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Full text of "History of Hudson County : genealogies of prominent families"

CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

LBRARIES 

riHACA, N. Y. 14853 



JOHN M. OLIN 
LIBRARY 



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Cornell University 
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The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924028828220 



HISTORY 



... OF ... 



HUDSON COUNTY 



GENEALOGIES 

... OF ... 

PROMINENT FAMILIES 
1917 




Compiled by ROBERT FELDRA. 



MICHEL & RANK 

PUBLISHERS 

Town of Union, New Jersey. 



Formation of Hudson County. 




LTHOUGH the smallest county in the state in area, Hudson 
County is the second largest in population in the State of New 
Jersey. It is bounded on the east by the Hudson River and 
New York Bay; on the west by Newark Bay and Passaic 
River ; on the north by Bergen County ; and on the south by the 
Kill van KuU, separating the county from Staten Island. It comprises 43.83 
square miles. The geological composition is trap rock with underlying 
sandstone. 

Hudson County was formerly a part of Bergen County, but was organ- 
ized into a separate municipality in 1840. Its original history is so closely 
interwoven with that of Manhattan Island, that one chronicle serves for both 
territories. All through the Dutch occupation it was part of New 
Amsterdam. ~' 

The County received its name from Hendrick Hudson, the discoverer of 
the Hudson River, but it is a source of deep regret that the only records of 
Northern New Jersey are so widely scattered — more so, perhaps, than those 
of any other section of the county. Thousands of grants, deeds, wills, and 
other documents relative to Hudson County, all of the greatest importance 
to the searcher for knowledge, were never recorded and never even deposited 
in any public record office, owing to the bitter controversy between the 
colonies of New York and New Jersey over the location of the boundary 
line between them, — a controversy which lasted more than a century from 
the time when the country began to be settled by Europeans. Then again, 
many of the only records of this section are peculiar and many are in a for- 
eign language. It would be necessary, in order to make a successful record 
of the early history of Northern New Jersey, to spend at least five years in a 
house to house hunt for the necessary data now hidden away in trunks and 
chests of the old pioneer families. This article has been prepared from 
available data which it has taken months of hard work to gather, but for the 
reasons above stated the matter it contains must necessarily be replete with 
errors and important omissions. However, it will be of some assistance to 
the thousands of descendants of those who settled the County of Hudson. 

The Village of Bergen. 

On September 5, 1661, the first municipality within the limits of New 
Jersey was established by order of Director General Stuyvesant and his 
Council. It was called the "Village of Bergen". There is some doubt 
about the origin of the name "Bergen". Some writers claim it to have been 
derived from "Bergen", the capital of Norway. Others assert it to have 
been derived from Bergen op Zoom, a town on the river Scheldt, in Holland, 
eighteen miles north of Antwerp. During the following seven years, new 
settlers located on lands outside the "village" limits. These, with a view to 
protect themselves from the savages, asked that they be annexed to the 
main settlement. Accordingly, Governor Philip Cartef et and his Council_ of 
East New Jersey granted to the settlers of North Bergen — then comprising 
some forty families — a charter under the corporate natpe of "The Towne 



and Corporation of North Bergen" This new "Towne comprised the 
present County of Hudson as far west as the Hackensack River. The hne on 
the north as described in the charter, started at "Mordavis Meadow , lying 
upon the west side of Hudson's River ; from thence to run upon a north- 
west lyne by a Three rail fence that is now standing to a place called Espatin 
(the hill), and from thence to a little creek (Bellman's Creek) surrounding 
N N W.'till it comes unto the river Hackensack, the Indian name of "Low- 
land", containing in breadth, from the top of the hill, one and a half miles or 
one hundred and twenty chains. Later new settlements sprang up north of 
Bergen. These were termed "Out Lands" or "Precincts" without any cor- 
porate power whatever and subject to the restrictions of the authorities of 
the "Towne". 

As the population increased, courts became necessary, and as all the 
colonial officials were Englishmen, and many English immigrants had settled 
in the colony, it was but natural that they should desire the adoption of the 
English system of County Government. On the seventh o.f March, 1682, 
the Provincial Legislature passed, and Deputy Governor Rudyard approved 
an act under which New Jersey was divided into four counties : Bergen, 
Essex, Middlesex, and Monmouth. Bergen County, as then defined, con- 
tained "all the settlements between Hudson's River and the Hackensack 
River, beginning at Constable's Hook and so to extend to the uppermost 
bounds of the Province, northward between the said rivers, with the seat 
of government at the Town of Bergen." Essex County comprised "all the 
settlements between the west side of the Hackensack River and the parting 
line between Woodbridge and Elisabethtown, and northward to the utmost 
bounds of the Province." By this division the greater part of the present 
County fell within the limits of Essex County, where it remained until 1710. 
This division into counties soon caused great dissatisfaction among the 
people. They complained that the counties were too large, that the distance 
between their homes and the county seat was too great, and that traveling 
such long distances over the worst of roads, interfered with their pursuits 
and subjected them to great expense and discomfort. Sheriffs found it dif- 
ficult to summon and compel the attendance of jurymen and witnesses. The 
administration of justice and the transaction of all other public business 
were seriously retarded. After the Assembly had stood out, for several 
years, against numerous complaints and petitions, it was finally obliged to 
yield, and on the second of January, 1710 (or 1709), an act was passed and 
approved directing a redivision. By the terms of this act, the boundaries of 
Bergen County were fixed as follows : 

"Beginning at Constable's Hook, so up along the Bay to Hudson's 
River, to the partition point between New Jersey and the Province of New 
York ; thence along the line and the line between East and West New Jersey 
to the Peguannock and Passaic Rivers; thence down to Peguannock and 
Passaic Rivers to the sound ; and so following the sound to Constable's Hook 
where it begins." 

In the northwestern part of the county, as above described, was in- 
cluded the County of Passaic, and on the 22nd of Februarv, 1840 all that 
part of it lying south of the original north bounds of the "Towne and Cor- 
poration of Bergen", together with a considerable area of territory west of 
the Hackensack River known as New Barbadoes Neck, were, by legislative 
enactment, erected into the County of Hudson. A part of this was annexed 
to Bergen County in 1852, being the boundaries of Bergen and Hudson 
Counties as they are to-day. 



Early Settlers of Hudson County. 

A large majority oi the first settlers in Hudson County were immigrants 
from Holland, or descendants of persons who had immigrated from that 
country and settled on Manhattan Island or Long Island. The rest were 
Germans, Scandinavians, English, and French. The principal causes which 
impelled them to leave their native lands, were overcrowding of population 
and the desire to. better their conditions. 

In the few years preceding 1621, several voyages of discovery and ad- 
venture had been made by the Dutch to New Netherland, but no colonies 
had been founded. Letters from these voyagers declared that New Nether- 
land was a veritable paradise — a land "flowing with milk and honey", tra- 
versed by numerous great and beautiful rivers, plentifully stocked with 
fish ; great valleys and plains, extensive forests, teeming with fruits, game, 
and wild animals ; and an exceedingly fertile and prolific soil. These and 
many similar letters aroused and stimulated many of the discontented and 
unemployed of Holland to emigrate to New Netherland with their families, 
in the hope of being able to earn a handsome livelihood. In 1621 the 
"States General", fully comprehending the gravity of the situation, took 
steps looking towards relief, and on June the third, a charter was granted 
to "The Dutch West India Company" to organize and govern a colony in 
New Netherland ; and in June 1623-4 an expedition under Captain Cornelius 
Jacobsen Mey, of Amsterdam, carrying thirty families, most of whom were 
religious refugees, came over to New Amsterdam and began a settlement on 
the lower end of Manhattan Island. Captain Mey, however, did not like his 
job of being director of the new colony, and soon returned to Holland, leav- 
ing William Verhulst in charge, who was succeeded by Peter Minuet in 
1626. The first colony was not a .success, as the colonists, aside from build- 
ing a few rude bark huts and a fort, busied themselves dickering with the 
savages for skins and furs, but tilled no ground, and for three years were 
non-supporting. 

On the 7th of June, 1629, the "States General" granted a title of "Free- 
doms and Exemptions" to all such private persons as would plant any 
colonies in any part of New Netherland — except the Island of Manhattan — 
granting to them the fee simple in any land they might be able to success- 
fully improve. Special privileges were granted to members of the West 
India Company, and whoever of its members should plant a colony of fifty 
persons, should be a feudal lord, or "Patroon", of a tract "sixteen miles in 
length, fronting on a navigable river, and reaching eight miles back. 

Up to this time only exploring parties bent on trade with the savages 
had traversed Hudson County. No one had ventured to "take up" lands 
here, until one Michael Pauw, then Burgomaster of Amsterdam, obtained 
from the Director General of New Netherland, under the title of "Freedoms 
and Exemptions", grants of two large tracts, one called "Hopogahn- 
Hackingh" (land of the tobacco pipe), now Hoboken, and all of Staten 
Island, and the other "Ahasimus" and "Aressich", including the whole neigh- 
borhood of "Paulus Hook" of Jersey City, to which Pauw gave the name of 
Pavonia. 

These grants bear date, respectively, of July 13th and November 22nd, 
1631. 

It was a wise selection on the part of Pauw, for the Indians used it as 
a vantage point from which to ship their peltries directly across the river to 
Fort Amsterdam. The territory was so desirable, in fact, that its acquisition 



gave rise to much jealousy. In December, 1633, Pauw was summoned to 
appear before the Assembly of the XIX and was finally forced to sell his 
property to the West India Company for 2600 florins.' Michael Paulesen, 
an ofificial of the company, was placed in charge as superintendent. It is 
said he built and occupied a hut at Paulus Hook early in 1633. If so, it was 
the first building of any kind erected in either P>ergen or Hudson County. 
Later in the same year the company built two more houses, one at Communi- 
paw, afterward purchased by Jan Evertse Bout, the other at Ahasimus (now 
Jersey City, east of the hill), afterward purchased by Cornelius \'an Vorst. 
Jan Evertse Bout succeeded Michael Paulesen as superintendent of the 
Pauw plantation, June 17, 1634, with headquarters at Communipaw, then the 
capital of Pavonia Colony. He was succeeded in June, 1636, by Cornelius 
Van Vorst, with headquarters at Ahasimus. 

In 1641 one Myndert Myndertse, of Amsterdam, bearing the title of 
"Van der Heer Nedderhorst", obtained a grant of all the country behind 
Achterkull (Newark Bay), and from thence north to Tappan, including part 
of what is now Bergen and Pludson Counties. With a number of soldiers, 
Myndertse occupied his purchase, established a camp, and proceeded to civil- 
ize the Indians by military methods. He soon abondoned this perilous un- 
dertaking and returned to Holland, forfeiting the title to this grant. Early 
in 1638, William Kieft became Director General of New Netherland, and on 
the first day of May following, granted to Abraham Isaacsen Planck (Ver- 
planck) a patent for Paulus Hook (now lower Jersey City). 

There were now two "plantations" at Bergen, those of Van Vorst and 
Planck. Part of these were later leased to and occupied by, Claes Jansen 
Van Pummerend, Dirck Straatmaker, Barent Jansen, Jan Cornelissen Buys, 
Jan Evertsen Carsten, Michael Jansen, Jacob Stofifelsen, Aert Teunsen Van 
Putten, Egbert Woutersen, Garret Dirckse Blauw and Cornelius Ariessen, 
Van Putten also leased a farm in Hoboken. 

The thriving settlement of Bergen was, however, soon imperiled by the 
acts of Governor Kieft, whose idea of government was based mainly upon 
the principle that the Governor should get all he could out of the governed. 
The savages, for the first time, began to show symptoms of open hostility. 
Captain Jan Petersen De Vries, a distinguished navigator, who was then en- 
gaged in the difficult task of trying to found a colony at Tappan, sought 
every means in his power to conciliate the Indians and to persuade Kieft that 
his treatment of them would result in bloodshed. 

The selfish Governor turned a deaf ear to all warnings and continued to 
goad the Indians by cruel treatment and harsh methods of taxation. In 
1643 an Indian— no doubt under stress of great provocation— shot and 
killed a member of the Van Vorst family. This first act of murder fur- 
nished a pretext for the whites and precipitated what is called "the Mas- 
sacre of Pavonia", on the night of February 25, 1643, when Kieft with 80 
soldiers fully armed, crossed the Hudson, landed at Communipaw 'attacked 
the Indians while they were asleep, and without regard to age or sex de- 
liberately and in the most horrible manner, butchered over a hundred of 
them. After this attack the tribe, at once took to the war path attacked the 
settlement, burned the buildings, murdered the settlers, Wiped the viUae-es 
out of existence, and laid waste the country round about. 

Only a few of the settlers escaped and fled across the river to New Am 
sterdam. Peace was not restored until August, 1645, when the remaininp- 
owners and tenants of farms returned to the site of the old village rebi 'h 
their homes and started anew. ' " 



Governor Kieft had, in the meantime, been driven from office and 
Petrus Stuyvesant was made Director General, July 28, 1646. Under his 
administration, the settlement grew rapidly and prospered. Between his 
arrival and the year 1669 the following named persons purchased and leased 
lands: Michael Pauw, Michael Paulesen, Jan Evertse Bout, Cornelius Van 
Vorst, Myndert Myndertsen Van der Heer Nedderhorst, Abraham Isaacsen, 
Planck (Verplanck), Claes Jansen Van Pummerend (Cooper), Dirk Straat- 
maker, Barent Jansen, Jan Cornelissen Buys, Jan Evertsen Carsten, Michael 
Jansen (Vreeland), Jacob Stofifelsen, Aert Teunisen Van Putten, Egbert 
Woutersen, Garret Dircksen Blann, CorneHus Ariesen, Jacob Jacobsen Roy, 
Francisca Van Angela (negro), Guillaem Corneliesen, Dirk Lycen, Claes 
Carsten Norman, Jacob Wallengen (Van Wintsch), James Luley, Lubbert 
Gerritsen, Gysbert Lubbertsen, John Garretsen Van Immen, Thomas Davi- 
son, Garret Crynnen, Casper Stimets, Peter Jansen, Hendrick Jans Van 
Schalckwyck, Nicholas Bayard, Nicholas Varlet, Herman Smeeman, Tiel- 
man Van Vleck, Douwe Harmansen (Tallman), Claes Jansen Backer, 
Egbert Steenhuysen, Harmen Edwards, John Vigne, Paulus Leendertsen, 
John Verbruggen, Balthazar Bayard, Samuel Edsall and Aerent Laurens. 

All these persons received their deeds or such titles as they had, from 
the Dutch, through the different Director Generals. 

The English captured New Netherland from the Dutch in 1664, and 
thereupon, Philip Carteret, by an appointment of the "Lords-Proprietors" of 
the Province of East New Jersey, became its first Governor. 

Besides confirming the titles of the settlers in Bergen in 1668, Carteret 
also granted other portions of land in Hudson County to the following 
persons : Maryn Adrianse, Peter Stuyvesant, Claes Petersen Cors, Peter 
Jansen Stett, Barent Christianse, Mark Noble, Samuel More, Adrian Post, 
Guert Carsten, Frederick Phillips, Thomas Frederick De Kuyper, Guert 
Geretsen (Van Wagenen), Peter Jacobsen, John Berry, Ide Cornelius Van 
Vorst, Hans Diedrick, Hendrick Van Ostum, and Cornelius Ruyven. 

"The Town and Corporation of Bergen", as appears by Carteret's 
charter, had an area of 11,500 acres. Up to the end of 1669, only one-third 
of this area had been patented to settlers. The balance, more than 8,000 
acres, was used in the common by the patentees, for nearly a century, be- 
fore it was finally divided and set off to those entitled to it. As is ever the 
case under similar circumstances, many of the patentees and their descend- 
ants and grantees encroached upon these common lands. This state of 
things caused great confusion and numerous violent disputes between the 
settlers, who in January, 1714, petitioned Governor Hunter for a new char- 
ter empowering them, in their corporate capacity, to convey or lease their 
common lands, in fee, for one, two or three lives, or for years. 

Governor Hunter in response to this petition procured a new charter 
for the town, known as "the Queen Anne Charter". The power given by 
this charter had little or no effect in stopping encroachments, and in 1643 
-another effort was made by the settlers to protect their rights in the common 
lands. An agreement was made, dated June the 16th, of that year, provid- 
ing for a survey of the common lands, and how much of same had been law- 
fully taken up, used or claimed, and by whom. However, this agreement 
was never carried out, and matters continued to grow worse until December 
7, 1763, when the settlers appealed to the Legislature for relief. That body 
passed a bill, which was approved by Governor Franklin, appointing commis- 
sioners to survey, map and divide the lands among the persons entitled there- 
to. These commissioners filed their reports and maps on the second day of 



March, 1765, copies of which reports and maps are filed in the offices of the 
Clerks of both Bergen and Hudson Counties 

In the divisions made by the commissioners the common lands were 
apportioned among the patentees hereinbefore named, and their descend- 
ants, as well as among the following named persons .Michael de Mott, 
George de Mott. Gerebrand Claesen, Joseph Waldron Dirk Van Vechten 
Tames Collerd, Thomas Brown, Andries Seagaerd, Dirk Cadmus, Zackariah 
Sickles Job Smith, Daniel Smith, Joseph Hankins, John Halmeaghs, Fhilip 
French' Ide Cornelius Sip, Herman Beeder, Nicholas Preyer, Sir Feter 
Warren, Anthony White, Michael Abraham Van Tuyl, Walter Clendenny, 
John Cummings, David Latourette, and John Van Dolsen. 

Several other families, namely those of Day, de Graun, de Groot, Hes- 
sels, Hopper, Banta, Huysman, Van Giesen, Earle, Franzen, Morris and 
Swaen, had become residents of the county without having lands granted 
them. It may therefore be safely said that the families above named con- 
stitute nearly all of the original settlers of Hudson County east of the 
Hackensack River. The westerly part of the county was included in the 
purchase by Captain William Sand ford from the Parish of St. Mary's in the 
Island of Barbadoes. Governor Carteret and Council granted this tract to 
Sandford July 4th, 1668. The southerly part of the tract is now East 
Newark, in Hudson County. 



Landowners and Settlers. 

For the information of the reader and those who may become interested 
in genealogical research, a list of the earliest and most prominent landowners 
and settlers of Bergen and Hudson Counties is hereto appended. 



SURNAME OF SETTLER LINEAGE 

ACKERMAN Dutch. 

ACKERSON Dutch. 

ADRIANSE Dutch. 

AERISON Dutch. 

ALLEN (1) Dutch. 

ALLEN (2) Flemish. 

ALYEA French. 

ANDERSON Scotch. 

ANTHONY Dutch. 

ARENTS Dutch. 

AURYANSE (1) Dutch. 

AURYANSE (2) Dutch. 

BACKER (1) Dutch. 

BACKER (2) EngHsh. 

BACKER (3) Dutch. 

BANTA Dutch. 

BARE.NTSEN Dutch. 

BASTIENSEN Dutch. 

BAYARD (1) French. 

BAYARD (2) French. 

BEDLOW Swedish. 

BEEDER Dutch. 

BEEM German . 

BELL (1) German. 



NAME AND DESCENT OF EUROPEAN ANCESTOR. 

. David Ackerman Berlikum, Holland 

.Johannes Tomassen Oostenvelt, Holland 

. Maryn Adrianse Veere, Holland 

.Cornelius Ariesen N. Brabant, Holland 

. Pieter Van Hallen Utrecht, Holland 

. Lorens Van Hallen Limbourg, Flanders 

. John Alyea Artois, France 

.John Anderson Inverness, Scotland 

. AUerd Anthony Amsterdam, Holland 

Johannes Arents Vanderbilt, Holland 

.Jan Auryanse New York, United States 

.Lambert Arianse Gelderland, Holland 

.Claes Jansen Backer Hertogenbosh, Holland 

. Richard Backer Barbadoes, West Indies 

. Jacobus Backer Amsterdam, Holland 

• Epke Jacobse Harlengen, Holland 

• Dirk Barents Amsterdam, Holland 

.Johannes Bastiansen Aernheim, Holland 

. Balthazar Bayard Daupheney, France 

■ Nicholas Bayard Alphen, France 

.Isaac Bedlow Stockholm, Sweden 

.Herman Beder Amsterdam, Holland 

• Anthony Beem Flammersvelt, Germany 

• Hermann Bell Darmstadt, Germany 



SURNAME OF SETTLER LINEAGK 

BELL (2) English. 

BExXSON Swedish. 

BERDAN Dutch. 

BERRY English. 

BERTHOLF Flemish. 

BILFIELD English. 

BLACKLEDGE ........ English. 

BLAGGE English. 

BLANCH English. 

BLAWVELT Dutch. 

BLAUW (1) Dutch. 

BLAUW (2) Dutch. 

BOARD English. 

BOGERT (1) Dutch. 

BOGERT (2) Dutch. 

BOGERT (3) Dutch. 

BOUT Dutch. 

BRAECKE Dutch. 

BRIGGS English. 

BRINKERHOFF Dutch. 

BROCKHOLST Dutch. 

BROSS Dutch. 

BROWER (1) Dutch. 

BROWER (2) Dutch. 

BROWER (3) Danish. 

BROWN English. 

BURGER ;. Dutch. 

BUSH Dutch. 

BUYS Dutch. 

CADMUS Dutch. 

CAMPBELL (1) English . 

CAMPBELL (2) Scotch. 

CAMPBELL (3) English. 

CAMPBELL (4) Irish. 

CARSTENS Norwegian. 

CHAMBERS Scotch. 

CARSBOON Dutch. 

CHRISTIANSE (1) .... Danish. 
CHRISTIANSE (2) .... Danish. 

CHRISTIE (1) Scotch. 

CHRISTIE (2) Dutch. 

CLAESEN Dutch. 

CLARK lirsh. 

CLENDENNY Scotch. 

COLE Dutch, 

COLLERD English,, 

COMMEGAR Dutch,, 

COOPER (1) Dutch,. 

COOPER (2) Danish.. 

CONKLIN (1) English.. 

CONKLIN (2) English,. 

CONOVER : Dutch,. 



NAME AND DESCENT OF EUROPEAN ANCESTOR. 

..William Bell New York, United States 

. . Dirck Bensingh Groningen, Holland 

. . Jan Baerdan Amsterdam, Holland 

. .John Berry Barbadoes, West Indies 

. . Guillian Bertholf Sluys, Flanders 

. .John Bilfield Enfield, England 

. . Philip Blackleach London, England 

. . Benjamin Blagge London, England 

. . Richard Blanch Bristol, England 

. . Garret Hendericksen Deventer, Holland 

. . Gerret Dirck Blauw Drenthe, Holland 

. . Herman Jansen Blauw .... Gronengen, Holland 

. . Cornelius Board London, England 

. . Cornelius Jansen Schoendewoert, Holland 

..John Lou we Schoendewoert, Holland 

..Tunis Gysbertsen Heykoop, Holland 

..Jan Evertsen Bout Barnevelt, Holland 

..Dirk Claesen Braecke Amsterdam, Holland 

. . Walter Briggs Providence, Rhode Island 

. . Joris Dircksen Drenthe, Holland 

. . Anthony Brockholst Amsterdam, Holland 

. . Hendrick Brass Albany, New York 

. . Peter Clementsen Hoorn, Holland 

. . Adam Brower Cologne, France 

..Jacob Eldertsan Brower. .. .Holstein, Denmark 

. . Thomas Brown London, England 

. . Burger Joris Hersburg, Silesia 

. . Hendrick Bosh Leyden, Holland 

. .Jan Cornelisen Buys Beest, Holland 

. . Dirck Fredricksen Friesland, Holland 

. . Alexander Campbell North Britain, England 

..James Campbell Aberdeen, Scotland 

..William Campbell Isle of Man, England 

. . William Campbell Ireland 

. . Clates Carstiaens Sant, Norway 

. . John Chambers New York, United States 

..Jan Elbertsen Carsboon . . . . Gelderland, Holland 

. .Christiaen Pietersen Holstein, Denmark 

. . Barent Christianse Holstein, Denmark 

.James Christyn Edinburgh, Scotland 

.John Christianse Amsterdam, Holland 

. Gerbrand Claesen Hoorn, Holland 

. Robert Clark Caven Co., Ireland 

. Walter Clendenny Scotland 

.Barent Jacobsen Kool Amsterdam, Holland 

.Jacobus Collerd London, England 

.Hendrick Jans Commegar.. Amsterdam, Holland 

. Claes Jansen Purmerend, Holland 

.Tennis Fredericks Oldenburg, Denmark 

. Mattys Conkelin Philipsburg, New York 

.John Conklyne Nothinghamshire, England 

.Jacob Wolfortsen Amsterdam, Holland 



SURNAME OF SETTLER LINEAGE 

CORBETT English.. 

CORNELISEN Swedish.. 

CORNELL French.. 

CORS Dutch.. 

CORTELYOU French . . 

. COX German . . 

CUMMINGS Enghsh . . 

DANIELSON Dutch . . 

DAVIDSOX Dutch.. 

DAVISON English.. 

DAVISOX (2) Irish.. 

DAY (1) Dutch.. 

DAY (2) English.. 

DeBAUN Flemish.. 

DEBOW ...■ Dutch.. 

De CLARK Dutch.. 

De GRAW Dutch.. 

De GROOT (1) Dutch.. 

De GROOT (2) Dutch,. 

De GROOT (3) Dutch.. 

De HART Dutch . . 

De KAY Dutch.. 

De KLYN Dutch.. 

De KUYPER Danish. . 

DELAMATER French.. 

De La MONTAGNE .... French. . 

DEMAREST French.. 

DEMEYR German.. 

De MONT German. . 

De MOTT Dutch . . 

De REIMER French.. 

De RONDE Dutch.. 

De VOE (1) French.. 

De VOE (2) French.. 

De VRIES (1) Dutch.. 

De VRIES (2) Dutch.. 

De VRIES (3) French.. 

De WITT Dutch.. 

DIEDRICKS Dutch.. 

DOREMUS Dutch.. 

DOUGLAS Scotch.. 

DOW Dutch.. 

DOUW I Dutch.. 

DUNCAN English.. 

DURIE .. French.. 

EARLE English.. 

ECKERSON Dutch . . ■ 

EDSALL English.. 

EDWARDS Welsh . . 

ELBERTSEX Dutch . . 

ELY English . . 

EVERTSEN Dutch . . 



NAME AND DESCENT OF EUROPEAN ANCESTOR. 

.John Corbett London, England 

. Cornelius Mattys Stockholm, Sweden 

. William Cornelise Kalbrist, France 

.Claes Petersen Cors Amsterdam, Holland 

. Jacques Cortelyou Utrecht, Holland 

.Michael Co.x Hanover, Germany 

. John C. Cummings Scotland 

.James & Jacob Danielsen, Amsterdam, Holland 

.John Davidsen Liveden, Holland 

.Thomas Davison London, England 

. William Davison Dublin, Ireland 

. Tunis Dey Amsterdam, Holland 

.William Dey New York, United States 

.Joost de Baen Amsterdam, Holland 

. Hendrick De Boog Amsterdam, Holland 

. Daniel De Clerq Amsterdam, Holland 

.Albert Leendertsen Amsterdam, Holland 

. Dirk Jansen de Groot Rylevelt, Holland 

.Staats Janse de Groot Tricht, Holland 

.Wm. Petersen de Groot Harlem, Holland 

. Balthazar de Haert Utrecht, Holland 

.Theunes de Kay Amsterdam, Holland 

. Hugh Barents de Klyn Buren, Holland 

.Thomas Fred, de Kuyper, Oldenburg, Denmark 

.Claude le la Maister Riechburg, France 

.Jean de la Montagne Saintong, France 

. David des Marets Beauchamp, France 

. Nicholas de Meyr Hamburg, Germany 

. Frederick Tremont Darmstadt, Germany 

. Mattys de Mott Kingston, New York 

. Petrus de Reimer Amsterdam, Holland 

.Jacob de Ronde. .. .Cortland Manor, New York 

. Frederick de Voe Rochelle, France 

.Nicholse de Voe Walslandt, France 

.Jan Jacobs de Vries Vries, Holland 

. Jan Garretsen de Vries Workum, Holland 

.Jan Petersen de Vries Amsterdam, Holland 

.Dirk Claesen de Witt Zunderland, Holland 

.Hans Diedricks Isleven, Holland 

.Johannes Doremus Middleburgh, Holland 

. William Douglas Leith, Scotland 

. Douwe Jans Harlengen, Holland 

. Volkert Jansen Lenwarden, Holland 

. George Duncan Bristol, England 

.Jan Durje Mannheim, Germany 

. Edward Earle, Jr Maryland, United States 

. Jan Tomassen Oostenvelt, Holland 

. Samuel Edsall Reading, England 

. Harman Edwards . . New York City, New York 

. Elbert Elbertsen Nieukerk, Holland 

. Nathaniel Ely Hartford, Connecticut 

.Jan E\erts Bout Barnevelt, Holland 



10 



SURNAME OF SETTLER LINEAGE 

FELL French. 

FELTER German. 

FERDON French. 

FEURST Flemish. 

FLIERBOOM Dutch-. 

FRANCE Dutch. 

FREDERICKSEN Dutch. 

FRENCH EngHsh. 

FOUNTAIN French. 

GARRABRANTS Dutch. 

GARRISON Dutch. 

GARRETSON (1) Dutch. 

GARRETSON (2) Dutch. 

GILBERTS Dutch. 

GISNER ., German. 

GROOME English. 

GUEST Dutch. 

HALMAGHS Dutch. 

HARDING Swiss. 

HARING Dutch. 

HARRIS .■ English. 

HART English. 

HAWKINS English. 

HELMS Dutch. 

HENNION Dutch. 

HERTIE Swiss. 

HESSELS Dutch. 

HOLDRUM Dutch. 

HOOGLAND (1) Dutch. 

HOOGLAND (2) Dutch, 

HOPPER Dutch. 

HOUSMAN Dutch. 

HUYLER Dutch. 

JACOBS Dutch. 

JACOBUS Dutch. 

JANSEN (1) Norwegian. 

JANSEN (2) French. 

JANSEN (3) Swedish. 

JAY French . 

JEROLEMON Dutch. 

JOOSTEN Dutch. 

JURIANCE Dutch. 

KIERSTED German. 

KINGSLAND English. 

KIPP Dutch. 

KUYPER Dutch. 

LAMATER French. 

LAROE French. 

LAURENCE (1) English. 

LAURENCE (2) Dutch, 

LAURENCE (3) Danish. 

LAURENCE (4) Danish. 



NAME AND DESCENT OF EUROPEAN ANCESTOR. 

. Symon Fell Dieppe, F'rance 

. William Velta Hamburg, Germany 

. Thomas Verdon Amsterdam, Holland 

.Bartholmew Feurst Bruges, Flanders 

. Mattys Flierboom Albany, New York 

. Frans Jacobsen Beest, Holland 

.Dirk Fredericksen Friesland, Holland 

. Phillip French London, England 

. Charel Fontayn Brooklyn, Long Island 

. Gerebrand Claeseu Hoorn, Holland 

. Gerret Gerretsen Wageningen, Holland 

. Gerret Gerretsen Wageningen, Holland 

. Wouter Garretsen Workum, Holland 

. Gysbert Lubberts Hilversam, Holland 

.Hendrick Geisener. .. .Westchester, New York 

.Samuel Groome Stepney, London, England 

. John Guest Pennsylvania, United States 

. Peter Roloef sen Utrecht, Holland 

.Hans Jacobsen Harding Berne, Switzerland 

. Jan Pietersen Hoorn, Holland 

. Ezekiel Harris .... New England, United States 

. Thomas Hart Enfield, England 

. Richard Hawkins London, England 

.Hendrick Teunis Hellinck Leyden, Holland 

.Nath'l Pietersen Henyon New York, U. S. 

. Hans Jacob Hertie Berne, Switzerland 

. Peter Hessels New Utrecht, Long Island 

.William Hoklrum Amsterdam, Holland 

. Dirk Jansen Maarsendeen, Holland 

.Cornehus Adriance Amsterdam, Holland 

. Andries Hoppe Amsterdam, Holland 

.Guert Cornelius Huysman, Amsterdam, Holland 
.Capt. John Huyler. . . .New York, United States 

. Peter Jacobs Beest, Holland 

. Roloff Jacobus Amsterdam, Holland 

. Peter and Roloff Jansen Sant, Norway 

. Mattice Jansen Cologne, France 

. Barent Jansen Stockholm, Sweden 

. Peter Jay London, England 

.John Hans Jerolemon Albany, New York 

. Rutgert Joosten Amsterdam, Holland 

, Andries Juriance . . . Bergen op Zoom, Holland 

. Kier Wolters Magdeburg, Germany 

.Nath'l & Isaac Kingsland, Barbadoes, West Ind. 

. Hendrick de Kype Amsterdam, Holland 

. Claes Jensen Purmerend, Holland 

.Claude de Lamaister Riechbourg, France 

. Jaques Laroe France 

.William Laurence St. Albans, England 

. Arent Laurens Ysselstein, Holland 

. Serven Lorens Holstein, Denmark 

. Laurens Andriesen Holstein, Denmark 



11 



SURNAME OK SETTLER LTNEaGE 

LEENDERTS Dutch. 

LOCKHART English. 

LOOTS English. 

LOZIER French. 

LUBY Dutch. 

LUDLOW English. 

LYDECKER Dutch. 

LYN German . 

MABIE Dutch. 

MACLEAN Scotch. 

MANDEVILLE Dutch. 

MARINUS Flemish. 

MARTIN English. 

MERSELIS Dutch., 

MATTYS Swedish. 

MEET (1) English. 

MEET (2) Dutch., 

MELLINOT Italian.. 

MERRITT English.. 

MEYER (1) German.. 

MEYER (2) German.. 

MEYER (3) German.. 

MILBURN English.. 

MOORE (1) English.. 

MOORE (2) EngHsh.. 

MORGAN Welsh.. 

MORRIS (1) English.. 

MORRIS (2) English.. 

MORRIS (3) English.. 

MORRIS (4) English.. 

NAUGLE Dutch.. 

NEWKIRK Dutch.. 

NOBLE English.. 

ONDERDONK Dutch.. 

OUTWATER Dutch.. 

PARCELLS French.. 

PAUW Dutch.. 

PEACK English.. 

PERRY French.. 

PETERSEN (1) Dutch.. 

PETERSEN (2) Dutch.. 

PHILLIPS Dutch.. 

PINHORNE English.. 

PLANCK Dutch., 

POST (1) Dutch.. 

POST (2) Dutch.. 

POWLESS Dutch.. 

POWLESSEN Dutch.. 

POWLESSEN (2) Dutch 

PRIOR Dutch 

PROVOST Dutch.. 

PULI S German . . 



NAME AND DESCENT OF EUROPEAN ANCESTOR. 

. . Paulus Leenderts Amsterdam, Holland 

. . George Lockhart London, England 

. . John Loots Norwich, England 

. . Francois Luseur Colmenil, France 

..Jacob Luby . . .' Amsterdam, Holland 

. . Gabriel Ludlow London, England 

. . Ryck & Gerrit Lydecker . . Amsterdam, Holland 
..Conrad & Abraham Lyn. .Darmstadt, Germany 

. .Casparus Meebje Amsterdam, Holland 

Charles Maclean Leith, Scotland 

..Gillis Jansen de Mandeville, Garderen, Holland 
. . Cornelius Jansen Marinus . . Oostberg, Flanders 

..James Martin New York, United States 

. . Peter Merselles Beest, Holland 

. . Cornelius Mattice Stockholm, Sweden 

. . Adam Meet, Essex, England 

. . Pieter Jans Meet Amersf ort, Holland 

. . Michael Mellinot Savoy, Italy 

. . William Merritt London, England 

. . Adolph Meyer Ulsen, Germany 

..Nicholas Meyer Hamburg, Germany 

. . Harmanus Meyer Bremen, Germany 

. . Jacob Milburn London, England 

. . Francis Moore Boston, Massachusetts 

. . Samuel Moore Barbadoes, West Indies 

. . Carl Morgan Hamburg, Germany 

. . Robert Morris Liverpool, England 

. . Richard Morris London, England 

. . Anthony Morris London, England 

. . Jury Maris '. 

. . Barnt Naugle Groningen, Holland 

. .Gerbrand Claesen Amsterdam, Holland 

. . Mark Noble New England, United States 

. . Adrian Vanderdonk Breda, Holland 

, .Frans Jacob Cutwater Oudewater, Holland 

. Thomas Parcells Huntington, England 

. Michael Pauw Amsterdam, Holland 

.Johannes Peack Amsterdam, Holland 

.Jan Perie Pont-le-f eekes, France 

. Gerret Petersen Friesland, Holland 

. Peter Rolof sen Utrecht, Holland 

. Frederick Phillipse Bolswaert, Holland 

. William Pinhorne London, England 

.Abram Isaacsen Planck Amsterdam, Holland 

.Jan Jansen Postmail Harlingen, Holland 

.Capt. Adrian Post Harlingen, Holland 

• Powles Pietersen Merven, Holland 

■ Powles Pietersen Merven, Holland 

.Michael Powles Veendoren, Holland 

. Casparus Cornelissen Amsterdam, Holland 

.David Provost Connecticut, United States 

. John Pulisf elt Darmstadt, Germany 



12 



SURNAME OF SETTLER LINEAGE 

QUACKENBUSH Dutch. 

QUIDORE French. 

RAMSAY English. 

REYSERICK Dutch. 

RIKER Dutch. 

ROMAINE Dutch. 

ROY Dutch. 

RUTAN Dutch. 

RYERSEN Dutch. 

RUYVEN Dutch. 

SANDFORD English . 

SAUNIER French. 

SCHOONMAKER German. 

SCHUYLER Dutch. 

"SEGER Swedish. 

SCHOENMAKER Dutch. 

SHUART German. 

SICKLES Austrian. 

SIP Dutch. 

SIMMONS English. 

SI VERT German . 

SLINGERLAND Dutch. 

SLOTE Danish. 

SMEEMAN Dutch. 

SMITH (1) Irish. 

SMITH (2) English. 

SMITH (3) English. 

SMITH (4) Dutch. 

SMOCK , Dutch. 

SNEDEN Dutch. 

SNYDER German . 

SOMERINDYKE Dutch. 

SONMANS Scotch. 

SPIER German. 

STAGG Dutch. 

STEENHUYSEN Dutch. 

STEVENSEN Dutch. 

STEWART Scotch. 

STILLWELL (1) Dutch. 

STILLWELL (2) English . 

STIMETS Dutch. 

STOFFELSEN Dutch. 

STOOTHOFF Dutch. 

STORMS Dutch., 

STRAATMAKER German.. 

STRAUT German.. 

STUYVESANT Dutch.. 

SUFFERN Irish.. 

SWAEN Swedish.. 

SYCAN Danish.. 

TALLMAN Dutch.. 



NAME AND DESCENT OF EUROPEAN ANCESTOR. 

. . Petrus Quackenbos Oostergeest, Holland 

. . Petrus Quidore Havre, France 

. .' Samuel Ramsay Scotland 

. .Reynier Reyserick Amsterdam, Holland 

. . Abram Reyken Amsterdam, Holland 

. .Claes Jansen Romeyn Amsterdam, Holland 

..Jacob Jacobsen Roy Amsterdam, Holland 

. . Daniel Rutan Esopus, New York 

..Adrian & Martin Ryerson .. Amsterdam, Holland 

. . Cornelius Ruyven Ruyven, Holland 

..William Sandford, St. Marys, Barbadoes, W. I. 

. . Paul Saunier Normandy, France 

. . Cornelius Jans Schoomaker, Hamburg, Germany 
. . David Pietersen & Philip Petersen, Amsterdam, 

Holland 

. . Andries Seagard New Albany, New York 

..Jan Cornelius Crynnen Aernheim, Holland 

. . James Shureg Darmstadt, Germany 

. . Zacharias Sickels Vienna, Austria 

..Jan Adrianse Syp Amsterdam, Holland 

. . George Simmons Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

. .Adolph Sivert Pruynes, Germany 

..Albert Slingerland Albany, New York 

..Jan Pietersen Slott Holstein, Denmark 

. . Herman Smeeman The Marsh, Holland 

. . Morgan Smith Co. Cavan, Ireland" 

. .Matthew Smith London, England 

. . Michael and John Smith London, Bingland 

..Lambert Arianse Gelderland, Holland 

. . Hendrick Mattice Smock . . . Friesland, Holland 

..Johannes Sneden Amsterdam, Holland 

, . Abram Snyder Germany 

. .Necaseus de Stille Aernheim, Holland 

. Pieter Sonmans Wallingford, Scotland 

. Dirck Jansen Spier Bremen, Germany 

.John and William Stagg. .Amsterdam, Holland 

.Egbert Steenhusen Soest, Holland 

. Oloff Stevensen Holland 

.John Stewart Stirling, Scotland 

.Alex Stillwell Dunkirk, Holland 

. Nicholas Stilwell .... Staten Island, New York 

. Caspar Stimets Zeeland, Holland 

.Jacob Stoffelsen Zirrickzee, Holland 

. Elbert Elbertsen Newkerk, Holland 

. Dirk Storms Utrecht, Holland 

. Dirk Straatmaker Bremen, Germany 

. Dirk Straatmaker Bremen, Germany 

. Petrus Stuyvesant Friesland, Holland 

.John Suffern Antrim Co., Ireland 

. John Swaen Stockholm, Sweden 

. Dirk Sycan Holstein, Denmark 

, Douwe Harmensen Friesland, Holland 



13 



SURNAME OF SETTLER LINEAGE 

TER BOSH German. 

TERHUNE French. 

TIBOUT French . 

TISE Dutch. 

TITSORT Dutch. 

VANDELINDA Flemish. 

VANDERBEEK German . 

VANDERHOFF Dutch . 

VANDERPOOL Dutch . 

VARLET French. 

VARRICK Dutch. 

VAN ALLEN (1) Flemish. 

VAN ALLEN (2) .' Dutch. 

VAN BLARCOM Dutch. 

VAN BUSKIRK Danish. 

VAN BUSSUM Dutch. 

VAN CAMPEN Dutch. 

VAN CORTLANDT Dutch . 

VAN DAM Dutch. 

VAN DINE (1) Dutch. 

VAN DINE (2) Dutch. 

VAN DOLSEN (1) Dutch. 

VAN DOLSEN (2) Dutch . 

VAN DUSER Dutch. 

VAN DYKE Dutch. 

VAN EMBURG Dutch . 

VAN ETTEN Flemish . 

VAN GELDER Dutch . 

VAN GIESEN Dutch . 

VAN HORN Dutch. 

VAN HOUTEN Dutch . 

VAN IMMEN Dutch. 

VAN NESS Dutch. 

VAN NOSTRAND Dutch . 

VAN ORDEN (1) Dutch . 

VAN ORDEN (2) Dutch. . 

VAN OSTUM Dutch., 

VAN PUTTEN Dutch. 

VAN REIPEN Danish.. 

VAN SALLE Dutch . . 

VAN SAUN Dutch.. 

VAN SCHALCKWYCK. . . Dutch . . 

VAN SCIVER Dutch.. 

VAN TUYL Dutch . . 

VAN VALEN Dutch. . 

VAN VECHTEN Dutch . . 

VAN VLECK German.. 

VAN VOORHIS Dutch. . 



NAME AND DESCENT OF EUROPEAN ANCESTOR. 

, .John Terbosh Delmenhorst, Westphalia 

..Albert Albertsen Terhune Hunen, Holland 

..Michael Jan Tibout Bruges, France 

Dirk Tysen Gelderland, Holland 

.John Titsort Amsterdam, Holland 

.Joost Vanderlynden Belle, Flanders 

. Paulus Vanderbeek Hamburgh, Germany 

. Cornelius Vandehoff Gelderland, .Holland 

.Myndert Gerritsen Amsterdam, Holland 

. Nicholas Varlet Am-sterdam, Holland 

.Rudolphus Van Varrick .. Gelderland, Holland 

. Lorens Van Halen Limbourgh, Flanders 

. Petrus Van Halen Utrecht, Holland 

.Johannus Van Blarcom Blarcom, Holland 

. Lourens Andriesen Holstein, Denmark 

. Cornelius & Gerret Van Borsen, Emden, Holland 

. Garret Jansen Campen, Holland 

.Oloff Stevens Van Cortlandt, Wyck te Dunner- 

stede, Holland 

. Rip Van Dam Albany, New York 

.Gerret Cornelisse Van Dyne, Niewkirk, Holland 

, Dirk Garretsen Tricht, Holland 

.Jan Garretsen Vries Workum, Holland 

. Dirk Jan Van Dolsen Haarlem, Holland 

. Abram Pietersen Dursen, Holland 

.Jan Tomasse Van Dyke. . . .Amsterdam, Holland 
.Gysbert Gysberts Van Imbrooch .. Amsterdam, 

Holland 
.Jacob Jansen Van Etten .... Brabant, Flanders 
.Jacobus Evertse Van Gelder, Gelderland, Holland 

. Reynier Bastianse Giesen, Holland 

. Claes Jansen Hoorn, Holland 

. Peter Roelf sen Utrecht, Holland 

.Dirk Garretsen Van Immin. Bextel, Holland 

.Hendrick Garretsen Van Ness,.... Amberlandt, 

Holland 

. Hans Hansen Zeeland, Holland 

. Claes Jansen Naerden, Holland 

. Dirk Jansen Naerden, Holland 

. Hendrick Van Ostum Amsterdam, Holland 

. Aerent Teunesen Putten, Holland 

.Juriaen Tomassen Reipen, Denmark 

. Anthony Franzen Saale, Holland 

. Jacob Van Saun Zauwen, Holland 

. Henry Jans Van Schalckwyck .... Schalckwyck, 

Holland 

. Petrus Van Schuyven Schuyven, Holland 

.Michael Abrams Van Tuyl.' Tuyl, Holland 

.Johannes Vervielle Amsterdam, Holland 

. Tunis Dircksen Van Vechten .... Noeg, Holland 

.Tielman Van Vleck Bremen, Germany 

.Coert Albertsen Voorhuysen, Holland 



14 



SURNAME OF SETTLER LINEAGE 

VAN VORST Dutch. 

VAN WAGENEN Dutch. 

VAN WART (1) Dutch. 

VAN WART (2) Dutch. 

VAN WINKLE Dutch. 

VEDDER Dutch. 

VERBRUGGEN Dutch. 

VERBYCK Dutch. 

VERWAY Dutch. 

VINGE Flemish. 

VREELAND Flemish. 

WALDRON Dutch. 

WANNAMAKER German. 

WARREN English. 

WESTERVELT Dutch. 

WHITE English. 

WILSON Scotch. 

WINANS Dutch. 

WINNE Flemish. 

WORTENDYKE Dutch. 

WOUTERSON Dutch. 

YEREANSE Dutch. 

ZABRISKIE Polish. 



NAME AND DESCENT OF EUROPEAN ANCESTOR. 

. . Cornelius Van Vorst Gelderland, Holland 

. . Guert Gerretsen Wageningen, Holland 

. . Mattice Van Waert Utrecht, Holland 

..Tuis Jacobsen Van Woert Schoendewoert, 

Holland 
. .Walling, Jacob and Simon Jacobsen, Middleburg, 

Holland 
. . Harman Albertsen Vedder . . Gronengen, Holland 

. .John Verbruggen Amsterdam, Holland 

..Jensen Verbryck Isveren, Holland 

..Cornelius Verway ...Amsterdam, Holland 

. . John Vinge Bruges, Flanders 

. . Michael Jansen Brockhuysen, Flanders 

. . Resolved Waldron Amsterdam, Holland 

. . Peter Wannamaker Darmstadt, Germany 

. . Peter Warren London, England 

..Lubbert Lubbertsen Meppel, Holland 

. .Anthony White Boston, Massachusetts 

. . Peter Wilsey Leith, Scotland 

..Cornelius Wynhard Gronengen, Holland 

. . Peter Winne Ghent, Flanders 

. . Nicaseus de Stille Aernheim, Holland 

. . Egbert Wouterson Ysselstine, Holland 

. . Andries Jurianse .... Bergen op Zoom, Holland 
. . Albrecht Sobeiski Zolkieu, Poland 



Introduction of Township Governments. 

The first division of the counties into townships was made pursuant to 
two acts of the Colonial Assembly, one approved in September, 1692, and 
the other in October, 1693. The reasons for this division were set forth in 
the preamble to the second of the above mentioned acts, as follows : 

"Whereas, several things is to be done by the inhabitants of towns, ham- 
lets, tribes, or divisions within each county, as chusing of deputies, con- 
stables, &c., taxing and collecting of several rates for publick uses and the 
making orders amongst themselves respectively about swine and fences, &c. 

"Whereas, a great many settlements are not reckoned within any sucli 
town or division, nor the bounds of the reputed towns ascertained by means 
therof, the respective constables know not their districts, and many other 
inconveniences arising from them, and forasmuch as the act made in Sep- 
tember, 1692, for dividing the several counties and townships, the time for 
the return of the said divisions, being too short and the method of dividing 
by county meeting inconvenient, Therefore be it enacted, &c." 

Under the above acts Bergen County (then including the present Bergen 
and Hudson Counties) was divided into three townships: Hackensack, New 
Barbadoes, and Bergen. Of these, Hackensack comprised "all the land 
betwixt the Hackensack River and Hudson River, that extends froiii the 
corporation town bound of Bergen to the partition line of the Province." 
New Barbadoes comprised "all the land on Passaic River, above the third 
river, and from the mouth of the said third river northwest to the partition 
line of the Province, including also all the land in the New Barbadoes neck, 
betwixt Hackensack and Passaic Rivers, and thence to the partition line of 



IS 



the Province." Bergen comprised what is now that part of Hudson County 
east of the Hackensack River. 

The following table shows the names of the several townships and muni- 
cipalities erected in Hudson County to date, the dates of their erection, and 
the names of the townships and other municipalities from which they were 
erected : 

NAME OF TOWNSHIP FROM 
No. NAME OF TOWNSHIP DATE OF ERECTION WHICH TAKEN 

1 Bergen (Tp.) October, 1693 Original 

2 Jers°ey (City) January 28, 1820 Bergen 

3 Harrison (Tp.) February 22, 1840 Lodi, Bergen County 

4 Van Vorst (Tp.) March 11, 1841 Bergen 

5 North Bergen (Tp.) February 10, 1843 Bergen 

6 Hoboken (Tp.) March 1, 1841 North Bergen 

7 Hudson (Tp.) March 4, 1852 Bergen 

8 Hoboken (City) March 28, 1855 North Bergen 

9 Weehawken (Tp.) March 15, 1859 Hoboken 

10 Bayonne (Tp.) February 16, 1861 Bergen 

11 Union (Tp.) February 28, 1861 Bergen 

12 West Hoboken (Town) February 28, 1861 Bergen 

13 Greenville (Tp.) March 18, 1863 Bergen 

14 Town of Union March 29, 1864 Union 

15 Kearney (Town) March 14, 1867 Harrison 

16 Bayonne (City) March 10, 1869 Bayonne 

17 Guttenberg (Tp.) April 1, 1878 Union 

18 West New York (Town) March 21, 1898 Union 

19 East Newark (Town) 1898 Harrison 

20 Secaucus (Bor.) March 12, 1900 North Bergen 

21 Secaucus (Town) June ( ?) , 1917 North Bergen 

Borough Governments. 

The borough system of government for small communities was first 
introduced into New Jersey by an act incorporating the "Borough of Eliza- 
beth" During the next ninety years a number of similar municipalities 
were erected in various parts of the State, each of which was the creation of 
a special act of the Legislature. No general law on the subject was enacted 
until April 5, 1878, when what has since been known as "The General Bor- 
ough Act" became a law. It provided that the inhabitants of any township 
or part of a township embracing an area not to exceed four square miles, 
and containing a population not exceeding five thousand, might become a 
body politic and corporate in fact and in law whenever, at a special election 
to be called for that purpose, it might be decided by a majority of votes of 
the electors of the proposed borough qualified to vote at elections for State 
and Township officers. 

For a period of sixteen years following the passage of this act , very 
few boroughs were organized in the State, only three of them being in Berge~i 
County. In the spring of 1894 an act was passed establishing an entirely new 
system of public instruction. By this act the old school districts were blotted 
out and each twonship erected into a separate and distinct district. yVll the 
taxpayers of each township were thenceforth required to assume and pay, 
pro rata, the debts already incurred by the several old districts, as well as 



16 



all future debts of the township for school purposes. The people com- 
plained against the injustice of such a law, and sought a way to escape its 
operation. 

By the terms of the law, it was in operation in all incorporated boroughs, 
towns, villages and cities, and accordingly a rush was made to form boroughs, 
particularly in Bergen County, and had not the Legislature hastened to 
check this rush by amending the school law, the whole county would have 
been carved into boroughs in less than two years. As it was, 26 boroughs 
were created in the county from January 23rd, 1894, to December 18th, of 
the same year. The amendment which the Legislature made to the school 
act provided that no borough might maintain a school separate from the 
township unless there should be 400 children within its limits. This so 
effectually checked the borough movement that only five have since been 
formed, 

Jersey City. 

The locality now known as Jersey City was, before the white race came 
to America, inhabited by a branch of the Minsi Division of the Lenni 
Lanape Nation of the red men, and was called Sheyichbi. The name Lenni 
Lanape means "Men of Otir Nation" and they claim to be the oldest nation 
and root of the great Algonquin stock which occupied this co,ntinent from 
Hudson Bay to South Carolina, and from the Atlantic to the Mississippi and 
the great plains, with the exception of a portion east of the lakes, where the 
Huron Iroquois dwelled. In 1750 New Jersey paid them $5,000 for their 
lands in this state. 

In the fall of 1609, when Hendrick Hudson anchored the "Half Moon" 
off Communipaw, where lower Jersey City now stands, it was largely salt 
marsh, and the heights were crowned with heavy forests. Hendrick Hudson 
found an Indian village called Gemoenepa, and another at Hackensack. It is 
said that Summit Avenue was a part of the trail or path connecting the two 
villages. He found the natives along the west shore, from Sandy Hook to 
Weehawken, most friendly and generous. Of these natives it is said "they 
were more beautiful in form or feature than can possibly be described". 

As already mentioned, Michael Pauw secured a deed froni the Indians 
on November 22, 1630, to Ahasimus and Aresick (burying ground) pen- 
insula late called Paulus Hook. In May, 1633, Michael Paulaz or Paullus- 
son, an officer of the West Indian Co., was living at Pavonia. He lived in a 
hut on the Point, which was later called Paulus Hook. 

In the latter part of 1633, two houses were built, one at Ahasimus, 
what is now the corner of Fourth and Henderson Sts., and the other at 
Communipaw. These were the first two regular buildings in this county. 
Jan Evertsen Bout, who succeeded Pauluson as Superintendent of Pavonia, 
selected the house at Communipaw for his home and was the first white 
resident there. This house was burned in 1643. In 1636, Cornelius Van 
Vorst became Superintendent of the property and lived in the house biult at 
Ahasimus. 

On September 8th, 1660, Jacques Cortelyou was ordered to survey Ge- 
monepa and lay it out into lots. This site, fronted by the bay, extended from 
what is now Communipaw Avenue on the north to the Bay Shore House on 
the south. In June, 1663, Gerrit GerritseA, Harmen Smeeman and Dirck 
Claussen were appointed commissioners to fortify Gemoenepa, as it was 
called at that time. On May 9th, 1661, Egbert Sanderson and Jan Theunis- 



17 



sen, inhabitants of Long Island, petitioned for permission to erect a saw 
mill near the stream of Gemoenepa and move their families there, and tor a 
lot of land for each. The permission was given, and they built a mill below 
the points of rocks on the stream formerly called the Creek of the Woods or 
"the Creek of the High Wood Lands." This mill was later referred to as 
the "Mill of Hossemus" ; from this mill the creek received its name ot Mill 
Creek This creek was filled in when the cut was made for the Pennsylvania 
Railroad in 1837. In 1661 Sanderson erected a saw mill on Showhank 
Brook ; this creek rose in an Indian spring in West Hoboken and ran south 
until it reached the point where New York Avenue crosses Palisade Avenue ; 
then it turned down the hill and emptied into Mill Creek. ,- i. j 

The first legalized ferry across to Manhattan Island was established at 
the foot of Communipaw Avenue, when the village of Bergen was started in 
the fall of 1830 by William Jansen. The boats were of the old Spanish 
pirouge style, pointed at both ends, and with two masts. Horses and cor- 
riages were also transported across in these boats. The rates were fixed by 
the Governor General and Council. Jansen ran boats across three times a 
week. In 1669 a licensewas issued to Peter Hetfelsen to run a ferry from 
Communipaw to New York with a list of rates to be charged ; all of which 
were payable in Wampum. "Any person, letter, packett, or message of 
public business, and the Governor and his family were to be carried free." 
John Tymensen succeeded Hetfelsen in 1672. In 1783 Aaron Longstreet 
and Company advertised that "constant attendance was given by the boats at 
the ferry stairs, near the Exchange, at 3 P. M., to bring passengers to Com- 
munipaw, where the Newark stage would be ready to convey them to New- 
ark and thence by the excellent New York and Philadelphia running ma- 
chines in one day to Philadelphia." 

The first road built in this county was from Communipaw to Bergen in 
1660. It ran across the present Communipaw Avenue to Summit Avenue, 
then northerly along Summit Avenue to Academy Street, then westerly to 
Bergen. It was named "Off-fall" Road, from the stream that ran from 
Tuer's Pond and fell over the ledge of rock at the present intersection of 
Grant Street and Communipaw Avenue. Until Grant Street was extended 
across the marsh in 1847, the people from Communipaw and along to Bergen 
Point, could only reach Jersey City by way of Bergen, and the Prior's Mill 
Road or Newark Avenue; where Monticello Avenue now is was a marsh 
until comparatively recent times. On November 24th, 1790, the Legislature 
appointed five commissioners to locate and build bridges across the Hacken- 
sack and Passaic and lay out a road four rods wide from the Newark Court 
House to Paulus Hook. 

Bergen section, around Montgomery Street and Bergen Avenue, was 
founded in 1660 by Tilman Van X^leck. He petitioned for permission to 
found a village there. After being refused twice, he was finally success- 
ful the third time, and on August 16th, permission was granted him on the 
following condition : "The site should be selected by the Governor and Coun- 
cil ; it must be a place easily defended ; the land to be distributed by lot, and 
work on each lot to begin within six weeks. Each owner of a lot to send one 
man to bear arms. The houses were to be within a fortified village, and the 
farms were to be outside." The place was surveyed and laid out by Jacques 
Cortelyou, Surveyor of Nieu Netherland. This was the first village in New 
Jersey, and was called "Bergen Village" after a small town in Holland. It is 
claimed that a block house was built on the corner of Vroom and Teurs Sts., 
as a protection against the Indians. The first lot taken in the new village, 



18 



now known as 201 Academy Street, was bought by Cornelius Van Reypen. 
Some of the other families who bought lots in the village, were : Van Wage- 
nens, Romeyns, Van Winkles, Sip and Neukirk. Branches of many of these 
families are still living in that neighborhood. 

The first local Court in New Jersey was established in Bergen in Sep- 
tember, 1661. Tielman Van Vleck was schout or sheriff, Michael Jansen, 
Herman Smeeman and Casper Stynmets as schepens or magistrates. How- 
ever, only smaller offenses came before this court, all criminal cases were 
tried before the Director General and Council in Nieuw Netherland. In 
1673, a house was made "ye prison for the Province" until a prison could be 
built, and Adrian Post, a constable, was made keeper. Later a "lock-up" 
was built on the east side of the square near where the school now stands. 
On the westerly side were the stocks and the whipping post. 

During the war of 1812-14 a Liberty Pole was erected in a well, which 
had been dug in the center of the square in L662. This pole was taken down 
in 1870, when the square was paved. 

^ The first school house in Bergen was built in 1664, and Engelbert Steen- 
huysen was appointed schoolmaster. In 1790 the Columbia Academy was 
built on the same site, and in 1857 the present school. No. 11, was erected. 

The first church was built in 1680, but before that time it is believed 
religious services were held in the school house. 

In 1773, the new church building was erected on the corner of what is 
now known as Vroom Street and Bergen Avenue. The third church was 
dedicated July 14th, 1882. 

The first cemetery of Bergen was laid out on the south side of Vroom 
Street, just outside of the new town. The second cemetery was opened in 
1738 on the corner of Vroom Street and Bergen Avenue. The Jersey City 
Cemetery was opened in 1829. About 1831 still another burial ground of 
the Bergen Church, east of Bergen Avenue and south of Vroom Street, was 
bought of Aaron Tuers. The New York Bay Cemetery was established in 
1849, and the Spier's Cemetery in 1857. Other cemeteries have been 
founded since then. 

Paulus Hook was situated east of what is now Warren Street. It was 
sold by the East Indian Company to Abraham Issacsen Planck on May 1, 
1638. The Planck family sold it to Cornelius Van Vorst on August 2, 1699. 

In 1754 a post route was established between New York and Philadel- 
phia by way of Bergen Point and Staten Island. 

One of the first parks was laid out by Van Vorst, at what is now the foot 
of Grant Street. Michael Cornelisen built a tavern north of Grant Street, 
near the water. This was later also used as a ferry house. In 1769, Van 
Vorst laid out a race track along the edge of the upland. This was in use 
until 1804. 

The Beacon Race Course was established on the hill which was later 
known as Hudson City, about 1837. It was located southeast of where the 
reservoir now stands and was the scene of some very celebrated races. 

Revolutionary Notes. 

Lord Stirling, in command of the American forces in this section in 
1776 put Bergen and Paulus Hook in condition of defense. A fort was 
built 'at Bergen Neck, later called Fort Delancy, to prevent the Enghsh from 
coming over from Staten Island. Tfoops from New York and Philadel- 
phia were stationed there under command of General Mercer. On July 



19 



12th, 1776, fire was opened on the British warships as they came up the bay. 
On the 16th of September, the British captured New York City, and on Sep- 
tember 23rd, the EngHsh bombarded the fort and then landed a force. 
General Mercer recognized that the fort could not be held, and retired with 
his troops, after removing all guns, stores, etc. He retired with his troops 
to Bergen and later joined Washington in his retreat to the Delaware. 

For a long time Paulus Hook was the only British stronghold in New 
Jersey. 

On August 18th, 1789, Major Henry Lee, with a little over 400 men, 
started from New Bridge (Hackensack) on a march of 14 miles through the 
woods to make an attack upon the fort at" Paulus Hook. The following 
afternoon he gained possession of the outer fort. Major Lee had intended 
to burn the barracks, but on finding sick soldiers, women and children, he 
retreated, after taking 159 prisoners ; he lost 2 of his own men and had three 
wounded. After a march of many hardships Major Lee returned to New 
Bridge. He received a medal from Congress and $15,000 to be distributed 
among the troops which were engaged in the attack. 

On August 24th, 1779, General Lafayette marched his troops on a for- 
aging expedition from Fort Lee to Bergen. They encamped in the locality 
now known as Waldo Avenue, between Henry Street and Magnolia Avenue, 
about an old tulip tree. The tree was cut down December 20th, 1871. Van 
Wagenen's Place on the northwest corner of Academy Street and Bergen 
Square, was Lafayette's headquarters. Here he entertained General Wash- 
ington at dinner in the orchard under an apple tree. 

The Incorporation of Jersey City. 

Anthony Dey of New York bought Paulus Hook with its ferry rights, 
from the Van Vorst family, on March 26, 1804, for $6,000 in Spanish Milled 
Dollars. Dey sold it to Abraham Varick, who again, within a month, sold it 
to Richard Varick, Jacob Radcliff, and Anthony Dey. These men' were all 
siiccessful lawyers in New York, and they became the founders of Jersey 
City. They divided their purchase into one thousand shares, associating 
others with themselves. On November 10th, 1804, the Legislature passed 
an act incorporating the "Associates of the Jersey Company". 

The city Hmits were, at various times, extended and the governing 
power changed. In 1820 the Legislature passed an "Act to Incorporate 
Jersey City, in the County of Bergen". On January 23, 1829, this was 
changed to "The Board of Selectmen and Inhabitants of Jersev City". On 
the 22nd of February, 1838, the governing power was vested in the "Mayor 
and Common Council of Jersey City". It then ceased to be part of Bergen 
Township. 

Dudley S. Gregory was the first Mayor of Jersey City. 'He served as 
Mayor in 1838-39-41, 58 and 59. ^ J ^ y 

Hudson County was set off from Bergen County in 1840. Hudson City 
was formerly part of North Bergen Township, but on March 4th, 1852, was 
incorporated as the "Town of Hudson in the County of Hudson". On the 
11th of April, 1859, it was incorporated as the "City of Hudson". In 1869 
that section, Bergen, and Jersey City, became one city under the name of 
Jersey City. In 1873 the town of Greenville was annexed to Jersey City 

The first school on Paulus Hook was started in 1806. ' This was a pri- 
vate 'pay" school and soon failed, in 1838, the Mayor and Council re- 
modeled an old building and used this as a school house, town hall, and jail 



After a time the officials ceased to use it, and they met at different inns and 
taverns until 1861, when the City Hall was built. In 1887 measures were 
begun to build a larger City Hall, and on May 26, 1894, the corner stone was 
laid for the present City Hall, which was completed on January 1st, 1896, 
costing a sum of $736,267.56. 

The first public school was opened in Jersey City in 1848, on York St., 
west of Washington St. Mr. Lensley was the first principal and the school 
was called Public School No. 1 . 

The first Post Office was established in 1807 by Postmaster General 
Grainger. Before that time, people had to go to New York or Newark for 
their letters. The first successful church society was that of St. Matthews' 
Episcopal Church, which was organized on August 21, 1808. The first Pres- 
byterian society was founded in 1809. The Particular Baptist Church was 
organized in 1839. In 1836 the Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church was 
organized. It is said that the Roman Catholics were under the jurisdiction 
of the Diocese of New York until 1853, when the Diocese of New Jersey was 
organized. However, St. Peter's R. C. Church opened for services in 1837. 
Many other church societies have since been organized. 

The first Fire Department was started in 1829 by pubHc subscription. The 
Police Departement was organized about the same time with seven watch- 
men. In 1837 four night watchmen and a City Marshal to serve by day, 
were appointed. In 1845 the watchmen were required to call the hours 
during the night '"'until the hour of calling off arrive". In 1851 uniform caps 
and clubs were introduced. The first station house was built in 1859 at 
Coopers Alley and Gregory St. The present form of police government was 
started in 1866, and the mounted police were organized in 1873. The first 
attorney to practice law in Jersey City was James Wilson, who opened his 
law office in 1812. The Hudson County Bar was founded in 1840. 

The first court of the new county opened in Lyceum Hall in Grand St., 
on April 14th, 1840. On September 19th, 1843, the court was moved to the 
Newkirk house at the Five Corners, and continued there until March 11th, 
1845, when the Court House was completed. The jail, next to the Court 
House, was finished a little later. The present Court House was completed 
in 1912 In 1843 street lamps were introduced; on December 1, 1852, gas 
was first used in Jersey City, and in 1884 electric lighting for the streets 
began. The first telephone service in the' city was in 1878. 

In the early days, people living in Bergen and Communipaw, had to 
travel by private conveyances or walk to the ferry by the mill road ; later 
stages were run by Peter Merselis from the ferry to Bergen via the Five 
Corners. After a tirne omnibuses were introduced and large open sleighs in 
the winter, Peter .Merselis sold out to the Jersey City and Bergen Railroad 
Co., which was incorporated on March 15th, 1859. They were authorized to 
lay out and construct a railroad from some point on the Kill van Kull at Ber- 
gen Point to the Newark Turnpike Road, leading from Jersey City to New- 
ark. They ran a line with dummy engines from the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Ferry to Bergen Point. Later they received permission to lay a single track 
of iron rail on Montgomery St., Newark Ave., Grove St., to Montgomery 
St., Gregory St. to York St. and Hudson St. to Montgomery St. 

The horse cars came into use in 1864, and the first trolley car was run in 
Jersey City on the Montgomery St. line from Bergen Ave. to Monmouth St., 
in 1890. 

In 1834, the New Jersey Railroad and the Paterson and Hudson River 
Railroad were opened in Jersey City. The N. J. Railroad extended to 



21 



Newark. Eight trips were made a day and each trip took one hour and a 
half from Jersey City to Newark. The cars were drawn by horses until 
the locomotive, "the Newark", was used in 1838. The road consolidated 
with the Camden and Amboy in 1867, and the consolidation was leased to the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Co. in 1870. 

Jersey Cit}' to-day is one of the most up-to-date and prosperous com- 
munities in the county. Many of the most beautiful biuldings can be found 
there ; the Court House, City Hall, Post Office, Free Public Library, City 
Hospital, Dickinson High School, and many others too numerous to mention. 
Some of the finest parks in the county can also be found in Jersey City. 

In 1913, Jersey City adopted the Commission form of government to 
take effect the following year. 

Hoboken. 

Hoboken received its name from Hohopoghan Hackingh — the land of 
the tobacco pipe. Here the Indians procured the stone from which they 
carved their pipes. 

The first recorded deed was conveyed by the Indians on July 12th, 1630, 
to the Director and Council of New Netherlands, who were acting for 
Michael Pauw. An agent of Pauw, Cornelius Van Vorst, settled at Aha- 
simus (Jersey City), and his son Hendrick was probably the first white oc- 
cupant of Hoboken. At least he had a farm there, but there is no record 
of any house, and they probably lived with his father at Ahasimus. He re- 
turned to Holland, where he died in 1639, and the following year Director- 
General Kieft, the Governor of Nieu Netherland, leased Hoboken to Aert 
Teunissen Van Putten and agreed to build a small house there. Van Putten 
miproved the place, worked the soil, and built a brew-house, which was still 
standing in 1649. \^an Putten was killed by the Indians in 1643. His 
widow later re-married and laid claim to Hoboken, but Governor Kieft did 
not allow the claim and leased Hoboken to Dierck Claesen from Bremen 
who later abandoned the place, and in the end of the year 1649 Hoboken was 
unoccupied. A few years later Nicholas Varleth acquired an interest in 
Hoboken, and in 1663 he succeeded in getting a formal grant of the land 
from Governor Peter Stuyvesant, which was later confirmed by Governor 
Carteret after the English conquest in 1668. Varleth had married Anna 
Stuyvesant, a sister of the Governor, and the widow of Samuel Bavard, in 
1665. After Varleth s death in 1675 his heirs succeeded to his estate, and 
from them the Hoboken property was conveyed to his step-son Samuel 
l^\Z' ■\?'' "^ • ,f descendants continued in possession of Hoboken 

until the Revolutionary War. The mansion of Wm. Bayard, the last of the 
tamily to own Hoboken, stood on Castle Point 

1 °f '1^ the Revolutionary War, Wm. Bayard was on the side of the 
a)lonists but when the British captured New York in 1776, he joined the 
Kings Army with the rank of Colonel. At the close of the war, the State 
LfTJ^"'^^ confiscated his Hoboken estate, as he had taken up arms 
tbn Cener.TV°""^^i ^^'- !f^^te was ordered to be sold at public auc- 
tion. General Von Steuben tried to buy the land before it was sold at auc- 
tion, but his attempt was unsuccessful and the auction sale of the Bavard 

isS:fr.b„i,^i5,,S£'* '"""■ '"^^ '"•"^" >""=-- •»'*,,« 

The Stevens family at once started to build up Hoboken, and it soon 
became one of the greatest pleasure resorts. Twenty-five thousand to thirtv 



22 



thousand people would come to Hoboken to spend the day there. There 
were all kinds of entertainments and refreshments were- served at the "76 
House" near the ferry and at the "Colonnade", a pavillion which was 
erected by Colonel Stevens in the Elysian Fields in 1830, and many others. 
The "Green" and "River Walk" were frequented by all classes of all ages. 
John Jacob Astor and many other well known people mingled freely with 
the throngs of pleasure seekers there. 

In 1811, John Stevens ran the first steam ferry boat, the "Julianna", 
his own invention, and the first steam ferry boat in the world. In the early 
days the ferry boats landed in New York at Vesey St. ; in 1817 it was mover 
to Murray St., and in 1818 to the present site, at Barclay St. 

With the perfection of the steam ferry boat and the steamship, Hoboken 
slowly changed to a commercial center. 

On March 28th, 1855, Hoboken was incorporated as a city, with a popu- 
lation of 6,727. To-day the population of the "Mile Square City" numbers 
over 80,000. 

The first stage route was established in 1855 ; the first water mains wpre 
laid in 1857; in 1858 the first school was opened. St. Paul's Protestant 
Episcopal Church held the first services in 1832, but a permanent organiza- 
tion was not effected before March 2nd, 1835. 

The first horse cars appeared on Washington St. in 1861. The first 
National Bank was estabhshed in 1865. The Erie Railroad and the Ham- 
burg-American Line were estabhshed two years previous. 

North Hudson. 

West Hoboken, which has the distinction of being the biggest town in 
the United States, was incorporated as a township on February 28th, 1867. 
Previous to that time, it was part of North Bergen Township, which form- 
erly was part of Bergen County. It is not definitely known when the first 
house was erected in West Hoboken, but it is supposed to be in the last 
quarter of the eighteenth century. The first inhabitants, who were Dutch, 
and later French people, settled and founded a village around Paterson and 
Clinton Ave. A few people settled in the northern end of the town, whiclr 
at that time was mostly woodland. 

It seems that the Indians, after the Indian War in 1643, gained complete 
control over the northern part of the county, or what is now known as North 
Hudson. A deed conveying this property to the whites, read in part as 
follows : "On the 30th day of January, 1658, the Indians sold to the Noble 
Lord Director General Pieter Stuyvesant and Council of Nieu Netherlands, 
a tract of land lying on the west side of the North River. 

"Beginning from the Great Clip (referring to the Palisades) above 
Wiehachen and from there right through the land above the Island Sikakes 
(Secaucus) and therefrom thence to the Kill von Coll, and so along the Con- 
stables Hoeck again to the aforesaid clip above Wiehachen." 

The tract was purchased for: 80 fathoms of wampum, 20 fathoms of 
cloth, 12 brass kettles, 6 guns, 1 double brass kettle, and half a barrel strong 
beer," in all valued at $675.00. 

Almost all of the property north of Stevens Street belonged to the 
Bayard Estate. This was auctioned ofif, as before mentioned, in 1784, when 
John Stevens bought the biggest part of it ; he later sold his holchngs in West 
Hoboken to the Hoboken Land Improvement Co. Wm. Jackson bought a 
large tract of land adjoining Stevens' propetry. In 1785 Cornelius Van 



23 



Vorst bought a large tract of what now comprises the middle western part of 
the town. Some of the other early land owners were : the De Motts, Trap- 
hagens, Van Reinens and Van Winkles. A large tract of land was owned by 
Mersalis in 1779,and by his heirs later sold to John Syms. Outside the 
"village" limits West Hoboken was composed of farms and thick woods, in 
which many specimens of cedar trees could be found. Among some of the 
owners of these farms and their descendants may be mentioned the Kerri- 
gans, De Motts, Van \'orsts, Syms, Ludlows, Mascus, Roseman's, Trap- 
hagens, Dubois, Bonus and the Dreschers. Some of these farms were only 
cut up into building lots in the early 60's and some much later. 

At the time the town was incorporated the population numbered 1500 
inhabitants. The center of population was at Paterson and Clinton Avenue, 
and only a few houses were grouped together in the northern end of the 
town, where the car barns are now located. 

One of the oldest land marks in North Hudson is Cox's store on Hack- 
ensack Plankroad and the Boulevard. It was established in 1837 when the 
Cox family bought it from A. Ross. People living in the neighborhood 
would say, "I live ten minutes north (or souh, east or west) of Cox's Cor- 
ner." Some people would even print this on their business cards, besides 
their address. 

One of the greatest amusement places in those days was the Syms 
Woods, located in the middle of the Township. It was bounded on the east 
by the present line of Spring Street, on the south about one hundred feet 
south of Syms Street, on the west about one hundred feet east of Central 
Avenue, and on the north by John Street. The gate leading to this wood 
was situated on Spring Street. Most of the picnics were held in this 
wood. In the minutes of the Town Council of June, 1871, a motion can be 
found to "allow the trustees privilege to maintain a bar for the sale of malt 
liquors, said bar to be in the woods." 

There were no streets running north and south through the town, except 
the Weavertown Road (Boulevard), until 1870, when Palisade Ave. was 
opened. There were no side streets from Stevens Street north to Angelique 
Street, until 1882. Spring Street was opened 1882, and Clinton Avenne was 
opened five years later. The large tract of land in the northern part of the 
town was "known as the Commons". It was on these "Commons" that the 
U. S. Government, in 1861, maintained a camp for their soldiers. When 
the car stables were built, the railroad company leased part of the "Com- 
mons", fenced it in, and used it for pasturage for their horses. 

The first members of the Township Committee of West Hoboken were 
Smclair, Cox, and Aldcorn. W. Sinclair was the first chairman of the 
lownship Committee, and John A. Freeland was the first Township Clerk 
Smclair was also- elected Treasurer, and Andrew Anderson was the first 
Assessor and Collector. The first meeting of the Township Committee was 
held in the office of John Hague and later the meetings were held at Mrs. 
C. H. Piebes Hotel on Hillside Road and Palisade Avenue. A Town Hall 
was erected on Palisade Avenue, near High Street, in 1868. The building 
was later removed to Charles Street, where it remained until 1888, when 

%^^Z7\a77\^^^^ """' \""*; ^^^ °^'' °f ^^'°''^'' ^^s -^re^ted in 
18/5, and W E. Simms was the first Recorder. The Justices of the Peace 
had previously tried most of the cases. There were no policemen, but on 
holidays or on special occasions a Constable would be hired to preserve 
peace, the offices of Assessor and Collector were separated in 1871 and 
the first Assessor was Herman BrUsing. The Post Office was situated on 



24 



Paterson Avenue in a grocery store kept by John Freeland, who was also 
the Postmaster. 

In 1884 the Township assumed the title of Town, but retained the old 
charter, and in that year the following citizens were elected to the Town- 
ship Committee : Alfred De Bevoise, Thomas Nolan, B. Fitzgerald, R. E. 
Galbraith, and Fred Engeln ; S. A. Fawl was elected Town Clerk. A regu- 
lar paid police force was established the same year, with Fred Sieler in 
command as sergeant. The special officers were paid on the piece work 
system, receiving fifteen cents for each hour's work. In addition they re- 
ceived seventy-five cents for every arrest, fifty cents for attending court, one 
dollar and forty-eight cents to bring a prisoner to Snake Hill, and a dollar 
and a quarter for lodging a prisoner in the County Jail. 

The first school in West Hoboken was established in 1845. It consisted 
of one large room in a small one-story frame building located on Hoboken 
Street near Spring Street. The lone teacher and principal's name was 
Kelly. A few years later another school was established on Ann Street, 
and this school was in charge of a teacher named Kroh. Several other small 
schools were added until 1867, when Public School No. 1 was built at a cost 
of $32,762.56. The first principal of this school was John Keynton. 

The first transit facility was established in 1846, when Saltzman began 
running stages from De Mott Street and Clinton Avenue to the Hoboken 
Ferry, going down Paterson Plankroad. The fare was one shilling. The 
line changed hands several times until finally Nicholas Goelz secured con- 
trol of the line. He changed the route from West Hoboken to Union Hill, 
using the Hackensack Plank Road to the ferry. This was in 1859. Goelz 
built his stables on Bergenline Avenue and Franklin Street. About this time 
a line of horse cars were running from the ferry to Congress Street in 
Jersey City. Goelz's barns and stables were struck by lightning and burnt 
down in 1863, and before rebuilding he consolidated with the Jersey City 
Co., who had cars running in Jersey City and Hoboken. After the consoli- 
dation the company erected a car depot on Spring Street in 1865, and a 
steam dummy was installed on the Palisade Avenue line in Jersey City, and 
this road was extended up into West Hoboken, running as far as the Hill- 
side Road. In 1871, the tracks were extended to the car stables, the dummy 
was discontinued, and the first horse car was run through West Hoboken. 

At that time the stores and residenecs were illuminated by kerosene 
lamps, but in 1872 the Township Committee of West Hoboken entered into 
an agreement with the Hudson County Gas Co., and this company was given 
permission to lay gas mains in several streets. Seventeen gas lamps were 
installed and John Everson was appointed gas lighter. The gas company 
agreed to pay one half of his salary and the Township the other half. The 
lamps were not supposed to be lit on nights when the moon, according to the 
almanac, was supposed to shine. 

In the year 1890, the Town Council contracted with the Hudson Electric 
Light Co. for fifteen arc lights. These were installed on Clinton Avenue 
from Stevens south, and on Spring Street from Stevens north. 



25 



Union Hill. 

Union Hill, which was incorporated as a town on March 26, 1864, began 
to be settled in 1851, when a small group of German-Americans employed 
by the Hoe Company in New York City crossed the Hudson River to look 
for more pleasing quarters where they could establish their homes. After 
climbing the bluff, they reached Union Hill, which at that time was farms 
and woodlands. After thoroughly looking over the ground, they decided it 
would be an ideal place to live, and tipon their return to New York City, they 
called a meeting in a small Weinstube on the Bowery near Stanton Street, 
and there organized a Building and Loan Association. In this way Union 
Hill was born. John Pleikhardt, who has since become well known in 
Union Hill, was among the first settlers. The section between Hackensack 
Plank Road and Union Street was the first to be settled, but in 1853 Louis 
Becker incorporated a company, which bought large parcels of land from 
the Gardner Farm, one of the largest farms located between Union and 
Fulton Sts. The Greenleaf, Danielsen, Earle, Merrit, Cantello, and several 
other farms were located within the section. The Louis Becker Co. sold 
the lots ranging from $50 to $100 a piece on the installment plan, payable at 
$2.50 a month. After part of the money had been paid, a lottery was held 
in New York one Sunday morning, when a drawing for their lots took 
place. Hardly any of the men who had bought lots knew where these were 
located or what they looked like. After the drawing the men went to 
Union Hill to locate their individual plots ; some found themselves to be 
very lucky, and others found their lots to be a big water pool. Among the 
latter was Fred Lange, who found his lot to be nothing but water, where 
the Simon factory now stands. He had already paid $30, but stopped 
further payments on his purchase. Among some of the luckier purchasers 
were the Berenbroick and Gottlieb families, and several others. 

The first public school was established in 1858 on Lewis Street, next 
to where now the Hudson Theatre stands. Part of this first schoolhouse 
still stands there. A man by the name of Schaef er was the teacher. 

On January 30, 1860, several citizens met at Erb's Hall to organize a 
Fire Company. The following temporary officers were elected: H. Rott- 
mann, President; W. \^ogel, Secretary; U. Erb, Treasurer. The monthly 
dues were fixed at 25c. A committee consisting of Rottmann, Vogt and ' 
Reinhart were elected to prepare a constitution. It was decided to hold 
the next meeting at Budtenbender's Hall, on Sunday, February 12 The 
constitution was adopted at the next meeting, and the cohipany organized as 
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, Union Hill. Any German over 21 years of 
age was eligible for membership. This was amended at the next meeting to 
read : All business at meetings and orders at fires shall be in German The 
uniform consisted of a red woolen shirt and a fire hat. The following of- 
ficers were elected: H. Rottmann, Foreman; J. Reinhart, Jr., Assistant 
Foreman ; W. Vogel, Secretary, and U. Erb, Treasurer. On April 7 1860 
the company was accepted by the Town Committee. On May 1 Mr' Rott- 
mann bought a truck for $50, which he paid. The first bell'tower was 
erected on Jefferson St., between Palisade and New York Avenues The hell 
originally came from Krupp Gun Works, Germany. It's the same laiw bell 
now at the Town Hall. 

It was not alone in the Fire Department, but in all the town's official 
departments, that all business was transacted in the German language. The 



26 



executive sessions of the Board of Council were conducted in German as 
recently as 1893. 

The charter of the old North Hudson County Railroad, which intro- 
duced the horse cars in North Hudson, was granted in 1859. 

The late John H. Bonn of Weehawken was the first President, and 
the late Nicholas Goelz the first Superintendent. 

The first rail was laid in 1860, and the first car was run over the tracks 
on December 15,, of that year. The horse cars were given up in the 90s. The 
North Hudson County Car Road consisted of a single track road at first and 
ran from 19th St., Weehawken, down the old Bulls Ferry Road to the lower 
Hoboken Ferry. The old stage line which had been in existence since 1858 
continued from 19th St., Weehawken, to Union Hill. The waiting room and 
the stables of the stage line were, as before mentioned, located at Kossuth 
St. and Bergenline Avenue on the site of the present residence of Henry 
Luther, at 22 Bergenline Avenue, son-in-law of Nicholas Goelz, who built 
it for his home after the stables were removed. A horse car line was later 
extended to include Union Hill, the route leaving from Bergenline Ave. was 
from Union St. down to 19th St.,Weehawken down Bullsferry Road to Wil- 
low Ave., Hoboken, and down Ferry St. to the ferry. Returning from 
Hoboken, it ran up Washington St. to about 8th St., where it ran diagonally 
across town until it struck Willow Ave., then up the Bulls Ferry Road to 
Lewis St., Union Hill, and along Lewis St. to Bergenline Ave. Two turn- 
tables were used in connection with the Union and Lewis St. turns. The 
double track system from Union Hill to Hoboken was installed about 1876. 
Later cars were installed on Bergenline Ave., to run along that thoroughfare 
to Herman Ave., Guttenberg. The steam elevator at the West Shore Ferry 
was operated for the first time in 1894. The passengers were lifted from 
the ferry to the top of the steel structure, a height of about 154 feet. The 
process required but one minute. 

The Hillside Railroad or the "Merry-Go-Round" was established in the 
early nineties. 

The first church in Union Hill was the German Evangelical Church on 
Columbia Street, which was organized in 1853. The minister was the Rev. 
Mohn. People living in the section of Union St. and Bullsferry Road used 
the cow path running from that section across to Columbia St. and Bergen- 
line Ave. when they went to church. The section above Fulton St. was all 
thick woods. It was in these woods that Gen. Lee lost his way when he, with 
400 men, marched down to Paulus Hook to take this fort from the English 
in 1776. 

Bergenline Ave. was a narrow lane, and it was originally thought that 
Palisade Ave. -was to be the main street. A bitter fight arose over this 
question, but the people who favored Bergenline Ave. as the main street 
won out. 

The late Abraham Birnbaum established the first dry goods store on 
Bergenline Ave. and Franklin Lane in 1872. Some months later Holt- 
hausen opened his store on Bergenline Ave. and Jefiferson St. 

The Gulden furniture store was established by the late William Gulden 
in 1868. It was located at 129 Union St. as a furniture and repair shop. 
"Big Schneider" opened his store the same year, at Palisade Ave. and Jefifer- 
son St. ' Other old stores were: Schmidt's drug store on Bergenline Ave. 
and Hackensack Plankroad, Foster's photo studio on the top floor of the 



27 



building where Groth's cafe now is located; Etzold's hardware store on 
Blum St., near New York Ave.; Roehm's stationery store, and Vorberg's 
grocery store, and others. 

The famous eating place at that time was Hellstern's Oyster House at 
the corner of Bergenline Ave. and Lewis St. Meier's Hotel was at the 
corner of Union St. 

Daniel Bermes Brewery was founded in 1833, and William Peter 
founded his brewery in 1863 at its present location. 

In 1886, the first local new,spaper appeared. It was published in 
German, under the name of "Union Hiller Sonntags-Journal" (Union Hill 
Sunday Journal). John Weber, who conducted a small print shop at 422 
Liberty St., was the publisher. It was a weekly paper, and before the second 
issue was published, Fred Michel secured a position as printer with Weber, 
and two years later George Rank was employed, also as a printer. Soon 
after, the name of the paper was changed to "Hudson County Revue". In 
1898, Weber died, and Michel and Rank conducted the business for his 
widow until August of that year, when they bought the paper as well as the 
printing plant. Six years later, the shop was moved to its present location at 
Humboldt St. and New York Avenue, where Michel & Rank, the publishers 
of this book, are still continuing the business, and publishing the "Hudson 
County Revue" 

At the west side of Bergenline Ave. was a thriving settlement, con- 
taining at least 25 houses, as early as 1850; this was called Dallytown. Its 
central point was the Liberty Pole at what is now the corner of Fulton St. 
and the Boulevard. Here the people met once a week to await the arrival of 
a butcher by the name of Chamberlain, of Hoboken, who supplied them with 
fresh meat. Here, too, was the end of the stage line to Hoboken, and many 
an old resident remembers the sound of the old stage horn. This corner 
was long known as the Sawpit, for here many of the trees of the surround- 
ing forest had been changed into ship timber. 

North Bergen. 

North Bergen became a township on February 10, 1843. It consisted 
of a long stretch of land lying west of H.udson Boulevard and extending 
from the Jersey City boundary line to Bergen County. One of the most 
popular sections of the township is New Durham, which up to 1803 was 
known as Marshland, and here was located "The Three Pigeons", a well 
known tavern before the Revolution, where many people came to enjoy a 
spin behind fast trotters along the country roads. The Frenchman's Gar- 
dens was another interesting place. Andre Michaux, a noted French botan- 
ist, came to this country with letters of introduction from Marquis de La- 
fayette to George Washington. He was granted 200 acres of land on the 
western slope of the hill at New Durham. From this spot, the Lombard 
poplar trees spread all over the country. 

The Schuetzen Park, in North Bergen, was established in 1874. It is 
claimed that this land was the estate of the son of an English lord, who built 
a stone castle there, surrounded by a deer park. Later it became the resi- 
dence of a rich Southern cotton broker named Wright. He failed some 
time later, and the Plattdeutsche Verein purchased the 33 acres for $105,000. 
It has since become known, not only in this county, but in the whole state, 
as well as in New York, as one of the greatest amusement parks. 



28 



North Bergen, especially the New Durham section, has become a thriv- 
ing manufacturing centre, while the upper section, Woodcliflf, is one of the 
finest residential sections in the county. 

Weehawken. 

Weehawken, variously also known as Whehocken, Weehank and Wee- 
hauk, was the place where Hendrick Hudson anchored his "Half Moon", in 
the cove north of Hoboken. The name orginiated from the Indians, and 
translated means : the end of the Palisades. The women of the Indian tribe 
who was in possession of that section, are described in early history as "the 
prittiest ever seen". 

The water front, a short distance north of the anchorage of Hendrick 
Hudson, is a historic spot, known as a great duelling ground. One of the 
most famous duels was fought here on July 11, 1804, between Aaron Burr 
and Alexander Hamilton. Burr had fought one with Hamilton's brother- 
ia-law, Mr. Church, on September 2, 1799. Alexander Hamilton's son, 
Philip, was shot and killed, at the same spot, by Geo. L. Gacker, a New York 
lawyer, on November 23, 1801. The day before, Gacker fought a duel, at 
the same place, with a Mr. Price, a companion of Philip Hamilton, so it 
seems it must have been a family feud. 'Other duels fought on this ground 
were between : John Langstaff and Oliver Waldson, Jr., Dec. 25, 1801 ; 
DeWitt Clinton and John Swartout, July 31, 1802; Richard Riker and 
Robert Swartout, November 21, 1803; Isaac Gouverneur and W. H. Max- 
well, July 10, 1815; Benjamin Price and Major Green, May 12, 1816. 

Weehawken became a township on March 15, 1859. Among the first 
settlers of that section were the Duer, King, Cassett, and Brown families, 
who owned large estates there. 

It is claimed that Maryn Adriansen was the first settler. The Wee- 
hawken ferry was established in about the year of 1700. 

Like the other sections in North Hudson, Weehawken consisted of 
farms and woodland. The "Shades" was a strip of land west of Willow 
Ave. which formerly belonged to West Hoboken, but in 1878 was consoli- 
dated with Weehawken. The Kings woods on the top of the blufl? was a 
mobilization camp during the Spanish-American War in 1898. Eldorado, 
now the Highwood Park section, was about 25 years ago one of the greatest 
amusement parks in the country. This section was later cut up into building 
lots, and to-day some of the finest residences can be found there. It is not, 
however, in that section alone that fine dwellings can be found, the Haux- 
hurst section as well as Weehawken Heights contain some of the most 
beautiful residences in North Hudson. 

West New York. 

West New York is one of the youngest municipalities in North Hudson. 
It was incorporated as a town on March 21, 1898, and has since that time 
developed into one of the most up-to-date sections of the county. West 
New York and Guttenberg were formerly associated together, but it dis- 
agreed, and West New York seceded. It then established the Township of 
Union and went along prospering, until it outgrew itself and adopted a 
more liberal charter in 1908, which in a great measure contributed to its 
success. The enormous growth and improvement of West New York from 



29 



a rural section to practically a full grown city has certainly been a wonder- 
ful achievemeiit. In 1895 the town had a population of 5,000, while to-day 
its inhabitants number over 30,000. 

The population has increased by about 20,000 in the last seven years. 
This is due to the many wonderful improvements which have been made in 
the town in recent years, and the splendid facilities the town ofifers to manu- 
facturers, business men, and residents. The town fathers went slow and 
noted the mistakes of the neighboring towns. In this way they avoided 
many mistakes. The town is especially well known for the many embroidery 
factories situated there. No other town can boast of a better administra- 
tion, police and fire department, and school system. The town has one of 
the most beautiful municipal buildings in North Hudsori. It was erected at 
the cost of $80,000. The town is one of the healthiest places that any one 
could wish to locate in. It lies high and the air is very pure. 

Guttenberg. 

Guttenberg was formerly a farm owned by Wm. Cooper. In 1853 it 
was sold to a party of New Yorkers, who had formed a Weehawken Land 
and Ferry Association. Lots were sold for $140 a piece, payable at $5 a 
month. The company ran two boats, the "Hultz" and the "Flora". These 
plied between Guttenberg, landing at the foot of Bulls Ferry Road, Pleasant 
Valley and Fort Lee, and Spring St., New York. Shares in the ferry were 
sold at $10. The West Shore Railroad Co. later bought over the rights in 
the ferry. 

The settlers of Guttenberg were, like the settlers of Union Hill, 
mostly Germans. 

The present Mayor Daniel Herrmann's father, Frederick Herrmann, 
was one of the pioneers. He settled in that town in 1854. 

Guttenberg became a town in 1859. In 1894 the first car tracks were 
laid on Broadway, where the Palisade Trolley cars now are operated. 

It was one of the most prosperous towns in the days of the 
Guttenberg race track in North Bergen, when thousands of people visited 
that place. 

Bayonne. 

The first tract of land of the present Bayonne contained about 300 acres 
and was granted to Jacobsen Roy, a gunner of Fort Amsterdam, hence the 
name of "Konstable", the title for gunner and hocke. Constable Hook or 
Gunner's Point. Van Boskerck's Poi'nt, which is really a part of the same 
formation of land, jutting out into the bay, was to the north of the point, 
distinctively named Constable Hook. Probably the first house ever built in 
Bayonne stood on Van Boskerck's Point in 1646. Patents were granted 
for lands between Gemonepas and Kill Van Kull in 1654. What was form- 
erly called Pamrapo, but then Pemrepogh, now a portion of the third ward 
was within this grant. During the early years of the settlement the growth 
was somewhat retarded by the unfriendly attitude of the Indians, who had 
been incensed by the treatment they had received from the Dutch at Nieu 
Amsterdam. The Indians gradually disappeared from the section, the 
forests were cleared, the farms extended, and the population increased. 



Bayonne played an important part in the Revolutionary War, when it 
was used as a thoroughfare for the fighting forces between Staten Island 
and New York and northern- New Jersey. It is said that a fort was located 
on the high ground near the old homestead of Hartman Vreeland, about 
52nd St. and Avenue C. 

A militia company, known as the "Close Light Guards", was organ- 
ized at the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861. It received its name from 
Joseph B. Close, a wealthy resident and property owner, who provided 
money for some of the equipment. The company saw service at the front. 

The present City of Bayonne is a southerly part of Bergen Township, 
formerly known as Bergen Neck. This township was one of the parts of 
Hudson County which were set off from the County of Bergen in 1840. 
The City of Bayonne was chartered in 1869, and since that time its growth 
has been remarkably rapid, until at the present time the population has 
reached nearly 70,000. The city was governed by Mayor and Council from 
1869 until May 1, 1915, when Commission Government assumed control. 

In Revolutionary days, the transportation facilities were limited to 
horseback or farm wagons. This led to the construction of the Jersey City 
and Bergen Point Plank Road, built as a Town Road, and maintained as 
such until after the incorporation of Bayonne. 

A States Route was then established and maintained for many years ; 
later a steamboat line was established running from Elizabeth Port to New 
York. When the line of the Central Railroad of New Jersey was first laid 
and operations begun, passengers and freight were carried by rail to Eliza- 
beth Port and thence by the steamboat to New York. The bridge across 
Newark Bay, and the line through Bayonne to Jersey City were then built. 
The first trains ran over this section of the railroad in 1865. Prior to the 
building of the Central Railroad the Jersey City and Bergen Railroad con- 
structed its line to what is now Broadway, and then over its own right of 
way between Avenue C and Broadway to Bergen Point. This was operated 
for many years as a steam "duirfmy" railroad between the Bergen Point 
Ferry and Jersey City Ferry. Later the steam cars were abandoned, and in 
1885 the company obtained its franchise for a car line over Avenue C and 
the route now used, and in 1893 electricity was substituted for horse power. 



In writing this History of Hudson County, it must be understood that 
some of the data has been taken from various publications, while other in- 
formation has been secured from data possessed by old residents. 

The reader is requested, however, not to take every statement in this 
history as absolutely authoritative, as it- has been impossible to verify many 
items, because no official records could be found of these. Much of the 
data has been taken from the memories of old residents, and the reader must 
realize that memories are not always accurate. 

The publishers of this book wish to thank the many people who have 
contributed much valuable information and in this way assisted in writing 
this history. 

Many items of historical interest will be found on the following pages 
among the biographies. H^istories of churches, schools, and public depart- 
ments may be found in the biographies of the ministers, boards of education, 
and public officials. 



31 



The Stevens Family. 



One of the most distinguished 
and influential families in Hudson 
County is the Stevens family of 
Hoboken. For generations ' this 
family has been conspicuous in civil, 
military, governmental and pro- 
fessional affairs, contributing a 
wholesome influence in the commu- 
nity and achieving for themselves 
distinction as men of great learning 
and abilitv. 




Col. E. a. Stevexs. 

The development of Hoboken was 
a gigantic achievement for which 
the family will never be forgotten. 

The numerous great inventions 
which have been perfected by vari- 
ous members of the family have 
been important and of enormous 
value, not alone to this country, but 
to the whole world. 

Their daring and heroic under- 
takings and the splendid results ob- 
tained from these have put the 
Stevens family down in history as 
one of the most beneficial to man- 
kind. 



As philanthropists the family has 
benefited the community probably 
more than any other family in this 
part of the country. 

John Stevens, the founder of the 
family on this side of the Atlantic, 
immigrated to this country in 1699 
from England, where he was bom 
in 1687. He married Margaret 
Campbell. Their son John (2) was 
born in New York City in 1708. He 
married Elizabeth Alexander. Their 
children were : John ( 3 ) , Richard, 
anfl Mary, who married C. Living- 
ston. John (3) was born in New 
^'ork City in 1749. He married 
Rachel Cox. Their children were : 
John C. (4), Robert E., James. 
Richard, P'rancis 0., Edwin A., 
Julianna, Mary, Harriet, Esther 
Howes and Katrina. 

The second John settled in New 
Jersey, where he later became one 
of the joint commissioners for de- 
fining the boundary line between 
New Jersey and New York, in No- 
vcnil)er, 1774. Ele resigned as 
Ixoyalist Councilor in 1776 and 
from that year till 1782 was \'ice- 
President of the Council of New 
Jersey. In November 1783 he was 
elected to the Federal Congress, 
and on December 18th, 1787, pre- 
sided over the State Convention 
that ratified the United States Con- 
stitution. He died in 1792. 

John Stevens ( 3 ) , the grandson 
of John, the immigrant, was gradu- 
ated from Kings (now Columbia) 
College in 1768, was admitted to 
the liar, and during the Revolution- 
ary War held several offices, being 
Treasurer of New Jersey from 
1776 to 1779. On March 16, 1784, 
he bought Hoboken or the Bayard 
Estate, at auction, as mentioned in 
the historical section of this book. 
In 1790 he petitioned Congress for 
protection to American Inventors, 
which resulted in a law, passed 
April 10, 1790, that formed the 
foundation of the American Patent 
Law. Having begun experiments 



33 



ill the application of steam in 1788, 
he now continued them with his as- 
sociates Nicholas I. Roosevelt and 
the elder Brunei. Mr. Stevens, his 
brother-in-law Robert R. Living- 
ston and Nicholas I. Roosevelt built 
the steam boat and navigated the 
Hudson River near the close of the 
eighteenth century. Tlieir boat, 
however, failed to develop the speed 
required b)' the Legislature of New 
York and their joint proceedings 
were interrupted by the appoint- 
ment in 1801 of Livingston as Min- 
ister to hVaiice. In Paris the latter 
met Robert Inilton and afterwards 
was associated with him in estab- 
lishing and developing steam navi- 
gation. 

In 1804 Mr. Stevens built a ves- 
sel propelled b}' twin screws that 
navigated the Hudson, which was 
the first application of steam to the 
screw propellor. Li 1807, Mr. 
Stevens and his son, Robert, built 
the paddle wheel steam boat "Phoe- 
nix", which was used on the Dela- 
ware River for six years. Mr. 
Stevens was one of the greatest in- 
ventors and he secured patents on 
numerous important inventions. On 
October IL 1811, he established 
the rtrst steam ferry in the world 
with the "Juliana", which was 
operated between New York City 
and Hoboken, In 1813 he invented 
the ferry boat with the paddle 
\vheel in the middle, which was 
turned by six horses. This sample 
of horse-boat was long used on 
the Hudson and East Rivers. In 
1814, Mr. Stevens applied to the 
.State of New Jersey for a Railroad 
Charter from New York to Phila- 
delphia, which he received on Feb. 
15th. He did not proceed with the 
project, however, hi 1823, with 
Horace Binney and Stephen Girard, 
he obtained from the State of Penn- 
sylvania a Charter for a railway 
from Philadelphia to Lancaster 
along the route of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad. These were the first 



railroad charters granted in this 
country. On October 23. 1824, he 
obtained the patent for the con- 
struction of railroads. He built a 
circular railroad in Hoboken in 
1826 and placed on it a locomotive 
with a multi-tubular boiler wdiich 
carried a half dozen people at the 
rate of o\'er twelve miles an hour. 
This was the first loccjmotive that 
CA-er ran on a steel railroad in 
America. 

Air. Stevens built Castle Point 
in Hoboken and in 1833 replaced 
it by the present mansion. Colonel 
Stevens married Elizabeth Alex- 
ander, a sister of William Alex- 
ander, who laid claim to the liarl- 
dom of Sterling and was a famous 
General in the Revolutionary ^Var. 
Colonel Stevens died in Hoboken, 
March 6th. 1838. 

John Cox Stevens, son of John 
Stevens, was born September 24, 
1785, and died in Hoboken, June 
13, 1857. 

Robert I_.ivingston Stevens, an- 
other son of John Stevens, was 
born CJctober ISth, 1787, and died 
in Hoboken, April 20, 1856. 

James Alexander Stevens, also 
a son of John Stevens, was born 
January 29th, 1790, and died in 
Hoboken, October 7, 1873. 

Edwin Augustus Stevens, an- 
other son of John Stevens, was 
born at Castle Point, Hoboken. 
July 28, 1795. He married twice. 
His first wife was Mary B. Pieters, 
with whom he had two children, 
Mary P. and Elizabeth. His second 
wife was Martha B. Dod. The fol- 
lowing children blessed this union: 
John (5), Edwin A., Carolin B., 
Julia A., Robert L., Charles Albert, 
and Richard. He became an en- 
gineer and was very closely con- 
nected in business afifairs with his 
brother Robert L. 

Edwin A. Stevens was occupied 
largely in the management of his 
father's estate, on which the City of 
Hoboken now stands. He was also 



34 



connected with the organization, 
construction and operation of the 
Camden and Amboy Railroad, the 
charter for which he and Robert 
L. obtained from the State of New 
Jersey in 1830. Robert L. became 
the President and Edwin A. the 
Treasurer and Manager of the road 
which was opened for traffic in 
about 1842. The brothers made 
many improvements, among which 
may be mentioned the vestibule 
car. They retained their intei-est 
in navigation and made many im- 
provements thei-ein and became 
prominent in the invention, intro- 
duction and development of appli- 
ances for railroads, locomotives 
and cars. 

Edwin A. patented the air-tight 
fire room for the forced draught in 
1842. This invention is now used 
in all the great navies of the world. 
The brother also devised and ef- 
fected many improvements in the 
means of attack and defense in 
naval warfare. Edwin A. invented 
the steam plow which was very ex- 
tensively used for years. He 
founded the Stevens Institute in 
Hoboken and bequeathed to it and 
the High School a large plot of 
ground, $150,000 to the building 
and $500,000 for endowments. 
His widow, whose maiden name 
was Martha Bayard Dod, donated 
$200,000 to religious and charitable 
institutions, among which was the 
Church of the Holy Innocence of 
Hoboken. 

Edwin Augustus Stevens (2), 
the subject of this sketch, was the 
third oldest of eight children. He 
was born in Philadelphia, Pa., 
March 14, 1858, and obtained his 
education at St. Paul's School, Con- 
cord, N. J., and later at Princeton, 
N. J. • He built the first screw 
ferry boat, although the people ridi- 
culed his idea. This ferry boat is 
the "Bergen", which is still run- 
ning between Hoboken and New 
York. Many others of Mr. Ste- 



vens' screw ferry boats are to-day 
operated on the D. L. & W. R. R. 
ferries. 

In 1905 he received the degree 
of Doctor of Engineering from 
Stevens Institute of Technology. 
Mr. Stevens also built the electric 
light engine and marine engine. 

Like his ancestors, he soon be- 
came one of the most distinguished 
and influential citizens in this part 
of the country, and was honored 
with many public offices of great 
responsibility and trust. For six 
years he served as State Highway 
Commissioner. He also served on 
numerous other local and State 
Committees. 

Mr. Stevens took a deep interest 
in military life. He served as 
Adjutant of the Ninth Regiment, 
N. G. N. J., from 1880-1881, as 
Aide on the Governor's Staff from 
1881 to 1886, and as Colonel of the 
Second Regiment from 1886 to 
1892, when he retired. 

The Colonel served as an Elector 
in 1888 and 1892. In 1894 he made 
an unsuccessful attempt to become 
a member of Congress, and in 1906 
he was a prominent candidate for 
the U. S. Senate. 

His career has been an eminently 
successful one and stamped him as 
a man of unusual ability, of great 
force of character, and he was pos- 
sessed of that self-reliance and per- 
severance which characterize the 
man of affairs. He achieved a wide 
reputation as an able, conscientious 
man, a'nd through his many excel- 
lent qualities always had the con- 
fidence and respect of the entire 
community. 

Colonel Stevens married Emily 
C. Lewis in 1879. They had seven 
children: John, Edwin A., W. 
Lewis, Bayard, Basil M., Lawrence 
L., and Emily L. 

The Colonel was interested in 
many local institutions. He was 
President of the Hoboken Land and 
Improvement Co. and a director in 



35 



the First National Bank of Hobo- 
ken, the Commercial Trust Com- 
pany of Jersey City, and the Pru- 
dential Life Insurance Co. He was 
a Trustee of Stevens Institute of 
Technology, Treasurer of the Dio- 
cese of Newark, etc. 

Colonel Stevens died on March 
8th, 1918. 



The Peter Family. 



One of the most noted families 
in the County is the Wm. Peter 
family of Union Hill. 

Wm. Peter, Sr., was born in 
Achern, Baden, Germany, March 
16th, 1832. His parents were 
Franz Joseph and Antonia (Hof) 
Peter. His father was Mayor of 
Achern for a number of years and 
later served in the legislative bodies 
of Baden. He was a staunch 
democrat and took an active part 
in the revolution against Prussia, 
which brought him into quite some 
trouble and by which he lost his 
whole fortune. 

In 1849 he brought his wife and 
five children, William and four 
girls, and a son-in-law, Max Freeh, 
to America. They settled in New 
York City, where Joseph Peter 
opened a grocery store in Houston 
Street. Some time later he. helped 
his son-in-law to establish a wax 
candle manufacturing establish- 
ment in Port Richmond, Staten 
Island, where the family then 
moved. 

Mr. William Peter received a 
splendid education in his native 
country, where, after completing 
his High School course, he studied 
chemistry and then learned the 
trade of brewer. After the family 
had settled in New York, he se- 
cured a position in Wm. Richter's 
brewery in Hester Street and later 
went with an English brewery in 
New York in order to learn the 
English method of brewing beer. 



For the next few years he "aban- 
doned his trade and went with his 
brother-in-law into the wax manu- 
facturing business. He remained 
with him for a few years and then 
secured a position in a similar busi- 
ness in Harlem. His desire, how- 




WM. PETER, SR. 

ever, to return to his own trade, 
soon became so strong that he went 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he se- 
cured a position in a brewery and 
remained for three years. In 1857 
he returned to New York, where he 
worked as a brew master in various 
breweries controlled by the Lion 
Brewery Co. in New York, Newark 
and Staten Island. Then he changed 
his position to "First Man" in the 
Walther Brewery Co. in Williams- 
burg, Brooklyn, and in about 1859 
he started- his own little brewery in 
West New York at Seventeenth 
Street, near the Hudson Boulevard. 
The property consisted of a small 
wooden shanty, a stable, two lots, 
for which he paid the high rent of 
$44 per year. The -capacity of this 
brewery was three barrels per day. 
Later he removed the brewery to 
West Hoboken, where he soon 
after sold out. A short while after 
he worked for a short time as fore- 
man in George Fausel's brewery in 
Union Hill, and in 1864 he started 



36 



his present brewery in the house in 
which Bravinstein's Pavilion is now 
located on Hudson St., Union Hill. 
From then on the business expand- 
er and grew by great leaps every 
year. In 1886 he built a brewery 
at its present site, adding new 
buildings as the business expanded. 

It can readily be seen that Mr. 
Peter had no smooth road to travel 
in the beginning, but had many 
"ups and downs". He, however, 
was a man with an iron will and 
bound to succeed. When he started 
in business for himself, he had ex- 
actly $50 and his output of beer 
consisted of three barrels per day. 
To-day his company is one of the 
largest in the east and has a daily 
output of 1500 barrels. The pres- 
ent area covered by the various 
buildings of the company embraces 
a ground space of 600 x 600 feet, 
one city block. The structures are 
built of brick, stone, and iron, and 
are models of the architectural art. 
They are located on Hudson Ave., 
Weehawken Street, and Palisade 
Avenue. 

The latest and most up-to-date 
machinery is used for the manu- 
facturing of the product. The bott- 
ling department, which was erected 
1 few years ago, is one of the most 
complete in the State. The immense 
stables and garages are also located 
on the premises. 

In 1904 the company erected a 
modern two-story office brick build- 
mg on Hudson Ave., opposite the 
handsome residence of Mr. Wm. 
Peter, which was built by George 
Fausel. 

May 18th, 1890, the business was 
incorporated under the name of 
Wm. Peter Brewing Co. 

William Peter married three 
times. In 1858 he married Magda- 
lene Jager, with whom he had six 
children, Magdalene Anna, Emma, 
William, Charles, Philip, and 
August. 

In 1870 Mr. Peter married Caro- 



lina (Aeppli) Ohlenschlager, who 
had one child by a former mar- 
riage, Sophia Ohlenschlager. She 
later married Wm. Braunstein, 
whose mother was a sister of Wil- 
liam Peter. (See Braunstein, for- 
ward.) This second marriage of 
Mr. Peter, Sr., was blessed with 
two children, Amanda and Emil. 

In 1902 Wm. Peter, Sr., married 
Sophia (Vogel) Bertram, whose 
daughter Antonia, by her first hus- 
band, married August Peter, the 
son of her present husband. 

Anna, the oldest child of Wm. 
Peter Sr.'s first marriage, was born 
November 15, 1859. She married 
Karl Jenne, with whom she had 
three children. One of these died 
in infancy, Chas. Wm. Jenne died 
when 16 years old, and Marie C. 
Jenne died when one year of age. 

William Peter, Jr., the oldest son, 
was born in West New York, De- 
cember 11, 1860. He received his 
early education in the local public 
schools and completed his studies 
in Baden, Germany. 

Returning to' America, he at once 
began to study the brewing trade, 
and in order to learn the different 
methods, he traveled all over the 
country, working in the principal 
big breweries. 

In 1883 he returned to Union 
Hill, having mastered every detail 
in the art of brewing beer. He was 
appointed General Superintendent 
and Brewing Master of the WilHam 
Peter Brewing Co. 

Mr. Peter, Jr., married Mary 
Veseput in 1890. There are no 
children. 

In the many several organiza- 
tions of which Mr. Peter is a mem- 
ber, he is a great favorite. His 
frank and democratic manners and 
his pleasing personality have gained 
him a host of friends. 

Charles Peter was born in the 
Peter Mansion at Union Hill, De- 
cember 20, 1862. After attending 
the public schools he spent several 



37 



years in travel and benefited greatly 
by his observations. 

After his return he became very 
efficient in the office details and real 
estate department in his father's 
brewery. 

Some years ago he suffered a 
sunstroke and went to Germany to 
undergo treatment. 

August Peter was also born in 
the homestead in Union Hill. He 
came to this world June 25, 1868. 

Like his older brother, he ob- 
tained his early education at the 
local public schools, later attended 
the Hoboken Academy, and took a 
commercial course at Packard's 
Business College. He has since 
been associated with the other 
members of the family in the 
Brewing Co., in which he occupies 
an important position. 

He married (first) Alice Christi- 
ansen, in 1892, with whom he has 
one child, William August. 

He married (second) Antonia 
Bertram in 1905. One daughter, 
Elfrieda, blessed this union. 

Although Mr. August Peter is 
not a member of any societies, he is 
very popular and his friendship is 
greatly esteemed. 

Philip, the youngest child of the 
first marriage, died when only an 
infant. 

Emil Peter, second child of the 
second marriage of William Peter, 
Sr., was born in the family resi- 
dence in Union Hill, October 22, 
1873. He was ediucated at the 
Hoboken Academy and went 
abroad to finish his education in the 
colleges of Karlsruhe and Munich, 
Germany. After spending four 
years and a half at college, he re- 
turned home and was made Secre- 
tary of the Wm. Peter Brewing 
Company. 

As a man with considerable more 
than the average official ability, he 
was put in charge of the office de- 
partment. Although this was pro- 
bably one of the most difficult po- 



sitions in the company, he dis- 
charged his duties in the most able 
manner and made a large circle of 
friends with ' the hundreds of 
people who had business dealings 
with the company which naturally 
went through the office. 

He married Amy Conley, who 
died in 1915. In 1916 he married 
Rose C. Sutton. He had no 
children. 

He was a very prominent mem- 
ber of the Masonic Order and se- 
veral other societies. Mr. Emil 
Peter died December 5, 1917, to 
the great sorrow of his family and 
of the community in which he had 
achieved an eminent reputation. 

William Braunstein, oldest son of 
Captain Franz and Marie Louise 
(Peter) Braunstein, was born in 
New York City, January 3, 1854. 
His mother was a sister of William 
Peter,' Sr. His father, Captain F. 
Braunstein, served this country in 
the civil war and was soon pro- 
moted to Captain for his gallant 
services. 

William Braunstein obtained his 
educational training in the public 
schools of New York City and in 
Union Hill. At the age of 19 he 
entered the employ of the William 
Peter Brewing Co. as a clerk. He 
soon became thoroughly efficient in 
every detail of the administration 
of the business and was then made 
Treasurer of the company. 

Mr. Braunstein has taken an ac- 
tive interest in public affairs and in 
1888 he was elected Treasurer of 
the Town of Union, which office he 
held for eight years. He is very 
prominently connected in fraternal 
circles and is a member of the Pali- 
sade Lodge, No. 84, F. & A. M.; 
Cyrus Chapter No. 32, Royal Arch 
Masons ; Pilgrim Commandery No. 
16, Knights Templars, of Hoboken ; 
Mecca Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine; and a member of the An- 
cient and Accepted Order Scottish 



38 



Rite. He is a member of the Arion 
Society of New York and the Lie- 
dertafel, Union Hill. He wai one 
of the organizers of the Old 
People's Home and Benevolent As- 
sociation of North Hudson, of 
which he has been Treasurer for a 
number of years. 

Mr. Braunstein married Sophie 
Ohlenschlager, with whom he had 
three children : Antoinette Caroline, 
Erna Amanda (who married Coun- 
sellor Charles Kappes, with whum 
she has one son, Charles William 
Kappes, ancHa daughter, S. Wini- 
fred), and William Peter, named 
after his grandfather. 

Few men can count as large a 
circle of friends as Mr. William 
Braunstein enjoys. His demo- 
cratic, open and frank manners, and 
his pleasing personality have m;uie 
him immensely popular. 

Mr. William Peter, Sr., made his 
success upon the foundation of 
business ability, honesty, and strict 
attention to his work. He was one 
of the most shrewd business men 
in the community. Possessed of a 
great foresight and unusual, sound 
judgment and imbued with an un- 
impeachable integrity, he achie\cd 
an enviable reputation in business 
as well as in social circles. He was 
one of the foremost factors in the 
upbuilding and developing of 
North Hudson. He can truly be 
called one of the makers of the 
Town of Union, having brought ta 
it one of the principal industries, 
and establishing a business which 
gives employment to a large num- 
ber of inhabitants. 

The large real estate holdings of 
the William Peter Brewing Corii- 
pany pay a great sum annually in 
taxes to the town. Mr. Peter's 
giant enterprises stand as a monu- 
ment to his immense business 
ability. As an employer he was 
greatly esteemed by his employees. 

Mr. Peter was a public-spirited 
and loyal citizen, and in numerous 



ways contributed large sums of 
money for the prosecution of the 
great war. 

In local affairs he was also ever 
ready to lend a helping hand to any 
worthy movement of benefit to the 
community. He was a great phi- 
lanthropist and never forgot that, 
although he had climbed the ladder 
to success, others had not been able 
to do so. To those he was always 
willing to give a helping hand. 

His children are closely, follow- 
ing their father's footsteps, and 
what has been said about the father 
can truly be said about every mem- 
ber of his family. ,. /^Vx 

The Peter family rank among 'the 
foremost in business and social 
circles and is one of the families of 
which the Town of Union can be 
proud. 

Mr. Peter's greatest hobby was 
art, and up to the very end of his 
life passed many hours in his art 
studio painting landscapes, for 
which he had shown a great talent 
from his early youth. 

On Monday, June the 10th, 1918, 
at 9 P. M., Mr. William Peter sud- 
denly died at his home, after he had 
spent a whole day up to six o'clock 
in his office going over some de- 
tails with his son. 

He reached the high age of 
eighty-six years. His death came 
as a sudden shock to his family and 
friends and to Hudson County, 
which lost one of its most valuable 
and most beloved citizens. 



The Schneider Family. 



One of the most highly esteemed 
and respected families in the nor- 
thern part of the County is the 
Schneider family of Union Hill. 

Fred Schneider, and his wife 
Sophia, both natives of Germany, 
immigrated to this country in 1853 
and settled in New York City. Ten 
years later Fred Schneider opened 



39 



a small tinware and stoves store in 
Canal St., New York, and in 1867 
he moved the business to Union 
Hill and opened a store at Palisade 




years ago and his son William died 
about two years ago, leaving three 
children, Emil, Fred and Cora. The 
latter married Charles Fisher, who 
conducted a hardware business in 
West Hoboken for a number of 
years and later consolidated with 
the Schneider firm. 

Emil Schneider, the present head 
of the concern, married Julia Sie- 
gele in 1889. They have two chil- 
dren, Minnie and Albert E. 

As mentioned before, the firm of 
F. Schneider & Son Co. is one of 
the largest concerns in the county 
dealing in hardware, auto supplies, 
paint, house furnishings, toys, etc. 
The firm is widely known for its 
fair dealings in every respect. 



Fred. Schneider. 

Ave. and Jefferson St. The business 
met with success and in 1876 it 
was found necessary to move into 
larger quarters on Bergenline Ave. 
and Lewis St. In the meantime 
the business had grown into a hard- 
ware and house furnishing store, 
and in 1896 the business was moved 
to its present location at 80-86 Ber- 
genline Avenue, and has for years 
been known as one of the largest 
establishments of its kind in Hud- 
son County. 

Mr. Schneider's two sons, \\'i\- 
liam and Emil, had jn the meantime 
been taken into the business and 
the firm became known as F. 
Schneider & Sons, or more com- 
monly known as ''Big Schneider". 
The firm built the present place, 
which is three stories high and has 
a floor space of 25,000 square feet. 
Thirty-five employees are continu- 
ally kept busy there. 

Fred Schneider died about five 




Emil Schneider. 

The Schneider Family has con- 
tributed much to the development 
and upbuilding of North Hudson 
especially. The family owns con- 
siderable property in this section as 
well as a summer home in Bergen 



40 



County, and another at Laurel 
Beach, Milford, Conn. This is one 
of the most beautiful estates on the 
water front. Always interested in 
every movement of welfare to the 
community and always ready to 




Albert E. Schneider. 

lend a helping hand to any deserv- 
ing charity, the Schneider Family 
has gained the admiration of the 
local residents. 

Emil Schneider is a man of the 
highest business qualifications and 
one of the most shrewd business 
men in the section. He has achieved 
an enviable reputation for his good 
judgment and unquestionable in- 
tegrity. 

Albert E., the only son, is closely 
following his father's footsteps. 
Although a young man, he is show- 
ing unusual abilities in his father's 
business. He was born in Union 
Hill, where he received his early 
school education and later attended 
a military academy. He then at- 
tended business school, and after 
completing his course, was offered 
a position by the well known firm of 



Sargent and Company in New 
York. His father, however, needed 
him in his business, where he now is 
interested. 

Albert Schneider is one of the 
most popular young men in North 
Hudson, where he has gained a 
host of friends by his straightfor- 
wardness and pleasing disposition. 
He is very fond of automobiling 
and is the owner of several cars. 
As an autoist he has achieved quite 
some fame. Outside of business 
he speaks and thinks of nothing else 
but autos and knows a machine in 
every detail. 



William Dahm. 



One of the most respected citizens 
in the northern part of the county 
is Wm. Dahm, of North Bergen. 

He was born in Germany, Octo- 
ber 6th, 1867. His parents immi- 




grated into this country when he 
was only seven years old and the 
family settled in North Bergen. 
When William had finished his 
schooling in the North Bergen 



41 



schools, he secured a job in a gro- 
cery store and later worked in the 
oil business, in which he has since 
continued and made a great success. 
Mr. Dahm has for the last fourteen 
years been treasurer of the Bel- 
mont Gurnee Stone Company, Inc., 
in North Bergen, one of the largest 
concerns of its kind in this part of 
the country, and has four quarries, 
one located at Granton, N. J., one 
at Mount Ivy, New York, one at 
Sufifern, N. Y , and one at West 
Nyack, N. Y. 

The main quarry and ofifice in 
North Bergen employs from sixty 
to seventy men and has its own rail- 
road facilities for shipping. 

Mr. Dahm is also interested in se- 
veral other enterprises. He is Pre- 
sident of the Belmont Stone Co., 
President of the Hillside Sand Co., 
and Treasurer of the Belmont Auto 
Trucking Co. He is considered one 
of the ablest and .shrewdest business 
men and possessed of great fore- 
sight and unimpeachable integrity. 

He was elected a memeber of the 
Board of Freeholdeers in 1903 and 
served one term, and although his 
renomination was offered him for a 
second term, he declined. He was 
one of the organizers of Pioneer 
Hose Co., the first fire company in 
North Bergen, and is now an Ex- 
empt Fireman. 

Mr. Dahm married Eleanor Stock- 
fish, of the well known North Ber- 
gen family, in 1896. They have five 
children: Arthur, William, Luetta. 
Herbert, and Walter. The family 
residence, one of the most beautiful 
residences on Hackensack Plank- 
road, was built about 110 years a^o. 

Mr. Dahm is a member of the 
Elks, Hoboken No. 74, and the 
Foresters, of which he was one of 
the organizers of Court Friendship. 



Richard Meyer. 



In the city record of Eisenberg 
in Sachsen-Altenburg, Germany, 
the Meyer family can be traced 
back for over four hundred years. 
In these four last centuries the 




family has been engaged in the tan- 
nery business, which has been 
handed down from father to son. 

C. F W. Meyer was the last 
member of the family to conduct 
the business in Germany. He immi- 
grated to this country in August, 
1846, and settled in Philadelphia, 
where he continued the business in 
this country. 

Richard Meyer, the subject of 
this sketch, and the son of C. F. W. 
and Carolina Fredericka (Uhl) 
Meyer, was born at the family's 
homestead in Germany, November 
22, 1842. He received his school 
education in Philadelphia and when 
of age entered the father's business. 

The family moved the business to 
Union Hill in 1863 and when, four 
years later, a boiler exploded in the 
building where the plant was locat- 
ed, the tannery was moved to its 



42 



present location on Third St., North 
Bei-gen. This was November 14th, 
1867. The plant covers four city 
lots and employs ten men.. It spe- 
cializes in pianoforte buckskin. 

Mr. Meyer married Pauline 
Louisa Beyer in 1869. The union 
was blessed with six children, of 
which five are living. They are : 
Lena A., Christian Frederick Wil- 
liam, Richard E. (who married 
Mary Schaaf ; they have two chil- 
dren, Richard A. and Walter Wil- 
liam), Carolina Fredericka, and 
Louis Albert (who married Marie 
Haust; they have one child, Mary 
Louisa). The three sons are as- 
sisting their father in the business. 

Mr. Meyer has achived an emi- 
nent standing in the cotnmunity for 
his great ability and integrity. He 
is a true example of a hard work- 
ing and honest man who has suc- 
ceeded through his own efforts. He 
is a member of the Odd Fellows. 

A beautiful life size oil painting 
of a minister, a member of the 
Meyer family, is decorating one of 
the walls in the Meyer residence in' 
North Bergen. This is a copy of 
an original accidentally discovered 
in a church in Germany by Mr. 
Meyer when he was visiting his 
native country some years ago. 
The niKnerals 1686-1716 appear on 
this painting, but Mr. Meyer has 
been unable to find out just 
what these figures represent. The 
church would not give up the 
original painting, so Mr. Meyer had 
a copy made of it and brought it 
back to this country with him. 



in Jersey Heights in 1856. Mr. 
Francois was the seventli of four- 
teen children. He received his 
public school education at School 
No. 2 in Jersey City Heights and 



J. C. Francois. 

Judsqn Camille Francois, the 
former recognized leader of the De- 
mocratic Party in West Hoboken, 
was born in Brussels, Belgium, 
Dec. 5, 1850. His parepts, Joseph 
Francois and Pauline Maria, immi- 
grated to this country and settled 




later entered his father's hair dres- 
sing establishment. He has since, 
like eleven of his brothers and sis- 
ters, achieved professional promi- 
nence as a hair dresser in New 
York and New Jersey. In 1872 he 
opened his present hair dressing 
parlors at 419 Paterson Ave., West 
Hoboken, and for several years he 
conducted a similar establishment 
in New York City. 

Mr. Francois has been very ac- 
tive and prominent in the Demo- 
cratic Party since 1876, when he 
was elected Constable. This office, 
which he held for sixteen consecu- 
tive years, was the foundation for 
his future political career. In 1889 
he was elected to the New Jersey 
Legislature to fill a vacancy. While 
in this office he introduced several 
bills, among which may be men- 
tioned the one giving one police- 
man for every eight hundred of 



43 



population in West Hoboken, an- 
other providing that a defendant 
under arrest should have three 
days' notice before the date of his 
trial. He introduced and had 
passed many other bills too numer- 
ous to mention here. 

In 1892 he was elected Council- 
man for West Hoboken, in which 
office he served two years. He held 
the office of the Justice of the 
Peace for a number of years and 
also that of Democratic County 
Committeeman. For four years he 
was Treasurer of the Board of 
Fire Trustees and was the founder 
and standard bearer of the J. C. 
Francois Association. He was a 
member of the Town Fire Depart- 
ment, Neptune Engine Co., for 
twenty-two years. He served in 
Company B, Fourth Regiment, N. 
G. N. J., for ten years. Mr. Fran- 
cois is a Commissioner of Deeds, 
Committeeman, and Constable. 

Mr. Francois was married to 
Martha Stilwell in 1872, with 
whom he had four children : Joseph 
Judson, Martha, Alexander, and 
Edward C. Francois, Acting Post- 
master, West Hoboken Post Office. 

Mrs. Francois later died, and in 
1902 Mr. Francois married Sophia 
Naef, with whom he has two sons,. 
Judson C. Francois and Edgar 
Judson, who at the writing of this 
is five years old, and one daughter, 
Cammille Annie. 

The most remarkable feature is 
Mr. Francois' robust health. Al- 
though 67 years of age, his strength 
is twice that of many a normal 
young man. 



James W. Cranwell. 



Few men have contributed more 
to the growth and prosperity of the 
Town of West Hoboken than 
James Cranwell, one of the fore- 
most builders and contractors in 
the county. 



Associated with his father under 
the firm name of George W. Cran- 
well & Son, he has erected build- 
ings in West Hoboken which yield 
over a quarter of a million dollars 
in annual taxes to that town. The 




activity of this concern has not 
been confined to West lioboken 
alone, but has extended over the 
whole State of New Jersey as well 
as New York State. The Union 
Hill Town Hall, the Union Hill 
High School, St. Michael's* Paro- 
chial High School, St. Michael's 
Parochial Grammar School, Public 
Schools Nos. 6 and 7, Free Public 
Library of West Hoboken, St. Jo-. 
seph's R. C. Church of Bayonne, 
Public Service Commercial Build- 
ing in Union Hill and hundreds of 
factories, loft buildings, large 
apartment houses and private resi- 
dences have been erected by his 
firm. 

Mr. Cranwell, Sr., erected the 
original part of the Monastery in 
West Hoboken, and numerous 
churches and structures of all 
kinds throughout the States of 
New York and New Jersey. He 



44 



has for some years retired from 
active life, and the business has 
since been conducted by his son 
James W. Cranwell. 

Like his father, he has become 
one of the most conspicuous build- 
ers and contractors in the State. 
His work shows great skill and 
ability and stamps him as one of 
the ablest men of his vocation. He 
is thorough in every detail, con- 
scientious and practical in carry- 
ing aut his contracts. He has 
achieved an eminent reputation for 
his foresight, sound judgment and 
his capacity for business. He is a 
public - spirited and enterprising 
citizen and is universally respected 
for those virtues which make up 
the loyal friend and honest man. 

James W. Cranwell was born in 
Union Hill in 1866. His parents 
were George W. and Margaret 
(Fullerton) Cranwell. He was 
the oldest of five children and 
the only son. His father's parents 
were Edward and Elizabeth Cran- 
well, natives of Ireland, where 
George W. Cranwell was born on 
December 25, 1836. The family 
immigrated to this country and 
settled in Utica, N. Y., and in 1857 
moved to West Hobokeri. A short 
time after James W. was born the 
family returned to Utica, where 
James received his early school 
education. The family moved 
back to West Hoboken in 1886 and 
has resided in that town ever 
since. 

After finishing his early educa- 
tion, James Cranwell started to 
learn the building and contracting 
business of his father, and was 
later taken in as a member of the 
firm. 

While always interested in the 
welfare of his town, Mr. Cranwell 
has. never sought nor accepted any 
political office, with the exception 
of that of Tax Collector, which of- 
fice he held some years ago. 

Mr. Cranwell married Katherine 



McConan in 1894. They had ten 
children, of which eight are living, 
five boys and three girls. His wife 
died in 1913, and two years later 
Mr. Cranwell married her sister 
Minnie. 



The MeeKs Family. 



Joseph Meeks was a prominent 
citizen in New York City prior to 
the American Revolution. His 
name appears on the poll list of the 
electors of the City of New York 
in 1761. He was a patriot, and 
his three sons, John, Joseph, and 
Edward, all fought in the patriotic 
cause during the Revolution. 

Captain John Meeks, the eldest 
son, married in New York City 
Susanna Helena Maria de Moli- 
nars, of an old French Huguenot 
family. She was the daughter of 
Jean Joseph de Molinars, and a 
granddaughter of Jean Joseph 
Sieur Brumeau de Molinars, who 
was at one time assistant to the 
Rev. Louis Rou of L'Egljse de 
Saint d'Espirit of New York City. 
John Meeks held the commission as 
Captain during the Revolution, in 
the famous regiment known as the 
"Hearts of Oak". He owned a 
country place at Morristown, N. J., 
adjoining Washington's headquar- 
ters, and his wife acted as inter- 
preter for Washington and Lafay- 
ette during the time of their stay 
there. As a reward for his ser- 
vice during the Revolution Captain 
John Meeks received a grant of 
land near Syracuse, N. Y., which 
his descendants have never claim- 
ed. He had several sons and a 
daughter. 

Joseph Meeks, the second son, 
was a prominent citizen of New 
York City. At the age of twelve 
he assisted in tearing down the 
British flag from the top of a 
greased pole erected in Battery 
Park. Subsequently he was a sol- 



45 



dier in the war of 1912. He was 
one of the founders of the original 
Tammany Society, from which 
Tammany Hall has sprung. He 
married Sarah, daughter of Colo- 
nel A'an Dyke, an ofiicer of the 
Revolution and a descendant of 




one of the best known old Dutch 
families of New York. They had 
several sons and two daughters. 

John Meeks, the oldest son of 
the preceding, married Elizabeth 
Bush, granddaughte,r of Richard! 
Bragaw of Revolutionary fame. 
He became a resident of Hudson 
County and in 1851 acquired about 
150 acres of land, the present site 
of Woodcliff. It is upon this land 
that, through the enterprise of his 
son Hamilton V. Meeks, the pres- 
ent political section of Woodcliff 
has sprung up. 

Hamilton V. Meks was born in 
New York City, Dec. 19, 1850. His 
father was a member of the New 
York firm of J. and J. AV Meeks, 
cabinetmakers. This business was 
originally established on Broad 
Street and barely missed destruc- 
tion in the great fire in New York 



City in 1835, being just on the edge 
of the burnt district. 

On November 4, 1874, Hamilton 
V Meeks married Euretta Elea- 
nore, daughter of Robert E. Gard- 
ner, of the prominent Gardner 
family in Union Hill, and the sarne 
fall engaged in business with his 
father-in-law, under the name of 
Gardner & Meeks, lumber dealers 
of Union Hill and Guttenberg. 
This business had been originally 
founded by the firm of J. & R. 
Gardner, which became successive- 
ly Robert E. Gardner and Gardner 
& Meeks. Upon the death of Mr. 
Gardner in 1895, the Gardner & 
Meeks Company was incorporated. 

Hamilton V. Meeks was a liberal 
donor of two-thirds of the right of 
way which enabled the construction 
of the Grand Boulevard on the 
crest of the west bank of the Hud- 
son overlooking New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meeks had three 
children, two sons and a daughter, 
Howard Victor Meeks, Clarence 
Gardner Meeks, and Euretta Ele- 
anor Meeks. 

Howard Victor Meeks was born 
in Union Hill in 1878. After fin- 
ishing his public school education 
he studied engineering at the Ste- 
vens Institute in Hoboken, from 
which institution he graduated in 
1901. He worked as an engineer 
for three years and then went into 
the firm of Gardner & Meeks, of 
which company he later became 
Treasurer. 

In 1903 he married Ethel Colon, 
with whom he has two children, 
Eleanor and Katherine. 

Mr. Meeks is a member and 
Treasurer of the Sigma-Nu, a col- 
lege fraternity of Stevens Insti- 
tute, Secretary of the Woodcliff 
Land Improvement Co., Secretary 
and Treasurer of the Union Auto- 
mobile Co., and a member of the 
Areola County Club. 

Clarence Gardner Meeks was 
born in Union Hill in 1880, where 



46 



also he received his pubHc school 
education. He then attended a 
private school in Hoboken, and 
later studied at the Columbia Col- 
lege in New York, from which in- 
stitution he graduated in 1901. He 




then went into the company of 
Gardner & Meeks, of which he 
later became the President. 

Mr. Meeks is inuch interested in 
public affairs, and a few years agf 
was appointed as County Park 
Commissioner. In this office he 
has been very instrumental in beau- 
tifying the parks in the county. 

Mr. Meeks married Lilly Ben- 
nett of Bayridge, Brooklyn, in 
1901. They have three children, 
Hamilton, Elizabeth and Clarence, 

Jr. 

Mr.. Meeks as a member of the 
F. and A. M., Salaam Chapter of 
Mystic Shrine, Trustee New Jer- 
sey Lumber Protective Association, 
Treasurer of the Woodclifif Land 
and Improvement Co., member of 
the Carteret Downtown Club of 
Jersey City, the Columbia Univer- 
sity Club, the Areola County Club, 
the Spring Lake County Club, the 



Building Material Exchange of 
New York, theLumber Trade Club 
of New York, the Lumber Trade 
Association, and the Labor Com- 
mittee of New York. 

Like all their ancestors, Messrs. 
Hamilton and Clarence Meeks ai?e 
highly esteemed and respected for 
their business abilities and unim- 
peachable business integrity. They 
are great philanthropists and al- 
ways ready and willing to aid every 
worthy movement. 



Louis C. Hauenstein. 



Louis C. Hauenstein, Recorder 
of the Town of Union, is one of 
the most prominent men in North 
Hudson. He was born in Germany 
in 1842. He emigrated to this coun- 
try in 1856 and settled in New 
York, but a few years later moved 
to North Hudson, where he se- 
cured a position as collector with 
the Bermes Brewery. In 1880 he 




established a brewery in Gutten- 
berg, which he twelve years later 
sold to the Rock Spring Brewery 
Co. He then went into the Real 



47 



Estate and Insurance business. In 
1861-65 he served in the U. S. 
Army. 

The Judge has been very promi- 
nent in public affairs and has been 
elected to various offices of respon- 
sibility and trust. He served six 
years as Mayor of Union Hill, was 
twice elected to the Board of Free- 
holders, and was elected a member 
of the Board of Council several 
times. 

In 1887 he was elected Recorder 
of the Town of Union, which of- 
fice he still holds. 

The Judge has gained an envi- 
able reputation for his ability, in- 
tegrity and sound judgment. While 
on the bench he has always been 
highly regarded for his fair deci- 
sions and judgments. He is patri- 
otic, public -r spirited, and has al- 
ways been a staunch member of the. 
Democratic Party. Personally he 
is a strong man and is recognized 
as such in the community. While 
possessed of all the dignity that be- 
longs to his office, he is also a man 
of genial nature, refined courtesy 
and urbanity. He makes friends 
without effort and always keeps 
them. 

The Judge married Theresa 
Gnand in 1871. They have twelve 
children. 



Oscar Broberg. 



Oscar Broberg, a leading builder 
in Woodcliff, N. J., and a member 
of the firm of Adie and Broberg, 
was born in Sweden on May 18, 
1875. There he received his early 
education and later served in the 
Army. He came to this country 
in 1897, and immediately upon his 
arrival started to learn the carpen- 
ter trade in New York City. 

He came to Hudson County in 
1910 and settled in the Woodcliff 
section, where he one year later 
started his own business as car- 



penter and builder. The follow 
ing year he went into partnership 
with G. Addie. 

Mr. Broberg is a man of recog- 
nized ability, and as a builder has 
achieved eminent success. He is 
thorough in every detail, energetic 




and practical in carrying out his 
contracts, and prompt in all his 
undertakings. His foresight, inte- 
grity and sound judgment arid his 
capacity for business have brought 
him into local prominence. His 
pleasing personality is gaining him 
a large circle of friends. 

Mr. Broberg was married to 
Siegrid Eckdel in 1896. 

He has, in partnership with Mr. 
Addie, built over one hundred pri- 
vate residences in the section, and 
has gained a high reputation as an 
honest and conscientious builder. 

As a citizen he is patriotic and 
public spirited and always interest- 
ed in anything which may benefit 
the community. 

Mr. Broberg resides in a beauti- 
ful home at 400 30th St., Wood- 
cHff. 



4a 



William Gulden. 



William Gulden, of Union Hill, 
is one of the most widely known 
and highly respected men in North 
Hudson. His furniture establish- 
ment is known all over the county 
and state. The business was 
established by his father, William 




Gulden, in 1868. He started a 
small furniture and repairing store 
in Union St., between Hudson and 
Park Avenue. 

William Gulden, the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Union Hill, 
November 12, 1854. After com- 
pleting his public school education 
he became a salesman in his fa- 
ther's furniture store. Later he 
established his own furniture store 
in New York City. But as he was 
eager to learn every detail and 
branch of the business, he soon 
gave up his store in New York and 
became a traveling salesman for a 
large wholesale furniture house. 
In this way he not alone learned all 
there was to learn about the dif- 
ferent pieces of furniture, but he 



also learned different business 
methods from the various furniture 
concerns he visited in different 
parts of the country. 




In 1882 he returned to Union 
Hill. Full of new and modern 
ideas, he took charge of his father's 
store, which the following year was 
moved into larger quarters at 81-83 
(now 149-151) Bergenline Ave. 
It did not take long before the 
Imsiness, under Mr. Gulden's man- 
agement, started to prosper and 
people from all over the section 
started to patronize the store. Be- 
fore that time, the store had only, 
been known in the near vicinity. 
Mr. Gulden always found new 
methods of attracting the public's 
attention to his store and the num- 
ber of pleased customers grew by 
leaps. It did not take long before 
it was found necessary to enlarge 
the quarters, and in 1892 a large 
four-story brick building was built 
at the same location. Business in 
this new building continued to grow 
and the Gulden furniture stablish- 
ment was fast becoming one of the 
largest of its kind in the state. As 



49 



business was just at the highest, 
and only a few weeks before Christ- 
mas, in 1916, a fire broke out one 
evening and burned the building 
down to the ground. It was one 
of the largest fires in the history of 
North Hudson. People from all 
over North Hudson hastened to 
condole Mr. Gulden, who, every- 
body thought, would retire from 
business. However, a great sur- 
pi-ise was in store ' for those 
who thought so. Although Mr. 
Gulden at that time was a man 62 
years of age, his spirits were by no 
means broken, he was naturally 
deeply aflfected, but quick in his de- 
cision to start all over again. 

A few days after the fire he had 
rented a vacant store, and to the 
great astonishment of the people in 
the section, he opened up with a 
new stock. In the meantime an 
architect was engaged to draw 
plans for- a new building, the ruins 
from the fire were torn down, and 
at the writing of this article, the 
outside walls of the new building 
are already up. This building will 
be 5 stories high, of beautiful ar- 
chitecture, and will be another 
structure of which Union Hill 
can be proud. All through this 
crisis, in which many a man 
would have completely broken 
down, Mr. Gulden has shown a re- 
markably strong determination. 
This in fact has been the founda- 
tion for his success. Strong in his 
convictions, strong in character and 
possessed of a great business abil- 
ity, no obstacles can possibly stop 
his efiforts. 

In many other ways, Mr. Gulden 
has been instrumental in the de- 
velopment of the community. He 
is President of the Phoenix Pad 
Manufacturing Co. of Baltimore, 
President of New York Excelsior 
Co., and one of the Directors of the 
Weehawken Trust Co. He is a 
great philanthropist and closely 
identified with charitable work. He 



is connected with the North Hud- 
son Hospital, of which institution 
he was the first and only financial 
secretary. 

He is a member of the Eintracht 
Singing Society and many other as- 
sociations and was formerly Presi- 
dent of the North Hudson Board 
of Trade. 

He has never sought or accepted 
any political offices, although it is 
well recognized that he would be 
the strongest candidate in the town 
for any office he may desire. 

As a citizen he is thoroughly 
identified with the best interests in 
the town. His genial and pleasing 
manners and his sterling business 
character have gained him a host 
of friends. 



James G. Morgan. 



James G. Morgan is one of the 
prominent, enterprising, public- 
spirited and respected citizens of 
the Town of Union and has been 
honored by his fellow-citizens by 
elections and appointments to many 
offices of responsibility and trust. 
He has taken a live interest in 
everything pertaining to the welfare 
of the community. He has faith- 
fully discharged the many duties 
connected- with the important posi- 
tions he has held, and won the pub- 
lic confidence by his integrity, fair- 
ness and sound judgment. 

Mr. Morgan was born in Wee- 
hawken at Duer Place, July 17, 
1848. He is the son of John Mor- 
gan and Sarah Gardner, the latter's 
ancestors dating back to the eigh- 
teenth century in Union Hill. 

Mr. Morgan's great-grand- 
father, E. F. Gardner, owned a 
large part of Union Hill or what 
at that time was called North Ho- 
boken. His property extended 
from what is now called Union St. 
to Columbia St., including a large 



SO 



part of Weehawken. Mr. Gard- 
ner's grandfather later sold this 
property to the North Hoboken 
Land Co., with the exception of ten 
acres, which he reserved for the 
children. 

It may be mentioned here that 
Gardner St. received its name from 
E. F. Gai-dner and John St. from 
John Gardner. Morgan St. re- 
ceived its name from John Morgan. 

John Morgan immigrated to this 
country from Scotland in 1824 and 
settled at Central Park, N. Y. He 
came to this section in 1825, when 
he took charge of Major Wallace's 
estate, which was later sold to Gen. 
Sheppitan and still later sold to 
James King, whom Mr. Morgan 
served as horticulturist and stew- 
ard up to 1862, when he retired. 
He died in 1876. 

Mr. J. Moi-gan took an active 
part in public affairs and was 
elected to the Board of Council, and 
also served in the Board of Free- 
holders and as Commissioner in the 
Board of Equalization of Taxes of 
Hudson County. 

James G. Morgan, the subject of 
this sketch, attended Public School 
and later the German American 
School, where he studied under 
Prof. Seidhorf and this Profes- 
sors' sister-in-law Augusta Friede- 
rich for four years. Later he 
studied under Dr. Wm. Mabon and 
then attended the College Institute 
of. New York. After his gradua- 
tion from this institution he se- 
cured a position as clerk with the 
Grand Locomotive \\^orks of 
Paterson, N. J., where he was em- 
ployed until his marriage. 

He returned to Union Hill to 
the house his father had built at 
Columbia St. and New York Ave., 
in 1863. Mr. Morgan entered the 
real estate business in 1869 and was 
very successful in this field up to 
1911, when he retired. 

In 1903 he became Vice-Presi- 



dent of the Third National Bank in 
Jersey City. 

As this was later merged with 
the Commercial Trust Co. of Jersey 
City, he became the Vice-President 
of this institution on January 17, 
1915, and was assigned to theGrove 
St. Branch of this institution. Mr. 
Morgan is also Director of the Ho- 
boken Bank of Savings, which of- 
fice he has filled since 1885. 

Mr. Morgan has always been 
ready to serve the community when 
called to fill some important office. 
He was appointed School Trustee 
in 1870 and served several terms as 
Recorder of Union Hill. He was 
also Justice of the Peace for sev- 
eral years. In 1878 he was elected 
to the Board of Freeholders, where 
he served two terms. He also held 
the office of Collector of Arrears 
of Union Hill. In 1892 he was 
elected Presidential Elector for 
Cleveland. Governor Murphy ap- 
pointed Mr. Morgan to the Board 
of Morris Plains Insane Institution, 
which Board he served for six 
years. He was appointed to the 
County Board of Equalization of 
Taxes in 1881 and served on this 
Board for twenty-one years, lie- 
coming President of the Board. He 
has served as Clerk and President 
of numerous other important com- 
missions. 

Mr. Morgan is a member of the 
Masonic Order, Mystic Tie No. 
123, and is a Royal Arch Mason, 
Pen Talpha, Chapter 11. 

Mr. Morgan's daughter. Miss 
Sadie, married Robert Dixon, the 
prominent architect. 

Mr. Morgan has travelled very 
extensively berth by sea and! by 
land. He has visited West Indies, 
Canada, and nearly every part of 
Europe, and has on his trips in- 
cluded every place of interest. He 
is a very keen observer of people 
and their customs and has closely 
studied conditions in the countries 
he has visited. He has seen nearly 



SI 



every battle field of historic inter- 
est. Mr. Morgan's sterling busin- 
ess character, his perseverance, 
united with great business tact and 
skill, has brought him into promi- 
nence and his pleasing personality 
and geniality has gained him a 
large circle of friends. 



R. C. Dixon. 



Robert Campbell Dixon, one of 
the most eminent architects in the 
county, with offices at 548 Park 
Avenue, Weehawken, has contrib- 
uted much to the growth of North 
Hudson. 




He was born in New \'ork City, 
his parents being Robert and Mar- 
garet (Campbell) Dixon. Some of 
his ancestors filled important posi- 
tions of trust. One branch of his 
grandmother's family being Sir 
Wilfred Lawson, a representative 
in the English Parliament. The 
Dixon and Lawson families have 
contributed wholesome influence to 
their respective communities, and 



achieved distinction as men of 
learning and ability. Robert C. 
Dixon, of this sketch, attended 
public school in Poughkeepsie, N. 
Y., and afterward pursued his 
studies in private schools. He 
completed his literary education at 
River View Military Academy, and 
finished with a business course in 
Eastman's Business College at 
Poughkeepsie. In 1876 he entered 
the office of D. & J. Jardine, archi- 
tects, of New York City, as stu- 
dent. In 1883 Mr. Dixon engaged 
in business for himself as an ar- 
chitect, and has since achieved 
marked success and a notable repu- 
tation. He built the Town Hall of 
Union Hill, thePalma and Colum- 
bia Club Houses, Big Schneiders, 
William Gulden and George Den- 
zer's business houses, the W^eehaw- 
ken High School, numerous church 
edifices, many important public 
schools, factories, and mercantile 
establishments in New York, New 
Jersey, and Pennsylvania. 

During the last ten years he has 
resided in Highwood Park, in 
which section many of the elegant 
residences erected by Mr. Dixon 
testify to his ability in his profes- 
sion. 

In political matters Mr. Dixon 
has been an active and influential 
leader, serving frequently as dele- 
gate to local and State Democratic 
Conventions. He served as Presi- 
dent of' the Board of Education at 
Union Hill. 

He is a member of Columbia 
Club of Hoboken, and the Palma 
Club of Jersey City. He was one 
of the organizers of the New Jer- 
sey Society of Architects, and is a 
member of the American Institute 
of Architects, and also the New 
Jersey Chapter of Architects. He 
is a Warden of Grace Episcopal 
Church of Union Hill, and a mem- 
ber of Columbia Lodge, No. 151, 
Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Dixon was married Sept. 22, 



52 



1886, to Sadie Gardner Morgan, 
only daughter of James (i. Morgan 
of Union Hill (see Morgan His- 
tory). They have two children, 
Robert Kenneth, who is actively 
engaged in business in New York 
City, and Lola Smyth, who is mar- 
ried into the Geo. \' Denzer 
family. 



Gustav Dopslaff. 



One of the most highly esteemed 
and respected citizens in North 
Hudson is Gustav Dopslaff, Presi- 
dent of the Commonwealth Trust 
Co. in \\'est Hoboken. He is what 
can be truly called a self-made 
man, having worked his way up 
from carpenter to his present po- 
sition. 




He was born in Germany, the 
12th day of March, 1864, and re- 
ceived a common education in that 
county. He emigrated to America 
in 1879, and settled in West Ho- 
boken, where he, learned the trade 



of carpenter and builder. In 1889 
he engaged in business for himself 
as a contractor and builder. He 
immediately became one of the 
most successful builders in the sec- 
tion, and in other sections as well, 
as he built in Jersey City, Union 
Hill, and many other parts. In 
1899 he disposed of his business to 
Mr. E. Wesp, but for a number of 
years after, continued to devote 
his energies in building and selling 
dwelling houses. 

He soon became a large property 
owner and has done much for the 
development of the community in 
which he always has exerted an 
important and wholesome influence. 

In 1906 Mr. Dosplaflf helped to 
organize the Commonwealth Trust 
Co., and in 1910 became the Presi- 
dent of this institution. The re- 
markable growth of this bank is 
due to the conservative and careful 
management. The bank was 
started in small quarters at Stevens 
St. and Clinton Ave., later mov- 
ing next door to the present lo- 
cation on Spring St. It soon pros- 
pered to such an extent that the 
Directors decided to erect the pres- 
ent building at the corner of Spring 
St. and Highpoint Avenue. The 
bank occupies the entire ground 
floor, while the upper floor is rented 
out for office purposes. 

The Commonwealth Trust Co. is 
to-day ranked as one of the fore- 
most banking institut?ions in the 
county, and its management is re- 
cognized as one of the most ef- 
ficient. 

Mr. DosplaflF has become im- 
mensely popular by his gonial and 
c'emocratic ways. He is a public- 
siiirited citizen, possessed of the 
highest integrity and business abil- 
ity and enjoys the confidence of all 
with whom he has come in contact. 

He married Augusta Nadler in 
1885. They had seven children, 
of whom, however,- only two are 
living, Gustav, Jr., and George. 



53 



Henry Kohlmeyer. 



lienry Kohlmeyer, Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth Trust Co. in 




West Hoboken, was born in Union 
Hill, July 22, 1870. His father, 
Henry Kohlmeyer, at one time 
served Union Hill as Councilman 
and Chairman of Police. He was 
a resident of that town since the 
early 60's. 

Henry, the subject of this article, 
attended the local public school and 
then worked in various positions, 
until he secured a clerical position 
with the American Type Founders 
Co. in Jersey City. He worked for 
this concern for fifteen years, rais- 
ing himself from a small position to 
that of Assistant Treasurer. Mr. 
Kohlmeyer then took a trip to 
Mexico, -and upon his return in 
1908 became connected with the 
Commonwealth Trust Co., which 
had been established two years pre- 
vious. 

He started in the capacity of 
bookkeeper, was later promoted to 
Assistant Treasurer, and in 1911 
to Treasurer. 



With his sound judgment and 
great foresight Mr. Kohlmeyer has 
been instrumental in making the 
Commonwealth Trust Co. one of 
the most conservative and most re- 
liable banks in the northern part 
of the county. He has distinguish- 
ed himself as a safe financier of 
marked ability and sagacity. He 
has mastered every detail of the 
banking business. His skill and 
ability have won for him a high 
rank in the banking world, while 
his untiring attention to duty, his 
constant application and his great 
care and practical devotion to the 
interest of the depositors has gain- 
ed their appreciation and confi- 
dence. 



Thomas McEwan. 



Former Congressman Thomas 
McEwan, one of the leading bank- 
ers in the county, was bocn in Pa- 
terson, N. J., February 26th, 1854. 




He is the son of Thomas and Han- 
nah (Ledget) McEwan. 

After he had received his pre- 



54 



paratory education in the public 
schools and the High School, he 
entered the Columbia Law School, 
from which institution he gradu- 
ated and received the degree of L. 
L. B. in 1881. He was admitted 
to the Bar the same year and quick- 
ly rose to be one of the most able 
barristers in the county. 

Mr. McEwan has been honored 
by election and appointment to 
many public offices of great respon- 
sibility and trust. He served as 
Tax Assessor of Jersey City from 
1887 to 1888; Chief Supervisor of 
Elections, District of New Jersey, 
from 1892 to 1893 ; was elected to 
the Assembly in 1894 and became 
the leader of the Republican ma- 
jority. This was the first time that 
a one-year member of the Assem- 
bly had held the office as leader. 
Mr. McEwan was elected and 
served as a member of the 54th and 
.S.=ith U. S. Congresses from 1895 
to 1899. He was the first Repub- 
lican elected to Congress since 
1878. He served as Comptroller 
of Jersey City in 1905. Mr. Mc- 
Ewan has, since its organization, 
held his present office of Presi- 
dent of the Highland, Trust Com- 
pany in West Hoboken. No man 
is more prominent or more es- 
teemed than is Mr. McEwan. He 
is enterprising, public-spirited, and 
one of the most respected citizens 
in the community. The confidence 
which his service in his many vari- 
ous capacities has inspired is evi- 
denced by the fact of his appoint- 
ment as executor, guardian, and 
trustee of many large estates. He is 
President of the Hoboken Heights 
Land Co., Treasurer of the Vienna 
Fancy Case Co. and Wecman Co. 

He is a member of the New Jer- 
sey State Bar Association, New 
York City Bar Association, Hudson 
County Bar Association, U. S. Su- 
preme Court; Advisory Committee 
Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion; President of Hudson County 



Branch of States Charity Aid So- 
ciety and meriiber of Executive 
Committee, Equal Franchise. 

In fraternal circles Mr. McEwan 
is very prominently connected, 
being a Scottish Rit€ Mason (32nd 
degree) and a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and United 
Workmen. He is also a member 
of the Union League of Hudson 
County, the National Arts Society, 
N. Y. City, and the Hudson County 
Historical Society. 



Frederick C. Hansen. 



In the year of 1851, Peter Han- 
sen emigrated from Schleswig- 
Holstein, and in the same year 
settled in Union Hill, being one of 
the pioneers of that town. After 




two years of hard work, he had 
saved enough to send for his wife 
and children. One of his sons, 
Frederick C, the subject of this 
sketch, was then four years old. 
Having been born in Rendsburg, 
Schleswig-Holstein, Sept. 29, 1849. 



55 



Frederick attended private school 
in Union Hill until 1858, when the 
lirst public school was opened. He 
graduated from this school in 1863. 
He then helped his father, who had 
become a very successful contrac- 
tor, and in 1876 Frederick estab- 
lished his own business as a real 
estate and insurance broker. In 
the same year he was elected Town 
Clerk of Union Hill and re-elected 
to this office for four successive 
terms, serving eight years in all. 
In 1885, he was elected to the 
Board of Council, and served four 
years in that Board, three years of 
which he served as President of 
the Board, or, what was later called 
Mayor. 

In 1891, Mr. Hansen, with John 
A. Ross, established a real estate 
and insurance firm, under the name 
of Hansen and Ross. In 1911 Mr. 
Ross retired from the business and 
Mr. Hansen took his two sons, 
Paul A. and Ernest N., into the 
firm, which then became known as 
Hansen & Hansen. 

Mr. Hansen has always exerted 
a wholesome and beneficial influ- 
ence in the community, and en- 
joys the confidence of all who know 
him. He is highly respected and 
esteemed and has gained a high re- 
putation for his business abilit)- 
and integrity. 

He is a member of the F & A. 
M., Director of Hoboken Trust 
Co., Secretary of the Town of 
Union Tiuilding and Loan Asso- 
ciation, member of the Eintracht 
Society, and was for five years 
President of the Exempt Firemen's 
Association. 



The Lange Family. 

Frederick Lange was JDorn in 
Germany in 1830. \Mien he was 
nineteen years of age, he decided to 
emigrate to this country, and after 
spending thirty-five days in a vessel 



he finally landed at Rector St., 
New York City, in 1849. 

Soon after his arrival, he estab- 
lished a lamp business and sold 
oil for lighting purposes. In 1856 
he moved to Hoboken and contin- 
ued the business there. He estab- 
lished sevqral routes, especially in 
West Floboken, Union Hill and 
North Bergen. He was one of the 
first ones to buy lots in Union Hill, 
which were sold by Louis Becker, 
who had formed a company to sell 
lots laid out by the garden farm. 




These lots ranged in price from 
$50 to $100 and were paid by in- 
stallment of $2.50 a month. After 
people had paid part of the money, 
a drawing took place, whereby each 
man drew his own lot. The 
people then started out to locate 
their respective lots, and Frederick 
Lange, to his great dismay, found 
his lot to be a great waterpool, 
where the Simon factory now 
stands in Union Hill. He had by 
this time paid in $30, but stopped 
further payment and gave up his 
claim. 

In 1857 he married Caroline 



56 



Baier, with whom he had ten chil- 
dren, of whom, however, only six- 
are living. They are: Adaline, 
Herman, Fred, Maurice, Carrie 
and Frank. 

A few years after their marriage 
the family moved to Union Hill, 
where Mr. Lange also moved his 
business. He was later elected 
School Trustee of that town, which 
office he held for three years. Mr. 
T-ange is now living in retirement 
at his private residence in North 
Bergen. 



Herman Lange, a son of Fred- 
erick Lange, was born in Hoboken, 
September 5, 1861. He received 
his public school education partly 
in Hoboken Academy and partly in 
the Union Hill public schools. 

After leaving school, he received 
a position on August 3, 1876. with 
F O. Etzold, who conducted a 
hardware store at Blum Street. 
Five months after securing this 
position, Mr. Etzold died, and the 
responsibilil^ of ' condiicting the 
l)usiness was put upon Herman, 
who took full charge, acting as 
salesman, buyer and collector. 

In 1884 he established his own 
hardware business in a small store 
12 by 20 feet on Bergenline Ave. 
The rent of this store was $8. His 
sole capital was $200. One year 
later he was able to move into lar- 
ger quarters, and in 1891 he had 
succeeded to such an extent that 
!he was able to buy the corner 
building at Columbia St. and Ber- 
genline Ave. Two years later, 
however, when business depression 
set in and the country was prac- 
tically in a panic, Mr. Lange had 
to give up his business interests. 
He was, however, not to be dis- 
couraged, and with remarkable 
energy and determination he 
started all over again and in 1907 
he established his present hardware 
business with a capital of $800. 

This business was located at 296 



Bergenline Ave., has since become 
one of the most prospering hard- 
ware concerns in North Hudson. 

In 1886 Mr. Lange married 
Anna Kumpa, with whom he had 
five children, of whom, however, 
only three are living. They are: 
Hermine, Charlotte and Ernst. 

While Mr. Lange has never 
sought nor accepted any public of- 
fice, he is a public-spirited and 
patriotic citizen. His pleasing 
manner and sterling business 
character has gained him a host of 
friends. 



Maurice Lange is another son of 
Fred Lange. He was born in 
Union Hill, April 26, 1873. After 
finishing his education in the local 
public schools, he started to help 




his brothers in the hardware 
business. His brother conducted a 
branch store on Spring St., West 
Hoboken, which the father took 
over, and Maurice helped the 
father in that store. 

In the month of October, 1912, 
Maurice took over the store and 



57 



has conducted it ever since. It is 
located at 466 Spring St., West 
Hoboken, and is one of the largest 
hardware and housefnrnishings 
stores in that town. 

Mr. Lange is possessed of a 
pleasing personality which has, 
combined with using honest busin- 
ess methods, been a great factor for 
his success in business. 

He has never taken any active 
interest in political affairs, but de- 
voted his full time to his. ever 
growing business. He is, however, 
always interested in any move- 
ments which may benefit his town, 
and always willing to lend assist- 
ance wherever he can. 

In 1912 he married Margaret 
Schutte, with whom he has one 
child, Helen Dorothy. 

Mr. 'Lange is a member of the 
Union Hill Turnverein. His great 
i lobby 
sports. 



IS fishing and outdoor 



Joseph TuercK. 

The distinction of being the first 
architect in West New York be- 
longs to Mr. Tuerck, one of the 
foremost architects in North 
Hudson. 

He was born in Germany, Nov. 
19, 1858, and obtained his early 
education in that country. He im- 
migrated to this country in 1884 
and five years later settled in Gut- 
tenberg. In 1900 he moved to 
. ^Vest New^ York, where he has re- 
sided ever since. His Hfe study 
has been architecture, in which he 
has made an immense success. 
Many of the finest buildings in the 
county are monuments to his 
ability. 

An attempt to describe or even 
mention the numerous buildings 
he has erected and supervised, 
would fill a little book. Let it suf- 
fice to mention Clififside School 



No. 2, Guttenberg School, West 
New York School No. 3 and 4, 
Fairview School No. 3, Fort Lee 
School No. 2, Echpse Hose Co., 
Guttenberg, Empire Hook and 
Ladder Co., and Empire Hose Co. 
No. 3 of West New York, and not 
to forget the Lincoln High 
School, one of the most beautiful 
buildings in the section. He has 




also erected several residences, 
factories, etc. 

With his many years of experi- 
ence as an architect, Mr. Tuerck 
has achieved a reputation second to 
none in Hudson County. His 
knowledge of his business is broad 
and comprehensive, giving him the 
position of recognized leader in his 
profession. 

Mr. Tuerck is a public spirited 
citizen and takes a deep interest in 
every movement affecting the wel- 
fare of the community. He is 
greatly esteemed and respected, not 
only for his professional achieve- 
ments, but also for those eminent 
qualifications and personal attrib- 
utes which distinguish the success- 
ful man. His foresight, integrity 
and' sound judgment and his capa- 
city for business have brought him 
into more than local prominence. 



58 



Fred. W. Hille. 



Few men have achieved a higher 
reputation than Fred W. Hille, one 
of the foremost bankers in North 
Hudson and President of the Mer- 
chants' and Manufacturers' Rank 
in Union Hill. 




He was born in Marburg, Germ- 
any, July 6, 1850. There he ob- 
tained his early education and later 
attended the "gymnasium" until he 
was seventeen years of age. He 
then studied drugs and chemicals in 
Frankfort am Main and at the 
University at Marburg. He next 
secured a position as drug clerk in 
Elberfeld, and after spending two 
years in that position, came to this 
country in 1872. He settled in 
New York, where he worked as a 
druggist for two years in one of 
the largest drug concerns in that 
city. In 1874 he came to Union 
Hill, where he worked as a clerk in 
Phil Gelhaar's (now Frank's) 
Drug Store on Main Street. This 
store, which had been establi.shed 
in 1867, was at that time located in 



what is now Wacker's Bakery. At 
the time Mr. Hille became con- 
nected with this store, Gelhaar'.s 
widow was conducting the business 
with the help of a few clerks. After 
demonstrating his abilities to the 
satisfaction of Mrs. Gelhaar, .she 
entrusted the management of the 
business to Mr. Hille, and soon 
after sold him the business. He 
then doubled his efforts and worked 
practically day and night to make a 
success of his enterprise. It did 
not take long before he became 
known as one of the most conscien- 
tious and reliable druggists in the 
section. 

The business steadily increased, 
and the store became too small. By 
this time he had saved enough 
money to buy the adjoining lot and 
on this he erected a building, into 
which he moved his store in 1881 ; 
for the next twenty years Mr. Hille 
successfully conducted his drug 
business there, until ipoor health 
compelled him to sell out to Aug. 
I'rank. 

Mr. Hille was not a man, how- 
ever, who could be idle for any 
great length of time, and he sooii 
opened a small drug store in 
Ridgefield, N. J. This he gave up 
after a few years, and in 1890 he 
became connected, in a confidential 
capacity, with the Hudson Trust 
Company, of which he had been 
one of the founders. 

He continued with this banking 
institution until August, 1917, 
when he resigned. 

The Merchants' & Manufactur- 
ers' Trust Co. in Union Hill had just 
then been organized and the found- 
er of this bank, after much persua- 
sion, finally succeeded in secur- 
ing the services of Mr. Hille to 
direct the affairs of this institu- 
tion. He became President of this 
bank on August 15, 1917. No bet- 
ter man could possibly be found 
for that important position. Mr. 
Hille's influence in the communitv 



59 



stamps him as one of the leading 
citizens, and . his great knowledge 
in banking affairs and methods 
makes him especiall_v qualified for 
his new ofifice. 

He is a rare gentleman, most 
gracious and hospitable, sincere 
and earnest and so honest and hon- 
orable in all the affairs of life, that 
the faintest breath was never raised 
to question his perfect integrity. 

He is a paWic-Sfpirited citizen, 
and has held many positions of 
trust and responsibility. He organ- 
ized the Town of Union Building 
and Loan Association, of which he 
was Treasurer for four years. He 
was one of the organizers of the 
Free Library Association and the 
\\ eehawken Building and Loan 
Association. In politics he has 
always taken a keen interest and 
served as Tax Collector for the 
Town of Union for four terms. 

In 1881 Mr. Hille married Chris- 
tiana Frick, a member of one of 
tlie oldest families in Union Hill. 
They have three children, Katie, 
Lmma, and \\'illiani, who is one of 
the rising, young promising law- 
yers of North Hudson. 

Mr. Hille is a member of Mv.stic 
Tie Lodge No. 123, F. & A. M'., of 
which Lodge he has been the 
Treasurer for the last eighteen 
years. 



Wm. G. Hille. 



Among the foremost lawyers in 
North Hudson is William C. Hille, 
son of the noted banker of Union 
Hill. 

He was born in that town April 
10th, 1884, and received his pre- 
liminary education at the Hoboken 
Academy. He then took a four 
year's college course at the New 
York University College, from 
which institution he received his 



college degree in 1905. Having 
received a thorough training, he 
took up the study of law at the 
New York University Law School, 
where he received his degree of 
L.L.B. in 1907 He continued his 
law studies in the offices of coun- 
sellor A. Leuly, where he served as 
clerk for two years. On March 9, 
1909, he was admitted to the Bar 
as an Attorney at Law in the State 
of New Jersey and in 1912 he was 
admitted as Counsellor at Law and 
Master of Chancery. 




Mr. Hille has been actively and 
successfully engaged in the general 
practice of his profession since his 
admission to the Bar, and in a large 
number of important cases with 
which he has been identified he has 
displayed high legal qualifications, 
a broad and accurate knowledge of 
the law, and great skill and ability. 
He has established a reputation es- 
pecially as a real estate mortgage 
and chancery lawyer. 

Counsellor Hille is a public-spir- 
ited man prominently connected in 
public, fraternal, professional and 



60 



social circles. He has served sev- 
eral terms as County Committeman 
and is a member of the Mystic Tie 
Lodge, F. & A. M., and of several 
college fraternities, social arid pro- 
fessional clubs. 



Prof. A. Riesenberger. 



One of the most esteemed and 
respected citizens in the county is 
Prof. Adam Riesenberger, of the 
Stevens Institute of Technology in 
Hoboken. 




He .was born in Ulster County, 
New Vork, February 9th, 1857, but 
his parents moved to Union Hill 
when he was only three years of 
age. Adam Riesenberger obtained 
his early school education at the 
Hoboken Academy, and at the ear- 
ly age of fifteen years he took up 
the study of mechanical engineer- 
ing at the Stevens Institute of 
Technology, from which college he 
graduated four years later. He 
continued his studies and in 1881 
was appointed instructor in Mech- 
anical Drawing at the safne institu- 



tion. Six years later he was ap- 
pointed Assistant Professor, and 
Professor in 1889. Prof. Riesen- 
berger is also the Treasurer of this 
institution, an office which he has 
held since 1884. He holds the of- 
fice as Registrar since 1902, when 
the office was first established. He 
has for many years been an active 
and influential resident of Union 
Hill, in which town he still re- 
sdes. He was a member of the 
Union Hill Board of Education for 
nearly seventeen ye^ars, five years 
of which he served as President of 
the Board. He resigned the latter 
part of 1916. -He is Vice-President 
of the Hoboken Trust Company 
since this bank was incorporated 
15 years ago, and a Director of the 
Hoboken Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation for about 28 years. He is 
First Vide-President of the Boy 
Scouts, Trustee of the Old Peo- 
ple's Llome in North Bergen, 
member of the Citizens' Federation 
of Hudson County, of the Americ- 
an Society of Mechanical Engin- 
eers, and of the Society for the 
Promotion of Engineering Educa- 
tion. 

Prof. Riesenberger's career has 
Ijeen an eminently successful one 
and stamps him as a man of un- 
usual ability, of great force of 
character, and possessed of that 
self-reliance and perseverance 
which characterize the man of af- 
fairs. His ability, integrity, and 
pleasing personality has gained him 
a large circle of friends. He is 
thoroughly identified with the best 
interests of the town, and by ac- 
tion and example has exerted a 
wholesome influence in the com- 
munity, whose respect and confid- 
ence he enj6ys to the utmost. 

Prof. Riesenberger married, in 
1878, Antoinette Schlemm, who, 
however, died two years later, 
leaving him one child. In 1881 
he married Sophie Werner, with 
whom he has six children. 



61 



The Westervelt Family. 



The Westervelt Family repre- 
sent one of the oldest and most 
prominent families in Hudson and 
Bergen Counties. Their ancestors 
date back about 400 years in Hol- 
land, where the family was known 
as ^'an Westervelt. 

Daniel P- Westervelt is a lineal 
descendant of Lubbert Lubeitsen 
( Westei-velt), the founder of the 
American branch of the family, 
w ho came to America from Hepple, 
a province of Drenth, Holland, in 
1662. He settled in Flatbush, Long 
Island. Upon his death his sons 
settled in Bergen County, New 
Jersey, where they became large 
land owners. Their descendants 
intermarried with families of note 
in Hudson and Bergen Counties, 
and the- different branches of the 
family became tillers of the soil, 
noted lawyers, and eminent states- 
men. 

Daniel P. ^Vestervelt was born at 
Tenafly, Bergen County, in 1827. 
He became one of the biggest com- 
mission merchants in New York 
City. 

He married Cornelia \\'estervelt, 
who was also a descendant of the 
Van Westervelt Family, in 1847. 

They had four children : John 
H., Lundy, Anna, and Rachael. 



Until recently, Mr. Westervelt 
resided at the old Westervelt home- 
stead, the property located next to 
the Lincoln Theatre on Hacken- 
sack Plankroad, which property he 
still owns, but now resides in 
Woodcliff, N. J., where he built a 
beautiful home. 

He is one of the prominent 
public spirited and respected citi- 
zens of North Hudson. While 



John H. Westervelt. 

John H. Westervelt was born in 
New York City, August 17, 1853. 
In 1862 the family moved to Ho- 
boken, and in 1867 to Union Hill, 
where John attended public school. 
After leaving school, he learned the 
butcher trade and worked at the 
Washington Market until 1897, 
when he became connected with the 
Armour Co. Mr. Westervelt is 
now Manager of this concern's 
branch in Jersey City. 




never aspiring to any public oflice, 
Mr. Westervelt is always interested 
in everything pertaining to the wel- 
fare of the community. In business 
he has exercised great executive 
ability, untiring energy, sound 
judgment and unusual foresi|ght. 
His achievements are the result of 
his own efforts of the broad- and 
progressive ideas of an able man. 
As a citizen he is greatly esteemed 
and has gained a large circle of 
friends by his pleasing personality. 
In 1874, Mr. Westervelt married 
Eliza McCroskery, a daughter of 
Michael C. McCroskery, one of the 
oldest residents in Hudson County. 
They had seven children, of which 



62 



however, only five are living: Wal- 
ter Daniel (who married Sophie 
Stalter; they have one child, Eliza 
Augusta, who married John Roff, 
with whom she has two children, 
Lester and Muriel), Anna May, 
James Calvin (who married Amelia 
Eva Eoerch; they have three chil- 
dren, Dorothy May, Marjorie 
Ruth, and Evelyn Adell), Clara 
(deceased), Cornelia (who married 
II. Knowlton, they have two chil- 
dren, John Henry and Mildred 
Florence), Ray (deceased), and 
Julia (who married Henry J. Rau ; 
they have one child, Marjorie). 

Although only sixty-three years 
of age, Mr. Westervelt is a great- 
grandfather, a fact of which he is 
very proud. 



W. D. Westervelt. 



Walter Daniel ^Vestervelt was 
born at the old \^'ester-velt home- 




sitead on Hackensack Plankroad, 
Town of Union, August 6, 1875. 
After finishing his public school 
education, ht worked in a whole- 



•sale drygoods house for a number 
of years. In 1896 he started to 
learn railroading, . in which busi- 
ness he is still engaged as an En- 
gineer for the West Shore R. R. 

In 1896 he married Sophie Stolte, 
a daughter of Carl Stolte, who had 
been a resident of North Hudson 
for over forty years. They have 
one daughter, Eliza Augusta, who 
in 1914 married John Roth. They 
have two children, Lester Wester- 
velt Roth and Muriel. 

Mr. Westervelt is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias and of the 
Brotherhood of Engineers. 



James C. Westervelt. 

James Calvin Westervelt was 
born in West Hoboken, Mav 2, 
1881. He attended Union 'Hill 




Public School, and after finish- 
ing his schooling worked for the 
Gorham Silver Co. as a silver- 
smith. H:e then started to learn the 
plumbing business, and has worked 
at this trade ever since. In 1899 he 



63 



established his own business, and 
has since met with great success. 
. IHs shop is located at the rear of 
his beautiful residence, which he 
Iniilt next to that of his father, at 
409 32nd St., Woodcliff. He has 
also a branch shop at Hackensack 
Plankroad, Union Hill. 

Mr. ^^'estervelt has built up a 
very extensive business b}' his hon- 
esty and business ability. He is 
thorough in every detail, energetic 
and practical in carrying out his 
contracts, and prompt in all he un- 
dertakes. His foresight, integrity 
and sound judgment, and his ca- 
pacity for business have brought 
him into more than local promin- 
ence. He is patriotic and possesses 
a pleasing personality. 

Mr. Westervelt married Amelia 
Rva Foerch, September 14, 1907 
They have three children, Dorothy 
May, Marjorie Ruth, and Evelvn 
.Adelle. 

Mr. \\'estervelt is a member of 
the Jr. O. U. A. M. As his rapidly 
increasing business demanded his 
continued attention, he has not had 
much time for political affairs, 
nevertheless he is always interested 
in civic affairs. 

He is very fond of automobiling, 
and often makes long trips through- 
out the country. 



Ephraim G. Hellstern, 
M.D. 



Ephraim G. Hellstern, M. D., of 
Hudson Heights, was born in 
Union Hill, January 23, 1879. 

His parents were John and Caro- 
line (Meckel) Hellstern. They 
were old, honored and respected 
residents of Union Hill, having 
settled in that town in 1870. 

Mr. Hellstern attended the Union 
Hill Public Schools and later the 
Eagan Business Schools, being one 
of the first pupils of the latter. He 



then studied at the New York High 
School and the Stevens Institute of 
Hoboken, and in 1900 took up the 
study of medicine in the University 
of Maryland, from which institute 
he graduated in 1904, receiving the 
degree of M. D. Immediately after 




he established his own practice in 
Union Hill, and a short time after 
moved to Hudson Heights, where 
he soon came into prominence as a 
physician and surgeon of unusual 
ability, and where he has since con- 
ducted a large and successful prac- 
tice. Displaying broad and liberal 
qualifications, a thorough mastery 
of the science of medicine, and 
sound -judgment, united with a 
genial good nature, he has gained a 
wide circle of friends and aii en- 
viable standing in the community. 
In professional circles ■ he has 
achieved a high reputation. As a 
citizen he is public spirited, pro- 
gressive, patriotic, and universally 
respected and esteemed. 

He is assistant surgeon of the 
North Hudson Hospital and is a 
member of the Board of Health of 
Fairview and Cliffside? and is a 



64 



medical school inspector for both 
of those boroughs. 

The doctor is prominently con- 
nected in fraternal circles. He is a 
member of the F. and A. M., a 
former Commander of the Shrin- 
ers, a member of the Foresters, Jr. 
O. U. A. M., Woodmen, Redmen, 
Shepherds of Bethlehem, and num- 
erous others. 

The doctor married in 1905, but 
his wife died four years after. He 
Ve-married in 1913, and in this 
marriage is father of one child, 
Marie. 



Jos. D. Lu^osch. 



Joseph D. Lugoseh has achieved 
as an architect a measure of suc- 
cess which stamps him as one of 
the most prominent men in the 
county in his profession. 




He was born August 21, 1872, in 
Germany, where he received his 
education in the public schools, and 
after completing his schooling he 
turned his attention to the study of 
architecture, for which he had a 



decided taste. He studied at the 
Charlottenburg Polytechnic Insti- 
tution, Hildburghausen, and other 
prominent institutions in Germany. 

In 1901 he came to America, and 
soon after settled in Weehawken, 
later moving to Union Hill. Three 
years after his arrival in this coun- 
try he established his own business 
and opened an office at 540 Pali- 
sade Ave. This office he later 
moved to 15 Bergenline Avenue, 
and then to his present location at 
21 Bergenline Ave., where he oc- 
cupies a suite of offices. 

Mr. Lugoseh has gained an ex- 
tensive business through his ability 
and skill. He has designed and 
erected many of the finest structur- 
es in the northern part of the 
county, among which may be men- 
tioned the Goelz Building, Har- 
vard Building, Flat Iron Building, 
William Peter's Bottling Depart- 
ment, Consumers' Ice Plant, Rev. 
Father Grieff's Rectory, the Pleas- 
ant Avenue houses for VVm. Peter, 
the new Gulden Building on Ber- 
genline Avenue, and not to forget 
the Union Hill High School, which 
is one of the finest structures in 
North Hudson. He has also erect- 
ed several engine houses in Union 
Hill, many moving picture houses 
and embroidery factories and num- 
erous private dwellings. 

His work shows great originality, 
broad professional knowledge and 
marked artistic taste, as well as a 
thorough comprehension of struc- 
tural problems. His success is the 
result of his own efforts. 

Mr. Lugoseh had the distinction 
of being appointed the first build- 
ing inspector in Union Hill. Other- 
wise he has never sought or accept- 
ed any public office, as his continu- 
ously growing business demands 
his full attention. He is neverthe- 
less a public-spiritel citizen, active 
and influential in promoting busm- 
ess and public interest. He is a 
man promptly discharging every 



6S 



obligation and imbued with the 
highest principles of integrity. His 
genial nature and winning manners 
have gained him a host of friends. 
In social circles Mr. Lugoschis a 
welcome guest, and he is promin- 
ently connected in fraternal and 
social societies. 

He is a member of the F. and A. 
M. (PaHsade Lodge No. 84), Odd 
Fellows, Elks of Hoboken No. 74, 
Liedertafel, Eintracht Singing So- 
ciety, Peter Braeu Bowling Club, 
and several others. He is an ex- 
Captain of the Union Hill Schuet- 
zen Corps. 

Mr. Lugosch married in 1910 
Anna Dorothy Riefer, a daughter 
of the well known piano manufac- 
turer. 



C. W. Van Zile. 



The Van Zile family is one of 
the oldest families in Hudson 
County. Cornelius W Van Zile, of 




the Van Zile Company, of 589 to 
593 Sutnmit Ay^nu?, West Hobo^ 



ken, is the sixth child of eight 
children, his parents being Edward 
Van Zile and Cornelia N. Cross- 
man. 

Although the family has resided 
in Hudson County for over three 
generations, Cornelius W. was not 
born in this county, as his parents 
had moved to New York, where 
they resided for a few years, and 
where Cornelius was born in 1869. 

The family moved back to Union 
Hill in 1870, and there Corrielius 
attended Rev. John Justin's 
school and later the Union Hill and 
Weehawken Public Schools. After 
graduating, Cornelius secured a po- 
sition as clerk in A. Birnbaum's 
Shoe Store on Bergenline Avenue 
and worked in the retail shoe busi- 
ness for a number of years. He 
then worked in the office of the 
Erie Railroad for six years, and 
then changing to outdoor work, 
went on the road traveling for a 
New York City firm, selling teas 
and coffees to the retail .store trade 
in New York and New Jersey. 

In 1904 Mr. Van Zile originated 
his present business and in partner 
ship with his brother Edward K., 
started his present business under 
the name of Van Zile Brothers 
Company, which after six months 
was changed to Van Zile Company. 
They started the manufacturing of 
Wash-Day-Wonder- Workers in the 
old Sanitarium at Palisade Avenue 
and Paterson Plank Road. The 
business was a success from the 
start, and one year later they built 
and moved to a larger factory at 
924 Monastery Street, West Ho- 
bokgn, where they stayed up to 
1911, when the business had again 
outgrown the facilities, and Mr. 
Van Zile built the present factory 
at 589 to 593 Summit Ave., West 
Hoboken. This building is two 
story brick with a large cellar, cov- 
ering a ground of 29x75 feet, and 
with a floor spac^ of 6,50Q square 
feet. 



65 



The Van Zile Company manu- 
factures Van's Noi-ub, which wash- 
es clothes clean without rubbing or 
mjury, and Van's Addit, which 
makes common starch perfect. 
The firm has become known all 
over the country, and has agencies 
throughout the United States. 
Their products, which have become 
immensely popular, are being sold 
by all the leading wholesale and re- 
tail grocers. 

Mr. Cornelius W. Van Zile has 
never affiliated himself with any 
political or fraternal organizations, 
but is nevertheless a public spirited 
and patriotic citizen. He is enter- 
prising, enthusiastic, and popular, 
and has gained the respect and es- 
teem of everybod|y with whom he 
has come in contact. His dignified, 
pleasing personality has gained him 
a host of friends. 



August A. Schle^eL 



August A. Schlegel, the success- 
ful hardware merchant in Union 
Hill, was born in Germany, April 
3, 1871. His parents brought him 
to this country in 1880, when the 
family settled at 112 Gardner St. 
After finishing his education in the 
local schools, he learned the trade 
as mill worker, and for a number 
of years worked in the piano in- 
dustry. In 1892 he secured a po- 
sition with "Big Schneider", who 
at that time conducted a small 
haifdware store on Lewis St. He 
worked for Schneider for four 
years and then opened his own 
jjusiness under the name of the 
"Hudson County Stove Repair Co." 
and located at 168 New York Ave. 
He conducted this business for six 
years and then moved to Columbia 
St. and Bergenline Ave., where he 
continued the business under the 
name of Schlegel & Meyer, until 
1907. 



Mr. Schlegel was then taken in as 
a member in the firm of "Big 
Schneider", one of the largest hard- 
ware concerns in North Hudson. 
He became the general manager, 
and for ten years successfully con- 
ducted this firm's business. A few 




months ago he retired his member- 
ship in the firm, and has now open- 
ed his own hardware store on the 
corner of Bergenline Avenue and 
Fourth St., Union Hill. This store 
is modernly equipped and stocked 
with everything pertaining to the 
hardware line. The store is con- 
ducted under the name of the. 
Schlegel Hardware Co., and Mr. 
Schlegel is the sole' owner. 

In 1893 Mr. Schlegel married 
Augusta S. Meyer, with whom he 
had three children, of whom, 
however, only one girl. Bertha is 
living. She married Nicholas 
Schutz, who is associated with Mr.' 
Schlegel in his new enterprise. 

In social circles Mr. Schlegel is 
well known, being a member of 
over a dozen different associations 
and societies. 

He has gained an eminent repu- 
tation as a man of the highest in- 
tegrity and great business ability. 
He is a prominent citizen, connect- 
ed with the b^st interests of North 
Hudson, 



6? 



Arnold Rippe. 

Arnold Rippe, one of the largest 
insurance agents in the County, 
with offices at IS Exchange Place, 
Jersey City, was born in New York 
City, December 29, 1876. He went 
to Public School No. 44 in that city 
and after graduating started to 
study the fire insurance business, 
working for different brokers in 
New York City in order to learn 




the business thoroughly. In 1890 
he moved to Union Hill and was a 
resident of that town until he 
moved to Weehawken some IS 
years ago. On October 7, 1903, he 
established his own office, at the 
above address, and has since be- 
come one of the most successful 
men in the insurance business. 

Mr. Rippe has never "sought nor 
accepted political offices, but pre- 
fers to devote his whole time to his 
business. He is always ready 
however, to bear a loyal citizen's 
part m public afifairs, and takes a 
deep mterest in all worthy move- 
ments affecting the community. 



He is secretary of the Vestry of 
Grace Church, Union Hill, and 
third vice-president of the First 
National Bank in Union Hill. He 
is also vice-president of New Jer- 
sey State Fire Underwriters. 

Mr. Rippe married Jenny V. 
Symes, of the old West New York 
family, on April Sth, 1899. They 
have one child, Gladys. 

Mr. Rippe's father, Fred Rippe, 
was prominently identified with 
political afifairs and once held the 
office of Director of the Board of 
Freeholders. He was also Presi- 
dent of the Court House Commit- 
tee, which built the present Court 
House, one of the finest structures 
in the State. 



Wm. C. Kronmeyer. 



Wm. C. Kronmeyer, of West 
Hobqken, is descended frorii an old 
family of Civil War fame. His 
father, Chas. J. Kronmeyer, was 
born in the State of New York in 
1834. He married Caroline Louise 
Brauneck, with whom he had seven 
children. They are : Charles C. 
(deceased), Christian C, ; Frede- 
rick C; Julius C; William C; 
Elizabeth and Caroline (deceased). 

He was an inventor and manu- 
facturer of pencil sharpeners until 
(the outbreak of the Civil War, 
when he joined the 52nd Regiment 
of New York. He showed an im- 
mense ability and bravery as a sol- 
dier and was rapidly promoted. 
On November 1, 1861, he was mus- 
tered in as first Sergeant, Co. C; 
was promoted to second Lieutenant 
Co. I, March 1, 1862; on February 
1st, 1863, was promoted to first 
Lieutenant, Co. E ; on October 23, 
1863, Captain Co. C, and on June 
17, 1865, was promoted to Major 
with rank from May 28th, 1865 
On May 10th, 1864 (in the Battle 
of the Wilderness) he was wound- 



68 



ed and captured while in action, at 
Poe River, Virginia, and sent to 
Camp Sorghum, Columbia, S. C, 
as a prisoner of war. He was later 
transferred to Andersville prison, 
where he was kept a prisoner of, 
war up to the latter part of March, 
1865, when he escaped and returned 
to Camp California, at Arlington 
Heights, Virginia. While in the 
Army, Mr. Kronmeyer gained a 




high reputation as a splendid of- 
ficer, always exercising sound judg- 
ment and remarkable bravery. By 
his good humor and pleasing per- 
sonality he gained a host of friends. 

He returned with his regiment in 
July, 1865, and a few years later 
moved with his family to Hudson 
County, where he died in 1897. The 
first surgeon of the regiment, in 
speaking of Mr. Kronmeyer, re- 
ferred to him as "one of our best 
fellows, one of our truest com- 
rades, always cheerful, a good fel- 
low, a fine singer, and a faithful 
comrade." 

Wm. C. Kronmeyer, the subject 
of this sketch, was born in Jersey 
City Heights, March 10th, 1881. 



He attended the old Public School 
No. 7 , and after graduating from 
this school he attended the Jersey 
City Evening High School, from 
which he graduated February 18, 
1898. He then took a course at the 
Y. M. C. A. in New York City, 
from there he went to the New 
York Preparatory School and then 
entered the New York University, 
where he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. 

He was admitted to the Bar of 
the State of New York and is at 
present practising law in New York 
City. Mr. Kronmeyer is also a 
real estate, insurance and bonding 
broker, with offices in New York 
City. 

He has been a resident of Hud- 
son County practically all his life, 
and a resident of West Hoboken 
(with the exception of one year in- 
tervening) for the past seventeen 
years, and has been prominently 
connected in public affairs. He 
served the town as Councilman 
from 1910 to 1911. He was a can- 
didate for Alternate Delegate for 
the National Republican Conven- 
tion in 1908. 

Mr. Kronmeyer married Kathe- 
rine Kaelin in 1910. He is a mem- 
ber of the Lafayette Camp, Sons of 
Veterans, New York City, Ells- 
worth Camp, Sons of Veterans, 
Union Hill, Royal Order of Eagles, 
Royal Arcanum, the Pierian De- 
bating Society, and the New York 
County Lawyers' Association. 

He is also a member of theCo- 
as-You-Please Bowling Club of 
Union Hill and of the Halcyon 
Canoe Club. 

Though a young man, Mr. Kron- 
meyer has achieved a very high re- 
putation for ability and persever- 
ance. He is a public spirited citi- 
zen, imbued with an exalted sense 
of patriotism and progressiveness, 
and by example has exerted a 
wholesome influence in the com- 
munity, whose respect and confi- 



69 



dence he enjoys to the utmost. He 
is honest and enterprising and is a 
man of the highest integrity. 

Mr. Kronmeyer's brother, Frede- 
rick C, who is also a lawyer, a 
member of the New York and New 
Jersey Bars, has his office at No. 2 
Wall Street, which office was form- 
erly occupied by General Grant, 
who was a member of the firm of 
Grant & Ward. 



John Neff, Sr. 

The well known real estate and 
insurance broker, with office at 185 
Summit Avenue, West Hoboken, 
was born in Switzerland, April 23, 
1845. There he attended public 
school and later Gymnasium (col- 
lege). His parents wanted him to 
study for the priesthood, while he 







himself wanted to study law. 
However, Mr. Neff finally chose 
to learn the telegraph business, 
and later passed the examina- 
tion as telegraphist, when the 
government appointed him as such 



in a French part of Switzerland, 
and, afterwards, as postmaster in 
Appenzell, Switzerland. After re- 
signing from this position, he start- 
ed his own printing shop and edited 
,and published a newspaper, which 
he continued until 1878, when he 
sold out and went into the em- 
broidery business. 

Mr. Neff was also a military and 
.State's officer in Switzerland. 

In 1865, he passed a cantonal 
military course, then a federal of- 
ficers' military school, when he 
was appointed as 2nd lieutenant, 
afterwards as 1st lieutenant, and 
then as ober-lieutenant. In 1874, 
when the" first federal niilitary or- 
ganization became a law, he had to ■ 
pass a quarter-masters' military 
school at Thun, Switzerland. 

During the French-Prussian war 
in 1870-1871 he was with the Swiss 
army on the border — protecting the 
Swiss neutrality. He saw the 
French "Bourbaki" army, consist- 
ing of 84,000 men, that was repuls- 
ed by General Werder over Belfort, 
Montbeliard, Besancon, Pontarlier, 
to Verrieres Suisses, where, in 
order to avoid being taken prison- 
ers, said Bourbaki army entered 
Switzerland, where the French 
soldiers were treated like brothers. 

He was also elected as president 
of the Oberaufsichtskommission 
fiir VValdwirtschaft (Supreme Di- 
rection of Woodcraft) of his can- 
ton (State), which office he held 
until he emigrated to this country 
in 1882. He first settled in New 
Orleans, then in New York City. 
In 1891 he came to West Hoboken, 
where he and his wife were active 
in hand embroideries, until he went 
into the real estate and fire insur- 
ance business. He was quickly 
elected a Justice of the Peace, ap- 
pointed a Notary Public and Com- 
missioner of Deeds. 

The Judge married Anna Maria 
Koch, in Switzerland, June 5, 1867. 
They had seven boys, of whom only 



70 



three are living. They are: John 
J., who married Anna Witzig 
(they have nine children) ; Antho- 
ny, who married Margaret Brun- 
ner, nee Silver (they have one 
child) ; Alfred R., who married 
Olga Marquard (they have three 
children). 

Judge Neff is well known 
throughout Hudson County, etc., 
is a member of two large Swiss 
societies and is highly respected by 
all, who know his honesty, inte- 
grity, and human feeling. 



William Schlemm. 



The Schlemm family is one of 
the oldest and most prominent fam- 
ilies in North Hudson.' Robert 
Schlemm was born in Union Hill 
in 1845 and resided in that town 
and in West Hoboken until his 
death in 1911. He, at one time, 
served as Mayor of Union Hill. 
He married Charlotta Bischoff, 
with whom he had five children. 
One of these children, William, the 
subject of this sketch, was born in 
Union Hill, May 4, 1885. He at- 
tended the local public schools and 
then started to help his father, who 
had established the undertaking es- 
tablishment of Robert Schlemm & 
Son in Union Hill in 1890. Three 
years later the business was moved 
to West Hoboken, and on the death 
of his father, William took full 
charge. 

Mr. Schlemm, although a young 
man, has become one of the most 
prominent and best known men in 
the northern part of the county. 
As an undertaker he has become 
known from one end of the county 
to the other. His business ability, 
integrity and pleasing personality 
have gained him a host of friends 
throughout the county. 

He is prominently identified with 
the Democratic Party and at one 



time served as Coroner of Hudson 
County. While in this office, he 
held the inquest in the murder case 
of Anna Aumueller, for which 




Hans Schmidt was later convicted. 
Mr. Schlemm was highly compli- 
mented by high New York police 
officials for the thorough manner in 
which he had conducted the in- 
quest. He has always been a fear- 
less advocate of honest govern- 
ment and sound Democratic prin- 
ciples. As a citizen he is public- 
spirited, enterprising, and patriotic, 
and is well known for his many 
charitable deeds. 



John Merritt. 



John Merritt, one of the most 
respected citizens in the Town of 
Union, was born in that town in 
1849. His parents were John 
Merritt, who immigrated to this 
country from England, and Cathe- 
rine Van Gieson, who was born in 
Secaucus, 1820, of Dutch parents. 

Mr. Merritt, the subject of this 



71 



sketch, was bom at Jefferson PI., 
and the Boulevard, about 25 feet 
from his present residence. 

After finishing his public school 
education in Union Hill, he learned 




the lithographing trade and later re- 
ceived a position with the litho- 
graphing firm of Knapp & Co.' of 
New York City. He was with this 
hrm for thirty-eight years and be- 
came a recognized artist in the 
trade. Some of his beautiful work 
can be seen at his home on Jefferson 
Place. 

In the growth and prosperity of 
the Town of Union Mr. Merritt 
soon gained influence, and through 
his energy and public spirit has 
been active in promoting the gen- 
eral welfare. He took an early ac- 
tive part in the councils of the Re- 
publican Party and served as a 
member in the Town's Board of 
Council for four successive terms 
and was a member of the Board of 
Education for three years. In 1911 
Mr. Merritt was appointed Post- 
master and held this office till 1915, 
under President Taft. 

In 1873 Mr. Merritt married 



Kate Seeley, daughter of John 
Seeley, of New Durham. The 
Seeley family were among the ear- 
lier settlers of Nortlr Bergen. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Merritt have 
two children : Henry, who married 
Miss M. Brown (they have two 
children, John and Jessie), and 
Frank, who married Miss E. Hal- 
den wang (they have also two chil- 
dren, Howard and Frank). 

Mr. Merritt has distinguished 
himself for ability, sound judgment 
and patriotism. He is known as an 
honest and enterprising citizen of 
the highest integrity and enjoys the 
co"hfidence and respect of all who 
know him. 



August Wetterer. 



One of the most esteemed and 
respected residents of the northern 
part of the county is August Wet- 
terer, of the Town of Union. 

He was born in New York City, 
December 27, 1859. His father, 
Charles ^Vetterer, immigrated from 
Baden, Germany, to this country, 
in 1848, and later became one of 
the most prominent contractors in 
New York as well as in this county. 

The family moved to Union Hill 
ill ISGi. There August received 
his public school education and la- 
ter learned the real estate and in- 
surance- business. In 1877 he 
opened a real estate and insurance 
office with J. G. Morgan under the 
name of Morgan & Wetterer (see 
sketch of Morgan & Wetterer). 
This office still stands at the corner 
of Union Street and New York 
Avenue, but is now conducted by 
Mr. W^etterer himself, as Mr. Mor- 
gan resigned from itjhis bus'iness 
five years ago. The firm is now 
Wetterer & Betz. 

Mr. Wetterer has, all his Hfe, 
displayed great business ability, 
sound judgment and unerring 



72 



foresight, united with manly cour- 
age, indomitable industry and hon- 
est effort. He served his town in 
the capacities of Collector of Ar- 
rears and Taxes in 1890-'91-'92. 

In 1885 he married Harriet Guth 
of the old prominent family resid- 
ing in Union Hill since 1850. 

Mr. Wetterer is a member of the 
Palisade Lodge Mo. 84, F. & A. M., 
of which Lodge he has been a mem- 
f)er for ihe last thirty years ; Cyrus 
Chapter, Pilgrim Commandery, 
Garfield Council and several other 
societies. 

He is a large property owner and 
has done much for the development 
of the community, and has always 
taken an active interest in every- 
thing connected with the welfare or 
improvement of Union Hill. 

Mr. VVetterer's father died in 
1910, at the age of eighty-four 
years. 



FranK Selbach. 



Few men are more popular than 
Frank Selbach, the prominent iron 
work manufacturer in North 
Hudson. 

Hes was born in Germany, Dec. 
26, 1867, and received his early 
education in that country, and later 
learned the iron trade. 

In 1887 he came to this country 
and for a number of years worked 
at his trade, later establishing his 
own business in Hoboken, which 
he conducted for 6 years. 

Ten years ago he established the 
business of Selbach-Meyer Co. in 
West New York, which concern to- 
day ranks among the foremost in 
structural and ornamental iron 
work. The plant is located at 21st 
to 22nd Street, West New York 
and covers a ground of 75x217 
feet and employs about 30 men. 

This firm has had the contracts 



for some of the largest structures 
in this section, including as follows : 
The Union Hill High School, of 
which the contract was $35,000; 
West New York Town Hall, $10,- 
000; School No. 6, West New 
York; Belvidere Court, Jersey 
City ; Goelz Building, Union Hill ; 
North Hudson Hospital, Cliffside 
School ; Leonia School ; and a large 
number of other contracts too 
numerous to mention. 



«ll 


.;^-^«. 


',,» 


.■jrj • ^^hI 


A1 


I 



While being a public spirited and 
enterprising man, Mr. Selbach has 
never sought public offices, but has 
devoted his full time to hisbusiness. 
He is known throughout the north- 
ern part of the county as a man of 
the highest ability and integrity^ 
and is possessed of sound judg- 
ment and a sterling business char- 
acter. His pleasing personality 
has gained him a large circle of 
friends. 

Mr. Selbach married Marie 
Bachmann in 1888. They have 
four children, Mary, Augusta, 
Margaret, and Charles. 



n 



M. a L. Mineral Water 
Company. 



Probably one of the best known 
concerns in Hudson County is the 
M. & L. Mineral Water Company, 
manufacturers of high grade aer- 
ated beverages and mineral waters. 

The plant, which is located at 
395 and 397 Haliday Street, Jer- 
sey City, covers a ground of 50x 
100 feet, and employs 16 men 
steady. 

The concern was established in 
1911 by Mr. William J. Menovvn, 
who started in a small place with 
four men, and two wagons for de- 




liveries. Today three double and 
two single wagons and a two-ton 
motor truck are kept busy making 
deliveries all over the county and 
in New York City, besides large 
shipments delivered by rail to dif- 
ferent places in New Jersey, New 
York, and Pennsylvania. The firm 
supplies most of the large and pro- 
minent clubs and hotels in these 
three states. Orders have been re- 



ceived so fast of late, that it has 
been found impossible to fill them 
with the present facilities. 

Mr. Menown received on Janu- 
ary 1, 1916, the first certificate is- 
sued by the Board of Health for 
cleanliness in his factory. At the 
exhibition and parade conducted by 
the Jersey City Chamber of Com- 
merce a few years ago, Mr. Men- 
own received the blue ribbon for 
display of wares. 

All the latest and most up-to-date 
machinery can be found in his fac- 
tory. All bottles are first steril- 
ized, then go through a brushing 
process, and finally through the 
rinsing machines. 

All ingredients used in the man- 
ufacture of. the beverages are made 
at this plant, and only the purest 
materials used. The different con- 
tainers for water, syrup, etc., are 
made of slate and porcelain, and 
are screened to keep out dirt and 
flies. 

Mr. Wm. J. Menown has been in 
the business for over fifty years, 
starting to learn it when only a 
boy, in Ireland, where he was born 
January 19, 1856. He immigrated 
to this country in 1882, and settled 
in the section of Jersey City where 
the factory is now located. He at 
once started to work at his trade, 
and his abilities were soon recog- 
nized, procuring him a responsible 
position with the old Standard 
Bottling Works in Jersey City. 
He ran this firm's first machinery 
at the exhibition in New York, 
1883. 

In 1911 he established his pres- 
ent business and by consistent hard 
work and push, and by sticking to 
his principle of "Honest Methods", 
giving the public the purest and 
best products, Mr. Menown soon 
succeeded in making his business 
known country wide. His aim 
from the beginning has always been 
"Quality", and he has stttck to it 
ever since. 



74 



S. T. FairbanKs. 



Samuel T. Fairbanks, one of the 
best known auctioneers in Hudson 
County, with offices at 89 Mont- 
gomery Street, Jersey City, was 
born m that city, January 11, 1875 




There he received his early educa- 
tion at the Public Schools, and later 
worked in the furniture business. 
He, however, soon became inter- 
ested in real estate, and worked for 
several large firms in and about 
New York. After a few years he 
established his own business and 
opened an office on Washington 
St. in Jersey City, N. J., where the 
present Post Office now stands. He 
then became interested in auction- 
eering, in which business he has 
made a huge success, with hundreds 
of important sales to his credit, 
some of the largest deals having 
been handled by Mr. Fairbanks, 
who is known from one end of the 
state to the other. 

Mr. Fairbanks is honest and en- 
terprising, and a man of the highest 
integrity, enjoying the confidence 



and respect of all who know him. 
In 1900 he married Louise Sieben, 
of Jersey City, by whom he has 
had four children, Warren, Gordon 
and Mildred, now living; and Ed- 
gar (deceased). 

He is a member of the F. and A. 
M. and the Jr. O. U. M. 

He is doing business under the 
firm name of Jersey City Realty 
Exchange, and is a real estate 
broker, auctioneer, and appraiser. 



F. E. Giavatti. 



Fernando E. Ciavatti is fast be- 
coming one of North Hudson's 
most noted portrait painter's. He 
was born in RiiAini, Italy, in 1892 
and early in life showed a great 
talent for portrait painting. He 




(Photo from Painting.) 

studied under the widely known 
portrait painter and sculptor E 
Panzini in Italy. 

Mr. Ciavatti came to West Ho- 
boken in 1906 and has since made 
quite a name for himself both in 
New York and New Jersey. He is 



75 



an artist with a splendid talent and 
ability, a fact which has been re- 
cognized by many prominent 
people who have posed for him, 
among which can be found a num- 
ber of men and women of New 
York's best society. 

Mr. Ciavatti is also well known 
socially. He is at all times genial, 
has a pleasant word and hearty 
welcome to everybody, and his 
pleasing ways make everybody take 
a liking to him. 

He was married in 1913 and re- 
sides at 406 Mountain Road. 



John Haag. 



John Haag, well known in North 
Hudson, was born in Union Hill, 
'the 27th of August, 1867. His 
parents were John Haag and 
Christiana Miller. They settled in 




that town in 1846, and were some 
of the earliest settlers of that 
section. 

After John had received his 
public school education, he learned 



the plumbing trade and was in this 
business for a number of years. In 
1904 he went with the Peerless 
Granite Company and has been 
with this concern ever since. He 
is now Secretary of this firm. 

Mr. Haag has taken a great in- 
terest in public affairs, and in 1909 
was elected to the Board of Coun- 
cil and re-elected to this Board 
again in 1911. After finishing his 
second term, Mr. Haag withdrew 
to give another man a chance. 
While in office, Mr. Haag was 
chairman of the Fire Committee 
for four years and chairman of the 
Finance Committee for two years. 
He has always been a staunch 
Democrat and a great believer that 
every man in the party should have 
an equal chance. 

Mr. Haag married Christina 
Siebel in 1894. They have one son, 
John C, Jr., who married Florence 
Schmidt. 

Mr. Haag has exerted an im- 
portant influence in various direc- 
tions, and by courage and persever- 
ance has achieved a high reputa- 
tion in all relations of life. 

He is a public-spirited and enter- 
prising citizen and has always 
taken a great interest in the devel- 
opment of the community. 



James H. Hughes. 

Descended from one of the oldest 
and most prominent families and 
one of the first undertakers in Jer- 
sey City, is James H. Hughes, with 
undertaking parlors at 183 Mont- 
gomery Street. 

Mr. Hughes established the busi- 
ness in 87-89 Montgomery St. in 
1846. It was at that time a furni- 
ture and casket business. He was 
the second undertaker starting in 
business in Jersey City. 

On May 2, 1899, Wm. Hughes 



76 



died, and his son Thomas took over 
the business, later moving it to 101 
Montgomery St., and still later to 
260 Warren St. He married Har- 
riet McGillily, with whom he had 
one daughter, Ida. Thomas Hughes 
died on February 15, 1915, and 
the business was then taken over by 
James H. Hughes, who was a 
cousin to the deceased. He moved 
the business to the present address. 

James H. Hughes was born in 
Jersey City on January 26, 1876. 
After finishing his school education 
in the local schools, he worked for 
a time in a large drug concern and 
later started to learn the under- 
taking business. 

He married Minnie Schade in 
1907. They have one son, Edwin, 
mond. 

The Hughes family are probably 
the only undertakers who kept a 
record of their funerals previous to 
1875. Before that time no records 
were kept by anybody of where 
people were buried. 

James Hughes is naturally 
deeply interested in Jersey City and 
especially in the lower section, 
where he was born and raised and 
where his family lived in the early 
days. He has a splendid memory 
of the olden days, and has followed 
the growth of the section with an 
appreciating interest. 

He is, of course, well known in 
the community, whose respect and 
esteem he enjoys to the utmost. 

Although he is a public-spirited 
man, he has never taken any active 
interest in politics and devoted his 
full time to his business. He is a 
very careful and conscientious man, 
able and dignified in his profession, 
and has achieved a high reputation 
for his sterling business character. 

He is well known in fraternal 
circles, and is a member of the F. 
and A. M. and the Elks. 



Anton Dite. 



Anton Dite, well known in poli- 
tical and social circles, was born in 
Bohemia in 1863 and came to 
America in 1879. He worked in 
several grocery stores in New 




York and later at the manufactur- 
ing of cigars. He came to West; 
Hoboken about thirty years ago,- 
where he worked as a painter and 
later opened a cafe, which he con- 
ducted for 13 years. He then re- 
tired from this business and 
started in the real estate business, 
with office at his residence, 246 
Palisade Ave., West Hoboken. 

Mr. Dite was elected Freeholder 
in 1902 and served in this capacity 
until 1908. 

He was married in 1886 and 
there are six children. Mr. Dite 
is prominently connected with sev- 
eral Bohemian organizations and 
is a member of the Foresters of 
America, the Exempt Firemen's 
Association and Columbia Mutual 
Aid Society. 

He is a public spirited and en- 



77 



terprising citizen and has always 
been actively interested in the wel- 
fare of the community and in vari- 
ous capacities has served his fellow 
citizens efficiently and honorably. 
He is one of the organizers of the 
Commonwealth Trust Co. of West 
Hoboken and is a Director of this 
bank. 



Charles W. WycKoflF. 



One of the most prominent and 
best known builders in West Ho- 
boken is Charles W. Wyckofif , He 
was born in Huntington County in 




which he has the help of his four 
sons. Mr. Wyckoff served on the 
Board of Education for five years. 
He is a member of the Free Ma- 
sons and Royal Arcanum. He was 
married in 1870, and there are 
eight children, four sons and four 
daughters. 

Mr. Wyckoff's great hobby is 
automobiling, and he very often 
goes out on large and extensive 
trips in his car, and has in this 
way seen a large part of the United 
States. 

He has a host of friends through- 
out the country, and is known as 
a sterling business man, whose 
word is recognized wherever he i; 
known. 



1848 and after finishing his school- 
ing, he started to learn the car- 
penter business. He went to 
Texas, where he stayed for four 
years, then went to Princeton, and 
ten years later moved to Asbury 
Park, where he remained for siy 
years. He then came to West 
Hoboken in 1888, and since then 
Mr. Wyckoff has erected over 600 
buildings in North Hudson, and is 
still very active in th? business, in 



Fred'K J. Bergmann, Jr. 

Frederick J. Bergmann, Jr., one 
of the best known men in the 
northern part of the county and 
one of the most successful painting 
contractors in that section, was 
born in Weehawken, May 5, 1870. 
He is the son of Frederick J. and 
Gertrude (Ziegler) Bergmann, na- 
tives of Germany, who emigrated 
to this country in 1848. 

Frederick obtained, his 'public 
school education in Weehawken 
and Hoboken and later took a 
course in decorative design at the 
Cooper Union Institute in iNew 
York City. In 1898 he established 
his own business as painter and 
decorator. He has since become 
one of the most brilliant men in 
his line of business and his deco- 
rations in some of the most noted 
buildings have been praised as 
masterpieces. 

Mr. Bergmann is a public spirit- 
ed citizen and has held many 
public offices of responsibility 
and trust. He served the Wee- 
hawken Board of Education in 
1901-1902-1903. He , was elected 
Township Committeman from the 



m 



Second District, in which office he 
served from 1904 to 1905. He 
was then elected, by the unanim- 
ous vote of the Weehawken Coun- 
cil, to iill the unexpired term of 
Township Treasurer. He has 
faithfully discharged his duties 
connected with his different offices 



G. H. DecKer. 




and won the public confidence by 
his fairness and sound judgement. 
excellent reputation for business 
abihty, integrity and enterprise. 
His work stands as monuments to 
his industry. He has also won re- 
cognition as a landscape and por- 
trait painter and many beautiful 
paintings executed by his own 
hands can be seen at his home and 
at the homes of his many friends. 
He is thorough in every detail, en- 
ergetic and practical, and prompt 
in all his undertakings. 

In 1896 he married Augusta 
Kleinke, daughter of the well 
known contractor and builder 
Fred Kleinke of Weehawken 
Heights. 

He is a member of many politic- 
al, business, fraternal and social 
associations and clubs. : 



Gottlieb H. Decker, one of the 
foremost builders in North Hud- 
son, was born in Wuerttemberg, 
Germany, January 1, 1869. There 
he received his early education and 
later learned the mason and build- 
ing business from his father. In 
1891 GottHeb came to this country 
and settled in North Hudson, where 
he, three years later, established his 
own business. He became one of 
the most successful builders in the 
county, and one whose reliability 
and ability became widely known. 
He has been very successful in se- 
curing large and prominent con- 
tracts, and was once one of the 
busiest contractors in the section. 
His pay roll, at one period, amount- 




ed to $2,200 a week. Mr. Decker 
secured the contract for the Tuber- 
culosis Hospital at Laurel Hill, and 
has erected numerous noted build- 
ings, the latest of" which is a monu- 
ment to his ability. This is the Na- 
tional Bank of North Hudson, lo- 
cated at the Transfer Station, West 
Hoboken, 



79 



He also built the Merchants' 
National Bank in Jersey City, the 
extension to the Hudson Trust Co. 
Building, and numerous churches, 
factories, and private houses. 

Of late Mr. Decker has, however, 
devoted most of his time to the 
automobile business, and is part 
owner of the Decker-Keynton Gar- 
age and repair shop located at 3828 
Hudson Boulevard. This two- 
story building covers a ground of 
6.Sxl00 feet, and stores about sixty 
autos. 

In 1893, Mr. Decker married 
Katherine Wolf, with whom he has 
one child, Frieda. 

He is a member of the F. & A. 
M., Elks Hoboken No. 74, Zem 
Zems, and Odd Fellows, of which 
latter he has been a member for the 
last twenty-one years. 



Henry Schopmann. 



What can truly be said to be one 
of the best known builders in the 
northern part ' of the county, is 
Henry Schopmann, at 3609 Hudson 
Boulevard, Jersey City. 

Mr. Schopmann comes from an 
old, prominent family. His father, 
Henry Schopmann, immigrated 
from Germany to this country and 
settled in this section over fifty 
years ago. He was one of the pio- 
neer carpenters and builders in that 
section and became known county- 
wide for his ability and reliability. 
Henry, Jr., was born in Jersey 
City, February 22, 1872. As soon 
as he had finished his Public School 
elucation, he started to learn the 
carpenter trade from his father. 
Later he worked for different buil- 
ders, as he was eager to learn all 
there was to learn and the different 
methods in the building trade. In 
1904 he engaged in business for 
himself, the first three years with 



W. S. Anderson, for whom he had 
worked for over ten years. 

Mr. Schopmann has been very 
successful in securing some of the 
larger and more prominent con- 
tracts, one of the latest of which 
was the carpenter work in the Na- 
tional Bank of North Hudson, lo- 
cated at the Transfer Station at 
West Hoboken. He also executed 




the carpenter contracts in the Key- 
stone and Courtland Theatres in 
\A'est Hoboken, the Jackson Thea- 
tre, and the Seamen's Home in Ho- 
boken, and numerous private resi- 
dences, several churches, and some 
sixteen twenty-family houses, fac- 
tries. etc. 

\Vhile Mr. Schopmann has never 
mixed in politics, he is nevertheless 
a public spirited and patriotic citi- 
zen. He is prominently connected 
in fraternal circles, being a mem- 
ber of the F. & A. M., Odd Fel- 
lows, and Foresters. 

He married Katherine Heilich, 
of the well known West Hoboken 
family, in 1897. They have one 
son, Valentine, wo is helping the 
father in business. 



80 



Henry Koch. 



Henry Koch, Mayor of Secau- 
cus, is undoubtedly one of the best 
known men in the country. 

He was born in Germany, Sept. 
9, 1870, and after finishing his pub- 
He school and High School educa- 
tion in that country, he learned the 
trade of coppersmith, but as he was 




anxious for an adventurous life, he 
secured a job on a ship and became 
a seafaring man. He traveled 
nearly all over the world in dif- 
ferent capacities, but in 1890 he 
gave up this life and settled in this 
country, working at different jobs 
in New York City. By hard, con- 
sistent work and by saving every 
penny he possibly could, Mr. Koch 
was soon able to buy a business of 
his own. He bought a cafe at 205 
Third St., Hoboken, which he con- 
ducted for a number of years, then 
sold out and went into the ice busi- 
ness, and later into the hotel busi- 
ness, which he conducted together 
with an agency seUing ocean steam- 
ship tickets for all principal steam- 



ship companies, and in conjunction 
therewith a foreign banking busi- 
ness and money exchange. 

In 1907 he went into the real 
estate and insurance business, 
which business he still conducts at 
95 Washington St., Hoboken, also 
having a branch office in Secaucus, 
N.J. 

Mr. Koch has always been very 
active in political affairs. He has 
been a Justice of the -Peace for the 
last fifteen years. He has been a 
resident of Secaucus for the last 
twelve years, and has served that 
town as Recorder for years. In 
1913 the residents elected him 
Mayor of Secaucus by a very large 
majority. He took office on Janu- 
ary 1, 1914. His splendid man- 
agement of the town's affairs and 
his principle of running his office 
on a business basis soon gained him 
many admirers and enthused the 
people so much that they re-elected 
Mayor Koch by a big majority in 
1915 to serve another term as 
Mayor of Secaucus. In 1917 he 
was again re-elected to the highest 
office in town and began his third 
term on January 1, 1918. 

During his four years of admin- 
istration he has won the absolute 
trust and confidence of the people. 
To mention the Mayor's numerous 
achievements would fill up a small 
book. He has been and still is a 
hard fighter for the development of 
Secaucus. His honesty, ability and 
his sterling business character, 
combined with a pleasing person- 
ality, has made him one of the most 
popular men in the county. 

He is prominently connected in 
fraternal circles, being a member of 
the F. and A. M., Hudson Lodge 
No. 71, Eagles, Foresters, and 
Knights of Pythias. He is a mem- 
ber of the Secaucus Fire Depart- 
ment and many societies and or- 
ganizations too numerous to men- 
tion. 

Mayor Koch married Lizzie 



81 



Jurich in 1900. She, however, died 
in 1911, leaving !him one son, 
Henry, who is now seventeen years 
of age. 

James Nolan. 

James Nolan, Mayor of North 
Bergen, was born in Annandale, 
N. J., June 25th, 1874. His par- 
ents moved to North Bergen in 
1881, where James finished his 
public school education in North 
Bergen Schools No. 4 and 6. In 
1888 he secured a position as mes- 
senger boy, and while employed as 
such learned the Morse system of 
telegraphy. He then became a tele- 
graph operator for the West Shore 




Railroad, and later hecame con- 
nected with the Manhattan Rail- 
road in New York City, and for 
twelve years held the position a,s 
operator in this railroad's switch 
tower at Chatham Square. This 
was, at that time, the busiest switch 
tower in the world. Mr. Nolan 
then became a cigar salesman for 
Aug. Kleflfmann Cigar Co., and 



two years later became connected 
with the Peerless Rubber Mfg. Co. 
in an official capacity. He then 
started in the real estate and in- 
surance field, in which business he 
is still engaged. 

Mr. Nolan takes a deep interest 
in the welfare of the community, 
and in various capacities has con- 
tributed much to its growth and 
advancement. He is a Democrat 
in politics, a sagacious business 
man, and enjoys a wide popularity. 
He was elected a member of the 
Township Committee in 1903, and 
was re-elected in 1905-07-09. In 
1910 he resigned from the Town- 
ship Committee and was appointed 
to the Board of Freeholders to fill 
a vacancy. He was elected Tax 
Assessor in 1911 and served an un- 
expired term till 1913, when he was 
re-elected to a full term of three 
years, and in 1916 was again re- 
elected to a third term. While a 
member of the Township Commit- 
tee, he served as Chief of Police. 
In 1917 Mr. Nolan was elected 
Mayor of North Bergen. It was 
through Mr. Nolan's efforts that 
the town Secured its own post of- 
fice. The police department was 
also inaugurated afi'd ' ; the Town 
Hall built during his. terms as 
Committeeman. 

The Mayor was married in 1910 
to Cristine B. Smith, nee Berg- 
man, of Philadelphia. He is a 
member of the Elks, Hoboken No. 
74, and of the Knights of Colum- 
bus, Palisade Council No. 387. He 
is also a member of the Exempt 
Firemen's Association, being a 
member of the department for over 
nine years. 

Mr. Nolan's parents were Philip 
Nolan and Mary Lyon, both na- 
tives of Ireland. They immigrated 
to this country in 1854 and settled 
in Hunterdon County, N. J. They 
had ten children, four girls and six 
boys, As the children grew up, 



8? 



the family was known as the hea- 
viest family in the world, each of 
the boys weighing over 250 pounds 
and each of the girls weighing over 
200 pounds. They are nearly all 
over six feet in height. 



Daniel Herrmann. 



One of the most highly esteemed 
men in North Hudson is Daniel 
Herrmann, Mayor of Guttenberg. 
He was born in that town in 1877. 
His parents were Frederick W. and 




Fredericka (Hess) Herrmann. His 
grandfather was Frederick W. 
Herrmann, a native of Germany, 
who immigrated to this country in 
1834. The Mayor's father was one 
of the pioneers in Guttenberg, 
where he settled in 1854, and with 
his stepfather established a grocery 
and hardware store at the north- 
west corner of Franklin Ave. and 
First Street. In 1861 the step- 
father died, and F. W. Herrmann 
became the sole proprietor. In 
1872 he married Fredericka Hess, 



with whom he had four children, 
Frederick W., George, Alfred and 
Daniel. 

Daniel Herrmann, the subject of 
this sketch, attended the local pub- 
lic schools, and later with his bro- 
thers helped in the father's busin- 
ess. This business soon developed 
to such an extent that the elder 
Mr. Herrmann foimd it necessary 
to erect a two-story brick structure 
on the southeast corner of Franklin 
Ave. and Bullsferry Road. In this 
building he opened a double store 
for the hardware business, which 
was managed by the sons. When 
the father died in 1913, his sons 
continued the business under the 
firm name of F. W. Herrmann Co. 
This firm has since become one of 
the largest in North Hudson, deal- 
ing in hardware and building sup- 
plies. 

Like his father. Mayor Herr- 
mann has always taken an active 
interest in political affairs. The 
older Mr. Herrmann was elected 
for five successive terms to the 
Board of Freeholders, and for two 
years served as Assessor of Gut- 
tenberg besides holding many other 
minor offices. 

Daniel Herrmann was elected 
Mayor of Gutteiiberg in 1913 and 
in 1915 re-elected to the same of- 
fice. He was again re-elected 
Mayor in 1917 and is now serving 
his third term in this office. The 
town has benefited by numerous 
improvements under Mayor Herr- 
mann's administration. The Fire 
Department has been supplied with 
automobile apparatus, and several 
streets have been asphalted, and 
numerous other improvements are 
under way. 

The Mayor is undoubtedly one of 
the most popular executives any 
city or town has ever had. Nearly 
every man, woman and child in the 
town has a good word for their 
Mayor, but as an executive he is 
bound to have some enemies ; these, 



S3 



however, are so few and insignific- 
ant that they are not worth men- 
tioning. 

As a business man as well as a 
public official Mayor Herrmann has 
been successful in every enterprise 
he has undertaken. His ability, 
enterprise, sound judgment and in- 
tegrity have never been questioned. 
His pleasing, democratic manners 
have gained him a host of friends, 
and his sterling character has gain- 
ed him the confidence he enjoys in 
the community. 



Emile Grauert. 



One of the most prominent and 
respected citizens in North Hudson 
is Emile W. Grauert, Mayor of 
Weehawken. He is the son of W. 
Grauert and Elizabeth Kauth. He 




was born in New York City, Oc- 
tober 5, 1856, and after attending 
the Hoboken Academy and the 
German American Institute in 
New York, he started to learn ar- 
chitecture in the office of several 



noted architects. He has since then 
become one of the foremost men 
in his profession in New York, as 
well as in New Jersey. He has 
gained the respect and confidence 
of builders, contractors and finan- 
ciers with whom he has become in 
contact. They recognize in him the 
business man in whom confidence 
can be placed. Mr. Grauert has 
erected and superintended the 
erection of many buildings both in 
New York and New Jersey. In 
politics, Mr. Grauert has always 
been an ardent Republican, fearless 
in espousing the best principles and 
earnest in his convictions as well 
as enthusiastic in his efforts. In 
1907 he was elected Township 
Committeeman, and in 1908 he 
was appointed Mayor of Weehaw- 
ken. He has since then been 
elected four terms as Mayor, miss- 
ing one term, when he was de- 
feated by only seventy-seven votes. 
He is now serving his fifth term as 
Mayor of Weehawken. 

Throughotit his administration, 
Mayor Grauert has exhibited a re- 
markable progressive and enter- 
prising spirit, and through his ef- 
forts has effected numerous im- 
portant improvements for the 
township. He successfully fought 
the Public Service Co. and com- 
pelled the company to replace 
something like one hundred tele- 
phone poles which had become de- 
fective. 

In the matter of street improve- 
ments the Mayor has been very 
successful, and Weehawken can 
pride itself upon the best paved 
and kept streets within the whole 
of North Hudson. 

Mayor Grauert is undoubtedly 
one of the most able and serious- 
minded officials the Township has 
ever had. He makes his daily in- 
spection of the Township every 
morning before he starts his day's 
work, and it is a known fact that 



84 



nothing can prevent the Mayor 
from making his inspection. 

All other matters pertaining to 
his duties in his responsible office 
receive this same careful attention. 
Mayor Grauert is greatly esteemed 
and respected by the community, 
and has won the public confidence 
by his integrity, fairness and splen- 
did judgment. 

He is prominently connected in 
fraternal circles, being a member 
of Doric Lodge, F. & A. M., and 
Royal Arcanum. He is a member 
and one of the organizers of the 
Highwood Fire Company and was 
also one of the organizers of the 
Civic Betterment Association. 

1881, the Mayor married Clara 
Funger, with whom he has one son, 
E. Robert Grauert, who is treas- 
urer of the firm of Schulz and 
Grauert, a prominent real estate 
and insurance concern of which 
the Mayor is Vice-President. 



Mayor Wm. Brady, M.D. 



Dr. Wm. Brady, Mayor of 
Union Hill, who is one of the most 
prominent physicians ^in North 
Hudson, was born in Paterson, N. 
J., September 15th, 1876. After 
graduating from Public School, he 
attended the Paterson High School 
from which he graduated in 1892. 
After spending a year at the 
World's Fair at Chicago, he took 
a course in military training for 4 
years, at the Vermont Academy. 
From -there he entered the Univer- 
sity of Vermont and graduated 
from this institution in 1901 with 
the degree of M. D. In the same 
year he started to practice in New 
York, and was on the staff of the 
Oppenheimer Institute in that city, 
and later transferred to their 
branch in Philadelphia. 



In 1905 he came to Union Hill. 
The Mayor has always been much 
interested in miHtary training; he 
enlisted in the Spanish-American 
War, and in 1911 he joined the 
Fourth Regiment, N. G., N. J., and 
was promoted to second lieutenant 
the following year. He was acting 
commander of Company M, and in 
1913 he was promoted to captain. 




Although his military abilities 
had. been fully recognized and his 
future possibilities were inviting 
he, however, found it necessary to 
resign, as his medical practice had 
grown to such an extent that it re- 
quired the most of this time. The 
Mayor is still much interested in 
military training and hopes, in the 
near future, to have it introduced 
into the public schools. 

Shortly after this country en- 
tered the War, the Mayor answered 
the call and is now serving as cap- 
tain in the Medical Corps, U. S. A. 



85 



FranK H. EcKert. 



Frank H. Eckert, ex-Mayor of 
West Hoboken, is the second oldest 
child of Gottlieb and Frances 
(Huber) Eckert. 

He was born October 19, 1870, 
in Jersey City, where he received 
his early education and graduated 
from Public School No. 8. He 
then entered the Jersey City High 




School, from which institution he 
graduated in 1886. His great de- 
sire was to study chemicals and 
drugs, and for two years he worked 
in Dr. Wolfstein's drug store at 
291 Central Ave., and then entered 
the New York College of Phar- 
macy and graduated form this col- 
lege' in 1889 at the age of 18>4 
years, being one of the youngest 
graduates. Starting out with his 
degree of Ph. G., he worked in 
several drug concerns in New York 
and Brooklyn, then went to St. 
Louis and in 1897 came back to 
West Hoboken, where he secured 
a position as manager, and after 
one year bought his present store. 
Mr. Eckert is an enterprising and 



public-spirited citizen, and it did 
not take long before he became ac- 
tive in the town's affairs. In 1901 
he was appointed a member of the 
Board of Health, and in 1903 he 
was elected a member of the P>oard 
of Education by one of the great- 
est majorities on record. He was 
re-elected to this office in 1906 and 
again in 1909, but did not serve Ids 
full term, as the law in 1911 was 
changed from electing to appoint- 
ing the members of the Board. 

In 1915 he was elected Mayor of 
West Hoboken by a big majority, 
defeating Mr. Mohn, who had held 
that office for three terms . previ- 
ous. Mr. Eckert took office Janu- 
ary 1, 1916, and has since accomp- 
lished much for the welfare of the 
town. He has increased the Police 
Department personnel, and created 
a Detective Bureau, the Fire De- 
partment has been improved con- 
siderably, the Hillside steps were 
built, and the Emerson High 
School finished under Mayor Eck- 
ert's administration. He has been 
a strong advocate of the relief 
joint outlet sewer which is now 
being built. 

The former Mayor is thoroughly 
known as a man of unimpeach- 
able integrity, great ability and 
sound judgment. He is patriotic 
and intensely interested in the af- 
fairs of the community. His term 
of office expired- on January 1st, 
1918. 

On October 1, 1896, the Mayor 
married Anna Staedler, with whom 
he has one child, Charles. 

He is a member of the F. and A. 
M., Mystic Tie, Odd Fellows, Elks 
Hoboken No. 74, Foresters, Ind. 
Foresters, Royal Arcanum, and Jr. 
O. U. A. M. 



85 



Joseph Stilz. 

Few men have achieved the dis- 
tinction in both business and pub- 
He Hfe which Joseph Stilz, the 
Mayor of West New York, enjoys. 
He has long been active and in- 




fluential in business and public 
affairs, and in the various posi- 
tions he has filled he has displayed 
great executive ability, sound 
judgement and commendable fore- 
sight. He has probably done more 
for the development of West New 
York than any other man. 

Mr. Stilz was born in Paterson, 
N. J., February 8th, 1878. His 
parents moved to Union Hill when 
he was only seventeen months old. 
The family shortly after moved to 
West New York, where Mr. Stilz 
has ever since resided. He attend- 
ed the local public schools and later 
graduated from the Union Hill 
High School. After studying at 
different other institutions and re- 
ceiving a thorough training for an 
active business life, he established 
his own real estate brokerage in 



West New York. He has since be- 
come one of the largest real estate 
brokers in the northern part of the 
county. He has erected numerous 
buildings in West New York, and 
is the owner of some of the largest 
properties in the town. In fact, he 
is one of the largest tax payers in 
the section. 

The people of ^Vest New York 
soon recognized in Mr. Stijz a man 
of great ability and enterprise. He 
took an ardent interest in the wel- 
fare of the town and especially in 
the children and their education, 
and in 1910 he was elected to the 
Board of Education, to which office 
he was re-elected in 1914 and later 
became the President of the Board. 
Much credit is due him for the 
town's splendid school system, 
which is second to none in the 
State. Mr. Stilz also held the res- 
ponsible position as Town Treas- 
urer from June, 1908, to March, 
1914. He faithfully discharged 
the duties connected with these po- 
sitions and is a man prompt in the 
discharge of every obligation im- 
bued with the highest principles of 
integrity and active and influential 
in the community, whose confid- 
ence he enjoys to the utmost. 

Mr. Stilz was one of the organ- 
izers of the Weehawken Trust 
Co. and is a director of this insti- 
tution. 

Being one of the most respected 
and esteemed men in the town, it 
was only natural that the people 
should want Mr. Stilz for their 
chief executive. After hesitating 
for a long while, as it meant a 
great sacrifice to his great and ex- 
tensive business interests, Mr. Stilz 
finally yielded after much persua- 
sion and signified his willingness to 
become a candidate for the office. 
Although he had strong opposition, 
he was elected Mayor of West New 
York at the Fall election of 1917, 
by a very large majority. He took 
office January 1, 1918. 



87 



0. L. Auf der Heide. 



Freeholder Oscar L. Auf der 
Heide, ex-Mayor of West New 
York, is one of the most popular 
public officials in the county. 
He was elected Mayor in 1913 
and re-elected to the same office 
in 1915. During his tenure in 
office West New York developed 
and progressed more than any 
town in the county. Splendidly 
paved streets, a fine lighting sys- 
tem, a school system and school 




buildings second to none in the 
county, an up-to-date Police and 
Fire Department, With modern 
motor apparatus, an effective fire 
alarm system, plenty of recreations 
and entertainments for the people 
of the town, these are only a few 
of the many plans and improve- 
ments inaugurated during his ad- 
ministration. 

The Mayor did, of course, not 
procure all these improvements 
alone, but had the assistance of 
some of the most able men in the 



town, many of whom he appointed 
on important committees to work 
for the welfare of the community. 

Mayor Auf der Heide has held 
many public offices of responsibil- 
ity and trust. He is now serving 
his second term in the Board of 
Chosen Freeholders, to which office 
the people re-elected him by a large 
majority vote. He has always 
faithfully discharged the duties 
connected with the different public 
offices he has held and has become 
widely known throughout the 
couny as a man of great business 
sagacity, enterprise and integrity. 
While in the Board of Freeholders, 
he has always fought hard for 
needed improvements in North 
Hudson. 

The Mayor's pleasing personal- 
ity and his democratic ways and 
manners have gained him a large 
host of friends who greatly respect 
and esteem him and whose confi- 
dence he enjoys to the utmost. 

He is a member of numerous 
fraternal, political and social or- 
ganizations and clubs and is a re- 
cognized leader in the Democratic 
party. 



Arthur F. Norton. 



Arthur F. Norton was born in 
Chelsea, Mass., Feb. 26, 1881. His 
parents moved to West Hoboken 
nine years later and Arthur receiv- 
ed his education in that town. He 
later started in the insurance 
business and for the last 13 years 
has been employed by one of the 
largest insurance companies in the 
world. He is also agent for several 
large fire insurance companies, 
with his office at 412 Oak Street, 
West Hoboken. 

Mr. Norton is one of the best 
known men in the town, where he 
has achieved a high reputation for 
his ability, enterprise and sterling 



business character. He has always 
been deeply interested in public and 
civic affairs and alert to anything 
that may be of benefit to the com- 
munity. 

He is a strong advocate of hon- 
est government and is quick in de- 
nouncing unfair and dishonest 
methods. He is fearless in his at- 
tacks on questionable undertakings 



Louis Nagel. 

Louis John Nagel, Councilman 
of Union Hill, has been a resident 
of this town since 1884. He was 




and equally quick in exposing 
them. 

Mr. Norton is ,!promiiiently 
connected in fraternal circles. He 
is a member of Doric Lodge 
No. 86, F. and A. M., and General 
Hancock Council No. 301, Jr. O. 
U. A. M. 

He is a member of the West Ho- 
boken Playground Commission and 
of the Lincoln Republican Associa- 
tion. The character of Mr. Nor- 
ton is summed up in a_ few lines 
"The man who is not easily turned 
down, or shaken off ; who has bull- 
dog grit — tenacity of purpose ; who 
smiles at rebuffs, who thrives upon 
them." 




born in New York in 1874 and 
when of the age of ten years, came 
to Union Hill. His father started 
an express business on Hudson 
Avenue, next to William Peter's 
Brewery. When Louis was thir- 
teen years old, he left school and 
went to work for his father, and 
later started his own express busi- 
ness in Jersey City. He, however, 
came back to Union Hill after two 
years, and when his father died in 
1896, he took over the entire busi- 
ness. In 1902 the business had 
grown to such an extent that he 
had to move to larger quarters. 
He then built his present ware- 
house, express office and stables 
at 120 New York Avenue. 

Mr. Nagel has always been very 
prominent and popular, and last 
year his numerous friends induced 
him to run for Councilman, which 
he finally consented to do, with 
the result that he was very easily 
elected. 



The Councilman married Bertha 
Roth of the well known Union Hill 
family in 1896. They had three 
children, of which, however, only 
one is living. 

Mr. Nagel's greatest hobby is 
walking, and in this sport he is 
quite an expert. 



William Perils. 



Counsellor William Pedis, with 
law offices in the Hudson Trust 
Building, West Hoboken, has been 
very successful in winning a large 
percentage of his cases, and al- 




though a young man, he is a very 
able practitioner and conscientious 
worker. 

His ability as on orator is well- 
known throughout the county, and 
it has helped him materially in his 
arguments before judges and 
juries. His humor and wit and h"s 
genial disposition have won him 
many friends and clients. He was 



born in Union Hill, January 2nd, 
1891, and attended the West Ho- 
boken public schools from a, b, c, 
through the High School, from 
which he graduated in 1908. He 
then entered the New York Law 
School, from which he graduated 
in 1911 with signal honors, receiv- 
ing the degrees of LL.B. and 
LL.M. He immediately thereaf- 
ter entered the law office of As- 
semblyman Peter H. James in Jer- 
sey City, and was associated with 
the Assemblyman until 1913, when 
he passed the Bar Examination, 
and in the same year started as a 
practising attorney, being the 
youngest in the State. 

In 1916, he was admitted as a 
Counsellor-at-Law and Master in 
Chancery. He is representing 
several large corporations, and has 
been connected with many cases of 
public interest. He is the legal ad- 
visor of the West Hoboken Liquor 
Dealers' Association. He has a large 
practice, which has taken him 
through the highest courts in the 
State. 

Counsellor Perils was much 
talked about for the Recordership 
and Town Attorney of West Ho- 
boken and has on numerous occa- 
sions been requested to run for poli- 
tical offices, but has always refused, 
as he wants to devote his full time 
and efforts to his ever increasing 
practice. 

He is, what can be truly 'said, a 
self-made man. He was born in 
meager circumstances and his 
mother died when he was only IS 
months old. His father, the well- 
known Justice of the Peace J. 
Perils, had the responsibility of 
bringing up William and his only 
sister. . 

The Counsellor has, however, 
successfully overcome all obstacles 
and has a splendid career before 
him. 



90 



Frederic Fichtel. 



Frederic Fichtel, one of the most 
able musicians in the country, came 
to Union Hill with his parents, 27 
years ago. He attended Public 
School No. 1 in that town, at the 




same time studying piano under 
Professor Charles Becker of New 
York, and soon became one of his 
mo^t promising pupils. 

In 1900, Mr. Fichtel went to 
Germany, and later graduated, in 
piano, at the Royal Academy of 
Music at Munich, where he also 
studied counterpoint undier Rhein- 
berger. He then went to France, 
and studied piano for one year 
with Philipp at Paris. 

Upon his return to America he 
was appointed Professor of Piano, 
Harmony and Ensemble at Hardin 
Cellege. Later he studied piano 
for one year under the famous 
Godowsky of Berlin. 

He then accepted a position as 
Director of Music at Centennary 
College at Tennessee. 



His last position was as head of 
the Piano Department of North- 
western Conservatory at Minnea- 
polis, one of the largest music 
schools in the U. S. 

He has played a great many 
times in public as soloist, with or- 
chestras and in ensemble with vio- 
linists, trios, etc. He appeared 
prominently twice before local au- 
' diences. A few years ago with 
Schumann-Heink and the Union 
Hill Liedertafel Concert, where he 
played Liszt's E-flat Concerto, and 
once again in December, 1916, he 
played with the Union Hill Lieder- 
tafel and Frieda Hempel when he 
appeared as soloist at their Golden 
Jubilee Concert. 

He is a pianist of rare ability 
and a good teacher. He has many 
prominent pupils, who now hold 
responsible positions as teachers of 
piano in conservatories and col- 
leges, in the various schools where 
he taught. He has had pupils from 
nearly every State in the Union. 

Mr. Fichtel has a residence 
studio at 76 Liberty Place, Wee- 
hawken and has a studio at 220 
Madison Ave., New York, where 
he is meeting with great success. 



John Sutter ® Son. 

One of the largest marble and 
granite works in the county is that 
of John Suttef & Son, located at 
the entrance of the Hoboken Cem- 
etery in North Bergen. Some of 
the finest work has ben turned out 
in this plant, among which may be 
mentioned the monument of the 
Hoboken Elks, made in one piece 
and weighing 16 tons. This monu- 
n-;ent is placed in the Hoboken 
Cemetery. The monument in front 
of the Union Hill High School was 
also made by this concern. 

The plant of John Sutter & Son 



91 



covers a ground of 50x100 feet and 
about eight men are continuously 
kept busy there. 

It is one of the niost modern 
and most completely equipped 
plants in the country. Electric pol- 




ishers, pneumatic tools, in fact, all 
modern machinery, are used by this 
firm. 

The concern is doing work in 
nearly all the cemeteries in the 
State of New York and New Jer- 
sey and before the war executed 
many orders for Europe. 

John Sutter, Sr., was born in 
Germany in 1864 and immigrated 
to this country in 1880. He se- 
cured a position with his uncle, 
who has a marble and granite yard 
in Middle Village, Long Island. 
After working there for twelve 
years he came to Hudson County 
in 1892. He worked for Batter- 
son & Eisele and other big concerns 
and in 1901 he established his own 
business. Two years later he was 



appointed superintendent of the 
Hoboken Cemetery, an oiifice which 
he still holds. 

Mr. Sutter married Anna Leh- 
mann in 1891. They have one son, 
John P. F. Sutter. 

Mr. Sutter, Sr., is a member of 
the Free Masons, Odd Fellows, 
Elks (Hoboken No. 74), and the 
Zem Zems. 

Mr. Sutter, Jr., received his 
early education at the local public 
schools and later began to learn the 
trade of his father. He showed a 
remarkable ability and became very 
enthusiastic in his work. Many 
new, modern ideas were introduced 
by him, and in numerous ways he 
improved the business to such an 
extent that the father took him into 
the business, which then became 
known as Sutter & Son. 




Both father and son have ac- 
quired a great knowledge of their 
trade and are widely known for 
their ability and integrity. 

Mr. Sutter, Jr., is a member of 
the Masonic Order, Zem Zems, and 
Jr. O. U. A. M. 



92 



Fred Hensel. 



Few men are better known in 
North Hudson than architect Fred 
Hensel of West Hoboken. 

In his professional career he has 
gained the respect and confidence 
of builders and contractors with 
whom he has come in contact. 
They recognize in him the business 
man in whom confidence can be 
placed. 

Outside of his profession Mr 
Hensel is the type of manhood of 




which any community might feel 
proud. Careful, conscientious and 
genial, Mr. Hensel is a man with 
whom it is both a pleasure and a 
privilege to hold a friendship. 

He was born in Hoboken in 
1866, . and after finishing his 
schooling there, he started to learn 
the trade as designer and carver 
in wood and stone. When he was 
18 years old, he took up the study 
of architecture at Cooper Union 
where he later received his dip- 
loma. He started in business for 
himself when he was only 25 years 



old. He has erected over a thou- 
sand buildings, among which may 
be mentioned Schools Nos. 5, 6. 
and 7, in West Hoboken., the Tu- 
berculosis Hospital at Laurel Hill, 
and, associated with Architect 
Weir, erected St. Joseph's Audi- 
torium and School, St. Michael's 
School, North Bergen, and the 
Union Building in Union Hill, and 
numerous others. 

Mr. Hensel has always been 
prominent in politics. He sei'ved 
West Hoboken as Recorder from 
1900 to 1911. For a number of 
years he was a County Committee- 
man, and in 1916 was appointed a 
member of the Board of Education 
for a term of five years. Mr. 
Hensel is a member of the Masonic 
Order. 



Wm. Bimer. 



Wm. Bimer, Councilman of 
West Hoboken, was born in that 




town in 1876. After attending the 
West Hoboken public school he 
learned the trade of lithographer. 



93 



He did not, however, follow up his 
trade, but went to work for the 
North Hudson Railroad as car re- 
pairer, working his way through 
the different grades until he was 
finally made a brake inspector. 
After fourteen years of faithful 
service, he resigned and opened a 
cafe at 555 Spring Street. He 
soon prospered, and in 1904 built 
the four story brick corner house 
at Clinton Avenue and Elm Street, 
in which his cafe with meeting 
room and bowling alleys is located. 

Mr. Bimer has always taken a 
great interest in the town's affairs. 
He was Treasurer of the Town 
Committee, and has held the of- 
fice of Police Pension Commission- 
er since 1913. In 1917 he was 
elected Councilman and has, at this 
writing, effected several important 
improvements in the town. 

Although in the cafe business 
himself, he has already closed sev- 
eral saloons of questionable repu- 
tation. He runs a first-class place 
himself, and believes ithat every 
man in the business should do the 
same. He also believes that every 
man holding a city position, high 
or low, should do his full duty to 
the job the people are paying him 
for. 

Mr. Bimer was married in 1900 
to Anna Schurr of the well known 
West Hoboken family, and they 
have one daughter. 

The Councilman is a member of 
the Eagles, Royal Moose, and the 
Lincoln Republican Club. He is 
also Committeeman of Hudson 
County. 



Fred M. Vincent. 



Fred M. Vincent, one of the 
most prominent roofing contractors 
of North Hudson, has been a resi- 
dent of Weehawken since 1896. 



He was born in New York City 
in 1872, where he, after leaving 
Public School, learned the roofing 
trade of his father, who was a 
well known contractor in New 
York. 




Twenty-one years ago, Fred 
moved to Weehawken, where he 
continued to work at his trade, and 
in 1906 established his own busi- 
ness. 

As a contractor, Mr. Vincent has 
achieved a measure of success, 
which stamps him as one of the 
most prominent men in his line of 
business in North Hudson. 

He has always .taken an active 
interest in politics ever since he 
starter! to vote, and in 1912 his 
ability and honesty were recogn- 
ized, and he was elected a member 
of the Township Committee. He. 
however, made an unsuccessful run 
for re-election in 1914, but was 
again elected Councilman in 1916, 
carrying every district in his ward. 
He- was the only Democrat elected 
to the Board at this election. 

His opponent was one of the 
strongest Republicans in the ward. 



94 



but nevertheless Mr. Vincent came 
out a victor. He is, what can truly 
be said, a man of the people and 
for the people, and is always doing 
his utmost to take care of the 
people's interests. He has never 
taken dictation from any political 
boss, neither has he received con- 
tributions for campaign purposes 
from any bosses or leaders. 

His last election was simply a 
recognition of his splendid work 
while in office two years previous, 
when he inaugurated a street clean- 
ing system and improved several 
streets and sidewalks. In 1913 he 
had the Public Service Corpora- 
tion indicted for keeping the 
Hackensack Plank Road as a nuis- 
ance. Mr. Vincent has always 
been interested in the Fire Depart- 
ment, and his one great aim is to 
see a paid department installed in 
the town. He is also hopeful of 
establishing some kind of a recrea- 
tion, such as a playground for the 
children. Through his efforts the 
Public Service was forced to 
place over 300 telephones in 
town. 

Mr. Vincent married Miss 
Strickland in 1896. They have two 
children. Miss Sybil, who is a 
noted pianist, having played at 
many local concerts, and Fred, Jr.. 
who is attending public school. 

Mr. Vincent is a member of the 
Masons, Loyal Association, and Jr. 
O. U. A. M. He is also a .member 
of the Second Ward Democratic 
Club, the F. Bergmann Association 
and the Owls' Bowling Club. 



re- 

the 

M. 



William Weir. 



Architect William Weir is the 
son of Alexander Weir,one of the 
oldest living general contractors in 
Hudson County, and under whose 



training Mr. Weir received a thor- 
ough and complete knowledge in 
all lines of constructional work in 
buildings. This training has been 




one of his most valuable assets in 
his present profession. 

^^'illiam Weir was born in Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, in 1880. He has 
resided in West Hoboken since 
1888, and received his education in 
that town. Later he studied archi- 
tecture at Cooper Institute, New 
York, and is now a promising 
architect with a splendid career 
before him. 

He has erected several large 
buildings and has been associated 
with Mr. Hens el in the erection of 
No. 5 School, North Bergen, St. 
Joseph's Auditorium and School 
Building, St. Michael's School 
Buildings in West Hoboken, and 
the Union Building in Union Hill. 

Mr. Weir has always taken a 
keen interest in public affairs and 
is well known throughout the 
county, 



95 



Charles Frei. 



Wm. Roth. 



The distinction of having in- 
stalled over 3,000 electric motors 
in ■ North Hudson, belongs to the 
well known electrical contractor 
Charles Frei, at Central Ave. and 
Sip Street, West Hoboken. Always 
busy, with no time for political oi 
social aflfairs, Mr. Frei has be- 
come recognized as an electrical 
expert, whose work and honesty 
can be fully relied on. 




He has installed numerous elec- 
tric plants, one of which may be 
mentioned, in Wm. Peter's Brew- 
ery Bottling Department, and in 
■ many embroidery factories too 
numerous to mention. 

His large shop, located at above 
mentioned address, covers a 
ground of 45 by 25 feet and em- 
ploys about 16 men. 

Mr. Frei was born in Switzer- 
land in 1878 and came to this 
country in 1899. A few years later 
he started in the electrical business. 

He was married in 1901 and is 
the father of three children. 



Descended from one of the 
oldest families in Union Hill is 
Wm. Roth, the well known musi- 




cian at 408 Blum Street, His 
father was a prosperous retail shoe 
merchant, having settled! in that 
town in 1865. 

William was born in Union Hill 
in 1877 and at an early age 
showed great talent for music. He 
studied piano and violin under 
Wm. Winkelmann and later at the 
Laufenberg Music School, under 
William and Adam Laufenberg. 

Mr. Roth started to teach music 
20 years ago and has since become 
a noted musician, having conducted 
several large and successful con- 
certs. He is an instructor in violin, 
piano, mandolin, and harmony. 
For the last 15 years he has been 
recognized as an expert in piano 
tuning. 

In 1903 Mr. Roth married Leah 
C. Dobbs, daughter of the well 
known Tom Dobbs, one of the 
oldest and most prominent families 
in North Hudson. 



96 



Geo. B. Meneely. 



George B. Meneely, the promin- 
ent, well known baker of West Ho- 
boken, has been Poormaster of that 
town for the last seven years. 

He was born in New York City, 
Sept. 19, 1863. There he received 
his early education and later took 
up the study of medicine and 
chemistry. He held a responsible 
position in the chemical department 
of the National Biscuit Company 
for a time. He then became inter- 
ested in the baking of bread and for 




a number of years managed one of 
the largdst bakeries in Pennsyl- 
vania. The New York Bread Co. 
then secured the services of Mr. 
Meneely, and he served this con- 
cern as superintendent until the 
time when he went in business for 
himself. 

In 1899 he established his own 
bakery, and the following fear built 
his own store at 253-255 Clinton 
Avenue, West Hoboken. 

Mr. Meneely's great knowledge 
of the business, his ability and hon- 



esty, soon gained him a large circle 
of customers until today his busi- 
ness is one of the largest of its kind 
in North Hudson. From time to 
time he has improved and enlarged 
the bakery, which now covers a 
ground of three city lots, employs 
thirty people, and keeps fourteen 
wagons busy making deliveries. 

"Meneely's Bakery", as it is 
widely known throughout the coun- 
ty, is one of the cleanest and most 
sanitary bakeries in the section. It 
is equipped with the most modern 
mjichinery and is up-to-date in 
every way. 

Mr. Meneely has been a resident 
of West Hoboken for the last 27 
years, of which he has, in a very 
praiseworthy manner, served the 
town as Poormaster for the last 
seven years. 

In 1896 he married Effie Rich- 
ards, of the old North Bergen fam- 
ily. They have two children, How- 
ard R. and Marion B. 

Mr. Meneely is a member of the 
F. and A. M., Jr. O. U. A. M., and 
Woodmen. 



Max RosenKranz. 



Max Rosenkranz, the newly ap- 
pointed member of the Board of 
Education of West Hoboken, N. 
J., has been a resident of that town 
for the past twenty-two years. 

He is well regarded throughout 
the community and is looked upon 
as a conscientious and serious- 
minded citizen, whose counsel is 
.welcome at all times, not alone in 
political circles, but also in busi- 
ness circles. His earnest integrity 
and excellent character can be 
vouched for by all. 

Mr. Rosenkranz is one of the 
most reliable painting contractors 
in this town, and a producer of ex- 
cellent work as such, as evidenced 
by the fact that he has had the cori- 
tracts for most of the public insti- 



97 



tutions in the county, among them 
the Tuberculoslis Hospital and 
Alms House at Laurel Hill, and 
most of the county bridges. He 
has also held the contracts for 
various school work in North Hud- 
son, particularly in West Hoboken, 
Mr. Rosenkranz is a member of 
the John Hancock Lodge No. 70, 
F. & A. M., West Hoboken Coun- 
cil, Royal Arcanum, Cosmopolitan 
Lodge, L O. O. F., 251, and sev- 
eral prominent Hebrew lodges. 




He started to learn the carpenter 
trade at an early age, and after 
working for a number of years at 
th^s trade, he established his own 



During the year 1904, he was 
married to Miss Beatrice Zatu- 
love of Bayonne, and is the father 
of two children, Milton, who at- 
tends the Emerson High School, 
and Arnold, a pupil of the Public 
Schools of the same town. 



F. Adriance. 



Franklin Adriance, contractor, 
of. West Hoboken, was born in 
Jersey City, March 22nd, 1858. 
His parents moved to West Ho- 
boken when he was two months 
old. 




business as carpenter and builder. 
Since then he has erected numer- 
ous buildings throughout the 
county. 

Mr. Adriance has always shown 
an active interest in politics. He 
was elected a Fire Trustee for the 
Volunteer Fire Department several 
years ago, and in 1914 he was 
elected Councilman and re-elected 
in 1916 with the largest majority 
on record. 

He is very prominently con- 
nected in fraternity circles, being 
a member of the Mystic Tie Lodge, 
F. & A. M., and has been a mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows for the 
last 35 years. 

Mr. Adriance was married in 
1882. There were five children, of 
which, however, only one is living. 
The Councilman is well known for 
his sterling character. His motto 
in business as well as in politics is: 
"Give people a square deal." 



Charles Kutler. 



Recorder Charles Kutler of 
West Hoboken was born in Ho- 
boken in 1883. He attended public 
school in that city and some years 
later moved to West Hoboken and 
went into the theatrical business, 
becoming manager of the New 
Amsterdam Theatre. 

He has always been active in 
politics and is known as a fighter. 
He has, in fact, always fought his 
own battles, and always came out 




a victor. In 1915 he was appointed 
Recorder of the town, and in Jan- 
uary 1917 re-appointed after a 
very bitter fought battle. 

The Judge is, and always has 
been, a Democrat, and when in 
January of this year the Board of 
Council became Republican by 
majority, the Republicans naturally 
fought against his re-appointment, 
as they wanted a man of their own 
party in his place. 

However, Judge Kutler's numer- 
ous friends, forgetting their politi- 



cal faith, rallied to his support and 
pointed out his splendid record, 
and after a very hard fought battle 
they finally won out, and Judge 
Kutler was appointed for another 
two year term. 

He is a great philanthropist, and 
one of the most kind-hearted men 
on the bench. It is not uncommon 
to see the Judge pay the fine out of 
his own pocket for some poor man 
or woman unable to pay the fine 
themselves which he had to impose 
upon them. 

For the last two years the Judge 
has conducted the Christmas Bas- 
ket Fund for the poor of the town, 
and last , year over 200 families 
were supplied with baskets through 
his efforts. 

He has always been fair and 
honest in his decisions, and the 
legal profession holds him in great 
esteem. 

Judge Kutler conducts a detec- 
tive agency at 139 Paterson Plank 
Road. 



Daniel Bryan. 



Daniel Bryan, the well known 
musician, at 419 Washington St., 
Hoboken, has built up one of the 
largest musical schools in the 
county. Four competent teachers 
are giving instructions in every 
kind of instrument. 

Mr. Bryan was born in Brook- 
lyn, August 4th, 1890. After fin- 
ishing his early school education, 
he gave himself up completely to 
the studies of music. He studied 
the clarinet under the eminent Pro- 
fessor W. S. Mygrants. He also 
studied at the New York College of 
Music and has for a number of 
years studied at the New York C ol- 
lege of Art. 

Mr. Bryan is a student of piano 
and harmony. At an early age he 
started to play for a living. In 191 1 



99 



he settled in Hoboken, where he 
opened a studio at his home. He 
met with great success at the 
start, and soon found it necessary 
to move into larger quarters. On 



A. L. Scarmolin. 




January 1, 1917, he moved the stu- 
dio to 419 Washington Street. 
Here Mr. Bryan as well as his four 
teachers are kept busy giving les- 
sons in private as well as in classes. 
Mr. Bryan is also a band and or- 
chestra leader and has become well 
known as one of the best musicians 
in the county. He was the organi- 
zer of the Hudson Glee Club's 
Band, and of the Lackawanna and 
Hoboken Redmen's Corps. For a 
long time Mr. Bryan furnished 
free music to the social centre of 
Hoboken. He has always been 
ready to do his share for anything 
which may be of benefit to the com- 
munity. 

In 1913, Mr. Bryan married Elsie 
Veronica Erode, of the old, well 
known Hoboken family. He is an 
honorary member of the Hudson 
Glee Club, and a member of several 
other associations. 



A. Louis Scarmolin, one of 
North Hudson's young promising 
music composers, residing in West 
Hoboken, was born in Italy, July 
30th, 1890, and came, with his 
parents, to this country ten years 
later. After receiving his educa- 
tion in the public school, he studied 
piano and composition at the New 
York German Conservatory under 
Bertha Cahn and Carl Hein. He 
appeared in the limelight at the 
early age of 14, when his first 
composition was published, and 
has since composed numerous 




pieces for voice, piano and or- 
chestra. 

Mr. Scarmolin is young and am- 
bitious and has a splendid career 
before him. He is recognized as 
a composer of ability, and his 
pleasing personality has gained him 
many friends. 

He is a resident of West Ho- 
boken since 1901, and is a member 
of the Foresters of America. 



100 



Heraco Exchange. 

H. R. Raven and C. L. Hen- 
richs of the Heraco Exchange at 
615 Spring Street, West Hoboken, 
with a branch store at 610 Bergen- 
line Ave., West New York, are 
cousins and come from one of the 
oldest and most prominent families 
in West Hoboken, their grand- 
father being Herman Breusing, 
who was the first Tax Assessor in 
that town. 

They are both what can truly be 
q^lled "live wires", dealing in high 
class phonographs, cameras and 
photo supplies, at both their stores. 
Their splendid business abilities in 
selecting and offering to the public 
only the very best, combined with. 




H. R. Raven. 

their pleasing personalities, have 
gained them a host of friends and 
satisfied customers. 

H. R. Raven, who is the Presi- 
dent of the Heraco Exchange, was 
born in West Hoboken in 1885. 
After finishing his schooling in 



that town, he went to work for a 
broker in New York City and later 
worked as an accountant in the 
railroad business. He has always 
been very fond of music, and when 
only 14 years old played in an or- 
chestra and later became leader of 
his own band. 




C. L. Henrichs. 

C. Leo Henrichs, Treasurer and 
Secretary of the firm, was also 
born in West Hoboken, in 1893. 
He also went to school in that 
town, and after graduating became 
interested in artistic work. He has 
the distinction of taking the picture 
for the first colored postal views of 
North Hudson. 

Both cousins in company started 
a small photo supply store at 608 
Spring Street in 1910, and later 
moved to 505 DuBois Street, 
where after three and a half years 
the businesss had grown to such 
an extent that they had to look 
for larger quarters. They then 
moved to their present location, 
which they have just enlarged on 
account of the continued increase 



101 



of business. They are now agents 
of the Aeolian-Vocalion and Co- 
lumbia Phonographs and carry a 
large and varied stock of records, 
also of cameras and photo supplies. 
They came of a musical family, 
being related to T. F. Droops of 
the well known firm E. F. Droops 
& Sons of Washington, D. C, the 
largest musical firm south of New 
York. 



A. M. Miles. 



Alfred M. Miles, Recorder of 
North Bergen, was born in the 
State of Maryland, the 24th of 
May, 1862. His father, Alfred M. 
Miles, was Comptroller of that 




State from 1856 to 1860. The fam- 
ily was well known in Maryland, 
being among the earliest settlers of 
that State. After receiving his 
early education in his homestead. 
Judge Miles came to North Hud- 
son in 1894. He was first associated 
with David S. Brown & Co., a soap 
concern. He then entered the em- 
ploy of the Manhattan Soap Co. 



New York City, with which con- 
cern he has been associated for the 
last fifteen years. His ability and 
faithfulness were soon recognized 
and he is at present one of the im- 
portant adjuncts to that enterpris- 
ing concern. 

Judge Miles has always taken an 
active interest in public and politic- 
al affairs and in all questions which 
affect the welfare of the com- 
munity. In 1900 he was elected 
a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion in North Bergen, and was re- 
elected for a second term as Presi- 
dent of the Board. He has also 
held the offices of Supervisor of 
Lights on the Boulevard and 
Supervisor of Census. On Jan. 1 
1917, he. was appointed Recorder 
of the Township. 

The Judge is very prominently 
connected in the Masonic Fratern- 
ity, being a member of Doric 
Lodge, No. 86, of West Hoboken, 
Cyrus Chapter, No. 32, Union Hill. 
Pilgrim Commandery, No. 16, of 
Hoboken, and Mecca Temple, of 
New York City. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Royal Arcanum. 

Judge Miles resides at Wood- 
cliflf, N. J., where he was the prin- 
cipal organizer and first President 
of the local Fire Department. 

In 1885, Judge Miles married 
Laura Dillinger, with whom he has 
two children, Edith L. and Alfred 
M., Jr. 

The Judge has achieved a high 
reputation for ability, sound judg- 
ment, and his sterling business 
character. While on the bench 
only a short time, he has won the 
esteem of the legal profession for 
his fair and honest decisions. 

His excellent judgment, fore- 
sight, integrity and energy in con- 
nection with his pleasing personal- 
ity, have gained him a large circle 
of friends not alone in North Ber- 
gen, but in the whole of North 
Hudson. 



102 



Frank Tibbitt. 



Frank Tibbitt, member of the 
township Committee of Weehaw- 
ken, was born in the State of Dela- 
ware, January 17th, 1876. There 




he received his public school edu^ 
cation and later learned the trade 
of machinist. 

He came to Weehawken in 1897 
and the following year joined the 
colors in the Spanish-American 
War. After receiving an honor- 
able discharge, he returned and 
soon became prominent in public 
affairs. He has always been ac- 
tively interested in the Republican 
Party, and in 1915 was elected a 
member of the Township Commit- 
tee to take office on January 1st, 
1916. He was re-elected to a 
second term, which he is now serv- 
ing. He has at several times, served 
as County Committeeman. 

Mr. Tibbitt has been employed 
by the West Shore Railroad as a 
marine engineer for the last 20 

years. 

Social and popular and a general 



favorite among his friends, Mr. 
Tibbitt's reputation and honorable 
standing are the result of his own 
energetic efforts. He takes an ac- 
tive interest in everything affecting 
the welfar.e of the community. He 
is a man of strength of character 
and of unimpeachable integrity and 
is highly respected. 

Mr. Tibbitt married Daisy S. 
Rowe in 1900. They have three 
children, Mildred, Francis, and 
Marion. 

He is prominently connected 
in fraternal circles, being a member 
of the Masonic Order and Royal 
Arcanum. He is also a member of 
the town's Volunteer Department, 
in which he takes a very deep 
interest. 



Thos. L. Anderson. 



Thos. L. Anderson, former mem- 
ber of the Weehawken Township 




Committee, was born in that town, 
February 24th, 1881. He is the 
son of Charles Anderson and Mary 



103 



Fox, who were among the first 
settlers of Weehawken. 

There Thomas attended public 
school and after leaving school he 
worked in a real estate office for 
about seven years. He then went 
into the saloon business and has 
since 1907 conducted his present 
cafe at 1833 Willow Ave., Wee- 
hawken. 

Mr. Anderson has been very 
prominent in politics and has for 
the last fifteen years been leader of 
the Democratic Party. He has 
served four successive terms as 
Town Committeeman from the 
iMrst \Vard. During his tenure of 
office, many improvements have 
been effected in the township, such 
as the building of the Clifton Fire 
House, the purchasing of automo- 
bile fire apparatus, and many other 
improvements too numerous to 
mention. 

In 1913 Mr. Anderson married 
Rose Gilmore. 

He was formerly actively inter- 
ested in Athletic Clubs, but in later 
years has become more interested 
in automobiling. 

The First Ward, which Mr. An- 
derson represented, is one of the 
old landmarks, having been built 
about 1877. 

By his courtesy and pleasing per- 
sonahty, Mr. Anderson has made 
a host of friends. 



Joseph Weber. 



Joseph Weber, the well known 
architect of . 132 26th St., Gutten- 
berg, was born in Germany, March 
7, 1876. When only thirteen years 
of age, he started to learn the cabi- 
net making and building trade. In 
1900 he came to this country and 
settled in West Hoboken, and a few 



years later moved to Guttenberg. 
After working at his trade for a 
number of years, he established his 
own business as a contractor and 
builder in 1906. He later took up 
the studies of architecture, attend- 
ing the Cooper Union Institute of 
New York City, and International 
Correspondence School, Scranton, 
Pa., and in 1913 he started prac- 
tising as an architect. 




Mr. Weber is the only architect 
in Guttenberg and has erected and 
supervised the erection, of several 
large buildings, factories, tenement 
houses, and private residences. He 
has gained a high reputation as a 
conscientious worker, and is known 
as a man who knows his business 
form A to Z. In 1914 Mr. Weber 
was appointed Tax Collector of 
Guttenberg, which office he still 
holds. 

He married Sophie Ruch in 
1902. There are two children, 
John and Margaret. 

Mr. Weber is a member of the 
Free Masons, F, and A. M., Pali- 
sade Lodge No. 84, and Washing- 
ton Kranken- and Sterbe-Kasse of 
West Hoboken. 



104 



W. G. Turner. 



Wilfred G. Turner, Councilman 
of the Town of Union, was born in 
New York City, November 8th. 
1887. There he attended Public 
School and later the Peter Cooper 
High School. The family moved 
to Union Hill in 1901, and Wilfred 



The Councilman is unmarried, 
and resides with his parents at 223 
First Street. 




finished'his schooling in the Union 
Hill High School. He then se- 
cured a position with a New York 
Shoe Manufacturing concern- and 
is still connected with this firm. 

Although a young man, he is 
very actively interested in public 
affairs. He was elected to the 
Board of Council in 1916 and re- 
elected in 1918. He is now serving 
Union Hill as Acting Mayor while 
Mayor Brady is serving his country 
in the Army. Mr. Turner is an 
ardent Democrat, and is one of the 
organizers of the Phil Schumacher 
Association. 

The Councilman is possessed of 
excellent judgment, foresight, in- 
tegrity and energy. 

He is popular and respected in 
both social and political circles and 
has achieved a high reputation for 
ability and perseverance. Mr. 
Turner is a member of the School 
Estimate Board and for the past 
four years has been a member of 
the Union Hill Fire Department 
Engine Co. No. 2. 

His gr^at hobbies are athletics 
baseball, and bowling. 



Edward Meyer. 

Edward Meyer, member of the 
Board of Council from the Second 
Ward, Town of Union, was born 
in New York City, April 1st, 1880, 
where he attended public school. 
When he was nine years of age, his 
parents moved to Union Hill, 
where he finished his studies and 
upon graduation from the Public 
Schools learned the electrical trade 
and was for some six years em- 




ployed by the Public Service Cor- 
poration, resigning to become Man- 
ager of the Charles Meyer Co. 
Manufacturer of Chenilles and 
Novelties, of which his father was 
proprietor. He later became in- 
terested in the Painting and De- 
corating line, and in 1914 embarked 
in the aforementioned business on 
his own account, and from a small 
beginning, by hard work and close 
application, has succeeded in es- 
tablishing one of the largest paint- 



lOS 



<ng and decorating businesses in 
town. 

Mr. Meyer has always taken an 
active interest in the town's public 
and civic affairs. In 191 S he was 
elected a member of the Board of 
Council and re-elected for the term 
of 1918-1920. At present he is 
serving as chairman of the Police 
Committee as well as other commit- 
tees. 

Under his regime many import- 
ant improvements have been made 
in town, among which is the new 
underground Police Signal System, 
which is one of the finest in exist- 
ence and enables those at Police 
Headquarters to keep ' in constant 
touch with the officers patrolling 
the town. 

Mr. Meyer has also co-operated 
with his colleagues in effecting 
numerous improvements, such as 
automobile fire apparatus, new fire, 
alarm system, street improvements 
etc. He has been a member of 
Union Hjll Hook and Ladder Co. 
No. 1 for over ten years, and is an 
enthusiastic fireman. He is also a 
member of the Second Ward 
Democratic Club, Charles Lindke 
Association, Humboldt Association 
and others. 



Wm. H. Gardner. 



. \Vm. H. Gardner, Councilman 
of the Second Ward of Union 
Hill, was born in that town in 
1880. There he received his early 
education and after leaving public 
school he learned the trade of 
photo engraver, and has worked at 
this trade ever since. 

Mr. Gardner has always been 
actively interested in the Republic- 
an Party, and in 1916 he was 
elected a member of the Board of 
Council of the Town of Union 
and went into this office January 
1st, 1917. 



He is a prominent and enterpris- 
ing citizen, active in promoting 
every worthy object, prompt in the 
discharge of duty and thoroughly 
identified with the best interests of 
the town. He is chairman of the 
Finance, Taxes and Assessments 
Committee and chairman of the 




Legislation Committee. Mr. Gard- 
ner descends from one of the oldest 
families in the town. His grand- 
father, Wm. Babcock, used to cut 
trees in Union Hill in olden days 
when that place was mostly 
Woods. His parents were Jacob 
Gardner and Emma Ward. 

In 1903 Mr. Gardner married 
Ella Blauvelt, descending from the 
prominent family of that name 
and on the mother's side descend- 
ing from the old Baxter family. 

The Councilman has two chil- 
dren, William H. Jr. and James 
W. He is a member of the Gar- 
field Co., Jr. O. U. A. M., America 
Flag Council, Sons and Daughters 
of Liberty, and Mystic Star Shep- 
herds of Bethlehem, and several 
social and political associations. 



106 



Wm. A. Mclndoe. 



^William A. Mclndoe, Council- 
man of the Town of Union, is the 
son of Alexander W. Mclndoe and 
Marie Halstead, both born in New 
York City. 

William was born in that city on 
August 18th, 1871. There he re- 
ceiving his early education, and 
after leaving Public School started 
to learn the printing trade. The 
family moved to Union Hill in 
1898 and William was married in 
the same year to Julia Langen- 
bacher, with whom he has three 
children, Wm. Jr., Walter J., and 
Alexander W. 




Mr. Mclndoe has always been a 
public-spirited and enterprising 
citizen. In 1911 he was elected 
Councilman -of Union Hill and 
thrice re-elected to this office, now 
serving his fourth term. While in 
office, the Councilman has helped 
inaugurate many important im- 
provements, such as the purchasing 
of automobile apparatus, the erec- 
tion of Engine Co. No. 2 House, 



the installation of the Fire Alami 
and Police Signal systems, and has 
effected several street improve- 
ments. 

Mr. Mclndoe is very prominent 
in fraternal, political and social so- 
cieties. He is a member of the 
Mystic Tie Lodge, No. 123, F. & 
A. M., and the Zem Zem Grotto. 
He is a standard bearer of the as- 
sociation bearing his name, and is 
a member of the John J. Eagan 
Association, of which he was a 
Secretary for ten years. For the 
last ten years he has been a secre- 
tary of the Emil Groth Association. 
He is a member of the Charles 
Schaaf Association and the John 
Haas Association, also of the J. J. 
Vervoort Association and John 
Meiller Association. 

The Councilman is very fond of 
bowling, fishing, and gunning, and 
is a member of the Regatta Rod 
and Gun Club. 



Edw. F. Russell. 



Edward F. Russell, ex-Chief of 
the Fire Department of the Town of 
Union, was born in Hoboken, No- 
vember 1, 1881. He was educated 
in the public schools of that city, 
and after finishing his schooling, 
he secured a position with a large 
concern in New York City, and is 
still employed with this firm. 

Mr. Russell was one of the or- 
ganizers of Engine Co. No. 2, of 
the Town's Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment, in 1907. He has been honor- 
ed with every office in the Com- 
pany in the department. In 1915 
he was elected Assistant Chief and 
in 1916 was elected Chief of the 
Department. As a fire fighter, the 
Chief has discharged his duties 
with distinction. He has always 
displayed great ability, enterprise 
and probity of character and has 



107 



gained the confidence and respect 
of all who know him. He is a man 
with great energy and thoroughly 
identified with the affairs of the 




town. At the recent 'Gulden fire 
in 1916 and at the Franklin Street 
fire in 1917, the Chief exerted great 
ability in handling these as well as 
other big fires. 



L. F. Marcy. 



Leonard F. Marcy, Chief of the 
Police of North Bergen, and one of 
the best known citizens of the nor- 
thern part of the county, was born 
•in New York City in 1881. His 
parents, Leonard Marcy and Mary 
Ward, moved from that city to 
North Bergen when Leonard was 
only two years old\ 

There he spent his boyhood and 
youth attending the public schools. 
After leaving school he learned the 
steam-fitting business and later be- 
came an engineer. He then became 
connected with the brewing in- 
dustry and finally became proprie- 



tor of the Casino, a famous pleas- 
ure resort. 

On May 1st, 1907, he was ap- 
pointed Captain on the local police 
force, which at that time consisted 
of seventeen men. In 1913, the 
sixth of March, he was appointed 
Chief of the North Bergen Police 
Department. To-day this depart- 
ment consists of 33 men, including 
the Chief, three Lieutenants, three 
Sergeants, and one Detective. 




Chief Marcy has discharged his 
duties with marked ability and 
sound common sense, which has 
won the approval and confidence 
of the entire community. 

Although a strict policeman and 
disciplinarian, he has gained a 
tremendously large circle of 
friends, among the public as well 
as among the men of the police 
force. 

He has inaugurated many need- 
ed improvements in the department 
such as the finger-print system, 
a photo gallery and index system. 

North Bergen has now, thanks 
to the Chief, a fully up-to-date and 
modern police department. 



108 



J. H. Rottmann. 

John H. Rottmann, the promin- 
ent painter contractor of West Ho- 
boken, was born in Gillana, Illinois, 
the 26th of April, 1874. His par- 
ents were Christian C. Rottmann 
and Veronica Volkmann. The 
family came to Union Hill the 




same year John was born, and 
settled on a farm. at Blum Street 
and Hudson Boulevard After fin- 
ishing his public schooling, John 
learned the painting trade, and in 
1896 established his own business. 
In 1900 he built his present shop, 
office and residence at 306 Elm 
St., West Hoboken. His father 
had. built the house on the corner 
of Elm St. and Palisade Ave., this 
being the first house in that section. 
.The father was well known in 
political circles, having served the 
town as a member of the Board of 
Council. He died in 1910. 

John Rottmann married Clara 
Wicke of Paterson in 1902, with 
whom he has two children, John 
Jr. and Albert. 



Mr. Rottmann is a prominent 

citizen, well known throughout the 
county. His foresight, integrity 
and sound judgment and his capa- 
city for business have brought him 
into more than local prominence. 
While never aspiring to any poli- 
tical office, he is a public-spirited 
and patriotic citizen, always ready 
and willing to do more than his 
share for anything effecting the 
betterment of the community. 

Mr. Rottmann is a member of 
the Elks, Hoboken No. 74, and the 
John J. Eagan Association. He is 
very fond of automobiling and 
other outdoor sports. 



R. Blechschmidt. 



R. Blechschmidt, the noted chiro- 
practor, with offices at 920 Savoye 
St., North Bergen, is universally 




regarded as one of the most enthu- 
siastic men in his profession. 

He first became interested in the 
art of drugless healing when he 
fell and broke his leg and was sent 



109 



to a hospital for treatment. After 
a few days stay in the hospital, he 
became dissatisfied with the meth- 
od used and claiming that no pro- 
gress was being made in the heal- 
ing of his leg, he demanded to be 
sent home. As soon as he reached 
liis home, he called a doctor prom- 
inent in drugless healing, and ex- 
plaining matters to him, requested 
him to treat his leg. 

Dr. Blechschmidt claims that 
from then on it only took a very 
short time to cure his leg, which 
became as perfect as before the ac- 
cident. He became so interested in 
chiropractic that he decided to take 
up the study, and in 1912 he enter- 
ed the New Jersey Collejge of 
Chiropractors and three years later 
passed the examination at that in- 
stitution. In 1914 he received his 
diploma from the New England 
College of Chiropractors and in 
1916 he passed the examination at 
the Anatom Chi Society in Flower 
Hospital. In the beginning of 1917 
he passed the examinations of Na- 
turopathy. He had already passed 
the examination for the Red Cross 
Society in 1910. 

Dr. Blechschmidt has performed 
many marvelous cures, for which 
he has become widely known. He 
has cured numerous cases of infan- 
tile paralysis, some of which have 
been miraculous. 

The Doctor is a member of the 
Naturopath Ass'n, the Chiroprac- 
, tors' Research Ass'n, and the Hud- 
son County Chiropractors' Ass'n. 

In 1883 he married Wilhelmina 
Hill, with whom he has six chil- 
dren, Augusta, John, who is also a 
Chiropractor, Richard, Frederic, 
Emma, and Wilhelmina. 

The Doctor, his wife and the 
children are known as the acrobat 
family. Each is the picture of 
physical perfection. 



Theodore A. Hleffmanil. 



Theodore A. Kleflfmann, Secre- 
tary of the Board of Education of 
North Bergen, was born in New 
York City, October 29, 1880. After 
graduating from public school in 
that city, he took a commercial 
course for two years and then went 
to work for his father, Aug. Klefl- 
mann, the manufacturer of the 
famous "King's Taste" cigars. 




In January, 1915, Mr. Theo. 
Kleffmann, in partnership with his 
two brothers, succeeded the father 
in the business, which is over 
thirty-seven years old. 

Mr. Kleflfmann has been a resi- 
dent of North Bergen for the- last 
seventeen years and resides on the 
Hudson Boulevard. He has been 
a Democratic County Committee- 
man for the last seven years, of 
the first district of the Third Ward, 
and a member of the North Bergen 
Fire Department, Pioneer Engine 
Co. No. 1, for the last six years. 
He was appointed Secretary of the 
Board of Education on February 1, 



110 



1916, and re-appointed to this of- 
fice on February 1, 19t7. 

Mr. Kleffmann was married in 
1907 to Thekla Hofstetter, of the 
old North Bergen family. They 
have two children, Thekla and 
May. 

Mr. Kleffmann is a member of 
the B. P. O. E. No. 74, Hoboken 
Lodge, and is Secretary of the Ci- 
tizen's Association of the First 
District, Third Ward, and Treas- 
urer of the North Bergen Build- 
ing and Loan Association. 

Mr. Kleffmann is one of the 
leadling citizens in the community, 
and enjoys a high reputation for 
his ability, integrity and sterling 
business character. His pleasing 
personality and frank and open 
manners have gained him a host of 
friends. 



Michael Modarelli. 



Michael Modarelli, the recogn- 
ized leader of the Italian-Ameri- 
cans in North Hudson, is one of 
the most prominent men in that 
section. 

He was born in Italy in 1876 and 
came to America in 1890, when he 
settled in the Town of Union. He 
worked as a barber for two years, 
saving every penny he possibly 
could, and in 1903 he opened his 
own barber shop. By hard, con- 
sistent work and strict attention to 
business, he soon prospered, and in 
1905 he sold out and entered the 
real estate and insurance business, 
in which he since has made a great 
success. 

Mr. Modarelli is a Justice of the 
Peace and has held this office for 
three successive terms since 1906. 
He has always been actively inter- 
ested in politics and is President of 
the Italian-American Political Club 
of Union Hill. 

As one of the foremost Italians 
in the county, the Italian Consul 



appointed Mr. Modarelli chairman 
of the Italian Red Cross Society in 
North Hudson. He has done much 
work for this society, as well as for 
War Relief work, and is interested 
in many other important move- 
ments. 

He was the founder of Volere e 
Potere No. 398, Sons of Italy, and 




is a Trustee and founder of Saint 
Rocco's Church. 

Mr. Modarelli married Rosa 
Ricciulli in 1897. They had nine 
children, of whom, however, only 
seven are liviiig. They are : Alfred 
E., who is studying at the Colum- 
bia University, Amile, Julia, Helen,' 
Arthur, Robert and Walter. 

Mr." Modarelli!s oifice is located 
at 242 Bergenline Ave., and his 
residence at 214 2nd St. 

He is a large property owner in 
North Hudson and is a man whose 
life has been one of constant activ- 
ity, and in every way successful. 
He has won and gained the confi- 
dence of all with whom he came in 
contact. He was recently appointed 
Assessor of Taxes. 



Ill 



Tischler Bros. 



One of the largest tinsmith and 
roofing concerns is that of Tisch- 
ler Bros, at 115 Blum Street, Town 
of Union. The business was estab- 
lished in 1907 by David and Sa- 
muel Tischler. Since then it has 
grown very rapidly and to-day the 
premises of the concern, including 
shop, yard and office, covers a 
ground of 50 x 100 feet, employ- 
ing about fifteen men steady. A 
motor truck is continually bringing 
out orders for the different jobs. 
The firm has gained a high reputa- 
tion and standing in the building 




trade for its reliability and thor- 
oughness. The policy of effecting 
the best class of work combined 
with the best service, honesty and 
fairness, is always Ijeing strictly 
lived up to by this concern. 

David Tischler was born in 
Austria, May 15th, 1882, where he 
received his public school educa- 
tion and later learned the trade as 
tinsmith. He immigrated to this 



country in 1903 and worked at the 
trade untif he established his own 
business. In 1907 he married J. 
Blecher, with whom he has three 




children, Ida, Carrie and Leonard 

Samuel Tischler was born in 
Austria in 1886 and came to this 
country one year after his brother. 
He had also learned the tinsmith 
trade in the old country and work- 
ed as such over here, until he went 
into partnership with his brother. 

He was married in 1913 to S. 
Weiner. They have two children, 
Ruth and Leo. 

Both brothers are well known in 
North Hudson. They are mem- 
bers of the North Hudson Hospital 
Association and are prominently 
connected with several Hebrew 
associations. 

They are both possessed of ex- 
cellent judgment, foresight and en- 
ergy, and are public-spirited and 
enterprising, and enjoy the respect 
of all who know them. 



112 



Emil Wendland. 



One of the most respected busi- 
ness men in West Hoboken is Emil 




Wendland, the prominent plumber 
of that town. 

He was born in Austria, July 1, 
1866, and after finishing his public 
school education he started to learn 
the coppersmith anl plumbing trade 
in his native country. 

Anxious to see the world, he took 
to traveling at an early age, and has 
seen not alone every part of Aus- 
tria, but also many foreign coun- 
tries. He has worked at his trade 
in Constantinople, Cairo, Alexan- 
dria, and many other -southern 
cities. 

In 1892, he came to America and 
settled in West Hoboken, where he 
continued to work as a plumber. 

A few years later he established 
his own business, which he has suc- 
cessfully worked up to one of the 
largest of its kind in North Hud- 
son. He has executed many large 
plumbing contracts in public build- 



ings, as well as in factories and pri- 
vate houses. 

Mr, Wendland has always been 
recognized as one of West Hobo- 
ken's leading citizens and is held 
in great respect and esteem by 
every one who knows him. He is 
very conspicuous in fraternal cir- 
cles, being a member of the F. and 
A. M., the Scottish Rite, the 
Shriners, and the Zem Zems. 

In public aflfairs he has always 
taken a deep interest. He is an 
ardent Republican and a member 
of the Lincoln Republican Associa- 
tion, Charles Bollinger Association 
and many others. 



C. Heim. 



Conrad Keim, the prominent 
baker of 341 Spring Street, West 
Hoboken, is probably one of the 




best known men in that town or in 
the whole of North Hudson. 

He was born in West Hoboken, 
and after finishing his schooling in 
that town, he started to learn the 
baker busiaess of his father, who 



113 



had established the ■ present busi- 
ness in 1873. The buiness is one 
of the oldest bakeries in North 
Hudson. When his father died in 
1911 Conrad, together with his 
brother Frank, took over the 
business. 

Mr. Keim has always been a 
public spirited and enterprising 
citizen. He served the town as 
Councilman in 1915 and was Poor- 
master for a number of years, an 
office he took over from his father, 
who was Poormaster of West Ho- 
boken for over 26 years. 

Mr. Keim is one of the most 
popular men in the town. His 
pleasing personality, integrity and 
sterling business character has 
gained him a large circle of 
friends. 

As a business man he has gained 
an enviable reputation, and the 
business is constantly growing. 
Both Mr. Keim and his brother 
Frank believe in fair and honest 
dealings and in giving customers a 
hundred cents value for every dol- 
lar. They are both very courteous, 
as are also the sales people in their 
store, which is known as one where 
people get the best and most pleas- 
ing service. 

The bakery is sanitary in every 
respect, light and well ventilated 
and located above the ground. 
Fifteen people are employed here 
and four delivery wagons and one 
auto are kept busy making de- 
liveries. 



A. Benoist. 



Alexis Benoist, Secretary of the 
West Hoboken Board of Educa- 
tion, was born in Paris, France, in 
1866. 

His parents brought him to this 
country in 1873, and settled in New 
York City, where he attended 
public school. At the early age of 



thirteen years he left school and 
started to work as a wagon boy. 

He indeed "roughed it" for a 
few years, then took up litho- 
graphy, in which profession he 




later became prominent. In the 
meantime he took up a course in 
drawing at the Cooper Union In- 
stitute and later at the Academy of 
Design under the noted Professor 
Edgar M. Ward. 

Mr. Benoist's abilities were soon 
recognized, and as a young man he 
was given charge of the artist 
room of a large concern in New 
York. 

He has executed a considerable 
amount of artistic work in the in- 
dustrial and commercial art, also 
in water color studies. 

He is widely known as a labor 
man and has several times satis- 
factorily settled labor difficulties. 
He has always been interested and 
active in political and civic affairs 
as well as in fraternal and social 
circles. 

He was appointed Councilman to 
fill the unexpired term of Charles 



il4 



A. Mohn in 1910 when the latter 
was elected Mayor. 

Six years ago he was appointed 
Secretary to the Board of Educa- 
tion and is now serving -his sixth 
term in that office. 

Mr. Benoist was married in 
1895 to Lena Hirschi. They have 
three children, Alice, Emile and 
Louise. Miss Alice is at present 
taking a teachers' course at the 
Montclair State Normal School. 
She is a noted musician, having 
played at many of the town's pro- 
minent affairs. Emile and Louise 
are attending the Emerson High 
School. 

Mr. Benoist is a Past Regent of 
the West Hoboken Council No. 
1185, Royal Arcanum. 

He is much interested in charity 
and uplifting work, and is an Elder 
of the First Presbyterian Church 
of West Hoboken. 



John H. Schuster. 

John H. Schuster, the well 
kiiOwn Committeeman of the 
Township of Weehawken, is the 
son of Jacob Schuster and Eliza- 
beth Steinberg, both natives of 
Germany. 

John was born in New York City 
on May 22nd, 1880. He is one out 
of twelve children. After- he had 
finished his public school education 
in New York City, the family 
moved to Duer Place, Weehaw- 
ken, where the father had built a 
home for the family. John then 
started to learn the real estate and 
insurance business and in 1912 
opened his own office, making a 
specialty of Weehawken real estate 
and handling all kinds of insurance, 
representing some of the largest 
and most responsible insurance 
firms. Mr. Schuster has been very 
successful in this business and has 
become one of the ranking real 



estate and insurance brokers in 
North Hudson. 

Mr. Schuster has always been a 
public-spirited and enterprising 
citizen, and in 1915 was elected 
Committeeman of the Third Ward. 
Although this Ward had voted 
Republican for four years, Mr. 
Schuster, who is a staunch Demo- 
crat, easily won out by a large 
majority. Since January 1, 1917. 
he has been chairman of the Police 




Committee, one of the most im- 
portant committees in the Board. 
He has already effected several im- 
portant improvements in the Police 
Department, the most important 
of which is the three shift system. 
He has charge of the traffic 
regulation at the West Shore Ter- 
minal, one of the busiest traffic 
points in North Hudson. He is 
also Clerk of the Board of Health 
In 1917 his many friends in- 
duced him to run for Mayor of the 
Township, and Mr. Schuster 
claims, if it had not been for a split 
in the Democratic Party and 
treachery in the party, he would 
easily have won. At the campaign 



115 



he created quite an excitement in 
the town by accusing certain of- 
ficials of neglect, especially in the 
Tax Department, which books he 
claimed had not been kept on a 
business basis, and which showed 
that taxes had not been collected 
for several years past. The matter 
was thoroughly sifted, and as a 
resuh, Mr. Schuster claims, that 
up to the present time, March. 
1917, three months after his accu- 
sations, $75,000 have been collected 
for arrears in taxes. 



Dr. L. WinKelmann, D.C. 



Dr. L. Winkelmann, D. C, the 
Chiropractor, of 248 Cambridge 
Avenue, Jersey City Heights, has 
one of the best equipped offices in 
the state. He gives X-ray treat- 




The doctor was born in Jersey 
City Heights, June 30th, 1882. His 
father was an old and well known 
resident of that section.' The doc- 
tor attended Public School No. 7 
and the German American School. 
He then took up the study of music 
and attended the Conservatory of 
Music at Philadelphia, where he 
studied the piano. He afterward 
became quite a pianist, but later be- 
came interested in drugless heal- 
ing, and took up the study of oste- 
opathy with Dr. Charles S. Murray 
from Illinois, where he, after the 
completion of his course, received 
a diploma, and finally took a course 
at the Anatpm. Chi.. Society .of 
Dissection at the Flower Hospital. 

Dr. Winkelmann is a member of 
the Americaii Naturopath Associa- 
tion, Chiropractors Ass'n of New 
Jersey, and Hudson County Chiro- 
practors Association. 

The doctor is very popular in the 
Heights section, where he has re- 
sided .his whole life, and where he 
has gained a splendid reputation in 
professional and social circles. 

The doctor started to practice 
about three years ago and has since 
gained a large circle of patients, 
who are loud in their praise of his 
wonderful achievements. 



ment, which he has studied for a 
long time and in which he is a 
specialist, and is also an expert at 
photography, which is a very big 
factor in the practice pf ChirO' 
praetor, 



Alexander Arvay. 



Alexander Arvay was brought 
over to this country by his parents 
when only three years of age. The 
family first settled in New York 
City, and later moved to West Ho- 
boken, where Alexander attended 
Public School. The family then 
moved to Guttenberg, where he fin- 
ished his schooling. Alexander 
then attendled the DeWitt Clinton 
High School, where he took a 
course in architectural drawing, 
drafting, and mathematics. He 
then established himself as a con- 
tractor and builder, and continued 



116 



in this business in Guttenberg up 
to 1912, when he went to Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y., where he erected 
several buildings. He then went to 
Omaha, Nebraska, when with the 



Charles Puff. 




Drake Construction Company he 
built up whole sections, and then 
went to Kansas, where- he helped 
build up a whole little town named 
Hunter in three months. While out 
West, Mr. Arvay also dealt exten- 
sively in real estate. 

He returned to Guttenberg the 
latter part of 1916, and is now 
established as a carpenter and 
builder in that town. He special- 
izes in interior work, and is at pres- 
ent very busy with screen work. 
Mr. Arvay has a wide acquaintance 
in North Hudson and his many 
friends are predicting a great suc- 
cess for him. He is an enterpris- 
ing citizen, a thorough mechanic, 
and his honesty has never been 
questioned. Mr. Arvay's residence 
and office is located at 237 25th St., 
Guttenberg. 



Probably one of the best known 
painters in the county is Charles 
Puff, at Lincoln Place, West New 
York. He was born in Germany, 
August 31, 1870, where he received 
his public school education and la- 
ter learned the painting trade. In 
1901 he came to America and set- 
tled in Hudson County, where he 
worked for different painting con- 
tractors up to 1907, when he es- 
tabhshed his own business. He has 
since become one of the most re- 
■ cognized painter and decorator 
contractors in the county, and has 
executed a number of very large 




contracts, among which may be 
mentioned City Hall, Hoboken, 
Public School No. 1, Hoboken; 
Public School No. 24, Jersey City ; 
Lincoln School, Fairview; St. Jo- 
seph's School, and Public School 
No. 6, West New York; Tubercu- 
losis Hospital at Laurel Hill, and 
numerous others. He also has the 
contracts for painting work on the 
following new buildings: Dispatch 



117 



Building, Union Hill, N. J.; Lin- 
coln High School, Jersey City; 
Public School No. 16, Jersey City; 
Public School No. 4, jersey City; 
Administration Building, Jersey 
City; Jersey City Hospital; Nurses 
Home, Jersey City ; English Neigh- 
borhood School, Fairview, N. J. 

Mr. Puff married Anna Scha- 
rioth in 1899. They have two chil- 
dren, Alfred and Johanna. Mr. 
Puff has resided in West New 
York for the last four years, pre- 
vious to which he resided in West 
Hoboken. He is a very high de- 
greed Free Mason, and President 
of the Deutscher Kriegerbund of 
New Jersey. Mr. Puff has achiev- 
ed his success as a painter through 
his own energy, ability and sound 
judigmenf. He is a progressive, 
patriotic citizen, and a man of the 
highest integrity. He has gained a 
host of friends by his pleasing ways 
and manners. 



Dr. F. P. Nief. 



One of the most prominent dent- 
ists in North Hudson is Dr. Frede- 
rick P. Nief, with offices in the 
Commonwealth Trust Co. Build- 
ing, West Hoboken. The doctor 
was born in Jersey City, Jul}"- Sth, 
1888. His parents were John Ni- 
colaus Nief and Minnie (Roeber). 
He received his public school edu- 
cation in West Hoboken, and later 
attended the High School in that 
town. He then took a coui'se in 
the New York College of Dentistry, 
from which institution he gradu- 
ated in 1910. He established his 
own practice the same year at the 
above mentioned address, and has 
since succeeded in building up a 
practice second to none in North 
Hudson. Several assistants and a 
trained nurse are continuously em- 
ployed at his offices. 

The name of Dr. Nief is widely 
known in the professional circles. 



as well as among the public. He 
has gained an excellent reputation 
for ability, integrity and enter- 
prise, and has made a host of 




friends by his pleasing personaHty. 
He is identified with the best in- 
terests in the town, and is a public- 
spirited and patriotic citizen. 

The doctor married Margaret 
Hibbard in 1916. He is a member 
of the Elks No. 74, and of several 
Dental Societies. 



George Weissgerber. 

" George Weissgerber, the proprie- 
tor of the "Old Corner" on Hack- 
ensack Plankroad and Spring St., 
AA'est Hoboken, is one of the most 
popular men in North Hudson. He 
was born in Germany, September 
22, 1868, and after finishing his 
public school education in that 
country, he worked at odd jobs, 
and in 1889 emigrated to America. 
He settled in New York City, where 
he worked in the brewing business. 
In 1900 he came to West Hoboken, 
where he, in partnership with his 



118 



brother-in-law, bought the "Old 
Corner". Five years ago his bro- 
ther-in-law retired, and Mr. Weiss- 
gerber took full charge of the 
place, which consisted of the cafe 



Otto 0. Hoffmann. 




and restaurant. He, however, soon 
leased the restaurant, and devoted 
his energies to the cafe. 

The "Old Corner" is one of the 
old land marks of West Hoboken. 
It was formerly known as "Carl's 
Old Corner" when Carl Rodenhau- 
sen conducted the place, which in 
early days was a meeting place for 
many of the prominent politicians. 
Many a successful politician receiv- 
ed his first boost from this corner. 

Mr. Weissgerber married Marie 
Rodenhausen, a sister of the 
former owner^ in 1890. They have 
one child, Charles. 

Mr. Weissgerber is one of the 
best known men in the northern 
part of the county. He is a man of 
the highest integrity and has gained 
a large circle of friends by his 
pleasing personality and courteous 
manners. He is well known in fra- 
ternal and social circles, and is a 
member of the Palisade I.x)dge No. 
84, F. & A. M., Odd Fellows, 
Eintracht Singing Society, Odd 
Fellow Maennerchor, Union Hill 
and West New York Schuetzen 
Corps. 



Otto O. Hoffmann, the well 
known metal ceiling contractor at 
3631 Hudson Boulevard, Jersey 
City, was born in Boston, Mass., in 
1880. His parents moved to this 
country when Otto was but an in- 
fant, and he attended public school 
in Jersey City and West Hoboken. 
Later he learned the tinsmith and 
metal ceiling trade, and in 1907 
estabHshed his own business in 
North Hudson. Since then Mr. 
Hoffmann has become widely 
known as one of the most reliable 
men in the trade, and one of the 
largest metal ceiling contractors in 
North Hudson. His shop, which is 
located at 124 Leonard Street, 
West Hoboken, is continuously 
keeping 15 men busy. 



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Mr. Hoffmann is prominently 
connected in fraternal circles, and 
is a member of F. and A. M., No. 
84, Jr. O. U. A. M., Hudson Coun- 
ty No. 175, Zem Zem Grotto No. 
16, and the Odd Fellows. He is 
also a member of a Maennerchor, 



119 



and is very fond of singing, fishing 
and hunting. 

While Mr. Hoffmann has never 
had time to devote to political af- 
fairs, he is, nevertheless, a public- 
and civic-spirited man, who has the 
welfare of the community at heart. 
His business, which is continuously 
growing, demands his full atten- 
tion, and he has achieved his suc- 
cess just because he has person- 
ally supervised every detail of the 
business. For those qualities 
which distinguish the successful 
man, he is greatly esteemed and 
enjoys the confidence of all who 
know him. 

Mr. Hoffmann married Minnie 
Mairer. They have two children, 
Helen and Edna. 



Albert Ensmin^er. 

Albert Ensminger is a descendant 
of the old Ensminger family. He 
was born in New York City, Dec. 
17, 1883, and was only two years 
old when the family moved to 
North Bergen. There he received 
his public School education and 
later went to work in the railroad 
shops, where he worked for three 
years. He then started to learn the 
mason trade, and has worked at this 
ever since. In 1908 he went into 
partnership with his brother Wil- 
liam and established the mason 
and plasterer firm under the name 
of Ensminger Bros. 

Mr. Ensminger married Anna 
Wildemann of Union Hill in 1911. 
They have one daughter, Anna 
May, named after Mr. Ensminger's 
sister, who married J. F. Wurde- 
mann, the Councilman of North 
Bergen. See sketch of J. F. Wur- 
demann.) 

Mr. Ensminger has always been 
a public-spirited, patriotic and en- 
terprising citizen. While never 
seeking political office, he is never- 
theless thoroughly identified with 



the interests of the community and 
active in promoting every worthy 
object. He is thorough in every 
detail, energetic and practicable in 
carrying out his work, and prompt 
in all he undertakes. His foresight, 
integrity and sound judgment, 
combined with a sterling business 
character, have brought him into 
local prominence. 

Mr. Ensminger is a member of 
the Mystic Tie, F. & A. M., and Jr. 




O. U. A. M. He has been a mem- 
ber of the North Bergen Fire De- 
partment for the last seven years. 
His one great hobby is automobil- 
ing. \ ., 

Wm. Ensminger, a brother and 
the partner of Albert, was born in 
New York City, December 14, 
1874. After finishing his public 
school education, he learned the 
mason trade. He established the 
business twenty years ago and has 
for the last seven years resided in 
\\'est New York. 

He was married, in 1902 to Mary 
Haerter, with whom he has one 
daughter, Edna. 



120 



Mr. Ensminger is a member of 
the Mystic Tie,F. & A. M., Jr. O. 
U. A. M., Knights of Pythias, and 
Exempt Firemen's Ass'n. 



August KleinKe. 



"August Kleinke, a member of the 
Board of Council of West Hobo- 
ken, and one of the best known ma- 
son contractors and builders in 
North' Hudson, was born in Germ- 
any, December 28, 1876., but came 
to America with his parents when 
he was only a year and a half old. 
The family settled in West Hobo- 




ken, and there August received his 
public school education. At the 
early age of fourteen he com- 
menced to learn the masons and 
builders trade, and by hard, con- 
scientious work he was soon able 
to establish his own business. He 
has since become one of the most 
successful contractors and builders 
in the northern part of the county. 
He is thorough in every detail, en- 
ergetic and practical in carrying out 
his contracts, and prompt in all he 



undertakes. His great foresight, 
integrity, and sound judgment, and 
his capacity for business, has 
brought him into more than local 
prominence. 

In politics he is an ardent Re- 
publican. In 1916 he was elected a 
member of the Board of Council 
and took office January 1, 1917. 
Shortly after, he was appointed 
chairman of the PoHce Committee. 

Mr. Kleinke's success has been 
the result of his own efforts, as he 
is what can truly be called a self- 
made man. 

Many important buildings . in 
North Hudson attest his skill and 
ability, while the esteem and con- 
fidence in which he is held by his 
fellow-citizens, represents in a 
measure his popularity throughout 
this section. 

Mr. Kleinke was married to 
Anna Tirch on June 24, 1904. 

He is a member of many frater- 
nal, political and social organiza- 
tions. 



John G. Meister. 

John ■ G. Meister is descended 
from one of the pioneer families in 
the Highwood Park section. His 
father biiilt one of the first houses 
in that section. 

John Meister was born in New 
York City, in 1889, but his parents 
brought him to Highwood Park 
when he was only six years old. 
He attended all the schools in Wee- 
hawken and later the Union Hill 
High School. After graduatingfrom 
this institution, he learned the real 
estate and insurance business and 
soon opened his own oflfice. Al- 
though a young man, Mr. Meister 
has become one of the leading real 
estate brokers in that section. He 
has gained an enviable reputation 
as an able and trustworthy man and 
has gained the confidence of all who 
have come in contact with him. 



121 



In 1912 he was elected Tax As- 
sessor of Weehawken, to take of- 
fice on January 1st, 1913. He was 
re-elected to this office in 1916, 
and also holds the office as Vital 




Statistician, ilc lus discharged 
his official duties to the full satis- 
faction of the people of Weehaw- 
ken, who predict a great political 
career for Mr. Meister. 

He is a public-spirited and enter- 
prising citizen, who is deeply con- 
cerned in the welfare of the com- 
munity and always willing to do his 
.share towards anything which may 
benefit his town. 

He is a member of the Board of 
Health of Weehawken, Highwood 
Fire Company, the Union Hill 
High School Alumni and several 
political and social associations. 

Through 'his greatly pleasing per- 
sonality he has gained a large 
circle of friends, not alone in Wee- 
hawken, but in North Hudson. 



F. W. Ziebell, D. D. S. 

F. W. Ziebell, one of the fore- 
most dentists in North Hudson, 
with offices in the First National 
Bank Building, Guttenberg, and 
also at 277 Bergenline Ave., Union 
Hill, was born in Union Hill, July 
16, 1891. His parents were the 
late Ferdinand A. and Dora 
(Bachle) Ziebell. Mr. Ziebell, the 
elder, one of the most esteemed 
citizens of North Hudson, died in 
December of 1916. The mother 
died in the spring of 1917. 

Doctor Ziebell, the subject of 
this sketch, graduated from the 





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Public School and High School "of 
this town, and then attended 
the New York College of Dentist- 
ry, from which institution he gra- 
duated in 1914, receiving the de- 
gree of D. D. S. While at college, 
he worked for the erriinent Profes- 
sor H. S. Dunning of New York. 

Dr. Ziehen's Dental Office is one 
of the most modern equipped in 
North Hudson. A trained nurse is 
continuously in attendance. Dr. 



122 



Ziebell is Attending Dentist for the 
Hudson County Tuberculosis Clin- 
ics and Sanatorium at Laurel Hill. 
Like his father, he is very promi- 
nent in the Masonic fraternity. He 
is a member of the Palisade 
Lodge, No. 84, a fourteenth degree 
Mason of the Jersey Lodge of Per- 
fection, an eighteenth degree mem- 
ber of the Jersey City Chapter of 
Rose Croix, a thirty-second de- 
gree member of N. J. Consistory, 
S. P. R. S., member of Jersey City 
Council Princes of Jerusalem, and 
a member of Salaam Temple A. A. 
O. N. M. S. 



Daniel Bermes. 



Daniel Bermes is descended from 
one of the oldest and most promin- 
ent families in the northern part 




of the county. His grandfather 
was the founder of the Bermes 
Brewery in Union Hill. The fam- 
ily settled in that town in 1853. 

Daniel Bermes, the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Union 



Hill, June 5th, 1880. He received 
his preliminary education in the 
local public schools and later at 
the Hoboken Academy. He then 
took a course at the Packard Busi- 
ness School in New York. After 
graduating from this institution, 
he started to learn the real estate 
business, and fof a number of years 
was connected with the Limouze- 
Singer Co. In 1912 he established 
his own real estate and insurance 
business, with offices at 138 Fourth 
St., Union Hill, where he still is 
located. 

Mr. Bermes has built up a very 
successful business and is widely 
known as a man of a strong char- 
ter, possessed of sound judgment 
and great business ability. He is 
a genial, companiable, public-spir- 
ited man, deeply interested in the 
general welfare of the community, 
and is always ready to respond to 
the demands of good citizenship. 
Progressive in all that the word im- 
plies, he has been active and influ- 
ential in the advancement of his 
town, a liberal contributor to its 
growth and moral, improvement, 
and ever alert in increasing its use- 
ful institutions. He is a member of 
the Board of Education of North 
Bergen, in which town he resides. 

Mr. Bermes married Hortense 
Alt in 1912. He is a member of 
the F. and A. M., and one of the 
directors of the First National 
Bank of the Town of Union. 



Charles Waechter. 



Chas. Waechter, the prominent 
painter, descends from one of the 
pioneer families in Union Hill. He 
was born in that town August 17, 
1867. His parents were Martin 
and Phoebe (Elinter) Waechter. 
His great-grandfather at one time 
owned half of Main St. 

Charles Waechter attended pub- 
lic school in Union Hill and after 



123 



finishing his schooling, he worlced 
at the baker business for a time, 
and then learned the painting and 
decorating trade. ■ ' 

In 1891 he established his own 
business, and has for the last elev- 
en years been located at 414 Blum 




St. Some years ago, the son, 
Charles, Jr., was taken into the 
father's business, which then be- 
came known under the firm name 
of Charles Waechter & Son. The 
firm has become widely known 
throughout the northern part of 
the county and has gained a high 
reputation for its high class work. 
Mr. Charles Waechter, Sr., has 
always taken an active interest in 
the affairs of his town. He was 
elected and served as a member of 
the Board of Council, from 1910 to 
1911. In that year the Board 
"^eatly imjjroved Bergenline Ave. 
% 1888 Mr. Waechter married 
(5&rrie Kaiser of Union Hill. They 
hive six children: Charles, Jr., 
Anna, Martin, William, Carrie, 
^nd Phoebe. 

i Mr. Waechter is a member of 
the Foresters of America, and Fi- 



nancial Secretary of the Firemen's 
Relief Association. 

Chas. Waechter, Jr., started to 
learn the painting business of his 
father after finishing his early edu- 
cation in Union Hill. He was, as 
above stated, later taken into the 
business with his father. He mar- 
ried Edith Merz, with whom he 
has two children ; Albert, and Dor- 
othy. 

The Merz family, another old 
family in Union Hill, is related to 
the Ellenhausen family, which built 
the house on Gardner St. and New 
York Ave., about fifty years ago. 



John J. Schneider ® Son 

One of the foremost real estate 
firms in the northern part of the 
county is that of John J. Schneider 




& Son, with offices at 553 Bergen- 
line Ave., West New York. 

This firm has been very instru- 
mental in the upbuilding of West 
New York and has erected numer- 
ous large apartment houses, all 



124 



hibdernly equipped, and several 
factory and loft buildings. 

Mr. John J. Schneider, Sr., was 
born in Germany, in 1868. He im- 
migrated to this country in 1881 
and for the last ten years has been 
engaged in the real estate and in- 
surance business. He is one of 




the best known men in the northern 
part of the county and has gained 
a high reputation for his splendid 
business ability and honest charac' 
ter. 

Mr. Schneider has never aspired 
to any public office, but devotes his 
full time to his many large enter- 
prises. 

John J. Schneider, Jr., was born 
in New York City, on April 28th, 
1896. He attended school in that 
city, and later learned the machinist 
and automobile trade. 

Although a young man, Mr. 
Schneider has practically seen near- 
ly every part of the country. He 
took to traveling at a very early 
age, and his great hobby was to 
"rough it". He has gone through 
some of the most hair-breaking ex- 



periences, and only a short time ago 
Settled down to "normal" life with 
his father in West New York. He 
is now associated with his father 
in the real estate business, and be- 
sides conducts a cafe at 22nd St. 
and Park Ave., West New York. 



John V. Zoppel. 

The distinction of being the 
youngest post office superintendent 
belongs to John V. Zoppel of North 
Bergen's Past Office. He was born 
in Athenia, New Jersey, July 9, 
1887, and has been a resident of 
North Hudson since 1898. He 
received his public school education 
inUnion Hill, where his parents had 
moved when he was very young. 
After finishing his school education 
he worked a few years for the West 
Shore Railroad, and in 1908 se- 
cured a position " as' clerk in the 




Weehawken Post Office, in which 
position he continued until 1914, 
when he was appointed Superin- 
tendant of the North Bergen Post 



12S 



Office This post office had then 
just been built, after a long, hard 
fight by the people of North Ber- 
gen. 

Though a young man, Mr. Zop- 
pel has achieved a high reputation 
for his ability and perseverance. 
He is a public spirited citizen, im- 
bued with an exalted sense of pa- 
triotism and progressiveness, and 
enjoys the confidence and respect 
of every one who knows him. He 
is one of the most popular and best 
known men, not alone in his town, 
but in North Hudson [generally. 
He is discharging his duties to the 
full satisfaction of the people in the 
community. 

Mr. Zoppel is a member of Jr. 
O. U. A. M., and the Shepherds of 
Bethlehem. 



Dr. L. A. Pera^allo. 



No man in the county is more 
worthy of extended mention than 
Dr. Louis Anthony Peragallo of 
Hoboken, who has risen in promi- 
nence in the musical world solely 
through his efforts and ability. 

Although a young man, he has 
made a record for himself of which 
many an old man could well feel 
proud. 

Dr. Peragallo was born in New 
York City, in the year 1888. His 
parents were Ferdinand Peragallo 
and Mary Vezetti, the latter a 
member of one of the most promi- 
nent families in Hoboken, and both 
natives of Italy. 

The family moved to Hoboken 
when Louis was very young, and 
there he received his early educa- 
tion, graduating from Public 
School No. 8. He then entered 
High School, but as he had a splen- 
did talent for music, his parents 
took him to Italy, when he was fif- 
teen years old, and there he studied 
the violin under the widely known 
Professor Sarti. 



For eleven years he studied 
music in Italy and in 1914 he gra- 
duated from the Royal Conserva- 
tory in Bologna, in that country, 
with high honors, and was award- 
ed the degree of Doctor of Music. 
He was also elected honorary mem- 
ber of the Royal Philharmonic 
Academy of Bologna. The follow- 
ing year he returned to this coun- 
try and opened a studio at 1035 
Garden St., Hoboken. 




' The doctor since has conducted 
several large and very successful 
concerts, and his quintet, composed 
of some of his advanced pupils, 
have taken many honors at the dif- 
ferent places they have played. 

Dr. Peragallo is not only well 
known in musical circles, but also 
in social aflfairs has become quite a 
figure. 

His pleasing personality has 
gained him a host of friends and 
admirers, and between his profes- 
sional and social duties he is kept 
very busy. When at leisure the 
doctor indulges in walking and has 
become quite an expert in cross- 
rnuntrv w^alkinp'. 



A. HoKanson. 



Andrew Hokanson was the first 
and is today one of the largest 
builders in Woodcliff. 

He was born in Sweden, June 
13, 1868, and after finishing his 
public school education there he 




learned the carpenter and building 
trade. He became quite an expert 
as a ship carpenter and for eight 
years he sailed the seas and has 
been in every civilized country in 
the world. In 1903 he came to this 
country, and settled in New York 
City, but two years later moved to 
Woodcliff. He worked as a car- 
penter until 1909, when he en- 
gaged in business for himself as 
a contractor and builder. The dis- 
tinction of being the first builder in 
that section of the county belongs 
to Mr. Hokanson. During the time 
he has been in business he has built 
a house at the average of every 
thirty days. He specialized in pri- 
vate residences and has erected 
some of the most beautiful dwell- 
ings in the Woodcliff as well as in 



the Grantwood sections. He is at 
present very busy erecting several 
houses for many prominent people, 
who are anxious to secure his ser- 
vices. 

Mr. Hokanson employs as many 
as sixty men, and personally super- 
vises every detail in his building 
enterprises. 

He was married in 1900 to 
Hanna Henrikson, with whom he 
has one daughter. 



Oscar Hogrelius. 

Among the foremost builders in 
the Woodcliff section is Oscar 
Hogrelius. Although in business 




only a few years, he has erected 
numerous buildings, and has prac- 
tically built up the whole length of 
29th Street, Woodcliff. He special- 
ized in cozy residential dwellings, 
for which that section is so well 
known. He has, however, of late 
erected two large, beautiful apart- 
ment houses on 28th Street. Mr. 
Hogrelius built the Church of In- 
tercession in New York. He is one 



127 



of the most successful contractors 
and builders in the northern part 
of the county. He is thorough in 
every detail, energetic, and practical 
in carrying out his contracts, and 
prompt in all he undertakes. His 
splendid foresight, integrity, and 
sound judgment, and his capacity 
for business has brought him into 
more than local prominence. As 
his business has always occ.upied 
his full time, he has never affiliated 
himself with any political or frater- 
nal organization.' He takes a great 
interest in church work, and is, na- 
turally, much interested in civic 
work. 

Mr. Hogrelius was born in Swe- 
den, January 25th, 1865. There he 
received his early education and 
later learned his trade. In 1899 he 
immigrated to this country, and 
settled in New York, later moving 
to Woodcliff, where he soon after 
engaged in business for himself. 

In 1906 he married Edith Olson, 
with whom he has one son, Olaf . 



Fred. E. Conover, D. C. 



Fred E.. Conover, D. C, one of 
the best known Chiropractors in 
North Hudson, was born Nov. 30, 
1880. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of West 
Hoboken, and after graduating 
took a course in a business college. 
He then started to study drugless 
healing and attendted the New Jer- 
sey College of Chiropractors, from 
which institution he graduated and 
received the degree of D. C. and 
Ph. C. He took a post graduate 
course at Electric Osteopathic In- 
stitute, and also studied at the 
American School of Naturopathy. 

The Doctor is a member of sev- 
eral professional societies, among 
which may be mentioned the New 
Jersey Chiropractors' Association, 
Hudson County Chiropractors' As- 



sociation, of which he is Treasurer, 
New Jersey Naturopaths' Associa- 
tion, American Naturopaths' Asso- 
ciation, and the American Academy 
of Chiropractors' Research. 

Although practising only about 
two • years. Dr. Conover has be- 
come one of the foremost Chiro- 
practors in North Hudson. He es- 




pecially gained wide publicity some 
time ago, when he treated and 
cured the little son of the noted 
sculptor F. E. Elwell, who was suf- 
fering from a chronic disease and 
had been treated by several physi- 
cians without success. Several 
other well known people in North 
Hud.son are praising the Doctor for 
his skill and thorough knowledge 
of his profession. Numerous 
hopeless cases have been cured by 
the Doctor, and his practice today 
is probably one of the largest in 
North Hudson. 

His pleasing personality and his 
genial manners have made him very 
popular and gained him a large 
circle of friends; 



128 



August G. Apel. 

August G. Apel, of North Ber- 
gen, is one of the best known men 
m Hoboken and North Hudson. 
He was born in Germany, in 1871. 
He came to this country when only 
sixteen years of age, and settled in 
New York City. In 1890 he moved 
to Hoboken, where he learned the 
butcher business, and soon after 




opened a butcher store of his own. 
After a few years' hard work, he 
was able to open a larger butcher 
store, which he conducted under 
the name of 'the Hudson County 
Beef Company. This soon became 
one of the largest butcher stores in 
Hoboken. Mr. Apel has always 
been a great believer in new ideas, 
and modern systems ; he would, for 
instance, when he sold a pound of 
corned beef, give a head of cabbage 
free with it, or when he sold soup 
meat, give free soup greens. He 
was one of the first business men 
to install a cash register.^ The busi- 
ness soon became too big for him>^ 
and rather than conduct a store in 



which he had to employ several 
men, he sold out this business and 
built a home at the Six Corners, 
North Bergen, in which he opened 
a small butcher shop. This he sold 
out about fifteen years ago, when 
he built another house on the next 
lot, where he started a moving and 
trucking business. In this he has 
also succeeded, and by hard consist- 
ent work, has made this business 
one of the largest of its kind in 
North Hudson. He has two large 
auto moving vans and about twenty 
wagons and horses. 

Mr. Apel was one of the organ- 
izers of the Protection Company of 
the North Bergen Fire Depart- 
ment. 

In 1891, Mr. Apel married Mary 
Muhring, with whom he has three 
children, of which August,. Jr., al- 
though only twenty-one years of 
age, is practically running the busi- 
ness. He is as much devoted to the 
father as the father is devoted to 
him, and together they make an in- 
separable pair. He is always find- 
ing ways and means of improving 
the business, and is a very hard- 
working youth, in fact, he is always 
working. Although he has never 
had any mechanical tuition, he is 
quite a mechanical genius, and has 
just built and perfected a splendid 
motor boat. Like his father, he has 
never affiliated himself with any 
political or fraternal associations, 
as the continuously growing busi- 
ness demands steady attention. 



Preben J. Peaters. 

One of the greatest scenic artists 
in the county is Preben J. Peaters, 
with studio in North Bergen. 

He was born in Denmark, March 
21, 1866, and at the age of six years 
he startgd to study art in Copen- 
hagen, the capital of Denmark. 
When nineteen years of age, he 
came to this country, where he 



129. 



worked as a scenic artist in New 
York City, and later traveled to 
every principal city in the United 
States. He spent five years in San 




Ralph Emerson Peaters, and Ger- 
trude Stevenson Peaters. 

He is a member of the F. and A. 
M., Mystic Tie, and was the first 
President of the Pastmasters As- 
sociation of that Order in this sec- 
tion. 



Francisco and a short time in Texas 
and then returned to this county. 

In 1903 he opened his own studio 
at Monroe St., North Bergen, 
where he since has painted the scen- 
ery for some of the largest produc- 
tions. His studio and residence 
covers a ground of 75x100 feet. 

It is not alone as a scenic artist 
Mr. Peaters has become noted 
throughout the county, but he has 
also achieved quite a reputation as 
a landscape and portrait painter. 
Some of the most beautiful works 
painted by his own hand can be 
seen at his studio and residence, 
and numerous others have been 
sold. 

Mr. Peaters' great hobby is farm- 
ing, and he owns a large farm of 
220 acres in New York State. 
There his family spent the summers 
and Mr. Peaters his week-ends. 

In 1902 he married Dore Drives, 
who soon after died in Texas. In 
1911 he married Jenni_e E. Steven- 
son. Mr. Peaters is the father of 
thr^e chiHren, C^rl Preben Jr., 



Otto G. SternKopf. 



Otto G. Sternkopf, one of the 
youngest real estate and insurance 
brokers in West Hoboken, was 
born in New York City, Feb. 18, 
1891. He attended Public School 
in North Bergen, where his parents 
had moved when Otto was very 
young. Later he attended the West 
Hoboken High School and then 
took up the study of law at the 
New York University. He, how- 
ever, soon had to give up his studies 
on account of trouble with his eyes. 




Determined to obtain as much 
knowledge of law as possible, he 
secured a position in a law office, 
where he worked for nine years. 
Six months agQ he opened his own 



13Q 



real estate and insurance office at 
294 Summit Avenue, West Hobo- 
ken, where he, in these few months, 
has made a great success. 

Mr. Sternkopf is a public spirited 
and enterprising young man. He is 
actively interested in all civic work 
which may be of benefit to the 
community. Although a very young 
man, he has erected several build- 
ings in the Grantwood section, and 
intends to go into the building line 
extensively. 

He is Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Summit Investment Co. and is 
a member, of several organizations 
and societies. 

In 1916 Mr. Sternkopf mamed 
Marion Paulsen, of the well known 
old West Hoboken family. 

Mr. Sternkopf's father, Albert 
Sternkopf, was born in Germany, 
in 1849, and immigrated into this 
country fifty years ago. He worked 
for a number of years in the insur- 
ance business, in which he became 
very, successful. One of his other 
sons, Frederick, is Town Treasurer 
of North Bergen. 



James J. McClelland. 

One of the most enterprising and 
ambitions young men in North 
Hudson is Mr. James J. McClel- 
land, Cashier and one of the Di- 
rectors of the First National Bank 
of the Town of Union. He is the 
son of Thomas McClelland, the 
present Tax Collector of .Union 
Hill and was born in that town on 
May 30, 1884. After finishing his 
early school education in the local 
schools, he worked in minor clerical 
positions and in 1909 entered the 
service of the above mentioned 
bank as messenger. The bank had 
just been organized and Mr. Mc- 
Clelland was one of its first em- 
ployees. He at once put his whole 
heart and soul into his work, and 
his ability and efficiency was quick- 
ly recognized. He was promoted the 



following year to bookkeeper, the 
year after to Paying Teller, and in 
1913 to Cashier. He is now also 
one of the bank's Directors. Mr. 
McClelland has discharged his du- 
ties in a thorough, businesslike 
manner with great fidelity and 
honor. He has proven himself 
more than equal to his task and has 
achieved a high reputation for abil- 
ity and perseverance. 




That the First National Bank of 
the Town of Union has greatly 
benefited by Mr. McClelland's valu- 
able services, can readily be seen 
when reading the history of this 
bank published elsewhere in this 
book. 

Mr. McClelland is a pubHc-spir- 
ited and patriotic citizen, and while 
he has never aspired to any public 
office, he is nevertheless much in- 
terested in anything which may 
benefit the community. 

He is not an organization man or 
connected with any fraternities, but 
devotes his entire time to his du- 
ties in the bank. 

His great hobby is "Work", in 
which he takes a deep and conscien- 
tious interest. 



131 



FranK Effert. 



Frank Effert, of the blue and 
lime stone firm of Effert & Gerish. 
was born in West New York, Oc- 
tober 9th, 1885. After finishing 
his early public school education, 
he learned the stone cutting busi- 
ness withWm.Luckhardt, and later 
worked in • several large stone 
yards. Eight years ago he estab- 




lished his present business, which 
is the largest of its kind in North 
Hudson. The shop and yard lo- 
cated at 670 Polk St. cover a 
ground of 75x200 feet. It is 
equipped with the most modern 
machinery and tools. 

Mr. Effert has always taken a 
deep interest in public affairs and 
has held the office of Assessment 
Commissioner for the last three 
years. As a resident of West New 
York he came early into promi- 
nence, displaying a broad public 
spirit and winning a deserved pop- 
ularity. He is greatly respected 
and esteemed in the community, 
whose confidence he enjoys to the 



utmost. He has exerted an import- 
ant influence in various directions, 
and by courage and perseverance 
has achieved a high reputation in 
all the relations of life. His un- 
impeachable integrity has never 
been questioned. 

In politics, Mr: Effert has al- 
ways been an a:rdent Democrat. 

His motto has always been: 
"Treat the people the same way 
you would like them to treat you." 
In the present campaign Mr. Efl'ert 
is not doing much shouting, but be- 
lieves that actions speak stronger 
than words. 



FredericK Koch. 



Frederick Koch, manufacturer 
of artistic medals and badges, was 
born in Baden, Germany, Feb. 15, 
1862. He received his early edu- 
cation in the old country, and later 




studied as an artist. Not satisfied 
with studying in Germany alone, he 
started to travel and studied in 
Vienna, London, Rome, and Brus- 
sels, in which latter city he received 



132 



two prizes for modeling, from the 
Academy. 

He came to this country in 1884, 
when he settled in New York City, 
where he worked as an artist. In 
1889 he established his own busin- 
ess in New York as an engraver. 
Twenty-five years ago he came to 
West Hoboken, where he establish- 
ed his present business as manu- 
facturer of badges and medals four 
years ago. 

The plant, which is located at 
72-82 Palisade Ave., West Hobo- 
ken, and which is one of the largest 
in the country, has a space of about 
7,000 square feet, and employs 
from 25 to, 50 people. 

Although Mr. Koch does not 
employ any salesman, he has been 
very successful in finding a market 
for his products, and can now boast 
of having customers all over the 
United States, South America, and 
Canada. This has been made pos- 
sible by extensive advertising, of 
which Mr. Koch is a great believer. 

As a public-spirited and enter- 
prising citizen, none is .better 
known than Mr. Koch. He has for 
many years been prominently con- 
nected with the Republican Party. 
He is genial and frank, and is pos- 
■sessed of a sterling business charac- 
■ ter. 

He married Elizabeth Ringler, of 
the well known West Hoboken 
family, in 1893. They have four 
children, — Frederick August, 
Charles William, Louis Ottoj, and 
Lillian. 



George E. Barrett. 

George E. Barrett, County Com- 
mitteeman, residing at No. 411 
Humboldt St., Union Hill, was 
born in New York City on the 11th 
of July, 1877. He received his 
early education in that city, and at 
an early age secured a position as 
messenger boy in a Wall Street 



office. He has worked in Wall St. 
all his life and now holds a respons- 
ible position as manager in a large 
Wall St. banking house. Mr. Bar- 
rett has gained a high reputation as 
a certified public accountant. 

Before moving to Union Hill, in 
which town he has lived for a num- 
ber of vears, Mr. Barrett was nrom- 




inent in politics in New York City 
and actively interested in Tammany 
Hall, and was a General Commit- 
teeman in that organization. 

In 1915 he was elected County 
Committeeman and -Secretary of 
the County Committee in this coun- 
ty, although his opponent was one 
of the strongest candidates in the 
Ward. In' 1916 he was re-elected 
to this office by a substantial ma- 
jority. 

Mr. Barrett is probably one of 
the most prominent men in frater- 
nal, political and social circles. He 
is the Esteemed Leading Knight of 
'the B. P. O. E., Hoboken Lodge 
No. 74, and a member of the Royal 
Arcanum. He is also a member of 
the Phil Schumacher Association, 
and an honorary president of the 



133 



Jefferson Democratic Club in the 
Bronx, N. Y., and a member of the 
Wall Street Clerks Association. 
He is Vice-President of Engine Co. 
No. 2, Union Hill, Fire Depart- 
ment, and is a member of this de- 
partment since 1914. He is one of 
the best known orators in the coun- 
ty, and one of the most accomplish- 
ed after-dinner story tellers. 

Mr. Barrett married Marcella 
McLean in 1899. They have three 
children, Agnes, Eugene, and 
George, Jr. 

In July, 1917, he was appointed 
chairman of the Local Draft Board 
No. 3 for the County of Hudson, 
State of New Jersey, by President 
Wilson. 



William G. Weller. 



William G. Weller, Town Treas- 
urer of WestHoboken, is one of the 
best known men in North Hudson. 




Though a young man, Mr. Weller 
has achieved a high reputation for 
ability and perseverance. He is a 
public-spirited citizen, imbued with 



an exalted sense of patriotism and 
.progressiveness, and by action and 
example has exerted a wholesome 
influence in the community, whose 
respect and confidence he enjoys to 
the utmost. 

He was born in Brooklyn, Nov. 
5, 1885, where he received his 
public school education. His par- 
ents moved to ^Vest Hoboken in 
1897, and William secured a cleric- 
al position, later becoming a book- 
keeper, and worked in this capacity 
with one firm seven years. In the 
meantime he studied accounting, 
and later opened his own office as 
an expert accountant, with offices 
at 110 Hutton Street, Jersey City. 
He is publicly recognized as one 
of the ablest accountants in the 
county, and does a very extensive 
business with numerous large firms. 
He lately completed an audit of the 
books of the Township of Wee- 
hawken. He is also Secretary of 
the Central Building and Loan As- 
sociation of Jersey City. 

Mr. Weller has always taken an 
active interest in the Republican 
Party and served the Town of 
West Hoboken as Councilman from 
1913 to 1915. On January 1st, 
1917, he was appointed Treasurer 
of that town. 

He is a member of the Lincoln 
Republican Club of West Hoboken 
and several other societies. He is 
very fond of baseball, and was 
formerly known as one of the best 
bowlers of North Hudson. Mr. 
Weller is unmarried. 



Adolph Machetto. 



Adolph Machetto, a member of 
the North Bergen Board of Educa- 
tion, and one of the young promin- 
ent men of North Hudson, was 
born at Stirling, Morris County, 
N. J., on November 1, 1890. Six 
years later his parents moved to 
North Bergen, and Adolph receiv- 



134 



ed his education in the Union Hill 
public schools and in the North 
Bergen Public School No. 3. At 
the age of fourteen he secured a 
position as office boy for a business 
firm in New York City, and he 




has remained with this firm dur- 
ing the twelve years since, and by 
his energy and strict attention to 
business has worked his way up to 
his present position as City and Ex- 
l)ort Sales Manager. 

Though a young man, Mr. 
Machetto has achieved a high repu- 
tation for his ability and persever- 
ance. He is a public-spirited citi- 
zen, imbued with an exalted sense 
of patriotism and progressiveness, 
and by action and example has ex- 
erted a wholesome influence in the 
community, whose respect and con- 
fidence he enjoys to the utmost. He 
is one of the most popular and best 
known men, not only in his town, 
but in North Hudson generally. 

He has always taken an active 
interest in public affairs. On Fe- 
bruary 1, 1916, he was appointed 
member of the Board of Educa- 
tion; he is also a member of the 



Board of School Estimate and of 
the Volunteer Fire Department, 
Peei-less Hose Co. No. 3. 

Mr. Machetto is also interested 
in several business enterprises and 
is a member of the Jr. O. U. A. M., 
(Garfield Council No. 56), and the 
Second Ward Democratic Club of 
North Bergen. He is unmarried. 



Theodore Schaefer. 



One of the most popular officials 
in A\'est New York is Councilman 
Theodore Schaefer. 

He was bom in Germany, on 
July 13th, 1882, and came to this 
country in 1896. Twelve years ago 
he settled in West New York, where 
he bought his present business, that 
of wagon manufacturer and wagon 
painter. He conducted the busi- 
ness in partnership with Herman 
W. Schaefer of Jersey City, under 
the firm name of Schaefer & 




Schaefer, for ten years. Herman 
W. Schaefer died, and Mr. Theo- 
dore Schaefer became the sole 
owner. 



13S 



The business was originally es- 
tablished over fifty years ago and 
under the able management of Mr. 
Schaefer it has become one of the 
largest concerns of its kind in 
North Hudson. Twelve men are 
continuously employed in the shop, 
building, repairing and painting 
wagons. Everything is done on the 
premises from start to finish; and 
some of the finest work is turned 
out. 

Among the customers of this 
concern are some of the oldest and 
most prominent business men, who 
pride themselves in having excep- 
tionally fine delivery wagons. 

In public life Councilman Schae- 
fer has always taken a prominent 
part. At one time he served his 
town as Tax Assessor. His great 
ability and integrity were soon re- 
cognized, and /in 1914 the iresli- 
dents of the town elected him a 
member of the Board of Council. 
After his term had expired, the 
people insisted on keeping him in 
the Board and re-elected him for 
another term in 1916. His second 
term expires at the end of this year 
but although the people were eager 
to elect him for a third term, he 
declined on the plea that his busi- 
ness needs his full attention. 
While in office he has done much 
for the welfare and the develop- 
ment of the town and has been 
instrumental in bringing about 
many needed improvements. 

The Councilman is possessed of 
great business ability and a sterl- 
ing business character. His pleas- 
ing, dignified, quiet manners have 
gained him a host of friends, who 
greatly admire and esteem him. 

He is a member of the Free 
Masons, Foresters of America, 
Ind. Foresters of America, and has 
been chairman of the Building and 
Loan Association for the last four 
years. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the W. N. Y. Maennerchor 
and was chairman of the Building 



and Ground Committee when the 
new Town Hall was built. 

In 1905 he married Hanna Bock, 
with whom he has one son, Theo- 
dore, Jr. 



John B. Freudenberger, 
Jr. 

One of the best known and most 
respected men in West New York 
is John B. Freudenberger, Jr., a 
member of the Board of Council 
of that town. 

He was born in New York City, 
July 3rd, 1882, and received his 
school education in New York and 




abroad. After finishing his school- 
ing, he secured a position as clerk 
and in 1900 became connected with 
Armour & Co. in New York City, 
and later with the New York Stock 
Exchange as reporter and tele- 
grapher, where he has since been 
employed. 

He came to West New York in 
1907 and soon after became deeply 



136 



interested in the upbuilding of that 
town. 

His abiHty, sound judgment and 
enterprise combined with a sterling 
business character, soon made him 
one of the most popular men in 
the town, and the residents urged 
him to become a candidate to the 
Board of Counci|men. Hte was 
elected a member of the Board in 
1913, and during his term in of- 
fice procured so many improve- 
ments in the section and discharged 
his duties in such an efficient man- 
ner that the people re-elected him to 
„the same office in 1915. 

Councilman Freudenberger has 
been instrumental in the laying out 
of many streets, especially in the 
lower section on the easterly side, 
and has worked enthusiastically 
with the other members of the 
Board for the improvements of the 
Fire Department, which ihas al- 
most been motorized completely. 
A new modern fire alarm system 
has also been installed in the town 
during the tenure of the Council- 
man's office. 

Though a young man. Council- 
man Freudenberger has achieved a 
high reputation for ability and per- 
severance. He is a pubHc-spirited 
citizen, imbued with an exalted 
sense of patriotism and progres- 
siveness, and by action and ex- 
ample has exerted a wholesome in- 
fluence in the community, whose 
respect and confidence he enjoys to ■ 
the utmost. His one great hobby is 
to develop the town of West New 
York to one of the most modern 
towns in the State. 

The Councilman married Miss 
Mary V. Wolf in 1904. They have 
two children. Their names are 
John and Joseph. 



Richard J. Miller. 



One of the most respected and 
esteemed inen in North Hudson is 
Richard J. Miller of West New 
York, former Mayor of that town. 

During his two terms as Mayor, 
from 1910 to 1914, he rendered 
most efficient service to the town, 




bringing to his duties the energies, 
abilities and thoroughness 'which 
characterizes successful men. Due 
to his great ability, superior judg- 
ment and enterprise West New York 
has becpm^i.pne of the foremost 
municipalities in the county. To 
attempt to publish the many im- 
provements he inaugurated during 
his administration, would fill a 
moderate sized book. 

Mr. Miller is a man of broad, 
scholarly attainments, of noble and 
generous impulses, and universally 
esteemed and respected not only 



137 



for his ability and integrity, but 
also for those affectionate and sym- 
pathetic qualities which make him 
so popular among all people. He 
has always interested himself in 
the affairs of the community and is 
an ardent advocate of every move- 
ment and project which has the 
welfare of the people for its object. 

He has always been an ardent 
democrat, a friend of education, 
and a benevolent, patriotic, public- 
spirited citizen. 

Previous to his term of Mayor, 
he served one year in the Board 
of Council. In 1913 he named the 
first appointive Board of Education 
under the laws of 1912. The 
Board <yi Playground Commission- 
ers was created by Mr. Miller in 
1912, and the people of West New 
York can thank the former Mayor 
for the playground, which has 
been of immense benefit to the 
people of the Town. As chairman 
of the Board of Recreation Com- 
missioners, he has inaugurated 
many plans of benefit to the people. 



John L. VoellmicKe. 

John L. Voellmicke is one of the 
well known cafe owners in the 
northern part of the county. 

He was born in Germany, June 
20, 1884,- and. received his public 
school education in that country. 
He then secured a position in a 
wholesale dry goods concern, and 
on November 21, 1905, he came to 
this country. He then settled in 
New York, but after a few months 
moved to Newark, where he work- 
ed in the cafe business. One year 
after he came to North Hudson, 
where he has resided ever since. 

In 1908, only a little over two 
years after his arrival in this coun- 
try, he went into the cafe business 
fpr himself in West Hoboken. 

Four years ago he bought his 
present place on Hackensack 



Plank Road, on the corner of 
Gardner St., Union Hill. This 
place is one of the oldest in North 
Hudson and was the first Turn 
Hall in that section. The place, in- 
cluding cafe, restaurant, summer 
garden and wagon sheds, covers a 
ground of five full city lots. It 




especially caters to funeral parties 
and is located right opposite the 
Palisade and Weehawken Ceme- 
teries. 

Mr. Voellmicke has never sought 
nor accepted any public office, 
nor does he belong to any secret 
fraternities or lodges. He devotes 
his full time to his business enter- 
prise, and is known as a man par- 
ticularly able in his business. He 
is public spirited and enterprising 
and a man of pleasing ways and 
manners, which has gained hiii^ 
a large host of friends. His hon- 
esty and integrity have never been 
questioned. 

Mr. Voellmicke marrired Mary 
Bartl in 1910. They have three 
children, Viola, John, and Wil- 
liam. 



138 



M. C. Wolpert. 

Mfchael C. Wolpert, one of the 
leading contractors in Union Hill 
and the present Building Inspector 
of that town, was born in Baden, 
Germany, December 23, 1866. Af- 
ter barely finishing his public school 
education in that country, he came 




to America in 1884. He started 
to learn the tinsmith and roofing 
trade with several well known con- 
tractors in Union Hill, and in 1890 
went into business for himself and 
opened a small shop at 183 Bergen- 
line Avenue, and as business in- 
creased, he found it necessary to 
look for still larger quarters, and in 
1911 he built his present shop, of- 
fice and stable at 514 Third St 

This property covers a ground 
of 50x100 feet and the shop is 
equipped with all the most modern 
machinery. 

Mr. Wolpert has built up a large 
business in sheet metal work, roof- 
ing, hot air heating and ventilating. 
By close, careful study he has suc- 
ceeded in building up a large busi- 
ness and a repvitation second to 
none in North Hudson. He has 
demonstrated that the man with ab- 
solutely no financial backing can 
•succeed, provided he uses his hands 
and head. 

Wr. Wolpert executed the con- 
tract on all metal work and copper 



corners at the Necker Building, 
Union Hill, and has for the last 
fifteen years done all the metal 
work for the Hackensack Water 
Works on all this company's plants 
scattered all over the county. 

One year ago, Mr. Wolpert in- 
corporated his business, which is 
now known as Michael C. Wol- 
pert Inc. 

On January 1, 1917. he was ap- 
pointed building inspector of the 
Town of Union. 

Mr. Wolpert married Ida Rie- 
menschneider, of the well known 
Union Hill family, in 1889. There 
are no children. 



Peter Planert. 



The distinction of being one of 
the most remarkable men in Hud- 
County belongs to Peter 



son 




Planert, the proprietor of the 
Fischer Hotel on First St., 
Hoboken. 

He is French by birth, speaks 
the German language fluently, as 



139 



well as English, and some Polish. 
He conducts a hotel under a Ger- 
man name, which is largely patron- 
ized by German, English, French, 
Scandinavian, and American 
people. 

The hostelry, which is one of 
the oldest in Hoboken, having been 
built about 30 years ago, is widely 
known all over the United States, 
as well as in Europe. It is the 
favorite stopping place for travel- 
ers coming from all parts of the 
country going to or coming from 
Europe. The hotel consists of a 
cafe, restaurant and forty rooms. 
It is one of the coziest and most 
homelike hotels imaginable. 

Mr. Planert was born in Lor- 
raine of French parents, April 27, 
1876, and came to this country in 
1892. He started to work in New 
York City in a grocery store for 
$5 a month, and later traveled 
West, where he worked in the hotel 
business. After his return to New 
York he worked in the Holland 
House and in the Waldorf. In 
1907 he bought the Fischer Hotel, 
which he has since succeeded in 
making one of the most popular 
hotels in Hoboken. He personally 
supervises every detail of the busi- 
ness and carefully looks after the 
comfort of each guest. 

His great knowledge of the 
business, his ability, enterprise, in- 
tegrity, and pleasing personality- 
have been the great factors of his 
success. 

Mr. Planert is a member of the 
Elks, Hoboken No. 74, Scottish 
Rite, Euclid Lodge No. 136, F. & 
A. M., and Zem Zem Grotto. 



John Faller a Son. 



One of the most conspicuous 
manufacturing concerns in Hudson 
Cdunty is that of John Faller 
monumental Co. 

The firm conducts two plants, 



one at Hackensack Plank Road at 
the entrance of the Weehawken 
and Palisade Cemetery, which is 
the main oilice and yard and under 
the supervision of Mr. Faller Sr., 




while the other plant is located at 
Fairview, under the supervision of 
John Faller, Jr. Both places are 
equipped with the most modern 
machinery and tools and because 
of the beautiful work turned out 
at these places, they have become 
very widely known. 

John Faller, Sr., was born in 
Baden, Germany, in 1860. After 
obtaining his early school educa- 
tion he started to learn the monu- 
mental business and in 1877 he 
emigrated to America. In 1881 he 
started in business at Lutheran 
Cemetery, Queens County, Long 
Island, from which place he moved 
in 1886 to the State of New Jersey 
to form a partnership with" \Vm. 
Luckhardt, at the entrance of Ho- 
boken and Flower Hill Cemeteries. 
Six years later he sold out his 
share in the partnership and went 
out west, where he remained about 



140 



SIX years. In 1901 he returned to 
North Hudson and purchased the 
Monumental business . of the late 
Adam Duerkes, and also that of 
the late George Wernsing at the 
Weehawken and Palisad'e Ceme- 
teries. 

About eleven years ago Mr. 
Faller took John, Jr., and George 
into partnership, and the firm be- 
came known as the John Faller 
Monumental Co. The branch yard 
in Fairview was then established. 
About nine years ago the son 
George sold his share of the busi- 
ness to his father and brother. 

John Faller, Sr., and John Fal- 
ler, Jr., are well known through- 
out the county. Their great abil- 



Charles J. Morris. 




ity and knowledge of the business 
have brought them into more than 
local prominence. They are both 
prominent in fraternal and social 
circles and have achieved an emin- 
ent reputation for their sterling 
business character. 

Mr. Faller, Sr., is a member of 
the F. & A. M. and the Odd 
Fellows. 



Few men in the county are bet- 
ter known than Charles J. Morris, 
Township Committeeman of North 
Bergen. 

He was born in New York City, 
November 11th, 1872, his parents 
being Michael Morris and Sarah 




(O'Neil). Charles received his 
early education in New York, and 
came to Hudson County with the 
family 26 years ago, of which time 
they have spent 21 years in North 
Bergen. 

Mr. Charles Morris has been 
with one firm the last twenty-five 
years, beginning as a clerk, then, 
promoted to bookkeeper, and now 
holds the position as cashier. He 
has been active in politics for the 
last 18 years, and served as Presi- 
dent of the School Board from 
1899 to 1900. He was Chief of 
the Fire Department from 1905 to 
1907, then served as clerk for the 
Board of Health for three years, 
and was then elected to the Board 



14i 



of Freeholders, in which Board he 
served from 1911 to 1912. 

In 1914 Mr. Morris was elected 
to the T^ownship Committee and re- 
elected in 1916. While serving as 
Township Committeeman he also 
holds the ofifice of chairman of the 
Police Committee. 

Mr. Morris married Elisabeth 
Weiss of the old Guttenberg family 
in 1894. They have three children, 
Charles, Jr., Louis J., and G. A. 
Julius. 

He is very prominently con- 
nected in fraternal, political and 
social circles, being a member of 
the F. & A. M., the Shriners, Scot- 
tish Rite Masons, the Elks (Hobo- 
ken No. 74), and Royal Arcanum. 
He is the standard bearer of the 
Charles Morris Association, Presi- 
dent of North Bergen Exempt 
Firemen's Association, Treasurer 
of the North Bergen Firemen's 
Relief Association, Treasurer of 
the American Engine Co., Treasur- 
er of Charles Morris Xmas So- 
ciety, member of Keystone Fire 
Chiefs Association, and Secretary 
of North Bergen Building and 
Loan Association. 

Mr. Morris is possessed of an 
exceptional ability, sound judg- 
ment, and splendid foresight. He 
is considered a leader among men, 
and his pleasing personality has 
gained him a very large host of 
friends. 



Paul Seglie. 

One of the most popular men 
in the County is Boulevard Com- 
missioner Paul Seglie of West 
Hoboken. 

He has been a resident of that 
town for many years and has built 
up a very successful liquor busi- 
ness in North Hudson. 

Mr. Seglie is a fine example of 
the Italian-American citizen, one 
of that large class whose industry. 



economy and sturdy intelligence 
have done so much toward the de- 
velopment of our country, and 
whose solid qualities and valuable 
service in all departments of pri- 
vate and public life have been re- 
cognized in every portion of the 
republic. 

By tireless activity- and prompt, 
thorough attention to business he 
has built up one of the largest 




businesses of its kind in the nor- 
thern part of the county. 

Mr. Seglie is a man of kind and 
generous impulses, as is evidenced 
by the fact that he is known as a 
friend of the poorer classes, who 
often receive his assistance and 
help. 

So bright and energetic a man 
could scarcely fail to become a 
leader in politics. He is an ardent 
Republican and has always been 
true to the Republican standards, 
and hence enjoys the fullest con- 
fidence of his party. 

He has twice been elected to 
the Boulevard Commission and the 
last time, in 1916, after one of the 
most bitter political contests Hud- 



142 



son County has ever witnessed. 
While in office, Mr. Seglie has 
faithfully discharged his public 
duties, and has become very popu- 
lar - for his strong opposition to 
closed specification. He is a man 
whose ability and integrity has 
never been questioned, and -who 
will not stand for any one impos- 
ing on the public by dishonest 
methods. 

Mr. Seglie has also held the of- 
fice as County -Committeeman, to 
which office he seeks to be re- 
elected at the coming election. 

His many friends predict that he 
will have no trouble, but will be re- 
elected by a large majority. 



Arthur 0. Smith. 



One of the most respected men 
in educational circles in the State 
of New Jersey is Arthur O. 
Smith, Superintendent of the Pub- 
lic Schools in West Hoboken. 




He was born at Smith's Hill, 
Sussex County, N. J., March 6th, 
1875, His parents were Albert 



O. and S. Elizabeth (Anderson) 
Smith, who were among the earlier 
settlers of that section. 

Mr. Smith attended the district 
school in the village of Washing- 
tonville, now called Halsey. He 
later entered the High School at 
Newton, from which institution he 
graduated in 1895. 

Mr. Smith then began teaching 
in a "little red school house in the 
woods" at Blooming Grove, Want- 
age Township, iri his native county. 
The following iyear he was ap- 
pointed principal of the school at 
Branchville, N. J., where he .re- 
mained for two years. In 1898 he 
entered the State Normal School at 
Trenton, graduating in 1900. In 
this institution he also took a Post 
Graduate Course. His studies 
were, however, interruptedt by a 
severe illness, but after regaining 
his health he took up his studies 
again and completed his final course 
there in 1902. The same year he 
was appointed Superintendent in 
the Borough of Sussex and held 
that office for two years. 

In September, 1904, Mr. Smith 
came to North Bergen as Principal 
of School No. 3, a year later 
School No. 8, then newly opene:l, 
was also placed in his charge. 

In the meantime Mr. Smith stu- 
died at the New York University, 
where he received the degrees of 
B. S. in 1911 and M. A. in 1914. 

On November 4th, 1916, he was. 
appointed County -Superintendent 
for Hudson County. 

After the death of Superintend- 
ent Kinsley of West Hoboken, the 
Board of Education of that town 
offered the vacant position to Mr. 
Smith. He would accept the posi- 
tion only on the conditions that the 
Board would unanimously appoint 
him and that he be given a free 
hand of the management of the 
schools in West Hoboken. Mr. 
Smith did not want to become Su- 
perintendent of Schools in name 



143 



only, but wanted full authority in 
all matters pertaining to the educa- 
tional phase of the public school af- 
fairs in the town. 

On June 2Sth, 1917, the Board of 
Education of West Hoboken, by a 
unanimous vote appointed Mr. 
Smith Superintendent of Schools 
for a period of five years with 
power and authority as he desires. 

Mr. Smith is a highly trained 
and educated man and possesses 
all of those virtues which stamp 
him as a successful man. As an 
educator and disciplinarian he has 
achieved an eminent reputation. 
His pleasing personality has gained 
him many friends throughout the 
county. 

Mr. Smith married Melissa 
Greenleaf in 1908. 

He is a member of I. O. O. F., 
a member of the Consistory of the 
Grove Reformed Church in North 
Bergen, is President of the Build- 
ing and Loan Association in North 
Bergen and Director of the Mer- 
chants' and Manufacturers' Trust 
Co. in Union Hill. 



Otto Venino, Jr. 

Among the able younger lawyer,'^ 
of North Hudson is Otto Venino. 
Jr., who has office with the real 
estate and insurance firm of Ven- 
ino & Son, located at 414 Lewis 
St., Town of Union. 

Councellor Venino has, since his 
admisssion to the Bar, been a credit 
to North Hudson and to the pro- 
fession he represents. He has a 
select list of clients, which is con- 
stantly growing, because in him 
those who are careful in legal mat- 
ters, recognize a man who will 
look after their interests as closely 
as he would his own. 

Mr. Venino, Jr., was born in 
the Town of Union in 1891 and 
received his early education in the 



Public schools and High School of 
that town. After graduating 
from High School in 1908, he en- 
tered the New York University 
Law School. He graduated from 
this institution in 1911 with the 
degree of L. L. B. The following 
year he received the degree of L, 
L. M. 

He was admitted to the Bar of 
New Jersey as an Attorney-at- 




Law in 1913, and in 1916 admitted 
as a Counsellor-at-Law and Master 
in Chancery. 

Although his practice is general 
and cases of every nature arc 
handled by him, there is probably 
no • lawyer in the county who is 
more conscientious about the mer- 
its of the case he undertakes as is 
Mr. Venino. He is dignified, self- 
confident, and is possessed of a 
nature which draws men to him. 

Mr. Venino is the son of the 
noted real estate broker Otto 
Venino, and both are members of 
the well known real estate firm 
Venino & Son. 



144 



Charles Kappes. 

Charles Wm. Kappes, one of the 
prominent members of the Bar of 
New Jersey and New York, was 
born at 33 Union Place, Union Hill, 
May S, 1880. His parents were 




Charles A. and Sophia (Koeber- 
lein) Kappes, both descendants of 
the early settlers of that section. 

Charles attended the Union Hill 
Public Schools, and in 1896 gradu- 
ated from the Union Hill High 
School. He then entered the New 
York University Law School, 
where he received the degree of L. 
L. B. in 1898. The same year he 
was admitted to the New York 
Bar. After practising in the New 
York Courts for several years, 
during which time he was associ- 
ated with counsel in a number of 
important . cases, he took the ex- 
amination in this State and was ad- 
mitted as an Attorney-at-Law in 
1906 and subsequently as a Coun- 
sellor-at-Law and Master in Chan- 
cery. He established his own law 
practice, with offices on Bergenline 



Ave., Union Hill, in 1906. Mr. 
Kappes was later admitted as a 
Counsellor-at-Law of the United 
States Court. He has displayed 
high legal qualifications in a large 
number of important cases, with 
which he has been identified. As 
a lawyer he has established a high 
reputation for his broad and accu- 
rate knowledge of the law, and his 
great skill and ability have often 
been proven. 

Mr. Kappes is a public-spirited 
and enterprising citizen, thoroughly 
identified with the best interests of 
his town. He is prominently con- 
nected in fraternal circles and is a 
member of the F. and A. M., 
Shriners Temple, and Jr. O. U. A. 
M. In 1911 he married Erna A. 
Braunstein and has two children, 
Charles W., Jr., and S. Winifred. 



Philip Geist. 

Philip Geist, Councilman from 
the Third Ward, West Hoboken, is 
one of the most popular men of 
that town. His ability, sound judg- 
ment arrl integrity have made him 




greatly respected and esteemed in 
the community whose confidence 
he enjoys to the utmost. He is pos- 
sessed of those qualities which es- 
pecially fits him to represent the 
people. 



145 



He has been a resident of West 
Hoboken for over thirty years and 
is a successful business man of that 
town. 

He is not what may be called a 
politician, but a man of the people 
who thoroughly knows what the 
people want and what the town 
needs. He is enterprising and fear- 
less and is not bossed by any man 
or set of men, but acts and governs 
according to the wishes of the 
people. 

Mr. Geist was born in Germany 
on July 8th, 1880, and came to this 
country when only six years of 
age. After finishing his early 
school education he learned the 
plumbing trade and for a number 
of years he was connected with 
Menegaux's plumbing concern in 
Union Hill. Twelve years ago he 
established his own business as 
plumber and steam fitter. 

His friends, knowing his sterling 
qualities and honesty, urged him. to 
become a candidate for Council- 
man in 1917. He was elected at 
the November election and took of- 
fice on January 1st, 1918. 

Mr. Geist is a member of the 
Odd Fellows and the Democratic 
Town Committee. 



Wm. Meister, 



Ranked as third highest in the 
taxidermist profession, by such au- 
htorities as Carl Ackley and James 
L. Clark, is Wm. Meister, with stu- 
dio at 1195 Summit Ave., Jersey 
City. 

He was born in New York City 
October 3rd, 1883. His parents 
were Wm. and Anna (Kellee) 
Meister. Wm. was the third oldest 
of nine children. The family moved 
to Jersey City in 1891, where Wil- 
liam finished his school education 
He then attended the New Jersey 
Law School for two years, but pre- 
fering the studies as a naturalist to 



that of law, gave up the latter and 
devoted his full time to the work he 
had been interested in since he was 
15 years of age. On October 1, 
1915, he established himself in busi- 
ness as a taxidermist and immedi- 
ately met with great success, which 
has followed him ever since. 

Mr. Meister does all the taxi- 
dermy work of the Bronx Zoologic- 
al Garden and for many large New 




York concerns and numerous pro- 
minent hunters. Some of the most 
beautiful work can be seen at his 
studio. 

As a citizen he is esteemed for 
those qualities which distinguish the 
successful man and enjoys the con- 
fidence of all who know him. In 
politics he is an ardent Democrat, 
and in a quiet way has rendered 
valuable service to his party and 
community. He was Treasurer of 
the 12th Ward Wittpenn. Club and 
of the Hudson City Democratic 
Club, both of Jersey City. 

Mr. Meister has achieved a high 
reputation for ability and persever- 
ance. He is a public-spirited citi- 
zen, imbued with an exalted sense 



146 



of patriotism and progressiveness, 
and by action and -example has ex- 
erted a wholesome influence in the 
community, whose respect and con- 
fidence he enjoys to the utmost. He 
is one of the best known and popu- 
lar men not alone in Jersey City, but 
in Hudson County. 

He married Dorothy C. Kreutz- 
burg of Jersey City in 1905. They 
have two children, Alma F. and 
I-avinia D. 

Mr. Meister is a member of the 
F. & A. M., and the Masonic Club. 
His great hobby is hunting and in 
fact all outdoor sports. 

He is also quite an artist in paint- 
ing and rriodelling. 



Prof. Gustav Meyer. 



Prof. Gustav Meyer, 
Astrologer, with studio 
at 1125 Washington St., 
was born in Madison, 
February 16th, 1876. 
moved with his parents 
land, Ohio, and in 1885 



the noted 
and office 
Hoboken, 
Indiana, 
He later 
to Cleve- 
moved to 




Brooklyn, N. Y. Five years later 
the family moved to Hoboken 
where the father became a pros- 
perous merchant, but died in 1905. 
. In 1909 Prof. Meyer started to 
study astrology under the world- 
wide known Prof. J. O. Astor of 
Boston, Mass., who had a study in 
St. Paul's Building, New York. 
He at once gave his whole body 
and, soul to his tudies; he read 
thought, and wrote about astrology 
and had very soon mastered it. 



Then he decided to open his own 
studio, and has since become one 
of the foremost Astrologers of the 
world. 

The Professor has made numer- 
ous predictions of actual happen- 
ings, the mention of which would 
fill a whole book. In the N. Y. 
Sun, December 28th, 1913, he fore- 
told the great European War, and 
was the only Astrologer who fore- 
told this great war. 

He predicted the (assassination 
of President McKinley, the Ho- 
boken fires. Lord Kitchener's death 
and numerous other facts, which 
actually happened as he predicted. 



J. Parentini, Ph. G. 

Joseph J. Parentini, President of 
the Board of Education of West 
Hoboken, was appointed to this 
Board four years ago. 




He was born in New York City 
in 1882, Where he attended school 
until his parents moved to West 
Hoboken, where he finished his 



147 



schooling, and graduated from 
School No. 1. For two years he 
worked for a drug firm in New 
York and then entered the New 
York University, where he gradu- 
ated in 1902. He later passed 
the New York State Board and 
later the New Jersey State Board. 
He then opened a drug store at 
Savoy and Spring Streets and in 
1912 moved into his present store, 
located at 259 Spring Street. This 
is one of the most up-to-date and 
modern drug stores in that section. 

Mr. Parentini was a trustee of 
the University of Pharmacy, Jer- 
sey City, for one year ; he is a Di- 
rector of the Palisade Building and 
Loan Association, charter member 
and ex-Director of the National 
Bank of North Hudson, and a 
member of the Free Masons, For- 
esters of America, and Woodmen 
of America, and is also a Deputy 
Registrar of West Hoboken. 

Mr. Parentini has made a large 
circle of friends by the pleasing 
and courteous treatment he offers 
everyone who comes in contact 
with him. 



Michael Censullo. 



Among the most widely known 
and successful builders of North 
Hudson is Michael Censullo of 622 
Monastery Street, West Hoboken. 
To mention the numerous build- 
ings he has put up, would take too 
much space, be it sufficient to men- 
tion the one block of high-class 
apartment houses at Filmore PI., 
the large loft building at Filmore 
PI. and Seventeenth Street, both 
in West New York; the post of- 
fice, fire house, a twenty-two fam- 
ily house in Edgewater, N. J., and 
the school in Bergenfield, N. J., 
and many others. 

Mr. Censullo was born in Italy 
in 1880 and came to this country 



in 1891. He landed in Boston, 
where he finished his schooling and 
learned the carpenter trade. 

He later moved to Brooklyn, 
and in 1900 came to North Hudson 



■f 


I 


^^^^HP^ 


■ 







and there established his own busi- 
ness 12 years ago. 

Mr. Censullo is prominently 
connected with fraternal and social 
circles. He is a member of the 
Zem, Zem, Mason, and Foresters 
of America. 



Louis Hohler. 



One of the most popular musi- 
cians and bandmasters in North 
Hudson is Louis Kohler, at 205 
Spring St., West Hoboken. 

He was born in Jersey City, and 
after finishing his schooling in 
that city, he studied music and 
learned to master violin, cornet, 
and drum. He was in the thea- 
trical business for a number of 
years and traveled with different 
companies as music director. 

He later moved to West Hobo- 



148 



ken and has since built up an en- 
viable reputation as an instructor 
of music and band leader. He has 
played at many high-class affairs. 
and Mr. Kohler and his orchestra 
can be found at most of the promi- 



Joseph Peschkar, D. 0., 
N. D., D. C. 




J. Peschkar, the well known 
Chiropractor and Naturopath, re- 
siding at 313 Main St., Union Hill, 
N. J., was born in Austria, Febru- 
ary 18th, 1881. He came to this 
country in March, 1908, and at 
once started to study in West Ho- 
boken and the New York evening 
schools. 



nent affairs held in this section. 
He is very popular and has a host 
of friends, and is a prominent 
figure in fraternal and social Ufe. 
He is a member of Jr. O. U. A, 
M. ; Sons and Daughters of Liber- 
ty ; Foresters of America ; Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters; 
Loyal Order of Moose; Fedleral 
Order of Eagles; Imp. Order of 
Redmen; Shepherds of Bethle- 
hem; Grove Mutual Ben. Ass'n; 
Anchor Athletic Club; Clover 
Social Club, and Charles Bollinger 
Ass'n. He is also a member of 
the Musicians' Local No. 526, Jer- 
sey City, and Local No. 310, A. 
F. of M. 

Mr. Kohler 's telephone number 
is 1385 Union. 




The doctor has studied at and 
graduated from the International 
College of Osteopathy, 111., Ameri- 
can School of Naturopathy and N. 
J. College of Chiropractic, the Vo- 
tus Academia (O. P. M. College), 
and Electric Osteopathic Institute of 
New York. Dr. Peschkar is one 
of the few in his profession who 
have taken a full course in Human 
Dissection at the Flower Hospital, 
New York City. , 

The doctor has built up a very, 
large practice and has become well 
known throughout North Hudson. 
He is a member of several profes- 
sional organizations and has gained 



149 



a large host of friends in the pro- 
fession as well as among the public. 
The doctor is devoting his full 
time to his practice in Union Hill, 
N. J., and Long Island City, N. Y., 
and has no time to devote to fra- 
ternal or social societies. 



Henry F. A. Matthies, 

D. 0., N. D., D. C. 

Ph. C. 



Henry F. A. Matthies, D. O., N. 
D., D. C, Ph. C, one of the fore- 
most Osteopaths in North Hudson, 
was born in New York City, on 
March 5, 1881, and when six years 
old, his parents moved to West 
Hoboken, where he has resided 
ever since. Dr. Matthies' early 
education was received in the 
West Hoboken Public Schools and 
Eagan's School of Business. After 
a successful business career in the 
diamond trade, he took up the study 
of drugless healing with marked 
success, graduating' from the New 
Jersey College of Osteopathy on 
January 27, 1909, and received the 
degree of D. O. On June 15, 1910, 
he completed a course at the Natu- 
ropathic Institute at Butler, N. J., 
receiving the degree of N. D. At the 
New England College of Chiro- 
practic, he took up the study of 
Chiropractic, and on June 28, 1913, 
was graduated with the degree of 
D. C, and later taking a Post Gra- 
duate Course at the New Jersey 
College of Chiropractic, graduated 
on June 24, 1915, and was awarded 
the degree of Philosopher of Chiro- 
practic. After a long fight for re- 
cognition with the Medical Board 
of New Jersey, Mr. Matthies took 
a special Post Graduate Course in 
the Philadelphia College of Osteo- 
pathy, at the completion of which 
he took the Pennsylvania State 
Board examinations and was the 
first Osteopath in North Hudson to 



receive a license from the New 
Jersey State Medical Board. Dur- 
ing the years that Dr. Matthies has 
practised in West Hoboken, he has 
gained an eminent reputation as a 
man who thoroughly understands 
his profession. His wonderful 
cures in many well-known hopeless 
cases in North Hudson have as- 
tonished his colleagues as well as 
the public. Although his time is 
taken up by an extensive practice, 
the Doctor finds time for civic 
work. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the Ambulance Corps of 
the North Bergen Fire Department 




and held the position of Chief 
Steward for five consecutive years. 
Aside from being an Exempt Fire- 
man of the North Bergen Fire De- 
partment, he is a member of Doric 
Lodge, No. .86, F. & A. M., of 
West Hoboken, Zem Zem Grotto of 
Jersey City, and was also one of the 
organizers and first Secretary of 
the West Side Democratic Club of 
West Hoboken. The Doctor and his 
family now reside at 491 Palisade 
Ave., West Hoboken, where his of- 
fice is fully equipped to successfully 



150 



treat the. human body without the 
use of drugs. 

For the last seven years he has 
been a member of the Tyler Hook 
and Ladder Co., North Bergen. 
He is also a member of the North 
Bergen Election Board and is Sec- 
retary of the West Side Democratic 
Club of West Hoboken, which he 
helped organize. 

In 1906 the Doctor married Ca- 
roline Lang, with whom he has 
three children, Henry, Harry, and 
Caroline. The Doctor resides at 
419 Palisade Avenue, West Hobo- 
ken. 



Siro Tagliabue. 

Siro Tagliabue, one of the most 
notable builders in this section, 
was born in Italy in 1870, and 




came to this country in 1886. His 
father was one of the largest and 
most prominent builders in Italy. 
Mr. Tagliabue established his 
own business 16 years ago, and has 
since put up numerous buildings. 



among which may be mentioned, 
Haase and Koehls Wholesale 
Grocery Establishment on Cam- 
bridge Ave., Vietmeyer's Bakery 
on Sherman Ave., Transfer Sta- 
tion at West Hoboken, the Summit 
and Spring Theatres, and many 
others. He executed all the in- 
side work in the Emerson High 
School. 

Mr. Tagliabue is very promin- 
ently connected in fraternal, poli- 
tical and social circles. He is a 
member of the Zem Zems, a Chief 
Past Ranger of the Foresters of 
America, and President of the 
Benevolent Italian Association 
He served as Playground Commis- 
sioner for four years and was 
formerly a County Committeeman 

He was married twenty-six 
years ago in West Hoboken, has 
no less than thirty-six nieces and 
nephews in West Hoboken. He 
has the distinction of being one of 
the first Italian builders in the 
town. The building at 243 Spring 
Street, in which he resides and has 
his office, was built by himself last 
year. 



Wm. O'Connor. 



WiUiam O'Connor was born in 
the town of West Hoboken, on 
September 21st. 1886. While at 
the age of two years he suffered 
the loss of his mother, and his edu- 
cation and upbringinig devolved 
upon his father, John O'Connor, 
the well known building contractor 
of that period. 

After completing his education 
he entered the contracting business 
with his father and upon the de- 
mise of his parent eleven years ago 
he continued the busines's with 
marked success, erecting many 
buildings, among which are the 
German Hospital Building in Jer- 
sey City and the First National 



ISI 



Bank Building of Sullivan County, 
N. Y. 

In business and private life his 
geniality, frank and open nature 
won him hosts of friends, and in 




the spring of 1914, when he had 
attained the age of 28 years, thru 
the fact of the dissatisfaction of 
many of the citizens of the town 
with the council form qf govern- 
ment, he was popularly named as 
candidate to head the movement 
for a commission form of adminis- 
tration, but thru various reasons 
including that of business and an 
inherent distaste for mingling in 
politics, caused him to decline the 
honor, but in 1915, one year later, 
the popular wish for him to parti- 
cipate in the governmental aiifairs 
of the town became so universal 
and insistent, that he accepted the 
nomination as candidate for the of- 
fice of Councilman of the second 
ward and was elected the same 
year, with the distinction of being 
the youngest man to hold that im- 
portant office in the history of 



Hudson County. He was re-elected 
to this office for a second term. 

His fearless and uncompromising 
attitude in the discharge of his 
duties as Councilman, coupled with 
his well deserved reputation for 
possessing the highest integrity 
and honesty, gained for him the 
sobriquet of "Honest Bill O'- 
Connor". 



A. G. Sacco, M. D. 



Dr. Anthony G. Sacco, of West 
Hoboken, is one of the best known 
men in .the medical profession. He 
was born in Long Branch, Septem- 
ber 5, 1889. After finishing his 
early school education, he entered 
the Cornell University, where he 
graduated in 1911, and received the 
degree of M. D. He served his 




hospital term in New York City 
Hospital and Christ Hospital, Jer- 
sey City, and in 1913 started his 
own practice. 

In March, 1916, he was appointed 
School Physician of West Hobo- 
ken, and on January 1, 1917, was 



152 



appointed Board of Health Medi- 
cal Inspector. 

The doctor is State Medical Di- 
rector of the Georgia Casualty 
Company, and is Treasurer of the 
North Hudson Physicians' Club. 
He is on the staff of the North 
Hudson Hospital, and is a mem- 
ber of the Alpha Kappa. 

Dr. Sacco has built up a very ex- 
tensive practice and has gained the 
trust and confidence of people all 
over North Hudson. He is a pop- 
ular figure in professional as well as 
in social circles, and has a large 
» number of admirers and friends. 
He is a spirited and enterprising 
man, always ready to do his share 
for the community. As a philan- 
thropist he is well known, and is 
always ready to lend a helping hand 
where help is needed. 

He is very quick-witted and fond 
of a good joke. His ability as a 
medical doctor, his democratic 
ways, and his sterling business 
character has made him one of the 
most popular doctors in North 
Hudson. 

Since the writing of this Dr. 
Sacco has enlisted and is now serv- 
ing in the U.. S. Army Medical 
Corps in France. 



Dr. H. C. Dehn. 



Dr. Henry C. Dehn, Surgeon 
Dentist, with offices in the Hudson 
Trust Building, West Hoboken, has 
been practising in this community 
for the past seven years. 

Born and brought up in Moscow, 
Russia, where he attended High 
School, he came over to this 
country 26 years ago, settled in 
New York, and in 1902 took up 
the study of dentistry in the Penn- 
sylvania College of Dental Surgery, 
from which institution he graduat- 
ed in 1905. In 1911 Dr. Dehn, 
after having had charge of Dr. 



Denis' office, finally took over the 
practice himself and since built up 
one of the most successful prac- 
tices in North Hudson. 

Doctor Dehn is very enthusiastic 
about his work as Dental Examiner 
at the St. Michael's Parochial 
School, where he has been doing 
regular examination for the past 3 
years. 

Dr. Dehn has passed the State 
examinations of New Jersey, Penn- 
sylvania, and New York. His 
pleasing personality and sterling 




business character have gained him 
a host of friends. 

The Doctor married Anna 
Manster in 1898. They have one 
son, Clarence. 



Jos. A. Hurley. 

Jos. A. Hurley, Plumbing Inspec- 
tor of Quttenberg, was born in 
New York City, January 17, 1882. 
He has been a resident of Qutten- 
berg for the last seventeen years, 
and established himself as a plumb- 



153 



ing and gasfitting contractor six- 
teen years ago. He has executed 
many large and important con- 
tracts, and is well known as a thor- 
ough mechanic who knows every 
detail of his business. 

In civic and political matters, 
Mr. Hurley has always taken a 
great interest, and he has in many 



Anthony Barberis. 




ways done much for the welfare of 
Guttenberg. In 1907 he helped or- 
ganize the town's Board of Health, 
on which Board he served for four 
years prior to his reappointment in 
1916. He also helped organize 
Tribe No. 250 of Guttenberg of the 
Redmen about eight years ago. 

Mr. Hurley has always been a 
staunch Democrat, in which party 
he is very active. He is a patriotic 
and public spirited citizen, pos- 
sessed of sound judgment and sterl- 
ing business character. His pleas- 
ing personality has gained him a 
host of friends. 

Mr. Hurley's shop is located at 
58 Bergenline Ave., where he con- 
tinuously keeps three men busy. 



Emigrating from sunny Italy, 
where he was born on February 1, 
1874, Anthony Barberis, the well 
known real estate and insurance 
broker of West Hoboken, came 
to this country in 1896. His par- 
ents, who were in well-to-do cir- 
cumstances, had given him a splen- 
did education in his native country, 
where he attended public school, 
High School and College, and had 
learned Latin, Greek, and several 
other languages. His father had a 
woolen factory in Italy, where" 
Anthony worked, helping his fa- 
ther und supervising the business, 
until he came to this country. 
Here he worked in the silk mills, 




and in 1903 established a real 
estate and insurance business, 
which he is still conducting at 160 
Clinton Avenue, West Hoboken. 

Mr. Barberis married Amelia 
Bozzo in 1902. They have five 
children, Antoinette, Emma, Paul, 
James, and Clotilde. 

Mr. Barberis has been a Justice 



1S4 



of the Peace since 1905. He is a 
Notary Public and Commissioner 
of Deeds. He is very prominently 
connected with several of the im- 
portant Italian societies, and is a 
member of the Forresters of 
America. 

Greatly esteemed, not alone by 
the Italian- Americans, but by all 
who know him, Mr. Barberis has 
become one of the most prominent 
men in West Hoboken, and is iden- 
tified with the best interests of the 
town. 

He resides at 304 Mountain 
Road, West Hoboken. • 



Paolo Cremonesi. 



Paolo Cremonesi, the distinguish- 
ed Italian actor, is a resident of 




which North Hudson can be 
proud. 

He was born in Milano, Italy, 
January 8, 1872, and made his first 
stage appearance when he was 
seven years old, playing boys' 
parts until the age of twelve, when 



he entered tlie Dramatic Academy 
of Milan, where he studied for 
three years, and graduated from 
this institution while still in his 
teens. He studied under the great 
Giuseppe Giacosa and became one 
of his star pupils, being equally 
facile in the expression of French 
and Italian. After a year's travel 
he settled down to serious dramatic 
work. His reputation was quickly 
made, and he has shone equally in 
tragedy, comedy, drama, and farce. 
He himself prefers characters from 
the plays of Shakespeare, Moliere, 
Alfieri, and Goldoni. 

Mr. Cremonesi made his debut 
on the English - speaking stage 
in this country at the Keith and 
Proctor Fifth Avenue Theatre. For 
the last six years he has played with 
his own company in his own vaude- 
ville act, playing the leading vau- 
deville houses from coast to coast. 
Last spring he' conducted the opera 
at St. Joseph's Auditorium in West 
Hoboken, which proved a great 
success. He will start a new season 
of opera at the same theatre for 20 
consecutive Sundays, beginning 
Sept. 23rd. 

Mr. Cremonesi's genuine art 
and eminent gifts have commanded 
attention everywhere, and the crit- 
ics have often praised his remark- 
able ability. 

He rnarried Esther Estiot in 
1897. They have two children, 
Germaine and PauHne. 



Geo. Zwerneman, D. C. 



Possessed of a great knowledge 
of the human body. Dr. George 
Zwerneman, the prominent chiro- 
practor, has made an eminent suc- 
cess as a drugless practitioner. 

He was born in Jersey City on 
April 13, 1874. After finishing his 
early school education in^that city, 
he worked at odd jobs and then be- 
came interested in the study of the 



155 



human body. For the last 25 years 
he has practised physical culture 
and has become well known as a 
trainer of athletes. The doctor 
himself is a great athlete and is 
the holder of a championship in 
long distance swimming. He has 
trained many people for the latter 
sport, also for wrestling, in fact for 




every kind of athletics. By his suc- 
cessful methods he has built up a 
large practice and has people com- 
ing to his office for treatment from 
all parts of the county as ' well as 
_from New York. The medical pro- 
fession is recommending numerous 
patients to the care of Dr. Zwerne- 
man. Many almost hopeless cases 
of well known prominent people 
have been absolutely cured by the 
doctor. 

He has gone into the study of 
drugless healing very thoroughly- 
and studied at the New Jersey Col- 
lege and at the New York School 
of Chiropractors. 

The doctor married Rose Kuntz, 
with whom he has two children, 
both girls. 



He is a member of the Jersey 
City Elks and takes an active in- 
terest in all professional, social and 
civic affairs. He has a large num- 
ber of friends, who admire him for 
his ability, integrity and pleasing, 
personality. 

The doctor's office is located at 
601 Pavonia Ave., Jersey City. 



Wm. C. Harper. 

Wm. C. Harper, the instructor of 
the Lyric Musical Company, in 
Union Hill, is a violinist of a high 
reputation. 

He was born in Newark, N. J., in 
1885, and attended Public School 
in his native city. He began to 
study violin when only six years of 
age and studied under the noted 
violinist Mr. B. Drew. He later 
studied at the New York Conserva- 
tory of Music for three years. He 
came to Union Hill in 1910 and has 
since been an instructor of the Lyric 
Company. 

Mr. Harper teaches in classes and 
orchestra form and has graduated 
many successful pupils. 

His splendid talents and abiHty 
has made him a well known figure 
in musical circles. His friends are 
legion, being found in large num- 
bers especially in North Hudson. 

While a public spirited citizen, 
Mr. Harper has never affiliated 
himself with any political or frater- 
nal associations, but devotes his 
whole time to his profession. ,i 

His tastes, his environment and 
his natural inclinations all fitted him 
for the musical profession, and in 
prosecuting it as an instructor and 
student he has scored marked suc- 
cess and achieved a high reputation. 

Mr. Harper is what may truly be 
styled a domestic man and spends 
all his spare time in his home, of 
which he is very fond. 



156 



Lewis B. Eastmead. 



One of the leading barristers in 
the county is Lewis B. Eastmead, 
with law office on Summit Avenue, 
West Hoboken. He was born in 
Savannah, Georgia, June 17, 1885. 
He obtained part of his school edu- 
cation in his native city, but jour- 
neyed with his parents to Jersey 
City in 1893 and finished his edu- 
cation in the Jersey City schools 
and the Jersey City High School. 
He worked as a newspaper adver- 
tising man for five years and then 
• entered the custom service, at which 
he worked for a number of years, 
later becoming an inspector. Dur- 
ing his leisure hours he studied law 
at the New York Law School and 
after two years' study was admitted 
to the Bar as an Attorney-at-Law, 
in December, 1911. The following 
year he opened a law office in part- 
nership with Robert Hille on Jer- 
sey City Heights, but after one year 
the partnership was dissolved and 
Mr. Eastmead at 108 Summit Ave., 
West Hoboken, establishel his own 
law office and in 1915 he moved to 
his present location, 254 Summit 
Avenue. 

Mr. Eastmead came to the Bar 
well equipped for the duties of a 
lawyer and has displayed those legal 
abilities and qualifications which 
win success. 

He is an active and influential 
member of the Democratic Party, 
and while he has never accepted or 
aspired to any political office, he is 
very much interested in political 
. affairs. 

He is also prominently connected 
in fraternal circles. He is a chap- 
lain of the North Hudson Eagles, 
Grand Knight of Carrol Council, 
K. C, and a member of tlie Moose 
and the Foresters. He is interested 
in athletics and is a member of the 
Anchor Athletic Club of Jersey 
City. 

Mr. Eastmead married Jeanette 



Davidson in 1909. They have three 
children, James, Lewis, and 
Dorothy. 



Dr. Harold VolcKmann. 



One of the most distinguished 
drugless physicians in Jersey City 
is Dr. Harold Volckmann, with of- 
fices at 40 Zabriskie St. 

He is descended from one of the 
old families in the hill section and 
was born in the house in which his 
office is located and in which he also 
resides. 

He obtained his education in the 
public school and later attended the 
New York Preparatory School. He 
graduated from this institution and 
later graduated from the New York 
State Board of Regent. For a time 
he studied medicine at the well 
known college and then took up the 
study of Osteopathy and later gra- 
duated from the Osteopathy College 
of New Jersey. 

In 1912 he established his own 
practice as a drugless physician and 
Osteopath. A few years later he 
took a post graduate course at the 
Osteopath College of New Jersey. 

The doctor has received many 
diplomas and certificates from the 
various institutions of learning he 
has attended, and from many of 
which he has graduated with high- 
est honors. 

Dr. Volckmann has succeeded in 
building up a very successful prac- 
tice and is recognized as one of the 
most skilled men in his profession. 

He enjoys the confidence and res- 
pect of his colleagues as well as of 
the hundreds of people he has 
cured. 

As a citizen he has attained an 
enviable reputation for his sterling 
qualifications. He has never sought 
nor accepted any political office, pre- 
fering to devote his whole time to 
his profession. He is always ready, 



157 



however, to bear a loyal citizen's 
part in public affairs and takes a 
deep interest in all wortKy move- 
ments affecting the community. 

The doctor is a member of sev- 
eral professional and fraternal as- 
sociations. 



Geo. E. Burger. 



William F. BurKe. 



Counsellor William F. Burke, a 
member of the New Jersey Bar 
since 1899, and now engaged in the 
general practice of law in West 
Hoboken, with offices in the Com- 
monwealth Trust Company Build- 
ing, was born in Hoboken in 1877. 
He has proved himself an apt dis- 
ciple of Blackstone, and his law 
business is constantly growing. 
He has the training, the system, 
and the experience, which will per- 
mit him to do an enormous amount 
of work in the shortest possible 
time. His interests are always those 
of his clients, and those who have 
retained him are loud in praise of 
his satisfactory work in their 
behalf. 

He was educated in the Hoboken 
Public School and High School, 
and in 1898 graduated from the 
New York University with the de- 
gree of L.L.D. The following year 
he passed the Bar Examination. 
He then entered the office of Russ 
& Heppenheimer in Hoboken and 
served there until 1902, when he 
opened his own law office in Ho- 
boken. Five years later he moved 
to his present location. 



George E. Burger, the under- 
taker at 335 Bergenline Ave., Union 
Hill, was born in Grantwood, Au- 
gust 12th, 1877. His parents mov- 
ed to Brooklyn a few years later 
and there George received his 
early education. The family then 
moved up New York State and 
settled on a farm. George helped 
on the farm until he was 19 years 
of age, when he started to learn a 
trade. He did not, however, con- 
tinue at this, but in 1904 secured a 




position with undertaker Greenleaf 
of West Hoboken, with whom he 
remained for three years. In Fe- 
bruary, 1909, he went to work for 
Wm. Necker and continued with, 
him until February 1, 1917. 

Mr. Burger worked his way up 
with Mr. Necker and held a respon- 
sible position, taking care of fun- 
eral arrangements at all Necker' s 
branch offices in Hudson and Ber- 
gen Counties. He soon became one 
of the most trusted and most effi- 



1S8 



cient employees of the Necker firm. 
Having gained a thorough knowl- 
edge of every detail of the under- 
taking business, Mr. Burger decid- 
ed to etsablish his own business. 
He selected the best thoroughfare 
in North Hudson and opened his 
undertaking parlors at the above 
address. His' beginning has been 
very encouraging and there is little 
doubt he will make a great success. 

His complete knowledge of his 
business, his earnest desire to be of 
service, his conscientious business 
principle and his courteous and 
'dignified, but pleasing ways, make 
him especially fitted for his profes- 
sion. 

Mr. Burger is an enterprising 
citizen, and a man of business abil- 
ity. He has been taught to vfork 
and does not believe in being idle. 
If he is not engaged in his busi- 
ness, he looks around for some- 
thing else to do, for he is one of 
those men who simply must be busy 
at all times. 

He has never taken any active 
interest in political afifairs, but is a 
civic-spirited citizen, interested in 
the welfare of his community. 
• He is a loyal and patriotic man 
and is a member of the Jr. O. U. A. 
M., Garfield Council, and the 
Daughters of Liberty. 



Charles A. Heyler, D. C. 



Charles A. Heyler, one of the 
countys' best known chiropractors 
and naturopaths, with offices at 67 
Lincoln St., Jersey City, was born 
in New York City, April 29, 1874. 
After receiving the advantage af- 
forded by the public schools in the 
city, he worked at clerical jobs and 
was a singer in St. John's Church, 



New York, Trinity Parish, on 
Varick St. 

He then became interested in the 
art of drugless healing and took up 
the study of chiropractor in the 
New England College " in Boston, 




from which institution he received 
his diploma in 1914. On June 24, 
1915, he received his diploma from 
the New Jersey College. Dr. Hey- 
ler has also studied at Dr. Lust 
Naturopath Institution and at the 
Anatom Chi Society. 

He also received the degree of 
Philosopher of Chiropractic from 
the Mecca College of Chiropractic, 
Wilmington, Delaware, June 1917. 

The doctor opened his practice 
at No. 100 Terrace Ave., Jersey 
City, and one year ago moved to 
his present location. 

Dr. Heyler enjoys a very large 
practice and has become widely 
known for his successful cures. He 
has succeeded in a number of cases 
by his great knowledge of his pro- 
fession, where no other expedient 
known to medical science has been 
successful. 



159 



As a citizen he is successful and 
enterprising, and his pleasing per- 
sonality has gained him a large 
circle of friends. He is well known 
in professional as well as social 
circles and is a member of the F. 
and A. M., Mystic Tie. 

The doctor married Rose Meiss- 
ner in 1896. They have one daugh- 
ter, Gertrude, who has become a 
well known teacher of piano music. 



Geo. C. 



Weiershausen, 
D.C. 



Dr. George C. Weiershausen, the 
prominent chiropractor and naturo- 
path, and one of the leading social- 
ists of the county, was born in New 
York City, February 10, 1890. 

He attended Public School No. 
15 in that city and later the High 
School. He then secured a cleric- 
al position in a broker's office and 
studied chemistry at the New York 
Evening High School. Soon after 
he became interested in drugless 
healing and into this study he threw 
his heart and soul. He studied 
chiropractice at the New Jersey 
College, Naturopathy at the Butler 
Institute, and Human Dissection at 
the Flower Hospital. 

Dr. Weiershausen has gone 
deeper into the study of drugless 
healing than most of his colleagues. 
He has also studied Neuropathy 
and Iridology, the latter enabling 
the students to read the disease 
from the eyes of the patients. He 
has made a wonderful success in 
his practice, especially in the cases 
of children, and he has cured 
numerous cases of infantile paral- 
ysis, insane, blind, paralyzed in all 
limbs, and deafness. 



Dr. Weiershausen gives free ad- 
vice to mothers for the prevention 
of infantile paralysis. 

In political affairs he has become 
very promment. He has always 
been a staunch supporter of the 
Socialist Party and has been fear- 
less in advocating its principles. 
He is chairman of the Hudson and 
Bergen County Federate Union of 
Democracy. In 1915 he managed 
the Labor Union Suffrage Cam- 
paign. 

Dr. Weiershausen has been a resi- 
dent of Guttenberg for the last 




twelve years, but has his office at 
the Palisade Supply Building in 
Grantwood. 

He is well known as a lecturer 
and one of the best orators in the 
section. He is a member of the 
Shepherds of Bethlehem, Hudson 
County Chiropractors and Naturo- 
paths Association, New Jersey Chi- 
ropractors Association, American 
Academy of Chiropractic Research, 
Alliance of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, and the Young People's 
Socialist League. 



160 



Charles Swensen. 



Charles Swensen, Town Clerk of 
West New York, was born in Den- 
mark, September 21, 1878. He 
came to this country, all alone, 
when he was only eleven years of 
age. He settled with relations in 
New York City and later moved to 




West Hoboken. He received part 
of his public school education in 
New York and finished his school- 
ing in West Hoboken. He then re- 
ceived a clerical position with a 
large jeweler and silversmith man- 
ufacturer and worked for that con- 
cern for a number of years. 

In 1898 he moved to West New 
York and soon after became active 
in public affairs. He was elected 
a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion in 1908 and re-elected in 1911. 
He served as Clerk of that Board 
for four years. In 1916 he .was 
appointed Assistant Town Clerk, 
and in this year, 1917, he was ap- 
pointed Town Clerk after the death 
of his predecessor. 

Mr. Swensen has always been 
affiliated with the Democratic 
Party. He is a public-spirited and 



enterprising citizen and has 
achieved an excellent reputation as 
a man of ability, industry, and un- 
impeachable integrity. He is 
thoroughly identified with the af- 
fairs of his town and active and in- 
fluential in every movement which 
effects the welfare of the communi- 
ty. He enjoys the respect and con- 
fidence of all who know him, and 
by his pleasing personality he has 
gained a very large circle of 
friends. 

Mr. Swensen married Dorothy 
Andres in 1902. They have four 
children, Robert, Harry, Charles 
and Norman. 

Numerous voters in West New 
York who would like to see Mr. 
Swensen continued in the office as 
Town Clerk, are leaving no stone 
unturned to secure his nomination 
at the coming primaries. They 
claim he has demonstrated his abil- 
ity and faithfully discharged his 
duties and deserves a full term as 
Town Clerk. This is by no means 
a "soft job", as much work is at- 
tached to this office, and Mr. 
Swensen not alone puts in a full 
day's work, every day, but can_ be 
found in his ofike every evening, 
always busily engaged. 



Samuel L. Hirschberg. 



One of the most promising 
young lawyers in Hudson County 
is Assemblyman Samuel L. Hirsch- 
berg. 

He was born in Hoboken, Sep- 
tember 28, 1892. Receiving his 
preliminary education in the Ho- 
boken public schools and the High 
School, he later took up the study 
of law at the New Jersey Law 
School, from which institution he 
received the degree of L.L.B. in 
1913. He studied in the law offices 
of Judge Tennant of the Common 
Pleas Court, and of Judge Haight 



)61 



of the United States District Court, 
and in December, 1914, Mr. 
Hirschberg was admitted to the 
New Jersey Bar as an Attorney-at- 
Law. One year later he establish- 
ed his own practice, with law of- 
fices in Hoboken, and with a 
branch office in West New York, 
in which town he resides. 

Mr. Hirschberg is a bright young 
man steadily rising to prominence 
among the members of the Hud- 
son County Bar. Endowed with 
broad, intellectual qualifications, 
with splendid judgment -and great 
energy, he has, through his own ef- 
forts, achieved distinction as an 
able, industrious and painstaking 
lawyer, and is highly esteemed and 
respected by all who know him. 

He has always been interested in 
civic affairs and ever ready to pro- 
mote anything which may be of 
benefit to the community. 

Mr. Hirschberg was elected to 
the Assembly in the Fall election of 
1917, and although he has occupied 
the seat only a short time, he has 
already introduced several bills, one 
in favor of increasing the payments 
to insured workingmen under the 
present Compensation Law. His 
experience as an attorney has con- 
vinced him that the Compensation 
Law as it now is, is very unjust to 
the working classes. 

He is inviting suggestions from 
organizations for future healthful 
legislation and will be glad to ap- 
pear at any meetings where any 
such suggestions might be made. 



Dr. L. Hubner, D. C, 
N. D. 



Dr. Louis Hubner, D. C, N. D., 
with offices at 130 Fourth Street, 
Union Hill, is one of the best 
known chiropractors in North 
Hudson. The doctor was born on 
Long Island, Aug. 11, 1892, but 



his parents moved to North Bergen 
when the doctor was only a few 
months old. There he received his 
public school education and later 
graduated from Eagan's Business 
School, after which he took a 
course at the Senftner Prep. 
School in New York. 

He then started to study the art 
of drugless healing, and in 1916 
received his diploma from the N. J. 
College of Chiropractors. He next 
took a post graduate course at 
the American School of Naturo- 
pathy and received a diploma from 
this institution, and later received a 
diploma from the Natiiropathic So- 
ciety of U. S. of America, where 
he took a full coiu'se, after which 
he started his own practice. This 
has since grown to one of the lar- 
gest in North Hudson, and his of- 
fice is constantly filled with pa- 
tients eager to have Dr. Hubner 
treat them for various diseases. 
Many who have suffered a lifetime 
have been completely cured by Dr. 
Hubner. 

The doctor is prominently con- 
nected in professional circles, 
being Vice-President A. N. A.. 
New Jersey Division; Secretary of 
Hudson County Chiropractors and 
Naturopath. Association ; a mem- 
ber of the Chi. Sqc. for Human 
Dissection ; Red Cross Society of 
Finst Aid to the Injured; N. J. 
Chiropractors' Association; Ameri- 
can Academy of Chiropractic Re- 
search, and the Anti-Compulsory 
Vaccination Society of New Jer- 
sey. 

The doctor is a man for whom 
nobody can help but have a liken- 
ing. His frankness and open man- 
ners make one take full confidence 
in him. 

Dr. Hubner has well said it when 
he said that Chiropractic Adjust- 
ments are the automatic spark ad- 
vance of life, 



162 



John Warren. 



John Warren, one of the lead- 
ing lawyers of the county, was 
born in Jersey City, March 25, 
1888. He attended Public School 
No. 12 of that city and later Jer- 
sey City High School. His great 
desire was to study law, but as his 
parents were in meagre circumstan- 
ces, he found it necessary to work 
in the day time while he studied law 
at the New York Law School in 




the evening. He worked in several 
law offices, where he had an oppor- 
tunity to study banking and real 
estate as well as law. For a time 
he was employed in McDermitt & 
Fisk Law Office and later worked 
in the office of Judge Blair. 

In 1910, Mr. Warren was ad- 
mitted to the bar and immediately, 
afterward started his own law 
practice. He soon achieved a high 
reputation in the legal profession. 
His abilities were soon recognized 
and in 1913 he was appointed Po- 
lice Judge of the First Criminal 
Court in Jersey City. While on 



the bench, the Judge made an ad- 
mirable record and instituted many 
needed reforms and improvements, 
such as the establishment of the 
Night Court, the postponed and 
probation systems. 

He resigned from the bench on 
May 1, 1915, a few months after 
he had been elected President of the 
National Bank of North Hudson. 
This bank was, at that time, housed 
in imdoubtedly the smallest bank- 
ing quarters in the county, at De 
Mott Street and Summit Avenue, 
West Hoboken. Judge Warren at 
once employed all his energy and 
ability to build up this bank, and 
after two years of hard and strenu- 
ous work succeeded to such an ex- 
tent that the bank was able to build 
its own building on the opposite 
corner, which today ranks as one of 
the most beautiful and most mo- 
dern banking institutions in North 
Hudson, if not in the whole 
county. 

Judge Warren is interested in 
nearly every undertaking which is 
of benefit to the community. He 
is possessed of a remarkable busi- 
ness ability, and although a young 
man, has achieved a tremendoufc 
success in all his undertakings. He 
was the first President of the 
School Extension Committee of 
Jersey City and is Vice-President 
of the Society for the Prevention 
of Cruelty to Children. He is Sec- 
retary of the committee of North 
Hudson Bankers appointed to 
handle the Liberty Bond issue. He 
is a member of several exclusive 
clubs, such as the Lotus Club of 
New York City, the Jersey City 
Club, the Carteret Club, the Na- 
tional Democratic Club of New 
York, the Jersey City Elks, Jersey 
City Foresters, Knights of Colum- 
bus ,and many others. 

The Judge married Marie Bett- 
cher of Jersey City on Nov. 8, 
1916. 
He is especially interested in all 



m 



civic work and reforms pertaining 
to the children and their school sys- 
tems. When at leisure he indulges 
in the sport of golf. 

The Judge conducts a very large 
law practice, with law offices at Ex- 
change Place in Jersey City, and in 
National Bank of North Hudson 
Building, West Hoboken. 

Judge Warren successfully con- 
ducted the campaign for the adop- 
tion of Commission Government in 
Jersey City in 1913. 

He is known as one of the most 
eloquent orators in the county. 



George Willaredt. 



Among the most distinguished 
architects of North Hudson is 
George Willaredt. 

He was born in New York City, 
October 5th, 1884. His parents 
were Andrew and Bertha (Ge- 




risch) Willaredt. His father once 
served as School Trustee of West 
New York. He died in 1909. 
George attended the public 



schools in New York City and 
West New York and later took up 
the study of architecture at the 
New York Evening High School. 
He then secured a position in the 
office of the noted architect F. S. 
V. Hoppin in New York. Mr. 
Willaredt established his own busi- 
ness in 1907, being the second ar- 
chitect in West New York. He has 
since become one of the most able 
men in his profession. 

Among some of the more impor- 
tant buildings he has erected may 
be mentioned the Transfer Station 
in West Hoboken, the Talmud 
Torah Hebrew .Temple on Sher- 
man Ave., Jersey City, the North 
Hudson Grocery Warehouse, the 
iive-story apartment house on Ber- 
genline Ave. and Seventh Street, 
West New York, Warehouse for 
Hudson Supply Co., Palisade Ave.. 
Jersey City, and numerous facto- 
ries, private residences, and tene- 
ment houses. 

Mr. Willaredt has attained a high 
standing as an architect and has 
continually and successfully prac- 
ticed his profession in North Hud- 
son. He rapidly came into promi- 
nence, and by his untiring energy 
and industry achieved eminent suc- 
cess in every sense of the term. 
Enterprising and practical, he is 
universally respected for his broad 
and sterling qualities, which mark 
the honest man. The esteem in 
which he is held is attested by his 
popularity and by the confidence 
reposed in his sound judgement and 
unimpeachable character. He is a 
man of the highest integrity, faith- 
ful in every trust, just and con- 
scientious in all the relations of 
life, modest and unassuming, 
though true to his convictions. He 
has developed great mental energy 
and intellectual abilities, and during 
his successful career has maintain- 
ed the confidence of the community. 

He is a member of the Palisade 
Lodge No. 84, F, & A, M. 



164 



John J. McGovern. 

One of the most prominent pub- 
lic men in the County of Hudson 
is John J. McGovern, County 
Clerk of Hudson County. 

He was born at Morristown, N. 
J., April 17, 1863. His parents 
moved to Hoboken about five years 
later. He received his early school 
education at St. Michael's School, 
West Hoboken, Public School No. 




3, and Hoboken High School. 
Later he attended the New York 
and New Jersey Law School. He 
was employed. by the D. L. & W. 
and the United States Express, and 
his first public office was as a mem- 
ber of the Hoboken Common 
Council. Mr. McGovern was elect- 
ed Recorder of Hoboken for three 
successive terms and in November 
1914 was elected to his present po- 
sition of County Clerk, which of- 



fice he assumed on April 12, 1915. 
As Recorder Mr. McGovern 
achieved a high reputation for his 
work in connection with the bet- 
terment of the condition of young 
men. He created and conducted 
Juvenile and Night Court and es- 
tablished an employment bureau. 
There are to-day men, especially 
young men, in different sections of 
the county, who have occasion to be 
grateful to Judge McGovern for 
the help he gave them in start- 
ing on the right road to success and 
prosperity. 

Judge McGovern also conducted 
a successful campaign against the 
use of cigarettes by boys. The 
campaign was very successful and 
became the topic of general dis- 
cussion and commendation. 

The County Clerk was a dele- 
gate to the Baltimore Convention 
of 1912 that nominated Woodrow 
Wilson, and as an ardent supporter 
of the President attended the St. 
Louis Convention four years later 
that re-nominated Wilson. 

In public and private life the 
Judge has always had an eminent 
reputation and enjoys the friend- 
ship of a host of admirers. Of a 
kindly, charitable and jovial dis- 
position, he is esteemed and res- 
pected by all who know him. 



Minconi Bros. 



One of the most prominent fami- 
lies in West Hoboken is the Min- 
coni family at Mountain Road. 

Raphael and Frank, the two 
brothers and partners in the firm of 
Minconi Bros., with studio at 335 
West 24th St., New York City, 
have become noted throughout the 
nation as sculptors of the highest 
ability and standing. 

The ' artist blood runs in the 
Minconi family. An uncle, Pietro 



165 



Ghiloni, has achieved fame in Eu- 
rope as well as in this country. 

The Minconi Bros, are doing 
work in practically every part of 
the country. They have been, as- 
signed to do all the art work at the 
Missouri State Capitol Building, 
and, among other important work 
erected Mrs. Hetty Green's Memo- 
rial in Boston. They have exe- 
cuted many art pieces for the Du 
Pont family, well known gun pow- 
der manufacturers, and have exe- 
cuted many important contracts 
for interior as well as exterior art 
work at many prominent homes on 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

The Minconi Bros, are highly 
praised in several national publica- 
tions and have achieved a distin- 
guished reputation for their work- 
manship. Several booklets have 
been issued, illustrating some of 
the most beautiful works of art too 
numerous to mention in this brief 
sketch. 

Raphael Minconi was born in 
Italy, 1877, and came to this coun- 
try in 1895. His talent as a sculp- 
tor was noted in his younger years. 
He studied with many of the most 
noted sculptors and soon became 
a recognized master in his profes- 
sion. He is a teacher at the 
School for Architects in New York, 
where his younger brother Frank 
also teaches. 

The brothers have not alone 
achieved an eminent reputation in 
the business and artistic world, but 
also enjoy a high standing in so- 
cial circles. Seven years ago the 
two brothers moved with their fa- 
milies to West Hoboken, where 
they had bought a most beautiful 
residence on Mountain Road, over- 
looking the Hudson. 

While they have never taken any 
active interest in public affairs, they 
are civic-spirited and greatly inter- 
ested in the welfare of the com- 
munity. 



Adrian Post. 



Adrian Post, Town Clerk of Se- 
caucus, is descended from one of 
the oldest families, his grand- 
father, John H. Post, being one of 
the first settlers of that town. 

Adrian Post was born in Secau- 
cus, August 23, 1869. He attended 
the local school and finished his 
education at the Jersey City High 
School. 

He then started to help his father 
on the latter's farm and to-day is 
one of the largest truck farmers in 
Secaucus. 

In 1900 Mr. Post was appointed 
Clerk of Secaucus, which then was 
a Borough. He served until 1905 
and in 1910 was again appointed 
Clerk, and served in this capacity 
up to the present time. As Secau- 
cus has become a town, the clerk- 
ship ceases to be an appointive of- 
fice, and the people have to decide 
if they want to retain Mr. Post, 
in which case they must elect him. 
He -is, however, certain of being 
elected, as he has no opposition. 
He has been endorsed by both par- 
ties and has no opposition what- 
ever. 

Mr. Post is a public-spirited citi- 
zen possessed of great business 
ability, foresight and integrity. He 
has always been an ardent Repub- 
lican and has served as County 
Committeeman for a number of 
years. His pleasing personality 
has gained him a large circle of 
friends, and he enjoys the confi- 
dence of the entire community. He 
is a conscientious, hard working 
•man, fairminded and broadminded, 
and strong in his own convictions. 

He takes a great interest in any- 
thing and everything which may 
aflfect his town and is untiring in 
his eflforts in any movement which 
may benefit the community. 

Mr. Post is a member of the Jr. 
O. U. A. M., and of the Secaucus 
Building and Loan Association. 



166 



Dr. E. K. Stretch. 



One of the most noted osteo- 
paths in the county is Dr. E. K. 
Stretch, with offices at 615 Trap- 
hagen St., West Hoboken. 

He was born in Paterson, De- 
cember 8, 1876, but soon after 
moved to Jersey City, where he re- 
ceived his public school education 
and later graduated from Jersey 
City High School. He then stud- 




ied medicine at the Bellevue Hos- 
pital for one year, and the follow- 
ing three years studied at the New 
York University, from which insti- 
tution he graduated in 1897, receiv- 
ing the degree of V. S. The doc- 
tor then took up the study of osteo- 
pathy, and in 1910 graduated from 
the New Jersey College of Osteo- 
pathy. In the early part of 1917 
he completed a course at the Phda- 
delphia College of Osteopathy. He 
passed the examinations of the 
State Board of Pennsylvania with 
the highest average. He is also a 
licensed osteopath in the State of 
New Jersey. The doctor has stud- 



ied every branch of drugless heal- 
ing, and in 1911 graduated from 
the Davenport College of Chiro- 
practor. 

During the years of Dr. Stretch's 
practice he has achieved an emin- 
ent reputation as a man very high 
in his profession. He has success- 
fully cured numerous cases which 
were considered hopeless and in- 
curable. As his successes became 
known, his practice grew, and to- 
day he enjoys one of the largest 
practices in the county. His of- 
fice or clinic is equipped with all 
the most modern appliances, such 
as electric apparatuses, ex-ray ma- 
chine, etc. The dotcor has had 
several treating rooms built in or- 
der to treat each case separately. 

He is a member of the Alumni 
of the New York University, Ver- 
salius Anatom Society, Philadel- 
phia College of Osteopath, Osteo- 
path Society of Essex County, and 
the United Chiropractic Associa- 
tion. 

;Dr. Stretch married Margaret 
Reiner in 1900. They have three 
children, Olive, Wm. B., and May. 



Rob. G. Taylor. 



Rob. G. Taylor, the Tax Col- 
lector of West Hoboken, has held 
this office for the last 12 years. 

He was born ' in that town in 
1866, where he, after finishing his 
education in the public schools, 
started to learn the electrical trade. 
He later had charge of electrical 
construction work in New York. 

■In 1905 he was elected to his 
present office, succeeding John S. 
Conlin, who was Tax Collector of 
West Hoboken for 15 years. 

Mr. Taylor is recognized as one 
of the most competent officials in 
the town, a fact which the people 
have proven by electing him four 
successive terms. 

He is well known in fraternal 



167 



and social circles, being a member 
of the Masonic Order and the Zem 
Zems. He is also a member of the 
Exempt Firemen's Association, 




\\ est Hoboken Democratic Club, 
and is a director of the Palisade 
Huilding and Loan Ass'n. , 

Mr. Taylor married Louise Kat- 
tenhorn, of the well known West 
Hoboken family. They have two 
children, both boys. 



Clarence J. Rieman. 

Although a young man, Clarence 
J. Rieman has become one of the 
leading funeral directors in North 
Hudson. 

He was born in Buffalo, N. Y., 
July 23, 1887. He began to re- 
ceive his early education at the St. 
Michael's School of West Hobo- 
ken and continued his education at 
Cansius College, Buffalo, to which 
city his parents had moved in 
1898. 

After finishing his schooling he 
secured a position with the U. S. 
Express Co., and later with the 
Lehigh Valley R. R. In 1907 he 
became interested in the undertak- 
ing business and became connected 
with William Necker, for whom 
he worked three years. He then 
worked in a large undertaking es- 



tablishment in New York City, 
and for three years worked for 
Thos. F. Carey of Jersey City. 

In 1914 he opened his own un- 
dertaking establishment at his pres- 
ent location at 512 Stevens St., 
West Hoboken, where he has con- 
ducted the business ever since. 




Mr. Rieman has become well 
known in the northern part of the 
county as a conscientious and hon- 
est man. He has conducted num- 
erous large funerals of well known 
people in the section. 

He is actively interested in pub- 
lic affairs and also in fraternal aiid 
social associations. He is a mem- 
ber of St. Michael's Holy Name 
Society and Knights of Columbus. 

On Sept. 20, 1916, he married 
Miss E. Schulze, with whom he has 
one son, Clarence, Jr. 

Mr. Rieman is very fond of 
baseball and automobiling. 

At the Fall election, he was 
elected Coroner of Hudson County 
to take office January 1, 1918. He 
is one of the youngest Coroners the 
County has ever had. 



168 



James F. Norton. 



No man is better known or more 
popular than James F. Norton, the 
Surrogate of Hudson County. 

He was born in Brooklyn, De- 
cember 23rd, 1858, but his parents 
moved to Jersey City when "Jim", 
as Mr. Norton is popularly known, 
was only ten years of age. He at- 
tended the St. Peters Parochial 




School in Jersey City, but at a very 
early age he had to start making 
his own living, as his father had 
died and his mother was in meagre 
circumstances. " He started in to 
sell newspapers, and later secured 
a position as messenger boy for a 
local newspaper. This was his be- 
ginning as a newspaper man, in 
which profession he since became 
very successful. For a nuijiber of 
years he worked as a press "feeder, 
then as a typesetter, and finally as 
a reporter. ..He served once as the 
Hudson Coupty editor of the New- 
ark Morning Star, and later, asso- 
ciated with Sheriff.. Kinkead and 
Thomas -Tumulty, now Secretary 



to President Wilson, published the 
Jersey City Sunday Eagle. 

Mr. Norton was, until lately, re- 
porter and political writer for the 
New York World, and was associ- 
ated with that newspaper for 
twenty-six years. 

He has held many public offices 
of trust and responsibility. In 1883 
he was elected to the Board of 
Freeholders and re-elected to a 
second term in that Board. He was 
elected to the Assembly in 1887, 
and re-elected in 1888. Mr. Nor- 
ton worked hard to bring about the 
adoption of Commission Govern- 
ment in Jersey City, and after its 
inception was rewarded with the 
office of Deputy Director of Public 
Safety under Director F. Hague. 
He served in this capacity until 
1916, when he was elected Surro- 
gate of the County by a very large 
majority. 

Mr. Norton's integrity of charac- 
ter, his faithfulness and the close 
attention which he has given to 
public duties, have brought him in- 
to more than local promiiience, and 
stamped him as a man of the 
highest attributes. 

He was married November 23, 
1888, to Marie Trayene, with 
whom he has two children, Daniel 
and Helen. 

He is a member of the Jersey 
City Elks, Royal Order of Moose, 
and several political and social or- 
ganizations. 



Charles DarKe. 



Charles Darke, one of the 
youngest funeral directors in 
North Hudson, was born in New 
York City, September 25, 1884. 
His parents moved to Guttenberg 
when Charles was only one year 
old, and in that town he received 
his public school education, later 
attending the Union Hill High 
S&hool. He then secured a posi- 



16S 



tion with Samuel Armstrong, the 
well known undertaker. When S. 
R. Sharpe took over the business, 
Mr. Darke continued to work for 




him until 1913. From 1913 till 
February 26, 1917, he worked for 
former Coroner Schlemm, then 
went with A. J. Volk & Co., and 
managed their branch office at 
West New York, and on July 15 
of this year he bought out that 
branch and is now conducting his 
own undertaking establishment at 
670-72 Bergenline Ave., West 
New York. 

Although only in business a very 
short time, Mr. Darke has made a 
splendid beginning and promises to 
be one of the most successful fune- 
ral directors in North Hudson. 

He is a hard and conscientious 
worker and has achieved a high re- 
putation while in the employ of 
Mr. Sharpe as well as Mr. 
Schlemm, with whom both he held 
responsible positions. His pleas- 
ing and tactful manners have gain- 
ed him a large circle of friends. 

Mr. Darke married Mathilda 
Woehrle in 1906. He is a member 



of the Jr. O. U. A. M., the Ex- 
empt Firemen of Union Hill, and 
has been a member of the Palisade 
Engine Company for the past 
eleven years. 

His parents were William and 
Sarah A. (Campbell) Darke, resi- 
dents of Guttenberg since 1885. 
His father was Police Captain of 
the New York Police Department. 

Mr. Darke himself served in 
the Union Hill Police Department 
for one year under Captain 
Krieger. 



Wm. Soliveau, Ph. G. 



Wm. Soliveau, the prominent 
druggist of West Hoboken, is the 
proprietor of one of the oldest drug 
stores in that town, located at 261 
Summit Avenue. 

His father, John B. Soliveau, 
studied chemistry and graduated as 
a druggist in Luxemburg. He came 
to this country about forty-six years 
ago and later conducted a drug store 




in Newark, where William was 
born. After completing his school 
education, the son started to learn 



170 



the profession of his father and 
studied at the New Jersey College 
of Pharmacy, from which institu- 
tion he graduated in 1908. 

About twenty years ago the elder 
Mr. Soliveau established the present 
business on Suvnmit Ave. He died 
in 1910 and Mr. Wm. Soliveau took 
over the business. 

He has since succeeded in build- 
ing up a very large and successful 
business and has become known as 
one of the most reliable druggists in 
the town. His prescription depar- 
ment is especially very large, as the 
, doctors as well as the public are 
thoroughly familiar with the fact 
that Mr. Soliveau only uses fresh 
and pure drugs and is especially 
careful in the filling of prescrip- 
tions. He makes up several of his 
own remedies, for. which a great 
demand has been created. 

As a business man Mr. Soliveau 
has achieved a splendid reputation 
for his ability and sterling business 
character. He is thoroughly known 
in the town, where he has gained 
the respect and confidence of all 
who know him. 



A. Sonzo^ni. 

J. Sonzogni, of the firm of Son- 
zogni Brothers, manufacturers and 
dealers in marble, mosaic, terrazo,- 
tiles and ceramics, with offices and 
yard at 527-529 Courlandt Street, 
West Hoboken, is porbably one of 
the best known men in his line of 
business. He has been awarded and 
has successfully executed numerous 
of the largest contracts in the coun- 
ty, among which may be mentioned 
the Lincoln High School in Jersey 
City, St. Josephs Home for the 
Blind, Jersey City; the Technical 
School of Hoboken, Hoboken High 
School, McKinley Memorial in 
Ohio, and many others, too numer- 
ous to mention, not alone in this 
county, but all over the country. 



The firm employs as many as 
thirty-five men and their yards at 
the above address cover a ground of 
75x100 feet. 

Mr. Sonzogni was born in Italy, 
October 3, 1861, and came to this 




country in 1890. He settled in New 
York City and a few years after 
came to West Hoboken, in which 
town he has been a resident for the 
last twenty-five years. He learned 
the tile and marble business and 
thirten years ago established his 
own business in conjunction with 
his brother under the name of Son- 
zogni Bros. 

Mr. Sonzogni is a public-spirited 
and patriotic citizen, always inter- 
ested in anything which might be of 
benefit to the community. He is 
possessed of a very pleasing person- 
ality, which has gained him a host 
of friends. Mr. Sonzogni married 
in 1884 and is the father of seven 
children. He is prominently con- 
nected with several Italian societies 
and is a large property owner in the 
town of West Hoboken. 



171 



Edward Fetterly. 



One of the most respected, citi- 
zens in North Hudson is Edward 
Fetterly, of Weehawken. 

He was born in Canada, in 1874, 
and received part of his education 
in that country, but finished his 
schooling in Chicago, where his 
parents had moved. At the age of 
nineteen years he entered the em- 
ploy of Swift & Co. By hard and 
conscientious work and strict atten- 




tion to business he worked his way 
up from one position to another un- 
til he was made general department 
manager of the Chicago City 
Branch Houses. In 1900 he was 
transferred to New York as man- 
ager of the largest Branch House 
in the city. 

Mr. Fetterly has been connect- 
ed with the Swift Co. for the last 
twenty - two years. This is the 
first and only concern he has ever 
been connected with. 

Fie has been a resident of Wee- 
hawken for the last fourteen years 
and has achieved an eminent repu- 



tation as a man of great ability 
and unimpeachable integrity. He 
is a public-spirited and enterpris- 
ing citizen and deeply interested in 
the welfare of the community. He 
is especially interested in boys' 
work and is connected with several 
boys' organizations. He is (also 
interested in religious work and is 
a Warden of Grace Episcopal 
Church of Union Hill. He is fond 
of outdoor sports, but his one great 
hobby is his home, in which he 
takes a great pride. 

In politics he has always been 
an ardent Republican, and in the 
Fall election he was elected to the 
Board of Council and took office 
January 1, 1918. 

, Mr. Fetterly married Catherine 
E. Webber in 1900. They have 
one daughter, Dorothy. 



Wm. J. Hanley. 



William J. Hanley was born 
in Hoboken, N. J., January 18, 
1891. He attended Public School 
No. 2 and in 1905 graduated 
from Grammar School No. 8 in 
Hoboken. In 1909 he graduated 
from St. Peters College in Jersey 
City, and later studied at the Holy 
Cross College in Mjassachusetts, 
from which institution he graduat- 
ed in 1912. Returning to Hoboken, 
he secured a clerical position in the 
Jersey City Court House and later 
worked as a reporter for the Hud- 
son Dispatch. In the meantime he 
had taken up the study of law at 
the New York Law School and in 
1915 received the degree jf L.L.B. 
The following year, on June 4th, he 
was admitted to the New Jersey 
Bar as an Attorney-at-Law. On 
the seventh day of June, 1917, he 
established his own practice in his 
native city. 

Mr. Hanley has succeeded in 



172 



building up an eminent large and 
successful law practice and is re- 
cognized as one of the most able 
young lawyers in Hoboken. He 




specializes in organization work, 
and was the organizer of the Hobo- 
ken Jitney Men's Association and 
is attorney for that organization. 

Mr. Hanley is known as one of 
the best orators in the county and 
is much in demand as a public 
speaker. 

He has achieved a high reputa- 
tion for his ability, integrity and en- 
terprise. His pleasing personality 
and frank and open manners have 
gained him a large circle of friends. 
Mr. Hanley was elected a mem- 
ber of the Assembly for the year 
1918 by the splendid majority of 
24,000 votes over the high man on 
the Republican ticket, having all 
those qualifications which make 
him most valuable to the people. 
As already stated, he is a splendid 
speaker, fearless and possessed of a 
strong personality. He is a man of 
the people and will truly represent 
the people and safeguard their in- 
terests. 



James P. Dolan. 

James P. Dolan, former Police 
Judge of Jersey City and one of the 
best known men in the legal pro- 
fession, was born in Jersey City, 
July 1st, 1886. He attended St. 
Bridget School and later St. Peters 
College, where he received the de- 
gree of A. B. in 1905 and A. M. in 
1907. He then entered the New 
York Law School, and after receiv- 
ing the degree of L. L. B. from this 
institution, was admitted to the 
Bar as an attorney at law in 1908. 
He was admitted a Counsellor at 
Law in 1912. 

Judge Dolan taught school in St. 
Peters College from 1907 to 1909. 




He was appointed Clerk to the 
First District Court in 1910, and 
served in this office to 1915, when 
he was appointed Police Judge of 
the First Criminal Court of Jersey 
City. He served on the bench for 
two years, and in this time became 
known as one of the most able 
jurists and at the same time also as 
one of the most fair-minded men on 



173 



the bench. After retiring from the 
bench, the Judge opened his own 
law practice, with offices in the 
National Bank of North Hudson 
Building in West Hoboken. 

Although only a young man, 
Judge Dolanhas achieved a high re- 
putation for his ability and integrity 
and is held in great esteem and res- 
pect by his fellow citizens. He is a 
public-spirited and enterprising 
young man, and is always ready to 
do his share for 'anyhting which 
may benefit the community. 

He is a member of St. Peter's 
Alumni, the Alumni of the New 
York Law School, and the Knights 
of Columbus. He is one of the di- 
rectors of the National Bank of 
North Hudson. 

The Judge married Anna Kerri- 
gan, of Jersey City, in 1914. They 
have two children, James, Jr., and 
Catherine. 

While on the bench, the Judge 
was instrumental in establishing the 
Night Court, the postponed sen- 
tence and probation systems. 



Froemchen's Hall. 



This hall, located at 327 Union 
Street, is one of the old landmarks 
in Union Hill, where many of the 
most prominent affairs were held 
in olden days. 

It was built about 1880 by Her- 
mann Froemchen, and covers an 
area of three city lots. The ball- 
room is still one of the largest, 
measuring 92 by 60 feet. It also 
contains dining and meeting 
rooms. 

Mr. Froemchen died in 1911, 
and the place has since been con- 
ducted by his widow, who has 
shown a surprising ability to con- 
duct such a large establishment. 
Mrs. Froemchen altered the whole 
building about five years ago, and 



it is now one of the most modern 
places in North Hudson, suitable 
for all kinds of social affairs, of 
which many are held there every 
month. 




Mrs. Froemchen enjoys a 
splendid reputation and can count 
as her friends the most prominent 
people in North Hudson. 



Hans Pf eiffer, D. C. 



Hans Pfeiffer, the noted Chiro- 
practor of 32 Clendenny Avenue, 
Jersey City, was born in Germany 
in 1851. 

He received his schooling in his 
native country and in 1870 immi- 
grated to America. A few years 
after he took up the study of drug- 
less healing. He studied at the 
New York School of Chiroprac- 
tors, and after graduating from this 
institution, started his own practice 
in Jersey City. 

Dr. Pfeiffer has become one of 



174 



the most conspicuous dirugless phy- 
sicians in the county and has gained 
an eminent reputation not alone in 
Hudson County, but in the States 
of New York and New Jersey as 




well. His office is daily being vi- 
sited by numerous patients from 
this county as well as from across 
the river. Many so-called hopeless 
cases have been completely cured 
by the doctor. His modern office 
gives the impression of a success- 
ful practitioner. He is highly es- 
teemed in the profession and is 
known as a man of the highest 
ability and integrity. 

Dr. Pfeiffer is also a Naturopath 
and is a member of the Hudson 
County Chiropractors' Association. 

In private life he is much inter- 
ested in any movement which may 
be of benefit to the community. He 
is a public and civic-spirited citizen 
who enjoys the confidence of all 
who know him. 

As a Chiropractor, he probably 
enjoys one of the largest practices 
in the county. 



August Frank. 

One of the best known druggists 
in the county is Mr. August Frank 
of Union Hill. 

He was born in Stuttgart, Ger- 
many, August 28th, 1869, and im- 
migrated to this country in 1891. 
He studied chemistry and medicine 
at the New Jersey College of Phar- 
macy and graduated from this in- 
stitution in 1888. Later he ob- 
tained a position as clerk in F. W. 
Hille's Drug Store in Main Street, 
Union Hill, and soon after became 
manager of this store. In 1884 he 




bought Mr. Hille's business, which 
he is still conducting. 

Mr. Frank has succeeded in 
gaining the name or rather title of 
the leading druggist in North Hud- 
son. His careful filling of pre- 
scriptions, his ability as a chemist 
and druggist, and the splendid ser- 
vice rendered the customers, have 
gained him a name and reputation 
of which not many druggists can 
boast. 

As a philanthropist and a civic- 
and public-spirited man Mr. Frank 



175 



is well known. He is always wil- 
ling to lend a helping hand to any 
worthy movement which will bene- 
fit the community. He is an 
esteemed and respected citizen 
whose ability and integrity have 
been recognized both professionally 
and socially. He has never taken 
any active interest in public affairs, 
but has in many other ways been a 
very useful citizen. 

Mr. Frank married Tillie Beier 
in 1896. 



Max Schumann. 



One of the best informed men in 
the hotel business is Max Schu- 
mann, proprietor of the old Central 
Hotel or Hofbrau House on River 
St., Hoboken. 




The hotel is one of the oldest in 
that city and is known not alone in 
Hudson County, but in New York 
as well. 

The cozy restaurant on the 
ground floor has for years been the 
favorite place where some of the 



best people, social as well as politi- 
cal, enjoyed their luncheons, din- 
ners and suppers. The deliciously 
cooked food has always attracted 
those people who are very particu- 
lar eaters, to the Central Hotel. 

Mr. Schumann began to learn 
the hotel and restaurant business in 
his native country, Germany, where 
he was born in 1876. After finish- 
ing his early .school education, he 
worked as a waiter and coming to 
this country in 1907 he continued 
to work as a waiter. He was con- 
nected with the Meyer's -Hotel for 
four years and with the Elks' Club 
House for one year. 

On October 1, 1916, he bought 
the Central Hotel, where he had 
previously worked for four years 
and three months. 

He at once started to improve 
the place and succeeded so far that 
it was fast becoming one of the 
most coziest and best outfitted ho- 
tels and restaurants in Hoboken. 

Then the war broke out, and as 
the hotel is situated right across 
from the big army piers, he was in 
the "barred zone" and, like numer- 
ous other hotel and cafe men, for- 
bidden to sell liquor. This has, at 
the writing of this history, worked 
a great hardship on him as well as 
on the other hotel men. However, 
Mr. Schumann, anxious to aid and 
help the government, is obeying the 
law to the letter and is doing his 
"bit" by facing his losses bravely. 

Since his arrival in Hoboken, in 
which city Mr. Schumann settled 
when he came to America, he has 
gained scores of friends. His 
ability, his sterling business cha- 
racter and his pleasing personality 
have made friends for him all over. 
He has never taken any active in- 
terest in politics, but in business 
and social circles he is very popu- 
lar, and his presence in the many 
clubs of which he is a member, is 
always welcome. 



176 




Ernest G. Beckert, Chief of the 
West New York Fire Department, 
was born in Germany, August 3rd, 
1880. His parents emigrated to 
this country in 1882 and settled in 
Guttenberg. There Ernest at- 
tended public school, and after fin- 
ishing his schooling in West New 
York, he worked at the milk busin- 
ess and later in the butcher busin- 
ess, and finally went into the brew- 
ery industry, with which he was 
connected for over thirteen years. 
He worked for the Bermes Brew- 
ery Co. for a number of years. 

In 1913 he was appointed cap- 
tain of the town's paid Fire De- 
partment, which at that time con- 
sisted of nine men. He was the 
first paid official in the department. 
On May 1st, 1914, the volunteers 
and part-paid firemen elected him 
Chief by a big majority. In 1915, 
when the full-paid Fire Depart- 



ment was organized, consisting of 
twenty-six men, Mr. Beckert was 
appointed Chief. He has the dis- 
tinction of being the last Chief of 
the Volunteers and first Chief of 
the paid Department. 

The Chief has fought several 
large fires, among which may be 
mentioned the North Bergen 
School on February 12th, 1914, 
Union Hill Turn Hall, January 31, 
1915, the Marine Shop Fire in 
1910, and numerous others. He 
has at all times shown a great abil- 
ity as an Executive Fireman. His 
great foresight and good judgment 
have at many instances prevented 
great disasters. 

Mr. Beckert married Emma 
Losche in 1902. They have three 
children, Pearl A., Lester Ernest, 
and Sylvia C. Mr. Beckert is a 
member of the Foresters of Amer- 
ica, the Firemen's Mutual Ass'n, 
the Firemen's Exempt Ass'n, and 
the International Ass'n of Fire 
Engineers. 



Jacob Ring'g'er. 



Jacob Ringger, for 35 years a 
respected resident of North Hud- 
son, was born in Switzerland in 
1847. After receiving his early 
education in his native country, he 
started to learn the cabinetmaking 
trade, and in 1881 emigrated to 
America. He settled in the State 
of Illinois, but a few years later 
came to Union Hill, where he se- 
cured a position as carpenter in 
William Peter's Brewery. He 
worked there for four years and 
then started in partnership a small 
factory, manufacturing doors, 
sashes, blinds 'and mouldings. The 
factory was located on Savoy St., 
West Hoboken, but he soon had to 



177 



move to larger quarters and built 
a factory at Highpoint and Kerri- 
gan Avenues. After many years 
of hard and conscientious work, 
Mr. Ringger had built up a splen- 
did business. But he was not to 
enjov the frutis of his labor very 
long' On January 11th, 1906, his 
factory burned completely down to 
the ground, and as he carried no 
insurance, he lost everything. He 
was not, however, to be discour- 
aged, and it did not take him long 
to start business anew. He moved 
across the street from his former 
location, and started anew. In 
1908 the partnership was dissolved 
and Mr. Ringger became the sole 
owner of Jacob Ringger & Co. 

The factory located at High- 
point and Kerrigan Aves. covers 
a ground of 176x100 square feet. 
In busy times as many as 45 men 
are employed there. 

Mr. Ringger has never sought 
nor accepted any public office, but 
has devoted his full time and ener- 
gy to bis business. He is a public- 
spirited citizen and held in great 
respect and confidence by the entire 
community, and is noted for his 
benevolence, kindness and genero- 
sity. He is always ready and wil- 
ling to lend his assistance to any 
movement of welfare to his town. 

Mr. Ringger is what can be truly 
called a self-made man. Through 
great thrift and economy he not 
alone succeeded in working his 
way from carpenter up to a large 
manufacturer, but also succeeded 
by wise investments to become a 
large property owner. He owns 
several large houses in North Hud- 
son. 

In 1861 Mn Ringger married 
Barbara Meyli in Switzerland. 
They had three children, of which, 
however, only two are living, both 
girls. 



Gabinetto Mensolilo, 
D.C. 



Among the most successful chi- 
ropractors in North Hudson is Dr. 
Gabinetto Mensolilo, of Summit, 
Ave., West Hoboken. 

Five years ago he took up the 
study of drugless healing, and three 
years ago he established his own 
practice. The dotcor is a gradu- 
ated chiropractor and naturopath, 
and in the few years he has been es- 
tablished he has succeeded in build- 
ing up a very large and successful 
practice. He has gained a thor- 
ough knowledge of the profession 
and has accomplished great skill in 
many serious cases where he has 
procured wonderful results. 

In the last few years he has spent 
much time and money in the study 
of chiropractic and has studied 
every detail of the profession. He is 
a sincere and conscientious believer 
in his work and fully believes in 
the science of chiropractic. 

Dr. Mansolilo was born in Italy 
in 1887, where he received his early 
school education. He immigrated 
into this country 13 years ago and 
settled in New York City. About 
3 years ago he came to West Hobo- 
ken, where he started a small office 
on De Mott St. His practice soon 
grew so large that he found it ne- 
cessary to move into larger quar- 
ters, and he then opened his present 
office on 174 Summit Ave. 

The doctor has received several 
diplomas as a naturopath as well 
as a chiropractor. He is promi- 
nently connected with several orga- 
nizations and clubs and held in 
great respect in professional circles 
as well as in private life. His pleas- 
ing manners, his ability and his 
sterling business qualifications have 
gained him a large circle of friends, 



178 



Henry Andes. 



Henry Andes, the Tax Collector 
of North Bergen, has lived in this 
town since he was six months old. 

He was born in Paterson, June 
30, 1867. His parents, Henry An- 
des and Theresa Morton, could not 
afford to give Henry an expen- 




sive education. In fact, he had to 
leave public school, which he at- 
tended in North Bergen, at the 
early age of ten, when he had to 
earn his own living. He worked at 
odd jobs for a time and then begaw 
to learn the trade of mason and 
plasterer, which he has followed 
ever since. In 1891 he engaged in 
business for himself and has since 
put up numerous buildings, 
among which may be mentioned the 
handsome brick building at 14th 
St. and Bergenline Ave., West New 
York, the largest building in that 
town. He has built eleven schools 
and numerous houses and cottages 



in West New York and Highwood 
Park, in fact all over North Hud- 
son. 

Mr. Andes is one of the most 
successful contractors and builders 
in North Hudson. He is thorough 
in every detail, energetic and prac- 
tical in carrying out his contracts, 
and prompt in all he undertakes. 
His foresight, integrity and sound 
judgement, his capacity for busi- 
ness, have brought him into more 
than local prominence. In politics 
he is an ardent Democrat. He has 
held every office in the gift of the 
people in the town with the excep- 
tion of Mayor, which he has re- 
peatedly refused. In 1891 he was 
elected a member of the North Ber- 
gen Board of education and re- 
elected to this ofhce in 1893 and 
again in 1894, the last time for a 
term of three, years. He was one 
of the principal organizers and the 
first foreman of the American Hose 
Co. of North Bergen and is still ac- 
tive in the Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment of the town. In 1899 he was 
elected Chief of the Fire Depart- 
ment and held this office for two 
terms. In 1905 he was elected a 
member of the Township Commit- 
tee, in which capacity he served for 
four successive terms. While in 
the Board he was appointed chair- 
man of the Police Committee. He 
was one of the organizers of the 
paid Police Depai'tment, which was 
created in the town in 1914. Mr. 
Andes was elected Tax Assessor 
and re-elected to this oiBce last 
year. He has been instrumental 
in many needed improvements, 
among which may be mentioned the 
Sewer Bill for East New Durham, 
of which he was the father. 

Mr. Andes was married Febru- 
ary 21, 1893, to Sophia Menkel of 
the well-known West New York 
family of that name. They have 
two children: Henry P., Jr., and 
Martha S. 

Mr. Andes is a County Com- 



179 



mitteeman and a member of the 
Elks, No. 74, and the Schuetzen- 
bund, and a member of the town's 
Democratic Club and several other 
associations. 

Mr. Andes' great hobbies are 
hunting and automobiling. 



Charles W. Heinrich. 



Charles W. Heinrich, one of the 
most respected citizens of North 
Bergen and Committeeman of this 
township, was born in Hoboken, 
May 17th, 1879. His parents were 
Charles Heinrich and Emma 
(Carstens). 

Charles attende dthe Hoboken 
Public Schools, and after graduat- 
ing started to help his father, who 
was in the wholesale liquor busi- 
nesss, and is now part owner of this 
business. 

Mr. Charles Heinrich has always 
taken a deep interest in everything 
of interest and to the welfare of 
the community. 

He has been active in political af- 
fairs since 1900,- when he became 
a member of the School Board, in 
which capacity he served till 1902. 
He was elected a Township Com- 
mitteeman in 1911, and re-elected 
in 1913, 1915, and 1917, now serv- 
ing his fourth term in this office. 

Mr. Heinrich married Lillie 
Tschupp, of the old prominent 
family of that name. They have 
three children, Fred, Mathilda, and 
Ruth. 

Mr. Heinrich takes an active in- 
terest in the welfare of the com- 
munity, and in various capacities 
has contributed much to its growth 
and advancement. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, a sagacious business 
man, and enjoys a wide popularity. 
He is chairman of the Township 
License and Printing Committee. 



Edw. W. Collins. 

Edw. W. "ColHns, the noted 
chiropractor and former Superin- 
tendent of the New Jersey College 
of Chiropractics, is one of the best 
known men in the profession. He 
studied the art of drugless heahng 
at several of the more prominent 
institutions in the country and is a 




graduate of New England College 
of Chiropractors in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and of the American 
School of Naturopathy. 

He is known throughout the 
State as one of the most skilled 
practitioners and has attained an 
eminent standing in the profes- 
sional world. 

His father, Dr. F. \\'. Collins, 
founded the college of which Dr. 
ColHns, the subject of this sketch, 
was the Superintendent. It was 
started on a small scale, but was 
time after time enlarged and was 
located in a large building con- 
nected with a hospital in Newark. 
A free clinic. had also been estab- 
lished, at which from 40 to 50 pa- 
tients were treated every day. 



180 



The New Jersey College of Chi- 
ropractors is now consolidated with 
the New York College of Chiro- 
practors, one of the largest institu- 
tions of its kind in the east. The 
college is located in the heart of 
New York City. 



George Medina. 

Mr. Medina has been a resident 
of North Bergen for the last twen- 
ty-four years and has in that time 
achieved an enviable reputation as 
•a man of great ability and unim- 
peachable business character. 

He served the township as Recor- 
der for nine years and gained the 
respect of the legal profession for 
his fair decisions. He has served 
in the Township Committee for one 
year, filling an unexpired! term. 
While serving in the latter capacity, 
he has procured many needed im- 
provements for the First Ward 
which he represents. He has im- 
proved the lighting system and se- 
veral streets and sewers. 

Mr. Medina was born in the State 
of New York in 1871. After re- 
ceiving his education at a military 
institute, he worked for his uncle, 
who was a. wholesale grocer. Twen- 
ty-five years ago he secured a po- 
sition with the Consolidated Gas 
Co. of New York and gradually 
worked his way up until he reached 
• the position as special representa- 
tive which he now holds. 

Mr. Medina is a member of the 
F. and A. M., the Royal Arcanum, 
and was one of the organizers of the 
Marcy Association, of which he is 
now first vice-president. He is pre- 
sident of the First Ward Democra- 
tic Club and a member of the 
Woodcliflf Fire Co. and numerous 
other organizations and clubs. 



The Cox Family. 

William and Albert Cox, pro- 
prietors of the large hardware con- 
cern located at the Hackensack 
Plankroad and the Boulevard, 
West Hoboken, descended from 
one of the oldest and most promi- 
nent families in the northern part 
of the county. 

Their grandfather, William Cox, 
emigrated from England ^o this 
country in 1838 and settled in West 
Hoboken the following year. In 
the spring of the same year he 
opened the present business as a 
"general store" selling practically 
everything. The business was lo- 
cated in a small house situated near 
the present location on the corner 
of Hackensack Plankroad and the 
Hudson Boulevard. 

William Cox had several chil- 
dren, among whom was George, 
who was born in England, 1837. 
He attended school in West Ho- 
boken, and later helped the father 
in his business. He (George) 
married Catherine von Asperen in 
']}860. They had eight children. 
His father died in 1878 and George 
took over the business, which in 
the meantime had been moved into 
larger quarters in the present build- 
ing, which the Cox family built in 
1861. George continued to run the 
business until 1903, under the 
name of George Cox and Soils, 
having taken two of his sons, Wil- 
liam and Albert, into the business. 
George Cox died in 1910. 

William Cox, one of the present 
proprietors, was born in 1861. He 
married Elizabeth Applegate, of 
the well known Hoboken family, in 
1893. They have five children. 

Albert Cox was born in 1873. He 
married Annie McAller with 
whom he has five children: 
George, Albert, Joseph, Norman, 
and Annetta. 

An uncle, WiUiam Cox, was 
very prominent in political affairs. 



181 



He was a member of the Board of 
Freeholders and a National Dele- 
gate to the Saratoga Convention. 

In 1905, the firm discontinued 
their grocery department, and has 
since conducted business as a hard- 
ware and feed store. The firm is 
one of the largest of its kind in the 
northern part of the county and 
does a very extensive business in 
practically every part of the county. 

Both William and Albert Cox 
are highly reputable men, who 
have gained the esteem and confi- 
dence of all with whom they have 
come into contact. They have 
strictly adhered to the principles 
as laid down by their grandfather, 
the founder of the business, and 
which has been the keynote of the 
firm's success, namely : Honest 
Business Methods. 



Dr. Frieda Pfau. 



Dr. Frieda Pfau, proprietress of 
the Physical Health Institute, lo- 
cated at 120 Palisade Avenue, West 
Hoboken, has gained an eminent 
reputation in the art of drugless 
healing. 

The doctor was born in Switzer- 
land, where she studied her pro- 
fession. She came to this country 
in 1901 and started a small practice 
at 596 Clinton Avenue, West Ho- 
boken. She was one of the pioneers 
in the profession in New Jersey. 
In 1910 she established the Insti- 
tute at the above mentioned ad- 
dress. Here every modern appara- 
tus and appliance for the cure and 
prevention of nearly every disease 
known may be found. Electric ap- 
paratus, baking ovens, vibrators, 
and many other devices are used in 
this institute, and some of the 
agencies employed are massage, 
electro-vibrassage, Swedish move- 
ments (curative), gymnastics, col- 



ored rays treatment, changeable 
spray and douches, hot and cold 
baths, herbal, salt, medicated, alter- 
nating, electric, and Nauheim baths, 
also Turkish, vapor and hot air 
baths. Every facility can be found 
at this institute for the treatment of 
patients. 

Dr. Pfau has studied every 
branch of drugless healing. She is 
an osteopath, having passed the 




State examination of New Jersey 
and received her license in 1915. 
She was the first one in Hudson 
County to receive this license. She 
is a chiropractor and naturopath, 
having studied and received her 
diplomas from some Of the most 
eminent institutions. The doctor 
has written several important ar- 
ticles on drugless healing in some 
of the largest professional publica- 
tions. 

Many of the medical doctors are 
sending their patients to Dr. Pfau 
to undergo treatment. She enjoys 
a very high reputation in the pro- 
fession and has achieved wonder- 
ful success in her undertaking. 



182 



Chas. W. Randall. 



Charles W. Randall, one of the 
best known architects and contrac- 
tors in the northern part of the 
county, was born and brought up 
in the Jersey Heights section. Af- 




office he is especially fitted to fill 
because of his great experience in 
the building tirade. 

As a citizen Mr. Randall is pub- 
lic-spirited, enterprising and always 
ready to lend his assistance to any 
movement which may benefit the 
community. He is possessed of 
great ability, foresight and sound 
judgment and an unimpeachable 
integrity. 

He is President of the Lincoln 
Republican Association, a member 
of the Town Improvement Associa- 
tion and the Suckly Park Associa- 
tion, of which he was chairman for 
a number of years. 



ter he had finished his school edu- 
cation, he began to learn the car- 
penter and building trade. Later he 
took up the study of architecture 
at the Cooper Institute in New- 
York City and graduated from this 
institution in 1885. For some years 
after, he devoted his time as an 
architect and then became a con- 
tractor and builder as well. 

Mr. Randall has erected over 200 
houses in Hudson County and has 
achieved a high reputation as a con- 
scientious builder and busmess 
man. 

In public afifairs he has always 
taken a sincere interest. He is an 
ardent Republican and a leader m 
the councils of that party. 

At the beginning of this year, 
Mr Randall was appointed Budd- 
ing Inspector of West Hoboken, an 




Fred'k W. Schier 

Chief Engineer 
West Hoboken Fire Departm't. 



183 



Edwin B. Young. 



Edwin Berkley Young, one of 
the leading real estate and insur- 
ance men~ with office at 429 Ber- 
genline Avenue, Union Hill, is des- 
cended from a very old, distin- 
guished family. 

The Youngs made their first 
settlement at Athol, Prince Edward 
County, Ontario, Canada, at East 
Lake. 

Colonel Henry Young, born in 

Jamaica, Long Island, in 1737. was 

the second son of six children of an 

English gunsmith, who ;founded 




the family in this county and 
Canada. Henry joined the British 
army when a young man and served 
for six years in the French and 
Indian wars and in numerous en- 
gagements against the Continentals. 

At the close of the American re- 
volution, he retired on half pay and 
was granted 3,000 acres of land. 
He selected a site at East Lake in 
the Town of Athol. There he 
brought his family in 178L He 
had four daughters, Elizabeth, 



Mary, Catherine, and Sarah, and 
two sons, Henry and Daniel. Henry 
married, and his son Richard 
Young married, and the son of 
this marriage was William Henry 
Young, who married Sarah Jane 
Clark. They are the parents of 
Edwin Berkley Young and Geo. 
A. Young. 

Edwin was born in Athol Town- 
ship, Prince Edward County, On- 
tario, and in 1883 married Henri- 
etta Bell, with whom he had three 
sons, Edwin Henry, Ralph Percy, 
and Herbert Eldred. Edwin Henry 
married Margaret Thompson. 
They have two sons, Edwin Berk- 
ley 2 and James Donlapp. Ralph 
Percy married M. Nurge. They 
have one child, Ralph Henry. Her- 
bert Eldred is still single. 

Edwin B. Young, the subject of 
this sketch, has achieved marked 
success in real estate operation, and 
by untiring devotion to business has 
won the confidence and respect of 
the entire community. He was 
Secretary of the old Literary So- 
ciety of the Town of Union, and 
later became one of the prime mov- 
ers in organizing the Free Reading 
Room and Library Ass'n, of which 
he was for many years the Treas- 
urer. 

Mr. Young is a prominent mem- 
ber of various fraternal and social 
organizations, including Mystic Tie 
Lodge, F. and A. M., of which he is 
the oldest living Past Master. He 
was the founder of Trinity Chap- 
ter No. 18, O. E. S., was Grand 
Patron of the Order of Eastern 
Star in New Jersey, a veteran of 
the Scottish Rite in New York 
City, Masonic fraternity, and a 
member of the Royal Arcanum. In 
1899 he was elected Most Worthy 
Grand Patron of the Order of the 
Eastern Star, and in 1900 was 
elected 1st President of the Past 
Masters' Association of Hudson 
County. 



184 



Prof. H. Godio. 



Prof. Henri Godio, one of the 
most noted musicians in North 
Hudson, was born in Cleveland, 
Ohio, in 1889. His parents brought 
him to West Virginia when he was 
quite young, and there he received 
his early education. 

He came 'to West Hoboken in 
1900, and although a young man, 
has m^de an enviable reputation as 
a noted musician. He started to 




study the violin at the early age of 
nine, and studied in the New York 
Conservatory of Music under the 
widely known Henry Lambert, 
Nathan Ulanov, and several other 
prominent artists. 

Prof. Godio has played at sev- 
eral of the largest hotels in New 
York, among which may be men- 
tioned the Astor, Healy's, Shan- 
ley's, and Sherry's. 

He opened his own studio U 
years ago and taught music as a 
side line, until his pupils became 
so numerous that he found it ne- 
cessary to devote his full time to 
the instruction of music. 



His ability and talent were soon 
recognized, and in December, 1916, 
be was appointed director and or- 
ganizer of the Emerson High 
School Orchestra by the West Ho- 
boken Board of Education. He 
conducted the first concert with 
this orchestra in January, 1917, 
and it was one of the greatest suc- 
cesses the town has ever witnessed. 
The orchestra, composed of both 
boys and girls, playing all different 
instruments, now numbers sixty 
members and is an institution of 
which the Board of Education as 
well as the whole town can be 
proud. It is one of the finest in 
North Hudson, and Prof. Godio is 
co-operating with the Board of 
Education to make it one of the 
best in the state. 

The Professor has also his own 
pupils' orchestra. His first own 
orchestra experience was in the 
Young Men's Symphony Orchestra 
under the direction of Dr. A. 
Volpe. 

Prof. Godio has, by his courte- 
ous ways and pleasing personality, 
gained a large circle of friends, 
who admire him for his great 
talent, integrity and sterling char- 
acter. 

His father, August Godio, is a 
prominent sculptor, well known in 
Europe as well as in this country. 
He studied in Rome and in Paris 
and came to this country in 1882. 



G. E. Martinelli. 



Gaetano Enrico Martinelli, one 
of the best known violinists in 
West Hoboken, was born in Ve- 
rona, Italy, in 1887. 

He began to study the violin at 
an early age and later attended the 
Academy in Verona. After spend- 
ing sixteen montlis in Canada, he 



185 



came to this country in 1907 His 
splendid talent was soon recog- 
nized and his services became dif- 
ficult to obtain. He played at the 
Waldorf-Astoria and many other 
leading hotels in New York City, 
and his name soon became well 
known in musical circles in the 
metropolis. About three years ago 
he opened his own study at 349 Pa- 
lisade Avenue, West Hoboken. 

It did not take long before Mr. 
Martinelh's ability as a teacher be- 



A. Martinelli. 




came known, and numerous pupils 
flocked to his studio to study with 
this noted violinist. 

It is not alone in the musical 
circles that Mr. Martinelli has 
achieved a high reputation, but as 
a citizen he is also held in great 
esteem and respect. While he de- 
votes practically all his time to this 
his life study, he is always inter- 
ested in any movement which may 
be of benefit to the community. 
His pleasing personality has made 
him a score of friends, who are 
proud of his achievements. 



One of the leading jewelers in 
West Hoboken is A. Martinelli of 
Summit Ave. He was born in 
Italy, April 6th, 1876, and after 
receiving his preliminary educa- 
tion in his native country he came 
to America in 1896. About nine- 




teen years ago he started a small 
jewelry store at 227 Summit Ave., 
and after one year had to move 
into larger quarters at 204 Summit 
Ave. The business soon outgrew 
these quarters also, and fourteen 
years ago he moved into his present 
store at 213 Summit Ave. This is 
one of the largest if not the largest 
jewelry store in West Hoboken. 

Mr. Martinelli studied geometry 
at the North Illinois College of Op- 
tometry, where he received his di- 
ploma, and later he received the 
certificate as a registered optician 
of the State of New Jersey. His 
optical department is connected 
with his jewelry store. 

Mr. Martinelli is an enthusiast of 
music and art, and an amateur of 
no mean ability in both fields. 



186 



He is a cornet player of high re- 
putation. In art he has won fame 
as a portrait and landscape painter. 

Gifted with so many rare abili- 
ties, it is only natural that he has 
many friends in the community. 
While he has always taken a deep 
interest in all civic matters, he has 
never sought nor accepted any pub- 
lic office. In 1901 Mr. Martinelli 
married Jenniie Sighinolfi, with 
whom he has three children, Elsa, 
Anzo, and Anthony. He is a mem- 
ber of many professional and so- 
cial organizations. 



Chas. W. Zentgraf. 



Among the residents of the 
Town of Union, Chas. W. Zentgraf 
is best known. He has resided in 
this town for the last twelve years, 
and in this time has gained the res- 
pect and confidence of the people of 
the community. 

He immigrated to this country 
with his parents in 1888. The fa- 
mily settled in New York, where 
Charles received his final educa- 
tion in different institutions. 

When the Spanish - American 
War broke out, he joined the colors 
and was soon afterwards placed in 
the Adjutant's office, where he 
quickly was promoted to a respon- 
sible position. Later he was placed 
in charge as manager of the Army 
and Navy Store. Returning to pri- 
vate life, he secured a position 
with the Metropolitan Co., with 
which company he is now con- 
nected. In the Union Hill office 
he is known as one of the most 
valuable men, whose ability and ef- 
ficiency is greatly prized. 

Probably no man bears a more 
striking likeness to ex-President 
Roosevelt than Mr. Zentgraf. It is 
not alone in the resemblance that 
he is like our former President, but 



also in figure, stout and broad- 
shouldered, with the winning smile. 
He is dignified and stern, exactly 
like Roosevelt, and like the latter — 
a Republican. All these qualifica- 
tions make him especially suited for 
the office the people of Union Hill 
have persuaded him to become a 
candidate for — that of Recorder of 




the town. Mr. Zentgraf has been 
a student of law for many years, 
and all his leisure time has been 
spent over the law books. He was 
elected Justice of the Small Cause 
Court of Hudson County, and is 
also a Notary Public. His un- 
questionable integrity, ability and 
great judgment and other qualifica- 
tions make him especially suited for 
the recordership. He is not what 
may be called a professional politi- 
cian, and it is certain that he will 
not let politics interfere with jus- 
tice if he should be elected. 

Mr. Zentgraf is a wide-awake 
and ambitious man, who will not be 
influenced in his judicial decisions 
by any political faction or otherwise. 



187 



Charles M. Egan. 



Former Senator Charles M. Egan 
was born in Jersey City, October 
13, 1877. He was educated in the 
Public schools of his native city, 
and later studied at the New York 
J.aw School. He served his law 
clerkship in the law office of Vice- 
Chancellor John Griffin, until his 




admission to the Bar in November, 
1899. After his admission to the 
practice of his profession, he form- 
ed a partnership with Congressman 
James A. Hamill and he and Mr. 
Hamill remained together in busi- 
ness for eight years, when they both 
opened separate offices. In 1910 
he was elected to the Assembly, and 
re-elected in 1911 and 1912. He 
became the majority leader of the 
House of Assembly in 1913. In the 
latter year he was elected ta the 
State Senate and served in this of- 
fice until January 1, 1917. During 
his tenure of office at Trenton, Sen- 
ator Egan won great recognition 
for his sound judgment and great 
force of character. Fie was the 



"father" of the Child Labor Law, 
Full Crew Law, present Chancellor- 
Sheriff Jury Law, the Juvenile 
Court Law, the Parental Flome 
Law, and the Loan Shark Law; 
the latter law had the effect of driv- 
ing all the loan sharks out of the 
State of New Jersey. 

His entire legislative career was 
marked by careful, comprehensive, 
and intelligent attention to the busi- 
ness of the State, and especially to 
those measures which affected his 
town or county, and his devotion 
to the public interest gained for him 
a high reputation as well as a wide 
and intimate acquaintance. 

Only a few months ago, Senator 
Egan was appointed an assistant 
Prosecutor of the Pleas of Hudson 
County, and he is now serving in 
this capacity. 

On June 14, 1916, the Senator 
married Eleanor S. Walsh, a 
daughter of the late Magistrate 
James J. Walsh of New York City. 
He is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus, A. O. H., Carteret 
Club, the Elks, and several political 
and social organizations. 



Emil Bautz. 



Emil Bautz, Town Clerk of 
Union Hill, one of the most i^es- 
pected men in North Hudson, was 
born in Germany, November 1, 
1874. His parents brought him to 
this country when he was only four 
months old, taking up their resi- 
dence in New York City. The 
family came to Union Hill in 1882, 
and in that town Emil received his 
public school education. After fin- 
ishing his schooling he worked in 
several clerical positions. 

In 1901 he was elected a member 
of the Board of Education, and the 
following year he was elected 
Town Clerk. Mr. Bautz is still 
holding this responisible position, 



188 



having been re-elected five succes- 
sive terms, and is now serving his 
fifteenth year as Tovi^n Clerk. 

Mr. Bautz has always been an 
ardent Democrat and a strong sup- 
porter of clean politics. 

He has gained an excellent repu- 
tation for ability, integrity and en- 
terprise. He has conducted the 
town's aflfairs in a thorough, busi- 
nesslike manner, creditable to him- 
self and his constituents, and most 
satisfactory to all classes of citizens 
irrespective of party. With char- 
teristic energy and application he 
entered upon his duties as Town 
Clerk, which he has discharged 
with great fidelity and honor. 

Mr. Bautz married Rose Henze 
in 1904. She died some years later, 
and in 1915 Mr. Bautz married 
Helen Quinlan. 

He is a member of the Elks, Ho- 
boken No. 74, Royal Arcanum, 
Highwood Council, Palisade Coun- 
cil, Knights of Columbus, and 
John J. Eagan Association. 



G. M. HutschinsKi. 



One of the largest property own- 
ers in West Hoboken is G. M. 
Kutschinski, the prominent Real 
Estate Broker. 

He is what can be truly called 
a self-made man. Born in Ger- 
many, November 11th, 1859, under 
meager circumstances, he was com- 
pelled to go to work at a very early 
age in order to help support the 
family. In order to better his con- 
dition, he succeeded in saving 
enough money to come to America, 
and settled in this country in 1885. 
He worked at difiFerent jobs as a 
carpenter, and twenty-five years 
ago settled in West Hoboken. 
Seven years later he established 
his own business as a carpenter, 
contractor and builder. His con- 



scientious work and his honest and 
fair business methods soon helped 
him to success. Numerous large 
buildings in North Hudson have 
been erected by Mr. Kutschinski, 
who drew all the plans himself. 

After fifteen years in the build- 
ing line he I'etired and devoted his 
time to real estate. Through his 




great foresight and careful meth- 
ods he made several profitable in- 
vestments and soon acquired much 
valuable property. 

Although being a public-spirited 
citizen, he has never sought nor ac- 
cepted any public office, but has de- 
voted his full time to his business. 
He is widely known not alone in 
West Hoboken, but in North Hud- 
son, as a man of ability and great 
integrity. 

In 1888 he married Mary Mayer, 
with whom he has seven children. 
They are Amelia, Gustav A., Hen- 
rietta, Fred, Alvaria, Margaret and 
Walter. 

Mr. Kutschinski has been a Com- 
missioner of Deeds for two terms 
and a Notary Public for the last 
twenty years. 



1£9 



PatricK A. Brady. 



Henry Trost. 



Patrick A. Brady, the Town 
Clerk of North Bergen, was born in 
New York City on March 15th, 
1872. There he went to public 
school and later to the College of 
the Christian Brothers. After gra- 
duating from this institution, he 
learned the plumbing trade. In 
1888 his parents moved to North 
Bergen, where he later established 
his own plumbing business. 

Mr. Brack's political career 
started in 1896, when Sheriff Hel- 
ler appointed him Constable of the 
County Court, which office he held 
for six years. In the years of 1900 
and 1901, he served North Bergen 
as Township Committeeman, dur- 
ing which time he was Chief of Po- 
lice, or chairman of the Police 
Committee, as it was called at that 
time. He later became connected 
with the Claim Department of the 
Public Service Railway, which po- 
sition he held for five years. 

On January 1, 1907, he was elect- 
ed Town Clerk and has since been 
re-elected to his office three times, 
and is now serving his fourth suc- 
cessive term in this capacity. 

Mr. Brady is a member of the 
Exempt Fire Department, and was 
one of the first members of the 
North Bergen Fire Department, in 
which he was enrolled in 1892. 

He married Minnie A. Schneider 
on April 12th, 1910. He is a mem- 
ber of many political and social or- 
ganizations, and has always been 
prominent in the Democratic Party. 

Mr. Brady has gained an excel- 
lent reputation for his ability, in- 
tegrity and sterling business char- 
acter. His pleasing personality has 
gained him a large circle of friends, 
and the fact that he has been elect- 
ed four successive terms speaks for 
itself. He is much devoted to his 
home, where he spends every min- 
ute not taken up by his official 
duties. 



Henry Trost, one of the most 
prominent contractors in West Ho- 
boken and former Town Treasurer 
of that town, was born in Jersey 
City Heights in 1873. Pie attended 
school in that section for two years, 
when his parents moved to West 
Hoboken, where Henry finished his 
schooling. He then learned the 




electrical trade, and when only 
twenty years of age, traveled to the 
West as well as the South, working 
his way as an electrician. After a 
few years he returned to West Ho- 
boken, and in 1906 he established 
his own business as a general con- 
tractor, and has since, built up a 
very large bus'iness. 

Mr. Trost has achieved an emin- 
ent reputation and during his entire 
career has maintained the respect 
and confidence of all who know 
him. He has always ben thorough- 
ly identified with the affairs of his 
city, active and influential in every 
movement which affects the wel- 
fare of the community. 

Mr. Trost was elected Town 
Treasurer in 1915. He is promin- 
ently connected in fraternal and 
social circles, being a member of 
the Masons, Zem Zems, Elks, Ho- 
boken No. 74, and Cosmopolitan 
Lodge of the Odd Fellows. He is 
also a member of the Automobile 



190 



Club of America and the Harmony 
Singing Society. 

Mr. Trost was married in 1898 
to Minnie Eichmann, daughter of 
the well known Captain E. Eich- 
mann of West Hobolien. They have 
two children: Minnie and Henry, 
Jr., and reside at 512 Elm St., 
West Hoboken. 



Wm. Mayer. 



There is probably not a more 
popular man in West New York 
than Councilman Wm. Mayer. It is 
certain that it would be difficult to 
find a person who has. an ill word 
for Mr. Mayer. 

"Dutchy", as he is commonly 
known by every man, woman and 
child in the town, has a big heart 
and cannot rest if he knows any- 
body is in need or trouble. He is al- 
ways ready to give whatever as- 
sistance Tie can, and instances are 
known where he has deprived him- 
self of dire necessities in order to 
help some unfortunate person. 

It is only natural, therefore, that 
he has gained a standing and repu- 
tation second to no other in North 
Hudson. 

The Councilman was one of the 
organizers of the Volunteer Fire 
Department in West New York, 
and for six years held the office of 
Fire Chief. He held the position 
as School Janitor for ten years and 
then established himself as a build- 
ing contractor. Three years after 
he retired and engaged in the cafe 
business. 

In politics he has always been 
a recognized leader and influential 
member of the Deniocratic Party. 
He was elected Councilman of the 
Second Ward in 1907 and has been 
re-elected to this office for five suc- 
cessive terms. It is predicted in his 
town that he can be elected to any 



office he desires and that he can 
control any election in the town. 

Mr. Meyer has gained his emi- 
nent popularity by his democratic 
ways and pleasing manners. He 
has a good word for every man, 
whether he be dressed in shabby 
clothes or in evening dress. 

In the administration of the town 
he has faithfully discharged his 
duties and displayed ability, sound 
judgement and great foresight and 
an unimpeachable integrity. 

As a citizen he is patriotic and 
progressive and enjoys the confi- 
dence of all who know him. 



Chas. S. Hegadorn, D. C. 

One of the foremost Chiroprac- 
tors in North Hudson is Charles 
S. Hegadorn of West Hoboken. 




He was born in Canada, Febru- 
ary 28, 1872, where he received his 
early school education. After fin- 
ishing his schooling he worked at 
farming and later went into the 



191 



Real Estate business. He then 
came to this country and soon after 
became interested in the art of 
drugless healing. For two years 
he studied Chiropractic at the 
Palmer School of Chiropractics, 
the largest school of its kind in the 
United States, and in 1916 received 
his diploma from this institution. 

Dr. Hegadorn has been a very 
successful practitioner since the 
day he opened his office. During 
the first ten months of his practice 
he handled 116 cases. His success 
continued and his practice is one of 
the most successful in the northern 
part of the county. His name has 
become well known outside the 
county limits and his practice has 
spread rapidly. 

The doctor has achieved a high 
reputation for his professional abil- 
ity and also as a citizen. His 
many successful cases have natural- 
ly gainedj him many admirers, who 
greatly esteem him for his qualifica- 
tions. 

In the community in which he 
resides, he is respected as a patri- 
otic and public-spirited citizen, 
whose unimpeachable integrity has 
never been questioned. 

Dr. Hegadorn married Ettie 
Wallace in 1893. They have two 
children, Milton and Archibald. 



Edw. BecK. 



Descended from one of the oldest 
families in North Bergen is Mr. 
Edw. Beck, Committeeman of that 
Township. He was born in the 
house in the Hoboken Cemetery 
occupied - by the Superintendent, 
which position his father, Andrew 
Beck, held at that time. Andrew 
Beck came to North Bergen when 
only 13 years of age, and became 
one of the best known men in the 
county. He held the office of 



Mayor, Boulevard Commissioner, 
and was a member of the Assembly 
and of the local school board. He 
married Marie Brewster, of the 
well known rich Brewster family 
of Ridgefield, N. J. They had ten 
children, of which four are dead. 

Edward Beck, the subject of this 
sketch, was born December 31st, 
1885. After finishing his public 
school education in North Bergen, 
he started to learn the steam-fitting 
business. At the early age of eigh- 
teen years, he established his own 
business as heating and power con- 
tractor. He has since succeeded in 
building this business up to one of 
the largest in North Hudson. He 
employs six men steady all the year 
around, and has executed quite a 
number of large contracts, among 
which can be mentioned School No. 
5 and St. Michael's School, both in 
West Hoboken, the Birnbaum 
Building on Bergenline Avenue in 
Union Hill, and four of the dif- 
ferent schools in North Bergen. He 
also built the large apartment house 
on 18th Street and Bergenline Ave., 
West New York. 

Mr. Beck has always taken a 
great interest in political affairs, 
and when only 21 years old was 
elected Fire Chief of North Bergen. 
In 1910 he was elected Township 
Committeeman and has since been 
re-elected three successive times, 
now serving his fourth term. He is 
chairman of the Finance, Fire and 
Water Committee. He is also a 
member of the Township's Board 
of Health. 

Mr. Beck married Edith Dobbs 
September 10th, 1904. He is a 
member of the Jr. O. U. A. M., 
Peerless Fire Co., Second Ward 
Democratic Club, and has been a 
delegate to the Firemen's Relief 
Association of North Bergen for 
the last eight years. 



192 



Philip L. Amon. 

One of the best known men in 
musical circles of the county is 
Philip L. Anion, Principal of the 
New Jersey Institute of Music and 
Languages. 

This institution, which is one of 
the largest of its kind, was estab- 
lished over 30 years ago and has 




graduated hundreds of pupils. It is 
located on Palisade Ave., Jersey 
City Heights. 

Mr. Amon came to this country 
when only sixteen weeks old, with 
his parents, who settled in New 
York. He spent his early school 
life in the parochial school of the 
Church of the Redeemer in New 
York City. At the age of only 12 
years he began to study Latin and 
Greek. 

His hobby, however, was music, 
and in 1859 he began to study under 
John Wegner. He graduated from 
De La Salle University and was an 
organist in this institution in 1867. 
Later he studied under such famous 



teachers as Beyersdorfer, Kirch- 
ner, Unruh and Steigler. 

His rise in the musical world was 
rapid, as his rare talent was soon 
recognized. 

He taught and played in many 
Catholic institutions and was musi- 
cal director for several dramatic 
and musical companies. 

He came to Hoboken in 1884, and 
in 1891 established the New Jersey 
Institute. 

Mr. Amon has also been very in- 
terested in union labor circles. He 
was most active in establishing the 
local musical union, and for several 
terms was President of that organi- 
zation. He is a very well known 
bandmaster and for one season was 
Inspector of Music in the Jersey 
City parks. 



August Carell. 



Hotel Carell, located at 18 
Journal Square, near the Tube 
Station, Jersey City, is one of the 
best known establishments in that 
section. 

The modern outfitted cafe and 
the cozy restaurant are the popular 
meeting places of some of the most 
prominent citizens in public as well 
as in civil life. 

The splendid cooking, the home- 
like surroundings and the fine 
music have attracted many people 
to the place, not alone from Jersey 
City, but from all parts of Hudson 
County and Newark and New York 
as well. Numerous large dinners 
and banquets have been held at this 
hotel, as well as many other social 
affairs. The hotel rooms, single or 
en suite, affords complete comfort 
for the guests. A roof garden 
covers the entire roof. 

August Carell, who has conduct- 
ed the hotel for the last five years, 
was born in Germany, June 22, 
1872. He came to this country in 



m 



1891 and settled in New York City. 
In 1903 he came to Hudson County, 
where he has ever since been en- 
gaged in the hotel and restaurant 
business. 

By his own efforts, his great abil- 
ity and his exceedingly pleasing 
personality, and by attending strict- 
ly to business he has succeeded in 
making a great success of his enter- 
prise. He is one of the most popu- 
lar men in Jersey City and has 
gained a large circle of friends out- 
side Jersey City. 

Mr. Carell has never sought nor 
accepted any political office, but 
takes a deep interest in any move- 
ments concerning the welfare of 
the community. He is a loyal and 
public-spirited citizen and possessed 
of a sterling business character. 

He is a member of the Masonic 
Order, Jersey City Lodge B. P. O. 
E., the Germania Riding Club, and 
several other organizations and 
clubs. When asked what his 
hobbies are, Mr. Carell answered : 
"Business" His full time is taken 
up in his establishment, as every- 
thing is done under his personal 
supervision. He is therefore a very 
busy man and has had no time to 
develop any hobbies. 



John V. BurKe. 



Few men can count more friends 
than former Coroner John V. 
Burke, the well known undertaker 
at the Five Corners section, Jersey 
City. He was born at the corner of 
17th St. and 7th Ave., New York 
City, in 1852. 

After finishing his school educa- 
tion he launched into business as a 
building contractor and later went 
into the undertaker business. For 
over 40 years he has been located 
on Newark Ave. and Oakland Ave., 
where he a few years ago built one 



of the most up-to-date undertaking 
parlors. He has served for several 
terms as Coroner of Hudson 
County. 

Mr. Burke is one of the leading 
men in his profession and his busi- 
ness is one of the oldest establish- 
ments in Jersey City. 




His ability, integrity and dignity, 
combined with a pleasing personal- 
ity, has made him one of the most 
sought-after funeral directors. 

He has conducted some of the 
largest funerals in the section in a 
most praiseworthy manner and has 
gained a reputation, second to none, 
for his sterling business methods. 

In fraternal circles he is very 
prominent and is a member of se- 
veral clubs and organizations. 

Mr. Burke is very esteemed and 
respected in his profession as well 
as in business and social circles and 
has won the confidence of all with 
whom he has come into contact. He 
is always interested in civic better- 
ments and is a patriotic citizen of 
high standing. 



194 



Lincoln Restaurant. 



One of the most cozy restau- 
rants in North Hudson, if not in 
the entire county, is the Lincoln at 
Hackensack Plank Road, Union 
Hill. It is located in the same 
building with the Lincoln Theatre 
and consists of dining room, ban- 
quet hall, bar and grill room. It 
is profusely decorated and furnish- 
ed and is without doubt one of the 
coziest places in the county. The 
excellent food and splendid service 




have made it a popular place for 
the most prominent people in the 
community. The dining room on 
the ground floor has a seating ca- 
pacity of about 200 and the banquet 
hall on the tipper floor can seat 
500 people. The guests are on cer- 
tain evenings entertained by music 
and dancing. 

The Lincoln is conducted by 
William von Frankenberg, a pro- 
gressive and enterprising man. 
Since he took charge, the place has 
been altered and refitted to meet 
the taste of the most particular 
people. 



Mr. von Frankenberg has been in 
the restaurant business for many 
years. 

He was connected with the Club 
House of the Hoboken Elks for 
several years. He is thoroughly 
known for his ability, enterprise, 
and integrity and has gained a host 
of friends by his pleasing personal- 
ity and courtesy. That he would 
make a success of his new enter- 
prise is evidenced by the large pa- 
tronage he has gained since he took 
possession. 

The Lincoln has become noted 
for the special Sunday dinners 
served here at moderate prices, for 
the grill room, where many of 
North Hudson's known business- 
men enjoy their lunch ; for the din- 
ing room, which has become a ren- 
dezvous for the best people of the 
section, and for the banquet hall, 
where many of the most prominent 
affairs were held. The Bar has be- 
come popular with the better class 
of patrons. 



J. F. Wurdemann. 

John Fred Wurdemann, the pop- 
ular Committeeman from the Sec- 
ond Ward of North Bergen, was 
born in Hoboken, November 20, 
1880. He attended the old Public 
Schol No. 1 in that city, and after 
leaving school, he started to learn 
the insurance Isusiness, in which -he 
continued for seven years. 

His father, John Wurdemann, 
was an old resident of Hoboken, 
where he conducted a grocery store 
for over fifteen years. He estab- 
lished several bread routes in 
North Hudson, representing one of 
the larger bakers, and John Fred 
helped his father on these routes. 

In 1897, Mr. J. F. Wurdemann, 
the subject of this sketch, estab- 
lished his own business in North 
Bergen, later securing the local 
agency for the Ward Baking Co., 
and has still charge of this con- 



195 



cern's deliveries in North Bergen. 
Besides Mr. Wurdemann is doing 
a general trucking business. His 
residence with yard and stables, 
located at 844 Anderson Place, 
covers a ground of 100x100 feet. 

He is a pubHc-spirited citizen, im- 
bued with an exalted sense of patri- 
otism and progressiveness, and by 
action and example has exerted a 
wholesome influence in the com- 
munity, whose respect and confid- 
ence he enjoys to the utmost. He 
is one of the most popular and best 
known men in North Hudson, and 
by his frankness and courtesy 
makes a pleasing impression on 
all with whom he comes in contact. 
He has always taken an active in- 
terest in politics and is prominently 
connected with the Democratic' 
Party. About twelve years ago, 
Mr. Wurdemann was elected Con- 
stable, from which office he later 
resigned when he was elected Jus- 
tice of the Peace. In 1911 he was 
elected Township Committeeman, 
and was re-elected in 1913, and 
again in 1915, now serving his third 
term in that office. Mr. Wurdemann 
is one of the leading factors in the 
fight of having the county take over 
the Secaucus Road, in the improve- 
ment of the Hackensack Plank 
Road, in the elimination of the soft 
coal nuisance, in the laying of new 
sewers, in the improvement of Ton- 
neLe Avenue, and numerous other 
important improvements. He has 
served as County Committeeman 
since 1911. 

Mr. Wurdemann was married 
October IS, 1907, to Anna May 
Ensminger, of the well known 
North Bergen family of that name. 
They have one son, Fred. 

The committeeman has been a 
member of the town's Fire Depart- 
ment for the last fourten years. 
He is a member of the Exempt 
Firemen's Association, Jr. O. U. A. 
M., and Second Ward Democratic 
Club. 



Albin E. Strobel, D. C. 



"Practice what you preach", is 
the motto of Albin E. Strobel, the 
well known chiropractor and natu* 
ropath, of 520 Paterson Plankroad, 
Jersey City. 

He not alone takes chiropractic 
treatment for all his ailments him- 
self, but follows up chiropractic 
suggestions as to taking exercise, 
diet, fasting, etc. Some time ago 
he fasted one full week and lost 
several pounds, but gained con- 
siderable in health. He is also a 
strong behever in athletics and is a 
member of several athletic asso- 
ciations. 

Dr. Strobel was born in Jersey 
City, March 24th, 1891 and receiv- 
ed his early school education in 
that city. 

Having always been a strong be- 
liever in nature and nature's work, 
it was only natural that he should 
become interested in chiropractic, 
which is a scientific method of re- 
moving the cause of disease and en- 
able nature to restore normal con- 
ditions. 

He took up the study at the N. 
J. College of Chiropractors, and af- 
ter receiving his diploma from this 
institution he took a postgraduate 
pourse at Butler's Institute in New 
Jersey. 

He then started his own practice, 
to begin with in his spare time, but 
he soon found it necessary to give 
everything else up and devote his 
full time to his profession. 

Dr. Strobel is well known in 
Jersey City as an enterprising 
young man, a deep thinker and sin-^ 
cere student of important problems. 

His pleasing ways and manners 
have gained him a host of friends. 
He has never taken any active in- 
terest in politics, but is much inter- 
ested in civic reforms and in any- 
thing which may benefit the com- 
munity. 



196 



John Eisele. 



Few men have achieved a higher 
reputation than John Eisele, Presi- 
dent and General Manager of Bat- 
terson & Eisele Marble Works. 

Mr. Eisele came to America in 
1872 at the age of 19 years. He had 
received a thorough education and 
had chosen stone cutting for his 
life work. In New York City he 
secured a position as journeyman 
in the marble works of A. L. Fau- 
cher & Co. His talent and business 
ability were soon recognized and he 
' was rapidly promoted to salesman, 
then to foreman of the plant, and 
finally to a small partnership. 

However, this rapid progress 
did not satisfy his ambition, and 
seeing a better opportunity, he 
formed a partnership with the late 
James G. Batterson, President of 
the Travelers' Insurance Co. of 
Hartford, Conn., under the firm 
name of Batterson & Eisele, as im- 
porters and workers of marble, 
onyx and granite, making architec- 
tural work a specialty. This .firm 
is now one of the largest in this 
part of the country. 

Mr. Eisele married Miss Anna 
Horsberger in 1873. They have 
six children. The beautiful resi- 
dence of the family is located on 
Union St., Union Hill, and was 
constructed from his own designs 
in 1904. 

Mr. Eisele is a self-made man in 
every sense of the word ; he has 
through his own efforts, business 
ability, integrity and perseverance 
climbed the ladder of success, but 
has never forgotten that once upon 
a time he was at the bottom of the 
ladder. 

Although a Captain of Industry 
of high standing, he has preserved 
his democratic ways and manners. 
He is an active, energetic and patri- 
otic citizen, but has never sought 
nor accepted any political office. In 



charitable work he is a very con- 
spicuous figure and ever ready to 
help any worthy movement. 

Mr. Eisele is a most genial and 
hospitable man and kind to every- 
body. His employees as well as his 
business associates and his friends 
hold him in very great esteem and 
value his friendship greatly. He is 
esteemed and respected in the com- 
munity as a man of the highest 
standards. 



Chr. A. Jetter. 

Christian A.- Jetter, proprietor of 
the Zimmerman Hotel, formerly 
the Venice, located at River St. 
and Hudson Place, Hoboken, was 
born in New York City, January 
23, 1880. He received his public 
school education in that city, and 
later became engaged in the milk 
business. He came to West Hobo- 
ken in 1912, and this year, 1917, 
bought the above mentioned hotel, 
which was in earlier days known as 
the Delaware Hotel. The building 
is four stories, brick, and covers a 
ground of 35x125 feet. It is one of 
the most beautiful hotels in Hobo- 
ken, is modernly equipped and ab- 
solutely fire-proof. The large, airy 
and splendidly outfitted cafe, on the 
ground floor, is favored by many of 
the most prominent men in the city. 

Mr. Jetter has gained an excel- 
lent reputation for business ability, 
integrity and enterprise. He is a 
patriotic citizen, interested in any- 
thing which may be of benefit to 
the community. Although in busi- 
ness only a, few months, he has 
gained a large circle of friends. 
His frankness and pleasing person- 
ality gain him the confidence of all 
who meet him. 

Mr. Jetter is a member of the 
Elks, Hoboken No. 74. He is un- 
married. 



197 



John J. Muilef . 

John J. Muller, the present Fire 
Chief of Guttenberg, is probably 
the youngest Fire Chief in the 
county. 

He was born in New York City, 
October 18, 1891, but his parents 
moved to Guttenberg when John 
was only six months old. 

He attended the Guttenberg 
Public School and later the Egan 
Business School. He then started 
to help his father, who conducted 
the cafe in Guttenberg, of which 
Mr. .Muller now is the owner. His 
father, who conducted this cafe 
since 1892, was one of the leading 
men of Guttenberg and served his 
town as Councilman two terms. 

Chief Muller has been a member 
of the Town's Fire Department for 
the last eight years. He was one 
of the organizers and later foreman 
of the Palisade Hose Company. He 
was elected Chief of the Fire De- 
partment this year. The Chief is 
well known not alone in Guttenberg, 
but in all North Hudson, where he 
has made a large circle of friends. 
He is a patriotic and public-spirited 
citizen, always interested in any- 
thing which may be of benefit to 
the community. He is a member of 
the Foresters of America, of which 
order he is a Past Chief Ranger 
and Grand Trustee of the State of 
New Jersey. 



Fred. Bebber. 



Fred Bebber, manufacturer of 
the famous cigar "The Monarch's 
Taste", is one of the best known 
men in the Jersey City Heights 
section. 

His factory, located at 103.S Sum- 
mit Ave., is known as one of the 
most sanitary cigar shops in Hud- 
son County. It is a three-story 
brick building, well ventilated and 



Scl'eened and with well lighted 
workrooms. 

Mr. Bebber has been in the cigar 
manufacturing business for over 
30 years, and has in this time built 
up a very large business. His pro- 
duct as well as his fair business 
dealings have gained him a reputa- 
tion second to none. 

In civic and fraternal circles he is 
very popular. His genial ways and 
his sterling character have gained 
him numerous friends in all parts 




of the county. He is a patriotic 
citizen, always interested in the wel- 
fare of his country and in the com- 
munity in which he resides. 

The "Monarch's Taste", which 
he manufactures, can be found in 
nearly every first class place where 
cigars are sold ; it is strictly union- 
made and smoked by many thou- 
sands of men who appreciate a 
good smoke. The steady growth of 
his business bears out these facts. 

Mr. Bebber has never sought nor 
accepted any political office, but has 
devoted his whole time to his busi- 
ness. 

When asked what his "hobbies" 
were, Mr. Bebber answered: 
"VVork", which he constantly does 
enjoy and which is the reason for 
his success in business. 



198 



Eugene N. Nelson. 

Eugene Nelson, the proprietor of 
the famous Duke's House in Ho- 
boken, is probably one of the 
youngest restaurant proprietors in 
the county. 

The Duke's House, located oppo- 
site the D. L. & W. Railroad, fer- 
ries and the Hudson Tubes, is an 
old, well known institution. As a 
restaurant, the Duke's House is un- 
equalled on this side of the river. 
The patrons number many of our 
first citizens. The Bar was pro- 
"bably one of the most interesting 
places previous to the establishment 
of the War Zone. At that time 
the most mixed assemblage could 
be found there : millionaries, 'long- 
shoremen, bankers and truck dri- 
vers, the most prominent politi- 
cians and street cleaners would rub 
elbows at the bar. To the credit of 
the place, however, it must be said 
that people of the highest standing 
in business, political and social cir- 
cles make the Duke's House their 
rendezvous. 

The entire establishment has 
been completely rebuilt outside and 
inside. The beautiful, cozy restau- 
rant has a seating capacity of 250. 
Music and dancing entertains the 

guests. 

Mr. Nelson has been in the res- 
taurant business all his life. He 
was born in Germany, July 19th, 
1886, and came to this country 
about ten years ago. Previous to 
his taking charge of the Duke s 
House about a year ago, he was 
manager of the German Club m 
Hoboken. His thorough knowledge 
of his business, his modern, pro- 
gressive ideas and his pleasmg per- 
sonality have made him orie of the 
most successful men in the busi- 
ness. . r , • 

With the able assistance of his 
manager, Otto Schmidt, who has 
also been in the restaurant busi- 



ness all his life in Germany, France 
and this country, where he held a 
responsible position in the Biltmore 
Hotel, there is little doubt that Mr. 
Nelson will make the Duke's House 
even more popular than it has been 
heretofore. 



Louis Poellot. 



Louis Poellot, the prominent tin- 
smith and roofer, at 44 Polk St., 
Guttenberg, was born, in New York 
City, September 23, 1889. His 
parents moved to North Hudson, 
where Louis graduated from the 
West New York pubHc school. He 
then secured a position with the 
Manhattan Electrical Co. of Jersey 
City, and later worked in the office 
of Thomson and Thomson Co. 
Then he started to learn the tin- 
ning and roofing business with the 
New Jersey firm of Schmidt and 
Doersett, and later with his uncle. 
In 1913, he established his own 
business, at the above mentioned 
address. His two-story shop, 
which covers a ground of 25x45 
feet, is equipped with all the most 
modern machinery and facilities. 

Mr. Poellot employs from seven 
to ten men continuously and keeps 
an auto truck for delivery pur- 
poses. 

This auto truck can daily be seen 
in nearly every part of North Hud- 
son, a fact which demonstrates that 
Mr. Poellot is a very busy man, 
doing business in many different 
sections. 

His ability as a mechanic is fast 
making him one of the foremost 
contractors in his line. 

In 1912, Mr. Poellot married 
Anna Naegeli, of West New York, 
with whom he has one child, 
Dorothy. 

He is a member of Wm. Duhne 
Association and several other socie- 
ties, and is very fond of automobil- 
ing'and all kinds of water sports. 



199 



Thomas Carrol. 



Thomas Carrol, Clerk of the 
Township of Weehawken, was 
born in Hoboken, May 1, 1867. 
His parents, Patrick and Johanna 
(Sullivan) Carrol, and his grand- 
parents Philip and Mary Carrol, 
were natives of Ireland, his father 
being born in Tipperary and his 
mother in Cork. Philip Carrol 
come to this country with his fami- 
ly soon after 1880 and settled in 
Princeton, N. J., where he_ ope- 
rated a large stone quarry. His son 
Patrick learned the carpenter trade 
in New Brunswick and about 1862 
moved to Hoboken, where he had 
charge of the Hoboken Land Im- 
provement Company's saw mill for 
about twenty-eight years. He later 
moved to Weehawken, where he 
died in 1890, being survived by his 
wife and several children, of whom 
Thomas is the oldest living son. 

Thomas Carrol was educated at 
St. Mary's Parochial School and 
the Christian Brothers' School in 
Hoboken, and at the age of fifteen 
entered the employ of the Standard 
Oil Company. Later he learned 
the plumbing trade with J. H.Knif- 
fin of Hoboken, and for more than 
six years he followed that business 
with marked success, having an es- 
tablishment of his own during a 
part of that period. 

In the meantime, Mr. Carrol had 
become an acknowledged and in- 
fluential leader of the Republican 
Party in Weehawken, taking an ac- 
tive part in local politics and being 
honored by his party with several 
positions of trust. He was Police 
Clerk of Weehawken for six years 
and in April, 1891, he was elected 
Township Clerk. He has been re- 
elected numerous times and still 
holds this office. 

Mr. Carrol was one of the organ- 
izers in 1890 of the old Weehawken 



Athletic Club, of which he was 
Secretary. He is an Exempt mem- 
ber of the Baldwin Hose Co. No. 1, 
which he served as Secretary for 
six years. He was a member and 
Secretary of the old West Side So- 
cial Club and a member of Glend- 
laugh Council No. 214, C. B. L. 

Mr. Carrol is a pubHc-spirited, 
progressive citizen and has been ac- 
tive in promoting the best interests 
of his town and county. 




William C. Asper 

COUNSELLOR - AT - LAW 

^ttxal ifflaatrr of (fUjattrtrg 

0iqtf nnr Cflourt CUnmntiaatonrr 

iil0umal{t)i Attarncy of Hirrl;attittfn 



423 Hackensack Plankroad 
Hudson Trust Bldg. West Hoboken, N. J. 



200 



Herman Bruns, Jr. 

One of the oldest families in Jer- 
sey City Heights, Jersey City, is 
the Bruns family. 

Herman Bruns, Sr., has resided 
on the hill for over 55 years and 
built many houses, and in many 
other ways helped to develop Cen- 




joys one of the lai-gest patronages 
on Central Avenue. His principle 
of selling only the very best meat 
and his courteous treatment to his 
customers have been the foundation 
of his success. His pleasing per- 
sonality and his sterling character 
has gained him many friends. 

Mr. Bruns married Wilhelmine 
Braun, daughter of Captain R. H. 
Braun, in 1910. They have two 
children. 



tral Avenue, which now is one of 
the most up-to-date business thor- 
oughfares in Jersey City. 

Herman Bruns, Jr., the object of 
this sketch, was born in the house 
on Central Avenue where his 
butcher store is located. His father, 
who conducted several stores in 
Hudson County, built this house. 
After finishing his early school 
education, Herman, Jr., started to 
learn the butcher business, and m 
1900 opened his present store. His 
patronage grew very rapidly, be- 
cause he handled only the very best 
of meat, and soon he had to enlarge 
and improve his store. 

In 1911 he installed his own ice 
plant and made many other impor- 
tant improvements. To-day he en- 



Albert Leuly. 



Albert Leuly, one of the best 
known lawyers in North Hudson, 
with offices in the Hudson Trust 
Co. Building inWestHoboken, was 
born in that town, March 15, 1872. 
His parents were Jacques Leuly, 
a well known florist, and Barbara 
Gasser. There were eight chil- 
dren, four of whom are living : 
Emil, a retired florist; Jacob, 
the well known real estate man ; 
Louise, who married Romeo Pal- 
mer, and Albert. 

Albert received his public school 
education in West Hoboken and 
later attended the Stevens High 
School in Hoboken. He then 
entered the New York University 
Law School, from where he gradu- 
ated with the degree of L.L.B. in 
1894. He served his clerkship with 
Judge Abel L Smith and John S. 
Mabon of Hoboken. 

Mr. Leuly was admittted to the 
bar of New Jersey in 1895 and im- 
mediately after he started his own 
practice in a small oifice at his 
present location. 

He soon found it necessary, how- 
ever, to move into his present large 
quarters. 

Mr. Leuly is a lawyer of the old 
school, a lawyer who lives and 
breathes and feels deeply the trust 
imposed on him by his clients. 
There is nothing of the spectacu- 



201 



lar about him, none of the flam- 
buoyancy which marks so many of 
the profession to-day. 

Mr. Leuly served as Counsellor 
for the Township of Weehawken 
for a number of years. He also 
served as President of the Board of 
Education of that town for several 
years. He is attorney for the Hud- 
son Trust Co., the First National 
Bank of Secaucus, and the Board 
of Education of Secaucus. 

In 1896 Mr. Leuly married 
Christiane Fisher of Jersey City. 
They have two children, Marjorie 
I. and Vera J. 

Mr. Leuly is a member of the 
Palisade Lodge No. 84, F. & A. M. 

His hobbies are automobiling, in 
which sport he was one of the pio- 
neers, and golf. 



Anthony Capone. 



One of the larger excavating and 
sewer contractors in North Hudson 
is Anthony Capone of West Ho- 
boken. 

He was born in Italy, June 5th, 
1869, and emigrated to this country 
in 1888. For some time he worked 
in Pennsylvania and then came to 
West Hoboken, where he establish- 
ed his own business about 16 years 
ago. 

He has since then executed many 
large contracts important to the 
development of the respective sec- 
tions. 

The yard and stables are located 
on Sip Street, West Hoboken, and 
cover a ground of 75 x 100 feet. 
Fifty to sixty men are generally 
kept busy at the different jobs. 

Mr. Capone is a hard working 
man, a true type of sunny Italy. 
He is conscientious in his work, 
honest and self-sacrificing. 

His full time is devoted to his 
work and he has little time for 
anything else. He has, therefore, 
not been active in politics, but is, 



however, a civic-pirited citizen, in- 
terested in the welfare of his town 
and always ready to help any move- 
ment which may be of benefit to 
the community. 

Mr. Capone married in 1892 and 
the union has been blessed with 
eleven children, of which one son is 
helping in the business. 

His ability as a contractor, his 
foresight and great judgment in his 
many times dangerous work, have 
gained him a high standing. His 
pleasing and generous ways have 
gained him a host of friends. 



Howard Fetzg'er. 



Howard Fetzger, better known 
as "The Battling Chief of the 
North Bfergen Fire Department," 
was born in that township, July 30, 
1877. 

Te went to school in North Ber- 
gen, where his mother was born 
and where his father was an in- 
fluential member of the Democratic 
party. 

He has been a member of the 
Township Fire Department for the 
last twenty years and was one of 
the organizers of the Peerless Hose 
Co. For the last three years he has 
been Chief of the Department. 

Mr. Fetzger has on numerous 
occasions displayed great skill and 
ability as a fire fighter and has won 
the admiration of the people as 
well as of his fellow firemen. As 
a citizen he has become popular 
and well liked and by his pleasing 
personality has gained a large circle 
of friends. 

In 1899 Mr. Fetzger married 
Annie Flemming, with whom he 
has four children, Howard, Jr., 
William, Elmar, and Alvin. 

Mr. Fetzger is an Exempt Fire- 
man and a member of the Fire- 
men's ReHef Association of North 
Bergen and several other political 
and social associations. 



202 



J. Smarak. 



Few men have more knowledge 
of horses than J. Smarak, the pro- 
prietor of the Boarding, Sale and 
Ejcchange Stables at 300 Hacken- 
sack Plankroad, Union Hill. The 
stables cover an area of 100 by 
110 feet, and about eight men are 
continually employed here. 

Mr. Smarak is a recognized ex- 
pert on horses and has been in this 
line of business all his life. 

He was born in Austria in 1866, 
and came to America in 1899. He 
has been a resident of Hudson 
County for the last 15 years, and 
12 years ago established his present 
business. 

He was married 21 years ago 
and is the father of six children. 
One.of the sons, Sidney, is helping 
in the business and is of great as- 
sistance to his father. 



chairman of the Arms Committee, 
a member of the License Commit- 
tee and Police Committee. He is 
a conscientious and efficient public 
official, who has the welfare of the 
people and community at heart. 

In private life he is foreman of 
John E. Bowe Co., Inc., and work- 
ed for the late Mr. Bowe for the 
last twenty-two years. He is a 
member of the Jr. O. U. A. M. 
since 1805. 

In 1894 he married Anna Wolf, 



Charles Schitti^. 



Charles Schittig, member of the 
Board of Council of West New 
York, was born in New York City, 
January 23, 1873. After finishing 
his early school education in that 
city, he started to work in a paper 
factory and later worked at the 
printing trade. Later he began to 
ledtti the bricklaying trade, at 
which he has ever since been en- 
gaged. 

He settled in West New York in 
1886 and soon after became inter- 
ested in the development of the 
tbwtl. He has always been a staunch 
Democrat, and once served as Poor 
Master and later as Clerk to toe 
Assessment Commissioners. He 
was elected Councilman last year 
and took office January 1, 1917. 

Mr. Schittig is chairman of the 
Building and Ground Committee, 




a sister of the late Town Clerk of 
West New York. They have two 
children, Charles and Leonard. 

Mr. Schittig is very fond of fish- 
ing and is much interested in labor 
unions. He has gained a large 
circle of friends by his pleasing 
personality and open manner. 

He holds the respect and confi- 
dence of the entire community and 
is well known for his benevolence, 
kindness and generosity. 



203 



John Knobloch. 

John Knobloch, Councilman of 
West New York, has served in this 
capacity for tKe last four years, 
now finishing his second term. 

He has always been a great fight- 
er for civic betterments and was 
one of the main instigators for a 
paid Fire Department, which was, 
after a great fight, installed in May, 




1915. He was also instrumental 
in having a modern Fire Alarm 
System installed in the town. As 
chairman of the Fire Department 
Committee he has rendered West 
New York very valuable service. 
It is, however, not alone in the Fire 
Department that Mr. Knobloch's 
efforts have been successful. He 
has fought for many other needed 
improvements in other departments 
and has achieved much for the de- 
velopment of the community. 
While in office, he has faithfully 
discharged his duties and has 
gained a host of admirers for his 
ability and determination. 

He is a public spirited citizen 



possessed of good judgment and 
great foresight and a sterling busi- 
ness character. 

After his term expires, January 
1, 1918. Mr. Knobloch will retire 
from public life, much against the 
wishes of his many friends, who 
greatly deplore the loss of his ser- 
vices in the administration of the 
town's affairs. 

Mr. Knobloch has gained a high 
reputation as a civic spirited citizen 
who has devoted much of his time 
to the welfare of his town. He 
has been untiring in his efforts to 
procure the very best for West 
New York, and in this way has 
greatly helped the town to become 
one of the most progressing towns 
in the county. 



Prof. R. Taverna. 



Professor Remo Taverna, at 406 
Savoye Street, West Hoboken, is 
one of the most noted pianists in 
the country. He is also well known 
as a composer and opera coach. 
Born in 1888 in America, he went 
to school here, and later went to 
Italy to study music. After con- 
centrating his energies under the 
direction of the famous Vittorio 
da Camino, Professor of Compo- 
sition, and under the able tutor- 
ship of Alessandro Rissone, re- 
nowned as a teacher of the piano, 
harmony, caunterpoint, and with 
Paolo Giorza, for the art of sing- 
ging, and dramatic coaching, he 
graduated from the Conservatory 
of Torino, Italy, and came back 
to America. He opened a studio 
in New York, where he taught 
piano, singing and composition. 
Several large and successful con- 
certs have been directed by Pro- 
fessor Taverna. He was Director 
of the San Carlo Opera Company, 
of New York, for two seasons! 



204 



Then the following year he re- 
signed from the conductorship of 
the above mentioned opera com- 
pany and opened a studio in West 
Hoboken, where he has since been 
kept very busy as a teacher of the 



musical festival of the Verdi Cen- 
tenary Celebration of America, un- 
der the auspices of the "Italian 
Orchestral Society of New York," 
held at Carnegie Hall, New York 
City. His ability as a high-class 




piano and its kindred subjects, 
specializing in the Italian school 
of Bel Canto. 

Prof. Taverna, although young, 
has long since made a name for 
himself; he is a man of whom 
North Hudson may be proud. In 
October, 1913, he was chosen As- 
sistant Conductor for the great 



entertainer, combined with his 
pleasing personality, has made 
him well known all over, and he is 
held in great esteem by everybody 
who has had the pleasure of meet- 
ing him. 

Mr. Remo Taverna is a member 
of several social clubs and musical 
societies.. 



205 



John J. Shannon. 

One of the most successful un- 
dertakers in Jersey City is John J. 
Shannon. 

He is the son of Owen Shannon, 
in the early days a prominent con- 
tractor and old time resident of the 
Bergen section. 

John was born in Jersey City, 
July 17, 1871. After completing 
his school education in that city, he 
started to learn the undertaker 
business. His first position was with 
Undertaker Boylan, for whom he 
worked from 1884 to 1886. He 
then went to work for Undertaker 
Merrity, who conducted an estab- 
lishment a few doors from Mr. 
Shannon's present location at 482 
Communipaw Avenue. Mr. Mer- 
rity diecl in 1905, and after 
conducting his business for the 
widow for five months, Mr. Shan- 
non took over the business himself. 
He has since succeeded in build- 
ing the business up to one of the 
largest undertaking establishments 
in the city. 

Unlike many other undertakers, 
Mr. Shannon has his own stables. 
He is very prompt in the discharge 
of his obligations, in fact, he claims 
this to be one of the reasons for his 
success. "Always meet your bills 
promptly and take -advantage of the 
discount" is one of Mr. Shannon's 
principles. This is only an illustra- 
tion of his strict business policies, 
which prove him to be a man of 
ability, sound judgment, great 
foresight and integrity. 

For these, as well as for many 
other sterling qualifications, Mr. 
Shannon has become widely known 
not only in Jersey City, but in every 
part of the county. During his 
many years in the business he has 
gained a high reputation as one of 
the most able and conscientious 
undertakers.- 



Mr. Shannon married Bridget 
Gawaren in 1895. They had two 
children, Eugene, and Mary. His 
wife died in 1901, and three years 
later Mr. Shannon married Mary 
C. Pakenham. 



John J. Fa^an. 

Ranking as one of the most pro- 
minent men in Hoboken is Archi- 
tect John J. Fagan, son of former 
Mayor Lawrence Fagan and Hanna 
(McHale) Fagan.. 

He was born in Hoboken, June 
8th, 1882, and attended the local 
schools and later the Stevens Insti- 
tute. 

After finishing his schooling, he 
went to work in his father's large 
plant, "the Fagan Iron Works", in 
Jersey City, where he studied 
structural engineering. 

He then went to Europe, where 
he studied architecture for lj4 
yars, then returned to Hoboken and 
in 1914 engaged in business for 
himself as an architect. 

His first "job" was the new en- 
gine house No. 2. Later he erected 
the addition to Hoboken High 
School, and was also architect for 
St. Michael's Rectory in Jersey 
City, the new Odd Fellows' Hall, 
and the re-modeling of the "Duke's 
House", both in Hoboken. 

Mr. Fagan is fast becoming one 
of the most conspicuous architects 
in the county. He has gained an 
eminent reputation for his ability, 
skill, great foresight and sound 
judgement. 

Descending from one of the lead-r 
ing families in the city, it is only 
natural that he should take a great 
interest in the welfare of the com- 
munity. He is a loyal and patriotic 
citizen, imbued with the highest 
sense of integrity and actively in- 
terested in many worthy move- 
ments. 



205 



Unlike his father, he has never 
sought nor accepted any pubHc of- 
fice, but devotes the greatest part 
of his time to his continuously 
growing business, which demands 
all his attention. 

Mr. Fagan married Elisabeth 
Heidemeier on February 1, 1910. 
They have one daughter, Helen 
Elisabeth. 

He is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus and the Elks, Hobo- 
ken No. 74. 



Clarence Razim. 



One of the best known electrical 
contractors in North Hudson is 
Clarence Razim, of West Hoboken. 
He was born in Long Island, 
April 11, 1883, and received his 
school education partly in New 
York City and partly in West Ho- 
boken, where his parents moved in 
1891. 

After finishing his schooling, he 
began to learn the electrical trade 
and in 1907 established his own 
business in partnership with his 
brother. Five years later the part- 
nership was dissolved and Clarence 
took over the business himself. 

By constant attention to the busi- 
ness he has mastered every detail 
in his trade, a fact which soon be- 
came so well known that several 
large and important contracts were 
given him. 

He executed the electrical con- 
tracts in the Palace Court and the 
Royal Court, both located on Park 
Avenue, Weehawken, with 90 
families in both buildings, — ^the 60 
family apartment house on Hud- 
son Avenue and Seventh Street, 25 
family apartment house on Hudson 
Avenue and Eighth Street, 2.5 fa- 
mily apartment house on Hudson 
Avenue and Second Street, 15 fa- 
mily apartment house on Palisade 
Avenue and Eighth Street, all in 
West New York, the Hudson Con- 



sumers Ice Plant, Woodcliff Re- 
formed Church, and numerous 
residences in Woodcliff, Fairview 
Terrace, Dr. McCroskery's beauti- 
ful residence, and the First Pres- 
byterian Church, both in East 
Orange. 

These are only a few of the 
large contracts in which Mr. Razim 
has proven himself a thorough me- 
chanic of great ability and skill. 

As a citizen he is very popular 
and enjoys a large circle of friends. 

He is a member of the John J. 
Eagan Association, the John Haas 
Association, John Meiller Associa- 
tion, John Haas Bowling Club, the 
Regatta Rod and Gun Club and 
many others. 

His large business, which con- 
tinuously demands his attention, 
has prevented Mr. Razim to take 
any active interest in political af- 
fairs. He is, however, a civic- 
spiritecl citizen, always interested 
in anything which may be of benefit 
to the community. 



Peter J. Rohr, D. C. 

Ranking among the foremost 
chiropractors in North Hudson is 
Peter J. Rohr, with offices in the 
Dispatch Building. 

He was born in Hoboken, April 
27, 1892, and received his early 
school education in that city. 

Displaying artistic talent at an 
early age, he took a course in draw- 
ing at the Cooper Institute in New 
York City, and later graduated 
from that institution. During his 
studies at drawing he became inter- 
ested in anatomy and soon knew 
every bone and muscle in the 
human body. In this way he be- 
came interested in chiropractic. He 
studied at the N. J. College of 
Chiropractors, from which insti- 
tution he received his diploma and 
later the degree of Philosopher. 
He then took a postgraduate course 



?07 



at the American School of Naturo- 
path and later at the Delaware Col- 
lege of Chiropractors. 

Dr. Rohr served as House Phy- 
sician at Dr. B. Young's Sanitari- 
um in New Jersey, and at one time 
had charge of the noted health re- 
sort Tangerina in Florida. 

Two years ago he opened his 
own practice in West Hoboken and 
this year moved to his present lo- 
cation. 

Although a young man, the doc- 
tor has achieved a high reputation 



and standing in his profession and 
enjoys a large and successful prac- 
tice. 

His thorough knowledge of his 
profession and his refined, pleasing 
personality, combined with his un- 
impeachable integrity, has made 
him one of the most noted chiro- 
practors in the section. 

As a citizen he is very popular 
and has gained a large circle of 
friends, who greatly respect and es- 
teem him for those qualifications 
which make a successful man. 



lI!IliillLiiMi'iin!ii|i i aijjjjj|in]n]lUiIIir^^ ^ff(( p .TnmTTTn rTTnn.mTitrtiTirm rm 




GEO. COX & SONS. Inc. 

817 Hackensacfc Plankroad, near the Hudson Boulevard. West Hoboken, N. J. 



Established 1839. 



208