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Full text of "The churchman's missionary atlas"

ason 

BV2045 
l6 7 



S67t 







CHARLES WILLIAM WASON 

COLLECTION 

CHINA AND THE CHINESE 



THE GIFT OF 

CHARLES WILLIAM WASON 

CLASS OF 1876 

1918 



BV 2045^867" """"""' "■"""" 



The churchrnan's missionary atlas. 




3 1924 023 021 Oil 




The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924023021011 



THE 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 




WITH FORTY -ONE MAPS. 

THIRD EDITION. 

(With Index). 



}t giorwtg iax \\t propagation of i\^t 6os|£l m J'oreigu fads. 

WESTMINSTER. 
I9I2 



A wall map of the world showing 
the positions of all the dioceses of 
the Anglican Communion is pub' 
lished by the S.P.G., price 6d., 
post free, 8d. 



INTRODUCTION. 

This atlas was first issued in 1907 in order to meet the demand for a 
cheap atlas which would enable the student of Anglican Missions to find at 
a glance the positions of all the chief centres of work connected with these 
Missions. The present issue will, we trust, be found to be much more 
serviceable than either of the two former editions, as almost all the maps 
have been re-drawn and we have had the benefit of the criticisms which 
have reached us from all parts of the world from those who have used the 
former editions. The difficulty which map makers have experienced in spelling 
the names of places in China and India, owing to the many different systems 
which had been adopted in the past, has at last been removed. The Chinese 
postal authorities have been compelled by the exigencies of modern telegraphy 
to issue in English characters an authorised spelling of all places to which 
letters or telegrams can be sent, and the Indian Government has published a 
series of maps of India in which a uniform authorised spelling has been adopted. 
In the sectional maps of India and China contained in this volume all places 
are spelt in accordance with the systems which have been authorised in these 
two countries. 

In the preparation of the maps and the statistical information contained 
in the atlas we have been indebted for help to the secretaries of all the 
Anglican missionary societies and to the representatives of the American 
Episcopal Church. The statistics have for the most part been supplied by the 
Bishops of the several dioceses. We regret that the limits of our space have 
only made it possible to include a few general statistics in regard to the 
Missions of the Roman and Greek Churches and the numerous and extensive 
English Missions other than those connected with the Anglican Church. 

A delay of many months in the issue of the atlas was caused by the 
accidental destruction by fire of a large part of the maps which had already 
been drawn for it. 

The maps have been reproduced by Messrs. G. F- Hundley & Co., 

Harp Alley, Farringdon Street, E.C. 

C. H. R. 

January, 19 12. 

p,S. — The atlas is issued in two forms, bound in cloth with coloured maps, 
at 5s. net, and with linen cover and black and white maps at is. 6d. net. 

iii 



LIST OF MAPS. 



I. The Bishoprics of the American Church, U.S.A. 
II. The Canadian Dominion in Dioceses 

III. The Diocese of Nova Scotia 

IV. North West Canada 

V. Rupert's Land, Keewatin, Moosonee, and Algoma ... 

VI. British Columbia - ... . . 

VII. Newfoundland 

VIII. West Indies in Dioceses .. 

IX, British Guiana . . 

X. South America - 

XI. Anglican Bishoprics in Africa ... 
XII. Dioceses of Capetown and George ....... 

XIII. Diocese of Grahamstown ... . .... 

XIV. Diocese of Natal - - 

XV. Diocese of Bloemfontein ---... 

XVI, Diocese of Zululand ---... ..... 

XVII. Diocese of St. John's, Kaffraria ... 

XVIII. Diocese of Pretoria -.. .. ... 

XIX. Diocese of Mashonaland -- - ..... .. 

XX. West Africa .... .. 

XXI. East Central Africa - - ..... 

XXII. Madagascar and Mauritius - - .... 

XXIII. India in Dioceses .... . ---.... 

XXIV. North East India - - ... 

XXV. Bombay Presidency - ..... .... 

XXVI. South East India - .. ----60 

XXVII. Diocese of Tinnevelly and Madura - ... .. --62 

XXVIII. North West India .... --63 

XXIX. Chota Naopur -- - ... -64 

XXX. Diocese of Colombo -- - 66 

XXXI, Burma (Diocese of Rangoon) ... - 68 

XXXII. Dioceses of Singapore, and Labuan and Sarawak - - ... yo 

XXXIII. Anglican Bishoprics in China - 71 

XXXIV, North East China ... .... ... 72 

XXXV. Japan in Dioceses .... .. .. ...yg 

XXXVI. Corea 82 

XXXVII. Australian Dioceses 84 

XXXVIII. Queensland go 

XXXIX. New Guinea 92 

XL. New Zealand in Dioceses, and Tasmania - - 96 

XLI. Melanesia .... --g8 



OPPOSITE PAGE 

3 
4 
7 
II 
12 
18 
20 
23 
25 
28 
30 
32 

- -34 
- - 36 
37 
38 
40 
42 

44 
■ - 48 
50 
54 
55 
57 
58 



LIST OF DIOCESES. 



Accra 

Adelaide - 

Africa, W.E. - 

Algoma 

Antiqua .... 

Argentina and E.S. America 

Athabasca 

Auckland .... 

Australia (North West) 



Dunedin - 



PAGE 

49 
93 
49 
lo 

24 
28 
12 
96 
94 



Ballarat ..-...- .88 

Barbados - ........ 24 

Bathurst . 87 

Bendiqo 88 

Bermuda ... .....21 

Bloemfontein - - . . - 37 

Bombay 58 

Brisbane go 

BUNBURY -94 

Calcutta - 57 

Caledonia ig 

Calgary - 15 

Capetown. - 32 

Carpentaria . - . . gi 

Chekiano -- 72 

China (North) ...... ^3 

China (Western) - 73 

Chota Nagpur - - 64 

Christchurch -97 

Colombo .... ... 66 

Columbia, British ... . - 18 

COREA ..... ---82 



98 



Falkland Islands . . - . - 28 

Fredericton .- 8 

Fuh.Kien ---...-..74 

George 46 

Gibraltar loi 

GiPPSLAND - 8g 

GOULBURN 86 



Grafton and Armidale 
Grahamstown . . . 
Guiana . . . . 



Hankow ... 

Hokkaido 

HONAN ... 

Honduras, British . 

Honolulu 

Huron 



Jamaica 
Jerusalem 



87 
34 
25 

76 
80 
76 

27 

lOI 

9 

23 

100 



Keewatin .... ... 17 

Khartoum ... ... 100 

kimberley and kurumau . . 46 

KlUSHIU . ... . . yg 

KOOTENAY - - . - ... 20 

KWANGSI AND HUNAN . 75 

Kyoto 8i 

Labuan AND Sarawak - . . . 70 

Lahore . . .....63 

Lebombo 45 

LUCKNOW 65 

Mackenzie River - - . - 15 

Madagascar ... ... g^ 

Madras . ..... 60 

Mashonaland . ... 44 

Mauritius . . - " ■ - 53 

Melanesia ... . - gg 

Melbourne - . . . - - 88 

Mombasa . -52 

Montreal. ..-..- - 9 

moosonee ... - - 12 

Nagpur .........66 

Nassau -.-...-..26 
Natal .........36 

Nelson ......... gy 

Newcastle (N.S.W.) 86 

Newfoundland 20 

New Guinea ga 



LIST OF DIOCESES 



New Westminster - 
Niagara - . . . 
Northern Rhodesia 
North West Australia 
Nova Scotia . - - 
Nyasaland 



Rangoon 

Rhodesia (Northern) 
Riverina 
Rockhampton - 
Rupert's Land 

St. Helena 

St. John's, Kaffraria 

Saskatchewan - 

Shanghai 



PAGE 

i8 

lO 

53 

94 

7 

50 



Ontario - - . . g 

Osaka 80 

Ottawa 10 

Perth - ■ - 93 

Polynesia gg 

Pretoria 42 

Qu'aPPELLE ... .... 14 

Quebec ... 7 

Queensland, North ...... go 



67 

52 

87 

91 



47 
40 

13 
76 



Shantung - 
Sierra Leone 
Singapore 
Sydney 

Tasmania ... 

Tinnevelly and Madura 

Tokyo, South 

Tokyo, North - 

Toronto - . . 

Travancore and Cochin 

Trinidad 

Uganda - . 

Victoria, Hong Kong 

Waiapu 

Wangaratta 

Wellington 

Western Equatorial Africa 

Windward Islands . 

Wuhu 

Yukon 

Zanzibar - 

zululand 



FAOE 

74 
48 
70 
86 

94 
62 

79 
81 
8 
61 
26 

52 

71 

97 
89 

97 
49 
24 
76 

16 

50 
38 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. 

Dublin University Mission. 

Colonial and Continental Church Society. 

Church of England. 

Church Missionary Society. 

Missionary Society of the Church of England in Canada 

Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. 

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. 

Universities' Mission to Central Africa. 



A. B. C. F. M. 

D. U. M. 

C. C. C. S. 

C. of E. 

C. M. S. 

M. S. C. C. 

S. P. C. K. 

S. P. G. 

U. M. C. A. 

C. E. Z . M. S. Church of England Zenana Missionary Society. 



ENGLISH COLONIAL AND MISSIONARY BISHOPRICS, 



Founded. 

+Nova Scotia»t 1787 

tQuebect i793 

tCalcutta 1814 

+JamaicatTr 1824 

+Barbados 1824 

tMadras 1835 



1836 
1837 
1839 
1839 
1841 



fSydney (formerly " Australia ") IT . 

fBombay 

+Toronto*1' 

tNewfoundland*J 

+Auckland (formerly " New Zealand")X^ 

Jerusalem and the East 1841 

fTasmaniaJl 1842 

fAntiguaJ 1842 

fGuianaJ 1842 

tGibraltaiJ 1842 

tFrederictonir 1845 

tColomboJ 1845 

tCapetownJ 1847 

tNewcastleJir 1847 

+Melbourneir 1847 

tAdelaideT 1847 

fVictoria (ChinajJIT 1849 

fRupert's Land 1849 

fMontrealJ 1850 

fSierra LeoneJ 1852 

fGrahamstownt 1853 

+NatalJ ... . . . 1853 

tMauritiusJ .... ... 1854 

fLabuan and Sarawak*{ 1855 

tChristchurch (N.Z.)tir 1856 

fPerthJ 1857 

fHuronir 1857 

fWellingtonJir 1858 

tNelsonJir 1858 

fWaiapuir 1858 

tBrisbaneflT 1859 

+St. Helena 1859 

fBritish ColumbiaTT 1859 

tNassau*J 1861 

fZanzibar and East Africa (originally 
and then " Central Africa ")ir . 

fMelanesialT 

tOntarioJIT . 

+Bloemfontein (formerly " Orange River ")*% . 

fGoulburnfir 

tWestern Equatorial Africa (formerly " Niger ") 

tDunedinJIT 

fGrafton and Armidale ..... 

fBathurstlT i86g 

Falkland Islands ... . . . li 

tZululand . . 1870 

Moosonee 1872 



' Zambesi ' 



1861 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1866 
1867 



tTrinidadJ 

Chekiang (formerly " Mid-China ") 
•(■Algoma*J .... ... 

+St. John's (formerly " Independent Kaffraria ")* 

Athabasca 



Founded. 

tSaskatchewan*t 1874 

+ Madagascar * 1874 

tBallaratf 1875 

+Niagarair 1875 

fLahoreJ 1877 

+RangoonJ 1877 

+Pretoria*t 1878 

+North Queensland* 1878 

tWindward IslandsJ 1878 

f Caledonia i . . ■ . 1879 

fNew WestminsterJ 1879 

Travancore and Cochin 1879 

fNorth China 1880 

fSouth Tokyo {formerly " Japan ")* .... 1883 

fHonduras* 1883 

tQu'Appelle (formerly " Assiniboia ")*J . . . 1883 

Mackenzie RiverJ 1883 

fRiverina 1884 

VgsnAa. (formerly " Eastern Equatorial Africa") . 1884 

tCalgaryJ 1887 

tCorea** i88g 

fChota NagpurJ 1890 

\^\ikon (formerly " Selkirk") 1890 

tMashonaland*J ... .... 1891 

fLebomboJ 1891 

fRockhamptonJ 1892 

Nyasaland (/oj'mc)'/)' "Likoma") .... 1892 

fLucknowJ 1893 

Kiushiu (South Japan) 1894 

Western China 1895 

+Osaka (Japan)* 1896 

tOttawalT 1896 

Hokkaido (Japan) 1896 

fTinnevelly and Madura*! 1896 

tNewGuineaJir 1898 

Mombasa 1898 

fCarpentaria J 1899 

fKeewatinJ 1899 

+Kootenay igoo 

fBendigolT 1901 

fWangaratta TT igoi 

fGippslandlT ........ igoi 

tNagpurJ igo2 

tShantungt igo3 

fBunbury . . . ... 1904 

Fuh-Kien . igo6 

fPolynesia* .... ... igo8 

fNorth West Australia* 1909 

Northern Rhodesia 1909 

fAccra (Gold Coast) * igog 



86g fSingapore ^ 



1909 

Kwangsi and Hunan 1909 

Honan igog 

1872 Argentina and Eastern South America . . . igio 

1872 tGeorge* ign 

1873 +Kimberley and Kuruman " ign 

1873 [Note. — A new diocese was constituted in igii in Japan, 
^874 to be supported by the Canadian Church, see pp. 6, 81.] 



* This mark shows that the Society has contributed to the support of work in this diocese by annual grants, 
f This signifies that the Society has planted or supported missions which now form a part of the diocese. 
+ This shows that the Society has contributed to the permanent endowment of the see. 
IT This signifies that the diocese is now independent of aid from the Society. 

viii 



BISHOPRICS OF THE AMERICAN CHURCH. 

(Th« figui« in bracket, represent the number of clergy working in the several diocese, in 1910.) 



tConnecticut (2ii) . 

Maryland (127) 
fPennsylvania (ago) 
+Massachusetts (226) 
tNew York (396) . 
Virginia (96) . 
+South Carolina (62) 
+New Jersey J (120) 
tVermont (49) 
fRhode Island (73) . 
fDelaware (36) 
+New Hampshire (52) 
fNorth Carolina (57) 
Ohio (93) 
tMaine (34) 
tGeorgia (30) . 
Mississippi (33) 
Tennessee (58) 
Kentucky (33) 
Alabama (40) 
Michigan (80) 
Chicago (120) 
Cape Palmas (28) . 
tWestern New York (122 
Louisiana (37) 
Indianapolis (27) 
Florida (27) . 
Missouri (55) . 
Shanghai (22) 
Milwaukee (92) 
Texas (33) . 
California (100) 
Iowa (52) 
Minnesota (98) 
Kansas (45) . 
fHonolulu * X (20) 
Haiti (14) 
Pittsburgh (gi) 
Tokyo {originally " Yedo," then " Tokyo,' 

then "North Tokyo") {38) 
Nebraska (36) 
Easton (38) 
fLong Island (161) . 
fAlbany (146) 
fCentral New York (in) 
Arkansas (22) 
Bethlehem (73) 
South Dakota (46) 
f Newark (147) 
Western Michigan (39) . 
New Mexico (16) 



Firat 

Organ- Bishop 

ised, cons. 



1783 

1783 

1784 

1784 

1785 

1785 

1785 

1785 

1790 

1790 

1791 

1 802 

1817 

1818 

1820 

1823 

1826 

1828 

1829 

1830 

1832 

1835 
1836 
1838 
1838 
1838 
1838 

1839 
1844 
1847 
1849 
.850 

1853 
1857 

1859 

1863 
1865 

1866 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1871 
1871 

1873 
1874 
1874 
1875 



1784 
1792 
1787 

1797 
1787 

1790 
1795 
1815 
1832 

1843 
1841 
1844 
1823 
1819 
1847 
1841 
1850 

1834 
1832 
1844 
1836 

1835 
1851 

1839 
1841 
1849 
185 1 
1844 
1844 

1854 
1859 

1853 
1854 
1859 
1864 
1861 
1874 
1866 

1866 
1865 
1869 
i86g 
1869 
1869 
1838 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 

1875 



Arizona (10) . 

Southern Ohio (82) 

Fond-du-Lac (46) . 

Quincy (2g) . 

West Virginia (36) 

Springfield (35) . 

Montana (29) 

North Dakota (24) . 

fEast Carolina (34) . 

Colorado (48) 

West Texas (26) . 

Oregon (25) 

Kansas City (27) . 

Olympia (33) . 

Southern Florida (39) 

Oklahoma (17) 

Spokane (20) . 

Southern Virginia (81) 

Alaska {13) . 

Dallas (30) 

Marquette (22) 

Lexington (21) 

Los Angeles (79) . 

Washington (D.C.) (10: 

Asheville (33) 

Duluth (44) . 

Sacramento (33) 

Utah (14) . 

Idaho (21) 

Kearney (13) . 

Michigan City (22) 

Brazil (21) 

Kyoto (Japan) (22) 
fWestern Massachusetts 

Salina (19) 

Philippine Islands (12) 

Hankow (41) . 

Porto Rico and Vieques 

Cuba . 

Harrisburg (73) 

Mexico . 

Wyoming (19) 

Nevada (8) . 

Eastern Oregon (5) 

Western Colorado (15) 

Atlanta (35) . 

San Joaquin . 

North Texas . 

Eastern Oklahoma 

Erie 

Wuhu . 



(56) 



(3) 



diocese. 



i8g8 i8gg 

1898 1900 

igoi igo2 

1901 1903 

igoi rgoi 

igoi igo4 

1901 igo2 

igoi igo4 

1904 1905 

1904 1904 

igo7 igog 

1907 1908 

1907 1907 

1907 igog 

igo7 i8g2 

igio igii 

igio igio 

1910 igii 

igio 1911 
igio 

ignifies that the S.P.G. 
The S.P.G. contributed towards the purchase of a See House at Burlington, New 



First 
Organ- Bishop 

ised. cons. 

1875 

1875 

1875 

1877 

1877 

1877 
, 1880 
. 1883 
. 1883 
. 1887 
. 1888 
. i88g 
. i8go 
. 1892 
. 1892 
. 1892 
. 1892 
. 1892 
. 1892 

• i8g5 

• i8g5 

• iSgs 

• i8g5 

• 1895 

• 1895 
■ 1895 
. i8g8 
. i8g8 
. 1898 
. 1898 



1875 
1875 
187s 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1880 
1883 
1884 
1865 
1888 
1854 
i8go 
1880 
i8g2 
i8g2 
i8g2 
i8g2 
i8g5 
1874 
1892 
i8g6 
i8g6 
i8g6 
i8g6 
1897 
1899 
1867 
1887 
1890 
1898 §1897 



Honolulu, founded as an English Bishopric, was transferred to the American Church in igo2. + This mark si. 



planted Missions which now form a part of the t 
Jersey, in 1713. § As Bishop of Indiana. 

The number of 'clergy working in connection with the American Church is 5543. The Ameri- 
can Church has now in the United States 91 bishops of dioceses and missionary districts (which 
need not be distinguished) with 12 coadjutors, assistants or suffragan, besides 10 foreign missionary 
bishops. England has 37 diocesans, with 31 suffragan bishops; Scotland 7, Ireland 13. Including 
coadjutor and assistant bishops, India 11, the rest of Asia 17, Africa 26, Australasia 30, Canada 24, 
the West Indies and South America 9. 

(i) 



NORYh AMERICA. 



For the greater part of the eighteenth cen- 
tury the colonies of Great Britain, extending 
along the east coast of North America, from 
South Carolina to Maine, together with the 
negroes and with the Indian tribes who dwelt 
further inland, constituted the principal mission 
field of the Society, the order of occupation being : 
South Carolina, New York, New England (which 
included Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode 
Island, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and 
Narragansett), New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and 
Delaware in 1702, North Carolina in 1708, and 
Georgia in 1733- 

Until 1785 the Society endeavoured to plant 
the Church in those regions, and for nearly the 
whole of the century it "furnished the only 
point of contact, the only bond of sympathy be- 
tween the Church of England and her children 
scattered over the waste places of the New 
World ". Its first two missionaries, the Rev. 
George Keith and the Rev. Patrick Gordon, 
landed at Boston on nth June, 1702, and were 
followed by many others, including John Wesley, 
who laboured for nearly two years (1736-37) in 
Georgia, 

The work among the natives (begun in 1703) 
resulted in the conversion of "great multi- 
tudes" of negroes and Indians in less than forty 
years. 



(3) 



When the war of Independence broke out in 
1775 the Society was supporting seventy-seven 
missionaries in the " States," and these suffered 
severely for their loyalty to their Church and 
King, many of them barely escaping with their 
lives to England, or to Nova Scotia and Canada. 

The severance of the American colonies from 
the mother country, while it almost destroyed 
the Church in the United States, set her free to 
obtain that gift of the episcopate so long denied, 
and the Rev. Samuel Seabury, one of the Society's 
missionaries, was consecrated Bishop of Con- 
necticut by the bishops of the Scottish Church 
at Aberdeen, on 14th November, 1784. Other 
bishops were consecrated in Lambeth Palace 
Chapel — for Pennsylvania and New York (in 
1787) and Virginia (in 1790). 

During its connection with this field — i.e., 
the U.S.A. (1702-85) — the Society expended 
£■227,454, and employed 309 ordained mission- 
aries there. 

The American Churcli, which now has in 
bishops and 5,543 clergy, raised through its 
own Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society 
in 1908-9 $731,744 for Domestic and $725,499 
for Foreign Missions, and it is " constantly striv- 
ing to stimulate " its own people " to do more for 
others by the recollection of what was done for 
them through the S.P.G.". 



(2500/0. 14083.) 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



THE S.P.G. IN CANADA. 



On the cessation of its labours in the United 
States in 1785, the Society's efforts were for 
many years concentrated on the remaining Bri- 
tish North America. Its operations in this field 
had begun with Newfoundland in 1703, and were 
extended to Nova Scotia in 1728, Quebec Pro- 
vince in 1759, New Brunswick in 1783, Ontario 
Province in 1784, and Cape Breton in 1785, 
Prince Edward Island in 1819, The Bermudas 
in 1822, Rupert's Land (now Manitoba) in 1850, 
British Columbia in 1859, and North-West Terri- 
tories in 1875. Bishops were placed in Nova 
Scotia in 1787, and in Quebec in 1793. Through- 
out the long wars which followed the French 
Revolution, the Society devoted its scanty in- 
come chiefly to support missionaries in this 
field. 

After the peace of 1814, emigrants flocked to 
America, the Society's income was increased by 
the establishment of parochial associations in 
England, even Parliamentary grants were allowed 
for a time, and the Church grew rapidly. In the 
education of the masses the Society led the way 
by introducing in 1815 the national system of 
education, which rapidly spread throughout the 
colonies. It also established colleges for the 
training of an indigenous ministry. The labours 
of the Society's missionaries proved "not un- 
worthy of the primitive ages," and the fruit of 
its work generally is to be seen in a Church now 
extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific, with 
a record of noble work done among both white 
and dark races. Many of the former, " once sunk 
in heathen darkness " — " hardly one remove from 
the native Indian " — have become Christian com- 
munities, while the change wrought among the 
Indians is shown by " men whose histories were 



written in blood and sorceries " becoming dis- 
ciples of Christ. 

During the period 1703-1910 the Society ex- 
pended £2,014,035, and employed about 1740 
ordained missionaries in this field (British North 
America). At the present time its work there 
is being carried on in eleven dioceses, its total 
annual expenditure being £'14,000 and the num- 
ber of its missionaries 158. 

The Canadian Church in 1890 entered on 
direct Foreign Mission work in Japan. A 
General Synod for the whole of Canada was 
formed in 1893. 

Canada was discovered by Sebastian Cabot in 
1497. In 1534 the French took possession of 
the parts which had so far been explored, and 
founded Quebec in 1608. In 1759 Quebec sur- 
rendered to the English, and in 1763 the whole 
territory of Canada became a possession of Great 
Britain. In 1867 the Provinces of Canada (On- 
tario and Quebec), Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick, were united under the title of the Dominion 
of Canada. In 1870 the Province of Manitoba 
was formed, and, with the rest of the Hudson 
Bay territory, was admitted into the Dominion. 
In 1905 the Provinces of Saskatchewan and 
Alberta were created. Newfoundland alone now 
remains a separate colony. 

The population of the Dominion, which is 
very rapidly increasing, is 7,489,781 (1910). 
The descendants of the French colonists reside 
chiefly in the Province of Quebec. Its population 
in 1911 was over 2,000,000; of these, 1,429,260 
are Roman Catholics, the majority of whom 
speak French. Montreal, the largest city in the 
Dominion, has a population of nearly 600,000. 
Toronto, the capital of Ontario, has over 380,000. 



Canada 



The Red Indians.— The number of Red 
Indians in Canada is about 108,000. Of these, 
one-quarter are in the Eastern Provinces, half 
are in Manitoba and the north-west, and the 
rest are in British Columbia. About 75,000 of 
the whole number are settled on lands reserved 
for them by the Government. The principal 
tribes are the Crees, Ojibbeways or Sotos, Chipe- 
wyans and Tukudh. Work was begun amongst 
them by the Rev. John West, the first chaplain 
of the Hudson Bay Company, in 1820, in what 
was then called the Red River Colony. 

A good account of the work carried on by the 
C.M.S. amongst the Red Indians during the first 
half of the nineteenth century is given by Mr. 
Eugene Stock in The East and The West for 
April, 1907. 

The Hskimos are supposed to number about 
40,000. They seldom go more than 20 miles 
inland from the sea. They are scattered over a 
territory 3,200 miles in length, but, despite their 
wide dispersion, are remarkably homogeneous. 
Their language differs so little that a Green- 
lander can easily understand an Eskimo from 
the remote West. The Western Eskimos in- 
habiting Alaska and the Asiatic side of Behring 
Straits number about 13,000, the Mackenzie Es- 
kimos from Barter Island to Cape Bathurst 2,000, 
the inhabitants of the central districts (including 
the Arctic Archipelago) about 4,000, the Eskimos 
of Labrador 2,000, and those in Greenland up- 
wards of 11,000; those in the Aleutian Islands, 
many of whom have intermarried with Russians, 
about 2,400. The Eskimo settlements contain, 
as a rule, from 40 to 200. 

Organisation of the Church in Canada. 
— In 1787, three years after the first bishop 
had been consecrated for the United States, 
Dr. Charles Inglis, an S.P.G. missionary, was 
consecrated for Canada, being the first English 
colonial bishop. He was born in the west of 
Ireland, and had gone out to New York when 
quite young. There he became rector of Trinity 
Church, but was driven out during the War of 
Independence. His original diocese comprised 



Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Bermuda, to- 
gether with the whole of Canada. 

Up to 1854 the clergy were to a large extent 
supported by the original clergy reserves created 
by the Constitutional Act of 1791. These re- 
serves were resumed by the Government in 1854. 
Societies were then formed to deal with the sums 
which were handed over by the Government in 
lieu of pensioning the individual clergy. In 1861 
the first ecclesiastical province was formed when 
Montreal was by letters patent created the met- 
ropolitical see of Canada. On the resignation of 
Bishop Oxenden (in accordance with the previous 
decision of the Provincial Synod the primacy was 
no longer of necessity attached to Montreal, but on 
each avoidance a Metropolitan is named by vote 
of the House of Bishops), Bishop Medley of 
Fredericton was elected Metropolitan on 27th 
January, 1879, ^"^^^ ^^Id the office until his death 
in 1892. The successive Metropolitans have 
been Archbishop Lewis, of Ontario (1893- 1901), 
Archbishop Bond, of Montreal, 1901-1906, Arch- 
bishop Sweatman, of Toronto (1906-1909) and 
Archbishop Hamilton, of Ottawa, 1909. 

There are ten bishoprics included in the pro- 
vince. 

In 1875 was formed the ecclesiastical Province 
of Rupert's Land, and in 1893 was constituted the 
Canadian General Synod. It was the Canadian 
Provincial Synod which in 1865 suggested to the 
Archbishop of Canterbury the holding of what is 
now called the Lambeth Conference. The first 
conference met in 1867, 

Missionary Work of the Canadian Church. 
— -In 1883, at the Provincial Synod of Canada, 
the " Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society 
of the C. of E. in Canada" was formed. It was 
then decided to divide its contributions towards 
the support of Foreign Missions in the proportion 
of two-thirds to the S.P.G. and one-third to the 
C.M.S. In 1888, after taking counsel with the 
S.P.G. in London, the Canadian bishops re- 
solved to start direct missionary work for them- 
selves, and in 1890 they sent their first missionary 
to Japan. 



PROVINCE OF CANADA (formed in 1861). 



Nova Scotia, 1787, 

the colonial sees. It comprises two distinct 
civil provinces : Nova Scotia (including the Island 
of Cape Breton) and Prince Edward Island. 
The former has an area of 200,900 square miles, 
with an English-speaking population of 459,574, 
and 10,000 other than English-speaking people. 
The chief town is Halifax, which has a popu- 
lation of 46,081 (191 1). Prince Edward Island 
is 2,133 miles in extent, and has a population of 
93,722 (191 1). Cape Breton Island, which was for- 
merly a distinct colony, contains an area of 3,120 
square miles with a population of 49,166 (1901). 
Its chief town is Sydney, population 17,617 (191 1). 

There are 72,083 members of the Church of 
England in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward 
Island of whom 14,560 are communicants. The 
parishes number 96 and are served by 119 clergy. 
There are 10 parishes, with 11 clergy in Prince 
Edward Island. 

The S.P.G. supported work in Nova Scotia 
from 1749 to 1902. 

There are 250 churches in Nova Scotia and 
Prince Edward Island, many of which have been 



Ten Bishoprics, 

This is the earliest of erected entirely by the contributions of the people. 



About 150 have received aid from the S.P.G. and 
the S.P.C.K. 

Eastern Canada has lost much of its old popu- 
lation by the movement Westward and a new 
population in large numbers has been coming 
into the mining districts. To these the Church 
in Nova Scotia has been ministering and at the 
same time has been sending a large sum to the 
Western dioceses. 

On the occasion of the 200th anniversary of 
the founding of the Anglican Church in Canada 
a Congress was held in Halifax in September, 
1 910, which was attended by the Bishop of Lon- 
don and other representatives from England. 
The Bishop took part in the consecration of the 
new cathedral at Halifax. 
Bishops : — 

Charles Inglis, 1787. 

Robert Stanser, 1816. 

John Inglis, 1825. 

Hibbert Binney, 185 1. 

Frederick Courtney, 1888. 

Clarendon Lamb Worrell, 1904. 



Quebec, 1793. — This diocese comprises the 
districts of Quebec, Three Rivers, St. Francis, 
and Gaspd, and has a population of 788,738, 
of whom 729,270 are of French origin. Those 
living on the coast are fishermen ; those in 
the district between the St. Lawrence and the 
United States are engaged in agriculture. Timber 
is exported from Quebec; Sherbrooke is the 
capital of the agricultural district, and has also 



some beginnings of manufacture. There is little 
immigration, but the Church population of the 
diocese is fully maintained. The cathedral Church 
of the Holy Trinity is at Quebec, and the number 
of Church members is 22,161 (1910) ; there are 
83 clergy; 132 consecrated churches, 41 mission 
stations and 2,180 parish helpers. 

There are 102 Sunday schools in the diocese. 
The University of Bishop's College at Lennox- 



(7) 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



ville belongs equally to this diocese and that of 
Montreal. It has upwards of 70 resident students 
in Arts and Divinity. 

The diocese having given up the S.P.G. grant 
for the stipend of one of the missionaries on the 
Canadian Labrador, the Society still makes a 
grant towards the stipend of one clergyman in 
the diocese, i.e., to Archdeacon Balfour, on ac- 
count of his connection with the marine hospital, 
and also assists the diocese by a considerable 
grant of exhibitions for students, who are being 
trained at Bishop's College, Lennoxville, for work 
in the diocese. 

The Society opened a mission in Quebec in 



1800, and has contributed to the permanent en- 
dowment of the see. It has also greatly aided 
Bishop's College, Lennoxville. 

As Nova Scotia did not form part of Canada 
when Bishop Inglis was appointed, the diocese 
of Quebec may claim to be the first Bishopric 
actually constituted in Canada. 

Bishops : — 

Jacob Mountain, 1793. 
Charles James Stewart, 1826. 
George Jehoshaphat Mountain, 1836. 
James William Williams, 1863. 
Andrew Hunter Dunn, 1892. 



Toronto, 1839. — This diocese comprises an 
area of 9,261 square miles, with a population ac- 
cording to the census of 1901 of 564,141 (the city of 
Toronto having a population of 376,240 (1911)). 

The cathedral church of St. Alban the Martyr 
is at Toronto and the number of Church members 
is 100,782 ; there are 29,319 communicants, 206 
clergy, and 259 permanent churches. Number of 
parishes loi and 176 mission stations. 

There are 208 Sunday schools ; 2 training col- 
leges — Trinity University (with a divinity faculty 
and a royal charter), and Wycliffe College. St. 
Hilda's College, Toronto, for women, is affiliated 
with Trinity University. 



The S.P.G. began work in Toronto in 1792, 
and gave much assistance at the time when it 
was formed into a diocese. The Society ceased 
to make grants to this diocese in 1858. 

Bishops : — 

John Strachan, 1839. 

Alexander Neil Bethune, 1867. 

Arthur Sweatman, 1879 ; Archbishop, 1906; 

Primate of all Canada, 1907. 
James Fielding Sweeny, 1909. 

Assistant Bishop : — 

William Day Reeve, 1907 (cons. 1891). 



Fredericton, 1845. — This diocese was founded 
in 1845, before which time it formed part of the 
diocese of Nova Scotia. It comprises the whole 
of the Civil Province of New Brunswick, and is 
bounded on the north by the Province of Quebec, 
on the east by the Gulf of St. Lawrence, on the 
south by the Bay of Fundy, and on the west by 
the State of Maine (U.S.). A narrow isthmus, 
about 15 miles across at its narrowest part, 
joins it on the south-east to Nova Scotia. The 
area is 27,985 square miles, and the population 
according to the census of 191 1 was 351,815. 
Out of this 41,767 were mem'bers of the Church of 
England. There are about 9,000 communicants. 

The cathedral is at Fredericton the capital of 



the Province, the population of which was (in 
191 1), 7,208. There are 152 consecrated churches, 
80 mission stations, 116 Sunday schools, 600 
teachers, and 6,000 scholars. 

The S.P.G. supported missions in this district 
for many years prior to the formation of the 
diocese. The number of clergy in the diocese is 
73. The Society ceased to make grants to this 
diocese in 1910. 
Bishops : — 

John Medley, 1845. 

Hollingworth TuUy Kingdon, Coadjutor- 
Bishop, 1881 ; Bishop, 1892. 
John Andrew Richardson, Coadjutor-Bishop, 
1906 ; Bishop, 1907. 



PROVINCE OF CANADA 



Montreal, 1850.— This diocese was divided 
from that of Quebec. It comprises the territory 
of Montreal, an area of 44,000 square miles. 
Population, 739,248. 

The cathedral is at Montreal (population 
466,197). The proportion of the Church of Eng- 
land to the whole population is less than 7 per 
cent., French Roman Catholics largely predomi- 
nating. The number of Church members is 
about 50,387, of communicants about 16,759. 
There are 104 parishes and 45 missions, with 170 
churches and 73 other stations where services 
are occasionally held. The clergy number 126, 
the lay readers 45, and the students of the 
Diocesan Theological College, of whom there 
were 25 in 1910, work in the vacant parishes 



and missions during the summer months. 
The Sunday schools number 139, with 10,232 
scholars. 

There is an increasing demand for services in 
French. 

The S.P.G. assisted the endowment fund of 
this see by a grant of £3,000. 
Bishops : — 

Francis Fulford, 1850. 

Ashton Oxenden, 1869. 

William Bennett Bond, 1879 ; Archbishop, 

1901 ; Primate of all Canada,. 1904. 
James Carmichael, Coadjutor-Bishop, 1902 ; 

Bishop, 1906. 
John Craig Farthing, 1909. 



Huron, 1857. — This diocese contains 13 coun- 
ties, including an area of 12,000 square miles. 
The population is estimated at over 800,000. 

There are 149 clergy in active service. Num- 
ber of Church edifices, 290. The Church popu- 
lation is 61,522 ; the communicants number 
20,375; Sunday schools, 230; pupils, 13,309. 

The Huron Theological College, incorporated 
1863, and the Western University, incorporated 
1878, are under Church auspices; they are sit- 
uated in the city of London. London, in which 



is the cathedral and the bishop's residence, has a 
population of 49,507. Other towns are Brantford, 
20,711; St. Thomas, 14,578; Windsor, 16,142. 

The S.P.G. gave temporary assistance to the 
see of Huron, but was able to withdraw its help 
in 1882. 
Bishops : — 

Benjamin Cronyn, 1857. 

Isaac Hellmuth, 1871. 

Maurice Scollard Baldwin, 1883. 

David Williams, 1905. 



Ontario, 1862. — The diocese was formed from 
that of Toronto. The first bishop was con- 
secrated on 25th March, 1S62. The diocese 
was divided in 1896, when the diocese of Ottawa 
was formed, and now consists of the counties of 
Grenville, Leeds, Frontenac, Lennox, Addington, 
Hastings and Prince Edward, comprising 78 
townships in an area of 6,692 square miles, and 
contains a population of 208,599. 

The number of Church people as reported by 
the census was 38,871. There are 79 clergy 
and 9,313 communicants, 107 Sunday schools and 
4,999 scholars. 



The S.P.G. began work in this district in 
1784. The Society contributed to the endow- 
ment of the see, which is now independent of 
its aid. 

The .bishop's seat is at Kingston which has a 
population of 19,193 and where is the cathedral 
of St. George. 
Bishops : — 
John Travers Lewis, 1862 ; Archbishop, 

1893. 
William Lennox Mills, Coadjutor-Bishop, 
1900; Bishop, 1901. 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Algoma, 1873. — This diocese is a missionary 
one dependent for nearly one half of its mainten- 
ance on the voluntary offerings of the members 
of the Church in the older parts of Canada and 
in England. The S.P.G., S.P.C.K., and C.C.C.S. 
subsidise it with varying amounts. 

The clergy in 1910 numbered 50, lay readers, 
26. Their ministrations extend over an area of 
nearly 70,000 square miles. The diocese com- 
prises the civil districts of Muskoka, Parry Sound, 
part of Nipissing, the Manitoulin Island and 
East and West Algoma. 

Algoma has an English-speaking population 
of 132,000 and of other than English-speaking 
people 8000. 

There are 103 churches, 12 self-supporting 
parishes and 125 congregations. 

The S.P.G. has contributed to the support of 
this diocese by giving annual grants ; it has also 
contributed to the permanent endowment of the 
see. The future of the diocese depends largely 
on the completing of this endowment. Clergy 
working in connection with S.P.G., 6. 



The diocese has made great progress in the 
past few years ; much new work, especially in 
the rapidly developing mining region, has been 
undertaken. There is need for further expansion 
and such need is very pressing. For this reason 
men and money are needed and are greatly de- 
sired at this time of advancement and growth, 
A diocesan synod has been established and held 
its second meeting in June, 1909. 

At the following stations the work is assisted 
by the S.P.G. : Baysville, Blind River, Burk's 
Falls, Byng Inlet, Emsdale, Fort William West, 
Rosseau, Sturgeon Falls. 

The residence of the Bishop is Bishophurst, 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. 

At Sault Ste. Marie there are homes for Indian 
boys and girls. 

Bishops : — 

Frederic Dawson Fauquier, 1873. 
Edward Sullivan, 1882. 
George Thorneloe, 1897. 



Niagara, 1875. — This see, which comprises 
part of the Province of Ontario, was founded 
in 1875, and is the smallest of the Canadian 
dioceses in point of area, although in the num- 
ber of clergy it exceeds several. The six counties 
which form the diocese contain a population of 
240,000. The members of the Church of Eng- 
land number 35,980, of whom 13,309 are com- 
municants. There are 81 clergy and 35 lay 
readers in the diocese. The parishes, including 
missions and stations, number 109. 



The cathedral is at Hamilton, which has a 
population of 81,879 (iQii)- 

The S.P.G. has not aided Niagara as a 
separate diocese ; but the Missions contained 
in it were either planted by the Society or are 
the direct outcome of its work 
Bishops : — 

Thomas Brock Fuller, 1875. 

Charles Hamilton, 1885 (tr. to Ottawa, 1896). 

John Philip Du Moulin, 1896. 

William Reid Clark, 1911. 



Ottawa, 1896. — This see was founded in 1896 
by a division of the large diocese of Ontario. 
The new diocese consists of the counties of 
Dundas, Stormont, Glengarry, Prescott, Russell, 
Carleton, Lanark, Renfrew, and part of the dis- 
trict of Nipissing, making in all a distance of 
300 miles. Area 11,000 square miles. The Eng- 
lish-speaking population of the diocese of Ottawa 
is 217,034 and the non-English-speaking 69,689. 



The cathedral is at Ottawa, the Federal capital, 
which has a population of 86,340 (191 1). The 
Church population is 31,455, with 11,835 com- 
municants. There are 73 clergy in the diocese 
and 126 churches ; Sunday schools 102 ; scholars, 

7.205- 

Charles Hamilton, 1896; Archbishop and 
Metropolitan, 1909. 



o- 




PROVINCE OF RUPERT'S LAND. 
Nine Bishoprics. 



Rupert's Land, 1849. — This diocese extends 
from the boundary of the United States 264 
miles north and is 222 miles in breadth. It con- 
sists of nearly the whole of the Province of 
Manitoba, except a small portion towards the east. 

It is difficult to give accurately the population 
of the diocese. It is approximately 360,000. 
There has been considerable development in the 
diocese during the last few years, owing to the 
extension of the various railway systems, and a 
number of new towns have grown up, whilst 
others have increased very largely in population, 
especially those of Winnipeg 135,430 (191 1) and 
Brandon 13,837 (191 1). The cathedral is at 
Winnipeg and the Church population has greatly 
increased ; it is now about 50,000. There is a 
large foreign element, consisting of Mennonite 
Germans, Russians, Galicians, Doukhobors, 
Scandinavians, etc. There are (1910) 112 licensed 
clergy and about 57 licensed lay readers. 

In the diocese are St. John's College, St. John's 
College School for boys, and Havergal College 
for girls. In the University of Manitoba there 
are four colleges in Arts, belonging respectively 
to the Church of England, the Roman Catholics, 
the Presbyterians and the Wesleyans. The 
Church College of St. John's has about 90 
students in Arts and Theology, and there are 
about 100 boys in the College School. 



The S.P.G. has given much help to this dio- 
cese, dating from 1850, and has also given a 
large sum of money towards the endowment 
of St. John's College, Winnipeg, which is the 
Theological College for the Ecclesiastical Pro- 
vince of Rupert's Land. Clergy working in 
connection with the S.P.G., 17. There are also 
a large number of catechists supported by the 
S.P.G. 

Indian Missions. — The diocese contains an 
Indian population of 5,800, of whom 3,000 are 
members of the Church. 

At the following stations work is assisted by 
the S.P.G. :— 

Belmont, Carroll, Clanwilliam, Deloraine, Durban, Elk- 
horn, Elm Creek, McGregor, Minioto, Pilot Mound, Posen, 
Rathwell, Russell, Snowflake, Somerset, St. Cuthbert's, 
St. George, Brandon ; St. Jude's, Winnipeg ; St. Paul's, 
Wakefield, Woodlands, Winnipeg Cathedral & College 
Mission Staff. 

The C.M.S. supports work at Shoal River. 

Bishops : — 

David Anderson, 1849. 

Robert Machray, 1865 ; Archbishop and 

Primate of all Canada, 1893. 
Samuel Pritchard Matheson, Assistant Bis- 
hop, 1903 ; Archbishop and Metropoli- 
tan, 1905. Primate of all Canada, 1909. 
I) 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Moosonee, 1872. — Moosonee formed part of 
the original diocese of Rupert's Land, out of which 
it was taken in 1872 when the first bishop was 
consecrated; and which until 1903 included the 
diocese of Keewatin. The diocese includes the 
south-eastern portion of the basin of Hudson 
Bay. It extends inland from 300 to 500 miles 
on its eastern and southern sides, and northwards 
as far as human beings exist : area about 600,000 
square miles. The population may be estimated 
at 14,000, Indians 5,000, 2,500 Eskimos, and, as 
far as discovered, 6,500 white people. 

The Church members are white 1,000, Indians 
4,000, Eskimo 300, communicants 1,200, and 
there are 9 clergy, 4 lay workers and 16 native 
catechists. There are five ladies connected with 
school work. There is a pro-cathedral with about 
100 communicants, also Indian boarding schools 
at Moose and Chaplean and there are good 
churches at twelve other places. A new station, 
Martin's Falls, has been lately occupied and this 
last summer another at Agamaskee. The whole 
of the Crees in the diocese, as well as at least 
three-fourths of the Ojibbeways, have been bap- 
tised. The diocese is divided into large districts, 
over which a clergyman is placed : his work is 
arduous, as he has to travel throughout his dis- 
trict at least once a year; this is done in summer 
by means of canoe, and in the winter in snow 
shoes or with dogs and sledges. 

The southern portion of the diocese is rapidly 
opening up for settlement. The Grand Trunk 
Pacific-Railway is being constructed through the 
diocese from east to west, a distance of 500 miles, 
and a second, the Temiscaming and Northern 
Ontario, from south to north, a distance of 100 
miles, making the junction with the G.T.P. at a 
place called Cochrane, which will soon be a large 
and important town. Small towns at Matheson, 



Dane, AbitibI Crossing, Bisco, and other places 
are rapidly springing up. Chaplean, the chief 
town of the diocese, has a population of 1,200. 

With the exception of Moose Island, it is very 
diiificult to grow even vegetables at any of the 
missions on the Bay. The summer is very short, 
about three months, and subject to heavy frosts 
every month in the year. The staple food is 
tinned meats, bacon and flour. Fish and game, 
such as cod, geese and ducks, etc., are plentiful 
in the spring and late autumn. 

The work among the Indians has made such 
progress that the C.M.S. has withdrawn much 
of its support, preferring to give most support to 
Eskimo work. They have established an Arctic 
Mission at Ashe Inlet on Hudson's Straits. 

The Arctic Mission comprises all the country 
inhabited by the Eskimo. The base of com- 
munication is now transferred from England or 
Scotland, as hitherto, to St. John, Newfound- 
land, thus saving a distance of 2,000 miles, and 
providing a more reliable means of transporta- 
tion. From the headquarters station at Ashe 
Inlet, the missionaries have planned to itinerate 
in different directions. 

The C.M.S. supports missionaries at Fort 
George, Blacklead Island and Ashe Inlet. 

At Rupert's House there are i,ooo Indians scat- 
tered over 90,000 square miles. At Mistussinee, 
and Biscotasing new churches have lately been 
built. At Fort George there are 850 Indians and 
Eskimos. At Albany there are 800 Indians, 515 
of whom are members of the Church. 



Bishops :- 



John Horden, 1872. 

Jervois Arthur Newnham, 1893. 

George Holmes, 1905. 

John George Anderson, 1909. 



Athabasca, 1874- — This diocese comprises the 
southern portion of the original diocese of that 
name (N.W. Territory, Dominion of Canada), 
which included what is now called the diocese of 



Mackenzie River. It has now an area of over 
200,000 square miles. The division was effected 
at the Provincial Synod of the Church of England 
in Rupert's Land in 1883. The population of Eng- 



0- 




PROVINCE OF RUPERT'S LAND 



13 



lish-speaking people is about 2,000, and rapidly 
increasing, Indians and half-breeds. Church 
population — White 700 ; Indian, 400. 

The mission work in this diocese is supported 
by the C.M.S., C.C.C.S. and M.S.C.C, Staff: the 
bishop and 9 clergy, 5 lay workers, 10 ladies. 

The Beavers are the aborigines of the central 
and western portions of the diocese : the Chipe- 
wyans of the eastern and the Slave Indians of 
the northern and north-easterly portions. The 
Beavers are diminishing through too close inter- 
marriage, want of cleanliness and scarcity of 
food. 

There are 9 mission stations : St. Paul's, 
Chipewyan (this is the headquarters of the Hud- 
son Bay Company's northern fur trade, and 
the main channel of communication with the 
still further north) ; St. Luke's, Vermilion, con- 
nected with which is the Irene Training School ; 



the Christ Church Mission, near Smoky River ; 
St. Peter's Mission, Lesser Slave Lake, where 
there is a boarding school for Indian children ; 
St. Andrew's Mission, White Fish Lake, working 
chiefly among the Crees where there is also a 
boarding school, St. John's, Wopuskow, Spirit 
River ; All Saints Mission at Athabasca Land- 
ing. All Saints Church has been built here. 
While the mission work amongst the Indians is 
maintained, extensive Evangelislic efforts in be- 
half of the increasing white population are being 
made. 

Bishops : — 

William Carpenter Bompas, 1874. 
Richard Young, 1884; resigned 1904. 
William Day Reeve (Bishop of Mackenzie 

River), resigned 1907. 
George Holmes, 1909. 



Saskatchewan, 1874.— The diocese of Sas- 
katchewan was formed out of Rupert's Land. 
It embraces the former territory of Saskatchewan, 
together with a large extent of territory lying 
to the north. Its area is over 200,000 square 
miles. The English-speaking and foreign popu- 
lation increases so fast that no statistics are 
of any use. The majority of the Indian popu- 
lation are members of the Church. A large 
number of towns and villages have sprung up 
along the C.N,Ry., C.P.Ry. and G.T.P.Ry., 
besides many settlements as yet some distance 
from these railways. The immigration for some 
years past has been large, and there is a prospect 
of rapid development through the building of 
the Canadian Northern Railway and Grand Trunk 
Pacific, which pass right through the diocese 
from east to west. 

The diocese of Saskatchewan has received 
much help from the S.P.G. from the time of 
its formation. 

The principal stations assisted by the S.P.G. 

are : — 



Asquith, Bresaylor, Birch Hills, Borden, Battleford, 
North Battleford, Campbell Lake, Colleston, Clair, Crooked 
River, Duck Lake, Humboldt, Halcro, Islay, Kinistino, 
Lashburn, Melfort, Mancroft, Mannville, Maidstone, Mar- 
vin, Meota, Naseby, New Osgood, Pascal district, Prongua, 
Prince Albert East, Prince Albert district, Radisson, Shell- 
brook, Saskatoon, Scott, Vonda, Wilkie, Warman. 

During the last few years over sixty laymen 
have gone out from England to serve as cate- 
chists in the diocese, a number of whom after a 
course of study extending over three years have 
now been ordained. 

A church hostel is in course of building at 
Saskatoon in connection with the large Govern- 
ment university which is also in course of build- 
ing. It is hoped that many of the future clergy 
for Saskatchewan may be trained at this hostel. 
The Colonial and Continental Church Society 
have given a large amount of assistance to this 
diocese during the last few years. 

Work amongst Indians. — Emmanuel College 
at Prince Albert was established for training 
candidates for Holy Orders, school teachers and 
Indian students for employment in mission 



14 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



work generally. It is now a Divinity College, 
for catechists and students, and is affiliated with 
the Saskatchewan University. 

The Industrial School at Battleford is for the 
training of Indian boys and girls and is wholly 
maintained by the Indian Department, Ottawa. 

The St. Barnabas Boarding School, Onion 
Lake, is for the training of Indian youths and 
girls. There is also an Indian boarding school 
at Lac la Rouge, maintained mainly by the 
Indian Department. 

The work amongst the Indians does not make 
much progress. There are eleven clergy engaged 



in this work, of whom three are principals of 
schools. It is very difficult to get competent 
teachers for the salary oflfered by the Canadian 
Government. The Indians are advancing a little 
in farming in some places, but they do not pro- 
gress in the matter of the support of their clergy. 
The bishop resides at Prince Albert. 

Bishops : — 

John McLean, 1874. 

Cyprian Pinkham, 1887. 

Jervois Arthur Newnham, 1903 (cons. 1892). 



Qu'appelle, 1883 (Originally Assiniboia). — 

This diocese comprises the southern half of the 
Province of Saskatchewan and contains an area 
of 90,000 square miles. It was formed out of 
the dioceses of Rupert's Land and Saskatchewan, 
and is bounded on the east by the diocese of 
Rupert's Land, on the north by the diocese 
of Saskatchewan, on the west by the diocese 
of Calgary, and on the south by the United 
States. 

It is almost entirely agricultural and pastoral. 
Immigration into this district began about 
1883. 

The diocese which is rapidly growing in num- 
bers owing to the development of railways and 
the consequent inrush of settlers, is divided at 
present into 70 districts or missions all of which 
contain a large number of out stations. At 
present there are at work in the diocese 69 clergy 
and 58 lay readers. 

The Railway Mission, modelled upon a similar 
organisation in South Africa, and financially sup- 
ported by the Archbishops' Fund and M.S.C.C, 
is an agency supplementary to the more normal 
diocesan activities. Its modus operandi is a free 
movement of clergy and lay workers from a com- 
mon central home at Regina along the many 
new and for the most part unclaimed lines of 
railway, with the railways themselves as their 



proper means of locomotion, in order to secure a 
rapid and effective lengthening of the Church's 
cords. 

The first workers started out late in November, 
1910 ; their number in 191 1 was 12, half of them 
priests and half laymen. These are providing 
fortnightly ministrations at forty different centres 
widely scattered throughout the diocese, and hope 
to promote the building of a number of churches 
during the present year. 

The existing staff suffices only for 500 miles 
out of the 2,800 miles of track within the diocesan 
borders to-day ; and it is practically certain that 
this latter figure will be well nigh doubled during 
the next three years. 

A prairie brotherhood organised by the Rev. 
W. J. H. McClean was started in the south of 
the diocese in 1908. It has at present 3 mem- 
bers who hold services over a very wide district 
the centre of which is at Willow Bunch. A 
railway line is being built through the district 
which will shortly result in a very large increase 
in its population. 

The S.P.G. supports missions at the following 
stations : Abernethy (now Balcarres), Areola 
Line, Baring, Broadview, Cannington, Carlyle, 
Craik, Cupar, Estevan, Fort Qu'Appelle, Halbrite, 
Kamsack, Kelliher, Kutawa, Milestone, Nokomis, 
Oxbow, Outlook, Pense, St. Chad's Hostel, Re- 



PROVINCE OF RUPERT'S LAND 



IS 



gina, Sintaluta, Strasburg, Swift Current, Togo, 
Watrous, Weyburn, Willow Bunch, Zealandia, 
and has contributed to the endowment fund of 
the Bishopric and to the clergy sustentation fund. 
Clergy working in connection with S.P.G., 35. 



Bishops : — 

Adelbert John Robert Anson, 1884. 
William John Burn, 1893. 
John Grisdale, i8g6. 
Malcolm Taylor McAdam Harding, 
(Coadjutor, 1909). 



1911 



Mackenzie River, 1883 (Originally Atha- 
basca). — This diocese was separated from the 
diocese of Rupert's Land in 1874, and from Atha- 
basca in 1883, and the diocese of Selkirk was 
separated from it in 1890; but it still remains 
one of the largest of the colonial dioceses, and 
contains upwards of 500,000 square miles. The 
population of English-speaking people is 200 ; 
Indian, 4,000 ; Eskimo, 400. Church popula- 
tion — White, 100 ; Indian, 700 ; Eskimo, 50. 
There are 4 churches. 

The chief burden of the support of the mission 
work was borne by the C.M.S. from its incep- 
tion in 1858 until recently; but as the C.M.S. 
is now gradually withdrawing, the M.S.C.C. is 
trying to take up the work. The C.M.S. still, 
however, supports one clergyman, and makes a 
grant which diminishes year by year. There are 
four mission stations and several outposts. At 
Hay River is the diocesan school, where there 
are about thirty boarders gathered from all parts 
of the diocese. Work is also being done among 
the Eskimos. Day and Sunday schools are held 
at the stations. 

The principal centres of work are at Herschel 



Island, where there is a mission which was 
started by Bishop Stringer in 1892. It reaches 
the Eskimos, the American whaling station, and 
a contingent of the N.W. Mounted Police. 

Fort MacPherson, Tukudh Mission. Here 
Archdeacon McDonald laboured for fifty years, 
and translated the whole of the Bible into the 
vernacular. The Indians number about 400. 

Fort Norman, Hare Indian Mission. 

Fort Simpson, Tess Cho Tone Mission. The 
attendance at Church reaches 140. 

Hay River, Slavi Mission. There are 30 
children in the school. 

Tribes : Eskimos, Tukudh, Hare, Slavi, Moun- 
tain, Sikani, Dog Rib, Yellow Knives, Chipewyan, 
besides white people and half-breeds. 

Number of clergy in the diocese, 4 ; lay 
workers 5, and 3 ladies. 

Bishops : — 

William Carpenter Bompas, 1874 (tr. to Sel- 
kirk, 1890). 
William Day Reeve, 1891 ; resigned, 1907. 
The Bishop of Athabasca, residing at Athabasca 
Landing, acts as Bishop for Mackenzie River. 



Calgary, 1888.— The diocese of Calgary was 
established in 1888, having been taken from the 
diocese of Saskatchewan. Its greatest length is 
378 miles, and its greatest breadth 342 miles. 
Its area is more than 100,000 square miles. Its 
population is probably about 250,000, Its chief 
cities and towns are Calgary 43>736, Edmonton 
24,882, Lethbridge 8,048, Strathcona 5,580, Wit- 
askiwin 3,500, High River 2,000. For some 
years after it was called into being the diocese 
was worked along with that of Saskatchewan, 



by one bishop who worked each separately; but 
upon the completion of the Calgary Bishopric 
Endowment Fund, October i, 1903, the bishop 
resigned the care of Saskatchewan and here con- 
fined himself to Calgary. When the diocese of 
Calgary was organised in 1889, there were 11 
clergy ; now there are nearly 90, with a number 
of paid lay readers whose whole time is given 
to their work. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G., 27. 
There are now nearly 30 clergy who are entirely 



i6 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



supported by the free-will offerings of the people, 
and nearly all the self-supporting parishes were 
originally either S.P.G. Missions or part of such 
Missions. 

St. Hilda's College, a girls' church school, has 
been for some years in successful operation in 
Calgary. A college, to be called the Bishop 
Pinkham College, in which a Church high 
school for boys is at present being held, has 
been recently opened. 

At Edmonton in the north of the diocese a 
brotherhood has been established which consists 
of 9 clergy and 6 laymen who are endeavouring 
to minister to the spiritual wants of a large district 
in and near Edmonton and radiating westerly 
and north-westerly to the western boundary of 
the diocese. The brotherhood is at present sup- 
ported by the Archbishops' Western Canada 
Fund. 

A similar brotherhood has been started in 
the southern part of the diocese and is worked 
on similar lines. 

Indian Missions. — The Church has missions 
to the Indians on the four Reserves in the 
Southern part of the diocese, i.e., among the 
Blackfoot, Bloods, Peigans and Sarcee. The 



total Indian population on the four Reserves is 
said to be 2,692. Of these the number of church 
members is about 563 including about 170 com- 
municants. The Roman Catholics, the only other 
religious body working on three of the Reserves 
(on the Sarcee we are alone), claim according to 
government returns about 573 leaving 1,556 still 
to be evangelised. 

The church began its work among the Peigans 
in 1879 among the Bloods in 1880, among the 
Blackfoot in 1883, and among the Sarcee in 
1886. 

There are church boarding schools for the 
Bloods, Peigans and Sarcee. The boarding 
school in the Blackfoot Reserve has been closed 
till the new building now in course of erection 
is ready, and the school has (for the present) 
by the express wish of the government become a 
day school. All four schools have pupils of both 
sexes. 

Among the Blackfoot there is a valuable medi- 
cal mission and an Indian hospital of great value 
to children and adults. 

First Bishop : — 

William Cyprian Pinkham, 1888 (see under 
Saskatchewan). 



Yukon (formerly Selkirk), 1890.— This 
diocese comprises the Yukon Territory, Canada, 
and was formed out of the diocese of Mac- 
kenzie River. It lies in the extreme north- 
western corner of the Dominion of Canada, 
extending from British Columbia on the south 
to the Arctic Ocean on the north, and from 
the Rocky Mountains on the east to the 
United States Territory of Alaska on the 
west. 

Population : English speaking people, about 
15,000; native Indians, 1,000. 

There are 8 clergy and 4 lay readers, who, 
together with the bishop and several teachers 
in the schools, comprise the working staff of 
the whole diocese. 



The three native Missions at Fort Selkirk, 
Carcross and Moosehide are assisted by the 
C.M.S. A new church, towards the cost of which 
the Indians contributed more than £400, has 
been erected at Moosehide as a memorial to 
Bishop Bompas. The native schools receive aid 
from the Canadian Government and also a grant 
from the S.P.C.K. 

The C.C.C.S. assist two of the English Mis- 
sions. 

When the Klondyke gold fields were opened 
the S.P.G. received an offer from the, Rev. W. G. 
Lyon to devote himself to the work of minister- 
ing to the miners. Regarding this as a work for 
the Canadian Church to undertake the S.P.G, 
voted £200 " to assist and stimulate it in send- 



PROVINCE OF RUPERT'S LA^fD 



17 



ing a mission to Klondyke and supporting the 
same without further aid from the Society ". 
Mr. Lyon started from Dawson City in 1898, 
but was drowned in Lake Barge on his way to 
Klondyke. 

Church work. — In this matter endeavour has 
been made to keep pace to some extent with the 
growth of the country. Previous to the opening 
of the Klondyke mines, the Church work in the 
diocese was confined to 2 or 3 missions to 
the native Indians exclusively. There are now 
4 missions to the Indians, and in addition to 
these there are organised parishes and English 



congregations. There are altogether in the 
diocese 8 clergy. There are 5 permanent churches 
and 3 school-chapels, or mission-rooms. There 
are 7 mission houses or parsonages. The Indians 
are nearly all christianised. The 4 Indian Mis- 
sions are supported by the C.M.S., and 3 of the 
4 English Missions are assisted by the C.C.C.S. 

Bishops : — 

William Carpenter Bompas, 1891 ; Bishop 
of Athabasca, 1874 ; of Mackenzie River, 
1884. 

Isaac O. Stringer, 1905. 



Keewatin, 1899. — The diocese of Keewatin 
was organ;|ed in 1899, but the first bishop was 
not appointed until 1902. It was formed so as 
to relieve the diocese of Moosonee of the Indian 
and Eskimo work on the west shores of Hudson 
Bay. It took in also most of the Indian work 
in the diocese of Rupert's Land. 

It is bounded on the east by the dioceses of 
Moosonee and Algoma, on the south by the 
boundary line dividing the United States from 
Canada, and on the west by the dioceses of 
Rupert's Land, Saskatchewan and Mackenzie 
River. To the north it goes farther than any 
other diocese in Canada, taking in all the 
Eskimos as far as Fox's Channel and even 
beyond. 

The diocese stretches from Savanne on the 
east to Molson in the west, and comes into 
three provinces — Ontario, Manitoba and Kee- 
watin. In extent it is about 350,000 square 
miles. The present population is about 27,000, 
being 17,000 whites and 10,000 Indians and 
Eskimos. 

Work in Keewatin is almost equally divided 
between whites, Indians and Eskimos. All the 



Indian and Eskimo work was begun, and has 
been carried on up to the present, by the C.M.S., 
but they are now gradually withdrawing their 
aid. There are 10 central Indian missions with 
populations varying from 150 to 600. There 
are now 14 parishes amongst the white settlers ; 
in 1902 there were only 4. In 1902 there were 
7 clergy; now there are 16, and 10 paid lay 
workers. 

The S.P.G. contributed £1,000 to the endow- 
ment of the diocese, and partly supports two clergy 
for white work at Keewatin and Dryden. Not 
many settlers are coming into the diocese at pre- 
sent, as there is very little farm land ; but there is 
a large and growing work amongst lumberm'en, 
miners and railwaymen, both the Canadian 
Pacific and the Grank Trunk Trans-Continental 
and Canadian Northern lines running for 300 
miles through the heart of the diocese. 

St. Albans Kenora (Rat Portage), appointed 
as the pro-cathedral in 1906, is the only self- 
supporting parish in the diocese. 

Bishop : — 

Joseph Lofthouse, 1902. 



INDEPENDENT DIOCESES. 



British Columbia, 1859. — This diocese was 
founded in 1859 ; the diocese of Caledonia was 
separated from it in 1879, and in the same year 
the diocese of New Westminster was also formed 
out of it. The four dioceses west of the Rockies 
are soon to be formed into an Ecclesiastical 
Province, but until this is accomplished, with the 
consent of the Archbishop of Canterbury the 
jurisdiction of these dioceses has been trans- 
ferred to the Primate of All Canada. It com- 
prises Vancouver Island and the adjacent islands, 
and has an area of 17,000 square miles. Agri- 
culture, coal-mining, lumber mills, ship-building, 
and salmon and seal fisheries employ most of the 
people. Population — English-speaking people, 
7 5, 000; other than English-speaking people, 
14,500. Victoria, population 31,620 (1911), the 
capital of the Civil Province of British Columbia, 
is the seat of the bishop. The number of clergy 
is 30. The S.P.G. began work in 1859 and for 



many years continued its support. But the diocese 
has received no grant since 1909. The work of 
the Columbia Coast Mission which was started 
in 1905 for the Logging Camps has developed, 
and there are now three hospitals with resident 
doctors and nurses, and a steamer built at a cost 
of £5,000 which regularly visits the camps, and 
is provided with everything necessary for the Ser- 
vices of the Church, and also carries a surgeon. 
The work is under the charge of Rev. T, Antle as 
superintendent, and a joint committee of this 
diocese and the diocese of New Westminster. 

At Alert Bay there is an Indian Industrial 
School in connection with the C.M.S. 

Bishops : — 

George Hills, 1859. 

William Willcox Perrin, 1893 (resigned 

1911). 
John Charles Roper, 191 2. 



New Westminster, 1879.— This diocese was 
founded in 1879, when the original diocese ot 
British Columbia was divided into three dio- 
ceses. It comprised a district on the mainland 
between the 49th and S4th parallels of N. lati- 
tude, and bounded on the west by the Gulf ot 
Georgia, and on the east by the Rocky Moun- 
tains. It was further divided in 1900, when that 
portion of the diocese east of the 120th meridian 
of W. longitude was separated and formed into 
the diocese of Kootenay. The area is about 
90,000 square miles, with a rapidly-growing 
population of at least 200,000 people. In- 
cluded among these are over 8,000 Indians (ot 
whom 1,679 ^re returned as belonging to the 



Church), besides a considerable number of 
Chinese and Japanese and several hundred 
Sikhs from India. 

Number of clergy, 58; churches, 51; com- 
municants, 5,000 ; Sunday school scholars, 
3,000; local contributions of parishes (1909), 
£11,500. Self-supporting parishes, 15; aided 
missions, 26. 

Vancouver (population, 100,000) has fourteen 
parishes and missions, eight of which are self- 
supporting. New Westminster (pop. (191 1) 
13,394), has three parishes two of them self- 
supporting. Five other parishes receive no aid, 
and these may become self-supporting in 191 1. 
But owing to the mountainous character of the 
(18) 




o 
COLUMBIA '^ 

Scale of Miles 
so 



P Ik 



!^ 



130' 



12S' 



/20° 



/I5° 



The prmctpa/ staNons assistec/ bi/ S.PG. are underlined 



INDEPENDENT DIOCESES 



19 



diocese, and thinly settled districts a number of 
missions will require help for some time. The 
development of the city of Vancouver, and of the 
Lower Fraser Valley is remarkable and taxes all 
the resources of the Church to provide services 
for incoming church people. The railway de- 
velopments in the next five years will open up 
many new districts in the diocese. Missionary 
work is carried on among the Indians by three 
clergy and two catechists in thirteen churches, 
most of which were built by the Indians them- 
selves. There is an excellent school for Indian 
girls at Yale, an industrial school for boys at 
Lytton, supported by the New England Company, 
and an Indian hospital, enlarged in 1909, and 
equipped with operating room and modern surgi- 
cal appliances. A Chinese mission is established 
in Vancouver, with a native Chinaman in charge. 
Work is carried on among the Japanese men 
and women. For the year ending June, 1909, 
fourteen were baptized and seven confirmed. 
The Columbia Coast mission to loggers and 
settlers along the coast of the mainland within 
the diocese and the islands belonging to the 
diocese of Columbia is operated jointly by the 
two dioceses. The mission steamer Columbia, 
having proved too small, a larger boat, 100 feet 
long, with powerful gasolene engine and auxiliary 
sails is now (Jan., 191 1) completed at a cost of 
£4,000. 

Hospitals are operated at Rock Bay, Alert 
Bay and on Texada Island. A resident doctor 
and two nurses are stationed at each hospital. 
On the boat, which is fitted up for emergency 
cases are the superintendent, doctor and neces- 
sary helpers. 



The supplementary endowment for the bishop- 
ric has been completed. The endowment is now 
about £1 1,000, and a See house situated in the 
city of New Westminster. 

The " Missions to Seamen Society" assist in 
the support of work among the sailors in the 
Port of Vancouver. 

Apart from missionary work, which continues 
to expand with the rapid growth in population, 
the special need is the organisation and estab- 
lishment of a theological college in the city of 
Vancouver, now under consideration. The estab- 
lishment of this diocese was due in great measure 
to the S.P.G., which has contributed £1,532 to 
the episcopal endowment. 

The archdeaconry of the diocese was founded 
in i860 by Miss Burdett-Coutts with a gift of 
£5,000. The present archdeacon is a diocesan 
and missionary officer, and holds no parish. 
The trust deed of the archdeaconry was drawn 
up by the Society, and the property which is 
in British Columbia is administered by local 
trustees appointed by the Society. By careful 
management the endowment now amounts to 
54,300 dollars (over £11,000), and a residence 
has been built for the Archdeacon in Vancouver, 
which, owing to increase in values of real estate, 
is with the lot valued at £2,500. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. — 
7 European clergy, Chinese catechist at Van- 
couver, Indian catechists at Lytton and Yale. 

Bishops : — 

Acton Windeyer Sillitoe, 1879. 

John Dart, 1895. 

Adam Urias de Pencier, 1910. 



Caledonia, 1879,— The diocese of Caledonia 
comprises the northern half of British Columbia, 
and embraces the many outlying islands, the 
coast district and the interior. The three large 
rivers— the Skeena, the Naas and the Stickine— 
form the natural way into the interior, which is 
very mountainous. At present there are only a 



few settlements on the coast or up the rivers; 
but as the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway will 
shortly be constructed across northern British 
Columbia, the country, which is rich in natural 
resources, such as timber, fish, minerals, etc., 
with many fertile valleys, is destined to develop 
rapidly. Already settlers are pouring into some 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



of these valleys, such as Bulkley, Kitsum Kalum, 
Nechaco, etc., and a new terminal city, Prince 
Rupert, has arisen which has a population of 
4,771 (191 1). Population — White, 10,000; Indian, 
8,000 ; Chinese, 1,000 ; Japanese, 750. 2,308 of 
the Indians are members of the Church of Eng- 
land. The diocese of Caledonia now forms part 
of the Canadian Church as organised in the 
General Synod of Canada. It has a diocesan 
synod in which White and Indian congrega- 
tions are represented without distinction. Bishop 
Ridley, who was consecrated in 1879, when the 
diocese was formed, resigned in 1904, and was 
succeeded bv Bishop Du Vernet. 

The S.P.G. assists 5 of the clergy, the CM.S. 
8, and the Missionary Society of the Canadian 
Church is furnishing funds for another clergyman 
for the new work. 



The CM.S. began work among the Indians 
in 1857, the S.P.G. among the miners in 1884. 

The work supported by the CM.S. is carried 
on at Metlakatla (1862) and Kitkatla (1887) on 
the coast, Hazelton (1880) and Giatwangak (1882) 
on the Skeena River, Kincolith (1866) and Aiy- 
ansh (1883) on the Naas River, and at Massett 
(1876) in the Queen Charlotte Islands. The 
figures in brackets denote the dates at which 
the several missions were started. 

The following stations are assisted by S.P.G. : 
Atlin, Bulkley Valley, Kitsum Kalum, Massett, 
and Port Essington. 



Bishops . 



William Ridley, 1879. 

Frederick Herbert Du Vernet, 1904. 



Kootenay, 1900. — This diocese was created 
out of the diocese of New Westminster. The 
first Synod of Kootenay as a separate diocese 
was held in Nelson May 29th and 30th, 1900. 
Kootenay is still in charge of the Bishop of New 
Westminster and will remain so until an endow- 
ment fund of ten thousand pounds has been 
raised, or the stipend of the Bishop otherwise 
satisfactorily provided for. 

The diocese comprises all that part of British 
Columbia that lies east of the 120th meridian 
of West Longitude. The population is chiefly 
English speaking but a few thousands of 
Japanese, Chinese and Hindoos with a few 
thousand Indians are also part of the inhabi- 
tants. A guess at the population would be 
about 100,000 all told. 

The country has been described as " A sea of 
mountains " and that well describes it. 



The industries are first mining, gold, silver, 
lead, coal. Next we might place lumbering. 
There is little or no fishing, that is for the 
market. The lakes and streams abound with 
trout. 

Agriculture is coming to the front and fruit 
raising will shortly be an important industry ; as 
yet the trees are too young. Apples, peaches, 
pears, plums and all the smaller fruits are grown 
and they are all of excellent quality. 

The diocese now has 28 clergy. There are 70 
stations at which services are held. There are 
27 church buildings and ten self-supporting 
parishes. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G., 7. 

The stations assisted by S.P.G. are: Arm- 
strong, Enderby, Golden, New Denver, Penticton, 
Summerland. 



Newfoundland (and Bermuda), 1839,— This, 

the oldest English colony, has an area of 42,734 
square miles, with a coast line of about 2,000 
miles ; and according to the census of 1901 a 



population of 217,037, exclusive of those resident 
on the Labrador coast (4,106) within the juris- 
diction of Newfoundland. The inhabitants are 
situated almost exclusively on the sea coast, the 



N*? VII. 




The principal Motions assisted by ttie S.P.G are underlined. 



INDEPENDENT DIOCESES 



chief industries being the cod, seal, herring, 
salmon and lobster fisheries. 

In the interior, which is practically uninhabited, 
are large tracts of agricultural, timber and 
mineral lands. There are 638 miles of railway 
open. The island is rich in mineral resources ; 
there are large and valuable deposits of copper 
and iron ; oil wells and coal have recently been 
discovered. Shoe, biscuit, cordage and nail fac- 
tories, iron foundries, lumber mills, the recent 
introduction of whale fishing, and the erection of 
pulp mills give employment to part of the popu- 
lation. There are 73,008 members of the Church 
of England. There are 69 licensed clergy, 156 
licensed lay readers, and 160 churches. There 
are 300 schools, 439 teachers, 14,611 scholars 
of the Church of England, 21 of which are sup- 
ported by the C.C.C.S., and 240 Sunday schools, 
1,150 teachers, and 12,350 scholars. In 1903 the 
Rev. J. J. Curling gave a sum of ;f5,ooo to be 
held in trust by the S.P.G. "for the purpose 
of making some provision for the needs of the 
Church of England in the diocese of New- 
foundland and its dependency of North-Eastern 
Labrador ". 



The S.P.G. first assisted mission work in New- 
foundland in 1703. The diocese was founded 
in 1839, the Society contributing to the support 
of the bishop and to the endowment fund. 

Clergy working in connection with the S.P.G., 
22. 

Queen's College, Newfoundland, was founded 
in 1842 with the aid of the Society, by Bishop 
Feild. 

The following stations are assisted by S.P.G. : — 



Belleoram. 

Brooklyn. 

Burgeo. 

Carbonear. 

Catalina. 

Exploits. 

Foxtrap and Hopewell. 

Harbour Briton. 

Harbour Buffett. 

King's Cove. 

Lamaline. 

New Harbour. 



Petty Harbour. 
Portugal Cove. 
Pouch Cove. 
St. George's Bay. 
St. John's. 
Salmon Cove. 
Salvage. 
Tilt Cove. 
Topsail. 
Trinity, West. 
White Bay. 



Bishops : — 

Aubrey George Spencer, 1839. 

Edward Feild, 1844. 

James Butler Knill Kelly, Coadjutor-Bishop, 

1867 ; Bishop 1876. 
Llewellyn Jones, 1878. 



Bermuda, — The Bermudas or Somers Islands 
are a cluster of about 100 small islands, 15 
or 16 of which are inhabited, comprising an 
area of about 19 square miles and contain- 
ing (1901) a population of 17,535, of whom 6,383 
are white, exclusive of those in the army and 
navy. There were in 1901, 10,627 rnembers 
of the Church of England. The islands derive 
their name from Bermudezj a Spaniard who 
sighted them in 1527, but they were first colonised 
by Sir George Somers who was shipwrecked 
here in 1609. The chief town is Hamilton ; 
population (1901) 2,246. 

Bermuda was formerly an archdeaconry in the 
diocese of Nova Scotia. In 1839 the diocese of 
Newfoundland was founded and Bermuda was 
attached to it, the bishop having by letters patent 
episcopal jurisdiction in Bermuda. The Church 



in Bermuda is established. In 1878 an Act of 
the Colonial Legislature was passed authorising 
the formation of a synod, chiefly with a view to 
providing for the episcopal supervision in these 
islands. This had become necessary through 
the death of Bishop Feild. As the result of the 
action taken by the synod, immediately after its 
constitution, the Church in Bermuda still re- 
mains in connection with the diocese of New- 
foundland. The colony is divided into 9 
parishes* The bishop spends every alternate 
winter in Bermuda the diocese of which is en- 
tirely distinct from that of Newfoundland. 

Number of clergy in Bermuda, 12. There are 
14 Church Sunday schools. 

The S.P.G. first gave aid to Bermuda in 1705, 
it ceased to contribute to the support of work in 
the islands in 1870. 



THE WEST INDIES, CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA. 



The S. P. G. began by aiding clergymen with 
books and passage money in 1703, and in 1710 
became permanently connected with the West 
Indies by accepting the trusteeship of the Cod- 
rington estates in Barbados. Its operations 
were extended to the Bahamas in 1 731, to the 
Mosquito Shore (among the Mosquito Indians) 
in 1748, to Tobago, the Leeward Islands, Jamaica 
and British Guiana in 1835, Trinidad in 1836, 
British Honduras in 1844, Panama in 1883, and 
Costa Rica in 1896. As early as 17 15 the 
Society also sought to establish two bishoprics 
in the West Indies, but did not succeed until 
1824, when the sees of Jamaica and Barbados 
were founded. The Society's exercise of the 
Codrington Trust proved " a noble exception " 
at a time (extending over a century) " when the 
African race " (in the West Indies) " were, even 
by members of the Church, almost entirely ne- 
glected," and it prepared the way to freedom. On 
the abolition of slavery the Society became also 
an instrument for the evangelisation of the freed 
slaves, and between 1835-50 it expended a fund 
of £164,495 on the work in this field. Few 
missionary efforts have produced such great 
results in so short a time as were effected in 
this instance. 

The assistance rendered from " the Negro 
Education Fund " drew out a large amount of 
local support, it being a condition that at least 
one-half of the salaries of the missionaries and 
lay teachers should from the first be provided 



from other sources, and that eventually the en- 
tire charge should be undertaken by the colonies. 
From some of the colonies it was possible for 
the Society to withdraw all assistance at an early 
date, without injury to the work; in others it has 
been necessary to continue and renew aid from 
time to time, both in order to sustain churches 
which otherwise must have sunk under disen- 
dowment (or rather the withdrawal of State aid), 
and to extend missions among native races, in- 
cluding the coolie immigrants from China and 
India in Guiana and Trinidad. In Guiana the 
evangelisation of the aboriginal Indians and the 
Chinese immigrants has been practically accom- 
plished in one generation ; only 2,000 or 3,000 of 
the Indians are now heathen. In Trinidad the 
work among the East Indian coolies has been 
more fruitful than in Guiana. 

Three-fifths of the clergy who have laboured 
in the West Indies have been educated at Cod- 
rington College, Barbados, and coloured mis- 
sionaries have been sent thence to the heathen 
in West Africa, the special foreign mission field 
adopted by the West Indian Church in com- 
memoration of the Society's third jubilee in 1851. 

During the period 1712-1910 the Society ex- 
pended £723,860, and employed about 484 
ordained missionaries in the West Indian field. 
At the present time its work there is being car- 
ried on in 7 dioceses ; its total annual expendi- 
ture in 1910 was £6,440, and the number of its 
missionaries 77. 



(22) 



Jamaica, 1824. 

Nassau, 1861. 

I 
Honduras, 1883. 



PROVINCE OF THE WEST INDIES 

THE WEST INDIAN EPISCOPATE. 

Barbados, 1824, and Windward Islands, 1878. 



I 
Antigua, 1842. 



Guiana, 1842. 



Trinidad, 1872. 



Jamaica, 1824. — In the year 1824 Jamaica, 
the Bahamas, and the settlements in the Bay 
of Honduras were created a bishop's see, but the 
Bahamas and Honduras have now been made 
separate dioceses, and the original diocese is 
limited to the island of Jamaica, which is 144 
miles long by 49 broad, and contains 4,207 
square miles. Population (1909) 848,656. The 
number of consecrated churches is no, in 
addition to which there are about 214 school 
chapels and mission rooms. Of these, 122 are 
mission stations in connection with the Jamaica 
Church Home and Foreign Missionary Society. 
There are 90 clergy, and 324 catechists and 
voluntary lay readers. The number annually 
confirmed averages about 2,000. There are 1,658 
Sunday schools and 26,892 scholars in average 
attendance. 

The S.P.G. has given grants to Jamaica from 
time to time, the first help given being in 1703. 
In 1897 the Society gave £1,000 towards the 
enlargement of the Jamaica Theological College, 
founded by Archbishop Nuttall in 1883. It also 
recently voted £100 for two years to supplement 
the income of poor clergy in the diocese. It gave 
a grant of £1,000 towards the restoration of 
church buildings destroyed by the hurricane of 
August, 1903. 

(23) 



In 1903 the total amount of voluntary offerings 
was £27,446 : in 1905, owing to the general de- 
pression caused by the failure of the sugar in- 
dustry and the hurricane of 1903, the amount 
contributed was only £20,395. On 14th January, 
1907, an earthquake occurred which destroyed a 
great part of Kingston. The S.P.G. voted £100 
and raised a special fund of £330 towards 
relieving the suffering caused by the earth- 
quake. A pan-Anglican grant of £15,000 was 
devoted to the same purpose. 

An article entitled "The Church in Jamaica, 
Past and Present," by the late Dr. Collins, Bishop 
of Gibraltar, which appeared in The East and The 
West for January, 1903, gives a clear account of 
the religious life of Jamaica. 

Bishops : — 

Christopher Lipscombe, 1824. 

Aubrey George Spencer, 1843. 

Reginald Courtenay, 1856. 

William George Tozer, 1879. 

Enos Nuttall, 1880 ; Archbishop, 1897. 

Charles Frederick Douet, Assist. Bishop, 

1888 ; resigned, 1904. 
Albert Edward Joscelyne, Coadjutor-Bishop, 
1905. 



24 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Barbados and the Windward Islands, 
1824. — This diocese included originally what are 
now the dioceses of Guiana, Antigua, Trinidad. 
The population of Barbados is 196,498 of whom 
about 160,000 are members of the Church of 
England. 

There are 11 parishes, 46 churches and chapels, 
and 51 clergy, 43 licensed lay readers, and 
22,160 registered communicants. 

There are 166 elementary schools, of which 
131 belong to the Church of England. The 
average attendance at the elementary schools is 
about 14,000. 

Codrington College was founded by Sir Chris- 



topher Codrington in 17 11, who bequeathed to 
the S.P.G. certain estates for its support. It is 
affiliated to Durham University, and was at one 
time the great educational institution of the West 
Indies. The S.P.G. has recently voted a large sum 
towards the endowment of Codrington College 
out of its Bicentenary Fund. It has also handed 
over the local management of the Codrington 
College to the General Synod of the West 
Indies. 

The salaries of the bishop and clergy are paid 
by the Colonial Legislature. The total amount 
raised (independent of clerical stipends) for the 
upkeep of the Church is about £8,500. 



The Windward Islands, — This diocese in- 
cludes St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Grenada, and the 
Grenadines. Population 180,675. In St. Vin- 
cent and in the Grenadines the majority belong 
to the Church of England ; in St. Lucia 
and Grenada, where the population is largely 
French in descent and language, the dominant 
religion is Roman Catholic. There are at pre- 
sent 18 clergy in the islands, and the diocese 
remains under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of 
Barbados until a sufficient endowment for the 
stipend of a separate bishop can be obtained. 
The church is disestablished and disendowed. 

The S.P.G. has done mission work in these 
islands since 1712. The Society contributed 



£■750 for the rebuilding of churches and schools 
destroyed by the hurricane in 1898 in St. Lucia 
and Grenada, and made a special grant of ;f 300 
a year for five years to the bishop to assist the 
clergy suffering from the results of the volcanic 
eruption in 1902. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G., 6. 

Bishops ; — 

William Hart Coleridge, 1824. 

Thomas Parry, 1842. 

John Mitchinson, 1873. 

Herbert Bree, 1882. 

William Proctor Swaby, 1899 (cons., 1893). 



Antigua (Leeward Islands), 1842. — This 
diocese embraces the English islands of An- 
tigua, Dominica, Barbuda, Montserrat, St. Kitts, 
Nevis, Anguilla, Tortola, Virgin Gorda and 
Anegada, as well as churches in the foreign 
islands of St. Bartholomew (French), Saba 
Eustatius (Dutch), St. Martin (half Dutch, 
half French), St. Croix and St. Thomas 
(Danish). English is the language of the 
common people in all these islands, except 
in St. Bartholomew and in Dominica, which was 
formerly a French possession. Population 
(1910), 160,000. 



There are 43 churches, with separate parishes 
or districts, besides schoolrooms licensed for 
public worship ; there are 30 clergy and 25 
licensed lay readers, and 12,287 registered com- 
municants. 

A large majorit}' of the labouring population 
can read, and of the younger people nearly all, 
and many can write also. There is in Antigua 
one grammar school conducted by a clergyman, 
one in Dominica and one in St. Kitts. 

The S.P.G. first began to work in the Leeward 
Islands in 1834, the year of the passing of the 
Emancipation Act. The Society has contributed to 



N9 IX. 




S.P. G. Mission Stations are underlined. 



PROVINCE OF THE WEST INDIES 



25 



the endowment fund of the diocese. The Church 
was disestablished and disendowed in 1873. 
Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 16. 
Bishops : — 

Daniel Gateward Davis, 1842. 

Stephen Jordan Rigaud, 1858. 

William Walrond Jackson, i860. 

Charles James Branch, Coadjutor-Bishop, 

1882 ; Bishop, 1895. 
Herbert Mather, 1897. 
Walter Farrar, 1905 (resigned 1910). 
Edward Hutson, 191 1. 



The following stations are assisted by 
S.P.G. :— 



Anguilla, St. Mary's 

,, St. Bartholomew's 
„ St. Earth's 
Antigua, St. Mary's 
„ St. Philip's 
,, All Saints' 
St. Paul's 
,, St. George's 
,, St. John's 
Barbuda, Holy Trinity 
Montserrat, St. Anthony's 

,, St. George's 

Nevis, St. Paul's 
,, St. Thomas' 
,, St. George's 



Nevis, St. John's 

Saba 

St. Croix, D.W.I. 

St. Paul's 
St. Kitts, Holy Trinity 
,, St. Thomas' 

St. Paul's 
,, St. John's 

,, Cayon, St. Mary's 

SandyPt. St.Anne 
St. Thomas', All Saints' 
Tortola, St. George's 
Virgin Gorda, St. Mary's 
St. Philip's 



Guiana, 1842. — The diocese of Guiana was 
separated from Barbados and is co-extensive 
with the colony of British Guiana, extending 
from Venezuela on the west to Surinam on 
the east, having a seaboard of nearly 300 
miles. The country may be divided into 
three distinct belts: (i) The flat alluvial land 
runnmg inland 40 or 50 miles, which is under 
the cultivation of sugar, rice, cocoa, etc., and 
which is thickly populated by people of various 
nationalities. (2) Forest land running south for 
300 miles, sparsely inhabited by Indians and the 
workers on the gold and diamond fields. (3) 
Savannah lands inhabited almost entirely by 
Indians. The population is approximately esti- 
mated at 320,000, consisting of aboriginal In- 
dians, including a dozen distinct tribes and 
languages, 8,000; Portuguese, 12,000; Hin- 
doos, etc., 106,000; Chinese, 4,000; negroes, 
120,000 ; Europeans, 5,000 ; mixed races, 29,000. 
There are about 97 centres of work, and some 40 
clergy, including the bishop, with about 100 
catechists and schoolmasters. The day schools 
are about 87 in number, with 11,811 children 
on the books. There are 5,700 children in the 
Sunday schools. 

The S.P.G. began work in Guiana in 1835, 
and has given much help. The Society con- 
tributed towards the endowment fund of the 
diocese. 



Queenstown 

The Holy Trinity 

Pomeroon Missions 

North West District 

St. Peter, Leguan 

Wakenaam (East Indians) 

Essequibo Missions 

Potaro River Missions 

Rupununi Mission 
Berbice — 

All Saints' 

St. Patrick 

Port Mourant 

Skeldon 

Corentyne River 

St. Michael's 

Berbice River (East In- 
dians). 
Dutch Guiana — 

Surinam 



The S.P.G. contributes to the support of work 
at the following places : — 

Georgetown — 

Christ Church 

St. Philip (East Indian 
Mission) 
Demerara — 

St. Paul, Plaisance 

Beterverwagting. 

Buxton 

Enmore 

Cane Grove \ 
cum \ 

Mahaica Creek J 

St. Swithin, West Bank 

West Coast District 

St. Matthew, East Bank 

Demerara River Missions 

Camounie and Santa 
(aboriginal Indians) 
Essequibo — 

St. John Suddie (abori- 
ginal Indians) 

The S.P.G. helps to support a chaplain at 
Paramaribo, Surinam (Dutch Guiana). 

In a recent report the Bishop refers to the 
" boom " in rubber which is now being felt in 
his diocese. He says : " The opening up of 
the great Hinterland for gold and rubber brings 
thousands of coast people into the (aboriginal) 
Indian country . . . and it is necessary to teach 
men to remember their duty as Christians when 
away from home in the bush, and further to go 
to these aboriginal Indians and evangelise them. 
This is being done by the help of the Society's 
grant." ^ 

1 For accounts of work amongst the aboriginal Indians, 
see Mission Field, June and October, igii. 



26 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



For many years the women's department of 
S.P.G. has been asked to supply teachers for the 
schools of this diocese in Georgetown, but the 
lack of workers has prevented any assistance. 
During the year 1910 they were able to send 
out a lady who has been stationed at Rupununi. 



Clergy working in connection with S.P.G., 
23 ; also a large staff of lay agents. 
Bishops : — 

William Piercy Austin, 1842. 

William Proctor Swaby, 1893 (trans., 1899). 

Edward Archibald Parry, 1900. 



Nassau, 1861. — • The diocese consists of 
the Bahama Islands, together with the Turk's 
and Caicos group, and has a land area of 
about 4,420 square miles. The population 
according to the census of 1901 was 60,000. 
The number of mission buildings including 
churches is 95, of clergy 22, of professing 
Church people about 15,000, and of com- 
municants 5,503. There are 32 Church day 
schools, with 1,510 day scholars, besides the 
Government schools ; also 74 Sunday schools, 
with 240 teachers and 3,880 Sunday scholars. 
Three middle-grade schools, 80 scholars. Sisters 
of St. Peter's, Horbury, who are associated mis- 
sionaries of the S.P.G., conduct a high school 
for girls at Nassau, and visit amongst the 
coloured people. 

The S.P.G. contributes £500 to the fund for 
the maintenance of the clergy. The clergy are 
assisted by about 100 catechists who receive no 
remuneration. 

In 1735 the S.P.G. provided funds for the 
opening of a school in Nassau, having previously 



given a grant towards the support of a mission- 
ary there. 

The five islands assisted by the S.P.G., i.e., 
Harbour Island, Long Cay, Andros, Watling- 
cum-Rum Cay and the Turk's Islands, are spread 
over a length of 700 miles of sea. 

There are 6 clergy working in connection with 
S.P.G. Stations assisted by the S.P.G. :— 

St. Philip's, Inagua 1884 

St. David's, Long Cay .... 1903 
St. John's, Harbour Island .... 1903 
St. Christopher's, Watling .... 1905 
All SS. Andros 1869 

St. Thomas ),„,,,, , 

„ „ t Turk s Islands ... — 

St. George ) 

Bishops : — ■ 

Charles Caulfield, 1861. 

Addington Robert Peel Venables, 1863. 

Francis Alexander Randal Cramer-Roberts, 

1878. 
Edward Townson Churton, 1886. 
Henry Norris Churton, 1902. 
Wilfrid Bird Hornby, 1904 (consecrated, 

1892). 



Trinidad, 1872. — The diocese comprises the 
islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and jurisdic- 
tion over British subjects in Venezuela. It 
contains (including Venezuela) 1,868 square 
miles, and a population of 330,000, of whom 
1 10,000 are East Indians and Chinese. The East 
Indians are for the most part Hindoos or Moham- 
medans. Members of the Church of England 
number 80,000 ; communicants, 14,000. There 
are 39 clergy and 34 lay readers. 

The S.P.G., which began work here in 1836, 
gives about £'950 per annum to the diocese. 
The work done under the auspices of the 



S.P.G. in this diocese comprises the missions 
to Tobago, north coast of Trinidad, and a 
mission to East Indians in Trinidad, and help 
to the work in Venezuela. 

Canon Trotter is the resident priest at Caracas 
in Venezuela, who itinerates amongst the Angli- 
cans elsewhere also, and has, in 1910, explored 
the interior. See Mission Field for October, 
1910. 

A forward movement has lately been made in 
East Indian work, about 1,200 East Indians 
are Anglicans. 

Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : — 



PROVINCE OF THE WEST INDIES 



27 



St. Andrew's, Tobago .... 

St. Mary's and St. Paul's, Tobago 

St. Patrick's, St. David's and St. John's 

Grande Riviere "j 

Toco I N. Coast 

Sans Souci j 

Caracas, Venezuela ..... 



i»SO 
1886 



1899 



igo6 



Working in connection with S.P.G. : 5 clergy, 
a staff of catechists and teachers engaged in the 
Coolie Mission. 

Bishops : — 

Richard Rawle, 1872. 
James Thomas Hayes, 1889. 
John Francis Welsh, 1904. 



British Honduras and Central America, 
1883, — ^This diocese embraces the colony of 
British Honduras and Central America. The 
area of the colony is 7,560 square miles, and the 
coast line of the diocese is 1,700 miles. The 
population of the colony is 40,000, and that of 
Central America over 4,400,000. There are about 
2,000,000 Indians scattered throughout the in- 
terior. The diocese was formed from that of 
Jamaica in 1883. 

In 1894 the Synods of British Honduras and 
the Provincial Synod of Jamaica, w^ith the con- 
currence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the 
Bishop of London and the Bishop of the Falk- 
lands, agreed to the extension of the diocese, so 
as to be practically the bishopric of Central 
America. 

In March, 1906, the Canal Zone and that part 
of the Republic of Columbia which extends from 
the Isthmus of Panama to the Maddalena River, 
was ceded to the American Church, the parties 
to the agreement being the Archbishop of the 
West Indies, the Presiding Bishop of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church of America and Bishop 
Ormsby. 

The present (1910) staff of Church workers are 
the bishop, 2 archdeacons, 13 clergymen and 
57 licensed lay readers. The colony is divided 
into 8 mission parishes, and in the extra-colonial 
sphere there are missions at Puerto Cortez, 



and Rio Blanquito in Spanish Honduras Blue- 
fields; Rama, Corn Island and Grey Town in 
Nicaragua ; Bocas del Toro and Bocas del Toro 
Lagoon in the Republic of Panama ; Port Limon 
and its many stations and San Jose and Ger- 
mania in Costa Rica. Guatemala city with two 
stations at Virginia and Port Barrios all in the 
Republic of Guatemala. 

Each of the eight large parishes has been 
provided with a clergyman and a staff of 
helpers, mainly through the assistance of the 
S.P.G. 

There is a diocesan high school for girls in 
British Honduras. 

Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : — 

Belize, St. John's 1844 

Corozal 1894 

Stann Creek 1897 

Belize, St. Mary's 1844 

Orange Walk 1894 

Monkey River ...... — 

St. Mark's, Port Limon .... 1900 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 
the bishop, 8 clergy. 

Bishops : — 

Henry Redmayne Holme, 1891. 

George Albert Ormsby, 1893 (resigned, 

1907). 
Herbert Bury, 1908 (resigned, 191 1). 



BISHOPRICS HOLDING MISSION FROM THE SEE OF 

CANTERBURY. 



Falkland Islands, 1869. — The Falkland 
Islands are a Crown colony with a population in 
igo8 of 2,289 of whom nearly 1000 live in Stanley 
the capital, where the cathedral church is also 
situated. The bishop's jurisdiction extends over 
the Anglican congregations and missions through- 
out the south and west coasts of South America, 
in the republics of Chile and Peru, with some 
possible additions. The number of English- 
speaking people in these regions is probably at 
least 10,000. Valparaiso, where some 3,000 
British reside, is the natural centre of the work. 
The steamers of the Pacific Steam Navigation 
Company link the whole coast with the Falkland 
Islands and home. The number of clergy at 
present is thirteen, of whom five are working in 
connection with the South American Missionary 
Society. This Society has two missions to the 



Indians, i.e. the Yaghans in Tierra del Fuego 
and the Mapuches or Arancanians in Southern 
Chile, and several important chaplaincies. The 
Missions to Seamen Society has, in recent years, 
established a flourishing work at Valparaiso and 
Callao, and maintains a chaplain and two readers. 
Some progress has been made in ministering to 
small scattered British communities in the coast 
towns north of Valparaiso and in the desert 
pampa which is the seat of the nitrate industry. 
With the formation of the new see out of his old 
jurisdiction the bishop will be able to attend to 
this work far more effectively than has been 
possible in the past. 
Bishops : — 

Waite Hocken Stirling, 1869. 

Edward Francis Every, 1902. 

Laurence Frederick Devaynes Blair, 1910. 



Argentina and Eastern South America, 
191O. — This new diocese was created out of the 
former jurisdiction of the Bishop of the Falkland 
Islands and includes the Anglican Churches and 
missions in the republics of Argentina, Uruguay, 
Paraguay and parts of Brazil. Its working centre 
is Buenos Aires, whither all lines of railway and 
steamships converge, as upon the metropolis of 
a continent. St. John's Church serves as a pro- 
cathedral. The number of English - speaking 
people is probably not less than 50,000. There 
are about thirty clergy, the majority of whom are 
engaged in chaplaincy work in towns, more than a 
third being in or near Buenos Aires, but four act 
as " camp chaplains " and are constantly travel- 

(28) 



ling over vast areas in the republics of the Place 
bringing the ministrations of the Church to our 
scattered fellow countrymen. The South Ameri- 
can Missionary Society has two centres of special 
interest in this diocese (i) a remarkable educa- 
tional and evangelistic work among the poor of 
Buenos Aires, some 5,000 children attending the 
Argentine Evangelical Schools, as they are called 
(2) the Mission in the Chaco of Paraguay, a 
remote and desolate region, where the Zengua 
Indians have mostly become a Christian people. 
The Society maintains seven clergy and many lay 
workers and ladies many of whom are engaged 
in educational work. Among its agencies is an 
orphanage for the children of English-speaking 



N? X. 




Stvtions where work, supported by the S A. Missionary Society is being carried on are underlined: 
There is a Bishop of the American Church in Brazil. 



BISHOPRICS HOLDING MISSION FROM THE SEE OF CANTERBURY 



29 



parents which has met a great need. The 
Missions to Seamen Society maintain three 
chaplains. They have a large and important 
work at Buenos Aires, and another at Bahia 
Blanca where the chaplain also ministers to the 
resident British. In only two instances is help 
received from the British Government, i.e. in the 
Consular chaplaincies of Pernambuco and Monte- 
video, and upon the retirement of the present 
chaplains these grants cease. The greatest diffi- 



culties are to bring religion and education within 
the reach of our people in the vast country 
districts and smaller towns. A few Church 
schools have been established at various points 
and St. George's College, Guilmes, corresponds 
in all ways to a first-class English school under 
Church management. 

Bishop : — 

Edward Francis Every, 1910 (Cons. 1902). 



AFRICA. 

THE GROWTH OF THE COLONIAL EPISCOPATE. 

PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA. 

Capetown, 
1847. 



Grahamstown, 

1853- 

I 

George, 

1911. 



Natal, 
1853- 



St. Helena, 
1859. 



Bloemfontein, 
1863. 



Zululand, 
1870. 



St. John's, 
1873- 



Pretoria, Mashonaland, Lebombo, Kimberley and Kuruman, 
1878. 1891. 1892. 1911. 



Sierra Leone, 

1852. 
Mauritius, 
1854. 



INDEPENDENT BISHOPRICS. 

Zanzibar and East Africa, 
1861. 

I 
Nyasaland, 

1892. 
W. Equatorial Africa (formerly Niger), | 

1864. Northern Rhodesia, Uganda (formerly E. Equatorial Africa), 

Madagascar, | 1910. 1884. 

1874. Accra (Gold Coast), | 

1909. Mombasa, 

1898. 



The Society's entrance into the African field 
was due to the zeal of one of its early mission- 
aries in America — the Rev. Thomas Thompson. 
Having resigned a Fellowship at Christ's College, 
Cambridge, in order to become a missionary in 
the cause of Christ, and having done great ser- 
vice for over five years (1745-50) by his labours 
in New Jersey, Mr. Thompson devoted himself 
to work at Cape Coast Castle on the Gold Coast 
from 1752 till 1756 when, broken in health, he 
returned to England. 



In the meantime (1754) he had sent to 
England three negro boys to be trained at the 
Society's expense as missionaries to their coun- 
trymen. Two died, but the survivor, Philip 
Quaque, became the first of any non-European 
race (at least since the Reformation) to receive 
ordination in the Anglican Communion, return- 
ing to the Gold Coast in 1765, and labouring 
there until his death in 1816. The mission was 
discontinued in 1824. In commemoration of the 
Society's third jubilee (185 1) the West Indian 



(30) 



N9XI. 




The territory coloured pink is not included in any Anglican Diocese. 



AFRICA 



31 



Church founded in 1855 a mission on the Rio 
Pongo, West Africa, which is still doing ex- 
cellent work, the Society aiding both in its 
foundation and its subsequent maintenance. 
Since 1890 the Society has helped to support an 
English chaplain at St. Vincent, Cape de Verde 
Islands. It has now restarted its long-discon- 
tinued work in the Gold Coast Colony, which 
was made a separate diocese in 1909 under the 
title of Accra (see p. 49). 

In South Africa the Society began its labours 
at the Cape in iSzi, the western division being 
occupied in that year and the eastern division 
in 1830. Little progress was made until the 
arrival of Robert Gray (consecrated Bishop of 
Capetown in 1847), under whom, from 1847 to 

1872, and subsequently, the work spread with un- 
exampled rapidity. 

Natal was occupied in 1849, the Orange River 
district in 1850, Kaffraria in 1855, Zululand in 
1859, the Transvaal in 1864, Griqualand West 
in 1870, Swaziland in 187 1, Bechuanaland in 

1873, Basutoland in 1875, Mashonaland in 1890, 



Matabeleland in 1893, Portuguese South-East 
Africa (Delagoa Bay and district) in 1894, and 
Tongaland in 1895. 

The other divisions of the Society's African 
field are Northern Africa, where a few English 
chaplains have been occasionally assisted since 
1861 ; and the islands of The Seychelles (occu- 
pied in 1832), Mauritius (1836), St. Helena 
(1847), Tristan d'Acunha (1851), and Mada- 
gascar (1864). 

During the period 1752-1910 the Society ex- 
pended £'1,216,640 and employed 700 ordained 
missionaries in Africa. At the present time its 
work there is being carried on in 14 dioceses, its 
total annual expenditure being £38,158 and the 
number of its missionaries 328 (including 96 
natives'). 

Population (census 1911) — The Union of 
South Africa, viz., the Cape of Good Hope, 
Natal, Transvaal and the Orange Free State, 
has a total population of 5,958,499, made up as 
follows: native, 4,061,082; all other coloured 
races, 619,392; white, 1,278,025. 



PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA. 



Capetown. 1847. — This diocese embraces 
the western portion of the colony of the Cape ot 
Good Hope, and covers an area of 100,000 square 
miles. It is the Metrop>olitical See of the Pro- 
vince of South Africa, and was founded in 1847, 
being then the only diocese in South Africa, and 
embracing the whole of the present province. 
The population of this part of Cape Colony con- 
sisted in 1904 of 310,361 Europeans and 296,522 
others. The number of Church people in the 
diocese of Capetown alone is over 100,000. The 
work may be classed under two heads : that among 
European residents and sojourners, and that 
among the natives of the country, Hottentots, 
Kaffirs, Damaras, Basutos, Mantatees, and, 
the mixed races, who are scattered over every 
part of the diocese. There were at the 1901 
census 24,548 heathen in this diocese, as well 
as 15,119 Jews, and 18,595 Mohammedans, 
mostly Malays, descendants of slaves brought 
from Batavia more than a century ago, who 
form an important and influential element in 
the population. The white population in the 
country districts is in the main Dutch, and the 
land is almost entirely owned by members of 
the Dutch Reformed Church. 

A special Mission to natives was started in 
Capetown by the Cowley Fathers in 1884. The 
work included the chaplaincy in connection with 
the houses and work of the All Saints' Sisters 
of the Poor in Capetown, a special work directed 
to the evangelisation of the native men of the 
Bantu races sojourning as labourers in Capetown 
and its neighbourhood, and a mission work by 
which to reach the Mohammedans (about 11,000 



in number) of Capetown known as Malays, the 
race name of the people who first brought that 
religion to South Africa. St. Columba's Home 
for native labourers affords accommodation for 
70 natives who make it their home during their 
stay in Capetown. In March, 1901, 7,000 natives 
working in Capetown were hastily removed to 
the location at Maitland on the breaking out of 
the plague. The S.P.G. contributed ;f 1,000 for 
work amongst these. In 1896 a medical mission 
to women with a dispensary was opened under 
a lady doctor for the poorer Malays. 

There are 74 churches, 128 school chapels 
and mission rooms, and 102 Church schools. 
The clergy number 98, and there is a large staff 
of catechists. The communicants of the diocese 
number 26,451. The average attendance at Sun- 
day school is 7,274. 

In 1911 the Archdeaconry of George, together 
with certain parishes taken from the diocese of 
Grahamstown, were formed into a new diocese 
under the title of George. 

The Diocesan College at Rondebosch was founded 
by Bishop Gray in 1849 for the purpose of pro- 
viding higher education on Church principles. 
In 1891 the College was incorporated by Act of 
Parliament. In accordance with the terms of 
the Act it is intended " to afford facilities to 
youths of all classes for the prosecution of higher 
or professional studies, and for qualifying them- 
selves for the examinations prescribed or to be 
prescribed, by the University of the Cape of Good 
Hope ". In 1886 the St. Saviour's Grammar 
School, Claremont, was affiliated to the College 
under the name of the Diocesan College School. 



(32) 



o- 




PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA 



33 



In 1901 the school was transferred to the new 
buildings adjacent to the College at Rondebosch. 
The number of students in the college depart- 
ment is 135, of whom many attend the higher 
classes beyond matriculation. In the school de- 
partment there are 150 boys. The school is 
designed to provide a liberal education on Eng- 
lish public school lines in accordance with the 
principles of the English Church. Residential 
accommodation exists for 120 boarders in the 
college and school combined. A Rhodes' 
scholarship of ;f 300 is awarded annually, tenable 
at Oxford University. 

The native College at Zonnebloem was the outcome 
of Bishop Gray's visit to the native districts in 
1857. The first pupils, sons of the Basuto chief 
Moshesh, were received at Bishopscourt in 1858. 
Zonnebloem Estate was purchased in i860. 
The trust deed of the estate provides for the 
education of the sons of native chiefs and other 
members of the Basuto race as well as children 
of mixed race and poorer white children who 
are to receive " religious instruction and in- 
dustrial training". All Students irrespective of 
race or position are required to spend two hours 
daily in industrial work, chiefly printing, car- 
pentry and gardening. There are at present in 
the Collegfe over 250 students, 50 of whom are 
boarders. The S.P.G. has made grants out of 
its Bicentenary Fund towards the building and 
equipment of the Kaffir Mission at Uitvlugt, and 
has given £1,000 towards the enlargement and 
remodelling of the Zonnebloem College. 



The S.P.G. has been connected with Capetown 
since 1820, and has worked in the diocese since 
the foundation of the see. 

The Cowley Fathers have a mission in Cape- 
town, and the All Saints' Sisters have charge of 
St. Cyprian's High School for Girls, St. Michael's 
Home for Orphan and Destitute Children, and 
St. Hilda's School for European Children of the 
Middle Class, and of a House of Mercy at Lelie- 
bloem. 

Clergy working in connection with vS.P.G. : 
European clergy, 27; there is also a staff 
of catechists and native workers. Women 
Workers 2. 

The S.P.G. helps to support work at the 
following stations : — 



Abbotsdale 

Bredasdorp 

Caledon 

Ceres 

Constantia 

D urban vi lie 

George, St. Paul's 

Maitland 

Newlands 

O'okiep 



Paarl, Upper 
,, Lower 
Port NoUoth 
Robertson 
Springbokfontein 
Stellenbosch 
Wellington 
Woodstock 
Zonnebloem College 



Bishops : — 

Robert Gray, 1847. 

William West Jones, Bishop, 1874; Arch- 
bishop, 1897. 

Alan George Sumner Gibson, 
Coadjutor, 1894; resigned, 1906. 
William Mouat Cameron, Coad- 
jutor, 1906. 
William Marlborough Carter, 1909. 



34 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



GRAHAMSTOWN. 



Grahamstown, 1853. — This diocese con- 
sists of the eastern part of Cape Colony, and 
contains an area of 75,000 square miles, with an 
English-speaking population of 50,000, other than 
English-speaking 500,000 (1891 census). There 
are go European and 8 native clergy. The 
work of the diocese is of a two-fold character. 
In the native reserves the clergy devote them- 
selves almost exclusively to the conversion 
of the heathen and the building up of a native 
church. In the towns and villages, and among 
the outlying farmers in the country districts, 
the usual work of the Church is carried on. 
Owing to the large area of the diocese, and 
its sparsely populated parishes, the clergy labour 
under great difficulties in bringing the influence 
of the Church to bear upon many of the people. 
Much of the work is of an itinerant character. 
The Church population is 42,135; communi- 
cants, 11,633. The S.P.G. contributes towards 
the native mission work of the diocese. Grants 
have been made by the trustees of the Marriott 
Bequest Fund to the amount of over ;£'6,5oo ; 
£5,000 of this amount was assigned to the training 
institutions at Grahamstown and St. Matthew's, 
Keiskama Hoek. There are a large number of 
out-stations in the native districts, where services 
are held by catechists and lay readers. These 
are periodically visited by missionaries. 

Educational work both for natives and Euro- 
peans is a prominent feature of the diocese. In 
Grahamstown itself there are three institutions, 
which are doing a great work not only for the 
diocese, but for the province at large. (i) St. 
Andrew's College, founded by Bishop Armstrong, 
is worked on English public school lines. (2) 



The diocesan school for girls gives an education 
on the lines of an English High School. (3) 
The training school for mistresses at St. Peter's, 
under the charge of the Sisters of the Community 
of the Resurrection, is the only Church institu- 
tion of the kind in the colony. The training 
school for natives at St. Matthew's, Keiskama 
Hoek has much increased in numbers during the 
past few years. There are 324 pupils, of whom 
about 190 are boarders. 

In August, 1900, the bishops of the province, 
at a synod held in Grahamstown, made arrange- 
ments to receive into communion with the 
Church the members of the Ethiopian body, 
who, through their leader, Mr. Dwan^, had ap- 
proached the archbishop on the subject. At 
Advent, 1900, Mr. Dwan^ was ordained deacon 
by the Bishop of Grahamstown. There are now 
four native deacons and seven catechists belong- 
ing to the Order. Dr. Cameron, the Coadjutor- 
Bishop of Capetown, is now the acting Provincial 
of the Ethiopian Order. The Ethiopian Order 
is entirely distinct from the Ethiopian Movement, 
which is a political rather than a religious or- 
ganisation. 

The S.P.G. began work in this diocese in 1853. 

In 191 1, the new diocese of George was formed, 
consisting of the Archdeaconry of George, taken 
out of the diocese of Capetown, and the parishes 
of Graaff Reinet (including Aberdeen), Jansenville 
(including Steytlerville) and that part of the 
parish of Richmond which lies within the Civil 
District of Murraysburg, out of the diocese of 
Grahamstown. 

The following stations are assisted by 
S.P.G. :— 



N9 XllI . 



25 



ze 



30 



3/ 



Houtkraah 
BehkiHalt 



Kolberg 
Honeynestk/ooi 
ff<Blabas y •Enslin 
.JhkrnHHI EnJn'^^f^" 



Jacobs lal 



_EaamiBad 



^Belmont ^^^^^ , \^\^^^^JMm^ 



JlTdBarteliu 



fdybi 



mUerea " Machacha 



ommisste) 



^i 



Witteputs I , <_ r, I 



Hraanhli 



, Do^mfllaats 
£3 [L E 



Hoksfontem 
Blaauwh 



KalkButt 
' Poffimtein ^ 

ilipstown . -J- / /yj \ 



Jietfatrtein 

laaibosG 



HoyxsPorri&aii 
f^tJ^f^mfefia/!} 



'pfontein 
ding 



Hanover ( Wildfir 

Naauw ^oortJunc!{ 
Spiankop 

Hictjmond 



' Dassiefyrrtein B^ng ai 
Meffbofeinl ^iddelburg 



Murray. 



^arlton 



^Oliveb^r^ 



ifeynsbvrg 



aleki 



burq^-^-.^^^ ^ 
luiirponrf ,,, 

I 



cW,, i, '\darod^ 



IZltzik 



'hi 



GFaafe^einet . ^ 

Rouvjervjlle\ Pefersbu/iK 
jAdendo/p^l 

'Charlwopd 



^ ibe. \deen ^Vj^ '^^°"'~'n 



tLajidsf 



axony 
Hjjpplaat Jun^ 

mStewarf 
Hanke 



^-C^^,f/umB 



xrwsA 



<Zaurfonfein 



> Mortimeri 

\ ywageB^liek W[epna^ 
lornaroiv. 



•ston 



^ddersDorq^ 



laseru ^ Thaba Bosigo 
"""'" >StMicfi3e/s 

■onstanii^StJosepk^ 'T% 
'atriena /^ 



burg 



Helvetia^ 






Smitbfield 

^ouxifille 



ilandOr. 



Surgh 



mPatriotsK w 



[mhop^ 



'Cyphergatx^jden 
Jushmansmm 

Wildscb^Sa 



hrkastai 



Jame; 

'Rom 

fu'r,f.^"-S^^Dof3fe 



'terkstroom 



rena f ^ 

' Mohatfesmk 



Befbesda I 



mthati 
\eBih^ Falls 



'f/iokuana j* 
PackOM 



^eha's 



^ferksp. 



, rBensonvm 

•nerschel 



^W-.! 



Gkn/^lmoh 



IFIetchemh 



T 
town 



Clifford 



:bt 



GafbsD 



bene 



"^ogeikruisNin^flfle^ 
Sprin^/ei 6f/im< 

PostRelief i 5ii/ 



Hertzpi 



oc iwualeton\ 



Lonq 



Fiih 



I^JrmsVilla 
2^ • 



KareJgb 



Zuarben 

/fl/ceha: 

tnon Ssw"^ 

rath 



mdtiaask,xjf / , 
bsthdsdQrd^T"'P^J.^ 



^ort Elizabeth 



$TFRACIS 
BAY 



--^■pr-^CHecTFe 
•> ('/ax.. 



"^Ss, 



e/ffif 



Ifh 



,f*Seyt^ur Sfi^er/t^r^yVVin 
ieaale •PeriK^'^NIadean 



^pran^emve 'Jihf(jW/l/idi 



•Riebeck FfBrom 

^j^^^:;i_ 'Bothasi 

' Granamstown 
Sidbury ' 



, AleKdndrk , „ - ,. 
ssfer • ^tPTbeopoli^ 

T.Padrone 
COA B. 



eng, 
hthur g C^a \^ ^ 

^'w;? -ville ^<-JkatT^'a ^ 
\teri Wodehoust 



Ugie 



'^ 



fiubenxa'(a^ 



30 



31 



3oloi^a 



Vlam 



'mbemliP^ 



lommba , 
Hplaf ^^"^^ 
Ba^ersora' IS] ' 



So, 



Berlin 
Breidbach' Jl^tZ 



't'reakM""' ' 



CT/i 



il *Pedi 
Newca& 



fndale 
Hamburg 



WbiK 
Wfred 



'mlafa 



Idutvwa ^ ^ 
'Blythes^d 






lainton^j/lor, gp 



ridge 

dsrLondon 



32 



33 



D/OGESE OF GRAHAMSTOWN. 



10 20 30 40 SO 



JS' 



too 



Scale of Miles. 



34 



24 



28 



Places at which work assisted by the 6. P. G. is being carried on are under Jin ed. 



rROVlNfl'; 0\- SOUTH AFRICA 



35 



East London \\c>i 

St. Matthew's College, Kcislv.ima Hoek 

Hun.ansdorp ... 

St. Stephen's, Port Elizabeth 

St. James', Peddie .... 

St. Andrew's, Queenstown . 

St. Mich.iers, Herschel 

Itinerary Ch.\pl.vin, Order of Ethiopia . 

Cradock ...... 

Holy Trinity, Fort Beaufort 

St. Luke's, with St. John's Gwaba and St 

Philip's, East London 
Macubeni, Lady Frere 
St. PhiHp's, Grahamstown . 
St. Peter's and St. John Baptist, Lady Frere 
St. Matthew's, Keiskama Hoek . 



1859 
igoi 

iS.Sy 
1878 
1870 
1862 
1876 
1904 
1856 
1865 

1854 
1879 
i860 
1856 
1855 



Clergy working in connection with S.P.G 
European 14, native clergy, 9. There is also 



stall of catechists and school teachers. One 
Woman Worker. 

All the native clergy are supported entirely by 
the " Diocesan Native Ministry Fund ". 

European Missionaries . . . . .14 
Native Missionaries ..... 9 
European Clergy who have Parochial Native \ 

/ 21 



Missions 



44 



Bishops : — 

John Armstrong, 1853. 

Henry Cotterill, 1856. 

Nathaniel James Merriman, 1871. 

Allan Becher Webb, 1883; consecrated, 
, : 1870. 

a Charles Edward Cornish, 1899. 



36 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



NATAL. 



Natal, 1854. — This diocese comprises the 
greater part of the colony of Natal. It is 
bounded on the north by Zululand and the 
Transvaal, on the south by Pondoland and East 
Griqualand, on the east by the Indian Ocean, 
and on the west by Basutoland and the Orange 
Free State. The diocese has an area of 20,851 
square miles, with a population estimated at 
797,093, of which 86,264 ^rs English-speaking, 
100,356 Indians, 607,473 natives, and 6,000 of 
mixed race. 

The members of the Church number about 
22,000, of whom 6,552 are communicants. 
There are 27 parishes, 201 churches and mission 
rooms, and 49 English clergy, 6 native 3 Indian 
and 45 licensed lay readers. In 19 10 there were 
2,840 children in Sunday schools. 

Education. — Michaelhouse diocesan school for 
boys, Balgoivan. Founded in 1896 as a private 
school in Maritzburg, it was moved to Bal- 
gowan and reorganised as a diocesan school on 
the lines of an English public school in 1898. 
The new buildings were opened in 1901. There 
are at present over 60 scholars. 

5/. Anne's diocesan College for girls, Maritzburg, 
was opened after being rebuilt a few miles outside 
Maritzburg in 1 904. It has at present 80 scholars. 

St. Alban's native Training College, Estcourt, is 
intended for training native clergy, catechists 
and teachers. 

The Sisterhood of St. John the Divine at Maritz- 
burg have charge of St. John's High School for 
Girls at Maritzburg and a high school for girls at 



Durban. There is a boarding school for native 
boys at Riverdale, and one for native girls at 
Enhlonhlweni. 

There is a training College for Indian catechists 
and teachers at Sydenham, and a training College 
for native women teachers at Enhlonhlweni. 

In the Indian Mission in 1910 there were 1,204 
children being educated in the day schools, 189 
in the Sunday schools; 20 teachers and 12 cate- 
chists being trained. 

The S.P.G. has worked in this diocese since 
1853. A school which has been opened at 
Weenen will, it is hoped, supply the great want 
of native Christian teachers in the diocese. 

Stations assisted by the S.P.G. 



Dundee 

Durban, St. Faith's Native 

Mission 
Durban, St. Aidan's Indian 

Mission 
Estcourt 
High Flats 
Kar kloof 
Ladysmith 
Lower Umgeni 



Maritzburg, St. Mark's Na- 
tive Mission 

Maritzburg, St. Paul's Indian 
Mission 

Newcastle 

Pinetown 

Polela 

Springvale 

Umzimkulwana 

Verulam 



Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 
17 European and 7 native clergy. 

There are 9 Women Workers, one of whom is 
a doctor in connection with the S.P.G. — at the 
Indian Mission, Sydenham, Durban, 3 ; Maritz- 
burg, 3 ; and Enhlonhlweni, 3. 

Bishops : — 

John William Colenso, 1853. 
William Kenneth Macrorie, 1869. 
Arthur Hamilton Baynes, 1893. 
Frederick Samuel Baines, 1901. 



.N9:?av. 




The places underlined are those where missionary or colonial church work is being carried on. 



PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA 



37 



BLOEMFONTEIN. 



Bloemfontein, 1863. — This diocese con- 
sists of the Orange Free State, and Basutoland. 
Population (in 1904) : Orange Free State, 
387,315; Basutoland, 348,000. In 1911, Bechu- 
analand and Griqualand West which were 
included in the diocese of Bloemfontein formed 
the new diocese of Kimberley and Kuruman. 

There are 72 clergy and about 12,500 com- 
municants. 

The following are the diocesan institutions : 
Mission Brotherhood of Society of the Sacred 
Mission at St. Augustine's, Modderpoort ; 
Sisterhood of St. Michael and All Angels, 
Bloemfontein. There is also at Kimberley a 
Church high school for girls founded by the 
St. Michael's Sisterhood. At Maseru is St. 
Catherine's industrial native girls' school. 

The town of Bloemfontein contains (191 1) a 
population of 26,241 Europeans and 30,431 
natives. 

The sub-division of the diocese, by which two 
new dioceses will be formed viz., Kirriberley and 
Basutoland, which was decided upon in 1908, has 
not yet been carried out owing to the funds 
needed for endowments, etc., not having been 
fully raised. A step, however, in this direction 
has been taken by the appointment of an Assist- 
ant Bishop in the person of the Venerable Arch- 
deacon Balfour, who was consecrated in Cape 
Town Cathedral on i January, 1911. 

Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : — 



Jeyateyareng 

Orange Free State 

St. Patrick's, Bloemfontein 

Jagersfontein 

Brandfort 

Thaba Nchu 



Basutoland 

Sekubu 

Tsikoane 

Masite 

Mohales Hoek 

Mafeteng 

St. Saviour's (Leribe) 

The S.P.G. work in this diocese began in 
1850. In 1906 its grant for native missions 
was £i,TS°j ^"'^ ^°^ itinerating work amongst 
Europeans £300. 



Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 
European, 21, Native, 3. 

There are 8 Women Workers in connection 
with the S.P.G. — 6 at Maseru, i at Bloem- 
fontein, and I at Mafeteng. 

The population of the Orange Free State in 
191 1 was 526,906, consisting of 175,435 Euro- 
peans and339,8ii natives; all other coloured races 
11,660. 

The following tables show the number of 
native Christians connected with the principal 
missionary societies which are at work in the 
Orange Free State : — 



Wesleyan .... 
Dutch Reformed 


51.570 
21,272 


Anglican 

Lutheran ..... 
American methodist episcopal 
Paris Mission .... 


14,782 
5.030 
3.747 
3.197 


Roman Catholic 


1.093 


Presbyterian .... 


704 




101,395 


Natives with no religion . 123,258. 


Christians of mixed blood. 




Dutch Reformed 


2,572 


Anglican 

Lutheran 


1,887 
1,103 


American methodist episcopal 
Paris Mission .... 


361 
275 


Wesleyan .... 
Roman Catholic . ... 


4.163 
"5 


Presbyterian .... 


89 




10,565 



Mixed races with no religion . 4,258. 

. Bishops : — 

Edward Twells, 1863. 

Allan Becher Webb, consecrated 1870 (tr. 

1883). 
George Wyndham Hamilton Knight-Bruce, 

1886 (tr. 1891). 
John Wale Hicks, 1892. 
Arthur Chandler, 1902. 

Assistant Bishop : — 

Francis Richard Townley Balfour, 191 1. 



38 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



ZULULAND. 



Zululand, 1870. — This is largely a missionary 
diocese and was founded in 1870 in memory of 
the late Bishop Mackenzie. It embraces Zulu- 
land, Tongaland, Swaziland, The Vryheid, 
Utrecht, Piet Retief, districts of Natal and so 
much of the districts of Wakkerstroom and 
Ermelo as lie to the east of the watershed of 
the Drakensberg mountains. The population 
of the first three countries consists chiefly of 
natives. The other parts of the diocese were in 
the Transvaal, but have been annexed to the 
colony of Natal, and are inhabited mainly by 
Dutch Boers. Population about 360,000 natives 
and about 3,000 Europeans. 

The Zulus came into prominence about the 
year 1829, under Chaka, who conquered various 
other tribes, incorporating them into the Zulu 
nation ; his successors, Dingaan, Panda and 
Cetshwayo, welded them still more into one 
nation, but many fled to Natal. Cetshwayo was 
conquered by the British in 1879. At the present 
time in Zululand itself and parts adjacent, Vry- 
heid, etc., there are calculated to be about 200,000. 
They live in kraals, all over the country, and 
most of the work of looking after the gardens, 
cattle and goats is done by the women and boys. 
The men plough and weed and manage the 
kraals, or go for periods to the towns to work. 
Some are employed as native police. Their re- 
ligion is mere superstition, but it enters into 
nearly every action of their lives ; a fear of the 
Amadhlozi, or spirits of their ancestors, a belief 
in charms and witchcraft. Polygamy is uni- 
versal ; no man or woman remains single, with 
very rare exceptions. Excessive beer drinking, 
hemp smoking and immorality of certain kinds 
are their chief vices. They have many virtues : 



courage, patience, endurance, honesty and polite- 
ness. 

The Tongas are much the same as the Zulus, 
although they mutually despise one another. 
Living on the coast has brought them to some 
extent in longer contact with civilisation, and 
they have more enterprise. Their language is 
a different one from that of the Zulus, which 
however they understand and speak equally well. 
The country lies very low and is unhealthy. The 
Swazis are also much the same as the Zulus, 
though perhaps not so brave a people. They 
have a Queen of their own. Their country has 
since 1870 been under the suzerainty of Great 
Britain, but governed by the Boers. Now it is a 
Crown Colony. There are about 85,000 Swazis. 
Their language is slightly different from the Zulu. 

The customs and religion of Tongas and Swazis 
are much the same as those of the Zulus. 

In the diocese there are eighteen principal 
centres of work, and in connection with most of 
these there are several out-stations. Included 
are several townships, chiefly small. In Eshowe, 
Melmoth, Vryheid, Utrecht and Mbabane, there 
are resident priests, who minister to Europeans 
and natives. There are 32 clergy, of whom 13 
are native, and about 225 lay workers, of whom 
197 are native. 

At Isandhlwana there is a training college for 
native teachers founded by Bishop McKenzie. 
There are about 30 young men and boys. The 
buildings consist of the Church of St. Vincent, 
erected in memory of those who fell at Isandhl- 
wana in 1879 ; the mission-house, a large build- 
ing with dining-room for scholars ; a large school 
built chiefly out of the S.P.G. Marriott Bequest 
Fund in 1902 ; a House of rest for European 



N? XYl. 



25 



26 



27 



30 



OUT STATIONS 



1 Enkande 

2 Umdunyaie 

3 KnamPinke 
4- KivaOukuya 
SEncome 

6 Blood River 
1 KnaHlom'isa 
S Emhkngvifane 
dMafi'fleng 
10 Kyva. Mayina 
orSfAqathct 



y 



11 Nondntni *"<?*' 

12 HIcizakazi 
15 emayoyo Lidenbury 



3/ 



t N 



32 



MTAfK. trson 



14 Ibabanan^ 
e AmaliHensika^i 
16 Inkandla 
nindulindl 
ISMelmoth 



MauchBeni 
873.0 ^ 



\Spih. 



cJl — ^^ ^^ 
19 Emakayanen'i ^"^ ' 

tlamishoak Sfa.^^ .- 



D / 






\?-^ 



>" 



V 





^arohna 



j^msigrdofv ^fm 



S^^i<iiE^apel 



. SKO 



' '^rJ..C/,rissie 
R M^ E" L O 

^ . /rrn /ii lit 



. Ma/iusan- 




Mt/nUanyeti 



LotlQsKop 

• sooo ^ ' 



hamo'^onqa 



\es^^}^Sft^lalseneSl 
Avoca ^-ry!' 

--•->? ( ^akassaj iJ 



4/ 

ma-h Palrt 



^ 



JanJoub^ 








/ Amsterdam 



Komafi 
tS/e) 

Adcock -'Erasers 

'iyi\n* /!<ma\ • Bremkrsdari 

\ n 

Osutu 



nbelosi 




»> 



l^ol Fonfein 

— fer 



^ 




^ .DrieFonfeinfyi^ 

^iuA £nkmS\^ \Lbenezef 
Wakherstroom ^i^bai 

ifeSteSw S4,:. 

ngsNek 
ifrespecf 




^ Si Kooiiqsberq 







HIauk 



A 





In^a^ane. 








OF 





, An-tiolta 



)tokolo 



^ 



V 



^o/ 



tiningma Maddmo] 

jShikow'tifye 



4n 



^oamba 

■ V 




25 



MahllcK. _ ICp 

LourerJcn Marq iiaK^ 5* *^ 

j9? 



^•ia/^/o 




flamingo/ 



Clnhcika 
hnaka i. 



26 



i:.St''nana 



dhla 




'LeeumNek , ^-, - 
Inhlasalyt / SStli el 



NO, 



'bo/nbo 



'Not\ga 



OvndeejiA^ 







27 



wana B. 



■3bor 



JandiLga'ijte „., j„ 



a 



^dy\rnj+h;^^"^i^-\ 



luderii 



,<f 



( 



,'£kamt3. 



Is 



5" V^g —gff'/t'griw'' ^ 

• ■ ,71 'Cfaianeiii • ' S^a 

»K' , '■^Z "''l''°(e/l»tsie\ kambe. l/n^njamhi'l! . , S* " 

Mlinholm\ / j) >. \ -Km, 



' JJmkalumba flhmbtini' 
^OOSMvdenf 




fEmlala 






Rietriti 
".Wesioa / 




\Ft£ytly„ 






^M^LOS 



Eshowe 









\^/sflc/c/a B ay 

%i-} C.St Lucia 



28 



/Richards Bay 

^imjhlovu 

DIOCESE OF ZULU LAND 



23 



Scale oF Miles. 



33 



Mission Stations are underlined. 



PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA 



39 



workers, and other buildings. There is a garden 
cultivated by the scholars, who work in it and 
their own gardens every day after school hours. 
The college is in receipt of a small Government 
grant, and the work is carried up to the sixth 
standard. Catechists as well as teachers are 
trained here. 

Sf. Augustine's (near Rorke's Drift). There 
is a great work here. Archdeacon Johnson has 
32 out-stations, which he has gradually spread in 
a network over the surrounding country. At 
each of these stations is a catechist, and, at 
some, teachers as well, with Sunday and daily 
services and schools; and also 72 additional 
centres for preaching on Sundays. Altogether 
there are employed, paid and unpaid, 105 cate- 
chists, teachers and evangelists. The out-stations 
are periodically visited for the administration of 
the Sacraments and general examination and 
supervision ; and every quarter a meeting takes 
place at the archdeacon's house of all the cate- 
chists for consultation on work. He has built, 
almost entirely by native labour, a very large 
church, conspicuous over the veldt for many 
miles, capable of holding 2,000 people. 

The first missionary of the Church to begin 
work in Zululand was the Rev. R. Robertson, 
who, under the inspiration of Bishop Colenso 
and aided by the S.P.G., penetrated the country in 
i860, and established himself with other helpers 
at Kwa Magwaza, in the days of King Panda. 
Later on a station was also opened in Swaziland, 
near the river Usutu. After the death of Bishop 
Charles Mackenzie, of Central Africa, in 1862, Mr. 
Robertson's work was reinforced by the founding 
of a Mackenzie Memorial Mission to Zululand. 
In 1870 Bishop Wilkinson was consecrated first 



Bishop of Zululand. He resigned in 1875. The 
second bishop, Douglas McKenzie, established 
the work and extended it in various directions. 
He began his work at Isandhlwana in 1880, 
where Mr. C. Johnson (now archdeacon) had 
already set up a station after the memorable 
battle there on 22nd January, 1879. Bishop 
McKenzie died at his post in 1890 at Isandhlwana. 
Bishop Carter succeeded him and in every direc- 
tion the work grew under his rule. During his 
episcopate the country of Zululand and Tonga- 
land passed from under the British Government 
to that of Natal. He resigned his post in 1903 
after the conclusion of the Boer war, being elected 
to the diocese of Pretoria. The clergy and laity 
of the diocese chose one of their number, the 
present Bishop Vyvyan, whose headquarters are 
at Vryheid, to succeed him. 

The S.P.G. gives a grant of £1,850 a year to 
this diocese. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 
European clergy 19, native clergy 7, woman 
worker i, with a staff of native workers. 

Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : — 



Annesdale 
Emkindini 
Endhlozana 
Enkonjene 
Eshowe 
Etalaneni 
Ingwavuma 
Country) 
Inhlwati 
Isandhlwana 



(Samba na's 



Kambula 

Kwa Magwaza 

Mbabane 

Nondweni, etc. 

Nongoma 

St. Augustine's 

Usutu, Swaziland 

Utrecht 

Vryheid 



Bishops : — 

Thomas Edward Wilkinson, 1870 (resigned 

1876). 
Douglas McKenzie, 1880. 
William Marlborough Carter, 1891 (tr. 1902). 
Wilmot Lushington Vyvyan, 1903. 



40 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



ST. JOHN'S, KAFFRARIA. 



St. John's, KafTraria, 1873. — Missions had 
been begun before this time from the dioceses 
of Grahamstown and Maritzburg. The dio- 
cese comprises the territories of the Transkei ; 
Fingoland, Tembuland, Griqualand East and 
Pondoland. Population (191 1) : Natives (Bantu), 
888,460; Europeans, 19,666; Hottentots and 
Griquas, about 5,000. There is but little immigra- 
tion from England. The natives are all peasants, 
engaged in agriculture and stock-breeding ; they 
are acute reasoners, law-abiding and thrifty. The 
Christian natives are distinctly more progressive 
than the heathen, are on the side of law and 
order and are desirous of education. The Pondos 
have distinctive customs and dialect. They 
occupy the eastern district lying between the 
Umzimkulu and the Umtata Rivers and are 
quite distinct from the Pondomisi tribe. The 
Griquas are a mixed race descended from 
the Boers and their Hottentot slaves. In Gri- 
qualand East a number of Basutos are found. 
The Fingoes are a wandering race who are con- 
stantly removing from one district to another. 
Pondoland was annexed by the British Govern- 
ment in 1894, with the consent both of the people 
and of the chiefs. Its annexation was hastened 
by the increasing hold which witchcraft had 
gained in the country and the consequent inse- 
curity of life and property. Missionary work was 
started in Western Pondoland in 1892, and soon 
afterwards was definitely established there. 

The diocese is divided into 2 archdeaconries 
and 19 parishes, the latter containing over 400 
mission stations, many of these having each 
its own chapel, day school and staff of native 
workers. 



There are {1910) 38,242 Church members 
and 13,648 communicants; 1,372 confirmations. 
New mission work is being begun in Pondoland, 
Eastern and Western, and on the borders of the 
Drakensberg among the Basuto. There are 57 
clergy, of whom 23 are natives ; 360 native 
catechists and teachers and 3 women workers. 

There is a mission school and college for 
natives at Umtata. The college (St. John's) 
originally begun by Bishop Callaway has 
been enlarged as a " Callaway Memorial ". 
There are about 172 boys in attendance, 100 of 
whom are boarders. The theological college has 
now become a separate institution, known as 
St. Bede's, and has 11 students supported by 
S.P.C.K. There is also an industrial mission at 
Umtata. At Engcobo is All Saints' native girls 
training school. 

There are European girls' schools (Church) at 
Umtata and Cala. The education of the natives 
is greatly assisted by generous grants given by 
the Union Government annually. 

At St. Cuthbert's Mission, Tsolo, the work is 
carried on under the supervision of the clergy of 
the S.S.J.E. Here there is an industrial mission, 
the boys are taught carpentry, and the girls 
weaving ; the weaving school has been highly 
successful in its results. 

The work carried on at St. Cuthbert's Hospital 
continues to be most beneficial, not only to the 
bodies of the people but also on account of the 
influence which it indirectly gives to the Church. 
There is a resident medical missionary, and the 
nursing staff is supplied and supported by the 
Wantage Sisters. The Society for Promoting 
Christian Knowledge gives an annual grant. 



N9XVn. 




<o 










ytlliotda/f 










m-s. 



J ^«*S><H 



Cgaot/ 'Ngxol-l/ana 















^S /^t/tt/¥Vf ^ -"^ -^ 




Mazeppa 



^MQuqif 









DIOCESE . OF 

ST JOHNS 

KAFFRARIA 



IS 10 iS id 



l.rni, J'H,icS^^_ 






^;>^ 




[lis f -^"S •tM^i^;^y*^^#»jir_ »-/- 



-'Kf; 



Church MissionStoHons are underlined,tL denotes places where European serifices ore held. P- Free Ch. of Scotland Mission, W-Wtslei/anMission,lf-Uornmn Mission 



PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA 



41 



The diocese is assisted by the S.P.G. and by 
the Scottish Episcopal Church. The work of 
S.P.G. in Kaffraria dates from 1855. Its annual 
grant to the diocese is about £5,000. 

The principal Mission stations are : — 



Umtata Cathedral 

„ Mission Church 
„ Missions (Tembu- 
land) 

All Saints' 

Butterworth 

Cala 

Idutywa 

Pondoland West 

Port St. John's 

St. Alban's 

St. Mark's 

Tsomo 



Clydesdale 

Indawana 

Kokstad 

Maclear 

Matatiele 

Mount AylifF 

Mount Frere 

Pondoland East 

Qumbu 

St. Cuthbert's 

Umzimkulu 

St. Bede's College 

Emjanyana 



Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. 
European 27, 3 women workers, native 22. 



The United Free Church of Scotland has many 
mission stations in Kaffraria, including large in- 
dustrial training colleges at Blythswood and 
Lovedale. At the latter during 1906 there were 
715 scholars on the roll, of which number 380 
boys and 150 girls were boarders. Scottish 
missionaries started the work in 1822. Work is 
also being carried on by the Wesleyans and the 
Moravians. 

Bishops : — 

Henry Callaway, 1873, 
Bransby Lewis Key, 1886. 
Joseph Watkin Williams, 1901. 



42 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



PRETORIA. 



Pretoria, l877' — This diocese consists of 
so much of the Transvaal as Hes west of the 
Drakensberg mountains, the area of which is 
io6,3S7 square miles. The population before 
the war was about 750,000, of whom only 
150,000 were whites. These included 63,000 
Transvaal Boers and 87,000 Uitlanders, 80 per 
cent, of whom were probably British sub- 
jects. In 1896 451,801 natives paid hut-tax. 
The chequered history of the land has affected 
the course of the Church. The number of Church 
members was estimated before the war at 18,000 ; 
the communicants at about 4,000. Since the 
war the population has become much more 
British than it was and has increased very con- 
siderably. According to the last census (1904) 
the native population numbers 969,379 and the 
European population 299,327. The population 
of Johannesburg in May, 1911, was 240,581 
made up as follows: Europeans 122,071, natives 
103,922, other coloured races 14,588. The popu- 
lation of Pretoria in 1911 was 157,420, of whom 
551363 were Europeans. 

The total number of clergy working in the 
diocese is just 100 ; it will be by the end of 19 11 
about 105. In January, 1906, it was 26. There 
are 9 native deacons and 2 native priests, and 4 
Army chaplains. 

The total amount raised in the diocese for 
Church purposes during the last complete year 
before the war was just under £13,000: since 
1903 an average sum of over £41,000 per annum 
has been raised from local sources. In 1910 
nearly £44,000 was raised. £8,000 was spent on 
native work. Of this sum £2,050 was provided 
by the S.P.G., £2,000 was provided locally by 



European Churchmen in the diocese, and nearly 
£4,000 was provided by the natives themselves. 
The Church has a great opportunity of planting 
itself firmly in the country districts of the diocese 
(which is over three times the size of England) if 
only it is adequately manned and supported now. 

Schools. — The diocesan school for boys at 
Pretoria was taken over by the Government in 
1907. The diocesan girls' school, under the 
Wantage Sisters, has over 120 pupils and is 
increasing. St. John's College, Johannesburg, 
is under the charge of the Community of the 
Resurrection. It has now permanent buildings 
(and 13-^ acres of excellent land), there are 140 
pupils of which 40 are boarders. St. Margaret's 
school for girls, Johannesburg continues under 
the East Grinstead Sisters. The Government 
makes no grants whatever to any but Government 
schools. 

No grants from the S.P.G. have been used for 
white work. All that comes from the Society 
is spent on native or coloured work. There are 
now 250 native congregations in the diocese. 
The S.P.G. supports work at the following 
stations: Johannesburg, Potchefstroom, Krugers- 
dorp, Lydenburg, Pietersburg, Pretoria and 
Rustenburg. 

Missionary work. — For the purposes of native 
work the diocese is divided up into districts, 
with a white priest in charge, viz. : The Rand, 
Krugersdorp, Pretoria, Potchefstroom, Rusten- 
burg, Waterberg, Northern Transvaal (or Pie- 
tersburg). The Rev. C. B. Shaw is in charge of 
the native church in Johannesburg, and a native 
priest is in charge of the District of Lydenburg ; 
while work is also carried on in the Eastern 




J-- CO 

^ I 

a to 



to 

s 









to ^ 
o ^ 



to 



5 -^ 



JO 



PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA 



43 



Transvaal at Ermelo and Wakkerstroom under 
the supervision of Archdeacon Fuller, Arch- 
deacon of native Missions. 

The Chamber of Mines, Johannesburg, is a 
great missionary society ; it brings the Rand 
natives from all over South and Central Africa. 
When they return to their homes they carry back 
with them what they have learnt of European 
manners and customs and of the Christian Faith. 
The Community of the Resurrection brethren 
responsible for the native mission work on the 
mines are therefore in charge of a strategic point 
in the evangelisation of Africa. 

In 1902 the S.P.G. voted £7,000 from the 
Marriott Bequest Fund towards the development 
of missionary work in the coal and gold fields. 



It has since granted further sums towards the 
support of this work. 

Three ladies connected with the S.P.G. are 
beginning work amongst native women on the 
Rand. 

Missionary work in different parts of the dio- 
cese is also being carried on by the Wesleyan 
Mission Society, the Berlin and Hermannsburg 
Societies, the American Board of Missions 
(A.B.C.F.M.) and the Mission of the Free 
Churches of French Switzerland. 
Bishops : — 

Henry Brougham Bousfield, 1878. 
William Marlborough Carter, 1902 (con. 

1891 : tr. 1909). 
Michael Bolton Furse, 1909. 



44 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



MASHONALAND. 



Mashonaland, 1891. — This Mission was 
founded definitely in 1891, work having been 
commenced from the diocese of Bloemfontein 
three years previously. It comprises the country 
south of the Zambesi east of the Victoria Falls, 
and a line which may be drawn on the south, 
taking in Khama's Town, Serowe, and extending 
along the Limpopo River till its junction with 
the Nuanetze, thence running to the nearest 
point on the Sabi River, and thence along this 
river to the sea. Mission work has been begun 
in what is known as Mashonaland, though the 
terms Mashona and Makalaka, or Makaranga, 
are only names of contempt given to the people 
by the Matabele ; and there is no name that 
denotes the whole population or country. It 
would be almost impossible to compute the 
population as a whole ; the Europeans may 
perhaps number about 24,000, others 750,000. 

Salisbury is the headquarters of the Mission. 
Here there is the Pro-Cathedral and Church 
house, also the Bishop's house which has been 
recently purchased. Very shortly the Choir of a 
new Cathedral is to be commenced, together with 
a Memorial Chapel to the late Mr. Rhodes. 

There are 58 mission workers now attached to 
the diocese — the bishop, 21 priests, i deacon, 
1 evangelist, 3 candidates, 12 women workers, 
20 catechists. 

Bishop Gaul, who resigned owing to ill-health 
in 1907, was bishop for twelve years. At the 
close of his episcopate Church buildings had 
been erected at Salisbury, Buluwayo, Gwelo, 
Umtali, Francistown, Victoria, Rusape and ' 
Penhalonga Valley. There were 12 farms in 



possession of the Church, besides 56 town 
plots. Four European schools were receiving 
Government grants, and each native centre had 
its day and night school. There were 8 head 
mission centres with buildings and resident 
mission clergy and cathechists at Salisbury, 
Buluwayo, Bembeze, Francistown, Wrening- 
ham, Victoria, Rusape, and at the central in- 
dustrial institution of St. Augustine and St. 
Monica at Penhalonga. Each of these head 
stations has its sub -station in charge of 
teachers. Five mission stations are worked 
by catechists from St. Augustine's as well as 
those at the college itself. In the industrial 
school at Penhalonga there are about 240 boys 
and 80 girls in training. 

The question of the wives of native Christians 
is being met by the training of native girls at St. 
Monica's Home, where there are at present about 
80 boarders. 

There are 13 clergy working in connection with 
the S.P.G. 

The following stations are assisted by the 
S.P.G : Bembezi, Bonda, Bulawayo, Francis- 
town, Hunyani, Macheke, Marandellas, Nyawiros, 
Penhalonga, Salisbury, Sekis, Umguza, Umtali, 
Wreningham, and Zimunga. 

Bishops : — 

George Wyndham Hamilton Knight-Bruce, 

1891 (cons. 1886). 
William Thomas Gaul, 1895 ; resigned, 

1907. 
Edmund Nathanael Powell, 1908 ; resigned, 

1910. 
Frederic Hicks Beaven, 191 1. 



o- 




PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA 



45 



Lebombo, 1891. — This Missionary diocese 
was constituted by Act of the Provincial Synod 
held at Capetown in 1891, but there was some 
delay in the choice and consecration of the first 
bishop. It was taken out of the district allotted 
to the Mackenzie Memorial Mission, which was 
founded by friends of the first bishop of Central 
Africa, and subsequently became the diocese of 
Zululand and the tribes towards the Zambesi 
River. No work, however, had been done in 
this part of the district, and when the new bishop 
visited his diocese in 1893 he only found two 
communicants of the Church of the Province 
of South Africa in the whole diocese ; there were 
no clergy, no churches, no schools, no organisa- 
tion, and no property whatever belonging to the 
Church. 

Politically the diocese is entirely in Portu- 
guese territory, and embraces the civil districts 
of Lourengo Marques and Inhambane, and a 
portion of the territory of the Mozambique 
Company. It was defined as consisting of the 
country between the Lebombo Mountains and 
the Indian Ocean, extending from the northern 
border of Zululand on the south to the Sabi 
River on the north. 

The population consists mainly of various 
Bantu tribes, but is not coterminous with the 
territory occupied by any of them. Zulu is 
spoken on both sides of the southern frontier, 
Ndao on both sides of the northern boundary, 
and various Thonga dialects, called by the 
Portuguese " Landine," extend also into the 
Transvaal ; there are two distinct tribes, with 
quite distinct languages, which occupy territory 
entirely within the diocese, the Chopi, and the 
Nyembanes (whose language is called Gi 
Tonga). 

Besides the Bantu, there is a mixed popula- 
tion of Portuguese, Indians, English, Germans, 
French, Syrians, Greeks and others. 

The official estimate of the population at the 
last census was : — ■ 

District of Louren90 Marques — 



In the town - 9,849 

In the country 101,154 

1 District of Gaza 180,000 

District of Inhambane 360,000 

To these figures must be added the number of 
those temporarily working in the Transvaal and 
other places, between 50,000 and 80,000 ; and 
also the population of the portion of the Mo- 
zambique territory, for which no figures are 
available. 

The area of the diocese is about 50,000 square 
miles. The greater part of it consists of un- 
dulating, sandy country ; the highest mountain 
is said to be 2,150 feet above the sea-level. 

The diocese is not yet divided into parishes, 
but is worked in districts from centres : — 

(i) Louren90 Marques, with European congre- 
gation and native work among servants in the town. 

(2) Hlamankulu with 16 out-stations. 

(3) Namahacha, with small European con- 
gregation, diocesan training college and three 
out-stations. 

The languages used at the above are English, 
Ronga, Shiputhsu and Zulu. 

(4) Inhambane Town (Sewe), with boarding 
and night schools for young men, and two out- 
stations. 

(5) Inhambane East, worked from Chamboni, 
with diocesan printing press, and 12 out-stations. 

(6) Inhambane West, worked from Magyaneni, 
with a home for young women and a boarding 
school for little girls, and several country stations. 

The languages used at the above are Gi Tonga 
and Shitswa. 

(7) Chopiland East, worked at present from 
Chamboni, and several country stations, for work 
among the Chopi, Adonge and Tshangana 
peoples. 

(8) Chopiland West, with 20 country stations 
near Chaichai. There is at present no central 
station, but a priest goes occasionally from 

' This district has since been abolished, and the territory 
divided between the Civil Districts of Lourenfo Marques 
and Inhambane. 



46 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Lourenyo Marques to administer the sacraments. 
The work is amongst the Bulandeela, Chopi and 
Tshangana peoples. 

The services at the above are held mostly in 
Chopi. 

The present staff of the diocese consists of 
bishop, archdeacon, 5 other priests, 4 deacons, 
3 sub-deacons, 7 catechists, 3 European laymen 
and 6 women ; and a large number of voluntary 
native lay workers. 

Si. Christopher's training College at Nama- 
hasha was founded in 1901. It is situated in 
Portuguese territory on the Lebombo Moun- 
tains, about a mile from the border-line of 
Swaziland and Portuguese East Africa, and 
45 miles south of Komati Poort. It has students 
from the coast tribes near Lourenjo Marques 
and Inhambane, who are preparing for work as 
catechists and sub-deacons. Manual labour 
forms part of the curriculum. 

At present the complete Bible is not published 
in any of the native languages ; the Old and 
New Testaments are to be had in Zulu, the 



New Testament and Psalms in Ronga, the New 
Testament and the Book of Ruth in Gi Tonga, 
the New Testament in Shitswa, and portions 
of the New Testament in Shiputru and Chopi. 

Other bodies doing mission work in the dio- 
cese are the Roman Catholics, the Swiss Pres- 
byterian Free Church, the English Wesleyan 
Methodists, the American Methodist Episcopal 
Church, the American Free Methodists and the 
American Congregationalists ; there are also a 
few congregations of the Zulu Congregationalists. 

Most of the Bible translations have been made 
by members of these bodies. The Church has 
produced translations of portions of the Prayer- 
book and of the two diocesan catechisms in 
Ronga, Shiputhsu, Gi Tonga and Chopi ; also 
hymn books in Ronga and Gi Tonga. 

The " Missions to Seamen " have a " Seamen's 
Institute " at Louren^o Marques which is doing 
very good work amongst seamen of all nation- 
alities who visit the port. 

Bishop : — 

William Edmund Smyth, 1893. 



George, 1911. — In 1870 the Provincial Synod 
passed a resolution in favour of the creation of a 
diocese of George to be taken out of the diocese 
of Capetown. Part of the funds collected for 
the establishment of this diocese were, however, 
diverted to the support of the Bishop of Maritz- 
burg and afterwards to the support of the Bishop 
of Natal. The Bishopric of Natal recovered 
its former endowments by the Natal Church 
properties act of 1910 and the funds collected for 
the diocese of George were released for this 
purpose. 

For the formation of the diocese of George 
the diocese of Capetown parts with the parishes 



of Beaufort Westj Knysna, Mossel Bay, Oudt- 
shoorn. Prince Albert, Riversdale, Swellendam, 
and Victoria West, and with the parochial 
Districts of Fraserburg, Heidelberg, Union- 
dale, and Willowmore : all in the old Arch- 
deaconry of George. The diocese of Grahams- 
town parts with the parishes of Graaff-Reinet 
(including Aberdeen), Jansenville (including 
Steytlerville), and that part of the parish of 
Richmond which lies within the Civil District of 
Murraysburg. 

Bishop : — 

Henry Brindley Sidwell, 191 1. 



Kimberley and Kuruman, 1911. — This 
diocese was constituted at the Bishops' Synod 
held in Maritzburg in October, igii. It includes 



the whole of Bechuanaland and Griqualand 
West with Kimberley as its centre. It is largely 
a missionary diocese. With the exception of 



PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA 



47 



Canon Bevan's work in South Bechuanaland, 
the AngUcan Church has not hitherto had much 
opportunity of doing missionary work there. 

Nearly the whole area is taken out of the 
Bloemfontein diocese, but one parish, Prieska, 



is taken out of the new diocese of George, and 
two districts, De Aar and Richmond out of the 
Grahamstown diocese. 
Bishop : — 



St. Helena, 1859, — This diocese, which is in the 
Province of South Africa, was founded in 1859, 
having before been part of the diocese of Cape- 
town : it includes the islands of St. Helena, 
Ascension, and Tristan d'Acunha, in the South 
Atlantic Ocean. 

The work is pastoral rather than missionary. 

In St. Helena the population of 3,500 consists 
for the most part of coloured people who are 
poor, though not wanting the necessaries of life. 
They give what they can for the Church, but the 
maintenance of the clergy is largely assisted by 
the S.P.G. The Hussey Charity provides three 
Church schools for the poor, and there are two 
other Church schools in the island ; the Church 
Benevolent Society supports two more ; and the 
Government has three schools. The island is 
divided into four parishes, each with its church ; 
but the two in Jamestown are under the care of 
one priest. 



At Ascension there is a garrison of officers and 
men of the Royal Navy and Marines with their 
families. At present there is no naval chaplain 
on the island ; but Sunday services are taken in 
St. Mary's Church by the officers in command, 
and the bishop visits the island twice in the year. 

Tristan d'Acunha, far to the south, is inhabited 
by about 100 persons. The Rev. J. G. Barrow 
went in 1906 to minister to them. He came 
back to England in 1909, but is hoping to return. 

Three (European) clergy receive grants from 
S.P.G. 

Without the Society's aid it would be impos- 
sible to maintain the clergy, as the people are so 
poor their weekly offerings are usually in pence. 

Bishops : — 

Piers Calvely Claughton, 1859 (tr. 
Thomas Earle Welby, 1862. 
John Garraway Holmes, 1899. 
William Arthur Holbech, 1905. 



1862). 



COLONIAL DIOCESES AND MISSIONARY BISHOPRICS HOLDING 
MISSION FROM THE SEE OF CANTERBURY. 



Sierra Leone, 1852. — This diocese includes 
the Church of England chaplaincies in the 
islands of Madeira, Teneriffe, Grand Canary, 
and the Azores. It also embraces the west 
coast of Morocco, the Gambia colony, the Rio 
Pongo Mission in French Guinea, including the 
Isles de Los, the native congregations of Sierra 
Leone, and the mission stations of the interior. 
The C.M.S. Missions in Sierra Leone date from 
the beginning of the nineteenth century. An 
S.P.G. missionary was for a short time working 
in the diocese of Sierra Leone in the middle of 
the eighteenth century. The bishopric dates 
from 1852. There are 53 clergy and 70 churches 
within the diocese. There is also a successful 
technical school and industrial mission school, 
and a flourishing medical mission. The popula- 
tion of the colony of Sierra Leone, as distinct 
from that of the Hinterland, is 76,655 ; that of 
the Hinterland about 1,000,000. The native 
Christians of the Anglican Church raise about 
£■10,006 a year for the support of the clergy, 
catechists, schoolmasters, the upkeep of the 
churches and parsonages, and for mission work. 
There is a native archdeacon in Sierra Leone. 

There are permanent chaplaincies at Madeira 
and Orotava (Teneriffe), with consecrated 
churches. Las Palmas, in Grand Canary and 
Santa Cruz (Teneriffe) also have churches, 
which are served for six months in the winter. 

St. Michael's, in the Azores, has a church, 
and a chaplain is occasionally sent by the S.PG. 
The church of St. Mary, Bathurst, Gambia, is 
served by a European who is the bishop's chaplain. 
There is a flourishing Church membership and 
a school, assisted by the Colonial Government, 

The old church of St. George in Freetown 
is the Cathedral and the Bishop is the Dean. 



There are at present two archdeacons and five 
canons. 

On the west coast of Morocco there is a 
church at Casablanca in the British cemetery, 
the ground of which was consecrated in 1902, 
and it is proposed to have a chaplain to minister 
to the English communities in the coast towns. 
There is also a licensed church at Mogador, 
served by a layman who holds a reader's licence. 

The work of the West Indian Mission to West 
Africa, commonly called the Rio Pongo Mission, 
which was started in 1855, is assisted by the 
S.P.G. It is now the official Mission of the 
Province of the West Indies. The archdeacon of 
the mission is the Venerable C. W. Farquhar. 
The Society gave a grant of £1,000 to this 
work in 1902, in addition to its annual grant. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 4 
native clergy. 

The C.M.S. supports 2 European and 4 native 
clergy ; also a Men's College affiliated with Dur- 
ham University, a large boys' Grammar school 
and a girl's secondary school. 

The stations assisted by the S.P.G. are : 
Konakry, Dubrika and Quiah, Isles de Los, 
Domingia, etc., Kambia. 

Bishops : — 

Owen Emeric Vidal, 1852. 

John Wills Weeks, 1855. 

John Bowen, 1857. 

Edward Hyndman Heckles, i860. 

Henry Cheetham, 1870. 

Ernest Graham Ingham, 1883 (resigned 

1897). 
John Taylor Smith, 1897 (resigned 1901). 
Edmund Henry Elwin, 1901. 
John Walmsley, 1910. 



(48) 



1^ .. 



INDEPENDENT AFRICAN BISHOPRICS 



49 



Western Equatorial Africa (formerly 
Niger), 1864. — The diocese includes the Colony 
and Protectorate of Southern Nigeria which now 
includes Lagos and its hinterland, and the Pro- 
tectorate of Northern Nigeria, including the Nupe 
country and the Hausa states. 

The first English clergyman, perhaps the first 
Englishman, to undertake missionary work in 
Africa was the Rev. Thomas Thompson, a 
Fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge, who was 
appointed on 15th February, 1751, by the S.P.G. 
as " missionary to the Gold Coast ". He re- 
turned to England in 1756, but the work which 
he started was continued under native super- 
vision until 1824. In 1904 the S.P.G. re- 
sumed its interrupted work. The Gold Coast now 
extends for nearly 500 miles into the interior. 

The Niger Mission was undertaken in 1857 
by the C.M.S. In 1864, a native bishop was 
consecrated for it, the Right Rev. S. A. Crow- 
ther, with the title of " Bishop of the Niger 
Territories ". The Yoruba country (excepting 
Lagos, which was within the jurisdiction of the 
Bishop of Sierra Leone) was a part of his titular 
diocese, though administered by the Bishop of 
Sierra Leone up to 1893. 

Bishop Crowther died in 1891, and the Rev. J. 
S. Hill succeeded him in 1893 with the title of 
" Bishop in Western Equatorial Africa ". At 
the same time with Bishop Hill, two African 
clergymen, the Rev. C. Phillips and the Rev. 
I. Oluwole, were consecrated assistant bishops 
for the Yoruba country. 

Bishop Hill died in January, 1894, and Bishop 
Tugwell succeeded him in March of that year. 



In 1898, Lagos and the Gold Coast with its 
hinterland were added to the diocese. In 1900, 
the Rev. James Johnson, another African clergy- 
man, was consecrated Assistant-Bishop for the 
Niger Delta. In 1904, an English clergyman, the 
Ven. N. T. Hamlyn, Archdeacon of Lagos, was 
consecrated Assistant-Bishop for the Gold Coast. 
On 4th January, 1909, the Gold Coast Colony 
with its hinterland were separated from the dio- 
cese and constituted as the diocese of Accra. 

The staff of the diocese consists of the bishop, 
2 assistant bishops, a native archdeacon of the 
Niger Delta, an English archdeacon of the 
Niger, an English archdeacon of the Yoruba 
country, 24 English and 52 native clergy, 10 
English laymen, 36 English ladies and 254 
native lay readers. 

There are 40,708 adherents and 15,089 school- 
children. Native contributions for the year 1910 
amounted to £'11,676. 

The number of European residents in the 
diocese is estimated at about 2,000, and the 
population of the diocese at 20,000,000. 

Bishops : — 

Samuel Adjai Crowther, 1864. 
Joseph Sidney Hill, 1893. 
Herbert Tugwell, 1894. 

Assistant Bishops : — 

Charles Phillips, 1893; died, 1906. 
Isaac Oluwole, 1893. 
James Johnson, 1900. 

Nathanael Temple Hamlyn, 1904 (Bishop 
of Accra, 1909). 



Accra (Gold Coast), 1909.— The diocese in- 
cludes the Gold Coast Colony, Ashanti, and the 
Northern Territories. It has a coast-line of about 
250 miles, and the distance from the coast to the 
northern frontier is about 450 miles ; it is bounded 
on the west by the French Ivory Coast, and on 
the east by the German Colony of Togoland. It 
has an area of about 80,000 square miles, and a 
population of about 2,000,000 natives and 2,000 
Europeans, The principal languages spoken in 



the colony are Ga at Accra, Fanti at Cape Coast, 
Twi in the Ashanti country. 

The Gold Coast was originally in the dio- 
cese of Sierra Leone, but in 1893 i^ was made 
a part of the diocese of Western Equatorial 
Africa, 

In 1909, the Gold Coast and Northern terri- 
tories were by arrangement between Bishop 
Tugwell and the S.P.G. made a separate diocese 
under the jurisdiction of Bishop Hamlyn. 



so 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



In igio, the bishop was compelled to resign, 
after fourteen years' service in West Africa, owing 
to ill health. 

There are 3,000 Church members, 5 clergy, 
10 lay readers, 400 communicants. In Govern- 



ment schools at Accra and Cape Coast there are 
about 1,900 scholars. 
Bishop : — 

Nathanael Temple Hamlyn, 1909 (resigned, 
1 9 10) cons. 1904. 



Zanzibar, 1861. — This Mission to Central 
Africa was proposed by David Livingstone in 
1857, and undertaken in 1859. Charles Frederick 
Mackenzie, Archdeacon of Natal, was appointed 
head of the mission, and with 2 clergymen and 
3 laymen sailed for Capetown, where he was 
consecrated first bishop of the mission on ist 
January, 1861. Bishop Mackenzie settled at 
Magomero, near the River Shire, in Nyasaland. 
In 1862 he died. He was succeeded by Bishop 
Tozer, who removed the mission to Zanzibar, 
the capital of East Central Africa, intending that 
Zanzibar should be the key with which to open 
the door of Central Africa. He was succeeded 
in 1874 by Bishop Steere, under whose guidance 
the mission re-established itself on the main- 
land. Bishop Steere died in 1882, and Bishop 
Smythies was consecrated in 1883. The diocese 
at that time included Zanzibar with three stations, 
the Usambara country with five stations, the Ro- 
vuma country with three stations, and the Nyasa- 
land district with eight stations. The diocese 
comprises Zanzibar and the countries within 
lat. s"-!!", long. 38°-4o°. 

Bishop Smythies assumed the title of Bishop 
of Zanzibar and Missionary Bishop of East 
Africa. When the diocese of Likoma was 
founded, in 1892, the diocese of Zanzibar re- 
tained Zanzibar, the Usambara country, and the 
Rovuma country. 

It is impossible to correctly estimate the popu- 
lation. In Zanzibar alone there are 250,000 



people. In the diocese there are 13 stations and 
a number of sub-stations, 9 stone churches, and 
70 temporary buildings used for service. There 
are two hospitals on the mainland, and one in 
Zanzibar, with beds for 35 natives and 9 Euro- 
peans, built at a cost of £2,000, with a staff of 
13 nurses. There are 189 schools, with a total 
of 6,744 scholars and 150 native teachers ; St. 
Andrew's Theological College at Kiungani, for 
the training of boys — both released slaves and 
boys from up-country schools — was founded in 
the hope that some may eventually be found to 
have a vocation for Holy Orders ; St. Mark's 
College, Zanzibar, is for the training of natives 
for Holy Orders. Clergy: 40 (including natives); 
13 laymen ; 44 women. 

The total number of adherents is 11,380 (6,563 
males and 4,817 females). 

The whole of the mission work in this diocese 
and that of Likoma is supported by the Uni- 
versities' Mission to Central Africa. 
Bishops : — 

Charles Frederick Mackenzie, 1861. 

William George Tozer, 1863. 

Edward Steere, 1874. 

Charles Alan Smythies, 1883. 

William Moore Richardson, 1895 (resigned 
1901). 

John Edward Hine, 1901 (cons., 1896), (tr. 
Northern Rhodesia, 1909). 

Frank Weston, 1908. 



Nyasaland (formerly Likoma), 1892. — The 

dioceseof Nyasaland was founded in 1892, though 
work had been begun on the shores of Lake 
Nyasa as early as 1881. The first bishop con- 
secrated to this diocese was Bishop Hornby, who 
was obliged to resign the following year through 



ill health. In 1895 ''^^ Venerable Chauncy 
Maples, who had been archdeacon of Nyasa, was 
consecrated as bishop, but was drowned in the 
lake the same year. In 1896 the Rev. Dr. Hine, 
who had long been a member of the Mission, was 
consecrated bishop, and appointed the Rev. W. 



N9XXI. 




Places under/inedindioceseso/'Z3n3i6ar.Ny6sal3nc/& Northern Rhodesia are U.M.C.A. stations, those in diocese of 
Uaanda Ss Mombasa areC.M.S. stations. Diocesan Boundaries International Boundaries 



mDEPENDENT AFRlCANplSHOPRICS 



SI 



P. Johnson archdeacon. On his translation to 
the bishopric of Zanzibar in igoi, the Rev. 
Gerard Trower was consecrated for Likoma 
(1902). 

The diocese embraces a portion of Central 
Africa generally known as Nyasaland, and lying 
chiefly on the eastern shores of the lake. It 
includes territories under three governments — 
the British, German and Portuguese — and ex- 
tends along a coast of more than 300 miles. 

The central station is on the island of Likoma 
in the centre of the lake, and has a beautiful 
stone cathedral consecrated in 1905. The popu- 
lation of this island is estimated at 4,000 ; about 
half of its inhabitants are now Christian, and 
the work in many respects resembles that of a 
large parish at home. Three large schools at 
the head station and twelve out-schools can 
scarcely provide accommodation for the younger 
Christian and catechumen adherents. There is 
a European hospital for members of the staff 
and a native hospital and dispensary, where 
patients from all parts of the lake district are 
treated as well as the inhabitants of the islands. 

In 1905 a theological college was started for 
the training of native clergy, and stands close to 
a small stone church at the farther end of the 
island. 

On the mainland opposite, in Portuguese 
territory, is a training college for male teachers, 
with accommodation for about 60 students. 
This forms one in a chain of mission stations 
extending from Amelia Bay in German terri- 
tory to the south end of the lake. Most of 
these stations, numbering over 40, are under 
the charge of the clergy on the mission steamer, 
Chauncy Maples, which runs regularly up and 
down the lake. 

On the west side of the lake is the important 
European station of Kota-Kota, with its out- 
stations extending along a coast line of 20 miles 
to the north and to the south. It has a fine 
stone church and European and native hos- 
pitals. 

Owing to the large increase of work in the Yao 



hill country, the new archdeaconry of Mtonya 
has been formed, which includes in its area a 
chain of inland stations from Unangu to the 
south end of the lake. Similar work among 
the Yao and Nyasa tribes is rapidly developing 
along the banks of the Upper Shir6, and pro- 
vides ample work for an itinerant priest, who 
also ministers to the members of the Church of 
England in Blantyre and Zomba. 

The completion of the Mackenzie Memorial 
Church at Chiromo makes it probable that the 
work of the U.M.C.A. will soon have to include 
in its sphere a large part of the Lower Shire. 

There are 7 European stations and about 167 
schools with 6,475 scholars. The total number 
of adherents is 16,143. Of these 7,683 are males 
and 8,460 are females. 

The staft consists of the bishop and 25 clergy 
(2 archdeacons, 14 European and 9 native clergy), 
9 laymen, 16 women, and about 180 native 
teachers and readers. 

Other missionary agencies at work in British 
Central Africa are the Roman Catholics (who 
have 10 missionary priests and 2 schools) ; the 
United Free Church of Scotland works on the 
west shore of the lake ; the South Africa Dutch 
Reformed Ministers' Union in the Angoni hills 
west of the lake ; the Church of Scotland has a 
large and flourishing mission at Blantyre in the 
Shire region south of the lake, and the Zambesi 
Industrial Mission works west and north-west 
of Blantyre. All these societies (omitting the 
U.M.C.A. and the R.C. Missions) report 376 
stations and out-stations, 160 missionaries, 977 
native workers, 670 schools with 48,000 scholars, 
17 hospitals and dispensaries, and 14,000 pro- 
fessed Christians. 

Bishops : — 

Wilfrid Bird Hornby, 1892 (resigned 1894). 
Chauncy Maples, 1895. 
John Edward Hine, 1899; tr. 1901. 
Gerard Trower, 1902 ; (tr. N. W. Australia, 

1909). 
Thomas Carthew Fisher (1910). 



52 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Northern Rhodesia, 1909. — The diocese of 
Northern Rhodesia was founded in 1910 by the 
Universities' Mission. The Right Rev. J. E. 
Hine D.D. (Bishop of Zanzibar, 1901-1909, Bis- 
hop of Nyasaland 1899-1901) was appointed first 
bishop, and he selected the township of Living- 
stone, Victoria Falls, as his temporary head- 
quarters. In 1 91 1 missionaries were at work 
at these centres ; Livingstone (N.W. Rhodesia), 
Mapanzas (N.W. Rhodesia) and Fort Jameson 
(N.E. Rhodesia). 

The population of Northern Rhodesia is esti- 
mated at half a million, including a considerable 
and increasing number of Europeans who are 



settled in the country in connection with the 
Government and mining and farming operations. 

In the high lands the climate is reported to be 
healthy. Bishop Hine's staff at present (191 1) 
consists of three priests, and four laymen. Other 
missionaries, Roman Catholics, Dutch Reformed 
Church, London Missionary Society, Free Church 
of Scotland, and French Protestants are at work 
in the country. The languages have been studied 
by Mr. A. C. Madan (formerly of the Universities' 
Mission) and handbooks compiled by him are ob- 
tainable at the Clarendon Press, Oxford. 

Bishop : — ■ 

John Edward Hine, 1909 (cons. 1899). 



Uganda, 1884. — This diocese was originally 
included in the one called Eastern Equatorial 
Africa. In 1899 it was divided into two portions. 
The interior portion, comprising Uganda, Bun- 
yoro, Toro, Kavirondo, and all the countries then 
within the boundaries of the Uganda Protector- 
ate, was formed into the diocese of Uganda. 

The Uganda Mission was commenced in 1877 
by missionaries of the C.M.S. It was not, how- 
ever, until 1882 that the first baptism took place. 
European missionaries (1911) ordained, 39; lay- 
men, 12 ; married women, 35 ; single women, 28. 
Four of these are doctors and ten are trained 
nurses. African agents ordained, 38 ; laymen, 
2,111; women, 253. The baptised Christians now 
(1911) number 71,038, the communicants 19,527. 

The work of the native Church is entirely self- 



supporting. All the clergy and lay workers are 
maintained by native grants. All churches and 
schools are built, repaired and maintained by 
the natives themselves. There are about 1,077 
churches and other buildings used for Church 
services in the diocese. There are training in- 
stitutions and 147 schools, with 47,424 names on 
their books. Nearly 120,000 visits of out-patients 
were recorded at the hospitals and dispensaries 
in 1910, and 2,536 in-patients were received. 

The number of baptisms during 1910 was 
4,621 (including 2,916 adults). 
Bishops : — 

James Hannington, 1884. 

Henry Perrot Parker, i886. 

Alfred Robert Tucker, 1890 (resigned, 191 1). 

John Jamieson Willis, 1912. 



Mombasa, 1898. — The diocese of Mombasa 
includes almost all the British East African 
Protectorate, and all German East Africa except 
the area covered by the Universities' Mission 
of Zanzibar. East of 38° Long. East and South 
of 8° Lat. South. 

The population of the British East African Pro- 
tectorate is estimated at 4,000,000. There may 
be more than this number in German East Africa. 

The British Protectorate was proclaimed on 
19th November, i8go. Mombasa, has a popula- 



tion of about 29,000, of whom nearly 200 are 
Europeans. Nairobi, the headquarters of British 
East African Government and central station of 
the Uganda railway, has a population of about 
13,000, of whom about 600 are Europeans. 
There are also hundreds of European farmers in 
the neighbourhood of Nairobi. 

Missionary Agencies. — The missionary agencies 
other than the C.M.S. at work in the British East 
African Protectorate, are the Roman Catholics, 
the Church of Scotland, the United Methodist 



INDEPENDENT AFRICAN BISHOPRICS 



53 



Free Churches, the Africa Inland Mission 
(American), the German Lutheran and Swedish 
Mission. 

Anglican missionary work is carried on by the 
C.M.S. There is an English chaplain at Nairobi, 
part of whose stipend is paid by the Colonial 
and Continental Church Society. 

The Church adherents, African, number over 
3,000. There are 117 schools and about 5,000 
scholars receiving Church teaching. There are 



21 clergy (including 3 natives), 8 laymen (in- 
cluding two doctors), 19 single women, and 20 
married women (including one doctor), 12 per- 
manent churches, 15 mission rooms, 108 native 
lay workers, and there are more than 1,000 
native communicants. 

There is a large European and Eurasian popu- 
lation which is ever increasing. 

Bishop ; — 

William George Peel, 1899. 



Mauritius, 1854. — This see is coextensive 
with the colonies of Mauritius with its de- 
pendencies and the Seychelles, which com- 
prise 149 islands, many of these being barren 
rocks, whilst others are inhabited only by 
one or two families. These islands are widely 
scattered over the Southern Indian Ocean, 
the two centres of the diocese, namely, 
Mauritius and Seychelles, being about 1,000 
miles distant from one another. The whole 
are included within the Southern tropic, and 
communication between the different islands is 
slow, costly and infrequent. The actual area 
of land is only about 1,400 square miles, of 
which Mauritius itself contains 714. The popu- 
lation amounts to about 390,000, of whom 373,000 
are in the island of Mauritius. These are made 
up of English, French, Creoles, Malagasy, Afri- 
cans, Arabs, Chinese and British Indians ; the 
last are by far the most numerous, numbering 
260,000. The population of the Seychelles Archi- 
pelago is over 17,000, and of the other scattered 
islets about 3,500. The death-rate of Mauritius 
is considerably higher than the birth-rate, and the 
density of its inhabitants is only maintained by 
the constant arrival of fresh batches of coolies 
from India. 

The estimated number of Church members is 
8,274, of whom more than 2,000 are Indians, 
and more than 3,000 belong to the Seychelles. 
The communicants are estimated at 1,954. 
There are 34 churches and chapels, besides 
schools in which services are held. For the 
regular Sunday services (upwards of 60 in 



number and conducted in 6 different languages) 
the Church has, besides the bishop, 19 clergy 
in Mauritius and the Seychelles. Nine are on 
the Government establishment. There are 14 lay 
readers and catechists. 

There are 22 day and 16 Sunday schools, con- 
taining 3,200 scholars ; among these are many 
heathen. A theological training college has 
been organised to replace the one which was 
blown down by the cyclone of 1892, into which 
five students have been admitted. The course 
will be for three years. 

Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : Bambous, 
Des Anguilles, Mahebourg Failles, Port Louis, 
Rose Hill, Souillac, S. Pierre, Seychelles, Vacoas, 
Verdun. 

The work of the S.P.G. in this diocese began 
in 1843. P°rt Louis is the headquarters of mis- 
sion work. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 
European 2, native 5. 

The C.M.S. has withdrawn from work in the 
diocese but assists the bishop with a yearly 
grant of money which will not entirely cease 
until 1919. 
Bishops : — 

Vincent William Ryan, 1854. 
Thomas Goodwin Hatchard, 1869. 
Henry Constantine Huxtable, 1870. 
Peter Sorenson Royston, 1872 (resigned 

i8gi). 
William Walsh, 1891 (resigned 1897). 
Walter Ruthven Pym, 1898 (tr. 1903). 
Francis Ambrose Gregory, 1904. 



54 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Madagfascar, 1874, — The staff of this diocese 
consists of the bishop, 2 archdeacons, 6 other 
English priests, i French layman, 6 English 
ladies, 17 native priests, 10 native deacons, and 
120 lay teachers. The work falls into two dis- 
tinct branches: (i) the work in Imerina, the 
central province, among the Hova ; (2) the east 
coast work among the Betsimisaraka, Antaimora 
and Vorimo. This latter includes a promising 
mission at Beforona, between Imerina and the 
coast, which is under the charge of a young 
Betsimisaraka deacon. At Antananarivo there 
is the cathedral church, dedicated to St. Law- 
rence, and three suburban and 17 district 
churches. There are also a high school, a girls' 
higher grade school, and a girls' boarding-house. 
At Ambatoharanana the Mission possesses a 
college and mission station with 30 district 
churches. There is also a thriving mission 
station with an excellent school and workshops 
at Ramainandro with 22 district churches. The 
coast work is more difficult than that among the 
Hova, as the Antaimora, Betsimisaraka, and 
Vorimo are much less intelligent and harder to 
convert. The four existing stations are : Ando- 
voranto with Tamatave, Ambinanindrano College 
and mission station, Mahanoro, Mananjary. 
Each station has a school ; the last-named 
station has over 200 scholars, a very large number 
when compared with the other coast stations. 
There is at Mahanoro a girls' boarding-school. 
In 1910 there were 127 permanent churches and 
mission districts, 1,521 baptisms, 4,628 com- 
municants, and 2,342 children receiving Church 
teaching. The total number of baptised persons 
is 12,450. 

The mission work has had to be readjusted to 
meet the requirements of the French Govern- 
ment. The Government, though it would prob- 
ably welcome the withdrawal of English missions, 
does not actually interfere with the work of the 
Church of England and unduly restricts the 
development of the evangelistic work, by refus- 



ing in most cases, to authorise new churches, 
has not otherwise withheld reasonable liberty of 
action. Many schools have, however, been sup- 
pressed, and there is much vexatious interference 
in educational matters. The apparent progress 
of the work is much slower, and the cost of it 
much greater, than in former years. 
Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : — 

Antananarivo (Cathedral) 

Ambanidia 

Antsararay 

Anjainaminavola 

Ambatoharanana 

Amboatany 

Ambohimanga 

Anjazafohy 

Malaza 

Morarano 

Andrianjoky 

Ramainandro 

Ambatofotsy 



Tapiafady 

Andovoranto 

Tamatave 

Manarintsoa 

Beforona 

Mahanoro 

Vatomandry 

Ambinanindrano 

Befotaka 

Marolambo 

Mananjary 

Vohimasina 

Sahavato 



The population of English-speaking people is 
100 ; that of other than English-speaking people, 
2,800,000. 

The headquarters of the Mission in this diocese 
is Antananarivo, where the S.P.G. has been 
working since 1866. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 
the bishop, European clergy, 8, native clergy, 
29. Women Workers connected with S.P.G. : 
European 7, native 9. 

There are 4 other societies, not connected with 
the Anglican Church, working at Antananarivo. 
The greater part of the missionary work in the 
central province is carried on by the London 
Missionary Society. 

Work is also carried on by native mission- 
aries supported by the S.P.G. at Beforona and 
the Forest, Befotaka, Anjazafohy, Vatomandry, 
Amboatany, Malaza, Tamatave, Vohimasina, 
Ambohimanga, Morarano, Ankadiefajoro, An- 
janaminavola, Mananjary, Vohimasina and other 
stations. 

Bishops : — 

Robert Kestell Kestell-Cornish, 1874. 
George Lanchester King, 1899. 



N9XKII. 



-^—-TmmI^ 




50° 



10 






Sambava 
Isaha 



Cape Bast 



15 



^# 4<^ ^ * —Tils' Ivohiba 
vbayo^ i^-^r^onyilBr 



■10 



zoo 



300 



Scale of Miles 



15 



MADAGASCAR 



55 



The principal s/a/-/ons assisted by fhe SPG. are under/ined 



N9 XXIII. 



X5"° 












% 



nnagor 




./^ Umrlhi 



'^t>- 



S5 



INDIA 
IN DIOCESES 



50 100 

I , , , , l 



ZOO 



300 



Scale of Miles. 



Un^alla, ? Smt 



\^ 



Khaii^fSoor 



'Rajcok 




tBlkaner 



J P 



O O T 

»Jodhpooi 



-f^m 



\mssctrj> 



i '/ 






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J~ »Ahmectab 












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'Indon 



CENT ft ^^^ 






20 



BOMBAY 






_ Ahnia^naga, 
O I 1 










/J 



Kolhapur } 
o -C / 

•Hubi 



tSecunderabad ^ 



HYDERABAD 



^Mangalore\ 




Bel/a ry 



Cali'o 




<^ 



10 



tA 




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Z5 



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15 



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§ 

I 
Cuddalore ^ 
re Cr 

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\Necfopcriam 




85' 



30° 



ASIA. 

ANGLICAN BISHOPRICS IN ASIA. 

Calcutta, 
1814. 



Madras, Bombay, Colombo, Lahore, Rangoon, Chota Nagpur, Lucknow, Nagpur, 
1835. 1837. 1845. 1877. 1877. 1890. 1893. 1902. 

I 



Travancore and Tinnevelly, 

Cochin, 1879. 1896. 



Victoria (Hong-Kong), 
1849. 


Chekiang (formerly Mid-China), 
1872. 




1 Canadian Mission, 
North China, Honan, 
1880. 1909. 


1 


Shantung, Kwangsi and Hunan, 
1903. 1909. 


Western China, Fuh-Kien, 
1895. 1906. 


South Tokyo (formerly Japan), 
1883. 


American Mission (Yedo), 

1866 

1 


shyu (South Japan), Osaka, 
1894. 1896. 


Hokkaido, 
1896. 


N. Tokyo, Kyoto, 
1898 1898. 


Labuan 


and Sarawak, 
i8SS- 


Corea, 
1889. 



(formerly Singapore, Labuan and Sarawak.) 

Singapore, 
1909. 



(55) 



56 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



There is good reason to believe that Syrian 
missionaries visited India before the end of the 
second century. The Syrian Church, v^fhich num- 
bers about 600,000, is now confined to the Malabar 
district of Southern India. In the sixteenth cen- 
tury St. Francis Xavier started work in Southern 
India which has been carried on ever since. 

The first non-Roman Mission to India (after 
the Reformation) — viz., that begun by the Danish 
Lutherans, Ziegenbalgh and Plutscho, at Tran- 
quebar in 1706 — originated from the example of 
the S.P.G. in America. Its object at the outset 
was promoted by the Society, and it was largely 
assisted by the S.P.C.K., to whose care many of 
its stations were afterwards transferred. Inde- 
pendently of this the S.P.C.K. began a mission 
of its own in Madras in 1728. This, with the 
adopted missions and others subsequently opened 
by the S.P.C.K. in Southern India, were carried 
on for nearly 100 years by German Lutheran 
missionaries. 

Soon after the foundation of the bishopric of 
Calcutta in 1814, the S.P.G. extended its opera- 
tions to that country by undertaking, in 181 8, 
the establishment of Bishop's College, near 
Calcutta. Its first two missionaries (the Rev. 
Dr. W. H. Mill and Mr. J. H. Alt) arrived in 
February, 1821, and the college, opened in 1824, 



became the centre of active missionary opera- 
ions in Bengal. 

The fields since occupied by the S.P.G. in 
Asia have been : Bombay Presidency in 1830, 
the North- Western Provinces 1833, the Central 
Provinces 1846, Assam 1851, the Punjab 1854, 
Burma 1859, Cashmere 1866, Ajmere 1881, 
Ceylon 1840, Borneo 1848, the Straits Settle- 
ments 1856, China 1863, Japan 1873, Corea 
i88g, Manchuria 1892, Siam 1903. 

During the period 1820-1910 the Society ex- 
pended £'3,197,079, and employed 871 ordained 
missionaries in Asia. At the present time its 
work there is being carried on in 17 dioceses, its 
expenditure in 1910 being £')?>fi2>T, and the 
number of its ordained missionaries 318, includ- 
ing 157 natives, 61 laymen (35 natives), 215 
women. 

The total population of India, including Burma, 
according to the census of 191 1, is 315,132,537, 
which includes 217,586,920 Hindus, 3,014,466 
Sikhs, 1,248,182 Jains, 10,721,449 Buddhists, 
100,100 Parsis, 66,623,412 Mohammedans, 
10,295,168 Animists, 20,980 Jews, 3,876,196 
Christians. 

For a further statement in regard to the 
Christian population of India, see page 102, 



0> 




I 

3 



I 



I 
I 

I 
I 



I 

I 



1 

1) 

I 









INDIA. 



PROVINCE OF CALCUTTA. 



Calcutta, — -This diocese was founded in 1814. 
It then included all India and Australia, and out 
of its original area all the dioceses of the pro- 
vince have been successively separated. It now 
comprises the Province of Bengal (Bengal, Bihar 
and Orissa), and the Province of Assam. The 
languages spoken, besides English and Urdu, 
are Bengali, Hindi, Uriya, Nepali, and Assamese, 
with their dialects ; Santali, Khasi, and many 
other non-Aryan languages. With the exception 
of Darjiling in the Himalayas, and of Shillong 
in the Khasi Hills, nearly the whole diocese con- 
sists of great river valleys or plains, and a large 
proportion of it is subject to annual floods. The 
population of the diocese in 1891 was 110,376,000 
of whom 58,821 are English-speaking. 

In the city of Calcutta, with its eight recog- 
nised districts or parishes, the work is very much 
like parish work in England, and is worked on 
parochial lines, with parish schools, boarding 
schools, etc., Fort William only being a purely 
military charge. Here are also established the 
headquarters of the mission work, with Bishop's 
College and the Oxford brotherhood, and the 
C.M.S. Divinity School. But the immense 
majority of the population — both of Bengal and 
of Assam — live in villages, and there are few large 
towns. Only Patna, which includes the canton- 
ment of Dinapur and the important civil station 



of Bankipur, has more than 160,000 inhabitants 
Dacca and Gaya are the only other places which 
reach half that nilmber. The work of the Church, 
therefore, both among Europeans and among 
Indians, is much scattered. There are 21 chap- 
lains (belonging to the Ecclesiastical Establish- 
ment of Bengal), whose primary duty is to 
minister to troops and to servants of Govern- 
ment, but of whom several have charge of city 
parishes and of the institutions in them. Be- 
sides the places in which they reside, the chap- 
lains visit about 30 smaller towns and settlements 
(out-stations). They minister altogether to about 
5,000 soldiers and soldiers' families (the chief 
military stations being Calcutta, with Barrackpur 
and Dum Dum, Darjiling and Dinapur), and to 
about 10,000 civilians. They are entirely main- 
tained by Government. Government makes 
further grants (Rs. 100 or Rs. 150 a month) in 
aid of the ministrations of 14 other clergy, who 
minister in 16 principal stations and about 60 
out-stations. These, with 8 others who are un- 
aided by Government, minister to about 5,000 
persons. Among the most important groups are 
the indigo-planters of Bihar, the tea-planters of 
Darjiling and of Assam, and the ever-increasing 
railway population. These furnish large con- 
gregations in at least six or seven places besides 
Calcutta. The principal mission districts are 



(57) 



58 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



those of the Sunderbuns, in S. Calcutta (S.P.G.) ; 
Nadiya (CM.S.) and Burrisal (O.M.), in Bengal; 
in Santalia (C.M.S.), and in the tea districts of 
Assam (S.P.G.). 

There are 14, clergy working in connection 
with the S.P.G. , 9 of whom are Indians, 48 in con- 
nection with the C.M.S., 23 of whom are natives 
and 13 supported by the Oxford Mission to Cal- 
cutta. There is one woman worker supported by 
the S.P.G. at the Milman School, Calcutta. 

The S.P.G. has worked in the diocese since 
1821. 

The Oxford Mission to Calcutta was founded 
in 1880 with a view more particularly to work 
among the educated natives of Calcutta, es- 
pecially those attending Calcutta University. 
It maintains hostels for students at Calcutta and 
Dacca and undertakes mission work of various 
kinds in and round Burrisal east of Calcutta. 
In addition to the 13 clergy belonging to the 
mission there are 2 laymen and 6 sisters belong- 
ing to it. 

Institutions : Bishop's College, Calcutta was 
founded in 18 19 by Dr. Middleton, first Bishop 
of Calcutta. It is under the control of the S.P.G. 
It was designed by its founder to be a mis- 
sionary institution and to promote the spread of 
the Christian religion in India, especially by in- 
structing native and other Christian youths in 
the doctrine and discipline of the Church in 
order to their becoming preachers, catechists or 
schoolmasters, or for their preparations for Holy 
Orders. It is affiliated to the Calcutta University. 

The Bishop's College School, which is under the 
control of the Principal of Bishop's College, is in- 
tended to provide for native Christian boys an 
education up to the standard of the Calcutta 
University entrance examination. 

CM.S. work. — Two English missionaries 
were sent to Calcutta in 181 6, Buedwan was 
occupied in 1817, Krishnagar (Nadiya) in 1831, 



and Bhagalpur in 1850. Great interest was 
aroused by a movement in the Nadiya district 
in 1838, when 3,000 persons forsook heathenism 
and 900 were baptised in the presence of Bishop 
Daniel Wilson. Work among the Santals, an 
aboriginal tribe, was begun at Hiranpur in i860. 
The CM.S. is now working at the following 
stations : Calcutta and out-stations, Burdwan, 
Krishnagar, Chupra, Bohirgachi, Ranabanda, 
Kapasdanga, Ratnapur, Bollobhpur, Bhobarpara, 
Joginda, Santirajpur, Kushtia, Meliapota, Solo, 
Balinrah, Santalia — Taljhari, Barharwa, Bar- 
heit, Hiranpur, Santalpur and Talpahari, Bha- 
gaya, Godda, Behar — Bhagalpur, Jamalpur. 

It supports 48 clergy in the diocese. 

The CM.S. Divinity School was first estab- 
lished at Krishnagar in 1878 and removed to 
Calcutta in 1880. It trains students as cate- 
chists and evangelists, and for Holy Orders. 

Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : — 

Calcutta : St. Saviour's (Bengali, Tamil, and 
Hindustani). Thakurpukur, Diamond Harbour, 
Geonkhalli and Burrisal. 

Sunderbuns : Barripore, Canning, Mogra Hat, 
Kharri, Tollygunge and Ghangra. 

Assam : Tezpur, Dibrugarh, Titabar, Silchar, 
Solabari. 

Bishops : — 

Thomas Fanshaw Middleton, 1814. 
Reginald Heber, 1823. 
John Thomas James, 1827. 
John Matthias Turner, 1829. 
Daniel Wilson, 1832. 
George Edward Lynch Cotton, 1858. 
Robert Milman, 1867. 

Edward Ralph Johnson, 1876 (resigned 1898). 
James Edward Cowell Welldon, 1898 (re- 
signed 1 901). 
Reginald Stephen Copleston, 1902 (cons. 

1875)- 



Bombay, 1833. — This diocese was separated Bind. Outside this area, which measures 200,000 
from that of Calcutta. It comprises the whole square miles, the bishop's charge extends to 
Presidency of Bombay except the Province of the Aurungabad district of the Hyderabad 



N9XXV. 




Chitaldrooq 
\ Ounderi 



S.P. G. Mission Stations are underlined thus . 



Other C.ofE. Mission Stations thus . 



PROVINCE OF CALCUTTA 



59 



State, a small portion of Rajputana, and Aden 
in Arabia. 

The total population in 1901 was about 
25,500,000 (including feudatory states, Aden, 
etc.). English-speaking, about 40,000. About 
20,000,000 are Hindus, about 4,500,000 Mussul- 
mans, 78,000 Parsis, 11,000 Jews, and 216,000 
Christians, who show an advance of 29 per cent, 
on the number registered in 1891. 

About 106,000 are Roman Catholics, a large 
portion of these being immigrants from Portu- 
guese territory, and many others tracing their 
Christianity back to the labours of St. Francis 
Xavier and his companions. The total popula- 
tion belonging to the Anglican communion was 
returned in the census of 1901 as 35,614; but it 
is not possible to treat this return as more than 
approximately complete, a considerable number 
of persons having returned themselves as " Pro- 
testants," and there being nothing to show to 
what denomination they belong. 

Work of the Anglican Communion. — There are 
84 clergy in the diocese, of whom 25 are Govern- 
ment chaplains, 3 belong to the Additional 
Clergy Society, i harbour chaplain, and the re- 
mainder are working in connection with C.M.S., 
S.P.G. and the Cowley Fathers. There are 23 
Indian clergy. 

The work of the clergy is strengthened by 
the assistance of 386 Women Workers and of 
the Wantage and All Saints' Sisterhoods, and 
of women who are working in connection with 
the C.M.S. 

The Cowley Brotherhood has houses in Bom- 
bay and Poona. In Bombay the community hold 
the incumbency of St. Peter's Mazagaon, a poor 
European district ; this is the centre of the 
Society's work, while the work carried on at 
Umarkhadi, close by, is entirely missionary. 
Their work at Poona is of a purely mis- 
sionary character. The Wantage Sisterhood 
opened a branch at Poona in 1877, and are 
settled near the Cowley Mission at Panch 
Howd. They have charge of several large 
schools, both for European and Indian girls, 



and are also responsible for the nursing at the 
Sassoon General Hospital at Poona. 

The All Saints' Sisterhood (1878) helps the 
Society in its work in Bombay, both amongst 
Europeans and Indians, and has charge of the 
nursing at the largest native hospital. 

The C.M.S. has stations at Bombay, Nasik, 
Poona, Malegaon, Manmad and Aurungabad. 
Their most flourishing mission is at Nasik, 
where medical and industrial work are well to 
the fore. 

The S.P.G. began work in this diocese in 
1830, and now has centres at Bombay, Ahmad- 
nagar, Kolhapur, Hubli, Gadag and Dapoli. 

At the present moment 21 clergy are scattered 
over the diocese carrying on the Society's work 
at the six different stations. Eleven of the 29 
clergy are Indians. Women Workers, 21. 

The Ahmadnagar Mission is the largest of the 
Anglican missions in the diocese, and 9 clergy, 
I layman, 16 women, 14 catechists, 13 readers 
and 85 schoolmasters are engaged in the work. 
At Ahmadnagar and its out-stations — Miri, Kare- 
gao, Rahuri and Sonai — there are 16 Euro- 
pean Women Workers and 18 Indian teachers 
connected with the S.P.G., many of these being 
attached to St. Monica's Mission, Ahmadnagar. 
These are engaged in educational, evangelistic 
and parochial work. There are 14 boarding 
schools, 64 day schools, and about 2,217 children 
are under Christian instruction. There is an 
important industrial school at Ahmadnagar. In 
this school Christian lads and men are trained 
to become carpenters, smiths, cane workers and 
tailors, but, owing to the recent difficulties about 
obtaining a superintendent, the numbers have 
fallen and its efficiency decreased. 

A large number of the Society's schools are 
inspected and aided by Government. 

The S.P.G. work at Bombay is carried on 
in three distinct languages. At Holy Trinity 
Church and the Indo-British Institution the 
work is carried on entirely in English, while at 
St. Paul's Church the services are conducted in 
Urdu, and the efforts of the workers are centred 



6o 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



amongst the Mohammedans, of whom there are 
175,000 in Bombay. 

Besides these two branches of the work in 
Bombay, an Indian priest is working amongst 
Tamil Christians, and has an out-station with 
church and school at Dharavi, about 10 miles 
from Bombay. 

At Kolhapur the Mission Press does good 
work and its Christian apprentices get good 
places from it. The Anson School for girls 
flourishes. Evangelistic work is attempted in 
the neighbourhood. 

At Dapoli the work is chiefly educational, and it 
has one of the best high schools in the Presidency. 

At Hubli and Betgeri (Gadag) the work has 
made a good start amongst the Canarese popula- 
tion. There are churches and schools in both 
places. At Betgeri is St. Augustine's College 
for ordinands and candidates for the position of 
catechist through which more than half the 
Indian clergy and catechists pass. 



The C.M.S. started work in Bombay in 1820. 
In 1832 the work was extended to Nasik ; Junnar 
was occupied in 1843, Malegaon 1848, Aurunga- 
bad i860, Poona 1882, and Manmad 1901. 

At the following stations the work is assisted 
by the S.P.G. :— 



Bombay — 


Ahmadnagar —{cont 


Holy Trinity 


Sonai 


Hindustani Mission 


Miri 


Kamatipura (Tamil) 


Rahuri 


Dharavi (Tamil) 


Karegao 


Kolhapur — 


Dapoli — 


Kagal 


Betgeri-Gadag— 


Ahmadnagar — 


Hubli 


Headquarters and Ghats 


Dharwar 



Bishops : — 

Thomas Carr, 1835. 

John Harding, 1851. 

Henry Alexander Douglas, 1869. 

Louis George Mylne, 1876 (resigned 1897). 

James Macarthur, 1898 (resigned 1903). 

Walter Ruthven Pym, 1903 (cons. 1898). 

Edwin James Palmer, 1908. 



Madras, 1835. — This diocese was founded by 
letters patent from King William IV. on June 
i3i 1835. It is coterminous with the Presi- 
dency of Madras. The bishopric of Tinnevelly 
and Madura is legally part of the diocese of 
Madras, but for all practical purposes is an inde- 
pendent see. The population of the Presidency 
is 44,503,159. The Bishop of Madras has juris- 
diction also in the native States of Hyderabad 
and Mysore and the Province of Coorg. Tamil, 
Telugu, Malayan, Tulu, Canarese, Hindustani, 
Mahratti and some aboriginal dialects are spoken 
within the diocese and jurisdiction. There are 
in the diocese and Coorg (excluding Tinnevelly 
and Madura) and in the native States of Hydera- 
bad and Mysore, about 83,233 adherents of the 
Church of England ; of these 28,943 are Euro- 
peans and Eurasians, and 44,507 are baptised 
Indians and 9,053 are catechumens. There are 
about 4,000 European and Eurasian, and 15,997 
native communicants. There are in all under 
the Bishop of Madras 148 clergy — viz., 38 
Europeans and no Indians. 

1 Cf. Hibbert- Ware's " Christian Missions 



In the S.P.G. mission schools there are about 
11,278 native scholars, of whom about 2,368 boys 
and 1,210 girls are Christians. 

The S.P.G. began work in the Madras diocese 
in 1825. The society has a theological college 
in Madras, a college and high school at Trich- 
inopoly and a high school at Tanjore. The 
Nandyal Training College trains the mission 
agents for the Telugu Missions.^ Work amongst 
women was begun at Nandyal in 1909. The 
Bishop Cotton School, Bangalore, is for European 
and Eurasian boys. 

Clergy : European clergy 23 (wholly supported 
by S.P.G.), native clergy 33 (partly supported 
by S.P.G., partly by native Church). Women 
Workers connected with S.P.G. : European 10, 
native 25. In Madras City there are many 
women workers connected with the Eurasian 
Settlement Mission, also i English and 7 
teachers at St. Ebba's Boarding School for Girls. 
There are i European and several native teachers 
at Tanjore and 3 Europeans and other native 
teachers at Trichinopoly. 
in the Telugu Country." S.P.G. 2S. net. 



N?XXVI. 



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S.P.G. Mission Stations are under /i nee/ thus Other CoFE. Mission Stations thus 



PROVINCE OF CALCUTTA 



6i 



The C.M.S. supports i6 European clergy and 
32 native clergy in this diocese. 

There are 14 other societies, unconnected 
with the Anglican Church, working in Madras. 

Stations assisted by S.P.G. : — 

First Division 

Trichinopoly 

Irungalur 

Mettupatti 

Annamangalam 

Pudukotai 

Tanjore 

Vediarpuram 

Kumbakonatn 

Canendagudi and Aneiccadu 

Negapatam 

Nangur — Tranquebar 



Second Division 

Secunderabad 
Bolarum 
Yellandu 
Chudderghaut 
Bellary 
Bangalore 
Kolar 
Cuddalore 

Villupuram — Pondicherry 
Madras — Church of Good 
Shepherd 



Second Division (cont.) 
Madras St. Thome 

,, Egmore 

,, Vepery, St. Paul's 

,, Sembium 
Coimbatore 
Salem 

Madras Theological College 
St. Ebba's School 



Third Division 

Proddatur 
Mutyalapad 
Kalasapad 
Giddalur 
Nandyal 
Kurnool 

Nandyal Training College 
and Parish 



Bishops : — 

Daniel Corrie, 1835. 
George Trevor Spencer, 1837. 
Thomas Dealtry, 1849. 
Frederick Gell, 1861. 
Henry Whitehead, 1899. 



Travancore and Cochin, 1879. — This diocese 
is coterminous with the two native States from 
which it takes its name. The population of 
Travancore, the larger State of the two, is 
2,952,157, and that of Cochin 812,025, making 
a total of 3,764,182. The combined area is 8,452 
square miles, showing an average density of 506 
persons to the square mile. 

The number of Christians in this area, accord- 
ing to the census of 1901, is 895,626, or nearly 
one-fourth of the whole population. Details are 
given below. The jurisdiction of the bishop 
is the Church of England in Travancore and 
Cochin. 

The Europeans and Eurasians number 3,572, 
of whom many belong to the Roman Church, 
most of the remainder being members of the 
Church of England. 

The native members of the Anglican Church 
number 48,412; catechumens 4,884; clergy, 
Europeans 12 and 36 Indian. During the year 
1908 there were 2,148 infant and 1,400 adult 
baptisms; 13,921 communicants and 5,965 
Sunday scholars. 

Church work. — -There are two chaplaincies 
among Europeans and Eurasians. The chap- 
laincy of Trevandrum, the capital of Travancore, 
including the out-station ofQuilon,is supported 
by a grant from the Government of India, sup- 
plemented by subscriptions from the European 
residents. The chaplaincy of Cochin is included 



in this episcopal jurisdiction by arrangements 
with the Bishop of Madras ; it includes the out- 
station of Munnar on the High Range, a plant- 
ing district, and is supported by a grant from 
the Colonial and Continental Church Society, 
supplemented by subscriptions from the resi- 
dents. Missionaries minister to the smaller 
European communities. 

The missionary operations of the diocese are 
conducted by the Church Missionary Society 
and the Church of England Zenana Missionary 
Society. The former maintains 11 ordained mis- 
sionaries and the latter 8 women missionaries. 
The native Church is gradually becoming self- 
supporting, though it still receives financial help 
from the C.M.S. ; it maintains 31 Indian clergy 
for pastoral duties and 25 evangelists and a 
diocesan missioner. It has also 7 Anglo- 
vernacular and 207 vernacular schools. By its 
missionary association the native Church sup- 
ports a clergyman and a few evangelists and 
teachers for work among the heathen. 

Some of the institutions in the diocese are : 
the Cambridge Nicholson Institution for training 
candidates for Holy Orders and evangelists and 
teachers ; the C.M.S. College of Kottayam, affil- 
iated to the University of Madras ; the Buchanan 
Institution, for training female teachers ; the 
Baker Memorial High School for Girls;, the 
C.M.S. Press at Kottayam ; the Christian Litera- 
ture Society and Malayalam Religious Tract 



62 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Society ; the Mission to the Jews on the Mala- 
bar Coast ; the Diocesan Education Fund ; high 
schools at Trichur and Mavelikara ; boys' and 
girls' boarding schools at Tiruvella, Trichur 
and Kunnankulam ; an industrial school for 
boys at Kottayam ; leper asylums at Alleppey ; 
and the Diocesan Sunday School Union. 

The S.P.C.K. gives assistance by way of 
scholarships for students and grants for ver- 
nacular Prayer Book revision and various pub- 
lications. The Madras Auxiliary of the British 
and Foreign Bible Society undertakes the pub- 
lication and revision of Bibles in the vernacu- 
lar. A diocesan conference is held annually in 
August. The Pro-Cathedral Church of the Holy 
Trinity is at Kottayam, where the bishop resides. 

The native members of the ancient Syrian 
Church, under the Jacobite Patriarch of Antioch, 
number about 204,000, and those of the Reformed, 
or St. Thomas, Syrian Church under its own 
Metropolitan, about 50,000. Those owing alle- 
giance to the Church of Rome number, according 



to the Syrian rite, about 290,000, and according 
to the Latin rite, about 233,000. Those under 
the East Syrian Patriarch (or the Catholicos of 
the East) number from 10,000 to 30,000; their 
exact number is not known. Their chief station 
is Trichur. All these Churches are administered 
by II native, i Chaldean, and 3 European 
bishops. 

Missionary work was begun by the C.M.S. in 
1816. For 20 years it was carried on mainly 
with a view to the reform of the ancient Malabar 
Syrian Church. Since 1837 the missionaries 
have laboured independently. Alleppey was oc- 
cupied in 1816, Cottayam and Cochin 181 7, 
Mavelikara in 1839. 

There are about 70,000 Christians in connection 
with the London Missionary Society in South 
Travancore. 

Bishops : — 

John Martindale Speechly, 1879. 

Edward Noel Hodges, 1889 (resigned 1905). 

Charles Hope Gill, 1905. 



Tinnevelly and Madura, 1896.— This bis- 
hopric is legally part of the diocese of Madras, 
but the bishop, who holds a commission from 
the Bishop of Madras, has a free hand, and 
appeals from him can only be made to the 
Metropolitan. The bishopric includes the two 
collectorates of Tinnevelly and Madura, in the 
extreme south of India. Population, about 
4,000,000. Europeans are very few in num- 
ber, chiefly Government officials. Native Chris- 
tians of the Church of England, 92,000. Both 
the S.P.G. and C.M.S. support Missions in the 
diocese. The former occupies the eastern, the 
latter the western, side of the district. There 
are S.P.G. schools at Tuticorin and at Ramnad 
for boys and girls, a high school for girls, two 
training institutions for teachers, an art in- 
dustrial .school, and orphanages at Nazareth. 

The work of the S.P.G. in Tinnevelly dates 
from 1825. The bishopric was in part endowed 
by the S.P.G. 



The S.P.G. support 7 dispensaries or hos- 
pitals ; the C.M.S. i dispensary. 

There is a theological training class at 
Nazareth. 

The S.P.G. and C.M.S. have itinerating 
evangelistic bands which carry on mission 
work in the different villages. 

There is an institution for the deaf and dumb 
at Palamcottah. 

There are lace schools at Nazareth, Idaiyangudi, 
Kudenkulam and Ramnad belonging to the S.P.G. 

The C.M.S. has. a college at Tinnevelly, the 
Sarah Tucker College for girls at Palamcottah, 
and high schools at Palamcottah, Mengnana- 
puram and Srivilliputhur. There is also a theo- 
logical school (C.M.S.) at Palamcottah. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G.: 
European clergy, 4; Indian clergy (partly sup- 
ported by S.P.G.), 39. Women Workers, 7. 

The C.M.S. supports 9 European clergy and 
40 Indian clergy in this diocese. 



NV:XXVIE. 



'WEEL 



2i 



— [ fj ajosinQawsngalam 

madukuluttur \f. Utitnn^i/^ — ~~:C^'^*t-^ ^amesmnin\ 

Shekul, 
Sfiqyfi 



^i^^r^M/"^ 



Bridge 



7a°SA^ 



50 



\Utt3mapaiaiyam 



'olBvandan 

Sitfampiafth 



Mapkulam 



Melur 
li'ruvadur 



.^■.^mapali 
KHampam 

/ tGudalur ^ 



shanw 



'araikhen'fj,^ 



Piwandi 

^irumangalarrT^^s^ 
~^J)rvpvvi 

s Maurnaud 

'/Muaf I ^ 

Corriaputfy \ 

Vurrasooif 






Vasudevanallu* 



• tehmalai 

•Sevaipai, 



' Rajakari ^M^> 'fXtMmMifiW' 

•Sippiparai 



lemmeni 



Jembars 

npni - . K 



'Pudur" 



Vasudevai^llii'r 'n y —rri i^-jr ^n^*^=^ (JB galapurarn 

. , - ,/ Chokkampatti S/ <i W/./r.J^-£^mmmi ^ ^'Mf" 
^-^Wakurajfl^-fBlei \janaiva.dali»-^m^ahibijr "^^^^^^p^^^^l 



miqarei i „S. ^, , , 
Jlafikul^y&''"''" 



. Tenl^^i^'Suramrr") 



tPak. 



ivant/bna/ ' 



4Afe//£/r ^^'''^'■'^- 



1^ \Ko\(i/uffu 

■^ -* --* ^ XSilualsamutbram >f r 

PavanasatTim ^^^ 

(S) VthMan^ttur, 
falapaurae 17 



mia 



Hulaseqaranallu, 
KallamMnbru 



• Melaseithddi 
'Offappidaran 



Talaiyuftu 



_ iampMur 
'"^^dafhupf^^;^ ' ^Tufjcor/'n 

>arkadu^ 
•by r, , ' JVIuaimnm 
f*M?J0)<iOt!?0. 3awvelrpj 



jydrh/rm 



h'dai'v'aha 



8 



Bundaiapauraey QSyaJ. -Z-T^ongara^ 

-2-> Idaivankujam , Serghkulam, ., Tiruvagin Hajumahdy 

@ "~,"-]^ llfvafhapoj^i mtk' 'P rakaS^rW 



.tai 

^MadagiriR. 



mtucal/^ Tirukurui 
talliel Y}- 

Arr^mariay Ponmunna ^mugaranga^ufam' 

^ V •Panahdi 

^etoray 

^erraneeU Tittuviley "5^ . 
oanthapuram nora/\ i f** 



fc ,Nangun"eri\ .^P.H^mr^47firochendur 

!j^Dji.knmr.Pai^p0[^^^ SSmrsrn ^ 



Jn^mSrh ^'i-'i^ ii t'^'^'"W k 



Peifdnkld\Wcm^P.^J^ 
Menkulam 



MlidKJ 



Satankulkm if^dafur 
sfiagurai 

Mm 

Ovary 



/!5ii§f'' 





lyapafi 
^aindankarai 



'^03/ 



\peComom 



I Scale of Miles. 

DIOCESE OF 
IIMEVELLY & MADURA.^ 



10 



30 



Z/W 



78° 



S. p. G. Mission Stations are underlined thus. 



Other C. of E. Mission Stations thus . 



PROVINCE OF CALCUTTA 



63 



Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : — 



TiNNEVELLY 

Tuticorin 
Idaiyangudi 
Radhapuram 
Nagalapuram 
Puthiamputhur 
Nazareth 
Mudalur 
Christianagratn 
Sawyerpuram 
Pudukotai 

Tinnevelly evangelistic 
work 



Tinnevelly — (cont.) 

Sawyerpuram Secondary 
School 

Victoria Girls' School 
Ramnad — 

Ratnnad District 

Ramnad Town 

Mudukulathur 

Paramagudi 

Kilanjani 

Rajasingamangalam 

Keelakarai 

Pamban 



Bishops : — 

Robert Caldwell, 1877-91. \ 
Edward Sargent, 1877-90. / 
Samuel Morley, 1896 (resigned 1903). 
Arthur Acheson Williams, 1905. 



Lahore, 1877- — This diocese was founded in 
1877 as a memorial to Bishop Milman, who died 
when on a visitation in the Punjab. It consists 
of the Punjab (and its dependencies), taken from 
the diocese of Calcutta, and Sindh taken from 
Bombay, together with Beluchistan and Kash- 
mir. The population is not less than 34,000,000, 
of whom rather more than half are Mohamme- 
dans. There are about 37,000 English-speaking 
people. The first bishop was Dr. Valpy French. 
The Cathedral Church of the Resurrection was 
consecrated on 25th January, 1887. The num- 
ber of clergy is 115, of whom 33 are Govern- 
ment chaplains, and 8 are engaged in pastoral 
or educational work among Europeans. There 
are 58 clergy (17 are Indians) in connection 
with the C.M.S., and 15 (2 are Indians) in 
connection with the S.P.G. There are also 36 
European Women Workers in connection with 
the S.P.G. 

T'/fe Cambridge Mission to Delhi is also in 
connection with the S.P.G.^ 

This mission to North India was originated in 
1877, with the object of carrying on educational 
and evangelistic work. St. Stephen's College pre- 
pares students (now about 150) for the degree 
examinations of the Punjab University. New 
college buildings were opened in 1891 and again 
in 1908, and there are hostels for both Christian 
and non-Christian students. St. Stephen's High 
School and the branch schools (with about 850 
pupils) are also under the charge of the mission, 
and a boarding house for Christian boys (about 
40) adjoins the S.P.G. Mission House which is 

> C/. " The Story of the Delhi 



the headquarters of the Brotherhood of the Cam- 
bridge Mission. There is also an hostel for non- 
Christian boys whose parents live in the country. 
The mission is responsible for services in Urdu 
in St. Stephen's Church, and for the pastoral 
charge of the native Christians. A second church 
has been consecrated, called " Holy Trinity,'' for 
the use of native Christians, in another part of 
Delhi ; also one in the town of Karnal, and a 
small one in the village of Fatehpur. Classes 
are held for the instruction of catechists, school- 
masters, etc. Evangelistic work among Hindus 
and Mohammedans is carried on in Delhi and in 
other parts of the South Punjab. There is an 
industrial boarding school at Gurgaon, where 
about 50 pupils are taught shoemaking, tailoring, 
or carpentry. 

Nine missionaries are stationed at Delhi and 
two at Rohtak. Two hospitals for women and 
children (St. Stephen's at Delhi and St. Eliza- 
beth's at Karndl), and a dispensary at Rewari, are 
carried on by 5 women doctors ; also girls' schools 
and Zenana teaching in various parts of the mis- 
sion district, by other ladies who are in part sup- 
ported by S.P.G. The S.P.G. annual grant to 
the diocese is about ;^3,ooo. 

Society of St. Hilda, Lahore. — ^^This Society 
consists of deaconesses, licensed workers and 
probationers. The Society is affiliated to the 
S.P.G. It has charge of the Cathedral High 
School for girls and of several other schools in 
the diocese. 

St Johns Divinity School, Lahore, was estab- 
lished in 1870 by the late Bishop French in 
Mission." S.P.G. 2s. net. 



64 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



connection with the C.M.S. Its object is to 
prepare candidates for ordination. 

The S.P.G. began missionary work at Delhi 
in 1852. This was temporarily interrupted by 
the Mutiny, but was resumed immediately after- 
wards. Work was started at Karndl in 1862, at 
Riwari in 1883. 

The C.M.S. began work in the Punjab in 
1851 soon after its annexation. Amritsar was 
occupied in 1851, Peshawar in 1855, Multan 
1856, Srinagar 1864, Lahore 1867. Work was 



commenced at Kotgurh prior to the annexation 
of the Punjab. In the valley of Kashmir a 
medical mission was started in 1865. Mission 
work in Sindh (which is also in the diocese of 
Lahore) was begun in 1850. Karachi was oc- 
cupied in 1850, Hyderabad in 1856, and Sukkur 
in 1887. 
Bishops : — 

Thomas Valpy French, 1877. 

Henry James Mathew, 1888. 

George Alfred Lefroy, 1899. 



Chota Nagpur, 1890. — The diocese of Chota 
Nagpur is situated in the Province of Bengal, 
and comprises the whole of the old political 
Division ^ known by that name. Its nearest point 
is 200 miles west of Calcutta. The population 
of 5,500,000 is made up of Hindus, Mussulmans 
and aboriginal tribes. 

Missionary work in this diocese was started 
in 1845 by Lutheran missionaries from Berlin. 
The S.P.G. commenced work in 1869. 

Ranchi is the cathedral town and is the centre 
of the Society's work in the surrounding district, 
in which there are over 16,000 Christians scattered 
over 16 parishes. There are also boarding 
schools for boys and girls, and 2 hospitals. 
There are 34 clergy in the diocese, of whom 22 
are Indians. 

The Dublin University Mission to Chota 
Nagpur was founded in 1891. It was to con- 
sist of graduates of the University of Dublin 
who should live in community and work under 
the S.P.G., with the Bishop of Chota Nagpux 
as their Visitor. The Mission also includes lady 
associates, who work with the sanction of the 
bishop under the direction of the Head of the 
Mission. The centre of its work is at Hazari- 
bagh which lies in the north of the diocese. A 
branch house was opened at Chitarpur in 1901, 
and another at Ranchi in 1902, but the latter was 

1 Division is the technical name, a District is a sub-section 
of a Division. The boundaries of the Division have been 
altered, but the Diocese remains the same. 



closed in 1910, owing to lack of men, and the work 
was taken over by S.P.G. At Hazaribagh the 
Mission supports a college (with 125 students) 
which is affiliated to Calcutta University ; and a 
high school with a Christian boys' hostel (118 
boys) in connection with it. There are connected 
with the Mission 3 hospitals and 5 dispensaries. 

Chaibasa is the most important mission 
station in the southern part of the diocese. 
It is the centre of educational, evangelistic, and 
pastoral work, which exerts an influence over a 
wide tract of the surrounding country. 

The principal languages spoken in the diocese 
are Hindi, Bengali, Mundari, Santali, Ho, and 
Uraon. 

The native Christians, almost wholly from the 
aboriginal tribes, number over 161,000, being an 
increase of more than 60 per cent, in ten years. 
The members of the Church of England num- 
ber 18,463, Lutherans about 63,000, and Roman 
Catholics about 80,000. 

Of the 18,463 Christians in communion with 
the Church of England 16,135 are in the Ranchi 
District, 1,608 in Singhbhum (Chaibasa), 682 in 
Hazaribagh, and 38 in Manbhum. Of the 16,135 
in the Ranchi district about 11,000 are Mundas, 
and the remainder Uraons and ex-Hindus. 

In the last thirty years while the number of 
Christians has more than doubled (8,334 and 
18,463), the native contributions have increased 
threefold. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P.G. : 



PROVINCE OF CALCUTTA 



65 



European, 15 (including 6 in the Dublin Uni- 
versity Mission). Indian clergy not receiving 
any salary from S.P.G., 19. There are 11 women 
workers in the Dublin University Mission con- 
nected with the S.P.G., and 12 other European 
women workers at Ranchi, Chaibasa, and 
Murhu, including 4 wives of missionaires. 

The S.P.G. provided ^^2,000 towards the 
episcopal endowment of this diocese. 

Stations assisted by the S.P.G. : — 



Ranchi 

Phatyatoli 

Duru 

Kachabari 

Bargari 

Murhu 

Itki 

Takra 

Dorma 

Soparom 



Maranghada 

Tapkara 

Jaipur 

Jargo 

Ramtolya 

Chaibasa 

Sitagarra 

Chitarpur 

Hazaribagh 

Purulia 



Bishops : — - 

Jabez Cornelius Whitley, 1890. 
Foss Westcott, 1905. 



Lucknow, 1893. — This diocese consists of 
the Province of Oudh and the Jhansi Division. 
To this, by commission from the Bishop of 
Calcutta, the remaining portion of the United 
Provinces has been added, the whole compris- 
ing an area of 112,612 square miles. The total 
population is about 50,000,000, of whom 102,471 
are Christians (1891). The cathedral church of 
the diocese is at Allahabad. It was consecrated 
in 1887. 

The S.P.G. supports 14 clergy, of whom 3 
are Indians; the C.M.S. supports 47, of whom 
15 are Indians. Women Workers in connection 
with S.P.G., 21. 

The number of clergy is 92 ; of these 24 are 
Government chaplains. The diocese has a 
council of clergy and laity, in connection with 
which are Boards of Finance, of Church Ex- 
tension, of Education and of Missions. The dio- 
cese has over 80 permanent churches. There 
are 12 unpaid diocesan lay readers, and a large 
number of European and Indian lay agents paid 
by the missionary societies. 

The work of the S.P.G. in what is now the 
diocese of Lucknow began in 1833, when the 
Rev. J. Carshore was sent to undertake mis- 
sionary work in Cawnpore. Work was begun 
in Roorki in 1861, in Banda 1873, and in 
Hardwar 1877. Henry Martyn's first convert 
was baptised by him at Cawnpore in 1810. At 
Rurki there is an Orphanage and two girls' 
schools, with branch schools at Hardwar. 
' In 1896 the Cawnpore S.P.G. Brotherhood was 

^ Cf. The Story of the Cawnpore 

5 



formed. Its formation has resulted in a large 
development of the work in and around Cawn- 
pore. The mission work at Cawnpore includes 
Christ Church College, which is affiliated to the 
Allahabad University, and prepares students up 
to the M.A. standard (number on rolls, about 
105); a high school with 230 pupils; St. Mar- 
tin's Industrial School, where the boys are 
taught printing, carpentry, and brass foundry 
work; St. Martin's Home for Boys (number of 
boarders, about 60) ; also a class for the training 
of Indian catechists and clergy. 

A Hospital for Women is in charge of women 
doctors, a Girls' Orphanage (no boarders) and 
Day School and a Zenana Mission. At the 
hospital the staff consists of 3 European doctors 
and 3 nurses, and 12 Indian nurses and dispensers. 
There are 16 European and 30 Indian teachers 
connected with the Orphanage and Zenana 
work. 

At Banda where the work is evangelistic and 
educational there are two schools, one for 
Mohammedan and one for Hindu girls, in charge 
of 2 Women Workers. At Karwi, an out-station 
of Banda, where the work is entirely evangelistic, 
there are 2 women workers, both of whom are 
native Indian deaconesses. 

The S.P.G. also helps to support work at 
Moradabad and work amongst women at Alla- 
habad. 

The C.M.S. began work in what is now the 
diocese of Lucknow in 181 5. Agra was occupied 
in 1813, Meerut in 1815, Benares 1817, Gorakpur 
Mission. S.P.G. 2S. 6d. net. 



66 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



1823, Jaunpur 1831, Lucknow 1858, Allahabad 
and Dehra Dun 1859, Aligarh 1863. 

St. John's College, Agra, was established in 
1853, and was affiliated to the University of 
Calcutta in 1862, and to the University of 
Allahabad in 1888. It prepares students up to 
the M.A. standard. The daily attendance, in- 
clusive of the five branch schools in the city, 
is about 1200. Scriptural instruction is given 
daily to all the students. 



The Queen Victoria Girls' High School at 
Agra, opened in 1904 has 220 pupils on the rolls. 

The C.M.S. maintains St. Paul's Divinity 
College at Allahabad, also a hostel at Allahabad 
for Christian and non-Christian students attend- 
ing the University. 

Bishops : — 

Alfred Clifford, 1893 (resigned 1910). 
George Herbert Westcott, 1910. 



Nagpur, 1902. — The territories out of 
which the diocese was formed had up till 
then been, with the exception of the Berars which 
was in the Madras diocese, part of the Calcutta 
diocese. These territories comprise the Central 
Provinces, with the Berars, Central India and 
Rajputana. The Central Provinces are part 
of British India, and are administered by 
a Chief Commissioner. Central India and 
Rajputana are composed of a large number of 
native states under their native rulers. In these 
native states the interests of the Indian Govern- 
ment are cared for by political officers, who are 
appointed by them. 

The first Bishop of Nagpur was consecrated 
in St. Paul's Cathedral, Calcutta, on 25th March, 
1903. The new diocese takes its title from Nag- 
pur, which is the capital city of the Central 
Provinces. The bishop of the diocese now resides 
at Nagpur, a large Mahratta city with 130,000 
people. 

The number of clergy in the diocese is 35, of 
whom 17 are chaplains, and the remainder are 
missionaries mostly connected with the Church 
Missionary Society. The Church Missionary 
Society has important missions at Jubbulpore, 
and the Gond country in the Central Provinces ; 
and at Bharatpur and the Bhil country in Raj- 



putana. The Scotch Episcopal Church has a 
mission to the Gonds at Chanda in the Central 
Provinces. Jubbulpore, the oldest of the C.M.S. 
stations in the diocese, was occupied in 1854, 
Mandla 1879, Marpha 1892, Patpara 1897, Katni 
Murwara 1899. In Rajputana, Kherwara was 
occupied 1880, Biladia, Lusadia and Sukulpura 
1901, and Bharatpur 1902. The number of bap- 
tised Christians in connection with the C.M.S. 
in the Central Provinces (1906) is 1,128, and in 
Rajputana 858. 

The S.P.G. has a small mission at Ajmeer 
worked by an Indian clergyman. The Society 
helps to support a chaplain at Bandikui, who 
ministers to Europeans and Eurasians. 

The C.M.S. and C.E.Z.M.S. support about 20 
ladies in connection with missionary work, and 
the C.M.S. have about 6 laymen working chiefly 
in the Gond and Bhil Missions. 

The Episcopal Church of Scotland started 
work at Chanda in what is now the diocese of 
Nagpur in 1870. The mission staff at Chanda 
consists of 2 European clergy, i Indian deacon, 
3 European lady workers, 5 Indian Christian lay 
workers, i Mohammedan and i Hindu assistant. 



Bishop : — 



Eyre Chatterton, 1903. 



Colombo, 1845. — This diocese comprises 
the island of Ceylon, with a population 
of 3,576,990. This population is thus divided : 
Singhalese, 2,334,570 ; Tamils, 95o>844 ; 



Moormen, 224,066. The Moormen are, 
as their name implies, almost without ex- 
ception Mohammedans ; the Singhalese, if 
not Christians, are Buddhists ; and the 



N9XXX. 



10 



8 



C EYLON 

DIOCESE OF 
COLOMBO 



Scale of Mil es 
Mulafivu 




81 



I ! I I 



IPO 



'ValcHfenclfJ'^^'''^'"'''^ 
Eraooj. 



'Bafficaloa . 
\jfarativo 









^Arugam 
Bay 



79 



80 



81 



8Z 



S.P. G. Mission(present or Former) stations are underlined thus C.M.3. stations thus. 



PROVINCE OF CALCUTTA 



67 



Tamils, if not Christians, are Hindus. The 
Buddhists number 2,142,000; Hindus, 828,000; 
Mohammedans, 248,000. The Christian popu- 
lation is 358,000, of whom 283,000 are Roman 
Catholics, and about 32,000 Church of England. 

The clergy number 88, of whom 32 are from 
England. Sisters of the Community of St. 
Margaret's, East Grinstead, carry on educa- 
tional, orphanage, nursing and parish work in 
Colombo. A clergy pension fund has been 
started. 

The work of the S.P.G. in Ceylon began 
at Colombo in 1840. St. Thomas's College, 
Colombo, is the centre of its work in this 
diocese. 

The S.P.G. helps to support 3 European and 
4 native clergy. The following stations are as- 
sisted by the S.P.G. : Batticaloa, Dandugama, 
Kurana, Galkisse, Matara, Weligama, Tangalle, 
Buona Vista and Galle. 

St. Thomas's College, Colombo, was founded 
in 1851 by the first Bishop of Colombo. It was 
affiliated to Calcutta University in 1864. The 
foundation comprises divinity studentships for 
candidates for Holy Orders and a collegiate 
school. 

The C.M.S. supports 17 European clergy, and 
16 native clergy are connected with the C.M.S., 
but are supported almost entirely by their flocks. 
This Society began work amongst the Singhalese 
population at Kandy in 1818, Baddegama 1819, 
Cotta 1822, and Kegalle 1880. For work amongst 
the Tamils, Jaffna was occupied in 1818, Colombo 
1850, Galle 1903, and the Tamil Coolie Mission 
was begun in 1855. 

The Bishop of Calcutta, formerly Bishop of 
Colombo, writing in regard to the work of the 
S.P.G. in Ceylon, says: "The S.P.G.. has been 
a promoter and helper of missionary work rather 
than a proprietor of distinct missions. In one 



or two districts, as in the villages between 
Colombo and Negombo, or in the Matara dis- 
trict, south of Galle, it has independent and 
valuable work; but more often, even where its 
work has been most distinctly evangelistic — as 
around BaduUa, in the Kandian province of 
Uva, or around Batticaloa and among the 
Veddas — the S.P.G. has worked in close con- 
junction with Government chaplains or dio- 
cesan clergy, rather than by a staff and missions 
of its own. In so doing it has deserved very 
well of the Church, and has efficiently served 
the missionary cause. The Society is also as- 
sociated with the bishop in the tenure of the 
cathedral, and of St. Thomas's College, the 
leading educational institution of the diocese, 
and, we may almost venture to add, of the 
colony. This college, which boards over 100 
boys, from all the races of the island, and 
teaches about 400, has received continuous aid 
from the S.P.G. About two-thirds of the whole 
number of pupils are Christians, and the Chris- 
tian atmosphere and excellent tone of the col- 
lege — in which the esprit de corps is very strong, 
both among present and past students— naturally 
have a good effect on the non-Christian pupils, 
though actual conversions are not frequent." 

The chief missionary societies other than those 
belonging to the Anglican Church are the Wes- 
leyan Missionary Society, the American Board 
of Commissioners, and the Baptist Missionary 
Society. 

Bishops : — 

James Chapman, 1845. 
Piers Calvely Claughton, 1862 (cons. 1859). 
Hugh Willougby Jermyn, 1871 (tr. 1875). 
Reginald Stephen Copleston, 1875, trans. 

1902. 
Ernest Arthur Copleston, 1903. 



Rangoon, 1877. — The diocese of Rangoon great extent to the liberality of the diocese of 
includes the whole of Burma and the Andaman Winchester. In 1887, after the annexation, 
and Nicobar Islands. It owes its existence to a Upper Burma was added by letters patent to 



68 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



the diocese. The estimated area is over 
200,000 square miles, with a population of about 
12,115,217, consisting of Europeans, Eurasians, 
Burmese, Karens, Chins and other hill tribes and 
numerous Chinese and natives of India. The 
total Christian population (191 1) is 210,081. 
There are in all 52 clergy and about roo Church 
lay workers. 

The S.P.G. began work in Burma in 1864, and 
is the only C. of E. mission in that country. 

Clergy working in connection with S.P. G. : 
European clergy, 17 ; native clergy, 15 (Burmese 
2, Karen 11, Indian 2) European laymen, 5. 
Women Workers connected with the S.P.G. : 
European, 12; native, 30. These are engaged 
in educational and evangelistic work in Rangoon, 
Shwebo, Toungoo and Moulmein. 

Other societies 1 working in Burma, not con- 
nected with the Anglican Church, are : Ameri- 



can, 3, adherents, 80,000 (total of missionaries 
from America about 180); British, 6 (adherents, 
11,093); Continental, i (adherents, about 861). 

The Roman Catholic Church has 3 bishops, 
70 European and 13 native priests and about 
100 lay European missionaries in Burma, and 
claims 56,600 adherents. 

Work at the following stations is assisted by 
the S.P.G.:— 



Rangoon, St. Gabriel's 
,, St. Barnabas' 
,, St. Mary's and St. 
John's 

Kemendine, St. Michael's 

Prome 

Moulmein, St. Augustine's 



Toungoo, St. Luke's (North) 
St. Peter's (South) 
Mandalay, Christ Church 
Shwebo, All Saints' 
Maymyo 
Port Blair 



Bishops : — ■ 

Jonathan Holt Titcomb, 1877. 

John Miller Strachan, 1882. 

Arthur Mesac Knight, 1903 (resigned 1909). 

Rollestone Sterritt Fyffe, 1910. 



' Cf. Purser's Christian Missions in Burma, S.P.G., 2S. net. 



Church of England Zenana Missionary 
Society. — This Society has now completed its 
thirty-first year of work. It was established 
upon its present basis in April, 1880. The 
Society works in Kashmir, the North-West 
Frontier Province, Sindh, the Punjab, Behar, 
Bengal, the Central Provinces, Bangalore, Ma- 
dras, Mysore, Tinnevelly, Travancore and Cochin, 
Ceylon, Singapore, and the Fuh Kien Province 
of China. 

Its staff consists of about 211 women mis- 
sionaries in home and local connection, and 
75 assistants in local connection, and 255 Bible- 
women, 828 native teachers, nurses and dis- 
pensers, making a total staff of 1,369. The 
evangelistic work of the Society is being carried 
on amongst purdah women in 50 stations in 
India and 2 in Ceylon. The returns available 
from most of the missions show that about 
6,890 Zenana pupils receive instruction in the 
course of a year. The Society works in 12 
stations in China and at i in Singapore. This 
Society has 308 elementary and a few middle day 
schools, with upwards of 13,926 children on the 



rolls, and an average attendance of perhaps two- 
thirds of that total. A large number of these 
schools are under Government inspection and 
receive Government grants. Many of the native 
teachers are trained, and the greater number 
are Christians. It also has boarding schools, 
orphanages and training homes for girls. Chris- 
tian Eurasian and native women are being trained 
as assistant missionaries, Bible-women, dis- 
pensers, nurses and teachers. The Society has 
17 women doctors with British qualifications — 
14 working in India and 3 in China — besides 14 
trained nurses and a number of partially trained 
workers, English and Indian. It has also 21 
hospitals and about 40 dispensaries. The Society 
has 6 homes for converts in India and in China, 
in which women who are not suitable for train- 
ing as Bible-women or teachers, are taught to 
support themselves by means of some industry. 
The incorne of the Society for 1910 was £52,168. 
Other Missionary Societies Working in 
India. — Some statistics in regard to the number 
of Christians in India connected with Roman 
Catholic and with various Protestant denomina- 



N9 XXXI. 



92" 



96° 



100° 



/kachins*'^"'P"'' 



24° 



20' 



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•ffdn^amah' 



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(Kanbalu 






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c H ri N A 



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m 



re^or. 



RtA K A N 



iapain, 



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•Madav^ 



-l Kunlonq 



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yfamethin^ 



S H 



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Scale oF Miles. 

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Mission S fa/ions supported by the S. P. G. are underlined , other Anglican Stations. 



PROVINCE OF CALCUTTA 



69 



tions, extracted from the Indian census returns, 
will be found below. 

The Roman Catholic establishments in India 
divide the country into 7 (or, including Ceylon, 
into 8) Archbishoprics. These are : (i) Agra, 
including the North West Provinces, Rajpu- 
tana, Punjab and Kashmir (baptised adherents, 
35,204); (2) Calcutta, including Bengal, Assam 
and Arakan (baptised adherents, 105,960); (3) 
Bombay, including Sindh and Baluchistan, the 
western coast and Mahratti country together 
with Trichinopoly in Madras Presidency (baptised 
adherents, 373,749) ; (4) Madras, with part of 
Madras Presidency, Hyderabad and Central Pro- 
vinces (baptised adherents, 91,031); (5) Pondi- 
cherry, including part of Madras Presidency, 
Mysore, Coimbatore, Kumbakonam (baptised 
adherents, 316,618) ; (6) Verapoli containing Tra- 
vancore and Cochin (R.C. and Syrian Christians, 
512,513) ; (7) Goa under the Patriarch of the 
East Indies, containing the Bishoprics of 
Damao, Cochin and Mylapur (baptised adher- 
ents, 578,957); (8) Ceylon or Colombo (baptised 
adherents, 297,872); (9) Burma, under three 
Vicars Apostolic (baptised adherents, 62,242). 

In the diocese of Goa 299,628 belong to 
Portuguese territory and 35,403 to British terri- 
tory. In the diocese of Damao 2,213 belong to 
Portuguese territory and 69,789 to British terri- 
tory, the sees of Cochin and Mylapur are entirely 
in British territory. In Pondicherry 25,859 be- 
long to French territory and 117,266 to British 
territory. In the Province of Verapoli 325,281 
follow the Syrian Rite but are subject to Rome. 

By subtracting the figures for French and 
Portuguese India and Ceylon the total results 
are as follows, 1,439,066 of the Latin Rite and 
325,281 of the Syrian Rite. From the adherents 
of the Latin rite deduct Europeans and Eurasians 
of the Roman Catholic persuasion and the net 
result is the native Christians in obedience to 
Rome. (See Catholic Encyclopa;dia, etc) 



The native members of the ancient Syrian 
Church, under the Jacobite or West Syrian 
Patriarch of Antioch, number about 204,000 ; 
and those of the reformed, or St. Thomas Syrian 
Church, under its own Metropolitan, about 50,000. 
Those owning allegiance to the Church of Rome 
number, according to the Syrian rite, about 
290,000, and according to the Latin rite, about 
233,000. Those under the East Syrian Patri- 
arch, or the Catholics of the East, number from 
10,000 to 30,000 ; their exact number is not 
known. Their chief station is Trichur. All 
these Churches are administered by 11 native, 
I Chaldean, and 3 European bishops. 

The principal English and American mission- 
ary societies working in India, arranged in order 
of the number of their baptised Christians, are : 
The Methodist Episcopal Church in the U.S.A., 
the Church Missionary Society, the American 
Baptist Missionary Union, the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel, and the American 
Lutheran Church. 

There are more than 60 separate societies 
in all at work. The figures published by the 
Methodist Episcopal Society of the U.S.A. 
cannot be compared with those published by 
other societies, as the Methodist Episcopal 
Society's missionaries enrol and baptise ad- 
herents in many instances after a much shorter 
preparation than that which is thought necessary 
by other missionaries. 

The total number of European missionaries 
other than those connected with the Roman 
Missions in India is 4,614. These include 115 
men doctors and 163 women doctors. The total 
number of Indian Mission workers who include 
teachers and catechists is 35,000. Work is being 
carried on at 10,247 centres. Total number of 
Indian Christian adherents connected with the 
Anglican and Protestant Missions in India (re- 
turned in 1909) 1,472,000. 



INDEPENDENT DIOCESES. 



Labuan and Sarawak, 1855. — The diocese 
of Labuan was founded in 1855, largely through 
the efforts of Bishop McDougall — the first bishop 
— and Sir J. Brooke the Rajah of Sarawak who 
permitted the bishop to add " Sarawak " to his 
title. The Straits Settlements up to then, in the 
diocese of Calcutta, were added to the diocese in 
1869, and the title was changed to " Singapore, 
Labuan and Sarawak" in 1881. 

In 1909 the diocese was divided and a new 
see — Singapore — was created, the bishop of 
which exercises jurisdiction over the Straits 
Settlements. The see of Labuan and Sarawak 
now includes Sarawak, Brunei, British North 
Borneo and the island of Labuan. The Bishop 
jesides at Kuching in Sarawak. 

The number of Christians in communion with 
the Anglican Church is about 5,000 including Sea 
Dyaks, Land Dyaks, Chinese, Indians, Eurasians 
and Europeans. 



The S.P.G. took over the work in Borneo in 
1848 from the Borneo Church Mission Associa- 
tion. 

Working in connection with S.P.G. are the 
bishop, 8 priests (including 2 Chinese), 3 laymen, 
8 women workers, besides 35 native workers. 

There are superior schools — boys and girls — 
at Kuching, and Sandakan, as well as schools of a 
more elementary type at Labuan, Jesselton, and 
Kudat, British North Borneo ; Merdang, and 
Sabu, Sarawak. 

There are Missions of the Roman Catholic 
Church, the Basel Mission and the American 
Episcopal Methodists in both parts of the diocese. 

Bishops : — 

Francis Thomas McDougall, 1855. 
Walter Chambers, 1869. 
George Frederick Hose, 1881 (resigned 1901). 
William Robert Mounsey, 1909. 



Sing^apore, 1909. — The diocese of Singapore 
was founded in 1909. The Strait Settlements 
which include Singapore were formerly in the 
diocese of Calcutta but in 1867 were attached 
to the diocese of Labuan and Sarawak. The 
diocese includes the Straits Settlements and the 
Federated Malay States. The Bishop of Singa- 
pore also supervises the Anglican clergy working 
in Siam and Java. The population of the diocese 
includes about 45,000,000 non-Christians and 
7,000 Europeans. There are also about 1,200 
Tamils and Chinese. The chief centres of work 
in the Straits Settlements are Singapore, Malacca 



(70) 



and Penang and in the Federated Malay States 
Negri Sembilan, Perak and Selangor. There are 
2 clergy stationed at Bangkok in Siam. There 
are 13 European and 3 Asiatic clergy in the dio- 
cese. In addition to these there are a number of 
honorary lay-readers English, Malay and Tamil, 
and 6 Chinese catechists. 

An article on the wild tribes of British Malaya, 
written by R.J. Wilkinson, Esq., British Resident 
at Negri Sembilan, appeared in The East and The 
West for October, 1911. 

Bishop : — 

Charles James Ferguson -Davie, 1909. 



1SI9XXXUI. 




* -^^^^^,S^^v^'^'^''-feS^ 



MeihsienY 






30' 



jLitanj 






■iSam 
Suih 



'ymilmFiiKji 

rp-czi^—iMinao' 
Chi(f^king\ \^^ 




'ngchowm ,'^ 

Ningwu 

Paotln^ 

§Fencliow ^^ 
Pingliang '"m^^oy^XPingyang Chan. 



Honan 



^chang 



Hanko\ 



KJ muLqp 






25' 






Tengyuj\. 



''Shummn 



Kutsing 
J/unnanfu 



^nshun 
SzechenJS 







Tajch ow (;3 

Ingchow^ ^S^u- , ■ 
^ / <^ Hinghwa'i 



20° 



V ^uenkiahg 



luangPhrahang 



,f^anqm/>^amchqwl \Koch5w — ^Li ^^Ana-kona 



mku 



pRMOSA 



Hoihow 

nfuEcfcfisn 



105° 



^HAI-NJUN 



South C. 

ANGLICAN BISHOPRICS 
OF CHINA. 



so mo 



200 



Scale of Miles. 



II S° 



IZO° 



S. P. G. Mission Stations are underlined thus 



Other Anglican Stations thus. 



/ing//can M/ss/onarc/ tvor/< /n Centra/ CMna between /he <//bceses ofC/ie/fianff a/?// Western China 
IS under thejur/sa/icfion o/'/'Ae /Imer/csn Bishops of Shanc/hai, Hankow anaf 'A/uhu. 



CHINA. 



Christianity was introduced into China by 
Nestorian missionaries in the seventh century. 
According to the Syro-Chinese monument at 
Hsi-an, teachers of the Luminous Doctrine 
were welcomed by imperial decree in 635 a.d. 
These were East Syrian clergy, followers of 
Nestorius. East Syrian annals state that in 
720 a metropolitan see was founded in China. 
The monument was erected in 781 by Yezbuzid, 
Chorepiscopos, a native of Balkh ; and about 
eighty names in Syriac of his colleagues of 
various ecclesiastical rank are given. Chris- 
tianity seems to have been then a vigorous 
institution in China. Sixty years later, Bud- 
hist and Christian monasteries were suppressed, 
and the spread of the Christian faith ceased. 
In the tenth century a Christian monk in Bag- 
dad is said to have excused the abandonment 
of his post in China on the plea that only one 
Christian remained in the land. In the latter 
half of the thirteenth century Marco Polo found 
Nestorian Christians and churches in several 
places throughout China. A stone found at 
Si-ngan Fu in 1625 records the introduction 
of Christianity into the city of Chang-ngan in 
the seventh century. Missionary work was re- 
started by John of Montecorvino in 1293, ^"'^ 
carried on by the Franciscans during the first 



half of the following century, when it apparently 
died out. Francis Xavier died in the island of 
San Chan, near Canton, in 1552, and missionary 
work was started by the Jesuits soon afterwards. 
The London Missionary Society started its work 
in China in 1807, the American Episcopal Church 
in 1834, the C.M.S. in 1844, and the S.P.G. in 
1863. The American Church sent their first 
bishop to Shanghai in 1844. They have now 
bishops at Hankow and Wuhu as well. 

The inhabitants of Mongolia and Tibet are 
chiefly Buddhists. There are about 8,000,000 
Mohammedans in China, chiefly in Yun-nan, 
and Chihli provinces. The Christian population, 
is about 1,500,000. 

The total number of missionaries connected 
with Anglican and Protestant Missions in China is 
about 1,500. These include 251 doctors. Total 
number of women missionaries about 2,000 in- 
cluding 114 doctors. Attached to the various 
Missions there are 12,000 Chinese workers in- 
cluding teachers and catechists. Work is being 
carried on at 5,000 centres and the number of 
Christian adherents is about 470,000. The 
Roman Missions report a total of 1200 European 
priests and rather less than a million Christian 
adherents. 



Victoria, Hong-Kong, 1849.— This diocese 
includes the colony of Hong-Kong, with congre- 
gations and missions in the Provinces of China 
south of the 28° of latitude, with the exception of 
Fuh-kien, which forms a separate diocese and 



Northern and Southern Hunan which form 
another new diocese. In the colony itself there 
is a mixed population of 10,000 English and 
other Europeans, about 280,000 Chinese, and a 
considerable number of Eurasians. The Church 



(71) 



72 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



mission work in the Colony prospers, the native 
church, which is self-supporting, being under the 
pastoral care of two ordained clergy, who have 
charge of congregations of 800 baptised Chris- 
tians, of whom about half are communicants. 
On the mainland, in the Province of Kwang-tung, 
the C.M.S. has three central stations, in which, 
together with their out-stations, there are about 
1,000 baptised converts. The needs of the Eng- 
lish civilians in the colony are supplied by three 
churches, whilst the military and naval establish- 
ments have their own chaplains. The residents 
of the Treaty Ports are visited and at Canton 
and Pakhoi there are churches in which regular 
services are held. There is a theological college 



in the diocese — St. Paul's College, Hong-Kong — 
which is used for the training of Chinese Chris- 
tians for work in the diocese and in other parts 
of the world in which the Chinese are resident. 

Hong-Kong was occupied by the C.M.S. in 
1862, Pakhoi in 1886, Canton in 1898, Kuei-lin 
and Shiu-hing in 1899, Liem-chow in 1902, and 
Yung-chow in 1903. Bishop Hoare was drowned 
in a typhoon in September, 1906. 
Bishops : — 

George Smith, 1849. 

Charles Richard Alford, 1867. 

John Shaw Burdon, 1874. 

Joseph Charles Hoare, 1898. 

Gerard Heath Lander, 1907. 



Chekiang (formerly Mid-China), 1872. — 

The missionary diocese of Chekiang consists of 
the province bearing this name. In 1872 Dr. 
Russell was consecrated as Bishop of Mid-China 
which was then cut off from Victoria. In 1880 
the new diocese was divided into North and Mid- 
China, the latter diocese including the provinces 
of the Yangtze Valley. In 1895 the most westerly 
province in this area became the diocese of 
Western China. In 1909 the missionary juris- 
diction in the whole of the Mid-China area except 
in Chekiang was resigned to the American 
Bishops. 

In Chekiang the missionary work which is 
supported by the C.M.S. centres round Ningpo, 



Hangchow, Taichow, Chuki and Shaoshing. 
There is a theological college and normal school 
at Ningpo and there are mission hospitals at 
Ningpo, Hangchow and Taichow. The Bishop 
lives at Ningpo which has been occupied as a 
mission station since 1848. 

There are 22 European and 20 Chinese clergy 
in the diocese. There are about 4,200 English- 
speaking people and about 22,000,000 Chinese 
in the diocese. Chinese baptised Christians 
about 4,000. 
Bishops : — 

William Armstrong Russell, 1872. 

George Evans Moule, 1880 (resigned 1907). 

Herbert James Molony, 1908. 



North China, 1880. — This diocese originally 
consisted of the six Provinces of Chihli, Shan- 
tung, Shansi, Honan, Shensi and Kansu. The 
Province of Shantung has now been constituted 
a separate diocese, while the eastern Province 
of Sheng-king, part of Manchuria, has been 
transferred from Corea to North China. The 
Anglican mission work in this diocese is sup- 
ported by the S.P.G 

Work among the English residents is carried on 
in Peking, Tientsin and Shanhaikwan in Chihli, 
and at Newchwang, Qalny, Moukden, etc., in 



Manchuria ; while visits are paid elsewhere as 
opportunity offers. In these places there are 
churches, two of them consecrated, one being 
the fine Church of All Saints', Tientsin, con- 
secrated in 1903. The clergy at Newchwang 
and Tientsin undertake no Chinese work. The 
work in Tientsin bids fair to become entirely self- 
supporting very soon. In Peking the Chapel of 
the British Legation is served by the bishop or one 
of his clergy. A new church, built in memory 
of Deaconess Ransome and those who fell in the 
BpKer insurrection, was consecrated in 1907. 



N9xxxrv. 





/ •7/Mfao ^-•- 

TssoAsfi^ 'Shinhsien 

%■ \ \ SUchowfuf ^ I 14 Al WV m/ 

' ' _ -ft 



//ff' 



S.PG. Mission Stations are under/inec/ thus 



CHINA 



73 



JTor^ amongst the Chinese is carried on in 
Peking and three up-country stations, of which 
Yung-ch'ing, 50 miles to the south, is the largest, 
the other two being Lung-hua-tien, 120 miles 
south, and Ch'i-chou, 140 miles south-west of 
Peking. 

There are 14 English missionaries and 4 
Chinese clergy. There is one good boys' school 
at Yung-ch'ing, and 3 others more or less 
efficient. The women's work in the diocese is 
under the direction of Deaconess Edith Ransome, 
the Head of St. Faith's Home in Peking. There 
are 8 other women missionaries engaged in medi- 
cal, educational and other missionary work. 

Hospital and dispensary work is carried on in 
Peking, Yung-ch'ing and the other stations by 
3 native doctors, who received a certain amount 
of foreign training in Peking. 

With the help of the Pan-Anglican grant a new 
college has been built in Peking which was 
opened in 19 ir. 

In 1862 the C.M.S. began work in Peking, but 
withdrew in 1880. 

The S.P.G. started work in Peking in 1863, 
but its work was interrupted in the following 
year, and was not restarted till 1880. Work 



was begun at Yung-ch'ing in 1880, Lung-Hua- 
Tien in 1880, Chefoo (the first station occupied 
by the S.P.G. in China) in 1874, Taianfu in 
1879, Ping Yin in 1879, ^^nd Tientsin in 1890. 

The Society supports native schools at Peking 
(city), Hsin-min-chuang, Tai-wang-chuang, Han 
Ke Chuang and Lung-hua-tien. 

The following are the departments of the work 
in the diocese of North China : — 

1. The pastoral care of the English congre- 
gations at Peking, Tientsin, Shanhaikwan, New- 
chwang, Dalny and Moukden. 

2. The pastoral care of the Chinese congre- 
gations in four groups : (i) Peking ; (2) Yung- 
ch'ing, Hsin-min-chuang, Tai-wang-chuang, 
Han-ko-chuang, San-sheng-k'ou ; (3) Lung-hua- 
tien, Nan-chang-ho ; (4) Ch'i-chou, I-li-tsun. 

3. The charge of 7 Chinese schools. 

4. The Peking hospital and dispensary, under 
Dr. Aspland (partly supported by S.P.C.K.) 
and Dr. Rivington ; the dispensaries at Yung- 
ch'ing, Lung-hua-tien and Ch'i-chou, under Drs. 
Yang and Chang. 

5. The preaching to heathen in various stations. 
Bishop : — 

Charles Perry Scott, 1880. 



Western China, 1895.— The diocese of West- 
ern China, embraces those parts of the Provinces 
of Szechuan and Kweicheo which lie to the north 
of the 28th parallel of latitude. It is almost 
co-extensive with the Province of Szechuan. 

The meaning of the word Szechuan is the Four 
Streams. 

The diocese extends from the frontiers of Tibet 
and Kokonor on the west, to the great mountain 
barrier on the east through which the Yangtze 
cuts its way into central China, forming the 
world-renowned gorges of that river, and covers 
in all an area of over 166,000 square miles. The 
actual work is confined to the eastern part of the 
Province. 

The population is variously estimated at from 
45 to 70,000,000 ; and the energy of its inhabi- 



tants is accounted for partly by the fact that the 
people are largely emigrants from other provinces, 
and partly by their isolation from other sources 
of supply, which compel them to depend upon 
their own resources for all the necessaries of life. 

The present bishop, who came out to China in 
the year 1885, first visited this region in 1886, as 
a missionary clergyman in connection with the 
China Inland Mission. In October, 1887, he 
received an episcopal licence for work here, from 
Dr. George Moule, then Bishop of Mid-China 
(who though exercising nominal episcopal control 
was never able to visit this distant part of his 
vast diocese). 

In 1892 the Church Missionary Society sent a 
band of workers into this region, under the leader- 
ship of Rev. J. Heywood Horsburgh, and in 1895 



74 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



on the formation of the new diocese, Mr. Cassels 
was nominated as the first bishop. At that time 
there were about 40 missionaries on the field 
(only 5 of whom were in Holy Orders), and 
10 stations had been opened. 

There were many difficulties to contend with 
in the early days ; it was difficult even to rent 
houses from which to begin work. But since the 
formation of the diocese the development has 
been rapid, and there are now 24 stations in 
which missionaries reside, as well as over 90 out- 
stations in which regular services are conducted. 
There are also over 2,000 communicants; 1,300 
other persons have been admitted as catechumens, 
and over 3,000 persons are receiving elementary 
instruction as " Hearers". 

The present missionary staff consists of 22 
English clergy, 22 laymen, and 51 single ladies. 



Of the above 3 are fully qualified medical men, 
and many have had training as teachers or nurses. 
There is also one Chinese clergyman and a large 
band of Chinese catechists, preachers, teachers, 
and others who give valuable help in the work. 

A diocesan training college for catechists and 
others, recently started, is now in working order. 

More attention is now being given to school 
work, and plans have been made for starting a 
hostel for work amongst students in Chentu, the 
capital of the province, where as yet work in 
connection with the diocese has not yet been 
begun. 

The bishop and missionaries in the diocese 
have striven to adapt themselves to their sur- 
roundings by wearing the Chinese dress. 

Bishop : — • 

William Wharton Cassels, 1895. 



Shantung, 1903. — This diocese was origin- 
ally part of the North China diocese. All the 
Anglican mission work in the diocese is supported 
by the S.P.G. It consists of the Province of 
Shantung with the exception of the portion — 
Tsing Tao or Kiao Chow — leased to the Emperor 
bf Germany. The population is estimated at 
about 40,000,000. The people are chiefly agricul- 
tural, though industries, such as straw-plaiting 
and lace-making, have obtained some foothold. 
Besides the German colony of Kiao Chow, the 
province has two chief places where Europeans 
reside — Wei Hai Wei, a British possession, and 
Chefoo, a Treaty Port. At both of these places 
there are churches for British residents, and a 
clergyman in charge of English Church work. 
At Chefoo there is also a theological college for 
native students, and at Wei Hai Wei a school 
for teaching English and supplying a European 
training for those who wish to obtain Govern- 
ment employment. Besides the 3 ports where 
Services are held for English residents there are 
3 Chinese mission stations and 22 out-stations. 



Most of the mission work centres round Tai An 
and Ping Yin. 

In addition to three Roman Catholic missions 
in Shantung (with about 50 European mission- 
aries), there are besides the Anglican mission, 
13 other missionary bodies working in the dio- 
cese, represented by over 140 missionaries. Of 
these the strongest are the American Presby- 
terian, the American Methodist, and the Eng- 
lish Baptist Missions, all of which are well 
equipped both for medical and evangelistic work, 
and in numbers of converts far outstrip the Church 
Mission. The number of Church workers both 
European and native has greatly increased dur- 
ing the past three years. There are 8 European 
and 5 Chinese clergy, and 22 licensed Chinese 
workers. There are 7 European Women 
Workers. At Ping Yin there is a hospital for 
women. And in 1912 a hospital will be opened 
at Yenchowfu. 



Bishop :- 



Geoffrey Durnford Iliff, 1903. 



Fuh-Kien, 1906. — ■ This diocese consists 
nominally of the whole Province of Fuh-Kien, 
and was formerly under the Bishop of Victoria. 



The population of the Province is estimated at 
over 22,000,000. The people are chiefly agri- 
cultural. There are small European commun- 



CHINA 



75 



ities at Foochow and Amoy. The Church work 
in this diocese is supported by the C.M.S. and 
the C.E.Z.M.S. Missionary work was begun in 
Foochow in 1850, the first conversion being in 
1861. By an arrangement agreed upon with 
other missions the C. of E. Missions have taken 
the prefectures of Foochow, Hinghua, Fuh-ning, 
and Kienning as their special sphere. In the 
Foochow and Hinghua Prefectures, American 
Methodist and Congregational Missions are also 
working. 

Chinese Church members number about 13,000 ; 
mission stations, 19; out-stations, 214; English 
clergy including bishop, 22 ; Chinese clergy, 18. 
There are 24 places occupied by resident Euro- 



pean missionaries. Besides a theological college 
and a training institution for Bible-women, there 
are 2 theological classes, 10 boys' boarding 
schools, II for girls, and about 150 elementary 
day schools. There are 6 hospitals for men and 
9 for women, besides numerous dispensaries, leper 
and blind asylums, and a foundling home. The 
diocese is at present divided into 12 Church 
Council Districts and 67 pastorates. There is a 
Representative Diocesan Synod consisting of the 
Bishop, the clergy and lay-delegates elected by 
the Pastorate Committees. 

Bishop : — 

Horace McCartie Eyre Price, 1906. 



Kwangfsi and Hunan. — This diocese was 
founded in 1909 and consists of the Province of 
Hunan south of the 28th parallel and the Province 
of Kwangsi north of the West River. It was 
taken out of the diocese of Victoria. It contains 
approximately about 80,000 square miles, with 
about 13,000,000 people. 

Church work. — The work is entirely mis- 
sionary, and has been carried on since 1899. 
There are at present two stations where mis- 



sionaries reside and work, Kweilin, the capital of 
Kwangsi, and Heng Chow, a city in the south of 
Hunan. The Bishop's house will be at Siangtan, 
the commercial capital of the Hunan Province. 
It is also proposed to locate a clergyman at the 
city of Hung Chow in Hunan. There is a staff 
of 7 clergy. 
Bishop : — 

William Banister, 1909. 



Honan 1909. — The Church of England in 
Canada decided to be responsible for a missionary 
diocese in China. The new diocese consists of 
the province of Honan which was formerly in the 
diocese of North China. The Bishop lives at 
Kaifeng the capital of the Province, and mission- 
ary work has also been commenced at Chengchow 
and Kweiteh Fu. 

Statistics of Honan Mission, 15th March, 1911 : 
Clerical missionaries, 2 ; women missionaries, 3 ; 
wives, 2 ; total, 7. Chinese male workers : 



Catechists, 6 ; schoolmasters, 3 ; colporteur, i ; 
total, 10. Communicants (Chinese, including 
workers and wives), total, 16. Baptised during 
the year: men, 4; women, 2; total, 6. Total 
baptised now attending (including communi- 
cants), 23. Catechumens, 32 ; hearers (ad- 
herents) about 120. Stations, 3; school, i; 
male scholars, 11. 
Bishop ; — 

William Charles White, 1909. 



BISHOPRICS IN CHINA SUPPORTED BY THE AMERICAN 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



Shanghai, 1844. — The missionary district of 
Shanghai consists of the Province of Kiangsu. 
The chief stations at which missionary work is 
carried on are Shanghai, Soochow, Wusih, 
Kiading, Kiangwan and Tsingpoo each of which 
is a centre for work carried on in the surrounding 
districts. In Shanghai there are four large 
churches. There are 14 foreign and 17 Chinese 
clergy who are assisted by a staff of catechists and 



teachers. St. John's College, Shanghai, includes 
a medical and theological department and is now 
incorporated as a university. It has 300 students. 
Bishops : — 

William Jones Boone, 1844. 

Channing Moore Williams, 1866. 

Samuel Isaac Joseph Schereschewsky, 1877. 

William J. Boone, 1884. 

Frederick Rogers Graves, 1893. 



Hankow, 1901. — The missionary district of 
Hankow includes that part of China lying within 
the Provinces of Hupeh, and Hunan. It has a 
population of over 50,000,000. There are 14 
foreign and 13 Chinese priests and i foreign and 
8 Chinese deacons, 54 day schools and 18 board- 
ing schools : Chinese catechists and assistants 
52, Bible-women 26, Chinese teachers 149. The 
principal centres of work are Wuchang and 
Hankow. At Wuchang are situated the Boone 
University College and the Boone Medical and 
Divinity Schools. A university is about to be 



established at Hankow in connection with the 
United Universities Scheme which will supple- 
ment and aim to unite the educational work con- 
nected with the various missionary societies in 
the districts near Hankow. The £'5000 allocated 
from the pan-Anglican grant will be spent on the 
erection of a hostel in connection with the Han- 
kow University. 

Bishops .' — 

James Addison Ingle, 1902. 
Logan Herbert Roots, 1904. 



Wuhu, 1911. — The missionary district of 
Wuhu comprises the Province of Nganhwei and 
that part of Kiangsi which lies north of Latitude 
28. The principal centres of work are at Wuhu, 
and Anking in the Nganhwei Province and Kiu- 



kiang and Nanchang in the Province of Kiangsi. 
There is a medical Mission at Anking. 



Bishop : — 

Daniel Trumbull Huntington (elect 191 1). 



(76) 



BISHOPRICS IN CHINA SUPPORTED BY THE AMERICAN EPISCOPAL CHURCH 77 



Some General Statistics. 



The Roman Catholic Missions in China and 
Formosa report 1213 foreign and 550 native 
priests. The total number of adherents is 
951,477. Of these nearly half are in the Pro- 
vinces of Chihli and Kiang-su. In these 
provinces the missions are under the charge of 
the Jesuits. 

The societies other than those connected with 
the Roman Church, which report the largest 
number of adherents, are as follows (the num- 
bers in brackets denote the year in which they 
commenced worlc in China) : China Inland 
Mission (1865), 76,000. Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America (1846) 67,000. 
Methodist Episcopal Church (U.S.A.) (1847), 
53,000. American Board of Missions (1847), 



26,800. Presbyterian Church of England (1847), 
25,000. London Missionary Society (1807), 
23,000. American Southern Baptist Missionary 
Union (1845), 22,000. United Methodist Church 
Missionary Society (1859), 21,000. Church 
Missionary Society (1862), 20,100. 

The London Missionary Society, which began 
work in China in 1807, supports European 
missionaries at 20 head stations attached to which 
are many hundreds of out-stations. It supports 
26 mission hospitals. In Peking the Society has 
a fine medical college in which teaching is given 
in connection by members of the other missions 
in Peking. It has also a large Anglo-Chinese 
College at Tientsin. 



The total population of China according to the Government census of 1911 is 312,420,025, 



JAPAN. 



The present population of Japan is about 
47,000,000. The name Nippon or Japan means 
" source of the sun ". Japan was first visited by 
Europeans in the sixteenth century. A Portu- 
guese explorer brought back with him to India 
the young Japanese Han-siro or Anjiro, who 
prompted the mission of St. Francis Xavier. 
By. the end of the sixteenth century there were 
200,000 nominal converts to Christianity. The 
persecution of the Christians culminated in the 
massacre of 30,000 of them at Shimabara in 1637. 
With the exception of some Chinese and a few 
Dutch merchants who were allowed to live in 
the island of Deshima, Japan remained closed 
to foreigners till 1854. The American Episcopal 
Church began work in Japan in 1859, the C.M.S. 
in 1869, and the S.P.G. in 1873. 

Bishop Williams, an American, was conse- 
crated as the first bishop in Japan in 1866. 
In 1 894-6, largely through the influence of Bishop 
Bickersteth, the missions of the English and the 
American Church were united, and the Japan 
Church, Nippon Sei Kokwai, was formed. 

The Nippon Sei Kokwai comprises 7 dioceses. 
The S.P.G. supports the bishops in South Tokyo 
and in Osaka. The C.M.S supports the bishops 
of Kiushiu and Hokkaido. The American 
Episcopal Church supports the bishops of North 
Tokyo and Kyoto. The Canadian Church has 
undertaken to support a bishop for a diocese to 
be taken out of the diocese of South Tokyo. 

In 1894 the islands of Kyu-Shyu and Yezo 
(Hokkaido) were formed into separate missionary 



dioceses under the care of the Church of Eng- 
land. At a synod held in Tokyo in May, 1894, 
the main island was itself divided into 4 mis- 
sionary dioceses, called respectively the dioceses 
of North and South Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka. 
The dioceses of North Tokyo and Kyoto are 
under the care of the American Church, and 
those of South Tokyo and Osaka under the 
care of the Church of England. 

The baptised members of the Nippon Sei 
Kokwai at the end of 1910 numbered 15,300. 

The European missionaries include 62 priests, 
2 deacons, 11 laymen and 105 single ladies. The 
Japanese missionaries include 58 priests, 18 
deacons, 138 catechists and 72 Bible-women. 
There are 102 churches and 131 preaching 
places. The Sunday schools contain 16,500 
scholars. 

The Roman Catholic Missions in Japan and 
Formosa include 145 European and 33 Japanese 
priests, 363 women belonging to various Orders, 
and 309 catechists. They have 46 schools with 
5, goo pupils, and 21 orphanages with 1,430 
children. Formosa is ecclesiastically dependent 
on Amoy in China. The adherents of the R.C. 
Missions in Japan number about 64,000. 

There is a Greek Church Mission under Arch- 
bishop Nicolai, formerly chaplain of the Russian 
Legation and an assistant Bishop. The Greek 
Church has 265 stations. Its adherents number 
rather more than 31,000. There are 33 Japanese 
priests and i Russian and 5 Japanese deacons. 

Of the many other missionary societies working 



(78) 



N9XXXV. 




SPG. Miss/on Stations are underlined ttius 



Other Churcti amission Stations ttius^ _ _ . 



JAPAN 



79 



in Japan, those which report the largest number 
of adherents are : American Board of Commis- 
sioners (1869) ; Presbyterian Mission of the 
U.S.A., North (1859); Methodist Episcopal 



Church of the U.S.A. (1873) ; Presbyterian 
Church of England (1865). The total number 
of Christian adherents connected with Anglican 
and Protestant Missions is about 100,000. 



South Tokyo (formerly Japan), 1883.— The 

Missions of the Church of England are in the 
capital and the adjoining districts. Those of the 
Canadian Church which are included in the new 
diocese are in the more distant provinces of 
Shinshiu, Owari, Mino, etc. 

The population of Tokyo is about 2,000,000. 
Yokohama, the chief seaport of Japan, has a 
population of over 200,000. 

The community missions of St. Andrew and 
St. Hilda in Tokyo are affiliated to the S.P.G. 

The St. Andrew's Community Mission was 
founded by Bishop Bickersteth in 1886 on the 
lines of the Cambridge Mission to Delhi, of 
which the bishop had been the Head. Its work 
is both educational and evangelistic, and for 
some years it devoted its chief efforts to the 
training of Japanese clergy and catechists. 

The St. Hilda's Community Mission was also 



founded by Bishop Bickersteth in 1887. The 
mission is supported by the Guild of St. Paul. 
The C.M.S. has also a branch of women's work 
in Tokyo. 

There are ig Europeans and 15 Japanese 
priests, and i European and 2 Japanese deacons, 
and 37 licensed catechists. Women Workers 
connected with S.P.G., 17, including those who 
are connected with St. Hilda's Mission. 

The Divinity hostel at Tokyo is now merged 
in the new central theological college. The 
number of baptised Christians belonging to the 
Nippon Sei Kokwai (Dec, 1910) was 2887. 

Bishops : — 

Arthur William Poole, 1883. 
Edward Bickersteth, 1886. 
William Awdry, 1898 (cons. 1895). 
Cecil Henry Boutflower, 1908 (cons. 1905). 



Kiushiu (South Japan), 1894.— The dio- 
cese of South Japan includes the islands of Kiu- 
shiu and Lu Chu, with such other islands of 
the Japanese Empire as fall between the 24th 
and 35th parallels N. lat. Kiushiu is the most 
southerly of the four chief islands of Japan. It 
was formed into a separate diocese in 1893. 
The population is about 7,000,000, and the area 
28,552 square miles. It is now divided into eight 
prefectures, including that of which Lu Chu is 
the centre, and called Okinawa. Some of the 
most progressive work is at Kokura. 

The C.M.S. is the only Church society en- 
gaged in missionary work in this diocese ; the 
first missionary began work in Nagasaki in 1869. 
Nagasaki is the only city with a foreign com- 
munity ; it has an EngHsh church. In Kago- 



shima, Kumamoto, Fukuoka, Kokura and Sasebo 
there are also resident foreign missionaries, and 
three of these have extensive itinerating districts. 
The Bishop resides at Fukuoka. The staff at 
the close of 19 10 consisted of: 6 English and 5 
Japanese priests, 15 catechists, and 8 Bible- 
women. The number of baptised persons con- 
nected with the Nippon Sei Kokwai (Dec, 1910) 
was 1239. 

Nagasaki was occupied by the C.M.S. in 1869, 
Kumamoto and Fukuoka in 1888, Kagoshima in 
1895, Nobeoka in 1897, Kokura in 1898, and 
Sasebo by European Missionaries in 1908. 

Bishops : — 

Henry Evington, 1894 (resigned 1909). 
Arthur Lea, 1909. 



8c 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Osaka, 1896. — The diocese of Osaka, which 
comprises all the mainland of Japan from Osaka 
westward, and includes the islands of Awaji, 
Shikoku, and Oki-no-kuni contains more than 
10,500,000 souls. The largest cities are Osaka, 
1,250,000; Kobe, 340,000; Hiroshima, 121,000; 
Okayama, 95,000; Kure, 80,000; Shimonoseki, 
46,000 ; in all of which are mission stations. 
The native work is carried on by missionaries, 
both men and women, from the two English 
Societies, C.M.S. and S.P.G., as well as by 
native clergy, catechists, and Bible-women. In 
Kobe, where there is a foreign community of 
over 1,000 persons, is an English chaplain, 
whose salary is paid by voluntary contributions, 
and English services are undertaken by the resi- 
dent missionaries for the smaller communities in 
Osaka. Higher grade schools for boys and for 
girls are being carried on in both Osaka and Kobe 
with a considerable measure of success. The 



C.M.S. has a divinity college in Osaka, where 
catechists and clergy are trained. 

The Bishop of Osaka is also in charge of the 
mission work of the Church of Japan in For- 
mosa, where there are 65,000 Japanese colonists 
and 3,000,000 Formosan Chinese and aborigines. 
It has not yet been found possible to begin work 
among the latter, but there is a native priest 
resident in Taikoku, and a catechist in Tainan 
working among the Japanese. 

The total number of baptised persons in the 
diocese in connection with the Nippon Sei Kok- 
wai is 2,760. 

There are 13 European and 12 Japanese priests, 
and I Japanese deacon. European women 
workers, 27, catechists 21, Bible- women 7. 

Bishops : — 

William Awdry, 1896 (tr. 1898). 
Hugh James Foss, 1899. 



Hokkaido, 1896. — This diocese, which in- 
cludes the northern island of Japan, called 
Hokkaido or Yezo, and the half of Saghalien 
ceded to Japan by Russia was formed in 1896. 
The Church mission work throughout the diocese 
is supported by the C.M.S. There are 3 Euro- 
pean and 4 Japanese clergy, 10 European women 
workers, 20 catechists and 10 Bible-women. 

There is an Ainu girls' home at Sapporo, and 
a hospital at Hojo. 

The population of the diocese is about 
1,500,000, including 15,000 Ainu aborigines. 



There are 12 permanent churches and 9 mis- 
sion stations. The number of baptised Christians 
belonging to the Nippon Sei Kokwai (Dec, 
1910) was 2,866. 

Hakodate was occupied by the C.M.S. in 1874, 
Kushiro in 1889, Sapporo in 1892, Otaru in 
1897, and Muroran in 1906. The Bishop resides 
at Sapporo. 

Bishops : — 

Philip Kemball Fyson, 1896 (resigned 1908). 
Walter Andrews, 1909, 



BISHOPRICS IN JAPAN SUPPORTED BY THE AMERICAN 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



North Tokyo. — The first Bishop sent by 
the American Church in 1866 bore the title of 
Bishop of " Yedo ". The title was subsequently 
changed to "Tokyo," and in 1898 to "North 
Tokyo ". The Japan Mission was divided 
by the General Convention of 1898 into the 
two missionary districts of Tokyo and Kyoto. 
By the action of the General Synod of Japan 
the missionary district of Tokyo was recog- 
nised and constituted one of the dioceses of 



the Nippon Sei Kokwai under the title of 
North Tokyo. 

The diocesan staff includes 14 American 
priests and i deacon, 14 Japanese priests and 
8 deacons, 25 Japanese catechists and 20 Bible- 
women. Sunday school scholars, 3,556. The 
number of baptised persons on the roll is 2,759. 
Bishops : — 

Channing Moore Williams, 1866 ; res. 1889. 

John McKim, 1893. 



Kyoto. — The missionary district of Kyoto was 
constituted by the General Synod of Japan as the 
diocese of Kyoto. 

There are 45 mission stations, 7 American 
priests, 5 Japanese priests, and 7 deacons, 12 
lay readers, 16 teachers, 18 Japanese catechists 



and 12 Bible-women. Sunday school scholars, 
1,588. Baptised persons on the roll, 2,048. 
Bishop : — 

Sidney Catlin Partridge, 1900; tr. to 

Kansas City, igii. 
Henry St. George Tucker (elect 1911). 



A new diocese. The tenth general synod of 
the Nippon Sei Kokwai in 191 1. It was decided 
to separate that portion of the diocese of South 
Tokyo which has hitherto been largely worked by 
missionaries from Canada and to form it into a 
new jurisdiction under a bishop to be appointed 
and supported by the Church in Canada. This 



work has been carried on in the prefectures of 
Aichi, Gifu, Nagano and Niigata. The most 
important centres of missionary work are Fuku- 
yama and Hiroshima. 

Bishop :■ — ■ 



(81) 



COREA. 



Corea, 1889. — This diocese embraces the 
kingdom of Corea. The area of Corea is esti- 
mated at 71,000 square miles, and the population 
at about 15,000,000. The worship of ancestors 
is observed with as much punctiliousness as in 
China, but otherwise religion holds a low place. 
Buddhism which was once the national religion, 
has many temples and monasteries but has ceased 
to have any aggressive influence. Confucianism 
is held in high esteem by the upper classes but 
this is rather an ethical system than a religion. 

The language is an intermediate between 
Mongol-Tartar and Japanese, with a large ad- 
mixture of words of Chinese derivation. There 
is a native phonetic system of writing. In all 
official writing, and in the correspondence of the 
upper classes, the Chinese characters were used 
exclusively, but in official documents a mixture 
of native script is now the rule. The whole of 
the Bible has been translated into Corean. 

The introduction of Christianity into Corea. — 
In 1784 some fragments of Christian literature, 
which must have formed part of the publica- 
tions of the old seventeenth - century Jesuit 
Mission in China, accidentally found their way 
into the " hermit kingdom " amongst some 
goods imported in the train of the Corean Em- 
bassy, on its return journey from the annual 
tribute mission to the Court of Peking. These 
fell into the hands of some Corean literati, who 
proceeded to construct a sort of amateur church 
for themselves, even going to the length ot 
appointing some of their number bishops and 
priests, and administering sacraments, without 
of course having received any ordination, until 



at length they succeeded in opening communica- 
tions with the Roman Catholic missionaries in 
Peking. These last were at that time, however, 
in such great straits themselves, and the coasts 
and borders of Corea were so jealously guarded 
against intrusion, that it was found impossible 
to send any missionary into the country for 
fifty years or more. At length, in 1831, Pope 
Gregory XVI. requested the Societ'e des Missions 
Etrangeres de Paris to start a mission in Corea, 
and appointed an "Apostolic Vicar" to take 
charge thereof. It was some years, however, 
before work was actually begun, but, during the 
thirty years that followed, considerable progress 
was made in the teeth of violent but intermittent 
opposition, which culminated in the frightful per- 
secution of 1866, when the Vicar Apostolic, his 
coadjutor, several priests and a large number of 
Christians lost their lives. 

Shortly after the conclusion ot the treaty 
between Corea and America in 1882, mission- 
aries of the American Presbyterian and Ameri- 
can Methodist bodies arrived in the country, 
taking advantage of an understanding that the 
Corean Government would gladly welcome 
medical men and teachers of Western lan- 
guages, especially English. They have suc- 
ceeded in establishing flourishing missions both 
in Seoul and the provinces. There are also 
Australian and Canadian Presbyterian Missions, 
and a Mission of the Russian Church. 

The Mission of the Church of England. — On 
All Saints' Day, 1889, the first bishop of Corea 
was consecrated, and the following year the 
S.P.G. began work in Seoul, the capital of 
(82) 



N9 XXXVI. 




The chief Mission Stations supported by the S.P. G.are underlined. 



COREA 



83 



Corea. The Society contributed to the endow- 
ment of the see. 

The chief mission stations are : — 

1. Seoul. — Here are churches for Corea and 
Japanese work, and a church for English services. 
The Sisters of St. Peter (Kilburn) have a mission 
house and an orphanage for Corean girls. 

2. Chemulpo. — The church here is used for 
English, Corean, and Japanese services. There 
is a well-equipped hospital under the charge of 
an English physician. 

3. Kanghwa. — This is an island, about the 
size of the Isle of Wight, situate at the mouth 
of the Seoul River. Here are two well-built 
churches (in native style), and numerous village 
churches and schools. 

4. — Paikchou. — This is a station in the main- 
land, opposite Kanghwa, and is fast becoming an 
important centre with church schools. 

5. Souwon. — This is an important turn on the 
Seoul-Fusan Railway. Here is a well-built 
church and numerous village chapels and schools. 
The Sisters of St. Peter have a mission house and 
a girls' school. 



6. Chinchun. — This town is about 25 miles 
from the railway ; and is the centre of a large 
and important mission district with a church, 
numerous village chapels, schools and a well- 
equipped newly built hospital. 

7. Fusan. — For many years Japanese services 
have been held in this port. There is a parson- 
age and church room and it is hoped that a 
permanent church will soon be built. It has a 
resident Japanese priest and a European lady 
worker. 

At present the mission staff consists of the 
bishop, 12 clergy, 3 doctors, 6 sisters, and 8 lady 
workers. 

Corea is one of the most promising mission 
fields in the Orient. The number of Christian 
adherents connected with the Anglican and 
Protestant missions is estimated at 180,000, and 
the number of those connected with the Roman 
Mission at 72,000. 
Bishops : — 

Charles John Corfe, 1889 (resigned 1904). 
Arthur Beresford Turner, 1905. 
Mark Napier Trollope, 1911. 



AUSTRALIA. 



AUSTRALIA. 



Sydney, 
1836. 



Tasmania, Adelaide, 
1842. 1847. 



Melbourne, 
1847. 



Newcastle, Goulburn, Bathurst, North Queensland. 

1847. 1863. 1869. 1878. 



I 



Perth, Ballarat, Bendigo, Wangaratta, Gippsland, Brisbane, Grafton Riverma, 
1857. 1875. 1902. 1902. 1902. 1859. and 1884. 

1 Armidale, 



Carpentaria, 
1900. 



I I 

I I 

Bunbury, N.W. Australia, 

1904. igog. 



Rockhampton, 
i8g2. 



1867. 



New Guinea, 
i8q6. 



The establishment of a penal settlement in 
New South Wales in 1788 led to the Society 
entering the field by undertaking the support 
of schoolmasters there in 1793, and in Norfolk 
Island in 1796. For the latter settlement it 
appointed a clergyman in 1798, but he failed 
to go there. In 1826 the British Government 
withdrew its provision for the spiritual needs of 
the convicts, and in succeeding years thousands 
were transported and cast on the shores without 
any steps being taken " to prevent their instantly 
becoming pagans and heathens ". Consequently, 
at the end of eight years it seemed " as if the 
main business of all the community " in New 
South Wales "were the commission of crime 
and the punishment of it," while in Norfolk 



Island " evil men with men more evil . . . 
helped each other to make a hell of that which 
else might be a heaven ". One convict said : 
" Let a man's heart be what it will, when he 
comes here his man's heart is taken from him, 
and there is given to him the heart of a beast ". 
At this juncture the Society, in response to the 
appeal of Archdeacon Broughton, who became 
the first Bishop of Australia in 1836, intervened 
to save the convicts from a condition more 
pitiful than that of the heathen, and others from 
lapsing into heathenism. The aid thus begun 
in 1835 was extended to Tasmania in that year, 
to South Australia in 1836, Victoria in 1838, 
Queensland in 1840, Western Australia in 1841, 
and New Guinea in 1890. The Churches thus 



(84) 



AUSTRALIA 



85 



planted by the Society are now, for the most 
part, self-supporting. 

The organisation of the Australian Church 
(with its now 21 dioceses) into provincial and 
diocesan synods, where each diocese preserves 
its own integrity and yet takes its part in the 
whole, suggested to the late Sir Henry Parkes the 
lines upon which the federation of the Australian 
Colonies — accomplished on ist January, 1901 — • 
could best be carried out. 

During the period 1793-19 10 the Society ex- 
pended £283,022, and employed 427 ordained 
missionaries in Australia. At the present time 
its work there is being carried on in 5 dioceses, 
its total annual expenditure in Australia and the 
Pacific in 1910 was £8,561, and the number of 
its missionaries 26. 



Australia has now 20 dioceses, most of which 
have been aided in their formation by the S.P.G. 

There is at present in Australia, a Province of 
New South Wales with 6 dioceses, a Province of 
Victoria with 5 dioceses, and a Province of 
Queensland with 5 dioceses, each having its own 
Archbishop. The remainder of dioceses have not 
yet been arranged in Provinces. 



CENSUS 


191 1. 




New South Wales - 




1,648,212 


Victoria 




1,315,000 


Queensland 




603,908 


South Australia - 




411,161 


West Australia 




280,316 


Tasmania 


itralia 


190,898 


Total for Aus 


4>449.49S 



PROVINCE OF NEW SOUTH WALES. 



The Province of New South Wales includes 
the dioceses of Sydney, Newcastle, Goulbourn, 
Grafton and Armidale, Bathurst, and Riverina. 

Sydney, 1836. — The diocese of Sydney is 
situated on the eastern coast of New South 
Wales, and measures about 200 miles from 
north to south, and 100 miles from east to 
west. It comprises but a small portion of the 
original bishopric of Australia which was formed 
in 1836, and included New Zealand and Tas- 
mania. New Zealand was detached in 1841, 
and Tasmania in 1843. In 1847 the diocese 
of Australia was again divided, the sees of 
Sydney, Newcastle, Adelaide and Melbourne 
being formed, and the Bishop of Australia was 



created .by letters patent Bishop of Sydney and 
Metropolitan of Australia and Tasmania. There 
are 103 parishes, and 20 Mission districts, 393 
churches and other buildings licensed for divine 
service and 225 clergy. The members of the 
Church of England are estimated at about 
371,489. There is Church accommodation for 
about 5,000. 
Bishops : — 

William Grant Broughton, 1836. 

Frederick Barker, 1854. 

Alfred Barry, 1884. 

William Saumarez Smith, 1890 ; archbishop 
1897. 

John Charles Wright, 1909; archbishop and 
primate. 



Newcastle, 1847. — This diocese comprises 
part of the east coast of New South Wales, 
extending from the Hawksbury River on the 
south to Camden Haven on the north, and 
from the east coast to the dividing range on 
the west. A church was built in Newcastle so 
early as 181 7, -and stood until lately, when it 
gave place to the rising cathedral. The popu- 
lation of Newcastle is 75,000. 

The Church members are estimated at go, 000. 
The total English-speaking population of the dio- 



cese is about 180,000; other than these, 4,000. 
There are 55 clergy, 154 churches, and 82 other 
places in which Divine service is regularly held. 
In the Sunday schools there are 10,000 children 
and 900 teachers. 

Bishops : — 

William Tyrell, 1847. 

Josiah Brown Pearson, 1880. 

George Henry Stanton, 1891 (cons. 1878). 

John Frowai Stretch, 1906 (cons. 1895). 



Goulburn, 1863. — This diocese was formerly 
part of that of Sydney. The original diocese 
was divided in 1884 by the formation of that 
of Riverina. The present diocese of Goulburn 



comprises the south-eastern portion of the 
colony of New South Wales, and contains an 
area of 50,000 square miles, with a scattered 
population of about 135,000 British and other 



(86) 



PROVINCE OF NEW SOUTH WALES 



87 



settlers, of whom upwards of 56,000 profess 
to be members of the Church of England. 
There are 500 other than English-speaking 
people in the diocese. There are 56 clergy, 46 
readers, 40 parishes and parochial districts, 170 
churches and school churches. In addition to 
the churches, public worship is held in 60 



other public buildings and in many other 
places. 

Bishops : — 

Mesac Thomas, 1863. 
William Chalmers, 1893. 
Christopher George Barlow, 1902 (cons. 
1891). 



Grafton and Armidale, 1865. — This diocese 
embraces the north-eastern portion of the colony 
of New South Wales, and covers an area of over 
70,000 square miles. The population of the dio- 
cese at the 1901 census was 220,813, °f whom 
100,000 belonged to the Church of England. The 
diocese was originally a portion of the diocese 
of Newcastle, and was separated from it in 1865. 
Grafton has a population of 6850 ; Armidale, 
7895; Tamworth, 8057; Lismore, 11,900. 



There are 70 clergy in the diocese and 21 
stipendiary lay readers. The number of children 
in the Sunday schools is 6673. 

Bishops : — 

William C. Sawyer, 1867. 

James Francis Turner, 1869. 

Arthur Vincent Green, 1894 (tr. 1900). 

Henry Edward Cooper, 1901 (cons. 1895). 

Cecil Henry Uruitt, 1911 (coadjutor Bishop). 



Bathurst, 1869. — The diocese of Bathurst 
had formerly an area of 147,600 square miles. 
On 29th May, 1889, a large portion of this was 
ceded to the diocese of Riverina, and 450 square 
miles, a few years later, were ceded by Newcastle, 
thus making the area of the present diocese 
73,050 square miles. 

The Church members are estimated at 74,340. 
The total English-speaking population of the 
diocese is about 164,938 ; other than these, 2,000. 
There are 50 clergy. In the Sunday schools 
there are 6634 children. Religious instruction 



is regularly given by the clergy in 268 State 
schools to a total of 9297 children. Thirty-eight 
of these State schools are visited by the Brother- 
hood of the Good Shepherd. 

The S.P.G. made a grant towards the forma- 
tion of the Brotherhood at Dubbo, the buildings 
of which were dedicated in 1895. 

Bishops : — • 

Samuel Edward Marsden, 1869 (resigned 1886). 
Charles Edward Camidge, 1887. 
George Merrick Long, 1911. 



Riverina, 1884. — This diocese contains about 
111,000 square miles, and comprises the western 
portion of New South Wales. It is bounded on 
the north by the diocese of Brisbane, on the east 
by the dioceses of Bathurst and Goulburn, on 
the. west by South Australia, and on the south 
by the colony of Victoria. There are 32,000 
members of the Anglican Church. The clergy 
are 17 in number; they are separated by great 
distances, several being as much as 120 miles 
apart. The members of the Church number 



28,000. Missions to the aborigines are carried 
on at Warangesda and Maloga, at the former 
under Church auspices, and are frequently visited 
by one of our clergy. A Chinese catechist works 
among the Chinese population. 

The formation of this diocese was in great 
measure due to the help of the S.P.G. 

Bishops : — 

Sydney Linton, 1884. 

Ernest Augustus Anderson, 1895. 



PROVINCE OF VICTORIA. 



In 1905 the Province of Victoria was consti- 
tuted. It includes the dioceses of Melbourne, 
Ballarat, Bendigo, Wangaratta and Gipps- 
land. Out of a total population (in 1901) of 
1,201,070 in the State of Victoria, 423,955 re- 
turned themselves as members of the Church of 
England. 

Melbourne, 1847. — The area of this diocese 
is 43,225 square miles, that of the state being 
87,884 square miles, or a little less than that of 
Great Britain. 

The diocese of Melbourne contains 600,000 ; 
the number of Church members is about 
250,000; of communicants, 25,547. There are 
226 churches in the diocese, and 139 other 



buildings used for Church services. There are 
170 clergy, and there are besides 19 stipendiary 
readers and 220 honorary lay readers. 

There are 242 Sunday schools with 26,131 
scholars. 

St. Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne, of which the 
foundation-stone was laid in 1880, was conse- 
crated on 22nd January, 1891. 

Bishops : — 

Charles Perry, 1847. 

James Moorhouse, 1876 ; tr. to Manchester, 

1886. 
Field Flowers Goe, 1887. 
Henry Lowther Clarke, 1902 ; archbishop, 

1905. 



Ballarat, 1875. — This diocese was separated 
from that of Melbourne in 1875 ; it forms the 
western, as the latter (with the dioceses ot 
Bendigo, Wangaratta and Gippsland) now 
forms the eastern, portion of the State ot 
Victoria. It is half the size of England and 
Wales, and contains some 282,000 souls, of 
whom 86,000 are adherents of the Church of 
England ; the majority are Presbyterians and 
Methodists, and one-sixth are Roman Catholics. 

The diocese includes the wide and sparsely 
settled area known as the " Mallee," which is 
specially liable to periodic droughts, and which 



forms a heavy charge upon the resources of the 
diocese. 

The city of Ballarat contains a population of 
about 48,000. In the diocese there are 81 
parishes and 86 clergy, 11 lay readers and 68 
honorary lay helpers; 170 Anglican Churches, 
besides 172 other places used for Church of Eng- 
land services. 
Bishops : — 

Samuel Thornton, 1875 (resigned 1900). 
Henry Edward Cooper (coad.), 1895, 
translated to Grafton and Armidale. 
Arthur Vincent Green, 1900 (cons. 1894). 



Bendigo, 1902. — This diocese was taken being about 150 miles long by 100 miles wide, 
out of that of Melbourne, and consists of the Its population is 137,680, of whom about 40,000 
northern portion of the colony of Victoria, are members of the Church of England. The first 

(88) 



PROVINCE OF VICTORIA 



89 



bishop was consecrated in Melbourne Cathedral 
on 24th February, 1902. The bishop's seat 
is at Bendigo, which has a population of 
40,000. 

There are 31 parishes or parochial districts 
with 33 clergy and 19 stipendiary readers who 
are students for Holy Orders and 59 honorary 



readers, 75 churches and 65 temporary buildings 
in which services are held. 

There is a mission to the Chinese in the town 
of Bendigo. 
Bishops : — 

Henry Archdall Langley, 1902. 
John Douse Langley, 1907. 



Wangaratta, 1902. — This diocese consists 
of the north-eastern portion of Victoria. It 
was taken out of the diocese of Melbourne. 
The population of the diocese in 1901 was 
110,280, of whom about 40,000 profess to belong 
to the Church of England. The bishop's seat is 
at Wangaratta. 

This diocese includes 15,000 square miles of 
sparsely populated country. The principal pur- 
suits are farming, grazing and mining. There 
are no large towns, and only two very small 



Church schools. There are 34 clergy and 10 
stipendiary lay readers and 38 honorary readers, 
who hold services at more than 200 small centres. 

There are 32 parishes and parochial districts 
and 8 mission districts. Divine service is held 
regularly in 81 churches, 102 schools and public 
halls, and 11 private houses. There are 116 
Sunday schools, with 4,500 scholars. 

Bishop : — 

Thomas Henry Armstrong, 1902. 



Gippsland, 1902. — This diocese consists of 
the south-eastern portion of Victoria. 

The approximate population of the diocese is 
78,210, of whom about 25,000 belong to the 
Church of England. There is an aboriginal 
mission station in the diocese, at Lake Tyers, 
under the spiritual charge of a Church of England 
clergyman. There are about 90 aborigines in 
this district. The see town of the diocese is 
Sale, having a population of 3,500. 

There are 29 parishes or parochial districts 
in charge of clergymen. Attached to these 29 
centres there are a large number of smaller places 
where services are held. There are 31 clergy, 13 
stipendiary readers and 23 honorary readers, 71 
churches and 155 other buildings used for 



services, and 24 parsonage houses. The number 
of individuals attending services on an ordinary 
Sunday is 6,855. The estimated number of com- 
municants is 2,783. 

Education. — The instruction given in the State 
primary schools is good and progressive, but it 
is absolutely secular. Once a week a clergyman, 
or his helper, is allowed to give religious instruc- 
tion, of half an hour's duration, before the school 
begins or after the school is dismissed. In the 
77 Sunday schools in the diocese there is an 
enrolment of about 3,209 scholars. There are 
no Church of England primary day schools. 

Bishop : — 

Arthur Wellesley Pain, 1902. 



PROVINCE OF QUEENSLAND. 



The Province of Queensland, which was 
constituted in 1905, includes the dioceses of 
Brisbane, North Queensland, Rockhampton, 
Carpentaria and New Guinea. 

Brisbane, 1859. — The see of Brisbane was 
founded when the new colony of Queensland was 
separated from that of New South Wales. The 
diocese then comprised Central and Southern 
Queensland, with a small part of Northern 
Queensland ; since, however, the formation of the 
diocese of North Queensland in 1878, and the 
diocese of Rockhampton in Central Queensland 
in 1892, the diocese of Brisbane includes South 
Queensland only. The population of Brisbane 
is over 125,000. The area of the present dio- 
cese of Brisbane contains 209,278 square miles. 



with a population of about 385,000, of whom 
37 per cent, are members of the Church of 
England. 

There are now 91 parishes and districts with 
78 clergy, 10 catechists, and 61 honorary lay 
readers holding the bishop's licence ; 161 
churches, and numerous temporary buildings in 
which services are held, together with 279 
stations. The communicants number 8,232. 

There are Missions to the Chinese in Brisbane 
and its neighbourhood. 
Bishops : — 

Edward Wyndham Tufnell, 1859. 
Matthew Blagden Hale, 1875 (cons. 1857). 
William Thomas Thornhill Webber, 1885. 
St. Clair George Alfred Donaldson, 1904; 
archbishop, 1905. 



North Queensland, 1878.— The diocese of 
North Queensland, when founded in 1878, in- 
cluded the whole northern political division of 
the State, the southern boundary being at the 
22nd parallel of latitude. In igoo the diocese 
of Carpentaria was formed to include the 
northern territory of South Australia and the 
extreme north of Queensland. The northern 
boundary of the diocese of North Queensland 
therefore has been defined by a line running 
from the eastern boundary of the State of 
South Australia 19° 30" to 144° longitude east 
of the meridian, and thence by a line running 
due east to the coast. Townsville, which is 
the see city, is also the centre of the civil ad- 
ministration of the northern division of the State. 



(90) 



The present area of the diocese is 230,000 
square miles, and the total population is over 
100,000 of whom 50,000 are members of the 
Church of England. There are a few large 
towns, the chief among them being Townsville, 
with a population of 15,506, and Charters Towers, 
numbering about 20,976. The remainder of the 
population, scattered far and wide, is composed 
of miners among the mountain ranges, sugar 
farmers on the coast-line, and pastoralists in 
the' far West. The whole diocese is settled 
sparsely outside the main towns, and the lonely 
settlers in the extreme West can only be reached 
by means of itinerant clergymen and bush 
brotherhoods. 

It is estimated that there are 16,000 aborigines 



N9XXXVni. 




PROVINCE OF QUEENSLAND 



91 



still existing in the northern division of Queens- 
land. The majority are in the diocese of Car- 
pentaria, but North Queensland possesses a 
most successful Mission in Australia — Yarrabah. 
The position of the half-castes and quadroons is 
the source of great anxiety. Unless they are re- 
moved to mission stations they sink almost in- 
variably into the lowest depths of degradation. 
The total number of coloured aliens in North 
Queensland has very considerably diminished 
owing to the White Australia policy of the 
Commonwealth. There are about 5,000 Chinese 



in the diocese, 500 Japanese, and 300 Kanakas 
who are exempt from deportation. There are 
also a certain number of Afghan camel drivers, 
Cingalese and Malays. Very little Christian 
work is possible through the small number of 
clergy in the diocese through lack of funds. 

There are 22 clergy in the diocese, 6 stipendiary 
lay readers, 30 voluntary lay readers. 
Bishops : — 

George Henry Stanton, 1878. 

Christopher George Barlow, 1891 (tr. 1902). 

George Horsfall Frodsham, 1902. 



Rockhampton, 1896. — When this diocese 
was founded the S.P.G. contributed £'i,ooo 
to the Endowment Fund. The diocese is prac- 
tically coterminous with what is known 
as Central Queensland. It contains about 
223,000 square miles, and is bounded on the 
north by the diocese of North Queensland, on 
the south by the diocese of Brisbane, on the 
east by the South Pacific Ocean, and on the 
west by the northern territory of South Australia. 
The country consists chiefly of vast sheep and 
cattle " runs ". The population is widely scat- 
tered, and the towns are few and far between. 
The English-speaking people number 65,000 ; 
other than these, 1,400. The members (nominal 
and actual) of the Church of England are about 



27,000. There are 19 parishes or parochial dis- 
tricts, with 12 clergy and 6 honorary lay readers 
holding the bishop's licence ; 28 churches and 50 
temporary buildings in which service is held, 
also 185 "head stations" visited by the clergy 
for the conduct of service. The communicants 
number about 2,100. 

The following stations are assisted by the 
S.P.G. : North Coast Mission, Blackall, Emerald, 
Mount Morgan, Springsure, Winton. 

The S.P.G. gave a grant towards the estab- 
lishment of the Community Mission settlement 
at Longreach. 

Bishop : — 

Nathaniel Dawes, 1892 (cons. 1889). 
George Dowglass Halford, 1909. 



Carpentaria, 1900. — This see was founded in 
1899, and its first bishop consecrated in 1900. 
It comprises Northern Queensland and the 
northern territory of South Australia, an area 
of not less than 620,000 square miles. 

The population, which is very widely scattered 
over this immense area, consists of about 15,500 
whites, 5,000 Japanese, Chinese and other aliens, 
and 35,000 aboriginals. The white population is 
chiefly mining and pastoral, and almost entirely 
of the working class, Croydon (population, 5,500) 
being the largest centre. The see town is Thurs- 
day Island, a pearl-shelling centre off Cape York. 
The largest town is Croydon, population 5,500. 



Mission work is carried on among the South 
Sea Islanders at Moa and Thursday' Islands, 
among the Japanese at Thursday Island, and 
among the aborigines at the Mitchell River, 
where the bishop has obtained from the Govern- 
ment a reserve of about 600 square miles, and 
where a Mission was started in 1905, and on the 
Roper River where a Mission was begun in 1908. 

There are 8 clergy, and 5 voluntary lay workers. 

Two students are preparing for Holy Orders. 
The S.P.G. helps to support mission work in the 
diocese. 

Bishop : — 

Gilbert White, 1900. 



92 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



NEW GUINEA, 



New Guinea, 1898. — The Mission was com- 
menced in 1891 ; the see constituted by resolu- 
tion of the General Synod of Australia and 
Tasmania, in 1896, and the first bishop con- 
secrated in 1898. The S.P.G. contributed _;^i,ooo 
towards the establishment of the Mission, and 
_;^2,soo towards the endowment of the see. 
British New Guinea or Papua contains 88,000 
square miles, with a population of nearly 1000 
English-speaking people, and about 350,000 other 
than these. The area undertaken by the Church 
for work amongst the heathen is situated on the 
north-east coast, and extends from Cape Ducie 
to the German boundary at the eighth parallel of 
south latitude, in all 300 miles of coast and the 
land lying behind it. The white settlers are 
scattered over the mainland and adjacent islands. 
The natives are agriculturists, and live a settled 
life in villages. In some districts they are still 
addicted to tribal raids and cannibalism. White 
people are attracted mainly by the gold dis- 
coveries, and are also engaged as pearl-shellers, 
and in procuring beche-de-mer, planters, and 
traders generally. 

The mission staff, drawn almost entirely from 
Australia, now numbers 66 — viz., the bishop, 
7 clergy, 4 lay workers, 10 ladies, and 28 South 
Sea Islanders, 10 native pupil teachers, 4 native 
evangelists, and 2 native catechists. One 
thousand four hundred and forty -one have been 
baptised, there are 432 catechumens, 568 com- 
municants, and 16 Papuan pupil teachers and' 
evangelists. Twenty-three mission stations have 
been established with 28 schools containing 1,451 
children, and services are held regularly at 79 
centres, some entirely by native evangelists. 
Forty-five other places are visited at regular in- 
tervals, about 13,600 natives in all being influ- 
enced. The stations cover the greater part of 
the 300 miles of coast line above referred to. 
The Church has established a day school at 



Samarai, and has thus supplied the only oppor- 
tunity of education to the white children gathered 
at this main centre of trade and influence in British 
New Guinea. A separate station for half-caste 
children has 42 boarders. 

The S.P.G. by a grant of £50 a year, continued 
for five years, enabled the bishop to place a 
clergyman at Samarai, whose influence has been 
far-reaching. The grant after 5 years was volun- 
tarily suspended. 

The twenty-three regular stations belonging to 
the mission are Samarai, Uhuna, Taupota (with 
Modaua and Awauia), Hioge, Topura, Wamira, 
Wedau (with Gelaria and Magavara), Dogura, 
Ganuganuana, Boianai, Menapi, Wabubu, Muk- 
awa, Uiaku, Sinapa, Wanigela, Ambasi, and 
River Mamba. Awaiama, Paiwa, Uarakanta, 
Okein, Gona and Cure. 

The first missionary work in the island was 
started in Dutch New Guinea in 1855. The 
Utrecht Missionary Society is still working 
there. The London Missionary Society began 
work in New Guinea in 187 1, and have 14 
stations, with 15 English missionaries, and 150 
native pastors. Their work lies on the south-east 
coast at Gulf Mission, Fly River, Elema, Jokea, 
Delena, Port Moresby, Vatorata, Kerepunu, 
Mailu, Fife Bay, Kwato, Kalaigolo. One of 
their missionaries, the Rev. James Chalmers, 
was murdered by the natives in 1901, after many 
years of most successful work. 

The Roman Catholic Church commenced work 
in 1886 and has about 60 missionaries and 5,000 
adherents. The Australian Methodists who 
started in 1891, have 12 European missionaries 
and 3,800 adherents. 

Bishops : — 

Montagu John Stone-Wigg, 1898 (resigned 

1908). 
Gerald Sharp, 1910. 







1 



<» 
^ 



INDEPENDENT DIOCESES. 



Adelaide, 1847, — This diocese was founded 
in 1847, and by the letters patent of the first 
bishop (Dr. Short) the diocese was made co- 
terminous with the colony of South Australia. 
The creation of the diocese of Carpentaria, by 
the consecration on St. Bartholomew's Day, 
1900, of Archdeacon Gilbert White as first 
bishop, has finally relieved the Bishop of 
Adelaide of his supervision of the " northern 
territory ". The total area comprises 380,000 
square miles, of which about 136,828 are at 
present occupied. The estimated population in 
1910, was 414,315. 

The number of licensed churches is 193, 
served by 103 clergy, 5 paid catechists, and 300 
unpaid licensed lay readers. Sunday scholars 
number 11,249. 

According to the census of 1901, the adher- 



ents of the Church of England formed 29-5 per 
cent, of the population. The Roman Catholics 
form i4'3 of the population. 

The ratio of communicants to the whole 
population is improving. In 1883 it was one 
in every 99 of the population; in 1908 it was 
nearly one in every 28. St. Peter's collegiate 
school held its jubilee in 1897. St. Barnabas' 
theological college provides training for candi- 
dates for Holy Orders. 
Bishops : — 

Augustus Short, 1847. 

George Wyndham Kennion, 1882 ; tr. to 

Bath and Wells, 1894. 
John Reginald Harmer, 1895 ; tr. to Roches- 
ter 1905. 
Arthur Nutter Thomas, 1906. 



Perth, 1856. — General Description. — The 
diocese until 1904 comprised the entire State 
of Western Australia, but two new dioceses 
have now been created, namely Bunbury and 
North West Australia. A fourth diocese for 
the eastern goldfields (Kalgoorlie) is being 
formed. 

The diocese of Perth is limited by the bound- 
aries of the State of Western Australia, except 
on the south-west, where it is bounded by 
32° 22' 30" of south latitude from the sea-coast 
to the i2ist meridian of east longitude, thence 
south by the said meridian to the sea. 

In area the original diocese embraced 510,000 
square miles. Its scattered population numbers, 
exclusive of aborigines, 216,800 persons. 



Church work. — -The members of the Church 
of England are about 94,000. There are 57 
clergy and 80 churches, besides about 70 mis- 
sion halls, schools or other buildings used for 
Divine service. A good deal of lay help is 
given voluntarily, there being 100 readers holding 
the bishop's licence. Synodical action was in- 
augurated in Western Australia in 1872. The 
Synod is constituted of the bishop as President, 
of each licensed clergyman, and two lay com- 
municants for every clergyman. 

Successful efforts continue to be made to extend 
the ministrations of religion to the goldfields and 
other outlying centres of fresh settlement. 

Education. — -The Education Act grants permis- 
sion for the ministers of the various denomina- 



(93) 



94 



tions to give religious instruction to the children 
of their own denomination during school hours. 

There are Sunday schools in every parish in 
connection with the principal church, and, in 
most instances, in the schoolrooms or other 
places where Divine service is held. 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 

Number of scholars, 7,000 ; teachers, 500. 
Bishops : — • 



Matthew Blagden Hale, 1857 (tr. 1875). 
Henry Hutton Parry, 1876. 
Charles Owen Leaver Riley, 1894. 



Bunbury, 1903. — The diocese of Bunbury 
was formed out of the diocese of Perth. The first 
bishop was consecrated on July 17, 1904. The 
diocese contains 40,000 square miles. The popu- 
lation in the diocese is almost exclusively Euro- 
pean. 

The estimated population of the diocese of 
Bunbury proper is about 50,000 of whom about 
23,000 are Church people. There are 26 clergy, 
3 stipendiary lay readers and 45 honorary lay 
readers. There is a steady increase of communi- 
cants every year. 

By Act of Parliament the clergy and other duly 
authorised teachers are permitted to give religious 
instruction in all Government elementary schools, 
and this is regularly and almost universally 
given. At Bunbury there is a Church Grammar 
school for girls, which is doing good work. 



The work is assisted by S.P.G. in Wagin, 
Karridale, Narrbgin, Bridgetown, Greenbushes, 
South Bunbury, Collie, Ravensthorpe, Bruns- 
wick, and the Travelling Mission and in the 
North West. A Bush Brotherhood was estab- 
lished at Williams in 1911 (see " Mission Field," 
Oct., 1911). 

About 700 miles of new railway have been 
recently constructed and the rapid development 
of agriculture and mining render the work very 
difficult ; the efforts however of the Church are 
meeting with a considerable measure of success, 
but, owing to the great distances and the speedy 
growth, they involve a proportionately great cost. 

Bishop : — 

Frederick Goldsmith, 1904. 



North West Australia, 1910. — This diocese 
was formed out of the diocese of Perth. The 
southern boundary is lat. 26 and is bounded 
on the east by the diocese of Carpentaria. It 
contains altogether about 500,000 square miles. 
There are about 7,000 Europeans including 
pearlers, business men, government officials at 
the small seaports along the coast, miners and 
prospectors on the Pilbarra and Kimberley gold 
fields, and squatters settled on sheep and cattle 
stations often far inland and at remote distances 



from one another. There are also several thou- 
sand Japanese, Chinese, Malays, Manilla men 
and other Asiatics engaged in trade or employed 
in the pearling industry. There are also about 
30,000 aboriginals including a number of half- 
castes. 

Bishop Trower was formerly Bishop of Likoma. 
The staff at present consists of the Bishop and 
four clergy. 

Bishop : — 

Gerard Trower, 1909, cons. 1902. 



Tasmania, 1842. — This see is second to 
Sydney in seniority. The Church began its 
work in the colony in 1804, when the colony 
was founded. The diocese comprises Tasmania 
and its dependencies (the islands in the Bass 
-trait and others). The area is 16,778,000 acres, 



being about the size of Ceylon. The popula- 
tion is calculated to be 190,898, of whom about 
110,000 are native born. The 1901 census 
gave the Church population as just under 50 
per cent, of the whole. Several hundred half- 
castes are located in the Bass Strait Islands. 



INDEPENDENT DIOCESES 



95 



The bishop visits them and the lighthouses 
annually. 

There are 90 ordained clergy. The conse- 
crated churches number 163, and there are 140 
other buildings which are regularly used for 
worship. There are 90 lay readers, 56 parishes, 
3 mission districts. Sunday school children, 
7.537- 



The clergy are permitted to teach in the State 
schools during school hours at fixed times. 
Bishops : — 

Francis Russell Nixon, 1842. 
Charles Henry Bromby, 1864. 
Daniel Fox Sandford, 1883. 
Henry Hutchinson Montgomery, 1889 (re- 
signed 1 901). 
John Edward Mercer, 1902. 



PROVINCE OF NEW ZEALAND AND MELANESIA. 

NEW ZEALAND AND THE PACIFIC. 

New Zealand 

(now Auckland), 

1841. 



Christchurch, 
1856. 

I 
Dunedin, 

1866. 



Wellington, 
1858. 



Nelson, 
1858. 



Waiapu, 
1858. 



The evangelisation of New Zealand was 
begun by Samuel Marsden, chaplain at Para- 
matta, near Sydney, who landed at Rangi- 
houa, in the Bay of Islands, and on Christmas 
Day, 1 8 14, held the first Christian service. 
The work, which was supported by the 
C.M.S., spread steadily throughout the is- 
lands. The Maori population (191 1), 49,350, 
most of whom live in the dioceses of Auckland 
and Waiapu. The C.M.S. has now withdrawn 
its financial aid from New Zealand. 

The S.P.G. began work in Norfolk Island 
in 1796, and in New Zealand in 1840, and its 
operations were extended to Melanesia in 1849, 
Pitcairn Island 1853, the Hawaiian Islands in 
1842, and Fiji in 1880. 

The formation of the six dioceses of New 
Zealand was mainly due to its aid. Melanesia 
received an annual subsidy from the Society up 
to 1 88 1, besides which the Society, on the death 



Melanesia, 

1861. 
Polynesia, 

1908. 



of Bishop Patteson and his co-martyrs in 1872, 
raised a fund of ^7,000 for a Memorial Church, 
a new vessel, and the partial endowment of the 
Mission. 

The total population of the Dominion of 
New Zealand in igii was 1,008,468 (North 
Island, 563,729; South Island, 444,120; Stewart 
Island, 357 ; Chatham Islands, 258 ; Kermadec 
Islands, 4). The provincial population : Auck- 
land, 264,520; Taranaki, 51,569; Hawke's Bay, 
48,546 ; Wellington, 199,094 ; Marlborough, 
15,985; Nelson, 48,463; Westland, 15,714; 
Canterbury, 173,185 ; Otago, Otago portion, 
132,402 ; Southern portion, 58,728. 

During the period 1796-1910 the Society ex- 
pended ;^i42,6o9, and employed 116 ordained 
missionaries (including 6 natives) in New Zea- 
land and the Pacific. At the present time its 
work in this field is being carried on in Fiji. 



Auckland, 1841. — This diocese, formerly Dunedin. The diocese contains an area of 

known as New Zealand, and which comprises 17,300 square miles. The number of clergy is 

the north part of New Zealand, is that part of at present 90 (including 16 Maoris), and the 

the colony which the late Bishop Selwyn re- number of congregations about 422 (including 

tained for himself, after resigning the charge of 73 Maori). The European population is 214,000 

those portions which now form the dioceses of of whom 100,000 are members of the Anglican 

Christchurch, Wellington, Nelson, Waiapu and Church, about 8,000 Maoris are members of the 

(96) 



N9XL. 



168 



no 



nz 



5€ 



NEW ZEALAND 

— /Af DIOCESES. 



ftb'mrais 



,CMu P 
fyrenga-renga 



176 



178 



igaroa 



kdikon, 



of Islands 
[Kororurika 



fha. 



Scale of Miles. 

BO 40 60 80 100 



38 



Waimamalh/ \^ 

TeviaraW'^ 



Okai 



AUCKLAND 



PorfWaikah 



■imercur\/P!' 

hmhamshmn 
\Shmland , c 



<,V 



<^ 



^S'^ 



NORTH ISLAND 



\ 



40- 



\ 



I' 



\ 



'^ 



Jauranga 



Kawhja 



N.PIymoufI 
C.Ejmom 



\KawaKawa 

lorergi mmRangitukia 
■Mllrua tPnxajki—Jj/Hbareponpa 
^ I -Va^/ I xTokomaru 

ipo ^ru>ai 
Taupo^ 



, Jokafumuiljffaupo jSYufangaii^Whangara 



C.Farewell^^ 
Collin^wQodxjASMAN 



Whangan^^^\ 
Bull 
Palmersmnei 



42 



Wei 



'^^ffT 



m 



r)BAY^ 



Bl^m/m 

rowy 



Greymouthk 



HOKITIHI, 

SOU\TH ISLAND 

Okarih 



'aifhha^ 

'..Coin 



' MtCook 

Cascade P!^^ ' 

CHi 



vNewcat 



'Li 



mUna. 



'rapier 

ilewfe 
'Vaipayta_ 



-^y 



>^ 



"^/^iKl 



mkoura 



^Cheviot 
Kari 



hCHRl, 



ISTCHURCH 

•Ifon 



'OF 



fNi 



invers^ 



^STEWARTI. 

Part Pegasus 



\Timaru 

wamaru 
Wampden 

nPort Chalmers 



''W^ 



48- 



38 



36 



168 



170 



172 



174- 



176 



A-^'rA, 



AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne 



Scale of Miles. 



jfa 



/-u/- ri^sss Strait 
C.Wickham 



TASMANIA. 



C.Gr!m^%S'' 
WestI 



'■^oi. 



Reminei 
'/lac(fuariesh 

PtHibh. 



Frmtler a<j\, Furneaux 
'■\X-mvup 
c^CBarren 

jVankStralt 
^obyalla 

Sunce^ton 

- ,^maryi 



'M , 



Hoc/tyPfL HOBARTii 
Batfiurs^.^ 
PtDaveyi, 



ySMarial. 

(Tasmans Pen 
'^C.Pillar 



''''<P^. 



145~ 



PROVINCE OF NEW ZEALAND AND MELANESIA 



97 



Anglican Church. There are still many Maoris 
who are heathen. There are 56 parishes or 
districts, including 13 Maori parishes; and 166 
churches, mostly built of wood, of which 46 are 
Maori. 



Bishops : — 

George Augustus Selwyn, 1841, tr. to Lich- 
field, 1869. 
William Garden Cowie, 1869. 
Moore Richard Neligan, 1903 (res. 1910). 
Owen Thomas Lloyd Crossley, 1911. 



Christchurch, 1856. — This diocese consists 
of the middle portion of the south island, viz., 
Canterbury and part of Westland, and comprises 
an area of 20,000 square miles. The population 
is about 159,000, exclusive of 900 natives. Of 
these 67,000 declared themselves members of the 
Anglican Church. 

There are about 870 Maoris. 

There are 74 clergy, 105 lay readers, 8 deacon- 



esses, 125 churches, and 75 buildings in which 
services are held. On All Saints' Day, 1904, 
the completed cathedral was consecrated. Christ's 
College at Christchurch forms part of the Uni- 
versity of New Zealand. 

Bishops : — 

Henry John Chitty Harper, 1856. 
Julius Churchill, 1889. 



Wellington, 1858. — This diocese comprises 
the provincial district of Wellington and part of 
the provincial district of Taranaki. The area is 
10,000 square miles. English-speaking people, 
about 195,000, Maoris, 5,750. 

Nearly half the population profess to be mem- 
bers of the Church. The Maoris are under the 
charge of 8 clergy (6 of them of their own race). 

A Chinese lay reader is doing good work 
among his fellow-countrymen, of whom there 
are about 600 in the diocese. They have them- 
selves raised ;£3oo, which has been supplemented 
with a gift of ;fi8o from a European friend, for 



building a Chinese Mission Church. Colleges 
for Maori lads has been established at Clareville 
and Otaki. A college for theological students, 
which serves also as a home for other students 
of the University was opened in 1909. The 
Missions to Seamen carries on good work at 
Wellington. 

Bishops :■ — 

Charles John Abraham, 1858. 
Octavius Hadfield, 1870. 
Frederic Wallis, 1895 (resigned 191 1). 
Thomas Henry Sprott, 191 1. 



Nelson, 1858. — This diocese was founded in 
1858, and comprises the northern portion of the 
south island of New Zealand. Its southern 
boundary is on the west the river Teremakau, 
and on the east the river Hurunui. The popu- 
lation of the diocese is now about 67,000, together 
with about 300 Maoris, and about 100 Chinese. 
Between 38 and 39 per cent, of the whole are 
nominally members of the Church of England. 



The diocese contains 6 duly constituted parishes, 
with 29 parochial districts and 53 churches and 
66 other buildings used for Divine worship. The 
number of clergy is 23. The S.P.G. contributed 
towards the endowment of this diocese. 
Bishops : — 

Edmund Hobhouse, 1858. 

Andrew Burn Suter, 1866. 

Charles Oliver Mules, 1892. 



Waiapu, 1858. — This diocese occupies the 
eastern portion of the north island of New 
Zealand. The estimated population consists 
of 65,000 Europeans and 16,600 Maoris ; 30,800 



Europeans and about 9,000 Maoris belong to the 
Church of the Province of New Zealand. There 
are 30 clergy working among the Europeans. 
Four English clergy are working among the 



98 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Maoris under the Maori Mission Board, besides 
one who is Principal of the Maori Theoogical 
College at Gisborne, and one who is master of 
the native boys' school at Waerengaahika. 
Seventeen native clergy have settled congrega- 
tions of their own people, 3 are working among 
the people who fell away from Christianity during 



the war of 45 years ago, and one is assistant 
tutor at the Maori Theological College. 
Bishops : — 

WiUiam Williams, 1858. 

Edward Craig Stuart, 1877. 

William Leonard Williams, 1895 (res. 1909). 

Alfred Walter Averill, 1910. 



Dunedin, 1868. — This see was founded by 
an Act of the General Synod, by which it 
was cut off from Christchurch. It comprises 
Otago and Southland, New Zealand. The popu- 
lation is about 174,000, of whom 35 per cent, 
have recorded themselves as members of the 
Church of England. There are 300 Maoris and 
some Chinese. 



The clergy number 40, and there are 69 
churches, 2 of which are for the natives, besides 
30 unconsecrated buildings. There are 3,700 
children in the Sunday schools. 

Bishop : — 

Samuel Tarratt Nevill, 1871 ; primate, 1904. 



Melanesia, 1861. — This diocese comprises the 
Western islands of the South Pacific, from the 
Northern New Hebrides to the Solomon Islands 
inclusive. 

Work is being carried on by missionaries, and 
native teachers on thirty-two islands, and others 
are visited by the Mission Ship in the hope of 
placing schools on them. The staff of the 
Mission consists of the bishop, 34 clergy (19 
white and 15 native) 6 laymen and 14 ladies. 
From all the different islands boys and girls are 
brought to the school at Norfolk Island for a 
training lasting seven or eight years. There is 
a small boys' school also in the Banks Islands. 
Most of those trained natives become teachers, 
759 of whom are now teaching in 327 schools, 
with over 18,000 scholars. 

The three islands in the Northern Hebrides 
under the Mission's charge have in them 2,286 
baptised persons, and more than 1,000 besides, in 
the schools. 

In the Banks Islands there are but few 
heathen remaining. There are 3,135 baptised, 
and over 600 hearers. 

The last of the four Torres Islands has lately 
joined the others and accepted Christianity. There 
are 470 baptised in the group, and over 100 hearers. 



Santa Cruz and the Reef Islands are far the 
most backward part of the diocese. There are 
only 106 baptised, and 160 hearers. 

The Solomon Islands have made wonderful 
progress. There are schools everywhere now, 
and the natives ask for more. The old savage 
ways have yielded to a religion which brings 
life instead of death ; and teachers cannot be sup- 
plied fast enough to satisfy the people. There 
are 8,415 baptised and 3,000 hearers and cate- 
chumens. Other Missions have lately entered 
the group but none of them have any native 
teachers like those which Norfolk Island has 
equipped for this Mission. 

The " Southern Cross " makes two voyages 
annually round the diocese, fetching the boys and 
girls to school, and placing them afterwards. 

The Mission lost three of its most efficient 
priests recently, Henry Welchman of Bagota, 
and Frank BoUen of Guadalcanar and Savo, and 
C. C. Godden of Lolowi, all dying at their posts. 

The population of English-speaking people is 
about 700. The natives number about 300,000. 

Bishops : — 

John Coleridge Patteson, 1861. 
John Richardson Selwyn, 1877. 
Cecil Wilson, 1894 (res. 191 1). 



N9 XLI. 



I60 



170 



w 






Co 



r ^Vanua Lavaw/naf^ J . Is lands 

SoiMej-n Bovndan^ af^Mele^eaj^an MiSiions Sphere C^^/ii^Art7rw«j'"'fe"»-;, 





Nerr 

Britain 



litrrlreland 



'^.<^'>^^ ' ° 






Treasury I. t.^^ 



Choiseul I. ^ 

y^abell. o 



iNewGuinea 



T -.\ ..-•-, Rossa/J- 
Louisuiae ■-, 'C^'^' 
ArchipeJaga - • - S-iudasi- 1. 



'Gorftrl. 

<> toterfeiH-l. 



wJesus I. 



Q Kennedy I. 



.DufPl. 



^ 







4^ 



^/^ennellll. '^ vj'mkoro 



killed 



'ru2. Islands 

^Anooda 



V- • 



Tucopia 



=n 




10 







MISSIONARY WORK IN OCEANIA 



99 



Independent Diocese. 

Polynesia, 1908.— The headquarters of the 
diocese is at Suva which is the capital of the 
largest of the Fiji Islands. The population of 
Suva is 7,693. 

In 1902 the S.P.G. undertook a mission to the 
Indian coolies, of whom there are about 1,800, 
in the Fijian groups. The Fijians are Wes- 
leyans, but the Society has chaplains at Suva 



and Levuka for the Churchmen living there. It 
also has a mission to the labourers from Mela- 
nesia who work in the groups. The work in 
Tonga is superintended by Bishop Willis, who 
was formerly Bishop of Honolulu. 

Bishop : — 

Thomas Clayton Twitchell, 1908. 



Polynesia includes the islands of the Pacific 
lying east of Australia, New Guinea, Melanesia 
and Micronesia and north of New Zealand. The 
principal groups of islands are : — 

1. The Fiji Islands, & British colonial posses- 
sion, comprise 200 islands. The population is 
about 120,000, of whom there are about 2,500 
Europeans, 94,400 Fijians and 17,000 Indians. 
The Christian population numbers 100,864 (in- 
cluding 9,338 Roman Catholics). The S.P.G. 
supports work amongst the Indians in Fiji. 
The rest of the missionary work, other than that 
done by the Roman Catholics, is under the charge 
of the Australian Methodist Missionary Society. 

2. The Samoan Islands are under the protec- 
torate of Germany, with the exception of three 
small islands, which are dependencies of the 
United States of America. Population, 38,500. 
It is entirely Christian ; 4,000 are connected with 
the Roman Catholic Mission. Most of the mis- 
sionary work is under the charge of the L.M.S. 

3. The Cook, or Hervey, Islands are a de- 
pendency of New Zealand. Population, about 
12,000. The missionary work is carried on by 
the L.M.S. 

4. The Ellice and the Tokelau Islands, which 
are under British control, contain a population 
of 3,450. The missionary work is under the 
charge of the L.M.S. 

5. The Tonga, or Friendly, Islands are a 
British protectorate. Population, 22,000, of 
whom 21,000 are natives and 360 are Euro- 
peans or half-breeds. 2,000 are Roman Catho- 



lics. Nearly all the rest are attached to the 
Australian Methodist Mission. 

6. The Society Islands (Tahiti being the 
largest island), including the Leeward Islands, 
the Tuamotu Islands, the Austral Islands, the 
Gambier Islands and the Marquesas. Aggre- 
gate population, about 29,000. The natives are 
all Christians, 16,000 being Roman Catholics, 
The islands belong to France. The Protestant 
missions are maintained by the Paris Evan- 
gelical Missionary Society. 



Other missionary work in Oceania. — The 

population of Melanesia is estimated at about 
475,000. Of these 141,000 are Christians (30,000 
being Roman Catholics), and the rest are heathen. 
There are about 250 islands in Melanesia, of 
which the largest are in \h.& Bismarck Archipelago 
and the Solomon Group. The Bismarck Archi- 
pelago and the Western section of the Solomon 
Islands are under German control. 

The New Hebrides are jointly protected by 
England and France. The eastern section of 
the Solomon Islands, the Banks and the Sania 
Cruz islands are ruled by Great Britain. Mis- 
sionary work in the New Hebrides, except in 
the three northern islands in which the Mela- 
nesian Mission works, is under the Presbyterian 
New Hebrides Mission. They have 39 mission- 
aries (including men and women), and carry on 
work, with the assistance of 300 natives, in 126 
places. In the Loyalty Islands the London 



lOO 



THE CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Missionary Society has a missionary, who is 
assisted by 399 native workers. 

The term Micronesia is often applied to groups 
of small islands in the western part of the North 
Pacific, including the Caroline islands, the Ladrone 
islands, the Marshall islands and the Gilbert 
islands. The first three groups are a German 
possession, with the exception of Guam, which 



belongs to the United States of America. The 
Gilbert islands are under British control. In 
Micronesia there are about 160,000 heathen 
and 30,000 Christians (including 12,000 Roman 
Catholics). The Protestant missions are carried 
on by the American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions. They report 67 stations, 28 
missionaries and 197 native workers. 



Jerusalem and the East, 1841. — The 

charge of the bishop in Jerusalem and the East 
extends over the congregations and interests of 
the Anglican Church in Egypt and the regions 
about the Red Sea, in Palestine and Syria, in Asia 
Minor (except portions attaching to the bishopric 
of Gibraltar), and in the island of Cyprus. 

The clergy are 62 in number. Of these 31 are 
in Palestine and Syria, 27 in Egypt, 4 in Cyprus. 
There are also 8 lay readers. There are 6 mis- 
sionary clergy of the London Jews' Society and 
27 of the C.M.S. ; 4 are chaplains to the Forces, 
and 4 are season chaplains. There are 11 conse- 
crated churches and 6 licensed chapels in Egypt ; 
7 churches in Palestine, of which St. George's 
Collegiate Church, Jerusalem, St. Luke's, Haifa, 
and Christ Church of the London Jews' Society, 
Jerusalem, are consecrated. In addition there 
are 8 C.M.S. churches which are not conse- 
crated. The Bishop's Chapel at Beyrout and the 
3 chapels of the London Jews Society in Palestine 
and Syria are licensed. 



In the island of Cyprus the Greek Church is 
generally in charge of education, under an Eng- 
lish inspector. There is considerable success 
and promise both in towns and villages. 

In Egypt the Bishop's Mission to Jews at 
Cairo has about 200 children under instruction 
in 2 schools. The C.M.S. Mission to Moham- 
medans has about 200 children under education, 
and a good medical mission. 

The C.M.S. supports a considerable staff, who 
work both amongst the Eastern Christians and 
amongst Mohammedans. 

The S.P.G. contributes to the support of an 
itinerant chaplain to work amongst Europeans 
in the Nile Delta. It has voted ^^loo towards 
the erection of a church at Beyrout. 

Bishops in Jerusalem : — 

Michael Solomon Alexander, 1841. 

Samuel Gobat, 1846. 

Joseph Barclay, 1879. 

George Francis Popham Blyth, 1887. 



Khartoum, 1908. — In 1905 the Soudan was 
created an Archdeaconry by the Bishop of Jeru- 
salem. In 1908 Archdeacon Gwynne was con- 
secrated suffragan Bishop to the Bishop of 
Jerusalem with the title of Anglican Bishop in 
Khartoum. 

The work of the Church of England consists 
in ministering to the spiritual needs of the British 
community in Khartoum, numbering 1,200, and 
to those scattered over the Soudan, and of 
missionary work in Khartoum, Omdurman and 
Atbara, in the shape of schools for girls and a 



medical mission for Omdurman, all supported by 
the C.M.S. The C.M.S. has also undertaken 
missionary work in the upper regions of the Nile, 
and has established a station at Malek amongst 
the Dinkas, under the management of one or- 
dained and one lay missionary. 

There are two chaplains with head-quarters at 
Khartoum who conduct services at Suakin, Port 
Soudan, Atbara, and at Omnabardi gold mines ; 
the services at these places, when the clergy are 
unable to be present, are taken by laymen. 

A transept of the cathedral now being built, 



GENERAL STATISTICS 



not fkr from the place where he died, is to be a 
memorial to General Gordon. The cost of the 
cathedral is estimated at £28,000. 



Bishop : — 

Llewelyn Henry Gwynne, 1908. 



Gibraltar, 1842. — This diocese was founded 
in 1842. It is of an exceptional nature, con- 
sisting of the Rock of Gibraltar ; but the Bishop 
has jurisdiction also over British congregations 
and individuals in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Turkey, 
Greece and the Balkan Peninsula, in South 
Russia, Asia Minor, and North Africa ; i.e., on 
the seaboard and islands of the Mediterranean 
(excepting Egypt, Cyprus and Syria), and Adriatic 
and Black Seas. The ministrations of the clergy 
are confined to members of the Church of Eng- 
land, except in the case of the few clergy ap- 
pointed by the London Society for promoting 
Christianity among the Jews. 

There are 105 clergy and 54 churches, but at 
45 only of the chaplaincies are services held 
during the whole year. Some of the chap- 
laincies — e.g., in Northern Italy — are for the 
summer only ; others for the winter and spring 
— e.g., along the Riviera. The Society for pro- 



moting Christianity among the Jews has mission 
stations at Bucharest, Smyrna, Constantinople 
and Tunis. 

The chaplaincies in the rest of Europe are 
supervised by the Bishop of Northern and 
Central Europe, who acts as a suffragan to the 
Bishop of London. 

On the continent of Europe the S.P.G. con- 
tributes to support 33 permanent 88 summer 
and 32 winter chaplaincies. The support of 
the season chaplaincies at the various health 
resorts does not involve any actual expenditure 
of the income of the S.P.G. 
Bishops : — 

George Tomlinson, 1842. 

Walter John Trower, 1863. 

Charles Amyand Harris, 1868. 

Charles Waldegrave Sandford, 1874. 

William Edward Collins, 1904. 

Henry Joseph Corbett Knight, 1911. 



Honolulu 1861. — This bishopric was founded 
in 1 86 1, and was transferred to the American 
Church on ist April, 1902. The Hawaiian 
Islands have a population of 170,000, of whom 
35,000 are native Hawaiians. The remainder of 
the population is composed of : Whites, 28,533 ; 
Chinese, 32,000; Japanese, 60,000, with a con- 



siderable number of Coreans and Filipinos 
There are 20 ordained clergy, 7 lay readers and 
25 parishes. 
Bishops : — • 

Thomas Nettleship Staley, 1861. 

Alfred Willis, 1872 (resigned 1902). 

Henry Bond Restarick, 1902. 



Some General Statistics. 



The population of the world is roughly 
estimated at 1,760,000,000. Of these about 
558,000,000 are Christians {i.e., Roman Catho- 
lics, 272,000,000; Anglicans and Protestants, 
166,000,000 ; members of Eastern Churches, 
120,000,000). The Mohammedans number about 
216,000,000; Hindus, 209,000,000; Buddhists, 
137,000,000 ; Confucianists and Taoists, 
291,000,000; Pagans, about 160,000,000; Jews, 
11,000,000. 



In a recent issue of The Missionary Review of 
the World the statistics relating to Anglican and 
Protestant Missions are given as follows : — 





1909. 


1910. 


Missionaries 


21,844 


21,248 


Ordained native helpers 


5,929 


6,159 


Stations and out-stations 


43.934 


45.^4° 


Baptised during year . 


135.114 


139,899 


Adherents . 


4,866,661 


• 4,951,325 


School 


29,190 


30,215 


Scholars 


• 1. 113.995 


• 1.562,039 



The increase in the Christian population of India. 
The following figures are extracted from the Indian Government Census returns. 





1881. 


1891. 


igoi. 


1911. 


Provinces — 










Ajmer-Merwara 


2,225 


2,683 


3.712 


5,432 


Andamans and Nicobars . 




— 


483 


486 


566 


Assam 




7>093 


16,844 


35.969 


106,3891 


Baluchistan (Districts, etc.) 




— 


— 


4,026 


5,030 


Bengal .... 




128,13s 


190,829 


275,125 


319.384 


Berar .... 




i>335 


I.3S9 


2,375 


included in C.P. 


Bombay .... 




138,317 


161,770 


208,930 


233,246 


Burma .... 




84,219 


120,768 


147.525 


210,081 


Central Provinces . 




11,949 


12,970 


24,809 


34.697^ 


Coorg .... 




3.152 


3.392 


3,683 


3,553 


Madras .... 




71 1,080 


865,528 


1,024,071 


1,191,259 


North-West Frontier Province 




47,664 


.'58,441 


5,273 


6,585' 


Punjab .... 




33-420 


53,587 


65,811 


198,106 


United Provinces 








102,469 


177,949 


States and Agencies^ 










Baluchistan (Agency Tracts) 


— 


— 


— 


55 


Baroda .... 




771 


646 


7,691 


7=203 


Bengal States . 






— 


1,655 


3.241 


38,530 


Bombay States 






6,837 


8,239 


II. 157 


12,411 


Central India . 






7,065 


5,999 


8,114 


9.358 


Central Provinces States 






24 


338 


782 


38,704 


Hyderabad 






13.614 


20,429 


22,996 


54,296 


Kashmir . 






— 


218 


422 


975 


Madras States . 






634,903 


714,651 


910,409 


1,154,209 


Mysore . 






29,249 


38,135 


50,059 


59,844 


Punjab States . 






279 


322 


780 


1,645 


Rajputana 






1,294 


1,855 


2,840 


4,256 


United Provinces States 




■~ 


— 


486 


1,745 



' igii figures include Eastern Bengal. ' igii figures include Berar. 

5 The census returns for 1881 and i8gi include the United Provinces. 



Total number of Christians. 



1881. 
1,862,634 



1891. 
2,284,380 



1901. 
2,923,241 



1911. 
3,876,196 



Place. 


Map No 


. Lat. 


Aasvogel Pt. . 


• 13 


34 S 


Abaji 


20 


8N 


Abdallah's . 


21 


gS 


Abercorn 


21 


8S 


Aberdeen 


13 


32 S 


Aberdeen Rd. 


13 


32 S 


Aberdorn 


19 


17 s 


Abernethy 


4 


SoN 


Abeshr . 


II 


14 N 


Abetife . 


20 


6N 


Abigiza 


. 16 


27 S 


Abinsi . 


20 


7N 


Abo 


20 


5N 


Abomey 


20 


7N 


Abonema 


20 


4N 


Abu, Mt. 


28 


24 N 


Abuanhe 


18 


23 s 


Abuja . 


20 


gN 


Accra . 


20 


SN 


Achin . 


• 32 


5N 


Achincovis 


• 27 


9N 


Achterbang . 


13 


30 S 


Ackerpur 


■ 25 


22 N 


Acklin . 


8 


22 N 


Acton Homes 


14 


28 S 


Adamawa 


II 


8N 


Adams Bridge 


30 


gN 


Adams Peak . 


■ 30 


7N 


Adavale 


38 


26 S 


Adcock . 


16 


26 S 


Adda . 


20 


6N 


Addia . 


20 


13 N 


Addis Abeba . 


II 


gN 


Addna . 


20 


5N 


Adelaide (Aus. ) 


37 


34 S 


Adelaide (S. Africa 


13 


32 S 


Adialal . 


27 


gN 


Adjuntah 


25 


20 N 


Admiralty Is. 


39 


iS 


Ado 


20 


7N 


Ado 


20 


6N 


Adoa 


II 


14 N 


Adoni . 


26 


15 N 


Adra 


29 


23 N 


Adrar . 


II 


20 N 


Advent . 


17 


30 S 


Agades . 


II 


18 N 


Agaitala 


24 


23 N 


Aghadumo . 


20 


7N 


Agra . 


28 


27 N 


Aguire R. 


9 


8N 


Agulhas C. . 


12 


34 S 


Agusteshuer . 


37 


8N 


Ahipara 


40 


35 S 


Ahmadpur . 


28 


28 N 


Ahmadabad . 


25 


23 N 


Ahmadnagar . 


25 


24 N 


Ahmadnagar . 


25 


19 N 







INDEX. 




Long. 


Place. Map No 


. Lat. 


Long. 


24 E 


Ahoada . 


20 


SN 


6E 


7E 


Aimbur . 


• 37 


8N 


77 E 


30 E 


Air 


II 


18 N 


5E 


31 E 


Aiwaiama 


• 39 


10 S 


150 E 


24 E 


Ajanfa 


■ 25 


20 N 


75 E 


24 E 


Ajmer . 


. 28 


26 N 


74 E 


31 E 


Ajua 


20 


5N 


2 W 


102 W 


Akalkot 


• 25 


17 N 


76 E 


20 E 


Akarabisi 


9 


7N 


eow 


oW 


Akassa . 


20 


4N 


6E 


31 E 


Akeruf 


20 


gN 


7E 


8E 


Akiri 


20 


8N 


9E 


7E 


.\kita . 


• 35 


39 N 


140 E 


2E 


Akka . 


21 


iN 


29 E 


7E 


Akorai Mts. 


9 


I N 


58 W 


73 E 


Akropon 


20 


5N 


2 W 


34 E 


Akrosa 


20 


7N 


oE 


7E 


Akure 


20 


7N 


SE 


oW 


Akuse 


20 


6N 


oE 


97 E 


Akyab . 


• 31 


20 N 


93 E 


76 E 


Alajuela 


8 


9N 


84 W 


25 E 


Alaska 


2 


SoN 


iSoW 


75 E 


Alaska (Mash 


onalandjig 


17 S 


30 E 


73 W 


Albany Austr 


alia) 37 


34 S 


ii8E 


29 E 


Albany (Nov£ 


I Scotia) 3 


45 N 


64 W 


15 E 


Albany Ho. a 


nd L. 5 


52 N 


94 W 


79 E 


Albany R. 


5 


51 N 


89 W 


81 E 


Alberdi . 


10 


32 S 


63 W 


144 E 


Alberni . 


6 


48 N 


124 W 


31 E 


Albert Edwar 


d, Mt. 39 


8S 


147 E 


oE 


AlbertEdward 


Nyanza2i 


oS 


29 E 


II E 


Albert Nyanz 


a . 21 


2N 


31 E 


39 E 


Alert Bay 


6 


SON 


127 W 


2 W 


Alexandra 


14 


30 S 


30 E 


139 E 


Alexandra, IVI 


t. . 40 


46 s 


167 E 


26 E 


Alexandria (S 


Africa) 13 


33 S 


26 E 


77 E 


Alexandria (B 


C.) . 6 


52 N 


122 W 


75 E 


Alfred . 


• 14 


30 S 


30 E 


146 E 


Algoa Bay 


• 13 


33 S 


25 E 


5E 


Algonia 


2 


48 N 


85 w 


3E 


All bag . 


25 


18 N 


72 E 


39 E 


Ali Bandar 


• 25 


24 N 


69 E 


77 E 


Alice . 


• 38 


23 S 


146 E 


86 E 


Alice Dale 


13 


33 S 


26 E 


10 W 


Aligarh . 


. 28 


27 N 


78 E 


30 E 


Ali pore . 


• 24 


22 N 


88 E 


8E 


Alipur . 


. 24 


26 N 


89 E 


91 E 


Alisons . 


. 16 


27 S 


31 E 


8E 


Aliwal North 


13 


30 s 


26 E 


77 E 


Alix 


6 


32 N 


113 w 


60 W 


Alkmaar 


18 


25 S 


31 E 


20 E 


Ailada . 


20 


6N 


2E 


77 E 


Allahabad 


. 28 


25 N 


81 E 


173 E 


AUeppey 


. 26 


gN 


76 E 


70 E 


Alligator Pt. 


• 39 


8S 


148 E 


72 E 


Allora . 


• 38 


28 S 


152 E 


73 E 


All Saints 


• 17 


31 s 


27 E 


74 E 


All Saints 


17 
(103) 


31 s 


29 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


All Souls 


17 


31 s 


27 E 


Allur . 


26 


14 N 


80 E 


Almeida Bay . 


21 


13 s 


40 E 


Almora . 


28 


29 N 


79 E 


Alpha . 


38 


23 S 


146 E 


Alvarneri 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Alwar . 


. 28 


27 N 


76 E 


Alwaye . 


. 26 


10 N 


76 E 


Alyunnur 


27 


gN 


78 E 


Amacura R. . 


9 


8N 


59 W 


Amageddi 


20 


8N 


7E 


Amagi . 


■ 35 


,33 N 


130 E 


Amala . 


28 


32 N 


74 E 


Amandrose . 


22 


22 S 


47 E 


Amar . 


20 


8N 


10 E 


Amarapura . 


31 


21 N 


96E 


Amasanga 


13 


30 s 


25 E 


Amatikulu R. 


16 


2gS 


31 E 


Amatonga 


II 


25 s 


34 E 


Amazon B. . 


39 


10 S 


149 E 


Amazon R. . 


10 


3S 


56 W 


Amazon Station 


10 


gS 


65 W 


Ambala . 


28 


30 N 


77 E 


Ambarambe . 


22 


17 S 


47 E 


Ambaro 


22 


13 s 


49 E 


Ambasamudram , 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Ambasi . 


39 


8S 


148 E 


Ambatoharanana 


22 


18 S 


46 E 


Ambatondrazake 


22 


17 S 


46 E 


Amber, C. 


22 


12 S 


49 E 


Ambinanindrano 


22 


20 S 


48 E 


Ambondro 


22 


20 S 


44E 


Ambositro 


22 


21 S 


48 E 


Ambriz . 


II 


8S 


14 E 


Ambrym Is. . 


41 


16 S 


168 E 


Amby . 


38 


26 S 


148 E 


Amersfoort . 


18 


26 S 


29 E 


Amewita 


19 


17 S 


36 E 


Amhara . 


II 


12 N 


38 E 


Amherst, Burma 


31 


16 N 


97 E 


Amherst, Nova Sec 


)tia 3 


46 N 


64 W 


Amoy . 


33 


24 N 


118 E 


Ampalaza 


22 


25 s 


44 E 


Amparofaravolu 


22 


17 S 


47 E 


Amri 


25 


26 N 


68 E 


Amritsar 


28 


31 N 


75 E 


Amsterdam . 


16 


26 S 


30 E 


Amuku, L. 


9 


SN 


59 W 


Analalava 


22 


15 s 


47 E 


Anand . 


• 2S 


22 N 


73 E 


Anandpur 


■ 29 


22 N 


85 E 


Ananthapuram 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Anatapur 


. 26 


14 N 


77 E 


Anchow 


34 


38 N 


115 E 


Andaman Is. . 


31 


13 N 


93 E 


Andaw . 


39 


IS 


134 E 


Anderson Bay 


40 


41 S 


147 E 


Andipati Hills 


• 27 


gN 


77 E 



I04 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 


Hap No. 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Andover 


3 


46 N 


67 W 


Arnhem C. . 


37 


12 S 


Andovoranto . 


22 


18 S 


49 E 


Aro Chuka . 


20 


5N 


Andrahambe . 


22 


25 s 


47 E 


Aroegas 


12 


29 s 


Andrava Bay 


22 


12 s 


49 E 


Aropen . 


39 


3S 


Andros . 


8 


24 N 


77 W 


Arrah . 


M 


25 N 


Anduba . 


21 


I N 


29 E 


Arramanay . 


27 


8N 


Anegada 


8 


19 N 


64 W 


Arrowhead . 


6 


SON 


Aneiteum 


41 


20S 


169 E 


Arrow Lake . 


6 


SON 


Anenous 


12 


29 S 


17 E 


Arrul 


25 ■ 


23 N 


Angoana 


i8 


25 s 


32 E 


Arthur R. 


40 


41 S 


Angola . 


II 


13 s 


ISE 


Artikokan 


5 


48 N 


Angra Pequena 


II 


26 s 


15 E 


Aru Is. 


39 


6S 


Anguilla 


8 


18 N 


63 W 


Arugam Bay . 


30 


7N 


AuguUle, Cape 


7 


48 N 


59 W 


Arumuganeri 


27 


8N 


Angwa R. 


19 


16 S 


30 E 


Arundel 


13 


30 S 


An-Hsien 


33 


32 N 


103 W 


Aruppukkottei 


27 


9N 


Animarupu . 


39 


10 S 


147 E 


Arusha . 


21 


2S 


Anjanwel 


25 


17 N 


73 E 


Asaba . 


20 


SN 


Anjha . 


25 


24 N 


72 E 


Asan 


36 


37 N 


An-Ju . 


36 


39 N 


126 E 


Asansot . 


29 


23 N 


Anka . 


20 


12 N 


6E 


Asawad . 


II 


20 N 


Ankarapona . 


22 


24 S 


43 E 


Asben . 


II 


18 N 


Ankavandra . 


22 


19 s 


45 E 


Ascension 


17 


31 S 


Ankisitra 


22 


20 s 


47 E 


Ascension 


17 


31 s 


Anklesvar 


25 


21 N 


73 E 


Ascension Is. 


II 


8S 


Ankober 


II 


10 N 


39 E 


Ashaku . 


20 


6N 


Ankola . 


25 


14 N 


74 E 


Ashburton 


40 


44S 


Annapolis Royal 


3 


45 N 


65 W 


Ashcroft 


6 


50 N 


Annesdale 


16 


27 S 


32 E 


Asi 


39 


I S 


Annes Villa 


13 


33 S 


25 E 


\sirvathapuram 


27 


8N 


Annfield 


. 28 


30 N 


77 E 


Asisippi 


4 


53 N 


Annobon Is. . 


II 


6S 


5E 


Asquith . 


4 


52 N 


Annotto Bay . 


8 


18 N 


76 W 


Assab . 


II 


13 N 


Anolahy R. 


-2 


23 s 


44 E 


Assaye . 


25 


20 N 


Anouda . 


41 


II S 


196 E 


Assegai R. 


i5 


26 S 


Anoweta 


• 2S 


25 N 


76 E 


Asseree . 


25 


20 N 


Anshun . 


• 33 


26 N 


106 E 


Assumption Is. 


22 


10 S 


Antalo . 


II 


12 N 


39 E 


Astrolabe Mts. 


39 


9S 


Antananarivo 


22 


18 S 


47 E 


Asuncion 


10 


26 S 


Antelope 


4 


50 N 


108 W 


Atabula 


20 


7N 


Antelope Park 


17 


30 S 


28 E 


Atapame 


20 


7N 


Antigonish . 


3 


45 N 


61 W 


Atbara R 


II 


10 N 


Antigua 


8 


17 N 


61 W 


Athabasca L. 


6 


59 N 


Antler . 


6 


53 N 


121 W 


Athabasca Landing 


: 6 


55 N 


Antofagasta . 


10 


24 S 


71 W 


Athabasca R. 


6 


57 N 


Antongil B. . 


22 


16 s 


49 E 


Atherton 


• 38 


17 S 


Antonio R. 


21 


16 s 


40 E 


Athni 


25 


16 N 


Anukrapuram 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Atlin 


6 


60N 


Anupgarh 


. 28 


29 N 


73 E 


Atmakur 


26 


14 N 


Anuradhapura 


• 30 


8N 


80 E 


Atsuta 


35 


43 N 


Aomori . 


35 


41 N 


141 E 


Attabari. 


• 24 


27 N 


Apaso . 


20 


7N 


oE 


Attangarei 


27 


9N 


Api Is. . 


41 


17 S 


168 E 


Attiwapiskat R. 


5 


53 N 


ApoUonia 


20 


5N 


2W 


Attock . 


28 


33 N 


Aquaforte 


7 


46 N 


53 W 


Attoor . 


■ 27 


8N 


Aracain 


10 


10 S 


38 W 


Aiur 


. 26 


II N 


Araguara 


10 


22 S 


49 w 


Auckland 


. 40 


37 S 


Arakaka 


9 


7N 


60 w 


Augila . 


II 


29 N 


Arakan . 


31 


20 N 


92 E 


Aundh . 


• 25 


17 N 


Aramac 


38 


23 s 


145 E 


Auragabad 


• 29 


24 N 


Araria . 


24 


26 N 


87 E 


Aurangabad . 


• 25 


20 N 


Arawan 


II 


19 N 


3W 


Aurora . 


41 


15 s 


Archer R. 


• 38 


13 s 


142 E 


Aussa . 


II 


20 N 


Areola . 


4 


49 N 


102 W 


Austin . 


5 


49 N 


Ardanji . 


30 


10 N 


79 E 


Australia, N. 


10 


25 s 


Arequipa 


10 


16 S 


74 w 


Autioquia 


10 


7N 


Argentina 


10 


30 s 


60 W 


Ava 


■ 31 


21 N 


Argunge 


20 


12 N 


4E 


Avalon . 


7 


47 N 


Argy 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Avoca , 


18 


25 s 


Arica 


10 


18 s 


70 W 


Awaji 


■ 35 


34 N 


Arichat . 


3 


45 N 


61 W 


Awauia . 


39 


10 S 


Ariwimi R. 


II 


oN 


20 E 


Awe 


20 


8N 


Ariyalur 


26 


11 N 


79 E 


Awita 


20 


6N 


Arkona . 


18 


24 S 


29 E 


Axim 


20 


4N 


Arkonam 


25 


13 N 


79 E 


Ayliff, Mt, . 


17 


30 S 


Armidale 


37 


30 S 


153 E 


Ayr 


38 


19 s 


Armstrong . 


6 


50 N 


119 W 


Ayrshire , 


'9 


17 s 



Long. 

136 E 
8E 

19 E 

137 E 
85 E 

77 E 

117 W 

118 W 
69 E 

145 E 
91 W 

134 E 
82 E 

78 E 

25 E 

78 E 
37 E 

6E 

126 E 

87 E 

oW 

19 E 

29 E 
27 E 
ISW 

TO E 

172 E 
121 W 

133 E 

77 E 
107 W 
107 W 

40 E 

76 E 
31 E 

73 E 
46 E 

147 E 

60 W 

I W 

I E 

30 E 
no W 
113 W 
iiiW 
145 E 

75 E 

134 W 

79 E 
141 E 

95 E 

78 E 
85 W 
72 E 

77 E 

78 E 
174 E 

26 E 

74 E 
84 E 

75 E 
168 E 

o W 
99 W 
57 W 
77 W 

96 E 
S3W 

31 E 
134 E 
150 E 

9E 
3E 

2W 

29 E 
147 E 

30 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Ayutha . 


31 


ISN 


lOl E 


Azimgarh 


28 


26 N 


82 E 


Azul . 


10 


36 S 


60 W 


Babra . 


25 


23 N 


70 E 


Badagri 


20 


6N 


2E 


Badama Is. and Po 


rt 22 


14 S 


47 E 


Badami. 


25 


16 N 


75 E 


Baddeck 


3 


46 N 


60 W 


Baddegamma 


30 


6N 


80 E 


Baden . 


4 


52 N 


lOiW 


Badin . 


25 


25 N 


69 E 


BaduUa 


30 


7N 


8iE 


Bagaha . 


24 


27 N 


84 E 


Bagain . 


20 


II N 


2W 


Bagalkot 


25 


16 N 


75 E 


Bagamoyo . 


21 


6S 


39 E 


Bagana . 


20 


7N 


7E 


Ragherhat 


24 


22 N 


89 E 


Baghmundi . 


29 


23 N 


85 E 


Bagida . 


CO 


6N 


I E 


Baha . 


20 


12 N 


4E 


Bahadurgarh . 


28 


28 N 


77 E 


Baham 


13 


33 S 


27 E 


Bahawa . 


24 


24 N 


87 E 


Bahawalpur 


28 


29 N 


71 E 


Bahia . 


10 


12 S 


39 W 


Bahia Blanca 


10 


38 S 


62 w 


Bahindi 


20 


II N 


4E 


Bahraich 


28 


27 N 


81 E 


Bahr el Arab . 


II 


10 N 


20 E 


Bahr el Gazel 


II 


oN 


20 E 


Bahso . 


20 


5N 


2W 


Bajibo . 


20 


gN 


4E 


Bajiso . 


20 


9N 


3W 


Bakel . 


II 


10 N 


10 W 


Bakhasar 


25 


25 N 


71 E 


Bakong . 


32 


-2N 


113 E 


Bakundi 


20 


8N 


10 E 


Bakura . 


20 


12 N 


SE 


Balarti . 


21 


oS 


39 E 


Balasore 


24 


24 N 


87 E 


Balfour . 


18 


26 S 


28 E 


Balgonie 


4 


SON 


104 W 


Bali 


20 


6N 


10 E 


Balinian 


32 


3N 


112 E 


Balipara 


24 


26 N 


92 E 


Ballarat 


37 


36 S 


143 E 


Balls Pyramid 


41 


32 s 


159 E 


Balmir . 


28 


25 N 


7' E 


Balmoral 


18 


25 S 


29 E 


Balsar . 


25 


20 N 


73 E 


Bal Tir . 


II 


oN 


40 E 


Baltu Rackil . 


32 


5N 


102 E 


Bambous 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Bamenda 


20 


6N 


10 E 


Bammaho 


II 


10 N 


oW 


Bampton Reef 


JI 


19 S 


158 E 


Bamuku 


20 


9N 


II E 


Banaga . 


20 


II N 


6E 


Banana . 


38 


24 S 


150 E 


Banana . 


11 


oS 


10 E 


Band 


. 29 


22 N 


84 E 


Banda . 


28 


25 N 


80 E 


Bandaon 


. 29 


22 N 


85 E 


Bandar 


• 32 


2N 


102 E 


Bandarban . 


. 24 


22 N 


92 E 


Bandarpur . 


. 24 


24 N 


92 E 


Bandawe 


21 


12 S 


34 E 


Bandhi 


■ 25 


26 N 


68 E 


Bandi 


20 


6N 


12 E 


Bandikui 


. 28 


26 N 


76 E 


Bandon . 


• 32 


9N 


99 E 


Bands R. 


• 2S 


26 N 


76 E 


Bangala 


■ 19 


14 S 


34 E 


Bangala 


II 


oN 


10 E 


Bangalore 


26 


13 N 


77 E 



INDEX 



loS 



Place. 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Banganapalle . 


. 26 


15 N 


78 E 


Bashee R. 


17 


32 S 


28 E 


Benatang 


• 32 


2N 


Bangiryama . 


17 


30 S 


30 E 


Basilisk Is. . 


39 


10 s 


150 E 


Bende . 


20 


5N 


Bangkok 


32 


13 N 


100 E 


Bass Sirait . 


37 


39 S 


147 E 


Bendigo 


• 37 


35 S 


Banguay Is. . 


32 


7N 


117 E 


Bassa , 


20 


10 N 


6E 


Bengal, Bay of 


. 26 


14 N 


Bangui . 


II 


oN 


10 E 


Bassan . 


20 


9N 


lE 


Benghazi 


II 


30 N 


Bangweolo Lake 


21 


11 S 


30 E 


Bassein . 


31 


16 N 


94 E 


Bengu . 


• 13 


31 s 


Bani 


21 


13 s 


34 E 


Bassila . 


20 


gN 


I E 


Benguela 


II 


10 S 


Banikoro 


20 


10 N 


2 E 


Batala 


28 


31 N 


75 E 


Benin . 


20 


6N 


Banjagara 


II 


loN 


oW 


Batan 


32 


iN 


103 E 


Benin R. 


20 


5N 


Bank Strait . 


40 


41 S 


148 E 


Batang . 


33 


29 N 


99 E 


Beni Shouga . 


II 


10 N 


Bankipore 


24 


25 N 


85 E 


Batang Luper R. 


32 


I N 


112 E 


Bennetts. 


17 


30 S 


Bankot 


• 25 


18 N 


73 E 


Batataes 


10 


20 S 


48 W 


Benoist Mt. . 


• 39 


2S 


Banks Is. 


41 


14 S 


167 E 


Batavia R. 


38 


12 s 


142 E 


Benoni . 


. 18 


26 S 


Bankura 


29 


23 N 


87 E 


Bathuist 


40 


10 N 


10 W 


BensonviUe . 


13 


30 S 


Bannu . 


28 


32 N 


70 E 


Bathurst 


3 


47 N 


65 W 


Bentotte . 


• 30 


6N 


Bansda . 


25 


20 N 


73 E 


Bathurst 


37 


32 S 


149 E 


Benue R. 


20 


7N 


Banswara 


25 


23 N 


74 E 


Bathurst (Grahams 








Benve R. 


II 


oN 


Banting . 


32 


iN 


no E 


town) 


13 


33 S 


26 E 


Bequia . 


8 


13 N 


Bantry . 


4 


SON 


112 W 


Bathurst (Tasmania 


i) 40 


43 S 


145 E 


Bequie . 


8 


18 N 


Bantva . 


25 


21 N 


71 E 


Bato 


20 


7N 


I E 


Bera 


39 


2S 


Bantwal . 


. 26 


12 N 


75 E 


Batterson 


13 


32 S 


27 E 


Berber . 


II 


10 N 


Banyai . 


19 


20 S 


29 E 


Batticaloa 


30 


7N 


82 E 


Berbera . 


II 


10 N 


Banyo . 


20 


6N 


II E 


Battlefields . 


19 


18 S 


29 E 


Berbice R. . 


9 


6N 


Banyora 


21 


10 S 


34 E 


Battleford 


4 


S3N 


108 W 


Berea . 


• 13 


29 S 


Banzi . 


17 


32 S 


27 E 


Battle Harbour 


7 


52 N 


55 W 


Berega . 


21 . 


6S 


Banzyoille 


11 


oN 


20 E 


Batu Gajah 


32 


4N 


101 E 


Berege 


20 


9N 


Bao 


33 


22 N 


103 E 


Bau 


32 


I N 


iioE 


Berg R. . 


12 


32 s 


Baouda . 


20 


SN 


I W 


Bauchi 


20 


10 N 


9E 


Bergh . 


12 


34 S 


Bap 


25 


27 N 


72 E 


Bauphal 


24 


22 N 


90 E 


Beri 


20 


12 N 


Bapatla 


26 


15 N 


80 E 


Baura . 


21 


7S 


32 E 


Berlin . 


13 


32 S 


Bara Banki . 


28 


27 N 


81 E 


Baure . 


zo 


12 N 


8E 


Berlinhafen . 


39 


2S 


Barabhum 


29 


23 N 


86 E 


Bavas . 


19 


18 S 


31 E 


Beterverwagting 


9 


6N 


Barakur 


29 


23 N 


86 E 


Bavianus R. . 


13 


32 s 


25 E 


Bethal . 


. 18 


26 S 


Baram Pt. 


32 


■SN 


114 E 


Bavliari . 


25 


22 N 


72 E 


Bethany 


. 18 


25 S 


Barava . 


II 


oN 


40 E 


Bawa 


17 


32 S 


27 E 


Bethel (Zululand) . 16 


27 S 


Barbados 


8 


13 N 


S9W 


Bawera . 


20 


II N 


iW 


Bethel (E. Africa) . 21 


4S 


Barberton 


. iS 


25 S 


31 E 


Bawif 


4 


S3N 


112W 


Bethelsdorp . 


13 


33 S 


Barbuda 


8 


17 N 


61 W 


Baxter Harbour 


39 


10 S 


150 E 


Bethesda(Kafifraria) 17 


30 a 


Barcaldine 


■ 38 


23 s 


I4SE 


Bay de Verd . 


7 


48 N 


53 W 


Bethesda (Transvaal) 18 


23 s 


Barclay Sound 


6 


48 N 


125 W 


Bay Roberts . 


7 


47 N 


53 W 


Bethlehem 


• 15 


28 s 


Barcoorpettah 


■ zS 


13 N 


74 E 


Bazaruto I. , 


19 


21 S 


35 E 


Bethulie 


• IS 


30 s 


Bardai . 


II 


20 N 


10 E 


Baziva Mt. . 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Betigeri 


• 25 


IS N 


Bardera . 


II 


oN 


40 E 


Beaconsfield . 


15 


28 s 


24 E 


Betoota 


• 38 


25 S 


Bareilly . 


28 


28 N 


79 E 


Beau Bassin 


22 


20 s 


57 E 


Bettiah . 


• 24 


26 N 


Bargari . 


• 29 


23 N 


8s E 


Beaudesert . 


38 


28 s 


153 E 


Bevaan R. 


16 


27 s 


Barhampore . 


. 24 


24 N 


88 E 


Beaufort West 


12 


32 s 


23 E 


Bey la 


• 25 


23 N 


Barhanpur 


• 25 


21 N 


76 E 


Beaver Cove . 


3 


46 N 


60 W 


Beypore . 


. 26 


II N 


Barhi . 


29 


24 N 


85 E 


Beawar 


28 


26 N 


74 E 


Beyt 


■ 25 


22 N 


Barima R. 


9 


7N 


59 W 


Bed^s 


9 


7N 


59 W 


Bezwada 


. 26 


16 N 


Barima Sands 


9 


8 N 


59 W 


Bedford 


13 


32 s 


26 E- 


Bhader R. . 


• 25 


21 N 


Bariiuanni 


9 


7N 


59 W 


Bedourie 


38 


24 s 


139 E 


Bhagalpur 


• 24 


25 N 


Baring . 


4 


SoN 


102 W 


Beforana 


22 


19 s 


47 E 


Bhaghaya 


24 


25 N 


Baring Lake . 


21 


oN 


36 E 


Behr's Halt . 


13 


30 s 


24 E 


Bhakkar 


. 28 


31 N 


Baripada 


24 


21 N 


86 E 


Beira . 


19 


19 s 


35 E 


Bhamo . 


31 


24 N 


Barisal . 


24 


22 N 


90 E 


Bejan 


18 


23 s 


33 E 


Bhangor 


• 25 


22 N 


Bariya . 


25 


23 N 


74 E 


Belaga . 


32 


2N 


114 E 


Bhaptiah 


• 24 


26 N 


Barka . 


II 


30 N 


20 E 


Bel Air . 


9 


6 N 


58 W 


Bhartpur 


. 28 


27 N 


Barkatta. 


29 


24 N 


85 E 


Belanga . 


20 


12 N 


oW 


Bhatkal . 


. 25 


14 N 


Barkly East . 


13 


31 s 


27 E 


Bele 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Bhilwara 


. 28 


25 N 


Barkley, West 


IS 


28 s 


24 E 


Belfast . 


18 


25 s 


30 E 


Bhima, R. 


• 25 


17 N 


Barmer . 


25 


26 N 


71 E 


Belgaum 


. 25 


15 N 


73 E 


Bhind . 


. 28 


26 N 


Barnma R. . 


9 


7N 


59 W 


Belingwe 


19 


20 s 


29 E 


Bhinmal 


• 25 


25 N 


Bare 


20 


8N 


6E 


Belize . 


8 


17 N 


88 W 


Bhir 


• 59 


18 N 


Baroda (Grahamst' 


n) 13 


31^ 


25 E 


Bell 


13 


33 S 


27 E 


Bhor . 


• 25 


18 N 


Baroda (Bombay P 


) 25 


22 N 


73 E 


Bellair . 


14 


29 S 


,30 E 


Bhugoo 


• 25 


27 N 


Barpeta . 


24 


26 N 


91 E 


Bellary . 


26 


15 N 


76 E 


Bhuj . 


25 


23 N 


Barquisimeto . 


10 


10 N 


69 W 


Belle Isle 


7 


52 N 


55 W 


Bhusawal 


• 25 


21 N 


Barracouta Pt. 


21 


iSS 


40 E 


Belle Isle Strait 


7 


SiN 


57 W 


Bhutnir . 


. 28 


29 N 


Barranquilla . 


10 


II N 


74 W 


Bellevue. 


13 


33 S 


26 E 


Bibianiah 


20 


6N 


Barren Is. 


40 


40 S 


14s E 


Bellona Is. . 


41 


II S 


159 E 


Bicholim 


• 21; 


kN 


Barrington . 


3 


43 N 


65 w 


BeHoram 


7 


47 N 


55 W 


Bida 


20 


;>' 


Barrydale 


12 


33 S 


20 E 


Belyando R. . 


• 38 


22 S 


146 E 


Rideford 


3 


46 N 


Barsi 


25 


18 N 


75 E 


Bemaraha Hills 


22 


20 S 


45 E 


Bidi 


• 32 


I N 


Bartica . 


9 


6N 


58 W 


Bembezi R. . 


19 


19 S 


28 E 


Big Reed I.,. . 


5 


54 N 


Barue . 


19 


18 S 


33 E 


Bembezi 


19 


30 S 


29 E 


Biggar . 


4 


52 N 


Baruipur 


24 


22 N 


88 E 


Bembwe 


19 


16 S 


31 E 


Bihar . 


• 24 


25 N 


Barwaha 


25 


22 N 


76 E 


Benares . 


28 


25 N 


82 E 


Bijapur . 


• 25 


16 N 



Long. 

Ill E 
7E 

145 E 
81 E 
20 E 

27 E 
10 E 

5E 

SE 

30 E 

29 E 

140 E 

28 E 
27 E 
80 E 

9E 

oE 

62 W 

65 W 

133 E 

30 E 
45 E 
58 W 
27 E 

37 E 
7E 

18 E 
22 E 

1 W 
27 E 

141 E 
57 W 

29 E 

27 E 

31 E 

38 E 

25 E 

28 E 

29 E 
28 E 

26 E 
75 E 

140 E 

84 E 
31 E 
70 E 
75 E 

69 E 
80 E 

70 E 
87 E 
87 E 

71 E 

97 E 
70 E 
86 E 

77 E 
74 E 

74 E 

75 E 

78 E 

72 E 
75 E 

73 E 

73 E 
69 E 
75 E 

74 E 

2 W 

74 E 
6 E 

64 W 
109 E 

98 W 
107 W 

85 E 

75 E 



io6 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Plact 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place 


Map No 


Lat. 


Bijnaur . 


. 28 


29 N 


78 E 


Bolota R. 


17 


31 s 


Bikaner 


. 28 


28 N 


73 E 


Bolotwa . 


13 


31 s 


Bikini . 


20 


12 N 


2E 


Boma . 


II 


oS 


Bilaria . 


• 25 


25 N 


75 E 


Bombatana . 


41 


7S 


Bilay . 


• 25 


14 N 


74 E 


Bombay . 


■ 25 


19 N 


Bihna . 


n 


10 N 


10 E 


Bompata 


20 


6N 


Bimbla 


20 


8N 


oW 


Bona 


II 


30 N 


Binji 


20 


13 N 


5E 


Bonai . 


29 


24 N 


Binscarth 


4 


SiN 


loi W 


Bonaso . 


20 


7N 


Bintenne 


■ 30 


7N 


SI E 


Bonau . 


39 


5S 


Bmiulu . 


• 32 


3N 


113 E 


Bonavista 


7 


48 N 


Birch Ck. 


S 


52 N 


99 W 


Bondee . 


• 25 


25 N 


Birch Hills 


4 


53 N 


105 W 


Bonga . 


II 


oN 


Birch I. . 


S 


52 N 


99 W 


Bongon . 


32 


6N 


Birch Rivers 


S 


52 N 


loi W 


Bonheur 


5 


49 N 


Birdsville 


• 38 


26 S 


139 E 


Bonne Bay 


7 


49 N 


Birni-n-Kudu 


20 


II N 


9E 


Bonny . 


20 


4N 


Birnin Kebbi 


20 


12 N 


4E 


Bonnytown 


II 


oN 


Brro 


■ 35 


42 N 


143 E 


Bonsor Mine 


19 


19 S 


Binhday 


. 18 


23 S 


30 E 


Bontuko 


20 


7N 


Biru 


■ 29 


22 N 


84 E 


Boobyalla 


. 40 


40 s 


Bishnath 


24 


26 N 


93 E 


Boomplaats 


13 


29 s 


B-shop's Com 


t . 12 


33 S 


18 E 


Boorghee 


• 25 


17 N 


Bishop's Falls 


7 


49 N 


55 W 


Booroman 


38 


20 s 


Bishop Sounc 


i 41 


20 S 


166 E 


Borden . 


4 


52 N 


Biskra . 


II 


39 N 


10 E 


Bori 


20 


9N 


Bismarck Arc 


lipelago 39 


3''> 


150 E 


Borku . 


II 


10 N 


Bismarckburg 


21 


3S 


31 E 


Bornu 


II 


10 N 


Bissagos Is. a 


nd Port II 


10 N 


10 W 


Boromo . 


20 


11 N 


Bivi 


• 19 


18 S 


35 E 


Borsad . 


• 25 


22 N 


Bizerta . 


II 


39 N 


roE 


Borunia 


19 


16 S 


Blaauwhe'ive 


• 13 


30 s 


25 E 


Bosebango 


20 


13 N 


Black . 


. 16 


28 S 


31 E 


Bosekari 


24 


23 N 


Black R, 


8 


18 N 


77 w 


Boshot . 


15 


28 S 


Black ill 


. . 38 


24 S 


14s E 


Bosso 


20 


13 N 


Black Fonteir 


1 . 17 


30 S 


28 E 


Boston . 


2 


43 N 


Blackville 


3 


46 N 


65 W 


Boston (Natal 


) ■ 14 


29 S 


Blanco C. 


11 


toN 


10 E 


Botha's Hill 


13 


33 S 


Blanco C. 


II 


aoN 


16 W 


Botu 


20 


12 N 


Blancoe Mt. 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Bougainville I 


s. . 41 


6S 


Blandford Po 


rt . 7 


48 N 


54 W 


Boulia . 


• 38 


23 S 


Blantire 


21 


15 s 


35 E 


Bourke . 


37 


31 s 


Blassbelg 


• 13 


30 S 


27 E 


Boutebok 


■ 13 


32 s 


Blaiiberg 


. 18 


23 s 


28 E 


Bowden . 


13 


33 S 


Blauwbank 


. 18 


26 S 


27 E 


Bo«ell . 


4 


50 N 


Blenheim 


. 40 


41 s 


174 E 


Bowen . 


• 38 


20 S 


Blesbok 


13 


31 s 


26 E 


Bowen, C. 


■ 38 


14 s 


Bloemfonte n 


i.S 


29 s 


26 E 


Bowen, R. 


• 38 


20 s 


Bloemhof 


18 


27 s 


25 E 


Bowenville 


38 


27 s 


Biomidon C. 


3 


45 N 


64 W 


Bowesdcrp 


12 


30 s 


Blood R, 


16 


28 S 


30 E 


Braganea 


10 


23 s 


Bloomfield 


3 


44N 


65 W 


BrahmanbariE 


I 24 


24 N 


Bluauwbosch 


• 13 


3>S 


25 E 


Brahmaputra 


R. . 24 


24 xN 


Blue Bank 


14 


28 S 


29 E 


Brakriam 


■ 13 


29 S 


Blylheswood 


• 17 


32 s 


27 E 


Branco R. 


9 


2N 


Boa F, . 


20 


4N 


9E 


Brandfort 


• 15 


28 S 


Bocantuncan 


38 


23 s 


147 E 


Brandon 


5 


49 N 


Bocas del To 


ro . 10 


9N 


82 W 


Brass . 


20 


4N 


Bodele . 


II 


10 N 


10 E 


Brazzaville 


II 


S 


Bodeli . 


25 


22 N 


73 E 


Breakfast Vie 


i 13 


33 S 


Bodinayakka 


lur 26 


10 N 


79 E 


Bredasdorp 


12 


34 S 


Bodumea 


. . 38 


28 S 


151 E 


Breede R. 


12 


33 S 


Boeloch Haw 


ar . 32 


3N 


98 E 


Breidbach 


13 


32 S 


Bogaboga 


• 39 


9S 


150 E 


Breipaal 


• 13 


30 S 


Bogadjim 


39 


5& 


145 E 


Bremensdorp 


. 16 


26 S 


Bogra 


. 24 


24 N 


89 E 


Brendenbury 


4 


51 N 


Boianai . 


• 39 


10 S 


149 E 


Bresaylor 


4 


52 N 


Boisseva'n 


5 


49 N 


100 W 


Breton Is. 


2 


45 N 


Bokleni's 


17 


31 s 


29 E 


Brewarrina 


• 37 


30 S 


Bokore 


21 


oS 


39 E 


Breyten 


18 


26 S 


Bokoveni 


• 17 


30 S 


29 E 


Bridgetown 


3 


45 N 


Boksburg 


. 18 


26 S 


28 E 


Bridgewater 


3 


44 N 


Bolarumi 


. 26 


17 N 


78 E 


Brighion 


. 40 


42 S 


Boli 


20 


10 N 


10 E 


Brigos . 


7 


47 N 


Bolivar 


8 


8N 


77 W 


Brisbane 


■ 38 


27 S 


BoUon . 


. 38 


28 S 


147 E 


Brisea Veldib 


re . 22 


20 S 


Bolo . 


13 


33 s 


27 E 


Biitish Hond 


uras . 8 


17 N 



Long. 
q8E 
27 E 
10 E 
157 E 

72 E 

1 W 
oE 

84 E 

o W 

146 E 

S3W 

75 E 

30 E 

117 E 

91 W 

58 W 

7E 

oE 

29 E 

2 W 
148 E 

25 E 
75 E 

145 E 

107 W 
2E 

10 E 
10 E 
2 W 

73 E 
29 E 

I E 

88 E 

25 E 
13 E 
71 W 

29 E 

26 E 
6E 

155 E 
140 E 

146 E 

27 E 
26 E 

iiiW 
148 E 
144 E 

147 E, 
151 E 

17 E 
46 W 
91 E 

89 E 
24 E 
60 W 
26 E 

100 W 

6E 

10 E 

26 E 
2qE 
19 E 

27 E 
26 E 
3'E 

loiW 

108 W 
60 W 

147 E 

30 E 
65 W 
64 W 

147 E 
53 W 

153 E 
57 E 
89 W 



Place. 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Briton Hr. . 


7 


47 N 


Brits 


18 


25 s 


Broach . 


25 


21 N 


Broadford 


13 


30 S 


Broadmount . 


38 


23 s 


Broad Sound 


38 


22 S 


Broadview 


4 


50 N 


Broken Hill . 


19 


14 S 


Broken Hill . 


37 


31 s 


Brooketon 


32 


5N 


Brooklyn 


7 


48 N 


Broome . 


37 


17 S 


Broughton Bay 


36 


39 N 


Broughton Strait . 


36 


34 N 


Brown's Town 


8 


iSN 


Brumer Is. . 


39 


10 S 


Brunei . 


32 


5N 


Brunnette 


7 


47 N 


Bruno . 


4 


52 N 


Bruny Is. 


40 


43 S 


Bryer Is. 


3 


44 N 


Buale 


20 


8N 


Bubeni . 


16 


27 S 


Bubesi's 


17 


30 S 


Bubye R. 


19 


21 S 


Buchanan L. 


38 


21 S 


Buchunan 


16 


26 S 


Buckhans 


16 


26 S 


Buckley Valley 


6 


55 N 


Budaon 


28 


28 N 


Budon . 


20 


8N 


Buea . 


20 


3N 


Buenaventura 


10 


4N 


Buenos Aires 


10 


34 S 


Buffalo R. . 


14 


28 S 


Buffels R. 


12 


34 S 


Bugala Is. 


21 


oS 


Bugiri . 


21 


6S 


Bugoma 


21 


2N 


Buiko . 


21 


4S 


Bukuru . 


20 


9N 


Bulandshahr . 


28 


28 N 


Bularti . 


21 


oN 


Bulawayo 


19 


20 S 


Bulberg . 


13 


29 S 


Buldana 


25 


20 N 


Bulilima 


19 


20 S 


Bulls . 


40 


40 S 


Bulongoa 


21 


gS 


Bulsar 


25 


20 N 


Bulwer . 


14 


29 S 


Bumbire Isles 


21 


I s 


Bumum . 


20 


SN 


Buna 


39 


8S 


Buna 


20 


8 N 


Bunbury 


37 


33 S 


Bundaberg . 


38 


24 S 


Bundalapaurae 


• 27 


8N 


Bundi . 


. 28 


25 N 


Bundu . 


29 


23 N 


Buntingville . 


• 17 


31 s 


Buona Vista . 


■ 30 


6N 


Buopehu Mt. 


. 40 


39 S 


Bupi 


. _ 20 


8N 


Burdekin R. . 


■ 38 


20 S 


Burdwan 


• 24 


23 N 


Burge Islands 


7 


47 N 


Burghersdorp 


• 13 


31 s 


Burin 


7 


47 N 


Burin Bay 


7 


47 N 


Burketown 


■ 38 


17 S 


Burnie . 


. 40 


41 S 


Burra . 


• 19 


23 S 


Burra Falsa 


. 18 


22 S 


Buse 


20 


II N 


Buseima 


11 


20 N 


Bushman's Hoek 


• 13 


31 s 



Long. 
55 W 
27 E 
73 E 

27 E 
150 E 

149 E 
103 W 

29 E 
142 E 
iiSE 

54 W 
122 E 
127 E 
129 E 

^^yN 

150 E 

115E 

55 w 

105 w 

147 E 
66 V^^ 

2 W 
32 E 

28 E 

30 E 
145 E 

31 E 

31 E 
126 W 

79 E 

6E 

9E 
77 W 
59 W 
30 E 
18 E 

32 E 

36 E 
30 E 

37 E 
8 E 

77 E 
39 E 

28 E 

26 E 

76 E 

27 E 

175 E 
34 E 
73 E 

29 E 
32 E 
10 E 

148 E 
3W 

"SE 
152 E 

77 E 
75 E 
85 E 

28 E 
80 E 

176 E 
I W 

147 E 
87 E 
57 W 
26 E 
55 W 
55 W 

139 E 

146 E 
35 E 
35 E 
aW 

• 20 E 
26 E 



INDEX 



107 



Place. 
Bushman's Kop 
Bushman's R 
Busi R . 
Bussa 
Bussanga 
Busunyei 
Butler . 
Butterworth (S 

rica) 
Butterworth (Malay 

Pen.) 
Buxa 
Buxton . 
Byet:stown 
Byrne 



Map No. 
13 



Af- 



14 
19 



S 
17 



Lat. 
30 S 
29 S 
20 s 

10 N 

11 N 
2S 

49 N 
32 S 



Long. 

27 E 
29 E 

33 E 
4E 
oE 

34 E 
91 W 

28 E 



22 s N 100 E 



Caba 

Cabacaburi 

Cabazana 

Cabot Str. 

Caconda 

Cahanda 

Cairns . 

Cairns . 

Cairo 

CajamarcA 

Cala 

Cala R. 

Calabar 

Calamo 

Calcutta 

Caldero 

Caledon 

Caledon R, 

Caledonia 

Calgary 

Calicut . 

Calimere Pt. 

Calitzdorp 

Callao . 

Calliel . 

Calvinia 

Camacusa 

Carabay 

Cambell Town 

Cambridge 

Cameta 

Camooweal 

Campbellton 

Camps Bay 

Camrose 

Cana 

Canacona 

Canada Bay, 

Candane R. 

Canendagud 

Canning 

Cannington 

Canso . 

Canso Cape 

Canso Str. 

Canterbury 

Canton 

Cape Barren Is. 

Cape Breton Is. 

Cape Coast . 

Cape East 

Cape of Good Hope 

Cape Point . 

Cape Sable Is. 

Cape Town , 

Cape York Peninsula 37 

Capella . 

Capim Grosso 

Capo Capo . 

Caracas 

Caravellas . 



24 

9 

38 

14 



27 

12 

9 

25 
40 

13 
10 
38 
3 
12 

4 
18 

25 
7 
9 

26 

24 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 

33 
40 

3 
20 
22 
12 
12 

3 



38 



19 
8 



26 N 
6 N 

16 S 

29 S 

32 S 
7N 

30 S 

47 N 

10 S 
oS 

16 S 
52 N 

30 N 
7S 

31 s 
31 s 

4N 
22 s 

22 N 

25 N 
34 S 

27 S 
57 N 
50 N 

11 N 
10 N 

33 S 

12 S 
8 N 

31 S 
5N 

22 N 

42 S 

32 S 

2S 

19 s 

48 N 

33 S 
53 N 
25 s 
15 N 
50 N 

4N 
10 N 
22 N 

49 N 
45 N 

45 N 

46 N 
46 N 

22 N 
40 S 
46 N 

SN 

15 s 

34 S 
34 S 

43 S 
33 S 
10 S 

23 s 

9S 

20 s 
10 N 
17 S 



89 E 

57 W 
144 E 

30 E 

27 E 

58 W 

29 E 

60 W 
10 E 
10 E 

14s E 
iioW 

30 E 

78 W 
27 E 
27 E 

8E 
69 W 
88 E 

71 W 
19 E 
27 E 

130 W 
112 W 
75 E 
80 E 
21 E 
77 W 
77 E 
19 E 

59 W 

72 E 

147 E 
27 E 
49 W 

138 E 

66 W 
18 E 

112 W 
27 E 
74 E 

56 W 

57 W 

79 E 
88 E 

loi W 

61 W 
61 W 
61 W 

67 W 
112 E 

148 E 

60 W 
I W 

SoE 
18 E 
18 E 
65 W 
18 E 
142 E 
148 E 
40 W 
33 E 
67 W 
39 W 



G. of 



Place. 
Carbonear 
Carcross 
Cardwell 
Carhue . 
Caribbean Sea 
Carlton (Grah.ims 

town) 
Carman 
Carman gay 
Carna . 
Carnarvon 
Carnduff 
Carnet Mt. 
Carnotville 
Carolina 
Carpentaria, 
Carrot R. 
Cartagena 
Cartstadt 
Cartwright 
Cascade P(. 
Cassikityn R 
Castle Pt. 
Castor . 
Cat L. . 
Cat Lake R. 
Catalina 
Catamarca 
Cathcart 
Cauvery R. 
Cawnpore 
Caxamarea 
Cayenne 
Ceara . 
Ceara-merine 
Cedar Lake 
Cedarville 
Ceeocuwena 
Cengcani 
Cengcu . 
Cengu . 
Centani 
Centenary 
Centuli, Lower 
Cepani 
Ceram or Serang 
Ceres . 
Ceru . 
Ceuta 
Chabua . 
Chachla 
Chaco . 
Chad, Lake 
Chaibasa 
Chai-Chai 
Chai-Kow 
Chainat . 
Chaiye . 
Chakai . 
Chakanga 
Chakirta 
Chakradharpur 
Chalambi 
Chaleur Bay 
Chalisgaon 
Chalra . 
Chamba 
Chambal R. 
Chambalada 
Cnambi 
Chamboni 
Champagne Castle 
Chanaral 
Chandernagore 
Chandil 
Cbandna 
Chandod 



Map No. 
7 
6 

38 



13 



S 
6 

13 



4 

38 
20 
18 
38 



5 

5 

40 

9 
40 

4 
5 
5 
7 
10 

13 
26 
28 



5 
17 
17 
17 
17 
13 
17 
19 
17 
17 
39 
12 

17 
II 

24 
25 



24 
18 

34 
31 
19 

24 

19 
24 
29 
18 
3 

25 

29 
28 
28 

19 
20 
18 

14 
10 

24 
29 
25 
25 



I, at. 

47 N 
60 N 
18 S 
36 S 

13 N 

31 S 

49 N 

50 N 

29 S 

31 s 

49 N 

17 S 

9N 

26 S 

14 S 
53 N 
II N 
49 N 
49 N 
44 S 

I N 
41 S 
52 N 

52 N 

51 N 
48 N 

28 S 

32 S 
II N 

26 N 
6S 
5N 
3S 
5S 

53 N 

30 S 

31 s 
31 s 

31 s 

31 s 

32 s 

20 s 

31 s 

30 s 

4S 

33 S 

32 s 
30 N 

27 N 
23 N 

23 S 

14 N 

22 N 

25 S 
36 N 
16 N 
13 s 

24 N 

15 s 

21 N 

22 N 

23 S 

48 N 

20 N 

24 N 
32 N 

26 N 

21 S 
9N 

23 S 

29 S 

28 S 

22 N 
22 S 

25 N 

22 N 



Long. 

S3W 
134 w 
146 E 

63 W 

70 W 
24 E 

98 W 
113 W 

27 E 

22 E 

loi W 

145 E 

2 E 

30 E 
140 E 
103 W 

75 W 

90 W 

99 W 
168 E 

58 W 
176 E 
III W 

92 W 

91 W 
S3W 

68 W 

27 E 
78 E 
80 E 
78 W 
52 W 
39 W 
36 W 

100 W 
29 E 

28 E 
28 E 
27 E 

27 E 

28 E 

27 E 

28 E 

29 E 
130 E 

19 E 

27 E 

oW 

95 E 

69 E 
58 W 
13 E 

85 E 
33 E 

136 E 
100 E 

30 E 

86 E 

31 E 

92 E 

85 E 
35 E 
66 W 

75 E 
84 E 

76 E 
76 E 
35 E 

oE 
35 E 
29 E 

71 W 
88 E 

86 E 
73 E 
73 E 



Place. 
Chandpur 
Chandpur 
Chandrakona 
Chang-Chia-Hai-Tzu 34 
Changchin 
Chang Dan . 
Chang-heung . 
Change Is. 
Changhow 
Changkiu 
Changli 

Changpingchow 
Changre Ho. . 
Changsacha . 
Changseng 
Changsha 
Chang-song . 
Chang-teh 
Changweni . 
Changyen 
Channel 
Chaochow 
Chaochowfu . 
Chaotung 
Chaoyangfu 
Chaoyiian 
Chapelton 
Chaplin 
Chapman B. 
Chapra . 
Chara . 
Charleston 
Charlestown 
Charleville 
Charlottetown 
Charter 

Charters Towers 
Chas 
Chasoa . 
Chatham 

Chatham Junction 
Chau, L. 
Che Chekwa . 
Chechenina . 
Chedabucto B. 
Cheefoo . 
Che-ju . 
Chekiang 
Chelaro . 
Chemulpo 
Chenab R. 
Chenan . 
Cheng-Li 
Chengning 
Chengteh 
Chengtu 
Chentabum . 
Chepepo 
Cherrapunji . 
Chester . 
Cheukia-keo . 
Cheviot . 
Chiafunga's . 
Chiba . 
Chibababa 
Chibanda 
Cbibinga 
Chibwon 
Chicago 
Chichow 
Chicksan 
Chieng Hung 
Chieng Mai . 
Chihli, Gulf of 
Chikore 
Chikurindi 
Chikusi , 



3 No 


Lat. 


28 


24 N 


24 


23 N 


24 


22 N 


34 


36 N 


36 


41 N 


36 


37 N 


36 


34 N 


7 


49 N 


33 


32 N 


34 


36 N 


34 


39 N 


34 


40 N 


33 


36 N 


36 


40 N 


36 


40 N 


33 


28 N 


36 


35 N 


33 


29 N 


18 


24 S 


36 


38 N 


7 


47 N 


33 


37 N 


33 


23 N 


33 


27 N 


33 


41 N 


34 


37 N 


8 


18 N 


4 


SON 


12 


34 S 


24 


25 N 


20 


4N 


38 


18 S 


i5 


27 S 


38 


26 S 


3 


46 N 


19 


18 S 


38 


20 S 


29 


23 N 


21 


15 S 


3 


47 N 


3 


47 N 


33 


32 N 


21 


14 S 


19 


16 S 


3 


45 S 


33 


37 N 


36 


33 N 


33 


29 N 


25 


25 N 


36 


37 N 


28 


32 N 


33 


23 N 


34 


36 N 


33 


38 N 


33 


40 N 


33 


30 N 


32 


12 N 


19 


14 S 


24 


25 N 


3 


44 N 


33 


34 N 


40 


43 S 


21 


II S 


35 


3SN 


19 


20 S 


21 


II s 


19 


nS 


21 


II S 


2 


43 N 


34 


38 N 


36 


37 N 


31 


21 N 


31 


19 N 


33 


38 N 


19 


20 S 


19 


13 s 


21 


14 s 



Long. 
78 E 
90 E 

87 E 

116 E 
127 E 

127 E 
126 E 

54 W 
120 E 

117 E 

119 E 

116 E 

114 E 

128 E 

125 E 

113 E 

126 E 
III E 

33 E 

125 E 
59 W 

117 E 
ii6E 
104 E 

120 E 

120 E 
77 W 

107 W 
18 E 

85 E 
6E 

143 E 

29 E 
146 E 

63 W 
31 E 

146 E 

86 E 

30 E 
6s W 
65 W 

117 E 
36 E 

30 E 
61 W 

121 E 

126 E 
120 E 

70 E 

126 E 
73 E 

107 E 

118 E 

115 E 

118 E 
104 E 
102 E 

28 E 
gi E 

64 W 

114 E 
173 E 

31 E 
140 E 

33 E 
31 E 

31 E 

34 E 

88 W 
.15 E 

127 E 
100 E 

99 E 

119 E 

32 E 
30 E 
34 E 



io8 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 
Chilaw . 
Chilcotin 
Childers 
ChiUagoe 
Chilian . 
ChilUanwala 
ChiUowelo 
Cliiloe Is. 
Chilumbanger 
C'hilwa, Lake 
Chimborazo 
Chimbwa 
Chimoio 
Chimwala 
China Str. 
Chinandenga 
Chinchilla 
Chincho Is. 
Chin-Chou 
Chinchowfu 
Ching-kiang 
Chingomanji 
Chininga 
Chinju . 
Chinkiang 
Chinkoko 
Chinnampo 
Chinniapura:^ 
Chins 
Chintochi 
Chinwanga 
Chinwangtao 
Chinwi . 
Chiplun 
Chirala . 
Chiramba 
Chirambo 
Cbirewe . 
Chironibo 
Chironio 
Chisagowi 
Chisanga 
Chisindo 
Chisiri . 
Chisuinulu 
Chitala . 
Chitaldroog 
Chitarpur 
Chitesi . 
Chitindire 
Chitor . 
Chitorgarh 
Chitral . 
Chittagong 
Chittar R. 
Chittoor (Madras) 
Chitua, Lake 
Chiwanga 
Chiwata 
Chiweres 
Chochow 
Choiseul 
Choisalil I. 
Chokkampatti 
Cholam 
Cholchol 
Chonan . 
Chong-ju 
Chong-ju 
Chongpa 
Chonju 
Chopan . 
Chopda . 
Chor 
Chosan . 
Chota Nagpur 
Chota Udaipur 



Map No. 

3° 
6 

38 
38 
10 
28 
21 



10 
21 

19 
19 
39 



38 
10 
36 
34 
33 
21 

19 
36 
74 
21 
36 
27 
31 



34 
36 

2S 

19 
19 



19 
19 



29 

21 

19 

25 
28 

ss 
24 
27 
26 

21 

19 



34 
41 
41 
27 

24 
10 
36 
36 
36 
33 
36 
28 

25 
25 
36 
23 

2S 



Lat. 

7N 
52 N 

25 S 
17 S 

36 S 
32 N 

13 S 
42 S 

14 s 

15 s 

iS 

16 s 
19 s 
14 s 

10 s 

12 N 

26 N 

14 S 

37 N 
41 N 
32 N 
12 S 

17 S 

35 N 

24 N 
iSN 

38 N 
9N 

18 N 

11 S 
17 S 

39 N 
37 N 
17 N 

15 s 

16 S 

17 S 

14 s 

15 s 

16 s 

11 s 

12 S 
12 S 
12 S 
12 S 
12 S 

14 N 

23 N 

12 S 

17 s 

25 N 

24 N 

36 N 

22 N 
8N 

13 N 
iSS 
17 S 
10 s 

13 s 

39 N 
6S 
7S 
9N 

23 N 
39 S 

37 N 

39 N 
36 N 
32 N 
35 N 

24 N 

21 N 

25 N 

40 N 
23 N 

22 N 



Long. 
80 E 

124 W 
152 E 
144 E 

72 W 

73 E 
35 E 

74 W 
30 E 

35 E 
80 W 

36 E 

33 E 
32 E 

iSoE 

87 E 

150 E 

77 W 

127 E 
120 E 
120 E 

35 E 
30 E 

128 E 

103 E 
30 W 

125 E 

78 E 
94 E 

34 E 

35 E 
119 E 
127 E 

73 E 
34 E 
34 E 

34 E 
30 E 

30 E 

35 E 

34 E 

35 E 
35 E 

32 E 

34 E 

31 E 

76 E 
85 E 

35 E 

33 E 

75 E 

74 E 

73 E 
91 E 

77 E 

79 E 
35 E 
35 E 
39 E 

34 E 
116 E 

156 E 

157 E 
77 E 
93 E 

74 W 
127 E 
125 E 
127 E 

104 E 
127 E 

82 E 

75 E 
7'E 

121; E 
8s E 
74 E 



Place. 
Chotan . 
Chowtsun 
Chrissie, Lake 
Christchurch . 
Christianagram 
Chiistiansborg 
Chuaiyo . 
Chuaka . 
Chuapa R. 
Chubut . 
Chucheng 
Chiichow Sung 
Chu ki . 
Chuksan 
Chukutu , 
Chummoo 
Chun-chon 
Chungju 
Chungking 
Church Pt. 
Chuzus . 
Cibeni . 
Ciciva . 
Ciko 
Clair . 
Clan William 
Clanwilliam 
Claremont 
Clar nee R. 
Clarenville 
Claresholni 
Clarkabad 
Clarksbury 
Clarkson 
Claudetown 
Clearwater 
Clermont 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Clifford 
Clifton . 
Clinton . 
Cloncurry 
Closepet 
Cloudy B. 
Clumber 
Cluny 
Cobar . 
Coblenz 
Cobongo R. 
Cochabamba 
Cochin . 
Cochrane 
Cockpit Country 
Coco Is. 
Coega . 
Cofimvaba 
Cofimvaba Vill. 
Coimbatore . 
Coin de Mire (Mau- 
ritius) 
Coite 

Coka Forest 
Colabba 
Colchester ' 
Coldwell 
Coleman R. 
Colenia . 
Colenso 
Coleridge 
Coleridge, L. 
Coleroon R. 
Colesberg 
Colesberg Br. 
Colleston 
Collie 
CoUingwood 



Map No 


Lat. 


25 


25 N 


34 


37 N 


. 18 


26 S 


40 


43 S 


27 


8N 


20 


5N 


21 


14 s 


21 


15 s 


II 


oS 


10 


43 S 


34 


36 N 


34 


35 N 


33 


29 N 


36 


37 N 


19 


19 S 


25 


26 N 


36 


37 N 


36 


37 N 


33 


29 N 


3 


44N 


19 


16 s 


17 


31 s 


17 


31 s 


17 


32 s 


4 


52 N 


5 


50 N 


12 


32 s 


12 


33 S 


40 


42 S 


7 


48 N 


6 


i;o N 


28 


31 N 


17 


3'i 


13 


34 S 


32 


4N 


13 


30 S 


38 


22 s 


38 


27 s 


38 


19 s 


13 


31 s 


13 


32 s 


40 


46 s 


38 


20 s 


26 


12 N 


39 


10 s 


13 


33 S 


22 


20 s 


37 


31 s 


4 


52 N 


II 


10 S 


10 


16 S 


26 


9N 


6 


SI N 


8 


18 N 


31 


'14N 


13 


33 S 


17 


32 S 


17 


32 S 


26 


II N 



17 

25 

13 

s 

38 

10 

14 

4 
40 

5) 
13 
13 
4 
37 
40 



19 S 
II S 

31 s 

18 N 
33 S 

48 N 

15 S 

23 S 
28 s 

49 N 
43 S 
II N 
30 S 
30 S 
53 N 
33 S 
40 S 



Long. 

71 E 

117 E 
30 E 

173 E 

78 E 
oW 

30 E 

30 E 
20 E 
65 W 

119 E 

118 E 

120 E 
127 E 

31 E 

72 E 

127 E 

128 E 
106 E 

65 W 
30 E 
28 E 
28 E 
28 E 

104 W 
99 W 
18 E 
18 E 

173 E 
54 W 

114 W 
74 E 
28 E 

24 E 
114 E 

27 E 
147 E 
153 E 

147 E 
27 E 
26 E 

169 E 

140 E 

77 E 

148 E 

26 E 
57 E 

146 E 

108 W 

10 E 

66 W 

76 E 
114 W 

77 W 
93 E 

25 E 

27 E 

27 E 
77 E 

57 E 
39 W 

28 E 

73 E 
25 E 
86 W 

142 E 

58 W 

29 E 
no W 
171 E 

79 E 
25 E 
25 E 

106 W 
116 E 
173 E 



Place. 

CoUingwood B, 

Colombo 

Colon . 

Colonia . 

Colosa . 

Columbia (S. Africa) 

Columbia (Diocese] 

Combaconam 

Comet . 

Comet R. 

Comilla . 

Coramissie Poort 

Comorin, C. . 

Comoro 

Comoro Is. . 

Comox . 

Compass Berg 

Conceicao 

Concepcion . 

Conception Bay 

Concordia 

Conducia B. . 

Conflict Group 

Confut 

Congo R. 

Conjeeveram . 

Conrad . 

Constantia 

Constantia . 

Constantia Berg 

Contai . 

Ccnway 

Cooch Behar 

Cook Mt. 

Cook Str. 

Cooktown 

Cooletoray 

Coolgardie 

Coomassie 

Coondapoor 

Coonoor 

Coorg . 

Copiabo 

Copperfield 

Coquimbo 

Coral Sea 

Cordalba 

Cordoba 

Cordova 

Corea B. 

Corea Strs. 

Corentyne R. 

Corfield 

Corisso B. 

Cornwallis 

Coro 

Coronel 

Coronie 

Corriaputty 

Corrientes^ C 

Corrientes, C, 

Cosme . 

Cotaram 

Cote d'Or (Mauri- 
tius) . 

Cotta . 

Cottonwood 

Cowigban 

Cqoqora 

Cradle Mt. (T; 
mania) 

Cradock 

Craik 

Crapand 

Creve Coeur 
ritius) 

Criquet B. 



(Mau- 



Map No 


Lat. 


39 


9S 


30 


7N 


8 


9N 


10 


34 S 


\ '3 


32 S 


a) 17 


30 s 


) 6 


50 N 


. 26 


II N 


38 


23 S 


38 


24 S 


24 


23 N 


13 


29 S 


26 


8N 


22 


II S 


22 


II S 


6 


49 N 


13 


31 s 


19 


18 S 


10 


36 S 


7 


47 N 


10 


32 s 


21 


14 S 


39 


10 s 


13 


31 s 


II 


oS 


26 


12 N 


6 


60 N 


13 


29 S 


12 


34 S 


12 


34 S 


24 


21 N 


13 


31 s 


24 


26 N 


40 


43 S 


40 


40 S 


38 


15 s 


27 


8N 


37 


30 S 


20 


6N 


25 


13 N 


26 


11 N 


26 


12 N 


10 


27 S 


38 


22 s 


10 


30 s 


38 


11 s 


38 


25 S 


10 


31 s 


10 


31 s 


36 


39 N 


36 


34 N 


9 


2N 


38 


21 S 


II 


iN 


3 


45 N 


10 


12 N 


10 


37 S 


9 


5N 


27 


9N 


10 


38 S 


18 


24 S 


10 


27 S 


• 27 


8N 


22 


ig S 


30 


7N 


6 


53 N 


6 


48 N 


■ 17 


32 S 



40 
13 

4 
3 



41 S 
32 S 
51 N 
46 N 

20 S 
SiN 



Long. 

149 E 
80 E 
79 W 
58 W 

28 E 

29 E 
125 W 

79 E 
148 E 
148 E 
91 E 
27 E 
77 E 
43 E 
43 E 
124 W 

24 E 
36 E 
74 W 
53 W 
60 W 
40 E 

150 E 

26 E 
10 E 

79 E 

134 w 

27 E 
18 E 
18 E 
87 E 

25 E 
89 E 

170 E 
174 E 
145 E 

77 E 
120 E 

2W 

74 E 

76 E 

75 E 

70 W 
147 E 

71 W 
145 E 
152 E 

66 W 

65 W 

124 E 

130 E 

57 W 

143 E 

9E 

64 W 

70 W 

74 W 

56 W 

78 E 

56 W 

35 E 

56 W 

77 E 

57 E 

80 E 

122 W 

123 W 
27 E 

145 E 
25 E 

106 W 
63 W 

57 E 

ssw 



INDEX 



109 



Place. 


Map No 


. Lat. 


Long. 


Crocodile 


. i8 


.25 s 


31 E 


Crocodile R. . 


18 


24 S 


27 E 


Crooked R. . 


4 


54 N 


103 W 


Cross R. 


20 


5N 


8E 


Crow's Nest . 


• 38 


27 S 


152 E 


Croydon 


• 38 


18 S 


142 E 


Cuba . 


8 


22 N 


80 W 


Cucuta . 


10 


8N 


74 W 


Cuddalore 


. 26 


II N 


79 E 


Cuddapah 


. 26 


14 N 


78 E 


Culebra 


8 


18 N 


6s W 


Cullinan Sta. . 


18 


25 s 


28 E 


Culunca 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Culungea 


• 17 


31 s 


28 E 


Culvei- . 


S 


49 N 


95 W 


Cumana 


8 


10 N 


64 W 


Cumberland . 


2 


55 N 


102 W 


Cumbum 


. 26 


15 N 


79 E 


Cumming 


• 17' 


30 S 


29 E 


Cundapur 


• 25 


14 N 


74 E 


Cunene R. 


II 


i3S 


12 E 


CunnamuUa . 


• 38 


28 S 


145 E 


Cupar . 


4 


50 N 


104 W 


Curazao Is. . 


10 


13 N 


68 W 


Curepio (Mauritius 


) 22 


20 S 


57 E 


Curloss, S. . 


10 


9N 


72 W 


Cutch, G. of . 


• 2S 


23 N 


70 E 


Cut Knife . 


4 


52 N 


108 W 


Cuyaba 


10 


15 s 


55 W 


Cuyuni R. 


9 


6N 


59 W 


Cyphergat 


• 13 


31 s 


26 E 


Cypress 


4 


SoN 


108 W 


Dacca . 


24 


23 N 


90 E 


Dagero . 


S 


49 N 


95 W 


Dahanu . 


• 2S 


20 N 


72 E 


Dahnavur 


■ 27 


8N 


77 E 


Dahomey 


II 


9N 


£ E 


Daka . 


19 


18 S 


26 E 


Dakala . 


20 


14 N 


2E 


Dakhla . 


II 


25 N 


31 E 


Dakor . 


• 25 


23 N 


73 E 


Dakota . 


2 


45 N 


100 W 


Dalami . 


20 


8N 


12 E 


Dalat . 


• 32 


2N 


113 E 


Dalavaipuram 


• 27 


8N 


78 E 


Dalby . 


38 


27 S 


151 E 


Dalgin . 


9 


6N 


58 W 


Dalhousie 


3 


48 N 


66 W 


Dalma . 


29 


22 N 


86 E 


Dalny . 


34 


39 N 


121 E 


Daltonganj . 


24 


^'^S 


84 E 


Daman . 


25 


20 N 


72 E 


Damara 


39 


10 S 


148 E 


Damas . 


21 


15 s 


35 E 


Dambeni 


■ 17 


31 s 


29 E 


Dambool 


30 


8N 


81 E 


Damietta 


II 


3N 


3E 


Dampier's Archip. 


37 


21 S 


116 E 


Dampier I. . 


39 


4S 


147 E 


Damra . 


24 


26 N 


90 E 


Damrana 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Dams Laagte 


12 


3"^T 


21 E 


Damuda R. . 


29 


23 N 


8s E 


Dancing Pt. . 


S 


52 N 


97 w 


Dangaria 


20 


14 N 


12 E 


Daniel's Harbour 


7 


50 N 


57 W 


Dankar 


28 


32 N 


78 E 


Dannhauser . 


16 


28 S 


30 E 


Dapoli . 


25 


17 N 


73 E 


Darbeji . 


25 


27 N 


68 E 


Darbhanga . 


24 


26 N 


86 E 


Dar-es-Salaam 


21 


6S 


39 E 


Dar Fur 


II 


12 N 


24 E 


Dargle . 


'4 


29 S 


30 E 


Darjeeling 


24 


27 N 


88 E 


Darkton 


16 


26 S 


31 E 



Place. Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. Map No 


Lat. 


Darroro 


20 


9N 


8E 


Dharmavaran 


1 . 26 


14 N 


Darsi 


. 26 


iSN 


79 E 


Dharmsala 


. 28 


32 N 


Dartmouth 


3 


44 N 


63 W 


Dharwar 


• 25 


15 N 


Darwin . 


5 


49 N 


96 W 


Dhebar, L. 


25 


24 N 


Das pur . 


• 24 


22 N 


86 E 


Dhing . 


24 


26 N 


Datha . 


• 25 


21 N 


72 E 


Dholera . 


■ 25 


2^N 


Daudnagar 


. 24 


25 N 


84 E 


Dholpur 


. 28 


26 N 


Daunai . 


• 39 


10 S 


149 E 


Dhond . 


25 


18 N 


Dauphin, La 


ke . s 


51 N 


100 W 


Dhone . 


. 26 


15 N 


Dauphin 


5 


51 N 


lOoW 


Dhoraji . 


• 25 


27 N 


Daura . 


20 


13 N 


8 E 


Dhrafa . 


25 


22 N 


Davel . 


18 


26 S 


29 E 


Dhrangadhra 


25 


23 N 


Dawa River 


II 


4N 


40 E 


Dhubri . 


24 


26 N 


Dawson City 


2 


60 N 


139 W 


Dhulia 


25 


20 N 


Dawson Rive 


r . 38 


25 S 


150 E 


Diabo 


20 


12 N 


Daysland 


6 


SON 


112W 


Diamond Hr. 


24 


22 N 


De Aar June. 


• 13 


30 s 


24 E 


Diamond iVlts 


. 36 


38 N 


Dease House 


6 


58 N 


128 W 


Dibrugarh 


24 


27 N 


Dease, Lake 


6 


58 N 


129 W 


Didsbury 


6 


SiN 


Debba Hebe 


20 


10 N 


II E 


Diep River St 


a. . 12 


34 S 


De Beer 


. 16 


26 S 


31 E 


Digboi . 


24 


27 N 


Debera . 


17 


31 s 


27 E 


Digby . 


3 


44N 


Debhata 


■ 24 


22 N 


89 E 


Digby Bason 


3 


45 N 


Debiso . 


20 


6N 


2W 


Dikoa . 


20 


II N 


Debur . 


■ 2S 


24 N 


74 E 


Dikova Distri 


-t . 30 


7N 


Deception Ba 


y • 39 


7S 


144 E 


Dilato, L. 


II 


10 S 


Dedalo . 


• 17 


30 S 


29 E 


Dillon Bay 


. 41 


i8S 


Dedele . 


■ 39 


10 S 


148 E 


Dimapur 


. 24 


25 N 


Dedun . 


• 25 


21 N 


71 E 


Dimbula Dist 


riot . 30 


7N 


Deduru R. 


. 30 


7N 


80 E 


Dimlah . 


24 


26 N 


Deepdale 


. 14 


29 S 


29 E 


Dinajpur 


. 24 


25 N 


Deer Lake 


7 


49 N 


57 W 


Dindigul 


. 26 


10 N 


Deesa . 


• 25 


24 N 


72 E 


Dindori . 


25 


20 N 


Degilbo . 


. . 38 


25 S 


152 E 


Dingo . 


38 


23 S 


Dehri . 


. 24 


24 N 


85 E 


Dirk Hartog ] 


• 37 


26 s 


Deinzerhole 


• 39 


6S 


146 E 


Dill, Bombay 


• 25 


20 N 


De Kruis 


12 


29 S 


21 E 


Diu, Mashona 


land 19 


15 s 


De Kruis 


12 


31 s 


21 E 


Divari . 


39 


10 s 


Delagoa Bay 


. 18 


25 S 


32 E 


Diwangiri 


. 24 


26 N 


Delamuzi 


■ 17 


29 S 


29 E 


Dixcove 


20 


4N 


Delft Islands 


• 30 


9N 


79 E 


Dobu Is. 


• 39 


9S 


Delgado, Cap 


e . 21 


10 s 


40 E 


Dodanduwa 


30 


6N 


Delhi . 


. 28 


28 N 


77 E 


Dogura 


• 39 


10 S 


Deloraine {Ca 


nada) 5 


49 N 


100 W 


Dohad . 


• 25 


23 N 


Deloraine (Ta 


.smania) 40 


41 S 


146 E 


Dohnavur 


• 27 


8N 


Delsna . 


• 39 


8 S 


146 E 


Doisa 


• 29 


23 N 


Denmark 


3 


45 N 


63 W 


Doko 


20 


5N 


Dennison 


5 


48 N 


85 w 


Dolanner 


• 33 


40 N 


D'Entrecastea 


ux Is. 39 


9S 


151 E 


Dolia . 


• 25 


22 N 


Denu 


20 


SN 


I E 


Dolopinis 


17 


31 s 


Deogar . 


. 24 


24 N 


86 E 


Dolores . 


10 


37 S 


Deogarh 


. 28 


24 N 


77 E 


Domanuthia 


. 18 


25 s 


Deogaria 


. 24 


26 N 


94 E 


Dominica 


8 


15 N 


Deoyn . 


• 25 


25 N 


73 E 


Dondo . 


II 


10 S 


Dera Dun 


. 28 


30 N 


78 E 


Dondra Head 


• 30 


6N 


Dera Ghaza 1 


Chan . 28 


30 N 


70 E 


Donga . 


20 


7N 


Dera Ismail !• 


Chan . 28 


31 N 


70 E 


Dongola, New 


r . II 


20 N 


Derby . 


. 16 


26 S 


30 E 


Dongola, Old 


II 


20 N 


Derby (Pretoi 


ia) . 18 


25 s 


26 E 


Dongurpur 


• 25 


23 N 


Derwent 


18 


25 S 


29 E 


Donker Poort 


• 13 


30 S 


Derwent R. 


. 40 


42 S 


146 E 


Donnybiaale 


• 14 


29 s 


Desirade 


8 


16 N 


60 W 


Donovans Ko 


P • 13 


30 s 


Detroit . 


2 


43 N 


84 W 


Doobyalla 


. 40 


41 s 


Devarkonda 


. 26 


16 N 


78 E 


Doom R. 


. 18 


22 S 


Devgarh 


• 2S 


16 N 


73 E 


Doranda 


■ 29 


23 N 


Deviapatam 


• 30 


9N 


79 E 


Dordrecht 


• 13 


31 s 


Devils' Peak 


12 


33 S 


18 E 


Doreh 


39 


I s 


Dewetsdorp 


• 15 


29 S 


26 E 


Dori 


20 


14 N 


De Wildt 


. 18 


25 s 


28 E 


Dorma . 


. 29 


23 N 


Dewir . 


. 28 


25 N 


73 E 


Dornakal 


. 26 


17 N 


Dexter . 


5 


49 N 


90 W 


Doro 


20 


7N 


Dhanbad 


. 29 


2?N 


86 E 


Dorrokarri 


19 


20 S 


Dhandhuka 


• 25 


22 N 


72 E 


Dou Dai 


• 39 


9S 


Dhanera 


• 25 


24 N 


72 E 


Douglas Harh 


our . 39 


8S 


Dhangain 


■ 24 


25 N 


84 E 


Drakensberg 


■ 14 


29 S 


Dharampur, E 


ombay 25 


20 N 


73 E 


Drennah 


• 13 


32 s 


Dharmapuri 


. 26 


12 N 


78 E 


Drie Fontein 


16 


27 s 



Long. 
77 E 

75 E 
74 E 
74 E 

92 E 
72 E 
77 E 
74 E 
77 E 
70 E 

70 E 

71 E 
89 E 
74 E 

o W 

88 E 
128 E 

94 E 

114 W 
18 E 

95 E 
65 W 
65 W 
13 E 
80 E 
20 E 
69 E 

93 E 
80 E 

89 E 
88 E 
77 E 
74 E 

149 E 
113 E 

71 E 
32 E 

150 E 
91 E 

2 W 
150 E 
80 E 
T50E 
74 E 
77 E 

84 E 
13 E 

115 E 
71 E 

28 E 
58 W 
30 E 
61 W 
10 E 
80 E 
10 E 
30 E 
30 E 
74 E 

25 E 
30 E 

26 E 
148 E 

30 E 

85 E 
26 E 

134 E 

oE 

85 E 

80 E 

loE 

24 E 
143 E 
148 E 

29 E 

25 E 

30 F 



lib 



CttURCHMAiST'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 
Dryden . 
Dry Harbour 
Dsoje 
Duala . 
Duaringa 
Dubbo . 
Dubrajpur 
Duchi 
Ducie C. 
Duck, L. 
Du Cop B. 
Dudhai . 
Dudhi . 
Duff Is. . 
Dufrost . 
Duganden 
Du Jacolet B 
Dullstroom 
Dulwad . 
Dumar 
Dumasi . 
Dum Duma 
Dundee . 
Dundee Store 
Dundugama 
Dunedin 
Dungarpur 
Dunkwa 
Dunmore 
Danraven Mine 
Dunsu , 
Dunvegan 
Dura 
Durban 
Durbanville 
Durgapur 
Durge Strs. 
Duru 

D'Urville, C. 
Dwarka 
Dwingfu 
Dyke Ackland B. 
Dyrnent 



Eabimet, L. 
Eagle . 
East Cape. 
East London 
Ebenezer 
Ebeny Point 
Ebuta . 
Edaseval 
Eddystone Is. 
Edea . 
Edenburg 
Edmonton 
Edward R. 
Efoge . 
Egbe 
Egboni . 
Egga 

Eijmont, C. 
Ehlamohlomo 
Eidsvold 
Einasheigh 
Ekombola 
Ekuan, L. 
Ekulangeni 
Ekvitaseni 
Ekwan, R. 
Ekwenden 
Elands Berg 
Elandshoek 
Elands Laagte 
Elands, R. . 
Elbow . 



Map No 


. Lat. 


S 


49 N 


8 


i8N 


20 


6N 


20 


3N 


• 38 


23 S 


• 37 


32 s 


• 24 


23 N 


20 


13 N 


• 39 


10 S 


4 


53 N 


22 


20 s 


. 28 


24 N 


. 28 


24 N 


• 41 


10 S 


5 


49 N 


■ 38 


28 S 


22 


20 S 


. 18 


25 s 


■ 25 


16 N 


• 29 


23 N 


17 


31 s 


■ 24 


•27 N 


• 14 


28 S 


17 


30 S 


• 30 


7N 


. 40 


46 s 


• 25 


24 N 


20 


6N 


4 


50 N 


• 19 


19 S 


2Q 


14 N 


6 


56 N 


20 


II N 


14 


29 S 


12 


33 S 


24 


25 N 


• 39 


7S 


29 


23 N 


• 39 


I S 


■ 25 


22 N 


• 13 


32 s 


39 


gS 


S 


49 N 


5 


51 N 


5 


49 N 


39 


10 s 


13 


33 S 


16 


27 S 


9 


5N 


17 


30 S 


27 


9N 


41 


8S 


20 


3N 


IS 


29 S 


4 


S3N 


38 


14 S 


20 


6N 


20 


8N 


20 


8N 


20 


8 N 


40 


39 S 


16 


27 S 


38 


25 s 


38 


18 S 


16 


27 S 


5 


S3N 


16 


27 S 


16 


28 s 


S 


S3N 


21 


II S 


i6 


27 S 


i8 


25 S 


14 


28 s 


18 


25 S 


4 


51 N 



Long. 
93 W 

77 W 
oE 
9E 

149 E 
148 E 

87 E 
12 E 

150 E 
106 W 

57 E 

78 E 
82 E 

167 E 
97 W 

152 E 
57 E 
30 E 
74 E 
85 E 

29 E 
95 E 

30 E 

29 E 
80 E 

170 E 

74 E 

I W 

iioW 

30 E 
I E 

117 W 
II E 

31 E 
18 E 

91 E 
139 E 

85 E 

138 E 

69 E 

25 E 

148 E 

92 W 

88 W 

93 W 

150 E 
27 E 

30 E 
57 W 

29 E 
77 E 

156 E 
10 E 
25 E 

114 W 

142 E 
5E 
5E 
5E 
6E 

174 E 

31 E 

151 E 
144 E 

30 E 
88 W 

31 E 
31 E 
85 W 
33 E 
30 E 
30 E 
30 E 
27 E 

106 W 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


El Fashr 


II 


10 N 


Elim 


. 18 


23 S 


Eliya . 


• 30 


6N 


Elkhorn 


4 


50 N 


Elliot . 


• 17 


31 s 


Elliotdale 


17 


,32 s 
20 N 


EUora . 


■ 25 


Ellore . 


. 26 


17 N 


Elmina . 


20 


5N 


Elmsdale 


3 


45 N 


El Obeid 


II 


10 N 


El Orda 


11 


10 N 


Eluculweni 


17 


31 s 


Elujecweni 


• 17 


•31 s 


Elunyaweni 


• 17 


31 s 


Elupur . 


• 27 


9N 


Elusizini 


17 


31 s 


Emahlabatini 


. 16 


28 s 


Emanghur . 


• 25 


26 N 


Emayapurara 


26 


9N 


Embotyl R. . 


17 


31 s 


Embulwana . 


14 


28 s 


Emerald 


■ 38 


23 s 


Emerson 


5 


49 N 


Emfundisweni 


17 


30 S 


Emfundweni . 


17 


30 s 


Emgwalaka . 


17 


31 s 


Emjanyana . 


17 


31 s 


Emkanz 


17 


31 s 


Emkindini 


16 


28 s 


Empangeni . 


16 


28 s 


Empendhleni 


14 


29 s 


Emseleni 


17 


31 s 


Emtombeni , 


16 


28 s 


Emtsundwane 


17 


3'S 


Eraukosini 


. 16 


27 S 


Emu Park 


■ 38 


23 s 


Emyezani, R. 


16 


26 s 


Endeavour Str. 


39 


II s 


Enderby 


6 


SoN 


Endicott 


18 


26 S 


Eneyuda. 


9 


5N 


Enfumeni 


16 


28 s 


Engabeni (S. Luke 


s) 14 


30 s 


Engabo . 


20 


5N 


Engcobo 


• 17 


31 s 


English, R. . 


S 


50 N 


Engwcmpis, R. 


. 16 


26 S 


Engxogi , 


17 


31 s 


Enhlonhlweni 


14 


28 s 


Enhlozane 


16 


26 s 


Enkeldoorn . 


• 19 


19 s 


EnkoUweni Mts. 


17 


30 s 


Enkunzi . 


14 


28 s 


Ennersdale 


14 


29 s 


Enon 


13 


33 S 


Ensenada 


10 


35 S 


Ensikeni 


17 


30 S 


Enslin . 


13 


29 s 


Entafuta 


17 


31 s 


Entafuta R. . 


17 


31 s 


Entebbe 


21 


oS 


Enterprise 


19 


17 S 


Entombe 


16 


27 s 


Entsimbini 


17 


31 s 


Enyandu 


14 


28 s 


Epiphany 


17 


30 s 


Epira 


9 


5N 


Epome . 


20 


6N 


Equatoria 


II 


oN 


Eral 


27 


8N 


Eraoor . 


30 


8N 


Erie, L. . 


2 


43 N 


Erinpura 


28 


25 N 


Eritrea . 


II 


10 N 


Ermelo . 


18 


26 S 


Ernakulam 


26 


9N 



Long. 
20 E 

29 E 
80 E 

lOiW 

27 E 

28 E 
75 E 
8i E 

I W 
63 W 

30 E 
30 E 

27 E 

28 E 
28 E 



78 
29 

29 
148 
97 W 

29 E 

30 E 

27 E 

28 E 

27 E 

31 E 

32 E 

29 E 
29 E 
31 E 

29 E 

30 E 
150 E 

31 E 
142 E 
119 W 

28 E 
58 W 

31 E 
30 E 

2 W 

27 E 
94 W 
30 E 

28 E 

29 E 

30 E 
30 E 

28 E 

30 E 

29 E 
25 E 
57 W 
29 E 
24 E 
29 E 

29 E 

32 E 

31 E 

30 E 

29 E 

30 E 
28 E 
57 W 

I E 
30 E 
78 E 
81 E 
80 W 
73 E 
30 E 
30 E 
76 E 



Place. 
Erode 
Eromanga 
Erromango 
Erungalore 
Esangwea 
Esashi . 
Eshowe . 
Esihlengni 
Esikobeni 
Esinxoka 
Esiqungwini 
Esitoleni 
Esk 

Esmeraldas 
Espiritu Santo 
Essequibo R. 
Estcourt 
Esterhazy 
Estimati 
Estrevan 
Etah 

Etaivapuram 
Etalaneni 
Etawah . 
Etembeni 
Eton 
Etyeni . 
Eulo 
Eupukari 
Eureka City 
Eurimbula 
Evar or Kei Is, 
Evaton . 
Evesham 
Exploits 

Fachow 
Faike . 
Fairfield 
Fairford House 

Mission 
Falcon . 
Falkland Is. 
Falmouth (J amaica) 
Falmouth (Nova 

Scotia) 
False B. 
False B.(Cape Colony) 
Farafra . 
Farewell, C. 
Faridpur 
Farview 
Fashoda 
Fatehpur 
Fatehpur 
Fathigarh 
Fathpur 
Fauresmith 
Favafangane 
Fayyum 
Fazilka . 
Fazokl . 
Fearn Is. 
Feihsien . 
Feir 

Fenchow 
Fenerive 
Fengsiang 
Fergusson Is. 
Fernando Po 
Ferozepore 
Ferry land 
Fez 

Fezzan . 
Fianarantsoa 
Fife 
FifeB. . 



and 



R. 



33 



13 



40 
24 
17 
II 

25 
28 
28 
28 

15 
22 
II 
28 
II 
41 
34 
19 
33 
22 

33 
39 
20 
28 
7 



Long. 

77 E 
143 E 
169 E 

78 E 
29 E 

142 E 
31 E 
31 E 
28 E 
28 E 

28 E 
27 E 

152 E 

79 E 
166 E 

58 E 

29 E 
loiW 

31 E 

102 W 

78 E 

78 E 
31 E 

79 E 

27 E 
149 E 

28 E 
145 E 

59 W 

31 E 
151 E 
133 E 

27 E 
109 W 

54 W 



22 N III E 

II N 8E 

33 S 26 E 

51 N 97 W 
49 N 91 W 

52 S 58 W 
18 N 77 W 



MapNc 


. Lat. 


. 26 


II N 


• 38 


26 S 


• 41 


18 S 


. 26 


II N 


17 


30 S 


• 35 


45 N 


. 16 


28 S 


. i6 


28 S 


• 17 


31 s 


• 17 


.31 s 


■ 17 


31 s 


• 17 


31 s 


38 


27 s 


10 


I N 


41 


15 s 


9 


iN 


14 


29 S 


4 


50 N 


16 


29 S 


4 


49 N 


28 


27 N 


27 


9N 


16 


28 S 


28 


27 N 


13 


33 S 


38 


21 S 


17 


30 S 


38 


28 S 


9 


3N 


18 


25 s 


38 


24 s 


39 


5S 


18 


26 s 


4 


52 N 


7 


49 N 



39 



45 N 

27 s 

34 S 

28 N 
40 S 
23 N 
30 ,S 

10 N 
28 N 

26 N 

27 N 

28 N 

29 S 

22 S 

29 N 

30 N 

11 N 

23 S 

35 N 
ISS 
37 N 
17 S 

34 N 
98 
3N 

31 N 
47 N 

35 N 
25 N 
22 S 

98 
10 s 



64 w 
32 E 
18 E 
28 E 
173 E 
89 E 
28 E 

31 E 
75 E 
80 E 
79 E 
77 E 
25 E 
47 E 
30 E 

73 E 
34 E 

172 E 
118 E 

30 E 
III E 

49 E 

107 E 

150 E 

8 E 

74 E 
53 W 

5W 
iSE 
47 E 

32 E 
149 E 



INDEX 



111 



Place. 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Figig . 


II 


32 N 


2W 


Fove.iux Str. . 


40 


47 S 


168 E 


Gathwa . 


. 2g 


24 N 


Fiji Islands . 


41 


l6S 


178 E 


Fox Land 


2 


65 N 


75 W 


Gatooma 


19 


18 S 


Fika 


20 


II N 


II E 


Foxtrap 


7 


47 N 


52 W 


Gatrun . 


II 


20 N 


Filingue 


20 


14 N 


3E 


Franceville . 


11 


2S 


12 E 


Gauhati . 


24 


26 N 


Fingal School 


17 


31 s 


27 E 


Francis T ,ake 


6 


61 N 


I2g W 


Gautier Mts. . 


39 


2S 


Fion 


20 


13 N 


3W 


Francistown . 


ig 


21 S 


27 E 


Gaya 


24 


24 N 


Fish Hoek B. 


12 


34 S 


18 E 


Frankfort 


IS 


27 S 


28 E 


Gayndah 


• 38 


25 s 


Fishing, L. . 


S 


SI N 


88 W 


Franklin Mt. 


40 


42 s 


173 E 


Gbebe . 


20 


7N 


Fish River Rand 


13 


32 s 


26 E 


Fraserburg 


12 


31 s 


21 E 


Gebe . 


20 


II N 


Fistolet B. . 


7 


51 N 


55 W 


Fraser R. 


15 


52 N 


121 W 


Geelvink B. . 


39 


3S 


Fititi . 


20 


12 N 


II E 


Frasers . 


. 16 


26 S 


31 E 


Gelaria . 


39 


10 S 


Fitzroy R. 


38 


23 s 


149 E 


Fray Bentos . 


10 


33 S 


57 W 


Genisdal 


12 


30 s 


Flattery, C. . 


38 


15 s 


145 E 


Frederick Henry 


Is. 3g 


8S 


138 E 


Geo.ikhah 


. 24 


21 N 


Fletcher, Mt. 


17 


30 s 


28 E 


Fredericton . 


3 


46 N 


66 W 


George . 


12 


33 S 


Fletcherville . 


13 


30 s 


28 E 


Freels, Cape . 


7 


49 N 


53 W 


Georgenholtz 


. 18 


22 s 


Flettenberg B. 


12 


34 S 


23 E 


Freetown 


II 


gN 


12 W 


Georgetown . 


8 


7N 


Fleuxes Drift . 


18 


22 s 


2gE 


Frere, Mt. . 


17 


30 S 


28 E 


Georgeiown, Tasm. 40 


41 s 


Flinders Is. (Tas 








Frere Town . 


21 


4S 


39 E 


George own, N. Z. 40 


45 S 


mania) 


40 


40 s 


147 E 


Friday Is. 


• 38 


10 S 


142 E 


Georgetown, B. G. g 


6N 


Floff . 


18 


26 S 


28 E 


Fromme R. . 


12 


34 S 


18 E 


Georgetown, N.S 


3 


46 N 


Flores . 


37 


gS 


120 E 


Fuchiu . 


35 


34 N 


133 E 


Georgetown, Mai. Pen. 32 


5N 


Flower Cove . 


7 


51 N 


56 W 


Fuchow Ki . 


• 33 


27 N 


116 E 


Georgetown, Aus 


.. 38 


18 S 


Fly R. . 


39 


7S 


140 E 


Fuchow King 


■ 34 


39 N 


121 E 


Georgia Strait 


s 


50 N 


Fogo Is. 


7 


49 N 


54 W 


Fuh-kien 


33 


25 N 


118 E 


Geraldton 


. 38 


17 S 


Fontesvilla 


19 


igS 


34 E 


Fuhning 


• 33 


27 N 


120 E 


Germiston 


. 18 


26 S 


Foochow 


33 


26 N 


iigE 


Fuji Mt. 


• 35 


35 N 


138 E 


Gertrugsberg . 


. 18 


22 S 


Forbes . 


16 


26 S 


31 E 


Fukuoka 


■ 35 


33 N 


129 E 


Gerufa . 


19 


igS 


Forcados 


20 


SN 


5E 


Fukushima 


■ 35 


38 N 


140 E 


Geur R. 


• 17 


32 s 


Forest Hall 


12 


33 S 


23 E 


Fukuyama 


• 35 


34 N 


133 E 


Geurki . 


20 


12 N 


Foriz 


9 


6N 


58 W 


Fulan Kungo 


• 19 


14 S 


33 E 


Ggagalo 


• 17 


31 s 


Fork River . 


S 


SI N 


100 W 


Fuljula . ' . 


20 


8N 


2 W 


Ggaka . 


17 


31 s 


Formosa 


• 33 


23 N 


121 E 


Furaso . 


20 


6N 


iW 


Ggoggora 


• 17 


31 « 


Formosa B. . 


21 


2S 


40 E 


Funchal 


II 


32 N 


15 w 


Ghadames 


II 


30 N 


Forres . 


4 


50 N 


logW 


Fundy, B. of . 


3 


45 N 


66 W 


Ghaggar R. . 


. 28 


28 N 


Fort 


• 19 


21 S 


2g E 


Furneaux Gro 


Lip 






Ghantwar 


• 25 


21 N 


Fort Alexander 


S 


51 N 


g7W 


(Tasmania) 


40 


40 S 


148 E 


Ghat 


II 


50 N 


Fort Amelia . 


21 


13 s 


40 E 


Fusan . 


36 


35 N 


I2g E 


Ghaziabad 


. 28 


28 N 


Fort Beaufort 


13 


32 s 


26 I-; 


Futechpur 


. 28 


28 N 


77 E 


Gherdi . 


25 


17 N 


Fort Brown . 


13 


33 S 


26 E 


Futuna . 


• 41 


igS 


170 E 


Gholwad 


• 25 


20 N 


Fort Churchill 


2 


59 N 


95 W 


Fyfe 


. 16 


26 S 


30 E 


Giant's Castle 


14 


29 S 


Fort Colville . 


6 


48 N 


117 W 


Fyzabad 


. 28 


27 N 


82 E 


Giddalur 


. 26 


15 N 


Fort k la Corne 


4 


53 N 


104 W 










Gierku . 


20 


10 N 


Fort Dauphin 


22 


25 s 


47 E 


Gabenxa 


■ 17 


3'S 


28 E 


Gifu 


■ 35 


35 N 


Fort Elebi 


• 19 


22 S 


28 E 


Gabes . 


II 


30 N 


10 E 


Gilbert R. 


• 38 


17 S 


Fort Evelyn . 


. 16 


28 S 


31 E 


Gabi R. . 


20 


10 N 


gE 


Gilberton 


. 38 


19 S 


Fort Fordyce 


13 


32 s 


25 E 


Gad Hingtaj . 


• 35 


16 N 


74 E 


Gilbert Plains 


S 


SI N 


Fort Fraser . 


6 


54 N 


124 W 


Gadag . 


• 25 


ISN 


75 E 


Gilletts 


• 14 


29 S 


Fort George 


6 


54 N 


123 W 


Gadzema 


• 19 


18 S 


30 E 


Gimli . 


5 


51 N 


Fort Hope . 


S 


51 N 


88 W 


Gafata ' . 


20 


II N 


12 E 


Ginginghlovu . 


. 16 


28 S 


Fort Jackson 


13 


32 S 


27 E 


Gaika . 


• 13 


32 S 


27 E 


Gippsland 


• 37 


37 S 


Fort Jameson 


21 


13 s 


32 E 


Galkisse . 


• 30 


7N 


80 E 


Gira K. 


• 39 


8S 


Fort Johnston 


• 19 


148 


35 E 


Galla . 


II 


oN 


30 E 


Giri 


20 


gN 


Fort Keppel . 


32 


3N 


113 E 


Galle 


• 30 


6N 


80 E 


Giridih . 


• 24 


24 N 


Fort Liard . 


6 


59 N 


121 W 


Gallinas Pt. . 


8 


12 N 


72 W 


Giro 


20 


II N 


Fort Mangoche 


• 19 


14 s 


35 E 


Gamane 


20 


4N 


13 E 


Gisborne 


. 40 


8S 


Fort Manning 


• 19 


13 s 


32 E 


Gambia . 


II 


10 N 


10 W 


Gizola Is. 


• 41 


gS 


Fort Marshall 


16 


28 s 


30 E 


Cameras 


• 19 


18 S 


31 E 


Glace B. 


3 


46 N 


Fort Nottingham 


• 14 


2g S 


2gE 


Gampola 


• 30 


7N 


80 E 


Gladstone (Aust 


-alia) 38 


23 S 


Fort Pelly 


4 


52 N 


102 W 


Gams 


12 


29 S 


19 E 


Gladstone (Cana 


3a) 5 


SON 


Fort Pelly Banks 


6 


62 N 


132 W 


Gandevi . 


• 25 


21 N 


73 E 


Classen Pt. . 


■ 13 


34 S 


Fort Piet Uys 


16 


27 s 


30 E 


Gando . 


20 


12 N 


4E 


Gleichen 


4 


SON 


Fort St. Andrew (B 








Gangapur 


• 25 


igN 


75 E 


Glen Almon.l 


• 13 


30 S 


Guiana) 


9 


6N 


57 W 


Ganges R. 


• 24 


25 N 


84 E 


Glenboro' 


5 


49 N 


Fort St. John 


6 


56 N 


126 W 


Gangle Daria . 


II 


oN 


40 E 


Glencoe 


3 


48 N 


Fort Saskatchewan 


6 


53 N 


113 W 


Gangpur 


• 2g 


22 N 


S4E 


Glencoe June. 


14 


28 S 


Fort Selkirk . 


2 


63 N 


136 W 


Gangra . 


• 24 


22 N 


88 E 


Glengarry 


3 


45 N 


Fort Severn 


5 


56 N 


8gW 


Ganutia . 


• 24 


23 N 


87 E 


Glengarry 


• 17 


30 S 


Fort Vermilion 


6 


58 N 


116 W 


Gari 


20 


8N 


12E 


Glengyle 


• 17 


30 S 


Fort Warden 


13 


32 S 


28 E 


Gariep R. 


II 


20 S 


toE 


Glcnlynden . 


• 13 


32 s 


Fort William 


s 


48 N 


8gW 


Garnet Spruit 


• 15 


2gS 


28 E 


Glenorchy 


5 


48 N 


Fort YoUand . 


16 


28 S 


31 E 


Garnish . 


7 


47 N 


55 W 


Glenwood 


7 


49 N 


Fortaleza 


10 


3S 


39 W 


Garrol . 


5 


49 N 


ICK) W 


Globe and Phoei 


ix 19 


igS 


Fortune . 


8 


22 N 


73 W 


Garua . 


20 


gN 


13 E 


Glorioso Is. . 


22 


12 S 


Fortune B. . 


7 


47 N 


55 W 


Garuga . 


• 19 


igS 


26 E 


Gnace . 


5 


49 N 


Foule Pt. 


22 


17 s 


49 E 


Gascoyne R. . 


• 37 


25 S 


115 E 


Goa 


■ 25 


iSN 


Foulwind, C. . 


40 


42 S 


171 E 


Gashaka 


20 


7N 


II E 


Goal para 


• 24 


26 N 


Fourie, R. 


13 


2g S 


26 E 


Gasi 


■ 19 


17 S 


32 E 


Goalundo 


• 24 


23 N 



Long. 
83 E 
30 E 
10 E 
gi E 
139 E 

85 E 
151 E 

6E 

4E 

136 E 

149 E 

18 E 

88 E 

22 E 

30 E 

58 W 

147 E 
171 E 

S8W 

62 W 

100 E 

143 E 

125 W 

146 E 
28 E 
30 E 

26 E 
28 E 

gE 
28 E 
28 E 

28 E 
o E 

71 E 
70 E 
10 E 
77 E 
75 E 
73 E 
2gE 
79 E 
7E 
136 E 

142 E 

143 E 
100 W 

30 E 
97 W 

31 E 

148 E 

147 E 
12 E 

86 E 
4E 

178 E 
157 E 

59 W 
151 E 

gg W 

25 E 
112 W 

27 E 
ggW 
67 W 
30 E 
62 W 
2gE 

29 E 

26 E 
92 W 
54 W 
29 E 
47 E 
91 W 
74 E 
90 E 
8gE 



tI2 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 


Map No. Lat. 


Gobindpur 


• 29 


23 N 


Godda . 


• 24 


24 N 


Godhra . 


• 25 


23 N 


Gofe . 


20 


9N 


Goghla . 


• 25 


20 N 


Gogo 


• 2S 


21 N 


Gogra R. 


. 28 


28 N 


Gogunda 


■ 25 


25 N 


Gogwana 


• 17 


31 s 


Gohana 


. 28 


28 N 


Gojo 


• 35 


34 N 


Gokak . 


• 25 


16 N 


Golaghat 


. 24 


26 N 


Golconda 


. 26 


17 N 


Golden . 


6 


51 N 


Golea . 


II 


30 N 


Gombi . 


20 


II N 


Gona 


• 39 


8S 


Gonda . 


. 28 


27 N 


Gondal 


• 25 


22 N 


Gondar . 


11 


12 N 


Gondu R. 


• 27 


9N 


Gongome 


20 


7N 


Gongula R . 


20 


II N 


Goodenough Is. & I 


5- 39 


9S 


Goodhope 


18 


23 s 


Gooldvile 


. 18 


23 S 


Goondiwindi . 


38 


28 S 


Goose L. 


5 


54 N 


Goose L. 


4 


51 N 


Gooty 


26 


15 N 


Gopani . 


18 


25 S 


Gopeng . 


32 


4N 


Gordon R. 


40 


42 S 


Gore 


40 


46 S 


Goree Is. & Port 


II 


12 N 


Goropu . 


39 


9S 


Gosalla . 


25 


18 N 


Goschen 


13 


32 S 


Goschen Straits 


39 


10 S 


Goulburn 


37 


34 S 


Gouriiz R. 


12 


34 S 


Gouveia . 


■ 19 


18 S 


Gower Is. 


41 


3S 


Goyaz 


10 


16 S 


Grace Hr. 


7 


47 N 


Grafton 


37 


28 S 


Graham Is. 


6 


54 N 


Grahamstown 


13 


33 S 


Grahamstown, N.Z 


40 


37 S 


Grand Manan 


3 


45 N 


Grand Pond 


7 


48 N 


Grand Popo . 


20 


6N 


Grand R're 


3 


45 N 


Grandview 


5 


51 N 


Grange Is. . 


39 


10 S 


Granum 


6 


49 N 


Granville Ebe. 


39 


9S 


Graspan 


13 


29 S 


Grass L. 


5 


54 N 


Grave P. 


7 


47 N 


Gravel . 


5 


48 N 


Great Abac:) . 


8 


26 N 


Great Bahama 


8 


26 N 


Great Canada 


II 


28 N 


Great Fish R. 


13 


33 S 


Great Gandak R. . 


24 


26 N 


Great Hartz R. 


18 


26 S 


Great Kei 


17 


32 S 


Great Lake (Tas- 






mania) 


40 


42 S 


Great Rann Des . 


25 


24 N 


Great Riet 


13 


32 S 


Great Salt R. . 


II 


33 S 


Great Sandy Is. . 


38 


25 s 


Great Slave L. 


6 


61 N 


Great Stride . 


6 


52 N 


Great Winterberg . 


13 


32 S 



Long 

86 E 

87 E 
74 E 

I W 

70 E 

72 H, 

81 E 
74 E 
29 E 

76 E 
135 E 

74 E 

94 E 

78 E 

117 W 

oE 

4E 

148 E 

82 E 

71 E 
38 E 
78 E 
II E 
II E 

150 E 
29 E 
29 E 

150 E 
94 W 

107 W 

77 E 

25 E 
loi E 
145 E 
169 E 

8 W 

149 E 

73 E 
27 E 

150 E 

149 E 
21 E 
34 E 

160 E 
50 E 
53 W 

150 E 

133 W 

26 E 
175 E 

66 W 

57 W 

2E 

64 W 

loi W 

148 E 

114 W 
147 E 

26 E 
99 W 
53 W 
87 W 
76 W 
78 W 
12 W 

26 E 
84 E 
25 W 
28 E 

146 E 
70 E 

25 E 

27 E 
153 E 

115 W 
125 W 

26 E 



South 



Is. 



Place 
Green Bay 
Green Is 
Greenbush. 
Green Pt. 
Green's Pond 
Gregory R. 

Grenada Is. 

Grenada, Nic, 

Grenadines 

Grenfell . 

Grenna . 

Grenville C. 

Grey R, 

Greymouth 

Greytown, 
Africa 

Grey town, N, 

Greytown, Natal 

Grim C. 

Grindstone Is, 

Griqua Town 

Guacipati 

Guadaicanar 

Guadaloupe 

Guaku . 

Guanda . 

Guaso Nyifo 

Guatemala 

Guayanavieja 

Gunyaquil 

Gubenxa 

Gubio 

Gudnlur . 

Gudiyatam 

Gudur . 

Guedlinburg 

Guiana . 

Guidaruii R. 

Guingua 

Guirat . 

Gujranwala 

Gulbarga 

Gulf Is. . 

Gummi . 

Gumsuri 

Gunderi , 

Guneunhana 

Gungululu 

Gunjong 

Guntakal 

Gunti 

Guntur . 

Gurara . 

GurdAspur 

Gure 

Gurgaon 

Gurha 

Gurr'amkonda 

Guruwe . 

Gusau . 

Guti 

Guysboroagh 

Guzco 

Gwada . 

Gwai 

Gwalior 

Gwanda 

Gwani . 

Gwatalala 

Gwazo . ■ 

Gwelo . 

Gxididi . 

Gxobani 

Gxojana 

Gympie . 

Habe . 
Habiganj 



Map No. 
7 



38 



38 
40 
40 

13 

-|0 

14 
40 

3 
15 
10 

41 
8 

19 
10 



13 
20 
27 
26 
26 
18 
8 
9 
13 
28 
28 
26 
41 



25 
18 

17 

24 

25 

29 
26 
II 
28 
20 
28 

25 
26 



17 
19 
28 

19 
20 

19 
21 

19 
17 
17 
17 
38 



Lat. 

49 N 
18 N 
S3N 
33 S 

49 N 
18 S 
12 N 
12 N 
12 N 

50 N 
30 N 
12 S 
42 S 
42 s 

32 s 

46 s 
29 s 
40 s 

47 N 
28 S 

7N 
9S 

16 N 
20 S 

19 S 
2S 

14 N 
8 N 
2S 

31 « 

12 N 
9N 

13 N 

14 N 

22 S 
8N 
3N 

33 S 

32 N 
32 N 

17 N 
10 S 

12 N 
ir N 

14 N 

24 S 

31 s 

25 N 

15 N 

23 N 

16 N 

20 N 

32 N 

13 N 
28 N 

25 N 

13 N 

15 s 

12 N 

5N 

45 N 

14 S 
32 S 

19 s 

26 N 

21 S 
10 N 

20 S 
ISS 
19 s 

31 s 

32 s 
32 s 
26 s 



20 9 N 
24 24 N 



Long. 

55 W 

78 W 

102 w 

18 E 

53 W 

139 E 

62 W 

86 W 

62 W 

102 E 

20 E 

t43E 

171 E 

171 E 

27 E 
170 E 

30 E 
145 E 
62 W 
23 E 
62 W 
159 E 
62 W 
25 E 
41 W 
36 E 
90 W 
62 W 
79 W 

28 E 
12 E 

77 E 

78 E 

79 E 

29 E 
58 W 
58 W 
25 E 
74 E 

74 E 
76 E 

162 E 

5E 

12 E 

76 E 
34 E 
28 E 
93 E 

77 E 
85 E 

80 E 
oE 

75 E 

10 E 

77 E 
72 E 

78 E 
37 E 

6E 

9E 
61 W 
71 W 

28 E 

27 E 
77 E 

29 E 

11 E 

28 E 
35 E 

29 E 
29 E 
28 E 
27 E 

152 E 

II E 
91 E 



Place. 


Map No. Lat. 


Long. 


Hachinohe . 


• 35 


40 N 


142 E 


Hackney, Grahams- 






town. 


13 


32 s 


26 E 


Hackney, Guiana 


9 


7N 


58 W 


Hadeijo 


20 


12 N 


10 E 


Hadendoa 


II 


10 N 


30 E 


Haenertsburg 


. 18 


24 s 


29 E 


Hagani R. . 


. 26 


14 N 


76 E 


Haicheng 


• 34 


41 N 


122 E 


Haichow 


• 33 


34 N 


119 E 


Haidarabad . 


25 


18 N 


76 E 


Haifong. 


• 33 


21 N 


107 E 


Haijanghsien . 


■ 34 


36 N 


121 E 


Hai-ju . 


• 36 


38 N 


125 E 


Hailai . 


• 34 


40 N 


115 E 


Hailakandi . 


24 


24 N 


92 E 


Hai-nan . 


■ 76 


19 N 


iioE 


Haitan Is. 


33 


25 N 


120 E 


Hajo 


• 24 


26 N 


91 E 


Hakodate 


35 


42 N 


140 E 


Hala . 


. 28 


25 N 


67 E 


Halbrite 


4 


49 N 


103 W 


Halcro . 


4 


53 N 


106 W 


Halesowen 


13 


32 s 


25 E 


Halfway Tree (Ja 








maica) 


8 


18 N 


76 W 


Halifax Hr. . 


3 


44N 


63 W 


Halifax, N.S. 


3 


44N 


63 W 


Halifax, Queenslan 


d 38 


18 s 


146 E 


Hal-la-san 


36 


33 N 


126 E 


Hamada 


79 


35 N 


132 E 


Hamamatsu . 


35 


35 N 


138 E 


Hamans Kraal 


18 


25 s 


28 E 


Hambanlotte 


30 


6N 


81 E 


Hamburg 


13 


33 S 


27 E 


Hamheung 


36 


39 N 


127 E 


Hamiota 


5 


50 N 


101 W 


Hamirpur 


28 


26 N 


80 E 


Hampden 


40 


45 S 


171 E 


Hampolo 


22 


24 S 


44 E 


Hampton 


3 


45 N 


65 W 


Han, R. 


36 


37 N 


127 E 


Han, R. 


33 


33 N 


109 E 


Hanchung 


33 


33 N 


107 E 


Hange 


17 


32 s 


27 E 


Hankey 


13 


33 S 


24 E 


Hankow 


33 


31 N 


115 E 


Hanley . 


4 


51 N 


106 W 


Hanoi . 


33 


21 N 


105 E 


Hanover 


13 


31 s 


24 E 


Hanover Rd. 


13 


30 S 


24 E 


Hansi . 


28 


28 N 


76 E 


Hanyang 


33 


30 N 


113 E 


Haputale 


30 


7N 


81 E 


Harar . 


II 


9N 


41 E 


Harbour Buffer 


7 


47 N 


54 W 


Harding 


14 


30 S 


29 E 


Hardisly 


4 


52 N 


iiiW 


Hardwar 


28 


30 N 


78 E 


Hardy Pt. . 


39 


98 


149 E 


Hare Bay 


7 


51 N 


55 W 


Harewood 


8 


18 N 


76 W 


Hargrave 


4 


49 N 


100 W 


Harihar . 


25 


14 N 


75 E 


Harnai . 


25 


17 N 


'73E 


Harpanahalli . 


25 


14 N 


75 E 


Harrismith . 


15 


28 S 


29 E 


Hartebeest R. 


12 


30 S 


21 E 


Hartingsburg 


18 


24 S 


28 E 


Hartley . 


19 


i8S 


30 E 


Hartley Hill . 


21 


18 S 


30 E 


Hatia . 


29 


23 N 


85 E 


Hatong . 


36 


35 N 


128 E 


Hauraki 


40 


37 S 


175 E 


Hauraki, Gulf of . 


40 


36 S 


175 E 


Havannah Harbour 


41 


18 S 


168 E 


tiawke Bay . 


40 


39 S 


177 E 


Hawkesbury . 


3 


45 N 


61 W 



INDEX 



11^ 



6 

S 
24 
29 

6 
38 

7 
40 

17 
17 
38 

15 



Place. Map No. 

Hay ... 37 
Hay River . 
Haywood 
Hazaribagh . 
Hazaribagh Road 
Hazelton 
Headingly 
Heart's Content 
Heazleton 
Hebehebana . 
Hebehebe 
Hebel . 
Hebran . 
Heidelberg, Cape 

Colony . . 12 
Heidelberg, Transvaal 18 
Heilbron . . 15 
Hekitiho Pah . 40 
Helvetia . . 13 
Hembo ... 5 
Hemlock . . 18 
Hench ... 33 
Hengchow . 33 
Hengrijar . 24 
Henning . . 13 
Henzada . . 31 
Heongshan . . 33 
Herald Pt. . . 21 
Herb L. . . s 
Herbert . . 4 
Herberton . . 38 
Herberts Dale . 12 
Herman. . . 13 
Hermitage . . 22 
Hermitage Bay . 7 
Heron Bay . . 5 
Herring Neck . 7 
Herschel . . 13 
Hertzog . . 13 
Hervey B. . 38 
Herz Jesu . . 21 
Hex R. . . 18 
Hibango . . 20 
Hibbs Point (Tas- 
mania) . . 40 
High River . . 4 
Higher Briton . 7 
Highflats . . 14 
Highlands, Grahams- 
town ... 13 
Highlands, Natal . 14 
HillR. . . s 
Hillcrest . . 14 
Hillsbrough Bay . 3 
Hillside ... 18 
Hilton Road . . 14 
Hinchinbrook Is. . 38 
Hindi ... 56 
Hinganfu . 33 
Hinghwa . . 33 
Hinzouan . . 22 
Hioge . . 39 
Hiranpur . . 24 
Hirosaki . 35 
Hiroshima . . 35 
Hissar ... 28 
Hiwasa . • • 3S 
Hlamankulu . . i3 
Hlangomoya . .18 
Hlatikulu . . 14 
Hlobe ... 17 
Ho ... 33 
Hobart ... 37 
Hodge . . . S 
Hoefjyes B. . .12 
Hoffnungshoh . 21 
Hohenfriedeberg . 21 



Lat. 

33 S 

59 N 
49 N 
24 N 

24 N 
SSN 

21 S 

47 N 
41 S 

32 s 

32 s 
29 s 

28 s 

34 S 

26 S 

27 s 

41 s 

29 s 

48 N 
2SS 
27 N 

23 N 
27 N 

31 s 

17 N 

22 N 
17 S 
S4N 
SON 

17 S 
34 S 

29 S 
20 S 

47 N 

48 N 

49 N 

30 S 

32 S 

25 S 
7S 

2SS 
9 N 

42 S 

50 N 
47 N 
30 S 

33 S 
29 S 
S6N 
29 S 
46 N 
2SS 
29 s 

18 s 

27 N 

32 N 
25 N 
12 S 
10 S 

24 N 
40 N 

34 N 

28 N 

33 N 

25 S 

26 S 

29 S 

32 S 
36 N 
42 .S 
49 N 

33 S 
7S 
4S 



Long. 

144 E 
118 W 

98 W 

8s E 

8s E 

127 W 

138 E 

53 W 
147 E 

27 E 

27 E 

147 E 
24 E 

20 E 

28 E 

28 E 
176 E 

26 E 
86 W 
30 E 

112 E 
109 E 

94 E 

26 E 

95 E 

113 E 
35 E 

100 W 
107 W 

145 E 

21 E 

27 E 
57 E 
56 W 
86 W 

54 W 
27 E 

26 E 
152 E 

33 E 

27 E 
12 E 

145 E 
113 W 

56 W 

30 E 

26 E 

29 E 
94 W 

30 E 
63 E 

29 E 

30 E 

146 E 
8s E 

109 E 
120 E 

44 E 
150 E 

88 E 
140 E 
132 E 

75 E 
134 E 

32 E 

33 E 
29 E 

28 E 
103 E 

148 E 
93 W 
17 E 
38 E 
38 E 



Place. 
Hoihow . 
Hoima . 
Hokchiang 
Hokenaap 
Hokien . 
Hokitiki 
Hokkaido 
Holat . 
Hoi Fn . 
Holland 
Holnicote B. 
Holy Trinity 
Homweni 
Honan 
Honavar 
Hondeblats R. 
Honduras 
Honduras, Gulf of 
Honeynestkloof 
Hong, R. 
Hongi . 
Hong-ju . 
Hong-Kong 
Hongtse, L. 
Hood Pt. 
Hoogly 
Hoogly, R. 
Hoopstad 
Hopefield 
Hopetown 
Hopetown B. 
Ho-ping 
Hora 
Horleng 
Horn, C. 
Horner . 
Hornby Range 
Horo 

Horobetsu 
Hosdruga 
Hoshiarpur 
Hoshio . 
Hospet . 
Hota(Kaffraria) 
Houita . 
Hout Bay 
Houtkraal 
Houw Hock 
Howe, C. 
Howick 
Howrah 
Hsiao-Hsin-Chuang 
Hsing-min-ting 
Hsino-Hsin . 
Hsintai 
Hsint-ai 
Hsipaw . 
Huamachuco 
Huaraz 
Hubli . 
Huchang 
Hudsco, Port & R. 
Hudson Bay 
Hudson Bay Jc. 
Hughenden 
Hula . 
Hulafa . 
Humansdorp 
Humbe . 
Humboldt 
Hamulus 
Hunan . 
Hungerford 
Hungund 
Hunyani 
Hunyuan 
Huokleng 



Map No. 
33 



33 

12 

33 
40 

35 
13 
18 

5 

39 
17 
18 

33 
25 
13 



13 
33 
25 
36 
33 
33 
39 
24 
24 

IS 
12 

13 

9 
33 
21 

36 
10 

5 
39 
16 

35 
25 
28 
21 
25 
17 
17 
12 

13 

12 

37 
14 
24 
34 
33 
33 
33 
34 
31 



25 

36 



4 
38 
39 
20 

13 
19 
4 
19 
33 
38 
25 
19 
33 
33 



Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map:No 


Lat. 


Long. 


20 N 


no E 


Huon R. 


40 


43 S 


147 E 


^iN 


31 E 


Huron . 


2 


44 N 


83 W 


26 N 


119 E 


Hurunui R. . 


40 


43 S 


173 E 


31 s 


18 E 


Hussan . 


26 


13 N 


76 E 


37 N 


116 E 


Hwai R. 


33 


32 N 


115 E 


43 S 


171 E 


Hwaian . 


33 


33 N 


119 E 


43 N 


143 E 


Hwangchow . 


33 


30 N 


115 E 


32 s 


27 E 


Hwang-hai 


33 


30 N 


124 E 


24 S 


27 E 


Hwang- Ho . 


33 


43 N 


120 E 


49 N 


98 W 


Hwang-hsien . 


34 


37 N 


120 E 


8S 


148 E 


Hwang-Ju 


36 


38 N 


126 E 


30 S 


29 E 


Hwochow 


33 


37 N 


III E 


23 S 


34 E 


Hwuichaw 


33 


29 N 


118 E 


34 N 


113 E 


Hyde Park . 


9 


6N 


58 W 


14 N 


74 E 


Hyderabad, Deccar 


26 


17 N 


78 E 


30 S 


24 E 


Hyderabad (Lahori. 


) 28 


25 N 


67 E 


15 N 


88 W 


Hyogo . 


35 


34 N 


135 E 


16 N 


87 W 










29 S 


24 E 


Ibadan . 


20 


7N 


4E 


24 N 


106 E 


Ibanda . 


21 


4S 


32 E 


17 N 


76 E 


Ibeka . 


17 


32 s 


28 E 


36 N 


126 E 


Ibi 


20 


8N 


9E 


22 N 


114 E 


Ichagar . 


29 


23 N 


86 E 


33 N 


118 E 


Ichak 


29 


24 N 


85 E 


10 S 


147 E 


Ichaura . 


9 


5N 


59 W 


23 N 


88 E 


Ichowfu . 


34 


35 N 


118 E 


22 N 


88 E 


Idah 


20 


7N 


7E 


27 S 


26 E 


Idaiyangudi . 


26 


8N 


77 E 


33 S 


18 E 


Idaiyankulam 


62 


8N 


77 E 


29 S 


24 E 


Ideles . 


n 


22 N 


.5E 


6N 


58 w 


Idunda . 


21 


8S 


34 E 


24 N 


IIS E 


Idutywa . 


17 


32 s 


28 E 


II S 


33 E 


Idyangudi 


27 


8N 


77 E 


42 N 


130 E 


Ifafa R. . 


14 


30 S 


30 E 


56 s 


67 W 


Igan 


30 


2N 


112 E 


49 N 


95 W 


Iganga . 


21 


iN 


33 E 


9S 


149 E 


Igatpuri . 


25 


19 N 


73 E 


2SS 


31 E 


Igonda . 


21 


5S 


32 E 


42 N 


141 E 


Iguazu Falls . 


lo 


24 S 


55 W 


13 N 


76 E 


Ijan 


20 


7N 


5E 


31 N 


76 W 


Ijebbu Ode . 


20 


6N 


4E 


16 S 


38 E 


Ikawa . 


21 


gS 


32 E 


15 N 


76 E 


Ikom 


20 


SN 


8E- 


31 s 


27 E 


Ikomba . 


21 


9S 


32 E 


32 S 


27 E 


Ikombe . 


21 


gS 


34 E 


34 S 


18 E 


Ikoppa R. 


22 


17 S 


47 E 


30 S 


24 E 


Ikorodu . 


20 


6N 


3E 


34 S 


19 E 


Ikula . 


21 


7S 


36 E 


35 S 


117 E 


Ilesha . 


20 


7N 


4E 


29 S 


30 E 


Ilfracombe 


38 


23 S 


144 E 


22 N 


88 E 


Illele . 


20 


14 N 


5E 


38 N 


IIS E 


Illo 


20 


n N 


+ £ 


42 N 


121 E 


Illorin 


20 


8N 


4E 


37 N 


IIS E 


lUovo R. 


14 


30 S 


30 E 


35 N 


117 E 


Imaichi . 


35 


35 N 


132 E 


36 N 


118 E 


Imbazane R. 


14 


27 S 


29 E 


2J N 


97 E 


Imbewula 


13 


32 s 


28 E 


7S 


77 W 


Imboban 


18 


22 s 


34 E 


9S 


76 W 


Iminimira 


39 


10 s 


150 E 


iSN 


75 E 


Imoshagh 


II 


22 N 


5E 


41 N 


126 E 


Iraoti . 


9 


7N 


59 W 


28 S 


71 W 


Impanda 


19 


20 S 


32 E 


60 N 


85 W 


Impendhla . 


14 


29 S 


29 E 


53 N 


102 W 


Imphal . 


24 


24 N 


94 E 


20 S 


144 E 


Imvusi Swamp 


. 16 


26 S 


32 E 


10 S 


147 E 


Imyani . 


13 


32 s 


26 E 


loN 


3W 


Inagua . 


8 


21 N 


73 W 


34 S 


24 E 


Incomati 


18 


25 S 


32 E 


18 S 


33 E 


Indawana 


■ 17 


29 S 


29 E 


52 N 


loSW 


Independencia 


10 


6S 


35 W 


22 S 


31 E 


Indi 


• 25 


17 N 


76 E 


27 N 


112 E 


Indore . 


• 23 


22 N 


76 E 


29 S 


144 E 


Indus R. 


. 28 


32 N 


79 E 


16 N 


76 E 


Indwana 


• 17 


31 s 


27 E 


17 s 


30 E 


Indwe . 


■ 13 


31 s 


27E 


39 N 


114 E 


Indwe R. 


■ 17 


31 s 


27 E 


27 N 


120 E 


Indwedwe 


14 


29 s 


30 E 



114 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 


Vlap No. 


Lat. 


Infelberg 


1.3 


31 s 


Ingagane 


14 


27 S 


Ingagane R. . 


14 


28 S 


Ingalate R. . 


18 


22 s 


Ing Chung . 


33 


25 N 


Ingele Mts. . 


14 


30 S 


Inglewood 


38 


28 s 


Ingogo . 


16 


27 s 


Ingram . 


38 


18 s 


Inguana 


18 


23 s 


Ingwangwane R. 


14 


30 s 


Ingwavuma R. 


16 


27 s 


Inhabirai 


19 


20 s 


Inhambane . 


18 


25 S 


Inhapallata . 


18 


24 s 


Inharime 


18 


24 s 


Inhlasatye 


16 


27 s 


Inhlwati 


i5 


27 s 


Inkoka I. 


18 


26 s 


Inkoman Simba 


18 


22 S 


Inland Sea . 


35 


34 N 


Innisfail 


15 


52 N 


Inould 


19 


21 S 


In Salah 


II 


26 N 


Insein . 


31 


17 N 


Insukameni . 


19 


19 S 


Insusi R. 


16 


28 s 


Invahibe 


22 


15 s 


Invercargill . 


40 


46 s 


Inxu 


13 


31 s 


Inyamandis . 


19 


19 s 


Inyanga . 


• 19 


18 s 


Inyantshishi . 


. 18 


22 S 


Inyati . 


• 19 


19 s 


Inyatsutsu 


• 19 


16 s 


Ipoh . 


• 32 


4N 


Ipolela . 


• 14 


29 s 


Ipolela R. 


14 


29 s 


Ipswich . 


38 


27 s 


Ipwani . 


21 


4S 


Iquique 


10 


20 s 


Iquitos . 


10 


2S 


Irachi 


27 


9N 


Irene 


i8 


25 s 


Iringa . 


21 


7S 


Irrawadi 


31 


20 N 


Irvine . 


4 


49 N 


Isaacs R. 


38 


22 S 


Isaha . 


22 


14 s 


Isandhlwana . 


16 


28 s 


Isbindi R. . 


14 


28 s 


Ise 


21 


oS 


Ishur 


• 34 


35 N 


Isigidimi 


• 13 


30 S 


Isipingo 


• 14 


30 s 


Isisele . 


• 17 


30 s 


Isisford . 


• 38 


24 s 


Isita Mosheh's 


• 17 


30 s 


Islamabad 


33 


33 N 


Islamkote 


• 2S 


24 N 


Islands, Bay of 


7 


49 N 


Islands, Bay of 


. 40 


35 S 


Island L. 


5 


53 N 


Islay 


4 


53 N 


Isle Madame . 


3 


45 N 


Isle Royal 


5 


48 N 


Itabira . 


10 


19 S 


Itebbu 


20 


6N 


Itki 


• 29 


23 N 


Itobe . 


20 


7N 


Itumba . 


21 


6S 


Ituri R. 


II 


iN 


Ituribisce 


9 


7N 


Ivohibe . 


22 


23 S 


Ixopo . 


14 


30 s 


Izintwald 


17 


30 s 



Long. 
25 E 
30 E 
29 E 
29 E 
118 E 

29 E 
151 E 

30 E 
146 E 

34 E 
29 E 
32 E 

34 E 

35 E 
35 E 
,.E 

31 E 
iE 
lE 

E 

E 

;W 

;E 

;E 
E 



351 



32] 

33 1 

32 1 

132 - 



"5 
35 
2 
96 
29 E 

31 E 
50 E 

168 E 
28 E 

32 E 

33 E 
33 E 

28 E 

32 E 
loi E 

29 E 

29 E 
152 E 

35 W 
70 W 
72 W 
77 E 
28 E 

33 E 
95 E 

iioW 

148 E 

50 E 

30 E 
30 E 
35 E 

118 E 
26 E 
30 E 
30 E 

144 E 
28 E 
75 E 
70 E 
58 W 

174 E 
94 W 

iioW 
60W 
88 W 
42 W 
4E 
85 E 
6E 
35 E 

28 E 
58 W 
44E 
30 E 

29 E 



Place. 
Jack Fish 
Jack Fish 
Jack River 
Jafarabad 
Jaffna 
Jagavirapuram 
Jagersfontein . 
Jagersfontein Rd. 
Jaggayyapeta 
Jaigarh . 
Jaipur , 
Jaitpur . 
Jalalpur . 
Jalarpet 
Jalaun . 
Jalgaon . 
Jalingo . 
Jailor . 
Jalna 
Jalpaiguri 
Jalrapatan 
Jamaari 
Jamaica 
Jamalpur 
Jamestown 
Jamkhandi 
Jamkhed 
Jammalamadugu 
Jammu . 
Jamnagar 
Jandiala 
Jangipur 
Janjira . 
Jaochow 
Jappen . 
Jargo . 
Jarod 
Jashpur . 
Jath 

Jatoba . 
Jaunpur . 
Jaypur . 
Jcizeiro . 
Jebba 
Jedcherla 
Jedore . 
Jelebu . 
Jenas 
Jenca 
Jenkiu . 
Jericho . 
Jesselton 
Jessore . 
Jeur 

Jeysulmere 
Jhabua . 
Jhang-Bar 
Jhansi . 
Jhelam . 
Jhenida . 
Jherria . 
Jichaohsien 
Jilore 
Jimbo 
Jind 
Jintur 
Jobat 
Jodhpur 
Johanna 
Johannesburg 
Johore . 
Jojweni . 
Jokea 
Joliba R. 
Jondaryan 
Jonker . 
Jorhat . 



Map No. 
5 
4 
5 

25 
30 
27 

15 
Stn. 13 
26 

25 
28 
28 

25 
26 

23 

25 
20 
28 
25 
24 
28 
20 
8 

24 
13 
58 
25 
26 
28 

25 
28 

24 
25 
33 
39 
29 
25 
29 
25 
10 
28 
29 



26 
3 
32 
19 
17 
34 
38 
32 
24 
25 
28 

25 
28 

33 

28 

24 
29 
34 
21 
21 
28 
25 
25 
28 
22 
18 
32 
17 
39 
II 
38 
12 
24 



Lat. 
48 N 

53 N 

54 N 

20 N 

10 N 
9N 

29 S 

30 S 
17 N 
17 N 
26 N 

25 N 

21 N 
12 N 

26 N 

21 N 
9 N 

25 N 
19 N 

26 N 
24 N 

11 N 

17 N 
24 N 

31 s 

16 N 

18 N 
14 N 

32 N 

22 N 
31 N 

24 N 
18 N 
29 N 

2S 

23 N 
22 N 
22 N 
16 N 

9S 

25 N 
22 N 

9S 

9 N 

16 N 

45 N 

2N 

22 S 

31 s 

38 N 

23 S 
5 N 

23 N 

18 N 

26 N 
23 N 

31 N 

25 N 

32 N 
23 N 
23 N 
35 N 

3S 
3S 

29 N 

19 N 
22 N 

26 N 

12 S 

26 s 
2N 

31 s 

8S 

10 N 

27 S 

30 s 
26 N 



Long. 
W 



86 
108 
91 
71 
80 
78 
25 
25 
80 



73 
76 

79 
73 E 

78 E 

79 E 

75 E 
II E 
73 E 

76 E 
88 E 

76 E 
10 E 

77 W 
90 E 

26 E 
75 E 
75 E 

78 E 
75 E 

70 E 
75 E 

88 E 

72 E 
117 E 
136 E 

86 E 

73 E 

84 E 
75 E 

38 W 
82 E 

85 E 
41 W 

4E 
78 E 
62 W 

102 E 
32 E 
28 E 

116 E 
146 E 
116 E 

89 E 
75 E 

71 E 

75 E 

72 E 
78 E 

73 E 
89 E 

86 E 
119 E 

40 E 

39 E 

76 E 
76 E 
75 E 
73 E 
44E 
28 E 

103 E 

27 E 
146 E 

19 W 
151 E 

20 E 
94 E 



Place. 
Josana . 
Josanne's 
Jos6 

Joubert's Kroon 
Jowai 
Jpapua . 
Juan de Fuca Straits 
Juani Is. 
Juarez . 
Juba R. . 
Jubboogana . 
Jujuy . 
Julgaun . 
Jumna R. 
Junagarh 
Junction Ferry 
Jundan . 
Junin 
Junkseylon 
Juvong . 

Kaal Plaats . 

Kaal Spuit . 

Kaapmuiden . 

Kabbir . 

Kabe . 

Kabulwebulwe 

Kacha . 

Kachabari 

Kachia . 

Kachins 

Kadachapuram 

Kadaiyanadai 

Kadalui 

Kadambur . 

Kadi . 

Kaduna R. . 

Kaffa 

Kafifir R. 

Kafimbi 

Kagera . 

Kagherko 

Kagoshima . 

Kagunga 

Kaha . 

Kahal . 

Kaiapoi 

Kaichow Chi . 

Kaietur Fall . 

Kaifung 

Kaikohe 

Kaikoura 

Kaikoura Mts. 

Kaikwa . 

Kailasapuram 

Kailashahr . 

Kaile . 

Kailpatti 

Kailung 

Kaipinghsien. 

Kaira . 

Kaiserin Auguste 

R. 
Kaitaia . 
Kaithal . 
Kaiyama 
Kaiyuhgu 
Kajan R. 
ICajang . 
Kajuna . 
Kala . 
Kalabagh 
Kalabas 
Kalaigolo 
Kalakad 
Kalasapad 
Kalgan . 



Map No. 
. 16 
■ 17 



18 

24 



25 
10 

25 
28 

25 
17 
38 
10 
32 
32 

17 
13 
18 - 
20 
20 

19 
20 

29 
20 

31 
27 
27 

27 
27 
25 
20 
II 
13 



79 
21 
40 
28 
40 
34 
9 
33 
40 
40 
40 
33 
27 
24 
39 
27 
28 
34 
25 

39 
40 
28 
20 
19 
32 
32 
21 
21 
28 
13 
39 
27 
26 

33 



Lat. 
26 S 

30 S 

29 S 

23 S 

25 N 
6S 

48 N 
8S 

37 S 
oN 

21 N 

24 S 

20 N 

26 N 

21 N 

31 S 

24 S 

34 S 
7N 
I N 

30 S 
29 S 

25 s 
9N 

10 N 
15 s 
8 N 

23 N 
9N 

24 N 
8N 
8N 
9N 
9N 

23 N 
10 N 
oN 
29 S 
9S 
oS 
9N 

31 N 
4S 

37 S 
33 N 
43 S 

35 N 
4N 

35 N 
35 S 
42 S 
42 s 

23 N 
8N 

24 N 
9S 
9N 

32 N 
40 N 

22 N 

4S 
35 S 
29 N 

5N 

15 s 

3N 

3N 

oS 

8S 

32 N 

298 

9S 

8 N 

15 N 

40 N 



Long. 
31 E 

29 E 
65 W 

30 E 
92 E| 
36 E 

124 W 
40 E 

58 W 
40 E 
73Eji 
65 W 

71 E 
80 E 

70 E 

28 E 
142 E 

59 W 
98 E 

103 E 

29 E 
26 E 

31 E 
9E 
4E 

26 E 
6E 

85 E 
7E 

94 E 

77 E 

78 E 
77 E 

77 E 
72 E 

7E 

30 E 

25 E 
30 E 
30 E 

7E 
130 E 

30 E 
178 E 

72 E 

173 E 

115 E. 
59 W 

114 E 

174 E 
173 E 
173 E 
105 E 

78 E 
92 E 

147 E 
77 W 
76 E 

122 E 
72 E 

142 E 
173 E 

76 E 
6E 

26 E 

116 E 
loi E 

31 E 
31 E 

71 E 
24 E 

147 E 

77 E 

79 li 

115 E 



Index 



lis 



Place. 
Kalgoorlie 
Kalka . 
KalkB. 
Kalk Butt 
Kalkfontein 
Kalkudah 
Kallattikinaru 
Kallikkudi 
Kallowelly 
Kallur Kot 
Kalmunai 
Kalna . 
Kalof . 
Kalol . 
Kalomo 
Kalpitiya 
Kalu, R. 
Kalutara 
Kama, Algoma 
Kama, Burma 
Kama Kama 
Kamastone . 
Kambam 
Kambane 
Kamban's 
Kambe . 
Kambula 
Kamerun 
Kami R. 
Kaminisikwia 
Kamlekeni 
Kamloops 
Kampi Ka Kobi 
Kampot 
Kamsack 
Kamndi 
Kamuli . 
Kana . 
Kanazawa 
Kanbalu 
Kandes . 
Kindi . 
Kandi . 
K andy . 
Kanem . 
Kangetnndi 
Kanghwa 
Kang-Kyei 
Kang-neung 
Kango . 
Kangombe 
Kangra . 
Kanhar R. 
Kaningow 
Kanis 

Kankanc'^ari 
Kankanga 
Kano . 
Kanowit 
Kinowna 
Kanoya . 
Kant Mts. 
Kanyenda 
Kanzalo 
Kaoko Land 
Kaomi . 
Kao-Yu . 
Kapako . 
Kapenda 
Kapit . 
Kapityns 
Kapsan . 
Kapurthala 
Kara Nor 
Karachi . 
Karaikkeni 
Karamanayar R. 



Map No. 
37 
2S 

12 
13 
13 
30 
27 
27 
26 
23 

30 
24 

2S 
2S 
19 
30 
30 
30 

5 
31 
19 
13 
27 
18 
18 
16 
i6 
II 
19 

S 
21 

6 
21 
32 

4 
27 
21 
20 
35 
31 
18 
24 
20 

30 
II 

19 
36 
36 
36 

21 

19 
28 
29 
32 
19 
20 
20 
20 
32 
37 
3S 
39 
21 

19 
II 

34 
34 
19 
21 

32 
12 

36 
28 

33 
28 

27 
27 



Lat. 

30 S 

31 N 
34 S 
30 S 
30 s 

8N 
SN 
9N 
8 N 

32 N 

8 N 
23 N 

22 N 

23 N 
17 S 

8N 

7N 

6N 

49 N 

19 N 

20 S 
32 s 

9 N 

24 S 
24 s 
28 s 
27 s 

oN 

19 s 
48 N 

3S 

SI N 

oN 

10 N 
51 N 

9N 
I N 
7N 

36 N 
23 N 

22 N 

23 N 

11 N 
7 N 

10 N 

20 S 

37 N 
41 N 
37 N 

12 S 

15 s 

32 N 

23 N 
6N 

22 S 
12 N 
9N 

11 N 
2N 

30 S 

31 N 
6S 

II S 
17 S 

10 s 
36 N 

36 N 
ISS 

11 .s 

2N 

30 S 
41 N 

31 N 

37 N 

24 N 
9N 
8N 



Long. 



121 

77 
18 

24 

82 

77 

n 

81 

71 
82 



E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
73.E 
72 E 
26 E 
80 E 
80 E 

80 E 

87 W 
95 E 

25 E 

26 E 

77 E 
33 E 
33 E 
30 E 

30 E 
loE 

27 E 
89 W 
40 E 

120 W 

35 E 

103 E 

I02 W 

78 E 

33 E 
2 E 

137 E 
95 E 
32 E 

88 E 
3E 

81 E 
10 E 
32 E 

126 E 
126 E 

129 E 
35 E 
32 E 

76 E 
83 E 

116 E 

26 E 

I E 

oW 

8E 

112 E 

122 E 

130 E 
146 E 

37 E 

28 E 
10 E 

119 E 
116 E 

34 E 

31 E 
i[4E 

19 E 
128 E 
74 E 
98 E 
66 E 

77 E 

78 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat, 


Karativo 


30 


7N 


Karces Kroon 


13 


32 s 


Kareclaagte . 


13 


29 s 


Karegoa 


25 


18 N 


Kareiga 


13 


33 S 


Karens . 


31 


19 N 


Kariba Gorge 


19 


i5S 


Karikal . 


26 


10 N 


Kariraama 


20 


12 N 


Karimganj . 


24 


24 N 


Karisalpatti . 


27 


8N 


Karmata 


25 


18 N 


Karnal . 


28 


29 N 


Karnali R. . 


28 


28 N 


Karo 


39 


10 S 


Karon ga 


21 


10 S 


Karumiia 


38 


17 S 


Karunkulam . 


27 


8N 


Karur . 


26 


II N 


Karwar . 


25 


14 N 


Karwi . 


28 


25 N 


Kasama 


21 


10 S 


Kasamba 


21 


13 s 


Kasanya 


19 


16 s 


Kasenga's 


21 


10 s 


Kasimbo 


21 


14 s 


Kassala 


II 


10 N 


Kasungn 


21 


12 S 


Kasungu 


21 


13 s 


Katagum 


20 


10 N 


Katagum 


20 


12 N 


Katerere 


19 


17 S 


Katha . 


31 


24 N 


Kathi . 


25 


22 N 


Katkop 


12 


30 S 


Katpur . 


25 


21 N 


Katras . 


29 


23 N 


Katsena Allah 


20 


6N 


Katsina 


20 


12 N 


Kattregam . 


30 


6N 


Katusi . 


19 


14 S 


Kaura 


20 


12 N 


Kavali 


26 


15 N 


Kavigondo . 


21 


5S 


Kavitondo 


21 


oS 


Kawa . 


20 


12 N 


Kawa-Kawa . 


40 


37 S 


Kawai . 


21 


13 s 


Kawar . 


II 


10 N 


Kaiyataria Is. 


39 


8S 


Kawembe 


21 


9S 


Kawhia Hr. . 


40 


38 S 


Kaw Samuie . 


32 


9N 


Kaw Yai 


32 


7N 


Kazaura 


20 


12 N 


Kazemba 


II 


10 S 


Keakaro B. . 


39 


10 S 


Kebabo . 


II 


20 N 


Kedah . 


32 


6N 


Keego . 


5 


48 N 


Keerweer 


38 


14 S 


Keewatin 


2 


60 N 


Keewatin 


5 


49 N 


Keffi . 


20 


8N 


Kegalle 


30 


7N 


Kei or Evar Is. 


39 


5S 


Kei R. . 


13 


32 S 


Keiskama Hoek 


13 


32 S 


Kelantan 


32 


5N 


Kelany R. 


30 


7N 


Kelliher. 


4 


StN 


Kelowna 


6 


49 N 


Kemendine . 


31 


16 N 


Kemp Welch R. 


39 


9S 


Kenaimapu . 


9 


5 N 


Kenelm . 


13 


31 s 


Keng Tung . 


3> 


21 N 



Long. 
82 E 

25 E 

26 E 

74 E 
25 E 
97 E 
29 E 
79 E 

3E 
92 E 
77 E 

75 E 
^E 
[ E 
?E 
JE 
[ E 
?E 
?E 
tE 
[ E 



77 
81 

147 

34 

141 

77 
77 
74 
8i 

30 E 
34 E 
36 E 

31 E 

32 E 
30 E 

33 E 

33 E 
9E 

10 E 

32 E 

96 E 

74 E 

20 E 

72 E 

86 E 

9E 

7E 

81 E 

32 E 

6E 

80 E 

30 E 

34 E 
■3E 

178 E 
32 E 
10 E 

151 E 

31 E 
175 E 
100 E 
100 E 

8E 
29 E 

148 E 
20 E 

100 E 
91 W 

141 E 

95 W 
94 W 

7E 
80 E 

13s w 

28 E 

27 E 

102 E 
80 E 

103 W 
119 W 

96 E 
147 E 

58 W 

28 E 
loi E 



Place 
Kenhardt 
Kenia Mt. 
Kenmore 
JC!ennedy Is. 
Kenogami R. 
Kenora . 
Kensington 
Kentani . 
Kentville 
Kenura R. 
Keppel . 
Keppel B. 
Kerepuna 
Keroli . 
Kesariya 
Keti 

Keum-kang-san 
Keum-san 
Khairpur 
Khammamett 
Khanapur 
Khanapur 
Khandesh 
Khandwa 
Khanpur 
Khari R. 
Kharroh 
Khartum 
Khatu 
Khed . 
Kheri . 
Kherwala 
Kherwara 
Khipra . 
Khokarpar 
Khotsong 
Khulna . 
Khutria 
Kiakng . 
Kiang R. 
Kianghung 
Kiaochow 
Kiaochow B. 
Kibonze 
Kichelwe 
Kichownan 
Kichowpei 
Kicking Horse Pass 
Kienchang 
Kienchang 
Kienchang 
Kienchow 
Kieng-ju 
Kiengseng 
Kienning 
Kienyang 
Kifmangao 
Kihngan 
Ki-Jii . 
Kikate . 
Kikise . 
Kikwama 
Kilakarai 
Kilanjuni 
Kilemba 
Kililioni 
Kiliman 
Kiliwa . 
Kilkivan 
Killarney 
Killarney 
Killerton, C. 
Kiloa . 
Kilwa . 
Kilwa-Kisiwani 
Kilwa-Kivinji 
Kimberley 



pNo 


. Lat. 


12 


29 S 


21 


oS 


4 


49 N 


41 


8S 


5 


50 N 


5 


49 N 


3 


46 N 


13 


32 S 


3 


45 N 


17 


30 S 


10 


SiS 


38 


23 s 


39 


10 s 


28 


26 N 


24 


26 N 


17 


32 S 


36 


38 N 


36 


39 N 


28 


27 N 


26 


17 N 


2S 


17 N 


25 


ISN 


25 


21 N 


25 


21 N 


28 


28 N 


25 


25 N 


28 


27 N 


II 


10 N 


15 


27 S 


25 


19 N 


28 


27 N 


25 


24 N 


23 


23 N 


28 


26 N 


25 


26 N 


17 


30 S 


24 


22 N 


29 


23 N 


33 


24 N 


33 


32 N 


33 


22 N 


34 


36 N 


34 


36 N 


II 


oS 


21 


7S 


34 


37 N 


34 


40 N 


6 


51 N 


34 


41 N 


33 


27 N 


33 


41 N 


33 


34 N 


36 


36 N 


36 


41 N 


33 


27 N 


33 


27 N 


21 


7S 


33 


27 N 


36 


41 N 


21 


oS 


21 


oS 


21 


ss 


62 


9N 


27 


9N 


II 


oS 


21 


2S 


21 


4S 


21 


6S 


38 


26 S 


5 


49 N 


38 


23 S 


39 


8S 


11 


oS 


II 


oS 


21 


9S 


21 


8S 


IS 


23 S 



Long. 
21 E 
37 E 
loiW 
168 E 
8s W 
94 W 

63 W 

28 E 

64 E 

29 E 
60 W 

150 E 

147 E 
76 E 
85 E 
28 E 

128 E 
126 E 

69 E 

80 E 
74 E 

74 E 

75 E 

76 E 

70 E 
75 E 
70 E 

30 E 

23 E 
74 E 

81 E 
73 E 
73 E 

69 E 

70 E 
28 E 
89 E 
83 E 

n6E 
106 E 
loi E 

119 E 

120 E 
20 E 
39 E 

115 E 
117 E 

117 W 
119 E 

116 E 

121 E 
no E 

129 E 
129 E 

118 E 
118 E 

39 E 
115 E 
129 E 

41 E 

31 E 
37 E 
78 E 
73 E 
20 E 
35 E 
31 E 
31 E 

152 E 
99 W 
152 E 

148 E 

40 E 
40 E 
^9E 
39 E 

24 E 



ii6 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Kimberley Goldfield 37 


19 S 


Kimenye 


21 


4S 


Kimkumbi . 


21 


7S 


Kinchow 


• 34 


39 N 


Kincora 


13 


29 S 


Kindersley 


4 


51 N 


King Is. 


. 40 


40 S 


King's Cove 


7 


48 N 


Kingston 


8 


17 N 


King William 


s Town 13 


32 S 


Kingyang 


• 33 


36 N 


Kin-hwa 


• 33 


29 N 


Kinistino 


4 


52 N 


Kinosota 


5 


50 N 


Kinsha Ho. . 


• 33 


28 N 


Kintampo 


20 


8N 


Kionga 


21 


10 S 


Kipopotwe 


21 


iS 


Kirkee . 


• 25 


18 N 


Kirkella 


4 


SON 


Kirkuyu 


21 


iS 


Kirtachi 


20 


12 N 


Kirui Is. 


21 


II S 


Kiruve 


21 


oS 


Kisaki . 


21 


7S 


Kishanganj 


. 24 


26 N 


Kishorganj 


• 24 


24 N 


Kishungarh 


• 25 


27 N 


Kisi Is. 


21 


II S 


Kislawar 


28 


33 N 


Kismayu 


II 


oN 


Kistna 


. 26 


16 N 


Kistna R. 


26 


16 N 


Kisukonse 


21 


7S 


Kiswere 


21 


9S 


Kitombo 


22 


22 S 


Kitsum Kalu 


m 6 


S4N 


Kiukiang 


• 33 


29 N 


Kiung-chau-fi 


J 33 


20 N 


Kivo, L. 


21 


2S 


Klaarstroom 


12 


33 S 


Klang . 


• 32 


3N 


Klein Umzen 


nvubu 17 


30 S 


Klein Vry Sta 


lat . 16 


26 S 


Klerksdorp 


. 18 


26 S 


Klip R. 


. 14 


28 S 


Klipdam 


. 18 


23 s 


Klippen Pt. 


13 


34 S 


Klondike 


S 


49 N 


Klondyke 


2 


64 N 


Knapdaar 


• 13 


30 S 


Knee, L. 


5 


SSN 


Knutstoru Ml 


• 39 


9S 


Knysna 


12 


34 S 


Koba . 


. 19 


17 S 


Kobe . 


• 35 


34 N 


Kobong 


. 32 


iN 


Kobongaba E 


.. . 17 


32 S 


Kobrar . 


■ 39 


6S 


Kochow 


33 


22 N 


Kochs . 


■ 17 


31 s 


Kod 


. 26 


14 N 


Kodankulam 


27 


8N 


Kodarma 


• 29 


24 N 


Kodinar 


• 25 


20 N 


Koel R. Nort 


li . 29 


24 N 


Koal R. Soutl 


1 . 29 


22 N 


Koffipkuil 


13 


29 S 


Koflyfontein 


■ IS 


29 S 


Kohat 


. 28 


33 N 


Kohima 


. 24 


25 N 


Koilkonda 


. 26 


17 N 


Koilkuntla 


. 26 


15 N 


Koisan . 


. . 36 


36 N 


Koje . 


• 36 


3SN 


Kokelay R. 


. 30 


9N 



40 E 

38 E 
73 E 

lOiW 
37 E 
2 E 
29 E 
29 E 
37 E 
88 E 
90 E 
7SE 
29 E 

76 E 
43 E 

77 E 
79 E 
35 E 

39 E 
43 E 

128 W 

115 E 

no E 

29 E 

22 E 
loi E 

29 E 

30 E 
26 E 
29. E 
29 E 
24 E 
92 W 

139 W 

26 E 
95 W 

147 E 

23 E 

27 E 
135 E 
III E 

28 E 
134 E 
III E 

27 E 
75 E 
77 E 
85 E 

70 E 

83 E 

84 E 

24 E 

25 E 

71 E 
94 E 

77 E 

78 E 
128 E 
128 E 

81 E 



Place. 
Kokohu . 
Koko Nor L. 
Koksfontein 
Kokstad 
Kolar 
Kolberg 
Kolhapur 
Kollappatti 
KoUasim 
Kollur . 
Kolu R. . 
Kolukombi 
Kolweni 
Komarno 
Komati Poort 
Komati R. 
Kombole 
Komgha 
Kompa . 
Kona 
Koncha . 
Kondoa . 
Kongarayarkurich: 
Kong-ju 
Kongwa 
Konkobiri 
Kontagora 
Koonatucall 
Kootenay, L. 
Kopah . 
Kopargaom 
Koppal . 
Koppig Enkel 
Kordofan 
Koree R. 
Korjal . 
Kornet . 
Korogo . 
Kororiky B. 
Kororurika 
Korosko 
Kosai R. 
Kosaka . 
Kosal R. 
Kosciusco 
Koshe . 
Kosi 
Kosi, L. 
Kosi R. . 
Koster . 
Kota Bharu 
Kotah . 
Kota-Kota 
Kotana . 
Kotar . 
Kotarare 
Kotchandpur 
Kote 
Kotgurh 
Kot Kapura 
Kotonga 
Kotonkarifi 
Kolonii . 
Kotra 
Kotri 

Kottaipatti 
Kottali . 
Kottayam 
Kotturu . 
Koudie Kraal 
Kouroulene 
Kou-Tou 
Koviluttu 
Kowara . 
Kowlong 
Kowrah 



Mt. 



Map No. 
40 
33 
13 
17 
26 

13 

25 

27 

21 

25 

30 
19 
16 

5 
18 
16 
21 

13 
20 
20 
20 
21 
27 
36 
21 
20 
20 
27 
6 
32 

2S 
25 

18 

II 

25 
25 

t3 
20 
22 
40 



29 
37 
18 
21 
16 
16 
18 

32 
28 
21 
17 
27 
21 

24 
25 
28 
28 
21 
20 
20 

25 
28 
27 
27 
26 

2S 
13 
18 

34 
27 
20 
31 

25 



Lat. 

35 s 
37 N 
30 S 
30 S 
13 N 

29 S 

16 N 
9N 
6S 

13 N 
6N 

22 S" 
27 S 
50 N 
25 S 

25 S 
8S 

32 S 

12 N 
8 N 
7N 
4S 
8N 

36 N 
6S 

11 N 
10 N 

8 N 

49 N 

9N 

19 N 
iSN 
27 S 
10 N 

23 N 
18 N 

30 S 
10 N 

17 S 
35 S 

20 N 
oS 
oN 

22 N 

35 S 

23 S 
iS 

27 s 

26 s 

25 s 

6N 

25 N 

13 s 
32 s 

8N 
17 S 

23 N 

26 N 

31 N 
30 N 

12 S 
8N 
6N 

24 N 

25 N 
9N 
8N 
9N 

14 N 
30 S 
23 S 

36 N 
8N 

14 N 
23 N 
23 N 



Long. 

173 E 
100 E 

25 E 

29 E 
78 E 
24 E 
74 E 
77 E 

39 E 
74 E 
80 E 

26 E 

31 E 

97 W 

32 E 

31 E 

30 E 

27 E 
3E 

13 E 
12 E 

35 E 
77 E 

127 E 

36 E 
2 E 
SE 

77 E 
117 W 

98 E 

74 E 

76 E 
23 E 
20 E 
68 E 

75 E 

27 E 
oW 

43 E 

174 E 
30 E 
10 E 

32 E 
87 E 

149 E 
35 E 

40 E 
32 E 

32 E 
26 E 

102 E 

76 E 
34 E 

28 E 

77 W 

33 E 
89 E 
68 E 

77 E 

75 E 
30 E 

6E 

2E 

73 E 
67 E 
77 E 
77 E 

76 E 

76 E 
26 E 
30 E 

117 E 

77 E 
4E 

98 E 
70 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Koyang . 


36 


37 N 


Kpate . 


20 


7N 


Kpiana . 


21 


9g 


Kraalfontein . 


• 13 


30 S 


Kraankui 


• 13 


29 S 


Krach . 


20 


7N 


Krantzkop 


14 


28 s 


Kreuzburg . 


18 


23 s 


Kribi . 


20 


3N 


Krishnagar . 


24 


23 N 


Krishnagarh . 


28 


27 N 


Krishnagiri . 


26 


12 N 


Kroonstad 


IS 


27 S 


Krugersdorp . 


18 


26 S 


Kruis Fontein 


13 


34 S 


Kuala Kangsu 


■ 32 


4N 


Kuala Kubu 


32 


3N 


Kuala Lumpur 


• 32 


3N 


Kuala Lypis . 


32 


4N 


Kuande 


20 


10 N 


Kuandi Kuandi 


20 


12 N 


Kubli . 


20 


10 N 


Kucheng 


33 


27 N 


Kuching 


32 


iN 


Kudal . 


25 


16 N 


Kudankulam . 


• 27 


8N 


Kudar . 


32 


7N 


Kudchi . 


25 


16 N 


Kudur . 


26 


13 N 


Kuebung 


17 


30 S 


Kufra . 


II 


20 N 


Kujam . 


12 


29 S 


Kuka . 


II 


10 N 


Kukawa 


20 


12 N 


Kulasegaranallur . 


27 


8N 


Kulattur 


27 


9N 


Kum R. 


36 


36 N 


Kumaka 


9 . 


SN 


Kumamoto . 


35 


32 N 


Kumbukum R. 


30 


6N 


Kumera 


24 


22 N 


Kumgoui 


21 


6S 


Kumusi R. 


39 


8S 


Kunashiri 


35 


44N 


Kundgol 


25 


iSN 


Kundla . 


25 


21 N 


Kimgchang . 


33 


34 N 


Kungnung . 


24 


23 N 


Kunlong 


• 33 


23 N 


Kunnankulam 


26 


10 N 


Kunnur 


27 


gN 


Kunsan 


36 


36 N 


Kuntaga 


20 


12 N 


Kuntum 


20 


9N 


Kunuku Mts. 


9 


3N 


Kunwana 


18 


26 S 


Kuobun 


20 


7N 


Kupela . 


20 


12 N 


Kupeni 


20 


9 N 


Kurana 


30 


7N 


Kurnool 


26 


15 N 


Kuru . 


21 


iS 


Kurukkalpatti 


27 


9N 


Kuruman 


15 


27 s 


Kurunegala . 


30 


7N 


Kuruvikulam 


27 


9N 


Kushiro 


35 


43 N 


Kushtagi 


25 


ISN 


Kushtia 


. 24 


23 N 


Kusi . 


• 33 


31 N 


Kutambangra 


■ 41 


8S 


Kutawa . 


4 


SiN 


Kutei R. 


32 


iN 


Kuthing R. . 


13 


30 S 


Kutsing 


33 


26 N 


Kuttalum 


27 


8N 



Long. 
127 E 

6E 
34 E 
25 E 
24 E 

oE 
30 E 
29 E 
10 E 

88 E 

75 E 
78 E 
27 E 

27 E 

24 E 
100 E 
loi E 
loi E 
102 E 

2 E 

2E 

4E 
120 E 
no E 
73 E 

77 E 

116 E 
74- E 

76 E 

28 E 
10 E 
19 E 
10 E 
13 E 

78 W 
78 E 

126 E 

57 W 
130 E 

81 E 
91 E 

39 E 
148 E 
145 E 

75 E 
71 E 

losE 
93 E 
99 E 

76 E 

77 E 
126 E 

13 E 
o,E 

58 W 

25 E 
2 W 
o W 
3W 

80 E 
77 E 

40 E 
77 E 
23 E 
80 E 
77 E 

144 E 

76 E 

89 E 
no E 
157 E 
104 W 

117 E 
2i E 

104 E 

77 E 



INDEX 



117 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Kuze . 


17 


32 s 


27 E 


Langenburg . 


21 


9S 


Kwa R. 


II 


oS 


10 E 


Langevin 


4 


SON 


Kwa Hindi . 


21 


iS 


34 E 


Langson 


33 


22 N 


Kwa Kirunda 


21 


6S 


3SE 


Lanigan 


4 


SI N 


Kwa Murgusia 


21 


ss 


36 E 


Lao K.iy . 


33 


22 N 


Kwaaiman . 


17 


31 S 


28 E 


La Paz . 


10 


16 S 


Kwakwa R. . 


21 


18 S 


37 E 


Lapoa . 


39 


10 s 


Kwalla . 


18 


22 s 


31 E 


La Poele 


7 


47 N 


Kwamagwaza 


16 


28 s 


31 E 


Larkhana 


. 28 


27 N 


Kwancheng . 


34 


40 N 


118 E 


Las Animas . 


10 


28 S 


Kwando 


20 


7N 


oE 


Lashburn 


4 


S3N 


Kwando R. . 


II 


10 s 


20 E 


Lashio . 


31 


22 N 


Kwangming . 


33 


42 N 


120 E 


Lathi . 


• 25 


21 N 


Kwangning . 


34 


41 N 


121 E 


Laton . 


• 32 


3N 


Kwango R. . 


II 


oS 


10 E 


Lau 


20 


9N 


Kwangsi 


33 


25 N 


iioE 


Lauderdale . 


21 


16 S 


Kwangsinfu . 


33 


28 N 


118 E 


Laura . 


• 38 


iSS 


Kwanju . 


36 


3SN 


126 E 


Launoeston . 


. 40 


41 s 


Kwanping 


33 


36 N 


114 E 


LaOling . 


• 33 


37 N 


Kwato . 


39 


10 S 


iSoE 


Lava, Mt. . 


22 


17 S 


Kwebulanas . 


17 


32 s 


27 E 


Laverton 


37 


28 S 


Kweihwating 


33 


41 N 


tI2 E 


Lavora . 


■ 39 


10 S 


Kweilin 


33 


2SN 


iioE 


Lawas . 


32 


SN 


Kweite . 


33 


24 N 


107 E 


Lawding 


9 


SN 


Kweiyang 


33 


27 N 


106 E 


Lawlers . 


• 37 


28 S 


Kwisungu Is. 


21 


17 S 


38 E 


Leaba . 


20 


•9N 


Kyaiklat 


31 


16 N 


9SE 


Lebenya 


• 17 


30 s 


Kyaikto 


31 


17 N 


97 E 


Le Bihan Falls 


• 13 


29 s 


Kyane Rock . 


16 


26S 


31 E 


Lebombo 


19 


22 S 


Kyankin 


31 


19 N 


94 E 


Lebu 


lO 


37 S 


Kyauk Pyu . 


31 


igN 


93 E 


Leduc . 


4 


53 N 


Kyebi . 


20 


6N 


oW 


Leeuw Nek . 


16 


27 S 


Kynuna 


38 


21 S 


142 E 


Leguan Is. 


9 


7N 


Kyo-ha . 


36 


37 N 


126 E 


Leichhardt R. 


■ 38 


19 S 


Kyonpyaw . 


31 


17 N 


94 E 


Lemana 


. 18 


23 s 


Kyoto . 


3S 


3SN 


13s E 


Lenore . 


5 


50 N 


Kyotong 


36 


37 N 


126 E 


Leo 

Leopold II., L. 

Leopoldville . 


20 
II 
II 


II N 
oS 
oS 


Labisia . 


21 


13 s 


30 E 


Leper's Is. 


41 


isS 


Labrador 


2 


SSN 


65 W 


Lepreaux 


3 


45 N 


Labuan . 


32 


5N 


USE 


Leribe . 


• IS 


28 S 


Labuk . 


32 


6N 


117 E 


Leslie . 


. i3 


26 s 


Lac du Bonnet 


5 


50 N 


96 W 


Lesseyton 


• 13 


31 s 


Lacombe 


4 


52 N 


113 W 


Letaba R. 


. 18 


23 s 


Lac Seul 


S 


SON 


92 W 


Lethbridge 


4 


49 N 


Lado 


II 


oN 


30 E 


Letpadan 


• 31 


18 N 


Ladybrand . 


15 


29 S 


28 E 


Levern . 


4 


SoN 


Lady Frere 


13 


31 s 


27 E 


Lewisport 


7 


49 N 


Lady Grey 


13 


30 S 


27 E 


Leydsdorp 


18 


24 S 


T.adysmith 


14 


28 s 


29 E 


Lialui . 


II 


10 s 


Lagos . 


20 


6N 


3E 


Liangchow 


• 33 


38 N 


Lagenburg . 


4 


SiN 


loi W 


Liangsiang 


• 34 


39 N 


La Haue 


3 


44 N 


64 W 


Liao Ho 


■ 33 


41 N 


Lahore . 


28 


31 N 


74 E 


Liaotung Gulf 


• 33 


40 N 


Laichow 


33 


37 N 


120 E 


Liaoyang 


■ 34 


41 N 


Laijang . 


34 


37 N 


120 E 


Liard R. 


6 


59 N 


Laings Nek . 


16 


27 S 


29 E 


Liberia . 


II 


oN 


Laiwu . 


34 


36 N 


117 E 


Libode . 


• 17 


31 s 


Lakhimpur . 


24 


27 N 


94 E 


Libo R. . 


II 


10 s 


Lakhpat 


2S 


24 N 


69 E 


Lichtenburg . 


. 18 


26 s 


Laksham 


24 


23 N 


91 E 


Liengkong 


• 33 


2SN 


Lalganj 


24 


2SN 


8s E 


Lifu 


• 41 


21 S 


Lallatpur 


28 


24 N 


78 E 


Ligua . 


10 


35 S 


Lamba . 


25 


26 N 


74 E 


Likiang . 


■ 33 


27 N 


Larabayeque . 


10 


6S 


80 W 


Likomo I. 


21 


12 S 


Lamberts Bay 


12 


32 S 


18 E 


Lima 


10 


12 S 


Lamu . 


11 


oS 


40 E 


Limbang R. . 


■ 32 


5N 


Lanatenje 


19 


17 S 


34 E 


Limbua . 


20 


12 N 


Lancava 


32 


6N 


99 E 


Limchow 


• 33 


22 N 


Lanchow 


33 


39 N 


lOiE 


Limkhera 


• 25 


23 N 


Lanchow 


74 


36 N 


104 E 


Liraon . 


8 


10 N 


Landman's Drift 


16 


28 S 


30 E 


Limpopo R. . 


. 18 


23 s 


Lanfiera. 


20 


T2N 


3W 


Linan 


33 


23 N 


Lange . 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Linchow 


• 33 


24 N 


Langebaan . 


12 


33 S 


18 E 


Linder . 


It 


20 N 



Long. 

34 E 
III W 
106 E 
los W 
105 E 

67 W 
150 E 

58 W 
67 E 
71 W 

109 W 
97 E 

71 E 
100 E 

11 E 

35 E 
144 E 
147 E 
117 E 

46 E 
123 E 
150 E 
iiSE 

59 W 

120 E 
4E 

28 E 

28 E 
32 E 
74 W 

113 W 

31 E 

58 W 

140 E 

29 E 
loi W 

2W 

10 E 

10 E 

168 E 

66 W 

28 E 

29 E 
26 E 

30 E 
112W 

95 E 

108 W 
55 W 
30 E 
20 E 

102 E 
116 E 
122 E 

121 E 

122 E 
128 W 

oW 
29 E 
20 E 
26 E 
119 E 
167 E 

72 W 
100 E 

34 E 

77 W 

115 E 

12 E 

109 E 
74 E 
83 W 

32 E 
103 E 
112 E 

oE 



Place, 
Lindi 
Linebank 
Ling Cha 
Lingsugur 
Linja 
Linko . 
Linstead 
Lintsingchow 
Lion's Head 
Liping . 
Litang . 
Little Andaman 
Little Hr. Deep 
Little Ingwang- 

wane R. 
Little Island 
Little Tugela R. 
Liu-Kou 
Liverpool, N.S. 
Livingstone, Canada 
Livingstone, Rho 

desia . 
Livingstone Falls 
Livingstonia . 
Liwondi. 
Lloyd Bay 
Lloydminster . 
Loango . 
Loanhsien 
Lobethal 
Lobstick 
Lockeport 
Loeries Fontein 
Logh . 
Lohardaga . 
Loikaw . 
Loko 
Lokoja . 
Loktak, L. 
Lolodorf 
Lo Magondis 
Lomami R. 
Lomond Mt, 
Lonauli . 
Londa . 
Londonderry, 
Longhope 
Long I. . 
Long Is. 
Long Is. 

foundland) 
Long Pt. 
Longkwe R. 
Long Reach 
Loon, Algoma 
Lopez G. 
Lord Howe's Island 
Lord Howe's Isles . 
Los_Cacos 
Los I. , 
Lotinghsien 
Louisburg 
Louisfontein 
Louis Trichardt 
Louisuide Archi 

pelago 
Louren90 Marques 
Lovedale 
Lower Tugela 
Lower Umkomaas 
Lower Umzimkulu 
Lowther 
Loyalty Islands 
Luan . . , 
Luang Prahomg 
Luanza . 



Map No. 



N.S 



(NeW' 



13 

34 

25 

32 

S 

8 

34 
12 

33 

33 

31 

7 

14 
8 

14 

34 

3 

4 

19 



38 

4 

II 

34 
18 
6 

3 
12 
II 
29 

31 
20 

20 

24 
20 

19 
II 
40 

25 

25 

3 
13 
8 

39 

3 

5 

19 
38 

5 
II 

41 
41 
10 
II 
34 
3 
12 
18 

41 

18 

13 
14 
14 
14 
40 

41 
33 
33 
19 



Lat. 

10 S 

32 S 

35 N 

16 N 
I N 

49 N 
18 N 
37 N 

33 S 
26 N 
30 N 

11 N 

50 N 

30 S 

22 N 

29 S 

36 N 
44N 

52 N 

18 S 
oS 

10 s 

15 s 

12 S 

S3N 
oS 

37 N 
24 S 

53 N 
44N 

31 s 

oN 

23 N 

19 N 
8N 
7N 

24 N 
3N 

17 S 
oS 

42 S 

18 N 
15 N 

45 N 

32 S 
23 N 

ss 

44N 
52 N 
18 S 
23 S 
48 N 

oS 
32 S 

5S 

30 S 
oN 

39 N 

46 N 

31 s 
23 s 

12 S 

2SS 

32 s 

29 s 

30 s 
30 s 
4SS 
22 s 
36 N 
19 N 
16 S 



Long. 

39 E 
2SE 

118 E 

76 E 
III E 

90 W 

77 W 
116 E 

18 E 
109 E 
100 E 

92 E 
56 W 

29 E 
73 W 
29 E 

116 E 
64 W 

102 w 

26 E 
10 E 

34 E 

35 E 

143 E 
iioE 

10 E 

118 E 
29 E 

iiSW 
64 W 

19 E 

40 E 
84 E 

98 E 
8E 
6E 

93 E 
10 E 
29 E 

20 E 
147 E 

73 E 

74 E 
63 W 

25 E 
74 W 

147 E 

66 W 

99 W 

27 E 

144 E 
88 W 

oE 

159 E 

160 E 
66 W 
10 W 

119 E 
60 W 
18 E 

29 E 

1S2E 
32 E 

26 E 
31 E 

30 E 
30 E 

168 E 
168 E 
113 E 
102 E 
36 E 



ii8 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Lubengeyo . 


21 


iS 


29 E 


Madha . 


25 


18 N 


75 E 


Maken^o 


21 


14 S 


Lucea . 


8 


i8N 


78 W 


Madhipuia . 


24 


25 N 


86 E 


Maketu . 


40 


37 S 


Lucinda Pt. . 


• 38 


18 S 


146 E 


Madhubani . 


24 


26 N 


86 E 


Makinak 


s 


SON 


Lucknow 


. 28 


27 N 


81 E 


Madliupur 


24 


24 N 


86 E 


Makini . 


39 


3S 


Luckow . 


■ 33 


29 N 


106 E 


Madodo 


21 


II S 


39 E 


Maklutsi 


19 


22 S 


Ludhiana 


. 28 


31 N 


76 E 


Madpura 


25 


26 N 


71 E 


Makombes 


19 


17 S 


Ludlow . 


• 13 


31 s 


24 E 


Madras . 


26 


13 N 


80 E 


Makondo 


21 


9S 


Ludlow {New E 


runs. ) 3 


46 N 


66 W 


Madura 


27 


gN 


78 E 


Makonga 


21 


15 s 


Luebo . 


11 


oS 


20 E 


Mafeking, Canada 


4 


52 N 


loiW 


Makosini 


16 


27 S 


Lugengeni 


21 


8S 


37 E 


Mafeteng 


IS 


29 S 


29 E 


Makowe 


. i6 


27 S 


Luia R. . 


19 


16 S 


31 E 


Mafia Is. 


21 


7S 


39 E 


Makua . 


21 


16S 


Luichow 


• 33 


21 N 


iioE 


Mafube 


17 


30 s 


28 E 


Makuse R. . 


21 


17 S 


Lujenda R. . 


II 


10 S 


30 E 


Magala . 


21 


3S 


29 E 


Makwababa 


17 


31 s 


Lukuledi 


21 


10 S 


38 E 


Magalaqueen R. 


18 


23 s 


28 E 


Malabwi 


21 


14 s 


Lull 


21 


13 s 


40 E 


Maganges 


18 


24 s 


31 E 


Malacca 


32 


2N 


Lulu R. . 


II 


oS 


20 E 


Magani 


19 


18 s 


32 E 


Malacca Str. . 


32 


4N 


Lumbo . 


21 


12 S 


40 E 


Magavara 


39 


10 s 


150 E 


Malahisi 


18 


24 s 


Lumding 


• 24 


25 N 


93 E 


Magdala 


II 


10 N 


30 E 


Malai . 


32 


SN 


Lumesule 


21 


10 S 


37 E 


Magdalen Is. . 


3 


47 N 


61 W 


Malaimbandi 


22 


21 S 


Lumsden 


4 


i;oN 


105 W 


Magellan Strs. 


10 


52 S 


69 W 


Malaka . 


21 


13 s 


Lumut . 


32 


■4N 


100 E 


Magersfontein 


IS 


28 S 


25 E 


Malali . 


9 


SN 


Lunda . 


II 


10 S 


20 E 


Maghiana 


28 


31 N 


72 E 


Malandas 


19 


19 s 


Lundi . 


19 


20 s 


30 E 


Magila . 


21 


5S 


38 E 


Malattar, R. . 


27 


gN 


Lundi R. 


19 


21 S 


32 E 


Magomere Mis. Stn 


21 


iSS 


35 1-- 


Malayta Is. . 


41 


gS 


Lundu . 


■ 32 


I N 


iioE 


Magori . 


25 


23 N 


73 E 


Malcolm 


37 


29 s 


Luneburg 


. 16 


27 s 


30 E 


Magula Is. 


•39 


10 S 


150 E 


Malegaom 


• 25 


20 N 


Lunenburg . 


3 


44N 


64 W 


Magumeld . 


18 


24 s 


33 E 


Malepa 


. 18 


24 s 


Lungchow 


33 


'23 N 


109 E 


Magumeri 


20 


12 N 


12 E 


Malindi 


21 


14 s 


Lung Huatien 


• 33 


38 N 


ii6E 


Mahaica 


9 


6N 


58 W 


Malindi 


21 


2S 


Lungngan 


■ 33 


32 N 


104 E 


Mahaica R. . 


9 


6N 


57 W 


Malitzi . 


19 


23 s 


Luni 


. 28 


26 N 


73 E 


Mahaka . 


40 


39 S 


177 E 


Malkapur 


• 25 


20 N 


Luni R. . 


. 28 


2SN 


72 E 


Mahamba 


16 


26 S 


31 E 


Mallankannar 


27 


gN 


Lunsefwa R. . 


19 


15 s 


29 E 


Mahambehala 


17 


30 S 


29 E 


MallicoUo 


41 


16 S 


Lurio Bay 


21 


13 s 


40 E 


Mahanoro 


22 


20 S 


49 E 


Malmesbury 


12 


33 S 


Lusefa . 


21 


13 s 


35 E 


Maharpi 


19 


23 s 


27 E 


Malopa 


■ 19 


16 S 


Lusik siki 


17 


31 s 


29 E 


Mahavilli R. . 


• 30 


7N 


81 E 


Malpeque 


3 


46 N 


Luxeni 


17 


32 s 


27 E 


Mahebourg . 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Malsobane . 


18 


24 S 


Luzizi . 


13 


32 s 


28 E 


Mahela . 


22 


21 s 


48 E 


Maluba Lube 


17 


30 s 


Lwan-ho 


34 


41 N 


117 E 


Maheshwar . 


25 


22 N 


75 E 


Malundo 


21 


16 s 


Lwapchow . 


• 34 


39 N 


119 E 


Mahin . 


20 


6N 


4E 


Malvan . 


• 25 


16 N 


Lydenburg 


. 18 


25 S 


30 E 


Mahlubini 


17 


32 s 


27 E 


Mamba, R. . 


• 39 


8S 


Lyttelton 


. 40 


43 S 


173 E 


Mahlungulu 


17 


.31 s 


28 E 


Mamboia 


21 


6S 


Lytton . 


6 


SoN 


123 W 


Mahom . 


II 


oN 


20 E 


Mambwe 


21 


gS 










Mabone B. 


3 


44 N 


64 W 


Mameni 


. 18 


26 S 


Mabola . 


13 


29 S 


27 E 


Mahonti . 


18 


22 S 


32 E 


Mampas 


. 18 


23 S 


McAdam June. 


3 


45 N 


67 W 


Mahonzes 


19 


22 S 


31 E 


Mampuri 


28 


27 N 


Mac Gregor . 


S 


49 N 


98 W 


Mahoo R. 


9 


3N 


59 W 


Mamusa 


. 18 


27 S 


Machabel Grov 


- 19 


19 S 


29 E 


Mahrani 


32 


2N 


103 E 


Manaar Is. & T. 


30 


gN 


Machadodorp 


18 


2SS 


30 E 


Mahrani 


28 


24 N 


78 E 


Manakora 


22 


16 S 


Machacha 


'3 


29 S 


28 E 


Mahurangi 


40 


36 S 


174 E 


Manambatoo 


22 


24 s 


Machako 


II 


oS 


30 E 


Maibana 


19 


22 S 


27 E 


Manarabovo . 


22 


25 s 


Macheke 


19 


18 S 


32 E 


Maibi . 


39 


10 S 


149 E 


Mananjary . 


22 


22 S 


Machenisa . 


18 


22 s 


35 E 


Maidstone 


4 


53 N 


logW 


Manaos 


10 


3S 


Machi . 


20 


12 N 


8E 


Maidugari 


20 


II N 


13 E 


Manapadu 


• 27 


8N 


Machinna 


20 


13 N 


10 E 


Maidzuru 


35 


35 N 


135 E 


Manarkadu 


• 27 


8N 


Mackay . 


• 38 


21 S 


149 E 


Maifoni . 


20 


II N 


13 E 


Manbazar 


29 


23 N 


Mackenzie, Alg 


Dma 5 


48 N 


88 W 


Maikonkeli . 


20 


gN 


6E 


Mandala 


21 


15 s 


Mackenzie Rive 


r . 2 


6s N 


iioW 


Main 


19 


22 S 


30 E 


Mandalay 


• 31 


22 N 


McKinlay 


• 38 


21 S 


141 E 


Main 


13 


3tS 


28 E 


Mandera 


21 


6S 


Mac Laren Harl 


30ur 39 


gS 


149 E 


Main Drift 


18 


22 S 


29 E 


Mandeville . 


8 


18 N 


Maclean 


13 


32 S 


27 E 


Maintirano 


22 


18 s 


43 E 


Mandigo 


19 


igS 


Maclear 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Maipu . 


10 


37 S 


57 W 


Mandilen 


17 


30 S 


Maclear, C. . 


21 


14 S 


35 E 


Maitland 


12 


33 S 


18 E 


Mandingoes . 


II 


oN 


Macleod 


6 


49 N 


114 W 


Maitland, N.S. 


3 


45 N 


63 W 


Mandozaka . 


22 


22 S 


MacMillan 


S 


49 N 


94 w 


Majambo R. . 


22 


iss 


46 E 


Mandurda 


• 25 


21 N 


Macquaries Hr. 


. 40 


42 S 


145 E 


Majaruka 


21 


8S ■ 


36 E 


Mandvi . 


■ 25 


21 N 


Macubene 


■ 13 


31 s 


27 E 


Majili R. 


19 


17 S 


35 E 


Mandvi . 


■ 25 


23 N 


Madagascar . 


II 


20 S 


45 E 


Majuda . 


18 


25 s 


32 E 


Maneao . 


• 39 


gS 


Madagiri, R. 


• 27 


8N 


78 E 


Makaia . 


ig 


ig S 


34 E 


Maneering . 


• 15 


27 S 


Madaripur 


■ 24 


23 N 


90 E 


Maknloi . 


21 


12 S 


40 E 


Manfora 


22 


23 s 


Madathupatti 


• 27 


8N 


77 E 


Makandi 


19 


13 s 


36 E 


Mangaldai 


• 24 


26 N 


Madaya 


• 31 


22 N 


96 E 


Makanga 


19 


15 s 


33 E 


Mangolore . 


. 26 


12 N 


Maddur . 


26 


12 N 


77 E 


Makanuanyi . 


21 


oN 


33 E 


Mangele 


17 


31 s 


Madebing 


fS 


26 N 


23 E 


Makanyera . 


19 


15 s 


36 E 


Mangoche Pt. 


21 


14 S 


Madeira Is, . 


II 


30 N 


10 W 


Makapaanaspoort 


18 


24 s 


2g E 


Mangoky R. 


22 


22 s 


Madela 


. 16 


26 S 


31 E 


Makarrela 


18 


23 s 


32 E 


Mangora R. . 


22 


19 s 


Madenya 


21 


7S 


34 E 


Makel . 


19 


21 S 


35 E 


Mangrol 


■ ?5 


21 N 



Long. 

31 E 
176 E 

99 W 
137 E 

28 E 

33 E 

34 E 
.33 E 

31 E 

32 E 
38 E 
37 E 

27 E 

34 E 
102 E 
100 K 

35 E 
n8 E 

45 E 

36 E 

58 W 

33 E 
78 E 

161 E 

121 E 

74 E 
30 E 

35 E 
40 E 
29 E 

76 E 
78 E 

167 E 
18 E 

36 E 
63 W 
32 E 

28 E 
.•>4 E 
'73 E 

148 E 

37 E 

32 E 

33 E 

27 E 
78 E 
25 E 
80 E 
47 E 

47 E 

46 E 

48 E 
60 W 
78 E 

77 E 
86 E 
35 E 
96 E 

38 E 
77 W 
.^3E 

28 E 
oW 

47 E 
70 E 
73 E 

69 E 

149 E 
24 E 
45 E 
92 E 

75 E 
28 E 
35 E 
44E 

48 E 

70 E 



INDEX 



119 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Mangwendi . 


21 


18 S 


Mangwi 


19 


20 S 


Manica . 


18 


24 S 


Manifold, C. . 


• 38 


22 s 


Manikarchar . 


24 


25 N 


Manikcheri , 


24 


22 N 


Manikgan 


24 


23 N 


Maning . 


13 


31 s 


Manipori L. 


40 


45 S 


Manipur 


24 


25 N 


Manito L. 


4 


53 N 


Manitoba L. . 


5 


SiN 


Manitou 


s 


49 N 


Maniyachi 


27 


8N 


Manjakaze 


. 18 


24 S 


Manje . 


19 


15 s 


Mankulatn . 


27 


10 N 


Manmad 


25 


20 N 


Manmelgudi . 


26 


loN 


Manarkota . 


27 


9N 


Manning Pt. 


17 


30 S 


Mano . 


19 


14 s 


Manomby R. 


22 


16 s 


Mansinam 


39 


iS 


Manso . 


20 


5N 


Mantanga 


17 


31 s 


Mantotte 


■ 30 


9N 


Manubie 


17 


32 s 


Manunda's 


17 


30 s 


Manville 


4 


S3N 


Manyami 


• 19 


20 s 


Manyema 


II 


oS 


Manzana 


17 


31 s 


Manzana R. . 


. 18 


24 s 


Manzanilla . 


8 


20 N 


Manzimdaga 


• 17 


31 s 


Manzimdaka 


17 


31 s 


Mapanda 


19 


19 s 


Mapela . 


18 


24 s 


Maple Creek . 


4 


50 N 


Mapochan 


. 18 


26 s 


Mapumulo . 


14 


29 s 


Maputa R. . 


. 18 


26 s 


Marabastad . 


. 18 


24 s 


Maracabe 


8 


10 N 


Maradi . 


20 


13 N 


Maradu 


20 


12 N 


Maragoli 


21 


oN 


Maraio . 


10 


oS 


Marais . 


18 


24 S 


Maraisburg . 


13 


31 s 


Maraisburg . 


18 


26 s 


Marakas 


21 


I N 


Marakuta 


21 


9S 


Maramba 


19 


16 s 


Marambitsy B. 


22 


iss 


Marandava . 


22 


21 s 


Marandellas . 


19 


18 s 


Maranghadda 


29 


23 N 


Marau . 


41 


10 s 


Marchand 


S 


49 N 


Mar del Plata 


10 


38 S 


Mare 


41 


21 S 


Mareeba 


38 


16 S 


Margaree Hr. 


3 


46 N 


Margas . 


2S 


ISN 


Margherila . 


24 


27 N 


Maria Hilf . 


21 


3S 


Maria Is. 


40 


42 S 


Mariamne Stn. 


39 


8S 


Mariawa R. . 


9 


3N 


Marie Galante 


8 


i5N 


Mariguana 


8 


22 N 


Markapur 


26 


iSN 


Marlow . 


13 


32 s 


Marola . 


18 


25 s 


Marovoaya . 


22 


16 s 



Long. 

32 E 

27 E 
34 E 

150 E 
90 E 
ciE 
90 E 

28 E 

167 E 
93 E 

109 W 
99 W 
98 w 

77 E 

33 E 

33 E 

78 E 
74 E 

79 E 
77 E 

28 E 
32 E 
45 E 

134 E 
I W 

29 E 

80 E 

28 E 

29 E 
III W 

27 E 
20 E 
27 E 
32 E 
77 W 

27 E 

28 E 

34 E 

28 E 
109 W 

32 E 

31 E 

32 E 

29 E 

71 W 
7E 
6E 

34 E 
49 W 

29 E 
25 E 
27 E 

35 E 

31 E 

32 E 

45 E 
44 E 

31 E 
86 E 

160 E 
96 W 
58 W 

168 E 
145 E 

61 W 
74 E 
95 E 

32 E 
148 E 
139 E 

60 W 
60 W 

72 W 
79 E 
25 E 

30 E 

46 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Marranquene 


18 


25 S 


Marromeo 


19 


18 S 


Marshall 


4 


S3N 


Martin . 


5 


49 N 


Martinique . 


8 


14 N 


Maruranui 


21 


3S 


Marwar Jn. . 


25 


25 N 


Mary R. 


38 


26 S 


Maryborough 


38 


25 s 


Masa . 


21 


iS 


Masablano . 


19 


24 s 


Masakaa's 


17 


30 s 


Masanipo 


36 


35 N 


Masardu 


II 


oN 


Masasi . 


21 


10 S 


Masea . 


21 


i5S 


Maseru . 


15 


29 S 


Mashed . 


19 


18 s 


Mashonaland 


11 


20 S 


Masibi . 


19 


22 s 


Masindi . 


21 


I N 


Masinga 


18 


23 S 


Masitisi . 


13 


-SO S 


Masouara R. . 


9 


SN 


Massansani B. 


21 


19 S 


Massaruni 


9 


6N 


Massenga 


II 


10 N 


Masset . 


6 


54 N 


Massikessi 


21 


18 S 


Massina 


II 


10 N 


Massourak 


II 


10 N 


Masuda . 


• 35 


34 N 


Masulipatam . 


. 26 


16 N 


Mataala, Mt. . 


22 


•13S 


Matakong 


18 


23 s 


Matala . 


18 


23 s 


Matale . 


30 


7N 


Matanana 


41 


10 s 


Matara . 


• 30 


6N 


Matate . 


18 


24 S 


Matate . 


21 


12 s 


Matatiela 


17 


30 s 


Matatle's Vley. 


19 


21 S 


Matebi . 


18 


22 S 


Matelane 


18 


25 s 


Matella . 


. 18 


25 s 


Mathatha 


13 


29 s 


Mathe . 


21 


2S 


Matheran 


25 


19 N 


Matheureux . 


22 


20 S 


Matia . 


19 


16 s 


Matibi . 


19 


21 S 


Matibis 


19 


21 S 


Matiti . 


19 


21 S 


Matope . 


21 


15 s 


Matopis . 


19 


17 s 


Matoppo Terminus 


19 


20 s 


Mator 


15 


27 s 


Matrieng 


13 


2Q S 


Matserak 


22 


2iS 


Maistatra R. . 


22 


22 S 


Matsue . 


35 


35 N 


Matsuyama . 


35 


40 N 


Matswanakaba 


13 


30 S 


Matthew I. . 


41 


22 S 


Matte Grosso 


10 


14 s 


Matu 


32 


2N 


Matua . 


19 


17 s 


Matumbi 


21 


8S 


Matya . 


16 


26 S 


Maubin . 


31 


16 N 


Mauritius 


22 


20 S 


Maurnaud 


■ 27 


9N 


Mavilikara 


26 


9N 


Mavona 


21 


oS 


Mavuji . 


21 


9S 


Maware , 


39 


4S 



Long. 
32 E 
36 E 
109 W 
91 W 
61 w 

31 E 
73 E 

152 E 

152 E 

40 E 

32 E 

28 E 
128 E 

oW 
38 E 

34 E 

29 E 
36 E 

30 E 

29 E 

31 E 

35 E 

27 E 
60 W 
34 E 
58 W 
10 E 

131 W 

33 E 
oW 

30 E 
131 E 

81 E 
49 E 

28 E 

29 E 
80 E 

165 E 
80 E 

32 E 

34 E 
28 E 
-2E 

34 E 

31 E 

32 E 
28 E 

38 E 
73 E 
57 E 

35 E 

30 E 

30 E 
32 E 
35 E 

31 E 
28 E 
23 E 

27 E 
44 E 
47 E 

133 E 
141 E 

28 E 
172 E 

57 W 

III E 

28 E 

39 E 
31 E 
96 E 
57 W 
78 E 
76 E 
coE 
38 E 

136 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Maxixi . 


. 18 


23 S 


May Pen 


8 


17 N 


Maya . 


■ 35 


34 N 


Mayatta Is. . 


22 


13 s 


Maymont 


4 


52 N 


Maymyo 


■ 31 


22 N 


Mayou I. 


• 41 


9S 


Maytown 


• 33 


16 S 


Mazaruni R. . 


9 


6N 


Mazeppa B. . 


• 17 


32 s 


Mazibi . 


19 


23 S 


Mazimbagupao 


21 


17 s 


Mazoe . 


19 


17 s 


Mazoe R. 


19 


16 s 


Mbabame 


. 16 


26 s 


Mbako, Upper 


• 17 


31 s 


Mbale . 


21 


3S 


Mbalis . 


■ 17 


32 s 


Mbange 


■ 17 


31 s 


Mbarara 


21 


oS 


Mbarra . 


20 


10 N 


Mbekeni's 


17 


31 s 


Mbidlana 


17 


31 s 


Mbinja . 


17 


31 s 


Mbizana 


• 17 


30 s 


Mblanblani . 


17 


31 s 


Mbokotwana 


17 


31 s 


Mbulu 


• 17 


32 s 


Mbulukweza . 


• 17 


32 s 


Mbumbulwana 


• 17 


30 s 


Mbuna . 


21 


12 S 


Mbunga 


21 


3S 


Mbutudi 


20 


10 N 


Mbweni 


21 


6S 


Mceula . 


• 17 


31 s 


Mcucu . 


17 


32 s 


Mdakana 


• 17 


32 s 


Mecha . 


II 


ON 


Mechenga 


■ 19 


19 S 


Medan . 


■ 32 


3N 


Medicine Hat 


4 


50 N 


Medine . 


II 


10 N 


Medingen 


. 18 


23 s 


Meean-Meer . 


. 28 


31 N 


Meerut . 


. 28 


29 N 


Meherpur 


• 24 


23 N 


Mehsana 


• 25 


23 N 


Mehur . 


. 28 


27 N 


Meihsien 


• 33 


34 N 


Meiktila 


31 


21 N 


Mekkaw 


20 


7N 


Mekong R. . 


■ 33 


20 N 


Melanesia 


41 


15 s 


Melaseitheldi 


27 


8N 


Melbourne 


• 37 


35 S 


Melfort 


4 


■S2N 


Melilo . 


21 


14 S 


Melita . 


4 


49 N 


Melkava 


. 26 


10 N 


Mel moth 


. 16 


28 S 


Melsetter 


19 


20 S 


Melur . 


27 


10 N 


Melville . 


4 


50 N 


Melville C. . 


• 38 


14 S 


Melville Is. . 


37 


II s 


Memba B. 


21 


14 s 


Mempakol 


• 32 


SN 


Memphis B. , 


II 


20 N 


Me Nam 


• 31 


17 N 


Menapi 


• 39 


9S 


Mendoza 


10 


32 S 


Mengnanapuran 


1 . 27 


8N 


Mengtsz 


• 33 


23 N 


Menoo . 


21 


oN 


Mequinez 


II 


30 N 


Mercara 


. 26 


12 N 


Mercedes 


10 


34 S 



Long. 
35 E 
77 W 
134 E 
45 E 

107 W 
97E 

152 E 

144 E 

58 W 

28 E 

34 E 

30 E 

31 E 

33 E 
31 E 
28 E 

38 E 
27 E 
27 E 
30 E 
10 E 

27 E 

28 E 

28 E 

29 E 
28 E 

28 E 
27 E 
27 E 

29 E 

34 E 

39 E 
13 E 

39 E 

27 E 

28 E 
27 E 

30 E 

31 E 
98 E 

iioW 
10 W 
30 E 

74 E 

77 E 
88 E 
72 E 
67 E 

108 E 
95 E 

3E 
102 E 
165 E 

78 E 
144 E 
104 W 

30 E 
loi W 

76 E 

31 E 

32 E 
78 E 

102 W 
144 E 
130 E 

40 E 
115 E 

30 E 
100 E 
149 E 

69 W 

77 E 
104 E 

32 E 
oW 

75 E 
6s W 



I20 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. Map No. 
Mercury Pt. . . 40 
Merdang . . 32 
Mergui ... 31 
Mergui Arch, 31 

Meridd ... 8 
Merta Rd. . 
Mervin . 
Meshra er Beh 
Mettumalai . 
Mezada 
Mfengchen 
Mfini 
Mfula . 
Mgakama 
Mganduli 
Mgano . 
Mgekesweni 
Mgomanzi 
Mgud 
Mgumgco 
Mgupos 
Mgxabozweni 
Mhlabisa 
Mhlakalo 
Mhlambve 
Mhoba . 
Mhowa . 
Miani 
Mianwali 

Miao-Chia-Hai-Tzu 
Michigan 
Middelburg 
Middelburg 
Middel Post 
Middle Drift 
Middleton 
Middleton, Algoma 
Middleton, Nova 

Scotia 
Midillovo 
Midnapore 
Midnapur 

Miencheo{Mienohow) 33 
Mienchuhsien . 33 

Miharaani 
Mihintale . . 30 
Mihomba . . 21 
Mikolongo 

Milada ... 20 
Milani ... 28 
Milavittan . . 27 
Miles ... 38 
Milestone . . 4 
Milk River 
Millayani . 27 

Miller Pt. 
Millertown . . 7 
Millertown Jet. . 7 
Milne Bay . . 39 
Milton ... 3 
Milyang . . 36 
Mimbal ... 25 
Mimminiska, L. s 

Min, R. . . -33 
Minas Bayou . . 3 
Minbu ... 31 
Mine Centre . . 5 
Minenga . 19 

Mingha ... 18 
Mininga 

Miniota ... 5 
Minitonas . 5 

Minnaria Tank . 30 
Minnedosa . . 5 
Minnesota 
Minow Is. 
Minyoka 
Miola . 



28 
4 
II 
27 
II 

36 
II 

17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
21 

17 
17 
17 
18 

17 
13 
25 
ZS 
28 
28 

34 

2 

18 

13 
12 
18 
13 

5 

3 
14 
24 
29 



Lai. 

36 S 

I N 

12 N 

12 N 

21 N 
27 N 
53 N 

oN 
9N 

30 N 
41 N 

oS 
32 S 

31 s 
31 s 

29 s 

31 s 

32 s 

10 s 
32 s 

30 s 
32 s 
26 s 

31 s 

32 s 

22 N 

21 N 

32 N 
32 N 
36 N 
45 N 
25 S 

31 s 

31 s 

22 S 

32 s 

48 N 

45 N 

30 S 
22 N 

22 N 
32 N 

31 N 
3S 
8 N 
3S 

16 S 

11 S 

25 N 
8N 

26 S 
50 N 

17 N 
9N 

34 S 

49 N 
48 N 
10 S 

44 N 
36 N 
17 N 
SiN 
26 N 

45 N 
20 N 
48 N 
16 S 

23 S 
4S 

SON 

52 N 

8 N 

SON 

46 N 

13 s 
10 S 
15 s 



Long. 

176 E 

iioE 

99 E 

98 E 

89 W 

74 E 

108 W 

20 E 

77 E 
10 E 

129 E 
10 E 

27 E 
29 E 

28 E 

29 E 
28 E 
27 E 
40 E 

27 E 

28 E 

27 E, 
32 E 

28 E 

28 E 
73 E 
71 E 
73 E 
71 E 

116 E 

85 W 

29 E 

24 E 
20 E 

29 E 

25 E 

86 W 

64 W 

30 E 

87 E 
87 E 

104 E 

104 E 

34 E 

80 E 

32 E 
34 E 

33 E 
67 E 

78 E 
150 E 
104 W 

77 W 
77 E 
18 E 
56 W 
56 W 

iSoE 
6s W 

129 E 
76 E 
89 W 

118 E 
64 W 
95 E 
92 W 
27 E 

31 E 

32 E 
loiW 
loiW 

81 E 
100 W 

94 w 
48 E 
36 E 
40 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Miquelon 


7 


46 N 


56 w 


Mira B. . 


3 


46 N 


59 W 


Miraj 


■ 25 


16 N 


74 E 


Mirani 


• 38 


21 S 


148 E 


Miri 


• 25 


19 N 


75 E 


Miri (Sarawak) 


• 32 


4N 


114 E 


Mirzapur 


. 28 


25 N 


81 E 


Misahole 


20 


6N 


oE 


Miscat . 


■ 39 


2S 


130 E 


Miscon Is. 


3 


48 N 


64 W 


Misikaba 


• 17 


31 s 


29 E 


Misozwe 


21 


ss 


38 E 


Mistatim 


4 


53 N 


103 W 


Mitchell 


• 38 


26 S 


148 E 


Mitchell R. . 


• 38 


iss 


142 E 


Mitchell R. Mis. 


• 38 


iSS 


141 E 


Mito 


• 35 


36 N 


140 E 


Mitsana . 


21 


oN 


32 E 


Mivigam 


• 25 


22 N 


73 E 


Miyazaki 


35 


32 N 


131 E 


Miyiln . 


• 34 


40 N 


116 E 


Mkewe . 


2t 


10 S 


32 E 


Mkoma . 


21 


14 s 


33 E 


Mkusi R. 


16 


27 s 


31 E 


Mkuzi . 


21 


sS 


38 E 


Mkwere . 


21 


ss 


35 E 


Mkwinti . 


17 


32 S 


27 E 


Mlebba . 


• 19 


17 s 


31 E 


Mluluka . 


21 


13 s 


35 E 


Mlunduis 


17 


32 s 


28 E 


Mncwasa 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Mngemnye . 


• 17 


31 s 


29 E 


Moa Is. . 


-,• 38 


10 s 


142 E 


Moamba (E. ( 








Africa) 


21 


10 s 


31 E 


Moamba, Zululan 


d 18 


258 


32 E 


Moassu . 


21 


16 s 


36 E 


Moche . 


21 


14 s 


30 E 


Mo-Chuang . 


• 34 


35 N 


118 E 


Mooomoco Pt. 


9 


8N 


59 W 


Modasa . 


■ 25 


23 N 


73 E 


Modawa 


• 39 


10 S 


150 E 


Modder Fontein 


12 


32 S 


18 E 


Modderponrt 


IS 


28 s 


27 E 


Modder R. . 


15 


28 s 


26 E 


Modslu . 


21 


2S 


37 E 


Moehao C. . 


■ 40 


3<,S 


175 E 


Moesi . 


21 


10 s 


37 E 


Moffets . 


17 


31 s 


27 E 


Mogdisku 


II 


oN 


40 E 


Mogodor 


II 


30 N 


oW 


Mogok . 


■ 31 


23 N 


97 E 


Mogra Hat 


. 24 


22 N 


88 E 


Mohah . 


22 


16 S 


46 E 


Mohales Hoeck 


IS 


30 S 


27 E 


Mohangarh . 


■ 25 


27 N 


71 E 


Mohasi L. 


21 


iS 


30 E 


Mohilla . 


22 


12 S 


44 E 


Mojanga 


22 


iss 


46 E 


Moka . 


22 


20 s 


57 E 


Mokambo B. 


21 


iss 


40 E 


Mokaria 


21 


6S 


30 E 


Mokatani 


19 


22 S 


27 E 


Mok-Chon . 


• 36 


36 N 


127 E 


Mokokchung 


• 24 


26 N 


94 E 


Mokpo . 


. 36 


35 N 


126 E 


Mokuana 


13 


30 s 


28 E 


Mokumbi 


18 


24 s 


34 E 


Mokumbo 


18 


24 s 


34 E 


Mokwa . 


20 


9N 


SE 


Moliros . 


21 


8S 


30 E 


Molo 


21 


oS 


35 E 


Moloko . 


19 


18 S 


32 E 


Molote . 


. 18 


26 S 


26 E 


Molotta's Kaal 


14 


28 S 


29 E 


Molsen . 


5 


50 N 


96 W 


Molteno . 


• 13 


31 s 


26 E 


Mombasa 


, 21 


4S 


39 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Mombetsu 


• 35 


45 N 


Mombo . 


21 


4S 


Mona R. 


16 


28 S 


Monarch Reef 


19 


21 S 


Moncton 


3 


46 N 


Monda . 


21 


6S 


Moneague 


8 


18 N 


Monganui 


40 


34 S 


Monghyr 


24 


25 N 


Mongonu 


20 


12 N 


Mong-sin 


31 


21 N 


Monia R. 


22 


21 S 


Monow . 


21 


9S 


Montagu 


12 


33 S 


Montana 


2 


45 N 


Montego Bay 


8 


18 N 


Monte Video 


10 


34 S 


Montgomery . 


28 


31 N 


Montizambert 


5 


48 N 


Montreal 


2 


45 N 


Montserrat . 


8 


18 N 


Monywa 


31 


22 N 


Monze . 


19 


16 S 


Mooi River . 


- 17 


31 s 


Mooivlei 


18 


26 s 


Moore Town 


8 


18 N 


Moose Fort . 


2 


52 N 


Moose Jaw . 


4 


50 N 


Moose L. 


q 


53 N 


Moosomin 


4 


50 N 


Moosonee 


5 


52 N 


Mopani . 


19 


22 S 


Mopeia . 


19 


17 S 


Mopou 


22 


20 S 


Moquequa 


10 


17 s 


Mora 


20 


II N 


Moradabad . 


28 


28 N 


Morant Bay . 


8 


17 N 


Morant Pi. . 


8 


17 N 


Morantsetra . 


22 


iss 


Moratuwa 


30 


6N 


Morawhanna 


9 


8N 


Morden. 


5 


49 N 


Moresby Is. (B 






Columbia) . 


6 


52 N 


Moresby Is. (Brit 






New Guinea) 


39 


10 S 


Moreton B. . 


38 


27 S 


Morgan . 


37 


33 S 


Morgan C. . 


13 


32.S 


Morija . 


13 


29 S 


Morioka 


35 


39 N 


Morne . 


22 


20 S 


Mornington Is 


38 


16 S 


Morope 


10 


68 


Morricetown . 


6 


55 N 


Morro de Megillon 


;s 10 


23 s 


Morro Velho . 


10 


19 s 


Mortimer 


13 


32 s 


Moruca, R. . 


9 


7N 


Morven 


• 38 


26 s 


Morvi . 


25 


23 N 


Mossamedes 


II 


10 s 


Mossel B. 


12 


34 S 


Mossy Pt. 


5 


53 N 


Mota Is. 


41 


14 S 


Motetsi . 


18 


23 s 


Motihari 


. 24 


26 N 


Motitu . 


• IS 


27 S 


Motokos 


. 19 


17 S 


Motomono . 


19 


16 s 


Motsilana 


. 18 


26 S 


Mouille Pt. . 


12 


33 S 


Moukden 


• 34 


41 N 


Moulmein 


31 


16 N 


Mount Arthur 


13 


31 s 


Mount Diablio 


8 


18 N 


Mount dti Bar^boq 


23 


20 S 



Long. 

143 E 

38 E 

31 E 
27 E 

64 W 
37 E 

77 W 
173 E 

86 E 

II E 

101 E 

46 E 
33 E 
20 E 

iioW 

78 W 
55 W 
73 E 
85 W 

75 W 

65 W 
95 E 

27 E 

28 E 

29 E 

76 W 
82.W 

105 W 

100 W 

101 w 
85 w 

27 E 
35 E 

57 E 
71 W 
13 E 
78 E 
76 W 

76 W 
49 E 
80 E 

58 W 
98 W 

131 W 

iSoE 
153 E 

140 E 

28 E 
27 E 

141 E 

57 E 
139 E 

80 W 
127 W 
71 W 

47 W 
25 E 

58 W 
147 E 

71 E 
10 E 

22 E 
98 W 

168 E 

29 E 
85 E 

23 E 

32 E 
37 E 
25 E 
18 E 

122 E 
98 E 
27 E 

77 W 
57 E 



INDEX 



Place. 
Mount Elliot Min 

ing Field . 
Mount Magnet 
Mount MoUoy 
Mc'unt Morgan 
Mount Stewart 
Mourilyan 
Mourilyon 
Mowbray 
Moyena . 
Mozambique 
Mozobi . 
M passu . 
Mpasu . 
Mpemba 
Mpenda . 
Mpharane 
Mphome 
Mpimbi 
Mpimbu's 
Mpindweni 
Mponda 
Mpota . 
Mpoza . 
Mpozolo 
Mrogoro 
Mronya Mt. 
Mrowi . 
Mruli 
Mriimbi 
Msalata . 
Mshiri . 
Msoro . 
Msumba 
Msunga . 
Msuva . 
Mtaka . 
Mtarika 
Mtenguha 
Mtom 
M tonga . 
Mtonja Mis 
Mtonjeni 
Mtoro . 
Mtulemuhle 
Altwaku 
Muakerary 
Mualia . 
Muani . 
Mubargaon 
Mubi 
Mucania 
Muchena 
Mudalur 
Mudge Is. 
Mudhol . 
Mudittanendal 
Mudsidsami . 
Mudukuluttur 
Muhamba's . 
Muhammadpur 
Muizenberg . 
Mujangas 
Muka 
Mukawa 
Mukobo 
Mulativu 
Multan . 
Mumias . 
Mumpava 
Muncindi 
Mundha 
Munguna 
Muogolong 
Murchison R 
Murhu . 
Muritaro 
Muroa . 



Map No, Lat. Long. 



38 
37 
38 
38 
37 
38 
39 
12 

13 
21 
i8 
19 
19 
21 
21 

17 
18 
21 

21 
17 
19 
21 

17 
17 
21 
21 
21 
II 
21 
21 

19 
21 

21 
21 

19 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
19 
17 
21 

17 
17 
21 
21 
21 

25 
20 

19 
19 
27 

39 
2.? 
27 

19 
27 
21 
24 
12 
21 
32 
39 
17 
30 
28 
21 
32 
38 
25 
38 
17 
37 
29 
9 
19 



21 S 

28 S 

16 S 
23 S 
23 S 

17 S 
9S 

33 S 
30 S 
ISS 
23 s 
16 s 

16 s 

12 S 

14 s 

30 s 
23 s 

15 s 

6S 

31 s 

14 s 

7S 

31 s 

32 s 

7S 

13 s 

10 s 
oN 
7S 
3S 

14 s 

13 s 

12 S 

17 s 

12 S 

11 s 

12 S 

7S 
7S 
13 s 

32 s 

ss 

30 s 
32 s 

9S 

13 s 
2S 

20 N 
10 N 

13 s 

15 s 

8 N 
10 S 

16 N 
8 N 

21 S 
gN 
3S 

23 N 

34 S 
10 S 

3N 

9S 
30 s 

gN 
30 N 

oN 

o 

29 S 

27 N 

17 S 

30 s 

28 s 

22 N 

SN 
17 S 



141 E 
117 E 

145 E 
150 E 
133 E 

146 E 
150 E 

18 E 

27 E 
40 E 

34 E 

36 E 

35 E 
31 E 
35 E 

28 E 
jg E 
35 E 
31 E 
28 E 

34 E 
30 E 

28 E 
z8 E 

37 E 

35 E 

34 E 
30 E 

30 E 
33 E 

29 E 

31 E 

35 E 

37 E 

36 E 

35 E 

36 E 
35 E 
39 E 

38 E 
35 E 
.7E 
35 E 
29 E 

27 E 
33 E 

38 E 

37 E 
73 E 
13 E 
31 E 

33 E 

77 E 
150 E 

75 E 

78 E 

28 E 
78 E 

29 E 
8g E 

,iS E 

39 E 
112 E 
149 E 

29 E 
81 E 
71 E 

34 E 
log E 
149 E 

71 E 
144 E 
28 E 
115 E 
85 E 
58 W 
34 E 



Place. 
Murray R. 
Murray R. 
Muriee . 
Murshidabad, 
Murud . 
Murzuk 
Musan . 
Musa R. 
Mushe . 
Musiguboyas 
Mussoree 
Musuniba 
Muttaburra 
Mutum Biu 
Mutupellah 
Mutupet 
Mutyalapad 
Muweha 
Muzaffargarh 
Muzaffarnagar 
Muzaffarpur 
Mvenyani 
Mvenyani R. 
Mvera. L. 
Mwanza 
Mwembe 
Mwenza 
Mwina , 
Mwiniwano 
Mwiti 
Myers . 
Myittha . 

Mynfontein Siding 
Myolo, Lower 
Myolo, Upper 
Myongora's . 
Mysore . 
Mzaza . 

Naauw Poort June. 
Nababeep 
Nabumale 
Nadaiyaneri . 
Nadia . 
Nadiad . 
Nadshahr 
Nafada . 
Nagalapuram 
Nagano . 
Nagar . 
Nagar . 
Nagasaki 
Nagatatolla . 
Nagercoil 
Nagoya . 
Nagpur . 
Nahndeed 
Naju 
Naka , 
Nakawn 
Naktung R. . 
Nakusp . 
Nalbari . 
Naldrug 
Nalgonda 
Nallamalpuram 
Nalloor . 
Nallur . 
Nalumnvady . 
Nannahasha . 
Namakia Mts. 
Namama 
Nambyar, R. 
Namkam 
Namma, R. . 
Namoue 
Namoondeooly 
Nam-won 



Map No 


. Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map Nc 


. Lat. 


Long. 


3 


46 N 


62 W| 


Nam Yang . 


• 36 


37 N 


126 E 


37 


33 S 


142 E 


Nanaimo 


6 


48 N 


123 W 


28 


33 N 


73 E 


Nan an go 


• 38 


26 S 


152 E 


=4 


24 N 


88 E 


Nanao . 


■ 35 


37 N 


137 E 


25 


18 N 


72 E 


Nanchang 


■ 33 


28 N 


115 E 


II 


20 N 


10 E 


Nandaon 


25 


20 N 


74 E 


36 


42 N 


129 E 


Nandikotkur . 


26 


16 N 


78 E 


39 


gS 


148 E 


Nando . 


20 


12 N 


I E 


20 


5N 


II E 


Nandod . 


25 


22 N 


73 E 


19 


20 S 


32 E 


Nandurbar 


25 


21 N 


74 E 


28 


30 N 


78 E 


NTandyal 


. 26 


15 N 


78 E 


II 


oS 


20 E 


Nanguneri 


• 27 


8N 


77 E 


38 


22 S 


144 E 


Nanjangud 


. 26 


12 N 


76 E 


20 


8N 


II E 


Nankang 


33 


29 N 


USE 


27 


gN 


78 E 


Nanking 


■ 33 


32 N 


118 E 


30 


10 N 


79 E 


Nannine 


■ 37 


27 S 


iiSE 


26 


15 N 


79 E 


Nanning 


• 33 


24 N 


109 E 


21 


13 s 


38 E 


Nanpihsien 


■ 34 


38 N 


116 E 


28 


30 N 


71 E 


Nanton . 


6 


50 N 


114 W 


28 


2gN 


77 E 


Nan-Wang-Chuang 34 


35 N 


118 E 


24 


26 N 


85 E 


Nanzizi . 


21 


16 S 


37 E 


17 


30 S 


29 E 


Naperi . 


20 


gN 


oE 


17 


30 S 


29 E 


Napier (Cape Town) 12 


34 S 


:oE 


II 


oS 


20 E 


Napier (New Zea- 






21 


2S 


32 E 


laiid) 


. 40 


39 S 


177 E 


21 


13 s 


36 E 


Napinka 


5 


49 N 


icoW 


21 


gS 


32 E 


Napu . 


■ 19 


13 s 


37 E 


22 


2S 


40 E 


Naraiangaon . 


25 


igN 


74 E 


21 


gS 


33 E 


Narayanganj . 


24 


23 N 


goE 


21 


10 S 


38 E 


Narbada, R. . 


■ 25 


22 N 


75 E 


16 


27 s 


30 E 


Naregal 


• 25 


ISN 


75 E 


31 


21 N 


96 E 


Narisha 


24 


23 N 


go E 


13 


30 s 


23 E 


Narp 


• 35 


34 N 


136 E 


• 17 


31 s 


28 E 


Narowal 


. 28 


32 N 


74 E 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Narreenda 


22 


14 S 


47 E 


21 


6S 


34 E 


Narr endale . 


13 


33 S 


27 E 


26 


12 N 


76 E 


.Varukot 


• 25 


22 N 


74 E 


19 


13 s 


31 E 


Narval . 


. 24 


23 N 


8g E 








Naseby . 


4 


52 N 


107 W 


13 


31 s 


24 E 


Nasik . 


• 25 


20 N 


74 E 


12 


29 s 


17 E 


Nasirabad 


• 25 


26 N 


75 E 


21 


iN 


34 E 


Nassa . 


21 


2S 


34 E 


27 


gN 


77 E 


Nassarawa 


20 


8N 


7E 


24 


23 N 


88 E 


Nassau . 


8 


25 N 


75 W 


25 


23 N 


73 E 


Natal (Diocese) 


II 


30 S 


30 E 


28 


26 N 


67 E 


Natal (Brazil) 


10 


5S 


35 W 


20 


II N 


II E 


Natal Spruit . 


. 18 


26 s 


28 E 


27 


gN 


78 E 


Natanga 


20 


12 N 


2E 


35 


36 N 


138 E 


Natolas 


21 


13 s 


37 E 


25 


13 N 


75 E 


>^aushahro 


25 


27 N 


68 E 


26 


13 N 


75 E 


Navanagar . 


■ 25 


22 N 


70 E 


35 


32 N 


129 E 


Navsari . 


• 25 


21 N 


73 E 


19 


ig S 


25 E 


NawaLshah . 


• 25 


26 N 


68 E 


26 


SN 


77 E 


Nawada 


24 


24 N 


8s E 


35 


35 N 


136 E 


Nawadi . 


• 24 


24 N 


86 E 


23 


25 N 


75 E 


Nawaruma . 


21 


iss 


37 E 


25 


25 N 


73 E 


Nawibandar . 


• 25 


21 N 


6gE 


36 


35 N 


126 E 


Nazareth 


. 26 


8N 


77 E 


19 


20 S 


30 E 


Nazira . . 


• 24 


27 N 


94 E 


32 


8N 


100 E 


Nbadua 


21 


14 s 


38 E 


36 


35 N 


128 E 


Ncele . 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


6 


50 N 


117 W 


Ncolosi 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


24 


26 N 


gi E 


Nconcolora . 


17 


32 s 


27 E 


25 


17 N 


76 E 


Ncora . 


17 


31 s 


27 E 


26 


16 N 


79 E 


Ncum bu 


■ 17 


31 s 


28 E 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Ncuti 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


26 


SN 


81 E 


Ndarala 


• 17 


30 s 


29 E 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Ndejo 


21 


oN 


32 E 


27 


8N 


78 E 


Ndoro . 


21 


oN 


36 E 


18 


25 S 


32 E 


Ndoye . 


21 


II S 


36 E 


22 


17 s 


48 E 


Ndula . 


21 


1 S 


38 E 


21 


3S 


33 E 


Ndwandwe . 


. 16 


28 S 


31 E 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Neepawa 


5 


50 N 


99 W 


31 


23 N 


97 E 


Negapatam . 


. 26 


10 N 


79 E 


31 


23 N 


97 E 


Negombo 


• 30 


7 N 


60 E 


20 


5N 


2W 


Negrais, C. 


• 31 


16 N 


94 E 


30 


7N 


81 E 


Negril . 


8 


18 N 


78 W 


36 


35 N 


127 E 


Negro R, 


10 


oS 


64 W 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



30 
26 
18 

6 
40 
39 
27 

3S 
41 
38 
17 
25 
24 

17 

36 

8 

33 
21 

17 
9 
II 

41 
39 
41 
14 



Place. Map No. 
Neikaza . 17 

Neis Poort . 12 

Nellore, Ceylon 
Nellore, Madras 
Nelspruit 
Nelson . 
Nelson . 
Nelson C. 
Nemmeni 
Nemuro 
Nepean I. 
Nerang . 
Nesizo . 
Nespi 
NeLrakona 
Neulu, Lower 
Neung-ju 
Nevis 

Newchwang 
Newato . 
New Amalti 
New Amsterdam 
New Antwerp 
Ne.v Britain . 
New Britain Is. 
New Caledonia Is. 
Newcastle (Natal). 
Newcastle ( N. Bruns'k) 3 
Newcastle ( New Zea- 
land) ... 40 
Newcastle (Australia) 37 
Newcastle (Gra- 

hamstown) . 13 

Newdale . 5 

New Denver . 6 

.Newdigate . . 16 
Newfoundland 2 

New Germany . 3 
New Glasgow. . 3 
New Guinea . 39 

New Halle . . 18 
New Hanover, Is. . 39 
New Hanover, Natal 14 
New Harbour . 7 
New Ireland . . 41 
Newlands . . 12 
New Norfolk 40 

New Plymouth . 40 
Newport . . 3 
New Rose . . 3 
New Westminster . 6 
New York . . 2 
Ngabaro R. . .17 
Ngabisana . . 19 
Ngadu ... 17 
Ngalonkulus . 17 

Ngalweni . 17 

Ngamakwe . . 17 
Ngamba 
Ngamba 
Ngambe 
Ngami L. 
Nganking . . 33 
Ngao . . 21 

Ngaunderi . . 11 
Ngcengane . , 17 
Ngcwangula . . 17 
Ngedoa 17 

Ngencu . . • '7 
Nggunggu, Lower 17 
Nggunggu, Upper 17 
Nghai ... 17 
Nglewa . . 20 

Ngo ■ . 
Ngodiloe . . 17 
Ngodusweni . , 17 
Ngofi . 
Ngogwe 
Ngolose, . . 17 



Lat. 

31 s 

32 .S 
10 N 

14 N 
25 S 
49 N 
41 s 

9S 

9N 

43 N 

29 S 
28 S 

31 ^S 

16 N 
25 N 

32 S 
35 N 

17 N 
40 N 
10 S 

30 S 
6 N 
oN 

ss 
ss 

22 s 
27 s 

47 N 

45 S 
32 S 



Long. 
29 E 
23 E 
80 E 
80 E 
3'E 
117 W 
173 E 

149 E 
78 E 

145 E 

168 E 
153 E 

27 E 
74 E 
90 E 
27 E 

127 E 
62 W 

122 E 
39 E 

2Q E 

57 W 
10 E 

150 E 
150 E 
i6sE 

29 E 
65 W 

169 E 
152 E 



33 S 


27 E 


50 N 


100 W 


49 N 


118 W 


23 S 


30 E 


50 N 


55 W 


44N 


64 W 


45 N 


62 W 


10 S 


150 E 


25 S 


28 E 


2S 


150 E 


29 S 


30 E 


47 N 


54 W 


3S 


153 E 


33 S 


18 E 


42 S 


147 E 


39 S 


174 E 


45 N 


65 W 


45 N 


64 W 


49 N 


123 W 


41 N 


75 W 


32 S 


28 E 


20 S 


24 E 


31 S 


28 E 


31 s 


28 E 


30 S 


28 E 


3-S 


27 E 


9S 


35 E 


15 s 


40 E 


6N 


II E 


20 S 


20 E 


31 N 


117 E 


2S 


40 E 


oN 


10 E 


31 s 


28 E 


31 s 


28 E 


31 s 


27 E 


31 s 


28 E 


31 s 


28 E 


31 s 


28 E 


31 S 


28 E 


12 N 


13 E 


4N 


9E 


30 S 


28 E 


31 s 


29 E 


12 S 


35 E 


N 


33 E 


32 s 


27 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Ngonyania's . 


17 


32 S 


NgDronji 


21 


13 s 


Nguruman 


21 


2S 


Ngutu . 


17 


32 s 


Ngqeleni 


17 


31 s 


Ngw.idhla 


16 


27 s 


Ngwemnyana 


17 


30 s 


Ngwiliso's 


17 


31 s 


Ngxaza, Lower 


17 


31 s 


NgXutyana 


17 


32 s 


Niagara 


2 


43 N 


Niah 


32 


4N 


Niamei . 


20 


13 N 


Nianikolo 


21 


8S 


Niamniam 


II 


oN 


Nicaragua L. 


8 


II N 


Nicholson 


19 


21 S 


Nickeri 


9 


SN 


Nickerie, R. . 


9 


SN 


Nicola . 


6 


SoN 


Niekerks 


17 


30 S 


Nigel Mine 


18 


26 S 


Niger R. 


20 


12 N 


Nikki . 


20 


9N 


Nikko . 


35 


36 N 


Nikoma 


21 


oN 


Nikungu 


21 


12 S 


Nimbhira 


28 


24 N 


Nimbi . 


20 


4N 


Nina 


41 


19 S 


Ninga . 


5 


49 N 


Ningchow 


33 


36 N 


Ninghia 


33 


38 N 


Ningkiang . 


33 


32 N 


Ningming 


• 33 


22 N 


Ningpo . 


33 


30 N 


Ningwu . 


74 


39 N 


Ningyuan 


33. 


27 N 


Ningyiianchow 


• 34 


40 N 


Nipani . 


25 


16 N 


Nipigon 


5 


49 N 


Nipigon L. . 


5 


50 N 


Niuma . 


20 


12 N 


Nizampatam . 


26 


15 N 


Njuya Nkata 


21 


II S 


Njonbela 


17 


31 s 


Nkoranza 


20 


7N 


Nkupulweni 


17 


30 s 


Noagaon 


24 


2.jN 


Noaji . 


17 


31 s 


Nobeoka 


35 


32 N 


Noecundra . 


38 


27 S 


Nogar Parkar 


■ 25 


24 N 


Nogongweni 


17 


31 s 


Nogoo R. 


38 


24 S 


Nokomis 


4 


51 N 


Nomadaraba 


17 


31 s 


Nomalorre 


21 


12 s 


Nombala 


17 


31 s 


Nomoheya . 


17 


32 s 


Nongoma 


16 


27 s 


Noord Hock 


12 


34 S 


Norfolk Is. . 


41 


29 S 


Norman, Cape 


7 


SI N 


Norman R. . 


38 


19 S 


Normanby Is. 


■ 39 


10 s 


Normanby R. 


38 


14 s 


Normanton . 


38 


17 s 


North Battleford 


4 


52 N 


North China . 


33 


35 N 


North Point . 


3 


47 N 


North Queensland 


• 37 


20 S 


North Saskatchew; 


m 4 


S3N 


North Sydney 


3 


46 N 


North Tokyo . 


• 35 


38 N 


Northumberland S 


tr. 3 


46 N 


Norton . 


A 


45 N 


Norubi . 


12 


30 S 


Nervals Pont Sta. 


13 


30 S 



Long. 
27 E 

38 E 
35 E 

27 E 
29 E 
32 E 

28 E 

29 E 

28 E 
i8 E 
77 W 

114 E 

2 E 

31 E 

20 E 

86 W 

29 E 
56 W 
56 W 

120 W 
29 E 

28 E 
3E 
3E 

139 E 
31 E 

39 E 
74 E 

6E 

169 E 

99 W 

107 E 

106 E 

107 E 

107 E 
122 E 
112 E 
102 E 
120 E 

74 E 
88 W 

88 W 
2W 

80 E 
34 E 

29 E 
I W 

28 E 

89 E 

28 E 
131 E 
142 E 

71 E 

29 E 
147 E 
lOsW 

27 E 

40 E 
:8 E 

28 E 
31 E 
18 E 

158 E 

55 W 

141 E 

150 E 

144 E 
141 E 

108 W 
no E 

64 W 

145 E 

109 W 
60 W 

140 E 
63 W 

65 W 
18 E 
25 E 



Place. 


Map No 


. Lat. 


Long. 


Norway House 


II 


54 N 


98 W 


Nosibe . 


22 


13 s 


48 E 


Nosigangwana 


• 17 


31 s 


28 E 


Nosivalavo . 


22 


16 s 


44 E 


Notre Dame Bay 


7 


49 N 


55 W 


Nottan . 


• 39 


2S 


132 E 


Notupi . 


• 39 


3S 


152 E 


Nova Scotia . 


2 


45 N 


55 w 


Nowgong 


• 24 


26 N 


Q2 E 


Nquaru 


■ 17 


31 s 


27 E 


Nqudles 


■ 17 


32 s 


27 E 


Nququ . 


• 17 


31 s 


27 E 


Nqutyana 


• 17 


32 s 


28 E 


Nqxamagele . 


• 17 


32 s 


27 E 


Nsalla . 


21 


2S 


33 E 


Nshokolsa 


19 


21 s 


25 E 


Ntibane 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Ntseshe 


17 


32 s 


28 E 


Ntshigo 


• 17 


31 s 


28 E 


Nuanetzi 


• 19 


21 S 


30 E 


Nuatsu 


18 


24 s 


32 E 


Nubia . 


II 


10 N 


20 E 


Nugata 


• 35 


38 N 


139 E 


Nukapu Is. . 


• 41 


10 s 


166 E 


Nulambe R. . 


21 


17 s 


35 E 


NuUur . 


. 26 


9N 


77 E 


Numan . 


20 


9N 


12 E 


Numazu 


• 35 


35 N 


138 E 


Nuso 


17 


3tS 


28 E 


Nuumi . 


21 


6S 


36 E 


Nuwara Elya 


35 


7N 


81 E 


Nvengaby B 


22 


16 S 


50 E 


Nxakalo 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Nxanxadi 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Nxaxa , 


■ 17 


30 s 


28 E 


Nyakogwe . 


18 


23 s 


35 E 


Nyakwasi 


21 


16 s 


34 E 


Nyamarranque 


. 18 


24 s 


34 E 


Nyangala 


21 


7S 


37 E 


Nyangiwe 


II 


oS 


20 E 


Nyasa, Lake 


19 


13 s 


34 E 


Nyasaland 


II 


15 s 


35 E 


Nyasang 


20 


6N 


13 E 


Nyasoso 


20 


4N 


9E 


Nyelgsa 


• 17 


31 s 


27 E 


Nylstroom . 


18 


24 s 


28 E 


Nyosini 


17 


30 s 


29 E 


Nzungazi 


21 


iS 


30 E 


Oakhurst 


12 


34 S 


22 E 


Oaklake 


5 


49 N 


loiW 


Oamaru 


. 40 


45 S 


171 E 


Oat 


8 


24 N 


75 W 


Oatland 


. 40 


42 S 


146 E 


Obama . 


• 35 


35 N 


135 E 


Obihira 


■ 35 


43 N 


143 E 


Obock . 


II 


10 N 


40 E 


Obotsi . 


20 


6N 


7E 


Obree Mt. 


• 39 


9S 


148 E 


Observatory . 


12 


33 S 


18 E 


Obubra . 


20 


6N 


8E 


Obudu . 


20 


6N 


9E 


Obutu . 


20 


5N 


oW 


Odaki . 


• 35 


35 N 


140 E 


Odate . 


35 


40 N 


140 E 


Odawara 


• 35 


35 N 


.139 E 


Ode 


20 


6N 


3E 


Odendaal 


13 


30 s 


26 E 


Ogaki . 


• 35 


35 N 


136 E 


Ogbomosho . 


20 


8N 


4E 


Ogoja . 


20 


6N 


8E 


Ogowok 


II 


oS 


10 E 


Ogun R. 


20 


6N 


3E 


Ohehonge 


40 


41 S 


176 E 


Ohrigstad 


. 18 


24 S 


30 E 


Oita 


• 35 


33 N 


131 E 


Ojogbo . 


20 


6N 


5E 


Okarito . 


. 40 


43 S 


170 E 


Okaru . 


. 40 


36 S 


174 E 



INDEX 



123 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Okanagan L. 


6 


50 N 


Okayama 


35 


34 N 


Okein . 


39 


9S 


Okigwa . 


20 


5N 


Okoba . 


20 


5N 


Okuta . 


20 


9N 


Okwoga 


20 


6N 


Old Harbour 


8 


17 N 


Olds . 


4 


SI N 


Old Wives Lakes 


4 


50 N 


O'Leary 


3 


46 N 


Oiifant . 


18 


24 S 


Olifants R. (Cape 






Colony) 


12 


31 s 


Olifants R. (Trans- 






vaal) . 


18 


24 S 


Olive . 


13 


30 s 


Oliveberg 


13 


31 S 


Olpad . 


25 


21 N 


Olympia 


17 


47 N 


Omdurman . 


II 


10 N 


Ondo . 


20 


6N 


Ongeluk's Nek 


13 


30 S 


Ongole . 


26 


15 N 


Onibe R. 


22 


20 S 


Onin Mts. 


39 


3S 


Onion Lake . 


4 


53 N 


Onitsha 


20 


6N 


Ono 


3S 


42 N 


Ontario, Lake 


2 


45 N 


Oodnadatta . 


37 


27 S 


Ookiep . 


12 


29 N 


Oontoo . 


38 


27 s 


Ootacamund . 


. 26 


II N 


OpeR. . 


39 


8S 


Opopo . 


20 


4N 


Opotiki . 


40 


38 S 


Oran . 


10 


23 s 


Orange Grove 


■ 13 


32 s 


Orange River 


IS 


30 s 


Orange River Stati 


on 13 


29 s 


Orchha . 


28 


25 N 


Orealla 


9 


5N 


Orinoco R. . 


9 


8N 


Oro 


39 


8S 


Oruro . 


10 


17 S 


Orurua . 


40 


35 S 


Osaka . 


35 


34 N 


Osborne 


17 


30 S 


Oshogbo 


20 


7N 


Osko . 


5 


49 N 


Osnaburgh Ho. 


S 


■;i N 


Osorno , 


10 


41 S 


Ostersund 


5 


49 N 


Otaki . 


40 


41 S 


Otbu C. 


40 


35 S 


Otea Island 


40 


36 S 


Oti R. . 


20 


9N 


Oto.- 


35 


43 N 


Otsi 


35 


43 N 


Otsu 


35 


34 N 


Ottapidaram . 


27 


8N 


Ottawa . 


2 


43 N 


Otyirabingue . 


II 


20 S 


Oudtshoorn . 


12 


33 S 


Ouepe . 


10 


39 S 


Ouessant 


39 


10 S 


Ouimet . 


5 


48 N 


Oure . 


39 


8S 


Ouro Preto 


10 


20 S 


Outlook . 


4 


51 N 


Ovalle 


10 


3'i 


Ovambo 


II 


10 S 


Ovary . 


27 


8N 


Ov^en Stanley Ran{ 


;e 39 


8S 


Owerri . 


20 


5N 


Owo 


20 


7N 


Oxbow . 


4 


49 N 



Long. 
119W 
134 E 

149 E 
7E 
9E 
3E 
7E 

77 W 
113 W 
107 W 

64 W 

29 E 

18 E 

31 E 
25 E 

25 E 
73 E 

123 W 

30 E 
4E 

28 E' 

80 E 

48 E 

133 E 

iioW 

6E 

140 E 
76 W 

13s E 
18 E 

141 E 

76 E 
148 E 

7E 
177 E 
64 W 

26 E 

28 E 
24 E 

78 E 
57 W 
60 W 

148 E 
67 W 
173 E 
13s E 

29 E 
4E 

90 W 
goW 

72 W 
94 W 

17s E 

173 E 

17s E 

oE 

140 E 

143 E 

136 E 

78 E 

75 W 

10 E 

22 E 

73 W 

150 E 
88 W 

14S E 
47 W 

107 W 
72 E 
10 E 

77 E 
148 E 

7E 

5E 

loiW 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. Map No. 


Lat. 


O.xford L. 


S 


54 N 


96 W 


Pang-chwang 


34 


37 N 


Oya 


32 


2N 


112 E 


Pangona 


21 


10 S 


Oyama 


• 3S 


35 N 


139 E 


Panipat 


28 


29 N 


Oyo 


20 


7N 


4E 


Panjnad R . . 
Panki . 
Pankipi . 


28 
21 
19 


29 N 
14 S 
14 S 


Paama . 


41 


16 S 


168 E 


Pankudzi 


19 


14 S 


Paardeburg 


• IS 


29 s 


25 E 


Pannaivilai . 


27 


8N 


Paarl . 


12 


33 S 


18 E 


Pannayoor 


27 


9N 


Paauw Pan . 


13 


30 S 


24 E 


Pannikulam . 


27 


9N 


Pabalong 


• 13 


30 s 


28 E 


Pantalakudi . 


27 


9N 


Pabna . 


. 24 


23 N 


89 E 


Panyam 


20 


9N 


Pachambi 


• 29 


24 N 


86 E 


Paoning 


33 


31 N 


Pachete 


29 


23 N 


86 E 


Paoting . 


33 


39 N 


Pachia . 


21 


12 S 


34 E 


Paoting-fu 


34 


39 N 


Pachora 


25 


20 N 


75 E 


Papar 


32 


SN 


Pachow Chi 


• 34 


39 N 


116 E 


Paparoa Ra. . 


40 


42 S 


Pachpadra . 


. 28 


26 N 


72 E 


Papawai 


40 


41 S 


Pack Ox Nek 


• 13 


30 S 


28 E 


Pappankulam 


27 


9N 


Packsham 


31 


II N 


99 E 


Papua, G. of . 


39 


8S 


Padawai Tank 


30 


9N 


81 E 


Pard . 


10 


iS 


Padrone C. 


. 13 


33 S 


26 E 


ParagonFs 


10 


40 S 


Pagadi . 


• 19 


21 S 


33 E 


Paragua R. . 


10 


20 s 


Pahang . 


32 


4N 


102 E 


Parahiba 


10 


6S 


Paihia 


40 


35 S 


174 E 


Paraku . 


20 


9N 


Paiho . 


■ 34 


41 N 


116 E 


Paramagudi . 


27 


9N 


Paikchon 


36 


38 N 


126 E 


Parameta 


39 


10 s 


Paithan 


■ 25 


19 N 


75 E 


Paranahyba . 


10 


3S 


Paiwa . 


• 39 


9S 


149 E 


Parana R. 


10 


28 s 


Pa-ju . 


36 


37 N 


127 E 


Parantij . 


25 


23 N 


Paka . 


• 32 


I N 


iioE 


Parapadi 


27 


8N 


Pakala . 


. 26 


13 N 


79 E 


Parapato 


21 


16 s 


Pakhoi 


. 33 


22 N 


109 E 


Parasnath 


29 


24 N 


Pakies . 


17 


30 S 


29 E 


Paraz 


10 


7S 


Paklau . 


• 32 


8N 


98 E 


Parbati R. . 


28 


25 N 


Pak-nam 


• 32 


13 N 


100 E 


Parengarenga 


40 


35 S 


Pakshan 


32 


10 N 


98 E 


Paritdia . 


19 


15 s 


Palachwe 


19 


22 S 


27 E 


Parman 


39 


9S 


Palala R. 


. 18 


23 S 


28 E 


Parrsboro' 


3 


45 N 


Palamau 


. 24 


23 N 


84 E 


Pairy . 


5 


49 N 


Palamcottah . 


. 26 


8N 


77 E 


Parsa 


24 


25 N 


Palana . 


• 25 


27 N 


73 E 


Partabgarh , 


25 


24 N 


Palasbari 


•^4 


26 N 


91 E 


Partabgarh . 


28 


26 N 


Palhanpur 


■ 25 


24 N 


72 E 


Partabgarh . 


24 


26 N 


Pali 


28 


26 N 


73 E 


Parys 


15 


27 s 


Palk Strait . 


• 30 


10 N 


79 E 


Pascal . 


4 


52 N 


Palkof 


29 


22 N 


84 E 


Pasco . 


10 


II s 


Palla 


19 


23 S 


26 E 


Pasqua . 


4 


SON 


Palladam 


. 26 


II N 


77 E 


Passandava 


22 


13 s 


Pallai . 


30 


10 N 


80 E 


Pasuvanthanai 


27 


9N 


Pallam . 


. 26 


9 N 


76 E 


Patau . 


25 


24 N 


Palma . 


II 


20 N 


10 W 


Patani . 


20 


SN 


Palm-rston . 


37 


12 S 


130 E 


Pataspur 


24 


22 N 


Palmerstone . 


. 40 


40 S 


17s E 


Pataza R. 


16 


27 S 


Palmerton 


• 17 


31 s 


29 E 


Pathri . 


25 


19 N 


Palraerville . 


• 38 


16 S 


144 E 


Patiala . 


28 


30 N 


Palniietti 


13 


30 S 


27 E 


Patiyu . 


32 


10 N 


Palmyra Point 


. 30 


10 N 


80 E 


Patna . 


24 


25 N 


Palmford 


. 18 


27 S 


29 E 


Patoni . 


32 


6N 


Palo . 


■ 32 


2 N 


III E 


Patri 


25 


23 N 


Palverayen 


. 26 


9N 


80 E 


Patriots Klip 


13 


30 S 


Pama . 


20 


II N 


I E 


Pattaeoffe 


30 


10 N 


Pamahom 


18 


24 S 


31 E 


Pattakulam . 


27 


9N 


Pamangkat 


• 32 


I N 


109 E 


Patterson 


13 


33 S 


Pambagora . 


21 


7S 


34 E 


Patteson P. . 


• 41 


14 S 


Pampas 


10 


13 s 


73 W 


Patuakhali . 


24 


22 N 


Pamplemousses 


22 


20 s 


57 E 


Pauking 


33 


27 N 


Pan 


18 


25 s 


29 E 


Paul Pieters Dorp 


16 


27 S 


Panadura 


30 


6N 


80 E 


Paumben Passage 


30 


9N 


Panaivadali . 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Paupancolum 


. 27 


gN 


Panaiyadipatti 


• 27 


9N 


77 E 


Pavanasam . 


27 


8N 


Panakudi 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Pavur 


. 27 


8 N 


Panama 


8 


8N 


79 w 


Paysandu 


10 


32 s 


Panant . 


. 32 


13 N 


loi E 


Peace R. 


6 


56 N 


Pandharpur . 


• 25 


17 N 


74 E 


Peach R. 


38 


'3^, 


Pandietti 


• 39 


10 S 


151 E 


Pearl . 


5 


48 N 


Pangal . 


. 26 


16 N 


78 E 


Pearston . 


• 13 


32 s 


Pangani 


II 


oS 


30 E 


Peddle . 


• 13 


33 S 



Long. 
116 E 

34 E 

77 E 

71 E 

35 E 

34 E 

35 E 

78 E 
78 E 

77 E 

78 E 
8 E 

106 E 
115 E 

115 E 

116 E 
171 E 
175 E 

78 E 
I4SE 
48 W 
62 W 
57 W 
35 W 
2 E 

78 E 
150 E 

42 W 
59 W 
73 E 
77 E 
40 E 

86 E 
77 W 
76 E 

173 E 
33 E 

148 E 
64 W 
93 W 
85 E 

75 K 
81 E 
93 E 
27 E 

108 W 

76 W 
105 W 

48 E 

77 E 

72 E 
6E 

87 E 
31 E 
76 E 

76 E 
99 E 
85 E 

loi E 
71 E 
26 E 

79 E 

77 E 

26 E 
107 E 

90 E 

no E 

30 E 

79 E 

78 E 
77 E 
77 E 
57 W 

121 V/ 
142 E 

88 W 
25 E 

27 E 



124 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. Map No. 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. Map Nc 


. Lat. 


Long. 


Pedro Pt. 


3° 


10 N 


80 E 


Pingtu . 


34 


36 N 


120 E 


Port Darwin . 


37 


12S 


130 E 


Pedrotalagala Mt. . 


3° 


7N 


81 E 


Pingyang 


33 


36 N 


III E 


Port Davey 


40 


43 S 


145 E 


Pegu . 


31 


17 N 


96 E 


Pingyin . 


33 


36 N 


116 E 


Port Desire . 


10 


47 S 


65 W 


Pekan . 


32 


3N 


103 E 


Pingyuanhsien 


34 


37 N 


116 E 


Port d Esny . 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Peking . 


3 


40 N 


117 E 


Pingyueh 


33 


27 N 


107 E 


Port Dickson 


32 


2N 


loi E 


Peldheburee . 


32 


12 N 


99 E 


Finite 


■ 13 


29 S 


27 E 


Port Douglas 


38 


16 S 


145 E 


Pelican Falls . 


S 


52 N 


100 W 


Pinnacle 


38 


21 S 


148 E 


Port Elizabeth 


13 


33 S 


25 E 


Pelican L. 


4 


50 N 


io5W 


Pioneer . 


38 


13 s 


142 E 


Port Essington 


6 


54 N 


130 W 


Pella (Cape Colony) 


12 


29 S 


19 E 


Pipiriki . 


40 


39 S 


175 E 


Port Florence 


21 





35 E 


Pella (Pretoria) . 


i8 


25 S 


26 E 


Piquetberg 


12 


■XQ. S 


18 E 


Port Glasgow 


39 


10 S 


149 E 


Pemba B. 


21 


12 S 


40 E 


Piranhas 


10 


9S 


37 W 


Port Hamilton 


36 


3-4 N 


127 E 


Pemba Is. 


21 


ss 


39 E 


Pirara . 


9 


3N 


59 W 


Port Heral.l . 


19 


16 S 


35 E 


Pemoi . 


20 


8N 


oW 


Pirojpur 


24 


22 N 


90 E 


Port Hibbs . 


40 


42 s 


145 E 


Pemteno 


21 


10 S 


38 E 


Pitanguy 


10 


19 S 


45 W 


Port Kissinga 


21 


12 S 


40 E 


Penang 


32 


SN 


100 E 


Pitoa . 


20 


9N 


13 E 


Port Lazaref. 


36 


39 N 


127 E 


Penguin Pt. 


21 


11 S 


40 E 


Pitoria . 


29 


23 N 


85 E 


Port Louis . 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Penhalonga 


19 


18 s 


32 E 


Pitou Riv. Noire 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Port Maria . 


8 


18 N 


76 W 


Penhold 


6 


52 N 


114 W 


Pitsanuloke . 


31 


17 N 


100 E 


Port Mollendo 


10 


15 s 


74 w 


Pense . 


4 


50 N 


105 W 


Pitsing . 


17 


30 S 


28 E 


Port '/orant 


8 


17 N 


76 W 


Pehtecost 


41 


16 S 


168 E 


Pittsworth 


38 


27 S 


151 E 


Port Moresby 


39 


9S 


147 E 


Penticton 


6 


49 N 


119 W 


Pitupa . 


40 


39 S 


175 E 


Port Morien 


3 


46 N 


59 W 


Pentland 


38 


20 S 


145 E 


Piwandi 


27 


9N 


78 E 


Port Mulgrave 


3 


45 N 


61 W 


Penukonda . 


26 


14 N 


77 E 


Placentia 


7 


47 N 


54 W 


Port Newchwang . 


34 


41 N 


122 E 


Perankudi 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Placentia B. . 


7 


47 N 


54 W 


Port Nolloth . 


12 


29 S 


17 E 


Perie . 


13 


32 S 


27 E 


Placo 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Port of France 


41 


22 S 


167 E 


Perim Is. 


II 


10 N 


40 E 


Plaine Magnier 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Port of Spain 


8 


10 N 


61 W 


Pernambuco . 


10 


8S 


35 W 


Plaisance, Guiana 


9 


7N 


58 W 


Port Patteson 


41 


14 S 


167 E 


Perppulankulam . 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Plaisance, Mauritiu 


s 22 


20 s 


.57 E 


Port Pegasus 


40 


47 S 


168 E 


Perry Mt. 


38 


25 s 


151 E 


Plassey . 


24 


23 N 


88 E 


Port Pirie 


37 


32 s 


138 E 


Perth . 


37 


32 s 


115 E 


Platrand 


18 


27 S 


29 E 


Port Royal . 


8 


17 N 


76 W 


Perumanal . 


27 


8 N 


77 E 


Plava Pt. 


9 


8N 


59 W 


Port Said 


II 


30 N 


30 E 


Peshawar 


28 


33 N 


71 E 


Playford 


37 


14 S 


■32 E 


Port St. Johns 


17 


31 s 


29 E 


Petarbar 


29 


23 N 


85 E 


Plumas 


5 


roN 


99 W 


Port Shepstone 


14 


30 s 


30 E 


Pi't Riviere . 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Plumstead Sta. 


12 


34 S 


18 E 


Port Simpson 


6 


54 N 


130 W 


PetrusviUe 


13 


30 s 


24 E 


Plumtree 


19 


20 S 


27 E 


Port Sweitenham . 


32 


2N 


loi E 


Petty Harbour 


7 


47 N 


53 W 


Pnom Penh . 


32 


II N 


105 E 


Port Waikato 


40 


37 S 


175 E 


Phalton . 


25 


18 N 


74 E 


Po'nt Riche . 


7 


50 N 


57 W 


Port Weld . 


32 


4N 


100 E 


Phatiyatola . 


29 


23 N 


84 E 


Pokharan 


25 


27 N 


72 E 


Portage la Prairie 


5 


50 N 


98 W 


Philip I. 


41 


29 s 


168 E 


Pokhuria 


29 


23 N 


86 E 


Porterville 


12 


32 s 


18 E 


Philip R. 


39 


7S 


143 E 


Pol 


25 


24 N 


73 E 


Portland 


12 


33 S 


22 E 


Philippolis 


13 


30 s 


25 E 


Polavaram 


. 26 


17 N 


81 E 


Porto Alegre . 


10 


30 S 


51 w 


Philipstown . 


13 


30 s 


24 E 


PoUanaruwa . 


30 


8N 


81 E 


Porto Nova 


20 


6N 


2E 


Phillips Hr. 


39 


gS 


149 E 


Polur . 


26 


12 N 


79 E 


Porto Rica 


8 


18 N 


67 W 


Phokeng 


18 


25 s 


27 E 


Polynesia 


41 


15 s 


180 E 


Porto Seguro 


20 


6N 


lE 


Phokwani 


15 


27 s 


24 E 


Pomeroy 


14 


28 S 


30 E 


Porus . 


8 


18 N 


77 w 


Pialba . 


38 


25 S 


153 E 


Pomerum R. . 


9 


7N 


58 W 


Posen 


5 


50 N 


97 W 


Picton . 


40 


41 s 


174 E 


Pomerun B. . 


9 


7N 


58 W 


Poshan . 


34 


36 N 


117 E 


Picton, N.S. . 


3 


45 N 


62 W 


Pondicherry 


26 


12 N 


79 E 


Post 


19 


21 S 


27 E 


Piecer Both 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Pondoland . 


14 


30 S 


29 E 


Post R. . 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Piechen . 


34 


37 N 


118 E 


Pongola R. (Trans 








Post Relief . 


13 


32 s 


26 E 


Pieimuns, R. 


40 


41 S 


145 E 


vaal) 


18 


23 s 


27 E 


PotR. . 


17 


30 s 


28 E 


Pierson . 


4 


49 N 


loi W 


Pongola R. (Zulu 








Potaro R. 


9 


4N 


59 W 


Pietermaritzburg . 


14 


29 S 


30 E 


land) . 


. 16 


27 S 


31 E 


Potchatstroom 


II 


20 S 


20 E 


Pie'ersburg . 


18 


23 S 


29 E 


Ponmunna . 


27 


8 N 


77 E 


Potchefstroom 


18 


26 s 


27 E 


Piet Retief 


16 


27 S 


30 E 


Ponnaiyar R 


. 26 


12 N 


78 E 


Potfontein 


13 


30 s 


24 E 


Pigs Peak 


16 


25 s 


31 E 


Ponneri . 


. 26 


13 N 


80 E 


Potgietersrust 


18 


24 s 


29 E 


Pike L. . 


5 


53 N 


96 W 


Ponoka . 


4 


52 N 


113 W 


Potoro . 


9 


5N 


59 W 


Pilands Herg 


18 


25 s 


27 E 


Pontianak 


32 





109 E 


Pottalpatti . 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Pilcomayo R. 


10 


22 s 


61 W 


Poona . 


• 25 


18 N 


74 E 


Potzdam 


13 


32 s 


27 E 


Pile of Bones R. 


4 


50 N 


104 W 


Poonamalee . 


. 26 


13 N 


80 E 


Pouch Cove . 


7 


47 N 


53 W 


Pilgrims Rest 


18 


25 S 


30 E 


Poothoor 


27 


9N 


78 E 


Poudre d'Or . 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Pilibbi . 


28 


28 N 


79 E 


Porbandar . 


• 25 


21 N 


69 E 


Poyang L. 


33 


28 N 


116 E 


Pillar. Cape . 


40 


43 S 


148 E 


Poplar Pt. . 


5 


coN 


98 W 


Prahsu . 


20 


SN 


iW 


Pilot Mound . 


S 


49 N 


98 W 


Porahat . 


29 


22 N 


85 E 


Prairie . 


38 


20 S 


144 E 


Pinchards Is. 


7 


49 N 


53 W 


Port Adams . 


• 33 


39 N 


122 E 


Prairie River . 


4 


53 N 


102 W 


Pinchow She . 


33 


35 N 


108 E 


Port Alfred . 


13 


33 S 


26 E 


Prakaspuram 


27 


8N 


78 E 


Pinchow Sung 


34 


37 N 


117 E 


Port Antonio 


8 


18 N 


76 W 


Prampram 


20 


SN 


oE 


Pinda . 


19 


17 s 


35 E 


Port Arthur . 


33 


38 N 


122 E 


Pratabgarh 


28 


24 N 


74 E 


Pind Dadan Khan 


28 


32 N 


73 E 


Port Arthur (Algor 


na) 5 


48 N 


89 W 


Pretoria 


iS 


25 s 


28 E 


Pine C. 


7 


46 N 


53 W 


Port Augusta 


• 37 


31 s 


138 E 


Prieska . 


12 


29 s 


23 E 


Pinehill . 


38 


23 s 


147 E 


Port au Prince 


8 


18 N 


72 W 


Prince Albert (Can- 








Pine Lake 


6 


52 N 


113 W 


Port aux Basque 


7 


47 N 


59 W 


ada . 


4 


53 N 


io6W 


Pines, Is. of . 


41 


23 S 


167 E 


Port Beaufort 


12 


34 S 


20 E 


Prince Albert (S. 








Pinetown 


14 


29 S 


30 E 


Port Bevan 


• 39 


7S 


143 E 


Africa) 


12 


33 S 


22 E 


Pingchuan 


34 


41 N 


118 E 


Port Blair . 


31 


II N 


92 E 


Prince Alfred's Ham- 








Pingkuksien . 


34 


40 N 


117 E 


Port Chalmers 


40 


46 S 


171 E 


let . 


12 


33 S 


19 E 


Pingliang 


33 


35 N 


106 E 


Port Curtis . 


• 38 


24 S 


151 E 


Prince Rupert 


6 


54 N 


130 W 


Pinglo . 


33 


24 N 


iioE 


Port Dalrymple 


. 40 


41 s 


147 E 


Prince's Is. . 


II 


oN 


oE 



INDEX 



125 



Place. Map No 
Princess Charlotte B. 38 
Princeton 
Prince of Wales Is, 

(Brit. Columbia) 
Prince of Wales Is, 

(Queensland) 
Priors . 
Proddatur 



Lat. 
14 S 

49 N 



Long. 

144 E 
121 W 



6 55 N 132 W 



Prome . 

Proserpine 

Prospect 

Prospect Mt. 

Prot Hill 

Providence C. 

Provost . 

Puchow . 

Pudukkottai 

Pudukotai 

Pudur . 

Puerto Barrios 

Pukchen 

Pulicat . 

Puliyankudi 

Pullampet 

Pungchen 

Pung Dok 

Pungwe 

Puno 

Puong Yang .. 

Puquios . 

Purandhar 

Purdy Is. 

Puri 

Purnea . 

Purngarh 

Purrakay 

Purulia . 

Pururu . 

Purus R. 

Putai . 

Puthiamputhur 

Puttalam 

Pyapalli 

Pycktong 

Pyinmana 

Pyong Taik 

Qahazana 
Qalambana 
Qalha's Nek . 
Qangu . 
Qingeni . 
Qora 
Qora R. 
Qota 

Quamanea 
Qu'Appelle . 
Qu'App' He Ft. 
Qu'Appelle R. 
Quartier Militaire 
Quatre Bornes 
Qudeni Mts. . 
Quebec . 

Queen Charlotte Is, 
Queens Kraal 
Queensland N. 
Queens Mercy 
Queenstown (Brit 

Guiana) 
Queenstown (Gra 

harastown) . 
Queenstown (New 

Zealand) 
Quelpart Is. 
Quembetshe's 
Que-Que 
Quesnel . 
Quesnel L. 



38 
13 
26 

31 
38 
17 
16 

3 
40 

4 
33 
26 
27 
27 

8 

36 
26 
27 
26 
36 
36 



36 
10 

25 

39 
19 
24 

2.5 

27 
24 



34 
27 

30 
26 

36 
31 
36 

17 

17 

13 

17 

17 

17 

17 

17 

13 

4 

4 

4 

22 

22 

16 

2 

6 

16 

37 

17 



10 S 
30 S 
14 N 

19 N 

20 S 

30 S 
27 S 
46 N 

46 S 
52 N 
3SN 
10 N 

8N 

9N 

16 N 

40 N 

13 N 
9 N 

14 N 

38 N 
37 N 

20 S 
iSS 

39 N 

26 S 
18 N 

2 S 

21 S 
25 N 
16 N 

8 N 
23 N 
6S 
5S 
37 N 
8 N 
8 N 

15 N 

40 N 
20 N 
36 N 

32 S 

31 S 
30 S 

30 s 

31 s 

32 s 
32 s 

31 s 
31 s 

50 N 
SoN 
SoN 
20 s 
20 s 
28 s 

47 N 
52 N 

27 S 
20 S 
30 s 

6N 



13 31 s 



40 
36 
17 
19 
6 
6 



45 S 
33 N 
29 .S 
18 S 
53 N 
52 N 



142 E 

25 E 
78 E 

95 E 
148 E 

28 E 

29 E 
64 W 

167 E 

iioW 

no E 

78 E 

78 E 

78 E 
89 W 

128 E 
80 E 
77 E 

79 E 

124 E 
126 E 

34 E 
70 W 

126 E 
70 W 
74 E 

146 E 
28 E 
87 E 
73 E 

77 E 
85 E 
34 E 
63 W 

117 E 

78 E 

80 E 
78 E 

125 E 

96 E 

127 E 

28 E 
28 E 

27 E 

28 E 

29 E 
28 E 
28 E 
28 E 

27 E 
104 W 
103 W 
102 W 

57 E 

57 E 

30 E 
70 W 

131 W 
32 E 
140 E 

28 E 

58 W 

26 E 

169 E 

126 E 

29 E 
29 E 

122 W 
121 w 



Place. 

Quilimane 
Quilon . 
Quirpon Is. . 
Quito . 
Quitta . 
Quixera Mobim 
Qumbu . 
Quop 
Qutb . 
Qutsa . 
Qutsa, Lower 
Qutubeni 



Rabai . 

Raba's 

Rabat . 

Rabu . 

Race, Cape 

Radhapuram 

Radisson 

Raghanathpur 

Raghavapuram 

Raha . 

Rahe 

Raheng 

Rahuri . 

Rai Bareli 

Raichur 

Raiganj 

Rainy River . 

Rajahmundry 

Rajakari 

Rajapalaiyam 

Rajapur 

Rajgarh 

Rajkot . 

Rajosingamangalam 

Rakal . 

Raleigh 

Rallavarani . 

Ramah . 

Ramainandro 

Ramallakota 

Rambukkana 

Ramdurg 

Ramea Is. 

Ramee Is. 

Rameswaram 

Ramgarh 

Ramnad 

Ramnagar 

Ramoutsa 

Rampur 

Rampur Boalia 

Rampur Hat 

Ramtoliya 

Ranaghat 

Ranchi . 

Randfontein 

Rangamati 

Rangitiki R. 

Rangitukia 

Rangoon 

Rangpur 

Raniganj 

Ranneivilie 

Rano 

Ranpur . 

Rapid City 

Rapri R. 

Rathwell 

Ratlam 

Ratnagiri 

Ratnapura 

Ravensfell 

Ravenswood 

Ravenswood June 



Map No. 



Is. 



26 
7 



17 
32 
28 
17 
17 
17 



17 
II 
20 

7 
26 

4 
29 
26 
24 
29 
31 
25 
28 
26 
24 

5 
26 

27 
26 

25 
28 

25 
27 
21 

5 
26 

13 
22 
26 
30 
25 
7 
31 
30 
29 
27 
28 
18 
28 
24 
24 
29 
24 
24 
18 
24 
40 
40 

31 
24 

24 
26 
20 
25 
5 
28 

5 

25 

25 
30 
13 
38 
38 



Lat. 

17 S 
8 N 

51 N 
oS 

5 
5S 

31 S 
I N 

28 N 

32 S 
32 S 

31 s 



3S 

29 s 

33 N 

9N 

46 N 
8 N 

52 N 
23 N 
17 N 
26 N 

23 N 
17 N 
19 N 
26 N 

16 N 

25 N 

48 N 

17 N 
9N 
9N 

16 N 

24 N 

22 N 
9N 
oS 

49 N 
13 N 
29 S 
19 S 

15 N 
7N 

16 N 

47 N 

19 N 
• 9N 

23 N 
9N 

32 N 

24 S 
28 N 
24 N 

24 N 

22 N 

23 N 
23 N 

26 S 

22 N 
40 S 
38 S 

16 N 

25 N 

23 N 
8 N 

II N 

27 N 

50 N 
27 N 
49 N 
23 N 

17 N 
6N 

31 s 

20 S 
19 S 



Long. 
37 E 

76 E 
55 W 
78 W 

oE 

40 W 

28 E 

iioE 

77 E 
27 E 
27 E 
27 E 



39 E 

29 E 

7W 

5E 

53 W 

77 E 

107 W 

86 E 

80 E 

92 E 
85 E 

100 E 

74 E 

81 E 
77 E 
88 E 
94 W 

81 E 
77 E 

77 E 
73 E 
76 E 
71 E 

78 E 
31 E 

91 W 
80 E 

24 E 
46 E 

78 E 
80 E 

75 E 
57 W 

93 E 

79 E 
85 E 

78 E 
73 E 

25 E 

79 E 
88 E 

87 E 
85 E 

88 E 
85 E 
27 E 

92 E 
175 E 
178 E 

96 E 

89 E 
87 E 
78 E 

8E 

68 E 

100 W 

82 E 
98 W 
75 E 
73 E 

80 E 
27 E 

147 E 
146 E 



Place, 
Ravi R. 
Rawal Pindi . 
Rawdon 
Rawson 
Rayadrug 
Ray, Cape 
Rayner . 
Rayton , 
Recife . 
Recife C. 
Red Cliff 
Red Deer 
Red Deer R. 
Red Deer R. 
Red House 
Red Indian L. 
Red L. . 
Reddershurg 
Reed L. 
Regina . 
Rehoboth 
Rejang . 
Rejang R. 
Remine . 
Remport Mt. 
Remport R. 
Rennell I. 
Resolution Ft 
Ressano Garcia 
Reston . 
Resurrection 
Retreat . 
Revelstoke 
Rew R. . 
Rtwa R. 
Rewari 
Rhio 

Rhodes Drift 
Rhodesia 
Ribe . 
Rice L. . 
Richards B. 
Richelieu 
Richibucto 
Richmond, 

Colony 
Richmond, Natal 
Richmond, Queens 

land . 
Riebeck 
Rietfuntein 
Rietfontein 
Riet Vley 
Riga 

Rio Clare 
Rio Cuarto 
Rio de la Plata 
Rio del Rey 
Rio de Oro 
Rio de Janiiiro 
Rio Mouri 
Rio Pardo 
Risang . 
Rivera . 
Riverdale 
Rivenna 
Riversdale 
Riverside 
Riviire S^che 
Robben I. 
Robert B. 
Robertson 
Rock I. 
Rockhampton 
Rockingham B, 
Rockstone 
Rockvale 
Rocky Pt. 



Cape 



Map No 


Lat. 


. 28 


31 N 


. 28 


33 N 


3 


45 N 


10 


43 S 


. 26 


14 N 


7 


47 N 


13 


31 s 


. 18 


25 s 


10 


7S 


• 13 


34 S 


9 


2N 


6 


52 N 


4 


51 N 


6 


53 N 


13 


33 S 


7 


48 N 


5 


51 N 


• 15 


29 S 


5 


54 N 


4 


SoN 


II 


20 S 


• 32 


2N 


■ 32 


2N 


. 40 


42 s 


22 


20 s 


22 


20 s 


41 


nS 


2 


61 N 


18 


25 s 


4 


49 N 


17 


30 S 


12 


34 S 


6 


51 N 


9 


2N 


9 


3N 


. 28 


28 N 


• 32 


I N 


. 18 


22 S 


II 


10 S 


21 


3S 


5 


53 N 


. 16 


28 S 


22 


20 S 


3 


46 N 



, V 



do 



13 
14 



31 s 

29 S 



38 


20 S 


13 


33 S 


13 


3'f 


13 


30 S 


12 


33 S 


4 


50 N 


10 


21 S 


10 


33 S 


10 


35 S 


20 


4N 


II 


20 N 


10 


23 s 


II 


oN 


10 


30 S 


32 


2N 


10 


30 S 


14 


28 N 


37 


32 S 


12 


34 S 


17 


30 S 


22 


20 s 


12 


33 S 


7 


47 N 


12 


33 S 


39 


5S 


38 


23 S 


38 


18 s 


9 


SN 


18 


"^1 


40 


43 S 



Long. 
73 E 
73 E 

63 W 
65 W 
76 E 
59 W 
26 E 

28 E 
35 W 
25 E 
57 W 

114 W 
III W 
102 w 

25 E 

56 W 

94 W 

26 E 
100 W 
105 W 

10 E 
III E 
114 E 
145 E 

57 E 
57 E 

160 E 

104 W 
32 E 

loi W 
30 E 
18 E 

118 W 

57 W 

58 W 
76 E 

105 E 

29 E 
20 E 
39 E 

95 W 
32 E 
57 E 

64 W 

24 E 

30 E 

143 E 
26 E 

23 E 

24 E 
18 E 

loi W 
49 W 
64 W 

56 W 

8E 
10 W 
44 W 
10 E 
53 W 
103 E 
C4W 
29 E 

145 E 
21 E 
29 E 

57 E 

18 E 
53 W 

19 E 
148 E 
150 E 

146 E 

58 W 
31 E 

14s E 



126 



CHURCHMAN*S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 


Map No 


. Lat. 


Long. 


Rooky Pt. . 


22 


20 S 


S7E 


Rode . 


• 17 


30 S 


29 E 


Rogo 


20 


II N 


7E 


Rohtak 


28 


28 N 


76 E 


Rolabilis 


17 


30 S 


29 E 


Roland . 


17 


30 S 


28 E 


Rol Fontein . 


. 16 


26 S 


29 E 


Roma . 


13 


29 s 


27 E 


Roma 


■ 38 


26 s 


148 E 


Ron 


• 25 


ISN 


75 E 


Rondavel 


13 


31 s 


27 E 


Rondebosch . 


12 


33 S 


18 E 


Roodefontein . 


12 


32 S 


21 E 


Roode Kranz 


13 


32 S 


25 E 


Roodepoort . 


. 18 


26 S 


27 E 


Rooijantjesfontei 


n . 18 


26 S 


26 E 


Room . 


• 39 


3S 


13s E 


Roorkee 


. 28 


29 N 


78 E 


Roosenekal . 


. 18 


2SS 


30 E 


Roper R. 


■ 37 


14 s 


13s E 


Rorke's Drift 


16 


28 s 


30 E 


Rosario 


10 


33 S 


60E 


Rosebelle 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Rosedale 


■ 38 


24 S 


151 E 


Rose Ft. 


• 13 


32 s 


25 E 


Rose Hill 


22 


20 N 


57 E 


Rosenfeld 


5 


49 N 


9;W 


Rosetta 


14 


29 S 


29 E 


Ross 


. 18 


25 s 


31 E 


Rossel Is. 


41 


11 s 


155 E 


Rossmore 


S 


48 N 


90W 


Rossport 


5 


48 N 


87 W 


Rothesay 


3 


45 N 


6s W 


Rotorua L. . 


. 40 


38 S 


176 E 


Rouleau 


4 


50 N 


104 W 


Rouxville 


• IS 


30 s 


26 E 


Rovuma R. . 


21 


II S 


39 E 


Roza 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Rubiana 


• 41 


9S 


159 E 


Rudolf L. . 


II 


oN 


30 E 


Ruga Ruga 


21 


7S 


33 E 


Ruhanga 


21 


oS 


30 E 


Ruitji . 


II 


oS 


30 E 


Rukwa L. 


21 


SS 


33 E 


Rumanika's . 


21 


iS 


30 E 


Rumaruma 


■ 39 


10 S 


150 E 


Rungwa 


21 


7S 


31 E 


Rungwa 


21 


9S 


33 E 


Rupert's Land 


2 


S3N 


100 W 


Rupununi R. . 


9 


3N 


59 W 


Rusapi 


iq 


18 S 


31 E 


Russell . 


4 


51 N 


102 W 


Rustenburg 


18 


25 s 


27 E 


Rusthof . 


18 


27 s 


29 E 


Rutengani 


21 


9S 


33 E 


Ruviko . 


• 19 


18 s 


35 E 


Riizambo's . 


19 


16 s 


32 E 


Rye Bay 


21 


12 S 


34 E 


Siibanill.i 


10 


II N 


75 W 


Sabi R. . 


■ 19 


2. S 


33 E 


S.ible C. 


3 


43 N 


65 w 


Sabure 


20 


II N 


oW 


Sachego R. 


5 


54 N 


92 W 


Saokville 


3 


46 N 


64 W 


Sad^ya 


■ 24 


27 N 


95 E 


Sado 


• 35 


38 N 


138 E 


Sadra . 


• 25 


23 N 


72 E 


Saffi 


II 


30 N 


oW 


Saga . 


■ 35 


33 N 


130 E 


Sagaing 


■ 31 


22 N 


96 E 


Sagalla . 


21 


3S 


38 E 


Sagar . 


25 


14 N 


74 E 


Sagase . 


21 


5S 


37 E 


Saharanpur . 


. 28 


30 N 


77 E 


Sahibganj 


• 24 


24 N 


8s E 


Sahwan . 


■ 25 


26 N 


68 E 


Saiem . 


• 13 


33 S 


26 E 



Place. Map No. 
Saigon ... 32 
St. Aidai . . 19 
St. Albans . 17 
St. Ambrose . . 17 
St. Andrew,' C. 22 
St. Andrews (New- 
Brunswick . . 3 
St. Andrew (Zulu- 
land) . . 16 
St. Andrews (Kaf- 

fraria) . . 17 
St. Andrews (Kaf- 

fraria) . . 17 
St. Andrews (Kaf- 

fraria) ... 17 

St. Anne . . 5 

St. Ann's . . 17 

St. Ann's Bay . 8 
St. Augustine (Mash- 

onaland) . 19 
St. Augustine 

(Rorke's Drift) . 16 
St. Augustine (Kaf- 

fraria) . 
St. Augustine Bay 

(Madagascar) . 22 
St. Augustine's 

(Kaffraria) . . 17 
St. Barnabas. 17 
St. Barnabas. 17 
St. Bartholomew . 17 
St. Bartholomew 8 
St. Bede . 17 
St. Bede's . . 19 
St. Columba's . 17 
St. Cuthberts . 17 
St. Cuthberts(Naial) 14 
St. Cyprians 17 
St. Davids . . 17 
St. Eduardo 10 
St. Faith's . . 17 
St. Francis Bay . 13 
St. Francis C. 13 
St. George (Queens- 
land) . 
St. George (New- 
foundland) . . 7 
St. George (New 

Brunswick) • . 3 
St. George, C. . 7 
St, George's Bay 7 
St. George's L. . 7 
St. Helena . 11 
St. Helena Bay . 11 
St. James . s 
St, John(N.B.) 3 
St. John . 8 
St. John Bay. . 7 
St. John River . 3 
St. John's (Kaffraria) 17 
St. John's ( Newfound- 
land) . . 7 
St. John's River . 17 
St. Josd (Guatemala) 8 
St. Jos^ (Costa Rica) 8 
St. Joseph L. . . 5 
St. Joseph's . . 13 
St. Kitts 8 
St. Lawrence. . 38 
St. Lawrence Bay. 3 
St. Lawrence R. . 2 
St. Leonard Grand 

Falls . . 3 

St. Louis . . II 

St. Luce Bay . . 22 

St. Lucia . . 8 

St. Lucia Bay 16 
St. Lucia C. . .16 



Lat. 
10 N 
20 S 

31 s 

30 S 
16 s 

45 N 

29 S 

32 s 

31 s 

30 s 
49 N 

30 S 
18 N 

18 S 

28 S 

17 30 S 



23 S 

30 S 

31 s 

31 s 
30 S 
17 N 
30 S 
20 s 

30 s 

31 s 

30 s 

31 s 

31 S 

22 s 
30 s 
34 S 
34 S 



38 28 S 



48 N 

45 N 
48 N 
48 N 

48 N 
10 S 

30 S 

49 N 

45 N 
18 N 

50 N 

46 N 
32 S 

47 N 

31 s 

14 N 
9N 

51 N 
29 S 
17 N 
22 S 
47 N 
45 N 

47 N 
10 N 
24 S 
14 N 
28 S 
28 S 



Long. 


lOsE 


28 E 


27 E 


28 E 


44 E 


67 W 


31 E 


27 E 


29 E 


29 E 


96 W 


28 E 


77 w 


32 E 


30 E 


28 E 


43 E 


28 E 


29 E 


29 E 


29 E 


62 W , 


29 E 


28 E 


28 E 


28 E 


30 E 


27 E 


29 E 


42 W 


29 E 


25 E 


24 E 


148 E 


58 E 


66 W 


59 W 


58 W 


57 W 


oW 


10 E 


97 W 


66 W 


64 W 


57 W 


67 W 


27 E 


53 W 


29 E 


90 W 


84 W 


90 W 


27 E 


62 W 


149 E 


60 W 


74 W 


67 W 


10 W 


47 E 


60 W 


32 E 


32 E 



Place. Map No. 
St. Lucia L. . .16 
St. Lucia R. . 16 

St. Luiz . . 10 
St. Luke's . . 17 
St. Luke's Engabeni 14 
St. Luzia . . 10 
St. Margaret B. . 3 
St. Mark's (Kaffraria) 17 
St. Mark's (Kaffraria) 17 
St. Mark's (Kaffraria) 17 
St. Martin (West 

Indies) . . 8 
St. Martin L. . s 
St. Martin's (Kaf- 
fraria ... 17 
St. Martin's (N.B.) 3 
St. MaryB. (N.Scotia) 3 
St. Mary C. 22 

St. Mary Is. . . 22 
St. Mary's . . 17 
St. Mary's . . 17 
St. Mary's (Kaffraria) 17 
St. Mary's (Kaf- 
fraria) . . 17 
St, Mary's (Tasmania) 40 
St. Mary's B. (New- 
foundland) . 
St. Mary's Hill 
St. Matthew's 
St. Michael . 
St. Michael's 
St. Mcnica . 
St. Paul de Loanda 
St. Paul (Nova Scotia) 
St. Paul's (Kaffraria) 
St. Paul's (Kaffi aria) 
St. Paul's (Kaffraria) 
St. Paul's (Zulu- 
land . 
St. Peter 

St. Peter (Grahams- 
town) 
St. Peter B . 
St. Peter Is. (Lee- 
ward Is. ) . 
St. Peter's (Grahams- 
town) 
St. Peter's (Nova 



7 
16 

17 



13 
17 
II 

3 
17 
17 
17 

16 
3 

13 
3 



Lat. 
28 8 

28 S 
3S 

30 S 
30 S 
19 S 
44N 

30 S 
32 s 

31 s 

17 N 

SiN 

30 S 
45 N 

44 N 
25 S 
17 S 
30 S 
30 S 

32 s 

30 s 
41 s 

47 N 

27 S 

30 s 

3S 

29 s 

30 s 
oS 

45 N 
30 S 
30 s 

30 s 

28 s 

46 N 

31 s 

45 N 



Long. 
32 E 

32 E 
44W 

29 E 

30 E 

44 W 
64 W 

28 E 
27 E 

29 E 

63 W 
97 W 

29 E 
6s W 
66 W 

45 E 
SoE 
29 E 
29 E 
27 E 

29 E 
148 E 

54 W 
32 E 

29 E 
32 E 

27 E 

28 E 
10 E 
62 W 

30 E 
28 E 
28 E 

31 E 
62 W 

27 E 
60 W 



8 18 N 64 W 
13 32 S 27 E 



Scotia) 


3 


45 N 


60 W 


St. Peter's (Kaffraria) 


17 


32 S 


28 E 


St. Peter's (Kaffraria) 


17 


31 S 


29 E 


St. Peter's (Kaffraria) 


17 


30 S 


28 E 


St. Philip's (Kaffraria) 


17 


30 s 


28 E 


St. Pierre 


7 


46 N 


57 W 


St. Roque C. 


10 


5S 


35 W 


St. Sebastian, C. . 


iS 


22 S 


35 E 


St. Stephen's (New 








Brunswick) 


3 


45 N 


67 W 


St. Stephen's 


17 


32 S 


27 E 


St. Stephen's 


17 


30 S 


28 E 


St. Swithen's 


17 


32 S 


27 E 


St. Thomas (West 








Indies) 


8 


18 N 


6s W 


St. Thomas (Kaf- 








fraria) 


17 


32 S 


27 E 


St. Thom^ C. 


10 


22 S 


41 W 


St. Vincent . 


8 


13 N 


61 W 


St. Vincent (Zulu- 








land . 


16 


28 S 


30 E 


St. Vincent C. (Ma- 








dagascar) 


22 


22 S 


43 E 


Saitsing 


34 


37 N 


116 E 


S;ikai . 


35 


36 N 


136 E 


Sakai . 


35 


34 N 


135 E 


Sakata . 


35 


38 N 


139 E 


Sakete . 


20 


6N 


2E 


Sakini . 


21 


iS 


37 E 


Sakurai . 


3S 


34 N 


136 E 



INDEX 



Jif 



Place. Ma] 
Salaga . 
Salaya . 
Saldanha B. . 
Sale 

Salem (Dutch Guiana) 
Salem (Madras) . 
Salisbury 
Salmon Cove 
Salt Lakes 
Salt R. . 
Salta . 
Saltcoats 
Salto . 
Salt Pans 
Salt Vley 
Salungu 
Salvador 
Salvage 
Salwin R. 
Samaguting 
Samarai 
Samatan 
Saraatave 
Sambanas 
Sambava 
Sambhar, L. 
Samchek 
Samsu . 

Samugaranapuram 
Sanaga R. 
San Christoval 
Sancha Ho. . 
Sanchor. 
Sandalwood . 
Sandgate 
Sandhills 
Sandia . 
Sandoway 
Sand Spruit . 
Sandwich I. . 
Sandwich I. . 
Sandwich Point 
Sandwip 
Sandy C. 
Sandy L. 
Sandya 
Sangesa 
Sang-ju 
Sangli . 
Sangone B. . 
Sang-pan 
Sanguru 
Sanguti R. 
Sani 

Sankaranaiynarkovil 
Sankh, R. 
Sankuru 
Sanna . 
San Salvador 
Sansane Mango 
Sanse . 
Santa . 
Santa Cruz 
Santa Cruz 
Santa F^ 
Santa Maria 
Sta. Maria 
Santhapuram 
Santiago (Chili) . 
Santiago da Cuba 
Santiago (Argentine] 
Santipur 
Santos . 
Sanyati, R. 
Sao Paulo 
Sapele . 
Sapporo 
Sara 



pNo 


Lat. 


20 


8N 


25 


22 N 


12 


33 S 


37 


37 S 


9 


5N 


26 


11 N 


19 


17 S 


7 


47 N 


12 


34 S 


12 


33 S 


10 


24 S 


4 


51 N 


10 


31 s 


II 


20 S 


12 


34 S 


19 


21 S 


8 


14 N 


7 


48 N 


31 


20 N 


24 


25 N 


39 


10 S 


32 


iN 


19 


18 S 


16 


27 .s 


22 


14 s 


28 


27 N 


36 


37 N 


36 


41 N 


27 


8N 


20 


3N 


41 


10 S 


33 


27 N 


25 


25 N 


37 


10 S 


38 


27 s 


9 


SN 


21 


14 s 


31 


18 N 


16 


27 s 


41 


18 s 


39 


2S 


41 


16 s 


24 


22 N 


38 


24 s 


S 


S3N 


10 


53 S 


21 


4S 


36 


36 N 


2S 


17 N 


21 


14 S 


33 


33 N 


19 


17 S 


18 


23 s 


19 


13 s 


27 


9N 


29 


22 N 


II 


oS 


29 


23 N 


II 


13 S 


20 


10 N 


21 


oS 


10 


gS 


10 


17 S 


41 


10 S 


10 


31 s 


41 


14 S 


10 


30 s 


27 


8N 


10 


33 S 


8 


20 N 


10 


26 S 


24 


23 N 


10 


24 S 


19 


17 S 


10 


23 S 


20 


5N 


35 


43 N 


24 


24 N 



53 W 
98 E 

93 E 
iSoE 
109 E 

34 E 
32 E 
50 E 
75 E 
129 E 

127 E 
77 E 
II E 

162 E 
107 E 

72 E 
119 E 
153 E 

57 W 

32 E 

94 E 
29 E 

168 E 
151 E 
168 E 
91 E 
153 E 
94 W 
72 W 
34 E 

128 E 

74 E 
40 E 

104 E 

33 E 

33 E 

34 E 

77 E 
84 E 
20 E 
83 E 

8 E 
oE 

35 E 

78 W 
62 W 

166 E 
62 W 

167 E 
55 W 
77 E 
71 W 

75 W 
64 W 

88 E 
46 W 
29 E 
46 W 

6E 
141 E 

89 E 



Place. 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Long. 


Saraki . 


20 


9N 


5E 


Sarawak 


32 


2N 


112 E 


Sargodha 


28 


32 N 


72 E 


Saribas . 


32 


I N 


III E 


Sarmento 


19 


19 S 


34 E 


Sarota R. 


25 


24 N 


72 E 


Sasaram 


24 


24 N 


85 E 


Saskatchewan 


2 


55 N 


105 W 


Saskatchewan R. 


4 


53 N 


104 W 


Saskatoon 


4 


52 N 


107 W 


Satana . 


25 


20 N 


74 E 


Satankulam 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Satara . 


25 


17 N 


74 E 


Satchiyapuram 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Satlaj 


28 


30 N 


73 E 


Sattur 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Saturn . 


32 


6N 


100 E 


Satyamangalara . 


26 


II N 


77 E 


Saul . 


18 


25 s 


28 E 


Saul's Poort . 


18 


25 S 


27 E 


Saunshi . 


25 


15 N 


75 E 


Savage Cove . 


7 


51 N 


56 W 


Savakasi 


26 


9N 


77 E 


Savalu . 


20 


7N 


2E 


Savanna la Mar 


8 


18 N 


78 W 


Savanne 


5 


49 N 


90W 


Savantyadi . 


25 


16 N 


74 E 


Savanur 


25 


14 N 


75 E 


Savelugu 


20 


9N 


iW 


Sawee Bay 


32 


10 N 


99 E 


Sawi . 


20 


6N 


2E 


Sawyerpuram 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Saxby . 


38 


19 S 


141 E 


Say . 


20 


13 N 


2E 


Sayalakudi . 


27 


9N 


78 E 


Schombie 


13 


31 s 


2SE 


Schoonberg . 


12 


33 S 


21 E 


Schouten Is. . 


39 


3S 


143 E 


Schrieber 


5 


48 N 


86 W 


Scott 


4 


52 N 


108 W 


Scottsburg . 


39 


6S 


147 E 


Scratchley Mt. 


39 


8S 


148 E 


Sea Pt. . 


12 


33 S 


18 E 


Sebanane 


19 


19 S 


26 E 


Sebastian C. 


22 


12 S 


49 E 


Sebattik 


32 


4N 


ii8 E 


Sebayau 


32 


iN 


III E 


Seccondee 


20 


4N 


iW 


Secunderabad 


. 26 


17 N 


78 E 


Secundra 


28 


27 N 


77 E 


Sedra Gulf . 


II 


32 N 


18 E 


Seduan . 


32 


2N 


112 E 


Sefton . 


5 


51 N 


100 W 


Segah R. 


32 


2N 


116 E 


Segalang 


32 


2N 


III E 


Segu-Sikaro 


II 


10 N 


oW 


Sehwan . 


28 


26 N 


67 E 


Sekar 


39 


3S 


132 E 


Seketwayo 


16 


27 S 


30 E 


Sekodumase . 


20 


7N 


I W 


Sekwani 


. 18 


24 s 


26 E 


Selangor 


32 


3N 


loi E 


Selang Pathar 


• 24 


26 s 


'94 E 


Selaru. 


39 


8S 


131 E 


Selepen . 


19 


21 S 


27 E 


Selkirk 


2 


65 N 


13s w 


Selkirk . 


5 


50 N 


97 w 


Selkirk I. 


5 


53 N 


99 W 


Selukwe 


19 


19 S 


29 E 


Selvvyn . 


38 


21 s 


140 E 


Semunjan 


• 32 


I N 


III E 


Sena 


19 


17 S 


34 E 


Sendai . 


35 


39 N 


141 E 


Sendridi 


20 


8 N 


10 E 


Senegal R^ . 


II 


16 N 


10 W 


Senegambia . 


II 


15 N 


10 W 


Seneka . 


IS 


28 S 


27 E 


Sengappadei . 


27 


9N 


78 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Sengara 


32 


7N 


100 E 


Sengottai 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Sennar 


II 


14 N 


35 E 


Seoul . 


36 


37 N 


127 E 


Seram . 


26 


17 N 


77 E 


Serampore 


24 


22 N 


88 E 


Serang . 


39 


4N 


130 E 


Seratok . 


32 


1 N 


III E 


Sereikela 


29 


22 N 


86 E 


Sereraban 


32 


3N 


loi E 


Serenje . 


21 


13 s 


30 E 


Serghkulam 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Serikei . 


32 


I N 


III E 


Serpentine L. 


3 


47 N 


66 W 


Servil . 


26 


15 N 


78 E 


Ses; Is. 


21 


oS 


32 E 


Sesheki . 


19 


17 S 


25 E 


Setagara 


29 


23 N 


85 E 


Setana 


35 


43 N 


140 E 


Settler . 


4 


52 N 


112 W 


Settur . 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Seval . 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Sevalpatti 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Seven Persons 


4 


49 N 


III W 


Severn Ft. . 


2 


56 N 


89 W 


Severn, L. 


5 


53 N 


92 W 


Severn R. 


5 


54 N 


92 W 


Seymour 


6 


51 N 


119 W 


Seymour (Grahams 


- 






town) 


13 


32 S 


26 E 


Shahalate 


18 


22 S 


32 E 


Shahapur 


25 


19 N 


73 E 


Shahapur 


25 


16 N 


74 E 


Shahbandar . 


28 


24 N 


67 E 


Shahgarh 


28 


27 N 


69 E 


Shahjahanpur 


28 


27 N 


29 E 


Shahpur 


2J 


32 N 


72 E 


Shahpura 


23 


25 N 


75 E 


Shaki 


20 


8 N 


3E 


Shakka . 


II 


10 N 


20 E 


Shalawe 


21 


iSS 


38 E 


Shamaduro 


19 


20 S 


34 E 


Shami 


25 


23 N 


71 E 


Shamo . 


19 


17 S 


35 E 


Shangani R. . 


19 


18 S 


28 E 


Shanghai 


33 


32 N 


122 E 


Shanhaikwan 


34 


40 N 


119 E 


Shanhsien 


34 


35 N 


116 E 


Shans . 


31 


21 N 


93 E 


Shantung 


33 


35 N 


118 E 


Shaohing 


33 


30 N 


120 E 


Shari R. 


II 


oN 


10 E 


Shashi . 


19 


21 S 


27 E 


Shashi R. 


19 


21 S 


28 E 


Shashis . 


33 


30 N 


112 E 


Shashun R. . 


20 


11 N 


10 E 


Shawbury 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Sheba . 


5 


49 N 


91 W 


Shebo . 


4 


51 N 


103 W 


Shediao 


3 


45 N 


64 W 


Shekul . 


■ 27 


9N 


78 E 


Shelburne 


3 


44 N 


65 W 


Shellbrook . 


4 


53 N 


107 W 


Shenabawie . 


9 


4N 


59 W 


Shencottah . 


• 27 


9N 


77 E 


Shepherd 


b 


51 N 


113 W 


Shepherd Is. . 


■ 41 


17 S 


168 E 


Sherbrooke 


3 


45 N 


61 W 


Sherghati 


■ 29 


24 N 


84 E 


Sherpur . 


• 24 


25 N 


90 E 


Shiamel 


19 


21 S 


34 E 


Shibamba 


19 


15 s 


28 E 


Shibemba 


II 


10 S 


10 E 


Shibetcha 


• 35 


43 N 


144 E 


Shih-Kou-Shan 


34 


36 N 


116 E 


Shihtao . 


33 


37 N 


122 E 


Shih-tsuen 


• 33 


32 N 


103 E 


Shikarpur 


■ 25 


14 N 


75 E 



128 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 


Map No. 


Lat. 


Shikarpur 


28 


28 N 


Shikewela 


19 


23 S 


Shikoku . 


35 


33 N 


Shikwalla 


18 


22 S 


Shikweld 


18 


23 s 


Shilauvane . 


18 


24 S 


Shilemba 


21 


17 S 


Shiliman 


18 


22 s 


Shillong 


24 


25 N 


Shiloh.Grahamstow 


n 13 


32 s 


Shiloh.Mashonalan 


d 19 


19 s 


Shimba Mt. . 


21 


4S 


Shimbazo 


18 


23 s 


Shimdvva 


19 


17 s 


Shimogar 


25 


13 N 


Shimonoseki . 


35 


34 N 


Shinan . 


33 


30 N 


Shingovo R. . 


18 


22 s 


Shingwedsi R. 


18 


24 S 


Shinto . 


21 


II S 


Shippegan Is. 


3 


47 N 


Shipurios 


19 


16 S 


Shire R. 


II 


10 S 


Shirora . 


19 


20 s 


Shirwa L. 


21 


15 s 


Shiuchow 


33 


25 N 


Shiulung 


33 


22 N 


Shizuoka 


35 


35 N 


Shoal L. Town 


5 


50 N 


Shoal R. Ho. 


5 


S3N 


Shoalwater B, 


■ 38 


22 S 


Sholapur 


25 


17 N 


Shorkot . 


28 


31 N 


Shortland 


40 


37 S 


Shoylagudy 


27 


9N 


Shringonda . 


• 25 


18 N 


Shua R. 


19 


20 S 


Shui-Li-Pu . 


34 


36 N 


Shunking 


33 


31 N 


Shunning 


33 


24 N 


Shunleh 


33 


37 N 


Shunyi . 


34 


40 N 


Shuonga 


19 


17 S 


Shuswap L. . 


6 


51 N 


Shwebo . 


68 


23 N 


Shwegyin 


• 31 


18 N 


Siam Gulf . 


• 32 


II N 


Sian 


• 33 


34 N 


Siangyang 


■ 33 


32 N 


Siar 


• 39 


ss 


Sibayi L. 


i5 


27 S 


Sibombo 


18 


22 S 


Sibsigar 


24 


27 N 


Sibu 


32 


2N 


Sicuco 


19 


21 S 


Sidbury . 


• 13 


33 S 


Sidli 


24 


26 N 


Sidney 


5 


49 N 


S doi . 


• 17 


30 S 


S'engchin 


■ 35 


40 N 


Sieng-Tu 


33 


25 N 


Sierra Leone . 


II 


oN 


S.fuli . 


18 


22 S 


Sigcau's Great Pla 


ce 17 


31 s 


Signal Hill . 


12 


33 S 


Sihlabeni 


17 


32 S 


Sikanjane 


. 18 


22 S 


Sikar . 


25 


28 N 


Sikassiko 


20 


8N 


Sikiang, R. 


■ 33 


23 N 


Sikkira . 


. 24 


27 N 


Silam 


■ 32 


5N 


Silasua 


• 39 


10 s 


Silchar . 


■ 24 


24 N 


Siligury . 


• 24 


26 N 


Silli 


• 29 


23 N 


Silvalsamuthram 


■ 27 


BN 


Simarau 


21 


2S 



Long. 
68 E 
33 E 
133 E 
31 E 

33 E 

30 E 
36 E 

34 E 
92 E 
26 E 
28 E 
39 E 

31 E 
34 E 
75 E 

130 E 

105 E 

33 E 

32 E 

31 E 
64 E 
30 E 
30 E 

34 E 

35 E 

113 E 
112 E 
138 E 
loi W 
loi W 
150 E 

75 E 

72 E 

17s E 

78 E 

74 E 
26 E 

116 E 

106 E 
100 E 

114 E 
116 E 

35 E 
119 W 
95 E 
97 E 
loi E 
109 E 
112 E 
146 E 

32 E 
34 E 
94 E 

III E 

34 E 
26 E 
90E 
99 W 
29 E 

129 E 

119 E 

10 W 

35 E 
29 E 
18 E 
28 E 
35 E 

75 E 
2W 

iioE 
88 E 
118 E 
150 E 
92 E 
88 E 
85 E 
77 E 
35 E 



Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Simba . 


• 19 


22 S 


33 E 


Simbang 


• 39 


6S 


148 E 


Simla 


. 28 


31 N 


77 E 


Simons Bay . 


12 


34 S 


18 E 


Simonstown 


12 


34 S 


18 E 


Sinapa . 


• 39 


9S 


149 E 


Sinchen. 


• 36 


38 N 


124 E 


Sind R. . 


. 28 


25 N 


77 E 


SindiT . 


II 


10 N 


oE 


Sindgi 


• 25 


17 N 


76 E 


Sindhmur 


• 25 


15 N 


76 E 


Sindkheda 


• 25 


21 S 


74 E 


Sinfu . 


• 33 


31 N 


104 E 


Singapore 


• 32 


I N 


103 E 


Singket . 


• 32 


2N 


97E 


Singpur . 


. 28 


24 N 


82 E 


Singyi . 


• 33 


25 N 


105 E 


Sini 


• 29 


22 N 


86 E 


Sining . 


• 33 


36 N 


102 E 


Sinku R. 


■ 15 


39 S 


28 E 


Sinning . 


• 33 


23 N 


108 E 


Sintaihsien . 


34 


35N 


117 E 


Sintaluta 


4 


103 W 


Sipango's 


17 


32 S 


27 E 


Sipifa 


■ 17 


31 s 


27 E 


Sippiparai 


• 27 


9N 


77 E 


Sipra 


. 28 


25 N 


77 E 


Sira 


. 26 


13 N 


76 E 


Sirguja . 


29 


23 N 


84 E 


Sir James Hall Is 


• 36 


37 N 


124 E 


Sirohi 


25 


25 N 


73 E 


Sirsa . 


24 


22 N 


86 E 


Sirsa 


. 28 


29 N 


75 E 


Sirsi 


• 25 


14 N 


74 E 


Sirtoko C. 


• 35 


45 N 


145 E 


Sirur 


25 


18 N 


74 E 


Sitanda 


• 19 


14 S 


27 E 


Sitapur . 


28 


27 N 


80 E 


Sitarampur . 


29 


23 N 


86 E 


Sitonga 


■ 17 


31 s 


27 E 


Sitoza's 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Sittampatti 


■ 27 


10 N 


78 E 


Sittang, R. 


• 31 


18 N 


97 E 


Siugurugui . 


19 


21 S 


33 E 


Siuyen . 


34 


40 N 


122 E 


Siwa 


II 


30 N 


25 E 


Skeena, R. 


6 


55 N 


128 W 


Skeldon 


9 


5N 


57 W 


Slang R. 


17 


31 s 


27 E 


Sledmere 


■ 13 


32 s 


27 E 


Smaldeel 


IS 


28 s 


26 E 


Smithfield . 


15 


30 s 


26 E 


Smith Sound 


7 


48 N 


53 W 


Smitsdorp 


18 


24 S 


29 E 


Smoky R. Post 


6 


56 N 


117 W 


Snowflake 


5 


49 N 


98 W 


Snowshoe L. . 


5 


SI N 


95 W 


Soabala 


22 


16 S 


45 E 


Soahany 


22 


19 s 


44 E 


Sobarom 


29 


23 N 


85 E 


Sobat . 


II 


oN 


30 E 


Sobat, R. 


II 


oN 


30 E 


Sochi 


21 


iss 


33 E 


Socorro 


10 


6N 


73 W 


Soda Ch. 


6 


52 N 


122 W 


Sofala . 


19 


20 S 


34 E 


Sofia, R. 


12 


16 S 


47 E 


Sohna . 


. 28 


27 N 


76 E 


Sokna 


II 


20 N 


10 E 


Sokoto . 


20 


13 N 


5E 


Sokoto, R. . 


20 


13 N 


4E 


Solabari 


24 


26 N 


92 E 


Solomon Is. . 


41 


6S 


160 E 


Sombas . 


• 32 


I N 


109 E 


Somerset (Ca 


pe 






Colony 


12 


34 S 


18 E 


Somerset (Carpe 


n- 






taria) 


• 38 


10 S 


142 E 



Place. M 


ap No 


Lat. 


Somerset (Ruperts- 






land) . 


5 


49 N 


Somerset (Tasmania) 


40 


41 S 


Somerset East 


13 


32 s 


Sonai . 


25 


19 N 


Sonepat 


28 


29 N 


Sone R. 


29 


24 N 


Song . 


32 


2 N 


Song Do 


36 


38 N 


Songir . 


25 


21 N 


Soochow 


33 


31 N 


Soping . 


33 


40 N 


Sorab . 


25 


14 N 


Sorato Mts. 


10 


16 S 


Sordwana B. 


16 


27 S 


Souillac 


22 


20 S 


Sounding L. 


4 


52 N 


Souris . 


3 


46 N 


Souris 


5 


49 N 


South C. 


33 


21 N 


South C. 


40 


43 S 


South C. 


39 


10 S 


Southampton Is. . 


2 


63 N 


Southbarrow 


14 


30 S 


South-East Is. 


39 


8S 


Southern Cross 


37 


31 s 


Southesk 


4 


50 N 


Southeyville . 


17 


31 s 


South Georgia Is. 


10 


54 S 


South Natuna Is. . 


32 


3N 


Southport 


38 


28 S 


South Tokyo. 


79 


36 N 


Sova C. 


35 


45 N 


Spaldings 


17 


31 s 


Spaniard's B. 


7 


47 N 


Spanish Town 


8 


18 N 


Spiloh . 


13 


29 S 


Spionkop (Cape 






Colony) 


13 


31 s 


Spion Kop (Natal) 


14 


28 S 


Spitskop 


13 


29 s 


Spitz Kop 


18 


25 s 


Springbok Fontein 


12 


29 s 


Springbox 


II 


25 S 


Springfield . 


3 


44 N 


Springfontein 


15 


30 S 


Springhill 


3 


45 N 


Springs 


18 


26 S 


Springsure 


38 


24 S 


Springvale 


17 


31 s 


Springvale, Natal . 


14 


30 s 


Spring Vallei 


13 


32 s 


Sprucewell 


18 


26 s 


Sprucewood . 


5 


49 N 


Srinagar 


28 


34 N 


Srivilliputtur . 


27 


9N 


Stabbert 


18 


23 S 


Stakwe . 


17 


31 s 


Stamford 


38 


21 S 


Standerton 


18 


26 s 


Stanford 


12 


34 S 


Stanger 


14 


29 s 


Stanhope 


33 


28 s 


Stanley (Falkland Is. 


10 


51 s 


Stanley (Tasmania) 


40 


40 s 


Stanley F alls (Africa) 


II 


oS 


Stanley Pool 


II 


oS 


Starbuck 


5 


49 N 


Star City 


4 


52 N 


Star Park 


41 


14 S 


Steel . 


5 


48 N 


Stefani L. 


II 


oN 


Stellarton 


3 


45 N 


Stellenbosch 


12 


33 S 


Stephenville 


7 


48 N 


Sterkspruit 


13 


30 S 


Sterkstroora . 


13 


31 s 


Stewart Is. , 


41 


8S 



Long. 

98 W 

145 E 
25 E 

75 E 
77 E 
83 E 

113 E 

126 E 

74 E 

120 E 
112 E 

74 E 
67 W 
32 E 
57 E 

iioW 

62 W 

100 w 

121 E 

146 E 
150 E 

85 W 

30 E 
131 E 
119 E 
112 W 

27 E 
36 W 

109 E 
IS3E 
138 E 

142 E 

28 E 
53 W 

76 W 

27 E 

24 E 

29 E 

25 E 

31 E 
17 E 
10 E 
64 W 

25 E 
64 W 

28 E 
148 E 

28 E 

30 E 

26 E 

29 E 
88 W 

75 E 

77 E 
29 E 

27 E 

143 E 
29 E 
19 E 

31 E 
152 E 

59 W 
145 E 

25 E 
iSE 
97 W 

104 W 
168 E 
86 W 
35 E 
62 W 
19 E 
58 W 
27 E 

26 E 
164 E 



INDEX 



129 



Place. Map No. Lat. 
Stewart Is. (N.Z.) . 40 47 S 



Steynsburg . 


13 


31 s 


Stitkene R. . 


6 


56 N 


Stonehenge . 


17 


29 S 


Stonewall 


5 


50 N 


Stormberg Junction 


13 


31 s 


Stormel . 


38 


23 s 


Stoughton 


4 


49 N 


Strahan 


40 


42 S 


Strasburg 


4 


SiN 


Strathcona . 


6 


S3N 


Strickland R. 


39 


7S 


Stroma 


4 


52 N 


Stroom 


13 


30 S 


Stuarts Town 


14 


30 s 


Student I. 


41 


II s 


Stumpnose . 


12 


32 s 


Sturgeon Falls 


S 


43 N 


Stutterheim 


13 


32 S 


Suai R. 


32 


3N 


Suakim . 


II 


10 N 


Suanhwa 


33 


40 N 


Siianhwafu 


34 


40 N 


Suau 


39 


10 S 


Subarnarekha R. . 


29 


22 N 


Subarnarekhi . 


24 


21 N 


Suckling Mt. 


39 


9S 


Sucre . 


10 


18 S 


Sud Est C. 


39 


8S 


Suez 


II 


20 N 


Suffield . 


4 


SoN 


Suifu 


33 


28 N 


Snigam . 


25 


24 N 


Suitingfu 


33 


31 N 


Sukchen 


36 


39 N 


Sukkur . 


28 


27 N 


Sullivan L. . 


4 


53 N 


Sultanpur (Lucknow 


28 


26 N 


Summerside 


3 


46 N 


Sumrahu 


25 


26 N 


Sundarbans 


24 


22 N 


Sunday Is. 


39 


9S 


Sunday R. 


14 


28 S 


Sundwana 


17 


31 s 


Sung-Chia-Kuan- 






Chuang 


34 


36 N 


Sung-Kiang . 


33 


31 N 


Sunthow 


33 


24 N 


Supa 


25 


15 N 


Superior, L. 


2 


47 N 


Surandei ' . 


27 


8N 


Surat (Bombay P.) 


25 


21 N 


Surat (Brisbane) 


38 


27 S 


Suri 


24 


23 N 


Surma 


20 


II N 


Suru 


19 


16 S 


Susa 


II 


30 N 


Sussex 


3 


4SN 


Sutherland 


12 


32 s 


Suviseshapuram 


27 


8N 


Su-won . 


36 


37 N 


Suyang . 


33 


28 N 


Swan L. 


5 


52 N 


Swan R. 


37 


31 s 


Swan River 


4 


52 N 


Swatow . 


■33 


23 N 


Swellendam 


12 


34 S 


Swift Current 


4 


SoN 


Sydney (Cape Bre- 






ton Is.) 


3 


46 N 


Sydney, N.S.W. . 


37 


33 S 


Sydney Mines 


3 


46 N 


Sylhet . 


24 


2SN 


Symbu . 


21 


8S 


Syriam . 


31 


16 N 


Szecheng 


33 


2SN 


Szenan . 


33 


28 N 


Szengen. 


33 


24 N 


Szmau Esraok 


33 


22 N 



Long. 
168 E 

25 E 
130 W 

29 E 
97 W 

26 E 
150 E 
102 W 
i4SE 
105 W 

113 W 
142 E 
112 W 

26 E 

30 E 
1S3E 

17 E 
92 W 

27 E 

114 E 
30 E 

iiSE 
■ 115 E 

150 E 
87 E 
87 E 

149 E 
65 W 

148 E 
30 E 

in W 
104 E 

71 E 
107 E 
125 E 

69 E 
III W 

82 E 
63 W 

70 E 
89 E 

150 E 

30 E 

28 E 

117 E 
121 E 
III E 
74 E 
87 W 
77 E 

72 E 

149 E 
87 E 

o W 

31 E 
10 E 
65 W 
20 E 
77 E 

127 E 
losE 
loi W 

116 E 
loi W 

117 E 
20 E 

108 W 

61 W 

150 E 
60 W 
91 E 
30 E 
96 E 

106 E 
108 E 

107 E 
102 E 



Place. Map No. Lat. 


Taaiboschfn . 


13 


30 S 


Tabankulu 


17 


30 b 


Tabara . 


II 


OS 


Tabase . 


17 


31 s 


Tabase, Upper 


17 


31 s 


Tabataba 


41 


6S 


Table Bay . 


12 


33 S 


Table Bay (Papua) 


39 


10 S 


Table Cape 


40 


39 S 


Table Mt. 


12 


33 S 


Tabora . 


21 


4S 


Tabor Mt. 


16 


28 S 


Tachin . 


32 


13 N 


Tachin R. 


32 


14 N 


Tacna . 


10 


17 S 


Tadpatri 


26 


14 N 


Tadwala 


25 


18 N 


Tafenk . 


17 


32 s 


Tafileb . 


II 


30 N 


Taghelel 


20 


14 N 


Tahioku 


33 


25 N 


Taian . 


33 


35 N 


Taichow 


33 


28 N 


Taichu . 


33 


23 N 


Taidong R. 


36 


39 N 


Tai-ho, L. 


33 


31 N 


Taiku . 


36 


36 N 


Tainan . 


33 


22 N 


Taindankarai 


27 


8N 


Tainton . 


13 


32 s 


Taiping . 


33 


23 N 


Taiping, MalayStates 


32 


5N 


Taiserbo 


II 


20 N 


Taiyuan 


33 


37 N 


Tajul 


2S 


27 N 


Takasaki 


35 


36 N 


Takata . 


35 


37 N 


Takaungu 


21 


3S 


Takow 


33 


22 N 


Takra 


29 


23 N 


Taku . 


33 


39 N 


Takuanchuang 


33 


35 N 


Takutu R. . 


9 


3N 


Talaikkattapuram 


27 


9N 


Talaiyuttu 


27 


8N 


Talap . 


24 


27 N 


Talapani 


29 


23 N 


Talcahuana 


10 


36 S 


Talen . 


17 


32 s 


Tali 


33 


25 N 


Taloda 


25 


21 N 


Tamale . 


20 


9N 


Tamar . 


29 


23 N 


Tamar R. 


40 


41 S 


Tamarin B. 


22 


20 S 


Tamarin R. . 


22 


20 S 


Tamaringa's . 


21 


17 S 


Tamata . 


39 


8S 


Tamatave 


22 


18 N 


Tambo . 


38 


25 s 


Tambraparni R. . 


27 


8N 


Tambura 


II 


oN 


Tamingfu 


34 


36 N 


Tamkala 


20 


12 N 


Tammu 


24 


24 N 


Tampin 


32 


2N 


Tamsui. 


33 


25 N 


Tana R. 


II 


oS 


Tanah 


39 


28 


Tandala 


21 


gS 


Tan do 


25 


25 N 


Tanesar . 


28 


30 N 


Tanga 


21 


5S 


Tangail . 


24 


24 N 


Tangalle 


30 


6N 


Tangan . 


34 


39 N 


Tanganyika L. 


21 


6S 


Tangasi 


II 


oN 


Tangier 


II 


30 N 



Long. 
24 E 

29 E 

30 E 
28 E 
28 E 

156 E 

18 E 

149 E 

178 E 

18 E 

32 E 

32 E 

100 E 

100 E 

70 W 

77 E 

76 E 

27 E 
o W 
8 E 

122 E 
117 E 

120 E 

121 E 
126 E 

120 E 

128 E 

121 E 

77 E 

28 E 
107 E 
100 E 

20 E 

112 E 

69 E 

139 E 
138 E 

39 E 

121 E 
85 E 

117 E 
115 E 
60 W 

78 E 
77 E 
95 E 
83 E 
74 W 
28 E 

100 E 

74 E 

iW 

85 E 

147 E 
57 E 
57 E 
31 E 

147 E 
49 E 

146 E 
77 E 
20 E 

115 E 
3E 

94 E 
103 E 

122 E 

40 E 

140 E 
34 E 
69 E 
77 E 
39 E 
90 E 
81 E 

116 E 
30 E 
20 E 

oW I 



Place. 


MapNc 


. Lat. 


Taniyuttu 


30 


9N 


Tanjambata 


22 


20 S 


Tanjore 


26 


10 N 


Tank . 


28 


32 N 


Tanna . 


20 


12 N 


Tanna . 


41 


19 S 


Tanzo 


22 


16 S 


Tao 


II 


20 N 


Taochow 


33 


25 N 


Tapah 


• 32 


4N 


Tapkara 


. 29 


22 N 


Tappatti 


■ 27 


9N 


Tapti R. 


23 


20 N 


Tapuselei 


39 


9S 


Tarkastad 


13 


31 s 


Tarn-T4ran 


28 


31 N 


Taroom 


• 38 


25 s 


Tarquah 


20 


5N 


Taru . 


17 


31 s 


Tarudant 


II 


30 N 


Taruma 


9 


2N 


Tasalima 


20 


8N 


Tasmania 


37 


40 S 


Tasman Bay . 


40 


41 S 


Tasman Penin. 


40 


43 S 


Tataparai Station 


27 


8N 


Tatau . 


32 


3N 


Tati 


19 


19 s 


Tati 


19 


21 s 


Tating . 


• 33 


29 N 


Tatta 


. 28 


24 N 


Tatum . 


20 


6N 


Tatung . 


• 33 


40 N 


Taungyi 


21 


20 N 


Taupiri . 


. 40 


37 S 


Taupo . 


. 40 


39 S 


Taupo, Lake 


40 


39 S 


Taupota 


39 


10 S 


Tauranga 


40 


37 S 


Taveta . 


21 


3S 


Tavoy . 


• 31 


14 N 


Tavoy Is. 


31 


13 N 


Tawao 


32 


4N 


Tawaree 


II 


20 N 


Taytao Peninsula 


10 


46 s 


Tchon-kour 


33 


32 N 


Teakworth 


18 


26 S 


Te Anau 


40 


45 S 


Te Aute 


40 


40 S 


Tebe 


21 


16 S 


Tegina . 


20 


10 N 


Tegucigalpa 


8 


14 N 


Tehchow 


34 


37 N 


Tekapo, L. 


40 


44S 


Tekari . 


24 


25 N 


Tekenika 


to 


55 S 


Tekwen . 


36 


39 N 


Telegraph Creek 


6 


57 N 


Tele Jaune Cache 


6 


53 N 


Telford . 


5 


49 N 


Tellicherry . 


26 


II N 


Telok Anson . 


32 


4N 


Temaringa's . 


19 


17 S 


Temple B. . 


38 


12 S 


Temuco 


10 


38 s 


Tenasserim 


31 


12 N 


Tengchow-fu. 


33 


37 N 


Tenge . 


20 


II N 


Tengyuen 


33 


24 N 


Tenimber Is. . 


39 


8S 


Tenkasi . 


27 


8N 


Tenke . 


II 


10 S 


Tenmalai 


27 


9N 


Tennyson 


13 


31 s 


Tessawa 


20 


13 N 


Testel Is. 


39 


10 S 


Tete . 


II 


10 s 


Tete, Mashonalanc 


19 


16 s 


Tetuan . 


II 


30 N 



Long. 
80 E 

48 E 
79 E 
70 E 

2E 
169 E 

49 E 
10 E 

III E 
loi E 
85 E 
78 E 
70 E 

147 E 

26 E 
75 E 

149 E 
2W 

29 E 

oW 

56 W 

2W 

145 E 

173 E 

148 E 
78 E 

113 E 
33 E 

27 E 
104 E 

67 E 

10 E 

113 E 

97 E 

175 E 
- 176 E 

176 E 

150 E 

176 E 
37 E 

98 E 
98 E 

117 E 

oE 

75 W 

98 E 

29 E 
168 E 

177 E 
33 E 

6E 

87 W 

116 E 

171 E 

85 E 

69 W 

127 E 

130 W 

119 W 
95 W 
75 E 

100 E 
31 E 

143 E 
73 W 
98 E 

120 E 
oW 

98 E 

131 E 
77 E 
20 E 
77 E 
26 E 

8E 
150 E 

30 E 
33 E 

o W 



ijo 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Tewara Head 


40 


36 S 


17s E 


Tewatin 


• 38 


26 S 


153 E 


Texas . 


• 38 


29 S 


151 E 


Teyaterjaneng 


13 


,29 s 


27 E 


Tezpur . 


. 24 


26 N 


92 E 


Thaba Bosigo 


IS 


29 S 


27 E 


Thaba Morena . 13 


29 S 


27 E 


Thaba' nchu . 


IS 


29 S 


26 E 


Thaba Patchoa . i^ 


29 S 


27 E 


Thana . 


• 25 


19 N 


73 E 


Than Hoa 


.33 


21 N 


105 E 


Thargomindah 38 


28 S 


143 E 


Tharrawaddy 


31 


18 N 


95 E 


Thaton . 


31 


17 N 


97 E 


Thayetmyo 


• 31 


19 N 


95 E 


Thazi . 


■ 31 


21 N 


96 E 


Thecumanagar . 27 


8N 


78 E 


Thelesu R. . 


16 


26 S 


30 E 


Theopolis 


13 


33 S 


26 E 


Thlotse . 


IS 


28 S 


28 E 


Tbobal . 


. 24 


24 N 


94 E 


Thompsons 


13 


33 S 


27 E 


Thompson's 


(Kaf- 






fraria) 


17 


31 s 


27 E 


Thongwa 


31 


16 N 


95 E 


Thorngrove 


13 


32 S 


25 E 


Thornville 


14 


29 S 


30 E 


Thiimbura 


21 


17 s 


33 E 


Thunder, Cap 


e 5 


48 N 


88 W 


Thurayur 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Thursday Is. 


38 


10 S 


142 E 


Tiamguri 


21 


oS 


37 E 


Tianfu . 


34 


36 N 


117 E 


Tibati 


20 


6N 


12 E 


Tibeti 


II 


20 N 


19 E 


Tientsin . 


33 


39 N 


117 E 


Tierra del Fu 


;go lO 


S3S 


69 W 


Tigr^ . 


II 


ISN 


39 E 


Tikriganj 


24 


25 N 


87 E 


Tilley . 


4 


50 N 


112 W 


Tima Lake 


II 


10 N 


35 E 


Timakowa 


39 


ss 


139 E 


Timaru . 


40 


44S 


171 E 


Timbuktu 


II 


10 N 


oW 


Timijau, Mts. 


9 


2N 


60 W 


Timor Is. 


37 


10 S 


124 E 


Timoraka 


39 


ss 


139 E 


Timor Laut 


37 


7S 


132 E 


Tina, R. 


17 


31 s 


29 E 


Tinano, Mt. 


17 


30 s 


28 E 


Tinda . 


13 


30 s 


28 E 


Tmdivanam 


26 


12 N 


79 E 


Tingabaly, R 


22 


iss 


50 E 


Ting Chai-Ch 


uang 34 


36 s 


118 E 


Tingchow 


34 


38 N 


lis E 


Tingchow 


33 


26 N 


115 E 


Tingtas . 


34 


35 N 


115 E 


Tinjar R. 


• 32 


4N 


114 E 


Tinnevelly 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Tin-tin R. 


36 


38 N 


127 E 


Tinto . 


20 


5N 


9E 


Tiruchendur 


27 


8N 


78 E 


Ti-rukkoyilur 


26 


12 N 


79 E 


Tirukurunkud 


i 27 


8N 


77 E 


Tirumangalan 


^ . 27 


9N 


78 E 


Tirupati 


26 


13 N 


79 E 


Tirupuyanam 


27 


9N 


78 E 


Tirushuli 


27 


9N 


78 E 


Tiruttangal 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Tiruvadur 


27 


10 N 


78 E 


Tiruvagiri 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Tiruwella 


26 


9N 


76 E 


Tisirao 


34 


36 N 


120 E 


Titabar . 


24 


26 N 


94 E 


Titaochow 


33 


35 N 


104 E 


Tittuviley 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Toay . 


10 


36 S 


65 W 


Tobago Is. . 


8 


II N 


60 W 



Place, 
Tocantino, R. 
Tofield . 
Togombo 
Tokanga 
Tokushima 
Tokyo 
Toleni . 
Tollygunge . 
Tombeau Bay 
Tomi . 
Tomioka 
Tongaat 
Tnngaat R. 
Tongaland 
Tongario Vol. 
Tongchen 
Tongkah 
Tongo . 
Tongzin 
Tonti 
Toovaula 
To'twoomba . 
Topchanchi 
Topetora 
Topsail . 
Topura . 
Tor Bay 
Torbay 
Torere 
Toro 
Toro . 
Toronto 
Torres Is. 
Torres Strait . 
Torricelli, Mts. 
Tortola . 
Torusan 
Toto . 

Touchwood Post . 
Toungoo 
Towns River . 
Townsville . 
Trabonjy 
Tracadie 
Trafalgar Mt. 
Trail . 
Traitor Bay 
Tranquebar 
Traynor 
Treasury Is. . 
Tregannu 
Trelew . 
Tres Arroyos. 
Trichardts 
Trichinopoly 
Trichur 
Trincomalee . 
Trinidad 
Trinity . 
Trinity Bay . 
Trinity Bay (Queens- 
land) . 
Tripoli . 
Trivandrum 
Trompsburg . 
Trout L. 
Trout L. 
Trout L. 

Trout Lake Mission 
Truro 
Truxillo 
Tsakoma 
Tsangchow . 
Tsangshing . 
Tsaochowfu 
Tsaohsien 
Tsehchow 
Tsenan 



Map No. 
10 
6 
20 
40 
35 



35 
17 
24 
22 

39 
35 
14 
14 
16 
40 
36 
32 
20 
36 
17 
27 
38 
29 
3° 
7 
39 
3 
3 
40 
21 

13 
2 

41 

38 

39 

8 

32 
10 

4 
31 
12 

38 
22 

3 

39 

6 

39 

25 

4 
41 
32 



18 
26 
26 

30 
8 

7 
7 

38 
II 
26 
13 

5 



5 

3 

8 
18 
34 
34 
34 
34 
33 
18 ' 



Lat. 

5S 
53 N 

10 N 

38 S 

34 N 

36 N 

32 S 

22 N 
20 S 

6S 

33 N 
29 S 

29 S 
27 s 

39 S 
39 N 

8N 

11 N 

37 N 

30 S 
8N 

27 N 

23 N 
10 N 
47 N 
10 S 
45 N 
45 N 
37 S 

oN 

31 s 

45 N 

13 s 

10 N 
3S 

18 N 
4N 

37 S 

51 N 

19 N 
33 S 
19 S 
16 S 

47 N 
gS 

49 N 

8S 

10 N 

52 N 

7S 

SN 

43 S 

38 S 
26 S 
10 N 
10 N 

8N 
10 N 

48 N 
47 N 

16 S 
30 N 
8 N 
29 S 
55 N 
S3N 
51 N 

53 N 
45 N 

9N 
23 S 
38 N 
23 N 

35 N 
35 N 
35 N 
22 S 



Long. 
49 W 

112 W 
3W 

175 E 
134 E 
139 E 

27 E 
89 E 
57 E 

148 E 

134 E 

31 E 

31 E 

32 E 

176 E 
128 E 

98 E 

II E 

126 E 

29 E 

77 E 
152 E 

86 E 

80 E 
52 W 

150 E 
61 W 
61 W 

177 E 

30 E 

28 E 
70 W 

166 W 
142 E 
141 E 
64 W 

115 E 
73 W 

103 W 

97 E 

20 E 

146 E 

47 E 

6sW 

148 E 

117 W 

148 E 

79 E 

108 W 

155 E 

103 E 

6s E 

60 W 

29 E 

78 E 
76 E 

81 E 
60 W 
S3W 
54 W 

146 E 
10 E 
76 E 
25 E 
97 W 

92 W 

93 W 
91 W 
63 W 
70 W 

30 E 

116 E 

113 E 
USE 
115 E 
112 E 

34 E 



Place. 
Tsfanihy 
Tshapile 
Tsilitwa 
Tsimanampetsatsy. 

L. 
Tsimanandrafozana 
Tsinan . 
Tsinchow 
Tsingchowfu 
Tsinghsien 
Tsingohow 
Tsingtao 
Tsining . 
Tsitsana 
Tsitsana, R. 
Tsitung 
Tsojana 
Tsolo 
Tsomo 
Tsomo 
Tsovo 
Tsu 
Tsugaru 



Strait 



Tsui-Chia-Chuang 

Tsungming . 

Tsunhwaohow 

Tsunyi . 

Tsurugaoka 

Tsushima Is. . 

Tuat 

Tubau . 

Tubetube 

Tucopia 

Tucuman 

Tugela R. 

Tugela R. (Little) 

Tukoma 

Tulagh 

Tulear 

Tulin . 

Tumatumari . 

Tumbura 

Tumen R. 

Tumkur 

Tummo 

Tumuc Humac 

Mts. 
Tundi 
Tunga . 
Tungchangfu 
Tungchow 
Tungchow Chi 
Tungchwan Yan 
Tunghi 

Tungkwanghsien 
Tungor . 
Tungping 
Tungting L. . 
Tunis . 
Tupacama R. 
Tura . 
Turaiyur 
Turanga 
Turks Is. 
Turuku . 
Tushihkow . 
Tuticorin 
Tuurbraak 
Tweedale 
Tweefontein . 
Twelve Apostles 
Twillingate 
Two Waters . 
Tyira . 
Tyira, Lower. 
Tyira, Upper. 
Tylden . 
Tyvan 



Map No. 
22 
17 
17 



22 
22 
33 
33 
34 
34 
33 
33 
34 
17 
17 
34 
17 
17 
17 
17 
21 

35 
35 
34 
33 
34 
33 
35 
36 
II 
32 
39 
41 
10 

14 
14 
19 



29 
9 
19 
36 
26 



29 
34 
34 
33 
34 
33 
21 

34 
33 
34 
33 
II 

9 
24 
26 
40 



34 
27 
12 

13 
13 
12 

7 
13 
17 
17 
17 
13 

4 



Lat. 

25 S 

31 s 

30 S 

24 s 
19 s 

37 N 

35 N 

36 N 

38 N 

37 N 

36 N 

35 N 
30 S 

30 S 

37 N 

32 S 

31 s 

31 s 

32 s 

3S 

34 N 
42 N 

36 N 

32 N 

40 N 
28 N 

38 N 

34 N 
20 N 

3N 
10 S 

12 S 
26 s 

28 s 

29 s 

15 s 

33 I 
23 s 

23 N 
5N 

17 S 
42 N 

13 N 

20 N 

2N 

24 N 

36 N 

39 N 

35 N 
39 N 

26 N 

10 S 

37 N 
22 N 
35 N 
28 N 

30 N 
7N 

25 N 

11 N 
39 S 

21 N 
iS 

41 N 
8 N 

34 S 

31 s 
31 s 

33 S 
49 N 
33 S 

31 s 

31 s 

31 s 
31 s 

SON 



Long. 
45 E 
28 E 
28 E 

43 E 

44 E 

117 E 
losE 

118 E 

117 E 

118 E 
121 E 

116 E 
28 E 
28 E 

117 E 

27 E 

28 E 
27 E 

27 E 
38 E 

136 E 
140 E 

117 E 
121 E 

118 E 
104 E 
139 E 
129 E 

oW 
113 E 
151 E 
169 E 
65 W 

29 E 
29 E 

32 E 

19 E 
43 E 
86 E 
59 W 

33 E 
129 E 

77 E 
10 E 

55 W 
86 E 
116 E 

116 E 
iioE 

117 E 
103 E 

40 E 
116 E 

111 E 
116 E 

112 E 
10 E 
58 W 
90E 

78 E 
178 E 

72 W 
36 E 
116 E 
78 E 

20 E 

24 E 

25 E 
18 E 
54 W 
24 E 

28 E 
28 E 
28 E 

26 E 
103 W 



INDEX 



131 



Place. M 


ap No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. 


Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Place. Map No 


Lat. 


Long. 


Uani . 


20 


SN 


3W 


Umvoti R. 


14 


29 S 


31 E 


Vatorata 


39 


9S 


147 E 


Uarakauta . 


39 


9S 


149 E 


Umyalazi R. . 


16 


28 S 


32 E 


Vavoniya 


30 


gN 


80 E 


Uba 


20 


II N 


13 E 


Umyugone R. 


16 


28 S 


30 E 


Vegriville 


4 


53 N 


iiiW 


Ubangi R. . 


II 


oN 


20 E 


Umzimklava R. 


17 


31 y 


29 E 


Vellalanvilai 


27 


8N 


78 E 


Ubemiba 


21 


9S 


32 E 


Umzimkuku . 


17 


30 S 


30 E 


VellaLavella. 


41 


8S 


157 E 


Uberaba 


10 


19 S 


48 W 


Umzimkulu, Lower 14 


30 S 


30 E 


Vellore . 


26 


13 N 


79 E 


Ubombo 


16 


27 S 


32 E 


Umzimkulu R. 


14 


30 S 


29 E 


Vembakottai . 


27 


gN 


77 E 


Ubombo Range . 


16 


27 s 


32 E 


Umzimpofu 


16 


26 S 


31 E 


Vembar . 


27^ 


gN 


78 E 


Uchungwe . 


21 


8S 


35 E 


Umzimvubu . 


17 


30 S 


29 E 


Venezuela 


10 


8N 


60 W 


Udaipore 


28 


24 N 


73 E 


Umzimvubu R. 


17 


30 s 


29 E 


Vengurla 


25 


16 N 


73 E 


Udaipur 


24 


23 N 


91 E 


Umzinto 


14 


30 s 


30 E 


Ventenat C. 


39 


10 S 


150 E 


Udaipur 


25 


24 N 


74 E 


Umzinto R. 


14 


30 s 


30 E 


Veniersburg 


15 


28 S 


27 E 


Udayagiri 


26 


14 N 


79 E 


Una Mt. 


40 


42 s 


172 E 


Ventersdorp . 


18 


26 S 


26 E 


Udeni . 


20 


7N 


8E 


Unao 


28 


26 N 


80 E 


Venterskroon 


18 


26 S 


27 E 


Udepur . 


24 


21 N 


86 E 


Unde . 


21 


II S 


35 E 


Venters tad 


13 


30 s 


26 E 


Uen 


41 


20 S 


166 E 


Under berg 


14 


29 s 


29 E 


Veraval 


25 


21 S 


70 E 


Uganda 


II 


oN 


30 E 


Undi . 


21 


14 s 


32 E 


Vereeniging 


18 


26 S 


28 E 


Ugbo 


20 


6N 


5E 


Undup . 


32 


I N 


no E 


Vermaak 


16 


27 S 


31 E 


Ugie 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Unfunjambili 


16 


28 s 


31 E 


Vermeio R. . 


10 


24 s 


62 W 


Uhaiya . 


21 


I S 


31 E 


Ungava Bay 


2 


60 N 


67 W 


Vermillion 


5 


49 N 


g3W 


Uhimba 


21 


2S 


30 E 


Ungwali 


13 


32 s 


27 E 


Vermillion 


4 


S3N 


iioW 


Uhoi 


39 


4S 


152 E 


Uniondale 


12 


33 S 


22 E 


Vernon . 


6 


50 N 


iigW 


Uhuna . 


39 


10 S 


150 E 


Unity . 


4 


52 N 


108 W 


Verzamel Bergen . 


16 


27 S 


30 E 


Uiaku 


39 


9S 


149 E 


Unkofski B. 


36 


36 N 


129 E 


VetR. . 


15 


28 S 


26 E 


Uitdraai 


13 


29 s 


25 E 


Unsang, C. 


32 


5N 


119 E 


Vetyu 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Uitenhage 


13 


33 S 


25 E 


Unyamwezi . 


II 


oS 


36 E 


Vicenti . 


19 


18 s 


35 E 


Ujiji . 


21 


4S 


30 E 


Upper Tugela 


14 


28 S 


29 E 


Vichumbi 


21 


oS 


2g E 


Ukara. Isles . 


21 


iS 


33 E 


Uppodai R. . 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Victoria (Dis.) 


33 


23 N 


no E 


Ukkirankotei 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Upsalquitch R. 


3 


47 N 


67 W 


Victoria, B.C. 


6 


48 N 


124 W 


Ukweli . 


21 


13 s 


37 E 


Urambo 


21 


4S 


32 E 


Victoria, Cameroon 


20 


3N 


gE 


Ulsan . 


36 


36 N 


129 E 


Urandangi 


■ 38 


21 S 


138 E 


Victoria Falls 


19 


18 S 


26 E 


Ulundi . 


16 


28 S 


31 E 


Urguru . 


21 


5S 


33 E 


Victoria, Labuan . 


32 


5N 


lis E 


Umarkot 


28 


25 N 


69 E 


Uria . 


39 


10 S 


150 E 


Victoria Lake 


7 


48 s 


56 W 


Umba . 


21 


ss 


37 E 


Urigi . 


21 


2S 


31 E 


Victoria, Mashona- 








Unibaleki 


13 


31 s 


25 E 


Uruguay R. . 


10 


27 s 


56 W 


land . 


19 


20 s 


30 E 


Umbanambi . 


16 


28 s 


32 E 


Urungu 


21 


2S 


34 E 


Victoria Mt. . 


39 


8S 


148 E 


Umbanjin 


19 


19 s 


29 E 


Usambara 


21 


iS 


34 E 


Victoria Nyanza 


21 


iS 


33 E 


Unibeges 


16 


27 s 


31 E 


Usambiro 


21 


3S 


32 E 


Victoria West 


12 


31 s 


23 E 


Umbeiosi R. . 


16 


26 s 


31 E 


Usenda . 


21 


4S 


31 E 


Victory Mt. 


39 


gS 


i4QE 


Umbolisa 


16 


26 s 


31 E 


Ushuaia 


10 


54 S 


68 W 


Viedma . 


10 


40 s 


62 W 


Umchungu 


18 


23 s 


35 E 


Usisya . 


21 


II s 


34 E 


Vierfontein . 


15 


27 S 


26 E 


Umduna R. 


16 


27 s 


32 E 


Usutu . 


16 


26 s 


31 E 


Vijapur . 


25 


23 N 


72 E 


Umfolosi R. . 


16 


28 s 


32 E 


Usutu R. 


. 18 


26 s 


32 E 


Vijayadurg 


25 


16 N 


73 E 


Umfolosi, Black, R. 


16 


28 s 


31 E 


Utenga . 


21 


iS 


31 E 


Vijavapati 


27 


gN 


77 E 


Umfolosi, White, R. 


16 


28 s 


31 E 


Utengule 


21 


9S 


33 E 


Vilatikulam . 


27 


gN 


78 E 


Umga, Lower 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Utonga . 


21 


12 S 


35 E 


Villa Concepcion 


10 


23 S 


57 W 


Umgasi R. 


17 


31 s 


29 E 


Utrecht . 


16 


27 s 


30 E 


Villa Rica . 


10 


26 s 


56 W 


Umgeni 


14 


29 s 


31 E 


Uttamapalaiyani 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Villupuram . 


26 


II N 


79 E 


Umhlali R. 


14 


29 s 


31 E 


Uttangara 


26 


12 N 


78 E 


Vinjorai . 


28 


26 N 


71 E 


Umhlatuzana 


16 


28 s 


31 E 


Uttumalai 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Vinukonda . 


26 


16 N 


79 E 


Umhiatuzi R. 


16 


28 s 


31 E 


Uvulu 


• 19 


21 S 


28 E 


Viramgam 


25 


23 N 


71 E 


Umhloti R . 


14 


29 s 


31 E 


Uyeno 


35 


34 N 


136 E 


Viiavanallur . 


27 


8N 


77 E 


Umjika . 


17 


31 s 


28 E 










Virdel 


25 


21 N 


74 E 


Umjika, Lower 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Vaal Kranz 


• 14 


28 S 


29 E 


Virden . 


4 


49 N 


loi W 


Umkomaas, Lower 


14 


30 s 


30 E 


Vaal R. . 


IS 


28 S 


25 E 


Virgin Gorda 


8 


18 N 


64 W 


Umkomanzi R. 


14 


30 s 


30 E 


Vacaos . 


22 


20 S 


57 E 


Virudupatti . 


27 


gN 


77 E 


Umkusi R. 


16 


27 s 


32 E 


Vadaktnkulam 


■ 27 


8N 


77 E 


Visapur . 


25 


18 N 


74 E 


Umlalazi 


14 


29 s 


31 E 


Vadakurai 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Viswem 


24 


24 N 


94 E 


Umlata . 


13 


33 S 


27 E 


Vageikulam . 


27 


9N 


77 E 


Vitjoen's Drift 


18 


27 S 


28 E 


Umlazi . 


14 


29 s 


30 E 


Vaijapur 


• 25 


20 N 


74 E 


Vitu 


11 


oS 


40 E 


Uinlazi R. . 


14 


29 s 


31 E 


Vaippar 


• 27 


9N 


78 E 


Vogel C. 


39 


gS 


150 E 


Umpamhinyoni R. 


14 


30 s 


30 E 


Vaippar R. . 


• 27 


9N 


78 E 


Vogelstruis Nek 


13 


32 s 


26 E 


Umsasas 


19 


I6-S 


30 E 


Valachenai 


■ 30 


8N 


81 E 


Vogel Vlei 


17 


30 S 


2gE 


Umsikaba R. 


17 


31 s 


29 E 


Valdezia 


. 18 


23 S 


30 E 


Vohemare 


22 


13 s 


49 E 


Umsinga 


14 


28 s 


30 E 


Valdivia 


10 


40 S 


74 W 


Vohimasina . 


22 


22 S 


48 E 


Umsuaze's 


19 


20 s 


27 E 


Valencia 


8 


10 N 


67 W 


Volksrust 


14 


27 s 


2gE 


UiDsunauzi R. 


14 


29 s 


30 E 


Valladolid 


8 


20 N 


87 W 


Volta R. 


20 


10 N 


I W 


Umsunduzi . 


16 


27 s 


32 E 


Valparaiso 


TO 


33 S 


72 W 


Vonda . 


4 


52 N 


106 W 


Umtali . 


19 


18 s 


32 E 


Valsch R. 


15 


27 S 


26 E 


Votoniandry 


22 


igS 


49 E 


Umtamvuna R. 


17 


31-'^ 


30 E 


Vancouver I. , 


6 


49 N 


123 W 


Vryheid 


16 


27 S 


30 E 


Umtata . 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Van Diemen G. 


37 


T2S 


132 E 


Vulkan 1. 


39 


4N 


14s E 


Umtata R. . 


17 


31 s 


29 E 


Vandina 


■ 38 


26 S 


153 E 


Vurawara 


39 


10 S 


149 E 


Umtentu 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Vangaindrano 


22 


22 S 


47 E 


Vurrasoor 


27 


gN 


78 E 


Umtentu R. . 


17 


31 s 


29 E 


Vanikoro 


■ 41 


II S 


167 E 










Umtsindewa . 


16 


26 s 


31 E 


Van Reenerf . 


14 


28 S 


29 E 


Wa . . . 


20 


10 N 


2 W 


Umtuli R. 


16 


26 s 


30 E 


Vanua Lava 


• 41 


T4S 


167 E 


Wabamum . 


6 


53 N 


114 W 


Umtwalumi R. 


14 


30 s 


30 E 


Varshanid 


• 27 


9N 


77 E 


Wabigoon . 


S 


49 N 


g2W 


Umtyelekwanas . 


16 


26 s 


32 E 


Vasudevanallur 


■ 27 


9N 


77 E 


Wabubu 


39 


gS 


150 E 



132 



CHURCHMAN'S MISSIONARY ATLAS 



Place. 

Wadai 

Wadan 

Wsidelai 

Wadena 

Wadhwan 

Wadi 

Wadi . 

Wady Haifa 

Wahabu 

Wahiguya 

Wai 

Waiapu 

Waikari 

Waikari Lake 

Waimamaku 

Waimate 

Waini Pt. 

Waini R. 

Wainwright 

Waipah 

Waipawa 

Wairgrapa . 

Wairoa . 

Waitara 

Waitara R. . 

Walthha 

Wajanga Yoa 

Wakamatsu 

Wakapoa 

Wakara 

Wakatipu, L. 

Wakayama 

Wakefield . 

Wakenaain 

Wakimachi . 

Wakkerstroom 

Waku . 

Walani . 

Waldeck 

Walfisch Bay 

Walkara 

Walkers 

Wallace 

Wallangarra 

Wallaston Is. 

Wallmansthal 

Walpole Is. 

Walsh . 

Walumbale . 

Walwale 

Wamba 

Wamira 

Wandamma . 

Wandenge . 

Wandiwash . 

Wanetzi R. . 

Wanga 

Wanga Bazar 

Wangaeho R. 

Wanganui R. 

Wangaratta . 

Wang-Chyang 

Wangemansbwah 

Wanigers 

Wankie Coal Fields 

Wansbeck 

Wapela 

War 

Waraka 

Waramuri 

Waraputa 

Ward Hunt Str. . 

Warialav 

Warman 

Warmbath . 

Warra 

Warra . 

Warrenton . 



Map No. Lat. 

31 13 N 

II 20 N 

II 3 N 

4 52 N 

25 23 N 

26 17 N 
20 13 N 
II 22 N 
20 II N 
20 13 N 
25 17 N 
40 38 S 
40 43 S 
40 39 S 
40 35 S 
4° 35 S 

9 8 N 

9 7N 

4 52 N 

• 9 5N 
40 40 S 
40 41 S 

• 40 39 S 
40 39 S 
40 39 S 
40 43 S 
40 19 N 

• 35 37 N 
9 7 N 

• 39 4S 

40 45 S 
35 34 N 
18 25 S 

9 7 N 

• 35 34 N 

16 27 S 

13 32 s 

20 14 N 

4 50 N 

II 20 S 

20 II N 

17 29 S 

3 45 N 

38 29 N 

10 56 S 

18 25 S 

41 23 S 

4 49 N 
20 10 N 

20 TO N 

21 5S 

39 10 S 

39 2S 
21 I S 
26 12 N 

18 24 S 
21 4 S 
28 24 N 

40 40 S 
40 40 S 

38 19 s 
34 36 N 
21 9 S 

39 9S 

19 18 S 
17 29 S 

4 50 N 

11 23 N 

40 43 S 
9 7N 
9 5N 

39 9S 

39 5S 

4 52 N 

18 24 S 

20 10 N 

38 26 S 

15 28 S 



Long. 

20 E 
II W 
31 E 

104 W 

71 E 

77 E 

II E 

31 E 

2 W 

2 W 

74 E 

178 E 

173 E 

177 E 

173 E 

174 E 
59 W 

59 W 
III W 

60 W 
177 E 

175 E 
177 E 
174 E 
174 E 
171 E 

21 E 

140 E 
,59 W 
137 E 
169 E 
135 E 

29 E 
59 W 

134 E 

30 E 

27 E 
2 E 

108 W 

10 E 

3W 

29 E 

63 W 

152 W 

68 W 

28 E 
169 E 
no W 

2 W 

T W 

34 E 

150 E 

134 E 

37 E 

79 E 

32 E 

39 E 

69 E 
175 E 
175 E 
147 E 
116 E 

34 E 

149 E 
25 E 
29 E 

102 W 
15 E 

169 E 
59 W 
59 W 

150 E 
134 E 
106 W 

28 E 
4E 

151 E 
24 E 



Place. 
Warrl . 
Warwick 
Wase 
Washa . 
Washbank Park 
Washington 
Washow R. . 
Wassulu 
Watadzu 
Water Hen L. 
Water Hen R. 
Waterberg . 
Waterloo 
Waterval 
Waterval 
Watervau R. 
Watlam 
Watling 
Wat reus 
Waya 
Wedau 
Weenen 
Weenisk, L. . 
Weenisk, R. . 
Wegdraai 
Weihaiwei 
Wei Ho 
Weihsien 
Weihsien Chi 
Weipa . 
Weir, R. 
Weligama 
Welkom 
Welle Island. 
Welle R. 
Wellesley Is. 
Welligammo Is. 
Wellington, N.Z 
Wellington 

Colony) 
Weme R. 
Wenchow 
Wenteng 
Weppener 
Werur 
Wese 

Westbourne 
Westbury 
West Calder . 
Western China 
Western Eq. Africa 
West Lubo . 
Weston . 
Westport 
West Pt. 
Westwood 
Wetaskiwin . 
Weti . 
Way burn 
Weymouth . 
Whale Rk. 
Whanganui 
Whangarei 
Whangaroa 
Whareponga 
Whitbourne . 
White Bay 
Whitehorse 
Whiteraouth . 
AVhite River . 
White Sand R. 
Whitewood 
Whitewood 
Whittlesea 
Wickham, C 
Wida 
Wide B. 
Wiju 



(Cape 



Map No. 
20 
38 
20 



13 
2 

5 
II 

35 
5 
5 

18 

9 
18 
16 

9 
33 



39 
14 
5 
5 
19 
33 
33 
33 
34 
38 
38 
30 
13 
39 
II 

38 
26 
40 



Lat. 

5N 
28 S 

9N 
13 N 

31 s 

46 N 

51 N 
10 N 
35 N 

52 N 

52 N 
24 S 

5N 
258 

27 s 
2N 

22 N 

24 N 

51 N 

6N 

10 S 

28 S 

53 N 

54 N 

23 S 
37 N 
34 N 
37 N 
37 N 
12 S 
28 S 

6N 
30 S 

9S 

5N 
16 S 

9N 
41 s 



12 33 S 

20 7 N 

33 27 N 

34 37 N 
15 29 S 

39 2S 

20 8 N 
5 50 N 

40 41 S 
4 49 N 

33 3 ■ N 

11 10 N 

21 19 S 
14 29 S 
40 42 S 
40 41 S 
38 23 s 

4 53 N 

21 SS 

4 49 N 

3 44N 

12 33 S 
40 40 S 
40 36 S 
40 35 S 
40 38 S 

7 47 N 

7 50 N 

6 61 N 

5 49 N 
5 48 N 

4 52 N 
4 50 N 

38 21 S 

13 32 S 
40 40 S 
20 6 N 
38 2SS 
36 40 N 



Long 

5E 

152 E 

9E 

9E 

27 E 

118 W 
9? W 

5 W 
132 E 
99 W 
99 W 

28 E 
56 W 

30 E 

31 E 
60 W 

109 E 
74 W 

losW 
I E 

150 E 
30 E 
88 W 
88 W 
27 E 

122 E 

106 E 

119 E 
IIS E 
141 E 
150 E 

80 E 

25 E 
150 E 

20 E 
139 E 

80 E 
175 E 

18 E 
2E 

120 E 
122 E 

27 E 

134 E 

2E 

98 W 
147 E 

104 W 

105 E 
10 E 
36 E 
30 E 

172 E 

145 E 

150 E 

114 W 

39 E 

103 W 

65 w 

18 E 

175 E 

174 E 

174 E 

178 E 

53 W 

56 w 

134 w 

95 W 

85 W 

102 W 

102 w 

144 E 
26 E 

145 E 
2E 

153 E 
124 E 



Place. 
Wildchutsberg 
Wildebeeste R. 
Wildfontein 
Wilgeriver 
Wilkie . 
Willoughby 
Willow . 
Willow Bunch 
Willowdale 
Willowmore . 
Wilmot 
Winburg 
Windessi 
Windhoek 
Windhorah 
Windsor 
Windsor 
Windsor June. 
Windsor Pt. 
Winnaba 
Winnipeg 
Winnipegosis 
Winton (Aust.) 
Winton(N.Z.) 
Winzona 
Wisaru . 
Wisconsin 
Wismar 
Witbank June 
Withersfield . 
Wit Kop 
Witteputs 
Witte R. 
Wiverville 
Wi-won . 
Wokatumu 
Wokhi . 
Wolf . 
Wolfville 
Wolmarais Stad 
Wolseley 
Wonderfontein 
Wonju 
Wonki . 
Wonsan 
Woodbine 
Woodlands . 
Woodlark Is. 
Woodstock . 
Woodstock . 
Woolanmaroo 
Woolgar . 
Woolridge 
Woonga 
Wooroorooka 
Wope . 
Worcester 
Worgla . 
Wreningham 
Wubio . 
Wuchang 
Wuching 
Wuchou 
Wuhu . 
Wukari . 
Wuntho 
Wurnu 
Wushek . 
Wushishi 
Wuting . 
Wyandra 
Wyldesdale . 
Wynberg 
Wynyard 

Xabane '. 

Xabane, Upper 
Xayimpi 



Map No. Lat. 

13 31 s 

17 31 S 

13 31 s 

18 25 S 

4 52 N 

13 30 s 

18 27 S 

4 51 N 

17 32 S 

12 33 s 
3 45 N 

15 28 S 

39 2S 
II 23 S 
38 25 S 

13 32 S 
3 45 N 
3 45 N 

40 46 S 

20 s N 

5 49 N 
5 52 N 

38 22 S 
40 45 S 

21 o S 

39 3S 

2 43 N 
9 5N 

18 25 S 

38 ?3S 

13 31 s 

13 29 S 

13 30 s 

5 49 N 

35 41 N 

40 39 S 
24 26 N 

S 48 N 

3 45 N 
18 27 S 

4 50 N 
18 25 S 

36 37 N 
20 7 N 
35 39 N 

18 258 

5 50 N 

39 9S 

3 46 N 

12 33 S 
38 17 s 

38 19 s 

13 33 S 
5 49 N 

38 29 S 

20 7 N 

12 33 S 

11 iN 

19 18 S 

20 3 N 

33 30 N 

34 39 N 
33 23 N 
33 31 N 
20 7 N 
31 24 N 
20 13 N 
20 14 N 
20 9 N 
33 37 N 
38 27 S 
16 258 

12 34$ 

4 51 N 



Long. 
26 E 

28 E 
24 E 

29 E 
108 W 

26 E 

30 E 
105 W 

28 E 
23 E 
54 W 

27 E 

134 E 
18 E 

142 E 
26 E 
64 W 

63 W 
i^E 

iW 

97 W 

100 W 

143 E 
168 E 

39 E 

135 E 

90 W 

58 W 

29 E 
147 E 

25 E 
24 E 
27 E 
97 W 

126 E 
175 E 

94 E 
88 W 

64 W 
27 E 

102 W 

30 E 
128 E 

2 W 

127 E 

26 E 
97 W 

152 E 
67 W 

18 E 
146 E 
143 E 

27 E 

91 W 

145 
oE 

19 E 
7E 

30 E 
12 E 

iiSE 

116 E 
III E 
118 E 

9E 

95 E 
SE 

10 E 
6E 

117 E 
146 E 

31 E 
18 E 

104 W 



17 31 S 28 E 
17 31 S 28 E 
17 31 S 28 E 



INDEX 



133 



Plage. 


Map No 


.■ Lat. 


Loug. 


Place. 


Map No 


. Lat. 


Xolobe . 


17 


32 s 


27 E 


Yenan . 


33 


37 N 


Xongoro, Upper 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Yenan . 


36 


37 N 


Xora R. 


17 


32 S 


28 E 


Yen Bay 


33 


22 N 


Xugswala 


17 


31 s 


28 E 


Yenchow 


33 


35 N 


Xume . 


17 


32 s 


27 E 


Yenchowfu 


• 34 


35 N 


Xwili . 


• 17 


31 s 


28 E 


Yendi . 
Yengpien 


20 
• 36 


9N 

40 N 


Yadda R. 


• 39 


9S 


147 E 


Yenheung 


• 36 


39 N 


Yadgiri 


26 


16 N 


77 E 


Yeni 


20 


13 N 


Yako . 


20 


12 N 


I W 


Yenkingchow. 


34 


40 N 


Yale 


6 


49 N 


121 W 


Yenping. 


33 


26 N 


Yallapur 


26 


14 N 


75 E 


Yeola 


■ 25 


20 N 


Yalo . 


n 


oN 


10 E 


Yeral . 


27 


8N 


Yalu R. . 


• 36 


40 N 


125 E 


Yerkasse 


20 


7N 


Yamato 


35 


34 N 


136 E 


Yerraneel 


27 


8N 


Yambassi 


20 


4N 


10 E 


Yeulba . 


38 


26 S 


Yambuya 


II 


oN 


25 E 


Yihsien . 


34 


35 N 


Yamchow 


■ 33 


22 N 


108 E 


Yingchow 


33 


39 N 


Yamen 


• 33 


42 N 


120 E 


Yingkow 


33 


40 N 


Yaraethin 


31 


20 N 


96 E 


Yingkow 


3+ 


41 N 


Yamma Yamma 


38 


26 S 


141 E 


Ying-shaw 


33 


33 N 


Yanago 


3S 


35 N 


133 E 


Yio 


10 


17 S 


Yangandi 


20 


6N 


13 E 


Yo. 


20 


13 N 


Yang-Chia-Ho 


• 34 


36 N 


116 E 


Yoju 


36 


37 N 


Yangchow 


33 


33 N 


119 E 


Yoko . 


20 


5N 


Yang-ju . 


■ 36 


37 N 


127 E 


Yokohama 


35 


35 N 


Yangsin . 


• 34 


37 N 


117 E 


Yokote 


35 


39 N 


Yang tse kiang 


33 


32 N 


107 E 


Yola . 


20 


9N 


Yang-yang . 


36 


38 N 


128 E 


YoUahs 


8 


17 N 


Yankee Doodle 


19 


20 S 


29 E 


Yongampo 


• 36 


40 N 


Yannikkonendal 


• 27 


9N 


77 E 


Yonghai 


36 


37 N 


Yanping 


• 33 


22 N 


112 E 


Yongin 


. 36 


37 N 


Yargura 


• 39 


10 S 


ICO E 


York . 


14 


29 S 


Yarmouth 


3 


44N 


66 W 


York C. 


38 


10 S 


Yarrabah (Miss.) 


• 38 


17 s 


146 E 


Yurk Factory 


2 


58 N 


Yashikira 


20 


9N 


3E 


York Pt. 


7 


52 N 


Yatiyantota . 


. 67 


7N 


80 E 


Yorkton 


4 


51 N 


Yatu I. 


• 41 


13 s 


167 E 


Ysabel Island. 


• 41 


8S 


Yatua I. 


41 


13 s 


167 E 


Yuanchow Hun 


33 


27 N 


Yavigimbas 


21 


3S 


30 E 


Yuankiang 


33 


20 N 


Ychang . 


• 33 


30 N 


III E 


Yuawauri R. . 


9 


iN 


Ye. 


2S 


15 N 


97E 


Yucatan . 


8 


20 N 


Yebba . 


20 


13 N 


oW 


Yuenkiang 


33 


22 N 


Yeji 


20 


8N 


oW 


Yuen, R. 


S3 


28 N 


Yellapur 


58 


15 N 


74 E 


Yuhshan 


33 


28 N 


Yellowhead Pass 


6 


53 N 


118 W 


Yukon . 


2 


60 N 


Yellow R. 


33 


36 N 


117 E 


Yule Mts.- . 


• 39 


8S 


Yellow Sea . 


■ 33 


30 N 


124 E 


Yulin . 


33 


38 N 


Yelua . 


20 


8N 


9E 


Yun 


33 


24 N 


Yelwa 


20 


II N 


4E 


Yunchenghsien 


34 


35 N 


Yeiwa . 


20 


II N 


BE 


Yungchang . 


■ 33 


24 N 


Yembe . 


20 


4N 


12 E 


Yungching 


• 34 


39 N 



Long. 
109 E 
126 E 
105 E 
117 E 
117 E 
oE 

126 E 

127 E 
3E 

116 E 

117 E 
74 E 
78 E 

3W 

77 E 

149 E 

118 E 
113 E 

123 E 
122 E 

117 E 
71 E 
13 E 

127 E 
12 E 

139 E 

140 E 
12 E 
76 W 

124 E 
129 E 
127 E 

30 E 
142 E 
90 W 
56 W 
102 W 
159 E 
109 E 
100 E 
58 W 
90 W 
104 E 
III E 

118 E 
130 W 
147 E 
109 E 
100 E 
116 E 

99 E 
116 E 



Place. 
Yungchow 
Yunglung 
Yungning 
Yungpingfu . 
Yunnanfu 
Yunyang 

Zagwitzi 

ZakR. . 

Zambezi R. . 

Zambot . 

Zand Dr. 

Zand R. 

Zandspruit 

Zanzibar 

Zanzibar Is. 

Zaria 

Zasfron . 

Zaurfontein 

Za valla . 

Zazagawa 

Zealandia 

Zebedela 

Zeckoe . 

Zeerust . 

Zeila 

Zibadlo . 

Ziban 

Zigon 

ZiUmanton 

Zimbane 

Zinder . 

Zitimbili 

Zitzik 

Zivani . 

Ziwundwana . 

Zombas . 

Zonnebloem 

Zoutpan 

Zululand 

Zumbo 

Zungeru 

Zurumi 

Zuurberg 

Zuurfontein 

Zwaartberg 

Zwagees Hoek 

Zwart Kop 

Zwartkops 

Zwartruggens 

Zweltendam Pt. 



Map No. Lat. 
33 26 N 



33 
33 
34 
33 
33 



26 N 

27 N 
39 N 

25 N 
33 N 



17 32 S 

12 31 S 

19 isS 

16 27 s 

13 30 s 
15 28 s 

18 27 s 

11 10 s 
21 6S 

20 II N 

13 30 s 

13 32 S 

18 24 S 

20 12 N 

4 51 N 

18 24 S 

12 34 S 
i8 25 S 

11 10 N 

17 31 S 
20 14 N 
31 i8 N 
38 17 S 
17 31 S 

20 13 N 
17 32 S 

13 33 S 

21 6S 

17 32 S 
21 14 S 

12 33 S 

18 22 S 

11 20 s 
21 isS 
20 9 N 
20 12 N 

13 33 S 

13 30 s 

17 30 S 
13 32 S 

12 34 S 

13 33 S 

18 2SS 
13 34 S 



Long. 
112 E 

99 E 
loi E 
118 E 
103 E 
III E 

27 E 
21 E 
32 E 

31 E 

26 E 

27 E 

29 E 

30 E 

39 E 
7E 

,27 E 

25 E 

34 E 

4E 

107 W 
29 E 
18 E 
25 E 

40 E 

28 E 
lE 

95 E 
144 E 
28 E 
9E 
28 E 
23 E 

32 E 

28 E 

33 E 
18 E 

29 E 

30 E 
30 E 

6E 
6E 
25 E 
25 E 
29 E 
25 E 
t8E 

25 E 

26 E 
23 E 



ABERDEEN : THE UNIVERSITY PRESS