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CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 




Cornell University Library 
F 277M2 S46 



History of Marion county. South Carolina 



olin 




3 1924 028 790 414 




Cornell University 
Library 



The original of tiiis book is in 
tine Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924028790414 



A HISTORY 



OF 



MARION COUNTY. 



SOUTH CAROLINA, 



From Its Earliest Times to the Present, 190U 



By W. W. SELLERS, Esq., 

of the Marjon Bar. 



Columbia, S. C. 

Thk R. I,. Bkyan Company, 

1902. 









v-ll 11 1 / 1^^ 



Copyright, 1902, 
By John C. Sbi<i.BRS. 



CONTENTS 

Chapter I. 

Settlement i 

Chapter II. 

Section I. Location and Boundaries 6 

Section II. Its Surface and Soil, Its Rivers and Lakes, Its In- 

Land Swamps iS 

Section III. Its Soil and Productions Vj 

Section IV. Stock Raising 29 

Chapter III. 

Section I. Its Educational, Political and Judicial History 33 

Graduates of Colleges 50 

Political History 52 

Queensboro Township 78 

Plat of the Welch Grant (First) 81 

The Early Settlement of Marion County 104 

Some Families mentioned : 

Godbold 117 

Evans 125 

Giles 13s 

Britton, Fladger. etc 137 

Crawford 142 

Murfees 147 

Berry 148 

Saunders I57 

Gibson 159 

Page 162 

Ayres 166 

Ford 167 

Hays 170 

Elvington 173 

Scott I7S 

Owens 17s 

Gaddy 176 

Lupo and Arnett 178 

Rogers 178 

Perritt 183 

Edwards i8s 

Nichols 189 

Hutchinson 191 

Barfield 191 

Goodyear 192 

Tart 193 

Bryant I97 

Watson 199 



IV A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

R<>aves 206 

208 



Grice 

Roberts 209 

EUerbee ^^3 

Fore : 218 

Mace 221 

Finklea 223 

Haselden ^^3 

Bass 22s 

Hamer 232 

McKenzie ^35 

Manning •' 238 

Jones 241 

Cottinghara 246 

Hamilton 247 

Braddy 249 

Clark 252 

Harrelson 255 

Martin 258 

Henry 261 

Huggins 263 

Hayes 267 

Dew 271 

Nicholson 275 

Jackson 276 

Galloway 281 

Sherwood 281 

Alford 282 

Greenwood 284 

Mclnnis 285 

Stafford 287 

Blue 289 

Baker 290 

McPriest 291 

McKellar 291 

McKay 292 

McCormick 293 

McArthur 299 

Mclntyre 300 

McKinly 307 

McLellan 308 

Sinclair 314 

McDuifie 315 



Campbell 320 

Butler 327 

Moody 330 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. V 

Harllee 342 

Woodberry 355 

Stackhouse 358 

Wayne 366 

Legette 369 

Gasque 373 

Brown 373 

Gilchrist 382 

Easterling 384 

Lane 386 

Bethea 395 

McMillan ; 421 

Miller 425 

Spencer * 427 

Williamson 429 

Wall 432 

McEachern 435 

Carmichael 437 

Baker 445 

Davis 448 

Stanley . . . '. 455 

Harrel, in Britten's Neck 456 

Altman 456 

Whaley 457 

Richardson 457 

Stevenson 462 

Craven 463 

Thompson 464 

Kirton 464 

Philips 465 

Owens 466 

Rowell 468 

Giles 471 

Coleman 472 

Norton 475 

Lewis 480 

Fowler 483 

Shooter 484 

Campbell (of Maiden Down) 486 

Atkinson 488 

Fladger 49i 

Smith 492 

Flowers 502 

Mullins , 506 

Gregg 510 

Collins ' 512 



VI A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Wiggins, of Wahee Si" 

Shaw ■ Si8 

Dozier S2i 

Foxworth and Boatwright 5^2 

White and Monroe S25 

Sniipes 528 

Wilcox 536 

Young 537 

Johnson 538 

Sellers 543 

The Negro 546 

Towns of the County 55° 

Marion 551 

Nichols and Mullins 553 

Latta and Dillon 555 

Hamer and Sellers 559 

The Denominational Churches 560 

Clerks of Court for Marion County, from 1800 to 1900 564 

Sheriffs for Marion County from 1800 to 1900 565 

Representatives in the Legislature 566 

Senators from 1800 to igoo 568 

Ordinaries and Probate Judges from 1800 to 1900 568 

Proprietary Governors 568 

Lawyers practicing at Marion from 1800 to 1900 570 

Volunteers in Confederate Army 572 

Company L, 21st Regiment Infantry, C. S. A : . 572 

Company H, Orr's Regt. Rifles S. C. V., C. S. A 577 

Company F, 4th Regt. Cav. S. C. V., C. S. A 581 

Company E, Gregg's i«t Regt. S. C. V., C. S. A 585 

Company I, 8th Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 590 

Company H, 8th Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 593 

Company I, ist Regt. Inf. (Hagood's) S. C. V., C. S. A. . 596 

Company L, loth Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 599 

Company L, 8th Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 602 

Company I, 21st Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 605 

Company E, 23d Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 609 

Company Gregg's Battery, Co. D, Manigault's Battalion 

Artillery S. C. V., C. S. A 613 

Company H, 23d Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A. 620 

Company D, loth Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 626 

Company F, loth Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 628 

Company I, 6th Regt. Cav. S. C. V., C. S. A 631 

Company D, 2Sth Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 632 

Company E, 26th Reg. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 636 

Company I, loth Regt. Inf. S. C. V., C. S. A 639 

Company D, 7th Battalion S. C. Reserves 642 

Company of Militia, last called into service 644 



PREFACE 

Within the last ten or twelve years the author has been 
solicited to write a history of this, Marion County, and by 
many whose opinions and judgment he much valued ; but then 
being much engaged in the practice of the law, he could not 
find the time to engage in and complete such a work. Further- 
more, he felt a diffidence in his abilities to perform the task 
with satisfaction and credit to himself. January, 1898, he 
concluded to retire from the active practice of his profession, 
for the reason, first, that his sense of hearing became much 
impaired; and secondly, because of his age, then near eighty 
years old. He retired, and since that time has taken no new 
case, and confined himself only to old cases then pending in the 
Courts of Marion, Florence and Horry Counties; cases, too, 
that his junior partner had had nothing to do with and knew 
but little about. Those cases were in due time mostly ended. 
After this work in the Courts was practically accomplished, 
and having fair health aiid strength for one of his age, physi- 
cally and mentally, he determined to undertake the work, and 
for the last eighteen months has been engaged principally in 
its performance, and he herewith submits it to the people of the 
county, and it will be for them to say whether he has succeeded 
well or has failed to meet expectations. Such as it is, it is his 
own work. Its subject matter, the language used, the style, 
manner and composition are all his own. He has not borrowed 
from another author without giving to that other full credit 
by placing the language used in quotation marks, and referring 
to the author by name and page. He acknowledges his indebt- 
edness to Dr. Ramsay's History of South Carolina, to Bishop 
Gregg's History of the Old Cheraws, to the Lives of General 



VIII A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Marion written by M. L. Weems, and General Horry, and the 
same by W. Gilmore Sims, to the Statutes at Large as pub- 
lished by Dr. Thomas Cooper, and to perhaps other sources. 
He is further indebted to many of our citizens for information 
as to families that he could not otherwise have obtained. 

It may be found that he has made mistakes. It will be a 
wonder if it is not so found. He expects no other. In men- 
tioning families, it is mainly genealogical. All genealogy is 
history, and he trusts that families for the next three or four 
generations, at least, may be able to trace their ancestry back 
to and including what is herein written; that it will not be 
then, as he has found it in his inquiries of persons, when 
writing this history, that some of them of superior intelligence 
did not know who their grands-father was. Many of the old 
families have become extinct by death or removal. The author 
may have omitted to notice some that now exist. Where that 
is the case, it was because the author knew nothing or but little 
about them, and could not ascertain anything in reference to 
them. He tried to get a list of the graduates of literary col- 
leges from Marion County, but some of them did not answer 
inquiries. Hence he had to depend on memory. Marion may 
well congratulate herself on the number and character of her 
young and older men of learning. She is fast coming to the 
front in that line, as well as in many other lines. He has 
furnished a list of all the Clerks of the Court, Sheriffs and 
Probate Judges or Ordinaries from the earliest times of her 
existence as a Judicial District. Also, a list of her Senators 
in the Legislature and Representatives. Further, a list of all 
the lawyers that have practiced in Marion since 1800. He has 
also procured and inserted a list of all the Governors of the 
province, proprietary and royal, while a province, and all after 
it became an independent State down to the present time, and 
last, but not least in importance and in its numbers, a list of all 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. IX 

the companies that went from Marion to the Confederate War. 
This list embraces West Marion, including all company officers, 
what became of them, killed in battle or died of disease or 
wounds ; whether living or dead now, so far as is known, and 
much other information concerning our brave boys during that 
momentous struggle. All of which the author trusts may be 
of interest to many, very many, of the present generation. 

The author, now in his eighty-fourth year, submits what he 
has done in this regard as his last work on the stage of life. It 
has been a labor of love, for the county in which he has spent 
most of his life, and for any errors, omissions and failures he 
asks the indulgence of its people, to wliom he herein and hereby 
respectfully dedicates the result of his labors. 

W. W. Sbi,i.BRS. 

Sellers, S. C, August 27tih, 1901. 



A History of Marion County 



CHAPTER I. 

The first permanent settlement made in South CaroHna was 
by a few emigrants from England, under the direction and 
patronage of William Sayle, at or near Port Royal, in 1670. 
William Sayle was their first Governor. These colonists, for 
some reason or another, became dissatisfied with their location 
at Port Royal. They removed, in 1671, up the coast and set- 
tled on the west side of the Ashley River, opposite the present 
site of the city of Charleston, and there laid the foundation 
of old Charleston. This site was not wisely chosen, as it 
could not be reached by ships of heavy burden, and therefore 
it was abandoned. "A second removal took place to Oyster 
Point, formed by the confluence of Ashley and Cooper Rivers. 
There, in 1680, the foundation of the present city of Charleston 
was laid, and in one year thirty houses were built." Of the 
number and names of these first settlers of South Carolina, no 
records have been kept and preserved; only two names have 
come down to us, that of William Sayle and Joseph West. 
William Sayle dying in 1671, Joseph West was appointed as 
his successor, August 28, 1671. He was succeeded by Sir 
John Yeamans, April 19th, 1672, and he was succeeded by 
Joseph West, 13th August 1674, who held the office till 26th 
September, 1682, when he was succeeded by Joseph Morton, 
and on September 6th, 1684, Joseph West was appointed 
Governor for the third time, (i vol.. Statutes at Large, pp. 
17, 18 and 19.) The first slaves introduced in South Carolina 
were brought hither by Sir John Yeamans from Barbadoes, 
one of the West India Islands, in 1671. Sir John Yeamans was 
an Englishman, though he came from Barbadoes to Carolina. 
Had he not been an Englishman, he would not have been 
appointed Governor of the province. The writer infers that 
he left England at or about the time the emigrants left England 
under William Sayle for Carolina, and who landed at Port 



2 A HISTORY 0^ MARION COUNTY. 

Royal the year before, to wit : 1670. The writer further infers 
that Sir John Yeamans went by Barbadoes for the purpose of 
getting a cargo of slaves to be carried to Carolina, and that 
Yeamans and Sayle understood one another. A sad day for 
the country ! Thus the .germ of near two hundred years' con- 
tention in America was planted, which culminated in a bloody 
four years war between the States of America, from 1861 to 
1865. The results of this nucleus of slavery are still felt 
among us, and is perplexing the brain of our best and ablest 
men, and will, perhaps, for ages to come. There is no doubt 
a providence is in it all, and He who rules and determines the 
destinies of men and nations, may and will bring good out of 
the seeming evil. 

The government of Carolina (both North and South Caro- 
lina) had been granted by two charters by King Charles the 
Second, to certain English noblemen, to wit : to "Edward, Earl 
of Clarendon, High Chancellor of England, and George, Duke 
of Albemarle, Master of our Horse and Captain General of all 
our forces, and well beloved William Lord Craven, John 
Ivord Berkley, our right trusty and well beloved Counsellor, 
Anthony L,ord Ashley, Chancellor of our Exchequer, Sir 
George Content, Kn't and Baronet, Vicp Chamberlain of our 
household, and our trusty and well beloved Sir William Berk- 
ley, Kn't, and Sir John Colleton, Knight and Baronet, being 
excited with a laudable and pious zeal for the propagation of 
the Christian faith, and the enlargement of our empire and 
dominions, have humbly sought leave of us by their industry 
and charge to transport and make an ample colony of our 
subjects natives of our Kingdom of England and elsewhere 
within our dominions, unto a certain country hereafter de- 
scribed in the parts of America not yet cultivated or planted, 
and only inhabited by some barbarous people who have no 
knowledge of Almighty God." This charter, of which the 
above quotation is the first section, was granted 24th March, 
1663 ; and on the 30th June, 1665, the said Charles the Second 
granted to the said parties named in the first charter the same 
territory, to wit: all the lands lying between the 31st and 36th 
degrees of north latitude, and between the Atlantic Ocean on 
the east and the South Seas (Pacific Ocean) on the west, in- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 3 

eluding what is now the States of North CaroKna and South 
Carolina, giving to the said named proprietors larger rights 
and powers than in the first charter. (See ist and 2d charters, 
I vol., Statutes at Large of South Carolina, pp. 22 to 31, and 
pp. 31 to 40.) 

Under these charters, the Lords Proprietors drew up, or had 
it done, five different constitutions for the government of the 
province, but it does not appear that any one of them was 
ever adopted and ratified by the Assembly, except in part, and 
except those drawn up by the celebrated John Locke, and then 
only in part; but notwithstanding the rejection of parts of all 
of them by the Assembly, the government established by them 
moved along with some success, and without serious friction, 
for a period of forty-nine or fifty years, until 17 19, when a 
revolution (bloodless) took place under the administration of 
Robert Johnson, Esq., as Governor, and threw off and repu- 
diated the government of the Lords Proprietors, thinking they 
would be better protected in their rights under the King. 
They first offered the government to Governor Robert John- 
son, provided he would administer it in the name of the King, 
instead of in the name of the Lords Proprietors. He refused 
so to do, whereupon the Assembly offered the governorship 
to Col. James Moore, son of the former Governor, who ac- 
cepted the position and took upon himself the government of 
the province. Accounts of the trouble in the province being 
sent to England, King George the First appointed Francis 
Nicholson Governor of the province, to act until the matter 
was decided between the Lords Proprietors and the King. 
Facilities for communicating and conferring together across 
the Atlantic were not what they are now, and it took several 
years to consider and come to an agreement. At last, in 1729, 
the second year of the reign of George the Second, they came 
to an agreement by wWch seven of the proprietors agreed 
to surrender to the Crown their title and interest in the prov- 
ince, which agreement was duly signed by the several Lords 
Proprietors, and which surrender was confirmed by an Act of 
Parliament. Robert Johnson was commissioned under the 
broad seal of England as Governor of the province, and his 
Excellency arrived in the province in December, 1730; and 



4 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

henceforth for more than fifty years the government of the 
province was administered under the Crown of England. 

Lord Carteret (afterwards Lord Granville), the eighth Pro- 
prietor, resigned on the 17th September, 1744. all pretensions 
to the government and his eighth part of the right to the soil 
of Carolina. Commissioners were appointed on his part and 
on the part of the King to lay off his part to him, which they 
did next adjoining Virginia. In 1729, the province of Caro- 
lina was divided into North and South Carolina, and the 
boundaries between the two provinces were fixed by an order 
of the British Council. 

Hardship and privation were doubtless the lot of the first 
settlers of the province, so numerous that all cannot even be 
imagined in this day and time. The number of the first emi- 
grants were unknown, as no record of them has been kept. 
There could not have been many : "There could not, however, 
been many, for all of them together with provisions, arms and 
utensils requisite for their support, defence and comfort, in a 
country inhabited only by savages, were brought from Eng- 
land to Carolina in two vessels." (Ramsay's History of South 
Carolina, vol. i, p. i.) To increase the population was the 
general primary object. Think of it. A country of vast ex- 
tent, and a vast wilderness roamed over by savages and wild 
animals ; no roads or bridges across the rivers and other inland 
streams ; nowhere to go ; no means of communication with the 
rest of the world except by the stormy Atlantic, and to cross it 
took from one to two months. The first settlers were of neces- 
sity taught that valuable lesson, self-reliance. They were 
obliged to go to work building rude houses for habitation, also 
to cut down and clear up lands for cultivation, to make crops 
for another year. They were necessarily obliged to stay close 
together, by the laws of self-preservation, being surrounded 
by hostile and murderous savages. Wherever they were or at 
whatever they were engaged, they had to carry their arms, and 
be always on the lookout for an attack from their savage 
enemies. In Ramsay's History of South Carolina, pp. 18 and 
19 : "They were obliged to stand in a constant posture of de- 
fence. While one party was employed in raising their little 
habitations, another was always kept under arms to watch the 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 5 

Indians. While they gathered oysters with one hand for sub- 
sistence, they were obliged to carry guns in the other for self- 
defence. The only fresh provisions they could procure were 
fish from the river or what game they could kill with their 
guns." 

The young colonists being thus situated and necessarily con- 
fined within such narrow limits, were extremely anxious that 
other settlers should come in. The proprietary and regal 
governments were also anxious to the same end, and, therefore^ 
they held out great inducements to the people in Europe and 
elsewhere to migrate to the new province of Carolina, by offer- 
ing bounties in money and land to all (being Protestants) and 
especially poor Protestant families, to emigrate to Carolina. 
By the inducements held out to the people of the old world by 
various parties, many emigrants were induced to venture into 
the province from England, Scotland, Wales, France and Ger- 
many — transportation and supplies in many instances fur- 
nished. The several bodies of emigrants coming into the 
province at different times, from different countries, and other 
provinces or States, besides individual emigration or families 
from the more northern States, and the natural increase of the 
population, raised the number of the inhabitants from the mere 
handful that came in 1670, as hereinbefore stated, to 345,591 in 
130 years, or in 1800. (Ramsay, i vol., p. 14.) During this 
period, 130 years, the government was first proprietary, then 
regal, and lastly from regal to a representative government, 
a "government by the people and for the people," under which 
we are now living and have lived for 124 years, and which the 
writer hopes will be perpetual for all time to come. From 
1696 to 1730, there were not any a:dditions made to the popula- 
tion of the province by the emigration to it of any large bodies 
of settlers, only by an occasional adventurer to the province 
from other provinces. 

I have here given a general view of the State in its first 
settlement; the hardships and privations of its early inhabi- 
tants ; its changes of government, &c., without going into de- 
tails, as preliminary to the subject to be brought to view in the 
proposed history of this, Marion County. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 



CHAPTER II. 



Location and Boundaries — Surface and Soil— Its Rivers and 
Lakes — Its Inland Creeks or Swamps. 

SECTION I. 

Marion County, as originally laid out, is in about latitude 34 
north, and longiture 3 west from Washington. A line com- 
mencing at a stake on the North Carolina line, about one and 
a half miles from Mclnnis' Bridge over Little Pee Dee River, 
running a southwest course to and across the Great Pee Dee 
River to Lynch's Creek (river), dividing it from Marlborough 
County, on the east side of the Great Pee Dee, and from Dar- 
lington County, on the west side of said river. From the point 
w'here said line intersects Lynch's River — said Lynch's River 
is the line down to its confluence with the Great Pee Dee on 
its west side ; thence down the said Great Pee Dee to its conflu- 
ence with Little Pee Dee ; thence up the Little Pee Dee to its 
confluence with Lumber River ; thence up Lumber River to its 
intersection with the North and' South Carolina line; thence 
up the said North Carolina line to the beginning stake above 
Mclnnis' Bridge. Its boundaries may be thus described: on 
the north by Marlborough County ; on the northwest by Dar- 
lington County ; on the west and southwest by Lynch's River ; 
on. the southwest and south by Great Pee Dee; on the east by 
Little Pee Dee and! Lumber River ; on the north and northeast 
by North Carolina. 

Since the formation of Florence County, in 1888, Great Pee 
Dee forms its southern and southwestern boundary. It 
covers between nine and ten hundred square miles (estimated) 
now, or since the formation of Florence County. In length, 

from the northwest to southeast, it is about seventy miles 

some of our people have to travel thirty-five or forty miles to 
reach the Court House. In breadth, from east and northeast to 
west and southwest, it is about thirty miles, on the line of the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad ; from that line southward it grad- 
ually narrows to a point at the confluence of the two Pee Dees. 
The line between Marion and Marlborough is estimated at 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 7 

eighteen to twenty miles long, and on the North Carolina side 
at thirty-one or thirty-two miles (estimated). For political 
and county government purposes it is divided into fourteen 
(formerly eighteen) townships, as nearly equal in area as may 
be, having regard to creeks or swamps, public roads and other 
well known marks or division lines. Their names are Marion, 
Reaves, Hillsboro, Carmichael, Manning, Harlleesville, Bethea, 
Moody, Kirby, Wahee, Rowell, Legette, Britton's Neck and 
Woodberry. Of these, Marion, Reaves, Harlleesville and 
Manning are the most populous, and have the greatest amount 
of 'taxable property within them. These townships were laid 
out under the State Constitution of 1868, and Acts of the 
General Assembly made in pursuance thereof, and are yet con- 
tinued under the Constitution of 1895, and subsequent legisla- 
tion. The taxable property of these several townships, includ- 
ing the two graded schools in Marion and Manning Townships, 
is hereto appended, as shown from the County Auditor and 
County Treasurer's books for the year 1899. Also, the popula- 
tion of each of said townships : 

Taxes 1899. 

Bethea Township $209,701 

Britton's Neck Township 99.659 

Carmichael Township 282,910 

Harlleesville Township . . . ; 418,039 

Hillsboro Township 287,542 

Kirby Township 296,429 

Legette Township 136,661 

Manning Township 498,605 

Marion Township 745,235 

Moody Township 260,147 

Reaves Township 434,107 

Rowell Township 79>o65 

Wahee Township 3i5>37i 

Woodberry Township 18,298 

$4,081,768 

The above shows the total taxable property for Marion 
County in the year 1899, exclusive of poll taxes. There are at 
least two thousand in the county, at one dollar each, $2,000. 
2 



8 A HISTORY O^ MARION COUNTY. 

Never before in the history of the State were townships or 
subdivisions of the counties made or laid out for civil pur- 
poses, but only for military and church purposes. Our people, 
from the earliest settlement of the State down to the present 
time, 'have been a military people, as the legislation of the 
State showis. From the very first, when the first Legislature, 
or Parliament as it was then called, met in Charleston (1674), 
they provided as best they could with their scanty means for 
the defence of the colony against the hostile incursions of the 
Indians. Although no Act or Acts of the provincial Legisla- 
ture of the province are to be found until 1682 — eight years 
after the first Legislature, in 1674 — yet we are bound to infer 
that there were during that period some Act or Acts passed 
for thie protection of the infant colony against hostile attacks 
from the bordering savages, which were hovering round and 
watching for an opportunity to successfully attack and destroy 
Ihe pale-faced intruders from off the land, and whom the In- 
dians thought to be enemies, and whose presence, in their 
estimaition, bodted no good to them. Hence we may infer 
that the attention of the first legislators was directed to the 
organization of the militia by apix)inting a Commander-in-Chief 
or General, Colonels, Captains, Lieutenants, &c., and for an 
enrolment of the militia. From that time on to the Revolution, 
numberless enactments of the Legislature were passed perfect- 
ing the organization of the militia of the former, as may be 
seen on examination of the Statutes at Large, by Dr. Thomas 
Cooper, under authority of the Legislature, and on down to 
1841, when the compilation of Dr. Cooper was published, and 
even dawn to the present time, 1900. The tenth volume of said 
compilation is an index to the nine preceding volumes. The 
index to the militia laws of the province, and now the State, 
covers twenty pages. Our people have always manifested a 
martial spirit, not only on paper by legislation, but in actual 
service in times of war. I will not herein undertake to enu- 
merate the valiant deeds of her sons in all the wars through 
which they have freely spilled their blood — in all of which, 
whether in the right or not, they believed they were right. 

In 1832 and 1833, Acts were passed reorganizing the militia 
of the whole State. By those Acts the muster beats (town- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 9 

ships) in every county were laid out, and a thorough reorgani- 
zation of the militia of the State effected. Every muster beat 
formed a company, eight companies formed a regiment, four 
regiments formed a brigade, two brigades formed a division, 
and five divisions covered the State. For each division a 
Major General was elected, for each brigade a Brigadier 
General was elected, and for each regiment a Colonel, a 
Lieutenant Colonel and a Major were elected, and for each 
company a Cat>tain and three Lieutenants were elected ; also, a 
staff for each field officer was appointed. The field officers for 
divisions and brigades were elected by the Legislature. Colo- 
nels of regiments and all officers below him were elected by the 
people. An Adjutant was appointed for each regiment, and 
an Adjutant and Inspector General for the wihole State was 
elected. The Governor for the time being was Commander- 
in-Chief of the militia of the whole State, including cavalry 
and artillery regiments. Brigade encampments were provided 
for in each of the two brigades, to be held for five and six days 
every two years. The brigade encampment for the 8th bri-' 
gade, in which the regiment (32d) from Marion was, was held 
every two years on the west side of Great Pee Dee, near 
Godfrey's Ferry. At these brigade encampments the Governor 
and his staff; the Major General and his staff of this (4th) 
division; the Brigadier General and his staff; the Colonels of 
the eight regiments composing the 8th brigade ; all the Adju- 
tants of the several regiments; the Lieutenant Colonels and 
Majors ; all the Captains and Lieutenants of all the companies 
in the brigade, were required to attend, each in his prescribed 
uniform, from Lieutenant up to Governor. These brigade en- 
campments were for drill, exercise and inspection. The horses 
of the field officers were required to be richly caparisoned, 
according to rank, the higher the officer the richer the uniform 
and horse-trappings. They had their tents and camp equipage. 
The expense of all this was borne by each officer, so far as his 
uniform and horse-trappings were concerned. The transporta- 
tion of all this equipage was in wagons (no railroads in those 
times). 

The subdivisions of the district into company beats (town- 
ships) in Marion District were as follows: High Hill, Maiden 



10 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Down, Berry's Cross Roads and Harlleesville formed what was 
the upper battahon ; Marion or Gilesboro, Britton's Neck, Big 
Swamp and Jeffreys formed the lower battalion. The com- 
panies in each beat were required to meet for "drill, exercise 
and parade" every two months, or six times in the year. In 
each battalion there had to be a battalion muster once a year, 
and a general muster of the regiment, composed of the two 
battalions, was required to be held once a year. Every able- 
bodied man in each beat was enrolled and required to do 
militia service, between the ages of eighteen and forty years. 
Many other requirements, not necessary to mention, were con- 
tained in the law. The organization was seemingly perfect — 
at least on paper — and continued to exist until the Confederate 
war. The offices, from highest to lowest, were eagerly 
sought — our people were ambitious to obtain military honors 
or distinction, notwithstanding they were mere empty titles. 
There was no money or pay in any of them, except the Adjutant 
and Inspector General of the State. Every officer equipped 
'himself and served bis country at his own expense. As a 
general rule, they took pride in their positions and showed off 
to best possible advantage — and especially the field officers. 
The writer recollects an illustrative remark made by the late 
John C. Bethea, in reference to the late Col. James R. Bethea, 
while he was Colonel of this (the 32d) regiment. He bought 
a fine horse for $200 and fine horse-trappings, a uniform for 
himself of fine material, trimmed in the manner prescribed by 
law for an officer of his rank. The total outfit cost him from 
$400 to $500. He was elected Colonel while a single man. 
He was also fond of hunting, and kept a kennel of hounds^ 
five or six. Pending his colonelcy he married, and in dfae 
process of time his wife bore him a son, whom he named 
Jesse; the Colonel was very proud of his boy. There were 
four objects which the Colonel delighted in above all things 
else, to wit : his wife, Mary ; his son, Jesse ; his horse, Hugh- 
warra, and his dogs — these were his pets and neairest his 
heart. John C. Bethea, a relative and neighbor of the Colonel, 
observing these idols of his, said : "It was difficult to tell which 
of the four the Colonel worshipped most." Said though, "he 
thought the boy, Jesse, was first, and his horse, Hughwarra, 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 11 

was next; and he did not know which came next, whether it 
was Mary or the dogs." This play of humor upon Col. Bethea 
illustrates the martial pride and spirit of the whole State, 
inclusive of Marion District. It permeated the whole people. 
Tihe higher militia offices were sought most generally by men 
of means, able and willing to incur the concomitant expense. 
They were sometimes sought by men of small means, but such 
was the militia mania of the people and times, that men with 
little means would stake all they had or could procure for the 
sake of the empty honors consequent upon military titles and 
preferments. Some of the bitterest contests that ever occurred 
in Marion District for office, were inspired by this military 
spirit. This was much more commendable than the scramble 
of the present day, between scheming politicians for office be- 
cause of the money there is in it. From 1833 to i860, Marion 
District had her full share of the high positions in the military 
of the Staite. I will name such of them as are remembered 
since 1833 : Before 1833, Marion had her Brigadier Generals, 
Thomas Godbold and William Woodberry; Brigadier General 
E. B. Wheeler, Brigadier General William Evans, Brigadier 
General Elly Godbold; Major General W. W. Harllee; Colonel 
Thomas Harllee, Colonel James R. Bethea, Colonel John 
J» George; Majors W. H. Moody, William Ford, D. J. 
Taylor, Samuel McPherson, R. G. Howard, James S. 
Rogers, John A. Breeden, Woodward Manning and D. W. 
Edwards. The Majors and Brigadier Generals went up 
by regular gradations from the lower positions of Major 
and Colonel. The Colonels rose from lower position to 
that of Colonel. All except Colonel Thomas Harllee, who was 
the first Colonel elected upon the reorganization of the militia 
under the Acts of 1832 and 1833. He was elected, as the 
writer has always understood, from the ranks. By those Acts, 
all previous commissions were vacated. The election was just 
after the heated struggle for and against Nullification. In 
Marion District, the parties for and against Nullification were 
about equal in strength. The Nullifiers carried the District 
by a narrow majority. In 1834, when the reorganization actu- 
ally took place, the smouldering fires of the Nullification 
struggle were again lighted up and burned with their original 



12 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

fury. Each party put up their supposed strongest man for 
Colonel. The Nullifiers brought out Thomas Harllee, a modest 
and unassuming man— a man who had never asked for office, 
and never did afterwards (he had previously been elected a 
delegate to the Nullification Convention in 1832, unsought, by 
him). He was a man of great natural popularity, a magnetic 
man. The Opposition or Union party brought out as their 
candidate for Colonel, John T. Ervin, then a resident citizen of 
Marion District, but afterwards moved to Darlington. He 
was a man of wealth, with winning and graceful manners, a 
magnetic man. They both had many strong and monied 
friends — either could command as much money as he wanted. 
These two champions entered the race — ^the most heated and 
exciting race, perhaps, the county has never had. The district 
was stirred from centre to its utmost limits ; in every nook and 
corner, the aged and decrepit were hunted up and brought to 
the polls on the day of election. Doubtless, much money was 
spent by the respective parties during the campaign, and on 
the day of election. When the votes were counted, it was 
ascertained that Ervin had beaten Harllee one vote. The elec- 
tion was protested by Harllee's friends, and of course more 
than one illegal vote was found. The election was set aside 
and another election was ordered. The parties entered the 
second race with renewed determination and vigor, nothing 
left undone that was within human compass. The second elec- 
tion was held, and when the voltes were counted, it was ascer- 
tained and so declared that Harllee had beaten Ervin by twenty- 
six votes. No protest was made, and Harllee became Colonel 
of the 32d Regiment. Colonel Thomas Harllee was not fitted 
for such an office — it was not congenial to his nature. He held 
the office, however, with credit to himself and satisfaction to 
his numerous friends for a few years, and resigned and re- 
turned to the pursuits of private life. He was of a retiring 
dispositon, modest and unassuming — the district honored itself 
in honoring him. He was older than the late General W. W. 
Harllee, and never married. In 1844 or 1845, he sold out at 
Harlleesville and went to Charle'ston, and there went into a 
factorage and commission business with a man named Carson, 
under the firm name of Carson & Harllee. He lived only a 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 13 

short while after this, and died universally loved and respected 
wherever he was known. 

Among the Majors of the two battalions, the oldest by virtue 
of his seniority became Lieutenant Colonel. The writer may 
not have mentioned all the Colonels and Majors in Marion 
District since the reorganization in 1834 — the omission arises 
not from intention, but from his want of memory — he has no 
record! to look at. 

Other heated contests were common in companies and bat- 
talions. The most noted of these was between Captain John J. 
George, of Berry's Cross Roads beat, and Captain H. B. Cook, 
of llie Maiden Down beat, for Major of the upper battalion, 
which occurred by the promotion of Major James R. Bethea to 
the Colonency of tihe regiment. This was about 1842 or 1843. 
The first election. Captain Cook beat Cajitain George six 
votes. George protested the election, which was set aside and 
another election ordered. At the second' election, George beat 
Cook seven votes. It was protested and set aside, and a third 
election ordtered — at which Captain Cook declined to enter 
the race, and Captain Henry Rogers, of the High Hill beat, 
became the candidate. At this third election. Captain George 
was elected by a hundred majority. This contest, though con- 
fined to the upper battalion, was exciting, and a full vote was 
polled. Major George was finally promoted to the Colonelcy 
of the regiment, which he held for several years. 

Enough has been said to show the martial spirit of our people 
even in times of peace, and it continues down to the present 
day — ^though it seeras to the writer that the present organiza- 
tion of the militia of the State is not calculated to awaken and 
arouse and foster the martial ardor and spirit of the people as 
did the former organization of the State militia, and especially 
that of 1833 and 1834, which the writer thinks the best ever 
devised here or elsewhere for a citizen militia. As already 
stated, every able-bodied man from eighteen to forty years of 
age was enrolled At each petty muster the roll was called, 
and defaulters marked and afterwards court martialed; and 
unless he had an excuse deemed sufficient by the court, he was 
fined, and if not paid an execution was issued against his prop- 
erty and lodged with the Sheriff ; and if no property suiificient 



14 A HISTORY Ot MARION COUNTY. 

to satisfy the execution and costs, he could be arrested and put 
in jail, and kept there until he was thence discharged according 
to law. This provision of the law forced attendance, and there 
were few defaulters without sufficient excuse. Along in this 
line a ludicrous occurrence once happened at roll-call at Harl- 
leesville on a petty muster occasion, which I will relate. 
During roU-call the name of Ephraim Taylor, the father of our 
late respectable fellow-citizen, Morgan Taylor, was called; he 
did not answer— was not present. Ephraim's brother, Thomas, 
was in line, and he (Thomas) hollered out, "He could not 
come, he had no breeches to wear." This produced a general 
laugh along the whole line. 

Another incident, at the same muster ground, of a different 
character, had a sad ending. In July, 1842 or 1843, at a petty 
muster, one Yates Cottingham, the grand-father of our Henry 
C. Cottingham, at Dillon, was at the muster that day. The old 
gentleman, a harmless man, ha;d one failing, and but one — ^he 
was passionately fond of liquor; if he had any other failing, 
the writer never heard of it. He went up to a cart or wagon 
where whiskey was to sell (for in that day any one might sell 
liquor with impunity, although against the law), several were 
stanlding round; old man Yates expressed a strong desire for 
some liquor, and said he could drink a quart, if he had it, 
without taking it from his head ; whereupon some one in the 
crowd said to him, "Yates, if you will drink it I will pay for 
it." The whiskey was measured in a quart cup and handed out, 
the old gentleman took it and turned it up to his mouth, and 
there held it until he had drained the quart cup. After drink- 
ing it, lie turned and walked off towards Colonel Thos. Harl- 
lee's store, a few steps off, walked up the steps and to a long 
board in the piazza ; he lay down on the board and never rose 
again. In the afternoon the people broke up and left for their 
homes. About sunset, after the people had all gone. Colonel 
Harllee closed up the store and went up to his house, perhaps 
a hundred or more yards away. Colonel Harllee said when he 
closed his front door, he saw old man Yates lying there on the 
bench ; did not go to him nor did he call him — that the old man 
was only^tight and was asleep ; that the old gentleman would 
wake up during the night and go home, only a mile or so away. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 15 

That he had seen him many times drunk and asleep upon that 
bench ; that the old gentleman would wake up during the night 
and go home. Col. Harllee heard or knew no more till the 
next morning, when a negro went to his house, and told him 
the old man was dead. He immediately went down to the 
store and found the old man dead and rigid — so much so that 
they concluded that he died before night the evening before. 
An inquest was held and the facts found about as herein 
stated. The old man, Yates Cottingham, was the uncle by 
marriage of Colonel Harllee — Yates' wife was his aunt. It 
is supposed that there are not many now living who were there 
that day, hence the writer speaks of it as a sad occurrence 
at a petty muster in that day and time, and that the incident 
may be transmitted to posterity and have an influence for good 
upon the present and future generations. 

SECTION II. 

Its Surface and Soil, Its Rivers and Lakes, Its Inland Swamps. 

The surface of Marion County is generally level. It is 
undulating gently in the upper portion of the county, and is 
undulating more or lesis on the rivers and inland swamps in 
every part of the county, which afifords fall enough for proper 
and effective drainage, but not enough to produce damage to 
the cleared land by washing from excessive floods of rain.^ It 
is a well watered region. It has on its west side Great Pee 
Dee, its western boundary, and its tributary streams. It is 
intersected in its whole length by Little Pee Dee, where said 
river is not a boundary, and Lumber River is a boundary in 
part on the east. In the upper part of the county it has the 
two Reedy Creeks, Big and Little Reedy Creek. They both 
rise in Marlboroug'h County, and running in a southeasterly 
direction come together just above the town of Latta, and make 
Buck Swamp, which continues to run the same course, or 
rather a little more east, for fifteen or more miles, and pours 
its waters into Little Pee Dee, near or just above what was 
formerly called Norton's Landing, and is now known by that 
name, though long since it has ceased to be a public landing. 
These creeks and Buck Swamp have several small tributaries 



16 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

laterally emptying themselves into them, to wit: Hannah 
Betbea's Mill Branch into the Big Creek; the Clark Mill 
Branch and Cana Branch into Uttle Reedy Creek ; Gin House 
Branch and Peter's Branch into Buck Swamp; Robert's Mill 
Branch and Maiden Down, with its tributaries, into Buck 
Swamp, lower down. There are good lands on all these 
streams, and well watered by them. There are, perhaps, other 
small tributaries not herein mentioned. There are many trib- 
utaries to Little Pee Dee, on both sides, which water the sec- 
tions through which they flow. Shoe Heel is one almost as 
large as Little Pee Dee ; Hays' Swamp another ; Maple Swamp 
another; Catfish, another inland • swamp, has its rise in Marl- 
borough County, and traverses for near forty miles the county 
from north to northwest to south and southeast, and empties 
into Great Pee Dee seventeen or eighteen miles below Marion 
C. H. It has some tributaries, not so many as Buck Swamp, 
to wit : E. J. Moody's Mill Creek, Smith's Swamp, Bull Swamp 
and others. Catfish waters a large portion of the country, and 
has some very fine lands (mostly sandy) watered by it and 
its tributaries. . 

Lumber River has a large tributary from the upper end of 
Marion, to wit: Bear Swamp, with its tributaries, Gaddy's 
Mill Creek, Cowper's Swamp and Alligator Swamp. It 
empties into Ashpole, and Ashpole empties into Lumber River 
just, above Nichols' Depot, in the eastern portion of the county. 
There are two Reedy Creeks, with their tributaries, below 
Marion,_ coming together above Legett's Mill, emptying into 
Little Pee Dee. There is the Back Swamp, which breaks out 
of Little Pee Dee not far below Gilchrist's Bridge, and runs 
down somewhat parallel with the river for ten or fifteen miles 
and flows into the river again. This swamp may have been ■ 
originally, or in the long past, the river itself. Reasons for this 
theory are only conjectural, not conclusive. Lower down is 
Cypress Creek, flowing into Little Pee Dee from the west. 
Upon all of these streams are good lands, with sufficient natu- 
ral drainage, and aided by the many artificial ones, makes the 
lands adjacent most desirable for agricultural purposes. Na- 
ture has done as much for us in Marion County as perhaps any 
other county in the State, with as few drawbacks, and it re- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 17 

I 

mains for its people to avail themselves of these many natural 
advantages, and to improve upon them ; and if the same prog- 
ress and improvements are made for the next fifty years as has 
been made for the last fifty, the county will probably take the 
highest stand, agriculturally, among the many agricultural 
counties in the State. They are already vieing with each other 
for the highest distinction. An ambition to excel in agricul- 
tural life is everywhere apparent, not only here in Maron, but 
all over the State. 

SECTION III. 

Its Soil and Productions. 

Tihe soil of the county is varied, some parts sandy and light, 
other parts a dark gray soil or loam, others a dark brown soil, 
and some places black. The different soils here mentioned 
rest on a clay foundation, except the sandy or light soils, and 
even some of these are underlaid with clay. The different soils 
vary in thickness, as also in fertility, from one inch to six 
inches, and in some places even more than six inches, to wit: 
in swamp or bay lands. The^ lands of every description are 
more or less fertile, and respond more or less abundantly to 
the labor of man in plentiful harvests. The sandy or light 
lands lie mostly on Catfish and Little Pee Dee. The gray soil 
is mostly found on Buck Swamp, and its tributaries ; and below 
Marion in all parts or neighborhoods after leaving Catfish and 
Little Pee Dee for two or three miles, also in the MuUins 
region, and in Hillsboro and Carmichael, after getting off from 
the river as above indicated. The dark brown soil is mostly 
near the Great Pee Dee River, and the Grove lands in Wahee 
Township. The black in swamps and bays. The agricultural 
productions of the county are varied — most or all of the cereals, 
sudi as corn, wheat, rye, oats, rice and barley. Vegetables in 
great abundance are successfully grown in every portion of the 
county, made. for domestic use and some for shipment; of the 
latter, peas, beans, cabbage and strawberries are becoming, 
over and a;bove domestic use, a money crop. Strawberries, in 
particular, are raised for shipment with reasonable profit, and 
are increasing in value every year. The cultivation of these 



18 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

vegetable crops for shipment gives needed employment to 
many that otherwise would be unemployed. Women and 
Children find work to do, which they can perform, and thus, 
become contributors to their own support, rather than con- 
sumers only. Irish and sweet potatoes are generally made 
mostly for domestic use, some for shipment. Watermelons and 
cantaloupes grow well here, only f6r domestic use. The great 
money crops are cotton and tobacco. It is only within the last 
few years that tobacco has been grown here as a money crop, 
and its production has been rapidly increased, giving employ- 
ment to hundreds that formerly were unemployed from July 
1st to September in every year. In the cultivation, curing 
and grading tobacco, to which stemming has Tecently been 
added, hundreds in the county, every season, are busily em- 
ployed. There are perhaps hundreds of tobacco barns in the 
county and others are now going up. At MuUins, there are 
tlhree tobacco warehouses; ait Nichols, one; at Marion, two; 
at Latta, two, and at Dillon, two, with prize houses at each 
point named, in number and size sufficient to accommodate the 
business need's of the trade. It i's estimated that there were 
made and sold at these different tobacco warehouses in 1899 
ten millions of ix)unds; many of the farmers shipped their 
tobacco to Danville, Va., Richmond, and other markets. To- 
bacco is fast becoming one of the staple crops of Marion 
County, and there is no telling to what proportions it may 
attain. 

Tobacco has been raised as a money crop for export in this 
country, ever since the first settlement at Jamestown, Va., in 
1607. Its cultivation in this State began only a few years ago, 
and still later in this, Marion County. It has so far, in this 
county, brought fairly good prices, which, together with the 
low price of cotton, stimulates its production. Most of the 
arable lands in the county are well adapted to its growth and 
maturity, and much of the land makes tobacco of a very fine 
quality, and it commands the highest prices. Its cultivation 
as a money crop has, pe Aaps, come to stay. The leading staple 
crop of the county is cotton— the lands are well adapted to its 
growth and maturity. Its production prior to 1793 was quite 
limited, not only in Marion County, but in the State, and we 
might say throughout the cotton belt. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 19 

From the first settlement of the State, in 1670, to 1793, for 
near one hundred and twenty-five years, the export of agri- 
cultural products was confined to rice and indigo. The rice 
crops were mostly raised on the coast or in tide-water lands, 
where it is yet the leading money crop. It was never raised' to 
much extent in Marion County; only raised for domestic use. 
A few old rice plantations were in the lower part of the county, 
contiguous to the river. Rice was shipped thence to Charles- 
ton, the only market for it in the State, and thenoe shipped to 
Europe. 

Cotton tes been the chief money crop of the State for one 
hundred years or more. It succeeded indigo. Althougli cot- 
ton has been known for more than two thousand years, or since 
the days of Herodotus, who wrote that "Gossypium (cotton) 
grew in India which instead of seed prod^uced wool" (Ram- 
say's, vol. 2, p. 119), yet through all ages from that remote 
period cotton was grown only for domestic use. Now it is an 
article of universal use, and it may be said, clothes the world. 
Of cotton, there are two kinds — ^the long staple, or black seed, 
and the short staple. The former is restricted as to produc- 
tion to confined limits, to the sea islands and parts adjacent. 
The lint is easily separated from the seed, and is used for 
manufacturing the finer classes of goods. The latter, or short 
staple cotton, grows well in all the cotton belt in this country, 
and is used in making the coarser fabrics, such as are in com- 
mon use everywhere, and the lint is hard to separate from the 
seed, and can be done with facility only by the use of saw gins. 
The difficulty of separating the lint from the seed furnishes the 
reason it was not planted and cultivated as a money crop in 
South Carolina till about tihe first of the nineteenth century, or 
about one hundred years ago. The saw gin was invented 
in 1793, by Eli Whitney, a Connecticut school teacher, then 
teaching in Georgia. This invention, and its success in the 
purpose for which it was intended, suddenly gave a stimulus 
to the production of cotton in the South. "Whitney's invention 
has had more influence on the industry, wealth and political 
condition of this country than any other labor saving machine 
ever constructed in America." Previous to that time only 
small quantiites of cotton had been made in the South. Almost 



20 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

every one planted a little patch for domestic use, and that little 
was freed from the seed by the fingers. A grown hand could 
not pick more than a pound a day, and did well to pick that 
much. This was tedious, and so expensive that none but the 
.rich oQuli aflford to buy it. (American History, by Mont- 
gomery, p. 196) : "By the use of Whitney's machine, one man 
could clean in a single day a thousand pounds." Now, at this 
writing, 40,000 pounds may be cleaned of seed and packed and 
hooped for market in one dky. The same author says: "In 
1784, we had exported (from the cotton belt) eight bags, or 
about 3,000 pounds of cotton to Liverpool. The cotton was 
seized by the English custom officers on the ground that the 
United States could not have produced such a prodigious 
quantity, and that the captain of some vessel must have smug- 
gled it from some other country. Ten years after Whitney 
had put his machine into operation ( 1803), we were exporting 
over 100,000 bags of cotton, or more than 40,000,000 pounds, 
and every year saw an enormous increase. The effect at home 
was equally marked. Hundreds of cotton mills for the manu- 
facture of cotton cloth were built in New England. At the 
South, the raising of cotton became immensely profitable, and 
planters gave more and more land to it. Up to this period, 
many men in both sections of the country had deplored the 
holding of slaves. They bad earnestly discussed how to rid 
the country of what was felt to be both an evil of itself and a 
danger to the nation. The invention of the cotton gin put a 
stop to the discussion in great measure ; for now the Southern 
planters and Northern manufacturers of cotton both found it 
to their interest to keep the negro in bondage, since by his 
labor they were both rapidly growing rich. Few, even of the 
ablest minds, of that time realized what we all see to-day ; that 
in the end free labor is cheaper, safer and better than any 
either." The author says : "To sum up, Whitney's great inven- 
tion of 1793 did four things: (i) It stimulated the production 
of cotton and made it one of the leading industries of the 
country. (2) It increased our exports immensely. (3) It 
caused the building of great numbers of cotton mills at the 
North. (4) It made a large class, both North and South, 
interested in maintaining slave labor." In a note to the fore- 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 21 

going quotation, the author says: "Whitney received fifty 
thousand dollars for his invention from South Carolina, be- 
sides something from several other Southern States." Such 
was the impetus given to the production of cotton by the inven- 
tion of Whitney, that, in the sihort space of two years. South 
Carolina, in 1795, exported to England cotton to the value of 
£1,109,653 (Ramsay's History of South Carolina, vol. II., p. 
120). What an enormous increase ! The author does not say 
bow many bags or how many pounds were shipped, nor wihat 
it brought per pound — lie only gives the totail value, which is 
equivalent to $5,000,000. The increase in production must 
have been fabulous, or prices of the staple must have been fab- 
ulous. We suppose South Caiolina must have g^ne into its 
production with a vim, as she bouglit the riglit to use it for 
$50,000, and "Munificently threw open its use and benefit to 
all its citizens." (Ramsay, II. vol., 121.) The invention of the 
Whitney saw gin was and is the greatest invention of modern 
times. From tihat time to this it has been the means of expand- 
ing our commerce to vast proportions. Has been the means 
not only of clothing the civilized world, but it gives remuner- 
ative employment to millions, and by which they obtain their 
daily bread. It overshadows every other invention of any 
age, ancient or modern. Many other inventions since Whit- 
ney's, of immeftse use, are now to be counted, but they sink 
into insignificance when compared with the result of the Whit- 
ney saw gin. Machinery for the manufacturing of cotton 
cloth soon followed, first in England, then in the United 
States, and they are now to be found in every civilized country 
of the world. It has enterprized and vitalized almost every 
other useful art which contributes to the happiness of man 
in every clime. Its production has increased from eight 
small bags crudely put up, exported previous to Whitney's 
invention, and which was seized by the custom house officials 
in L/iverpool, on the ground that so much cotton could not 
have been made and exported in the United States, and, there- 
fore, was smuggled from some other country, to the prodigious 
number of 11,000,000 bales much heavier than those seized as 
smuggled. Cotton has been called "King;" and that is no mis- 
nomer. The writer will not now enter into a discussion of the 



22 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

question as to whether cotton is entitled to j:hat high distinc- 
tion to wear the title of "King." 

Marion County, if she has not been magna pars fui, she has 
been minime pars fui, not in a disparaging sense of the latter 
term. She has done and is doing her full share in utilizing the 
benefits of Whitney's inventive brain. From a wilderness, say, 
170 yeairs ago, s'he has converted much of her territory to fertile 
field's, and including that part of her territory now in Florence 
Ckmnty, she makes at least 50,000 bales of cotton. 

The first great article of export from Carolina was rice, 
raised mostly on tidewater lands. The second was indigo. 
The first indigo seed was introduced into South Carolina by 
"Miss Eliza Lucas, the mother of Major General Charles Cotes- 
worth Pinckney. Her father, George Lucas, Governor of 
Antigua (one of the West India Islands), observing her fond- 
ness for the vegetable world, frequently sent her tropical seeds 
and fruits to be planted for her amusement on his plantation at 
Wappoo (near Charleston). Among others be sent her some 
indigo seed as a subject of experiment. She planted it in 
March, 1741 or 1742; it was destroyed by frost. She repeated 
the experiment in April ; this was cut down by a worm. Not- 
withstanding these discouragements, she persevered, and her 
third attempt was successful. Governor Lucas (her father), 
on hearing that the plant had seeded and ripened, sent from 
Montserrat a man by the name of Cromwell, who had been 
accustomed to the making of indigo, and engaged him at high 
wages to come to Carolina and let his daughter see the whole 
process for extracting the dye from the weed. This professed 
indigo maker built vats on the Wappoo Creek, and there made 
the first indigo that was formed in Carolina. It was but indif- 
ferent. Cromwell repented of his engagement as being likely 
to injure his own country, made a mystery of the businesis, 
and with the hope of deceiving, injured the process by throw- 
ing in too much lime. Miss Lucas watched him carefully, and 
also employed Mr. Deveaux to superintend his operations. 
Notwithstanding the duplicity of Cromwell, a knowledge of 
the process was obtained. Soon after Miss Lucas had com- 
pletely succeeded in this useful project she married Charles 
Pinckney, and her father made a present of all the indigo on 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 23 

his plantation, the fruit of her industry, to her husband. The 
whole was saved for seed. Part was planted by the proprietor 
next year at Ashepoo, and the remainder given away to his 
friends in small quantities, for the same purpose. They all 
succeeded. From that time the culture of indigo was common, 
and in a year or two an article of export. Soon after the dye 
was successfully extracted from the cultivated plant, Mr. 
Cattel made a present to Mr. Pinckney of some wild indigo, 
w'hich he had just discovered in the woods of Carolina. Ex- 
periments were instituted to ascertain its virtues. It proved 
to be capable of yielding good indigo, but was less productive 
than what had been imported. The attention of the planters 
was fixed on the latter. They urged its culture with so much 
industry and success, that in the year 1747 a considerable quan- 
tity of it was sent to England; which induced the merchants 
trading in Carolina to petition Parliament for a bounty on 
Carolina indigo * * * Aooordingly, an Act of Parliament was 
passed in the year 1748 for allowing a bounty of six pence per 
pound on indigo raised in the British American plantations, 
and imported directly into Britain from the place of its 
growth. In consequence of this Act the planters applied 
themselves with double vigor and spirit to that article, and 
seemed to vie with each other who should bring the best kind 
and greatest quantity of it to market. Some years indeed 
elapsed before they found out the nice art of making it as good 
as the French; but every year they improved in the mode of 
preparing it and finally received great profit as the'reward of 
their labors. While many of them doubled their capital every 
tlhree or four years by planting indigo ; they, in process of time, 
brought it to such A diegree of perfection as not only to supply 
the mother country, but also to undersell the French at several 
European markets. It proved more really beneficial to Caro- 
lina than the mines of Mexico or Peru are or have been either 
to old or new Spain. In the year 1754, the export of indigo 
from the province amounted to 216,924 pounds, and shortly 
before the American Revolution it had a/risen to 1,107,660 
pounds. In the Revolutionary War it was less attended to 
than rice. In the year 1783, it again began to be more culti- 
vated — 2,051 casks of indigo was exported, and it continued to 

3 



24 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

form a valuable export for some years ; but large importations 
of it from the East Indies into England so lowered the price 
as to make it less profitable. Near the close of the eighteenth 
century it gave place to the cultivation of cotton." ( Rarnsay, 
II. vol., ii8 and 119.) Eli Whitney's invention of the saw 
gin, in 1793, put a complete stop to the making of indigo — just 
so soon as the Whitney invention was introduced. From 1747 
to 1793, many fortunes were made by raising and exporting 
indigo. It is true, that in this part of the province (what is 
now Marion County), other pursuits were remunerative. 
Stock raising was a money making business, and that, with 
indigo, during the period indicated, made many men rich — 
rich for that day and time and especially in the lower end of 
the county and on the Great Pee Dee River, where the range for 
stock was seemingly inexlhaustible, and where the lands were 
well adapted to the production of indigo. As late as 1876, and 
since that time, the writer hereof, on a visit to old Ark Church, 
thirty-three miles below Marion Court House, in some old 
fields which had been thrown out on what was formerly Gene- 
ral Woodberry's plantation, saw stalks of indigo growing about 
in those old fidds four or five feet high, limbed out vigorously, 
so much so that it attracted his attention. On getting to the 
"Ark," where he met a crowd of ihe citizens, and during his 
stay he inquired of some one — he thinks William Woodberry, 
son of the old General Woodberry — how it was that there was 
so mudh indigo growing in those old fields. The answer was, 
that in former times the people planted much indigo in thaft 
region for market, and although its culture had been aban- 
doned for years, yet it had perpetuated itself from year to 
year, and was there regarded as wild indigo. The writer has 
seen it in various places in the county and in Robeson County, 
N. C, adjoining Marion County, when a boy and even since 
manhood; but always supposed it to be wild indigo, until 
better informed by reading the early history of the State, and 
What he was told by Mr. William Woodberry in 1876 as to that 
then growing in that part of the county. In 1848, the writer 
bought the place on whidi he soon afterwards settled, in the 
fork of the two Reedy Creeks, about three miles above the 
town of Latta. Most of the lands that had been cleared had 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 25 

been thrown out; 'that one. field, which it was said had been 
cleared more than a hundred years, not a stump in it, right 
in the Big Creek, and a point of the field ran down as it were 
into the creek, so that the creek was on three sides of the point. 
On that point the. writer saw several stalks of indigo very- 
luxurious in growth ; the land was rich, and he then supposed 
it was wild indigo. The land was soon taken in and tJie indigo 
destroyed. He now supposes it was the cultivated indigo, and 
that it perpetuated itself as did that in Woodberry Township. 
Old Colonel Eli^a Bethea, who was born and raised near by, 
informed the writer that the Murfies, from Greiat Pee Dee, 
of whom more will be said hereinafter, used to bring their stock 
out there on account of the reed range in those creeks every 
winter; that they penned them in that field above spoken of, 
and it was said marked 300 calves every spring. Old Colonel 
Elisha Bethea further said that his father, old Buck Swamp 
John Bethea, of whom more will be said hereafter, after he 
came there marked often 100 calves every spring. It is not 
difficult to infer that some of the previous owners of the place 
planted and raised indigo for market on those lands, and when 
abandoneid and the land thrown out, the indigo sprang up every 
year, and thus perpetuated itself, and had continued to do so 
year after year till 1850, when the writer saw it there, as above 
set forth. It is certain that indigo was planted and cultivated 
as a money crop within the bounds of what was afterwards 
Marion District and is now Marion County. "Fortunes were 
made rapidly by its cultivation." (Gregg's History of the 
Old Cheraws, p. 112.) In a note appended, the same author 
(Gregg) says: "As an illustration of the value of the crop, 
it may be mentioned that General Harrington sent three four- 
horse wagon loads to Virginia, and with the proceeds of the 
sale boug'ht from fifteen to twenty negroes." The same 
author (p. 112) says: "It brought at one time $4 to $5 per 
pound." In a note to the same he says : "The account sales of 
one cask of indigo shipped to Ix>ndon from the Pee Dee in 
1766,' shows that it commanded 2s. and 3d. per pound, amount- 
ing to £37 4s. and 3d., the bounty oh it, £3 13s. and 4d. ; the 
total expense of the shipment from Charleston £3 6s. and 4d." 
Many people in the county continued to plant it for domestic 



26 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

use long after it was abandoned in 1793 as a money crop. Our 
mothers and great-grand-motbers were necessarily obliged to 
keep up its culture, with which to dye their thread w(hich was 
woven into cloth to clothe their families wi*h. In the laiter 
part of the eighteenth and first part of the nineteenith centuries, 
there were no cotton mills; every family had to manufacture 
its own cloth, whether of wool or cotton. It was not until far 
in the nineteenith century that manufactured cloth could be 
bougiht because of its scarcity and because of its price, and a 
vast majority of our grand-mothers were thus forced to make 
their own cloth, and many of them preferred the domestic 
article to the manufactured. They were provided with their 
spinning wheels and cotton cards, their reels and warping bars, 
their slags and weaving harness and their looms. Every 
family was of necessity possessed of these implementts for 
making cloth, and indigo blue was indispensible in coloring 
their thread, and hence every family had their annual patdh of 
indigo, and all were familiar with the process of extracting 
the dye from the indigo weed. All were scientisits to that 
extent. As a safeguard to this species of domestic property, 
the law of the lanid threw around it its protecting aegis. In 
1823, our State I^egislature passed an Act exempting from 
levy and sale under execution to every family certain property 
of the execution debtor, to wit : One pair of cards, one spinning 
wheel and loom, and other articles (I have not the Adt before 
me), showing the necessity of these articles to every family. 
Many of our mothers did) not give up the making of cloth for 
their family's use for many years after 1823, and a few not 
until after 'the Confederate War, and there may be some that 
yet continue to make their own homespun. Every mother 
had her indigo patch ; it was as indispensible to her as was her 
vegetable garden. The writer's mother never did abandon the 
home industry of making cloth entirely, up to the time of her 
death, in 1868; she had her little indigo patch every year; she 
spun and wove her own cloth while she lived. The blockade 
of the war did not affect her in that regard — she had her wheel 
and cotton cards, loom, &c., and she knew how to use them. 
Being cut off from all oommerce with the outside world for 
four years, many of our people were put to it to supply cloth- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 27 

ing to their families. They had no implements for making 
cloth for domestic use. To get cards was the greatest 
trouble — they could not be had except through blockade run- 
ners, and only at enormous prices. Few had any of the old 
spinning wheels or looms and other necessary implements for 
making cloth, and when they were procured or made, many 
did not know how to use them. These troubles of our people 
are better remembered by many now living than can be ex- 
pressed. In the writer's mother's case, ^he was in no way 
nonplussed, as she had all the apparatus for making cloth, 
and knew how to use them. Sudh women were in demand 
during the war blockade. They could teach their less provi- 
dent neighbor women how to make indigo and how to extract 
the dye ; how to card and spin the cotton into thread, andl how 
to dye it, not only with indigo blue but with other improvised 
dyes ; how to warp it and put it through the slays and harness, 
and then how to weave it. We cannot now well see how the 
people could have gotten along without these domestic and 
provident mothers and grand-mothers. Bless their memory! 
Though many of them are dead, yet they live in recollection at 
least, "honored and sung." The prettiest dtesses for ladies, 
the writer ever saw, were of homespun tastefully streaked 
and striped with domestic dye, and made in the style of the 
times, and worn by our mothers and daughters on public 
occasion, at church, &c., only. They were adtmired by all and 
appreciated by all. This latter ,. sentiment was what, in the 
main, imparted to them beauty and high adornment. For the 
first thirty years or more of the nineteenth century, the house- 
wives of the country made cloth to sell to the merchants, who 
in that day and time bought it, especially where it was paid 
for in trade. The writer's mother, when he was a boy, would 
make cloth, and carry it to Fair Bluff, Iveesville and L,umber- 
ton, N. C, and sell it or barter it for other goods with the 
merdhants. The prices paid for it were remunerative, depend- 
ing on the quality of the cloth, ranging from 25 cents to $2 
per yard — the latter price for the finest jeans cloth. In con- 
nection with this subject, the making and selling or bartering 
of home-made cloth, I will relate an incident which occurred 
when I was a boy, from the year 1828 to 1832. My mother 



28 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

and one Susan Rosier, a maiden lady rather above the mar- 
riageable age, a near neighbor and wtio went by the name of 
"Sookey Rosier," and though near neighbors, the State line 
divided them, my mother living on the North Carolina side of 
the line and Miss Rosier on the South Carolina side. Each 
made a piece of cloth for sale. They carried it to Fair Bluff, 
iST. C, and offered and did sell it to a merchant doing business 
there, by the name of Colin McRae, a young man from Marl- 
borough District. My mother sold hers, I think, at 30 cents 
per yard, and Miss Rosier was offered 40 cents per yard for 
hers. She said she could not take that for hers ; the merchant 
said that was all he could give for it. She said she set her 
price on her cloth before she left home, and if she did not get 
that, she would carry it back home. McRae, the merchant, 
asked what was the price fixed; she replied, "A quarter and 
seven pence a yard," and if she did not get that she would carry 
it back home. McRae, the merchant, said to her, "Madam, I 
have offered you more than that — ^that 40 cents was more than 
'a quarter and seven pence ;' " to which she replied, "You can't 
fool me; if I do not get "a quarter and seven pence' for it, I 
will carry it back home." My mother, standing by, said to 
her, "He has offered you more than that;" to which Miss 
Rosier replied, "I know better than that ; I am not going to be 
fooled by any of you." Whereupon McRae said to her, "Well, 
I will give you 'a quarter and seven pence' a yard for -your 
cloth ralther than you shall carry it back home with you," which 
was her price. And she went home satisfied. A remarkable 
instance of gross ignorance (crassa ignorantia). "A quarter 
and seven pence" wais only thirty-seven and a half cents. 
However, notwithstanding h^r gross ignorance, she knew how 
to make good cloth — she had been trained in that ait. The 
family, not many years afterward, sold out and removed to 
some other parts, and so far as that family' is concerned, the 
name has become extinct in Marion County. S. S. Rozier at 
Dillon, we think, is of a different family. The family of 
"Sookey" Rosier lived on Cowpen Swamp, which rises in 
North Carolina, and runs south and empties into Bear Swamp, 
jus.t below Page's Mill, and just above Bear Swam^ Baptist 
Church. The Rozier place was on the west side of said Cow- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 29 

pen Swamp, and was afterwards bought by Zany Rogers, an 
older brother of our respected fellow-citizen. Captain Robt. 
H. Rogers ; and I suppose Zany Rogers died there. The writer 
has not seen the place in sixty-five or more years. It is a fine 
region in upper Marion, in Hillsboro Township, and was, when 
the writer last saw it, almosit wholly undeveloped, but now, it 
is learned, that it is greatly developed and fast coming to the 
front. 

SECTION IV. 

Stock Raising. 

From the first settlements in South Carolina down, even to 
the present time, a period of more than two hundred years, 
stock raising for market has been a profitable pursuit in all the 
State, and especially in the lower or eastern portions of the 
State, in which Marion County is located. Initerseoted as it 
is, by the Pee Dee and Lumber Rivers, with numerous inland 
creeks, swamps and bays, it afforded a splendid and extensive 
range for cattle and hogs. Luxurious bodies of reeds were 
in the swamps and low grounds of the three rivers, and in 
the inland swamps and bays of the county; the uncleared 
uplands everywliere covered with a heavy annual crop of nutri- 
tious grass in summer for cattle to browse up>on ; the swamps, 
and especially the river swamps, teeming with acorns, and 
the pine woods bearing every year cpiantities of mast — ^pure 
mast. The enterprising and sagacious settler quickly saw the 
money in it, and at once utilized the bounties of nature around 
him, which 'he could do without much labor. All he had to do 
was to watch and attend to his stocks of cattle and hogs, and 
feed them just enough to keep them gentle.- The range was 
suflficient to maintain and fatten for market large droves of 
cattle and hogs with little or no expense or labor. In the first 
instance, he had to have a road to market, and the means of 
crossing rivers aiid other inland streams. With these facili- 
ties he was in easy reach of Charleston, his only market in the 
State. These facilities were not long in being procured and 
established. Bishop Gregg, in his history, page 76, says: 
"Stock raising was the most profitable business, and laid the 
foundation of fortunes which rapidly increased." Stock rais- 



30 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

ing in Marion County, from its earliest settlement, was a 
common and very profitable business, and some of the largest 
fortunes made in the territory now embraced in this county 
were made by raising stock and carrying it to market. In 
Bishop Gregg's History, p. i lo, he says : "The stock was driven 
to Charleston and other places on the coast, as well as to more 
distant markets. Large numbers of cattle were sent from Pee 
Dee to Philadelphia." The same author further says, on page 
68 : "Stock raising was the most profitable business, Charleston 
affording a good market for all that the industrious settlers 
could carry tihither." This was about 1735. In a note to page 
no, the same author says: "It is relaJted of Malachi Murphy, 
w'ho drove many beeves annually to Philadelphia, that on one 
occasion he was the owner of a famous beast called 'Blaze 
Face,' of great size and unusual sagacity, which he sold in 
Philadelphia. On the night of his return home to Pee Dee, 
and soon after his arrival he heard the low of 'Blaze Face.' He 
had escaped and followed close upon the track of his owner, 
swimming rivers and distancing all pursuers. Mr. Murphy 
drove him a second time to Philadelphia, and again he returned. 
Sudh a spirit was worthy of a better fate, but did not shield 
the bold rover. He was taken a third time to Philadelphia and 
came back no more. This was related to the author by the 
late John D. Witherspoon, of Society Hill." This same Mala- 
chi Murphy (Murfee, originally spelled), was one of the four 
brothers, who settled on the Great Pee Dee about 1735, at a 
place then called Sandy Bluff, afterwards known as Solomon's 
Ivanding, and is just above the railroad crossing, and of whom 
more may yet be said — became very wealthy from stock raising, 
and of whom Bishop Gregg, p. 72, says : "Of these, Malachi 
became the most wealthy. He is said to have given one hun- 
dred slaves to each of three sons. He died before the Revolu- 
tion." He took up large bodies of land up and down the Pee 
Dee River. Malachi Murphy, senior, had also three daughters. 
It is naturally to be supposed that he provided for his daughters 
as well as for his sons, and if so, he was certainly the wealth- 
iest man in the Pee Dee section of the province. We have no 
account that he made his money in any other way than by 
stock raising, yet we are bound to suppose that having as many 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 31 

slaves as he had, he employed them, or most of them, in other 
pursuits, perhaps in raising and preparing indigo for market, 
at thait time, from 1747 to 1793, a lucrative business. He must 
have been an extraordinary man, full of pluck and energy, 
together with sound judgment. It was related to the writer 
fifty years ago, when he first settled in the fork of the two 
Reedy Creeks which make Buck Swamp, by Colonel Elisha 
Bethea, that in former times the Murfees (suppose Malachi) 
drove their stock to that place to raise them on the range in 
the two creeks and Buck Swamp, which was then very fine and 
is yet good. That Malachi Murfee would or did mark and 
trim as many as 300 calves there in a spring. And he further 
told the writer that his father (Buck Swamp John Bethea) in 
early times marked and trimmed as many as 100 calves of a 
spring, and raised a great many hogs in the swamp every year, 
and drove to Charleston every year a large drove of cattle and 
hogs. That the hog range kept good until the "big storm" of 
1822, w'hich blew down most of the oaks, and thus the acorn 
crop was destroyed or cut off. Old Buck Swamp John Bethea 
became wealthy, mostly from raising stock for market. He 
died in 182 1. More will be said of the Murfees and Buck 
Swamp John Bethea hereafter. 

We suppose stock raising was the business of most of the 
early settlers of the county, and especially in that part of 
Marion County called Britton's Neck. The settlers down in 
that region became wealthy, and outstripped the upper end 
of the county for near a hundred years in the pursuit and 
accumulation of wealth. When the writer can first remember, 
the wealth of the county was mostly in its lower end, and the 
upp>er end of the county was comparatively poor. These con- 
ditions are now and 'have been for the last half century 
reversed. The greater wealth is to be found in the upper end 
of the county. This state of things may be accounted for, in 
great part, because of the greater agricultural enterprise among 
its people, and because of the failing of the stock range in the 
lower end of the county; and because of the more numerous 
and better schools in the upper end, and the more general dif- 
fusion of knowledge among the people of that section; and 
lastly, the facilities of transportation and commerce and trade 



32 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

conditions are better, and have been so for a period of years, 
than in the lower section. For the last few years, however, 
the lower section of the county shows signs of upheaval in 
these respects, and ere long, if she progresses as she has for 
the last fifteen or twenty years, she may claim her place,, her 
section of the county, to be equal with that of the northern 
section. She has lands of equal fertility, and all they need is 
intelligent and energetic culture, and to build up and foster her 
schools, public and private. 

Pursuits, other than stock raising, and other than agricul- 
tural, have necessarily occupied the attention of the people of 
Marion County, nnore or less, for, perhaps, one hundred and 
sixty-five years, subordinate to and consequent upon those 
leading pursuits. Tradesmen of various kinds have sprung 
up amongst us. Blacksmiths, until within the last few years, 
were to be found in every community, were in great demand, 
and found constant and remunerative employment. They 
have been supplanted of late by imported work from outside the 
county. This imported work is better adapted to the uses of 
the farmer than the former domestic work, hence the black- 
smith is driven out; and the same of the wheelwright — his 
occupation is gone; his work is superseded by imported pro- 
ductions along his line of work, and hence he is driven out. 
The 'house carpenter and brick mason holds his own ; they yet 
find remunerative employment, and thereby make a living. 
The turpentine and lumber industry in the county are and 
have been very extensive. How many of them have succeeded 
in making money, is not known. It may be said only a few 
have made a fortune. While they have succeeded admirably 
in destroying our very extensive and beautiful pine forests to 
such an extent as to threaten, and in the near future to bring 
about a timber famine. To the writer it looks like vandalism. 
The face of the whole county will soon be denuded of timber, 
and neither the county as a section of the country nor its 
people will have anything to show for it. No valid considera- 
tion left in its place, no quid pro quo. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 33 



CHAPTER III. 

SECTION I. 

Its Educational, Political and Judicial History. 

No scheme was ever inaugurated in South Carolina for the 
general education of the public, until it was provided for in 
the Constitution of 1868. The reconstruction was made and 
adopted, not by the intelligence of the State, but under the 
restraints of the sword by "carpet-baggers" and a few rene- 
gade whites, contemptuously called "scallawags," and igno- 
rant negroes. Yet, with respect to education, it was quite an 
improvement upon the Constitutions of 1790 and 1865, neither 
of which fundamentally made any provision for the education 
of the masses. From the earliest times it seems to have been 
a matter of concern to establish and to have schools for the 
education of the masses. As early as 1710, the Provincial 
Legislature passed an Act to found such schools; and again in 
1712, another Act was passed, extending and amplifying the 
system. In both of these Acts there was a provision that no 
one should be employed as a teacher or schoolmaster in the 
public schools of the province unless he belonged' to the English 
or Episcopal Church. ( Statutes at Large, vol. II., p. 342, and 
vol. II., p. 390.) Under each of these Acts, sixteen persons 
were named as Commissioners, every one of whom belonged 
to the Church of England, and who were empowered and di- 
rected to found said schools, to buy land, to erect school houses, 
to employ teachers, and so forth, and to be paid for out of the 
public treasury. These two Acts, or rather the latter one, 
remained the law for free sdhools in the province and the State 
till 181 1, when another Act was passed). (V. Statutes at 
Large, p. 639.) The title of this Act is as follows: "An Act 
to establish free schools throughout the State." The first sec- 
tion of this Act reads as follows : "Be it enacted by the Honor- 
able Senate and House of Representatives, now met and sitting 
in General Assembly, and by the authority of the same, That 
immediately after the passing of this Act, there shall be estab- 
lished in each election district within this State a number of 



34 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

free schools equal to the number of members which such dis- 
trict is entitled to send to the House of Representatives in the 
Legislature of the State." Under this Act, Marion District, 
a large district territorially, could only have two free schools 
within her borders, as sihe then was only entitled to two 
Representatives in the State Legislature ; but the little parishes 
in the lower part of the State, some of them not having more 
than twenty-five or thirty voters in them, could have three free 
schools, as each of them, by the Constitution of 1790, was 
entitled to three Representatives in the State Legislature. 
(Constitution of 1790, I. vol. Statutes, p. 184, and amendments 
sequens.) Those parishes were the creation of the Church of 
England, under the proprietary and regal governments of the 
province, and their power and influence were retained by the 
Constitution of 1790. In the Convention of 1790, its members 
equaling tihe number of Senators and Representatives in the 
Legislature to which each parish and district or county was 
entitled under the Constitution of 1778, was 158 of the Church 
of England (Episcopal), and 68 belonged either to that church 
or to some other. Thus it is easy to see what influence domi- 
nated the Convention of 1790, that made the Constitution of 
thlt year. The Constitution of the United States and its 
amendments, made in 1787, and ratified by a Convention of 
South Carolina, May, 1788 — Article L of its amendments reads 
thus : "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment 
of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." This 
amendment made it necessary for South Carolina to disestab- 
lish her estaiblishment of the Church of England. Article VIIL 
reads thus on that subject: "The free exercise and enjoyment 
of religious profession and worship without discrimination 
or preference shall forever hereafter be allowed within this 
State to all mankind; provided, that the liberty of conscience 
hereby declared shall not be so construed as to excuse acts of 
licentiousness, or justify practices inconsistent with the peace 
or safety of this State." (Vol. L, Statutes at Large, p. 191.) 
For near one hundred years the people of the State, including 
all Dissenters, had been taxed to buy lands (glebe) for Episco- 
pal Churches to build churches in the different parishes, and 
to pay the rectors or preachers of that church their salaries. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 35 

Dissenters were deprived of the rig'ht to hold office and of the 
right to various employments within the State, w'hile a member 
of the Church of England had the exclusive right by law to 
seek and to hold office, and to enter into and assume any 
employment whatever. The first step taken towards the estab- 
lishment by law of the Ghurcli of England in the province of 
Carolina was in 1698, when an Act "to settle maintainance on a 
minister of the Church of England in Charlestown," was 
passed. This Act did not seem to awaken any suspicion and 
alarm among the Dissenters ; but the precedent thus set paved 
the way for furtber Acts in favor of that church. In Dr. 
Ramsay's History of South Carolina (vol. 2, pp. 3 and 4), we 
find the following, and the author can do no better than to 
give it in his own words: "In the year 1704, when the white 
population of the province was between 5,000 and 6,000, when 
the Episcopalians had only one church in the province, and the 
Dissenters three in Charleston and one in the country, the 
former were so far favored as to obtain a legal establishment. 
Most of the proprietors and public officers of the province, and 
particularly the Governor, Sir Nathaniel Johnson, were zeal- 
ously attached to the Church of England. Believing in the 
current creed of the times, that an established religion was 
essential to the support of civil government, they concerted 
measures for endowing the church of the mother country and 
advancing it in South Carolina to a legal prominence. Pre- 
paratory thereto they promoted the election of members of 
that churth to a seat in the provincial Legislature, and suc- 
ceeded by surprise so far as to obtain a majority. The recently 
elected members soon after they entered on their legislative 
functions took measures for perpetuating the power they had 
thus obtained ; for they enacted a law which made it necessary 
for all persons thereafter chosen members of the House of 
Commons to conform to the religious worship of the Church 
of England, and to receive the sacrament of the Lord's Supper 
according to the rights and usages of that church. This Act 
passed the lower House by a majority of one vote. It virtually 
excluded from a seat in the Legislature all w'ho were Dis- 
senters, erected an aristocracy, and gave a monopoly of power 
to one sect though far from being a majority of the inhabitants. 



36 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

The usual consequences followed. Animosities took place and 
spread in every direction. Moderate men of the favored 
church considered the law as impolitic and hostile to the pros- 
perity of the province. Dissenters of all denominations made 
a common cause in endeavoring to obtain its repeal." They 
used every means within their power to obtain its repeal. They 
not only tried to get their own Legislature to repeal the obnox- 
ious law, but they petitioned the Lords Proprietors, and failing 
there, they went to the House of Lords in Parliament, and 
finally to Queen Anne, but all to no purpose. The law re- 
mained of force until the Revolutionary War, and even down 
to the time of the Constitution of 1790. And it will be seen 
that that Constitution did not afford entire and complete relief ; 
that through its parochial system of representation in the Sen- 
ate and House of Representatives, the Episcopal Church has 
to a great extent controlled the legislation of the State from 
that time, 1790, all the way down to 1868; when by that 
Constitution the parish system was broken up and the State 
freed from the domination of the Episcopal Church. Though 
the white people of the State had no sympathy with the Con- 
vention that made the Constitution of i868, yet many of its 
provisions are a great improvement upon the Constitution of 
1790 — ^notably the destruction of the parish system ; the eman- 
cipation of married women as to their rights of property, and 
perhaps other improvements not necessary to mention. Such 
legislation betokens superlative arrogance and self-assumption. 
It was oppressive and a tyranny. When the government prop 
is knocked from under them they fall. They have had to 
stand upon their merits for the last hundred years, and they 
have dwindled down to a small element in the body politic, 
their members are a mere handful when compared with the 
members of the various dissenting denominations. All honor, 
however, to many of the noble people who were and are iden- 
tified with that branch of God's church. Their position of 
undue influence in the State's affairs was the result of early 
environments, and its best and most conservative followers 
recognized the injustice of the system in vogue before the war, 
and were willing that it should be abolished, as it was inimical 
to the best interests of their church. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 37 

Under the Act of 1811, $300 was appropriated to each 
school. Under the Act of 18 14, $37,000 was appropriated for 
the free public schools, and continued from year to year up to 
the war. How much of this $37,000 appropriated for free 
schools since 18 14 was apportioned to Marion District is 
unknown, as no permanent record thereof seems to have been 
kept by the Commissioners. If any was kept, it is inacces- 
sible — it was, however, a mere pittance, and did but little good. 
The four counties — Beaufort, Colleton, Charleston and George- 
town — having most of the parishes within their borders, and 
having the greater representation in the Legislature, hence they 
shared most of the appropriation, while the rest of the State 
got but little of it, and were little benefited by it. It was pro- 
vided in said Act of 181 1, that all should send to said schools, 
rich and poor alike, free of expense; and further, that if the 
money appropriated was insufficient to pay for all attending 
said schools, a preference should be given to the poor, or the 
children of indigent parents. The result was that the poor in 
many instances did not attend those schools, parents were not 
able to furnish books and clothing for their children ; and many 
of them being poor and ignorant themselves, were careless and 
indifferent about educating their children. Whether there 
were any public schools, public or private, in Liberty or Marion 
District prior to the beginning of the nineteenth century, we 
cannot say, nor can we with certainty say there were schools 
in Marion ' District before 1814. We can only say there was 
legislation to that end as to free public schools, but whether 
our people availed themselves of it or not, we can only conject- 
ure. We, however, suppose their little "old! field" schools were 
opened for short terms in some neighborhoods, with teachers 
possibly competent to teach the rudimentary branches of an 
education, and which each succeeding generation has improved 
upon during the whole of the nineteenth century, and has 
brought it up to its present high standard; and as evidence 
thereof, the log cabin school houses with, in many instances, 
only a dirt floor, have been succeeded by large and commodious 
school buildings, and in some places brick buildings, in almost 
every section of the county, and they are all well patronized; 
and we have teachers fully competent to instruct and to prepare 



Oo A HISTORY 01? MARION COUNTY. 

the youth of both sexes for college. The progress in educa- 
tional enterprise has kept pace with the progress in material 
and industrial enterprise. Much might be said in amplifying 
the contrast between our conditions educationally now and one 
hundred years ago, but space will not permit and the field is 
too large. In 1814, the Marion Academy Society, at Marion 
Court House, was given the power of escheators and also its 
perquisites up to $2,000. It seems it had been incorporated 
before, but the writer has not been able to find the Act of incor- 
poration, and hence he cannot give the names of the corpora- 
tors, t A school was established there under its provisions, and 
has been kept up with more or less success from that time to 
the present. At that school many men of the past generation 
who have been prominent in the affairs of the county and State, 
and in the industrial walks of life, were educated, and it exerted 
an influence for good all over the county. The writer can only 
mention a few of the many who went there, and got the educa- 
tion and training that fitted them for life and its activities and 
responsibilities. All of them have passed off the stage of life. 
Hugh Godbold, General William Evans, Dr. Charles Godbold, 
Asa Godbold, General E. B. Wheeler, Colonel Eevi Legette, C. 
D. Evans, Colonel D. S. Harllee, Dr. Robert Harllee, General 
W. W. Harllee, John C. Bethea, Elisha C. Bethea, W. B. 
Rowell, General Elly Godbold, Nathan Evans, General N. G. 
Evans, Reddin W. Smith, all men of mark and character, and 
a host of others younger, all of whom got their training and 
early impressions from that school, taught by such men as the 
Rev. Joseph F. Travis, Rev. Tracy R. Walsh, and W. H. 
Witberow. We are not yet done harvesting from the seeds 
planted and cultivated in that school ; its fruits are still being 
gathered. And it has been succeeded by one of the best and 
most successful graded schools, perhaps, in the State. A large 
and commodious brick building has been erected, and the school 
established under the laws prescribing the manner of regulat- 
ing such schools. It is largely patronized, and has a strong 
corps of teachers, and is equal, perhaps, in its curriculum and 
course of study to one of our colleges a hundred years ago. 
There a young man or woman is prepared to enter the Fresh- 
man Class in the South Carolina College, or any other college 

quite an advance on the schools of the eighteenth century. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 39 

Not many years after this — ^perhaps in the thirties — an 
ajcademy was built at Harlleesville, and a school established 
there, and for more than sixty years a good school has been 
kept up 'at that point. It has told upon the intelligence and 
high standing of that community. Its teachers have gene- 
rally been men of learning, character and scholarly ability. It 
has awakened a spirit of industrial pursuits and industrial arts, 
perhaps, unsurpassed anywhere. It has moulded character — 
high character — ^in both male and female. It has energized 
its citizens and made them the peer of the citizens of any 
community. They have no cause to blush when they say, "I 
am from I;ittle Rock, Marion County." They are proud of 
their citizenship and homes. The school was founded by 
Herod Stadkhouse, Isaac Stackhouse, Allen Gaddy, Cade 
Bethea, John Braddy, and last, but not least, by Colonel Thomas 
Harllee — ^though he never married and had no children to send 
to school, yet he was liberal to any call for the betterment of his 
people, the uplifting of them and putting them upon a higher 
plane in civilized life. His hand and heart were ever open to 
any such enterprise. Those substantial and open-hearted men 
have been succeeded by a better informed community, their 
efiforts have been crowned with success far beyond expectation. 
They are all gone to their reward, but their works survive, and 
yet remain to bless and build up generations yet to come. 

The next high school, in the order of time, in the county was 
Pine Hill Academy, near Sellers, on the Florence Railroad, 
built in 1841. It was erected hy Major James Haselden, John 
C. Ellerbe, Isham Watson, Henry Berry, James Tart and the 
Widow Moses Mace, and perhaps others. The first teacher 
in that school was John H. McDonald, a brother of D. J. 
McDonald, who afterwards merchandised at Marion for years, . 
and who married a Miss Crawford, a sister of the late W. H. 
Crawford. The next teacher at Pine Hill was the late A. Q. 
McDuffie, Esq., who taugiht there several years and had a large 
and flourishing school. The writer hereof, in 1842, went to 
school there to John H. McDonald, and in 1844, to A. Q. 
McDuffie. The latter was his last teacher. The old academy 
yet stands as a monument to the enterprising men who built 
and established it, still dispensing its influence for good to the 
4 



40 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

third and fourth generations of the men who founded it. It 
has done much for the oommunity in which it is located, and 
ha& furnished many men and women who have been prominent 
in the affairs of the State and county, and among them our 
Governor, the late Williami H. Ellerbe. 

The next high school, in the order of time, was Hofwyl 
Acadtemy. It was built in 1853, and was burned by an incen- 
diary in 1855. T'his academy was built and the school estab- 
lished there by Captain E. C. Bethea, Colonel James R. Bethea, 
John R. Bethea, Rev. Samuel J. Bethea, Stephen Fore, Captain 
C. J. Fladlger, Joseph D. Bass and W. W. Sellers--all of whom 
have passed "over the river of death" except the writer. After 
the burning in 1855, another and better building was erected 
on the same spot by the same parties, at once, and the school 
reopened with competent teachers, and was very popular in its 
day. It attracted patronage from beyond the limits of its 
immediate neighborhood. From below Marion Court House, 
the late W. F. Richardson sent two of his daughters up there — 
Miss Augusta, who afterwards married James H. Godbold, 
and who now resides about fifteen miles below Marion, and 
Miss Alice, who afterwards became the second wife of John 
H. Hamer, of Little Rock. She is now dead, leaving five child- 
ren surviving her, Ed. Hamer, of Little Rock, and Dr. Tristram 
B. Hamer, now in the far West, Mrs. Neill A. Berry, of 
Sellers, and Mrs. Lawrence Manning, in the Little Rock sec- 
tion, and John H., now about twenty-one years old. Also, G. 
W. Wood'berry, of Britton's Neck, sent his daughter, Julia, to 
the Hofwyl School. She afterwards, I think, married a Mr. 
Brown, and is yet living, and reared a nice family. James 
Jenkins sent his daughter, Ella, his only child, to Hofwyl. 
She afterwards married B. F. Davis, below Marion; they 
raised a large family of sons and daughters ; the mother died 
some years ago. Miss Mary E. Watson, daughter of the late 
James Watson, near Marion, went up to the Hofwyl School. 
She afterwards married Jessie H. Gibson, below Marion ; both 
are now livin'g, and have raised a family of sons and daughters 
ready to take their places in society, and to fill them with re- 
spectability and success, as their parents have done. Dr. F. 
M. Monroe went to school there, perhaps the last school he 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 41 

I 

ever attended before reading medicine ; he boarded at Captain 
James W. Bass', together with one Willie Sbeckelford, son of 
Jotin B. Sheckelford, below Marion. He came to a sad end 
in North Carolina. Dr. Monroe is now well known in the 
county as one of our best physicians, a respecta:ble and promi- 
nent citizen of hich character and a Christian gentleman. 
From the L,ittle Pee Dee section there were H. M. Stackhouse, 
now a very prominent citizen of Marlborough County, lately 
its State Senator, a progressive and successful farmer, well 
posted in the concerns of his county, State and nation. Also, 
his brother, Robert E. Stackhouse, who died' while a young 
man a few years afterwards — very promising. J. G. Haselden, 
who died a few days ago, near Sellers, attended the Hofwyl 
School, perhaps the last scliool to which he ever went. He 
became a prominent and useful citizen, a progressive farmer, 
raised a family of four children, three sons and a daughter, all 
of whom survive him. He represented his county one term 
in the State IvCgislature. His sons are the Hon. J. D. Hasel- 
den, L. M. Haselden and L. B. Haselden, now in Clemson 
College ; and his daughter, Carrie Haselden. His son, L. M. 
Haselden, took a literary course ir\ the South Carolina College, 
and another in the law department of that institution, from 
which he graduated with highly distingui^ed honors. F. M. 
Godbold also went to school at Hofwyl at the same time that 
J. G. Haselden was there. They both boarded at the writer's 
house. Soon after leaving the Hofwyl School, F. M. Godbold 
went to the Cokesibury School, in Abbeville District, where he 
soon married a Miss Vance, had several children as the fruit 
of the marriage, when his wife died. He afterwards married 
another Miss Vance, a cousin of his former wife, and they now 
together live three miles above Marion Court House. He is 
now farming. Others from the Little Pee Dee section came to 
the Hofwyl School, to wit : John C. Clark and his brother, R. 
K. Clark. John C. se:emed at school to be a cowardly boy; 
other boys in school, it was said, imposed on him more than 
ordinary among school boys, and he would not assert himself 
so much as to resent it. Afterwards, when the war com- 
menced, John Calvin Clark volunteered in Company L, 8th 
regiment South Carolina troops, and was Second Lieutenant 



42 A HISTORY Ot MARION COUNTY. 

in that company. In one of the many battles in wliich that 
regiment was engaged, Jdhn Calvin, for some reason or other, 
was in command of his company, and was killed in advance of 
his command, while calling on his men to follow him, telling 
them to come on, not to go on. Thus a truly brave boy fell 
at the head of his comimand, in a position that tried men's 
souls; wliile others of his command, perhaps, in sdiool, and 
then in battle with him, if they did not exactly show the "white 
feather," did not manifest the bravery of schoolboy days. All 
honor to the true, manly courage of John Calvin Clark. R. 
K. Clark, a brother. Who went to sdiool at Hofwyl, grew up 
to manhood and went into the war towards the last of it, and 
from the writer's knowledge of him was equally as brave in the 
performance of duty as was his brother, John Calvin. After 
the war he married Miss Nannie Stackhouse, a daughter 
of the then late Wesley Stackhouse. He went to farming, 
which he continued to follow with some success till 1876, 
when 'he was nominated in that memorable campaign for 
Clerk of the Court, and was elected. He served four years 
in that position with credit, and made an excellent Clerk. At 
the end of his term he was a candidate for renbmin'ation, but 
failed to get the nomination, and J. Albert Smith was nominated 
and elected. For reasons which it is not necessary to state, he 
failed to get the nomination. It was not that he had not made 
an efficient Clerk. He was soOn afterwardis appointed County 
Treasurer, which position he filled with great credit and to the 
entire satisfaction of his people. He held it for a year or two, 
and resigned it and moved UfK>n his plantation in upper 
Marion, where he successfully farmed until 1888, when he died, 
leaving his widow, who has since died, and three sons and 
four daughters, of whom Luther Clark, now in Marion, is one, 
and Hon. W. A. Brown's wife is another. Do not know of 
the remaining five. 

There is another batch of Hofwyl pupils from abroad that I 
must notice. They were from Marlborough County, viz: 
Joseph Steed, who died at old man Philip Bethea's, where he 
boarded while going to school. There was, also, R. Y. Hene- 
gan, son of ex-Governor B. K. Henegan, Henry Baggett and 
Peter Baggett. R. Y. Henegan is yet living, near Florence, 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 43 

and is one of the many good citizens of that county, and promi- 
nent in his community; married, I think, a Miss Waring, a 
highly respectalble family. The writer saw Bob a few days 
ago, with his daughter, a beautiful girl, at Florence. Time is 
snowing on the head of R. Y. Henegan, the Hofwyl schoolboy. 
The two Baggett boys, Henry and Peter, the writer knows 
nothing of. Thinks Henry Baggett went to Charleston after 
the war, and went into, perhaps, a factorage and commission 
business, unaeir the firm name of J. H. Baggett & Co. I think, 
Peter Baggett was killed or died in the war. All these from 
abroad showed the popularity of the school. Such was its 
efficiency that it drew to it the favor and patronage, not only 
of its neighborhood, but others frcan a distance. The first 
teacher in that school was William McDuffie, a cousin of the 
late A. Q. McDuffie, Esq. The next was Harris Covington, a 
very scholarly man and a good teacher. He had his sister with 
him one or two years of his three or four years. The next 
was the late W. J. McKerall, for two years. He had his sister 
with him the last year, 1859. Harris Covington succeeded W. 
J. McKerall in i860 and 1861. During 1861, Covington vol- 
unteered in C. J. Fladger's company, was First L;ieutenant in 
that company and went off to the war. Then followed Archi- 
bald McGrogan, a young man from North Carolina, who con- 
tinued the school till 1865. Next was Colonel J. W. St. Clair, 
Who continued' till 1868. John C. Sellers taught the school in 
1869. John A. Kelly taught there in 1870, and Philip Y. 
Bethea, in 1871, which was the last school taught at Hofwyl. 
The community became bare of children — so much so, that it 
was deemed proper to close it, and no school has been taught 
there since. The school made its mark there, and for about 
twenty years was the pride of the community, and did much in 
building up the neighborhood. It turned out many boys and 
girls that made our best citizens, surpassed nowhere. The 
writer, it is to be hoped, will be pardoned for having said so 
much about the Hofwyl School. He was magna pars fui, one 
of its founders, and one of its constant promoters and patrons. 
All his children except the youngest were educated at that cele- 
brated school, the foundation was laid there. Two of his sons 
graduates, one at the South' Carolina College, the other at 



44 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Wofford College, both citizens among you, and stand in charax:- 
ter and attainments the peers of any. He has a right to talk, 
to feel proud, to be grateful, that he lived wlien he did and 
was enabled to accomplish the little be did for his community 
and for bis own children. Let the coming generation do as 
well — ^yea, better — for their posterity than did the Hofwyl 
community in their day and time. So may it be. 

The next high school, in chronological order, was^the Mullins 
School, established some twenty-five or thirty years ago. This 
school for several of its first years did not prosper or succeed 
well. Owing to dissensions and some ill feeling among its 
patrons ; but time with its soothing and harmonizing influence 
has hushed its bickerings, and mollified and wiped out the 
former ill feeling that existed among its patrons, and it now 
presents a harmonious and united front, and they have a school 
there now of high standing and equal, perhaps, to any in the 
county, well attended, jx>pular and doing a good work, a great 
deal for that community. They have a corps of competent 
teachers, -and no reason why it should not continue to prosper 
and grow in its power for good. It, with other influences for 
the uplifting of the community, is making the Mullins people 
a great people, a moral and Christian community. The school, 
the two Sunday Schools there, one Baptist, the other Metho- 
dist, the two churches. Baptist and Methodist, under the hand 
of the highest supreme power, have achieved a revolution for 
good, so mudh so, that the most sanguine among them twenty- 
five years ago never dreamed or thought of. The writer will 
not draw and present the contrast any further. It is easier to 
conceive it than to tell it. 

The next high school, in the order of time, as remembered, 
was at Dalcho, near the Catfish Baptist Church, in Bethea 
Township. It is a part of the old Hofwyl Academy. It was 
established some twelve or fifteen years ago, has been and is 
yet a very flourishing school. It is well attended, they Jiave 
kept the best of teachers there and it is tellinig for good on that 
wbole community, raising the .standard of morality, widening 
the circle of social life, elevating and inspiring Cbristian 
character and Cbristian endeavor. The school bas much to 
do with it. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 45 

The next school (high school), in chronological order, is the 
Dotihan School, another part of the old Hofwyl Academy. It, 
too, is a school of high standing, well patronized; they employ 
and keep the best teachers in it. Some years ago the promoters 
and principal patrons built a large and commodious academy 
building there at a cost of $i,6oo. A year or two after it was 
constructed, they had some public school exercises there one 
night in very waitn weather — ithey had no fire except liglited 
lamps ; it was burned down about i or 2 o'clock, together with 
books, seats, blackboards and other school furniture, a total 
loss with no insuranoe. It was and is yet believed that it was 
an incendiary fire. Not daunted there'by, they went back into 
the old school house near by, a house less pretentious and less 
commodious, and continued the school, and have kept it up to 
the present day. It is in a good community. They are doing 
a goodi wrork there, training and fitting the youth of that place 
for higiher education, if they desire it, and to take their respec- 
tive places in future society and in future business life. 

The next high school, in the order of time, is the Hopewell 
School, situated in the "For*k" neighborhood, between Little 
Pee Dee and Buck Swamp. This school the -writer has heard 
is a first class school. Its chief promoters and patrons are D. 
D. McDuffie, Dempsy Lewis, T. B. Rogers, Ferdinand Rogers, 
David S. Edwards and perhaps others. It is well attended, 
has a strong corps of teachers, is doing much in building up 
and improving the community, and' giving to its people a 
higher and better tone, inspiring their local pride and promo- 
tive of good morals. 

Another high school estaiblished about the same time was the 
Gaddy School, located near or at Caddy's Mills, in Hillsboro 
Township. Its chief patrons are Captain R. H. Rogers, Jo- 
seph R. Oliver, Barfield Rogers, T. B. Hays, W. S. Lupo, A. 
B. Carmichael, Samuel T. Caddy, B. F. Edwards and perhaps 
others. They keep a good school there, employ good teachers, 
and are doing much for building up and elevating- their com- 
munity. The school, together with the two churches, Piney 
Grove (Baptist) and Union (Methodist), are improving the 
morals of that community, and qualifying and fitting the 
present rising generation for a favorable entrance upon life's 
arena. 



46 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

The next High school, in the order of time, is the school at 
Latta. A school had been established there, or just above the 
town, some years before the Florence Railroad was constructed, 
not very pretentious, but was said to be a good country school. 
It, too, was a part of old Hofwyl. When a town sprang up 
(Latta), it seemed to quicken and inspire an ambition for 
better and larger schod facilities, and hence the establishment 
of the present popular high school. The writer does not know 
wheth'er it is called "a graded school" or not, he has since 
learned that it is a graded school. It, 'however, does not 
matter — the school is established and has a high character. 
They have a good building, well attended, and the school is in 
high favor with the town and surrounding country. They 
have a first class teacher at its head, who is sowing the seeds of 
knowledgethere that will spring up and bear good fruit in that 
community years to come in the rising and coming generation. 
They are touching chords that will vibrate not only in future 
years but in and through eternity. That school, with the three 
churches (Methodist, Baptist and Presbyterian) located there, 
will, in the near future, if they continue to nurse them and 
strengthen them, elevate that people far above present concep- 
tions, and future generations will echo with the praises of their 
ancestry. It being a growing town, it is difificult to say who 
are the leaders in their school enterpris'e ; therefore, the writer 
will ascribe it to all the good citizens of that place. 

At Dillon, on the Florence Railroad, is a most excellent 
graded school. It is only of few years standing, and already 
will compare favorably with any like school, perhaps, in the 
State. The town of Dillon itself is only eleven or twelve 
years of age. It has now from 800 to 1,000 inhabitants. It 
is a very enterprising place, located in a fine section of the 
county, and surrounded on all sides by one of the best farming 
regions in the State, its prospects for becoming a city in the 
near future are bright and cheering. They have started right. 
They have established a fine graded school, and built a com- 
modious brick building for the school. The school is largely 
attended. They keep a corps of good teachers, who are doing 
a good work, giving entire satisfaction to the patrons. The 
• session now closing for the present scholastic year, 1899 ^^^ 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 47 

1900, discloses the fact that the enrolment of scholars in the 
white school for this session is i8o. What will it he ten years 
hence? Doubled, if the town continues to grow as it has in 
the last ten years. 

All the foregoing schools are and were, including Hofwyl, 
which no longer exists, first class schools, largely attended, ran 
for tihe whole year and from year to year. At any one of 
them a boy could be prepared to enter the Freshman Class in 
any college in the State, and even higfher than that — ^to enter 
the Sophomore Class, as was done in one instance at least. 

It will be noted that all these first class schools are in the 
upper end of the county — Marion is in the centre — ^and goes 
to verify w'hat the writer said in a former part of this book, 
contrasting the progress made by the upper end as compared 
with that of the lower end. It is there said that one of the 
causes was that the upper end had more and better schools 
th'an in the lower end. The writer would not say a word in 
disparagement of the people in the lower end, but he is merely 
stating what is apparent to any one — a fact, the truth. Far 
from it, the writer hopes that by stating this particular fact, 
the people of the lower end will be stirred up to follow the 
example set them by their fellow-citizens of upper Marion. 
Thus far, in pursuing this subject, the educational history of 
the county, the writer has only referred to the high schools, 
some near a 'hundred years old, others a half century and more, 
and others for a shorter period. It is not to be inferred from 
this that there are and were not other schools all over the 
county of less note, and which have done a great deal of good, 
and are still doing so. Those schools may be said to be auxili- 
aries to the higher schools. They are not only to be found in 
upper Marion, but in lower Marion as well, and they are as 
useful in their limited sphere as are the higher schools. In 
them, limited in duration and in calibre as they are, they teach 
and instruct the youth attending them in the fundamentals of 
an education. In them the foundation is laid for the super- 
structure. If they go no further, that much is effected, and by 
self-effort and self-improvement, such may become useful and 
intelligent citizens, otherwise the foundation thus laid gets no 
higher and the recipient relapses back to his natural condition. 



48 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

and his ambition, if he had any, is dwarfed, and he never rises 
any higher than "a hewer of wood and a drawer of water," 
lives in the very lowest walks of life unnoticed and dies in the 
same way. The common schools have been in the county from 
the earliest times — at least, from the writer's earliest recollec- 
tion. He went to school in this county (upper Marion), on 
the roajd leading from Ha;rlleesville to Fair Bluff, N. C, be- 
tween Bear Swamp and the North Carolina line, in 1832, near 
seventy years ago, and he remembers seeing the late General 
Woodberry pass there. He was electioneering for Sheriff. 
He stopped at the sdhool house and talked with the teacher, 
Daniel McLellan, an uncle of our present County Auditor, F. 
T. McLellan, also to some young men there, scholars and 
voters, to wit : the late Blgat Horn, Daniel Horn and Alexander 
Johnson, all now dead. General Woodberry was in fine humor 
and adapted himself to his then surroundings. He was elected 
Sheriff and went into office in April, 1833, and served his term, 
four years, as the Sheriff's office shows. By the then Consti- 
tution (1790), he was not eligible for a second term, until the 
expiration of another four years. That was the only time the 
writer ever saw General Woodberry, a man of great versatility 
and of marked character. More may be said about General 
Woodberry in a subsequent part of this book. That school 
house was built of logs, about twenty feet long and sixteen feet 
wide, a dirt floor, a dirt chimney. One log Was cut out of the 
back end so as to give light ; the log below that had some holes 
bored in it with a two-inch auger. I^arge pegs, a foot or more 
long, were driven into those auger holes, and then a plank laid 
on those pegs and nailed to them. This served for our writing 
desks. That schol building and its appliances were about such 
as were, in that day and time, used in many or most of the 
schools in the country. The means of the people were limited, 
and the spirit of progress and improvement was equally as 
limited. Occasionally you would find a man of more elevated 
views, as to schools, but standing alone, he could do nothing 
to improve the prevailing conditions. It was not until about 
1840, that signs of a better day, in these respects, began to show 
themselves, and from that time to the present signs of improve- 
ment have been multiplying and spreading, until the whole 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 49 

country is penneated with a spirit of education, even in sections 
of the county where, heretofore, great indifference was mani- 
fested. A wholesome sentiment on the subject is prevaiUng. 
The fundamental provisions in the Constitution of 1868 and of 
189s have been and are potent factors in kindling and energiz- 
ing a stronig and healthy sentiment in favor of education. The 
L,egislature has wisely and liberally constructed the machinery 
for public education. The laws foster and care for the com- 
mon schools ; the common 'schools evolute the higher schools, 
and by am ascending gradation the higher schools evolute 
colleges. There is no excuse now, nor can there be any, for 
illiteracy and ignorance among our people, white la.nd colored. 
Both races, under the law, share equally in the liberal appro- 
priations made by the Legislature for school purposes, and the 
funds provided seem to be equitably distributed. School funds 
raised by taxation and in some other forms, for the year 1899, 
and distributed under the law to the schools of Marion County, 
amounted to $11,502.13. In this amount is included $1,500 
pdll tax; this last item is an estimate, as the precise amount 
oould not be arrived at. The county is laid off into fifty-five 
school districts and schools estaJblished in each school district. 
They are designated by numbers from one to fifty-five. Ac- 
cording to the report of the County Superintendent of Educa- 
tion, there were enrolled in the different schools through the 
year 7,638 attending those schools, white and colored-. The 
school funds collected and paid out as above stated are nearly 
one-third as much as was the appropriation for the public 
schools each year for the whole State a year from 1811 to the 
war. And besides the amount thus callected and paid to the 
public schools of the county, in which rich and poor share 
alike, in many neighborhoods there are pay schools, that are 
kept up from year to year; or after the public funds are ex- 
hausted, the schools are continued oni and paid for by th€ 
private funds of the patrons. Thus it is easy to be seen how 
much greiater are the educational advantages of to-day than 
they were fifty years ago and before that time. Few there were 
a half century ago that had an opportunity to "rub their backs 
against a college wall." Now our college graduates may be 
counted by the dozens. Our young men and women, too, are 



50 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

fitted to fill any station in life, public or private. What im- 
provement! Rapid strides are making towards the goal of 
universal knowledge. In the next generation there will be 
found few who cannot read and write. 

Graduates of CotLEGes. 

From Davidson College, N. C. 

A. Q. McDuffie (dead). 
William McDuffie (dead). 
D. W. Bethea (dead). 
D. W. Bethea, Jr. 

From Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Gewood Berry, 1846 (dead). 
J. Hamilton Evans, 1854 (dead). 
John H. Hamer, 1856. 
Missouri R. Hamer. 
William D. Carmichael, Jr. 

From Greenville University, S. C. 
Rev. Joseph H. Dew, 1890. 
W. C. Allen, 1900. 

From the Citadel Academy, Charleston, S. C. 
Lieutenant Colonel W. P. Shooter, 1859 (dead). 
A. J. Howard, J. T. Coleman, 1886. 
A. G. Singletary, 1890. 
A. S. Manninig, 1892. 
S. W. Reaves, 1895. 
T. W. Carmichael, 1896. 
Herbert Rogers, 1900. 

Wofford College, S. C. 
There have been ninety matriculates from Marion County. 
The following graduated : 
Bond E. Chreitzburg, 1869. 
Marcus Stackhouse, 1871. 

James T. Brown, William A. Brown, Wilbur F. Smith, 1874. 
W. J. Montgomery, 1875. 
Henry M. Wilcox, T. B. Stackhouse, 1880. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 51 

Philip B. Sellers, 1882. 

W. M. I^ester, 1884. 

J. E. EUerbe, J. Marion Rogers, 1887. 

E. P. Taylor, 1888. 

R. Iv. Rogers, 1889. 

J. G. Baker, 1890. 

P. P. Bethea, 1892. 

P. H. Ed^ward's, W. M. EUerbe, 1894. 

J. R. Rogers, B. B. Sellers, W. F. Stackhouse, 1895. 

C. H. Barber, C. C. Leitner, L,. B. Smith, 1896. 

T. L,. Manninig, W. B. Evans, 1897. 

C. H. Leitner, 1898. 

G. E. Edwards, 1899. 

South Carolina College. 

From this College I have no report. My son, John C. Sel- 
lers, wrote to Professor R. Means Davis, who was a classmate 
of his in that College, for a report. The Professor replied that 
he would do so, but has never sent it. My grand-son, Wallace 
D. Sellers, who was in the South Carolina College in 1899- 
1900, procured a catalogue of the Euphradian Society up to 
1859, which shows the matriculates from Marion County, but 
who and how many of them graduated is not shown, as follows : 
Robert H. • Gregg, 1808 ; Ezra M. Gregg, 1817 ; Jeremiah 
Brown, 1819; Charles Godibold, 1819; D. Reese Gregg, 1825; 
John H. Latta, 1826; C. D. Evans, 1836; G. Cooper Gregg, 
1836; O. S. Gregg, 1838; R. G. Howard, 1848; Evander 
Gregg, 1837; E. M. Davis, 1848; R. C. Mclntyre, 185 1 ; G. M. 
Fairlee, 1853; J. C. McClenaghan, 1854; D. Mclntyre, 1854; 
S. A. Gregg, 1855; W. J. Singletary, 1856; Walter Gregg, 
1857 ; C. E. Gregg, 1859. Those of the above who it is cer- 
tainly known graduated are: C. D. Evans, R. G. Howard, R. 
C. Mclntyre, G. M. Fairlee, W. J. Singletary. Those gradua- 
ting there since the war are : John C. Sellers, Hezekiah John- 
son, Robert P. Hamer, Jr., W. M. Hamer, P. A. Wilcox, J. 
S. McLucas, Walter H. Wells, Luther M. Haselden, Henry 
Mullins. 

Wake Forrest, N. C. 

The graduates from this College, as ascertained, are : Dr. C. 



52 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

T. Ford, Rev. Rufus Ford, Julian Dew, Baker Ford, Lila 
Ckjitingham. 

The graduates from Marion in female colleges are equally as 
numerous as in the male department^. I have not the list of 
them. In education, Marion (bounty will rank as high, accord- 
ing to her population, as any county in the State. She is now 
fully awake to her interest in that regard. 

Political and Judicial History of Marion County. 

The first divisions of the territory of the Province (State) 
were for purposes of "Church and State," to wit: parishes, 
counties and districts, partly political for representation in the 
lyCgislature, and partly judiciaJl for the establishment of courts 
of justice for the convenience of the people and the adm,inis- 
tration of law, in conformity to the then existing laws of 
England, and for military purposes and the protection of the 
colonists against the hostile incursions of the Indians. 

As early as 1682, twelve years after the first settlement of 
the province, it was deemed advisable to "divide the province, 
or rather the settled portions of it, into counties, and accord- 
ingly there were laid out, Berkeley, embracing Charleston and 
the space around the capitall, extended from Seewee (Santee) 
on the north to Stono Creek on the south. Beyond this to the 
northward was Craven County, and to the southward Colleton 
County, all extendimg thirty-five miles from the coast. Shortly 
after this Carteret County was added." Subsequently Craven 
County was greatly extended, so as to embrace all the territory 
between Santee River and the Wateree up to the North 
Carolina province line; thence down the dividing line between 
North and South Carolina to the Atlantic Ocean, and thence 
the seacoast to the mouth of S&ntee River. At the time 
of this division, Craven County was much the largest of 
any of these counties, and was so sparsely settled that it was 
not particularly noticed. But twenty years afterward it was 
described as being pretty well inhabited, the Huguenots having 
settled on the Santee. About which time it sent two members 
to the General Assembly of the province. It took its name 
from William, Earl of Craven, one of the Lords Proprietors, 
and long retained it. (_Gregg's History of the Old Cheraws, 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 53 

pp. 31 and 32.) The same author says: "The first parochial 
organization in Craven County was under the Act of Assembly 
of 1706, commonly called the Church Acts, passed for the 
establishment of religious worship according to the Church of 
England and for erecting churches. It divided the province 
into ten parishes, of which Craven County constituted one, by 
•the name of St. James Santee." (Statutes at L,arge, vol. II., 
p. 330.) The Circuit or District Court Act of 1768 divided 
the provinces into seven judicial districts, to wit: Charleston, 
Beaufort, Orangeburg, Georgetown, Camden, Cheraw and 
Ninety-Six. (Statutes at L,arge, vol. VII., p. 199, section II.) 
Each one of those districts covered three or more counties. By 
the Act of 1785, those districts were divided into counties. 
One district, Georgetown, was divided into four counties — 
Winyaw, Willianisiburg, Kingston and Liberty. (Act of 1785, 
Statutes at Large, vol. IV., pp. 662 and 663, section I.) By 
the County Court Act of 1785 (vol. VII., Statutes at Large, p. 
211), County Courts were established with limited jurisdiction. 
Courts to be held every three months in each county where 
established, by seven Justices of the Peace, or a majority of 
*hem. The Circuit Courts for our county (Liberty) were 
held in Georgetown. No County Court was ever held in any 
of the counties composing the Georgetown District. The nth 
section of the County Court Act of 1785, appoints and em- 
powers the County Court Judges to select sites for court houses 
and jails of the several counties, and to contract for and build 
the same. As no County Court was established in Liberty 
County (now Marion), no court house or jail was built therein. . 
No one had any power to contract for and to build, hence it 
was not until years afterwards that a court house and jail were 
erected in Liberty or Marion County. The Constitution of 
1778 fixed the representation for the dlistrict east of the Wateree 
at two members in the Legislature, which so continued until 
the Constitution of 1790. The district east of the Wateree 
includied Lancaster, Kershaw, Sumter, Clarendon, Darlington, 
Chesterfield, Marlborough, Marion, Williamsburg, Kingston 
and Georgetown, and also included the parishes of St. James 
Santee, Prince George Winyaw, All Saints, Prince Frederic 
and St. David, to each of which Representatives were assigned 



54 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

as follows: St. James Santee, six; to Prince George Winyaw, 
four; to All Saints, two; to Prince Frederic, six, and to St. 
David, six — making twenty-four Representatives from the 
parishes named as within the district east of the Wateree ; while 
the whole district, exclusive of the said parishes, had only ten 
Representatives. (I. vol.. Statutes at Large, p. 140, 13th sec- 
tion.) By the said Constitution of 1778, each parish and elec- 
tion district throughout the State elected a Senator. No pro- 
vision was made for the district east of the Wateree, except 
Prince George Winyaw and All Saints. They together could 
elect a Senator. There were some few other exceptions. No 
Senator or Representative was eligible unless he professed the 
Protestant religion. There is no evidence of any change in 
the law or Constitution in regard to representation until the 
Constitution of 1790 was made and adopted, and which became 
necessary in order to make our Constitution conform to the 
Con'stitution of the Unitedl States. 

The Act of 1785 had created or established Liberty County 
(now Marion). The Constitution of 1790 recognized it, so 
far as to assign^ to it two Representatives in the House, and 
assigned to it and Kingston (Horry) together one Senator. 
Whilst all the little parishes in the low country each had three 
Representatives, except All Saints, which had but one, and 
Charleston, including St. Philip and St. Michael, had fifteen 
Representatives. Such counties as Williamsburg, Marlbor- 
ough, Chesterfield, Darlington, Chester, Fairfield, Richland, 
Lancaster, Kershaw, Claremont, Clarendon, Union, Spartan- 
,burg and Greenville had only two Representatives each. In 
the Senate, Charleston (including St. Philip and St. Michael), 
had two Senators, each and every parish had a Senator, while 
Winyaw and Williamsburg together had one. Liberty and 
Kingston one, Marlboroug'h, Chesterfield and Darlington to- 
gether had two Senators. Fairfield, Richland and Chester 
together had one. Lancaster and Kershaw together had one. 
Claremont and Clarendon together had one. (See article I., 
sections 3 and 7, Constitution 1790, L vol., Statutes at Large, 
pp. 184, 185 and 186.) Article XL reads as follows: "No 
Convention of the people shall be called unless by the concur- 
rence of two-thirds of both branches of the whole representa- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 55 

tion. No part of this Constitution shall be altered, unless a 
bill to alter the same shall have been read three times in the 
House of Representatives and three times in the Senate, and 
agreed to by two-thirds of both branches of the whole repre- 
sentation ; neither shall any alteration take place until the bill 
so agreed to be published three months previous to a new elec- 
tion for members of the House of Representatives ; and if the 
alteration proposed by the Legislature shall be agreed to in the 
first session by two-thirds of the whole representation in both 
branches of the Legislature after the same shall have been read 
three times on three several days in each House, then, and 
not otherwise, the same shall become a part of the Coristitu- 
tion." (L Vol., Statutes at Large, page 192.) 

The Constitution of 1790 was of force, and the people of the 
State lived under it, without alteration or amendment, for 
twenty years. The amendlment ratified iu December, 1808, 
which did not go into effect till 1810, made some change in the 
basis of representation. Population and taxation were the 
basis, and if there was a deficiency in either population or 
taxation, or of both, there was a provision for some represen- 
tation, as will be seen. And' representation varied every ten 
years, according to the population as shown by the census every 
tenth year, which was provided for, and the taxation for each 
decade might show. The amendment of December, 1808, was 
as follows : "The House of Representatives shall consist of one 
hundred and twenty-four members, to be apportioned among 
the several election districts of the State according to the num- 
ber of white inhabitants contained and the amount of all taxes 
raised by the Legislature, whether direct or indirect or of 
whatever species paid in each, deducting therefrom all taxes 
paid on account of property held in any other district, and 
adding thereto all taxes elsewhere paid on account of property 
held in such district. An enumeration of the white inhabitants 
for tfhis "purpose shall be made in the year one thousand eight 
liundred and nine, and in the course of every tenth year there- 
after, in such manner as shall be by law directed ; and Repre- 
sentatives shall be assigned to the different districts in the 
above mentioned proportion by Act of the Legislature at the 
session immediately succeeding the above enumeration. 
5 



56 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

"If the enumeration herein directed should not be made in 
the course of the year appointed for the purpose by these 
amendments, it shall be the duty of the Governor to have it 
effected as soon thereafter as shall be practica;ble. 

"In assigning Representatives to the several districts of the 
State, the Legislature shall allow one Representative for every 
sixty-second part of the whole number of white inhabitants in 
the State; and one Representative also for every sixty-second 
part of the whole taxes raised by the Legislature of the State. 
The IvCgislature shall further allow for such fractions of the 
sixty-second part of the white inhabitants of the State, and of 
the sixty-second part of the taxes raised by the Legislature of 
the State, as when added together they form a unit. 

"In every apportionment of Representatives under these 
amendments, which shall take place after the first apportion- 
ment, the amount of taxes shall be estimated from the average 
of the ten preceding years ; but the first apportionment shall be 
founded upon the tax of the preceding year, excluding from 
the amount thereof the whole produce of the tax on sales at 
public auction. 

"If, in the apportionment of Representatives under these 
amendments, any elective district shall appear not to be en- 
titled, from its population and its taxes, to a Representative, 
such election district shall, nevertheless, send one Represen- 
tative ; and if there should still be a deficiency of the number 
of Representatives required by these amendments, such defi- 
ciency shall be supplied by assigning Representatives to those 
election districts having the largest surplus fraction, whether 
those fractions consist of a combination of population and 
taxes, or of population or of taxes separately, until the number 
of one hundred and twenty-four members be provided. 

"No apportionment under these amendments shall be con- 
strued to take effect in any manner, until the general election 
which shall succeed such apportionment. 

"The election districts for members of the House of Repre- 
sentatives shall be and remain as heretofore esta:blished. 

"The Senate shall be composed of one member from each 
election district as now established for the election of members 
of the House of Representatives, except the district formed by 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 57 

the parishes of St. Philip and St. Michael, to which shall be 
allowed two Senators as heretofore." 

Such was the Constitution of 1790 and amendments of 1808, 
made with reference to representation in the State Legislature. 
Taking into consideration the time when it was framed and the 
circumstances which brought it about, the persons composing 
the Convention and the historic facts antecedent thereto and 
leading up to it, the most casual reader cannot fail to see its 
purpose. It was to secure and perpetuate the power of those 
who had dominated the State from 1704 up to that time 
(1790) a period of, say, eighty-five years. It is well under- 
stood) by those who have read and kept up with the history of 
the State, to what party allusion is here made. The Church 
of England, the Episcopal Church, is meant. In 1704, that 
church secured legal establishmient. (Vol. II., Statutes at 
Large, page 236, et sequens.) 

The caption of the Act is, "An Act for the establishment of 
religious worship in the provinces according to the Church of 
England, and for the erecting of churches for the public wor- 
ship of God, and also for the maintenance of ministers and the 
building convenient houses for them." There are thirty-five 
sections of the said Act, covering ten pages. The said several 
sections cannot here be given in full, for the want of space. It 
was, however, provided that lands should be taken up or bought 
upon which to erect the churches and for church-yards, ceme- 
teries, out-houses, &c., and to have built thereon the church 
and all necessary out-buildings, together with convenient and 
commodious parsonages and chapels of ease, and to employ 
ministers or rectors at sucfh salary as might be agreed on, 
and all to be paid for put of the public treasury. At this time 
there was only one Church (of England), St. Philip, in 
Charleston, and the same provisions were made for all such 
Episcopal Churches that migiht be erected in future ; thoug<h at 
that time, and, perhaps, at all times since, the Episcopalians 
were greatly in the minority, yet they managed to hold to this 
adivantage, laying off parishes till the Revolution, and erecting 
churches to the number of twenty-four, mostly on the coast or 
in the low country. (Ramsay, II. vol., p. 5.) Thus the Epis- 
copal Church gained political ascendancy and held it till the 



58 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Revolution or until 1790, having all their church expenses paid 
by the public, besides other advantages, their religion costing 
them but little comparatively, vvhile dissenting denominations 
had to build and maintain their own churches or do without 
them, if too poor to buy and build and support their own min- 
isters — a. most iniquitous arrangement, unjust and tyrannical. 
Many amendments to the law were subsequently made, but 
none to weaken their political power and advantage. They 
held it with a death-like grip. The Revolutionary War 
brought no change in the law. It may have dirhinished some 
of its rigors, but no repeal of the obnoxious law. No disposi- 
tion was manifested after the Revolutionary War ended to re- 
peal the unequal and unjust laws. There is a considerable 
difference between "skinning and being skinned." They had 
been extracting money from the people to support their re- 
ligion for more than one hundred years — very pleasant to them, 
but very unpleasant to the taxpayers. The Constitution of the 
United States was made in 1787, and was submitted' to the 
States for ratification or rejection. The Convention of South 
Carolina called for the purpose ratified and adopted the United 
States Constitution in May, 1788. Having ratified that instru- 
ment, she of necessity was obliged to put herself in line with it. 
Hence a Convention of the State to frame another Constitution 
was called, and the Constitution of June, 1790, was the result. 
South Carolina was in a dilemma. She had either to give up 
her legislation in favor of the Episcopal Church — so dtear to 
the hearts of its adherents, though iniquitous and oppressive 
to all other classes — or remain out of the Union formed by the 
Constitution of the United States. She chose between the two 
evils the former, and retained the latter position which she had 
assumed in 1788, by ratifying the Constitution of the United 
States. Being shorn of her discriminating power, hitherto 
exercised in favor of the Episcopal Church, and to the discom- 
fort and injury of all dissenting denominations, she determined 
to hold on to the political power she had obtained and wielded 
for near a century. She had the Convention of 1790 called to 
frame a new Constitution, and in that to perpetuate her politi- 
cal power and influence, through parochial representation. 
The low county parishes dominated that Convention. Its 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 59 

membership was composed of delegates from each parish and 
district as provided for representation in the Legislature under 
the Constitution of 1778, as hereinbefore stated. They out- 
numbered all other delegations at least two to one ; they could 
and did make a Constitution just such as suited the views of 
the low country, and thereby in the fundamental law of the 
State f>eri>etuated their power and influence in the Legislature. 
They fixed repr.esentation so as thus, under the forms of law, 
to control and influence the legislation of the State. The Con- 
stitution of '1790 in this regard is "iron bound" and "rock 
ribbed." No future Convention of the people could be called, 
or any amendment or alteration made in that Constitution, 
unless it was by bill, introduced in the Legislature, and read 
three times, on three several days, in both the Senate and House 
of Representatives, and upon its second and third readings, 
must be agreed to by two-thirds of the whole representation in 
each house. And this is not all. The proposed alteration or 
amendment, after being thus agreed to, must be publisihed pre- 
vious to a new election for memibers of the House of Repre- 
sentatives ; and if the alteration proposed by the Legislature 
shall be agreed to in their first session by two-thirds of the 
whole representation in each branch of the Legislature, after 
the same shall have been read' on three several days in each 
house, then, and not otherwise, the same shall become a part 
of this Constitution. Thus it is seen that the low country, 
by means of their parochial representation, secured to them- 
selves the ix>wer to control the legislation of the State, and also ■ 
to prevent any legislation which looked to the curtailment of 
their power. They kept and maintained their power until after 
the war between the States, the Confederate War. First by 
the Constitution of 1865, made under the auspices of Governor 
B. F. Perry, and under the proclamation of Andrew Johnson, 
then President of the United States. The Constitution of 
1865 broke up the parish system of the low country and de- 
stroyed its power, so long enjoyed and originally so oppres- 
sively exercised. We were not allowed to live under the 
Constitution of 1865. A maddened and fanatical Congress of 
the United States disagreed with Andrew Johnson, the Presi- 
dent, as to his method of restoring the late seceding States to 



60 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

I 

proper relations to the Union, and passed the Reconstruction 
Acts of Congress, putting the South under a military govern- 
ment. The President, Andrew Johnson, vetoed those Acts, 
and the Congress readopted and passed them over his veto by a 
two-thirds vote of that body. Those Acts divided the South- 
em States into military divisions, and put a commanding 
general over each division, to carry out at the point of the 
bayonet, if necessary, those Acts. Many among us remember 
too well the hardships and rigors of the enforcement of those 
Acts. Burdensome and annoying as they were, our people, 
with a fortitude unequaled, bore them all in mute obedience to 
the "powers that be" until they were consummated by the Con- 
stitution of 1868 — a Constitution made by carpetbaggers, scal- 
awags and negroes. That Constitution, odious as it was, and 
with it at the time the intelligence of the State bad no sym- 
pathy, yet it did, as did the Constitution'of 1865, strike a death- 
blow to parochial representation in the Legislaturewof the State, 
and thereby the citizens everywhere in the State were relieved 
of the parish system, and its unjust and discriminating power — 
in the interest of a favored class, and against all others equally 
concerned and equally entitled to a fair share of the benefits of 
legislation. 

It may be asked, why so much space is given to the discus- 
sion of this subject? It is answered by saying that it affected 
the people of Marion County to her injury. Marion County 
was, and has been all the time, an integral part of the State, 
and whatever affected the State, affected her pro tanto. To 
some few people, the revelations here made are news, and to 
many they are already familiar. Such political machinery can 
never again set itself up in South Carolina. The schoolmaster 
is, and has been, abroad in the land. The people are too 
intelligent, and know and appreciate their rights too well ever 
to allow of such again. 

The first legislative notice taken of Marion District by that 
name is to be found in the Act of 1798, ist section, 7th vol. 
Statutes at Large, page 283, by which the name was changed 
from Liberty County to Marion District, on page 284 of the 
said 7th vol. of the Statutes at Large. In the said first section 
of the said Act are the following words : "One other district 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 61 

to be named Marion District, to comprehend the county now 
called Liberty County, according to its present limits." This 
section of the Act changes the name in some instances, as well 
as also the counties, to be called districts for the whole State. 
By section II. of the said Act, Courts were established in the 
following words : "That in each of the said districts by this Act 
established, there shall be held, from and after the first day of 
January, in the year of our Ivord one thousand eight hundred, 
by one or more of the Associates Judges of this State for the 
time being, and at such places as shall be appointed by or under 
this Aot, a Court of Sessions, and a Court of ^Common Pleas, 
to possess and exercise, respectively, each Court, in its respec- 
tive district, the same i)ower and jurisdiction now held and 
exercised by the several Circuit or District Courts of this State 
in their respective districts, and shall sit at the times following, 
that is to say : for Marion District, at Marion Court House, on 
the first Mondays in March and October in every year." The 
fourth section of the Act distributed! the Courts into circuits. 
"And that the several Courts of Marion District, Darlington 
District, Marlborough District, Chesterfield District, Fairfield 
District, Kershaw District, and Sumter District, shall form 
one other Circuit, to be named the Northern Circuit, and that 
the Solicitor of the said Northern Circuit Shall attend each of 
the Courts of the said Northern Circuit, and prosecute therein, 
respectively, all suits and prosecutions on behalf of the State, 
according to the usage and custom of the existing Circuit 
Courts of the State." These Courts were made Courts of 
record, juries provided for. Clerks and Sheriffs to be appointed, 
and their duties prescribed. The County Courts after ist Jan- 
uary, 1800, to have no jurisdiction, original or appellate, of 
any causes, civil or criminal, and after 1800, all causes, civil 
or criminal, pending in the County Courts were transferred to 
the Court of Sessions or Common Pleas, as the case might 
be, to the Courts hereby established. It was further enacted, 
"That from and after the first day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred, the several Courts of General Sessions of the 
Peace, Oyer and Terminer, Assize and General Gaol Delivery 
and of Common Pleas, now established and held in this State, 
shall be, and the same are hereby, forever abolished ; and that 



62 A HISTOKY O? MARION COUNTY. 

all suits, appeals and iDdictments then depending in any of 
the said Courts (except the Court of Charleston District, in 
which the business already commenced shall be continued in 
the District of Charleston, established by this Act), shall be 
transferred in the manner following, that is to say : when any 
dSstrict shall contain two or more of the districts established by 
this Act, the suits, appeals and indictments depending in the 
superior Courts of law of such districts shall be transferred to 
that new district established by this Act, within such district, 
wherein the defendant or appellee resides ; and where there are 
two or more defendants or appellees residing in different new 
districts within the limits of such district, then to such one of 
the said) new districts as the plaintiff or appellor shall direct, 
and where more of the defendants or appellees reside in such 
district, then to such of the new district therein as the plaintiff 
or appellant shall direct ; and all indictments to the new district 
where the offence was committed, and all the said suits and 
indictments shall be continued, proceeded on and determined 
in the respective Courts to which they shall be transferred as 
aforesaid; and all records of the said Superior Courts hereby 
abolished shall be transferred to the nearest district estaJblished 
by this Act, there to be kept and continued." 

(Section XL of Act of 1798, 7th vol. Statutes at Large, an 
Act to es'^ablish an uniform' and more convenient system of 
judicature.) Section XXIII. of said Act appoints Commis- 
sioners to locate court houses and gaols, and to superintend 
building the same, and for Marion District, the following 
named gentlemen were appointed: "Colonel John McRae, 
Dr. Thomas Wickham, John Ford, John Orr, Benjamin Har- 
relson, James Crawford, Thomas Harley and James Rie; 
that they be, and are hereby, appointed Commissioners for 
the purpose of fixing on a convenient and central location 
whereon to establish and build a court house and gaol in 
the District of Marion, and to superintend the building of 
the same." A very good Commission as is supposed. The 
men appointed set about the work they were appointed to 
perform. They only had the year 1799 to perform the work 
assigned them — ^the time was too short, with the facilities then 
to be had for such undertakings. ^By the terms of the Act, the 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 63 

rst Court was to be held first Monday in March, 1800. Tra- 
ition informs us, that the first Court held in the county, 
nd under the terms of this Act, was held about two miles 
elow the present court house, just across Smith Swamp, On 
tie plantation owned and occupied by Colonel Hugh Giles, 
fterwards owned and occupied by the late Samuel Stevenson, 
nd now by W. W. Baker. The very spot where the house 
tood was shown the writer by Mr. Stevenson while he owned 
t. The new court house then in course of construction was not 
ti condition to be used ; therefore, this little log house, probably 
ixteen feet square, was improvised for holding the first Court 
ver held in the county. Philip Bethea, the father-in-law of 
he writer, told him often that he attended the first Court held, 
t is supposed that the court house was completed during the 
'ear — that court house is still in existence and in a good state 
>f preservation. It was located somewhere on the public 
quare not far from wliere the present court house stands — a 
vooden building. It was occupied as a court house until 1823, 
vhen it was replaced by a brick building, which was built that 
'ear and was located about the place where the new fire-proof 
tuilding, lately constructed for the Clerk's office and for the 
'robate Judge now stands. The recordls in their offices are 
leemed most important, and hence this latter building, made 
ire-proof for the protection and safe preservation of those 
ecords. The court house erected in 1823 of brick was of 
[ood material, but was found to be too small and contracted 
or convenience, and not adapted to the requirements of the 
prowing county ; hence the present commodious and substantial 
trick building was constructed in 1853 and 1854, and it is well 
I'dapted to the purposes for which it was built, except that the 
ntrance dioor should have been placed in the northern end of 
he building instead of the eastern side, where it is. The 
hrong^coming in and going out where it now is, produces noise 
.nd confusion — very often to the disturbance of the Court, to 
.ttorneys, parties and witnesses engaged. Furthermore, a 
old east wind, when the door is open, comes rushing in from 
he door, to the great discomfort and annoyance of all within, 
nd necessitates keeping the door closed, which it is almost 
tnpossible to do, as persons are frequently passing in and out. 



64 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

and the opening and closing the door every minute causes con- 
fusion. If the entrance was at the north end, much or all of 
these objections would be obviated. 

As already stated, the first court house was a wooden struct- 
ure, which, doubtless, did very well as an initiatory court 
house, but was soon found to be insufficient for the purposes of 
its erection, and the powers that then were, had the brick one 
of 1823 built. Who the contractor was for the one built in 
1800, we have not been able to find out. The contractor for 
the one built in 1823 was Enos Tart, a prominent man in his 
day. The court house of 1800 was sold or given to the late 
Thomas Evans, St., who moved it out of the public square and 
reconstructed it on his own lot, and converted it into a com- 
modious dwelling. The house still stands on said lot, and now 
belongs to the Hon. T. C. Moody, and is occupied at this writ- 
ing by said Moody and Stephen G. Miles and family. The 
house, though one hundred years old, seems to be perfectly 
sound and still in a good state of preservation. The writer 
supposes it was built of the very best material; if it had not 
been it would have gone to decay before this time. It was 
built before the day of turpentine vandalism. It is an evident 
fact, that the timber from w'hich .{he turpentine has been ex- 
tracted soon rots — its very life is taken from it. It is like 
taking the blood from the animal, man includled; life is de- 
stroyed, and soon goes into a state of decay. One hundred 
years ago the uses of turpentine had not been discovered, nor 
had the cupidity of man been excited to the destruction of our 
pine forests. 

The court house of 1823 remained intact for about ten years 
after the new or present court 'house was erected. The rooms 
below were rented by the Commissioners of Public Buildings 
to lawyers and others for offices. They were occupied as such 
until the year of 1861. Who the Commissioners were is not 
now remembered. In the winter of 1864 and 1865, one O. R. 
Smith, claiming to be a quartermaster, was stationed at 
Marion, and was there during the year 1864 and 1865, till the 
surrender of General Lee. During the latter part of his stay 
he claimed to have bought for $S,ooo (Confederate money) the 
old court house (of 1823), upon condition that he was to 



' A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 65 

move it. He took down the building and shipped off the 
ick, iron and stone steps, &c., that he did not sell to individ- 
ds in town. What he received for it is unknown, whether 
lything or not. Whether he ever paid for it or not, and to 
hom paid, is also unknown. There tos never been any ac- 
►unting for its proceeds, or any accounting called for, by the 
ourt or other authority. In the minds of many it has been 
)ubted whether he ever paid anything for it. There was no 
le authorized to sell it. No Commissioners of Public Build- 
gs were then in existence. If there were any, they were 
sorganized and had no power to sell. The old court house 
>ld was built by the State and not by the county, hence it 
ilonged to the State and not to the county. The Legislature 
one had the power to sell or to authorize and direct its sale, 
hich the Legislature had not done. The pressure of the war 
as upon us. Civil affairs were not much looked after or at- 
nded to. Ever3^hing in relation to civil affairs were much 
isorganized, it may be said were disintegrated. Confusion 
id disorder prevailed everywhere. Matters more vital occu- 
ied our attention — our very existence was threatened. Some 
lere were who took advantage of the conditions then existing ; 
ley were on the make, and were not very scrupulous as to 
>w they made it. We do not say that this old court house 
ansaction was one of those cases, but we do say that the 
rcumstances surrounding and attending the transaction are 
lough at least to excite a reasonable suspicion. The said O. 
. Smith, the so-called Confederate Quartermaster, left just 
hen Sherman's raid passed through the upper end of the 
)unty, and carried two wagons loaded with corn and bacon, 
hich he had not gathered as an official, but took it from the 
arehouse at Marion, and which had been gathered and stored 
lere by the Post Quartermaster's Department, the writer 
;reof being in charge of it, and who remonstrated with said 
mith about it. Smith's reply to him was with an oath, "That 
y\i, corn, bacon and all, would be in the hands of the Yankees 
i two weeks. D — n it all, he was going to take care of him- 
Jf; he was going to get away and carry what he could." 
his prediction of Smith then seemed probable. The writer 



66 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

saw Smith about four or five years afterwards, and has heard 
since that he was dead. He was from Warrenton, N. C, 

The first jail was built about the time the first court house 
was built ; it is not known by whom it was built. It is supposed 
the Commissioners appointed for the purpose by the Act of 
1798, supra, had the jail built as early as practicable. It was 
located northwest of the present court house on the public 
square. The writer saw it while standing. Did not then 
observe it as he would now. It remained there and was used 
until about 1846, when it was replaced by the present jail, 
located at the lower end of Main street. 

The court house and jail located according to the Act of 
1798, formed or made a nucleus for the building up a county 
town, at and around the court house. We do not know who 
resided near the county seat before the court house was erected ; 
as we are informed by tradition, Colonel Hugh Giles, a distin- 
guished character during the Revolutionary War, lived just 
over Smith's Swamp, south of the site of Marion Court House. 
It was for him that the village of Marion was first called Giles- 
boro, and was so called till away up into the thirties, and even 
after that by some of the older people. The town of Marion 
was not incorporated until long after. At the time of which 
we are now writing, we suppose others were in the vicinity. 
These were descendants of John Godbold, who settled jiist be- 
low where Marion Court House now stands, of w'hom more 
will be said hereinafterwards ; also, the descendants of Nathan 
Evans, who was one of the early settlers of that region, of 
whom more will yet be said. In connection with the name of 
Giles'boro, the writer will relate what his father-in-law, Philip 
Bethea, told him. Before Marion Court House was located 
and established as the county seat, there were no public roads 
leading to it, from the upper end of the county. The court 
house being located there, it became necessary to lay out and 
build roads to the seat of justice The road now leading from 
Marion up by Moody's Mill, and on up by what is now Eben- 
ezer Church, and on up by John Bethea's (now John C. 
Bethea's plantation), and on up to Harlleesville (now Little 
Rock), then owned by Gibson (Stephen, the writer believes), 
was ordered by the road authorities to be laid out, opened and 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 67 

ut in condition for travel. In cutting out and opening the 
>ad, the overseer in charge of the work had much trouble in 
etting those liable to perform road duty to work; the hands, 
le poorer white people, alleging that they did not want to 
'ork and build a road for old Colonel Giles and John Smith, 
-■ho lived where Moody's Mill now is, to go up to old John 
iethea's to drink cider (old John Bethea made quantities of 
ider and peach and apple brandy) ; that no one else wanted the 
>ad or would use it, the white hands alleging that they did not 
rant the road. He said that such was the opposition that it 
Imost amounted to a rebellion, and that the law had to be in- 
oked in order to get the work done. The road is one of the 
lost useful roads we have in the county, and none so poor that 
e would not 'be affected by closing it up, and would not have it 
bandoned. The writer's informant, Philip Bethea, was a man 
Town at the time, and a son of old John, the cider maker, and 
ne of the road hands. We have a few such people among us 
et, and perhaps always will have them — men having no public 
pirit, and care for no one but themselves. 

Courts of Equity, prior to the Revolution, were held by the 
lOvernor and 'his Majesty's Council, or a majority of them. 
>y the Act of 1721 (VII. vol. Statutes at Large, p. 163), it was 
rovided that the Court of Chancery should always be open for 
le transaction of business within the jurisdiction of that 
k>urt, "but the days and times of full and solemn hearing shall 
e four times in every year, that is to say, on every Thursday 
ext after the Court of Common Pleas is directed to meet and 
it in Charleston, and shall at such times sit de die in diem 
ntil the blisiness ready for said Court shall be finished." It 
?as fprther provided, "that all the officers of the said Court 
hould reside in Charleston." All Courts were held then only 
1 Charleston. This was an ample arrangement at the time 
nd answered all the purposes of said Courts. Charleston was 
ien the State, and at that time was convenient to the settled 
arts of the province. Some modifications or amendknents 
3 the Act of 1 72 1 were made in 1746, which it is not necessary 
5 notice. In regard to the Courts of Equity, no special 
hanges were made until 1784, after the Revolution. In that 
ear the Legislature passed an Act abolishing the former 



68 A HISTORY OF MABION COUNTY. 

Courts or Equity and conferring all its powers and duties on 
three Judges or Chancellors, to be elected by the General As- 
sembly, and to be commissioned by the Governor. (It will be 
remembered that in 1784 there was no such thing at "His 
Majesty's Counsel.) The powers and duties of the Courts 
were the same as under the Act of 1721. The change was 
made to suit the conditions then existing. The Court estab- 
lished by this Act, 1784, was to be held only in Charleston. 
The three Chancellors provided for in this Act, and elected 
by the Legislature, were John Rutledge, Richard Hudson and 
John Matthews. 

The next Act of the Legislature to establish a Court of 
Equity within this State is the Act of 1791. (VII. vol. Statutes 
at Large, p. 258.) The first section of which provides : "That 
all laws now of force for establishing the Court of Chancery 
within this State, be, and they are hereby, declared to be and 
continue of force in this State, until altered or repealed by the 
Legislature thereof," &c. 

The second section of this Act, 1791, after reciting the great 
inconveniences to the remote inhabitants of this State resulting 
from the fact that the Court of Equity is held only in one place 
within the State, to wit: Charleston, enacts: "That all future 
sittings of the Court of Equity for the full and solemn hearing 
of cases shall be held at the times and places hereinafter di- 
rected, that is to say : At Columbia, for all causes wherein the 
defendant shall reside in Camden, Orangeburg or Cheraw Dis- 
tricts, on the 15th days of May and December; at Cambridge, 
for all causes wherein the defendant shall reside within the 
District of Ninety-Six, on the sth days of May and December ; 
and at Charleston, for all causes wherein the defendant shall 
reside in either of the Districts of Charleston, Beaufort or 
Georgetown (our district), on the second Monday in March, 
the second Monday in June, and the third Monday in Septem- 
ber, and the same days in every succeeding year," &c. It 
further provided that each and every Judge should ride the 
Circuit, unless prevented by sickness or other unavoidable dis- 
ability. 

The next Act in regard to the Equity Courts is the Act of 
1799 (VII. vol. Statutes at Large, at page 297), which divides 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 69 

the districts as then established into four Equity Circuits, to be 
called the Eastern, Northern, Western and Southern. Marion 
County was placed in the Eastern Circuit ; the Courts of Equity 
for this Circuit were to be held for Marion and Georgetown, 
at Georgetown, on the first Monday in February in each and 
every year. 

The next Act in reference to the Courts of Equity is that of 
1808 (VII. vol. Statutes at Ivarge, p. 304). Section i of said 
Act divides the State into three Equity Circuits, viz : the South- 
ern, Northern and Western. Our county, Marion, is placed in 
the Northern Circuit, composed of Georgetown, Horry, Marion 
and Williamsburg, which shall form one other Equity District, 
to be called the Georgetown District, the Courts of Equity for 
which shall be held at Georgetown, on the first Monday in Feb- 
ruary and June in every year. This Act of 1808 also provides 
for the election of two additional Chancellors to be commis- 
sioned and perform the same duties as the present Chancellors. 
The two elected were Henry Wm. DeSaussure and Theodore 
Gaillard. 

The Act of 1824 established an Appeal Court for both law 
and equity, to consist of three Judges. It also divided the 
State into four Equity Circuits. Marion District was assigned 
to the Fourth Circuit, and the Courts to be held for "George- 
town, at Georgetown, for the Districts of Williamsburg, 
Horry, Marion and Georgetown, on the first Monday after 
the fourth Monday in January, to sit for two weeks, should so 
much be necessary." (VII. vol. Statutes at Large, section IX., 
p. 327.) From which it appears as well by this Act of 1824 
as by the Act of 1808, supra, that from and after the year 1799, 
the business of the Equity Courts for this section of the State 
was on the decrease, for by the Act of 1799, only Georgetown 
and Marion were united for equity purposes ; while by the Act 
of 1808 and 1824, Georgetown, Marion, Williamsburg and 
Horry were united for the same purpose. 

The Act of 1825, VII. vol., p. 330, was amended so far as 
to allow the Court of Equity to sit twice a year for the George- 
town (Marion) Equity District instead of but once, one week 
at each term, if so much be necessary. 

By the Act of 1833, it appears that Marion and Williamsburg 



70 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Districts were detached from the Georgetown Equity District, 
and that the Court sat in each separately, to wit : for Marion 
District, to commence the Thursday after the first Monday 
after the fourth Monday in January, and to continue in session 
three days, unless the business be sooner disposed of." The 
Act of 1833, for the first time in the judicial history of Marion 
District, recognized Marion as a coequal in her relations to the 
Courts of Equity with the other districts of the State. 

The Act of 1824, entitled "An Act to revise and amend the 
judiciary system of this State," with some amendments thereto, 
continued to be the law regulating both the Courts of law and 
equity, together with the Court of Appeals, composed of three 
Judges, until 1835, when the Act of that year, 1835, entitled 
"An Act to reform and amend the judiciary system of this 
State," was passed. By this latter Act, the Appeal Court as 
then existing was abolished, and its powers and duties were 
transferred to a Court of Appeals, composed of all the law 
Judges and all the Chancellors in the State, sitting in banc; 
that no Chancellor or law Judge who had tried the cause on 
Circuit should sit upon hearing the appeal thereon. That the 
Courts of Common Pleas and General Sessions, and also the 
Equity Courts, should be arranged into circuits. One circuit ■ 
was called the Eastern Circuit, in which Marion was placed. 
Courts of Common Pleas and General Sessions were to be held 
at Marion Court House for Marion District, on the third Mon- 
day after the fourth Monday in March and October each and 
every year thereafter for one week at each term, unless the 
business of the said Courts respectively shall be sooner dis- 
patched. And the several Courts of Equity in the State shall 
hereafter ibe holden twice annually at the following^ periods, 
that is to say :" * * * and "at Marion Court House, for Marion 
District, on the Thursday next after the second Monday after 
the fourth Monday in January, and the Thursday next after the 
third Monday in June, in every year, for three days at eatfh 
term, unless the business of the said Courts shall, respectively, 
be sooner despatched. (Act of 1835, VH. vol. Statutes, pp. 
335 and 336.) 

Another Act of 1836 was passed, entitled "An Act to organ- 
ize the Courts of this State. That the several Courts of law 



A- HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 71 

and equity in this State shall hereafter be held at the times and 
places as follows, that is to say : For the Eastern Circuit, at 
Marion Court Hause, on the fourth Monday in March and 
October." This was for the Court of Common Pleas and 
General Sessions. For the Court of Equity, "at Marion Court 
House, on the third Monday in January." By this Act, "all 
appeals from the Courts of law shall be heard and determined 
in a Court of Appeals, consisting of the law Judges, and that 
all appeals in equity shall be beard and determined in a Court 
of Appeals, consisting of the Chancellors. That said Courts 
shall meet at the same time and be held as follows, that is to 
say: at Charleston, on the first Monday in February, and at 
Columbia, on the first Monday in May, and fourth Monday in 
November." (Act of 1836, VII. vol. Statutes, 339 and 340.) 
By this Act also was created the Court of Errors, as follows : 
"That upon all constitutional questions arising out of the Con- 
stitution of this State or the United States, an appeal shall lie 
to the whole of the Judges assembled to hear such appeal. 
That an appeal shall also lie to the whole of the Judges upon all 
questions upon which either of the Courts of Appeal shall be 
divided, or when any two of the Judges of the Court shall 
require that a cause be further heard by all the Judges. That 
the Judges of law and equity, when assembled as aforesaid in 
one chamber, shall form a Court for the correction of all errors 
in law or equity in the cases that may be heard before them, 
and that it shall be the duty of the Judges to make all proper 
rules and regulations for the practice of the said Courts," &c. 
In this latter Court, Marion District figured in two of the cases, 
involving the constitutionality of the stay law, as it was called, 
passed in»December, 1861, and continued from year to year till 
1866, inclusive. The two cases were the State vs. Carew, 13 
Richardson Law Reports, p. 398, represented by Mr. Ivord, of 
Charleston, and the case of Barry vs. Iseman, 14 Richardson 
Law Reports, p. 161, represented by A. C. Spain for plaintiff- 
appellant, and W. W. Harllee and W. W. Sellers for defend- 
ant-respondent, from Marion. The cases were argued together 
in the Court of Errors before all the Judges and Chancellors 
"assembled in the same room," at May Term, 1866, in Colum- 
bia, S. C. As to the case of the State vs. Carew, opinion by the 
6 



72 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

venerable Chancellor Duncan, then Chief Justice, the stay law 
was held to be unconstitutional. Judge A. P. Aldrich dissent- 
ing. As to the case of Barry vs. Iseman, from Marion, opinion 
by Judge Monroe, the stay law was held to be constitutional. 
No dissent. The essential difference between the two cases 
was this : in the case of the State vs. Carew, the contract was 
made 'before the passage of the stay law, hence its passage was 
held to be an impairment of the obligation of the contract. In 
the case of Barry vs. Iseman, the contract was made after the 
passage of the stay law, and hence its passage was held not to 
be an impairment of the obligation of the contract, and, there- 
fore, constitutional. The contract was made in reference to 
existing law. (Constitution of the United States, article I., 
section lo; Constitution of the State, 1790, article IX., section 

2.) 

The Circuit Courts, 'both of law and equity, continued about 
the same, as provided by the Act of 1836, supra, until the war. 
In 1859, a separate Court of Appeals, consisting of three 
Judges, was again established) for the hearing and decision of 
all cases of appeal, either at law or equity. The Court of 
Errors remained as before. The Judges of the Court of Ap- 
peals, as organized in 1859, were John Belton O'Neall, Chief 
Justice, Job Jdhnston and F. Wardlaw, Associate Justices. 
F. Wardlaw died in i860 or 1861. Chief Justice O'Neall and 
Job Johnston died during the war, upon which Chancellor B. 
F. Dunkin was elected Chief Justice, and D. L,. Wardlaw and 
John A. Inglis were elected as Associate Justices, which posi- 
tions they held with distinguished! ability, until the upheavals 
of reconstruction put tbem' out. It can be truthfully said that 
the judiciary of South Carolina from the earliest times as a 
State, have been filled, both Circuit and Appeal Courts, by men 
of high character, distinguished alike for integrity, dignity, 
learning and ability. Many of them would have done credit to 
any country, in any age of the world. Their names stand 
prominent on the rolls of fame. Such a galaxy of eminent 
names is scarcely to be seen anywhere. Where all are so emi- 
nent, it would seem to be invidious to mention any. Without 
disparaging others, the writer cannot forbear to mention some. 
From the Revolution down to the war of the States, John 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 73 

Rutledige, Henry Wm. DeSaussure, Hugh Rutledge, Thomas 
Waties, Joseph Brevard, Samuel Wilds, Jr., Abraham Nott, 
Charles Jones Colcock, Langdon Oheves, William Harper, 
David Johnson, John S. Richardson, Joihn Belton O'Neall, Jo- 
seph J. Evans, Joib Johnston, B. F. Dunkin, D. L,. Wardlaw, 
Frank Wardlaw, John A. Inglis and George W. Dargan. To 
this list of eminent jurists others might be added. Of such an 
array of legal talent as this, any people might justly be proud 
Most of these Judges performed circuit as well as appeal duty. 
Their names are imperishable. It may be said that the judicial 
system of the State was perfected with and by the Act of 1836. 
Some slight amendlments were made to it in after times, and up 
to "reconstruction." That unparalleled event affected great 
and radical changes in the judiciary system of the State. It 
abolished the Court of Equity as a separate Court, and with 
it the venerable name of Chancellor. It transferred all its 
powers, jurisdiction and duties to the Court of Common Pleas. 
The same Judge administers both law and equity — the former 
with a jury, the latter without a jury — the conscience of the 
Judge being in place of a jury. A Court of General Sessions, 
which has jurisdiction of all criminal matters, is also estab- 
lished, and is administered by the same Judge. Hence, we now 
have a three-sided Court; one side is called the law side, 
another side is called the equity side, and another side is called 
the criminal sidte. Thus centering in one man's hand jurisdic- 
tion of every possible right or wrong to be redressed, cogniz- 
able among a highly civilized p>eople. Whether for the better 
or not, such is the now judicial administration of law in our 
State, and such it 'has been for more than thirty years — so since 
the making of the Constitution of 1868. That Constitution 
was made and adopted for the government of the people by a 
class of men who did not understand the situation or the wants 
of the people of the State. Those who were well qualified by 
ediucation and a knowledge of the needs of the people, were 
shut out of the Convention of 1868, called to make an organic 
law for the State. It was made by a few foreigners called 
"carpet-baggers," a few white men, natives of the State, rene- 
gades, called "scalawags," and a horde of ignorant negroes — 
whom the carpet-baggers voted like so many cattle. It was 



74 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

made really only by fifteen or twenty men, vv^ho had no sym- 
pathy with or for the heretofore ruling element of the State. 
It was made rather to humiliate and punish the better class of 
the people than for their future benefit. Its purpose was to 
perpetuate the power of themselves, to aggrandise and enrich 
the "carpet-bag" and "scalawag" few, out of the hard earnings 
of the former rulers, the former owners of the property of the 
people. In other words, it was to put the "bottom rail on top" 
and keep it there. The Constitution-makers of 1868 did make 
some improvement upon the Constitution of 1790 in the aboli- 
tion of the parish system of representation in the State 
Legislature, in emancipating married women as to their owner- 
ship of property and their right to control it independent of 
their husbands. 

Marion County has been an essential factor in all this. 
Whatever affected the State for good or evil affected her. 
She has 'borne her troubles and misfortunes with marked equa- 
nimity — ^she has subordinated herself to the powers that be, 
and has ever been in favor of law and order. Her people are 
a law-abiding people — lynch law finds no place among us. Her 
citizenship, as a whole, are composed of honest, industrious 
men, who live by honest means, who are enterprising, each in 
his vocation trying to live and let others live. She is 
fast coming to the front among her sister counties in the race 
for distinction and preferment — a model county. If she pro- 
gresses through the twentieth century, as she has during the 
nineteenth century now closing, she will have attained a promi- 
nence in everything that makes a people great, prosperous and 
happy. Her resources are unbounded and not yet half devel- 
oped. These, used as they may and will be, by her people for 
another century, will make her a star of first magnitude among 
the many stars of the commonwealth, and her citizens, when 
they travel, will be proud to say, "I am from Marion County, 
S. C." The officials of the county. Senators and Representa- 
tives in the State Legislature, her Clerks of Court, her Sheriffs, 
her Ordinaries and Probate Judges, her Commissioners and 
Masters in Equity, will be hereinafter given, and, perhaps, the 
names of other county officials, since days of "reconstruction." 



A HISTORY OP MAKION COUNTY. 75 

Political History. 

Prior to the Revolutionary War, the territory now embraced 
in the County of Marion, including that portion of it on the 
west side of the Great Pee Dee, now embraced in the County 
of Florence, was unknown as a political or judicial division of 
the State, then a province of Great Britain. Bishop Gregg, in 
his History of the Old Cheraws (a tribe of Indians), does not 
mention Marion County or District as of early formation. 
Wherever he speaks of it, he speaks of it as what it was at the 
time of his writing ; for instance, as what is "now called Marion 
District." Tha;t eminent writer's purpose was mainly to write 
a history of Chesterfield, Marlborough and Darlington, and 
what he says about Marion County is only incidental. 

The English government,' from the earliest settlement of the 
province of Carolina, had manifested a deep interest in the 
colony, and was anxious to strengthen it by emigration. Great 
inducements were held out to the poor of European nations to 
emigrate to Carolina in various ways — ^by offering bounties in 
lands and in other ways. Prior to 1730, there were few, if any, 
settlements in what is now Marion County. It appears by well 
authenticated tradition that there were a few settlements within 
its territory, concerning which notice will be taken hereinafter- 
wards. Bishop Gregg, in his history, on page 42, says : "From 
i6g6 to 1730, although its population gradually increased, no 
large addition was made at any one time to the inhabitants of 
Carolina. About the latter year (1730), a new scheme was 
adopted to promote the settlement of the province, which 
proved successful beyond the most sanguine expectations of 
the government. Governor Johnson was instructed 'to mark 
out eleven townships, in square lots, on the sides of rivers, 
consisting eadi of twenty thousand acres, and to divide the 
land within them into shares of fifty acres, for each man, 
woman and child that should come over to occupy and improve 
them. Each township was to form a parish, and all the inhabi- 
tants were to have an equal right to the river. As soon as the 
parish should increase to the number of one hundred families, 
they were to have the right to send two members of their own 
election to the Assembly, and to enjoy the same privileges as 



76 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

the parishes already established. Each settler was to pay four 
shillings a year for every hundred acres of land, excepting the 
first ten years, diuring which term they were to be rent free.' 
Governor Johnson issued a warrant to St. John, Surveyor 
General of the province, empowering him to go and mark out 
these townships ; but he having demandedi an exorbitant 'sum 
of money for his trouble, the members of the Council agreed 
among themselves to do this piece of service for their country." 
(Noble on the part of the Council.) "Accordingly, eleven 
townships were marked out by them in the following situa- 
tions : two on the River Altamaha, two on Savanna, two on 
Santee, one on Pee Dee, one on Wackamaw, one on Wateree 
and one on Black River." The writer does not understand 
how it was that two townships were to be laid out "on the 
River Altamaiha," as that is a river of the afterwards Province 
of Georgia, and Georgia was not then settled, 1 730-1 731, and 
was not settled until two years afterwards (1733). The 
Province of South Carolina did not at that time, nor at any 
time since, have any jurisdiction beyond the Savannah River. 
It must have been the Edisto River, which may have been at 
that time called the "Altamaha River." The writer cannot 
otherwise account for it. "The township on the Pee Dee was 
called Queensborough, and to the time of its being marked out, 
1 73 1 -1732, or a period a little subsequent, is to be assigned the 
date of our first settlements. There was no delay in the exe- 
cution of this work (of marking out the townships), which 
had 'been committed to the Governor by his Majesty's govern- 
ment, for 'building up its waste places and the more speedy set- 
tlement of the province." Bishop Gregg further says, on page 
44 : "From the annexed plot or draft, Queensborough appears 
to have been laid out on the Great Pee Dee, but a short distance 
above the mouth of Little Pee Dee River, embracing a part of 
what has since been known as Britton's Neck (a narrow strip 
of land between the two rivers), and extending also on the 
west side of the Great Pee Dee." He says further: "But for 
this plot, most unexpectedly found, the exact location of 
Queensborough Township could not have been determined." 
On page 45, he further says : "On the 14th February, 1734, it 
was ordered that the several persons who have laid out the 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 77 

several townships do prepare a rough draft or plan of a town 
to be laid out in each township containing about 800 acres, out 
of wliich a common of 300 acres, to be laid out in the back 
part, and the remaining 500 to be laid out in half-acre lots, to 
be a convenient distance from the river." This was dtone 
accordingly, and the town for Queensborough Township was 
located on the west sidte of the Great Pee Dee, as the wrLter 
supposes, not far from Godfrey's Ferry. The township 
covered 20,000 acres, and lay on both sides of the river. How 
far it extended up the river is unknoiwn, nor how far on each 
side, as the plot does not s'how the number of chains to the mile. 
The town Khus laid out and located on the west sidte of the 
river in Queensboroug*h Township seems never to have been 
settled as a town. Bishop Gregg says that up to 1734 no 
settlement was made in Queensborough Township. 



78 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Queensborough Township. 







This township, together with ten others in different parts of 
the Province of South Carolina, laid off in 1731-1732. 

Bishop Gregg says, on page 45 : "The inducements held out 
in connection with the township, appear to have led to a visit 
of some of the Welsh from Pennsylvania for the purpose of 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 79 

exploration and settlement, and to removal very shortly after of 
the colony, wliich was destined to form so important an element 
in the history and progress of the region of the upper Pee Dee." 
He says, on page 47 : "The first visit of the Welch to Pee Dee 
appears to ihave been made in the latter part of 1735 or early in 
the following year. It led to a remarkable act of favor on the 
part of the Council, to induce the colony to come. Wishing on 
tlieir arrival to settle in a body, and be possessed of ample and 
exclusive privileges as to the occupancy of the soil, they peti- 
tioned the government that an extensive tract of land might be 
appropriated to their sole benefit for a certain period. This 
appears from a message of the Lieutenant-Governor to the 
lower House of Assembly, 2 February, 1737, in which he said: 
'The late Lieutenant-Governor, with the advice of his Majesty's 
Council, thought it would tend to the service and strengthening 
of the province to grant the petition of several natives of the 
principality of Wales, in behalf of themselves and others of 
their countrymen, who intended to settle in this province from 
Great Britain and Pennsylvania, praying the land near the fork, 
above the township (Queens'boroug'h) on Pee Dee River, 
miglit be reserved and set apart for their uses, and Mr. John 
Ouldfield being thought a very proper person, was employed 
for that service.' The petition here referred to bore date Au- 
gust 13th, 1736, having been fevorably received by the Council, 
his Majesty's Surveyor-General, James H. St. John, Esq., was 
instructed to have the said tract laid out. Accordingly he 
directed a precept to John Ouldfield, bearing date November 
16th, 1736, 'to admeasure and lay out for the Welsh families 
that were to be imported to this province a tract of land, con- 
taining in the whole one hundred and seventy-three thousand 
eight hundred and forty acres, situated and being in Craven 
County. Ten thousand acres, being part thereof, lying within 
the limits of the township of Queensborough, on the north 
side of Pee Dee River. The remainder of said tract lying on 
the south side of said river and abutting and bounding to 
southeast on the reserved land of the said township of Queens- 
borough, and all other sides on vacant lands, as are supposed.' 
The survey was made, and a plot thereof returned 29th Nov., 
1736, of which a copy is annexed." The tract thus surveyed 



80 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

extended up the 'river on both sides only a short distance above 
Mar's Bluff. It was not adapted to the wants of, the Welsh 
people, the petitioners. They petitioned) again the government 
ior a further extension of the tract up the river, and after due 
consideration of this petition, the authorities granted it, by 
vVhich it was extended up the river, to and even above the 
North Carolina State line, to the branches of said river, to wit : 
"Yadkin and Uwhare or Yadkin and Rocky River," a distance 
of over one hundred miles by the course of the river, and 
included a territory of eight miles on each sidie of the river the 
whole way. Thus the Welsh hadi exclusive privileges over an 
immense territory, probably half million of acres. This proves 
both the anxiety and benevolence of the government, and the 
Welsh were not slow in availing themselves of such unprece- 
dented advantages. This extension of their grant was dated 
8th February, 1737. This first grant to the Welsh was after- 
wardte extended up to North Carolina line, eight miles on each 
side of Pee Dee River. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 



81 



A Plat of the Welch Grant (First). 

Containing 173,840 acres. November i6th, 1736. Scale of 
copy Plat, 320 chains per inch. 




"South Carolina. 

"By virtue of precept to me directed by James H. Johns, 
Esq., His Majesty's Surveyor General, bearing date i6th No- 
vember, 1736, I have measured and laid for the Welsh familys 
that are to be imported to the province, a tract of land contain- 
ing in the w'hole one hundredi and seventy-three thousand eight 
hundred and forty acres, situate and being in Craven County. 
Ten thousand acres being part thereof, lying within the limits 
of the township of Queensborough on the north side of Pee 
Dee River. The -remainder of said tract lying on 'both sides of 
said river. Butting and bounding to the southeast on the 
reserved lands of the said township of Queensborough, and all 
other sides vacant lands as is supposed, and hath such shape, 
form and marks as are represented by this delineated plot 



82 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

thereof. Given Under my hand, 29th day of November, 1736, 

per me. (Signed) 

"Deputy Surveyor." 

NoTB. — This copy made May 22, 1859, from original plat in 
Secretary of State's ofiRce by White & Ramsay, Deputy Sur- 
veyors. 

These bodies of land were not civil or political divisions, but 
only tracts laid out to induce emigrants to come in and settle 
them. It was to increase the population, to begin the develop- 
ment of the vast resources of the soil, to raise products not only 
for home consumption but for exportation to Charleston and 
to England. 

As to Queensborough Township, the laying it off was for 
the double purpose of inducing emigrants to come in and settle 
it up and to obtain lands cheaply, and in the Act or order of 
the Governor and Council for laying it and ten other townships 
ordered to be laid out at the same time, it was provided that so 
soon as the population in any township should amount to a 
hundred families, that such township should constitute a 
parish, and be entitled to two representatives in the General 
Assembly. To this extent it was a civil or political division. 
Whether any of the eleven townships laid off at that time, 
1 73 1 -2, availed themselves of this political provision or not, is 
not known. It is very certain that Queensborough Township 
did not. 

Marion County was designated for the first time as a civil 
or political division by the Act of 1785, and was called Liberty. 
Prior to that time, it formed part of the large county of 
Craven; but Craven County, as such, never had any represen- 
tation in the General Assembly. For political purposes, it was 
called the District East of the Wateree, and as such was entitled 
to two Representatives. (Constitution of 1778, 1, vol. Statutes 
at Large, page 140, section 13.) 

The politics of the Province of South Carolina up to the 
Revolutionary War were intensely British. After the Revo- 
lution, they did not take definite shape, as far as can now be 
gathered, until about the date of 1800, when her policy tended 
to support the views of Alexander Hamilton — who, though an 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 88 

advocate for the adoption of the Federal Constitution of 1787, 
and a Federalist, yet he believed in a latitudinous construction 
of that instrument. He believed in a strong executive govern- 
ment. Hamilton was not ailone ; many able andl truly patriotic 
men had the same views. John Adams and the Pinckneys, of 
South Carolina, ranged themselves on that side. They were, 
doubtless, honest in their opinions, laboring for the good of 
the country. In the presidential campaign of 1800, the contest 
was bitter and intensely exciting. Thomas Jefferson, the great 
apostle of Republicanism (Democratic) of that day, and John 
Adams, Aaron Burr and perhaps others, headed the two 
parties. Republicans and Federalists. There was no election 
by the people; hence, under the Constitution, the election de- 
volved upon the House of Representatives, in which, as the 
writer understands it, they voted by States ; each State counted 
one vote, and in that way the small States of Rhodfe Island and 
Delaware were as strong as the larger States — Virginia and 
New York. The House balloted thirty-seven times before an 
election was made. The race in the House was between Jef- 
ferson and Burr, each getting eight votes — South Carolina 
voting for Burr. On the thirty-seventh ballot. South Carolina 
and Tennessee voted blank ; the result was, eight for Jefferson 
and six for Burr. Jefferson was declared elected President 
and Burr was declared elected Vice-President. It thus appears 
that South Carolina voted for thirty-six ballots for Burr and 
against Jefferson, the great leader of the Democracy of 1800. 
And though dead for three-quarters of a century, Jefferson is 
now the beau ideal of the Democracy of 1900. How it was 
that they then voted with the Federalists and against Democ- 
racy, has never been explained. Such is the record of history. 
In every presidential election since that time, except one in 
1832, South Carolina has invariably voted for the Democratic 
candidiate. 

We have no means of ascertaining what were the politics of 
Marion County in 1800, but we presume they were in line with 
the balance of the State. On several occasions since that time, 
the people of Marion County have been divided on political 
issues, and have had some very bitter contests among them- 
selves. The first, in the order of time, was in 1832, on the 



84 A HISTORY Of MARION COUNTY. 

question of Nullification^ — ^that is, to decide whether or not 
South Carolina should nullify and make void within this State 
the tariff laws passed by Congress, and to resist by force, if 
necessary, the collection of the Federal revenue within this 
State. It raised a storm, a very tempestuous one, from the 
mountains to the seaboard, Marion included. One party was 
called Nullifiers and the other Union men. Marion District 
was aroused as it had never been before from its centre to its 
utmost limits. Each party had its candidates for delegates 
to the Convention. I do not know who the candidates were 
on the respective sides, but do know who were elected. The 
Nullifiers carried the county by a few votes — say thirty. 
Coloneil Thomas Harllee, General William Evans and Alex- 
ander L,. Gregg, from West Marion, were ^elected. The Con- 
vention convened in Columbia on the 19th November, 1832, and 
passed and adopted an ordinance of Nullification on the 24th 
November, 1832. (I. vol. Statutes at Large, pp. 329-333.) 
This Convention had in it many able men, and true patriots, 
such as R. W. Barnwell, Pierce M. Butler, C. J. Colcock, F. H. 
Elmore, Robert Y. Hayne, William' Harper, Job Johnston, 
George MacDuffie, Stephen D. Miller, Charles C. Pinckney, 
Thomas Pinckney, John Lide Wilson, F. H. Wardlaw, R. 
Barnwell Smith (Rhett) and many others. Most of the Union 
delegates refused to sign the ordinance. The Convention 
issued a strong and stirring address to the people, setting forth 
their grievances and their rights and the proposed remedy. 
The die was cast. Preparations to resist by force were hastily 
made, war seemed imminent. Andrew Jackson was President 
of the United States. He issued a proclamation, Congress 
passed a force bill and everything looked like war. South 
Carolina seemed determined, and set about making the best 
preparation possible for defence. Turmoil' and strife existed 
and permeated the w'hole State — brother arrayed against 
brother, father against son, neighbor against neighbor. Those 
were fearful times. The more thoughtful among us were 
scheming how to throw oil on the troubled waters, and to avoid 
a collision. Just at this juncture of affairs a ray of hope 
dawned upon us. The State of Virginia, seeing the danger, 
intervened in the interest of compromise and peace. With a 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 85 

view to its accomplishment, she sent as an agent or a commis- 
sion to South Carolina the Hon. Benjamin Watkins Leigh, and 
he, with the aid of Hon. Henry Clay, the great pacificator of 
the United States in Washington, stayed the advance of grim- 
visaged war so close upon us, and brought about a compro- 
mise. Congres's passed an Act for the gradual reduction of 
the tariff, the casus belli, down to a revenue standard — which 
South Carolina accepted, and repealed her ordinance of Nulli- 
fication. Thus was averted, for a period of near thirty years, 
a bloody fratricidal war. (I. vol. Statutes at Large, p. 390, 
et sequens.) 

In repealing the ordinance, the Convention excepted from 
its operation the Act entitled "An Act further to alter and 
amend the militia laws of this State, passed by the General 
Assembly of this State on the 20th day of December, 1832." 
Thus preserving and manifesting a military spirit, which has 
ever characterized the State. The stirring times of the Nulli- 
fication struggle intensified the military ardor of our people, 
referred to more at large in the former part of this history, and 
opened the way for the contest a year or two later, in this 
(Marion) district, between Thomas Harllee and John F. Ervin 
for the colonelcy of the newly-organized 32dl regiment of the 
South Carolina militia, and gave an impetus to and fanned into 
a flame the military spirit of the people, which continued with 
unabated ardor for years, and culminated in the founding of 
the Arsenal Academy in Columbia, and Citadel in Charleston. 
The Arsenal was preparatory to the Citadel, and they were 
largely patronized until they were broken up by the war of 
1861-1865. Those schools turned out many useful and distin- 
guished men, versed in military affairs, and prepared to take 
the lead in the bloody contest of 1861-1865. Since the war 
(1882), the Citadel has been reorganized and is doing well, 
has an extensive patronage, and is turning out every year 
young men well educated and, especially in the arts of military 
life, prepared and equipped for service in any rank of military 
life, and competent to fill the highest positions in the army or 
honorable positions in civil life. It is one of the best schools 
in the State. The names of the sons of Marion County gradu- 
ating therein are hereinbefore given. 



86 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Not long after the Nullification struggle, the Whig party in 
the United States was formed. In 1836, that party nominated 
for the Presidency Hugh L. White, of Tennessee, and' the 
Democrats nominated Martin VanBuren, of New York. Van- 
Buren was elected. In that campaign. South Carolina was not 
much divided — she voted for VanBuren. In 1840, the Whig 
party had become very formidable. They nominated for the 
Presidency that year, William Henry Harrison, of Ohio, and 
for the Vice-Presidency, John Tyler, of Virginia. The Demo- 
crats nominated Martin VanBuren, of New York, for a second 
term, and Richard M. Johnson, for the Vice-Presidency. This 
campaign was called the "Log Cabin, Hard Cider, Coonskin 
and Red Pepper" campaign. In Nashville, Tenn., they actU'-* 
ally built a log cabin, put it on wheels, with a barrel of hard 
cider planted in the top of it, a picture of their candidate pic- 
tured on it astraddle of the barrel with a quill in his mouth 
sucking the cider from the bung of the barrel ; coon-skins and 
red pepper were hung all round the cabin, and the whole drawn 
through the streets of Nashville by four white horses. It was 
said in the newspapers of the day that Parson Brownlow, a 
Methodist preacher, and editor of a leading newspaper in 
Nashville, rode on top of the cabin, sucking cider out of the 
barrel with a quill, and gnawing the coon-skins — ^thus parading 
himself and his candidates through that refined city. And 
such emblems and "clap-trap" as that carried the election, not 
only in Tennessee, but in the United States. William Henry 
Harrison was, doubtless, a patriot and good man. The whole 
thing was gotten up, promulgated and carried through by his 
partisans, who were hungry for the "plums" of Federal pat- 
ronage. Unfortunately for the Whig party. President Harri- 
son lived only a month after his inauguration, and John Tyler, 
the Vice-President, became President, and proved to be about 
as good a Democrat as most public men belonging to the party! 
It is said that history repeats itself. John Tyler was with the 
Whig party only on one question, that of internal improvements 
by the government, and was nominated for the Vice-Presidiency 
as a matter of policy — that is, to carry Virginia, then a large 
State, in the electoral college. Virginia then included what is 
now West Virginia. So in 1864, during the war, the Repub- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 87 

licans nominated Andrew Johnson, a war Democrat, for the 
Vice-Presidency on the ticket with Abraham Lincoln, as a 
matter of policy to mollify the South and to carry not only 
Tennessee, Johnson's State, but perhaps other Democratic 
States, against George B. McClellan, the Democratic candidate. 
They succeeded in the election, but Lincoln lived oflly a little 
over a month after inauguration, and Andirew Johnson became 
President. The Republican Congress was caught just like the 
Whig Congress, elected in 1840, was by John Tyler. Tyler 
vetoed the favorite Acts of the Congress of 1841-2, and the 
party in Congress were not strong enoug'h to pass them' over 
the veto by a two-thirds vote. Not so in Andrew Johnson's 
case. He vetoed the Reconstruction Acts of Congress, and 
the Republicans were strong enough to pass them over the 
veto by a two-thirds majority. Johnson did all he could to 
save the South from the horrors of reconstruction, but the 
Congress was too strong for him. They tried to impeach him, 
and came within one vote of succeeding in their mad effort. 
Andrew Johnson was far from being the man the South 
would have wanted for President. The South, however, owes 
him a debt of gratitude, though in his grave, for what he 
strove to do in her favor. Too many Thad. Stevens then in 
Congress, whose hearts were bent on revenge. 

In the Log Cabiji, Coon-skin and Red Pepper campaign of 
1840, Marion District was about equally divided between the 
Democrats and the Whigs. There were strong men on both 
sides. The Whig candidates were, for the State Senate, Ben- 
jamin Cause, and for the House, Davidi Palmer, Henry Davis 
and Dr. Daniel Gilchrist. The Democratic candidates were, 
for the Senate, Addison L. Scarborough, and for the House, 
John C. Bethea, Hugh Godbold and William T. Wilson. The 
people were wrought up to the highest point. VanBuren's 
administration of the government was too extravagant. His 
administration of the government had cost on an average 
$60,000,000 a year. That was paraded in the newspapers and 
all through the country as being enormous. Another fad cir- 
culated was that he slept on a $1,500 bedstead, and had other 
conveniences in proportion. When, now sixty years after that 
period, an administration of the government costs on an aver- 
7 



88 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

age of $500,000,000 a year, when not engaged in a foreign 
war. Our people are standing all this reckless expenditure of 
money now, when our fathers and grand-fathers could not stand 
$60,000,000. President VanBuren's extravagant administra- 
tion, together with the coon-skin and 'hard cider "clap-trap," 
hurled VanBuren from power. What shall be done now in the 
campaign of 1900? In 1840, the result in Marion District was 
the election of Benjamin Gause to the Senate by eighteen votes ; 
David Palmer, Henry Davis and John C. Bethea were elected 
to the House. Among the six candidates for Representatives, 
there were not fifty votes between the highest and the lowest 
of the six. 

In the campaign of 1844, the Whigs and Democrats had 
another contest in Marion District. The respective parties had 
each its candidate for the Presidency. James K. Polk headed 
the Democratic party, and Henry Clay led the Whig party. 
Polk was elected President. The respective parties had each 
its candidates in Marion. Ex-Governor Dr. B. K. Henagan 
was the Democratic candidate for the Senate ; John C. Bethea, 
Barfield Moody and Chapman J. Crawford were the Democratic 
candidates for the House of Representatives. Senator Benja- 
min Gause was a candidate for re-election to the Senate as the 
Whig candidate; William H. Grice, John Woodberry and N. 
Philips, Esq., were the Whig candidates for the House. The 
campaign was conducted with spirit and dogged determina- 
tion — every exertion jx)ssible was made by each party for 
success. The result was that the Democratic ticket carried 
the county by a majority of 200 or more. The writer remem- 
bers that Henagan's majority over Gause was 204. The 
campaign that year (1844) lacked the "Coon-skin and Red 
Pepper" clap-trap of 1840 to give it success. The class of men 
carried by such clap-trap in 1840 were generally such as could 
be swerved and seduced from that path by silent and effective 
influences, no doubt used, which were powerless in 1844. The 
writer remembers hearing a remark made by Colonel W. H. 
Grice, one of the defeated candidates for the House, at Marion 
on the second day of the election, when it was ascertained 
that the Democratic ticket was elected entire, to this effect: 
That such a thing had never .before been beard of — ^the entire 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 89 

delegation from a district. Senator and Representatives, all be- 
longed to one family. The Senator, Dr. B. K. Henagan, and 
Representatives, Bethea, Moody and Crawford, were all con- 
nected with each other by blood or marriage. The wife of 
Barfield Moody was the aunt of John C. Bethea and Chapman 
J. Crawford, Bethea and Crawford were first cousins ; Craw- 
ford's father and Bethea's mother were brother and sister, 
and Moody's wife was a sister of Crawford^'s father and also 
of John C. Bethea's mother ; Bethea's name was John Crawford 
Bethea. The Senator-elect, Dr. B. K. Henagan's, mother was 
a Bethea. The result of the election verified Colonel Grice's 
remark; yet it was not a precoflcerted arrangement, — it was 
only a happen so. 

The election laws, at that time and for years before and after 
until the war, providted that elections should be held one day at 
each poll, including the court house poll, in the district, and on 
the next day the election should continue to be held at the 
court house. That on the second day, the managers from the 
out or country polls, or a majority of them, were required to 
carry in the votes from the out polls, respectively, to be counted 
whilst the election was going at the court house poll, and at the 
close of the court house poll it was counted and the result for 
the whole district was then declared. The practical operation 
of this arrangement of the election laws of the State opened 
the door to all sorts of combinations on the second day at the 
court house poll. Many times the candidate or candidates 
elected on the first day of election were beaten on the second 
day. Not more than half the votes would be polled at the 
court house on the first day, and many from the out polls would 
not vote the first day, but would go to Marion the second day, 
and after hearing from, perhaps, all the polls in the district 
as to how the election went the day 'before, were ready to form 
combinations to elect or to defeat certain -candidates, and vote 
accordingly. A heavy vote was thereby cast on the second 
day. It was not then, as now, an elector could vote at any 
precinct in the county, provided he could identify himself to 
the satisfaction of the managers, and take the required oath 
that he had not voted in the election at any other voting pre- 
cinct. The having one day's election at the out polls and two 



90 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

at the court house, was wrong in policy, as it often operated to 
defeat the will of the people; but allowing an elector to vote 
at any poll in the district, wherever he might happen to be 
on day of election, was right and good policy, and ought to be 
so now in 1900, provided he showed his registration certificate 
and takes the required oath. And it ought to be extended 
further. An elector ought to be allowed to vote at any precinct 
in the State for Governor and other State officers, and for a 
Representative in Congress at any voting precinct in his Con- 
gressional District, provided he identifies himself to the satis- 
faction of the managers by the production of his registration 
certificate and by other evidences, and takes the required oath. 
It often happens that a man's business or family necessities 
compel him on day of election to be somewhere else other than 
at his own poll. If so, by the law as it now is, he is disfran- 
chised, he is deprived of his right to vote. Our election and 
registration laws ought to be amended so as to avoid such dis- 
franchisement. Every man ought to have, and does have, the 
right to have his voice in choosing the makers and adtainistra- 
tors of the law under which he lives,- unless by crime or other 
disability he has forfeited that rig'ht. 

After the campaign of 1844, there was a lull in party strife, 
and each party seemed to merge into the other party ; discrimi- 
nation ceased and men were seemingly elected to office without 
any reference to past party affiliations till 1851 and 1852. In 
1 85 1, it was proposed to hold a Convention of the Southern 
or slave-holding States at Montgomery, Ala., to consult as to 
the most advisable course to protect themselves against the 
aggressions of the North on the institution of slavery. South 
Carolina was for separate State action, whether any other State 
joinedi,in or not. When I say South Carolina was for separate 
State action, I mean that was the proposition — Separate State 
Secession or Co-operate Secession — Secession or Co-operation. 
A popular election was held to elect delegates to the proposed 
Convention at Montgomery, Ala. It aroused a furor in the 
State. Excitement and strife permeated the whole State, from 
the mountains to the seaboard. The Co-operation party, as it 
was called, was in favor of secession, provided they could get 
the co-operation of the other slave States, or a majority of 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 91 

them; the Separate State Action party were in favor of the 
secession of South Carolina, Virhether any other Southern State 
seceded or not. Each party put out their respective candidates 
for delegates. T'he contest was bitter and strong ; animos'ities 
were engendered, party feeling was strained to its utmost 
tension. I do not recollect who the respective candidates were. 
The Co-operation party carried the district by thirty-five 
majority, and that party carried the State by a considerable 
majority. The Montgomery Convention was never held, and 
thus the matter ended; but the feelings, the animosities and 
jealousies engendered and aroused were not allayed, or seem- 
ingly modified, but continued through the next year, 1852, as 
bitter and unrelenting as ever. Each party was unwilling to 
trust the dther, and each party had out its candidates 'for the 
Senate and House the next year, 1852, in this, Marion District, 
and it was so throughout the State. Dr. Robert Harllee was 
the candidate of the Secession party for the Senate, and C. J. 
Crawford was the candidate of the Co-operation party for the 
same office. I do not remember the names of the candidates 
for the House. Dr. Harllee was elected to the Senate over 
Crawford by 171 majority. Dr. William R. Johnson, Colonel 
W. W. Durant 'and William S. MuUins were elected to the 
House of Representatives. Dr. Johnson was Secessionist, 
Durant and Mullins were Co-operationists. The Secession 
party had four candidates for the House to carry, and hence 
they elected but one of their ticket, Dr. Johnson. The bitter- 
ness engendered by the campaign gradually cooled down, and 
harmony and good feeling were restored. The party for 
Separate State Action believed and felt assured that if South 
Carolina acted alone, the other slave States would of necessity 
follow. The Co-operation party thought otherwise — that 
South Carolina should act only in conjunction with the other 
slave States. Both parties, doubtless, were honest. One 
party wanted to act at once, the other party wanted'to go slow, 
being more cautious. The writer believes that if we had acted 
then, either separately or unitedly, there would have been no 
attempt at coercion. The anti-slavery feeling of the North 
was not then as strong as it was in i860 and 1861. It was 
intensified and became more fanatical in each succeeding year 



92 A HISTORY 0]f MARION COUNTY. 

from 1852 to i860. Franklin Pierce was elected President in 
1852, and a Congress in accord with the views of Pierce. In- 
stead of coercion, some scheme of compromise would have been 
suggested and adopted, by which war would have then been 
averted, at least for a time, and maybe for all time. Slavery 
was bound to go, sooner or later, either peacefully or by the 
scourge of war. After 185 1 and 1852, there were no questions 
or issues to divide our people in South Carolina. But for the 
constant agitation of the slavery question in Congress, the 
people of the State were quiet and at ease. No division among 
themselves, nothing to disturb their equanimity of a political 
character. 

Marion District, during the last decade before the war be- 
tween the States, was steadily progressing on the different lines 
of civilized life to that proud eminence to which she has since 
attained, and which she now occupies. When the tocsin of 
war was sounded, she responded to the call of her section with 
an alacrity and an enthusiasm not excelled by, perhaps, any 
district in the State. However much she may have heretofore 
been divided and torn by factional issues and factional strife, 
she was almost a solid unit for the war, as the rolls of the 
companies from Marion District will show, hereinafter pub- 
lished. It is true, there were a few 5n Maple Swamp and in 
the lower part of Hillsboro Township, and perhaps a few in 
the Great Pee Dee slashes in Kirby Township, who failed and 
refused to respond to their country's call, but the great bulk 
of the young and middle-aged, and some passed the age of 
active military service, obeyed their country's call from motives 
of patriotism, and went to whatever place they were assigned, 
and wherever the exigencies of the times and service required, 
and sealed and demonstrated their devotion to their country's 
cause with their life's blood. Many left home and family and 
friends, never to return. The casualties of our late war with 
Spain and now going on in the Philippines, are but a bagatelle 
to the casualties in the Confederate War. In some of the great 
battles in Virginia and elsewhere, the casualties on each side ran 
up into the thousands. The casualties were generally much 
greater in the Federal army than in the Confederate army. All 
were Americans — all had learned the arts of warfare in the 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 93 

same school, and why should the casualties have been greater 
in the Northern army than in the Southern? The Northern 
army had greatly the advantage in numbers, in the character 
and calibre of their arms, in equipment of their soldiers and in 
their means and resources of every kind for successful war. 
It can be accounted for only upon the assumption that the 
Southern people as a whole have more pluck, more indomitable 
courage, more intrepidity and more diogged endurance than 
has the Northern people. With equal means, equal numbers 
and resources, the South would have won, and the war could 
not have lasted more than two years. Above all, our cause 
was just; the slavery question, although the proximate cause 
of the war, was subordinate to the great cause of the right of 
self-government, self-control. The Southern people were and 
are a homogeneous people, a chivalrous people — more of the 
Cavalier than the Puritan or Round-head, and under equal 
conditions make the best soldiers. Hence it was that the South 
resisted the overpowering forces of the North so successfully 
for so long a period — four years. The North never did whip 
the South by combat on the field, but by exhausting us and our 
resources. The world's history does not furnish a single 
example of such heroic endurance against such odds so suc- 
cessfully for so long a time, and Marion District did her full 
share in every way during the unparalleled struggle. She may 
truthfully say, magna pars fui, to the full extent of her capa- 
bilities. The war over, her men who had escaped the casualties 
and diseases and deaths incident and consequent upon it, 
having lost all, save honor, returned to their desolated and 
impoverished homes, with nothing to begin life again but 
strong arms and stout hearts. They found property gone (and 
what little remained had but little value), destitute homes, 
ragged children, in many cases no bread and other necessaries 
of life, and nothing to buy with. Their condition in many 
instances was deplorable indeed. Their poverty and want were 
more appalling than the enemy they had faced for four long 
years. The prospect foe living, for recuperation, was most 
gloomy. Our people, nothing daunted, went to work with 
such scanty means as they had or could procure, entered the 
school of hardship and self-denial with a hearty good will, and 



94 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

in a comparatively short time acquired the means necessary to 
supply their natural needs, and continuing to ply their energies 
under adverse circumstances, the horrors of reconstruction 
under an insolent soldiery, the people of the district gradiually 
recuperated, and not only supplied natural and pressing wants, 
but after reconstruction, though on a radical basis, began to 
accumulate the means of life,* as well as many of its comforts 
and enjoyments, and occasionally a surplus. Our troubles did 
not end by reconstruction, so-called, and the State Constitution 
of 1868. The institution of civil government did not displace 
the military, but it was continued for eight or nine years, or till 
April, 1877. Before every election, and at the meeting of the 
Legislature, so-called, a body of armed soldiers was sent here, 
for the purpose of intimidation, and to awe our citizens at the 
polls and, as the "powers that be" said, to protect the voters of 
the Republican party at elections, and to prevent as many 
Democrats as possible from exercising their right to vote. And 
on the meeting of the Legislature, the soldiers were the door- 
keepers, and allowed no one to enter, as a member, except such 
as were known Republicans; and some from counties, for in- 
stance, Horry County, where after the first three or four years 
it was impossible to elect a Republican. The soldiers were 
the judges of the election and election returns, and were the 
actual returning boards of both county and State ; were judges 
of not only the election of members to the House and Senate, 
but also of their qualifications ; and the only qualification neces- 
sary for admission to a seat in either House, if a white man, 
was that he was a Republican, a "carpet-bagger" or "scala- 
wag ;" if a negro, that his skin was blac!k or tan colored. So 
far as the negro member was concerned, he was nothing more 
than a puppet in the hands of those who led and controlled the 
body, and at least five-sixths of the members were negroes. 
There were a few leading negroes, such as W. J. Whipper, of 
Beaufort, Beverly Nash, of Richland, S. A. Swails, of Wil- 
liamsburg, Henry E. Hayne, of Marion, H. J. Maxwell, of 
Marlborough, and some other negroes, who were the lieuten- 
ants of such men as Scott, Moses, Leslie, John J. Patterson, H. 
C. Corbin and the Mackeys, and perhaps some others. These 
latter did the planning as to when and how to steal, and their 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 95 

lieutenants put the plans into execution. The ignorant rabble 
in the Legislature were voted as occasion might require. Such 
a carnival of plunder, under the forms of law, was never wit- 
nessed before. Open and shameless bribery was the order of 
the day, and the bribes were paid from the pubHc treasury. 
Every man had his price — verifying the assertion of Robert 
Walpole, of England. The 'bribes paid in South Carolina were 
from $S,ooo down to $200. Every man was paid according to 
his supposed influence. Henry E. Hayne, first a Senator from 
Marion County, and then Secretary of State, built a fine house 
in Marion, now owned and occupied by Mr. James Baker, and 
had it finely furnished. Whilst he was hauling up the furni- 
ture from the depot at Marion, the writer heard him say that it 
(the furniture) was a present to his mother from a friend of 
hers. Each one of those mentioned above, including B. F. 
Whittemore, a Massachusetts carpet-bagger, representing Dar- 
lington County in the Senate, received $5,000; others $2,000, 
$1,000, $500 and $200. I would mention the names of some 
of the scalawags in Marion, but out of respect to the families 
or descendants of some of them, the writer forbears, knowing 
that the present generation' is not responsible for what was 
then done. 

When the white people, the taxpayers of the State, got pos- 
session of the Legislature and the executive departments of the 
government by the election in 1876 (ever to be remembered) , 
a Fraud Commission was appointed to investigate and unearth 
the frauds and stealage for the then past eight years. One 
Josephus Woodruff, who had been and was Clerk of the Senate, 
turned evidence against his party, or against the party who 
had been in power. It seems he kept a little book, called at the 
time a "whirligig book," in which many of the stealings were 
entered — I suppose it was stenographically entered — each 
man's name, and how much he was paid, and what he had 
been paid. When that Committee made its- report, our own 
people were astonished. They knew that fraud and stealing 
had been going on, but to what extent was unknown. A stam- 
pede from the State of many of the leaders, white and colored, 
took place at once. Whittemore, then in the State Senate from 
Darlington, fled never to return ; the same of Moses ( F. J., Jr. ) , 



96 A HISTORY Of MARION COUNTY. 

R. K. Scott, H. E. Hayne, S. A. Swails, and', in short, the 
whole gang of the leaders, the biggest rogues, fled the State, 
and in a few months time they were all gone. "A guilty con- 
science makes cowards of us all." Henry E. Hayne left Co- 
lumbia and went down to Marion, his home, and where his 
mother lived, and was so badly frightened that he did not 
spend the night there, but left the same night and, as the writer 
understands it,, has never returned. "He left his country 'for 
his country's good." We can spare him. The particular 
stealings aibov^ mentioned were not all, by many, that occurred 
during the eight years of radical rule and high carnival. These 
were the bribes given and taken to pass a certain financial 
scheme by which the State was robbed and to be robbed of 
millions. In the early part of their career they did not seem 
so rapacious^ — ^more modest in their actings and doings ; but as 
time went on, the disguise was thrown off, and they became 
familiar with crime and theft; and growing more rapacious, 
they did not hesitate to take it by thousands, when at first they 
were afraid of being caught, and being somewhat squeamish, 
they would take only by littles, by hundreds ; now in or near 
the end of their reign, they could and did take it by thousands ; 
and no doubt thinking that their hold on the State could not be 
broken — that their lease of power was well secured to them for 
all time to come, or at least for a long time — ^they were the 
more ready to embark into stealing enterprises on a large scale. 
Hence this voracious greed for money could not be satiated 
with small amounts. It took more and more to satisfy them. 
Wresting the State from them in 1876 was a complete surprise 
to them — they had no idea of defeat. On the 15th August, 
1876, D. H. Chamberlain, their candidate for Gtovernor, said in 
a public speech in Marion that day, that the Republican party 
would carry the State by 40,000 majority. In other words, 
that be would be elected by that majority. There are many 
now living who heard him say it. Hence the Hampton cam- 
paign success was a great and fatal surprise to them. 

In 1868, at the first election under the Constitution of that 
year, Henry E. Hayne, a mulatto negro, was elected to the 
State Senate. I am not certain as to who were elected as 
Representatives, but think it was B. E. Thompson, Ebben Hays 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 97 

(white) and W. S. Collins (white) ; the white men were called 
scalawags. In 1870, only Representatives were elected. The 
Democrats put out a ticket that year and succeeded in electing 
it, to wit : Rev. Joel Allen, F. A. Miles, Dr. Thomas R. Bass 
and John C. Sellers. They were elected by a majority of from 
150 to 180. They would, doubtless, have been counted out 
by the Returning Board for the county, had they not been put 
in fear. Some half dozen or more of our citizens, headed by 
Major S. A. Durham, waited upon R. F. Graham, C. Smith 
and others, leading lights of the Radical party, the night before 
the returns of election were to 'be canvassed the next day, and 
told them that they knew the Democratic ticket entire was 
elected, and if they were counted out, the lives of the canvassers 
would be taken at once. Major Durham and his associates 
were appointed a committee to wait on the Board of Canvass- 
ers, and) so say to them, by an impromptu meeting of citizens 
in the town of Marion. This prompt action on the part of the 
Democrats had the desired effect, and thus saved Democratic 
representation to and from the county. Our Representatives 
could do nothing in the I,egislature when they were there. 
They could only watch the Radicals and block, as far as pos- 
sible, any hurtful legislation atteriipted. There were only 
about twenty Democrats in that Legislature. 

In 1872, the Democrats and Republicans each had their 
tickets in the field for Marion County. A strong effort was 
made, but the Republicans having the whole machinery of elec- 
tion in their hands, succeeded by fraud and by counting in their 
candidates. Williaan S. MuUins was the candidate for the 
Senate on the part of the Democrats, and C. Smith on the 
part of the Radicals. Henry E. Hayne, the former Senator, 
was elected that year Secretary of State. The Democrats 
elected every one of their candidates, but they were all counted 
out, and the Radicals counted in. Kukluxism had been doing 
its bloody wt>rk in some parts of the State, and the power of 
the United States was being invoked to suppress and punish 
it, and that to some extent awed our people and deterred them 
from going as far in 1872 as they would have gone in 1870. 
Hence the counting out of our candidates in 1872 was submit- 
ted to. We had a full Radical set of county officers and Sena- 



98 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

tor and Representatives. Incompetency in office and greed for 
money ruled the times. Crime was everywhere rampant, not 
only in Marion County, but throughout the State. The State 
was called the "prostrate State" — ^she was powerless every- 
where. In 1872, three negroes, Jonas Deas, Lawrence Mills 
and Enos Reeves, were elected County Commissioners for 
Marion County. Ignorant and corrupt, they knew nothing 
whatever about the duties of the office, nothing about finances, 
except to steal them. For the year 1874, they fixed the county 
taxes so high that they, with the State levy, made the taxes for 
Marion County $100,000, whereas they should not have ex- 
ceeded $40,000, county and State. In consequence of which a 
public meeting of the citizens and taxpayers was held at Marion 
on salesday in January, 1874. The Legislature was then in 
session ; our situation was discussed, and resulted in appointing 
a committee of our citizens to go to Columbia and memorialize 
the Legislature on the subject, and to pray that body for relief. 
The committee appointed to perform that duty was comfK>sed of 
Major A. J. Shaw (afterwards Judge), A. Q. McDuffie, J. M. 
Johnson, T. C. Moody and W. W. Sellers. The committee re- 
paired to Columbia. We consulted our own delegation and the 
leaders, or some of them, in the House and Senate, and heard 
their suggestions. We drew up a strong memorial for the 
House and Senate, setting forth our grievances and the relief 
sought, in a respectful manner, avoiding or refraining from 
saying anything that would give offence or exhibit any partisan 
feeling — remembering the old adage, "that when your hand 
is in the lion's mouth, it won't do to twist his tail." We had 
the memorial printed and placed copies in the hands of our 
delegation, and they were introduced simultaneously into the 
House and Senate, and were referred to the respective Judici- 
ary Committees of the House and Senate. By appointment 
of those Committees we went before them and were courteously 
received. Major A. J. Shaw, the Chairman of our committee, 
was our spokesman before the Judiciary Committees. The facts 
were very fully stated, both in the memorials and in the state- 
ments made by Major Shaw. We remained in Columbia about 
a week, talking with different members of other delegations 
and with our own, when we left and returned home, feeling 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 99 

very well assured that our mission there woflld be successful. 
The final result was the passing of an Act for our relief, and 
a reduction was made of the taxes for that year from fifty to 
sixty per cent., and was so arranged as to benefit only those 
taxpayers whose property was valued too high. For on inspec- 
tion of the Auditor's books, there were those whose property 
was not valued too high and, of course, those did not share in 
the reduction. It saved some of our people a great deal, while 
it saved to others less. It saved to General William Evans 
over $200, to William S. EUerbe near $250 ; one Mr. Sinclair 
(w^hose first name is not remembeied) was assessed at $89 
amount to be paid, and; by the reduction made it was less than 
$30. Thus it 1-an, some saving much and some less. All this 
trouble and expense were incurred' by the ignorance and incom- 
petency of the three negro County Commissioners for the 
county, and it is not improbable that they desired a heavy 
collection of taxes that they might have a larger pile to steal 
from. This is inferred from the fact that they were afterwards 
indicted for embezzlement of the public funds, tried by a Re- 
publican Court, prosecuted! by a Republican Solicitor and a 
jury, a majority of whom were negroes, and were convicted 
and sentenced to terms, each, of imprisonment for a number 
of months not now remembered' — some for longer terms than 
others. Jonas Deas, the Chairman of the Board, got the 
longest term. 

In 1874, there was a sort of compromise in Marion County 
between the parties, by which the white people of the county 
had two Representatives and' the Republicans two. The Rep- 
resentatives elected' that year were ex-Chancellor W. D. John- 
son and Colonel R. G. Howard, and William E. Hayne and 
Anthony Howard — the two former for the whites and the two 
latter for the Republicans. During that legislative term Judge 
Green (a Republican) died, which left the Third Circuit with- 
out a Judge. His place was filled by the election of A. J. 
Shaw, Esq., then a resident citizen of Marion, and a Democrat. 
The Representatives from Marion voted for him, and it was 
said, and truthfully said, that W. E. Hayne, one of the Repub- 
lican Representatives from Marion, did his best for the election 
of Shaw as Judge, and' was fully appreciated by the citizens of 



100 A HISTORY OJP MARION COUNTY. 

Marion and of the Third Judicial Circuit, and also by the people 
of the State. Daniel H. Chamberlain, Republican, was Gover- 
nor from 1874 to 1876, and during his term as Governor there 
were two other vacant judgeships, and W. J. Whipper and 
Franklin J. Moses, Jr., were elected to fill those vacancies, at 
which the whole State was very much mortified and humiliated ; 
but, to the surprise and great relief of the white people of the 
State, Governor Chamberlain refused to commission them, on 
the ground of their want of moral character, and thus the State 
was saved from the infliction. Chamberlain was a man of 
courage, otherwise he would not have dared to refuse their 
commissions. Chamberlain was a decent Republican and a 
gentleman. He had been first elected Attorney tieneral of the 
State and then Governor by the Republican party. It took 
courage to oppose the will of the Legislature expressed in the 
election of said men as Judges. Very few in the party, if any, 
would have thus flown in the face of the party as Chamberlain 
did. He was a Northern man, a graduate of Yale College, a 
fine scholar and a brainy man. He did many things while 
Governor which the white people favored, and by which he 
ingratiated himself into the favor of many of our good and 
leading men. In the campaign of 1876, Chamberlain was 
again nominated by the Republicans for a second term as Gov- 
ernor. The people of the State were sick and tired of Radical 
carpet-bag rule, and anxious to make the fight for its over- 
throw. Many good men in the State were fearful that if the 
fight was made that it would fail, and our condition would 
thereby be madte more intolerable; that as Chamberlain had 
made a pretty good Governor, we had better acquiesce in his 
nomination and election, than to run the risk. This was the 
idea of many very good men, who were opposed to making the 
contest. "The Straightouts," as they were called, were for 
making the contest, and gain all or lose all ; that if they were 
beaten, it could not and would not make our condition any 
worse. Strong men were on each side of the question. A 
Democratic State Convention was called to meet in Columbia 
on 15th August, 1876. Each and every county in the State 
was represented in the Convention, and the election of a Chair- 
man or President of the Convention was made the test of the 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 101 

Strength of the respective sides. The "Straightouts" nomi- 
nated General W. W. Harllee, of Marion, for .Chairman, and 
the Chamberlain men nominated C. H. Simonton, of Charles- 
ton (now Judge), for Chairman. Upon a strict party vote. 
General Harllee was elected Chairman by thirteen majority. 
The Convention made nominations for Governor, Lieutenant- 
Governor and State officers, including Solicitors, and perhaps 
Congressmen. General Wade Hampton was nominated for 
Governor and W. D. Simpson for Lieutenant-Governor. The 
Chamberlain men wheeled right into line. They were just as 
good men as the "Straightouts," only were not as sanguine as 
to results as were the "Straightouts." The delegation from 
Marion were all "Straightouts," the only county in the Pee 
Dee section that sent such. The whole State was a unit, and 
in a blaze with enthusiasm. Never before within the memory 
of the writer was there such unanimity and such united effort. 
The campaign meetings were attended by the whole people 
throughout the State. No "coon-skins, hard cider or red 
pepper clap-trap" were resorted to. Nothing but red shirts, 
and cavalcades, and bands of music, marked the campaign. To 
defeat the Radical party and to rescue the State from its 
clutches were the aim and end to be attained. To do this, it 
was necessary to carry a great portion of the negro vote, and 
we did carry enough of it to turn the scale. A red shirt was 
the badge, and it was not uncommon in Marion to see in the 
cavalcades of the day as many as fifty to a hundred negroes, 
mounted on horseback in the cavalcades, with red shirts on, in 
procession with the white folks. The red shirts and horses in 
most instances were furnished them by the white people. He 
was then committed to the Hampton ticket, and could not go 
back on it. The business of the country was for the time pretty 
much abandoned. Men rode day and night with the red shirt 
insignia of the times on. No doubt, that some excesses were 
committed by the less considerate of our people, but not often 
to the injury of the common cause. Speech-making to gather- 
ings of the people was the order of the day, and they were 
attended by the people in crowds. Never before in the memory 
of man, had there been such intensified determination mani- 
fested. It was not much less than a struggle for life. Cham.- 



102 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

berlain, the Republican candidate for Governor, in a speech 
delivered at Marion on the very day of the meeting of our 
Convention in Columbia, said that he would carry the State by 
40,000 majority, we suppose he was about correct, counting 
every n«gro voter a Republican. To elect our ticket we must 
carry with us more than 20,000 negro voters — and we think 
that many were carried. The Hampton ticket was on white 
paper, the Radical ticket was on pink colored paper — all kept 
secret from the opposite party. A few days before the election, 
Captain Daggett, of Horry, managed to get hold of one of their 
tickets, it was immediately sent to Charleston (News and 
Courier), thousand's of them were printed with the names of 
our candidates on them, and on the morning of election day 
they were at every voting precinct in the State. That discovery 
and its immediate sequel was a protection to the negro voter 
for the Hampton ticket. There were many negroes willing to, 
and wanted to, vote that ticket, but were afraid to do so — were 
afraid of their own people, and especially of their neighbor- 
hood leaders ; and dbubtless thousands of those red tickets, with 
the Hampton candidates' names upon them, were that day (7th 
November, 1876), voted. Those red tickets turned the elec- 
tion, by which the people of the State were redeemed from the 
curse and hateful, ruinous rule of the carpet-bagger, scalawag 
and the ignorant negro. How or by what means Captain 
Daggett came into possession of that red ticket, with its eagle 
emblem upon it, we do not know, nor do we care to know. 
The tickets were sent to leaders in every county in the State, 
with an injunction of secrecy, to let no White man see them or 
to get hold of them. No doubt Captain Daggett knew the 
leaders in his county, Horry — ^he knew who was approachable 
and 'by what means. He accomplished his purposes for the 
good of his adopted State, and thereby his State was redeemed. 
To him should be erected a monument in the hearts of the 
people of the State more enduring than brass and marble.- He 
was afterwards honored by the citizens of Horry with a seat 
in the State Senate, an honor not at all commensurate with the 
daring courage which animated his patriotic bosom to do or to 
die. Captain Dagget has been dead for several years, has 
gone to his reward — "Requiescat in pace." The election in the 



A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 103 

State for Gtovernor was pretty close. Hampton's majority, as 
claimed and his claim was sustained, was 1,134. Marion 
County was carried overwhelmingly for the Hampton ticket. 
Marion did her full share in the contest and she did no more 
than the other counties in the State — all were strained to the 
utmost. There were elected in the State, also, majorities for 
the Senate and House of Representatives. There were bitter 
contests in the Supreme Court for the offices. Chamberlain and 
State officers on his ticket claimed to have been elected. For a 
While there were two Houses of Representatives, each organ- 
ized with a Speaker and other officers. Both bodies, for two 
or three days, had possession of the. Representative Hall, both 
Speakers-elect occupied the Speaker's chair. William H. 
Wallace was Speaker of the Democratic House, afterwards a 
Judge. E. W. M. Mackey, of Charleston, was Speaker of the 
Republican House. They clashed and blocked each other for 
two or three days and nights without leaving the House — took 
their meals there, furnished by the respective friends outsidte. 
In the meantime, thousands of our people had assembled out- 
side the State House. Every man was well armed and ready 
for the fray. A company of United States soldiers were sta- 
tioned in Columbia, and a detachment of them was in the State 
House with their guns and bayonets. General Hampton made 
a speech from the steps of the Capitol to our people, in whidi 
he assured them he would be Governor, and advised that they 
commit no act of violence nor provoke any hostilities. His 
head was cool and level. Such was the confidence the people 
had in him, they took his advice and left for their homes. Our 
legislative House quietly withdrew from the Capitol building 
and went to some other house in town and held their sessions 
there. The Court was composed of F. J. Moses, Chief Justice, . 
a Republican, A. J. Willard, a carpet-bag Judge, though an 
able man, and J. J. Wright, a negro Judge. This Court, con- 
stituted as it was, or a majority of them, decidted the various 
questions springing out of the late elections in favor of the 
Democrats, and when Rutherford B. Hayes, the President- 
elect, was inaugurated to the Presidency, the military troops 
were ordered to leave Columbia, and did leave. Chamberlain 
at once vacated the executive chamber, and left the whole 
8 



104 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

State House open for the Democratic Legislature and Demo- 
cratic State officials. Thus ended the struggle, and thus 
ended the reign of the carpet-bag government, to the great joy 
and satisfaction of the people. This consummation proved the 
sagacity and wisdbm of our leader, Wade Hampton, when he 
advised, in his speech above alluded to, the people to do nothing 
rash, to be quiet and to go home, with his assurance that he 
would be Governor. But for the magic of his name and 
character, the State might have been till this day under Repub- 
lican rule, and maybe the rule of the bayonet. This much has 
been said about carpet-bagism, reconstruction, the profligacy 
of the Radical regime, and the State's redemption in 1876, not 
so much for the present generation, as most of them were the 
subjects and actors, and participants in the governmental occur- 
rences of the last twenty-five or thirty years, but that some faint 
sketch of it might be put in book form, for the sons and 
diaughters of the next and future generations to read and 
ponder. The one-hundredth part has not been told — in fact, 
it can never all be told. 

The Barly Settlement of Marion County. 

This part of the Province of South Carolina, Craven County, 
was not much settled until about 1735. When Queensborough 
Township was laid off wholly in Marion County, in 1731 and 
1732, there was not a settlement within it ; but below that town- 
ship, and between the two rivers, Great and Little Pee Dee, 
according to well authenticated tradition, there were some set- 
tlements before that time. Mr. M. M. Lowrimore, of Wood- 
berry Township, has furnished the writer with some interest- 
ing facts about the first settlement of that part of the county, 
Britton's Neck, below the old Britton's Neck Church of the 
present day (about which church more may be said herein- 
after). The writer is also indebted to Mrs. Margaret F. 
Johnson, widow of the late Hugh R. Johnson, near Nichols, S. 
C, and who was the daughter of the late General William 
Woodberry, of Britton's Neck, for valuable and interesting 
information about the Woodberry family. From these two 
sources, viz: letter of Mr. M. M. Lowrimore and letter of 
Mrs. Margaret F. Johnson, the writer gleans the following: 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 105 

"Some time in the early part of 1700, there came from Ireland 
some people by the name of Michalls, 'not McAU,' and 
settled on a point of land now called the 'Tan-yard.' Their 
occupation in their native land was that of tanners. After 
coming to this country, finding gcune so numerous, they be- 
came great hunters, and to carry on their trade they erected a 
tan-yard just one mile a:bove the mouth of Little Pee Dee 
River, on the bank of the Great Pee Dee. They killed game, 
then plentiful of all kinds and sorts, bought hides from others, 
tanned them and sold the leather to the early planters in that 
region and on the Waccamaw Neck. What became of the 
Michalls is unknown; the signs of the tan-yard erected by 
them were there for many years afterwards, and may be seen 
there even yet. The place is known now as the 'tan-yard.' 
The name of Michall is now extinct in the county." Mr. 
Lowrimore says: "About 17 10, there came over a goodly 
number from Great Britain, and thereby they were called the 
Brittons or Brittains." This would imply that the whole col- 
ony, whatever might be their individual names, were called the 
"Brittons" or "Brittains." The time of this settlement ante- 
dates the settlement made twenty-five years afterward, as 
spoken of by Bishop Gregg in his book, p. 69 There possibly 
may have been two emigrations in those early times to that 
part of the county (Craven). Mr. Lowrimore says: "They 
commenced settling at the lower mouth of Jordan's Lake. 
Their occupations were planting corn, peas, potatoes, rye, oats, 
wheat and flax, raised hogs, sheep, goats and cattle ; lived high 
on fish and honey, and wore otter-skin coats." If Mr. Lowri- 
more is correct, and the writer sees no reason to discredit him, 
this applies to the colony of 1710, called "Brittons" or "Brit- 
tains." Mr. Lowrimore further says: "About 1734, a number 
of Lowrimores with their wives came over from Ireland. 
Their trade was blacksmith and house carpentering. My 
great-grand-father was the blacksmith. Some of them went 
off to the rice countries and got rich, and lost it all by bad 
management. My grand-father, W. James Lowrimore, was a 
blacksmith, which trade my father, Robert Lowrimore, 
learned." The writer regrets that he has not been able to see 
Mr. Lowrimore, and learn more of the Lowrimore family — 



106 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

whom they married, how many children they raised, and their 
names, and what their successes in life were, and what has 
become of them. The writer has met with the present M. M. 
Lowrimore in times past, but not lately. He is advancing in 
life, perhaps seventy years' old, an excellent man, in fact, no 
ordiinary man, considering his want of opportunities and his 
environments. He and his immediate family are the only ones 
by the name known now to be in the county. In his very 
interesting letter to the writer, he says nothing about his fam- 
ily, except as above quoted, and nothing at all about his own 
immediate family, or whether he has any children or otherwise. 
There are several of the name in Horry County, who the 
writer supposes to be lineally or collaterally related to him. 
M. M. Lowrimore is a patriot and true man; if he has any 
family of his own, he is too modest to say anything about them. 
He is a remarkable antiquarian, and it is natural with him, not 
acquired, as his early educational opportunities were quite 
limited. Mr. Lowrimore continues : "Later on came a Capps, 
a farmer; next a family of Augustines, bee-tree hunters 
and hunters generally. This is on a lonely island between 
Jordan's Lake and the Great Pee Dee. Also an adjacent 
island was settled by a family of Hunters, a hunter by name and 
by trade. These islands go by the names of Augustine and 
Hunter's Islands. In 1734, came in a family of Kibber (or 
Kibler), occupation as others. All this on the Great Pee Dee. 
On Little Pee Dee, a man from England settled near its waters, 
by the name of Parker. Next a family of Colemans and a 
man by the name of Jerry Touchberry ; the Brittons at Hickory 
Hill. Next on the Little Pee Dee River, a family of the Wood- 
berrys, who raisied hogs and cattle fof market, made indigo, 
met the trading vessels and changed off indigo pound for 
pound of negro weighed naked (so much for the Woodberrys). 
Next the Okes did likewise also. About 1760, the Munner- 
lyns (Irish), farmers and stock raisers, planted indigo, rice, 
oats, wheat and tobacco, raised orchards, beat cider." Mr. 
Lowrimore proceeds: "Next was a number of Williams^ — I 
know not where from. They lived chiefly by raising stock 
and driving it to market. Near the Great Pee Dee, a family 
of Rays, near the place that you know that is called Ray's 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 107 

Causeway, on the road leading from Britton's Neck to the Ark 
Church. Also, the old Jenkins lived in there, too. There is 
where old" Mrs. Jenkins drank the toast to the British officer, 
when she told him she had three sons in the war, and she 
wished that she had three thousand. Another settlement which 
I forgot to note was old James Crockett, an old Englishman, 
came and settled on Little Pee Dee, near what is known as 
Pawley's Camps, the place where old Tory Pawley hid when 
old General Marion was ransacking this part of the country for 
the Tories. But the said Crockett obtained a warrant, and in 
1734, he took up and had granted' to him a tract of land. I 
have had the old plat and grant in my hand many times. This 
then was called Craven County. I have not gone above the 
road leading to Britton's Neck Ohurch. The Graves that lived 
on the road, you can get knowledge of than and the old Davises 
and Mapp Claff." The old gentleman, Mr. M. M. Lowrimore, 
closes above quoted letter in these words, verbatim et literatim: 

"Mr. Sellers, I take great pleasure in replying to you it was 
a Great strain on the mind, I did as best I could under the 
present circumstance please write to me if it is any profit to 
you or not, excuse mistakes and blunders, as I am no Gramma- 
reon In those old days the rattlesnakes were numberous I give 
you a receipt for the cure of Rattlesnake bite take one handful 
of parsley leaves one of Hoar hound leaves, beat up and squice 
(or) squix through one pint of new milk, add a lump of allum 
as big as a hulled hickory nut, give at draught" (he doesn't say 
how much) "When this you remember an old friend." Yours 
M. M. Lowrimore." 

"address Smiths Mills, S. C." 

The writer cannot adequately express his appreciation of the 
above quoted letter, coming from the man it did. Now as to 
the different settlers mentioned in Mr. Lowrimore's letter. 
The Michalls, of "tan-yard" notoriety, have long since disap- 
peared. It is not improbable that the name Michall, as given 
by Mr. Lowrimore, is the same as Mikell (a family), noticed 
by Bishop Gregg, pages 89 and 90, and notes, as coming to the 
Upper Pee Dee in 1756, two brothers, John and William. The 
difference is in the spelling, but idem sonans. One of these 
was killed during the Revolutionary War by a Tory ; the other 



108 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

survived that struggle. John, the elder brother, settled on the 
west side of the river, a few miles above Long Bluff. Gregg 
says hfe became a Major in the Revolutionary War, and was a 
man of decided character.^ It is not stated by Gregg where 
the Mikells came from, and it may be when the Michalls broke 
up from the "tan-yard," that they moved up the river on the 
west side in 1756, as stated by Bishop Gregg. At any rate, 
the suggestion is made for what it is worth. There are no 
Michalls in Britton's Neck now, nor has there been within the 
memory of the writer. As to the Lowrimores, the writer has 
already said all he knows about them. Now as to the colony 
of English spoken of by Lowrimore as coming into Britton's 
Neck about the year 1710, and coming from England, 
"thereby" called "Brittons" or "Brittains." They were differ- 
ent from the Brittons by name, as settling down there about 
1735 or 1736, by Bishop Gregg (page 69), who says: "About 
the time John Godbold came to Pee Dee, two important settle- 
ments were made in that region. One of these was in Britton's 
Neck, twenty miles below Mar's Bluff and forty miles above 
Georgetown." "It was composed of the families of Britton, 
Graves, Fladger, Davis, Tyler, Giles and others. They came 
directly from England as one colony." Further notice of this 
colony will be taken by the writer hereinafter. As to the 
"Brittons" mentioned by Mr. Lowrimore, of 1710, and those 
mentioned by Bishop Gregg, of 1735, are they the same, or 
were there two emigrations by the name of Britton? Both 
may be correct, or one of them is in error, and if so, which one? 
Neither Bishop Gregg nor Mr. L/owrimore were cotemporaries 
with the Brittons, and, therefore, both dependted on informa- 
tion derived from tradition. Bishop Gregg was a man of 
scholarly ability ; Mr. Lowrimore was to the "manor born," a 
lineal descendant of some of the "Lowrimores with their 
wives," who came there in 1734 from Ireland, and M. M. Low- 
rimore got his information in the traditions of his family, 
handed down from the great-grand-father to the grand-father, 
and from him to the father, Robert Lowrimore, and from the 
father, Robert, to the son, M. M. Lowrimore. Bishop Gregg 
obtained his information (traditional) from the late Hugh 
Godlboldi, of Marion District — says so, in a note on page 69. 



- A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 109 

The writer will not undertake to decide between them, but 
leaves it to the reader to decide for himself. 

As to the Capps, spoken of by Mr. L,owrimore as coming 
later, who he says was a farmer, the writer supposes he is and 
was the progenitor of the family by that name now living, 
and has been for a century, below Marion Court House. If he 
was not the progenitor of them, it is altogether unknown what 
became of the one mentioned by Mr. lyowrimore. As to the 
Augustines and Huntets, mentioned by Mr. Lowrimore as set- 
tling there in those early times, the writer knows nothing ; he 
is not informed as to what became of them. No such name as 
Augustine is now in Marion Ck>unty, nor has there been since 
his recollection. The name has disappeared; as also the 
Hunters, so far as Marion County is concerned. There are 
Hunters in Florence and Darlington Counties, who, it is not 
improbable, descended from the Hunter family or families, 
mentioned by Mr. Lowrimore as settling in Britton's Neck. 

Mr. Lowrimore says, in 1734, a family by the name of 
"Kibler or Kibber" came in and settled there ; that name is also 
extinct in Marion County. He says all the foregoing settle- 
ments were made on the Great Pee Dee. He says : "On Little 
Pee Dee, a man from England settled near its waters by the 
name of Parker. Next a family of Coleman, and a man by the 
name of Jerry Touchberry; the Brittons at Hickory Hill." 
Parker is a name that has been long and favorably known in 
Marion County; the Parker family reside on the west side of 
the Great Pee Dee, in w'hat is now Florence County, formerly 
in Marion. There is also a family of Parkers in Marlboroug'h 
County, quite respectable. The family in both counties have 
extensive connections, and are here to stay. In the absence 
of other information, it is probable that the family in both 
counties sprang from the one who settled about 1734 in Brit- 
ton's Neck. The name of Touchberry is not in Marion County 
now. The name of Britton is also extinct in this county, and 
has been for years, though they have connections here not 
bearing the name. Time and circumstantial conditions effect 
wonderful changes — ^at least, in 165 years — and often leave no 
trace or remembrance of families or conditions. All terrestrial 
things are transitory and passing into the shades of oblivion. 



110 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Mr. Ivowrimore says : "Next on Little Pee Dee River, a family 
of the Woodlberrys (came), who raised hogs and cattle for 
market, made indigo, met the trading vessels and' changed off 
indigo pound for pound of negro weig'hed naked." 

The writer received a letter from Mrs. Hugh R. Johnson, 
who was a daughter of the late General Wm. Woodberry, of 
Britton's Neck, in which she says: "The Woodherrys (two 
brothers), Richard and Jionah, came from Socastee — I can't 
give the date ; they settled in Britton's Neck, where they found 
several brothers by the name of Britton, who were large land 
and slave owners. Richard Woodberry, my grand-father, 
married Miss Lizzie Balloon, on Black River. They brought 
up two sons and three daughters; one of the sons was my 
father, the well known General Wm. Woodberry. General 
Woodberry was born January loth, 1788, and died January 
31st, 1851. I have beard my father say that about 1815, the 
Brittons sold out and moved to Sumter County, except Dr. 
Tom Britton, who had married Margaret, one of the General's 
sisters ; she died childless. Fannie, another one of the sisters, 
married Sam. Wilson; she also died without children. The 
other sister married the Rev. Jeremiah Norman, of North Caro- 
lina ; Mrs. John Woodberry and Mrs. James Jenkins, and Sam- 
uel Norman, of Horry, were their children. Richardi Wood- 
berry, the General's only brother, married Miss Desda Davis; 
their children were John and Washington, Mrs. Benjamin 
Gause and Mrs. John Gause. General Woodberry's first wife 
was Miss Hannah Davis; they had four children, all dying 
quite young. His second wife was Miss Sarah Johnson, of 
Horry ; they brought up four sons and four daug'hters, all of 
whom except one daughter married and reared families, but I 
expect you know as much about them as I do." 

Mr. Lowrimore says: "Next the Okes did likewise all" — 
that is, as I construe it, they did like the Woodberrys — "raised 
hogs and cattle for market, made indigo, met the trading ves- 
sels and changed off indigo pound for pound of negro weig'hed 
naked." As to this name, "Okes," there is no record of such 
name in the county anywhere, as the writer has ever seen. 
The name may be included in the word "others," mentioned by 
Bishop Gregg, on p. 69, where he mentions the settlement in 



A HISTORY OF MAmON COUNTY. Ill 

Britton's N©ck of 1735, and gives the names of several of 
those early settlers there and concludes with the words "and 
others." The name has entirely disappeared, if it ever existed. 
Mr. Lowrimore says: "About 1760, the Munnerlyns (Irish), 
farmers and stock raisers, planted indigo, rice, oats, wheat and 
tobacco, raised orchards, beat cider." They settled in Brit- 
ton's Neck ; there are none there now by that name. It is very 
probable that the Munnerlyn family, the Rev. Thomas M. Mun- 
nerlyn, who lived up near Ariel Church for many years, and 
raised a family there, and died there some twenty years ago, 
was a descenidlant of the Munnerlyn spoken of by Mr. Lowri- 
more. The Rev. Thomas M. Munnerlyn had a son, Thomas 
W. Munnerlyn, who became an itinerant Methodist preacher, 
and who died in 1898 and was buried at Smithville, S. C. 
(Minutes of the Conference, 1899, held at Orangeburg, S. C), 
a son named George, who emigrated West some years ago, 
and a daughter, who married the late R. Z. Harllee ; he and wife 
are both dead„ The Munnerlyn family were quite respectable 
in their day; none bearing the name now in the county, that 
the writer is aware of. A branch of the old Munnerlyn family 
is in Georgetown. B. A. Munnerlyn, of Georgetown, is a first 
class business man and stands high with all who have business 
with him. Mr. Lowrimore mentions the Williams as being 
early settlers in Britton's Neck, on the Great Pee Dee; that 
they raised stock and drove it to market. There are several 
Williams down ia that region or portion of the county now, but 
the writer has no personal acquaintance with them. They 
have the reputation of being a peaceable and quiet people, un- 
ostentatious, and unpretending in their manners and habits. 

Mr. Lowrimore mentions a family of Rays, who settled near 
the place that is called Ray's Causeway, on the road leading 
from Britton's Neck to the "Ark" Church. There are no Rays 
down in that section now. There are Rays in the upper end 
of the county, but they are not of that family. What became 
of them is unknown. Mr. Lowrimore further says: "Also, 
the old Jenkings lived, in there, too, there is where old Mrs. 
Jenkins drank the toast to the British officer, when she told 
him she had three sons in the army, and she wished she had 
three thousand." This colloquy between Mrs. Jenkins, who it 



112 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

seems .was at that time a widow, and the British officer, is re- 
lated in full in the Life of Marion, written by Brigadier General 
Horry and Rev. M. L. Weems, pages 220-222. It is as fol- 
lows : "It was not for the British and Marion to lie long at rest 
in the same neighborhood. After a short repose. Colonel 
Watson, with a stout force of regulars and Tories, made an 
inroad upon Pee Dee, which was no sooner known in our 
camp, than Marion pushed after him. We presently struck 
their trail ; and after a handsome day's run, pitched our tents 
near the house of the excellent widow, Jenkins, and on the 
very spot which the British had left in the morning. Colonel 
Watson, it seems, had taken his quarters that night in her 
house; and learning that she had three sons with Marion, all 
active, young men, he sent for her after supper, and desired 
her to sit down and take a glass of wine with him. To his 
request, a good old lady of taste and manners could have no 
objection; so waiting upon the Colonel, and taking a chair 
which be handed her, she sat down and emptied her glass to 
his health. He then commenced the following conversation 
with her: 'So, Madam, they tell me you have several sons in 
General Marion's camp; I hope it is not true.' She said, 'It 
was very true, and was only sorry that it was not a thousand 
times truer.' 'A thousand times truer. Madam!' replied he, 
with great surprise. 'Pray, what can be your meaning in 
that ?' 'Why, sir, I am only sorry that in place of three, I have 
not three thousand sons with General Marion.' 'Aye, indeed ! 
Well, then. Madam, begging your pardon, you had better send 
for them immediately to come in and join his Majesty's troops 
under my command ; for as they are rebels now in arms against 
their king, should they be taken they will be hung as sure as 
ever they were born.' 'Why, sir,' said the old lady, 'you are 
very considerate of my sons ; for which, at any rate, I thank 
you. But, as you have begged my pardon for giving me this 
advice, I must beg yours for not taking it. My sons, sir, are 
of age, and must and will act for themselves. And as to their 
being in a state of rebellion against their king, I must take the 
liberty, sir, to deny that.' 'What, Madam!' replied he; 'not 
in rebellion against their king? Shooting and killing his 
Majesty's subjects like wolves! Don't you call that rebellion 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 113 

against their king, Madam ?' 'No, sir,' answered she ; 'they are 
only doing their duty, as God and nature commanded them, sir.' 
'The d — 1 they are, Madam.' 'Yes, sir,' continued she, 'and 
what you and every man in England would glory to do against 
the king, were he to dare to tax you contrary to your own 
consent, and the Constitution of the realm. 'Tis the king, sir, 
who is in rebellion against my sons, and not they against him. 
And could right prevail against might, he would as certainly 
lose his head as ever King Charles the First did.' ~ Colonel 
Watson could hardly keep his chair under the smart of this 
speech ; but thinking it would never dio for a British Colonel to 
be rude to a lady, he filled her glass, and saying, 'he'd be d — d 
if she were not a very plain spoken woman at any rate,' insisted 
she would drink a toast with him for all that. She replied she 
had no objection. Then filling the glasses round, he looked 
at her with a constrained smile, and said, 'Well, Madam, here 
is George the Third.' 'With all my heart, sir,' and turned off 
her bumper with a good grace. After a decent interval of 
sprightly conversation, he called on the widow for a toast, who 
smartly retorted, 'Well, sir, here's George Washington.' At 
which he darkened a little, but drank it off with an officer-like 
politeness. The next morning early, we left the good Mrs. 
Jenkins, and burning with impatience to give Watson another 
race, we drove on Jehu-like." Mrs. Jenkins was a noble lady, 
full of the fires of patriotism, and had the courage, inspired by 
it, to speak her mind in almost the presence of royalty — at least, 
in the presence of and to a representative of it — and yet she 
did not forget the proprieties of her sex. She did not hesitate 
to express her sentiments, though pointed, yet with the calm 
dignity of a true and virtuous woman. She assuredly got 
the better of Colonel Watson, which he did not rudely resent. 
It may be inferred from his rank and position that he had 
the instincts of a gentleman, and though she stung him to 
the core, he treated her with much respect and due consider- 
ation. She, doubtless, loved her sons with all the ardt>r of her 
soul, yet she was willing to surrender them to her country's 
call, to resist its invaders, to fight for its liberties and, if needs 
be, to die in its cause. The writer does not know how many 
sons she had; he does know, however, that she had, in addi- 



114 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

tion to the three noble boys in Marion's army, another boy, 
James, then a lad of fourteen or fifteen years, who at an early 
age entered into the ministry, joined the Methodist Conference, 
and engaged in a warfare against the devil and sin — a much 
more formidable enemy than was the King of Great Britain. 
He joined the Conference in 1792, and was an itinerant 
preacher for the balance of his life, or as long as he was physi- 
cally able. He was a pioneer preacher. In those early times 
of Methodism, the South Carolina Conference included the 
States of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. Pre- 
vious to 1800, there was but one Presiding Elder's District 
covering the whole territory of the Conference. In that year, 
the whole State of South Carolina was made a District, and 
James Jenkins was appointed the Presiding Elder. He became 
a strong preacher, and was distinguished through life for his 
great pulpit strength, and for his deep and devoted piety. He 
was an effective preacher wherever he went, and filled the most 
important positions in his Conference. He lived to the age of 
eighty-three. In his old age he became blind, and had to be 
led about by some one. The writer saw him and heard him 
preach two masterly sermons at a camp meeting in Browns- 
ville, Marlborough County, S. C, in 1841. It seemed to the 
writer that he knew the Bible and hymn book by heart. He 
gave his h)rmns as though he was reading them from the book, 
and would state the number and page, and during the sermon 
would quote from the Bible, book, chapter and verse. It was 
simply wonderful. It was evidence that he had made the Bible 
and its contents a lifelong study. He died 24th June, 1847, 
and was buried in Camden, S. C. A distinguished son of 
Marion County, 'born and reared by a noble and historically 
distinguished mother ; thus verifying the adage, that "all great 
men had great mothers." W. J. Crosswell, Superintendent of 
Southern Express Company, of Wilmington, N. C, and J. J. 
Crosswell, Route Agent of same company, Fayetteville, N. C, 
are grandhsons of the Rev. James Jenkins. 

Mr. lyowrimore gives us the name of another early settler 
in Britton's Neck, by the name of James Crockett, in the fol- 
lowing words : "Another settlement which I forgot to note was 
old James Crockett, an old Englishman, came and settled on 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 115 

Little Pee Dee, near what is known as Pawley's Camp, the 
place where old Tory Pawly, hidi, when old General Marion 
was ransacking this part of the country for the Torys ; but the 
said Crockett obtained a warrant, and in 1734, he taken up 
and had granted to him a tract of land. I have had the old 
plat and grant in my hand many times." This was probably 
the progenitor of the celebrated David Crotkett, of frontier 
fame in the wild West, seventy-five or eighty years ago. 
Davy Crockett was a great hunter in those early times. He 
wrote a book containing his own biography — ^his life and ad- 
ventures with the Indians and wild, ferocious animals, his 
hair-'breadth escapes, always the hero of his own stories; his 
candidacy for and election to Congress ; a ludicrous account of 
his introduction to and interview with President Andrew Jack- 
son. Crockett was exceedingly humorous, and could tell most 
ludicrous stories. His dress was made of the skins of the ani-- 
mals he killed ; wore a cap made of a coon-skin, with the tail 
hanging down his back. It has been forty or fifty years since' 
the writer read his book, and remembers some of his exploits 
as he told them, but cannot tell any of them like Crockett told 
them in his book. He cannot put the "spice in and gravy on," 
as Crockett did. He will, however, venture to insert one of his 
exploits here. Crockett says one day he was hunting in a 
swamp or bog, and he found a den of young bears. They were 
in a large hollow stimip some twenty feet or more high; he 
could hear the young bears in the stump. He determined to 
get at them and destroy them. He sat "Betsy," his rifle, whidi 
he called Betsy, down against a tree, and then climbed up the 
hollow stump to the top. He looked down the hollow and 
could see the young bears in their bed at the bottom, but he 
could not reach them. He got into the top of the hollow, his 
feet downwaTds, and with his hands hold of the top of the 
broken tree — like going down into a well feet foremost; 
swinging by the top of the curb with Tiis hands, he let himself 
dbwn as low as he couldi — his feet not reaching to the bottom ; 
he turned loose and dbwn he dtoppedi in among the young 
bears. The young bears became frightened at his intrusion 
among them, and set up a terrible screaming. The old she 
bear being off a little distance in the swamp. The mother 



116 A HISTORY 0^ MARION COUNTY. 

bear, hearing the distress cries of her young, came to see what 
was the matter. She climbed up the stump and looked down 
to see her young ones and to see what was the matter, and saw 
Crockett down there among them ; she, enraged, turned tail 
downward and climbed down. Crockett was in a very serious 
dilemma — a maddened mother bear coming down upon him 
among her young ones. Crockett, always ready with some 
expedient, jerked out of a side pocket in his clothes his hunting 
knife, which he always carried, and which was long and sharp- 
pointed, then made ready for the contest with the maddened 
mother bear. As soon as she approached near enough, he 
grabbed' her by the tail with one hand and with the knife in the 
other, he plunged it into her hind parts. She tried to turn 
upon him, but could not do so ; he kept plunging the knife into 
her. She made for the top of the hollow, in order to extricate 
herself from Crockett and' the knife, Crockett hanging on to 
her tail and using the knife constantly; she soon carried him 
out. She went down the stump to the ground, carrying her 
tormenter with her. He turned her loose and sprang to 
"Betsy," his rifle, close by, and fired on h*, and thus dispatched 
her. The above is substantially the story as told by Crockett, 
but is not related as Crockett himself told^ — in fact, no one 
could tell it as he did. His book was full of such stories — ^he 
was always the hero. He may be a descendant of the Britton's 
Neck Crocketts. If so, he has immortalized the name. This 
"Nimrod" of the West was a unique character, a wonderful 
man. The name is now extinct in Marion County ; what has 
become of them is unknown. It is likely that the family re- 
moved West, and hence the celebrated "Davy Crockett." 

There are other families in Woodberry Township, but the 
writer is little acquainted in that region, and, therefore, can say 
nothing about them. The Hucks family, down there — W. W. 
Hucks and his brother, Robert Hucks — are prominent men in 
their community, indusflrious and thriving citizens; they are 
'in middle life, have families, and are doing well and quite 
respectable. They are sons of the late John R. Hucks, who 
has been a resident citizen for many years. I think he came 
from Horry County. The old gentleman was a very patriotic 
man; voluntered in 1837, i" ^ company raised in Horry, and 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 117 

went in Geneiral Harllee's Battalion to the Seminole War in 
Florida ; and' when the Confederate War came on, though past 
age, he volunteered into the Confedei-ate service and went to 
Virginia and remained, as the writer thinks, in the service to 
the end. Few there are who would have done so ; as he was 
not subject to conscription, and is, therefore, entitled to the 
greater honor. I think he is dead — died lately in his ninetieth 
year. His sons and family are and may be justly proud of 
him. I think the old gentleman Hucks had some daughters, 
but how many, and who they married and where they are, is 
unknown to the writer. 

GoDBOLD. — ^John Godbold was the first who came to the 
region of Marion Court House. Bishop Gregg, p. 68, says: 
"He was an Englishman, and had been long a sailor in the 
British service. Though advanced in years at the time of his 
arrival, such was his enterprising energy that he succeeded in 
accumulating what for that day was a large property. He 
settled in 1735, about a half-mile below the site of the present 
village of Marion, being the first adventurer to that locality." 
* * * "During the French and Indian wars, Mr. Godbold was 
plundered of almost all the personal property he had gathered. 
Of thirty negroes, twenty-two were taken from him and never 
recovered ; a trunk of guineas, the fruits of many years' labor, 
was rifled. He married, after his arrival on Pee Dee, Eliza- 
beth McGurney, by whom he had three sons, John, James and 
Thomas, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, from whom 
the extensive connexion in Marion have descended." To this 
Bishop Gregg appends a note, in which he says : "Of his sons, 
John, the oldest, married Priscilla Johes, and had three sons, 
Zachariah, John and Jesse. Of these, Zachariah was a Captain 
in the Revolution; James, the second son (of the first John), 
married Mourning Elizabeth Baker, by whom he had six sons, 
John, James, Zachariah, Cade, Abram and Thomas. Of these, 
John and Zachariah were Lieutenants in the Revolution. 
Thomas, the youngest spn, was the father of the late Hugh 
Godbold, of Marion. Thomas, the third son (of the first old 
John), married Martha Herron, and had four sons, Stephen, 
David, Thomas and' EHy. Of these, Thomas was the father 



118 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

of Asa Godbold, of Marion, and Elly, who left a son bearing 
his name." Bishop Gregg, in a note to this note, acknowledges 
that he got his information, and also much other valuable in- 
formation, from the late Hugh Godbold, and to whom the 
Bishop pays a very high compliment. Thus it will be seen 
that all the Godbolds now in the county, or that have been 
for many years in IJhe county, and connections through the 
females, are derived directly from the first old John, who was 
an Englishman, and not only in the county, but in the State and 
perhaps in the United States. Many of the descendants of 
old John emigrated to the Western States. More than 
forty years ago the writer was in Alabama and Mississippi, 
and he found God'bolds in those States ; also in Texas, thirty 
years ago. The writer supposes that, counting the seven or 
eight generations of them down to the present time, they, per- 
haps, would number thousands. There are not very many now 
in the county bearing the name, but their connexions are 
numerous, and could scarcely be counted, if the attempt to do 
so was made. As a family, they have always stood high as 
men of decided character, pluck and energy. General Thomas 
God'bold, the grand-son of the first old John, had three sons, 
John, Hugh and Charles, all now dead; yet were and are 
known to many now living. The late Hugh Godbold was a 
remarkable man. The writer, on one occasion, heard the late 
Julius Dargan, of Darlington, say of Hugh Godbold, that he 
had mind enougth, if he had been educated, to be President 
of the United States — a very high compliment, coming from 
the source it did: Charles Godbold was a graduate of the 
South Carolina College ; studied medicine, but died soon after 
graduation; never married. Neither Hugh nor Charles left 
any children. John, the other son, never amounted to much — 
his habits were not good; his matrimonial connection was not 
such as to promote his social standing. He lived to a ripe old 
age. Some of his grand-children are among us now.; and 
some of them are doing much to elevate their branch of the 
family. The first old John Godbold, Bishop Gregg says, lived 
to be more than a hundred years old, and died in 1765, a 
member of the Church of England. Thomas, the third and 
youngest son of the first old John, and who married Martha 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 119 

Herron, had four sons, Stephen, David, Thomas and EUy. 
Stephen was the father of the late Stephen G. Godbold, was a 
well-to-do citizen, and lived in Wahee Township, I think, on 
the place where Dr. D. F. Miles formerly lived ; he died there. 
He left but two children ; married twice ; the late Stephen G. 
God'bold was a son of the first wife, and by the second wife he 
had a daughter, who is now the widow of the late John F. 
Spencer, and owns and resides upon her father's patrimony. 
The late Stephen G. Godbold, a most worthy and estimable 
man, settled near by his father ; married and had an only child, 
a daughter, who married the late Francis A. Miles. Mrs. 
Miles inherited the entire estate of her father, Stephen G. 
Godbold. Mrs. Miles was the mother of several children; 
three sons, David Franklin, Samuel A. C. Miles and Stephen 
G. Miles, and, I think, two daughters, Mrs. W. L. Durant and 
Mrs. Lide, of Darlington. Of these, Dr. SamueL A. C. Miles 
and Mrs. I^ide are dead; both leaving children. Dr. D. F. 
Miles is now Clerk of the Court at Marion, and resides there, 
has a farm in Wahee; is an amiable, worthy gentleman, and 
a very efficient and accommodating Clerk. Stephen G. Miles 
is merchandising at Marion, resides there, and has a farm 
in Wahee, which seems to be run successfully; a very ener- 
getic, worthy citizen. Mrs. Durant was left a widow, with . 
six or seven children (small) ; she lives on lands inherited 
from her mother; has raised her children respectably, and 
it is said they are promising ; Mrs. Durant is a very excellent 
lady — a woman of strong sense and full of energy. These 
Miles are the great-grand^^hildren of old Stephen God'bold, 
who was the grand-son of the first old John Godbold. Mrs. 
Spencer, the daughter of old Stephen Godbold, and who lives 
on lands he gave her, has ten living children, all grown, and 
air married, except a son, Nathan. Mrs. Spencer is a worthy 
lady, of sound, practical sense, and very energetic; she is a 
great-grand-daughter of the first old John Godbold. Thomas, 
a brother of old man Stephen, married I do not know whom ; 
but he had a son named Thomas, w'ho married Nancy Gasque. 
The fruits of this marriage were a daughter, who married a 
Mr. Harrington, I think, of Georgetown ; and sons, Asa God- 
bold, Jehu, Robert, Thomas, Alexander, Charles, Thomas and 
9 



120 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

William H., and another daughter, named Martha Ann. Tho- 
mas Godbold, the father of these latter, died in 1836 or '7. 
Asa Godbold, the eldest son of this family, married, in 1828, 
Miss Sarah Cox, a most excellent lady ; the fruits of this mar- 
riage were Mary Jane, James, Thomas W., Asa, Sarah, Anne, 
Eliza and F. Marion. Asa Godbold, Sr., was a very energetic, 
persevering man, sharp and shrewd, was elected Ordinary 
after the death of General E. B. Wheeler, in 1859, which posi- 
tion he held by successive elections until the reconstruction 
period, and he, like all others of the old regime, was relegated 
to the rear. His daughter, Mary Jane, married Captain Mat. 
Stanly, of Mexican War and Confederate reputation, and 
resides ten or twelve miles below Marion Court House. Cap- 
tain M. B. Stanly is an importation from Darlington. When 
a young man he volunteered and went to the Mexican War, 
was with General Taylor in the several battles around the city 
of Mexico, and in the storming and capture of that city. 
When the Confederate War began, he was made Captain of 
the first company that left Marion, 4th January, 1861, and 
went to Charleston and joined the first regiment (Maxcy 
Gregg's), and remained Captain of the company until after 
the reduction of Fort Sumter, 13th April, 1861. Captain 
Stanly has several children, two sons and one daughter, who 
are the men and women of the present generation, and all 
dioing well. James Godbold, son of Asa, Sr., married a 
daughter of the late W. F. Richardson, below Marion. He 
has reared a family of two sons and three daughters, the names 
of whom the writer does not know. Asa Godbold, Jr., married 
Miss Sallie EHerbe, sister of the late Captain W. S. EUerbe; 
he died a few years ago, leaving a large family of sons and 
daughters ; the sons are Walter, William, James C, Lawrence 
and Luther; the daughters, Alice, Mollie, Anne, Victoria, Bes- 
sie and Daisy ; of the sons, Walter and William are married ; 
of the daughters, Alice, Mollie, Anne and Victoria are mar- 
ried; Bessie and Daisy are unmarried. Of the sons, Walter 
married a Miss Williams, near Nichols, S. C. ; William married 
his cousin, Lucy EHeAe, sister of the late Governor EUerbe. 
Of the daughters, Miss Alice married Rev. J. Thomas Pate, 
now stationed at Florence ; Miss Mollie, J. B. Moore, of Latta, 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 121 

S. C. ; Miss Annie married James Harrel, of Cheraw, S. C. ; 
Miss Victoria married W. H. Breeden, of Campbell's Bridge, 
S. C. T'he late Thomas W. Godbold, another son of Asa God- 
bold (senior), was no ordinary man; clear-minded, energetic 
and industrious ; never married; died about a year ago, at the 
age of sixty-five. F. M. Godbold, the youngest son of Asa 
Godbold (senior), married, first, a Miss Vance, in Abbeville 
County, to which county he removed, and there ranained till 
a few years ago, when he returned to his native county, where 
he now resides ; by his first wife he ha'd several children ; and 
she dying, he married another Miss Vance, a cousin of the first 
wife. Sarah Godbold, second daughter of Asa (senior), mar- 
ried Colonel E. B. Ellerbe, uncle of the late Governor Ellerbe; 
he some years back moved to Horry County, where he now 
resides ; has a large family. Annie Eliza Godbold, the young- 
est diaughter of Asa (senior), married Edwin A. Bethea, now 
of Latta ; they have several children, sons and daughters ; one 
diaughter married to W. C. McMillan, of Marion, but now 
residing in Columbia, and is said to be doing well ; one son, 
Asa Bethea, is in Texas; the other children are all with their 
parents at L,atta. 

We have noticed the families of St^hen and Thomas God- 
bold, grand-sons of the first old John. Stephen and' Thomas 
had two other brothers, David and EUy. What became of 
David Godbold and his family, if he had any, is unknown to 
the writer. The other brother, Elly, had and left a son 
named Elly, and one named Stephen, usually called Captain 
Stephen, and one named Ervin M. The son, EUy, afterwards 
kno;wn as Sheriff Elly, and then as General EUy (jodbold, was 
bom in 1804. His early educational opportunities were very 
limited; he could scarcely write his name. The writer had 
hundreds of business transactions with him while Sheriff for 
three terms, and never knew him to write anything but his 
name — ^never saw any writing said to be his, except his name ; 
he could barely write it, yet he was the most remarkable of 
men ; nature had endowed him' with strong intellectual powers, 
mental acumen and astuteness; he was well versed in human 
nature ; could look in a man's face and know all about him — 
could almost read his thoughts. He was elected Sheriff for 



122 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

three terms, and served) in that office for four years each term, 
with entire satisfaction to the people and with credit to himself. 
During those terms the business of the office was very heavy, 
as his books will show. He was a model Sheriflf, though he 
could do nothing in the office himself — ^never pretended to make 
a settlement with any party ; be had his clerk to do all the office 
business; don't think his handwriting appears in or on any 
book kept in his office during his three terms, nor on paper 
belonging to the office, except in matters where it was required 
by law for him to sign his name in propria persona. He was 
run a fourth time for Sheriff, during the Radical regime in 
1872, by the white people of the county, and elected, but, like 
all others of bis party in that election, was counted out. He 
was a successful manager of men ; he knew every man, knew 
his inclinations and almost his thoughts; he knew his weak 
points, as well as his strong ones, hence he knew how to turn 
his innate knowledge of men to advantage. He had military 
ambition, and rose in the militia of that day by regular grada- 
tions from the Captaincy of a company to Brigadier General 
of the Eighth Brigade, S. C. militia, and performed the dtities 
of that position with satisfaction to all concerned (see supra). 
He was twice married ; first, to Miss Flowers, by whom he had 
three sons, Huger, David and Zachariah, and two daughters. 
Huger married a daughter of Stephen White, by whom he had 
several children, sons and daughters, when his wife died and 
left him with her children; the sons, or rather two of them, 
went West ; one, Waties, is here yet, and married, and lives over 
Catfish, in Wahee Township; one of the daughters married 
a Mr. Game, and another married Truman Foxworth ; a third 
•one is yet single. The father, Huger, though a widbwer for 
thirty years, has not married again; he is about seventy-five 
jears of age, has been in Washington for eight or ten years ; is 
in the public printing office. Though seventy-five years old, he 
looks about as young as he did thirty years ago ; sprightly as a 
T)oy, has no gray hairs. General Elly Godbold's son, David, was 
an the Confederate War, and was killed or, died in it. His son, 
Zack, married and had four children ; his wife died ; he went 
off, left his children, all small, married again — don't know 
what has become of him. His son, D. E. Godbold, the eldest. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 123 

grew up, took care of his sisters; one of the sisters married 
some one ; another sister died, a young woman ; the youngest 
sister is yet single ; D. E. Godbold is now at Mullins, merchan- 
dising, in partnership with W. McG. Buck, and seems to be 
doing fairly well. D. E. Godbold married a Miss Young, 
daughter of the late Johnson B. Young ; he is Mayor of the 
town of Mullins, is steady, a first rate business man and is 
bound to succeed. He is very much like his grand-father. 
General Godbold ; he deserves much credit for his success, so 
far, and especially for the care he has taken of his orphan 
sisters. General Elly Godbold was a successful man ; he accu- 
mulated a large property. He toild the writer just before 
the war that he ihad fifty negroes (children) that were not 
large enough to work in the field His wife died some years 
before the war. He remained a widower until the i6th Febru- 
ary, 1874, when he married the Widow Kelly, then in Marion; 
she was forty-five years old and he was seventy — ^born in 1804. 
He died suddenly, 12th June, 1874, not quite four months after 
the second marriage. What became of the General's brother, 
Stephen T., or Captain Stephen, as he was called, the writer 
knows not. He was, by no means, such a man as his brother, 
the General. Ervin M. married Miss Foxworth; is dead; 
left several children. Recurring back to the sons and grand- 
sons of the old first Joihn, a majority of them must have 
died childless or removed to other parts. The old first John, 
as has already been stated,' had three sons, John, James and 
Thomas. John had three sons, Zachariah, John and Jesse. 
What became of these last three is not stated, and is altogether 
unknown. The second son of old John was James; James 
had six sons, John, James, Zaohariah, Cade, Abraham and 
Thomas. No account whatever is given as to these or their 
posterity, except Thomas, the youngest, who was the father 
of the late Hugh Godbold, as before stated, and who became 
a Brigadier General of the militia, and was quite a prominent 
man in his day; he died in 1825. Thus, five of the grand- 
sons of the old first John seem to have no representatives or 
descendants in this country. The third son of the old first 
John was named Thomas, and he had a son named Thomas., 
This latter Thomas was the father of Asa Godbold (senior), 



124 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

of whom we have already had' something to say. It seems that 
this last Thomas had seven sons, who have already been named ; 
only three of them were married; Asa (senior), Robert and 
William H. ; the others lived in single blessedness, and they 
are all dead, leaving no representatives. Robert married and 
died, leaving only a daughter. Of Asa. (senior) and his 
family, we have already spoken. The only one not yet noticed 
is William H., the youngest ; he was a doctor, and a most 
excellent and worthy man ; he married, first, a Miss Menden- 
hall, of North Carolina ; she died in about a year, leaving no 
offspring; after the usual lapse of time in such cases, the 
Doctor married a second time, a Miss Hunt (Mary E.), from 
about High Point, N. C, a highly accomplished lady — a 
woman of a fine and a cultivated mind. By her the Doctor 
had four children, two sons, Thomas N. and William H., and 
two daughters, Mattie and Mary L,. ; the Doctor died when 
these children were all small ; the mother, with the courage of 
a Spartan, with her limited' means, raised her children respect- 
ably, and gave them all a fairly good education; she is yet 
living. After some years she married Captain J. C. Finklea 
(Confederate), by whom she had one child, a son; who died, 
however, at the age of four or five. The eldest son, Thomas 
N. Godbold, married on the loth January, 1888, the youngest 
daug'hter, Mary, of the writer. She has three children living, 
Thomas Carroll, Anna and Mary E. The second son of Dr. 
W. H. Godbold, who was named for his father, married, about 
1886, a Miss Mattie Beaty, daughter of Hon. James C. Beaty, 
of Horry County. About seven years ago, he disappeared 
from home, and has not been heard of since; he left his wife 
and four small children, two sons and two daughters ; his wife 
and the children are doing fairly well. Dr. Godbold's oldest 
daughter, Mattie, married J. E. Stevenson; she died three or 
four years ago, and left three children, two sons and a 
daughter ; Mary L., the youngest daughter of the Doctor, mar- 
ried Richard Davis, below Marion ; they are doing very well. 

There is one circumstance worthy to be noted in the Godbold 
family, and that is the name Thomas. The first old John had 
a son by that name ; and his son, James, who had six sons, one 
of whom was named Thomas, and who became General Tho- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 125 

mas Godibold. The third son of old first John was named 
Thomas, and he had a son named Thomas, called "Tom Cat," 
not in derision, but to distinguish him from his cousin, Thomas 
(the General) ; and in most branches of the family, from those 
early days till the present time, the name Thomas is to be 
found, and now at this time there are four or five Thomas 
Godbolds in the family. The late Ervin Godbold, youngest 
brother of General ,Elly, as already, stated, married a Miss Fox- 
worth, by whom he had five or six children; he was a quiet, 
inoffensive man, unaspiring, and had the respect and confi- 
dence of his fellow-citizens. One of his daughters became the 
wife of the late S. G. Owens, Clerk of the Court ; she died, and 
Owens died. Ervin M. Godbold left a son, Thomas, keeping 
up that name. The writer has dwelt upon the Godbold family 
to a greater extent than he otherwise would, because the first 
settlement made about Marion Court House was made, as here- 
inbefore stated, by John Godbold. It runs over a period of 
165 years, and yet the Godbolds are here, by themselves and 
by their respectable connections, while many who came and 
settled in other parts of the county, about the same time and 
before and after, have disappeared; their names have become 
extinct, either by misfortune, deaths or removals. 

Evans. — The next family the writer will notice, is the Evans 
family. Bishop Gregg says, on page 75 : "Nathan Evans was 
a Welshman, and settled on Catfish. He either came from the 
Welsh Neck above, soon after his arrival there, or was one of 
those who went first to the lower part of the Welsh tracts, and 
remained: there. Lands in the neighborhood of Tart's Mill 
(now Moody's) were granted to Nathan Evans." Bishop 
Gregg, in a note on same page, says : "Nathan Evans was the 
grand-father of the late Thomas Evans and General William 
Evans, of Marion. The father of General Evans was also 
"-"^M Nathan, and was a man of upright character through 
Nathan Evans' arrival and settlement on "Catfish" was 
ifter the arrival and settlement of John Godbold, in 1735. 
Gregg further says: "David Evans, a son of Nathan, was a 
Captain in the Revolution, and a man of note. He died child- 
less. About the same time, two families of James and Lucas 



126 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

came down the river and settled on Catfish ; with the latter of 
these the Crawfords and Evans intermarried. Soon after a 
family of Bakers came from Newtern, N. C, to Pee Dee. 
One of this name married a daughter of Nathan Evans. Wil- 
liam Baker was prominent in the Revolution, and marked for 
his devotion to the cause of liberty." Thus the foundation of 
the Evans family, so far as Marion County is concerned, is laid 
in old Nathan Evans. We are not informed whether he had 
sons other than David and Nathan, and no account of any 
daughter, except that one of the name of Baker married a 
daughter of Nathan Evans. His son, Nathan, was the only 
one to perpetuate the name. The writer thinks he married 
twice (the second Nathan). His first wife was a Godbold, by 
whom he had a son, the late Thomas Evans, and two daughters, 
Mrs. R. J. Gregg and Mrs. Colonel Levi Legette, there may 
have been other children of the first marriage. Nathan Evans' 
second wife was a Miss Rogers (first name not known), a 
daughter of old Lot Rogers, of upper Marion. By his second 
wife he had three sons and a daughter. The sons were the 
late General William Evans, Nathan Evans and Gamewell 
Evans; the daughter, Elizabeth A., married Alexander Mur- 
dock, of Marlborough County. The late Thomas Evans 
married a Miss Daniel, a Virginia lady, a most excellent 
woman, and a woman of more than ordinary culture for her 
day and time ; the fruits of this marriage were ten sons and one 
daughter. The father, Thomas Evans, was quite a prominent 
man in his day — Representative and Senator from his county 
in the State Legislature, Commissioner in Equity, and a useful 
man generally ; he died' in middle life — I think, in 1845 ; the 
names of his sons, as remembered, were Chesly D., Thomas, 
Nathan G., James, Beverly, Jackson, William, Asa, Alfred and 
Woodson ; the daughter, Sarah, who married R. L. Singletary, 
on the west side of Great Pee Dee, who has children grown and 
married. Chesly D. Evans graduated at the South Carolina 
College, I think, in 1839, studied law and was admitted to the 
bar in 1841 ; went into practice, and was electedl Commissioner 
in Equity, which position he held for years ; he was a delegate 
to the Secession Convention in i860, was quite a scholarly man 
and a good lawyer, though not much of an advocate ; he mar- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 127 

ried, in 1850 or 1851, Miss Jane Haselden, and reared a family 
of seven sons and one daughter. The sons were Junius H., 
Chesly D., Walker, Samuel, Frank, Leon, Nathan and David 
(called Tris Magistas) ; and a diaughter, Bettie. Of these, 
Junius is a practicing lawyer at Marion ; married Miss Florence 
Durant, and has three or four children. Chesly D. married a 
Miss Wells ; he is dead, and left three children. Samuel Mar- 
ried an English lady, and is dead; he left two children. 
Walker married a Miss McDougal, in upper Marion, and is 
farming and doing well. Frank is in Spartanburg at the head 
of a graded school, and is highly esteemed. Where the other 
two, Nathan and David, are unknown, having left Marion. 
L,eon died when a youth. Chesly died in May, 1897, at the 
advanced age of eighty years, being born loth January, 1817. 
Thomas Evans, second son of Thomas Evans (senior), grew 
up, studied law, practiced for several years, and was appointed 
(I think, by President Pierce,) United States District Attorney 
for South Carolina, which position he filled for four years with 
credit to himself and satisfaction to the public. He married 
late in life (don't rememiber whom), settled down in Britton's 
Neck at a place called' Oakton, and soon thereafter removed 
West and died there. Nathan G. Evanfe, and third son of 
Thomas Evans (senior), was educated at West Point and went 
into the regular army of the United States, and when the war 
between the States broke out, loyal to his section, he threw 
himself on the sidfe of the South and was soon appointed by 
President Davis a Brigadier General, and won distinction on 
many fields, and especially at the battle of L,eesburg or Ball's 
Bluff, where he pursued the Federals to the river, completely 
routed them, and besides killing many, others sprang off the 
bluff into the river and were either drowned or killed in the 
water. (Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, i vol., 
437.) General N. George Evans (called Shanks at home), 
married about the close of the war a Miss Gary, of Edgefield, 
or Abbeville, and by her had sons and daughters, the number 
and names unknown, think three sons; one of whom, John 
Gary Evans, is now an ex-Governor of the State ; he removed 
to Edgefield after his marriage, and died there several years 
ago. A true South Carolinian and a gallant soldier, his face 



128 A HISTORY Of MARION COUNTY. " 

was ever to the front. James E. Evans, another son of 
Thomas Evans (senior), was a doctor, and did service in the 
war as asurgeon; married a Virginia lady, and after the war 
returned to South Carolina, located as a physician at Little 
Rock, in his native county, and remained there doing a good 
practice for several years ; then removed to Florence, and con- 
tinued his practice there till the present time. He is eminent in 
his profession, is Secretary to the State Board of Health, and 
President of the State Board of Medical Examiners for the ex- 
amination of applicants to practice in the State, as required by 
law — quite a distinguished position; he is a man of high 
character and of excellent morals; has a- family, children 
grown, the numher and names unknown; has a daughter 
married to Hon. F. B. Gary, present Speaker of the House of 
Representatives of the South Carolina IvCgislature, and at 
present a candidate for Governor of the State. Another son 
of Thomas Evans (senior), William, who was in the navy 
under Admiral Semmes on the Alabama, during the war, and 
an officer of what rank is now unknown, and was perhaps a 
graduate of the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. ; he was a 
brave Carolinian, and a staunch supporter of the Confederacy ; 
he never married, and died some years ago and was buried in 
his native town. Two other sons of Thomas Evans (senior), 
Jackson and Beverly, left this country years ago and went 
West; they were unmarried when they left Marion; don't 
know what has become of them. Another son. Captain A. L. 
Evans, now Deputy Clerk of the Court, of Thomas Evans 
(senior), volunteered early in the war, and remained in it to 
the last, a gallant soldier, contending for the rights of his 
section ; he was Adjutant in his brother's, N. G. Evans, brigade, 
and went through all the battles in which it was engaged during 
the war, from Virginia to Mississippi, always at his post and 
did his full duty; he married a daughter of the late Horatio 
McClenaghan, and by her has had five children, two sons and 
three daughters; one daughter married. Two other sons of 
Thomas Evans (senior), were Alfred and Woodson. Soon 
after the war, Alfred, a young man, went West; I have lost 
sight of him, and cannot say what has become of him. Wood- 
son, the youngest son, just as he was entering into manhood. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 129 

sickened and died. That family of Evans did much for the 
"lost cause ;" their whole soul was in it and went down with it, 
not whipped, but simply overcome by the number and resources 
of the enemy. 

General William Evans, a son of Nathan, the second, by his 
second marriage, was bom in 1804, grew up to manhood and 
married Miss Sarah Ann, Godbold, daughter of General 
Thomas Godbold; settled down at the place just north of 
Marion, and went to farming ; he succeeded well in his chosen 
occupation and amassed a large property; he' had only two 
sons, James Hamilton and William Thomas ; the latter is now 
the Sheriff (second term) of the county; and seven daughters, 
viz: Catharine, Mary, Eliza Jane, Louisa, Ann M., Rosa and 
Margaret. The oldest son, James Hamilton, was a gradtiate 
of the University of North Carolina. He married Miss Amelia 
Legette, daughter of Rev. David L/egette, and lived to a. ffew 
years back and died childless. William Thomas grew up to 
manhood, just in time to strike the war ; he was in college, left 
it and came home, volunteered and went into the war and 
made a good soldier, remained in it till the last; came home 
and married a Miss Stith, of Wilson, N. C. ; by her he had one 
child, a daughter ; soon after his wife died ; he has not remar- 
ried; his daughter, however, grew up, raised by her grand- 
mother, Evans, and married Henry I. Gasque ; had two children 
for him, a daughter and a son; she died three or four years 
ago, leaving her two children and husband. Thus it appears 
that the name of Evans, so far as the sons of the General are 
concerned, will become extinct, unless the Sheriff, W. T. 
Evans, should- marry again and thereby perpetuate his name. 
General Evans' oldest daughter, Catharine, died not long after 
reaching her womanhood, unmarried; his daug'hter, Mary, 
married A. J. Requier, a lawyer, who afterwards moved to 
Mobile, where Requier became distinguished as a lawyer, a 
man of erudition ; his wife, Mary, died in Mobile, Ala., I think, 
childless ; his daughter, Eliza Jane, married Dr. Dixon Evans, 
of Fayetteville, N. C. ; by the marriage she did not change her 
name, but preserved' her identity as an Evans. Dr. Dixon 
Evans died at Marion a few years ago, leaving three sons and 
three daughters; of the sons, Charles E. Evans, now of 



130 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Marion, is the eldest, who married Sophie Miles, daughter 
of Dr. D. F. Miles, Clerk of the Court. The next son, 
William A., grew up and went West; his whereabouts is 
unknown to the writer. The third and last son of Dr. 
Dixon Evans is named Joseph, a young man, unmarried. 
Of Dr. Evans' daughters, the eldest is the wife of B. R. 
Mullins, of Marion; the second daughter, Kate, married W. 
H. Cross, Cashier of the Merchants and Farmers Bank at 
Marion; she died three or four years ago, and left two or 
three children. Another daughter, Amelia, married a Mr. 
Glover, of Payetteville, N. C. General Evans' daughter, 
Ivouiza, married, first, a Mr. McEacshern, of North Carolina; 
by him she had two daughters, when McEachern died.' The 
widow, in a few years, married Rev. W. C. Power, an itin- 
erant Methodist minister, and by him, I think, she has six 
chfldren, three sons and three daughters; one daughter and 
two sons, W. C. and John M., married, but do not know to 
whom. Rev. W. C. Power married in 1867. He has con- 
tinued in the itinerancy thence to the present time ; stands high 
in the Conference, has filled many important stations, has been 
a Presiding Elder for twenty years ; he is a close thinker and 
an able minister, a very methodical man. I have heard it re- 
marked by several that he ought to have been a bank presi- 
dent — ^he is a good financier. The two McEachern daughters 
both married; the eldest, Lilly, married John M. Power, a 
nephew of the Rev. W. C. Power; I do not know what has 
become of them; the younger McEachern daughter, Mary, 
married a Mr. Tesky, of Charleston; he is a merchant in his 
home city, and is said to be a prosperous man. General 
Evans' daughter, Anna M., married Colonel John G. Blue, of 
North Carolina ; he was a graduate of the University of North 
Carolina and a lawyer ; Colonel Blue was a man of good sense 
and mentally much above the ordinary, and especially when 
aroused ; and had he applied himself to his profession, as some 
do, he doubtless would have attained an enviable position in 
the profession ; he would have been where there is always room 
plenty — ^that is, at the top ; he went into the war early as a pri- 
vate, and rose by successive steps to a Lieutenant Colonelcy; 
be was brave and patriotic; bad a high sense of duty; very 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 131 

tatnperate in all his habits except one, and in that was very 
intemperate, and that was in the use of tobacco, and its exces- 
sive use probably shortened his life; he was a candidate for 
the Legislature in 1876 and was elected and was a member of 
the famous "Wallace House" of that year, and was re-elected 
for several terms thereafter, and was a very useful member of 
that body ; he was very cool and deliberate, and his judgment 
good ; he had the confidence of his fellow-members. Some ten 
or twelve years ago his health failed him, and after lingering 
for several months he died in Richmond County, N. C, his old 
home place, to which he had gone for recuperation; he died 
rather unexpectedly; his widow and the younger mem'bers of 
her family live on their homestead, near Marion. Colonel 
Blue raised three sons and five daughters ; his eldest son, Wil- 
liam E. Blue, is yet single and lives with his mother, and 
carries on the farm, and is now County Treasurer; he is a 
young man of fine talents and of good character. Another son, 
Rupert, is a doctor, and has for several years been a surgeon 
in the United States Army, and stands well as such ; he is, or 
was, somewhere in the West, attending to the duties of his 
position. Another son, Victor, graduated some years ago, in 
the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., and has been in the 
navy ever since his graduation, and is now Flag Lieutenant, and 
has gone, it is said, in the newspapers, on a war ship to 
China as Flag Lieutenant. He acquired celebrity and distinc- 
tion by heroic deeds in the late Spanish-American War, and is 
well on the road to an Admiralship, the highest honor that can 
be attained in that branch of his country's service — a Marion 
boy, of whom Marion and the whole State are justly proud; 
be is a fine specimen of manhood physically ; he recently mar- 
ried a daughter of some naval Captain. Of Colonel Blue's 
daughters, one. Miss Sallie, married Peter John, of Marl- 
borough .County ; another. Miss Ida, married Mr. James John, 
of North Carolina, a brother to Peter. The Johns are good 
men and well-to-do. Another daughter. Miss Effie, married 
Edward B. Wheeler, of Marion, a very worthy native and 
citizen. The two other daughters. Miss Kate and Miss Hettie, 
are unmarried — worthy of some good man. Miss Kate has 
obtained some celebrity as a writer, and is quite literary in her 



132 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

taste. Another daughter of General Evans, Miss Rosa, mar- 
ried Captain Duncan Mclntyre; did not hve long, after her 
marriage, and died childless. The youngest daughter of 
General Evans, Miss Margaret, or Maggie, as she was called, 
married in the latter part of the war the late Major S. A. 
• Durham, and by him she had three children, two daughters 
and a son. The son, Cicero A. Durham, now living in Marion, 
married' Miss Kate McKerall, daughter of the late Captain W. 
J. McKerall; they have no children. The two daughters of 
Major S. A. Durham, Miss Eunice and Miss Marguerette, 
are unmarried. 

General William Evans was a prominent man in his day. 
He was a large and active man, handsome and of fine address, 
and much of a man physically. He was chosen as one of the 
delegates to the Nullification Convention in 1832, and was one 
of the signers to the Ordinance of Nullification passed by that 
body. About that time he was elected Brigadier General of 
the militia. In 1838, he was elected to the House of Represen- 
tatives from his county and served a term; he was again 
elected to the same position in 1846, and served another term. 
General Evans was a man of fine sense, but not a scholar ; he 
devoted himself almost exclusively to his farm', at which he 
succeeded well, made a large property in lands and slaves, and 
kept out of debt. At the time of emancipation he owned 
over one hundred slaves. It seemed that everything he 
touched "turned to gold" — it prospered in his hands. He died 
sitting on the steps of his front piazza, suddenly, on the 6th 
June, 1876, at the age of seventy-two years. 

Nathan Evans, a younger brother of General Evans, and a 
grand-son of the first old Nathan, was 'born in 1805 ; was a 
worthy man and an excellent citizen ; a gentleman of fine taste, 
affable and very popular with everybody; he married a Miss 
Baker, below Marion, a daughter of William and. Annise 
Baker ; by whom he had four children, two so^ns, William B. 
and Nathan, and two daughters, Lizzie and Ann Eliza. The 
Baker wife died. After a reasonable time, he married again. 
Miss Harriet Braddy, of upper Marion; by her he had four 
children, two sons, Julius and Lawrence, and two daughters, 
Martha, called "Pat," and Fannie. His second wife died 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 133 

about 1878 or 1879, of cancer; she suffered for a long time 
the most intense agonies. He married no more, lived on 
his farm until 12th February, 1885, when he, too, passed 
away. His son, William B. Evans, was a Captain in the 
war, a true and valiant soldier. In one of the battles in 
Virginia he was badly wounded, shot through one of his 
lungs — which at the time was thought to be mortal; but to 
every one's surprise, he recovered. After recovery he re- 
turned to his command and continued therein to the surrender 
of Johnston's army, 26th April, 1865. He came home and 
soon after married Miss Maggie Haselden, a daughter of 
Major James Haselden; she lived but a short while and died 
childless. He afterwards married Miss Sue Berry, a d^aughter 
of Elihu Berry, a niece of his first wife, by whom he has had 
three sons and five daughters. The sons are William Boyd, 
James Aubrey and Thomas Baker; the daughters are Mamie, 
Emma, Nellie, Lucy and Gary Ivee, all unmarried, except his 
oldest son, William Boyd Evans, who has recently married a 
Miss Heyward, in Charleston. W. Boyd Evans is a graduate 
of Wofford College; he was Private Secretary to Governor 
Ellerbe up to the death of the Governor, 2d June, 1899 ; he has 
also recently graduated in the law department of the South 
Carolina College. With it all, including his recent marriage, 
he is well equipped for life, and sets out on its tempestuous sea 
with ballast, rudder and sails. The other children, sons and 
daughters, of Captain Evans, are all with him ; the sons and 
two eldest daughters are grown, the rest are small. Captain 
Evans is a very worthy citizen, a man of good morals, and a 
good man in his family — in short, he is a high-toned gentle- 
man; he is a farmer. 

Nathan Evans' daughter, Lizzie, by his first wife, married 
the late W. W. Braddy, and by him had several children ; they 
are all dead, except two — Sue, the wife of Professor Coleman, 
in the Citadel Academy, in Charleston, .and a son, Wightman 
Braddy, a young man just grown. Mrs. Lizzie Braddy had a 
daughter named Walker, who married J. W. Davis, of Marion. 
They moved to Alabama, where Walker died, as is said, and 
left three sons, Willie, Hicks and Elbert. Their father, J. W. 
Davis, has married twice since his first wife. Walker Braddy, 



134 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

died. These three Davis boys are direct descendants of 
Nathan Evans, whose family we are now noticing. Nathan 
Evans had another son by his Baker wife, named Nathan ; he 
grew up to manhood and died unmarried. He had also 
another daughter by the Baker wife, named Ann Eliza; she 
married a man by the name of Cole and died childless. As 
already stated, Nathan Evans (the third) had by his second 
wife, Harriet Braddy, two sons, Julius and Lawrence; and 
two daughters, Martha (called Pat) and Fannie. Julius grew 
up to manhood, merchandised a few years at Marion, in part- 
nership with his brother-in-law, Richard Jordan, who had mar- 
ried his sister, "Pat." The firm was not successful. In the 
meantime, he had married a Miss by w'hom he has 

had four sons and a daughter. He removed to Tallahassee, 
Florida, where he now resides. 

Richard Jordan, of Horry, married Miss "Pat" Evans, ana 
after the failure of the mercantile firm of Jordan & Evans, as 
above indicated, Mr. Jordan remained' in Marion a few years, 
variously engaged, and then removed to Georgia and started 
a business there (turpentine and merchandise) , at which, it is 
said, he has succeeded well. He has a considerable family, 
seven daughters and one son. Mr. Jordan is a first-rate busi- 
ness man, full of push and energy — 'by no means an idler ; if 
he cannot succeed at one thing, he tries another ; he tries again 
and does not give up. Nathan Evans' (the third) son, L,aw- 
rence, married some girl in Horry County some years ago, and 
has been lost sight of. Miss Fannie, the youngest daughter 
of Nathan Evans, by second wife, went out to Georgia with 
her brother-in-law, Jordan, and married a Mr. Applewhite ; she 
has also been lost sigiht of. 

Nathan Evans (the third) was one of nature's noblemen; 
had great good sense, was energetic and upright in every re- 
spect ; always lent his ear to a tale of suffering; had a kind and 
sympathetic heart, and would help his neighbor in distress, if it 
was in his power, often to his own injury; he injured himself 
and family by becoming surety for others. He lived on his 
splendid farm, which he managed to keep, till his death; he 
was a very popular man, more so than his brother, the General ; 
yet he never aspired to the honors of office but once, and then 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 135 

not of his own motion; but being urged by his numerous 
friends, he became a candidate for Representative in the State 
Legislature in 1858, and though the contest was heated, he was 
triumphantly elected at the head of the ticket, and served a 
term in the House. Faithful to his trust, he retired from public 
life in the full confidence of his people, and could never after 
be induced to become a candidate again — he loved his home 
and family too well ; the pursuits of home life were more con- 
genial to his nature. 

"About 1735," as stated by Bisfhop Gregg, p. 69: "two im- 
portant settlements were made in that region (Marion Dis- 
trict) ; one of these was in Britton's Neck, twenty miles below 
Mar's Bluff, and forty miles above Georgetown. It was 
composed of the families of Britton, Graves, Fladger, Davis, 
Tyler, Giles and others. They came directly from England as 
one colony; and being members of the Established Church, 
one of their first acts was to erect a house for the worship of 
God. Their minister. Dr. Robert Hunter, came with them, 
and is supposed to have died there. He was succeeded by the 
Rev. Mr. Allison." In a note on the same page. Bishop 
Gregg, in regard to the church built there at that time, 1735, 
says : "This building was of black cypress, with a brick foun- 
dation, and is still to be seen (1859), ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ years since, 
in a good' state of preservation, on the road leading from Port's 
Ferry to Potato Bed Ferry, on Little Pee Dee. About the year 
1780, the congregation having long been without a minister, 
and doubtless very much broken up by the troublous times of 
the Revolution, united with the Methodist, and the building 
passed into the hands of the latter, by whom it has since been 
retained. Charles Wesley is said to have once preached in it. 
The name of one of these families subsequently became dis- 
tinguishd in the person of Hugh Giles, who took a prominent 
part in this region during the Revolution. He was the son of 
Robert Giles." 

Giles. — Of Colonel Hugh Giles, something has already 
been said in these pages, and something more may yet be said 
herein. Of the church here spoken of, it is the Britton's 
Neck Methodist Church now — of course, not the original 

ID 



136 A HISTORY OF MARION CpUNTY. 

building, but on the same plat of ground, and is supposed to be 
the oldest church in the county. I think it likely that Francis 
Asbury (Bis'hop) in his travels round and through the country 
preached in it more than once. The writer has not the life of 
Bishop Asbury now before him, but he read it years ago, and 
remembers the fact stated in it, that be preached in the Brit- 
ton's Neck Church perhaps more than once. Bishop Gregg 
says it was built of black cypress, with a brick foundation. 
The question may arise in the mind of the reader, where did 
they get the brick from ? Had they, then and there, the appli- 
ances for making bricks ? The answer is, they had' not ; they 
brought the brick with them from England. Many of the first 
brick houses or brick chimneys in Charleston and other portions 
of the low country, were made of brick imported from Eng- 
land, and some of the first settlers brought the brick with them. 
Brick afforded a capital ballast for the ships, then sailing ves- 
sels. The writer, in the spring of 1900, visited Jacksonboro, 
in Colleton County, thirty-seven miles below Charleston, to 
see his youngest daughter, Mary S. Godbold. He stayed there 
three weeks, and while there he was invited one afternoon to 
take a carriage ride into the country with old Mrs. Gioodman 
and her daughter. Miss Edith, and a Miss Cobum, school 
teacher; of course, he accepted the invitation; went out west- 
ward about five miles to the ruins of an old Episcopal Church 
in what was formerly known as St. Bartholomew's Parish. 
The two side walls were both down and most of the brick had 
been removed'; the back end wall was to a great extent down 
and bricks removed; the front end wall was nearly intact. 
The old lady Goodman said the bricks were brought from Eng- 
land — ^that was the tradition. They seemed to be as hard as 
iron ; the writer tried to make an impression on or an incision 
with his knife, but could not do so. The cement between them 
was equally as hard. Upon the front wall, about fifteen or 
twenty feet from the ground, was an inscription dimmed by 
the action of time so that the writer could not read it; but 
those in our party whose eyes were younger could read it thus : 
"i2th November, 1754." Those brick, said to, have been made 
in England, are much harder than any brick now made in this 
Southern country. The brick of this old St. Bartholomew 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 137 

[Church, put there some twenty years after the old brick in the 
Britton's Neck Church, spoken of by Bishop Gregg, corrobo- 
•ates the tradition that in the early times of the Province of 
South Carolina, the settlers either brought their brick with 
:hem from England, or imported them from that country 
ifter their arrival. 

BrittoNj FivAdger, Etc. — Of the Brittons we have already 
spoken; none of the name now in the county. The Graves 
have also become extinct in the county; tradition says they 
were a good people and prosperous. The name Fladger has 
also become extinct in the county, except one female, a 
daughter of the late C. J. Fladger, named Sallie Maria, unmar- 
ried, and lives with her half-sister, Mrs. R. B. Game, near 
Mullins. Of the Fladgers, however, they may be noticed 
herein further on. Of the Davis, of whom there are many, 
they will be noticed further on. Of the Tylers, they must 
have removed or disappeared many years ago, as the writer has 
never heard the name in the county ; there are some of the name 
in Horry County, who probably are descendants of those spoken 
of by Bishop Gregg. Of the Giles, something has already been 
said, and more may be said of them hereafter. "And others," 
a term used by Bishop Gregg, does not afford us much light. 
It may mean many or it may be only a few ; nor does the term 
identify any one in particular. "And being members of the 
Established Church, one of their first acts was to erect a house 
for the worship of God. Their minister. Dr.- Robert Hunter, 
came with them, and is supposed to have died there. He was 
succeeded by the Rev. Mr. Allison." It will be remembered 
that hereinbefore it has been stated on the information of Mr. 
M. M. Ivowrimore, that a family of Hunters, huni}ers by trade 
as well as by name, about this time, 1735, came and settled 
down there on Hunter's Island, so named from the Hunters 
settling there. This is corroborative of what Bishop Gregg 
says, as above stated. No one of that name has been known 
in the present limits of Marion County for years ; but families 
by that name have been known in West Marion, now in Flor- 
ence County, in all these years, and there may be some over 
there now by that name. It is probable that the family first 



138 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

settling in Britton's Neck, in the progress of time, moved 
higher up the river on the west side, and those over there are 
descendants of the Hunters of Britton's Neck. "Dr. Robert 
Hunter came with them, and is supposed to have died there. 
He was succeeded by the Rev. Mr. AlHson." The Allisons 
have been long known on the lower Pee Dee. The late James 
H. Allison, a very reputable genttleman, lived and reared a 
family on Great Pee Dee — I suppose, on the west side, and 
died there some years ago. One of his sons or grand-sons 
married a daughter of our late fellow-citizen, Captain William 
H. Crawford, and moved out to Georgia some few years back, 
and it is said he is very prosperous there in his business — is 
getting rich. It is an old and respectable name of the county, 
though the name is extinct in the county now, so fas as is 
known. A ferry on the Great Pee Dee, just above Port's 
Ferry, or just below, bears the name of "Allison's Ferry." 
The two ferries are not more than a mile apart. 

Bishop Gregg, page 70, says : "The other settlement referred 
to was made at a point on the east bank of the river called 
Sandy Bluff, two and a half miles above Mar's Bluff. A few 
traces of it are yet to be seen at several points immediately on 
the high bank of the river. The families of Crawford, Saund- 
ers, Murfee, Crosby, Keig'hly, Berry, and shortly after the 
Gibsons, made up this community. Sandy Bluff extended up 
the river about three miles. With the fertile uplands running 
out for some distance, and a rich swamp on the opposite side, 
and supplied, too, with numerous springs of good water, this 
locality was in many respects admirably adapted to the wants 
of the infant colony." * * * "These settlers built their houses, 
as did the Welsh above, immediately on the bank of the river, 
and in close proximity to eadh other, for the convenience of 
water, of social intercourse, and their mutual protection against 
the Indians. It was also more healthy than locations further 
from the river, as experience has proved. They were from 
England and Ireland, and having landed at Charleston, found 
their way to Georgetown, and thence up the river, attracted 
by the bounties which the government had offered. Like their 
neighbors in Britton's Neck, they erected a building for public 
worship according to the rites of the Established Church. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 139 

Faint traces of this early structure were to be seen a few years 
since. The brick used for the foundation were brought up the 
river (the settlers thus transporting themselves and their 
stores), and were of superior quality. The Rev. Wm. Turlje- 
ville came with this colony, and was their pastor. He was a 
well educated man, and had a high reputation as a preacher. 
Eminent also for piety and devotion to his work, he retained the 
confidence and affection of the people in an extensive region of 
the country to the close of a long life. One of the incidents 
related in connexion with him is singularly illustrative of this 
feeling. Such was the genral confidence in his piety and the 
efficacy of his prayers, that he was sent for from considerable 
distances during the pressure of any general calamity, to make 
intercession to God in behalf of the people. On one occasion, 
about the year 1760, during the prevalence of a fearful drought, 
there was a general meeting at Bass' Mills to pray for rain." 
(I suppose then known as Hulon's Mills.) "Mr. Turbeville 
was sent for. He answered the summons and, as tradition 
relates, before the sufferers had reached their homes, the 
heavens were opened and copious rains came down. Mr. 
Turbeville had no children. Several brothers came with him, 
of whom some descendants are now (1859) to be found in 
Marion. He lived at Sandy Bluff until after the year 1800, 
then removed to the west side of the river, near Mar's Bluff, 
where he married a second time, and died a:bout 1810, at the 
advanced age of 103 years." Bishop Gregg says further, in a 
note," page 71 : "Mr. Turbeville was a poor man through life. 
It is said that William AUston, grand- father of Governor 
Allston," (I suppose, R. F. W. AUston,) "who lived at that 
time near the Wahees," (a few miles below Mar's Bluff,) 
"complained to Mr. T., on one occasion, of his wearing such 
coarse garments. Mr. T. told him, he got but little for preach- 
ing and could not afford to dress better. Whereupon Mr. 
Allston gave him a black suit and silk gown, on^ condition that 
he was not to use them except in preaching andl on other public 
official occasions." 

This last is a most remarkable story. Here is a man of fine 
edHacation, young and vigorous, with a wife, but no children to 
support and educate, preaching for what, we suppose, was and 



140 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

became a rich church — a church, too, supported by taxation and 
a church to which, I suppose, AUston himself belonged, or at 
least attended, lived near by, and the Murfees, Saunders, Craw- 
fords and Gibsons, all rich men, so says Bishop Gregg, and yet 
did not pay their pastor enough to enable him to appear decent 
in the pulpit. This presents a strange condition of affairs, 
and does not speak well for his congregation ; though rich, yet 
niggardly stingy, and very much detracts from their otherwise 
high standing. Mr. Turbeville, in his apparent poverty, was 
in truth more wealthy than all of them put together. He evi- 
dently had the saving grace of God in his heart, and in his 
physical make up had the elements of an unusually long life, 
which was abundantly more valuable than gold and costly 
apparel. He, after suffering poverty and its pangs here for 
one hundred and three years, was taken into "Abraham's 
bosom." What became of his wealthy parishioners, is not 
known. Bishop Gregg says : "Mr. Turbeville had no children. 
Several brothers came with him, of whom some diescendants 
are now to be found in Marion." These were the foundation 
and origin of the Turbeville family in Marion. Of these, old 
William Turbeville, then in the prime of life, sixty years ago, 
lived in the neighborhood of Bbenezer Methodist Church, 
within the bounds of what was then called the Cross Roads 
Beat Company — a military division. The writer remembers 
very distinctly a very spirited contest for the Captaincy of the 
Cross Roads Beat Company, in 1840 or early '41, between 
William Turbeville and W. H. Moody. The respective candi- 
dates and their friends worked for their favorites as zealously 
as if the election had involved the safety of the State or an 
income of thousands of dollars. The military spirit of the 
State, in those times, has been noted in preceding pages of this 
book. The result of the election was in favor of W. H. Moody 
by thirteen votes. There were three brothers of that genera- 
tion of Turt)evilles — William, Absalom and John. William, 
not long after the contest for the Captaincy of the Cross Roads 
militia company, moved down into Britton's Neck, and there 
died in a good old age, left a son, Asa, and one named William. 
Asa Turbeville is one of our most respected citizens in the 
Britton's Neck section. A daughter of his married J. H. Bos- 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 141 

tick, in that section, another worthy and upright man, and is 
doing well. Absalom Turbeville, a brother of old William, 
lived on and owned the place just below Ebenezer, where the 
late John C. Campbell lived and died. Absalom left one 
daughter. John Turbeville lived and owned the place on the 
northeast side of Ebenezeir, died only a few years ago ; he left 
sons and daughters. Of his sons, George and Samuel are still 
living, but not on the lands of their father. The late William 
Dillon, a brother of J. W. Dillon, of the town of Dillon, married 
a daughter of John Turbeville, and by her had several sons 
and daughters. William Dillon and wife are both dead, and 
I think most of their children' — parents and children all died of 
consumption. I do not know that all are dead, but many of 
them are. Another branch of the Turbeville family was the 
father of the late old William Turbeville, of Marion; he is 
dead. Bethel Turbeville, another brother, is also dead. One 
of them, do not remember which, left a son, Edward, called 
Ned Turbeville, a blacksmith, who died young, leaving a fam- 
ily ; what has become of them is unknown. There was another 
brother of Bethel, who lived over Catfish, in Wahee, a very 
noisy man, especially at elections, when enthused by the spirits 
of the occasion ; his name was Robert, familiarly called Bob ; 
he is dead. Recurring to the William Turt>eville who ran for 
the Captaincy in 1840, as before stated, he left another son, 
named Stephen, who is one of our most worthy citizens ; lives 
on Buck Swamp. The wife of the late Samuel Johnson was a 
daug'hter of old "Captain" William, and is still living, but has 
no children. Beverly Culbreatih, merchant of Marion, married, 
first, a daugliter of Asa Turbeville, and she died, and he has 
married another daughter. These three old Turbevilles about 
Ebenezer Church were not rich, yet they were not poor — "they 
lived at home and boarded at the same place," as the saying 
goes. They were honest, hard-working men. 

Of the settlement at Sandy Bluff, the names Saunders, 
Crosby and Keighly, as also that of Murfee, are now extinct 
in Marion County. Never have heard of the name Keighly; 
that family must have removed to other parts. The name 
Crosby, the writer has heard of; in fact, he has seen a man 
by that name from Alabama, who said he was bom in Marion 



142 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

County, and was a half-brother of the late John C. Legette, of 
West Marion ; this was fifty years ago ; his name was William 
Crosby. The name Saunders has long since disappeared from 
the county. I have been informed, however, there is a Peter 
Sanders, who lives below Marion Court House, who is, doubt- 
less, a descendant of the Saunders spoken of; he is a good 
citizen and has been Assistant Door-keeper of the House of 
Representatives in Columbia for the last several years. The 
writer in his law practice for more than fifty years has seen 
grants of large bodies of land in Marion District to John 
Sanders, supposed to be a descendant of the family at Sandy 
Bluff ; the grants spoken of were for lands lying between Cat- 
fish and Great Pee Dee, in the neighborhood of Antioch 
Churcih and Berry's Cross Roads. 

Bishop Gregg, p. 71, says : "Of the settlers at Sandy Bluff, 
the Murfees, Sanders, Gibsons and Crawfords accumulated 
the largest properties, and became most prominent. John 
Crawford, the first of that name, had three sons — ^James, John 
and Hardy. James, the eldest of them, amassed a large for- 
tune for that day, and maintained through life a high character 
for integrity. He was a Captain in the Revolution, and a val- 
iant soldier in the cause of liberty." In a note, the Bishop 
says : "He was the grand-father of the late Chapman J. Craw- 
ford, of Marion." Thus we have the origin of the once 
extensive family of Crawfords, so far as Marion County is 
concerned — ^to whom they married and what children they had, 
we are pretty much in the dark. Bishop Gregg says, on p. 75 : 
"About the same time, two families of James and Lucas, came 
down the river, and settled on Catfish. With the latter of 
these, the Crawfords and Evans intermarried." Who of the 
Crawfords intermarried with the Lucas family, and whether 
they were males or females, is now unknown, and perhaps 
past finding out, and the same may be said of the Evans and 
James. 

Crawford. — James Crawford, the grand-father of the late 
Chapman Crawford, had a son named James, the father of 
Chapman; whether there were other sons or not, is not now 
known ; there were daughters — ^the wife of old Osborne Lane 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 143 

was one; the first wife of old William Bethea was another, 
who was the mother of the late John C. Bethea; another 
daughter married a man by the name of Porter ; §he was the 
grand-mother of Robert P. Porter, now living at Marion. 
James Crawford, the father of Chapman J. Crawford, married 
Miss Rachel Nevils, and by her bad two sons, Chapman J. and 
William H., and three or four daughters ; one married Peter P. 
Johnson, of Fayetteville, N. C. ; one married D. C. Milling, of 
Darlington, and one married D. J. McDonald, long a merchant 
at Marion, and Representative from Marion in the State Legis- 
lature in 1850, and finally failing in his business, removed to 
Arkansas. James Crawford, the second, was a very prosper- 
ous man, left a large estate, and died in the prime of life. His 
widow, Rachel, married Dr. Cherry, and by him had several 
daughters; one of them married, first. Dr. Richard Scar- 
borough, of Marion; he soon died childless, and his widow 
then married Major O. P. Wheeler, and after some years he 
died, and she remained his widow for several years, when she 
died. Another daughter of Mrs. Cherry became the wife of 
the late C. Graham, of Marion ; she died before he did, and left 
an only child, a son, Herbert C. Graham, now residing in 
Marion. Another daughter, Sarah Jane, became the wife of 
Dr. J. Hamilton Wheeler, who died and left her a widow with 
two children, Ed. B. Wheeler and Tiston C. Wheeler, now 
residing in Marion ; their mother, Sarah Jane, still lives. Dr. 
Cherry, a most excellent and upright man, died away back in 
the '40's ; he was a well-to-do man. The sons of James Craw- 
ford, the second, were Chapman J. and William H. Crawford. 
Chapman was an ambitious, energetic and enterprising man; 
married, first, a Miss Jolly, an only child of Joseph Jolly, a 
very wealthy man in West Marion ; she died, leaving an only 
child; he married again, and the second wife died, and he 
married a third time. I think he had two or three children 
in all. Dr. Ross married the daughter by the Jolly wife; 
Junius H. Law, of Darlington, married a daughter by one of 
his other wives. By his energy and push and by his mar- 
riages, he made property and left a large estate at his death, 
which occurred in November, 1852, when only in the prime of 
life; he lived fast (not in the sense of a dissipated life) and 



144 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

went through life in a hurry. His younger brother, Wm. H. 
Crawford, grew up and married a Miss Durant, sister of Rev. 
H. H. Durant, of the South Carolina Conference of the South- 
ern Methodist Church; he married, loth February, 1840, the 
same day of Queen Victoria's marriage to Prince Albert. 
Captain Crawford started out in life with fine prospects; he 
went into a large mercantile business at Marion, in partnership 
with his brother-in-law, D. J. McDonald, who had had some 
training for such business — a man of push and enterprise, but 
lacking in business judgment. The firm seemed to do well for 
a few years and then began to go down, and finally failed alto- 
gether, and Captain Crawford's whole property was swept out, 
and he with his family were left penniless. McDonald emi- 
grated, to Arkansas, and was said to have built up again; but 
Captain Crawford remained poor to the day of his death ; he 
lived in Marion until three or four years ago, when he moved 
to Georgia, and died there about two years ago, eighty years of 
age. Captain Crawford was a good man, but the reverses to 
which he had been subjected soured his disposition, and he 
became apathetic as to all mankind; he left two sons, George 
and William, who are the only hope of perpetuating the name 
in that branch of the Crawford family. George Crawford is 
married and has children, whether sons or daughters, is un- 
known to the writer ; William is yet single. The connexion is 
yet large, but the name, like many others, may become extinct 
at least in that branch of the family, in another generation or 
two. What changes are wrought in one hundred and sixty 
years! The first James Crawford married a second time, 
and had a daughter, Sallie, who became the wife of the late 
Barfield Moody, a prominent man in his day in Marion, of 
wihom more may be said hereinafter. Recurring to the late 
Chapman J. Crawford, it is proper to say that he was elected 
to the lower House of the Legislature in 1844, as hereinbefore 
stated, and again in 1846, and served two terms. In 1852, he 
was a candidate for the Senate against Dr. Robert Harllee, and 
after a very heated campaign, he was beaten by 171 majority, 
and, like Horace Greeley in 1872, did not survive the campaign 
more than a month. It was thought and said by some that his 
defeat killed him or contributed to his death ; he was a very 
ambitious man. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 145 

We have traced oue branch of the family pf old John Craw- 
ford, who was one of the first settlers at Sandy Bluff (after- 
wards called Solomon's Landing, and perhaps later called 
Bird's Landing) . Old John Crawford had three sons, James, 
John and Hardy. We have traced it through James, the eld- 
est; of John and Hardy's posterity we know not how they 
ran. There have been other Crawfords here, but whether 
from John or Hardy, or both, we can't say ; for instance, James, 
called Cype, lived upon and owned the grove lands, now 
owned by the estates of Governor EHerbe and James G. Hasel- 
den ; Cype Crawford died there, back in the '40's ; never mar- 
ried. He had a brother, Willis Crawford, who married Sallie 
Bethea, and raised a large family, and died in 185 1, in what is 
now Bethea Township; his sons were James, Hardy B., 
Thomas C, Willis G., William and Gibson G. Crawford; his 
daughters were Rhoda and Margaret. Of Willis Crawford's 
sons, James died before he was grown; Hardy B. married a 
Miss Piatt, and went to Mississippi years ago, and is yet living, 
and is said to be doing well ; Thomas C, well known and now 
living in Florence County, and one of the best of her citizens, 
married, first, a Miss Morgan, of Charleston, who died a year 
or two after marriage, childless ; he married again, i6th May, 
1866, Miss Carrie R. McPherson, in West Marion (now 
Florence), where Thomas C. Crawford has ever since resided, 
and where he now resides.* His wife died suddenly about a 
month ago, childless. Willis G. Crawford was a doctor ; mar- 
ried a Miss Morgan, of Charleston, a sister of his brother 
Thomas' wife. Not long after his marriage he was on a fox 
chase, and galloping his horse through the woods, his horse 
bogged down and threw the doctor, whose gun was lying 
across his front, and in the fall of his horse and himself, the 
gun was discharged and he was killed ; he left no- child. Wil- 
liam Crawford died unmarried, some years after the war. Gib- 
son G. Crawford married a daughter of the late Colonel James 
R. Bethea ; the fruits of the marriage were two sons, James G. 
and Samuel B., and two daughters, Jessie and Mary; the sons 
are now young men. James G. married, a week or two ago, 
a Miss Evans, of Society Hill; the daughter, Jessie, married 

*Thomas C. Crawford died since writing the above. 



146 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

W. Ellis Bet!hea, who lives at lyaitta ; Samuel B. and Mary are 
yet single, and live at Latta with their father, G. G. Crawford. 
Of the two daughters of Willis Crawford, Rhoda married 
Henry Easterling, about 1850, and he was killed in the war; 
the widow, Rhoda, is also dead ; she left three sons, Willis C, 
Thomas and Frank; and two daughters, Ella and Florence. 
The three sons are married — Willis C. to a Miss Legette ; they 
have a family, some of them grown and married. J. Frank 
Easterling married a Miss Watson, daughter of the late Samuel 
Watson. Thomas Easterling went to Florida, where he mar- 
ried, has children, and is Sheriff of the county in which he 
lives. The Easterling boys are men of character and doing 
fairly well. Of the two daughters of Henry Easterling and 
his wife, Rhoda, Ella married Iveroy Bethea, a son of Captain 
D. W. Bethea ; they live in Marlborough, and are doing well ; 
I know not of their family. Florence Easterling, the other 
daughter, married Robert McPherson, in West Marion; she 
is dead ; left one child, a son. Margaret Crawford, the young- 
est daughter of Willis Crawford, nevfer married; she died a 
few years ago. "Cype" and Willis Crawford had another 
brother — think he was a brother — named Gadi. The writer 
never saw him ; he died unmarried. There was another family 
of Crawfords, dtescendants of old John, but in a different 
branch of the family — Hal Crawford and a brother, named 
John, and two sisters, the wife of Cross Roads Henry Berry, 
and Mercy Bass, wife of Joseph Bass (senior). Berry's wife 
was named Charity. Hal Crawford married and went West; 
John Crawford never did marry. I suppose they are both 
dead. "Cype" and Willis Crawford had a sister, named 
Rhoda, who became the wife of the late Hugh Godbold ; she has 
been dead some years, and left no «hildTen. There were two 
Crawford brothers from Alabama of the same family, named 
John H. Crawford and Dr. James Crawford; they were here 
during the '40's. John H. married a Sarah Ann Moody, oldest 
daughter of the late Barfield Moody. They went back to Ala- 
bama. The wife of John H. died, leaving a son, named 
Albert, but was called Dock Crawford; he came back to this 
State and lived here for years ; was a merchant at Marion, and 
was County Auditor for a while, but resigned the office. It 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 147 

was said he went crazy or became a lunatic, and in a lucid in- 
terval went or started back to Georgia, and dlied, it was said, 
crazy in the woods. He was the nephew of our fellow-citizen, 
E. J. Moody. 

MuRFEE. — Bishop Gregg, p. 71, says : "Of the Murfees there 
were four brothers, Moses, Malachi, Maurice and Michael. 
Of these, Malachi became the wealthiest. He is said to have 
given one hundred slaves to each of three sons ; he died before 
the Revolution. Maurice had a son bearing his name, who 
was destined to occupy a prominent place in the subsequent 
history of the Pee Dee." Maurice Murfee, of the second gen- 
eration, was a Colonel in the Revolution, and did valiant ser- 
vice for his country. He was an ardent Whig, of daring and 
reckless courage ; he was a man of violent passion, so much so, 
as to lead him to the commission of violent and brutal acts; 
he killed his uncle, Gideon Gibson, in a fit of anger, and for 
which he had no valid excuse or even palliation; he was a 
violent man through life, and finally died in prison for debt. 
Malachi Murfee, of the second generation, was a Captain in 
the Revolution ; he was wounded and escaped at Bass' Mill in 
a fight with the Tories; another account says he was killed. 
He was a first cousin of Colonel Maurice Murfee. The Mur- 
fee family must have been numerous, not only in the name, 
but also in its connections. There were four brothers of them 
to start with; they all had descendants, males as well as 
females. They intermarried with the best families in both 
ways, males and females, and by the third and fourth genera- 
tions must have been numerous. We have no account of their 
emigration to other parts, and yet in a period of one hundred 
and fifty years, the name (from that family) has entirely dis- 
appeared, and their connections are unknown. The last one 
of them has disappeared. Mrs. Arline Mooneyham, nee Mur- 
fee or Murphy, died childless, about ten years ago, in the Pee 
Dee slashes ; she was the last ; she had no children or known 
relations to inherit her lands — some 600 or 800 acres in the 
slashes ; she made a last will and gave all she had to Dr. J. E. 
Jarnigan; he attended her in her last illness. Such are the 
results of the action of time. Change and decay pervade all 



148 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

things terrestrial. The present actors in the drama of life, in 
a few years will have passed into the forever beyond, and their 
successors will not know, in many instances, that a particular 
one lived. 

Berry. — Another settler at Sandy Bluff (Solomon's Land- 
ing), mentioned by Bishop Gregg, was a Berry. He does not 
say what his name was, or anything else about him. The 
writer takes it for granted that he is the progenitor of the ex- 
tensive family by that name, in the county, and such suppo- 
sition is not in conflict with the traditions of that family, but 
rather corroborate it. The writer a few years ago, and not 
long before her death, talked with old Mrs. Pama Tart, who 
died in her ninety-fourth year, and who, as she said', was the 
grand-daughter of the first Berry in this region of country, and 
she said his name was Andrew Berry — a small man in stature ; 
he settled at Sandy Bluff, on Pee Dee River. How long he 
remained or who he married, is not known ; but, according to 
Mrs. Tart's statement, he had and raised a family of ten 
children, six sons and four daughters. From the Berry family 
and its connections is derived much of our citizenship. The 
sons of old Andrew were six. Henry and Stephen were 
both known to the writer. Henry was a man of family, and 
had lands granted to him on lyittle Reedy Creek in 1786; he 
married a Miss Hays, and settled on said Reedy Creek; he 
raised two sons, Dennis and Slaughter, and four daughters. 
Dennis and Slaughter married sisters, two daughters of David 
Miles, an old citizen of upper Marion. Of the four daughters, 
Elizabeth married Bryant Jones; Fama married Nathan 
Tart; Martha, called Pattie, married John M. Miles; and Mary 
married William Rogers. The father, Henry Berry, was a 
capital man and intelligent for his day and time; he served as 
Justice of the Peace for some years, evidenced by his official 
signature to the probate of deeds for record seen by the writer ; 
he accumulated a good property for his time; he founded or 
built the Catfish Baptist Church, not where it now stands, but 
back from its present location on Little Reedy Creek. In his 
old age he divided out his property among his children, and 
then lived among them himself till his death, about 1853 or 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 149 

1854; he was over ninety years of age at his death. His 
brother, Stephen, also lived to a great age — perhaps as old as 
his brother, Henry. I do not know whom he married; he 
raised a considerable family, only two sons, and several 
daughters ; his sons were Henry (known in later times as Cross 
Roads Henry), and Andrew Stephen Berry; he was a good 
citizen, an honest man, bore a good character through life, but 
not as useful a man as was his brother, Henry — ^perhaps, not 
so well educated; he dSed about 1862. Dennis Berry, the old- 
est son of old Henry, raised only one son, Frank A. Berry, who 
died childless, a few years ago. Dennis Berry lived to an 
advanced age, over eighty ; he, too, was a Justice of the Peace 
in his diay — ^but few in his locality competent for such position, 
and still fewer in his father's day. The second son of old 
Henry Slaughter, and youngest child, as before stated, married 
a Miss Miles ; he raised a small family — two sons, Charles and 
Henry, and two da.ughters; he and his family removed to 
Florida in 1854 or 1855. Elizabeth, daughter of old Henry, 
married Bryant Jones, the father of our fellow-citizen, Henry 
Jones, and the late F. D. Jones and James E. Jones ; the two 
latter are dead. James E. never married ; and two daughters, 
Nancy and Polly. Fama Berry, who married Nathan Tart, 
born in 1791, and died in 1884, was a most remarkable woman, 
physically and mentally. The writer went to see her a year or 
so before she died ; she was very large and corpulent, suppose 
she weighed 250 or more ; she said she had never in her life 
been sick but little, and had never taken any medicine, except 
what she prescribed for and could procure for herself; her 
mental powers were unimpaired and her memory of persons, 
families and events excelled anything of the kind I ever met 
with. I wrote her obituary and published it in the "Marion 
Star" newspaper, soon after her death. She was not sick 
when she died, as it was told the writer by her son-in-law, 
Wilson Hays — ^who called in a physician to see her, who said 
the fat had overgrown the heart so as to prevent its action, and 
no relief was possible. Fama Tart raised several sons, Enos, 
James H., H. Tart, Thomas E. and Gadie, and several 
daughters. The sons are, perhaps, all dead; also the daugh- 
ters, except Jane, who married Willis Waters, who lives in 



150 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Florence County; and Wilson Hays' wife. H. H. Tart, who 
was an excellent and energetic man of high character in his 
sphere of life, died last year, about seventy-eight years of age. 
Fama Tart's children and great-grand-children, and even 
another generation of them, are numerous. Pattie Miles has 
been dead for years, the third daughter of old Henry. If there 
are any of her children or grand-children now in the county, it 
is unknown to the writer, except the widow of H. H. Tart, 
dieceased, and her children and grand-children, all of whom 
are unknown. Mary, called Polly Rogers, wife of the late 
William Rogers, has been dead for more than twenty years; 
she was the youngest daughter of old Henry Berry; she has 
several descendants now in the county, to the third and fourth 
generations. Our good citizens, Philip B. Rogers and Lot B. 
Rogers, are sons of hers ; and of her daughters, Mrs. Mastin 
Stackhouse, Mrs. D. F. Berry and Mrs. Maggie Ivey are still 
living. Of the dead and the living they, perhaps, number 
more than a hundred, among the Hays, Stackhouses, Lewis, 
Adams, Berrys and others, her descendants are to be found. 
To trace all from old Andrew down through males and females 
is and would be an impossibility ; if it could be done, it would 
run up into thousands. Heretofore in this work the writer 
has in most cases pursued that course — ^that is, commencing 
with the first settler and tracing it down through every branch 
of the family to the present generation, male and female — 
which in many instances is very difficult and in some cases 
impossible, for want of knowledge ; but he will have to aban- 
don that mode for want of space and' time, and in a book of the 
size contemplated, the fourth part could not be told. Andrew 
Berry, a grand-son of the first Andrew, and brother of Cross 
Roads Henry, lived to the advanced age of eighty-nine, and 
died only a few years ago; was a harmless, inoffensive man; 
raised by two wives several sons and daughters — Captain 
Stephen F. Berry and Bright Berry by the first marriage — 
(the latter of whom is now dead, leaving a considerable family, 
sons and daughters, names unknown), and by the second mar- 
riage, Henry, Nathan, Joseph and two other sons, nicknamed 
"Close" and "Tight." Nathan married a daughter of Daniel 
A. Piatt, and died, leaving a son named David. Joseph Berry 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 151 

married his brother Nathan's widow, and' has a considerable 
family. Of the brothers, "Close" and "Tight," the writer 
knows nothing, and can, therefore, say nothing more. An- 
drew Berry had several daughters, but knows not to whom 
they married ; no doubt but that there is a numerous progeny 
from Andrew (second) Berry, but they are unknown to the 
writer. Cross Roads Henry Berry, a grandi-son of the first 
■settler, Andrew, and a brother of Andrew, the second, became 
the most noted of any of the Berry family, except, perhaps, his 
Uncle Henry, already referred' to. He was bom January 13th, 
1796, and died 9th July, 1876, and was cremated, July nth, 
1876, near his home. 

Cross Roads Henry Berry was a man of fine business sense, 
honest and upright in all his various dealings Avith his fellow- 
man; he applied himself strictly to his own business (farm- 
ing) and succeeded therein, not for show and ostentation at 
county and State fairs, but for profit. He settled on 150 acres 
of land, acquired through his wife, Charity Crawford (then 
unimproved), and with very little means otherwise began life 
at the Cross Roads, afterwards and yet called Berry's Cross 
Roads, where he lived and where he spent his whole life, and 
there and thereabouts made his large property. He entered 
into no schemes of speculation ; he at first acquired slowly but 
surely ; he took care of what he made and kept adding to it, 
making it larger and larger year by year ; lived well at home, 
but without ostentation; made most of what he used on his 
plantation ; he acquired a large landed estate around him, more 
than ten thousand acres, most of which he deeded to his 
children before his death; his land's were very valuable; he 
avoided debt through life ; he raised to be grown fiye sons and 
three daughters. The sons were Cade, Gewood, Elihu, James 
and Stephen, all of whom are now dead, except James, who 
lives on the old homestead of his father. Cade Berry, the old- 
est son, never married; he died more than twenty-five years 
ago ; Gewood, a graduate of the University of North Carolina, 
and the only one of the family to whom a collegiate education 
was given, married Joanna EUerbe, a daughter of the late John 
C. Ellerbe, and a sister of the late Captain W. S. EUertje; the 
fruits of this marriage were five sons and a daughter; the 
II 



152 A HISTORY OK MARION COUNTY. 

daughter died in childhood, the sons were all raised to be 
grown. Three of the sons, John H., Edward Burke and 
Thomas Wickham Berry, are among our best and most re- 
spected citizens ; the two others, William E. and Ashton, emi- 
grated West ; William E. Berry is dead, leaving a family some- 
where in the Western States. Ashton lives in Florida, and is 
doing well, as is said. Elihu Berry married, first. Miss Jane 
Haselden; and she, after having three children, Sallie, Sue 
and James H., died. Elihu married, a second time, to Miss 
Mary Ellen Hays, a daughter of the late John C. Hays^ and by 
her had four daughters and two sons. The sons are E. L,ide 
Berry and Eugene Berry, the latter now a minor; the 
daughters, Telatha, Emma, Lucy and Leila. Telatha married 
J. W. Davis, of Marion, removed West, and is now dead, 
leaving two little daughters, twins, who are now being raised 
by their Grand-mother' Berry ; Emma, the next daughter, mar- 
ried Dow Atkinls, who is one of our good citizens ; Lucy and 
Leila are both young girls — one at the Columbia Eemale Col- 
lege, the other at Rock Hill. E. Lide Berry, a very worthy 
young man, is yet single. James Berry, a son of Cross Roads 
Henry, the only survivor of the family, resides on his father's 
old homestead, advancing far into life, sixty-seven years of age, 
a very successful farmer and exemplary citizen; be married 
Miss Harriett Alford, a daughter of the late Neill Alford, and 
has raised a large family of sons and daughters. The sons are 
Robert A., Neil A., Henry, James, Quincy and Downing; the 
daughters are Telatha, Julia, Florence and Etta — all married, 
except Florence and Downing. Robert A. and James are 
doctors, residing and practicing their professions in Birming- 
ham, Ala., and are said to be doing well. Robert A. married 
a Virginia lady, a Miss McChesney; James married a Miss 
Carpenter, of Charleston; Henry married a Miss Deer,- of 
Marion; Quincy married a Miss Oliver, of Marion, and 
daughter of Squire D. J. Oliver ; Downing is yet single. Of 
the daughters of James Berry, Telatha married a Mr. Guy 
Lovejoy, and is in some of the Western States ; Julia married 
Mr. Ed. R. Hamer, who resides at Little Rock; Miss Etta 
married a Mr. Drayspring, of Birmingham, Ala. ; Miss Flo- 
rence is yet unmarried. Of Elihu Berry's children by his first 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 153 

wife, Jane Haselden, Miss Sallie married Willis Fore; they 
raised five children, three sons and two daughters. The sons 
are Linwood, Tracy and Willis. Linwood married a Miss 
Dudley, of Marlborough; Tracy married a Miss Hays, 
daughter of our fellow-citizen, H. R. Hays ; Willis is yet un- 
married. Of the two daughters, Janie married James Dudley, 
of Marlborough ; Rebecca, the younger daughter, married John 
C. Hays. The second daughter of Elihu, Sue, married our re- 
spected fellow-citizen. Captain W. B. Evans ; they have several 
children, sons and daughters, noted among the Evans family. 
Of the children of Elihu Berry by his first wife, is a ran, James 
H. Berry, one of our energetic and prosperous fanmers ; he has 
been married twice. His first wife was Miss Mollie Stack- 
house, daughter of the late Colonel E. T. Stackhouse ; she died 
some years ago, leaving seven children; the husband, James 
H. Berry, married, a second time, a daughter of John H. Davis, 
of Marion. Of the sons of the late Gewood Berry, John H. 
married Miss Madge Fore, a daughter of Tracy R. Fore ; they 
have only one child living, a daughter. Edmund Burke mar- 
ried Miss Mary Manning, daughter of the late Thomas J. 
Manning; they have only one child living, a boy, named for 
his father, Edmund Burke. Thomas Wickham Berry, the 
youngest son of Gewood Berry, married Miss Tommie Man- 
ning, a sister of Edmund Burke's wife; they have several 
children, all girls ; they are in the L,ittle Rock community. 
Stephen Berry, the youngest son of Cross Roads Henry Berry, 
married Miss Euphemia Watson, a daughter of the late old 
Isham Watson; Stephen died in about a year after his mar- 
riage, childless. His widow married the late F. D. Jones, of 
Marion, and raised a family of five daughters and one son, 
about whom more may be said hereafter; Mrs. Jones is also 
dead. Of the daughters of Cross Roads Henry Berry, Mary, 
the eldest, married Stephen Fore, 20th February, 1845. The 
writer was one of his best men upon that pleasant occasion. 
Stephen Fore and 'wife are both dead; he died nth March, 
1881 ; Mrs. Fore died some four or five years ago ; the fruits 
of their marriage were five daughters and four sons, viz: 
Flora, Amanda, Florence, Annie and Ida ; the sons are George, 
Oliver Cromwell, J. Russell and Clarence. Flora, the eldest 



154 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

daughter, married James D. Bethea, who survives her, she 
having died two or three years ago ; she left several daughters 
and three sons, viz: Mary, Blanche, Maude, Clara, Maggie 
and Iveslie, all of whom are grown. Blanche and Maude are 
married' — ^the former to Dan Dillon, the latter to Chalmers 
Biggs; the other girls are single. The sons are Kemper, 
Charles and Lonnie; of these, Kemper, the writer thinks, is 
married, and is in the city of Washington, in the employ of 
the government in some of its departments ; Charles is about 
grown ; be and his younger brother, Lonnie, remain with their 
father and unmarried sisters. Amanda, the second daughter 
of Stephen Fore and wife, Mary, married David S. Allen ; she 
died some years back, and left at her death four girl children, 
the oldest of whom, Mary, is the wife of John D. Coleman, a 
very excellent man and worthy citizen ; her three sisters all live 
with her. D. S. Allen, the father,, married a second time; his 
wife is the sister of his son-in-law, John D. Coleman. The 
writer is curious to know what kin the children of D. S. Allen, 
by his second wife, are to the children of John D. Coleman, 
the son-in-law of D. S. Allen ? The third daughter of Stephen 
Fore and wife, Mary, Florence by name, married D. McL,. 
Bethea; she died in May last, leaving seven children, six 
daughters and one son, named James Stephen; the daughters 
are Estelle, Nellie, Lutie, Annie, Ida and Florence AUine; 
Nellie, the second daughter, lately married Mr. Maurice Man- 
ning, a promising young man ; the other children are with their 
father, the youngest about two years old; the son, James 
Stephen, is about fifteen or sixteen years of age. D. McL. 
Bethea is a very prosperous man. Annie, the fourth daughter 
of Stephen Fore, married Willie Watson, son of William Wat- 
son, deceased; they have ten children, seven sons and three 
daughters; the sons are Lawton, Julian, Burke, Hoyt, Jasper, 
Pratt and Memory; the daughters are Nora, Pauline and 
Alma — all single and live with their parents. The two oldest 
sons, Lawton and Julian, are in Wake Forrest College, in 
North Carolina. Ida, the fifth daughter of Stephen Fore, 
married Mr. Evmerson M. Duffie, at Marion, who is a genius 
in machinery, and is the owner of the extensive iron works in 
the town of Marion ; he is not only a useful man in his profes- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 155 

sion, which he took up within himself and brought it up to its 
present perfection without serving any apprenticeship ; he may 
truthfully be called a natural genius, but he is a most excellent 
man every way — full of energy, pluck and perseverance, re- 
liable in every phase of life. They have five or six children of 
both sexes, none grown, names unknown to the writer. The 
oldest son of Stephen Fore is George Fore, one of our best 
and most worthy citizens; he married a Miss Ford, daughter 
of the late Elias B. Ford. George Fore has three children; 
two sons. Baker and Joseph, and one daughter, Kate — -all 
grown and unmarried. The oldest son. Baker, is a graduate 
of Wake Forrest College, and is a promising young man.* The 
second son of Stephen Fore is J. Russel Fore ; he and the fourth 
son, Clarence Fore, have never married; they live together on 
the father's old -homestead ; one of James D. Bethea's daugh- 
ters, their niece, stays with them and keeps house. Each of 
these boys has his own place, runs his own farm, and makes 
his own money. J. Russel is reputed to have money ahead; 
he is much older than Clarence, and has been working for 
himself much longer, and hence has accumulated more money. 
Oliver Cromwell Fore, the third son of Stephen Fore, married 
Miss Jennie Lassiter, a very smart woman, as well as a good 
woman; they have four children, two boys and two girls, all 
small ; Cromwell has been in the iron works of his brother-in- 
law, McDuffie, for several years, and is supposed to have 
learned much about machinery and how to make or repair it. 
Cross Roads Henry Berry's second daughter, Telatha, married 
Dr. Willis Fore, a brother of Stephen Fore, supra; she lived 
only a few years, and died childless ; Dr. Fore himself survived 
his wife only a few years, when he died, not having remarried. 
Cross Roads Henry Berry's third and youngest daughter, Vir- 
zilla by name, married the late John Mace; the fruits of the 
marriage were two daughters, Lucindia M. and Maggie Ellen ; 
their mother died when they were quite young, aged eight and 
and six years respectively ; they were raised without any mother 
by their father; he never remarried; the girls grew up to 
womanhood, and the younger, Maggie Ellen, married John C. 
Sellers, 23d December, 1869; four years afterwards, Lucinda 
*Sihce writing the above, George Fore has died. 



156 A HISTORY OF MARION COUi^TY. 

M. married William G. Edwards ; both Lucinda M. and Maggie 
E. are dtead; the latter died 26th April, 1888, the former died in 
1896. Maggie left six children surviving her, viz : Lucy, Ben- 
jamin B., Annie, Wallace D., lyeila and Maggie Ellen (called 
Pearl), the latter only three days old at her mother's death; 
she was taken by her aunt, Rachel Norton, who has kept her 
till the present time ; she is now thirteen years old. Lucinda 
M., wife of William G. Edwards, left at her death five children, 
three daughters and two sons ; the daughters are : Mary, now 
the wife of J. Dudley Haselden; she has two children, both 
sons; also, Maggie and Carrie Edwards. The two sons are 
Henry A. Edwards and Samuel Edwards. Henry, the elder 
son, after taking a two years course in Wofford College, went 
to Vanderbilt University, Tenn., arid took a three or four 
years course in the medical department of that well equipped 
institution, and is now a young "M. D." . 

Captain Stephen F. Berry, son of the late Andrew Berry, 
and nephew of Cross Roads Henry, married a Miss Jones, and 
raised a large family of sons and daughters, the names of 
whom (or all of them) the writer does not know. His oldest 
son, Henry, married a Miss Cottingham, and has a fajnily; 
another son, Wylie, married a daughter of H. C. Dew, and is 
doing fairly well; he has one child, a daughter. Another 
son, Benjamin O., was for a while an itinerant Methodist 
preacher ; married some lady, to the writer unknown ; he did 
not do well, was finally expelled from the Conference and 
has disappeared. Another son, G. Raymond Berry, married 
a Miss Mclntyre, and having a fair education, he has taught 
school most of the time since, his majority, and has a good 
reputation, both as a citizen and as a teacher ; he is very popu- 
lar, and has lately been elected as County Superintendent of 
Education. Captain Berry has other sons unmarried and 
living with him, names unknown — ^think one of them is named 
Wade Hampton ; he has four married daughters ; one married 
Albert Rogers, who is doing well and a good citizen, has 
children — how many is unknown. Another married John B. 
Hamer, a very energetic, pushing man ; I think he has five or 
six children. Another married James S. Hays, and is doing 
well ; Hays is an energetic, persevering man, and prosperous ; 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 157 

he has several children. Another daughter married a man by 
the name of Wright, who recently died at Latta ; don't think he 
left any children. 

Another family of Berrys may be noted, to wit: Samuel J. 
Berry's faniily. The first old Andrew, that settled with the 
Sandy Bluff colony about 1736 or 1737, it will be remembered, 
had six sons and four daughters, according to tradition, 
through old Mrs. Fama Tart, a grand-daughter of old Andrew. 
Mrs. Tart was a living walking genealogical dictionary, and a 
memory equally as wonderful. Of the six brothers, four lived 
to be grown and raised families, to wit: Henry, her father, 
Stephen, John and Andrew ; I think another was named Sam- 
uel; the sixth name not remembered. The Samuel J. Berry's 
family, mentioned above, was a direct descendant from either 
John or Andrew. Samuel J. Berry died some years ago, leav- 
ing a family of three sons, Madison, Wilson and Stephen, and 
perhaps some daughters ; he was a volunteer soldier in the 
Florida Seminole War, in a company from Marion, com- 
manded by Captain and formed a part of the bat- 
talion commanded by Major W. W. Harllee. The writer pro- 
cured a pension for Samuel J. Berry's widow, which she yet, if 
living, receives from the United States government. Samuel 
J. Berry was an unpretentious man, a quiet and peaceable citi- 
zen, honest to the cent, but little known outside his neighbor- 
hood ; his three sons, Madison, Wilson and Stephen, are of like 
character, honoring their departed father and perpetuating his 
name and many virtues. There are other Berrys, descend- 
ants of the first old Andrew, of less note than those herein 
mentioned, and unknown to the writer. Their connections, 
through the female line, are very extensive and permeate pretty 
much the whole of the upper end of the county; many have 
gone West. The name will not soon become extinct. Of the 
four daughters of the old first Andrew Berry, two of them 
married Dews, one of them a Hays, and the other did not 
marry — ^if she did it is not known to whom. Of these more 
will be said hereafter. 

Saunders. — In the settlement made at Sandy Bluff, the 
name of Saunders appears. John, George and William 



158 A HISTORY OT^ MARION COUNTY. 

Saunders were the first of the name there. Bishop Gregg, on 
p. 71, says: "Of the "settlers at Sandy Bluff, the Murfees, 
Saunders, Gibsons and Crawfords accumulated the largest 
properties." The name Saunders has become extinct in 
Marion County — not one of the name in the county, to the 
knowledge of the writer. One John Saunders took up large 
grants of land between Catfish and Great Pee Dee. "They 
came from England. John Saunders had two sons, George 
and Thomas. George was the father of Nathaniel Saunders, 
who became a man of some note, and was the father of the late 
Moses Saunders and Jordan Saunders, in Darlington" (Gregg, 
p. 73). In a note to the same page, the Bishop says: "George 
Saunders came to an untimely end; in connection with which 
a singular incident is related. He was engaged on a Sunday 
in cutting down a bee tree, a cypress, in the swamp on the 
opposite side of the river. As the cypress fell, the limb of an 
ash was broken off, and being thrown with violence on the 
head of Saunders, killed him instantly. An ash afterwards 
came up at the head of his grave and grew to a large tree, 
being regarded by the people as a standing monument of the 
judgment sent upon him for the violation of the Lord's day, 
which led to his end. It is but a few years since that the last 
vestige of this famous ash was to be seen. Near the spot are 
faint traces of the burial ground of the Sandy Bluif settle- 
ment." The descendants of this Saunders family have all 
played out. Between fifty and sixty years ago, Tobias Saun- 
ders and Smithey Saunders, brother and sister (neither one 
ever married), lived on the road leading from Berry's Cross 
Roads to Marion, near the end of Pigeon Bay, just below 
where the Florence Railroad crosses said bay; they were de- 
scendants of old John Saunders, to whom much land had been 
granted ; the little hut of a house in which they lived stood on 
land granted to their ancestor ; they were invalids, and lived by 
begging and by the dharity of the neighbors. The writer 
used to see them at his father-in-law's many times begging, 
and the old man would give them a shoulder of meat and half 
bushel of meal, as much as they could carry. The sister was 
the stronger of the two ; they were imbecile, and especially the 
brother, and harmless ; they ultimately died there. Such are 
the sad changes in families. 



A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 159 

Gibson. — ^Among the early settlers at "Sandy Bluff" were 
the Gibsons. Gregg, p. 73, says : "Of the Gibsons, Gideon and 
Jordan were brothers. Tihe latter (Jordan) went to the West 
as a companion of Daniel Boone. Gideon Gibson came with 
his father from Virginia to Pee Dee. There is a public record 
of a grant to him for 550 acres of land as early as April, 1736. 
He settled at a place called Hickory Grove, five miles from 
Sandy Bluff, on a large and fertile body of land, long after 
noted as the most valuable in that region." In a note to the 
same page, Gregg says : "He (Gideon Gibson) was the grand- 
uncle of the late Captain John Gibson, of Darlington. Gideon 
Gibson had three sons" (p. 74) ; "of these, Stephen became 
wealthy, and removed to Georgia about the year 1800. Roger, 
another son, removed to the West before the Revolution." 
-Bishop Gregg says nothing about the third son of Gideon Gib- 
son, does not even mention his name. The writer supposes his 
name was Tobias Gibson, who became a Methodist traveling 
preacher, joined the Conference in 1792, from Marion County, 
and died in 1804, at the age of thirty years, and was buried at 
Natchez, Miss. (Minutes of the iiith session of the South 
Carolina Annual Conference of the M. E. Church, South, held 
in Abbeville, S. C, December 9-14, 1899.) According to this, 
he was born in 1774 ; he may have been a g<rand-son of Gideon 
Gibson. In 1 781 (February), Gideon Gibson was killed at his 
own house by Colonel Maurice Murfee ; Gideon Gibson was the 
uncle of Murfee. Colonel Maurice Murfee, though a staunch 
Whig and a daring and gallant soldier, yet was a very violent 
man, and especially so when in liquor. Bishop Gregg, p. 354, 
says : "Lower down, on the east side of the river, the Tories 
made frequent incursions from Little Pee Dee, finding co- 
operation on the part of some in that immediate region. The 
Whigs were driven in some instances to acts of cruel retalia- 
tion. One instance of the kind is related of Colonel Maurice 
Murphy. He was a man of ungovernable passion, which was 
often inflamed by strong drink. On the occasion alluded to, 
he went to the house of a noted Tory, named Blackman, then 
somewhat advanced in years, and inoffensive. He had, how- 
ever, several sons who were active against the Whigs. Mur- 
phy's real object, doubtless, was to discover where these and 



160 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

others of their companions were. Having tied Blackman, he 
asked him who he was for; and upon his replying 'for King 
George,' gave him fifty lashes. The question was repeated, 
with the same reply, and the like punishment inilictedi until the 
fourth time, when, upon finding the old man unyielding. 
Murphy was compelled to desist. Blackman lived on Catfish, 
and the place is yet called 'Tory's Camp.' Gideon Gibson, the 
uncle of Murphy, blamed hitn for his conduct on the occasion. 
Subsequently, Murphy stopped, with his company, at Gibson's 
for breakfast, and while there the subject was resumed. A 
quarrel ensued, and as Murphy mounted his horse to start off, 
Gibson followed him to the dbor and said something offensive, 
whereupon Murphy shot him dead. Three of Gibson's sons 
were present in Murphy's company, and were men of un- 
daunted courage; but knowing his violent temper and des- 
perate resolution, did not interfere. Nothing was done to 
Murphy afterwards on account of it." Frorp this it would 
appear that Jordan Gibson, the brother of Gideon, must have 
been the grand-father of the "late Captain John Gibson, of 
Darlington." Jordan Gibson' went off "West as a companion 
of Daniel Boone," but we suppose he returned to Carolina, 
Gregg says, supra, that Gideon Gibson was "the great-uncle of 
Captain John Gibson, of Darlington." Stephen Gibson was a 
son of Gideon ; he lived prior to 1800, and owned a large body 
of land in and around Harlleesville, in this county. About the 
latter date, he sold his lands there and removed to Georgia 
(Gregg). The writer remembers in his long practice of law 
to have seen the deeds from Stephen Gibson to Thomas Harl- 
lee. He may have been the father of Tobias Gibson, the 
preacher hereinbefore referred to. Captain John Gibson lived 
in Marion County and owned large bodies of land therein, near 
Mars Bluff Ferry, on both sides of the river ; he had two sons, 
Ferdinand S. Gibson and James S. Gibson; I think he married 
a Miss Savage. The lands on the east side of the river, and 
perhaps some on the west side, went to his son, Ferdinand, 
whose first wife was a Miss Godfrey, and his second wife was 
Miss Constantine McClenaghan ; he died at Marion Court 
House, I2th May, 1867, childless. He was considered very' 
wealthy before the war, had two hundred or more slaves; he 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 161 

was involved in debt, his lands were sold under proceedings 
to marshal his assets and for the payment of his debts, and 
thus that valuable property 'has passed entirely out of the hands 
of the family ; his widow got dower out of it ; she afterwards 
became the wife of Dr. D. S. Price ; she died some years "back, 
leaving some four or five children — think three sons and a 
daugihter ; the latter is now the wife of W. G. Mullins. 

James S. Gibson, brother to Ferdinand S., married a Miss 
DuBose, of Darlington; he inherited from his father, Captain 
John Gibson, that large and valuable plantation, on the west 
side of Great Pee Dee, near Mars Bluff Ferry. James S. Gib- 
son died not long after his brother, Ferdinand ; he was a better 
manager, or at least more fortunate in the results of the war, 
and saved his large landed estate for his two sons. Knight and 
Nathan S. ; the latter is now in possession of those lands. 
Knight Gibson married a daughter of Dr. C. H. Black, by 
whom he had, I think, four children ; Knight Gibson died in 
the latter part of 1885 or 1886 ; what has become of his child- 
ren is unknown. Nathan S. Gibson is certainly rich in lands 
and may be so otherwise; he is unmarried, and is almost fifty 
years of age. This is in Florence County, formerly Marion 
County. » 

Another quite respectable family of Gibsons are below 
Marion Court House. The first known of them was Squire 
David Gibson, who was a very worthy man and good citizen. 
Think 'he came from Scotland — at any rate, he was a Scotch- 
man ; his tongue betrayed 'his nationality. It has been siaid of 
him that he was on the stand as a witness in some case, that 
the occasion and circumstances suggested the question to be 
asked him, if be believed in ghosts, spirits, &c., and the old 
gentleman, in the honesty of his heart, replied that he could 
not say that he did, but that when he passed by a graveyard at 
night he always kept a sharp lookout. The writer does not 
know whom he married, but he raised four sons, if no more, 
James, Allen, Jessee and Albert ; the first and last of these are 
dead, but left families; Allen and Jessee yet survive, and are 
among our best people, quiet and unpretentious, honest and 
straightforward in all their movements and dealings with their 
fellow-men; engage in no local strife or bickerings; keep clear 



162 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

of lawsuits ; attend strictly to their own business and let the 
business of others stridtly alone ; it may be said, "with masterly 
inactivity." Observation teaches that it takes a pretty smart 
man to do this. Jessee Gibson and Allen Gibson married 
sisters, daughters of the late James Watson, and, doubtless, 
make good housewives, and are raising up families "in the way 
they should go." James Gibson died many years ago and left 
six or seven children; his oldest son, about twenty years of 
age, was killed on Main street, in Marion, more than twenty 
years ago ; a horse ran away with a cart wihich the jroung man 
was driving, and threw him out near where the Bank of 
Marion now stands, his head striking an elm root on the side- 
walk, which crushed his skull. The writter was in fifteen 
feet of him when he fell, and was the first one to get to him ; 
others soon came up and among them a doctor; he breathed 
sturtously for five or ten minutes and then expired. A sad and 
sudden ending. Albert Gibson died a few years ago, leaving 
a family of children, none grown at the time; he was one of 
our progressive, good citizens; his family are not known to 
the writer. 

Page. — ^Another pretty extensive family in the county are 
the Pages ; they are mostly on Bear Swamp and Ashpole, near 
the State line, and Buck Swamp and L,ittle Pee Dee. Of the 
old Pages known to the writer, there were Joseph, Solomon 
and Thomas, and perhaps David. Joseph died about the first 
of the nineteeath century, leaving three sons and several 
diaughters; his wife was a Miss Horn; his sons were Joseph 
and Abram and John W. The son, Joseph, settled on the 
paternal homestead, just across the State line, in North Caro- 
lina, owning lands, however, in both States; he married a 
Miss Connerly, a North Carolina lady; died many years ago, 
quite a thrifty man, leaving two sons, Joseph, and Timothy, and 
four daughters; his large landed property descended to his 
two sons, Joseph and Timothy. Joseph is dead, leaving sons 
and daughters, unknown to the writer. Timothy raised a 
considerable family, sons and daughters, and is still living. 
Timothy's sisters, all older than he and his brother, Joseph, 
married well ; one an Elvington, one a Lewis, one a Connerly, 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 163 

and another, the youngest. Civil, married William H. Oliver, 
of North Carolina, and became the mother of two of our most 
respected and worthy citizens, to wit : the late Joseph R. Oliver 
and the late Dr. Wm. A. Oliver, both quite prominent, wihose 
descendants, sons and daughters, married and single, are 
among us now, treading in the footsteps of their honored and 
beloved sires. Abram Page, the second son of the first old 
Joseph, marnied Miss Alice Nichols, of Columbus County, N. 

C, and sister to our late respected fellow-citizen, Averett 
Nichols, of Nichols, S. C. He settled on Ashpole, below the 
mouth of Bear Swamp, on the place now owned by the Widow 
T. B. Braddy, and where she resides. Abram Page raised 
five sons and one diaughter; the sons were David N., Averett, 
Abram B., Joseph N. and Dock, as he was called, and one 
daughter, Ava. David N. died in early manhood; I do not 
think he married ; Averett moved into North Carolina ; I do not 
know whom he married, nor of his family; Abram B. Page, 
well known by his cotemporaries, settled and merchandised for 
many years at Nichols, S. C, and apparently did well for years, 
but finally failed, lost his mind, was carried to the Asylum at 
Columbia, S. C, and after staying there for a while, returned 
home and soon thereafter died; he never married; his fine 
property in and about Nichols was all sold and has gone into 
other hands. Joseph N. Page, of Page's Mill, settled there 
many years ago; he married a daughter of the late Elias B. 
Ford, by whom he had and raised only one child, a daughter, 
who in recent years married a Mr. L. W. Temple, of Raleigh, 
N. C, who has a family of several children. Joseph N. Page 
was a very safe man, accumulated a considerable property, 
which was all clear at his death, a few years ago. Dock Page, 
the youngest brother, and who inherited the old homestead, 
married Miss Addie Ayres, daughter of Thos. W. Ayres, and 
lived on the old homestead until a year or two ago, when he 
sold it to Mrs. Braddy, as herein stated, who now occupies it. 
Dock Page has a considerable family, unknown to the writer. 
Ava Page, the only daughter of Abram Page, married James 

D. Oliver, many years ago ; they removed' to Texas ; nothing 
further is known of them. John W. Page died in middle life, 
and left two children, a son, Augustus Page, and a daughter. 



164 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

who married the late Aaron Oliver. Augustus Page married 
a Miss Page ; he died childless. Solomon Page lived and died 
on Bear Swamp, on the road from L,umberton, N. C, to 
Nichols, S. C. ; his wife was a Miss Ford ; he raised a consid- 
erable family, sons and daughters ; the sons were Eli, Joseph, 
James E., David and John F., all of whom were our citizens 
thirty or forty years ago, but all now dead, each leaving a 
family of sons and daughters. They and their desoendlants 
and connections are numerous, and especially in that part of 
the county. Three of the sons, EH, John F. and David, mar- 
ried three sisters. Misses Bennett — somewhat remarkable. 
Thomas Page married and settled on the south side of Little 
Pee Dee, on the place where S. L. Page now resides ; I do not 
know who his wife was ; he raised one son, an only child, his 
name was William ; he married a Miss Smith, daughter of old 
Samuel Smith, who lived and died about 1843, just below 
"Temperance Hill," on the road from Buck Swamp Bridge to 
Marion Court House. That marriage connects the Page and 
Smith families. Captain William Page was. an excellent citi- 
zen and a very successful farmer, and accumulated a large 
property ; he died in 1859 ; he left four sons, Samuel T., John 
S., William J. and Pinckney Page; the latter married a 
daughter of the late John L. Smjth; he was killed or died in 
the war ; left three children, I think, a son and two daughters ; 
I do not know much about them. John S. Page married Miss 
Louisa Bass, and died about the beginning of the war, and left 
four or five children. William, a son of John S., was killed in 
1873 or '4, in a posse of Sheriff Berry's, in trying to make 
an arrest. One of the daughters is now the wife of C. J. 
McColl, a cotton buyer at MuUins, S. C. The oldest son of 
Captain William Page, Samuel T., got into some trouble, in 
1865, with the military authorities then stationed in Marion; 
he sold out his plantation, now owned by J. Robert Reaves; 
eluding the "Yankees," he went West, and for years it was not 
. generally known where he was — ^he was in Mississippi ; he re- 
mained there for twenty years or more, when he returned to 
Marion with his wife ; she soon died, and he has been with his 
son, John K. Page, and still lives with him ; he is in his eighty- 
third year. John K. Page, with whom the old gentleman lives. 



' A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 165 

is a very trustworthy man, a good manager and very prosper- 
ous. William J. Page, another son of Captain William Page, 
resides on his father's old homestead ; he married, first, a Miss 
Grice, by whom he had eighteen children, and raised sixteen of 
them to be grown, sons and aiighters, most of whom are mar- 
ried ; they are all unknown to the writer, except the oldest son, 
J. Lawrence Page, a Magistrate for years, and a very good 
one, and a useful man ; he lives on the homestead of his great-- 
grand-father, Thomas Page; he has children grown and mar- 
ried unknown to the writer, except the second wife of John K. 
Page. William J. Page is over three score years and ten, but 
vigorous and active, a good citizen. Old Captain William 
Page had several daughters; one married Joseph Deer (the 
name now extinct in Marion County) ; Deer died, and the 
widow married Rev. John B. Piatt, of the South Carolina Con- 
ference; I think she had two sons and three daughters by the 
Deer marriage; Wm. P. Deer and John were the sons; Mrs. 
William Watson, one of the daughters, still survives; one 
other daughter, Ellenora, never married, and is dead ; the last 
daughter, Elizabeth, married John E. Elvington. By the Piatt 
marriage, she had a son, R. B. Piatt, a Magistrate, near Mul- 
lins, S. C, and two daughters, Mrs. B. Gause Smith, and the 
late Mrs. Dr. C. T. Ford; they all have large families. 
Another daughter of Captain William Page married D. W. 
Piatt; they moved to Mississippi, fifty years ago or more. 
Another daughter married George J. Bethea, and still survives ; 
she had two sons, William A. Bethea and John D. Bethea, and 
several daughters; I do not know whom they married, except 
that one married W. B. Ellen and one married W. Joseph 
Watson, and is dead, leaving several children. Another 
daughter of Captain William Page married the late Samuel 
Watson, and is dead ; she left at her death, W. Joseph Melton, 
S. P. and Stonewall C. Watson, and two daughters, Sophronia 
and Maggie. W. Joseph Watson removed to North Carolina. 
Melton is dead, without child or children; he married a 
daughter of the late Charles Moody, who still survives. So- . 
phronia was the first wife of John K. Page ; she left two sons, 
Samuel and Ernest. Maggie married Frank Easterling, a 
very worthy citizen, and is doing well. Another daughter of 



166 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

old Captain William Page married Levi H. Hays, and was the 
mother of our very worthy fellow-citizen, W. B. Hays, in 
Hillsboro Township. 

Ayres. — ^Another family in the northeastern section of the 
county is the Ayres family. Of this family the first known to 
the writer was the Rev. William Ayres, and two brothers, 
Darius and John, usually called Jack Ayres. Rev. William 
Ayres was a Baptist preacher; stood well among his clerical 
brethren, and was dearly beloved by the laity of his church; 
he married a Miss Shaw ; the fruits of the marriage were our 
esteemed fellow-citizens, Thomas W. Ayres and Enoch S. 
Ayres, and several daughters — three or four. Thomas W. 
Ayres is well known to the county ; was County Commissioner 
perhaps two terms, some years ago, and a prominent member 
of ihe Baptist Church ; he did valiant service in the war — he 
and two of his sons were in the war together; his two sons 
were killed, as the writer has been informed, on the same day 
and in the same battle. Thomas W. Ayres married a Miss 
Williamson, in the Gapway neighborhood, a sister of Joseph 
Williamson. Besides the two sons killed in the war, he has 
three other sons, John and Pendleton G. Ayres, two excellent 
citizens, and a younger son, named Robert; he has several 
daughters, one married Dock Page, as hereinbefore stated, and 
one named Sallie, who died while off at school at Limestone 
Springs ; not known as to the other daughters. Pendleton G. 
Ayres married a Miss McMillan, in the Mullins community. 
John Ayres married Miss Susan Page, a daughter of Timothy 
Page, and has a house full of children, so said. Robert Ayres 
has gone to Georgia and, I think, has married out there. 
Enoch Ayres, one of our best citizens, youngest son of Rev. 
William Ayres, married a Miss Tyler, in Horry County; the 
fruits of the marriage are three sons and four or five 
daughters; the sons are William, Elias and Lennon; his 
daughters all married but one, Erma ; two in Kentucky, or are 
there now; one of them married a Baptist preacher named 
Rockwell; she was reputed to be a very intellectual lady. 
Another daughter married a Mr. Renfroe, of North Carolina. 
Of the daughters of Rev. William Ayres, one, Catharine, mar- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 167 

ried Major H. B. Cook; they moved to Horry, raised a consid- 
erable family, sons and daughters ; both are now dead. Another 
daughter married Buck Watson; they moved to Horry just 
after the war; both are dead. Another daughter married 
Levi Grainger, of Horry. I think another daughter died un- 
married, during the war, with smallpox — I am not sure of it. 
Rev. William Ayres and wife both died of smallpox during the 
war. His brother. Jack Ayres, came home from the army, and 
after getting home the disease broke out on him and he died of 
it, whence it spread in the neighborhood, and several others, 
perhaps a dozen or more, died of it. Jack Ayres never mar- 
ried. Darius Ayres, brother of Rev. William, died in early 
life, leaving two sons, Darius and another, whose name the 
writer has forgotten (they both went to school to him). The 
elder boy, Darius, grew up, and the last heard of him by the 
writer he was a Baptist preacher in North Carolina. I do not 
know whence the Ayres sprang; I think, from the name, and 
their complexion and their general make-up, that their pro- 
genitors were from Wales, in South England, and may have 
been part of the Welsh settlement on Great Pee Dee, who came 
from Pennsylvania and Delaware to South Carolina, in 1735 
or '6, and afterwards. 

Ford. — The Ford family, in upper Marion, were among the 
first settlers in upper Marion. In the appendix to Ramsay's 
History of South Carolina, on page 302, volume 2, he says: 
"There have been many instances of longevity in the county 
between Little Pee Dee and Catfish Creek, about sixty miles 
north of Georgetown; six very old men died there since the 
year 1800. One of them, James Ford, died in or near 1804, 
at the age of one hundred years. The others are James Mun- 
nerlyn, Moses Martin, Rockingham Keene, Michael Mixori 
and William Watson, who all died upwards of eighty years of 
age, James Munnerlyn served in the office of Constable at 
eighty-six years, walked fifty miles to serve a process and re- 
turned hoirie again in less than thre days." Where the Fords 
of Marion originally came from, is unknown. The James 
Ford mentioned above by Dr. Ramsay, must have been here 
two*hundred years ago ; and without better or other informa- 
12 



168 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

tion, the writer will assume that either he or some other con- 
temporary Ford were the progenitor or progenitors of the ex- 
tensive family by that name. The first one known to the 
writer, in about 1830, was Preserved Ford, universally called 
Zarv Ford ; he was then seventy-five or eighty years of age, 
may be older ; he lived on the west side of Caddy's Mills, then 
called Ford's Mills. It was at an association held at the old 
Saw Mill Church, on the east side of the mills— the church was 
old and dilapidated. It was there that I first saw him, and 
never saw him afterwards. He was a well-to-do man, and 
prominent in his day; he had three sons, Jessee, William and 
"Charles. Major Jessee Ford, the eldest son, represented the 
district in the Legislature in the twenties — I do not know the 
precise date.* He was Major in the militia ; his first wife was 
a Miss Townsend, of Robeson County, N. C. ; by her he had 
two sons, the late Elias B. Ford and Allen Ford ; his second 
wife was a MisiS Watson, a daughter of Scarcebook Watson, 
above Nichols, on the road from Nichols to Lumberton, N. C. ; 
by the second wife he had several sons and daughters ; the sons, 
as their names are remembered, were Watson, Jessee, Thomas, 
David and Charles Ford. The war and emigration have re- 
moved them all, except Jessee, who is now an old and respect- 
able citizen in the community of his birth, and has raised a 
family, unknown to the writer. The daughters of Major Jesse 
Ford, as remembered, were Elizabeth, Mary, Caroline and 
Virginia. Elizabeth married William H. Hays; by him she 
had several children; Mary married John I. Gaddy, and died in 
a year or two childless; Caroline married Dr. George E. 
Shooter, and raised a large family, unknown ; I do not remem- 
ber what became of Virginia. Major Jesse Ford may have 
had other daughters. Elias B. Ford, a most excellent and 
kind hearted man, born in 1809, married, 9th February, 1830, 
Miss Jane Herring, of Robeson, N. C, a woman of good prop- 
erty and one of the best of women ; the fruits of this marriage 
were three sons. "Sandy" Ford, for a long time in Marion, 
and very prominent as a business man, now resides in Ander- 

i^Jessee Ford was elected a Representative in 1820. See list of Repre- 
sentatives in latter part hereof. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 169 

son County.* Dr. C. T. Ford, of Mullins, and Rev. Rufus 
Ford, a prominent minister of the Baptist Church, and now 
resides in Marlborough, and several diaughters. Neill C. 
McDuffie, Sheriff, married two of them ; D. D. McDuffie mar- 
ried one ; Joseph N. Page married one, and George Fore mar- 
ried one ; one unmarried and one dead, names not remembered. 
Elias B. Ford lost his wife, the mother of these children, and 
he married, a second time, the Widbw Helen Pitman, who had 
four Pitman .children, two sons and two daughters; the sons 
were killed or died in the war, and one of the daughters died 
during the war, all unmarried ; the other daughter, the young- 
est, Amanda, married the late Joseph R. Oliver, and had by 
inheritance a good property. Elias B. Ford had no child or 
children by his second marriage; he died some years ago, 
greatly missed by the poor of his neighborhood. Allen Ford, 
the second son of Major Jessee Ford by his Townsend wife, 
married a Miss Falk, of Robeson ; she died childless in a few 
years, and he removed to the West many yeaVs ago. Major 
William Ford, the second son of old man "Zarv" Ford, married 
a Miss Thompson; he was a well-to-do man; had not many 
children; the writer does not remember but one, a daughter, 
Sallie, who had a personal distinction, seldom, if ever, met 
with — she had a black eye and a blue one; a very pretty girl; 
she married John R. Waitson, who occupied and owned his 
father's homestead, on the road from Nichols to Lumberton, 
N. C. ; he died, leaving six or seven children together with his 
widow; the children all small; the widow managed well and 
raised a very nice family, sons and daughters — ^mostly daugh- 
ters; the mother died some years ago, much respected while 
living. Major William Ford may have had a son, not now 
recollected; he had another daughter, as now remembered, 
who became and is now, the wife of Captain R. H. Rogers. 
Old man "Zarv" Ford's third and youngest son, Charles, died 
after arriving at manhood, unmarried. There was another old 
Ford, by name of George, who lived just below Tabernacle 
Church, on the road leading from Bear Swamp to Allen's 
Bridge, on Little Pee Dee ; he was related to those other Fords, 
at least collaterally ; 'he was a very energetic man and accumu- 

*Moved to Texas. 



170 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

lated some property.; I never knew much of him; he was not 
a very old man when he died. I know that he left two sons, 
William and Nelson Ford, and know that he had three 
daughters, if no more, to wit; second wife of William Good- 
year, Sr. — her name was Elizabeth ; also the wife of the late 
Benjamin Shooter — her name was Mary ; she was the mother 
of the Shooter family, a numerous family, and among them 
the gallant Colonel W. P. Shooter, who was killed in the severe 
battle of Spottsylvania Court House, in May, 1864. A family 
noted for its gallantry in the war. Colonel Wm. P. Shooter 
and two of his brothers (names not remembered) fell on the 
same day and in the same fight. Another daughter was the 
wife of Anthony Cribb, and became the mother of our W. T. 
Cribb and of Dempsy Cribb, Jr. ; the latter is dead. W. T. 
Cribb is a respectable and good citizen, a brave soldier in the 
struggle for the "Lost Cause," and so was his brother, George 
T. Cribb. He lost a leg in the contest, and yet lives. Of the 
sons of George Ford, William (familiarly called "Little Bill 
Ford"), as now remembered, married, first, a Miss Lupo; he 
raised some family by her, the names and number not- now 
known to the writer. "Little Bill Ford" has been dead some 
years, and perhaps his Butler wife. Nelson Ford lived to an 
advanced age, eighty or more, has not been dead many years; 
he was a most excellent man and worthy citizen ; he married a 
Miss Lupo, and raised a family, how many is not known; one 
of his sons, named Hardy, lives near Nichols, and is a most 
excellent man and one of our best citizens. The Ford family, 
as a whole, were good people, and extend down two or three 
generations further than herein traced ; for the want of infor- 
mation and personal acquaintance, the writer can go no 
further. They did their duty fully in the war, and demon- 
strated to their country a patriotism and courage of which the 
present and coming generations may be proud. Their connec- 
tions are extensive. 

Hays. — Another family of note in Hillsboro Township is the 
Hays family. The common ancestor of that family was Ben- 
jamin Hays; I do not know who his wife was; he raised 
a considerable family of sons and daughters; the sons, as re- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 171 

membered, were James, Jessee, William H., Joseph B. and 
Ivevi H. Hays ; the daughters, as remembered, were Mrs. Elias 
Allen, the mother of the late Rev. Joel Allen, and Thompson 
Allen, of Marlborough County; Mrs. Samuel Smith, of Buck 
Swamp, who died in 1857, and Mrs. John Martin, of Buck 
Swamp and Maiden Down; there may have been other 
daughters. These sons and daughters are all dead, some of 
them for many years, but were the stock of a numerous 
progeny — ^down to a second and third and even to a fourth 
generation ; many of them unknown to the writer, and, there- 
fore, can say but little about them. James Hays married a 
daughter of Matthew Jones, of Robeson; he raised a large 
family of sons and daughters ; the names of these sons, as re- 
membered, were Reaves, Henry and James R. ; they were 
older than the writer, and all are dead. One of them was the 
father of our respected fellow-citizen, above Buck Swamp 
Bridge, W. D. B. Hays — the upper bridge is meant. There 
are several bridges across Buck Swamp now. The bridge near 
Page's was, for a long time, the only bridge on the swamp, and 
acquired the name of Buck Swamp Bridge ; and when we say 
Buck Swamp Bridge, that bridge is meant. I do not know 
to whom these sons of James Hays were married. Jessee 
Hays married a Miss Elvington, and, raised a large and respect- 
able family. William H. Hays married, first, a Miss Thomp- 
son, and from that marriage sprang children, one named Lewis, 
as now remembered; his wife died, and he then married Miss 
Elizabeth Ford, daughter of Major Jessee Ford ; this wife had 
children unknown to the writer; the Ford wife died, and he 
married, a third time, a Miss Elvington, by whom he had 
children, how many is unknown. Joseph B. Hays, the father 
of our much respected and substantial fellow-citizen, T. B. 
Hays, married a Miss Gaddy, daughter of old Ithamer Gaddy, 
near Gaddy's Mills ; the fruits of this marriage were three sons, 
as now remebered, E. Wilson Hays, Aleck and T. B. Hays; 
E. Wilson Hays is now dead ; he married, first. Miss Elizabeth 
Ann Rogers, a sister of our fellow-citizen. Lot B. Rogers ; he 
had several children by this marriage ; one of them is Gamewell 
Hays, who has removed to the West, and another is O. C. 
Hays, who lives near Little Rock; he married a daughter of 



172 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Owen Jackson, in the Judson section of the county, and he has 
a large family ; Wilson Hays married, a second time, a daughter 
of the late Matthew Martin; she bore some children^ to him, 
how many is unknown. E. Wilson Hays was a very respectable 
man and excellent citizen ; he died a few years ago of a cancer 
on his face. T. B. Hays married Sarah Nance, daughter of 
Everet Nance, of Robeson County, N. C, and by her had four 
children, Orilla, now the wife of Olin Edwards, Ina Rembert 
and Tristam. Rembert recently graduated at Wofford Col- 
lege, and is now engaged in farming; the first wife dying, T. 
B. Hays married, a second time, his cousin. Miss Walker Hays, 
daughter of Wm. B. Hays, by whom he has one child. Aleck 
Hays married Elizabeth, daughter of the late Colonel John 
Roberts, and lives at the forks of the road just below the resi- 
dence of Captain Wm. J. Page; he raised a large family, all 
of whom are grown ; one of his sons (name not remembered), 
married a daughter of Hiram Lee; another, Murray, married 
a daughter of Mrs. Zilpha Floyd ; Mattie married a D. V. Cole- 
man, of Columbus County, N. C, and removed to Georgia 
several years ago; Annie and Fanny are unmarried. Joseph 
B. Hays had some daughters; I do not know how many; one 
married the late T. B. Rogers, in the Fork, and is still living; 
they raised a considerable family; of the sons, J. Marion 
Rogers is a preacher of the South Carolina Conference, Meth- 
odist Church, South ; he graduated with distinction at Wofford 
College some years past; another son, Herbert, graduated in 
the Citadel Academy last year, 1899. Another daughter of J. 
B. Hays married a Mr. Booth ; think she is a widow. Another 
daughter of Joseph B. Hays became the wife of Solomon Ed- 
wardls, in the Fork ; she has an only daughter, who is now the 
wife of that excellent citizen, Kirkland Fort, with whom Mrs. 
Edwards lives, her husband having died many years ago. 
Another daughter, rather late in life, married Archie Thomp- 
son, and resides in Robeson County, N. C. Joseph B. Hays was 
•a useful man in his day in his community; he was a Magistrate 
for many years. Levi H. Hays, the youngest son of old Ben- 
jamin, married a daughter of Captain William Page, near 
Buck Swamp Bridge; he raised a family, how many is not 
known ; our respected and highly esteemed fellow-citizen, WiU 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 173 

liam B. Hays, is a son of Levi H. Levi H. Hays was a most 
excellent man and useful citizen in his neigihborhood in his 
day; he served as a. Magistrate for several years, and gave 
general satisfaction in that responsible and indispensable posi- 
tion ; he preceded some of his older brothers to the grave. 

The Hays family, of Hillsboro, have held their own about as 
well as any family in the county. They are and ever have been 
a peaceable, orderly and law-abiding people; honest, industri- 
ous and frugal, attend strictly to their own business, and do not 
meddle with the business of others ; their name seldom api>ears 
on the journals of the Courts. An incident may here be related 
in reference to the old man, Benjamin, told to the writer sixty- 
five years ago. It runs thus : At a night meeting held in the 
neighborhood, some brother was called upon to pray (the name 
forgotten), and in his prayer, among his many petitions, one 
was that the good Lord would send down a thunderbolt from 
heaven and strike old Ben Hays' heart and make him sell his 
"backer" (tobacco) cheaper. From this incident several in- 
ferences may be drawn. The reader is left to draw his own 
conclusions. There is another family of Hays in Hillsboro, 
perihaps related collaterally; if so, they have greatly degener- 
ated from their common ancestry — at any rate, so little is 
known of them that the writer cannot trace them. 

There is another family of Hays in Kirby Township, which 
will be noticed herein further on. 

Elvington. — The Blvington family are to be found in Hills- 
boro. There were two old Elvingtons, brothers, of some note 
in Hillsboro — John and Jessee. The descendants of both, with 
their connections, are numerous; some of them are in the 
West. Old John Elvington lived on the road from Gaddy's 
Mills to Nichols ; he raised a large family, sons and diaughters ; 
of the sons, Zadoc Elvington still survives, and lives near the 
old homestead; has no children; had two sons, whom he lost 
in the war. In some respects he is a prodigy, which will not 
be further alluded to. He has made and has money, which it 
is said he does not much enjoy, except the satisfaction of 
knowing that he has it. He married one of the ten daughters 
of the late John Goodyear (all of whom, it is said, were good 



174 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

women, and made industrious and frugal housewives). Old 
man John Elvington was a good citizen. His other sons were 
William, John (commonly called Jack), and Owen. They are 
all dead. Ow'en was the father of our excellent and thrifty 
good citizen, George W. Elvington ; there may have been an- 
other son or two, not now remembered. He had several 
daughters ; one the wiie of the late Henry Huggins ; one the 
wife of the late James Scott (she still survives) ; one the wife 
of the late Eli Scott, and perhaps others. The old gentleman 
was remarkable m one respect; he told the writef, when he 
was over seventy years of age, that he never saw a seed-tick or 
a red-bug in his life ; spectacles did him no good, yet his eye- 
sight had not failed him and he could see as well in his old age 
as he ever could; his eyes were very peculiar — did not look 
like the ordinary eye — they sparkled or twinkled. Old man 
Jessee Elvington lived and died on Bear Swamp; he was an 
old man seventy years ago ; a good manager and snug farmer ; 
he raised a considerable family, sons and daughters. Three 
sons, Giles, Hug'hey and John E. Giles Elvington married 
Miss Mary Ann Page, daughter of Joseph Page, just in North 
Carolina; Giles Elvington lived till after the war, and died 
an old man, after having married a second time. By his first 
wife he raised several children, sons and daughters, none of 
whom are now known to the writer. Giles Elvington owned 
the plantation where Dr. William A. Oliver lately died ; he, like 
his father, was a good manager — at least, during his first wife's 
lifetime, and he and family were hig'hly respected. Hughey 
Elvington married one of the ten girls of John Goodyear, here- 
inbefore mentioned, and she is now the wife of Wilson Lewis, 
of Horry, and weighs 260 pounds, as she recently told the 
writer. Hughey Elvington was a good citizen. John E. El- 
vington married a Miss Deer (Elizabeth Ann), daughter of 
Joseph Deer ; her mother was a Page, and he inherited the old 
homestead of his father ; he has been dead several years ; raised 
a family quite respectable. A daughter of his is now the 
wife of William J. Williamson, who it is supposed has grown 
children. The several daughters of old Jesse Elvington mar- 
ried; one married the late Elgate Horn, who raised a large 
family, entirely unknown; another daughter married William 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 175 

B. Grantham, of North Carolina ; they are both dead and died 
childless. I do not know Whom the other daughter of old 
man Jessee married. The Elvingtons and their connections are 
numerous, and all sprang from the two old men, John and 
Jesse Elvington. 

Scott. — ^The Scott family, in Hillsboro, are not very exten- 
sive. Old man Pharaoh Scott lived near Tabernacle Church, 
on the road from Gaddy's to Nichols; he was a harmless, 
honest and inoffensive man; he raised three sons, Thomas, 
James and Ely. Thomas married and moved West, many years 
ago; James married Miss Sallie Elvington, daughter of old 
John Elvington ; James Scott is dead, but his wife, Sallie, still 
survives ; he raised a large family, sons and daughters, all un- 
known except the oldest son, Giles Scott, who is now a worthy 
citizen of that community. Ely Scott also married Miss 
Appie Elvington, daughter of old man John Elvington ; by her 
he had one daughter ; his wife died, and he married another one 
of the ten daughters of John Goodyear — an excellent woman 
she was ; I think she is dead ; she left two daughters ; Ely Scott 
is also dead. Old Pharaoh Scott had one daughter, named 
Patience; she married Jerry Campbell, near Mullins; Jerry 
and wife are both dead; they left two sons, K. M. Campbell 
and Rev. Ely Campbell, citizens of Reaves Township, and 
much respected. Pharaoh Scott had a brother up about the 
Hig'h Hill, whose name is forgotten; he had sons, William 
and Ervin, and perhaps others, and there are members of thait 
family now in that neighborhood, two of whom, John L. and 
William, are known. Erviii Scott married a daughter of old 
Jessee Elvington; he was an energetic, persevering man; he 
died in middle life, and left a family. I know nothing of 
them — nor is anything known of William Scott's family. 

Owens. — The writer knows but little of the Owens family, 
in Hillsboro. Reddin Owens, who died two years ago, at the 
advanced age of ninety-four, was a son of old Shadrack Owens, 
of the Fork community; he had another son, named Lot 
Owens; he was in Hillsboro for the last sixty years or more, 
and raised a considerable family ; he was an honest, well mean- 



176 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

ing man ; of his family nothing is known, except a grand-son, 
James Owens, who resides near where his grand-father died. 

Gaddy. — Another family in Hillsboro, is the Gaddy family. 
Old man Ithamer Gaddy was the first known ; his wife, Char- 
ity, was a Miss Pitman, sister of old man Hardy Pitman, who 
seventy-five years ago lived near by, and was a prominent citi- 
zen ; the name Pitman is not found in the county. Old man 
Ithamer Gaddy was a most excellent man, quiet and inoffen- 
sive, a Christian gentleman ; he raised a large family, five sons 
and two daughters; the sons were William, James, Hardy, 
Allen and Silas; the daughters were Elizabeth and Mary 
(Polly, as she was called). William Gaddy married Miss Sal- 
lie Jones, on Catfish, daughter of old man John Jones ; raised 
a large family of sons and daughters, to wit: John I., L/evi, 
Israel, Joseph, Samuel T. and Charles B. ; the daughters were 
Elizabeth, Ann, Mary and Sarah. John I. Gaddy married 
Miss Mary Ford; he and his wife both died in a few years, 
perhaps childless. Levi Gaddy was a very steady, level-headed 
young man, and bid fair to succeed well in life; he went into 
the war, and was killed or died of disease or wounds, never 
came back. Israel Gaddy married in North Carolina and set- 
tled there ; know nothing of his family, if he had any ; Joseph 
died unmarried; Samuel T. Gaddy, one of our good citizens, 
married a daughter of the late Harman Floyd, of Nichols, S. 
C, the fruits of the marriage are one son. Walker, and two 
daughters — one the wife of W. B. Atkinson, the other the wife 
of Franklin Rogers ; the son, Walker, married a lady in North 
Carolina. Charles B. Gaddy, the youngest son of William 
Gaddy, married one of Colonel John Roberts' daughters ; three 
sons and one daughter are the results of the marriage. 
Charles B. Gaddy died suddenly, a few weeks ago, on the old 
homestead of his father. Of the daughters of William Gaddy, 
Elizabeth Ann, the eldest, married Elias Grantham, wiho was 
killed near Campbell's Bridge, in the discharge of his duty 
during the war, it was said, by Nicholas Gaddy, a first cousin 
of his wife. They raised a family of several children, sons 
and daughters, who are now living on, and near, the place of 
their birth; the mother died a year or two ago. William 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 177 

Gaddy's second daughter, Mary, married a Mr. Inman, of 
North Carolina; I know nothing further of her. Sarah, the 
youngest daughter, married D. C. McKinly, who is dead ; she 
has two sons, William and John McKinly, living, and one 
daughter married, anoither dead. William Gaddy and wife 
died in a few days of each other, of typhoid fever, in August, 
1850 ; William Gaddy was an industrious, energetic and trust- 
worthy citizen. James Gaddy married Elizabeth Jones, an- 
other daughter of old man John Jones; he settled just across 
the State line, in Robeson County; raised a large family; I 
know nothing further of them. Hardy Gaddy married Miss 
Winnie Humphrey, of Robeson, a very smart, business woman ; 
they are both dead; they raised a family, four sons and three 
daughters; the sons were Nicholas W., J. Maston, Richard 
M. and Duncan ; the daughters were Anna Jane, Charity and 
Lizzie. Richard M. went to Virginia some years ago, and 
is now a citizen of that State; Nicholas M. removed several 
years ago to North Carolina, and is now a resident citizen of 
that State; J. Maston died a few years ago, at Marion Court 
House, and left one son, William, and two daughters — one 
the wife of Joseph A. Baker, the other the wife of Thomas. 
Monroe, of Marion ; I do not know what has become of the son, 
William. J. Maston Gaddy married twice; first, a Miss 
Fladger, the mother of his children; the second wife was a 
Widow Gregg, daughter of General Elly Godbold ; she is also 
dead. Duncan Gaddy, youngest son of Hardy Gaddy, married 
a Miss Miller, and lives near Gaddy's Mills ; I know nothing of 
his family. Of the daughters of Hardy Gaddy, Anna Jane 
married a Mr. Inman, of Robeson; Lizzie married A. B. Car- 
michael, son of old Sheriff Carmichael, and lives on the home- 
stead of her grand-father, Ithamer Gaddy, and has a fjunily ; I 
know nothing of the family. Charity married our good fel- 
low-citizen, R. L. Lane, who resides near Dillon, S. C. ; he has 
several sons and one daughter. Hardy Gaddy was an excel- 
lent and very safe man, prudent and successful in his vocation. 
Allen Gaddy married a Miss Stackhouse, an aunt of Colonel 
E. T. Stackhouse, and raised a considerable family; he and 
wife have both been dead for years ; I know not much of the 
family; had a son, Herod Gaddy; I do not know what has 



178 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

become of him — think he is in Marlborough ; another son, John 
W., who is a good citizen and lives now at Bingham ; another 
son, named Tristran, I don't know what has become of him. 
The widow of the late David Ellen was a daughter of Allen 
Gaddy; she married twice; first, a Manship, of Marlborough, 
and after his death she married the late David Ellen, an old 
man when she married him ; he died in 1876 ; she lives with her 
son, John H. Ellen, a very energetic and prosperous farmer, in 
the Dothan neighborhood; she had two daughters by the 
Manship marriage — one is the wife of Peter P. McCormac, 
the other the wife of Woodberry Norton. Silas Gaddy, the 
youngest son of old Ithamer Gaddy, marrjed a Miss Caldwell, 
in North Carolina, and first settled near his father; after the 
birth of several children, he emigrated Westward. Of the 
daughters of Ithamer Gaddy, the oldest married Joseph B. 
Hays, as hereinbefore stated; the second daughter, Mary (or 
Polly), married Lysias Stackhouse, son of Herod Stackhouse; 
they raised one son, John W. Stackhouse, and some daughters, 
perhaps only two. The son, J. W. Stackhouse, has been dead 
about thirty years ; left a family, all grown ; one of the daugh- 
ters married Thomas Ammons, a descendant of Joshua 
Ammons, of Revolutionary fame ; I do not remember who the 
other daughter married ; the third and last daughter married 
Owen Grantham, of Robeson County, N. C. ; some of her 
descendants are now living in Marion ; the wife of W. C. Fox- 
worth is a grand-daughter of Owen Grantham and wife, 
Elizabeth Grantham, nee Gaddy. The writer has seen six or 
seven generations of that Grantham family. 

Lupos AND Arnetts.— There is, and was, a family of Lupos 
and Arnetts in Hillsboro, but do not know enough of them 
to trace their genealogy. Some of them went to school to the 
writer, sixty-six years ago — 1834 and 1835. They were an 
honest and hard-working people, primitive in their modes of 
living and habits, as most people were in that day and time. 
What is said about the Lupos and Arnetts may be said about 
the Horn family. 

Rogers.— The Rogers family, in Hillsboro, is a very exten- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 179 

sive family, taken in connection with the Rogers in the Fork 
and Mullins region, whence they all sprang; there is, perhaps, 
not a more extensive family in the county. Dew Rogers, a 
way back in the twenties, went from the Fork over into what 
is now called Hillsboro, having married over there, a Miss 
Mary Barfield; he bought land and went to work; he was a 
very energetic, persevering and frugal man; made money, 
bought other lands, negroes, &c., and raised children; the 
children reached the number of sixteen or nineteen, mostly 
sons ; the names of some of them, as remembered, was Zany, 
Jesse, Henry, Ebenezer, Dew, Barfield and others, and lastly, 
our esteemed and worthy fellow-citizen, Captain Robert H. 
Rogers — the youngest son ; some of them are yet living, and it 
may be supposed they are keeping up the name and perpetu- 
ating it to the second, third and fourth generations. Captain 
Henry Rogers (familiarly called "Captain Tarleton"), a 
brother of old Dew, married a Miss Thompson, and came over 
from the Fork about the same time Dew Rogers came, and 
settled on the Lewis Thompson homestead, his wife's father, 
and lived and died there some years ago ; he also raised a large 
family of sons and daughters, and about them the writer 
knows but little. R. R. Hays, of Dillon, is a grand-son of 
"Captain Tarleton." These two old Rogers are the trunks of 
the family, so far as Hillsboro is concerned. They had two 
brothers left in the Fork, Ebenezer and Alfred ; the latter was 
a Baptist preacher ; I do not think he ever married. Ebenezer 
Rogers died in the Fork a few years ago, leaving a numerous 
progeny. The Rogers family in Hillsboro, in the Fork and in 
the Mullins region are all related to each other in greater or 
less degree — had a common ancestor, whose name is unto the 
writer unknown. The numerous branches, each becoming, as 
it were a new trunk, are so varied that it is impossible, with 
the limited information at hand, to take each branch up seria- 
tim and trace them, with their numerous descendants, down 
to the present time ; want of time and space, together with the 
want of information, forbid the undertaking. As a family 
they are peaceable, harmless, inoiifensive and law-abiding; in 
so large a family, of course, there are, and must be, some 
exception, but they do not affect the general rule. As a family, 



180 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

they are honest in their sentiments and convictions; in their 
modes of life they are somewhat primitive and unostentatious ; 
patriotic to the core, as evidenced by the numbers they and 
their connections furnished to the Southern army in the war. 
Their names do not often appear upon the dockets of the 
Courts, civil or criminal, and this said, is saying much for so 
large a family. There are two other families of Rogers in 
the county — one in the Dothan neighborhood and one in Brit- 
ton's Neck ; neither of which, or both together, are not so large 
and numerous as the family just mentioned. Of the Britton's 
Neck family, the writer knows but little. There was, years 
ago, an old gentleman in the Britton's Neck section by the 
name of Silas Rogers ; of his family the writer knows nothing ; 
also. Major James S. Rogers (militia Major), lived and died 
a few years ago in that section — ^a man rather prominent in 
his day, a good citizen and quite reputable, and was for years 
a fair representative of his family and of his section; he left 
some family, but of them the writer knows nothing; nor does 
he know whether be was lineally or collaterally related to old 
man Silas Rogers, or not, and, therefore, can say nothing 
more. Of the Dothan family, one Lot Rogers, from Virginia, 
came to South Carolina about the close of the Revolutionary 
War; he married a sister of old Buck Swamp John Bethea, 
named Nannie, whether before his arrival in South Carolina 
or after, is not now known; he settled and lived and died just 
above Dothan Church, on the road leading from Dothan to 
Little Rock, formerly called Harlleesville ; he raised a large 
family — think, mostly sons ; of these, only Timothy and Wil- 
liam were known to the writer ; others of them went West ; one 
daughter only known to the writer; she became the wife of 
Nathan Evans, and the mother of the late General William 
and Nathan Evans, as hereinbefore mentioned. Timothy 
Rogers, a most excellent man and worthy citizen, married 
Sarah Bethea, a daughter of Sweat Swamp John Bethea, and 
settled where Dr. J. F. Bethea now lives; they raised a large 
family of sons and daughters; of the sons, John B. Rogers 
emigrated to the West many years ago — not, however, until 
after he married a Miss McRee, and had some family. Tres- 
tram B. Rogers married a Miss Parnell ; had some family when 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 181 

he removed West, and Ivot B. Rogers married a Miss Thwing, 
had some family and removed to Texas, I think. These three 
all dead ; I know nothing of their posterity. Two other sons, 
Jesse and Cade B. Rogers. Jesse married, first. Miss Harriet 
Bethea, daughter of the late Parker Bethea, by whom he had 
three children, two sons and one daughter. Two sons, David 
S. Rogers, of "Free State," who married a Miss Pipkin, of 
Marlborough, and who has had twenty children born to him 
by the same wife, seven of them are, however, dead; D. S. 
Rogers is quite a good citizen and prosperous man. Albert S. 
Rogers, the other son, married- a daughter of Captain Stephen 
F. Berry, has a considerable family, sons and daughters, how 
many is unknown. Albert Rogers is also doing well. Their 
sister, Alice Rogers, married Holden Bethea; they live in the 
"Free State," and are said to be doing well ; have a family of 
children. Jesse Rogers married, a second time, the Widow 
Anna Rogers, below Marion; his wife was the widow of his 
cousin, Evan Rogers, who will be mentioned hereinafterwards ; 
he (Jesse) died, leaving no issue by his second marriage. 
Cade B. Rogers, the youngest son of old man Timothy Rogers, 
still survives, and, as far as is known, the only survivor of that 
large family; he married, firs't, a Miss George (Nancy) ; by 
her he had two daughters and one son; one of the daughters 
married a Mr. Butler, on north side of Little Pee Dee ; can say 
nothing of their family, if they had any; the other daughter 
married Herod Gaddy, and lives in Marlbdlx)ugh. The son, 
Henry G. Rogers, married a Miss Pipkin, settled in Marl- 
boroug'h, and is dead ; I can say nothing of his family. Cade 
B. Rogers' first wife died, and he married a second time, a 
Widow Morris, of Florence County ; no children by this latter 
marriage. Of the many daughters of old man Timothy 
Rogers, the oldest married Daniel Mclnnis; both dead and 
childless; the second, Mary, married the late Rev. Samuel J. 
Bethea, and is dead; the next, Miranza, married Thomas C. 
Bethea; the next, Harriet, married Arch'd K. McLellan; the 
next, Elizabeth, married Daniel A. Piatt ; the next (name for- 
gotten) married Levi Gasque; and the next (name forgotten) 
married William E. Brown, of Marlborough; all dead, and 
left families except Mrs. Mclnnis. Mrs. T. C. Bethea, Mrs. 



182 A HISTORY 01? MARION COUNTY. 

Levi Gasque and Mrs. William E. Brown went West many 
years ago; those remaining here raised large families, and 
they and their descendants now form a good portion of our 
population. Old Lot Rogers' youngest son, William, and 
perhaps his youngest child, born in 1799, inherited the old 
homestead of his father, and is now owned by his youngest 
son, our good fellow-citizen. Lot B. Rogers; he married the 
youngest daughter (Mary) of old Henry Berry, as hereinbe- 
fore stated; he and wife lived and died on his father's 
homestead at an old age — not many years ago; the fruits of 
the marriage were sons, Charles, Evan, Frank, Philip B. and 
Lot B., and daughters, Elizabeth Ann, Mary Ann, Nancy and 
Margaret. Of the sons, Charles emigrated West, and, doubt- 
less, is dead ; nothing, however, is known of 'him by the writer ; 
Evan grew up and married Miss Anna Legette, daughter of 
Colonel Levi Legette, below Marion, and where Evan Rogers 
settled. He was killed on Sunday, ist of October, 1855, by a 
man by the name of Harrelson, who was tried the next week 
after at Court in Marion, and very ably defended by the late 
Chancellor Inglis and Julius A. Dargan, two very eminent and 
able lawyers, and was convicted and sentenced to be hanged on 
a certain day fixed ; before the day appointed for his execution 
he escaped from jail; a large reward, two hundred dollars or 
more, was offered for his recapture and delivery at the jail in 
Marion by General Elly Godbold, then Sheriff; great efforts 
were made to find and recapture him, but all in vain; about 
eig'hteen months thereafter he was recaptured in Columbus 
County, N. C, brought back and lodged in the jail in Marion, 
and at the succeeding Court, in March, 1857, ^^ was re- 
sentenced or a new day assigned for his execution, and he 
was accordingly hanged by the then Sheriff, N. C. McDuffie, 
on the 5th day of June, 1857. The third son, Frank, grew up 
to manhood and went to Louisiana, and died there many years 
ago. Philip B.,.the fourth son, now one of our prosperous 
fellow-citizens, married a Miss Gaddy, daughter of Allen 
Gaddy, and raised a considerable family, sons and daughters, 
who are among us now as citizens and wives of our citizens, 
and are known. Philip B. Rogers' wife died some two or 
three years ago; he is now a widower — I do not know how 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 183 

long he will remain such.* Lot B. Rogers, the youngest son 
of William Rogers, is now a leading and successful farmer 
among us; he married Miss Adaline Townsend, daughter of 
the late Jacob Townsend, and sister of D. A. Townsend, of 
Union, one of the Circuit Judges of the State; by that mar- 
riage a large family resulted, of sons and daughters, and 
among them are four sets of twins — all the latter are living 
except one — some grown and some married, and some of them 
yet minors. Having succeeded well in life. Lot B. Rogers has 
so far educated his children well, and they are promising; he 
himself has represented his county in the State Legislature, 
besides holding other public positions in the county by the 
suffrages of his fellow-citizens, and in every one of them has 
discharged his duty faithfully and to the satisfaction of his 
friends. William Rogers died in 1874, at the age of seventy- 
five years ; his wife survived him a few years and she died. 

Pbrritt. — Another numerous family of the county is the 
Perritt family. Of the old Perritts, there were four brothers 
known to the writer, viz: David, Joseph, Jesse and John. 
David only has left posterity; he married a Miss Smith, a 
sister of old Mr. Hugh Smith, and he in turn married a sister 
of David Perritt (this latter is according to information, may 
be wrong). The old man Perritt raised a family, mostly sons, 
David B., Needham, William, Bennett, Jesse, John E. and 
Asa, and one daughter, if no more. David B. Perritt married 
Miss Martha Edwards, daughter of the late Rev. David Ed- 
wards, and by her had several children, sons and daughters; 
and they in turn have perpetuated the name and connections 
to a second and, perhaps, third generation, and of whom the 
writer knows nothing. Needham Perritt married a Miss 
Moody, sister of the late Joshua W. Moody, a man highly 
esteemed for his many good qualities and noble traits of char- 
acter. Needham Perritt is dead ; he left a considerable family, 
sons and daughters, and they (the children) have become 
fathers and mothers, and extending down to another genera- 
tion or more. William Perritt married a Miss Carmichael, 
daughter of the late Dugald C. Carmichael, of Buck Swamp 

*PhiUp B. Rogers has since married to a lady in North Carolina. 
13 



184 . A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

and Maiden Down; William Perritt is dead, and left a son, 
Morgan, and three daughters, who, it is supposed, are among 
the present inhabitants of the country, unknown to the writer. 
Bennett Perritt married a Miss Powers, sister of our esteemed 
fellow-citizen, Mitchell Powers; he raised a family, about 
whom the writer knows but little ; one daughter married James 
Sanderson, who has been dead for years ; his widow still lives, 
and. has raised her family respectably, and is said to be doing 
well; she has two sons grown; one daughter married Hugh 
Price, a prosperous citizen in that neighborhood ; he has a fam- 
ily, about whom the writer knows nothing. Another daughter 
married Frank Huggins ; he and she have both left the country, 
and their whereabouts unknown. If Bennett Perritt had any 
sons, it is unknown to the writer. Jesse Perritt, another son 
of old David, the writer has not been able to get anything con- 
cerning him ; whom he married and whether he had any family 
or not, is unasoertainable ; it is said that he is dead. Another 
son of old David Perritt is our very worthy fellow-citizen, 
John E. Perritt ; he married, first, a Miss Campbell, a' daughter 
of the late Wm. S. Campbell, and raised a large and respectable 
family, mostly daughters, and two sons, A. J. A. Perritt and 
Arvjngton Perritt. A. J. A. Perritt moved to Darlington 
County some years ago, and since he has been there has held 
several positions of honor and trust, to wit : County Superin- 
tendent of Education, Representative in the State Legislature 
and a member of the State Constitutional Convention, all of 
which positions he has filled with credit to himself and satis- 
tory to his constituents ; he married a daughter of the late Rev. 
John W. Murray, of the South Carolina Conference of the 
Methodist Church, South. Arvington Perritt left the county 
a single man and went to Texas ; nothing further is known of 
him. Of John E. Perritt's daughters, one married our excel- 
lent fellow-citizen, Jerry Lambert; another married W. C. 
Bracy, of Dillon ; another married a Mr. Keith ; another mar- 
ried a Mr. Smith, below Marion, think a son of Reddin W. 
Smith. I think there is another one or two daughters, whether 
married or not, is not known. Asa Perritt, the youngest son 
of old David, was a Lieutenant in Captain S. A. Durham's 
company in the late war; he married a daughter of the late 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 185 

■Rev. David Edwards, and removed West not long after the 
war ; nothing further is known of him. Of the three brothers 
of old David Perritt, Joseph never married; he has been dead 
many years. Jesse married Mary Dew, daughter of old Chris- 
topher Dew ; they had no children ; she died, and he married a 
second wife, the widow of Elias Townsend; she had been the 
widow of Alfred Kirven, and was originally Elizabeth Tart, 
daughter of old Enos Tart, a notable man in his day, and of 
whom something may be said hereinafter ; by her he had no 
child or children ; both have been dead for some years. John 
Perritt, the youngest brother of old David Perritt, died in 
1840 or 1841, a young single man, from the bite of a rattle- 
snake ; he was with a surveying party about the Marlborough 
line, and in toward the Great Pee Dee River, when the snake 
bit him; there was no house near them and no doctor near; 
he was carried two miles to the nearest house and a doctor was 
finally procured, but too late; he died that same night; a 
young man of fine character and good habits, and was spoken 
well of by all who knew him. Thus it seems that the very 
large family of Perritts and their many connections of the 
present day, and now in the county, sprang from old David 
Perritt, on or near the Ten Mile Bay; he was an energetic 
and persevering man, exceedingly frugal and thoughtful; 
would not be in debt, paid as he went, and made a good prop- 
erty by saving it; was a good and law-abiding citizen; he lost 
his wife in his old age; married some one, name not remem- 
bered, and left her a widow ; I think she drew a pension after 
his death for his services in the War of 1812 — I think he drew 
it in his lifetime. Few men anywhere have a larger connection 
than he has from himself. They and the Perritt connections 
are numerous, and are an honest, well-meaning people ; ambi- 
tious only to live honestly and to let others live, and are primi- 
tive in their modes of life. 

Edwards. — The Edwards family, on Buck Swamp, is 
another family of some note. Tradition informs us that 
Richard Edwards came to South Carolina from Virginia soon 
after the Revolutionary War; that he was originally from 
England,, or rather his ancestors ; that during the Revolution 



186 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

he was shot in the head and his skull was fractured ; that the 
fracture was trepanned with gold, and from that fact was 
generally called "Gold-headed Richard or Dick Edwards." 
We are not informed who his wife was ; he raised a family of 
sons and perhaps daughters, the daughters are unknown; his 
sons were Richard, David, Samuel and Henry — who became 
stocks for families, more or less numerous, now in the county ; 
they settled on Buck Swamp. Their father, "Gold-headed 
Dick," lived to a great age, and was a man of some means. 
Richard, the oldest son, a local preacher of the Methodist 
Church, had only two children — a son, the late Captain L,. M. 
Edwards, and another, whether a son or daughter, is unknown. 
Captain L. M. Edwards was noted in his day; he died a few 
months ago, and left a large family, sons and daughters ; he 
was married twice ; his first wife was a Miss Martin, sister of 
the late A. Martin and, I think, a cousin of Captain Edwards ; 
by her be had sons and daughters ; sons, Richard, Albert, Enos 
and Hamilton, all of whom are married, and have families, are 
good citizens and doing fairly well. By Captain Edwards' sec- 
ond wife, the Widow Fort, originally a Miss Lewis, he had 
sons — P. H. Edwards, Marion, Olin and Bonnie; of these, 
Marion is dead ; P. H. Edwards married a daughter of Dr. C. 
T. Ford ; Olin married a daughter of T. B. Hays ; Bonnie is yet 
single. Captain Edwards had some daughters by each wife; 
one married Samuel Roberts; one married a Nicholson; and 
perhaps other daughters, unknown. Of his first sons, Richard 
married a Miss Martin, his first cousin ; Albert Edwards mar- 
ried a Miss Roberts; Enos Edwards married Miss Hays, and 
Hamilton Edwards married Miss Ida Smith. These are all now 
citizens of the county, and performing their duties as such. 
Rev. David Edwards, second son of "Gold-headed Dick," a 
capital man, married into the extensive family of the Rogers ; 
his wife was a sister of "Captain Tarleton" and of Dew 
Rogers, both of them before spoken of herein ; by his marriage 
he had and raised fourteen children, six sons and eight daugh- 
ters; the sons were Carey, Andrew, David, Richard, Robert 
and William; the daughters were Harriet, Elizabeth, Sallie, 
Martha, Nancy, Alice, Emaline and Mary. Of the sons, An- 
drew, Richard and Robert are dead ; of the daughters, Sallie, 



A HISTORY OJP MARION COUNTY. 187 

Martha, Alice and Emaline are dead ; the dead ones, however, 
all married and left families. I do not know who Andrew 
married ; he \yas a Baptist preacher ; he left the county ; I know 
nothing of his family. Richard married Miss Caroline Martin, 
and left two sons, B. F. Edwards and Austin Edwards. Rob- 
ert married Sarah I^ewis, and left two sons, George and 
Stanly; they went to Texts some years ago; George died in 
Texarkana, and was Mayor of that city at the time of his death, 
and was otherwise a prosperous man; he being a single man, 
his property was inherited by his only brother, Stanly Ed- 
wards, who was also in Texas, is yet there, and is said to be 
wealthy and a good citizen of the "L,one Star" State. Of the 
dead daughters, Sallie, the wife of Stephen H. Martin, left 
two sons and a daughter; the sons were Mack Martin and 
David Martin. The daughter married Perry J. Williams, and 
is dead. Martha Edwards married David B. Perritt, and 
is dead, leaving a considerable family. Alice married Solo- 
mon Bryant, and is dead — died in the Asylum. Emaline mar- 
ried Hugh Bryant, and is dead ; she also died in the Asylum in 
Columbia. Alice and Emaline both left families, who are now 
among us. Of the sons of David Edwards, only three survive, 
to wit: Cary, David W. Edwards, of Mullins, and William. 
D. W. Edwards married a Miss Carmichael, daughter of old 
Dugal Carmichael, on Buck Swamp, and has three children; 
two sons, E. C. Edwards, our very excellent felloW-citizen, 
and County Superintendent of Education, and Melvin Ed- 
wards, also a good citizen ; and a daughter, Catharine, who is 
now the wife of Robert Rogers, a prosperous farmer. D. W. 
Edwards married a second time ; her name is unknown. Wil- 
liam Edwards married Miss Nancy Owens, of the Fork. 
William Edwards, like two of his sisters above mentioned, is 
afflicted with lunacy, and has been in the Asylum two or three 
times, but is now at home; he has a family. The oldest 
daughter, Harriet, married the late Richard Moody; she still 
survives, with a numerous family. Carey Edwards, the oldest 
son, married Miss Martha Mace, 5th March, 1845 — the writer 
was at the wedding; four children are the fruits of said mar- 
riage, two sons, John and James, and two daughters, Melvina 
and Jane — ^the latter is dead, died in the Asylum. Carey Ed- 



188 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

wards still survives, an old man, and lives writh his son, John; 
his Wife has been dead many years. James married a Miss 
Davis, in Wahee; he has a family of four children. Melvina 
is an old maid, enjoying the sweets of single blessedness. 
John married his cousin, a daughter of Solomon Bryant, and 
lives on the homestead of his mother. Elizabeth married John 
Thompson, of Britton's Neck. Thompson is dead; of his 
family little is known. Nancy married Asa Pruitt, and re- 
moved West many years ago. Mary married, first. Ebb. 
Smith ; he went into the war and was killed or died of disease — 
has never returned; his widow married George Lane, and be- 
tween the two husbands raised a considerable family, who are 
now among our citizens ; the writer knows but little of them. 
Samuel Edwards, the third son of "Gold-headed Dick," mar- 
ried a Miss Martin, sister of Matthew, Jr., and the late Aaron 
Martin; he lived and died in the Fork, and raised a family, 
how many the writer does not know ; he was a prosperous and 
excellent man. He had a son, Renselaer, who died some years 
ago, and left a family — ^the number is not known, nor do I 
know who the mother was. He has another son, David S. 
Edwards, now a prominent and prosperous farmer in the Fork ; 
he has a large family of sons and daughters ; I think his wife 
was a Miss Carmichael. D. S. Edwards is an enterprising and 
public-spirited man; he is doing a good part by his children 
in the way of education ; one of his sons, G. Emory Edwards, 
graduated in Woff ord College recently with distinction ; since 
his graduation he has been teaching at Dothan, and gives full 
satisfaction to his patrons. D. S. Edwards has two daughters, 
promising girls and graduates of the Winthrop Female Col- 
lege ; he is doing abundantly better for his children than those 
of the former generations. It is greatly to be wished that we 
had many more like him with regard to education. Another 
son of Samuel Edwards was Solomon, who died many years 
ago; he married a daughter of Joseph B. Hays and left one 
daughter, who is now the wife of Kirkland Fort. Samuel Ed- 
wards had a daughter, Civil, who married Daniel W. Carmi- 
chael, and they have raised a numerous family of sons and 
daughters, who will be further noticed when we come to speak 
of the Carmichaels. Samuel Edwards, I think, had another 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 189 

daughter, who married an Owens, in the Fork; nothing is 
known of them. Another son of "Gk>ld-headed Dick," named 
Henry, the youngest, married a Miss Gerald, and had one son, 
L,evi, who lives in the Gapway neighborhood. Henry Ed- 
wards' habits were not good; he drank excessively, never did 
much in life, and, no doubt, was a source of much trouble to 
his relations. It seems to the writer that there was another 
son of "Gold-headed Dick," perhaps the oldest one, by the 
name of Solomon; nothing, however, is known of him or of 
his family, if he had any — I am not certain there was such an 
one. The Edwards family and its connections are numerous ; 
they are quite respectable, and stand fair among their fellow- 
citizens; seldom in the Courts. Since writing the foregoing 
account of the Edward's family, the writer has learned that 
Captain L. M. Edwards had a brother, named Enos, who mar- 
ried and died, leaving a son, Frank Edwards, who lives in the 
Pleasant Hill neighborhood, and is one of our good citizens. 
It may be further added, that B. F. Edwards, in the Gaddy 
neighborhood, and Austin Edwards, in the Latta community, 
great-grand-sons of "Gold-headed Dick" Edwards, are promi- 
nent and thriving men of our county. 

NiCH0i<s. — The Nichols family, so far as the county is con- 
cerned, sprang from old Averett Nichols, of Columbus County, 
N. C. His youngest son, Averett, born 8th March, 1803, set- 
tled in Marion County in 1830 ; he married a Miss Burney, of 
Columbus County, N. C. ; he located near what is now called 
Nichols, in the woods, apparently a poor place, lived there 
during his long life, and died there at the age of near ninety- 
three, on the 7th January, 1896; he raised a family of ten 
children, eight daughters and two sons ; the sons, McKendree 
(called Kendree) and Averitt Burney. Kendree was a very 
promising young man, unmarried; went into the Southern 
army as a Lieutenant, and was killed, as I think, in second , 
Manassas, 30th August, 1862. A. B. Nichols, a prominent 
and progressive citizen, merchant and farmer at Nichols, S. 
C, married a Miss Sophronia Daniel, and has a family of child- 
ren, how many is unknown — be is doing his full duty in that 
respect, as well as in every other ; he is a first class man, and 



190 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

safe in every way. Averitt Nichols' oldest daughter, Mary, 
married Isham H. Watson, and is now a widow, and childless ; 
his daughter, Lucy, married a Mr. Lawson ; they emigrated to 
Texas many years ago, and, I suppose, are contributing their 
share to the population and wealth of that great State. Sarah 
(or Sallie) married our modest but successful fellow-citizen, 
J. Thomas Jones; she has been dead many years, but left 
several sons and daughters, all of whom are now among us ; 
I do not know the names of all the sons ; Eli is one, Beverly 
another, Kendree, Evander and Robert Boyd, maybe another 
one or two. There are four daughters, Lucy Ellen, who mar- 
ried J. B. Williams; Lola, who married William E. Hewit; 
Catharine, married David N. Bethea; and Miss Fannie is yet 
single. Of this family, it may be said, they are all first class 
citizens, doing well and law-abiding. Anne Nichols married 
the late T. B. Braddy, who was killed by D. W. McLaurin, in 
1881 ; he left a son, Oscar Braddy, by his Nichols wife ; he and 
his mother reside in Hillsboro Township, and, I suppose, arc 
doing fairly well. Fannie Nichols married our respected fel- 
low-citizen, Jacob W. Smith, and has several children; I do 
not know how many ; he lives in Latta. I know his son, Alonzo 
Smith, who is a progressive and first class young business 
man, and promises to become one of the leading men of the 
county. Miss Rebecca Nichols, youngest daughter of Averitt 
Nichols, never married ; she was, after the death of her mother, 
the controling spirit and manager of the female department of 
the household until a few years ago, she unexpectedly and sud- 
denly died; she was a charming young woman, just the sort 
to have made a good housewife. There were two other 
daughters, who died about maturity and unmarried. Averitt 
Nichols was a very exemplary man ; he had the faculty in large 
degree of attending to his own business and of letting other 
people's business severely alone; the result was that he 
amassed a large property, raised a large and respectable family ; 
would not go in debt — paid as he went ; he was never in a hurry 
or in a flurry about anything ; had in the Bank of New Han- 
over, Wilmington, N. C, several thousand dollars when it 
failed some seven or eight years ago,- and which was mostly 
lost. In his later days the old gentleman partially lost his 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 191 

mind, and his affairs, financial and otherwise, were managed 
by his son, A. B. Nichols. The old man was never informed 
of the loss of his money by the failure of the bank ; he died not 
knowing anything about it. 

Hutchinson. — There is a family near Nichols, by the name 
of Hutchinson. John Hutchinson is a very worthy citizen. 
I do not know anything of his ancestry, or where he came 
from ; he has children grown and married ; a daughter married 
a Barfield, who lives in the neighborhood, and is doing well. 

Barfield. — The Barfield family, in part, live in Hillsboro. 
They are descendants of Barrett Barfield, who in the thirties 
resided in Hillsboro, just below Gaddy's Mill, and on the 
plantation now owned by his grand-son. Captain R. H. Rogers ; 
he had by the same wife, and raised them to be grown, twenty- 
two children, sons and daughters ; he, with most of his family, 
removed West. Writ Barfield, a son, and an excellent citizen, 
remained, and several of his daughters, who had married — one 
to Dew Rogers, one to Ebenezer Rogers in the Fork, one to 
Love Goodyear — they also remained and all raised large fam- 
ilies. Writ Barfield was a very worthy citizen, raised a con- 
siderable family, several sons ; they and their posterity now are 
among our people, not personally known to the writer ; and he 
supposes that old Barrett Barfield, their ancestor, was a son, 
or brother, or nephew of the celebrated Tory, Captain Barfield, 
of Revolutionary fame; which appellation, Tory, is now no 
longer a derisive name — at least, so far as the Barfield family 
is concerned ; some of the best soldiers we had in our late Con- 
federate War were of that family, of that name and its connec- 
tions of Barfield blood. The writer may have something to 
say further on in this book in regard to the word Tory, as an 
appellation of derision or contempt. Captain Barfield as a 
leader, though on the losing side in the Revolution, is spoken 
of as a brave man, fighting for what he believed to be right. 
A distinctive characteristic of the Barfield family, and especi- 
ally of the females, was their beauty — perfect in form and 
features, of medium size and great activity. The men were 
as agile as a deer. It was said of one of the sons of old Bar- 



192 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

rett, named Thompson, that he could cut a double summer- 
sault — that he could walk along and cut a dozen without 
stopping. In a tustle or a fight, they were hard to handle, even 
by larger men and of greater strength. Miss Appey Barfield, 
the youngest daughter of old man Barrett, was as beautiful a 
woman as ever the writer looked at, weighed about one hundred 
and twenty-five or thirty, was perfect in form and as pretty as 
the fabled Venus. The last time the writer saw her was in 
February, 1835, not long before her father left this country. 
Writ Barfield, the father of the Barfields, now in Hillsboro, 
lived to be more than eighty years of age. 

Goodyear. — The Goodyear family, so far as Marion County 
is concerned, sprang from William Goodyear, who died in 1800. 
His wife, I think, was a Ford or a Grainger ; his sons or grand- 
sons were the late John Goodyear and Love Goodyear, both 
dead. John Goodyear had only one son, who was killed or 
died in the war; he raised ten daughters, of whom something 
has already been said herein. Love .Goodyear died in 185 1, 
and left a family of sons and perhaps daughters ; the sons, as 
remembered and known, were William, Elias and Harman. 
William Goodyear, now an old man and very worthy citizen, 
lives near Nichols, and has raised a family who are now among 
our people and known. I do not know what became of Elias, 
whether dead or alive; Harman, I think, is dead. There is 
one, Madison Goodyear, if alive, whose son he is, or was, is 
not now remembered. Some six or eight years ago, the writer 
received a letter from a lady in the State of Washington or one 
of the Dakotas, the wife of a Lieutenant in the regular army 
of the United States, stationed out there in the far West, who 

signed her name "Grace Goodyear ■ " (the last name 

not remembered, and the correspondence is mislaid). This 
lady said she belonged to the family of Goodyears in this 
county, or was collaterally related to them ; that she had been 
referred to me as an antiquarian and genealogist ; she said she 
was trying to trace her family, the Goodyear family, back to a 
Goodyear (John, I believe), who was Lieutenant-Governor of 
Connecticut, then a province of Great Britain, about 1690.; 
The writer made what investigation he could, and wrote the 



A HISTORY O? MARION COUNTY. 193 

result to her, which she received and acknowledged its receipt 
in very complimentary and appreciative terms. I have heard 
nothing from her since. The Goodyear family are, doubtless, 
of English extraction, and were among the early settlers of the 
country. There is now in the city of New York a very wealthy 
family of that name, and a strong company called "The Good- 
year Rubber Company," and the Goodyears of this county are, 
doubtless, of the same family. 

Tart. — The Tart family was formerly a very noted family — 
at least, in the person of old Enos Tart. There were three 
brothers of them as known to the writer, Enos, John and Na- 
than. Of these, Enos was the most prominent ; he lived on, and 
owned the plantation and mill latterly known as E. J. Moody's. 
Who the father of these three brothers were, is not known to 
the writer. When that mill was built, and by whom, is not 
known. In Gregg's History it is spoken of as "Tart's Mill, 
about six miles above Marion Court House." It is reasonable 
to presume it was among the first mills in the county, except, 
perhaps, "Hulins," on Catfish, afterwards Bass' Mill. (Gregg, 
P- 359- ) The mill was, before the Revolution, the property of 
John Smith, whose daughter, tradition informs us, was the 
mother of Enos Tart and brothers. This John Smith was the 
progenitor of most of the Smiths (numerous) now and since 
that time in the county. Enos Tart was a most remarkable 
man, a giant in strength and size, weighing about three hun- 
dred pounds and not over corpulent. It is related of him that 
he could interfere between two men fighting, and take one com- 
batant with one hand in the collar and with the other hand the 
other combatant, and hold them apart ; they could not break his 
hold, and he would hold them apart, until each promised him 
that they would desist, and each go his way and quit the fight. 
He was a man of such remarkable equanimity of temper, that 
a man might curse and abuse him for everything he could think 
of, and call him all sorts of contemptuous names, and he would 
not resent it, but laugh at his would-be adversary. It is re- 
lated of him that on one occasion old man Cade Bethea so 
cursed and abused him at Marion Court House, calling him by 
every contemptuous name in the catalogue, and daring Tart 



194 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

to resent it, which Tart did not do, and as usual laughed at old 
Cade. On that night, as Tart was going home, he came up 
with old man Cade by the side of the road, down dead drunk. 
Tart alighted, went to him and took him home with him, and 
stripped him and put him to bed, old man Cade being uncon- 
scious all the while. Next morning, the sleeping Cade; so 
furious the day before, awoke and found out where he was; 
he got up and manfully acknowledged his error; that he was 
whipped by Tart's kindness, and was ever afterwards a close 
and constant friend of Tart's. Enos Tart, according to tradi- 
tion, was never known to strike any man, and the reason given 
for it was, that he was afraid to strike a man for fear he might 
kill him; Tart knew his physical power. He was a kind- 
hearted and generous man, and befriended all as far as he 
could; he was a very popular man, and could not be beaten 
before the people. He was more than once a Representative 
of his district in the State Legislature; was Sheriff of the 
county, and Clerk of the Court when he died, in 1828. Enos 
Tart married a Miss Susanna Johnson, of the county; the 
results of the marriage were four or five daughters and three 
sons. One of his daughters married Jack Finklea ; one married 
Willis Finklea; one, Elizabeth, married, first, Alfred Kirvin, 
and had two children for him, two daughters, when they sep- 
arated, and years afterwards, after Kirvin died, she married 
Elias Townsend; some years afterward, Townsend died, and 
she married Jessee Perritt ; by neither of the last marriages 
had she any offspring ; they lived together for some years, and 
they both died in a week of each other. Of her Kirvin child- 
ren, the oldest, Lucinda, died just as she was budding into 
womanhood. The other daughter, whose name is not remem- 
bered, married James Fore, and had four children, three 
daughters and a son; of these, two of the daughters married 
Berrys — Stephen Berry and William Berry ; the other daughter 
married Powers, a son of Mitchel Powers. The son, Thomas 
E. Fore, is now one of our good citizens, and has a family. 
Susan Tart, the fourth daughter, married a Mr. Brown, of 
Brownsville, in Marlborough; after having two children, a 
son and a daughter, the father and mother both died ; the child^ 
ren grew up and emigrated West. Jane Tart, the youngest 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 195 

daughter of old Enos Tart, married another Brown, of the 
same family; he soon after died, leaving no offspring; the 
widow again married Humphrey 1/ester; the results of this 
marriage were two children — a daughter, Mary, now the wife 
of M. Stackhouse, and a son, Robert H. Lester, now among 
us, with an increasing family; he married a Miss Proctor, of 
Little Rock. Soon after the birth of these two children, 
Humphrey Lester died, and Jane became a widow the second 
time; she again married our esteemed fellow-citizen, E. J. 
Moody ; the fruits of this latter marriage were two sons, Tho- 
mas E. and Neill C. Moody, and two daughters. Thomas E. 
married a Miss Little, daughter of the Rev. L. M. Little ; he 
soon died childless. Neill C. Moody never married, died three 
or four years ago. The daughters, Virginia and Maggie, both 
married. Virginia married Douglas Mclntyre, of Marion — a 
noble woman she was ; she died some years ago, leaving three 
or four children, the oldest of whom, Janie, married Robert 
Proctor ; they have left the State. Mclntyre married again, a 
Miss Fore, and has his first children with him now, except 
Janie. Maggie Moody married Dr. D. I. Watson; they re- 
moved to Southport, N. C, have several children, and are said 
to be doing well. It may be truthfully said of Mrs. Jane 
Moody, who died some years ago, that she was the excellent 
of the earth ; high-toned, and above all had a good and kind 
heart, beloved by all who knew her ; and if any of her children 
or grand-children should turn out badly, it will not be the fault 
or failings of the mother; she left an influence that will tell 
upon her offspring sooner or later. Old Enos Tart had three 
sons, Enos, Nathan and Thomas E. Tart. Enos, the oldest, 
died a young man, in 1844, before his mother; he was a very 
promising young man, a graduate of the University of Vir- 
ginia, a Chesterfield in his manners and deportment; he had 
many of the qualities of his father ; had he lived, would, doubt- 
less, have become prominent, and filled a large space in the 
public eye. Soon after Enos Tart, Jr., died, Thomas E., the 
youngest brother, accidentally shot himself with a pistol, from 
which he died in a few minutes. Three or four years after 
that sad event, Nathan Tart, the middle son, died. The sons 
of old Enos all died unmarried, so that the name, so far as old 



196 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Enos was concerned, was entirely cut off. Enos Tart was not 
a very old man when he died ; he was a man of business, accu- 
mulated a large property and left his family in good condition ; 
he was the contractor for and built the old brick court house in 
Marion, in 1823, which was torn down and removed, in , 1864, 
during the war. That court house stood about the spot where 
the new building lately erected for the Clerk and Probate 
Judge's offices now stands. There are many now living who 
remember the old brick court house ; it was constructed on the 
"Mills" plan of court houses for that day and time. Of the 
brothers of old Enos, John and Nathan, John Tart, I think, 
married a Miss Crawford; he raised two sons and some 
daughters; the sons were James and Enos Tart — ^the name 
Enos runs down to the present generation in every family. 
James Tart's brother, Enos, was called "Dog Enos," for dis- 
tinction. Why they gave him so unsavory a name is not now 
known. The writer has seen him, or saw him, about sixty 
years ago ; he was regarded as a bully on the muster fields of 
that day ; I do not know what became of him. James, the older 
brother, was a very respectable man and good citizen ; he mar- 
ried Miss Julia Ann Smith, and raised a large family of sons 
and daughters, all of whom are now dead, except the youngest 
son, Enos Murchison Tart, who married in Columbus County, 
N. C, where he settled and now resides. John W. Tart, the 
oldest son of James, married a daughter of Rev. Samuel J. 
Bethea, raised a large family of sons and daughters, who are 
now among us as citizens of the county ; he died on April 14th, 
1875, of a cancer on the tongue. A daughter of James Tart, 
Amelia, married the late John C. Campbell, near Ebenezer 
Church, where he and she both died a few years ago; they 
raised a large family of sons, and two daughters, perhaps eight 
or ten sons. Some of the sons, two or three, are dead, leaving 
no family, and one of the daughters is also dead, unmarried; 
the others are among us, and are respectable citizens. James 
Tart died during the war, on the place near Moody's Mill, now 
owned by the estate of the late Governor Ellerbe. James Tart 
had some sisters, two of whom married Birds, Joseph Bird and 
Hugh Bird, and one married a Malloy — all of whom are dead. 
Nathan Tart, the youngest brother of old Enos, married Kama 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 197 

Berry, a daughter of old Henry Berry, as already herein noted ; 
by their marriage a considerable family resulted of sons and 
daughters. Nathan Tart died in middle life and left his 
widow, Fama, and children. Fama Tart, as heretofore noted, 
was one of the most remarkable women that the writer ever 
saw. Of this family of Tarts, I think I have already written. 
Nathan and Fama Tart also had a son, named Enos, who was 
called by way of contradistinction, "Russell Enos." The name 
is continued down for two or three generations further. 

Bryant. — ^Another family may be here noticed. The Bry- 
ant family is an old family. Jesse Bryant is said to have been 
the first of that name in the county ; he came from England, as 
it is said ; he married a Miss Turbeville, supposed to have been 
a sister of Rev. William Turbeville, who, according to Bishop 
Gregg (pp. 70 and 71), came over about 1735, and settled at 
Sandy Bluff, on the Great Pee Dee, with the colony then and 
there settled, as their minister. "Several brothers came with 
him, of whom some descendants are now to be found in 
Marion." It may be presumed that sisters came too, and that 
one of them married old Jesse Bryant. Old Jesse had sons, 
William, Stephen and Jesse. Of these, William married Re- 
becca Miller ; he lived and died some twenty-five or thirty years 
ago, on the road just above Ebenezer Church, at the age of 
eighty-nine. Whether William, Stephen or Jesse was the old- 
est, is not known. Old Billy Bryant raised a large family, four 
sons and several daughters. Of the sons, John M. Bryant 
was the oldest ; he died some years ago, at the age of eighty- 
three; he married a Miss Drew, below Marion, and raised a 
large family — sons, Eli, Solomon, David, Pinckney and Hugh 
Bryant ; and daughters, Mrs. David Johnson, Mrs. Hardy John- 
son and Mrs. Addison Lane. Eli Bryant went West. Solo- 
mon Bryant married a daughter of Rev. David Edwards, first, 
and then a Miss McDonald. I do not know who David mar- 
ried; he has a son, named Curtis Bryant. Pinckney Bryant 
married, had a large family and is dead ; I don't know who his 
wife was. Hugh Bryant married a daughter of the late Rev. 
David Edwards, and has a family; these are now our fellow- 
citizens, and are contributing their share towards populating 



198 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

aind improving the conditions of the county. John M. Bryant 
was a solid, number one man, honest, truthful and reliable. 
Jesse Bryant, son of the first Jesse, went West. Stephen Bry- 
ant was the father or grand-father of F. D. Bryant, Esq., of 
the Marion bar. One of the daughters of the first Jesse was 
the wife of the late Charles Taylor. One of the sons of old 
William Bryant, named William, was a Baptist preacher; he 
went to Horry, and became the head of a family there. Also, 
did Stephen, the father of F. D. Bryant. Old man William 
Bryant was a simple-minded gentleman, honest and straight; 
he acted for many years as a Constable ; and I heard it related 
of him that on one occasion, having a Magistrate's execution 
to levy on the property of another, the old man went to the 
cowpen of the execution debtor to levy upon a bull yearling 
therein ; that the old man's idea was, that in order to make the 
levy, as required by the mandate of the execution, he had to 
lay the execution upon the back of the yearling. Accordingly, 
the old man went into the cowpen, armed with the execution, 
and took after the yearling, and after running him a while 
caught him by the tail, and he and the old man had it round 
and round the pen, the yearling bellowing ; at last the old man 
got him hemmed in a jamb of the fence and held him, till he 
laid the execution on the yearling's back; when the old man 
said, "I levy upon this yearling in the name of the State of 
South Carolina." Another incident showing the simplicity of 
the old gentleman was, that he used to plant and cultivate two 
and three stalks of corn in a hill. Some one asked him why he 
did so, saying to him that one stalk in a hill would make more 
corn than the two or three. The old gentleman replied, that 
when he cultivated only one stalk in a hill, he never made com 
enough to do him ; but when he cultivated two and three stalks, 
he always made plenty ; that when he fed his' horse, he always 
gave him ten ears at a bait ; that ten little ears would go as far 
as ten large ones; that two or three stalks in a hill would 
make more in number than one stalk. Many of the Bryants 
of Marion have emigrated to other sections of the country. 
The writer is not reasonably certain that this account of the 
Bryant family is correct in every particular — it is, however, 
in accord with the information obtained. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 199 

Watson. — ^Another family that may here be noticed, is the 
Watson family. The progenitor of this family, so far as 
Marion County is concerned, was Barnabas Watson, on Buck 
Swamp, who was the great-grand-father of our now fellow-cit- 
izens of the county. Old man Isham Watson was the founder, 
it may be said, of the family on Catfish, in name and fortune. 
Barny Watson, his father, was married twice ; whether he had 
a child or children other than Isham, by his first wife, is not 
known. Isham Watson married and settled on Catfish, near 
where Antioch Church now stands, in the first part of the nine- 
teenth century, a poor man; his wife was Miss Mary Hays, a 
sister of the late John C. Hays ; the results of the marriage were 
five sons, Matthew, James, Isham H., Samuel and William; 
and seven daughters, Nellie, Nancy, Elizabeth, Mary, Verzella, 
Fama and Jane ; all raised to be grown and all married, and all 
now dead, except the daughters, Mary and Jane. Matthew 
Watson married Miss Celia Easterling, in 1839; and raised a 
large family of sons and daughters; the sons are David E-. 
Isham E., Silas, Enos and Robert; and daughters, Martha, 
Lavina, Kate and Hortensia. David E. Watson married Miss 
Rose Bass, and has now living two sons and one daughter. 
Silas Watson married a Miss Page, daughter of W. J. Page, 
and has a family of sons and daughters, some of them grown. 
Isham E. Watson married Miss Beulah Emanuel ; he moved to 
Florence and has several children, sons and daughters; he is 
in the dairy business. Enos Watson married Miss Theodocia 
Emanuel, sister of Isham E. Watson's wife ; the two brothers 
married two sisters — ^both married the same evening. Enos 
Watson's wife is dead, leaving five children, the oldest of 
whom, Henry, by name, went into the Cuban war, thence to 
the Philippines, and perhaps now in China. Robert Watson 
married a Miss Walling ; he died four or five years after mar- 
riage, and left two or three children ; the whereabouts of his 
.widow and children are unknown. Martha, the eldest daughter 
of Matthew Watson, married the Rev. Alfred Pitman, in 
North Carolina, and resides there. Lavina, the second daugh- 
ter, married a Mr. McNeill, in North Carolina, and is dead, 
leaving children. Kate Watson married Tracy R. Fore, they 
have several children, one, a daughter, married to John H. 
14 



200 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

Berry. Hortensia Watson married Thomas J. Bass, who was 
killed some years ago by the falling of a tree, leaning over the 
path which he was traveling ; he left four sons, all young men, 
now among us ; their mother resides at Latta. James Watson, 
the second son of Isham Watson, married Miss Elizabeth 
Jones, daughter of Bryant Jones, of Wahee; the fruits of the 
marriage were several sons and daughters. James, the eldest, 
married Miss Flora Lane, and has several children, sons and 
daughters. Edward B. Watson married Miss Addie Bethea, 
a daughter of the late John R. Bethea ; they have several child- 
ren. Joseph F. Watson, a physician, married in Darlington; 
I don't know to whom. Cicero Watson, I think, is still single. 
Charles, I think, is married, and he and two single sisters live 
together on the old homestead of his father. James Watson's 
oldest daughter, Mary, married Jesse Gibson, below Marion; 
they have a family, how many is not known. The, next 
daughter, Sarah, married Allen Gibson, brother of Jesse ; they 
also have a family, of how many is not known to the writer. 
Another daughter married W. H. Daniels, of Mullins; they 
have two or three children. Two daughters of James Watson, 
Telatha and Drusilla, are yet single, and live with their brother 
on the old homestead. Isham H. Watson, the third son of old 
man Isham, married a Miss McDuffie, sister to the late Sheriff 
McDuffie; by her he raised three children, two sons and a 
daughter; the sons were George E. and Duncan I., the latter 
named for his two grand-fathers, Isham Watson and Duncan 
McDuffie; the daughter (Janie), married our fellow-citizen, 
J. D. Montgomery. Isham H. Watson's first wife died of 
small-pox during the war; he married again. Miss Mary 
Nichols, who survives him, childless. George E. Watson went 
West, and married there; some months after marriage, Geo. 
E. died suddenly, and left his widow, to whom a posthumous 
daug'hter was born, who takes and has the name of her 
father, George Elmore ; the widow and daughter are both now 
in Marion. Samuel Watson, the fourth son of old Isham, 
married, first, a Miss Page, and by her had sons, W. J. Watson, 
Melton, S. P. Watson and S. C. Watson, and two daughters, 
Sophronia and Maggie. W. J. Watson married his first 
cousin, a Miss Bethea, moved to Mt. Airy, N. C. ; his wife is 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 201 

dead ; he 'has seven children. Melton Watson married a Miss 
Moody, daughter of the late Charles Moody, and soon after 
died childless; his widow still survives. Samuel Watson's 
first wife died, and he married a Miss Roberts, daughter of the 
late Rowland Roberts, and by her had five children, when she 
died ; he married a third time, a Miss Price, sister of the Rev. 
Willie Price, of the Baptist Church ; by her he had one child, a 
boy, named Albert. The children of his last two marriages are 
unknown to the writer ; they are, however, here among us, and 
are of the present generation. S. P. Watson, third son of Sam- 
uel, married a Miss Bryan, near Little River, in Horry County ; 
is a physician; he left a few days ago, with his family, for 
Oklahoma ; he practiced medicine in Latta, and left his beauti- 
ful and comfortable home in Latta unsold; he sold his planta- 
tion to J. K. Page; he has seven children; he made a trip to 
that far off land last winter, and bought thirty acres of land 
in the suburbs of Oklahoma City, at $90 an acre; the city is 
growing so fast that his place is no longer in the suburbs, but 
is now in the city; his purchase has already quadrupled, and 
there is no telling what his thirty aches of land will be worth in 
the near future; the city now has 20,000 inhabitants. S. C. 
Watson, the fourth son of Samuel Watson and youngest by his 
first wife, married a Miss Stackhouse, daughter of Wm. R. 
Stackhouse; he has five children. William Watson, the fifth 
son and youngest of old man Isham's sons, married Miss 
Cherry Deer, daughter of Joseph Deer ; the results of the mar- 
riage were four sons, John G., William E., Furman and D. 
Maxcy Watson; and three daughters, Ellen, Pauline and 
Norma. William Watson, the father, died some years ago. 
The son, John G. Watson," married a Miss Emanuel, and by her 
has several children ; he resides in Marion, and is now one of 
the division chief liquor constables of the State. William E. 
Watson, the second son of William Watson, deceased, married 
Miss Annie Fore, daughter of the late Stephen Fore, and by 
her has had twelve children, one dead, eight sons living and 
three daughters. Furman Watson married Miss lyinnie Bond, 
and has two children, two sons. D. Maxcy Watson, the 
youngest son of the late William Watson, married Miss Lucy 
B. Sellers, daughter of John C. Sellers, and grand-daughter of 



202 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

the writer; they have no children. Of the daughters of the 
late William Watson, the eldest, Ellen, married Addison Bass ; 
they have several children, sons and daughters. The second 
daughter, Pauline, married, first. Rev. Mr. Price, a Baptist 
minister ; he died a few years ago, leaving one child, a daughter, 
named Annie Hamer; the widow married, a second time, 
Charles W. Wiggins, of Dillon; they have no children. 
Norma, the youngest daughter, married Benj. B. Sellers, son 
of John C. Sellers; they have two children, a son and a 
daughter — Harry and Margaret Ellen. As to the two daugh- 
ters of the late Samuel Watson by his first marriage, Sophro- 
nia and Maggie, Sophronia married John K. Page, a first class 
citizen ; she died some four years ago, leaving two sons, Sam- 
uel and Ernest. Samuel is now in Baltimore, in a medical 
college; Ernest, a lad, is yet at home. The second daughter, 
Maggie, married Frank Easterling, a very worthy man; they 
have two children, sons, Rupert and Henry. Of the daughters 
of old Isham Watson, Nellie, the oldest, married Frank A. 
Berry, in 1839; she died, together with her infant, in 1840; 
both were buried together in the same grave. Frank A. Berry 
lived a widower for perhaps thirty years or more, when he 
married Verzilla Waitson, sister of Nellie, then an old maid; 
she died childless, a few years ago; her husband preceded her 
to the grave a year or two. Nancy, the second daughter, mar- 
ried Rev. Joel Allen; they raised a large family of sons and 
daughters; the sons were James (killed in the war), William, 
Joel I., David E. and Frank ; the daughters were Annie, Maria, 
Eugenia and Alice. Of the sons, William married a Miss 
Cox, of Florence; they have a large family of children, sons 
and daughters, and live on the old homestead. Joel I. married, 
first. Miss Helen Bass ; she died, and left four or five children, 
sons and daughters; Joel I. married, a second time, a lady 
near Ridgeway, S. C, named Lulie Meredith ; by her he had 
three children, when she died, and he is now a widower again, 
with two sets of children, eight in number. Joel I. Allen, like 
his father, is a Baptist preacher, and has charge of the Baptist 
Church at Dillon, and resides there ; is a fair preacher, and has 
one quality that many preachers do not have — ^his sermons are 
short and sensible, and when he gets through he quits — ^he 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 203 

does not turn round and thrash the straw over again or rehash 
it; he is a good' man. David E. Allen married Elizabeth 
(Bettie) Bethea, a daughter of Philip W. Bethea; has raised a 
family of eight or nine children, sons and daughters ; some of 
them are married and have families. Frank Allen emigrated 
some years ago to Greenwood, S. C, and married there — can't 
say to whom ; he is a first class man. The Allen boys are all 
good men, straightforward and reliable. Of the daughters of 
the Rev. Joel Allen, Annie Maria, the oldest, married Dr. 
Andrew J. Bethea, son of Rev. S. J. Bethea; he died in 1881, 
and left three sons and two daughters ; the sons are Herbert, 
Percy and Andrew, and are all young men of fine character. 
Andrew is now in Wake Forrest College, N. C. ; all unmar- 
ried.* Of the daughters, the oldest, Nettie Bethea, married 
Rev. Pierce F. Kilgo, a Methodist preacher of the South Caro- 
lina Conference, and is now stationed at Williamston and Bel- 
ton, and is said to be a fine preacher ; they have several child- 
ren. Georgia, the younger daughter, married W. T. Bethea, 
her first cousin, who is, and has been, for several years, agent 
for the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company at Dillon, and 
has been Mayor of the town for three or four years. They 
have three children, sons, and are doing well. W. T. Bethea 
is the grand-son of the writer. Eugenia, a daughter of Rev. 
Joel Allen, married Preston L. Dew; they moved to Green- 
wood several years ago, and are said to be doing well; they 
have several children. Alice Allen, the remaining daughter of 
Rev. Joel Allen, married her cousin, Furman Allen, of Marl- 
borough; they are doing well, and have a large family, sons 
and daughters'. The Allen family under consideration herein 
are most respectable, good citizens, worthy to be emulated. 
Elizabeth Watson, third daughter of old man Isham, married 
the late George W. Reaves, being his third wife; by him she 
had five children, three of whom died children; two were 
raised a son, J. R. Reaves, and a daughter, Mary E. Robert 
Reaves is one of our leading fdlow-citizens, on Buck Swamp ; 
he married a Miss McMillan, in the MuUins community, 
and has raised a large family — I think, thirteen or fourteen 

*Herbert Bethea has recently married Miss Eva Manning, daughter of 
the late Houston Manning. 



204 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTV, 

children, sons and daughters; he is doing a good part by 
his children in the way of education. Charles is a leading 
merchant of Mullins. Samuel W. is a graduate of the Cita- 
del, and is a promising young man* Robert, another son, is 
a graduate of a dental school, and has located in Marion for 
the practice of his profession; he is also a promising young 
man. Of J. R. Reaves' daughters, the older ones are well 
educated and stand well ; one or two of them married, to whom 
unknown; several not yet grown.f Mary married Dr. N. C. 
Murphy, who died several years ago; she is a practical busi- 
ness woman, a good manager in her business and farm affairs ; 
she has three sons and two daughters ; both daughters are mar- 
ried, one to a Mr. McMillan, the other to a Mr. Cain, of St. 
' Matthews. Mary, the next daughter of Isham Watson, mar- 
ried James B. Ivegette, and still survives ; they raised a large 
family, mostly girls — only two sons, Salathiel and Andrew. 
The oldest daughter, SaraJh Ellen, married a Mr. Cadell, a 
one-legged man ; they left the county — I think they are now in 
Florence ; they have a family, how many not known. Another 
daughter married D. S. Cottingham, and is doing well ; of their 
family the writer knows nothing. Another married W. C. 
Easterling, of "Free State;" they have several children, five 
daugihters and two sons; the oldest daughter married; I do 
not know anything of their family. Of the two sons of James 
B. Legette and Mary, his wife, the oldest, Salathiel, acciden- 
tally shot himself several years ago, unmarried. The younger 
orie, Andrew, married a Miss Moore, a daughter of Alfred 
Moore, of Marlborough ; he lost his wife some months ago, and 
left him with, I think, seven children. Fama Watson, another 
daughter of old man Isham Watson, married, first, Stephen 
Berry, youngest son of Cross Roads Henry Berry; he 
lived about a year, and died childless ; the widow afterwards 
married the late Fred. D. Jones, of Marion; the fruits of this 
marriage were one son, Presley, and five daughters. Presley 
Jones married a Miss Sparks, of Marlborough, and has four 
children. The oldest daughter, Costa, married a Mr. Hunter, 
of Marlborough, who died a few months ago, and left five 

*S. W. Reaves is now a professor in Clemson College. 

tMary Reaves, a graduate of Winthrop. died of tvphoid fever recently. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 205 

or six cliildren. Alice Jones married L. W. Oliver, of 
Marion. Sallie, Theodocia and Cora, young ladies, are yet 
single, and live at the old homestead. The father and mother 
are both dead. Jan« Watson, the youngest daughter of 
old Isham, married John M. Mace, and yet survives; they 
live in the Friendship neighborhood, and have a large family 
of sons and daughters ; the sons are Thadeus, Stephen, Moses, 
Samuel, John C. and Cornelius, and one son dead ; daughters, 
Elizabeth (Bettie) and Mary. Thadeus married a Miss 
Eugenia Gasque, daughter of our excellent fellow-citizen, 
Arny Gasque, and Moses Mace married another daughter. Miss 
Emma. Stephen Mace married Miss Julia Philips, daughter of 
our late fellow-citizen, F. Marion Philips. Samuel Mace mar- 
ried a Miss Carter, and John C. Mace married a Miss Griffith, 
I think, of Edgefield County. Neill Mace is yet unmarried. 
Of these sons of John M. Maee, Jo^hn C. Mace and Samuel 
are both doctors ; one, John C, located at Marion, and running 
a drug store, and is Coroner of the county ; Samuel Mace is 
located at L,oris, in Horry County, and is said to be doing 
well there, and is a fine physician. Of the two daug'hters of 
John M. Mace, the oldest, Bettie, is married to Furman Wall ; 
the younger one, Mary, is yet unmarried. It is supposed (the 
writer does not know) that all these young Maces that are 
man led have families, more or less numerous, perpetuating 
the name and family connections, and also contributing to an 
increase in the population of the county, and industriously 
adding to the county's wealth and prosperity. This closes the 
notice of the Watson family, so far as is diescended from the 
old man, Isham. In many respects, the old man, Isham, was an 
extraordinaTy man ; he made a large fortune, raised his large 
family respectably — industry, frugality and economy were the 
prominent characteristics of his career; these, with his great 
good sense, gave him success in life; he died of erysipelas, in 
1864, over three-score and ten years of age. Barney Watson, 
his father, married a second time, I do not know to whom ; by 
this marriage he had two sons, Barney and Meredith, and some 
daughters. Barney and Meredith are both dead, and left 
families, about whom the writer knows nothing. Barney and 
Meredith were hard-working, honest men, but did not succeed 



206 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

in life as did their older half-brother, Isham. The father, old 
man Barney, had two brothers, Needham and Thomas; I do 
not know what became of Thomas. Needham Watson married 
and had a family — at least, one son, named Wickham, who 
lived in the Temperance Hill neighborhood. Wickham mar- 
ried and had a family, how many is unknown ; one son, named 
Kerigan — what became of him is unknown; he was not re- 
markable for his beauty ; if there had been such a club as an 
"Ugly Club," he would have stood a fair chance to have been 
its president. Wickham Watson was a remarkable man phy- 
sically, in respect to which the writer will say nothing. There 
are some Watsons in Britton's Neck, whether related to these 
Watsons on Catfish is not known ; of them, however, the writer 
knows nothing. There was another family of Watsons in w^hat 
is now known as Hillsboro Township, and of whom something 
has already herein been incidentally said. Seacebook Watson 
came from Virginia, and settled on the road leading from 
Nichols to L,umberton, N. C, more than one hundred years 
ago; he succeeded well in life, raised a large family, sons 
and daughters; the sons, Michael, Thomas and John R., 
were known to the writer. Michael and Thomas went to 
North Carolina, married sisters. Smithy and Kitsey Ham, very 
excellent women, and each raised respectable families; they 
were just across the line, and many of their descendants are 
now in South Carolina. John R. Watson, the youngest son, 
married Miss Sallie Ford, who had the phenomenon of a black 
eye and a blue one; they lived on the old homestead of his 
father, and had a large family of four sons and several 
daughters. John R. Watson died in middle life, and left his 
widow and children, many of them small ; the widow managed 
well and raised her family respectably, and died a few years 
ago ; some of them are now in the county, and among our best 
people. If all these Watsons and their thrice multiplied con- 
nections, hereinabove referred to, were destroyed, it would cut 
a mighty swathe in our county population. There may be, and 
perhaps are, some few families larger or more numerous, but 
not many — ^the name will not soon become extinct. 

RgAvies. — Another family to be here noticed is the ReaVes 



A HISTORY OF MARION, COUNTY. 207 

family. The first known of this family was Solomon Reaves, 
a Baptist preacher. The writer heard him pr«ach when a boy, 
about 1829, at an association at Porter Swamp Church, in Co- 
lumbus County, N. C, about five miles from Fair Bluff, N. C. ; 
he was then an old man, white hair and red face ; he had a son, 
named "Charles — ^he may have had other sons, but Charles is 
the only one that concerns Marion County ; he married a Miss 
Hodge, sister of the late Dr. Samuel Hodge, in the Gapway 
neighborhood ; by her he had two sons, George W. and Robert 
H. Reaves; he may have had other sons and daughters. His 
first wife dying, he married Miss Mary Griffin, of North Caro- 
lina, near Fair Bluff; no oflfspring by this second marriage. 
Charles Reaves died in 1861 or 1862, leaving his widow and 
a large estate of lands and negroes ; he died intestate, his prop- 
erty, real and personal, descended under the law to his widow 
and two sons, one-third each, the widow getting the' old home- 
stead. Some years after that, the widow married the late Col- 
onel John T. Harrington, who died some years back, and left 
Mrs. Harrington a widow for the second time; no child or 
children; she still survives and is still a widow on the old 
Reaves homestead, now in her eighty-seventh year — somewhat 
a remarkable woman for her age. Of the sons, George W. 
Reaves married four times — ^not being a very old man at the 
time of his fourth marriage; he was born in 181 1, and died, I 
think, in 1896 or 1897; his first wife was a Miss Carmichael, of 
what is now Carmichael Township, a sister of the late Neill 
C. Carmichael ; she lived only about a year, and died dhildless ; 
he married, a second time, a Miss Brown ; by her he had some 
children, how many is not known. There were one or two 
sons by this marriage, who were killed or died in the war, and 
a daughter, who married some one, and soon became a widow ; 
I know nothing more of her. His Brown wife died, I think, 
in 1846 or 7; he married in a few months. Miss Elizabeth 
Watson, who has hereinbefore been spoken of ; by her he raised 
two children, James Robert Reaves and Mary E. Reaves, now 
Mrs. Murphy — heretofore noticed. The Watson wife died, 
and he married a Miss Rogers, of the Fork, a daughter of the 
late Captain John Rogeirs ; by her he had and raised four sons, 
George R. Reaves, John Reaves, William Reaves and Edward 



208 A HISTORY 0? MARION COUNTY. 

Reaves ; the latter is a Baptist preacher of high standing, and 
is pastor of some church in the upper part of the State. These 
sons of George W. Reaves are all respectable and valued citi- 
zens, and are a part of the bone and sinews of the county, 
married and contributing their full share to the citizenship and 
general prosperity of the county. The father, George W. 
Reaves, was a good citizen and a prominent church man, 
weighed, avoirdupois, three hundred pounds, or more. His 
brother, Robert H. Reaves, was for many years a prominent 
merchant at Marion ; he married a daughter of old Colonel W. 
H. Grioe, who still survives, and lives upon and owns 
her patrimonial estate in Wa'hee Township. R. H. Reaves, 
the last years of his life, retired from mercantile pursuits, 
and went on his farm in Wahee, where he accidentally 
fell from his piazza some years ago and broke his neck; he 
raised a family of four sons and perhaps two daughters ; of the 
sons, two, Henry and Thomas, died young rnen, unmarried; 
Augustus and James still survive ; the former unmarried, lives 
with his mother; the latter married, and lives in Sumter 
County; has a family, and is said to be doing well. Of the 
daughters. Miss Sallie, the oldest, has never married, and lives 
with her mother. The younger one, name not remembered, 
married a Mr. Lide, in Darlington. R. H. Reaves was a good 
and successful merchant for many years, but in the wind-up of 
his mercantile affairs, did not seem to have made much, but 
saved his plantation and negroes; he was a man of equable 
temperament, and never seemed to be in a hurry ; he represented 
the district in the Legislature just after the war in 1866 — ^before 
Reconstruction commenced or before it got under way. 

Grice. — ^Just here may be noticed the Grioe family, to which 
Mrs. Reaves belonged. Colonel W. H. Grice was originally 
from Horry County; he came to Marion away back in the 
twenties or thirties. In former times he had represented Horry 
in the House and had been Senator from lyiberty (Marion) 
and Kingston before 1810 ; he was a well read man for his day; 
he had three diildren, one of whom was Mrs. Reaves, above 
spoken of. His youngest daughter, Ellen, became the third 
wife of the late Colonel W. W. DuRant, well known in Marion, 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 209 

having been in the town perhaps all his life ; she was respected 
by all who knew her, and loved for her many good qualities ; 
she raised several daughters and one son to be thirteen or 
fourteen years of age (Thadeus, I believe), who accidentally 
shot himself twelve or fifteen years ago. These daughters of 
Colonel DuRant have all married and have families, except, 
perhaps, two, who reside in the old DuRant homestead, near 
the town, all dtring well and quite respectable. Colonel Wil- 
liam H. Grice had only one son, Augustus E. Grice, quite a 
literary man and a fine speaker ; he was elected Sheriff of the 
county in 1876 ; he lived about two years, and died during his 
term of softening of the brain ; he married, late in life, a Miss 
Tanner, and left a considerable family. Perseus L,. Grice, our 
present fellow-citizen, and quite respectable, is one of his 
sons — ^perhaps the oldest ; one of his daughters is the wife of 
J. T. Dozier, the late nominee of the Democratic party of 
Marion for County Supervisor.* Of the others of the family 
of Sheriff Grice, the writer knows nothing. Colonel William 
H. Grice died in 1854, leaving a good property in 'both town 
and country to his children ; he was up to the times in his day, 
a very honest and reliable man, very cautious and prudent. 
The old court house of 1823 hadi a large crack in its northwest 
comer, and such was t!he prudence of Colonel Grice — excited, 
perhaps, by his fear — ^that he would not go up into the court 
room when it was crowded, unless from strong business com- 
pulsion; whether it was dangerous or not, the writer cannot 
say ; he was in it many times wlien it was packed with people. 

Roberts. — The next family now to be noticed is the Roberts 
family. The first of them known to the writer was Redden 
Roberts and Norton Roberts. They settled on Buck Swamp, 
near Buck Swamp Bridge. I do not know who the wife of 
either was, but both married and raised families. Redden 
Roberts had sons, William D., James, Rowland and Giles. The 
latter went into the Confederate army, and died of disease, un- 
married. William D. Roberts married Lishia Manning, a 
daughter of old John Manning, and had and raised a consider- 
able family, sons — ^John M. Roberts and William Roberts ; they 
*J. T. Dozier was elected anji is now the County Supervisor. 



210 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

both have families unknown. Daughters of Wm. D. Roberts — 
Penelope, and perhaps another, married sons of Charles Tay- 
lor, both of wihich Taylors were killed or died in the Confed- 
erate War. Another daughter, Julia Ann, married A. H. Har- 
relson, who has a family of several children. Another, Lispia 
Ann, married Captain Thomas E. Tart ; Tart is dead. Another 
(name not remembered) married Dugal C. Mclntyre; Mcln- 
tyre is dead ; left a family of several children, and the widow 
still survives. Another married an Avant; he is dead, his 
widow survives ; there were no children. And one other daugh- 
ter (name not remembered) still unmarried. James Roberts, 
second son of old man Reddin Roberts, married Sallie Good- 
year, only child of old Mr. William Goodyear ; he raised a con- 
siderable family; he is and was a very excellent citizen; little 
is known of his family. A son of his, Henry Roberts, is a 
capital man and good citizen; I do not know whether he is 
married or not ; I think he lives on his father's old homestead. 
One of James Roberts' daughters married A. C. Oliver, of 
Robeson County, N. C. ; they have considerable family. An- 
other daughter married Albert Edwards, of this county ; think 
they have but one child, a daughter, who is said to be quite a 
scholar and a fine teacher. Another daughter is the wife of 
Albert Shooter. James Roberts had other children, not 
known to the writer. James Roberts was a good man and 
unexceptional citizen — ^honest and truthful. Rowland Rob- 
erts, third son of Reddin Roberts, married Miss Mary Smith, 
daughter of the late Samuel Smith, senior, of Buck Swamp'; 
they raised a family of sons and daughters — ^the oldest, I think, 
was Pinckney, who went into the Confederate War, and was 
killed or died of disease, unmarried. Roger married, first, a 
daughter of Colonel John Roberts ; they had four or five child- 
ren, boys and girls, when their mother died, and Roger married 
again — I do not know whom. Giles, another son, married 
Miss Hays, daugbter of Wilson Hays. Samuel and Stephen, I 
think, both married daughters of Captain L. M. Edwards ; they 
all have families, are good citizens, and are doing their share 
towards building up and forwarding the interest and welfare 
of the county. Rowland Roberts' daughters, twO' of whom are 
only known by the writer; one married the late Samuel Wat- 



A HISTORY 01? MARION COUNTY. 211 

son (his second wife, I think) ; her name was Bettie; she died 
some years ago, leaving five children, named Mary, Lamar, 
Judson, Elliott and Carrie. Mary is married to Albert Allen, 
a son of Elmore Allen, of Marlborough County. Albert Allen 
resides in North Carolina. Elmore C. Allen, of Latta, married 
the other da,ughter of Rowland Roberts, named Sallie ; resides 
at Latta, and has several children, neither age or sex is known. 
Elmore Allen is one of the well-to-do citizens of the town and 
county ; he and his wife are first cousins, their' mothers being 
sisters. Of the daughters of old Reddin Roberts, one married 
Harllee Bethea, who removed to Florida miany years ago — 
know but little of his family ; had a son named Reddin, a very 
promising young ma,n. Another daughter married Henry 
Hays, of Hillsboro, who has been dead several years ; he left a 
son, our good fellow-citizen, W. D. B. Hays, near Mount 
Andrew Church; he married his first cousin, a daughter of 
Harllee Bethea; they have only one child, a daughter; I sup- 
pose she is grown, name not known. Another daughter of old 
man Reddin, his youngest, named Zilpha, married C. P. Floyd, 
of Nichols ; be was killed on the railroad between MuUins and 
Nichols, some twenty-five or thirty years ago; he left several 
children, sons and daughters. Mrs. Floyd now lives on the 
homestead of her father, an excellent lady and capital man- 
ager; has raised her children in credit and respectability — 
three ■sons and three or four daughters. The sons were 
Charles P., Henry Bascom (called Battie), and Giles R. Floyd. 
Charles P. was killed some twenty or more years ago by a man 
by the name of Anderson, near Campbell's Bridge. The writer 
was employed to prosecute Anderson, who was convicted of 
manslaughter and sentenced to two years in the State peniten- 
tiary. Henry Bascom married a Miss Stackhouse, daughter of 
the late Wm. R. Stackhouse, and is one of our good citizens. 
I believe Giles R. is married; don't know to whom; he is af- 
flicted with asthma. The writer can truly sympathise with him, 
as he has had that most distressing of diseases, off and on, for 
twenty-five years. Of her daughters, the two oldest, Cornelia 
and Minnie, married North Carolina men, where they residfe, 
and, therefore, cannot tell anything about their families. 
Think Minnie is dead. Roberta married Lewis S. Bethea, 



212 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

above Latta, and is doing well. There is one, perhaps, two 
daughters yet unmarried, and yet with their mother. Reddin 
Roberts had another daughter, who never married; her name 
was Martha Arm ; she is dead. Old man Reddin Roberts was 
an excellent, quiet citizen; was wealthy before the war, 
especially in negro property. It was said of him that 
when he married he had one negro girl about grown, that 
his wife bad one, and on the night of their marriage, his 
wife's girl had a child ; that from these two girls, at emanci- 
pation, he had and had given off some to his children together 
eighty slaves; that during his married life he had sold 
two and had bought three, or vice versor— showing how for- 
tunes might be made by raising negroes. It was said he did 
not work his negroes hard, and fed and clothed them well, 
hence his negro women "bred like rabbits," as the saying is. 
He was an exemplary man, lived at home and kept out of debt. 
Norton Roberts resided on the first settled place south of Buck 
Swamp Bridge ; don't know to whom he married — think, how- 
ever, his wife was a Miss Johnson ; be, with all bis family, ex- 
cept his oldest son. Colonel John M. Roberts, went to Louisi- 
ana a way back, perhaps, in the forties, and it is said, don't 
know with how much truth, that one of his sons became Gov- 
ernor of Louisiana. I have learned from the Hon. James 
Norton, that Norton Roberts' mother was a Miss Norton, sister 
of James Norton's grand-father, hence his name, Norton Rob- 
erts. Norton Roberts married Martha Norton, who was the 
mother of Colonel John M. Colonel John M. Roberts, his old- 
est son, married Miss Franky Mace; by her he had seven 
daughters and no son. One of his daughters died unmarried. 
His oldest daughter, Elizabeth, married Alexander Hays, son 
of Joseph B. Hays, and brother to our T. B. Hays ; they have 
raised a large family of sons and daughters, unknown to the 
writer. Another daughter, Joanna, married Thomas Finklea, 
a son of old "Corn-making Willis Finklea." Finklea is dead ; 
suppose they raised a family. Another daughter married 
Roger Roberts, already mentioned herein. Another daughter 
married Charles B. Gaddy, who died a few weeks ago, sud- 
denly, hereinbefore m'entioned. Another daughter, Louisa, 
married John M. McCoU, now one of our best and most reliable 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 213 

citizens ; they have only one child, a daughter, Fannie ; married 
to a Mr. McNeill, of North CaroUna. One other daughter, 
named Emelia or Mille, has never married, and still living. 
Colonel Roberts was eminently a good citizen, a successful 
man every way, with only an ordinary common school educa- 
tion. In the late unpleasantness, he volunteered early, raised 
a company and went into the war as a Captain, and upon the 
reorganization of the regiment was promoted to Major, and 
then to Lieutenant Colonel. In the battle. Seven Days Fight 
around Richmond, or at Second Manassas, or at Sharpsburg, 
in 1862, was wounded in the thigh by a Minie ball or piece of 
shell. He came home, the wound 'became gangrenous, and 
he died, to the regret of all who knew him, both in and out of 
the army ; he was a good soldier, a good officer, beloved by his 
company and regiment, a growing, rising man at home and in 
the army ; and though comparatively a young man, had accu- 
mulated a good property, and left it unencumbered and his 
family in good condition. Had he lived, there was no public 
position within the gift of the people that he might have as- 
pired to, that he could not have obtained ; he was exceedingly 
popular. 

Eli<ERbE. — ^Tihe next family to be noticed is the Ellerbe fam- 
ily. Two brothers, Thomas and John Ellerbe, came to South 
Carolina about 1740. Thomas Ellerbe applied to the Council 
for lands, about which he had some trouble ; and Bishop Gregg 
says, on page 63 : "Mr. Elerby was doubtless successful in the 
end, as he remained in that neighborhood and became the 
owner of extensive landed possessions, a large portion of 
which has remained in the family to the present day." And in 
a note to this, Gregg says : "The mill site referred to in the 
petition of Thomas Elerby was, doubtless, that on Juniper 
Creek, of which some signs yet remain, near the road lading 
from Cheraw to Society Hill. A grist and saw mill, at all 
events, were there, and in successful operation some time be- 
fore the Revolution." Resuming the -text, Bishop Gregg 
further says : "John Elerby, a brother of Thomas, came with 
him to Pee Dee, and settled on the east side of the river. He 
either returned to Virginia or removed elsewhere at an early 



214 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

period. Thomas Elerby brought a good property with him 
and was probably the first slaveholder on the upper Pee Dee. 
Some years prior to the Revolution be had a large number, 
at least for that day. This family emigrated from England to 
Virginia. The name is still known in England, and is spelt 
as it appears in our early records. Not long afterwards, how- 
ever, it was changed to its present form, Ellerbe. Thomas 
Elerby, wiho married, as already stated, Obedience Gillespie, 
had two sons, Thomas and William, from whom the extensive 
family on the Pee Dee have descended." In a note to this, 
page 63, Bishop Gregg traces the progeny of William and 
Thomas Ellerbe down to his own d&y and time, or near it. So 
far as Marion County is concerned, the first of the name in this 
county was John C. Ellerbe, of the same family spoken, of 
above. He married a Miss Wickham, daughter of Dr. Thomas 
J. Wickham, a man of much note in his day in Liberty or 
Marion; she was wealthy and perhaps the only child; at any 
rate, John C. Ellerbe married her and came down into Marion 
and settled on her property, and lived and died there ; he re- 
tained her property and increased it ; not an old man when he 
died — he died some time in the forties; his widow survived 
him, and afterwards married ex-Governor B. K. Henagan ; no 
offspring from the marriage; they both died in a few years. 
John C. Ellerbe left his family in good condition; his large 
property went, as the law then was, mostly to the Henagans — 
that is, the personal property; the large landed estate went to 
the heirs of the widow, who, I think, survived him. By John 
C. Ellerbe's marriage, be had and raised three sons and three 
daughters. The sons were William S., Richard P. and Ed- 
ward B. ; the daughters were Joanna, Julia and Sallie. The 
son, William, married Miss Sarah Haselden, daughter of 
Major James Haselden ; the fruits of this marriage were four 
sons and nine daughters. Of the sons, William H. Ellerbe 
married Henrietta Rogers, daughter of the late Henry Rogers, 
of Marlborough County; the fruits of this marriage were six 
children, five sons and one daughter ; one son dead. He was 
a very successful man in more ways than one — succeeded well 
in his occupation as a farmer in the acquisition of property. 
In the political revolution of 1890, he was on the winning 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 215 

side, and by the help of good friends, to the manor born, was 
nominated and elected Comptroller General of the State ; was 
re-elected without opposition in 1892. At the end of his 
term, in 1894, he was a candidate for Governor, but was de- 
feated by John Gary Evans, of Aiken. In 1896, John Gary 
Evans not being a candidate for re-election as Governor, Wm. 
H. Ellerbe was again a candidate, with opposition, and was tri- 
umphantly elected. In the meantime, a new State Constitution 
had been made, which changed the time for the meeting of the 
General Assembly, so that Governor Ellert)e was not inaugu- 
rated till January, 1897. With his administration there was 
much dissatisfaction; his health had failed him, and in 1898, 
he was again a candidate for re-election, but had numerous and 
strong opposition — so much so, that he failed to get the nomi- 
nation in the first primary, but led all others. In a second 
primary he was, however, nominated by over 4,000 votes. In 
November afterwards, at the general election, he was elected 
to a second term. Miles B. McSweeney, of Hampton County, 
was elected Lieutenant-Governor. They were inaugurated as 
Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, i8th January, 1899. 
Such by this time was the Governor's state of health, that he 
could do but little work in his laborious ofifice, and lingered 
from bad to worse till 2d June, when he expired in his old 
home — ^the home in which he was raised. Thus his eventful 
career was ended, and the Lieutenant-Governor, by operation 
of the Constitution, became Governor, and took the oath of 
office on the night of the 4th June, 1899, and has filled out the 
unexpired term of the deceased Governor Ellerbe. Mc- 
Sweeny has just been elected to the next full term. Thus the 
world goes. This was the second death of a Governor while 
in office in the history of the State — Governor Patrick Noble 
died in office, in 1840, and Dr. B. K. Henagan, then of Marl- 
borough, afterwards of Marion, being the Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor, filled out Governor Noble's unexpired term. J. E. 
Ellerbe, the next son of the late Captain W. S. Ellerlbe, and 
now one of our fellow-<:itizens, has not been as successful, in 
any way, as his deceased brother, the late Governor Ellerbe; 
be has great energy and persistent pluck, and is an impressive 
public speaker; he married Miss Nellie Elford, of Spartan- 
15 



216 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

burg, an elegaiit lady; the fruits of the marriage are four 
children, two sons and two daughters. J. E. EUerbe is yet 
comparatively a young man; has represented his county in 
the lower House of the Legislature ; was (ihosen as a delegate 
to the State Convention for making a new Constitution for the 
State, and served in that body ; he '1ms three times been a candi- 
date for Congress, but has failed to receive the nomination ; his 
opportunities have been better than those of his brother, the late 
Governor ; he graduated in 1887, at Wofford College ; the Go- 
vernor only spent two years in college (Wofford) ; neverthe- 
less, he outstripped his younger brother in the race of life for 
wealth and honors. Dont know what J. E. EUerbe may do 
or become in the lines indicated in the future. Cash EUerbe, 
the third son of Captain W. S. Ellert)e, is a young single man, 
highly respectable, a good farmer and business man, and prom- 
ises to be a first class man every way — nothing to hinder it. 
Herbert EUerbe, the fourth and youngest son, about twenty- 
five years of age, unmarried, was unfortunately killed on the 
railroad, on the 3d or 4th of August, 1899. Of the daughters 
of Captain W. S. EUerbe, the oldest, Mary, married Dr. EUerbe, 
of Cher aw; by him she had two sons, W. M. EUerbe and 
Thomas, and a daughter, Estelle, when he died suddenly, w*hile 
his children were yet small ; the widow has raised and educated 
them, who are all now grown ; her sons are promising young 
men, and the daughter a charming young lady, all unmarried. 
Another daughter (don't know the names of some of them nor 
the order in which they come,) married her cousin, James H. 
Manning, and has a large family, sons and daughters ; Man- 
ning is a very prosperous farmer. Another married Charley 
Rogers, of Marlborough, in the Brownsville neighborhood, 
likewise a prosperous man; they have a famUy, how many is 
not known. Another married Stephen G. MUes, a good farmer, 
and is a merchant at Marion; they have a large family, sons 
and daughters — I think, mostly daug'hters. Another married 
Dr. S. A. C. Miles, who is dead ; the widow has four chUdren, 
all daughters. Another married her cousin, Willie Godbold, 
who is not wanting in push and energy ; they have some two or 
three children. Another married Hon. T. C. Moody, of 
Marion, and is dead, childless. Two daughters. Misses Omega 



•It, J_l. -l-Vf ■!■ 1~ri^ i&i V.I.' J.TX.l.kIi%J.V^A1 V>V^ \al ^^ X &■ 



and Eva, are yet unmarried. The Widow Ellerbe and her 
family, the Widow Miles and her family, together with their 
brother. Cash Ellerbe, and two single girls, all live together on 
their father's homestead. Richard P. Ellerbe, second son of 
old John C. Ellerhe, married Elizabeth Lamb, a very pretty 
woman and quite a belle in her day; they remained here for 
several years, and had several children; he did not succeed 
well ; some years ago they went to Florida, where Mrs. Ellerbe 
died; what has become of Richard P. or his children is not 
known. Edward B. Ellerbe, the youngest son of old John C, 
inherited the old homestead of his father, where J. E. Ellerbe 
now resides, a very fine plantation; he married Miss Sarah 
• Godbold, a daughter of old Asa Godbold ; he did not succeed 
well ; sold his place to his brother, William, and moved off, and 
finally went to Horry County, where he now resides ; raised a 
large family, sons and daughters^ about whom the writer 
knows but little. John C, his eldest son, is in Venezuela, 
South America, as the writer has been informed. Of the 
daughters of old John C. Ellerbe, Joanna, the oldest, married 
the late Gewood Berry; the results of which were five sons 
raised, viz : John H., William E., Edmund Burke, Ashton and 
Thomas Wickham Berry; of these, John H., Edmund Burke 
and Thomas Wickham are now among us, and are among our. 
best citizens, doing well and highly respected. Julia Ellerbe, 
second daughter of old John C. Ellerbe, married our respected 
fellow-citizen, Charles Haselden; by this marriage is three 
daughters; one married and dead; Anne and Mary both yet 
single; and six sons, James, C. Edgar, Samuel, Thomas, 
Alonzo arid Guy. Of these, James and C. Edgar are married ; 
James married a daughter of the late F. C. Dew, lives in the 
"Slashes." C. Edgar married a Miss Dusenberry in Horry. 
Samuel has gone West. Thomas, a fine and much respected 
young man, suicided last winter at Clio, S. C. ; no cause 
known. Alonzo is here, a very nice young man, unmarried. 
Guy, the youngest, is said to be in Florida. The youngest 
daughter of old John C. Ellerbe married Asa Godbold, Jr., and 
is now a widow; she has ten or twelve children. Of this 
family the writer has already hereinbefore spoken, and it is 
not necessary to be repeated or added to. The late Captain W. 



218 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

S. Ellerbe was a most excellent man and a capital manager of 
affairs ; he attended to his own business, and left his family in 
good condition ; his wife survived him but a short while. 

FoRe. — The Fore family will be next noticed. The first 
Fore known to the writer was Joel Fore ; he was an exemplary 
man', and a good quiet man, unpretentious, and strictly honest — 
a man who seemed to measure every word, an,d practical in 
his management in every day life ; he married a Miss Finklea, 
and raised a considerable family, sons and daughters. Five of 
his sons, Thomas, Daniel, Willis, Stephen and Alfred, were best 
known in the county.* Others of them, when young, went 
West, and one of them, named Jam'cs, it was said, became very 
wealthy. Thomas, the eldest of the sons, was bom in 1805 ; 
he lived to a great age — I think the age of eighty-eight. Tho- 
mas married a Miss Gasque, and settled on a little place on the 
northeast side of Catfish, at what is now called EUerbe's cross- 
ing, and there, on about sixty-four acres of land, he raised a 
family of eight sons and three daughters, and did it respectaibly ; 
he purchased other lands after his children were practically 
raised; his sons were EHy, Thomas, Daniel, James, Tracy R., 
Willis and Edward M. Fore; his daughters were Elizabeth 
Ann, Rebecca Jane and Eugenia. Of his sons, EUy, Thomas 
and Daniel emigrated to Louisiana, young men. James Fore, 
a son, married, first, a Miss Kirvin, and by her had three 
daughters and a son, Thomas E. Fore ; the latter is now living 
on the place where his grand-father settled. Of James Fore's 
daughters, they have already herein been noticed in the notice 
of the Tart family. His Kirvin wife dying, he married a 
daughter of the late Bryant Lane, named Henrietta ; by her he 
has some children, how many is not known ; they have removed 
to Columbus County, N. C. Tracy R. Fore married Miss Kate 
Watson, daughter of the late Matthew Watson, who has here- 
inbefore been noticed in the notice of the Watson family. 
Willis Fore married Miss Sallie Berry, daughter of the late 
Elihu Berry; they have five children, three sons and two 
daughters; the sons are Linwood, Tracy and Willis.; the 
daughters are Janie and Rebecca. Willis Fore's family has 
♦John, Joel and James, three others, went West. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 219 

already been noticed in the notice of the Berry family. Willis 
Fore was killed some years ago, by a fall in getting off of a 
moving train at Marion depot. Edward M. Fore married a 
daughter of Charles Haselden, named Maggie; they had four 
children, one daughter and three sons; he was murdered in 
the Slashes some years ago; his widow did not turn out well, 
and died ; the daughter is married and in Columbia ; the sons 
are scattered. Of the daughters of old man Thomas Fore, 
Elizabeth Ann, the oldest, married the late Colonel E. T. Stack- 
house; they are both dead ; raised a large family — ^sons, James, 
William land Walter F. Stackhouse ; daughters, one the wife of 
James H. Berry, dead ; left seven children ; another, the wife of 
Houston Manning ; she and her husband both dead ; left three 
children, two sons and a daughter, Austin and Maurice; the 
latter married Nellie Bethea, daughter of D. McL. Bethea. 
The daughter, named Eva, unmarried.* Another the wife of 
Neill Alford; they have several children. Another the wife 
of W. J. Montgomery, Esq., of the Marion bar; they have 
several children, mostly girls. Another the wife of T. C. Cov- 
ington ; they have several children. Of the sons, James Stack- 
house married a Miss McAlister; they have several children. 
One son, Laneau, married Mary Miles, the daughter of Dr. 
D. F. Miles, the efficient Clerk of the Court. There are other 
sons and daughters, how many and names unknown, except a 
son named Lacy. William Stackhouse, of Dillon, married a 
daughter of B. F. Davis ; they have some children, how many 
is not known. . James Stackhouse is Senator-elect from Marion 
to the State Senate. W. F. Stackhouse, the youngest son of 
Colonel E. T. Stackhouse, lately married' a Miss Waller, of 
Greenwood, S. C. ; is a member of the Marion bar, and promises 
to attain to a place in the front. The second daughter of old 
man Thomas Fore, Rebecca Jane, married Dr. W. W. Hamil- 
ton, of Marion, a dental surgeon and farmer, and a first rate 
man ; they have only one child, a son, named Thomas, and now 
Hearing manhood. The third and last daughter, Eugenia, 
never married; she died a few years ago. Daniel Fore, an- 
other son of old man Joel, was a tailor by trade — ^which in his 
day was a profitable business ; he made a suit for the writer in 

*Miss Eva Manning, since writing the above, married Herbert Bethea. 



220 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

1843. He did not marry till somewhat late in life ; he married, 
first, the Widow White, who was the daughter of old man 
Isaac Stackhouse, and sister of the late Colonel E. T. Stack- 
house; by her he had one child, a daughter, the wife of Rev. 
Maston Gasque; when' she died, he married, a second time, a 
Miss McDuffie, sister of the late A. Q. McDuffie; by this 
marriage he had two sons, John A. Fore, now of Dillon, and 
one named Baker, who died a young man, and, I think, three 
daughters ; one of them dead ; another became the second wife 
of Douglas Mclntyre, and has some children ; another daughter 
yet single — she and her mother live with Mr. Mclntyre. Dan- 
iel Fore died some y^rs ago, in a good old age ; his son, John 
A. Fore, married a Miss Gibson, daughter of the late Albert 
Gibson, below Marion; they have five children, sons and 
daughters. Dr. Willis Fore, another son of old man Joel 
Fore, married Miss Telatha Berry ; she lived only a few years, 
and died childless; he lived a widower for several years, and 
died in 1864. Another son of old man Joel was Stephen, who 
married Miss Mary Berry, the oldest daughter of Cross Roads 
Hjpnry Berry ; his family has already been noted in the notice 
of the Berry family hereinbefore. Alfred Fore, the youngest 
son of old Joel, married Miss Martha Ann Mace, daughter of 
the late Moses Mace ; they had some children, don't know how 
many; one son I knew, A. M. Fore, a promising and growing 
man ; he died a few years ago — left some family. Alfred Fore, 
the father, went into the Confederate army, and was killed or 
died. Of the daughters of old Joel Fore, there were two, Mary 
Ann and Elizabeth. Mary Ann married Samuel Campbell, 
and died, leaving one child. Elizabeth married Hugh Finklea, 
her cousin ; he died, left her a widow, without any child ; she 
again married, Bennett Jordan, below Marion; they had no 
child or children; she died some years ago. The Fores, 
as a family from old Joel down, had the peculiarity of being 
particular and exceedingly cautious in all they said or did, 
either in social or home life; honest, truthful and upright, 
straight in all their dealings with the world around them, eco- 
nomical, industrious and frugal — ^they came as near living to 
themselves and of themselves as any family within the writer's 
knowledge. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 221 

Mace. — ^Another family will now be noticed, the Mace 
family. The grand-father of the late John Mace was named 
John Mace, who came from Maryland in the time of the Revo- 
lutionary War, being a widower, with one child, a son, named' 
John, then a small boy; the old gentleman married a Widow 
Crawford ; by her he had no offspring ; he died and his widow 
again married a Mikell. The son, John, grew up and married, 
first, a Miss Franky Finklea, a sister of old "Corn-making 
Willis Finklea;" by this marriage he had five children, Mat- 
thew, Moses, Eliza;beth (Betsy), Mary (Polly) and Martha 
(Patsy) ; his first wife died, and he married again, a sister of 
his first wife, named Martha (Patsy) ; by the second marriage 
he had Franky, John, Massey, Sallie, James and Rhoda; of 
all these children by both marriages, Matthew, the oldest, never 
married, and died with a good property, about 1853. Moses 
married Miss Drusilla Miles, a. daughter of David Miles, the 
grand-father of Dr. D. F. Miles ; by this marriage he had six 
children, Martha Ann, John M.,' Verzilla, Gregory, James and 
Mary. Martha Ann has already been noticed in or among the 
Fore family, and John M. was noticed in or among the Watson 
family. Verzilla married William C. Bethea, and after having 
several children, they moved to Texas, where father and 
mother, and perhaps some of the children, died in an epidemic 
of yellow fever ; and Frank A. Miles and others of their friends 
made up money and sent out to that far-off State (Dallas, 
Texas, I believe,) and brought the surviving children back to 
this State and county; they have grown up, but what has 
become of them is not known to the writer. Dr. Gregg Mace 
and his brother, James, both went to the Confederate War, and 
both were killed or died of disease, both unmarried. Mary 
Mace married a man by the name of Adams, and left the State ; 
don't know anything further of her. Elizabeth Mace married 
the late John H. Moody ; by this marriage there, was only one 
child, a daughter ; she grew up and married the late Major S. 
A. Durham ; only one child, a daughter, was the result of this 
latter marriage; she grew up and married a Mr. Gorham, of 
North Carolina, to which State they went ; nothing further is 
known of them. Mary (Polly) married Hal Crawford, and 
went West; nothing further is known of them. Martha 



222 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

(Pattie) married Gary Edwards; of her and her family notice 
has already been taken in or among the Edwards family. 
Eranky, the oldest child by the second marriage of old John 
Mace, married Colonel John Roberts; of their family notice 
has already been taken in or among the Roberts family. John 
Mace (the late) married Verzilla Berry, of whom notice has 
already been taken in or among the Berry family. Massey, 
a daughter, married the late David Monroe ; by her he had one 
child, a daughter, when his wife died ; the daughter grew up, 
and married a Mr. King, in North Carolina; nothing further is 
known of her. Sallie Mace married Wesley White; by this 
marriage was a son, James White, and several daughters. 
James White is still unmarried. Another son, William, older 
tha:n James, was killed or died in the war. Of the daughters, 
one married Hugh Davis, and is a widow, with several child- 
ren ; another daugliter, Susan, married Joseph Game, and has 
no children ; another married Benjamin Philips, and is now a 
widow, with several children; another married Thomas Har- 
grove ; they have several children ; and there are two unmarried 
daughters, Martha and Sallie. James Mace, brother to the 
late John Mace, died in 1846, when a young man, unmarried. 
Rhoda Mace, the youngest by old John Mace's second mar- 
riage, married William' S. Lewis ; by this marriage five children 
were born and raised, Sarah, Evan, Joel, Wesley and Anne. 
Sarah Lewis married Robert Edwards, and has been noticed 
in or among the Edwards family. Evan Lewis did not marry 
till late in life; he married a Miss Avant, and I suppose has 
some children; he is one of our good citizens. Joel Lewis 
went West, and is said to be doing well. Wesley Lewis mar- 
ried Miss Addie Potter, of Marion, turned out badly, and has 
gone West ; his wife is now at Marion ; she has three children, 
a son, Charles, who is in Georgia, but provides for his mother 
and sisters — a dutiful son; the two daughters are with their 
mother, living on a place in town, which her son, Charley, 
bought for her, and paid $300 for it, and provides for her in 
other ways. All the sons and daughters of old John Mace 
are dead. One daughter of Rhoda Lewis above forgotten; 
her name was Anna ; a charming woman, as it was said ; she 
married, first, Marion Avant, who was killed or died in the 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 223 

war, left one child; the widow, after the war, went to Wil- 
mington, and there married a Mr. Wilson, by whom she has 
one child, a daughter, now a grown young lady ; her son, Willie 
Avant, was a locomotive engineer for the Atlantic Coast Ivine 
for many years ; he died last August, leaving a widow and some 
children. Moses Mace died in 1836 or 1837. John Mace died 
in 1885. Matthew Mace died about 1854, and James Mace 
died about 1846. The Maces as a family are and were ener- 
getic and prudent managers of affairs, economical and frugal, 
held to what they had and added to it all they could, peaceable 
and quiet people, not ambitious of public favor. 

FiNKi,BA. — Another family, once numerous and somewhat 
prominent, but now reduced in numbers to but a few, are the 
Finkleas ; they have been much reduced by emigration. There 
were two old Finkleas in the early times in the county — ^John 
Finklea and "Corn-making Willis." John Finklea, whose 
wife was a Crawford, with his numerous family, went to Ala- 
bama, and died there about 1850. Captain J. C. Finklea, a 
grand-son, now in Wahee Township, is the only representative 
of that branch of the family. Of "Corn-making Willis" fam- 
ily, the only remaining ones bearing the name are Hardy 
Finklea, of Latta,* who has one son, named Willis ; and Alfred 
Finklea, who has three sons, John, Alfred and Hugh; and a 
son of Thomas Finklea, deceased, named Neill. Upon these 
depend the perpetuation of the name in the county, and not 
only the name, but the reputation of it. Captain J. C. Finklea 
is sixty-three years of age, and has no child or childTen, and it 
is not presumable that he ever will have any. 

Haseldbn. — ^Another family to be noticed is the Haselden 
family. There were three Haseldep brothers, John, William 
and James; don't know which was the older, nor is anything 
known of their ancestors. John Haselden married Elizabeth 
Godbold, daughter of old General Thomas Godbold; by this 
marriage three children were born and raised, Cyrus B. Hasel- 
den, Hugh G. Haselden and Jane Haselden ; don't know which 
was the older. John Haselden, the father, died, and the widow 

*Hardy Finklea, since writing the above, died. 



224 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

married the late David Monroe, and by her had two sons, Col- 
onel James Monroe, of Confederate fame, and our respected 
fellow-citizen. Dr. F. M. Monroe, of Latta. Cyrus B. Hasel- 
den married Miss Labennon Bass, daughter of the late old 
Joseph Bass; by this marriage one child was born, and the 
mother died, and a few months afterwards the child died. The 
grand-father, Bass, had died before the death of Mrs. Hasel- 
den. Thus, by three successive deaths, Cyrus B. Haselden, 
the husband and father, became the heres f actus, one of the 
heirs of the large estate of Joseph Bass, and as such, received 
in property and money from $10,000 to $15,000. There were 
ten of the Bass heirs, including C. B. Haselden ; he soon after 
married Miss Sallie Finklea, a niece of the writer's wife, and 
by her he had five children, Lucy, John, Maggie, Fannie and 
Frank. In the meantime, Cyrus B. Haselden went through 
with all bis property, and whilst his children were all small, the 
youngest, Frank, about two years old, he took the train one 
night (not letting his family know anything about it) and left; 
he went to Arkansas, and has not been seen in this country 
since. His wife and her children were taken by her mother, 
Mrs. Margaret Finklea, and the children were raised respect- 
ably and in good credit; they all married respectably and all 
doing well. The other brother, Hugh G. Haselden, volun- 
teered in the Confederate army, and was killed or died in the 
same; he married, I think, a Miss Foxworth, and had some 
children, one or two sons, who are among us, but whose name 
or names is or are unknown. Jane Haselden, a very pretty 
girl, married, in 1850, Hon. C. D. Evans, of the Marion bar, 
and has had and raised seven sons and one daughter; they 
have been noticed hereinbefore in or among the Evans family. 
Mrs. Jane Evans is now a widow, and an excellent lady she is. 
Of William Haselden's family, the writer can't say anything ; 
they are, if living, in Darlington, Florence and Williamsburg 
Counties. Of Major James Haselden and family, the writer 
can speak with some certainty. Major James Haselden mar- 
ried Mary Godbold, another and the youngest daughter of old 
General Thomas Godbold; the fruits of the marriage were 
Charles, Anna, Sarah, Jane, James G. and Maggie — all now 
dead except Charles and Anna. Charles Haselden married 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 225 

Miss Julia Elkrbe, and notice of their family has already been 
taken herein or among the Ellerbe family, not necessary to 
repeat it; and the same may be said as to Sarah's family, 
already spoken of among the Ellerbes. Of Jane and her fam- 
ily, notice has already been taken in and among the Berry 
family. Of James G. Haselden and his family, now here 
among us— he married Miss Rebecca Dudley, of Marlborough 
County, an excellent lady ; the fruits of the marriage are James 
Dudley Haselden, Carrie Haselden, Luther M. Haselden and 
Lawrence Benton Haselden ; of these none are married except 
James Dudley Haselden; he married Miss Mary Edwards, a 
very nice girl ; they live in her patrimonial home, and have two 
children, sons, named J. Dudley and William E. Haselden, an 
infant. The grand-father. Major James Haselden, and the 
son, James G. Haselden, and the grand-son, J. Dudley Hasel- 
den, have all been honored by the people of the county with ^ 
seat in the State Legislature — ^the latter, or grand-son, twice. 
James G. Haselden died at his home on the 20th April, 1900. 
Major James Haselden died in 1864, at the age of fifty-nine. 
Major Haselden in many respects was a model man, and excel- 
lent farmer, a good neighbor and a very successful man; he 
was modest and unassuming; a man of fine sense and good 
humor, of good habits and genteel in demeanor and appear- 
ance ; he accumulated a large property, wholly unencumbered 
at his death, and was divided among his heirs with<jut the 
intetposition of any Court ; he was greatly missed in his com- 
munity. The Haselden family are not long-lived. The writer 
heard Charles Haselden say when he was sixty-nine, that he 
was the oldest Haselden he ever knew. J. G. Haselden was 
sixty at the time of his death. 

Bass. — ^The Bass family will 'be . next noticed. The first 
Bass of which the writer has any information was Joseph 
Bass; he married a Miss Jones, sister of John Jones, Bryant 
and Thomas N. Jones. By the older people, her contempora- 
ries, she was spoken of in very high terms as an excellent lady, 
industrious and frugal, ever looking with a keen eye to the 
welfare of her household, and with all, and above all, was a 
pious, good woman — truly a "mother in Israel;" they settled 



226 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

on Catfish, on the road leading from Berry's Cross Roads to 
Harlleesville, now the property of James Berry, and is yet 
called the "old Bass place;" they raised a family of sons and 
daughters ; the sons were Joseph, Bryant and Robert, and three 
or four daughters, names unknown. The old people accumu- 
lated a good property for that day and time. Of the sons, 
Joseph, the oldest, married Miss Massey Crawford, and first 
settled just below the present town of Latta, on the place now 
owned by the Widow Thomas J. Bass and her four sons ; after- 
wards he moved to the place where the late Captain James W. 
Bass lately lived and died. Joseph, the second, raised five 
sons and six daughters. The sons were James W., Joseph R., 
Enos, Thomas R. and John C. Bass ; the daughters were Eliza- 
beth, Harriet, Laura, Helen, Adarezer and Lebanon. Of the 
five sons, James W. Bass married late in life Miss Lucy 
Moody, daughter of the late Barfield Moody ; by this marriage 
they had and raised to be grown, C. G. Bass, Edgar, Robert, 
George P., T. Leon, Lucius and Rufus. The widow, Lucy, 
died a few years ago, suddenly. The second son, Joseph R., 
married Miss Amelia Moody, a daughter of the late Eliza- 
beth Moody, of Buck Swamp, and settled on the land now 
covered in part by the town of Latta, and died there in 
1866, leaving four children, two daughters and two sons — 
Araininta and Rosa, and Addison L. and Thomas J. Ara- 
minta, the oldest, married Hugh Ellis, and lived only a year 
or two, and died childless. Rosa married our fellow-citizen, 
DavidI E. Watson, and has already been noticed in or among 
the Watson family. Addison L. Bass married Miss Ellen 
Watson, daughter of the late William Watson, resides now 
at Latta, and has been already noticed in or among the Watson 
family. Thomas J. Bass, the youngest son, married Miss Hor- 
tensia Watson, daughter of the late Matthew Watson, who has 
already been somewhat noticed herein in or among the Watson 
family. But his death was so tragic and unusual that I deem 
it proper in this place to notice it more particularly. He was 
a juryman in Marion, at a June term of the Court, about fifteen 
years ago, and was discharged from the Court on Tuesday 
evening; he went home in perfect health and vigor. On the 
next afternoon he left home to go to the postoffice, just across 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 227 

Buck Swamp, at the Bailey Ford, and went a footpath around 
the plantations next to the swamp, it being a nearer way — a 
path that I suppose he had traveled five hundred times. He 
passed by a negro house by the side of the swamp and went to 
the well and drew some water and drank it; a negro woman 
saw him at the well. He left the well andl went some two or 
three hundred yards to a point where a pine tree had, years 
before, fallen and lodged on the limb of another tree, over the 
path, and as he passed under the lodged tree, it broke loose 
from its moorings and fell upon him ; and he was found that 
night, on the ground under the fallen tree, which fell upon him 
and crushed him to instant death. The tree where it struck 
was more than a foot through and was heavy^don't suppose 
he knew what struck him. It is supposed that he had walked 
under that lodged tree perhaps five hundred times. Such a 
thing would not happen again in perhaps a million of times. 
Thus was the tragic end of Thomas J. Bass, the youngest son 
and dhild of Joseph Bass, the third. He 'left his widow and four 
sons, Carl, Tracy, Luther and Thomas, now promising young 
men. Tracy is now the agent of the railroad ait Sellers, S. C. 
The father was an energetic and persevering man^ — cut off in 
middle life. Again recurring to James W. Bass' family, his 
son, C. G. Bass, a boy scarcely grown at the death of his 
father, in 1876, took charge of the family and its circum- 
stances ; his father was much in debt at the time of his death ; 
he had been the guardian of his infant niece, Helen Bass, who 
had a good property ; she had grown up and married the now 
Rev. Joel I. Allen, about the time of Captain James W. Bass' 
death. Captain Bass' widow administered upon his estate. 
Joel I. Allen called upon the administratrix for a settlement of 
his guardianship account with his ward, Helen, and which 
Allen estimated at near $10,000 due his ward — cash received, 
negro hire,,&c. One item in the account was $3,315 cash re- 
ceived at one time from the Commissioner in Equity, in March, 
i860, which, with interest, amounted to about $8,000. Allen, 
not wishing to break up Captain Bass' family, offered to take 
$3,315, without interest, and receipt in full. The then advisers 
of the administratrix, not being safe and good advisers, she 
declined Allen's proposition. He then filed a complaint, 



228 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

against her as administratrix and her children for an account 
of the guardian's transactions, and after two or three years' 
stifif litigation, a decree was rendered in favor of the ward for 
about $8,000. Defendant threatened an appeal and neglected 
to prosecute it till it was too late, submitted to the decree. 
Allen, then, in the magnanimity of his heart, not desiring to 
break up and beggar Captain Bass' family, offered to take 
the $3,315 as at first offered, without interest — ^notwithstanding 
the hot litigation and the hundreds paid out in counsel fees, 
loss of time and so forth, much to Allen's credit. Defendants 
agreed to pay the compromise. There were other debts of 
Captain J. W. Bass — one to F. W. Kerchner, of Wilmington, 
N. C, in judgment, I think, for about $1,400, compromised 
for $800. C. G. Bass, then hardly grown, took charge of the 
farm, and by his untiring energy and good management in three 
years' time paid up the indebtedness of his father's estate, and 
saved his valuable plantation, lands and other property for his 
mother, himself and younger brothers. These things are men- 
tioned herein to the everlasting credit of Rev. Joel I. Allen 
and Cornelius G. Bass. Notwithstanding this sacrifice on the 
part of these two gentlemen, they both have prospered, and are 
among our best citizens. C. G. Bass married his cousin. Miss 
lyula Deer ; the result of their marriage is one son, yet a little 
boy. Enos Bass, the third son of Joseph the second, died a 
young man, unmarried, before his father. Thomas R. Bass, 
the fourth son of Joseph the second, grew up and studied med- 
icine, and located in West Marion (now Florence County), on 
Ivynch's River ; married a Miss Carter, raised a nice family of 
sons and daughters, and accumulated a large property, educated 
his children, was a good citizen and useful man ; was a Repre- 
sentative from Marion County in the Legislature of 1870 ; died 
some years ago, much respected and largely regretted by his 
people ; his family is scattered — don't know enough about them 
to particularize. John C. Bass, the fifth and youngest son and 
child of Joseph the second', born in March, 1835, yet survives, 
and lives near Latta ; he is the only survivor of that large fam- 
ily, male or female; he married, first. Miss Hannah Jane 
Bethea, daughter of the late Ivcvi Bethea ; they lived together 
for many years, when she died, childless ; he married, a second 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 229 

time, a lady whose name is not now remembered ; she died at 
her first accouchement, neither she nor the child surviving; 
John has not married again — apparently the name will die out 
or disappear, so far as he, John C. Bass, is concerned. Of the 
daughters of Joseph the second, the oldest, Elizabeth A., mar- 
ried Rev. S. J. Bethea, his second wife ; only one child to live, 
was the fruit of this marriage, born October 7th, 1857, now 
the Rev. S. J. Bethea, of the South Carolina Conference of 
the M. E. Church, South; she wa^ a most excellent woman, 
died a year or two ago. Harriet, the second daughter, married 
the late John R.' Bethea, 2d February, 1842. The writer was 
one of the guests ^t the marriage. The results of this mar- 
riage were two daughters, Almira, now the wife of Joseph 
Allen, of Latta, and Addie, now the wife of Ed. B. Watson; 
and five sons, Joseph J. Bethea, our well known and much re- 
spected fellow-citizen of Latta, who married his distant cousin, 
Carrie Bethea; they have no children. Lewis S. Bethea, 
whose first wife was a Miss McPherson, of West Marion, and 
who died some years ago, leaving five or six children ; Lewis 
married, a second time. Miss Roberta Floyd, a daughter of 
Mrs. Zilpha Floyd, near Campbell's Bridge; there are two or 
three children from this last marriage. Harris C. Bethea, a 
third son, became a Methodist traveling preacher, and after 
traveling for several years, by some means or other, unknown 
to the writer, he quit the Methodist Church and ministry, 
joined the Baptist Church, and became and is now a minister 
in that denomination ; he married some lady in Sumter County, 
and there now resides ; know nothing of his family. Another 
son, Walter E. Bethea, now a citizen of Latta, married a Miss 
Rouse, of Williamsburg County, an excellent woman; they 
have no children. Thomas C, the fifth and youngest son of 
the late John R. Bethea, sickened and died when about twenty- 
one years of age. Laura Bass, the third daughter of Joseph 
the second, married her first cousin, David S. Bass ; she had 
and left one child only, Helen, when she died; that child 
from early girlhood was raised by her guardian. Captain James 
W. Bass, and became the first wife of Rev. Joel I. Allen, as 
hereinabove mentioned ; she left five children. David S. Bass 
afterwards married a Miss Powers, and went oflf to George- 



230 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

town County ; know nothing further of him. Helen Bass, the 
fourth daughter of Joseph the second, married W. H. Smith, 
of Buck Swamp ; by him she had two children, daughters, and 
then died; those daughters grew up, and one married Law- 
rence Sessions ; they raised a considerable family, now young 
people among us, quite respectable; the other married a Mr. 
Moody, son of the late Hugh Moody, whose name the writer 
has forgotten ; know nothing further of them. Adarezer, the 
fifth daughter of Joseph Bass the second, married her first cou- 
sin, James E. Coxe, of Marlborough, and raised a family of 
four children, two sons and two daughters; Mrs. Coxe died 
in the spring of 1900 ; they being in Marlborough, the writer 
can trace the family no further. Lebanon Bass, the sixth and 
youngest daughter of Joseph the second, married Cyrus B. 
Haselden, as hereinbefore stated in and among the Haselden 
family, to wliich reference is made. Joseph Bass the second, 
notwithstanding his large family of eleven children, all raised 
to be grown, by his energy and frugality amassed a large 
fortune for his day and time; he died intestate, in 1854; 
his estate was valued at $150,000, unencumbered; his wife, 
Massey, preceded him to the grave, in December, 1846. The 
Bass family, back to Joseph the first, including all the descend- 
ants, as far as known, have been noted for their large hospital- 
ity. Joseph the second, gave away more at his table in one 
year than some of his equally welHo-do neighbors did in a 
whole lifetime ; he and all his sons were close and tight on a 
trade, exacting to the last cent; but go to their homes, and 
their hospitality was most lavish. Of the eleven children, 
John C. Bass, now sixty-five years old, only survives. Of the 
other sons of Joseph the first, Bryant Bass married Miss Jane 
Kogers, daughter of old EH Rogers ; by her he had five child- 
ren, three sons and two daughters, and died before reaching 
middle life, well-to-do and prosperous. Of his sons, David 
S. has already been spoken of; the other two sons, William 
and Robert, emigrated West in early manhood ; know nothing 
further of them. Of the two daughters, Louisa and Anna, the 
former married John S. Page, who died in first of the war, 
as already noticed in or among the Page family ; he left some 
sons and two daughters ; one of the sons, William, was killed 



A HISTORY Ot MARION COUNTY. 281 

in Sheriflf Berry's posse, twenty-five or thirty years ago, as 
already stated; think another son or two went to parts un- 
known. One daughter married Joseph Smith, from whom she 
was divorced in the seventies, while that law was in force; 
don't know where she is or what has become of her. The 
other daughter of John S. Page and wife married C. J. McCoU, 
DOW of MuUins, a prosperous man and good citizen ; has been 
a cotton buyer for years and is still thus engaged ; they have a 
family of children to the writer unknown. Robert Bass, the 
third son of Joseph the first, married Miss Mahala Deer; by 
her he had four children, one son and three daughters ; he died 
when quite a young man ; like his brothers, he was prospering 
at the time of his death ; the widow married again ; don't re- 
member to whom; they removed West in the forties; know 
nothing of them since. Of the daughters of Joseph the first, 
one married old Daniel Piatt, who died in 1839 or '40; she was 
the progenitress of all the Platts in the county, from that time 
until now, and there have been many and their connections, 
yet the name Piatt is now extinct in the county, except R. B. 
Piatt and children of Mullins. Another daughter, Nancy, 
married a Mr. Coxe, of Marlborough ; Coxe died, leaving her 
a widow, well-to-^o, with three sons, Edwin, James and Rob- 
ert ; the eldest and youngest both died unmarried ; Robert was 
a doctor; James Coxe is still living, a well-to-do citizen and 
highly respectable. Another daughter of old Joseph the first, 
Dicey, married a Tart, whose name is now forgotten; they 
went West. Recurring to the children of Bryant Bass: his 
youngest daughter, Anna, married Samuel Smith, son of old 
Samuel Smith, on Buck Swamp; she is still living, and has 
raised several children, daughters and sons ; one the wife of 
Dr. Connelly; one the wife of R. B. McLean, of Dillon — 
McLean married two of them ; she has three sons, young men, 
unknown to the writer. Bryant Bass' widow married Salathiel 
Moody, and by him had two children, a son and a daughter; 
the son was idiotic and died; the daughter grew up, and mar- 
ried Mack Martin; think they went West — at any rate, have 
lost sight of them. Recurring to the family of Captain James 
W. Bass ; his second son, Edgar, married, a few years ago, a 
Miss Mclntyre, of Carmichael Township, and immediately 
16 



232 A HISTORY OF. MARION COUNTY. 

left for Georgia ; it was said that at the time of their marriage 
their joint weight, avoirdupois, was over 500 pounds. The 
third son of Captain J. W. Bass, Robert A., is a physician; 
married his first cousin, a daughter of Robert Moody, of Rich- 
mond, Va. ; resides at Latta, and has two or three children; 
George F. and Lucius Bass, sons of Captain J. W. Bass, have 
gone from the county, and can say nothing about them. T. 
Leon Bass married Miss Beulah McColl ;* has only one child, 
a son, resides at Dillon, is a dispenser of liquor, under the law, 
and is also merchandising ; he is apparently doing well ; sober 
and a very pleasant gentleman and highly respectable, except 
so far as the odium which attaches to liquor sellers affects him. 

Hamer. — The next family to be noticed is the Hamer family. 
So far as Marion County is concerned, the Hamer family is an 
importation from Marlborough County. The late Robert C. 
Hamer, son of John Hamer and wife, Mary (Polly), of Marl- 
borough, married, in 1830, Mary (Polly) Bethea, daughter of 
Tristram Bethea, in this (Marion) County, and settled on the 
road leading from Harlleesville to Rockingham, about five 
miles above Harlleesville, where he resided till his death, Feb- 
ruary, 1878 or 1879 ; by the marriage he raised three children 
to be grown ; Elizabeth Ann, John H. and Robert P. Hamer ; 
he had another son, named Tristram, who when about grown 
sickened and died ; his wife died when Robert P. was quite a 
child ; the father never married again, but remained a widower 
until his death ; a maiden sister of his kept house for him, and 
looked after his children. His daughter, Elizabeth Ann 
(Betsey Ann, as she was called,) married a Mr. Thompson, of 
Robeson County, N. C. — think bis name was John ; he died and 
left his widow with three children, one daughter and two sons. 
The daughter (MoUie, I believe,) married her cousin, L. D. 
Hamer, of Marlborough ; of the two sons, John C. Thompson 
married a Miss Smith, of Alabama; the other son, Tristram 
Thompson, married Miss Flora Bethea — daughter of Dr. J. 
F. Bethea; by this marriage two sons were born. Prank and 
Tristram ; their father died six or eight years ago, with measles^ 
or rather a relapse of that disease ; his widow moved to Dillon, 
*She is now dead. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 238 

and she died suddenly some two years ago, leaving her two 
boys surviving ; their grand-father, Dr. J. F. Bethea, took them 
to his home, where they now are. The widow, Elizabeth A. 
Thompson, married Lemuel Thompson, a cousin of her first 
husband ; by this, her second marriage, she had and raised three 
children, two daughters, Mary and Charlotte (Lottie), and one 
son, Robert. Mary is the wife of Adolphus Stackhouse, now 
a resident citizen of Sumter County. Charlotte married Dr. 
P. N. Timmerman, of Edgefield or Bamberg County, but now 
a resident citizen of Marion County. Lemuel Thompson, a 
most worthy man and quiet, unpretending citizen, died about a 
year ago, leaving "Betsey Ann" a widow for a second time. 
Her son, Robert Thompson, married a Miss Woodley, of 
Marlborough, and is among our best and most progressive citi- 
zens, a young man of promise. John H. Hamer, the oldest son 
of old Robert C, married, first. Miss Missouri Bethea, 
daughter of the late William S. Bethea; she died in a year or 
two, leaving an infant son, Missouri Robert, now one of our 
best citizens, a graduate of the University of North Carolina, 
and who married a Miss Townsend, of Robeson; they have 
only one child, a son, named John David, for his two grand- 
fathers, John H. Hamer and David Townsend. After the 
death of his first wife, John H. Ham;er married Miss Alice 
Richardson, daughter of the late Wm. F. Richardson, below 
Marion ; by this marriage he had five children, three sons and 
two daughters ; the sons are Edward R., Tristram and John H. ; 
the daughters are Mary and Orianna. Of the sons, Edward 
R. married Miss Julia Berry, daughter of James Berry ,' they 
have several children. Tristram Hamer is a physician, and 
left the county a few years ago, a single man, and went to 
Texas, where he still is, as it is said. John H., Jr., is a young 
mjtn, and still resides with his father. His daughter, Mary, 
married Neill Berry, one of our progressive citizens, and has 
three children. Orianna Hamer is the second wiie of Law- 
rence Manning; they have no children. After the death of 
his Richardson wife, John H. Hamer married the Widow Fan- 
nie Lyles, of Anson County, N. C. ; she was originally a 
Fladger, of Marion, a daughter of the late Captain C. J. 
Fladger. Robert P. Hamer, the youngest son of old Robert 



234 ,A HISTORY Of MARION COUNTY. 

C. Hamer, lives at old HarlleesviUe, now called Little Rock; 
he married a Miss McCall, of West Marion, a daughter of old 
William McCall. Robert P. "has raised a large family of ten 
or twelve children, sons and daughters ; think he has lost a 'son 
and a daughter, both grown or about so. His older sons: 
Robert P. Hamer married a Miss McCoUum, daughter of the 
late Brown McCoUum, and lives at Hamer, on the "Short-cut" 
Railroad, and is one of the most thorough-going, progressive 
men of the county ; though a young man, is already a rich man 
for our section of the country ; he has some four or five child- 
ren. James Hamer, another son of Robert P., married a Miss 
Breeden, of Marlborough ; don't know whether they have any 
offspring or not. Brooks Hamer, another son of Robert P., 
married a Miss Bennett, daughter of John Bennett, in upper 
Marion; don't know whether they have any children or not. 
William M. Hamer, another son of Robert P., yet single, is 
quite prominent in business circles, is reputed to have made 
money, and very clear-headed in business — a promising young 
man. A daughter of R. P. Hamer married T. B. Stackhouse, 
of Dillon, Cashier of the Bank of Dillon ; also has a good farm 
near by ; well qualified for business, a first class business man 
every way, and stands fair with all who know him; he has one 
child, a daughter. Robert P. Hamer has other sons and several 
daughters, unmarried, some grown. Old Robert C. Hamer 
was a very successful man in life ; he accumulated a large prop- 
erty, and left his children in good condition for the battle of 
life, so far as means are concerned. In his numerous dealings 
with men be was always prompt and strictly honest, acting "on 
the plumb and parting on the square ;" he was frugal and eco- 
nomical, and made his money by gradual accretions; liberal 
in his views of life and with his means to every commendable 
project for the gOod of his community and advancement of his 
people. Much more might be said of him, but space will not 
permit. It is not in good taste to speak of the virtues and 
good traits of the living, remembering the old adage, "Never 
speak of one's virtues to his face, nor of his faults behind his 
back;" but as to this family I will venture one remark: 
wherever you find a Hamer, phrenologically speaking, you will 
find the bump denoting acquisitiveness fully developed, strong 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. . 235 

and prominent; and when it is mixed with old William Mc- 
Call's family, it adds to its development and strength. Another 
branch of the Hamer family, imported from Marlborough, is a 
Widtow Hamer and sons, John B. Hamer, Charles Hamer and 
Jesse Hamer, with a deaf-mute sister, in Kirby Township. 
John B. Hamer was first -imported and married a daughter 
of Captain Stephen F. Berry ; by her he has several children ; 
he lives in Bethea Township. Charles Hamer recently mar- 
ried a daughter of Wilson Berry. Jesse and the mute sister 
live with their >mother. This branch of the family are collater- 
ally related to those in Harlleesville community ; they all came 
from the same common stock, old man John Hamer, of Marl- 
borough, whose wife was a daughter of old Thomas Cochrane, 
and sister to the writer's mother-in-law, Rachel Bethea. This 
branch of the Hamer family seems not to have succeeded in 
life so well as the Harlleesville branch, yet they have many of 
the same characteristics. 

McKenziB. — ^Another family will here be noticed — ^the 
McKenzie family. The first known was old Robert McKen- 
zie ; he settted and lived there till he died, near where Dothan 
Church now stands; don't know who his wife was; he raised 
a family, some of whom the writer knows nothing of. He had 
a son named John and one named Asa; he had a daughter 
named Dilla and one, his youngest child, named Mary (Polly) ; 
may have had others, perhaps did have. Old "Bobby," as he 
was familiarly called, was one of the principal founders of 
Dothan Church, where first located, and also where it now 
stands. It was first located on the road from Harlleesville to 
Mars Bluff, opposite the dwelling of John C. Bethea, and for 
several years in the first of the nineteenth century camp meet- 
ings were held there; the camp ground was above the road 
leading to Harlleesville, between the cross of the roads and 
Little Reedy Creek ; it was called Bethea Camp Ground ; camp 
meetings were held there as late as 1808 and 1809. The 
grand-father and father of the writer was there at a camp 
meeting in August, 1808 or 1809. This the writer got from 
his father, Jordan Sellers. The circumstances as related were, 
that they were at camp meeting there and heard that Levin , 



236 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Sellers, a brother of my father, and traveling preacher of the 
Methodist Church, had died on Cypress Circuit, in the low 
country, and my grand^father proposed going down there after 
his dead son's horse, books, clothing, &c. ; that old John 
Bethea, Robert McKenzie and others dissuaded him, on ac- 
■ count of his age and the hot weather, from going, but to send 
his son, my father, which he did, and my father went accord- 
ingly, and got his brother's horse, saddle-bags, &c., and carried 
them home. This church building was not then called Dothan, 
was then called Bethea's Church. About 1830, most of the 
congregation moved to the place now and since called Dothan, 
and first built a log church. The writer was there at church 
in 1832, then a lad, and saw old "Bobby McKenzie;" he was 
a very pious man. Of his sons, John, called "Jackey," married 
Emery Jackson, a daughter of old Ed'ward Jackson, the first 
of that name on Catfish. "Jackey" and Emery raised a con- 
siderable family, as remembered — Robert, James, Elisha and 
David J., and several daughters, names not remembered. 
Jackey died and left Emery a widow, with her children, and 
who died a very old lady, since the Confederate War. Robert, 
the oldest son, married a Miss Sallie Kenady, and raised a con- 
siderable family, mostly sons, John W., Eli, Allen, Frank and 
David, and two daughters, Sarah Ann, the name of the other 
not remembered. John W. McKenzie married, first, a Miss 
Brigman, daughter of the late Thomas Brigman, who had 
several children, and died; he married, a second time, I don't 
know to whom. Eli McKenzie married a Miss Spivey, 
daug'hter of Isaac Spivey; think she is dead, leaving several 
children. Allen McKenzie married another daughter of Isaac 
Spivey ; she died, leaving several children, and he married 
again, a Miss Jackson, daughter of the late Reuben B. Jackson, 
who has one child. Erank McKenzie married a Miss Spivey 
also. David McKenzie married a Miss Allen, daughter of 
ffhe late Joseph Allen, of Buck Swamp ; he and his wife are 
both dead, leaving some children, don't know how many; the 
children are cared for by their uncle and guardian, Herod W. 
Allen. Of the daughters of Robert McKenzie, the oldest, 
Sarah Ann, married Ervin M. Jackson; she had, perhaps, two 
children, a son, Thomas Jackson, who now lives in the Dillon 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 287 

community ; she died some years ago. The other daughter of 
Robert McKenzie married Kenneth Hargrove; know nothing 
more of them. Robert McKenzie and his wife, Sallie, both 
died some years ago ; the sons are all industrious and progres- 
sive men, all successful farmers and good managers. Of old 
"Bobby McKenzie's" other son, Asa, the writer knows nothing ; 
of his daughters, Dilla, married Owen Jackson, a hard-work- 
ing, honest man; he lived and died on the road from Dothan 
Church to Harlleesville, on the place now owned and occupied 
by Missouri Hamer; he raised a considera:ble family of 
daughters and one son, Ervin M. His oldest daughter, Eliza- 
beth, never married ; two daughters married William T. Jack- 
son, and died childless; another one is the wife of Hugh P. 
Price, and has no children. I think there were other daugh- 
ters, not now remembered. His son, Ervin M., married 
Sarah Ann McKenzie, as already stated. Old "Bobby Mc- 
Kenzie's" youngest daughter, Mary (Polly), married the late 
David Ellen, of grateful memory; the fruits of this marriage 
were Ritta, Zimri, Robert M., William B., Wesley, Elijah, 
Mary Jane and Martha Ann. Ritta married Isaac Price, who 
many years ago emigrated to Mississippi with his family, and 
died; I think his widow is still living, and it is said that she 
and her children are all doing well and are highly respected. 
Isaac Price (called Peter) was an older brother of Hugh P. 
Price, of Maple notoriety. Zimri M. Ellen married Miss Mar- 
garet Little, a sister of the late Rev. John R. Little; was an 
industrious, thriving man ; he died in November, 1890, child- 
less ; his widow, a first-rate, good woman, still survives, and is 
doing well. Robert M. Ellen married Miss Mary Wilson, of 
Marlborough, sister of Rev. John B. Wilson, a Presiding Elder 
now in the South Carolina Conference; Robert M. died some 
twenty years ago, leaving two or three children; his widow 
went back to Marlborough; married again — don't know to 
whom, or what has become of her or her children. Wesley 
and Elijah Ellen both went into the war, young single men, 
and both were killed or died. William B. Ellen married Miss 
Amatida Bethea, daughter of George J. Bethea; he owns the 
old Ellen homestead at Dothan; has raised a family of five 
children, three sons and two daughters ; he is a hard-working. 



238 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

well-to-do man, and a good citizen in every way; don't know 
the names of his children, except the oldest son, James ; he is 
married, don't know to whom ; he is depot agent and telegraph 
operator somewhere — I think, on the Central Road, in Claren- 
don County. Mary Jane did not marry ; Martha Ann married 
William Bundy, of Marlborough; have lost sight of her and 
Mary Jane — they are somewhere in Marlborough County, near 
Red Bluflf. Mary (Polly) Ellen, first wife of David Ellen, 
was no ordinary woman for business ; she died 14th November, 
1854. Old man David married again, 17th September, 1857, 
the Widow Charles Munship; the fruit of the marriage was 
and is John H. Ellen, near Dothan, an excellent manager and 
successful farmer and a first-class citizen; he married a Miss 
Moody, daughter of the late Richard Moody, of Buck Swamp ; 
has three children, a son now in Wofford College. 

Manning. — ^Another family now to be noticed is the Man- 
ning family. The first known of them was old John Manning ; 
he came from Virginia ; married a sister of old Buck Swamp 
John Bethea, whether before or after his arrival in South 
Carolina, is not known — perhaps, before he came. Nothing is 
known of his family or progeny, except one son, whose name 
was John; who John, Jr., married is not known, but he mar- 
ried some lady arid settled where his father lived, on Buck 
Swamp, where John D. Bethea now lives. It is now remem- 
bered that his wife was a Miss Lee, a name now almost 
extinct in the county. There yet remains James W. L,ee and 
his son, Calvin Ivee, fairly good citizens of the county. If 
there are others of the name in the county, the writer knows 
not of them. John Manning, Jr., raised a considerable family 
of sons and only one daughter, Lisha, who became the wife of 
the late William Roberts, and who has been somewhat noticed 
in or among the Roberts family. Of the several sons of John, 
Jr., none will be noticed here except Meely and Woodward, as 
the others, Ira, James and, I think, one named John, emigrated 
West. Meely married Miss Mary (Polly) Kinney, of Marl- 
borough, and settled, lived and died in that county. Woodward 
married a sister of Meely's wife, and first settled on Buck 
Swamp, but afterwards moved to Marlborough and lived there 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 239 

for years, and then moved back to Marion, and lived on his 
father's old homestead till he died, some years ago. Meely 
Manning raised a large family of sons and two daughters; 
the sons were Eli, Thomas J., William, James, John, Frank, 
Houston and Holland. These, though born and raised in 
Marlborough, many of them came back to Marion and became 
citizens of their mother county. The two daughters were 
Sarah Jane and Gerona. Eli, the oldest, married Miss 
Amanda Bethea, a daughter of Tristram Bethea, of Floral 
College; he settled and lived in Marion County, raised two 
sons, Thomas B. and Eli. Thomas was a doctor ; he practiced 
medicine some years at Little Rock ; he married a Miss Carnes, 
of Sumter; he emigrated Westward. Eli, a promising young 
man, went West. EH Manning was an excellent man and 
citizen; he died some years ago; think his widow went West 
with her sons. Thomas J. Manning married Miss Anna Hasel- 
den, a daughter of the late Major James Haselden. Thomas 
J. Manning was killed by the deserters, whom he, with others, 
was hunting in Donahoe Bay, in the latter part of the war ; he 
left his widow, Anna Manning, and five children, three daugh- 
ters and two sons, in good condition, so far as the means of 
life were concerned ; the widow managed well, and raised her 
children quite respectably, and all are married and doing well. 
Her oldest daughter, Lettie, married Dr. J. H. David, now of 
Dillon, S. C, an excellent business man and very prosperous; 
they have five or six children. The next daughter, MoUie, 
married E. Burke Berry, an excellent citizen and very prosper- 
ous man ; they have but one child, a son, who bears his father's 
name, E. Burke, Jr. The youngest daughter, Tommie, mar- 
ried Thomas Wickham Berry, and has four or five children, 
all daughters; he, too, is doing well and prospering. The 
eldest son, James H. Manning, a thorough-going business man 
and prt^ressive farmer, married his cousin, a Miss EUerbe, 
daughter of the late Captain W. S. EUerbe; they have several 
children, unknown to the writer. The younger son, Lawrence 
Manning, one of our good citizens and reliable men, married, 
first, a Miss Malloy, of Chesterfield ; she died childless, and he 
married, a second time. Miss Orianna Hamer, daughter of 
John H. Hamer; they have no children. Mrs. Ann Manning 



240 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

yet survives, and stays with her son, Lawrence. William 
Manning married Miss Martha Jane Stackhouse, daughter of 
the late Wesley Stackhouse, about the beginning of the war, 
settled in Marion County ; 'he went into the war early, and was 
killed at second Manassas, 29th or 30th August, 1862; he left 
one child, a daughter, named Willie; her mother afterwards 
married her cousin, Milton Stackhouse, of Marlborough — or, 
rather, they went to Marlborough and still reside there; her 
daughter, Willie Manning, was well educated, and is now a 
professor or teacher in some 'high sdhool or college; has not 
married; James Manning married a Miss Covington, and 
lived in Marion for years, and then went back to Marlborough ; 
have lost sight of him and his family. Houston Manning 
married a daughter of Colonel E. T. Stackhouse, resided in 
Marion till his death, some years ago; he died in Baltimore 
under a surgical operation there and then performed on him ; 
he was one of o»r best citizens; he left 'his widow, who has 
since died, and three children, two sons and a daughter. One 
of the sons, Maurice, recently married Miss Nellie Bethea, 
(feughter of D. Mcl^. Bethea. Austin, the older brother, is 
yet single; both are promising young men. The daughter, 
Miss Eva, is yet unmarried, and is a pretty girl. Holland 
Manning married, first, a Miss Gibson, of Richmond County, 
N. C, or of Marlborough County, S. C. ; he settled and lived 
in upper Marion until after the death of 'his wife, by whom he 
had four or five children ; he then married Miss Clara Bethea, 
daughter of the late Colonel James R. Bethea ; since that mar- 
riage he has resided ou' his second wife's place, still retaining 
his place in upper Marion ; he has two children by his second 
marriage, both daughters; three or four of his first children 
are married — don't know to whom. Meely Manning's oldest 
daughter, Sarah Jane, married Captain D. W. Bethea ; by this 
marriage, two sons, Le Roy and D. W. Bethea, Jr., bearing his 
father's name, were raised. I^e Roy, the older one, resides in 
Marlborough, on his mother's patrimony; D. W., Jr., resides 
on his father's homestead, in Marion. Sarah Jane, the mother, 
died more than twenty years ago. Le Roy and D. W. Bethea, 
Jr., both have families ; are good citizens and promising young 
men. Their father, D. W. Bethea, St., married, a second 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 241 

time, a Miss Brunson, of Darlington ; no offspring as a result 
of the marriage; lie died a year ago. Of the sons of Meely 
Manning remaining in Marlborough, are John, who became a 
Methodist preacher, and Frank Manning, who was a Captain 
in the war, and has two or three times represented his county 
in the IvCgislature. The youngest daughter, Gerona, married 
a Mr. McLean, has a large family, and resides in Marlborough. 
Meely Manning amassed a large property, died during the 
war, negroes were emancipated; his large landed estate was 
unencumbered; he left his family in good condition. Wood- 
ward Manning left but two children, daughters, Rebecca and 
Sallie; he had a son. Who lived to be grown, named Robert, 
but who died in early manhood, before the war. Rebecca, his 
oldest daughter, married, first, Frank Bethea, who died Janu- 
ary 2d, i860, leaving one child, a son, who died soon after his 
father. The widow married, a second time, Simeon P. 
McCorniac ; by him she had three sons. Simeon went to the 
war and died of measles, and her three boys all died in one 
week with diphtheria; so far as children were concerned, she 
was where she started — childless. After the war some time, 
she married a third time, James Mclntyre ; by him she had an 
only son, who is now one of our fellow-citizens. Woodward 
Manning Mclntyre, a large, fine-'looking man ; he married a 
Miss Atkinson, of North Carolina, and has one or two child- 
ren. Rebecca, his mother, still lives, and is an excellent 
woman. Sallie Manning married John D. Betbea; they live 
on the old Manning homestead ; they have four or five children, 
don't know whether sons or daughters. Woodward Manning 
died some years ago, and left his two daughters in Comfortable 
condition; he did not make property like his brother, Meely; 
they were 'both harmless, inoffensive men and attended to their 
own business ; for years Woodward drank excessively, but quit 
entirely a few years before his death. 

Jones. — The Jones family will next 'be noticed. The writer 
has some difficulty in ascertaining and assigning properly the 
remote ancestry of the Jones family in Marion County. To 
the writer three old Jones — ^John, Bryant and Thomas M. 
Jones — were known; but Bishop Gregg, in his history, goes 



242 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

further back than the writer's knowledge, and if Bishop Gregg 
is correct, the father of the three aJ)ove named was John Jones, 
a brother of the noted Tory, Captain Joseph Jones, who led 
the Tory party to the killing of Colonel Kolb, in April, 1781. 
Time, the great leveler, together with the conduct of our people 
during the late war, has measurably put an end to the odious 
distinction between Whig and Tory of the Revolution, and 
properly so, too. The descendants of many of the Tories of 
the Revolutionary War are now among our best people, and of 
highest respectability ; and further, many of the soldiers in our 
late war, descendants of Tories, were as good soldiers as the 
Confederacy had. I need not specify, because it is generally 
known and well understood, and hence the term, Tory, as a 
derisive term, ought to be no longer named. Bishop Gregg 
says, on page 360: "Accordingly a company of about fifty 
Tories collected at the place now known as Tart's Mill, six 
miles above Marion Court House. The leader was Captain 
Joseph Jones, a native of that neighborhood, &c." This com- 
pany, led by Joseph Jones as Captain, went over to where 
Society Hill now stands, and killed Colonel Kolb, plundered 
and burned his house. In a note to page 361, Gregg says: 
"John Jones, a brother of the Tory Captain, was seen on the 
return of the party as they passed old John Bethea's, riding 
Colonel Kolb's horse and saddle, with a feather-bed tied before 
him." Bishop Gregg, on page 367, further says: "Captain 
Jones, the leader, which surprised Colonel Kolb, was a man of 
some note. He possessed a good property, and was ingenious 
to a remarkable degree. He is said to have made the first 
surveyor's compass ever used in Marion District. Notwith- 
standing his course during the Revolution, he continued to live 
on Catfish until about 1802, and then removed to Colleton 
District, where he died not very many years since." It is pre- 
sumed (in the absence of more definite information) that either 
Captain Joseph Jones, or his brother, John Jones, was the pro- 
genitor of these Jones on Catfish, or the family in question. 
Rather suppose it was John and not Joseph Jones. The killing 
of Colonel Kolb in the manner in which it was done, and the 
plundering of his premises, was most certainly a horrid crime, 
and a severe blow to the cause of independence in South 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 243 

Carolina — ^at least, for a while ; but yet we are obliged to admit 
that it was not without provocation. It was merely retalia- 
tory. Colonel Kolb with his men had just been down on 
Catfish, in the region of the Jones, and had killed several of 
the Tories, so that if honors were not even, conduct and con- 
ditions were about equal. The writer takes it for granted 
that one of these Jones was the father to the three brothers, 
John Jones, Bryant Jones and Thomas M. Jones. John Jones 
lived on the road leading from Isfham Watson's crossing of 
Catfish to Marion Court House, not more than half a mile from 
the crossing. The writer stayed all night at his house in 1838, 
went there in company with the late William Gaddy, a son-in- 
law of old man Jones. Old man Jones had two sons, John D. 
and Samuel (if there were other sons, the writer never knew or 
heard of them) . There were two daughters, Sallie and Eliza- 
beth, who married two of the Gaddys, William and James, and 
have already been noticed among the Gaddy family. John D. 
Jones married, first, a Miss Avant, below Marion, and settled 
on the north side of Little Pee Dee, where his son, John 
Thomas Jones, now resides; he was a local preacher in the 
Methodist Church, and a most excellent man and manager of 
affairs ; he raised only three children, a daughter, Mary, and 
two sons, James A. and John Thomas. The two latter went 
to school to the writer in 1834 and 1835. James A., the older, 
married a Miss Huggins, a daughter of Solomon Huggins, and 
by her had several children — one a son, J. O. Jones, a prom- 
ising and worthy man, the others not known. The father, 
James A., went into the Confederate War, and was either killed 
or died in the war ; his family are about Nichols. John Thomas 
Jones married Miss Sallie Nichols, as hereinibefore stated in 
the notice of the Nichols family; is yet living, a first-rate, 
practical man and a worthy citizen ; he raised a family of six 
sons and four daughters. The sons are Evander, Eli, Beverly, 
Kendree, R. Boyd and another, name forgotten, all young men 
of promise ; four of them have families, two unmarried — good 
people. Of the daughters, one married J. B. Williams, of 
Nichols; one W. L. Hewit, of Marion; one D. N. Bethea, in 
upper Marion, and Miss Fannie is unmarried. Taken alto- 
gether, there are no better people in, the county than they are. 



244 . A HISTORY 0]P MARION COUNTY. 

Mary Jones, the daughter of John'D. Jones, married John 
Hug-gins (famiHarly called Jack) ; they raised several children. 
He (John Huggins) was a local preacher in the Methodist 
Church, a capital and good man; he died years ago, suddenly 
one morning, as he rose from his knees at family prayers ; he 
raised a considerable family, mostly sons, George W., Johji, 
Dock and Charles — ^may have been others. George W. mar- 
ried a Miss Porter, daughter of Rev. John A. Porter ; he moved 
to Georgia some years since; know nothing further of him. 
Dock Huggins married a Miss Johnson, daughter of the late 
Hugh R. Johnson ; they have a family, names and number un- 
known — a well-to-do citizen. Don't know to whom John and 
Charles married, if at all. Know of but two daughters, Zilpha 
and Miss Louisa, now at Dillon ; Zilpha married a man by the 
name of Blackwell ; he and family have gone to parts unknown. 
A daughter of Blackwell, raised by her aunt. Miss Lou Hug- 
gins, married Mr. E. L. Moore, of Dillon. Miss Louisa Hug- 
gins, a nice woman, has never married. "Jack" Huggins may 
have had other sons and daughters, unknown to writer. Old 
John Jones had another son, Samuel ; he emigrated West many 
years ago. John D. Jones married, a second time, to the Widow 
Walters ; by her he had no children ; she survived him — don't 
know what has become of her. Bryant Jones married, late in 
life, Elizabeth Berry, daughter of old Henry Berry the first, as 
hereinbefore stated, and settled down in Wahee on the "Grove" 
lands ; they raised a family of three sons and three daughters. 
The sons were Henry B. Jones, Frederic D. Jones and James E. 
Jones ; the daughters were Elizabeth, Nancy and Mary (Polly). 
Henry B., the only survivor of the family, married a Miss 
Hood, second cousin to him, and lives on his patrimonial 
estate; he raised a family of six children, two sons and four 
daughters ; the sons are Frank and Charles. Frank married a 
Miss Sessoms, and has a coming family, is a quiet, good citizen. 
Charles is unmarried. One daughter, Hattie, married a Mr. 
Bowen, a son of Dr. Bowen; don't know where they are or 
what they are doing. The other three daughters are single 
and with their parents. Frederic D. Jones married the Widow 
Stephen Berry, whose maiden name was Fama Watson. Fred. 
D. Jones and his family have already been noticed in or among 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 245 

the Watson family. James E. Jones died some years ago, un- 
married. Elizabeth Jones married the late James Watson, and 
has already been noticed in or among the Watson family. 
Nancy Jones married William A. Brown; they raised five 
children, three sons and two daughters. One of the daughters 
married Calvin Dew; she and her husband are both dead, 
childless. The other daughter died unmarried,. though grown. 
Of the sons, Edward is a physician and citizen of Latta; he 
married Miss Victoria Martin ; they have some children ; don't 
know how many. John Brown, the second son, married a 
Miss Turbeville, daughter of our good citizen, Stephen Turbe- 
ville. William Brown married a Miss Bowen, daughter of Dr. 
Bowen, of Florence County, and have several small children. 
Mary Jones (called Polly) married B. W. Jarnigan, of North 
Carolina; he lived and died in the neighborhood of his 
marriage, three or four years ago; his wife also died soon 
after; they had and raised two children, a son and a daugh- 
ter — Dr. J. E. Jarnigan and Sarah Ellen. Dr. Jarnigan 
married Miss Alice Bailey, of Fairfield County; his wife 
lived several years, and died childless. The Doctor still 
remains a widower, muoh to his own disgust and surprise 
to his friends ; he was physician to the State Penitentiary for 
three or four years, and was Consul to Honduras, appointed by 
President Cleveland, for two or three years, and was recently 
elected to represent the county in the State Legislature; has 
had much experience in affairs and more of observation in his 
life, and is well equipped for the position he now occupies. 
His sister, Sarah Ellen, married A. J. Matheson, of Marlbor- 
ough, who is now a very wealthy man, engaged in mercantile 
and agricultural pursuits — succeeds in everything he touches, 
and turns it to gold ; they have eight children living, sons and 
daughters — several of them married. Thomas M. Jones emi- 
grated with his family to Alabama more than fifty years ago. 
A sister of John and Bryant Jones married old John Blackman, 
became his second wife. Another sister married Christopher 
Dew the second, and by him she had two children, Frederic C. 
and John A. Dew, both dead. Frederic left several children, 
son's — John Foster, Philip and Christopher; and daughters — 
don't know ; one the wife of James Haselden. John A. Dew 



246 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

married a Miss Hays, daughter of old Levi Hays, but had no 
children; his widow still survives. 

CoTTiNGHAM. — The Cottingham family will next be noticed. 
Andrew Cottingham and his brother, Daniel Cottingham, are 
importations from Marlborough County. Andrew Cotting- 
ham was the son of Conner Cotting'ham, bom the 4th January, 
1818, as he told the writer himself, and' is still active and strong 
for a man of his age — a first rate citizen ; married, I think, a 
Miss Sinclair; has made a good living; has raised six enter- 
prising and respectable sons, J. C. Cottingham, Daniel C. Cot- 
tingham, A. J. Cottingham, Elkanah Cottingham, William 
Cottingham and A. J. C. Cottingham; most or all of them, 
except A. J. C, are married or have been married. Elkanah 
settled and lived in West Marion ; his wife died two or three 
years ago ; don't know whether he has remarried or not — think 
he has several children. Daniel C. Cottingham married a Miss 
Legette, daughter of the late James B. Legette, and lives in the 
"Free State" section of the county — a good citizen and is doing 
well. J. C. Cottingham married a Miss Legette, of Marlbor- 
ough County ; has raised a nice family, doing well ; has a son, 
promising young man, a graduate of Wake Forrest College, 
N. C. A. J. C. Cottingham lives at Dillon, one of the leading 
merchants of the town; has made money — enterprising arid 
progressive; be does not marry fast — ^pays a great deal of 
attention to ladies, and especially to the younger ones, but 
never gets to the "sticking point." The Cottinghams are all 
first class citizens, energetic and progressive, doing their share 
in the general make-up of the county, so far as the development 
of the county's resources are concerned. We would like to 
make other such importations from Marlborough County or 
elsew'here as the Cottingham family have proven themselves to 
be. Andrew Cotting'bam raised one daughter, who married 
W. J. Carter, of Dillon, a worthy and useful man ; they have 
several children, sons and daughters, and are prosperous. If 
there are other daughters, the writer does not know them. - 
Daniel Cottingham, a brother of Andrew, is another good citi- 
zen of the county, but I dtm't know enough about them to 
specify and give them a place herein seriatim. One of Daniel 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 247 

Cottingliam's daughters married Henry Berry, a son of Cap- 
tain Stephen F. Berry. Another is the wife of our progressive 
fellow-citizen of Latta, John L. Dew ; have only one child. 

There is another family of Cottinghams, not of recent im- 
portation, that must have a place herein. I mean old Yates 
Cottingham, whose sad end has already been noticed. Yates 
Cottingham married a sister of old Thomas Harllee ; where he 
came from is not known; his only fault was that he inordi- 
nately loved liquor ; by his marriage he had a son, Stewart Cot- 
tingham; there may have been others — never heard of any 
others. Old Yates had daughters also — one, at least, the 
mother of the polite and accommodating barber now at Dillon, 
Henry Cottingbam ; don't know who his father was. Stewart 
Cottingham was a very reliable and very worthy man; don't 
know wlio his wife was; he had a son (and, perhaps, others), 
named Thomas (a Harllee family name), who married and 
raised a family, unknown to the writer; he died a few years 
back. 

Hamilton. — ^Another family to be noticed is the Hamilton 
family. This is an old family in the county, never noted for 
being over-pretentious, but plain, honest, hard-working people. 
As known to the writer, there were two brothers, William and 
John, in the prime of life a hundred years ago ; don''t know to 
whom either of them was married. Of William Hamilton and 
his family the writer knows more than of John and his family. 
William Hamilton had two sons, Whittington and William. 
Whittington married a Miss Herring, by whom he had several 
sons, John, Arthur, Stephen, Tobias, William Warren and 
Whittington ; and some two or three daughters. Of the sons, 
John married and raised several children, sons and perhaps 
daugbters ; the sons were Allen, Perry, Ira, John H. and Bryant. 
Allen married a Miss Price, by whom he has a large family of 
children, how many not known. Perry died unmarried. Ira 
married a Miss Surls, daughter of A. B. Surls, of Dillon. Bry- 
ant is unmarried. Arthur Hamilton married a Miss Hyatt, and 
by her had only one child, a daughter, now the wife of Talley 
Martin ; know nothing of Martin's family. Stephen Hamilton 
married and has sons, Dayton V. and William K. ; a daughter, 
17 



248 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

the wife of Angus Moore ; they all have families. Tobias went 
to Horry after the war; never married; accumulated a nice 
property, which went mostly to his brothers and sisters. Dr. 
William W. Hamilton, now of -Marion, married Miss Rebecca 
J. Fore, daughter of the late Thomas Foi-e, by whom he has 
only one child, a son, named Thomas F., now nearing man- 
hood, with a fine prospect for life ahead of him. Whittington 
Hamilton married his cousin, a daughter of Henry Jackson, 
and by her has several bhildren, two sons and, perhaps, three 
daughters. The sons are Whittington, Jr., and Warley. 
Whittington, Jr., married, but his wife died childless, a year or 
so ago ; Whittington, Jr., is now a widower. Warley married 
a Miss Waters, and has some two or three children ; he resides 
at Dillon, an energetic and enterprising young man. Whit- 
tington Hamilton's daughters — ^two or three are married, but 
to whom is not known ; has one single one with him. Of old 
man John Hamilton's family, the writer knows but little; he 
had two sons, John and Tristram, both are dead. John_ mar- 
ried a daughter of old man Alexander Henderson, a unique 
character fifty years ago; by the marriage there are two 
sons, Jasper and Tristram, two excellent men and good citi- 
zens; both married. Who Jasper's wife was is not known. 
Tristram married Miss Nellie Bethea, a daughter of E. Bethea, 
of Latta, S. C. ; they reside at Dillon ; have two or three child- 
ren, and are doing well. Of the daughters of old John, also of 
his son John, or of Tristram, I know nothing, and, therefore, 
can say nothing about them. William Hamilton, a son of old 
William, married twice ; who his first wife was is not known ; 
his last wife was a Miss Moody, a daughter of the late Rev. 
Hugh Moody ; by her he had and left several children ; know 
nothing further of them. Of the daughters of old William, 
I can only speak of two of them. One married William Jack- 
son> called "Fire-coal Bill;" both are dead. "Fire-ooal Bill" 
had six sons in the war, and all gallant soldiers — Robert, I^evi, 
Owen, Malcolm, others, names not remembered. Another 
daughter married Elisha McKenzie, and raised a large family, 
sons and daughters ; but of their children the writer is not in- 
formed and can say nothing. The Hamilton family, taken as a 
whole, are good people, taking into consideration their time 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 249 

and environments. They lived on Maple Swamp and its bord^ 
ers, and that region of the county was, up to 1!he war, the "dark 
corner" of the county — not scarcely civilized. Since the war 
a new order of things has obtained on Maple, and it is now 
one of the best sections of the county, a progressive and up-to- 
date population. The Hamilton family was true to the Con- 
federacy from beginning to the end. "Fire-coal Bill" Jack- 
son had six boys (half Hamilton) in the war, and no better 
soldiers followed the flag than they. Dr. W. W. Hamilton 
went into it as a Second Lieutenant and came out as a Captain 
of his company. Heard one of his comrade Captains say of 
him, that he (Captain Hamilton) was one of the coolest men 
he ever saw in battle; that he went on all occasions without 
hesitation and without trepidation wherever he was ordered, 
it mattered not how dangerous the position. He is a kind- 
hearted man and a real gentleman, and is an honor to his name 
and family ; and while saying this, the writer would not dispar- 
age others of his family. 

Braddy. — The Braddy family will now be noticed. John 
Braddy, the first known in the county, married Martha (Patty) 
Bethea, daughter of John Bethea, and sister to old Tristram 
and Cade Bethea ; he raised a considerable family of sons and 
daughters. The sons were John B., lyUton C, Tristram B., 
William W. and Robert B. Braddy, and of these, Robert 
B. alone survives ;* the daughters were Elizabeth, Harriet and 
Kittie. John B. Braddy married Miss Mary Crawford, a 
lovely girl, raised by Hug'h Godbold, a niece of his wife, 
Rhoda; they remained a few years in Marion and then went 
to Alabama; had two children when they left. Braddy and 
wife are both dead. Luton C. Braddy grew up and studied 
medicine and located near Holmesville, on the North Carolina 
line ; he was a young man of fine presence and promise, a pic- 
ture of health, robust and strong ; he took brain fever and died 
therefrom ins three or four days, unmarried. T. B. Braddy 
married, first, a Miss McKinnon, of Robeson County, N. C.,- 
and by her had three sons, Daniel McK. Braddy, Luton C. 
Braddy and Adolphus Braddy, and a daughter, Alice Braddy, 

*Now dead. 



250 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

when his wife died ; and he married, a second time, Miss Anne 
Nichols, a daughter of old Averitt Nichols, and by her he had 
one son, Oscar, who has already been mentioned among the 
Nichols family. T. B. Braddy was shot and killed by D. W. 
McLaurin, in November, 1881. McLaurin was tried for it on 
the charge of murder, and was acquitted. As the writer was 
employed by the sons of Braddy to assist the Solicitor (Dar- 
gan) in the prosecution of the case, he will forbear saying any- 
thing further of the homicide. Daniel McK. Braddy married, 
and tlhey have now only one child, a daughter. Luton C. 
Braddy married, and has several children, all girls but one, 
Adolphus Braddy, who died suddenly some few years ago, 
unmarried. The daughter of T. B. Braddy, Miss Alice, is still 
unmarried. Daniel McK. and Luton C. Braddy are excellent 
^ and good citizens, energetic and prosperous. William W. 
Braddy, a fine specimen of the physical man, married Miss 
Lizzie Evans, a daughter of the late Nathan Evans, by whom 
he h&d several children, sons and daughters. Walker Braddy, 
his oldest daughter, married J. W. Davis, of Marion ; they emi- 
grated to Alabama, where she died, leaving some children. 
William, his oldest son, died about the time of his majority, 
unmarried. Another son, Robert, died when a lad. His 
daughter, Susan, married J. T. Coleman, a professor in the 
Citadel Academy, in Charleston; they reside there, and have 
one son, named Walker. His youngest, a son, named Wigbt- 
man, two weeks old at his father's death, is a young single 
man in Charleston, and belongs to the "Grip-sack Brigade" of 
commercial travelers, and, I suppose, is doing fairly well; his 
mother still survives. W. W. Braddy was elected Clerk of 
the Court in 1868, and held that position at the time of his 
death, November 29th, 1872. S. G. Owens had been elected as 
his successor in office, but had not qualified and entered upon 
the duties of the office at the time of Braddy's death, but did 
so in a short time afterwards. Horace Greeley died the same 
day that Braddy did, 29th November, 1872. R. B. Braddy, 
the youngest child and son of old John Braddy, still lives ; he 
married, first, a Miss McKay ; she had one child for him, a 
daughter, and then died. After some years he married again, 
a Miss Wishart, of North Carolina ; they had five or six child- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 251 

ren, sons and daughters. The oldest daughter married a Mr. 
McQueen, of Horry, where they now reside. Another daugh- 
ter, named Hattie, married to some one not now known. His 
youngest daughter was an infant when her mother died; she 
was taken by Mrs. J. R. N. Tenhet, of Marion, and raised ; is 
now a young lady, and instead of taking her true name, 
Braddy, she takes the name of Tenhet — Miss Ethel Tenhet, so 
her name appears in the Columbia College catalogue, where 
she graduated. His sons, Edgar and Otho, and another, have 
left the county and perhaps the State, all unmarried. The old 
gentleman moves about among his (Children. His daughter by 
his first wife married some gentleman in North Carolina ; saw 
her father a few weeks ago coming up from Marion on the 
train, he and his son, Edgar, were on their way to see her in 
North Carolina. The eldest daughter of old John Braddy, 
Elizabeth, married Mr. Jefferson Williams, of Marlborough, 
in February, 1830; by this marriage several children were 
born ; only one, Benjamin, now survives ; he formerly lived in 
Marion, a merchant, failed; he went to Sumter County, and 
there married a Miss McFadden, an only child of her parents ; 
he resides in Sumter, on the patrimony of his wife, and is said 
to be succeeding well. "Ben," as he was called, liad a good 
•deal of the "get-up'' in him, and was an honorable boy. The 
second daughter of old John Braddy, Harriet, was a very 
pretty girl, very popular, but did not marry young ; she finally 
married Nathan Evans, a widower, below Marion, and lived 
and died there, where B. F. Davis now resides ; by her marriage 
she had four children, two sons, Julius and Lawrence, and 
two daughters, Martha (Patty) and Fannie; she died about 
1879, wi'th cancer. Her oldest daughter married Richard 
Jordan, of Horry, a first-rate business man; he merchan- 
dised several years with his brother-in-law, Julius Evans, as a 
partner ; they finally failed, and each at different times went to 
Georgia or Florida. It is said that Jordan has succeeded well 
in his new home, and has raised a nice family, mostly girls ; two 
of them were here on a visit to their uncle. Captain W. B. 
Evans, in 1899 ; they were fine looking. Julius Evans married 
and went to Florida, and is said to be doing well ; one of his 
daughters. Miss Edna, was also on a visit to her undle. Captain 



252 ■ A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Evans, in the summer of 1900, on her way home from Win- 
throp College. Lawrence Evans, the second son of Harriet 
Evans, nee Braddy, married in Horry, don't know what has 
become of him. The younger daughter, Fannie, went out to 
Georgia with her sister, Mrs. Jordan, and married some one 
out there; have lost sight of her. The Braddys, as a family, 
were very ardent in their disposition and attachments, and 
were very good citizens, and self-asserting. 

Clark. — Another family to be noticed is the Clark family, 
Malcolm and Kenneth, two brothers, citizens on Little Pee 
Dee, near where the town of Dillon now is. The writer can 
trace them no further back than themselves; but is satisfied 
they were of Scotch origin ; they both had and raised families. 
Malcolm married a Miss McCollum, of Robeson County, N. 
C, aibout 1839 or 1840, a very excellent lady, a sister of the late 
Brown McCoUum's father; don't know how many children 
they had — think there were three sons and two daughters — 
Martin Luther, John Calvin and Robert Knox Clark. The 
two daughters (names not known), one married the Rev. Dun- 
can McDuffie ; she died, leaving some children ; one son, named 
Archie. Duncan McDuffie married again, and now lives in 
Florence County; has been School Commissioner of that 
county; a worthy, good man. The other daughter of old 
Malcolm married a Mr. Gasque, from about Marion, who died 
in a few weeks after his marriage; his widow had a posthu- 
mous son, named Robert K. Gasque; don't know what has 
become of either him or his mother. Of the sons of old Mal- 
colm, Martin Luther died when about grown, unmarried. 
John Calvin was a Lieutenant in the Confederate War, and 
was in command of his company in some battles in Virginia, 
and was killed in front of his command, calling out to his men, 
"Come on, come on," not go on ; he was one of the many brave 
men from Marion in that eventful struggle, made by the South 
for Southern independence. John Calvin Clark, when a boy 
at school at Hofwyl Academy, was considered by his school 
comrades, or some of them, at least, as a coward, and was so 
branded; yet he was anything else but cowardly when duty 
required the exercise of true courage; his courage was not of 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 263 

the school-boy 'sort or the muster field kind ; but was true cour- 
age — the courage to do right, the courage to do his duty, how- 
ever dangerous the position might be. Rc>bert Knox Clark, 
late Clerk of the Court, was the second son of old man Mal- 
colm, well known to many now living; he, too, was not a 
coward, either in war or in peace; he married Miss Nannie 
Stackhouse, daughter of the late Wesley Stackhouse; by the 
marriage they had three sons and four daughters. The sons 
were Martin Luther, Robert Knox and John Calvin' — ^the same 
names that his father, old Malcolm, gave to his sons. The 
four daughters were Dora, Eliza, Lilly and Nannie, the latter 
about two years old when her father died, in 1888. Martin 
Luther Clark, the oldest son, is now at Marion, editor of the 
"Marion Star" newspaper. The next two sons, Robert K. 
and John Calvin, the writer has lost sight of ; don't know what 
has become of them. Of the oldest, Dora, has never married. 
Eliza, the second daughter, married the Hon. William A. 
Brown, below Marion, and has several Children. Lilly, the 
third daughter, married a Dr. Smith, son of Dr. E. B. . Smith, 
below Marion' ; don't know the results of the marriage. John 
Calvin, the youngest son, and Nannie, the youngest daughter, 
are harely grown. It is due to the memory of the late R. K. 
Clark to say that at the age of seventeen, he volunteered and 
went into the army in Captain C. J. Fladger's company, and in 
January, 1863, was transferred to the Arsenal Academy, in 
Columbia ; remained there that year and in January, 1864, was 
transferred to the Citadel, in Charleston, and remained there 
during the year 1864, and was then transferred back to the 
army, where he remained till about the end of the war, when 
he came home and undertook to avenge his father's death — 
who was killed by deserters on 12th March, 1865 — ^which he in 
great part succeeded in doing. It was after this he was mar- 
ried. In 1876, he was elected Clerk of the Court, which posi- 
tion he filled with credit to himself, for four years ; he was then 
appointed County Treasurer, which position he held for one 
or two years, and resigned, and retired upon his farm, where 
he lived till 1888, and died thereon ; he was likewise a man of 
true courage ; he had the courage to say no, which every man 
does not possess. The old man, Malcolm, died game. He 



254 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

was passing up the road from Marion, on Sunday after Sher- 
man's "bummers" had passed through the upper end of the 
county, I2th March, 1865, and came upon a crowd of deserters, 
who were cooking in Samuel Page's lane, near where J. R. 
Reaves now lives. The old man had his gun, and on approach- 
ing the crowd cooking, and recognizing who they were, one of 
them, the leader, said to him, "Old man, put down your gun 
and surrender." He did neither, but fired in among them ; the 
one he aimed at jumped behind his horse, and Clark's load 
entered the horse, and killed him; whereupon others of the 
crowd seized their guns and fired upon the old man and killed 
him. The deserters left him and the dead horse there in the 
road, and they lay there two days before they were removed. 
The few old men then in the community were terrorized by 
■ Sherman's bummers and the emboldened deserters to such an 
extent that they were afraid to remove old man Clark and the 
dead horse out of the road, and give the old man a burial. The 
circumstances of the killing were told, afterwards, by one of 
the deserters to a friend, and that friend informed the writer. 
Kenneth Clark, a brother of old Malcolm, was a first-rate man 
and good citizen ; don't know whom he married ; he had a son, 
John Clark, and one or more daughters ; the old gentleman is 
dead. His son, John, is on the old homestead, a first-class citi- 
zen, a good soldier in the war, has never married ; is prosperous 
and quite respectable, drives a fine horse and a fine buggy, is 
fully able to take care of some man's daughter as a wife, but 
does not seem to have much fancy for such a life. Old man 
Kenneth Clark was also a brave man- — could here relate an 
incident in his life in proof of his courage, but space will not 
permit. Those who knew him will indorse him, not as a cow- 
ard, but as a brave man. 

There is another Clark, Pinckney Clark, two or three miles 
east of Marion; don't know anything of his parentage, or 
where he came from ; he has a family, think grown and mar- 
ried, sons and perhaps daughters ; he is obscure, makes no 
noise in the world, inoffensive and works for his living. His 
family, now poor and obscure, may in the future develop into 
prominence — who can tell! The writer could name parents 
within his day, who were as obscure as Pink Clark's family, 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. ZOO 

vs/hose children are now prominent citizens among us. Such 
developments often occur. It also happens that those promi- 
nent in the present, go down into obscurity and dwindle away 
in the second and third generation — "There is a providence 
that shapes our ends, rough-hew them as we may." 

HarrElson. — Another family now to be noticed is the Har- 
relson family. Of this family, on Buck Swamp and Maiden 
Down, the writer cannot say much, for the want of informa- 
tion; he cannot trace them gen«alogically. They are some- 
what numerous in name and in their connections, and in former 
times more prominent than they now seem to be. In 1798, 
Lewis Harrelson and John Ford were elected as Representa- 
tives of Liberty County (now Marion) in the State Legislature. 
(Gregg's History, page 459.) Also, in the Acts of the Legis- 
lature of 1798 (section 7, p. 289,) we find Commissioners ap- 
pointed "for the purpose of fixing on a convenient and central 
situation, whereon to establish and build a court house and 
gaol for the District of Marion and to superintend the building 
of the same;" and among them we find the name of Benjamin 
Harrelson ; and it may be supposed that he and. Lewis Harrel- 
son, the member of the Legislature that year from Liberty or 
Marion, were brothers, and it is to be presumed that the best 
men were selected for the Legislature and for locating and 
building the court house and gaol for the county. Hence the 
Harrelson family of that day was prominent and among the 
first people of the county. From these two Harrelsons, and, 
perhaps, others of the family whose names have not been pre- 
served in the records of the times, have descended all the Har- 
relsons of the county from that time to the peesent. The 
writer only wishes that he could trace them down to the pres- 
ent generation. The writer remembers that in July, 1835, he 
ate supper one night at the house of an old man, Hugh Harrel- 
son (I believe, was his name), where the Widow Lewis 
Harrelson now resides, near the lowest bridge on Buck Swamp ; 
he had daughters grown. The writer could tell why he was 
there and who went there with him, and the circumstances of 
the occasion, and what happened in that family two or three 
years afterwards, in connection with one who went there with 



256 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

him, but all that is not necessary in a book of this kind. The 
writer was then only seventeen years of age. These old Har- 
relsons were men of high character and stood well among their 
iJeople, and from them descended the large family with their 
connections, which now inhabit the county. Although those 
of the present day may not be as prominent as their ancestors, 
yet all the way through, they have been law-abiding, indus- 
trious and honest people, part of the bone and sinew of the 
county. The late Lewis Harrelson, near Miller's Church, 
married Miss Mahala Rogers, and by her had six or seven 
children, sons and daughters, all minors at his death. The 
oldest son, Charles, is quite a promising young man ; the names 
of the others not remembered; they are soon to take their 
places in society. The late Lewis Harrelson had a brother, 
J<jhn Harrelson, who died or was killed in the war ; he left two 
daughters, both married and have families; their names not 
remembered. Lewis and John Harrelson had a sister, Mary 
Jane, who married our capital citizen, W. T. Cribb ; she died a 
few years ago, childless. There are other Harrelsons in the 
county, collaterally related. George Harrelson, near MuUins, 
is an exceptionally good man, and is doing well. Another 
branch of the family is on the Back Swamp, above Ariel. Old 
man Hugh Harrelson, down there, was a well^o-do man; 
married a Miss Smith, of Horry, and raised a family of five 
sons and five daug'hters. John E., Hugh G., David J., Samuel 
and another not now remembered; the daughters were Mrs. 
William J. Atkinson, Mrs. James Atkinson, Mrs. Prudence 
Johnson, Mrs. John D. Sessions, and Miss Theresa, Who died 
unmarried before her father. The old gentleman left a last 
will and testament and, by means which it is not necessary to 
state, it got into the Courts, and it wag in some form or another 
in the Circuit and Supreme Courts of the State for twelve or 
fourteen years. This is stated from the personal knowledge 
of the writer, as he had to do with the litigation from start to 
finish. Of the old man Hugh Harrelson's sons, Hugh G. mar- 
ried, I think, a Miss Williamson, and died young, leaving his 
widow and some children; don't know what has become of 
them. John Ellis Harrelson married, and raised a large family 
of children, sons and daughters, who are aniong our citizens 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. '^01 

now ; some unknown, but those that are known are good men 
and prospering. Ham Harrelson, a son, is one of the leading 
citizens of his community. John E. Harrelson died about two 
years ago ; he was an energetic and persevering man, and sub- 
stantially a good citizen. The other sons of old Hugh Harrel- 
son all died unmarried and childless. It is assumed that these 
Back Swamp Harrelsons are of the same family as the Buck 
Swamp Harrelsons ; that they are all collaterally related ; that 
they all had the same common ancestor. L,ewis, Hugh and 
Benjamin seem to be family names from the early times down 
to the present ; that events and circumstances separated them, 
though not far apart, in the same county. In the absence of 
other and better information, the writer is bound to assume 
that they are all of the same family originally, and sprang from 
a common ancestor in the first settlement of this part of the 
State, Marion County. At all events, they are here and have 
been from time immemorial, and have been and are quite 
respectable. Another branch of the same family are those on 
the north side of Little Pee Dee River. They are certainly 
of the same family as those on Buck Swamp and Maiden 
Down. Zephaniah and Stephen Harrelson, two old men, 
resided on Bear Swamp and Cainey Branch, near the Gaddy 
Mills, sixty-five or seventy years ago. Stephen Harrelson 
raised a large family of sons, nine or ten, who are among us 
now, and are respectable, good citizens ; don't know the names 
of all of them, but name such as are remembered — ^John R., 
Alfred H., James W., Joel and Hugh only are remembered; 
another one is a Baptist preacher. Of these, Alfred H. Har- 
relson married a daughter of William Roberts, and has a fam- 
ily of sons and daughters ; he is an industrious and prosperous 
man and a law-abiding citizen. James W. lives near MuUins, 
is also a quiet and worthy citizen. John R. (called Jack) 
raised a considerable family, died years ago. One of his 
daughters was the second wife of Dr. George E. Shooter; 
another is the wife of John Altman. Joel Harrelson has raised 
a family, is a progressive, good citizen, and is well to do ; don't 
know to whom he married. They were all good soldiers in the 
war, did their duty there and are doing the same now, in time 
of peace. Don't know anything of old man Zephaniah Harrel- 



258 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

son's progeny ; he died many .years ago, a respectable, good 
man in his day ; don't think he had many children. A daughter 
of Stephen H. married Neill B. McQueen; is now a widow; 
she is an extra smart woman, if alive yet. 

Martin. — Another family will here be noticed, to wit : the 
Martin family. This family is somewhat extensive, both in 
name and its connections. The first Martin in the county, of 
which the writer has any knowledge or information was 
Matthew Martin ; have not been able to learn who his wife was. 
He lived in the Maiden Down section, and raised a family of 
four sons and two daughters, and, perhaps, other daughters, 
to the writer unknown ; he was a thrifty man, and accumulated 
a good property as a farmer for his day and time. His sons 
were John, Matthew, Stephen H. and Aaron; daughters' 
names unknown. John Martin married a Miss Hays, daughter 
of old man Benjamin Hays, on north side of Little Pee Dee; 
by her he had and raised a family, how many is unknown. 
He had a son, Alexander Martin, now in Horry County; he 
married a Miss Cribb, daughter of Anthony Cribb; he went 
years ago to Horry County, raised a family and they are in that 
counity. John M'artfin "had some daughtters. One married 
Dempsey Cribb, Jr. ; another married a Mr. Baker, and another 
married a Mr. Lovet; know nothing further of them. John 
Martin died before the war, freezed to death. Matthew Mar- 
tin, Jr., married a daughter of Captain John Rogers, in the 
Fork; by this marriage he had and raised four daughters, 
names not known. One married Jesse Butler, who moved to 
Darlington, and is dead ; he had a family of several children — 
one son, named Charles ; suppose they are all in Darlington now. 
Another daughter married E. W. Hays, of Hillsboro, and is 
now a widow ; $he has some children. Another daughter mar- 
ried R. B. Piatt; she is dead; think she left some three or 
four children. Another daughter married a Mr. Nicholson 
(Archie) ; they are raising a family, prospering and doing well. 
Aaron Martin, the youngest son of old Matthew, Sr., married 
a daughter of Captain John Rogers, in the Fork ; they are now 
both dead, but left a family of two sons and seven daughters ; 
the sons were Mitchel M. Martin and Valentine Martin. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 259 

Mitchell married Miss Lizzie Smith, daughter of the late 
Stephen Smith; the fruits of the marriage are four sons — 
Vance, Victor, Clyde and Mitchell. Of these, Vance married 
Miss Florence Owen, daughter of the late Rev. John Owen, 
who was accidentally shot and killed a few weeks ago; they 
have two- children, a son and a daughter. Victor Martin lately 
married a Miss Pepper, of Southport, N. C. The two younger 
boys, Clyde and Mitchell, are with their mother. Mitchell 
Martin died some years ago, at Mullins, S. C, where his widow 
now resides. Valentine Martin, the youngest son of Mr. 
Aaron Martin, married Miss Margaret Norton, daughter of 
the late John Norton; to this marriage twelve children have" 
been born, ten of whom are living — seven daughters and three 
sons. One son, Donald, is grown; and five daughters, Lilly, 
Pensy, Maggie, Kate and May ; the other names not known. 
Of the daughters of Aaron Martin, the eldest, Anne, married 
her first cousin, Richard Edwards, a notice of whom has 
already been taken in or among the Ed'wards family. The 
second daughter, Louisa, married W. H. Daniel, of Mullins; 
for him she had three children — one son, Robert, and two 
daughters, Katie and Mary. Katie married George Reaves, 
and has two or three children. Robert Daniel married Minnie 
Be^hea, a daughter of Dr. John J. Bethea, who died childless, 
and Robert is now a widower. Mary Daniel, the youngest, 
died in early womanhood, unmarried — quite a charming young 
lady. Katie Mantin married Perry J. Williams, of Nichols, S. 
C. -; by him she had two or three children, when the father died 
and left her a widow ; she afterwards married and went off to 
Georgia. Emma Martin, another daughter of Aaron Martin, 
married J. Oscar Daniel, of Mullins, by whom she had several 
children, when he died ; she afterwards married William Leith ; 
whether there was any offspring by the Leith marriage, the 
writer does not know ; she died, and Leith, after a time went 
off West; don't know what became of her children by Oscar 
Daniel. Ida Martin married B. F. Elliott, of Marion, and by 
this marriage a daughter and a son were born. The daughter 
is very promising, and is now in the Salem, JST. C, Female 
School. The son is a mere boy; name not known. Victoria 
Martin married Dr. Edward Brown, now of Latta, S. C. ; by 



260 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

this marriage three sons and one daughter are born, all yet 
children. Mary Martin married a Mr. Oole, from North Caro- 
lina; they left immediately for Georgia; don't know anything 
further of them. Stephen H. Martin, a brother of John, 
Matthew and Aaroji Martin, not mentioned in the order of 
their ages, married a daugihter of the late David S. Edwards, 
and by her 'had several children, and then died. Two of his 
sons, "Mack" Martin and David Martin, grew up, and "Mack" 
married Miss Josephine Moody, a daughter of the late Salathiel 
Moody; they had some family, how many is not known — a 
son, named Robert, who was rather an extra keen and sensible 
young man. The family went West some years ago, and it is 
said are doing well in that region. David Martin went West 
also; have heard nothing of him since. Stephen H. Martin 
had a daughter, named Sue, who married Perry J. Williams, 
of Nichols (first wife) ; she had some three, or four children, 
and died very suddenly, without any apparent cause. "Mack" 
Martin, her brother, became the guardian of her children, and 
took them and raised them; the oldest, a daughter, Maggie, 
became the wife of Benjamin M. Carmichael; they are raising 
a family. "Mack" Martin, their guardian and uncle, managed 
in some way to turn the boys, three (I think), and their means 
over to Carmichael and wife, and went West ; after this Car- 
michael and wife have had charge of them. The writer has 
understood that two of the boys are graduates of Wofford Col- 
lege, or if they did not graduate they matriculated in that col- 
lege, and went for a while, perhaps, two years or more. Hope 
they will do well, as they were orphans, indeed. Two daugh- 
ters of Matthew Martin, Sr., are only known of ; don't know 
their names. One married the late Samuel Edwards, and the 
other married his nephew. Captain L. M. Edwards; both of 
whom have herein already been noticed in or among the 
Edwards family. The Martin family thus far noticed are an 
unpretending people, hard-working, honest, good citizens, sat- 
isfied with themselves, regardless of what others might think 
or say. Matthew, Jr., and Aaron married sisters, good 
^omen, and by industry and frugality accumulated a good 
property, and left it unencumbered for their children. 

There are other Martins in the same section of the county. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 261 

and the writer's information is (whether true or not) that they 
are no relation to those above mentioned; some of them I 
know nothing -about, and, therefore, can say nothing concern- 
ing them. The late William Martin married, first, a daughter 
of the late Rev. Moses Coleman — a mighty good woman, as it 
is said ; she had for him several children ; don't know how 
many. The sons, Daniel, William P. and Charles Betts Mar- 
tin, now among our good citizens, and doing well. Daniel 
Martin married a Widow Chreitzberg, whose maiden name 
was Game, a daughter of our excellent man and fellow-citizen, 
Robert B. Game; they have no children. Daniel is a hard 
worker, a goodfman, and is doing well. William P. Martin, 
another brother, is and has been for several years in the rail- 
road service as section master at and near MuUins ; has made 
some money and saves it; he married a Miss Rushing, the 
daughter of Henry Rushing, also a railroad man ; they have, as 
I am informed, several children, whether sons or daughters 
the writer does not know. Charles Betts Martin, another 
brother, is one of our citizens, but whether married or not is 
not known. Their father, William Martin, married a second 
time, but to whom is not known ; he died a year or so ago, and 
left a widow with children, about whom the writer knows 
nothing. William Martin had by his first wife a daughter 
(may have had more), named Julia; she married Joseph M. 
Price, a nephew of the writer ; think they have five or six child- 
ren, sons and daughters. Price is now above Columbia in the 
railroad service as section master. There are other Martins 
in the community that the writer would like to notice, but for 
the want of knowledge or information he cannot do so. The 
Martins and their connections are very numerous, and many 
of them quite respectable. 

Henry. — ^Another now to be noticed is that of our respected 
fellow-citizen, John E. Henry. This family is not very exten- 
sive in name or connections. The grand-father of John E. 
Henry was named John; I suppose he lived at Marion; he 
married some lady, I think, a Miss Dudley, sister of the late 
Colonel Dudley, a prominent member of the bar for years at 
Bennettsville, S. C. ; by the marriage two children were born — 



262 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

a son, the late David S. Henry, and a daughter, whose name I 
have forgotten. The father died, and the late Addison L. 
Scarborough married the Widow Henry, and for him she had 
two children — a son and a daughter — Richard and Mary F. 
Richard Scarborough became a doctor, married a Miss Craw- 
ford or Cherry ; died a young man, childless, and his widow 
afterwards married the late Major O. P. Wheeler; both are 
dead and left no child. Mary Scarborough married the late 
James J. Harllee, a member of the Marion bar, but did not 
practice much after his marriage — devoted himself mainly to 
his large farm near Marion, which his wife inherited from her 
father, A. L. Scarborough. In 1861, J. J. Harllee and wife 
•sold their plantation, near Marion, now owned by the daughters 
of the late Fred. D. Jones, and took their negroes and money, 
&c., and emigrated to Arkadelphia, Ark., where they remained, 
I suppose, during the war. J. J. Harllee was killed about that 
time, as it was said, by a horse running away with him; his 
widow, Mary F., was left poor by the war and by other 
causes — extravagance mainly, as it is said. A girl that had 
never known what it was to need or want anything, both before 
and after her marriage, was reduced to penury and want. This 
the writer knows from correspondence with her after the war 
and information obtained from others. Our correspondence 
was in reference to her claim for dower in certain lots in the 
town of Marion, which he brought action for and recovered, 
and sent the money to her. She had no child ; she afterwards 
married a "Yankee" officer from Wisconsin, a widower, with 
four children, whose name was F. M. Chrisman. This mar- 
riage, I suppose, took place during the Reconstruction period 
in Arkansas. David. S. Henry, the son of John Henry, grew 
up and married a Miss Telatha Flowers, and by her had only 
one child, a son, our energetic and enterprising fellow-citizen, 
John E. Henry, who married Miss Charlotte Bethea, a daugh- 
ter of the late Levi and Mary Ann Bethea; they have several 
children, sons and daughters — ^one son named Sheppard, one 
named John (called Jack), and Patrick, and a daughter named 
Mary, who married Mr. Augustus Aiford ; they moved to Geor- 
gia, have several children, and are said to be doing well. The 
sons, Sheppard and Jack, emigrated West somewhere, and, I 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 263 

siippose, looking out for themselves. John E. Henry and wife 
have another daughter grown, whose name, I believe, is Ella; 
besides these there are other children, younger. John E. 
Henry is an enterprising man, and is apparently doing well; 
they own and occupy the old homestead of Mrs. Henry's pater- 
nal grand-father, old William Bethea. The sister of David S. 
Henry married the Rev. Tracy R. Walsh, a strong preacher in 
thfe Methodist Conference, who is dead; his family are scat- 
tered through Marlborough and Chesterfield Counties. 

HuGGiNS. — ^Another family may here be noticed — the 
Huggins family. The first known of this family were John 
Huggins and Willis Huggins, not brothers, but first cousins.* 
Old John Huggins lived at Huggins' Bridge, on Little Pee 
Dee ; he married a Miss Campbell, sister of Gadi and Theophi- 
lus ; he raised a considerable family of sons and one daughter — 
if there were other daughters, the writer never heard of them ; 
the sons were Solomon, Henry, John, Theophilus, George, 
Enos and Ebben. Solomon Huggins married some one to the 
writer unknown, and raised a family, of whom I know nothing. 
Henry Huggins married a Miss Elvington, daughter of old 
man John Elvington, of whom mention has already been made 
herein. Henry Huggins had a son, Theophilus, now one of 
our good citizens, on Little Pee Dee; he married some one to 
the writer unknown, and has raised a considerable family. 
Henry Huggins raised one daughter, Martha, and, perhaps, 
others. Martha married James A. Jones, an older brother of 
our excellent fellow-citizen, J. T. Jones, and her family has 
already been mentioned herein, in or among the Jones family. 
There may have been other sons and daughters of Henry Hug- 
gins ; if so, the writer knows nothing of them. Henry Huggins 
and wife died many years ago. Another son of Henry Hug- 
gins is now remembered, Thomas A. Huggins, who married 
and raised a family, not known to the writer; Thomas A. 
Huggins died a few years ago, quite an old man. John Hug- 
gins, Jr. (Jack, as he was called), has already been mentioned 

*John Huggins and Willis were first cousins. Their fathers were 
brothers; their grand-father was the common ancestor, and, I suppose, 
was the first Huggins in the county, about 1740 or 1750. 
l8 



264 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

in and among the Jones family; his wife was Mary Jones, a 
sister of our J. T. Jones. Theophilus Huggins and George W. 
Huggins became Methodist traveling preachers in the South 
Carolina Conference, and both died therein.; George W. 
Huggins never married, and died young — in Conway or 
Horry — to which circuit he was then assigned, in 1835. In 
the minutes of the Conference of 1899, in the chapter entitled 
"The dead of the South Carolina Conference, 1788 to 1900," 
George W. Huggins is put down as joining the Conference in 
1833 ; that he died October, 1835, at the age of twenty-seven, 
and was buried in Horry County. As to the place of his 
burial, it is a mistake; he was buried at Huggins Bridge, on 
Little Pee Dee — not more than a hundred yards from the place 
of his birth. The writer attended his funeral and knows 
whereof he speaks. Theophilus Huggins continued in the 
itineracy until his death ; he married some one unknown to the 
writer ; think he died in the North Carolina Conference. Enos 
Huggins, a very vigorous and athletic young man, sickened and 
died when young, unmarried. Dr. Ebben Huggins, a dental 
surgeon, married and settled in Horry County, just below Gal- 
ivant's Ferry; he raised a large family— or, rather, had one — 
he dying before the younger ones were raised. Old John 
Huggins' daughter, Mary (Polly as she was called), married 
the late Stephen Smith; by the marriage several sons and 
daughters were born; the sons were, and are, Ebenezer, 
George W., S. Elmore, Benjamin Cause, S. W'hiteford and J. 
Emory Smith, and another, named Augustus, who was killed 
during the war on a train near Florence ; and daughters, Mrs. 
Mitchell Martin, Mrs. George W. Rogers, Mrs. J. C. Harrelson 
and Mrs. Celia Atkinson. Ebb Smith was killed or died of 
disease in the war. George W. Smith, one of our steady and 
progressive citizens, married a Miss Nance; the fruits of the 
marriage are several sons and daughters ; some of them mar- 
ried and have families coming on, the names of all of whom are 
not known. One daughter of George W. Smith married Allen 
Lewis. A son,' Augustus, at Mullins, married a Miss Dill. 
Bonham Smith married a Miss Lewis. Another daughter 
married Hampton McMillan ; another daughter married a Mr. 
Nye. Benjamin Gause Smith, another progressive and pros- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 265 

parous citizen, married a Miss Piatt, daughter of the late Rev. 
John B. Piatt ; they have, I think, ten children, seven sons and 
three daughters; the older sons are L,. Boyd Smith, Rembert 
Smith and others, names not remembered. The two oldest' 
daughters, Florence and Leila, are married. Florence to W. 
F. Norton ; they have no children. Leila married P. S. Cooper, 
a first-rate business man at Mullins ; they have had two child- 
ren, both dead. The third daughter, Polly, liamed for her 
grand-mother, now a little girl. L. Boyd Smith married a 
Widow Gibbes, in Macon, Ga. ; they are living at Mullins ; he 
is in the saw mill business ,' is a graduate of Woflord College. 
S. Elmore Smith, a first-class business man and an excellent 
citizen, married a Miss Montgomery, of Williamsburg County ; 
has a large family, sons and daughters, mostly daughters. Has 
one daughter married ; she married a Mr. Love, of Wilming- 
ton ; think they are now residing in Mullins ; has a son grown, 
named Eugene; has other daughters grown. S. Whiteford 
Smith married a Miss Boatwright, daughter of the late 
Thomas W. Boatwright; by this marriage are two children — 
a son, Fleming, who, I think, is married, and a daughter, whose 
name is Bessie ; think she has arrived at womanhood. White- 
ford Smith is a business man and good farmer; was County 
Superintendent of Education for four or six years; retired 
from that position and was immediately elected as a Repre- 
sentative of his county in the State Legislature. In whatever 
position he has been placed, he has met public expectation — a 
man of strict integrity every way, and perfectly reliable. J. 
Emory Smith, the youngest son of old Stephen and Polly 
Smith, married a Miss Williamson, a daughter of Joseph Wil- 
Uamson, and has a family coming on. It seems that J. Emory 
has not succeeded so well as his older brothers ; he is- young 
and may yet win, outstrip them in the race of life. Mrs. 
Lizzie Martin and her family of four sons have already been 
noticed herein or among the Martin family. Mrs. George W. 
Rogers, another daughter of Polly Smith, nee Huggins, has 
raised a nice family of sons and one daughter; the writer is 
not posted as to the particulars of this family. I know three of 
the sons, Leroy, Lucean and Chalmers; they are promising 
young men, and in the race of life will be very apt to be among 



266 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

the winners in the race. Leroy married a Miss Gore, in Wil- 
mington; she died a few days ago, leaving an infant. Chal- 
mers Rogers married Miss Laura Smith ; they have two child- 
'ren. Willis Huggins, the cousin of old John Huggins, whose 
progeny we have been tracing, was a very respectable and good 
citizen; married some one and raised a family — one son and 
three daughters. The son, Jesse Huggins, was a promising 
young man ; was Captain of the Maiden Down militia company, 
a position then much sought by our best men; he was killed 
by John Martin, hereinbefore mentioned; he never married. 
Willis' daughters were Nancy, Elizabeth and Polly. Nancy 
Huggins married the late John Norton, father of the Hon. 
James Norton ; she had three children, one son and two daugh- 
ters. The son is John W. Norton, now of Mullins; he 
married, first, a Miss Carmichael; by her he had one child, a 
daughter, named Ira, who was killed by the band-wheel of a 
^in, vvhen a girl; he afterwards married the Widow Car- 
michael ; by her he had one daughter, named Minnie, who died 
-when about grown. The second wife died, and he married, a 
third time, a Miss Ivey; by whom he now has four children, 
Ttwo sons and two daughters, all small. John W. Norton went 
through the 'Confederate War. Some years before the war he 
^enlisted in the regular army of the United States and served 
in the frontiers for five years: Lizzie Norton married Aaron 
Oliver, of Robeson County, N. C, by whom she had three 
sons and four daughters. One of the latter died unmarried; 
another daughter is now the second wife of John C. Sellers. 
Mrs. Lizzie Oliver is dead. The second daughter of old John 
^Norton and his wife, Nancy, married Lewis Huggins; her 
name was Caroline; they had several children, sons and 
•daughters. Lewis Huggins and family emigrated to Georgia 
■some years ago ; have lost sight of them. Elizabeth, the second 
daughter of old Willis Huggins, married, first, a Mr. Lupo; 
Xupo died childless, and his widow married John Hill, for 
whom she had two children — a son, Charles, and a daughter, . 
Adaline, when the mother died. Charles Hill is on Bear 
Swamp. Adaline married a Mr. McCormic, of Cotton Valley ; 
know nothing further of them. Polly, the youngest daug'hter 
of old Willis Huggins, never married, and is dead. There are 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 267 

Other Huggins in the county, of whom the writer knows but 
little. The Huggins family and their connections are exten- 
sive, and especially the descendants of old John. The old 
house he lived in and raised his family stands yet, near Hug- 
gins' Bridge ; it is a unique old building, weather-boarded with 
shingles — ^was very old and dilapidated. The other Huggins 
alluded to above are sons, and, perhaps, daughters, of the late 
Neill C. Huggins (I think that was his name) ; he married a 
daughter of old Squire Neill Carmichael, near Carmichael's 
Bridge, on Little Pee Dee ; he has long since died, either in the 
war or soon after, from wouyds received in the war or from 
exposure; he left a good large family; was a coming man, 
doing well ; his sons, as known to the writer, are t). A. Hug- 
gins, Neill Huggins and Judson Huggins, who are among our 
citizens ; whether the mother is dead or alive, is unknown to 
the writer. 

Hayes. — The next family to be here noticed is the Hayes 
family, of Kirby Township. The first of this family in this 
county were James Hayes, John Hayes, William Hayes and 
Ebben. Of these, Ebben did not remain here, but emigrated 
West; nothing further is known of him. They all came from 
Virginia, and were of English descent. The other three mar- 
ried and settled in this county. This family came here during 
or before the Revolutionary War. Don't know who any of 
these old Hayes married. James Hayes had four sons, whose 
names were Levi H. Hayes, William Hayes, John G. Hayes 
and Mills Hayes. The first, William Hayes, had three sons, 
Ebben, Dwight and Henry Hayes. Ebben Hayes, known to 
many living, was a local Methodist preacher, and represented 
his county in the State Legislature after the war and during 
the Reconstruction period; he was twice elected, served two 
terms or four sessions of the Legislature, and died at an ad- 
vanced age a few years ago. Dwight Hayes, a brother of 
Ebben, became a Baptist preacher of some note ; he died many 
years ago. Henry Hayes grew up and married Miss Marina 
Dew, a daughter of old Christopher Dew ; his wife was a sister 
of his brother Ebben's wife; he died comparatively young, 
leaving a widow and several children, who with their children 



268 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

and grand-children are now among us. We have thus traced 
the sons of the three brothers (leaving ^bben out, who went 
West), James Hayes, William Hayes and John Hayes. Of old 
James Hayes' children, Levi H. Hayes married a Miss Whit- 
tington, and by her had seven sons, James N., Levi G., Benja- 
min P., Erastus W., Hamilton R., A. G. and Robert H. Hayes. 
Levi H. Hayes had two daughters, if no more. One became 
the wife of Joel Meggs, who, perhaps, raised a considerable 
family; only two sons, William H. and John L. Meggs, are 
known to the writer ; and a daughter, who married Dr. N. C. 
McLeod. Another daughter of I^evi H. Hayes, named Ann 
Elizabeth, married John A. Dew, who died and kft his widow 
childless; she still lives. Of the sons of Levi H. Hayes, 
James N. and Erastus W., are dead, but left families. Levi 
G. Hayes married a Miss Jackson, and went West many years 
ago. A. G. Hayes married, also, a Miss Jackson, sister to his 
brother L. G. Hayes' wife. A. G. Hayes, called G. Hayes, 
died or was killed in the war. Erastus W. Hayes married a 
Miss George; think he died in the war. James N. died some 
time before the war. B. F. Hayes married a Miss Dew, 
daughter of Wilson Dew ; has only one child, a son, .our good 
fellow-citizen. Rich Hayes. Hamilton R. Hayes married a 
Miss Harper ; has four sons, Charles W., James Adger, Hum- 
bert and Hamilton R. Hayes, Jr; and six daug'hters, names not 
known. One married W. H. Meggs ; one married Rich Hayes ; 
one married Tracy Fore ; one married Andrew Tart ; one mar- 
ried a Napier ; one married Wilson Berry ; and one is unmar- 
ried. Of his sons, Chatles W. married a Miss Hill; James 
Adger married a Miss Napier ; Hamilton R., Jr., and Humbert 
are unmarried. William Hayes, a son of old James, married 
some one, but do not know to whom ; he has been dead many 
years; and of John G. Hayas and Mills Hayes the writer 
knows nothing. The late Ebben Hayes married a daughter of 
old Ohristopher Dew, as before related ; he had seven sons and 
several daughters; the sons were Jessee H., Ebben, Wilson, 
Joseph D., Nicholas W. and John David ; these, with their sis- 
ters, are all married, have children and grand-children, and 
are among our many good citizens. Old John Hayes, one of 
the first comers, married a Miss Berry, an aunt of Cross Roads 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 269 

Henry, and raised a family; his sons were Newton, Coburn, 
John C. and David S. Hayes. Of Coburn, nothing is known. 
Newton married a Miss Clark, andJiad a family of sons and 
daughters, but of them nothing is known. Newton Hayes 
died some twenty years ago, over eighty years of age. John 
C. Hayes married a Widow Lindsay, whose maiden name was 
Mary Ann Stubbs, an excellent woman she was ; by this mar- 
riage he had five sons, who lived' to be grown — L,ewis E., 
Henry C, James S., Thomas C. and John C. ; the latter was 
born one month after the death of his father ; these are all now 
living, and among our best citizens. Of the daughters of 
John C. Hayes, Sarah Jane first married aii Adams, of Marl- 
borough, who died in a year after the marriage, leaving her 
with one child, a daughter, named Dora, who is now the wife 
of Jasper C. George, and who has now five sons. The Widow 
Adams afterwards married the late James DuPre ; she still sur- 
vives. Another daughter of John C. Hayes — ^Ann Eliza, I 
think, ^as her name — married Philip B. Meekins ; they went to 
North Carolina; know nothing more of them. Another 
daughter, Mary Ellen, married Elihu Berry; by this marriage 
were born one son, named Elihu L,ide Berry, and another son, 
Thomas, both of whom are single ; and four daughters, Tela- 
tha, Emma, Lucy and Leilah ; of whom Telatha married J. W. 
Davis, went West, and died, leaving twin daughters, whom her 
mother now has, and is raising. Emma Berry married Mont- 
calm Dow Atkins; they have now two children. Another 
daughter of John C. Hayes married Charles Miles ; they moved 
to North Carolina. Another daughter married Sydney E. 
Jackson ; they now live, at Dillon, and have seven or eight child- 
ren, two daughters grown. Jackson is a good citizen and 
doing well. Another daughter, Addie, married James Green- 
wood ; had one child, and died ; the child then died ; Greenwood 
is a widower of ten or fifteen years; he inherited the entire 
estate of his wife, is a business man and is doing well. Of 
the sons of John C. Hayes, Lewis E. married a widow (name 
forgotten). Henry C. Hayes married a Miss Legette, daugh- 
ter of the late James B. Legette; they have a family, don't 
know how much. Thomas C. Hayes is yet unmarried. John 
C. Hayes, Jr., married, first, a Miss Stubbs, of Sumter; she 



270 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

died a few months ago, leaving five or six children, one quite 
an infant; he married a few days ago, the secx>nd time, Miss 
Rebecca Fore, daughter of the late Willis Fore. David S. 
Hayes, the youngest son of old John Hayes, married, rather 
late in life, a Miss Fladger, daughter of old Hugh Fladger ; by 
this marriage two daugliters -were born ; one died unmarried, at 
about twenty years of age. The oither, named Ida, is the wife 
of John B. Moore, of Latta ; they are doing very well, and have 
some children; don't know how many, a daughter grown. 
David S. Hayes died some twenty years ago, and left a good 
landed estate to his daughter, Mrs. Moore. The information 
the writer obtained" as to the old Hayes did not extend to the 
females; but was confined exclusively to the males. The 
writer knows from other sources that old John Hayes had one 
daughter, at least, named Mary; she became the wife of old 
man Isham Watson, and in turn became the progenitress of 
most of the Watsons in the county, and their connections, 
hereinbefore mentioned. I will close this notice of the Hayes 
family with the relation of an incident in that family, as told 
to the writer some years ago by old Aunt Fama Tart, who 
was, in many respects, the most remarkable woman with whom 
he ever met ; old Aunt Fama was a grand-daughter of James 
Hayes. She related that during the Revolutionary War in 
Virginia, her grand-uncle, William Hayes, was drafted to go 
into the war ; that his wife was a large and portly woman, and 
had considerable beard upon her upper lip ; that when the time 
came for her husband, William Hayes, to report to his com- 
pany to go into camp, she donned his clothes, cut off her hair 
in man's style, and went and reported to the officer as William 
Hayes ; she was accepted, went into camp, and for several days 
performed all the duties of a soldier in camp life, until such 
time as she thought her husband had gotten out of the reach of 
the officials, when she disclosed her sex to the officer in charge. 
She was discharged from service, made her way back home, 
and in the progress of time got a hearing from her husband in 
South Carolina, where he had fled, and she then made her way 
to him. From this narrative, the writer infers that James 
Hayes, an older brother, had previously came to South Caro- 
lina, and that William fled from Virginia to South Carolina, 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 271 

to join his older brother, James, there ; and as soon as the wife, 
left in Virginia, ascertained that be had made good his escape 
and had reached his brother, James, that she then put off to 
join him. According to the account we have of the family, 
this heroine of a wife was the mother of the late Ebben Hayes, 
and the grand-mother of all his children and also of Henry 
Hayes' children. 

Dew. — Another family may be noticed here — ^the Dew fam- 
ily, once pretty extensive, but not so much so now. The two 
old Dews, of whom the writer has any knowledge, were 
Christopher and Absalom. The writer has heard of one old 
John Dew, but what ibecame of him or of his family, if he had 
one, he knows not. Cross Roads Henry Berry bought his land 
more than sixty years ago, and he seems to have disappeared 
from the county. Old Christopher Dew seems to have been 
a man of some note in his day; he bought and owned a vast 
barony of lands on the Great Pee Dee River and in and out of 
the "Slashes;" he lived on the Pocosin, and died there, i8th 
December, 1827. The late Bryant Lane married his youngest 
daughter, Henrietta, that day, whilst her father lay a corpse in 
the house. This remarkable coincidence was related to the 
writer, many years ago, by old Bryant Lane himself ; hence the 
precise date is remembered and here stated. Old Christopher 
was a prosperous man ; he married a Miss Berry, daughter of 
the first old Andrew Berry, who was in the settlement at 
"Sandy Bluflf," about 1735, as hereinbefore stated. That it 
may be better known, old Christopher's wife was the aunt of 
Cross Roads Henry Berry; they raised a family of three sons 
and five daughters, as known to the writer; the sons were 
Wilson, Christopher and Abraham Dew; the daughters were 
Marina, Nancy, Mary (Polly), Charity and Henrietta. Wil- 
son Dew married his cousin, a daughter of old Stephen Berry, 
and sister of Cross Roads Henry Berry; he raised a family; 
only one son is known, Christopher T. Dew, called "Little 
Chris," who married some one not known to the writer ; had 
a family of several sons and, perhaps, daughters; he moved 
to Horry many years ago, with his family ; was alive a year or 
so ago — an old man, eighty or more. Wilson Dew had 



272 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

daughters, how many is not known. One married her first 
cousin, the first wife of the late Captain S. D. Lane; she died 
childless, some forty years ago; and in November, 1865, he 
married again, Miss Flora Bethea, a daughter of the late Rev. 
S. J. Bethea. Captain Lane died childless, 5th July, 1899, and 
his widow. Flora, died a month or so ago. Another daughter 
of Wilson Dew married B. F. Hayes, as has been already 
stated herein ; they have only one child, a son. Rich Hayes ; I 
think another daughter married the late Samuel Berry ; if so, 
it is already noticed herein in or among the Berry family. 
Christopher Dew, Jr., son of old man Christopher, married a 
Miss Jones, sister of Bryant Jones, which has already been 
noticed in or among the Jones family. Abraham Dew, the 
third son of old Christopher, lived to a good old age in a state 
of single blessedness. Of the daughters of old Christopher, 
Marina and Nancy have already been noted herein, in or among 
the Hayes family. Charity married a Mr. Wise, and he died, 
leaving her with several children, James C, Finklea G. and 
Thomas Aquilla ; and, perhaps, some daughters — one, I know, 
a Mrs. Wetherford, and, I believe, another, the wife of John 
G. Kirby. James C. Wise died a few years back, at an old age, 
eighty years or more, leaving a large family. Finklea G. 
Wise lives in Wahee, a very old man; don't know to whom 
he married — think his wife is dead ; he raised some family. A. 
G. Wise, of Wahee, a son of his, is one of the best citizens of 
that township, a very reliable man every way ; he has a family 
of several children, sons and daughters, grown ; they are quite 
respectable. Thomas Aquilla Wise was idiotic; he had some 
property, and Finklea G. Wise was appointed by the Court a 
committee to look after him and his property; Aquilla died 
some years ago. Another daughter of old Christopher Dew, 
Mary (Polly), marrie Jesse Perritt; she died childless, years 
ago, as has already been noticed in or among the Perritt family. 
The youngest daughter of old Christopher, Henrietta, married 
Bryant Lane, as above stated, the day of her father's death; 
they made a good living, raised a family of four sons — Stephen 
D., Joseph, Robert L. and Bryant. Stephen D. Lane married, 
first, his cousin, Miss Dew, daughter of Wilson Dew; she 
died childless, and he married again, Miss Flora Bethea, as 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 273 

above stated ; he was a first-class, good citizen. Joseph Lane 
was killed in the war, or was wounded and died. Robert L- 
Lane, now of Dillon, another first-class good citizen, married. 
Miss R. C. G'addy, daughter of the late Hardy Gaddy ; by this 
marriage six or seven children have been born, mostly sons, 
none of whom are known to the writer, except the oldest, Ver- 
ner, who was one of the late volunteers in the 2d South Caro- 
lina Regiment for the Spanish War. His uncle, Stephen D. 
Lane, willed to Verner his home place, which, I suppose, 
Verner will soon occupy, with a Miss Somebody as a helpmate. 
Bryant Lane, Jr., was an idiot, and died a few months ago, at 
his brother's, R. L. Lane, who was committee for him and 
his property. The daughters of Bryant Lane and wife were 
four — Miss Kesiah, now an old maid,. Mary (called Polly), 
Anne and Flora Ellen Lane. Hartwell C. Dew, one of our best 
citizens, married, first, Mary (Polly), and had by her six or 
seven children — Preston L., John L., Duncan M. and Joseph 
H. Dew, and two daughters, Roberta and Dora. Preston L. 
Dew married Miss Eugenia Allen, daughter of Rev. Joel Allen ; 
they moved to Greenwood some years ago, having several 
children. John L. Dew, now of Latta, married a Miss Cot- 
tingham, daughter of Daniel Cottingham, and has one child, a 
son; is ait Latta, merchant and fK>stmaster. Duncan M. Dew 
. married, first, a Miss Thornton; she had one child, and died, 
afterwards the child died ; and he married, a second time, a Miss 
Chappel; don't know where from; they reside at Latta, and 
have some children; he is one of the leading merchants at 
Latta — a. man of fine character, wholly reliable and trustworthy. 
Joseph H. Dew, as will be seen elsewhere in this book, is a 
graduate of Furman University, and, I believe, of the Baptist 
Seminary at Louisville, Ky. ; is a preacher of reputation in the 
Baptist denomination; married some lady foreign to this 
county ; stands well among his people ; don't know where he is. 
Miss Roberta Dew married Wylie Berry; they reside at 
Latta; have one child, a daughter; they are doing fdirly 
well. Dora Dew married H. E. K. Smith, on Buck Swamp ; 
he is a successful farmer, doing well; have some children, 
don't know how many. Hartwell C. Dew lost his first wife, 
Mary (Polly), and he married again to Anne Lane, a sister 



274 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

of his first wife ; by her has had several children — Mollie, Isla, 
Julian, Lawton, Janie, Harvey and another son, name not 
.known; his second wife, Anne, died; he survives, and has not 
again married. Hartwell C. Dew is one of our plain, honest 
and successful men ; has amassed a good property, is well ad- 
vanced in life — I suppose, over seventy years old. His daugh- 
ter, Mollie, by the last wife, married a Dr. Baker, from Georgia, 
and resides there. Isla married Rev. Mr. Grumpier, who died 
in a year or two, leaving her a widow, with one child. Janie 
married a Mr. Kinard, of Newberry ; they reside in thajt county. 
Julian, Ivawton, Harvey and L,awrence, are all unmarried, and 
still remain under the parental roof. Flora Ellen Lane, the 
youngest daughter of Bryant Lane and wife, married James R. 
Watson ; they now reside in Dillon, and have already been no- 
ticed in or among the Watson family. The other old Dew, men- 
tioned in the beginning of this notice of the Dew family, was 
Absalom Dew. Whether he was brother to old Christopher 
Dew or not, is not known to the writer — think, however, that 
he was ; he also married a Miss Berry, daughter of the first old 
Andrew, of the "Sandy Bluff" settlement, and sister to the wife 
of old Ghristopher, and aunt of Gross Roads Henry Berry. 
Never knew or heard of but two of his children, sons, named 
William and Alexander. William Dew married a Miss Cole- 
man, sister to the Rev. John D. Coleman, well known in this 
county as a Baptist minister ; by this marriage there were three 
sons, Leonard M., Har'twell C. and John, and two daughters, 
Ann Eliza and Martha. Of the sons of William Dew, the 
oldest, Leonard M., married a Miss Miles, a daughter of John 
M. Miles; by this marriage, three sons, Calvin (called Gad), 
Frank and Dennis, and, perhaps, a daughter, were born, when 
the father died, and left his widow and children; she being 
what is usually called a smart woman, raised her children 
creditably; they moved some years ago to North Carolina. 
Calvin married Mary Jane Brown, daughter of the late Wil- 
liam'M. Brown; she died -within a yea;r or two, and left no 
child; Calvin himself died a few months ago. Know nothing 
of the other two boys, Frank and Dennis. Hartwell G. Dew 
has already been noticed above herein. John Dew, the young- 
est son of old William, went off into the war, and has never 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 275 

been heard of since. Ann Eliza Dew married Mr. John Atkin- 
son, below Marion, and had one child, Thomas Atkinson, when 
she died. Thomas Atkinson married a daughter of the late 
Stephen A. Hairgrove, and is now one of our good citizens. 
Martha Dew married another Atkinson, below Marion, and by 
him she had a son, W. B. Atkinson, when Atkinson died, and 
left her a widow ; she still survives and has not remarried ; her 
son, W. B. Atkinson, resides with her on the old William Dew 
homestead, and is one of our most enterprising and successful 
citizens ; he married a Miss Gaddy, daughter of Samuel T. 
Gaddy, and has a considerable family ; think they have already 
been noticed in or among the Gaddy family. This closes the 
notice of the Dew family, an old and respectable family of the 
county. Much more might be said of some of them, but space 
will not permit ; enough has been said to enable future genera- 
tions to trace their ancestry. 

NiCHOi<soN. — The next family to be noticed is the Nicholson 
family. The first of the name known in the county was John 
M. Nicholson; he came direct, as I think, from Scotland; 
don't know how it was that he came to South Carolina, but 
think be came with some of the old Sinclairs. He was a black- 
smith ; whether he learned that trade in Scotland or after he 
came to this country, is not known ; he was a large, strong and 
muscular man, unpretentious, made no display, personally or 
otherwise; honest and upright in his dealings with others, 
jealous of his own' rights, while he accorded to every man the 
same rights which he claimed for himself; was not querulous, 
but would not be imposed upon ; was of equable temperament, 
until he was aroused, then an antagonist might look out; 
physically he was a powerful man. He married, I think, a 
Miss Sinclair, and had and raised, as known to the writer, three 
sons, Archibald, Duncan and Walter Nicholson — may have 
had other sons ; these are all that the writer ever knew. He had 
one daughter, Nancy ; she married Mr. Elly Greenwood, a sec- 
ond wife of his ; they have some family. Old man Nicholson 
may have had other daughters. Archie Nicholson, now in the 
MuUins region, married a Miss Martin, daughter of Matthew 
Martin, and by her has several children, and is doing well — a 



I 
276 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

good, industrious and law-abiding citizen. Duncan Nicholson 
married a Miss Edwards, daughter of Captain L,. M. Edwards, 
and by her has several children ; he, likewise, is an industrious, 
progressive and prosperous citizen; such men constitute the 
bone and sinew of the country, and its hope for the future. 
Walter Nicholson is unmarried, but, like his brothers, is 
attentive to his business — keeps it before him, and is perfectly 
reliable in every respect. 

Jackson. — The Jackson family will next be noticed. This 
family is and has been very extensive in name and in its con- 
nections in the county. The first old Jackson was from Vir- 
ginia, his name was Edward; said to have been a very small 
man in size — somewhat like the late Dr. James C. Mullins ; he 
settled on Catfish ; his wife was a Miss Manning, of Virginia, 
or it may be that Miss Mannning was the wife of his son, Ed- 
ward ; he raised a considerable family of sons and, perhaps, 
daughters; of the latter, the writer knows nothing; the sons 
were, Edward, Jr., William, John, Reuben, Owen and Ervin 
Jackson. I cannot trace all these different sons seriatim, for 
the want of information, but will do so as far as I can. Ed- 
ward, Jr., the oldest son, married, if not a Miss Manning, 
some other lady — I think, though, a Manning — and had and 
raised a considerable family of sons, and, perfiaps, daughters ; 
the sons were, as known to the writer, William R., Edward 
M. and Warren R. Jackson. William R. Jackson married 
a Miss Hayes, daughter of John Hayes, and a sister of 
old man Isham Watson's wife ; he raised a considerable fam- 
ily — one son, William R., and other sons, whose names are not 
remembered; some daughters also, only one of whom is re- 
membered, Mary, who became the wife of the late Stephen A. 
Hairgrove, and they raised a considerable family of sons and 
daughters. Only one son survives, Thomas H. Hairgrove, 
now of Wahee. One daughter married Thomas Atkinson, 
who has some family — I think, two daughters. Miss Huldah 
Hairgrove also survives; she has never married. Think all 
the sons of William R. Jackson, Sr., went West. William R. 
Jackson, Jr., went to the Mexican War; I saw him after his 
return; he then went West. William R. Jackson, Sr., died 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 277 

more than sixty years ago; old man Isham Watson adminis- 
tered on his estate. Their wives were sisters. Edward M. 
Jackson, son of Edward, Jr., and his brother, Warren R. Jack- 
son, married sisters, Ellen Adams and Anne Adams, daughters 
of old Elias Adams, whose wife was a sister of old Thomas 
Harlke. Misses Ellen and Anne Adams were first cousins of 
the late General W. W. Harllee. Edward M. and Warren R. 
Jackson both raised quite respectable families. Edward M. 
moved West many years ago, and carried his whole family — 
though some of them, perhaps, two or three, were married; 
two of his sons became Baptist preachers. Warren R. Jack- 
son raised sons, Anderson W., James R., Jefferson A. and 
Sydney E. Jackson, and one boy killed accidentally by another 
boy, and, I think, two daughters, Agenora and Missouri ; an- 
other daughter, Amelia, died when a girl. Anderson W. Jack- 
son married a Miss Flowers ; he became a Methodist itinerant 
preachei", traveled for some years within the South Carolina 
Conference, finally superannuated on account of eyes failing, 
and, I think, now lives in Williamsburg County; he had and 
raised two or three sons and, perhaps, one daughter — all of 
whom, I think, are married. He had one son, Preston B., who 
became, also, a Methodist preacher, and attained much distinc- 
tion as such in the Conference ; he married a lady in Darling- 
ton, and after traveling for several years, was transferred to 
California; I can follow him no further. James R. Jackson 
married a Greenville lady; was waylaid one night on the road 
from Marion and shot within a mile or so of his home ; he died 
from the wounds in a week or so. It was pretty well under- 
stood who was the assassin, but no proof could be made. Jef- 
ferson A. Jackson married and had a family; he became a 
Baptist preacher of some note, and moved off to Texas, and in 
some town there had charge of a church for several years, and 
stood high in his calling ; he died there some five or six years 
ago ; don't know about his family. Sydney E. Jackson married 
a Miss Hayes, daughter of the late John C. Hayes; has seven 
or eight children — ^two daughters grown ; he left his excellent 
farm on Catfish some five or six years ago, and moved to Dil- 
lon, because of better school facilities there; he is a carpenter 
by tradt, and it is supposed that as Dillon is a growing and 



278 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

progressive town be is doing well at his trade; the income from 
it, together with the rents of his farm, enables 'him to support 
his large family. The oldest daughter of Warren R. Jackson, 
Agenora A., married the late Colonel John J. George; the 
fruits of the marriage were seven children, four sons and three 
daughters. One son died -when about arriving at manhood; 
the other sons are Jasper C. George, John J. George and Wil- 
liam Warren George. Jasper C. George married Dora Adams, 
a grand-daughter of the late John C. Hayes; they have five 
sons. The oldest, Percy, is grown and now at Clemison Col- 
lege. Jasper C. George is one of our most energetic, perse- 
vering citizens; is doing well, and making money — a good 
farmer. John J. George, named for his father, married, first, 
a Miss Bethea, daughterjof E. Bethea; she died childless; then 
he married a Miss Rogers, daughter of Philip B. Rogers ; is 
raising a family, a farmer, and is doing well. William Warren 
George married a Miss Ellen Gaddy, daughter of John Gaddy ; 
he is and ever has been a merchant, now at Latta, S. C. ; a man 
of indomitable pluck and enterprise; has failed once or twice, 
and was apparently down to stay down; but not so, he rises 
and comes again; has done more for Latta than any i man that 
has been in it, according to his means, in building it up and 
booming the town — such a man cannot be kept down ; he has 
no children. The daughters of Colonel J. J. George and wife 
were three. Mary Ann married Michael Finnega-n ; they have 
several children, one or two married ; Michael Finnegan is one 
of our best and most progressive citizens, doing well, and rais- 
ing a nice family; such men tell upon the prosperity of the 
country. Delia George, another daughter of Colonel J. J. 
George and wife, married John Haselden ; they have a family, 
two sons and two daughters ; they have moved to Horry, and 
are said to be doing well. Aurelia George, the youngest 
daughter, married Henry Berry, a widower; they have no 
children; Berry is a good citizen. Colonel J. J. George died 
soon after the war, having lost a leg in the last battle at 
Bentonville, above Fayetteville, N. C, just before General Joe 
Johnston's surrender; he left his wife, Agenora, with seven 
little children, and no property except a little farm, perhaps, 
200 acres poor land ; she was an extra smart woman ; they went 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 279 

to work, she soon began to gain ; they made ample support and 
some money; she raised her family in credit, and they are all 
doing well ; she died two or three years ago ; she lost one son, 
Henry. Missouri Jackson, youngest dtoghter of Warren R. 
Jackson, married Frank Dew; they went to North Carolina, 
where she now resides, Frank being dead ; she has six or seven 
children, some of them grown ; know nothing further of them. 
Warren R. Jackson died in 1857, leaving his wife, Anne, with 
her several small children; his estate was involved, and much 
litigation ensued both in the Circuit and Appeal Courts, she 
finally was successful, and saved the estate from utter wreck 
and ruin. The writer knoweth whereof he speaks, being 
mixed up in it as her attorney from beginning to end. Of the 
sons of Edward Jackson, Sr., William married a Miss Man- 
ning, also settled on Catfish, and raised a family ; don't know 
how many — ^two sons only were known to the writer, Reuben 
and John M. Jackson. Of Reuben and his family, little is 
known ; he is dead ; don't know what has become of his family. 
John M. Jackson married a Miss Miles, a daughter of old 
David Miles and sister of the late Francis A. Miles ; he settled 
on his father's, William Jackson, homestead, and lived and 
died there; he raised one son, Frank M., and three or four 
daughters ; his wife died ; he lived for several years a widower, 
and died. His son, Frank, married a Miss Miles, his first 
cousin, a daughter of Charles Miles, Sr. The daughters of 
John M. Jackson, after the death of their father, moved off, 
perhaps, to Georgia. Frank M. Jackson then took possession 
of the old homestead and lived on it for several years, then 
sold it and moved into North Carolina, and thus he has 
been lost sight of. Of John Jackson, son of Edward, Sr., 
nothing is known as to what became of him. Reuben married 
some one and settled on Maple ; raised a family, of whom the 
writer knows nothing, except two sons of his, James and John 
Jackson. James Jackson married a Miss Herring, and raised a 
family of sons and daughters. Of his sons, Arthur and John 
became notorious during the war. James Jackson and his 
brother John were killed", just after the close of the w.ar, on 
account of their sons, and especially Arthur and John, by 
parties in revenge. The writer has ever thought that these two 
19 



280 A HISTORY O^ MARION COUNTY. 

old men, James and John Jackson, were wrongfully killed ; but 
it was done at a time when human life was cheap, and in very- 
troublesome times. Another brother of old James and John 
Jackson was Henry Jackson. The three brothers married 
three sisters. Misses Herring, sisters of old Whittington Ham- 
ilton's wife, and Whittington, Jr., married a daughter of Henry 
Jackson ; she was a first cousin to him. While not much can 
be said in favor of this branch of the Jackson family, yet there 
are worse men than these three old brothers. Old Edward 
Jackson, St., had a son, Owen Jackson, who married Dilla 
McKenzie, a daughter of Robert McKenzie; he lived upon 
and owned the lands where Missouri R. Hamer and Philip B. 
Rogers now live and own ; he was a simple-minded old man, 
worked hard, was strictly honest and law-abiding, and strictly 
attended to his own affairs; he raised a considerable family, 
mostly daughters, and two sons only known. Hugh P. Price's 
wife is one of the daughters,, and, like her father, stays at home 
and mind's her own business ; she has no children. One son, 
William Jackson, called "Fire-coal Bill," married a daughter 
of old man William Hamilton, and who has already been men- 
tioned herein, in or among the Hamilton family. Another son, 
Ervin M. Jackson, married Sarah Ann McKenzie, who died 
a few years back, leaving an only child, a son, Thomas Jackson, 
who has already been noticed herein, in or among the McKen- 
zie family. Old man Owen Jackson may have had another 
son, if so it has escaped the memory of the writer ; and as to 
his other daughters, the writer has lost sight of them. Ervin 
Jackson, the youngest son of old Edward, Sr., married a Miss 
Watson, on Hayes Swamp, near the North Carolina line ; they 
settled near the father, old Mark Wa;tson, and by industry and 
frugality amassed a good property, and raised quite a respect- 
able family. Owen Jackson, Jr., a son or a grand-son of old 
Ervin, married a sister of the late Duncan Murchison ; he died 
a few years ago; made a -considerable property, raised a very 
respectable family of sons and daughters, some of whom are 
among the leading men of Marlborough County. One son is 
known to the writer, John M. Jackson, as a leading merchant 
and business man in Bennettsville. They reflect credit upon 
the Jackson name. There is also a John R. Jackson, grand-son 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 281 

of old Ervin, now a kading man in the community of his an- 
cestors. There may be others of the name in some one or 
other of the many branches of the Jackson family not men- 
tioned, but they are not known, or, rather, their genealogy is 
not known, and hence not especially mentioned. 

Galloway. — The Galloways may here be mentioned, four 
of them. They are importations from Marlborough, and our 
county would not be hurt by many more such importations — 
James T., William, Samuel T. and Joseph Galloway are their 
names. James T. Galloway married Miss Louisa Bethea, 
daughter of Levi and M'ary Ann Bethea, just after the war, 
and has been in this county ever since his marriage ; he has a 
considerable family, has succeeded well in life. Has one son, 
Henry, married, don't know to whom-^— I think, a Miss Barren- 
tine, of Marlborough. One daughter married to Mr. Maxcy 
McCown, of Florence County. His other children are with 
him ; he is one of our most substantial citizens. William Gal- 
loway, a later importation, a brother of James T., has bought 
land in upper Marion. A comparison of his place with what 
it was fifteen years ago will show that he is a farmer right; 
he is a hustling man ; know nothing of his immediate family, 
and the same may be said of Samuel T. and Joseph Galloway, 
a late importation, who have bought land on Catfish, near 
EUerbe's Crossing, and are moving ahead, first class men and 
excellent citizens; know nothing of their immediate families. 
Samuel T. Galloway married Johny Carmichael, and Joseph 
married a daughter of Elmore Allen, of Marlborough County. 
I knew their father and mother, James Galloway and Rebecca, 
his wife ; she was a Townsend, daughter of .old Jabish Town- 
send, and sister of the late Meekin Townsend, of Marlborough. 

Sherwood. — The Sherwoods will next be noticed. The first 
Sherwood known in the county was John Sherwood, an old 
man, more than sixty years ago ; he was a great church man 
and exceedingly pious; he had two or three sons and one 
daughter. Of the sons, nothing is known, except as to James. 
James Sherwood married Miss Martha (Patsy) Bethea, a 
daughter of William Bethea, near Harlleesville ; by the mar- 



282 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

riage three sons were born and raised' — ^Cade, Postell and John. 
Cade Sherwood owns the old 'homestead of his grand-father, 
John Sherwood. James Sherwood died and left his widow 
with her children small; the widow married again — do not 
remember to whom. Cade and Postell grew up, and Cade 
bought the old homiestead of his grand-father, and married 
a Miss Ivegette, of Marlborough, daughter of James S. Le- 
gette. Cade Sherwood has one of the best plantations in 
upper Marion, an excellent manager and farmer; everything 
about his house and premises denotes comfort and convenience 
not excelled by any one in the county. Postell Sherwood, 
of Mullins, married his .first cousin, Miss Lou Scarborough, 
daughter of the late Rev. L/ewis Scarborough, many years an 
itinerant preacher in the South Carolina Conference, and sister 
of the Hon. R. B. Scarborough, of Conway. Postell is doing 
well ; has a small family, two daughters, but has not succeeded 
like his brother, Cade Sherwood. John Sherwood is unmar- 
ried. 

Ai<if0ED. — The late Neill, James L. and L,odwick B. Alford, 
brothers, were importations from North Carolina, and were 
quite an acquisition to the moral, social and material prosperity 
of the county — men of high character, and contributed much to 
the upbuilding of the county; would be glad to have many 
more similar imporltations. Neill Alford married a Miss 
McPherson, S'ettled on the Big Reedy Creek, near where the 
Reedy Creek Presbyterian Church now stands ; by his marriage 
he had and raised a large family of five sons and ten daughters ; 
William McD., Henry, Robert, John and Walter L. Alford. 
William McD. Alford married a Miss McLean, of North Caro- 
lina, and has raised a large family of sons and daughters, five 
of eaoh sex; the sons arfe McLean (called Mack), Yancy, Rob- 
ert, Plummer and William. Mack and Yancy only are mar- 
ried; don't know to whom. Yancy Alford is a practicing 
physician in Sumter County. One of Wm. McD. Alford's 
sons is a practicing dental surgeon ; think his name is Plummer 
or Robert. None of his daughters are married ; one of them, 
Miss Ella;, I believe was a teacher for some time in the Co- 
lumbia Female College. Wm. McD. Alford has performed 



A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 283 

lis duty in the relations of life, and one specially-^that is, 
le has educated his children well, and exceedingly so, 
or a man of his somewhat limited means and the number of 
lis children ; he and family are among our best people — a man 
)f high character, indomitable will and energetic ; no task too 
leavy, and no difficulty insurmountable; the words "fail" or 
'I can't," are not in his vocabulary. The people of his county 
ippreciating his many good qualities have made him their Rep- 
■esentative in the State Legislature. He is, as it were, rele- 
gated to the rear, because for the last ten years he has not been 
n line with the dominant party in the State — ^many of our best 
nen are in the same category. W. McD. Alford is one of our 
eading and most progressive farmers. Henry Alford, a 
)rother, married in North Carolina, and resides about Floral 
;k>llege, in Robeson County. Robert Alford, another brother, 
lied a:bout 1868 ; he was a promising young man. John 
md Walter S. Alford have never married, though both are old 
;nough to enter upon that, to them, untried relation in life. 
Df the ten daughters of old man Neill Alford, two are yet un- 
narried and may be called "old maids." Two of the married 
►nes, Mrs. McLucas and Mrs. DuBose, are dead; Mrs. 
ilclvucas childless; don't know as to Mrs. DuBose. Three 
lied unmarried. Of the married ones, three are living — Mrs. 
^urrie, Mrs. James Berry and Mrs. Benjamin McKibben. Of 
kirs. James Berry's family, they have already been noticed in 
Kr among the Berry family. James L,. Alford married a Miss 
i/[cPhaul or McFail; by the marriage, twelve children' were 
om, six sons and six daughters. Of the sons, two are dead ; 
hose living are Daniel M., Frierson, Neill and Manton. Dan- 
si M. Alford married a Miss Walter; they reside at Dillon; 
lave a family, one daughter grown ; don't know as to others of 
lis family. Frierson Alford married a daughter of Dr. Wil- 
iam J.' David ; resides in upper Marion, and is one of our good 
itizens; has a family, some grown children. Neill Alford, a 
uiet and inoffensive man, married a Miss Stackhouse, daugh- 
er of the late Colonel E. T. Stackhouse ; they have a consider- 
ble family, some grown; don't know how many grown or 
therwise; they reside at Marion. Manton Alford married 
n Alabama lady, and resides in upper Marion^ — one of our 



284 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

nost respectable and worthy citizens. Of James L,. Alford's 
-ix daughters, only one survives, Dian or Dianna, who mar- 
ried Dr. McLean, in upper Marion ; they have one daughter, 
the wife of Clarence McLaurin; are said to be doing well. 
Not one of her five sisters ever married. Loderick B. Alford, 
brother of Neill and James L., also came from North Carolina, 
with his brothers, but did not remain long, he went to Ten- 
nessee, and married there a Miss Hall; after some years he 
returned with his family to upper Marion, and died there along 
in the fifties. He raised a considerable family — the names of 
only two of them are remembered. Althea, his oldest child, 
who married, first, James P. Mclnnis, who died and left her a 
widoiw ; she afterwards became the second wife of Colonel Levi 
Legette, and still survives ; think she had one child by Mclnnis, 
a daughter, who married W. D. Oarmichael, now one of the 
citizens of the county below Marion. The late Warren L. 
Alford married, and raised a considerable family; the names 
of only two of his children are known to the writer. Dock 
Alford married a Miss Harrelson, daughter of the late 
John E. Harrelson, and has a family of sons and, perhaps, 
daughters, names unknown. A daughter of Warren L. Al- 
ford, named Delia, has never married ; she may be classed now 
as an old maid. Warren L. Alford, a peaceable, quiet and 
harmless man, died a fe^y years past; his family are four or 
five miles below Marion', on the Galivant's Ferry road. 

GrBEnwood. — Of this family, William and Frank Green- 
wood were known to the writer, sixty years ago. He once saw 
their mother, old Mrs. Greenwood. William Greenwood mar- 
ried a sister of Cross Roads Henry Berry ; only two children of 
this marriage were known to the writer — there may have been 
others — Dawson Greenwood and a daughter, w^hose name, I 
believe, was Mary. Dawson married an illegitimate daughter 
of old John Manning, on Buck Swamp ; think they went West 
or elsewhere. The daughter, Mary (or other name), became 
the wife of the late David R. Owens ; by him she had and raised 
two sons, Stephen G. and Leonard R., and two daughters. Of 
the sons, Stephen G. married a Miss Godbold, daughter of 
Ervin Godbold ; had two sons, one of them dead. Stephen G. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 285 

Owens was elected Clerk of the Court in 1872, and filled that 
position for four years ; the upheaval in 1876 defeated him for 
re-election. He was a very competent man, but became a luna- 
tic some years afterwards, and died in the Asylum. Leonard 
R. Owens married a Miss Wall, and has considerable family at 
Marion — ^names not known, except oldest son, Paul, who is said 
to be very bright ; one daughter grown. Leonard Owens is a 
very competent business man; was postmaster for four years 
under the Hairrison administration, and four years a deputy 
under D. Mclntyre, during Cleveland's second term ; was again 
appointed by McKinley, and served two or three years, when 
he got into some trouble and was removed from office. He 
seems to be under a doud — yet resides in Marion. Don't 
know whether- his mother is dead or alive. Of the two 
daughters of Mrs. David R. Owens, one married George Wall, 
brother of L. R. Owens' wife. They live at Marion, and have 
a family, about whom nothing is known. Don't know what 
became of the other daughter of David R. Owens. Frank 
Greenwood died a few years ago, a very old man; he raised 
some fajmily; was a harmless, inoffensive ahd good citizen; 
don't know who his wife was; he had three sons and one 
daughter; the sons are EHy B., James and Donaldson. EUy 
married, first, a Miss Piatt, daughter of Daniel A. Piatt; by 
her he had no children ; she died, and be married again, a Miss 
Nicholson, who has already been mentioned- in or among the 
Nicholson family ; he has by this marriage some family, don't 
know how much; James Greenwood married Miss Addie 
Hayes, youngest daughter of the late John C. Hayes, who has 
already been mentioned in or among the Hayes family; his 
wife died, then her child died, and he became heir to her prop- 
erty; he has not remarried; is a first-rate business man, and 
resides at Latta. Donaldson Greenwood has never married; 
is harmless and inoffensive, a good young (old) man. The 
daughter, Amanda Greenwood, married Henry Berry, a wid- 
ower; she had some children, don't know how many, when 
she died. Berry has married, the third time. Miss Aurelia 
George ; no children 'by this marriage. 

McInnis. — The Mclnnis family, in the Carolina neighbor- 



286 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

hood, will next be noticed. Of this family, the first known 
was Duncan Mclnnis, who was a most excellent man and 
worthy citizen. He is thought to have been a Scotchman, 
though, perhaps, born in this country. He married some 
Scotch lady, settled in the Carolina neighborhood, raised a 
considerable family, four sons and four or five daughters ; the 
sons were Neill, John L,., Miles and another, name not remem- 
bered. The two latter emigrated to Texas some years ago, 
together with John L. Mclnnis. John L. married in Texas, 
a Texas lady, and some years after returned' to this State, and 
now occupies and owns the old homestead of his father; he 
had two sons born in Texas, William and one, name unknown. 
William Mclnnis has a family; married his cousin, a Miss 
McDonald, and has, perhaps, two or three children; is a first 
class man, of high character, good habits, and has proper ideas 
of life ; if misfortune should overtake him, he ^would still be a 
man. His brother, younger than himself, unmarried. Neill 
Mclnnis died a few years ago; he left a family, unknown to 
the writer; he was a most excellent man and worthy citizen, 
and will be mucK missed not only by his family, but by his 
community. Miles Mclnnis and another brother are in Texas. 
Of the daughters of Duncan Mclnnis, two of them married 
McLaurins, whether in Marion or Marlborough County, is 
unknown; they both have families, number and names un- 
known. One daughter married our respected fellow-citizen, 
A. J. McDonald ; they have children grown and married, and, 
perhaps, grand-children, but for want of information can say 
nothing about them. Another daughter married one James 
McDonald, I think, of Marlborough; they seem to be doing 
well. Another daughter is yet unmarried. There was, a way 
back in the forties or fifties, one James P. Mclnnis, who mar- 
ried Miss Althea Alford, daughter of Lodwick B. Alford, who 
has already been mentioned in or among the Alfords; he did 
not live long after marriage; seemed to be an energetic and 
pushing man. Whether he was any relation of the "Carolina" 
Mclnnises or not, is unknown to the writer. Another Mclnnis 
(Miles), who has been dead many years, lived' in upper 
Marion; he married a Miss Townsend, a sister of old man 
Light Townsend, a well known citizen of Marlborough County. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 287 

Old Miles Mclnnis was a harmless and inoffensive man; 
raised a considerable family, of whom nothing is now known. 
Don't know whether he was related to the "Carolina" Mcln- 
nises or not ; but Miles seems to be a family name ; as John L. 
Mclnnis has a brother by that name, I infer that old Miles 
Mclnnis, of whom I am now writing, was of the same family — 
perhaps, a brother of old Duncan Mclnnis. Old man Miles 
Mclnnis has 'been dead many years ; he was not a man of 
much energy, though full of native Scotch honesty. 

Stafford. — The first Stafford in the county known to the 
writer was the late Malcolm Stafford ; don't know anything of 
his parentage or -whence toe came ; he was a Scotchman, a man 
of more than ordinary intelligence, better educated than most 
men of "his day, a Christian gentleman, and a very useful man in 
his neighborhood; was much missed therein after his death, 
which, I think, occurred some time in the fifties. He married 
Miss Jeanette Campbell, daughter of old man Duncan Camp- 
bell, on north side of Little Pee Dee, in what is now called Car- 
michael Township; he settled on the south side of that river, 
near where Stafford's Bridge now stands ; he raised a consider- 
able family — 'three sons, James Harvey, Duncan C. and Neill 
E., and three daughters. Of the sons, not one of them ever 
married. James Harvey Stafford died a few months ago, I 
suppose, near seventy years of age; be was one of our best 
citizens, accumulated a large property, bad a fine plantation, 
upon which he built a palatial residence, and had everything 
about him necessary for comfort and the enjoyment of life, 
except a wife and Children. He had $5,000 stock in the Dillon 
factory; a large stockholder also in the Bank of Dillon, and 
president of the same. He lost, some years ago, by the failure 
of the Bank of Hanover, in Wilmington, N. C, $3,000, and his 
maiden sister, Laura, lost therein $10,000; they were very 
prosperous. Captain James H. Stafford was no ordinary man. 
The following is from the pen of Captain A. T. Harllee, in 
reference to Captain Stafford : "He was a man of superior intel- 
ligence, and traveled much in his time. In 1856, he, with a 
number of other young men from the State, went to the then 
Territory of Kansas, and was engaged in what was called 



288 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

fJie pro-slavery war, in which old John Brown, afterwards 
hung at Harper's Ferry, Va., Jim Lane and other Abolition- 
ists were c»nspicuous figures. Matters becoming somewhat 
settled at the theatre of war, Captain Stafford betook himself 
away out on the frontier of the territory on the Big Blue River, 
200 miles from the settlement, and pre-empted a claim of 160 
acres of land; but the winters were too severe, and after 
remaining a year, he returned to his home in South Carolina. 
At the breaking out of the war he raised a company with John 
W. Harllee as First Lieutenant, Duncan Murphy, Second Lieu- 
tenant, and William Manning as Brevet Second Lieutenant. 
The two latter were killed in Virginia, and Lieutenant Harllee 
was permanently disabled for field service by a wound in the 
knee. His company saw much service in Virginia in Jenkins' 
famous brigade. Since the war he lived most of his time on 
his old home place; but having purchased and built a fine 
residence on his plantation on the North Carolina State line, 
at 'Lone Home,' he resided there till his death> a few weeks 
ago, his sister, Laura, living with him." He was postmaster 
at "Lone Home." Captain J. H. Stafford was an extensive 
farmer, and succeeded well in his vocation. He was elected, 
without seeking it, a Couilty Commissioner in 1880, served 
very acceptably one term, and never after sought any office. 
Duncan C. Stafford, the second son, was killed in the trenches 
by a sharpshooter, in 1863; he was Second Lieutenant in 
Captain A. T. Harllee's company of the 8th Regiment. He 
was an excellent young man, of fine character and very prom- 
ising. Neill E. Stafford, the youngest son, lives at the old 
homestead, near Dillon ; he is a graduate of Davidson College, 
is a well informed man, went into the war at fifteen years of 
age and was a gallant soldier; has never married, lives a 
bachelor's life. Of the daughters of Malcolm Stafford, the 
eldest, Delitha, married the late William R. Stackhouse, near 
Dillon; by this marriage, three daughters and one son were 
born. The eldest daughter is yet unmarried. Another daugh- 
ter, Fannie, married Stonewall Watson ; she has five children, 
three daughters and two sons. Another daughter married H. 
B. Floyd, near Campbell's Bridge ; they have a young family. 
The son, Duncan Stackhouse, married a Miss Williams, 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 289 

daughter of J. B. Williams, of Nichols, S. C. Evaline Staf- 
ford, daughter of old Malcolm Stafford, married D. J. McKay ; 
by this marriage, six daughters were born and raised ; four of 
these daughters married, one of whom is dead ; don't know to 
whom these daughters married. The two youngest daughters 
of D. J. McKay and wife are single, and live with their parents. 
Miss Laura Stafford, another daughter of Malcolm Stafford, 
has never married ; she lived with her brother, James H., until 
his death, a few weeks ago, and still resides there, in a state of 
single blessedness. Old man Malcolm Stafford Avas a sur- 
veyor, an'd did much in that line. The writer has seen many 
of his plats, wliich were characterized 'by accuracy and neat- 
ness; has also seen wills and deeds drawn by (him; in these 
respects he was a very useful man. 

Blue. — William Blue, first of the name in upper Marion, on 
north side of Little Pee Dee and Shoe Heel Creek ; he was the 
original grantee of the lands on which he and his descendants 
have ever since lived. William Blue had only two sons, Alex- 
ander and Daniel, and several daughters. Daniel Blue married 
a Miss McArthur, and raised a large family, all girls but one, 
William Blue, who was killed in battle in Virginia, in Captain 
J. H. Stafford's company of ist Regiment South Carolina, Ha- 
good's Brigade, early in the war. Of the daughters of Daniel 
Blue, Mary married Duncan N. McCall, who was a gallant sol- 
dier of the Confederacy, and now resides on part of the Daniel 
Blue homestead, and has two children, both girls — one of whom 
is the wife of Albert M. Baker, a live and progressive farmer 
of that section of the county. Another daughter, Sarah, mar- 
ried Milton McPhaul, of North Carolina ; he and his wife are 
both dead ; their children have moved to Georgia. The young- 
est diaughter, Nancy, married a Mr. Miran, of N^Drth Carolina ; 
he died soon after their marriage, and she lives on the old 
homestead, with her three sisters, Martha Ann, Flora and 
Catharine — all of them now well advanced in years. Alex- 
ander Blue, the younger of the two brothers, was one of the 
staunchest citizens of the county ; he was from early manhood 
to his death one of the ruling elders in Ashpole Presbyterian 
Church, just across the State line from where he lived, and 



290 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

he rarely ever missed a service at that church ; he was beloved 
and respected by all viho knew him. He married Ann Alford, 
a daughter of Major Sion Alford, a prominent citizen of 
Robeson County, N. C, when 'a young man ; two children were 
the issue of ithe marriage, daughters. The eldest, Mary Ann, 
just after the war, married Captain A. C. Sinclair, who was the 
surviving commander of Fairlee's old company of Orr's Rifles, 
and they now reside on the Alexander Blue homestead, and 
have a family of five grown up children. The youngest 
daughtdr, Bettie, married Nathaniel McNair, of North Caro- 
lina, wlio died in 1894, leaving her with one child, a daughter, 
married to Edwin Smith, a lawyer of Red Springs, N. C, 
where he, his wife and Mrs. McNair now reside. One of the 
daughters of old William Blue and a sister of Daniel and 
Alexander Blue, married Daniel McDuffie; by this marriage 
only one child was born, a son, named William McDuffie, who 
was a very promising young man; he graduated at Davidson 
College with distinction, and died soon after graduation, in 
i860. Many in the Hofwyl Academy neighborhood will re- 
member William McDuffie, as a teacher in that academy for 
two or more sessions, about 1855 or 1856 — ^may be 1854. He 
was a close student, bent on education — ^his close application to 
study may have shortened his days. The writer's older child- 
ren went to sdhool to him at Hofwyl. Another daughter of 
old William Blue married a Mr. Campbell, and had one 
daughter, but she, too, died young. His other daughters 
never married, but lived to be very old ladies; all are now 
dead. The name of Blue, so far as this family is concerned, is 
already or about to become extinct in the county. 

Bakbr. — The Baker family, in North Marion, will next be 
noticed. Squire Neill Baker, the first known in that section, 
was a sturdy Scotchman and an excellent citizen of the north- 
ern section of the county; he married Polly McArthur, and 
left many descendants in his section. One of his grand-sons, 
A. M. Baker, hereinbefore mentioned as a prosperous and 
progressive man, owns the old homestead. One of his sons, 
Edmund Baker, married a Miss McGist ; he died without issue. 
Another son, James Baker, married a Miss Bracy, and moved 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 291 

to North Carolina, where he died, and left a family of several 
children. An older son, John D. Baker, married Miss L/Ovedy 
McPriest, and! died, leaving her with two sons — Albert M. 
Baker, above spoken of, and Neill A. Baker. The widow, 
Ivovedy Baker, lives with her son, Neill A. Baker, in Georgia. 
Old man Neill Baker had but two daughters. The oldest mar- 
ried William McKay, of Nortli Carolina, and moved to Missis- 
sippi, where his wife died. The other daughter, Jeannette, 
married, just at the close of the war. Captain Gilbert W. 
McKay, who was at one time Captain of Fairlee's old com- 
pany, and who may be remembered by many who now live in 
the town of Marion, as be lived there when he went into 
the war. Both are now dead, leaving two children surviv- 
ing — John W. McKay, who lives at McCall, S. C, and Mary, 
who married John Millsaps, and moved to Georgia, where they 
now reside. 

McPriest. — Alexander McPriest, a good citizen and staunch 
old Scotchman, lived in the same section of the county ; he mar- 
ried a Miss McKellar, raised a large family of children, all 
girls, but one, named Peter E. McPriest, who served through 
the war, but is now dead. One daughter married John D. 
Baker, as already mentioned. Another married William 
Braddy Lester, who also served through the war in Orr's 
Rifles ; he and his wife are both living. Two other daughters, 
Katie and Mary Ann, never married, and are living on their 
portion of their father's old homestead. 

McKei<i<ar. — Peter McKellar was among the first settlers of 
this section of the county. He raised a large family; some of 
whom moved away, but many of tlheir descendants still remain 
and own portions of the old McKellar lands.' A. McKellar 
Trawick and his brother, William, grand-sons of Archie 
McKellar and great-great-grand-sons of the original Peter 
McKellar, now own one of the finest plantations in Carmichael 
Township, adjoining the plantations of Captain A. C. Sinclair, 
Captain A. T. Harllee and R. P. Hamer, Jr., the latter owning 
a portion of the McKellar lands, and Captain D. J. McKay 
another portion of the same. Archie McKellar, a grand-son 



292 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

of old Peter, married a Miss McCormick, of North Carolina, 
and raised a large family of daughters, and two sons, Peter and 
John, both of whom were killed in battle in Virginia early in 
the war. AH the daughters died single, but one, Elmyra, who 
married David Trawick, who was also killed, leaving her with 
the two sons above mentioned, "Mack" and William, with 
whom she lives ; neither of them are married. Captain D. J. 
McKay, as noted above, lives on the John McKellar homestead, 
near "Ivone Home/' in this section ; he has been and still is one 
of the most progressive of the many progressive farmers of his 
section of the county; by industry and perseverance he has 
amassed a comfortable living, and is one of the substantial and 
wealthy farmers of the county. He volunteered in the com- 
mencement of the war, and was First Lieutenant of Co. D, 
25th S. C. Regiment, McKerraJl's old company, and served to 
the close of the war ; be was severely wounded and still suffers 
at times from his old wounds. 

McKay. — Daniel McKay, the grand-father of Captain D. J. 
McKay, came to this county direct from Scotland, at what time 
is not known; he had and raised two sons, John and Archie. 
John McKay married Katie Alford, a daughter of Major Sion 
Alford, of North Carolina, by whom he bad and raised three 
sons. Captain G. W. McKay, Alford McKay, who died just as 
he attained manhood, and D. J. McKay, and three daughters. 
Flora Ann, Bettie and Clarkey. Of the sons, G. W. McKay 
married a Miss Baker, as already related, and he and wife 
are both dead, as herein stated. Captain D. J. McKay, just 
after the close of the war, married Miss Evaline Stafford, 
daughter- of Malcolm Stafford, as herein already stated in or 
among the Stafford family. D. J. McKay is an Elder in the 
Ashpole Presbyterian Ohurdh, a regular attendant; he has, 
from' early manhood, been an enthusiastic Mason, and has sev- 
eral times been Master of the lodges of which he was a member. 
Of the daughters of John McKay, Flora Ann, the eldest, mar- 
ried Colonel John A. Rowland, of L,umberton, N. C, whose 
eldest son, Hon. Alfred Rowland, was a Representative in 
Congress for two terms, from the Sixth Congressional District 
of North Carolina, and declined a re-election on account of his 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 293 

health, and died soon after the expiration of his term. Bettie 
McKay, daughter of John McKay, married Dr. John K. Al- 
ford, of North Carolina, and had one son ; and after the death 
of her husband, moved with her son to Texas, where she died ; 
her son is now a prominent lawyer of the "Lone Star State." 
Clarkey, the youngest daughter, married Henry Alford, of Sel- 
kirk, S. C, a son of the late Neill Alford ; they moved to North 
Carolina, Where they raised a family, two sons and three daugh- 
ters; the sons are successful business men at Maxton, N. C, 
and Henry Alford's wife has been dead several years, which 
leaves Captain D. J. McKay the only survivor of John McKay's 
children. Archie McKay, brother of John, married' a daugh- 
ter of Jo^hn Drake, of Robeson County, N. C. Archie McKay 
was the father of the late Hector T. McKay, who married a 
sister of Hon. James McRae, as his first wife; and James 
McRae, for his first wife, married a sister of Hector T. 
McKay ; another sister of H. T. McKay married R. B. Braddy, 
who died, leaving one child, a daughter, who married a Mr, 
Morrison, of North Carolina. Hector T. McKay married, as a 
second wife, the widow of Dr. McKinnon. John J. McKay 
and his sister, Janie (don't know whether by the first or second 
marriage), are the only surviving children' of Hector T. Mc- 
Kay, and live on his old homestead. Hedtor T. McKay was 
one of the first men of the county; well informed, of good 
habits, indiustrious and frugal, kind-'hearted and liberal minded, 
thought for himself, and allowed the same privilege to others ; 
he was a man of well-rounded character every way; never 
aspired to political preferment, was elected and served one 
term as County Commissioner without seeking it; he was an 
exemplary citizen. Would like to dwell more on his many 
good qualities, but space will not permit. 

McCoRMiCK. — The McCormick family and history of Little 
Rock will next be noticed, and is from the pen of Captain A. T. 
Harllee : "John McCormick, better known to every one in his 
day as 'Little Mack,' was another old settler of the upper sec- 
tion of the township, on Shoe Heel Creek and the North Caro- 
lina State line, and lived in the immediate section of the Blues, 
Bakers, McKellars and McArthurs ; he was a jolly old Scotch- 



294 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

man and everybody admired 'him ; he married a daughter of 
Duncan McEachem, on Wilkinson Swamp, in North Carolina, 
and raised a family of five sons, but no daugliters. His two 
eldest sons, Neill and Allen, married in Anson County, N. C, 
and moved there and have lived there ever since,: raising large 
families. His sons, Malcolm and Archie, died when young 
men. Duncan E. McCormick was the youngest of his sons ; he 
married and lived all his life in Marion County ; he was well 
known all over the county, having held the office of Tax Col- 
lector and various other stations of a public character ; he was 
a good business man, and started out in life as a clerk in the 
store of Colonel Thomas Harllee, at old Harlleesville, which is 
now Little Rock; he afterwards taught school, and was one 
of the pioneers in business at what is now called Little Rock. 
The business of all that section before was done at the bridge, 
near where R. P. Hamer, Sr., now lives, and the postoffice 
was Harlleesville, and had been since the days of Thomas 
Harllee, Sr., who was the original owner of most of the lands 
around there for several miles. Duncan E., with Tristram B. 
Walters, bought some lots from Enoch J. Meekins, not far 
from the church and school house, which had been given the 
public by Thomas Harllee, Sr., for church and school pur- 
poses; and they built on the lands they bought dwellings, 
storehouse and a large hotel building, and thus launched the 
town of Little Rock, named it after a rock that protrudes above 
the ground some three or four feet, and weighs, perhaps, 500 
pounds, and now stands in the fork of the roads, one leading 
to Mars Bluff and the other to Marion via Dillon. They went 
to work and got the postoffice removed there, and the name 
changed from Harlleesville to Little Rock. No opposition 
developing to the removal or change of names, as some parties 
who had procured a lot close at hand started a grog ship ; and 
those who would have protested under other conditions and 
circumstances, were glad of the change of name; the grog 
shop, however, was short-lived, and there has never been one 
there since. It must not be inferred that Duncan E. was 
favorable to or a promoter of the grog-shop, for he was not, 
and was and always remained until his death a strictly temper- 
ate and moral man. Little Rock boomed for a while. At one 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 295 

time there were eight or ten stores in full blast and a large 
amount of business was done there. J. W. Dillon commenced 
business at that point and accumulated much of his large for- 
tune there; he remained there until the railroad was projected 
and the town of Dillon established, and he removed all his 
business to that point. Duncan E. McCormick first married 
Martha Beckwith, and raised a family of three sons and two 
daugliters. Mary, the eldest, married John McGirt, of Robe- 
son County, N. C. ; they have a large family of sons and 
daughters. Flora married John C. Hargrove, son of Asa 
Hargrove ; he first moved to North Carolina, and then to Mis- 
sissippi, where they now live, and have several sons and daugh- 
ters, all grown. Duncan E. had three sons, John, Philip and 
General (nick-name), all of whom' were gallant soldiers of the 
Confederacy, and after the war all of them removed' to Texas, 
where they are good citizens. Duncan E. McCormick's second 
marriage was to Harriet Walters, the widow of William 
Walters; she was the daugliter of one Ridgell, and in her 
marriage with William Walters had two daughters and one 
son. The eldest daughter, Bettie, married Daniel W. Alford, 
and they live at Dillon, S. C, and have two daughters and 
one son. The youngest daughter, Willie (Walters), married 
R. A. Brunson, after the war, and had two daughters and one 
son ; she is now dead. Augustus J. Walters, the son, married 
Sallie, the daughter of Alfred Edino; they now live at For- 
reston. Clarendon County, S. C, and have two sons and one 
daughter, all grown — ^the latter married. In his second mar- 
riage, Duncan E. had one son and three daug'hters. The son, 
A. P. McCormick, was a brilliant young man, was a lawyer and 
died soon after his admission to the bar. His eldest daughter 
(by the second marriage), Georgianna, married Duncan 
McLaurin, one of Dillon's most prominent and progressive 
citizens ; he was the first settler in the new town, was its first 
Postmaster, and on the organization of the town was its first 
Mayor or Intendant ; he owns three fine plantations ; one near 
the town of Dillon, one on the east side of Little Pee Dee, in 
Carmichael Township, and one above Little Rock, which in- 
cludes the old William Walters homestead ; he is a large stock- 
holder in the Dillon Tobacco Warehouse, in the Dillon Bank, 
20 



296 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

oil mill and the new cotton factory ; he has three children, two 
sons and one daug'hter, all of whom are living with him. The 
other two daughters of Duncan E. McCormick, Ada and Ellen, 
the youngest children, and were twins. Ellen died when about 
grown. Ada married W. Boone White, and they live in For- 
reston, in Clarendon County, S. C. "Little Mack McCor- 
mick," so-called, I suppose, to distinguish him from some other 
larger Jdhn McConmick, was a capital man and of unique 
character; he loved whiskey and sometimes drank too much, 
perfectly harmless when drinking, and at such times was very 
religious, and talked religion a great deal. On one occasion, 
in the fall of 1839, the writer chanced to spend the night 
together with "L,ittle Mack" and his wife at old man Gilbert 
McEachern's on Hayes Swamp. "Little Mack" married the 
sister of old Gilbert, who at the time had a lot of hard cider on 
hand. It was on Saturday night. During the afternoon and 
evening the cider was passed around pretty frequently, and 
"Little Mack" got pretty tight. The writer in those days did 
not drink cider or anything stronger — besides, I went there to 
see Miss Margaret Ann, a diaughter of old man Gilbert, and a 
nice girl she was, too — 'hence I did not join in the cider drink- 
ing. At a late hour we all retired. Before day the next 
morning (Sunday), I was awaked by "Little Mack," who slept 
in a room adjacent to mine, singing aloud so as to be heard 
throug'h the w'hole house, the following familiar lines : 

' 'Sweet is the day of sacred rest, 
No mortal care shall seize my breast; 
O may my heart in tune be found 
Like David's harp of solemn sound," &c. 

He did not stop at singing one verse, but kept on until the 
whole hymn was sung, and aroused the whole house — to which 
he gave a lecture on Sabbath observance. Another instance 
of his religious zeal when "in his cups" is related as follows: 
Away back in the thirties, there was a circuit preacher on this 
circuit by the name of Mahoney. At one of his revival meet- 
ings or a camp meeting, which were very common in that day, 
"Little Mack" professed religion. Some years afterward, 
Mahoney paid a visit to his people about Harlleesville, and had 
an appointment to preach at Liberty Chapel, as it was then 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 297 

called. Mahoney was very popular when he was on the 
circuit, and consequently a great many went to hear and to see 
him, and among them' was "Little Mack" — 'he went pretty 
tight. On meeting Mahoney, he grabbed his hand and said, 
"O, Brother Ma'honey ; I am so glad to see you. I never will 
forget yoa, for you were the one that converted my soul." 
To which Mahoney replied, "It looks like some of my bung- 
ling work; if God had converted your soul, you would not 
have been here to-day drunk." Notwithstanding this stinging 
reply of Mahoney, "Little Mack" was not nonplussed in the 
least, but insisted that his conversion was genuine, and Brother 
Mahoney was the instrument. There were worse men than 
"Little Mack," if he did drink ; he has been dead fifty years or 
more — requiescat in pace. 

Another family of McCormicks will next be noticed. Neill 
McCormick, known as Squire Neill, was the elder brother of 
"Little Mack," and lived in the fork of Hays and Persimmon 
Swamps, adjoining the McKellars and the McArthurs ; his old 
homestead is now owned by D. J. McKay; he married Katie 
McDonald, a direct descendant of Flora McDonald, of Revo- 
lutionary fame, and her grand-daughter, Bettie McCorenick, 
married another descendant of the same heroine, Hugh A. 
McDonald, who now lives at Dillon, S. C. Squire Neill had 
eight sons and one daughter. His elder sons, Daniel, Joe and 
John, went West — the first to Mississippi, the two latter to 
Texas, where they all married and raised families. Randall 
and Wylie died soon after reaching manhood, and the three 
others, James, Thomas and Frank, were all killed in battle in 
Virginia. James and Thomas were in Fairlee's old company, 
Orr's Rifles; Frank was in Captain Stafford's company. 
Thomas and Frank were both killed in the second battle of Ma- 
nassas, at about the same time, and James was killed at Gaines' 
Mill. The latter married Drusilla McCormick, of North 
Carolina, and left a family of two sons and four daughters. 
The eldest, Warren Alford McCormick, married a Miss Wise, 
and moved to Marlboroug'h, where they now live. The other 
married Virgie Legette, the great^grand-daughter of old James 
McArthur, and lives on his old home place. One of the 
■daughters. Flora Amanda, married T. R. McLellan, who is 



298 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

dead ; but she, with a large family of sons and daug'hters, sur- 
vives. Laura, another daughter, married Henry Barnes, of 
North Carolina. Another married Richard Atkinson, of North 
Carolina, and they live at McCoU, S. C. ; and the youngest, as 
noted above, married Captain Hugh A. McDonald, of Cumber- 
land County, N. C. ; he was a gallant soldier of the Confed- 
CTacy ; they now live at Dillon, S. C, and have a large family of 
children. The one daughter of Squire Neill McCormick, Ma- 
nila, married Neill McEachern, and they left two daughters 
and three sons. One of the daughters, Manila, married 
Charles Altman, and they, with a grown up family of five child- 
ren, live in Horry County. The other daughter. Flora, mar- 
ried James McKellar, both of whom! are dead, and left several 
children — ^the youngest son, Peter McKellar, being a pros- 
perous merchant at Bemiettsville, S. C, where he married a 
niece of Hon. Joshua H. Hudson. Of the three sons of 
Neill McEachern, William died just as he was grown. Ed- 
mund Q. served through the war, and died soon after. John 
C. McEachern is still living ; he, too, was one of the heroes who 
served from the beginning to the end in the cause which was 
lost; he was a private in Fairlee's company, and bears the 
lionorable marks of service on his person ; soon after the war 
he married Jennie, a daughter of "Hatter" John Carmichael, 
and they have raised a family of four sons and two daughters, 
and he and his family live on his fine farm in the fork of Little 
Pee Dee and Hayes Swamp. The widow of Squire Neill Mc- 
Cormick lived to a very great age, and died on his homestead 
since the war. Neill McEachern after the death of his wife, 
Manila, again married, Sallie McCall, of North Carolina, by 
whom he raised a family of four sons and two daughters. 
Neill Duncan, the eldest, married Margaret McDuffie, daughter 
of Neill McDufifie, and has a family of four daug'hters ; he lives 
at McColl, S. C. Robert Bruce, the next son, married Ama- 
rantha, daughter of A. S. Buie, and bas a family of one son and 
three daug'hters; they live near Hamer, S. C. Peter G. and 
Edmund Bishop McEachern, the two youngest sons, live on 
their fine plantation, near Hamer, and their mother and two 
sisters live with them ; neither of them> have married ; they are 
up-to-date, progressive farmers, and it is said of them that no 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 299 

matter how high the price of cotton may rule, they always 
keep a lot for a better price. The writer heard a candidate 
who visited these McEachems say that he saw eleven fat 
Chester hogs there that would average 400 pounds each, be- 
sides a number of smaller ones — that was some three years 
ago; they owe no one anything; they have much more to sell 
than to buy. 

McArthur. — James McArthur was one of the original set- 
tlers on the north side of Hays Swamp and on the North Caro- 
lina State line; he married a Miss Campbell and raised a 
family of three sons and four daughters. The eldest daughter, 
Effie, married Gadi Braswell, and her only son, Richard H. 
Braswell, now owns and lives upoU' a part of the old McArthur 
lands or homestead, just across the State line. Mary, another 
daughter, married Richard J. Millsaps, and moved to another 
part of tihe McArthur lands or homestead in North Carolina; 
they had one daughter, Mary Jane, who married T. J. L,egette, 
and she now lives at Rowland, N. C. Her four daughters, the 
eldest, Louise, married Joseph A. McEachern, and she died, I 
think, childless. The next oldest married Robe Bond ; the third 
to James A. McCormi-ck, and the fourth and youngest to W. A. 
Ivey, who lives at Dillon, S. C. — all of them owning part of 
the McArthur lands. The other two daughters, Katie and 
Jennie, never married, and both of them died at advanced ages 
since the war. Alexander, John and James were his three sons. 
The two former lived to be old men and never married, and 
died since the war ; both of them were too old for service in the 
army, but were patriotic citizens and contributed all in their 
power to the success of the cause that was lost. James, the 
youngest son, married Sarah McDonald, daug'hter of Neil! 
McDonald, in the "old Fork," which is known in that region 
as such, being the territory in the fork of S'hoe Heel Creek and 
Wilkinson Swamp and Little Pee Dee River; they had one 
child, a daughter, EUa, wbo married George R. Campbell, of 
North Carolina, and they live on their father's old homestead, 
or a part of it; Mr. Campbell is a good farmer and a good 
citizen. James McArthur went to the front in the beginning 
of the war, in Captain Stafford's company; was sent to the 



300 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

hospital, sick, at Culpeper C. H., and was never heard from 
after being sent from his company, and it is supposed that he 
died there, and is one of the many unknown dead whose re- 
mains repose in the soil of old Virginia. His widow, in 1873, 
married M. M. Watson, of North Carolina, who was a gallant 
soldier in the Confederate army, and lost a leg in the service ; 
he was one of our most respected adopted citizens at his death, 
and his widow died soon after; they left two sons and one 
daug'hter, and they live on another part of the old McArthur 
homestead, and are progressive and industrious young men. 

McIntyrE. — Dougald, Daniel, Duncan and Archie Mclnltyre, 
four brothers, came from Scotland to Marion County in the 
early part of the nineteenth century — say from 1815 to 1820; 
all of them grown young men. Dougald, ithe eldest, married in 
Scotland ; his wife was Lilly Campbell ; they settled on the place 
where they lived and died, and where their diaughters, Jennette 
and Lilly, now reside ; they raised a family of twelve children, 
six sons and six daughters — ^the two eldest of whom, Elizabeth 
and John B., were bom in Scotland ; the sons were John B., 
Dougald C, Joseph, Duncan ET., James and William Wallace 
Mclntyre — none of them are now living; the daughters were 
Elizabeth, Jennette, Nancy, Margaret, Lilly and Mary. John 
B., the eldest son, was a tailor by trade ; moved to North Caro- 
lina; he married Civil Legette, and lived until after the war, 
when he acquired the farm near Hamer, where he remained 
until his dteath; he raised six children — three sons and three 
diaughters ; the sons were Jdhn A., Cousar and Dougald ; and 
the dauifhters were Sarah, Mary and Margaret. John A. lives 
in North Carolina, and is unmarried. Dougald married Lilly 
Faulk, of Selkirk, and lives in North Carolina. Cousar mar- 
ried Fannie Willis, and moved to Georgia. Sarah, the eldest 
daughter of John B., married John W. McMillan. Mary 
married John W. McLean, and is still a resident of the neigh- 
borhood. Margaret is unmarried, and lives with her brother, 
Dougald, in North Carolina. Dougald C, second son of old 
Dougald, moved to Robeson County, N. C, when quite a young 
man, and remained there during his life ; he was a leading spirit 
in many benevolent and public enterprises in his county, and 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 801 

for a long time filled the office of School Commissioner and 
also -that of Magistrate ; his widow and several children and 
many grand-children survive him, and are among the most 
highly respected people of Robeson County. Joseph, the third 
son of old Dougald, was an energetic and active farmer ; at the 
outbreak of the war he volunteered and went to the front, 
where he remained until the surrender; be married Emaline 
Carmichael, a daughter of Sheriff Archie Carmichael, and 
settled on the place near Hamer, where they lived and where 
they both died, leaving a family of seven children — ^three sons 
and four daughters; the sons are Duncan, Archie and Leigh- 
ton; the daughters are Nettie, Ivizzie, Isla and Blanche, and 
have all, with one exception, removed elsewhere. Duncan 
went to Texas. Archie married Katie McLellan, daughter 
of Timothy R. McLellan, and settled on a place ad^joining that 
of bis aunt. Leig^hton is an invalid, and lives with his sister. 
Nettie, the eldest daughter, married J. Edgar Bass ; they live 
in Florida; this couple when they marriedi weighed over five 
hundred pounds avoirdupois. L,izzie, Isla and Blanche are 
single, and live in Dillon, with their invalid brother, Leighton. 
Duncan E., the fourth son of old Dougald, was a Presbyterian 
minister ; he was pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Helena, 
Ark., when the war commenced ; he returned to his old home, 
and in order that his brother, James, who was the business 
manager and dependence of his widowed mother, mig'ht remain 
with her and his sisters, be went to the front as a substitute 
for his brother, James, and died while in service. James, the 
fifth son of old Dougald, was a man of some sterling qualities, 
was noted for his kindness of heart, and his affectionate care 
for those dependent upon him ; he lived with his mother until 
after the war, when his younger brother, Wallace, succeeded 
him; he married Mrs. Rebecca McCormick, a daughter of 
Woodward Manning, and removed to his late residence on 
Buck Swamp ; his widow and one son survive him ; the son's 
name is W. M. Mclntyre. William Wallace, the sixth son of 
old Dougald, the youngest of the six brothers, was an active 
and progressive farmer ; he lived with his mother and sisters, 
managing the farm, and also owned the place near Hamer, 
now the property of Frank Edens ; he served through the war 



302 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

in Co. I, Tenth Regiment, S. C. V. The daughters of old 
Dougald Mclntyre, Elizabeth, Jennette, Nancy and Lilly, never 
married. Elizabeth and Nancy are dead. Jennette and Lilly 
are living on the old homiestead. Margaret married A. C. Mc- 
Kenzie, and lives in North Carolina. Daniel Mclntyre, one of 
the four brothers from Scotland, was a farmer; he settled on a 
place adjacent to that 'of his brother, Dougald, where he lived 
and died ; he married Mary Carmichael, a daughter of "Com- 
modore" Dougald Carmichael, and had three sons — Etougald 
W., John C. and Duncan A. Mclntyre — none of whom' are now 
living. Dougald W. was a farmer and surveyor ; he was twice 
married ; first, to Margaret McArthur, of North Carolina ; she 
died, leaving three children — one son. Palmer, and two daugh- 
ters, Celestia and Rosanna ; both of whom are married and live 
in North Carolina. His second wife was Katie Roberts ; she 
died, leaving six children' — one son, Donald, and five daughters, 
Margaret, Kittie, Delia, Lilly and Cora; all are single, and 
with their elder brother. Palmer, and live on the homestead of 
their father. John C, second son of Daniel Mclntyre, was by 
occupation a farmer ; at the breaking out of the war he enlisted 
in the Confederate army and went to the front ; he was severely 
wounded in battle, from which he never entirely recovered ; he 
mairried Sarah Ann Carmichael, a daughter of Captain Neill 
M. Carmichael, and settled on the 0I4, homestead of his Grand- 
father Carmichael, on Pee Dee, where he lived for several years ; 
afterwards moved to the home of his father, whose failiijg 
health required the care and attention he and 'his kind-hearted 
wife couM give him ; his father died soon after, leaving to him 
the place, but he survived his father but a short while ; his wife, 
also, is dead; they had five children, two sons and three 
daughters; the sons are Jefferson D. and Daniel Frank; the 
daughters are Loretta, Mary Catling and Orella. Jefferson is 
an energetic and progressive farmer; he lives on his farm, 
near Hamer; he married Louise Carmichael, a daughter 
of Archie M. Carmichael. Daniel, Frank and his eldest 
sister, Loretta, are single, and live on the homestead of 
their father. Mary Cutting married G. Raymond Berry, and 
they live at Dillon, S. C. G. Raymond Berry is now the County 
Superintendent of Education. Orella married Peter Stewart, 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 803 

of North Carolina, and they live on their farm, near Carmi- 
chael. Duncan A., third son of Daniel Mclntyre, was a man 
of some education and business attainments ; he was engaged 
in teaching school at the outbreak of the war ; he enlisted in the 
Confederate army and served through the war; after the war 
,he accepted a clerkship with S. A. Durham & Co., of Marion, 
where he remained several years ; he married Anne Legette, a 
daughter of Dr. A. S. Legette, of Centenary, and removed to 
Centenary, but died soon after, leaving one son, Daniel 
Mclntyre. Duncan and Archie, brothers of Dougald and 
Daniel Mclntyre. Duncan was a Presbyterian preacher; he 
died unmarried, while still a young man. Archie married Miss 
Effie McCollum', of North Carolina — I believe, an aunt of the 
late Brown McCollum — and settled on land adjoining his 
brother, Daniel ; and after Ijaving four or five children, sold his 
land, 175 acres, to the writer, in 1836, for $225, and moved to 
Alabama. Mary Mclntyre, daughter of old Dougald, mar- 
ried Joseph W. Williamson, and they settled on their home- 
stead, near Kentyre Church, where they lived, and where 
they both died in the prime of life, leaving a family of seven 
children, several of whom were quite small. In connection 
with the Mclntyres of Carmichael Township, another -family 
of the same name in the county will here be noticed — I mean 
the Mclnltyres of the town of Marion. Archie Mclntyre 
was the first known of this family — don't know where he came 
from or anything of his parentage ; he was, doubtless, a Scotch- 
man; he was a tailor by trade — this in former times was a 
lucrtitive trade; he married Miss Sophia Howard, of West 
Marion, daughter of old man Richard Howard, of that section, 
who was both wealthy and prominent in his day. Archie 
Mclntyre settled in Marion, and lived there all his life ; by his 
marriage he had seven sons and three daughters, that were 
raised; the sons were Richard, Robert C, Duncan, Archie, 
George A., Joseph and Douglas ; the daughters were Matilda, 
Rebecca and Sallie. Of the sons, Richard married Miss 
McCoU, and settled in West Marion; he had one son, named 
Richard (may have had other children) ; Richard, Sr., died, 
while yet young, and his widow married Rev. D. E. Frierson, 
a Presbyterian minister of some note, and went to Anderson 



304 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

County. Richard Mclntyre, Jr., grew up and married a 
Miss McPherson, daughter of Robert McPherson, of West 
Marion ; he had some family, don't know how many or 
of w'hat sex ; he died a few years ago, and left his widow and 
family on the homiestead, and they are still there. Think Rich- 
ard (senior) was a graduate of the South Carolina College, 
and a young man of promise. Robert Charles, the second son, 
was also a graduate of the South Carolina College ; he married, 
first, a Miss M-urdoch, of Marlborough County ; she died in a 
few years, childless, when he married, a second time, a sister 
of his first wife. These Murdoch girls had two brothers, who 
both died young, unmarried ; 'hence the fine plantation of their 
father, near "Beauty Spot," in Marlborough, fell to Mrs. 
Mclntyre; they moved up there and raised a considerable 
family of sons and daughters, all of whom are now grown. 
The mother died, and Robert Charles and his family surviving, 
reside thereon. Robert Charles Mclntyre was quite a literary 
man, was a Magistrate for some years in Marion, soon after 
the close of the war ; he was very capable and filled that posi- 
tion very acceptably. Duncan Mclntyre, the third son of 
Archie Mclntyre, married, first, Miss Rosa Evans, a daughter 
of General William Evans ; she died, childless, after a year or 
so, and he married again, the widow of John C. McClannaghan, 
whose maiden name was Betts, a daughter of Rev. Charles 
Betts, of grateful m'emory ; they have no offspring, and live in 
West Marion or Florence County. In the early part of the 
war, Duncan Mclntyre raised a company as Captain, which 
formed a part of the Eighth South Carolina Regiment, and 
gallantly went through the war; he also went to the South 
Carolina College, but think his educational course in that 
institution was interrupted by the war; be, though, is a well- 
informed man. Archibald Mclntyre, the fourth son of Archie 
Mclntyre, Sr., grew up, and married Miss Martha Betts, 
another daughter of Rev. Charles Betts, about the commence- 
ment of the war ; Archie, notwithstanding his recent marriage, 
volunteered in the first company (Captain M. B. Stanley's) 
that left Marion for Morris Island, near Charleston, the 
4th January, 1861. After the capture of Fort Sumter by the 
Confederate forces, the company was reorganized, and W. P. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 305 

S'booter, who was First Lieutenant in the original company, 
was elected Captain, in which Ardiie, Jr., was a member ; they 
went to Virginia, and in some of the early battles in that fron- 
tier State was fatally wounded and died — a more gallant soldier 
was not in the Confederate army. Dr. A. Mclntyre, now in 
the town of Marion, a prominent practicing physician, was 
born, I think, a short time after his father's death ; the widow 
married, a second time, Dr. E. B. Smith, an able physician, and 
a most excellent farmer, below Marion, who has a family of 
sons and, perhaps, daughters; one or two of Dr. Smith's sons 
are practicing physicians. George A. Mclntyre, the fifth son 
of Archie, Sr., was a young man at the beginning of the war, 
was also a Lieutenant in Captain Stanley's, afterwards Captain 
Shooter's company ; voilunteered and went to the front, and re- 
mained in the service till he lost his arm ; he became Captain of 
the company after the promotion of Captain Shootfer to a Lieu- 
tenant Colonelcy. After Captain G. A. Mclntyre became dis- 
abled for active service by the loss of an arm, he was appointed 
enrolling officer and assigned to Marion, and continued to per- 
form the duties of that ix>sition to the end of the war. Soon 
after the war. Captain McInt)Tre married Miss Emma Young, 
daugliter of Major Johnson B. Young, and settled on a part 
of his mother's fine plantation, on the west side of Catfish, and 
has succeeded well in his calling. At one time since the 
redemption of the State from carpet-bag and scallawag rule, 
in 1876, Captain Mclntyre was appointed County Treasurer, 
which position he honestly and faithfully filled for three or four 
years, when 'he resigned, or declined a further appointment; 
since whidh time he has been in retirement upon his excellent 
farm, and may be truthiuUy said to be one of our best citizens ; 
he has raised a considerable family, mostly or all girls. One 
married W. C. Foxworth, who lives near him, and I think, 
another one is also married, but to whom is not remembered. 
Captain Mclntyre is a model man and is what is termed the 
noblest work of God, "an honest man." Joseph Mclntyre, the 
sixth son of Archie, Sr., went into the war and was a gallant 
soldier; married Miss Mary Mullins, ol-dest daughter of the 
late Colonel W. S. Mullins; they first settled over Catfish, on a 
part of the late Daniel F. Berry's lands, where he farmed for 



306 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

several years with as much success as might be expected on 
such a place ; after a Avhile there was a division of the large 
body of the MuUins lands, near Mullins, and the old Mullins 
homestead was allotted to Mrs. Mclntyre, to which they moved 
and now own, and are doing fairly well; they have several 
children, how many or of what sex is unknown. Douglas 
Mclntyre, the seventh and youngest son of Archie, St., is a 
prominent and leading merchant of Marion, and has been for 
several years ; he married, first. Miss Jennie Moody, a daughter 
of E. J. Moody ; by the marriage three children were born, as I 
think, two daughters and one son, or vice versa; his first wife 
dying, he married a Miss Fore, daughter of the late Daniel 
Fore, by whom he has some children, all small. His oldest 
daughter, Jennie, by his first marriage, married Robert Proc^ 
tor, and they have gone West. Douglas Mclntyre, in addition 
to his large ihercantile interest, has a large farm nearby town, 
which he successfully runs ; he is full of energy and enterprise 
and a model citizen; he was honored some few years ago by 
his fellow-citizens with a seat in the Representative branch of 
the State L/Cgislature, which position he filled with credit to 
him'self and satisfaction to his people. Archie Mclntyre, Sr., 
had three daug'hters. The eldest, Matilda, married Ezra M. 
Davis, of West Marion, a well-ito-do man; they raised a con- 
siderable family, but the writer does not know enough of them 
or about them to say more. Rebecca, the second daughter, 
married Rev. J. E. Dunlap, a brave and daring soldier of the 
Confederacy, in which he obtained the title of Colonel, and was 
and is a preacher of the Presbyterian Church — an able preacher 
he is; they raised a family of several children, sons and 
daughters ; his wife died some years ago, and Colonel Dunlap 
has had the misfortune to lose, by death, two or three of his 
grown and promising children. Some years ago. Colonel 
Dunlap resigne'd his pastorate of the Presbyterian Chur<3h in 
Marion, and moved to Williamsburg County, and has charge 
of two or more churches in that county ; he has not remarried, 
is yet a widower ; his children are all grown. Colonel Dunlap 
is a large-hearted man, brave as "Julius Caesar;" thinks for 
himself, and generally thinks right — no deceit in his make-up ; 
a friend to the poor and a warm sympathiser with the dis- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 307 

tressed — ^a friend indeed. Sallie Mclntyre, the third and 
youngest daughter of Archie, St., a charming lady, married 
Dr. D. F. Miles, our present and efficient Clerk of the Court, 
personally a very popular man; has just been elected to the 
third term; has been honored twice with a seat in the State 
Legislature; he has a farm some four or five miles from 
Marion ; they have had five children — ^three daughters and two 
sons ; the daughters are Sophia, Mary and L,illian — all married. 
Sophia ma.rried Charles E. Evans; they have three or four 
children. Mary married Lanneau Stackhouse ; they have, per- 
haps, two children. Lillian married a Mr. Owens, first name 
not remembered; they all reside in Marion, and are good 
women. Dr. Miles and his wife, Sallie, had two sons, Frank 
and Lanneau. Frank, just at manhood, sickened and died, in 
1899 ; so they have but one son left, spes gregis, who, is a lad — 
hope he will live and help keep up and perpetuate the name. 
Archie Mclntyre, Sr., though he began life as a tailor, man- 
aged well and accumulated a large property,- and left it unen- 
cumbered for his widow and children; several of his children 
were small when he died, but the widow was a good manager 
also, and kept the estate free from debt, and at her death 
transmitted the same to them unencumbered. Archie Mcln- 
tyre, Sr., though a tailor, like Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee, 
and who became President of the United States, was no ordi- 
nary man; he and his wife, Sophia, raised a family of high 
standing in every way. Of such a parentage their children 
and grand-children ought to be proud. 

McKiNLY. — ^John McKimly and his wife, who was Catharine 
McNish, and their children, Daniel, Duncan and Neill, Mary 
and Jennette, came from Scotlandyand settled on the homestead, 
where they lived and died, and later where their children, Neill 
and Jennette, lived and died. Daniel, the oldest, was twenty- 
one years old when they landed, and Neill, the youngest, was 
six. Daniel married a Miss McCormic, of North Carolina, and 
settled on the place adjacent to the homestead of his father, 
where he lived and died ; he applied himself to his chosen occu- 
pation with energy and perseverance, was a farmer on the in- 
tensive system of farming, and attained considerable success ; 



308 A HISTORY O-e MARION COUNTY. 

he had only one child, a son, Duncan C. McKinly ; he was like- 
wise a farmer, and settled on his fine farm near Kentyre 
Church; he married Saraih Gaddy, a daughter of William 
Gaddy; they had four children, two sons and two daughters; 
the sons are William D. and John D. ; the daughters are Leo- 
nora and Mary. William D. removed elsewhere. John D. 
married Florence McKenzie, a daughter of David J. McKenzie ; 
they live in Dillon. Mary is dead. Leonora married Hugh 
McLean, and they moved to Florida. Duncan C. McKinly, the 
father, is dead. Duncan, the son of old John, engaged in com- 
mercial pursuits and moved to Mississippi, where he accumu- 
lated a large property, but never married, and is dead. Neill 
McKinly never married, nor did his sister, Jennette ; they lived 
and died on the homestead of their father, John McKinly. 
Duncan C. ultimately got all the property of his Uncle Duncan, 
of Mississippi, all his father's, and all his Uncle Neill's and 
Aunt Jennette's ; but it seemed not to do him or his family any 
good— only whilst it was going ; he died poor. Mary, the old- 
est daughter of old John McKinly, died unmarried, soon after 
attaining to womanhood. 

McLELtAN. — Alexander McLellan and his brother, Mal- 
colm, came to this country from Scotland, in the close of the 
eighteenth century, and settled on the lands on which some of 
their descendants now live and own. Alexander was married 
in Scotland, to Mary McKinnon, and lived thefe for some time 
after his marriage, and several children were born to them 
there, who died in infancy ; one, a lad, named John, died after he 
settled here ; he resided on the place recently the 'home of J. W. 
Williamson, where Daniel Walker Campbell now lives, and he 
died there in 1838 or 1839 ; he devoted himself to farming and 
stock raising, accumulating considerable wealth ; of his children 
who reached maturity, there were four sons, Danidl, Duncan, 
Archie K. and Colin ; and one daughter. Flora. Daniel lived on 
the homestead of his father; never married and died in i860. 
Duncan lived on a farm adjacent to his brother and a part of 
his father's old homestead ; he never married, and died in 1872. 
The plantation where Duncan lived has been divided — z part 
owned by R. P. Hamer, Sr., another part by R. P. Hamer, Jr., 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 309 

and still another part by Neill McDuffie, and on which he now 
resides. Archie K. McLellan married Miss Harriet Rogers, a 
daughter of Timothy Rogers, 4th December, 1833 (where Dr. 
J. F. Bethea now resides). The writer attended the wedding; 
there were more people there than he ever saw convened on 
such an occasion — ^the cavalcade that accompanied the groom 
was over one hundred. He settled on lands adjoining his 
brothers, Daniel and Duncan, and near his father's homestead, 
and resided there for many years, and then removed to North 
Carolina, remaining there till after the death of his brother, 
Duncan, and inheriting the homestead tract of his brother, he 
returned to South Carolina, and lived until his death, in 1887 ; 
he raised a large family of children — nine sons and five daugh- 
ter; the sons were Malcolm, Alexander, Timothy R., Daniel, 
John B., Archie K., Jr., F. Tristram, Duncan and Robert. 
Malcolm moved to Pollard, Ala., when quite a youth; was 
married there to Miss Celia Jernagen, and lived and died there. 
Alexander was a brave and gallant soldier in a North Carolina 
regiment; he was captured and died in prison. He married, 
during the war. Miss Roxanna Gaddy, but left no children. 
Timothy R. married Flora Amanda McCormick, daughter of 
James Hunt McCormick ; he resided near the old homestead of 
his father until his death, in 1897 ; his widow and eight child- 
ren, four sons and four daughters, survive him. Daniel lived 
with his father until his death, and remained there until the old 
homestead was broken up and sold for division; he married 
Miss Sallie Legette, of North Carolina, in 1888; after her 
death, in 1892, he removed to North Carolina, where he now 
lives. John B., on attaining his majority, went to Benton, 
Ala., where he remained during his life; he was a man of 
splendid ability, and was elected to an important office of public 
trust, which he filled for many years ; he was married to Miss 
Patty Blackshear, of Alabama, who, with three daughters, sur- 
vive him. Archie K., Jr., lives in North Carolint, and is 
unmarried. F. Tristram is at present writing the very efficient 
Auditor of Marion County, to which he was elected in 1896, 
and again in 1898, and resides at Marion C. H. ; he married, 
in 1899, Miss Harrelson, of this county. Duncan formerly 
lived in this county, but removed to North Carolina; he has 



810 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

been twice married; first, to Miss Hannah Wiggins, and then 
to a Miss Willis ; his first wife left two children, a son and a 
daughter. The son, John Robert, was adopted by his Uncle 
Tristram, and is the Assistant Auditor of the county ; he is a 
bright and intelligent youth. The daughters of Archie K., Sr., 
were Sarah, Margaret, Mary Ann, Flora and Moranza. Mar- 
garet married Allen Seely, and moved to North Carolina. 
Mary Ann married Archie Stewart, and also moved to North 
Carolina. The other daughters, Sarah, Flora and Moranza, 
are all unmarried, and live with their brother, Archie K., Jr., 
in North Carolina. Flora, the daughter of old Alexander 
McLellan, married' Dougald B. Carmichael ; they both lived on 
the place they settled upon, and died there; it is now owned 
and occupied by their youngest son, Malcolm C. Carmichael; 
she died at an advanced age, in 1877, her husband having died, 
in 1857, at the age of seventy-eight; the fruits of their mar- 
riage were two daughters, Mary Ann and Catharine, and five 
sons, Alexander A., Duncan C, Daniel, John L. and Malcolm C. 
Mary Ann, the oldest daughter (and, I believe, the oldest 
child), married Neill McDuffie; both are still living,* in far 
advanced age; they and their numerous family will be further 
noticed among the McDuffie family, sequeus. The daughter, 
Catharine, married Neill B. McQueen ; she lived only a short 
time, and died ; it is not known whether she left any offspring. 
The five sons all volunteered in the early part of the war ; three 
of them, Alexander A., Daniel and John L., were killed or died 
in the service; the other two remained in service to the end, 
and returned home; Duncan C. and Malcolm C. still live, and 
are energetic and progressive farmers; have fine lands and 
are successful. Duncan C. Carmichael (farniliarly called 
"Red Duncan"), married, first, Miss Sallie McKinnon, of 
North Carolina; she died, leaving two children — one son, 
Dougald A., and one daughter, Charlotte. Dougald A. went 
to Georgia, where he still lives. Charlotte married NeiU J. 
Carmichael; he married, the second time, Lemantha Walters, 
of North Carolina; she has four children, none of whom are 
grown. Malcolm C. Carmichael, fifth son of Dougald B. and 

*She (Mary Ann McDuffie) died a short time ago; her husband, Neill 
McDuffie, yet survives, eighty-three years of age, 15th March, 1901. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 311 

Flora, married Miss Amanda Carmichael, daughter of "Hatter 
John;" they have eight children — ^four sons, Albert E., John 
L., Neill C. and Walter; four daughters. Flora C, Ann 
Murphy, Martha and Mary. Albert E. and Neill C. moved to 
Mississippi, where they are prosperously engaged in the tur- 
pentine business. John L. died when about eight years old. 
Walter, the youngest son, is still at school. Flora C, the eldest 
daughter, married S. A. McQueen, of North Carolina; they live 
at Red Springs, N. C. Ann Murphy married Alexander 
McLellan, and they live at Dillon. Martha and Mary are still 
single, and are with their parents. Dougald B. Carmichael, 
the husband and father, was a very quiet, peaceable man, of 
lymphatic temperament and a man of remarkable equanimity ; 
he was a blacksmith by trade — 'a. good trade in those days ; he 
did a great deal of work in the shop, whilst his wife, Flora, 
looked after the 'house department and somewhat after the 
farm; and after his death she looked after it all, except the 
blacksmith shop; Mrs. Carmichael was no ordinary woman; 
she had mind enough to grasp anything and everything in the 
affairs of life ; a woman of fine physique, her mental qualities 
were of a superior order ; of sanguine temperament, a cheerful 
disposition, of boundless ambition, and had the energy to back 
it up; made 'her hospitable home the seat of comfort ;• method 
and order were displayed in all the household affairs ; she took 
the troubles of the war, the death of her daughter, Catharine, 
and husband, the loss of three sons in the struggles of war, 
philosophically, and with heroic courage set to work to repair 
the losses in property and means as far as s'he could, and help 
and render comfortable her surviving children ; she succeeded 
well in so doing, and left them not only in homes of their own, 
but also left them her virtuous example, which is worth more 
than gold and silver. Colin McLellan, the youngest son and 
youngest child of old Alexandter McLellan, married Rebecca 
Bethea, oldest daughter of "Buck Swamp" William Bethea ; he 
settled on the place where he lived and died, in 1858 ; he was 
a successful farmer ; he raised a family of four children, two 
sons and two daughters ; the sons were William and Daniel ; 
the two daughters were Mary and Flora. The sons were Con- 
federate soldiers and served through the war in Captain Ful- 
21 



312 A HISTORY 0:P MARION COUNTY. 

more'6 company, Fifty-first Regiment, North Carolina Volun- 
teers. Daniel died at the old home, in 1868, when quite a 
young man. William moved to North Carolina, and married 
Victoria McCormick, a daughter of James McCormick; he 
settled on lands inherited from his father in North Carolina, 
and was a successful farmer ; but in a personal difficulty with 
an employee, Thomas Gilchrist, he was shot and killed, in 1872. 
Mary, the eldest daughter, married Carl Faulk, and moved to 
North Carolina, and died a few years ago. Flora married 
Richard Faulk, and resided for several years on her father's 
old homestead, on Buck Swamp, but removed to North Caro- 
lina a few years ago, where she now lives. 

There was and is another family of McLellans in the county. 
The first of them known to the writer was Rev. Archie 
McL,ellan, and a blacksmith; he lived on the south side of 
Catfish, on Pigeon Bay; he was a local Methodist preacher; 
had a small farm, which he cultivated; he was a good man — 
the "salt of the earth ;" he married a Miss Buie ; had and raised 
a considerable family of several sons and daughters; he hud 
also two orphan nephews, sons of a deceased brother, whom he 
raised' — their names were John and Angus McLellan. Just 
before the war, the old gentleman sold his place on Pigeon Bay, 
and moved off to Britton's Neck, and bought another place, 
where he lived and died some time after the war ; by his re- 
moval the writer lost sight of his family. Two sons, Peter 
and Enos, are remembered, and only two daughters are remem- 
bered^ — one named Elizabeth, the other name not remembred, 
but she married a Mr. Moore. His two oldest children, Eliza- 
beth and Peter, together with his nephews, John and Angus, 
went to school to the writer in 1840, sixty years ago. Peter 
Mcl/ellan was also a blacksmith ; he married a Miss Lane, a 
daughter of the late James C. Lane, and lived and followed his 
trade for some years at Little Rock, S. C. ; he died and left 
some family; of them, however, nothing is known. Enos, 
another son, married a Miss Myers, of West Marion, and now 
lives at Dillon, a widower — his wife having died some years 
ago ; he has not remarried^ ; he has four or five daughters, some 
of whom are grown ; he is a poor man, but a man of fine char- 
acter, strict integrity and a hard worker. Elizabeth, the oldest 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 318 

child, has never married. Mrs. Moore was made a widow, 
about the time of General Lee's surrender, by the atrocious 
murder of her husband, at Little Rock. Moore was a good 
soldier of the Confederacy, was at home at the time, near Little 
Rock, on furlough, with a broken arm in a sling — fresh from a 
battle, in which his arm had been broken by a Minie ball or 
piece of shell ; he went up to Little Rock, one afternoon, where 
he met with some parties who had imbibed spirits other than 
the patriotic spirit of the times, and they charged him with 
being a spy for the deserters of Maple Swamp notoriety, which 
he denied most vigorously — yet they shot and broke his other 
arm ; he fell, and they walked up to him arid cut his throjat, 
dragged him off a few steps, and partially buried him in the 
jamb of a fence. His distressed wife, after the garrison came 
to Marion, went to the commandant for redress ; they said they 
had no jurisdiction in the matter, but they advised her to go to 
the civil authorities and get a warrant for the arrest of the 
parties accused ; she accordingly did so, and the warrant was 
lodged with the Sheriff ; but no arrests were made, for reasons 
of State policy — ^that is, the authorities high in official life did 
not countenance prosecutions for murder committed during the 
war or just after the surrender — ^because, if the door was 
opened to such prosecutions, it would work both ways and 
would involve many of our best citizens ; hence the warrant in 
question was never executed. It was, nevertheless, an inex- 
cusable murder; the parties charged are all now dead, and 
have been for several years. I could specify more particularly 
as to the policy of the State, and as to the offense and the 
parties charged, but these things are already known. The 
widow remained in the neighborhood for two or three years 
and disappeared — at least, so far as is known to the writer. A 
girl raised by the late Samuel Stevenson (called Bettie Steven- 
son), and who married a Mr. Dozier, son of the late Dr. T. J. 
Dozier, of Britton's Neck, was the daughter of Mr. Moore, the 
man murdered — whether by a former marriage or by the 
McLellan marriage, the writer knoweth not. Old Archie 
McLellan, the preacher and blacksmith, -was a Scotchman, and, 
perhaps, related to the McLellans, of Carmichael Township; 
he was an upright and just man. 



814 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

S1NC1.AIR.— Archie Sinclair was a resident of Harlleesville 
Township, above Little Rock ; he came from Scotland, in 1820, 
and settled on the place wliere he lived and died ; his youngest 
daughter, Mary, now owning and living on his old homestead, 
and one of his grand-sons, A. M. McColI, living with her. (A. 
M. McColl died a few days ago, unmarried). He married, in 
Scotland, Catharine McGilvray, and they raised five sons and 
three daughters. The eldest son, John C, was born in Scot- 
land, and when he attained manhood here, was married to the 
Widow Jennette MeLucas ; he died in 1852. Duncan removed 
to Georgia, and married and died there, leaving a family of 
grown-up children. Captain Daniel C. was the third son; he 
served throughout the war in cavalry ; was one of the 'best farm- 
ers in the county, and a pioneer in the development of the now 
famous Contrary Swamp section of Carmichael Township ; he 
accumulated by his farming operations a handsome property; 
he never married, and died in 1882. The fourth son. Captain 
A. C. Sinclair, has already been mentioned in or among the Blue 
family. The fifth son, Malcolm, was a soldier in the Confeder- 
ate army, in Fairlee's company, Orr's Rifles, and died in the 
hospital in Charlottesville, Va. His eldest daughter, Nancy, 
married John L. McCall, Esq., of Marlborough, and they had a 
large family. Colonel C. S. McCall, of Bennettsville, is the eld- 
est ; he is one of the most successful men in the Pee Dee section 
of the State; conducts the largest mercantile business in this 
section, and owns several large plantations in Marlborough, 
which he, with his next oldest brother, T. Dickson McColl, 
manage very successfully ; he has been, since 1876, three times 
elected State Senator from Marlborough, and on account of 
his manifold business connections, declined further service in 
the Senate ; he has been frequently mentioned and solicited to 
become Governor of the State; he has never married. His 
other brothers, J. G. B. McColl and A. M. McColl (both now 
dead), own and successfully conduct the famous "Contrary 
Swamp" plantation, formerly owned by their uncle. Captain 
D. C. Sinclair; neither of them have ever married. The 
youngest son, John, is blind, but is a remarkably bright young 
man and a fine musician ; he and his mother live near Bennetts- 
ville. Since the death of Squire McCall, their eldest daughter 



A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 815 

married John A. Pate, and they live in Bamherg, S. C. The 
second daughter, Pocahontas, married a Mr. Roper, and lives 
in Williamsburg County. The third daughter, Kate, married 
Hon. H. H. Newton, and lives in Bennettsville. The youngest 
daughter, Sallie, married Joe Edens, and lives near Clio, S. 
C. The second daughter of old Archie Sinclair, Sallie, never 
married, and died in 1869. The youngest daughter, Mary 
Sinclair, as elsewhere herein imentioned, never married, and 
lives on the old Archie Sinclair homestead. There are but 
few of this family, but what there are of them seem to prosper 
in everything except in the matrimonial field — they don't marry 
much. 

McDuFFiE. — Alexander McDuffie, with his brothers, Dun- 
can, George and Daniel, were the sons of Archie McDuffie, who 
came from Scotland, and settled on the Raft Swamp, in North 
Carolina, and died there, his sons and two diaughters removing 
to this county after his death. Alexander, the eldest, settling 
on what is now known as the old "McDuffie place," on Little 
Pee Dee, where the Rev. J. H. Moody now lives ; he married 
Jennette McQueen, and had seven sons and two daughters. 
Mary, the eldest daughter, married Daniel Fore, on Spring 
Branch, who has already been noticed in or among the Fore 
family. The eldest daughter of Daniel and Mary Fore married 
Douglas Mclntyre, who has already been mentioned in or 
among the Mclntyres. Margaret, the other daughter of Alex- 
ander McDuffie, married Edward D. Carmichael, a son of 
"Hatter John," and had one child, a daughter, also named Mar- 
garet, and she lives with her aunts, Nancy and Katie Carmi- 
chael, on the old homestead of "Hatter John" Carmichael. 
Hon. A. Q. McDuffie was the oldest son, he was a lawyer, a 
graduate of Davidson College, and before he read law taught 
school for several years. The writer went to school to him at 
Pine Hill Academy, during the year 1844. He settled and lived 
and died at Marion Court House, and was for a long time the 
partner of General W. W. Harllee, and in their day had the 
finest practice of any firm at that bar ; he married the widow 
of Dr. James R. McQueen, who was the daughter of Captain 
Singletary, one of the old landmarks of Marion ; by this mar- 



316 A HISTORY 0^ MARION COUNTY. 

riage three children were born, a son, named Alexander, who 
died when two or three years old, and two daughters, L,izzie 
and Jennie; both are yet living, and unmarried. Lizzie, the 
eldest, is or was the finest female scholar in her day in the 
town of Marion ; she graduated at Due West Female College 
in one year after matriculation, and was then elected one of its 
professors ; she accepted the position and held it for one year, 
and on account of her failing health, resigned and came home. 
Jennette was also well educated, and after their father's death, 
31st March, 1889, they 'both engaged in teaching, which they 
continued at intervals till after their mother's death ; they own 
a plantation in Woodberry Township; don't think they reside 
on it, but rent it out ; When last heard of, they were in Hampton 
or Colleton County, both teaching school ; they are unmarried. 
"A. Q." McDuffie, as he was familiarly called by everybody, 
was for eight or ten years before bis being stricken with paraly- 
sis, and of which he died, after living two or three years, 
Master in Equity for M'arion County. Just after the war, 
in 1866, under Andrew Johnson's proclamiation, during Gover- 
nor B. F. Perry's administration of the State government, at 
one election held throughout the State for Senators and Rep- 
resentatives in the Legislature, "A. Q." McDuffie was elected 
Senator for or from' Marion District, and served one session of 
the Legislature — which election and all the legislation of .that 
session of the Legislature was made void by the Reconstruc- 
tion Acts of Congress — his senatorship was vacated or set aside. 
"A. Q." McDuffie, being a very diffident man, was not an 
effective public speaker, but he was a good office lawyer and 
a safe adviser. Neill McDuffie was the second' son of Alexan- 
der ; he is the oldest citizen now living in Carmichael Township, 
now nearing eighty-three, but is hale and healthy, and remark- 
ably active for a man of 'his age; he was too old for active 
service in the war, but he volunteered and was a Lieutenant 
in the reserves, and saw much service about Georgetown and 
Charleston, S. C, and Savannah, Ga. He married, in early 
life, Mary Ann, the oldest daughter of Dougald B. Carmichael, 
and they have raised six sons and six daughters; the sons 
are Alexander, Dallas, George, John, Daniel and Dougald. 
George and John are dead, all the others are living with their 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY; 317 

father and mother. Dougald, being a skillful first class me- 
chanic, is much of his time away. The other three are indus- 
trious, persevering young men, and are farmers; they run a 
store of general merchandise at Hamer, in connection with 
their farming operations; they are all unmarried. The six 
daughters are Katie, Nancy, Flora, Margaret, Martha and 
Sallie. Margaret married Neill Duncan ' McEachem ; they- 
have four daughters, all nearly grown, and live at McColl, S. 
C. Sallie died when about grown ; the other four are unmar- 
ried, and live with their father. Of the next sons of old 
Alexander McDuffie, John and George, the latter a physician, 
went West, and both are dead ; neither of them were married. 
Alexander, the next son, died at his home, when about grown. 
Daniel, the next one, was a brave and gallant soldier in Captain 
A. T. Harllee's company of the Eighth South Carolina Regi- 
ment ; he was Second Sergeant of the company ; he was mor- 
tally wounded 2d July, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg, and 
died the next morning. Duncan McDuffie was the youngest 
son of old Alexander, graduated at Oglethorpe College, in 
Georgia ; he is a Presbyterian preacher, and now lives in Flo- 
rence County, S. C, and has been School Commissioner of that 
county; he married Margaret Clark, a daughter of Malcolm 
Clark, and they raised a family of four sons and two daugh- 
ters, all grown ; his first wife died, and he has married again in 
Florence County. Alexander McDuffie had two sisters, who 
lived with him. The eldest, Margaret, married John Murphy, 
and had three sons, viz : Archie, Edward J. and Malcolm. The 
two latter died while young. Edward J. Murphy was- a grad- 
uate of some college in Virginia, and was a young man of more 
than ordinary ability and promise. Archie Murphy married 
Nancy Carmichael, daughter of Duncan Carmichael, and sister 
of Dugald B. ; he was a hatter by trade, and settled on Little 
Pee Dee, Enos Moody now owning the place and living upon 
it ; he died there ; they had three sons, John, Duncan and Dr. 
Neill C. Murphy — all of them were in the Confederate army ; 
John was in Captain W. D. Carmiohael's company of the 
Eighth Regiment ; Duncan was Second Lieutenant in Captain 
Stafford's company, and was killed in battle in Virginia ; Dr. 
Neill C. Murphy was Assistant Surgeon of the Tenth Regi- 



818 A HISTORY Oi MARION COUNTY. 

ment. Dr. Murphy married, since the war, Mary, the daugh- 
ter of the late George W. Reaves, and he lived and died at 
Marion Court House, 4th September, 1886 ; his widow survives 
him and lives at his old home, near Marion ; they raised three 
sons and two daughters. The elder daughter married a Mr. 
McMillan, and, I think, they live in Clarendon County. Ed- 
ward Murphy, one of the sons, is a popular teacher of the 
county. Nancy, the other sister of old Alexander McDufifie, 
married Malcolm Carmichael, and removed to Alabama soon 
after their marriage; they raised a large family of children, 
many of them wealthy and prominent citizens of that State, 
one of them having been a Judge of the Courts there. Duncan 
McDuffie, brother of old Alexander, married Mary Carmichael, 
sister of Sheriff Archie and "Hatter" John ; they had four sons, 
viz : Archie B., who never married, was a prominent commis- 
sion merchant in Wilmington, N. C, and is now dead. Neill 
C. was Sheriff of the county before the war, and without dis- 
paraging' other Sheriffs, will say he was one of the best Sheriffs 
Marion has ever had. He raised a company as Captain and 
went into the Twenty-third Regiment, and served through the 
war. In January, 1865, was again elected Sheriff, and after a 
protest against his election was decided in his favor, he went 
into the office again in April, 1865 ; he held the office for two 
years, when he resigned. The office was not worth much at 
that time, under bayonet rule ; his reasons for resigning, as he 
told the writer, were, that if he held on, he would have to hurt 
his sureties or let his family suffer, hence the resignation. He 
married, first. Miss Lizzie Ford, daughter of Elias B. Ford, 
and after her death he married her sister. Miss Fannie; he 
raised a family of children, sons and daughters. One of the 
daughters married Prof. Kenedy, of Clinton, S. C. Another 
marf-ied Dr. William A. Oliver, who was a few years ago a 
Representative in the Legislature from Marion County, a fine 
physician and a good farmer; he was the pioneer in tobacco 
culture in Hillsboro Township; he is now dead. Another of 
Neill C.'s daughters married Shepherd Oliver, of Robeson 
County, N. C, and he has several times represented his county 
in the Legislature of that State. Another of his daughters 
married Johnson Gilchrist; they live at Gilchrist Bridge, on 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 319 

Little Pee Dee ; they have some children. Another daughter, 
Madge, married a Mr. Herring, of North Carolina. Of N. C. 
McDuffie's sons, one, Julius, is a Baptist preacher in North 
Carolina. Another son, D. K. McDuffie, who lives at MuUins, 
an excellent nian every way, and successful business man at 
that place, married Miss' Maggie Haselden, daughter of the 
late Cyrus B. Haselden; they have two children, a daughter 
and a son, not grown. Two other Sons of Neill C, twins, 
Watson and Ellerbe,* have removed elsewhere — think they are 
both married. And still another son, the youngest, named for 
his father, Neill C, is also married, and lives in Williamsburg 
County, S. C. Duncan D. McDuffie, the third son of Duncan, 
his father, married Miss Penelope Ford, another daughter of 
Elias B. Ford, and is now living on his father's old homestead, 
in the "Fork," between Buck Swamp and Little Pee Dee; he 
has raised a family of several children. One son, Duncan, in 
El Paso, Tex. Another son, name not remembered — ^Jasper, 
I believe — died a young man. Another son, Emerson, the 
leading machinist in this part of the State, and owning and 
running an iron foundry and machine works at Marion. Dun- 
can D. McDuffie served throughout the war, and was a Lieu- 
tenant in the Tenth South Carolina Regiment, in Manigault's 
Brigade, of the Western army. D. D. McDuffie is one of our 
best citizens and a leading man in his neighborhood; he has 
some daughters, to th,e writer unknown ; think he has educated 
his daughters well. George Alexander, another son of Dun- 
can, moved to Horry County, and married a Miss Alford there, 
but moved back to the old homestead and died there. Nancy, 
the only daughter of Duncan, married Isham H. Watson, who 
was once the Coroner of the county and a good citizen ; he and 
his first wife are both dead — she died of small-pox, i6th Janu- 
ary, 1864; he married again. Miss Mary Nichols, who has no 
children; he had two sons, George Elmore and Duncan J. 
Watson, and one daughter, now the wife of J. D. Montgomery. 
These have already been mentioned in or among the Watson 
family. George, the third brother of old Alexander, died 

*Ellerbe McDuffie was killed, by the blowing up of a steam saw mill 
recently in Williamsburg County, a prosperous young man. His remains 
were brought to MuUins and buried there, near his father. 



320 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

while a young man ; he was a hatter by trade, and never mar- 
ried. Daniel, the youngest of the four brothers, married a 
Miss Blue, and they left a son, William. These have already 
been noticed in or among the Blue family. 

Campbei^l. — Edward Campbell was the first of the family of 
that name that settled north of Little Pee Dee. He came from 
Scotland with a family of children, and settled near where 
Hamer station, on the Florence Railroad, is located ; the land on 
which he lived is now owned by Neill McDuffie. He was a 
sturdy old Scotchman ; his wife was Mary McLellan, and others 
of her name and quite a colony came across the ocean with old 
Edward — some of them settling in Cumberland and Robeson 
Counties, N. C, others settled in Marion County, S. C. Old 
Edward, after living here many years, went West, and all his 
family went with him except his son, Duncan Campbell, who 
had married and settled on Little Pee Dee, where his son, Dan- 
iel, now lives. Duncan Campbell was another old settler on the 
east side of Little Pee Dee, south of Hayes Swamp ; he came 
from Scotland with his father, Edward, and owned a large 
body of land; he married Margaret McEachem, and they 
raised a family of three sons and five daughters- Edward and 
Neill both died long before the war. Edward married Martha. 
J. McCollum, daughter of Dougald McCollum, of North Caro- 
lina, and they had one child. Flora Margaret, who married 
George J. Bethea, of Buck Swamp, near Latta, where they now 
live, and have raised a large family of children. Neill Camp- 
bell never married. The youngest son, Daniel, is among the 
oldest and staunchest citizens of that community, and lives on 
the old homestead where he was born and raised, and where 
his father lived and died. It is a notable fact that may be here 
noted, that throughout Carmiohael Township there are but 
four men who live upon and own the homesteads of their 
fathers, who were the original settlers of said homesteads, and 
who are owning and living upon the same, viz : Daniel Camp- 
bell, Malcolm C. Carmiohael, Daniel M. Carmichael and Cap- 
tain A. T. Harllee, although much of the lands in the township 
are owned by and lived upc>n by the descendants of the original 
settlers. Daniel Campbell served throughout the war in the 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 321 

company of his nephew, Captain J. H. Stafford, and was a true 
and brave soldier, undergoing many hardships from which he 
is still a sufferer ; before the war, he married Eliza, the eldest 
daughter of "Hatter" John Carmichael (the name by which 
that old Scotchman loved to be called), and has raised a large 
family of sons and daughters, two of the latter being married 
to industrious and worthy citizens of North Carolina ; the two 
youngest, with his two youngest sons, Neill Murdoch and 
Oscar, living with him; his two eldest sons, Duncan M. and 
John Edward, both died several years ago. Another son, Dan- 
iel Walker, married the eldest daughter of Joseph W. William- 
son ; they live near Kentyre Church, he being one of the RuKng 
Elders ; he is also an earnest Mason of the lodge at Dillon, also 
a Knight of Phythias of the lodge there, a School Trustee of 
the township, and a sturdy, staunch and progressive citizen. 
Another son, William Simeon, is largely engaged in the manu- 
facture and shipping of shingles to the northern markets ; he, 
too, is a worthy young man and up-to^ate citizen; he was 
quite recently married to Miss Sue Campbell, the youngest 
daughter of Hugh Campbell, formerly a citizen of Cumberland 
County, N. C, but for many years past a citizen of this county. 
Old Duncan Campbell raised five daughters. The eldest mar- 
ried Malcolm Stafford, as already noticed in or among the 
Stafford family. Another daughter, Mary, married Leonard 
Walters, and removed to Alabama, and raised a large family, 
her sons being among the wealthiest men about Montgomery, 
Ala. Christian, another daughter, married A. S. Buie, who, 
in his lifetime, was a peaceable, industrious and Christian 
gentleman; they had three daughters. The eldest, Louisa, 
married Gilbert Butler; both are dead. The next, Margaret, 
married Calvin C. Carmichael, and are living. Nancy married 
Robert Monroe, of North Carolina ; both are dead. Margaret, 
the youngest, died when about grown, ffom yellow fever, 
which she contracted from going with her father to Charleston, 
in the month of August, with a drove of sheep and turkeys ; 
several of the negroes who went with him also contracted the 
disease, and some of them died ; Duncan Campbell himself took 
the fever and died also; he left a large estate unencumbered 
for his widow and children. There are other families of the 



322 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

name of Campbell in the township in no way related to each 
other. Duncan Campbell was the original settler in that 
region; he was a unique character. It was told of him, that 
once he was drawn to serve on the jury at Marion, twenty-five 
miles away ; that on Sunday night, while at the supper table, he 
said to his wife that she must he up before day and get him 
breakfast before he started to Marion. He still sat at the table 
talking about the trip to Marion ; that he must be there by lo 
o'clock; that he must have his breakfast early, and so forth; 
at last he said to his wife, "Peggy," as he called her, "if you 
will get it, I will eat it now — it will be in me and I can get up 
and start when I please." 

There are other families of Campbells in the county. Camp- 
bell is a very populous name. Such as I know and know of 
will now be mentioned. The family of the Campbells that 
formerly lived (and some of them may be there now), about 
Campbell's Bridge, were old Peter Campbell, who came from 
Scotland, about 1800, and settled on the east side of I<ittle Pee 
Dee, near where Campbell's Bridge now is; don't know who 
his wife was ; he had and raised six sons — ^Alexander, Archie, 
Duncan, James, Hugh and David — who are all long since dead. 
Alexander Campbell lived on the east side of Little Pee Dee; 
don't know who his wife was ; he had one son, John J. Camp- 
bell, who married a daughter of John D. McRae, in Marl- 
borough; he disappeared or was lost sight of after the war; 
his father was a jolly old Scotchman, was a farmer, who had 
some property, but was not considered rich, yet he lived at his 
own home and had plenty to live on ; he died many years ago — 
think John J. was his only child. Archie Campbell lived on the 
west side of the river, not far from Campbell's Bridge; he 
married a Miss Paul ; he raised four sons, John P., Peter, Wil- 
liam P. and Alexander. John P. and one of his sisters, Sarah 
Ann, I believe, together with his brother, Peter, lived on the 
old homestead together before and during the war ; neither of 
whom ever married, and all died since the war. Alexander 
married and had a family, and lived just below Campbell's 
Bridge ; don't know who he married or how many children be 
had, nor what has become of them. William R., the most 
active and most prominent one of the sons of old Archie, mar- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 323 

ried a sister of Wm. S. Camipbell, who lived and died near 
Ebenezer Church and Temperance Hill ; they had one son only, 
who died with typhoid fever, about 1855, after being down 
with it for four months, the only child. Wm. P. Campbell 
was Deputy Sheriff for Neill C. McDuffie during his term of 
office, from 1857 ^ 1861, and was very effective as Deputy, 
and was also very popular personally; he was elected, in Jan- 
uary, 1861, as successor to McDuffie. Under the then Con- 
stitution of the State (Constitution of 1790), a Sheriff was 
not re-eligible to election to a succeeding term of four years — 
hence McDuffie could not succeed himself. Wm. P. Campbell 
went into office, in April, 1861, just as the war was commenc- 
ing. It was a trying time to a Sheriff, but Campbell, never- 
theless, discharged his duty faithfully and satisfactorily until 
the fall of 1863, when he was killed, near the home of his birth, 
one night just after dark, and when he was actually in the 
discharge of a public duty, by the leader of a gang of Maple 
Swamp deserters. He was in his buggy, and there were two 
buggies along in a path that led through a thick woods, from 
one road to another ; two of the company were carrying a light 
before them or on each side (a very unwise act to have the 
light, as it enabled the assassin to pick his man, the Sheriff) ; 
when his buggy passed, the assassin stepped in the road behind 
him and shot him in the back; Campbell did not fall out of 
the vehicle, but he was d«ad, and his brother, Peter, got up 
into the buggy with him and held him therein till they got to 
the house, two or three hundred' yards off. He had gotten an 
order, as Sheriff, from the authorities, either civil or military, 
to arrest those Maple Swamp deserters, so as to send them to 
the army; he obeyed the order, as he did all orders, and 
gathered some men to go with him up there to hunt for and 
to arrest them — ^don't remember who all the men were that 
were with him; Captain Samuel T. Page was one of them, 
and who yet lives and can tell about it, although in his eighty- 
third year. Thus an efficient officer and a good man was 
assassinated in the dark. The county was then without a 
Sheriff ; Is'ham H. Watson was then Coroner and by operation 
of law became Sheriff and conducted the office until the next 
general election for Sheriff came on, in January, 1865, when 



324 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Neill C. McDuffie was again elected, and went into office, in 
April, 1865, as hereinbefore stated. Campbell's widow, child- 
less, went to her people, and died a few years after the war. 
There are many yet living who gratefully remember Wm. P. 
Campbell. In the early fifties, the Campbell brothers went 
into a mercantile business at CampbeH's Bridge, under the firm 
name of A. Campbell & Co. The business was not successful, 
and they failed about 1855 ; it was managed mainly by Alex- 
ander ; they were harassed for a few years by creditors in the 
Courts, but managed some way to save their homes. Hugh 
Campbell, one of the six brothers, married Miss Absala 
Bethea, daughter of Buck Swamp William Bethea, and settled 
at and owned the land at Campbell's Bridge — the bridge 
was so called because the Campbells lived around it, and 
owned all the lands round about. Hugh Campbelll settled 
and lived and died where his grand-son, William Hugh Bree- 
den, with his mother, now lives ; he in a short while died, leav- 
ing his widow and one child, a daughter, Adaline. The widow 
continued to reside there, and raised her daughter; she also 
prospered and was well-to-do. Adaline married, about 1848, 
John A. Breeden, a native of Marlborough County, and first 
cousin of J. B. Breeden and his brothers, Joseph and others. 
John A. Breeden was in some respects a remarkable man, of 
very quick and acute perceptions ; his habits were not good, yet 
he managed well and kept his property ; he lived on the place 
with his mother-in-law till her death ; after which he remained 
there till his death, some fifteen or twenty years ago ; he raised 
a family of three daughters and one son, William H. Breeden. 
The oldest daughter, Mollie, married Wesley Stackhouse ; they 
have a considerable family, sons and daughters, some of whom 
are grown ; they live at Dillon. The second daughter, Jackey, 
married Frank Edens; they live in North Carolina, and have 
eight or ten children, some of them grown — a first class family 
and are well-to-do. The third daughter, Absala, named for 
her grand-mother, but called "Appey," married Faulk Floyd, 
of Robeson County, N. C, who was Sheriff of that county at 
the time of the marriage ; they live in Robeson, and have only 
one child, a diaughter. Pearl. The son, William H. Breeden, 
a capital citizen, married Miss Victoria Godbold, daughter of 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 325 

the late Asa Godbold, Jr. ; they reside with his mother, AdaUne, 
who yet Hves, at the old homestead of Hugh Campbell, his 
grand-father. William H. Breeden has no children ; is a very 
quiet man and well informed on most subjects. The name 
Breeden is likely to become extinct in the county. James 
Campbell, son of old Peter, married in North Carolina, and 
moved to that State. Duncan Campbell, another son of old 
Peter, married and settled just above Campbell's Bridge, on the 
west side of the river; don't know who he married; he had 
and raised two children^ a son, named Hugh, and a daughter, 
Mary Ann. Mary Ann married Hugh Dove, near Campbell's 
Bridge, and, I think, had two or three children ; her husband, 
Hugh Dove, was killed, about 1855, by her brother, Hugh 
Campbell — a wilful and premeditated murder. Hugh Camp- 
bell fled from the country and has not been heard of since. 
David Campbell, another son of old Peter, married some lady 
in North Carolina, and went to that State and died there ; know 
nothing further of him. 

Another family of Campbells to be next noticed are those 
living in the Ebenezer and Temperance Hill community. The 
first known of this family was William S. Campbell, who was 
one of our best and most respected citizens — unpretending, no 
display, but gave close attention to his business, and treated 
that of others with "masterly inactivity ;" he married, 

and raised three daughters and two sons, John C. 
and Samuel. The eldest daughter, Flora, married Stephen L. 
Lane, who was killed in the last battle fought during the war, 
at Smithfield, in North Carolina ; they had and raised a family 
of sons and daughters; the widow managed well after the 
death of her husband ; took care of the property and perhaps 
added to it ; she died some few years ago ; she had a son, named 
William, and a daughter, that became the second wife of Mere- 
dith Watson. Another daughter married our fellow-citizen, 
now at Marion, W. J. B. Campbell, and who is merchandizing 
there ; she, perhaps, had other children, unknown to the writer. 
Another daughter of old Wm. S. Campbell, married John E. 
Perritt, whose family has already been noticed in or among the 
Perritt family. And still another, the third daughter, I think, 
her name was Mary, married David Perritt, a nephew of John 



326 A HISTORY OP MARION GOUNTY. 

E. Perritt; he died' soon and left her a widow; don't know 
if she had any child or children. John C. Campbell, the older 
son, married Miss Amelia Tart, a daughter of old James Tart, 
who lived and died just above E. J. Moody's mill, now owned 
by Governor Ellerbe's estate. By this marriage nine sons were 
bom and two daughters; the sons were Byroii, Preston, Val- 
cour, Samuel, Frank, W. J. Beauregard, Thomas LeGrande 
and another whose name is not remembered. Of the sons, 
Valoour, Frank and Thomas are dead — died unmarried; 
Byron went to Texas ; Preston married some one to the writer 
unknown ; also the same of Samuel ; W. J. Beauregard married 
his first cousin, the daughter of Stephen L,ane and Flora, his 
wife, aibove mentioned. W. J. Beauregard Campbell owns the 
old homestead, or the greater part of it, situate just below 
Ebenezer Church, eight miles above Marion ; don't know if he 
has any children. LeGrande is yet single, and is also merchan- 
dising at Marion. Of the two daughters of John C. Campbell, 
Roberta and Romine, one of them' died unmarried, but grown 
and very handsome ; the other married Samuel L,ane and lives 
near by. Samuel Campbell, the younger son of old William 
S., married, first, a Miss Fore, and has already been noticed in 
or among the Fore family ; she had one daughter, who married 
Herod W. Allen, and is dead. Samuel Campbell married, a 
second time, a Miss Hays, daughter of Levi H. Hays, and sister 
of W. B. Hays, of Hillsboro Township ; by this marriage three 
daughters were born to them, names unknown. One married 
James L,ane ; they have some family, how much is not known. 
Another daughter married Thomas A. Lamb; they had four 
or five children, two or three years ago, when they left here and 
went to Florida, where they are now. The other daughter 
married some one and went off ; don't know what has become 
of her. Samuel Campbell's widow still survives, and is on 
the old homestead. John C. Campbell and his wife are both 
dead. Old William S. Campbell was no ordinary man ; quiet 
and unassuming, thought right and acted right; prudent and 
seldom made mistakes ; neither of bis sons were equal to him ; 
he made a good property and transmitted it by will to his child- 
ren unencumbered. 

There are other Campbells in the county, but the writer 



A HISTORY pF MARION COUNTV- 327 

knows nothing about them. There is a family near Hamer, 
Hugh Campbell, ; think he came from North Carolina ; have 
been told that he has six sons and two daughters. The elder 
daughter married John B. McEachem, near Hainer, a very- 
substantial man and a good farmer; they have one or two 
children. The younger daughter, Sue, a charming girl, has 
lately married William Simeon Campbell, a son of Daniel 
GaiiipbeUi who has already been mentioned herein. Hugh 
Campbell has six sons, but the writer knows only two of them 
by name — ^John, I think, the oldest, and James, perhaps, the 
youngest, who was recently telegraph operator and dq>ot agent 
at Sellers, on the Florence Railroad, for some time, now at 
Elrod, on the same road. 

Butler. — The Butler family will next be noticed. They 
live on Hays Swamp and Little Pee Dee, and they are the de- 
scendants of old Isham Butler, who was one of the first settlers 
of that region of the county ; he was the father of Stephen and 
Isham Butler of later times, and had six daughters. Annie, 
the oldest, never maTried, but lived and died at the homestead 
of her brother, Isham. Laney married her cousin, Dempsy 
Butler, and they have one son, Alfred W. Butler, who has a 
large family of grown-up children, and lives on the plantation 
formerly owned by Neill McDuffie, near Stafford's Bridge. 
Patience, the third daughter, married Green Watson, and 
moved to Alabama. Polly married Stephen Moody, and 
moved to Tennessee. Zilla married Reuben Paul, and he and 
she both died before the war, without issue. The youngest, 
Susan, died unmarried, when about eighteen years old. Ste- ' 
phen Butler was the oldest son of old Isham, and he and his 
brother, Isham, lived near each other ; J. W. Dillon & Son own 
the old homestead of Isham, and R. P. Hamer, Jr., a part of 
that of Stephen, which was sold a few years ago for division ; 
the descendants of Stephen live on the other parts of his old 
homestead. Stephen Butler married Katie McEachem, and 
had three sons, Gilbert, Silas and Thomas, all of them good 
soldiers — Gilbert and Thomas in Captain Stafford's company, 
and Silas in Captain W- D. Carmichaers company. Eighth 
Regiment. Silas came home on sick furlough, and died in one 

22 



828 A, HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

week after reaching home. Gilbert married, first, before the 
war, Ivouisa, the eldest daughter of A. S. Buie ; they are both 
dfead, and left three children, all grown. The youngest daugh- 
ter is a deaf-mute, but was well educated at the Cedar Springs 
Institute, and is a young woman of remarkable intelligence; 
she lives with her brother, in North Carolina. Thomas Butler, 
the youngest son, married Mary, the daughter of Cade B. 
Rogers ; both of them are dead, but left a family of four daugh- 
ters and two sons, who are living on a portion of the old 
Stephen' Butler homestead. Of the four daughters of Stephen 
Butler, the eldest, Jennie, married William Blue, before the 
war; he was killed in battle in Virginia, in Captain Stafford's 
company, and his widow survives and lives at McCoU, S. C. 
Clarissa, the next oldest daughter, married Allen Stephens, 
and both of them are dead, but their sons, Stephen, Gilbert, 
Allen, Preston and Silas, are all living near each other, in the 
Bermuda section of Carmichael Township, and are amongst 
the foremost citizens of their section; all of them married' and 
are raising large families 'of children, and all of them progres- 
sive farmef'S and first class citizens. Charity, the third daugh- 
ter, married Washington W. Norman, generally known as 
"Colonel Norman," by reason of his being the best fisherman 
on Little Pee Dee, and is one of the sturdy citizens of the 
section ; they live on a portion of the old Stephen Butler home- 
stead ; they have three grown daughters living with them ; they 
had two sons, but both were drowned in Ivittle Pee Dee, while 
bathing near their home, several years ago — one of them nine 
and the other eleven years old. "Colonel Norman" is a good 
farmer, and a kind and hospitable citizen. Miss Flora A. But- 
ler was another daughter, older than Charity, and owned and 
lived and died a few years ago, on the old homestead, where 
her father lived and died. Isham Butler, the brother of 
Stephen, had but one child, a daughter, Mary, who married 
Nathan McCormick, her cousin, and he was a gallant soldier 
of Fairlee's company, in the war ; both of them are living, and 
have six sons and three daughters, all of them grown. Nathan 
Butler, son of old Isham, was another of the first settlers ; he 
had four sons. Dempsy, the eldest, married his cousin, Laney ; 
Solomon married Polly Brasswell and had no childTen; Sam- 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. / 329 

uel married Milly Brasswell, and went to Georgia; James, the 
youngest, married the Widow Jane Davis — ^all of them are 
dead. Laney, the wife of Dempsy, according to the census 
return of her son, Alfred, in 1890, was 110 years old ; she, too, 
is now dead. As to the age of Laney, as above, the writer 
has something to say. Dempsy Buller, her husband, was 
killed by a man by the name of McCormipk, in 1859. I was a 
Magistrate at the time, and was sent for to hold an inquest; 
I went and held it ; it was right on the North Carolina State 
line, and as the line was shown to me by those present, the kill- 
ing was about five feet in South Carolina; he was killed by a 
stab with a knife, in the abdomen. Dempsy Butler, from ap- 
pearance (I had seen him often before he was killed), was a:bout 
forty-five years of age ; his wife, Laney, was also present, and 
would judge her to be younger, not older. According to this 
she could not have been, in 1890, more than seventy-five or 
seventy-six — ^there must be some mistake about her age, sure. 
Nathan also had five daughters. The eldest, Viney, married 
Benjamin Locke, and had a large family of children, one of 
whom is our good citizen, William Locke, who lives on a part of 
the old McDufifie homestead, on Little Pee Dee. Willie, a 
daughter, married John McConnick, who had several children, 
all of them_ dead but Charles, who lives at McCoU, S. C, and 
Nathan, who still lives in that section. Sallie married Philip 
Rouse, and Ada married William Abbott. Geriah, the young- 
est, never married. All of them are dead, but have left numer- 
ous descendants living here and in the West. The writer knew 
Benjamin Locke back in the thirties ; he was the greatest rail- 
splitter he ever knew ; have often said and now think he split 
rails enough to make a fence half around the county ; he split • 
rails for that whole section, and it mattered not how far he 
was from home at work in his chosen avocation, he would go 
home every night — he would brave any weather to get home; 
he was a hard working, honest and harmless man. 

Recurring again to the Haseldens. The writer has learned 
that the progenitor of Major James Haselden and his brothers, 
John and William, was William Haselden ; he lived and owned 
the place where Dr. D. F. Miles now owns and farms ; he had, 
in addition to the sons already herein mentioned, four daugh- 



380 A klStORY Oi MARION COUNTY. 

ters. The eldest married a Mr. Cox, who had only one child, 
a daughter, Sarah ; her father and mother both died and left 
her ; she was raised 'by some of her people, grew up, and mar- 
ried Asa Godbold, about 1828. His family and hers have 
already been noticed hterein. Another daughter, Anne, I be- 
lieve, was her name, married, first, a Mr. Brown, of Marl- 
borough ; he died in a short time, childless, and the widow 
married Cyrus Bacot, of Dairlingtoh County; they lived to- 
gether some years, and Baeot died, and left her with consid- 
erable property, and by her will (she had' no children), she 
gave some of it, said to be $2,000, to 'her nephew, Cyrus BacOt 
Haselden, who was named foir her husband — ^which has already 
been mentioned herein. The third daughter of old William 
Haselden married Stephen G. Godbold, who only raised one 
child, a daughter, who married Francis A. Miles; they had 
and raised three sons and two daughters, as already noticed 
herein. The fourth daughter of old William Haselden died or 
disappeared ; no account of her is obtainable. The Haseldens, 
as a family, seem to be s'hort-lived> as has already been stated. 

Moody. — The Moody family will next be noticedt Robert 
Moody arid Barfield Moody, two brothers, were only known to 
the writer as one branch of the family. Another branch of 
the family is headed by the Rev. Tapley Moody, and there is 
still another branch whose bead in this county is not known to 
the writer ; James A. Moody, of Marion, belongs to this branch. 
These branches are all collaterally related to each other. All 
collateral relations have a common ancestor somewhere, either 
proximate or remote ; Robert Moody married Elizabeth Smith, 
daughter of Samuel Smith, Sr. ; 'he lived and died just below 
Temperance Hill, on the road to Marion ; she was a sister of 
Samuel, Jr., as he was called, back in the twenties, who lived 
and died on Buck Swamp ; to this marriage were born several 
sons and daughters; the sons were Hugh, Richard, Salathiel 
and Charles; can't give the names of all the daughters — ^as 
remembered, they were Milly, Celia, Smithy, Evaline and 
another one or two^— ^have just learned that one was named 
Mary. Hugh Moody married Miss and raised 

one son and several daughters. The son was named John 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 331 

Thpmas, w'ho married his first cousin, Sarah Ann Moody, 
daughter of Richard Moody ; they had and raised a family- 
two sons, Dayid and Robert, and several daughters, number 
and names not known. His son, David Moody, married a 
daughter of Peter Parley McCormic, and lives at Dillon. 
Robert married a daughter of Thomas Sawyer. Hugh Moody, 
the grand- father, has one daughter that married William Ham- 
ilton, as a second wife, and has several children ; Hugh was a 
farmer, and was a loc^l Methodist preacher ; also a Magistrate 
for a number of years, and was a useful man in his community ; 
his influence was for good, always in favor of right and justice; 
he died some twenty years ago or more. Richard Moody, the 
next younger brother, married Miss Harriet Edwards, daugh- 
ter of Rev. David S. Edwards, and had and raised four sons 
and four daughters; the sons were Thomas D., Richard J., 
Hugh and Barfield; the daughters were Martha, Sarah Ann, 
Helen and Sophia. Of the sons, Thomas D. married a daugh- 
ter of Needham Perrit ; had only one child, and she is grown 
and married. Richard J. Moody married a daughter of Reu- 
ben B. Jackson, and has a family, already mentioned in or 
among the Jackson family. Hugh Moody, Jr., married Miss 
Mass^y Smith, a daughter of the late William H. Smith, of 
Buck Swamp; they have a family, how large or small is un- 
known. Barfield Moody, Jr., married a daughter of Bennett 
Perritt, and has some family. Of the daughters of Richard 
Moody, St., Martha, the oldest, married William McKenzie, 
of the Maple Swamp region ; they have a family, how many is 
not known. Sarah Ann married John Thomas Moody, as 
above stated. The daughter, Sophia, married John H. Ellen, 
of the Dothan section, who is one of the most progresisive 
farmers in the county ; they have three children, a son in Wof- 
ford College; don't know the sex of the other two children. 
The daughter, Helen, is unmarried. The third son of Robert 
Moody, Salathiel, married in March,. 1843, the Widow Jane 
Bass, up on Catfish ; she was the widow of Bryant Bass, herein- 
before mentioned ; they had only two children, a son, who was 
idiotic and died before maturity, and a daughter, Josephine, 
who married Mack Martin, who has already been noticed in or 
among the Martin family. Charles, the fourth and youngest 



332 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

son of Robert Moody, married a Miss Monroe, of North Caro- 
lina, and settled and lived and died on^ a part of the homestead 
of his grand-father, Samuel Smith, Sr. ; they raised a family 
of three sons and one daughter ; the mother died many years 
ago. The daughter married Milton Watson, already spoken 
of in or among the Watson family ; he soon died, childless ; the 
widow went back to her father, and remained with him until 
his death, a few years ago, and still remains there with her 
brothers — all of whom are unmarried, and names not remem- 
bered. Of the daughters of Robert Moody, Mary, the oldest, 
married a Mr. Edwards, who died soon and left her with one 
child, a daughter, who grew up and became the first wife of 
Meredith Watson ; she soon died, and left two children, a son, 
who was imbecile and weak and soon died ; the daug'hter mar- 
ried and has some family, unknown to the writer. Robert 
Moody's daughter, Celia, married William Bryan, in Robeson 
County, N. C, where they resided till both died; as to their 
family, the writer only knows of a son, Quincy Bryant or 
Bryan, who came back to this county, and married his first 
cousin. Miss L,izzie A. Moody, a daughter of the late Joshua 
T. Moody. Quincy Bryant is one of our most worthy citizens, 
and resides six miles below Marion; they have a family of 
several children, sons and daughters — a son, named Marvin, 
who is now a promising young man; a daughter grown, and I 
think, married; know nothing of the other members of the 
family. Milley, another daughter, married Joseph D. Bass, 
who has already been noticed herein in or among the Bass 
family. Smithy, another daug'hter, married Evander Brig- 
man, of Marlborough, who has raised a considerable family ; 
one of her sons, an energetic and prosperous man, now lives at 
Dillon ; I think Mrs. Brigman yet lives ; if so, she is the sole 
survivor of the children of Robert Moody. Another daugh- 
ter, the youngest, Evaline, married Joshua T. Moody; in the 
latter part of his life he resided on his farm, near Ariel, nine 
miles below Marion ; they raised only two children, Lizzie and 
James A. Lizzie married her cousin, M. Q. Bryant, as above 
sitated. James A. is unmarried, though twice old enough ; is 
and has been for several years past merchandizing at Marion ; 
he condticts his business on a safe plan, buys and sells only for 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 333 

cash, is close and hoards his money ; if he makes but little, he 
holds on to that little with tenacity ; think he and Mrs. Bryant, 
his sister, still hold on to their father's lands, near Arial. Rob- 
ert Moody died more than sixty years ago; he made a good 
property, and his widow and children held on to it to the old 
Ijady's death, just before the war ; their land on Buck Swamp 
was valuable; had about fifty negroes. The lands are now 
owned by Mrs. Lucy Godbold, wife of Willie A. Godbold, and 
Js much more valuable now than when in the hands of the old 
lady Moody. Barfield Moody, a brother of Robert, whether 
older or younger is not known, was a very prominent man in 
this county from 1830 to i860, when he died ; he was very popu- 
lar before the people, though sometimes 'beaten ; he was elected 
twice as Representative of the county in the Legislature. After 
the death of General Wheeler, in 1859, he was elected Clerk of 
the Court ; but on account of his failing health, he could not per- 
form the duties thereof in person, and he deputed his young 
son, Thoipas C, and placed him in as dteputy, who discharged 
the duties of the office until the death of his father, 7th April, 
i860. Barfield Moody was a Magistrate for many years, and 
he did not run that office as it is run in these latter days, for the 
money that was in it, but mostly as an arbiter among his 
neighbors as to their civil rights and a pacificator in their 
quarrels and fig'hts — ^niaking peace many times and hindet;ing 
prosecutions in the criminal courts — which is regarded as one 
of the first and best qualifications of a Magistrate ; he was also 
a good surveyor, and was called to its practice often. The 
writer, in his extensive land law practice in the county, has had 
occasion to see and scrutinize his work as a surveyor ; his plats 
were neat and mathematically correct, in most instances. He 
was a useful citizen in many ways, did a great deal of survey- 
ing for poor people without charge, and in suits before him as a 
Magistrate would often charge no costs, and especially in cases 
compromised or settled. Barfield Moody married Miss Sallie 
Crawford, a sister of James Crawford, who lived at Spring 
Branch, four miles above Marion — she was only a half-sister ; 
(tjhey had and raised five sons and four daughters; the sons were 
William H., Evander J., Robert B., Thomas C. and Albert C. ; 
William H. and Robert B. are dead. Of these sons, William 



884 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

H. married a Miss Lamb, of Marlborough. Afterwards the 
L,amb family moved into Marion, having bought the late Craw- 
ford plantation, four miles above Marion, and they all lived and 
died there, except those who went West. The Lamb name is 
now extinct in the county. Barfield Moody settled on the 
north side of Catfish, opposite Watson's, and William H., after 
a while, settled on a part of the Lamb plantation, where his 
■widow now resides. William H. and his wife had and raised 
several sons and daughters; the sons were Sandy, Clarence, 
Jiames C, Bartow, Rhett and Theodore; the daugliters were 
Lucy and Sue. Of the sons, Sandy went to Kershaw County, 
.and there married; know nothing further of him. Clarence 
died a few years ago, unmarried. Rhett emigrated to parts 
■unknown. James C. is unmarried, though twice old enough; 
he was County Auditor for several years, and now has some 
State employment; he is a competent man for any business 
position. Bartow married, a few years ago, a Miss Cotting- 
ham ; they may have some family. Theodore died just as he 
was arriving at manhood. Miss Lucy married a Mr. Mclnr 
tyre, of North Carolina ; both are dead, and left two children, a 
son and a daughter, who stay with their grand-parents in 
North Carolina. Miss Sue married Joseph Bruoe, of Marl- 
borough; suppose they have some family, how many is un- 
.known. William H. Moody died, maybe twenty years ago; 
he was a good citizen. Before the war he first held a Captain's 
commission in the Berry's Cross Roads militia company, and as 
hereinbefore stated, the contest for the Captaincy of said com- 
pany, in 1840 or 1 84 1, was spirited and hot, but Moody was 
elected by thirteen votes. Afterward, when Major James R. 
Bethea was elected Colonel of the regiment, the Majorship of 
.the upper battalion became vacant, and William Moody was 
elected Major of the upper battalion, which position he held 
with credit to himself for several years; he never aspired to 
any other position. Evander J. Moody, the second son of Bar- 
field Moody, grew up, and first married Miss Florence Smith, 
a daughter of Samud Smith, of Buck Swamp; she had one 
child, a daughter, named Florence, and died. Florence, the 
child, was raised by her Grand-mother Smith while she lived, 
and after the death of her grand-mother she went back to her 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 335 

■father, who in the meantime ihad married again, to the Widow 
Lester (twice a widow, her rnaiden name was Jane Tart) , and 
remained with him until 17th May, 187 1, when she married Dr. 
J. C. MuUins (a second wife) ; by this marriage three sons and 
one daughter were born — Randolph, Frank and Woods; the 
daughter is also named Florence, and is approaching woman- 
hood. Frank MuUins died a young man, unmarried. Ran- 
dolph has emigrated to Greenville, and is in the drug business. 
Woods and Florence, Jr., are with their mother, at Maripn. 
Dr. J. C. Mu'llins died about three years ago. By E. J. 
Moody's second marriage, he had and raised two sons, Thomas 
E. and Cornelius G. Thomas E. grew up and married a Miss 
Eittle, daughter of Rev. Lewis H. Little ; he gave promise of 
being an energetic and progressive man, but suddenly died soon 
after his marriage, childless ; his widow remained for a year or 
itwo with E. J. Moody's family, and then returned to her own 
people. Cornelius G. never married; he was a very steady, 
fevel4ieaded, straightforward young man, and gave promise of 
success and good citizenship ; but, alas ! he took sick and died 
some three or four years ago. The two daughters of E. J. 
Moody, by his last marriage, were Virginia and Maggie. Vir- 
ginia married Douglas Mclntyre, of Marion, and has already 
been noticed herein in or among the Mclntyre family. Maggie 
married Dr. D. I. Watson, now of Southpprt, N. C, and has 
already been noticed in or among the Watson family ; they have 
several children. E. J. Moody has been and is yet a large- 
hearted man, hospitable to a fault; has been a man of aflfairs, 
ferming and merchandizing all his life, and during his long- 
life (he is now seventy-five years of age) he has given away 
at his table and house enough to make a small fortune; his 
wife, Jane, was one of the noblest of women ; she died several 
years ago, after which her husband kept house with his son, 
Cornelius (called Neill), for a while, and then broke up, and 
E. J. Moody since that time has been staying with children 
(surviving) and other relatives; he has an income sufficient 
■for his support; he has done his part in developing the re- 
sources and bringing up the county to its present high position, 
and has nothing now to do but to ruminate on the past and ,to 
prepare for his approaching end. Robert B. Moody, the third 



336 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

son of Barfield, grew up and early volunteered for service in 
the Confederate army, rose to a Lieutenantcy therein, and con- 
tinued to the end of the -yvar ; he went first in Captain Stanley's 
icompany, and on its reorganization left it and went into Cap- 
tain Finklea's company as Lieutenant, which composed part of 
the Twenty-third Regiment, South Carolina Volunteers. 
After the war he married Miss Delilah Wyche, of Virginia, 
who came down into this county to teach school ; upon his mar- 
riage he repaired with his wife to her home in Virginia 
(Greenfield or Westfield), where he settled and lived for 
many years ; he had but one child, a daughter, who grew up, 
and after her mother's death married her first cousin. Dr. Rob- 
ert A. Bass, of Latta, S. C, and who now resides at Latta, and 
has three or four children ; her father, after some time, married 
again, a widow lady, with one child, a daughter; they went 
to Richmond, Va., where, in 1891, they were keeping a large 
hotel — whether it belonged to his wife or whether it was 
rented, the writer knoweth not, but rather thinks it belonged 
to his wife. The writer spent one day and night with them 
very pleasantly, in the summer of 1891 ; when he went to leave, 
he asked for his bill, and "Bob," as we used to call him, said 
it was nothing ; he insisted upon paying it, but he and his wife 
absolutely refused it. They showed me much attention while 
?n Richmond, got a ^carriage with two horses and took me 
with his wife over the city to various places of interest and 
among them the "White House of the Confederacy," where the 
lamented Winnie Davis, the daughter of the Confederacy, was 
born. We went into every room in the house, and Mrs. Moody 
pointed out the room in which Winnie was born — a sacred 
'Spot to every Southerner. The house was then unoccupied; 
the key to it was obtained from its keeper^ a colored man. It 
is in a very eligible spot, not far from the Capitol. I suppose 
it has been much adorned and beautified since that time. 
Some four or five years after that time, "Bob" came out here 
to see his friends and relatives, and was sick and died at 
Latta, with a cancer oYi his lip, and he was buried here in the 
land of his birth. Peace be to his ashes. He had no child by 
the last wife. Thomas C; Moody, the fourth son of Barfield 
Moody, was in the Clerk's office as his father's deputy, at his 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 337 

father's death, in April, i860 — when, as a matter of course, he 
had to retire. Asa Godbold, the then Ordinary, became Clerk 
until a successor to the dead Clerk was elected and' qualified ; 
this was then existing law. An election for Clerk was ordered 
by the proper authorities to be held in June following. At this 
election the young deputy was a candidate for the office against 
five others, every one of whom was much more competent than 
"Tom," as he was called, and is so called yet; he was then 
twenty-three years of age, with but little education, no experi- 
ence in such matters, a verdant, green, country youth — could 
not write legibly — ^yet led the ticket at the election by seventy 
, votes. One of his supporters in that election was the writer. 
It was thought by many that, on account of his youth and inex- 
perience, he would not be able to properly perform the duties 
of the office. This is said, not in disparagement of Mr. 
Moody, but it is said to bis credit, as the sequel will show. He 
qualified and took charge of the office and held it till the next 
regular election, when' he was again elected, and held the sec- 
ond term until he was ousted by reconstruction. As time 
rolled along, be improved, and became a very efficient Clerk 
and performed its duties satisfactorily. As an evidence of his 
ihefficiency on account of his lack of experience, I will relate 
an incident of what occurred in Court shortly after Mr. Moody 
went into office — I think, the October term, i860. The Clerk, 
as required by law, made up the dockets for the Court. Judge 
W'hitner presided ; and in calling the cases on the dt)cket the 
Judge mistook the letter '^C" for "G," which made quite a dif- 
ference in the name or word. Some member of the bar spoke 
to the Judge and corrected the call. The Judge looked' at it 
more critically and said, "I would never call that a 'C " He 
then spoke to fhe Clerk, and said to him, "Come up here, you 
are a young Clerk, and let me show you how to make a 'C " 
The Clerk, of course, went up to the Judge and the Judge took 
up his pen, and made a "C" for the Clerk's guidance. This is 
also related to the credit of Mr. Moody. "Tom" was again a 
candidate for Olerk, in 1872, and was elected, but the then 
powers that be counted every Democratic candidate (and all 
were elected) out. "Tom" kept improving as time advanced, 
and after the redemption of the State in 1876, he was elected 



338 A HISfORY- OP MARION COUNTY. 

to the lower House of the State Legislature (don't remember 
what year) ; he served a term in that house, and in 1884 was 
nominated and elected Senator from the county in the Ivegis- 
lature ; he served four years, was again nominated and again 
elected to the Senate, in 1888, and served a second term, till 
11892. The upheaval in the State that year relegated every 
man to the rear that did not ohime in with the views of B. R. 
Tillman. During Mr. Moody'si first term in the Senate, or 
just before, he married Miss Eliza Ellerbe, a daughter of 
Captain W. S. Ellerbe, and sister to the late Governor Ellerbe ; 
they had no children, and she died in 1896 or 1897 ; he did not 
marry till late in life, and he has not remarried ; and lives a life 
of retirement and "splendid leisure," he having acquired a 
loompetency to live on ; he is now sixty-four years of age. T. 
C. Moody is a kind-hearted man and very considerate of the 
poor, and after he went out of the Clerk's office kept many a 
poor fellow from going to jail by going on his bond for his 
appearance at Court; his sympathies were not hard to arouse 
in favor of the distressed. Could say much more favorable to 
Mr. Moody, but space will not permit. Albert C. Moody, the 
fiftli and youngest son of old Barfield Moody, grew up just 
in time for the war ; he volunteered, went into the service early 
in the war and remained to tflie last ; when he came home from 
the army he went to Lumberton, N. C, and there married a 
daughter of Sheriff King, and remained there until King's 
dieath. King was murdered, as it was said, by the Lowry 
gang— na gang which terrorized Robeson County for several 
years after the war, robbing and killing many of the citizens.. 
The State troops were called out to suppress them, but they 
were of little avail. Sheriff King was a wealthy man and re- 
puted to have plenty of money — which, no doubt, was the 
inducement to his murder. Albert, with his wife, came from 
there to this county, and settled about six miles above Marion, 
on the road leading to Buck Swamp Bridge; has raised a con- 
siderable family of sons and daughters, some of them grown. — 
a daughter, who married a Mr. Hunter ; he lost a grown son 
by death a few years ago. Albert is a farmer, and though not 
very progressive, yet manages to support his family. Barfield 
Moody had four daughters, Sarah Ann, Lucy, Julia and Lizzie. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 839 

Tlie eldest, Sarah Ann, a very aooomplished lady, married John 
Crawford, of Alabama, a relative of hers through her mother ; 
soon after the marriage they went to Alabama ; she had one 
fchild, a son, named Albert-, familiarly called here "Dock ;" she 
died, and Albert, or "Dock," was raised by his people in Ala- 
bama and by those here — especially the latter part of his rais- 
ing ; he was intelligent and promising ; he merdhandised a while 
at Marion, but did not succeed well ; he was appointed County 
Auditor. It was soon discovered that he was incompetent, his 
habits not good, and finally he was removed or resigned his 
office, and was sent to the Asylum for treatment ; after staying 
in the Asylum for some months, he was discharged and sent 
home ; he was unmarried ; he left for Georgia or Alabama and 
died in Georgia — doubtless a victim of the drink habit. A 
lesson for all young men Who are cognizant of his case. The 
third daughter of old Barfield Moody, Lucy, married Captain 
James W. Bass ; a good woman she was, but she has already 
been noticed in or among the Bass family. Julia, the fourth 
daugihter, married William P. Deer, just at the beginning of 
the war ; he volunteered and went through the war ; the fruits 
of the marriage were two daughters, Blanche and Lula. 
Blanche married Henry Berry, and lives upon the Deer home- 
stead ; they have two or three children, all small. Lula mar- 
ried her first cousin, C. G. Bass ; they have only one child,- and 
have already been noticed in or among the Bass family. Wm. 
P. Deer left or disappeared some fifteen or twenty years ago, 
and 'he has not been heard of since, as the writer has been 
informed lately by his sister, Mrs. William Watson. Mrs. 
Lucy Bass and Mrs. Deer are both dead. The second daugh- 
ter of Barfield Moody (omitted in the order of births), Lizzie, 
married Major W. D. Lamb, then a citizen of the county ; they 
had and raised seven sons, names not remembered; their 
mother died some years ago ; the boys grew up and one by one 
they emigrated to Florida ; and finally the father went and soon 
after died in Florida. The sons are all there. Major Lamb 
was a character, but space will not permit a further' notice of 
him. 

Rev. Tapley Moody, an old man sixty or seventy years ago, 
was the head of another brandh of the Moody family in this 



340 A HISTORY O^ MARION COUNTY. 

county. Old "Tap," as he was called, was an excellent man, 
0. Christian gentleman, a local Methodist preacher, and a man 
of no ordinary ability — if he had been educated, he, doubtless, 
would have been a power. The writer has (heard him preach 
many times — he was a strong preacher. In some parts of a 
sermon he became truly eloquent; the confidence the people 
had in his piety gave effect to his sermon. He was greatly 
beloved by all, whether in the church or out of it — was univer- 
sally popular; married more couples than any other man of 
his day or since his time — was sent for far and near to marry 
people. He was a poor man, and had and raised a large family 
of sons and daughters — ^he raised them right and respectably ; 
don't know that I can name all of his sons ; they were, as now 
remembered, John H., Stephen, Daniel, Tapley, Wesley and 
James R. Ervin ; may have 'been another one or two, and some 
daughters — three or four; don't know who his wife was, but 
think she was a Miss Herring. All the sons were good men 
and made good citizens; think they are all dead. John H., 
the oldest, married Miss Elizabeth Mace, already mentioned 
in or among the Mace family. Stephen' married Miss Obeda 
Butler, a daughter of Elias Butler, in the Gaddy neighborihood ; 
they had and raised' a family, don't know how many — know 
but one, Enos M'oody, a capital citizen of Carmiohael Town- 
ship, near Dillion ; he has a family, not known of ; his mother, 
Obeda, still lives. The name, in that family of Butlers, I 
^hink, is extinct. Daniel Moody married the Widow Mary 
Edwards, a daughter of the "Widow Betsy Moody," on Buck 
Swamp; think they are both dead. Tapley married some one 
not known ; so did Wesley. James R. Ervin married, first, a 
widow, whose maiden' name was Mary Crawford, a niece of 
Cross Roads Henry Berry's wife ; she died ; think she left two 
children; he married again, a Miss Finklea, daughter of the 
late Willis Finklea, and had some family, how many not 
known ; he is dead. Of the daughters of old Tapley Moody, 
one married the late Jessee Hays, of Reaves Township; she 
had one ohild, a daughter, who married some one unkhown. 
Jessee Hays was a good citizen ; he and his wife are both dead ; 
don't know anything of the other daughters of old Tapley 
Moody, who was a Mason, and died in 1843 ; was at his funeral 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 341 

(Masonic) ; he was buried on the plantation of Wm. D Rob- 
erts, on'Bu'ck Swamp. 

Another branch of ithe Moody family was represented by 
three brothers, Josiah, John W. and Joshua T. Moody. They 
were related to all the foregoing Moodys, but what it is, is not 
known. Josiah Moody went to school at Pine Hill, in 1842 
and 1844 — ^the writer went to school there at the same time; 
he was a genial young man and full of the spice of life ; he was 
then grown; he afterwards married the Widow Polly Piatt, 
widtow of old Daniel Piatt, who lived just below Latta; she 
had six or seven children. In 1854, he and Hugh Haselden 
built a large hotel at Marion, as Moody & Haselden ; the hotel 
was near the depot, and is remembered by many now living. 
It was intended for a railroad house — was built just as the 
railroad was finished, but did not run long; they sold it to 
Philip P. Bethea. Of course, a barroom was appended to it. 
Bethea and Gilbert W. McKay ran it till about the beginning 
of the war, when they sold it to Woodward Manning. It is 
not necessary to trace its history any further. John W. 
,Moody emigraied with his family, or as many of them as 
would go, to Texas ; know nothing further of him. John W. 
Moody, when quite young, went to clerking for Wyatt Fuller, 
at Allen's Bridge ; and suoh was his aptitude for business that 
Fuller kept him until his (Fuller's) death, which, I think, 
occurred in the last of the forties or early fifties, and for the 
last two or three years of Fuller's life, he being unable to attend 
to it, the whole business was run by John W. Moody, and 
apparently with success. Moody was well up to such business 
and was trustworthy. In the meantime, he married Miss 
Shooter, ■ the only daughter of Benjamin Shooter. After 
Fuller's death and his affairs wound up, Moody's wife having 
died in the meantime, he, I think, went to Texas also — ^^he dis- 
appeared, and have heard that he was dead ; don't know if he 
had any children. Joshua T. Moody, the youngest brother, 
was well known in this county ; he was also a genial gentleman, 
])arge-Jhearted and liberal to a fault ; he would make any per- 
sonal sacrifice to accommodate a friend ; honest and honorable 
in all his dealings, full of life and buoyancy,^ and of gushing 
hospitality ; he merchandized a while, run a barroom a while. 



842 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

and filially bought a part of the John J. Collins land, near Ariel, 
and for several of the last years of his life he farmed on it, and 
succeeded .very well ; he married Miss Evaline Moody; a rela- 
<tjve, as herein already stated; they had two children, Lizzie 
and James A. Lizzie married McQuincy Bryant, as already 
•stated, and has a family. James A. Moody has not married ; 
he is a worthy son of a noble father and mother, both of whom 
are dead — the father died first ; the place, as I suppose, belongs 
ip James A. and his sister, Mrs. Bryant. There was another 
Moody, named Jessee, who belonged, as said, to this branch of 
the Moody family ; he was an excitable and over-religious man, 
an exhorter in the Methodist Church ; his hair curled as much 
as I ever saw ; the old man would shout when he felt like it, 
and I heard one of the clerical brethren once say of him, that 
when old Jessee got happy in church, that his hair was so kinky 
tJhat it would lift him off the floor ; suppose he's dead. 

HarlleS. — The name, Harllee, is a change in the orthog- 
raphy, retaining nearly the same pronunciation as the original 
name, Harley, which the ancestor of the Harllees bore. These 
descended from a younger branch of the house, which was 
represented by Robert Harley, Earl of Oxford, during the 
reign of Queen Anne. The younger brother, Peter Harley, the 
ancestor of the present Harllees, espoused the cause of the 
exiled house of Stewart, and was among those active in at- 
tempting to restore the "Pretender" to the throne of England. 
A price was put on his head as a penalty of this prominence 
in the Jacobin cause, and he was compelled to remain concealed 
uritil his kinsmen obtained for him a pardon from the govern- 
ment; but, probably at the suggestion of the Earl of Oxford 
hiniself, who was anxious to sever all connection with one of 
the unpopular party, the condition of the pardoti was that Peter 
Harley should change his name. He agreed to alter the spell- 
ing of the name, but to retain the sound as nearly as possible — 
so thenceforth he became Peter Harllee. Througth the patron- 
age of his then powerful kinsman he obtained an appointment 
in the navy for his only son, Peter, who was subsequently 
f)romoted to the Captaincy of a British man-of-war. Peter 
remained in this position until his sixtieth year, when, owing 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 343 

to his failing healfh and on account of a wound, he resigned 
his commission, retired on his pension and settled in Virginia, 
then a British colony about the year 1758. He had remained 
a bachelor until this time, but the following year, when sixty- 
one years old, ihe married Ann Leake, of Goochland County, 
Va., a maiden lady, forty-five years old ; the result of this mar- 
riage was four children — Ellen, Jane, John and Tihomas. 
Ellen married William A(te.ms, for whom Adamsville, in Marl- 
borough County, is named ; Jane married Thomas Cottingham ; 
John died in youth ; Thomas, the youngest, was just sixteen 
years old at the surrender of Cornwallis, at Yorktown, 
1 78 1. His father having a contract with the commissary of 
Washington's army to supply 'beeves, sent his sons, with some 
negro slaves, in charge of a herd of cattle to Yorktown ; they 
reached there on the eve of Cornwallis' surrender. The boy 
witnessed, and in after years often related the circumstances 
to his children. The son was too young to serve in the army, 
and the father too old, being then over eighty years of age. 
Peter Harllee died soon after the close of the war, leaving his 
iamily impoverished, not only through the loss of his British 
pension, but because that portion of Virginia had suffered de- 
vastation at the hands of both armies. Thomas moved' with 
his mother and sisters to South Carolina. He often related 
to his children, that, being very poor, he engaged in manual 
labor beyond his strength to obtain money to forward a claim 
to the British government for the renewal and the arrears of 
pension due to his father. This claim, made through our Min- 
ister to Great Britain, was refused, the authorities asserting 
that Captain Peter Harllee had been a rebel, and had aided the 
colonies in their revolt, and had thus forfeited all claims upon 
Great Britain. Finding himself without other resources than 
those of youth, health and energy, he literally became the 
architect of his own fortunes. He had settled on Little Pee 
Dee River, where R. P. Hamer, Sr., now lives. Agriculture 
being in its infancy in that section, offered little hopes of live- 
lihood; but having considerable mechanical skill, he engaged 
in boat and flat making and found it very profitable. By this 
means he laid the foundation of the large property which he '^ 
possessed at his dealth. He sold his flats to the rice planters, 
23 



344 A HISTORY 0? MARION COUNTY. 

and loadted his pole-'boats with merchandise for his store on 
Little Pee Dee. This was the only store between Marion 
Court House and Cheraw. He engag^ largely in farming 
and stock-raising, and entered all the lands for several miles 
around him on both sides of the river. With an education so 
limited that when he came to Soulth Carolina, he could only 
read and write, his ambition stimulated him to educate himself. 
Being too poor to buy candles, often, after a hard day's work, 
he situdied for hours by a fire of blazing lightwood; thus he 
acquired the rudiments of knowledge and mad^e sufficient 
progress in mathematics to begin surveying, and did much 
of this work ; was employed by the State to survey several dis- 
tricts in the eastern pant of the State for a large map of the 
State. This map is sitill extant and very accurate. He was 
aided in this work by his eldest son, John, who became one of 
■the best surveyors in the State. He continued to enter and buy 
land as he accumulalted the funds to do so, paid for it in coin 
weighed by avoirdupois, as was then customary. He pros- 
pered in everything in which he engaged. He often told 
his children that he attributed the blessings of Providtence 
upon his undertakings to his life-long respect, affection and 
devotion for his aged mother, who continued to live with him 
until her death in 1810, at the advanced age of ninety-six 
years ; she had retained Itbe most extraordinary vigor of mind 
and body.- When Marion was first organized as a district, 
Thomas Harllee represented it in the IvCgislature ; he was for 
many years Clerk of tihe Court for Marion District, having in 
his office a poor iboy from Lumberton, N. C, as assistant, E. B. 
Wheeler, who succeeded his benefactor as Clerk) and held the 
office continuously until his death in 1859. Thomas Harllee, 
when young, married a girl of Scotch parentage, named Eliza- 
beth Stuart; her fa'ther, David Stuart, emigrated from Scot- 
land and seittled in Richmond County, N. C. He, with his two 
sons, David and Hardy, foughlt through the Revolutionary 
War under General Marion. David Stuant, Sr., died about 
tihe close of the war, but his two sons survived him ; neither of 
tjhose sons left descendants. David Stuart, Jr., was taken 
prisoner by the British, and was one of the few who survived 
•tihe terrible incarcerations in the British prison ships in 



A HISTORY Ot MARION COUNTY. 845 

Charlesiton harbor. In this connection it may be mentioned 
tihalt in the lower part of Barnwell, Hampton and Orangeburg 
Counties, there is a large family of Harleys, between whom 
and the Harllees of the Pee Dee section is a very striking 
nesemblance — so marked is this resemblance, that at one time 
before the war, when Dr. Robert Harllee represented Marion 
County in the State Senate, and Dr. Robert Harley represented 
Barnwell in the same body, the presiding officer of the Senate 
frequently mistook the one for the other. There were bom to 
Thomas Harllee and wife ten children — John Anne, Elizabeth, 
David S., Peter, Robert, Thomas, Harriet, William W. and 
Lucretia ; the last died in childhood ; the others all attained to 
manhood and womanhood — some of them living to advanced 
ages, rearing large families of children; but all of them are 
now dead — General W. W. Harllee, the youngest, being the 
last one to die — hie died in 1897, at the age of eighty-five years. 
The oldest son. Major John Harllee, was a well known man 
throughout the Pee Dee section ; he was a man of fine mind and 
splendid intellect. In his youth he was appointed a Lieutenant 
in the United States army; he saw much service with the In- 
dians and with General Jackson against the British at New 
Orleans. While stationed on the frontier, which was then 
Louisiana, he became involved in a j)ersonal difficulty with a 
fellow-Lieutenant, and the lartter challenged him to mortal 
com'bat — duelling in those days, especially among army officers, 
A^as very common. Lieutenant David E. Twiggs, afterwards 
a Major General of the United States army, and Who distin- 
guished himself in the war with Mexico, was the second of 
Lieutenant Harllee in the affair. They fought with rifles at 
forty paces ; Lieutenant Harllee threw away his shot at a sap- 
ling in the opposite direction from his challenger. After the 
latter had fired, he taunted Lieutenant Harllee with being 
afraid to shoot at him, and demanded another shot, which was 
accorded him, and ait the word fire, the rifles cracked and the 
challenger fell dead — shot through the hips. Soon after this 
affair of honor, which he ever after deplored. Lieutenant Harl- 
lee resigned from the army and returned to his home, where 
he engaged in surveying and teaching school, until he became 
an old man. He was an expert and very correct surveyor, but 



346 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

did not work at that employment constantly. He was an ex- 
cellent and pains-taking teacher, but did that work also spas- 
modically. During his long vacaiions his visits to his brothers' 
and sisters' families, where he spent these intervals, were wel- 
come events to the children of the families, especially his 
quaint and original expressions and narrations of his varied 
career, all of which were enjoyed by everybody, and can never 
be forgotten by those who knew him. In early life he was a 
keen sportsman, but as age grew upon him he could only in- 
dulge in fishing, which seemed to be a ruling passion ; this and 
reading were his only occupations in his last years. His lit- 
erary talents led him to read everything ; he could quote pages 
and pages from his favorite poets, and had rare poetic gifts 
himself — he, indeed, had in himself the elements of a grand 
and original character. He was never married, and spent his 
last years in comfort at the home of his niece, Mrs. Elizabeth 
McRae, at Argyle, N. C., where he died at the age of eighty- 
nine years. 

Colonel David Stuart Harllee was the second son. His 
father settled him near him on lands now owned by M. R. and 
E. R. Hamer. He was Sheriff of the county, while he lived 
there, but soon sold out his lands and moved to Cheraw, S. C, 
where for a long period he was a leading merchant of the 
town. He finally sold out his mercantile business, bought a 
large plantation in Marlborough County, moved and lived 
there till he died. He was admitted to the bar laite in life, at 
the age of fifty-one years — ^he and the writer were both ad- 
mitted in the same class ; he became a good lawyer. He mar- 
ried Harriet Barnes, of Ro^beson County, N. C, and they raised 
a family of three sons and four daughters. The eldest son. 
Major James J. Harllee, was a lawyer ; he began the practice 
of his profession at Marion Court House, but soon gave up the 
law to devote his entire aittention to his large farming interest, 
near town. He married the only daughter of A. L. Scar- 
borough. Just before the civil war, he sold out his land and 
moved to Arkansas ; he owned a large number of slaves, and he 
carried them with him to Arkansas. He was a successful 
planter until the breaking out of the civil war. He fought 
through the war in the cavalty, and after the surrender the 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 347 

government, through the Freedman's Bureau, seized several 
hundred bales of cotton belonging to him. After a long con- 
troversy, he gained back his cotton, and on the day he suc- 
ceeded in his suit for his cotton, he mounted his horse, in the 
town of Arkadelphia, to return to his home, a few miles dis- 
tant, but his horse becoming frightened became unmanageable, 
threw him and killed him. He was married before leaving 
Soutlh Carolina, but left no children. Dr. William F. Harllee, 
was the second son. He first married a Miss Medley, in Anson 
County, N. C, and after her death, a Miss McRae, daughter of 
General McRae, of Newberne, N. C. He raised several child- 
ren, and died several years ago. He was an Assistant Surgeon 
in the Confederate army during the entire war. The young- 
est son of Colonel D. S. Harllee is Thomas Henry Harllee, Sr., 
who lives ait Florence, S. C. He married Margaret McCoU, 
daughter of William McCbll, near Florence, S. 'C. ; they have 
raised a family of three sons and iour daughters, all of whom 
are now living. Two of his 'sons, Thomas H., Jr., and David 
S., are popular conductors on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. 
The eldest daughter of Colonel D. S. Harllee, Elizabeth, mar- 
ried, first, Dr. Neill McNair, of Robeson County, N. C. ; they 
had one son, Harllee McNair, who entered the Confederate 
service, and was stationed at Wilmington, N. C, where he died 
early in the war. After the death of Dr. McNair, his widow 
married Alex. McRae, of Wilmington, N. C. ; they lived at 
Argyle, their country home, until the death of Mr. McRae. 
Mts. McRae now lives in Wilmington, N. C, with her step- 
daughter, Mrs. Emily Payne; she is quite an intellectual 
woman ; most of 'her time is given to missionary work for the 
Presbyterian Church in the mountains of North Carolina. 
The second daughter of Colonel D. S. Harllee, Mary Ann, 
married B. H. Covington, of Richmond County, N. C. ; they 
raised a family of several sons and one daughter. One of the 
sons. Rev. J. E. Covington, is an able minister of the Baptist 
Church, and lives in the upper part of South Carolina. An- 
other son, Frank F. Covington, of Marion, S. C, is the 
efficient sitenographer of the Fourtli Circuit, and is Chief Clerk 
in the enrolling depaHtment of the General Assembly ; he mar- 
ried Miss Nora Aycock, of Wedgefidd, S. C, and has a family 



348 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

of four children. The youngest son, Benjamin Harllee Cov- 
ington, married a Miss Cox, and Hves in Marlborough, on his 
grand-faither's plantation. The daughter, Hallie, married Mr. 
William Lawson, an Englishman, who is now a prominent 
merchant in Birmingham, Ala. The third daughter of 
Colonel D. S. Harllee, Julia, married Colonel John N. McCall, 
of Mars Bluff, S. C. After the war .they removed to States- 
ville, N. C, where Colonel McCall died, and where his widow 
still lives. They raised a large family of children. Colonel 
McCall represented the County of Marion in the Legislature 
before the war ; he was a large planter and owned a great many 
slaves. On the same night that Julia was married, EUen, her 
youngest sister, was married at the residence of their brother, 
James J. Harllee, at Marion, to Robert F. Graham, who was 
theu a young lawyer of fine talent and large praotice, associated 
with General W, W. Harllee; he had graduated with high 
honors at the South Carolina College ; he entered tihe army and 
was Colonel of the Twenty-first Regiment. After the sur- 
render, he allied himself with the Republican party in the 
State, and was one of the leaders from 1868 until his death, 
which occurred from yellow fever, in Charleston, in 1874; he 
was Judge of the First Circuit at tihe time of his death. He 
had several sons and daughters. His widow married Dr. 
Muckenfuss, and they reside at Summerville, S. C. Colonel 
Thomas Harllee was the third son of Thomas Harllee, Sr. He 
inherited the old homestead, where he continued the mercan- 
tile businesis near the river for a long time, and condiicted the 
large farm. He sold out his possessions to John A. McRae 
and John B. McDaniel, of Clio, S. C, and tihey afterwards 
sold to Elias Townsend, who in turn sold to R. C. Hamer. R. 
C. Hamer gave it to his son, Robert P. Hamer, Jr., who now 
lives upon it, on the very spot where Thomas Harllee first set- 
tled and bulk. Colonel Thomas Harllee was a very popular 
man and was beloved by all who knew him ; he represented the 
county in the Legislature in the olden times. Later in life, 
after selling ouit Harlleesville, he removed to Charleston, where 
he did business as a commission merchant until his death, in 
1855 ; he never married. The fourth son of Thomas Harllee, 
Sr., was Captain Peter Harllee, who inherited the plantation on 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 349 

the east side of the river from Harlleesville, where he lived and 
died, and where his son, Captain Andrew T. Harllee, now 
lives. This is the only land, ouit of the vast possessions origi- 
nally entered and owned by Thomas Harllee, Sr., now owned 
and lived upon by his descendanits. Captain Peter Harllee 
married, in 1830, Ann Fulmore, of Robeson County, N. C. ; 
they raised a family of four sons and four daughters ; Captain 
Peter Harllee died in i860. All four of his sons being in the 
army, the widow successfully conducted the farms with the 
slaves, and raised and furnished large quantities of provisions 
for the soldiers, until her death, in 1863. The oldest son, 
Capltain Robert Z. Harllee, married Susan A. Munnerlyn, 
daughter of Thomas M. Munnerlyn; they had four sons and 
two daughters. The eldest son, Thomas M. Harllee, lives in 
St. Louis, Mo.; he won the prize in New Orleans for b^ing 
the most rapid typewriter in the United States. John W. 
Harllee is Captain of a steamer running out of Georgetown, 
S. C. Peter Zack, the third son, is the superintendent of an 
oil mill at Gibson, N. C. ; and the youngest son, Robert E., of 
one at Darlington, S. C. The eldest daughter, Sallie, married 
Edwin J. Wall, and they have a large family of children ; they 
live in Georgetown, S. C. The youngest daug<hter, Anne, mar- 
ried Joseph O. Wilson, who owns and runs a steamer out of 
Georgetown, where they live. Captain Robert Z. Harllee 
served throughout the war in Bragg's army, and was Captain 
of Company D, of the Tenth South Carolina Regiment, Mani- 
gault's brigade. He commanded the regiment at the battle 
of Atlanta, on July 28th, 1864, and was severely wounded in 
that battle; he also commanded the regiment in the series of 
battles through North Carolina just before the close of the 
war, and surrendered at Greensboro. He preserved the regi- 
mental flag by hiding it under his saddle blanket, and it escaped 
capture. He died at the residence of his brother. Captain 
Andrew T. Harllee, on the 17th April, 1900; his wife died in 
1896. Captain Andrew T. Harllee, when quite a youth, went 
with a number of young men from the Stfate to Kansas Terri- 
tory, in 1855 ; he remained there for a year, fighting under 
Atchison, Stringfellow and other pro-slavery leaders, against 
old Jdhn Brown (Ossauwatomie), afterwards hung at Harp- 



350 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

er's Ferry, Jim Lane and others of the Abolition party — hence 
he was no stranger to the whisitling of bullets from Sharp's 
rifles (Beecher's Bible), when the civil war began. After the 
failure of Kansas to be made a slave State, he returned to his 
native State, but soon after got an appointment, through his 
patron, Thomas A. Hendricks, in the Interior Department, in 
Washington, and held this position until South Carolina se- 
ceded, w'hen he resigned and returned to Charleston, where he 
was appointed Assistant Quartermaster on the staff of Gover- 
nor Pickens, with the rank of Captain ; discharged the duties 
of this office until the fall of Fort Sumter, when he resigned^ 
to raise Company I, of the Eighth Regiment, South Carolina. 
He went with that company to Virginia, and fought through 
the first 'battle of Manassas with a rifle. After that battle. 
Lieutenant R. H. Rogers having resigned, he was promoted 
to fill the vacancy, and on the reorganization of the company 
he was elected Captain, and served as such till the surrender. 
He was 'several times wounded — twice severely; first at the 
capture of Harper's Ferry, on Maryland Heights, through 
both thiglis, and then at Geittysiburg, in the right thigh again. 
After the surrender he went to Florida, remained there for 
three years, and then returned to his home, where he has 
resided ever since ; he is a farmer and a bachelor ; he has held 
many places of public trust — was a Trial Justice from 1876 to 
1886, was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention 
in 1884, is commander of Camp Harllee of Confederate Vet- 
erans at Dillon, S. C. John W. Harllee was the third son of 
Peter Harllee. He was First Lieutenant of Captain Staffordi's 
company of Hagood's brigade, and was a good officer. He 
was wounded twice — the last time he was permanently ' dis- 
abled by a resection of the knee joint, at the battle of the 
Wilderness, and his was the first successful operation of the 
kind performed in Lee's army, as the medical record shows; 
being* disabled for active service, he performed the duties of 
enrolling officer until the close of the war, having been pro- 
moted to Captain. After the war he removed to Florida, and 
married there Mary Ellen Curry; his wife died after the 
birth of his fourth son, and he never married again; he accu- 
mulated a handsome , fortune in the mercantile business, an^ 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 351 

died in 1887, of yellow fever; he left four sons — the eldest, 
John, is a wholesale and retail hardware merchant in Havana, 
Cuba. His next two sons, Horax;e E. and Andrew C, are 
merchants and fruit and truck farmers in Manatee County, 
Fla., at the town Palmetto. His youngest son, William C, 
left West Point Military Academy when half through his 
course, and went to the Philippines as a private in the Thirty- 
third United States Volunteer Infantry. After two months' 
service there he was promoted to Lieutenant in the United 
States Marine corps, and he is now with his command en route 
for China, and was promoted to First Lieutenant, 23d July, 
1900. Peter Stuart Harllee is the fourth and youngest son of 
Peter Harilee. He joined the army of the Confederacy at 
fifteen years of age, and served until the surrender in his 
brotiher. Captain A. T. Harllee's company, of the Eighth Regi- 
ment; he was in many of the battles in which the company 
engaged, but escaped without injury. After the war, he re- 
mained at home with his sisters until 4ie return of Captain A. 
T. Harllee from Florida, w'hen he went, first, to Texas, and 
then to Florida; he married, in Florida, Miss Alice Bullock, 
and they have several children; he is a large stock and fruit 
and vegetable grower, and has fine possessions along the Mat- 
inee River, in Tampa, and the interior of the State. Ann Eliza 
was the oldest daughter; she was a lady of remarkaible intelli- 
gence ; died in 1895. Amelia is the second daughter ; she lives 
with her brother, Andrew, at the old place where they were 
bom' — sihe and her brother being joint owners of the old home- 
stead. Agnes, the third daughter, married Captain W. D. 
Carmichael, and they live three miles west of Harlleesville ; 
they have six sons and four daughters, nearly all of whom are 
grown. Their eldest son, William D., graduated with distinc- 
tion at the University of North Carolina, in 1897, and he is 
now the Principal of the Durham High School, where he has 
been teaching since his graduation ; he married, in 1899? Mar- 
garet Mae Robert McCaull, daughter of Colonel John A. 
McCaull, of New York city ; he is a young man of fine talent. 
Captain Carmichael has one daughter, Jessie, married to 
Walter Tatum, one of the leading merchants of McColl, S. C. 
The youngest daughter of Captain Peter Harllee, Bettie, was 



352 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

a very accomplished and superior young lady, a favorite with 
everybody; she died just after reaching womanhood, in 1882. 
Dr. Robert Harllee was the fifth son of old Thomas Harllee ; 
he graduated in medicine and settled at Marion Court House, 
and while he practiced there his profession, he had a very 
extensive practice all over the county. He married, first. Miss 
Ann Gurly, a daughter of Joseph Gurly ; she died in a short 
time, childless; he afterwards married Mrs. Amelia Howard, 
widow of Charles Howard, of West Marion — her maiden name 
was Cannon, a daughter of old Major Cannon, of Darlington ; 
she had two children, a daughter, Melvina, and a son, Richard 
G. Howard, when she married Dr. Harllee; he (Dr. Harllee) 
raised a family of four sons and three daughters. His eldest 
son, Robert Armstrong, was a good soldier in the Eighth South 
Carolina Regiment; he died in camp, near Manassas, in 1861, 
of pneumonia. The next oldest son, Walter C, is a com- 
mercial traveler; he lives in Florence, S. C. The third son, 
Harry T., is a farmer; he lives near Florence; he married a 
Miss McCall, and they have a family of grown children. The 
youngest son of Dr.' Harllee, Arthur, is a lawyer; he lives in 
New Mexico, and is unmarried. The second daughter, Sallie, 
just after the war, married Dr. J. F. Pearce, and they have one 
son, Robert H., who is now associated with his father in 
business. Dr. and Mrs. Pearce had one daughter, Anne, who 
married a Mellichamp, of Charleston, and they now live in 
Atlanta, Ga. After the death of his first wife. Dr. Pearce 
married her sister, L/ouisa, and they live on a part of Dr. 
Dr. Harllee's homestead. Dr. Pearce is well known through- 
out the State. He and his son are progressive and successful 
farmers as well as eminent physicians. Dr. Pearce represented 
his county (Marion) once in the Legislature, and declined re- 
election. Hattie, the youngest daughter of Dr. Harllee, mar- 
ried Hon. Marsden Bellamy, of Wilmington, N. C, where they 
reside, and have a large family of children. Dr. Harllee was 
an exceedingly popular man; he was several times a Repre- 
sentative in the lower House and for two terms a Senator 
before the war ; he died after the war, at the age of sixty-five. 
General W. W. Harllee was the sixth and youngest son of 
Thom.as Harllee, Sr. ; he read law with Chancellor Dargan, of 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 353 

Darlington, and began the practice of his profession at Marion 
Court House. He volunteered for service in the Florida War 
with the Indians, and commanded la battalion from South Caro- 
lina in that war; he was Brigadier and Major General of the 
militia long before the war. He represented his county in the 
Legislature twice before the war, and since the war was elected 
Senator, and served one term, and while Senator was elected 
President pro tern, of the Senate ; he was President of the Wil- 
mington and Manchester Railroad for five years, from its 
organization to its completion ; it was due to his untiring efforts 
that the road was built ; he was delegate to the Secession Con- 
vention of the State, in i860, and was Lieutenant-Governor 
at the 'beginning of the war; he was the commander of the 
"Harllee Legion," that was stationed near Georgetown. 
When a young man, he married Miss Martha Shakelford, of 
Charleston ; they raised three sons and three daughters. Ed- 
ward Porcher, his eldest son, was a brilliant young man; he 
was a gallant officer on the staff of Generals Kershaw and Ken- 
nedy. He was admitted to the bar, but preferred journalism 
to law, and until a short time before his death was on the edito- 
rial staff of the New Orleans Picayune; he fell a victim to 
overwork, had softening of the brain as a result, and died, 
unmarried, in the prime of life. Charles Stuart, the second son 
of General Harllee, was also in the army, and did gallant ser- 
vice. He removed to Texas after the war ; married there and , 
died, leaving three children, who, with their mother, live in 
Texas now. James, the youngest son, also went to Texas, 
married, and is living there now. Florence and Lizzie, the two 
oldest daughters, have never married ; they are teachers, and 
live at Florence, with their mother; the city was named for 
the eldest daughter, Florence, it having been esatblished at the 
time of the building of the Wilmington and Manchester Rail- 
road, of which her father was then President. The third and 
youngest daughter, Mattie, married Frank Coachman, of 
Georgetown, and they have a large family of children, who 
live with their father, at PlantersviUe, S. C, since the death of 
their mother. Their eldest daughter, Helen, married Mr. 
LaBruce, a large rice planter of that section. The three 
daughters of Thomas Harllee, Sr., were Annie, Elizabeth and 



354 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Harriet. Annie married John McNeill, and settled on the east 
side of Little Pee Dee River, on Hays Swamp, but they soon 
moved to Wilcox County, Ala. ; they raised a large family of 
children, some of whom are now prominent in their State. 
Mrs. McNeill lived to he eighty years of age. Elizabeth, the 
next oldest, married Parker Bethea, and they lived and died 
near where they first settled, near what is now called Mineral 
Springs; they raised two sons and four daughters. Their 
eldest son, Harllee, married Elizabeth Roberts, a daughter of 
Reddin Roberts, on Buck Swamp ; they moved to Florida, and 
died there. One of their daughters married her first cousin, 
W. D. B. Hays, a good citizen and farmer; they live on Buck 
Swamp. The other children live in Florida. Benjamin 
Parker Bethea, their youngest son, was an officer from the be- 
ginning to the end of the war, and was a gallant and brave 
soldier. After the war, he married a Miss Woolvin, of Pender 
County, N. C, below Wilmington, to which place he removed 
and now resides, and is a successful farmer; his products are 
principally peanuts; he has a family of group-up children. 
The eldest daughter of Parker Bethea and wife, Elizabeth, 
married a Mr. Henderson, of North Carolina, and they had one 
son, Robert, who was a good soldier; he and his mother are 
both dead. The second daughter, Harriet, married Jesse 
Rogers, and both of them are dead. Their sons, David S. and 
Albert, are successful farmers of the county. The third 
daughter, Laura, married, late in life, Mr. Thompson Allen, of 
Marlborough County; and -the youngest daughter, Maria, mar- 
ried a Mr. Harris, and they moved to North Carolina. Har- 
riet, the youngest daughter of Thomas Harllee, Sr., married 
George L W. McCall, of Darlington, and they raised a family 
of three daughters. Hannah Jane, the youngest, has never 
married. Rebecca and Caroline both married gentlemen by 
the name of Saunders, of Sumter County, and they have 
numerous descendants living in Sumter and Darlington 
Countira, many of whom are prominent in business and social 
circles in those counties. 

The foregoing notice of the Harllee family was furnished 
to the writer by Captain A. T. Harllee, which has been copied 
herein, in extenso verbatim et liberatim, except in a few in- 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 855 

stances in the phraseology has 'been changed, and a few omis- 
sions and additions made, at the expense of space. It is a 
history of which the family may 'be proud as also the county. 

WooDBERRY. — Two brothers, Richard and Jonah Wood- 
berry, came to Britton's Neck from Socastee, in the early part 
of the. eighteenth century ; where they came from to Socastee 
is not known, but it is supposed they came from Wales or else- 
where in England. Richard Woodberry selttled in what is 
now called Woodberry Township, and married Miss Lizzie 
Balloone, on Black River; they raised two sons, Richard 
and William. Richard Woodberry, Jr., married Miss Desda 
Davis, and they had and raised two sons au'd two daughters ; 
the sons were John and George W. ; the daughters were Mrs. 
Benjamin Gause and Mrs. John Gause. The three daughters 
of old Richard, St., were Margaret, who married Dr. Thomas 
Britton ; she died childless ; another daughter, Fannie married 
Samuel Wilson, and she died childless; another daughter 
(name not known), married Rev. Jeremia!h Norman, of North 
Carolina; they had and raised Mrs. John Woodberry (first 
wife), Mrs. James Jenkins and Samuel Norman. The latter 
grew up and went to Horry, and married a Miss Beaty, 
sister of Colonel James Beaty, of Conway, who, before 
her death, in 1882, was universally called "Old Aunt Nor- 
man." She kept a public house; was born in 1791 — a remark- 
able woman; she had and raised a family, mostly daughters, 
and one son, who was a doctor — his name not remembered; 
married and died some years ago. The husband of "Old 
Aunt Norman" died many years before she died; she was 
a hustler in business ; kept a good house — the writer knows 
whereof he speaks. John Woodberry, son of Richard, Jr., 
married, first, his cousin. Miss Norman (Mary), and they had 
and raised sons, Franklin, William, Norman, Benjamin Gause ; 
and daughters, Eloise 'and Martha; know nothing of any of 
these chil'dren, except Benjamin Gause Woodberry ; he is now 
in Britton's Neck ; he married, first, a widow lady ; sihe had one 
child, a daughter, who married a few years ago, and is among 
us now. Benjami'n Gause Woodberry married, a second time, 
a Miss Brown, in Britton's Neck, and' they live down there. 



856 A HISTORY O? MARION COUNTY. 

John Woodberry married, a second time, Miss Ann Gregg, 
daughter of our late venerable R. J. Gregg ; she had two sons, 
John and Waddy ; I think Waddy is dead. John Woodberry, the 
son, married a niece of Mrs. Sturges, at Florence, and lives in 
Florence County ; he is a genial gentleman and has a good deal 
of the "get up" in him, which will count for him in days to 
come. George Washington Woodberry married a Miss 
Brown, sister of the late T. F. Brown, and had and raised three 
sons and three daughters ; the sons are Travis Foster, James 
and Edward; the daughters are Dora, Mary and Julia. Julia 
went to school at Hofwyl Academy, in 1857 — a. charming girl, 
about grown ; she married some one ; I have lost sight of her ; 
can trace the others no further. General William Woodberry, 
the brother of Richard, Jr., a very noted and prominent man in 
his day, was born loth January, 1788, and died 31st January, 
1851 ; he married, first. Miss Hannah Davis; they had four 
children, all dying quite young; his second' wife was Miss 
Sarah Johnson, of Horry ; hy this marriage four sons and four 
daughters were iborn, all of whom, except one daughter, mar- 
ried and raised families. General Woodberry's sons were 
Richard, William, Evander Mclver and Joseph Alston. Rich- 
ard Woodberry, the third, married Miss Joanna Balloone ; had 
two children, toth died in infancy. William married twice ; 
had three children by the first wife and five by the last; his 
oldest son, Richard, 4th, married' a Miss Britton ; a daughter, 
Venetia, married a Mr. Pope ; another daughter, Agnes, mar- 
ried a Mr. Mcllveen ; William, a son, married a Miss Cannon ; 
another son, Benjamin Gause, married a Miss Hucks; another 
son, Harrison, also married a Miss Hucks ; another, Joseph A., 
also married a Miss Hucks, and a daughter, Martha, married 
Arthur Hucks (the Hucks seemed to be popular with the 
Woodberrys) ; they all have families, about whom I know 
nothing. Evander Mclver Woodberry married a Miss Scott; 
they had two children. Joseph A. also married a Miss Scott, 
and had three sons and two daughters. General Woodberry's 
oldest daughter, Elizabeth Ann, married William H. Johnson ; 
they had three sons and five daughters. Another daughter, 
Mary, married Rollen Kimball; they had two sons and one 
daughter. Margaret F., the youngest daughter, married the 



A HISTORY Oi MARION COUNTY. 357 

late Hugh R. Johnson, who Hved and died near Nichols, S. C. ; 
they had and, raised five sons and two daughters ; the sons are 
Whiteford F., Richard Olin, Samuel A., William Woodberry 
and Edward Evander. Whiteford married Miss Ella Page, 
daughter of the Widow Pinckney C. Page, near CaTmichael's 
Bridge, on Little Pee Dee ; they have some children. White- 
ford is the only one of the five sons married. The daughters 
of Margaret F. are Sallie and Maggie May. Sallie married E. 
T. Huggins; they have considerable family, some grown. 
Maggie May married Thomas J. Capet, of Marlborough ; they 
have a young family. General William Woodberry was a very 
popular man in his day ; he filled several important positions 
of honor, profit and trust, and filled all with credit to himself 
and came out with unstained official integrity ; he was Briga- 
dier General of the militia, and was several times elected to 
the lower House of the Legislature; he was Sheriff of the 
county from April, 1833, to April, 1837; he was hospitable to a 
fault, kind-hearted and liberal, especially to the poor; he was 
full of wit and humor, and could tell a story with great zest ; a 
great hand to perpetrate a joke and to play innocent tricks on 
people. The writer has heard of many of them — one as to 
how he made the Methodist preacher bail the canoe with his 
fine beaver hat, as the General was putting him across the 
river; another, how he accidentally (purposely) turned over 
the canoe, in putting the venerable and reverend James Jenk- 
ins across the river, and luckily saved the old man from 
drowning ; another of his adventures with an old gobbler, when 
a boy, with a red cqat on ; wherever he went he drew a crowd 
around him by his wit and humorous stories, which he could 
tell with the greatest glee, to the great amusement of the listen- 
ers ; with all his wit, humor and innocent frivolity, he was a man 
of great good sense; he was a man of wealth, and managed 
his farm and financial affairs with great success ; his home was 
ever crowded, and his table substantially supplied, and was 
free ; he left no son his equal ; his daugihter, the youngest, Mrs. 
Margaret F. Johnson, approaches nearer to her falther and in- 
herited more of his humorous fun, and perhaps more of his 
towering intellect, than any other of his children ; and I don't 
mean, by thus saying, to disparage her other sisters, w'hom I 



358 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

have never seen, or any other member of the family. As 
already stated, the first Woodberrys in the county were Rich- 
ard and Jonah ; as to Jonah, he disappeared or emigrated to 
Other parts ; nothing further is known of him or his posterity, 
if he had any. They had a sister, who married General Wade 
Hampton, of Revolutionary fame, the grand-father of our 
present General Hampton. The name Hampton will ever be 
remembered in South Carolina with grateful recollection and 
pride. 

Stackhouse. — ^John Stackhouse, the progenitor of the 
Stackhouse family in the county, came 'here from Virginia, 
before the Revolutionary War; he married a widow, whose 
maiden name was Bethea, a sister of old Buck Swamp John 
Bethea; ithey had and raised two sons, John and William; 
don't know if tlhere were any daughters. William, I believe, 
at any rate, one of them, emigrated to other parts ; the other, 
John, remained in the county ; he was the grand-father of our 
fellow-citizen, T. F. Stackhouse ; . don't know to whom he 
married: — ^he did marry, however, and had and raised five sons 
and one daughter; the sons were Herod, Isaac, John, Hugh 
and Tristram; tlhe daughter's name not remembered. Herod 
Stackhouse, a very public-spirited man, a good man and a suc- 
cessful farmer, married Miss Nancy Roper; they had and 
raised two sons, Lysias and Wesley, and one daughter, Mary 
Ann. Lysias married Miss Mary Gaddy, daughter of old 
Ithamer Gaddy, and who has been noticed in or among the 
Gaddy family. Wesley Stackhouse, the second son of Herod, 
was a most excellent man and citizen, a good business man, 
well qualified by education and training; married the Widow 
Lucretia Meekins, whose maiden name was Bethea, a sister 
of the laite Samuel J. Bethea ; she had no children by her first 
marriage; by her marriage with Wesley Stackhouse, two 
daughters were born and raised, Martha and Nannie, and one 
son, Wesley, now of Dillon, S. C. His daughter, Martha, 
marrie)d Lieutenant William Manning, who was killed at the 
second battle of Manassas, 29th August, 1862 ; by him she had 
one child, a daughter, who, I think, was born after her father's 
death, and was named for him, "Willie ;" her mother soon after 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 359 

married 'her cousin, H. Milton Stackhouse, now of Marlbor- 
ough, and its late Senator in the State Legislature, and a first 
class man every way ; they have had and raised four sons and 
one d3.ughter ; the sons are R. E. Stackhouse, now a first class 
preacher in the South Carolina 'Conference of the Methodist 
Church ; Wade, a first class physician, and is married to a Miss 
Steed, daughter of the late W. H. Steed, of upper Marion; 
George F., who is a Paymaster in the United States navy, in 
the Philippines, and who married Miss Texia Young, of 
Marion, S. C. ; and another son, whiose name is not known, 
and who, I presume, is yet with his parents, and one daughter 
(name not known), who married Mr. J. C. Dunbar, who is 
now a member of the Legislature from Marlborough County. 
Miss Willie Manning, the daughter by her first husband, was 
well educated in the best schools in the South, and a highly 
accomplished lady, is unmarried, and makes teaching a busi- 
ness, and is somewhere in the State following her vocation, 
and has been thus engaged ever since her graduation. Nan- 
nie, the second daughter of Wesley Stackhouse, married Knox 
Clark, late Clerk' of the Court and County Treasurer — a man 
of nerve and force, and the power to say no, which many men 
cannot or do not say — a sober, progressive man ; he died in the 
prime of life, in September, 1888, and left Nannie a widow, 
with some children, three sons and four daughters — the young- 
est not two years old. Nannie Clark, the widow, survived 
her husband only a few years ; she died, and left all her child- 
ren unmarried, except Mrs. Brown. Wesley Stackhouse, the 
only son of his father, Wesley, grew up and married Miss 
Mollie Breeden, daughter of the late John A. Breeden; they 
live at Dillon, and have a family of seven or eight children, 
some of them grown. Unfortunately, Wesley's habits were 
not good; "he dissipated a great deal, and did nothing for 
several years — spent his inheritance and came down pretty 
low ; but for the last eight or ten years he has abstained — is 
now and has been for that time a sober man, and is trying to 
rebuild his lost fortune, in which it is hoped he will succeed ; 
he now has a heavy load to carry. He has a nice and very 
interesting family. His father died Christmas day, 1864. 
Mary Ann Stackhouse, the only daughter of old Herod, mar- 
24 



360 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 

nied Evander R. Bethea, a very successful farmer ; they had 
and raised one son, Jasper, and three daughters, Josephine, 
Carrie and Nannie. The son grew up, and after some years 
went to Texas, where he married and where he now Uves ; he 
has no children. The eldest daughter, Josephine, married her 
cousin, William B. Stackhouse, Who -was a very progressive 
man and farmer, and was at one time elected as County Com- 
missioner, and served one term very acceptably ; he died some 
years after, leaving Josei^hine and four or five children surviv- 
ing, mostly girls. The oldest. Miss Cora, is well educated, 
and is one of the teachers in the Latta Graded School. The 
widow is doing well on her fine farm. The second daughter, 
Carrie, married Joseph J. Bethea, who resides and merchan- 
dizes at Latta ; he has also a good farm near by ; he is a very 
successful man in affairs; they have no children. The third 
daughter, Nannie, married Rev. Samuel J. Bethea, who is a 
regular itinerant Methodist preacher in the South Carolina 
Conference — stands fair ; they have but one child, a son, Sam- 
uel J. Isaac Stadkhouse, the ibrother of old Herod, also mar- 
ried another daughter of old man John Roper, a sister of old 
Herod's wife; he, as well as old Herod, resided on his fine 
place, below Harlleesville, on Little Pee Dee, all his lifetime. 
This pair was more prolific than Herod and his wife; they 
had and raised six sons and one daughter ; the sons were Mas- 
ten C, Eli T., William R., Tristram F., Milton and Robert B. ; 
the daughter's name not reimembered. The oldest son, Mas- 
ten C. Stackhouse, married Mary Ann Rogers, a daug'hter of 
William Rogers. Hasten C. Stackhouse was a very quiet 
man, a farmer, and managed well ; they had and raised a con- 
siderable family of sons and daughters; the sons are Mark, 
John R., William B. and L P. Stackhouse, as remembered ; one 
daughter, Janie, one Florence, and one Charlotte, the other 
name not known. Mark or Marcus was the first graduate of 
Woff'ord College from Marion County ; he graduated in 1871 ; 
he married Miss Mary Lester, an excellent woman, step- 
daughter of E. J. Moody ; they have three sons grown, named 
Walter, Edward and Robert, all unmarried. Don't know who 
John R. Stackhouse married ; he lives and is doing business at 
Mullins. William B. married Josephine Bethea, and has 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 361 

already been mentioned. I. P. StacMiouse married his first 
cousin, a Miss Rogers, daughter of Philip B. Rogers; they 
have children, don't know how many; he lives near Moody's 
Mill, six miles above Marion' — is a farmer, and one of the 
registers of voters in Marion County. One of the daughters, 
Janie, married Dempsy Lewis, in the "Fork," now of Mullins ; 
he is an excellent manageE of his farm, and is now also 
merchandizing at Mullins; they have ten children, eight of 
them 'boys and two girls — they have five grown children. One 
of the daughters of Masten C. Stackhouse married a Mr. 
Edens ; another one married her first cousin, William Rogers ; 
they live at Mullins ; one married Fet Bethea ; one married a 
Mr. Pipkin, in Marlborough, and one is unmarried ; there may 
be others. E. T. Stackhouse, the second son of Isaac, was 
born 27th March, 1824; his birthday was the same as the 
.writer's — 'six years younger; he grew up and married Eliza- 
beth Ann Fore, a daughter of the late Thomas Fore ; they 
raised three sons and five daughters. Of the sons, James 
Stackhouse is the oldest; he married a Miss McAliSter, of 
North Carolina; they have a considerable family, sons and 
daughters — two sons grown. One, Lanneau, married Miss 
Mary Miles, daughter of Dr. D. F. Miles, Clerk of the Court ; 
they have some two or three children. The other grown son. 
Lacy, not married; other children small. James Stackhouse 
runs a livery stable (sale and feed) ; in early life he tried 
mercihandizing and hotel business, but failed; he then went 
into the livery business, and has succeeded well — this business 
suits him ; he is emphatically a horseman ; he now represents 
the county in the State Senate. The second son, William 
Stackhouse, at Dillon, married a daughter of B. F. Davis, just 
below Marion; they have some children, dk>n't know how 
many — they are small; he, too, is in the livery business, and 
seems to ibe doing well ; he is a capital citizen, and will doubt- 
less succeed. The third and youngest son, Walter F. Stack- 
house, is a graduate of Wofford College, in the class of 1895 ; 
has studied law and is associated with W. J. Montgomery, his 
brother-in-law, in its practice, at Marion; he married, a few 
months ago, a lady of Greenwood, and lives at Marion ; he is 
United States Commissioner at Marion; a man of business, 



362 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

and is quite promising. Of the daug'htters of Colonel E. T. 
.Stackhouse, the eldest, Mary, married James H. Berry, and 
has already been noticed among the Berrys. Another daughter, 
Mattie, married Houston Manning, and has already been 
noticed among the M'annings. Another, called "Duck" 
(though not her name), married Neill Alford, who has already 
been noticed in or among the Alfords. Another, Anna, mar- 
ried W. J. Montgomery, Esq., of Marion; they have several 
.dhildren, one or two grown — mostly girls. Mr. Montgom- 
ery graduated at Wofford College, in 1875; came home and 
studied law with General Harllee, was admitted to the bar and 
practiced some few years with that veteran of the law ; they 
dissolved partnership, and Mr. Montgomery set up for him- 
self; he has succeeded admirably, has 'become a fine lawyer 
and made money ; is President of the Merchants and Farmers 
Savings Bank of Marion, and has been ever since its organiza- 
tion, ten or twelve years ago — the bank has prospered under 
his administration of its affairs; he 'has been Mayor of the 
town. Representative of the county in the Legislature, and also 
a delegate from the county to the Constitutional Convention of 
.the State, in 1895; he is a man of affairs, and succeeds at all; 
deserves the more credit, as he was raised as poor as anybody. 
Much imore might be said of him, but space will not allow it. 
Anotiher and youngest daughter of Colonel Stackhouse, called 
"Pet" (not her real name), married T. C. Covington, his 
second wife; they 'have some children, small yet. Mr. Cov- 
ington is a high-minded, honorable gentleman, of fine address, 
and magnetic; he merchandized for a while, but did not suc- 
ceed well; is now farming in the "Free State" section — it 
remains to be seen how he will succeed in the farming role. 

Colonel E. T. Stackhouse deserves more than a passing 
notice. He was raised on a farm and received only a common 
school education. After he was married, he settled on the 
place where he ever after lived ; he was a farmer, a good and 
very successful one — farmed on the intensive system ; his farm 
was like a garden — all his house and farm arrangements were 
complete and adapted to comfort and convenience; his farm 
was a model one. When the war commenced, he raised a 
company of which he was made Captain ; his company formed 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 863 

part of the Eiglnth South Carolina Regiment ; he went through 
the war to Appomattox, and came out Lieutenant Colonel of 
the regiment. ' He was twice elected to the Legislature of the 
State. When the "Farmers Alliance" began to 'boom, Colonel 
Stackhouse went into it with all his might — it seemed to be in 
accord with his chosen occupation, and operated for the benefit 
of the farmer and its votaries. He became President of the 
State Alliance and held that position for one or two terms. 
Whatever may "have been the purpose and intentions of the 
founders of the Alliance, it was popular and flourished for a 
time ; but the politicians got hold of it and worked it for their 
benefit, made it a stepping-stone to office and killed it, much 
to the regret of those honest people who ha;d gone into it to 
better their condition as farmers. Under its influence and 
auspices. Colonel Stackhouse became a candidate for Congress, 
in 1890, and was overwbelmingly elected ; be took his seat in 
that body, in December, 1891, and died suddenly, in Washing- 
ton, 14th June, 1892. Between the meeting of Congress, first 
Monday in December, 1891, and his death, in June following, 
his good wife died. The complete reversal of the habits of 
his life, together with his ambition to get into the routine of 
business as done in Congress, so as to be able to do something 
for his people, was too much for him, for one of his age — 
he being sixty-eigfht years old in March preceding his death. 
A young man may change or reverse his habits with impunity, 
but an old man dare not do it. It is higbly probable that, if 
Colonel Stackhouse had remained at home on his farm, he 
miglht have been living to-day. He was a model citizen and 
a model farmer. William Roper Stackhouse, the third son 
of Isaac, died a few weeks ago, a retiring and unassuming man, 
a good farmer and successful man ; ihe married a Miss Stafford, 
daughter of Malcolm Stafford, and has already been noticed 
in or among the Stafford family. Tristfam F. Stackhouse, the 
fourth son of Isaac, one of our very best citizens, married Miss 
Mary Ann Bethea, a daughter of the late old man. Cade 
Bethea; he settled on the place near where he was born, now 
near tihe town of Dillon ; they had and raised three sons, Tris- 
tram Bascom, Adolphus and Lawrence. The oldest son, T. 
Bascom Stackhouse, is a graduate of Wofford College, in the 



364 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

class of 1880 ; he married a Miss Hamer, daughter of Rdbert 
P. Hamer, Sr., and settled near his father, between Harllees- 
ville and Dillon ; has a large farm there and is succeeding well 
thereon, although be gives it but little of his personal attention ; 
he is Cashier of the Bank of Dillon, w'hich requires most of his 
time ; he is a first class business man every way— is up-to-date 
in almost every branch of commercial and financial life ; he has 
only one child, a daughter, I think. Adolphus Stackhouse, a 
younger brother, married Miss Lucy Thompson, a daughter of 
the late Lemuel S. Thompson ; they first settled near Harllees- 
ville, and after a few years he sold out and moved to Sumter- 
County, know nothing as to their family — think he has been 
in the Legislature from Sumter and in the Constitutional Con- 
vention in 1895 ; it is said his wife is a most excellent lady, and 
the same may 'be said of him as a man. Lawrence, the young- 
est son of T. F. Stackhouse, is unmarried — unfortunately he 
is afflicted with epilepsy ; everything possible has been done for 
him, but to no avail ; suppose he is twenty-four or twenty-five 
years old, lives with his father. T. F. Stackhouse lost his wife 
some years ago ; he has not remarried ; his niece and her hus- 
band. Hasten Gasque, with their family, live with him and 
keep house for him and also runs his farm. T. F. Stackhouse 
is a modest, unassuming man and a capital citizen ; he has a 
large and splendid farm, and is well fixed for living; he has 
been twice consecutively elected to the lower House of the 
General Assembly, and is now serving a second term — a man 
of good judgment and fine sense. If our county was filled up 
with such men there would be little use for courts or lawyers. 
H. Milton Stackhouse, the fifth son of Isaac, has already been 
incidentally mentioned above with his wife, who was a 
daughter of Wesley Stackhouse, of the Herod branch of the 
family. Rdbert B., the sixth son of Isaac, was a promising 
young man ; sickened and died soon after coming out of the 
war — a young man of promise. Hugh Stackhouse, a younger 
brother of old Herod and Isaac, was drowned in Little Pee 
Dee River, about 1837 or 1838 ; was unmarried — n young man. 
The circumstances were these: there had been a tremendous 
freshet in Little Pee Dee, and it floated the planks off each end 
of Stafford's Bridge, and as soon as the freshet went down 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 865 

low enough, A. Q. McDuffie, who lived near by, and then a 
young man, together with Hugh Stackhouse, and a negro man, 
took a canoe and went d'own the river hunting up the planks, 
so as to bring them back and put them on the bridge again ; in 
going down the river, their canoe struck or got into a whirl in 
the river, whidh (the river being very full) was strong, so 
much so as to turn the canoe over. McDufEe was a good 
swimmer; Stackhouse could swim but little, and the negro 
could not swim at all. 'Stackhouse soon sank; McDuffie, 
seeing it, managed to sustain himself in the whirl, till Stack- 
house rose to the top, when McDuffie made for him and oaught 
hold of him ; Stackhouse, like all drowning men, had no sense, 
tried to cling around McDuffie's neck; the latter knew that 
would not do — ^that both would be drowned together ; he tore 
loose from Stackhouse and the latter sank again. McDuf- 
fie waited till he rose the second time, and caught him 
again, with the same result as at first. McDuffie freed himself 
from' him-, Stackhouse sank again, and he was seen no more. 
The negro, who could not swim at all, managed to get hold of 
an overhanging bough of a tree and saved himself. McDuffie, 
several times in his life, told this to the writer; said he could 
have saved Stackhouse, if he could have gotten him to have 
acted otherwise; said he hollered to Stackhouse with all his 
might, not to cling around his neck, but Stackhouse would not 
heed him, hence he tore loose from him and saved himself. 
The question was, shall both drown or only Stackhouse? 

The Stackhouse family is extensive and numerous in itself 
and its connections ; yet there are as few "dead-'beats" in it as, 
perhaps, in any family in the county. They are self-sustaining, 
all bread-winners. Old Herod and old Isaac were working 
men and had right ideas of life, and, above all, were God- 
fearing men — did all they could for the church and the cause 
of their Maker. From the twenties to the forties, inclusive, 
there were annually camp meetings at or near Harlleesville, and 
they two were among the strongest advocates and supporters 
of those meetings, and their daily life and intercourse with 
their neighbors showed the same spirit and was in strict accord 
with their professions. It reminds the writer of the language 
of the Psalmist, David, where he said, "I was young, but now 



866 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

I am old, yet have I not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his 
seed begging toread." Of the two brothers of Herod and 
Isaac, to wit : John and Tristram, John either died or went else- 
where ; Tristram Stackhouse became a Methodist preadher of 
the South Carolina Conference in 1830, a young single man, 
and died on Cypress Circuit, Cdleton County or Orangeburg, 
in 1831. 

Wayne. — This family, though the name is now extinct in 
Marion County, yet its descendants are numerous, and its 
connection extensive — hence it is now herein noticed. Francis 
Asbury Wayne, the first one known in this county (born in 
1787 and died in 1870), was the second son of William Wayne, 
who was a first cousin of General Anthony Wayne, was 
brought -up with the General in the latter's family. William 
was a brave Revolutionary soldier, and after the war (Revo- 
lutionary), moved to Georgetown S. C, where he lived and 
died, about 1820. It is recorded in Asbury's journal (which 
I have not now before me) , that William Wayne was the only 
Methodist at Georgetown, when the Bis'hop first visited that 
place. He married Esther Trezevant (a Huguenot), and I 
suppose a sister of Judge Lewis Trezevant, who was elected a 
Judge, lOth February, 1800, and died 15th February, 1808 
(vol. I., Statutes at Large, page 439), and both he and bis wife 
were buried under the Methodist Church at Georgetown, S. 
C. — 'a wide mart)le slab now covering both their graves. Other 
children of William Wayne were progenitors of Mrs. Eleanor 
Gregg, widow of the late Wesley W. Gregg, of Marion, the 
Mellichamps, of Sumter, a family of Elliotts and Daniel G. 
Wayne, and the Von Kolnitzs, of Charleston. Francis As- 
bury Wayne came to this county from Georgetown, and mar- 
ried, first, the widow of old Nathan Evans and mother of the 
late General William Evans ; she was a sister of the late Wil- 
liam Rogers, of Dothan ; the fruit of this marriage was an only 
daughter, Martha, who married Alexander Murdoch, of Marl- 
borough, and became the mcJther of the two wives of Robert 
Charles Mclntyre, whidh has already been noticed in or among 
the Mclntyres, and of two sons, John and Kenneth, both of 
whom died young and unmarried. The first wife dying, F. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 367 

A. Wayne married, a second time, Miss Elizabeth Marjory 
Ivegette, daughter of Jessee Legette, Sr., a sister of Captain 
David Legate, Jessee, Jr., and Ebenezer, and of Mrs. Ann 
Snow and Jane Legette; there was another sister, Theresa 
Ann, who married a Palmer. By this marriage they had and 
raised six daughters and three sons. Of the daughters, the 
eldest, Jane Trezevant, married Jeremiah Sessions, of Horry; 
they had and raised two sons. Ivawrence Trezevant, who mar- 
ried a Miss Smith, daughter of the late William H. Smith, by 
his first wife. Miss Helen Bass, and by this marriage were bom 
six or seven children, sons and daughters. This wife died, and 
he married again, I think, a Miss Campbell. Of the children. 
of Lawrence T. Sessions, the writer does not know their 
names, though some of them are young men grown, except the 
youngest, Clyde, who vras an infant wlien his mother died, and 
he was taken and raised by his cousin, J. J. Bethea, of Latta ; 
he is now nearly grown. Laurens Trezevant Sessions is a cap- 
ital man, good citizen and a good farmer. The other son was 
Percy Sessions, who became a dental surgeon, and settled in 
Williamsburg County. Caroline Anna Wayne, the next oldest 
daughter, married tihe late John Wilcox, of Marion; she had 
two children for him, John and George — don't know which was 
the older; she died, and afterwards her son, George, died. 
John Wilcox, now of Marion, is her only surviving child ; he 
married Miss Leila Smith, daughter of the late J. Albert 
Smith ; they have four or five dhildren, all boys. John Wilcox 
is one of the most efficient business men we have ; he has been 
well trained, first as clerk for the Sheriff, I think, about eleven 
years; then as Sheriff of the county for two years; then as 
Deputy Clerk of the Court for two years ; then as Clerk of the 
Court for ten years. In all these varied positions he acquitted 
himself with credit, and to the entire satisfaction of his people ; 
in each and all these places of trust he maintained the utmost 
official integrity, and wlien he was beaten, in 1892, for re-elec- 
tion to the Clerk's office, it was not 'because of any charges 
made against his competency or official integrity, but solely 
because he would not, or did not, wear the badge of Tillman- 
ism; fortunately for the county, the people got another good 
man in his place in the person of our present efficient and 



368 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

gentlemanly Clerk, Dr. D. F. Miles. The next daughter of old 
man Wayne, Elizabeth, married Wyatt Fuller; by this mar- 
riage three children were born — ^two sons, Frank and George, 
and one daughter ; Fuller and his wife are both dead. Of the 
sons, Frank was merchandizing in Florence, the last the writer 
knew of him ; he married a Miss Collins. George Fuller either 
went off or died — disappeared as to the writer. The daug'hter, 
Sallie Fuller, married Daniel J. Oliver, now of Marion, 
Magistrate and merchant; they have several children. The 
eldest, a son, L. Wyatt Oliver, married Miss Alice Jones, 
daughter of the late Fred. D. Jones, of Marion ; he runs a farm 
and some mercantile business; think they have one or two 
children. The eldest daughter of D. J. Oliver and wife, Mary, 
married Quincy Berry, and lives near Berry's Cross Roads; 
they have no c'hild. There are four Mary Berrys in the Cross 
Roads community, and they are distinguished from each other 
by the names, "Mary Elihu," "Mary Burke," "Mary Neill" 
and "Mary Quince." D. J. Oliver bas another son grown and 
married, whose name is not remiembered, and other younger 
children. The next daughter, Sarah Wayne, married Dr. O. 
J. Bond ; they had several 'dhildren, sons an'd daughters ; they 
removed to Chester County some years ago— think both are 
dead; their sons were Bernard, James and Harper Bond. Of 
these, James graduated in the Citadel Academy some years 
ago, and stood so well that he was elected one of its profes- 
sors — suppose he is there yet. Of the others, the writer knows 
nothing. The next daughter of old man Wayne was Catha- 
rine Maria, who married Rev. Osgood A. Chreitzberg ; he died 
childless; she went West, perhaps to Florida, and married 
some one, know not whom. Mary Adelaide, the youngest 
daughter of old man Wayne, first married her first cousin, Dr. 
Armand C. IvCgette, who afterwards became a Methodist 
preacher of the South Carolina Conference ; he traveled here a 
few years and was transferred to the Florida Conference, 
where he died in a s'hort time, and his widow married another 
minister, named Younge ; he died, and she has recently married 
another preacher of the same Florida Conference, whose name 
is not known ; how many children, if any, she has, is not known. 
The writer can say this of her : when she was a single lady, she 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 369 

was the most elastic and agile untrained woman he ever saw ; 
she could walk along by the side of a horse of ordinary height, 
and lay her hand upon his withers and spring from the ground 
into the saddle — he saw 'her perform this feat once, and it 
seems she is expert in catching Methodist preachers. Of the 
sons of old man F. A. Wayne, Gabriel I., the eldest, married, 
first, a Widow Britt ; by the marriage was bom and raised one 
child, a daughter, Julia, who married, first, George C. Bethea ; 
they lived together several years, when he died, childless ; the 
widow married again, a Methodist preacher, then belonging to 
the Florida Conference, by the name of Nathan Wiggins, but 
now of the South Carolina Conference ; they have two children, 
as I am informed. Gabriel I. Wayne's first wife died, and he 
married a second time, and lives now in Florence County; he 
is a farmer. The old gentleman, Francis Asbury Wayne, set- 
tled, lived and died near Marion Court House, near or on the 
place now owned by J. M. Johnson, Esq. Intellectually he was 
far above the ordinary ; he was in some respects an oddity — 
truthful and honest. 

L/EGETTE. — There were three old I/egettes, of whom the 
writer has knowledge — David, Jesse and Abner Legette. Old 
David Legette married, I do not know to whom, but he had and 
raised three children. Colonel L/evi Ivegette, Abner IvCgette, Jr., 
and Mrs. General Wheeler. Colonel Ivevi Legette married, first, 
a Miss Evans, sister of Thomas Evans, Sr., and half-sister of 
General William Evans ; the fruits of this marriage were three 
or four sons and three daughters ; don't know the names of all 
the sons or what has become of them. One son was named 
Morgan, who it was said was a very promising young man; 
he was very muscular and athletic ; he volunteered early in the 
war and went into the Confederate service ; during the war he 
was killed in some one of the battles in Virginia, or died from 
disease contracted in service. Another son, Levi, grew up and 
married some one, and may be in the county now, but is un- 
known; he may have had other sons. Colonel Levi Legette 
had and raised three daughters, Anna, Mary and Melvina. 
Anna married, first, Ebben Rogers, of the Dothan community ; 
he settled below Marion, and was killed in October, 1855, by a 



370 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

man named Harrelson, as already mentioned herein. By this 
marriage, two children were born, a son, named Bbben, and a 
daughter, name not remembered, and who is the wife of Addi- 
son J. Snipes, below Marion. Ebben went off to parts un- 
known. Snipes and wife have a family, how many is not 
known, and perhaps grand-children ; one of Snipes' daughters 
married A. P. Johnson, of Horry. The Widow Anna Rogers 
married again to Jessee Rogers, a first cousin of her first hus- 
band; no fruit of this marriage; both are dead. Mary, the 
second daughter of Colonel L,egette, married Mr. Edward C. 
Collins ; they had and raised several sons and two daughters ; 
don't know the names of either sons or daughters, except one 
son, Lawrence, who is clerk for the dispensary at Florence. 
One of the daughters married Erank Fuller; they reside in 
Florence. Think the other daughter is dead. Melvina, the 
youngest daughter, married William Loyd ; they have a family, 
of how many is unknown; think they 'have two sons, names 
unknown; they live 'below Marion, and are said to be doing 
well. After the death of Colonel Eegette's first wife, he mar- 
ried the widow of James P. Mclnnis, of upper Marion, whose 
maiden name was Althea Alford, a daughter of Lodwick B. 
Alford; they had no children; Colonel Legette died in 1871, 
at the age of seventy-six years ; his widow still survives. 
Colonel Legette was a man of marked individuality — there was 
but one Levi Legette ; 'he was a good surveyor and did a great 
deal of work in that line; had a fair education for his day; 
was a farmer, and represented his county in the lower House 
of the Legislature for one term. Abner Legette, Jr., a brother 
of Colonel Levi, was one of nature's men^ he was rough and 
outspoken, a man of great personal independence ; don't know 
of his family, if he had any ; have not seen him in many years — 
he has disappeared, by death or removal. The only daughter 
of old David Legette, Clara L., married General E. B. Whee- 
ler, as well known in his day as per*haps any man in the county ; 
he was Clerk of the Court for thirty years consecutively; he 
died in 1859 — ^he was no ordinary man ; the fruit of the mar- 
riage was an only son, who became Dr. James Hamilton Whee- 
ler. He married Miss Sarah Jane Cherry, a daughter of Dr. 
Cherry, of Spring Branch; the fruits of the marriage were 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 371 

two sons, our present fellow-citizen, Ed. B. Wheeler, and L,is- 
ton C. Wheeler, of Marion. Their father died when his two 
sons were quite small ; his widow, their mother, still survives, 
and lives at Marion ; she is a most amiable woman. The widow 
of General Wheeler died some years ago, leaving her money 
and little property to her two grand-sons, E. B. and Listen C. 
Wheeler, to w'hom she was passionately devoted in her latter 
days. Ed. B. Wheeler married Miss Efifa Blue, daughter of 
the late Colonel John G. Blue, of Marion ; two or three children 
are the fruits of the marriage ; they reside in Marion. Liston 
C. Wheeler married Miss Carrie Boyd, daughter of the late 
Rev. J. Mariion Boyd, who some years ago was the Presiding 
Elder of this, the Marion District, and who thereafter died 
suddenly on the Spartanburg District, a very able preacher; 
the fruit of this marriage is an only child, I believe, a son ; they 
reside in Marion. 

Old Jesse Legette, Sr., "had three sons, as known to the 
writer; don't 'know who his wife was; the three sons were 
Jessee, Jr., Ebenezer and David; he also had four daughters, 
Elizabeth, Marjory, Ann, Jane and Theresa Anna. Of the 
sons of Jesse, Sr., Jesse and Ebenezer were Methodist preach- 
ers, traveling for several years ; don't know to whom they mar- 
ried, but they did marry; and Ebenezer, after location in the 
Conference, settled in Marion, and merchandized for a while, 
when he died ; Jesse, Jr., his brother, died also ; know nothing 
of the family of either. Rev. David Legette (called' Captain 
David), the next or third son in the order named, married a 
Miss Richardson, daug'hter of John Richardson ("King 
John") and sister of t!he late William F. Richardson, and set- 
tled on the place now known as Legette's Mill, ten or twelve 
miles below Marion, where he lived and died ; the fruits of this 
marriage were two sons, Hannibal and Kossuth, and three 
daugliters. Of the sons, the eldest, Hannibal, a very promis- 
ing young man, volunteered in the early part of the war and 
entered the Confederate service — I think he was a Lieuten- 
ant — and was killed or fatally wounded and died early in the 
war; he was a brave man, and his memory sihould be and 
doubtless is cherished by all who knew him. Kossuth Legette, 
the younger son, grew up and settled on part of his father's 



372 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

plantation, on the west side of the mill, on the road leading 
from Marion to Britton's Ferry, on Great Pee Dee ; he married 
rather late in life a daughter of Allen Gibson ; they are rais- 
ing a family — all young ; he is one of the progressive farmers 
of that section of the county, and is succeeding well — a quiet 
and law-abiding citizen. Of the daughters of Captain David 
Legette, the eldest, Amelia, married James Hamilton Evans, 
who died a few years ago, childless ; the widow lived at Marion 
since his death, and owns still a house and lot on Godbold 
street; an orphan girl, Lizzie Bond, whom she raised, lately 
married a Mr. Douglas, of Fairfield County, and Mrs. Evans 
has gone with her into that county. A second daughter of 
Captain David Legette (name not known) married Rev. Wm. 
B. Baker, of the South Carolina Conference ; they have a fam- 
ily, how many and their sex and size unknown. Rev. Baker 
is said to be a very good man and an effective preacher. The 
third daughter of Captain D. Legette married A. R. Oliver, 
now a member of the Board of Registration of Voters ; he is a 
successful farmer and an excellent citizen; the fruits of the 
marriage are several sons and daughters ; don't know the names 
of all of them. His daughter, Eveline, married L. M. Gasque, 
of Marion ; she died, leaving one Child, and he married another 
one, Lizzie, who is now his wife. He has another daughter, 
named May, who is grown and unmarried' — there may be 
others ; he has several sons, some of them grown ; one, named 
Haskell ; has one son, Eugene, in the South Carolina College ; 
another son, Robert, gone out West ; another, named Langdon. 
Of the daughters of old Jessie Legette, Sr., the eldest, Eliza- 
beth Marjoray, married Francis A. Wayne, and she and her 
family have already been noticed in or among the Wayne fam- 
ily. Another daughter of Jessie Legette, sr., named Ann, mar- 
ried a man by the name of Snow, of the low country ; he died 
and left her with two children, a daughter and a son; the 
daughter was named Ida, don't remember the son's name — be 
was younger; they lived in Marian, in the early 70's, in the 
house afterwards owned and occupied by the writer, who pur- 
chased it in 1874; Mrs. Snow moved out of it just before the 
writer went in ; don't know what became of them — saw Miss 
Ida in Marian some few years after. Jane, the third daughter 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 373 

of Jessie Legette, Sr., married her first cousin, Ashley S. Le- 
gette, who lately died (Ashley), over eighty years of age. Dr. 
A^ley Legette and wife, Jane, had and raised five sons — Dr. 
Arman C, Major Ringold, Virgil, William and Woodson, and 
two daughters, Theresa A. and Elizabeth. Of the sons. Dr. Ar- 
man C. Legette married his first cousin, Mary Adelaide Wayne, 
who has already been noticed in or among the Wayne family. 
The other sons of Dr. Ashley, the writer does not know 
whether they are married or single. Of the daughters, Theresa 
Ann married, first, Duncan Mclntyre, who lived but a short 
time; he left her with one child, a son, who has already been 
mentioned herein in or among the Mclntyres ; she afterwards 
married Mr. T. J. Ledingham, who now live in the Legette 
neighborhood, and are bringing up a family; know but little 
about Mr. Ledingtiam — he has been a Magistrate for several 
years, and seems to be an intelligent gentleman. The daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, married a Mr. Vaught, about whom the writer 
knows nothing, nor of his family, or his or their whereabouts. 
The writer has seen a young lady, said to be his daughter, a 
pretty girl. Dr. Ashley S. Legette had a brother. Nelson 
Legette, who, I think, died many years ago — whether married 
or unmarried, fihe writer knows not. The father of Dr. Ashley 
and Nelson was Abner Legette, Sr., brother of old David and 
Jesse, Sr. 

There are some Legettes in Wahee Township. Their father 
was John Legette, called Jack Legette — whether they are of 
kin to the other Legettes below, is not known. The Legette 
family is one of the old families of the county, and have ever 
been men at the front as citizens. Captain David Legette was 
no ordinary man^ — was above the ordinary — a man of great 
energy and perseverance ; he was a local preacher in the Metho- 
dist connection; he was also a dental surgeon. The Legette 
family have always stood well in the county. Legette Town- 
ship was named thus for the Legette family. Recurring back 
to Captain D. Legette's children — one was overlooked, a daugh- 
ter, who married J. Clement Davis; they have five children. 
Mr. Davis is one of our best and most progressive citizens. 

GasquB. — The Gasque family will next be noticed. Samuel 



374 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Gasque, the first known, settled opposite Marion, over Catfish, 
before the Revolutionary War. He had five sons, Archie, 
Samuel, Henry, John and Absalom, and one daughter, Nancy ; 
the mother of these was a Dozier. Archie and Samuel went 
West. Archie has not been heard from or what become of 
him. Samuel raised a family, one son of whom, named Sam- 
uel, died a few years ago, in Louisiana, unmarried, and had an 
estate, at the time of his death, worth ten' or twelve thousand 
dollars, which was divisible among his first cousins, many of 
whom or all of them were of this county. W. B. Gasque, Mas- 
tin Gasque, Charles F. Godbold and others in the same degree 
of relationship, shared in the division, and got $400 each net, 
clear of expenses. The deceased had been or was County 
Judge in Ivouisiana. Henry Gasque married three times ; first, 
Miss Mourning Brown, and by her had Henry, Elly, Elizabeth 
and Rebecca ; his second wife was Nancy Brown, and had two 
children — Nancy, who married Drury Thomas, and Edith, who 
married a Mr. Brown. His third wife was Milley Bryant, and 
by her had ten children, viz : sons. Love, William B., Alfred, 
Wilson, Addison and Mastin ; daughters, Nellie, who married a 
Mr. Brown in North Carolina, and is dead ; Olive, who married 
a Mr. Hucks, in Horry ; and Martha, who married a Mr. Frye, 
and went to Horry County; they all have families. John 
Gasque married a Miss Crawford, and had three sons and two 
daughters'; the sons were James C, Samuel and John, all dead, 
and none of their descendants are in the county. Of the two 
daughters, Caroline, the mother of Rev. Sumter Gasque, now 
of the Western North Carolina Conference, she married a Mr. 
Foxworth, who died about the first of the war, a felo de se; 
Mrs. Mary Harrel, of Marion, was the result of the marriage, 
who has several children — sons, James, Joe, Frank and Fred, 
and three daughters, one of whom lately married Robert 
Boyd Jones, of Marion. These are descendants of old John 
Gasque. His daughter, Mrs. Foxworth, still survives, eighty- 
two years of age, and lives with her daughter, Mrs. Harrel, at 
Marion. Another daughter of old John Gasque, Ann, was the 
mother of the late Jessie C. Rowell's wife. Mrs. Rowell is an 
excellent woman, the "salt of the earth ;" she has a large family 
of sons and daughters. These are descendants of old John 
Gasque. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 375 

Absalom Gasque, the old Court crier before the war, was 
married twice; first, a Miss Dozier, by whom he had sons, 
James W., Archie, John D. and Henry A., and daughters, Celia, 
who became the wife of Atkinson ; Olive, who became the 
wife of Ebbie Atkinson ; Polly, who became the wife of Benj. 
Richardson-; Ann, who became the wife of David J. Rowell, 
and Sarah, who became the wife of John Tyler. Absalom's 
second wife was a Miss Davis, and had Susan, the wife of Val. 
Dozier Ervin, killed at Cold Harbor, Va., in 1864. Samuel 
married Cade Thomas' daughter, and lives in Britton's Neck. 
James W. moved to Georgetown. John D. died suddenly, the 
day of the 'bombardiment of Fort Sumter, 12th April, 1861. 
Henry A. married a Miss Collins, and had two children, daugh- 
ters. Francis married Calvin I^ee ; the other, Sallie, is yet un- 
married. The father, Henry A. Gasque, Court caller for years, 
like his father, Absalom ; he was a capital man and law-abiding 
citizen. Archie Gasque married Miss Ann Rowell; they had 
eight boys, David A., Marion, Amy M., Wesley E., Samuel, 
McB. R., Franklin J., Archie B., and five daughters. Monetta 
died in 1862. Jennette married John Jones, and lives at Mc- 
Coll, S. C. Susan married Starr Shelly, on Terrel's Bay, and 
have a family. Idella married Fletcher Stalvey, and have a 
family. Mary married David Dozier, and died — ^burned to 
death, in 1890, leaving four children.. Marion Gasque was 
killed at Drewry's Bluff, Va., in 1864. Samuel died in prison 
at Elmira, N. Y. Marion married a Miss Davis, and left three 
children — ^the wives of Willis Baxly, Evander Perritt and 
Charles B. Martin. David A. moved to Beaufort, and raised a 
family; now dead. Arny M. married the Widow Devon, 
whose maiden name was Phillips, and has five children. Eu- 
genia married Thadeus Mace. Philip, Boyd M. and Emma 
unmarried; and Moses Mace married Lena Gasque. Wesley 
Gasque married twice — first. Miss Williamson, and had seven 
children, Hannibal L., Troy, Elmore ; of the daughters, Mattie 
married Joseph Fowler, Emmile, Julia and Bettie are unmar- 
ried ; the sons are all married. His second wife was Ann Wat- 
son ; they have no children ; Wesley died in 1899. William B. 
Rowell Gasque married his cousin, Sallie Gasque, and has six 
children, five daughters and one son, Cicero. Florence mar- 
25 



376 A HISTORY O^ MARION COUNTY. 

ried R. H. Begham ; she died and left two children. Nannie 
married a Mr. Matthews, near Effingham, and has one child. 
Walker died. at eighteen years of age. Cora and one son, 
Cicero, are unmarried. Franklin J. (called Dock) married 
Mary McMillan, and left children, all girls— Claudia, Flossy 
and Mary. Dock, the father, died in 1895. Archie B. mar- 
ried a Miss Atkinson, and left no children; he died in 1875. 
Henry Casque married Miss Harriet Porter ; they had thirteen 
children, and-raised twelve — six sons and six daughters. Of 
the daughters, Jane married John A. Hatchel, of Florence 
County; Mary married Arthur Hutchinson, of Florence 
County; Martha Ann married, first, Benjamin Hatchell, and 
then James Farley; she has two sons at Dillon (Farleys) in 
business there; Rebecca married Jessie Atkinson, they have a 
family of children; Kitty married Siamuel Lane, and is in 
Horry ; Charlotte married Frank Lane, and is also in Horry — 
both have families ; and Virginia, who is unmarried', stays with 
her brother, Eli. Henry and Elly Gasque were brave Confed- 
erate soldiers, and both died in the war. Eli H. married, first, 
a Miss Shaw, in Mississippi ; her father, Merdock Shaw, went 
from Marion County; they had ten children, sons and daugh- 
ters; the sons were Lonney M., Henry E., Boyd R., Charles 
W., John O., Joseph H., Andrew Stokps and Henry Little ; the 
daughters were Hattie and Edna.. Hattie married a Mr. Twiur 
ing, of Wilmington, N. C, and has seven children, all small.. 
Lonney M. married, first, a Miss Oliver, and secondly, his first 
wife's sister, as already mentioned among the Legettes. 
Henry E. married Miss Nannie Gregg, of Marion; they have 
two or three children (small), one son, Andrew Stokes, died 
when young. The other sons of E. H. Gasque are all unmar- 
ried. E. H. Gasque married, a second time, Miss Sallie Fox- 
worth, daughter of the late William C. Foxworth ; the fruits of 
this marriage are two sons and two daughters — Herbert and 
Carroll, Rena and Lucy (small). David Gasque married Miss 
Anna Smith, daug'hter of the late John M. Smith, and has, I 
think, four girls; the eldest has just graduated with distinction 
in Knoxville, Tenn. David has been in Columbia for years in 
the railroad service. Wesley married, don't know who ; he has 
a family, a son in South Carolina College ; he is a farmer and is 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 377 

doing well ; he resides in Florence County. Bond Gasque mar- 
ried a Miss Rogers, daughter of Nathan Rogers ; has two boys ; 
lives at MuUins. William B. Gasque married, first, a daughter 
of "Corn-ma:king Willis Finklea;" he had by her two children, 
a son, Alfred-, and a daughter, who married a Mr. Brady, and 
they moved to Kansas. William B. Gasque married, a second 
time, a Miss Clark, daughter of Kenneth Clark, and by her had 
George K., Robert, James and Sallie, now the wife of W. B. R. 
Gasque ; also, Mrs. Jefferson Braswell andl Mrs. Mitchel Lane. 
Addison L. Gasque married a Miss Frye, who has a number of 
children, and lives in the Gapway section, a farmer, and is doing 
fairly well. Alfred Gasque (son of old Henry) married a 
daughter of Kenneth Clark, and died in two weeks after mar- 
riage. Wilson Gasque (son of old Henry) married a daughter 
of Malcolm Clarke ; he died in prison during the war ; he left 
one son, R. K. Gasque. Love Gasque, another son of old 
Henry, married Miss Susan Rogers, a daughter of old Timothy 
Rogers, and soon after moved to Mississippi. Mastin Gasque, 
another son of old Henry, married a daughter of Daniel Fore 
and a niece of T. F. Stackhouse ; he has seven or eight children, 
and lives with T. F. Stackhouse and conducts his farm ; he is a 
local Methodist preacher and an excellent man ; his eldest son, 
Randolph, died a year or two ago, at El Paso, Texas; some 
others of his children grown. Randolph left a wife in Marion 
County, with two children. The Gasque family and its con- 
nections are very numerous and extensive, and quite respecta- 
ble. Eli H. has merchandised all his life except during the 
war ; he is at Marion, doing a large business andi is well known 
throughout the county — ^a very public-spirited man and indomi- 
table in energy and perseverance; hard to down, and when 
down will rise again — no such thing as holding him down. The 
Gasques, as a family, did their full share in the war. I forgot 
to note, in its proper order, the only daughter of the first old 
Samuel Gasque, which I now mention: Nancy Gasque, sister 
of old Henry, John and Absalom; she married Thomas God- 
bold (called "Tom Cat"), and raised a large family, mostly 
sons, who have already been noticed in or among the God'bold 
family. Many people called her Aunt "Nancy Cats" — she was 
an extraordinary woman ; her husband died in 1836 or '7 ; seve- 



378 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Hal of her children were then small ; she, however, braved all 
difficulties, raised her children respectably and made property, 
and at her death, in 1863, left a large property in lands and 
slaves; she ran a public house in Marion for thirty or forty 
years with great success — her table was ever loaded with the 
substantials of life and well prepared. Major Elly Gasque, son 
of old Henry by his first wife, married, first, a Miss Brown ; by 
her he had no children ; he married, a second time, the Widow 
Montgomery, mother of J. D. and W. J. Montgomery ; by her 
he had and left two sons, Elly A. and Henry I. Gasque. EUy 
A. is a first class dental surgeon, unmarried'. Henry I. married 
Miss Jennie Evans, daughter of Sheriff W. T. Evans ; she died 
some four of five years ago, leaving a son 'and a daughter, quite 
small ; Henry I. has not remarried. 

Brown. — The Brown family will next be noticed. The first 
Brown known was John Brown, "Cut-face," as he was called ; 
came from' Columbus County, N. C, and settled below or east 
of Marion ; don't know to whom he married ; he had and raised 
six sons, Richard (Dick), Joshua, Thomas, John, Stephen and 
William, and two daughters. MoUie married a Mr. Fowler, 
the father of the late Jessie Fowler, and Patsey married a Mr. 
Campbell, who went West or disappeared. Ricihard Brown 
married a Miss Beach, and had two sons and two daugliters; 
the sons were Lewis and Joseph ; the diaughters were Pattie and 
Fannie. Lewis married, first, a Miss Elliott and next a Miss 
James, and had twenty-one children ; nine grew up and were 
named Charlotte, Ann, Mary (first set) ; W. J., Rebecca and 
Lewis (second set) ; Henrietta, Temperance and Frances (third 
set). Charlotte married James Carter, who was the father of 
our John Carter (horse trader). The father was killed in the 
war, and his son, John, was also in the war, but came out un- 
hurt, and lately a volunteer in the Spanish war, Second Regi- 
ment ; 'he deserves the plaudits and well done of his countrymen. 
Ann Brown married Frank Capps, and was the mother of 
David Capps. Mary Brown married Wilson James, and had a 
number of daughters and one son, Preston, who was killed in 
the war. William' J. 'Brown, two miles below Marion, and a 
most excellent citizen, married Miss Mary Pace, and has six 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 879 

living childTen (names unknown). Lewis Brown, Jr., mar- 
ried Miss Rachel Flowers, and had no children ; was killed in 
the war. Henrietta married Love Flowers ; had three children, 
now living (name and sex unknown). Temperance Brown 
married Baker Lewis, and has four -sons and two daughters 
living. Frances married John Drew; they live in Horry 
County. Joshua Brown, son of the first old John, married a 
Miss Brown, and moved to Horry, and has a number of chil- 
dren and grand-children in this county. Thomas Brown, 
second son of first old John, married a Miss Brown. Most of 
this family of Browns have emigrated to other parts. John 
BroWn, Jr., the third son of old John, moved to Georgetown, 
married and raised a family, and died there. Stephen, the 
fifth son of old John, married a Miss Whitner, of North Caro- 
lina, and had and raised two children, "Hon. John Brown," and 
daughter, Jane, who married Henry Waller, Who was killed in 
the war ; he left a family of three children. "Hon. John" lives 
about two miles below Mullins, I suppose, on his father's old 
homestead; he has attained to some notoriety by his unique 
character, quaint sayings, and by numbers of quaint and spicy 
letters which he has ha'd published in "The Marion Star" for 
the last thirty years. Any one who takes the "Hon. John" to 
be a fool, is badly sold ; he has talent for wit and humor that 
few have, and if "Hon. John" had been educated and had 
turned his powers at wit and humor in the proper channel, he 
might now be classed with Zeb. Vance and other distinguished 
wits of the age ; but, alas ! John — "Hon. John" — is limited to a 
narrow sphere around Mullins and his native county. "Hon. 
John" married a Miss Rogers, "Pat," and has raised several 
sons, who are a credit to "Hon. John," and form a part of our 
good citizenship. I know only two or three of them — Allison 
H., at Latta, Edward W., of Marion, and Charles V., late of 
Latta. "Hon. John's" enviroimients in early life, I suppose, 
were not the best ; it rarely happens that a man rises above his 
environments, and the society in which he is brought up to 
manhood, and the active realities of life. William, the sixth 
son of old first John, married a Miss Whitter or Whittier ; he 
was the father of William A. Brown, on Sister Bay, and a num- 
ber of other boys, who were all killed in the war, or died from 



880 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

disease or wounds. Joseph Brown married a Miss Richardson, 
in Britton's Neck, and had a son, James, killed in the war, and 
Evander, Pinckney, Washington and Lex, and two daughters, 
Ann and Julia. Ann married Mr. Benjamin G. Woodberry. 
Julia married Charles Pace ; they bad, or have, Charles, Joseph 
and Mrs. A. P. Hucks, Mrs. Richard McRae and Mrs. Sydney 
Richardson, w<hen Pace died, and she married M. H. Collins 
(Hook) ; they have no children. The Brown family and con- 
nections, it may be inferred from above statements, suffered 
greatly in the war, by fatalities — as much or more, perhaps, 
than any 'Other family in the county, in proportion to their num- 
bers. Brown is a very popular name throughout the United 
States, Marion County included. It may be here stated or re- 
stated, that old Henry Casque's first and second wives were 
Browns ; Miss Edith Gasque married a Mr. Brown ; Miss Nel- 
lie Gasque married a Mr. Brown, of North Carolina; Major 
Elly Gasque's first wife was a Miss Brown ; George W. Reaves' 
second wife was a Miss Brown. To what particular families 
of the Browns these wives and husbands belonged, does not 
appear. Perhaps the present Brown families, when they shall 
have read this sketch, can assign each to his or her particular 
branch of the Brown family. 

Another family of Browns, not related to the preceding 
Browns, will now be noticed, to wit : the family to which the 
Hon. W. A. Brown belongs. Jeremiah Brown, the great- 
grand- father of Hon. W. A. Brown, married a Miss Jolly — ^the 
same family that is or was related to the Mclntyres of Marion ; 
they had four sons, Jerry, James, William and John S. — ^the 
last named was in Fanning's army and was massacred by the 
Mexicans, about 1835 or '6, at the Alamo. There were two 
daughters — Rebecca, who married John Graham', and Annie, 
who married another John Graham, relative of the other. The 
son, Jam'es Brown, was the grand-father of Hon. W. A. 
Brown; he was born in West Marion, near Mars Bluff; he 
married Miss Julia Davis, a sister of Jackey Davis and aunt of 
Wm. J. Davis ; they had only two children, a daug'hter, Harriet, 
who married G. W. Woodberry, and an infant son, the late 
Travis Foster Brdwn, who was bom July, 1822, and died De- 
cember, 1894. Travis Foster Brown married Miss Martha 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 881 

Oaroline Baker, the youngest daughter of William and Annis 
Baker — were very young when they married; they had and 
raised five children, John O., William A. and James T. Brown, 
and two daughters, Susan A. and Julia M. Susan A. married 
Captain T. E. Stanley; JuHa married J. E. Stevenson; John,0. 
married Miss Louisa Brunson, of Darlington ; William A. mar- 
ried Miss Eliza Clarke, daughter of the late R. K. Clarke; 
James T. married Miss Louise DuRant — all are living except 
Julia, who died in 1885. J. O. Brown was delicate from child- 
hood; he joined the Confederate Army when eighteen years 
old, Neill C. McDuffie's Company L, 21st Regiment, Graham, 
Col., in 1861 ; served in same company under the young and 
gallant Captain Hannibal Legette, and after his death, under 
Captain W. B. Baker, and was captured at Fort Fisher, im- 
prisoned at Point Lookout, and remained there two months 
before Lee's surrender. The father, T. F. Brown, was in Colo- 
nel Cash's regiment. Captain W. S. EUerbe's company, while 
it was in service. T. F. Brown having lost his wife, never 
more married, but devoted himself to the raising and education 
of his children ; he was a widower for about forty years ; he and 
his sister, Mrs. G. W. Woodberry, were raised orphans by their 
uncle and aunt, Jacky Davis and Susie Davis, who were as good 
and kind to them as if they had been their own children. T. F. 
Brown began life a poor boy ; he at first clerked for John Henry, 
at Marion, for $5 per month, but soon rose and was depended 
on everywhere. When ihe married, he gave up clerking and 
engaged in farming on a small scale, near Tabernacle Church ; 
he was soon able to buy a larger farm and moved to it, where he 
spent the balance of his life; by industry and good judgment 
he was successful, and at the breaking out of the war was con- 
sidered to be in good circumstances ; so decided was he, that he 
never hesitated, but did the right as by intuition-; he was a life 
long and consistent member of the Methodist Church. The 
grand-parents of Hon. W. A. Brown, on his mother's side, were 
William and Annis Baker; his grand^mother's maiden name 
was Phillips ; she first married a Giles, son of Colonel Hugh 
Giles, of Revolutionary fame ; by this marriage she had only 
one child, Hugh Giles, Jr., when he died, and s'he then married 
William Baker ; by this latter marriage were born Mary, w^ho 



882 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

married Gause Sweet; Eliza, who married Nathan Evans; 
Susan, who married Alexander Owens; Jennette, who died 
quite young, and Martha Caroline, who married T. F. Brown ; 
and sons, James, who married a Miss Taylor, and who is the 
mother of our fellow-citizens, Joseph A., W. W. Baker and 
James Baker, of Marion; their mother still survives. Old 
Mrs. Annis Baker was an extraordinary woman ; her husband 
having died and left her many years before her death, sihe 
managed with unusual success a large landed estate and many 
negroes, and also a considerable amount of money, and accumu- 
lated much more property before her death, and superintended 
the whole in person ; would not employ an overseer — sihe over- 
seed for herself — lived to a great age, active and energetic to 
the last; she divided her property among her grand-children; 
she was, indeed, a most remarkable woman ; she had and raised 
another son, William J. Baker, w^ho lived and died a bachelor. 

Gilchrist. — The family of Gilchrist will next be noticed. 
This family is not very extensive, neither in name nor its con- 
nections in Marion County; yet its respectability and promi- 
nence require that it shall have some notice, though it be short. 
The progenitor of the family in this county was Dr. Daniel Gil- 
christ, a dental surgeon, from Richmond or Robeson County, 
N. C. The writer recollects seeing Dr. Gilchrist w<hen a boy, 
in 1 83 1. The writer was going to school at Red Bank, N. C, 
that year, and Dr. Gilchrist came along the road during a recess 
in the school, on horseback, with a pair of saddle-bags under 
him, in which his dental instruments were stored or packed — 
there was no such a thing as a buggy in that day. Two of the 
grown young men, Archie Baker, afterwards a Presbyterian 
minister, and Daniel McNeill, knew Dr. Gilchrist; he recog- 
nized them, stopped, and they talked a while with him, and 
among other things he said he was going down South to see if 
he could not find work to do down there. I suppose he had 
just graduated in dental surgery ; he was then a young single 
man. Whilst they were talking to him, the smaller boys in 
school, of whom I was one, gathered up around them to hear 
what was said, &c. The next I knew of Dr. Gilchrist, I think, 
about 1840, he was settled and living at w'hat formerly was 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 368 

called Newsom's Bridge, afterwards and now called Gilchrist's 
Bridge, on Little Pee Lee. Dr. Gilchrist had evidently- found 
work to do down South, for he had married a Miss Johnson, of 
Horry County, had bought the old Newsom place and was liv- 
ing upon it ; by his marriage he had and raised a family of four 
sons and three daughters ; the sons were Archie, D. E., Charles 
B. and Johnson ; the daughters were and are Virginia, Georgia 
and Ida. Of the sons, Archie married Miss Augusta Bethea, 
a daughter of Captain Elisha C. Bethea, and raised a family of 
three sons and three daughters ; the sons are Eugene B., Archie 
Hill and Claudius ; the daughters are Bessie, Alice and Mary. 
Eugene B. married' some one to the writer unknown, and has, 
perhaps, one child ; the other sons not grown. Of the daugh- 
ters, Bessie and Alice are grown and unmarried ; Mary is not 
grown. Archie Gilchrist, the father, settled at Mullins soon 
after the war, and was engaged in mercantile and turpentine 
pursuits for years, also had a farm near by ; he died some time 
in the last of the 8o's. D. E. Gilchrist, called "Van," has never 
married; he was agent for many years for the Atlantic Coast 
Line Railroad Company, at Nichols ; but when it was made a 
telegraph station, he had to resign his position to make room 
for an operator ; he went back to his old home, and is there with 
his brother, Charles, who also has never married, and his two 
maiden sisters, Miss Georgia and Miss Ida. Johnson Gilchrist, 
the youngest son of Dr. Gilchrist, married Miss Bettie Mc- 
Duffie, daughter of the late ex-Sheriff ; they have two or three 
dhildren; they also live on the parental homestead. Who is 
"boss" there is not exactly clear. The daughter, eldest, Vir- 
ginia, of Dr. Gilchrist, a highly accomplished lady, married Dr. 
J. W. Singletary, of Marion, who was also a well educated and 
genteel gentleman and a fine physician; owing to incompati- 
bility in their views of life, they did not agree and upon suit 
brought in the Court for divorce, it was granted; three sons 
were the offspring of the marriage ; one of them died in boy- 
hood; the other two, Archie G. and Joseph W., were raised. 
Archie G. Singletary is a graduate of the Citadel Academy, and 
after graduation went to Louisiana and taught as principal of a 
high school there, at $1,500 a year, for several years ; has stu- 
died law and, I think, is now practicing ; he is fine-looking and 



384 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

a polished gentleman — very much like his father. His 
brother, Joseph W. Singletary, is also in Louisiana, in the saw 
mill business, and it is said is making money, and stands fair ; 
their mother has gone out there and lives, I think, with Archie. 
The father. Dr. J. W. Singletary, died a few years ago, and is 
buried in the cemetery, beside his father and mother ; his sister, 
Mrs. A. Q. McDuffie, has died since, and is also buried there. 
D. E. Gilchrist is a man of talent and one of the best informed 
men we have ; he is now advancing in years, and if he had per- 
formed or fulfilled his mission in society and had not frittered 
away his powers, he might have attained to the highest posi- 
tions in the State, and most certainly in his county; and this 
much is said with no view to disparage him. Dr. Daniel Gil- 
christ was a very intelligent man and successful in his business 
every way; he married some property, which he greatly im- 
proved ; he was one of the many good importations from the 
Old North State. In politics he was a Whig, and, therefore, 
did not succeed in his political aspirations. He died just at or 
after the close of the war, also his wife ; his sons, all that were 
old enough, were good soldiers in the war for Southern inde- 
pendence, and went down only when the cause, for which they 
fought and suffered four years of hardship and privations, went 
down. 

Easteri^ing. — The Easterling family in Marion County is 
an importation from Marlborough — a very extensive and re- 
spectable family in that county. James Easterling married a 
Miss Manship, a sister of Rev. Charles Manship, of Marl- 
borough, and came down into Marion and first settled near 
what was then called Bethea's Cross Roads, in the early part of 
the nineteenth century. After some years, he sold his lands in 
the vicinity of Bethea's Cross Roads, now the Widow Ann 
Manning's, and moved on a place on the north side of Catfish, 
and just at the lower end of Catfish Bay, where he lived the 
remainder of his life ; he raised a considerable family of sons 
and daughters; his sons were Enos, Silas and, I think, John, 
Tristram, Henry and James F., and several daughters, whose 
names are not all remembered. Of the sons, Enos and Silas, 
and John, if there was a John, migrated West soon after they 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 386 

grew up, and never returned except on a visit. Tristram mar- 
ried, January 4th, 1844, Miss Jane Bethea, youngest sister of 
Squire Samuel J. Bethea. The writer was one of "his best 
men" on the occasion. He settled near by his mother-in-law, 
on lands belonging to his wife; some years afterwards he 
bought the land, near Harlleesville, where John H. Hamer now 
lives and owns ; in a few years he sold his Harlleesville place 
and moved to Mississippi ; he remained in Mississippi some 
years — ^his oldest daughter, Martha, married there — when he 
moved back to Marlborough, and lived near Bennettsville. 
Whilst there, his wife, Jane, was killed. She was drawing 
water at the well ; the well-sweep broke and fell on her head, 
fracturing the skull, of which she died in a day or two. Tris- 
tram Easterling had and raised a considerable family, sons and 
daughters. Of the sons I know nothing. His second daugh- 
ter, Lucretia A., married William Piatt, who died some fifteen 
years ago; Lucretia took her six children and went to Texas, 
where she and her children are doing well ; children all married 
respectably and well. "A rolling stone does not gather much 
moss," so with Tristram Easterling; he was ever moving — is 
alive yet in his eighty-third year, and is in Texas. Henry 
Easterling, the next son of old "Jimmy," married Miss Rhoda 
Crawford, daughter of Willis G. Crawford, of the "Free State" 
section ; by this marriage three sons were born and raised, Wil- 
lis C, Thomas C. and Frank, and two daughters, Ella and 
Florence. Willis C. Easterling married a Miss Legette, 
daughter of James B. Legette, of "Free State," and lives now 
upon the Daniel Piatt place; they have five daughters (one 
married) and two sons. Willis C. is an excellent man, kind- 
hearted, a straight-forward, honest citizen, and promineni): in 
his community. Thomas C. Easterling, when a young single 
man, went to Florida, and married a lady of that State ; is now 
Sheriff of his county and has been for two or three previous 
terms and is doing well ; suppose he has a family. Frank, the 
youngest son, a very estimable man, married Miss Maggie 
Watson; they have two boys, Rupert and Henry (small); 
Frank is a capital man and doing fairly well. Of the daughters 
of Henry Easterling, Ella married Iveroy Bethea, son of the 
lajte Captain D. W. Bethea ; they have several children, some of 



886 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

them may be grown ; they live in Marlborough. Florence, the 
younger daughter, married Roibert McPherson, of West 
Marion, now in Florence County, and 'had one child, a boy. Mc- 
Pherson Easterling is a capital and progressive citizen of that 
county. Henry Easterling was a very excellent man, full of 
good hard sense, sober and industrious, and was making a good 
living, when he went into the war ; he was killed in Virginia, in 
1864 — it was said he was literally cut in two by a shell or piece 
of shell ; he was greatly missed not only by his family but by his 
community. James F. Easterling, the youngest son of old 
"Jimmy," never married ; he went into the war early, and was 
killed during the same. Of the daughters of "Jimmy," one 
married a Fletcher — ^John Fletcher, I believe, of Marlborough. 
Another daughter, Celia, married the late Matthew Watson, 
who has already been noticed in or among the Watson family. 
The youngest daughter, Sallie, a very pretty girl, went to Ala- 
bama with one of her brothers, Enos or Silas, and married in 
that State, near a town called Benton, on the Alabama River, a 
man by the name of Melton. The writer passed through Ben- 
ton on a stage in 1854, and on inquiry, heard of her foUr miles 
away, and was told she was doing well and had four children. 
Think old "Jimmy" had another daughter or two, but it is not 
remembered what became of her or them. Old "Jimmy" was 
a model citizen, very social in his disposition, a farmer, lived at 
home, and lived as well, perhaps, as any man in the State ; he 
raised from his nursery fruit trees, apples, pears, peaches, &c., 
very extensively, and sold them; he had a fine vineyard and 
grew all kind of grapes, made wine and sold it ; also a fine apple 
and peach orchard, from which he made cider and brandy, and 
sold that, and yet with all these drinkables about him, all his 
sons together with himself were sober, temperate men. 

IvANE. — The L,ane family, with its many connections, will 
now be noticed. They all came from old Osborne Lane, on 
Buck Swamp. He was here, and a man grown, with, perhaps, 
a family, in the Revolutionary War, and was a Tory ; he died in 
1840. Bishop Gregg, in his history, page 359, says : "Nothing 
of importance occurred until they reached .'Hulin's Mill.' " 
Note — "This was the site of the mill owned by the late Joseph 



A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY. 387 

Bass, ten or twelve miles above Marion Court House." "Here 
they surprised two notorious Tories, John Deer and Osborne 
Lane. The latter was shot in attempting to make his escape 
into Catfish Swamp, and got off with a broken arm. Deer 
was overtaken as he reached the swamp, and killed. It was on 
this occasion, or shortly before, that Caleb Williams, a desper- 
ate marauder, noted especially for house burning, was taken 
by Kolb's party and hung. After proceeding further, captur- 
ing other guilty parties, and punishing or discharging them 
on promise of good behavior, Colonel Kolb returned home and 
dismissed his party, feeling secure for a time at least in the 
thought that the Tories had been overawed, and would not soon 
renew their depredations. In this, however, he was most sadly 
deceived," &c. The division line between Whig and Tory as 
made during the Revolution, and kept up for many years after- 
ward, should be forever obliterated — in fact, our late Confede- 
rate War knocked that line into smithereens ; some of the best 
soldiers we had in the army from Marion County were descend- 
ants of Tories ; were it necessary to do so, numbers of them 
could be named, hence it is no longer an opprobrium to be 
called a Tory or the descendant of a Tory. Many of the de- 
scendants of this very Osborne Lane, mentioned by Bishop 
Gregg above, were and are among our best people, and were 
among the best soldiers in the Southern army. Many of the 
old Tories, and perhaps a majority of them, were Tories from 
conviction, and thought it would be treason — ^the highest crime 
known to the law — to take up arms against the king and his 
government ; that by so doing, in the event of the king's success, 
that they would all be hanged as rebels. They were honest in 
it. The consequence was, they were under the ban of the 
local provincial government. They were compelled to take a 
stand, and forced to leave their homes and families, and lie out 
in the woods and swamps, or be carried into a war, the end of 
which might make them amenable to all the penalties of high 
treason; and being thus compelled to lie out, they could not 
pursue their several vocations in life for the support of them- 
selves and families. In these circumstances, they were forced 
to steal and plunder or starve themselves and families. They 
became thieves, marauders, from compulsion, from high 



388 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

necessity, and not from choice. There was no moral turpitude 
in it, because they were forced to it by the powers that be. So 
it was in our war from 1861 to 1865. It is true, that many 
were Tories, not from conviction but from a desire to be in a 
position to live upon thq labor of others ; were rogues at heart, 
and only wanted an opportunity to exercise and gratify their 
thievish inclinations. With all such, the writer nor any honest 
man sympathizes^-they became thieves and marauders from 
choice. Osborne Lane lived here till 1840, an honest, good 
citizen, and had the respect of all who knew him. 

Osborne L,ane often told the story afterwards : That when 
he was shot by Colonel Kolb's party, he got dff into the swamp 
with his broken arm ; that he crawled into a hollow log and lay 
there whilst they were hunting him, and after a while they came 
and sat down on the log into which he 'had secreted himself ; 
that he was so agitated and so much frightened that he was 
afraid they would hear his heart beat. If Osborne Lane was 
like his sons, he, although a Tory from conviction, was no 
marauder from choice. We have not any people within our 
bounds more honest and law-a'biding than the descendants of 
Osborne Lane, nor did the Confederacy have any better sol- 
diers or truer patriots in its armies than the descendants of old 
Osborne. The many Lanes, Smiths and, more than all, the 
late John Blackman (Jack), went into the Southern army and 
stood shoulder to shoulder with the descendants of the Whigs 
of the Revolution, and do not deserve to be taunted with the 
Toryism of their ancestors. "Jack" Blackman, as we called 
him, was a grand-son by his mother of old Osborne Lane, and a 
grand-son by his father of the Blackman (Tory), whom Colo- 
nel Maurice Murphy tied up and gave him fifty lashes, and this 
was repeated several times, because Blackman said and stuck 
to it to the last, that he was for King George (Gregg's History, 
p. 354). If Toryism in the Revolution was odious, and still 
odious, then the late Jack Blackman was doubly odious — for he 
had it on both sides. The whole South might be challenged to 
produce a parallel to Jack Blackman for unquestioned patriot- 
ism and oool courage. He volunteered in the Southern cause 
at the age of fifty-nine ; he went into the a:rmy in Virginia, and 
after staying in service, was discharged on account of his age. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 389 

He knocked around the camp for three or four days, with a 
discharge in his pocket. In the meantime, a battle occurred. 
Jack went back to his company, took his gun and went into the 
fight, was shot through the abdomen, the ball passing out at the 
rear — it happened not to cut any of his intestines, and Jack sur- 
vived it ; he lay in the hospital for two or three months, and 
then returned home. I will say nothing of his future services 
in the war. Here is a descendant of Tories on both sides. Was 
be odious ? Blot out the line between the Whigs and Tories of 
the Revolution and never mention it again. Jack Blackman 
lived to be ninety years of age; in many respects, he was the 
noblest man of his day. I think this has already been men- 
tioned berein, but it is so appropriate to the purpose just here, 
with the Lane family, that I cannot forbear repeating. Jack 
Blackman ought to have a monument erected to his memory — 
it is already erected in the hearts of all who knew him and 
knew of him. 

Osborne Lane married a Miss Crawford, a sister of old 
James Crawford, of Spring Branch — I suppose, older than her 
brother. The Crawfords were quite respectable in that day 
and have continued to be so down to the present time. The 
fruits of the marriage, as known, were eight sons, John, 
Thomas, Alexander, James, Robert, David, Stephen and Wil- 
liam, and two daughters, Kesiah and Elizabeth. Of the daugh- 
ters, one, Elizabeth, married old John Blackman, a son of the 
old Tory John, that Colonel Murphy tied and whipped ; by this 
marriage were three children born and raised, as known to the 
writer — Stephen Blackman and John, called Jack ; the name of 
"the daughter was Elizabeth, or Betsey; when an old maid, she 
became the second wife of Rev. John D. Coleman, below 
Marion ; both are dead ; don't know whether she left any chil- 
dren or not. Stephen Blackman married some one, to the 
writer not known ; he died many years ago, and left a son, Wil- 
liam, called Billy Blackman, and is now a middle-aged man and 
lives somewhere in the Latta neighborhood ; married, and has a 
family. Jdhn (Jack) Blackman married a Miss Bird, a sister 
of the late Hugh and Joe Bird, of the Toby's Creek section ; by 
her he raised two sons, Joseph A. and Hamilton, who, like their 
father, were good soldiers in the war. Hamilton was killed 



390 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

about Charleston, S. C. Joe died since the war, leaving several 
children; his widow married again, Robert C. Rogers, of 
Wahee Township ; know nothing of Joseph A. Blackman's chil- 
dren, suppose some or all of them are grown. John (Jack) 
Blackman was married a second time, late in life, to Caroline 
Mears, and by her had and raised one or two sons — one, named 
John, is as much like old John as it- is possible for a young man 
to favor an old man ; these sons are in the Mullins section. Old 
John (Jack) died in 1895, in June, and was ninety years of age 
in December before he died, as brave and patriotic as any man 
that ever lived in the county, and as honest as the days were 
long. The other daughter, Kesiah, of old Osborne Ivane, mar- 
ried old S'amuel Smith (three junior), of Buck Swamp; the 
results of the marriage were two sons, John L. and Stephen 
Smith, born, respectively, in 181 1 and 1813, when she died; and 
old man Samuel, Jr., married a second time, Miss Sallie Hays, 
daughter of old Ben Hays, of Hillsboro Township (now), and 
who has already been noticed herein among the Hays family. 
Two better citizens than John L. Smith and Stephen Smith are 
hard to find anywhere. Jc^hn L. Smith became a Methodist 
traveling preacher, and after traveling three or four years, mar- 
ried a Miss Wannamaker, of Orange'burg County, and located, 
but continued to preach in a local position up to a short time 
before his death; he was an exemplary, pious. Christian gen- 
tleman. John L. Smith settled in the Fork, on Buck Swamp, 
and accumulated a good property, which he left unincumbered 
to his widow by a second marriage and his children ; he raised 
five sons and three daughters ; his sons were Daniel Asbury, 
Marcus L., Jacob W., John A. and Wilbur F. Smith, each and 
every one of whom, except, perhaps, Wilbur and Albert, who 
was too young, went into the war early and remained in it to 
the end. Marcus L. was badly wounded, and carries the evi- 
dence of it in his person every day since. Daniel Asbury came 
out of the war as a Captain ; married, after the war. Miss Alice 
Bethea, a daug'hter of Captain E. C. Bethea; by the marriage 
four sons were born and raised, of whom Dr. Maxcy Smith, the 
eldest, now at Page's Mill, is one and the only one in the State. 
The other three, with their mother, are in Birmingham, Ala., 
all doing well. Dr. Maxcy Smith married an Alabama lady. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 391 

and has three or four children (small). Daniel Asbury Smith 
died some years ago. Marcus L. Smith married Miss Mary 
Smith, a daughter of Reddin W. Smith, east of Marion ; they 
have some children; don't know how many; has one or two 
married daughters. Jacob W. Smith, the third son, married 
Miss Fannie Nichols, who has already been noticed in or 
among the Nichols family. John Albert Smith, the fourth 
son, married a widow, Jennie Smith, of Mississippi; had and 
raised three daughters and one son, Henry Smith, now at Mul- 
lins, and has a family (small). The three daughters are mar- 
ried — the eldest to John Wilcox, of Marion, already mentioned 
among the Wayne family. Another daughter married Dennis 
Berry, of Marion ; they have some children, how many is un- 
known. The youngest daughter, Laura, married Chalmers 
Rogers, of MuUins, and resides there. John Albert Smith was 
first appointed County Auditor, which place he held with suc- 
cess for three or four years, when he was elected Clerk of the 
Court in 1880, as successor to R. K. Clark; he held that office 
for two years, when he died, and was succeeded by John Wil- 
cox, as hereinbefore stated. The three daughters of John L. 
Smith were Anna M., Jane and Hettie. Anna M. married 
Philip W. Bethea; by the marriage, three sons and three 
daughters have been raised — George C, L. Asbury and Pickett ; 
the daughters are Bettie, Nannie and Lilian. George married 
Julia Wayne, the only daughter of Gabriel L Wayne; they had 
no offspring, and he died a few years ago. L. Asbury never 
married, and died two years ago. Pickett Bethea, the third 
son, married a daughter of Captain R. H. Rogers, of the 
Gaddy's Mill section ; they have, perhaps, two or three children 
(small) ; Pickett is a graduate of Wofford College, and has 
successfully followed teaching ever since his graduation — ^has 
been teaching in the same school in Darlington County for four 
or five years, which evidences his popularity as a teacher. 
Bettie, the eldest daughter, married David E. Allen, and has 
already been noticed among the Watson or Allen family. 
Nannie and Lilian recently married two Mr. Williams, 
brothers, saw mill men; may have a child each. The second 
daughter of John L. Smith, Jane, became the second wife of 
Dr. John J. Bethea, of Mullins; by this marriage, two sons, 
26 



S92 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Lawrence and Julian, and one daughter, Minni^ were born. 
Lawrence Bethea married a lady in Mississippi, first, and by 
her had three or four ohildren — a son grown, named John ; a 
daughter, Ruth, who married a Mr. West, from Augusta, Ga., 
and who is now at MuUins, merchandising;. and one daughter. 
Pearl, who died before maturity. The first wife died, and 
Lawrence married a Miss Rogers, daughter of David S. 
Rogers, of the "Free State" section ; he is farming. Julian M. 
Bethea, the second son of Dr. John J. Bethea, married a lady 
in Mississippi ; has only one child, a daughter ; he is merchan- 
dising at MuUins. Hettie Smith, the youngest daughter of 
John L. Smith, married Pinckney C. Page, who was killed in 
the war or died of disease, and left three children, who has 
already been noticed herein or among the Page family. Wil- 
bur F. Smith, the youngest son of John L. Smith, graduated 
at Wofford College, in 1875, and soon afterwards emigrated to 
Mississippi, wliere he still remains ; I suppose he has a family. 
Minnie Bethea, the daughter of Dr. John J. Bethea, married 
Robert M. Daniel, son of W. H. Daniel, of Mullins ; she died 
in two or three years after marriage, childless. Stephen 
Smith, brother of John L. and a grand-son of old Osborne 
Lane, married Polly Huggins, a daughter of old John Huggins, 
of Huggins Bridge, on Little Pee Dee ; by this marriage seven 
sons and four daughters were born and raised; the sons were 
George W., Ebenezer, B. Cause, S. Elmore, S. W. Smith, J. 
Emory (all gallant soldiers in the war), and another killed on 
the railroad, near Florence, during the war; these, together 
with their sisters, have already been mentioned in or among the 
Huggins family, the Martin family and the Harrelson family. 
Of the sons of old Osborne Lane, it is not known which of the 
eight was the older — I think, however, John, who was a very 
old man in 1840 (the year old man Osfborne died) . John Lane 
had but one son, John G. Lane; don't know who his mother 
was ; John G. Lane married, I think, a Miss Johnson ; they had 
but one child, a daughter; don't know what became of her; 
John G. Lane died years ago", was an excellent man and good 
citizen. The next son of old Osborne, Thomas, and whom the 
writer never saw, married and settled, lived and died on a place 
near Sellers Depot, on the "Short Cut" Railroad, now owned 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 393 

by B. B. Sellers and Mrs. Lucy B. Watson. Thomas Lane had 
and raised one son only, Bryant Lane, who married, in 1827, 
Miss Henrietta Dew ; when his father died' is not known. 
Since writing the above, the writer has learned that Tihomas 
Lane had another son, named Frederic, who married and set- 
tled within 100 feet of where the depot at Sellers now stands ; 
that he afterwards emigrated to Alabama ; that his descendants 
are there now ; that some of Frederic's family came out here a 
few years ago, to visit their relatives, and tlhat subsequently the 
late Captain Stephen D. Lane went to Alabama to see his rela- 
tives in that State; that Frederic's family and descendants are 
doing well. Thomas Lane may have had a daug'hter or 
daughters — if so, where she or they are is unknown. Bryant 
Lane's family have already been noticed in or among the Dew 
families, to which the reader is referred. Alexander Lane, the 
third son of Osborne, I think, married a Miss Blackman (in 
this I may be mistaken) ; he lived and died on upper Buck 
Swamp, below Latta, and near wheire his father lived and died. 
Alexander Lane had and raised a numerous family of sons 
and daughters, only a few of whom are known to the writer. 
Samuel Lane, the oldest son, as I suppose, now a very old man, 
married, first, Sarah Coward, a daughter, of Wilson Coward, 
who owned the lands whereon Dillon now is situated, and by 
her had six or seven children, two of whom only were sons, 
William B. and Lane. One of these emigrated to 

Texas some years ago, having a family (increasing) when he 
left. Joseph Lane, another son of old Alexander, married 
twice (don't know to whom), and had several sons; those 
known are Alexander, William and Elisha — there are, perhaps, 
other sons and daugthters ; he died some years ago ; was an 
honest, hatid-working man, a good soldier in the war. Osborne 
Lane, another son of Alexander, married a Christmas, and lives 
near Mallory, on Little Reedy Creek ; he has several sons, the 
names of whom are unknown ; he is an honest, hard-working 
man and a good citizen. Another son of Alexander married a 
Miss Hensey, and has several sons — has removed to Florence 
County, and it is said is well to do. Another son of old Alex- 
ander, Robert Lane, married a Miss Rogers, and has a family, 
about whom the writer knows nothing. Another son of old 



394 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

Alexander, Leonard, was killed in the war. They were all 
good soldiers in the Confederate war. James C. Lane, I think, 
the youngest son of old Osiborne, was a most excellent man and 
a good citizen ; he married a Miss Lee, daughter of old John 
Lee, on the north side of Buck Swamp, and settled on Catfish, 
just opposite Latta ; he had and raised four sons, James C, Jr., 
Crawford, John O. and Stephen L. Lane, and four daughters, 
Hapsey, Sarah Anne, Orphea and Priscilla. Of the sons, 
James C, Jr., married a daughter of old William Bryant, a sis- 
ter of the late Jo^hn M. Bryant; he had and raised one son, 
David, and one daughter. The son married some one to the 
writer unknown ; he has a large family of sons and daughters, 
several grown; he lives in Kirby Township. The daughter 
married Peter McLellan, and had several children ; Peter and 
she (Rebecca, I think, was her name), are both dead; don't 
know what has become of the children — ^suppose they are all 
grown. Crawford Lane, second son of James C, Sr., married 
a Miss Perritt, daughter of David Perritt, and settled down on 
the Maiden Down and Ten Mile Bays ; he raised a large fam- 
ily of sons and daughters ; the names of two sons only are 
known — ^Addison and James. Addison married a daughter of 
John M. Bryant, and has several sons, two of whom are mar- 
ried, and several daughters, some grown. James Lane, son of 
Crawford Lane, married a daughter of the late Samuel Camp- 
bell, and has a family, how many are not known. Stephen L. 
Lane, tihe youngest son of James C, Sr., married Miss Flora 
Campbell, a daughter of the late William S. Campbell ; he was 
killed in the last battle of the war, just before Johnston's sur- 
render, after having gone through the whole war ; he left his 
widow. Flora, and several sons and daughters, none of them 
personally known to the writer ; one son is named William, and 
one daughter became the second wife of Merideth Watson, 
There are several other children. Another son of James C. 
Lane, Sr., was John O. Lane ; he married a Miss S'weat, daugh- 
ter of old George Sweat ; they had and raised a family, none 
of them known to the writer — ^both are dead. Of the daughters 
of James C, St., Hapsey married the late James Porter ; they 
had and raised a large family of sons and daugliters, none of 
wlhom are known to the writer, except Robert P. Porter, in 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 395 

Marion; he married a Miss Johnson, and has a family of 
several children, none grown. The second daughter of old 
James C, St., Sarah Ann, married a Mr. Jones, who either died 
or left the country, leaving her one child, a daughter — ^what has 
become of the daughter is unknown ; Mrs. Jones is long since 
dead. The third daughter of James C. Lane, St., Drphea, 
married a Mr. Turbeville; they had and raised a family, and 
have grand-children, but none of them are known. The 
youngest daughter of James, St., Priscilla, married "Sandy" 
Norton, who was killed or died in the war ; they had and raised 
three sons, Woodberry, Houston and Holland Norton, who 
are now among us and good citizens — especially Houston Nor- 
ton, of Latta ; there may have been daughters — if any, they are 
unknown to the writer. Another son of old Osborne L,ane, 
William, married, don't know to whom, and from whom are 
many descendants in the county. Think Rev. William and 
James Lane and the late Henry J. Lane are or were descend- 
ants of old William ; there are other descendants of this old 
man, but they are unknown to the writer. Of the three other 
sons of old Osborne Lane, Robert moved to Barnwell ; David 
moved to Union, and Stephen went to Georgia in the long past, 
and no tidings from them. 

Bbthea. — The Bethea family will next be noticed. This 
very large and extensive family, 'both in name and in its vast 
network of connections, all sprang from one common stock, 
John Bethea, who emigrated from England to Virginia, ait what 
precise time is not known, but supposed to be in the latter part 
of the seventeenth or early part of the eighteenth century. 
The name was originally spelled Berthier, and is supposed to 
be of F.renc!h origin. The writer has been furnished, by Philip 
Y. Bethea, of Marion, with a family tree, and chart of the fam- 
ily from old "English John" up to date — at least, so far as 
Marion County is concerned, and I suppose generally, so far 
as can be ascertained. This chart only gives the names of 
males, no females — for the reason that they generally lost their 
identity by marriage; yet Hhe females transmit the blood just 
as much as the males do — whence the writer will hereinafter 
notice the females as well as the males, in every instance where 



396 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

they are known. Old "English John" had two sons, John and 
Tristram. John settled in Nansemond County, Virginia, and 
Tristram settled on Cape Fear River, in North Carolina, as is 
supposed, in the early part of tihe eighteenth century. John, 
the second, had two sons, John, third, and William. John, 
third, emigrated to South Carolina, about the middle of the 
eighteenth century, or a little later, and settled on Buck Swamp, 
about two miles above the present town of Latta. His brother, 
William, about the same time, came to South Carolina (or they 
may have come together) , and settled on Sweat Swamp, three 
or four miles above Harlleesville. These were the progenitors 
of all the Be*heas and their numerous connections in Marion 
County, and, I suppose, throughout the Western States. Here- 
inafter these two families will be referred to as the "Buck 
Swamp family or set," and the "Sweat Swamp family or set." 
The wife of "Buck Swamp John" was Absala Parker, (hence 
their youngest son was named "Parker." "Buck Swamp 
John" settled on the plantation now owned by one of his de- 
scendants, John C. Bethea, of Dillon; he was a prosperous 
man — ^took up and owned at the time of his death, in 1821, six 
or eight thousand acres of land around him and in near by 
parts, the most of which is now owned 'by some one or another 
of his descendants ; he farmed and raised stock, drove it to 
Charleston ; had and raised large orchards, raised fruit ; made 
cider and Ibrandy, and sold it, in his day, without let or hin- 
drance; he accumulated a large estate for his day and time, 
wliidh he gave almost entirely to his five sons, William, James, 
Philip, Elisiha and Parker — giving nothing, comparatively, to 
his four daughters, Sallie, Pattie, Mollie and Absala (I think, 
was the name of the latter) . Sallie married Levi Odom, of 
Revolutionary fame ; two of them, Absala and Mollie, married 
a Mr. Owens ; and Pattie married another Mr. Owens. None 
of them except Pattie have descendants in this State — as Sallie 
and Absala died childless, and Mollie and her Mt. Owens emi- 
grated to Natchez, Miss. The five sons all settled, lived and 
died in Marion County. William, the eldest, married, first, a 
Miss Crawford; had ono diild, a son, Jtohm C. Bethea; his 
second wife was Mary (Polly) Sheckelford; the fruits of the 
marriage were five sons, Levi, Willam S., Frank, George J. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 897 

and Evander S. Bethea; the daughters were Rebecca, Absala, 
Mary, Catharine and Sarah Ann. Levi married Miss Mary 
Ann Belthea, a daughter of John Bethea, of the "Sweat Swamp 
set," and had two sons, Henry L. (who died in youth), and 
George, and four daugihters, Sophia, Hannah Jane, Louisa and 
Charlotte. Of these, Sophia married WilHam H. Smith, on 
Buck Swamp, and had and raised sons, Samuel O. Smith, 
Wm. B., Henry E. K. and John B. Smith, and two daughters, 
the wife of B. S. EUis (first cousins), and Hamilton Edwards' 
wife. Hannah Jane Belthea married John C. Bass, and died 
childless. Louisa Bethea married James F. Galloway, and has 
a facnily of two sons, Henry and James, and four daug'hters, 
Sallie, Rebecca, Mary and Rachel. Charlotte Bethea married 
John E. Henry, who lives on the old William Bethea home- 
stead, and has already been noticed in or among the Henry 
family. George Bethea, son of Levi, married a Miss Camp- 
bell, daughter of the late Edward Campbell, and has five sons, 
Edwin, Henry, Gary, Robert and Chalmers. Think Edwin 
lately married a Miss Smith, daughter of Marcus L. Smith. 
William S. Bethea, second son of William Bethea by his Sheck- 
elford wife, married Miss Sarah Ann DeBerry, of Marl- 
borough ; by her he had two children, a daughter, Missouri, 
and a son, William Henry. Missouri became the first wife of 
John H. Hamer; she died, leaving one child, a son, Missouri 
Robert Hamer, who lias already been noticed in or among the 
Hamer family. .The son, William Henry Bethea, ma!rried, 
first, a Miss Wilson, of Wilmington, N. C, and by her he had 
two daugihters, Adaline and Ella, both single, and two sons, 
Wilson and Henry (twins) ; Henry died in 1899; Wilson sur- 
vives, and is unmarried. William Henry's first wife died, and 
he married, a second time. Miss EUie Sherwood ; she has one 
son, Evander S., a 'boy nearly grown. William Henry Bethea 
died in 1891 or 1892, a felo de se. Frank Bethea married, late 
in life. Miss Rebecca Manning, daughter of Woodward Man- 
ning; had one child, a son; father and son (an infant) both 
died the same year ; the widow, Rebecca, married twice after 
that, and has already been mentioned among the Manning fam- 
ily. George J. Bethea married Miss Irena Page, daughter of 
Captain William Page ; they had and' raised two sons, William 



398 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

A. and John D., and several daughters, Amanda, Ellen, Mary, 
Rittie and Belle. William A. married a Miss Floyd and 
moved to North Carolina. John D. married Miss Sallie Man- 
ning, daug'hter of Woodward Manning. Of the daughters, 
Amanda married William B. Ellen ; Kittie married Joseph Wat- 
son, her first cousin; don't know who the others married. 
William A. has a son, named Jasper, and John D. has a son, 
named Herbert. Evander S. Bethea, the youngest son of old 
Buck Swamp William, never married. The oldest son of Buck 
Swamp William, by his Crawfofd wife, was named John C, 
born in 1798, and died January, 1863; married, first, a Widow 
Irby, whose maiden name was Allison ; she had one child, a 
daughter, Elizabeth, when he married her, who grew up and 
married Henry Rogers, of Marlborough; they raised a large 
family of sons and daughters, and among the daughters is Hen- 
rietta, who is now the widow of the late Grovernor W. H. El- 
leihe ; by his marriage with the Widow Irby, he had and raised 
one son, Edwin Allison, when she died; and he afterwards 
married Sarah Ann Davis, and by her had and raised one son, 
John C, now of Dillon. Edwin A. married Ann Eliza God- 
bold, youngest daughter of Asa Godibold, Sr. ; they live at 
Latta, and have a family of several sons and daughters; the 
sons are Asa, John C, Edwin and Reed Walker, and several 
daughters. One daughter married to W. C. McMillan, and is 
in Columbia, S. C. Asa has gone West; others all here. 
John C. Bethea, of Dillon, married Miss Hettie Bethea, daugh- 
ter of W. W- Bethea, of Mississippi, and of the "Sweat Swamp 
family;" they have two sons, Horace and John C, and five 
daughters, all small. Of the sons of Buck Swamp William, 
there was one noticeable peculiarity — they all, except old John 
C, drank liquor excessively, and when intoxicated or drinking 
were perfectly quiet and harmless — much more so than when 
sober, except, perlhaps, Evander S. ; they were all capital men, 
energetic and progressive citizens. Of the daughters of old 
William Bethea (Buck Swamp), Rebecca married Colin Mc- 
Lellan, who has already been noticed in or among the Mclvel- 
lans. Absala married Hugh Campbell, already mentioned in 
or among the Campbells. Mary married William W. Bethea, 
of the "Sweat Swamp set," who will be noticed further on. 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 399 

Catharine married Averitt N. Nance, of North Carolina, and 
raised one son, Daniel, and several daughters. Sarah Ann 
married a Mr. Folk, of North Carolina, and raised a family of 
two sons and two daughters, names unknown. All the sons 
and daughters of Buck Swamp William are dead; he himself 
died 13th June, 1840. James Bethea, the second son of old 
"Buck Swamp John," married Miss Margaret Cockrane, a 
daughter of Thomas Cockrane, of Marlborough County, and 
settled in the fork of Big and Little Reedy Creeks ; they had 
and raised to he grown twelve children, five sons and seven 
daughters; the sons were Thomas C, Samuel J., John R., 
David and Claudius; the daughters were Nancy, Deborah, 
Sallie, Rachel, Lucinda, Luoretia and Jane. Thomas C. mar- 
ried Miss Miranza Rogers, a daughter of old Timothy Rogers, 
and emigrated to Mississippi. Samuel J. married Miss Mary 
Rogers, another daughter of old Timothy Rogers ; he was a 
local Methodist preacher for more than forty years, a man of 
high dharacter and a most excellent citizen; he died in 1877; 
he married, a second time, Miss Elizabeth Bass, daughter of 
old man Joseph R. Bass; by his first marriage he had and 
raised to be grown eleven children — sons, James, Andrew J. 
and David N. ; daughters, Sarah, Margaret, Harriet, Flora J., 
Louisa, Lucinda, Charlotte and Cattie; and by his last wife, 
one son, Samuel J., Jr. Of the sons, James died unmarried, 
just on arriving at manhood. Andrew J. was a practicing 
physician, and married Anna Maria Allen, daughter of Rev. 
Joel Allen, settled in the "Free State" section, and died in 
1 88 1, leaving his widow and five children — all now grown — 
three sons, Herbert, Percy and Andrew, and two daughters, 
Mrs. Rev. Pearce Kilgo, who has five children, and Mrs. Wil- 
liam T. Bethea, who has three children, sons, James Earle, 
William Thaddeus, Jr., and Philip Osbome. The next son of 
Rev. S. J. Bethea, David N., who died last week, married, first, 
Anna J. Sellers, daughter of the writer, and settled in the "Free 
State" section; they had eight children, three of whom are 
dead, also the mother; of the eight, five were sons and three 
daughters ; the sons were William T., Samuel Stoll, David A., 
Swinton Legare and Andrew Pearce; the daughters were 
Cattie May, Lillian and Anna Laval. Of these, Samuel Stoll, 



400 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

David A. and Oattie May are dead — died before majority. 
William Thaddeus married his cousin, Georgia Bethea, as 
above stated and children as above stated ; he is railroad agent 
at Dillon and has been for more than ten years, and Mayor of 
the town for three years. By the second marriage of Rev. S. 
J. Bethea, he had one son, Samuel J., Jr., who is and has been 
for ten years or more a traveling Methodist preacher in the 
South Carolina Conference; he married Miss Nannie Be*hea, 
of the "Sweat Swamp" family, and have only one child, a son, 
Samuel J., Jr. Of the daughters of Rev. S. J. Bethea, three, 
IvUcinda, Cattie and Charlotte, all grown young ladies, died 
unmarried. Sarah married James Moore, of Marlborough 
County; they had only one child, a son, James B. Moore, of 
Latta ; the father died when James B. was an infant ; the widow 
never married again, and died a few years ago. The son, 
James B. Moore, married Miss Mollie Godbold, daughter of 
Asa Godbold, Jr. ; they have three children living, two sons, 
Clancy and LaCoste, and a daugliter, L,orena (small). Mar- 
garet, the next daughter of Rev. S. J. Bethea, married John 
W. Tart ; they had and raised three sons, James, John and An- 
drew; the father and mother are both dead. James went to 
Savannah, married a Miss Fuller, of Wayoross, Ga., and when 
last heard of was said to 'be doing well. John married a Miss 
Bethea, daughter of Elisha Bethea, Jr., of Latta; they have 
some family, how many and of wliat sex is not known. An- 
drew Tart married a Miss Hays, daughter of Hamilton R. 
Hays, and lives near Kirby's Cross Roads ; suppose they have 
some family, how many and of what sex is unknown. Of the 
daughters of John W. Tart and wife, two or three of them died 
unmarried, after maturity. One married Samuel O. Smith, of 
Buck Swamp ; they have a large family. Their oldest, a son, 
Stepihen Lane Smith, lives at Laitta, and lately married a Miss 
Edwards, a daughter of Austin Edwards. Another daughter 
married C. C. Gaillard, and has three children^-a daughter, 
Maggie, and a son, Luther, and another name unknown ; they 
now live at Dillon; their children are grown. Another 
daughter married James Johnson, a nephew of Chancellor W. 
D. Johnson, called "Black Jim," to distinguish him from J. W. 
Jdhnson, Esq., another nephew and son-in-law of the Chancel- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 401 

lor; they live at Fair Bluff, N. C. ; they have some children, 
how many and of what sex is unknown. Another and young- 
est daughter of John W. Tart and his wife, Margaret, married 
Solon Lewis, of Latta ; she died some months ago, and left two 
children, a daughter and a son, I think. The next daughter 
of Rev. S. J. Bethea, Harriet, and' the only survivor of his 
eleven first children, has never married, and is sixty-one or two 
years old. Flora, the next daughter, married the late Stephen 
D. Lane; both are dead, and died childless. Louisa, the next 
daughter, married Newton Owens, of North Carolina; they 
moved to Texas several years ago ; she is dead, leaving several 
children, sons and daughters — pertiaps, all grown. John R. 
Bethea, the third son of old James Bethea, married Miss Har- 
riet Bass, daughter of old Joseph R. Bass. I think this family 
has been already noticed in or among the Bass family. The 
fourth son of old James Bethea, David, died a young man, 
urunarried, in 1843. Claudius Bethea, the fifth and youngest 
son of old James Bethea, married, late in life. Miss Mary Ann 
Miles, daughter of Charles Miles, of the "Free State" section ; 
he and his wife are both dead, childless. Of the daughters of 
old James Bethea, the eldest, Nancy, married Salathd Moody, 
an older brother of old Barfield Moody ; they had several chil- 
dren, sons and daughters, some grown, when they broke up 
and moved West. Deborah, the second daughter, married 
James Spears, a very successful man in Marlborough ; they had 
and raised a large family — two sons, Andrewr J. and Edwin A., 
and six or seven daughters ; they have descendants, grand-sons, 
in Marion County now, in the persons of Dr. J. H. David and 
Frank B. David,* enterprising, progressive men, with their 
families. They have many descendants in Marlborough 
County. The two sons, Andrew J. and Edwin A., died child'- 
less ; Edwin married. Lucinda, the fifth daughter of old James 
Bethea, married Colonel Wilie Bridges, of Marlborough, and 
emigrated West. Sallie, the third daughter, married Willis 
Crawford, from whom sprang several sons and two daug'hters ; 
the sons were James, Hardy, Thomas C, Willis, William and 
Gibson G. Crawford, now of Latta ; the daughters were Rhoda 
and Margaret. Of the sons, James died when about grown, 
*Frank B. David died recently. 



402 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

unmarried. Hardy married a Miss Piatt, and went West. 
Thomas C. married twice, is well known in the county ; mar- 
ried, the last time, a Miss McPherson, in West Marion, and has 
resided there for more than thirty years ; his wife died a short 
time ago, childless ; 'he is a most excellent man and a good citi- 
zen.* Willis Crawford was a physician; married a lady in 
Charleston, and was soon after accidentally killed in a fox 
drive by his own gun — verifying the adage, "That more people 
are killed or hurt at play than at work." William died, a sin- 
gle man, after having gone through the war and came out un- 
hurt. G. G. Crawford married Miss Kate Bethea, daughter of 
Colonel James R. Bethea ; they had and raised two sons, James 
C. and Samuel B., and two daughters, Jessie and Mary; his 
wife is dead ; he has not remarried. James G. has lately mar- 
ried a Miss Evans, of Society Hill. Jessie married, two or 
three years ago, William Ellis Bethea ; no offspring. Samuel 
B. and Mary are yet single. The oldest daughter of Willis and 
Sallie Crawford, Rhoda, married Henry Easterling, and has 
already been noticed among the Easiterlings. Margaret, the 
youngest daughter, never married, and is dead. Rachel, the 
fourth daughter of old James Bethea, married Enoch Meekins, 
of Marlborougl:! ; he, however, settled and lived many years 
near Harileesville, and raised a considerrable family of sons and 
daughters, and finally moved to North Carolina, where he and 
his wife both died; don't know enough about his children to 
trace them. He had one son, Philip B., who married a Miss 
Hays, daughter of John C. Hays; they also moved to North 
Carolina, and are lost sight of. One daughter married John R. 
Oarmiohael ; he died, and left two sons, Alexander and McCoy, 
and one daughter, Johny; the mother still lives. Another 
daug'hter married James McGirt ; they went to North Carolina. 
Lucretia, the sixth daughter, first married Aaron Meekins, of 
Marlborough, brother of Enoch, wlio had married Rachel; 
Aaron Meekins lived but a short time, and died childless ; the 
widow afterwards married Wesley Stackhouse, who has already 
been noticed among the Stackhouse family. Jane, the young- 
est daughter, married Tristram Easterling, who has already 
been noticed. in or among the Easterling family. Philip Be- 
*Thomas C. Crawford has recently died. 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 403 

thea, the third son of old "Buck Swamp John," married, in 
1 80 1, Rachel Cochrane, daughter of old Thomas Cochrane, of 
Marlborough, and sister of his brother James' wife. (As to 
Thomas Cochrane — ^he was a Vermonter, ran away from his 
parents in Vermont when a mere lad, and married a Miss Coun- 
cil, and settled on Great Pee Dee, just above the mouth of 
Crooked Creek ; raised a family ; married three times ; the two 
Bethea's wives above mentioned were daughters of the first 
wife, together with another daughter, Polly, who became the 
wife of old John Hamer, and the progenitress of the large 
family of that name in Marlborough and Marion, and a son, 
named Robert; he amassed a large property and lived to a 
great age.) Philip Bethea settled on Catfish, where he lived 
and died in 1865 ; they raised to be grown two sons, Elisha C. 
and James R., and three daughters, Clarissa, Margaret and 
Martha Ann. Of the sons, Elisha C. married Martha Ann 
Walters, daughter of Jeremiah Walters, of upper Marion; 
Captain Elisha C. was a very successful man as a farmer and 
well to do in life ; they had eleven sons and four daug'hters .; the 
sons were Philip W., John J., Robert C, James A., Elisha, 
Picket, Morgan, George, William W., Clarence and Julius N. ; 
the daughters were Elizabdih Ann, Wilmina R., Augusta B. 
and Alice. Of the sons of Elisha C, Philip W. married Miss 
Anna Smith, a daughter of Rev. John L. Smith, of the "Fork" 
section, and settled Where he now lives; his family has been 
noted among the Lane family. The second son of Captain 
Elisha C. Bethea is Dr. John J. Bethea, at MuUins ; has been 
practicing medicine since 1852; he married, first, Miss Mary 
Bethea, a daughter of Tristram Bethea, of Floral Coillege, one 
of the "Cape Fear set ;" she had one child, a daughter, Emma, 
who grew up and married Dr. William Harrel, who moved to 
Georgia some years ago, and had w^hen they left six daughters 
and no son. Dr. John J. Bethea married, a second time, Miss 
Jane Smith, a daughter of Rev. John L. Smith, and sister of his 
Brother Philip's -wife. Owing to some trouble growing out of 
the war, Dr. John had to leave the county and State for fear of 
the Federal garrison stationed at Marion in 1865 to 1868; he 
went to Mississippi, and his family soon followed after him, 
and he stayed in that State some fifteen or twenty years, when 



404 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

he came back, and has been in this county ever since. His 
family have been noticed in tracing the Lane family. Robert C. 
Bethea, the third son of Captain Elisha C, married, some time 
before the war, a Miss Legette, daughter of John C. L/egette, of 
West Marion ; before the war, he removed to Mississippi ; they 
had some little family before leaving this county — know noth- 
ing more of them ; hie was also a physician, and in his adopted 
home he became a local Methodist preacher. James A. Bethea, 
the fourth son of Captain Elisha C, was a bright young man ; 
volunteered in the early part of the war, was a Lieutenant or 
rose to a lyieutenancy in Co. E, Twenty-third Regiment, S. C. 
v., and remained in the war to the end, a gallant soldier. After 
the war he went to Mississippi ; and from there went to a law 
school at Lebanon, Tenn. ; returned to Mississippi, was admit- 
ted to the bar, but soon after took sick and died — a worthy and 
promising young man ; he never married. Elisha Bethea, Jr., 
the fifth son of Captain Elisha C, married, on the 9th March, 
1861 — ^the writer officiating at the nuptials — ^to Miss Sallie 
Ellis, daughter of the Widow Ginsy Ellis. He also volun- 
teered and went into the army, and remained in it till he was 
disabled for field service, when he came home, and for some 
time his friends supposed he would not survive the wounds, 
but he did and lias been going on crutches ever since — ^the 
wound being in his hip ; he yet lives, and is near Latta, an ener- 
getic and successful man, a farmer. He had by his first wife 
several sons and daughters. His oldest living son, William 
Ellis, is now merdhandising at Latta, and has been twice mar- 
ried — first, a Georgia lady, who had three sons, Charles, Robert 
and Dallas, and one daugihter, Florence, and died ; he married, 
a second time. Miss Jessie Crawford ; she has no children. Ar- 
thur, his second son, has lately married a Miss Hays, of Hills- 
boro Township, a daughter of William B. Hays; he teaches 
school. Morgan, his third son, is a young man, unmarried ; he 
teaches school. Of his daughters by his first marriage, one, 
Mattie, married John J. George, who died childless. Another, 
Carrie, married John Tart; they have five children (small). 
Another, Augusta, is unmarried. Another, Nellie, married 
Tristram Hamilton; she has two children. Bertha and Sallie 
(small). Elisha Bethea, Jr., had another son, Benjamin, and 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 405 

one named Elisha; both died in youth. EHsha Bethea's first 
wife, Sallie, died; he married again, her sister, Mary Ann, 
who at the time of iher marriage was the Widow Thomas ; by 
this second marriage he has one son, named Power, who is now 
in Wofford College, and a daugliter, named Eva, and pertiaps 
others ('small). Pickett Bethea, the sixth son of Captain 
Elisha C, married Miss Carrie Honour, daughter of Rev. John 
H. Honour, of Charleston, about the first of the war ; by this 
marriage two sons were born. Walker and Pickett. Walker 
died when a child. Pickett K. grew up and became a doctor, 
and married a Miss Davis, of North Carolina, and has removed 
to Socastee, in Horry County, and is there practicing medicine, 
and is said to be doing well. His father, Pickett, volunteered 
early in the war, and was a Lieutenant in Captain McKerall's 
company, in 25th Regiment ; he was killed in one of the battles 
in Virginia, in 1863. His widow married again to J. W. Saint- 
clair, a school teacher; they removed West; she had several 
children for him, and died. Morgan, the seventh son of Cap- 
tain Elisha C, volunteered early in the war; he sickened and 
died at home while on a furlough ; he was unmarried. George, 
the eighth son, was killed, when about thirteen or fourteen 
years of age, by what was called a "flying mare" — ^another veri- 
fication of the adage "that more people are killed or hurt at play 
than ait work." William W. Bethea, the ninth son of Captain 
Elisha C, now living in West Marion, married Miss Sallie 
Morrison, a daughter of Rev. Mr. Morrison, a Presbyterian 
minister, of Anson County, N. C, a very estimable and accom- 
plished lady ; the fruits of this marriage are 'four sons, Morri- 
son, Theodore, Oscar and James. Of these, Morrison is mar- 
ried to a lady of Clinton (name unknown), and has two sons, 
Curtis and' Eugene ; there may be a daughter or two (all small) . 
William W. Bethea may bave daughters, the writer does not 
know. One of the sons, Theodore (I believe) is a graduate of 
the Citadel Academy of Charleston — said to have graduated 
with distinction. 'Clarence, the tenth son of Captain Elisha C, 
died when a small boy. Julius N., the eleventh son of Captain 
Elisha C, married, first. Miss Anna Shrewsberry, daughter of 
the late Edward C. Shrewsberry, of the "Free State" section. 
An incident of their marriage may be here related : They were 



406 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

married at a school 'house near by her father's, in the woods on 
a road not much frequented, by the Rev. Joel Allen, on Christ- 
mas day, in 1871 ; he gave them a certificate of their marriage 
Only one person was present at the nuptials besides themselves 
and the officiating clergyman ; and at their special instance and 
request, the marriage was to be kept secret until the 19th day 
of April following, it being Julius' birth-day and the day of his 
arrival at the age of twenty-one years. Julius carried his wife 
back to her home, half a mile away, and left her there ; he went 
to his father's, and said nothing until the appointed time, 19th 
April, 1872, when he told his father and mother about it, and 
went to her father's, and their marriage was satisfactorily es- 
ta)blished to her parents, and he took her and carried her to his 
father's. A sufficient reason, satisfactory to them, may have 
existed for their marriage and subsequent secrecy, but it does 
not accord -with the writer's views of propriety, nor with the 
conduct of 999 out of 1,000. His bride was a very intellectual 
and well cultivated lady — ^far more so than many in that re- 
gion; the fruits of the marriage were three sons, Hert>ert, 
Ernest and Adger, and one or two daughters, one named Mat- 
tie May — suppose they are all grown. Anna, his first wife, 
died, and he married, a second time. Miss Carrie iSessions, 
daughter of John D. Sessions, of Marion ; they reside now at 
Mullins; children of the last marriage, if any, are small — 
names, number and sex unknown. Of the daughters of Cap- 
tain Elisha C. Bethea, the eldest, Elizabeth Ann, married John 
B. Bethea, of the "Sweat Swamp" family; her mother was a 
half Bethea of the same set ; he had previously gone to Missis- 
sippi, and came back to her home in Marion County and mar- 
ried ; the bridal trip was to be to Mississippi. She had some 
negroes, which her father had given her, and they with their 
little baggage were taken along for the trip. This was before 
the war, about 1856. When the bridal party arrived at Marion 
to take the train, the groom put the bride on board, and stepped 
back to see to getting on the negroes — a woman and some chil- 
dren, and whilst thus engaged the train pulled off and left him ; 
of course, he ran after it and tried to stop it, but failed in his 
almost frantic efforts. His bride went on to Florence (then a 
small village) and stopped over for the night; the groom spent 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 407 

the night in Marion and went over the next day and joined his 
wife. I will leave the reader to imagine whether Dhere was 
intense disappointment or not, and whether there was any curs- 
ing done 'by the groom. The bridal party went to Mississippi 
and settled there — I think, in Smith County. John B. was a 
very energetic and persevering man, a farmer ; he went into the 
war, and in 1863, he died of disease, and left his wife arid four 
sons, Augustus B., William, Sumter and John — ^the latter born 
after his father's death, all then small. After John B.''s death, 
Captain Elisha C. went out to Mississippi and brought the 
widow and her children to this county. The widow settled on 
a place given her by her father, and went to work to raise and 
educate her sons ; in this she succeeded well. She was no ordi- 
nary woman; well educated herself and of fine literary taste, 
and to this added her fine business qualifications and her suc- 
cess, placed her in the front rank among women. Much more 
might be said to her credit, but space will not permit a further 
extended notice. Her sons grew up and one by one they went 
to Birmingham, Ala., and she finally followed and, I think, yet 
lives. The second daughter of Captain Elisha C, Wilmina 
Rachel, has never married, and is now in the sixtieth year of 
her age. The third daughter, Augusta B., married A. E. Gil- 
christ, of Mullins, and has already been noticed herein among 
the Gilchrist family. Alice, the fourth and youngest daughter 
of Captain Elisha C, married D; Asbury Smith, who has 
already been noticed among the Lane family. She, too, has 
gone to Birmingham, Ala., where three of her four sons reside. 
According to the chart of the Bethea family in all its 
branches, including the Nansemond County, Va., Betheas, the 
Cape Fear, N. C, Betheas, the "Buck Swamp set," and the 
"Sweat Swamp set," Captain Elisha C. Bethea "takes the cake" 
for having and raising the greatest number of sons, eleven; 
while Dr. J. F. Bethea stands next, with eight. Not much dan- 
ger of extinction. Colonel James R. Bethea, the second and 
youngest son of old man Philip Bethea, who has been men- 
tioned in several places herein before in connection with other 
matters, married, rather late in life (thirty-four or thirty-five 
years dd), to Miss Mary McLeod, of Marlborottg'h, one of the 
best and most devotedly pious women I ever met ; and should 
27 



408 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

any of ber children turn out badly in the future, it cannot be 
charged to any fault in the mother's training, either by precept 
or example; they had and raised (Jessie, the oldest, was near 
grcjwn when he died) six sons and three daughters ; the sons 
were Jessie, James D., Philip Y., Elisiha, D. McLeod and 
Rdbert Lucien; the daughters were Kate, Clara and M. Isa- 
bella. Of the sons, Jessie died when about grown. James D., 
the second son, married Miss Flora Fore, daughter of the late 
Stephen Fore; she is dead. Of James D.'s family, mention has 
already been made in or 'among the Fore family. Philip Y., 
the third son, now in Marion, a first dass business man ; has 
been County Auditor, and is now and has been for ten or more 
years cashier of the Bank of Marion ; married Miss Florence 
Johnson, of Charleston, a distant relative of his — ^his father and 
Florence's grand-mother, Sallie Strobel, were first cousins; 
they have had six sons (one, Philip Y., dead), Eugene, Arthur, 
Johnson, Stewart, Philip Y. and Markley, and three daugh- 
ters, Eloise, Edith and Mary McLeod — none of whom are mar- 
ried. Eugene, the eldest, is in the Philippines or China, in the 
United States army, an officer, a promising young man, and 
may rise to greater distinction. The other children are all at 
home — Eloise and Arthur are grown. Philip Y. has a very 
interesting family ; his wife is a superior woman, and well fitted 
by education and early training to raise a family. Elisiha, the 
fourth son of Colonel J. R. Bethea, was quite a promising 
young man, but the fates decreed that he should not live, and 
he died when twenty-five or six years of age, unmarried. D. 
McLeod Bethea, the fifth son of Colonel J. R. Bethea, a first 
class man, an excellent and successful farmer, married Miss 
Florence Fore, daughter of the late Stephen Fore, and who, 
with his family, have already 'been mentioned herein in or 
among the Fore family. Robert Lucien, the sixth son of 
Colonel Bethea, has married twice; first, a Miss Shaw, of 
Bishopville ; by her he had one child, a daughter, Leona, who 
is now nearly grown. The first wife died, and he married, a 
second time, to Miss Rosa Carnes, of Bishopville, and by her 
has some three or four children ; names and sex unknown ; they 
are yet children. Robert Lucien lives in Bishopville, and runs 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 4U» 

a hotel.* Of the daughters of Colonel J. R. Bethea, the eldest, 
Kate, married Gibson G. Crawford; both of whom and their 
family liave already been noticed herein among the Betheas 
aJbove. The second daughter of Colonel Bethea, Clara, mar- 
ried Holland Manning, who lives on her patrimony, and are 
doing well — in fact, Clara is an extra smart and sensible 
woman ; they have two children, daughters, both children, Mary 
Belle and Hope. Holland Manning was a widower with five 
children, three of whom are married ; he has ^ place of his own 
in extreme upper Marion, which he rents. Colonel James R. 
Bethea died in 1878, at sixty-nine years of age, and his widow, 
Mary, some years afterward. The youngest daughter, Isa- 
bella, or Belle, 'has never married ; she has a good farm, which 
she rents ; she also teaches school, and when not thus engaged 
she stays with 'her sister, Clara Manning. 

Colonel James R. Bethea, when young, imbibed a military 
spirit, and manifested a strong ambition to attain to high hon- 
ors in the militia of the State. Starting as a private in his local 
beat company (Cross Roads), he soon obtained a Lieutenancy; 
and from that to the Captaincy of the company ; and from that 
to Major of the upper battalion ; and by seniority soon became 
Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment ; and from that by election 
to the Colonelcy of the Thirty^second Regiment, which position 
he held at the time of his marriage, in March, 1844, and con- 
tinued to bold that position for three or four years afterward — 
and in the meantime declined to be a candidate for Brigadier 
General, to which place he could have been elected, perhaps, 
without opposition. He was an efficient officer, and was popu- 
lar as such. It was very expensive, and as he had a growing 
family he wisely chose to abandon the further pursuit of mili- 
tary honors (empty as they were), and devote his means to the 
support and education of bis fast-growing family. He re- 
signed his commission as Colonel, and Elly Godbold or John J. 
George was elected in his place. They both were successive 
Colonels, but do not remember which of the two were first 
elected. Afterwards Colonel Bethea was elected as a Repre- 
sentative from the district in the State Legislature (1848 to 

1850)- 

*He is now at Dillon in the same business. 



410 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

Of the daughters of Philip Bebhea, a son of old "Buck 
Swamp John," Clarissa, the eldest, never married, and died in 
1861, at the age of fifty-eigiht. The second daughter, Marga- 
ret, married Willis Fin'klea, called Arter Willis ; in a short while 
Finklea moved to Alabama; there they had several children, 
five of whom were raised. Willis Finklea was a drinking man 
and treated his wife badly, so much so that she could not stand 
it; they separated, and her father, in 1841, went to Alabama, 
Monroe County, in a wagon, and brought her and her five chil- 
dren back to Marion County ; Finklea soon after died ; her chil- 
dren were raised mainly by her father; there were two sons, 
James C. and William ; the daughters were Lucinda, Sallie and 
Margaret Agnes. James C. Finklea is now one of our fellow- 
citizens, known as Captain Finklea, in Wahee Township, and, 
in fact, all over the county. Captain Finklea volunteered in 
Captain C. J. Fladger's Company Et 23d South Carolina Regi- 
ment, in the Confederate War ; went off as a Sei-geant in that 
company. Captain Fladger in a few months resigned, and 
Harris Covington, First Lieutenant, became Captain, the other 
Lieutenants went up, and Captain Finklea was elected Third 
Lieutenant, made vacant. Some time after Covington re- 
signed, and the company was reorganized by orders from the 
proper authorities, and Captain Finklea was elected Captain of 
the company, and served gallantly until the latter part of 1864 
— ^having fought through all the campaigns from Virginia to 
Mississippi. At that time Captain Finklea was the senior Cap- 
tain in the regiment, when by the casualties of war the Major's 
ofiSce became vacant, and according to rules of promotion. Cap- 
tain Finklea was entitled to the place ; but a Junior Captain was 
promoted, by appointment, not by dection, to the Majoralty 
over him ; when Captain Finklea resigned and came home, and 
did not return to the service. It was said he wias a good and 
brave Captain; that his men all loved and respected him, but 
he was not popular with the higher officers, because he always 
associated with his men and not with them. Captain Finklea 
is known as a modest, retiring man ; not self-asserting. Had 
the vacancy for Major been left to his company, he would have 
gotten the vote of every man ; he sympathized with his men, 
fared as they fared, and assumed no superiority over them on 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 411 

account of his position. As an evidence of Captain Finklea's 
popularity, when he was first elected County Commissioner, a 
few years ago (lie was twice elected), he received every vote at 
Berry's Cross Roads, something over 200. He is a man of 
good sense, a good and safe manager of his farm and home af- 
fairs, unostentatious and unassuming, rather avoids company — 
unfortunately, of late years, his habits are not good. J^iter the 
war he went, first, to Alaibama and then to Texas, where he 
married a Miss Kyle ; she had one child for him, a son, who 
died in infancy, and the mother died; he then oame back to 
South Carolina, and married the widow of Dr. William H. God- 
bold, a most excellent and cultured woman ; by her he had one 
son, named for his first wife, a very promising boy, but he died 
at the age of four or five years. William Finklea, the young- 
est brother, died when about grown. Lucinda, the oldest 
daughter, married John T. Kinney, of Marlborough, and emi- 
grated to Texas, where tbey raised a family ; both are dead, and 
nothing is known further of them. Sallie, the second daugla- 
ter, married Cyrus B. Haselden ; they had and raised five chil- 
dren, two sons, John and Frank, and three daughters, Lucy, 
Maggie and Fannie. Cyrus B. Haselden and wife, Sallie, and 
family, have already been noticed in or among the Haseldens. 
Margaret Agnes, the youngest daughter of Willis Finklea and 
wife, Margaret, never married, and died of cancer on the breast, 
at the age of forty, in March, 1882. A noble girl she was. 
Martha Ann Bethea, the third and youngest daughter of old 
man Philip Bethea, married W. W. Sellers, the writer, loth 
January, 1847, ^^^ died 2d February, 1893; they had seven 
children, four sons, John C, William W., Benjamin Morgan 
and Philip B. ; of these, Benjamin Morgan died a little under 
two years of age; three daughters, Anna Jane, Rachel C. 
and Mary O. Of the sons, John C. is a graduate of the South 
Carolina College, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1870, 
was elected to the Legislature in 1870, practiced law only one 
year, and retired on the farm where he now lives ; his first wife 
was Miss Maggie E. Mace, daughter of the late Jo'hn Mace; 
she had seven children, three sons, Benjamin B., John M. and 
Wallace Duncan ; of these, John M. died under one year old ; 
there were four daughters, Lucy B., Annie R., Maggie Leila 



412 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 

and Maggie Ellen (called Pearl). Benjamin B. Sellers is a 
graduate of Wofiford College; married Miss Norma Watson, 
youngest daughter of the late William Watson ; they have two 
children, Harry and Margaret Ellen ; he is farming. Wallace 
Duncan's education is not completed. Of the daughters, Lucy 
B. is a graduate of the Columbia Female College ; she married 
D. Maxcy Watson ; they have no children. Annie R. went to 
the Female College for more than a year, but did not graduate ; 
is unmarried. Maggie Leila is near grown, iis going to school. 
Maggie E., called Pearl, was only three days old when her 
mother died ; her Aunt Rachel Norton took her and has so far 
raised her ; she is near thirteen years of age. W. W. Sellers, 
Jr., married Miss Harriet J. McPherson, daughter of C. Ervin 
McPherson, of West Marion; they have had seven or eight 
children, only three of whom are living — two daughters, Rachel 
Elise and Etta; the son is Marvin McSwain — none of them 
grown. W. W. Sdlers, Jr., is one of the Chiefs in the present 
State Constabulary, and has been for several years ; he resides 
at Latta. Philip B. Sellers is a graduate of Wofford College ; 
studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1884 (May) ; he 
married Miss M. Sue DuBois, daughter of J. T. DuBois, of 
Marion, in December, 1886; they have five children, three sons, 
John DuBois, Philip Bruce and William Maynard, and two 
daughters, Agnes Leona and Mildred Eugenia — all children, 
none grown ; he resides at Dillon, and is actively engaged in the 
practice of his chosen profession, with apparent success. Of 
the daughters of the writer and his wife, Anna Jane, the eldest 
daughter married her cousin, D. N. Bethea ; he and Anna Jane 
and their family have been already noticed in the same connec- 
tion, Betheas. The second daughter of W. W. Sellers and 
wife married Hon. James Norton, of Mullins; they had but 
two children, .sons, Evan Lewis and William Fitzroy. Evan 
Lewis, the eldest, died when four or five years of age. Wil- 
liam Fitzroy grew up to manhood ; first went to Wofford Col- 
lege, and after two years spent there, he went to the law depart- 
ment of the South Carolina College for two years, graduated 
in law, and ipso facto became a lawyer — ^he does not practice, 
however; be married Miss Florence Smith, daughter of B. 
Cause Smith, at Mullins ; they reside at Mullins, and have no 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 413 

children. Mary O. Sellers, youngest daughter of W. W. Sel- 
lers, married Thomas N. Godbold, a son of Dr. W. H. God- 
bold; they have only three children living, Thomas Carroll, 
Anna and Bessie. Thomas N. Godbold is in the railroad ser- 
vice, on the "Plant System" between Charleston and Savannah. 
This family has already been noticed in or among the Goldbold 
family. Recurring back a few lines: John C. Sellers, after 
living about ten years a widower, married, a second time, to 
Miss Jaquiline Oliver, of North Carolina, 2d February, 1898 — 
a most excellent woman ; they have had two children, boys, who 
are both dead. Elisha Bethea, fourth son of old "Buck Swamp 
John," known as old Colonel Elisha, never married. It is said 
of him that he was a very handsome man in his young days ; he 
was born in 1787, and was Captain of a company in the war of 
1812-14; he was better educated than any of his brothers — in 
fact, better than most men of his day. His father left him a fine 
property, his homestead and a large number of negroes ; few 
men of that time had such a prospect. He was very popular 
and had more natural politeness than any Bethea I ever saw. 
But, alas ! the demon of intemperance ruined him ; he died poor 
in 1854, at the age of sixty-seven years. After the war of 
1812, he became Colonel of the militia. He was true to his 
friends and true to his country. It seemed to be his delight to 
make others pleasant, happy and comfortable even at the ex- 
pense of his own convenience. This was the man after he 
became poor, which proved it to be natural with him. His 
bearing and appearance in pK>verty and old age was that of a 
nobleman, of a cavalier. Parker Bethea, the youngest son of 
old "Buck Swamp John," was born in 1790, and was given his 
mother's maiden name, Parker ; he settled opposite the head of 
Catfish, at the Cross Roads on the Marlborough line, twenty- 
two miles above Marion, and died there, St. John the Evangel- 
ist Day, 27th December, 1867; he married EHzaibeth Harllee, 
daughter of old Thomas Harllee ; they .raised two sons, Harllee 
and Benjamin Parker, and four or five daughters. Harllee 
had one son, Reddin, and Benj. P. had one named Charles. 
Harllee moved to Florida many years ago; his wife was a Miss 
Roberts — Benj. P.'s wife was a Miss Woolvin; he moved just 
after the war to Pender or Onslow County, N. C, thirty miles 



414 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

on the coast above Wilmington. These families have already 
been noticed in or among the Roberts family and the Harllee 
family. 

One more remark about these old Betheas, sons of "Buck 
Swamp John." They all loved liquor and, except old Philip, 
drank it to excess, till after middle life, when they tapered off, 
and by the time of old age 'became perfectly abstemious, and 
this was specially the case with William, James and Parker. 
They were all giood men and excellent citizens, and did much in 
starting the development of the resources of the county. The 
first gin 'house built in the county was built by old "Butk 
Swamp John ;" it stood on w*hat has ever since been called the 
"Gin House Branch," near the Cross Roads, at John C. Be- 
thea's plantation ; a good part of that gin house is still in use. 
After the death of old "Buck Swamp John," in 1821, the plan- 
tation fell to old Colonel Elisha, and he in his financial extremi- 
ties years afterwards sold the gin house to Cross Roads Henry 
Berry ; he pulled it down and hauled it to Berry's Cross Roads, 
and it stands there now, the property of James Berry, between 
his (James Berry's) dwelling and the storehouse. It has been 
there, to the writer's knowledge, more than sixty years. 

Of the grand-sons of old "English John," John settled on 
Buck Swamp, as already stated, and William settled on Sweat 
Swamp ; he married, and had four sons, John, Goodman, Philip 
and Jessie. Of these, John, the man who, after the Revolution, 
hung the Tory, Snowden, married, and 'he had and raised four 
sons, William, Tristram, John and Cade — the latter, no doubt, 
is remembered by many now living in upper Marion and else- 
where in the county. Goodman Bethea married and had two 
sons, Philip and Jessie. Philip, the brother of Goodman, never 
married, or if he did, he had no children. Jessie, the fourth 
son of old "Sweat Swamp William," had Hugh Goodman, Wil- 
liam, Henry and Tristram. 'According to the Bethea chart 
none of these latter five had any posterity. Supposed they 
emigrated to parts unknown or died in youth. William, the 
grand-son of "Sweat Swamp William," had seven sons, John, 
Tristram, Philip, Jessie, William, Thomas C. and Cade. Of 
these latter, John, William, Thomas C. and Cade had no off- 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 415 

Spring. Cade is in upper Marion now an old man.* Of the 
Other three, Tristram had one son, named William ; Philip had 
four sons, Jessie, William, Tristram and Philip*— these last four 
seem to have had no offspring. Jessie, the great-grand-son of 
old "Sweat Swamp William," had five sons, John, William, 
Charles, ^Farquehard and Holden ; their mother was a Miss 
Bethune; she had some daughters, one the wife (now dead) of 
Patrick Finagan. By the Bethea chart now lying before me, 
none of these five latter Betheas have any ofiEspring, but the 
writer knows to the contrary. John has twelve or thirteen 
children, 'boys and girls. Holden married Miss Alice Rogers, 
daughter of Jessie Rogers, and has some children. The Be- 
thune wife of Jessie Bethea had a daughter other than Mrs. 
Finagan, w'ho was the wife of the late Edward C. Shrewsberry. 
Tristram, the grand-son of old "Sweat Swamp William," mar- 
ried and had one son, Philip, who was a lawyer, but did not 
practice much 'here, and soon went to Alabama, and his father 
soon after moved himself there ; father and son have been lost 
sight of — suppose both are long since dead. John, another 
grand-son of "Sweat Swamp William," married MiSs Hannah 
Walker ; by the marriage four sons, William W., Alfred W., 
David W. and John B., were had and raised, and five daugh- 
ters, Sophia, Mary Ann, Charlotte, Sallie and Hannah. Of 
the soils, William W. married, first, Mary Bethea, a grand- 
daughter of "Buck Swamp John;" they had three sons, John 
F., Dallas and William ; don't know of any daughters by Wil- 
liam W.'s first marriage ; he married, a second time. Miss Mary 
Piatt, a daughter of old Daniel Piatt; by his (Piatt's) second 
marriage with Polly Lane, a daughter of old James C. Lane, 
who was a son of old Osborne Lane, I know of but two chil- 
dren; by William W. Bethea's second marriage, two daugh- 
ters — Hettie, the wife of John C. Bethea, of Dillon, who has 
already been mentioned; the other daughter married a Mr. 
Floyd, a son of Judge Floyd, of Alabama or Mississippi. J. 
F. Bethea (our Dr. Frank Bethea) married his first cousin, 
Hannah Jane, daughter and only child of Dr. Alfred W. Be- 
thea ; by this marriage eight sons, Alfred, Preston L., Tristram, 
William, Frank, Charles, Archie and Victor, and, I think, three 
*Died recently. 



416 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

daughters, Flora and two others whose names are not known, 
have been born. Alfred (I think) died about the time of his 
majority. Preston L. married a Miss Weatherby, daughter of 
Colon W. Weatherby, of Bennettsville, and resides at Dillon. 
Tristram married a Miss McRae, daughter of Hon. James 
M'cRae, of Albriton, in extreme upper Marion; he resides at 
Dillon. Frank married a Miss Smith, of Alabama or Georgia, 
and is now a resident of one of those States. William recently 
married a Miss McLeod, of Robeson County, N. C. The other 
three sons are yet with their father. Dr. Frank, I suppose, not 
grown. Of the daughters of Dr. J. F. Bethea, the eldest. Flora, 
married Tristram Thompson; she was a most excellent lady, 
loved and respected by all who knew her. The Doctor's two 
other daughters are minors and still with him. Dr. J. F. Be- 
thea is a successful man every way ; as a farmer, he is a man of 
affairs, a turpentine and saw mill man, is merchandizing at Dil- 
lon, he and his sons (don't know how many or which), under 
the firm name of J. F. Bethea & Co. ; he has once represented 
the county in the State Ivegislature. Dallas Bethea, brother of 
Dr. J. F. Bethea, is in Mississippi ; he has three sons, William, 
Preston and Franklin. Alfred W., another great^grand-'son of 
"Sweat Swamp William," married Flora Bethea, a daughter of 
Tristram Bethea, of Floral College, who was one of the "Cape 
Fear set," and by her had only one child, a daughter, Hannah 
Jane, who married Dr. J. F. Bethea, with the results above 
stated. Dr. Alfred W. Bethea was no ordinary man ; he was 
eminent as a physician, a good farmer, a well-informed man 
and of sound practical sense and judgment ; he was a member 
of the Secession Convention of i860; he was waylaid, shot and 
killed by the deserters in the last months of the war, much re- 
gretted by all who knew him ; he lived where Dr. J. F. Bethea 
now lives ; the widow, who survived him, is now dead. David 
W. Bethea, another great-grand-son of "Sweat Swamp Wil- 
liam," married, first, Miss Sarah Jane Manning, daughter of 
Mealy Manning, of Marlborough ; by her he had two sons, Le- 
Roy and David W., they are both married. LeRoy has two 
sons, Henry and Leon — ^these have already been mentioned in 
or among the Mannings and Easteriings, to which reference is 
made. David W., Jr., has lately married, I think, a Miss 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 417 

Townsend, of North Carolina; gives promise of becoming a 
useful man — is already so; if like 'his mother he cannot be 
otherwise, as she was one of the best of women. D. W. Be- 
thea, St., represented the county one time in the Legislature, 
1 860- 1 862 ; he was a good citizen ; he married, a second time, a 
Miss Brunson, of Darlington, who yet survives ; no offspring. 
John B. Bethea (the youngest), another great-grand-son of 
"Sweat Swamp William," married Elizabeth A. Bethea, a 
daughter of Captain Elisha C, of the "Buck Swamp set ;" they 
had four sons, as already mentioned among the "Buck Swamp 
set," to which reference is made. Of the daughters of John 
Bethea, the grand-son of "Sweat Swamp William," as given 
herein above, Sophia, the eldest, married Robert B. Piatt, and 
in a few weeks or months after her marriage she was accideh- 
tally burned to death, and, of course, died childless. Mary 
Ann, the second daughter, married Levi Bethea, of the "Buck 
Swamp set," and has already been herein noticed in the "Buck 
Swamp set," to which reference is made. Charlotte and Sallie, 
the third and fourth daughters, both married the same even- 
ing — Charlotte to Zack Fulmore and Sallie to Dr. John K. 
Alford, 'both of North Carolina, where they thereafter lived 
and died ; know but little of the family of either. Hannah, the 
fifth and youngest daughter, married Alexander Fulmore, of 
North Carolina; they moved to Alalbama; know nothing of 
them. Cade Bethea, the youi^est grand-son of old "William 
of Sweat Swamp," through his son, John, married Kittie Be- 
thea, a sister of "Floral College Tristram," and a great-grand- 
daughter of Tristram, the son of "English John," who settled 
on Cape Fear River, N. C. — ^her father being Jessee and her 
grand-father was Jessee, whose father was Tristram, the settler 
on Cape Fear, whose father was old "English John." This I 
get from the chart now lying before me. Cade Bethea' and 
Kittie had and raised five sons and three daughters; the sons 
were John W., Evander R., William C, Calvin and Henry ; the 
daughters were Caroline, Harriet and Mary Ann. Cade Be- 
thea settled on Sweat Swamp, north side, just opposite the 
mouth of Beaver Dam, on the south side, where he lived and 
died ; I think the place now belongs to Hon. D. W. McLaurin. 
There was but one Cade Bethea in regard to character ; he was 



418 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

an incessant talker, and in his latter days was always on fh-e go, 
around among his kinsfolk and friends ; was a great complainer 
and murmurer, and to hear him tell it, he was going to come to 
nothing — going to perish to death. An illustration of his char- 
acter in this regard may be here related : On one occasion, his 
nephew, Creek Jessie Bethea, went to see his Uncle Cade, in the 
month of July or August ; the old gentleman was in his piazza 
— it was a very hot day ; the old man was compilaining and mur- 
muring as usual, that his crop was a complete failure, that he 
was not going to make anything, and he and his family would 
all perish in a pile. After a while, Jessie, his nephew, proposed 
that they would go out and look around his crop ; the old man 
did not want to go ; said he did not want to see it — it made him 
sick to look at it ; they, however, went, and after looking around 
and seeing it all, Jessie remarked to him, "Well, Uncle Cade, 
your crop is ruined — you won't make anything. I thought my 
crop was hurt pretty 'badly, but not near as bad as yours ; I de- 
clare you will not make bread and you will have to go to the 
poor house." The old man Cade replied, "You are a liar, sir ; 
my crop is as good as yours, and I am not going to the poor 
house either." This is not all that was said, but is the pith of 
it, and -shows pretty clearly what the old man was in this re- 
spect. Jessie knew him, and said what he did just to bring the 
old man out, and to hush up his compilaints. John W. Bethea, 
the eldest son of old man Cade, married a Miss McLaurin ; they 
had and raised four sons, Jessie, Laurin, Festus and Alonzo, 
and one daughter, at least, who became the second wife of 
Robert A. Brunson; they moved to North Carolina. Jessee, 
the oldest son of John W., married an Alabama lady ; he died 
four or five years ago, at Dillon, and left his widow, two sons, 
Jessie and Jdhn, and two small daughters, Bessie and Lucile. 
John W. Bethea and wife are both dead. Evander R. Bethea, 
the second son of old Cade, married Mary Ann Stackhouse, 
and had one son, Jasper, and three daughters, Josephine, Carrie 
and Nannie, all of whom have already been noticed in or among 
the Stackhouse family. Laurin Bethea, the second son of John 
W. Bethea, married a Miss McLaurin, as I think; he is a 
farmer, and lives on Buck Swamp ; know nothing of his fajmily. 
"Fet" Bethea, the third son, married a Miss Stackhouse, daugh- 



A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY. 4iy 

ter of the late Mastin C. Stackhouse; he died, leaving his 
widow with some children — the youngest of whom, a little girl, 
was taken by Rev. S: J. Bethea and wife, and tlhey are raising 
it. Alonzo Bethea, the youngest son of John W. Bethea, is 
lost sight of; don't know whether he is living or dead, or 
whether he married or not — ^think, however, that he has emi- 
grated to other parts, or is dead. Wm. C. Bethea, t!he third son 
of old man Cade Bethea, married Miss Virzilla Mace, a daugh- 
ter of Moses and Drusilla Mace ; they had two sons, Henry and 
John D., I think; they and their children have already been 
mentioned in or among the Mace family, to which reference is 
made. Calvin C. Bethea, the fourth son of old man Cade, mar- 
ried Miss Caroline Bethea, a daughter of "Creek Jessie ;" they 
had one child, a son, named Jessie ; the father, Calvin, was sub- 
ject to epileptic fits, and on one occasion, while crossing a 
branch on Sweat Swamp, as supposed, an epileptic fit struck 
him and he fell in the water and was drowned ; some years after 
his death, his widow, with her son, went to Texas ; the son is 
grown, and the report is that they are doing well in that far off 
State. Henry, the fifth and youngest son of old man Cade 
Bethea, never married ; he was killed or died in the war. Of 
the daug'hters of old Cade Bethea, the eldest, Caroline, a highly 
accomplished lady, as it was said, married James DuPre, of 
Marlborough County ; she died childless, in aibout a year after 
her marriage. Harriet, the second daughter, married James 
McLaurin, of North Carolina; a few years back, they bought 
land on Buck Swamp and moved to it; think they are both 
dead — know nothing of their family. Mary Ann, the young- 
est daughter, married T. F. Stackhouse, and is dead, leaving 
him surviving ; they 'have already been noticed in or among the 
Stackhouse family, to which reference is made. Not one of 
old man Cade Betfhea's immediate family now survives. 

Of the "Cape Fear set," Tristram, a son of dd "English 
John," settled on Cape Fear River, N. C. ; he had sons, James, 
Jessee, Elisha and William. Of these, Jessee, had Jessee, Sim- 
eon, David and Jessee (it seems two sons were named Jessee) ; 
Simeon had Reddick, Jessee, William and Philip; and Jessee, 
the elder, had Thomas, Tristram and John — this Tristram was 
the "Floral College" Tristram ; and Jessee, the younger, had 



420 A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 

John, Tristram, David and Jessee ; and this latter Tristram had 
Jessee and Noah. William, the son of old Tristram, the "Cape 
Fear" settler, had John and William. Of these latter, John 
had William, John L., Jessee, David and Alexander ; and Wil- 
liam had David, John and Philip. The "Floral College" Tris- 
tram had Jessee, Daniel, Tristram, John and Thomas. Of these 
latter, all of them died without oflfspring. The eldest of these, 
Jessee, was well known in Marion ; he was a graduate of the 
South Carolina College ; studied law, settled in Marion to prac- 
tice his profession, was a partner of the writer, as Sellers & 
Bethea, for several years ; left Marion, abandoned the practice, 
never married, and died ; he was a good lawyer, but too modest 
and diffident to enter into the "rough and tumble" of the Court 
House — he was a good office lawyer ; after leaving Marion, he 
went to Marlborough and died there. This disposes of the 
"Cape Fear set" of Betheas — at least, as far as known. 

Referring, again, to the "Sweat Swamp" set — old William 
had four sons, John, Goodman, Philip and Jessee — I think, all 
these have been noticed except, perhaps, Goodman. Goodman 
had two sons, Philip and Jessee, and the latter, Philip, bad 
Goodman, William and Philip. Of the grand-daughters of 
"Sweat Swamp" William, Elizabeth married Jeremiah Walters, 
and raised a large family. Sarah married Timothy Rogers, a 
nephew of "Buck Swamp" John, and raised a large family. 
Pattie married John Braddy, and was the mcrther of the 
Braddys and their descendants, as have been and are now 
known in the county. 

The writer may have inadvertently omitted some of this 
numerous and extensive family as laid down on the chart kindly, 
furnished him, but do not think I have. From the original 
stock, "Old English John," it runs down to and includes the 
seventh and in one instance the eighth generation among the 
males bearing the name, and it is not improbable that among 
the females (if they had been given and traced), it would ex- 
tend to and include the ninth and tenth generations, as it is a 
well known fact, that females generally marry younger than 
males, and consequently propagate faster than through the 
male line. If every family had a chart or tree like this, it 
would be an acquisition to the history of our people. It is a 



A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 421 

fact, that many of our people are shamefully ignorant as to 
their ancestry. It is a fact, that the writer has found in his 
inquiries on tihe subject among the people of Marion County, a 
few instances where the party inquired of did not know, and 
could not tell, who his grand-father was, and to his great sur- 
prise he has found it of men otherwise intelligent, and well 
posted in other matters. A chart, like that of the Betheas, in 
every family would forever dissipate such ignorance, and 
would enahle every man to tell, at a word, whether he descended 
by natural and generic processes from his own species, or 
evoluted from a tadpole or a monkey. The Bethea chart is so 
cons^tructed as to be indefinitely extended ad infinitum to the 
remotest generations. 

McMillan. — The McMillan families will now be noticed. 
First, the family in the Mullins region. The first known were 
John, Malcolm and Neill V. MacMillan, three brothers. Neill 
V. lives in the Mullins region, and has a family of sons and 
daughters. One of his daughters married, last week, to Mack 
Harrelson, of Buck Swamp. Neill V. McMillan is a farmer, a 
law-abiding man, and a quiet, inoffensive citizen; don't know 
to whom he married or how many childr