guildhall School of Music, in rotation, 
the Recipient being nominated, without competition or 
examination, by the Principal or Director of each 
Institution in turn, assisted in each case by two of 
his principal Professors. 



Silver Medallists from the Schools 
of Music. 

1890. Mr. Stanley Hawley, Pianist, Royal 
Academy of Music* 

1 891. Miss Ethel Sharpe, Pianist, Royal Col- 
lege of Music. 

* Mr. Stanley Hawley was admitted to the Livery of the Company 
n the i7tb July, 1903. 



io8 

1892. Mr. Joseph Spaight, Pianist, Guildhall 
School of Music. 

1893. Miss Llewela Davis, Pianist, Royal 
Academy of Music. 

1894. Miss Clara Butt, Singer, Royal College 
of Music. 

1895. Mr. Francis Lloyd Chandos, Singer, 
Guildhall School of Music. 

1896. Mr. Percy Hilder Miles, Violinist and 
Composer, Royal Academy of Music. 

1897. Mr. Samuel Grimson, Violinist, Royal 
College of Music. 

1898. Miss Fanny Woolf, Violinist, Guildhall 
School of Music. 

1899. Mr. Harry Farjeon, Composer, Royal 
Academy of Music. 

1900. Miss Muriel Foster, Singer, Royal Col- 
lege of Music. 

1 901. Miss Mabel Monteith, Pianist, Guildhall 
School of Music. 

1902. Mr. Adam Ahn von Carse, Composer, 
Royal Academy of Music. 

1903. Miss Kate Elizabeth Anderson, Singer, 
Royal College of Music 

1904. Mr. Henry Ernest Geehl, Composer, 
Guildhall School of Music. 

1905. Mr. Edwin York Bowen, Pianist and 
Composer, Royal Academy of Music 



109 



The Silver Medal has also been awarded 
to the following gentlemen : — 

January 20th, 1903. 

Sir Walter Parratt, M.V.O., Mus. Doc, Oxon., 
Master of the King's Musick ; and 

Sir Hubert Parry, Bart., M.A., Mus. Doc, Cantab., 
Oxon., et Dubl., D.C.L., Director of the Royal 
College of Music, 

in recognition of their services as Adjudicators 
for the Coronation Prize March. 
Charles Ernest Rube, Esq., 

in recognition of his gift of a Loving Cup to 
the Company. 



April 28th, 1903. 



Thomas Lea Southgate, Esq. ; 

Cyril Arthur Pearson, Esq. ; and 

James Munro Coward, Esq., 

in recognition of their services in connection 
with the Coronation Prize March. 



no 
17th January, 1905- 

Arthur Frederick Hill, Esq., F.S.A. ; 

John Frederick Randall Stainer, Esq., 
M.A., B.C.L.; and 

Colonel Thomas Bradney Shaw-Hellier, J.P., 

in recognition of their services in connection 
with the Company's Tercentenary Exhibition^ 
igo4. 

11th July, 1905, 

William Hayman Cummings, Esq., Mus. Doc, 
Principal of the Guildhall School of Music, and 

Carl Hentschel, Esq., Chairman of the Music 
Committee of the Corporation of the City of 
London, 

in recognition of their services at the performance 
of the Maske of " The Golden Tree," 2gth 
fune, igoj. 



Miniature Medals to Past Masters. 

Since ipoi a Miniature replica of the Medal 
has been presented to Past Masters of the 
Company. 



Ill 



THE COMPANY'S SCHOLARSHIPS 

AT THE GUILDHALL SCHOOL 

OF MUSIC. 



Composition Scholarships. 



On the 31st October, 1893, the Court resolved 
to grant an Annual sum for an Exhibition to be 
competed for by Students of Composition at 
the Guildhall School of Music. 

The Exhibition has been awarded to : — 

Mr. H. Waldo Warner* 1895 

Miss Evangeline Morgan 1897 

Mr. Herbert Philip Thomas ... 1901 

Miss Emmeline Brooke 1905 



• Of Mr. Warner it may be noted that he was the winner of the 
composition prize given in 1897 by Mr. W. W. Cobbett (now a Livery- 
man of the Company). He has also composed an Opera, entitled 
"The Royal Vagrants," produced at the Guildhall School in igoo 
with considerable success. 



112 



The Carnegie Scholarships. 

In 1904, the munificence of Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie (Honorary Freeman of the Company) 
enabled the Company to found two Scholarships 
at the Guildhall School of Music, each Scholar- 
ship entitling its holder to three years' free 
tuition. In addition to other necessary qualifi- 
cations, it is imperative that the candidates 
for these Scholarships should show special 
ability in reading Music at sight. 

The first Examination of Ccindidates was held 
at the Guildhall School of Music on the 17th 
January, 1905, by Sir Frederick Bridge, Dr. F. J. 
Sawyer and Dr. E. Markham Lee (Members of 
the Company). 

Forty-seven Candidates, of both sexes, were 
examined, and the Scholarships were awarded to 

Miss Elizabeth Tarttelin, aged 16, and 
Miss Catherine Ethel Harman, aged 17. 



113 



The Ernest Palmer Scholarships. 

In July, 1905, Mr. S. Ernest Palmer, the 
Founder of the Patron's Fund of the Roya! 
College of Music and of the Berkshire Scholar- 
ship, an Honorary Freeman of the Company, 
presented the Company with a sum of one 
thousand pounds, which has been appropriated 
with his consent to the establishment of two 
further scholarships at the Guildhall School of 
Music. The interest on this munificent gift is to 
be devoted (i) to paying the fees for a Chorister, 
selected after competition, who' has left the St. 
Paul's Cathedral or Westminster Abbey Choir, 
to be taught for two years, and who will then have 
obtained a complete musical education ; (2) to 
performing the same service for a girl, also to 
be trained in music at the Guildhall School. 
Candidates must be British born, under 21 
years of age in the case of males, and under 
18 years of age in the case of females, 
and in making the selection, preference will 
be given to those who evince most aptitude 
in reading music at sight. Dr. G. J. Bennett and 
Mr. Stanley Hawley (Members of the Company) 
have been nominated Judges for the competition. 



"5 

Prize Competitions. 



The Coronation March. 
1902. 



On August 1st, IQOI, The Master, Wardens 
and Court of Assistants of the Worshipful Com- 
pany of Musicians offered a Prize of Fifty 
Guineas together with the Freedom and Livery 
of the Musicians' Company for the Composition 
of an Orchestral March, suitable for performance 
at Festivities that might be held in celebration 
of the Coronation of His Majesty King 
Edward VII. in ig02. The adjudicators were 
Sir Frederick Bridge (Past Master of the 
Musicians' Company), Sir Walter Parratt (Master 
of the King's Musick), and Sir Hubert Parry 
(Director of the Royal College of Music). One 
hundted and eighty-nine competitors took part, 
and the prize was awarded to Mr. PERCY 
Godfrey, Mus. Bac, Master of Music at the 



Ii6 

King's School, Canterbury. The March was 
played at His Majesty's Coronation on the gth 
August, 1902.* 

On the 1 2th February, 1903, a Deputation, 
consisting of the Master, Wardens and Clerk, 
attended at York House, St. James', and pre- 
sented H.R.H. the Prince of Wales with a cheque 
for ;£^866 2s. od. for King Edward's Hospital 
Fund, the money being derived from the sale of 
this March. A copy of the March, in appro- 
priate binding, was at the same time presented 
to the Prince. 



• The March is published by lUessrs. Metzier & Co., I-td. 



THE PRIZE GRACE. 

By 
CHARLES WOOD. M.A.Mns-.D. 



Rather slowly.{'^ - 72) 



SDPHAKO. 



ALTO 



TEHOH 



BASS 



ACCCMP: 



REHEARSAL 




ALSO PUBLiSHEO FOR WALE VOICES, 4.T.T.B. PRICE SIXPENCE. NET. 



, Reverently. (J = 80.) 



GRACE. 

By 
ARTHUR HENRY BROWN. 




Ta das es cam il - loj-am in tem-po_re 



op _ per - 



(u_ nc 




USD PUBLISHED FOR $.4X8. VOICES, PRICE SIXPEHCE. NET. 



117 

Mr. C. T. D. Crews' Prize. 

1904. 



For the Best Setting of THE GRACE:— 

" Occuli Omnium in Te sperant, Domine, et Tu das 
escam illorum in tempore opportuno. 
Gloria Tibi Domine, Amen" 

This Prize was won by Charles Wood, M.A., 
Mus. Doc, of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. 

An additional Prize was given by Mr. Crews for a 
very excellent setting of the Grace by Mr. Arthur 
Henry Brown, of Brentwood, Essex. 

There were 370 competitors. 

The Adjudicators were Sir Frederick Bridge 
and Sir George Martin. 

A Copy of each setting of the Grace is here given. 
Dr. Wood's for S.A.T.B. Mr. Arthur Henry Brown's 
or A.T.T.B.* 



•These Compositions are published by Messrs. Metzler & Co., Ltd. 



Ii8 

The Rev. Henry Cart's Prizes. 

Presented on the 300/A Anniversary of the Charter of 
fames /., %th fuly, 1904. 

A Cycle of Three Songs : — 

I. " How sweet the Moonlight sleeps upon 

this Bank." 
II. "To Music." 
III. " Music in the air." 

Prize of ;^2i won by Miss May Dawson. 

Seven Short Pianoforte Pieces, entitled: — 
"The Week." 

Prize of £,2C„ won by Percy Carter Buck, 
M.A., Mus. Bac, Oxon. 

Two Pieces for Violin and Pianoforte 
(grouped together), entitled : — 
{a) "Spanish Shepherd Song." 
{b) "Spanish Dance." 

Prize of ;£i2, won by Herbert Walter Wareing, 
Mus. Doc, Cantab. 

Organ Postlude : — 

" Allegro Maestoso " 

Prize of ;^io, won by Herbert Walter Wareing, 
Mus. Doc, Cantab. 

Part Song for S.A.T.B. :— 

" Phcebe sat, sweet she sat." 

Prize of ^10, won by James Lyon, Mus. Bac, 
Oxon. 

The Adjudicators were Sir Frederick Bridge, 
Sir George Martin, and Dr. Markham Lee, 
Members of the Company. 



These Prize Compositions will shortly be published by 
Messrs. Metzler & Co., Ltd, 



119 



The Cobbett Prize Competition 

Mr. W. W. Cobbett has presented the sum of 
£^o to the Company, to be awarded as a prize 
for the composition of the best "Phantasy," to 
take the form of a short Quartet written for 
strings. Other prizes are added by the Master 
and Mr. H. L. Sternberg, and from a 
" Donors' Fund " contributed to by Members of 
the Company. The object is to popularise a 
modification of the String Quartet among 
general audiences, and to endeavour to bring 
into life a new Art Form which should provide 
fresh scope for the composer of Chamber Music. 
The Manuscripts are to be sent to the Clerk of 
the Company before the close of the year 1905. 
The Competition is restricted to British subjects. 
Sir Alexander C. Mackenzie, Principal of the 
R.A.M., and Mr. Alfred Gibson, R.A.M., with 
Mr. W. W. Cobbett and Mr. H. L. Sternberg 
(Members of the Company) are the Judges for 
determining these Prizes. 

The works selected for publication will be 
assigned to and issued by the Company. 



120 



RECENT GIFTS TO THE 
COMPANY. 



Reference has been made to the generosity 
of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, Mr. S. Ernest Palmer, 
The Rev. Henry Cart, Mr. W. W. Cobbett 
and other members of the Company, whereby 
Scholarships have been founded and Prizes 
offered for the advancement and encouragement 
of the Art of Music. 

The Company has, however, received other 
gifts which must be recorded. 

The Rube Cup. 

This massive Silver Cup, of which two illus- 
trations are given, was presented in ig02 by 
Mr. Charles Rube. 

The predominant idea of its design is Music. 
One panel, by Morel Ladeuil, representing 
the Spirit of Music surrounded by her attendant 
nymphs, is a replica of one of the panels of the 




CUP Presemed to the Wc.rshipeul C<JA1PA^Y OK Musll;lA^s 
BY CHARLES UVBE, Esq. 

iPanel representing the Spirit oj iilusie). 



Between psges 120 and 1 



121 

Helicon Vase presented to Her late Majesty 
Queen Victoria. The other panel, by Spall, 
illustrates the Story of Orpheus charming the 
wild beasts by the beauty of his Music. The 
Cover of the Cup is surmounted by the figure 
of a winged Cupid plajang with Cymbals, and 
bears on one front the arms and motto of the 
Musicians' Company, and on its opposite the 
arms and motto of the City of London. 

The inscription on the Cup is : — 

"Presented to the Musicians' Company by 
Charles Rube, Esq., to commemorate the 
Coronation of His Majesty King Edward VII." 



122 



The Crews Cup. 

This Cup, presented in 1904 by Mr. C. T. D. 
Crews, is of silver gilt, and is a fine replica of the 
original by Paul Lamerie, the celebrated Silver- 
smith of Queen Anne's days. 



Gowns for the Master and Wardens.* 

In 1904, Mr. C. T. D. Crews presented gowns 
of rich blue silk, trimmed with black silk velvet 
with broad facings of musquash fur, for the 
Master and Wardens. 

The Clerk's black silk gown was also presented 
by Mr. Crews. 



See Illustration, facing p. i from a photograph taken at Vintners 
Hall on the 2nd May, 1905. 




CUP Presented by C. T. D. CREWS, Esq. 



To face page 122. 




THE BANNER of the Co,MPA^v. 
Presented by COLONEL SHAW-HELLIER. 

I'JO-l. 



To face paii^e 123 



123 

Banner of the Company 
Presented by Colonel Shaw-Hellier, in 1904. 

The following is a description of the 
Banner : — 

The subject is Saint Cecilia, patroness of 
Music, after the painting in the Musee du 
Louvre, Paris, by Domenico Zampieri dit le 
Dominiquin (1581 — 1641). The Saint, richly 
robed, being of a wealthy family, is depicted 
standing behind a sort of balcony, singing in an 
ecstasy of devotion, and playing upon a quciint 
violoncello with eight strings. The figure of a 
boy with wings stcinds upon the same level and 
with uplifted hands bears upon his head the 
open music book. Surrounding the central 
subject and forming the frame of the whole, is a 
classic plinth, columns and leafy arch. In the 
lower part are two shields, one charged with the 
arms of the Musicians' Company, the other with 
those of the Donor. On each column hangs a 
shield charged with the crest of the Company. 
The work is done in the method known as 
Tapestry painting. The Banner is carried on 
an ebonized Pole surmounted by the Lyre of the 
Company in polished brass. 



124 



Portrait of Handel. 

The fine Portrait of George Frederick Handel, 
by the celebrated French portrait painter, 
Hyacinthe Rigaud (1659-1743), was presented 
by Mr. Charles T. D. Crews, Master of the 
Company in 1905. 



Gift for Poor Students. 

Mr. C. T. D. Crews also presented the sum of 
fifty guineas to Dr. Cummings, to be expended 
by him in the relief of poor students at the 
Guildhall School of Music. 




^-i^^SifeSI^ 



POI>'TRAlT OF HANDEL. 
Presented to the Ojwpaw i-;y C. T. D, Ci-'tiWS, Hsq., 

MaSIEL' OI^ the CO.UI'ANV, 1C0-. 



To face page 124. 



M Patrons: "'s majesty the king. 

life -_^_^ Hgr Majestv Oueen Alexandra. 



Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. 

Their Royal Hi{;hiiesses the Prince and Princess of Wales. 



Tercentenary 
Exhibition c .he ^ 

I WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF MUSICIANS i 



TO ee HELD AT 



I Fishmongers' Hall, 

S LONDON BRIDGE 

•'^ iBr kind permission of the FISHMONOERS' COMPANY), on 

Tuesday, 28th June, until Saturday, I6th July, 1904. ^ 

A LOAN COLLECTION 

OF 

Musical Instruments, Manuscripts, Portraits, &c 

Admission by Payment as follows:— 
Between 10 and 6, ONE SHILLING. Between 6 and 8, SIXPENCE 



I Daily Afternoon Lectures, | 

with Musical Illustrations, by eminent Musicians, at 4.30. Il<^ 



Copy of the POSTER announcing the 
Tercentenary Exhibition. 



To face page 125. 



125 



THE COMMEMORATION OF THE 
TERCENTENARY 

of the granting by King James I. of the 
Company's Second Charter of Incorporation. 



THE MUSIC LOAN EXHIBITION. 

At a Court held on the 20th January, 1903, it 
was unanimously resolved, on the motion of Sir 
Homewood Crawford, to celebrate the 300th 
anniversary of the granting by King James I. of 
a Charter of Incorporation to the Musicians' 
Company on the 8th day of July, 1604, by 
holding an Exhibition of Ancient Musical 
Instruments, Manuscripts, Autographs, Portraits, 
Books and other mementoes of music ajid 
musicians, under the auspices of the Company. 

The following members of the Company were 
elected to form a ComiAi,ttee to carry out this 



126 

undertaking, with Sir Homewood Crawford as 
Chairman, namely : — 

The Master. 

William Cordy Herring, Esq. 

Senior Warden. 

Charles Thomas Daniell Crews, Esq., D.L., 
J.P., F.S.A. 

Junior Warden. 

Edward Ernest Cooper, Esq. 

Robert Edmund Brandt, Esq. 

Sir Frederick Bridge, M.V.O., Mus. Doc. 

The Rev. Thomas Henry Cart, M.A. 

Captain Adrian Charles Chamier, F.S.A. 

Sir Ernest Clarke, M.A., F.S.A. 

John Clementi Collard, Esq. 

Sir Homewood Crawford. 

Clifford Blackburn Edgar, Esq., Mus. Bac. 

The Rev. R. H. Hadden, M.A. 

Frank Harwood Lescher, Esq. 

W. H. p. Leslie, Esq. 

Alfred Henry Littleton, Esq. 

Sir George Martin, M V.O., Mus. Doc. 

Colonel Thomas Bradney Shaw-Hellier. 

Charles Ernest Rube, Esq. 

Thomas Lea Southgate, Esq. 

Joseph Edward Street, Esq. 

Thomas Collingwood Fenwick, Esq. (Clerk). 

Hon. Secretaries- 

A. F. Hill, Esq., F.S.A. 
J. F. R. Stainer, Esq., M.A., B,C,L. 



127 

The immediate patronage of His Majesty the 
King, Her Majesty Queen Alexandra, and Their 
Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of 
Wales was graciously given to the Exhibition. 

The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers 
granted the use of their magnificent Hall and 
adjacent rooms for a period of about four weeks 
for the Exhibition, and, in addition, gave their 
most cordial co-operation and valuable assist- 
ance, and bore the greater portion of the 
expenses of the opening Ceremony, thus placing 
the Musicians' Company under a lasting 
obligation to them. 

The general expenses of the Exhibition were 
borne chiefly by Members of the Company, but 
contributions were also received from the 
Worshipful Companies of Goldsmiths, Cloth- 
workers, Mercers, Grocers, Skinners, Merchant 
Taylors, Haberdashers, Vintners and Leather- 
sellerSj in addition to a handsome donation 
voted by the Court of the Company. 

The object of the Exhibition was to enable 
all interested in Music to contrast as a fruitful 



128 

means of instruction its past with its then present 
condition ; to estimate its growth and develop- 
ment, and to observe what progress had been 
made with the work of the Instrument Maker, 
Composer, Player and! Music Printer. 

The Exhibition includfed ancient Musical 
Instruments, rare Books, fine Pictures, unique 
Manuscripts, Autographs, Portraits and other 
Mementoes of Music and Musicians, many of 
which had never before been exhibited nor are 
they likely tO' be gathered together again. 
His Majesty the King graciously headed 
the list of lenders. It may confidently be 
said that the Exhibition surpassed in its 
completeness any other which had hitherto 
been held. It is impossible in this short 
notice to describe the exhibits or to indicate 
others of the prominent features of the collection. 
A complete record will, however, be given in the 
illustrated catalogue shortly to be published by 
Messrs. Novello and Co., Ltd., which will contain 
a list of all the exhibits, together with historical 
and critical remarks on the more important 
entries. 



129 

Their Royal Highnesses, the Prince and 
Princess of Wales, graciously consented to open 
the Exhibition, and fixed Monday, the 27th 
June, 1904, for the ceremony, and having 
expressed their desire that their visit should be 
regarded as more of a private nature than as an 
official function, the invitations were necessarily 
limited. Those invited to the Ceremony 
included the Lord Mayor (Sir J. T. Ritchie), the 
Lady Mayoress, and the Sheriffs (Alderman Sir 
John Knill and Sir Alfred Reynolds) with their 
ladies ; the Prime Warden, the Wardens, Court 
of Assistants and Clerk of the Fishmongers' 
Company, with their ladies ; the Masters and 
Clerks of the principal Livery Companies ; the 
Principals of the Royal Academy of Music, the 
Royal College of Music, and the Guildhall School 
of Music, and other distinguished Musicians; 
every Member of the Musicians' Company, the 
Members of the Court and the Exhibition Com- 
mittee and the lenders being asked to come 
accompanied by their ladies. 



I30 

The following programme of the Opening 
Ceremony, previously submitted to and approved 
by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, 
was carried out in its entirety. 

Programme of Opening Ceremony 

BY 

Their Royal Highnesses 
THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF WALES 

On Monday, the 2 7tb, June, 1904, at 4 o'clock, 

At Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge, 

By kind permission oj the Fishmongtrs' Company. 



The General Guests will assemble between 
3 and 3.30 o'clock, and take their seats in the 
Court Dining Room, where the Opening 
Ceremony will take place at 4 o'clock. 

A Selection of Music will be performed during 
the seating of the Guests and until the arrival 
of Their Royal Highnesses. 

The Rt. Hon. The Lord Mayor, the Lady 
Mayoress, the Sheriffs, and their ladies will arrive 
at 3.45, and be received by Master and Wardens. 

Their Royal Highnesses will on their arrival 
be received by the Prime Warden of the Fish- 



131 

mongers' Company (Henry Joseph Chinnery, 
Esq.), who will be presented, and will present 
the Wardens of his Company (S. Hope Morley, 
Esq., H. Doughty Browne, Esq., George Lewis 
Denman, Esq., Hugh Cohn Smith, Esq., and 
Bryan Erskine Durant, Esq.). 

Their Royal Highnesses will then be con- 
ducted upstairs to the entrance to the Great Hall, 
where they will be received by the Master of 
the Musicians' Company (William Cordy 
Herring, Esq.), who will be presented, and will 
present the Wardens of his Company (Charles 
Thomas Daniell Crews, Esq., and Edward 
Ernest Cooper, Esq.), and Mrs. Herring. 

Her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales 
will be presented with a bouquet by Mrs. 
Herring. 

The Master will then present the Chairman of 
the Exhibition Committee (Sir Homewood 
Crawford) and Lady Crawford, and Their Royal 
Highnesses will be asked to accept a copy of the 
exhibition catalogue from Lady Crawford. 

Their Royal Highnesses, conducted by the 
Chairman, will then make an inspection of the 

K 2 



132 

Exhibition, having the special features of it 
explained to them by Members of the Exhibition 
Committee at their respective sections. 

With the permission of Their Royal High- 
nesses, the following will accompany them : — 

The Rt. Hon. The Lord Mayor and Mrs. 
Herring. 

The Lady Mayoress and the Master of 
the Musicians' Company. 

The suite in attendance on Their Royal 
Highnesses. 

Alderman and Sheriff Sir John Knill, 
Bart, and Lady Crawford. 

Mr. Warden Crews and Lady Knill. 

Sheriff Sir Alfred Reynolds and Mrs. 
Crews. 

Mr. Warden Cooper and Lady Reynolds. 

The Prime Warden of the Fishmongers' 
Company and Mrs. Cooper. 

The Wardens and Clerk of the Fish- 
mongers' Company. 

The Clerk of the Musicians' Company 
and the Honorary Secretaries. 

On arrival in the Great Hall a short selection 
of Shakesperian Music, published in 1599, will 
be performed under the direction of Sir 



13^ 

Frederick Bridge, M.V.O., Mus. Doc, by the 
Rev. F. W. Galpin, Mrs. Galpin, and others, on 
the following instruments in actual use in 1604, 
namely: — 

The Treble Viol, the Recorder, the 

Cittern, the Pandora, the Lute, and the Bass 

Viol. 
Having made the tour of the Exhibition, Their 
Royal Highnesses will be conducted to the plat- 
form in the Court Dining Room, where they will 
be briefly addressed by the Chairman of the 
Exhibition Committee, and His Royal Highness 
will be asked to declare the Exhibition open. 

His Royal Highness having declared the 
Exhibition open. Their Royal Highnesses will 
be conducted downstairs to the Court Room, 
where light refreshments will be served. 



In the course of their tour of inspection 
of the Exhibition Their Royal Highnesses 
evinced considerable interest in the Exhibits, 
the more important of which were severally ex- 
plained by Sir Frederick Bridge, Col. Shaw- 
HeDier, Mr. Littleton, Mr. Southgate, Mr. Street 
and the Hon. Secretaries, who were respectively 
in charge of them. In particular Their Royal 



134 

Highnesses were especially charmed with the 
magnificent Portrait of Handel, never previously 
exhibited, lent by Earl Howe, the carved Violin 
presented by Queen Elizabeth to Earl Leicester, 
lent by the Earl and Countess of Warwick, the 
Lam.ont Harp, lent by Mr. W. Moir Bryce, Queen 
Elizabeth's Virginal Book, lent by the Marquis 
of Abergavenny, the Ruckers Harpsichord, lent 
by the Countess of Dudley, Nell Gwynne's 
Virginal, lent by Mr. A. F. Hill, the many 
interesting MSS. and Books on Musical Instru- 
ments and the beautiful collection of Virginals 
and Harpsichords and other old Instruments of 
ancient periods, particularly the English stringed 
ones of the 17th century. 

At the close of their visit Their Royal High- 
nesses were briefly addressed by the Chairman 
of the Committee (Sir Homewood Crawford), 
and the Prince of Wales made the following 
gracious reply = " Mr. Chairman, Ladies and 
" Gentlemen, — I can only say that it has given 
"both the Princess and myself the greatest 
"pleasure to come here to-day, and we have been 
"extremely interested in all we have seen of 
"those wonderful old musical instruments which 
" date back, as you say, 300 years. I can only say 



135 

" I hope it will be visited by a great number of 
" people, and I am sure they cannot fail to be as 
"interested as we have been. I am excessively 
"pleased to be present in the Fishmongers' Hall 
"once more, as I have the honour of being a 
"Member of that Company. I now have great 
"pleasure in declaring this Exhibition open." 

After partaking of refreshment, Their Royal 
Highnesses took their departure, having 
expressed their great satisfaction with the 
arrangements made for their visit, and repeating 
their expression of sincere hope for the success 
of the Exhibition. 

A letter received subsequently by the Chair- 
man from Col. Sir Arthur Bigge, the Secretary 
tp His Royal Highness, reiterated this expression 
of approval. 

The Exhibition remained open to the public 
until July i6th. Important lectures were 
delivered daily by eminent authorities (Members 
of the Company and others) on the Development 
of Musical Instruments and the Advance of 
Music since 1604. 

Particulars of the Lectures. 
June 28th. *T. L. Southgate. "The Evolution of the 

Pianoforte." 
June 29th. W. H. Cummings, Mus.Doc, F.S.A. " Our 
English Songs.'' 
» Member of the Musicians' Company 



13^ 



June 30th. H. Watson, Mus.Doc. " The Early English 
Viols and their Music." 

July I St. * E. Markham Lee, M.A., Mus.Doc. 
" Madrigals, Rounds, Glees and Part-Songs." 

July and. J. Finn. " The Recorder, Flute, Fife and 
Piccolo. " 

July 4th. * Sir Fredk. Bridge, M.V.O., Mus.Doc. 
" Music in England in the Year 1604." 

July 5th. * Algernon Rose. " Our Dances of Bygone 
Days." 

July 6th. A. H. D. Prendergast, M.A. "The Masque 
and Early Operas." 

July 7th. * F. J. Sawyer, Mus.Doc. " The English Opera 
School." 

July 8th. G. F. Huntley, Mus.Doc. "Our Cathedral 
Composers and their Works." 

July 9th. D. J. Blaikley. "The Single and Double 
Reed Instruments." 

July nth. Rev. F. W. Galpin, M.A., F.L.S. "The 
Water Organ of the Ancients and the Organ ot 
To-day." 

July 12th. * T. L. Southgate. " The Regal and its 
Successors; The Harmonica." 

July 13th. *W. W. Cobbett. "The Violin Family and 
its Music." 

July 14th. J. E. Borland, Mus.Bac. " The Brass Wind 
Instruments." 

July isth. *A. H. Littleton. "A Discourse on Early 
Music Books." 

July i6th. * Sir E. Clarke, M.A. " Music of the 
Country Side." 

These Lectures were given with musical illus- 

• Members of the Musicians' Company 



13^ 

trations, and formed a most interesting and 
unique feature of the Exhibition, and judging 
from the crowds who flocked daily to the Lecture 
Room, the Company may claim to have made 
a record in its mode of instructing an everyday 
musical audience. 

Arrangements have been made for the publica- 
tion of the Lectures with the object of securing 
a valuable and permanent record.* 

At the close of the Exhibition a letter of 
thanks was sent to each Exhibitor. His Majesty 
the King was plesised to command that the 
Company should be especially thanked for the 
vote of thanks accorded to him. 

The number of objects exhibited reached fully 
2,000. They were insured for £S7A'h7- 
The total number of lenders was 193. 

Owing to the want of an executive staff and 
executive officers everything connected with the 
arrangement of the Exhibition and the collection 
and return of Exhibits depended upon voluntary 
and friendly assistance. Special reference must 
be made to the valuable assistance rendered by 
Sir Fredk. Bridge, Dr. W. H. Cummings, Sir 

• The Lecture! will b^ published by tlie Walter Stott Publish- 
ing Co., Ltd. 



138 

Caspar Purdon Clcirke (Director of the Victoria 
and Albert Museum), the Rev. F. W. Galpin, 
Mr. T. L. Southgate, Colonel Shaw-Hellier, Mr. 
A. H. Littleton, Mr. J. E. Street and Miss 
Stainer, all of whom materially added to the 
Exhibition by the loan of exhibits of exceptional 
merit, and the majority of whom devoted them- 
selves assiduously to the task of making the 
Exhibition an unqualified success by constant 
personal attendance. 

The Chairman of the Committee, Sir Home- 
wood Crawford, and the Hon. Secretaries, Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill and Mr. J. F. R. Stainer, displayed 
great zeal in the discharge of their respective 
duties. The Company is under a lasting obligation 
to them for the enormous amount of time devoted 
to- the Exhibition, and it is a pleasure to record 
elsewhere that their services, as well as the 
services of other friends, have received recogni- 
tion by the Court of the Company. 



In connection with the Exhibition a Con- 
versazione was given on the 30th June, 1904, at 



139 

Fishmongers' Hall, by the Wardens, Mr. C. T. D. 
Crews and Mr. E. E. Cooper, to which the 
Members of the Company, their ladies and 
friends, and many distinguished guests were 
invited, when an interesting performance of 
ancient music was given. 



At the close of the Exhibition a Reception of 
the Members of the Company and their friends 
was held by Sir Homewood and Lady Crawford. 



140 



The Banquet. 

On July 8th, 1904, being the 300th anniversary 
of the granting of James I.'s Charter, the Master 
of the Company (Mr. W. Cordy Herring) 
generously entertained the whole of the Livery 
at a Banquet, at the Albion Hotel, Aldersgate 
Street. The company included the Lord Chief 
Justice (Lord Alverstone), Mr. H. J. Chinnery, 
Prime Warden of the Fishmongers' Company, 
and the Principals of the three Colleges of Music. 

Additional interest was imparted by the 
presence of Mr. Samuel Ernest Palmer, to whom 
the Freedom of the Company had been pre- 
sented at the Court previously held on that day ; * 
by the presentation of the Prizes given by the 
Rev. Henry Cartt to the successful competitors ; 
and by the Programme of Music, which was 
exclusively English and included many of the 
Prize Competitions, in which the Composers per- 
sonally assisted. 



• See Page 143 
t See Page 118 



HI 



THE 
HONORARY FREEMEN OF THE 
COMPANY. 



?^.E.?&. Prince Cftristi'aii of ScfilesftDiff. 

His Royal Highness Prince Christian of 
Schleswig-Holstein having honoured the Com- 
pany by signifying his willingness to accept the 
Freedom of the Company, the Certificate was 
presented to him at Schomberg House, Pall Mall, 
on the 1 8th July, 1905, by Mr. C. T. D. Crews, 
the Master ; Sir Frederick Bridge (representing 
Mr. E. E. Cooper, the Senior Warden); Sir 
Homewood Crawford, Junior Warden, and the 
Clerk, Mr. T. C. Fenwick, being in attendance. 



142 

Mr. Andrew Carnegie. 

The presentation of the Freedom of the Com- 
pany to Mr. Andrew Carnegie, LL.D., took place 
on the 1 2th May, 1904, at Clothworkers' Hall, 
kindly lent for the occasion by the Worshipful 
Company of Clothworkers. 

The honour was conferred upon Mr. Carnegie 
in testimony of the great services rendered to 
the Art of Music in the United Kingdom and 
the United States of America. 

A banquet followed at which a distinguished 
company largely composed of Musicians was 
present. The Master (Mr. W. Cordy Herring) 
presided. 

In proposing the health of Mr. Carnegie the 
Master mentioned the generous support which 
he (Mr. Carnegie) had afforded to Musical Art ; 
that through his initiative and instrumentality 
upwards of five hundred organs had been 
installed in Churches in Scotland, England and 
America ; and that in the munificent assistance 
given by him to the many free libraries through- 
out the country distinct service had been 
rendered to Music, inasmuch as Music and its 
literature formed a component part of the public 
library scheme 



143 



Mr. Samuel Ernest Palmer. 

A noteworthy event on the 300th anniversary 
(8th July, 1904) of the granting of the Charter 
by James I. was the presentation of the Freedom 
to Mr. Samuel Ernest Palmer, in appreciation of 
his services to Music, particularly by the founda- 
tion of the Berkshire Scholarship and the 
Patron's Fund of the Royal College of Music, 
and endowing that Fund with the munificent gift 
of ;£'20,ooo with the main object of assisting 
young British Composers in the production of 
their compositions. 

The munificent gifts of Mr. Carnegie and 
Mr. Palmer, whereby the company has been 
enabled to found Scholarships at the Guildhall 
School of Music, are referred to elsewhere 
(pp. 112 and Wl). 



144 



Dr. W. H. Cummings 



AND 



The Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

The Freedom of the Company was presented 
to these gentlemen at the Court held on the 
17th January, 1905, in acknowledgment of 
invaluable services rendered by them on the 
occasion of the Music Loan Exhibition, 1904. 




•■it 'J 



To lace page ijs 



145 

THE MASKE OF 
"THE GOLDEN TREE." 

On June 29th, 1905, Mr. C. T. D. Grews, tlie 
Master of the Company, most generously invited 
the Members and their friends to the theatre of 
the Guildhall School of Music to witness a per- 
formance of the Masque of " The Golden Tree." 
This work was written by Thomas Campion and 
produced at Whitehall in 161 3 on the occasion of 
the marriage of the Earl of Somerset and Lady 
Frances Howard. Thomas Campion was a poet, 
dramatist, composer and physician, who 
flourished at the end of the sixteenth century 
cind died in 161 9. He lived at a time when the 
Maske or Masque, a combination of speech, 
dance, song and chorus was in its prime. These 
grand spectacular displays, furnished with beauti- 
ful scenery, mechanical effects and splendid 
costumes, were the delight of royalty and the 
nobility for a considerable period. The best 
poets and foremost musicians of the day united 
to produce these precursors of the opera. 
Thomas Campion was a man of many parts, even 
on his musical side. Playford selected him to 



146 



write the Counterpoint Treatise in his "Intro- 
duction to the skill of Music," published in 161 8. 
He became popular by the music he wrote for 
the "Maske of Flowers," produced in 161 3. 

The performance at the Guildhall School of 
Music, kindly lent for the occasion by the Music 
Committee of the Corporation, and for which all 
possible assistance was given by Dr. W. H. 
Cummings, Principal of the School and a Free- 
man of the Musicians' Company, would indeed 
have delighted our forefathers. It was a 
magnificent presentation of a typical ancient 
Maske, scenery, rich dresses, graceful dances 
and delightful old music all combining to 
furnish an evening's entertainment without 
parallel. The performance was under the 
direction of Mr. A. H. D. Prendergast, M.A., 
a notable authority on the Maske. It was the 
custom for several composers to unite in pro- 
viding suitable music. It so happened in this 
case, the names of Lawes, Byrde, Coperario, 
Farnaby, Laniere and Holborne appearing in the 
score. Mr. Prendergast not only re-arranged 
their music for the little orchestra led by Miss 
Kate Chaplin, but also wrote some charming 
additional pieces quite in the olden style. With 



147 

the exception of some of the Principals, the cast 
was mainly composed of students of the Guild- 
hall School of Music, Mr. H. Saxe-Wyndham, 
the Secretary, assisting in the stage work, and 
Mr. B. Soutten being responsible for the Dances. 
H.R.H. Princess Christian and her two daughters 
honoured the performance with their presence. 
At its close, hearty cheers were raised for the 
Master whose munificence had provided for so 
enjoyable a scene. 



148 



STATIONERS' HALL. 

Through the courtesy of the Master Warden 
and Court of Assistants of the Stationers' Com- 
pany, arrangements have been made for the 
future official gatherings of the Musicians' Com- 
pany to be held at Stationers' Hall, a building 
of considerable interest to Musicians. Here the 
annual gathering in honour of the Patron Saint 
of Music known as " St. Cecilia's Feast " was 
held for many years in the latter part of the 
seventeenth and the beginning of the eighteenth 
centuries, when Odes in Praise of Music, specially 
written and composed, were performed. These 
Odes include Dryden's " Ode to St. Cecilia " 
(1687) and "Alexander's Feast" (1697), both of 
which, in later years, Handel set to music. Of 
recent years a handsome stained glass window 
representing the Saint has been placed in the 
Hall. The Stationers' Company is essentially a 
trade guild, and can boast a respectable antiquity, 
having recently celebrated its quincentenary, 
when the Master alluded to the interesting fact 
that it is exclusively composed of Members of 
the Company's trades and their descendants. 
The Register of Copyrights, which was estab- 



,4/^1 




The Company's FORM OF INVITATION. 



To lace page 148. 



149 

lished by the Company in the fifteenth century 
and has since been continued under the 
sanction of the legislature, contains many 
entries relating to musical compositions, 
and at the present time an entry at 
Stationers' Hall is ein important weapon in 
the protection of musical rights. The accom- 
modation placed at the disposal of the Musicians' 
Company comprises a handsome Hall panelled 
with oak and decorated with a richly-carved screen 
after the style of Grinling Gibbons, the work of 
Stephen CoUedge ; a Court or Dining Room 
used upon more than one occasion as the meeting 
place of the Grand Lodge of Freemasons ; and 
a panelled reception room sufficiently large to 
accommodate 200 guests. 



1906. 
THE ROLL 



Worshipful Company of Musicians, 
members of the livery. 

Arranged in order of Seniority according to the dates of their 
Adtnission. 



■^ Excused from Service in the Court of Assistants. 
** Member of King Edward VII's. Coronation Choir. 
t Member of the Committee of the Loan Exhibition, 1904. 



Name and Address. 



I. Thomas Prowett 
Jones, Randolphs, 
Biddenden, Kent 



2. John Burgess 
Knight, 
31, Holland Park, W 



3. George John 
Gadsdon, The 
Lodge, Ilford, Essex 



John Henry 

Skilbeck, 

Z05, Upper Thames 

Street, E.G. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



1843 
Aug. 10 



1844 
July 3 



1863 
April 8 



1867 
Feb. 20 



Admitted 
Assistant. 



i860 
July 4 



* 



* 



1871 
April 5 



Additions. 



Master 1870-1 ; 1883-4. 



Master 1876-7 ; 1888-9. Trustee. 



152 



Name and Address. 



5. Henry Richard 
Frisby, 
1 7, Tokenhouse Yard, 
E.G. 



6. Robert Betson 
Warrick, 

4, Verulam Buildings 
W.C. 



7. John Clementi 

COLLAED, 

16, Grosvenor Street, 
W. 



8. William Cordy 
Herring, 
Wraysbury House, 
Wraysbury, Bucks 



9. Frank Harwood 
Lescher, 

31, Devonshire Place, 
W. 



10. Edward Alfred 
Webb, F.S.A., 
Cookham Dene, 
Chislehurst, Kent 



Admitted 

on 
Livery, 



1867 
July 22 



1867 

Nov. I 



1871 
April 13 



1873 
April 10 



1875 
Feb. 8 



187s 
Feb. 8 



Admitted 
Assistant. 



1869 
July 7 



1876 
Jan. 4 



1886 
May 4 



1897 
July 6 



1896 
April 21 



* 



Additions. 



Elected to Livery May 26, 1846. 
Master 1874-5; 1885-6; 1895-6, 



Master 1879-80; 1891-2. 



fMASTER 1893-4; 1899-1900; and in 
1 90 1 {after decease of Sir /ohn 
Stainer). Treasurer. 



fMASTER 1903-4. 



(■Master 1902-3. 



153 



Name and Address. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



Admitted 
Assistant, 



Additions. 



II. Sir John Frederick 
Bridge, M.V.O., 
Mus Doc. Oxon., 
M.A. Dunelm., 
The Cloisters, 
Westminster Abbey, 
S.W. 



12. Joseph Edward 
Street, Woodside, 
Caterham, Surrey 



13. Sir HoMEWOOD 
Crawford, 
Merrington Lodge, 
West Bolton 
Gardens, South 
Kensington, S.W. 



1878 
May 6 



1885 
Jan. 20 



1880 
April 30 



1880 
Aug. 26 



* 



1902 

Nov. 28 



f Master 1892-3; 1898-9 ; President 
of the Livery Club 1903 ; Hon. 
R.A.M.; L.T.C.L.; President of 
the Royal College of Organists 
1904-5 ; Organist of Westminster 
Abbey ; Director of the Music at 
the Coronation of H.M. King 
Edward VII. ; Gresham Professor 
of Music ; Conductor of the Royal 
Choral and Madrigal Societies; 
Member of the Senate and King 
Edward Professor of Music of the 
University of London ; Trustee of 
the Musical Association; Composer 
of and Writer on Music. 



\Fellow of the Philharmonic Society ; 
Hon. Sec. Madrigal Society.'''* 



tJuNiOR Warden 1 904-s; Chairman 
of the Committee of the Loan 
Exhibition 1904; President 
OF the Livery Club 1904, Re- 
elected 1905 ; Vice-President 
and Chairman of the Council 
of the Westminster Orchestral 
and Choral Society ; Member of 
the Committee of the Royal 
Patron's Fund, R.C.M. ; Author 
of several Musical Compositions. 



IS4 



Name and Address. 



14. Charles Thomas 
Daniell Crews, 
D.L., J.P., F.S.A., 
Billingbear, Woking- 
ham, Berks., and 

4 1 , Portman Square, W, 
{High Sheriff for Berk- 
shire, i8gg.) 

15. Albert Charles 
Hunter, 

1 4, Montague Road, 
Richmond, Surrey 



1 6. John Westrope, 
207, Grove Lane, 
Camberwell, S.E. 

17. Edward Ernest 
Cooper, 

Berrydown Court, 
Overton, Hants. 



18. Thomas Lea South- 
gate, 

19, Manor Park, 
Hither Green, Lee, 
S.E. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



18S0 

Aug. 27 



1880 
Oct. 9 



1881 
July 21 

1882 

Julys 



1884 

May 13 



Admitted 
Assistant. 



1897 
July 6 



1903 
April 2I 



* 



1901 
Oct. 29 



1903 
July 7 



Additions. 



fMASTER 1904-5; Trustee; Hon. 
Treasurer of the Madrigal Society; 
Member of the Committee of Man- 
agement, R.AM.; Member of the 
Musical Association?^* 



Hon. Sec. Livery Club ; Member 
of the Royal Choral Society ; 
Formerly Member of the Madrigal 
Society and of Henry Leslies 
Choir.** 

Member of the Madrigal Society; 
Formerly Member of the Bach 
Choir. 

jSenior Warden 1904-5. Trustee. 
Fellow of the Philharmonic Society; 
Hon. Treasurer and Member of the 
Committeeof Management R.A.M.; 
Hon. Librarian Madrigal Society ; 
Member of the Committee of the 
Abbey Glee Club ; Life Member 
of the Musical Association.** 

\ Writer on Music; Hon. Sec. Union 
of Graduates in Music ; Member 
R.C.O.; Member of Corporation, 
Trinity College, L.ondon ; Member 
of the Council Musical Association; 
Vice-President of the Plain Song 
and Mediceval Music Society ; 
Formerly Editor of the "Musical 
Standard " and of'' 'Musical News. " 



'55 



Name and Address. 


Admitted 

on 

Livery. 


Admitted 
Assistant. 


Additions. 


19. Edward Beddome 


1884 


* 




Forbes, 


Nov. 21 




Tilburstow Lodge, 








South Godstone, 








Redhill. 








20. The Rev. Robert 


1884 


1904 


t Member of Committee of the 


Henry Hadden, 


Nov. 28 


April 26 


Livery Club. 


M.A., 








13, North Audley 








Street, W. 








(Hon. Chaplain to 








the Ki7ig) 








21. Charles Santley, 


1885 


* 


Distinguished Singer; Writer on 


67, Carlton Hill, 


Nov. 6 


Music. 


N.W. 








22. Otto GoLDSCHMiDT, 


1886 


* 


Vice-President R.C.O.; Member of 


I , Moreton Gardens, 


July 2 




the Council of the Royal College of 


South Kensington, 






Music; Hon. R.A.M.; Vice- 


•iN^ . {Knight of the 






President Madrigal Society ; 


Swedish Wasa) 






Director of the Philharmonic 
Society ; Vice-President Musical 
Association ; Member Swedish 
R.A.M. ; Formerly Prof. R.A.M. ; 
First Musical Director Bach Choir, 
1876; Composer 0/ and Writer on 
Music 


23. William Palmer 


1886 


i9°S 




Fuller, 


Nov. 3 


May 2 




2, Verulam Buildings, 








W.C. 









156 



Name and Address. 



24. Edward Chappell, 
18, Lower Belgrave 
Street, S.W. 

25. Alfred Moul, 
53Ai Shaftesbury 
Avenue, W. 

26. Alfred Henry 
Littleton, 

50, Lancaster Gate, 
W 



27. Charles Dennis 

HOBLYN, 

18, Bishopsgate Street 
Within, E.G. 

28.FrederickWalmisley 
Warrick, 
6, RaymondBuildings, 
Gray's Inn, W.C. 



29. 



Arthur Frederick 
Hill, F.S.A., 
Ray man, Drayton 
Green, Ealing, W. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



i»87 

July 5 



1889 
Feb. 14 

1889 
Oct. 30 



1890 
Jan. 2 



1890 
Jan. 2 



1891 
Sept. II 



Admitted 
Assistant. 



1887 
April 19 



1905 
Jan. 17 



1893 
Oct. 31 



1905 
Jan. 17 



Additions. 



Elected on Livery January 19, 1886. 
Retired from Court July 6, 1897. 



'[Member of the Council of the Royal 
College of Music ; Member of Com- 
mittee Royal Choral Society ; Mem- 
ber of Executive Council of Music 
Loan Exhibition, South Kensing- 
ton, 1885 ; Member of Musical 
Association. 

Master 1901-1902. President of 
THE Livery Club 1902. Member 
OF THE Committee of the Livery 
Club. 



Joint Hon. Sec. Loan Exhibition 
1904. Hon. Treasurer of the 
Livery Club; Writer on the 
Violin ; Member of the Committee of 
the Loan Collection of Ancient 
Musical Instruments, South Kens- 
ington, 1885; and of the English 
Committee of the Loan Collection 
(Music and the Drama), Vienna, 
1892/ Member of the Musiccil 
Association. 



157 



Name and Address. 



30. Henry Cock, 
Trinity House, 
Kingston-on-Thames 



31. William Stevenson 
HOYTE, Mus. Doc, 
68, Boundary Road, 

N.W. 



32' 



33- 



34- 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



Algernon Sidney 
Rose, F.R.G.S., 
3, Whitehall Court, 
S.W. 



CoI.Thomas Bradney 
Shaw-Hellier,J.P., 
(late Commanding 
j[th DragoonGuards), 
Wombourne 
Wodehouse, near 
Wolverhampton 



Robert Edmund 

Brandt, 

15, Lennox Gardens, 

S.W, 



1892 
Mar. 18 



1893 
Mar. 29 



1893 
July 4 



1894 
June I 



Admitted 
Assistant. 



1894 
June I 



Additions, 



Elected to Livery igth January, 1886 / 
F.R. C. O., Lie. Mus. T. C.L. ; Prof. 
Organ R.A.M. and R.C.M. ; 
Organist and Choirmaster All 
Saints', Margaret Street, W. ; 
Composer of Church Music.** 



Fellow of the Philharmonic Society ; 
Hon. Sec. Westminster Orchestral 
Society; Member of the Musical 
Association ; Writer on Music and 
Composer. 



f Elected Assistant, iith/uly, 1905. 
Late Commandant Royal Military 
School of Music, Kneller Ball; 
Chairman of Music Committee 
Royal Military Exhibition, 1890. 
Lectured on Military Band Or- 
ganisation at the Royal United 
Senice Institution, 1892. Member 
of the Musical Association. 



fMEMBER OF Committee of the 
Livery Club ; Fellow of the Phil- 
harmonic Society ; Member of the 
Musical Association. 







^58 




Name and Address. 


Admitted 

on 

Livery. 


Admitted 
Assistant. 


Additions. 


35- Capt. Adrian Charles 


1895 




\Memher of the Committee of the Handel 


Chamier, F.S.A. 


July 22 ; 


Society ; Member of Crystal Palace 


{late Lincolnshire 






Festival Orchestra since 1882. 


Jiegt.), 46, Nevern 








Square, S.W. 








36. John Clementi 


189s 






CoLLARD, junr., 


Sept. 18 






16, Grosvenor Street, W. 








37. Alexander Burnett 


1899 






Brown, F.S.I. , 


April 18 






Amberley House, 








Norfolk Street, 








Strand, W.C. 








38. Septimus Croft, J. P., 


1900 






St. Margaretsbury, 


Jan. 29 






Ware, Herts 








39. Clifford Blackburn 


1900 




("Member of the Committee of the 


Edgar, Mus. Bac, 


July 20 




Livery Clue; Represents the Gradu- 


London, B.Sc.,J.P., 






ates in Music on the Senate of the 


Wedderlie, Queen's 






University of Lotidoti; Member of the 


Road, Richmond, 






Madrigal Society ; Hon. Treasurer 


Surrey 






Musical Association ; Member of the 
Council of Union of Graduates in 
Music; President of the Richmond 
Philharmonic Society. 


40. Charles Lukey 


1900 






COLLARD,M.A ,B.C.L., 


July 24 






4, Temple Gardens, 








Temple, B.C. 









159 



Name and Address. 



41. Hugh Wyatt, 

I, Tokenhouse Build 
ings, E.G. 



42. The Rev. Henry 
Tiios. Cart, M.A., 
49, Albert Court, 
Kensington Gore, 
SW. 



43. Charles Ernest 
Rube, 

I, Belgrave Square, 
S.W. 



44. Sir Ernest Clarke, 
M.A., F.S.A., 
13A, Hanover Square, 
W. 



45- 



Admitted 

OQ 

Livery. 



1900 
Sept. 26 



Admitted 
Assistant, 



1 90 1 
June 14 



1901 
Oct. 29 



Sir George Clement 
Martin, M.V.O., 
Mus. Doc, 
4, Amen Court, 
St. Paul's, E.C. 



1901 
Dec. 30 



1902 
Feb. 21 



Additions. 



Member of the Musical Association. 



\Member of the Madrigal Society, and 
the Musical Association ; Member 
of the Committees of Management 
R.AM, and of the Royal Choral 
Society Formerly Member of the 
Bach Choir.** 

f Chairman of the Finance Committee, 
and Member of the Council of the 
Sunday Concert Society; Life 
Member of the Musical Association ; 
Lectured on Old Music, at the 
Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 
1897-8, Reading College, 1899, and 
Queen's LLall, 1899. 

■\ Organist of St. Paul's Cathedral; 
Hon.R.A.M., F.R.C.O ; Assistant 
Conductor King Edward VIL.'s 
Coronation Choir ; Composer of and 
Writer on Music. 



i6o 



Name and Address. 



46. Percy Godfrey, 

Mus. Bac. Dunelm ; 
27, Palace Street, 
Canterbury. 



47. William John 
Lancaster, J. P., 
South Lynn, Putney 
Hill, S.W. 



John Frederick 
Randall Stainer, 
M.A., B.C.L., 
I, New Court, Carey 
Street, W.C. 



49. 



s°. 



51 



Edward Barclay 

HOARE, 

iiA, Orchard Street, 
Portman Square, W. 



Charles James 
Powell, 
30, Throgmorton Street, 
E.C. 



Thomas Collingwood 
Fenwick, 
16, Berners Street, W, 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



1902 
April 4 



1902 
July 17 



1902 
July li 



1902 
July 23 



1902 
Sept. if 



1902 
Oct. 31 






Admitted 
Assistant, 



Additions. 



A.R.C.M. ; Master of Music, Kin^s 
School, Canterbury ; Composer of 
the Musicians' Company's Prize 
Coronation March, 1902. 



t Joint Hon. Sec. of the Loan 
Exhibition, 1904; Writer on 
Music ; Member of the Madrigal 
Society ; Trustee of the Musical 
Association.** 



fCLERK to the Company. 



i6i 



Name and Address. 



52. William Henry 
Perry Leslie, 
Broadwoods, Limited, 
Conduit Street, 

W. 

53. The Rev. Robinson 

Duckworth, D.D., 
C.V.O. 

Little Cloisters, 
Westminster Abbey, 
S.W. 

(Sub-Dean and 
Canon of West- 
minster, and 
Chaplain in Ordin- 
ary to the King). 

54. William Johnson 
Galloway, M.P., 
36, Portman Square, 
W. 



55. John Berwick 
Orgill, 

The Junior 
Athenseum Club, 
Piccadilly, W. 

56. William Henry Ash, 

J.P., 

51, Hamilton 

Terrace, N.W. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



1902 
Dec. 5 



1903 
Mar. 2 



1903 
Apr. 2 J 



1903 
May 4 



1903 
May 4 



Admitted 
Assistant. 



Additions. 



\ Member of the Council of the Royal 
College of Music. 



Hon. Chaplain to the Company. 



Member of the Madrigal Society ; the 
Moray Minstrels and the Allge- 
meiner Deutscher Musik- Verein. 



l62 



-Name and Address. 



57. The Right Hon. 
George Wynd ham, 
M.P., 
35, Park Lane, W. 



58. James Boyton, 
6, Vere Street, W. 



59. Robert Kennerley 

RUMFORD, 

Compton Lodge, 
South Hampstead, 

N.W. 



60. Stanley Hawley, 
19, Oxford Mansion, 
Oxford Circus, W. 



61. Alfred Louis 
Reynolds, 
4, Hans Place, S.W. 



62. Edward William 

NiCHOLLS, 

62, Queen's Gardens 
Hyde Park, W. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery, 



1903 
June if 



1903 
July 14 



1903 
July 17 



1903 
July 17 



1904 
Jan. 19 



1904 
Jan. 19 



Admitted 

Assistant, 



63. Henry Dexter 1904 

Truscott, May 12 

89, Holland Park, W, 

U (Mrs. Kennerley Rumford, nSe Miss Clara Butt, was the Recipient of the Company's Silver Medal in 1894.) 



Admission. 



Distinguished Singer.^ 



First Recipient of the Company's 
Silver Medal 1890. Pianist; 
Composer of and Writer on Music. 



Member of the Madrigal Society, the 
Round Catch and Canon Club, the 
Philharmonic Society, and the Royal 
Choral Society.** 



Member of the Royal Amateur Or- 
chestral Society. 



i63 



64. 



65- 



66. 



Name and Address. 



George John 
Bennett, 
Mus. Doc. Cantab., 
Minster Yard, 
Lincoln. 



Alexander Finlay, 

J.P., 
{lateLt.-Col.4thS.S. 
Regiment), Little 
Brickhill Manor, 
Bletchley, Bucks. 

John Meade 
Falkner, M.A., 
Oxon, The Divinity 
House, Durham. 
(First Class of the 
Osmanieh and First 
Class of the Mejidieh) 



67. Ernest Markham 
Lee, M.A., 
Mus. Doc. Cantab., 
Barclay House, 
Woodford Green, 
Essex. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



1904 
May 12 



1904 
May 12 



1904 
May 12 



1904 
May 12 



Admitted 

Assistant. 



Additions. 



Organist and Master of the Choristers 
of Lincoln Cathedral ; Fellow and 
Professor of Harmony and Com- 
position, R.A.M., F.R.C.O.; Ex- 
aminer Associated Board R.A.M. 
and R. CM.; Composer of Music, 
and Examiner for Musical Degrees 
at the University of London; Mem- 
ber of the Philharmonic Society 
and the Musical Association. 

Member of the Royal Amateur Or- 
chestral Society.** 



F.R.C.O., Organist of All Saints', 
Woodford Green ; Prof essor for the 
special preparation of Students for 
University Degrees in Music, 
G.S.M. ; Examiner of the In- 
corporated Society of Musicians ; 
Director of the Woodford Green 
Chamber Concerts; Composer of 
and Writer on Music ; Member of 
the Philharmonic Society and 
Musical Association. 

M 2 



164 



Name and Address. 


Admitted 

on 

Livery. 


Admitted 
Assistant. 


Additions. 


68. Joseph John 
BiSGOOD, B.A. 
Lend., 
4, Park Hill, 
Richmond, Surrey 


1904 
May 12 






69. Sir George 
Donaldson, 
4, Queen Anne 
Street, Cavendish 
Square, W. 
(Officer of the 
Legion of Honour) 


1904 
May 12 




Member of the Committee of Manage- 
ment, R.A.M. ; Member of Musical 
Association ; Donor and Hon. 
Curator of the Donaldson Museum ; 
Oni of the English Commissioners 
of the St. Louis Exhibition, 1904. 


70. Frank Joseph 
SAVifYER.Mus.Doc, 
Oxon, 

5 5,BuckinghamPlace, 
Brighton. 


1904 
Oct. 25 




F.R. C. 0. , Professor R. CM., 
Organist and Choirmaster of St. 
Patrick's, Hove; Founder and Con- 
ductor Brighton and Hove Choral 
and Orchestral Society , Composer 
of Music.** 


71. Avigdor Lewis 
Birnstingl, 
5, Pembroke Gardens, 
Kensington, W. 


1904 
Oct. 25 






72. Hermann Louis 
Sternberg, 
io,Strathray Gardens, 
Eton Avenue, 
Hampstead, N.W. 


1904 
Oct. 25 







16S 



Name and Address. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



73. William Henry 

Allen, J. P. 
I, Dean's Yard, 
Westminster, S.W. 
(High Sheriff of Bed- 
fordshire igo4) 

74. William Arthur 

Woltmann, 

46, Abbey Road, N.W, 

75. Sidney James 
Preston, 
Gillmon House, 
Carshalton, Surrey. 

76. Herbert Sullivan, 
The Manor House, 
Brightlingsea, 
Essex. 

77. Edgar Speyer, 

46, Grosvenor Street, 
W. 

78. Thomas Mountain, 

St. Mary's, 
Derby Road, 
Bournemouth. 



79, Victor Allcard, 
Holmesdale, 
Teddington. 



1904 
Oct. 25 



1904 
Oct. 25 



1904 
Oct. 25 



i9°S 
May 2 



1905 
May 2 



i9°S 
May 2 



Admitted 
Assistant, 



Additions. 



Member of the Felinfoel (Caermar- 
then) Musical Society, i860; Hon- 
orary Organist of the Felinfoel 
Church, 1860-64; Original Member 
of the Cardiff Musical Society, 
1865 ; Member of the Bedford 
Musical Society, iSg^. 

Professor of Music ; Violinist. 



A.R.C.O., Organist and Director of 
the Choir of the Parish Church- 
Car shalton. 



Member of the Noblemen and Gentle- 
men^ s Catch Club. 



Member of the Madrigal Society ; 
Associate of the Philharmonic 
Society; Member of the Royal 
College of Organists and the 
Musical Association. 



1 66 



Name and Address. 



80. AiME Ferdinand 

PiTEL, 

Wintons, Park Hill 
Road, East Croydon. 



5i. Walter Willson 

COBBETT, 

Pen y Bryn, 
Sydenham Hill, S.E. 



82. Harold Edward 
Webb, 

60, Bartholomew 
Close, E.C. 



83. Henry Milsted, 
Fairlight Lawn, 
Hornsey Lane, N. 



84. Edwin Freshfield, 
LL.D., D.L., F.S.A., 
31, Old Jewry, E.C. 



85. Albert Gartside 
Neville, 

Oakhurst, The Knoll, 
Beckenham. 



Admitted 

on 
Livery. 



I9°5 
May 2 



i9°S 
May 2 



1905 
May 2 



i9°5 
May 2 



1905 
July II 



i9°S 
July 1 1 



Admitted 
Assistant, 



Additions. 



Member of the Council of the Musical 
Association, and of the Oxford 
and Cambridge Musical Club; 
Principal ist Violin of the 
" Strolling Flayers " Amateur 
Orchestral iiociety ; Writer and 
Lecturer on Musical Subjects. 



Formerly Member of 
Society. 



the Madrigal 



Elected 6th July, 1880. 



167 

The following Members elected Ilth July, 1905, are awaiting 

Admission. 



Name and Address. 



Admitted 

on 

Livery. 



Admitted 
Assistant. 



Additions. 



86. Claudius James 
Ash, 

Broad Street, 
Golden Square, W. 

87. Robert Septimus 
Gardiner, 

67, Cadogan Square, 
S.W. 

88. Sir George Wyatt 

Truscott, Suffolk 
Lane, E.G. 
{Alderman of the 
City of London, 
Sheriff of London, 
ig02). 

89. Edwin Marriott 

HODGKIN, 

1 7, Portland Place, W, 

90. Douglas Frederick 

Charrington, 
2, Mansfield Place, 
Richmond, Surrey. 



i68 



HONORARY FREEMEN. 



Date 

of 

Admission 



^M.^^ frince (Christian of Sc|)IesiMitg ^al&tdn, %M; 

^MJB.®,^ Cumberland Lodge, Windsor Great Park. 

Andrew Carnegie, LL.D., Skibo Castle, Dornoch, Sutherlandshire, 
N.B. {President of the Oratorio Society and the Philharmonic Society 
of New York). 

Samuel Ernest Palmer, io, Grosvenor Crescent, Hyde Park, W. 
{Founder of the Berkshire Scholarship and of the Patron's Fund of the 
Royal College of Music). 

William Hayman Cummings, Mus. Doc, Dublin, F.S.A. {Principal of 
the Guildhall School of Music), Victoria Embankment, E.C. 

The Rev. Francis William Galpin, M.A., F.L.S,, Hatfield Broad Oak, 
Harlow, Essex. 



1905 
July 18 



1904 
May 12 



1904 
Julys 



1905 
Jan. 17 

1905 
Jan. r7 



169 



APPRENTICES. 



Name. 


Master. 




Edwin Charles Hodgkin, 
17, Portland Place, W. 


Arthur F. Hill, 


In the Art of Violin 
Playing. 


John Carrington Gibson, 
44, Canfield Gardens, 
South Hampstead, N.W. 


E. Ernest Cooper, 


In the Art of Violon- 
cello Playing. 


Stanley Clarence Edgar, 
Westminster School, S.W. 


E. Ernest Cooper. 


In the Art of Singing. 



170 

INDEX TO THE ROLL OF THE 
COMPANY. 



] 


Liverymen. 






NO. IN 




NO. IN 




LIST. 




LIST. 


AUcard, V. 


■ ■ 79 


Forbes, E. B. 


... 19 


Allen, W. H. 


- 73 


Freshfield, Dr. E. 


... 84 


Ash, C. J 


.. 86 


Frisby, H. R. ... 


5 


Ash, W. H. 


.. 56 


Fuller, W. P. 


.. 23 


Bennett, Dr. G.J. 


.. 64 


Gadsdon, G. J. ... 


••• 3 


Birnstingl, A. L 


•■ 7> 


Galloway, W. J. ... 


... 54 


Bisgood, J. J 


,. 68 


Gardiner, R. S. ... 


... 87 


Brandt, R.E 


•• 34 


Godfrey, P. 


... 46 


Bridge, Sir J. F 


.. II 


Goldschmidt, O. ... 


... 22 


Brown, A. B 

Boyton, J. 


" 37 
.. 58 


Hadden, Rev. R. H. 


... 20 


Hawley, Stanley... 


... 60 


Cart, Rev. H.T 


.. 42 


Herring, W.C. ... 


... 8 


Charrington, D. F. 


.. 90 


Hill, A. F 


... 29 


Chamier, Capt. A. C. . 


•• 35 


Hoare, E. B. 


... 49 


Chappell, E 


.. 24 


Hoblyn, CD. ... 


... 27 


Clarke, Sir Ernest 


■• 44 


Hodgkin,E. M. ... 


... 89 


Cobbett, W. W 


. 81 


Hoyte, Dr. W. S. 


... 31 


Cock, H 


.. 30 


Hunter, A. C. ... 


... 15 


Coliard, C. L 


.. 40 


Jones, T. P. 


I 


Collard, J. C 


•• 7 






CoUard, J. C, jun. 


.. 36 


Knight, J. B. 


2 


Cooper, E. E 


•• 17 


Lancaster, W. J 


... 47 


Crawford, Sir H. 


•• 13 


Lee, Dr. E. Markham 


... 67 


Crews, C. T. D. ... 


.. 14 


Leslie, W.H. P.,.. 


... 52 


Croft, S 


.. 38 


Lescher, F. H. ... 


... 9 


Donaldson, Sir George 


.. 69 


Littleton, A. H. ... 


... 26 


Duckworth, Rev. Cane 


>n 53 


Martin, Sir G. C, 


... 45 






Milsted, H. 


... 83 


Edgar, C.B. 


•• 39 


Moul.A 


... 25 






Mountain, T. 


... 78 


Falkner, J. M. ... 


.. 66 






Fenwick, T. C. ... 


•• S« 


Neville, A. G. ... 


... 85 


Finlay, Col. A. ... 


.. 6s 


Nicholls, E. W. ... 


... 62 



171 







NO. IN 
LIST. 




NO. IN 
LIST. 


OrgiU, J. B. 




• 55 


Street, J. E. 


.. 12 


Pitel, A. F. 




. 80 


Southgate, T. L. ... 


.. 18 


Powell, C. J. 




■ 50 


Sullivan, H. 


.. 76 


Preston, S. J. 




• 75 


Truscott, Sir G. W. 


.. 88 


Reynolds, A. L.... 




. 61 


Truscott, H. D. ... 


.. 63 


Rose, A. S. 




• 32 






Rube, C. E. 




• 43 


Vert, N 


.. 64 


Rumford, R. Kennerley 


59 


Warrick, F.W. ... 


.. 28 


Santley, C. 




. 21 


Warrick, R. B. ... 


., 6 


Sawyer, F.J. 




• 70 


Webb, E. A. 


.. 10 


Shaw-Hellier, Col 


T. B 


33 


Webb, H. E. ... 


.. 82 


Skilbeck, J. H. .. 




• 4 


Westrope, J. 


.. 16 


Speyer, E. 




• 77 


Woltmann, W. A. 


.. 74 


Stainer, J. F. R. .. 




. 48 


Wyatt, H 


.. 41 


Sternberg, H. L. 




• 72 


Wyndham, Rt. Hon. G. 


•• 57 



Honorary Freemen. 

\M.^. ^xinci ffifjttgttan n£ Scijkgtoig l^olsttin, it.©., ffi.CU.i 

Andrew Carnegie, LL.D. 

Samuel Ernest Palmer. 

W. H. Cummings, Mus. Doc. 

Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

Page 168. 



Apprentices. 

E. C. Hodgkin. 
J. C. Gibson. 
S. C. Edgar. 

Page 169. 



173 

THE LIVERY CLUB 

of 

THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF 

MUSICIANS. 



bounded 1962. 



President. 
Sir HOMEWOOD CRAWFORD. 

Committee. 

ROBERT E. BRANDT, Esq. 

CLIFFORD B. EDGAR, Esq., Mus. Bac, J.P. 

The Rev. R. H. HADDEN, M.A. 

C. D. HOBLYN, Esq. 

Honorary Treasurer. 
ARTHUR F. HILL, Esq., F.S.A. 

Honorary Secretary. 
A. C. HUNTER, Esq. 



The Livery Club was founded on the loth of 
March, 1902, by some Members of the Company 
who felt that the Annual Livery Dinner did not 



174 

afford sufficient means of personal intercommuni- 
cation between the Members, and that the 
interests of the Company and its usefulness to 
the Art of Music would be enhanced by the 
formation of a Club or Union of Members 
whereby more frequent opportunities for social 
intercourse would be afforded. 

The movement has been singularly successful. 
In its first year no less than 34 out of the 59 
Liverymen became Members. Mr. C. D. Hoblyn 
(the Master of the Company) was elected first 
President 

The first Meeting of the Club took place on 
the 26th of May, 1902, when the Members dined 
at the Holborn Restaurant. A programme of 
music of the period of 1604 followed the dinner 
as an entertainment. 

In October, 1902, the first edition of this 
book was compiled and privately issued by the 
Club, a copy being sent to every Member of the 
Company with the object of furnishing full 
information concerning the Company. 

The importance of the Club, and its unique 
position as being the only Livery Club, were 
quickly recognised, and on the 12th of May, 



1903, the Worshipful Company of Innholders 
generously lent their historic Hall for a dinner 
of the Club. 

Subsequently Meetings were held at De 
Keyser's Royal Hotel. On each occasion the 
Music provided has been of an exceptionally high 
order and of great interest to Musicians. 

The President (Sir Homewood Crawford) and 
Committee, having regard to the ancient juris- 
diction of the Company over Dancing Masters 
and Dancing Men, arranged for a Programme 
of "^ Ancient Dances," which was given under the 
direction of Miss Nellie Chaplin, at Queen's 
Gate Hall, on the 24th of May last. 

Under the arrangement which the Musicians' 
Company has lately made with the Worshipful 
Company of Stationers, the future Meetings of 
the Club can be held at the Stationers' Hall. 
The connection of the Stationers' Company with 
Music and its former observance of St. Cecilia's 
Festival (22nd of November) are referred to else- 
where, but it -is interesting to note, that in 1904, 
the Club determined to revive the observance of 
this Festival, and, whenever practicable, to hold 
its annual meeting on that day. 



176 

The Rules of the Club provide only for the 
Membership of Liverymen. It is, however, 
proposed to arrange for the admission of 
Honorary Freemen as Associates. 



Rules- 
I. 

The name of the Club is "THE LiVERY 

Club of the Worshipful Company of 

Musicians." 

II. 

The Members shall be Liverymen of the 

Worshipful Company of Musicians, and elected 

by the Committee of Management. 

III. 
The objects of the Club are to promote the 
interests of the Company and its usefulness to 
the Art of Music ; and to increase the opportuni- 
ties of its Members for social intercourse. 

IV. 
The Annual Subscription shall be ;£'i is. od., 
but Liverymen of the Company residing at least 
25 miles from London may be admitted to 
Membership at a reduced Annual Subscription 
of I OS. 6d. 



177 
V. 

The Club year shall begin on 1st October, and 
the Annual Subscriptions shall be payable as 
from that date. 

VI. 

The Officers of the Club shall be the Presi- 
dent, Honorary Treasurer and Honorary Secre- 
tary, who shall be elected annually at the first 
meeting in the Club year, and these, together 
with three or more other Members of the Club 
to be similarly elected, shall form the Committee 
of Management, three to form a quorum. 



Presidents of the Livery Club. 

1902. 
Mr. C. D. Hoblyn. 

1903. 
Sir Frederick Bridge, Mus.Doc, M.V.O. 

1904-1905. 
Sir Homewood Crawford. 



178 



Members of the Livery Club. 



Allen, W. H. 
Ash, W. H. 

Birnstingl, A. L. 
Bisgood, J. J. 
Boyton, J. 

Brandt, R. '^.{Committee). 
Bridge, Sir J. Fredk. 
Brown, A. B. 

Cart, Rev. H. 
Chamier, Capt. A. C. 
Clarke, Sir Ernest. 
CoUard, C. L. 
Collard, J. C. 
Cooper, E. Ernest. 
Crawford, Sir Homewood. 
(President). 
Crews, C. T. D. 
Croft, S. 

Duckworth, Rev. Canon. 

Edgar, C. B. {Committee). 

Falkner, J. Meade. 
Fenwick, T. C. 
Finlay, Colonel A. 
Forbes, E. B. 
Freshfield, Dr. E. 
Fuller, W. P. 

Godfrey, Percy J. 

Hadden, Rev. R. H. 

( Committee). 
Hawley, Stanley. 
Herring, William C. 
Hill, Arthur F. 

{Hon. Treasurer",, 



Hoare, E. B. 
Hoblyn, C. D. 

{Committee). 
Hunter, A. C. 

{Hon. Secretary). 

Lancaster, W. J. 
Lescher, F. Harwood. 
Leslie, W. H. P. 
Littleton, A. H. 

Martin, Sir G. C. 
M listed, H. 
Mountain, P. 

Neville, A. G. 
Nicholls, E. W. 

Orgill, J. B. 

Pitel, A. T. 
Preston, S. J. 

Reynolds, A. L. 

Rube, C. 

Rumford, R. Kennerley. 

Shaw-Hellier, Col. T. B. 
Southgate, T. L. 
Speyer, Edgar. 
Stainer, J. F. R. 
Sternberg, H. L. 
Street, J. F. 
Sullivan, Herbert. 

Truscott, H. D. 

Warrick, R, B. 
Webb, Harold E. 
Woltmann, W. A. 
Wyatt, H. K. 




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