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Full text of "Biographical review : this volume contains biogaphical sketches of the leading citizens of Franklin County, Massachusetts"



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http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924028817793 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW. 



THIS VOLUME CONTAINS BIOGRAPHICAL 
SKETCHES OF 



THE LEADING CITIZENS OF 
FRANKLIN COUNTY 



MASSACHUSETTS 



"Biography is the home aspect of history" 



BOSTON 

Biographical Review Publishing Company 

1895 



H 



s 



PREFACE. 



r 



HE present age is happily awake to the duty of writing its own records, setting down 
what is best worth remembering in the lives of the busy toilers of to-day, noting, not 



in vain glory, but with an honest pride and sense of fitness, things worthy of emula- 
tion, that thus. the good men do may live after them. The accounts here rendered are not of 
buried talents, but of used ability and opportunity. The conquests recited are of mind over 
matter, of cheerful labor directed by thought, not of shrewdness in getting "something for 
nothing," but of honest, earnest endeavor which subdues the earth in the divinely appointed 
way. 

While the plan of the work did not call for minute genealogical research, we have gladly 
made use of such data for filling out family histories as have been furnished us, and in nu- 
merous cases have verified or corrected and extended the same by consultation of standard au- 
thorities. In these pages we have briefly chronicled the life-stories of descendants of some of 
the first settlers of New England, progenitors who have a claim on what a wise speaker has 
termed "a moral and philosophical respect which elevates the character and improves the 
heart " ; passengers in the "Mayflower of a forlorn hope," and others who came in ships that 
closely followed in her wake, as the Fortune, the Lion, the Mary and John ; representa- 
tives, too, of later immigrants to the shores of Massachusetts Bay, imbued with the true 
Pilgrim spirit, together with stanch and progressive compatriots of foreign birth. It has 
seemed worth while to write and to publish these biographies, because, to borrow the words 
of an eloquent speaker, such men and women as are here commemorated "by their industrious 
toil and faithful citizenship have kept sweet the heart of New England civilization." Where- 
fore the book should commend itself as of more than passing interest and fleeting worth, — a 
volume to be prized by children's children. "The great lesson of biography," it has been 
said, " is to show what man can be and do at his best. A noble life put fairly on record acts 
like an inspiration. " 

BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY. 
Boston, December, 1895. 




GEORGE A. ARMS. 



BIOSRAPHIGAL 




tEORGE ALBERT ARMS, 
whose portrait is herewith 
presented, was born in the 
old town of Deerfield, March 
7, 1815. He is of the sixth 
generation born on the old 
homestead since William 
Arms — ancestor of all of 
this name in America — who 
bought it about the year 1695. Christopher 
Tyler Arms, George Albert's father, in his 
younger days wished to follow the sea, and 
for this purpose studied navigation; but, his 
parents wanting him to remain at home, he 
gave up his cherished plan, and became a 
farmer, engaging at the same time in various 
manufactures. He was also a well-known 
surveyor, and was thoroughly familiar with 
all the different boundary lines of the region. 
George Albert's mother was Avice Stebbins, 
daughter of Colonel Joseph Stebbins, of Deer- 
field, who fought at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
History says of him, "He came to the front 
as a patriot leader at the outbreak of the Rev- 
olution, and was able to maintain his posi- 
tion." Avice, his fourth daughter, combined 
strength of character with soundness of judg- 
ment and keenness of humor. 

When a mere child, George showed a taste 
for trade. Often the little fellow might have 
been seen trudging up the street to the busy 
storekeeper of the town to buy molasses. His 
long, thick hair was so strikingly noticeable 



that the aged lawyer of the village said a 
pleasant "Good morning, Buffalo," as he 
passed one day. His clothes were of the 
plainest homespun, but the little " Buffalo " 
knew it not. His mind was intent on a busi- 
ness project; and his small bare feet ran 
faster as he came in sight of the store. Here 
he bought a quart of molasses for twelve and 
a half cents: then, running home, he made it 
into thirty generous sticks of candy. These 
he sold for a penny a stick, thereby netting 
seventeen and a half cents on the quart. 
During summers in his boyhood George 
worked for his father, and winters he attended 
the town school and the Deerfield Academy. 
In 1829, when he was fourteen years old, his 
father decided to make his home in Canada, 
not far from his brother Daniel's. Here, on 
the shore of Brome Lake, we find the family 
struggling with poverty for four long years. 
Their house was a log cabin fourteen feet 
square. The loft where George slept was 
reached by a ladder. There was no lack of 
fresh air, for the wind blew in at the great 
cracks in the roof; and sometimes George 
found the buffalo skin he had spread over him- 
self at night covered in the morning with a 
thick layer of snow. He helped his father in 
logging, in the making of salts, which were 
ultimately converted into pot and pearl ash, 
and in raising crops. Two winters he at- 
tended the Stanstead Academy, and worked 
for his board. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



When eighteen, George returned to Deer- 
field, and that spring worked for his uncle 
Baxter, giving his earnings to his father. 
The following spring he farmed for Lawyer 
Pliny Arms, receiving thirteen dollars a 
month, and saved enough of this money to buy 
him a suit of clothes. The following autumn 
he decided to seek his fortune in Boston. 
Accordingly, we find him dressed in his drab 
home-spun and home-made suit, taking the 
rumbling stage, which passed through Deer- 
field on its way from Albany to Boston. 
Arriving in the city, he had only one dollar 
and twenty-seven cents in his pocket and no 
business. A relative offered him a home 
while he was trying to find a place. It was 
discouraging work, but every morning he 
started out with fresh courage. Finally, at 
the end of a fortnight, he let himself to a 
" dealer in groceries " for twenty-five dollars a 
year and board, with the privilege of accept- 
ing a better offer, should one be received. It 
turned out that this man sold more rum than 
groceries, so that the young clerk was glad to 
accept the position, which was offered four 
months later, of head clerk in a store on 
Chambers Street, with an increase in wages to 
one hundred dollars and board. The next 
year a still better offer was accepted from a 
dealer on Long Wharf. 

Then came the terrible business crisis of 
1837. Clerks were thrown out of employment 
by the thousand, and our clerk among the 
rest. He returned to Deerfield; but, instead 
of waiting idly for work he liked to do, he 
took up farming with a will. It was not long, 
however, before he heard of an opening with 
Benjamin B. Murdock, a general merchant of 
Northfield. He became his clerk on trial and 
afterward his book-keeper, receiving two hun- 
dred and fifty dollars a year. At the end of 
two years he decided to relinquish his posi- 



tion, although his employer offered him an in- 
terest in the business if he would consent to 
remain. Mr. Murdock's methods of doing 
business were not satisfactory to him, and he 
therefore concluded not to become a partner. 
He went to Deerfield; but afterward, at the 
earnest request of Northfield friends, he re- 
turned, and opened a store of general mer- 
chandise. Necessary repairs on the building 
cost him four hundred dollars, leaving him in 
debt one hundred dollars. He at once bought 
his stock in Boston, commanding a credit of 
from four to five thousand dollars' worth of 
goods. By untiring industry and strict econ- 
omy he was able to meet his payments 
promptly. He remained in Northfield ten 
years. Then in 1848, feeling that larger op- 
portunities awaited him elsewhere, he sold 
out, and went to Columbus, Ga. On the way 
an amusing incident occurred. About thirty 
passengers, including Mr. Arms, left the 
boat at Savannah, and took a special train 
for Macon. There was only a single track 
running from the town, and this was laid in 
a most primitive fashion. The passengers on 
board soon found they had left the uncertain 
sea only to be thoroughly shaken, on land. 
One could not attempt to drink a glass of 
water without having the contents shaken over 
one's self and the floor. The company was 
hungry, and Mr. Arms inquired of the con- 
ductor if there was any way of getting food. 
He replied that there was an old planter sev- 
eral miles ahead, and perhaps he would feed 
the travellers. Reaching the planter's house, 
everybody turned out ; and the planter and his 
negroes went to work. In little over an hour 
enough hens for thirty people had been 
caught, killed, picked, and cooked. Negroes 
waited upon the travellers, and brushed the 
flies away. At last, having gained strength 
and good humor, the company paid the planter 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



for his poultry, and continued their journey. 
They had not gone more than half a mile 
when the train came to a sudden standstill. 
"The special" had run into a cotton train 
standing on the track, and the engine was 
disabled. In this predicament there was 
nothing to do but to wait till the train 
hands had "patched" the engine by means of 
sledge hammers and such other tools as were 
at hand. This was travelling in Georgia in 
1848. While, at the South, Mr. Arms came 
face to face with the accursed traffic in human 
beings ; and from that time onward he was 
a stanch Abolitionist and a Republican of 
Republicans, although never an aspirant for 
public office. 

No good opening for business offered, so 
that in the spring of 1849 he went West to 
find a brother whom he had not seen for many 
years. He left Columbus for New Orleans, 
where he took a boat up the Mississippi to 
Evansville on the Ohio. It was at the time 
the cholera was raging throughout the coun- 
try. Many fell sick on the way, and one poor 
fellow died; while twenty-seven deaths had 
occurred on the boat that went up a fortnight 
before. Mr. Arms felt symptoms of the dread 
disease while helping to bury the man who 
had been its victim. He reached Evansville 
in a weakened condition, but with his usual 
determination he continued his journey in 
stages until its object was accomplished. 
The return to New England with his brother 
and family was made in a huge, covered 
wagon, provided with stove, cooking utensils, 
bedding, and other supplies, a full descrip- 
tion of which would be a story in itself. 

Mr. Arms' s next business venture was at 
Bellows Falls, Vt., where he hired a store, 
which he .stocked with men's clothing, hats, 
caps, boots, and shoes, and, after a profitable 
trade of one year, united with Norman Farr, 



who kept general merchandise. The firm also 
engaged in the merchant tailoring business 
and the manufacture of ready-made clothing. 
At the end of three years he sold to his part- 
ner at a bargain, and started for Canada West, 
where a brother was employed in building 
bridges on the Coburg & Peterboro Railroad. 
During the spring of 1854 he assisted in the 
work of straightening a bridge which extended 
across Rice Lake, a distance of three miles, 
interrupted only by a small island near the 
centre. A portion of the bridge had been 
thrown over toward the island by the melting 
of the ice in the spring, the winter having 
been so severe that the ice around the piles 
was three feet deep. This work completed, 
and the plan for building stations along the 
Coburg & Peterboro Road failing, Mr. Arms 
engaged in stock-raising and farming in Deer- 
field for a year and a half. About the year 
1855 he went to Ohio, and became interested 
in coal mining, previous to the completion of 
the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad. He car- 
ried on a successful business until obliged to 
come East. 

In March, 1859, while looking for a place 
in which to again enter mercantile life, he 
came to Greenfield, and purchased the stock of 
Messrs. Wells & Smead, general merchants. 
Here he soon developed an extensive trade in 
agricultural implements, seeds, and fertilizers, 
which he purchased direct, and disposed of in 
large quantities. He became the agent of 
Franklin County for the Waters Scythe, and 
in one year alone took orders for seven hun- 
dred dozen. He also secured the agency for 
the Granite State Mowing-machine, the lead- 
ing machine of that time and this, and of 
Enoch Coe's Phosphates. Early and late he 
worked, driving through all the towns of the 
county, and taking orders of the storekeepers 
and farmers. Later he added the coal busi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ness to his own, and, being already familiar 
with its details, carried the two on success- 
fully for a number of years. There were many 
discouragements, many unexpected failures, 
and consequent heavy losses; but, in spite of 
these, he met his payments promptly, won 
confidence, and commanded a good credit. 
After conducting a profitable business for a 
period of twenty-two years, he sold out in 
1882 to his two clerks, John Sheldon (his son- 
in-law) and Eugene Newcomb. 

Mr. Arms has been twice married. His first 
wife, whom he wedded in 1844, was Eunice S. 
Moody, of Northfield. She became the 
mother of three children: Ellen L. ; Jennie 
M. ; and George L., who died in infancy. 
Ellen L., wife of John Sheldon, of Deerfield 
and Greenfield, has three children — two 
sons, both in business in the latter place, 
and one daughter, pursuing the study of 
languages in Paris. The second daughter, 
Jennie Maria, has been a teacher of natural 
science in Boston the past sixteen years. 
After the death of his wife in Ohio he re- 
turned East, and in 1859 married Mrs. Fran- 
ces W. Childs, daughter of John F. Stearns, 
of Dummerston, Vt. 

About the year 1876 Mr. Arms erected a 
handsome brick block for stores and offices, 
and in 1893 another — Columbus Block. He 
also owns three other blocks of stores and 
valuable resident property in Greenfield, be- 
sides the historic "Arms's Corner" in Old 
Deerfield. He is a Trustee of the Greenfield 
Savings Bank, of which he was one of the 
organizers. He has also been a Director of 
the successful Miller's Falls Manufacturing 
Company since its start. Mr. Arms's life is 
a practical illustration of the truth of his 
words of advice to the young: "If any young 
man or woman of average capacity is honest, 
industrious, persevering, and economical, he 



or she will succeed; for honesty and economy 
command capital, and are the foundation of 

success." 




lEVI GARDNER stands in the front 
rank among the prominent and pros- 
perous business men that are iden- 
tified with the industrial interests of Ash- 
field, which is the place of his nativity, his 
birth having occurred here, June 12, 1821. 
His father, Jacob Gardner, was born in Plain- 
field, Hampshire County, Mass., and. there 
grew to manhood. He had natural mechanical 
ability, and learned the millwright's trade. 
He spent part of his life in Goshen, where he 
thrived for a time, and later engaged in busi- 
ness in Ashfield, running a grist-mill for 
many years. He also devoted some of his 
time to mechanical pursuits, and did a great 
deal of work in repairing mills and machinery 
in different localities. He died at the age 
of threescore and five. Jacob Gardner was a 
valued member of the Democratic party. In 
his religious beliefs he was liberal, interpret- 
ing the gospel according to the light of reason. 
He married Hannah Cook, who died in the 
fifty-sixth year of her age, leaving the follow- 
ing children : Bela, Elisha, Andrew, Nelson, 
Caroline, Reuben, and Levi. 

Levi Gardner became early accustomed to 
hard work, being put out on a farm to live 
until fifteen years old, when he returned to 
the parental roof, and for the following four 
years assisted his father, becoming an expert 
in milling and mechanical arts. He subse- 
quently went into business at Goshen with 
Samuel Ranney as a manufacturer of wood- 
work, such as broom handles and wood for 
baby carriages, the partnership continuing 
eight years. Mr. Gardner then sold his 
interest, and in company with his brother 
Elisha bought standing timber and a saw-mill 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



13 



at West Cummington. For six years they 
engaged in the manufacture and sale of lum- 
ber, working up a large trade therein. Then, 
selling out his share of the property, Mr. 
Gardner removed to Ashfield, where he and his 
brother Nelson bought a saw-mill and shop, 
and began the manufacture of wooden ware of 
various kinds, and also did a great deal of cus- 
tom sawing. In 1871, selling out to Mr. 
Flower, he purchased an interest in a saw-mill 
at South Ashfield with John Sprague, who 
soon after disposed of his share of the property 
to Mr. Gardner's son, Jacob S. Gardner. The 
latter has since been an equal partner with his 
father, the firm being one of the leading manu- 
facturing firms in the vicinity. Under their 
management the mill capacity has been greatly 
enlarged, new machinery has been put in, and 
they are carrying on an eminently successful 
business in sawing, planing, making shingles 
and laths, and doing custom sawing of all 
kinds. Like all business men, they have met 
with losses, one of the most serious having oc- 
curred April 23, 1895, when their large and 
well-equipped drying-house was burned to the 
ground. Through close application to busi- 
ness Mr. Gardner has accumulated a compe- 
tency, and besides his mill property owns a 
good house and lot of two acres of choice land 
in South Ashfield. 

Mr. Gardner was united in marriage in 1844 
to Miss Marvilla Selden, who was born in 
1823, and died in 1888, after a happy wedded 
life of more than twoscore years, leaving one 
son, Jacob S. , now in partnership with his 
father, as before mentioned. 

In politics Mr. Gardner has the courage of 
his convictions, and votes independent of party 
lines. He represented his constituents in the 
legislature in 1871 ; and during his residence 
in Ashfield he has ever evinced a warm inter- 
est in local progress and improvement, serving 



acceptably in the various town offices. He is 
at present Treasurer and Director of the Ash- 
field Mutual Fire Insurance Company. In 
religion, as in other matters, he is broad and 
liberal in his views. 




LONZO M. RICE, Treasurer and 
Business Manager of the Arms Manu- 
facturing Company, South Deer- 
field, Mass., was born at Conway, May 22, 
1846. His father, Daniel Rice, was a native 
of Hawley and the son of Daniel Rice, Sr. , 
also of that town, who was a farmer and lived 
to the age of ninety years. Daniel Rice re- 
sided with his parents upon the ancestral farm 
until becoming of age, when he left home, 
and going to Conway worked for a time in the 
tool manufactory of that town, later moving to 
Greenfield, where he, in company with others, 
laid out the street which is now known as 
Conway Street, and was also interested in the 
Greenfield Tool Company. From Greenfield 
he removed to Springfield, where he became a 
master builder, being at the present time well 
known in connection with that business. He 
married Fanny D., daughter of Williams and 
Zilpah Toby, residents of Conway, and had 
two children, as follows: Alice, wife of 
Arthur Burt, of Springfield; and Alonzo M. 
The mother died at the age of thirty-three 
years, having been a member of the Second 
Congregational Church, Greenfield, of which 
her surviving husband is also a member. 
Alonzo M. Rice passed his childhood in Con- 
way and Greenfield, commencing in the latter 
place his education, which he completed at 
Burrett's English Classical Institute in 
Springfield, and at the age of eighteen en- 
■ listed for ten months' service in the Civil War. 
After the expiration of his term of enlistment 
he was discharged at Boston, and, subse- 



14 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



quently returning to Springfield, he pursued a 
course at Burnham's Business College. In 
1867 he came to Deerfield as book-keeper for 
the late Charles Arms, then proprietor of the 
Arms Pocket-book Manufactory; but, after 
spending a year in that position, he again re- 
turned to Springfield and was book-keeper for 
Rice, Wight & Co., with whom he remained 
ten months. Once more entering the emplo)' 
of Mr. Arms, he continued with him as book- 
keeper for fifteen years; and then he became 
travelling salesman. On the incorporation 
of the stock company after the death of Mr. 
Arms, he was tendered the position of treas- 
urer and general manager, which he has occu- 
pied since 1888. This company are extensive 
manufacturers of all kinds of Russia seal and 
Turkey morocco pocket-books, calf and sheep 
wallets, bill books, card and letter cases, these 
goods being disposed of throughout the en- 
tire country. The enterprise of the con- 
cern increases rather than decreases by age, 
and Mr. Rice's energy and business ability 
have largely been the means of maintaining 
the company's extensive business and keeping 
their products up to the usual high standard 
of excellence. 

In 1869 Mr. Rice wedded Marie A. Arms, 
daughter of William S. Arms, of Springfield, 
she having been her father's only child by his 
first marriage. Mr. and ' Mrs. Rice have two 
children: Mabel A., who is now attending 
school in Greenfield; and Edward A., who 
resides at home. Mr. Rice is a Republican 
in politics, but not an aspirant for office, pre- 
ferring to devote his leisure time to objects of 
philanthropy, and has been a Trustee of the 
Smith Charities one year. He is a member of 
the Knights of Honor; and both himself and 
wife attend the Congregational church, of 
which he is a Deacon. He was for many 
years superintendent of the Sunday-school, 



in which Mrs. Rice is a teacher; and he still 
holds the office of church treasurer. 




RASTUS SPEAR, who is living retired 
'! from the active pursuits of life, is one 
of the highly esteemed and respected 
citizens of the town of Orange, where the 
major part of his life has been passed, his 
birth having occurred in this town, May 5, 
1836, at the home of his parents, Isaac and 
Laura (Haskins) Spear. His grandfather, 
Silas Spear, was an early settler of this place, 
removing from Medway to Franklin County, 
and here buying a farm, which he improved 
and developed to a high state of culture. He 
was a man of excellent principles and judg- 
ment, in course of time amassing considerable 
property. He lived to the advanced age of 
fourscore years. On attaining his majority he 
became identified with the Whig party, and on 
the formation of the Republican party became 
a stanch defender of its principles. He mar- 
ried Rebecca Thayer, who bore him eleven 
children; namely, Eliza, Mary, Isaac, Silas, 
Caleb, Erastus, Abigail, John, Lucinda, 
Henry, and Susan. 

Isaac Spear was a native of Orange, born on 
the family homestead, on which he worked 
with diligence until reaching man's estate, 
when he commenced making shingles by hand, 
the best, if not the only, way then known. 
Subsequently becoming proficient in the black- 
smith's trade he removed to Wendell, where 
he worked several years. Returning to the 
place of his birch, he bought the blacksmith- 
shop now owned by his son, and worked at 
his chosen occupation as long as his health 
would permit, retiring from business some 
time before his decease. He lived to be four- 
score and two. His first wife, who passed to 
the better land in the sixtieth year of her age, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



IS 



was Laura Haskins, a daughter of Nathan 
Haskins. She bore him six children ; namely, 
Wilson, Erastus, Frank, James, Luther F., 
and Isaac. After her death he married Mrs. 
Eliza Johnson, who was related to the Haskins 
family. In politics Isaac Spear was a sound 
Republican. 

Erastus Spear received the educational 
privileges granted by the district schools of 
his native town. When a young man he 
learned the blacksmith's trade of his father; 
and, with the exception of three years spent in 
manufacturing brick at Athol, he has worked 
at the forge, adding to that the business of a 
wagon-maker, his plant being still located on 
East Water Street, as in his father's days. 
In 1893 Mr. Spear retired from active work, 
having accumulated through diligent applica- 
tion and the exercise of excellent business 
judgment a competency. He has dealt to 
some extent in real estate, and is now the 
owner of four dwellings in Orange and of a 
portion of the old homestead of his parents. 
Politically, Mr. Spear has followed the faith 
of his ancestors, espousing the cause of the 
Republican party. Socially, he is a member 
of the Orange Lodge of Red Men. 

When twenty years old Mr. Spear was 
united in wedlock with Miss Elsie D. Ellis, a 
native of New Salem, the daughter of Artemas 
and Lucy Ellis. Mr. Ellis was a prosperous 
farmer, and also worked at the trade of a stone 
mason. He lived to the advanced age of 
seventy-seven years. His wife died at the 
age of threescore and three. They were the 
parents of six children: Henry, Mary A., 
Franklin A. Ellis, M.D., L. Angelina, Sarah 
J., and Elsie D. Although the wedded path- 
way of Mr. and Mrs. Spear has been usually 
bright and cheery, one great sorrow has been 
theirs, their first child, Leslie E., born June 
15, 1858, having died of heart disease in 



March, 1895. He was a mechanic by trade, 
a man of most exemplary habits and of high 
moral principles, being everywhere respected 
and beloved for his many fine qualities. He 
married Stella M. Bridges; and they had one 
child, Clara L. Mr. and Mrs. Spear have 
one other child, Clara J., born May 16, 1864, 
who married Arthur Bridges, of Orange, a 
railway conductor, and is the mother of one 
child, Edith J. Bridges. 



W" 



ILLIAM A. FORBES, a prominent 
dry-goods merchant of Greenfield, 
Mass., and one of the oldest busi- 
ness men of the town, was born at Buckland, 
in the western part of Franklin County, on 
May 13, 1836. His father. Captain William 
Forbes, was born at Buckland in 1802, his 
grandfather, Edward Forbes, who originally 
came from Bridgewater, Plymouth County, - 
having settled there in 1785. 

Edward Forbes was a volunteer soldier in 
the American Revolution, serving throughout 
the entire struggle for independence; and, 
while occupying a responsible position on 
board a man-of-war, he received a serious 
wound, which injured him for life. He was 
a highly intelligent and well-educated man, 
being a thoroughly competent surveyor, and 
used to teach a class in mathematics at his 
home during the winter season, together with 
penmanship, in which he also excelled. He 
was a pioneer in the Methodist faith, the first 
religious services of that denomination in the 
locality having been held in his barn ; and 
the famous preacher, Lorenzo Dow, often found 
a resting-place in front of his fireside. Mr. 
Edward Forbes was the first to rebel against 
the church tax, and stood forth strong and un- 
flinching in defending his religious belief. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Eunice 



i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Amsden, and who was a native of Deerfield, 
belonging to a prominent family, was brought 
up in Conway. 

They had two sons and one daughter, the 
first-born, Abner, who entered Williams Col- 
lege in 1^12, from which he was graduated 
after having pursued the regular course, be- 
came a prominent educator at Boston. Al- 
though a Garrisonian, he believed in educating 
the African race separately, and had charge 
of the colored school. He also conducted a 
large printing establishment, figuring as an 
editor and publisher, and enjoyed the reputa- 
tion of being an interesting writer under the 
nom de plume of Senex. He was a decidedly 
marked character of his day, and a famous re- 
lator of stories and anecdotes. He died at 
Conway in 1878, aged eighty-seven years; and 
his remains were laid to rest in Buckland. 
His son, Frank Forbes, was a Director of the 
Hoosac Tunnel, is now, and has been for the 
past forty years, a reporter of the State Senate, 
and is prominent in Boston as a journalist. 
During the Civil War he was in charge of 
railroads under General Haupt, and ranked as 
Colonel. 

Sarah, the second child of Edward Forbes, 
was a talented lady and a successful teacher. 
She became the wife of the Rev. Robert Trav- 
ers, of New York City, a Methodist clergyman, 
who was one of the first preachers of that 
denomination at Buckland; and they had two 
sons, Robert and Edward, the former an Epis- 
copal clergyman and the latter a lawyer. Cap 
tain William Forbes was a well-to-do farmer, 
having inherited the farm which his father, 
Edward, had cleared and improved. His 
death occurred in 1840, in the same house in 
which he was born thirty-eight years before, 
and where he had passed his entire life. It 
was made from hewed timber, even to the 
rafters, and was destroyed by fire in Novem- 



ber, 1 89 1, after having stood over one hundred 
years. The ancestral farm, which consists of 
seventy acres, is now owned by Caleb E. 
Forbes. His widow, Eunice Sherman Forbes, 
who still survives, was born at Conway, April 
19, 1808. She is the youngest and only sur- 
vivor of eleven children, and comes of a long- 
lived race, being at the present time remarka- 
bly bright and active, although fast approach- 
ing her nineties. She resides at Conway with 
her daughter, Minerva A., wife of Carlos 
Bachelder. Of her five children, one died an 
infant, and the others are: Sarah H., wife of 
Lafayette Anderson, a farmer of Nebraska; 
Minerva A.; Caleb E., of Greenfield; and 
William A., of this sketch. 

William A. Forbes was reared to farm life, 
and in his boyhood attended the district 
schools. He later pursued courses of study at 
the Conway Academy and the Williston Semi- 
nary at Easthampton, and at the age of six- 
teen years became a clerk for John Wells & 
Co. of the latter place, later filling a like 
position in Westfield. In i860 he came to 
Greenfield, where he entered the employ of 
T. D. Root, a dry-goods merchant, and, after 
remaining as clerk for a period of seven years, 
became a partner in the -business. On the 
death of the senior partner in 1871, Mr. 
Forbes succeeded to the business, having asso- 
ciated with him Mr. W. F. Root; but after 
three years of prosperity he retired from the 
firm and established himself alone in the same 
business, since which time he has conducted 
a most profitable trade, being at present one 
of the oldest business men in town. 

On March 17, 1863, he wedded Miss Eliza 
Prentiss, daughter of Jarvis and Mary (Wells) 
Prentiss, of Greenfield, the former having died 
in 1844, aged about forty years, leaving a 
widow and two children. Mrs. Prentiss, now 
aged eighty-eight years, resides with her 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



17 



daughter, Mrs. Forbes. Mr. and Mrs. Forbes 
have but one son, Frank P., who is now in 
business with his father. He married Miss 
Kate Talbot, of New York City, and has three 
sons, namely: Talbot; Leonard; and William 
A., who is yet an infant. 

Mr. Forbes is a Director of both the Pack- 
ard and Conway National Banks, Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Greenfield Savings Bank, of which 
he is also chairman of the Financial Commit- 
tee, and is a Director of the Greenfield Gas 
Company. He is a Democrat in politics, and 
was elected a representative to the legislature 
in 1883 from a Republican district. He is a 
Master Mason and a thoroughly successful 
business man. Mr. Forbes and his son reside 
respectively at 44 and 46 Ferel Street, 
Greenfield. 




»RS. NANCY D. GALE, a highly 
respected resident of Heath, widow 
of the late Daniel Gale, was born 
in the town of Rowe, and is the daughter 
of Joseph S. and Sarah (Angel) Dodge. 
Her father was a son of Joshua and Rhoda 
(Smith) Dodge, the former a native of Bev- 
erly, Mass., and a cooper by trade, who set- 
tled when a young man at Brimfield. Later 
he conducted a saw-mill and grist-mill at 
Whitingham, also owning a farm ; and finally 
he sold his property there, and purchased a 
farm in the township of Rowe. He died 
in the latter place at the age of eighty-three. 
His first wife, who died at the age of fifty 
years, bore him two children : Joseph and 
Rhoda. His second wife, who was Mrs. Sally 
(Langdon) Cheney, died at the age of ninety- 
three years. Joshua Dodge was a Whig in 
politics. In his religious views he was a Uni- 
tarian. Joseph S. Dodge, Mrs. Gale's father, 
whose birth occurred at Rowe, June 19, 1794, 
resided on the old homestead during his active 



life, and spent the last years with his sons in 
Illinois, where he died at the age of sixty- 
seven years. He was married March 2, 181 5, 
to Miss Sarah Angel, who was born July 16, 
1796. She was called to her final rest May 
31, 1893. Joseph Dodge and his wife were 
the parents of the following children : Rhoda, 
Nancy, Sarah, Sarah J., John A., Eliza D., 
Joseph P., Ellen M., George C, and Mary F. 
Nancy Dodge was united in marriage on 
May 24, 1843, to Daniel Gale, whose birth 
occurred at Heath on May 26, 1816. He was 
the son of Luther and Sally (Spooner) Gale, 
a more extended account of whose ancestors 
may be found in an article relative to the 
career of D. J. Gale, which appears elsewhere 
in this work. Daniel Gale resided with his 
parents until reaching manhood. He pur- 
chased a small farm upon the banks of the 
Connecticut River, in the vicinity of Spring- 
field, which he cultivated for a period of ten 
years, and then moved to the town of Rowe, 
where he bought one hundred acres of land, 
upon which he resided the following seven 
years. He then sold that property for the 
purpose of buying another farm in the same 
town; and, after residing thereon six years, 
he removed to Dell, in the town of Heath, 
where he settled upon the estate which his 
widow now occupies. This farm, which con- 
sists of one hundred and twenty-five acres of 
valuable land, was known as the Deacon Smith 
homestead for a period of seventy years. The 
residence was erected by Colonel Snow; and 
upon acquiring possession Mr. Gale built a 
carriage-house, and made other important 
improvements. Daniel Gale was a public- 
spirited man, and attained a position of promi- 
nence in the town government, serving as a 
Selectman, Assessor, School Commissioner, 
and Justice of the Peace; and he represented 
his district in the legislature during the season 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of 1869. He was a Unitarian in his religious 
views, and Mrs. Gale also adheres to that 
liberal religious faith. 



-AMES L. FARR, a farmer of Green- 
field, was born in Windham, Vt., De- 
cember 7, 1831, son of Micah and Sally 
(Stearns) Farr. His grandfather, Joseph 
Farr, who was a native of New Hampshire, 
followed the profession of a school teacher for 
a number of years, but later in life became a 
farmer. He died at Windham when forty- 
nine years of age, leaving a wife, who lived 
to a good old age. They were members of 
an Orthodox church, and in politics he was a 
Whig. They had nine children who grew up, 
only one of whom is now living, Iva N. Farr, 
residing in Westminster, Vt. 

Micah Farr, son of Joseph, was born in 
Chesterfield, N. H., in March of the year 1800. 
He passed his boyhood days and early manhood 
in New Hampshire, but spent his maturer 
years in Windham, Vt., where he owned and 
worked a farm. He took an active interest in 
the affairs of the town and at various times 
held public offices. In his religious views he 
was liberal, and was an attendant of the Con- 
gregational church. He died at the age of 
sixty-one; and his wife, Sally (Stearns) Farr, 
born in Windham, Vt., in November, 1799, 
died at seventy-nine years of age. They had 
six children, four of whom grew to maturity; 
and three are now living. Martha died in 
1 861, thirty-one years of age; Almon died 
when a little over four years of age; Alfred, 
when not quite two years of age; James L. 
Farr is the eldest of those now living; George 
A. Farr now resides in Chester, Vt. ; Sarah 
E. became the wife of R. W. Carpenter, and 
they reside in Westminster, Vt. 

James L. Farr spent the early years of his 



life in Windham, Vt. , where he received his 
early education in the public schools. Until 
twenty-one years of age he lived at home, but 
then began farming for himself, purchasing 
one hundred acres of land in Windham, the 
first piece of property he ever owned, on which 
he lived for two years. After farming in his 
native town for nine years, he sold his place 
there, and, moving to Westminster, there 
bought a farm, on which he resided about two 
years; but, again selling out, he went to Graf- 
ton, Vt. , and bought another farm, on which he 
lived two years. Selling this farm he re- 
turned to Windham,' where he purchased a 
place on which he lived six years. From 
Windham he removed to South Vernon, Vt. , 
where he rented land for three years, and then, 
in 1876, he moved to Greenfield; and, after 
renting land for seven years, in 1883 he 
bought the place where he now resides. Hav- 
ing disposed of his farm, he has in view the 
erection of a fine residence at no distant day. 

He was married in 1856 to Mary H. Stiles, 
of Grafton, Vt. She died in October, 1871 ; 
and in May, 1873, he married Mrs. Julia 
(Dunklee) Banks, of Sunderland, Mass. Mr. 
Farr had two children by his first wife, and 
is the father of one by the present Mrs. Farr. 
Mary A., daughter of the first wife, died at 
the age of fourteen years. Myron J. Farr, his 
only son, a lumber dealer, resides in Green- 
field. Vinnie M., the daughter by the second 
marriage, lives at home. 

Mr. Farr and his wife are both members 
of the Congregational church, and in politics 
he is a Republican. While in Windham he 
served two years in the capacity of Assessor, 
and since coming to Greenfield has taken an 
active interest in all movements pertaining to 
the welfare of the town. Mr. Farr has re- 
tired from the hard work and active pursuits 
of the morning of life, and is spending the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



19 



afternoon of his days in the enjoyment of the 
fruits of his labors. 



[AMES W. ADAMS, an extensive agri- 
culturist and an active dealer in real 
estate, residing in the town of Orange, 
was born January i, 1828, in New Salem, 
Franklin County, and is a son of Samuel and 
Arethusa (Whitney) Adams. His grandpar- 
ents, Amos and Lydia (Adams) Adams, lo- 
cated in New Salem in 1795. 

Of this branch of the Adams family the 
immigrant ancestor was John Adams, who set- 
tled in Cambridge, Mass., about 1650, and 
died there in 1706. He was a millwright by 
occupation and quite a well-to-do man. He 
left six children, namely: Rebecca, born in 
England; Mary; John; Joseph; Hannah; and 
Daniel. Joseph, the second son, born in 
Cambridge in 1657, died in 1701, He was a 
farmer, and after his marriage with Margaret 
Eames bought a farm in West Cambridge, 
where they reared their five children : Joseph, 
Daniel, Cherry, John, and Abigail. Their son 
Joseph, the second of that name, was born in 
West Cambridge in 1688, and died in 1774. 
He was a prosperous farmer and a man of in- 
fluence, being active in politics and holding 
many of the town offices. He married for 
his first wife Rebecca Cutter; and they reared 
three children : Thomas, Joseph, third, and 
Margaret. Joseph Adams, third, was born in 
Cambridge, July 3, 1715, and died May 3, 
1794. He was a thrifty agriculturist and one 
of the largest land-owners of his native town. 
He was Deacon of the church in Menotomy, 
now Arlington, and Selectman four years. 
The maiden name of his wife was Hannah 
Hall. She bore him ten children, as follows: 
Thomas, Rebecca, Susanna, Mary, Nathan, 
Joel, Amos, Daniel, Abigail, and Ann. 



Amos Adams, the paternal grandfather of 
James W., of whom we write, was born 
August 23, 1765, twin with Joel, and lived in 
Cambridge the first thirty years of his exist- 
ence. Removing then to Franklin County he 
purchased two hundred acres of wild land in 
the town of New Salem ; and this he partially 
cleared and placed under cultivation, further 
improving it by the erection of substantial 
buildings. He was highly respected as a man 
and as a citizen, being among the foremost in 
political matters. He was also an active 
worker in religious circles, being Deacon of 
the Congregational church. He lived to 
the ripe age of seventy-eight years. His good 
wife survived him, attaining the age of eighty- 
six years. They reared a large family of chil- 
dren ; namely, George, Amos, Samuel, James 
M., Nancy, Lydia, Hannah, Betsey, and 
Maria. 

Samuel Adams, the third son of Amos, was 
born on the paternal homestead at New Salem, 
September 25, 1805, and was reared to farm- 
ing pursuits. He inherited the farm from his 
father; but he subsequently sold a part, pur- 
chasing another adjoining, on which he made 
many improvements, and carried on lumbering 
in addition to tilling the soil, becoming one 
of the leading business men of the town. In 
him the Republican party found one of its 
most faithful adherents, and he filled satisfac- 
torily the offices of Assessor and Selectman for 
several years. He was, likewise, one of the 
Directors of the Springfield & Athol Railway 
Company, holding the office until his death, 
October 30, 1871. His wife, who bore him 
three children — James W. , Lydia A., and 
Sarah E. — lived to the advanced age of 
eighty-two years. 

James W. Adams completed his school life 
at the New Salem Academy, and when ready 
to establish himself in life assumed charge of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the home farm, which he managed successfully 
for two years. Following the star of empire 
westward, in 1857 Mr. Adams went to Michi- 
gan, settling in Deerfield, Lenawee County, 
where he bought a farm, on which he lived six 
years. He then enlisted in the Eighth Mich- 
igan Infantry for three years as a musician, 
playing the B-flat cornet, and at the expiration 
of six months was discharged by general orders, 
along with a large number of bands, from the 
army. He then came East on a visit, and 
while here engaged with J. Wiley at Cooley- 
ville in the manufacture of palm-leaf hats and 
in general mercantile business. He manufact- 
ured hats for two years at Prescott, making 
them on contract for other parties ; and in the 
succeeding three years he was engaged in 
mercantile business at Bond's Village, in the 
town of Palmer, Hampden County. Return- 
ing then to his native county, Mr. Adams 
bought the W. ReynoMs farm, containing 
fifty-three acres of choice land, finely located, 
south of Orange; and here in 1886 he erected 
a commodious brick residence and two con- 
veniently arranged barns, and has carried on 
general agriculture with excellent success. 
As a dealer in real estate he has exhibited 
energy and enterprise, having laid out fourteen 
acres in village lots, many of which he has 
sold. He has also built several houses, some 
twenty-three in all; and of this number he 
has but seven now remaining, they having met 
with a ready sale. Mr. Adams is the posses- 
sor of five hundred acres of land in New 
Salem, including the original homestead prop- 
erty of his paternal grandfather. 

On Thanksgiving Day in November, 1848, 
Mr. Adams was united in marriage with E. 
Augusta Cleveland, who was born at Rutland, 
Mass., March 18, 1826, a daughter of Shubael 
and Abigail (Jewell) Cleveland, the former a 
well-known shoemaker. Mrs. Adams passed 



to the spirit world June 17, 1871, leaving 
seven children, namely: Emma P., born Au- 
gust 3, 1849; John C, born January 15, 
185s; Walter ]., born June 16, 1859, who 
married May Clark, and is the father of two 
children — Elmer and Marjory; James S. , 
born June 13, 1863, who married Lulu Bas- 
sett, and has three children — Vera M., Lu- 
cinda L, and Emma A. ; Albert J. and 
Arethusa W., twins, born October 4, 1869; 
and Abbie A., born April 28, 1871. After 
the death of his first wife Mr. Adams married 
Miss Emily Jilson, who was born in Rich- 
mond, N. H., March 5, 1842. She is a most 
estimable woman and a home-keeper in the 
truest sense of the word. 

Politically, Mr. Adams is a stanch Repub- 
lican. He has served with credit in many of 
the town offices, having been Selectman, 
Assessor, and a member of the School Com- 
mittee. Socially, he is prominent in Grand 
Army of the Republic circles, belonging to 
Orange Post, No. 17; and he is also an active 
member of Orange Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 



"IjVpjATTHEW CHAPMAN, a retired 
1=1=/ manufacturer of Greenfield, Mass., 
<A -L V was born in Sterlingshire, Scot- 
land, September 10, 1814. His father, Jo- 
seph Chapman, a manufacturer of garden uten- 
sils and cutlery, was a native of Yorkshire, 
England, born in the vicinity of the famous 
cutlery manufacturing city — Sheffield. He 
removed to Scotland, where he engaged in 
business, and subsequently married Margaret 
Baird, a farmer's daughter, their union being 
celebrated in the year 1788. They raised a 
family of eight children, all of whom eventu- 
ally presided over families of their own. 

Matthew Chapman, who was one of three 
brothers, received a practical education in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



common English branches of study, and ac- 
quired his father's, trade, after which he left 
home, being naturally attracted to Sheffield, 
where he worked for some time, gaining much 
knowledge and experience relative to the art 
of manufacturing fine cutlery. In 1841 he 
crossed the Atlantic, arriving at New York on 
August 12, 1 84 1, after a passage of five weeks 
and two days upon an American vessel named 
the "Stephen Whitney," which was com- 
manded by Captain Popham, a son of the Rev- 
olutionary soldier. General Popham. 

Mr. Chapman started in the world without 
any great amount of cash capital, but, being 
an expert workman at his trade, he was able 
to command good wages, and came to this 
country provided with means sufficient to de- 
fray the cost of his return passage, in case he 
should find himself unfavorably impressed 
with the United States and dissatisfied to re- 
main here; but, although he has since made 
several visits to the old country, he has never 
had the desire to reside there permanently. 
He originally intended to locate at Pittsburg, 
Pa., where his cousin lived; but, meeting in 
New York Nathaniel Russell, a brother of 
John Russell of the well-known cutlery com- 
pany, after an interview of some length he 
decided to enter the employ of that concern, 
which was then conducting a comparatively 
small business. He commenced by doing 
piece work; and, being a strong, active man, 
skilled in his trade, he became of great value 
to the Russells, and soon received a salary of 
one thousand dollars per year. During the 
long period of business prosperity enjoyed by 
the Russell Company he was advanced from 
time to time to higher positions of responsi- 
bility and trust, each step being seasoned with 
a further recognition of his services and 
worth, until he at length received a salary 
of twenty-five thousand dollars per annum. 



Aside from his duties with the Russells, he 
established a factory for the manufacturing of 
edged tools and fine table cutlery of a superior 
quality, in which he employed twenty men, 
the products finding a ready sale throughout 
the United States; and during the past thirty 
years he has perfected and received patents 
upon thirteen valuable improvements. 

On July 26, 1845, Mr. Chapman married 
his first wife, whose maiden name was Eliza- 
beth Gaines, and who was born in Guilford, 
Vt., daughter of Samuel and Martha (Ather- 
ton) Gaines. Their union was blessed with 
four children, as follows: Jeannie, who mar- 
ried Charles Lord, of Kennebunk, Me., and 
died, together with an infant son, on February 
9, 1868, aged twenty-two years; Francis Rus- 
sell Chapman, who resides in Boston, having 
a wife and two daughters — Jennie L. and 
May H.; William M., who is a travelling 
man; and Lizzie Baird, wife of Walter Newell 
Snow, a bank official in Greenfield, who has 
one child — Galen Snow. After thirty-five 
years of wedlock Mr. Chapman was called to 
mourn the loss of his wife, Elizabeth, who 
died on July 26, 1880, at the age of fifty-eight 
years; and ten years later, on December 21, 
1890, he married for his second wife Miss 
Sarah J. Chapin, also of Guilford, Vt., daugh- 
ter of Nathan P. and Abigail (Hubbard) 
Chapin, her parents being now deceased. 
Her father was Justice of the Peace over fifty 
years, and during that time ofificiated at the 
union of more than two hundred couples, in- 
cluding that of Mr. Chapman with his first 
wife. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman reside at 161 
Main Street, where the former has lived for 
over forty years; and in his retirement he now 
has leisure to indulge his taste for books and 
reading, which, in common with so many of 
his countrymen, he possesses in a marked de- 
gree. Mr. Chapman was formerly a Director 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the Turner's Falls Bank, and has been a 
Trustee of the Greenfield Bank since its or- 
ganization. He has advanced in Masonry to 
the Knight Templar degree, or Commandery, 
having been a member of the craft for more 
than forty years. He voted with the Free 
Soilers for Martin Van Buren in 1849, but has 
been a Republican in politics since the forma- 
tion of that party, and, although not an aspir- 
ant for office, was a candidate for Representa- 
tive to the legislature in a very closely 
contested election, which resulted in the 
counting in of his Democratic opponent. His 
life has been one of useful and honorable ac- 
tivity and thoroughly successful, much of the 
prosperity of the Russell Company having 
been diie to his skill and energy. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chapman are members of the Congrega- 
tional church, and he has for many years been 
active in Sunday-school work. 




I D WARD WRIGHT, a successful and 
highly intelligent farmer of Rqwe, 
Franklin County, was born in Wind- 
sor, Mass., October 11, 1840, son of Philo 
and Harriet (Wells) Wright. His grand- 
father, Aschel Wright, who was a native of 
Connecticut, removed to Windsor, Mass., 
where he became the owner of several hundred 
acres of land, owning at one time the whole 
of Windsor Hill, Berkshire County. In polit- 
ical matters he supported the Whig party. 
He was a man of enterprise and public spirit, 
and served in several prominent town offices. 
His children were: Worthington, Aschel, 
Uriel, Erastus, Clark, Julius, Mary, Philo, 
and Maria. 

Philo Wright was born in Windsor, Mass. 
He became the owner of a portion of the old 
home farm, which he cultivated with success, 
but afterward sold it, and removed to West 



Cummington, where in 1865 he purchased- a 
home and retired from business. He was a 
Whig until the formation of the Republican 
party, whose ranks- he then joined. He ren- 
dered acceptable service as Town Clerk sev- 
eral years and also as Trial Justice. His 
wife, Harriet Wells Wright, bore him eight 
children : Harriet, Clark, Julia, Jane, Julia 
A., Henry C, Edward, and Martha. 

Edward Wright remained with his parents 
until twenty-one years of age, when he secured 
a position in Hudson, Mass., as clerk in a 
general store, where he remained until he 
came to Rowe. In this place he purchased 
the Dr. Gould farm, which contains one hun- 
dred and twelve acres of land ; and he has 
since successfully engaged in general farming, 
stock-raising, and dairying. On March 19, 
1862, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Hannah Gould, daughter of Dr. Humphrey 
and Electa (Haynes) Gould. Dr. Gould, who 
was a very successful physician, was born in 
Topsfield, Mass. He was educated at Will- 
iams College, and began the practice of his 
profession in Danvers, Mass., but soon after 
removed to Rowe, where he entered into part- 
nership with Dr. Haynes, his wife's father. 
He lived to be seventy-seven years old. His 
wife, Electa (Haynes) Gould, bore him two 
children: Electa, born August 15, 1828; and 
Hannah, born December 18, 1837. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Wright was also 
blessed by the birth of two children: Henry 
D., born January 18, 1872, who married Miss 
Grace Chilcott; and Lucius G., who was born 
February 3, 1875. Their mother died at the 
age of thirty-eight years. In January, 1877, 
Mr. Wright was again married to Miss Joseph- 
ine A. E. Day, daughter of Stephen P. and 
Sarah E. (Darby) Day. The second Mrs. 
Wright died at forty-two years of age. Mr. 
Wright is independent in politics. He has 




ELISHA ALEXANDER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



25 



held various offices, and has rendered good ser- 
vice as Selectman, Assessor, and Overseer of 
the Poor, as well as in other offices. At the 
present time he is Town Auditor, and for four 
years has served as chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen. 




kRS. ADALINE M. D. ALEX- 
ANDER, of Northfield, widow of 
the late Elisha Alexander and 
daughter of Timothy and Adaline (Maynard) 
Button, was born at the old Button homestead 
in the town of Northfield. Her great-grand- 
father, Timothy Button, was a native of He- 
bron, Conn., who settled at Northfield in 
1796, and erected, on the land adjoining Mrs. 
Alexander's present home, a residence which 
was at that time the most elaborate house in 
the town, and which still stands in a good 
state of preservation. Mr. Button was a pros- 
perous merchant, and occupied a prominent 
position in the community, holding different 
offices of public trust. He died in 1814, at 
seventy-eight years of age. His son, Timothy 
B. Button, Mrs. Alexander's grandfather, was 
born in Hebron, removed thence to Northfield, 
and, like himself, was an active and influen- 
tial citizen. He died in 182 1, at the age of 
forty-five years. (Further particulars in re- 
gard to the Button family may be found in the 
sketch of Miss Mary T. Button on another 
page.) 

Mrs. Alexander's father, Timothy Button, 
who was born March 23, 1805, passed his boy- 
hood in Northfield, and in early manhood went 
to Illinois, settling in Edgington, Rock 
Island Coun-ty, where he became identified 
with public affairs, and served as Town Clerk 
and Justice of the Peace for many years. He 
died at the age of seventy-eight years. His 
wife was a daughter of John Maynard, of 
Leominster, Mass; and she had four children, 



of whom Adaline M. (Mrs. Alexander) and 
Mrs. Lucy Woodruff, widow of the late Sam- 
uel Woodruff, of Hartford, Conn., are the 
only survivors. The mother died at the age 
of twenty-seven years. She was a member of 
the Congregational church. 

Adaline M. Button was educated in the 
schools of Northfield; and, after completing 
her studies at Groton, she taught in the 
schools of Massachusetts and Illinois. In 
1872 she was united in marriage to Mr. Elisha 
Alexander, son of Major Elisha Alexander and 
a representative of a prominent Northfield 
family. The first of this name in the records 
of the town was George Alexander, who was 
born in Scotland, and who, coming to New 
England, settled in Windsor, Conn., before 
1644; removed to Northampton, Mass., in 
1655, and to Northfield in 1673. Several of 
his descendants saw active service in the early 
Colonial wars and in the Revolution. The 
late Mr. Alexander was a successful agricult- 
urist. He was a Republican in politics, and 
served as a Selectman and Beputy Sheriff and 
in other positions. His death occurred in 
1876, at the age of sixty-nine years. Mr. 
Alexander was a philanthropist in the truest 
sense, and did a great deal for the community, 
the poor finding in him a friend at all times. 
His portrait shows the benevolent features of 
a good man, whose memory will long be grate- 
fully cherished. He was an active member of 
the Congregational church, in which Mrs. 
Alexander is also an earnest worker. 



SYMAN G. GOULB has been a resident 
of Shelburne since 1879, and within 
^m-^ that time has placed himself among 
the solid men of the town, where he has 
been actively and prosperously engaged in 
his business as a farmer and dairyman, and 



26 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



has improved a good farm. A native of 
Franklin County, he was born June 12, 1835, 
in Heath, being of good old Colonial stock. 
Both his maternal and paternal grandfathers 
served in the Revolutionary War. 

Mr. Gould's paternal grandfather, Eli 
Gould, removed from Amherst, his birthplace, 
to Heath during the early days of its settle- 
ment. He possessed the true patriot's spirit; 
and, although but a boy when the Concord 
fight and the battle of Bunker Hill occurred, 
he shortly enlisted as a private in defence of 
his country's liberty; but, being too young to 
enter the ranks, he was detailed to take charge 
of General Washington's horse. Later he was 
a shoemaker by trade, and continued at that 
employment through his years of activity, 
residing in Heath until his demise at the age 
of eighty-two years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Bernice Johnson, also lived to a ripe 
old age. 

David Gould, son of Eli and father of him 
of whom we write, was born February 20, 
1797, in Heath, where he spent his. entire 
life, dying in 1869. He began the world as a 
poor boy, a farmer by occupation, and grad- 
ually acquired a good property. After work- 
ing by the day until he had saved some money, 
he invested it in land, and before his death 
was the owner of a good farm, besides other 
property, all of which he had accumulated by 
his own industry. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Sarah Green, was a native of Will- 
iamstown, Mass., born November 24, 1802. 
The fruits of their union were twelve children, 
five of whom have joined the silent majority; 
namely, Mrs. Caroline Davenport, Henry D., 
Mrs. Sarah A. Hunt, George G., and Mrs. 
Frances A. Merrifield. The seven now living 
are: Bernice J., the wife of George S. Sage, 
of Greenfield; Hannah J., wife of Horace 
C. Cummings, of Amherst; Lyman G., the 



subject of this sketch; Louisa E. , wife of 
Hugh Maxwell, of Heath; Willard E., of 
Shelburne; Ann E., wife of Amos Temple, 
of Shelburne Falls; and Charles A., of Shel- 
burne Falls. 

Lyman G. Gould acquired a common-school 
education in the town of his nativity, and 
remained on the parental homestead until after 
the death of his parents, his mother having 
survived his father fourteen months. He was 
reared to agricultural labor, and made his first 
purchase of land in the town of Wendell, 
where he carried on mixed husbandry seven 
years, and was numbered among its most enter- 
prising and public-spirited citizens. He was 
influential in politics, being a decided Demo- 
crat, and prominent in local affairs, having 
been Town Treasurer, Clerk, member of the 
School Board two years, and Postmaster while 
he was there. Moving from Wendell to New 
Salem, Mr. Gould lived there two years, com- 
ing thence to Shelburne in 1879 a-nd buying 
the farm where he has since resided. It con- 
tains one hundred and sixty acres, which he 
has tilled with excellent success, his practical 
ability and good judgment assuring him con- 
tinued prosperity. Within the last three 
years, however, his activities have been les- 
sened by failing health. 

Mr. Gould was married March 24, i868, 
to Mrs. Roxanna O. Weed Kingsbury, who 
was born in Manchester, Vt., November 8, 
1838. In early womanhood she married A. A. 
Kingsbury, who died, leaving her with two 
sons, Arnold O. and Oscar B. Kingsbury. 
Of her union with Mr. Gould one son has been 
born ; namely, David O. Gould. During their 
residence in Shelburne Mr. and Mrs. Gould 
have established most pleasant relations with 
their neighbors and associates, and are held in 
high regard throughout the community, being 
esteemed for their modesty, probity, and gen- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



27 



uine worth. Religiously, he is a member of 
the Congregational church. 




ENJAMIN CUMMINGS is classed 
among the intelligent and thor- 
oughly wide-awake farmers who are 
contributing so much to the material prosper- 
ity of Franklin County, being the owner of 
a valuable farm in the town of Orange, where 
he makes a specialty of gardening and dairy- 
ing. A son of Daniel and Nancy (Maccolley) 
Cummings, he was born in Leverett, a town 
on the southern border of the county, October 
23, 1848. His paternal grandfather, Benja- 
min Cummings, was a farmer in comfortable 
circumstances at Leverett, and lived to be 
fourscore years of age. He reared a family of 
five children : Luther, Daniel, Salisbury, 
Fanny, and Almira. 

Daniel Cummings was born in Leverett, 
February 6, 1803, and was a life-long resident 
of that place, being a hard-working and pros- 
perous agriculturist. After the death of his 
parents he bought the old homestead, to 
which he added many substantial improve- 
ments, rendering it one of the finest and best- 
cared-for estates in the locality. His wife 
was the daughter of Samuel Maccolley, who 
was long interested in farming pursuits in 
Wendell. She died at the age of thirty-five 
years, leaving the following children : Anna 
M., who married George Barnes, and both of 
whom died, leaving two children — Herbert 
and Ella Barnes; Benjamin, the subject of 
this brief sketch; and Ira L. The parents 
were worthy Christian people and faithful 
members of the Baptist church. 

Benjamin Cummings received a limited edu- 
cation in the common schools of his native 
town, and at the early age of eleven years was 
put to work for Joseph Nourse, with whom he 



lived four years. He subsequently continued 
general farming in Leverett, going from there 
to Hardwick after his marriage, and a short 
time afterward removing to Dana, where he 
carried on his chosen occupation for ten years. 
Then, after being similarly engaged for five 
years at Athol, Mr. Cummings migrated to 
Yonkers, N.Y., and for thirteen years carried 
on an extensive and profitable business in 
dairying and gardening. In 1893 he came to 
Orange, and, buying the one hundred and 
twelve acres of land included in the A. P. 
Rice farm, has since carried on general farm- 
ing. In his large market garden he raises 
some of the finest and earliest vegetables of 
the season, the sale of which brings him in 
a good annual income; and his dairy, consist- 
ing of twenty choice cows, which are among 
the best in the State, and for which he has 
refused large prices, yields milk of so rich 
a quality that he has won a reputation for 
delivering to his customers, private families 
in Athol, the purest and best grade ever fur- 
nished to them. 

In 1867 Mr. Cummings was united in mar- 
riage with Mary S. Peckham, who was born in 
Dana, Mass., December 4, 1847, ^ daughter 
of Archibald and Submit (Stone) Peckham. 
Mr. Peckham, a stone mason and farmer, was 
born in Petersham, Mass., March 12, 1820, 
and lived to the age of fifty-three years. He 
was twice married, his first wife, Polly Stone, 
dying young, and leaving him one child, Eme- 
line, who married A. V. Fletcher, of Athol, 
and has two children : Edith L. and Carleton 
A. His second wife, the mother of Mrs. 
Cummings, was one of ten children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. John Stone, of Dana; namely, 
Prudence, Jerome, Ursula, Polly, Submit, Car- 
oline, Fordyce, Charles, and two children that 
died in infancy. Of Mr. Peckham's second 
marriage there were five children, as follows: 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Emery A., a farmer, living in Yonkers, N. Y. , 
who married Emeline Hart, and has one child, 
George E. Peckham ; Mary S., Mrs. Cum- 
mings; John, deceased; Nelson, a resident of 
Athol, who married Mary Howe; and Darius, 
residing at Worcester, Mass., who married 
Susie Peckham. 

The wedded pathway of Mr. and Mrs. Cum- 
mings has been brightened by the advent of 
three children into their home, two of whom 
are living. The elder, Carrie, born May 14, 
1868, in the town of Hardwick, is the wife of 
Nathaniel Lawrence, a progressive and pros- 
perous farmer, living on an adjoining farm, 
and has two children : Harold and Lillian. 
The other, Edna L. Cummings, was born at 
Yonkers, N.Y., January 31, 1888. Their 
youngest child, the pet of the household, 
Alice, died at the tender age of one year. 
Mr. Cummings' s course as a business man has 
demonstrated that he has excellent talent, and 
is clear-headed and far-sighted in the man- 
agement of his affairs. In politics he is a 
decided Republican, and he is of liberal re- 
ligious belief. 



(sTr l^ELRA H. WOOD, formerly assistant 
fj^ superintendent of the Griswoldville 
^ ® V.^ Manufacturing Company's cotton- 
mills, and now a prosperous merchant at 
Griswoldville, in the town of Colerain, was 
born at Rutland, Jefferson County, N. Y. , 
December 22, 1850. He is a son of Eli A. 
and Nancy (Crook) Wood, both of whom 
were born at Champion, Jefferson County, 
N.Y., the former in 1823 and the latter in 
1829. Mr. Wood's grandfather, John Wood, 
who was a native of Connecticut, was an 
early settler at Champion, journeying thither 
with an ox team and establishing his home 
in the wilderness at a time when but few 



white people were there and Indians roamed 
through the forests, who were, however, 
friendly toward them. He erected a log 
house, and succeeded in clearing a good farm, 
upon which he resided for the remainder of his 
life. John Wood was a strong, energetic, and 
thoroughly upright man, known by his neigh- 
bors as honest John Wood. He was noted for 
his total abstinence from the use of alcoholic 
stimulants and tobacco, which has also char- 
acterized his descendants to the present day. 
Mr. Wood served throughout the War of 1812. 
Politically, he supported the old Whig party. 
He died at about the age of forty years. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Polly Gardner, 
and who was also a native of Connecticut, was 
called to rest at the age of ninety-three. She 
was the mother of thirteen children, three of 
whom are now living in Lewis County, New 
York, namely : Arvin, who resides at Pinck- 
ney; Eli A., a farmer of Montague; and Will- 
iam, who resides at Harrisburg. 

Eli A. Wood was reared to .an agricultural 
life, and on attaining his majority settled in 
Jefferson County, where he followed farming 
and resided some years, later going to Lewis 
County, where he has passed the greater part 
of his life. He is a practical, progressive, 
and very successful farmer. Politically, he is 
a Republican. While residing in Jefferson 
County he married Nancy Crook, who faith- 
fully performed the duties of wife and mother. 
She died on December 16, 1869, having raised 
a family of four children, three of whom are 
living: Arthur E., who acquired the trade 
of a silver and nickel plater, died in Spring- 
field, Mass., at the age of thirty-eight; 
Adelra H. is the subject of the present sketch ; 
Fannie is the wife of M. C. Harwood, a clerk 
in Swain's store at Charlemont, Mass. ; and 
Carrie is the wife of A. J. Ashton, of 
Griswoldville. 



Biographical review 



i§ 



Adelra H. Wood received his early educa- 
tion in the district schools of New York State, 
and at the age of fourteen went to work as a 
farm laborer at six dollars per month, working 
during the summer and attending school in the 
winter. At the end of three years he secured 
a position at Watertown, N. Y., with Candee 
& Wooley, clothing merchants, and remained 
three years. While in their employ he had 
the privilege of attending the high school, 
and to the kindly advice and influence of Mr. 
Candee he owes much for his steady habits and 
successful business career. Being ambitious 
to enter professional life, he studied medicine 
with Dr. Faudry, of Barnes's Corners, N.Y. , 
for a period of eight months, but was obliged 
to relinquish this on account of nervousness. 
In November, 1871, he came to Griswoldville, 
and entered the employ of the Griswoldville 
Cotton Manufacturing Company as an opera- 
tive. He was connected with this company 
twenty-three years, rising step by step, at 
length reaching, the position of assistant super- 
intendent, which he held for seven years. In 
October, 1894, in company with Mr. H. H. 
Dennison he purchased the company's store; 
and they are conducting a very profitable busi- 
ness, carrying the largest stock of general 
merchandise in the town and steadily main- 
taining their hold upon the public's patronage. 
On April 2, 1873, he married Martha J. 
King, of Griswoldville, daughter of Jason W. 
and Sereptia (Hawkes) King, the former a 
native of Sunderland, Vt. , the latter of Charle- 
mont, Mass. Mr. Wood is a Republican in 
politics. He is a member of Alethian Lodge, 
No. 128, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of Shelburne Falls. His steady course, ex- 
emplary habits, and strict business integrity 
have won for him the esteem and confidence of 
his townsmen; and his long and honorable 
connection with the Griswoldville Manufactur- 



ing Company places him in a prominent posi- 
tion in the community. To his abstinence 
from stimulants and tobacco he attributes his 
business success and a strong, vigorous 
constitution. 



TT^HRISTOPHER C. WHEATON, a 
V JT well-to-do farmer of Rowe, in the 

v i? ^ north - west corner of Franklin 
County, Mass., was born in the town of War- 
wick, in the north-eastern part of the county, 
July 22, 1848. He is a son of Samuel D. 
and Elmina T. (Fuller) Wheaton, residents of 
Warwick. His grandparents were Reuben 
and Abigail (Partridge) Wheaton, the former 
of whom was a native of Leicester, Mass., and 
the latter was a native of Medway, Mass. 
After residing at Leicester for a time, Reuben 
Wheaton purchased a large farm in Townshend, 
Vt. , which he conducted very successfully. 
He subsequently sold his property in that 
town, and purchased a smaller farm at War- 
wick, Mass. But excessive labor had slowly 
but surely undermined his constitution, and he 
died at the age of fifty-two years. His wife 
was called to rest at the age of sixty-seven. 
Reuben Wheaton was a Republican in poli- 
tics. He was a very active and energetic 
man, and, having been well educated himself, 
provided in a like manner for his children, by 
educating them liberally for whatever profes- 
sion or occupation they chose to adopt. 

Samuel D. Wheaton was born at Townshend, 
Vt. , March 21, 181 5, and was reared to an 
agricultural life. He purchased the family 
homestead at Warwick upon reaching man- 
hood, and for years was engaged in the pursuit 
of agriculture. February 11, 1840, he mar- 
ried Elmina T. Fuller, of Winchester, N. H., 
daughter of Benjamin, Jr., and Dorothy 
(Bliss) p-uller, the former of whom was a 
native of the last-named town. The latter 



3° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was a native of Royalston, Mass. Benjamin 
Fuller was a son of Benjamin Fuller, Sr. , who 
was born at Bridgewater, Mass., and settled 
upon a farm in Winchester, N.H., where he 
resided until his decease, which occurred at 
the age of sixty years. He was a Whig in 
politics. His wife, who was summoned from 
earth at the age of fifty-three years, became 
the mother of the following children : Daniel, 
Louise, Mehitable, Phebe, Sally, and Benja- 
min Fuller, Jr., Mr. Wheaton's maternal 
grandfather. 

Benjamin Fuller, Jr., succeeded to the pos- 
session of the old homestead, the extent of 
which he later increased by the addition of 
one hundred acres, and became very prosper- 
ous. He finally sold the estate, and, purchas- 
ing a much larger farm, situated in the same 
town, continued successfully engaged in farm- 
ing until his decease, which occurred when he 
was sixty - seven years old. His wife had 
passed away at the age of forty-four. Their 
children were : Susan B., Elmina T., Caroline 
H., Harriet B., Emery G., Marinda E., Lu- 
cius A., and Caroline W. Benjamin Fuller, 
Jr., was a Republican in politics. He at- 
tended the Congregational church. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel D. Wheaton 
were named as follows: Julius D., Junius L., 
Julia E., Sarah A., Harriet E., Christopher 
C, and Williston W. 

Christopher C. Wheaton began his studies 
in the schools of Warwick and Orange, and 
after completing his education at the Apple- 
ton Academy in New Ipswich, N.H., entered 
the employ of R. Hunt & Co. of Orange, 
Mass. Serving a three years' apprenticeship, 
he acquired the trade of a mechanic, and be- 
came a journeyman. He purchased a house in 
Orange, where he resided until 1872, when he 
exchanged that residence for his present farm 
in the town of Rowe, which consists of two 



hundred and twenty-seven acres, part of which 
is well-improved land. This property was 
formerly known as the Rice farm. He has 
remodelled the buildings, besides making 
many other noticeable improvements, and now 
conducts general farming and dairying. He 
has a large herd of cows, besides some very fine 
young stock, and is in every way a progressive 
farmer. Mr. Wheaton is First Vice-President" 
of the Deerfield Valley Agricultural Society, 
and is a Director of the Charlemont Co-opera- 
tive Creamery Company. 

On March 8, 1888, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Eliza H. Newton, daughter of 
Healey and Roxanna (Thayer) Newton, of 
Hawley. Mr. Newton was a lumber manu- 
facturer and farmer, who owned and operated 
a saw-mill in that town. He was an active 
and enterprising man, but died when quite 
young, leaving three children ; namely, Ed- 
ward N., John E., and Eliza H. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wheaton have two children: Bertha E., 
born June 23, 1889; and Sara L., born 
September 14, 1891. 

Mr. Wheaton is a Republican in politics. 
He has served the town faithfully as Moder- 
ator, chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
Assessors, Overseers of the Poor, chairman of 
the School Committee, and is a Justice of the 
Peace. In his religious views he is inclined 
to be liberal. 




p^RS. SARAH J. RAMSEY, widow 
of the late John Ramsey, of 
Orange, is a woman of culture 
and refinement, possessing qualities of heart 
and mind that endear her to a large circle 
of friends. Her husband was of New Hamp- 
shire birth, born in Marlow, August 3, 18 14, 
son of James and Nancy (Tenney) Ramsey. 
His grandfather, James Ramsey, Sr., emi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



31 



grated from Scotland to this country, settling 
in Greenfield, N. Fl., where he carried on gen- 
eral farming, living to the age of seventy-eight 
years. 

His son and namesake, James Ramsey, the 
father of John Ramsey, was born in Green- 
field, N. H. He was reared to agricultural 
pursuits, and, when a young man, bought one 
hundred and fifty acres of land, which he 
improved by cultivation, erecting a good set of 
buildings. He subsequently disposed of this 
property, and moved to Alstead, Cheshire 
County, N. H., where his death occurred at 
the age of sixty-four years. His wife lived 
to the age of seventy-seven years. They were 
the parents of eleven children ; namely, Cal- 
vin, David, James, Mary, John, Celinda, 
Luther P., Martin, Martha Ann, Mark, and 
Nathan. Of these, two died when young ; and 
there was not another death among them for 
threescore years. Both parents were sincere 
Christians and esteemed members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. In politics 
James Ramsey was identified with the Demo- 
cratic party. 

John Ramsey, the husband of the subject of 
this biographical sketch, learned the trade of 
a carriage and sleigh maker, and, when a 
young man, came to Orange, where at the 
age of twenty-one years he took a contract to 
make one thousand dollars' worth of carriages 
of modern style, something comparatively new 
in the market at that time. This he com- 
pleted successfully and satisfactorily. He 
then established himself in business, building 
a fine house and a large shop back of it for 
his carriage manufactory, using the second 
story of the house as the painting-room, the 
whole being finished within two years after he 
had attained his majority. In the space of 
four years he was entirely free from debt, a 
record worthy of mention. After continuing 



in the manufacture of carriages and sleighs for 
several years, Mr. Ramsey rebuilt the house, 
fitting it for a hotel, named it the Mansion 
House, and conducted it with success for some 
years. He finally retired from the active pur- 
suits of life, first letting the hotel and after- 
ward selling the entire property and purchasing 
a pleasant residence at 6 Grove Street. This 
he remodelled and beautified, making it one of 
the best and most attractive homes in the 
locality. 

Mr. Ramsey was noted for his generosity, 
and his devotion to the highest moral and best 
material interests of his adopted town was well 
known and thoroughly appreciated. Some of 
the finest improvements of the village were 
due to his forethought and sagacity, among 
them the enlargement and adornment of the 
cemetery, which is one of the most beautiful 
in the county. Many of the shade trees orna- 
menting the village were set out by him or 
through his influence, and serve to perpetuate 
his name in a most pleasing manner. Of a 
deeply religious nature, he was held in high 
respect for his sterling virtues, and will be 
remembered as a kind-hearted neighbor and a 
benefactor to humanity, spending his seventy- 
two years of life in useful activity. 

Mr. Ramsey was three times married. His 
first wife, Susan Bullar, died at the age of 
twenty-six years ; and he afterward married 
Rachel Hawes, who died at the early age of 
twenty-eight years, leaving a daughter, Susan 
R., who passed to the higher life when a 
maiden of fifteen. In 1864 he was united in 
marriage to Mrs. Sarah J. Webber, who was 
born September 2, 1821, in Marlow, N.H., 
and is the daughter of Jonathan and Martha 
(Russel) Butler, the former of whom was a 
native of Lyndeboro, N.H, and the latter 
of Wilmington, Mass. Mrs. Ramsey's grand- 
father, Jonathan Butler, Sr. , was a soldier in 



32 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Revolutionary army, and participated in 
the battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775. 
He died in his ninety-third year. Neither 
parent is now living, her father having de- 
parted this life at the age of fifty-eight years 
and her mother at the age of threescore and 
ten. Both were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. They had a large family of 
children, namely: Nathaniel R., who died in 
infancy; Martha; Susan; Mary; William Z. ; 
Sarah J. ; an infant; Lucinda; J. Wesley; and 
John F. Mrs. Ramsey resides at the beauti- 
ful home at 6 Grove Street, which is a lasting 
memorial of her late husband. 



ULIUS D. HORTON, of Charlemont, 
Franklin County, Mass., a progressive 
farmer, who is also engaged extensively 
in lumbering, was born October 23, 1846, at 
Mount Holly, Vt., and is a son of Warren and 
Aurilla (Johnson) Horton, of that place. His 
grandfather, Andrew Horton, owned and con- 
ducted a farm of four hundred acres at Mount 
Holly, and also dealt largely in lumber, 
operating two saw-mills. He was formerly a 
Whig in politics, but later joined the Republi- 
can party. He died aged eighty-two years; 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Lucy 
Hale, was called to rest at about the same age. 
Their children were: Alva, David, Warren, 
Darius, Lovina, and Lucinda. Warren Hor- 
ton, upon reaching his majority, purchased 
a greater part of his father's farm, which he 
carried on in connection with the coopering 
business, and was likewise much engaged in 
carpentering during his early manhood. He 
possessed a strong and vigorous constitution, 
capable of withstanding much exposure and 
fatigue, and was a tireless worker. He at- 
tained a prominent position in public affairs, 
and, besides holding all of the important town 



offices, represented his district in the State 
legislature. In politics he was a stanch Re- 
publican, and in his religious views a Baptist. 
Warren and Aurilla Horton were blessed with 
the following children: Carrie M., who mar- 
ried Alton Hammond; Marcella J., wife of 
Luther French; and Julius D., of this sketch. 
At the age of twenty years Mr. Julius D. 
Horton commenced life's labors at a chair 
factory in Rutland, Vt. , and, after remaining 
there steadily at work for seven years, returned 
to Mount Holly, where he was engaged in con- 
ducting a wheelwright and carpentering busi- 
ness for the next three years. In 1887 he 
purchased the L. Hawkes farm of one hundred 
and thirty acres, with a saw-mill thereon, in 
the picturesque town of Charlemont, Mass., 
which he continues to occupy, and with very 
satisfactory results. He gives considerable 
attention to the raising of stock, in which 
he has been very successful, especially with 
sheep. In 1891 Mr. Horton married Miss 
Rena Todd, daughter of Edward Todd, a 
sketch of whose career appears elsewhere in 
this work, and has one child, Erving J., who 
was born May 8, 1893. Mr. Horton is a Re- 
publican in politics, and, although frequently 
urged to accept town offices, has invariably 
declined, as he cannot spare the time neces- 
sary for the proper administration of public 
affairs. 




f^^lENRY SLATE, a farmer and leading 
citizen of Bernardston, Mass., was 
born in this town, November 29, 
18 1 5, son of Joseph and Sylvia E. (Web- 
ster) Slate. The family is of English de- 
scent. Ancestors of Mr. Slate settled in 
Mansfield, Conn., at an early day. The first 
of the name in Bernardston was Joseph Slate, 
who came here about 1763 with his wife, Mary 
Strong, of Norwich, Conn., and took up land 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



33 



which is still held by some of his posterity. 
He died in Bernardston. Henry Slate's 
grandfather, Israel Slate, and his wife, Phcebe 
Hurlburt, were born in Chatham, Conn., in 
1762. He came to Bernardston when but two 
years of age, with his father, Joseph Slate, 
who had been a soldier in the French and 
Indian War, and later on was in the Revolu- 
tionary War. Israel was a hard-working prac- 
tical farmer, and cleared much of the land in 
this vicinity. He was a leading citizen of 
Bernardston, a Corporal in the State militia, 
also a member and zealous worker in the Con- 
gregational church, and in politics a Whig. 
He had a family of ten children, all of whom 
grew to maturity. 

Joseph, one of his sons, named for the elder 
Joseph, was born in Bernardston, January 28, 
1789, and became one of its most influential 
citizens and a successful farmer. He was 
Selectman for several terms, and took an 
active part in the affairs of the town. Having 
inherited a large tract of land from his father, 
he resided on the old Slate farm till his death, 
which took place August 16, 1867. His wife, 
born in Bernardston, March 14, 1796, con- 
tinued to make her home here till her death, 
August 7, 1886. Both were members of the 
Congregational church, and strictly orthodox. 
Their ten children all grew to manhood and 
womanhood. A brief record is as follows: 
Melinda, born October 29, 181 3, died March 
II, 1879; Henry, the second-born, is the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Francis, born February 23, 
1 81 8, died June 2, 1894; Eunice A., born 
November 4, 1820, is now living in Montague; 
Catherine S. , born February 19, 1823, now 
resides in Bernardston ; Edwin, born July 20, 
1825, died April 17, 1851; Harriet A., born 
April 13, 1828, now lives in Harvey, 111., 
near Chicago; Mary E., born December 31, 
1830, lives in Brattleboro, Vt. ; Dwight, born 



August 26, 1833, died in 1855; and Lewis 
A., born June 10, 1836, is a farmer of Ber- 
nardston. 

Henry Slate grew to manhood, and was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Bernardston and 
Goodell Academy. He has followed farming 
all through life, and being intelligent and 
thoroughly practical has by close attention to 
business made a success of it, owning ninety- 
nine acres of good land in Bernardston, with 
substantial buildings. He enjoys the esteem 
and confidence of his fellow-citizens, having 
filled the position of Town Clerk for seventeen 
years, and has now entered upon his nineteenth 
year as Town Treasurer. 

Henry Slate was married April 28, 1841, 
to Sylvina Hale, who died June 14, 1849, 
leaving four children : Cornelia, Irvilla, Jo- 
seph, and John, the youngest, who died soon 
after. Cornelia married A. Alford, who is 
now a retired business man, residing in Ber- 
nardston. Irvilla A. became the wife of 
E. B. Burnham, and lives in Montague. 
Joseph is a merchant residing in Edinburg, 
111. On June 5, 1850, Mr. Slate married 
Mary Clapp, who died April 24, 1864, leav- 
ing one child, Kate M., now Mrs. H. L. 
Crowell, of Bernardston. On the 7th of Feb- 
ruary, 1866, Mr. Slate married for his third 
wife Miss Elizabeth S. Holton, who was born 
in Gill, November 4, 1829, daughter of 
George L. and Content B. (Snow) Holton. 
Her father was a farmer, was liberal in his 
religious views and in politics a Democrat. 
He died at the age of sixty-three years, his 
wife at fifty-one. They were the parents of 
five children, four of whom are living: 
Thomas S. Holton died in Boston; Emeline 
P. became Mrs. Fay, and resides in Athol ; 
Jonathan P. Holton resides in Gill; Harriet 
C. , who became Mrs. Smith, resides in Green- 
field; and Elizabeth S., Mrs. Slate, is the 



34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



eldest child. Mr. and Mrs. Slate are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church, where he 
has served as Deacon the last thirty years. 
They are among the oldest residents of Ber- 
nardston, and all their children are faithful 
members and earnest workers in the Congre- 
gational church. 




^-vASSCALL MARVEL, whose por- 
trait appears on the opposite page, 
a worthy octogenarian retaining his 
faculties to a remarkable degree, long known 
as one of the leading farmers of Gill was 
born in Shutesbury, in the southern part 
of the county, December i, 1810, son of Pass- 
call and Polly (Davis) Marvel. Passcall 
Marvel, Sr., who was a native of Rehoboth, 
Bristol County, where his early life was 
passed on his father's farm, learned the trade 
of shoemaker, which he followed for some 
time, but later purchased land, and devoted 
his last years to tilling the soil, dying in 
Shutesbury in his sixty-fourth year. He mar- 
ried Polly Davis, and they reared a family of 
four children : Jesse, Mary, Passcall, and 
Martha, of whom Passcall is the only survivor. 
The mother died in Shutesbury at the age of 
sixty-four years. 

The younger Passcall on his father's death 
purchased the old home in Shutesbury, and 
lived there for ten years, coming to Gill on 
April I, 1844. He took care of his wife's 
parents until their death, when he purchased 
the Harris homestead, a farm of fifty-eight 
acres, on which he now resides. Mr. Marvel 
was married December 3, 1835, to Catherine 
C, daughter of Samuel Harris, a farmer of 
Petersham. They reared four children: Sarah 
J., who is the widow of Orison Knight; Lucy 
A., who married Marcus Pratt, and has two 
children — Carl M. and Carrie E. ; Willard 



H. and William C, twins. Willard married 
Jane Woodward, and has two children — Her- 
bert P. and Katie B. William worked for 
over twenty years as a machinist in Fitch- 
burg, Mass., but returned home to care for 
his parents. He is a Republican in politics, 
an Odd Fellow, and a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, having served two 
years in the Civil War as a soldier of Com- 
pany G, Tenth Massachusetts Infantry. He 
was in many battles, and was wounded at 
Fredericksburg. He married November 30, 
1885, Helen, daughter of Alfred and Martha 
(Mahoney) Brick- Alfred Brick was for- 
merly a chairmaker in Gardner, Mass. He and 
his wife, Martha Mahoney, a daughter of Cor- 
nelius Mahoney, of Providence, R.I., were 
the parents of six children. 

In politics Passcall Marvel has been allied 
with the Republican party, but is a Prohibi- 
tionist in principle. He is a member of the 
Baptist church of Bernardston, in which he 
held the office of deacon for many years. 



I^ATHANIEL CHENEY, a retired man- 
I =t ufacturer and an extensive landholder 
-L Vfc_^ of the town of Orange, where his 
birth occurred June 23, 1824, is a man of solid 
worth, possessing in an eminent degree those 
traits that command respect in the business 
world, and gain esteem among friends and 
associates. The immigrant ancestor of his 
family was William Cheney, who came to 
America in 1635, settling in Roxbury, Mass., 
the line of descent from him being William 
the second, then William the third, who was 
born at Mendon, Mass., in 1704, and whose 
children by his wife, Margaret, included Levi 
Cheney, the grandfather of the subject of this 
biographical sketch. 

Levi Cheney was born November 23, 1750; 










PASSCALL AND CATHERINE C. MARVEL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



37 



and, after reaching man's estate, he came to 
Franklin County, where he purchased eight 
hundred acres of wild land in the town of 
Orange. Clearing a space in the vast pine 
forest, he built a log house near the site 
where Mr. Jerome now lives; and here he 
reared his family. Much of the timber which 
he cut down he had to burn to get rid of; but, 
after clearing and cultivating a portion of his 
land, he erected a saw-mill, the first in the 
vicinity, and carried on a large lumber busi- 
ness in addition to general farming. He lived 
to the extremely advanced age of ninety-six 
years, dying in 1846. He was a man of excel- 
lent business ability, and, acquiring a compe- 
tency, gave to each of his sons a good farm. 
He was twice married. His first wife, Mary 
Hill, bore him the following children: Levi, 
Esther, Peter, Mary, Louis, Stephen, and 
Alexander. His second wife, whose maiden 
name was Sarah Ballou, bore him two chil- 
dren, Ursula and Preston Cheney. 

Peter Cheney was born in the primitive log 
house in which his parents first lived" on com- 
ing to Orange, and was there reared to habits 
of industry and thrift. When ready to estab- 
lish a home of his own, his father gave him 
a portion of the homestead property, now occu- 
pied by his son Nathaniel; and here he erected 
a residence, a commodious barn, and the requi- 
site farm buildings for successfully carrying 
on his work, which he conducted most ably, 
meeting with success in his undertakings. 
He became very prominent in the management 
of local affairs, being a sound Democrat in his 
politics and serving his fellow-citizens in the 
various minor offices of the place, besides 
being Town Clerk for about twenty years and 
Justice of the Peace the same length of time. 
To him and his wife, Abigail Goodell Cheney, 
thirteen children were born; namely. Pru- 
dence, Charlotte, Luther, E. Peter, Elijah B., 



Nathaniel, Ebenezer, Abner, Abigail, Jane 
and Janette (twins), and two others, also 
twins, that died in infancy. 

Nathaniel Cheney received the ordinary 
educational advantages of a New England 
country lad, completing his studies at the 
Westminster Academy, going from there to 
Boston, where he was employed for a year as 
a clerk in a grocery store. He was gifted 
with keen business abilities, however; and at 
the age of twenty years he became a partner 
with George W. Adams and S. A. Denio, 
composing the firm of G. W. Adams & Co., 
manufacturing iron for building purposes, and 
continuing seven years in Boston, when he 
sold out his interest in the works, and went 
on a trip to Europe. In 1852 Mr. Cheney 
returned to New York City, where he was a 
partner for five years in the iron works estab- 
lishment of D. D. Badger & Co., which after- 
ward was managed by a stock company, Mr. 
Cheney being its Treasurer and Vice-Presi- 
dent. He continued in the same business in 
New York for thirty-eight years, the last ten 
years being in company with Mr. Hewlett and 
carrying on a substantial business under the 
firm name of Cheney & Plewlett. In 1893 
he retired from the active pursuits of life, and 
came to Orange to the old homestead, where 
he and his family had spent their summers for 
about twenty-five years, during which time 
extensive buildings were erected and costly 
improvements made, the place being now one 
of the finest and most valuable estates in this 
section of the county. Mr. Cheney is a man 
of exceptionally pure morals and correct habits, 
and has never used tobacco or intoxicating 
liquors of any kind. He is of broad and ear- 
nest religious views and a faithful adherent of 
the Universalist church. Politically, he is 
a Republican. 

Miss Mary A. Eddy, to whom Mr. Cheney 



38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was united in marriage in 1846, was born in 
Warwick, Mass., July 5, 1823, being the 
daughter of Abijah Eddy, one of Warwicli's 
thrifty and respected merchants and farmers. 
Seven children have been born of their union ; 
but the Angel of Death has crossed their 
threshold three times, each time bearing a 
loved infant to its eternal home. The living 
are: Martha R., Charles E. , Clara J., and 
Lizzie J. Charles E. , who is engaged in the 
iron works at Brooklyn and New York City, 
married Lillian Walker; and they have one 
child, Bessie M. Clara J. is the wife of 
A. W. Newhall, a highly esteemed and enter- 
prising agriculturist of Franklin County, hav- 
ing charge of Mr. Cheney's farm, where he 
pays especial attention to dairying, keeping 
twenty-five choice cows of a fine grade. Liz- 
zie J., the youngest daughter, with her sister, 
performs the active duties of housekeeping, 
the mother being in feeble health. 



(sTr^I^REW J. WOODS, a farmer of 
j^* Bernardston, was born in the town 
yJU\^^ of Bath, Grafton County, N.H., 
April 22, 1833, son of William A. and 
Martha (Minot) Woods. His father was 
born in Bath in 1793, and his mother in 
Jaffrey, N.H., in the year 1800. The father 
of William A. was Andrew Woods, who was 
of Scotch descent, but resided for a time in 
the north of Ireland, and came from that 
country to America, landing in Boston. 

He purchased some land in the town of 
Bath, N.H., without having seen it, and, tak- 
ing his family with him, moved to his new 
home, making the journey with ox-teams. 
He was one of the pioneers of that town, and, 
being without previous training in woodcraft, 
he experienced some difficulty in initiating 
himself into its mysteries. After repeated 



trials at felling trees, he came to the conclu- 
sion that it was very dangerous work, as he 
could never tell which way the tree was 
about to fall. Great was his satisfaction 
when he learned from one of his neighbors 
the proper method -of proceeding, and it was 
not long before he became an expert wood- 
man. He resided in the town of Bath till 
his death, which occurred at the age of sev- 
enty-three years. His wife, Isabella Jameson 
Woods, also lived to a good old age. They 
had three sons and one daughter who grew up, 
all of whom are now deceased. One of the 
sons, Andrew Salter Woods, LL.D., a gradu- 
ate of Dartmouth College in 1825, was for 
fifteen years (1840-1855) an Associate Justice 
of the Superior Court of the State of New 
Hampshire, being then advanced to the posi- 
tion of Chief Justice, which he filled with 
ability during his short term of office. He is 
spoken of as a man of strictest integrity; as 
a judge, "even-tempered, patient, impartial, 
upright." 

William A. Woods grew to manhood in the 
town of Bath, succeeding to his father in the 
possession of the homestead; and he, too, fol- 
lowed farming with gratifying success, from 
time to time making additions to his real es- 
tate, till he had one thousand acres of land, 
constituting one of the largest farms in the 
town of Bath. He was a leader in the Ma- 
sonic fraternity in the State of New Hamp- 
shire and a man of considerable note, serving 
as Selectman of his town. In politics he was 
a Democrat, and both he and his wife were 
Universalists in religion. On the old farm, 
which his father had cleared and worked so 
many years before, he died, at the age of sev- 
enty-three years, and his wife at eighty-seven. 
They had nine children, seven of whom ar- 
rived at maturity, and three are now living: 
Arthur Woods, the eldest son, resides in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



39 



Bath, and still cultivates the old Woods 
homestead; Andrew J. Woods is the subject 
of this sketch: and Luella became the wife of 
Charles W. Leighton, a farmer of Greenfield. 
The deceased are: John, Emily, Martha, 
Julia, Caroline, and Myra. 

Andrew J. Woods grew to manhood on the 
paternal homestead in Bath, receiving his 
education in the schools of that town and the 
academy of St. Johnsbury, Vt., which he at- 
tended two terms. He lived on the old farm 
with his parents till the year 1874, when he 
left New Hampshire, and settled for a time 
in the town of Greenfield, Mass., removing 
shortly to Saratoga, N.Y., whence in 1878 he 
returned to Franklin County, Massachusetts, 
and took up his abode on his present farm in 
Bernardston. He has thirty-five acres of land 
and good buildings of his own erection, mak- 
ing a pleasant home. On the 25th of May, 
1876, Mr. Woods was united in marriage to 
Mary Osgood Sanderson, a daughter of John 
Sanderson. (See sketch elsewhere.) They 
have no children. Both Mr. and Mrs. Woods 
are attendants of the Unitarian church. In 
political matters Mr. Woods gives his support 
to the Democratic party. 



XpREDERICK W. UPTON, a young 
P J and progressive farmer of the town of 
Heath, was born in the town of Goshen, 
Hampshire County, Mass., August 28, 1859, 
son of Washburn A. and Mary F. (Damon) 
Upton and grandson of Chester and Miranda 
(Edgerton) Upton. From the valuable genea- 
logical work, "Upton Family Records," com- 
piled by Judge Upton, of Walla Walla, Wash., 
we learn that the parents of Chester Upton 
were Joseph and Thirza (Flint) Upton, the 
father a native of Bedford, Mass., son of Josiah 
Upton, a native of what is now North Read- 



ing. Josiah Upton, who settled in Charle- 
mont, Franklin County, in 1778, was a son of 
Ebenezer, grandson of Joseph, and great-grand- 
son of John Upton, the immigrant progenitor 
of the New England family of Uptons. Ches- 
ter Upton was a native of the town of Charle- 
mont, where he was born, January 6, 1804. 

He was the owner of a farm and saw-mill, 
and was engaged for some time in turning 
broom handles and manufacturing other 
wooden-ware. Besides his farm in Charlemont 
he owned lands in Hawley, where he lived for 
some time. He also resided at different times 
in Florence and Williamsburg; and, whatever 
his locality, he was always known as one of 
the foremost and most trustworthy citizens. 
His death occurred in 1886. His wife, Mi- 
randa Edgerton, was born July 4, 1807, and 
died in 1865. Her children were as follows : 
Olive, Washburn A., Aurelia, Mary, Lucy, 
•Sarah, Charles, and Joseph. 

Washburn A. Upton, father of Frederick 
W., was born in the town of Hawley, Feb- 
ruary 8, 1833, and in early life purchased a 
farm in Chesterfield, Mass., which he soon 
sold, and then rented one at Northampton. 
From that town he went to Whitingham, Vt. , 
where he rented another farm for two years, 
and next he rented one in Colerain for two 
years. He then purchased a farm in Cole- 
rain, and remained a tiller of the soil there for 
twelve years, after which he sold his farm, and 
removed to Agawam, again investing in farm 
land. He remained in Agawam until his 
death, at the age of sixty years. His wife, 
Mary F. Damon, was born July 5, 1835, 
daughter of Salma Damon, a successful farmer 
of Chesterfield, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Wash- 
burn A. Upton were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: Stephen F., born July 3, 1856, 
who married Addie Culver; Frederick W. , 
whose name appears at the head of this 



4° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sketch; and Sarah M., born March 21, 1865, 
who died at the early age of fourteen years. 

Frederick W. Upton, after acquiring a suffi- 
ciently practical knowledge of the common 
branches of learning, taught in the schools of 
his native town, became initiated into farm 
life and labor, remaining at home until the 
age of twenty-one. Three years later he mar- 
ried, December 2, 1883, Miss Sarah M. Bun- 
nell, an amiable and interesting young lady, 
daughter of Darius and Diantha (White) Bun- 
nell, well-known and respected residents of 
the county. Mr. Upton then purchased his 
present property of one hundred and twenty 
acres, known as the Sanford farm, situated in 
the north-east part of the town of Heath. He 
has improved the place by remodelling the 
house and barn ; and here he remains engaged 
in general agriculture, his estate presenting 
the typical appearance of the homestead of a 
New England farmer. He has fifteen head of 
fine stock, besides sheep and horses, his dairy 
products being of excellent quality. Mr. 
Upton is a Republican in politics, is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church, and is among the 
substantial and esteemed residents of the town. 



rmo 



EORGE F. ALEXANDER, one of 
\|5j^ the leading farmers of Northfield, 
Mass., was born September 12, 1815, 
in the house where he now resides, and which 
was the birthplace of his father, Samuel Alex- 
ander. His grandfather, Simeon Alexander, 
Jr., was a son of Simeon Alexander, Sr., one 
of three brothers who came over from Scotland 
and settled, in the year 1644, on the site of 
the present village of Northfield, where they be- 
came prominent and successful agriculturists. 
In 1779 Simeon Alexander, Jr., bought the 
farm on which his grandson now lives, erected 
the house, and here lived to the advanced age 



of ninety-four. He served with the minute- 
men and was in many of the hard-fought bat- 
tles of the Revolution, being present at the 
taking of Burgoyne's army. He was actively 
interested in the affairs of the town, serving 
as one of its first Selectmen. Samuel Alexan- 
der spent his whole life of more than fourscore 
years on the place, beginning as soon as old 
enough to assist his father in the care of the 
farm, and later becoming the owner of the 
property. He married Elvira, daughter of 
Theodore Field, whose ancestors were also 
among the early settlers ; and they reared 
three children, of whom George F". Alexander 
is the only survivor. Mrs. Samuel Alexander 
died at the age of sixty-seven years. 

George F. Alexander was educated in the 
district school, and rernained on the farm with 
his father until about thirty years old, when he 
went to Boston, where he was employed for a 
year as hotel clerk, and in the following year 
served in the same capacity in Brattleboro, Vt. , 
going from there to the Union House in Spring- 
field, Mass. A year and a half later he secured 
the position of clerk in the Astor Plouse in 
New York City, where he remained for twenty 
years, from 1849 to 1870, during which time 
he saw many of the prominent and noted men of 
those days. Returning to Northfield in March, 
1870, Mr. Alexander took care of his father as 
long as he lived; and at his father's death he 
became the possessor of the old homestead, on 
which he has since resided. 

He was first married in 1842, to Hepsibah 
Munn, a native of Gill and daughter of Seth 
Munn, of that place. She died November 14, 
1845 ; and some time after Mr. Alexander was 
married to his present wife, Ann Eliza, daugh- 
ter of William and Fannie (Simonson) Pinck- 
ney, of New York City. Mr. Pinckney was a 
native of West Chester, N. Y., but had moved 
to New York soon after marriage and engaged 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



41 



in the livery and hotel business, dying in that 
city at the age of seventy-eight. He served 
in the War of 1812, and was a prominent 
member of the old Militia Artillery Company. 
Of his eight children only four are now living; 
namely, Ann Eliza (Mrs. Alexander), George 
W., Samuel, and Adeline. The mother was 
seventy-nine years old at the time of her 
death, which occurred in Staten Island. Mrs. 
Alexander was educated in public and private 
schools of New York. She and her husband 
have one child, George L., who married Julia 
Graham, of Boston, and is engaged in the 
livery business in that city. 

George F. Alexander is a Republican, and 
a man who takes an active interest in all po- 
litical matters. He has served as Selectman 
four terms, and has likewise held the office of 
Assessor and Overseer of the Poor. He is a 
prominent Mason, having joined, in 185 1, 
Eureka Lodge, No. 243, of New York City, of 
which he was Master, and later the Lodge in 
Northfield, of which he has been Master three 
times; and he was instrumental in the organi- 
zation of the Orders of the Eastern Star in the 
latter place, his wife being among the first to 
join the Lodges. He was formerly Master of 
the Northfield Grange, having been one of the 
leaders in its formation. Mr. Alexander is an 
attendant of the Unitarian church. 



YpJTORACE A. SMEAD, one of Green- 
r^\ field's progressive farmers, was born 
JA® ^^ at his present homestead in this 
town, February 6, 1842, son of Jonathan and 
Lucy B. (Adams) Smead. His great-grand- 
father, Jonathan Smead, who was born in 
1735, and was a soldier in the French and 
Indian War, was one of the earliest pioneers 
of Greenfield, settling here when the Indians 
were still numerous in this part of the country 



and remaining till his death, in 1814. His 
son Jonathan was born in 1773, and reared on 
this farm, where he was a life-long resident. 
He died August 25, 1850, when he was sev- 
enty-seven years of age. He was one of the 
large farmers of his time, owning some three 
hundred acres, which required the hard labor 
and untiring energy which he so conscien- 
tiously put into it. He and his wife were 
both members of the First Congregational 
Church. They had a family of two sons and 
four daughters, none of whom is now living. 
Their son, Jonathan Smead, father of Horace 
A., was also born on this same farm, April 8, 
1812 ; and here he grew to manhood. In 1838 
he built the present house, was married, and 
settled with his father. In 1846 the farm was 
divided between himself and his elder brother, 
Charles Lewis, he taking the east part, where 
Charles B. Wells now lives. He faithfully 
followed his business as farmer through life; 
and here he died January 21, 1866, at the age 
of fifty-three years. His wife was born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1 81 3, in West Haven, Rutland 
County, Vt. She was a great-grand-daughter 
of the Rev. Edward Billings, the first minis- 
ter of Greenfield, and lived to be seventy-eight 
years of age, dying December i, 1891. They 
were both members of the Congregational 
church, and his party affiliations were with 
the Republicans. They had a family of four 
sons and one daughter: Charles L. Smead, 
who died when twenty-two years of age; Jona- 
than H., residing in New Bedford, connected 
with the United States mail service; Horace 
A., our subject; Sarah P., for many years a 
teacher in the public schools of Greenfield; 
and Edwin B., of Hartford, Conn., principal 
of Watkinson Farm School. 

Horace A. Smead received his education in 
the schools of Greenfield, and afterward moved 
to Vineland, N.J., where he bought a farm. 



42 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and was engaged in fruit-raising for a number 
of years, when he went into business in Tren- 
ton, N.J., where he remained eight years. In 
1877, selling his fruit farm, he moved back to 
Greenfield; and in 1884 he purchased the old 
farm of one hundred and seventy-five acres, 
where he now carries on general farming, fruit 
farming, gardening, and dairying. 

Mr. Smead was married November 28, 
1867, to Anna J. Fisher, of Vineland, N.J., 
who was born October 25, 1845, in Gouver- 
neur, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. , daughter of 
Isaac Preston Fisher and Lydia L. (Johnson) 
Fisher. Mr. Fisher was born in Rupert, Vt., 
March 14, 1820, and his wife November i, 
1823, in Griswold, Conn. He was engaged 
in farming and also in mercantile pursuits. 
His wife died July 14, 1862; and Mr. Fisher 
with his second wife (she that was Mrs. Clara 
Robertson), of Gouverneur, N.Y. , now resides 
with his daughter, Mrs. Smead. He had four 
children, Mrs. Smead being the eldest : Mary, 
who became Mrs. Seymore, resides in Putney, 
Vt. ; Louisa Maria died at thirteen years of 
age ; and Ogden at eleven months. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fisher were both members of the Con- 
gregational church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smead have two children of 
their own, and have adopted two. The eldest 
son, Horace P. Smead, was born October 6, 
1 87 1, is a graduate of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, and resides at home. Louis 
N. Smead was born November 28, 1876, and 
also lives at home, attending school at Mount 
Hermon. Mr. and Mrs. Smead are both 
members of the First Congregational Church. 



tT^oswe: 

\[\ memb 
-L^V^of I 



lOSWELL BAKER, a conspicuous 
iber of the agricultural community 
Franklin County, owns and occu- 
pies a fine homestead property in the town of 



Hawley, which is the place of his nativity, the 
date of his birth being March 16, 1817. He 
is the son of Hollister and Rebecca (Crowell) 
Baker, and comes of patriot-ic stock, his grand- 
father, Timothy Baker, having served in the 
Revolutionary War. 

Timothy Baker was born in 1748, and in 
1772 removed with his family from Sunder- 
land, Mass., to Conway, being one of the 
early settlers of this section of Franklin 
County. Three years later he settled in the 
town of Hawley, buying the hundred-acre farm 
now owned by M. Cressy. It was then in 
a state of primitive wildness; and he was 
obliged to clear a space for the small log 
cabin, which was his first place of residence. 
He improved a good farm, becoming prosper- 
ous in the pursuit of his chosen calling, and 
was numbered among the most valued citizens 
of the town. He was a conservative Whig in 
politics, and religiously was a firm believer in 
the doctrines of the Congregational church. 
He lived to a good age, dying April 3, 1836. 
Mrs. Baker, whose maiden name was Abigail 
Kibbe, survived her husband, dying in 1844, 
at the venerable age of ninety-four years. 
She was a woman of great force of character, 
well fitted for the wife of a pioneer, and was 
said to be the first white woman to settle in 
Hawley. He and his wife reared eleven chil- 
dren, giving them the following names: 
Rufus, Hollister, Sophia, Abigail, Ephraim, 
Sarah, Clarence, Julia, Harnena, Timothy, 
and Sophia. 

Hollister Baker, the second son named 
above, was born in Hawley, February 4, 1777, 
and as soon as old enough to use the axe or 
hoe began to assist his father in the work of 
redeeming a homestead from the wilderness. 
After his marriage he bought the home farm, 
which he managed most judiciously, making 
a good deal of money in his business transac- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



43 



tions; and this he invested from time to time 
in other land, finally becoming the owner of 
one thousand acres. He was known as one of 
the most thrifty and prosperous agriculturists 
in this section of the State, doing more to 
advance its welfare than any one person since 
that time. He erected a large brick residence 
and substantial barns, and in addition to farm- 
ing was interested in mining iron ore, which 
was then abundant on his farm, and in his 
work burned a great deal of charcoal. He 
paid much attention to the raising of good 
stock, keeping as many as thirty cows and a 
hundred sheep. He was a stanch Whig in 
politics, and was a public-spirited and progres- 
sive citizen. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Rebecca Crowell, was born October 22, 
1799, at Dennis, and died at Hawley, May 16, 
i860. Their household circle included ten 
children ; namely, Horace, Harvey, Rebecca, 
Ephraim, Elisha, Harriet, Noah, Roswell, 
Charles, and Ereda. 

Roswell Baker made good use of his early 
educational advantages, and, although not col- 
lege-bred, is a well-read and well-informed 
man, possessing in an eminent degree the good 
judgment and requisite business tact to insure 
material success. After leaving school he 
worked with his father until attaining his ma- 
jority, when he hired for one year the farm he 
now lives on, and found it so suited for his 
purposes that he then bought it, and has since 
conducted its interests in a thorough and skil- 
ful manner. The place originally consisted 
of sixty-five acres; but Mr. Baker has bought 
other land, his homestead now containing two 
hundred well-cultivated acres. The house in 
which he lives is nearly a century old, being 
one of the first frame buildings erected in the 
town; but under his care and improvements it 
compares favorably with the most modern-built 
residences. He has built new barns and other 



buildings; and his farm is one of the best- 
equipped in the vicinity, showing evidences of 
the enterprise and sagacious management of 
the owner. Mr. Baker has taken much inter- 
est in stock-raising, and has a choice dairy and 
about forty sheep; and, although not owning 
as much land as his father did, he is consid- 
ered the model farmer of the vicinity, being 
skilled in all branches of agriculture. 

Mr. Baker was united in marriage October 
17, 1839, to Miss Bathsheba C. P. Carter, a 
native of Buckland, born January 17, 1821, 
a daughter of Thomas and Ann (Toby) Carter. 
Mr. Carter was born May 28, 1773, in Leom- 
inster, Mass., and became one of the first 
settlers of Buckland, where he cleared and im- 
proved a valuable farm. In 1823 he removed 
with his family to Hawley, and there resided 
until his demise in 1832. In politics he was 
an active member of the Whig party, and he 
worshipped at the Congregational church. 
His widow survived him many a long year, 
passing away in 1870 at the age of eighty- 
eight years and six months. They were the 
parents of seven children, namely: Milo T. ; 
Asbel W. ; Cordelia W. ; Ann Eliza; Deborah 
F. ; Elias S. ; and Bathsheba C. P., the wife of 
Mr. Baker. The home circle of Mr. and Mrs. 
Baker was enlarged by the birth of five chil- 
dren, three of whom tarried but a short time 
on earth, not surviving the period of infancy. 
The two living are: Ereda, born January 4, 
1 84 1, now the wife of S. B. Budington and 
mother of four children — Ellen M., Robert 
A., Ethel H., and Walter C. ; and Edwin 
Baker, born January 18, 1843, a popular and 
successful druggist at Shelburne Falls, who 
married Emma I. Bannister. In his political 
views Mr. Baker favors the Republican party. 
Both he and his estimable wife are members of 
the Congregational church and active workers 
in that denomination. 



44 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




|DWARD R. CANEDY is a young and 
energetic resident of Dell, in tlie town 
of Heath, where he conducts a pros- 
perous business as a blacksmith and general 
wheelwright. His birth occurred at Jackson- 
ville, Vt, July 25, 1865; and he is the son 
of Dennis and Jane C. (Lake) Canedy. His 
grandfather, John Canedy, a prosperous farmer 
of Colerain, who wedded Susan Stowe, also 
a native of that town, raised a family of eight 
children, as follows : John, Susan, Louise, 
Roxanna, Lucy, Joel, Levi L. , and Dennis. 
John Canedy died at the age of fifty and his 
wife at the age of seventy-five years. 

Dennis Canedy, who was born at Colerain 
in 1828, purchased a farm at Whitingham, 
Vt. , when a young man, and after conducting 
it successfully for some years sold the prop- 
erty for the purpose of entering mercantile 
business at Jacksonville, Vt. His enterprise 
prospered; and, although the building and his 
stock were at one time totally destroyed by 
fire, he rebuilt, and continued to carry on an 
extensive trade. He later sold out to good 
advantage, and for the next few years engaged 
in teaming from Jacksonville to Greenfield, 
Mass., employing some extra fine draft horses. 
He subsequently purchased a farm of two hun- 
dred acres in the town of Heath, now owned 
and occupied by his son, Orian D. Canedy. 
Here he resided for a period of fourteen years, 
at the expiration of which time he retired from 
active labor. He is now passing the sunset of 
his days in ease and comfort at Shelburne 
Falls. His wife, who was a daughter of Bor- , 
den Lake, passed to another life at the age of 
sixty-three years. She was the mother of 
seven children, namely; John D. ; Ira; Her- 
bert, who died at the age of seventeen ; Orian ; 
Nettie, who died at the age of nine; Nellie; 
and Edward R. Dennis Canedy has been 
quite a prominent man in public affairs during 



his long life, and at one time served as Town 
Clerk at Heath. He is liberal in his relig- 
ious views. 

Edward R. Canedy was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Heath, and at the age of twenty- 
two years purchased the homestead, which, 
after successfully conducting for a period of 
four years, he sold. Pie then went to Shel- 
burne Falls, where he acquired the trade of 
a blacksmith and wheelwright, and subse- 
quently established himself in business at 
Jacksonville, Vt. Later he purchased the 
William Pennington residence and blacksmith- 
shop at Dell, which were erected by Samuel 
Barber. The estate is a fine one, including 
six acres of land ; and, since taking posses- 
sion, Mr. Canedy has remodelled the house 
and otherwise improved the property, and is 
doing a profitable business. 

On June 9, 1888, he was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary J. Maley, of Westboro, Mass., 
daughter of John and Mary Maley. The latter 
died in 1875, at the age of fifty-one years. 
The brothers and sisters of Mrs. Canedy are as 
follows: John, Hannah, Mary, Katie, Emma, 
Charles, and Elizabeth B. Mr. and Mrs. Can- 
edy have one son, named John D., who came to 
them on April 6, 1895. Mr. Canedy is inde- 
pendent in politics, and is liberal in his relig- 
ious views. 



T^APTAIN SAMUEL H. STOWELL, 
I Jp an experienced and skilful farmer of 

^* Franklin County, owns and occupies 

a valuable homestead in the town of New 
Salem, not far from the village of that name, 
and is known as one of its most respected citi- 
zens. He is a native of that county, having 
been born February 16, 1821, at Shutesbury, 
and is descended on both sides of the house 
from worthy English stock. His grandfather, 
John Stowell, was born and reared in Peters- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



4S 



ham, Worcester County, where he acquired 
a better education than was usually given to 
the boys of that day, and later was engaged in 
teaching. Having accumulated some money, 
he invested in a farm in Petersham, where he 
lived quite a number of years, and where his 
children were born. He afterward sold this 
farm, and bought a good property in Shutes- 
bury, to the cultivation of which he devoted 
the remainder of his life. He died at the age 
of sixty. Lois Eames, who became his wife, 
belonged to a family noted for longevity, and 
lived to be ninety-six years of age. The fol- 
lowing children were born to them : John, 
Henry, Peter, Luther, Sally, Lucy, and two 
that died at an early age. 

Peter Stowell, the father of the subject of 
this sketch, was born December 23, 1790, at 
Petersham, and spent the earlier years of his 
life as a farm laborer, working by the day or 
month until he had by prudence and economy 
saved enough money to buy a good farm. He 
then purchased one hundred and fifty acres of 
land in Shutesbury, on which he made many 
improvements, including a good set of build- 
ings, and placed a large part of it under cult- 
ure, being one of the foremost agriculturists 
of the town. There he spent the remaining 
years of his earthly life, passing away Septem- 
ber 24, 1868. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Lucy Fisk, was born in Worcester, Octo- 
ber 22, 1792, daughter of Samuel and Olive 
Fisk, and for some years was a resident of 
Shutesbury. Samuel Fisk, who was a well- 
to-do farmer, was twice married. His first 
wife, Olive Fisk, died when quite young, leav- 
ing four children: John, Lucy, Sally, and 
Betsey. He afterward married Pamelia 
Webb ; and they became the parents of four 
children: Olive, James, George, and Samuel 
Fisk. Mrs. Lucy F. Stowell died January 
28, 1 87 1. She reared but two children. 



namely: Franklin, born April 15, 181 8, who 
is a resident of Shutesbury; and Samuel H. 
Peter Stowell and his wife were active mem- 
bers of the Congregational church, and politi- 
cally he was a strong Republican. 

Samuel H. Stowell grew to manhood in the 
place of his nativity, and, having received a 
good education, was employed for several win- 
ters in teaching school, working at farming 
during the spring and summer seasons. About 
1846 he purchased a farm in Shutesbury, 
where he lived for some time, making many 
improvements on the place, including the 
erection of a new house and barn. He after- 
ward sold the property at an advantage, and 
bought another farm in the same town, which 
he worked on for a while, and then disposed 
of. In 1 871 he bought the Royce farm of one 
hundred acres in New Salem, where he has 
since resided. To this he has added by pur- 
chase, till he is now the possessor of two hun- 
dred and sixty-five acres of valuable land. 
Here he has carried on general farming with 
success, making somewhat of a specialty of 
raising fine stock. He has placed the land 
under high culture, and, having set out or- 
chards of peach, pear, and apple trees, raises 
an abundance of fruit. He has built a new 
barn ; and the house, which has withstood the 
wear of a century, is kept in fine repair, the 
neatness and thrifty appearance of the prem- 
ises being strongly indicative of careful man- 
agement and prosperity. 

On September 9, 1846, Mr. Stowell was 
united in marriage with Mary A. Chandler, 
who was born in Shutesbury, August 22, 1824, 
being a daughter of Aaron and Mary (Clark) 
Chandler and a grand-daughter of William and 
Lovina (Shumway) Chandler, of Petersham. 
William Chandler was engaged as a black- 
smith and farmer in Petersham, and afterward 
moved to Shutesbury, where he followed the 



46 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



same occupations. He and his wife both lived 
nearly fourscore years. They left the follow- 
ing children : Eunice, Clark, Lucy, Aaron, 
William, Benjamin, Wealthy, and Louisa. 
Aaron Chandler was born February 23, 1797, 
at Petersham, where he passed his boyhood 
days. He afterward moved to Shutesbury 
with his father, and became one of its most 
successful agriculturists. In 1850 he moved 
to Wendell, in this county, and afterward 
came to New Salem, and buying a good farm 
lived here until his demise, seventeen years 
later. Five children were born to him and 
his wife; namely, RIary, Charles, Willard, 
and two that died in infancy. 

The home circle of Mr. and Mrs. Stowell 
has been brightened by the birth of four chil- 
dren, of whom we chronicle the following: 
Mary E., born November i, 1853, is the wife 
of Henry P. Billings, of Ware, and has one 
child — Bertha E. ; Ellen F. died February 
20, 1891; Edwin F., born January 19, 1857, 
a merchant and Postmaster at New Salem, 
married Cora J. Eaton, and they have two 
children — Ralph E. and Carl E. ; Dwight A., 
born August 2, 1859, is in the store with his 
brother. Mr. Stowell has long been num- 
bered among the valued citizens of his adopted 
town, and has contributed his full share toward 
the advancement of its agricultural interests. 
In politics he is a zealous Republican, and 
has served as Selectman, Assessor, and Over- 
seer of the Poor, both in his native town and 
in New Salem. He has also been a member 
of the House of Representatives in the Mas- 
sachusetts legislature, and has been a Justice 
of the Peace for more than thirty years. Al- 
though he and his wife are well advanced in 
years, they are still hale and hearty, with an 
abundant capacity for enjoying the good things 
of life. Both are active members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



M 



EACON ISAAC T. FISKE, one of 
the substantial citizens of Shelburne, 
owns and occupies a well-kept and 
highly improved homestead, where he is carry- 
ing on agricultural pursuits with marked suc- 
cess. He was born on this farm, July 27, 
1824, and has here spent the major portion of 
his long and useful life, noting with keen in- 
terest the many changes that have taken place 
in his native town, and, as one of its most 
enterprising and progressive inhabitants, con- 
tributing largely to its advance and prosperity. 
The Fiskes are of English origin. The first 
of the family in America settled in Salem, 
Mass., in 1637. In 1761 Ebenezer Fiske, the 
great-grandfather of Deacon Fiske, settled in 
Shelburne, on what is called Pattern Hill; 
and there Pliny and Fidelia Fiske were born. 
Ebenezer Fiske, Deacon Fiske's father, was 
the son of Ebenezer Fiske, third, who was 
a well-to-do farmer. Succeeding to the occu- 
pation of his ancestors, he bought the present 
homestead of the family in 1820, and here car- 
ried on mixed husbandry with good results. 
The farm, which contained one hundred acres, 
was partly improved at the time of the pur- 
chase; and to these improvements he added 
each year, living here until his decease. He 
married Hannah Terrill, a native of Abington, 
Mass., and they became the parents of nine 
children, of whom five are deceased; namely, 
Clarissa, Levi, Francis, Pliny, and Henry. 
The four living are: Ebenezer, of Adrian, 
Mich.; Daniel T. Fiske, D.D., of Newbury- 
port, Mass., who has been a Congregational 
minister there for forty years, and is still 
doing parish work; Charlotte, widow of Frank 
Slate, of Bernardston; and Isaac T., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Isaac T. Fiske grew to manhood on the 
paternal homestead, receiving his elementary 
education in the district schools and afterward 




HARTLEY HALE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



49 



attending the Goodell Academy at Bernardston 
and spending one term at Amherst Academy. 
He began teaching school when quite young, 
and was thus engaged four winters. Remain- 
ing beneath the parental roof for several years 
longer, Mr. Fiske engaged in farming, which 
has been his principal occupation through life, 
if we except nine years when he carried on an 
extensive lumbering business at Guilford, Vt. 
On the death of his brother Levi he returned 
to the place of his birth, and buying the old 
home farm has since managed it with gratify- 
ing success. It contains one hundred and fif- 
teen acres of fertile land, and besides this 
property he has other lands in Colerain. 

On June 17, 1847, Deacon Fiske was 
united in wedlock to Hannah Parsons, of Ver- 
non, Vt. ; but their married life was brief, she 
having passed to life immortal at the age of 
twenty-seven years, leaving one daughter, 
Ella, the wife of Albert Wright, of Hardy, 
Neb. On the 15th of September, 1858, he 
married Rose Crosby, who was born in 
Granby, Canada, being a daughter of Hopkins 
and Sarah (Frost) Crosby. Mr. Crosby was 
a native of Brattleboro, Vt., but went when a 
young man to Canada, where he married Sarah 
Frost, who had moved there when a child with 
her parents from Keene, N. H. He was a 
blacksmith; and both he and his wife spent 
their remaining years in Canada, he dying at 
the venerable age of ninety-three years and 
she at the age of eighty- eight years. 

Of Deacon Fiske's second union five chil- 
dren have been born, of whom we chronicle the 
following: Charles S. Fiske, a farmer, lives 
in Shelburne; Levi L. , a farmer, resides in 
Greenfield; Alice B., a teacher, lives at 
home; Frederick F., a farmer, resides on the 
homestead ; and Rosa B. is the wife of Edward 
Cutting, of Colerain. Deacon and Mrs. Fiske 
are among the oldest and most respected resi- 



dents of the town of Shelburne, and in their 
pleasant home are enjoying the comforts of 
life and the society and friendship of a large 
circle of acquaintances. Both are members of 
the Congregational church, he having united 
with it thirty-five years ago, and for many 
years has served faithfully as Deacon of the 
church and as superintendent of the Sunday- 
school. In politics he is a stanch Republi- 
can, uniformly voting that ticket. 




ARTLEY HALE, a prosperous farmer, 
miller, and dealer in agricultural im- 

i^ V plements, residing in Bernardston, 
Mass., was born in this town. May 27, 1845, 
son of Increase S. and Abigail (Nelson) Hale. 
Increase S. Hale was a native of Bernardston, 
his father, John Hale, having been among the 
early settlers here. John Hale was a hard- 
working and successful farmer ; he had a vig- 
orous constitution, and lived to a ripe old age. 

Increase S. Hale was a carpenter and joiner, 
and also an owner of a saw-mill, and showed 
good practical sense in all his business trans- 
actions. His death took place at his home 
in Bernardston, November 2, 1886; but his 
wife, who was born in . Leyden, in December, 
1807, still survives him, living with her 
daughter, Mrs. L. A. Bullard. Mr. and Mrs. 
Increase S. Hale had seven children, one of 
whom died in infancy, and the following four 
of them are now living: Mary, the wife of 
J. H. Clark, residing in Gill ; Laura, widow of 
Luke Bullard, of Greenfield ; Hartley Hale, 
the subject of this sketch ; Lucy, the wife 
of David Chapin, residing in Bernardston. 
Hartley, Esther, and Sarah, who became the 
wife of Newell Snow, of Greenfield, are all 
deceased. Increase S. Hale was a Republican 
in politics and a liberal in religion. He had 
a brother who was in the War of 1812, and 



5° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his grandfather was a Lieutenant in the State 
militia. 

Hartley Hale was educated in the public 
schools of Bernardston. When only twelve 
years old he began working in his father's 
mill, and, being intelligent and energetic, as 
his years and strength increased, so did his 
capability, till he had acquired a thorough 
knowledge of the business. At twenty years 
of age he started out in life for himself at 
farming; and one year later he engaged also 
in milling, which two occupations he has hap- 
pily combined ever since. He has a farm of 
seventy acres and a tract of woodland of one 
hundred acres, both in the town of Bernards- 
ton. His first mill was a mile and a half 
from the village and was run by water-power. 
Finding the stream inadequate to his purpose, 
he put in a steam-engine, and used this power 
for some years, when he moved his plant to 
the vicinity of the railway station in Bernards- 
ton. In 1880 he located in his present com- 
modious quarters, where he has the largest 
saw and grist mill in town, equipped with the 
latest improved machinery and run by water- 
power. The grist mill has a daily capacity 
of four hundred bushels, the average output 
being two hundred bushels. Mr. Hale deals 
in all kinds of feed, also in fertilizers, coal, 
and farming implements, his stock in which 
embraces a wide range, from spades and pitch- 
forks to the latest high-grade mowers. The 
buildings which he owns and occupies were 
built under his own supervision in 1880. In 

1892 he put up his grain elevator; and in 

1893 he built the present dam, which is a 
solid, substantial piece of masonry, at a cost of 
twenty-five hundred dollars. 

On the 1st of January, 1877, Mr. Hale was 
united in marriage to Miss Harriet B. Has- 
kell, who was born March 27, 1853, the 
daughter of A. K. and Esther B. Haskell. 



Her father is now deceased, but her mother is 
living in Bernardston. Mr. Hale and wife 
hold liberal religious views, and in politics he 
adheres to the Republican party. They have 
no children. Mr. Hale is doing an excellent 
business, and is highly respected by all who 
know him. We are happy to present his por- 
trait in connection with this brief sketch of 
his busy and useful career to date. 



/^^TeORGE W. mayo, a skilled me- 
Vp I chanic of Orange, Mass., son of Ben- 
jamin and Louisa (Brattle) Mayo, 
was born at North Orange, May 14, 1832. 
He is a great-grandson of Benjamin and Dolly 
(Goddard) Mayo, the former of whom was born 
May 15, 1750, and the latter January 16, 
1757. The great - grandparents, who were 
well-to-do people, carried on a farm, and for 
a number of years kept the old tavern at North 
Orange. They had a large family of children, 
some of whom died in infancy, their names 
being handed down to children of a later birth, 
as follows: Benjamin, Nathan, Calvin, Dolly, 
Stephen, Esther, Lucena, Roxie, Dolly, Will- 
iam, and Roxie. 

Benjamin Mayo, the second, was born at 
North Orange, November 24, 1777, and was 
closely identified with the agricultural inter- 
ests of his native place during his entire life, 
which was but forty-seven years. His first 
purchase of land was that of the Frost estate, 
where he farmed successfully, and in addition 
kept a public house, giving good entertain- 
ment to man and beast. He married Esther 
Cheney, who was born in 1781, and was a 
descendant of a prominent family of this 
county. She lived until i860, rearing her 
only child, Benjamin Mayo, the third, to 
habits of industry and thrift. 

Benjamin Mayo, third, was born at North 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



SI 



Orange, March 7, 1805, and during the days 
of his youth and early manhood assisted on the 
home farm, which was located on the turnpike, 
managing it for some time after the death of 
his father. He subsequently purchased and 
occupied the Levi Cheney farm, and in course 
of time erected new buildings, besides mak- 
ing other valuable improvements. Here he 
departed his life in 1881, his death being uni- 
versally regretted. An uncompromising Dem- 
ocrat in his political views, he served the 
town faithfully as Selectman, and for three 
terms was representative to the State legis- 
lature. He was liberal-minded, and was a 
sincere Universalist in his religious beliefs. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Louisa 
Brattle, was born at Erving, November 4, 
1805, and died in 1884. Five children were 
born into their household circle, namely : 
George W. ; Nancy B. , who died young; Ben- 
jamin W. , who served bravely in the late 
Civil War; Orena L. , who died in childhood; 
and Carrie W. F. , who became the wife of 
William O. Ballou, and at her decease left 
two children — Nettie L. and Belle C. 

George W. Mayo was reared on the parental 
homestead, and received a practical education 
in the common schools. When twenty-two 
years old, he went to Michigan, where he was 
engaged for a year and a half in a chair factory 
and saw-mill. Returning to Franklin County, 
Mass., Mr. Mayo worked as a cabinet-maker 
the following eight years at Tully, and then 
came to Orange, where he was first employed 
as foreman for the J. S. Dewing Company, and 
was next with the Levi Kilbourn Company, 
where he remained nine years. Since that 
time he has held his present position with the 
New Home Sewing Machine Company, being 
one of its most trusted and valued employees. 
Mr. Mayo's politics are firmly embodied in 
the principles of the Republican party, and 



his religious faith is that of the Universalist 
denomination. 

On February 14, 1861, Mr. Mayo was 
united in marriage with Abby M. W. Mayo, 
who is a native of North Orange, born Novem- 
ber 24, 1843, being a daughter of Caleb and 
Mary W. (Ward) Mayo, the former having 
been a native of the same place, born Septem- 
ber 15, 1808. When only seven years of age, 
Caleb Mayo was bound out to a neighboring 
farmer, and for many years worked for his 
board, clothing, and schooling. He afterward 
learned the wheelwright's trade, and carried 
on a successful business in Tully for eight 
years, when, being burned out, he opened a 
store at North Orange ; but five years later he 
sold out, and removing to Orange worked in 
a cabinet-shop for twenty years. He was a 
man of iron constitution, vigorous and hearty 
to the end of his long life of eighty-five years, 
his death then being the result of a cut on his 
hand, which terminated in blood-poisoning. 
He was a strong Republican in his political 
affiliations, and religiously was an active mem- 
ber of the Universalist church. His wife, 
who died at the age of seventy-five years, was 
the mother of seven children; namely, Sarah 
W., Desire G. , Hannah A., Henry H., Abby 
M. W., Roxie ]., and Daniel F. 

The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Mayo was 
Stephen Mayo, who was born in Orange, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1783, and who died here in 1870. 
He was a progressive and practical agricultu- 
rist and a citizen of integrity. In April, 1804, 
he married Mary Cheney, who was born July 
20, 1784, and lived to the age of eighty-six 
years. They reared a large family of chil- 
dren; namely, Levi, Nancy, Caleb, Nancy B., 
Esther, William, Mary C, Dolly, and Roxie. 
Two children only have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Mayo, the elder of whom, Mary L., born 
September 23, 1879, lived but one day. Their 



52 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



other, a promising son, named Henry A. 
Mayo, was born November 21, 1883. The 
pleasant and attractive home of the family is 
at 26 High Street, a fine location, in a house 
built by Mr. Mayo in 1873. 




MOS D. ELMER, a well-known resi- 
dent of Northfield, proprietor and 
manufacturer of Elmer's Pain-kill- 
ing Balm, was born in this town, August 10, 
1830, son of Amos and Sally (Woodard) 
Elmer. Mr. Elmer's father, who was a native 
of Vernon, Vt., resided upon a farm in North- 
field a few years, and then went to Montague, 
where he continued to follow agriculture for 
some time. He subsequently removed to 
Shutesbury, and finally returned to Northfield, 
where he passed the remainder of his life, 
dying at the age of eighty-one years. 

His wife was a daughter of John and Sally 
(Drury) Woodard, the former a farmer, 
thought to have been of Scotch descent, who 
resided in Northfield. It is recorded in the 
family genealogies appended to the History of 
Northfield that Mr. John Woodward, as the 
name is there spelled, was from Norwich, 
England, was a soldier under Burgoyne, and, 
being taken when his army was captured, some 
time after enlisted in the American army, in 
which he served two years, being discharged 
by General Knox at West Point in October, 
1783. Mr. and Mrs. Amos Elmer became the 
parents of six children, three of whom are still 
living, namely: Amos D. Elmer, whose name 
appears at the head of this sketch; John 
Elmer, a resident of Readsboro, Vt.; and 
George Elmer, residing in Providence, R.I. 
The mother died at the residence of her son, 
Amos D., October 14, 1890, at the advanced 
age of eighty-six years. She was a member of 
the Congregational church. 



Amos D. Elmer passed his boyhood days in 
Montague, and at the age of thirteen years 
began life as a farm laborer, working by the 
month. He later found employment in the 
lumber-mills, where he was occupied until 
reaching the age of twenty-four, when he went 
to work in the broom-shops in Amherst, where 
he was employed for a time, later following 
the same occupation in Northfield. He then 
commenced the manufacture of medicinal rem- 
edies, and placed upon the market an article 
that was known as " Adhesive Salve," later 
introducing his " French Remedy," which 
found a ready sale. In 1865 he began the 
manufacture and sale of "Pain-killing Balm," 
a medicine which immediately sprang into 
popularity, and made a name for itself without 
the expenditure of a small fortune in advertis- 
ing, being sold entirely upon its merits. His 
preparations are shipped from Northfield to all 
parts of the country, the business being in a 
flourishing condition, the legitimate result of 
Mr. Elmer's energy and business ability. 

On November 27, 1856, Mr. Elmer was 
united in marriage to Marietta Coburn, daugh- 
ter of Leonard and Dolly (Lucas) Coburn, of 
Bernardston. Mrs. Elmer was born April 10, 
1837. Her father was a prosperous farmer, 
who, after residing in Bernardston for several 
years, died in Greenfield, at the age of fifty- 
five. Her mother, who was a native of Glas- 
tonbury, Conn., had a family of six children, 
five of whom are still living. She died in 
Hartford, Conn., at the age of sixty-five years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer have one son, Alton 
D., who was born in Northfield, October 21, 
1868. He has a good education, being a grad- 
uate of the Mount Hermon School, of the first 
class, and is occupying a position on the edi- 
torial staff of the Boston Journal. He is a 
member of Park Street Church of Boston. 
Mr. Amos D. Elmer is a Unitarian in relig- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



53 



ion. He and his wife are among the most 
prominent and respected residents of North- 
field. 




LONZO GRAVES, of Heath, Franklin 
County, Mass., for many years a prac- 
tical mechanic and now engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, was born in the neigh- 
boring town of Greeniield, December 14, 1829. 
His parents were Horace and Bathsheba 
(Mitchell) Graves, the former of whom was a 
native of Greenfield, where he acquired the 
trade of a printer and book-binder, and fol- 
lowed that occupation through life. The first 
wife of Horace Graves died, leaving four chil- 
dren : Horace, Ashley, Esther, and Martha. 
His second wife, Bathsheba Mitchell, also 
had four children; namely, Lucius, Irene, 
Alonzo, and William H., who died at four 
months. The father, subsequent to his second 
marriage, moved to Troy, N.Y., where he con- 
ducted a very successful business, and died at 
the age of fifty years. His widow became the 
wife of Robert Clark, who died aged sixty, 
while she, having a vigorous constitution, 
lived to reach the advanced age of ninety-six 
years, and was remarkably active to the last. 
She was a daughter of Moses and Lydia (Hale) 
Mitchell, her father being a prosperous farmer 
of Bernardston. 

Alonzo Graves was left fatherless at the 
tender age of~ three years. At nine years 
of age he commenced to earn his own living, 
being employed as chore boy on the farm of 
Colonel A. Smead, where he was obliged to 
milk nine cows, both morning and night, 
together with attending to other duties equally 
arduous ; and at the end of his four years' ser- 
vice he received from his employer two 
dollars. Tiring of farm life under such con- 
ditions, he then went to Bernardston; and, 
after learning the blacksmith's trade of B. 



Snow, followed that occupation for some years 
in that place and at Brattleboro, Vt. He next 
entered the employ of John Russell at the 
cutlery works in Greenfield, remaining there 
two years, and was subsequently engaged in 
the same business, both at Shelburne Falls 
and Conway, going from the latter place to 
Windsor, Vt. , where he ran a trip-hammer 
machine in the manufacture of table forks. 
Later he was foreman of the Bay State shops 
at Northampton, Mass., for a period of two 
years, and from there he went to Kenosha, 
Wis. Continuing in that State, he worked 
for the Racine Hardware and School Furni- 
ture Company, and then became a contractor 
for them. Failing health led to his return to 
New England; and in 1892 he settled at 
Heath, where he purchased a farm of one hun- 
dred and eighty acres, known as the Hunt 
place, and cheerily resumed the occupation of 
his early years. Since acquiring possession 
of the property, he has effected many notice- 
able improvements, having completely remod- 
elled the buildings, and is now progressing 
very satisfactorily in the dairying and stock- 
raising business. 

On November 24, 1853, he was united in 
marriage to Miss Eleanor D. Temple, of 
Heath, daughter of Solomon and Elizabeth 
(Stone) Temple, and grand-daughter of Solo- 
mon Temple, who was one of the very first set- 
tlers of the town. Solomon Temple purchased 
one hundred and thirty acres of wild land, 
which he cleared into a productive farm, and 
died at a good old age. His children were : 
Nathaniel, Richard, Benjamin, Asa, Abigail, 
Thankful, Lucy, and Solomon, Jr. The last, 
who was born in 1782, succeeded to the pos- 
session of the old homestead, where he died 
at the age of eighty-four years, his wife having 
been called to rest at the age of forty years. 
Mrs. Graves's brothers and sisters were: Na- 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



thaniel, Mary, Hamilton, Otis, Richard, 
James, and Elma E. Subsequent to the death 
of his first wife, Solomon Temple married 
Fanny Flagg, who survived but three weeks ; 
and for his third wife he wedded Mrs. Marsh, 
who bore him two children: James C. and 
Fanny. He served in the war of 1812, was a 
Whig in politics, and was a Congregationalist 
in his religious views. 

Mr. and Mrs. Graves have had seven chil- 
dren : Herbert A., who was born May 14, 
1855, a"d married Sarah A. Hallock; Clar- 
ence H., who was born May 14, 1857, married 
Ella M. Gormley, and has one daughter, 
named Florence; Lizzie, born October 16, 
1859, who wedded Ira D. Canedy, and has 
two children — Eva M. and Ella J.; Charles 
F., born August 22, 1861, and now residing 
at home ; Richard, who died at the age of five 
years; Jeannette I., born September 4, 1866; 
and Reginald S., born May 10, 1869. Mr. 
Graves is a Republican in politics and liberal 
in his religious views. 



KORENZO P. MUNN, farmer, a highly 
respected citizen of Gill, Franklin 
^0^ County, Mass., a representative of 
one of the oldest families of the Connecticut 
valley, was born in this town, September, 2, 
1815, only son of Seth, Jr., and Gratia 
(Wright) Munn. Mr. Munn is a lineal de- 
scendant of Benjamin Munn, who was an early 
settler of Hartford, Conn., but who removed 
to Springfield, Mass., in 1649, after fighting 
in the Pequot War, and whose son John was 
wounded in a battle with the Indians at 
Turner's Falls in 1676. John Munn, second, 
born in 171 2, son of Benjamin, second, and 
grandson of the first-named John, settled at 
Gill in 1739, and improved his farm, upon 
which he resided until his death. He reared 



a family of eight children. His son Seth, 
grandfather of Lorenzo P. , succeeded to a part 
of this farm, which he carried on with prosper- 
ous results, and died at the age of fifty-four 
years. It is stated in the History of the Con- 
necticut Valley that he served in the Rev- 
olutionary Army in 1779. His wife, Selina 
Janes, a native of Northfield, where her family 
were early settlers, died at the age of fifty-eight 
years, eight months, and twenty-two days. 
They had seven children, four sons and three 
daughters. 

Seth Munn, Jr., one of their sons, succeeded 
to the possession of the old homestead by 
purchasing the rights of the other heirs, and 
became a very successful farmer and a man 
of influence in the community. He was by 
nature an earnest seeker after knowledge, a 
great reader of books; and he was, above all, a 
very able Bible student. He married Gratia, 
a daughter of Oliver Wright, who belonged to 
one of the oldest families of Northfield, and 
they were the parents of six children, of whom 
three are still living, namely: Lucretia, 
widow of Uriah Tracy; Abigail, widow of 
James D. Merdough ; and Lorenzo P. Munn, 
our subject. Seth Munn, Jr., died at the age 
of eighty-seven; and his first wife. Gratia, 
at the age of fifty-three years. They were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and prominent in Sunday-school work. 

Lorenzo P. Munn received a fair education, 
attending the district school and also a private 
school in his native town; and he has resided 
at his present home during his entire life, 
with the exception of some short intervals in 
which he made visits to the West and South. 
When of sufficient age to drive oxen, ride a 
horse, or handle a hoe, he commenced to assist 
his father in the labors of the farm, in time 
becoming proficient in the various branches 
of agriculture, to which in his long period of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



SS 



activity he has devoted his energies with sat- 
isfactory results. He now cultivates seventy 
of the original one hundred acres of land, 
and the adjoining farms upon each side of his 
property are occupied by his sons. 

In 1838 Mr. Munn married Ruth Severance, 
daughter of Orin Severance, of Gill, and she 
became the mother of four children, as fol- 
lows: Mary Sophia, who married John Delvey 
and reared two of her four children, John and 
Nellie; Charles, who married Sarah Ripley, 
and has three children, Grace, Frank, and 
Mary; Chandler, who married Nellie Moore, 
and has two children, Lewis C. and Lucy; 
Sarah, a maiden lady, who died at the age of 
thirty years. Mr. Munn's first wife died at 
the age of fifty-four years ; and he wedded 
for his second wife, Sarah Cleflin, a native 
of Canada, a daughter of Luther Cleflin, whose 
father, Samuel Cleflin, came from Eng- 
land. Luther Cleflin moved to the vicin- 
ity of Ogdensburg, N.Y. , when his daughter 
Sarah was two years old. He lived on a farm 
and followed the trade of a mason until his 
death, which occurred at the age of fifty-four 
years. Mrs. Munn's mother, whose maiden 
name was Orpha Andrews, was born in Ver- 
mont, and died at the age of eighty-two years, 
having reared eight of her ten children, three 
of whom are still living; namely, Sarah (Mrs. 
Munn), Mabel E., and Clara, wife of Willard 
Hastings, of Gill. 

Mr. Munn was formerly a Whig in politics, 
having cast his first Presidential vote for Gen- 
eral Harrison in 1840, but has been a Repub- 
lican since the formation of that party, and, 
although he has been frequently solicited to 
accept public ofifice, has always declined. 
The family are members of the Methodist 
church, and Mr. Munn and his sons are very 
prominent in both the church and Sunday- 
school. 



■]rjTBR 



LBRIDGE ADAMS, a retired manufact- 
^1 urer and well-known and highly es- 
teemed citizen of Shelburne Falls, 
Franklin County, was born in Brookfield, 
Mass., February 24, 1818, son of Silas and 
Tirzah (Morey) Adams, and grandson of Jesse 
and Miriam (Richardson) Adams. 

Henry Adams, the progenitor of this branch 
of the Adams family in America, came from 
England and settled in what is now Quincy, 
Mass., about 1630. His sixth son, Joseph, 
was great - grandfather of President John 
Adams. Jesse Adams, grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, was a son of Abraham, 
grandson of John, and great-grandson of Henry 
Adams's seventh son, Edward Adams, who 
settled in Medfield, Mass. Jesse Adams was 
born in Brookfield, Mass., June 20, 1755. 
Like the majority of his contemporaries, he 
turned his attention to agriculture in early 
manhood, purchasing a farm in his native 
town, and spent his life as a progressive and 
successful farmer. He served in the Revolu- 
tionary War as a private more than two years. 
Jesse Adams died on September 24, 1827. 
His wife, Miriam Richardson Adams, bore 
him several children, including four sons and 
two daughters, who grew to maturity, as fol- 
lows : Charles, who became a successful phy- 
sician; Asa; Silas; Amasa; Catharine; and 
Cynthia, Mrs. Bowen. The mother lived to 
be over eighty years of age. 

Silas Adams was also a native of Brookfield, 
Mass., his birth occurring there on October 
18, 1786. He remained with his parents and 
cared for them during the declining years of 
their life. At their death he became the 
owner of the old homestead, a farm containing 
about one hundred and twenty acres of land, 
which he continued to carry on with profit. 
His death occurred on July 29, 1842. His wife, 
Tirzah Morey Adams, who was born August 29, 



56 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1790, was a daughter of Ephraim Morey. They 
became the parents of four sons and a daughter, 
namely: Simon A. and Elbridge, both of whom 
died in youth; Elbridge; Frederick A.; and 
Lorinda. The mother died November 27, 1 882, 
a little over forty years after the father's de- 
cease. In politics the father was a Whig, and 
in religious views he was liberal. 

Elbridge Adams, who grew to manhood on 
the old homestead, received a good practical 
education in the district schools of Brookfield. 
At eighteen years of age he learned the trade 
of a shoemaker, and continued to follow this 
vocation with profit for twelve years. He then 
came to Shelburne Falls, where he was en- 
gaged as an overseer in the grinding and 
finishing room of the Lamson & Goodnow 
Cutlery manufactory, remaining in that posi- 
tion for twenty-seven years. Mr. Adams next 
engaged in business for himself, purchasing a 
building on Mechanic Street, which he remod- 
elled and fitted up for the manufacture of 
paper boxes, an enterprise that he followed 
with profit for fifteen years, and in which he 
employed about ten assistants. At the expi- 
ration of that time he sold the business to 
H. A. Bowen, retaining the building, which 
he still owns. Mr. Adams then practically 
retired from active business life, although he 
is now superintendent of the cemetery, a 
position that he has held for eight years. In 
1852, when High Street, which at that time 
was a rye field, was laid out, he purchased a 
lot and built the house in which he now 
resides. His was the first dwelling erected on 
the street, and was then considered quite out 
in the country; to-day High Street is one of 
the best streets in the village, and has many 
fine residences. In front of his home are two 
noble elm-trees, which he set out at the time 
of building. He also owns a large tenement- 
house, which he has remodelled. 



Mr. Adams has been twice married, his first 
union being with Miss Sirilla Gavitt, daughter 
of Ephraim Gavitt, to whom he was married in 
1842. She died in 1882, at sixty-one years 
of age, leaving two children: Henry E., born 
June 22, 1855, who resides in Beverly, Mass. ; 
and Lorinda Ann, born January 6, 1843, now 
the widow of Joseph Merrill, by whom she has 
one child — Martha A. On October 10, 1883, 
Mr. Adams married Mrs. Angeline Vincent, 
daughter of Newell Phelps and Hannah A. 
Bassett Phelps. Her father was a successful 
agriculturalist of Clarksburg, Mass., where he 
was also engaged in the vocation of a carpen- 
ter. He is a supporter of Republican princi- 
ples, and takes a keen interest in public 
affairs. Mr. and Mrs. Phelps are the parents 
of five children, Mrs. Adams being an only 
daughter. The sons are: Edgar C, Henry, 
Edwin E., and George W. 

Mr. Adams is a stanch Republican, and has 
always taken an active interest in town affairs. 
For eight years he rendered faithful and 
acceptable service as a member of the Board of 
Selectmen. He and his wife are active and 
influential members of the Universalist church. 



KRANCIS H. WRIGHT, a well-known 
farmer of Northfield, was born in Bos- 
ton, March 2, 1838, son of Phineas 
and Elizabeth (Heath) Wright. Mr. Wright's 
grandfather, Phineas Wright, Sr., was a na- 
tive of Westford, Mass., where he followed 
agricultural pursuits and passed his entire life. 
His son and namesake, Phineas Wright, was 
born in Westford, and at the age of twenty-one 
years engaged in the trucking business in 
Boston, which he carried on for some years, 
later relinquishing that to enter the grocery 
business on Bromfield Street, and for many 
years was well and favorably known in busi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



57 



ness circles. He engaged to a considerable 
extent in other ventures, finally retiring from 
mercantile life and settling upon a large farm 
at Northfield, on which he remodelled the 
house and made other improvements. He 
enjoyed a long career of prosperity as a 
farmer, and died at the age of eighty-four 
years. His wife, Elizabeth, was a daughter 
of Samuel Heath, of Nashua, N.H., and they 
were the parents of two children : Phineas H., 
who was a business man of Boston, and died in 
Northfield on March 3, 1856, aged thirty-four 
years; and Francis H., the subject of the pres- 
ent sketch. The mother died at the age of 
seventy-nine years. 

Francis H. Wright was educated at a school 
in Bernardston and the academy in Northfield, 
and, after finishing his studies, he entered as a 
clerk the freight department of the Fitchburg 
Railroad, where he remained for several years. 
After his mother's death he took charge of the 
property which fell to his possession. He has 
since continued to reside at the old homestead, 
with the exception of a few short intervals, 
during which he has visited California and 
has given his attention to some business inter- 
ests in Boston. 

At the age of twenty-five years Mr. Wright 
was united in marriage to Miss Cynthia 
Brown, daughter of William and Cynthia 
(Shattuck) Brown, of Northfield. Her father 
was for some years an extensive manufacturer 
of brooms ; he removed from Northfield to 
Wisconsin, where he passed the remainder of 
his life. Mr. and Mrs. Wright reared three 
sons, as follows: Hammett, who married Miss 
Christina Sauter, of Greenfield, and is in busi- 
ness in Boston; William E. , who is with 
Beemis, Call & Co., of Springfield; and Fred- 
erick P., who is in the hardware business in 
Boston. Mrs. Wright died on October 13, 
1888. Mr. Wright is a Republican in poli- 



tics. For many years he has been a member 
of the Masonic Lodge of Northfield, in which 
he has held the office of Secretary and Treas- 
urer. He attends the Unitarian church. 




MMETT F. HASKINS, of Charlemont, 
Deputy Sheriff, is one of those intelli- 
gent, energetic, and courageous men 
who have attained success in life through 
sheer persistency. He was born among 
the hills of Savoy, Berkshire County, August 
23, 1854. The first of his ancestors of whom 
we have any knowledge were his great-grand- 
parents, Shurdick and Betsey Haskins, of 
Savoy, who died there in advanced years. 
They reared five children, as follows: Levi, 
Samuel, Ira, Mary Ann, and Lydia. 

The next in line of descent was Levi Has- 
kins, who spent his entire life in the quaint 
town of Savoy. Like his father, he was en- 
gaged in farming pursuits, although, the 
larger part of his land being heavily wooded, 
he derived a good income from cutting the 
timber and manufacturing it into lumber, he 
being the owner of a saw-mill, with which he 
carried on an extensive business. Besides till- 
ing his land, he made a specialty of buying 
wood lots in the vicinity, and in the winter 
season cleared them and sold the lumber. He 
was a Democrat in politics; and both he and 
his wife, whose maiden name was Julia Bul- 
lard, were faithful members of the Baptist 
church. They were the parents of nine chil- 
dren ; namely, Julia Ann, Hubbard, Diantha, 
Alvin, Cornelia, Henry, Octavia, Jane, and 
Tyler. Hubbard Haskins, who from the order 
in which they are recorded appears to have 
been the eldest son, was born in Savoy in 
1826, and there grew to manhood, working at 
home, milling and lumbering, for many years. 
He married Elizabeth Russell, who bore him 



58 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



two children, Emmett F. and Emerson F., 
the latter of whom died at the age of seventeen 
years. When these sons were quite young, 
both parents died, leaving them to the care of 
their grandparents. 

Emmett F. Haskins remained with his 
grandfather until twelve years old, when he 
went to work at farming for an uncle, with 
whom he lived two and one-half years. He 
became a wage-earner at the age of fifteen 
years, being very capable and industrious, and 
during the six summer months received ten 
dollars per month. The next season he was 
engaged by another neighbor, who appreciated 
his good qualities, and offered him thirteen 
dollars a month, but in the end failed to give 
him a penny. Not being discouraged, how- 
ever, he kept at farm labor until nineteen 
years old, when he went into a shop to work at 
making scythe snaths, an occupation which he 
followed nine years. Mr. Haskins afterward 
assisted for two years in the delivery of ore 
from the Davis sulphur mine, and since then 
has had constant and paying employment, a 
man of his willing disposition, marked ability, 
and exemplary habits, being always needed. 
Having been wisely economical from his 
youth, in good time he accumulated enough 
money to buy a lot on Main Street in Charle- 
mont, and thereon he has erected the finest 
house in that part of the village. In Febru- 
ary, 1893, he was appointed to his present 
office of Deputy Sheriff, and has discharged its 
duties to the entire satisfaction of all con- 
cerned and with credit to himself. 

An important step in the career of Mr. Has- 
kins was his marriage with Hattie A. Wells, 
the nuptials having been celebrated October 
10, 1875. Mrs. Haskins was born in New 
Ashford, August 3, 1858, being a daughter of 
Alexander and Lydia (Bliss) Wells, the for- 
mer of whom was a silver-plater by trade, and 



a life-long resident of New Ashford. He died 
in 1893, aged sixty-five years, leaving four 
children; namely, Charles A., Hattie A. 
(Mrs. Haskins), Mary E., and Carrie A. 
Mr. and Mrs. Haskins have two children : 
Lilla E., born February 26, 1879; 3"^ Arthur 
M., born October 2, 1885. Mr. Haskins affil- 
iates with the Republican party in politics, 
and with the liberals in his religious views. 




RTHUR FRANCIS SLATE, a promi- 
nent architect and contractor of Frank- 
lin County, was born at Manchester, 
Conn., December 29, 1842, a son of Thomas 
F. and Eliza (Parker) Slate. The Slate fam- 
ily have been known and honored in New Eng- 
land for several generations, more especially 
in Vermont and Connecticut. John J. Slate, 
father of Thomas F. , was born and bred in the 
Green Mountain State. During his younger 
years he was there engaged in farming, but 
later in life removed to Manchester, Conn., 
where he carried on a successful business as a 
hotel-keeper. He lived to the age of seventy- 
four years, and was an active worker in relig- 
ious circles, being a Deacon of the Congrega- 
tional church. He married Julia Bryant, a 
daughter of William C. and Hannah (Gurley) 
Bryant, the latter being a member of the Gur- 
ley family who played such an important part 
in the settlement and upbuilding of the great 
city of Chicago. Six children were born of 
their union; namely, Sophia, Roxanna, Mary, 
Juliet, John J., and Thomas F. 

Thomas F. Slate was born at Manchester, 
Conn., in 1822, and was reared to farming 
pursuits, remaining at home until twenty years 
old, when he learned the tailor's trade, which 
he continued to follow as long as his health 
permitted, becoming very proficient at this 
work, and having a large patronage. He mar- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



59 



ried Eliza Parker, and died at the early age of 
thirty-two years, leaving his young widow 
with one child, Arthur Francis, of whom we 
write. Mrs. Eliza P. Slate was born in 
Holden, Mass., January 31, 1823, and was a 
daughter of Jeremiah and Dorcas (Smith) 
Parker. Her father was a prosperous farmer, 
and she was one of a family of seven children; 
namely, Jeremiah, George, Aaron, Hannah, 
Columbus, Margaret, and Eliza P. Margaret 
Parker married Rodney Hunt, and bore three 
children : Hobart, Julia, and Solon, not one of 
whom is now living. She departed this life 
in the fifty-fourth year of her age, and Mr. 
Hunt afterward married his sister-in-law, Mrs. 
Eliza P. Slate. Of this union no children 
were born. 

Rodney Hunt was born, in 18 10, at Ash- 
burnham, Mass., a son of Peter and Keziah 
(Hobart) Hunt, and a worthy descendant of 
William Hunt, of Yorkshire, England. He 
was an energetic, industrious, and determined 
young man, beginning his career as a clerk in 
a hotel, where he saved three hundred dollars 
of his scanty wages, with which sum he raised 
the mortgage on his father's farm. After this 
was accomplished, Mr. Hunt learned the 
wheelwright's trade, and subsequently estab- 
lished himself in the business of manufactur- 
ing chairs and pails, at Wilton, Mass., but 
met with reverses, losing his entire property. 
Leaving his family, he came to Orange and 
began working as a wood-chopper at one dollar 
a day, which enabled him to supply the neces- 
sities of his family, and finally to bring them 
to this town. Although he had lost his 
money, his credit was still good; and he had 
no difficulty in borrowing money to buy a saw- 
mill at Warwick. This mill he remodelled, 
and by having good management, succeeded in 
placing it in a good paying condition. He 
sold the entire plant for three thousand dollars, 



a large advance on the original cost, which was 
six hundred dollars. Having paid his in- 
debtedness, Mr. Hunt had enough left to again 
start in business; and, after working for a 
while at his trade in Orange, he formed a part- 
nership with two gentlemen, and they began 
manufacturing water-wheels and different kinds 
of machinery, under the firm name of Hunt, 
Waite & Flint. 

Mr. Hunt had mechanical genius and a fer- 
tile brain, and later invented the turbine 
water-wheel, which brought him a fortune. 
The firm with which he was connected was 
eventually dissolved, and a stock company 
formed, incorporated under the name of the 
Rodney Hunt Machine Company, Mr. Hunt 
being President. This office he held up to the 
time of his death, in the eightieth year of his 
age. In politics he was a stanch Republican. 
He served with fidelity as Selectman and 
Assessor of Orange, and for three terms repre- 
sented his district in the State legislature. 
Religiously, he was a firm believer in the 
tenets of the Baptist church. Personally, Mr. 
Rodney Hunt was a man of tender feeling and 
open-handed generosity, heedful of the wants 
of the poor and needy, never forgetting the 
time when he himself was in humble circum- 
stances. In 1845 he built a fine house in 
Orange, and this is now occupied by his 
widow, Mrs. Eliza P. Hunt, a lovable woman, 
bearing with ease her many years of life, and 
held in high esteem by her friends and 
neighbors. 

Arthur Francis Slate received a practical 
education in the public schools of his native 
town ; and, being gifted by nature with 
mechanical ability, he learned the carpenter's 
trade when quite young. He had scarcely 
completed his trade when the tocsin of war re- 
sounded throughout the land; and, although a 
beardless youth of eighteen years, he loyally 



6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



responded to the call for volunteers. On Sep- 
tember 9, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, 
Tenth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, under 
the command of Colonel Russell, and served 
in that company until October 25, 1864, hav- 
ing been promoted for brave and meritorious 
conduct on September i, 1862, to the rank of 
Corporal, and again June i, 1864, to that of 
Sergeant of the company. On October 25, 

1864, Mr. Slate was appointed, by General 
A. H. Terry, First Lieutenant of Company G 
of the same regiment, and June 19, 1865, was 
commissioned, by General John Gibbons, Cap- 
tain of the company. His regiment went out 
in the Burnside expedition ; and he was an 
active participant in all of the battles of any 
importance in North Carolina, South Carolina, 
and Virginia, being at Hilton Head, at the 
second battle of James Island, and for three 
months under a steady fire at Fort Wagner. 
He was also at the front during the bombard- 
ment of Fort Sumter. Although in the midst 
of danger a great part of the time, Captain 
Slate escaped serious injury, four wounds which 
he received being but slight. On August 31, 

1865, he was honorably discharged, and on the 
4th of September he returned to the scenes 
of his childhood. Since then, with the ex- 
ception of three years that he was engaged 
in the coal business at Philadelphia, Pa., Mr. 
Slate has worked at his trade. In 1891 he 
settled in Orange, where he is carrying on an 
extensive and lucrative business in designing, 
contracting, and building. The Memorial 
Hall, and several beautiful dwelling-houses in 
Orange which have been erected under his su- 
pervision, are a standing monument to his good 
taste and mechanical skill. At present he is 
working on a large and handsome hall at Cole- 
rain, which will be an ornament to the place. 

On March 4, 1867, Mr. Slate married Ellen 
A. Larkin, who was a native of Unionville, 



Conn., a daughter of* John and Maria (Fuller) 
Larkin, respected members of the agricultural 
community of that town, neither of whom is 
now living, Mr. Larkin having passed away at 
the age of threescore and ten years, and his 
wife at the age of seventy-one. They were 
the parents of three children : Charles, Ellen 
A., and Jennie. The only child born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Slate was a daughter, Estella, whose 
stay upon earth was but nine short years. 
Mother and daughter are now united, the death 
of Mrs. Slate having occurred in Philadelphia 
on October 25, 1877. On June 14, 1886, Mr. 
Slate was married to Mathilde Minugh, of 
Long Branch, N.J. She was born in Jersey 
City, February i, 1862, being one of nine 
children of George and Mary (Hoag) Minugh, 
the former a prominent man at Long Branch. 
Mr. Slate has no children by his second 
marriage. 

Mr. Slate is a zealous advocate of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party, and takes an 
intelligent interest in the affairs of his adopted 
town, where he is now serving as Assessor. 
He is prominent in military circles, and be- 
longs to the Grand Army of the Republic, 
Post of Orange. 




BED S. ARMS is a boot and shoe 
dealer of South Deerfield, Mass., who 
has occupied his present place of busi- 
ness for the past forty years. He was born in 
this village, August 13, 1830, where his 
father, Josiah Arms, was also born on March 
15, 1800. The latter was a son of Eliphaz 
Arms and grandson of Thomas Arms, both of 
whom were also natives of Deerfield. The 
family, so far as known, is descended from 
William Arms, who was born in the Island of 
Jersey. Its genealogy was published in 1877, 
by Edward W. Arms, at Tfoy, N.Y. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Eliphaz Arms, who was -probably a farmer, 
passed his entire life in this village. His son 
Josiah established a shoe manufactory in 
Deerfield, where for a period of eighteen years 
he produced fine, hand-made goods, of a superior 
quality. He died at the age of forty years. 
Josiah Arms married for his second wife 
Abigail Squires, of Bernardston, Obed S. 
Arms being the only child of this union. 
After the death of her first husband, Mrs. 
Abigail S. Arms married Asa Edwards, of 
South Deerfield, with whom she moved to 
Southampton, where she died in 1869 at the 
age of fifty-nine years. 

Obed S. Arms, after attending for some 
years the schools of his native town, spent six 
months as a student at the Shelburne Falls 
Academy, and then became a clerk in a store 
in Greenfield, where he remained for about 
two years. Returning to South Deerfield at 
the expiration of that time, in 1854 he here 
went into business on his own account as a re- 
tailer, and also began manufacturing shoes in 
a small way, occupying a dwelling-house for 
that purpose. In 1855 he opened his present 
store, where he has since continued to carry on 
a successful business, and, with a single ex- 
ception, is the only tradesman in Franklin 
County who has remained in one place of busi- 
ness for such an unusual length of time. His 
mercantile career has extended over a long 
period, only two merchants now doing business 
in Deerfield having been thus engaged longer 
than he. Mr. Arms has always enjoyed the 
confidence of his fellow-townsmen, whom he 
has well and faithfully served. He relin- 
quished manufacturing some time since, and 
now devotes his time to the retail trade, carry- 
ing a complete and varied assortment of his 
line of goods. 

Mr. Arms has been thrice married, his first 
wife, whom he wedded in 1852, having been 



Julia Wrisley, a resident of Northfield Farms, 
who died in i860, aged twenty-eight years, 
leaving no children. His second wife was 
Leeta A. Lovejoy, of Augusta, Me., who died 
leaving one child, Carrie L. ; and his present 
wife was before marriage Elizabeth Babcock, 
of South Deerfield. Mr. Arms is a Republi- 
can in politics. He officiated as Postmaster 
at South Deerfield a period of twenty-four 
years, from Lincoln's administration to the 
first term of President Cleveland, has held the 
office of Town Treasurer seven years, and has 
acted as a Justice of the Peace and Notary 
Public for twenty years. He is a Master 
Mason, having joined the craft in 1861, and 
is a member of the Congregational church, as 
was also his second wife. He has been treas- 
urer of the church for fourteen years, and 
has been otherwise active in church work for 
many years. 



KRANCIS R. PRATT, Treasurer of the 
H. H. Mayhew Corporation, manufact- 
urers of mechanics' tools at Shelburne 
Falls, Franklin County, Mass., was born in 
Charlemont, a few miles away, April 3, 1835, 
a son of Josiah and Catherine (Hall) Pratt. 
His grandfather, Josiah Pratt, Sr. , who was a 
native of Mansfield, Mass., after marrying 
bought a farm in Buckland, in this county, 
and, besides attending to the cultivation of the 
land, worked at carpentry. He subsequently 
sold his Buckland property and removed to 
Shelburne Falls, where he remained but a 
short time. As old age crept upon him he 
retired from active work, and, returning to 
Buckland, there passed away at the age of 
eighty-seven. In politics Josiah Pratt was a 
Whig. He was a member of the Congrega- 
tional church, and for many years was Deacon. 
He was the father of six children, four sons 
and two daughters. 



62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Josiah Pratt, Jr., the father of our subject, 
was born in Mansfield, Mass., January 17, 
1802. He was for twenty years engaged in 
the manufacture of axes at Charlemont, doing 
the work mostly by hand, as was customary at 
that time, and conducting a good business. 
In 1843 he removed to Shelburne Falls, where 
he had a thriving trade, and in 1865 he sold 
his business and retired. His workshop was 
on the river bank, and was destroyed by the 
flood in 1869. Josiah Pratt died in 1887, at 
the age of eighty-five. In politics he was a 
Democrat, and in religion he held liberal 
views. He was a member of Mountain Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Catherine Hall, was the daughter of 
Joel Hall, one of the original charter members 
of Mountain Lodge, A. F. &. A. M., which was 
instituted at Rowe, Mass., in 1802. She was 
a member of the Unitarian church. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pratt were the parents of the following 
children: Frank J., who for some time was 
associated with his father in business at Shel- 
burne Falls; Mary H. ; Catherine A. ; Francis 
R. ; Julia M. ; George B. ; Ellery C. ; and 
Anna I. 

Francis R. Pratt finished his education at 
the Shelburne Falls Academy, and up to the 
age of twenty-seven he was engaged in the axe 
business with his father. In 1862 he entered 
the employ of W. H. Maynard & Co., tool 
manufacturers, and remained with them until 
1867, just previous to which date W. H. 
Maynard & Co. were succeeded by H. S. Shep- 
ardson & Co. The next five years Mr. Pratt 
spent in Worcester, Mass., in the office of 
W. H. Maynard & Co., wholesale grain dealers. 
In 1872, following his original bent, he re- 
turned to Shelburne Falls, and again associated 
himself with manufacturing interests by ac- 
cepting the position of superintendent with 
H. S. Shepardson & Co., manufacturers of me- 



chanics' tools and hardware specialties, and has 
remained with this concern and its successors 
ever since. In 1876, following the death of 
Mr. Shepardson, the business was sold out to 
H. H. Mayhew & Co., Mr. Pratt still acting 
as superintendent and manager. Later a stock 
company was formed, under the name of H. H. 
Mayhew Company, tool manufacturers, which 
employed a force of thirty-five men. Mr. 
Pratt became Assistant Treasurer of the com- 
pany in 1886, and on the death of Mr. May- 
hew, in 1894, was made Treasurer. 

Mr. Pratt was married in 1863 to Lydia 
A., daughter of Caleb and Mary (Burnett) 
Taft, the former a progressive and well-to-do 
farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Pratt have one son, 
William M., who is Treasurer of Goodell 
Brothers Company, manufacturers of hardware 
specialties at Greenfield, Mass. He married 
Emma C. Richardson, and has two children: 
Ethel A. and Francis W. His residence is 
in Greenfield, Mass. 

In politics Francis R. Pratt is an indepen- 
dent Democrat. He is one of the trustees of 
the savings bank and a member of the in- 
vesting committee. Socially, he belongs to 
Mountain Lodge, A. F. & A. M. In relig- 
ious views he is liberal, and his wife is a 
member of the Episcopal church. They have 
a pleasant home, shaded by fine old maples. 



-fgTARDING G. WOODARD, whose 
r=rl portrait accompanies this brief me- 
-^^ V moir, was for many years a prosper- 
ous business man of Greenfield, Mass. He 
was born in New Braintree, in this State, 
August 14, 1822, son of Freeman and Mary 
(Green) Woodard. Freeman Woodard's na- 
tive place was Dana, Mass., the date of his 
birth being April 13, 1798. He worked as a 
mechanic the greater part of his life, and died 




HARDING G. WOODARD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



6S 



at the home of his son, Harding G. , in Green- 
field, March 14, 1862. His wife, Mrs. Mary 
Green Woodard, was born May 20, 1804, in 
the town of Barre, Mass., and died at the 
son's home in Greenfield on Christmas Day, 
1881. 

Mr. Harding G. Woodard learned his trade 
of butcher in Worcester, Mass., and made a 
specialty of dressing and dealing in veal. In 
1847, after having lived in various places in 
Massachusetts, he removed to Greenfield, and 
here went into business as a wholesale dealer 
in veal, beef, poultry, hides, and tallow. He 
was the leading man of the place in this trade, 
which he conducted on an extensive scale and 
carried on for twenty-five years. Mr. Wood- 
ard's successful career is a good illustration of 
what energy and perseverance can accomplish. 
He began life a poor boy, buying his time of 
his father for three hundred dollars; and at his 
death he owned the home, with some twenty- 
five acres of land and other property, valued in 
all at fifty thousand dollars. 

He was first married November 28, 1844, to 
Sarah J. Ranney, who died October 11, 1861, 
leaving four children. He was again married 
January 6, 1863, to Martha Burnham, who 
lived but a few years. After her death, which 
occurred April 29, 1867, Mr. Woodard on 
March 10, 1868, married for his third wife 
Miss Lizzie Meriam, who was born May 21, 
1839, in Keene, N. H., the daughter of Joshua 
and Nancy (Holbrook) Meriam. Her father 
was born at Ashburnham, Mass., and her 
mother at the same place. The Meriam fam- 
ily settled in Ashburnham during the Revo- 
lutionary War. They were a branch of the 
Marion family. John Marion was born in Eng- 
land, in 1620; and his son Samuel was born in 
Boston, in 1655. Ignatius Meriam, who was 
the first of the family to settle in Ashburnham, 
died April 3, 1799, and his wife on April 2 of 



the same year. Joshua Meriam, their son and 
the father of Mrs. Woodard, was a shoemaker 
by trade, an energetic and industrious man, 
and a total abstainer from intoxicants. He 
was a member of the Methodist church and in 
politics a Republican. His first wife, Nancy 
Holbrook, died at Ashburnham, July 30, 1852. 
He had two children by this union, Mrs. 
Woodard being the only one living ; but by his 
second marriage, to Roxanna Fassett, he had no 
children. Mr. Meriam married for his third 
wife Miss Jane R. Wood, of English birth ; 
and the result of this union was a daughter, 
Miss E. J. Meriam, who is a resident of Bos- 
ton ; and a son, Otis Bradford, who died aged 
ten months. 

Harding G. Woodard was a consistent mem- 
ber of the Methodist church and a stanch Re- 
publican. He died March 19, 1884, leaving a 
widow and seven children, six of whom are 
now living : Mrs. Sarah L. Johnson, of 
Springfield, Mass. ; Mrs. E. E. Baker, of Tol- 
land, Conn. ; J. Madison Woodard and New- 
man H. Woodard, both veal dealers of Green- 
field, carrying on the extensive business left 
by their father; Herbert Meriam Woodard, 
in the real estate business in Boston ; Charles 
G. Woodard, in the lumber business in Green- 
field; and M. Mabelle, who died June 21, 1890, 
at the age of twenty-one years. Mrs. Jane R. 
Woodard still resides on the old Woodard 
place, enjoying its comforts and the many 
friends she has won to herself by her attractive 
graces of mind and character. She is a faith- 
ful member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



lEVI PRESTON CHENEY, an enter- 
prising, progressive, and liberal- 
minded citizen of North Orange, 
owns and occupies one of the finest estates in 
Franklin County. Mr. Cheney was born June 




66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



■ 3, 1846, in the town of Orange, which was the 
birthplace of many of his ancestors, who were 
important factors in the settlement and up- 
building of this part of the county. His 
paternal grandfather, Levi Cheney, was born 
in Orange, December 2, 1751, and was long a 
leader in all enterprises tending to advance the 
prosperity of the town. He was a farmer, 
residing in the western part of the place, and 
a man of iron constitution. He rounded out 
nearly a century of years, living to the age of 
ninety-six; and even in old age his hand did 
not forget the cunning of youth, as he proved 
to the younger generation by going into the 
hayfield when his head was silvered by the 
frosts of ninety-two years, and there showing 
the men how to mow. He was active in poli- 
tics, and a stanch Whig. His views on relig- 
ious matters were clear and liberal, he being a 
conscientious follower of the Univers'alist doc- 
trines. His first wife, whose maiden name 
was Mary Hill, died at the age of threescore 
years, leaving seven children, as follows: 
Esther, Mary, Levi, Peter, Stephen, Louis, 
and Alexander. He subsequently married 
Miss Sarah Ballou, who bore him two chil- 
dren, namely : Asula P. (Mrs. Goddard) ; and 
Preston Cheney, the father of the subject of 
this brief sketch. 

Preston Cheney was born in Orange, July 7, 
1823, and spent his entire life within its 
limits, dying October 13, 1855. Following 
in the footsteps of his honored sire, he became 
a farmer, and was a loyal and worthy citizen 
of the place, a valued member of the Republi- 
can party, and a strong Universalist in his 
religious beliefs. He married Mary A. Os- 
good, who bore him three children, namely: 
Levi Preston, of whom we write in the present 
sketch; George, born December 2, 1847, who 
died in November, 1892; and Charles N., 
born June 27, 1849, now a carpenter in Athol, 



who married Mary Shannon, and has three 
children — Frank, Mary, and Sylvester. 

Levi P. Cheney had the misfortune to be 
bereft of a father's care and counsel when a 
young lad ; and, the home being broken up, he 
went to Athol, where he worked for John 
Kendall at farming and lumbering until 
twenty-two years old, attending school in the 
winter. Removing to Tully, Mr. Cheney 
worked for four years in a furniture-shop, an 
employment in which he took great pleasure. 
He lived in Warwick for twelve years, carry- 
ing on the farm of his father-in-law, but gave 
it up, that he might care for his aunt, Mrs. 
Asula Goddard, and look after her property in 
North Orange. He was next employed in a 
furniture-shop in Orange, where he remained 
until 1893, when he returned to North Orange 
to take possession of the home left him by 
his aunt at her decease. This is beautifully 
located, commanding one of the best long-dis- 
tance views to be found in many miles around, 
Tully Mountain being east, and a pretty pond 
not far away. It is finely improved, with com- 
modious residence and barn ; and there he 
and his family enjoy all the comforts of life. 
During the summer season Mr. Cheney 
throws his house open to boarders from the 
city, being able to accommodate about twenty- 
five, who enjoy to the utmost the hospitalities 
of his house, and find rare delight in the pleas- 
ant drives of the locality, becoming refreshed 
and rejuvenated after a summer's stay. 

On August 27, 1873, Mr. Cheney married 
Miss Martha Ward. She was born December 
25, 1850, in Warwick, being a daughter of 
William and Zebiah (Sandin) Ward, the for- 
mer of whom was born April 15, 1800, and 
died in August, 1868. His wife was some 
years younger than he, having been born 
April 12, 1 819, a few weeks prior to the birth 
of Queen Victoria. Six children were born to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



67 



Mr. and Mrs. Ward; namely, William J., 
Harriet E., Stephen G. , Martha A., Oliver 
D., and Charles F. Mr. and Mrs. Cheney are 
the parents of two children: Henry W. , born 
June 24, 1874; and Carrie E., born August 5, 
1875. In politics Mr. Cheney is a sound 
Republican. Religiously, he is a conscien- 
tious believer in the Universalist faith. He 
is a member of the Orange Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M. ; and both he and his wife are valued 
members of the Eastern Star Lodge. 




^AMUEL H. ATHERTON, a manu- 
facturer of soaps, residing at Ber- 
nardston, was born May 25, 1820, 
in the town of Greenfield, Mass., son of 
Joseph, Jr., and Martha (Chamberlain) Ather- 
ton. His grandfather, Joseph Atherton, Sr., 
settled in Greenfield when the place consisted 
of only a few houses, and was a sturdy pioneer 
and successful farmer, prominent in all town 
affairs. He served as a minute-man in the 
War of 1812, and died in the town of Gill, 
April 6, 1834. His wife died March 3, 1844. 
Of their nine children, Ralph and Oliver died 
young; but Olive, Allen, Merry, Joseph, Jr., 
Horace, Hepzibah, and Henry grew to 
maturity. 

Joseph Atherton, Jr., was born in Green- 
field, August 3, 1789, but grew to manhood in 
Bernardston ; he afterward learned the trade 
of blacksmith in Greenfield, and this calling 
he followed the rest of his life. He had a 
shop, and carried on the business in Bernards- 
ton for a number of years, being a good 
mechanic and industrious citizen, commanding 
the respect of all who knew him. His last 
years, however, were spent in Hartford, Conn., 
where he died in middle life, at the age of 
fifty-two. His wife, Martha Chamberlain, 
died when about sixty-seven years of age. 



They were the parents of eight children : 
Joseph, Martha, Newton, Bartlett, Samuel H., 
Henry, John, and Elizabeth. All except 
Henry grew up and married, but three only are 
now living, namely : Martha, who became Mrs. 
Webster, and resides in Akron, Ohio; Samuel 
H. ; and Elizabeth, who is now Mrs. Burr, of 
Hartford, Conn. 

Samuel H. Atherton was educated and grew 
to manhood in Bernardston, where he has re- 
sided continuously since 1865. When a lad, 
he learned the shoemaker's trade, but never 
followed it to any extent. He was engaged 
in various lines of business, but for the last 
twenty years has been in the manufacture of 
soap, and is now at the head of the firm of 
S. H. Atherton & Son, who have a lye and 
soap factory in Bernardston. Mr. Atherton 
also has a farm in this town, and successfully 
carries on dairy and general farming, finding 
a home market for all his products. He has 
always been conscientious and diligent, not 
only in the management of his own private 
affairs, but in all duties pertaining to citizen- 
ship. For seven or eight years he has been 
Selectman and Tax Collector, which latter 
office he still holds. In politics he is a 
Democrat, and he and his wife are members of 
the Universalist church. 

Mr. Atherton was first married in 1843, 
when twenty-three years of age, to Roxanna 
Kingsley, who died in 1845. He was again 
married in 1847, to Abbie S. Taft, who died 
in 1 88 1. In 1882 Mr. Atherton was married 
to Mrs. Marian (Atherton) Plummer, widow 
of Jason H. Plummer. She was born in Ber- 
nardston, June 26, 1 8 19, daughter of Horace and 
Rhoda (Cushman) Atherton. Horace Ather- 
ton, a blacksmith by trade, was a native of 
Bernardston, and died in that town at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-seven years. His wife, 
Rhoda Cushman, was born in Greenfield, and 



68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



died in Springfield when thirty-three years of 
age. They had five children, four of whom are 
now living, namely: Rhoda, now Mrs. Cush- 
man ; Clessem C. ; Joseph B. ; Marian (Mrs. 
Atherton). The other was a daughter, Lu- 
cinda S. Mrs. Marian Atherton had two chil- 
dren by her former husband, Henry H. and 
Horace O. Plummer, both deceased. Mr. 
Samuel H. Atherton had four children, who 
died quite young, and has one son now living, 
Adelbert S. Atherton, born October 13, 1851. 
Mr. Adelbert S. Atherton married Mila H. 
Allen ; and they have five children, as follows : 
Lilia G., Fred S., John C, Raymond, and 
Abbie E. 




'AMUEL STILLMAN DEXTER, 
a prominent business man of Frank- 
lin County, is a leading citizen of 
the town of Orange, where his birth occurred 
March 4, 1829, the day on which Andrew 
Jackson was inaugurated President of the 
United States. He is a son of the late Ben- 
jamin Dexter, Jr., and is a lineal descendant 
of Thomas Dexter, who came to Massachusetts 
from England in 1630, was admitted a free- 
man at Lynn in May, 1631, owned eight hun- 
dred acres of land in what is now Saugus, and 
was interested with others in establishing there 
the first iron works in America. He was one 
of ten men of Saugus — namely, Edmund Free- 
man, Henry Feake, Thomas Dexter, Edward 
Dillingham, William Wood, John. Carman, 
Richard Chadwell, William Almy, Thomas 
Tupper, and George Knott — who, under date 
April 3, 1637, received from the Plymouth 
Colony a large grant of land on Cape Cod, 
permission having been given them, as stated 
in the records, "to view a place to sit down 
and have sufficient land for threescore fami- 
lies upon the conditions propounded to them 
by the governor and Mr. Winslow. " Thus 



was begun the settlement of Sandwich, which 
was incorporated as a town in 1639. 

Thomas Dexter settled in Sandwich, but 
afterward removed to Barnstable. He lived 
to the age of fourscore years, at his death leav- 
ing three children: Mary, .William, and 
Thomas, Jr. William Dexter was born at 
Pine Island, Mass. He married Sarah Vin- 
cent, was a large landholder and an influen- 
tial citizen, and died in 1694, leaving the 
following children : Mary, Stephen, Philip, 
James, Thomas, Benjamin, and John. Ben- 
jamin Dexter, son of William, became a 
wealthy man, owning one thousand acres of 
land in the town of Rochester on Buzzard's 
Bay. He was an active worker in political 
and religious circles, and gave to each of his 
children a fair start in life. He and his 
wife, Sarah Arnold Dexter, reared eight chil- 
dren, namely: Noah, born March 26, 1697; 
James, born July 22, 1698; Benjamin, bom 
March 4, 1700; Sarah, born July 25, 1702; 
Josiah, born July 12, 1704; Constant, born 
September 17, 1706; Samuel, born September 
14, 1708; and Ephraim, born May 27, 171 1. 
Samuel Dexter, fifth son of Benjamin and 
Sarah, was a pioneer settler of Athol, Worces- 
ter County, going there in 1736, and in- 
vesting largely in land, eventually becoming 
one of the leading farmers of the town. He 
subsequently moved to Hardwick, where he 
died at a ripe old age. He was a steadfast 
member of the old Whig party, and held 
several of the important town and county 
ofifices. The wife of Samuel Dexter was 
Mary Clark, and they were the parents of the 
following children : Joseph, born September 
2, 1733; Samuel, born October 13, 1734; 
Ichabod, born in 1736; Mary, born July 11, 
1743; Sarah, born May 8, 1745; and Ben- 
jamin, who was born November 28, 1747. 

Benjamin was the youngest child born to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



69 



his parents, Samuel and Mary Dexter. At the 
age of twenty-one years, being then a resident 
of Athol, his native town, he married Hannah 
Stone ; and they removed to the town of 
Orange, where he bought a farm of three hun- 
dred acres, which he carried on for a while 
very successfully, also filling many important 
town offices. He afterward disposed of that 
property, and bought a tract of land in Rich- 
mond, N. H., where he was engaged as Presi- 
dent of the Richmond Turnpike Company, and 
also carried on general farming until his death, 
February 22, 1818. His widow rounded out 
nearly a century of life, her age at her death, 
June 3, 1 84 1, lacking but a few days of 
ninety-seven years. Benjamin Dexter and his 
wife were Quakers in their religious belief. 
Their family circle included nine children, 
namely: Hannah, born December 5, 1770; 
Simeon, born October 31, 1772; Benjamin, 
born November 24, 1775; Lucy, born Decem- 
ber 24, 1777; Phoebe, born. September 11, 
1779; Betsey, born July 6, 1782; Susannah, 
born October 7, 1784; Sally, born November 
19, 1786; and Mercy, born June 17, 1788. 

Benjamin Dexter, Jr., was born in Orange, 
and received the advantages of the early 
schools of the town. There being but two 
sons in the family, his services were needed 
on the home farm, where he was a faithful 
worker until after attaining his majority. 
When ready to settle in life, he bought of his 
father two hundred acres of land in the place 
of his nativity, and engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, being one of the most enterprising 
and progressive farmers of the locality. He 
subsequently bought two hundred more acres 
of land, and carried on mixed husbandry and 
stock-raising until his decease, at the venera- 
ble age of eighty-three years. He was a 
prominent Whig, and filled various local pub- 
lic offices, and was an active member of the 



Congregational church. He possessed excel- 
lent judgment in affairs, and was often called 
upon to settle estates, his integrity and honor 
being unquestioned. He was four times mar- 
ried. His first wife, Hepzibah Ballard, lived 
but a few months after their marriage. His 
second wife, Anna Barrett, died in young 
womanhood, leaving one child, Hepzibah, who 
was born December 25, 1802. Betsey Legg, 
who became his third wife, died July 29, 1818, 
leaving seven children, namely: Stephen, born 
September 5, 1804; Anna, born March 3, 1806; 
Amasa, born December 3, 1808; Moses, born 
January 26, 181 1 ; David, born April 10, 1813 ; 
Aaron, born July 12, 1815; and Joseph, born 
March 31, 1818. The maiden name of his 
fourth wife was Frances Tuttle. She was born 
March 9, 1788, and was a daughter of Jedediah 
and Lucia (Smith) Tuttle. 

The Tuttle family originated in England. 
John Tuttle, the grandfather of Jedediah, 
sailed from that country in 1635, on the 
"Planter," and was one of the early settlers of 
the town of Ipswich, Mass. His son Simon, 
the father of Jedediah, settled in Winchendon, 
Mass., being one of the well-to-do farmers of 
that town. He was a veteran of the Revolu- 
tion, serving as Captain of a company at the 
battle of Bunker Hill and at the taking of 
Burgoyne, besides participating in many of the 
most important engagements of that memorable 
struggle for independence. Mrs. Lucia Smith 
Tuttle was lineally descended from Christo- 
pher Martin and Thomas Rogers, who were 
passengers in the first voyage of the "May- 
flower," Thomas Rogers being, it is said, a 
direct descendant of John Rogers, the martyr. 
Jedediah and Lucia (Smith) Tuttle reared ten 
children, as follows: James, born August 10, 
1780; David, born December 2, 1782; Jede- 
diah, Jr., born April 18, 1785; P"rances, born 
March 9, 1788; Clarissa, born November 2, 



7° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1790; Electus, born Februarys, 1793; Silas, 
born May 8, 1795; Eli, born July 5, 1797; 
Ainsworth, born January i, 1799; Sarah, born 
January 5, 1802; and David, born January 19, 
1806. Mrs. Frances Tuttle Dexter was a 
woman of great energy, strong common sense, 
and high religious principle. She became the 
mother of four children, namely: Simeon, 
born August 30, 1822; Betsey, born May 30, 
1825; Samuel Stillman, born March 4, 1829; 
and George W. , born April 6, 1831. 

Samuel Stillman Dexter acquired his ele- 
mentary education in the public schools of 
Orange, and afterward pursued his studies 
successively at the Shelburne Falls Academy, 
the seminary at Gouverneur, N. Y., the West- 
field Normal School, and the Lancaster Normal 
School. He then taught school for seven 
years, and subsequently engaged in business 
fifteen years in his native place, where he 
bought a tract of standing timber, which he 
manufactured into lumber and placed upon the 
market, he in the mean time becoming the 
owner of some valuable real estate. His next 
employment was that of a civil engineer, land 
surveyor, and conveyancer, which he still 
carries on, in addition to the care of his vil- 
lage and town property. He also has the care 
of several estates in the town, acting as agent 
for the owners, whose homes are elsewhere. 
Mr. Dexter is a man of untiring energy and 
business enterprise, practical and progressive, 
and is one of the sterling citizens of the town, 
very popular and highly esteemed. Mr. Dex- 
ter was united in marriage in 1855 to Maria 
C. Dewey, who was born in Westfield, Mass., 
February 18, 1831, daughter of Roland and 
Maria K. (Weller) Dewey. Her father was 
born in 1796, and passed away in 1861. He 
was a Democrat in politics, and an active 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Mr. Dewey and his wife were the parents of 



the following children : Evelina, Roland, Ed- 
ward, Maria C. (Mrs. Dexter), Alfred, Al- 
fred T. , Frances, and Eugene. Five chil- 
dren have come to bless the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Dexter, a brief record of whom is as 
follows: Hermann F., born October 13, 1858, 
now a publisher in San Francisco, married 
Ella Browning, and they have two children, 
Ruey and Dewey Browning Dexter; Caroline, 
born September 5, i860, is the widow of 
Martin W. Mayo, and has one child, Ella C. ; 
Edward M., born October 2, 1864, now a 
chair manufacturer at Black River, N. Y. , mar- / 
ried N. Gertrude Boyce, and they have one 
child, Raymond H. ; John B. , born August 3, 
1866, died January 9, 1868; and Maurice L., 
born May 3, 1869, now a mechanic, living in 
Orange, married Martha E. Foskett, and they 
have had three children — Albert M., Gladice 
M., and Roland F. The latter died August 4, 
1895. 

In his political views Mr. Dexter is a 
straight Republican. He takes a deep inter- 
est in local affairs, and is especially active in 
advancing the educational and literary inter- 
ests of the place. He has served with fidelity 
on the School Board for ten years, as library 
committee for an equal length of time, and 
has held the office of Justice of the Peace for 
twenty-three years. He is likewise an influ- 
ential member of the Board of Trade. Relig- 
iously, he is a valued and active member of 
the Congregational church. 

Mr. Dexter's long practice as engineer, sur- 
veyor, and conveyancer has given him a full 
and intimate acquaintance with the local his- 
tory of the section of the country in which he 
resides. This knowledge has been freely util- 
ized by him in the preparation of a number of 
articles which from time to time have appeared 
in print, and which are of much value, both 
from a literary and an historical point of view. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



71 




RIAN D. CANEDY, a young and 
enterprising farmer of Heath, was 
born at Whitingham, Vt. , July 17, 
1857. He is a son of Dennis and Jane B. 
(Lake) Canedy, and grandson of John Canedy, 
a prominent farmer of Colerain, who married 
Susan Stowe, also of Colerain. John Canedy 
died at the age of fifty, and his wife at the age 
of seventy-five years. Their children were : 
John, Susan, Louisa, Roxanna, Lucy, Joel, 
Levi L. , and Dennis. Dennis Canedy, who 
was born in Colerain in 1828, jDurchased a 
farm at Whitingham, Vt. ; and, after success- 
fully engaging for some time in general farm- 
ing, he sold his property and embarked in 
mercantile pursuits at Jacksonville, Vt. A 
fire destroyed the building, and he lost his 
entire stock ; but, nothing daunted, he built a 
larger and more convenient store, which he 
stocked with general merchandise, and con- 
ducted business on an extensive scale. He 
subsequently sold this business, and engaged 
in teaming from Jacksonville to Greenfield, 
Mass., employing a number of horses and 
becoming very prosperous. At length pur- 
chasing a farm of two hundred acres, situated 
in the central part of the town of Heath, he 
here followed agriculture for a period of four- 
teen years, and then sold the property and 
bought his present comfortable home at Shel- 
burne Falls where he is passing his declining 
years in retirement. His wife, who was a 
daughter of Borden Lake, a prosperous farmer, 
died at the age of sixty-three years. She was 
the mother of seven children, as follows : John 
D., Ira, Herbert, Orian, Nettie, Nellie, and 
Edward R., an account of whose career appears 
upon another page of this work. Dennis Can- 
edy was prominently identified with public 
affairs, and served for some time as Town 
Clerk at Heath. 

Orian D. Canedy received a good common- 



school education, and resided with his parents 
until twenty-one years of age, when he adopted 
farming as an occupation, for some years till- 
ing soil owned by others. He then purchased 
the F. Ward farm at Heath, which consisted 
of one hundred and sixteen acres, and, after 
successfully conducting it for six years, sold it 
and bought the farm of two hundred acres for- 
merly owned by his father, where he has since 
resided. He keeps about fifteen cows, mostly 
grade Jerseys, together with some extra fine, 
heavy draft horses, and aside from farming 
does considerable teaming. 

Mr. Canedy married Miss Elizabeth B. 
Maley, daughter of John and Mary Maley, of 
Westboro, Mass., where her father was a pros- 
perous farmer. Mrs. Canedy' s mother died at 
the age of fifty-one years. She raised a family 
of seven children; namely, John, Hannah, 
Mary, Katie, Emma, Charles, and Elizabeth. 
The union of Mr. and Mrs. Canedy has been 
blessed with four children: Mary J., who died 
at the age of two years ; Nettie M. ; Luella J. ; 
and Charles E. 




'rt, iRS. CELESTINA P. (PHIN- 
NEY) COOLIDGE, widow of 
the late Asa Coolidge, Jr., is a 
native of Franklin County, having been born 
February 25, 1830, in New Salem. Her 
grandfather, Noah Phinney, was a pioneer set- 
tler of this section of the county, having re- 
moved from Bridgewater, his native town, to 
Orange, where he bought a tract of heavily 
timbered land on Walnut Hill. This he 
labored hard to clear, and before his demise, 
at the age of sixty-eight years, he had im- 
proved a good homestead property. He was 
twice married, and was the father of twelve 
children, namely : Noah, Cyrus, Olive, Betty, 
and Celia by the first marriage; and Ansel, 



72 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Salmon, Jason, Edmund, and a twin sister 
who died in infancy, Lottie, and Cynthia by 
the second. 

Jason Phinney, the father of Mrs. Coplidge, 
was born on Wahiut Hill, and, having been 
early initiated into the art of agriculture, se- 
lected farming as his life occupation, engaging 
in it in Montague, Conway, and Ludlow. He 
finally settled in Orange, where he bought a 
well-appointed farm, on which he spent his 
declining years, dying at the age of seventy- 
eight. He married Ruth Tyrer, who preceded 
him to the other world, dying at the age of 
seventy-one years. They were the parents of 
eight children; namely, Ruth E., Eliza P., 
Mary C, Elon C, Lydia W., Salmon, El- 
mina G., and Celestina P. 

On May i, 1848, Miss Celestina P. Phin- 
ney and Asa Coolidge, Jr., were united in 
marriage. Mr. Coolidge was born at Natick, 
Mass., May i, 1803, being the son of Asa 
Coolidge, Sr., who was born in the same town 
in 1772. The elder Asa Coolidge was a car- 
penter by trade. He purchased the Orcutt 
farm in New Salem (now a part of Orange), 
at that time in almost its original wildness, 
very little of the one hundred acres being 
cleared, and removed thither with his family 
from Natick, arriving on the first day of May, 
1810. With characteristic energy and ambi- 
tion, he labored to place the land under culti- 
vation ; and it soon yielded to his judicious 
treatment, becoming richly productive. He 
erected a house for his family, and barns for 
his produce and his cattle, and at the time of 
his death, which occurred when he was fifty 
years old, was a prosperous man. He was 
active in town affairs, and the last eight years 
of his life was Tax Collector for New Salem. 
November 27, 1797, Asa Coolidge, Sr., mar- 
ried Anna Jenkinson. She was born in 1773, 
and bore her husband ten children; namely, 



Faithe, Avery, Asa, Almira, Mary and Sarah 
(twins), Napoleon B., Orara, Hannah, and 
Benjamin. She was a quick and active 
woman, and lived to the advanced age of sev- 
enty-three years, many of them being years of 
widowhood. 

Asa Coolidge, Jr., was just seven years old 
when his parents took possession of the Orcutt 
farm, the day of their arrival being his birth- 
day. He was reared to agricultural pursuits, 
and at the death of his father bought the inter- 
est of the other heirs and took possession of 
the homestead. He was a man of integrity, 
sound ideas, and of a kindly and charitable 
nature. In the welfare of his adopted town 
he took a genuine interest, being in his 
younger days an ardent Whig, and becoming 
identified with the Republican party after its 
formation. He was a member of the Univer- 
salist church. Thirteen years prior to his 
decease he fell from a tree, injuring the base 
of the brain and causing permanent heart 
trouble; and, though physically active, from 
that time he was mentally incapacitated for 
business. He died March 2, 1885, nearly 
eighty-two years old. The union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Coolidge was blessed by the birth of nine 
children, of whom the following is a brief 
record: Georgianna E., born September 11, 
1850, is the wife of Moses E. Butler, of 
Orange; the second child was a daughter, who 
died in infancy; Mary C, born March 18, 
1855, married David Lewis, of Westfield, 
and they have seven children; Inez C, born 
January 14, 1857, is the wife of Jerome Cut- 
ter, of Wendell, and has six children; Nellie 
R., born July 2, 1859, is a trained nurse, re- 
siding at Quincy, Mass. ; Asa B., born May 
18, 1 861, married Mary E. Blagbrough, and 
they live on the old home.stead ; Benjamin S., 
born August 18, 1864, resides with his mother; 
Hattie M., born July 30, 1870, is the wife 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



73 



of L. W. Taylor, of Orange; Vernon M., born 
August 17, 1874, died when a lad of twelve 
years. 

Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Cool- 
idge has added to the improvements of the 
farm, having erected a new house and barn ; 
and the homestead bears visible evidence of 
the thrift and enterprise which first estab- 
lished it and by which it has been perpetuated. 
She is a woman of more than ordinary ability, 
has been a wise and judicious mother, attend- 
ing closely to the education and training of 
her children, and has fitted them for the re- 
sponsibilities of life. She is an earnest mem- 
ber of the Congregational church, and is 
greatly respected throughout the community 
where she has spent so many years. 



» 



ANIEL J. GALE is an extensive 
and successful farmer and prominent 
citizen of the town of Heath, and is 
a descendant of one of the old settlers of the 
town. He was born on the farm on which he 
now resides, and of which he is the owner, 
August 23, 1842, son of Philip and Susan 
(Johnson) Gale. His paternal grandfather, 
Luther Gale, was a native of the town of 
Petersham, Worcester County, Mass., born 
March 31, 1779, during the Revolutionary 
War. 

Luther Gale was one of the early settlers 
of the town of Heath. He was a large land- 
owner, and settled on the farm now owned by 
William E. Gleason, clearing off much of the 
heavy timber. He was for a time engaged in 
the lumber business in Maine, but soon re- 
turned to Massachusetts. He died in the town 
of Heath, March 17, 1864. His first wife was 
Sally Spooner, who was born January 3, 1781, 
and died December 20, 1821, and by whom 
he had the following children : Esther, Philip, 



Otis, Sarah, Lucretia, Luther, Daniel, and 
Henrietta. His second wife, to whom he was 
married October 31, 1822, was Nancy Spooner, 
who was born May 30, 1787, and died January 
16, 1866. Her children were: Mary C, 
Elizabeth S. , Nancy A., and George C. 
Luther Gale was a Whig in politics, and 
served as representative to the State legislat- 
ure in 1817, 1826, 1834, 1838, 1841, and 
1843. He also held several different town 
offices in his day, was Selectman of the town 
in 1809, and was one of the most popular and 
best-known citizens of this locality. 

Philip Gale, his second child, and father of 
Daniel J. Gale, whose name appears above, 
was born in Maine, July 4, 1804. He worked 
with his father until manhood, and then 
started life on his own account, travelling 
through the country peddling "Yankee no- 
tions." After some years of this itinerating 
he bought the homestead, and in 1858 built 
the present house, which is a good, substantial 
dwelling, and resided on the farm until his 
death, September 18, 1865. He was a mem- 
ber of the legislature, Lower House, in i860; 
and he had also served his townspeople as a 
School Committee-man and Assessor. His 
wife, Susan Johnson, lived to be seventy-nine 
years old. They were Unitarians in religious 
belief, and were the parents of three children : 
Daniel ]., Philip S. , and Henry A. 

Daniel J. Gale, after acquiring a fair 
amount of practical education in the schools 
of his town, commenced to make himself use- 
ful on the farm, and also acquired a knowledge 
of the carpenter's trade. He remained under 
the paternal roof, taking care of his parents in 
their latter years, and on their death came into 
the possession of the old homestead, in which 
he now has three hundred and thirty acres of 
choice farm land. He has built a fine large 
barn, and improved and replaced other build- 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ings on the estate, besides bringing the land 
into a high state of cultivation. He keeps a 
choice dairy of Durham cows and a numerous 
flock of sheep, besides some fine horses, and 
is regarded as one of the most flourishing agri- 
culturalists in the town, his farm being the 
largest in the vicinity, and giving employment 
to quite a number of laborers. In politics 
Mr. Gale is a Republican, and in religion a 
Unitarian. He is noted for his genial and 
charitable disposition, and is a man who has 
many friends. As yet he has not married ; 
but, as he is still in the prime of life, perhaps 
Cupid and Fate are but procrastinating. 



OHN H. SMEAD, an enterprising and 
prosperous farmer of the town of Charle- 
mont, Franklin County, son of Elihu 
and Judith (Hatch) Smead, was born on the 
place where he now resides, May 29, 1829. 
He is a lineal descendant of William Smead, 
one of the early settlers of Deerfield. 

Elihu Smead was born in Deerfield, Mass., 
on February 12, 1788. He served as a private 
in the War of 1812, and at its close he settled 
in Belchertown, Mass., where he lived until 
1820, when he removed to the farm where his 
son, John H. Smead, now resides. He was a 
successful and progressive farmer, and among 
other improvements on his place he built a 
good barn. He died at eighty-eight years of 
age. His wife, Judith Hatch Smead, was a 
daughter of Harris and Deborah (Chamberlain) 
Hatch, the former of whom was profitably 
engaged in the varied occupations of hotel- 
keeper, brick manufacturer, and farmer, in 
Pembroke and Belchertown. In politics Mr. 
Hatch was a Whig, and he rendered good ser- 
vice as a patriot soldier of the Revolutionary 
War. He died at the age of sixty-six, and 
his wife in her eighty-second year. Mrs. 



Deborah Chamberlain Hatch, it will be noted, 
was the maternal grandmother of the subject 
of this sketch. She used to tell her grandson, 
in his younger days, as he well remembers, 
that she was a descendant of John Turner, who 
came over in the "Mayflower" in 1620. Such 
was her respect for the name that she called 
one of her sons Turner. Some future geneal- 
ogist, it is to be trusted, will make clear the 
line of descent. John Turner and his two sons 
are recorded as having died at Plymouth 
within a few months after their arrival. A 
daughter of Mr. Turner is said to have come 
later to New England, and to have been married 
in Salem, Mass. The children of Harris and 
Deborah C. Hatch were ten in number; namely, 
Deborah T. , Polly, Judith, John, Har- 
ris, Turner, Nancy, Fanny, Maria, and Nancy 
H. Mrs. Smead bore her husband the follow- 
ing children: a son born in 1813, who died in 
infancy; Sidney S. , born July 3, 18 14; Debo- 
rah S., born May 9, 18 16, who died at the age 
of twelve years; Catherine B., born May 3, 
1 81 8, died at thirty-two years of age; Nathan- 
iel N., born October 12, 1820, died in his 
third year; another son who died in babyhood; 
Nancy M., born March 21, 1827, now the 
wife of J. Crosby; John H. ; and Edward P., 
born in 1832, who died at the age of four 
years. Sidney S. , above mentioned, has been 
thrice married, his first wife being Miss Eliza 
A. Clark, the next Miss Ruth T. Thayer, and 
his present wife Miss Kate Sanderson. He 
has held the office of Deacon, also Justice of 
the Peace. Both parents were active and con- 
sistent members of the Congregational church, 
of which the father served as Deacon several 
years. In politics he was a Whig until the 
formation of the Republican party, which he 
afterward supported. 

John H. Smead grew to manhood on the old 
homestead, receiving a good practical educa- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



75 



tion in the schools of the town; and at twenty- 
one years of age he secured a position in the 
tool-shop in Conway, Mass., where he was 
employed during the following three years. 
At the end of that time, returning home to 
care for his parents during their declining 
years, he bought the homestead, to which he 
added by the purchase of one hundred and fif- 
teen acres of land, and there he has since resided. 
In 1888 he tore down the old house, which had 
been erected more than one hundred years pre- 
vious, and built a new one on nearly the same 
site, affording an excellent view of the beauti- 
ful Deerfield valley. He is successfully en- 
gaged in general farming and carries on a 
choice dairy, besides raising sheep and horses. 
On September 14, 1853, he was married to 
Miss Lydia J. Montague, who was born in 
Montague, one of the eastern towns in Frank- 
lin County, December 11, 1826, daughter of 
Noadiah and Mary (Jones) Montague, the 
former of whom was a son of Medad and Ruth 
(Dinsmore) Montague. Medad Montague, 
who was a native of Sunderland, Mass., bought 
and cleared a farm in Montague, where he was 
a successful and popular man, and rendered 
efficient service in various town offices. He 
and his wife, Ruth Dinsmore Montague, were 
the parents of the following children : Huldah, 
Esther, Samuel, Rufus, Zebina, Tryphena, 
Tryphosa, Medad, and Noadiah. The family 
were members of the Congregational church. 
Noadiah, who was born August i, 1796, spent 
his life on the old homestead in Montague, 
where he died at the age of sixty-one. His 
first wife, Mary Jones Montague, who lived 
to be but thirty-one years old, bore him four 
children: Harriett L., Emma E., Lydia J., 
and Horace N. He married for his second 
wife Miss Lucretia Ward, and of this union 
four children were also born: Henry W., 
Mary J. (deceased), Mary ]., and Helen M. 



Mr. and Mrs. Smead have one son, Edward 
P., born August 26, 1856, who married Miss 
Addie A. Hamilton, and has one daughter, 
Nellie I. Smead. This son lives with his 
father on the farm, which they successfully 
carry on in partnership. In political affilia- 
tion Mr. Smead is a Republican. He and his 
family are all active and influential members 
of the Congregational church, of which he has 
served as Deacon, also clerk and treasurer, 
for thirty years. Mr. Smead is also President 
of the Oak Tree Association, of which his 
son's wife is Secretary. 



(s/YLBERT B. NELSON, a successful 
tLj farmer and life-long resident of Cole- 
y<Jls^^^ rain, was born in this town July 25, 
1 8 14. He is a son of Obed and Elizabeth 
(Sturtgvant) Nelson, his father having been a 
native of Colerain and his mother of Vermont. 
William Nelson, father of Obed, formerly re- 
sided in Brimfield, Conn., but moved from 
that State in company with his two brothers, 
Edward and John, Edward settling at Leyden, 
Mass., John in Whitingham, Vt. , and William 
finding a home at Colerain, where he was an 
industrious farmer and a most worthy citizen, 
residing there until his decease, which oc- 
curred at about the age of eighty years. His 
wife, who also lived to reach a good old age, 
was the mother of six children, named as fol- 
lows : Obed, Jesse, Betsey, Polly, Abigail, and 
David, all of whom became heads of families 
and have passed away, their ashes reposing in 
the cemetery at Colerain. 

Obed Nelson settled upon the farm where 
his son Albert now resides, quietly pursuing 
the occupation of his ancestors, and continued 
to enjoy prosperity as the result of his diligent 
labors during his long and useful life, which 
came to a close at the age of seventy-six years. 



76 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He was known as an honorable and upright 
citizen, who possessed many estimable qual- 
ities. Politically he was a Democrat. Mr. 
Nelson was inclined to be liberal in his relig- 
ious ideas. His union with Elizabeth Sturte- 
vant, who lived to attain the ripe age of 
eighty-six years, was blessed with four chil- 
dren, who reached maturity, namely : Orpheus, 
who settled in the State of Michigan, where 
he became a prosperous farmer, and died at the 
age of sixty-four years; Albert B., of this 
sketch ; Austin, who followed agricultural 
pursuits in the town of Buckland, where he 
died at the age of sixty-eight years ; and 
Myron, who died in the State of Illinois at the 
age of fifty-five years. 

Albert B. Nelson attended the district 
schools of Colerain, where he obtained a good 
knowledge of the ordinary branches of educa- 
tion. By purchasing the interests of the other 
heirs, he succeeded to the possession of the 
homestead, and tenderly cared for his parents 
during their declining years. He owns a very 
productive farm, consisting of about one hun- 
dred and thirty acres, and, although well past 
the fourscore limit, still gives his personal 
attention to the farm duties, being stronger 
and more active, bot]? mentally and physically, 
than some of his younger neighbors. 

On November 9, 1847, he was united in 
marriage at Somers, Conn., to Miss Mary C. 
Prouty, who was born in Boston, Mass., No- 
vember 26, 1822, daughter of Asa and Sally 
Prouty. Mrs. Nelson passed from earth on 
January 28, 1890, at the age of sixty-eight 
years, having been the mother of six children, 
five of whom still survive: Whiting G., who 
was born December 11, 1848, and is now a 
merchant in the State of Michigan; Orrasville 
L., who was born May 7, 1852, now the 
widow of Jacob Lovell, residing in Spring- 
field; Arabelle E., born November 6, 1854, 



now the wife of Edward Mitchell, of Green- 
field; Laura, born February 24, 1857, who 
was the wife of Emerson Peck, of Greenville, 
Mich., and died December 14, 1882; Asa 
Obed, born December 11, 1859, who owns 
and resides on the large farm formerly owned 
by Milo Miller; and Olive Nellie, who was 
born July 29, 1865, and is the wife of William 
Tilton, of Boston. 

Mr. Nelson is a Democrat in politics, but 
has never taken an active part in public affairs 
beyond casting his vote and attending to the 
duties of some minor town ofifices which he 
has been called upon to fill. He is a very hos- 
pitable gentleman, a kind and thoughtful 
neighbor, charitably inclined, and is one of 
the best -known citizens of the town, there 
being at the present day but few residing 
there who have reached a more advanced age. 



YgTENRY W. MONTAGUE, farmer, an 
r^ influential resident of Northfield 
-J->^ V_^ Farms, Franklin County, Mass., 
was born in the adjacent town of Montague, 
October 15, 1833, son of Noadiah and Lu- 
cretia (Ward) Montague. His great-grand- 
father, Daniel Montague, son of Samuel 
Montague, was a native of Sunderland, Mass., 
where he followed agriculture. Medad Mon- 
tague, son of Daniel, was born in Sunderland, 
which is in the southern part of Franklin 
County, and settled in the North Parish 
thereof, now Montague, previous to the incor- 
poration of this town in 1753. After serving 
in the Revolutionary War, he became a pros- 
perous farmer, and was a Selectman twenty 
years, besides representing his district at the 
General Court for several terms. He died at 
the age of eighty-two years. He was three 
times married, and was the father of nine chil- 
dren. 




CHARLES B. WELLS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



79 



Noadiah Montague, Mr. Montague's father, 
was born in Montague, and, after completing 
his studies in the district schools, assisted his 
father upon the home farm, of which he event- 
ually became the owner, and resided there 
until reaching the age of fifty-eight years. 
He then purchased the farm now owned and 
occupied by his son, Henry W. ; and here he 
died three years later. Noadiah Montague 
married Lucretia Ward, a daughter of William 
Ward, a lawyer and a lumber dealer of Shutes- 
bury. She became the mother of four chil- 
dren, of whom Henry W., with whom she 
passed her last days, is the only survivor. Mrs. 
Lucretia W. Montague died at the age of 
eighty-two years. 

Henry W. Montague passed his boyhood in 
attending the district schools of his native 
town, and remained with his parents until 
reaching the age of twenty-one, when he com- 
menced to learn the carpenter's trade. Three 
years later he returned to the parental roof, 
and after the death of his father succeeded to 
the possession of the home farm, which he has 
since conducted with success. In 1866 Mr. 
Montague was united in marriage to Mary E. 
Field, daughter of Horace F. Field, of North- 
field. The fruit of this union is one son, 
Frank H. Montague, who resides with his par- 
ents. He has a good education, having at- 
tended successively in his youth the schools 
of Northfield, the seminary at New Salem, 
and the Albany Business College. 

Mr. Montague is a member of the Masonic 
Lodge of Northfield. He is a Republican 
in politics, has served as Selectman, Assessor, 
and Overseer of the Poor for nine years. In 
1882 he represented his district in the State 
legislature, and he was for four years Post- 
master at Northfield Farms. For the past 
eleven years he has discharged with ability the 
duties of the office of Justice of the Peace in 



Montague, having his first appointment thereto 
from Governor George D. Robinson and his 
reappointment from Governor William E. 
Russell. 



7TAHARLES BARNARD WELLS, 
I V'^ whose portrait appears on the opposite 

^•^ ^ page, a well-known and highly re- 
spected farmer of Greenfield, was born Decem- 
ber II, 1829, in Rowe, Mass., another Frank- 
lin County town. Plis great-grandfather, Joel 
Wells, was one of the early settlers of Green- 
field, which at that time was a part of Deer- 
field. In his day Indians and game abounded 
throughout this part of the country, and the 
pioneer settlers required skill in the use of the 
musket as well as the axe and hoe. He mar- 
ried Hannah Bascom, and followed the occupa- 
tion of farmer till his death, which took place 
in Greenfield. His son, also named Joel and 
also a tiller of the soil, resided at different 
times both at Greenfield and Rowe, but died at 
North Adams, Mass., at the age of eighty-five. 
He and his wife, whose maiden name was Abi- 
gail Hawks, and who died somewhat younger 
than he, were members of the Unitarian church. 
They had five sons and two daughters who grew 
up, all of whom are now cieceased. 

Alpheus Wells, son of the foregoing and 
father of Charles Barnard Wells, was born in 
Greenfield in 1789, and grew to manhood, and 
received his education in the schools of that 
town. When a young man he moved to Rowe, 
where he secured a good farm and engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. He was industrious and 
progressive, to which qualities he owed his 
success. He married Content Nash, who was 
born in Greenfield about 1789, daughter of 
Daniel and Abigail (Atherton) Nash. Daniel 
Nash was an early settler of Greenfield, and 
was actively identified with the affairs of his 
town, including religious matters, being a 



8o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



member of the First Congregational Church. 
Alpheus Wells was liberal in his religious 
views, while his wife faithfully adhered to the 
church of her father. In politics Mr. Wells 
was a Republican. He died at the age of fifty- 
seven years, his wife having lived to the age of 
forty-nine. They had two sons and two daugh- 
ters, namely : Sarah Ann, who died at seven- 
teen years of age ; Isabella G., born in Rowe, 
July 13, 1825, and now living with her brother, 
Charles Barnard ; George Nash, who died at the 
age of seventeen years ; and Charles Barnard, 
the immediate subject of this biography. 

Charles Barnard Wells resided in his native 
town of Rowe seventeen years, and then re- 
moved to Greenfield, where he has lived ever 
since. Having worked out at farming and 
lumbering a number of years in early manhood, 
in 1875 he bought the farm which he now oc- 
cupies ; he also owns a tract of twenty-five 
acres in Leyden. A hard-working man, by 
his undaunted energy and practical sagacity 
he has attained to a fair degree of success. 
He has never married, but lives with his 
maiden sister, Isabella G. Wells, on the old 
Smead farm. Miss Wells is a faithful and 
valued member of the First Congregational 
Church of Greenfield, while her brother holds 
liberal views in religion, and is guided by Re- 
publican principles in politics. As will be 
gathered from the brief record above given, 
they are the last of their immediate family; 
and it is, therefore, a happy circumstance that 
the likeness of Mr. Wells is herewith pre- 
sented for safe keeping, to be viewed with in- 
terest by the present and future generation of 
readers. 



■ SA PHELPS, a prosperous farmer and 
prominent man of Monroe, was born 
in this town, July 27, 1823, son 
of Dana and Prudah (Bullock) Phelps. His 




grandfather, Francis Phelps, was a native of 
Guilford, Vt., and settled in Halifax in that 
State, where he engaged successfully in agri- 
culture. He was a soldier in the Revolution- 
ary War, and drew a pension for his military 
services. In politics he was a Whig. He 
died at the age of seventy-five years, highly 
respected by all his neighbors. His children 
were : Francis, Barney, Porter, Jonathan, and 
Dana. 

Dana Phelps was a very active man, and in 
his younger days surpassed all the farmers in 
his neighborhood in the amount of farm work 
accomplished. Although not ordained, he 
was active in evangelical work, and for years 
preached the Universalist doctrine, minister- 
ing to souls in Monroe, Mass., in Readsboro, 
Vt. , and in Florida, Mass. In Monroe he 
was a prominent man and held most of the 
town offices. His wife, who was a woman of 
rare capability, strong in mind and body, was 
the mother of thirteen children, nine boys and 
four girls, whom she clothed with the products 
of her own deft hands, carding, spinning, and 
weaving the wool and flax for their garments 
during the first twenty years of her mother- 
hood. 

Asa Phelps was educated in the district 
schools and at Whitingham Academy, and at 
the age of nineteen began teaching school, 
which occupation he continued for six terms. 
He then bought a farm of thirty-two acres, 
known as the Phelps place ; but after a short 
time he sold it and purchased his present farm 
of one hundred and thirty acres, which he im- 
proved and upon which he erected a substantial 
dwelling. Later he built a small store, which 
he conducted for some time with fair success. 
His farm is well stocked and has a small but 
good dairy, and his place presents the thrifty 
appearance of the well-kept homestead of a 
typical New England farmer. Mr. Phelps is 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a man of influence in his town, and his opin- 
ion carries weight in public affairs. He is 
independent in politics, and has served as Jus- 
tice of the Peace for seven years, also as Se- 
lectman, Assessor, and Overseer of the Poor, 
has been a member of the School Committee 
for twelve years, and has twice served on 
traverse jury in the Superior Court. 

On July 3, 1845, he was married to Miss 
Lydia S. Bassett, daughter of Erastus and 
Lydia (Yaw) Bassett, well known and es- 
teemed citizens of this locality. Mr. and Mrs. 
Phelps are the parents of the following chil- 
dren : Leonard A., born August 15, 1846, 
who married Sarah Crocker, and has two chil- 
dren ; Homer A., born October 6, 1853, who 
married Cora D. Phelps, and has one child, 
Edna M. ; Lydia-C, born December 16, 1855, 
who died in early childhood, April i, i860; 
and Edna S., born March 2, 1861, who 
died at twenty-four. Mr. and Mrs. Phelps 
stand high among the people of the town of 
Monroe for their many sterling qualities, 
which they have doubtless in part inherited 
from their sturdy New England ancestors. 
They may well be regarded as representative 
citizens of Franklin County. 



"OSIAH P. DAY, a retired blacksmith 
of Bernardston and a veteran of the 
late war, was born in Cattaraugus 
County, New York, August 4, 1837, son of 
Robert and Adeline (Pomeroy) Day. The 
Days trace their-ancestry back to Robert Day, 
who in April, 1634, came to this country and 
settled in Newtown, now Cambridge, Mass., 
and later moved to Hartford, Conn., where he 
died. His name may be found recorded on a 
monument in that city erected to the memory 
of the first settlers. His son, Thomas Day, 
was the founder of the Springfield branch of 



the fafnily. John, the son of Thomas, was the 
first of the family to make his home in West 
Springfield. His son John was born in West 
Springfield, as were also his grandson Joel, 
James, son of Joel, and Robert, son of James 
and father of the subject of this memoir. 

Josiah P. Day came to Bernardston when 
but twelve years of age, and received the ad- 
vantages of the district schools of the town 
and also of the Goodale Academy. He began 
to learn the blacksmith's trade when seventeen 
years of age, and served three years, at the end 
of which time he found employment as a jour- 
neyman blacksmith in different places. On 
August 14, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, 
Tenth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers, 
which was in the following battles: in 1862, 
siege of Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks 
(two battles), Charles City Cross-roads, Glen- 
dale, Malvern Hill, Antietam, and Fredericks- 
burg; in 1863, the Mud Campaign, St. 
Mary's Heights, Salem Heights, Franklin 
Crossing, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, 
and Mine Run; in 1864, the Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, and 
Petersburg. Mr. Day's record was an event- 
ful one, and he saw much hard service. His 
first battle was Antietam ; and in. all he par- 
ticipated in fourteen or fifteen engagements, 
having two narrow escapes from death. At 
Salem Heights they had driven the rebels into 
the woods and received orders to halt and lie 
down. Mr. Day was on his knees, arranging 
his knapsack, and just dropped on his face as 
a ball struck the knapsack and lodged in his 
underclothing. At another time he was on 
one knee with his gun before him, when a ball 
from a sharp-shooter struck the gun-barrel di- 
rectly in front of his face, cutting the gun 
strap and stock in two and glancing off. He 
was honorably discharged from the service 
July I, 1864. At the close of the war he re- 



82 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



turned to Bernardston and re-engaged in the 
blacksmith business ; but owing to poor health, 
brought on by the hardships of army life, it 
was several years before he was well able to 
stand the wear and tear of his work. For 
twenty-two years, however, Mr. Day could be 
found most of the time at his forge in the shop 
that he purchased in 1867. His untiring in- 
dustry was attended with success ; but at length 
he was obliged to give up this labor on account 
of rheumatism, and now, retired from active 
business, is spending his time in rest and 
quiet at home. 

He married, January 2, 1868, Lucy A. 
Haskell, who was born in Montague, Mass., 
daughter of Abram K. and Esther (Kellogg) 
Haskell. The father was born in Shutesbury, 
Mass., and the mother in New Salem, Mass. 
Mr. Haskell was a mechanic by trade, but 
during the last years of his life he worked as 
a farmer. He died at the age of seventy-four 
years. His wife is still living in Bernardston. 
Mr. and Mrs. Day have a daughter, Josephine 
E., who graduated from Powers Institute in 
1 891, and also graduated in shorthand, type- 
writing, and book-keeping from Childs's Busi- 
ness College in June, 1893. Mrs. Day is a 
member of the Congregational church. Polit- 
ically, Mr. Day is a Republican. He belongs 
to the Edwin E. Day Post, No. 174, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of Greenfield, Mass. 



Tt^OLLIN C. WARD, M.D., a promi- 
\^\ nent physician of Northfield, Mass., 
-L^ V-^ "^2is ■ born at West Rutland, Vt. , 
April 6, 1838, son of Aaron and Olive B. 
(Southworth) Ward. Dr. Ward's great-grand- 
father, Jabez Ward, born in 1735, married Je- 
mima Allen, a near relative of Colonel Ethan 
Allen of Ticonderoga fame, and took a leading 
part in local public affairs in the Colonial pe- 



riod. He died in 1786, at his home in New 
Marlboro, Berkshire County, Mass., at the age 
of eighty-two years. His son Jabez married 
Eleanor Warner, of New Marlboro, and re- 
moved to Rutland, Vt. , where he was for some 
years a prosperous farmer, and died there at 
the age of sixty-six. The immigrant pro- 
genitor of this branch of the Ward family in 
America was William Ward, who received a 
grant of land in Sudbury, Mass., in 1639, and 
represented that town in the General Court in 
1644. He was great-great-grandfather of the 
first Jabez here named. 

Aaron Ward, son of the younger Jabez, was 
educated in the district schools, and trained 
to agricultural pursuits, which he followed 
through life. He succeeded to the possession 
of the old Rutland homestead, but, after resid- 
ing there for a few years, sold it to his 
brother, and for some time conducted a large 
boarding-house in the neighborhood of the 
quarries in West Rutland. Aaron Ward died 
at the home of his son, Rollin C. Ward, in 
Orwell, Vt. , aged seventy-seven years. He 
and his wife were members of the Congre- 
gational church. Mrs. Aaron Ward was a 
daughter of Isaac Southworth, a prominent 
farmer and an old resident of West Rutland, 
who was active in church affairs in that town. 
She died at the age of eighty-five years, hav- 
ing been the mother of twelve children, of 
whom four are now living; namely, Lorenzo, 
Silas, Selah, and Rollin C. 

Rollin C. Ward received his education in 
the schools of his native town, including the 
select school, the Castleton Seminary, and the 
Troy Conference Academy. Beginning to 
teach at the age of seventeen, he taught in 
both the district and select schools for several 
years, also doing some farm work during that 
time. On May 17, 1861, he enlisted as a 
Union soldier, and was made Fifth Sergeant 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



&3 



in Company B, Second Vermont Volunteer 
Infantry, which on being mustered into service 
was attached to the Sixth Army Corps ; and, 
passing upward from rank to rank until De- 
cember 20, 1862, was then promoted to that of 
Captain. He led his company through many 
memorable engagements, and received a gun- 
shot wound in each thigh at the battle of 
Spottsylvania, which confined him in the hos- 
pital for some time, and eventually incapaci- 
tated him for further service. He was dis- 
charged at Berryville, Va. , but attached him- 
self to the forage department of the army at 
City Point, and remained until the close of the 
war. Returning to Vermont, he purchased 
a small farm at Orwell, which he conducted 
for a short period ; and it was at this time that 
he first entered upon the study of medicine, 
devoting to it all the leisure hours he had 
when not employed in teaching. 

After graduating from the Harvard Medical 
School on June 28, 1870, Dr. Ward began the 
work of his profession in his native State. In 
1872 he settled in Northfield, where he has 
since conducted a successful practice and en- 
joyed the respect and esteem of the entire 
community. In 1868 he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Lucy Cushman, daughter of 
Earle and Lucy (Young) Cushman, the former 
of whom was a physican of Orwell, Vt., and 
died at the age of seventy-seven years, during 
fifty-three of which he had been in active prac- 
tice. Mrs. Ward's mother, a native of Athol, 
died at the age of fifty-five years. 

Dr. Ward is a member of the Masonic Lodge 
at Northfield, and is also connected with the 
Chapter and Commandery in Orange. He is 
a comrade of Post 171, Grand Army of the 
Republic, of Northfield, of which he has been 
commander for several years. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics; was Postmaster from 1885 to 
1890; was a Selectman for three years, during 



which he served as Chairman one year; was 
Chairman of the School Board six years ; and 
has served upon the Library Board since its 
organization. He has been President of the 
Franklin Medical Association and a member of 
the Massachusetts Medical Society. He was 
a candidate for State Senator for two years, 
and, although defeated, was complimented 
with a very large vote. He is liberal in his 
religious views. 



7TAHARLES HAMILTON, a prominent 
I jp farmer of Heath, was born at Shutes- 

V,^_^^ bury, November 19, 1823, and is a 
son of David and Betsey (Upton) Hamilton. 
His paternal grandfather was a native of Prov- 
incetown, Cape Cod, Mass., and extensively 
engaged in the fishing industry. He also 
owned considerable land in, that vicinity, but 
moved to Pelham, and later to New Salem, 
where he resided during the remainder of his 
life, dying at the age of eighty years. He 
was twice married. The children by his 
second wife, whose maiden name was Ann 
Eldridge, were Elijah and David. 

David Hamilton, who was also born on 
Cape Cod, accompanied his parents to New 
Salem. In early manhood he purchased two 
hundred acres of land in the town of Shutes- 
bury, and, clearing a portion of this for farm- 
ing purposes, he also carried on a lumber 
business and operated a saw-mill, attaining a 
position of business prosperity. He died at 
the age of sixty-eight years. He was origi- 
nally a Democrat, but in his later years sup- 
ported the Republican party. In religion he 
was a Baptist. His wife was a daughter of 
Benjamin and Betsey (Trask) Upton, who were 
residents of Shutesbury. Her father was a 
prominent farmer of that town, who served in 
the Revolutionary War, and was wounded at 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the battle of Bunker Hill. Their children 
were : John, P'anny, Mabel, Betsey, and Dor- 
cas. Mrs. Betsey Hamilton died at the age of 
sixty-three years, having reared the following 
children : David, William, Charles, Ann, 
John, Joseph, Sarah, and Elmira. 

Charles Hamilton left his home at the age 
of ten years, and for the succeeding three years 
was employed by a farmer and butcher, from 
whom he received for his services his board 
and clothing. From fourteen to seventeen 
years of age he continued to follow the occu- 
pation of a farm laborer, his wages being sixty 
dollars per year, with the privilege of attend- 
ing school winters. Next he rented a farm 
for two years, after which he purchased the 
homestead of his wife's father, consisting of 
sixty acres. He also purchased some timber 
land, and was engaged in lumbering upon it 
for six years. Having sold this property, in 
1855 he moved to the town of Heath, where 
he bought the estate of sixty acres known as 
the Williams farm. Later he added to his 
farm a tract of seventy-five acres, some of 
which is in the town of Rowe, and has effected 
several noticeable improvements, among them 
being a new house and barn. He makes a 
specialty of stock-raising, conducts a choice 
dairy, and owns one of the finest hay farms 
in the locality. His property is exceedingly 
valuable from the fact that it is located upon 
the mineral belt, in the immediate vicinity of 
the well-known Davis sulphur mine. On 
August 27, 1862, Mr. Hamilton enlisted in 
Company B, Fifty-second Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, under the command of Colonel Green- 
leaf, for nine months' service, but remained 
for a period of one year, during which time 
he participated in the battle of Port Hudson 
and other engagements. Mr. Hamilton is a 
Republican in politics, and is liberal in his 
religious views. 



On November 22, 1848, Mr. Hamilton was 
united in marriage to Miss Maria L. Baker, 
daughter of Jonathan S. and Louise (Horr) 
Baker. Their union has been blessed with the 
following children : Julia, born March 3, 
1850, who married first Martin L. Blanchard, 
and, after he died, leaving one son, married 
second Dennis W. Jones (also deceased), and 
is now the wife of Chandler H. Blanchard and 
resides at Greenfield, having one child, Grace 
L. ; Charles A., born July 12, 1853, who 
married Ellen Goodacre, and died at the age 
of forty-one years; James N. , born February 
28, 185s; Adelaide A., born July 16, 1857, 
who married Edward S. Smead, and has one 
child, named Nellie L ; and Myron S. Hamil- 
ton, born July i, 1861, who married Bessie L. 
Harris, and has two children, Carrie M. and 
Earle R. 




NDREW SAUER, a much esteemed 
citizen of Buckland, Franklin County, 
Mass., a successful dealer in gentle- 
men's furnishing goods, was born in Saxony, 
Germany, on February 14, 1841, son of Simon 
and Steina (Amstein) Sauer, both of whom 
were natives of the same place. Simon Sauer 
successfully engaged in the vocation of a car- 
penter and joiner. He died at the early age of 
forty-eight years. His wife, Steina Amstein 
Sauer, died when but fifty-six years of age, hav- 
ing borne him five children, as follows : George, 
Anna E. , Andrew, Casper, and Anna. 

Andrew Sauer lived with his parents during 
his youth, receiving a good practical education 
in the schools of his native country. At nine- 
teen years of age he came to America, landing 
in New York, from which place he came to 
Franklin County, Mass., and secured a posi- 
tion in the Lamson & Goodnow cutlery 
manufactory at Shelburne Falls as a me- 
chanic, remaining with them ten months. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



8S 



The Civil War was then in progress; and he 
enlisted in Company H of the Tenth Massa- 
chusetts Regiment, under Captain Miller. 
After a faithful service of three years, during 
which he took part in many important engage- 
ments, he received his honorable discharge on 
June 21, 1864. He then returned to Shel- 
burne Falls and again engaged in the cutlery 
manufactory, continuing in that position until 
1 871, when he purchased the clothing business 
of A. Sherwin, which he has since conducted 
with increasing success. His store is located 
in the Methodist Episcopal society's block, 
and he carries a good assortment of clothing, 
hats, and other gentlemen's furnishing goods. 
He owns two houses and lots in Buckland, one 
being his residence on Williams Street, which 
he erected, and the other a tenement-house. 
On July 9, 1864, Mr. Sauer was united in 
marriage with Miss Christie Witzeman, 
daughter of George Witzeman, of Germany. 
They have one child, a daughter, Jessie B. , 
who was born November 29, 1880. 

In politics Mr. Sauer is an independent 
Democrat. He has ever merited the respect of 
his fellow-citizens; and that they are not un- 
mindful of his ability, his public spirit, and 
upright character, is shown by the various 
offices of trust to which he has been elected, 
including that of Selectman, of Assessor, and 
Overseer of the Poor, he having served in the 
latter capacity for five years. Since 1862 he 
has held office in the fire department, in 
which he is actively interested. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Alethian Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and of Post 
No. 93, Grand Army of the Republic, of 
Shelburne Falls. He is also President of the 
Gun Club and Vice-President of the Turn- 
verein Lodge. Mr. Sauer and his estimable 
wife are active and influential members of the 
Congregational church of Shelburne Falls. 




RSON BALLOU CURTIS was for 
many years one of the most prominent 
business men of Colerain and a citi- 
zen who made his influence very much felt in 
the management of local affairs. He was a na- 
tive of New Hampshire, his birth having oc- 
curred January 27, 1825, in the town of Rich- 
mond, which was also the birthplace of his 
father, Orson Curtis. (A record of the Curtis 
family may be found in the history of Rich- 
mond, N. H.) Orson Curtis remained in the 
town of his nativity until after his marriage, 
on May 16, 1824, to Betsey Ballou, a daughter 
of New Hampshire. In 1829 they removed 
to Colerain, Mass., where Mr. Curtis followed 
the trade of shoemaking, both he and his wife 
passing their remaining days in this town. 
They reared a family of four children; namely, 
Orson Ballou, Semantha, Seth, and Henry, the 
latter, the youngest of the family, a resident 
of Colerain, being the only one now living. 
Orson Ballou Curtis was but five years old 
when he came with his parents to Colerain and 
began to attend the district schools. He com- 
pleted his education at a select school in Hali- 
fax, Vt. , where he afterward opened his career 
as a pedagogue. He also taught school sev- 
eral terms in Colerain previous to beginning 
mercantile life here as a clerk for Mr. Calvin 
Shattuck, in whose employ he acquired a good 
knowledge of business. He then opened a 
small grocery store in the village, in company 
with Mr. Walkup, also of Colerain ; but after- 
ward he bought out the interest of his part- 
ner in the store, and continued its manage- 
ment alone until his decease, April 21, 1888. 
He was a man of good business capacity, hon- 
est and upright, a most pleasant man to deal 
with, and soon built up a large and lucrative 
trade, having one of the most completely 
stocked stores of general merchandise in the 
vicinity. He was a sound Republican in 



86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



politics, and in public affairs was energetic 
and influential, representing his district in the 
legislature one term, serving as a member of 
the School Board, as Justice of the Peace for 
several years, and as Postmaster, an office 
which he was holding at the time of his de- 
mise. In religious matters he was actively 
interested, being a valued member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, one of its officers 
for many years, a member of both boards, as 
well as superintendent of its Sunday-school for 
many years and the leader of its choir. 

Mr. Curtis was twice married. His first 
wife, to whom he was united September 5, 
1849, ^^^ Mary S. Barber, a native of Cole- 
rain. After a brief term of wedded happiness 
she passed to the higher life, April 27, 1856. 
Mr. Curtis was married November 3, 1858, 
to Miss Sarah J. Shaw. She was born July 
15. 1833, in Lowell, Mass. Her father, 
Philo S. Shaw, was born in Middleboro, Mass. 
He was a carpenter by trade, and in the 
latter part of his life worked as a loom 
builder. He married Adaline D. Cheever, a 
native of Lowell, Mass., and ten children 
were born to them, nine of whom grew to ma- 
turity, and five are now living, namely: Sarah 
J. (Mrs. Curtis); Kate A., of Griswoldville ; 
Helen A.; Charles H., of California; and 
Edwin C, also a resident of California. The 
names of the departed were as follows: Ada- 
line, William H., Rose B. , George S. , and 
Lewis C. Shaw. Mrs. Curtis is a woman of 
great personal worth, and is held in high es- 
teem throughout the community in which so 
many pleasant years have been passed. She is 
a devoted Christian, active in the work of the 
church, and an efficient teacher in the Sunday- 
school. In her attractive home she has the 
companionship of a niece. Miss Bessie Ballou 
Curtis, who ably assists in hospitably entertain- 
ing their many friends and acquaintances. 




AMUEL SAWYER, who is engaged 
as a wood-turner at the works of 
the Miller's Falls Company, on 
Miller's River, in the town of Erving, Frank- 
lin County, opposite the village of Miller's 
Falls, was born at Richmond, N. H., May 3, 
1836, son of John M. and Rowena Sawyer. 
His grandfather, Nathaniel Sawyer, was a na- 
tive and life-long resident of Rutland, Mass. 

John M. Sawyer, who was born in Rutland, 
abandoned the parental roof on attaining his 
majority, and purchased a farm in Richmond, 
N.H., where he engaged in cultivating the soil 
and operating a saw-mill. In 1848 he sold his 
property there, and purchased a farm in Win- 
chester, N. H., where he resided until his 
death, which occurred at the age of seventy- 
three years. He was a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. John M. Sawyer mar- 
ried Rowena, daughter of Eli Sawyer, a farmer 
of Westminster, where her parents passed 
their entire lives. She was the mother of four 
children, all of whom are still living; namely, 
Joseph, Samuel, David, and Henry. The 
mother died in Winchester at the age of 
seventy-one years. 

Samuel Sawyer attended both the district 
and the graded schools, and after the comple- 
tion of his studies followed agriculture for a 
time, later finding employment in a saw-mill 
in Winchester village. He next went to 
Orange, where he acquired the trade of a 
founder; and, after the destruction of the 
foundry by fire, he engaged in the occupation 
of a millwright. He travelled for the Rodney 
Hunt Machine Company, setting up and ad- 
justing machinery, and, after continuing with 
that concern until 1869, came to Miller's 
Falls for the purpose of constructing the dam 
and erecting the shops for the Miller's Falls 
Company. He commenced the extensive un- 
dertaking in April of that year, and in the fol- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



87 



lowing December had completed the dam, 
during which time he superintended each par- 
ticular part of the work, from the cutting, 
hauling, and manufacturing of the lumber used 
in its construction to the figuring of the pay- 
roll. After the completion of this work he 
leased the old saw-mill at Miller's Falls, in 
which he conducted a jobbing business for 
a period of three years, at the expiration of 
which time he sold, and for the next year was 
engaged in the construction of buildings for 
industrial purposes at Rochester. He then 
went to the State of Michigan, where he re- 
mained for one and one-half years, and, return- 
ing East in 1877, engaged in his present busi- 
ness, which he has since successfully followed. 

In 1856 Samuel Sawyer was united in mar- 
riage to his first wife, who was Miss Sarah 
H. Starkey, daughter of Melvin Starkey, of 
Keene, N. H. The only child of this union, 
Hattie M., married Mr. E. E. Angel, of 
Somerville, Mass. ; and they have two chil- 
dren, named Pearl and Mildred. Mrs. Sarah 
H. Sawyer died in 1866; and Mr. Sawyer 
wedded for his second wife Sarah S. Pratt, a 
sister of Henry L. Pratt, of the Miller's Falls 
Company, and a native of Shutesbury, where 
her father was an extensive farmer and a well- 
known surveyor. Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer have 
one son, Charles L., who is a tool-maker, and 
foreman of one of the departments in the 
Miller's Falls Company's shops. He married 
Alice E. Dibble, of Chester, Mass. ; and they 
live at Miller's Falls. 

Mr. Samuel Sawyer is a Republican in poli- 
tics. He has served the town of Erving as a 
Selectman for eight years, also as Assessor; 
has served as Moderator of the town meetings 
fifteen years in succession ; and has held other 
town offices. Charles L. Sawyer is a sup- 
porter of the same political party. The 
family attend the Congregational church. 



AMES PORTER, superintendent of the 
Greenfield Water Works, a public- 
spirited and influential citizen of the 
town, was born in the town of New Hartford, 
Conn., May 25, 1836. On the paternal side 
of the family he is of English stock, his 
father, the late Jesse Porter, having been born 
about nine miles from the city of London, May 
22, 1798. 

Jesse Porter was a wool stapler. When a 
young man he came to this country, and was 
engaged in buying wool for the New York and 
New England manufacturers for several years. 
In 1832 he married Mary Lester, a native of 
Northampton ; and they soon after started west- 
ward, the Territory of Michigan being their 
point of destination. The journey from North- 
ampton to Detroit was made with a horse and 
wagon, a large portion of their way being 
through an almost trackless wilderness. They 
spent some time in Detroit, where their eldest 
son was born, and bought land not far from 
that place, being for many years owners of a 
quarter-section in Oakland County. Return- 
ing to New England, they lived for a while in 
New Hartford, but in 1838 removed to North- 
ampton, Mass. Mrs. Porter died April 4, 
1848; and five weeks from that day her hus- 
band was buried by her side in the Northamp- 
ton cemetery. They left an orphan family of 
six children, the youngest being five weeks 
old, and the eldest fourteen years. Their rec- 
ord is as follows: Jesse is a dentist in Chico- 
pee. James is the subject of the present 
sketch. George W. died in October, 1866, 
at the age of twenty-nine years, leaving a 
widow. He was a brilliant and ambitious 
scholar in the Freshman class at Yale College, 
but gave up his literary aspirations to fight for 
his country's flag, enlisting in 1861 in Com- 
pany E, Tenth Massachusetts Volunteer In- 
fantry, going out first as a scout, and was in 



88 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Richmond when McClellan was on the Penin- 
sula. His last two years of service were 
spent in Washington, where he was chief 
clerk at the Department of Washington head- 
quarters, his ofifice being on the spot where 
Philip Barton Key was killed. Hannah M., 
a graduate of the Mount Holyoke Seminary, 
and for many years a successful teacher, died 
at South Hadley in February, 1866, aged 
twenty-five years. Albert E. died December 
31, 1876, at Chicago, leaving a wife and one 
son, Albert. He too was a soldier in the late 
Civil War, enlisting when but sixteen years 
old, going to the front as a private in the New 
York Hawkins Zouaves, and participating in 
the battles of Big Bethel, Roanoke, and Fred- 
ericksburg. He was subsequently general 
ward master at the Harewood Hospital in 
Washington, until the expiration of his term 
of enlistment. Being physically disabled by 
the fatigue and exposures he had endured, he 
never recovered his health, but died about the 
time his little son was born. Mary L. , the 
youngest child, lived but a year and a half of 
earthly life. Jesse Porter and his wife were 
devout Christian people, the former belonging 
to the Church of England, and the latter 
being a believer in the Methodist faith. 

James Porter finished his education at the 
Wilbraham Academy, and in 1854 began to 
learn the trade of a tinner and plumber. In 
1857 he established himself in business in 
Palmer. Two years later he sold out, and for 
another two years was engaged in journeyman 
work, settling then in Northampton, where he 
was in business several years. In 1864 Mr. 
Porter entered the employment of P. P. Stew- 
art, as sale agent for his stoves; but "Black 
Friday," which discouraged all business men, 
broke up that enterprise, and he subsequently 
became book-keeper and cashier for a whole- 
sale and importing crockery house in New 



York. In 1865, owing to impaired health, 
Mr. Porter removed to Greenfield, buying the 
house at 30 Devens Street, where he has 
since lived, except the year 1876, when he 
was in New York City or on the road selling 
stoves. He first opened a store for the sale of 
the Stewart stoves, and handled nothing but 
Fuller & Warren's goods until 1867, when he 
sold out, his health being still too poor to 
allow of close attention to business. He then 
accepted the position of superintendent of the 
gas works, an office which he filled with satis- 
faction ten years. During the construction of 
the present system of water works Mr. Porter 
was clerk of the district and paymaster, and 
up to the fall of 1872 he was superintendent of 
the same. He was again appointed superin- 
tendent of the water works in 1882 for a term 
of three years, and from that time until 1888 
was again connected with the gas company 
as superintendent. In 1889 Mr. Porter was 
elected superintendent and collector of the 
water works for the third time, and has filled 
the position with fidelity and ability up to the 
present, having won the trust and confidence of 
all concerned. 

Mr. Porter was united in marriage May 27, 
1857, to Harriet J. Burnett, of South Hadley, 
a daughter of Stoughton W. Burnett. Four 
children have been born to them, namely: 
Edward L. , who passed away at the age of 
nineteen months; Byron A., who died in in- 
fancy; Fred H., who is correspondent in the 
Wells-Fargo and National Express Office in 
Boston ; and Francis Russell, who is in Bos- 
ton, with the National Express Company. 
Mr. Porter was in his earlier years a supporter 
of the principles of the Republican party, but 
since 1872 has uniformly cast his vote with 
the Democratic party. He is a man of liberal 
views on all subjects, and is free in religious 
thought. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



89 




\A]. PHARCELLUS D. BRIDGES 
is a prominent farmer in South 
Deerfield, and still resides upon 
the homestead where he was born on December 
21, 1846. His father, Benjamin F. Bridges, 
was born at Hardwick, Mass. ; and his paternal 
grandfather was Isaac Bridges of that town. 

Benjamin F. Bridges, who was a clothier by 
trade, owned and operated a mill at Sunder- 
land, Mass., for many years, which he iinally 
disposed of, and purchased the farm now occu- 
pied by his son. He continued to follow agri- 
cultural pursuits until compelled to relinquish 
active labor at the age of about seventy-five 
years, and died at the ripe old age of nearly 
ninety-five, in the full possession of his fac- 
ulties, after an illness of but a few days' dura- 
tion. His wife, Harriet A. Hubbard, a daugh- 
ter of Spencer Hubbard, of Deerfield, still 
survives, making her home with her son. 
Major Bridges, who is one of nine that are 
now living out of a family of fourteen chil- 
dren. 

Pharcellus D. Bridges received his elemen- 
tary education in the district schools, and, after 
completing his studies at the Deerfield Acad- 
emy, taught in both district and graded schools 
for a period of five years, subsequently enter- 
ing mercantile life at Broad Brook, Conn., 
where he remained for some length of time. 
Later, in company with a twin brother, he 
assumed the responsibilities of the home farm, 
and also engaged in the buying and shipping 
of country produce, which he has since carried 
on extensively with profitable results. 

In politics Major P. D. Bridges is a Repub- 
lican. He has always taken an active interest 
in public affairs, and has held various offices 
of trust. In 1875 he was elected a member of 
the School Board of the town, upon which he 
has served continuously ever since, and for the 
past eighteen years has been its Chairman — a 



position for which, by virtue of his experience 
as a teacher, he is especially adapted. In this 
capacity he has been mainly instrumental in 
improving the educational system of his native 
town, and also in securing the erection of the 
present school buildings for the better accom- 
modation of the pupils. The task of examin- 
ing and selecting teachers has likewise de- 
volved upon him for several years past, and he 
now has under his supervision a corps of twenty 
able instructors. In 1888 he was chosen Se- 
lectman, and has been Chairman of the Board 
from that time to the present, also having 
been Tax Collector for a period of seven years. 
In 1876 he was elected to the General Court, 
was re-elected in 1884, and again in 1893, 
when he was on the Committee on Military 
Affairs, being the only Representative in his 
district who has served three terms in the 
State legislature during the past thirty years. 
He has also served as Moderator of the annual 
town meetings twelve consecutive years. 

Major Bridges's military career has been as 
active and honorable as his political service. 
He enlisted as a private in Company H, Sec- 
ond Regiment of South Deerfield, under com- 
mand of Captain Babcock, and rapidly rose 
from rank to rank, till he became Captain. 
After his discharge he was unanimously re- 
elected, and he served as Captain of a company 
for a period of twelve years. In 1888 he was 
elected Major of the Second Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Militia, under the com- 
mand of his uncle. Colonel Benjamin F. 
Bridges, Jr., which rank he holds at the pres- 
ent time, having been in the service for a pe- 
riod of twenty-five consecutive years. Major 
Bridges was made a Mason in Morning Star 
Lodge, No. 28, of Ware Point House, Conn. 
He is also connected w-ith the Knights of 
Honor, and is a member of the Congregational 
church at South Deerfield. 



9° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




kiss MARY T. BUTTON, of 
Northfield, was born in the house 
where she now resides, daughter 
of Samuel W. and Mary F. (Dascomb) But- 
ton. Miss Button's great-grandfather, Timo- 
thy Button, who was a native of Hebron, 
Conn., settled at Northfield when nearly sixty 
years old, about the year 1796. He was 
known as both Beacon and Squire Button; 
and he resided in Northfield, where he was 
a prosperous merchant, until his death, Au- 
gust 31, 1 8 14. Timothy B. Button, son of 
Timothy and Martha (Bartholomew) Button, 
was born in Hebron, Conn., in 1776. He 
was an ensign in the militia, a deacon in the 
church, a merchant for some time in com- 
pany with his father, and was a member of 
the Board of Selectmen in Northfield five 
years. He died in 1821. 

Samuel W. Button, son of Timothy B. and 
Mary (Williams) Button, was born in North- 
field, May 13, 1813. He passed his entire 
life in this town, conducting mercantile busi- 
ness in company with a Mr. Osgood for a pe- 
riod of forty years. In addition to this, being 
a man of superior executive ability and of 
well-known integrity, he attended to a great 
amount of public business, and was called 
upon to settle many large estates. He served 
as Town Treasurer twenty-nine years, Town 
Clerk eighteen years, as a member of the 
School Committee twelve years, and was a 
representative to the State legislature in 1863. 
He was also a deacon for forty years, being 
very prominent in church affairs from early 
manhood until his death, at the age of sixty- 
three years. Beacon Button married Becem- 
ber 3, 183s, Mary Bascomb, born June 3, 
1797, daughter of Jacob Bascomb, of Wilton, 
N.H., and grand-daughter of James Bascomb, 
who was son of an English emigrant. Jacob 
Bascomb was born August 15, 1760, and died 



in 1827. He served in the Revolutionary 
army, in the Massachusetts line. After his 
marriage, on August 11, 1783, to Rachel 
Bale, as we learn from the History of Wilton, 
N.H., he lived in Lyndeboro, N.H., till 
1809, when he removed to Wilton. In the 
former town he served several years as Town 
Clerk and Selectman. Beacon Samuel W- 
Button and his wife were the parents of two 
children, namely: Samuel B., who served 
with distinction in the Civil War, and now re- 
sides in Nebraska; and Mary T., the subject 
of this sketch. The mother died in 1867, at 
the age of fifty-three years. Mr. Button's 
second wife was Mary A. White; and she died 
February 3, 1895, leaving no children. 

In the public schools of Northfield Miss 
Button obtained a good knowledge of the com- 
mon English branches, and then, entering 
Mount Holyoke Seminary at South Hadley, 
now Mount Holyoke College, applied herself 
to higher studies, but by her mother's fail- 
ing health was prevented from finishing the 
course. She is pleasantly situated at her 
comfortable home in Northfield, in the sub- 
stantial dwelling erected by her father in 

1835- 

As is clearly shown in these brief memorial 
paragraphs, the Button family has occupied 
a position of usefulness, influence, and honor 
in Northfield for nearly a full century. It 
is herewith further represented by a portrait 
of one of the best-known of its departed 
worthies. Beacon Samuel W., father of Miss 
Mary T. Button. Better be heir to a good 
name than the heritor of great riches. 



T^LARENCE M. LONG is the owner 

I J[ of a valuable homestead property in 

^^i_^ Shelburne, which has been in the 

possession of the Long family for more than 




SAMUEL W. DUTTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



93 



a hundred years. The house, a well-built, 
substantial structure, his own birthplace and 
that of his father, was erected by his grand- 
father, Aaron Long, in 1784. His father, 
Lewis Long, was born on August 21, 1801, 
and he on September 13, 1840. 

The Long family originated in Scotland, 
whence they emigrated to the north of Ireland, 
where John Long, the great-grandfather of the 
gentleman whose name appears at the head of 
this sketch, was born January 19, 1720. 
When six years of age he came to America 
with his parents, who settled in Eastern Massa- 
chusetts. Later, having grown to manhood, 
he became a pioneer of the town of Upton, in 
Worcester County, where he lived until 1780, 
when he removed with his family to Franklin 
County and bought the land now known as the 
Long homestead, which our subject owns and 
occupies. He carried on general farming, with 
the assistance of his son Aaron, until his 
death, September 30, 1797. He reared a 
family of ten children. 

Aaron Long was born in Taunton, Mass., 
August 27, 1764; and, when he came to this 
farm in 1780 with his father, John Long, 
above named, it was almost in a wild state, 
the only improvements being small clearings 
and a rude log cabin. By well-directed labor 
and indomitable perseverance he succeeded in 
placing a large portion of it under culture, and 
here reared his family of eleven children to be 
useful men and women. He was twice mar- 
ried. His first wife, Mary Miller, a native of 
Colerain, born April 26, 1767, died September 
21, 1823, after a wedded life of thirty-seven 
yelrs, their marriage having been solemnized 
February 16, 1786. In April, 1826, he mar- 
ried Mrs. Clarissa Severance, who was born in 
1777, and died March 10, 1834. Aaron Long 
was a man of irreproachable character, clear- 
headed and public-spirited, a faithful member 



of the Congregational church, to which his 
first wife also belonged. His second wife was 
a member of the Baptist church. The record 
of his children is thus given : Polly, born July 
9, 1787, died October 20, 1809; Anna, born 
August 6, 1789, died August 4, I793; Peggy, 
born March 19, 1792, died August 28, 1835; 
Melinda, born September 25, 1794, died Sep- 
tember II, 1845; Aaron, born January 10, 
1797, died January 17, 1864; Anna, born 
March 18, 1799, died September 10, 1878; 
Lewis, born August 21, 1801, died October 
12, 1868; Joel, born August 28, 1803, died 
April 9, 1808; Alonzo, born October 22, 
1805, died January 14, 1863; Joel, born Janu- 
ary 14, 1808, died February 5, 1834; and 
Robert M., born July 9, 1810, died March 9, 
1839. 

Lewis Long, the seventh-born, was a life- 
long resident of the family homestead, and was 
one of the successful farmers of the town, own- 
ing one hundred and seventy acres of land, 
which he tilled with good results, continuing 
the improvements inaugurated by his father. 
He was a man of sterling worth and ability, 
a Republican in politics, and a Congregational- 
ist in his religious beliefs. He married Sally 
Bardwell, a native of Shelburne, born August 
12, 1804. The name Bardwell, which is of 
English origin, was originally spelled and 
pronounced Bordwell; and some branches of 
the family still adhere to the old way, al- 
though the most prefer the more modern Bard- 
well. Mrs. Long's first ancestor in this coun- 
try was Robert Bardwell, who was apprenticed 
to the hatter's trade in London, England, in 
1665, and who five years later came to America, 
arriving in Boston during the time of the Ind- 
ian troubles. He was sent directly to Had- 
ley, but afterward he settled in Hatfield, where 
he was married November 29, 1676, and where 
his death occurred in January, 1725. Samuel 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Bardwell, the second of the four sons of Rob- 
ert, settled in Deerfield after his marriage, 
and reared a family of thirteen children. 
Gideon, the seventh child, who was born July 
2, 1724, and died January 20, 1814, settled in 
Montague, and reared seven children, one of 
them being Gideon, Jr., born December i, 

I7S4- 

In 1777 or 1778, Gideon Bardwell, Jr., set- 
tled at a point on the river's bank that became 
known as Bardwell's Ferry, he keeping a boat 
there for many years to transport passengers 
and goods. He died September 11, 1828. 
On February 11, 1779, he was united in mar- 
riage with Keziah Foster, who was born 
March 10, 1761, and died October 23, 1845. 
The record of their children is as follows: 
Joel, born August 8, 1780, died March 9, 
1849; Melicent, born July 9, 1783, died April 
14, 1 8 10; Aaron, born November 8, 1785, 
died in March, 1855; Sally, born May 6, 
1789, died December 25, 1797; William, born 
September 17, 1791, died May 30, 1867; 
Loren N. , born October 18, 1794, died Oc- 
tober 14, 1797; Hannah, born March 12, 
1799, died July 6, 1839; ^"d Sally (Mrs. 
Lewis Long), born August 12, 1804, died 
January 23, 1875. Five children were the 
fruit of the union of Lewis and Sally (Bard- 
well) Long, as follows : Melinda B. , who mar- 
ried William Nims, was born April 12, 1832, 
and died December 7, 1863; Melissa J., born 
October 15, 1834, married Zenas D. Bardwell, 
and died February 28, 1889; Melicent A., 
born October 15, 1834, married Zerah C. Al- 
vord, died March 18, 1887; Clarence M. is 
the subject of this sketch; Solomon L. , born 
August 28, 1844, a carpenter by trade, lives 
in Buffalo, N.Y. 

Clarence M. Long was educated in the dis- 
trict schools and at a select school in Shel- 
burne Centre. From earliest boyhood he 



assisted in the manual labor of the farm, and 
when quite a young man he assumed its entire 
management. After the death of his father he 
bought out the interest of the other heirs, and 
has since been prosperously engaged in general 
farming and dairying. Possessing good finan- 
cial ability, he has also carried on a successful 
business in buying and selling cattle, and has 
acquired a comfortable competency. He is a 
man of unquestioned integrity and every way 
worthy of the high regard in which he is held. 

On May 23, 1865, Mr. Long was united in 
marriage with Emeline M. Rice, who was 
born March 3, 1 841, in Colerain, a daughter 
of Moses and Ann (Smith) Rice, and great- 
grand-daughter of Major Hezekiah Smith. 
Mr. Rice was born October 4, 1799, at Han- 
cock, N. Y., and Mrs. Rice February 19, 1798, 
in Colerain. He was a shoe dealer, and car- 
ried on an extensive business in Holyoke, liv- 
ing there until his death, November 24, 1853. 
His widow and five children survived him. 
Mrs. Rice is still living, but two of the chil- 
dren have since passed away, namely : Clark 
M., born December 26, 1831, who died Au- 
gust 29, 1855; and Prudence B. Niles, born 
October 2, 1830, who died February 5, 1859. 
The living are: Jennie A., born April 11, 
1834, the wife of Elias Stone, of Halifax, Vt. ; 
Nathaniel S. , born August i, 1836, residing 
at Rowe, Mass. ; and Emeline M., Mrs. Long. 

Three children came to bless the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Long, one of whom, Delia M., 
born November 6, 1866, died March 19, 1891. 
Louis R. Long, born October 12, 1868, is a 
farmer, and lives with his parents. Archie 
C. Long, born August 24, 1872, is also a 
farmer, and lives on the old homestead. 

Mr. Long is a Republican in politics, as are 
his sons ; and for fifteen years he served accept- 
ably as a member of the School Board. Mr. 
and Mrs. Long and their sons are members of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



95 



the Congregational church, and are highly es- 
teemed throughout the community, being ex- 
emplary citizens, kind and obliging neighbors, 
and agreeable friends, their home being the 
centre of a gracious hospitality. 



/^HARLES S. HILLMAN, one of the 
I jp oldest and most respected residents of 
^^ ^ Colerain, Franklin County, Mass., 
was born in Conway, March i, 1814. He is 
the son of Presbrey and Editha (Hitchcock) 
Hillman, both natives of Conway, and the 
grandson of Lot Hillman, one of the early set- 
tlers of that town. Grandfather Lot Hillman 
was a cowboy in his early years, in England, 
his native country. On coming to America he 
spent a short time at Martha's Vineyard, and 
then settled in Conway, being one of the 
sturdy pioneers whose determined will, ably 
seconded by muscle, reduced the wilderness to a 
condition adapted to the needs of civilized life. 

" Oft did the harvest to their sickle yield, 

Their labor oft the stubborn glebe has broke ; 
How jocund did they drive their team afield ! 

How bowed the woods beneath their sturdy stroke ! " 

Lot Hillman died in his prime. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Lovie Luce, lived to 
a good old age, dying in Colerain. They had 
ten children, all of whom reached maturity, 
Presbrey, the father of our subject, being the 
eldest. 

Presbrey Hillman grew to manhood in Con- 
way, and there engaged in farming, also deal- 
ing in stock. He moved to Colerain in 1822, 
and settled on a farm adjoining the estate 
on which his son Charles S. now lives. As 
a farmer he was very successful, and he was 
one of the largest stock dealers in this vicin- 
ity. In politics he was a Whig, and later a 
Republican. He served three terms as a rep- 



resentative to the State legislature, and also 
filled various town offices, including that of 
Assessor. He died on his farm in Colerain at 
the age of sixty-eight, his wife living to be 
seventy-five. They had six children, one of 
whom, Sylvanus T., died in infancy. The 
others, who were named as follows: Eleanor 
H., Charles S., Henry M., Daniel D, and 
Nancy T., all grew up, were married, and all 
but one have passed away, Charles S. being 
the only survivor. 

Charles S. Hillman was eight years old when 
his parents moved to Colerain, and here in the 
district school he received his education. He 
has followed farming since boyhood, succeed- 
ing to the ownership of the farm of his fathers, 
which comprised fifty-six acres when it came 
into his possession. On that farm he spent 
twenty years. He has owned various other 
farms, and in 1879 purchased the one upon 
which he now lives, which covers one hundred 
and twenty acres. Mr. Hillman has literally 
"earned his bread by the sweat of his brow," 
working early and late to win success. 

He was married on November 14, 1839, to 
Jane Wilson, daughter of Robert Wilson and 
grand-daughter of David Wilson, one of the 
first settlers in the town. Mrs. Hillman was 
born in Colerain, June i, 1819, and died at her 
home in this town, September 8, 1890, leav- 
ing three children. A daughter, Mary A., 
wife of H. W. Thompson, had died some time 
previous, at the age of thirty-seven. The liv- 
ing children are: Flora A., wife of Arthur 
A. Smith, of Colerain; Charles W., who lives 
on the farm with his father; and Daniel D., 
who resides in Colerain. Mr. Hillman is a 
Republican, and has been Selectman during 
one term, and has filled several minor offices. 
One of the oldest citizens of the town, he 
holds a high place in the esteem of his fellow- 
men. 



96 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




^YLVANDER G. BENSON, a well- 
known farmer of Heath, was born in 
this town on September i6, 1856, 
and is a son of Squire and Elvira (Buck) Ben- 
son. His grandfather, also named Squire 
Benson, who married Hannah Green, was a 
son of Berrick and Sarah (Comstock) Benson. 
Berrick Benson was a native of Thompson, 
Conn., where he followed agricultural pursuits 
and was a very prosperous farmer. He served 
as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, was a 
Whig in politics, and both himself and wife 
lived to reach a ripe old age. Their children 
were: Jonathan, Ebenezer, Berrick, Jr., Job, 
Daniel, Joseph, Louise, Deborah, Sarah, Eu- 
nice, and Squire. The last named, whose 
birth occurred at Burroughsville, Conn., in 
1785, first settled at Thompson, but moved to 
Lleath, Mass., previous to the year 181 3, 
where he purchased a small tract of land situ- 
ated upon Burned Hill, and became one of the 
first settlers of the town. Pie cleared a good 
farm from the wilderness, which he occupied 
for many years ; but during the latter part of 
his life he resided at Shelburne P'alls, where 
he died on May 20, 1870. His wife died in 
1 87 1. She was born in 1792, and she was a 
daughter of Henry Green, a veteran of the Rev- 
olutionary War. They were the parents of the 
following children, three of whom died in in- 
fancy ; the others, who grew to maturity, were 
as follows: Seymour B. , Nelson H., Hannah, 
Orinda, Sylvander, Russell F. , Squire, Jr., 
Mary E., Frederick O., Charles D., Eucla E. , 
Lucy O. , and Francis O. Squire Benson, Jr., 
was born at Heath, July 6, 1823, and, when a 
very young man, commenced work in a tannery, 
where he was employed to grind bark. He 
followed that in connection with farming for 
several years, or until his marriage, which oc- 
curred on February 14, 1850, to Elvira Buck, 
daughter of John and Elvira (Lee) Buck. Her 



parents, who were early pioneers of Heath, 
later moved to New York State, where they 
died at a ripe old age. Squire Benson, Jr., 
having purchased the Buck farm immediately 
following the ceremony of his wedding, made 
many noticeable improvements in the prop- 
erty, which he successfully cultivated for many 
years. Both he and his wife are now passing 
their declining years in the enjoyment of good 
health. Their children are: Frederick, who 
married Audelle Vincent; Sylvander G. , of 
Heath; and Sarah S. , who wedded George A. 
Stetson. One daughter, Eucla E. , died at the 
age of nineteen years. 

Sylvander G. Benson resided with his par- 
ents until reaching manhood, and was engaged 
to some extent in following the trade of a car- 
penter. In 1888 he wedded Miss Rose Gould, 
of Heath, only daughter of George and Jane 
(Merrifield) Gould, the former born in this 
town on April 18, 1828. He was the son of 
Captain David and Sarah (Green) Gould, and 
grandson of Eli and Bernice (Johnson) Gould, 
who settled upon Burned Hill, where they 
cleared a good farm and became very prosper- 
ous. They lived to attain a ripe old age, and 
reared the following children: Samuel, David, 
Stillman, Eli, Willard, Betsey, Elmira, and 
Arethusa. David Gould became an extensive 
land-owner and very successful farmer. He 
was a Captain in the State militia, and held 
most of the important ofifices in the town where 
he resided for his entire life. He died at the 
age of seventy-two years, his wife at sixty- 
eight years. They had reared twelve chil- 
dren, as follows: Caroline, Henry, Angeline, 
George, Bernice, Jane, Almira, Lyman, Lou- 
isa, Willard, Ann, and Charles. 

George Gould, upon attaining his majority, 
settled upon the farm where Mr. Benson now 
resides. He was-a very successful farmer and 
stock-raiser, to that branch of business devot- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



97 



ing his principal attention until his decease, 
at the age of fifty-six years. He married on 
October 7, 1856, Jane Merrifield, daughter of 
Robert Merrifield, Jr., and Mary Faulkner 
Merrifield. The other children of Mrs. 
Gould's parents were: Rufus, Emerson, John, 
Mary, Esther, Emily, Lawson, Fanny, Laura, 
Sarah, and Lucy. Mrs. Gould's paternal 
grandparents, Robert and Rebecca (Fisher) 
Merrifield, emigrated from England and settled 
upon a farm of one hundred acres in the town 
of Colerain, Mass., a few miles east of Heath. 
Subsequent to his marriage Mr. Benson as- 
sumed charge of the Gould farm, and has since 
managed it with the most pronounced success. 
He carries on general farming and conducts 
a well-equipped dairy. Mr. and Mrs. Benson 
are members of the Union church. 



"HiDWARD B. ARMS, President and Di- 
P rector of the Arms Manufacturing 
Company, in which he owns a large 
amount of stock, was born at his present home 
in Deerfield, October 7, 1867. His parents 
were Charles and Harriet D. (Palmer) Arms, 
his father being a native of the town of Deer- 
field, as was also his grandfather, Dennis 
Arms, who was a shoe dealer and manufact- 
urer and the founder of the pocket-book manu- 
factory in this town. In his day the nearest 
depot from which he could secure his supplies 
and material was Albany, whence he used to 
fetch them by ox teams, shipping his goods to 
market by way of the river. He died in Deer- 
field, at the age of sixty-four years, highly re- 
spected by all. 

Charles Arms was one of four children, 
three boys and one girl, James only now liv- 
ing. Charles was brought up in the village of 
Deerfield, receiving his education in the dis- 
trict schools of the town and at Shelburne 



Falls Academy. At an early age he acquired 
a knowledge of agricultural methods, and at 
the age of eighteen entered his father's fac- 
tory, soon gaining a good knowledge of the 
business, and becoming overseer. Later, in 
connection with his brothers, he purchased an 
interest in the factory; and after his father 
died he bought out his brothers' interests, and 
conducted the business alone for some years. 
At a still later period he formed a company; 
and the firm name was changed from that of 
Charles Arms to the Charles Arms Manufact- 
uring Company, Mr. Arms remaining promi- 
nently connected with it until his death, at 
the age of fifty-seven, on April 15, 1888. He 
had always been active in public affairs, and 
was a member of the Board of Selectmen. 
He was also a Director of the Franklin Sav- 
ings Bank and the Smith Charity Fund. His 
death was partly due to his over-exertions 
in the superintendence of various public and 
town affairs, and was deeply deplored by his 
fellow- citizens. His wife, Harriet D. 
Palmer, a daughter of Squire Palmer, was 
born in Deerfield. They had three children: 
Hattie E. ; Minnie L. ; and Edward B., 
whose name appears above. Both parents 
were members of the Congregational church. 
Mrs. Arms still survives, and is a resident of 
Deerfield, making her home with her son, Ed- 
ward B. By a previous marriage to Harriet 
Clark, of this town, Mr. Arms had one child 
— Julia M. — who married William W. Fos- 
ter. 

Edward B. Arms was educated in the dis- 
trict schools and high school of Greenfield, 
Mass., and subsequently took a course at a 
business college in Springfield. He began to 
work for his father at the early age of four- 
teen; and at the age of eighteen, after com- 
pleting his studies, he took a position with the 
firm as shipping clerk, remaining thus en- 



98 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gaged until the death of his father. At that 
time the present company was formed, he then 
taking a position as clerk in the office. He 
was elected President of the company in 1892. 
The importance of the concern may be judged 
from the fact that of the eighty-four large 
pocket-book manufactories in the world it is 
considered as the second. Mr. Arms is a 
very popular and prominent young man in his 
town. He is a Republican in politics, and is 
a worthy successor of his father, who was one 
of the leading men of this locality. Mr. 
Arms was married in October, 1893, to Miss 
Martha F. Munyan, who was born in East- 
hampton, daughter of Aubrey Munyan, an en- 
gineer in the employ of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company. Mrs. Arms, like her 
husband, is a favorite in the social circles of 
Deerfield. 




iHARLES M. BALLOU, a well- 
known farmer, hotel proprietor, and 
horse dealer of Wendell Centre, 
was born in the town of Wendell, Franklin 
County, Mass., January 19, 1867, son of 
Stephen and Josephine M. (Beach) Ballou. 
His grandfather, Francis Ballou, was a native 
of Canada, being son of a French emigrant. 
Francis Ballou was brought up a farmer in 
that province, but removed to the United 
States and settled at Stafford Springs, Conn. 
His death, however, occurred at the home 
of his grandson, Charles M., in the town 
of Wendell, Mass. Stephen Ballou, son of 
Francis, was born in Connecticut, and there 
reared to agricultural pursuits . He came to 
Wendell in 1865, and resided in the town for 
twenty-five years, dying at the age of forty- 
four, at the present home of his son, Charles 
M. Ballou. His wife, Josephine M. Beach, 
was a native of the town of Wendell, where 
her father was a practical farmer. They 



reared three children: Charles M., the subject 
of this sketch; William H. ; and Anna B., 
who married John Maddern, of the town of 
Orange. The mother is still living, and 
makes her home in Connecticut. 

Charles M. Ballou spent his boyhood on the 
home farm with his parents, and acquired his 
education in the district school. At the death 
of his father he came into possession of the 
farm, which contains fifty acres of good land, 
and has since occupied himself in bringing his 
land into a high state of cultivation and other- 
wise improving the property. He has been 
quite successful in attaining the object of 
his modest ambition, and is classed among 
the most enterprising and prosperous agricult- 
uralists of Wendell. He is a Democrat in 
politics. That he is a man who faithfully 
performs the duties of citizenship, and is pos- 
sessed of ripe judgment and good business 
qualifications, may be gathered from the fact 
that he has been called upon to serve his town 
in several public capacities, having been Con- 
stable and Assessor for 1895. 

Mr. Ballou was married September 11, 
1890, to Laura Brown, daughter and only 
child of Robert O. and Mary A. Brown, resi- 
dents of the State of Connecticut, where her 
father was engaged in mercantile business. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ballou have one child, Frank 
E. , a bright boy, who bids fair to be a credit 
to the family in years to come. Mrs. Ballou 
attends the Congregational church, and stands 
high in the estimation of her neighbors for 
her true womanly qualities. 



KREDERICK DWIGHT KELLOGG, 
Associate Manager of the Ne-w Home 
Sewing Machine Company foundry, of 
Orange, Mass., is a man well fitted for this 
position of trust, and is fulfilling its responsi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



99 



ble duties with commendable fidelity. He was 
born November 29, 1840, in the town of New 
Salem, Franklin County, and is a son of P"red- 
erick and Elizabeth (Putnam) Kellogg. His 
paternal grandfather, Samuel Kellogg, was 
born and reared in New Salem, where, after 
marrying Susan Felton, he bought a farm, on 
which he lived for many years, he and his wife 
both dying there. They reared a large family 
of children, of whom the following are de- 
ceased : James, Lucy, Joseph, M.D., Samuel, 
Nancy, Hannah, Sally, Susan, Henry, Na- 
thaniel, and Roxanna. Esther and Frederick 
are still living, enjoying the twilight of a long 
and usefully spent life. 

Frederick Kellogg was born in New Salem, 
January 21, 1816, and there received as good 
an education as the district schools of that day 
afforded. He became a farmer by occupation, 
and when fifty-five years of age moved to 
Orange, where he for a time engaged in mer- 
cantile pursuits. Being better pleased with 
a farmer's life, he bought at length a farm of 
one hundred and fifty acres and started a dairy 
business, which has since become extensive and 
profitable. About fifteen years ago he had the 
sad misfortune to lose his eyesight, and is now 
obliged to hire a man to carry out his instruc- 
tions in regard to the work, which goes on in 
the same systematic manner as of yore. Broad 
in his views, a true and loyal citizen, and pos- 
sessing the courage of his convictions, he is a 
steadfast Republican in politics, and with his 
wife is a consistent and worthy member of the 
Unitarian church. His wife, formerly Eliza- 
beth Putnam, is a daughter of Amos Putnam, 
who during his life was one of the progres- 
sive and worthy farmers of New Salem. They 
reared a family of three children: Frederick, 
Edwin N., and Susan E. Edwin N., who 
died in November, 1885, was born May 18, 
1843, married Eliza Moore, and they were the 



parents of four children: Agnes E. , Nathan- 
iel P., Grace E. , and Charles L. Susan E. , 
born June 16, 1845, is the wife of William 
Orcutt, a farmer of New Salem, and the 
mother of three children: Frank A., George 
A., and Mary E. 

Frederick D. Kellogg acquired the rudi- 
ments of learning in the public schools of 
New Salem, afterward attending the academy, 
where he pursued the higher branches. When 
a youth of seventeen years he began teaching, 
and for six winters thereafter was thus en- 
gaged, while during seed-time and harvest he 
worked on the farm. He was employed as a 
clerk by his brother Edwin during the succeed- 
ing four years, at the expiration of which pe- 
riod he entered ihe' service of the New Home 
Sewing Machine Company, being engaged the 
first winter in the humble capacity of truckman 
and general workman. Proving himself emi- 
nently trustworthy and capable, he was offered 
a position in the office as assistant book- 
keeper; and here his efficiency soon earned for 
him an unasked promotion to the office of pay- 
master at the foundry. His duties have since 
been increased, so that now he has general 
charge of buying the iron, coal, wood, and 
other supplies, answering correspondence, and 
similar confidential work. Mr. Kellogg's 
business qualifications are of a high order; 
and much of the work connected with the 
foundry is left to his good judgment, and is 
carried on in a manner highly satisfactory to 
his employers. 

The union of Mr. F. D. Kellogg with Miss 
C. R. Bragg was celebrated in 1862. Mrs. 
Kellogg was born in Royalston, and is a 
daughter of the late Benjamin and Mary G. 
(Snow) Bragg, the former of whom was for 
many years engaged in the manufacture of sati- 
net and woollen goods. Mr. Bragg departed 
this life when but sixty-five years of age; but 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his widow survived him, living to the advanced 
age of fourscore and five years. Both were 
devoted members of the Congregational 
church, and reared their children to the same 
faith. Their family circle included eight 
children, of whom four grew to maturity, 
namely: Sarah P., wife of Newell Holman; 
C. R., Mrs. Kellogg; Mary S. , who makes 
her home with Mr. and Mrs. Kellogg; and 
Benjamin L. , who married Frances M. Ses- 
sions. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Kellogg 
has been blessed by the birth of two chil- 
dren: Frederick L. , born May 26, 1867, now 
one of the physicians of Somerville, who mar- 
ried Miss Grace Warren; and Edwin D., born 
January 29, 1882. In 1873 Mr. Kellogg built 
the fine house on Main Street which he has 
since occupied, and where he is interested 
with his father in the milk business. It is a 
commodious and conveniently arranged dwell- 
ing, and under the supervision of his estimable 
wife is the centre of a generous hospitality. 
A stanch Republican in politics, he is ever too 
much engrossed by the cares of his business to 
accept political office. His financial ability 
and sterling integrity are recognized by all, 
and he is now serving as one of the Trustees 
and as Auditor of the Orange Savings Bank. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Kellogg are esteemed and 
active members of the Congregational church 
and liberal contributors toward its support. 



-OHN A. ANDREWS, whose death oc- 
curred on his homestead in Shelburne, 
Franklin County, March 15, 1894, was 
born in this town on June 26, 1818. The an- 
cestors of Mr. Andrews were among the early 
settlers of Eastern Massachusetts. His pater- 
nal grandfather, James Andrews, is supposed 
to have been a native of Taunton, Mass. He 
was a farmer by occupation, and after his mar- 



riage removed to Conway, where he engaged 
in agricultural pursuits until his death, being 
one of those sturdy pioneers who did so much 
at an early day toward developing the natural 
resources of this county. 

John Andrews, son of James and father of 
John A. Andrews, was born in Taunton, 
Mass., and when little more than an infant 
was brought by his parents to Conway, where 
he grew to manhood. He was trained to farm- 
ing pursuits, and also learned the shoemaker's 
trade, which he followed in connection with 
the former. He lived for some years in Con- 
way, going thence to Hawley, and coming 
from there to Shelburne. Here he bought a 
tract of land in the southern part of the town ; 
and in the course of a few years he established 
a fine homestead, on which he engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising during the years 
of his activity. His declining years were 
passed at the home of his sons, John A. and 
Edwin Andrews, where his death occurred at 
the age of seventy-six years. He married 
Content Hawks, who was born in Deerfield ; 
and they became the parents of six children, 
who grew to mature years, four of whom are 
deceased; namely, John A., Mrs. Dolly New- 
hall, Valoris, and Frederick. The survivors 
are Mrs. Caroline Holmes and Edwin. 

Like his father, John A. Andrews wisely 
chose farming as the means by which he should 
earn a livelihood. In company with his brother 
Edwin he bought the old Bardwell farm, and 
this they managed in partnership for some 
years. Later the property was divided ; and in 
1879 Mr. John A. Andrews moved on to the 
homestead now occupied by Mrs. Andrews and 
her children, which contains three hundred and 
thirty acres of rich and valuable land, and whose 
cultivation and improvement he continued until 
his death. Mr. Andrews was a man of marked 
intelligence and ability, and was one who ex- 




FRANK L. BURROWS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



103 



erted a beneficial influence in the community. 
In educational matters and in whatever con- 
cerned the general welfare and advancement 
he took a deep interest, and served in various 
town offices with great acceptability, having 
been Selectman two years, a part of the time 
being chairman of the board. He was a faith- 
ful member of the Congregational church, 
which he joined when a young man. 

Mr. Andrews was twice married. His first 
wife, Elvira Kingsbury, lived but a brief time 
after her marriage. Two children, John R. 
and Georgianna, were born to them, both of 
whom died in infancy. Mr. Andrews subse- 
quently married Sarah A. Carpenter, the 
daughter of George Carpenter, of Shelburne, a 
further account of whose family may be found 
on another page of this volume in connection 
with the sketch of Walter W. Carpenter. 
Three children were born to Mr. John A. and 
Mrs. Sarah A. Andrews, namely: Anna T., 
July 16, 1857; Benjamin W., August 13, 
1861; and Elvira K., June 9, 1865, all of 
whom live on the old homestead with their 
mother. The Andrews estate is still owned 
by Mrs. Andrews and her children, and is 
practically under the management of the son, 
who is a thorough-going and capable agricult- 
urist. He is carrying on general farming, 
stock-raising, and dairying, keeping from thirty 
to thirty-five head of cattle and about seventy 
sheep, and is meeting with excellent success. 
Benjamin is a stanch Republican in politics, 
as was his honored father, a straightforward 
business man, and a useful and valued citizen, 
enjoying the confidence and esteem of his 
fellow-men. 

LPRANK L. burrows, formerly a 

pi conductor on the New York Central 

Railroad, now a well-to-do farmer of 

Bernardston, Mass., his native place, was born 



on August II, 183 1, son of Isaac and Rebecca 
L. (Connable) Burrows. Amos Burrows, 
father of Isaac, was born in Connecticut, 
whence he moved to Leyden, Franklin 
County, Mass., being one of the early settlers 
of that town. After working for some years 
at blacksmithing, later he turned his attention 
to farming, and in the course of time became 
the owner of a square mile of land in Leyden 
and Bernardston. He was very successful, 
and accumulated considerable wealth before 
his death, which occurred on the place where 
Nelson Burrows now lives, at the ripe old age 
of ninety-four years. He had a family of six 
sons and three daughters, and left each of his 
children a good property. Even after he had 
passed his ninetieth year, he was a remarkably 
active man. For his wife he kept a carriage, 
but he himself always rode on horseback. 

Isaac Burrows was born in Leyden, Mass., 
in 1797, and spent most of his life there and 
in Bernardston, following the vocation of 
farmer. He was a hard-working man and a 
prominent citizen, serving as Selectman of 
Bernardston for over twenty years, and was a 
member of the State legislature one term. In 
religion he was a Universalist, and in politics 
a Democrat, like his father. October 30, 

1 82 1, he was married to Rebecca Connable, 
who was born in Bernardston in 1803, and 
died here, April 6, 1874. His own death 
took place at Bernardston, December 4, 1865. 
Their children, all natives of Bernardston, 
are as follows: George H., born December 21, 

1822, lives in Buffalo, N.Y., and was for 
many years Superintendent for the New York 
Central Railroad; Julia L., born September 
21, 1826, became the wife of Barnabas Snow, 
a farmer of Greenfield; Melissa M., born 
March 8, 1829, was married to Silas N. 
Brooks, and they now reside in Chicago; 
Frank L. Burrows is further mentioned below; 



I04 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Edwin C. Burrows, born February 6, 1834, 
is a farmer, residing in Bernardston; Henri- 
etta W., born February 6, 1827, now wife of 
Ezekiel C. Hale, resides in Bernardston; 
Frederick A. Burrows, born July 12, 1839, is 
a farmer, living in Illinois; Abbie M., born 
February 7, 1841, is now the wife of Lucian 
S. W. Coy, residing at Little Rock, Ark. 

Frank L. Burrows was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Bernardston, where he grew to 
manhood. At the age of twenty-one he en- 
tered upon his career as a railroad man, start- 
ing as a fireman on the New York Central 
Railroad, at the end of six months being made 
engineer, and serving in that capacity for 
three years, when he became a conductor on 
the Wabash Railroad, which position he re- 
tained for eighteen years. Thereafter for two 
years he held the office of Assistant Superin- 
tendent of that road, then returned to the New 
York Central as a conductor, and for twelve 
or thirteen years ran passenger trains between 
Syracuse and Buffalo, being finally obliged, 
on account of ill-health in his family, to give 
up railroading. Removing to Bernardston, 
Mr. Burrows purchased in 1887 the old farm 
where he had spent his boyhood days, and now 
gives his whole time and attention to farming 
and stock-raising. He owns in all about two 
hundred acres, on which are situated some fine 
buildings. 

On the 28th of November, 1855, Frank L. 
Burrows was united in marriage to Josephine 
S. Carrier, who was born in Bernardston, No- 
vember 3, 1834, daughter of Amos Carrier. 
Mr. Carrier was a shoemaker by trade. He 
died at about seventy, and his wife, the 
mother of Mrs. Burrows, at nearly ninety-four 
years of age. Mrs. Josephine S. C. Burrows 
died September 15, 1892, aged fifty-eight 
years. 

Mr. Burrows has one daughter — Maveret 



P., born August 10, 1867, now the wife of 
H. A. Perry, a commission merchant of Man- 
hattan, Kan. Energetic, open-handed, public- 
spirited, ever ready to help in all works of im- 
provement, Mr. Burrows is easily a foremost 
citizen of Bernardston. As a religionist, he 
is of the liberal type; and, as a voter, he afifil- 
iates with the Republican party. He has a 
large circle of friends and acquaintances, and 
many who turn the leaves of this book will be 
pleased to recognize his portrait on an adjoin- 
ing page. 



■<-***-» 



HRANK E. LOWE, of the firm of Lowe 
Brothers & Co., commission merchants, 
wholesale dealers in meats and provi- 
sions, with stores located at Fitchburg, Gard- 
ner, and Greenfield, has charge of the estab- 
lishment in the last-named place, his trade 
also extending into the surrounding towns. 
These gentlemen handle the finest beef obtain- 
able, direct from Swift & Co., of Chicago, and 
buy their other provisions from the leading 
markets of the country, carrying none but the 
most desirable goods in any line. Their busi- 
ness was first established in 1871, at Fitch- 
burg, by the older brothers — Waldo H., Ira 
A., and Albert N. — and is now under the 
management of a fourth brother, Orin M. 
Lowe. In April, 1887, the store in this town 
was opened, and has since been carried on by 
Mr. Frank E. Lowe, who has built up a thriv- 
ing trade. The market at Gardner was started 
soon after the Greenfield one, and placed on a 
paying basis, under the efficient management 
of George R. Lowe, another brother. 

The name of Lowe has been prominent and 
honored in the annals of Fitchburg, Worcester 
County, the great-grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch having been a large landholder of 
the town and one of its most active and influ- 
ential citizens. His son David was a mason 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i°S 



by trade and a life-long resident of that place. 
He married Sarah Messenger, also a native of 
Fitchburg, born in 1800 and a resident of the 
town until her decease, at the age of sixty-six 
years. They reared a family of nine children, 
who became useful and respected members of 
society. 

John Lowe, their first son, who was born in 
1824, is a highly esteemed citizen of Fitch- 
burg, and one of the most active, being en- 
gaged in the meat and provision business with 
his sons. He has been twice married, and is 
the father of twelve sons and five daughters, 
all living, the sons being industriously en- 
gaged in life's vocations. His first wife, 
whose maiden name was Sarah Mead, died in 
1866, at the age of forty-two years, leaving 
nine sons and three daughters, of whom Frank 
E. was the eleventh child and eighth son. 
He subsequently married Mary Lowe, a daugh- 
ter of John Russell and widow of George 
Lowe ; and of this union five children were 
born — three sons and two daughters. 

Frank E. Lowe was educated in the fine 
public schools of his native city, and on the 
completion of his studies began his mercantile 
career, going at first to that busy mart of the 
West — Chicago — where he acquired a prac- 
tical insight into the business in which he 
is now engaged, being for some time in the 
employ of Swift & Co., a firm well known 
throughout our own country and the European 
continent. Returning from Chicago to Fitch- 
burg, Mr. Lowe there spent a year and a half 
before opening his present establishment in 
Greenfield, as above mentioned. He is a 
level-headed, keen, and sagacious man of busi- 
ness, sustaining a good reputation for honora- 
ble methods and fair dealing, is very popular 
among his associates, and is a valued member 
of the Greenfield Club. In politics he agrees 
with the views publicly expressed at the polls 



by his father and brothers, who at the last 
Presidential election cast twelve Republican 
votes. 

Many positions of trust have been held by 
members of the family, one brother, Arthur 
Houghton Lowe, having been Mayor of Fitch- 
burg and President of Board of Trade, and the 
father and three of the brothers having been 
Councilmen. A few months ago the subject 
of electric street railroads from Greenfield to 
Turner's Falls, and from Turner's Falls to 
Miller's Falls, was agitated. This met with 
considerable opposition, which was finally 
overcome by the persistent effort of Mr. Frank 
E. Lowe, the subject of this sketch, and other 
leading business and professional men. Mr. 
Lowe was one of the first to become interested 
in the scheme, and is the largest local stock- 
holder. In recognition of his willing service 
and untiring efforts in behalf of the roads the 
stockholders honored him with a call to the 
Presidency of both the Greenfield and Turner's 
Falls Street Railway Company and the Mon- 
tague Street Railway Company. Mr. Lowe is 
also a partner in the Falulah Paper Company 
of Fitchburg, with his brothers Albert N. and 
Herbert G., and their uncle, Seth D., doing 
a large and prosperous business in the manu- 
facture of fine-coated Manila paper. 



TT^EPHAS CLESSON SEVERANCE, a 
I Y^ highly respected and prosperous 

V J? ^ farmer of Leyden, Franklin County, 
was born where he now resides, April 23, 
1 812, son of Matthew and Mary (Wells) Sev- 
erance. His grandfather, Matthew Sever- 
ance, Sr. , was a native of Fort Dummer, Brat- 
tleboro, Vt., where he was born in June of 
1735. He settled in Greenfield and lived 
there for several years ; but finally, about 
1807, he removed to Leyden, where he sue- 



io6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cessfully engaged in farming. He served as 
a patriot soldier in tlie French and Indian 
War, during which, on June 25, 1758, he was 
taken prisoner, but made his escape, and to 
avoid recapture was forced to conceal himself 
in a hollow log. He died March 14, 18 16, 
at the home of his son Matthew in Leyden. 
His wife, Experience Nash Severance, was 
born in Greenfield, Mass., in May, 1745, and 
died a few years after his decease. She and 
her husband were the parents of twelve chil- 
dren, of whom eleven grew to maturity ; but all 
have now passed away. 

Their son, Matthew Severance, resided in 
Greenfield up to the time of his marriage. In 
1793 he removed to Leyden and settled on the 
farm where his son, Cephas Clesson Severance, 
now resides. But little had then been accom- 
plished in the settlement of the town, and the 
country was still in a wild and uncultivated 
state. Roads even were almost unknown, the 
traveller being guided by marked trees and 
similar devices; and of human habitations 
there was nothing more pretentious than the 
log cabin. Mr. Severance owned an excellent 
farm ; and, being endowed with a good fund of 
energy, in addition to his agricultural pursuits 
he also successfully engaged in the vocations 
of a tanner and shoemaker. In politics he was 
a Whig until the formation of the Republican 
party, which he afterward supported. He 
served as a Captain in the State militia. He 
and his wife, Mary Wells Severance, were the 
parents of ten children, of whom Cephas Cles- 
son is the only survivor. Mehitable, born Au- 
gust 7, 1787, died April 6, 1805; Mary, born 
March 4, 1790, died July 20, 1820; Matthew, 
born November 2, 1793, died September 21, 
1805; Cyrus, born November 15, 1796, died 
in 1 861 ; Chester, born April 20, 1799, died 
December 3, 1884; Miranda, born January 29, 
1802, died December 5, 1805; Emorancy, 



born March 21, 1804, died November 23, 
1871; Matthew, born August 9, 1807, died 
August 2, 1867; Ross, born May 12, 1810, 
died May 28, 1810. Their father's death oc- 
curred October 29, 1834, at the home place, 
and that of their mother several years later, in 
October, 1845. 

Cephas Clesson Severance was reared on the 
old home farm, acquiring a good practical edu- 
cation in the district school. Throughout the 
active period of his life he was successfully 
engaged in agriculture, and now owns an excel- 
lent farm of seventy acres. On November 19, 
183s, Mr. Severance was united in marriage 
to Miss Harriett Miner, a native of Leyden, 
who was born May 4, 1810, and died Septem- 
ber 25, 1853. Their union was blessed by the 
birth of five children. Samuel C. , the eldest, 
who was born August i, 1836, carries on the 
home place. He served eleven months in the 
Civil War as a soldier of Company B, Fifty- 
second Massachusetts Regiment. On October 
29, 1872, Samuel C. Severance was married 
to Miss Anjanette Deane, who was born June 
II, 1843, in Gill, Mass., and they have six 
children: Edith L., born November 26, 1873; 
Leon H., born February 15, 1875; Harriett 
G. , born December 2, 1876; Herman W., 
born November 22, 1881 ; Mildred E., born 
February 15, 1883; and Guy R., born Novem- 
ber 2, 1889. Harriett A. Severance, born 
October 5, 1838, died October 31, 1892. 
Henry H., born January 7, 1841, died July 
28, 1843. Mary Meroa, born August 4, 1843, 
resides at home. Charles F., born July 11, 
1848, is a farmer in Leyden, where he has 
served as Selectman and in other offices. He 
was married November 21, 1871, to Miss Ella 
S. Vining, of Bakersville, Vt. , born January 
7, 1852, and they have had two daughters: 
Gratia Ethel, born July 6, 1874; and Flor- 
ence Agnes, who was born May 26, 1876, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



107 



died May 22, 1892. On May 10, 1855, 
Cephas Clesson Severance was married to his 
present wife, Miss Nancy B. Legate, who was 
born in Charlemont, Mass., October 4, 1813, 
daughter of John and Sally (Blodgett) Legate. 
Mr. Severance is a stanch supporter of Re- 
publican principles, and since reaching his 
majority has missed but two town meetings, 
an example well worthy of imitation. He and 
his wife are consistent members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Although well ad- 
vanced in years, Mr. Severance still possesses 
a good degree of mental vigor and has a most 
excellent memory. 



M 



R. CHARLES LEE FISK, the 
oldest resident physician of the town 
of Greenfield, Mass., and the senior 
member of the Masonic fraternity living in 
the Connecticut valley, has achieved a large 
measure of success in his chosen profession, 
the natural result of superior ability, untiring 
applica:tion, and the personal qualities that 
win respect and confidence. The Doctor is of 
thrifty Scotch ancestry and a native of Con- 
necticut, having been born December 25, 
1804, in the town of Hampton, Windham 
County, which was also the place of nativity 
of his father, Ezra Fisk, who was born in 
1777, and died at the age of fifty-four years, 
of typhoid fever. 

Amaziah Fisk, the father of Ezra, was for 
many years a substantial farmer of Windham 
County, Connecticut, carrying on his occupa- 
tion in the towns of Hampton and Chaplin, 
his death occurring in that county at the age 
of eighty-six years. He was twice married, 
his first wife being the mother of all of his 
children, four sons and four daughters. The 
sons were : David, Ezra, Alba, and Bingham. 
David died in early youth. Ezra, as noted 



above, was the father of Dr. Fisk. Alba, a 
skilled machinist, was for a long time in 
charge of the United States Arsenal at 
Springfield. He died at the age of fifty-five 
years, leaving an estate valued at more than 
fifty thousand dollars. He was one of a com- 
mittee who called on President Jackson, in 
1833, to ask him not to remove the public de- 
posits from the United States Bank, but met 
with a scathing rebuke from "Old Hickory," 
who told them very plainly to go home and 
attend each to his own business, his mind 
being already made up. Bingham, who was 
a farmer in Chaplin and Hampton, died at the 
age of threescore years, of consumption. Ezra 
Fisk married Mary Downing, a daughter of 
James Downing and a native of Brooklyn, 
Conn. Mr. Downing was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and amassed considerable property, but 
was a heavy loser by the depreciation of con- 
tinental money. Mrs. Fisk survived her hus- 
band a few years, living to the age of sixty, 
her death then being caused by a throat dis- 
ease ; and her body was laid to rest in the rural 
cemetery at Brookfield, Vt. Ten children 
were born to her and her husband, the sons 
and daughters being equally divided; and of 
these Dr. Fisk is the fourth child and the 
sole survivor of his family, having neither 
brother nor sister, neither uncle nor aunt, left. 
Dr. Charles Lee Fisk, Sr., is a typical rep- 
resentative of the self-made men of our coun- 
try, having begun at the age of ten years to 
contribute to his own support by driving an ox 
team for the mere pittance of ten cents a day, 
toiling until late and then making his supper 
on bean porridge. He subsequently attended 
the district school in the winter seasons; and, 
being very diligent, he made such progress in 
his studies that at the age of seventeen years 
he began to teach school, receiving six dollars 
per month. Two years later he bought his 



io8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



time for one hundred dollars, and at the age of 
twenty-one had paid the debt and saved one 
hundred dollars, having been employed in 
teaching during the winter and in farm labor 
throughout the summer. In the autumn of 
1825 he removed to Pittsburg, where he was 
engaged in teaching for three years, when fail- 
ing health compelled him to resign his posi- 
tion. Placing himself under the care of an 
old-school physician, he was nearly killed by 
a too free use of calomel, but afterward re- 
gained his health by a judicious use of medici- 
nal herbs. This experience caused him to 
study the nature of plants, and finally to take 
up the practice of botanical or eclectic medi- 
cines. Returning to Pittsburg he accepted 
the principalship of the high school at a salary 
of sixty dollars a month, ten times the amount 
he received in his first school. While in that 
city he began the study of medicine, and com- 
pleted his course in Connecticut, being gradu- 
ated from the Botanico-Medical Society, May 
14, 1850. 

Dr. Fisk began his professional career at 
Chaplin, afterward removing to Killingly, now 
Danielsonville, Conn., where he had at one 
time one hundred and fifty cases of small-pox 
and varioloid, fifty of them being malignant, 
which he battled with most successfully, los- 
ing but one case out of the whole. In March, 
1853, he came to Greenfield, where during 
the many years of his activity he built up an 
exceptionally fine practice, his field of labor 
covering a wide territory. Though never a 
robust man, his wonderful energy and endur- 
ance enabled him to brave all kinds of weather 
when called to the bedside of the suffering by 
night or by day ; and his success was as emi- 
nent as it was deserved. Dr. Fisk is a re- 
markably bright and intelligent man, bearing 
his burden of ninety-one years as lightly as 
many men a generation younger, and, but for 



the loss of his eyesight some six years since, 
might yet be in active practice. 

On December 20, 1828, five days prior to 
the anniversary of his birth, Dr. Fisk was 
united in marriage with Miss Emeline Moul- 
ton, of Chaplin, the ceremony being solem- 
nized at the home of Parson Jared Andrews, of 
the Congregational church. The Doctor was 
at that time engaged in a mercantile business 
in company with his brother William, who 
subsequently died in Maiden, 111., in 1872, in 
the seventy-third year of his age, being one 
of the wealthy and influential citizens of that 
place. Two children blessed the union of the 
Doctor and his wife, the elder being Dr. 
Charles L. Fisk, Jr., of Greenfield, who is 
married and has three sons and one daughter. 
The younger child is Caroline, wife of Calvin 
L. Butler, of Greenfield; and she has two 
children, one son and one daughter, both of 
whom are now married. Mrs. Fisk passed to 
the higher existence May 2, 1890, aged eighty- 
one years, having lived in happy wedlock 
sixty-one years. On the day that marked 
the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage they 
celebrated no golden wedding, feeling that 
their union was for time and eternity. Its 
earthly period was one replete with joy and 
harmony, not even the Angel of Death crossing 
their threshold until it bore the devoted wife 
and affectionate mother to her eternal home. 

For more than threescore and ten years has 
the Doctor been a member of the Masonic 
Order, having been initiated the evening of 
his twenty-first birthday into the Masonic 
Lodge of Lawrenceville, then a suburb, but 
now included within the limits of Pittsburg, 
Pa., an uncle of his being Master of the Lodge 
at that time. Dr. Fisk was made a Knight 
Templar a full half-century ago ; he has served 
as Senior Warden, the highest office but one, 
of the Royal Arch Masons, and likewise oc- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



109 



cupied the same position in the Connecticut 
Valley Encampment of Knights Templars. 
Politically, the Doctor was in his earlier years 
a Jeffersonian Democrat; but, having a heart- 
felt sympathy for the oppressed, he joined the 
antislavery party, adopting for his motto that 
of the Liberator — a paper established in 
Boston, in 1831, by William Lloyd Garrison 
— " My country is the world, my countrymen 
are all mankind." He was a warm advocate 
of the views of that party, and, as " depot mas- 
ter " on the underground railway at Kill- 
ingly. Conn., assisted many a poor refugee on 
his way to freedom. He became personally 
acquainted with many of the leaders of that 
cause; and a warm friendship sprung up be- 
tween the Doctor and William Lloyd Garrison, 
at whose table he has dined. 

Dr. Fisk has always stood high among those 
of position and influence wherever he has 
lived, and in the management of local affairs 
has been quite prominent, having served a:s 
Constable and as Justice of the Peace for years, 
and, while a resident of Connecticut, came 
within one vote of becoming a member of the 
State legislature. He has ever taken a deep 
interest in the cause of education ; and he as- 
sisted in establishing the Danielsonville Acad- 
emy, being one of the contributors to that 
enterprise, and later one of the examin- 
ing committee when enrolling the corps of 
teachers. He was also one of the founders of 
the Eclectic College at Worcester, Mass. 
Dr. and Mrs. Fisk joined the Congregational 
church at Chaplin, Conn., and were among its 
leading members for some years; but, having 
taken a decided stand on the slavery question, 
he, with about twenty-five others, remonstrated 
with the church for communing with and al- 
lowing pro-slavery men to preach. The re- 
monstrance being of no avail, they all withdrew 
from the church ; and since that time the Doc- 



tor has been classed as a Free Thinker. He 
has a taste for music, and a talent for litera- 
ture which often finds expression in rural verse, 
as he terms it, and has produced many manu- 
script works, besides more than a hundred 
beautiful poems that have been printed, about 
thirty of them commemorative of his birthday, 
including one written on his ninetieth anni- 
versary, which lack of space prevents us from 
publishing. It is pleasant to record that the 
gloom of loneliness and blindness besetting 
the worthy Doctor's declining years has been 
in great measure dissipated through the kind 
and judicious ministrations of his excellent 
housekeeper, Mrs. E. D. Chase, who not only 
manages his domestic affairs and has charge 
of his finances, but reads to him, conducts his 
correspondence, and dispenses medicines to the 
patrons that still call at his office for well- 
tested pills and potions. Mrs. Chase has been 
a widow for some years. Her maiden name 
was Cantrell, and she is a native of Deerfield. 




ILBERT G. HILLIARD, who for 
S I over thirty years has been a resident 
and prominent farmer of Northfield, 
Mass., was born in Cornish, N. H., December 
17, 181 1, being a son of Amos A. and Sarah 
(Huggins) Hilliard, of that town. Amos A. 
Hilliard, having spent his boyhood and youth 
on his father's farm, on reaching his majority 
purchased a tract of timber land and at once 
began the work of clearing and getting the 
land into a state of cultivation. At first he 
made his home in a log house, but long after 
erected frame buildings, and still later on 
built the brick house in which he lived up to 
the time of his death, which occurred in his 
eighty-sixth year. His wife was Sarah Hug- 
gins, of Cornish, and they had six children, 
of whom but two are now living: Gilbert G. , 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the principal subject of this sketch ; and So- 
phia, who married Kimball Smith for her first 
husband and afterward a Mr. Martinsdale, and 
is now ninety-four years old. The mother 
died in Cornish at the age of eighty-two. 

Gilbert G. Hilliard spent his early years on 
his father's farm in Cornish, N. H., where he 
was educated in the district school. As a boy 
he assisted in the task of clearing the farm, con- 
taining one hundred and fifty acres, which he 
became the owner of at his father's death, 
residing there up to 1858, when he sold it and 
came to Northfield Farms to the place where 
he now resides, a farm of about thirty acres, 
in connection with which he has another near 
by containing about forty acres. In 1833 he 
married Sophia Plastridge, the daughter of 
Caleb Plastridge, of Cornish, N. H., and to them 
six children have been born, namely: Ellen, 
who married Fordyce H. Smith, an employee of 
the Estey Organ Company of Brattleboro, Vt., 
and has a daughter Mabel and a son Gilbert 
H. ; Sula, who married Marshall Stearns, of 
Northfield, and died at the age of thirty-six, 
leaving three daughters — Kate L., Eunice L., 
and Rosa M. ; Sarah, who married Frederick 
Morgan ; Freeman, who lives with his father 
on the farm and has been thrice married, his 
first wife being Isadore Wright, who died at 
the age of twenty-three, leaving one child, 
Fred W., his second wife Ellen Hay ward, 
who died at the age of twenty-eight, and his 
present wife Sarah G. , who is the mother of 
their daughter, Emma; Emma, who married 
George Merriam, of Greenfield, and died at 
the age of twenty-six, leaving one daughter, 
Florence; Ada, who first married Dr. Morgan, 
by whom she had one son, Carl, and afterward 
George Chamberlain, by whom she has one 
daughter, Marguerite. Mrs. Hilliard died in 
1 88 1, at the age of sixty-four. 

Mr. Hilliard is a Democrat, and was for- 



merly a member of the Baptist church, but later 
embraced the Methodist faith. He has served 
as Sunday-school superintendent and class 
leader, and is one of the prominent men of the 
church. 



/JC^Taiv 



AMALIEL D. GODDARD, son of 
y^J George and Caroline F. (Wales) 
Goddard, is a native-born citizen of 
the town of Orange, where he is an important 
factor of the agricultural and business inter- 
ests, owning a finely improved farm within its 
limits, and being extensively engaged in the 
manufacture and selling of lumber. He was 
born March 19, 1844, and is descended from 
worthy pioneer stock, his grandfather, John 
Goddard, having been an early settler of the 
place. 

John Goddard was born and bred in Ver- 
mont. In early manhood coming to Orange, 
he was for many years one of its w^ll-known 
citizens and very active in advancing its wel- 
fare. In 1794 he built a substantial house 
near North Orange; and this is now standing, 
in fairly good repair. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Hannah Forrester, bore him four- 
teen children, nine of whom grew to maturity; 
namely, Amos, Solomon, Lucinda, Augusta, 
John, David, Charles, Mary, and George. He 
was a very prosperous tiller of the soil, clear- 
ing a good farm before his death, which oc- 
curred while he was in the prime of a vigorous 
manhood, being but fifty-six years old. His 
wife survived him many years, living to the 
age of fourscore. He was a very large and 
powerful man, a veritable athlete, tall and 
well proportioned ; and many stories of his 
wonderful strength are still told. His wife 
was also a woman of fine physique, and their 
children, naturally inheriting the physical char- 
acteristics of their parents, were stout and well 
built; and it is noted that the parents and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



their nine children, at the time the youngest 
child was ten years of age, weighed two thou- 
sand and two hundred pounds. 

George Goddard, son of John and Hannah 
F. , was born in North Orange, November 2, 
1811, and, being reared on a farm, was for 
many years engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
He purchased a tract of land in Orange, which 
he ably managed several years, and in addi- 
tion carried on for some time a successful 
butchering busines. He subsequently re- 
moved to Athol, where he took a contract for 
laying the rails on the Fitchburg railway, a 
business for which his great strength made him 
peculiarly adapted, he being able to lift three 
rails at a time. He next went to Indiana, and 
was there engaged in a like occupation for two 
years, when he returned to Athol to accept a 
position in a machine-shop. Three years later 
he purchased the old homestead, where he 
spent his remaining days, living to the ripe 
age of eighty-one years. His wife, Caroline 
F. Wales, attained the venerable age of four- 
score and four years, passing to the bright 
world beyond in March, 1895. Six children 
were the fruitage of their union ; namely, 
Lucinda, Augusta, Sumner, Emerance, Milly, 
and Gamaliel. 

Gamaliel D. Goddard acquired a practical 
education in the North Orange schools, and 
first worked for wages in a furniture-shop at 
Tully. When very young he was one of the 
volunteers of the Civil War, having enlisted 
August 3, 1862, in Company F, Fifty-second 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in which 
he served bravely for a little more than a year. 
Returning to the duties of private life, Mr. 
Goddard resumed his position in the furniture- 
shop, remaining there eleven years. He then 
began investing his money in real estate, first 
buying the old Goddard homestead ; and since 
that time he has bought and sold several 



farms, and now owns about one hundred and 
fifty acres of land, one of his places being 
known as Wilbur Mill. In 1893 Mr. Goddard 
built a fine residence, one of the most comfort- 
able and convenientl)' arranged of any in the 
vicinity. In September, 1888, he formed a 
partnership with F. P. Williams in the lumber 
business, and since that time has been prosper- 
ously engaged in buying wood lots, from which 
he has cut the timber, sawing it into lumber 
and marketing the same. His trade is very 
large, three hundred thousand feet a year 
being a small estimate of the amount. 

Mr. Goddard was united in marriage in 
1867, to Hattie P. Forrester, who was born 
in North Orange, November 2, 1844. Her 
father, Nathaniel Forrester, was born August 
6, 1 82 1, and is a well-to-do and respected 
farmer of North Orange. He married Frances 
Goddard, who was born in Boston, July 16, 
1821; and they became the parents of three 
children : Fannie, Hattie, and Waldo. The 
home circle of Mr. and Mrs. Goddard has been 
cheered by the birth of three children : Ger- 
trude, born November 28, 1868; Elliott, born 
August 7, 1870; and Albert, born September 
16, 1872. In his political views Mr. Goddard 
is a stanch Republican, and has served his 
town with credit as Selectman. Socially, he is 
an esteemed member of Orange Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, Post No. 17, and of North Orange Grange, 
No. 86. 



LISHA D. ALEXANDER, one of the 
prominent business men of Colerain, 
Franklin County, Mass., was born in 
the adjoining town of Leyden, July 21, 1818, 
son of Elisha B. and Mary (Brown) Alexander, 
the former a native of Colerain, the latter of 
Leyden. Solomon Alexander, father of Eli- 
sha B., was a native of Connecticut, and was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



one of the early settlers of Colerain, where 
he cultivated a farm. He died at Leyden at 
an advanced age. He was twice married, his 
first wife bearing five children, and his second 
wife, who was also a native of Connecticut, 
and lived to be eighty-two years of age, bear- 
ing one son, Elisha B. , above named. 

Elisha B. Alexander was born and brought 
up in Leyden, owning a farm in that town, 
and was a veterinary surgeon of some note. 
In politics he was a Democrat. He belonged 
to the State militia, bearing the rank of Cap- 
tain for some time, and receiving promotion 
to that of Colonel shortly before his resigna- 
tion. He died in Shutesbury, at the age of 
eighty; and his wife lived to be eighty-five. 
They were both members of the Methodist 
church, in which he was class leader for years. 
They had eight children, six of whoin are now 
living, namely: Almira, widow of Josiah 
Gates, in Leyden; Elisha D., our subject; 
Jerusha, widow of Edwin Gibbs, at Lock's 
Ponds, Shutesbury; Esther, widow of Peter 
Gates, in Bernardston ; Nancy, widow of 
Stephen Brown, in Scott, N.Y. ; William, 
residing in Leyden, on the old farm. Electa 
P., wife of William Babcock, died at the age 
of seventy-two; and Henry S. Alexander died 
at forty-six. 

Elisha D. Alexander lived on his father's 
farm in Leyden until forty years of age. 
When a young man he learned the carpenter's 
trade and also that of carriage-making. In 
1865 he established himself at his present 
place of residence, where he shortly became 
busily engaged in conducting a farm, grist- 
mill and saw-mill conjointly, besides making 
use of the skill acquired in his youth in mend- 
ing wagons and doing other mechanical work, 
keeping a general repair-shop. Mr. Alexander 
is a first-class business man, widely known in 
these parts as a dealer in flour, grain, wood, 



lumber, and fertilizers. His post-oflfice ad- 
dress is West Leyden. 

On January 20, 1848, he was married to 
Maria F. Stewart, of Colerain, a sketch of 
whose family history will be found in the no- 
tice of her brother, Edmund B. Stewart, on 
another page. Mrs. and Mrs. Alexander had 
nine children, four of whom are deceased, 
namely: Orrin and Orise, twins, and Leroy 
and Linnia. The living are: Mary, wife of 
Albert Robertson, of Winooski, Vt. ; Eva E., 
wife of George Mattison, of Colerain ; Elisha 
L. , who has a laundry in Springfield; Emma 
H., wife of Lewis G. Blodgett, of Greenfield; 
and Edmund S. , who lives with his parents. 
He was born December 31, i860, and went to 
work in his father's mill when a boy. In 
1886 he bought the mills of his father, and 
now gives his whole attention to milling, turn- 
ing out large quantities of lumber ready fin- 
ished for building purposes, and carrying on 
an extensive trade in feed, which is manufact- 
ured at the grist-mill. 

Elisha D. Alexander votes the Democratic 
ticket. He and his wife attend the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which both are members; 
and they are among the oldest and most es- 
teemed residents of the town. Mr. Alexander 
is a genial and whole-souled man, whom the 
cares of life have not soured or spoiled; and it 
is a pleasure to meet him in business or 
friendly relations. 



YgTENRY C. HASKELL is a well- 
\^\ known and highly successful farmer 

J-^ V of Deerfield, whose property extends 

along the river-bank, and occupies a very de- 
sirable location. He was born at Wendell, in 
the eastern part of Franklin County, on Octo- 
ber 25, 1837; and his father, Nye Haskell, 
was also a native of that town, being a son of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



113 



Nathan Haskell, who moved there from Hard- 
wick, Worcester County, Mass., and settled 
on a farm. The descent of Nathan Haskell 
from his first American ancestor, as gathered 
from the History of Hardwick, may here be 
briefly given, as follows: Roger Haskell, who 
was born in England, died in Beverly, Essex 
County, Mass., in 1637. His son Mark re- 
moved to Rochester, Plymouth County, in 
1693, was Town Clerk there in 1697, and died 
in 1699. Mark's son Roger married Mary 
Swift, of Sandwich; and their son Ephraim 
bought land in Hardwick in 1773, which was 
occupied after his death, within less than a 
year, by his son Ephraim Haskell, Jr., who 
married Eunice Nye, of Rochester, and be- 
came the father of Nathan Haskell. 

Nye Haskell was the youngest of the two 
children of Nathan and Lucy (Knowlton) 
Haskell, and he resided with his parents until 
their decease. He succeeded to the posses- 
sion of the homestead in Wendell, but sold 
the property in 1840 or 1841, and then for a 
short time conducted the Lake Hotel, which 
he soon sold, and became interested in a stage 
line from Greenfield to Barre. He finally 
moved to Deerfield, where in 1842 he pur- 
chased the farm now owned and occupied by 
his son, which he improved to a considerable 
extent in the way of rebuilding, and here fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits with the most pros- 
perous results until his death, which occurred 
in i860, at the age of fifty-four years. He 
married Esther Field, daughter of David 
Field; and their union was blessed with two 
children — Henry C. and John G., the latter 
being also a successful farmer of Deerfield. 
Mrs. Esther Field Haskell died at the home 
of her son Henry, aged sixty years. She was 
a descendant of Thomas Clarke, of whom an 
early historian of Plymouth says, "It is a 
well-received tradition that this ancient man 



was the mate of the ' Mayflower ' and the one 
who first landed on the island which bears his 
name." As a settler, Thomas Clarke arrived 
at Plymouth in the "Ann" in 1623. The 
question whether the latter was an officer of 
the "Mayflower" in 1620 is one which the 
genealogist, S. C. Clarke, who has compiled 
a record of some of his descendants, says 
"cannot now be settled with any certainty." 
Thomas Clarke appears to have been one of 
the leading men in the Plymouth Colony, 
being a deacon of the church from 1654 to 
1697, when he died, at ninety-eight years of 
age. He was representative to the General 
Court in 1651 and 1655. 

Henry C. Haskell received both a common- 
school and an academic education, and at 
home, assisting his father in carrying on the 
farm, was carefully trained in various branches 
of agriculture. After his father's death he 
purchased his brother's interest in the home- 
stead property, consisting of about eighty 
acres, and has since carried on general farm- 
ing with energy and ability, which has pro- 
duced most satisfactory results, his place bear- 
ing evidence of judicious husbandry. He 
conducts a well-equipped dairy, for the main- 
tenance of which he keeps a very fine herd of 
Jersey cows; and he also deals quite exten- 
sively in agricultural tools and implements, 
including Adriance Buckeye Mowers and De- 
laval Cream Separators. 

In 1868 Mr. Haskell was united in marriage 
to Miss Rhoda McClellan, daughter of James 
McClellan, a prosperous farmer of Deerfield, 
who moved to this town from Colerain in 
1840. Mr. Haskell is a Democrat in politics, 
and has always taken an active part in public 
affairs, having served as a Selectman for six 
years, three of which he has been Chairman of 
the Board, and Assessor two years; and, al- 
though his district is strongly Republican, he 



114 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was elected a Representative to the State legis- 
lature for the years 1887-88. He is of the 
liberal type in religion, and attends the Uni- 
tarian church. 




MOS L. AVERY, the oldest merchant 
and one of the leading citizens of 
Charlemont, where he was born 
April 6, 183 1, is a business man of much 
prominence in the western part of Franklin 
County. His parents were Abner and Dorinda 
(Barnard) Avery. Several of his ancestors, 
both paternal and maternal, were of Connecti- 
cut birth. 

His father's father, Amos Avery, was 
born and reared in Montville, Conn., and 
there in youth and early manhood engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. Coming to Franklin 
County, Massachusetts, when it was mostly a 
wilderness, he settled on the farm now owned 
by Mr. Haskins, and built a tannery, which 
he operated for many years; and in addition 
thereto he worked at the shoemaker's trade to 
some extent. He cleared and improved a good 
farm and raised fine stock, including some 
noted horses, of which he was a great lover, 
making a thorough study of their habits and 
their care, he being' for many years the only 
veterinary surgeon in the vicinity. He was 
a man of great influence, active in all works 
for the public good, and served in many of the 
local offices. In politics he was a Whig. 

He married Eunice Avery, a daughter of 
Oliver and Abigail (Sears) Avery, who was 
not a relation, although bearing the same sur- 
name. Her father was born on November 10, 
1728, and died June 27, 1815, and was an 
original settler" of the town of Charlemont, 
coming here when most of its territory was in 
its original wildness, and buying a large 
tract of land, which has since been divided 



into seven good-sized farms. After building 
the typical pioneer log cabin, Oliver Avery 
went to Greenfield for his bride, returning 
with her in an ox cart. Early and late, with 
undiminished energy, he labored in felling 
trees and improving the land; and before many 
years comfort and prosperity smiled upon his 
efforts, his homestead being one of the best 
tilled and cared for in the locality. He re- 
placed the original log structure by a substan- 
tially built frame house, which, although 
erected one hundred and fifteen years ago, is 
still in fine condition, and occupied by Deacon 
David Avery, a hale and hearty man, who was 
born there January 19, 1805. Captain Oliver 
Avery was an expert in the use of the rifle, 
and kept the family larder well supplied with 
game, having shot on or near his farm, in one 
year, thirty wolves, nineteen bears, sixty deer, 
and two moose. His wife was a faithful help- 
meet, and spun the flax which they raised, 
weaving it and making it into clothing and 
bedding. Amos and Eunice (Avery) Avery 
reared fifteen children; namely, Azubah, 
Abner, Betsey, Charlotte, Rebecca, Eunice, 
Abigail, Louis, Freelove, John, Abel, Oliver, 
David, Amos H., and Lucretia. 

Abner Avery, their second child, was born 
March 19, 1786, on the old homestead, which 
he afterward bought. Following in the foot- 
steps of his ancestors as regarded his politics, 
he was first a Whig and later a Republican, 
and in his religious views was an Orthodox 
Congregationalist. Mr. Abner Avery spent 
his last years at Charlemont village, where 
his death occurred December 26, 1857. His 
first wife was Dorinda Barnard, of Shelburne, 
who was, born September 24, 1787, and died 
October 24, 1833. His second wife was 
Sarah Dean. Of the two unions twelve chil- 
dren were born, the offspring of the first being 
William B. , Rhoda A., Gardner F., Amanda 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



IIS 



L. and Clarissa (twins), and Amos L. , of 
whom we write; and of the second, Charlotte 
M., John D., Wales T., Sarah D., Prudence 
R., and Abner D. 

Amos L. Avery began when a boy of four- 
teen years to work out as a farm laborer, after- 
ward entering a factory, where he was engaged 
for five years in making scythe snaths. At the 
age of twenty-three he became a clerk for May- 
hew & Avery. Later he entered the employ of 
J. H. Wells, in East Hampton, remaining there 
a year, and was then engaged five years in 
Bernardston with R. F. Newcomb in the old 
brick store. In 1861 Mr. Avery decided to 
establish himself in business, and accord- 
ingl)' came to Charlemont and rented from 
the Mayhew heirs the store he now owns, pur- 
chasing it on the ist of April, 1868. Begin- 
ning his mercantile career in a very modest 
way, he has gradually increased his business, 
adding to its departments, and has been obliged 
to enlarge his original building and erect a 
new storehouse. Mr. Avery now has one of the 
finest-equipped stores of general merchandise 
to be found in this part of the State, carrying 
a stock including everything, apparently, that 
the most exacting customer can call for, from 
hardware to dry goods. Strictly honorable 
in his dealings, prudent in the management of 
his affairs, and giving close attention to his 
business, he has won the confidence and es- 
teem of his patrons. 

The union of Mr. Avery and Ellen R. Car- 
ter was celebrated June 7, 1859, and has been 
hallowed by the birth of one son, Oscar C, 
born September 15, i860, now in business 
with his father. He married Henrietta M. 
Eldridge, and they have one child, Henry L. 
Mrs. Avery was born November 23, 1836, and 
is a daughter of M. T. and Rosina (Scott) 
Carter, respected residents of Hawley, where 
she was reared to womanhood. 




OLON J. OLIVER is an excellent 
representative of the industrial in- 
terests of North Orange, being 
prosperously engaged in a mercantile dairy 
and blacksmithing business, and noted 
throughout this locality for his enterprise and 
practical ability. He was born June 21, 
1845, in the town of Athol, Worcester 
County, his parents, Franklin and Emily 
(Woodward) Oliver, having been natives of 
the same place. His grandfather, Esquire 
James Oliver, was a direct descendant of the 
Olivers who emigrated from Scotland to the 
north of Ireland, and thence to America. 
Four brothers — John, Robert, William, and 
James — came to Massachusetts in the fall of 
1735 or spring of 1736, staying for a short 
time in Hatfield, and thence going to Athol, 
and settling on Lyon's Hill. Robert, Will- 
iam, and James subsequently removed to other 
States, John alone remaining. His chil- 
dren were: Aaron, Jemima, Moses, Rachel, 
Hannah, Zirvah, Mary, Amara, John, Jr., 
Rachel, second, and Elizabeth. Aaron mar- 
ried, settled in Athol, and had the following 
children: Meribah, George, James, Caleb, 
Asaph, Mary, and Lucy, James, the third 
child, being the Esquire James Oliver above 
mentioned. This intelligent and influential 
citizen spent his entire life in Athol, where, 
having been bred to agricultural pursuits, he 
bought a farm pleasantly located on Lyon's 
Hill; and in addition to general husbandry 
he ran a distillery for many years. To him 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Hannah 
Kendall, seven children were born; namely, 
Aaron, James, Cinda, Franklin, Lucinda, 
Thomas, and Nancy. He was also a civil en- 
gineer, and in that capacity assisted in survey- 
ing and laying out much of the land in that 
vicinity. A man of much general information 
and of sound sense, his opinion was highly 



ii6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



valued on the important questions of the day; 
and for a number of years he served as Justice 
of the Peace and as Deputy Sheriff. Politi- 
cally, he was a stanch member of the old 
Whig party, and on the formation of the Re- 
publican party became identified with that. 

Franklin Oliver was born March 24, 1810, 
and lived and died in the vicinity of his native 
place. He began his life career as a clerk for 
his brother, in a store of general merchandise, 
afterward working in a pail and tub factory. 
He then started in business for himself, run- 
ning a store of general merchandise for several 
years, and buying timber lots at South Athol, 
where he also erected a saw-mill, and, clearing 
off the land, manufactured lumber, in which 
he was an extensive dealer, continuing in this 
occupation until his decease, in the eightieth 
year of his age. His wife Emily, a daughter 
of Bartholomew Woodward, a well-to-do 
farmer of Athol, died in the prime of life, 
being but fifty-four years old. She was an 
amiable and estimable Christian woman, and a 
faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, to which he likewise belonged. Their 
family consisted of eleven children; namely, 
Ozi, Sylvenus E., Otis, Franklin, Jr., Sally 
E., Franklin, second, Solon J., Orville O., 
Orrin O., Edd O., and Lilia E. Of these 
Franklin, the fourth child, died before the end 
of his second year; and Sylvenus died in An- 
dersonvilje Prison, at the age of twenty-nine, 
having been captured by the Confederates at 
the battle of Cold Harbor. He was a private 
in the Massachusetts Volunteers, enlisting in 
1 86 1 with three other brothers, who remained 
in the army to the close of the war. The re- 
maining nine children are all now living, all 
but one of them married and having families 
and children. 

Solon J. Oliver was reared in the place of 
his nativity, and in its public schools obtained 



a good education. His natural ability led 
him to select a mechanical occupation; and at 
the age of eighteen years he left the paternal 
roof-tree, coming to North Orange, where he 
secured work with the Furniture Manufactur- 
ing Company, with whom he remained for six 
years. At the expiration of that period Mr. 
Oliver, who was a young man of a good deal 
of push and energy, in connection with Mr. 
N. F. Blodgett, opened a blacksmith's shop; 
and at the death of Mr. Blodgett he bought 
out his interest in the same, and has since 
conducted it alone, having won the confidence 
and the patronage of hosts of people. His 
accumulations have been wisely invested. A 
few years since he bought the farm at North 
Orange known as the Captain Bishop place, 
adding to it by the purchase of other lands, 
making a farm of upward of eighty acres; and 
here he keeps a small dairy. In 1890 Mr. 
Oliver added to his other industries the busi- 
ness of a merchant, buying the Johnson store, 
where he carries a fine stock of general mer- 
chandise, well adapted to meet the wants of 
his numerous customers. A busier and more 
popular man in this section of the county it 
would be hard to find, he being Assistant 
Postmaster, and for three years was Tax Col- 
lector, besides attending to his private inter- 
ests. In him the Prohibition party finds one 
of its most earnest advocates, and the A. P. A.- 
Association, the Good Templars, and the 
North Orange Grange an esteemed and influ- 
ential member, as does also the North Orange 
Co-operative Creamery Association. Relig- 
iously, he is a faithful member of the Congre- 
gational church, superintendent of its Sunday- 
school, and a worker of the Christian En- 
deavor Society. 

In 1868 Mr. Oliver was united in marriage 
with Angela M. Putnam, who was born in 
North Orange, October 30, 1848, being one of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



117 



the five children of Joseph K. and Sophia B. 
(Bishop) Putnam. Mr. Putnam was a native 
of New Salem, but after his marriage settled 
in North Orange, where his death occurred, in 
the fifty-fourth year of his age. His wife sur- 
vived him many years, living until seventy- 
two years old. Their children were: Jane, 
Julia (the first), Julia (the second), Angela, 
and George. The wedded life of Mr. and 
Mrs. Oliver has been made happy by the birth 
of four children, namely: George S., born 
September 8, 1870, now a resident of Boston; 
Walton F., born July 28, 1874; Arthur C., 
born September 23, 1882; and Urban M., 
born September 12, 1889. 




ILLIAM E. KEITH, a young and 
progressive lawyer and highly re- 
spected citizen of Shelburne Falls, 
Mass., was born in Jackson, Me., August 28, 
1871, son of Justin L. and Angeline (Craig) 
Keith and grandson of Samuel Stillman 
Keith. The latter was a native of Brooks, 
Me., where he successfully followed the 
healthful vocation of an agriculturist. He 
died in Jackson, Me., at eighty-five years of 
age. In political affiliation he was a Repub- 
lican, and in olden times a Whig. Samuel 
Stillman Keith married Thankful N. Ellis, 
who bore him four sons and five daugh- 
ters, as follows: Stillman, Isaiah, Justin L., 
William, Emily, Caroline, Sarah, Eliza, and 
Mary Elizabeth. 

Justin L. Keith was born in Brooks, Me., 
in 1839, and spent his early youth there on 
his father's farm. At twelve years of age he 
went to Belfast, Me., where he was appren- 
ticed to the trade of a shoemaker; and at the 
age of eighteen he carried on the business on 
a small scale for a short time at Dixmont, 
Me., doing the work by hand. Later on he 



continued that business in Monroe, Me., from 
which place he went to Jackson, where, in 
connection with his trade, he engaged in 
agriculture, purchasing a farm of one hundred 
acres, on which he erected a large barn and 
finished other buildings, and remaining there 
sixteen years. In 1876 he moved to Still- 
water, Me., and two years later engaged in 
business in Oldtown, Me. It was in the last- 
named place that he began to attract especial 
attention as the manufacturer of the Keith 
River Driving Boot, of which he was the 
originator. From a small beginning, with 
but one or two men, his business rapidly in- 
creased; and a factory was afterward erected, 
in order to meet the demands for his specialty. 
Still later, in 1893, his son Alford Justin 
being then in business with him, they gave up 
the hand work, and put in machinery; and in 
1895 a stock company was formed, known as 
the Keith Shoe Company, with a capital of 
one hundred thousand dollars. They now em- 
ploy about fifty hands, and are doing a very 
successful business. His wife, Angeline 
Craig Keith, was a daughter of William 
Craig. They are the parents of five children, 
namely: Alice J., the wife of Samuel Elmer, 
who lives in Buckland, Mass., and has two 
children — Blanche and Blaine Everett; Al- 
ford J. Keith, who is a graduate of the Maine 
State College, class of 1880, a civil engineer 
by profession, and who married Miss Hattie 
Ballard, by whom he has two children — Bal- 
lard and Marian — and is now in business 
with his father; Samuel S. Keith, who mar- 
ried Miss Eliza Clancy, and is engaged in the 
retail boot and shoe business in Bangor, Me. ; 
Wilson P. Keith, who died in 1890, at twenty- 
two years of age; and William E. Keith. In 
politics the father is a Republican, and in 
religious views he is liberal. 

William E. Keith received his early educa- 



ii8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tion in the public schools of Oldtown, Me. ; 
and later on he attended the Maine State Col- 
lege, where, like his older brother, Alford J., 
he took up civil engineering. He then 
studied medicine with Dr. Charles B. Porter, 
but afterward returned to college, and fitted 
for law, which he studied with Joseph F. 
Gould, of Oldtown, Me., Samuel T. Fields, 
of Shelburne Falls, Mass., and Peregrine 
White, of Bangor, Me. During his college 
days he taught the grammar school at Great- 
works, Me., in 1889, and later, in 1891, the 
village school at Veazie, Me. During his 
college course he took an active interest in 
athletics, playing on the 'Varsity Bise-ball 
Team five seasons in succession, captaining 
the same a part of the time. He was Captain 
of the Coburn Cadets of the military depart- 
ment connected with the college during his 
Senior year. William E. Keith was admitted 
to the Penobscot bar at Bangor, Me., in Au- 
gust, 1894, and to the Franklin County bar at 
Greenfield, Mass., in May, 1895. Mr. Keith 
commenced practice at Oldtown, Me. ; and 
in April, 1895, he came to Shelburne Falls, 
where he is fast gaining a reputation. He 
has an office in the Bank Building on Bridge 
Street. Mr. Keith is a stanch Republican 
and an active man in his party. In religious 
belief he is a Universalist. 



< * » » > 



/^TeORGE ANDREWS COOKE, M.D., 
\J5 I a young and popular physician and 
surgeon of Miller's Falls, Mass., is 
a native of New Britain, Conn., where he was 
born November 8, 1866, being the son of 
Frank Homer and Mary (Andrews) Cooke. 
David W. Cooke, Doctor Cooke's paternal 
grandfather, was a native of South Hadley, 
Mass. He followed the vocation of a contrac- 
tor and builder in Worcester, and there gained 



such a reputation for good workmanship that 
he was engaged on many of the finest build- 
ings erected at that time, among which was 
the Asylum for the Insane, where he had full 
charge, being State Superintendent over all 
contractors in its erection. His last years 
were spent in Worcester, where he died, at 
the age of seventy-nine. 

Frank Homer Cooke was born in Belcher- 
town, Mass. His special line of work was 
ornamental painting, in which he was very 
successful, and which he learned under the 
guidance of Major Stiles, of Worcester, one 
of the best decorative painters in that city. 
Mr. Cooke was engaged by the Worcester Car 
Company to do the frescoing on the inside of 
railway cars. Unhappily, the nature of his 
occupatiorl shortened his days, his death at 
thirty-two years of age resulting from lead 
poisoning. His wife was Mary Andrews, the 
youngest daughter of Dr. John A. Andrews, 
of Worcester, who for sixty-three years has 
been engaged in successful practice. He is a 
graduate of the University of Vermont, which 
was formerly located at Woodstock, and also 
of Batavia College in Forsythe, Ga. The 
record of Dr. Andrews's children, of whom 
four are now living, is as follows: William 
is a farmer in Montague; John is a brass- 
moulder in Worcester; Orrin, the youngest 
son, who practised medicine in Wendell, 
Mass., for twenty years, died in that place 
in 1879; Melinda married Major Stiles, of 
Worcester; Mary is Mrs. Cooke, as above 
mentioned. Their father, the venerable Doc- 
tor, is still living in Worcester, being now, 
in 1895, ninety-three years of age. Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank H. Cooke reared two children: 
George Andrews; and Frank, who was edu^ 
cated at Becker's Business College in Worces- 
ter. Mrs. Cooke is a Unitarian, as was her 
husband. 




GEORGE A. COOKE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



121 



George Andrews Cooke was but eleven years 
old at the time of his father's death, after 
which he made his home with Major and Mrs. 
Stiles, the latter being his aunt. While he 
lived with them, he attended school in 
Worcester, and at the age of sixteen began the 
study of medicine under the guidance of Dr. 
J. A. Andrews, his maternal grandfather, with 
whom he continued two years, and then went 
to Marlboro, Mass., where for three years he 
studied with Dr. S. S. Shepherd. He next 
spent three years in the Long Island College 
Hospital, where he was taken with a seven 
months' illness. On his recovery Dr. Cooke 
went to Boston, and there engaged in regular 
practice in connection with Dr. F. F. Whit- 
tier, an eye specialist, in Tremont Temple. 
In addition to this Dr. Cooke had charge of 
the Ruggles Street Dispensary, was a member 
of the surgical staff of the North End Hospital 
on Charter Street, and also had visiting days 
at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Blackstone 
Square. The multiplicity of his duties and 
the amount of time he was obliged to devote 
to them (being frequently engaged from eight 
in the morning to eleven or twelve o'clock at 
night) soon told upon his strength; and, find- 
ing that his health was breaking down, he left 
Boston, and came to Miller's Falls, where he 
has had a constantly increasing practice, be- 
sides being often called to surrounding towns 
in consultation on serious medical cases, and 
also in cases where surgical skill is required, 
as he makes a specialty of surgery. He also 
has a special diploma for physical diagnosis. 
His office is on Main Street, opposite the 
O'Keefe Hotel, in the Amidon Block. 

On September 9, 1889, Dr. George A. 
Cooke was married to Carrie E. Emerson, 
daughter of Parker F. Emerson, superintend- 
ent of a shoe and leather concern in Ashe- 
ville, N.C., in which place the ceremony was 



performed. She was born in Manchester, 
Mass., being one of four children, and was 
educated at the English High School of 
Marlboro, where her father was at one time 
superintendent of the Boyd & Corey Leather 
Company, the second largest in the world. 
Mrs. Cooke was a most lovable and beautiful 
young woman, a devout member of the Unita- 
rian church; and her death, May 12, 1891, 
but three months after the completion of her 
husband's college course, was a severe be- 
reavement to the young doctor, just starting 
on his life-work. On June 5, 1895, Dr. 
Cooke was married to Miss Lydia Cecil 
Bemis, of Worcester, Mass. Miss Bemis was 
born in Southboro, Mass. ; but her parents 
now live in East Woodstock, Conn., her 
father being an extensive market gardener. 

In politics Dr. Cooke is a Republican; 
and, socially, he belongs to the A. F. & 
A. M., being a Master Mason of Bay State 
Blue Lodge of Montague and a member of 
Franklin Royal Arch Chapter of Greenfield. 
Dr. Cooke is likewise a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society of Greenfield, and is 
medical examiner for the State Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of Worcester, the Green- 
field Life Association of Greenfield, Mass., 
and railroad surgeon for the Fitchburg and 
New London & Northern Railroads. He is 
an attendant of the Unitarian church. 

A faithful likeness of Dr. George A. will 
be found among the portraits that illustrate 
the present volume. 



^/^LIA 



ILLIAM E. RYTHER, who was a 
iter by trade and for some years 
a successful newspaper publisher in 
Brattleboro, Vt., spent the last forty-two years 
of his long and active life in his native town, 
Bernardston, Mass., where he died, August i, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1893. He was born April 5, 1807, son of 
Gideon and Sylvia (Alexander) Ryther. His 
grandfather, David Ryther, who was of Eng- 
lish descent, settled in Bernardston about 
1740, buying a large tract of land, and build- 
ing the house which is still known as the 
Ryther home. He was the father of twelve 
children, as follows: Hannah, David (first), 
Peter, Hophpi, Rebecca, Martha, David (sec- 
ond), Abigail, John, Anna, Elihu, and 
Gideon. 

Gideon Ryther was born in Bernardston, 
November 28, 1768. He graduated from 
Dartmouth College about 1790, when twenty- 
two years of age, and then studied medicine 
with Dr. Prentice, of Northfield, Mass., after 
which he settled in Bernardston, where he re- 
sided till his death. Dr. Ryther was a suc- 
cessful physician, but not a good financier, 
being very moderate in his charges and too 
lenient in collecting fees to lay up for himself 
any great worldly treasure; but he left a fra- 
grant memory for deeds of charity, and was 
rich in the blessings showered on him by the 
poor. Dr. Ryther married Sylvia Alexander, 
who was born in Northfield, Mass., November 

16, 1764. They had a family of eight chil- 
dren, the youngest being William E., of the 
present sketch. The others were as follows: 
Alphae, born February 3, 1792; Martha, born 
October 3, 1793; Alexander, born August i, 
1795; Sophia, born March 12, 1797; Charles 
Jarvis, born February 26, 1799; D wight L., 
born April 9, 1801 ; Sylvia A., born February 

17, 1803. All are now deceased. 

William E. Ryther was educated and grew 
to manhood in the town of Bernardston. At 
fourteen years of age he was apprenticed to 
Mr. Phelps, of Greenfield, to learn the 
printer's trade. Leaving Mr. Phelps, he 
worked two or three years at his trade in 
Springfield, Mass., but returned, and finished 



his apprenticeship. He subsequently went to 
Brattleboro, Vt., and there became the pub- 
lisher of the Independent Itiquirer; and in 
September, 1834, in company with O. N. 
Piatt, he became interested in the Vermont 
Phcenix, and later became the sole owner of 
that paper. In April, 185 1, owing to death 
in the family and also to his own poor health, 
he sold the entire business to Mr. Piatt, and 
returned to the old home in Bernardston. 
Here he cultivated his farm of seventy-five 
or more acres until his death, which occurred 
a little more than two years ago. Mr. Ryther 
was an industrious and worthy citizen, very 
successful both in the publishing business and 
in farming, and accumulated a fine property. 
In politics he was a Republican, and in relig- 
ion he held to the liberal faith. 

February 28, 1836, Mr. Ryther married his 
first wife, Delia P. Jewett, who was born June 
2, 1810, and died November 5, 1855. She 
bore her husband seven children, only one of 
whom is now living, namely: George Holton 
Ryther, born April 20, 1852, now a lawyer of 
Boston. The other children were: William 
E., born September 18, 1837, who died De- 
cember 16, 1838; William G., born Septem- 
ber 6, 1839, who died June 5, 1840; Daniel 
Jewett, born June 5, 1841, who died Septem- 
ber 28, 1865, a soldier in the Civil War; 
Frances E., born May 4, 1843, who died May 
14, 1865; Dwight S., born November 5, 
184s, who died December 3, 1847; and 
Charles S., born April 22, 1850, who died 
June 20, 1852. On June 7, 1859, Mr. Ryther 
married his second wife, Martha Clark, who 
was born in Dummerston, Vt., October 30, 
1 8 19, daughter of Thomas and Martha (Ten- 
ney) Clark. Her father, Thomas Clark, was 
born in Dummerston, July 20, 1777, and 
there spent his life. He was a practical 
farmer, also the owner of a slate quarry, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



123 



was known as a man whose word was as good 
as his bond. He was a liberal in religion and 
a Republican in politics. He died November 
24, 1865, aged eighty-eight years. His wife, 
Martha Tenney Clark,, was born in Barre, 
Mass., August 5, 1785, and died October 31, 
1840, aged fifty-five years. Mr. Clark was 
her second husband. By her first husband, 
Samuel Bond, born in Winchester, N.H., in 
August 28, 1783, and died in Walpole, N.H., 
March 9, 1809, she had two children; and of 
her union with Mr. Clark four children were 
born, two of whom are living, namely: Mrs. 
Ryther, who is the elder; and Eli Clark, who 
resides on the old homestead in Dummerston. 
Thomas Clark and Mary Clark Button are de- 
ceased. 

The residence of Mrs. Martha Clark Ryther, 
which, notwithstanding its age, is a most 
comfortable home and in a fine state of pres- 
ervation, is one of the old landmarks in 
Western Massachusetts to-day. Its fame has 
attracted visitors from near and from far, and 
for this reason: In 18 12 a British refugee 
came to the Ryther homestead, and asked per- 
mission to remain for a time. With their ac- 
customed hospitality the family made him 
welcome; and in return for their kindness he 
decorated the walls of the front room with 
paintings of fantastic designs. The walls were 
of a rough finish, which gave a better effect to 
the queer figures and pictures of old-time 
scenes — of ships, horses with quaintly 
dressed riders, and different kinds of fruit 
which he put upon them, no two figures being 
alike. One day, however, officers came, hav- 
ing traced the refugee to his retreat, hand- 
cuffed the unknown artist, and took him away; 
and nothing more was ever heard from him. 
But his paintings on the walls of this front 
room are still admired and preserved un- 
touched as a relic in memory of "ye olden 



time," the colors seeming to be as bright as 
when they were painted more than eighty 
years ago. 

/T^HARLES H. SCOTT, a prominent 
I jr^ and highly respected citizen of Rowe, 
V ^ ^ Mass., was born in Halifax, Vt., 
February 23, 1840. He is a son of Thomas 
and Caroline (Grant) Scott and grandson of 
James and Clarissa (Smith) Scott. His great- 
grandparents, James and Sarah (Heale) Scott, 
who were of Scotch-Irish descent, came from 
Ashford, Conn., to Halifax, Vt., where they 
purchased a large tract of land, and were 
among the pioneer settlers of that town. 
James Scott, Sr., was an energetic farmer, 
succeeding in clearing a large portion of his 
land. His son James, who was born in Hali- 
fax, when he had grown to manhood purchased 
of him two hundred acres of land, and also 
successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
In politics James Scott, the elder, was a 
Whig, and took great interest in public af- 
fairs. He served as Captain of the State 
militia. He died at sixty-seven years of age, 
being long outlived by his wife, Clarissa 
Smith Scott, who reached the advanced age of 
ninety-one years. Their union was blessed 
by the birth of eleven children — Thomas, 
Henry, Jonas, Alson, Oshia, James, Clarissa, 
Martin, Horace, Lucy, and Sarah. Both par- 
ents were members of the Congregational 
church. 

Thomas Scott was born in Halifax, Vt., 
January 2, 181 1. At the age of twenty-one 
years he engaged in the tannery business in 
his native town; and in 1841 he removed to 
Rowe, Franklin County, Mass., where he pur- 
chased the old tannery, and continued in that 
line of business for forty years with success. 
He also owned a small place, consisting of a 
house and barn and forty acres of land in the 



124 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



village of Rowe, to which he retired when he 
went out of the tanning business; and here 
his. last days were spent. In politics he was 
a Whig until the organization of the Republi- 
can party, which he afterward supported, ren- 
dering efficient service in various town offices, 
as that of Selectman, of Assessor, and of 
Overseer of the Poor, to which he was elected 
for several terms. He died at seventy-nine 
years of age; and his wife, Caroline Grant 
Scott, who was a daughter of Joshua and Me- 
lissa (Hinckley) Grant, died at eighty-seven 
years of age. Her parents were large land- 
owners and successful farmers of Halifax, Vt. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Scott had the following 
children: Lyman, Charles H., Albert, S. 
Walter, and Carrie. Both parents belonged 
to the Baptist church. 

Charles H. Scott received a good practical 
education in the schools of Rowe, Mass. He 
then assisted his father in the tanning busi- 
ness, in which he later purchased an interest. 
At the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted 
in Company C of the Thirty-first Massachu- 
setts Regiment, under the command of Colonel 
Albert P. Goodwin, and took part in several 
prominent battles, among them that of Port 
Hudson, Red River, and the siege of Mobile. 
He received his honorable discharge on Sep- 
tember 28, 1865, having served four years. 
On his return home he continued in the tan- 
nery business, in which he was engaged up to 
1885; and since that year, in addition to 
carrying on a small farm which he owns in 
Rowe, he has devoted considerable time to 
selling monumental work. 

On November 9, 1871, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Jennie Hayward, daughter 
of Charles and Almira (Stacy) Hayward. 
Charles Hayward, who was born in Wood- 
stock, Conn., son of Thomas and Sarah (Ester- 
brook) Hayward, his father being a successful 



farmer of that place, was educated at Wilbra- 
ham Academy. He chose the ministry as a 
vocation, became a member of the New Eng- 
land Methodist Episcopal Conference, and 
began preaching at an early age. He con- 
tinued in this profession a number of years, 
until failing health necessitated a change, 
when he retired to a large farm which he pur- 
chased in Gill, Mass. He was, however, fre- 
quently called upon to fill pulpit vacancies. 
He died at eighty-one years of age. His 
wife, Almira Stacy Hayward, was a daughter 
of Gilbert and Azubah (Field) Stacy, and 
their union was blessed by the birth of the fol- 
lowing children: Martha, Clarence, Lillie B., 
Ellen, Jennie, Charles, and Flora. Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott have one son — Edmund — born 
June 19, 1873, who lives with his parents. 

Mr. Scott is a Republican, and has taken 
an active and prominent part in the affairs of 
his town, which he has faithfully and accept- 
ably served in various offices, having been 
Town Clerk and Treasurer, Tax Collector, and 
a member of the School Committee; and for 
twenty-five years he has acted as Justice of the 
Peace. He is a member of the Arthur Miller 
Post, No. 93, Grand Army of the Republic, 
of Shelburne Falls. In religious views Mr. 
Scott and his wife are members of the Baptist 
church. 




5. 



FRANK SEVERANCE, an active 
and prosperous agriculturist of the 
town of Shelburne, is a fine repre- 
sentative of the native-born citizens of this 
part of Franklin County, his birth having oc- 
curred March 2, 1 841, on the farm where he 
now resides. His parents were Lorenzo and 
Amanda C. (Stewart) Severance, both natives 
of Shelburne, his father having been born 
March 25, 18 13, and his mother, Novem- 
ber 17, 1809, on this same homestead. Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



I2S 



Severance is of substantial English and 
Scotch ancestry. John Severance, an early 
immigrant to Massachusetts, a freeman in 
1637, was one of the original proprietors 
of the town of Salisbury, in Essex County. 
He died in 1682. One of his sons, who 
also bore the name John, was born in 1647. 
John Severance, Jr., removed from Salis- 
bury, Mass., some years after his marriage, 
to Sufifield, Conn., and there, in October, 
1682, was born his fourth child, Joseph. A 
few years later the family came to Franklin 
County, Mass., and for a few years made their 
home in Deerfield, where a daughter Abigail 
died in 1691. John Severance, Jr., did not 
remain permanently in Deerfield, but made 
another removal, leaving his land in that town 
to his son Joseph. This was about the year 
1706. 

Martin Severance, son of Joseph and Anna 
Severance and great-grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch, was born September 10, 171 8, 
in Deerfield. After his marriage with Pa- 
tience Fairfield, who was born in 1728, he 
settled in what is now Shelburne, being 
among the few white men to venture into the 
wilderness then known as Deerfield Pasture, 
or "North-west," coming here first in 1760, 
but being so harassed by the Indians that he 
went back to Deerfield, where he remained 
two years. He then returned to his land, and 
on it in 1775 built the house that is now 
owned and occupied by Samuel Bardwell. 
Martin Severance was a brave soldier of the 
French and Indian War, in which he was 
taken captive; and he also fought in the Rev- 
olution. He died at Shelburne Falls, April 
10, 1810, nearly a year after the death of his 
wife, which occurred May 25, 1809. They 
had a family of twelve children, of whom 
Selah was the eleventh. Selah Severance was 
born September 26, 1771, at Shelburne Falls, 



and was reared to a farmer's occupation. He 
formerly owned the farm now in the possession 
of O. and E. Bardwell; and on this farm he 
successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until his death, October 8, 1832. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Hannah Putnam, was 
born October 24, 1780, in the town of Heath, 
and died May 30, 1854. Both were faithful 
and much esteemed members of the Congrega- 
tional church, being people of sterling char- 
acter. 

Lorenzo was the eighth child of a family of 
thirteen born to Selah and Hannah (Putnam) 
Severance. He learned the trade of stone- 
mason when a young man, and worked at that 
in connection with farming. In 1841 he 
settled on the farm now owned by his son, B. 
Frank, making it his abiding place until his 
decease, September 22, 1887. He was a man 
of good business ability, an untiring worker; 
and his labors were crowned with success. 
He was a strong Republican in politics, and, 
like his wife, a Congregationalist in religion. 
He married Amanda Charlotte Stewart, and 
they were the parents of six children, of whom 
two are now living, namely: B. Frank, of 
Shelburne; and his elder sister, Martha A., 
who was born May 3, 1839, and is the wife of 
Henry O. Draper, of Ware. The others may 
here be briefly named: Calvin C, born Octo- 
ber 10, 183s, died March 27, 1836; Mrs. 
Mary E. Field, born May 3, 1837, died March 
10, 1890; James H., born September 4, 1844, 
died February 15, 1846; and Herman L., born 
November 4, 1854, died February 10, 1855. 

Mrs. Amanda C. Severance now makes her 
home with her son on the farm where her pa- 
ternal grandfather, John Stewart, settled on 
October 19, 1773. Mrs. Severance is a lineal 
descendant of an earlier John Stewart (Stuart, 
as sometimes spelled), who was one of the 
first sixteen settlers of Londonderry, N.H., 



126 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in 1719. In Morrison's History of Windham, 
N.H., he is spoken of as Charter John, or one 
of the original grantees of Londonderry; and 
interesting particulars are there given of the 
family history, from which we glean the fol- 
lowing: — 

"Robert Stewart (or Stuart) is said to have 
been of royal blood and a landed proprietor in 
Scotland. He is supposed to have been one 
of the Covenanters who took part in 1679 in 
the battle of Bothwell Bridge, subsequently 
fleeing to Londonderry, Ireland. At his 
death, about 17 19, he left a widow and five 
children. His eldest son, John, the immi- 
grant above named, was born in Edinburgh, 
Scotland, in 1682. The land originally as- 
signed to him in New Hampshire consisted of 
sixty acres in what is now East Derry, near 
the meeting-house. In 1728 Charter John 
Stewart was one of the fourteen dissatisfied 
men to whom additional land was laid out in 
the Windham Range. This land furnished a 
home to his descendants for two generations. 
It was first occupied by his son John, who was 
born about 171 5. John Stewart, the second 
of the name, became a prominent citizen of 
Windham, N.H., being invoice-taker in 1743, 
Selectman in 1745, surveyor in 1748, and 
tithing-man in 1747, 1758, 1759. He mar- 
ried Mrs. Rebecca Costa Patten, who was born 
in Edinburgh, Scotland, and who after her 
husband's death moved with her son John, the 
third, to Shelburne, Mass., where she died, at 
the age of ninety-five years." 

John Stewart, third, son of John and Re- 
becca (Costa) Stewart, was born September 
22, 1743, at Windham, N.H., and came here 
a young man, being one of the first white 
settlers of the vicinity. He built a log house, 
and during the first years of his life in this 
locality was largely dependent on the game to 
be found in the woods for his subsistence. 



On December 31, 1765, he was united in 
marriage with Rebecca Stewart, of Colerain; 
and they brought their household goods from 
Windham to Shelburne in an ox-team, travel- 
ling about eight miles a day, the wife riding 
on horseback. He was a man of prominence 
in the town, and served as Selectman in 1806 
and in 1807. He died in 1815. John Stew- 
art, fourth, was a babe of a few months old 
when his mother brought him in her arms on 
horseback to the home farm, where he after- 
ward spent his life, an independent farmer. 
He died here in 1843, aged seventy years. 
He married Charlotte Flagg, a native of 
Brookfield ; and they reared five children, one 
of them being Amanda Charlotte, now the 
widow of Lorenzo Severance. 

B. Frank Severance was reared on the 
homestead, and acquired a good common- 
school education in his native town. Being 
early initiated into the details of agricultural 
arts, he has given his attention to farming, 
residing here his entire life, with the excep- 
tion of three years spent in Colerain. The 
estate, which he now owns, contains eighty 
acres of productive land,^ and is well supplied 
with substantial and convenient buildings for 
carrying on his work. The farm is known as 
Spring Farm, being named from its springs of 
living water, eighteen in number. Mr. Sev- 
erance makes a specialty of dairying, keeping 
twelve head of sleek-looking grade Jerseys, 
and finds this a very profitable branch of in- 
dustry. 

On Christmas Day, in the year 1875, Mr. 
Severance was united in marriage with Lizzie 
M. Kimball, who was born July 27, 1847, at 
Weathersfield, Vt., a daughter of Samuel and 
Electa (Morgan) Kimball. Her parents were 
natives of Weathersfield, and both born in the 
same year, 1804, the birthday of Mr. Kimball 
being June 6, and of Mrs. Kimball January 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



127 



20. They both spent their lives in the place 
of their nativity, and in death, in 1877, were 
not long separated, she passing away March 

21, and he April 22. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Kimball were liberal in their religious views, 
and he was a stanch Republican in politics. 
Six children — four sons and two daughters — 
were born to them, of whom two, John and 
Mary, are deceased. The three brothers of 
Mrs. Severance are: Chauncey M., born June 
24, 1 83 1, living at Weathersfield ; Daniel, 
born January i, 1833, residing in Claremont, 
N.H. ; Amos M., born February 27, 1836, 
living at Lake Geneva, Wis. Mr. and Mrs. 
Severance have no children. Their home is 
pleasant and attractive; and they are highly 
esteemed in the community, being faithful 
members of the Congregational church. In 
politics Mr. Severance is a steadfast Republi- 
can. 




ION N. PETERSON, an extensive 
land-owner and some time farmer 
of Heath, Franklin County, Mass., 
now occupying a position of responsibility in 
the United States Navy, was born in Colerain, 
October 19, 1857, and is a son of Jonathan 
and Chloe (Stratton) Peterson, former resi- 
dents of that town, which joins Heath on the 
east. Mr. Peterson's paternal grandfather, 
Sylvanus Peterson, was a son of Jonathan 
Peterson, a native of Middleboro, Mass., who 
became one of the first settlers in the town of 
Colerain, where he figured prominently in 
public affairs, and died at the advanced age of 
ninety-one years. Sylvanus Peterson was 
born in Colerain, and succeeded to the posses- 
sion of his father's farm, which he conducted 
for many years. He died at the age of sev- 
enty-nine years, having passed the latter por- 
tion of his life in retirement. He married 
Lavinia Call, who died, aged seventy; and 



their children were as follows : Olive, Mary, 
Cynthia, Fanny, Rhoda, Louis, Jane, Char- 
lotte, Nelson, John, George, Harlow, Jona- 
than, and another child, who died an infant. 

Jonathan Peterson, son of Sylvanus and 
Lavinia, purchased in his early manhood one 
hundred acres of land in Colerain, which he 
later sold, and, moving to Heath, here bought 
a farm of two hundred and three acres. He 
followed agricultural pursuits successfully for 
several years, but finally retired from active 
labor, and is at present residing with his 
daughter in the State of Washington. He 
was a Republican in politics, and held the 
ofifices of Selectman, Assessor, and Overseer 
of the Poor for several terms. His wife, who 
died at the age of sixty years, was a daughter 
of Alvin and Loantha (Sherman) Stratton, her 
brothers and sisters being Philoe, Clark, 
Frank, Lydia, and Triphena. The parents 
were early settlers of Hardwick, Vt. ; but 
somewhat late in life they removed to Cole- 
rain, Mass., and there passed the remainder of 
their days. They were in prosperous circum- 
stances, owning and occupying a large farm. 
Mr. Stratton died at the age of sixty-seven, 
and his wife at seventy-six. The children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Peterson were named 
as follows: Loantha, Lavinia, Bion N., 
Arthur J., Nettie, Frank, Josie E., and 
John A. 

Bion N. Peterson attended the common 
schools, and after the completion of his 
studies, when he was eighteen years of age, 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in the State 
of Connecticut for a period of one year. He 
then entered the employ of Luce Brothers, 
who ran steamers that were engaged in the 
menhaden fisheries, and remained with them 
six years, during which time he rose to the 
position of mate of what was known as the 
"Quick-step" steamer. Tiring of sea life, he 



128 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



once more became engaged in farming; but 
two years later he received and accepted an 
appointment as pay clerk in the cadets' store 
at Annapolis, Md., which position he held for 
the succeeding three years. Returning to his 
native State in 1889, he settled at Heath, 
where he purchased the Clark farm, consisting 
of one hundred and seven acres. He also 
owns another farm, which lies in the immedi- 
ate vicinity of his last purchase; and these he 
has continued to operate together, devoting 
his attention to general farming and dairying 
interests, also raising sheep, and dealing in 
live stock. He is a Republican in politics, 
and has served as a Selectman and a member 
of the School Board, and is at the present time 
a Justice of the Peace. He has recently ob- 
tained another position in the United States 
navy, and is now (September, 1895) stationed 
at the New York Navy Yard, in charge of the 
government stores on the receiving ship, 
"Vermont." 

On November 27, 1881, Mr. Peterson was 
united in marriage to Cornelia Reynolds, 
daughter of William and Delia (Guirley) Rey- 
nolds, of Connecticut, the former of whom was 
for many years connected with the iron manu- 
facturing industries. Mrs. Peterson's grand- 
parents, Thomas and Mary (Mitchell) Rey- 
nolds, emigrated from England, and settled at 
Birmingham, Conn., where her grandfather 
became an iron manufacturer, and resided 
there until his decease, which occurred at the 
age of eighty years. His children were: 
Lucy, Thomas, Henry, and William. Will- 
iam was born at Fall River, Conn., adopted 
his father's business, and also erected several 
prominent iron manufactories. He finally 
sold his enterprises in the East, and became 
superintendent of the St. Louis Iron Works 
at St. Louis, Mo., from which position he 
retired some time since. His wife died at 



the age of fifty-six years, leaving three chil- 
dren — Augustus, Jessie, and Cornelia. Mr. 
and Mrs. Peterson have had three children: 
France, born August 13, 1888; Alice, born 
July 20, 1890; and Jonathan, born August 10, 
1893. 



^■♦•^» 




ERBERT COLLINS PARSONS, as- 
sociate editor of the Greenfield Ga- 
zette and Courier, was born at 
Northfield, Mass., January 15, 1862, his 
father, Albert C. Parsons, having been born 
in the same town, July 31, 1812. The birth- 
place of both father and son was the dwelling- 
house built by the grandfather, Jabez Parsons, 
who was born at Enfield, Conn., in 1777, and 
settled at Northfield, Mass., about the year 
1798. He was a currier by trade, and estab- 
lished a tannery, which he carried on for 
some years, being at length disabled through 
loss of eyesight, from which he never re- 
covered, his blindness extending over a period 
of forty years. He died in February, 1876, 
aged nearly ninety-four years. His wife, 
Lovicy Prior, of Enfield, was the mother of 
five children, four of whom grew to maturity. 
Albert C. Parsons married for his first wife 
Hannah Stevens, of Warwick, who became the 
mother of four children, two of whom lived to 
reach maturity; and one is now living, Albert 
Stevens Parsons, of Lexington, Mass., treas- 
urer of the Cambridgeport Diary Company. 
His first wife having died in 1855, Mr. A. C. 
Parsons wedded for his second wife, in 1858, 
Mrs. Susan E. Lane Beach, widow of Joseph 
Beach and daughter of James Lane, of Ala- 
bama, a circuit judge, who was a lineal de- 
scendant of Ralph Lane, one of the founders 
of the Jamestown Colony, Virginia, in 1609. 
Susan E. Lane was born in Greenville, Ala., 
August I, 1822, and married her first husband, 
Joseph Beach, at Charleston, S.C., accom- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



129 



panyinghim to his home in Northfield, Mass., 
where he died. Mr. Albert C. Parsons, at 
the age of eighty-three years a well-preserved 
and active old gentleman, now retired from 
mercantile business, which he followed for 
fifteen years previous to 1885, still resides at 
the farm in Northfield that he inherited from 
his father. He has been prominent in the 
local town government, and was conspicuous 
as an anti-slavery worker in the early days of 
the abolition movement. He became a Re- 
publican with the formation of that party, but 
in 1884 joined the Prohibition party. He has 
been a Selectman, a member of the legislature 
in 1861, of the Senate in 1865, and has been 
a candidate on the Prohibition ticket for the 
same position. He is one of the oldest mem- 
bers of the Unitarian church in Northfield, 
and was at one time President of the Connecti- 
cut Valley Conference of that denomination. 

Herbert Collins Parsons is the younger of 
two children born to his parents, Albert C. 
and Susan E. (Lane) Parsons, and the only 
survivor, his sister, Mary Lane Parsons, a cul- 
tivated and accomplished young lady, a fine 
pianist, having died in 1890, at the age of 
thirty years, a short time after the death of 
their mother. After attending the public 
schools until reaching the age of nine years, 
young Parsons completed his education at a 
private school, and at the age of fifteen years 
became a salesman in his father's store, of 
which he became proprietor in 1885. He 
came to Greenfield in 1889, and entered the 
office of the Greenfield Gazette and Courier as 
associate editor. 

On June 30, 1891, Mr. Herbert C. Parsons 
wedded Miss Charlotte C. Severance, daugh- 
ter of the late P. P. Severance, whose widow, 
Harriet (Converse) Severance, is a resident of 
Greenfield. Mr. Severance left four children 
— three by his first wife — his daughter Char- 



lotte having been the only child of his second 
marriage. He was a farmer during his active 
years, and was a life-long resident of Green- 
field, where he took a prominent part in local 
public affairs. 

Mr. Parsons has always been a Republican 
in politics, and while a resident of Northfield 
was chairman of the School Board. He is 
chairman of the Republican Committee of 
Greenfield, has several times served as dele- 
gate to the State Convention, and in 1888 he 
was a candidate for representative to the legis- 
lature, but was defeated, the district being 
strongly Democratic. He is Secretary of the 
Greenfield Club, a Master Mason, and a mem- 
ber of the Unitarian church. As well befits 
the editor of a local paper and a scion of an- 
cient and worthy stock, he is particularly in- 
terested in historical subjects, and is one of 
the counsellors of the Pocumtuck Valley Me- 
morial Association. Mr. and Mrs. Parsons 
have lost their only child, a son, who died in 
infancy. 

rDRGE C. ADAMS, who carries on 
a dairy and general farming business 
at Greenfield, Mass., was born in 
this town, January 16, 1829, on the farm 
where he now resides. He is the son of 
George Allen and his wife, Mary Wells Par- 
menter Allen, and a lineal descendant of 
William Adams, who was born in England, 
February 3, 1594, three full centuries ago, 
and came to Massachusetts early in the Colo- 
nial period. Andrew Adams, grandfather of 
George C, was of the sixth generation from 
William, the four intervening being repre- 
sented by Samuel, Nathaniel, Samuel, and 
John, in the order here given. 

Andrew Adams, son of John, was born in 
Sutton, now Northbridge, Mass., November 7, 
1759, and came to Franklin County when 



13° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Greenfield and its surroundings was one vast 
wilderness, the abode of Indians and game, 
with here and there a white settler. Wild 
turkeys were abundant in those days, and 
many a bountiful feast did they furnish to the 
inmates of the little log house which Andrew 
Adams bad constructed with the help of his 
good axe. He was a hard-working man and 
successful in what he undertook. His wife 
was a Congregationalist, and he an attendant 
of that church. In politics he was a Whig. 
He died in the house where George C. Adams 
now resides, June 30, 1822, at about sixty-two 
years of age; and his wife, Betsy (Chapin) 
Adams, died January 3, 1846, at the advanced 
age of eighty-three years. He had four chil- 
dren by his first wife: Nahum, a Major in the 
War of i8i2; George, a farmer and lumber- 
man ; Eliza, who became the wife of B. New- 
ton ; and Peleg, a farmer. 

George Adams was born in Pawtuxet, R.I., 
and his wife, Mary, in Gill, Franklin County. 
He grew to manhood and spent all the days of 
his active life in Greenfield. Like his father, 
he was a hard worker, and won a fair degree of 
success in his business of lumberman and 
stock dealer, and owned the farm which is now 
occupied by his son, George C. Adams. It 
was considered a very good farm, and con- 
tained two hundred and twenty-five acres, most 
of the buildings on which were constructed by 
him or his father. He was prominent in the 
affairs of his town, and at various times filled 
the offices of Selectman, Assessor, and Over- 
seer of the Poor, and also settled a large num- 
ber of estates. In religion he was liberal. 
In politics he was a Whig and Republican. 
He died on the old farm at the age of sixty- 
five years, but his wife lived to the age of 
eighty-five. They had three children, two of 
whom- are now living: the eldest child, Mary 
Wells, died March 31, 1853, aged twenty- 



seven; the next was George C. Adams; So- 
phia, the youngest, is the wife of John W. 
Thompson, of Greenfield. 

George C. Adams attended the schools of 
Greenfield, and later the high school and acad- 
emy of Bernardston. Arriving at man's es- 
tate, he chose for himself the line of business 
at which his father and grandfather had been 
so successful — that of farmer. In addition 
to his general farming, he has until recently 
carried on a dairy, and sold milk at Turner's 
Falls and Greenfield. On November 24, 
1859, he was united in the bonds of wedlock 
to Mary Aurelia Parmenter, who was born in 
West Troy, N.Y., June i, 1838, daughter of 
Flaviel and Betsey (Davis) Parmenter. 

Mr. Parmenter was born in the town of 
Gill, Franklin County, Mass., and his wife in 
Savoy, Berkshire County. He was a machin- 
ist and a good business man. At Troy he was 
engaged in the manufacture of gun-carriages 
for the United States government, and also in 
iron roofing and other government work. His 
first wife having died, he was again married to 
Angeline Davis, who was a sister of his first 
wife, and who died at the age of seventy-two 
years. Mr. Parmenter had seven children — 
two by his first wife and five by his second — 
and three are now living: Mary A., the eldest, 
is the wife of George C. Adams; Miss Florie 
Isabella now resides in Orange, Mass. ; and 
Angeline Roxana married Mr. Lowe Gary, 
and resides in Indianapolis, Ind. William 
H. and two others died in infancy, and George 
T. died at two and one-half years of age. Mr. 
and Mrs. Parmenter were active members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and in poli- 
tics he was a Republican. 

George C. Adams and wife still reside on 
the old farm, which must be fruitful of many 
pleasant and tender recollections to Mr. 
Adams as he thinks of the days of his boy- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



131 



hood, and remembers that here his father and 
grandfather spent the greater part of their 
lives. Mr. and Mrs. Adams have reared four 
children. Frederick G., the only son, mar- 
ried Ellen Hartney. They live in Greenfield, 
and have two children — Francis Parmenter 
and Charles Frederick. Angeline E., the 
eldest daughter, resides with her parents. 
Nellie S. became the wife of Dana E. Wis- 
wall, and resides in Turner's Falls. They 
have had two children, of whom Ethel May, 
the elder, died at three years of age; and 
Elsie E. is the only living child. Carrie M. 
Adams, the youngest daughter, resides with 
her parents at the old homestead. George C. 
Adams and his wife are members of the Con- 
gregational church at Turner's Falls, and are 
highly respected and esteemed by their many 
acquaintances. Mr. Adams has always be- 
longed to the Republican party in politics. 



(s>rLFRED A. PARKER, a loyal Ameri- 
f^\ can citizen, who fought for the Union 
^^ '^ V.^ in the Civil War, now a retired 
merchant living at Orange, Franklin County, 
is a native of Massachusetts, having been born- 
in New Boston, then a part of the town of 
Winchendon, and is a worthy descendant of 
honored Revolutionary patriots, the family 
being of substantial English stock. Its earli- 
est representative in America was Thomas 
Parker, who, with his wife, Amy, came from 
London in the "Susan and Ellen" in 1635, 
and settled in the town of Reading, Middle- 
sex County, Mass., where he became one of 
the influential citizens, holding the office of 
Selectman and Deacon of the church, and as- 
sisting in the pioneer labor of building up the 
now thriving town. 

Amos Parker, the great-grandfather of the 
subject of this brief record, was a son of An- 



drew, grandson of John, and great-grandson of 
Hananiah, who was the second son of Deacon 
Thomas Parker, the immigrant. Amos was 
for some years a farmer in Lexington, but sub- 
sequently removed to Holden, Mass., in 1745, 
and later to Shrewsbury, where he and his 
wife passed their remaining years. They 
were noted for charity and piety, and be- 
longed to the Congregational church. They 
reared seven sons and one or two daughters; 
and six of the sons, it is said, served in the 
Revolution. 

Nahum, the sixth son of Amos, was born 
March 4, 1760, at Shrewsbury, and when a 
youth of sixteen years enlisted in the Conti- 
nental Army, and served throughout the war, 
being present at the surrender of General Bur- 
goyne at Saratoga in 1777, and late in life 
drawing a pension. He settled at Gerry, now 
Phillipston, Worcester County, where he lived 
until 1786, when he removed to Fitzwilliam, 
N. H. Although his early educational advan- 
tages were very limited, he became interested 
in reading instructive books through his 
mother's influence, and gradually obtained a 
superior education by his own efforts. He 
had great native ability, with much force of 
character, and, being very public-spirited, was 
kept almost continuously in town or county 
office, being Selectman and Moderator many 
years. Representative for two years, likewise 
a Counsellor and a member of the State Sen- 
ate, of which he was chosen President; and 
for a score of years he served as judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas. In 1806 he was 
chosen by the legislature United States Sena- 
tor. Both he and his wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary Deeth, rounded out a full pe- 
riod of years, and were the parents of nine 
children : Hannah, Austin, Maria, Amos, 
Ephraim, Nahum, Selina, Almon, and Sid- 
ney. 



13^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Ephraim Parker, familiarly known as Cap- 
tain Parker, the next in the line now being 
considered, of the State militia, was born 
August 1 8, 1793, at Fitzwilliam, N. H., and 
completed his education at the New Salem 
Academy, in this county. He was a mill- 
wright by trade, and, being quite a mechani- 
cal genius, made many inventions, some of 
which are in use to-day. He built mills at 
New Boston, from which place he removed to 
Fitzwilliam, where, in addition to milling, he 
served as Deputy Sheriff and Selectman for 
several years. After owning and operating 
mills at Ashby, Mass., and other places, he 
bought the patent right of the Woodruff plan- 
ing-machine, which he took to Richmond, 
Va., it being the first planing-mill in the 
South. He next went to Rock Island, 111., 
where he lived a short time, returning thence 
to Massachusetts, where he purchased the land 
and mills on the south side of the river in 
Orange, the former being now occupied by the 
New Home Sewing-machine Company plant. 
Disposing of that property, he then bought a 
rotton factory at Athol, and, at once becoming 
identified with the local interests, was largely 
instrumental in getting the Vermont & Massa- 
chusetts Railway through that town. On De- 
cember 7, 18 16, he married Lucy Stone, who 
was born June 3, 1795, a daughter of Captain 
David and Ruth (Miller) Stone, and who died 
while they were living in Rock Island, 111., 
in 1852. He survived nearly thirty years 
longer, dying from the effects of a paralytic 
stroke while visiting his son in Orange, Oc- 
tober 24, 1880. He was a man of marked 
ability and enterprise, and always lived some- 
what in advance of his generation. The 
names of the children born to his household 
were as follows: Julia S., Alfred A., Edward 
N., Horace M., Eliza A., Charles A., and Ja- 
nette F. 



Alfred A. Parker received his elementary 
education in the common schools of Fitzwill- 
iam, N.H., completing his schooling at the 
academy in Jaffrey, N.H. When sixteen 
years old, he went West with his father, and, 
being favorably impressed with the country, 
concluded to remain for a while. While in 
search of employment, he drifted down to St. 
Louis, Mo., where he finally secured work, 
being taken on trial as clerk for Nathaniel 
Phillips in a music store, and gave such satis- 
faction that he remained three years, when, 
wishing to visit his home friends, he sent for 
his brother to take his place. While at home, 
he assisted as superintendent of the Athol 
cotton-mill, and also attended the Leicester 
Academy for a year and a half. Returning 
then to St. Louis, Mr. Parker opened a store 
for the sale of gentlemen's' furnishing goods, 
his reputation for business tact and ability 
having been previously so well established 
that he had no trouble in securing financial as- 
sistance. At the end of six years he had se- 
cured a competency; and, being burned out 
soon after, he took his insurance money, and 
at once erected a substantial, three-story brick 
building, which is still standing, and there 
continued his mercantile business. Subse- 
quently selling out to his brother, he em- 
barked in a wholesale dry-goods business, 
which he carried on successfully until the 
breaking out of the late Rebellion, when he 
disposed of it, and, sending his wife and fam- 
ily East, he enlisted as a soldier in the State 
militia of Missouri, being at first under the 
command of General Frank Blair, and later 
under General Lyon. He served until the 
close of the war, participating in many of the 
more important battles in the South-west. 
Returning to his family in Massachusetts, Mr. 
Parker formed a partnership with George 
Whipple, and for three years was engaged in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



133 



mercantile business in Orange. Disposing of 
his interest in that store, he subsequently 
opened a stove and tinware shop; and by 
steady application and good judgment he se- 
cured an extensive trade in the town and sur- 
rounding country, continuing at the old stand 
nearly twenty-five years. He is now enjoying 
his well-earned retirement with his family at 
his pleasant home on Grove Street. 

Mr. Parker was united in marriage March 
30, 1857, with Miss Frances A. Whipple, 
who was born in Athol, September 19, 1834, 
and died November 6, 1891, being a daughter 
of John R. and Martha (Holbrook) Whipple. 
Four children — two sons and two daughters 
— were born to Mr. and Mrs. Parker. The 
daughters, Mary P. and Martha F. , are now 
living. Alfred W. , born January 2, 1859, 
died December 17, 1887. John R., born Sep- 
tember 9, 1861, died December 9, 1889. Mr. 
Parker is a man of strong convictions, a 
stanch Republican in politics, and liberal in 
his religious views. Mrs. Parker, whose 
death was a loss to the community, as well 
as to her immediate family, was a consistent 
and esteemed member of the Congregational 
church in Orange. 




iRS. ISABELLA RUSSELL, a 
much respected resident of Green- 
field, widow of the late Francis 
B. Russell, is a daughter of Henry W. and 
Ann C. (Hilliard) Clapp. Her father was 
born in Springfield, Mass., in 1792, and was 
the eldest son of Parsons Clapp, who was born 
in 1772, and was married in 1796 to Phebe 
Wells, a memoir of whose father, Henry 
WelLs, will be found appended to this sketch. 
Parsons Clapp was a resident of Springfield, 
and a man of some local fame, being Deputy 
Sheriff of the county. After some years' resi- 



dence in Springfield he moved to Montague, 
and later to Wilmington, where he died Feb- 
ruary 27, 1854. Henry Wells Clapp was mar- 
ried to his first wife, Eliza Baldwin, in 1823, 
and to his second, Ann C. Hilliard, of New 
York City, on June 2, 1833. The latter, who 
was born October 5, 1807, was a daughter of 
Robert Bell and Sophia (Crane) Hilliard, her 
father's parents being Nicholas and Jane Bell 
Hilliard, and her mother's William and Ann 
Pennington Crane. 

Henry Wells Clapp was a goldsmith, and 
conducted a successful business in New York 
City for many years, being a member of the 
firm of Palmer & Clapp, who commenced busi- 
ness on Reed Street, New York, in 1820. 
Retiring from the firm in 1835, he settled in 
Greenfield, at the corner of Main and High 
Streets, where he owned a large property. 
He became interested in real estate, and laid 
out Franklin Street — on which his daughter, 
Mrs. Russell, now resides — besides engaging 
in other enterprises. He was a large stock- 
holder in the Russell Cutlery Company, was 
President of the Connecticut Railroad, the 
Franklin County Agricultural Society, the 
Greenfield Bank, Franklin Savings Institu- 
tion, Greenfield Cemetery Association, and 
the Gas Company, and was always ready to 
support with financial aid and practical busi- 
ness ability any well-concerted enterprises 
that promised to be of benefit to the commu- 
nity. He was a prominent member of the 
Episcopal church, and gave liberally toward 
the erection of St. James's Chapel. He was 
a man of literary and artistic tastes, possess- 
ing a good knowledge of ancient and modern 
history, general English literature, and much 
genealogical information. He combined jus- 
tice with charity, and gave freely of his 
wealth, always using, however, a wise dis- 
crimination. His death occurred in Green- 



134 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



field on March 17, 1869. He had" five chil- 
dren by his first wife, all of whom reached 
maturity, and became heads of as many re- 
spective families. 

His daughter Isabella, Mrs. Russell, was 
educated in Miss Stone's school at Greenfield, 
and also attended Bent's private school in 
Worcester, Mass. Her marriage to Francis 
Burg Russell, son of John Russell, occurred 
July IS, 1863. Mr. Russell died July 4, 
1870, he and his wife having been the parents 
of three children, two sons dying in infancy. 
The surviving child is a daughter, Kate Den- 
nison Russell, who resides with her mother. 
Mrs. Russell is a communicant of the Episco- 
pal church in Greenfield, where she has passed 
most of her life. She is a lady highly es- 
teemed in the community, and has many 
friends in Greenfield and elsewhere. 




"ENRY WELLS, third son of Obadiah 
and Mary (Conkling) Wells, was born 

li® ^ ^ at what is now known as Union, 

Essex County, N.J., June 14, 1742, and re- 
' sided in New York City for a period of twenty 
years from 1746. He entered Nassau Hall, 
or the College of New Jersey, at an early age, 
and obtained his bachelor's degree at the age 
of fifteen, an uncle, who was five years his 
senior, having been a member of his class, to- 
gether with Nicholas Baird, of New York, and 
Peter Faneuil, of Boston. He studied medi- 
cine with Dr. Hull at New Haven, and in 
1760 received the degree of A.M. from Yale 
College. On May 26, 1764, he married Han- 
nah Stout, who was born in New York on 
February 19, 1747; and their married life ex- 
tended over a period of nearly half a century. 
In 1757 he moved to the then wilderness of 
Vermont, being one of the twenty-three orig- 
inal patentees of the town of Brattleboro, the 



tract of land which he improved consisting of 
one thousand acres. There upon the brow of 
a hill, where the cemetery is now located, was 
erected the first church in that vicinity. Mr. 
Wells built a substantial frame dwelling, 
which stood for more than one hundred years, 
and in which he resided for a considerable 
period, conducting a large medical practice 
among the early settlers. Although his time 
was much occupied in professional labor, he 
found opportunities to serve in various public 
ofifices ; and his name appears upon an original 
covenant, second among the seventy-nine sig- 
natures, a document written upon parchment, 
which is still preserved at Brattleboro, Vt., it 
having been executed on November 12, 1770. 

Seven children were born to him previ- 
ous to 1 78 1, when he relinquished his estate, 
which had cost him so much time and patient 
sacrifice to improve, and removed to Mon- 
tague, Mass., then a quiet agricultural town, 
where he won a wide reputation as a physi- 
cian, his practice extending far beyond the 
local boundaries; and he frequently received 
calls from Boston, Albany, and distant parts 
of New England. During the epidemic that 
occurred at Greenfield in 1802 he rendered 
such distinguished service as to receive the 
recognition of Dartmouth College, and he 
realized a handsome fortune from his profes- 
sional work. He was noted for his upright 
walk in life, his genial disposition, noble 
generosity, and kind consideration for the 
poor and needy, whom he was ever willing 
to assist both professionally and financially. 
His useful and honorable career was brought 
to a close on May 24, 18 14, at the age of sev- 
enty-two years, his estate continuing in the 
family's possession for over eighty years. 

Phebe Wells, third daughter of Dr. Wells, 
born at Brattleboro, October 28, 1777, was 
united in marriage on November 13, 1796, to 




CHESTER W. SEVERANCE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



137 



Parsons Clapp, a son of Daniel and Abigail 
(Root) Clapp. Parsons Clapp was a farmer 
and a mechanic, who suffered from feeble 
health, and in middle life was crippled by an 
accident, but whose latter years were made 
comfortable by the thoughtful care of his 
children. The eldest son, Henry Wells 
Clapp, devoted his wealth unstintingly to the 
special object of bringing happiness to his 
parents' declining years. Mr. and Mrs. Par- 
sons Clapp reared a family of ten children — 
six sons and four daughters. 



7TAHESTER WELLS SEVERANCE, a 
I Sj^ highly intelligent farmer and repre- 
^^ ^ sentative citizen of Leyden, Frank- 
lin County, was born here, February 27, 1831, 
son of Chester and Martha Smith (Nash) Sev- 
erance. Chester Severance, who was a son of • 
Matthew Severance, the date of his birth 
being April 20, 1799, was also a native of 
Leyden, where, after he had grown to man- 
hood, he was successfully engaged in the 
varied occupations of farmer, tanner, and 
shoemaker. His wife, Martha Smith (Nash) 
Severance, was a native of Greenfield; and 
her birth occurred March 31, 1793. Their 
union was blessed by the advent of three sons 
and four daughters, six of whom reached adult 
life, and four are now living, namely: Ade- 
liza, born May 5, 1823, the wife of John 
Thayer, of Rochester, N.Y. ; William S., 
born March 24, 1829, a successful physician 
of Greenfield, Mass. ; Chester W. ; and 
Charles Earl, born August 27, 1833, a skilful 
medical practitioner of Brattleboro, Vt. The 
others were: Martha, born October 7, 1826, 
died August 23, 1828; Mary M., born Octo- 
ber 20, 1824, died September 20, 1871; 
Helen, born February 13, 1840, died October 
14, 1865. Chester Severance, the father, 



died December 3, 1884, having outlived his 
wife nearly a quarter of a century, her death 
having occurred October 29, i860. In relig- 
ious views Mr. Severance was a Methodist, 
and in politics a stanch supporter of Republi- 
can principles from the formation of the party. 
He faithfully served his town as Selectman 
several years and in other offices. 

Chester Wells Severance received his early 
education in the district schools of Leyden, 
which was supplemented in the academies of 
Bernardston and Shelburne Falls. At seven- 
teen years of age he began teaching school, 
which occupation he followed for several years 
in Leyden and vicinity. He then conducted 
the Union Store at Leyden for a year. Up 
to this time he had made his home with his 
parents. He now took up the vocation of a 
farmer, and established a home for himself, 
buying in 1852 a farm of one hundred and fif- 
teen acres, where he still lives, having added 
to it by subsequent purchase, so that it now 
comprises about two hundred and fifty acres. 
His land and buildings are in good condition; 
and he is successfully engaged in general 
farming, being energetic and a good business 
manager. 

On November 25, 1857, Mr. Severance was 
married to Miss Catherine M. Wilkins, who 
was born February 10, 1840, youngest child 
of Dr. Willard A. and Laura (Stone) Wil- 
kins, the former of whom was a native of 
Guilford, Vt., and a successful physician. 
Dr. Wilkins died at the early age of thirty- 
nine years; but his wife, who again married, 
lived to be eighty-three years of age. They 
had three children: Joseph S., born September 
12, 1831, died October 22, 1831; Daniel G., 
who was born December 25, 1832, and died 
December 5, 1880, was a druggist in Boston; 
and Catherine M. Eight children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Severance, of whom four 



138 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



are still living: Lillian L., born September 20, 
i860; Willard W., born July 30, 1862; Etta 
May, born May 17, 1865; and Chester Gilbert, 
born September 29, 1869; Kate F., born Octo- 
ber 17, 1858, died August 28, 1878; a child 
born May 27, 1864, died in infancy; Ulysses 
Grant, born December 15, 1867, died March 
10, 1868; and George H., who was born Feb- 
ruary 2, 1873, died January 21, 1876. 

Mr. Severance is prominent in local public 
affairs, and has frequently been called upon to 
hold offices of responsibility and trust; for 
thirty years he has served on the school com- 
mittee, and for sixteen years as Selectman. 
He has also most acceptably filled the offices 
of Constable and Collector, as well as other 
positions. At the present time he is Trustee 
of the library. He is a member of Republi- 
can Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Greenfield. 

Mr. Severance, being endowed with musical 
talent, which he has cultivated to a considera- 
ble extent, has been engaged as a teacher of 
both instrumental and vocal music, and since 
he was seventeen years of age has led the 
choir of the Leyden Union Church. 

On an accompanying page will be found a 
portrait of this worthy scion of ancient Colo- 
nial stock, whose genealogy is further treated 
in sketches of other members of the family. 



tLFRED SCHOFF, proprietor and 
manager of the Mansion House at 
^^, Greenfield, Mass., is a genial, ener- 
getic, and keen-sighted business man, who in 
his character of host has won the respect and 
esteem of a large number of patrons. He was 
born in Newton, Middlesex County, Mass., 
November 8, 185 1, and is a son of Stephen 
A. Schoff, a native of Newburyport, Mass., 
but now a resident of Greenfield, making his 
home at the Mansion House. 



Stephen A. Schoff was gifted by nature 
with a taste for art, and when but thirteen 
years of age, in 1831, left his ancestral home, 
in order to cultivate his talent in that direc- 
tion. • Going to Boston, he apprenticed him- 
self to Joseph Andrews, who was the leading 
line engraver of that time in this country. In 
order to attain greater proficiency in line "en- 
graving, when about twenty years old, Mr. 
Schoff went to Paris, shipping before the 
mast as a common sailor, to defray the ex- 
penses of the voyage. After studying there 
three years, he returned to his native land, 
and opened an office in Boston, where he soon 
earned an enviable reputation for artistic 
work, and won many friends, among the more 
valued being the late William Morris Hunt, 
whose favorite picture, " The Bathers," he 
was engaged by Mr. John A. Lowell to repro- 
duce in the finest style of his art some time 
after the death of the painter. Mr. Schoff en- 
graved the Ralph Waldo Emerson portrait by 
Rouse, and for the past five years has done the 
engraving for the New England Insurance 
Company's calendars. He has given much 
attention to bank-note work, and stands very 
high in his profession, his portraits and vign- 
ettes being considered among the very best 
produced, some of the heads, " for delicacy, 
taste, and excellence of execution, being al- 
most unequalled in this branch of art." In 
184s he married Josephine Ha.stings, of 
Stow, Mass., and for some forty years there- 
after resided in Newton, where were reared 
the five children briefly mentioned below: 
A. H. Schoff, a woollen commission mer- 
chant in New York City, is senior member 
of the firm of A. H. Schoff & Co. ; Frederick, 
a manufacturer of machinery, lives in Phila- 
delphia; Alfred, in Greenfield; John I. died 
at the age of nine years; and Gertrude lived 
on earth but six years. The mother of these 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



^i9 



children passed to the higher life January 
1 8, 1882, and was laid to rest in the Newton 
cemetery. 

Alfred Schoff was educated in the schools 
of his native town, being graduated from the 
Newton High School in the month of January, 
1870, and studied drawing with Charles H. 
Moore, now a professor at Harvard College. 
After engaging in the woollen commission 
business for a time, Mr. Schoff began his 
career in the hotel business, buying a part in- 
terest in the Kearsarge House at North Con- 
way, N.H., in January, 1884. Subsequently 
he bought the entire property, and carried it 
on for five years, when he rented it, and came 
to Greenfield to take possession of the Man- 
sion House, which had also been under his 
management for two years, he having leased 
it in January, 1886. This house is one of the 
leading hotels of the town, and under the con- 
trol of Mr. Schoff has a reputation for comfort 
and good cheer that attract the best class of 
the travelling public. 

Mr. Schoff was married October 2, 1873, to 
Mary E. Keyes, a daughter of H. L. and Clara 
(Woodman) Keyes, of Newton. After a 
happy wedded life of a little less than seven 
years Mrs. Mary E. Schoff died, April 10, 
1880, leaving two children, namely: Bertha, 
now an accomplished young lady of twenty 
years, already well versed in music, having 
studied it for fourteen years, and for four 
years been a successful teacher, but still pur- 
suing the study of the art in Boston; and 
Olive, fifteen years old, and now a student at 
Waltham. Mr. Schoff married for his second 
wife Miss Rose Sauter, who is of German 
parentage, being a daughter of the late Jacob 
and Christine Sauter, the latter a resident of 
Greenfield, where her married life was passed. 
Two children have been born of this union, 
namely: Christine, born March 13, 1883; 



and Josephine, born January 23, 1895. Mr. 
Schoff was by birthright a Republican in poli- 
tics, but has so far departed from the faith 
that he now supports the Cleveland adminis- 
tration. 



■tp)TENRY H. DENNISON, of the firm 
l-^-j of Wood & Dennison, general store- 

-11® ^^^ _, keepers at Griswoldville, in the 

town of Colerain, has reached his present po- 
sition of prosperity through his own personal 
energy and perseverance. He was born at 
Wilmington, Vt., October 4, 1861, and is the 
son of Charles H. and Mary W. (Jenkins) 
Dennison, his father having been a native of 
Marlboro, Vt. , and his mother of Massachu- 
setts. Mr. Dennison's paternal grandfather, 
Samuel Dennison, was an early settler in 
Marlboro, Vt. , where, having made for him- 
self a home by clearing a farm from the wil- 
derness, he continued to reside during his ac- 
tive life, dying in Wilmington at the age of 
seventy-six years, his wife, Sophia Dennison, 
having lived to attain ripe old age. Of their 
family, which consisted of nine children, all 
born in Marlboro, two are now living, namely: 
Holland Dennison, of Wilmington, Vt.; and 
Mrs. Melissa Harris, of Esperance, N.Y. 

Charles H. Dennison was both a carpenter 
and a farmer; and subsequent to his marriage, 
which occurred at Abington, Mass., he pur- 
chased a farm in Wilmington, he and his wife 
having travelled thither by stage, the distance 
being one hundred and fifty miles. He re- 
sided in Wilmington, and continued to follow 
these occupations until 1878, when he moved 
to Colerain, and settled at Griswoldville, 
where one year later his residence was washed 
away by a freshet, carrying with it his entire 
worldly possessions. He continued a resident 
of Griswoldville until his decease, which oc- 
curred on December 22, 1892, at the age of 



14° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



seventy-nine years. His wife, who still sur- 
vives, and resides with her son Henr}' H. 
Dennison, was the mother of seven children, 
three of whom are now living, as follows : 
Adelbert E. ; Mary A., wife of William H. 
Norton; and Henry H. — all of Griswold- 
ville. Those deceased were: Lysander A., 
Emma E. , Alice M., and Charles A. 

Henry H. Dennison, having secured his 
education in the public schools, at fifteen years 
of age entered the cotton-mills of the Gris- 
woldville Manufacturing Company as an opera- 
tive, and continued in that employment until 
1880, at which time he was given a position 
as clerk in the company's store. In that ca- 
pacity he served faithfully and efificiently for 
fourteen years, or until October, 1894, when, 
in company with Mr. Wood, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this volume, he pur- 
chased the business. They conduct a large 
and well-equipped establishment, carrying a 
stock valued at about five thousand dollars, 
their sales amounting to about twenty thou- 
sand dollars per annum. 

On June 29, 1888, Mr. Dennison married 
Mary E. Call, of Colerain, daughter of 
Charles H. Call, who now resides in Shat- 
tuckville, Mass. They have two children: 
Leon Earl, born October 26, 1889; and 
Gladys May, born March 10, 1893. Mr. Den- 
nison is a Republican in politics; and both 
himself and wife are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, in which he has been 
superintendent of the Sunday-school for one 
year and steward for several years. 



(^Thoi 



HOMAS T. FYFE, M.D., an active 
(^1 practitioner of the homoeopathic school 
of medicine, is one of the younger phy- 
sicians of Greenfield, and comparatively a 
recent comer, but has already won a good 



reputation for professional knowledge, prompt- 
itude, and skill. He is a native of Scotland, 
and the date of his birth was May 18, i860. 
His father, Hugh Fyfe, was born in Scotland 
in 1820, was there reared and married, and 
lived there until 1869. In that year he emi- 
grated to the United States with his wife and 
family, which consisted of twelve children — 
five sons and seven daughters — of whom but 
two of the sons and five daughters are now 
living. He was a civil engineer by profes- 
sion, and, after being employed in that capac- 
ity in several cities and towns, settled in East 
Bennington, Vt., but after two years moved to 
Blackinton, Mass., where he died in 1876. 
His widow, whose maiden name was Annie 
Downly, survives him, living at North 
Adams, Mass., and at seventy years of age 
is strong and active both mentally and 
physically. 

Thomas was a lad of nine years when the 
family came to this country, and had obtained 
the rudiments of his education in the public 
schools of Scotland. After landing on these 
shores, he continued his studies in the graded 
schools of Cleveland, Ohio, being graduated 
from the high school in due course of time, 
and subsequently studying for his profession, 
and receiving his medical diploma at the 
Homoeopathic Hospital College of that city. 
In 1889, in the month of November, Doctor 
Fyfe settled in Greenfield; and during his 
residence here he has gained the good will 
and confidence of all with whom he has had 
dealings in a professional, social, or business 
way, and has acquired a lucrative practice. 

Dr. Fyfe was united in marriage March 
8, 1881, to Miss Elizabeth Ingraham, their 
nuptials being celebrated at the bride's home 
in North Adams, Mass. At their pleasant 
residence, which he purchased in March, 
1893, on Federal Street, the Doctor and his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



141 



wife exercise a genuine hospitality, entertain- 
ing their many friends with social converse 
and right good cheer. Dr. and Mrs. Fyfe 
are not connected by membership with any 
religious organization, but both are regular 
attendants of the Congregational church. In 
politics the Doctor affiliates with the Repub- 
lican party, being one of its stanchest allies. 



■OHN S. HUNT, a respected resident of 
Miller's Falls, where he carries on 
business as a blacksmith and wheel- 
wright, was born in the town of Rowe, Frank- 
lin County, Mass., February 14, 1861. His 
father, Moses Hunt, was a native of Hawley, 
Mass. ; and his grandfather, Atherton, was a 
long-time resident of that town, where he 
owned and cultivated a farm, and where his 
death occurred. 

Moses Hunt, father of John S., was one of 
five children. He received his education in 
the public schools of the town, remaining 
with his father until he came of age. He 
then purchased a farm in Rowe, which he 
cultivated until his death, at the age of forty- 
nine years. His wife was Ursula Dalyrimple, 
a native of Reedsboro, Vt., where her father, 
John S. Dalyrimple, was a prosperous farmer. 
By her marriage to Mr. Hunt she became the 
mother of three children, as follows: Martha, 
wife of Sylvester Davis, of Charlemont ; 
Mary, wife of S. C. Smith, of Colerain; and 
John S. Mrs. Moses Hunt is still living in 
Rowe. Both she and her husband were at- 
tendants of the Unitarian church. 

John S. Hunt spent his early years on his 
father's farm in Rowe, attending the public 
schools of the town, his education including 
a high school course. He then learned the 
trade of wheelwright and blacksmith, conduct- 
ing a business here for ten years, after which 



he sold out, and spent two years in the brace 
shop at Miller's Falls. He later purchased 
an interest in the shop he now conducts in 
connection with Philip Cavanaugh, and has 
been quite successful in building up a good 
business. 

In 1886 Mr. Hunt was married to Miss 
Alice Newell, daughter of Charles Newell, 
a well-known farmer of Rowe. Mrs. Hunt 
was born in Shelburne Falls, and was one of 
a family of four children, all of whom are now 
living. Mr. Hunt is independent in politics, 
casting his vote in accordance with his best 
judgment. He is liberal in his religious 
opinions, and takes an active interest in polit- 
ical, social, and religious matters. He is a 
man of intelligence and information, giving 
much of his leisure to the perusal of books, 
particularly works of biography, in which 
department of literature he has a discriminat- 
ing taste. 

J~X AVID M. PIERCE, a leading farmer 
—J and extensive real estate owner in 
^ Colerain, was born in this town, 
October 21, 1842, son of Morris and Sylvia 
(Upton) Pierce. He traces his descent on 
the paternal side from Captain William 
Pierce, who fought in the French and Indian 
War, and whose two sons, Zebulon and Gad, 
also participated in that struggle. Zebulon 
took up arms again later in life, being one of 
the patriots of the Revolution. He died on 
July 2, 1800, at the age of sixty-six; and his 
wife, Molly, died in July, 18 18, aged seventy- 
three. Their son Samuel, who was the grand- 
father of David M., was born in Stow, 
Mass., April 15, 1779. He established ai 
permanent residence in Colerain, and became 
quite a prominent man here, cultivating a 
large farm and taking an active interest in 
public affairs. He was a well-informed man, 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and was connected with a library and a histor- 
ical society. In politics he was a Whig, and 
represented his town in the State legislature; 
and for several years he was Town Clerk and 
Treasurer. He died February i, 1850, at the 
age of seventy-one. His wife, Rachel Smith, 
to whom he was married November 26, 1801, 
was born February i, 1782, and died at the 
age of sixty-five. Both Grandmother and 
Grandfather Pierce were members of the Bap- 
tist church. They had a large family, but 
only two sons and two daughters reached 
maturity. 

Morris Pierce was born in Colerain, April 
II, 181 1, and became one of the leading men 
of the place, owning a farm of three hundred 
acres at one time, and also running a saw- 
mill. He belonged to the old Whig party, 
and later was a Republican. He was several 
times elected Selectman and Assessor, and 
was in good standing as a member of the Bap- 
tist church. He died at the age of seventy- 
one. His wife, Sylvia Upton, who was born 
in Charlemont, December 12, 181 3, died May 

29, 1 88 1, when sixty-eight years of age. She 
was a daughter of Ebenezer Upton, of Charle- 
mont, and great-grand-daughter of Josiah 
Upton, a native of North Reading, who was 
fourth in line of descent from John Upton, 
the immigrant ancestor of the Uptons of New 
England. Mr. and Mrs. Morris Pierce had 
four children, of whom David Morris is the 
second. Samuel Sabin Pierce, born August 
31, 1837, is deceased; Albert J., born March 

30, 1847, iiow resides in Amesbury, Mass.; 
George Landon Pierce, born April i, 1852, 
lives on the old homestead where his grand- 
father died. He carries on general farming, 
making a specialty of fruit-growing and dairy 
products, and owns several head of stock, 
including sheep and Holstein and Jersey cat- 
tle. He has been twice married. His first 



wife, Sarah L., daughter of Thomas and 
Fanny Purington, of Colerain, died, leaving 
two children, Fanny M. and Wayne M. 
His second wife, Mary E., widow of H. D. 
Townsley, is the daughter of Charles and 
Philana (Lyon) Elmer, of Ashfield, who are 
both deceased. 

David M. Pierce grew to manhood in Cole- 
rain, receiving here his early education, 
which was supplemented by four terms at 
Powers Institute. After the death of his 
father, with whom he had then been in com- 
pany for eleven years, he bought the mill 
interest, and continued the business of manu- 
facturing wooden boxes for dairy products and 
other articles. For some years he was en- 
gaged in mechanical work, milling, and farm- 
ing, at one time raising and packing large 
quantities of tobacco. In 1875 he bought the 
farm where he now resides of his uncle, David 
S. Pierce, who had been in business with his 
father; and in 1891 he disposed of his inter- 
est in the mill, in order to attend more 
closely to his agricultural pursuits. He now 
owns a large territory of farm and pasture 
land, including one hundred acres in Charle- 
mont, which bears the Indian name, Pocom- 
tuck. Mr. Pierce carries on general farming 
and fruit-raising on an extensive scale, and 
has some fine cattle. He gives his personal 
supervision to every branch of his work, and 
the results speak for themselves. 

On June 2, 1880, he was married to Alice, 
daughter of Ephraim and Chloe (Peck) Trues- 
dell, of Rowe, where Mr. Truesdell is well 
known as an old resident and a public-spirited 
citizen. They have two children, Percy F. 
and Clara S. Pierce. Mr. Pierce votes the 
Republican ticket, and, true to the family tra- 
ditions, is a member of the Baptist church. 
Besides his real estate, he is concerned in the 
Shelburne Falls Creamery Association. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



143 




LMON B. EDDY, a prosperous farmer 
and highly esteemed citizen of Con- 
way, was born in Buckland, Frank- 
lin County, Mass., February 7, 1854, son of 
Benjamin and Nancy (Parks) Eddy, and grand- 
son of Joel Eddy. The grandfather, Joel, was 
a native of Vermont, where he was success- 
fully engaged as an agriculturist. He died 
at the advanced age of ninety-three years, and 
his wife at the age of seventy. Benjamin 
Eddy, who was born in Vermont, remained at 
home until he was twenty-one years of age. 
He then removed to Buckland, Mass., where 
he was employed in the cutlery manufactory 
for a few years, after which he purchased a 
farm in Vermont, and was engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits until he retired from active 
labor. He is now living with his son Almon 
B., and, though advanced in years, is still 
active, and enjoys a fair degree of health. In 
political views he is a Prohibitionist. His 
wife, Nancy Parks, was born and reared in 
Bernardston, Mass., daughter of Reuben 
Parks. She bore her husband a son and 
daughter, Lucinda E. and Almon B. The 
mother's death occurred when our subject was 
quite young. Both parents were communi- 
cants of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Almon B. Eddy removed in childhood with 
his parents from Buckland to Vermont, where 
he grew to manhood, receiving a practical 
education in the public schools. On attain- 
ing his majority he went to Iowa, and was 
there successfully engaged in farming for 
seven years. He then returned East, and 
settled in Conway, purchasing the small farm 
on which he now resides. He is profitably 
engaged in general farming, and in connection 
with his agricultural work is also employed 
by the Conway Creamery Company. In 1881 
Mr. Eddy was joined in marriage with Miss 
Nettie I. Lee, of Conway, daughter of Dennis 



Lee. Their home has been brightened by the 
birth of two children — a son and daughter — 
Walter C. and Jessie May. 

In political affiliation Mr. Eddy is a Repub- 
lican. He is a member of the Deerfield Ag- 
ricultural Society, and is a Master Mason, 
having taken the third degree in the Morning 
Sun Lodge of Conway. 



LIZA B. LEONARD, of Greenfield, 
Mass., is a native of Boston and the 
descendant of a family noted for 
their mental attainments and for estimable 
traits of character that gave them distinction 
among the leading members of their genera- 
tion. She is a daughter of the late Theodore 
and Elizabeth (Babcock) Leonard, the former 
a native of Sandwich, Mass., born March 24, 
1802, and the latter of Boston, born February 
24, 1809. 

The paternal grandfather of Miss Leonard, 
named Jonathan Leonard, was born at Bridge- 
water, Mass., on February 7, 1763, and was 
graduated from Harvard College in 1786. He 
studied for the medical profession, settled at 
Sandwich, Mass., in 1788 or 1789, and was 
for many years the foremost physician and 
surgeon of that locality. He was succeeded 
in his practice by his son Jonathan, also a 
Harvard graduate; and the latter in his turn 
has a son named Jonathan, who is now a stu- 
dent at Harvard, preparing for the hereditary 
calling. Dr. Jonathan Leonard, Sr., married 
Temperance Hall, of Sandwich, their nuptials 
being solemnized May 10, 1796, and they 
reared five sons, namely: Francis Dana, who 
passed the larger part of his life at Yellow 
Springs, Ohio, and who was always actively 
interested in advancing the cause of education, 
giving his daughters the advantage of a thor- 
ough course of study at Antioch College; 



144 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Theodore, father of Miss Leonard ; Jonathan, 
a physician, at Sandwich, as above mentioned, 
who was twice married, his first wife having 
been Alice Babcock, a sister of Miss Leon- 
ard's mother; George Kingman, for many 
years engaged in business in Boston, where 
he died, aged forty years, leaving two sons 
and two daughters; and Charles Cushing, 
who was probably lost at sea by the burning 
of the ship "President." Both grandparents 
attained the venerable age of eighty-six years, 
the grandfather dying in 1849, ^^d his widow 
in 1854. 

Theodore Leonard and Miss Elizabeth Bab- 
cock were united in marriage on the twenty- 
fifth day of September, 1832; and during the 
first few years of their wedded life they re- 
sided in different places, including Boston, 
Baltimore, Md., Mobile, Ala., and Dudley, 
Mass. In 1843 they settled in Greenfield, 
which they made their permanent home, in 
1853 purchasing the fine large residence at 50 
Federal Street, now owned and occupied by 
the subject of this brief sketch. Mr. Leonard 
was interested in the manufacture of woollen 
cloths, such as doeskins and cassimeres, until 
1857, being agent for the company, which 
failed in that year; and he, being the largest 
creditor, succeeded to the business, being 
actively and prosperously engaged therein for 
some ten years. He was in reality the archi- 
tect of his own fortune, having begun life as 
clerk in a Boston establishment, and, dili- 
gently applying himself, by his own energy 
worked his way up to a recognized position 
among the successful business men of the day. 
His years were well spent; and his death, 
which occurred May 7, 1872, was universally 
regretted. His widow survived him, living 
until January 9, 1892. Both were people of 
culture, liberal in their social and religious 
views, and consistent members of the Unita- 



rian church. Mrs. Elizabeth B. Leonard 
was a daughter of Samuel H. and Eliza 
(Brazer) Babcock, both natives of Boston, who 
were the parents of thirteen children, four of 
whom died when young. Nine grew to ma- 
ture life, as follows: Samuel B. (deceased) 
was for forty years rector of St. Paul's church 
at Dedham, Mass.; William G., a retired 
Unitarian minister, is living at Dorchester, 
Mass. ; Charles A. (deceased) was formerly in 
mercantile business in Boston; John, a manu- 
facturer, resides in Boston; Charlotte L., the 
widow of a prominent druggist of Boston, was 
the third child in order of birth, and is now 
an active and interesting woman of eighty- 
five years; Alice, deceased, was the wife of 
Jonathan Leonard; Caroline, deceased, mar- 
ried Theodore Dunn, of Dover, Mass. ; Sarah, 
deceased, married Augustus Whittemore, a 
well-known merchant of Boston; and Eliza- 
beth, as above mentioned, became Mrs. Theo- 
dore Leonard. 

Eliza B. Leonard was the only child born 
to her parents, and much attention was paid 
to her early education, which was obtained in 
private schools of Greenfield, and under the 
tuition of Professor Louis and Mrs. Elizabeth 
C. Agassiz, at the historic old town of Cam- 
bridge, Mass. Being somewhat dependent 
upon her own resources, she early began to 
make use of her abilities and attainments, and 
for a period of fourteen years taught French 
and music in Greenfield, but on account of 
failing health was obliged to relinquish her 
work. Miss Leonard has since filled her 
house with congenial boarders, and takes 
delight in providing them with the comforts 
of a pleasant home. She occupies a high 
position in the society of Greenfield, having 
many warm friends among the best people of 
the place, her liberal mind, large heart, and 
sympathetic nature commanding the respect 




AMOS STEWART. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



147 



and winning the love of all with whom she 
is brought in contact. 




MOS STEWART, a prosperous farmer 
and fruit-grower of Colerain, Franklin 
County, Mass., is a sturdy repre- 
sentative of the old Scotch Stewart family, 
members of which settled in the town in 1740. 
An old gravestone in the cemetery bears the 
name of one of Mr. Stewart's ancestors, with 
date of birth — James Stewart, 1680 — who 
was the first member of the family to make his 
home in Colerain. 

The parents of the subject of this sketch 
were Amos and Margaret (Oak) Stewart, 
both natives of Colerain, the former of whom 
was a successful farmer and for many years a 
prominent figure in public affairs, he having 
served his town as Selectman, and represented 
his district in the State legislature for several 
terms. He was a Presbyterian in religion. 
His death occurred June 17, 1867, at the age 
of seventy-four years, nearly seventeen years 
after that of his wife, Margaret Oak, who was 
called to rest in August, 1850, at the age of 
fifty-three. Of their ten children the only 
survivors are four sons: Amariah H., who 
resides in Connecticut; William, a resident 
of Colerain, and whose sketch with further 
genealogical data appears elsewhere in this 
work; David, who is now a resident of Michi- 
gan; and Amos, the father's namesake. 

Amos Stewart, Jr., attended the schools of 
his native town in his early years, and at the 
age of eighteen, under the influence of the 
gold fever, made an overland trip to California 
with an ox-team, leaving Greenfield in April, 
1852, and arriving at his destination in Octo- 
ber, a six months' journey, which must have 
been tedious to a degree, although unrivalled 
for leisurely opportunity of sight-seeing, and 



doubtless diversified by incidents of exciting 
and even of perilous nature, whose story one 
would like to hear. Hopeful and energetic, 
the young adventurer went immediately to the 
mines of Sonoma County, where he worked for 
three years, his expectations of sudden wealth, 
however, like those of many others, failing of 
realization. He returned East by way of the 
Isthmus; but, before settling down in his 
native place, he went to Wisconsin, where he 
remained for a year and a half, at the end of 
which time, not altogether satisfied with that 
part of the country, he returned to Colerain, 
and in 1857 purchased the seventy-acre farm 
that he now occupies. Having, however, 
since added to the original acreage, he now 
possesses a fine farm of about one hundred and 
twenty acres, which is admirably located and 
in a high state of cultivation. Besides being 
extensively engaged in fruit-growing, having 
a large and productive orchard which yielded 
last year over four hundred barrels of apples, 
he also devotes considerable attention to 
dairying interests with profitable results. 
The Stewart place, with its convenient and 
comely dwelling and its remodelled farm 
buildings, is one of the pleasantest and most 
comfortable homes in this vicinity. 

On April 14, 1858, Mr. Amos Stewart was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary Cone, who 
was born at Marlboro, Vt., October i, 1836, 
daughter of Jesse and Abigail (Nelson) Cone. 
Mrs. Stewart's parents are no longer living. 
Her father was formerly a merchant of Marl- 
boro, Vt., where he was an early settler, and 
became a prominent citizen, long serving as 
Justice of the Peace, Postmaster, Town Clerk, 
and Treasurer. He was successful in busi- 
ness, and was highly esteemed. He was 
twice married, and of his three children Mrs. 
Stewart is the only survivor. Mrs. Stewart's 
paternal grandparents were Robert and Sarah 



148 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



(Cook) Cone, the former of whom was a native 
of Saybrook, Conn., and became an early set- 
tler in Colerain, where he combined the occu- 
pations of farming and shoemaking. He was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary War. His 
death occurred at the age of sixty-three years. 
His wife, Sarah Cook, who was from Wil- 
mington, Vt., survived to the age of eighty- 
four. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have had three chil- 
dren, but have been called to mourn the loss 
of two: Jennie, who died January ig, 1875, ^t 
the age of sixteen years; and Abbie, Mrs. 
W. T. Holton, who died January 8, 1891, at 
the age of twenty-five years, in Redlands, 
Cal. Charles Amos Stewart, the only son, 
born April 14, 1871, is now superintendent 
of a fruit ranch at Redlands, Cal. Liberal in 
their religious views, Mr. Stewart and his 
wife are among the most respected residents 
of Colerain. He is a Republican in politics, 
has served as Selectman and Assessor for 
three terms, and is now Special County Com- 
missioner. As might be expected, he is a 
member of the Franklin County Agricultural 
Society. 

A portrait of Mr. Amos Stewart, which his 
acquaintances will have no difficulty in recog- 
nizing, and which will give pleasure to many 
friends, will be seen on an adjoining page. 



T^HARLES M. CONANT, a well-to-do 
I jp farmer of Gill, an interior town of 

V»^^^^ Franklin County, was born in War- 
wick, a few miles east of his present home, 
February 4, 1827, son of Jonas and Anna 
(Rising) Conant. Mr. Conant's great-grand- 
father, Benjamin Conant, was born in Beverly, 
Mass., in 1698; and in 1732 he became one 
of the incorporators of the town of Dudley, in 
Worcester County. He resided there for 



thirty-five years, during which time he was 
prominent in public affairs, and then moved 
to Warwick, where he died September 20, 
1767. For a more extended account of the 
family genealogy the reader is referred to a 
work entitled "A History of the Conant Fam- 
ily," which was published in Portland, Me., 
in 1887. Asa Conant, Mr. Conant's grand- 
father, was born in Dudley in 1750, and set- 
tled in Warwick, where he became an inn- 
keeper, and died February 21, 1832. 

Jonas Conant, son of Asa, was reared to 
agricultural pursuits. He erected a grist-mill 
in Warwick, which he operated for a time, but 
disposed of it later, and moved to Vermont, 
where he carried qn a farm for eleven years. 
In 1840 he returned to Warwick, where he 
passed the remainder of his life, dying at the 
age of eighty-one years. Jonas Conant was 
a member of the Congregational church at 
Warwick. By his first wife, Sarah Leonard, 
daughter of Jonas Leonard, he had four chil- 
dren, who have all passed away. Charles M. 
Conant is the only child of his union with 
his second wife, Mrs. Anna Rising Barker, 
daughter of Jonathan Rising, of Marlboro, 
Vt. The mother died in Whitingham, Vt., 
aged ninety-three years. 

Charles M. Conant received his education 
in the district schools and at Cambridge, 
N.Y., and resided with his parents until his 
father's death. He taught school for one 
winter, then followed carpentering and shoe- 
making, being engaged for some time in a 
particular branch of the latter trade — that of 
bottoming boots — and also carried on a farm. 
In 1864 he sold his property in Warwick, and 
settled upon his present farm in Gill, which 
consists of forty-five acres of well-improved 
land; and this he conducts with good results. 

In 1852 Mr. Conant was united in marriage 
to Emelia Johnson, daughter of Daniel John- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



149 



son, who was a prominent farmer of Warwick, 
but a native of Orange. Mr. Johnson died in 
Warwick, at the age of forty-one years. He 
and his wife, Sarah Ward, a grand-daughter 
of William Burnett, were the parents of six 
children, four of whom are still living, 
namely: Caroline, wife of Jonathan Blake, 
who resides in Gill; Emelia; Sarah, who 
married Dwight Fuller, of Springfield ; and 
James G., who resides at the old homestead. 
Mrs. Johnson passed her declining years with 
her daughter Emelia, Mrs. Conant, and died 
at the age of seventy-four. Emelia Johnson 
was well educated at the common and select 
schools of Orange, and, after completing her 
studies, taught school for one year before her 
marriage to Mr. Conant. 

Mr. and Mrs. Conant have had two daugh- 
ters; namely, Alice, who died at the age of 
twenty-one, and Sarah at twenty-three years. 
Both were liberally educated, and Sarah had 
already entered upon a useful career as a 
teacher. Mr. Conant is a Republican in poli- 
tics, but has never aspired to public office. 
He and his wife are attendants of the Congre- 
gational church. 




'ON. WILLIAM BARRETT WASH- 
BURN, LL.D., a resident of Green- 
ly V^ ^ field from 1857 to his death in 

1887, and Governor of Massachusetts for the 
years 1872 and 1873, was born in Winchen- 
don, Mass., January 31, 1820. His paternal 
grandfather, Elijah Washburn, who was born 
October 8, 1758, and who served in the Con- 
tinental Army during the Revolutionary War, 
was for some time a resident of Leicester, 
Mass., from which place he went as a pioneer 
settler in 1786 to Hancock, N.H. He was a 
blacksmith by trade, but engaged in agricult- 
ure in connection with other business pur- 



suits. He married Elizabeth Watson, of 
Leicester, Mass.; and they became the par- 
ents of a good old-fashioned family of twelve 
children. Mr. Washburn died in 1836, at 
the age of seventy-eight, his wife following 
him three years later, at the age of seventy- 
seven. The Washburn homestead in Hancock 
is still in possession of their descendants. 

Their son Asa, who became the father of 
the Hon. William B. Washburn, was born in 
1790, and in 18 17 married Phebe Whitney. 
Asa Washburn died October 21, 1824; and 
after his death his widow married in 1827 
John Woodbury, by whom she had one daugh- 
ter — Mary Jane — who died in her thirteenth 
year. Mr. Woodbury died in Winchendon, 
Mass., in 1870, when in his eighty-seventh 
year. Governor Washburn's mother, having 
survived her second husband, laid down the 
burden of life at the residence of her son, 
Nelson P. Washburn, Nashua, N.H., on 
March 7, 1876. 

William B. Washburn prepared for college 
at the academies of Westminster, Mass., Han- 
cock, N.H., and Groton, Mass., and in 1840 
entered Yale College, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1844. He had in- 
tended to enter the legal profession, but, 
yielding to the request of his uncle, William 
B. Whitney, who was in poor health, he 
assumed charge of the latter's extensive busi- 
ness interests at Orange, Mass. He early 
exhibited remarkable business ability, to- 
gether with a strict personal integrity, which 
soon brought him into public notice, and led 
to his being selected in 1850 as a fit candidate 
for the State Senate, where the foundation of 
his political career was laid. After serving 
one term in the House in 1854, he repre- 
sented his district in the thirty-eighth, thirty- 
ninth, fortieth, forty-first, and forty-second 
sessions of Congress, and in November, 1871, 



15° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was elected to the office of Chief Executive of 
the State, being inaugurated January, 1872. 
His record in this exalted position is well 
known, and need not be here enlarged upon. 
Suffice it to say that he proved himself a 
worthy successor to the many able and virtu- 
ous men who had preceded him in office, and 
showed himself abundantly endowed with the 
essential qualities of a true statesman and 
leader of men. He was twice re-elected, and 
in April, 1874, resigned the governorship, 
having been appointed by the legislature to 
succeed the Hon. Charles Sumner in the 
United States Senate. He took his seat in 
that body on May i, 1874, and completed the 
unfinished term of his illustrious predecessor, 
which closed on March 3, 1875. 

During his residence in Greenfield he filled 
a prominent place in the business world. He 
was elected President of the State Bank and 
of its successor, the National Bank, which 
position he held until his death. He was a 
Trustee of Yale College for nearly twelve 
years, a member of the Board of Overseers of 
Amherst College, and a Trustee of the State 
Agricultural College at Amherst. At the 
time of his death he was a Trustee of Smith 
College in Northampton and of the Moody 
School at Northfield, and was a Director of 
the Connecticut River Railroad Company. 
He was actively interested in all public 
affairs, both State and national, often neglect- 
ing his own private business to promote meas- 
ures for the general good of the community, 
and will long be remembered as a cheerful 
giver, a liberal benefactor to the Greenfield 
Library and other deserving institutions. In 
the midst of his useful and honored career, 
while attending in Springfield, Mass., a meet- 
ing of the American Board of Commissioners 
for Foreign Missions, of which he was a cor- 
porate member, he was summoned from earth 



on October 5, 1887, aged sixty-seven years, 
eight months, and five days. 

William B. Washburn was married on Sep- 
tember 6, 1847, to Miss Hannah A. Sweetser, 
of Athol, Mass., of which town both her par- 
ents were natives, and where their marriage 
took place in 1823. Mrs. Washburn has been 
the mother of six children — two sons and 
four daughters — as follows: Maria Augusta, 
who died January i, 1851, at the age of four- 
teen months; William Nelson, now residing 
in Greenfield; George Sweetser, who died in 
May, 1870, in his sixteenth year; Anna R., 
who married Walter Osgood Whitcomb Jan- 
uary 15, 1885, and is now a resident of New 
York City; Clara Spencer, who was married 
February 19, 1885, to James C. Deane; and 
Mary Nightingale Washburn. Clara and Mary 
reside with their mother at the Washburn 
mansion, 151 Main Street, Greenfield. 




,EV. ALPHEUS CLARK HODGES, 
of Buckland, pastor of First Congre- 
gational Church and editor and 
publisher of several religious newspapers, was 
born at Rochester, N.Y., in February, 1853. 
His father, Willard Hodges, a native of Tor- 
rington. Conn., was a son of Erastus Hodges, 
who was also born in that town. Mr. 
Hodges's great-grandfather, Elkanah Hodges, 
was a physician and one of the first settlers 
of Torrington, where, aside from his pro- 
fession, he engaged in mercantile pursuits 
and farming, residing there until his death. 
Erastus Hodges was a merchant in Torring- 
ton, both he and his wife, Laura Loomis, 
being life-long residents. 

Willard Hodges received his early educa- 
tion in Torrington, and, after two years' study 
at the Suffield Literary Institute and the same 
period at Williams College, was graduated at 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



151 



Yale with the class of 1845. He was for a 
time a merchant in New York City, but re- 
moved shortly to Rochester, N.Y., where he 
purchased a farm, and resided thereon until 
his death, which occurred in the month of 
July, 1888. His wife, who still resides at 
Rochester, was before her marriage Jane A. 
Bradley. She is a daughter of Gurdon B. and 
Phebe Bradley, of Fairfield, N.Y., and the 
mother of six children — Henry, Alpheus C, 
Jane R., Amy M., Louise M., and Fanny L. 

Alpheus C. Hodges, the second son, as 
above named, received his elementary and col- 
legiate preparatory education in the schools of 
Rochester, and was graduated at Yale College 
in 1877. He then entered the Theological 
Seminary at Hartford, Conn., graduating in 
1 88 1, and on November 16 of that year was 
ordained and installed a pastor at Buckland, 
Mass. In 1890 Mr. Hodges established a 
weekly newspaper at Buckland, called Our 
Country Cliurcli^ which is devoted to the inter- 
est of country churches and local church papers. 
At first the paper gave some space to local 
news, but, finding that its circulation was 
principally abroad, that department was trans- 
ferred to another publication ; and Our Country 
C/iurc/i, which was changed to a monthly, has 
now developed into a journal of sixteen pages, 
with Mr. Hodges as its editor. He also pub-' 
lishes the Connecticut Valley Congregationalist, 
the Deerfield Endeavorer, the Springfield Dis- 
trict Methodist, besides issuing a number of 
papers for different localities. 

In 1893 the Rev. Alpheus C. Hodges was 
married to Eleanor R. Squire, who was born 
at Dorchester, Mass., and is a daughter of 
the Rev. Edmund and Sarah M. Squire. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hodges have one son, named Benja- 
min Redfern. Mr. Hodges has been a liberal 
donor to the Public Church Library of Buck- 
land, which was established in 1890. 




ILLARD HENRY PIER:CE, M.D., 
physician and surgeon, with his 
home and office at 163 Main Street, 
Greenfield, has a large and increasing practice 
in this part of Franklin County, and, al- 
though young in years, has already performed 
feats in surgery that have brought him into 
prominent notice in the medical fraternity as 
well as before the general public. One espe- 
cially worthy of mention is a difficult case of 
laparotomy performed by the Doctor in 1890, 
the very first operation of the kind by a resi- 
dent physician in the entire county, and being 
entirely successful. Dr. Pierce is a native of 
Vermont, having been born November 21, 
1863, in the town of Westminster, which was 
the birthplace of several of his ancestors and 
life-long residence of his grandfather, Moses 
Pierce. 

Nathan G. Pierce, the Doctor's father, was 
born in Westminster in 18 16, being one of 
a family of three children — two sons and a 
daughter. He was a representative agricultu- 
rist of that part of Vermont, and a man of 
broad knowledge and sound sense, wielding 
quite a strong influence in local and State 
affairs; and, besides holding town offices, he 
served two terms in the State legislature. 
He was a stanch Republican in politics, and 
fearless in the expression of his principles. 
He died in December, 1888. He was twice 
married, both of his wives being daughters of 
John Keach, of Westminster. His first wife, 
Melissa Keach, died in the prime of young 
womanhood, leaving two sons: Hart Benton 
Pierce, a member of the detective force of 
Providence, R.I.; and Milton, who died at 
Camp Griffin during his enlistment in the late 
war. His second wife, Roxanna Keach, bore 
him five children, namely: Edwin R., man- 
ager of the Glendower Hotel at Springfield; 
Ella, who died in childhood; George W., who 



IS2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



has charge of the Asylum Farm at Brattle- 
boro, Vt. ; Lilla Jane, a young lady of rare 
promise, who passed to the higher life at the 
early age of sixteen years; and Dr. Pierce, of 
whom we write. 

Willard H. Pierce was reared on the pleas- 
ant home farm, and attended the district 
school as a boy, being afterward fitted for col- 
lege in the Vermont Academy, at Saxton's 
River, near Bellows Falls. His inclinations 
leading him to choose the profession of medi- 
cine, he entered the University of Vermont, 
from the medical department of which he was 
graduated with the degree of M.D. in June, 
1885. The following September Dr. Pierce, 
being then twenty-one years old, opened an 
office in Bernardston, Mass., remaining there 
until January i, 1893, when he took advantage 
of a favorable opening, and came to Green- 
field. As indicated above, he has gained an 
extended reputation for skill in surgery, to 
which he pays special attention, and has won 
the confidence and esteem of his many pa- 
tients, his eminent success proving that his 
life-work has been wisely chosen, and thus far 
faithfully followed. In September, 1894, Dr. 
Pierce established his hospital at 2 West Main 
Street, in a large brick dwelling, where he 
has the most modern appliances for success- 
fully attending to his suffering patients, giv- 
ing them his personal care and supervision. 

On the 7th of September, 1888, Dr. Will- 
ard H. Pierce and Nellie May Gray were 
united in marriage, and of their union two 
children have been born, namely: Roxy, a 
beautiful little girl of three years; and Frank 
Gray, who died in infancy. Mrs. Pierce is a 
daughter of Ormando and Roxcena (Arnold) 
Gray, of Bernardston, Mass., where they are 
now living, the former being the well-known 
map and atlas publisher, although he is now 
retired from active business. 



Politically, the Doctor is a warm supporter 
of the principles of the Republican party, and, 
socially, is an advanced member of the Ma- 
sonic order, being a Knight Templar, belong- 
ing to the Greenfield Commandery. He is 
prominent in medical circles, belonging to the 
Massachusetts Medical Society, to the Frank- 
lin District Medical Society, and to the Con- 
necticut Valley Association, and is a frequent 
contributor to the various medical journals of 
the country. Both he and his estimable wife 
are in hearty sympathy with the liberal faith 
and advanced thought of the Unitarian church, 
of which they are regular attendants. 



Y^TERBERT E. WARFIELD, an exten- 
|p!l sive farmer of Charlemont, was born 
-1-^ V_^ in the adjoining town of Heath, 
Mass., November 25, 1855, and is a son of 
Edward E. and Martha A. (Gleason) War- 
field. Mr. Warfield's grandparents were Job 
and Nancy (Thompson) Warfield, the former 
of whom was a son of Joshua Warfield, whose 
father, also named Job Warfield, was the first 
member of the family to settle in Franklin 
County. 

The first Job Warfield, who was a native of 
Milford, Mass., and a veteran of the Revolu- 
tionary War, became one of the original set- 
tlers of the town of Heath, where he purchased 
a tract of wild land, which he improved into 
a good farm. He resided there until his 
death, on July 21, 1835. The maiden name 
of his wife was Prudence Bush. Their son 
Joshua was born at Milford, and accompanied 
them to Heath. He also followed agricult- 
ural pursuits successfully. 

Job Warfield, son of Joshua, was born at 
Heath, and there grew to manhood. After 
marriage he purchased a farm in the eastern 
part of the town, a considerable part of which 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



153 



he cleared, and cultivated grain to some 
extent. In 1867 he sold his property in 
Heath, and moved to Buckland, where he 
resided until his death, which occurred on 
October 28, 1871, after fifty-six years of mar- 
ried life, he and his wife having celebrated 
their golden wedding in 1865. Mrs. Job 
Warfield was a daughter of Stephen and Phebe 
(Chapin) Thompson, and she lived to the age 
of eighty-two years. She and her husband 
were members of the Congregational church 
and Mr. Warfield was a Republican in poli- 
tics. Their children were: Stephen, Lucy, 
Edward E., Alexander, Nancy I., Sarah U., 
and Henry L. 

Edward E. Warfield was born at Heath on 
August 21, 1820. When a young man, he 
acquired the trade of a tanner, and, after fol- 
lowing that occupation for a few years, pur- 
chased a small farm in his native town. Five 
years later he traded that estate for the prop- 
erty known as the J. Twing farm, which he 
conducted for the succeeding eight years, 
when he sold, and moved to Wilbraham, 
where for some time he had charge of the 
academy boarding-house. In 1869 he re- 
moved to Charlemont, and purchased the 
Miner farm, which formed a part of the prop- 
erty known as the C. Rice tract, of one hun- 
dred and fifty acres, which is now owned by 
his son Herbert, and which at that time was 
in a very rough state. He cleared a consid- 
erable portion of the land, constructed a new 
road to the village, erected a new house and 
barn, and successfully devoted his energies to 
general farming, keeping during the latter 
part of his life thirty head of choice cattle. 
In politics he was a strong Republican, and 
served the town as a Selectman and Assessor, 
and as Overseer of the Poor for four terms. 
He also had charge of the town farm for 
one year. His own farm, on account of its 



healthy location and pleasant surroundings, 
became a noted resort for summer boarders, 
and has been known to accommodate as many 
as forty guests in a season. His wife, whom 
he married on June 7, 1843, was Martha, 
daughter of Abijah and Elizabeth (Bevins) 
Gleason, both of whom were natives of Heath. 
Abijah Gleason, who was a progressive 
farmer, died in 1852, aged fifty-nine years, 
his wife having passed away in 1844, at the 
age of forty-six years. Their children were: 
Salmon, Elizabeth, Reuben, Susan, Martha, 
Edward, Abigail M., Allen B., William F., 
Samuel K., and Charles A. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gleason were members of the Congregational 
church. Edward E. Warfield died at the age 
of sixty-nine years. He was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. His wife, who 
survives him, is still bright and active. She 
has reared three children, as follows: Abbie 
J., wife of Dr. Temple, a resident of Charle- 
mont; William S. ; and Herbert E. 

Herbert E. Warfield received his education 
in the public schools and at the Wilbraham 
Academy. He continued to reside with his par- 
ents; and after his marriage, which took place 
in his thirtieth. year, he purchased his father's 
farm. He has since established a creamery, 
and has added two hundred and ten acres of 
adjoining land for pasturage purposes. He 
keeps a herd of twenty choice cows, an equal 
number of fine young stock, five horses, and a 
pair of mules. There are unmistakable signs 
of mineral products upon his farm, sulphur 
being plainly visible; and in 1894 Mr. Davis, 
proprietor of the well-known sulphur mines, 
opened a silica mine upon the property, which 
he worked to some extent. Mr. Warfield and 
his wife are both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. In politics Mr. Warfield 
is a Republican. 

On January 22, 1885, Mr. Warfield was 



154 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



married to Miss Mary T. Bassett, daughter of 
William O. Bassett, of Hawley, an account of 
whom may be found elsewhere in this work. 
Mr. and Mrs. Warfield have two children, 
namely: Marjorie B., born April 4, 1890; 
and Horace E., born October 26, 1893. In 
the History of Milford, the birthplace of 
Joshua Warfield, as mentioned above, it is 
said that the Warfields of that town "all 
descended from Deacon John, of Mendon," 
who was in Dedham as early as 1642, and 
was later appointed the first schoolmaster in 
Mendon, certainly a far-off ancestor worthy of 
being held in remembrance. 



-OSHUA GRIFFITH SEARS, a retired 
merchant and highly respected citizen 
of Shelburne Falls, Franklin County, 
Mass., was born in the town of Ashfield, a 
few miles distant, September 5, 1822, son of 
Ahira and Aurora (Griffith) Sears. The Sears 
family genealogy in America is traced back to 
Richard Sears, of English parentage, who was 
taxed in Plymouth Colony, Mass., in 1633, 
and in 1639 removed to Cape Cod. Begin- 
ning with him, the lineal representatives of 
this branch of the family are as follows: 
Richard, Silas, Joseph, Zachariah, and Ro- 
land, the last-named being the grandfather of 
Joshua G. Sears. He was born in Yarmouth, 
Mass., February 3, 1745, and lived there until 
twenty-eight years of age. In 1773 he and 
Paul Sears removed to Ashfield, Franklin 
County, where they took up a grant of two 
hundred acres of land on what is now known 
as Cape Street. 

When they settled there, the country was 
new; and the farms were often separated by 
large tracts of wild or thickly wooded land. 
They cleared their land together, and they be- 
came successful and progressive agriculturists. 



Later in life they divided their grant equally, 
so that each had a farm of one hundred acres. 
Roland Sears served as a patriot soldier in the 
Revolutionary War. In political affiliation 
he was a Whig, and he was a member of the 
Congregational church. Ahira Sears, son of 
Roland and Jedidah (Conant) Sears, was born 
December 12, 1783. Having grown to man- 
hood, he continued to live with his parents, 
whom he cared for in their last days; and at 
their death he became the owner of the farm, 
on which he afterward erected a substantial 
new house and barn. He was also a success- 
ful agriculturist, and spent his whole life on 
the old Ashfield homestead, where he died 
January 18, 1870.. In politics he was a 
Whig, and in religious views a Congregation- 
alist. His wife, Aurora Griffith Sears, by 
whom he had six children, was born in Had- 
dam, Conn., in 1791, died in 1881, leaving 
two sons and one daughter; namely, Thomas 
Conant, Joshua Griffith, and Harriet Bement 
(Mrs. Spellman). 

Joshua G. Sears grew to manhood on the 
old homestead, receiving a good practical edu- 
cation in the district schools of Ashfield, 
Mass. In 1848 he removed to Shelburne 
Falls, where he purchased horses and the nec- 
essary outfit, and for five years was profitably 
engaged as a teamster from this place to 
Greenfield. At the end of that time he 
opened a livery stable, which he conducted for 
two years with good results. He next en- 
gaged as a clerk in the store of Joel Thayer; 
and later on, in company with Mr. Good- 
nough, he conducted a general grocery store 
for a year. He then purchased his partner's 
interest, and for ten years conducted a pros- 
perous business where Mr. Halligan's store 
is now located, after which he sold out, and 
retired from active business. 

Mr. Sears has twice married, but has no 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



iSS 



children. His first wife, Miss Mary El- 
dridge, daughter of Eli and Susan (Hall) 
Eldridge, died when but twenty-five years of 
age. Mr. Sears's present wife was before 
marriage Miss Hannah C. Sears, and is a 
daughter of Edmund and Betsey (Crowell) 
Sears, of Dennis, Mass., where her father was 
a prosperous farmer, and was also engaged in 
salt-making. Mr. Joshua G. Sears is a sup- 
porter of Republican principles; and he takes 
a keen interest in town affairs, but has at all 
times declined to serve in office. He and his 
wife are influential members of the Congre- 
gational church. They reside at 24 Main 
Street, in the pleasant and comfortable home 
which he has remodelled since he purchased 
the property. 

A granite monument, erected in Yarmouth 
cemetery by the late Hon. David Sears, of 
Boston, to the memory of his ancestors, bears 
this noteworthy inscription: — 

"Worth is better than wealth, 
Goodness greater than nobility, 
Excellence brighter than distinction." 



-OHN H. CLARK, a skilful wagon- 
maker, doing a good business at Fac- 
toryville, in the town of Gill, is a 
native resident of Franklin County, having 
been born in Greenfield, July 20, 1823. He 
is a son of John and Phoebe Fish (Henry) 
Clark, and grandson of Daniel Clark, whose 
father came to Massachusetts from Ireland, 
and settled in Colerain, where he engaged in 
agricultural pursuits during the remainder of 
his active life. Daniel Clark in his boyhood 
and youth acquired a practical knowledge of 
agriculture on his father's farm; and there he 
remained employed until reaching his major- 
ity, when he settled on a farm that he had 
purchased for himself in the same town. He 



was the father of four children, of whom John, 
father of John H., above named, was the 
third. 

John Clark was reared a farmer, but later 
acquired the blacksmith's trade, which he 
made his regular occupation until 18 12, when 
he removed to Greenfield, and engaged in the 
manufacture of woollen cloth, following this 
for some years. He finally resumed his labors 
at the anvil, which he continued, so far as he 
was able to work, up. to the time of his death, 
at the age of eighty-three. His wife, Phoebe 
F. Henry, a native of Halifax, Vt., was the 
mother of two children, John H. and Henry. 
She died at the age of eighty-two years, hav- 
ing spent her last years at the home of her 
son, whose name heads this sketch, the house 
purchased by her husband in 1828. Mr. and 
Mrs. John Clark were both church members in 
good standing, and were highly esteemed by 
their neighbors. 

John H. Clark, to whom we now return, 
spent his early years at home, attending the 
district school as opportunity afforded, and 
working in his father's shop until the age of 
twenty-one. He then went to work as a jour- 
neyman in the town of Greenfield, being there 
engaged in house carpentering for five years, 
and subsequently employed for some eight 
years as a machinist in a large woollen mill 
in that vicinity. He finally returned to the 
old homestead, and took charge of the place, 
both shop and farm, which he has managed 
successfully ever since, acquiring a good repu- 
tation for the quality of his work as general 
blacksmith and wagon-maker. He was first 
married, in 1855, to Eveline Severance, 
daughter of Obed Severance, a farmer of Gill, 
in which town her remote ancestors were very 
old settlers. Mrs. Eveline S. Clark died 
after eight years of happy married life, having 
reared one child — George C. Clark — who 



156 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



married Delia Blackmer, of Gill. Mr. Clark 
took for his second wife Miss Mary Hale, 
daughter of I. S. Hale, a prominent lumber- 
man and carpenter of Berna-rdston. 

Mr. Clark is a Democrat in politics, as 
was his father, and is a man highly esteemed 
by his neighbors and fellow-townsmen for his 
intelligence, sound business sense, and unim- 
peachable character. With such qualities it 
need cause no surprise to learn that he has 
ably filled several important ofifices, among 
them those of Selectman, Assessor, and Over- 
seer of the Poor, holding the latter office for 
twelve years, having been re-elected eleven 
times — a proof of the confidence of the people 
in his capacity for public affairs. He and his 
wife are attendants at the Congregational 
church. They are people who stand high in 
the community in which they dwell, and are 
representative citizens of their town and 
county. 

(sYt-NSEL HARRINGTON, a respected 
l^ resident of Tully, in the town of 
^ ® V_^ Orange, is the worthy representa- 
tive of one of the early pioneer families of 
the town, being a great-grandson of Jason 
Harrington, who settled on the east side of 
Tully Mountain in old Colonial days, and 
there became an extensive landholder, clear- 
ing and improving a good homestead. He 
was a native of Weston, Mass., born in 1734, 
and died in Orange, January 8, 1821. He 
married Priscilla Lebetter, who was born in 
1741, and lived until April, 1793. They 
reared a large family of children; namely, 
Isaac, Daniel, Rest, Millie, Sarah, Nancy, 
Susanna, Nabby, Obadiah, Molly, Azubah, 
Allen, and Jason. 

Daniel Harrington, second son of Jason, 
was born at Grafton, Mass., in 1762, and was 
a farmer by occupation. His first purchase of 



land was a farm west of Tully Mountain, con- 
sisting of one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
which are now included in the farm of A. N. 
Harrington. The land was partially in its 
primitive wildness at the time he bought it, 
and much hard labor was required to place it 
under cultivation; but he succeeded well in 
this undertaking, and further improved the 
place by erecting good farm buildings, living 
there until his demise, in 1843. The maiden 
name of his life companion was Sally Lord. 
She was born December 30, 1762, and died 
June 5, 1849. The following children were 
born of their union: Daniel, Sally, Molly, 
Lyman, Reuben, Emory, Polly, Abram, Asa- 
hel, and Ansel. 

Abram Harrington was a native of Orange, 
born January 14, 1802, and, being bred a 
farmer, continued in agricultural pursuits on 
the old homestead throughout his entire life, 
having bought the estate after the decease of 
his parents. In the course of time he made 
substantial improvements, erecting a new 
house and other needed buildings. He died 
at fifty-eight years of age, in i860. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Esther God- 
dard, died in the prime of early womanhood, 
in 1 84s, leaving six children ^ — Ansel, Asa 
G., Daniel, A. Nelson, Mary J., and Esther. 
Mr. Abram Harrington was a man of strong 
convictions, and was very liberal in his relig- 
ious belief. 

Ansel was the eldest child born to his par- 
ents, Abram and Esther (Goddard) Harring- 
ton. He acquired his education in the district 
schools, attending mostly in the winter sea- 
sons, and working on the home farm during 
the remainder of the year. At the age of 
nineteen years, which was in 1849, he having 
been born October 24, 1830, he turned his 
attention to mechanical pursuits, entering a 
furniture shop in Tully, where he worked for 




DAVID ASHCRAFT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



159 



six years. He was next employed in the 
same business at Templeton for about seven- 
teen years, subsequently remaining a resident 
of that place for four years longer, being en- 
gaged as railway station agent. Coming back 
then to Tully, Mr. Harrington bought the 
Mellen farm, on which he now resides, and to 
which he has added other land by purchase. 
He has entirely remodelled the house, and built 
a new barn, making it one of the finest and 
best improved homesteads in this section of the 
county. He is a man of excellent judgment 
and sound principles, a loyal and true-hearted 
citizen, taking a deep interest in local affairs, 
and is a stanch advocate of the principles of 
the Republican party. Religiously, he is a 
Spiritualist, and, socially, is a member of the 
Grange. 

Mr. Harrington has been twice married. 
His first wife, to whom he was united October 
24, 1854, was Hannah M. Mellen, who was 
born in Spafford, N.Y., May 3, 1833. Her 
father, Nathaniel K. Mellen, was a native of 
Mendon, Mass., and in his early years was a 
school-teacher and quite a musician, and later 
a practical farmer. He married Miss Ruth 
C. Wales, and they reared the following- 
named children: Jonathan W., James E., 
Lucetta, Mary Adeline, Hannah M., David 
D., Nathaniel, and William H. His first 
wife dying September 23, 1890, Mr. Harring- 
ton was again married August 30, 1892, to 
Mrs. F"annie L. Stratton, a daughter of Na- 
thaniel C. and Frances (Goddard) Forrester, 
her father a respected farmer, a descendant of 
the well-known and prominent Forrester fam- 
ily of Orange. Mrs. Harrington had previ- 
ously been twice married. Her first husband, 
Edwin S. Thompson, died February i, 1868, 
leaving her one son, Loren S. Thompson. 
She subsequently became the wife of Abner 
G. Stratton, who died March 26, 1882. This 



estimable woman is a native of Franklin 
County, born in Orange, May 4, 1843. The 
wife of a thrifty Franklin County farmer, it 
may safely be assumed that "she looketh well 
to the ways of her household, and eateth not 
the bread of idleness." 



M 



AVID ASHCRAFT, an old resident 
and well - to - do farmer of East 
Whately, in the extreme southern 
part of Franklin County, Massachusetts, was 
born at Guilford, Vt., May 28, 1821. His 
father, John Ashcraft, was also a native of 
that town and State, his grandfather, Daniel 
Ashcraft, who resided for a time at Fisher's 
Island, in Long Island Sound, a part of the 
town of Southold, Suffolk County, N.Y., hav- 
ing removed thence to Guilford, where he 
followed agriculture, and also engaged in 
manufacturing bricks. 

John Ashcraft was reared to farm life, and, 
having grown to maturity, continued to follow 
agriculture as an occupation. He had charge 
of the old homestead at Guilford during his 
father's declining years, and, succeeding to its 
possession at the latter's decease, which took 
place at the age ' of eighty-two, resided there 
the remainder of his life, which was brought 
to a close at the age of fifty-five years. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Clarissa Stock- 
bridge, was a daughter of David Stockbridge, 
a merchant of Hadley, Mass. She became 
the mother of thirteen children, who lived to 
reach maturity, of whom three still survive, 
namely: Amarette, who married for her first 
husband Henry Stedman, and for her second 
Melvin Chandler; Elizabeth, wife of Levi 
Stockbridge; and David, the subject of this 
biographical sketch. Mrs. Clarissa S. Ash- 
craft lived many years a widow, attaining the 
age of fourscore. Both herself and husband 



i6o 



biographical; review 



were earnest and sincere in their religious 
belief, and were members of the Universalist 
church. 

The boyhood and youth of David Ashcraft 
were passed upon the home farm in company 
with his six brothers and an equal number of 
sisters ; and he acquired his education in the 
district schools of Guilford. On reaching the 
age of twenty-two years, he came to Whately; 
and here he worked as a farm laborer for a 
period of two years. He then returned to his 
native town, where he married, and for the 
two succeeding years resided at the old home- 
stead. At the expiration of that time he pur- 
chased a farm in Halifax, Vt. ; but after a 
residence there of five years he sold that 
place, and removed to Colerain, in the north- 
ern part of Franklin County, Massachusetts, 
where he was engaged in farming for three 
years. Finally settling upon his present farm 
in East Whately, which he purchased in 1857, 
he has since devoted his time and energies to 
general farming, with satisfactory results. 

In the month of January, 1845, he was 
united in marriage to his first Wife, Cynthia 
Cole, who was born at Rehoboth, daughter of 
Samuel Cole, later a miller of Colerain. She 
became the mother of two children : Henrietta 
M., now wife of Frank Elwell, an employee 
at the United States Armory in Springfield; 
and Henry C, who married Amy Sears, and 
is now a merchant at East Whately. Mrs. 
Cynthia C. Ashcraft having died at the age of 
sixty-seven years, Mr. Ashcraft married for 
his second wife Marion Denison,. daughter of 
Edward Denison, of Leyden, where she was 
born. Her father, who is no longer living, 
was a prosperous farmer. Her mother still 
survives. Mr. Ashcraft is a Democrat in 
politics, and has participated actively in local 
public affairs. He served as a Selectman in 
1870, was again elected to office in 1890, and 



has served in that capacity ever since, being 
also an Overseer of the Poor. The family 
attend the Congregational church, of which 
Mrs. Ashcraft is a member. 

In calling the attention of our readers to 
the lifelike portrait prefixed to the present 
sketch, it may be further mentioned that Mr. 
David Ashcraft is a true son of the American 
Revolution, whether his name appears on the 
membership list of any society thus entitled 
or not, his grandfather, Daniel Ashcraft, as 
we learn from Volume I. of the Archives of 
the State of New York, having held a cap- 
tain's commission in the "First, or Lower, 
Regiment, Cumberland County Militia." 
Captain Daniel Ashcraft is supposed to have 
been a lineal descendant of John Ashcraft, 
who was in Stonington, Conn., in 1662. 



s 



UANE B. DUNHAM, superintendent 
of the Ashfield Co-operative Cream- 
ery, is a man of push and enterprise, 
possessing good executive ability, and during 
hi§ residence in this part of Franklin County 
has won the esteem and confidence of the com- 
munity and a large patronage for the cream- 
ery. A native of the Empire State, he was 
born August 29, 1847, in Lewis County, being 
a son of Orrin and Eliza (Towsend) Dunham. 
Orrin Dunham was born July 15, 1821, in 
the town of Denmark, Lewis County, N.Y., 
and received a practical education in the dis- 
trict school. He was entirely dependent upon 
his own resources, and began the battle of life 
as a pedler of dry goods and Yankee notions, 
travelling in and around Lewis County. Hav- 
ing in this manner accumulated some money, 
he purchased a tract of land, most of which 
was covered with timber; and from this he 
cleared and improved a good homestead prop- 
erty. On the land he found a large bed of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



r6r 



lime; and this he quarried, opening a kiln, 
which was then a new way of preparing it for 
market, and considered a wonderful improve- 
ment. Having followed quarrying and gen- 
eral farming for six years, he sold out, and 
bought a hotel at Denmark, N.Y., and man- 
aged it, in connection with teaming, until his 
decease, at the age of fifty-two years. His 
widow is still living. The following children 
were born to them : Harriet, who married 
George W. Pamater, a builder and contractor, 
of Carthage, N.Y. ; Dennis H.; Duane B. ; 
Marietta E., who died at the age of forty-five 
years; Edgar, who resides in Watertown, 
N.Y.; Marion, who married J. E. Knapp, of 
Denmark, N.Y. 

Duane was educated in the common schools 
of his native county, and continued to live at 
home, working with his father at teaming 
until 1873, when he began the manufacture of 
butter and cheese, in time becoming very pro- 
ficient in the business. In 1884 he came to 
Massachusetts, and, settling in the town of 
Hatfield, there opened the first creamery ever 
established in the New England States, and 
for three years continued as its superintendent 
and salesman. During the succeeding six 
years Mr. Dunham filled a similar position at 
Peterboro, N.H., coming thence to Ashfield 
in 1889, to take charge of the Ashiield Co- 
operative Creamery. He carries on a large 
business, manufacturing a choice brand of 
fancy package butter, which meets with a 
ready sale at the highest market price, the 
product sometimes reaching as high as four 
thousand pounds per week. 

On March 19, 1869, Mr. Dunham was 
united in marriage to Miss Louisa H. Loomis, 
who was born in Canada, October 26, 1847, 
a daughter of Ashley and Hattie (Francis) 
Loomis. Mr. Loomis was born in Jefferson 
County, New York, not far from Phelps Mills, 



where his paternal grandfather settled when 
the country was in its primitive wildness. 
After growing to manhood, Mr. Loomis moved 
to Canada, and for two years engaged in till- 
ing the soil, but, not being satisfied with his 
prospects, returned then to Phelps Mills, and 
was employed in blacksmithing for a while. 
He subsequently removed to Carthage, where 
he carried on a lumber business for a short 
time, but later bought, or rather built, a 
tannery, which he operated successfully for 
twelve years. Disposing of that, he bought a 
farm in Franklin County, New York, but soon 
after sold out, and migrated westward, locat- 
ing in Missouri, where he bought a coal mine, 
which he is successfully operating. He has 
two children, one being Mrs. Dunham, and 
the other Dr. Horace A. Loomis, a dentist in 
New York City. 

The wedded life of Mr. and Mrs. Dunham 
has been blessed by the birth of three chil- 
dren, namely: Carrie A., born September 21, 
1870, now the wife of Charles E. Henry, of 
Peterboro, N.H.; Mittie G., who died at the 
age of nine years; and Wesley L., born June 
19, 1879. As a man of business, Mr. Dun- 
ham is strictly honorable in his dealings, and 
in politics is a warm advocate of the princi- 
ples promulgated by the Prohibitionists. He 
and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



/2)eORGE H. davenport, manu- 
\^J^ f acturer of Davenport's Silver Polish, 
a well-known resident of Bernards - 
ton, and a veteran of the late war, was born 
in Lowell, Mass., October 6, 1837, son of 
Warren T. and Pamelia W. (Thayer) Daven- 
port. Mr. Davenport traces his ancestry back 
to John Davenport, who came across the water 
in 1637, landing in Boston, was among the 



l62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



first settlers of New Haven, Conn., in 1638, 
and was pastor of the first Puritan church of 
that place. Warren T. Davenport, the father 
of the subject of this sketch, a farmer residing 
most of his life in Petersham, Mass., was born 
in that town, and his wife in Athol, Mass. A 
hard worker, successful in his career as a 
farmer, and taking an active part in the 
affairs of the community, he served as a 
School Committee-man and Road Surveyor of 
his town. He was a Baptist, and in politics 
a Whig, and later a Democrat. His death 
took place at the age of seventy-six, while 
visiting his son George H. at Athol, Mass. 
His wife still lives in Petersham. They had 
three children: Emory W. Davenport died at 
twenty-nine years of age, while a member of 
the Second Massachusetts Heavy Artillery; 
George H. Davenport is the elder of the two 
sons now living; the youngest son, Nathan 
T., a painter, resides in Worcester, Mass. 
George H. Davenport grew to manhood in 
Petersham, where he attended the public 
schools, and at the age of eighteen began to 
learn the carpenter's trade, which business he 
followed till the breaking out of the Civil 
War in April, 1861. In 1861 he took a con- 
tract to build on East Rock, New Haven, 
Conn., an observatory, the tower of which was 
to have been sixty feet high. He commenced 
the erection of the stone tower; and it had 
reached the height of about fifteen feet when 
Mr. Stewart, for whom it was being built, 
became financially embarrassed. Upon learn- 
ing of this state of things, Mr. Davenport at 
once laid down his tools, and enlisted in the 
Union Army. In 1894 Mr. Davenport, chanc- 
ing to be in New Haven, found his tower still 
standing, it having been converted into a 
refreshment-room. In a conversation with the 
proprietor thereof he heard a story which had 
been current for years — how the man who had 



started building the tower had dropped his 
tools at the rousing of the North, on the fall 
of Fort Sumter had joined the federal forces, 
and been killed during one of the bloody bat- 
tles of the Rebellion. 

Mr. Davenport's term of enlistment dates 
from August 8, 1861, at which time he became 
a private in Company C, Tenth Regiment 
Connecticut Volunteers. He was afterward 
promoted to Sergeant, and then Lieutenant, 
and, after having served about two years in 
Company C, became attached to the Quarter- 
master's Department of the United States 
Service, where he remained two years longer. 
He was in the battles of Roanoke Island, 
Newbern, Whitehall, Kinston, and the siege 
of Fort Sumter, besides numerous minor en- 
gagements, during one of which he was struck 
by a piece of shell, and wounded. He was a 
brave officer, and displayed particular gallan- 
try in the battles of Roanoke Island and New- 
bern, and was promoted from Lieutenant to 
Captain of the Quartermaster's Department. 
He served during the entire time of his enlist- 
ment, and was honorably discharged in June, 
1865. At the close of the war he went to 
Meriden, Conn., and once more engaged in 
the business of contractor and builder, living 
there three years. Mr. Davenport's resi- 
dence in Bernardston dates from 1890. In 
1876 he invented what is now known as Dav- 
enport's Silver Polish, an article used for 
cleaning and polishing gold, silver, and other 
metals, besides glass, and has since devoted 
his entire time to pushing its sale. 

On the 9th of November, 1866, Mr. Daven- 
port was married to Emma A. Cleveland, 
born in Hardwick, daughter of Charles R. and 
Eunice S. (Thayer) Cleveland. Her father 
was a farmer, and died at the age of seventy- 
four, and her mother died at sixty-one, both 
deaths occurring at Athol, Mass. Two of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



163 



Mrs. Davenport's great-grandfathers, Asa 
Wait and Colonel Abija Thayer, are said to 
have served as soldiers in the Revolution. 
With what regiments they were respectively 
connected and in what battles they took part 
the present writer is not able to state. The 
son of the latter, Nathan Thayer, served in 
the War of 1812; and Mrs. Davenport's 
father was a soldier in the late Civil War, a 
private in Company A, Thirty-first Regiment 
Massachusetts Volunteers. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davenport have had four children: Clarence, 
deceased; Gertrude E. ; Mabel B. ; and Ernest 
R., deceased. Gertrude E. is the wife of 
Abijah N. Pierce, now living in Greenfield, 
engaged in business as a plumber. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pierce have three sons: George N., 
Abijah D., and Raymond R. Mabel B. 
Davenport is at home with her parents. 






LONZO GRAVES, a retired farmer of 
Greenfield, was born in Whately, 
Franklin County, Mass., April 15, 
1818, son of Plyna and Lucinda (Field) 
Graves. His great-grandfather, Oliver Graves, 
born in Hatfield about 1725, son of Nathaniel 
and great-grandson of Thomas Graves, was an 
early settler of Whately, which place was for- 
merly the northerly part of the town of Hat- 
field. Selah Graves, son of Oliver, was a 
successful farmer and the owner of a fine farm 
in Whately, on which he and his wife, Mary 
Strong Graves, resided until the time of their 
death, each living to a good old age. They 
reared seven sons and two daughters. 

Their son Plyna, father of Alonzo Graves, 
was born February 21, 1786, and spent the 
whole of his life of seventy-two years in 
Whately. He was a carpenter and joiner, and 
gave that trade his principal attention, but 
also owned and carried on a small farm. He 



was a man of sterling character, a Republican 
in politics, and served his town as Selectman. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Lucinda 
Field, died at the age of sixty-six years. 
They had five sons and four daughters, one of 
whom died in infancy. The rest grew to 
maturity, and four are now living, namely: 
Alonzo; Edward, whose home is in Charle- 
mont; Clarissa, widow of Edward Atkins, 
residing in Whately; and Jane, widow of 
Chester G. Craft, residing in Greenfield. 
The deceased are: Franklin, Noah first, Noah 
second, Lucinda, and Mary. 

Alonzo, who is the eldest of the family sur- 
viving, having received his early education in 
Whately, when fourteen years of age began to 
learn the trade of carpenter and joiner, and 
started in business for himself at the age of 
twenty-one. The first property he ever owned 
was a saw-mill in Deerfield, which he managed 
for about twenty years, also owning a small 
farm at that place. In the spring of 1865 he 
bought the farm in Greenfield, where he has 
since resided. In 1870 his buildings were 
burned to the ground, but with true manly 
courage he did not let the sun go down on the 
smouldering ashes before he commenced to get 
out timber for another house; and in a few 
days he had erected a new shelter for his 
family. 

In Hawley, Mass., March 27, 1845, when 
nearly twenty-seven years of age, Mr. Graves 
was united in marriage to Sophronia G. Rice, 
who was born in Hawley, October 6, 1824, 
and died August 26, 1854, leaving four chil- 
dren. Mr. Graves was again married March 
2*1, 1855, to Sophronia L. Field. She was 
born in Bernardston, in this county, December 
26, 1829, daughter of Jesse and Lurancy (Par- 
menter) Field, both natives of Bernardston, 
now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Field were the 
parents of six children: Mary H., the first 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born, whose birth date was March 30, 1820, 
died May 30, 1888; Aaron W. died at the age 
of three; John B., the eldest now living, is a 
farmer, residing in Bernardston; Harriet L., 
widow of Otis Chittenden, resides in Hadley, 
Mass.; Sophronia L. is now Mrs. Graves; 
and Aaron W., a Congregational preacher of 
Sandisfield, Mass. 

Mr. and Mrs. Graves have a family of seven 
children, namely: Ashmun T., a farmer of 
Shelburne, Franklin County; Clark O., also a 
farmer, residing in Greenfield; Cary C, a 
resident of Denver, Col.; Sophronia A., wife 
of Nathan J. Alger, of Cochesett, Mass. ; 
Burke F., residing in Greenfield, where he 
follows the business of farmer and dairyman ; 
Cyrus S., also a farmer of Greenfield; and 
Mary L., wife of John D. Cromack, a clerk 
residing in Greenfield. Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo 
Graves are among Greenfield's oldest and most 
esteemed citizens. Mr. Graves is a Prohibi- 
tionist in principle and practice, having never 
bought a drop of liquor in his life to be used 
as a beverage. Mrs. Graves is a member of 
the Baptist church. They have fourteen 
grandchildren living, and are enjoying their 
latter days in the consciousness of long years 
usefully spent, many duties faithfully per- 
formed. 



rORGE H. WILKINS, of the firm 
of Mayhew & Wilkins, silk manu- 
facturers of Shelburne Falls, was 
born in Antrim, N.H., June 7, 1861, son of 
Joel N. and Mary E. (Wright) Wilkins. 
His grandfather, Joel Wilkins, worked at 
shoemaking during the early part of his life 
in Antrim, and later owned and cultivated a 
large farm in the northern part of the town, 
living to an advanced age. 

Joel N. Wilkins was born in Antrim, 
N.H., June 9, 1828. He attended the dis- 



trict schools of his native town and the acad- 
emy at Hancock, N.H., and, on finishing his 
education, served an apprenticeship to cabinet- 
making in Reading, Mass. He spent some 
time in the West, at Bunker Hill, 111., but, 
his health being impaired by the climate, he 
returned home; and the rest of his life — 
with the exception of three years spent in 
Lowell, Mass. — was passed in his native 
town, working at his trade. He died at the 
age of fifty-nine. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary E. Wright, was a daughter of 
Imla and Rachel B. (McMaster) Wright. In 
politics Mr. Wilkins was a Republican. He 
was a member of the Methodist church, and 
his wife was a Presbyterian. They had but 
one child — our subject. 

George H. Wilkins acquired his elementary 
education in the district schools, and at the 
early age of thirteen went to work for wages, 
first obtaining employment in an establish- 
ment where apple-parers were manufactured. 
After that he worked on cutlery at Antrim, 
N.H., four years, and then entered the silk 
manufactory of J. N. Kelsea, commencing at 
the bottom, and winning his way up to the 
position of overseer of various departments. 
Intermitting his labors for a time, with a 
view to finishing his education, he took a 
course of study at Francestown Academy; and 
in May, 1881, he was tendered the position 
of overseer in the silk mills of Streeter & 
Mayhew at Shelburne Falls, the company 
being later known as the Mayhew Silk Com- 
pany. Mr. Wilkins subsequently became 
superintendent; and in 1891, in company 
with Francis Mayhew, he rented the building 
and machinery. Here, under the name of 
Mayhew & Wilkins, silk commission throw- 
sters, they carry on a thriving business, giv- 
ing constant employment to sixty-five hands. 

Mr. Wilkins was united in marriage No- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIP:W 



i6s 



vember 19, 1883, to Nellie M., daughter of 
W. B. and Ann (Orr) Jones, and the follow- 
ing children have blessed their union: Anna 
M., born January 28, 1887; Marion R., born 
October 14, 1888; and Bertha E., born Sep- 
tember 15, 1891. Mr. Wilkins votes the 
Republican ticket. He belongs to Mountain 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., being at present Grand 
Master. 



/^^TeORGE R. PURINTON, a leading 
yj5 I farmer in Colerain and a scion of one 
of the oldest and most respected 
families in this vicinity, was born on the 
farm where he now resides, October 18, 1853, 
son of Thomas and Eunice (Hawkes) Purin- 
ton. The family springs from two brothers, 
who came from France, and settled in Amer- 
ica in Colonial times — one in Maine, the 
other in Massachusetts. From the latter Mr. 
Purinton is descended. 

His great-grandfather, Joseph Purinton, 
who settled on this farm in 1784, was the first 
of the family to live in Colerain. Though a 
hard-working farmer, he was a well-educated 
man, and had the Bible at his tongue's end, 
becoming famous among his neighbors for his 
ready and apt quotations. He died here at an 
advanced age. David Purinton, son of Joseph 
and father of Thomas, was a child of nine 
years when the family came to Colerain. He, 
too, was a man of some culture, and took an 
active interest in educational matters, aiding 
materially in the establishment of the Frank- 
lin Academy at Shelburne Falls. He died on 
the farm where his father had passed away, 
and to the ownership of which he had suc- 
ceeded. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Lucy Wilkinson, lived to an advanced age. 
Grandfather and Grandmother Purinton were 
Baptists; and he, like his father, was a 
Deacon. 



Thomas Purinton first opened his eyes to 
the light in the old house where his grand- 
father and father had looked their last on 
earth. He was born on October 10, 1825, 
and spent his life on the farm, taking, never- 
theless, an active interest in town and State 
matters. He was Selectman and Assessor of 
the town for years, and was Captain in the 
State militia, being popularly known as Cap- 
tain Tom Purinton. He died at the old home 
on April 18, 1879. His widow is still liv- 
ing, and makes her home with her children. 
Mr. and Mrs. Purinton were members of the 
Baptist church, he a Deacon, the third of the 
Purinton family to hold that office. They had 
seven children, with two of whom they were 
early called to part — ^ Julia, who died at the 
age of fifteen, and Myron at two and a half 
years. Martha is the wife of E. Hillman, of 
Grand Junction, Iowa; Winnie E. is the wife 
of Nelson H. Purinton, of Colerain; Marian 
is the wife of Orrin Purinton, of Worcester, 
Mass.; and Jesse M. also lives in Worcester. 

The childhood of George R. Purinton was 
spent on the old farm, amid the same scenes 
and pursuits that had filled the daily life of 
his ancestors. Besides attending the district 
school, he studied during two terms at Powers 
Institute; and at the death of his father, he 
being then in his twenty-sixth year, he took 
charge of the home farm, which now covers 
one hundred and ninety-six acres. Here he 
carries on general farming and fruit-growing, 
and has a good dairy, prospering in his line, 
and taking "no steps backward." The build- 
ings on his farm are among the old landmarks 
of the town; and the house, which was built 
about 1827, has the broad and generous pro- 
portions characteristic of the domiciles of that 
day. 

On March 8, 1882, Mr. Purinton was mar- 
ried to Hattie M., daughter of Hiram W. and 



i66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Melinda W. (Slate) Dean, the former born in 
Burlington, N.Y., in 1811, the latter in Ber- 
nardston, Mass., in 18 13. Mr. Dean was a 
well-to-do farmer, residing in Gill, Mass., for 
many years, where Mrs. Purinton was born. 
He was a stanch Republican, and he and his 
wife were members of the Congregational 
church. They had eight children, seven of 
whom are now living; namely, Anjanette, 
James L., William H., Charles W., Edward 
P., Clifton S., and Hattie M. (Mrs. Purin- 
ton). Mr. and Mrs. Purinton have no chil- 
dren of their own, but have taken into their 
home an adopted daughter — Eva L. Purinton. 
Politically, Mr. Purinton favors the cause of 
prohibition. He maintains the family pres- 
tige in the town, holding the office of Select- 
man four years, and Assessor one year, and 
attends the Baptist church, of which he is a 
Deacon, being the fourth of the line of Purin- 
ton to hold that office. 



rrajI^ENRY HINSDALE, a prosperous 
\^\ farmer and highly esteemed citizen 
li® V ^ of Monroe, FrankliH County, was 
born in this town, June 25, 1830, son of 
Chester and Lucy (Allen) Hinsdale. His 
grandfather, Darius Hinsdale, was a farmer in 
Greenfield, Mass., where he died, at the age 
of fifty-eight years, leaving a widow. Electa 
Graves Hinsdale, who died there at seventy- 
five years of age. They were the parents of 
six children: Daniel A-» Chester, Ariel, 
Ebenezer, Fidelia, and Mary A. 

Chester Hinsdale was born in Greenfield, 
and there in early manhood learned the trades 
of tanner and shoemaker. He afterward pur- 
chased a small tannery, which he ran for a 
time, also engaging in shoemaking, but at 
length sold out, and during the succeeding 
four years carried on his father's farm. He 



next purchased fifty acres of land in Monroe, 
on which he built a log house, and proceeded 
to clear off the timber. That work being 
accomplished, he sold the place, and in 1835 
bought the' farm of two hundred acres on 
which his son Henry now resides. This farm, 
which was first settled by Hosea F. Ballou, 
then consisted for the most part of wild or un- 
cultivated land. Its new owner erected a sub- 
stantial frame house, and also built a shingle- 
shop, where for years he was successfully 
engaged in the manufacture of shingles. In 
politics Mr. Chester Hinsdale supported the 
Republican party, and served acceptably in 
the town offices of Selectman, Assessor, and 
Overseer of the Poor. He was a member of 
the Universalist church. He died at sixty- 
seven years of age; and his wife, Lucy Allen 
Hinsdale, lived to about the same age. They 
reared ten children, as follows: Daniel A., 
Miriam, Chester, Henry, Fidelia O., Diana, 
Lucy, Chester, Electa, and Louisa A. 

Henry Hinsdale, who has always lived on 
the home farm, received his education in the 
district schools of Monroe. He cared for his 
parents during their declining years, and at 
their death purchased the interest of the other 
heirs, and became the owner of the farm. He 
has since remodelled the buildings and cleared 
a good portion of the land. In addition to 
general farming, he is engaged in dairying, 
and keeps eight head of choice grade Jersey 
cows. Mr. Hinsdale's marriage to Miss Han- 
nah L. Porter was solemnized on August 31, 
1862. She was born December 19, 1836, 
daughter of Joseph and Oritha (Whitcomb) 
Porter, and died January i, 1887, leaving two 
children: Lyman E., born May 30, 1869, who 
died at seven years of age; and Eunice M., 
born March 17, 1873, who married George H. 
Bishop, of Readsboro, Vt., and has one child 
— Gertie — aged two years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



167 



Mr. Hinsdale was again married on April 
3, 1885, his bride being Miss Isabel A. 
Brown, a daughter of Nahum P. and Sarah 
(Pettingill) Brown, of Cummington. Mr. 
Brown was born in Florida, Berkshire County, 
Mass., December 16, 1815, son of Harvey and 
Rizpah (Thatcher) Brown, the former of whom 
was a successful farmer of Goshen, where he 
lived to be forty-five years of age, and his wife 
seventy-nine years old. They reared six chil- 
dren: Nahum P., Harvey R., Minerva, Al- 
mina, Sumner, and Achsah. Nahum P. 
Brown died January 25, 1878. By his first 
wife, Sarah Pettingill Brown, who was born 
May 30, 1 81 7, and died September 3, 1850, 
he had three children; namely, Osro P., 
Orrilla E., and Isabell A. Mr. Brown mar- 
ried for his second wife Miss Clarissa 
Hawkes, who survives him, and is now living 
in Savoy, having reared five children: Edwin 
A., Orline H., Ida S., Achsah, and Inez L. 
Brown. In political affiliation Mr. Hinsdale 
is a Republican, and has rendered faithful 
service in town offices. He is a quiet and 
unostentatious man, and is esteemed for busi- 
ness ability and sterling character. 



EEWIS L. HASTINGS, one of Gill's 
most progressive and well - to - do 
_ ^ farmers, was born in this town, 
June 5, 1843. His father, Onesimus Hast- 
ings, was born in Greenfield, as was also his 
grandfather, Oliver Hastings, the latter hav- 
ing been a farmer in that town for some years. 
In 1820 Onesimus Hastings moved to Gill, 
where he passed the latter years of his life 
upon the farm now owned by his son, and died 
here in 1891, at the age of ninety-six. His 
wife, who before marriage was Mary Newell, 
was a daughter of Rufus Newell, and was 
born at Wardsboro, Vt., from which place her 



parents moved to Bernardston, Mass., where 
they resided until their decease. She became 
the mother of seven children, as follows: 
Richard, who died in infancy; Mary, who 
married Josiah Rice, of Greenfield; Laura, 
widow of William Boyle; Willard; George; 
Abbie, who married Peter King, of Northamp- 
ton; and Lewis L. The mother passed her 
declining years with her son Lewis, but died, 
at the age of eighty-nine years, at the home of 
her daughter Laura. 

Lewis L. Hastings received a good educa- 
tion in the schools of his native town, and has 
spent his entire life upon the farm which he 
now conducts. He tenderly cared for his par- 
ents in their old age, and at their decease suc- 
ceeded to the possession of the old homestead, 
which is a very desirable piece of farm prop- 
erty, being well improved and in a high state 
of cultivation. Mr. Hastings is considered 
by his fellow-townsmen to be one of the most 
successful farmers in the locality. 

On December 30, 1864, he was united in 
marriage to Martha A. Hayward, daughter of 
the Rev. Charles and Almira (Stacy) Hay- 
ward, of Royalston, Mass. The brothers and 
sisters of Mrs. Hastings may here be briefly 
named, as follows: Ellen, now deceased; Jen- 
nie, who married Charles Scott, of Rowe; 
Clarence, now a resident of Louisville, Ky. ; 
Flora; Charles; Lilla Belle and Hattie, 
deceased. Mrs. Hayward was called to rest 
at the age of sixty-one years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hastings have two children: Clarence married 
Minnie Farrel, and lives on an adjoining 
farm. He has three children: Walter, 
Lewis, and Myra. Lilla Belle is still at 
home with her parents. 

Mr. Hastings is a Republican in politics, 
and very active in the local government. 
Both himself and wife are members of the 
Methodist church, of which he is a Trustee 



1 68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




and very prominent in all its affairs. Mr. 
Hastings is a progressive as well as a success- 
ful farmer, possessed in a high degree of the 
intelligence and practical ability needed in 
these later days to carry on agriculture with 
profitable results. Mr. Hastings is proud of 
his Holstein cattle, having a herd of about 
twenty registered animals, at the head of 
which we find a noted bull — "Belle Douglass 
Sir Colantha," No. 18365; "The Black Gal," 
No. 5071, and Pemsi, 2d, No. 9558, the two 
cows, being the ones from which his herd 
springs. 

^OLOMON H. AMIDON, the origi- 
nal of the portrait on the opposite 
page, an extensive contractor and 
builder at Miller's Falls, was born in Monroe, 
Franklin County, Mass., September 28, 1840. 
He is a son of David Amidon, a native of 
Reedsboro, whose father, Jedediah Amidon, 
was also born in that town, and there followed 
agricultural pursuits until his decease. , David 
Amidon acquired the trade of shoemaking, at 
which he labored for some years in Reedsboro, 
later in life moving to North Adams, Berk- 
shire County, where he died, at the age of 
sixty-nine years, having been a captain in the 
State militia. His wife, whose name before 
her marriage was Bertha Dunbar, was a native 
of Plymouth, Conn., daughter of Isaiah Dun- 
bar, of that place; and she was the mother of 
nine children, of whom six are now living, 
namely: Moses; Charles; William; Sarah 
Jane, who married John Taft, a resident of 
North Adams; Lucy M., wife of Stewart 
Lamon; and Solomon H. Mr. Amidon's par- 
ents were members of the Methodist church; 
and his mother, who died at North Adams at 
the age of eighty-one years, was especially 
noted for her earnest piety and Christian-like 
character. 



Solomon H. Amidon received his early edu- 
cation at the schools and academy of North 
Adams, later attending a select school at 
Williamstown, and, after completing his stud- 
ies, went to Greenfield, where he was em- 
ployed in the planing-shop for a period of 
three years. He then enlisted as a private in 
Company G, Tenth Massachusetts Regiment 
of Volunteers, serving three years, during 
which time he was promoted to the rank of 
Corporal. He was discharged at Boston, hav- 
ing been present at most of the famous battles 
participated in by the Sixth Army Corps. 
Returning to his former occupation at Green- 
field, he was there engaged one year, and then 
worked as a carpenter in this vicinity until 
1865, when he went West, and was employed 
for a time at Altona, 111. On his return to 
the East he settled at Miller's Falls, where he 
has since resided. He has erected a fine block 
at this place, the silverware factory at Green- 
field, the stone for which he quarried from a 
ledge near by, and has also built all of the 
houses on both sides of the river at Miller's 
Falls, numbering one hundred and forty, 
together with various factories, churches, and 
other structures in this locality, having just 
completed a dam, eighteen feet high and two 
hundred feet long, across Miller's River, to 
be used for furnishing electric power for the 
electric railroad between Miller's Falls and 
Greenfield. 

In 1870 he was united in marriage to Miss 
Miriam A. Jones, daughter of Charles H. 
Jones, of Cortland, N.Y., a cabinet finisher 
by trade, whose ancestors were New England 
farmers. Mr. Jones and his wife, Julia Love, 
of Ithaca, N.Y., still reside at Cortland. 
They have had four children, two of whom are 
now living, namely: Miriam A.; and An- 
nette, who married C. H. Cook, of Cortland. 
Mrs. Amidon's mother is a member of the 



Missing Page 



Missing Page 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



171 



Presbyterian church; and her father, together 
with his ten brothers and sisters, are all 
united with some church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Amidon have three children, 
namely: Minnie; Charles H., a carpenter, 
who is engaged in business with his father; 
and L. E. Cleveland Amidon. Mr. Amidon 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and of the United Friends at Turner's 
Falls, is a Democrat in politics, having served 
as Assessor five years, a member of the Board 
of Health one year. Road Surveyor and Con- 
stable for several years, and is now serving 
his fourth year as Selectman, having been first 
elected in 1892. In his religious views he is 
of the liberal faith; and Mrs. Amidon is still 
a member of the Presbyterian church of Cort- 
land, N.Y. 

|ISS CARRIE CANNING, a highly 
successful teacher, who for some 
time has been actively identified 
with the schools of Gill Centre, was born in 
the town of Gill, where also her father, the 
late Josiah D. Canning, was born, August 13, 
1 8 16. Her grandfather, the Rev. Josiah W. 
Canning, was a native of New Braintree, 
Worcester County, Mass., and was the son of 
Cornelius Canning, who was likewise a native 
of this State. Two of Miss Canning's great- 
grandfathers, maternal and paternal, served 
through the Revolutionary War from the bat- 
tle of Bunker Hill to the surrender of Lord 
Cornwallis at Yorktown. 

Josiah W. Canning, who was ordained a 
minister of the gospel at Gill in 1806, later 
became a teacher at Williamstown, Mass., 
and also New York State, and fitted many 
young men for college. He preached in Gill 
at two different periods, nearly thirty-six 
years in all, during the greater part of the 
time as pastor of the Congregational church, 




and died there, at the age of seventy-four or 
seventy-five years. Throughout his active 
career as a minister he was exceedingly busy, 
both in pastoral work and with his pen, and 
at his decease left a collection of eighteen 
hundred complete sermons. All of his sons 
were engaged in editorial or other literary 
work. His wife, Miss Canning's grand- 
mother, whose maiden name was Almira 
Smith, and who was a native of New Marl- 
boro, Mass., was the mother of five sons, one 
of whom, Ebenezer S., an editor at Detroit, 
died of cholera; another, Edward W. B., 
studied for the ministry; Josiah D. became a 
prominent resident of Gill; William Pitt be- 
came a surgeon in the navy, and died of yel- 
low fever; Joseph C. was also a surgeon in 
the navy during the Civil War, and later In- 
ternal Revenue Collector at New York City. 
Mrs. Almira Smith Canning died at Gill, 
aged seventy-four. She was a member of the 
Congregational church. 

Josiah D. Canning was born and reared on 
the old Canning homestead, which is situated 
nearly opposite to his daughter's present resi- 
dence, and at a very early age exhibited an 
aptitude for literary pursuits, in which he 
soon displayed marked ability. At the age of 
thirteen he constructed a printing-press, and 
by its aid he inaugurated the publication of 
a journal known as T/ie Village Post. This 
paper was quite ably conducted, as is shown 
by its complete file for two years, which is 
now in possession of his daughter; and, as it 
had a large circulation, extending from New 
England to Texas, the juvenile editor and pro- 
prietor became favorably known as a writer 
upon various subjects. Young Canning re- 
ceived a liberal education, and after finishing 
his studies was employed in a printing-office 
at Greenfield, from which he later went to 
Wheeling, West Va., where the journalistic 



172 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



experience obtained in his youth became of 
special value to him. Having spent several 
years in the latter place, he returned to the 
old homestead for the purpose of assisting in 
caring for his parents during their declining 
years. He next engaged in agriculture, vary- 
ing the monotony of farm life by making fre- 
quent and able contributions to different 
newspapers, which were received with favor, 
being largely read; and thus he continued to 
be occupied for the remainder of his active 
life. 

His last literary effort, which was known as 
"Connecticut River Reeds," was published in 
1892, a short time subsequent to his decease, 
at the age of seventy-five years. Mr. Canning 
was a strong and well-preserved man both 
physically and mentally, and had been out and 
around during the day on which that event 
occurred. He possessed a very retentive 
memory, both for places which he had visited 
and the vast amount of literature which had 
fallen under his notice; and his fame as a 
writer not only extended over the United 
States, but also reached across the Atlantic, 
his work receiving most favorable commenda- 
tion on the other side. He was Town Clerk 
and Treasurer for at least a quarter of a cen- 
tury, and was chosen Selectman, but was pre- 
vented from serving in that capacity by 
excessive labor in other directions. He was a 
member of the State legislature in 1866, 
served as Postmaster for fifty years, and fre- 
quently appeared as an orator in different sec- 
tions of the State, he being a widely known 
and thoroughly-respected citizen. Some of 
the older readers of these pages will, no 
doubt, recall the fact that a collection of 
poems by Josiah D. Canning was published in 
1838, and that in 1852 another volume, en- 
titled "Harp and Plough," was also issued by 
him, which enjoyed a very extensive sale. 



He married in 1842 Josephine M. Purple, 
daughter of Ezra Purple, a farmer, who re- 
sided at what was known as Grass Hill Farm, 
now the site of the Mount Hermon School. 
Her family was a prominent one in that local- 
ity, a brother having been upon the School 
Board for many years; and her parents died at 
the old homestead. Mr. and Mrs. Canning 
were the parents of six children, namely: 
Nellie, who died at the age of twenty-three 
years; Clara, who died aged about eighteen 
months; George, who occupies the old Can- 
ning homestead; Donald, who died in Flor- 
ida, aged twenty-nine years; Sarah, who 
married E. S. Chapin, a business man of 
Boston, and resides in Cambridge; and Car- 
rie, whose name introduces the present sketch. 
The mother passed from earth at the age of 
fifty-nine years. She was an attendant of the 
Congregational church. 

Miss Carrie Canning, who seems to have 
inherited from her father a love of learning 
and a capacity for scholarly attainments, after 
completing the usual course provided at the 
district school, pursued more advanced studies 
successively at Bernardston and at the Berk- 
shire Institute in New Marlboro. She then 
commenced the arduous profession of teaching 
in her native town, her superior natural abili- 
ties and well-trained mind standing her in 
such good stead that she has continued to pre- 
side over one school for a period of twenty- 
seven consecutive terms. She has always 
displayed a deep and undivided interest in 
her work, and has never allowed outside mat- 
ters of any kind to interfere with proper atten- 
tion to her professional duties, testimony as 
to her personal worth, her sound judgment, 
and practical ability as an educator being 
afforded by the fact that for three years she 
has been called upon to serve as a member 
of the School Board. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



173 




jUGENE A. NEWCOMB, junior mem- 
ber of the firm of Sheldon & Newcomb, 
hardware merchants, of Greenfield, 
has filled the office of Treasurer of Franklin 
County with fidelity and ability continuously 
since his first appointment to this responsible 
position in June, 1891, having given such 
universal satisfaction that he was elected 
November, 1891, for three years, and for an- 
other term of three years in November, 1895. 
He is a native of the county, having been 
born November 17, 185 i, in the town of Ley- 
den, on the same farm on which his father, 
Thomas Jefferson Newcomb, first drew the 
breath of life in 1808. 

The latter was of the eighth generation in 
direct line from Captain Andrew Newcomb, a 
well-known shipmaster on the New England 
coast in his day, who married his second wife 
in Boston in 1663. The intervening genera- 
tions were successively represented by a sec- 
ond Andrew, who bore the title Lieutenant; 
Simon; Hezekiah, born in 1694; Peter, 171 8; 
Hezekiah, 1747; and Hezekiah, 3d. Lieu- 
tenant Andrew, who was. son of Captain New- 
comb's first wife, was living, it is supposed, 
on or near the Isles of Shoals in 1666, but 
removed with his family about 1675 to Edgar- 
town, on Martha's Vineyard. His son Simon, 
who was born about the year 1666, removed in 
1713 to Lebanon, Conn. In that old town 
was born in 1769 Simon's great-grandson, 
Hezekiah, who is recorded as having been 
Justice of the Peace thirty years and a member 
of the General Court twenty years. This was 
when he was living in Bernardston, Mass., in 
the western part, now Leyden, to which place 
he removed with his parents when about three 
years old. Thomas Jefferson Newcomb was 
devoted to farming during his early life, but 
afterward travelled for a commercial house 
until 1877, when he retired from active pur- 



suits. In 1835 he married Rebecca S. Hitch- 
cock, a native of New York City; and they 
became the parents of twelve children, of 
whom three sons and five daughters grew to 
mature years, and are yet living. 

Eugene A. Newcomb was always of an en- 
ergetic and self-reliant disposition; and, al- 
though he was obliged to contribute toward 
his own support from the time he was eleven 
years old, first beginning work for the neigh- 
boring farmers during the summer seasons, 
and attending school in winters only, he ob- 
tained a good and practical education. When 
a little older, he worked in Guilford and South 
Deerfield throughout the harvest season, and 
in the winter was a student at Powers Insti- 
tute, Bernardston, where he made excellent 
use of his time. Mr. Newcomb began his 
mercantile career as a clerk in the hardware 
store of George A. Arms in this city, selling 
goods for him for eleven years, in that time 
becoming conversant with every detail of the 
business. In 1881 Mr. Newcomb and his 
present partner, John Sheldon, bought out the 
stock and good will of bis former employer; 
and they have since carried on an extensive 
and lucrative business, with an enviable repu- 
tation for fair dealing. Mr. Newcomb is 
noted for his good judgment; and he possesses 
traits of character that have given him influ- 
ence in business, political, and social circles, 
and gained him a host of friends and well- 
wishers. In politics he zealously supports 
the Republican party, and for many years has 
been one of the Greenfield Board of Regis- 
trars, and is at present one of the Water Com- 
missioners. He is prominent in the society 
of Odd Fellows, having passed all the chairs 
of the subordinate lodge, and is a supporter of 
the Congregational church, of which he and 
his wife are attendants. 

Mr. Newcomb was united in marriage May 



174 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lo, 1872, to Hannah T. Deakin, who was 
born in Sheffield, England, January 23, 185 1, 
and at the age of thirteen years came with her 
parents, William and Hannah T. (Thompson) 
Deakin, to this country. Her father was for 
many years a commercial traveller, but subse- 
quently established himself in the coal busi- 
ness in London, England. He is now living 
in Philadelphia, Pa., and has retired from 
active pursuits. His wife died in 1876, in 
the fifty-third year of her age, leaving three 
sons and two daughters. The wedded path- 
way of Mr. and Mrs. Newcomb has been 
brightened by the birth of four children, 
namely: William J., a graduate, of the Green- 
field High School, now a clerk in his father's 
store; Edith, who was graduated from the 
same school in 1895; E. Robert, twelve years 
of age; and Rebecca S., a bright little miss, 
two and one-half years old. They have a very 
pleasant home at 18 Highland Avenue, into 
which they moved in 1888, and where their 
many friends are always sure of a warm 
greeting. 

"ENRY J. SMITH, one of Colerain's 
representative citizens, owns a pro- 
lix V,^ ductive farm near Griswoldville, 

and occupies a fine comfortable residence, 
which he erected in 1894. He is the descend- 
ant of an old family, his ancestors having 
settled here at an early date. He was born at 
Colerain, February 15, 1847, son of David 
and Emeline (Johnson) Smith, the father 
being a native of the above-named town. The 
grandfather, John Smith, was also born in 
Colerain, a son of David, one of the early set- 
tlers of the town, who there passed his life in 
agricultural pursuits. John Smith was a suc- 
cessful farmer and a very prominent citizen, 
liolding various town offices. The latter por- 
tion of his life was passed in New York State, 




where he died, at the age of nearly eighty 
years. He was a Whig in politics and an 
attendant of the Baptist church. 

David Smith, father of our subject, passed 
his entire life in Colerain, where he became a 
prosperous farmer, and, besides the old Smith 
homestead, owned at one time about six hun- 
dred acres of land, being one of the most 
extensive farmers of the town. He served as 
a Selectman and Assessor, and was for many 
years a member of the School Board. He was 
liberal in his religious views, and in politics 
was a Republican. His death occurred in 
his seventy-ninth year. His wife died at the 
age of seventy-four, having been the mother 
of eight children — six sons and two daughters 
— as follows: Lysander and Eva, both resi- 
dents of Greenfield; Emma, a twin sister of 
Eva, residing in Charlemont; Henry J., the 
principal subject of this article; Edwin C. 
and Charles W., both of Colerain; Frank A., 
of Shelburne Falls, and Fred A., twins, who 
reside in Greenfield. 

Mr. Smith received his education in the 
schools of Colerain and Shelburne. He 
adopted agriculture as an occupation, and re- 
mained at home until reaching the age of 
twenty-five, at which time he moved to Cort- 
land County, New York. After residing 
there for seven years, he returned to Colerain, 
and some years later, in 1888, purchased his 
present farm, a part of his grandfather's origi- 
nal estate, which has been in the family for a 
period of one hundred years. He now pos- 
sesses two hundred acres of very valuable 
land, upon which he conducts general farm- 
ing, giving special attention to dairying. 

On September 20, 1872, Mr. Smith was 
united in marriage to Lelia Mather, of Cole- 
rain, daughter of Frederick and Betsey 
Mather; and they have five children, as fol- 
lows: Allen F., a clerk at Griswoldville; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



175 



William D. ; Emma B. ; Frederick; and Sarah 
— all of whom reside at home. Mrs. Smith's 
parents are no longer living. Mr. Smith is 
a Republican in politics, and has served as 
Selectman two years and Assessor one year. 
He is industrious and energetic as a farmer, 
and is a gentleman, courteous and affable 
in manner. He is liberal in his religious 
views, while Mrs. Smith is a member of the 
Methodist church. 



■OSEPH H. LAMB, proprietor of a 
finely equipped store at 8 Bank Row, 
in Greenfield, carries a fine stock 
of musical merchandise of all kinds, also 
watches, jewelry, and spectacles, in which 
he has a large and profitable trade. He is a 
native of the Green Mountain State, born 
October 11, 1830, in the town of Vernon, 
where his father. Mason Lamb, was engaged 
in general farming for many years. 

Mr. Lamb's paternal grandfather, Nathan 
Lamb, was a descendant of a captain in the 
British army, who emigrated to the United 
States about the time of the Revolution, and 
soon after the close of that war settled at 
Framingham, Mass. He there married Lucy 
Pepper, and after a few years of farming in 
that vicinity removed in 1799 to Guilford, 
Vt., where his death occurred in 1809. His 
widow survived him many years, dying in 
1854, at the ripe old age of eighty-six. They 
reared a large family of children, of whom one 
son, Amherst Lamb, was a Baptist minister 
of ability and mark, having been ordained to 
his sacred calling December 18, 1821, in the 
town of Guilford. He was at one time a 
representative to the Vermont legislature from 
the town of Whitingham, where he was long 
a resident, and where he departed this life 
in 1870, aged seventy-four years, leaving two 



sons. Another son, John Lamb, was a noted 
local preacher of the Methodist denomination. 

Mason Lamb was born in 1799, probably in 
Guilford, Vt., and was a practical and pros- 
perous tiller of the soil. After his marriage 
he settled on a farm which he bought in the 
town of Vernon. His earthly career was not 
long as measured by years, his death occurring 
in 1848, while he was yet in the prime of 
manhood. He married on April 9, 1828, 
Mrs. Alice Pierce Tyler, a daughter of Benja- 
min and Lucinda (Sargeant) Pierce, of Dum- 
merston, Vt., where she was born in 1795. 
Several children were the fruit of this union, 
of whom two died in childhood, and three are 
now living, namely: Joseph H., of whom we 
write; Lucy Ann, wife of William Cole, of 
Putney, Vt.; and Albert E., of this city. 
The mother had been previously married, her 
first husband, to whom she was united Decem- 
ber 6, 1819, having been Jesse Tyler, a well- 
to-do farmer, who died in his thirty-fourth 
year, leaving her a fair estate and a family of 
six little ones, of whom the following is a 
brief mention: Roxanna is the wife of George 
W. Kinney, ot Perkinsville, Vt. ; Sophia, of 
Worcester, Mass., is the widow of the late 
Jesse Frost; Nancy M. is the widow of Rufus 
Scott, of Dummerston, Vt. ; Betsey, widow of 
Orrin Weatherhead, of Guilford, Vt. ; Jesse 
died in Guilford; and Benjamin P., a resident 
of Staceyville, Iowa. The mother lived to a 
venerable age, dying in 1873. 

Joseph H. Lamb was reared a farmer's boy 
in his Vermont home, and after leaving the 
district school was a student for a year and a 
half at the village academy. He early became 
familiar with agricultural labors; but, finding 
them neither pleasant nor profitable to him, 
he left home in the spring of 185 1 to seek his 
fortune in Greenfield, and the first year there- 
after worked for the Russell Cutlery Company, 



176 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



during the next six years being employed by 
the Greenfield Tool Company. Prudent in 
his expenditures and wise in his savings, Mr. 
Lamb had by this time accumulated some 
money; and now, in partnership with one of 
his associates, he opened a grocery store and 
restaurant. Six months later he bought out 
his partner, and continued the business alone 
until 1861. In 1866 he embarked in his pres- 
ent enterprise. Having begun with sales of 
the Estey organ, which has a world-wide re- 
nown, he has added other instruments and all 
kinds of musical articles, being the oldest 
man in the music trade in this part of Massa- 
chusetts. He has met with excellent success 
in his business, and has the reputation of 
being a thoroughly trustworthy man to deal 
with. 

On the 6th of July, 1854, he was united in 
marriage with Mary A. Potter, daughter of 
George W. and Betsey G. (Guillow) Potter; 
and very soon after they settled in the home 
they now occupy, at 58 Federal Street. Their 
home circle was gradually increased by the 
birth of seven children, of whom we record 
the following: George F., a wholesale grain 
dealer in this city, has a wife and two chil- 
dren; Joseph E., who is in the grocery and 
grain business in Greenfield, has a wife and 
four children; F. A. Lamb, who is in the 
employment of his brother, has a wife and two 
sons; Isabelle, the widow of Z. L. Snow, re- 
sides at Melrose Highlands, near Boston, and 
has one son; Nettie, the wife of A. E. Snow, 
also resides at Melrose Highlands, and has 
one son and one daughter; Grace L., who was 
educated at Wilbraham, Mass., is an assistant 
in her father's store; and Bonner M. is a 
young law student at the Albany Law School. 
Mr. Lamb is a Master Mason, and, politi- 
cally, a Prohibitionist from the Republican 
ranks, taking an intelligent interest in local 



and State affairs, but has never sought or de- 
sired public office. Since November 12, 
1865, he has been an active member of the 
Methodist church, which he has served as 
Steward, Trustee, and superintendent of the 
Sunday-school for a quarter of a century. 



OSEPH D. NOYES, a successful and 
progressive farmer in Colerain, was 
born in Guilford, a border town of Ver- 
mont, May 30, 1823, son of James and Mary 
(Taylor) Noyes, both natives of Guilford. 
His grandfather, John Noyes, was one of the 
pioneer settlers of South Guilford, coming 
there from Rhode Island with his young wife, 
who belonged to the Rogers family. They 
journeyed from that State on horseback to 
their new home, daring the perils of the 
wilderness with quiet heroism. On the way 
they were often saluted with, "Going where 
the Indians will kill you!" and she calmly 
answered, "I am going." Their destination 
safely reached, Grandfather Noyes made a 
clearing and built a small log house ; and 
Grandmother Noyes soon had given to the rude 
dwelling the air of home comfort that only a 
woman knows how to impart. As the settle- 
ment grew. Grandfather Noyes became a prom- 
inent man in the community. He was a stanch 
Democrat, and was the first man sent to the 
State legislature to represent the town of Guil- 
ford. He and his wife believed firmly in the 
sustaining power of religion, and were pro- 
fessing members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. They had seven children, as follows : 
John, Nathan, Prentiss, Joseph, Isaac, James, 
and Betsey, all of whom are deceased. 

James Noyes, son of John, also spent his 
days in Guilford, residing on the farm cleared 
by his father, to which he added considerably, 
also erecting new buildings. His farm cov- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



177 



ered two hundred and fifty acres, and was one 
of the best in that part of the town. He was 
an industrious and capable farmer, a man of 
good judgment in affairs. A Democrat in 
political views, he held many offices, being 
chief Selectman for several years, and Justice 
of the Peace for forty years. He died at the 
old farm at the age of eighty-four, and his wife 
passed away at eighty-three. They were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. They 
had eight children, five daughters and three 
sons, four of whom are now living, Hannah, 
Mary Ann, Almira, and James M. being de- 
ceased. The others are located as follows: 
Harriet, Mrs. Carpenter, in Boston ; Betsey, 
Mrs. Burdick, in Guilford; Jeremiah, in Brat- 
tleboro, Vt. ; Joseph D., who is the youngest 
in the family, in Colerain. 

Joseph attended the district schools of Guil- 
ford in his boyhood, and continued living in 
that town and working at farming until Feb- 
ruary, 1850, when he moved to Colerain, and 
took charge of Mr. Franklin's farm. After 
being thus engaged for twenty-seven years, 
on New Year's Day, 1879, Mr. Noyes moved 
to his present residence. His estate com- 
prises two hundred and fifty acres, in good 
cultivation, with well-made and convenient 
buildings, and every needed facility for skil- 
fully carrying on general farming, as he evi- 
dently does, with intelligent painstaking and 
to good profit. 

On January 5, 1848, Mr. Noyes was mar- 
ried to Elvira Franklin, daughter of Aaron 
and Sarah (Stowell) Franklin, who was born 
December 7, 1824. Her father was a native 
of Guilford, a hard-working farmer and a 
good citizen, a Democrat in politics and a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Mr. Franklin spent his last years at the home 
of his son-in-law, Mr. Noyes, dying at the age 
of ninety-one. His wife, Sarah, whose maiden 



name was Stowell, was born in Bainbridge, 
Chenango County, N. Y. , and died at the age 
of fifty-eight. She, too, was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church ; and the four 
daughters born to her were brought up in that 
faith. They were as follows : Elvira, wife of 
Mr. Noyes; Augusta, Mrs. Esterbrook, living 
in Iowa ; Mary Ann, Mrs. Barber, in Kanka- 
kee, ' 111. ; Sophia, Mrs. Cobb, who died in 
Chicago, 111., at the age of fifty-eight. Mr. 
and Mrs. Noyes had one daughter, Elladora 
S. , who was born December 21, 1850, married 
Robert Miller, and died February 9, 1888, 
leaving no children. Mr. Miller lives with 
his father-in-law, ably assisting him in the 
management of the farm. In politics Mr. 
Noyes is a Democrat, and in religion holds 
liberal views. Though working late and 
early and hardly knowing what rest means, he 
enjoys perfect health, and has required the 
attendance of a physician but once in his life. 




is 



,ROCTOR P. PURPLE, a well-known 
and highly respected farmer of 
Franklin County, Massachusetts, re- 
siding in Gill, near the Centre, was born in 
this town October 27, 1826. He is a son of 
Roswell Purple, a native of Bernardston, and 
grandson of John Purple, who was a farmer 
residing in that town, a prominent citizen in 
his time. 

Roswell Purple, having been reared to agri- 
cultural pursuits, purchased a farm in Gill, on 
which he built a fine house and barn, took to 
himself a wife, and devoted his attention to 
farming till his sons were grown up. He then 
purchased a hotel at Gill Centre, and took the 
management of the stage routes of the locality, 
many stages being under his direction. Later 
he sold the hotel, and returned to the farm, 
where he lived to the remarkably advanced age 



lyS 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of ninety-four years, vigorous and well-pre- 
served to the last. He was a well-known 
auctioneer in this vicinity, following that 
business, as occasion called, till eighty years 
of age. Mr. Roswell Purple held many civil 
offices in the town. He was on the Board of 
Selectmen many years, and he was an Assessor 
and Overseer of the Poor. In politics he was 
an old-fashioned Whig. 

The maiden name of his wife was Mary 
Roberts. She was the daughter of Amaziah 
Robert.s, a farmer for many years in the town 
of Gill, and was born on the old homestead 
where Mr. Purple now lives. She died in 
Gill, at the age of seventy-four. Her only 
brother was named Ozias. The children of 
Roswell and Mary Purple, who grew to matu- 
rity, were thirteen in number, of whom seven 
are still living. Their names are here given, 
as follows : Nancy, widow of George Brock, 
of Athol ; Proctor P. ; Clarissa, wife of Obed 
Morgan, of Deerfield; Eliza, wife of Abner 
Bascomb ; Edwin ; Sophia, wife of Edgar 
Hale, of Springfield, Mass. ; and Henry. 

Proctor P. Purple spent his early years with 
his father, attending the schools of the town, 
and at eighteen began work for himself on a 
railroad; but after a time he returned to his 
father's farm. In 1864 he came to his present 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres, on 
which he has since resided, giving his princi- 
pal attention to dairying. In 1847 Mr. Purple 
was married to Miss Isabel Holton, a daughter 
of Horace and Polly (Dickinson) Holton. 
Her father was born in Northfield, and both 
he and his father, John Holton, said to have 
been a Lieutenant in the Revolution, were 
farmers, who spent their lives in that town. 
Mrs. Purple's mother, Mrs. Polly Dickinson 
Holton, was a daughter of Benoni Dickinson, 
and was born in Northfield, where her father 
was a farmer. She was one of seven children, 



and became the mother of thirteen, three only 
of that number having survived till now. The 
names of the three are Horace, Isabel (Mrs. 
Purple), and Fidelia. Mrs. Holton died in 
Northfield, at the age of ninety-eight. She 
was a member of the Unitarian church. Hor- 
ace Holton died April 22, 1858, aged about 
seventy-seven years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Purple have had three chil- 
dren, two of whom are now living, namely : 
Florine, wife of William Richmond, a manu- 
facturer of saddlery in Waterbury, Conn. ; and 
Clayton, who was born on the old homestead, 
January i, 1854, and is now in charge of the 
farm. He married in February of 1881 Miss 
Stella F. Lander, daughter of Benjamin 
Lander, a farmer of Greenfield ; and they have 
four children : Warren Ray, Bessie E. , Isabel 
M., and Carl Clayton. Mr. Purple and his 
son are Democrats in their political principles, 
and the former has been Tax Collector for 
many years. He and his household occupy a 
prominent position among the old, well-to-do 
families of Greenfield, the home of so many 
generations. 

<■*•*-> 

LONZO G. MINER, who has been inti- 
mately associated with the mercantile 
interests of Greenfield for upward of 
twoscore years, is one of its representative 
citizens, and in every respect merits the high 
esteem universally accorded him. He was 
born in the town of Colerain, this county, in 
February, 1826, and is a lineal descendant of 
Thomas Miner, who emigrated from England 
in 1 64 1, he being probably the first of the 
name to settle in America. He settled in 
Connecticut, the second in line of descent 
being Elnathan Miner, followed by his son 
Nathan Miner, the next generation being rep- 
resented by the paternal grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, Richardson Miner, who 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



179 



was born in Hartford, Conn., in 1748, and late 
in life drew a pension for hiis services in the 
Revolutionary War. 

He was a saddler and harness-maker by 
trade, and long followed that occupation ; but 
in the year 1802 he purchased a farm of one 
hundred and twenty-five acres in the town of 
Colerain. He made the journey hither from 
Stonington, Conn., on horseback, bringing the 
silver to the amount of two thousand, two hun- 
dred and iifty dollars, to pay for his land, in his 
saddle-bags. This homestead property has 
ever since been in the possession of the family, 
Mr. Alonzo G. Miner having now held the 
deed of it for a quarter of a century. Richard- 
son Miner married Sarah Holeman, of Hart- 
ford, the daughter of a sea captain, who met a 
tragic death, having been taken prisoner by 
the British, and, as the tradition is, by them 
poisoned. Mrs. Sarah H. Miner bore five 
daughters and two sons, and lived to quite an 
old age. After her decease her husband mar- 
ried again at the age of seventy-five years, and 
lived with his second wife a period of twenty- 
two, years, his demise occurring in his ninety- 
seventh year. He was very active in religious 
works, and for many years served as Deacon of 
the Congregational church. 

Gilbert S. Miner, who became the father of 
Alonzo G. , was born February 9, 1792, at 
Stonington, Conn., and in early life learned 
the mason's trade, which he carried on in con- 
nection with general farming, on the paternal 
homestead, at Colerain. He was very active 
in military circles, being for twenty-seven 
years Captain of a company, which he called 
out at the beginning of the war of 181 2. In 
1 814 he married Betsey Lyons, daughter of 
Jerry Lyons, of Colerain, and they became the 
parents of seven children: Mary R., who be- 
came the wife of Joel A. Hall, of Charle- 
mont, and died in Keokuk, la., leaving one 



daughter; Elizabeth S., now the widow of Joel 
Wilson, living in Greenfield; Sophronia A., 
who married Charles A. Shearer, and died in 
Colerain, leaving two sons and two daughters; 
Emily A., who died of consumption at the age 
of nineteen years; Alonzo G. ; Melissa N., 
Mrs. L. B. Stewart, of Colerain, who died at 
the age of twenty-four years, leaving an infant 
daughter; and Jerry L. , who resides on the old 
homestead. The father departed this life in 
1865, aged seventy-three years, and the mother 
in 1873, at the age of fourscore years. 

Alonzo G. Miner acquired his education in 
the district and a select school, living on the 
home farm until twenty-two years of age, when 
he started out in life on his own account, try- 
ing various kinds of employment, being for 
some time a pedler. In 1853 he came to 
Greenfield as a clerk in the mercantile house 
of his brother-in-law, Joel Wilson, who was an 
extensive dealer in windows, doors, blinds, and 
paper hangings. Three years later Mr. Miner 
became an equal partner with Mr. Wilson; 
but in 1 86 1 Gideon H. Strong purchased 
Mr. Wilson's interest, and the firm, under the 
name of Miner & Strong, carried on a good 
business for six years, when Mr. Wilson again 
became interested, being for ten years the firm 
known as J. Wilson & Co. In 1877 Mr. 
Miner bought the entire business, which he 
has since controlled, and, in addition to his 
previous stock, has added paints, oils, and var- 
nishes, having now a very large and lucrative 
trade. He possesses excellent practical abil- 
ity, and has a first-class reputation as an hon- 
orable and upright man of business. 

Mr. Miner was married June 5, 1849, to 
Sybil A. Shepardson, to whom he had been 
devoted from childhood days, when they at- 
tended the same school. They removed to 
Greenfield in 1854, at once taking possession 
of their pleasant home, at No. 30 Chapman 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Street. After more than forty years of happy 
wedlock, and having reared four children, Mrs. 
Miner passed onward to the home above on 
April 25, 1892. Four children have been 
born of their union. The youngest daughter, 
Lillian E. S. , the wife of Merrill P. Reed, 
died at the age of twenty-eight years, leaving 
two sons and one daughter. The only surviv- 
ing daughter, Rosa E. A. Miner, who keeps 
house for her father, has inherited musical tal- 
ent from her father and mother, is accom- 
plished both in vocal and instrumental music, 
and has been organist at the Methodist Epis- 
copal church for several years. One son, 
Clarence H. G. Miner, for seventeen years 
commercial traveller for a New York house, 
resides in Dorchester, Mass., and has a wife 
and one son, Roy M. Simpson; and Carroll A. 
L. Miner, a salesman in Chicago, is married, 
but has no children. 

In politics Mr. Miner was reared a Whig, 
but has been an ardent supporter of the Repub- 
lican party since its formation. In his early 
years he was a regular attendant of the Congre- 
gational church, in which faith he was reared ; 
but some forty-three years ago he united with 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and has been 
an official member much of the time since, 
taking a leading part in its prayer meetings 
and song services, and, as a member of the 
choir, playing the violin. 




kRS. LOUISA D. CHENERY, a 
well-known and highly esteemed 
resident of Montague, widow of 
Hollis Chenery, formerly a prominent mer- 
chant of this pleasant town in the Connecticut 
valley, was born in Heath, a neighboring town 
in Franklin County, Massachusetts, in 181 8. 
She is a daughter of Aaron Brown, a native of 
that town, and grand-daughter of Deacon John 



Brown, one of the early settlers of Heath, 
who carried on farm operations during most 
of his life there. Aaron was one of thirteen 
children, and lived with the family at the 
homestead, where he was brought up a farmer, 
and took care of his parents in their old age. 
He married Miss Rebecca Dickinson, who 
was born in Hatfield, being one of a family of 
five children of Daniel Dickinson ; and their 
later years were spent at the old Dickinson 
homestead in Hatfield, amid the scenes of her 
youth. Aaron Brown died at the age of 
seventy-two years. He and his wife were 
members of the Congregational church in 
Heath, and were parents of two children, 
namely: John; and Louisa Dickinson, who 
became Mrs. Chenery. 

Louisa Dickinson Brown resided in Heath 
during her early childhood, and at nine years 
of age went to her mother's early home in 
Hatfield, where she remained until her mar- 
riage. She attended the schools of the vicin- 
ity, and later became a teacher. On March 9, 
1845, she was married to Mr. Hollis Chenery, 
a native of Montague, whose father, Nathan 
Chenery, was a life-long resident and a suc- 
cessful merchant of that town. His mother 
was before her marriage Miss Sophia Gunn; 
and she became the mother of five children, 
none of whom are now living. Her death took 
place in Montague. 

Hollis Chenery was educated in the best 
schools of the locality, and began his mercan- 
tile career with an uncle in the town of Gill, 
Franklin County. Later he went West as far 
as the Mississippi River, and settled in Ful- 
ton, 111., where he established a business of 
his own, which he carried on with success 
until the death of his brother, who had been 
engaged in mercantile business in Montague. 
Mr. Chenery, then concluding to take up his 
brother's work, left Fulton in 1842, and, re- 




HOLLIS CHENERY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



183 



turning East, established himself in Montague, 
where he conducted a successful trade until his 
death in 1850, at the early age of thirty-five 
years. Only one child had been bora to him 
and his wife, a daughter named Harriet L., 
who is not now living. Mr. and Mrs. Chenery 
have been highly respected in the community; 
and Mrs. Chenery, an exemplary member of 
the Congregational church, who is now in her 
seventy-seventh year, with well-preserved fac- 
ulties, intelligent and active, is passing the 
serene sunset of a life early clouded by be- 
reavement, cherishing the memory of her hus- 
band and daughter, who have but gone before, 
soothed by the love and regard of appreciating 
neighbors and friends, and trusting in the 
Grace Divine that ruleth all things well. 

Mr. Hollis Chenery was a Whig in politics. 
In his brief active career he acquired a reputa- 
tion as a capable, energetic, and substantial 
man of business. We are happy to present 
his portrait herewith as that of a representative 
Franklin County tradesman of the first half of 
the century. 



^/Tllia 



ILLIAM E. TRAVER, a wealthy 
ive resident of Greenfield, now 
living in retirement, is the son of 
Philip and Matilda Traver. His father was 
born in New York State. 

After acquiring his education, William E. 
Traver entered the Franklin National Bank as 
a clerk, from which he rapidly rose to a high 
position of trust and responsibility; but fail-, 
ing health compelled him to relinquish active 
business, thus depriving the community of the 
services of one whose career had promised so 
much future usefulness. On March 11, 1884, 
Mr. Traver wedded Mrs. Julia Demarest, 
widow of the late James Demarest, and 
daughter of Joseph P. and Lucy (Fiske) Hale. 
Her father was born at Bernardston, Franklin | 



County, Mas.s., October 24, 18 19; and her 
mother, whose birth occurred at Kinderhook, 
N. Y. , on May 7 of the same year, was reared 
and educated at Lexington, Mass. 

Joseph P. Hale in his earlier years followed 
the trade of a house painter, later becoming a 
contractor and builder at Worcester, Mass., 
from which city he went to New York, where 
he was for a time engaged in the crockery 
business. He became interested in pianoforte- 
making, and eventually entered largely into 
the business, which through his energy de- 
veloped into an important industry, the Hale 
piano occupying a conspicuous place among its 
competitors. He conducted an extensive and 
very successful business, pecuniarily as well 
as otherwise, which he continued until about 
the year 1873, when impaired health caused 
him to retire permanently from active pur- 
suits. He died October 15, 1883, leaving a 
widow and two daughters : Augusta Hale, who 
married Charles H. Stone, and died August 
27, 1887, at the age of thirty-eight years, hav- 
ing had two sons ; and Julia, wife of William 
E. Traver. 

Julia Hale was carefully educated in New 
York City, where she attended the public 
schools, and later completed her studies at a 
private institution of learning. On July 12, 
1870, she was united in marriage to her first 
husband. Dr. James H. Demarest, grandson of 
a wealthy New Jersey landholder, who was an 
early settler in that State, owning at one time 
a tract of valuable land twenty miles in length, 
and extending from the Hudson River inland 
two miles. Dr. Demarest, who was a success- 
ful dental practitioner, died on March 21, 
1876, leaving two children: Josie M., now a 
young lady residing with her mother; and 
Samuel A., who is at present a student at the 
New York Dental College. 

Mr. and Mrs. Traver have had two children, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



namely: Alfred William, who died January 
14, 1885; and Arthur E., now a bright and 
promising lad of seven years. They occupy a 
very handsome and substantial residence at 
No. 2 Church Street, which was erected by 
Mr. Traver's father in 1892. Mrs. Traver's 
mother, Mrs. Lucy F. Hale, who, although 
now seventy-six years of age, is still active 
both mentally and physically, resides in New 
York City. She is a member of the Blue 
Anchor Society, the aim of which is to provide 
for the wants of shipwrecked sailors. 



T^HARLES BOWKER, M.D., a well- 
I jy known physician and public-spirited 

^■^ ^ citizen of Bernardston, was born in 
the town of Savoy, Berkshire County, Mass., 
September 16, 1824, son of Melvin and Betsy 
(Willett) Bowker. Dr. Bowker's grandfather. 
Liberty Bowker, was a native of Pembroke, 
Plymouth County, Mass., where the family 
was numbered among the early settlers. He 
was a box-maker in his earlier days, and later 
in life became a hotel proprietor in Savoy, 
Mass., where he died at seventy-two years of 
age. His wife's maiden name was Guerney. 
They had a family of four sons and two daugh- 
ters, all of whom grew up, and one, Calvin 
Bowker, still lives in South Adams, Mass. 
The others were : Melvin, father of Dr. 
Bowker; David; and James Madison. One 
daughter married Jesse W. Johnson, the other 
married Robert Sturtevant. Dr. Bowker's 
maternal grandfather, John Willett, a farmer 
and manufacturer of ship's spars, residing in 
the town of Hanson, Plymouth County, Mass., 
was also a native of Massachusetts, and was a 
successful business man. He died on his farm 
at Hanson, when over eighty years of age. 
He and his wife had a family of three sons and 
two daughters, all of whom are now deceased. 



Melvin Bowker, son of Liberty Bowker, was 
born in Pembroke, Mass., March 13, 1798. 
At an early age he went to Hanson, and 
there grew to manhood. Later he owned a 
good farm at Savoy, and carried on a successful 
business of farming and dairying. He died in 
that town at the age of seventy-seven years. 
His first wife, Betsy Willett by maiden name, 
was born in Hanson, Plymouth County, and 
died when her son Charles was four years old. 
After her death Mr. Bowker married Electa 
Mason, who died when about seventy-seven 
years of age. Politically, he was a Democrat, 
till the formation of the Republican party, 
when he joined that party, and remained a 
faithful adherent till the time of his death. 
He was for many years a Selectman, and also 
held the offices of Town Clerk and Town 
Treasurer; and in 1839 and 1840 he was a 
Representative in the State legislature. Mr. 
Bowker had four children by his first wife, two 
of whom, Calvin and Betsy, died in infancy. 
One son, Alonzo Melvin Bowker, M.D., died 
at about forty years of age, his brother 
Charles, subject of the present sketch, being 
the only one now living. By the second 
marriage Melvin Bowker had one daughter, 
Sarah Frances, who married Plenry Thayer, 
of Adams, Mass. 

Charles Bowker grew to manhood in the 
little hill town of Savoy, Berkshire County; 
and the foundation of his education was laid 
in the public schools of that place. Com- 
mencing at the age of nineteen years, he 
taught school for eight years, and then began 
the study of medicine under the instruction 
of his brother, Alonzo M. Bowker, after which 
he attended the Medical College of Pittsfield, 
Mass., for three years, graduating in the year 
1854. He began practice in Readsboro, Vt. , 
remaining there a short time, when he re- 
moved to Plainfield and stayed one year, re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



turning thence to Savoy, where he remained 
four years. The next four years were spent in 
Wilbraham. In 1864 he served one year in the 
United States Service as Contract Surgeon, and 
was in the hospitals of Washington and Alex- 
andria. The following year he settled in Ber- 
nardston, and has remained here ever since, 
being now the oldest physician in the town. 

Dr. Bowker was married in 1847 to Delcy 
D. Dunham, who was born in Savoy, and died 
in 1852, leaving no children. In 1853 he 
married his second wife, Harriett P. Dawes, 
who was born in Berkshire County, daughter 
of Samuel and Philena E. (Hume) Dawes, the 
former of whom was born in Windsor, June 19, 
1798, and his wife at the same place, June 5, 
1804, both being now deceased. They had 
two children : Harriett P., now Mrs. Bowker; 
and her sister, the wife of George Crittenden, 
of Shelburne P"alls. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bowker are both members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church of Bernards- 
ton, he being on the official board of that 
church. They have six children living. One 
son, Charles Willett, died at the age of two 
and one-half years. The others are : Delcy 
Harriett, who was born in Savoy, February 
21, 1854, married George W. Swasey, and 
resides in Centralia, Wash., where she is a 
teacher of music; Alphonso V. , born in Savoy, 
January 17, 1857, now a physician at Athol ; 
Samuel Dawes, a medical practitioner, born in 
Wilbraham, June 22, 1863, living at Rowe, 
Franklin County; Arthur Hume, born in Ber- 
nardston, April 18, 1867, employed in the 
shoe factory at Athol; Effie L. , born in Ber- 
nardston, September 13, 1868, a book-keeper 
in Greenfield; Rosa Evelyn, born in Bernards- 
ton, March 16, 1870, a music teacher living 
with her parents; Charles M. Bowker, born in 
Wilbraham, July 10, i860, and died March 2, 
1863. 



Dr. Bowker is a prominent and esteemed 
citizen of his town. He is now Chairman of 
the Selectmen and Overseer of the Poor, and 
is serving his fourth term as Selectman. He 
is also a trustee of the Cushman Library, and 
has been a trustee of the high school since 
first coming to Bernardston. 



< • ■ » » 



KYDIA E. STOCKWELL, whose fam- 
ily name has been known in the annals 
,,.,0^ of New England for several genera- 
tions, is an esteemed resident of the town of 
Gill. She was born in Hadley, Hampshire 
County, daughter of P"lavel Stockwell, whose 
early ancestors emigrated from England to the 
United States in old Colonial times. In the 
history of Sutton, Mass., it is said that the 
emigrant ancestor settled in Ipswich, married, 
and had five sons — William, John, Jonathan, 
Ebenezer, and David — all of whom settled in 
Sutton. The first John Stockwell married and 
had several children, including a son John, 
who, according to the same record, married 
first, in 1730, Margaret Smith, of Andover; 
second, Lydia Elliott, in 1737; and, third, 
Lydia King, in 1749. John Stockwell, a 
descendant of the Sutton family of Stockwells, 
became one of the prominent farmers of Lever- 
ett in this county, where he spent his last 
years. 

His son, Charles Stockwell, the grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch, was a native of 
Athol, Mass., and for a number of years a resi- 
dent of that town. He was a sturdy tiller of 
the soil, and made his first purchase of land 
in the town of Colerain, where he lived a short 
time, but later became one of the pioneers of 
Leverett, in that capacity assisting in its 
development and growth. He finally went to 
New York, and was never heard from in these 
parts afterward. He married Martha Moore, 



i86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



who bore him six children : Dexter, Daniel, 
Flavel, Mary, Stillman, and Eliza. 

Flavel Stockwell was born during the resi- 
dence of his parents in Colerain, and was there 
educated in its district schools, on the home 
farm in Leverett being drilled in the element- 
ary branches of agriculture. At the age of 
eighteen years he removed to Hadley, where 
he learned the trade of a broom-maker, which 
seemed to him preferable to farming. He 
worked at that until 1830, when he came to 
Gill. Here he purchased the property now 
owned by his daughter Lydia, and engaged in 
the occupation to which he was reared, becom- 
ing a successful agriculturist. The estate 
consists of eighty acres of land, all of which 
he placed under cultivation, making many and 
substantial improvements, continuing here 
until his death, in 1876, at the age of seventy- 
four years. 

His wife, whose maiden name was Rebecca 
Merriman, was a daughter of Elijah Merriman 
and grand-daughter of Samuel Merriman, both 
of whom were life-long residents and well- 
known farmers of Northfield, Mass. Elijah 
Merriman married Rebecca Clendenning, and 
they settled on a farm in Northfield, and there 
they reared their three children : Rebecca, the 
eldest, who married Flavel Stockwell; Elijah, 
named for his father; and Lydia, the wife of 
Nathan Smith, now living in Clinton. Mr. 
and Mrs. Flavel Stockwell became the parents 
of five children, namely: Elijah S. and Lucy 
Ann, twins, both deceased, the former at the 
age of nineteen years, and the latter twenty- 
one; Luther A., also deceased; Ellen Re- 
becca, who married William H. Deane, and 
died leaving two daughters — Carrie Leona and 
Lucy Irene; and Lydia, of whom we write. 
Mrs. Stockwell, who survived her husband 
many years, resided on the Stockwell home- 
stead, tenderly cared for by her daughter 



Lydia until her death, June 8, 1892, at the 
venerable age of eighty-eight years. She was 
a woman of rare personal worth and greatly 
beloved, a firm and trustful believer in the 
truths of Christianity, and with her family was 
a regular attendant of the Congregational 
church. 

Lydia was a little girl of six years when her 
parents removed to the home which she now 
owns and where she has since lived. In her 
younger days she was thoroughly drilled in the 
domestic arts, and, after arriving at years of 
maturity, devoted herself to the care of her 
parents, lovingly administering to their wants, 
making the last years of their earthly life com- 
fortable and happy. On the death of her sister 
Ellen she adopted the two orphan girls, Car- 
rie L. and Lucy I., and gave them a mother's 
care. They received excellent educational 
advantages, attending the Powers Institute, 
and afterward completing their studies at 
Northfield Seminary, where they took a special 
course. Carrie Leona still lives with her 
aunt; and Lucy Irene is the wife of Franklin 
P. Grout, a native of Warwick, but now a 
prosperous farmer of Gill. Inheriting the re- 
ligious belief of her worthy parents, Miss 
Stockwell is a regular attendant of the Con- 
gregational church, and is active in charitable 
works. 



fISENLIO D. THOMPSON is a well- 
known farmer in the town of Heath 
and a veteran of the Civil War. 
He was born at Colerain, Mass., July 29, 
1839, and is a son of Gurdin and Sophronia 
(Wilson) Thompson. His grandfather, Hugh 
Thompson, also a native of Colerain, owned 
and conducted a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, and was very prosperous in worldly 
affairs. He supported the old Whig party in 
politics, and was a Congregationalist in his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



187 



religious belief. He died at the age of 
seventy-five years, having reared the following 
children: Levi, John, Adolphus, Gurdin, and 
Hugh. 

Gurdin Thompson was born September 8, 
1 801, and during his younger manhood fol- 
lowed farming, together with the trade of a 
stone-mason, which constituted his occupation 
until he succeeded to the possession of the 
parental homestead by purchasing the interests 
of the other heirs ; and then he engaged exten- 
sively in stock-raising. He attained to a posi- 
tion of prominence in public affairs, was a 
Whig in politics, and, like the majority of 
that political element, joined the ranks of the 
Republican party at its formation. He very 
acceptably served as a Selectman, and also 
held other important town ofTices. He died 
aged sixty-nine, and his wife at the age of 
sixty-two. Their children were: Franklin B. , 
Laura A., Hugh W. , Visenlio D., Gurdin 
A., Almira, Julia, and an infant who died. 

Visenlio D. Thompson commenced farming 
upon his own account at the age of twenty-one 
years, but in 1862 enlisted as a private in 
Company B, Fifty-second Massachusetts In- 
fantry, and served one year in the Civil War, 
during which time his regiment was attached 
to the Department of the Gulf. He was pres- 
ent at the siege of Port Hudson, but, after 
participating in several minor engagements, 
became ill from exposure and forced marches 
of long duration under Major-general Banks, 
and was confined in the hospital at Baton 
Rouge for a period of three months. Having 
completed his term of service, he returned 
North, and bought a farm situated in the town 
of Charlemont, known as the Thatcher place, 
which consisted of one hundred and fifty acres. 
After residing there for a time, he sold the 
property and removed to Heath, purchased his 
present farm of one hundred acres, which had 



been known as the Clemens property. He has 
erected a new and spacious barn, besides mak- 
ing other improvements, and is extensively 
engaged in dairying and sheep-raising. 

Mr. Thompson has been twice married. 
On February 25, 1864, he wedded for his first 
wife Miss Flora J. Purrington, daughter of 
Thomas Purrington; and she was called to rest 
at the age of twenty-five years, leaving three 
children, namely: Francis H., who married 
Lillian McLean, and resides at Colerain ; Mor- 
ris L. ; and Flora J., who is now the wife of 
Adelbert Stetson, of Heath, and has two chil- 
dren — Alice M. and Leoa H. On November 
24, 1870, Mr. Thompson was united in mar- 
riage to his present wife, Harriet A. Daven- 
port, daughter of Gano S. and Caroline 
(Gould) Davenport, her father being a progres- 
sive farmer of Heath. Mrs. Thompson's 
mother died about twelve years ago, she and 
her husband, who is now living, having been 
the parents of twelve children, named as fol- 
lows : George J., Sarah J., David S. , Harriet 
A., Carrie L. , Celestia L. , Frank H., Charles 
G. , Ella D., Lucas E., Addie M., and one 
child who died in infancy. Mr. Thompson's 
children by his second marriage are: Laura 
S. , who married Charles R. Clark, of Granby, 
and has one child, named Walter S; Hugh L. ; 
Jessie G. ; Edward D. ; and Oscar R. Mr. 
V. D. Thompson is a Republican in politics, 
and both himself and wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



Yu^EV. STILLMAN BARBER, an influ- 
I I^Y^ ential and much respected citizen of 
J-^ V_^ Bernardston, and of late years en- 
gaged in farming, was born in Warwick, an- 
other Franklin County town, July 21, 1818, 
son of Azariah and Broda (Temple) Barber. 
His grandparents, Zachariah and Patience 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



(Whitney) Barber, were natives of Sherborn, 
Middlesex County, Mass. Zachariah Barber 
was a hard-working and successful farmer, and 
died in Warwick at the age of sixty-nine, his 
wife long surviving him, and dying at the same 
place, at eighty-nine years of age. They had 
four sons and three daughters who reached 
maturity, namely: Patty, Patience, Abigail, 
Azariah, Elisha, Cyrus, and Ebenezer. Aza- 
riah Barber, whose name appears fourth in the 
list, was born in Warwick, February i8, 
1782, and resided there all the days of his life 
on a part of the old Barber homestead. He 
was an excellent farmer and a good man, hon- 
est and upright in his dealings, liberal in his 
religious views, and in politics a Whig. He 
died at the age of sixty-five; and his wife, 
who was born in the adjoining town of Orange, 
Mass., July 25, 1789, died at eighty-three. 
They had six children, only two of whom are 
now living: Stillman, the subject of this 
sketch; and Azariah R., a farmer of North- 
field, Mass. The deceased were: Harlow, 
Hervey, Albert G. , and Elizabeth T. 

Stillman Barber acquired his elementary 
education in the common schools of Warwick, 
and later enjoyed the advantages of two or 
three terms at a select school and two terms 
at the New Salem Academy. Being of a 
studious nature, he lost no opportunity to 
improve his mind. He would take his books 
into the field with him ; and, poring over them 
without any instructor, he added not a little to 
the store of learning he had gathered in the 
schools. He committed to memory the first 
epistle of Pope's "Essay on Man " by keeping 
the book open before him while making 
shingles in his father's shop. When seven- 
teen years of age, he took charge of his father's 
farm, and, when eighteen, began to teach 
school, which he continued for seven terms; 
and at twenty-two he engaged in business for 



himself. Remaining in Warwick until 1844, 
he then moved to Lowell, Mass., where he 
lived for two years, at the end of which time 
he went to Meadville, Pa., and entered the 
Theological School. Shortly after graduating, 
in 1848, he took a pastoral charge at Como, 
111., which he held but briefly, going thence to 
Rockford, 111., but not to remain long. Re- 
turning to Massachusetts, he made his home 
once more in Warwick, preaching at various 
surrounding places till January, 1850, when he 
went to Rowe, in the extreme north-western 
part of the county. He was ordained in the 
following June, the Rev. P'rederick D. Hunt- 
ington, now Bishop Huntington, preaching 
the sermon ; and he held the pastorate of the 
First Congregational or Unitarian Church of 
that place three years. From Rowe he re- 
moved successively to Plubbardston, Worcester 
County, where he was pastor for a year and a 
half, to Townsend, Middlesex County, for two 
years, to Mendon for four years, and to Tyngs- 
boro, where he remained eight years. From 
Tyngsboro he came to Bernardston in 1868, 
and for three years he was pastor of the Ber- 
nardston Congregational or Unitarian church. 

In 1872 he bought his farm, but did not 
move on to it till the next year, since which 
time he has given his entire attention to farm- 
ing. He owns a farm of sixty acres, with 
good buildings; and the fact that he has in- 
creased its productiveness nearly three hundred 
per cent, is striking evidence of intelligent 
husbandry and assiduous toil. Having joined 
the Agricultural Society of Franklin County 
when he first came to Bernardston, he has held 
in it the offices of Vice-President and Trustee ; 
and he has also been President of the Farmers' 
Institute. Mr. Barber was married April 22, 
1 84 1, to Mary Cobb Fisher, who was born in 
Warwick, December 28, 1819, daughter of 
Moses and Lydia (Fisk) Fisher. She was but 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



189 



two years of age when her mother died, her 
father having died before she was born. Till 
the time of her marriage, her early life was 
passed in Warwick, where she had a good 
home, and where, after receiving her education 
in the public schools, she taught school for 
two terms. 

Mr. and Mrs. Barber are looked up to as 
among the leading citizens of Bernardston in 
intelligence and worth. They hold Unitarian 
views in religious matters, and he is independent 
in politics. They have two children : a son, 
Charles S. ; and a daughter, Caroline Augusta. 
Charles S. Barber, born in Rowe, August 21, 
1852, is a commercial traveller for the firm of 
Mcintosh & Co., of Springfield, Mass., having 
been connected with this company for twenty- 
.two years. He married Grace E. Allen. 
They have two children — Edith L. and Mary 
E. ; and they make their home with his par- 
ents. Caroline Augusta Barber was born Jan- 
uary 18, 1859, in Mendon, Mass. She is a 
graduate of Framingham Normal School, has 
taught school continuously since 1878, and is 
now engaged in teaching in Plainfield, N.J. 
Franklin Stillman Barber died in Mendon 
when about two years of age. The Rev. Still- 
man Barber, having a strong love for the work 
of the ministry, has continued to engage in it 
when called on for occasional services up to 
the present time; and, though well advanced 
in life, he is still able to attend to the duties 
of his farm, and is as enthusiastic in the pur- 
suit of knowledge as in his youth. 



Yp)TENRY O. ROOT, of Bernardston, a 
f^\ representative farmer of Franklin 
Ji® ^__^ County, was born in this town June 
30, 1830, son of Oliver and Elizabeth (Nich- 
ols) Root. His grandfather, Moses Root, was 
born in Montague, Mass., October 7, 1742; 



and his grandmother, Anna Bardwell Root, 
was born at the same place, March 29, i743- 
Their distant ancestors were English. Moses 
Root was a blacksmith, and diligently followed 
that trade through life, keeping the sparks 
flying from his anvil early and late. In poli- 
tics he was a Whig. He and his wife had 
eight children: Eunice, Anna, Rufus, Moses, 
Elihu, Oliver, Salmon, and Samuel, all of 
whom are now deceased. Moses Root died in 
Montague, December 17, 1817, his wife Anna 
having died November 24, 1809. 

Their son Oliver lived in Montague till of 
age. While yet a boy, he was apprenticed to 
learn the trades of tanner and shoemaker, 
and, when he removed to Gill, he started in 
business in these lines for himself ; but, after 
living in that town for eight or ten years, 
being thus employed, he removed to Bernards- 
ton about the year 18 10, and here, purchasing 
a large estate, he turned farmer, at which occu- 
pation he was very successful. 

At the time of his death, which occurred at 
the age of seventy-eight, he owned two hun- 
dred acres of land. His last days were spent 
on the farm, which to-day is owned by his son. 
His wife, Elizabeth Nichols Root, was born 
at Guilford, Vt., August 29, 1793, and died 
in 1867, at the age of seventy-four years. 
They were both members of the Unitarian 
church, and for many years Oliver Root offi- 
ciated as Deacon. He was a Republican, and 
was a citizen of more than usual note, both 
in Gill and Bernardston, being a Selectman 
in Bernardston, and also filling sundry other 
offices. 

Henry O. was the elder of the two chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Root. His sis- 
ter, Sarah E., now Mrs. Holton, resides in 
Winchester, Mass. Henry O. Root grew to 
manhood in Bernardston, receiving his educa- 
tion in the public schools of that town and in 



1 go 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Goodell Academy. He took up farming as a 
means of gaining a livelihood, and, being in- 
telligent, diligent, and painstaking, has fol- 
lowed it with marked success. He now owns 
the old farm, and has added more land, making- 
all together about two hundred acres of land. 
A man of great energy, combined with good 
business tact, and one who has always shown 
a lively interest in the general welfare, his ad- 
vice carries weight in matters pertaining to the 
good of the town. Mr. Root has been Se- 
lectman for nineteen years, and has held other 
local offices. 

On November 25, 1858, he was married to 
Alma O. Hale, who was born in Bernardston, 
September 16, 1834, daughter of John F. and 
Alcy (Weeks) Hale. Mr. Hale was a native 
of Bernardston, and his wife of Halifax, Vt. 
He was a farmer, and died at the age of 
eighty-seven. His wife is still living on the 
old homestead, now aged eighty-seven years. 
They had three children: Fanny C, who 
became Mrs. Whitehead, died at the age of 
fifty-four; Ellen A., now Mrs. Shattuck, re- 
sides in Bernardston. Mrs. Root is the 
younger of the two living. 

Mr. and Mrs. Root have two sons: Frank 
O. Root, born August 23, 1859, and now 
residing in Rochester, N. Y. , is a commercial 
traveller for a boot and shoe house; Warren 
H. Root, who was born August 9, 1870, is a 
clerk in the wholesale boot and shoe house of 
Mcintosh & Co., of Springfield, Mass. Lizzie 
M., the only daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry O. Root, died at the tender age of four 
months. Mr. Root and his wife are mem- 
bers of the First Unitarian Church of Ber- 
nardston; and in politics he is a Republican. 
He is an active and valued member of the 
Franklin County Agricultural Society, with 
which he has been identified since he became 
of age. 



rWTo 



EORGE PIERCE, Assessor of the 
Vp I town of Greenfield and a veteran of 
the Civil War, was born at North- 
ampton, March 2, 1830. His father, George 
Pierce, Sr. , was born in Greenfield' in 1804, 
and died at Deerfield in 1878. He was a son 
of Samuel Pierce, a native of Middletown, 
Conn., who settled at Greenfield in 1790, and 
there followed his trade, that of pewter-smith, 
manufacturing spoons, platters, and other arti- 
cles of table and kitchen ware. He erected a 
factory and salesroom on Main Street, south 
side, near the railroad arch, and later pur- 
chased the land opposite the Mansion House, 
where in 1811 he built a brick block, in 
which he conducted his business upon a larger 
scale. He manufactured also tinware and lead 
pipe, his sons being connected with him in the 
enterprise, which was carried on successfully 
between 181 2 and 1845, they being the pioneer 
stove dealers of the town. He owned a large 
tract of land on High Street, extending from 
the top of Rocky Mountain through Highland 
Avenue, west to Congress Street, Highland 
Avenue then being the old turnpike road to 
Albany. 

Samuel Pierce was one of the founders of 
the Episcopal church in this place. He mar- 
ried Anna Joyce, of Middletown, and raised a 
family of ten children, three of whom became 
victims of an epidemic which occurred in 
1804. Of those who lived to reach maturity, 
all married and became heads of families with 
the exception of Phebe, who accompanied her 
brother Samuel to Iowa. Their names were 
as follows: John J., Phebe, George, Henry, 
Hubbard, and Samuel. Samuel, Sr., died 
about 1 841, aged seventy-two years, his widow 
passing to her rest in 1844, aged about 
seventy-four. 

The maiden name of Mr. Pierce's mother 
was Olive D. Wilson. She was born at Cole- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



191 



rain in 1808, daughter of William and Polly 
(Sisson) Wilson. Her marriage to George 
Pierce, Sr. , occurred about the year 1825 ; and 
their four children were as follows: James D., 
who was born in 1827, and is now a merchant 
of Milwaukee, where he has been in business 
for over thirty years; William, who was a 
tinman by trade and an early pioneer in Cali- 
fornia, and who died in Greenfield, January 
15, 1868, aged thirty-nine years, leaving a 
widow and three children; George; and Henry 
H., who died while engaged upon a military 
expedition to Puget Sound in 1889, aged fifty- 
eight, leaving a widow and two children. 
Plenry H. Pierce was a veteran of the Civil 
War, having enlisted in the First Connecticut 
Heavy Artillery, in which he rose from a 
private to the rank of Major, serving in the 
Army of the Potomac. As a reward for his 
bravery and valuable service, he was tendered 
a commission as Lieutenant in the regular 
army, being at the time of his death brevet 
Captain and Adjutant of the Twenty - first 
United States Infantry, stationed at Fort Van- 
couver, near Portland, Ore. 

He was a graduate of Trinity College, Hart- 
ford, and, after his appointment to the regular 
army, was for six years professor of mathe- 
matics and military tactics at Morgantown, 
W. Va., subsequently filling a like position at 
the University of Michigan. He was a re- 
markable classical scholar, and during his 
leisure moments completed a translation of 
Virgil, which has been published by Lippin- 
cott, and is considered by scholars a most cred- 
itable production. His widow, who was the 
daughter of a prominent Washington clergy- 
man, now resides at Baltimore, where she is 
educating her son. Her daughter Katherine 
is the wife of a clergyman named Waters, liv- 
ing in Dubuque, la. Mrs. Olive D. Pierce 
died in 1838; and the father married for his 



second wife Sarah Ann Kemp, his children 
by this union being: Phebe, widow of William 
McClellan, of Springfield, an accomplished 
soprano singer; and Samuel R., a musician 
and piano-tuner in New York State. 

George Pierce received a good education in 
the Greenfield public schools, and resided with 
his uncle Samuel for three years subsequent to 
the death of his mother. At the age of fifteen 
he began to learn the trade of a tinsmith in 
Northampton, and, after serving an apprentice- 
ship of four years, returned to Greenfield, 
where he worked with his brother for two 
years, at the end of which time he purchased 
the business, and continued it until 1858. In 
1859 he was appointed a custom-house in- 
spector in Boston, and served in that position 
until 1861, when he resigned, and, enlisting 
at Greenfield, was commissioned First Lieu- 
tenant of Company G, Tenth Massachusetts 
Infantry. He succeeded to the command of 
his company, following the death of Captain 
Edwin E. Day, who was killed at the battle 
of Fair Oaks, and re-enlisted in 1864, being 
detailed to command a detachment of recruits 
and re-enlisted men of the Tenth, which were 
transferred to the Thirty-seventh Regiment 
the day preceding the battle of Winchester, 
where they were ordered into action. Captain 
Pierce commanding the advanced company. 
He was there wounded in the right shoulder, 
the wound being of such a serious nature as to 
incapacitate him for further service, he having 
previously been slightly wounded at the battles 
of Malvern Hill and Spottsylvania. He was 
engaged in the expedition which opposed 
Early's raid on Washington. Captain Pierce 
was mustered out November 13, 1864, having 
been in active service three years and five 
months. 

After returning from the army, he engaged 
in the crockery and glassware business, pur- 



192 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



chasing the store of Frank Long, which he 
conducted until 1875. Having spent the next 
two years as a commercial traveller, in 1877 
he was appointed Assessor, a position which he 
still holds, his present term not expiring until 
1897. He is also Clerk for the Board of 
Selectmen and Town Clerk, and is a Democrat 
in politics. He is a prominent member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, having been 
commander of the first post organized here; 
was made a Mason in 1854, in which he has 
advanced to the Knight Templar degree or 
Commandery, having filled important chairs in 
the various lodges. He is also a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of 
the Encampment, being one of the petitioners 
for the new lodge. 

In 1857 he wedded Miss Catherine L. Scott, 
the marriage ceremony taking place at the St. 
James Church, January 13, at seven a.m., the 
officiating clergyman being its rector, the Rev. 
Titus Strong. Their three children are: 
Edwin F. , a resident of Milwaukee, and secre- 
tary of the Electric Supply Company of Wis- 
consin ; Harry C, of Greenfield, an employee 
of the American Express Company, who is 
married and has two children; and Dorus M. 
Pierce, a practical printer, who is engaged 
with the Yontii' s Companion Company of Bos- 
ton, and resides in that city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pierce attend the Episcopal 
church. Their pleasant home is at 52 Davis 
Street. Mr. Pierce has invested to a consid- 
erable extent in real estate, and owns some 
very valuable residence property. 




ALTER W. SANDERSON, of 
Whately, is a descendant of one of 
the first settlers of that town, and 
resides upon a farm which was reclaimed from 
the wilderness by his ancestors, and is situated 



about one and a half miles from the Sunderland 
bridge. Llere his birth occurred July 25, 
1843, he being a son of Elijah D. Sanderson, 
who was born on February 10, 1 807, and who 
is represented in this volume by the lifelike 
portrait which appears on the opposite page. 
Mr. Sanderson's grandfather, Elijah Sander- 
son, who was born on October 28, 1782, was 
a pioneer farmer of the town, and cleared a 
greater portion of the present Sanderson farm, 
a part of the original house which he erected 
being still in existence. He was one of two 
Sandersons who owned a very large tract of 
land, extending from the Connecticut River to 
the Conway line, a distance of about four and a 
half miles. He served as an Ensign in the 
militia during the War of 181 2, and marched 
with his company to Boston, a distance of one 
hundred miles, where they reported for duty. 
He became a very prosperous farmer, and died 
in Whately on August 28, 1823. He was 
an earnest supporter of the Congregational 
church ; and both himself and his family were 
so religious that it was said that even the 
old family dog had acquired through instinct 
a certain respect for the Sabbath, as he was 
never known to leave his accustomed place 
under the bed on that day unless compelled to 
do so. 

Elijah D. Sanderson, who was but sixteen 
years of age when his father died, continued 
thereafter to reside at the family homestead. 
He attained a thorough knowledge of the cloth- 
dresser's trade, and followed that occupation 
until handwork was superseded by machinery, 
after which he gave his entire attention to 
agricultural pursuits, becoming a very prosper- 
ous farmer. He was well known in the com- 
munity as a man of strict integrity and of 
sound judgment, and his advice was often 
sought for and relied upon by his fellow-towns- 
men. He was a member of the Congregational 




ELIJAH D. SANDERSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



I9S 



church, in which he served as parish cleric for 
many years, dying at the old homestead on 
September 15, 1886. His faithful companion 
and life partner was Zelinda Wing, daughter 
■of Dr. Walter Wing, of Otsego County, New 
York. She was one of a large family; and 
she became the mother of three children, all of 
whom are still living, namely: Silas A., a 
resident of Putney, Vt. ; Walter W., of 
Whately ; and Jane E., who married Otis 
Hager, of Deerfield. Mrs. Zelinda W. San- 
derson passed from earth in 1878, at the age of 
sixty-three, eight years before her husband. 

Walter W. Sanderson in his boyhood en- 
joyed good educational advantages, attending 
first the district schools of his native town, 
and later pursuing higher studies successively 
at the Deerfield Academy and Powers Institute 
in Bernardston. He then spent some time 
with his father working on the home farm ; 
but, after reaching his majority, he became a 
travelling salesman, going through the State 
of Pennsylvania and a portion of the West. 
He continued thus engaged at intervals for a 
period of five or six years, at the expiration of 
that time returning to the parental roof for the 
purpose of assuming charge of the farm, having 
been requested to do so by his father, whose 
life was fast approaching its close. After the 
death of his father, whom he had tenderly 
cared for, by purchasing the interests of the 
other heirs he succeeded to the old homestead, 
and has since enjoyed a prosperous career. 
The farm consists of eighty acres, is all till- 
able, and can be readily adapted to the culti- 
vation of the various farm products that are 
suited to the New England climate. Mr. 
Sanderson devotes his special attention to the 
raising of tobacco. 

Mr. Sanderson was married in 1880 to Miss 
Emmagene Whitney, daughter of J. A. Whit- 
ney, a prosperous farmer and a highly es- 



teemed citizen of Gardner, who still survives 
at the age of eighty-one years. Mrs. Sander- 
son's mother, who was a native of Whately, 
died at the age of forty-five years, having 
reared a family of six children. A Republi- 
can in politics, Mr. Sanderson has been solic- 
ited to accept town offices, but has invariably 
declined to serve in any public capacity. He 
was made a Mason by the Columbian Lodge of 
Walpole, N. H., in 1875, and now belongs to 
Republican Lodge of Greenfield. Both him- 
self and wife attend the Congregational church 
at South Deerfield. Mr. and Mrs. Sanderson 
have one son, Walter Whitney, a very bright 
and prepossessing lad of four years, who is the 
life of their home and the object of their lov- 
ing care and fondest hopes. 




BENEZER S. HULBERT, manufacturer 
of agricultural implements and cutlery 
at Bernardston, who served as a 
Union soldier in the Civil War of 1861-65, 
was born May 27, 1820, in Burlington, Otsego 
County, N. Y. , his parents being Ambrose and 
Elizabeth (Sheldon) Hulbert. The first of 
the family to come to this country was Will- 
iam Hulbert, who settled in Dorchester, 
Mass., in the year 1632. William was a 
blacksmith; and the trade has had representa- 
tives in the family in every generation down 
to the present day. 

Ambrose Hulbert, the father of Ebenezer 
S., was born in Bennington, Vt., in 1782; 
and his wife was born in Bernardston, Mass. 
Learning the trade of blacksmith of his father, 
he followed it through life, and acquired the 
reputation of being a first-class mechanic. 
He died at eighty-eight years of age, and his 
wife died between sixty-one and sixty-two 
years of age. They had six children who 
grew up, four of whom still live, Ebenezer 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



S. Hulbert being the eldest. Louisa died 
at seventy-two years of age; Charles G. Hul- 
bert is a farmer, living in Minnesota; Mary 
M., Mrs. Green, is living in Greenfield; Abby 
L. Hulbert lives in Burlington, N. Y. ; Eri B. 
Hulbert died on his way to California. 

Ebenezer S. Hulbert grew to manhood in 
Burlington, N.Y. , was educated in the public 
schools, and began when a boy of fifteen to 
learn the hereditary trade of blacksmith, living 
at home till he was twenty-eight years of age. 
After that he followed his vocation in various 
places in the State of New York and in Massa- 
chusetts. In 1849 the firm of S. A. Millard 
& Hulbert was formed to manufacture agricult- 
ural implements, the factory being located in 
Clayville, Oneida County, N.Y. In Decem- 
ber, 1852, Mr. Hulbert disposed of his inter- 
est in this concern, and moved to Bernardston, 
Franklin County, Mass., where he established 
himself in the same business at his present 
site. The whole plant which he now occupies 
was built with especial reference to the needs 
of his business, and is equipped with all neces- 
sary machinery for turning out first-class work. 
In addition to the manufacture of hoes and 
other garden tools, he began in 1882 the manu- 
facture of cutlery, a branch of his business 
that has proved very successful. He nrakes 
all kinds of butcher's tools, his factory having 
a capacity for turning out from twenty-five to 
thirty thousand dollars' worth of goods per 
year, and giving employment to from twenty 
to thirty men. 

Mr. Hulbert was married in December, 
1863, to Laura Burr, who was born in Maine 
in 1830. Two children were the fruit of this 
union, both daughters, one of whom, Helen 
Hulbert, died in infancy. The other, Julia 
B., is now the wife of Fred B. Dennison, of 
Bernardston, and mother of two sons, Harold 
and Robert. In the war of the Rebellion Mr. 



Hulbert enlisted in the Fifty-second Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteers, went to the 
front, took part in several battles, and was 
wounded while in the service by the explosion 
of a shell. He has been Selectman of his 
town for twelve years in succession, and has 
also served one year as Representative to the 
State legislature. He is a member of the 
Republican Lodge of A. F. & A. M., Green- 
field, and also of the Edwin E. Day Post, No. 
174, Grand Army of the Republic. 




iRS. MARY S. TODD WARNER, 
an intelligent and cultivated woman 
of pleasing social gifts, residing in 
Greenfield, is the widow of the late Volney 
D. Warner, who died at Montague City, 
Mass., October 20, 1890, at the age of 
seventy-one years. He was a son of Newton 
Warner, a native of Hampden County, Mass., 
but later a resident of Charlemont, Franklin 
County, who removed in 1840 to Montague, 
where it was then expected the county seat 
would be located. Newton Warner was a 
farmer by birth and breeding, and bought a 
large farm in that town; but this, with the 
exception of the old house and the newly 
erected residence, has recently passed out of 
the possession of the Warner family. 

The maiden name of his wife was Rachel 
Cobb; and, of the ten children born to them, 
four sons and four daughters lived to maturity, 
and two yet survive, namely: Newcomb 
Warner, an octogenarian, living at Charle- 
mont; and Minerva, widow of S. B. Wood, 
of Toledo, Ohio. Newton Warner, Jr., twin 
brother of Newcomb Warner, died in Charle- 
mont, at the age of sixty-nine years, leav- 
ing a family of five children. The Warners, 
as a family, have merited the respect of the 
community in which they have lived, being 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



197 



home - loving, refined, and of irreproachable 
character. 

Mrs. Warner was born in Charlemont, being 
a daughter of Uriah and the late Mary Ann 
(Waterman) Todd, long-time residents of that 
place, her father being now eighty-six years of 
age. Mr. Todd has from his early years been 
identified with the agricultural interests of 
this county, and is now spending the golden 
sunset of life on the old home farm, which is 
superintended by his son, Warren U. Todd, a 
man of sterling worth. One daughter, Beda 
A., died in the prime of womanhood; and one 
son, Chester E. Todd, died at the age of 
twenty-five years. Mrs. Todd passed from 
earth in December, 1890, at the advanced age 
of seventy-nine years. She was a woman 
much beloved, and of whom it may be truly 
said, none named her but to praise. The 
Todds were first represented on American soil, 
as the story goes, by two brothers, one of 
whom was very tall, and the other short in 
stature, who came from England to the United 
States in the early part of its settlement, Mrs. 
Warner's father, who was born in Connecticut, 
being descended from the former. Savage's 
Genealogical Dictionary mentions two of this 
name as early immigrants in New England, 
saying nothing of any known relationship be- 
tween them : John Todd, who came to Charles- 
town, Mass., in 1637, and later settled in 
Rowley; and Christopher, in 1639, an original 
settler of New Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. Warner is a woman of fine mental 
attainments, having received a good education 
in her youthful days, completing her studies at 
the Shelburne Falls Academy and at a select 
school, where she was fitted for a teacher. 
She exhibited rare ability in her profession, 
and during the twenty-seven terms that she 
taught previous to her marriage was eminently 
successful, being thorough in her instruction, 



and winning the approbation of her employers 
and the love of her pupils. She resigned her 
position to become the wife of Volney D. 
Warner, a man of firm and noble purpose, who 
began the battle of life without capital, and 
by sturdy industry and integrity succeeded far 
beyond his expectations, winning a compe- 
tency. The larger part of his estate he left to 
his widow, who had materially aided him by 
her loving sympathy, wise counsel, and cheer- 
ful co-operation. Their pleasant home life 
was not brightened by the prattle of children 
of their own; but they enjoyed the love and 
esteem of a world of friends, who sincerely 
mourn the loss of a worthy neighbor, and who 
entertain for Mrs. Warner most hearty esteem 
and good will. 




silOlCHAEL J. ATKINS, a well-known 
and highly respected citizen of Buck- 
land, Franklin County, Mass., a 
scarred and pensioned veteran of the Civil 
War, was born in County Clare, Ireland, Jan- 
uary 27, 1845, son of Bryan and Catherine 
(Sweeney) Atkins, both of whom were also 
natives of that place. Having grown to man- 
hood in Ireland, Bryan Atkins there worked 
at farming till 1848, when he came to Amer- 
ica, landing in Boston, from which place he 
went to Springfield, Mass., and there during 
the succeeding year engaged in stone and 
masonry work. He then went to Leyden, 
Mass., in the employ of the railroad company, 
and thence to Shelburne Falls, where, as a 
mason, he assisted in the construction of some 
of the buildings now used by the cutlery manu- 
factory. He continued to work in Shelburne 
Falls until he was sixty-five years of age, after 
which he retired from active labor, and passed 
the remainder of his life in that town, at his 
home on School Street. He died there in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1883, at seventy-one years of age. He and 
his wife, Catherine Sweeney Atkins, had six 
sons and three daughters, as follows: John 
(deceased), Bridget, John (deceased), Edward 
(deceased), Michael J., Mary, James, Will- 
iam, and Kate (deceased). The mother died 
in 1886, at sixty-five years of age. In religion 
both parents were of the Catholic faith. 

Michael J. Atkins received a good practical 
education in the schools of Shelburne Falls. 
At twelve years of age he commenced to work 
in the cutlery manufactory during his vaca- 
tions, and continued in that employment until 
1863, when he enlisted in Company B of 
the First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, and 
went to the front to tight for the Union. 
On May 19, 1864, he received a severe wound 
in his thigh, and, being unable to make his 
escape, was captured by the enemy, who took 
him to Andersonville Prison, from thence to 
Mellen Prison, from which he made his escape, 
joining Sherman's army at Goldsboro, N.C., 
finally reaching Washington, D. C, April 7, 
1865. At Washington he obtained a furlough ; 
but, on reaching home, he was taken ill with 
typhoid pneumonia, and on account of his 
weak condition it was six weeks before he was 
able to return to his post. He received his 
honorable discharge at Boston, in June, 1865. 
As soon as he was able he resumed his work in 
the cutlery manufactory, and is still employed 
there. He also draws a pension for the inju- 
ries he received in the war. 

On January i, 1869, Mr. Atkins was united 
in marriage with Miss Anna Gallagher, who 
was born June 28, 1850, daughter of John and 
Jane (Clinton) Gallagher. Both her parents 
were born in County Mayo, Ireland, from 
which place they came to America, settling 
in Windsor, Vt. , where the father became a 
progressive and prosperous agriculturist. He 
died at fifty-one years of age; but his wife is 



still living, now, 1895, at the age of seventy- 
five years. Their children were: Patrick, 
Alice, John, Mary, Anna, Jennie, and Kate. 
The union of Mr. and Mrs. Atkins has been 
blessed by the birth of twelve children, eight 
sons and four daughters, of whom a brief rec- 
ord is as follows: William F., born September 
27, 1869, married Miss Mary Tehan, and re- 
sides at Shelburne Falls: he is a mechanic, 
and has one child, — Lillian M. ; Joseph E., 
born July 4, 1871, resides at home; John, born 
February 18, 1875, died in August, 1875; 
Jennie C. was born September 10, 1877; 
Henry M., born December 4, 1879; George 
B., born November 12, 1881 ; Mary E., born 
March 7, 1883; Charles F., born November 
5, 1884; Anna M., born June 5, 1887; Alice 
M., born October 16, 1889; Paul E., born 
December 16, 1891 ; and John P., born De- 
cember 31, 1892. 

Mr. Atkins is an independent politician. 
He has rendered acceptable service as Select- 
man for four terms, and is now Assessor of the 
fire district. He is a member of Azro Miller 
Post, No. 93, Grand Army of the Republic. 
Mr. Atkins and his wife are consistent mem- 
bers of the Catholic church. They reside on 
Wellington Street, on what was formerly the 
Fellows homestead, which has beautiful ter- 
raced grounds and fine shade trees ; and he also 
owns the vacant lot adjoining. 




LBERT B. WARNER, a practical agri- 
culturist, contributing his full share 
toward sustaining and extending the 
great farming interests of Franklin County, is 
pleasantly situated in Bernardston, where he 
owns one of the many fine farms for which 
this locality is noted. He was born on his 
present homestead April 9, 1853; and his 
father, Otis Warner, was born on the same 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



199 



farm, August 27, 1800. This property has 
been in the possession of the Warner family 
for a full century, Pliny Warner, the grand- 
father of Mr. Albert B., having bought it 
while it was yet in its original wildness, he 
being one of the comparatively early settlers 
of the town. He was a man of exceeding 
energy and industry, and cleared a large farm, 
on which he and his worthy helpmate spent 
their remaining years. Here they reared their 
family of five sons and two daughters, all of 
whom have joined the silent majority on the 
other shore. 

Otis Warner finally became owner of a por- 
tion of the old homestead, which, as a boy, he 
had helped redeem from the wilderness. He 
was a thrifty farmer, and made many fine im- 
provements on the place during his long life of 
eighty-two years. He died February 19, 
1882. His sound sense and good judgment 
on matters connected with the government of 
the town were recognized by his fellow-citi- 
zens, who called him to serve as Selectman and 
to fill other responsible positions. By his 
first wife, Eunice Felton, he had one daughter, 
Carrie M., who lives in Franklin, Vt. His 
second wife, whose maiden name was Mary M. 
Brown, was born March 12, 18 19, in the town 
of Guilford, Vt. She lives on the old home- 
stead, and still retains the mental and physical 
vigor that characterized her younger days. 
She has two sons and three daughters, namely : 
Augusta F., now a resident of Hatfield, Mass. ; 
Mary D. and Lucy H., living at home; Emer- 
son G., residing at Brattleboro, Vt. ; and 
Albert B. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on 
the home farm, and acquired his education in 
the schools of his native town, which are 
among the best in the county. Always indus- 
trious and capable as a lad, he was intrusted 
with the care of the farm when only seventeen 



years old, and has managed it from that time 
until the present day. He is one of the most 
extensive land-owners in the vicinity, possess- 
ing about three hundred acres, and has met 
with merited success, being in many respects 
a model farmer. Mr. Warner has a valuable 
dairy, consisting of thirty cows, and also pays 
some attention to stock-raising, finding both 
profitable. He has continually added to the 
improvements on the estate, having substantial 
buildings and all the modern conveniences for 
carrying on his work after the most approved 
methods. Following in the footsteps of his 
ancestors as regards religion and politics, Mr. 
Warner is liberal in his views oh the first sub- 
ject, and a steadfast Republican in the latter. 
In local affairs he has been quite prominent, 
having been Selectman two terms, besides 
holding minor offices, and is now Chairman of 
the Law and Order League of Bernardston, 
which was incorporated in 1894, and is one 
of the most active in promoting the welfare of 
the town. 

On December 11, 1878, Mr. Warner was 
united in marriage with Miss Carrie J. Deni- 
son ; and their union has been brightened by 
the birth of one child, Breta M. Warner. 
Mrs. Warner was born in Leyden, being a 
daughter of Captain Edward and Elizabeth E. 
(Hapgood) Denison. Her grandfather, Ed- 
ward Denison, an early settler and one of the 
first tavern-keepers in the place, cleared a farm 
on which his children were born, and which 
was subsequently owned and carried on by his 
son. Captain Edward Denison. Captain Deni- 
son was born on the old homestead in Leyden, 
in 1800, being one of the five children of his 
parents, Edward and Ruey (Babcock) Denison. 
After becoming possessor of the homestead 
property, the Captain bought adjoining land, 
increasing its acreage to three hundred acres, 
and remodelled the old tavern, which is to-day 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in good repair, and is one of the oldest resi- 
dences in Leyden. He was a liberal in relig- 
ion, an uncompromising Democrat in politics, 
and one of the influential men of the place, 
being Selectman and serving in various other 
offices. He died on the old homestead, aged 
seventy-nine years. His widow, who was born 
April 15, 1814, in Putney, Vt., makes her 
home with her daughter, Mrs. Ellen Sawyer, 
in Leyden. They reared eight children, as 
follows : Mrs. Frances Newcomb, of Leyden ; 
Mrs. Maria Howe, of Iowa; Edward H. Deni- 
son, of Leyden; Mrs. Ellen Sawyer; Mrs. 
Marion Ashcroft, of Whately ; Mrs. Eva 
Ware, of Northfield ; George Denison, of Ley- 
den; and Carrie J., Mrs. Albert B. Warner. 



7TAHARLES M. DUNCAN, M.D., whos'e 
I jr sudden death on October 4, 1884, was 
^,l£_^ a sad loss to the town of Shelburne, 
was an eminent and beloved physician, who 
had been successfully engaged in the practice 
of his profession for upward of half a century. 
He was born July i, 1808, at Dummerston, 
Vt., being a son of Dr. Abel and Lydia 
(Miller) Duncan. 

Dr. Abel Duncan, a son of Abel Duncan, 
Sr. , was a native of Massachusetts, born Feb- 
ruary 22, 1772, at Petersham, where his early 
years were spent. After fitting himself for 
the ijrofession of medicine, he opened his 
office at Dummerston, and in the few years of 
his active life which followed became widely 
known as a physician of skill and man of 
entire integrity, with a large heart. He died 
of spotted fever during the epidemic of 1813. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Lydia 
Miller, was born November 8, 1778, in Dum- 
merston, and died May i, 1869, at Shelburne. 
Three children were born of their union, 
namely: Charles M., the subject of this brief 



mention; Fanny M., born June 22, 1810, now 
the widow of Joel Knight, of Dummerston; 
and Lydia Evelyn, who was born August i, 
1 81 3, married Marshall Newton, and died Jan- 
uary IS, 1834. 

Charles M. Duncan grew to manhood in his 
Vermont home, being reared on a farm and re- 
ceiving the rudiments of his education in the 
district schools. His mother was a woman of 
superior character and intelligence, and no 
doubt aided in fostering the lad's love for 
learning. He was fitted for college at a select 
school in Brattleboro, subsequently leaving the 
home farm to become a student at Bowdoin 
College in Brunswick, Me., attending lectures 
at the Maine Medical School and graduating 
from there in 1833. He afterward took a full 
course of lectures at the Harvard Medical 
School, among his classmates there being Dr. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes, the witty, wise, and 
revered poet and citizen. After receiving his 
diploma, Dr. Duncan came to this county, 
settling in Shelburne in 1834. He was well 
prepared for his profession, and by his practi- 
cal ability, watchful care of his patients, and 
warm-hearted and generous sympathy won the 
confidence and patronage as well as the friend- 
ship of a host of people, including the best and 
most intelligent citizens of Shelburne and the 
neighboring towns. He was specially fond of 
children, and readily won their love and confi- 
dence. Although for some years prior to his 
decease he had suffered from a heart trouble 
which might at any minute loosen the silver 
cord that bound him to earth, yet he attended 
to his professional duties until the day upon 
which he was stricken; and his sudden death 
was a shock to his family and friends, and a 
profound sorrow to the entire community. 

On August 28, 1833, Dr. Charles M. Dun- 
can was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda 
Esterbrook, a native of Brattleboro, Vt., born 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



March 17, 1810, daughter of John Esterbrook. 
The home life that followed was long and 
filled with happiness, the golden anniversary 
of their wedding, August 28, 1883, being a 
joyous occasion. Two daughters were the 
fruit of their union. The eldest of these, 
Mrs. Fanny L. Mitchell, born March 2, 1840, 
resides in Shelburne Centre, and has one son, 
Morris Duncan Mitchell. The younger, Mrs. 
-Sarah M. Smead, born February 9, 1845, has 
been twice married. Her only son, Charles 
L. Upton, a graduate of Amherst College, 
1 891, married Catherine Griswold, of Turner's 
Falls, and is now a student in the medical 
department of the University of Pennsylvania. 
Dr. Duncan was closely and actively inter- 
ested in the welfare and advancement of the 
community in which he lived, being one of its 
most progressive citizens, and ever willing to 
encourage and aid all beneficial projects. In 
politics he was a firm Democrat, and served as 
Town Clerk and Treasurer for nearly twoscore 
years, and was also a member of the School 
Committee. He was prominent in medical 
circles, belonging both to the Massachusetts 
Medical Society and to the Franklin District 
Medical Society. Was a Mason, was a mem- 
ber of Greenfield Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and 
was also a Knight Templar: he likewise be- 
longed to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. The high esteem in which he was held 
by his brother physicians and Masons, as well 
as by his many other friends, was clearly shown 
by the large concourse of people that gathered 
at the village church on that beautiful October 
day to pay their last tribute of respect and af- 
fection, afterward following the remains to the 
Arms Cemetery, where the Knights conducted 
their impressive service over their departed 
brother. The Doctor was liberal in his views 
of religion, and generous in his contributions 
toward the support of religious organizations. 




iRS. NANCY A. CHAPIN, who 
owns and occupies one of the finest 
farms in Gill, beautifully situated 
near the Connecticut River, a part of the 
estate left by her husband, the late Eliphas 
Lyman Chapin, was born in this town April 
19, 1820, daughter of Horatio and Eunice 
(Davis) Roberts. Her father was also a native 
of Gill, born July 25, 1789, son of Ebenezer 
and Submit (Brooks) Roberts, and grandson of 
John Roberts, a farmer who removed to Gill 
with his family from St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Ebenezer Roberts died in Gill on February 
17, 1832, having carried on for a number of 
years a farm owned by his wife's father, Dan- 
iel Brooks, one of the early settlers, who had 
a quarter section of land. 

Horatio Roberts was the fourth in a family 
of seven children. He lived at the parental 
home till his marriage, when he purchased a 
farm near by, on which he resided for a num- 
ber of years; but in the latter part of his life 
he removed to East Charlemont, in the western 
part of the county. He died in 1S64. His 
wife, Eunice, was the daughter of Joseph and 
Azubah (Morton) Davis, of Guilford, Vt., 
where she was born, July 23, 1797. Her 
father was a carpenter and joiner by trade, and 
was a soldier of the Revolution. Mrs. Chapin 
remembers sitting on the knee of her grand- 
father Davis, when she was a child, and 
listening to the stories of the war. The 
grandmother, Mrs. Azubah Morton Davis, 
daughter of David and Mary Morton, outliving 
her husband, received a pension in her old age. 
She died at the home of her son-in-law, Mrs. 
Chapin' s father, in 1846, aged eighty-six 
years. Horatio and Eunice D. Roberts were 
the parents of nine daughters, of whom seven 
are still living, namely: Nancy Azubah, Mrs. 
Chapin; Rhoda, Mrs. Alonzo Thayer; Calista, 
who is Mrs. B. Rice, of East Charlemont; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Martha, widow of Horace Patterson, of East 
Charlemont; Esther, who married Edwin Bod- 
well, of Shelburne Falls; Jane O. , Mrs. David 
Thayer, of East Charlemont ; and Marinda, 
widow of David Fisk, of Springfield, Mass. 
The mother united with the Congregational 
church in 1821 ; and her last days were passed 
in East Charlemont, where she died March 9, 
1864. 

Nancy A. Roberts in her girlhood acquired 
a limited education in the district school. 
This, however, was but the beginning, not the 
finish, as she has continued to keep her mental 
faculties in healthful activity, and with the 
usual happy results. Early desiring to be use- 
fully employed and to have the means of self- 
support, she learned the trade of a tailoress, at 
which she became a skilful worker. She was 
married October 25, 1844, to Eliphas Lyman 
Chapin, who was born in Gill, April i, 1815, 
son of Ebenezer Chapin, the father being an 
early settler who came here from Mendon, 
Mass., and settled on a farm, where he spent 
his life, rearing a large family of children. 
Eliphas L. Chapin subsequently became the 
owner of the Chapin farm, on which he and 
his wife, resided some twenty-five years, and 
then came to "The Old Purple Homestead," 
the present home of Mrs. Chapin, where he 
died June 23, 1890, at the age of seventy-five. 

Three children of Mr. and Mrs. Chapin 
grew to maturity, only one of whom is now 
living, namely: Edward Sumner Chapin, born 
November 16, 1857, who married Sarah Can- 
ning, and has two children, Harold C. and 
Edward Radcliff. He is engaged with a busi- 
ness firm in Boston, and resides with his fam- 
ily in Cambridge. Ellen L. Chapin, only 
daughter, born September 30, 1845, who was 
educated in Bernardston and became a teacher, 
died November 20, 1874. Frank Wells, the 
elder son, born January 15, 1850, married 



Lizzie E. Graves, of Guilford, and died Octo- 
ber 31, 1886, leaving two children — LeFor- 
rest Earle and Winfred Ernest. He had 
stayed on the Chapin homestead, taking charge 
of it after the removal of his parents to the 
Roswell Purple place. 



AMES M. HALE, a well-known farmer 
and life-long citizen of Bernardston, 
was born in this town. May 5, 1833, son 
of Israel Porter and Auralia (Cushman) Hale, 
the father having been born in Bernardston in 
1807, and the mother in Greenfield in 1804. 
Mr. Hale's grandfather, Israel Hale, who was 
born May 8, 1766, was generally known 
throughout this region as "Leftenant " Hale, 
being in the State militia and left-handed, to 
which peculiarity the popular pronunciation of 
his title was supposed to have reference. He 
came from Connecticut with his father when a 
lad of nine, and was one of the first settlers 
in Bernardston. He learned farming, and in 
company with his brother acquired a large 
tract of land situated on the present site of 
Bernardston, where he erected the residence 
now owned by Alanson P. Hale. He was a 
large, well-built man, weighing two hundred 
and five pounds, unusually strong and vigor- 
ous, and was both sociable and genial. Strict 
and upright and honorable in his intercourse 
with others, he was held in high esteem by 
his neighbors; and many of the older residents 
of Bernardston to-day remember him as a 
good citizen and a warm friend. He was a 
Unitarian and liberal supporter of the church 
and other benevolences. In politics he was 
a Whig. He died August 25, 1850, on the 
farm now owned by his grandson, Alanson P. 
Hale, at the age of eighty-four years. He 
was twice married. His first wife, Jemima, 
was born December 31, 1764. The name of 




CHARLES SHEPARD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



205 



his second wife was Elizabeth. His five 
children, all by his first wife, were as follows: 
John, George, Joseph P., Israel P., and Phi- 
lander, four of whom grew to manhood. 

Israel Porter Hale, son of Lieutenant Israel 
Hale, became the owner of the old homestead 
in Bernardston, and followed the business of 
general farming to the end of his days. For 
several years he held the office of Selectman, 
and he also had in charge the settlement of 
various large and small estates. He and his 
wife were noted for their hospitality, and both 
were members of the Unitarian society. He 
was a Republican in politics. He died on the 
old home farm. May 29, 1883, at the age of 
seventy-si.\ years, his wife surviving him over 
nine years, dying July 24, 1892, at the ad- 
vanced age of nearly eighty-nine years. They 
had four children, all of whom are now living, 
namely: Huldah, wife of S. B. Slade, of 
Greenfield, born November 6, 1831 ; James 
Monroe Hale, the subject of this biographical 
mention; Alanson P., born March 23, 1835; 
and Loretta A., now the wife of Hiram 
Norton. 

James M. Hale, having spent the early years 
of his life in securing an education in the dis- 
trict schools of Bernardston and in Goodell 
Academy, remained at home, attending to farm 
work and taking care of his parents as they 
gradually came to feel the infirmities of age. 
Mr. Hale has been a general farmer all his 
life, and now owns about one hundred acres of 
the old farm, where, in connection with his 
general farming, he carries on a fine dairy. 
All the buildings and improvements that 
to-day make it a beautiful home have been 
added by his untiring energy. Mr. Hale's 
success in farming is due in great measure to 
the fact that he is not afraid of hard work. 

In 1856, on January i, he married Janette 
S. Slate, who was born in Bernardston, April 



27, 1834, daughter of Seorem B. and So- 
phronia P. (Snow) Slate. Mr. Slate was born 
in Bernardston, September 5, 1801, and his 
wife in the same town, July 5, 1803. He was 
a successful farmer and prominent citizen, and 
for a number of years Selectman, being at the 
time of his death a supporter of the Demo- 
cratic party. Mr. and Mrs. Slate were both 
members of the Unitarian church. She died 
January it, 1856, and he on March 6, 1866. 
They had seven children, three of whom, Mi- 
nerva P., Ellen P., and Sheldon S., are de- 
ceased. Seorem B. , Jr., a retired farmer, who 
has held many public offices, resides in Green- 
field. Janette S., as mentioned above, is the 
wife of James M. Hale. Julia S. became the 
wife of A. P. Hale, and resides in Bernardston 
with her husband. The other son is George 
P. Slate, a farmer, living in Hinsdale, N. H. 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Hale have no chil- 
dren. They are both members of the Unita- 
rian societ}', and Mr. Hale is a Republican in 
politics. 

J-xR. CHARLES SHEPARD, of 
=^ Whately, is a clairvoyant physician, 
^jy well known in this locality for his 
successful treatment of many serious cases. 
His birth occurred in the town of Alstead, 
Cheshire County, N.H., on February 17, 
1838; and he is a son of Gardner Shepard, a 
native of the same town, whose father, Simeon 
Shepard, moved into the State from Connecti- 
cut, and settled as a pioneer on a tract of wild 
land in Alstead. Grandfather Shepard died 
when he was about seventy years old. 

Gardner Shepard was reared to an agricult- 
ural life; but, after attaining his majority, he 
entered mercantile business, which he carried 
on with good success for several years, and 
then returned to the old homestead, where he 
resided until called to lay down the burden of 



:o6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



life, in his seventy-first year. By his first 
marriage he had three children, two of whom 
died in early childhood, and the other survived 
until a few years ago. His second wife, Sarah 
Merrifield, of Marlboro, Vt. , became the 
mother of nine children, of whom but three 
survive, namely: Susan, who married Oliver 
Shepard ; Sumner G. ; and Dr. Charles Shep- 
ard, of Whately. Mrs. Sarah M. Shepard 
passed into the spirit life at Alstead, N. H., 
aged sixty-one years. Although she and her 
husband were formerly adherents of the Ortho- 
dox Congregational faith, in their later years 
they became thoroughly converted to modern 
Spiritualism. 

Charles Shepard received his education in 
his native town, passing through both the com- 
mon schools and the high, and resided with his 
parents at the old homestead while they lived. 
At the age of twenty-two years he first became 
aware of the healing power with which nature 
had endowed him ; and he immediately began 
to use it in his neighborhood, with results 
which were not only of exceedingly great 
benefit to many sufferers, but in some in- 
stances quite remarkable and entirely unac- 
countable. He continued in active practice 
at Alstead until failing health made it advis- 
able for him to seek for a time a more mild 
and salubrious climate; and the winters of 
1878, 1880, and 1882 were passed by him in 
Florida. 

In 1875 he came to Franklin County, Mas- 
sachusetts, and, after boarding for some time 
in South Deerfield, moved to his present resi- 
dence, which is one of the most pleasant local- 
ities upon the river. His farm, which he 
rents, consists of about thirty-six acres of 
fertile land, thirty-one of which are under cul- 
tivation, and the rest covered with small tim- 
ber. He still continues to practise, and has 
effected many permanent cures in this locality, 



having been successful in some cases from 
which physicians of the regular schools were 
forced to retire. In religious matters Dr. 
Shepard is of the liberal school of thought, 
and in politics is strictly independent, always 
seeking to support the candidates whom he 
considers the most able and qualified to hold 
office. To him modern Spiritualism is a fact; 
and he not only does not hesitate to proclaim 
his sincere belief in the mysterious power of 
which he is a living exponent, but always de- 
fends and explains it whenever an opportunity 
presents itself for him to do so. A good like- 
ness of Dr. Shepard graces another page of the 
review. 



m 



,OLLIN P. WHIPPLE, a wide-awake, 
lergetic, high-minded business man, 
:s an extensive dealer in stoves, fur- 
naces, and plumbing supplies, his store being 
located on Miles Street in the village of 
Greenfield. He was born in March, 1842, at 
Windsor Locks, Conn., within a short distance 
of Warehouse Point, where his father, Joseph 
Whipple, was born in 1819. 

The latter was left an orphan at the early 
age of seven years, being the youngest of a 
family of three sons and two daughters thus 
bereaved. He began the use of tools at an 
early period of his life, exhibiting the genius 
of a natural mechanic ; and, being bound out 
to a man who was interested in his welfare, he 
had learned the blacksmith's trade before he 
was sixteen years old, and two years later 
he had charge of a shop. In 1837 he and his 
brother Henry went to New Jersey, where he 
took a job of making picks, and, being a very 
rapid and skilful workman, was soon earning 
three dollars a day, while the other men were 
making but two-thirds of that sum. He 
was very ingenious, and won the reputation 
of being able to make anything composed of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



207 



iron or steel, his specialty being the man- 
ufacturing and relaying of axes and edged 
tools. His first wife was Eveline C. Pinney, 
whom he married at Windsor Locks, January 
I, I 84 1. 

One year of their wedded life they spent at 
New Jersey, and one year at Springfield, 
Mass., the remainder being passed at Windsor 
Locks, where the death of Mrs. Eveline C. P. 
Whipple occurred in 1862. She left five 
children, namely: Rollin P., of whom we 
write; Isadora, wife of F. G. Strickland, of 
Poquonock, Conn., and the mother of four chil- 
dren; F^veline C, widow of Julius Chapman, 
of Windsor Locks, who at his death left 
three sons; Ida, who married Harris Hatha- 
way, and, dying in middle life, left three chil- 
dren; and Lillia T. (Mrs. L. A. Morand), of 
'Windsor Locks, who has one child. Joseph 
Whipple subsequently married Jane Shepard ; 
and he lived until February, 1891, when his 
body was laid to rest in the Windsor Locks 
cemetery. Few have had more earthly friends 
than he, and few are more deserving, he having 
been a man of purity and honesty, firm in his 
convictions and fearless in their expression. 
In politics he was a stanch Democrat; and 
besides having been for many years a Select- 
man, Assessor for a score of years, and a Con- 
stable when the position required an officer of 
nerve and courage, he twice represented his 
district in the State legislature. 

Rollin P. Whipple early showed an inclina- 
tion for the blacksmith's trade, and when a 
lad began to strike for his father, spending 
much of his leisure time when out of school in 
the shop. He remained at home until 1871, 
when he came to Greenfield as agent for the 
Weed sewing machines, which he had then 
handled for two years, making large sales. In 
the fall of 1876, desiring to be established in 
some permanent business, Mr. Whipple em- 



barked in the hardware trade, forming a 
copartnership with M. L. Farnsworth, with 
whom he was engaged for two years, carrying 
on a successful business under the firm name 
of Farnsworth & Whipple. In 1878 Mr. 
Whipple purchased his partner's interest, and 
has since that time continued alone, being a 
leading dealer in his line of goods, with 
a firmly established and completely stocked 
store, vying in its appointments with any 
similar plant in the place. The marriage of 
Mr. Whipple with Mary E. Squire, the daugh- 
ter of J. R. Squire, of Monson, was solem- 
nized October 4, 1871 ; and their home has 
been enlivened by the birth of two daughters, 
Grace and I'lorence, accomplished and winning 
young ladies, the elder being a student of art; 
and the younger, who is a pupil in the high 
school, bidding fair to excel in music, being 
gifted with a sweet and strong soprano voice. 
Having been rocked in a Democratic cradle, 
Mr. Whipple is an advocate of the political 
faith in which he was reared, and has served 
his fellow-townsmen as W'ater Commissioner. 
He is well advanced in Masonry, being a 
Knight Templar; and he attends and supports 
the Congregational church, of which Mrs. 
Whipple is an active member. In 1887 the 
family moved into their present residence, at 
No. 45 High Street, which was built by James 
Vick's son, and has a firm foundation, resting 
on the solid rock, being one of the finest and 
most commodious dwellings in the vicinity, 
and a delightful place to visit as well as a 
beautiful home to live in. 



r^B ,RS. JULIA AMIDON BROWN- 
ING, a highly respected resident 
of Rowe, Franklin County, Mass., 
is the widow of Arthur Browning, who was a 
successful jeweller and a popular and much 




2 08 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



esteemed citizen of this town. Mr. Browning 
was a son of Horace and Catherine (Wells) 
Browning. Horace Browning came to Rowe 
from Rhode Island, his native State, and here 
worked at his trade as a carpenter, erecting 
buildings and always making improvements. 
His wife's father. Colonel Noah Wells, who 
was an early settler of Rowe, purchased and 
cleared a large tract of land, and became a 
prominent citizen of the town, living to an 
advanced age. Horace and Catherine (Wells) 
Browning here spent their wedded life, both 
dying at the age of sixty years. He was a 
Republican in politics, and rendered accept- 
able service as a member of the School 
Committee. In religious belief he was a 
Unitarian. They were the parents of ten 
children, of whom two died in infancy. The 
others are : Wells, Sarah, Frederick, Arthur, 
Katie, George, John, Nellie. 

Arthur Browning, whose birth occurred in 
Rowe on January 6, 1843, remained at home 
during his youth, receiving his education in 
the schools of his native town. He then went 
to Greenfield, where he learned the jeweller's 
trade, at which he worked until September 9, 
1862, in the second year of the Southern Re- 
bellion, when he enlisted in Company A of 
the Fifty-second Massachusetts Regiment, and 
served one year. Not being very strong, his 
health gave out; and he was then obliged to 
return home to his father's. It was restored 
under influence of the pure mountain air. 
Later on he went to Northampton, where he 
was successfully engaged at his trade several 
years ; and he was afterward employed in 
Boston in the same line. He died on May 2, 
1882, at the early age of thirty-nine years. 
In political affiliation he was a Republican, 
and was a member of a post of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. His marriage with 
Miss Julia F. Amidon was solemnized Sep- 



tember 2, 1872; and their union was blessed 
by the birth of a son, Frederick A., born Jan- 
uary 20, 187s, who is now a clerk for B. T. 
Henry in a general store at Rowe, and is well 
educated and a promising young man. 

Julia F. Amidon was born in Rowe, being 
a daughter of Daniel and Mary (Fuller) Ami- 
don, who were highly respected people of this 
town, where her father was a prosperous farmer. 
Daniel Amidon was the son of Solomon Ami- 
don, and the brother of Lucy, Roger, Joseph, 
Solomon, Harry, and Elbert, all of whom 
lived to a ripe age, some even to the advanced 
age of ninety. Harry Amidon, now, 1895, 
eighty-six, is the only surviving member of 
this large family. Mr. E. E. Amidon, an 
uncle of these brothers, now aged seventy-four, 
lives with his niece, Mrs. Julia Browning. 
He has always been an important business man 
in town, owning and running the village store 
for forty years. He is a man of fine judgment, 
and much respected and beloved by all who 
know him. There is much that could be said 
of the Amidon family: many pages might be 
filled in telling of their honesty and upright- 
ness of character and benevolent disposition. 
They could be relied on as stanch helpers 
in all good works, and were Republican in 
politics. 

Mrs. Browning resides in the village of 
Rowe; and during the summer season her 
pleasant home is filled with city boarders, to 
whom she has proved herself a most agree- 
able and satisfactory hostess. She is a well- 
read and highly intelligent woman, capable in 
business, and an active worker in charity and 
in other matters pertaining to the welfare of 
the community, holding as a consistent Unita- 
rian — she and her son being members of that 
church, as was her husband — that "practical 
religion is summed up in love to God and love 
to man. ' ' 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



209 




iDWARD F. REECE, manufacturer of 
taps, dies, and screw plates, has been 
identified with the business interests 
of Greenfield for nearly a quarter of a century, 
and is well known throughout this part of 
Franklin County as an upright and honorable 
man in his dealings. He was born in Bir- 
mingham, England, which is noted for the 
extent and excellence of its hardware manu- 
factures, in 1842, and is a son of Joseph 
Reece, a native of the same place, who was 
born in 1805. 

Joseph Reece was the youngest of a family 
of six sons, four or five of whom were soldiers 
in the British arm}', and fought against Napo- 
leon, two being in the battle of Waterloo, 
where one was shot in the neck. Two or 
three of his brothers were under the command 
of the Duke of Wellington during the Penin- 
sular campaign, and were with him at the 
storming of Badajos, April 6, 1812. Joseph 
married Elizabeth Tucker, a native of Ches- 
ter, England, whose father was an officer in 
the British army, under Wellington. In 1847 
they emigrated to America, having a very 
quick passage of thirty days, in the good ship 
"Constitution." They came over here with 
means of their own, the father having sold out 
his machine-shop at Birmingham before leav- 
ing. He had much natural mechanical in- 
genuity; and, while serving his apprenticeships 
of seven years each at the jeweller's trade and 
as a machinist, he made several valuable in- 
ventions, among them being the hook and eye 
machine, which finished one hundred and 
twenty-five hooks per minute. He was also 
the first to make the composition button with 
an eye, at Florence, Mass. 

After his arrival in Massachusetts he was 
at first a little homesick and discouraged, and 
had serious thoughts of returning to England 
with his family, but fortunately met with 



A. P. Critchlow, for whom he worked some 
years in the shop at Florence, and later at his 
home, making numerous practical inventions, 
one being the round steel belt hook for the 
prevention of friction. He continued in active 
work at Florence until his decease, in 1868. 
His widow outlived him many years, dying in 
1891, at the advanced age of eighty-six years. 
They reared a family of six sons and three 
daughters, of whom Lucretia died at the age of 
nineteen years, in New York City; and James, 
the youngest son, who learned his trade of 
tool-making of the father, died at East Hamp- 
ton, Mass., in 1888, aged forty-one years, 
leaving a widow and four children. The liv- 
ing are: William Alfred, a retired tool manu- 
facturer, residing in Florence; Virginius J., a 
resident of Greenfield; Reuben G. , a well- 
to-do farmer in Williamsburg, formerly a 
tool-maker for the Wiley & Russell Company, 
now a widower, his wife having died in Green- 
field ; Edward F., of whom we write; and 
Henry, a retired tool-maker, of Florence. 

Although he had but a limited amount of 
schooling during his youthful days, Mr. Reece 
is well informed on all the leading subjects of 
the day, having been a continuous student and 
a reader of the best books of the time. He 
early developed the mechanical ability which 
he had inherited, and since ten years of age 
has worked as a mechanic or machinist, having 
been for six years employed as a tool-maker for 
the Florence Sewing Machine Company, in 
which his father-in-law, Carlos Humphrey, 
was interested. In 1870 Mr. Reece came to 
Greenfield, and in company with his brother, 
Virginius J. Reece, established the manufact- 
ure of screw plates, on which they have three 
valuable patents. In 1889 Mr. Reece sold his 
interest in the factory to his partner; but four- 
teen months later, owing to the ill-health of 
his brother, he bought the entire business 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and has an excellent trade. The factory was 
erected in 1881. It is situated on the corner 
of Wells and Devens Streets, and gives em- 
ployment to about six or seven men, the prod- 
ucts being sold principally through the New 
York and Boston jobbers, one man being em- 
ployed at each end of the line. 

On August 29, 1867, at Northampton, Mr. 
Reece was married to Addie E. Humphrey, 
daughter of Carlos Humphrey. The two chil- 
dren born to them are well settled in life. 
Their son, Edward J., a mechanic at Orange, 
Mass., is married, and has one daughter. 
Their other child, Maud H., is the wife of 
Edward Wilbur, of Greenfield. Mr. Reece is 
held in deserved esteem as a loyal and useful 
citizen of his adopted city, and both he and his 
good wife are valued members of the Baptist 
church. 



7TAARL E. DAVENPORT, a prosperous 
I ]| farmer of Colerain, was born in that 

vi? ^ town, July 22, 1852, son of Edward 
Davenport, Jr., and Marietta (Maxam) Daven- 
port, and grandson of the Rev. Edward and 
Lurena (Andrews) Davenport. (For an ex- 
tended account of the Davenport family, see 
the sketch of the life of Jonathan E. Daven- 
port, on another page of this volume.) The 
Rev. Edward was born in Dorchester, Mass., 
September 6, 1774. The greater part of his 
mature life was spent in Colerain; and the 
time not devoted to the duties of his calling 
as a minister of the gospel of the Baptist faith 
was spent in agricultural pursuits. He was a 
well-educated man for his day, and, being 
energetic and persevering, commanded success 
in all he undertook. He died December 8, 
1863, at the age of eighty-nine. His wife, 
the grandmother of our subject, was born 
March i, 1792, in Ashfield, Mass., and was 
the mother of several children. 



Edward Davenport, Jr., was born in Cole- 
rain, March 8, 181 7, and there grew to man- 
hood, getting a fair education in the common 
schools of the town. He was a thrifty farmer, 
and accumulated considerable property, his 
real estate comprising about one hundred and 
sixty acres. In 1847 or 1848 he bought the 
farm which is still in the family, and here he 
resided until his death, on May 5, 1883. Mr. 
Davenport in his latter years, after the disso- 
lution of the Whig party, voted the Repub- 
lican ticket. On May 8, 1849, he married 
Marietta Maxam, daughter of John and Mari- 
etta (Dwight) Maxam, who was born in Cole- 
rain, September 7, 1826. John Maxam was 
a carpenter, who conducted a farm for his fam- 
ily needs, and lived in Colerain the greater 
part of his life, having been born here in 
1796, and passing away at the age of seventy- 
three. His wife, a native of Williamsburg, 
born in 1800, lived to be a little over seventy. 
Mr. Maxam was a Republican in politics, and 
he and his wife were members of the Baptist 
church. They had four children, daughters, 
two of whom are deceased. Cordelia, wife of 
Theodore Galer, a soldier in the late war, who 
died in Andersonville, died at the age of forty- 
two; and Prudence, the wife of J. B. Daven- 
port, passed away when sixty years of age. 
The living are: Mrs. Juliette Walden, a resi- 
dent of Colerain ; and Marietta, Mrs. Daven- 
port. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Davenport, Jr., 
were members of the Baptist church. They 
had three children, as follows : John E. , born 
October 25, 1850, a farmer, married April 7, 
1878, to Ada Donalson, born July 6, 1854, 
daughter of Samuel and Louisa Donalson, of 
Colerain, and living in Colerain ; Carl E. ; 
and Rena M., born February 8, 1861, wife of 
Professor W. F. Lamb, residing in New York 
City, who has one son, F'erdinand R. Lamb, 
born December i, \\ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Carl E. Davenport maintains the prestige of 
the family, holding the respect and esteem of 
all who know him. He owns the old home- 
stead, which comprises a good farm, one of the 
finest residences in this part of the county, and 
substantial farm buildings. He is a hard 
worker, and very successful in his line; a Re- 
publican in politics, and liberal in religious 
views. Mr. Davenport is still a bachelor, his 
mother, who resides with him, occupying the 
place of honor in his household. 



Jg 



ANIEL BALLARD, a successful 
farmer and dairyman of Franklin 
County, owns a finely equipped and 
well- improved farm in New Salem, and is 
widely known as a public-spirited man who has 
filled many offices of trust in the town, and 
has fully merited the confidence which his 
fellow-citizens have reposed in him. He 
comes of Puritan- stock, and from a family 
noted for intelligence and enterprise, descend- 
ants of William and Grace Ballard, who emi- 
grated from England to Massachusetts at an 
early day, and settled on one of the Andover 
hills. They reared several children, their son 
Joseph being the progenitor of the line now 
being considered. 

Joseph Ballard was an industrious farmer of 
Andover, and was Ensign of a company of in- 
fantry in 1694-99. He married Rebecca 
Home, or Orne, most of the members of the 
Home family having at an early date dropped 
the "H," and written the name "Orne." Of 
their children, Jeremiah, who was born in 
Andover in 1697, married in 1721 Mary 
Dane, daughter of Francis Dane, of the same 
town ; and fourteen years later they removed 
to Lunenburg, where they were admitted to 
full communion of the church of Christ, Octo- 
ber 3, 1736, but apparently lived in Concord 



a few years afterward. They came to New 
Salem about 1746-48, being among the early 
settlers of this locality. Jeremiah Ballard had 
risen to the rank of a Captain of a company of. 
infantry, and had seen service in the days 
of French and Indian warfare. On May 20, 
1750, he and his wife united by letter from 
Lunenburg with the Congregational church 
in New Salem, of which he was elected the 
second Deacon. He was active and influential 
in church and town affairs, being one of the 
original proprietors of the New Salem town- 
ship, and filling the office of Selectman several 
years. He lived here until his decease, in 
1 761. The names of his children were: Jere- 
miah, Joshua, Daniel, Joseph, Mary, Phoebe, 
and Hannah. 

Daniel, third son of Jeremiah, was a native 
of Andover, and for many years a resident of 
New Salem, having moved thither with his 
father. He married January 26, 1754, Ruth 
Houlton, daughter of Joseph and Rebecca 
Houlton, of New Salem, and aunt of the 
Joseph Houlton who founded the town of 
Houlton, Me. They were admitted to the 
church in New Salem October 2, 1763. He 
was Tax Collector for several years. He col- 
lected and paid to H. Gardner, State Treas- 
urer, March 24, 1780, the sum of one thou- 
sand, ninety-nine pounds and four pence, in 
part for taxes committed to him to collect for 
the year 1779— State tax — a large sum for so 
small a town. He subsequently moved to 
Wendell, where he bought a farm, and lived to 
the age of fourscore years, his departure occur- 
ring on May 31, 1808. His widow survived 
him till November 22, 1817, attaining the age 
of eighty-four years. She left the following 
children : Daniel, Phoebe, Tilly, Josiah, Lucy, 
Joseph Henry, James, William, and Hannah, 
all born in New Salem. 

Josiah, son of Daniel and Ruth (Houlton) 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Ballard, was born February ii, 1762, and suc- 
ceeded to the ownership of his father's farm 
in New Salem, on which he carried on mixed 
husbandry during his entire life. He was a 
progressive farmer, and bought more land, own- 
ing some two hundred acres in all, and doing 
an extensive business in real estate and in 
lumber. On January 20, 1789, he married 
Frances Jane Zuil, daughter of Alexander and 
Frances Zuil, of Boston, who survived him 
nineteen years, dying near the old homestead 
at the home of her son Daniel in 1856. Josiah 
Ballard served several months as a Revolution- 
ary soldier, having enlisted when but sixteen 
years of age in the place of his father, who was 
drafted. He died in June, 1837, aged seventy- 
five years. Both he and his wife were members 
of the Congregational church. They reared 
five children, namely: Chester, James, Char- 
lotte, Daniel, and Lucinda. 

Daniel, Ballard, Sr. , son of Josiah, and 
father of the special subject of this sketch, 
was born in Wendell, March 4, 1802, and 
there received the rudiments of his education. 
He afterward attended both the New Salem 
and Amherst Academies, and later on he was 
engaged in teaching school in the winters and 
farming in the summer season for several 
years. He finally bought a two-hundred-acre 
farm in Wendell, and became one. of the most 
prosperous farmers in the town. Possessing 
great individuality and forcQ of character, he 
was very influential in local affairs, and for 
many years was a member of the School Com- 
mittee. He was a Whig in his earlier days, 
but on the formation of the Republican party 
became one of its most earnest adherents. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Bap- 
tist church. He died November 9, 1870; his 
widow, whose girlhood name was Dulcenia 
Brown, and who was born February 21, 181 1, 
is still living at New Salem. 



They were married March 7, 1833, and 
became the parents of the following children : 
Dulcenia J., born March 19, 1834, died Jan- 
uary 23, 1852; Harrison W., born October 
IS, 1835; Lottie M., born November 19, 
1837; Daniel, born January 16, 1840; Hattie 
L., born January 29, 1842; Milton, born 
March 3, 1844; Albert, born September 28, 
1846; L. Annie, born March 6, 1849, died 
July I, 1870; and Lester, born February 6, 
1852. Harrison W. Ballard was married 
December 6, 1S66, to Sarah Jane Larned, of 
Worcester, Mass. He has pursued mercantile 
business in Trenton and Jersey City, N.J., 
and Indianapolis, Ind., where they now (1895) 
reside. They have no children. Lottie M. is 
a teacher in the public schools of Wendell. 
Hattie L. married October i, 1868, Beriah 
W. p-ay, Esq., of New Salem, for many years 
one of the County Commissioners. Their 
children are Harry W. and Beatrice A. Mil- 
ton Ballard died February 7, 1866, from dis- 
ease contracted in the army during the Civil 
War, when he was a member of Company D, 
Thirty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers. Al- 
bert, who has a saw, shingle, and planing mill 
in New Salem, married August 16, 1876, 
Mary E. Foote, of Conway, Mass., daughter of 
David A. and Esther E. Foote. Their chil- 
dren are : Annie, P'rances, and Harold Foote. 
Lester Ballard, a farmer in New Salem, mar- 
ried September 2, 1875, Emma P., daughter 
of Edwin K. and Charlotte M. Parkhurst, of 
Chelmsford, Mass. Their children are : Wini- 
fred E., Hattie L., and Ruth P. 

As indicated above, Daniel Ballard, of New 
Salem, is the second son of the late Daniel 
Ballard, Sr. , and was born in Wendell. After 
leaving the public schools, he attended the New 
Salem Academy and the Ames Business Col- 
lege at Syracuse, N.Y., where he completed 
his education, afterward teaching in the winter 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



213 



season and working on the home farm during 
seed' time and harvest. In 1862, inspired by 
patriotic ardor, Mr. Ballard enlisted in the 
service of his country, becoming a member of 
Company D, Fifty-second Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry, with which he was at the 
front under General N. P. Banks, in Louisi- 
ana, for nine months, when he returned home, 
broken down in health and reduced to a mere 
skeleton. Not able to do any hard labor for 
some time, he at first accepted the position of 
a clerk, and, gradually growing stronger, at 
length entered into the lumber business with 
his brothers, they carrying on an extensive 
traffic until burned out. In 1874 Mr. Ballard 
purchased the Upton farm of one hundred and 
fifty acres in New Salem, where he has since 
resided. Lie has here built a commodious and 
convenient barn, repaired the other buildings, 
and by a system of under-draining has rendered 
his estate one of the most productive and val- 
uable in the vicinity. He pays much atten- 
tion to dairying, having a choice herd pf Jersey 
cows, this being an important branch of his 
industry. 

On November 11, 1868, Mr. Ballard was 
united in marriage with Bessie P. Foote, a 
daughter of David A. and Esther (Hill) Foote, 
her father being a well-to-do farmer of Con- 
way, Mass. Mrs. Esther H. P'oote died Janu- 
ary I, 1858. By this marriage Mr. Foote had 
five children, namely: Frances, born Decem- 
ber 30, 1840, died July 28, 1841; Bessie P., 
born November 26, 1843; David A., Jr., born 
December 2, 1847, died September 13, 1849; 
Mary E., born May 27, 1852; and Etta E., 
born December 31, 1857, died December 15, 
1878. After the death of his first wife David 
A. Foote married Lucetta Felton, who bore 
him one child, Eliza F., born April 10, 1861, 
who died November 5, 1879. Mr. Foote died 
December 18, 1869, at the age of fifty-nine 



years. He was a strong Republican in poli- 
tics, and both he and his wife were members 
of the Congregational church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Ballard are the parents 
of four children, of whom but two are living, 
namely: Frederick F., born January 3, 1872; 
and May E., born July 14, 1873. The de- 
ceased are: Bessie J., born September 10, 
1876, and died April 30, 1893; and Lottie 
L., who was born May 22, 1879, and passed to 
the higher life December 19, 1885. Mr. Bal- 
lard is a stalwart Republican in politics, and 
has served his town with credit as Selectman, 
Assessor, and Overseer of the Poor for ten 
years, as a valued member of the School Board 
for many terms, and in 1882 was Representa- 
tive to the State legislature. Lie is now one 
of the Trustees of the New Salem Academy. 
He- and his wife are esteemed members of the 
Congregational church, of which he is a Dea- 
con and superintendent of the Sunday-school, 
and are active workers in the cause of religion 
and humanity. 



AMES R. LONG, a well-known farmer 
of Greenfield, his native town, was born 
January 5, 1841, son of Lemuel H. 
and Sabrina (Flagg) Long. David Long, the 
grandfather of James R., married Millicindy 
Brooks, January 13, 1778, in Vermont, and, 
leaving that State, came to Greenfield, where 
he settled. He was a hard-working farmer, 
and, as a military man, served in the War of 
1 812. He successfully reared a family of 
eight sons and eight daughters, three of whom 
are still living. Grandfather Long died at the 
age of ninety-four, and his wife at ninety years, 
both in Greenfield. 

Mr. Long's maternal grandfather, Jonathan 
Flagg, father of Sabrina Flagg, was born Feb- 
ruary 26, 1775, in Worcester, Mass.; and his 



214 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wife, Sabra Titus, was born May i6, 1775. 
He owned and worked a good farm in Ver- 
mont; but in 1826 he moved to Greenfield, and 
bought, in company with Lemuel H. Long, 
the one hundred acres of land which to-day 
constitute the farm now conducted by James 
R. Long. The house which stands on it 
to-day was standing then, having been built 
fourteen years before, and was widely known 
as "A. Thayer's Hostelry," it being in the 
centre of the business portion of Greenfield 
at that time. This farm Jonathan Flagg and 
Lemuel Long continued to work in partnership 
till the death of the former. Mr. Flagg was a 
musician of some note, and a man of dignified 
presence, well-known as Squire Flagg, having 
for many years been Justice of the Peace in 
Vermont. In politics he was a Democrat. 
He had five children, all of whom grew to 
maturity, but are all now deceased. Mr. 
Flagg died in Greenfield April 12, 1864, and 
his wife January 29, 1861. 

Lemuel H. Long was born in Marlboro, 
Vt. , November 10, 1799; but most of his boy- 
hood and youth were spent in Halifax. When 
twenty-one years of age, he moved to Green- 
field, and was apprenticed to his brother David 
to learn the blacksmith's trade. After a time 
he became a partner with his brother, and they 
continued the business together until 1826, 
when Lemuel disposed of his interest, and 
moved to the farm where his son now resides, 
where he remained, tilling the soil, till his 
death, which took place February 24, 1881. 
He was married April 22, 1828, to Sabrina 
Flagg, who was born in Wilmington, Vt., 
January 14, 1802, and died January i, 1859. 

On June 19, i860, Lemuel H. Long's sec- 
ond marriage was solemnized, the bride being 
Julia Hinsdale, who is a native of Upper 
Meadows, Greenfield. The Hinsdale family 
are highly esteemed and numbered among the 



older residents of Franklin County. Mrs. 
Julia H. Long's great-grandfather, Samuel 
Hinsdale, who was an early settler of Green- 
field, was born April 24, 1708, and his wife, 
Rebecca, June 13, 1703. Mrs. Long's father, 
Samuel Hinsdale, a native of Greenfield and 
a farmer, married Sally Clark, of Colerain. 
Both died in Greenfield, he at a ripe old age. 
They had ten children, four of whom are now 
living: Emily; Fanny; Julia, Mrs. Long; 
and Maria, now Mrs. Baker. Mrs. Long has 
in her possession the old family Bible, which 
is in a good state of preservation, and dates 
back to the year 1708. Mr. Long, Lemuel 
H., was an attendant of the Episcopal church, 
and in politics belonged to the Democratic 
party. He had seven children, five of whom 
grew up, and two are now living, namely : 
James R. Long, born January 5, 1841 ; and 
his sister, Sabra T. Long, born March 26, 
1844. The others were: Sabra, born Febru- 
ary 3, 1829, died October 6, 1843; Jonathan 
F. , born December 30, 1830, died April 9, 
1853; Saloman H., born December 31, 1832, 
died November 7, 1893; and Alanson B., who 
was United States District Attorney for the 
district of Louisiana, born March 26, 1835, 
died October 30, 1870. 

James R. Long was educated in the public 
schools in Greenfield, where he grew to man- 
hood, since which time he has followed the 
occupation of farmer. He and his sister re- 
side with their step - mother, Mrs. Julia H. 
Long, on the old home farm, where he runs 
a dairy in connection with fruit - raising and 
general farming. James R. Long and his 
brother. Captain A. B. Long, were mustered 
into the United States Infantry, Company A, 
Fifty-second Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Militia, October 2, 1862, to serve nine 
months. The regiment was assigned to the 
Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Fourteenth 




WILLIAM STEWART. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



21 f 



Army Corps, and participated in the demon- 
stration against Port Hudson, La., March 14, 
1863, and also in the following engagements: 
Irish Bend, La., April 13, 1863; siege of Port 
Hudson, La., May 30, 1863; and Jackson's 
Cross Roads, La., June 20, 1863. The Fifty- 
second was the first regiment to ascend the 
Mississippi River from Port Hudson after the 
surrender of Vicksburg, Miss. The Long 
brothers were mustered out of service in 
Greenfield, August 14, 1863, James R. being 
Fifth Sergeant of his company. Mr. Long 
has never ventured on the sea of matrimony, 
but remains content in single blessedness, his 
step-mother and sister living with him. In 
politics he is independent. Mr. and Miss 
Long are Episcopalians. 



WILLIAM STEWA] 
will be recognizi 



iRT, whose likeness 
gnized on the opposite 
page, an influential and highly re- 
spected resident of Colerain, Franklin County, 
Mass., was born upon the farm he now owns 
and cultivates, September 16, 1820. He is 
a son of Captain Amos and Margaret (Oak) 
Stewart, both of whom were born at Colerain, 
the former on June 4, 1793, and the latter on 
June 15, 1797. The family are of Scotch an- 
cestry, being descendants of Charles Stewart, 
who, in company with his brothers, James and 
John, settled upon a tract of land in this town 
about the year 1740. They cleared good farms 
from the forests, and resided here for the re- 
mainder of their lives. Mr. Stewart's great- 
grandfather was William Stewart, a noted man 
in his day; and his son, David Stewart, who 
was born at Colerain in June, 1760, became a 
very active farmer. He died at the age of 
si.xty-nine years; and his wife, whose maiden 
name was Miriam Plaven, who was born at 
Hopkinton, Mass., December 27, 1760, died 



at the age of eighty-five years, having been the 
mother of four sons and two daughters, as fol- 
lows : David, Jane, Amos, Elizabeth, Will- 
iam, and Joram. 

Amos Stewart was reared to an agricultural 
life upon the old home farm, and resided there 
for his entire life. He was a hard-working 
and successful farmer, and a prominent man in 
the community, in religion always adhering to 
the Presbyterian faith, serving as Selectman 
and Assessor for many years, and representing 
his district in the legislature for three years. 
He was also a soldier and pensioner of the 
War of 1 81 2. He died June 17, 1867, at the 
age of seventy-four years, his wife having been 
previously called to rest on August 29, 1850, 
aged fifty-three years. Of their ten children, 
all reached maturity but one, and four sons are 
now living: Amariah H., a resident of Con- 
necticut, who was born May 13, 1818; Will- 
iam, of Colerain; Silas S., now deceased, 
who was born December 21, 1822; David, a 
resident of Michigan, who was born July 29, 
1827; Amos, who was born December 29, 
1829, and died young; Amos, 2d, a resident of 
Colerain, who was born May 13, 1833; Charles, 
also deceased, born June 29, 1836; Nancy 
Jane, born June 10, 1825, and died Septem- 
ber 16, 1849; Mary Abbie, born February 13, 
1839, and died November, 1882; and George 
H., born June 29, 1843, and died April 6, 
"1888. Captain Amos Stewart was twice mar- 
ried, his second wife having been Lydia Bab- 
cock, of Colerain, who died at the age of 
eighty years, on January 21, 1883, leaving no 
children. 

William Stewart, like his immediate ances- 
tors, has passed his entire life upon the farm 
where he now resides, the property having 
been in the possession of the family for a cent- 
ury and a half. He received his education in 
the district schools, and assisted his father in 



2l8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



carrying on the farm until the latter's decease, 
after which the estate was managed jointly by 
himself and his brother. Mr. Stewart suc- 
ceeded the ownership of a part of the old 
homestead, which consists of about one hun- 
dred acres, and is devoted to general farming. 
He has been a tireless worker all his life and 
eminently successful, being considered by his 
fellow-townsmen to be one of the most pros- 
perous farmers in the neighborhood. The 
land is in a high state of cultivation, being 
admirably located, and finely equipped and 
substantial buildings are kept in perfect re- 
pair. Although Mr. Stewart is considerably 
past threescore and ten, he is still actively 
engaged in superintending his farm, person- 
ally attending to all details, as has been his 
custom for so many years. 

On November 26, 185 1, he was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary C. Chapin, whose 
father, Erastus Chapin, was born at Spring- 
field, Mass., in 1790. Erastus Chapin was a 
farmer who resided at Leyden during a greater 
part of his active life, and who died at Green- 
field, April 30, 1870. His wife, who was 
born at Colerain, December 26, 1790, died on 
June 26, 1867. Of their six children, four 
lived to reach maturity, but only one now sur- 
vives, David G. , a resident of Greenfield, born 
August 27, 1824. Eliza Jane, now deceased, 
was born April 25, 1813; Sarah E., also de- 
ceased, was born March 10, 181 8; Julius E. , 
deceased, born December 14, 1821 ; Mrs. 
Mary C. Chapin Stewart died July 30, 1895, 
aged seventy-nine; and Miriam Chapin, born 
August 27, 1827, died August 6, 1895. Mrs. 
Stewart was well known and much esteemed in 
the community, of which she and her husband 
were among the oldest residents. She was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
having united with it at eighteen years of age; 
and he also has been connected with it many 



years, during a greater portion of which he has 
held official position in the society. Mr. 
William Stewart has long been prominently 
identified with local public affairs, having 
served the town as Selectman and Assessor, 
and was a representative to the State legisla- 
ture in 1873. His home is in many respects 
a model one, and now, in the absence of the 
devoted wife and mother, is cheered and jDre- 
sided over by the only daughter, Edith E., 
who was born on September 20, 1870, and is 
also an active member of the Methodist church. 



-fgTENRY S. SMEAD, a capable and 
r^H energetic farmer of Greenfield, was 

■i-^ \^ . born in that town, October 22, 1858. 

The Smeads were among the early settlers 
of Greenfield, the grandfather, Jesse Smead, 
being born here, January 9, 1785. When a 
young man, he bought the farm where Henry 
S. Smead now resides, and in course of time 
brought it into a high state of cultivation. In 
politics he was a Whig, and both he and his 
wife were attendants of the Congregational 
church. His death occurred at the farm Sep- 
tember 20, 1858. He was twice married. 
His first wife, Martha Allen, was born in 
Shelburne, December 3, 1823. For his sec- 
ond wife he married Matilda Allen, who died 
February 6, 1853. They had a family of six 
children, none of whom are now living. 
Their son, Sylvenus A. Smead, father of 
Henry S. , was born on the farm, August 22, 
1825, and here spent his life. After growing 
to man's estate, he became the owner of the 
farm in company with his brother; and they 
carried on its various industries together until 
the brother's death, when Sylvenus bought the 
entire property, which at that time amounted 
altogether to about three hundred acres of 
land, besides the farm buildings, it being one 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



219 



of the largest farms in the town. Politically, 
he was a Republican ; and his ready mind and 
practical business methods were called into 
use in public affairs, he being called upon at 
different times to fill various town offices, 
among them that of Assessor. He married 
Susan M. Ballou, who was born February 7, 
1835 ; and they became the parents of two 
children: S. Gertrude, born December 13, 
1864, now the wife of Charles A. Wheeler, of 
Greenfield; and Henry S. , the subject of this 
sketch. Mr. Smead died April 22, 1873. 
His wife survived him until August 6, 1895. 
Both were members of the Congregational 
church. 

Henry S. Smead attended the district and 
high schools of Greenfield until reaching the 
age of fourteen years and six months, when, 
on his father's death, he took charge of the 
farm. Inheriting the characteristic energy of 
his father, he applied himself to work with 
such good effect as to achieve a marked suc- 
cess, and now owns the old farm, which con- 
sists at the present time of two hundred and 
twenty-five acres. Here he carries on general 
farming, and also has a good dairy, keeping 
from thirty to forty head of full-blood Dur- 
hams. The buildings are in good condition, 
and the entire property presents a neat and 
thriving appearance. Mr. Smead is a stanch 
Republican, but does not care to hold office, 
preferring a private life to participation in 
active politics. He is liberal in his religious 
views.. On October 26, 1892, he was married 
to Alice L. Newcomb, who was born in Ley- 
den, April 27, 1865, the daughter of John H. 
and Frances (Denison) Newcomb, both of 
whom are now living in Leyden, Mr. Newcomb 
being a farmer of that place. Mrs. Smead is a 
member of the Congregational church ; and she 
and her husband, while enjoying the comforts 
of their pleasant home, are not unmindful of 



others, but lead unselfish lives, and are among 
the most useful and esteemed members of their 
community. 

BENEZER A. DEANE, M.D., a highly 
respected physician of Montague, and, 
with one exception, the oldest medi- 
cal practitioner in Franklin County, was born 
at Royalston, Worcester County, Mass., Jan- 
uary 16, 1825. Llis father, Jeremiah Deane, 
was a native of Warwick; and his grandfather 
Deane, who for many years followed agricult- 
ural pursuits in that town, was born at Ded- 
ham, Mass., and died at Geneseo, N. Y. , aged 
eighty-eight years. 

Jeremiah Deane was one of a family of nine 
children. On reaching the age of twenty-one, 
he purchased a farm at Burlington, N.Y. , 
which he occupied for about twelve years, 
when he sold it, and, moving to Royalston, 
Mass., bought a saw and grist mill; but, after 
operating the mill successfully for some years, 
he disposed of the property, and purchased a 
farm at Gill, where he resided until his de- 
cease, at eighty-eight years of age. His wife, 
whose name before marriage was Rhoda Allen, 
was a native of Gill, where her father was a 
miller and a farmer. She became the mother 
of ten children, two of whom are still living: 
Dr. Deane; and his elder sister, Rhoda A., 
widow of Abel Bliss, residing at West- 
field, aged (1895) eighty-five years, her hus- 
band having died in 1844. One son, the Rev. 
James O. Deane, who was educated at Wes- 
leyan Academy, and, becoming a Methodist 
preacher at the age of twenty-five, labored 
upon a circuit which embraced Hampshire, 
Hampden, and Berkshire Counties, died at 
Pelham when he was thirty-four years old. 
The others were: Merciline Deane, died at 
sixty-eight years; Hannah, also deceased, was 
the wife of Adams Prouty ; Hiram W., de- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ceased, aged seventy-two years; Achsah W. ; 
Albert E. ; Hepsibah J. ; Harriet N. ; and 
another daughter — who are all now deceased. 
Dr. Deane's parents were members of the Con- 
gregational church. His mother lived to the 
age of eighty-six years. 

Ebenezer A. Deane resided with his parents 
upon the farm until reaching the age of twenty 
years. In his boyhood and early youth he 
diligently pursued his studies in the district 
schools and in Goodale Academy at Bernard- 
ston, after which he attended the academy at 
Shelburne Falls, where he was engaged as 
assistant teacher for two years. It was during 
this period that he commenced the study of 
medicine with Dr. Stephen J. W. Tabor, of 
Shelburne Falls. Later he attended medical 
lectures at Woodstock, Vt. , and then entered 
Berkshire Medical College at Pittsfield, Mass., 
from which he graduated in 1853. He imme- 
diately entered upon the duties of his profes- 
sion at Jacksonville, in the town of Whiting- 
ham, Vt. , where he remained eight years. In 
1861 he came to Montague, and in October of 
that year commenced a practice which has ex- 
tended over a period of more than thirty-three 
years. When he established his residence 
here, he was the youngest member of the 
Franklin District Medical Society; and he 
has witnessed the passing away of all the 
original associates, he being at the present 
time next to the oldest member in the county. 
He has been exceedingly active, always ready 
to attend to the medical needs of a public 
distributed over a radius of many miles, and 
for forty-two years in all has ridden through 
the storms of winter and the heat of summer 
in the faithful discharge of his arduous duties. 

On May 15, 1854, he was united in mar- 
riage with Hannah D. Sanderson, of Wood- 
stock, Vt., where her father, John Sanderson, 
was a farmer. She was one of three children 



born to her mother, who was a second wife. 
Dr. and Mrs. Deane have two daughters, both 
residing at home, namely: Angelia M., a 
graduate of the Boston Conservatory of Music, 
who taught music for some years, but is now 
engaged in studying painting; and Mary, who 
was educated at Wilbraham. The Doctor is a 
member of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 
of which he has been Vice-President, and of 
the County Medical Society, of which he has 
been the presiding officer. He was sent to 
New York State Medical Society from the 
Massachusetts Medical Society as delegate to 
its annual meeting. He is a Republican in 
politics, and has served upon the School Board 
for many years. Dr. Deane was instrumental 
in securing the establishment of the Montague 
Public Library, of which he was a Trustee for 
several years. He is an active member of the 
Congregational church, being closely identified 
with its affairs and a teacher in the Sunday- 
school. Mrs. Deane has been President of the 
Ladies' Benevolent Society for many years, of 
which also her eldest daughter is Secretary 
and Treasurer. Her youngest daughter, Mary, 
is President of the Young People's Society for 
Christian Endeavor, devoting much time to 
church and Sunday-school work. 




RANK J. LAWLER, attorney - at-law 
in Greenfield, Mass., is a young man 
of great promise, possessing undeniable 
ability, and has a fair prospect of achieving a 
brilliant success in his professional career. A 
native of Franklin County, he was born at 
South Deerfield, July 31, 1863, son of the late 
James Lawler, who was born in 1832, in 
Dorola, County Cavan, Ireland. His grand- 
parents were Francis and Margaret (Lee) Law- 
ler, who came to America in 1858, and located 
in this county, at South Deerfield, where they 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



engaged in tilling the soil. To them fourteen 
children were born, seven of whom came with 
them to this country. They both lived more 
than fourscore years, the mother dying at the 
age of eighty-one, and the father soon after, 
aged eighty-three years, their bodies being 
laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery of 
Greenfield. 

James Lawler, the father of the subject of 
this sketch, followed his parents to this coun- 
try in i860, and lived for some years in South 
Deerfield, being there married to Margaret 
Hafey, who was born in Ballanclay, County 
Waterford, Ireland. He subsequently removed 
to Leicester, in Worcester County, where he 
was employed as a leather worker in a factory 
manufacturing cards to be used in carding 
wool. His health failing, he was obliged to 
relinquish his position, and in 1881 came to 
Greenfield, Mass., and was a continuous resi- 
dent of that place until his death, November 
5, 1886. Of their children, one, Margaret J., 
died at the age of three years. The follow- 
ing is the record of the four living now : Frank 
J., to whom this sketch has special reference; 
Nicholas ]., Deputy Collector of Internal Rev- 
enue and a real estate and insurance broker, 
at Room i. Pond's Block, Greenfield; Thomas 
L. , of the firm of Lawler Brothers, real es- 
tate and insurance brokers. Room i, Pond's 
Block, Greenfield; and Mary A., wife of 
Edward Donovan, a prosperous grocer of 
Greenfield. The mother is still living, her 
residence being at No. 13 Wells Street, Green- 
field; and her three sons, all unmarried, live 
with her. 

Frank J. Lawler began his education in the 
public schools of his native town, and after- 
ward pursued his studies in the Leicester pub- 
lic schools. At the age of thirteen years, his 
father being in poor health, he was placed in 
a shoe factory, that his scanty wages might 



contribute somewhat to the support of the fam- 
ily. In 1 88 1 he came with his parents to 
Greenfield, and for twelve or more years was 
employed in the Cutler shoe factory. He 
was an ambitious scholar, however, and from 
the time he left the school-room was a dili- 
gent student of the best books he could pro- 
cure, and by application acquired an amount of 
general knowledge far exceeding that of many 
academic students. In 1888 Mr. Lawler 
began to devote his evenings and his leisure 
moments to reading law in the office of S. O. 
Lamb, who from the first appreciated his tal- 
ents, and lent him encouragement in his en- 
deavors. He subsequently entered the law 
department of the Boston University, from 
which he was graduated in June, 1894, and in 
the following month was admitted to the bar 
in Franklin County. He began his profes- 
sional career by opening an office on his own 
account; but soon afterward, on February i, 
1895, he became the junior partner of the 
well-known firm of Lamb & Lawler, and dur- 
ing the short time he has been in practice he 
has had his share of patronage. He is quite 
prominent in social and political circles, being 
a member of the Father Mathew Temperance 
Society and of the Catholic church. He is a 
sound Democrat, and has been a member of 
the town committee. 

Nicholas J. Lawler was appointed United 
State Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue 
for the Fourteenth Division in the Third Dis- 
trict of Massachusetts in September, 1894, to 
succeed John E. Drew. The Springfield Re- 
piiblican, in its issue of September 21, 1894, 
says in reply to the question, "Who is Law- 
ler.'" "Well, he is a bright and worthy 
young man, full of pu.sh and energy, who has 
by close application and downright hard work 
come to the front, rising from the ranks of 
toilers, surprising many by his attainments in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



life, and already showing a capacity that will, 
no doubt, justify his appointment." 

Thomas L. Lawler was born in South Deer- 
field, October 23, 1868, and received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Leicester and 
Greenfield, Mass. After leaving school, he 
learned the plumber's trade, which he followed 
until June, 1895, when he entered into part- 
nership with his brother, Nicholas J., in the 
real estate and insurance business. The firm 
name was changed to Lawler Brothers, Real 
Estate and Insurance Agency. Thomas L. 
Lawler is a bright, wide-awake young man, 
of good business ability. He is strictly tem- 
perate, a member of the Father Mathew 
Temperance Society and the Knights of 
Columbus. 

The Lawler boys are most worthy and indus- 
trious young men, of exceptional ability, and 
deserve credit for what they have already ac- 
complished by their own unaided efforts. 
Their widowed mother early implanted in their 
hearts the upright principles that have been 
their guides through life, and she now takes a 
justifiable pride in their well-doing. 




[HARLES H. ROBERTSON, who is 
foremost among the stock-raisers and 
fruit-growers of Leyden, Franklin 
County, Mass., was born in Westminster, Vt. , 
November 23, 1850. His parents were Will- 
iam and Mary (Martin) Robertson, the former 
a native of Brattleboro, Vt., the latter of Guil- 
ford; and his grandfather was one of the early 
settlers in the neighborhood of Brattleboro, a 
brief synopsis of whose career will be found in 
the sketch of Roswell B. Robertson, on an- 
other page of this volume. William Robertson 
was a successful farmer, and owned a good farm 
of about seventy-five acres. Politically, he 
was a Democrat, and in his religious belief a 



Methodist. He died at his home in Leyden 
on August 18, 1 891 ; and his wife followed to 
the better land a little more than two years 
later, January 29, 1894. They had ten chil- 
dren, all of whom reached maturity, namely: 
Edward W. , now deceased; Harriet, Mrs. 
Stewart, a resident of East Colerain ; Roswell 
B. , a farmer in West Leyden; Martha E. , 
Mrs. Brackett, living at Green River, Vt. ; 
Albert R., a dealer in hides and tallow in 
Burlington, Vt. ; James P., John H., and 
Alonzo M., all of New York City; Charles 
H., of Leyden; and Julia J., Mrs. Babb, liv- 
ing in Fitchburg. 

The childhood and early youth of Charles 
H. Robertson were passed in Leyden on the 
old homestead. At the age of nineteen he 
went to New York City, and engaged in the 
provision business, remaining fourteen years; 
and in 1880 he bought the farm which he now 
cultivates. In 1882 he returned to Leyden to 
live, engaging in general farming. His farm 
covers one hundred and thirty-five acres, and, 
being largely devoted to fruit-growing, makes 
a fine showing of all kinds to which the cli- 
mate is adapted. Mr. Robertson also has a 
good dairy and some fine stock, raising sheep, 
hogs, and poultry for the market ; and, besides 
common table produce, he cultivates a variety 
of small grains. 

On September 16, 1874, Mr. Robertson was 
married to Mary Delia Miner, daughter of 
James R. and Mary Miner, of Leyden, and a 
member of one of the oldest families in the 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Robertson have one son, 
Walter H., born in New York, June 22, 1878. 

Mr. Robertson votes the Democratic ticket. 
His religious belief binds him to no fixed 
creed ; but his wife is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and he attends service 
with her. He belongs to the A, F. & A. M., 
being a member of Republican Lodge of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



223 



Greenfield. His estate is a fine one, and the 
neat appearance of the buildings and luxuriant 
growth of the vegetation show that the man- 
ager is a man of methodical ways and abundant 
resources. 




fi, iRS. CAROLINE C. FURBUSH, 
of Greenfield, widow of the late 
Merrill A. Furbush, was born at 
Deerfield, her maiden name having been 
Stone. Her maternal grandfather was Deacon 
Elisha Field, of that town, who married a 
daughter of Major Hubbard, of Sunderland; 
and Mrs. Furbush is thus related to Eugene 
Field, the poet and journalist, of Chicago, and 
to Marshall Field of that city, and is also con- 
nected with the Montagues. Left an orphan 
at a tender age by the untimely death of her 
parents, Caroline C. Stone was cared for by 
her grandparents and her aunt, Mrs. Alonzo 
Rice, of Deerfield. She was educated in the 
schools of her native town, and in 1858 was 
married in Worcester, Mass., to Merrill A. 
Furbush, an extensive manufacturer. 

Mr. Furbush was a native of Worcester 
County, Mass., and in early manhood became 
interested in the manufacture of improved 
machinery for woollen mills. In i860 he 
transferred his business to Philadelphia, where 
he continued at the head of an extensive and 
successful enterprise. He was a gentleman 
who possessed much business ability, together 
with a thorough understanding of the general 
principles and conditions of manufacturing and 
trade at home and abroad, he having travelled 
much, both for the purpose of sight-seeing and 
the observation of the industrial methods of 
other countries. In the beautiful residence 
built by Mr. Furbush in Greenfield in 1884, 
the work of the distinguished architect and 
writer, E. C. Gardner, of Springfield, author 
of "Homes, and How to make them" and 



"The House that Jill built," Mr. and Mrs. 
Furbush spent the ensuing summers till his 
death, which occurred on March 31, 1887, at 
the age of sixty-eight years. 

After that event the business established in 
Philadelphia by Mr. Furbush was placed in 
the hands of a stock company, which was organ- 
ized for the purpose of conducting it, with 
Merrill A. Furbush, Jr., as its official head, 
this gentleman, who has been recently mar- 
ried, being the only son. Mrs. Furbush has 
buried one daughter, Christine, who died Feb- 
ruary 9, 1888, and has two others, namely: 
Grace F., wife of Frank Bement, of Philadel- 
phia, having one daughter — Florence; and 
Caroline C, wife of Dr. J. P. Holmes, of 
Milford, Mass., who is now travelling in 
Europe. 

Mrs. Furbush came to Greenfield to reside 
permanently in 1894. She is a lady of both 
literary and artistic tastes, and possesses a val- 
uable library filled with choice and rare books, 
man)' of them in rich and costly binding, en- 
gravings, etchings, and bas-reliefs, together 
with various literary curiosities, including 
autograph letters of celebrated poets, artists, 
authors, actors, singers, and dramatists. The 
works of art embrace a fine steel engraving of 
Longfellow; a portrait of Abraham Lincoln 
woven into silk, which Mr. Furbush purchased 
at Lyons, France; an etching by Baldini of 
the fifteenth century ; an engraving of the 
prophet Ezekiel, dated 1624; and an idition de 
luxe of the new gallery of British art. The 
attractiveness of the home of Mrs. F'urbush, 
especially to the book-lover and art student, 
is enhanced by the fact that this lady is a kind 
and agreeable hostess, evidently one who takes 
pleasure in giving pleasure, exemplifying the 
poet's word, 

" Make others happy. All who joy would win 
Must share it: happiness was born a twin." 



224 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



She is a member of the Universalist church, as 
was also her husband. 



/pTTo 



EORGE H. GODDARD, a prominent 
\J5 I farmer, residing in Montague, Frank- 
lin County, Mass., was born in this 
town, November 24, 1844. He is a son of 
Sandford Goddard, whose father, Henry God- 
dard, was a native of Worcester County, and 
there spent most of his life, but died at the 
home of Sandford, in Montague. 

Sandford Goddard was born in Royalston, 
Worcester County, being one of seven chil- 
dren, and was brought up a farmer ; but at the 
age of seventeen he went to Boston, and en- 
gaged in trucking, soon after buying out his 
brother's interest in the business, and conduct- 
ing it independently. At the age of twenty- 
five he married, and went to Royalston, where 
he bought a farm, and resided two years. In 
1837 he removed to Montague, purchasing the 
farm on which his son now resides, remaining 
here till his death, which occurred at the age 
of fifty-seven years. Mr. Sandford Goddard 
was a man well known and highly appreciated 
in the community, a stanch Republican, and 
formerly a prominent member of the Whig 
party, taking an active part in the politics of 
the day. He was elected to represent the 
county as State Senator in i860, served on the 
Board of Selectmen many years, and filled the 
office of trial justice for a long period of time. 
He married Miss Julia Kendall, of Vermont, 
who brought up six children, four of whom are 
now living, as follows: Edward L., a soldier 
of the late war, and now living retired at 
Turner's Falls; Elvira, wife of George C. 
Kaulback, a leather manufacturer, of Newark, 
N.J. ; George H ; and Julia A., wife of D. F. 
Hamilton, of Greenfield, an ex - Postmaster, 
who was also a member of the legislature one 



term, and is now connected with the Green 
River machine works of Wiley & Russell. 
One of the children who died was Prentice 
H., who served in the Civil War, and lost his 
life at New Orleans. The mother of these 
children died at the age of forty-seven years. 

George H. Goddard grew up on the home 
farm, attending the schools of the town and 
assisting his father till he was seventeen years 
of age, when he was obliged to take full 
charge of the place. This he continued till 
his father's death; and then he leased the 
farm, and went West. After two years' ab- 
sence, having spent some time in California 
and Colorado, he returned to the East, and 
took up his old employments. Mr. Goddard 
is now the owner of three hundred acres of 
land, devoted to dairy purposes, and keeps a 
fine herd of Holstein cows. He conducted a 
successful milk route to Miller's Falls for fif- 
teen years, but for the last three years has fur- 
nished milk to the neighboring creamery. 

Mr. Goddard was married in 1875 to Miss 
Julia Hammond, daughter of John Hammond, 
of Ashburnham, who was by trade a ship car- 
penter of Boston. They are the parents of two 
children, named respectively Hattie May and 
Sarah Hammond. Mr. Goddard is a charter 
member of the Grange, a farmers' organization 
of the locality, founded in 1885, in which he 
has held all of the offices. He is a Republi- 
can in politics, has been Overseer of the Poor 
four years, and has filled the office of Select- 
man since 1890. He has also been one of the 
directors of the Creamery Association since its 
formation, being at one time its President. 
Election to these many offices is an indication 
of the high regard in which this gentleman 
is held by his fellow-townsmen and friends. 
Mr. Goddard is also one of the Trustees of the 
Congregational church at Montague, his wife 
being a member, and the family being all con- 




EDWIN A. STRATTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 2 7 



nected with the Sunday-school, and taking 
prominent parts in its various activities. 




|DWIN A. STRATTON, manufacturer of 
spirit levels at Greenfield, Franklin 
County, is one who by his own exer- 
tions has steadily climbed the ladder of pros- 
perity, and occupies an honorable position in 
the esteem of his fellow-men. He was born 
at Northfield, Mass., September 15, 1819, 
being a son of Asa Stratton, who was born in 
the same town, September 10, 1786. North- 
field was likewise the place of nativity of Asa 
Stratton, Sr. , who was at the battle of Ben- 
nington, under the command of General Stark, 
and was one of the militia that went with the 
regulars to arrest the progress of General Bur- 
goyne. Mr. E. A. Stratton still has in his 
possession the gun which his grandfather car- 
ried through the Revolutionary War. The 
story of the ancient weapon, contributed to 
these pages by a great-grand-daughter of the 
patriot, will be found appended to this sketch. 
Members of the Stratton family are men- 
tioned in the early records of Watertown, 
Cambridge, and Concord, Mass., the first thus 
noted being Samuel, who was born in England 
in 1592, crossed the Atlantic before 1648, was 
at Watertown in 1652, and died in 1672. 
One of his sons, Richard Stratton, came over 
in the "Speedwell" in 1656. Another son 
was Samuel, Jr., who married Mary Fry in 
1 65 I, and a few years later moved to Concord, 
where their son Samuel was born in 1660. 
Hezekiah Stratton, son of the third Samuel, 
removed to Deerfield about the year 171 3, and 
thence in 1715 to Northfield, where he was 
one of the earliest permanent settlers. Asa 
Stratton, Sr. , son of Eliezer and grandson of 
Hezekiah, married Lucy Woodbury, of Barre, 
Mass. ; and they had a family of seven sons and 



two daughters, of whom one daughter died 
young, and the remaining children married and 
reared families. Grandfather Stratton was 
quite a wealthy farmer, and of the four hun- 
dred acres of land included in his homestead 
property, much is retained in the family in the 
form of wood lots. The grandmother lived to 
the age of seventy-six years, surviving her hus- 
band sixteen years, his death having occurred 
in 1 8 16. 

Asa Stratton, the younger, was a farmer by 
occupation, carrying on mixed husbandry on 
the homestead farm in Northfield until 1854, 
when he sold out and removed to Greenfield, 
where he lived in retirement until his decease, 
April 3, 1869, being then fourscore and three 
years of age. The maiden name of his life 
companion was Sophia Holton. She was a 
native of Northfield, born in 1794, and was 
a worrian of more than average ability and 
brightness, retaining the use of her faculties 
until the close of her long life of ninety-six 
years, on November 4, 1891. Mrs. Sophia H. 
Stratton bore her husband seven children, of 
whom three are yet living: Edwin A. ; Sarah, 
wife of C. T. Buffum, of Keene, N. H.; and 
Oscar G. , who is unmarried, and resides in 
Greenfield. The deceased are as follows : 
Sarah, the first, who died at the age of seven 
years; Franklin A.; Charles M. ; and Dr. 
F. S. Stratton, who died September 20, 1894. 
Franklin A. was a Colonel of the Eleventh 
Pennsylvania Cavalry in the late Civil War, 
and was twice wounded in battle. He was 
afterward a civil engineer in the government 
employ, at Washington, D.C., being at one 
time in charge of the construction department 
at the navy yard, going thence to California, 
where he worked on the fortifications at the 
navy yard on Mare Island. His war record 
was brilliant and honorable, he having risen 
from the ranks to the office of Colonel, in 



22S 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which capacity he acted at the surrender of Lee ; 
and after the close of the war he was brevetted 
Brigadier-general. The sword presented to 
him by his regiment is now one of the valued 
possessions of his brother Edwin. Colonel 
Stratton died in Philadelphia in 1879, being 
then but fifty years old, and left a widow, but 
no children. Charles M. Stratton was asso- 
ciated with Edwin A. in business for many 
years as a carpenter and builder, the partner- 
ship continuing until the decease of Charles, 
on August 3, 1893, aged seventy years. He 
also left a widow, but no children. 

Edwin A. Stratton was the third child and 
the second son born to his parents, and, in 
common with his brothers and sisters, received 
his education in the district school, being 
reared on the home farm, whence they all scat- 
tered to different parts of the United States. 
Mr. Stratton never learned a regular trade, 
but, in company with his brother Charles, 
began carpentering in Northfield, and continued 
his occupation in Boston and the suburban 
towns. In 1848 he came to the western part 
of the State, and in the following fourteen 
years built many houses in Greenfield and 
vicinity. From 1862 until 1865 he was em- 
ployed by the United States government in 
the Springfield Armory ; and in 1869 he and 
his brother established the business that he 
now carries on alone, building their own shop. 
They made many improvements in their manu- 
factures, including wood and metal levels, and, 
having begun in a modest way, built up an 
extensive and paying business. 

Mr. Stratton has been twice married, his 
first wife, Almira Purple, of Gill, having died 
after three years of wedded life, in 1854, leav- 
ing one daughter, Almira, who married Ered 
Chase, and is the mother of two interesting 
children, the family residing in Keene, N. H. 
In 1857 Mr. Stratton was united in wedlock 



with Ellen A. Sawyer, of Northfield, a daugh- 
ter of Asahel Sawyer. Two children have 
been born of this union: Edith A., the elder, 
keeping books in her father's factory; and 
Lena L. S. , who was graduated from Smith 
College, Northampton, in 1892, and is now 
taking a post-graduate course, devoting herself 
to the study of art, in which she has already 
shown much ability. Mr. Stratton is always 
an interested actor in movements calculated to 
advance both the material and moral welfare 
of his community, being a liberal supporter of 
institutions of education and religion. He 
and his family are liberal Christians of the 
Unitarian type, followers of Channing and 
Martineau. In politics first a Whig, and 
later, naturally, a Republican, he voted in 
1840 for General William H. Harrison, and 
in 1888 for his grandson, Benjamin Harrison. 
The portrait of Mr. Stratton, herewith pre- 
sented, is the likeness of a worthy representa- 
tive of an old and patriotic New England 
family. 

THE OLD BEAR GUN. 

We do not know for certainty just when this 
old gun was brought to this country, but prob- 
ably it was brought from England with the 
first Strattons who came over. It is made like 
the old English guns, and, besides, it is known 
to have been in the family before there were 
any guns made in this country; and it is not 
probable that in coming to a new country they 
would have come without a gun with which to 
protect themselves from the wild beasts and 
Indians. The first account we have of the 
gun's figuring prominently in affairs is that 
our great-grandfather carried it in the Revolu- 
tion, where it did its share, with others like 
it, in helping to free our country. It was car- 
ried by our great-grandfather at the battle of 
Bennington; and it was there that he cut with 
a knife his initial, A for Asa, on the butt of 
the gun, where it can still be seen. 

One of the adventures in which the gun has 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



229 



figured was this: There was an old bear in the 
neighborhood of Northfield Mountain, which 
people had been hunting for several days. 
There was a light snow on the ground; and 
great-grandfather, in looking for his hogs 
which were allowed to run in the woods, came 
across her tracks in the snow, and followed 
them until he found where she had gone under 
some fallen logs. He returned to the house, 
took his gun, and went back, followed by his 
two boys, Roswell and Asa. Great-grand- 
father then fired in where he thought the bear 
was, but failed to awaken her, and, saying to 
his boys, "I guess she has gone," he crawled 
under the logs to investigate, when suddenly 
he came upon her; but, nothing daunted, he 
called to Roswell to hand him the gun. Fir- 
ing, he wounded the bear, but did not kill her; 
and she went tearing off through the brush, 
snorting and growling. It was then nearly 
dark. Great-grandfather notified some of the 
neighbors ; and they came out the next morning 
with a dog, which scented and followed the 
bear until he found her, and then chased her 
over on Round Mountain. Great-grandfather 
heard the dog barking, and, hastily taking the 
old gun, started in pursuit, grandfather, then 
but a lad, following after as best he could. 
Just as great-grandfather came up to where the 
bear was, she seized the dog with one paw, and 
bit him through the neck: at the same time 
great-grandfather fired at and killed her. 
Tying up the dog's neck with a handkerchief, 
they started home in triumph with the bear; 
and they found, when they dressed her, that the 
bullet went straight through the heart. 

In some other exploit, the exact circum- 
stances of which are lost, great-grandfather 
fired at a bear, but without effect ; and before 
he could load again she attacked him. So he 
fought her with the gun ; and in the struggle, 
before the bear was killed, she bit into the 
stock, and it shows to-day where a long piece 
of the wood was split off. 

For years this gun hung in the kitchen in 
the old house on the mountain, always loaded, 
ready to shoot any thieving hawk in search of 
unwary chickens. When the old house was 
sold, the gun was brought to Greenfield, and 
was in the possession of grandfather's son 



Charles, at whose death it came to us, to rest 
after more than a hundred years of active 
service. 

Lena Sophia Stratton. 



4 ^•^■t- 




ICHARD N. OAKMAN, who died 



recently, September 6, 1895, after an 
^ \^_ ^ illness of two weeks, formerly a 
successful teacher, and later a farmer in Mon- 
tague, where he was an extremely useful, influ- 
ential, and valuable citizen, was born at 
Wendell, Mass., January 20, 181 8. His 
father, Joseph Oakman, was born at Chester- 
field, N.H. ; his grandfather, Joseph B. 
Oakman, at Lynn, Mass. ; and his great- 
grandfather, Isaac Oakman, was a native of 
Salem, where he followed agriculture as an 
occupation. Joseph B. Oakman was a shoe- 
maker, but his son Joseph was a farmer in the 
town of Wendell. His wife, Mary Nickerson, 
daughter of Joseph Nickerson, of Province- 
town, Mass., was the mother of eight children, 
only two of whom — Orrin and William — are 
now living. Her husband having died at the 
age of forty-nine, Mrs. Mary N. Oakman 
passed her declining years with her children, 
living to the advanced age of ninety years. 
Both parents were members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Richard N. Oakman completed his studies 
at the Franklin Academy, Shelburne Falls, 
when he was seventeen years of age, and 
entered upon the arduous vocation of an educa- 
tor, a calling for which he was, in many ways, 
especially adapted. He taught school contin- 
uously for twenty-three years, six of which 
were spent at the academy in Provincetown, 
Mass. In 1846 he came to Montague, where 
he purchased a farm upon which he settled, 
and conducted it successfully for a period of 
eleven years. Having succeeded in clearing 
the property from all financial encumbrances. 



^3° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



he then disposed of it, a good opportunity 
occurring, and for the next six years had 
charge of the town farm, during which time he 
placed it on a self-supporting basis, thus sav- 
ing an expense of three thousand dollars annu- 
ally to the town. In 1863 he purchased the 
property, and resided there until 1877, when he 
bought the place, which remained his perma- 
nent home, and which he immediately occu- 
pied, leaving his son to carry on the old town 
farm, until the latter relinquished farming in 
order to engage in business. Mr. Oakman 
then sold the property and afterward devoted 
his time to his home farm, consisting of about 
ten acres of fertile land, together with one of 
the finest residences in this locality. 

Mr. Oakman was a Republican in politics, 
and was long identified with public affairs in 
the town. He was a Selectman for twenty- 
eight years, having been continuously in office 
for twenty-six years ; Overseer of the Poor for 
the same length of time; School Committee 
for twenty-three years; and a County Commis- 
sioner for three years. He was for twenty 
years a Director of the Crocker National Bank, 
serving as its President for sixteen years, and 
had in his possession a beautifully engrossed 
set of resolutions, expressive of appreciation 
and esteem, presented by the Board of Direc- 
tors upon his retirement. Mr. Oakman was 
also interested in other financial institutions, 
and he acted as notary public for a period of 
twenty years. 

In 1841 Mr. Oakman was united in marriage 
with Miss Julia Hawkes, daughter of Ichabod 
Hawkes, a farmer of Hawley. They became 
the parents of two sons and two daughters, 
namely: Richard N. Oakman, Jr., who mar- 
ried Sarah Clarke, of Exeter, N. H., and has 
one daughter — Anna C. ; Julia K., who was 
educated at Mount Holyoke Seminary, and is 
a successful teacher; Nellie P., who married 



Eugene S. Taft, of Greenfield, and has three 
children — Eugene, Richard Nickerson, and 
Julia Kate; and Frank Hawkes Oakman, who 
married Fanny Davenport, of Providence, and 
has three children — Ethel, Fannie, and Mar- 
ion. Mrs. Julia H. Oakman died on May 7, 
1894, after having well and faithfully per- 
formed the duties of wife and mother for more 
than half a century. She was formerly a 
member of the Congregational church at Mon- 
tague, but later became connected with the 
church in Greenfield. 



fHOMAS R. MILLER, a prominent 
farmer and successful business man in 
his native town, Colerain, was born on 
January 24, 1845, son of Robert and Martha 
Ann (Miner) Miller. Mr. Miller is of 
Scotch descent. His great-grandfather Miller 
was one of the pioneer settlers of the town, and 
was a very enterprising man, doing business as 
merchant and hotel-keeper, dealing in potash 
and dipping into various enterprises. He was 
well known and popular, and was universally 
missed when he died, at the early age of thirty- 
six years. His wife lived to an advanced age. 
They had six children, all of whom grew up, 
and five were married. 

One of their sons was Thomas Miller, who 
was born in Colerain, and here spent his life. 
He married Eunice Smith, also a native of 
this town, daughter of Oren and Keziah (Shep- 
ard) Smith, the former born on March 21, 
1747, the latter on October 22, 1778. Oren 
Smith was one of the early settlers of Cole- 
rain, where he established a reputation as a 
lawyer; and he knew as much about raising 
crops as about knotty points in law. When 
the trouble with the mother country came to a 
crisis in the American colonies, Oren Smith 
joined the Continental army, and took an active 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



231 



part in the Revolution. On his return from 
the war he settled on a farm in Colerain, 
where he died on May 14, 1823, survived 
nearly fourteen years by his wife, who passed 
away in April, 1837. They had nine chil- 
dren, all of whom grew to adult years and are 
now deceased. 

Robert, son of Thomas and Eunice (Smith) 
Miller, was born in Colerain on June 21, 
1806. He spent his days in Colerain and 
Leyden, engaged in agricultural pursuits, and 
was an enterprising and industrious man. In 
politics he was a stanch Republican, and on 
the subject of religion his views were liberal. 
He died on November 3, 1861. His wife, 
who was born in Leyden on February 5, 1814, 
is still living, making her home with her son, 
Thomas R., bright and active in her eighty- 
second year, and for sixty-five years has been 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Leyden Centre. They had ten children, 
five of whom are now living, namely : Martha 
Frances, Mrs. Young, in Greenfield ; Thomas 
R., in Colerain; Netta L. , Mrs. Denison, of 
West Leyden; Ozias E., in the same town; 
and Hattie E. , Mrs. Frizzell, in Greenfield. 
Fanny, Robert M., Harriet, Frank C, and J. 
Milo are deceased, Robert having been 
drowned in Green River, April 11, 1842. 
Frank C. Miller enlisted in the Fifty-second 
Massachusetts Regiment, and served as a sol- 
dier in the War of the Rebellion. 

Thomas R. Miller received his schooling in 
Leyden and Colerain, and early took up the 
routine of farm work. He has resided at his 
present home thirty-nine years, and owns the 
old farm and fifty acres besides, his real estate 
covering about one hundred and fifty acres. 
He carries on general farming, and is exten- 
sively engaged in stock-raising. The farm is 
in good condition, its fine appearance being 
the result of many a hard day's labor on Mr. 



Miller's part. The dwelling-house is substan- 
tial and comfortable, and has many antique 
and valuable articles of furniture, among them 
a clock which has been in the family seventy- 
seven years. Mr. Miller also owns some rare 
old books. He has never been married. In 
politics Mr. Miller is a Republican, and he 
belongs to the class of liberals in religion. 
He is a good business man, socially agreeable, 
and esteemed by all with whom he has trans- 
actions. 




DDISON JOHNSON, a retired farmer 
and mechanic of Northfield, was born 
in this town on October 13, 181 1, 
son of Calvin and Mary (Carey) Johnson. 
Mr. Johnson's grandfather, Richard Johnson, 
resided in Old Haddam, Conn., and was a 
Revolutionary soldier. He settled in Green- 
field, Franklin County, Mass., at a time when 
there were scarcely any houses in that town, 
and resided there until his death, which oc- 
curred November 22, 181 1, at the age of 
seventy-seven years. 

Calvin Johnson, Mr. Johnson's father, was 
born in Old Haddam, but passed his boyhood 
in Greenfield, where he was reared to an agri- 
cultural life. He attended the old district 
schools, and remained with his parents until 
becoming of age, when he commenced work 
for himself as a farm laborer in Greenfield. 
After his marriage to Mary Carey, of Mon- 
tague, he moved to Northfield, where he con- 
tinued to follow agricultural pursuits until his 
decease, which occurred at the age of seventy- 
six years. Of their ten children, but two are 
now living, namely: Addison, the subject of 
this sketch; and Charles, a resident of Marl- 
boro, Vt. The mother was an attendant of 
the Baptist church. She died in Northfield at 
the age of eighty-six years. 

Addison Johnson received his education in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the district schools, and at the age of twenty- 
one abandoned the parental roof for the pur- 
pose of commencing life for himself. He was 
employed during the succeeding two years in 
the manufacture of sashes and blinds in a fac- 
tory, which was the first of the kind established 
in the locality. He then built a factory in 
the vicinity of his present residence, and, after 
conducting it successfully twenty-one years, 
purchased the farm on which he followed agri- 
culture until about ten years since, when he 
retired from active labor. 

Mr. Johnson's first wife, whom he married 
in 1837, was Almira Bascom, daughter of 
Henry Bascom, of Gill. She was born in 
Greenfield, and died in 1875, aged fifty-seven 
years. Four of their seven children are still 
living, namely: Jennie E., who married Eli 
Sherwin, and has two children; Cora B., who 
married Omer Maris, and has three children 
— Bertha, Eli, and Henry; Harry, who lives 
in Indiana; and Mary L., who married Nelson 
G. Hilliard, a farmer. Henry H. was killed 
in the army, at the age of twenty-four years. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Hilliard are as 
follows: Almira M., who married Frank T. 
Rice, a machinist of Warren, and has one 
child — Harold ; Alfred A., who married Emma 
Underwood, and is a civil engineer in In- 
diana; Josie A., who married Irving Fisk for 
her first husband, by whom she had one child, 
Herbert N., married for her second husband 
Horace C. Wood, by whom she has two chil- 
dren—Alfred A. and Arthur F. ; Mira A., 
who died at the age of ten years; and Belle, 
who married Luther Tracy, of Chicago, and 
died in 1882, leaving one child — Mary. Mr. 
Johnson married for his second, wife Mrs. 
Lydia T. Bigelow, daughter of Ephraim 
Houghton, a resident of Greenfield. 

Mr. Johnson was formerly a Methodist in 
his religion, but is now connected with the 



Congregational church, of which his wife is 
also a member. A Republican in politics, he 
has never been an aspirant for public office. 
Firm in principle, brave in action, Mr. John- 
son may well be proud to-day of the fact that 
he was an "old-time abolitionist," and during 
long years fought the good fight for freedom, 
being one of the conductors of the "under- 
ground railroad " in the day when, to aid the 
escape of a fugitive slave, was to be liable to 
a one thousand dollar fine. 

" Then to side with Truth is noble, 
Wlien we share her wretched crust, 
Ere her cause bring fame and profit. 
And 'tis prosperous to be just." 




RED E. ALLEN, of the firm of Allen 
Brothers, dealers in clothing, gentle- 
men's furnishing goods of all kinds, 
trunks, and travelling bags, doing business in 
Turner's Falls, Franklin County, Mass., was 
born in Sutton, Worcester County, in this 
State, January 18, 1855, son of John Allen. 
Mr. Allen's paternal grandfather, Abner 
Allen, was born in Sutton in 1753. He was 
a farmer, and reared a large family there, of 
whom his son John was the third child. 

John Allen attended school during his early 
life, and at home was trained to farming 
pursuits. Later he entered on a mercantile 
career, and carried on a large general store for 
several years. The latter part of his life was 
spent in Gardner, where he died at the age of 
seventy-five years. He married Miss Hannah 
Maynard, a native of Shrewsbury, Mass., a 
daughter of Silas Maynard, a respected resi- 
dent of that town. She became the mother of 
seven children, six of whom are still living, as 
follows : Clara, wife of E. D. Howe ; Frank 
W. ; W. F. ; Fred E. ; Myron B., in business 
with his brother, Fred E. Allen; and Charles 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



233 



D. Allen. Mrs. Hannah Maynard Allen died 
in Gardner in 1881, at the age of fifty-eight 
years. Both parents were attendants of the 
Congregational church. 

Fred E. Allen spent his early years in 
Gardner, going to that town with his father 
when four years of age. He attended the pub- 
lic schools, finishing his course of study at the 
high school, and then began life as a clerk in 
one of the dry-goods stores of the town, chang- 
ing later to work in a large store in Worcester, 
which carried supplies of dry-goods, gentle- 
men's furnishings, etc., in which place he 
remained ten years, becoming thoroughly 
acquainted with that line of business. In 
1S81 Mr. Allen went to Turner's Falls, and 
in partnership with his brother, Myron B. 
Allen, established their present attractive and 
flourishing place of business. After six years, 
finding it advisable to establish themselves in 
more commodious quarters, they removed again 
into a new and handsome building which they 
had erected for the purpose. This building is 
three stories in height, and measures twenty- 
five by ninety feet on the ground plan, and 
gives space for their full assortment of first- 
class goods, suiting the requirements of the 
large and growing trade from the immediate 
neighborhood and the surrounding villages and 
farms. 

In 1877 Mr. Allen was married to Miss 
Fastena Buck, a daughter of Charles M. Buck, 
of Southboro, Mass. ; and they became the par- 
ents of two children, Elizabeth A. and Ruth 
B. The family are attendants of the Congre- 
gational church, taking active interest in its 
various departments of work. Mr. Allen is a 
Republican in his political principles, and is 
wide-awake to all the improvements which 
concern the welfare of the town, giving, how- 
ever, most of his attention to the business 
which the enterprise and ability of the firm 



have made one of the noteworthy establish- 
ments of Turner's Falls, the manufacturing 
centre of this part of the State. 



'ff^YAMES B. CROMACK, one of the sub- 
stantial farmers of Colerain, was born 
in this town, February 6, 1833, son of 
John and Antis R. (Walkup) Cromack, the lat- 
ter a native of Colerain, the former of Leyden. 
Mr. Cromack's paternal grandfather, James C. 
Cromack, was born in North Leeds, England, 
and came to Massachusetts in 1796, engaging 
in the manufacture of woollen fabrics in Frank- 
lin County. He was an industrious man, 
gifted with considerable business ability, but 
was cut off in his prime, being murdered and 
robbed while on a trip to New York. He was 
then but forty years old, and his widow and 
eight children were left with scanty resources. 
His son, John Cromack, went to live as a 
bound boy with James Barber, remaining with 
him until eighteen or twenty years of age. 
He then started out in the world for himself, 
settling finally in Colerain, where he bought 
land, and in 1838 established the homestead 
which is now the family residence. Mr. John 
Cromack was a hard-working man, and by his 
industry and integrity won the respect of all 
who knew him. He held various town offices, 
including that of Selectman; and he and his 
wife were members of the Baptist church. 
They were the parents of nine children, six 
of whom are living, namely : George W. and 
James B., both of Colerain; Eunice, now 
Mrs. Stetson, of Greenfield; Henry C, 
Charles, and Albert, all in Colerain. John, 
Charlotte (Mrs. Potter), and Angelia (Mrs. 
Hicks) are deceased. The father died in 
1858, the mother in 1884. 

James B. Cromack grew to manhood and 
received his schooling in Colerain. At the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



age of twenty he hired himself out as a farm 
hand, working eight months for thirteen dol- 
lars a month. He was then engaged by a firm 
in Troy, N.Y. , to sell tinware and Yankee 
notions on the road, a business which he fol- 
lowed for four years. After the death of his 
father he bought out the other heirs, and now 
owns the old home farm, to which he has added 
land until the estate covers three hundred and 
twenty-five acres. He carries on general 
farming and fruit-growing, and also receives 
quite an income from his dairy products. 

On November 14, 1861, Mr. Cromack was 
married to Ellen Boyd, of Wilmington, Vt. , 
daughter of Abraham and Amanda (Moore) 
Boyd, the former a well-to-do farmer in Wil- 
mington, who died at the age of fifty-eight. 
His widow was again married to Jehiel Swift. 
Mrs. Swift is yet living, a resident of Wil- 
mington. She is eighty-four years old, and, 
though so advanced in age, still keeps up 
her connection with the Universalist church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cromack have seven children : 
Frank E., John B., Arthur B., Nellie A., 
Sidney A., William I., and Antis A. Mr. 
Cromack is a stanch Republican. He and his 
wife are liberal in their religious views, and 
attend various churches. One of the oldest 
families in this part of the town, they hold the 
regard and esteem of their neighbors. Mr. 
Cromack spares neither pains nor labor in his 
agricultural work, and he has a fine farm and 
good buildings. 



'OHN SANDERSON, of Bernardston, a 
retired farmer and ex-State Senator, 
was born July 10, 1814, in the town of 
Petersham, Worcester County, Mass., son of 
John, Sr. , and Lydia (Morton) Sanderson, the 
former of whom was also a native of Peters- 
ham, where he was born May 21, 1769. Mr. 



Sanderson's grandfather, Jonathan Sanderson, 
was born in Worcester County, September 6, 
1740, in the early days of its settlement, 
before the Indians had all departed from their 
old hunting grounds. He was a farmer by 
occupation, and resided in Petersham. He 
was a man of keen intellect and shrewd busi- 
ness sense, and was often intrusted with the 
settlement of large estates. Though orthodox 
in his theology, he was liberal-minded, and 
was a Whig in politics. He died at the age of 
ninety-two years. The following is a copy of 
a document now in possession of his grandson, 
which is interesting as a relic of the olden 
time and a memorial of an outgrown custom : 

April 20, 1803. 

Article of Agreement between Jonathan 
Sanderson and his son, Curtis, of the first part, 
and Samuel Stevens of the second part, 
whereby said Stevens is to build and erect a 
building in decent and good manner, and in 
consideration of which said Jonathan Sander- 
son and son, Curtis Sanderson, is to pay said 
Stevens the sum of $340.00, $200.00 of said 
amount to be paid in cash and the balance in 
one year; and it is also further agreed that 
said Stevens is to have sixteen gallons of New 
England rum and also sugar to sweeten the 
same. 

The name of Jonathan Sanderson's wife 
before marriage was Mary Curtis. She was 
born March 12, 1745, and was about ninety 
years old at the time of her death. They were 
the parents of six children, all of whom 
reached maturity, namely: John, Susanna, 
Curtis, Sarah, Mary, and Joel. 

John Sanderson, the eldest son of Jonathan, 
grew to manhood in Petersham, and was edu- 
cated in the schools of that place. After 
learning the tanner's trade, he started a tan- 
nery in Petersham, where he did a profitable 
business in addition to farming, as he also 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



23S 



owned a good farm in Petersham. He was a 
man of good business ability, and was of indus- 
trious habits. Like his father, he was fre- 
quently called upon to settle estates, which 
indicates that he possessed in a large degree 
the confidence of those who knew him. He 
was liberal in his religious faith, and in poli- 
tics was a Whig. He died July 20, 1831. 
His wife, Lydia Morton, who was born in ^ 
Athol, Mass., died in October, 1872. They 
had two sons, of whom John is the only one 
living. His brother, Horatio M., died at the 
■ age of sixteen years. 

John Sanderson, the special subject of this 
sketch, spent the years of his boyhood in 
Petersham, and was educated in the common 
schools of that town. Being seventeen years 
of age at the time of his father's death, he 
took charge of the business, and carried it on 
until 1837, when he sold his possessions in 
Petersham, bought about one hundred acres of 
land in Bernardston, and commenced farming, 
in which occupation he has remained up to the 
present time, having bought other lands since 
his first purchase. Mr. Sanderson has a repu- 
tation for raising fine-blooded cattle and 
horses, and has some very fine stock on his 
farm. He is naturally proud of the fact that 
he raised the largest ox ever put on the 
market, according to best information ob- 
tainable. The ox was known as "Constitu- 
tion." His gross weight was three thousand, 
eight hundred and sixty pounds; and his net 
weight, when killed at six years of age, was 
greater in comparison with his gross weight 
than that of any other beef ever birtchered that 
has a record. In all respects he is an intelli- 
gent and progressive man, and takes a leading 
place among the agriculturists of this vicinity. 
He has resided on the place where he now 
lives since about 1842, and has a fine residence 
with good out-buildings. In addition to his 



farm property, he owns real estate in the vil- 
lage. He has always taken an active part in 
town affairs, and was elected to the State Sen- 
ate in 1861, serving one term. 

Mr. Sanderson was married in October, 
1840, to Miss Mary Osgood, who was born 
September 15, 18 16, in Wendell, Mass. She 
died January 27, 1890. They had a family 
of nine children, six of whom are now living, 
as follows : John H., born November i, 1841, 
now a banker in Greenfield ; Lavalette Osgood, 
born January 16, 1845, died October 14, 1874; 
Lucian Morton, born June 5, 1846, died Feb- 
ruary 19, 1857; Henry H., born July 13, 
1848, died August 19, 1887; Mary O., born 
July 7, 1850, is the wife of A. J. Wood, and 
resides in Bernardston; Ellery H., born Au- 
gust 14, 1853, resides at home, and is asso- 
ciated with his father in the management of 
the farm; Maria, born December 10, 1855, 
also resides at the Sanderson homestead ; 
Lydia, born July 29, 1857, is the wife of 
C. W. Scott, and resides in Greenfield; and 
Lucian Sanderson, born June 3, 1859, lives in 
New Haven, Conn. 




;_TILLMAN K. FIELD, a well-to-do 
farmer of Leverett, was born in 
Benson, Vt., December 6, 1834, 
son of William and Roxie M. (Kellogg) Field. 
His grandfather, also named William, was a 
native of Leverett, where he passed his life, 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Field's 
father was born in Leverett, where he attended 
the town schools. He was reared to farm life, 
and when a young man purchased a farm in 
this town, which he carried on for some time, 
later removing to Vermont, in which State he 
resided for fifteen years. Returning to his 
native town, he remained here for some time, 
but finally removed to Amherst, where he died 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



at the age of forty-seven years. He was a 
man naturally adapted to attain prominence in 
the community, and during his residence in 
Vermont represented his town in the State 
legislature for two years. His wife, Roxie 
M. Kellogg, was born in December, 1797, and 
was a daughter of John Kellogg, of Amherst, 
a representative of an old family there. She 
became the mother of six children, three of 
whom are still living, namely: Charles H., 
Stillman K., and Edward P. The mother 
passed her declining years with her son, Ed- 
ward, and died in September, 1867. 

Stillman K. Field when but nine years of 
age suffered the loss of his father, but made 
the best of his opportunities for obtaining an 
education in the schools of his native town. 
After working upon a farm for a short time, he 
went to Springfield, where he became a hotel 
clerk, later being employed in the same capac- 
ity in Washington, D.C., Chicago, and St. 
Louis. In company with his brother he con- 
ducted a hotel at Lake George for a time, but 
later returned to Washington, where he and 
his brother conducted a hotel in 1861, when 
the city was under martial law. While upon 
a visit to his home, the hotel was destroyed 
by fire, which event caused him to make dif- 
ferent plans for the future; and he settled 
upon his present farm, where he has since 
resided, engaged successfully in agricultural 
pursuits. 

In 1864 he was united in marriage to Mary 
E. Moore, of North Leverett, daughter of 
Dexter Moore, a lumber dealer. Mr. Field is 
a Democrat in politics, has been Assessor two 
years, and is serving his seventeenth year as 
Selectman, having been Chairman of the 
Board for fifteen years. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Congregational church, of 
which he is Treasurer. He also holds the 
same office in the Sunday-school. 



/^^^TeORGE DICKINSON, who resides at 
\JS I the Dickinson homestead in Whately 
and is a very prosperous farmer, was 
born in this town, July 21, 1846! His father, 
Rufus,' and his grandfather, Daniel Dickinson, 
were both natives of Whately, the latter hav- 
ing been a son of Gideon Dickinson, who was 
born in 1744, and who removed from Hatfield 
to Whately in 1770, and purchased the property 
later known as the Dexter Dickinson farm. 
Daniel Dickinson was born upon that farm; 
and there his boyhood and youth were spent in 
pursuing the elementary branches of learning- 
and acquiring experimental knowledge of agri- 
culture. After attaining his majority, he pur- 
chased a farm that was situated directly 
opposite his father's property; and this he 
occupied for a time, later moving to another 
farm on Spruce Hill, where he resided until 
his decease, which occurred in 1830, when he 
had attained the age of fifty-two years. 

Rufus Dickinson was born in 18 19 upon the 
first farm purchased by his father, and after 
the death of the latter continued to reside with 
his mother until his marriage, in 1844, at the 
age of twenty-five years. He inherited the 
present Dickinson homestead, where he re- 
sided several years, and died at the old home 
December 26, 1894, at the age of seventy-five 
years. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Julia S. Mather, was a daughter of Joseph 
Mather, whose father, Benjamin Mather, was a 
sea captain and a native of Connecticut. She 
became the mother of three children, two of 
whom are still living; namely, George and his 
brother Frank, a sketch of whose career will 
be found elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Julia 
S. M. Dickinson, now seventy-six years of 
age, resides with the last-named son. 

George Dickinson, after attending the dis- 
trict schools of his native town and also a pri- 
vate school, completed his studies at the 




RUFUS AND JULIA S. DICKINSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



230 



Deerfield Academy, and then returned to the 
parental home, where he has since continued 
to reside. He successfully conducts general 
farming, and, availing himself of the improve- 
ments which modern science has so effectually 
applied to agriculture, is enjoying a very pros- 
perous career. 

On April 5, 1871, he married Miss Myra E. 
Fairfield, daughter of George N. and Lydia 
Brown Fairfield. Mrs. Dickinson is a native 
of Conway, where her father, who was a tanner 
and currier, died at the age of eighty-one 
years. They had a family of seven children, 
six of whom are still living. Her mother died 
at the age of eighty years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dickinson are the parents of six children, as 
follows: Flora M. , who married Charles H. 
Pease, a farmer of Whately, having one child 
— Marshal R. ; Clara E. ; Dennis A. (de- 
ceased) ; Esther A. ; William L. ; and George 
R. Mr. Dickinson is a Democrat in politics; 
and he attends the Congregational church, of 
which his wife is a member. 

On the opposite page will be seen a like- 
ness of Mr. Rufus Dickinson, who, it may 
here be added, was of the seventh generation 
in direct descent from Deacon Nathaniel Dick- 
inson, a settler of Wethersfield, Conn., in 
1637, Town Clerk in 1645, Representative 
1646-56, and later a resident of Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts. 




ifRANK DICKINSON is an energetic 
and successful farmer of Whately, 
Franklin County, Mass., where he was 
born, November 9, 1850. Rufus Dickinson, 
his father, whose portrait may be seen on an- 
other page, and his grandfather, Daniel Dick- 
inson, were also natives of this place, the 
latter having been the son of Gideon Dickin- 
son, who was born at Hatfield, and who, ac- 



cording to the history of the town of Whately, 
published in 1872, settled here in 1770, and 
followed agricultural pursuits for the remain- 
der of his days. Daniel Dickinson, whose 
birth occurred in 1778, was reared to an agri- 
cultural life, and, after reaching the age of 
twenty-one years, purchased a farm in the 
immediate vicinity of his father's property, 
where he resided until within a few years of 
his death, which occurred in 1830, at the age 
of fifty-two years. 

Rufus Dickinson, son of Daniel, was born 
in i8ig. He became a well-to-do farmer, 
continuing to engage in agricultural pursuits 
until 1 871, in which year he retired from 
active labor. He was a Democrat in politics, 
and for many years was prominently identified, 
with local public affairs, serving as a Select- 
man, and also faithfully performing the duties 
of various other important town offices. He 
died at the age of seventy-five years. He 
married, April 25, 1844, Julia Mather, who 
was born February 21, 18 19, daughter of 
Joseph Mather, of Whately, and grand-daugh- 
ter of Benjamin Mather. The latter was a 
native of Connecticut, and for many years a 
sea captain, but died in Whately, his declin- 
ing years having been passed with his chil- 
dren. Joseph Mather, who was a hatter by 
trade, also followed carpentering and bridge- 
building as an occupation. He died in 
Whately at the age of eighty-five years. He 
wedded for his second wife a daughter of Israel 
Graves; and, of the five children by this union, 
four are still living: Benjamin; Julia, Mr. 
Dickinson's mother; Joseph; and Levi. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rufus Dickinson had a family of 
three children, two of whom now survive, 
namely: George Dickinson, an outline of 
whose prosperous career will be found else- 
where in this work; and- Frank, who forms the 
principal subject of the present biography. 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Frank Dickinson, after pursuing a rudimen- 
tary course of study in the district schools, 
attended the Deerfield Academy, and completed 
his education at the Powers Institute in Ber- 
nardston. He adopted the occupation of his 
ancestors, and has succeeded well in agricult- 
ure, being endowed with the sterling qualities 
which characterize the prosperous New Eng- 
land farmer. His residence, which was 
erected by his father, is both a pleasant and a 
substantial one. His mother, with faculties 
well preserved at seventy-six years of age, here 
makes her home. 

Mr. Dickinson was married on January 6, 
1875, to Miss Ella E. Warner, daughter of 
Edwin W. and Elmira L. (Smith) Warner, 
her father being a prominent farmer at North- 
ampton, of whose seven children five are still 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson have three 
children : Robert, who is a graduate of a busi- 
ness college at Springfield; Daniel; and Julia 
A. Mr. Dickinson is a Democrat in politics, 
taking a lively interest in all matters relating 
to local, State, and national issues, and has 
been called upon to hold various important 
town offices. He served one term each as 
Selectman and Assessor. The family attend 
the Unitarian church. 




^^TEPHEN B. BUDINGTON, a prom- 
inent and intelligent farmer of Ley- 
den, P^anklin County, was born 
there March 12, 1830, son of Jonathan and 
Sophronia (Denison) Budington, both of whom 
were natives of Leyden, the former born Feb- 
ruary 17, 1800, and the latter March 23, 1799. 
The Budington family are of English origin. 
Jonathan Budington, the grandfather of 
Stephen B., was a native of Groton, Conn. 
In early life he followed the sea for many 
years as captain of a sailing vessel, and was 



engaged in the West India trade up to the 
time of the Revolutionary War. He then 
secured a commission as privateer in the Con- 
tinental service, and took part in several naval 
engagements, receiving a prize for his success 
in capturing an English vessel in Boston Har- 
bor by strategy. At the close of the war Cap- 
tain Budington settled in Leyden, in sight of 
where Stephen B. Budington now lives. He 
was one of the pioneer settlers of the town, 
and owned a large tract of land. His death 
in 1 810 ended a long and successful life. 
His family consisted of four children; namely, 
Jonathan, Aaron O. , Stephen, and Priscilla 
H., all of whom have passed from the scenes 
of earth. 

Jonathan Budington was many years success- 
fully engaged in agriculture in Leyden, where 
he owned a portion of the old Budington home 
farm. He was an active and influential citi- 
zen, and often chosen by his townsmen to fill 
positions of responsibility and trust, among 
which were the offices of Selectman and 
County Commissioner. He also served accept- 
ably as a member of the legislature. In relig- 
ious views he was a Methodist, and for years 
was an official member and liberal supporter of 
the church. He died at the home of his son, 
Stephen Budington, where he had lived for 
sixty years. His first wife, Sophronia Deni- 
son Budington, bore him five children, three 
sons and two daughters, all of whom are dead 
with the exception of Stephen B. They were : 
Mary B., Ellen P., Stephen B., Charles O., 
and Jonathan. His second wife was Miss 
Abbie L. Wells, who died at forty-three years 
of age. There were no children from this 
union. 

Stephen B. Budington grew to manhood on 
the homestead. He received his early educa- 
tion in the district schools, and later attended 
Wilbraham Academy and East Greenwich 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



241 



Seminary. After completing his education, 
he taught school for several terms, and when 
twenty-one years of age engaged as clerk in 
the general store of Mr. S. L. Shattuck, at 
Leyden. The following year he was employed 
as agent for a co-operative store at Leyden ; 
and in 1855 he went West, where for about 
nine years he was engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness at Beardstown, 111. In 1864 Mr. Bud- 
ington returned to Leyden, and took charge of 
the home farm, which he subsequently pur- 
chased. He now owns about four hundred 
acres of land, and is profitably engaged in gen- 
eral farming, in connection with which he 
conducts a dairy, where the milk from a herd 
of Jersey cows is converted into products for 
the market. About five acres of his land are 
devoted to raising fruit, principally apples. 
On June 15, 1857, Mr. Budington was mar- 
ried to Miss Frances C. Hitchcock, of Beards- 
town, 111., a native of Bangor, Me., who died 
December II, 1865. Two children were born 
of this union: Charles N. , who died at three 
years of age; and Carrie F. , who was but two 
years old at the time of her death. Mr. Bud- 
ington formed a second marriage December 
15, 1868, with Miss Freda Baker, who was 
born in Hawley, Mass., January 4, 1841, 
daughter of Roswell and Bathsheba (Carter) 
Baker. Mr. and Mrs. Baker are also natives 
of Hawley, where the former was born in 
1817, and the latter in 1821. They now re- 
side in West Plawley. Mr. Baker is a hard- 
working and successful farmer. He is a Re- 
publican in politics. He and his wife are 
members of the Congregational church. Five 
children were born to them, three of whom 
died in infancy. A son and daughter are now 
living, Mrs. Budington and her brother Edwin. 
The latter, who was born January 18, 1843, is 
a druggist at Shelburne Falls, Mass. Mr. 
-Budington's second union has been blessed by 



the birth of four children : Ellen Mary, born 
May 26, 1870, the wife of the Rev. David 
Baines Griffiths, of Smith Centre, Kan. ; Rob- 
ert Allyn, who was born October 22, 1872, 
and resides with his parents, a member of the 
Senior Class of Williams College; Ethel 
Helena, born December 19, 1877, who is 
attending school ; and Walter Carter, born 
November 12, 1882, also with his parents. 
In politics Mr. Budington is a Republican, 
and a strong advocate of the principles of his 
party. His fellow-men have not been unmind- 
ful of his sterling character, and among the 
offices of responsibility and trust bestowed 
upon him are those of Selectman, Assessor, 
and Overseer of the Poor. He and his wife 
are consistent members of the Congregational 
church. On Mr. Budington's farm is found 
one of nature's wonders in the shape of a huge 
tipping rock, weighing several tons, which, in 
all probability, is a relic from the glacial 
period, and perhaps was brought from the dis- 
tant north in the great ice rivers or glaciers 
that geologists tell us once covered this sec- 
tion. In any event, there it stands, so beau- 
tifully poised as to be easily tipped from side 
to side. Its measurements are eleven feet four 
inches in length, seven feet eight inches in 
width, and six feet eight inches in height. 




LEY G. DICKINSON, a prosper- 
ous farmer of Whately Centre, was 
born upon the farm he now owns 
and occupies, March 8, 1824. His parents 
were Lyman and Experience (Graves) Dickin- 
son, natives of Whately, where the Graves and 
Dickinson families have been well and favor- 
ably known for many years. Mr. Dickinson's 
great-grandfather, Abner Dickinson, who was 
probably born in Hatfield, was a farmer in 
North Hatfield (now Whately). He was in 



242 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the French and Indian War from 1755 to 1763, 
and also served in the Revolutionary army, 
acting in 1780 as one of the guard about Major 
Andre on the night preceding his execution. 
The last years of Abner Dickinson's life were 
spent on the farm now occupied by his great- 
grandson, where he died in 1799. He had a 
family of four sons and five daughters. His 
son Jehu, the grandfather of our subject, was 
born in Hatfield, May 8, 1758. He also 
served in the Continental army, and, like his 
father, devoted the last years of his life to the 
peaceful pursuit of agriculture, settling upon 
a part of the Dickinson farm in Whately, 
where he died, October 6, 1819. He reared 
a family of seven children. 

Lyman Dickinson, sixth son of Jehu Dick- 
inson, who was born on June 24, 1795, passed 
his entire life upon the farm, which he culti- 
vated very successfully. He attained a posi- 
tion of prominence in the community, serving 
as a Selectman at different times during a 
period of many years, and also held other 
offices of public trust. Lyman Dickinson died 
at the age of eighty years. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Experience Graves, was a 
daughter of Moses and Abigail Graves, old 
residents of Whately. She was called to rest 
at the age of fifty years. Mr. and Mrs. Lyman 
Dickinson raised a family of seven children, 
two of whom are now living; namely, Ashley 
G. and Hiram R. 

Ashley G. Dickinson was educated in the 
district schools. He assisted his father in the 
farm duties until he reached the age of nine- 
teen years, at which time he commenced to 
learn the trade of a carpenter. After serving 
two years as an apprentice, he worked as a 
journeyman for some time at Worcester, 
Mass., later going to Westfield. There he 
resided for a period of thirty-five years, during 
which time he worked at his trade both as a 



journeyman and contractor, becoming well and 
favorably known as a man of sterling worth. 
In 1888 he returned to his native town, and 
has since been occupied in farming at the old 
homestead. The farm, which is situated upon 
high ground, consists of one hundred and 
sixty-five acres, and is devoted principally to 
the cultivation of tobacco. Mr. Dickinson has 
completely rebuilt the residence, and also 
erected a new barn. 

On December 5, 1855, Mr. Dickinson was 
united in marriage to Miss Jane Stebbins, 
daughter of Lansford and Sarah (Ames) Steb- 
bins. The Stebbins family also took an active 
part in the Revolutionary War, Mrs. Dickin- 
son's great-grandfather. Colonel Joseph Steb- 
bins, and her grandfather. Major Dennis 
Stebbins, being officers of note in the Con- 
tinental army. Her father, Lansford Stebbins, 
who was a native of Deerfield, spent the last 
years of his life in Illinois. Her mother was 
a daughter of Ebenezer Ames, of Greenfield, 
Mass. Mrs. Dickinson passed her childhood 
with her grandparents. She received a liberal 
education, attending the town schools and 
Deerfield Academy, and completing her stud- 
ies at Mrs. S. I. Barnard's boarding-school. 
After leaving school, she taught for some time. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson have had four chil- 
dren, two of whom are still living. William 
A. is now superintendent of a carriage hard- 
ware manufactory. He married Jennie Giles- 
pie, a native of the State of Michigan; and 
they have one daughter, Marjorie. Jeannette 
Dickinson is the wife of Harry Leigh, of 
Buffalo, N.Y., cashier of the New York Cen- 
tral Stockyards in that city. Gertrude, who 
married John B. Hill, of Boston, died in 1894, 
at the age of thirty-seven years; and Catherine 
died at the age of twelve years. 

Mr. Dickinson is a Republican in politics. 
He and his wife are members of the Congrega- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



U3 



tional church, and Mrs. Dickinson is actively 
engaged in Sabbath-school work. She was 
formerly superintendent of a Sabbath-school in 
Westfield, and has always been identified with 
church matters. 



Tt^OSWELL B. ROBERTSON, one of 
1^"^ the leading men. of Leyden, Mass., 
-1^ V_ ^ was born in Brattleboro, Vt., July 
6, 1839, son of William and Mary E. Robert- 
son. Mr. Robertson is of Scotch descent, his 
great-grandfather, William Robertson, and his 
grandfather bearing the same name, having 
come to America from Scotland, of which 
country they were natives. Grandfather Rob- 
ertson, who was a young man when he im- 
migrated to New England, rode into the 
wilderness west of the Connecticut, north of 
the Massachusetts line, and selected a spot for 
his home in what was then an unbroken forest, 
but where now is the village of Brattleboro, 
Vt., his father also going there to live. The 
sturdy pioneer went to work heartily, with no 
resources but a willing hand and a strong con- 
stitution. He died at Hillsboro, N. H., at 
an advanced age. Grandmother Robertson's 
maiden name was Tamar Barton. 

Roswell B. Robertson grew to manhood in 
Westminster, Vt. , acquiring a fair education 
in the district schools. He was engaged as a 
polisher for a period of twelve years, working 
in Northampton, Shelburne Falls, and Spring- 
field, and in 1863 bought the farm that he now 
occupies, which covers about one hundred and 
eighty acres. Here he carries on general 
farming, working tirelessly to bring the prod- 
ucts of his labor up to a high standard, both 
as to quality and quantity. 

In 1865 Mr. Robertson was married to Ada- 
line L., daughter of Wilder and Lectina 
(Wetherhead) Fisher, the former a well-to-do 



farmer in Brattleboro. Mrs. Adaline L. Rob- 
ertson died when a little over forty-six years 
of age; and in June, 1886, Mr. Robertson was 
married again, taking for his bride Mary 
Wheeler, a native of Colerain, daughter of 
Whitman and Louisa Wheeler, of that town. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robertson have one son, Ray 
R., born June 2, 1891. 

Mr. Robertson is a Republican in political 
affiliations. He is highly respected by his 
townsmen, and has iilled several public offices, 
holding that of Selectman for three years. 
He and his wife are liberal in their religious 
views ; and they have a very pleasant home, 
the appearance of the estate speaking well for 
the owners. 



OHN ANDREW ADAMS, formerly a 
well-known and highly respected farmer 
of Greenfield, but now no longer living, 
was born in that town August 14, 1840, son of 
Peleg and Lucinda (Hancock) Adams, the for- 
mer a native of Northbridge, born December 
29, 1799, the latter of Long Meadow, Mass., 
born in 1809. The Adams family is believed 
to be of Saxon origin, springing from Ran- 
dall Adams, of Norwood, town of Wem, 
Shropshire, England, a direct descendant of 
whom, William Adams, who was born in Eng- 
land, February 3, 1594, came to America in 
1628, and settled in Ipswich Hamlet (now 
Hamilton), Mass., in 1642. The farm which 
he cultivated is now occupied by a descendant, 
Sillsby Adams. Andrew Adams, the grand- 
father of John Andrew, represented the sixth 
generation from William, the line being 
traced, from father to son, through Samuel, 
who represents the second generation, Nathan- 
iel (the third), Samuel (the fourth), and John 
(the fifth), to Andrew (the sixth). 

Andrew Adams was born in Sutton, now 
a part of Northbridge, Mass., November 7, 



244 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1759, and removed to Greenfield, Mass., in 
1803. He purchased a large tract of land in 
the Connecticut Valley, and settled on the 
farm where Mrs. John Andrew Adams now 
resides, living in a log house. He built part 
of the road from Greenfield to the old Peleg 
Adams homestead, known as "The Swamp 
Road," and was one of the leading citizens of 
Greenfield in his day. He attended church at 
"the old meeting-house, " the first in Green- 
field. His death took place on the old farm, 
June 30, 1822. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Betsey Chapin, died January 6, 1846. 
They reared five children : Patty, Nahum, 
George, Eliza, and Peleg. 

Peleg Adams received a good common-school 
education. He worked on his father's farm 
till of age, and chose farming as his life voca- 
tion, in which he was very successful. He 
was also a large cattle dealer and a saga- 
cious business man. Purchasing the Mansion 
House in Greenfield, in January, 1877, for 
which he paid fifty thousand dollars, he ex- 
pended thirty-five thousand dollars additional 
on improvements, making it a model hotel ; 
and to-day it is one of the best as well as one 
of the oldest hotels in Franklin County. Mr. 
Adams was honest in all his dealings, and his 
ability and integrity won for him the respect 
of his townsmen. He served as Selectman, 
and filled other offices, always taking an active 
interest in public affairs. Though a liberal 
supporter of the various churches and in his 
youth an attendant at the Congregational ser- 
vice, and later at that of the Universalist soci- 
ety, he was never a professing member of any 
religious body; but his life was shaped by 
Christian principiles. He died at the home 
farm September 8, 1887. Mr. Adams's first 
wife, Lucinda Hancock, to whom he was 
united in 1831, died in 1840, at the age of 
thirty. She was the mother of the following 



children: Eliza Lucretia, born October 19, 
1833; Elizabeth Lucinda, born February 2, 
1836; Ruth Alma, born December 5, 1837; 
and John Andrew Adams, our subject. Peleg 
Adams's second wife, Sarah B. Meriam, who 
was born June 3, 1809, died in May, 1862. 
She was the mother of two children. One, 
born June 16, 1843, died in infancy. The 
other, Sarah Lucy, who was born December 
10, 1846, is also dead. Mr. Adams's third 
wife, Jane Bascom, whom he married October 
8, 1863, died April 13, 1890, without issue. 
Eliza L. , wife of J. P. Morgan, is the only 
living child of Peleg Adams. She resides in 
Greenfield, Mass. 

John Andrew Adams grew to manhood in 
Greenfield. He received a good common- 
school education, finishing his studies at Shel- 
burne Academy, and after leaving school gave 
his attention mostly to farming. His active 
life, with the exception of two years spent in 
Bernardston, was passed in Greenfield, the lat- 
ter part near the home of his father. He died 
December 3, 1880. June 29, 1864, he was 
married to Charlotte E. Meriam, a native of 
Barre, Mass., born February 26, 1843, daugh- 
ter of Jotham A. and Charlotte (Harwood) 
Meriam. Mr. Meriam was born in Oxford, 
February 25, 181 3. He was a great reader, 
a good school-teacher, and well informed in 
law, and was also a practical farmer. He died 
June 24, 1887. His wife, to whom he was 
united at Barre, Mass., May 3, 1841, was a 
native of that town, born November 5, 1814. 
She died October 16, 1878. Mr. and Mrs. 
Meriam were liberal in religious views, and 
were attendants of the Congregational church. 
They had two children : Charles Addison, 
born February 8, 1842, who died August 25, 
1877; and Charlotte E. , the wife of our sub- 
ject. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Adams was 
blessed by two daughters: Ruth C, born Sep- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 45 



tember 27, 1865; and Elizabeth L. , born 
March 25, 1867, in Greenfield. These young 
ladies graduated from the Greenfield High 
School in 1885, and taught for some time in 
Greenfield, but now give their time to the 
management of their real estate interests. 
Their grandfather, Peleg Adams, bequeathed 
to them — his only grand-daughters — much 
valuable property, including the Mansion 
House in Greenfield, which he left to them 
and their mother; and they are to inherit large 
tracts of land and other valuable property from 
their mother and their aunt, Mrs. Morgan. 
They are very accomplished young ladies, 
richly endowed mentally as well as financially. 
They reside at the old home farm with their 
mother, who also is a' well-educated and re- 
fined lady. 



<^ m^^ 




NSEL C. SMITH has been connected 
with the business interests of Colerain 
for many years, being now one of 
its most prosperous and progressive agricultu- 
rists, and one of its most influential and re- 
spected citizens. He was born December 29, 
1816, in the town of Wilmington, Vt., and is 
of Massachusetts ancestry. His parents were 
Rufus and Achsa (Ingraham) Smith, the father 
a native of Dover, Mass., born in 1790, and 
the mother of Amherst, where their nuptials 
were celebrated. 

Rufus Smith was a tanner and currier by 
trade, and during his earlier years worked at 
tanning and curry?ng; but, seeing no prospect 
of bettering his condition while working at his 
trade, he took charge of a grist-mill at Wil- 
mington, Vt. , and also engaged in the hotel 
business. He was an industrious man, but 
not very successful in financial matters. He 
spent his last years in Colerain, dying at the 
advanced age of eighty-four. He was liberal 
in his religious views and a strong Universalist 



in belief. Rufus Smith was twice married. 
His first wife died in Wilmington, Vt. , leav- 
ing five children; Of these, Ansel C, the 
subject of this brief biographical review, and 
Mrs. Barbara Russell, of Greenfield, are the 
only ones now living. The other three, Cath- 
erine, Mary, and Louisa, all married, reared 
families, and are now deceased. Rufus Smith 
subsequently married Elizabeth Browning, 
who bore him two children: a daughter named 
Elizabeth, who married and died; and a son, 
Horace A. Smith, who lives in Rowe. 

Ansel C. Smith went to Colerain when a 
lad of seven years, and there completed his 
education, attending the district schools. 
His home was with Mr. John Browning until 
he was sixteen years old, when he went to 
Rowe, intending there to learn the carriage- 
maker's trade; but before he had completed 
his apprenticeship he removed to Athol, 
N.Y., and, living there for some time with a 
brother of Mr. John Browning, worked at car- 
riage-making. He next located in Greenfield, 
Mass., where he learned the trade of a tanner 
and currier of Mr. Isaac Barton, and also 
became proficient in shoemaking. He re- 
mained with Mr. Barton three years as an 
apprentice and one year as a journeyman, 
after which he worked two seasons with Mr. 
I. Sheldon at Factory Hollow. Removing 
thence to Colerain, he continued his trade on 
his own account at Griswoldville three years, 
and the following three years was in the em- 
ploy of Mr. J. Perkins, manufacturing wagon- 
shafts. Mr. Smith subsequently established 
himself in the latter business at Foundryville, 
remaining five years. In 1862 he began his 
mercantile career, purchasing the stock of Cal- 
vin Shattuck, of Colerain, who had a general 
country store. This he conducted successfully 
until 1878, when he sold out to the firm of 
Thomas & Hillman; and since then he has 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



been actively engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
He has also assisted in building up the village 
of Colerain, erecting the present hotel of the 
place, and aiding materially in many radical 
improvements. 

On June 7, 1848, Mr. Smith was united in 
marriage to Sophia J. Thompson, who was 
born July 28, 1827, in Colerain, and is a daugh- 
ter of Mollis and Jane (Taggart) Thompson, 
the former of whom died June 23, 1856, and 
the latter March 31, 1874. Mrs. Thompson 
is descended from one of the oldest and most 
honored families of this section of the county, 
the Taggarts having been prominent among 
the pioneers of the town. Two children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, Henry A. and 
Mary. Henry A., who was born November 
II, 1850, is now in business with his father, 
and shares with him the ownership of the hotel 
and of a half interest in the store formerly con- 
ducted by Thomas & Hillman, the firm name 
now being Smith & Hillman. He was mar- 
ried October 8, 1873, to Margaret McClellan, 
who was born in Colerain, October 22, 1849, 
and died there, August i, 1894, without issue. 
She was an active Christian woman, a member 
of the Congregational church. Henry A. 
Smith is an influential citizen of the place, 
strongly Republican in politics, and for five 
consecutive years served as Selectman. Ansel 
C. Smith's daughter, Mary, who was born 
April 19, 1855, is the wife of C. H. Wilcox, 
a tin-smith, residing at Shelburne Falls. 
They have one child, Hattie Maud. 

In political views Mr. Smith is a stanch 
Republican. He represented his district in 
the State legislature in 1870, and has ever 
taken an active and intelligent interest in town 
affairs, serving as Selectman one term. Asses- 
sor three or four years, and as Town Clerk for 
twenty-six continuous years, resigning the 
ofifice in 1893. In his religious views he is 



liberal, and a firm believer in the doctrines of 
the Unitarian church. The life record of Mr. 
Smith furnishes a forcible illustration of the 
prosperity to be attained by persevering energy 
and a steady application to the details of busi- 
ness. He has attained his present high posi- 
tion ainong the leading men of the county by 
his own untiring efforts, his strong hands, will- 
ing heart, and courageous spirit having been 
his only endowments. 



MERSON C. WARNER, an energetic 
farmer of Whately, residing near the 
Hatfield line, was born in Granby, 
Mass., August 26, 1839, son of Foster J. and 
Achsah A. (Morton) Warner, the former of 
Amherst, the latter of Whately. The Warner 
family has been well and favorably known in 
Amherst for many years, our subject's great- 
grandfather, Josiah Warner, having been a 
resident of that town during a great part of his 
life. There he died, and there his only child, 
Josiah, the grandfather of Emerson C. Warner, 
was born and passed his life, engaged in farm- 
ing. There also Foster J. Warner, the father 
of Emerson C. , was born. He was trained by 
his father in the practice of agriculture, and 
also engaged in manufacturing brooms for a 
time. About 1842 he moved to Whately, 
where he purchased the farm now owned and 
occupied by his son, and erected the house. 
There he resided until his decease, which 
occurred when he was sixty-nine years of age. 
He was an industrious man, and left a farm 
of about one hundred and sixty-five acres, as 
the result of his labors. On March 2, 1837, 
he married Achsah A. Morton, daughter of 
Sylvester and Lydia (Frary) Morton, of 
Whately. Her grandfather, Justin Morton, 
was one of the early settlers of , the town. 
Her father, Sylvester Morton, was a wheel- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



247 



Wright in Whately. He raised a family of 
ten children, eight of whom are still living. 
Mrs. Warner became the mother of four chil- 
dren, of whom Emerson C. is the only sur- 
vivor. She still resides at the old homestead, 
bright and active at the age of eighty-three 
years, and continues to attend personally to 
her household duties. 

Emerson C. Warner was three years of age 
when his parents removed to Whately. Dur- 
ing his boyhood he assisted his father upon the 
farm, receiving his education in the district 
school and at a high school in Vermont. He 
resided with his parents until 1868, when he 
purchased a farm in East Whately, which he 
conducted until 1880. After his father's 
death, he returned to the homestead, where he 
has since resided. The farm, which consists 
of two hundred and eighty acres, he devotes 
principally to dairy interests; and he keeps a 
large herd of Jersey cows. 

In 1862 IVIr. Warner was united in marriage 
to Miss Amanda Hunter, daughter of Abraham 
Hunter, a carpenter of Chester, Mass. Mr. 
and Mrs. Warner have two children ; namely, 
Lizzie Ann and Minnie B. The former is 
the wife of George Graves, formerly of 
Whately, now a fruit-grower in California, 
and has two children, Lillian and Lemuel. 

Mr. Warner is a Republican in politics. In 
religious belief he is a Congregationalist. 



KORENZO D. ELMER, a successful 
business man of Miller's Falls, Mass., 
w^^ was born in Vernon, Vt. , December 
26, 1832, son of Levi and Clarissa (Silvester) 
Elmer. His grandfather, Reuben Elmer, was 
also a resident of Vernon, where his last years 
were passed. Levi Elmer was reared to the 
vocation of a farmer, which he followed with 
success throughout his life. Llis death oc- 



curred in Vernon, Vt. His wife, Clarissa Sil- 
vester, was a native of Maine. She died in 
Guilford, Vt. They reared a family of nine 
children, of whom two are now living — Ralph 
and Lorenzo D. 

Lorenzo D. Elmer was left an orphan at an 
early age, both parents having died before he 
was ten N'ears old. He lived with his brother 
until he was fourteen, and was then brought 
face to face with the neccessity of earning his 
own livelihood. Until he was twenty years 
of age he worked out by the season. He then 
secured a position on the railroad, where he 
had charge of construction work for a number 
of years. In 1863 he enlisted in Company F, 
Sixth Vermont Regiment, and, going to the 
front, received a severe wound from a minie- 
ball, which so disabled him that he was con- 
fined in the hospital for several months. On 
his recovery he was transferred to the Reserve 
Corps, in which he served until the close of 
the war, receiving an honorable discharge 
September 4, 1865, after a service of twenty- 
six months. Mr. Elmer then returned to rail- 
roading, making his home in Vermont at first, 
and later removing to Northfield, Mass., where 
he remained three years. From there he went 
to Templeton, Worcester County, where he 
lived eighteen years, or until 1889, when he 
located in Miller's Falls, and hired the station- 
ery store which he now occupies. He subse- 
quently purchased the news business, and now 
carries a complete line of sporting goods, 
cigars, stationery, periodicals, books, etc., and 
has a large and growing business. 

Mr. Elmer was married in 1857 to Marie C. 
Redfield, daughter of Joel Redfield, a black- 
smith of Woodford, Vt., where Mrs. Elmer 
was born. She is the youngest of six chil- 
dren. Mr. and Mrs. Elmer have reared two 
sons and two daughters, namely: George D., 
now station agent at Erving, Mass., who mar- 



248 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ried Emma Stoddard, and has two children — 
Maud and George ; Carrie, who married Fred 
Rowland, a dentist in Portland, Me. ; Mary 
E., wife of Charles L. Cook, who is associated 
with Mr. Elmer in the stationery business; 
and Frank R., who is with the Miller's Falls 
Company. All these children graduated from 
the high school at Templeton, Mass. 

In political affiliation Mr. Elmer is a Re- 
publican. He is a Mason, belonging to the 
lodge at Gardner, Mass. Mrs. Elmer is an 
attendant of the Congregational church. 



TT^ORNELIUS G. TROW, M.D., a pub- 
I Sj^ lie-spirited citizen and successful phy- 
V ^ ^ sician of Sunderland, whose features 
are portrayed on the opposite page, and whose 
personal and family record is briefly here set 
forth, was born in Buckland, Mass., March i, 
1847, son of Dr. Nathaniel G. and Catherine 
(Brooks) Trow. His great-grandfather, Josiah 
Trow, who was a native of England, served 
with distinction in the French and Indian and 
the Revolutionary wars; and his grandfather, 
Nathaniel Trow, son of Josiah, was a native 
of Beverly, Mass., but settled in New Hamp- 
shire, where he followed agriculture. Nathan- 
iel G. , son of Nathaniel the elder, was born 
in Wendell, N.H., July 25, 1811. He was 
reared to farm life, and carefully educated in 
the schools of Wendell, N.H., and the Cum- 
mington Academy. He then taught in the 
district schools, and began the study of medi- 
cine with Dr. Kittridge, of Hinsdale, later 
entering the Berkshire Medical School, from 
which he graduated, and commenced the prac- 
tice of his profession at Buckland in 1837. 
He resided there until 1850, when he removed 
to Sunderland, and remained in active practice 
until within five years of his death, which 
occurred at the age of seventy-six years. He 



was a skilful and reliable practitioner of the 
old school, and a man of many rare attain- 
ments. Dr. Nathaniel G. Trow was officially 
connected with the Congregational church, 
and served upon the School Board. His wife, 
who was a native of Buckland, became the 
mother of six children, Cornelius G. , of Sun- 
derland, being the only one to reach maturity. 
Mrs. Catherine Brooks Trow died in Sunder- 
land at the age of sixty-two. 

Cornelius was about four years of age when 
his parents moved to Sunderland, and he pur- 
sued the primary branches of his education in 
the schools of this town. After completing 
his preparatory studies at the Williston Semi- 
nary, he entered Amherst College, where he 
was graduated, and then began the study of 
medicine with his father. He subsequently 
pursued a thorough medical course at the New 
York College of Physicians and Surgeons, and, 
after graduating from that well-known school 
in 1872, began the practice of his profession 
in Sunderland, where he has since resided. 

In June, 1872, Dr. Trow wedded Genevra 
A. Shaw, of Springfield, a daughter of Samuel 
A. and Mary (White) Shaw, the former of 
whom was a prominent grocer of that city. 
Mr. Shaw's wife, who was a native of Ware, 
Mass., became the mother of ten children, 
three of whom are now living; namely, George 
D., C. W. , and Genevra A., Mrs. Trow. 
Mrs. Mary White Shaw died in Springfield at 
the age of fifty-six; and Samuel A. Shaw, who 
was again married, died at the age of seventy- 
nine, leaving, by his second wife, one daugh- 
ter, Mary Frances Shaw. He was a member 
of the South Church of Springfield. 

Dr. Cornelius G. Trow is a member of the 
Knights of Honor, the various college socie- 
ties, and the Massachusetts and the Franklin 
District Medical Societies. He is indepen- 
dent in politics, has served upon the School 




CORNELIUS G. TROW. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Board for twelve years, has been Chairman 
of the Town Committee, and a member of the 
Library Board, of which he has been a Trustee 
for twenty-three and Treasurer for fifteen 
years. He attends the Congregational church, 
of which Mrs. Trow is a member; and they are 
both active in the different church societies. 




'AMUEL C. BROWN, a highly re- 
spected farmer and worthy citizen of 
Leyden, Mass., was born in Guil- 
ford, Vt. , March 15, 1808, son of Elijah and 
Rhoda (Childs) Brown, the former of whom 
was a native of Woodstock, Conn., and the 
latter of Deerfield, Franklin County, Mass. 
His grandfather, Elisha Brown, who was born 
in Rhode Island, was among the sturdy pio- 
neers who settled in Leyden, and was a patriot 
soldier of the Revolutionary War. He and 
his good wife both lived to advanced age, he 
being over eighty years old at the time of 
his death. They reared seven children, all of 
whom are now dead. 

Elijah Brown removed from Woodstock, 
Conn., to Guilford, Vt., and thence to Leyden, 
Mass. He was an industrious man, and 
throughout his life followed farming with suc- 
cess. In town affairs he took a prominent 
part, serving as Selectman several years, and 
also in many minor offices. In his religious 
view he was liberal. Elijah Brown died at 
the age of eighty-four. His wife died in her 
sixty-second year. They were the parents of 
eight children, of whom seven grew to matu- 
rity and three are now living, as follows: 
Mrs. Tirzah Clark, widow of Elan Clark, 
who resides in Monroe, Wis., and is over 
ninety years of age; Samuel C, the subject 
of this sketch ; and Mrs. Caroline Carpenter, 
widow of Austin Carpenter, who also lives 
in Monroe, Wis. The deceased are: Eliza- 



beth, Willard, Henry K., Frank, and Willard 
(second). 

Samuel C. Brown removed with his parents, 
when a small boy, from Guilford, Vt., to Ley- 
den, where he received a good practical educa- 
tion in the district schools. At twenty-one 
years of age he started to earn a livelihood, 
and was first employed in a saw-mill and grist- 
mill in Deerfield, Mass., where he received 
twenty dollars for his first month's labor. He 
soon gave up this business, and, returning 
home, took charge of his father's farm, of 
which he has since become the owner. Mr. 
Brown has so prospered in his agricultural pur- 
suits that he has been enabled to add to his 
property by the purchase of other land from 
time to time, and is now the owner of consid- 
erable real estate. 

On September 10, 1835, Mr. Brown was 
joined in marriage to Miss Mary N. Carpenter, 
a native of Leyden, born December 10, 1815, 
who died in 1858. Their union was blessed 
by the birth of six children : Lorietta, who 
died at the age of a year and a half; Franklin 
C, who enlisted in the Fifteenth Massachu- 
setts Volunteers at the time of the war, and 
died in service, aged twenty-three years; 
Henry K. , who has been employed as collector 
of the Manhattan Gas Company of New York 
City the past twenty years; Elijah, who man- 
ages a planing-mill in New York City; Sam- 
uel C, Jr., general agent of the American 
Express Company at Kansas City; and Dwight 
C, a bridge-builder in Greenfield, Mass. Mr. 
Brown was subsequently married March 29, 
1862, to Miss Sarah A. McCloud, who was 
born in Rowe, Franklin County, Mass., Jan- 
uary 15, 1828, daughter of Charles and Hen- 
rietta (Knight) McCloud, each of whom 
represented an- old and respected family of 
Franklin County. Charles McCloud was born 
in Colerain, and was successfully engaged in 



252 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



agriculture up to the time of his death, which 
occurred in his seventy-third year. His wife, 
who was a native of Pawtucket, R.I., died at 
the age of sixty years. In politics Mr. Mc- 
Cloud was a supporter of the Republican party. 
He and his wife were members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Five children were 
born to them, three of whom are now living, 
namely: Hiram McCloud, of Colerain ; Mrs. 
Lurena Smith, of Silver City, la. ; and 
Sarah A., the wife of Mr. Brown. One child 
died in infancy; and a daughter, Lucy, died at 
twenty-one years of age. One daughter was 
born of Mr. Brown's second union, Ellen L., 
who is head nurse in the Dr. Pierce Hospital 
at Greenfield, Mass. 

In politics Mr. Brown is a Democrat. He 
takes an active part in town affairs, and has 
rendered efficient serv.ice as Selectman for 
three years, and has filled minor offices. In 
religious views he is liberal. Though in his 
eighty-eighth year, Mr. Brown is still active, 
and appears many years younger. The pros- 
perity which he now enjoys has been attained 
through years of unremitting toil and the exer- 
cise of prudence and good management; and in 
his work his estimable wife has been an able 
helper. 

^^»m* 

-ONATHAN E. DAVENPORT, a suc- 
cessful farmer and extensive fruit- 
grower of Colerain, was born in that 
town on May 7, 1857. He is a son of Otis 
J. and Sarah (Johnson) Davenport, both of 
whom were natives of the above-named town, 
Otis having been born on March 26, 1829, and 
his wife on February 26, 1832. Mr. Daven- 
port traces his ancestry in a direct line to 
Thomas Davenport, who, in company with two 
brothers, is supposed to have immigrated from 
England and settled in Dorchester, Mass., 
some time previous to the year 1640. Eben- 



ezer Davenport, son of Thomas, was born at 
Dorchester on April 2, 1661, and died on July 
19, 1738. Plis wife, Dorcas Andrews, was 
born in 1663, and died in 1723. Their son 
Ebenezer was born in Dorchester, October 23, 
1706; and his wife. Submit Howe, also a native 
of Dorchester, was born in April, 1707. Both 
lived and died in Dorchester; and in that town 
their son, Joseph Davenport, was born, August 
10, 1747. He was the first of the family to 
settle in Colerain, and was one of the pioneers 
in that part of the country. Acquiring a tract 
of land, he established a home not far from 
Mr. Davenport's present dwelling, and became 
a very prosperous farmer. Vigorous and ener- 
getic, he met the difficulties of pioneer life 
with courage and perseverance, and surmounted 
all obstacles in his path to prosperity. He 
died April 14, 182 i. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary White, was born in 1746. 
She died February 22, 181 7. 

Mr. Davenport's grandfather, Edward Dav- 
enport, son of Joseph, was born in Dorchester, 
September 6, 1774. He received a good edu- 
cation, and was ordained a minister of the 
Baptist church, preaching at Colerain and 
being employed for some time as a missionary 
among the white settlers who lived among 
the Indian tribes of Pennyslvania. Edward 
Davenport died December 8, 1863. He was 
twice married, and raised a family of four- 
teen children, of whom there is but one 
survivor, Mrs. Mary Newton, of Shelburne. 
His second wife, whose maiden name was 
Lurana Andrews, was the grandmother of our 
subject. She was born in Ashfield, March i, 
1792, and died March 7, 1875. 

Otis J. Davenport, the father of Jonathan 
E., was the second son of his father's second 
wife. He entered into the pursuit of agricult- 
ure with a spirit and energy which were pro- 
ductive of the most substantial results, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



253 



became one of the largest general farmers in 
the section, owning at one time over four hun- 
dred acres of land, including his fathers old 
farm. He purchased the farm where his son 
now resides in 1867. Mr. Davenport was 
recognized as one of the most successful 
farmers in Colerain, and he was a very exten- 
sive fruit-grower. He kept in touch with 
agricultural progress, and was an active mem- 
ber of the board of agriculture up to the time 
of his decease. Politically, he was a Repub- 
lican. He represented his district at the 
General Court in 1864, and was prominent in 
town affairs, serving on the School Board 
seventeen years. For a period of thirty years 
Mr. Davenport was an earnest member of the 
Baptist church. He was a man highly es- 
teemed for his many commendable traits of 
character; and his death, which occurred on 
September 6, 1880, was the cause of much 
regret to the entire community. His wife, 
who now resides with her son, Jonathan E. 
Davenport, was the mother of seven children, 
one of whom died in infancy. The others 
were as follows: Sarah M., wife of George 
Maxam, of Colerain, who was born on Septem- 
ber 3, 1855; Jonathan E., the subject of this 
article; William H., born May 27, 1862, a 
Baptist minister at Rochester, Minn. ; Clara 
F. , a resident of Colerain, who was born June 
22, 1864; Albert O., a carpenter of Colerain, 
born July 13, 1868; and Walter, Jr., a farmer 
of Greenfield, whose birth occurred on July 
21, 1874. 

Jonathan E. Davenport attended the schools 
of his native town, and was also a student at 
Powers Institute in Bernardston, at intervals, 
during a period of four years. He taught 
school for five terms in early manhood, and 
after his father's decease succeeded to the pos- 
session of the farm, which he has since suc- 
cessfully managed. He has in all one hundred 



and ninety-two acres of finely improved land, 
ten acres of which are devoted to the growing 
of fruit, and, besides conducting general farm- 
ing, also has a well-equipped dairy. He 
keeps a herd of ten full-blooded Jersey cows, 
and is also profitably engaged in sheep-raising. 

On October 22, 1882, Mr. Davenport was 
united in marriage to Miss Lucy A. Stone, 
who was born in Reedsboro, Vt., March 28, 
1859, daughter of Royal and Carrie A. (Ken- 
drick) Stone. Royal Stone died at the age of 
thirty-six years ; and his widow subsequently 
married the Rev. S. P. Everett, of Ayer, 
Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Davenport have had 
three children, namely: Royal W. , born 
December 14, 1885; Edna A., born December 
16, 1887; and Milton J., born January 23, 
1890. 

Mr. Davenport, like his father, takes an 
active interest in town affairs, and has served 
as Assessor and as a member of the School 
Board six years. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Baptist church, in which he is a 
Deacon, and is at present serving his fifteenth 
year as superintendent of the Sunday-school. 



T^ALVIN S. LOOMIS, a respected citi- 
I jr^^ zen of Whately, who has long been 

V..__^ identified with the agricultural in- 
terests of the place, was born in the house in 
which he now resides, on March 25, 1827. 
He is the son of Jonathan C. and Electa 
(Stockbridge) Loomis, the former a native of 
Whately, the latter of North Hadley. His 
grandfather, Abner Loomis, who was in all 
probability a native of Hatfield, moved from 
that town to West Whately, where he settled 
upon a farm. There he resided until his de- 
cease, which occurred at an advanced age. 

Jonathan C. Loomis, the father of Calvin 
S., was a carpenter by trade, and worked at 



^54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



building for many years in his native town, 
becoming widely known as an honest and reli- 
able contractor and builder. His last days 
were spent on the farm where his son now re- 
sides, which he purchased for a home, and 
there he died August 15, 1864, at the age of 
seventy-eight years. Mr. Loomis was a vet- 
eran of the War of 181 2. His wife, Electa 
Stockbridge, who was born at North Hadley 
on January 17, 1788, was the daughter of 
David Stockbridge, a farmer and miller. She 
was one of a large family. Mrs. Loomis was 
called to rest at the age of eighty-eight. She 
was a member of the Congregational church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Loomis were the parents of nine 
children, all of whom lived to reach threescore 
years, the first among them to be called home 
having passed that age at the time of his 
decease. Of these, six are still living, 
namely: Sarah, wife of Reuben Belden ; Mary, 
who married John Little; Elizabeth, widow of 
John D. Lee; Phila, widow of Ira Brown; 
Celia, widow of Otis Wells; and Calvin S. , 
the subject of this sketch. 

Calvin S. Loomis attended the common and 
high schools of his native town and the semi- 
nary at East Hampton. He resided with his 
parents and assisted his father upon the farm 
until 1855, when he went to the State of Ohio. 
There he was engaged in the raising of broom- 
corn and the manufacture of brooms for a 
period of two years. At the expiration of that 
time he returned East, and, once more tak- 
ing up his residence at the old homestead 
in Whately, engaged in the manufacture of 
brooms, establishing a factory for that purpose, 
at the same time attending to his farming in- 
terests. On the death of his father he suc- 
ceeded to the possession of the farm, which he 
has since cultivated with prosperous results. 
The home property consists of sixty acres of 
finely improved land, and Mr. Loomis has also 



one hundred and twenty-five acres of valuable 
land in Conway, where he keeps some fine 
young stock. 

In political views Mr. Loomis is a Repub- 
lican. He attends the Congregational church, 
and contributes to its support. His household 
is most ably presided over by his sister Phila. 



M 



AVID MOWRY, one of the most 
prominent and public-spirited citi- 
zens of Leyden, Franklin County, 
was born in that town, September 7, 1816, 
son of George and Polly (Avery) Mowry. His 
grandfather, John Mowry, was one of the 
pioneer settlers of Rhode Island; but his last 
days were spent in New York State. 

George Mowry, the father of our subject, 
who was born in Rhode Island, September 24, 
1776, removed to Massachusetts in early man- 
hood, and located in Franklin County, when 
the country was new and but thinly settled. 
He was a clothier by trade, and followed that 
vocation in Leyden for several years. Indus- 
try and honesty in all his dealings brought 
him success, and won for him the respect of his 
townsmen; and, as a mark of their esteem, he 
was often chosen to represent them in positions 
of honor and trust. During six sessions of the 
legislature he was a member of that body; and 
he also served most acceptably as a member 
and as Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
and for over twenty years acted as Justice of 
the Peace. He died on the farm where David 
Mowry now lives, October 19, 185 1, having 
attained the age of seventy-five years. He 
was twice married. His first wife, whose 
maiden name was Polly Brown, bore him one 
son, George, who died at twenty years of age. 
His second matrimonial alliance was with 
Miss Polly Avery, who was two years his 
junior, her birth occurring in 1778. She died 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2SS 



September 25, 1843, aged sixty-five years. 
They had a family of six children — John, 
Manley, Polly, Nathan A., David, and Albert 
L. — of whom David is the sole survivor. 

David Mowry acquired a good practical edu- 
cation in the schools of Leyden and the acad- 
emy at Deerfield, Mr. Luther B. Lincoln 
being the preceptor of the latter institution at 
that time. For a number of terms Mr. Mowry 
was engaged in school-teaching in Colerain 
and Leyden, Mass., and also in Vernon, Vt. 
Aside from the time occupied in this way, his 
life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits. 
He lived with his father until the latter's 
death, when he became the owner of the home- 
stead property, where he now successfully 
conducts a dairy and stock farm, and in con- 
junction with this is also engaged in lumber- 
ing to a moderate extent. He owns in all 
about four hundred acres of land. 

On September 7, 1840, Mr. Mowry was 
married to Miss Sarah A. Carpenter, who was 
born in Leyden, March 13, 1818. Her par- 
ents, David and Jemimah (Newcomb) Carpen- 
ter, both of whom were natives of Franklin 
County, are now dead ; and Mrs. Mowry died 
December 2, 1878. The home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Mowry was blessed by the birth of 
five children. Charlotte E. resides at home. 
David C. , who enlisted in the Twenty-seventh 
Massachusetts Regiment, Company C, was 
engaged in the battles of Roanoke Island and 
Newbern, died at Washington, October 10, 
1862, of malarial fever. Mary B. is the wife 
of F. J. Kellogg, of Utica, N.Y. Austin W. 
died in the New York Hospital, October 18, 
1891. Hosea B. is engaged in agriculture on 
the home farm. 

In politics Mr. Mowry is a Democrat. Like 
his father, he has manifested great interest 
in the public weal ; and, although he has now 
retired from active participation in such 



affairs, he has in times past rendered very effi- 
cient service to his party. In 1847 he repre- 
sented his district in the legislature; and he 
filled the offices of Town Clerk and Treasurer 
most acceptably for thirty years, as well as 
others of a less important character. In relig- 
ious belief Mr. Mowry is a Universalist. 



tLDEN W. GROUT, a pro 
farmer residing in Montague, 
^ , lin County, near Miller's Fa 



prosperous 

Frank- 

'alls, was 

born in Wendell, Mass., September 25, 1832, 
son of Martin and Clarina (Johnson) Grout, 
the former of whom was a native of Phillips- 
ton, Mass. Joel Grout, also the grandfather 
of Alden W. , was a native of Massachusetts, 
and spent the latter part of his life on a farm 
which he owned in the town of Pelham. 

Martin Grout, the father of Alden W. , was 
reared to the vocation of a farmer. He also 
learned the stone-cutter's trade, which he fol- 
lowed successfully for many years in Pelham 
and vicinity. He built the jail at Greenfield, 
was foreman on the Concord State Prison, and 
also built the vaults for the Franklin County 
National and Franklin County Savings Banks. 
In 1 834 he removed to Montague, and pur- 
chased the hotel property at Miller's Falls, 
which included one hundred and twenty-five 
acres of land. The hotel and seven acres of 
land he eventually sold to the railroad, and 
he then erected the residence in which Alden 
W. Grout now lives. Politically, Martin 
Grout was an adherent of the Republican 
party. He took an active interest in the wel- 
fare of his town, and was often chosen to 
fill positions of responsibility and trust. He 
served as Selectman several years, also as 
Assessor and as chairman of the committee 
that built the Town 'Hall at Montague Centre. 
Mr. Grout died at his home in Montague, 



^56 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



where his son Alden W. now lives, in August, 
1865. He was then in his seventy-fifth year. 
His wife, Clarina Johnson, was a daughter of 
Silas Johnson, a farmer of Woodstock, Mass., 
where she was born. They reared five chil- 
dren, of whom three are still living: Saman- 
tha S. , who married Severance Holton ; Alden 
W. , the subject of this sketch; and Martha 
S., who married Alfred Waite. The mother 
passed her last years at the home of Alden 
W. Grout, where she died at the age of 
seventy-two. She was a member of the Con- 
gregational church at Montague. 

Alden W. Grout was two years old when 
his father moved to Miller's Falls; and there 
he received his early education, later attending 
the high school at East Brattleboro and the 
academy at Brattleboro, Vt. After his father's 
death he became the owner of the homestead, 
a farm of one hundred and twenty-five acres, 
and since he purchased it has made various 
improvements, enlarging many of the build- 
ings. He is profitably engaged in the cultiva- 
tion of the land, and has a choice dairy, 
keeping a herd of fourteen Jersey and Holstein 
cows. 

In 1853 Mr. Grout was married to Charlotte 
P. Stone, the adopted daughter of Luther 
Stone, who removed from Wayland to Wen- 
dell, Mass. In the latter place he was 
engaged in farming, and also conducted a 
saw-mill up to the time of his death in his 
eighty-fourth year. Four children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Grout, two of whom they 
reared, namely: Alice, who married Elwin L. 
Stockwell, a machinist in Miller's Falls, and 
had two children, one of whom is living — 
Lulu A- ; and Laura A., wife of Frank H. 
Giles, of Charlemont, Mass., who is engaged 
in the milk business, and manages Mr. Grout's 
farm. Mr. and Mrs. Giles have one child, 
Florence M. Clara Newell Grout died at the 



age of fifteen, and Mary Ellen died in her 
twenty-seventh year. Laura attended school 
in Fitchburg, Mass. The other children were 
educated in Montague. 

Mr. Grout is a Democrat in political afifilia- 
tion. He is a man of keen intellect and ster- 
ling character, and his fellow-citizens have 
shown their appreciation of his worth by elect- 
ing him to many ofifices of trust. He has 
served as Selectman three years, Overseer of 
the Poor two years, and Assessor two years. 
He is an attendant of the Congregational 
church, of which his wife is a member. 



/!> 



EORGE B. McCLELLAN, a thriving 
\J5 1 agriculturist, who has a productive 
farm at South Whately, was born at 
Greenfield, Mass., July 30, 1857. He is a son 
of Elias and Mary A. (Fellows) McClellan, 
the former a native of Colerain, the latter of 
Shelburne. The great-grandfather of our sub- 
ject, Robert L. McClellan, was, it is believed, 
a native of Massachusetts. Flis son, Daniel, 
George B. McClellan's grandfather, who was a 
native of Colerain, was a farmer and hotel- 
keeper, residing in Colerain for many years. 
His last days were spent in North Adams. 

Elias B. McClellan was born in Colerain, 
October 11, 1824. He was reared to agricult- 
ural life, and also acquired the carpenter's 
trade, eventually becoming well known as a 
prominent contractor and builder, conducting 
an extensive business in Greenfield, Holyoke, 
Westfield, and Chicopee. He finally retired 
from the building trade, and in 187 1 purchased 
the farm at Whately on which his son now 
resides, and there passed the remainder of his 
life, his death occurring on August 23, 1882, 
at the age of fifty-seven years. He was con- 
nected with the Congregational church in his 
town, and was a man noted for his integrity. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2S7 



Elias B. McClellan was twice married. 
His first wife, Mary A. Fellows, who was 
born March 30, 1828, was the daughter of 
Captain Stephen Fellows, of Shelburne. Cap- 
tain Fellows was a carpenter by trade, and 
followed that occupation in early life. In 
1832 he purchased a farm, upon which he 
spent the remainder of his life, dying at the 
age of eighty-four. Mrs. McClellan was one 
of a family of five children. She died at 
Greenfield, October 25, 1859, aged thirty-one 
years. Of her children, George B. , the sub- 
ject of this article, was the only one to reach 
maturity. Elias B. McClellan's second wife 
was Miss Esther Newton, daughter of James 
Newton, of Greenfield. She became the 
mother of two children, namely: Mary, wife of 
Henry G. Taylor, of Westfield, Mass. ; and 
William B., who resides at Wilmington, Vt. 

George B. McClellan passed his early boy- 
hood in Greenfield and Holyoke. He was 
thirteen years of age when his father removed 
to Whately, and continued his education in 
the district schools of that town, finishing with 
the regular course at Powers Institute in Ber- 
nardston. After leaving school, he engaged in 
farm work, assisting his father; and on the 
death of the latter he purchased the interests 
of the other heirs in the property, and has 
since continued to successfully conduct the 
farm. The estate consists of one hundred and 
fifty acres of fertile and productive land, which 
Mr. McClellan devotes to general farming and 
the cultivation of tobacco. 

On May 27, 1884, he was united in mar- 
riage to Mary E. Sanderson, adopted daughter 
of Rodolphus Sanderson, formerly of Whately, 
but later of Northampton. Mrs. McClellan is 
a lineal descendant, on her father's side, of 
John Alden. Her mother was Harriet Clark, 
of Whately. She was a student at Mount 
Holyoke Seminary and Smith College at 



Northampton, and, after completing her 
studies, made her home in Whately. Mr. and 
Mrs. McClellan have two children, Randolph 
A. and Albert F. 

Mr. McClellan is a Republican in politics. 
He and his wife are members of the Congrega- 
tional church, in which he has served as parish 
clerk and superintendent of the Sabbath-school 
for several terms. 



WAYNE HIl 
sentative 



LLMAN, one of the repre- 
farmers of Colerain, was 
born in that town October 12, 1856, 
son of Smead and Emmeline (Coombs) Hill- 
man, both natives of Colerain, the former born 
in 1 8 19, the latter in 181 8. The grandfather, 
Reuben Hillman, was a son of Lot Hillman, a 
notice of whom is given in the sketch of C. S. 
Hillman on another page of this work. Reu- 
ben Hillman was born in Conway, and spent 
the greater part of his life in Colerain, where 
he carried on general farming with good re- 
sults. He passed away at the age of sixty- 
four. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Anna Nims, was a native of Buckland. She 
lived to be eighty-one years old. They had 
five children, four sons and one daughter, all 
of whom grew to adult age. The only survivor 
at present is Lysander Hillman, of Charlemont 
Upper Village. 

Smead Hillman, the father of our subject, in 
company with his brother Reuben, took charge 
of the home farm at the death of his father, 
carrying on general farming and also dealing 
in lumber, cutting large quantities at the saw- 
mill on the estate. After the death of Reu- 
ben, Smead Hillman carried on the business 
alone. He took an active part in town affairs, 
acting as Assessor for some time, and was also 
a member of the School Committee. He died 
on April 16, 1858, at the age of thirty-nine. 



2s8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



His wife was a daughter of Jonatiian and Betsy 
(McCrillis) Coombs, the former a well-to-do 
farmer in Colerain and one of the old resi- 
dents. Mr. Coombs lived to be eighty-one 
years of age. His wife passed away at sixty- 
four. Mr. and Mrs. Hillman had three chil- 
dren, all of whom are living, namely: Edwin 
S. , in Greene County, Iowa; Mina L. , who 
lives with her brother Wayne in Colerain, a 
highly educated young lady, and one of the 
most popular teachers in the district ; and 
Wayne, whose name appears at the head of 
this sketch. 

Wayne Hillman grew to manhood in Cole- 
rain, attending the district school in boyhood 
and adding to the amount of knowledge gained 
there by a course of study at Powers Institute, 
Bernardston. In 1878 he bought the farm 
where he resides, which covers about one hun- 
dred and thirty acres; and he is the owner of 
considerable real estate in other parts of the 
town. He carries on general farming, and 
deals in live stock and poultry to some extent. 
Ten acres of his land are devoted especially to 
fruit-raising; and he has twenty head of hand- 
some Jersey cattle, producing first-class butter 
and other dairy products. 

On January 4, 1880, Mr. Hillman was mar- 
ried to Anna S., daughter of Oliver H. and 
Rachel R. (Dodge) Taylor, residents of Cole- 
rain, the former a farmer in good circum- 
stances and one of the oldest residents of the 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Hillman have five chil- 
dren; namely, Lotta T., Bessie A., Alfred 
VV., Mildred, and Mina. 

In politics Mr. Hillman is a Republican. 
In religion he follows the teachings of the 
Baptist church, of which his wife also is a 
member. A persevering and hard-working 
man, he is successful in all branches of his 
vocation, and occupies an honorable position 
in the community. 




HAUNCEY BRYANT, a resident of 
T Greenfield for the past forty-four years 

1I2 ■' and an esteemed public official, was 

born at Ashfield, Franklin County, Mass., 
September 28, 1823. His father, William 
Bryant, was born there in 1778, and was a son 
of Zebulon Bryant, who was born at Bridge- 
water, Plymouth County, in 1741, and settled 
at Ashfield in 1763. He was one of the early 
pioneers of that town, and made his way 
through the wilderness at a time when blazed 
trees were the only indication of the right 
path. He cleared a small tract of land and 
erected a log cabin, which he later occupied 
in company with his young bride. 

He eventually cleared and improved a large 
farm; and here were born his eight children, 
seven of whom, two sons and five daughters, 
lived to reach maturity and become heads of 
families. After the death of his first wife 
he was again married. Some of his daughters 
moved to Illinois in 1835, and were residents 
there during the Black Hawk War. His first- 
born, Ruth, who became the wife of Isaiah 
Taylor, a farmer at Ashfield, lived to attain 
the ripe old age of ninety-nine years and ten 
months, her intellectual faculties remaining 
strong and unclouded until her ninety-sixth 
year. Grandfather Zebulon Bryant was a sol- 
dier of the Revolution, and marched to Albany 
through the woods. Mr. Chauncey Bryant has 
in his possession the musket, powder-horn, 
and some bullets which his patriotic ancestor 
brought home with him when he returned from 
the war. Although not known to have been a 
relative, he was an intimate friend of Dr. 
Peter Bryant, father of the eminent poet, 
William Cullen Bryant. His death occurred 
in Ashfield, at the age of eighty-seven years. 

William Bryant inherited the farm upon 
which he resided during his entire life. He 
married for his first wife, Nabba Hammond, 




CHAUNCEY BRYANT. 



■# 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



z6i 



who died in the prime of life, leaving four chil- 
dren, all of whom grew to maturity, married, 
and have passed away. His second wife, 
whom he married in 1805, and who became 
mother of Chauncey Bryant, was Sarah Mayn- 
ard, daughter of Calvin and Anna (Moulton) 
Maynard, of Westboro, Mass. She was a cousin 
of the Hon. Horace Maynard, who served his 
country as a member of Congress, as minister 
to Russia, and during the latter part of Presi- 
dent Hayes's administration as Postmaster- 
general. Her father, Calvin Maynard, served 
in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Bryant's chil- 
dren by this marriage were the following: 
twins, the first-born, who died in infancy; 
Hannah, widow of Milton Hammond, now 
residing at Lawrence, Mich. ; Nathan, who 
died at Leroy, N. Y., aged fifty-nine years, 
leaving two sons and a daughter; William, 
who died at the old homestead; Chauncey, of 
Greenfield, and his twin brother Charles, who 
died while an infant; Asa and Albert, also 
twins, the latter being now deceased and the 
former a resident of Leroy, N.Y. ; Henry, 
who died an infant; and Calvin, now residing 
at the old homestead, which has been in the 
family's possession for over one hundred and 
thirty-two years. William Bryant died at the 
age of sixty-eight years. His widow died in 
1869, at the age of seventy-nine. 

Chauncey Bryant passed his childhood and 
the early years of his manhood at the paternal 
home in Ashfield, and acquired a fair educa- 
tion, considering the limited opportunities 
offered him in his youth for study. As above- 
mentioned, he spent the greater part of his 
active life in Greenfield. He has always been 
a Republican in politics, and in 1863 was ap- 
pointed Deputy Sheriff — a position which he 
has since occupied, his first duty following his 
appointment having been to notify men who 
were drafted to serve in the Civil War. On 



July 8, 1852, he wedded Miss Mehitable Bas- 
sett, of Ashfield, daughter of Francis and 
Mehitable (Ford) Bassett, her parents having 
moved to Ashfield from Dennis, on Cape Cod, 
of which town her grandfather. Lot Bassett, 
was one of the first settlers. Their only son, 
Charles A. Bryant, is now a successful hard- 
ware dealer at Chicopee, where he has been 
in business for the past twenty years. He is 
married, and has two sons and two daughters. 
The subject of this sketch is a Royal Arch 
Mason, having first joined the Masonic order 
in 1865. His portrait on a neighboring page 
shows a man still vigorous in mind and body, 
one who, as an able and faithful public func- 
tionary, enjoys a well-earned popularity. Mr. 
Bryant has recently been called to part with 
his cherished companion, the devoted wife, 
who for more than forty years was the sharer 
of his cares and his joys. Mrs. Mehitable B. 
Bryant died at her home in Greenfield, June 7, 
1895. 




1845, son of Amos and Cordelia (Strait) Ross, 
both natives of Thompson. His grandfather, 
Eli Ross, who was a Methodist preacher, was 
also born there, and passed the latter years of 
his life in a neighboring village. Amos Ross 
in early manhood engaged in the stove and 
tinware business, and conducted an extensive 
trade for some twenty-five years, keeping a 
number of teams on the road. Flis last years 
were spent in Northfield, Mass., where he car- 
ried on a successful real estate business. He 
died at the age of sixty-two years. His wife 
lived to be sixty-six years of age. Her last 
days were spent at Abington, Conn. Mr. 
Ross was a Methodist in religious belief. 
His wife was a member of the Baptist church. 



262 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



They reared six children, as follows: Lafayette 
H., who served in a regiment of light artillery 
during the Civil War, and after his discharge 
from the service lived for a while in Spring- 
field and later at East Longmeadow, Mass., 
where he died at the age of forty-eight years; 
Augustus B., the subject of this article; Cora 
E., wife of George P. Fields, now residing at 
the old homestead in Northfield ; Dennis, for- 
merly in business with his brother Augustus, 
who died at Miller's Falls at the age of forty- 
one years; Estella M., who married Arthur 
Holton, and died in Northfield at the age of 
thirty-nine years; and Frederick A., who has 
a wood yard at Brattleboro, Vt. 

Augustus B. Ross attended the common 
schools and the academy at Thompson, Conn. 
He was twenty-one years of age when his par- 
ents removed to Northfield, where he remained 
for a time. He was subsequently, for three or 
four years, in the employ of a Boston concern, 
for whom he travelled through New England, 
selling shoddy and wool stock. He then 
erected a stock house in the vicinity of the 
depot, and, securing a mill at Winchester, en- 
gaged in the manufacture of shoddy, taking his 
brother into partnership, the firm being known 
as Ross Brothers. The business was well 
established and placed upon a sure footing 
when their plant was destroyed by fire, and the 
firm sustained a loss of from twenty-five thou- 
sand to thirty thousand dollars. Business was 
continued, however, and successfully carried 
on for a period of ten years, at the expiration 
of which the mills were again burned. Mr. 
Ross then gave his entire attention to the rag 
business at Miller's Falls, which he estab- 
lished in 1872. He conducts a large and 
profitable business, buying and selling rags at 
wholesale and also purchasing all of the con- 
demned clothing from the government, which 
he sorts, classifies, and sells to paper manufact- 



urers. He still owns the mill property at 
Winchester and a large amount of machinery, 
together with engines, boilers, etc., which he 
is holding for future use. He has invested 
extensively in real estate at Miller's Falls, 
and owns eight or ten houses which he himself 
erected; and he possesses a fine farm, which 
he devotes to dairying interests, keeping about 
twenty cows. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Ross was united in marriage to 
Miss Annie Augusta State, a native of Hins- 
dale, N.H., born January 29, 1855, daughter of 
Obed State, of Hinsdale. Obed State was a 
prominent citizen, who filled many positions of 
public trust. He was elected State Senator, 
and served some time as Justice of the Peace. 
He died in Hinsdale in 1869, at the age of 
fifty-six years. Mrs. State was called to rest 
in 1893, at the age of sixty-six. Mrs. Ross 
had two brothers and, one sister, namely : 
Charles, a farmer residing in Winchester, 
where he has been Selectman and Postmaster 
for many years ; George M. ; and Susie, wife 
of Clarence E. Tyler. Mr. and Mrs. Ross 
have two children : Edward B. and Mabel S. 
Both are graduates of the high school at Mon- 
tague, and Mabel is still pursuing her studies. 
Edward B. married Miss Jessie Doolittle, 
daughter of Silas Doolittle, of Hinsdale. 

Mr. Ross is a Republican in politics, and 
his son also votes the Republican ticket. 



W'^ 



ILLIAM WATSON DAVENPORT, 
a prosperous farmer and one of the 
most highly respected citizens of 
Leyden, Franklin County, was born there 
August 7, 1 84 1, son of Calvin Newton and 
Lucy (White) Davenport, the former of whom 
was also a native of Leyden, where he was 
born June 4, 1805. 

The Davenport family is of English origin, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



263 



tracing their ancestry back to Thomas Daven- 
port, who came from England to America 
about the year 1635, and settled in Dorchester, 
Mass. Oliver Davenport, the great-grand- 
father of our subject, was a native of Little 
Compton, R. I., born in 1714, and his son, 
Oliver Davenport, Jr., the grandfather of 
William Watson Davenport, was born in Cov- 
entry, Conn., in September, 1760. He was 
one of the early settlers in Leyden, Mass., 
and was successfully engaged in business as a 
drover, besides dealing quite extensively in 
cattle, which he drove on foot to Boston and 
Rhode Island. He also followed the vocation 
of a builder, or carpenter, and erected many 
of the old buildings that still stand in Leyden. 
His wife died July i, 1842, at the age of 
seventy-six years. They were the parents of 
seven children, three sons and four daughters, 
namely: Harriet, born September 28, 1791; 
Sophia, born April 28, 1793; Calvin, born 
June 10, 1795; Lucy, born June 28, 1797; 
Clarissa, born June 7, 1800; Oliver (third), 
born September 8, 1802; Calvin N., born 
June 4, 1805. Oliver Davenport, who resides 
with our subject, is the only one now living. 

Calvin Newton Davenport, who inherited 
good business capacities, followed the vocation 
of a farmer, and, like his father, was also suc- 
cessfully engaged as a drover and cattle dealer. 
His life was spent in Leyden, where he died 
September 25, 1852. In politics he was an 
ardent advocate of Democratic principles. In 
religious belief he and his wife, Lucy White 
Davenport, were Universalists. They were 
the parents of nine children, of whom five are 
still living. The record is as follows : Charles 
Newton, born October 20, 1832, who graduated 
from Glenwood School of Brattleboro, Vt. , 
studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854, 
and became a well-known lawyer; he died 
April 12, 1882, at Brattleboro, Vt. Martin 



v., born September 26, 1834, is a farmer 
residing in Bernardston. George W. , born 
June 14, 1839, resides in Bernardston. Will- 
iam Watson is the subject of this sketch. 
Stephen T. , born September 14, 1843, is a 
successful lawyer of Brattleboro, Vt. Edgar 
Henri, born November 21, 1845, is engaged 
in law practice at Wilmington, Vt., and also 
in farming. Three died in early childhood, 
namely : Harriet, who passed away November 
15, 1833; Sarah A., born June 21, 1837, who 
died August i, 1837; and Delason S., born 
August 22, 1848, who died June 20, 1849. 
William Watson Davenport received his 
education in the schools of Leyden, not in 
the ordinary manner, however; for from birth 
his sight was defective, and, as he was unable 
to see to read, he was dependent upon his 
hearing. But from listening to the recitations 
of the other children, he acquired considerable 
practical knowledge. He earned his first dol- 
lar at fifteen years of age, by sawing wood and 
threshing for David Mowry. When sixteen 
years of age he turned his attention to farming, 
purchasing his first parcel of land in Leyden, 
for the whole of which he was obliged to get 
credit. He afterward bought the homestead 
and lived there a number of years. Though 
deprived of sight, he was possessed of excep- 
tional business capacities, and at one time 
owned as many as a thousand acres of land. 
He now owns in the neighborhood of four hun- 
dred acres in Leyden, Mass., and in Vermont. 
In addition to his general farming interests, 
Mr. Davenport is engaged in buying and 
selling stock and farm produce, and is to-day 
one of the largest stock dealers in Franklin 
County, handling about two hundred thousand 
pounds of wool in a year, and from one hun- 
dred to two thousand head of cattle. He is 
considered one of the best judges of the weight 
and condition of cattle in the town. Mr. Dav- 



264 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



enport goes to Boston and New York on busi- 
ness, and, though unaccompanied on these 
trips, has never met with a mishap. 

On November 7, 1870, he was married to 
Miss Mary Green Knox, who was born in 
Jacksonville, 111., daughter of Milton and 
Mary C. (Green) Knox. Milton Knox was 
born in Blandford, Hampden County, Mass., 
December 7, 18 14, and was there engaged in 
agriculture for many years. The latter part 
of his life was spent in Missouri, and he died 
in Hannibal, that State, May 30, 1862. In 
politics he was a Republican; in religious 
views, a Congregationalist. He was twice 
married. His first wife, Mary C. Green 
Knox, was born in West Springfield, Hampden 
County, Mass., September 21, 1812, and died 
at St. Louis, Mo., January 20, 1846. She, 
too, was a member of the Congregational 
church. She was the mother of three chil- 
dren, namely: Sophia E., born April 20, 
1840, who died April i, 1843; Mary G., born 
October 24, 1842; and Milton H., born in St. 
Louis, Mo., August 5, 1844, who died October 
4, 1844. By his second wife Mr. Knox had 
six children, as follows: Olivia A., born 
December 4, 1848; John R., born October 3, 
1852; Franklin, born January i, 1855; Joseph 
H., born September 14, 1856; William H., 
born September 25, 1858; and John M., born 
September 4, 1861. Mr. and Mrs. Davenport 
have reared two sons and two daughters : 
Stephen Tabor Knox Davenport, born Septem- 
ber I, 1871, a stock dealer and farmer, and at 
the present time a member of the School Com- 
mittee of the town of Leyden, where he re- 
sides; Mary Lucy, born December 27, 1874, 
living with her parents; Charles Milton Dav- 
enport, born September 8, 1877; and Sarah 
Bertha, born October 6, 1881. 

In politics Mr. Davenport is affiliated with 
the Democratic party, and has filled acceptably 



many offices. He has served as Selectman 
three years, and is at present a member of the 
board. His wife has been a member of the 
School Board for four years. Mr. Davenport 
is liberal in his religious views, and his wife 
is a member of the Congregational church. 
In Mr. Davenport Franklin County possesses 
a citizen of whom she may well be proud, 
one who by honesty and business sagacity, de- 
spite the unusual difficulties under which he 
has labored, has raised himself from the foot 
of the ladder to the rounds of prosperity and 
success. 



T^HARLES A. MARCY, a conspicuous 
I JJ factor of the mercantile interests of 

^«C ' the town of Colerain, is a native of 

Franklin County, his birth having occurred 
July 19, 1849, in the town of Leyden. His 
parents, Andrew H. and Lovilla (Peck) Marcy, 
were natives of this county, the father having 
been born in 1807, in Leyden, and the mother 
in 181 1, in Colerain. Mr. Marcy's grand- 
father, Thomas Marcy, was one of the original 
settlers of Leyden, where he worked as a 
miller and millwright for several years. His 
last days were spent in Colerain, where he died 
in middle life, regretted as a valued citizen 
of the place. Politically, he was a strong 
member of the Whig party. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Amy Henry, attained the 
age of seventy-seven years. She was an active 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Andrew H. Marcy followed the trade of his 
father, residing in the place of his birth until 
1856. In that year he removed to Charle- 
mont, where he bought a grist-mill, which he 
operated until within a few years of his death. 
He lived to be eighty-four years of age, dying 
in 1891. His wife died in 1895. In politics 
Mr. Marcy was a warm advocate of the princi- 
ples of the Republican party from the time of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



26s 



its formation. He and his wife belonged to 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Thirteen 
children were born to their home circle, 
eleven of whom grew to maturity, and nine 
are now living, of whom we record the follow- 
ing : Andrew M. resides in Leyden ; Elvira 
(Mrs. Rogers) in Colerain ; Thomas E. in 
Blue Rapids, Kan. ; Addie M. (Mrs. Darling) 
in Leyden; Charles A. is the subject of this 
brief sketch; Gilbert H. resides in Charle- 
mont ; Ella J. (Mrs. Pierson) in Grand Cross- 
ing, 111. ; Isabel C. (Mrs. Van Ness) in 
Ashfield ; Mary C. (Mrs. Sheldon) in Spring- 
field. The names of the deceased are as fol- 
lows : Frank P., a soldier in the late Rebell- 
ion, who was killed at the battle of Pittsburg 
Landing; Alvin ; Arathusa (Mrs. Darling); 
and Thomas, who died at the age of four 
years. 

Charles A. Marcy passed the first fifteen 
years of his life in the place of his nativity, 
and there received a good education in the 
public schools. When sixteen years of age 
he removed with his parents to Charlemont, 
where he began his mercantile career by ped- 
dling tinware on the road, preferring this life 
to working in the mill with his father, as he 
had done in his younger days. In June, 1871, 
Mr. Marcy established himself in business at 
his present stand in the village of Colerain, 
forming a partnership with C. H. Wilcox, 
with whom he remained in company two years. 
In 1873 he bought his partner's interest in the 
business, and has since successfully carried it 
on alone. His large store contains a complete 
assortment of household furnishing goods, tin- 
ware, and furniture, and with true business 
enterprise he caters to the demands of his cus- 
tomers, endeavoring to please them in the 
quality and variety of his stock. He also 
deals in wagons and carriages, being in com- 
pany with Mr. John D. Miller in this depart- 



ment of his business, and having a large trade 
in the town and in the surrounding country. 

On January 2, 1872, Mr. Marcy was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary L. Donelson, a 
daughter of Samuel and Louisa Donelson. 
Mr. Donelson, who was a farmer in Colerain, 
died some time since. His wife is still living 
in that town. 

In political and social circles, as well as in 
the business world, Mr. Marcy is quite promi- 
nent. He is a stanch Republican, and for 
seven years has been one of the Selectmen of 
the town, being at the present time chairman 
of the board. He and his wife are liberal in 
religious belief, and are attendants of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. They are quite 
active in society, and their pleasant home is a 
centre of genial hospitality. 




lATTHEW STEBBINS SEVER- 
ANCE, an energetic farmer of 
Leyden, was born in that town 
August 6, 1836, son of Matthew and Maria T. 
(Stebbins) Severance. His father was born in 
Leyden, August 9, 1807, and his mother in 
Greenfield, August 20, 1808. (For a more 
extended account of the ancestral history of 
the family, the reader is referred to the sketch 
of Dr. W. S. Severance. ) 

Matthew Severance, the father of our sub- 
ject, who followed at different times the 
occupation of tanner, shoemaker, and farmer, 
resided twenty years in Central New Jersey, 
where he was engaged in shoemaking. From 
there he went to Wisconsin; and he passed his 
last years in the State of Georgia, where he 
died on August 2, 1867, at the age of sixty. 
He was an honest and industrious man, who 
won the respect of all with whom he was asso- 
ciated. In politics he was a Democrat; in 
religious belief, a Methodist. His wife, 



266 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



whose maiden name was Maria T. Stebbins, 
lived to be sixty-eight years of age, dying on 
October 9, 1876. Their family consisted of 
four children, two of whom are now living, 
namely: Maria T., widow of George A. 
Space, born August 7, 1829, who resides in 
New Brunswick, N.J. ; and Matthew S. , the 
subject of this article. Ellen E. died July 
10, 1832; and Ellen (second) died August 17, 
1836. 

Matthew Stebbins Severance passed his boy- 
hood and youth in various places, moving with 
his parents from Leyden to New York State 
when about a year old and residing there until 
ten years of age. He subsequently spent five 
years in New Jersey and two in Wisconsin, 
later returning to New Jersey. He received 
his education in Leyden and in Shelburne 
Falls, being sent there by his parents for that 
purpose. After completing his studies he was 
employed in the rubber works in New Jersey 
until 1859, when he went to Savannah, Ga. 
He entered the Confederate service during the 
Civil War, enlisting as a private in August, 
1 861, in the Home Guards, for a period of one 
year. He served two, however, having been 
conscripted for the war. He saw a great deal 
of severe fighting, serving under Generals 
Lawton, Early, Gordon, and Stonewall Jack- 
son, and participating in the seven days' fight, 
the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
and other memorable engagements. He was 
never discharged from the Confederate ser- 
vice, but entered the Union lines at Gettysburg 
in 1863 and voluntarily surrendered. He was 
confined at Fort Mifflin, seven miles below the 
city of Philadelphia, and succeeded in smug- 
gling letters to his father, who visited the fort 
and provided him with a supply of United 
States currency, by the aid of which he 
effected his escape in broad daylight, and, 
after secreting himself in a cornfield until 



night, swam the Delaware River to Camden 
under cover of the darkness, at length reaching 
New Brunswick, N.J., in safety. For a short 
time before the termination of the war he was 
engaged in making copper-nailed shoes at the 
latter place; and later he was for a period of 
two years employed on the Camden & Amboy 
Railroad, finally returning with his parents and 
family to Georgia and settling near Union 
Island, where he found mercantile employ- 
ment, eventually becoming manager of the 
Flilton Timber and Lumber Company's store 
— a position which he held for twelve years. 
In 1882, on account of ill health, he resigned 
his position and returned to his native town, 
purchasing the farm on which he now resides, 
which comprises about one hundred and thirty- 
three acres of valuable land. There he has 
since been engaged in general farming with 
prosperous results. 

On April 4, 1865, Mr. Severance married 
Harriet M. Belknap, who was born in Wayne 
County, Pennsylvania, May 16, 1847, daughter 
of James and Mary (Hillyer) Belknap, the 
former of whom was a native of New York 
State, the latter of New Jersey. James Bel- 
knap died in Pennsylvania. His widow is still 
residing in that State. They had six chil- 
dren, two of whom are living: Edwin E., who 
now lives in Pennsylvania; and Mrs. Sever- 
ance. The Belknap family also was well rep- 
resented in the army at the time of the Civil 
War. Edwin E. served in the Seventeenth 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. John was 
killed at Antietam, September 22, 1862, cut 
off in the flower of his youth, being but 
twenty -two years of age. Nathaniel E., 
who was a member of the One Hundred and 
Forty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, was taken 
prisoner by Mr. Severance's own division, and 
conducted to Libby Prison. He died January 
17, 1880. Angelina Belknap died at the age 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



267 



of fourteen years, and Mary E. died at the age 
of twenty-two. 

Mr. and Mrs. Severance have had a family 
of seven children, as follows: George M., born 
at New Brunswick, N.J., February 25, 1866, 
now a successful contractor and builder in 
Newark, N.J., who married F. E. Allen, and 
has one child, Agnes M. ; James W., born 
July 22, 1867, who died in infancy; Frederick 
J., born in Mcintosh County, Georgia, De- 
cember 16, 1869; Robert N., born in Georgia, 
May 29, 187s; Ella M., born in Mcintosh 
County, Georgia, October 2, 1877, now the 
wife of W. S. Davis, a resident of Shelburne, 
Mass., and the mother of one son, Frederick 
William; Lettice E. , born in Darien, Ga. , 
May 8, 1879; and Harriet B., born March 24, 
1887, in Leyden, Mass. 

Mr. Severance is a Democrat in politics, 
and has held various offices in the town. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Severance belong to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 



Y^TORACE KEMP, a prominent farmer 
r^-l in West Leyden, was born in Shel- 
Ji® V_^ burne, August 17, 1835, son of 
Lawrence and Mary S. (Stewart) Kemp, his 
father being a native of Shelburne and his 
mother of Colerain. Mr. Kemp's grandfather, 
Lawrence Kemp, was born in Shelburne, his 
father being one of the pioneer settlers there. 
He was a farmer, leaving his plough to fight 
in the War of 1812, and on the declaration 
of peace returning to his quiet pastures and 
furrowed fields. He died at an advanced age, 
his wife also living to be quite old. 

Lawrence Kemp, the father of our subject, 
was also engaged in farming in Shelburne, 
where he remained all his life. He was an 
industrious and successful man, thorough in 
all his undertakings. Casting his first vote 



in the Democratic ranks, he later changed his 
views and joined the Republican party. He 
died at the age of forty-nine. His wife out- 
lived him many years, passing away when 
seventy-seven years old. They had seven 
children, six of whom reached maturity. 
Three are now living, namely: Mary Ann, 
who became Mrs. Matthews, and lives in 
Brookline, Mass. ; Sumner, residing in Alden, 
la. ; and Horace, our subject. Lucretia M. , 
Charles S., and Elsie C, are deceased. 

Horace Kemp's boyhood days were passed in 
Shelburne; and there he attended school until 
twelve years of age, when he went to work on 
a farm, receiving six dollars for his first 
month's labor. For ten years he worked for 
other people, saving his earnings until he had 
enough to buy some land, when he purchased 
the property in Leyden now owned by Bridg- 
ham Martin, consisting of seventy acres. On 
this farm he lived for three years. He then 
sold the land and moved to Colerain, where he 
spent eleven years. In 1872 he bought the 
estate where he now resides, which covers 
about three hundred acres and is fitted with 
substantial and convenient buildings, which 
Mr. Kemp has remodelled since purchasing. 
His farm is in good condition, and everything 
about the place bespeaks the careful hus- 
bandman. 

On April 22, 1858, Mr. Kemp was married 
to Eliza A., daughter of Walter and Salome 
(Shepherdson) Bell, who was born on June 7, 
1835. Mrs. Kemp is of English descent, her 
first ancestor in America being James Bell, an 
Englishman, who was one of the pioneer set- 
tlers in Colerain, where he cultivated a farm. 
He was commonly known as Lieutenant Bell, 
and was an energetic and prominent man, hold- 
ing office in the town at various times and fill- 
ing the position of Town Clerk for years. He 
died in Colerain at an advanced age. His son 



268 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Walter, the grandfather of Mrs. Kemp, was 
born in Roxbury, Mass. , and was taken to Cole- 
rain when a young child. He, too, followed 
agriculture, and owned a good farm in the east- 
ern part of the town. Though small in stat- 
ure, he was noted for his courage. He fought 
bravely in the Revolution, receiving a pension 
for his services. In politics he was a Whig. 
On the subject of religion his views were lib- 
eral. He died at the homestead at an advanced 
age. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah 
Crouch, also lived to a good old age. They 
had eleven children, Mrs. Kemp's father, 
Walter Bell, being the fifth child. He also 
took up the pursuit of agriculture, and was 
besides a successful business man, taking con- 
tracts for roads and other public works. A 
Republican in politics, he took an active part 
in town affairs and was a prominent citizen. 
He died at the Bell homestead. His wife, 
who was a native of Leyden, died August i, 
1882. She was an active member of the 
Methodist church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kemp have five children, 
namely: Elsie S. B., wife of M. D. Miner, 
of Leyden; Ida G., wife of Charles D. Miner, 
of Colerain ; Walter H. Kemp, who married 
Mae S. Martin and lives in East Colerain; 
William S., in Brookline, Mass. ; and Harvey 
L., in Colerain. 

Politically, Mr. Kemp is a Republican. 
He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in whose affairs he takes an 
active part. They have a pleasant home and 
are prominent people in the town. 



"RIAH T. DARLING, a highly respected 
and prosperous farmer of Leyden, 
Franklin County, was born there 
June II, 1836, son of Uriah T. and Caroline 
(Williams) Darling. His grandfather, Moses 




Darling, was a native of Vermont and a suc- 
cessful farmer of Guilford in that State, where 
he died at an advanced age. He was the 
father of seven children, four sons and three 
daughters, of whom three are now living: Mrs. 
Lestina Scott, of Vermont; Oren E. Darling, 
of Springfield, Mass. ; and John Darling, of 
Hartford, Conn. Moses E. , Elmira, Uriah 
T. , and Lucinda have passed away. 

Uriah T. Darling, Sr. , was born in Guil- 
ford, Vt., December 30, 1802, and on his 
father's farm received practical instruction in 
agriculture. In early manhood he removed to 
Rowe, Mass., where he was successfully en- 
gaged in farming. About the year 1832 he 
located in Leyden, where he purchased a farm 
in the western part of the town; and in 1853 
or 1854 he bought the homestead on which 
his son resides. He died there at eighty-five 
years of age. His wife is still living, and 
makes her home with Uriah T. Darling, Jr. 
In political affiliation Mr. Darling was a Re- 
publican. He and his wife were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. They were 
the parents of twelve children, all but one of 
whom are now living. They were named as 
follows: Henry A., Moses E. , Charles W. , 
Caroline L. , Uriah T. , Joseph D., Olive, 
George L. , Mary J., John R., Amelia, and 
Elizabeth (deceased). 

Uriah T. Darling, Jr., grew to manhood in 
Leyden, receiving his early education in the 
district school, and finishing his studies at 
Powers Institute in Bernardston. He taught 
for fifteen terms in the town of Leyden and 
in the States of New Hampshire and Vermont. 
On attaining his majority, he started on an 
independent career, and for some time was 
engaged in farming, subsequently entering the 
mercantile business at Leyden Centre, where 
he successfully conducted a general store for 
seventeen years. He then disposed of this 




EZEKIEL L. BASCOM. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



271 



business and bought the old homestead, where 
he now lives. His farm comprises one hun- 
dred and twelve acres of land, and he carries 
on general farming with good results. Mr. 
Darling is a veteran of the Civil War, having 
enlisted September 8, 1862, in Company B, 
Fifty-second Massachusetts Regiment, under 
Colonel H. S. Greenleaf. He served in the 
Commissary Department from that time until 
he received an honorable discharge, August 
14, 1863. 

On November 4, 1866, Mr. Darling was 
married to Miss Arathusa Marcy, daughter of 
Andrew H. and Lovilla (Peck) Marcy. Mr. 
Marcy was born May i, 1807, and died August 
12, 1891. His wife, who was born May 7, 
1811, died January 11, 1895. They were the 
parents of thirteen children, namely: Thomas 
J., who died at four years of age; Alvin J., 
who was eight years old when he died ; Ara- 
thusa, who lived to be twenty-three years of 
age; Frank P., who died at twenty-four years 
of age, being killed April 7, 1862, at the 
battle of Shiloh, in which he participated as a 
soldier of the Forty-sixth Illinois Regiment of 
sharpshooters; Murvin A., a farmer residing 
in Leyden ; Elvira L. (Mrs. Rogers), a resi- 
dent of Colerain, Mass. ; Thomas E., who 
resides in Kansas; Adelaide; Charles A., 
a resident of Colerain, Mass. ; Gilbert H., 
of Charlemont, Mass. ; Ella (Mrs. Pierson), 
of Chicago, 111. ; Isabella (Mrs. Van Ness), of 
Ashfield, Mass. ; and Mary C. (Mrs. Sheldon), 
of Springfield, Mass. Mrs. Darling died May 
I, 1869; and on January 8, 1871, Mr. Darling 
was married to her sister. Miss Adelaide M. 
Marcy, who was born November 26, 1847. 
She has borne two children, one of whom, 
Frank Marcy Darling, born January 19, 1880, 
died in infancy. 

Mr. Darling is active in political matters 
and an ardent advocate of Republican princi- 



ples. His townsmen have shown their appre- 
ciation of his sterling character by electing 
him to various positions of trust. For sixteen 
years he has filled the office of Town Clerk 
and Treasurer, and since 1883 has served on 
the Board of Selectmen, of which he has acted 
as chairman during the past four years. He 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belong- 
ing to Republican Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of 
Greenfield. 

KRANK N. BASCOM is a very success- 
ful farmer, residing on the banks of Fall 
River, about three miles from Gill 
Centre. He was born on October 21, 1856, 
on the same farm he now occupies, and which 
was the birthplace of his father, Ezekiel L. Bas- 
com, whose portrait appears on the next page 
of this volume. Mr. Bascom's grandfather, 
Dorus Bascom, was also a native of Gill, hav- 
ing been a son of Moses Bascom, who was born 
at Greenfield, on May 15, 1761. The latter 
was the third in line from the original settler, 
Thomas Bascom, who located at Northampton, 
where his death occurred. (For a more ex- 
tended account of the family's early history 
the reader is referred to a complete genealogy 
published by William Parsons Lunt, of Bos- 
ton, in 1870. ) 

Moses Bascom first settled on the farm now 
owned by Frank N. Bascom, and reclaimed it 
from the wilderness, the original tract of land 
having been a very large one. He first con- 
structed a log cabin, in which he resided for a 
time, later erecting the present substantial 
farm-house, which is still in a good state of 
preservation ; and here he passed the remainder 
of his days. Dorus Bascom, son of Moses, 
resided in this house from his birth to his 
decease, and successfully conducted the farm. 
He became very prominent in local public 
affairs, holding the offices of Selectman and 



272 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Town Clerk and other positions of responsibil- 
ity. He married Esther Newton, and reared 
a family of eight children, Mr. Bascom's father 
being the fifth son. Ezekiel L. Bascom was 
reared to farming, but relinquished that occupa- 
tion for the stone-cutter's trade, which he 
followed in this vicinity for a time, later, 
however, returning to the farm, of which he 
assumed charge during his parents' declining 
years, and, after inheriting the property, con- 
tinued to reside there until his decease, in 
1876, at the age of fifty-six years. He was a 
Democrat in politics and a well-known man, 
serving as Selectman, Assessor, and Overseer 
of the Poor. He was a member of the Uni- 
versalist church. His wife, Theresa Ballard, 
was a daughter of Amaziah and Martha (Cur- 
tis) Ballard, her father being a farmer of Gill, 
son of Jeremiah Ballard, who died there at a 
good old age. Mrs. Ballard was a daughter of 
Thomas Curtis, a resident of Brattleboro, Vt. , 
and was one of a large family of children. 
She and her husband were the parents of 
eleven daughters, five of whom are still living, 
namely: Martha; Mary, a resident of Gill; 
Maverett ; Pomona ; and Laura, who resides at 
the old homestead, where the mother died. 
Mrs. Ezekiel L. Bascom reared two children : 
Lizzie, wife of Almon Hale, of Bernardston ; 
and Frank N., with whom she now resides. 

Frank N. Bascom received a good education 
in the schools of his native town and at the 
academy at Bernardston. He was twenty 
years of age at the time of his father's death; 
and he has since conducted the farm, which 
consists of about two hundred acres and is 
devoted principally to the dairying interests. 
He has erected his present handsome resi- 
dence, together with a spacious barn, and has 
made many other improvements. 

In 1 881 he was most happily united in mar- 
riage to Edna Dorrel, one of three children of 



the late Harris Dorrel, of Leyden. Mrs. Bas- 
com's father died at Greenfield. Her mother 
is still living. Mr. Bascom and his wife have 
four children, as follows: Earle, Rene, Edric, 
and Alice. Mr. Bascom is a Democrat in 
politics. He attends the Unitarian church, 
his mother being a Universalist in her relig- 
ious belief. 



ZRA FOSTER, a highly intelligent 
farmer and one of the oldest and best- 
known citizens of Leyden, was born 
February 2, 181 5, son of Ezra and Nancy 
(Smith) Foster. The father was a native of 
Bernardston, Mass., born September 21, 1779, 
and the mother was born in Chesterfield, N.H., 
October 25, 1781. 

Ezra Foster's great-grandfather was one of 
three brothers who came to America from 
England^ landing at Plymouth, Mass. He 
located in Middletown, Conn., in which place 
his son, Ezekiel, the grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch, was born. The latter removed 
to Bernardston, Mass., when a young man. 
The country was then new, and there was an 
abundance of wild game of various kinds, the 
forests being tenanted by deer, bears, and 
wolves, and beavers abounding along the 
borders of the streams, in whose waters trout 
and other fish were plentiful. There Ezekiel 
Foster lived a primitive life, farming, hunt- 
ing, and fishing. In 1782 he settled in the 
northern part of Leyden, and in 1786-87 he 
was an active participant in Shays's Rebell- 
ion, so called from its leader, Daniel Shays, 
a native of Hopkinton, Mass. This, it will 
be remembered, was caused by the financial 
depression following the Revolution. Daniel 
Shays, who had been a Captain in the army, 
headed a body of the people who demanded the 
abolition of taxes and an issue of paper money 
for general use. Mr. Foster died at the age 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



273 



of seventy-five years. His wife, Chloe (Burn- 
ham) Foster, was also a native of Connecticut, 
and removed to Bernardston, Mass., where 
their marriage took place. She was over 
ninety years of age at the time of her death. 
Their union was blessed by the birth of nine 
children, of whom five sons and three daugh- 
ters grew to maturity. 

Ezra Foster, their eldest son, the father of 
our subject, acquired a good practical educa- 
tion in the schools of Leyden. He chose the 
independent vocation of a farmer and became 
the owner of the homestead farm, which he 
cultivated with profitable results. He also 
took great interest in the welfare of his town. 
He was a man of sterling character; and that 
his fellow-men were not unmindful of his 
worth is evinced by the positions of trust and 
responsibility bestowed upon him, among 
which were those of Selectman and Overseer 
of the Poor. He also served as a Captain of 
the State militia. His wife, Nancy (Smith) 
Foster, bore him eight children : Nancy, 
Sylvia, Mary, Ezra, Joseph, Maria, Louisa, 
and Ransom. Three of these are now living: 
Ezra, Ransom, and Maria (Mrs. Warner), who 
resides in Greenfield, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Fos- 
ter spent their last years on the old Foster home- 
stead in the northern part of Leyden, the former 
dying March i, 1864, and the latter, February 
21, 1875, at the age of ninety-three years. 

Ezra Foster received his education in the 
district schools of Leyden, at Northfield Acad- 
emy, and at Halifax, Mass. He remained 
with his parents until twenty-one years of age, 
beginning at nineteen to earn a livelihood by 
teaching school, at which he was engaged for 
twelve years. He then decided to change his 
occupation, and, purchasing his first land, the 
farm where he now resides, he engaged in 
agriculture, and by hard work and good busi- 
ness ability commanded success. 



Mr. Foster has been twice married. On 
May 6, 1846, he was united to Miss Sarah A. 
Wilbur, who was born in Leyden in 1818, and 
died June 4, 1862. Three children were 
born of this union : Frank W. , who resides in 
Greenfield ; and Edgar S. and Charlie, who died 
on the same day, September 26, 1869, aged 
respectively eighteen and sixteen years, and 
were buried in one grave. Mr. Foster's sec- 
ond marriage took place May 17, 1863, his 
bride being Miss Susan A. Mowry, a native of 
Leyden, born September 15, 1840, daughter of 
Manley and Jane E. (Wilds) Mowry, both 
natives of Leyden. Mr. Mowry, who was a 
hard-working and successful farmer in Leyden, 
died at the age of seventy-two. His wife still 
resides in Leyden. They were the parents of 
five children, of whom three are living, 
namely: Mary C, the wife of D. N. Carpen- 
ter, of Leyden; Mrs. Foster; and Haven A. 
Mowry, of Greenfield, Mass. Esther E. died 
in her thirty-seventh year, and Manley M. at 
furty-three years of age. 

Mr. Foster has been a member of the Re- 
publican party ever since its formation. He 
takes an active interest in the welfare of his 
town, which he has served acceptably as Se- 
lectman and in minor offices; and at the pres- 
ent time he holds the State office of stock 
inspector. He and his estimable wife are in- 
fluential members of the Universalist church, 
of which he has served as secretary during the 
past thirty years. 




'pJRS. E. JOSEPHINE GOULD, now 
residing in Greenfield, but a native 
of Gill, where she was born Janu- 
ary 12, 1846, traces her paternal ancestry as 
follows: her father, Asa C. Howe, was a son 
of Elmer and Eliza (Osgood) Howe, and 
grandson of Asa and Esther (Bowker) Howe. 



= 74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Asa Howe, her great-grandfather, who was 
born in Sudbury, Mass., followed the occupa- 
tion of a farmer, owning a farm in Wendell; 
but in 1837 he and his son Elmer moved to 
Gill, where with his wife, Esther Bowker, he 
spent his last years on what is known as the 
Bates and Howe homestead. Elmer Howe, 
who was also a farmer, passed the latter part 
of his life in Gill, dying at the old homestead 
in 1853, in his sixty-eighth year. His wife, 
Eliza Osgood, was a native of Wendell ; and 
they were the parents of five children. Dur- 
ing her last days she lived in Greenfield, 
where she died in 1876, at the age of eighty- 
eight. 

Asa C. Howe, the father of Mrs. Gould, 
was born in Wendell, in 18 14. His education 
was begun in the district school, and com- 
pleted by a course at Shelburne Falls Acad- 
emy. He remained with his father on the 
farm in Wendell until he came to the Bates 
and Howe homestead in Gill, where he died 
in 1 891, at the age of seventy-six. He was a 
member of the Methodist church and very 
active in its affairs, holding office as Sunday- 
school superintendent, also as Trustee and 
Steward. Politically, he was a Republican, 
and for some years held the office of Select- 
man. Mr. Asa C. Howe married Almira 
Bates, who was born in 18 19, daughter of John 
Bates and grand-daughter of Jacob Bates. 
Jacob Bates, great-grandfather of Mrs. Gould, 
was a native of Thompson, near Sutton, and 
one of a family of twelve children. He was at 
one time a sailor and ship builder; but the 
greater part of his life was passed in agricult- 
ural pursuits, his last years being spent on the 
Bates homestead, which he purchased as early 
as 1770. His wife was Bathsheba Pierce, of 
Winchester, the daughter of a hotel-keeper; 
and they had one son, John, who learned the 
shoemaker's trade, but at his father's death he 



became the owner of the old homestead. John 
Bates was one of the best-known men of Gill, 
holding at different times various offices, 
among them those of Deputy Sheriff, Select- 
man, and Overseer of the Poor, as well as that 
of Assessor for many years. He was also 
prominent in Masonic circles, being Treasurer 
of Republican Lodge of Greenfield. Four 
children were born to Asa C. and Almira 
(Bates) Howe: Henry C, who married Maria 
Dennison, of Leyden ; Lyman B., who married 
Frances Chapin, of Leyden; E. Josephine, the 
subject of this sketch; and Isabel, who mar- 
ried Leroy Park. The mother is a member of 
the Methodist church. 

E. Josephine Howe completed her education 
at Powers Institute, Bernardston, after which 
she taught school in Bernardston, Gill, and 
Northfield. On September 4, 1867, she was 
married to Lucius H., son of Hazeltine and 
Sarah (Farnsworth) Gould, of Dover, Vt., and 
grandson of Benjamin and Hannah (Hazeltine) 
Gould of the same place. Benjamin Gould 
was a farmer in Dover, Vt., at the time of 
his death. His wife, Hannah Hazeltine, was 
a native of Jamestown, N.Y. Hazeltine 
Gould followed the threefold pursuits of 
farmer, carpenter, and mason, living in Dover 
until the latter part of his life, which was 
spent in Swanzey, N. H. He and his wife, 
Sarah Farnsworth, were the parents of seven 
children: Lucius H. ; Susan H., who married 
Harvey Sargent; George A.; Emerson A.; 
Abbie, who married Oscar Steadman ; Fannie 
M. ; and Frank. P'our are still living. The 
mother was a member of the Baptist church, 
and died in Dover, Vt., in 1872. The mater- 
nal ancestry of Lucius H. Gould is traced as 
follows: his mother, Sarah Farnsworth Gould, 
was a daughter of Joseph and Anna (Nichols) 
Farnsworth, and grand-daughter of Deacon 
Samuel and Rhoda (Carpenter) Nichols. The 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



27s 



latter was a daughter of Governor Benjamin 
Carpenter, who was the son of Edward and 
Elizabeth (Wilson) Carpenter, and was born 
in Rehoboth, Mass., in 1726. He was among 
the foremost of the early patriots of the State, 
being a Colonel in the Revolutionary service. 
He removed to Guilford, Vt., in 1770, and was a 
founder of the first Constitution and government 
of Vermont, being made a counsellor of Cen- 
sors in 1783, and a member of the Council and 
Lieutenant Governor of the State in 1778-81. 
Lucius H. Gould lived on a farm till he was 
twenty-five years old. He was educated at 
Leland & Gray Seminary, Townshend, Vt. , 
and at Powers Institute, and for a time taught 
school in Vermont and Massachusetts, and also 
in Iowa, where for three years he was princi- 
pal of Quasqueton Academy and Secretary of 
Buchanan County Board of Education. Re- 
turning East, he purchased a store in East 
Dover, Vt. , which he run for six years and 
then sold, after which, in 1873, he moved to 
Bernardston, Mass., where he carried on a suc- 
cessful trade for sixteen years and where he 
lived until his death, which occurred on May 
2, 1889, at the age of fifty-one years. Mr. 
Gould was a Republican in politics and was 
a man who took great interest in the welfare 
of his town, which he served as Selectman and 
Assessor for several years. He was superin- 
tendent of schools in Dover and a Trustee of 
Powers Institute and of Cushman Library in 
Bernardston. He was an attendant of the 
Methodist church, being prominent in church 
affairs. He is survived by his wife and one 
child, a daughter, Myrabel Josephine, who was 
graduated at Powers Institute as valedictorian 
of her class, and after teaching one year en- 
tered Wellesley College. Mrs. Gould is a 
woman of much intelligence and cultivation, is 
a member of the Methodist church at Bernards- 
ton, and when living there was connected with 



various organizations, the Ladies' Aid Society, 
the Missionary Society, the Ladies' Reading 
Club, and the Chautauqua Circle. 



W'' 



LLIAM A. MOORE, an energetic 
and progressive business man of the 
town of New Salem, living in the 
village of Millington, is a worthy representa- 
tive of the native-born citizens of the place, 
having won for himself an enviable reputation 
for honest integrity and straightforward deal- 
ing. He comes from excellent English ante- 
cedents, and is of substantial pioneer stock, 
the Moore family having first been represented 
in this country in 1635, when one of the name 
settled in Charlestown, Mass., going from 
there to Sudbury. 

Asa Moore, the great-grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, was a native of Sud- 
bury, and, in the words of the typical West- 
erner of to-day, was more of a hustler than 
the majority of his neighbors. He first en- 
gaged in business, consisting of farming, lum- 
bering, and operating a grist-mill at Leverett, 
Mass., where he was one of the early settlers. 
While residing there, he married Persis 
Knight, and they became the parents of nine 
children; namely, Levi, Otis, James, Lewis, 
Martin, Lyman, Jefferson, Garry, and a 
daughter who died when very young. In com- 
pany with one of the older sons he bought the 
mill property now owned by the father of the 
subject of this sketch at Millington, then 
owned by one Josiah Miller, and later on 
put his son Lyman in charge of the mill. 

Levi Moore learned the miller's trade, en- 
gaged in business in several different places, 
and finally settled in Greenfield, where he 
died. Otis married Polly Montague, owned 
with his father a part of the mill at Milling- 
ton for a time, finally sold out, and moved to 



i-jG 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



^ Frewsburg, N.Y. , conveying his family and 
household effects by an ox team the entire dis- 
tance, much of the way through the wilder- 
ness, finding their path by means of marked 
trees. There he cleared up land, and engaged 
in farming, lumbering, and milling the re- 
mainder of his life. James, a millwright by 
trade, married Tryphosa Montague, settled at 
New Salem, owned for a time an interest in 
the mill business with his father, and died 
while a young man. Lewis married, engaged 
in the milling business in Leverett, where he 
spent his days, and reared a large family. 
Martin married Beulah Fiske, of Wendell, 
and settled on the old homestead of the Moore 
family in Leverett, but afterward moved to 
Montague, where he followed farming the 
remainder of his days. 

Lyman, the grandfather of William A. 
Moore, was born in July, 1799, in Leverett, 
and there learned the millwright and miller's 
trade; and, coming to Millington, he took 
charge of the mill which his father bought, 
and which, by the way, was one of the first 
(if not the first) mills ever built in the local- 
ity. He soon succeeded his father in owner- 
ship of the property, and was possessed of the 
same at the time of his death, December 29, 
1843, in the forty-fifth year of his age. He 
was a man of unusual merit and respected by 
all, a Democrat in politics, a Unitarian in 
religious belief. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Eliza Smith, was a faithful member 
of the Congregational church. She preceded 
him to the land of eternal joys, passing away 
January 26, 1841, aged thirty-nine years. 

There were born to them a family of eight 
children; namely, Lyman E., Abigail, Jane, 
Hiram P., Maria A., Edward D., Lucian P., 
and Seraphine. Two of these, Abigail and 
Jane, died when very young. Hiram F., a 
millwright and general mechanic, married 



Cordelia Parlin. They settled in Millington, 
and were the parents of three children, who, 
together with the mother, have crossed the 
river which bounds the life that now is. 
Maria A. married Otis H. Moore, of Frews- 
burg, N.Y., where they started in life to- 
gether; and two children, Clara L. and Lucia 
E., were sent to bless them. Edward D., a 
mechanic, settled in Frewsburg, married 
Emogene Pope; and a son, H. Otis, came to 
them. The father died about 1880. 

Lucian P. Moore, a tanner by trade, a busi- 
ness which he followed a great many years, 
has for several years found employment in 
some of the largest shoe-shops in the State, 
having entire charge of certain departments. 
He married Lucretia Clapp, of Montague, and 
to them four children have been born : Nellie, 
Lottie, Clarence, and Robert. Seraphine 
Moore, who died April 25, 1888, at Buffalo, 
at fifty years of age, married Elijah R. Sax- 
ton, of Montague, a man of extraordinary 
business qualification and ability, who settled 
in Buffalo, N.Y., where they resided many 
years, and, having accumulated a large prop- 
erty, retired from business. They had one 
son — Charles B. Saxton — who was educated 
at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. 

Lyman E. Moore, the first named in the 
above list of the children of Lyman and Eliza 
(Smith) Moore, and the father of the gentle- 
man whose name appears at the head of this 
sketch, was born at New Salem (Millington), 
where he now lives, April 15, 1824, and re- 
ceived his education in the common schools 
and at Hopkins Academy at Hadley, Mass. 
After the death of his father he bought out 
the interest of the other heirs in the mill and 
house, and has since been engaged in the 
grain business, having built up an extensive 
local trade, which he now conducts. In 1858 
he rebuilt the mill, putting in new machinery. 



I 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



277 



The house is one of the oldest in town, and is 
in good condition, having withstood the blasts 
of one hundred and forty winters. 

Mr. Lyman E. Moore has always been an 
important factor in promoting the interests of 
the town of his nativity, advancing by every 
means in his power all beneficial enterprises. 
Since 1866 he has served as Postmaster and 
Justice of the Peace, and he has been one of 
the Trustees of New Salem Academy for sev- 
eral years. He is a Republican in politics; 
and, though he has steadily refused official 
honors, he served as Representative to the 
State legislature in 1869. He has been con- 
nected with the Masonic fraternity for over 
forty years, having first united with the Mount 
Zion Lodge at Hardwick (now of Barre), and 
is now a member of the Orange Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., and of Crescent Royal Arch 
Chapter. 

In 1847 Mr. Lyman E. Moore married 
Elizabeth Thompson, who was born December 
12, 1830, at Hardwick, Mass., and died 
December 4, 1878. Three children were born 
to them: Charles L., who died when a child; 
Eliza A. ; and William A. Eliza A. is the 
widow of Edwin N. Kellogg, of Orange, who 
died November 5, 1885. She has had four 
children, namely: Agnes E., who died in Sep- 
tember, 1885, at the age of sixteen years; 
Nathaniel P., who married Annie Durheim, of 
Ann Arbor, Mich. ; Grace E. and Charles L., 
who now reside in Orange. 

William A. Moore, the leading subject of 
this sketch, was born September 15, 1859. 
He was educated at New Salem Academy, 
and, like the rest of the Moore family, learned 
the miller's trade. He married Delia F. 
Wood, of Prescott, Mass., and resides with 
his father, caring for the business, which he 
now conducts. Socially, he, also, is a Mason, 
belonging to the Orange Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 



bfRANK H. ZABRISKIE, M.D., junior 
plj member of the firm of Dean & Zabris- 
kie, physicians and surgeons, of Green- 
field, is winning a wide and favorable 
reputation as one of the most successful prac- 
titioners of this part of the State, and bids 
fair to attain a position of eminence among 
the best physicians of the day. He was born 
in Norfolk, Va., August 31, 1859, and is of 
Polish origin, the Zabriskie family having 
originated in Poland, whence they removed to 
Holland, where they abided for a while. In 
1662 Albert Zabriskie sailed from Amster- 
dam, Holland, in the ship "Fox," and, com- 
ing to this country, settled in Hackensack, 
N.J. ; and some of his posterity have since 
that time intermarried with the Dutch. He 
was accompanied in his voyage to the New 
World by his wife, whom he had wedded in 
Holland, and their five children. One of his 
descendants. Christian Zabriskie, born at 
Englewood, N.J., in 1787, son of Albert 
Christian Zabriskie, was an importer of dry 
goods, and carried on an extensive business 
in New York City. He married Jane Roome, 
who bore him six sons and four daughters, all 
of whom married and reared families, their 
son Horsburgh, who was born in New York 
City in 1822, being the father of the subject 
of this brief sketch. 

Horsburgh Zabriskie was for many years an 
active business man in the city of his nativ- 
ity, being an insurance agent at 154 Broad- 
way. In 1847 he was united in marriage with 
Virginia Hartshorn, a native of Norfolk, Va., 
born in 1824, and they became the parents of 
two children, namely: Virginia A., wife of 
E. C. Sterling, a real estate dealer of New 
York City; and Frank H. Zabriskie. The 
father passed to his rest in 1891, but the 
mother is still living in New York. 

Frank H. Zabriskie grew to maturity and 



^78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was educated in the city of New York, attend- 
ing the public schools at first, and later the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, from 
which he was graduated in 1883, receiving 
the degree of M.D. In 1886 Dr. Zabriskie 
came to Greenfield, and, being favorably im- 
pressed with the place and the people, opened 
an office here. After a year's successful prac- 
tice he formed a partnership with Dr. Dean, 
with whom he has since been associated. A 
thorough student of medicine, in the diagnosis 
and treatment of the various diseases brought 
to his notice he has met with unusual suc- 
cess, and has won his full share of the patron- 
age of the community in which he has settled. 
The union of Dr. Frank H. Zabriskie with 
Miss Fannie Dean, daughter of Dr. H. C. 
Dean, was solemnized on the sixteenth day of 
June, 1893. They occupy an elegant resi- 
dence on Highland Avenue, erected by the 
Doctor in 1890. Politically, Dr. Zabriskie is 
a supporter of the Democratic party. He is 
a member of the Franklin County Medical 
Society and of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society, being quite influential in both 
societies. 



7TAARL EMIL JULIUS WEISBROD, 
I Y^ a prominent manufacturer of Green- 

V»l2_^^ field, Mass., was born at Coburg, 
Germany, in the month of April, 1843. His 
father, Carl Weisbrod, who was born in the 
same city in 181 5, and also his grandfather 
and an uncle, were landscape gardeners upon 
the estates of King Leopold of Belgium, 
holding positions which lasted through life. 
Carl Weisbrod married Frederica Bernhardt, 
and their three children were: Caroline, 
widow of Mr. Zehner and now a resident of 
Coburg; Carl Emil, of this sketch; and 
Johanna, who married Albert Wright, of 
Greenfield. The parents both died in the old 



country, the father in 1885, the mother two 
years later. 

Their children received the benefit of a 
good education, and Carl Emil, as the result 
of a competitive examination, earned the priv- 
ilege of attending a university; but, prefer- 
ring to enter mercantile life, he began at the 
age of seventeen a four years' apprenticeship 
in the office of a large banking and manufact- 
uring establishment. During this apprentice- 
ship Mr. Weisbrod was a member of a well- 
known rifle club, which was fitted out by the 
Duke Ernst II. of Coburg, and instructed by 
a captain of Garibaldi's army; and on the 
occasion of a national festival at Gotha, the 
capital of the duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, 
the club was invited, and entertained for three 
days at the Duke's palace, "Marienthal." 
After he had served there three years, the 
firm failed; and he was employed for part of 
another year to assist in closing up their 
affairs. In June, 1865, he started for the 
United States, having the promise of a situa- 
tion in New York City; but, stopping at 
Brussels to visit a friend of his father, he lost 
the steamer in which he had intended to take 
passage from Antwerp, and, being obliged to 
cross the ocean in a sailing-vessel, arrived at 
New York too late to secure the situation. 

Thus finding himself alone among strangers 
without means of support, he readily seized 
the first opportunity for work which presented 
itself, and entered the employ of Alexander 
Levino & Co., pocket-book manufacturers, 
with whom he served an apprenticeship of 
three years, at first receiving one dollar per 
month and board, which was eventually in- 
creased to three dollars per week. Although 
the wages were small, the experience gained 
was valuable, as it placed him in possession 
of a trade, which he has since followed with 
success. In September, 1870, he established 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



279 



business at Montague on a very small scale, 
with a capital of sixty dollars, himself and 
wife being the only operatives, until a time 
when its growth required assistance; and ere- 
long the enterprise assumed such importance 
as to necessitate the employment of twenty 
hands. In 1887 he moved to Greenfield, 
where he established his factory in the large 
three-story brick building that had been 
erected by the county for the sheriff's resi- 
dence and jail. Mr. Weisbrod purchased this 
property, which afforded ample facilities for 
the enlargement of his business; and he now 
employs from forty to seventy hands. 

Mr. Weisbrod and Miss Mary E. Newcomb, 
of North Adams, were married at Greenfield 
on September 14, 1869; and they have seven 
children, one of whom, a daughter, died at the 
age of seven years. The four sons and two 
daughters who survive are as follows : Carl, 
who wedded Florence Leslie, grand-daughter 
of the famous publisher, Frank Leslie, and is 
in company with his father; Willis Hamilton, 
also in company with his father; Luther H., 
an apt and industrious workman in his father's 
employ; Bertha, who is at present attending 
school; Elsie; and Frederick William. Mrs. 
Weisbrod was well educated, and taught 
school previous to her marriage. She and her 
husband are members of the Congregational 
church, and Mr. Weisbrod is Deacon of this 
and a Director and the Treasurer of the Young 
Men's Christian Association. 




"ENRY WARD CLOGSTON, a suc- 
cessful farmer and dairyman of Ber- 
}>^ \^ nardston, was born in Springfield, 
Mass., June 22, 1859, son of William and 
Sarah E. (Poor) Clogston. William Clogs- 
ton's father, John Glasford Clogston, was a 
native of Goffstown, N. H., born August 5, 



1794; and his wife, Eunice (Roberts) Clogs- 
ton, was born in Strafford, Vt., July 29, 
1797. He was a farmer, and resided in 
Strafford many years. On the breaking out of 
the War of 1812 he enlisted, and did good 
service for his country. He and his wife 
belonged to the Universalist church, and in 
politics he was a Republican. They had 
eight children, five of whom are now living: 
Spencer Clogston lives in Tunbridge, Vt. ; 
Mary, in Norwich, Vt. ; Aphia, in Strafford, 
Vt. ; and Luman, in Fair Haven, Vt. ; Will- 
iam, in Springfield, Mass. John, Henry, and 
Lucius are deceased. 

William Clogston, the father of Henry 
Ward, was born in Tunbridge, Orange 
County, Vt., July 15, 1831, but during the 
greater part of his life has been a resident of 
Springfield, Mass. For at least twenty years 
he has acted in the capacity of travelling 
salesman for the Powers Paper Company, and 
is still with them, having been in their ser- 
vice longer than any other man employed by 
them. He is a good business man, and knows 
how to make customers and friends when on 
the road, and does not lack for the latter, 
whether at home or en route. He owns a fine 
library, and has a valuable collection of 
antiquities and other curiosities, and is 
extremely well informed in the early history 
of Massachusetts. 

William Clogston was united in marriage to 
Sarah E. Poor, who was born in Robbinston, 
Me., February 20, 1833. Ancestors of Mrs. 
Sarah E. Poor Clogston were among the very 
early settlers of America. A certain Phillip 
Poor immigrated to this country so long ago 
that the date is very uncertain, but certain it 
is that many years later his descendants, 
among whom were Captain Thomas Poor and 
Captain Jonathan Poor, took active part in the 
French and Indian War; and members of this 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



family have also taken part in the Revolution 
and, later still, in the great Rebellion. Mr. 
and Mrs. Clogston have had four children, 
two of whom are deceased, namely: Willie, 
who was born in June, 1853, and died in 
1855; and Harry V. The only daughter, Ida 
F. Clogston, born August 9, 1856, is the wife 
of Walter Shipman, of Springfield, who is 
connected with the Springfield Republican. 
Henry W. Clogston, the subject of this 
sketch, was the youngest-born of the family. 
The parents are liberal in their religious 
views, and in politics both father and son are 
Republican. 

Henry Ward Clogston spent the days of his 
boyhood in the city of Springfield, where he 
attended school and- formed many of the 
friendships of youth which are so pleasant to 
renew in riper years. At the age of sixteen 
he left school; and, entering the office of the 
Springfield Homestead, he began mastering 
the mysteries of the printer's craft, but at the 
end of a year gave it up, and entered upon his 
career as a farmer. He commenced by work- 
ing out, receiving for his first month s wages 
five dollars. For three seasons he worked for 
others, but the fourth year hired a piece of 
land in Springfield, which he worked for two 
years. So well did he succeed that he was 
enabled to buy one hundred and twenty acres 
of land at Bernardston; and on March 10, 
188 1, he moved to this town, and started as 
his own master on his own land. He has 
since acquired adjoining property, and now 
has in all one hundred and forty-two acres of 
very good land, with convenient buildings. 
At present he has twenty-two head of stock 
— full blood Jerseys and grades. He gives 
his entire time and thought to his farming 
and dairying, and is making a grand success. 
The cream from his dairy is in great demand, 
and Mr. Clogston is already reckoned as one 



of Bernardston's most enterprising and thriv- 
ing farmers. 

On September 12, 1881, Henry Clogston 
was united in marriage to Eva L. Ross, who 
was born in Northfield, Vt., March 27, 1862, 
daughter of Freeman and Jane O. (Preston) 
Ross, both now living in South Royalton, 
Vt., where her father follows the carpenter's 
trade. Mr. Clogston and wife are members of 
the Unitarian church, and he is an adherent 
of the Republican party in politics. They 
have one son, Willie H. Clogston, who was 
born July 3, 1882. 



T^APTAIN ALVAH P. NELSON, a re- 
I V'^ tired farmer and lumberman of Cole- 
V»i£_^ rain, and a veteran of the Civil 
War, was born in this town. May 9, 1828, a 
son of David and Hannah (Brown) Nelson. 
His father was a native of Colerain, his 
mother of Rhode Island; and their marriage 
took place on February 5, 1824. Captain 
Nelson's grandfather, William Nelson, moved 
from Stonington, Conn., to Whitingham, Vt., 
where he lived one or two years, and then 
came to Colerain during the early days of the 
settlement of the town. He cleared a farm 
in the wilderness, first owning a small tract of 
fifty acres ; but by his persistent industry he 
acquired a large farm, which he successfully 
conducted for many years. He died there, at 
the age of eighty-four years. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Martha Riddell, and who 
also lived to reach a good old age, became the 
mother of six children — three sons and three 
daughters — who grew to maturity, and have 
passed away. 

David Nelson succeeded to the possession 
of the old homestead, and resided there during 
his entire life, engaging in the lumber busi- 
ness in connection with farming. He at- 




ALVAH P- NELSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



283 



tained a prominent position in tlie community, 
was a Selectman for four or five years, and 
also held other offices in the town. He was 
an officer in the State militia, a Democrat in 
politics, and liberal in his religion. His 
death occurred at the Nelson homestead, 
March 19, 1876, at the age of seventy-four 
years, his wife having died at the age of fifty- 
eight years. Of their seven children six 
lived to reach maturity, namely: Willard D., 
a resident of Colerain; Marcus, who now re- 
sides at Champlain, 111. ; Alvah P., of this 
sketch; Samantha B., wife of F. H. Ballou; 
Elizabeth, who died June 12, 1852, at the age 
of eighteen years; and Mary A., who died 
December 4, 1867, at the age of thirty-one 
years, she being the first wife of F. H. Bal- 
lou. She left one son, William H. 

Alvah P. Nelson was educated in the 
schools of his native town, and on reaching 
manhood adopted the business of his father, 
which he followed throughout the active 
period of his life, with the exception of a year 
passed in the service of his country during 
the Civil War, he having enlisted in Sep- 
tember, 1862, as Captain of Company B, 
Fifty-second Massachusetts Volunteers. He 
participated in the battle of Port Hudson, 
together with other memorable engagements, 
and, being disabled, was honorably discharged 
on August 14, 1863. Subsequent to his 
return home he continued to conduct business 
successfully in connection with farming. He 
owns a very fine farm, which is well im- 
proved, and possesses one of the most comfort- 
able homes in the neighborhood. 

On January 17, 1865, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary A. Barber, who was born 
at Halifax, Vt., June 15, 1842, and is a 
daughter of Benjamin and Lucy (Nelson) 
Barber, of that town, her father having been 
born there on October 10, 18 17, and her 



mother at Colerain, November 9, 18 16. Mr. 
Barber is a Republican in politics, and has 
been a member of the Board of Selectmen. 
He is also active in other official capacities, 
and is a Universalist in his religious views. 
They have had a family of four children, three 
of whom are now living, namely: Maria A., 
wife of Charles B. Denison, of Colerain; 
George A., a resident of Halifax, Vt. ; and 
Mary A., who is the eldest. The other, 
Frank H. Barber, died at the age of twenty- 
one years. 

Captain and Mrs. Nelson have no children. 
They are liberals in religion, and are so- 
cially very popular, having a large circle of 
friends and acquaintances. Captain Nelson 
is a Democrat in politics; and he is a com- 
rade of Greenleaf Post, Grand Army of the 
Republic, of Colerain. Many will recognize 
with pleasure the portrait of this stanch 
patriot on another page. Vain were the hope 
of the republic without its brave defenders: 

" Men — high-minded men — 
Men who their duties Icnow, 
But know their rights, and, Icnowing, dare maintain ! " 



7TAHRISTIAN F. SCHUSTER, profes- 
I ]| sor of music, residing in Greenfield, 

^^ ^ Franklin County, is a gentleman of 
talent and culture, occupying a high position 
among the musical celebrities of Western 
Massachusetts. He was born in New Prussia, 
near Leipsic, Germany, in 1826, son of Adam 
and Louisa (Lipoid) Schuster, his father 
being a farmer in very comfortable circum- 
stances. They reared a family of five chil- 
dren, but he was the only one to come to 
America; and one son and two daughters are 
still living in the fatherland. 

Christian F. Schuster inherited in a marked 
degree the musical ability native to his par- 



284 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ents; and special attention was early paid 
to its development, his entire time for four 
years, which he spent in Altenburg, being 
devoted to the study of music. Among the 
other musical instruments on which he learned 
to play was the trombone, in order that, if 
drafted into the army, he might join the band. 
At the age of twenty-two years he came with 
the Germania Band to the United States, 
making the voyage in a sailing-vessel, and 
being thirty-five days on the ocean. Of the 
thirty-five members of the band who came over 
at that time only two besides Mr. Schuster are 
now living, namely: Herr Eckhart, a noted 
musician of St. Paul, Minn. ; and Professor 
Eichler, formerly leader of the Germania 
Band in Boston, now living in that city, 
retired from active pursuits. Mr. Schuster 
is still hale and hearty, young for his years. 
He has always devoted himself to the teaching 
of music, both instrumental and vocal, paying 
special attention to voice culture, teaching 
in public schools, and giving private lessons. 
For some years after coming to this country 
Mr. Schuster remained with the Germania 
Band; and he was the first person to play the 
trombone solo in the city of New York, mak- 
ing his appearance in the old tabernacle on 
Broadway. He subsequently joined the Ital- 
ian Opera Company of Philadelphia, belong- 
ing to it for some time, and afterward settled 
in Brattleboro, Vt., and while there played 
the organ in the Congregational church every 
Sunday. 

Mr. Schuster was first married in Brattle- 
boro, Vt., in 1854, to Lizzie Brown, a daugh- 
ter of Addison Brown, whose widow is still 
living in that place, an intelligent and active 
old lady of ninety-two years. Mrs. Lizzie B. 
Schuster died in i860, leaving four children, 
of whom two died when young, the living 
ones being Paul, who is cashier of the Forest 



City National Bank, of Rockford, 111., and is 
married; and Elizabeth, the wife of Dr. 
Twitchell, of Dorchester, Mass. Mr. Schus- 
ter was again married in 1865 to Augusta 
R. K. Jonas, who was born in Kleine Heils- 
bach (one hour's ride from Frankfort-on-the- 
Main), Germany, and of this union three sons 
and one daughter have been born, namely: 
Christian, Jr., who resides in Holyoke, Mass., 
is married, and has one child; Carl, a pianist; 
Franz, who is in the newspaper business; and 
Alma, a very interesting and" bright young 
lady, living at Holyoke, Mass., with her 
brother. 

Politically, Mr. Schuster is an adherent of 
the Democratic party, although taking no 
active part in local affairs. He is held in the 
highest respect throughout the community, 
where he has hosts of friends, with never a 
known enemy, and, with the exception of his 
unfortunate collision with a highwayman, has 
had a most happy life. At that time he very 
narrowly escaped death, being horribly cut 
and bruised about the head and face, from the 
effects of which he was long unconscious and 
his life despaired of for twelve days, during 
which he suffered much, both from the nervous 
shock and the physical injuries. 



Kl- 



|ANSOM S. FOSTER, a prosperous 
and well-known farmer of Leyden, 
Franklin County, was born in this 
town, February 9, 1826, son of Ezra and 
Nancy (Smith) Foster. His grandfather, 
Ezekiel Foster, who was a native of Connecti- 
cut and son of an English settler in that 
State, removed when a young man to Ber- 
nardston, Mass., where he married, and set- 
tled down to farming, which he followed in 
connection with hunting and fishing; for at 
that time the woods and streams abounded in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



285 



game and fish of various kinds. In 1782 he 
came to Leyden, and here spent his last days. 
He was a patriot soldier of the Revolution. 
Ezra Foster, the eldest son of Ezekiel Foster, 
was born in Bernardston, September 21, 1779, 
and was therefore about three years old when 
his parents removed to Leyden. He received 
a good practical education in the schools of 
this town, where he afterward engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and became a prominent 
citizen. He was chosen by his townsmen to 
fill various offices of responsibility and trust, 
that of Selectman among others; and he also 
served as a Captain in the State militia. 

Ransom S. F"oster, who was reared to the 
vocation of a farmer, received a practical edu- 
cation in the district schools, and in addition 
to his agriculture has engaged in carpentry 
and wagon-making. The old Foster home- 
stead, where he now resides, was willed to 
him. It comprises one hundred and fifty 
acres of productive land, and on it is one of 
the oldest houses standing in Leyden to-day. 
Mr. Foster was married February 18, 1852, 
to Miss Climena Frizzell, who was born in 
Leyden, April 19, 1828, daughter of Rufus 
and Sabra (Wells) Frizzell. Her father was 
born October 6, 1793, being the son of Reu- 
ben and Anna (Squires) Frizzell, the former 
of whom died January 20, 1818, aged forty- 
seven years, and the latter June 16, 1844, at 
the age of seventy-seven years. Mr. Rufus 
Frizzell- was successfully engaged in the trade 
of a carpenter, which he followed in conjunc- 
tion with farming in Leyden, where he resided 
up to the time of his death, July 20, 1867. 
His wife, Sabra Wells Frizzell, was born 
June II, 1793, and died December 6, 1845. 
She bore him six children, of whom Mrs. 
Climena F. Foster is the only survivor. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Foster has 
been blessed by the birth of seven children — 



one son and six daughters — all of whom grew 
to maturity: and five are living to-day. A 
brief record follows: Mary C, wife of Henry 
Potter, of Brattleboro, Vt., died in her 
twenty-seventh year; Sara S. Foster died at 
twenty-one years of age; Lottie L. is the wife 
of Frank J. Allen, of Greenfield, Mass.; Nora 
H. is the wife of F. A. Cowan, of Natural 
Bridge, N.Y.; Nancy S. married Dr. D. 
Griffin, of Lynn, Mass.; Frank R. Foster 
lives on the old homestead; and Lilia E. 
Foster was educated in the State Normal 
School in Salem, Mass., and is a school- 
teacher. 

Frank R. Foster was educated in the 
schools of Leyden, and for a time was engaged 
in teaching school. Since his return to the 
old homestead he has successfully devoted his 
attention to agricultural pursuits, and is 
to-day classed among the rising young farmers 
of the town. In politics he is a supporter of 
the Republican party, and for three years has 
served on the School Committee, a position 
he is well qualified to fill, as he takes especial 
interest in educational matters. He is also 
an active and prominent member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. In political affilia- 
tion Mr. Ransom S. Foster is a Republican, 
and in religious belief is a Universalist. His 
wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mr. Foster's whole life has been 
spent in the community where he now resides, 
and of which he is a useful and highly 
respected citizen. 




|EVI J. GUNN, a prominent manufact- 
urer of Greenfield, was born in the 
village of Conway, June 2, 1830. 
His father, Levi Gunn, was born at Montague 
in 1793, and was a son of Levi Gunn, Sr., a 
farmer in that town, who died in the prime 



2S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of life, leaving a wife and three children. 
Grandfather Gunn's widow, whose maiden 
name was Mary Jewett, afterward married a 
Mr. Hale; and this last union was blessed 
with three children, Mrs. Hale dying in Mon- 
tague, at an advanced age. Mr. Gunn's 
father followed the trade of blacksmith, resid- 
ing in the towns of Conway and Buckland. 
In 1 8 14 he married Delia Dickinson, of 
Whately, Mass. ; and they reared a family of 
eight children — two sons and six daughters — 
of whom six are now living. Levi Gunn, the 
second of the name, died at Conway in 1862; 
and his widow, who long survived him, de- 
parted this life in 1881, aged eighty-eight 
years, both having been active to the last. 

Levi J. Gunn attended the schools of his 
native town, where he obtained a fair educa- 
tion; and he also acquired in his youth some 
knowledge of his father's trade. At the age 
of eighteen years he abandoned that calling, 
and entered the employ of a manufacturer of 
carpenters' tools at Conway, from which place 
he came to Greenfield about the year 1853. 
Here he continued in the same business until 
1864, when, in company with Charles H. 
Amidon, he commenced the manufacture of 
clothes-wringers, the firm conducting a suc- 
cessful and profitable business for a period of 
ten years. At the expiration of this time a 
stock company was formed, with a capital 
stock of two hundred thousand dollars, for the 
purpose of developing and carrying on an 
enterprise for the manufacture of hardware 
specialties, consisting of carpenters' and other 
mechanical tools, their factory being located 
at Miller's Falls. Mr. Gunn has held the 
position both of treasurer and manager of the 
company since its organization, his energy 
and capability having been the means of 
establishing and maintaining a large and very 
successful trade, their annual production 



being greatly in excess of its former amount, 
and requiring the services of two hundred 
workmen. 

On October 5, 1853, Mr. Gunn married 
Miss Esther C. Graves, of Sunderland, daugh- 
ter of Cephas and Miranda (Church) Graves, 
who were both natives of that town. Her 
father, who was a prosperous farmer, died in 
1847, aged fifty-four; and his widow was 
called to rest in 1865, aged sixty-six years. 
They had a family of eleven children, ten of 
whom lived to reach maturity; one, Allen, a 
farmer, now resides upon the parental home- 
stead of his wife; another, Elias, is a resident 
of Oshkosh, Wis. ; and a third, Royal C. 
Graves, resides in Boston. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gunn have one son, Levi Walter, a graduate 
of the Greenfield High School, who married 
Sybella Eastman. 

The family attend the Congregational 
church, of which Mr. Gunn is a member of 
the Financial Committee, and for the past 
fourteen years have occupied a most pleas- 
antly situated and comfortable residence, sur- 
rounded by giant elms, at 24 Main Street — a 
delightful home. Mr. Gunn is a Republican 
in politics, and has served two terms as As- 
sessor and Selectman. He was for two years 
a State Senator, and served a similar length 
of time as a member of the Governor's Coun- 
cil. He is a stockholder in the Greenfield 
Savings Bank. 




ENRY S. RANNEY, an honored and 
respected citizen of Ashfield, is 

-'' V.^ / noted as being, both in point of 

age and time of service, the senior incumbent 
of the office of Town Clerk in Franklin 
County. He was born in Ashfield, Mass., 
March 5, 1817. His paternal grandfather, 
George Ranney, was born at Chatham, Conn., 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



287 



January 9, 1747. In 1780, after his marriage 
with Esther Hall, he came to Ashfield, and 
bought one hundred acres of wild land, which 
now constitutes the farm owned by Charles 
Howes. He cleared a large portion, erected 
good buildings, and, while establishing a 
home and rearing a family, acquired a compe- 
tency. He was a stanch adherent of the old 
Whig party, but held no political office. 
With his wife, his religious associations were 
with the Congregationalists. She died at 
about middle age, and he at the age of 
seventy-five years, leaving seven children; 
namely, Samuel, Jesse, Joseph, Hannah, 
Esther, Anna, and George. 

George Ranney, Jr., was the youngest child 
born to the pioneer household, his birth occur- 
ring May 12, 1789, on the Ashfield home- 
stead, which he' afterward inherited, and 
managed with skill until 1832. Then, selling 
his property, he removed to Phelps, N.Y., 
where, with the exception of one year, during 
which he was engaged in the lumber business 
in Michigan, he carried on general farming 
until the time of his decease, at the age of 
fifty-three years. He married Achsah Sears, 
who was born April 11, 1789, and died 
August 7, 1869. They reared nine children, 
as follows: A. Franklin, George L., Henry 
S., Lucius, Priscilla M., Harrison J., Lyman 
A., Lemuel S., and Anson B. 

Henry S. Ranney, the special subject of 
this brief record, was educated at Sanderson 
Academy, and worked on the home farm until 
the age of fifteen years, when he accepted a 
position as clerk with S. W. Hall, one of 
Ashfield's most enterprising merchants, after- 
ward occupying a similar position in the store 
of Jasper Bement. He later formed a copart- 
nership with Richard Cook; and they opened 
a store of general merchandise, in which they 
carried on a substantial business for five years. 



Selling his interest here, Mr. Ranney next 
went to Boston, where he was engaged in a 
mercantile business with George C. Goodwin 
for four years. Returning then to the scenes 
of his childhood, he was employed as a clerk 
for a time with Joseph Bement, a son of his 
former employer, but soon went into business 
at the old stand with S. W. Hall. In the 
month of April, 185 i, he sold out his interest 
in the store, and bought the property in the 
village known as the John Williams Hotel, 
which was built in 1792 by Zachariah Field, 
and by him used as hotel and store. This 
property Mr. Ranney has always kept, though 
not using it as a public house. He has en- 
tirely remodelled it, arranging the rooms for 
tenants, having six tenements besides the por- 
tion which he himself occupies, often enter- 
taining transient guests. In 1857 he bought 
sixty acres of land near by, and until 1885 
successfully carried on general farming in 
connection with a variety of official business. 
In 1839 Mr. Ranney was chosen to the 
office of Town Clerk, and since that time has 
filled the office forty-eight years. On March 
18, 185 1, he was appointed by Governor 
George S. Boutwell Justice of the Peace, and 
has since performed the duties connected with 
the office in a most faithful and satisfactory 
manner. He has the courage of his convic- 
tions, was an early antislavery and Free Soil 
voter, and is to-day an independent Republi- 
can in politics, voting for the man and meas- 
ures most desirable and fit. He has been 
prominent in the management of local and 
State affairs, and, besides serving various 
terms as Selectman and Assessor, he has twice 
served as Representative to the legislature, 
having been elected in 1852, and again in 
1868. He has ever taken an especial interest 
in promoting the educational and moral ad- 
vancement of his native town, and has served 



288 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



as a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Sanderson Academy for forty years, having 
been President of the Board one-half of that 
time. He has long been one of the most 
active and esteemed members of the Congre- 
gational church here, holding the office of 
clerk. 

Mr. Ranney has been twice married. His 
second wife, whom he espoused on June 26, 
1856, and who died on August 25, 1890, was 
Julia A. Bassett, a daughter of Francis Bas- 
sett. The maiden name of his first wife, to 
whom he was united June 20, 1844, was Maria 
J. Goodwin. She died in 1855, at the age of 
thirty-three years, having had four children: 
the eldest, Ralph H., born March 16, 1845, 
married Rosa S. Bassett, and died in 1876, 
leaving her a widow with two children — Ray- 
mond R. and Clara M.; Ella L. Ranney, born 
September 24, 1847, died in 1874, leaving 
her husband, Albert W. Packard, and two 
children — Austin G. and Ella M. ; Clara M. 
Ranney, born August 2, 1851, died in 1859; 
and George G., who was born May 22, 1853, 
lived but four months. 



YgTENRY C. WILLARD, a pharmacist 
r=T| of large experience, carrying on a 

-1-^ V_ ^ substantial business at Greenfield, 
a gentleman of intelligence, enterprise, and 
social prominence, was born in this town in 
1836, but has spent much of his mature life 
elsewhere, having returned to his native place 
in 1890. He is a descendant of an early set- 
tler of Greenfield, his father, David Willard, 
a son of Beriah Willard, having been born 
here in 1790. David Willard was a mer- 
chant and one of the extensive land-owners of 
Greenfield, and exerted a strong influence in 
advancing its business interests. He married 
Miss Sarah Dickman, a daughter of Thomas 



Dickman, noted as being the editor and pub- 
lisher of the first paper established in West- 
ern Massachusetts, and the first postmaster 
at Greenfield. They reared a large family of 
children, of whom the subject of this brief 
biographical notice was the eighth child and 
the fourth son in order of birth. 

Henry C. Willard received his elementary 
education in the public schools, and this was 
supplemented by a complete course of study 
at Fisk Academy. At the age of sixteen 
years he began to learn the business in which 
he has since been continuously employed, 
becoming clerk in a drug store at Hartford, 
Conn., where he remained four years. The 
following three years he was employed in the 
same capacity at Pittsfield, Mass., returning 
thence to Greenfield, where he was similarly 
engaged another three years. In 1865 Mr. 
Willard, in company with Mr. Clark, estab- 
lished a drug store at Brattleboro, Vt., and 
under the firm name of Clark & Willard had 
carried on a very successful business for some 
ten years when a disastrous conflagration 
destroyed their store and its contents. Mr. 
Willard subsequently engaged in business by 
himself in Brook House Block, where he re- 
mained a score of years, removing from there 
to Great Barrington, Mass., having the lead- 
ing drug trade of that place during the suc- 
ceeding three years. In 1890 Mr. Willard 
gave up his store in Great Barrington to come 
to Greenfield to take charge of the drug busi- 
ness and the estate left by George Plovey, the 
deceased husband of his sister, Nancy M. 
Willard Hovey. . 

On June i, 1870, while a resident of Brat- 
tleboro, Vt., Mr. Willard was united in the 
holy bonds of matrimony to Miss Mary Field, 
of that city. She is the descendant of a dis- 
tinguished New England family, being a 
daughter of the Hon. Charles T. Field, and 




JOHN D. MILLER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



291 



a cousin of the well-known and talented 
writer, Eugene Field, of Chicago. Her 
mother was a daughter of General Martin. 
Of the two children born of their happy 
union one son died in infancy; and their 
other son, David Willard, is a Senior at 
Trinity College, where he is preparing for the 
Episcopal ministry. In his political views 
Mr. Willard has the courage of his convic- 
tions, and, although formerly a Republican, 
has been an adherent of the Democratic party 
since 1872. He is quite advanced in Masonic 
circles, being a Knight Templar, in which 
body he has served as Senior Deacon. He 
and his family worship at the Episcopalian 
church, of which they are communicants. 



"OHN D. MILLER, whose portrait meets 
the eye of the reader on the opposite 
page, one of the most enterprising and 
best-known citizens of Colerain, was born in 
this town, January 22, 1842. He is a son of 
Hugh B. and Mary Young (Drury) Miller, 
both natives of Colerain, his mother being 
now a widow. His paternal great-grand- 
father, William Miller, was of Scotch de- 
scent, but born in the north of Ireland, and 
was one of the numerous immigrants to this 
country known as Scotch-Irish. 

Robert Miller, son of William, passed the 
whole of his life in Colerain; and there his 
son Hugh B., the father of Mr. John D. 
Miller, was born on September 16, 181 3. He 
was engaged in his youth in lumbering, also 
conducting a farm, and was a shrewd business 
man, successful in all he undertook. In poli- 
tics Mr. Hugh B. Miller took an active inter- 
est, and belonged to the kindred parties of 
that time, being successively a Whig, a Free 
Soiler, and a Republican. He was elected to 
fill many public offices, being State Constable 



for seven years. Representative to the legis- 
lature from his district in 1859-60, and again 
in 1866. He also was prominent in town 
affairs, being Assessor for twenty years. Jus- 
tice of the Peace for twenty-seven years, and 
Trial Justice for some time. The greater 
part of his life was spent in Colerain Centre. 
He died August i, 1885. His wife, Mary Y. 
Drury, who was born October 12, 18 14, is 
now the oldest resident in the village. They 
had five children, namely: May Bolton, who 
died when four years old; Susan R., born 
January 12, 1836, now the widow of Newton 
Smead, and living in Colerain; Nancy E., 
born January 10, 1839, the wife of John L. 
Clark, of Elm Grove, Colerain; John D. ; and 
Robert, born May 28, 1849, a resident of 
Colerain. 

John D. Miller grew to manhood and was 
educated in Colerain. He sought his fortune 
in the city, engaging first in trade in milk 
and baker's goods in New York and Brooklyn, 
in the employ of J. A. Lincoln, afterward 
carrying on the same kind of business in his 
own name, going from New York to Jersey 
City. In 1868 or 1869 he returned to his 
native town, and here engaged in various 
enterprises, farming being his principal 
industry. He has a farm of about two hun- 
dred and forty acres, and besides this property 
owns real estate in the village. Mr. Miller 
is also in business with C. A. Marcy, who has 
a large trade in carriages and farm wagons, 
carrying in stock vehicles of every descrip- 
tion. In fact, he is the sort of man that only 
America can produce — one who can turn his 
hand to anything, and make all he undertakes 
a success. 

Mr. Miller was married on December 20, 
1 87 1, to Mary E., daughter of Lysander and 
Mary R. Brownell, both now deceased. Mrs. 
Mary E. Miller died January 2, 1890, leaving 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



three children: Sadie D., Hugh B., and 
Marian R. Marshall R., twin brother of 
Marian, died in his eleventh year. Mr. 
Miller is a Republican, and is quite promi- 
nent in local politics. In 1883 he was chosen 
Representative for the Fifth Franklin Dis- 
trict, which includes Northfield, Bernardston, 
Leyden, Heath, and Colerain; and in town he 
has served as Assessor, off and on, since 
1873, as Collector for several years, holding 
that office at present, and as Constable. He 
is Director and Agent of the Franklin County 
Mutual Insurance Company, and is also con- 
nected with the Quincy Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company of Quincy. 



/^^^^TeORGE WASHINGTON MILLER, 
\ p!)! late a leading citizen of Colerain, 
was born here on February 10, 18 16, 
and was a son of Robert and Nancy (Bolton) 
Miller, natives of the same town. On the pa- 
ternal side he was of the sturdy race known as 
Scotch-Irish. William Miller, the first of 
the family to settle in Colerain, came to this 
country from the north of Ireland in the early 
part of last century. William Miller removed 
to Franklin County from Stow, Middlesex 
County, about 1740 or 174S, at a time when 
the country was sparsely settled, and the home 
of every hardy pioneer was a miniature for- 
tress. The forests abounded with wild animals 
and with equally wild savages; and the roads 
made by the settlers were chosen with the 
greatest care, in order to avoid ambuscades. 
Indian Spring, on the Miller farm, is so 
called from an incident which aptly illus- 
trates the chances of the time. A settler who 
had lost a cow was seeking for the missing 
animal near this spring, guided by the sound 
of a bell which she had worn about her neck, 
when he caught sight of an Indian gliding 



among the trees and underbrush and ringing 
the bell, which he had taken from the cow, to 
lead the white man to sudden death or captiv- 
ity and torture. Quickly raising his gun, the 
pioneer fired, and the Indian dropped near the 
spring. William Miller first settled where 
Mr. Arthur Smith now resides, spending there 
three seasons. He then moved to what is 
called the Milo Sprague place, and there 
spent the remainder of his life, prospering in 
worldly affairs, and taking a prominent part 
in town matters. He passed away on Decem- 
ber 9, 1785, at the age of eighty-five. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Mary Wallace, 
was of the same lineage as William Wallace, 
the Scottish patriot. Her span of life cov- 
ered nearly a century, reaching its termination 
on March 28, 1794, she being then over 
ninety-nine years old. Mr. and Mrs. Will- 
iam Miller were Congregationalists, and 
attended service at the little church which 
stood near the Old Cemetery, the oldest bur- 
ial-place in this vicinity. 

Their son Robert, the grandfather of George 
W., succeeded to the farm, and on it spent 
his life, winning a good livelihood from the 
products of the soil, and taking an active part 
in town affairs. In politics he was a Whig, 
and he attended the Congregational church. 
He was twice married, his first wife being 
Margaret McClellan, a native of Colerain. 
She died in 1790, at the age of fifty-two, leav- 
ing eight children: William, Thomas, Rob- 
ert, David, Martha, Mary, Jane, and Margaret 
or Peggy. On April 26, 1791, Robert Miller 
married Martha (Richey) Smith, widow of 
Thomas Smith. The second Mrs. Miller, 
who was a native of Peterboro, N.H., daugh- 
ter of William Richey, one of the earliest 
permanent settlers of that town, died July 28, 
1849, aged ninety. She also was a member 
of the Congregational church. Of this union 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



293 



four children were born — John, Peggy, 
Annie, and Washington — who all lived to 
marry and raise families. 

Robert Miller, the younger, was born and 
bred in Colerain, and spent part of his life on 
the homestead, carrying on general farming. 
After his marriage to Nancy Bolton, he 
moved to the part of the Miller estate which 
lies opposite Mr. Michael Johnson's resi- 
dence; and there the ten children born of the 
union grew to adult age. They may here be 
briefly named, as follows: Minerva, wife of 
Amos Bardwell; Nancy, wife of Abel Shat- 
tuck, and later wife of David Jillson, of 
Whitingham, Vt. ; Robert, who married Celia 
Lyons; Margaret, wife of Nathan Hoskins, 
of Jericho, Vt. ; Elizabeth, the only survivor 
of the family at present, wife of Harry Hos- 
kins, of the same place; Jane T., wife of 
Asahel Snow; Hugh B., who married Mary 
Drury, the latter now a widow, residing in 
Colerain; George W. ; Joseph W., who mar- 
ried Helen Thompson and later Caroline 
Blakesly; and John M., who died, unmarried, 
at the age of thirty-one. 

George W. Miller was eleven years old 
when his father died; and, after the boy had 
acquired what book learning the district 
school afforded, he took up the pursuit of 
agriculture, buying in 1841 the farm now held 
by the family. It covers three hundred acres, 
and is a valuable piece of property. On this 
farm is the site of the first store opened in 
the town, which was kept by the Chandler 
brothers; and the residence was built by the 
Chandlers in 1791, and, though over one hun- 
dred years old, is still in good condition, and 
admirably suits its pleasant environment. 
Mr. Miller was a thrifty and successful 
farmer, and made many improvements in the 
place. A Democrat in politics, he served as 
Selectman for some time, besides holding 



minor offices. He belonged to the Colerain 
Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and, like his father and grandfather, 
was a Congregationalist in religion. He died 
at the home farm on December 9, 1891. 

Mr. Miller was twice married. His fir.st 
wife, to whom he was united August 31, 1837, 
was Sylvia Shattuck, who was born September 
II, 1815, and died on February 20, 1853. 
Six children were born of this union, only 
one of whom, Benjamin F. Miller, survives. 
He resides in Colerain, his home being just 
south of the old Miller place; and by his 
wife, whose maiden name was Eugenia Eddy, 
has three children: Frank Mowry, George 
Leroy, and Grace Peet. 

On September 7, 1853, Mr. Miller was 
married to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and 
Margaret (Miller) Shearer, a native of Shel- 
burne, born May 26, 1822. Thomas Shearer, 
who was born in Colerain, July 14, 1791, was 
a well-educated man, and taught school for* 
some time, but spent the greater part of his 
life in agricultural pursuits. He died Jan- 
uary 31, 1841. His wife, Margaret (Miller) 
Shearer, was born in Colerain, April 14, 
1793, and died' on March i, 1863. Mr. 
Shearer was a member of the Universalist 
Society, and Mrs. Shearer belonged to the 
Congregational church. They had eight chil- 
dren, all of whom grew up; but at the present 
time Mrs. Miller is the only one living. She 
is the mother of two children: S. Adelle, 
born March 4, 1856, wife of William Rickett, 
of Derby, Conn., and mother of three children 
— Tessie, Henry, and William Percy; and 
Helen M., born October 10, 1866, wife of 
William Apt, who lives on the home farm 
with Mrs. Miller, and has three children — 
Albro, M. Russell, and Dora Mildred. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Shearer Miller is one of the oldest 
and most esteemed residents of Colerain, and 



294 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



her retentive memory is stored with interest- 
ing facts relative to the history of the town. 




"ON. CHESTER C. CONANT, a 
prominent resident of Greenfield, 
and Judge of Probate for Franklin 
County, was born at Lyme, N.H., in 1831. 
His father, Colonel Jonathan Conant, was 
born in the same town in 1793, and was a son 
of Josiah Conant, who moved to Lyme from 
Bridgewater, Mass., where he was born in 
1768. Jonathan Conant, father of Josiah, 
was born at Bridgewater in 1734. He served 
through the entire struggle for independence; 
and, although he fought in the battle of 
Brandywine, and endured the hardships of the 
memorable winter at Valley Forge, he sur- 
vived the many dangers and vicissitudes of 
the war, and died at Orange, Vt., in 1820. 
Judge Conant is a lineal descendant of one 
of the oldest Colonial families. The imme- 
diate progenitor of his great-grandfather was 
David Conant, who was born at Beverly, 
Mass., in 1698, and one of whose sons, Will- 
iam Conant, 2d, was the first settled minister 
at Lyme, being pastor of the Congregational 
church for a period of forty years. David 
was a son of William Conant, born at Beverly 
in 1666, whose father. Lot Conant, was born 
at Nantasket in 1624, and was a son of Roger 
Conant, a Church of England Puritan. The 
father of Roger was Richard Conant, who was 
born about 1548 at East Budleigh, England, 
where Sir Walter Raleigh was born in 1552, 
whence it follows that they must have been 
boys together in the same village. Roger 
Conant, whose birth occurred at East Bud- 
leigh, England, in 1592, is supposed to have 
been a passenger on board the "Ann," which 
arrived at Plymouth in the month of July, 
1623. He erected the first house in Salem, 



where he settled, afterward being appointed 
Governor of the colony, an office which he 
filled for several years, until superseded by 
Governor Endicott. While residing at Nan- 
tasket, he made use of the island in Boston 
Harbor, then called Conant's Island, now 
known as Governor's Island. He was a 
grandson of John Conant, who was born near 
East Budleigh about the year 1520. The emi- 
nent divine, the Rev. John Conant, D.D., 
Archdeacon of Norwich, England, 1676, was 
a nephew of Roger Conant. 

Judge Conant's paternal grandmother was 
Betsey Sloan, daughter of John and Esther 
Sloan, of Palmer, Mass., and later of Lyme, 
N.H., where they were the first settlers. 
Their tombstone, which now stands in Lyme 
(N.H.) churchyard, records their ages — each i 
as ninety-six years. The ceremony of the 
marriage of Josiah Conant and Betsey Sloan 
was observed in 1788. The former was acci- 
dentally killed by a falling tree in 1801, at 
the age of thirty -three years, leaving three 
sons and four daughters. Judge Conant's 
father. Colonel Jonathan Conant, married in 
1820 Clarissa Dimmick, daughter of Samuel 
Dimmick, of Lyme, and one of a family of 
twenty-one children. Her paternal grand- 
father was present at the siege of Louisburg. 

Colonel Conant served in the War of 181 2. 
He was by trade a contractor and builder. 
Of his family of eight children Lucy died at 
the age of eighteen, and Samuel at seventeen 
years. The others became heads of families, 
but are now deceased, with the exception of 
Judge Conant and his brother Josiah, the lat- 
ter being a resident of Thetford, Vt., where 
he follows agriculture, and has been several 
terms a member of the Vermont legislature. 
Dr. David Sloan Conant was an eminent phy- 
sician and surgeon and a professor at Bowdoin 
College, Vermont University, and the New 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



29S 



York Medical College. He was a volunteer 
surgeon at the battle of Antietam, and died at 
New York in 1865, aged forty-five years. 
Abel B. Conant, the youngest brother, was 
surgeon of the Fourteenth Kentucky' Loyal 
Regiment, and passed some time in captivity 
at Libby Prison. He died of diphtheria a 
short time after his discharge from the army, 
aged twenty-seven years, while preparing to 
fill a professorship at the University of Ver- 
mont. Judge Conant's mother died in 1842; 
and his father, in 1863, at the age of seventy 
years. 

Although Chester C. Conant began life by 
following his father's business, being at the 
age of eighteen years competent to assume 
charge of building operations, he preferred to 
enter professional life, and accordingly pur- 
sued a full course at Dartmouth College, 
where he was graduated with the class of 
1857. He also graduated from the Albany 
Law School two years later, was admitted to 
both the New York and Massachusetts bars 
the same year, and afterward to the bar of the 
United States Supreme Court. He opened an 
office at Greenfield in company with the late 
Judge David Aiken, continuing in partnership 
with that gentleman for a period of four years. 
The partnership which he formed in 1877 
with his nephew, Samuel D. Conant, still 
continues, the firm conducting a large law 
practice. 

In politics Judge Conant has always been 
a Republican. In 1863 he was elected Regis- 
ter of Probate and Insolvency for Franklin 
County, to which office he was re-elected in 
1870; and he now holds the position of Judge 
of Probate and Insolvency, having been ap- 
pointed in September, 1870. Judge Conant 
was a delegate to the Republican National 
Convention at Chicago in 1882, and was also 
a Presidential elector from Massachusetts the 



same year. He has served upon the School 
Committee of his town, his knowledge of 
building making him of especial value to the 
town during the erection of the high school. 
He is also an active member of the Episcopal 
church, having been superintendent of the 
Sunday-school for a period of thirty years. 

On June 14, i860, he wedded Miss Sarah 
B. Howard, a childhood acquaintance, who 
died July 17, 1889, leaving two daughters — 
Charlotte H. and Martha P. — who are both 
graduates of Wellesley College. The former, 
in company with a classmate in college, now 
conducts a school at Natick, Mass., where 
young ladies are prepared for Wellesley and 
other colleges for women; and Martha has 
received the post-graduate degree of A.M. 
from that institution. On October 18, 1892, 
Judge Conant married for his second wife 
Miss Emily H. Haven, only surviving daugh- 
ter of John P. Haven, late of New York City, 
formerly a publisher of religious literature. 
Mrs. Conant is a graduate of the celebrated 
school of the Misses Draper, late of Hartford, 
Conn. 



m 



ILLIAM L. BOUTWELL, a very 
enterprising and successful young 
farmer of Leverett, son of Samuel 
W. Boutwell, was born January 20, 1858, 
upon the farm where he now resides. His 
home is very near the farm on which his 
grandfather, Levi Boutwell, who was a native 
of Fitzwilliam, N.H., settled in early man- 
hood. Grandfather Boutwell carried on his 
farm for many years, later moving into the 
village, and passing the sunset of his life 
with his children, who tenderly cared for him 
until his death, which occurred at the age of 
eighty-four years. He was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Baptist church and the father of a 
large family. 



296 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Samuel W., the second-born child of his 
parents, was reared to agricultural labors ; 
but, directly after completing his education 
in the district schools and at the Shelburne 
Falls Academy, he began the work of life by 
teaching in the schools of Leverett and the 
adjoining towns. Later he received as a gift 
from his father the very desirably located 
farm adjoining the old homestead, and here he 
has since resided. Always a very active man, 
he attended to the many arduous duties which 
fall to the lot of a farmer until the year 1885, 
since which time his son William L. has re- 
lieved him from care and labor, so that he is 
now passing his declining years in. the enjoy- 
ment of a quiet and well-earned retirement. 
He married Harriet D. Prescott, daughter of 
Luther Prescott, of Montague, where her fam- 
ily were early settlers and highly respected 
citizens; and this union has been blessed 
with but one child — William L. Mr. and 
Mrs. Samuel W. Boiitwell, although well 
advanced in years, are still well preserved 
mentally and physically. They are attend- 
ants of the church at North Amherst. 

At the age of fourteen years William L. 
Boutwell commenced a two years' course of 
study at the New Salem Academy, preparatory 
to entering Amherst Agricultural College, 
from which he was graduated in 1878. He 
then returned to the parental roof, and as- 
sisted his father in carrying on the farm until 
assuming entire charge, as above stated, since 
which time he has conducted the farm with an 
energy and push which plainly demonstrates 
the fact that he is well qualified, both by sci- 
entific knowledge and natural ability, to make 
farming a pronounced success. 

In 1882 he was very happily married to 
Sarah E. Bangs, of Leverett, one of the fam- 
ily of six children of Howard and Judith 
(Cutter) Bangs, her father, who was a native 



of Hadley, now deceased, having been a pros- 
perous farmer in Leverett. Mr. and Mrs. 
Boutwell have one child, named Estella Mira- 
bel. Mr. William L. Boutwell is a Republi- 
can in politics, and is active in all public 
affairs of the town, having served as a member 
of the Board of Selectmen and as Overseer of 
the Poor; and he has rendered valuable aid to 
the town as a member of the School Board 
during the past eight years. In agricultural 
affairs he has been prominent, having been 
Secretary of the Hampshire County Agricult- 
ural Society for three years, and for a number 
of years a member of the Executive Commit- 
tee; he also has been a Trustee of the Frank- 
lin County Agricultural Society for several 
years past. Mr. and Mrs. Boutwell are at- 
tendants of the church at North Amherst. 



jUFrANCIS a. CADY, who, at his beau- 
T^l^ tiful home in Ashfield, is enjoying the 
rest and recreation earned by his many 
years of useful activity, is numbered among 
the prominent and valued citizens of F'ranklin 
County, being a man of solid worth, possess- 
ing in an eminent degree those traits that 
command respect in the business world, and 
gain esteem among one's neighbors and asso- 
ciates. He was born in the town of Stafford, 
Conn., March 20, 1818, at the home of his 
parents. Garner and Susanna (Johnson) Cady. 
Garner Cady was born in Connecticut, and 
there reared to agricultural pursuits, becoming 
an extensive and prosperous farmer. He also 
carried on a profitable business in quarrying 
stone on his farm, which he sold for use in 
blast furnaces, deriving a good income there- 
from. Energetic and enterprising, he was 
one of the foremost citizens of his locality, 
both in business matters and in local public 
affairs. In politics he was a stanch Demo- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



m 



crat, and, besides serving in various town 
offices, was Representative of liis district to 
the State legislature several terms. He was 
a sincere and esteemed member of the Univer- 
salist church, and after a well-spent life of 
eighty-six years came to his grave 

" Sustained and soothed 
By an unfaltering trust." 

To him and his wife, who died in 1824, 
twelve children were born; namely, Phineas 
G., Alanson N., Andrew J., George F., Gid- 
eon H., Hannah, Garner, Jr., Isaac, Francis 
Augustus, Alfred D., Elvira, and Marietta S. 
Of these, Elvira, who married A. Blodgett, 
and is now a bright and active woman of 
ninety-three years, is the mother of thirteen 
children, three of whom are well-known 
physicians. 

Francis A. Cady was left motherless when 
a little lad of six summers, and for the follow- 
ing ten years he was cared for in the home of 
an uncle. After being well trained to habits 
of industry, honesty, and thrift, he started out 
in the world for himself, his first employment 
being that of clerk for S. Gaylord, of North 
Adams, Mass. While thus employed, he 
practised a wise economy; and, when he 
reached man's estate, he had saved enough 
money to enable him to open a small country 
store in North Adams, making a modest be- 
ginning, but gradually enlarging and extend- 
ing his trade. Ten years later Mr. Cady 
disposed of his store, and entered into the real 
estate business, buying and selling lands and 
lots, erecting houses, which he sold or rented; 
and he is to-day the owner of several valuable 
houses in North Adams. In addition to all 
this, he also for a short time carried on a 
thriving business in the manufacture of bricks. 
On May i, 1892, Mr. Cady removed to Ash- 
field, purchasing a house, which he has en- 



tirely remodelled and fitted with modern 
conveniences, making it, with its well-graded, 
grass-covered lawn, one of the finest in the 
village. Mr. Cady also owns a valuable farm 
in the town of Ashfield; and on this he has 
some choice stock, being a great lover of fine 
horses and cattle, and taking pleasure in hav- 
ing them well cared for. 

The marriage of Mr. Francis A. Cady and 
Miss Hattie Marie Graves, daughter of Eben- 
ezer and Persis R. (Whittiam) Graves, of 
Ashfield, took place on December 9, 1885. 
They have one child — a daughter — Frances 
Marie, the date of whose birth was June 29, 
1887. Mrs. Cady, who is a woman of refine- 
ment and culture and an accomplished musi- 
cian, is held in high esteem by her large 
circle of warm friends; and the pleasant home 
over which she presides is an attractive social 
centre. She is an active and valued member 
of the Congregational church. (For ancestry 
see following sketch of Ebenezer Graves.) 
Mr. Cady is a man of great intelligence and 
capability, one who thinks for himself, per- 
fectly independent in politics, voting for 
measures most beneficial to the general pub- 
lic, and in religion is of the liberal type of 
believers. 




BENEZER GRAVES, farmer, a well- 
known and esteemed resident of Ash- 
field, is the third in direct line who 
has borne this name in Franklin County. 
He was born in Charlemont, December 11, 

1830, son of Ebenezer and Nabby W. (Man- 
ter) Graves, who were married in 1821, and 
who moved to Ashfield in 183 1. They were 
the parents of five children — a daughter, 
Harriet, who was born in 1827 and died in 

1831, and four sons, the subject of this sketch 
being the only survivor. His brother Will- 
iam, born in 1823, died in 1849, and James, 



2 9-8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born in 1837, died in 1862, both unmarried; 
Addison, born September 25, 1833, died Jan- 
uary 15, 1867, leaving a wife, Helen M. 
Eaton Graves, and three sons — Charles B., 
a physician in New London, Conn., a gradu- 
ate of the Harvard Medical School, James M., 
and Addison — all now married. 

Ebenezer Graves, second, was the eldest 
son of Ebenezer and Olive (Flint) Graves, 
who were married on February 13, 1794, by 
the Rev. Eliab Stone, in the North Parish of 
Reading, Middlesex County, Mass., their na- 
tive place. The wedding trip was a journey 
of several days on an ox sled, with their 
worldly effects, to Charlemont, Franklin 
County, where they arrived on February 21. 
They were doubtless welcomed to that far off 
western settlement by the family of an uncle, 
Josiah Upton, who had removed thither in 
1778, and had died in 1791. But the new- 
comers soon had a home, and in a few years 
a family of their own, eight children being 
born to them; namely, Ebenezer, Olive, 
Eliza, Addison, Sally, Daniel, Mary, and 
Harriet. The father, Ebenezer Graves of 
Reading North Parish and Charlemont, was 
a son of Daniel and Sarah (Upton) Graves, 
brother of Captain Daniel Graves, and grand- 
son of Daniel and Martha (Coats) Graves, 
who removed to the North Parish of the old 
town of Reading from Lynn about the year 
1727. The first Daniel was a great-grandson 
of Samuel Graves, a farmer and a man of 
means and influence, who settled in Lynn in 
1630 or near that date. 

It may here be mentioned in passing that 
there were others of this name who crossed 
the Atlantic in early Colonial times, and set- 
tled in different parts of the country. A 
genealogy of the various branches of the 
Graves family in America is now (1895) in 
course of preparation by General John Card 



Graves, of Buffalo, N.Y., a gentleman of 
scholarly tastes and acquirements, and skilled 
in the art of research, who has devoted much 
time and money to this species of historic 
investigation. 

Mrs. Sarah Upton Graves, wife of the sec- 
ond Daniel, was a daughter of Ebenezer and 
Sarah (Goodell) Upton, and was a descendant, 
in the fourth generation, of John Upton, the 
progenitor of the New England family of 
Uptons. (See "Upton Family Records," an 
elaborate genealogical work, by Judge Will- 
iam H. Upton, of Walla Walla, Wash., 
great-grandson of Josiah Upton, above named.) 
Through his grandmother, Mrs. Olive Flint 
Graves, Mr. Ebenezer Graves of Ashfield 
may claim descent from two other early set- 
tlers of Massachusetts, among whose posterity 
have been numbered many distinguished 
names: Thomas Flint, of Salem, as early as 
1650; and John Putnam, who with his three 
sons — Thomas, Nathaniel, and John — came 
from England, and settled in Salem in 1634. 

Ebenezer Graves, second, died April 27, 
1864. His wife, Nabby W., died December 
26, 1878. Their son Ebenezer, named at the 
beginning of this brief record, married on 
December 31, 1855, Persis R. Whittiam, who 
was born in Leicester, October 15, 1830, 
daughter of Jeremiah and Diana (Doane) 
Whittiam. Her paternal grandparents were 
William and Hannah (Fitts) Whittiam, the 
former of whom came from Maine, and set- 
tled first in Oxford, Mass., where he married, 
later removing to Leicester; and her mater- 
nal grandparents were Reuben and Hannah 
(Slayton) Doane. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Graves are: Hattie M., born October 
II, 1856, now Mrs. Cady (see sketch of 
Francis A. Cady); and Dana L., born May 
21, i860, who married December 31, 1885, 
Florence Shaw. Dana L. Graves is a farmer 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



299 



in Ashfield. He and his wife have three 
children, as follows: Alonzo Shaw Graves, 
born March 22, 1887; Nelson Dana, born 
September 17, 1892; and Eliza, born October 
4, 1894. 

As noted above, the Graves family of Ash- 
field are of stanch New England stock, de- 
scendants of early settlers of the old Bay 
State. Industrious, upright, law-abiding, 
church-going people, in comfortable circum- 
stances, social, and hospitable, they well 
exemplify the sterling traits of their ances- 
tors. Mr. Ebenezer Graves has a pleasant 
home in a retired part of the town, the farm 
being under the efficient management of his 
son Dana L., he himself, more inclined to 
mercantile than to agricultural pursuits, hold- 
ing a position with Belding & Co., silk manu- 
facturers, as travelling salesman. 




L ON RAD H. GALE, a successful man- 
ufacturer and dealer in lumber, stands 

fc2 - prominent among the rising young 

business men of Orange. He is a native of 
Franklin County, having been born May 14, 
1864, in Warwick, son of Appleton and Mary 
E. (Conant) Gale. His great-great-grandpar- 
ents, David and Elizabeth Gale, who removed 
to Warwick from Sutton, Worcester County, 
were the parents of seven children; namely, 
David, Alpheus, Jesse, Huldah, Olive, Judy, 
and Mercy. David, second, son of David and 
Elizabeth, married Mary Eddy; and the fol- 
lowing children were the fruit of their union: 
John, Harvey, David, Levi, Horace, Elsie, 
Abigail, Rhoda, and Philana. 

David Gale, third, grandfather of Conrad 
H., was a farmer, living and dying in War- 
wick, on the place where he was born, March 
15, 1795. He fought in the War of 1812, 
and was a man of some note in the town. 



which he served as Selectman. His wife, to 
whom he was united in October, 1818, was a 
native of Orange, Mass., born December i, 
1799, just thirteen days before the death of 
Washington. Her maiden name was Augusta 
Goddard. They were married in Orange, and 
made their home in Warwick, becoming the 
parents of thirteen children, six of whom 
attained adult age; namely, John G., David, 
Appleton, William H., Charlotte, and Elvira. 
John G. was twice Representative in the 
legislature of the State, and held various 
important town offices for a number of years. 
William H. was also Representative, serving 
one year, and for years acted as a town official 
in various capacities. 

Appleton Gale, third son of David and 
Augusta (Goddard) Gale, was born in War- 
wick, May 21, 1829. In his younger days he 
worked at boot and shoe making. Twenty-five 
years ago he purchased a saw-mill and grist- 
mill, and has been extensively engaged in the 
lumber business ever since. Always honest 
and upright in his business dealings, and tak- 
ing an active interest in the welfare of his 
town, he is a very popular man, and has been 
twice nominated for Representative, but, be- 
longing to the minority party, has failed at 
the polls. He was one of the foremost 
workers for the town hall in Warwick, doing 
all in his power to insure its erection. He 
married February 14, i86r, Mary E. Conant, 
who was born in Warwick, February 25, 1837, 
daughter of Josiah and Rhoda CGale) Conant, 
and the following children blessed their 
union: Conrad H.; Ernest A., deceased; 
Julia M.: Abby R. ; and David J., deceased. 

Conrad H. Gale was educated in Warwick 
and Ashburnham, completing his studies at 
Gushing Academy. In the latter place he 
afterward began his career as an instructor of 
youth. He presided at the teacher's desk five 



300 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years in all, his last position in that capacity 
being in the Northfield grammar school. In 
1891 Mr. Gale purchased the Holden saw- 
mill and shop in TuUy, and since that time 
has conducted a large and prosperous business. 
He has bought wood lots in different sections, 
and cleared them, manufacturing the timber 
into lumber, which he sells; and he also does 
a large amount of custom sawing. Recently 
he has engaged in the manufacture of wooden 
boxes, and he now expects to send out the 
greater part of the stock in his shop in the 
form of manufactured products instead of 
rough lumber. A man of his business enter- 
prise and progressive spirit necessarily occu- 
pies an influential position among the citizens 
of any community; and, although Mr. Gale is 
not active in politics, his business interests 
engrossing his entire attention, he has served 
one term of three years on the School Board, 
and has recently been elected to the same 
position for another term. 

On August 20, 1889, Mr. Gale was united 
in marriage to Miss Irene E. Gibbs, a daugh- 
ter of Henry and Sophia (Temble) Gibbs. 
Henry Gibbs was born June 27, 1838. He 
is a son of William L. and Elizabeth (Spear) 
Gibbs, and the grandson of Jesse and Abigail 
(Leonard) Gibbs, and comes of a race of prac- 
tical and progressive agriculturists. He is 
now a resident of the town of Orange, having 
bought the L. Ward farm in 1876, and is a 
well-to-do member of the farming community. 
In his younger days Mr. Gibbs learned the 
trade of painter; and, after following that a 
while, he carried on a successful grocery and 
bakery business in Orange for several years. 
He is a stanch member of the Republican 
party in politics. In Masonic circles he is 
prominent, being Master of Orange Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M. Mr. Gibbs was married Jan- 
uary I, 1862, to the daughter of Isaac Temble, 



who bore the following children: Jennie S., 
born October 3, 1862, who married Kirk E. 
Gilson, and has one child — Luetta S. ; and 
Irene E., Mrs. Gale, born June i, 1867, in 
Canaan, N.H. Mrs. Gale's parents removed 
to Orange when she was a young child ; and 
in that town she received her education, grad- 
uating from the high school in 1886. She 
taught school for three years before her 
marriage. 

Of the happy union of Mr. and Mrs. Gale 
two children have been born: Conrad David, 
whose birth occurred December 16, 1890; and 
Rena B., born June 25, 1894, whose earthly 
existence was very brief. Mr. Gale stands 
high in his town as a man of abilit}^ enter- 
prise, and -upright dealing. He is liberal in 
his religious views and prompt in the support 
of whatever, in his opinion, is calculated to 
advance the moral and material welfare of the 
community. Socially, Mr. Gale is a valued 
member of Harmony Lodge of Northfield, 
Mass., A. F. & A. M., and of Crescent Chap- 
ter of Orange. 



T^HARLES W. HOSMER, clerk and 
I J| paymaster of the Montague Paper 

^^» ^ Company, established at Turner's 

Falls, Franklin County, Mass., a well-known 
resident of this village, was born at Saxton's 
River, Vt., April 7, 1855. He is the son of 
Joseph B. Hosmer, born in the town of Gill, 
in this State, and grandson of Eldad Hosmer, 
a native of Vermont, who carried on the car- 
penter's and joiner's trade in connection with 
farming. Later Grandfather Hosmer removed 
to Gill, where in 1805 he purchased a farm, 
and built a house, in which he spent his last 
years. 

Joseph B. Hosmer, his son, was brought up 
to the trade of woollen manufacturing, and 




HENRY A. HOWARD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3°3 



later took the position of superintendent in a 
woollen-mill at Saxton's River, which he held 
twenty years. His death occurred in that 
town, at the age of forty-six years. He was 
a Republican in politics, and firmly devoted 
to party principles. The maiden name of his 
wife was Lorintha Walker. She was one of 
seven children of Bliss Walker, and was born 
in Wardsboro, Vt., where her father, who was 
a farmer, lived and died. Her mother died 
in Wells, Me. Mrs. Hosmer spent her last 
years at Saxton's River, dying there at the 
age of forty-five years. She was a member of 
the Congregational church. The children of 
Joseph B. and Lorintha W. Hosmer were as 
follows: James E., who died at the age of 
nineteen; William, a druggist of Turner's 
Falls fifteen years, and later a resident of 
Clinton, Conn., where he died, at the age of 
thirty-six years; and Charles W., of Turner's 
Falls. 

Charles W. Hosmer was but nine years old 
when his mother died, and was only eleven 
when his father also passed away. He then 
went to Factory Village in Greenfield, where 
he made his home with his father's sister, 
attending school during the winters until he 
was fourteen, when he went to Wells, Me., 
and lived three years with his mother's sister, 
still attending school. Returning now to 
Turner's Falls, Mr. Hosmer joined his 
brother in the drug business, in which he con- 
tinued about two years. For the last twenty 
years, or since 1875, he has been engaged as 
clerk and paymaster with the Montague Paper 
Company, an honorable record of fidelity and 
efificiency. 

In January, 1876, Mr. Hosmer was married 
to Miss Sarah L. Miller, daughter of Justice 
Miller, of Waterford, Conn., where she was 
born, and where her father is still living and 
conducting a farm. Mr. and Mrs. Hosmer 



are parents of four children, as follows: Flora 
L., who was graduated with honors from the 
Oakman High School, and is now a teacher 
in Turner's Falls; Joseph W. ; Charles 
Irwin; and Charlotte L. 

Mr. Hosmer is a Republican in politics. 
He has held the position of clerk of the Fire 
District three years, has been a member of 
the Board of Registrars of Voters two years, 
and was Assessor one year, being elected in 
1877. Mr. Hosmer has also served for some 
years as one of the Selectmen of his town, 
and has been chairman of the Board since 
1 89 1. In 1876 he joined the Masons of Bay 
State Lodge, and in 1878 became charter 
member of Mechanics Lodge of Turner's 
Falls, of which, having held the preliminary 
offices, he is now Past Master. He is also 
treasurer of the Unitarian Society of Tur- 
ner's Falls, Mrs. Hosmer being a member. 
A man of much general intelligence and of 
good business capacity, Mr. Hosmer is a 
prominent resident of Turner's Falls, and 
with his family holds the respect of the com- 
munity with which he has been so long 
identified. 




ENRY AUGUSTINE HOWARD, a 
prominent citizen of the town of 

- V Colerain, formerly in the boot and 

shoe business, now extensively and prosper- 
ously engaged in farming, is a native of 
Franklin County, having been born May 2, 
1842, in Buckland. His paternal grand- 
father, Moses Childs Howard, was a well- 
known citizen of Colerain, following the trade 
of a tanner and shoemaker, and was also 
Deputy Sheriff of the county for many years. 
He settled here before his marriage, and was 
an industrious and hard-working man, but did 
not accumulate much property. He married 
Keziah Purrington, daughter of a pioneer of 



304 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Colerain; and they reared a family of six 
children, of whom Sarah E., the wife of J. B. 
Clark, of Colerain, is the only one living. 
The deceased are: Emily A., Seth Childs, 
Henry A., Anna C, and Leonora A. The 
father was a Democrat in politics and a Uni- 
versalist in religion, while his wife was a 
member of the Baptist church. 

Seth Childs Howard was born in 1822 in 
Colerain; and he always claimed this town as 
home, although he lived in various places. 
He was a talented musician, one of the most 
skilful violinists of his day, and in the pur- 
suit of his art was connected at times with 
the leading theatres of the country, being 
often in New York City and in Boston during 
the theatrical season. He died at the early 
age of thirty-eight years, at Hornellsville, 
N.Y. His wife, Almina M. Barnard, was 
born September 15, 1821, in Shelburne Falls, 
where she now resides. Only one of their 
two children is now living; namely, Henry 
Augustine, the subject of the present sketch. 
His sister, Helen Marion, who was born in 
1840, married Cordenio H. Merrill, of Shel- 
burne Falls. She died in 1893. 

Henry A. Howard grew to manhood in Col- 
erain, making his home with his paternal 
grandfather, and obtaining his early education 
in the public schools, afterward attending a 
select school. On September 5, 1862, he en- 
listed in defence of his country, becoming a 
member of Company B, under Captain Alvah 
P. Nelson, P'ifty-second Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and was engaged in the battle 
at Indian Bend and in the siege of Port Hud- 
son. At the expiration of his term of enlist- 
ment he was honorably discharged, August 14, 
1863; and the following year he re-enlisted, 
joining the Second Massachusetts Light 
Artillery, under Captain Marian, and after- 
ward being transferred to the Sixth Massachu- 



setts Light Artillery, with whom he served 
until the close of the war, when he was again 
honorably discharged, in June, 1865. Re- 
turning to Colerain, Mr. Howard engaged in 
the manufacture of boots and shoes at the old 
Howard homestead, formerly belonging to his 
paternal grandfather, and which was the first 
piece of real estate to come into his posses- 
sion. Here he remained for nine years, when 
he sold out, and removed into the village of 
Colerain, where he was engaged in the boot 
and shoe business for several years. In 1880 
Mr. Howard moved to his present farm; and 
four years later he purchased the property, 
and has since devoted himself to dairying 
and general farming, paying special atten- 
tion to the raising of fruits. His farm con- 
tains two hundred and fifty acres of rich and 
productive land, and is improved by a com- 
fortable and commodious residence and con- 
venient buildings for successfully carrying on 
his enterprises. 

On August 24, 1864, Mr. Howard was 
united in marriage with Helen M. Snow, of 
Colerain, a daughter of Asaph W. and Jane 
T. (Miller) Snow, both natives of Franklin 
County, Mr. Snow having been born in 
Heath, where he learned his trade of a car- 
penter and joiner, though in his later years he 
was a farmer; and Mrs. Snow was a native of 
Colerain. Mrs. Snow was a member of the 
Congregational church, and her husband was 
a Democrat in politics. Of the children born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Snow seven grew to adult 
life, and four are living to-day, namely: Rob- 
ert M., of Greenfield; David W., of Colerain; 
Helen M., Mrs. Howard; and A. Leander, of 
Lafayette, Ga. The union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard has been blessed by the birth of three 
children, of whom we record the following: 
Clara C, born November 16, 1866, is the 
wife of Charles G. Fisk, of Springfield, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



305 



has two children — Margaret H. and Marcus 
H.; Dean C, born November 11, 1870, was 
graduated from the Arms Academy at Shel- 
burne Falls, and is now a surgeon in the reg- 
ular army, located at Fort Snelling, Minn., 
where he married Myrtle Baldwin, of Toledo, 
Ohio; and James H., born March 3, 1874, 
lives at home. 

Mr. Howard is a steadfast and loyal Repub- 
lican, and is quite active in the management 
of local public affairs, has been Collector of 
Taxes nine consecutive years, for seven years 
was a member of the Board of Assessors, 
besides holding minor offices in the town, and 
at the present time is a member of the Board 
of Education. In 1894 Mr. Howard- was 
chosen to represent the Fifth Franklin Dis- 
trict in the legislature. He is a regular 
attendant of the Congregational church, of 
which Mrs. Howard is a consistent member. 
Socially, he is a member of the Mountain 
Lodge of Shelburne Falls, A. F. & A. M., 
and also belongs to the H. S. Greenleaf Post, 
No. 20, of Colerain, Grand Army of the Re- 
public. Mr. Howard is likewise a member of 
the Deerfield Valley Agricultural Society, of 
which he was President for two years. 

A portrait of this public-spirited citizen is 
happily included in the present collection of 
Franklin County worthies. 




HILO T. LYONS, a well-to-do 
farmer, an expert machinist, and an 
- engineer, living on a beautifully 

situated farm in the town of Orange, is a 
wide-awake, practical man of business and an 
esteemed resident of this section of Franklin 
County. The date of his birth, which oc- 
curred in Greenfield, Mass., was December 
21, 1848. He comes from honored ancestry, 
his paternal grandfather, Dr. Joel Lyons, hav- 



ing been one of the most noted and successful 
of the old-school physicians. He removed 
from Colerain to Gill, in this county, where 
he purchased a farm, on which his six sons — 
Alvin, Samuel, Joel, John, Benjamin, and 
Charles D. — were reared, and where he lived 
until an advanced age. 

Charles D. Lyons, the father of him to 
whom we specially refer in this short narra- 
tive, was born in Gill in 1817, and was there 
educated. When a young man, he went to 
Greenfield, where he learned the cabinet- 
maker's trade, at which he worked for many 
years. Having a decided musical talent, and 
being very ambitious, he made a thorough 
study of music, being mostly self-taught, and 
became one of the most noted violin players 
of this part of Massachusetts and a successful 
teacher of music. He married Elizabeth 
Temple, who was born in Deerfield, a daugh- 
ter of Philo Temple, a farmer of that town, 
who there spent his threescore and ten years, 
being one of its most useful and respected 
citizens. Elizabeth was one of four daugh- 
ters born to him and his wife, the others bear- 
ing, respectively, the names of Frances, 
Angeline, and Eunice. Mrs. Elizabeth T. 
Lyons is still living in Greenfield, a widow 
now for several years, her husband having 
joined the silent majority when but sixty-six 
years of age. He was a man of sterling qual- 
ities, rich in the virtues that win love and 
respect. In politics he was a strong Repub- 
lican, and he and his wife held to that form 
of rational Christianity which has been 
termed Channing Unitarianism. 

Philo T. Lyons acquired the elements of 
his education in the public schools of Green- 
field, afterward completing his studies at 
Powers Institute in Bernardston. He began 
the battle of life on the farm of his grand- 
father, which he worked for a few years. He 



3°6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



bad, however, a natural aptitude for the 
mechanical arts; and, in order that his talent 
might be developed, Mr. Lyons, on attaining 
his majority, went to Fitchburg, Mass., and 
for a while was employed in the railway 
repair shops. He was next engaged as a fire- 
man on the locomotive, and later as an engi- 
neer, in which capacity he was retained for 
nineteen years, being one of the most worthy 
and trusted employees of the company. To 
him was given the honor of running a train 
through the Hoosac Tunnel on the first day 
it was opened to the public; and he also 
assisted in celebrating that memorable day in 
Greenfield when the new railway was opened 
for traffic, running the first passenger train 
into that city. 

Becoming tired of railroad life, Mr. Lyons 
resigned his position in September, 1891, and 
bought the T. Rice farm in Orange, contain- 
ing one hundred acres of land, finely located 
at the south end of North Pond, it being one 
of the pleasantest and most valuable estates 
in the locality. He remodelled the build- 
ings, and in 1892 came here to live; and, 
notwithstanding he has never married, he has 
one of the most comfortable and attractive 
homes to be found. He is constantly adding 
to the many improvements of the place, among 
other conveniences having a stationary engine, 
with which he saws wood, grinds feed, runs a 
turning lathe, a circular saw, etc. He is a 
practical agriculturist, and in the manage- 
ment of his farm he invariably finds his labors 
crowned with success. For the past three 
years Mr. Lyons has had charge of the pumps 
used in the Orange water-works, his former 
experience making him a most desirable per- 
son for this position. He has the courage of 
his convictions both in political and religious 
matters, being independent in the former, and 
very liberal in his interpretation of creeds 



and dogmas. Socially, he is active and influ- 
ential in Masonic circles, belonging to the 
Greenfield Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 



tOBERT M. COOMBS, one of the 
foremost farmers in Colerain, was 
_^ born in this town on March 5, 
1853, son of William and Sarah (McClellan) 
Coombs. His grandfather, Jonathan Coombs, 
was born on March 8, 1769. In early life he 
sold tinware in the Southern States; but later 
coming into possession of a farm in Colerain 
through his wife, Elizabeth McCrillis, he en- 
gaged in its cultivation up to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1853. Elizabeth 
McCrillis was born on August 2, 1774, and 
was a member of one of the first families of 
Colerain, a race of well-to-do farmers. Of 
her union with Jonathan Coombs six children 
were born — three sons and three daughters — 
one of whom, Betsey E., widow of Smead 
Hillman, is living to-day, residing on the 
estate which was the birthplace of her brother 
William, the father of Robert. 

William Coombs was born in Colerain, 
July 17, 1810, and early took up the duties of 
agricultural life. He bought in 1852 the 
farm now tilled by his son. This farm, then 
called the Andrew and John Smith place, was 
laid out in 1736, and was one of the first 
established in the town. William Coombs 
was a well-read man, of broad views and good 
judgment. He voted the Republican ticket, 
and held office in the town at various times, 
serving as Selectman for several terms. He 
died at his homestead on July 2, 1880, at the 
age of seventy. His wife, who was born June 
12, 18 17, died on November 9, 1866. Mr. 
Coombs's religious views were strictly Ortho- 
dox, though he did not belong to any church. 
His wife was a member of the Congregational 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



307 



church. They had six children, two of whom 
died in childhood. Three are living to-day, 
namely: Jane E., born May 4, 1848, wife of 
J. D. Purinton, of Seward, Neb.; Edwin W. 
and Robert M., both born March $, 1853, 
farmers in Colerain. Henry W., who was 
born in September, 1849, died at the age of 
twenty-nine. Edwin W. Coombs lives on a 
farm adjacent to that of his twin brother. 
He married Flora, daughter of Allen and 
Olive (Underwood) Burrington, who live on 
a farm in Colerain, and has three children: 
Mabel, William, and Evelyn Coombs. Polit- 
ically, Edwin W. Coombs is a Republican. 
In religion he holds liberal views, and his 
wife is a Congregationalist. 

Robert M. Coombs attended the district 
school at Colerain in boyhood, and put his 
hand to the plough early in life, helping 
about his father's farm. To-day he owns the 
homestead, which is one of the best farms in 
this part of the town, the extreme south end, 
the land being well adapted for raising crops, 
also affording fine pasture for the stock which 
make up Mr. Coombs's dairy. The house in 
which he resides, and which was built in 
1875, is the fourth dwelling erected on the 
estate, the first having been made of round 
logs, and the second of logs hewed and fitted. 
This house is substantial and homelike; and 
the place, with its nearly two hundred acres 
of land, is one to be proud of. 

On February 22, 1892, Mr. Coombs was 
married to Ella P., daughter of Reuben J. and 
Nancy (Thompson) Donelson, who reside on 
a neighboring farm in Colerain. Mr. and 
Mrs. Coombs have two children: Ruth Donel- 
son, born July 27, 1893; and John McClellan, 
born March 30, 1895. 

Politically, Mr. Coombs is a Republican. 
In town affairs he takes a prominent part, and 
is now serving his sixth term as Selectman. 



He is a worthy scion of the old families from 
whom he is descended — the McCrillis, the 
Coombs, and the McClellan — an interesting 
account of whom is found in the History of 
the Town of Colerain, by Charles McClellan, 
who now resides in Troy, N.Y. Mrs. 
Coombs, also, is of honorable descent: and 
the records of the Methodist church, to which 
she belongs, bear many names prominent in 
her family. 



"Cpu/ALTER P. MAYNA 
\X^V_ dealer in Greenfield, 



MAYNARD, an ice 
Mass., is an 
active and enterprising business 
man, devoting his time and energies to his 
work. Although young in years, he has had 
a varied experience in life, but has been uni- 
formly successful in the most of his undertak- 
ings. He is a native of the Granite State, 
having been born in 1866, at Keene, where 
his father, the late Prentice A. Maynard, was 
born in 1833. The latter was a son of Alonzo 
Maynard, who was for many years a resident 
of Keene, where he departed this life in 1850. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Crissana 
Britton, bore him four children — two sons 
and two daughters. 

Prentice A. Maynard was a locomotive 
engineer, highly esteemed by his employers 
and associates, his early death, at the age of 
thirty-six years, being sincerely deplored. 
He married Martha Cook, a daughter of John 
Cook, of Ashburnham, Mass., but who moved 
to Missouri many years ago, and died at 
upward of fourscore years of age at St. Louis. 
Their union was solemnized in i860, and they 
became the parents of two children: Walter 
P., the subject of this brief biographical 
sketch; and Jennie F., the wife of C. S. 
Bishop, of Fitchburg, and Secretary of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. The 
mother subsequently married again, becoming 



3o8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the wife of A. J. Williams, of Keene, and 
has two children born of that union. 

Walter P. Maynard has been essentially the 
architect of his own fortune, having left 
school at fourteen years of age to earn his liv- 
ing, beginning his career as a milk pedler in 
the town of his nativity. He subsequently 
engaged in the bakery business for three 
years, and was afterward for a time an em- 
ployee of the American Express Company. 
His next employment was as a salesman in an 
agricultural implement, tool, and grain store, 
an occupation in which he continued until 
1887, when he came to Greenfield to engage 
in the ice business with his brother-in-law, 
Arthur O. Wheeler. In 1889 Mr. Maynard 
bought out the interest of his partner, and 
has since carried on the business without 
financial help, putting up about five thousand 
tons per annum for himself, and an equal 
amount for other parties. During the summer 
season he keeps seven men in constant em- 
ployment, his trade being very large, and 
increasing each year. Mr. Maynard is also 
quite a property owner, being proprietor of a 
three-hundred-acre farm, and keeping from 
eight to ten horses and fifteen or twenty head 
of cattle. 

On the 5th of September, 1884, being then 
but eighteen years old, Mr. Maynard assumed 
the responsibilities of a married man, being 
united in bonds of matrimony with Gertrude 
A. Wheeler, of Northfield, a daughter of 
E. O. and X-ouisa (Brown) Wheeler, and a 
niece of John Wheeler, the prominent manu- 
facturer of the New Home sewing-machines. 
This estimable woman, who is of the same 
age as himself, is a most devoted wife and an 
affectionate mother to the two bright children 
born of their union: Walter L., now in the 
eighth year of his age; and Beth L., two 
years younger. Politically, Mr. Maynard is 



a strong advocate of the principles of the 
Democratic party; and, socially, he is a 
Mason, being a member of the Connecticut 
Valley Commandery, Knights Templars. 
Since his residence in Greenfield he has won 
an assured position in business circles, being 
a man of sterling worth and character, full of 
energy and determination, and possessing that 
stability of purpose that is bound to bring 
success. He is a typical specimen of the 
sturdy sons of New Hampshire's granite 
hills, standing full six feet in height, straight 
and well proportioned, and weighing two 
hundred and fifteen pounds. 



OEL BURT, a prosperous farmer of 
Sunderland, was born in Westhampton, 
Hampshire County, Mass., August 3, 
1824, son of Levi and Betsey (Hale) Burt. 
Mr. Burt's great-grandfather, David Burt, was 
born February 12, 1723, and died December 
17' '793- He reared a family of five chil- 
dren, of whom Grandfather Joel Burt was the 
fourth-born. The latter, who was a native of 
Northampton, born May 24, 1759, owned a 
farm in Westhampton, upon which he resided 
until his death, which occurred on November 
21, 1 841. For more extended information 
in regard to the early history of the family 
the reader is referred to the genealogy pub- 
lished by Mrs. Elizabeth Burt, of Warwick, 
Mass., in 1891. 

Levi Burt, the father of our subject, was 
born in Northampton, May 18, 1791. He 
resided with his parents until his majority, 
and, after working out by the month for a 
time, purchased a farm in Westhampton, 
which he cultivated successfully, also operat- 
ing a saw-mill, an enterprise which was at- 
tended with profitable results. He was an 
active, energetic man, an extensive stock- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



309 



raiser, and at one time owned over one thou- 
sand acres of land. He took an active part 
in local and State issues, was Representative 
from his district to the General Court upon 
the Republican ticket, and a Captain in the 
State militia. He died November 25, 1871, 
at the age of eighty years. Levi Burt mar- 
ried a daughter of the Rev. Enoch Hale, who 
was for fifty-six years pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church at Westhampton, where he died 
at an advanced age. Mrs. Levi Burt became 
the mother of seven children, three of whom 
are living, namely: Joel, the subject of this 
article; Susan T., who married R. W. Clapp; 
and George, a resident of Westhampton. Mr. 
Burt's parents were attendants of the Congre- 
gational church. His mother, who passed her 
declining years with him, died at the age of 
eighty years. 

Joel Burt received his education in the dis- 
trict schools and at the Southampton Acad- 
emy. In early manhood he purchased a farm 
at Westhampton, which he cultivated with 
satisfactory results until 1873. He then sold 
his farm, and, after residing a year at Flor- 
ence, Mass., purchased his present home in 
Sunderland, where he has resided for the past 
twenty-one years. 

On August II, 1853, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sarah Edwards, of Westhamp- 
ton, daughter of Samuel and Betsey (Ludden) 
Edwards. Samuel Edwards, who was a native 
of Westhampton, was prominent in his local- 
ity, serving some time as a Selectman of the 
town, and was a Representative to the Gen- 
eral Court. He died at his own home, at the 
age of eighty-three. Mrs. Burt's mother was 
a daughter of Deacon Asa Ludden, of Will- 
iamsburg. She died at her home in West- 
hampton, at the age of sixty-nine. They 
were attendants of the Congregational church, 
of which the mother was a member. 



Mr. and Mrs. Burt have had three children; 
namely, Bessie R., Enoch Hale, and Francis 
Lyman. Bessie R. Burt died at the age of 
twenty-two years, two months, and twenty- 
three days. Enoch Hale Burt graduated from 
Amherst College in 1882, and, after pursuing 
a course at Yale Theological Seminary and a 
post-graduate course at Andover, Mass., en- 
tered on the active work of the ministry, 
preaching at Armada and Cadillac, Mich., 
and finally settling in West Winfield, N.Y. 
He married Emily Meekins Arms, of Sunder- 
land, daughter of the Rev. W. F. Arms, 
and grand-daughter of the Rev. Hiram Arms, 
D.D., a well-known clergyman, who was born 
in Connecticut. Mrs. Burt was born in Tur- 
key, where her father was engaged in mission- 
ary work. The Rev. Enoch Hale Burt and 
his wife are the parents of three children; 
namely, Emily Rose, Lillian Sarah, and 
Katharine Isabel. Francis Lyman, youngest 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Burt, wedded Emma F. 
Smith, of Sunderland, adopted daughter of 
N. A. Smith, and resides with his parents. 
He has one daughter, Frances Hale, born 
July 4, 1895. 

Mr. Burt is a Republican in politics. He 
served as Selectman in Westhampton three 
years, and acted in a similar capacity in Sun- 
derland for six years, also serving as Overseer 
of the Poor. He is a member of the Congre- 
gational church, as is Mrs. Burt also, who is 
prominent in the church societies, a teacher 
in the Sabbath-school, and a member of the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 



^^HILIP TRAVER, an esteemed resi- 
dent of Greenfield, who has been 

^ associated with the manufacturing 
interests of this place for more than twoscore 
years as a leading contractor and builder, and 



310 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



is now retired from active business, was born 
April 5, 1822, in the town of Schodack, 
Rensselaer County, N.Y., son of John and 
Mary (Pulse) Traver. He is of German an- 
cestry, his paternal grandfather, John Traver, 
Sr., having emigrated from Germany to New 
York, locating in Dutchess County, where 
he married a Miss Pulse. The Travers are 
connected with the Van Rensselaers, hav- 
ing intermarried with that family in several 
cases. 

John Traver, Jr., the father of the subject 
of this brief sketch, was the only son and one 
of two children born to his parents, his birth 
occurring in Dutchess County in 1806. He 
served in the War of 1812, and subsequently 
settled in Rensselaer County, New York, buy- 
ing a farm in the town of Schodack, and taking 
as a life companion Miss Mary Pulse. He was 
a millwright and wheelwright by trade, hav- 
ing learned from his father, and during the 
last years of his life worked at the carpenter's 
trade. Mr. Traver was at one time quite 
well-to-do, but met with reverses, losing most 
of his property. Thirteen children were born 
into his household, of whom nine sons and 
two daughters grew to adult life. Three are 
now living, namely: James, who is probably 
living in the South; Catharine, the widow of 
B. l5urnham, who resides in Schodack; and 
Philip, the subject of this sketch. The 
mother died in her seventieth year, at Green- 
bush, N.Y., and the father five years later, at 
the age of seventy-four years. 

Philip Traver was the twelfth child born to 
his parents, and was early obliged to care for 
himself, leaving home, after a very meagre 
schooling, when but a boy of twelve years. 
He began to learn the carpenter's trade at 
Valatie, Columbia County, N.Y., five years 
later, and in 1850 removed to Holyoke, 
Mass., where he spent two years. In 1852 



Mr. Traver located in Greenfield, and, being 
industrious, energetic, and of excellent judg- 
ment, soon found plenty of work at his trade. 
In fulfilling his contracts, he was always par- 
ticular as to the minutest details; and his 
work always stood the test of time. For 
some five years he was in company with H. C. 
Emburg, and for twelve years was a partner of 
Gilbert E. Jones. The remainder of the time 
Mr. Traver has been alone in business. 
Some of the principal buildings of Green- 
field have been built under his superintend- 
ence, notably the Newell Snow residence on 
Main Street, the Pond, Hollister, and Hovey 
Blocks, and the east extension of the Mansion 
House. The town hall, built in 1852 or 
1853, soon after he came here, was one of 
the first important pieces of work of his 
construction. 

In 1844 Mr. Traver married Matilda Vos- 
burgh, of Valatie, N. Y., a daughter of 
Everett Vosburgh, and a sister of Stephen 
Vosburgh, of Greenfield. She passed to the 
higher existence in 1880, in the fifty-seventh 
year of her age, joining their infant son in 
the spirit land, and leaving four children, of 
whom we record the following: William is a 
resident of Greenfield; Alice is the wife of 
A. W. Green, an undertaker and furniture 
dealer; Inez married Clayton L. Smith, and 
has two sons; and Edgar is a carpenter, mar- 
ried, and living in Boston. 

In politics Mr. Traver affiliates with the 
Republican party. He and his estimable 
wife were formerly supporters of the Presby- 
terian church, though neither was connected 
with it by membership; and for the past fif- 
teen years he has been an investigator of the 
doctrine of the Spiritualists, being closely 
identified with the little band of that denomi- 
nation in this place. Mr. Traver has a pleas- 
ant home at 31 Congress Street. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



311 




kRS. FANNY A. FAIRCHILD, 
who resides at her pleasant home 
on Sunderland Street, in Sunder- 
land, was born at Shutesbury, an adjacent 
town in the southern part of Franklin County, 
and is the daughter of James B. Prouty, a 
native of Massachusetts. Her grandfather, 
Richard Prouty, who was born at Scituate, in 
this State, moved to New York, where he set- 
tled upon a tract of land in Queens County, 
and was there engaged for several years as a 
farmer, but finally returned to New England, 
and passed his declining years with a daugh- 
ter in North Leverett. 

James B. Prouty after attaining his major- 
ity worked upon farms in Sunderland by the 
month, later engaging in the manufacture of 
chairs, which he continued to follow for sev- 
eral years in conjunction with farming, and 
eventually settling down upon the old home- 
stead, where he died, at the age of eighty-five 
years. He married Florilla Graves, daughter 
of Elijah Graves, who was a farmer in this 
vicinity and an early settler in the town, and 
they became the parents of two children, 
namely: a son, Frederick A.; and a daugh- 
ter, Fanny A., now Mrs. Fairchild. The 
mother passed her latter years with her daugh- 
ter, and died at the age of sixty-seven years, 
having been a member of the Congregational 
church, as was also her husband. Mrs. Fair- 
child's father was a Republican in politics, 
and served as Selectman, Overseer of the 
Poor, and Assessor for some years. 

Fanny A. Prouty was united in marriage to 
Lewis W. Fairchild in 1856. She has lived 
in Sunderland since her infancy. Her hus- 
band's father, Curtis Fairchild, a native of 
Virginia and a tailor by trade, followed that 
occupation for some years in Sunderland, 
where he died, at the age of seventy. He 
wedded Miranda Clapp, a native of Deerfield, 



who became the mother of eight children, 
namely: Edwin; Amanda, who married Den- 
nis Gage, of Athol ; Lewis; Edward B., now 
of Stoneham, Mass. ; John M., now a resident 
of California; William Henry; Edice M., 
deceased, who married John Ball, of Athol; 
and Charles A., who died in the army. The 
mother died at Sunderland, aged forty-seven 
years. 

Lewis Fairchild passed his boyhood in Sun- 
derland, and at the age of sixteen or eighteen 
years commenced work as a painter, a calling 
which he followed until after his marriage, 
when he moved to Worcester, where he fol- 
lowed the employ of A. J. Johnson as a trav- 
elling agent in the map business, going 
South, and spending his first winter in visit- 
ing different sections and his second year in 
the city of New Orleans. He handled maps 
successfully for three years, and then became 
interested in the sale of an atlas, with which 
he was also very successful for a period of 
three years, at the termination of that time 
receiving from his employers the appointment 
of general agent, a position which placed him 
at the head of a large number of subagents. 
He also assisted in introducing many of Ap- 
pleton's standard publications through the 
interior of New York State, his headquarters 
being at Utica. He was in the employ of 
that well-known house for some twenty-five 
years, subsequently engaging in the buying 
and selling of leaf tobacco, a business which 
he carried on extensively and with the most 
satisfactory results financially during the 
remainder of his life, his long and varied 
career being brought to a close November 24, 
1890, at the age of fifty-nine years. He was 
enterprising and progressive, and, aside from 
being well known among business men, at- 
tained a position of prominence in his own 
community, serving for some years as Select- 



312 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



man, and as a Trustee of the public library 
from the time of its organization. He was a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, and con- 
nected with the lodge at Greenfield for many 
years. 

Mrs. Fairchild is the mother of seven chil- 
dren, who may be briefly mentioned as fol- 
lows: Frederick L., a book-keeper for a boot 
and shoe firm, married Belle Chamberlain, 
and has two children, named Winifred B. and 
Dorothy; James P., a commercial traveller, 
married Mabel Hill, and has two children — 
Robert H. and Marion; William C, a 
farmer, married Etta Graves, and resides in 
Sunderland; Rollin E. married Eloise Town, 
and resides with Mrs. Fairchild; Emma F. 
wedded A. D. Smith, a farmer of Sunderland, 
and has one child — Marjorie; Lewis, Jr., is 
a commercial traveller in Maine; and Fanny, 
an assistant teacher in the Sunderland 
schools, resides at home. All in their child- 
hood and youth received the tender care and 
wise training of an intelligent and faithful 
mother, and were well educated in the schools 
of Wilbraham, Williston, and Prospect Hill. 
The family attend the Congregational church, 
but are all Unitarians in belief. 



'OSEPH PROCTOR FELTON, a prac- 
tical farmer and also a dealer in 
meats, long time resident in Green- 
field, is a man well known throughout a large 
part of the Connecticut valley. He was born 
August 19, 1824, in New Salem, F"ranklin 
County, Mass., which was the native place of 
his parents, Daniel and Fanny (Holden) Fel- 
ton, his father having been born March g, 
1787, and his mother on November 3 of the 
same year. Stephen Felton, the father of 
Daniel, was one of the early settlers of New 
Salem, where he owned about sixty acres of 



land, and followed the calling of farmer, 
being a hard worker. During the Revolu- 
tionary War he served as a soldier. He re- 
sided in New Salem until his death, which 
occurred when he was about eighty-four years 
old. His wife also lived to advanced age. 
They had twelve children, all of whom 
reached maturity, eleven of them marrying 
and raising families; but all of the twelve 
are now deceased. 

Daniel Felton grew to manhood in New 
Salem, and became a merchant of that town, 
and was also a farmer and a pioneer school- 
teacher, having taught forty-five terms during 
his life. A man well informed and promi- 
nently identified with the affairs of his town, 
he served as Selectman for fifteen consecutive 
years, and as chairman of the Board of Select- 
men for nine years. He owned a good farm 
in New Salem, but in 1839 he moved to Deer- 
field, where he also owned a farm; and here 
he remained till his death, which took place 
in 1868, at the age of eighty-one years. His 
wife, to whom he was married in New Salem, 
died three years later than he, at the age of 
eighty-four. They reared six children, three 
of whom are now living, namely: Myra, the 
widow of Charles Hagar, and Lucetta, widow 
of Austin Foot, both residing in South Deer- 
field; and Joseph Proctor, who is the youngest 
of the family and the immediate subject of 
this sketch. The deceased are: Alvin, 
Franklin, and Fanny. 

Joseph Proctor P"elton, having received his 
education in the schools of New Salem, taught 
school for nine winter terms, and worked out 
at farming for two years, receiving thirteen 
dollars per month for six months of the year. 
He purchased his first farm of sixty acres in 
South Deerfield, it being one-half of his 
father's old farm. He occupied the place 
seven years, but sold out in 1855, and moved 




JOSEPH P. FELTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3iS 



to Greenfield, where he bought a farm of two 
hundred acres in the north part of the town, 
and carried on a general farming business for 
about ten years. Selling that land in 1865, 
he then purchased the property where he now 
resides, at first a nice little farm of twenty- 
five acres, to which he has since added twenty 
acres. He has been a hard-working man in 
his day, successful in his business, and an 
active member of the Franklin Harvest Club 
for the last twenty years. He has also taken 
an active part in matters pertaining to the 
welfare of his town, serving eighteen years as 
a member of the School Board and three years 
as Deputy Sheriff of the county. In addition 
to his homestead of forty-five acres Mr. Fel- 
ton has a second farm nearer the village, 
which contains one hundred acres. Besides 
his farming, he carries on what is probably 
the largest business of the kind in the county. 
He is a dealer in meats, and has killed as 
many as from eleven hundred to twelve hun- 
dred head of stock to supply the demands 
of his own market for one year, his estab- 
lishment being the oldest of its kind in 
Greenfield. 

April 28, 1847, Joseph P. Felton was mar- 
ried to Harriet Amanda Bridges, who was 
born in Deerfield, November 6, 1824, daugh- 
ter of Jonas and Harriet (Ross) Bridges, both 
natives of Massachusetts. Mr. Jonas Bridges 
was born in Oakham in August, 1777. He 
married Harriet Ross, of Deerfield; and they 
lived on a farm in that town. Their children 
were: Antes Cleora, born in 1807, who mar- 
ried Jeduthan Eaton; Marianne, born in 
1809, died in 1811; Frederick A., born in 
181 5, died in Boston in 1834; and Harriet 
Amanda, Mrs. Felton, the only one now liv- 
ing. Mrs. Harriet Ross Bridges was a daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Eunice (Gunn) Ross, and 
grand-daughter of Samuel Ross, of Sterling, 



and his wife, Katy Geary, of Lancaster, Mass. 
Mrs. Thomas Ross was a native of Montague. 
She and her husband had but two children, 
Harriet and Lauretta. 

Mr. and Mrs. Felton have had six children, 
two of whom are now living, namely: Jennie 
Louisa, born in South Deerfield, June 13, 
1850, now wife of Albert J. Smead, who car- 
ries on a meat market in Greenfield for Mr. 
Felton; and Frederick Bridges Felton, born 
at Greenfield, August 25, 1856, who is book- 
keeper in the market. The others were: 
Fannie E. Felton, born at South Deerfield, 
December 19, 1852, who died in 1868; Mary 
Ross Felton, born at Greenfield in October, 
1859, died in September, 1865; George 
Franklin Felton, born in Greenfield in April, 
1862, died December 25, 1892; Harriet May 
Felton, born in Greenfield in October, 1866, 
died in August, 1868. 

Joseph Proctor Felton was formerly a mem- 
ber of the Guiding Star Grange of Greenfield, 
Mass., which was the first grange organized 
in the State. He was the first Master of this 
grange, and also the first Master of the State 
Grange. He and his wife were also actively 
identified with the National Grange. An ex- 
cellent portrait of Mr. Felton will be recog- 
nized on another page of the "Review." 




jOSES COOK, a retired farmer of 
Ashfield, spending the sunset of 
his life in the enjoyment of a lei- 
sure earned by years of persevering toil, was 
born in Ashfield, December 29, 1816. He is 
a son of Levi Cook, who was born at Hadley, 
Mass., in 1761, and traces his descent from 
Aaron and Sarah (Westwood) Cook, the for- 
mer of whom emigrated from Dorchester, 
England, in 1630 to America, settling in 
Northampton, Mass., where he lived to the 



3i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ripe age of ninety years. Westwood Coolc, 
the son of Aaron, was the great-grandfather 
of our subject. He married a lady named 
Joanna Cook, and their son Moses married 
Achsa Smith. Moses and Achsa (Smith) 
Cook were the parents of Levi, the father of 
our subject. 

Levi Cook was reared and educated in Had- 
ley, and there learned the trade of a harness 
and saddle maker. In 1786 he opened a 
harness-shop in Ashfield, building up a sub- 
stantial business in the vicinity, and later 
invested a part of his savings in land, buying 
one hundred and fifty acres in the village. 
This he improved, erecting a new house and 
barn, and made it his permanent abiding- 
place, living until well advanced in years. 
He was a veteran of the War of 18 12, and 
while in service had many hair-breadth es- 
capes and unique experiences, his horse hav- 
ing at one time been tarred and feathered. 
In politics he was closely identified with the 
Democratic party, being one of its most influ- 
ential official members, and serving for many 
years as Justice of the Peace, and for a great 
length of time as Postmaster, an office which 
has been held by the family for eighty-nine 
consecutive years, the present incumbent 
being a grand-daughter of the subject of this 
sketch. Mr. Cook was a strong Episcopalian, 
being one of the founders of the church of 
that denomination built in Ashfield in 1826. 
He was twice married, his first wife, whose 
maiden name was Achsah Smith, dying in the 
prime of life. She bore him ten children, as 
follows: Sarah, born August 22, 1786, who 
died in infancy; Sarah, born June 7, 1788; 
Achsa, who died in infancy; Rufus, born 
January 3, 1791 ; Achsa, born October 24, 
1795; Levi, born January 7, 1797, who died 
in infancy; Levi, born August i, 1798; 
Hannah, born December 29, 1800; Ralph, 



born February 18, 1802; and Abigail, born 
June 25, 1805. After her demise he married 
Nancy Taylor, and of this union five children 
were born, as follows : Nancy, born November 
19, 1807, who is now a resident of Hartford, 
Conn.; Richard, born August 29, 1809; Lu- 
cretia, born June 16, 1812; Harriet, born 
June 16, 1814; and Moses, whose name heads 
this article. 

Moses Cook was educated for a mercantile 
life; and, after completing his studies at San- 
derson Academy, he was engaged as a clerk in 
New York City with his brother Levi, with 
whom he was afterward associated as a partner 
for many years. The close confinement to 
business was injurious to his health, so much 
so that he was obliged to resign his position, 
and seek the invigorating air of the country. 
Returning to the pleasant town of his birth, 
Mr. Cook in 1853 bought the old homestead, 
which is one of the finest, in point of location 
and improvements, in the locality. In 1873 
he sold the house and a portion of the land 
surrounding it to George William Curtis, 
who makes it his summer residence. On a 
part of the farm that he retained Mr. Cook 
built his present house and barns, and is here 
living in quiet ease and contentment. 

The most important event in the life of Mr. 
Cook was his marriage with Minerva Howes, 
a daughter of Nathan and Nabby (Phillips) 
Howes. Their union was solemnized in 
1842; and fifty years later, surrounded by 
their children, grandchildren, and many 
friends, they celebrated their golden wedding 
in a most joyous manner, the bride and groom 
being as young in heart, if not in years, as on 
that sweet day fifty years before. Of their 
three children we record the following: Mary 
A. resides in Boston, Mass.; Elliott W., now 
a resident of Cambridge, married Mary Hol- 
ton, and they have two children — Winnifred 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



317 



and Edith; and Sarah W. is the wife of 
Abbott L. Hall, of Cambridge, and has two 
children — Minerva and Howard. 

No man has taken a deeper interest in the 
prosperity of Ashfield than Moses Cook, who 
has ever indorsed all worthy enterprises to 
promote its industrial, educational, and moral 
advancements, and has served most faithfully 
in the various offices of Selectman, Assessor, 
and Overseer of the Poor. In politics he is a 
strong Republican, having been a supporter 
of the principles of the party since its forma- 
tion. He is an active and worthy member of 
the Episcopal church, in which he has served 
as Senior Warden for many years. Through- 
out the entire community Mr. Cook is held 
in high regard, his strict integrity and trust- 
worthiness in every position being recognized 
by all. Though nearing the eightieth mile- 
stone on life's journey, his faculties are as 
alert, his judgment as clear, and his mind as 
vigorous as in the days of his youth. 



/^^TlLBERT E. JONES, of Greenfield, 
V (i) I carpenter, contractor, and builder, is 
one of the substantial business men 
of Western Massachusetts. He was born in 
Deerfield, Franklin County, Mass., October 
17, 1844, and is a son of Amasa Jones, who 
was born at Blenheim, N.Y., in 181 f, and 
during the same spring was brought to Deer- 
field by his father, Israel Jones, who was 
afterward a resident of that village. 

Israel Jones was a carpenter, and followed 
his trade the greater part of his active life. 
His work was much more laborious than that 
of the modern carpenter, as he lived before 
the time of modern improvements in the 
dressing of lumber; and in building he had 
to hew the timber for the entire frame. He 
married Eleanor Broderick, of Conway, 



Mass., where their nuptials were celebrated 
in 181 1 ; and the larger part of their wedded 
life was spent in Deerfield, where Mrs. Jones 
died in 1824, at the age of forty-four years. 
She reared four children — three sons and one 
daughter — of whom Charles Jones, one of the 
most esteemed citizens of Deerfield, is the 
sole survivor. Israel Jones subsequently mar- 
ried Cynthia, widow of Silas Atwood; and 
they reared one daughter. He lived to the 
age of seventy-five years, dying in 1862, and 
leaving a fair property, although he was not 
a man of wealth. Mr. Jones was a very intel- 
ligent man and remarkably well informed, 
having been educated for a physician. 

Amasa Jones, the father of our subject, was 
a farmer by occupation, and settled in Deer- 
field soon after his marriage, which occurred 
in 1836. He was a man of sterling character, 
respected as a kind friend, obliging neighbor, 
a devoted husband and father, and a public- 
spirited citizen. He passed to the higher life 
in August, 1877. His widow, whose maiden 
name was Nancy Bangs Robbins, still occu- 
pies the home farm. Mr. and Mrs. Jones 
reared a family of six children, of whom we 
record the following: Julius Wellington, a 
contractor, resides at Holyoke; Susan Amanda 
is the widow of George W. Jones, of West 
Deerfield; Gilbert E. is the subject of this 
short personal narrative; Almon A. is a con- 
tractor, residing in Holyoke; E. Jenner is a 
farmer, living on the old homestead; and 
Spencer A., a carpenter, resides in Greenfield. 

Gilbert E. Jones grew to man's estate on 
the parental homestead, living there nearly a 
quarter of a century, and working a portion of 
the time at the carpenter's trade. He then 
started out with his saw and hammer, begin- 
ning his labors as a journeyman at two dollars 
and a quarter a day, and gradually increasing 
his price until he received three dollars and a 



3i8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



half per day. Five years later he established 
himself in business with Philip Traver in this 
city, and under the firm name of Traver & 
Jones carried on a good business in contract- 
ing and building for eight years. Mr. Jones 
then bought the entire plant, and, adding the 
manufacture and sale of lumber, has continued 
until the present time, having now one of the 
finest and most lucrative trades in the city. 
His office and shop are at 28 School Street. 
He has been very prosperous in all of his en- 
terprises, and considers that he owes much of 
his success in life to his uncle, Charles Jones, 
with whom he spent several years of his 
youth, and whose influence and wise counsels 
were of inestimable value to him. He has 
accumulated a large amount of this world's 
goods, having dealt extensively in real estate 
the past ten years, and is the owner of seven- 
teen tenement-houses and three shops within 
the city corporation, two excellent farms in 
Leyden, and a very valuable farm of three hun- 
dred and seventy-five acres at West Deerfield. 
He is a large-hearted, whole-souled, genial 
man, broad and liberal in his views, domi- 
nated by neither creed nor greed, and is the 
possessor of a strong and robust physique; 
and, notwithstanding that he braves the winds 
and weather of the changeable New Eng- 
land climate, often taking long drives in 
the coldest season without overcoat or mit- 
tens, is never sick and rarely weary, his con- 
stitution being as strong as that of the United 
States. 

Mr. Jones was united in marriage January 
S, 1869, to Elenora I. Eastman, of Deerfield, 
a daughter of N. H. and Eunice (Munsell) 
Eastman. She has passed to the bright world 
beyond, her death occurring in the beautiful 
month of June, 1887. Three children were 
born to her, one of whom, a daughter, Flor- 
ence M., died at the age of twelve years. 



The two living are: Marion B., fifteen years 
old; and Grace R., five years younger. 

Mr. Jones has a pleasant home at 82 Chap- 
man Street, where he has lived for twenty-six 
years, the house being of his own construc- 
tion, very convenient and comfortable. 



-f^TENRY O. SCOTT, Postmaster at 
r^i Lyonsville, a versatile and success- 
-I-^ V» , ful business man, was born Novem- 
ber 10, 1839, in Colerain. He is the son of 
Henry A. and Mary A. (Call) Scott, the for- 
mer a native of Bernardston, the latter of 
Colerain. Mr. Scott's great-grandfather on 
the paternal side, Elihu Scott, was an early 
settler in Bernardston, where he owned a saw- 
mill. He was a carpenter and joiner by 
trade, and was fairly well-to-do. His wife's 
maiden name was Hannah Andrews. Their 
son Zora, grandfather of our subject, was born 
in Bernardston, and there spent the early part 
of his life in agricultural pursuits. In 1853 
he entered the employ of the Griswold Manu- 
facturing Company as all-around man, and in 
time became one of their most trusted em- 
ployees. As old age crept upon him he re- 
signed his position, and retired to a farm in 
Charlemont; and he passed away August 19, 
1884, in Colerain, at the age of ninety-one. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Abigail 
Orvis, died August 22, 1877. 

Henry A. Scott, the father of our subject, 
was born November 24, 18 16. He has been 
engaged in various pursuits during his life, 
spending thirty-five years in the Griswoldville 
Cotton Mills, and is now engaged in the coal 
business and in farming, owning an estate of 
one hundred acres in Colerain. Mrs. Scott, 
the mother of Henry O., was born in Cole- 
rain, June 22, 1 8 19, and died December 15, 
1870. She was a model wife and mother, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3^9 



devoted to the interests of her home and fam- 
ily. In politics Mr. Scott is a Republican. 
His wife was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, which he also attends. 
They had five children, two of whom have 
passed to the world beyond, namely: Zora 
W., born October 30, 1842, who died Novem- 
ber 15, 1843; and Edwin W., born January 
27, 1847, who died January 29, 1879. Henry 
O., our subject, is the oldest of those now 
living. Abbie O., born August 17, 1844, is 
the wife of Charles W. Billings, of North 
Adams. Zora L., born May 9, 1858, is clerk 
in a wholesale seed and hardware store in 
Syracuse, N.Y. 

Henry O. Scott received his education in 
the schools of Colerain, Guilford, and North 
Adams, and entered the cotton factory at 
North Adams, Mass., when a boy of ten. He 
worked as a factory hand in various places, in 
1856 moving to Lyonsville with his parents. 
Here he engaged as salesman on the road, 
selling crackers for a while, and later went 
into the teaming business, at one time having 
charge of all the teaming done between here 
and Greenfield. In this way he was employed 
for seven years, at the end of which he en- 
gaged in the manufacture of harnesses and 
livery findings in Lyonsville, the site of his 
business being the same as the one now occu- 
pied. At the start he erected a one-story 
building, twenty by thirty feet, putting in at 
first a line of tobacco and cigars in addition 
to his harness business. To this he has 
added little by little, until to-day he carries a 
complete line of the goods usually found in a 
general store. By his own unaided efforts he 
has built up a large business from a small 
beginning, and now has a flourishing trade. 
He is also engaged in the manufacture of 
palm-leaf hats, and has realized as much as 
three thousand dollars in a season from this 



branch of his business. Mr. Scott has a 
small farm, which he cultivates for family 
needs; and his voice is often heard in public, 
encouraging the highest bidder, he being the 
town auctioneer. 

On January 6, 1863, Mr. Scott was married 
to Mary A., daughter of Moses C. and Maria 
(Fuller) Goodnow, of Shelburne, both of 
whom are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have 
two children: Kate May, born April 20, 
1865, wife of William T. Francis; and Ross 
D., born January 27, 1874. Mr. Scott's son- 
in-law and son are both employed in his store. 

In politics Mr. Scott is a Democrat. He 
has been Postmaster of the town since the 
office was created, and he has also been Town 
Auditor since the creation of that office. Mr. 
and Mrs. Scott are liberal in religious views, 
and attend the Baptist church, in which he is 
organist and musical director. Mr. Scott is 
an accomplished musician, and has taught 
vocal and instrumental music for many years. 
He is the musical director of the local band 
(twenty pieces) which bears his name, and 
violinist and leader of the orchestra connected 
with it. 



■ASON MANN, a resident of the town 
of Montague, Mass., where he is well 
known as a manufacturer of various 
kinds of soap, was born in Richmond, N.H., 
July 17, 1839, son of Joseph Mann, a native 
of Richmond. His grandfather, who was a 
farmer, spent the chief part of his life in the 
same locality, dying there at an advanced age. 
Joseph Mann, the father of Jason, was one 
of six children. He acquired a good educa- 
tion, attending the district schools and the 
academy, and taught for many years in the 
schools in the vicinity of Richmond, also 
carrying on the work of farming. His latter 
days were spent with his son Jason, at whose 



320 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



home he died, at the age of eighty-nine. He 
married Miss Silence Newell, daughter of 
Benjamin Newell, a prominent farmer of 
Richmond, who held the office of Justice 
of the Peace. Mrs. Mann died at Richmond, 
aged sixty-four years. She and her husband 
attended the Universalist church. They 
brought up two children, namely: Jason; and 
Josephine M., wife of Brooks S. Merriam, of 
Little Falls, N.Y. 

Jason Mann left his home at the age of 
fourteen, and later became an attendant in 
the Insane Asylum at Brattleboro, Vt., where 
he remained nine years. He then engaged in 
the manufacture of soap, still remaining in 
that locality. In 1862 he enlisted as Ser- 
geant in Company B, Sixteenth Vermont 
Regiment, in which he served nine months. 
On receiving his discharge, he returned to 
Brattleboro, and took up his old business of 
soap manufacture. At the end of two years 
he went to Akron, Ohio, and two years later 
removed to Montague, where he now has a 
small farm, with dwelling-house, near which 
he carries on the manufacture of soap for local 
trade. 

In 1861 Mr. Mann was married to Miss 
Lura A. Babcock, a native of Guilford, Vt., 
a daughter of Henry Babcock, of that town. 
She was born July 14, 1843, ^^d was the 
youngest of four children. Her ancestry is 
traced back to Godfrey Babcock, who came 
from England, and settled in Deerfield, where 
during the Revolutionary War his house was 
burned by the British. He died in Deerfield 
in 1805. His son John married Eliza Hull; 
and their son Thomas married Esther Martin- 
dale, and settled in Deerfield. The latter 
couple had several children, only one of whom 
lived to rear a family of his own. This was 
Hull, the great-grandfather of Mrs. Mann. 
His son Harris, Mrs Mann's grandfather, was 



a farmer of Guilford. Her father, Henry 
Babcock, also was a farmer of Guilford. He 
died in Montague, at the home of his daughter, 
aged eighty years. His wife was Miss Elvira 
L. Baker, daughter of Peter Baker, a farmer of 
Guilford. Mr. Babcock reared four children, 
namely: Amanda, widow of Clark Stark, of 
West Brattleboro, who has two children — 
Willard and Minnie; Ellen; Baxter; and 
Lura, wife of our subject. The mother died 
at her daughter's home, at the age of seventy- 
six years. She was a Methodist in religious 
belief. Mrs. Mann's childhood days were 
passed in Guilford. When sixteen years of 
age, she went to Brattleboro to live, and 
spent seven years as attendant in the Brattle- 
boro Insane Asylum. After her marriage (in 
1 861), she travelled as general agent in the 
interest of a patent system of dress-cutting, 
her business requiring journeys through the 
States of Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, and New England. The length of her 
engagement — fifteen years — is ample proof 
of her capacity and business ability. 

Mr. Mann is a Democrat in his political 
views, arid takes an active interest in town 
affairs. He has filled the offices of Selectman 
and of Overseer of the Poor three years each. 
He is a member of the Masonic fraternity of 
the town, and has been some time connected 
with the Grand Army of the Republic, and 
Commander of the Post four years, besides 
filling other offices. His wife is a member 
of the Orthodox church. 



'OHN GEORGE YETTER, an active 
and prosperous dry-goods merchant of 
Greenfield, Mass., stands in a foremost 
position among the prominent business men 
of the city, having attained this place by the 
exercise of good judgment and a close applica- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3-^1 



tion to the details of his trade. He is of 
German birth, having been born January i8, 

1 85 1, in Weilheim, State of Balinger, Wiir- 
temberg, a son of Conrad and Margaret 
(Hoelle) Yetter. 

Conrad Yetter spent the larger portion of 
his brief life in the Fatherland, emigrating to 
America and locating in Massachusetts in 

1852. He was a weaver by trade, and while 
in Germany was employed as overseer of the 
weaving-room in a factory. He settled in 
Conway, where his death occurred in 1855, 
while yet a comparatively young man, being 
only thirty-six years of age. He left a 
widow and two children: John G., the sub- 
ject of this article; and Johanna, wife of 
John George Voetsch, of Turner's Falls. 
His widow subsequently became the wife of 
William Hoelle, of Turner's Falls; and of 
this union three children were born — two 
sons and a daughter. 

John George Yetter was reared to manhood 
and educated in his native country, which 
is famed for the number and excellence of 
its public schools, graduating from the high 
school. At the age of sixteen years he came 
alone to America, landing at New York, and 
going from that city to Greenfield. His first 
employment was with the Lamson & Goodnow 
Cutlery Company, in whose factory he re- 
mained until it was swept away by a flood 
three years later. Going then to New Brit- 
ain, Conn., Mr. Yetter accepted a similar 
position with Landers, Frary & Clark. He 
then established himself in business, taking 
contract work in finishing forks, and employ- 
ing a force of seven men. The business 
proved a very profitable one, but he was 
obliged to give it up on account of failing 
health. Returning to Franklin county, Mr. 
Yetter opened a fancy-goods and periodical 
store at Turner's Falls, where he continued for 



two and one-half years, when he sold out to John 
Eppler. He was subsequently employed for 
seven years as a clerk in the dry-goods house 
of William F. Root at Greenfield, remaining 
with him until his retirement from business 
in 1882. Mr. Yetter next accepted a similar 
position in the establishment of Knowles & 
Thompson, for whom he clerked four years, 
the succeeding two years being an employee 
of W. A. Forbes. During the later years of 
his clerkship Mr. Yetter was on the lookout 
for a favorable location for business; and on 
April 21, 1887, he purchased his present 
stand at 88 Main Street, being aided by trust- 
ing friends. He put in a stock of dry and 
fancy goods, cloaks, etc., valued at ten thou- 
sand dollars; and to this he has made contin- 
ual additions, his stock being now appraised 
at from fifteen to seventeen thousand dollars. 
Mr. Yetter has cancelled all his indebtedness, 
and has a very extensive trade, including the 
patronage of the leading people of the city, 
and employing several saleswomen. He has 
made his store very attractive to his cus- 
tomers, who feel confident of receiving a good 
article at a fair price. 

On December 23, 1873, Mr. Yetter was 
married to Miss Frances Sessler, of Green- 
field, a daughter of Jacob and Francisca (Ker- 
ber) Sessler, both natives of Germany. They 
emigrated to America when young, and were 
married at Brattleboro, Vt., in 1848, settling 
on a farm, where they lived until the death of 
Mrs. Sessler, in 1886. The father, now re- 
tired from active pursuits, makes his home 
with his daughter, Mrs. Yetter. Five chil- 
dren were born to them, one of whom — 
Frank J. — died when four years old. The 
record of the others is as follows: William, 
a farmer, lives in Colerain; Frances is the 
wife of Mr. Yetter; Eva Rose is the wife of 
Andrew Schwilling, of Miller's Falls; and 



322 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Frederick is a farmer, residing in Greenfield. 
The parents were both members of the Con- 
gregational church. The marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Yetter has been blessed by the birth of 
six children, namely: Frances S., a clerk in 
her father's store; Rose Louise, a student of 
music; Frederick G., an active youth of fif- 
teen years, who is learning the mercantile 
business; Frank Jacob, thirteen years of age; 
Elizabeth Amelia, eleven years old; and 
Mabel, eight years old. Mr. Yetter and his 
family live at 36 Davis Street, in the house 
which he bought in 1892, and have a very 
pleasant and attractive home. They are held 
in high esteem throughout the community, 
and are valued members of the Episcopal 
church. 



"CjDGAR L. BARTLETT is an extensive 
p i farmer, residing in Montague, who 
'^'""^■'^' also carries on a very profitable 
butchering business. He was born in that 
town on July 6, 1856, and is a son of Gideon 
Bartlett, a native of Enfield, Hampshire 
County, Mass., where his father, also named 
Gideon, was born. The latter was a prosper- 
ous farmer, who resided in Enfield until his 
decease, at the age of seventy years. 

Gideon Bartlett, Jr., the father of our sub- 
ject, was reared to agricultural life, and also 
acquired the trade of a wheelwright at Mon- 
tague, where he first went to live in 1833. 
He followed his trade for many years, broken 
by an interval when he remained with and 
assisted his father during his decline. After 
his father's death he returned to Montague, 
and there passed the remainder of his life, 
dying in 1876, at the age of sixty-one years. 
He was a stanch Republican in politics; and 
during his later residence in Enfield, which 
extended over the period from 1856 to 1870, 
he held the offices of Selectman and Assessor 



for several terms. His wife was Julia Law- 
rence, daughter of Colonel Cephas Lawrence. 
The latter was prominently identified with 
the State militia for many years, and was 
closely connected with the business interests 
of Montague, where he operated a large saw- 
mill and fulling-mill. Mrs. Bartlett was one 
of a large family. She became the mother of 
ten children who lived to reach maturity, 
namely: Juliet, who married George W. 
Holden, of Enfield; Alphonso, a resident of 
Miller's Falls; William, also of Miller's 
Falls; Lucia, who married F. A. Amsden, of 
Gardner; Eugene C, of Orange; Flora, wife 
of A. E. Whitney; Edgar L., the subject of 
this article; Nettie M., wife of John Good- 
win; Nellie M. (deceased), twin sister of 
Nettie M., who married H. F. Shaw, of Bel- 
chertown; and Eva L., wife of A. B. Dudley, 
of Gardner. Mr. Bartlett 's parents attended 
the Congregational church; and, although his 
father was not a member, he took deep inter- 
est in all religious affairs. The mother was 
called to rest in November, 1883, at the age 
of sixty-eight years. 

The first fourteen years of Edgar L. Bart- 
lett's life were passed in Enfield, upon the 
farm which his father conducted; and, al- 
though he was obliged to walk a mile and a 
half to school, through the cold of winter and 
the oppressive heat of summer, he considered 
it no great hardship, and always managed to 
occupy a position of prominence in his 
classes. When his parents removed to Mon- 
tague, he continued to pursue his studies 
there, and completed his education at the age 
of seventeen, having, in the mean time, dur- 
ing spare hours, worked in the shop of a 
cabinet-maker. He then entered the employ 
of Benjamin Fay, the village butcher, with 
whom he remained in a subordinate position 
until 1880. His employer's health failing at 



•^=4 




HENRY E. GOODELL, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



325 



that time, he became a partner with him in 
the business. At the expiration of five 
months Mr. Fay died; and Mr. Bartlett pur- 
chased his interest, although, in order to do 
so, he was under the necessity of incurring a 
heavy debt. This he paid off in the space of 
three years, through the practice of the most 
rigid economy and the closest attention to 
business. He conducted a very successful 
trade at the old stand for some time. In 
1889 he was burned out, and conducted busi- 
ness in the basement of Masonic Hall until 
April I of that year, when he moved to the 
old Ward farm, which is considered one of the 
very finest pieces of agricultural property in 
the locality, where he has since conducted a 
brisk butchering business in connection with 
farming, employing three teams permanently, 
and sometimes five, in order to supply his 
large and increasing trade. He also makes a 
specialty of breeding fine Jersey cattle, of 
which he generally keeps twenty-five head, 
and raises many excellent draft horses. Mr. 
Bartlett was the first President and is now a 
member of the Co-operative Creamery. He 
keeps in touch with the progress of the times 
in agricultural matters, and is very successful 
in all his operations. 

Mr. Bartlett was united in marriage in 
October, 1883, to Miss Addie A. Fay, only 
daughter of Benjamin Fay, his late partner in 
business, who was formerly a farmer in Mil- 
ford, Worcester County. Mr. Fay died at 
Montague, at the age of fifty-seven years. 
Mrs. Fay, whose maiden name was Jane H. 
Presho, was a native of Pelham. She became 
the mother of three children, as follows: 
Addie A. ; B. Frank, who died at the age of 
thirty-three years; and Henry C. Mr. Fay 
served on the Board of Selectmen of Montague 
for some time. He was a prominent member 
of the Congregational church, and served 



on the parish committee. Mrs. Fay, who 
now resides with her daughter, is also a mem- 
ber of that church. Four children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett, and they have been 
called upon to mourn the death of two — Rob- 
ert F. and Walter. Their home is brightened 
by two promising boys — Benjamin P. and 
Richard H. 

Mr. Bartlett is well advanced in Masonry, 
being connected with Bay State Lodge at 
Montague and Franklin Royal Arch Chapter, 
Titus Strong Council, and Connecticut Valley 
Commandery at Greenfield; and he has held 
some of the important offices in the Blue 
Lodge. He is a charter member and was the 
first Secretary of the grange at Montague. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett are active members of 
the Congregational church, in which he occu- 
pies an official position, and has been super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. 




ENRY E. GOODELL, whose por- 
trait is presented on the opposite 
- V ^ page, is a member of the firm of 
Goodell Brothers, of Greenfield, manufacturers 
of light hardware specialties, including auto- 
matic screw-drivers and drills, of which these 
enterprising gentlemen are the inventors and 
patentees. Mr. Goodell was born October 
12, 1848, in the town of Whitingham,.Vt., 
being a son of Anson Goodell, a native of 
Connecticut, who was born in 1805. 

Anson Goodell, when a young man, removed 
from his native State to Vermont, and, buy- 
ing a tract. of land in Whitingham, Windham 
County, carried on general farming there with 
much success for many years. Later he sold 
that farm, and removed to Buckland, Franklin 
County, Mass. He was an industrious man, 
not afraid of hard work, and rounded out a 
full period of years, passing to his rest in 



32C 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



May, 1892. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Lucy Rice, and who is now eighty-seven 
years of age, is living at Shelburne Falls. 
Of their marriage, which covered a period of 
sixty-five happy years, twelve children were 
born. As into every life some sorrow comes, 
so they, too, had troubles hard to bear, having 
been called upon to part with several of their 
children; namely, two who died in infancy, 
a daughter at the age of seven years, a son 
five years old, and two after reaching adult 
life. The latter were: Helen, who died in 
1873 on the home farm at Buckland; and 
Hiram, who died in 1877, aged forty-six 
years. The record of the surviving children 
is thus given: Anna, the widow of David 
Lanfair, who died in 1878 at Conway, leaving 
her with seven children; Dexter W., of the 
firm of Goodell Brothers in Greenfield ; Al- 
mina, widow of Clark Cary, living in Cole- 
rain, where he died in 1894, at the age of 
fifty-eight years, leaving two children; Albert 
D., a manufacturer of hardware at Shelburne 
Falls; Henry E. ; and Mattie, wife of Emer- 
son Hicks, of Shelburne Falls. Mr. Anson 
Goodell took a prominent part in political and 
religious affairs in his town, being a Repub- 
lican in politics, serving in various offices, 
and, with his wife, belonging to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, of which he was an 
official member. 

Henry E. Goodell was reared to agricult- 
ural pursuits on the parental homestead, 
where he lived until eighteen years old, when 
his mechanical talent asserted itself, and he 
began the manufacture of wood specialties, 
principally chair stock, with his brother 
Albert, in Buckland. Two years later they 
changed to hardware specialties, retaining the 
same factory; but this they sold a year later 
to the Miller Falls Manufacturing Company, 
in whose employment they were engaged the 



succeeding eighteen years. In June, 1888, 
these brothers again embarked in the hard- 
ware business, opening a factory at Shelburne 
Falls, and carried it on together under the 
firm name of Goodell Brothers for some three 
years, when Albert D. sold out his share to 
his partner, who continued alone for a few 
months. In November, 1893, Mr. Henry E. 
Goodell removed to Greenfield, and, taking 
into partnership his brother Dexter, erected 
their present factory, which is of brick, two 
stories high, one hundred feet by thirty feet, 
and is situated north of Main Street, on the 
Boston & Maine railroad tracks. They give 
steady employment to about twenty hands, 
turning out some thirty thousand dollars' 
worth of goods every year; and this product 
is sold to the United States and the European 
trade, articles of their manufacture having 
a wide reputation for excellence on two 
continents. 

Mr. Goodell was united in marriage May 
13, 1873, to Miss Alice S. Gaines, a native 
of Montague, and daughter of Benjamin A. 
and Lydia (Kendal) Gaines, now residents of 
Greenfield. Mrs. Goodell was educated at 
Bernardston Academy, and prior to her mar- 
riage was a successful and popular teacher, 
being a general favorite in society. Two 
children have been born of their union, 
namely: Harry G., a fine young man of 
twenty-one years, who married Lizzie Doo- 
little, a daughter of Andrew Doolittle; and 
Josie M., who is a graduate of the Greenfield 
High School. Mr. Goodell is a man of much 
stability of purpose and integrity, and by his 
untiring energy and enterprise has reached 
his present place among the successful men of 
the period. Although physically frail, he is 
known as a rapid and enthusiastic worker, 
doing more actual labor than any of his em- 
ployees, and at the same time superintending 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



327 



his extensive business. In politics he is a 
strong adherent of the Republican party; and 
he and his wife belong to the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, he being an officer therein. 
They have a fine new home at 31 Main Street, 
which he built in 1803. 



^fpNEUBEN H. NIMS, a thrifty and en- 
I ^^ terprising agriculturist, owning and 
^ V^^ managing a well-improved and 
finely equipped farm at Montague Meadows, 
was born in the town of Colerain, Franklin 
County, Mass., January 15, 1832. His par- 
ents were William and Phila (Gunn) Nims, 
the former a native of Colerain, the latter of 
Montague. The father was a cloth dresser, 
and worked at his trade in his native town 
and in Heath, his last days being spent in 
the latter place. His wife was the daughter 
of Asahel Gunn, a successful farmer of Mon- 
tague, where his birth occurred November 10, 
1757, and his death in November, 1834. 
Four of the five children born to William 
Nims and his wife grew to mature years, and 
two are still living, namely: Reuben H., the 
subject of this biographical record; and Mary, 
who married L. O. Gunn, of Erving, a sketch 
of whose life may be found elsewhere in this 
volume, and in connection with it a more 
extended history of the parents of Mr. Nims. 
Reuben H. Nims was left an orphan at an 
early age, his father having died when the 
boy was scarcely more than an infant, and his 
mother when he was only nine years old. He 
subsequently made his home with his uncle, 
Rodney Gunn, who was a farmer, and was 
educated in the district schools and at Shel- 
burne Falls. He became early acquainted 
with the mysteries of farming, and became 
a farmer by choice, finding the occupation 
pleasant and profitable. In i860 he made his 



first purchase of land, buying a farm in North- 
ampton, where he lived four years. Selling 
that property in 1864, Mr. Nims took up his 
residence on the farm which is now his home. 
It was then occupied by his uncle and aunt, 
who required his care, and who bequeathed 
him the property when death called them 
home. There he has since carried on general 
farming in a practical and progressive man- 
ner, meeting with excellent results in all of 
his operations; and he is an important mem- 
ber of the agricultural community of this 
section of the county. 

Mr. Nims has been twice married. His 
first wife, to whom he was wedded November 

22, 1859, was Miss Mary E. Edwards, a native 
of Northampton, the daughter of Thomas 
Edwards, a gardener of that place and an 
esteemed resident. She was a most estimable 
woman and a consistent member of the Con- 
gregational church. She died August 2, 
1876, leaving three children, of whom the fol- 
lowing is chronicled: Willie died at the age 
of twenty-one years; Hattie H., the wife of 
William Wright, agent for the Adams Ex- 
press Company, residing at Greenfield, has 
three children — Martha O., Mary E., and 
Harold I. ; and Charles, who assists his father 
on the farm, married Lucy F. Webber, a 
native of Old Hadley, they having one 
child — Homer Willis. On June 4, 1879, 
Mr. Nims was united in marriage to Miss 
Belle Farrington, a daughter of George W. 
Farrington, a Vermont farmer. Mrs. Far- 
rington's maiden name was Clara Marsh. 
She was a native of Vermont, born February 

23, 1831, and a life-long resident of that 
State. Her death occurred in the town of 
Walden, September 10, 1856. She was the 
mother of two children — Carl D. and Belle 
(Mrs. Nims). Mr. Farrington is yet living, 
but is quite feeble. Mr. and Mrs. Nims are 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the parents of three children — Clara Edith, 
Annie, and Mary — who are now enjoying the 
happy days of school life. 

In politics Mr. Nims is a straight Republi- 
can. He and his wife are esteemed members 
of the Congregational church. 



(shr^ERY J. DENISON, a representative 
fjA mechanic and farmer of Leyden, 
^ " V._^ Franklin County, Mass., was born 
in this town, November 24, 1829, son of Arad 
J. and Prudence (Burrows) Denison. His 
first ancestor in this country was William 
Denison, who was born in England in 1586, 
and came to America in 163 1, settling in 
Roxbury, Mass., with his wife, Margaret, and 
his three sons — ^ Daniel, Edward, and George. 
The latter, who was born in England in 
161 8, married Bridget Thompson, of Roxbury, 
who died in 1643; and after her death he re- 
turned to England, and served under Cromwell 
in the Parliamentary army, winning the title 
of Colonel. He was wounded at the battle of 
Naseby, and was nursed at the house of John 
Borodell, whose daughter Ann ministered to 
the comfort of the suffering soldier. A mut- 
ual affection being thus engendered, on 
regaining his strength George Denison mar- 
ried Ann Borodell, and with her returned to 
Roxbury, Mass., later settling in Stonington, 
Conn. He has been described as "the Miles 
Standish of the settlement " ; but he was a 
more brilliant soldier than Standish, having 
no equal in any of the colonies for conducting 
a war against the Indians. In emergencies 
he was always in demand, and he held many 
important positions. 

William Denison, son of George, was born 
in Stonington in 1655, and, spending his life 
on the homestead, died March 26, 1715. His 
son George, who was born February 28, 1692, 



was also a life-long resident there. The next 
in line, David Denison, was born January 29, 
1736, in Stonington, but in early manhood 
lived in New London. He was an officer in 
the Revolutionary army, and lost most of his 
property when Arnold, the traitor, burned 
that town. In 1785 he moved to Rindge, 
N.H., and thence to the southern part of 
Guilford, Vt., which was then an uncultivated 
and sparsely settled district. He died Janu- 
ary 24, 1808. His wife, Keziah Smith Deni- 
son, by whom he had eleven children, was a 
native of Groton, Conn. She died June 28, 
18 1 5, and was buried at Beaver Meadow 
Cemetery, at Leyden, Mass. Their son 
George, born in 1769, grandfather of Avery 
J. Denison, migrated to Fabius, Onondaga 
County, N.Y., contracting a fever while 
transporting the State militia to Sackett's 
Harbor. He died in 1813, leaving his wife, 
Lucy Babcock, daughter of Peleg Babcock, of 
Leyden, a widow with five children. 

Arad J. Denison was born March 28, 1807, 
in Fabius, N.Y., and in 1813, the year of his 
father's death, came to Leyden, Mass., to 
make his home with his grandfather, Peleg 
Babcock. He was a mechanic by trade, and 
lived to be nearly seventy, dying August 10, 
1876. On April 12, 1827, he was united in 
marriage with Prudence Burrows, who was 
born July 6, 1807, in Guilford, Vt., and died 
April 7, 1872. They had the following chil- 
dren, seven of whom are now living, namely: 
Willard Arad, born February 2, 1828; Avery 
Josiah, the subject of this sketch; Amy 
Sophia, born March 4, 1833; Lydia Louisa, 
born September 9, 1834; George Washing- 
ton, born January 30, 1837; Charles Kinyon, 
born February 2, 1842; Andrew Richard, 
born May 6, 1843; and Adelaide Lucy, born 
October 6, 1847. 

Avery J. Denison was educated in the pub- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



329 



lie and select schools of Leyden. In early 
life he showed an inclination for mechanics, 
in which he sought always to excel. For 
some time he worked with his father, and 
subsequently he was employed as a clothier, 
a workman on sashes, doors, and blinds, a 
millwright, a carpenter and joiner; and finally 
he took charge of a grist-mill and saw-mill, 
with wood-working machinery. At present 
Mr. Denison is engaged in general farming, 
which he conducts in an intelligent and pro- 
gressive manner. On May 4, 1859, he was 
married to Emma Stewart, who passed away 
on April 2, 1861; and on June 7, 1869, he 
was united to his second wife, Harriet 
Frances, daughter of Cyrus C. and Freelove 
(Packard) Miner, who was born in Leyden, 
October 12, 1842. 

The Miner family trace their descent from 
three brothers who came to America in early 
Colonial times, and settled in Connecticut. 
Mrs. Denison's grandfather, Cyrus Miner, 
was born in Stonington, Conn., April 3, 
1777. He lived in Halifax, Vt., for some 
time, later moving to Leyden. Grandfather 
Miner was a hard-working and prosperous 
farmer, and was famed for generosity and hos- 
pitality. In politics he was a Wig; and in 
religion he was liberal, looking on every man 
as his brother. He died in West Leyden, 
November 12, 1845. His wife, Fanny Clark, 
was born in Hopkinton, R.I., September 11, 
1 78 1, and became Mrs. Miner on December 
23, 1802. She died in May, 1877, at the 
advanced age of ninety-six. They had twelve 
children, one of whom died in childhood. 
At the present time three are living, namely: 
Martha, widow of Robert Miller, in East 
Colerain ; Mary, widow of Madison Noyes, in 
Guilford, Vt. ; and Ozias L. Miner, in Brat- 
tleboro, Vt. 

Cyrus Clark Miner, Mrs. Denison's father. 



who was born in Halifax, Vt., January 20, 
1804, was a well-to-do farmer and fruit 
grower, owning the farm in West Leyden 
known as the Peleg Babcock place. With the 
exception of a few years spent in Hatfield and 
in Halifax, Vt., Mr. Miner's life was passed 
in Leyden, where he was one of the first to 
engage in fruit growing on an extensive scale. 
He prospered in his undertakings, and spent 
his last years in retirement in Leyden Centre. 
A Republican in politics, he held many town 
offices, serving for some time as Selectman. 
He was a zealous member of the Methodist 
church, to whose support he liberally con- 
tributed. Mr. Miner died January 22, 1887. 
He was married October 30, 1827, to Free- 
love Packard, who died November 26, 1894, at 
the home of her son, M. Dayton Miner, in 
her eighty-eighth year. They had nine chil- 
dren, of whom six are living, namely: Oliver 
S., a carriage-maker in North Adams; 
Charles P. C, a farmer and apple dealer in 
Charlemont; William L., a farmer in Hud- 
son, S. Dak., who served three years in 
Company I, Forty -first Regiment Illinois 
Volunteers, and was wounded in the battle of 
Shiloh; Harriet F., Mrs. Denison; M. Day- 
ton, a mechanic and farmer; George Harlan, 
a book-keeper in North Pownal, Vt. Ange- 
line A., wife of I. N. Thorn, a druggist of 
Brattleboro, Vt., died March 27, 1856; Cyrus 
E. died August 15, 1852; and Anson D., 
who was principal of Drury Academy and 
superintendent of schools in North Adams 
twenty-eight years, died February 25, 1894. 
Mr. and Mrs. Avery J. Denison have two 
children — Carroll A. and Helen C. The 
former, who was born in Leyden, June 9, 
1870, is a mechanic, and resides with his 
parents. He was married September 28, 
1892, to Millie Hall, a native of Springfield, 
Mass., but at that time a resident of Green- 



33° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



field. They have one child, Ruth Freelove 
Denison, born April 30, 1894. Helen C, 
who was born July 16, 1875, also resides in 
Leyden. 

Avery J. Denison has always voted the Re- 
publican ticket, having cast his first vote for 
John C. Fremont. In 1869 he was a member 
of the State legislature, representing seven 
towns; and he has served as Selectman, As- 
sessor, and Overseer six years, besides filling 
minor offices, declining two appointments as 
Justice of the Peace, accepting the third, and 
serving seven years, declining to serve an- 
other term. In the discharge of his official 
duties Mr. Denison was fearless and indepen- 
dent, taking what he deemed the right course, 
regardless of public opinion. He has ever 
felt an earnest desire to promote the welfare 
of society, believing that all permanent civil- 
ization is based on morality as taught in the 
Bible. Mr. and Mrs. Denison are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. They 
are noted for their generosity and hospitality. 




"ENRY H. ROOT, a successful mer- 
chant of Montagiie, was born in this 
Li® V _, town, on what is known as Federal 
Street, September 8, 1856, his father, Harri- 
son F. Root, and his grandfather, Erastus F. 
Root, having been natives of the same place, 
both occupying the old homestead, where 
the latter spent his entire life. Harrison F. 
Root was reared to farm work; and, after 
receiving his education at the district schools 
and in Williston Seminary at Easthampton, 
he bought the home farm, and tenderly cared 
for his parents during their declining years. 
He is a Republican in politics, and promi- 
nent in public affairs. His wife, whose name 
before marriage was Hannah G. Stratton, is 
a daughter of Arad Stratton, of Northfield. 



Four children were born to them, as follows: 
Arthur, a farmer, residing in this town; Har- 
riet S., wife of Austin Lawrence, of Miller's 
Falls, who is now travelling through Canada, 
having previously visited all places of interest 
in the United States; Henry H., of whom 
more is written below; and Charles, who died 
at the age of six months. Mr. Harrison 
F. Root has been eminently prosperous in 
agricultural pursuits, and now enjoys a very 
comfortable competency. He and his wife 
are members of the Unitarian church. 

Henry H. Root passed his boyhood upon 
his father's farm. He received a good educa- 
tion in the district schools and at Wesleyan 
Academy, and at the age of sixteen entered 
the employ of Wright & Bangs as a clerk. 
After remaining with them two years, he 
went to Westfield, Hampden County, Mass., 
where he was employed in the same capacity 
by D. L. Gillett, a dry-goods dealer, for one 
year, and then, returning to Montague, ac- 
cepted a position in the general store of Mr. 
I. Cheney, being there employed for a period 
of four years. At the expiration of that time 
he purchased Mr. Cheney's interest, and, 
after successfully carrying on the business for 
two years more, sold to the former proprietor, 
later purchasing the building which was 
located on the site of his present store, to- 
gether with one adjoining. These buildings, 
including a large stock of goods, were de- 
stroyed by fire July 4, 1885, causing him to 
sustain a severe loss, from which, however, 
he speedily recovered. He immediately com- 
menced the erection of his present well- 
appointed establishment, and at the end of 
four months, with a fine stock of goods, re- 
sumed business, which he has since continued 
with the most satisfactory results. 

In July, 188 1, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Cora M. Streeter, only daughter of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVFEW 



331 



H. L. Streeter, of Winsted, Conn., who for- 
merly carried on the lumber business in that 
town. Mr. Root is a member of Bay State 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., is liberal in his 
religious views, and a Republican in politics. 
His business career has been thus far charac- 
terized by a degree of energy and ability that 
has insured his success, and his fellow- 
townsmen have every reason to expect a great 
deal of him in the way of developing the busi- 
ness resources of the locality. 



rACOB P. KELLOGG, who died at his 
home in Shelburne, Mass., on October 
6, 1843, was a worthy member of a 
family that has been represented in the Con- 
necticut valley more than two hundred years, 
its records including the names of not a few 
citizens of prominence in their day and gen- 
eration. The immigrant ancestor was Joseph 
Kellogg, who settled in Farmington, Conn., 
in 1651, and died in Hadley, Mass., in 1707 
or 1708, having been one of the leading pio- 
neers of that place. The next in the line 
now being considered was his son, John Kel- 
logg, who died in Hadley between 1723 and 
1728. The third child of said John Kellogg 
was Joseph Kellogg, who was born November 
6, 1685, and was a resident of South Hadley, 
where his son Jabez was born February 11, 
1734. Jabez Kellogg removed to Hanover, 
N.H., in 1785, living there until his death, 
in 1791. One of his children, Julius by 
name, was the father of Jacob P., the princi- 
pal subject of the present sketch. 

Julius Kellogg was born at South Hadley, 
September 27, 1765, and was a blacksmith by 
trade, following that occupation through his 
life, which terminated August 4, 181 3, in 
Shelburne. He married Molly Poole, who 
was born in Shelburne, February i, 1771, and 



died here, September 7, 1833. She was a 
daughter of Lieutenant Jacob Poole, who died 
at Sainte Therese, Canada, in June, 1776, 
while serving in the Revolutionary War. 
Among the first pioneers of the town of Shel- 
burne were Stephen Kellogg and Samuel 
Poole, both of them grandfathers of Molly 
Poole, so that she was also partly of Kellogg 
descent. Mrs. Molly Poole Kellogg was a 
rarely gifted woman, of great mental power, 
and with her husband took an active part in 
promoting the growth and prosperity of the 
town, they being among the foremost citizens 
of their day. Julius Kellogg was a public- 
spirited man, and was a Representative in the 
State legislature in 1808. Both he and his 
wife were influential members of the Congre- 
gational church from the time of its organiza- 
tion and liberal contributors toward its sup- 
port. A family of ten children were born to 
them, none of whom are now living. 

Jacob P. Kellogg, son of Julius and Molly 
(Poole) Kellogg, was born in Shelburne on 
February 16, 1793. Having learned his 
father's trade, he worked at general black- 
smithing, and also did a large business in the 
manufacture of hoes. He located in Shel- 
burne Centre, buying the estate on which his 
son and daughter now live, and making many 
improvements thereon, erecting the present 
commodious residence in 1834. A man of 
excellent judgment, intelligently interested 
in the common weal, he was often called upon 
to fill responsible stations, and, besides serv- 
ing as Selectman for several years, repre- 
sented his district in the State legislature in 
1843. Although his life was comparatively 
short, it was filled with useful activity; and 
his death, in the autumn of that year, was a 
sad loss to the community, as well as to his 
immediate family. He married in 1820 Lucy 
Wright, a native of Ashby, Mass., born Au- 



332 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gust 4, 179s, daughter of Stephen Wright, a 
native of Littleton. Mrs. Lucy W. Kellogg 
survived her husband many years, dying May 
25, 1882. Four children were born of their 
union, three of whom are now living. A 
brief record is as follows: Stephen Wright, 
born April 5, 1822, resides in Waterbury, 
Conn.; Ai, born February 15, 1824, lives on 
the old home farm; John, born January 6, 
1826, died April 25, 1865; and Sarah Pres- 
cott, born September 11, 1829, lives with her 
brother on the homestead. 

Stephen W. Kellogg received his early edu- 
cation in Shelburne, and after leaving school 
was engaged in teaching four terms, continu- 
ing at work on his father's farm during the 
summer seasons. When twenty years old, he 
entered Amherst College, where he studied 
two terms, going thence to Yale College, 
from which he was graduated in 1846, taking 
one of the first three honors of his class. He 
subsequently accepted for a short time the 
principalship of the Winchendon Academy, 
but soon entered the Yale Law School ; and, 
while prosecuting his studies there, he taught 
the classes in Greek in a classical school at 
New Haven. In June, 1848, he was admitted 
to the Connecticut bar, and has since been in 
active practice of his profession, residing 
most of the time in Waterbury. He was 
clerk of the Connecticut Senate in 185 1, of 
which he was a member two years later, repre- 
senting the Waterbury district, and in 1856 
was a member of the Connecticut House of 
Representatives, being chairman of the Judi- 
ciary Committee. In 1854 he was appointed 
Judge of the New Haven County Court, and 
for seven years was Judge of the Waterbury 
District Probate Court. Judge Kellogg was 
elected a member of Congress in 1869, and 
re-elected in 1871 and in 1873. While there 
he served on important committees — the Ju- 



diciary, Patents, Pacific Railroads — also 
being chairman of the Committee on Naval 
E.xpenditures in the Forty-second Congress, 
and chairman of the Committee of Civil Ser- 
vice Reform the following term. 

Since his retirement from Congressional 
life he has resumed the practice of law, and 
has been in the front rank of his profession. 
He drew up the bill, and was very active in 
procuring its passage, for organizing the 
National Guard to take the place of the State 
militia, and was appointed Colonel of the Sec- 
ond Regiment, Connecticut National Guard, in 
1864, and after two years' service was pro- 
moted to be Brigadier-general of the Guard, 
but resigned his position while in Congress. 
Stephen W. Kellogg married in 1851 Lucia 
Hosmer Andrews, grand-daughter of Chief 
Justice Hosmer, of Connecticut, and daughter 
of Major Andre Andrews, a lawyer of Buffalo, 
N.Y., who, with his wife, died of cholera 
during the scourge of 1833. Seven children 
have been born to them, and six are now liv- 
ing. The eldest son, Frank Kellogg, is a 
Lieutenant in the navy; and the other two are 
in their father's law office in Waterbury, 
Conn. John is married, and has one child. 
The three daughters are married, and have 
families. 

Ai Kellogg, who resides on the paternal 
homestead, carries on general farming in a 
systematic and successful manner. He has 
ninety acres of rich land, all under good cul- 
tivation and well improved. In May, 1862, 
he was united in marriage with Adaline 
Clark, of Barre, Mass., who died April 19, 
1864. The only child born of their union 
was a daughter, Emma Eliza, who lived but 
ten months. In politics Mr. Ai Kellogg is a 
stanch Republican. 

John Kellogg, third son of Jacob P., was 
graduated from West Point with honors in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



333 



1849, and afterward entered the Third United 
States Artillery as Second Lieutenant, and 
served his first campaign in the Indian Ter- 
ritory with great bravery. He was subse- 
quently stationed at Portland, Me., under 
General Anderson, going thence to Fort 
Snelling, Minn. From 1854 to 1861 he 
served on the frontier in Oregon and Wash- 
ington with great credit, being in command 
of a company a portion of the time, in the Ind- 
ian war of that section in 1857. In 1861 he 
was promoted to be captain in the commis- 
sary department, and after the battle of Bull 
Run he entered the volunteer service as Colo- 
nel of the Third California Regiment, so as 
to have a more active part ; but, contrary to 
his wishes, he was transferred to the commis- 
sary department again, and sent to San Fran- 
cisco. In 1864 he returned to Baltimore, and 
was placed on General Sheridan's staff as 
Chief Commissary, remaining with him 
through his campaigns of 1864 and 1865. 
Colonel Kellogg's duties were^:;vere, and he 
had many narrow escapes from capture and 
death. The work was too arduous; and he 
died from overwork and exhaustion in the final 
campaign ending in Lee's surrender at City 
Point, Va., April 25, 1865. 

Sarah P. Kellogg, the youngest member of 
the parental household, enjoyed in her girl- 
liood the superior educational advantages 
afforded by Mount Holyoke Seminary and a 
school in New Haven, and for a few terms 
after graduation was engaged in teaching. A 
woman of cultivated taste, gifted with literary 
talent, she is now living a quiet life with her 
brother in Shelburne, occasionally exercising 
her pen as an acceptable writer for the press. 
When quite young, Miss Kellogg began to 
express her thoughts in verse: and a volume 
of her productions, showing true poetic merit, 
was published in 1886. 




LVAN SANDERSON, one of the most 
highly respected citizens of the town 
of Ashfield, who is living retired 
from the active pursuits of life, was born in 
the house he now owns and occupies, Septem- 
ber 29, 1817. He is the son of Asa and 
Rebecca (Childs) Sanderson; and, tracing his 
line of ancestry back a few generations, we 
see that he is a lineal descendant of Joseph 
and Ruth (Parker) Sanderson. Joseph San- 
derson, who was born in Groton, Mass., 
August 30, 1714, settled in Canterbury, a 
district in Whately, in 1752, and there spent 
the remainder of his days, living until 1772. 
The following children were born into his 
household: Ruth, Esther, Isaac, Thomas, 
Abraham, David, John, Asa, Isaac, and 
James. The next in line of descent is the 
grandfather of our subject, Thomas Sander- 
son, who was born March 16, 1746. He was 
reared a farmer, and also learned the tanner's 
trade. He married Lucy Wright, and in 
1803 settled at Indian Hill, in Whately, 
being one of the pioneers of that district. 
Thomas Sanderson reared the following chil- 
dren : Martha, Mariam, Thomas, Asa, Alvan, 
Elijah, Lucy, Silas, Eli, and Chester. Asa, 
the fourth child in order of birth, was the 
father of our subject. His brother Alvan was 
the founder of Sanderson Academy, one of the 
finest schools of the kind in Massachusetts, 
which is noted for its superb schools. Alvan 
Sanderson was born in Whately, December 
13, 1780. A very ambitious student and 
eager to secure a good education, he worked 
his way through Williams College by teach- 
ing, and graduated from that institution in 
1802. He was popular and successful as an 
educator, and as a preacher of the gospel met 
with eminent success, winning the love of all 
during his eight years' pastorate in Ashfield. 
Always intensely interested in the education 



334 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the young, in 1816 he started a school in 
Ashfield, and later established the Sanderson 
Academy. He died before his work was fully 
accomplished, his brief life embracing but 
thirty-six years. 

Asa Sanderson, the father of our subject, 
was born February 8, 1779, in Whately, and 
there passed his earlier years. He learned 
the tanner's trade, and established himself in 
Conway, where he was very successful in his 
business. He eventually sold out, and later 
bought a tannery in Ashfield, which he con- 
ducted with profit for some years. This tan- 
nery was located on the site now occupied by 
F. A. Cady's barn. Mr. Sanderson's next 
investment was the purchase of the farm 
adjoining the tannery. This he cultivated 
until his demise in 1862. The house in 
which he lived in Ashfield he bought from 
Dr. Nash, who had it built in 1800. Asa 
Sanderson was a man of much intelligence 
and sound wisdom, and exerted a beneficial 
influence in the building up of his adopted 
town, giving material aid when it was 
needed ; and, though no office - seeker, he 
served acceptably in several public offices. 
In church matters, also, he was active, and 
for more than a score of years was Deacon of 
the Congregational church and treasurer of 
the same. His wife, the mother of our sub- 
ject-, whose maiden name was Rebecca Childs, 
lived to celebrate the eighty-second anniver- 
sary of her birth. She reared a family of 
seven children; namely, Louisa, Nancy, 
Lemuel C, Rebecca S., Asa W., Alvan, and 
Lucy W. 

Alvan Sanderson, the subject of this sketch, 
acquired his education in the academy founded 
by his uncle, Alvan Sanderson, which is still 
partly supported by his endowment. His life 
has been spent in the old home; and for many 
years prior to the death of his parents he 



tenderly cared for and watched over them, 
devoting himself to the interests of the farm. 
He has made many improvements on the prop- 
erty, remodelling the old house, and laying 
out a portion of the estate into village lots, 
for which there is always a ready demand, and 
has had the pleasure of seeing the land on 
which he spent so many days of hard labor in 
his earlier years occupied by beautiful resi- 
dences, surrounded by green lawns. Al- 
though not married, Mr. Sanderson has a 
pleasant home, and a host of friends value 
him for his many sterling qualities of heart 
and mind. He has ever been among the fore- 
most of the active citizens who are interested 
in promoting the welfare of the town and 
county, encouraging all enterprises tending to 
benefit the public. 




LIHU C. OSGOOD, a successful farmer 
of Greenfield, was born in the town of 
Wendell, Franklin County, Mass., 
November 7, 1823, son of Elihu and Ruth 
(King) Osgood. Mr. Osgood traces his pedi- 
gree back to one John Osgood, who was born 
in England, July 23, 1595, and settled in 
America with his family, dying in Andover, 
October 24, 1651. Elihu Osgood, the grand- 
father of our subject, who was born in 1762, 
and died August 27, 1834, was a hard-work- 
ing and progressive farmer. He was a promi- 
nent member of the Baptist church, and 
officiated as Deacon for many years. His 
wife, Polly Osgood, was born May 28, 1762, 
and died December 22, 1834. They had 
three sons and one daughter, all of whom 
raised families of their own, and have now 
passed from the scenes of earth. Their names 
were: Elihu, Sumner, Polly, and Warren. 

Elihu Osgood, the father of our subject, 
was a farmer, residing in the town of Wendell 




ROBERT AND ELIZABETH B. STRANGE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



337 



during the active period of his life, and fol- 
lowing his calling with great success. In 
politics he was first a Whig and later a 
Republican, and held at various times many 
town offices, such as Selectman, Town Treas- 
urer, etc. He, too, was an earnest member 
of the Baptist church. The declining years 
of his life were spent at the home of his son 
Elihu, where he died December i, 1875. 
His wife died November 14, 1874. They had 
five children, four of whom grew up, and two 
are now living, namely: Samuel M., who was 
born October 23, 1818, and now resides in 
East Milton, Mass., retired from active life; 
and Elihu C, the subject of this sketch. 
Mary, Sophia D., and Dolly have passed to 
the world beyond. 

Elihu C. Osgood spent the years of his 
boyhood in Wendell, receiving part of his 
education in the schools of that town, and 
afterward attended the New Salem Academy. 
When eighteen years of age, he began to 
teach school, but after three terms of teach- 
ing, he turned his attention to farming. 
The first land he purchased was in Wen- 
dell, and at one time he owned one hundred 
acres of Wendell property. Over twenty 
years of his life were spent in that town. In 
1853, having sold his Wendell property, he 
invested in the land that constitutes his pres- 
ent place in Greenfield; and he now has 
ninety acres in that town and one hundred 
and twenty in Bernardston. He carries on 
general farming to quite an extent, raising 
some small grain and tobacco, and also runs 
a dairy. By working early and late he has 
reaped a goodly reward, and is counted as one 
of Greenfield's successful farmers. 

On September 22, 1846, Mr. Osgood was 
united in marriage to Mary Stone, daughter 
of Eliab and Dolly (Armstrong) Stone, both 
natives of Franklin County. Mr. Stone was 



a hard-working farmer of Wendell. After 
bearing her husband company on life's voyage 
for nearly forty-six years, Mrs. Osgood died, 
January 26, 1892. They had three sons and 
four daughters, as follows: Abbie J., born 
November 17, 1847, died October i, 1850; 
Henry M., bora November 14, 1849, died 
July 13, 1890; Sophia S., now the wife of 
Mark BuUard, a farmer of Greenfield, was 
born October 27, 185 1; Emma J., born 
August 23, 1855, became the wife of Hollis 
E. Connable, and resides in Greenfield; John 
E., born February 12, 1859, is a manufact- 
urer, residing in Greenfield; Minnie K., born 
October 26, 1863, died April 11, 1877; 
Charles S., born September 12, 1869, is a 
farmer, residing with his father. 

In politics Mr. Osgood is a Republican. 
He has held different town offices, serving as 
Assessor in 1887 and 1888, and as Selectman 
four years consecutively, being elected the 
first time in 1888. In religious views he is 
liberal, but has always supported the Baptist 
church. He has a host of friends, and is 
highly, respected by the community at large. 



T^TJOBERT STRANGE, whose portrait, 
I ^V^ together with that of his wife, is pre- 
■L^ V^^ sented in this connection, is a 
prosperous farmer and highly respected citizen 
of Leyden, Mass., a veteran in the industrial 
ranks, one who early enlisted in the army of 
toilers, and has not fallen out by the way, 
having been neither a shirk nor a laggard, 
and who is fairly entitled to a place among 
the winners of life's battle. He was born in 
County Antrim, Ireland, February 28, 1829, 
son of Hugh and Catherine (Youngs) Strange. 
Both parents were natives of the northern part 
of Ireland, and, being of Scotch descent, be- 
longed to the class known as Scotch-Irish. 



338 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Hugh Strange followed the vocation of a 
mechanic in the old country, and was also 
successfully engaged in manufacturing. It 
was about the year 1859 that he and his wife 
came to America, and settled down to agri- 
cultural pursuits in Leyden. Of the children 
born to them three sons are still living: 
James Strange, who resides in the north of 
Ireland; Robert, of Leyden; and William 
Strange, of West Northfield, Mass. Both 
parents were members of the Scotch Presbyte- 
rian church. The father died in Leyden, at 
the age of sixty-six, and his wife in her 
seventy-second year. 

Robert Strange grew to manhood and was 
educated in Ireland, acquiring a good part of 
his learning after he left the day school, as he 
was of a studious disposition; and his even- 
ings were spent in study at home or at the 
night school. At ten years of age he began 
to learn the trade of linen weaver, and suc- 
cessfully followed this occupation the greater 
part of the time he lived in Ireland. Late in 
the summer of 1848 he set sail in the "Ara- 
bian," a three-masted sailing-vessel, under 
the captaincy of James Crangle; and a month 
later, on October 3, he landed in New York 
City. Thence he came to Leyden, Mass., 
where he was shortly engaged to work on a 
farm for Aaron Budington. He received for 
the first three months the sum of six dollars 
per month, and remained with Mr. Budington 
a year and a half. The succeeding three years 
he was employed in a similar capacity by 
other parties; and, being frugal as well as 
industrious, though his wages were so small, 
at the end of that time he was enabled to buy 
a small farm in Leyden, containing about 
twenty acres of land. After occupying that 
farm six years, he sold it, and purchased a 
part of the farm where he now resides, to 
which from time to time he has added land, 



so that he now owns in the neighborhood of 
four hundred and eighty acres. 

On March 17, 1849, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Elizabeth Black, who is like- 
wise a native of Ireland. Their union has 
been blessed by the birth of eight children, 
six of whom are now living, namely: Eliza- 
beth; Margaret W. ; Catherine H. ; Willie 
R., who spent four years in California; Frank 
J. and Fred H., who are twins — all of whom 
live at home with the exception of Elizabeth, 
the wife of Andrew Campbell, of Leyden, and 
Frank J., who is successfully engaged in the 
confectionery business at Springfield, Mass. 
The deceased are: Martha; and Anna M., 
who was a school-teacher. 

Robert Strange in political affiliation is a 
Republican, and is now serving as Highway 
Surveyor, which office he has held for several 
years. He was formerly a member of the 
School Board. He and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
they take an active interest, and which he has 
served as Steward and Trustee for many years, 
and for ten years has acted as class leader. 
He contributes freely toward the support of 
the church, and the neighbor or friend in need 
can also vouch for his liberality and Christian 
sympathy. 

"UGENE B. BLAKE, a dealer in wood 
and coal and agent for the Adams 
Express Company, is one of the 
thriving and able business men of Greenfield, 
and has been numbered among its esteemed 
residents for upward of thirty years. He was 
born in the town of Hill, Merrimack County, 
N.H., December 5, 1845, and is a son of 
Horatio K. Blake, a native of the same town, 
born in 18 10. The latter was a son of Green- 
leaf Blake, a respected member of the farming 
community of Merrimack County. 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



339 



Horatio Blake removed from his native 
town to South Royalton, Vt., where his last 
years were spent, his death occurring in 1864, 
soon after passing the milestone that marked 
his fifty-fourth year. He was twice married; 
and three children were born of his first 
union, two of them being twins. The follow- 
ing is recorded of them: Horatio C. is living 
at South Royalton, Vt. ; William Francis, 
who was a railroad man, died in the West, 
leaving a wife and daughter; and Henry S., 
also a railway employee, died in Minneapolis, 
Minn., where he left a family. Horatio 
Blake's second wife, the mother of our sub- 
ject, was Rebecca W. Berkley, a native of 
Franklin, N.H., daughter of Cyrus Berkley, 
a man of prominence in the town. She was 
born in 1816, and became Mrs. Blake in 1837. 
She is now residing at South Royalton, Vt., 
an active woman of nearly fourscore years. 
Eight sons and two daughters were born to 
her and her husband. The daughters and five 
of the sons are now living, as follows: Cyrus 
O., a manufacturer, resides at Bowling Green, 
Ky. ; Eugene B. is the subject of this sketch; 
Don W., a locomotive engineer, lives at St. 
Albans, Vt. ; Edric A., a telegrapher, is a 
resident of Roanoke, Va. ; Alice Belle is the 
wife of Charles Daggett, of South Royalton; 
Mattie G. is the wife of Frank Bradstreet, of 
the same place; Jed G. resides at Seattle, 
Wash. Edric died in infancy. Launcelot 
Kelley Blake was a soldier, doing gallant ser- 
vice during the late Civil War, serving as a 
Corporal, and was wounded in battle. He 
was subsequently killed April 24, 1866, on 
the Vermont Central Railway, on which he 
was a trainman. Charles G. Blake died in 
Rio Janeiro in 1875, leaving a wife, but no 
issue. He also served in the late war, enlist- 
ing in 1862 in the Thirty-fourth Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Infantry as a private, and 



coming out with the rank of Lieutenant and 
as Commander of his company. 

Eugene B. Blake attended school until 
sixteen years of age. Then, inspired by the 
patriotic zeal that caused five of his brothers 
to enlist in defence of their nation's flag, he 
volunteered his services, enlisting from Roy- 
alton in Company E, First Vermont Cavalry, 
and went out as a servant to his uncle, Samuel 
P. Rundlett. After a little more than a 
year's service he returned home — in the 
autumn of 1862 — and shortly after his arrival 
entered the telegraph office at Moore's Junc- 
tion, N.Y., where he remained about two 
years. In March, 1864, he obtained a posi- 
tion in Greenfield as operator and baggage 
master on the Connecticut River Railway, 
and for twenty-eight years was connected with 
the railway service, acting as ticket agent 
from 1869 until 1878, and then as freight 
agent of the Troy & Greenfield Railway, and 
depot master, until 1892. Mr. Blake then 
embarked in the coal and wood business, buy- 
ing out A. N. Hall. He now has a substan- 
tial and extensive trade, and in addition 
thereto has held the agency of the Adams 
Express Company for the past two years. 
Mr. Blake possesses excellent business capac- 
ity and tact, and has the confidence and 
respect of all his patrons. 

In 1869 he was united in marriage to Clara 
M. Haywood, who bore him three children, 
two of whom died in infancy. The other 
child, Mabel H. Blake, is a graduate of the 
Greenfield High School, and for a short time 
was engaged in teaching, but is now an assist- 
ant in her father's office. After a few years 
of pleasant wedded life, the mother died, in 
1879; and six years later Mr. Blake married 
Miss Elmina B. Mason, a daughter of Silas 
and Elmina (Ballou) Mason, and a grand- 
daughter of the Rev. Hosea Ballou, the noted 



340 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Universalist minister. One child was born 
of Mr. Blake's second union — Ralph M. — 
now a bright and active boy of five years. 
Mr. Blake is a man of influence and promi- 
nence in local matters, and has served as Se- 
lectman two years, having been elected on the 
Republican ticket. Socially, he is a Knight 
Templar and Past Master of the Republican 
Lodge. He and his wife are valued and con- 
scientious members of the Unitarian church. 




RMAN C. MARVELL, a prosperous 
farmer of North Leverett, was born 
at his present home, November 22, 
1856, son of Calvin Marvell, who was born at 
Shutesbury, Franklin County, Mass., Novem- 
ber 7, 1824. The grandfather, Jesse Marvell, 
was a native of the town of Rehoboth, Bristol 
County, Mass., and was a son of Pascal Mar- 
vell, whose birth occurred in an adjoining 
town. Pascal Marvell worked at both farm- 
ing and shoemaking. The latter part of his 
life was spent in Shutesbury, where he carried 
on a farm. Jesse Marvell, who was reared to 
agricultural pursuits, settled in Leverett in 
1834, and spent many years there, success- 
fully engaged in farming. He died at the 
age of seventy-four. He was prominent in 
public affairs at Shutesbury, and served as a 
Selectman for several years, both in Shutes- 
bury and in North Leverett. 

Calvin Marvell cared for his parents during 
their declining years, assisting in the man- 
agement of the farm, of which he eventually 
assumed charge, and now resides with his 
son, Orman C. Marvell, having retired from 
active labor. He is a Republican in politics, 
and has served the community faithfully as a 
Selectman and Overseer of the Poor. He was 
a charter member of Bay State Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., at Montague, and also of the Lever- 



ett Grange. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Lydia Glazier, was a daughter of Eben- 
ezer N. and Mary (Spaulding) Glazier, and a 
member of one of the first families to settle in 
the town. She died July 25, 1893, at the age 
of sixty-five. The following children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Marvell: Jane, widow 
of George Beals, who has one daughter — 
Lillian; Ella, who married Henry Fisk, and 
has two children — Lucy and Lora; Ida, who 
married Charles Moore, and has seven chil- 
dren, as follows — George C, Myra, Jesse, 
Millie, Rhoda, Flora, and Hazel; Lelia, wife 
of Sidney Williams, who has one child — 
Maud ; Flora (deceased), who was the wife of 
Orrin Grant, and left three children — Wes- 
ton, Leroy, and Mabelle, the former of whom 
married Hattie Dresser, and has one child, 
Flora Ida; Mary, died in infancy; and Orman 
C, our direct subject. 

Orman C. Marvell received a good educa- 
tion in the schools of his native town. He 
has passed his entire life upon the farm, 
which consists of about one hundred and fifty 
acres of fertile and well-cultivated land, and 
is engaged in general farming, which he car- 
ries on in a progressive and intelligent man- 
ner, being thoroughly conversant with all 
branches of agriculture. 

In 1877 Mr. Marvell was married to Miss 
Alice Church, daughter of Leonard and Jane 
(Barber) Church, of Buckland. Her parents 
were natives of Ashfield, Franklin County, 
Mass. ; and her paternal grandfather was born 
in Oakham, Worcester County, Mass. She is 
one of three children, the others being George 
B. and Lucy Church. Mrs. Marvell was 
educated at Ashfield, and taught nine years 
in that town and in Hawley, and two 
years in Leverett. One child has blessed 
the union of Mr. and Mrs. Marvell — a son, 
Ralph N. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



541 



In politics Mr. Marvell is a Republican. 
He takes an active part in the town govern- 
ment, and has been Selectman five years, and 
served several years as Road Commissioner. 
He is a member of Bay State Lodge of A. F. 
& A. M. at JVTontague, and of the grange of 
that town; and he and his wife belong to the 
Independent Order of Good Templars. Mrs. 
Marvell has been a member of the School 
Board for the past four years. The entire 
family attend the Baptist church. 




|RASTUS F. GUNN, a retired farmer, 
residing in Montague, was born at 
Miller's Falls, Franklin County, 
Mass., August 21, 1819, son of Otis and 
Lucy (Fisk) Gunn. His grandfather, Asahel 
Gunn, who was a native of Massachusetts, 
settled upon a farm in Montague subsequent 
to his marriage, which occurred when he was 
nineteen years of age, and resided there until 
his decease. He erected the hotel at Miller's 
Falls, known as the Lake Hotel, of which his 
son Otis was afterward proprietor. 

Otis Gunn, the father of our subject, was 
born on the farm in Montague. He took 
charge of the Lake Hotel after his marriage, 
and conducted it for twelve years, at the expi- 
ration of which time it was sold, and he 
returned to the old homestead. The latter 
property eventually passed into the hands of 
his son Erastus, who later disposed of it, and 
moved to his present farm, where his father 
died at the age of eighty-five years. Otis 
Gunn's wife, mother of Erastus F., was Lucy 
Fisk, of Wendell, in which town her father. 
Captain Zedekiah Fisk, was engaged in farm- 
ing. He served as an officer in the Revolu- 
tionary War, and was wont to tell of his 
terrible sufferings from the pangs of hunger 
and of being brought to the necessity of 



devouring a pair of boots, which he described 
as having been a welcome meal under the cir- 
cumstances. Mrs. Gunn became the mother 
of six children, four of whom, between the 
ages of eight and eighteen years, died within 
a few weeks. The survivors are Erastus F., 
the subject of this sketch, and Otis B., a civil 
engineer, who resides in Kansas City. The 
mother passed her declining years with her 
son Erastus, and died at the age of ninety- 
three. She was a member of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Erastus F. Gunn received a good education, 
attending the district schools, and finishing 
his studies at a select school and an academy. 
He subsequently taught in the district schools 
of this county for several terms. At the age 
of twenty-eight years he was married, and 
immediately assumed charge of his father's 
farm, on which he resided until 1872, when 
he sold the property, and moved to his present 
home, which he purchased of Dr. Bradford. 

In 1846 Mr. Gunn was united in marriage 
to Miss Nancy Bardwell, daughter of Moses 
Bardwell, a representative of an old family in 
this section. Mr. Bardwell formerly kept a 
hotel at Montague City, and later retired to a 
farm, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. His daughter, Mrs. Gunn, was one of 
three children. She became the mother of 
three, namely: Charles B., a conductor on the 
Rock Island Railroad, who married Addie C. 
Freeman, of Charleston, and had six children 
— Erie F., Ona May, Amy Lucy, Charles H., 
Allen, and Ernest George (deceased); Mary 
C, who married Charles O. Sawyer, formerly 
a school-teacher and now a commercial trav- 
eller, and has four children — William G., 
Leroy R., Vara H., and Alice Persis; and 
Alice P., wife of Frank O. Johnson, a grocer 
of Athol, Mass. In 1859 Mr. Gunn was 
called upon to mourn the loss of his faithful 



342 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and loving wife, who was called to rest at the 
age of forty-one years. 

Mr. Gunn was formerly a member of the 
famous Know Nothing party, and is now inde- 
pendent in politics. He has been promi- 
nently identified with the local government, 
having served as a Selectman and Overseer of 
the Poor several years, and also as Assessor 
and Collector for a considerable length of 
time. He was elected Representative for his 
district in 1862, and was for a period of six 
years Assistant Assessor of United States 
revenues. He has been a Trial Justice since 
1880, and was for thirty years a Justice of the 
Peace. Mr. Gunn is a member of the Con- 
gregational Society, with which his wife also 
was connected, and takes an active interest in 
all matters relative to the affairs of the church 
and its Sabbath-school. Although he is fast 
approaching fourscore, he is still mentally 
and physically active, and continues to main- 
tain a lively interest in all public affairs, 
being, in fact, a worthy representative of the 
old school of country gentlemen. Mr. Gunn 
feels a pride in the fact that he was one of 
those who each furnished a colored recruit for 
the army in 1864, willingly paying one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars, although not 
subject to draft at that time. 



tICHARD O'HARA, a leading mer- 
chant of Greenfield, dealing in boots, 
^^ shoes, stationery, and periodicals, 
was born in Ireland, May i, 1845, son of 
Richard and Mary (McKenna) O'Hara. 

His parents left the green sod of their 
native isle in 1847, fleeing from the famine of 
that terrible year to America, the paradise 
of the poor and the oppressed. Leaving little 
Richard with his grandfather McKenna, they 
started on their long voyage with an infant 



son, named John, who died on the journey, 
and was buried beneath the ocean's waters. 
The shock was too great for the poor mother, 
who, after they landed in Quebec, was pros- 
trated for several weeks ; and on her recovery 
the father was stricken with disease. They 
were poor in pocket, having had but one shil- 
ling of their united savings left when they 
stepped on American soil ; and their first year 
in this country was a sad struggle with pov- 
erty. In 1848 they located in Greenfield, 
where Mr. O'Hara secured employment with 
the John Russell Cutlery Company; and his 
wife worked at anything she could find to do. 
He remained an employee of the cutlery com- 
pany from 1852 until his death in 1871, being 
faithful and trustworthy in all of his duties. 
His wife preceded him to the better world, 
dying in 1858, and leaving seven children, of 
whom but three grew to adult life, namely: 
Stephen, who died in Greenfield, at the age 
of twenty-nine years; Mary; and Richard, 
the subject of this brief notice. 

Richard O'Hara came to this country with 
his mother's sister, Miss McKenna, when he 
was seven years old, and joined his parents in 
Greenfield. He attended the common school 
until eleven years of age, when he entered the 
service of the John Russell Cutlery Company, 
for whom he worked about five years. In 
August, 1862, being then a beardless youth 
of seventeen, he enlisted in Company A, 
Fifty-second Massachusetts Volunteer Infan- 
try, and about a year later re-enlisted, becom- 
ing a member of Company C, Sixty-fifth New 
York Volunteer Infantry, and served until the 
close of the war, being discharged as Cor- 
poral. He was seasick on the voyage to 
Baton Rouge, but after landing was never off 
duty, even if a little indisposed, being deter- 
mined to keep out of the hospital. He was 
not well for some time after his return home, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



343 



and invested a part of his savings in paying 
for a year's tuition at school and for the inci- 
dental expenses accruing. He subsequently 
entered the baby carriage factory of B. B. 
Noyes, for whom he worked some years, re- 
signing the position of superintendent of the 
factory to open his present store in Bank 
Row. He has been very successful from the 
start. Beginning in a modest way, his first 
remittance to one paper having been four dol- 
lars and a half per month, he has steadily 
increased his business, reaching sometimes as 
high as one hundred and eighty dollars in the 
same space of time. His shoe business has 
been well conducted, and also nets him hand- 
some profits. In 1867, just prior to his mar- 
riage, Mr. O'Hara bought land, and built a 
house in the south part of the town, his only 
move since that time being to his present 
home, which he erected in 1890. Here he 
has a valuable property, consisting of eight 
acres of choice land, and he also owns four 
tenement-houses at Turner's Falls. In 
the spring of 1895, concluding that he had 
paid rent long enough, he purchased the block 
in which his store is located.. Although not 
a man of wealth, Mr. O'Hara has a comfort- 
able property, and enjoys life in an unpreten- 
tious and sensible manner, one of his pleasures 
being a drive behind his speedy little brown 
mare. He is known as a man of stability, 
integrity, and honest purpose, and, though 
prospered in his undertakings, is as unassum- 
ing and unpretentious as in his early days, 
and may not infrequently be seen going the 
rounds with papers under his arm, as in the 
days of yore, taking the place of one of his 
carriers. 

June 23, 1867