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Full text of "History of Davenport and Scott County Iowa : Illustrated"

CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 




BOUGHT WITH THE INCOME 
OF THE SAGE ENDOWMENT 
FUND GIVEN IN 1891 BY 

HENRY WILLIAMS SAGE 




3 1924 028 914 384 
olin 




Cornell University 
Library 



The original of tiiis book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924028914384 



HISTORY 

OF 

DAVENPORT 



AND 



SCOTT COUNTY 

IOWA 



Harry E. Downer 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II. 



CHICAGO 
THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



' JOE R. LANE. 

There is no problem more difficult than character analysis. Psychic research 
often fails to clearly elucidate the problem and yet there is no truth more evident 
as the result of careful and analytical contemplation of successful lives than that 
results have been achieved through intelligence and energy. What special 
phases of nature causes a man to take up a certain line or lines of activity it is 
impossible to determine, but in the execution of a clearly defined purpose it is 
inevitable that unfaltering energy and intelligent appreciation of opportunity 
must constitute the vital forces. It is these qualities that have carried Joe R. 
Lane to the eminent position which he now occupies as a man of notable business 
sagacity and as a political leader whose wisdom and resourcefulness have en- 
abled him to accomplish seemingly impossible results. His interests are never 
so self-centered as to exclude active participation in affairs of moment to the 
community at large, for, on the contrary, he has been an active participant in those 
activities which have promoted the material, political and social life of the com- 
munity and which are matters of civic virtue and civic pride. 

Mr. Lane was born in Davenport in May, 1858, a son of James T. and Annie 
J. (Reed) Lane, and a brother of Mrs. lies. His father, who is mentioned else- 
where at length in this volume, was long a representative member of the bar and 
died in Denver in 1890. Passing through consecutive grades in the public 
schools, Joe R. Lane eventually became a high-school pupil and later attended 
Knox College at Galesburg, Illinois, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1878. He began preparation for the practice of law as a student in the office 
of Davison & Lane, of which firm his father was the junior partner. Subse- 
quently he matriculated in the State University Law School, from which he was 
graduated in 1880, when he became assistant in the office of Davison & Lane, thus 
continuing until January, 1881, when Charles Davison and Joe Lane, the sons of 
the respective partners, were admitted to the firm. In the following August, 
Charles Davison went to North Dakota and in 1889 James T. Lane withdrew from 
the firm on account of failing health. The relation between the older Davison 
and Joe R. Lane continued uninterruptedly and in 1893 Charles Davison reen- 



6 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

tered the partnership, the firm remaining Davison & Lane until 1900, when the 
death of the senior member occurred, while two years later Charles Davison also 
passed away. Mr. Lane was left alone to care for an increasing practice that 
had already brought him distinction as one of the most eminent representatives 
of the Iowa Bar. Soon afterward he was joined by Judge Waterman, who 
resigned his position as a member of the Iowa supreme court to enter into part- 
nership relations with Mr. Lane under the firm style of Lane & Waterman. A 
contemporary writer has said in this connection: "Possibly no higher testimonial 
to the standing, business value and reputation of the practice which Mr. Lane 
had helped to upbuild and of which he had become the head could be given than 
is embodied in Judge Waterman's action. Few positions are more earnestly cov- 
eted; none considered higher in judicial dignity; scarcely any offer more assured 
social position or surer and more commensurate recompense than the supreme 
judgeship, yet Judge Waterman resigned all these to become Mr. Lane's part- 
ner. Comment would be superfluous." The public voice names this firm as the 
most prominent in Davenport and one of the most distinguished of the state. 

It would be difficult to enumerate all the interests which have felt the stimulus 
of Mr. Lane's cooperation, keen sagacity and liberal business policy! Banking, 
manufacturing, lumber and real estate are among those interests which have 
claimed his time and attention and in furthering his individual interest along 
these lines he has contributed in substantial measure to Davenport's growth 
and expansion along normal and healthy lines. He is the president of the Joe 
R. Lane Investment Company, which erected the Lane office building at 
Third and Main streets; president of the Building Society of the new 
Commercial Club; a director of the Davenport Hotel Company; vice pres- 
ident and director of the First National Bank of Davenport; and finan- 
cially interested in numerous other commercial enterprises. His labors 
have constituted a most important feature in the railroad development of 
this section, for he was treasurer of the Davenport, Iowa & Dakota Rail- 
road at the time of its construction and was also manager and had charge 
of the building of the Davenport, Rock Island & Northwestern Railroad 
bridge, which gave the road entrance to Rock Island and Moline. His realty 
investments are most extensive and in all of his business connections he has 
proven himself a man of action rather than of theory. 

Moreover, Mr. Lane is recognized as one of the most influential members of 
the republican party. With full recognition of the duties and obligations as well 
as the privileges of citizenship, unlike many of the men today who are controlling 
extensive professional and business interests, he finds time for active participa- 
tion in public aflfairs upon which hinge the political stability and welfare of the 
country. As a political leader he has always put public needs and party benefit 
before self interests. He has served in the ranks from preference and only held 
office when it has been clearly shown him that it was a duty which he owed his 
fellow citizens and for which he could obtain no substitute. Several terms he 
«at in the council as alderman and his labors were always to the advantage of his 
ward and the city at large. During his term of service in congress, to which he 
was elected in 1898, he never forgot his allegiance to his state nor his duty to 
his constituents. He has frequently served as a member of the republican exec- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 7 

utive committee and always to his party's benefit. He holds decided views on 
public questions and expresses them clearly, cogently and logically when occa- 
sion demands, but it is always the timely word which he speaks. As a diplomat 
he has cemented party and business fractures, healed internal dissensions in 
various financial and political vetures and unified and solidified acute divisions 
in numerous enterprises where to all appearances such action was hopelessly 
looked upon. As a political leader he has led his party to victory in ward, city, 
county and state campaigns and added his share to national victories. And all 
this he has done without claiming individual credit or demanding personal recog- 
nition. 

Mr. Lane was married in 1881 to Miss Jennie Richardson, a daughter of D. N-. 
Richardson and a native of Davenport. They have three children : Dick R., who 
is now associated with the firm of Lane & Waterman; Jeanette, student in St. 
Katherine's school, a private institution; and Reed, who is attending the Iowa 
State University Law School. Mr. Lane has attained the highest degrees in 
Masonry, and is also connected with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
He likewise belongs to the Outing Club and the Arsenal Golf Qub. He is a 
member of the Business Men's Association and a patron of the many public 
beneficiaries which exist in Davenport. He is without sham or pretense, yet 
there is not the least shadow of mock modesty about him. He stands as a high 
type of the American business man and citizen, whose ideals are high, whose 
methods are practical, who is active and energetic in all public and private work 
and with laudable ambition for his own success displays a helpful and broad- 
minded interest in public aflfairs that has constituted his services of wide benefit 
to the city and state. 



EDWIN W. BRADY. 



In the years of Davenport's early development Edwin W. Brady became one 
of its residents and continued throughout his remaining days as one of its repre- 
sentative citizens, his labors beingt a tangible element for the growth and better- 
ment of the community at large. He was bom in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, Febru- 
ary 22, 1826, and was therefore a young man of twenty-eight years when he 
arrived in Davenport in 1854. Throughout his life he stood for those things 
which uplift hiunanity, which advance progress and promote improvement. He 
was a stalwart champion of the cause of temperance, laboring along practical, 
effective and far-reaching lines to curb and suppress the liquor traffic. About 
1880 he purchased the Blue Ribbon News from Dr. Morgan. This was a journal 
devoted to the cause of temperance amd, changing its name to the Northwestern 
News, Mr. Brady continued its publication for some time. His sons were in- 
terested with him in this enterprise and later they founded the Daily Times, with 
which the father was financially connected. At a still later date the sons went to 
New York to become stockholders in McQure's Magazine Company and have since 
been associated with that enterprise, helping to build up the business and make 
the magazine what it is today — one of the most interesting, entertaining and in- 



8 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

stiuctive popular magazines of the country.. When the sons removed to the east 
the father retired from business, spending his remaining days in the enjoyment 
of well earned rest. 

On the 22d of February, i860, Edwin W. Brady was imited in marriage to 
Miss Lydia Frances Weaver, a daughter of John Weaver, who died December 9, 
1908, at the remarkable old age of ninety-six years. He was born in Fairfield 
county, Ohio, April 16, 1812, and was there reared and educated. After arriving 
at years of maturity he was married in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 30th of June, 
1837, to Miss Julia Ann Warrington Fuller, who died March I, 1899, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-three years. For an extended period John Weaver was em- 
ployed in a wholesale grocery house in Cincinnati and was then appointed post- 
master of Little Mill Creek by President Polk. He acted as postmaster for four 
years, serving first at Little Mill Creek and afterward at Ostrander, Ohio. While 
there he also filled the office of justice of the peace and his opinions were strictly 
fair and impartial. The year 1853 witnessed his arrival in Davenport, after which 
time he did not again engage in active business. All of the family lived to an old 
age. His wife's father was one of the life guard of George Washington and was 
once shot while serving his country. He recovered his health, however, and lived 
for some time to enjoy the fruits of his labor, reaching the age of ninety-nine 
years. UntO' Mr. and Mrs. John Weaver were bom four children : Mrs. Lydia 
F. Brady, C. W., Albert and Mrs. Melissa Jennings. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Brady were born six children : Oscar W. ; Albert B., who is 
deceased; Mrs. Carrie B. Tagge; Edwin B.; Ella F. ; and Curtis P. As previously 
stated, the surviving sons became associated with their father in newspaper publi- 
cation and, continuing their eflforts in the field of magazine publication, all are 
associated with the conduct and management of McQure's, Curtis P. being the 
business manager of the magazine. 

The death of Mr. Brady occurred on the i6th of January, 1909, and thus 
passed from Davenport one whose record was of benefit to the city in many 
essential ways. He placed a correct valuation upon life, its purposes and its oppor- 
tunities and was never a self-centered man who found his happiness in the ac- 
quirement of success! to be used alone for his own efiForts, but on the contrary 
knew that joy which comes of service for others, and from practical, effective 
effort for the world's uplift. 



JAMES E. LINDSAY. 



Prominent for many years among the mill operators of the Mississippi river 
were James E. Lindsay and John B. Phelps, who as Lindsay & Phelps were for 
nearly forty years connected with the manufacture of lumber at Davenport. 

James Edwin Lindsay, the subject of this sketch, was born at Schroon, Essex 
county. New York, April 12, 1826. His ancestors came from Scotland in 1731 
and settled at Argyle, New York. His great-great-grandfather was Donald 
Lindsay, who was interested in the grant which was extended to Laughlin Camp- 
bell and was one of the hundred founders of that early Argyle community. His 






^. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 11 

training between 1826 and 1847 terminated with one year's schooling in civil en- 
gineering at Norwich, Vermont. His father was a hotel keeper, farmer and 
lumber manufacturer combined. Young Lindsay worked at measuring and the 
hauling of logs at his father's mill, a water power affair propelled by the old 
style "flutter wheel." This sawmill was facetiously called the "Thunder Shower 
Mill" on account of its utter inability to operate unless a frequent rain would 
kindly fill the small creek dam from which it drew its water power. Young 
Lindsay was in an atmosphere that was apt to make him a lumberman and in- 
cluded among his neighbors Israel Johnson, the inventor of the much used "mu- 
lay" saw, and Philetas Sawyer, the long time prominent lumberman and for 
many years United States senator from Wisconsin. Logs in those days meas- 
ured about two standards to the log, a standard, according to Dimock's rule, being 
measured on the basis of thirteen- foot log, nineteen inches at the top end. They 
were made up of perhaps twenty-five per cent clear at fifty dollars a thousand; 
twenty-five per cent second clear at forty dollars; twenty-five per cent select at 
twenty dollars; and twenty-five per cent common, worth fourteen dollars. Be- 
fore his twenty-first birthday anniversary young Lindsay already had some ex- 
perience in the logging business in partnership with his brother-in-law John 
Tompkins. The firm was named Lindsay & Tompkins and existed for four years. 

In the fall of 1856, the year he was thirty years old, he came west, and with 
his savings and what had been entrusted to him, secured about seven thousand 
dollars worth of lands through land warrants in the Black River Falls (Wis- 
consin) country. 

In March, 1861, Mr. Lindsay located permanently at Davenport, Iowa, and 
his Black river timber was logged and rafted to Davenport, where it was sawed 
into lumber by the thousand at the mills at that place. He had formed a part- 
nership with E. Harris, of Queensberry, New York, the understanding being — 
as above referred to — that Mr. Lindsay was to come west and look about and 
take an interest in whatever looked most favorable. The absolute trust of his 
partner in Mr. Lindsay's judgment seems to have colored his subsequent career. 
He had not only his own interests to further but also had absolutely in his keep- 
ing the interests of another. This tended to make him conservative, and he has 
always been a conservative man. This conservatism, however, should not be 
misjudged, for he has ever had an aggressive and enthusiastic confidence in the 
future values of timber lands. 

Later in 1861 Mr. Lindsay secured a lease of the Renwick mill in Daven- 
port. Shortly afterward John B. Phelps bought Mr. Harris' interest and the 
firm became Lindsay & Phelps, and it has so continued — barring its incorpora- 
tion in 1890 — for nearly fifty years. In 1866 Lindsay & Phelps built a mill at 
Davenport. It started with a circular saw; a gang saw was added in 1867, at 
that time the only gang mill in this section of the country ; and later, in 1880, a 
band mill was added and other necessary machinery for a more modern plant. 
The mill at Davenport continued in operation until the close of the season of 
igo4 — a period of thirty-nine years. The corporation of Lindsay & Phelps 
Company is still being maintained, the present officers being J. E. Lindsay, presi- 
dent ; R. E. Lindsay, vice president ; Fred Wyman, secretary and treasurer ; and 



12 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

George F. Lindsay, assistant secretary and treasurer. John B. Phelps, Mr. 
Lindsay's long time partner, died in July, 1900. 

Mr. Lindsay's confidence in pine timber was of the broader kind, and as early 
as 1882, with his close friend and associate, C. R. Ainsworth, of Moline, Illinois, 
he personally located the first holdings of the Lindsay Land & Lumber Company 
in Arkansas. Perhaps it may be due to Mr. Lindsay and Mr. Ainsworth that 
they be called the pioneer northern lumbermen in Arkansas, and surely they 
were among the earliest to purchase timber lands in that section. The company's 
first officers were J. E. Lindsay, president; C. R. Ainsworth, vice president; J. 
B. Phelps, secretary ; William Renwick, treasurer. The late Hon. D. N. Richard- 
son, a newspaper man and close associate in those early days of investment in 
the south, asked Mr. Lindsay in conversation one day, "Is there a chance for an 
outsider to put some money in your southern timber company, Mr. Lindsay?" 
"Not for you, a newspaper man," was the reply, "for it takes long patience and 
years of constant outgo of money to work out a proposition of this kind, and you 
who are accustomed to annual dividends would lack the 'sand' to stay with such 
a proposition." Without hesitancy Mr. Richardson replied, "We have the sand 
and only ask you to make the opportunity." Mr. Richardson went in and up to 
the time of his death that quality of sand first shown was ever apparent. 

Resulting from Mr. Richardson's enthusiasm later came the Richardson Land 
& Timber Company, with D. N. Richardson as its first president. The present 
officers are J. J. Richardson, president ; Fred Wyman, vice president ; and M. N. 
Richardson, secretary and treasurer. The directors are J. E. Lindsay, Rebecca 
Renwick, J. J. Richardson, Fred 'Wyman and J. B, Richardson. This company 
made purchases in Little River, Dalls, Sevier and Howard counties, Arkansas, 
and later extended its operations into Mississippi. At one time its holdings 
amounted to one hundred and fifty thousand acres in Arkansas At this time 
it owns nearly fifty thousand acres in Mississippi. 

In 1884 when Renwick, Shaw and Crossett went north to Cloquet, Minne- 
sota, and organized the Cloquet Lumber Company with George S. Shaw as its 
manager, Mr. Lindsay and Mr. Phelps became members of that company, Mr. 
Lindsay now being a director. 

The big trees of the Pacific coast next attracted Lindsay & Phelps' atten- 
tion and, associated with Weyerhaeuser & Denkmann and the Richardson inter- 
ests, they organized the Sound Timber Company on December 23, 1899. The 
officers are J. E. Lindsay, president ; Fred C. Denkmann, vice president ; George 
F. Lindsay, secretary and treasurer; and with F. Weyerhaeuser, Joe R. Lane 
and M. N. Richardson form its board of directors. This company owns some- 
thing over fifty thousand acres of fir, cedar and spruce in Skagit, Snohomish, 
Whatcom and King counties, Washington, and Lane county, Oregon. 

Interest was ' again directed to the south in 1901, and Mr. Lindsay, with 
Weyerhaeuser & Denkmann, the Laird, Norton Company, Dimock, Gould & 
Company, and the Richardson interests, formed the Southland Lumber Company 
on May 4 of that year, for the purchase of timber lands in Louisiana. Its offi- 
cers are : F. E. Weyerhaeuser, president ; F. C. Denkmann, vice president ; George 
F. Lindsay, secretary and treasurer ; Fred Wyman, assistant secretary and treas- 
urer. The directors are F. Weyerhaeuser, E. P. Denkmann, H. A. Ainsworth, 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 13 

J. E. Lindsay, F. S. Bell, F. H. Thatcher, Fred C. Denkmann, Calvin Ainsworth, 
Joe R. Lane, M. N. Richardson and Fred Wyman. The present holdings are in 
southwestern Louisiana and approximate one hundred and thirty thousand acres 
of longleaf yellow pine. 

The Southern Lumber Company of Arkansas was organized January 28, 
1902, by Weyerhaeuser & Denkmann, Dimock, Gould & Company, the Richard- 
son interests and J. E. Lindsay, purchasing the holdings of the Lindsay Land & 
Lumber Company, previously referred to, and has at the present time a sawmill 
in active operation at Warren, Arkansas, and seventy thousand acres of short- 
leaf yellow pine. The officers are F. E. Weyerhaeuser, president; E. P. Denk- 
mann, vice president; George F. Lindsay, secretary; Fred Wyman, treasurer; 
N. H. Clapp, Jr., assistant secretary and treasurer and general manager. The 
directors are F. Weyerhaeuser, C. H. Ainsworth, J. E. Lindsay, F. E. Weyer- 
haeuser, E. P. Denkmann, Calvin Ainsworth, Joe R. Lane, Fred Wyman and 
M. N. Richardson. 

Mr. Lindsay is still active in business, keeping in touch with the affairs of 
the companies with which he is connected, and spending several hours daily at 
his office. Local enterprises have always received the strong support of Lind- 
say & Phelps, and Mr. Phelps was before his death, and Mr. Lindsay now is, 
identified with many local organizations. 

Mr. Lindsay married in 1858 Mary Helen Phelps at Schroon River, Essex 
county. New York. Three children were born of this union; Ralph E. Lindsay; 
Mrs. Fred W)mian, who died in 1905; and George F. Lindsay. Mr. and Mrs^ 
Lindsay have two grandchildren, Edith Helen Wyman and Edwin Blair Lindsay. 

Mr. Lindsay has always manifested a deep interests in the religious and 
charitable institutions of the community. He is identified with the Baptist church, 
having been one of its most loyal supporters for many years. His interest in 
young men was evidenced by his liberal contribution to the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. 

The results of environment are very apparent in a man of Mr. Lindsay's 
character. Long years of association with kindly mother nature as exemplified 
in her vast forests have intensified in him those inherent qualities which are 
characteristic of the grandest forest growth. Their physical qualities find their 
counterpart in his mentality — strength of purpose, uprightness of character and 
those other admirable traits which are typified by the giants of the forest and the 
stalwarts among men. He has a minute knowledge of lumber and logs which 
always he is glad to share generously with his friends and of which they par- 
take with the utmost confidence in his judgment, notably in his home city, the 
center of a great lumber interest, where and in the adjoining cities of Rock Is- 
land and Moline between the members of the Lindsay & Phelps Lumber Com- 
pany and all competitive lumber and logging interests in the three cities Mr. 
Lindsay's thorough knowledge and sterling character are well known and highly 
honored. 

While of a modest and retiring disposition, one's first impression of Mr. 
Lindsay, unconsciously conveyed by him, is that of personal dignity; yet he is 
always approachable. He is never hasty in judgment and his decisions are al- 
ways the result of intelligent deliberation. Perhaps the only voluntary exercise 



14 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

of his innate qualities that needs restraint is his ready generosity, his practical 
sympathy for misfortune. In the sense that makes the characteristic a strongly 
commendable one, he is one of the most conspicuous figures in the lumber m- 
dustry of the middle west. 



EMANUEL PHILLIP ADLER. 

Emanuel Phillip Adler, as president of the Lee Newspaper Syndicate, repre- 
sents that spirit of organization and coordination of forces that constitutes one 
of the most forceful and vital elements in the business life of the times. It is 
but another expression of the truth of the old adage that "in union there is 
strength," for with combined interests the expenditure of time, labor and ma- 
terial is reduced to a minimum in the accomplishment of maximum results. 
Bending his eiforts to administrative direction and executive control as head of 
the Lee Newspaper Syndicate, Mr. Adler has justified his adoption of the print- 
ing business as a life work, for in this field he has advanced from a humble 
position to one of leadership. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, September 30 
1872, and was taken to Ottumwa, Iowa, by his parents, P E. and Bertha Adler, 
in 1874. His youthful days were therefore passed in this state, and in Ottumwa 
he pursued his education in the common schools to the age of fourteen years, 
when he began learning the printer's trade. He afterward secured a position 
in a Chicago, newspaper office as "sub" when seventeen years of age, and later, 
returning to Ottumwa he secured a position as printer on the Ottumwa Courier. 
In 1894 he was given a trial as "cub" reporter on the Courier and proving his 
worth was promoted from time to time serving successively in the position of 
editor, managing editor and business manager. In 1900 A. W. Lee, publisher 
of the Courier, purchased the Davenport Times and established the Lee News- 
paper Syndicate, and in January, 1901, Mr. Adler was sent to Davenport as pub- 
lisher of the Times. The policy which he inaugurated in its management made it 
one of the profitable journals of the state and the evidence of business ability 
which he thus displayed led to his election to the presidency oif the syndicate 
upon the death of Mr. Lee in 1907. Five daily papers constitute this syndicate: 
the Davenport Times ; the Ottumwa Courier ; the Muscatine Journal ; the La- 
Cross Tribune ; and the Hannibal Courier-Post. 

Mr. Adler's activities extend to political circles, wherein his labors have 
largely advanced the interests of the republican party in Iowa. He was made 
state central committeeman from the second district, was chosen secretary of the 
committee and given charge of the press bureau in the Taft campaign. To prac- 
tical politics he brings the results of business experience and that wise direction 
of forces which have been salient elements in the general movement toward 
placing the republican party in Iowa beyond the pale of possible diminution of 
power. 

On the 5th of February, 1902, occurred the marriage of Mr. Adler to Miss 
Lena Rothschild, a daughter of the late David R. Rothschild, president of the 
Rothschild Grain Company. Their only son, Phillip David Adler, is now a lad 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 15 

of six years. Mr. Adler's social nature finds expression in his membership 
in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Arsenal Golf Club, the Out- 
ing and Rock Island Clubs — assiociations which also indicate the nature of 
his recreation. Moreover, he is prominent in the Davenport Commercial Club, 
serving as its vice president and as a member of its board of directors. He is 
active in all projects looking to the development of the city along many lines 
of general improvement and has done much in promoting desired results. 



ALFRED CHRISTIAN MUELLER. 

Fortunate is the man who has back of him an ancestry honorable and dis- 
tinguished, and happy is he if his lines of life are cast in harmony therewith. 
In person, in talents and in character Alfred Christian Mueller is a worthy 
scion of his race. He is a representative in the maternal line of a family that 
has figured conspicuously in connection with the legal history of Davenport for 
fifty-seven years, and in his personal connection with the bar he has demon- 
strated the possession of those qualities which win success in law practice — 
close application, comprehensive study of legal principles and unfaltering devo- 
tion to the interests of his clients. 

Mr. Mueller was born in Davenport, June 14, 1875, a son of Christian and 
Elfrieda (Claussen) Mueller. The father, for many years a leading lumber mer- 
chant and prominent and beloved citizen of Davenport, is mentioned at length on 
another page of this volume. The mother was a daughter of Hans Reimer 
Claussen, who in 1853 was the founder of the present law firm with which A. C. 
Mueller is now connected. The business has descended by legacy or purchase 
to son and grandson to the present time and the firm has ever stood as one of 
the most successful and representative among the practitioners of the Daven- 
port bar. Hans Reimer Qaussen, the founder of the firm, was born in Schles- 
wig-Holstein, in 1804, and prepared for the practice of law as a student in the 
LTniversity of Kiel between the years 1824 and 1829. The following year he 
was admitted to the bar and entered upon the active duties of the profession 
near his old home. In 1834 he opened an office in Kiel, where he remained in 
active practice until 1851, when he was exiled by the King of Denmark, then ruler 
of Schleswig-Holstein. He had served as a member of the legislature of Hol- 
stein from 1840 until 185 1 and in 1848-9 was a member of the German parlia- 
ment, which convened in May of the former year. For the prominent part 
which he took in the discussion of governmental affairs, and because his son 
Ernest fought in the ranks of the revolutionists of 1848, the family were exiled. 
America, the refuge of so many political exiles from Germany, offered shelter 
and opportunity to H. R. Claussen, who, arriving in Davenport in 1851, began 
the study of the English language and two years thereafter was admitted to the 
bar. His son Ernest became his law partner and the firm soon took rank with 
the leading representatives of the legal profession in this city. In 1869 Hans R. 
Claussen was elected to the state senate for a four years' term, and his knowledge 
of the law enabled him to take active part in the revision of the court in 1873. 



16 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

He left the impress of his individuality upon the laws enacted during his con- 
nection with the general assembly and also upon the history of the republican 
party, aiding largely in shaping its history in this state. In May, 1832, he married 
Anna Rahbeck, a daughter of a Danish civil officer and niece of a celebrated 
Danish poet. Ernest Claussen, who became his father's law partner and was 
an uncle of A. C. Mueller, was born in 1833, spent the first two years in Amer- 
ica in St. Louis and then became a resident of Davenport. Following his father's 
retirement from the bar in 1870 he continued in practice alone until his son Al- 
fred became his associate. Moreover, he was prominent in connection with munic- 
ipal affairs and that his fellow townsmen recognized his devotion to the public 
welfare is indicated in the fact that he was for five terms mayor of Davenport. 

From a family of lawyers, therefore, Alfred Christian Mueller was de- 
scended in the maternal line. At the usual age he became a pupil in the pub- 
lic schools and afterward attended Duncan's Commercial College, while for one 
year he was a student in the polytechnic school at Hanover, Germany. His 
literary course completed, he took up the study of law and afterward pursued 
his reading for one year under the direction of Julius Lischer. He next entered 
the law school of the Iowa State University, from which he was graduated in 
1897 and afterward spent one year in the office of Lischer & Bawden. He next 
went to New York and pursued a three years' course in law in Columbia Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated in the class of 1901. Returning to Daven- 
port, he became associated with the Mueller Lumber Company as auditor, but in 
1903 entered actively upon the practice of law and became the successor of his 
cousin, Alfred Claussen, thus continuing the firm which was founded by his 
grandfather. 

On the 2ist of January, 1903, Mr. Mueller was married to Lulu May Ells- 
worth, a native of New York city and i daughter of Albert Starr and Cora Ells- 
worth, who were of English descent. Mr. Mueller takes little active part in 
politics but is a member of the school board and is much interested in the cause 
of education, recognizing the full value of public instruction as one of the bul- 
warks of the nation. 



EDWARD SAVAGE CROSSETT. 

The lumber industry occupies a most important relation to the development 
of the United States. One of the most interesting chapters in our national his- 
tory is that recounting the origin of this far-reaching activity, the struggles of 
its pioneers, their privations and triumphs and the marvelous growth which the 
business has now attained in certain sections of our common country. Employ- 
ing, as it does, literally an army of men ; offering channels of investment for mil- 
lions of dollars ; this branch of trade takes easily front rank as one of the wealth 
producing agencies of America. One of the captains in this great industry is 
the subject of this sketch. 

When one has spent the fifty most active years of his effective life in one 
section of the country and in the pursuit of a single enterprise which has issued 





/i^^p-^t^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 19 

in ultimately fortunate results to himself and those associated with him, he 
most certainly has contributed to the development of the industry and has won 
for himself a large and merited place in the history of that locality. Such a 
man is Edward Savage Crossett of Davenport, Iowa. For half a century he 
has played a conspicuous part in the lumber business of the entire Mississippi 
valley and is a masterful factor in council and conference wherever in that entire 
section men interested in yellow pine foregather. 

Mr. Crossett was born in West Plattsburg, Clinton bounty, New York, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1828, near the scene of the battle of Plattsburg, historic in the war of 
1812. His father, John Savage Crossett, participated actively in that war as a 
soldier in the American army. The subject of our sketch received his educa- 
tion in the public schools and in an academy . His first employment was in the 
printing office of Bardwell & Kneeland, at Troy, which work, however, he aban- 
doned on account of failing health. His new position as clerk in a shoe store 
brought him the munificent salary of two dollars and fifty cents each month 
and board. In 1846, when eighteen years of age, he became clerk in the village 
store at Schroon Lake, New York, and two years later he and his brother pur- 
chased the establishment. It was here that he first became interested in the 
lumber business, handling pine and spruce lumber in small quantities. 

At the age of twenty-two Mr. Crossett turned his business over to his brother 
and started west. From Cincinnati he journeyed to St. Louis by steamer, and 
in the spring of 1852 on to St. Paul, going soon to La Crosse, Wisconsin, where 
he remained one year and six months. In the meantime business matters had 
not gone well in the east, his brother had sold the property at a loss and young 
Crossett was under the handicap of debts, if anything can handicap one so 
strong and courageous. With the restiveness of an honest nature smarting under 
the sense of unmet obligations, he assumed the entire burden and eventually 
paid the last dollar. 

In the fall of 1853 Mr. Crossett went to Black River Falls, Wisconsin, where 
he took charge of a supply store for lumbermen. He was in entire command of 
this enterprise, from the making contract for supplies to the sale of the goods. 
His experience as a merchant in the Adirondacks served him well, and so satis- 
factory were the results that his employers united their four stores into one and 
gave him its management. From, 1854 to 1856 he was postmaster of Black 
River Falls, and in the latter year he associated himself with W. T. Price in a 
supply store busifiess of their own, returning, however, a year later to his former 
employers. 

Then came a period of reverses in which Mr. Crossett suffered heavy losses. 
The freshet of the following year swept the company's logs down the river and 
out of reach; as a result the company was forced to suspend operations and go 
into bankruptcy. A portion of Mr. Crossett's capital and two years salary were 
sunk in the general collapse. In 1859 he started a supply store of his own, but 
shortly after was burned out with the complete loss of stock and building. Still 
undaunted and unafraid, Mr. Crossett gathered up the threads of his raveled 
business and attempted to again weave them together. Succeeding in obtaining 
the equivalent of some bills due him, in the shape of lumber and hewn timber, 
he rafted it down the river in 1861 and sold it where he could, but was obliged 



20 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

to take in payment "stump tail currency," which depreciated largely before he 
could dispose of it. Thus Mr. Crossett's first eight years in the west brought 
him little but valuable experience. 

In this same year Mr. Crossett was employed to assist J. E. Lindsay, who was 
shortly thereafter joined in partnership by J. B. Phelps; and subsequently he 
was connected with other concerns until 1870. For several years he ran the 
yards of Isaac Spaulding in East St. Louis, spending his winters in picking up 
stock on Black river. From 1870 to 1875 he was engaged in scaling logs and 
estimating timber; purchasing for himself parcels of timber land whenever such 
were available and seemed valuable. 

In 1873 Mr. Crossett was united in marriage to Miss Harmony E. Clark, 
of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and from that auspicious day dates, as he declares, 
his real prosperity. The two made their home in Nielsville, Wisconsin, until 
February, 1875, when they removed to Davenport, Iowa, where Mr. Crossett 
became a member of the firm of Renwick, Shaw & Crossett. Their son, Edward 
Clark Crossett, was born at Davenport, August 7, 1882. The same year marks 
Mr. Crossett's first investment in yellow pine, as one of the organizers of the 
Lindsay Land & Lumber Company. 

In 1884 Renwick, Shaw & Crossett bought a sawmill and some pine land 
at Cloquet, Minnesota. Two years later Mr. Crossett sold his interest to Mr. 
Shaw, taking in payment ten thousand acres of Arkansas land covered with 
yellow pine. His friends were confident that he had made a serious mistake in 
acquiring Arkansas property, but the soundness of his judgment was speedily 
vindicated. Convinced by personal inspection of the great possibilities in yellow 
pine, he became extensively interested in other companies operating in the south. 
Already a heavy stockholder in the Eagle Lumber Company, of Eagle Mills, 
Arkansas, and in the Gates Lumber Company, of Wilmar, Arkansas, he, in 
company with C. W. Gates and Dr. J. W. Watzek, purchased in 1892 the Fordyce 
Lumber Company, of Fordyce, Arkansas. 

In the principle of cooperation Mr. Crossett has always been interested. 
With William Morris, its modern apostle, he has believed that the profits accru- 
ing from any enterprise should in some equitable way be divided among those 
producing them. In 1899 the Crossett Lumber Company was organized on a 
cooperative basis, not as the result of any dreaming of a modern Utopia, but 
as a business proposition, and partly no doubt because of his own long bout with 
the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune." In the cooperative organization 
Messrs. Crossett, Watzek and Gates held three-fourths of the stock and certain 
employes the other one-fourth. In recognition of Mr. Crossett's generosity, 
his fine sense of justice in this self-centered age, and of his wise council and 
cooperation always so freely given, his associates named the new town in his 
honor, and Crossett, Arkansas, came upon the map. 

After eight years of actual operation, this town has come from the virgin 
forest to be one of the "show towns" of the entire south. Here dwell a pros- 
perous people, numbering upward of two thousand, each in a home good enough 
for the best and at rents that return to the corporation only a very low interest 
rate on the investment. The town rejoices in a fine public school costing upward 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 21 

of fifteen thousand dollars, a well equipped hospital worth thirty-five thousand 
dollars, two good churches well supported and effective, and a clubhouse and 
swimming pool costing something like fifteen to twenty thousand dollars, these 
latter the personal gift of Mr. Crossett to the youth and manhood of the town. 
There is a five-mile liquor law and it is enforced ; the finest type of labor gravi- 
tates here naturally, and it is to be doubted if any finer specimens of life and 
character can be found in any lumber town in the world than flourish and mature 
in this favored spot. While much credit for these conditions is surely due to 
the splendid men whom Mr. Crossett has associated with him, the fact still re- 
mains that it is due to his influence, his ideals and his character that the town 
is what it is. 

More recently Mr. Crossett has extended his holdings and, as an influential 
member of the Jackson Lumber Company, of Lockhart, Alabama, has with his 
associates invested in one hundred and fifty thousand acres of virgin timber in 
Alabama and Florida. In cooperation with Messrs. Watzek and Gates, the two 
remaining members, a large sawmill plant was built at Lockhart, and the prop- 
erty otherwise developed and increased. In 1906 the Crossett Timber Company, 
of Davenport, Iowa, was organized for operation in the Pacific northwest, with 
holdings chiefly in Washington and Oregon. Mr. Crossett not only organized 
and projected this company but retains a controlling portion of the stock and 
direction in management through his son, Edward Clark Crossett, its president. 
Believing that a man should dispose of his property and provide for his family 
during his lifetime, while still in his early seventies Mr. Crossett organized the 
Crossett Land & Investment Company as a holding company for the greater 
part of his property and gave his wife and son equal shares with himself. 

Religiously Mr. Crossett has always been known as a sincere and earnest 
worshiper of the God of the forests. Reared as a Methodist, and a member of 
the Baptist church from the age of twenty-five, his sympathies have always been 
with all genuine men of whatever name or creed. It would be expected that a 
man of such robust personality and breadth of vision would have fellowship 
with all good men, and hence his interests and beneficences have outrun all de- 
nominational bounds. He was a member of the building committee of St. John's 
Methodist Episcopal church, of Davenport, of which his wife and son are com- 
municants, and his generosity and liberality, with that of one or two others, 
made that superb structure possible. His proposition to give fifty thousand 
dollars to a Young Men's Christian Association building in Davenport, providing 
the citizens would contribute an equal amount, was the means of securing for 
his home city one of the best equipped structures in the middle west, while his 
private benevolences, about which even his right hand knows not, are perpetual 
and broadcast. 

Mr. Crossett is that type of manhood for which America is most famed and 
for which she may well be proud ; yet only now and then in a century is she able 
to grow one of his superfine qualities. Born with little promise of what was to 
be, with little to assure him such a future as has been his, little save his rugged, 
stalwart character and his tireless determination, all graciously shot through 
with his changeless trust in God. Honest to the core, circumspect in life, genial 
in spirit, alert in mentality, helping everybody and hindering none, wronging no 



22 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

man that he might himself gain, but enriching all others by his own prosperity, 
he lives an honored and conspicuous type of that noblest of all men — an Ameri- 
can gentleman. 



GEORGE W. CABLE. 



George W. Cable, since 1866 a resident of Davenport and for many years 
one of the most prominent representatives of the lumber trade in the city, is 
now practically living retired but still has large investments and commercial in- 
terests. He was born in Athens county, Ohio, June Vj, 1831, his parents being 
Hiram and Rachel (Henry) Cable. The father was a native of Jefferson county, 
New York, and the mother's birth occurred in Washington county, Ohio. The 
family is of English lineage and was founded in America by James Cable, the 
grandfather of our subject, who came from England in 1770 and settled in Mas- 
sachusetts, whence representatives of the name removed to other localities and 
established other branches of the family. Mrs. Rachel Cable, the mother of 
George W. Cable, was of Scotch-Irish descent and was a lady of high charac- 
ter, whose influence has been one of the potent forces in the life of her son. 
Hiram Cable, prominent in public affairs, labored along practical and effective 
lines for the advancement and improvement of the section of the state in which 
he lived". Various public enterprises were promoted by him and commercial 
activity was also stimulated by his efforts through the years in which he was 
engaged in merchandising in Athens county, Ohio. Later he became one of 
the projectors of the Piqua & Indiana Railroad, now a branch of the Pennsyl- 
vania Central, and was one of the largest contractors in its construction. He 
also served for nine years as a director of the company. He was one of the 
founders of the picturesque town of Cable in Champaign county and in many 
ways left the impress of his individuality for good upon the development and 
substantial upbuilding of that section of the state. A republican in politics, he 
represented his district in the state legislature and did not a little toward mold- 
ing public thought and action. He was a man of strong character, fearless in 
defense of what he believed to be right and his championship of any measure 
was an effective force for its accomplishment. 

George W. Cable acquired a good English education in the schools of Ur- 
bana, Ohio, and commenced business life as a farmer in Champaign county, 
where he successfully conducted agricultural interests for two years. He then 
sold out in 1857 and came to Scott county, Iowa, where for nine years he de- 
voted his energies to general agricultural pursuits. In 1866 he came to Daven- 
port and with his father engaged in the coal business and lumber trade. Extend- 
ing the scope of their activities to include an extensive and up-to-date lumber 
manufacturing enterprise, George W. Cable has since been actively or financially 
interested in the business. In 1874 his father retired and was succeeded by John 
Hornby, under the firm name of Hornby & Cable. This association was main- 
tained until the death of the senior partner in 1879, in which year the business 
was reorganized under the name of the Cable Lumber Company, with George 




"^ ry. ^oJij-L^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 25 

W. Cable as president. The business grew to mammoth proportions, the Cable 
Company becoming a power in lumber circles. The enterprise was developed 
along modern business lines, its ramifying trade interests reaching out to various 
sections of the country, while the close conformity of the house to a high stan- 
dard of commercial ethics has made its reputation an unassailable one. By the 
stimulus of his exertions Mr. Cable aroused the enterprise of others and through 
this means added to his own efforts, while at the same time he furnished many 
with remunerative employment. His strict integrity, business conservatism and 
judgment have always been so universally recognized that he has enjoyed pub- 
lic confidence to an enviable degree and naturally this has brought him such a 
lucrative patronage that through times of general prosperity and general adver- 
sity alike he has witnessed a steady increase in his business until the Cable Lum- 
ber Company now controls one of the most important enterprises of this charac- 
ter in the middle west. Now, owing to failing health, Mr. Cable has retired from 
active work, his interests, however, being carefully guarded and augmented by 
his son. As the years went by he made other investments of an important char- 
acter, including some of the milling enterprises, banking and telephone interests. 
He was likewise a director in several railroads and his cooperation in any pro- 
ject has been taken as proof of its worth because of his business discernment 
and known reliability. 

On the i8th of October, 1854, Mr. Cable was united in marriage to Miss 
Eliza E. Baldwin, a daughter of Richard Baldwin, of Champaign county, Ohio. 
Their only son and Mr. Cable's namesake is his worthy successor in business. 
Active in the Presbjrterian church, Mr. Cable practices charity without ostenta- 
tion and Christianity without cant. His name is unsullied and there is no man 
who occupies a more enviable position in industrial and financial circles. His 
rise in the business world has been continuous and has been the legitimate out- 
come of methods that neither seek nor require disguise. 



HON. GEORGE W. SCOTT. 

Hon. George W. Scott, mayor of the city of Davenport, whose experiences 
have been wide and whose course has been marked by continuous progress, was 
born on a farm near Le Roy, in Oldtown township, McLean county, Illinois, 
January 31, 1861. His parents were William H. and Eunice B. (Lebo) Scott, 
the former of Irish descentv and the latter of French hneage. The maternal 
grandfather was bom in France, and some of the Lebo family were participants 
in the Revolutionary war and the war of 1812, while brothers of Eunice B. Lebo 
served in the Civil war. 

William H. Scott was a farmer by occupation and carried on agricultural 
pursuits and stock-raising on an extensive scale. He died March 19, 1889, near 
Lincoln, Nebraska, which city was at that time his home. His widow now re- 
sides with a daughter near Enid, Oklahoma. Their family numbered four sons 
and two daughters, five of whom are living : George W. ; Ira, who is on a farm 
near Cashion, Oklahoma; Wilson H., living near La Cygne, Kansas; Orris, 



26 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

whose home is near Norfolk, Nebraska; and Emma,. the wife of John Hollar, 
near Enid, Oklahoma. 

George W. Scott was reared to farm life and attended the district schools 
until nineteen years of age, when he continued his studies in the Evergreen City- 
Business College, at Bloomington, Illinois, pursuing a commercial course. He 
afterward entered the Illinois State Normal University at Normal, Illinois, 
and there pursued a two years' course. He afterward engaged in teaching in 
the country and graded schools for three years and, making advance in this 
field of labor as he has in every other to which he has directed his attention, he 
became principal of the graded schools at Morton, Ilhnois. After a short time 
he was appointed superintendent of the Indian school and special disbursement 
agent at Fort Stevenson, Dakota, now North Dakota. He continued in that 
position from October 28, 1885, until January 8, 1889, when he was appointed 
superintendent by Hon. J. D. C. Atkins, commissioner of Indian affairs, and 
at the same time received appointment as special disbursing agent from the 
Hon. L. Q. C. Lamar, secretary of the interior during President Cleveland's 
first administration. 

Shortly after reaching Fort Stevenson Mr. Scott was appointed first post- 
master of the fort by General Adlai E. Stevenson, first assistant postmaster- 
general. This was an old military fort established in 1868 and when Mr. Scott 
received this appointment the military reservation was set off, in charge of the 
interior department, for school purposes and he was placed in charge as its 
first bonded officer. He not only had charge of the school and reservation but 
also established an industrial school to which he brought many Indian children 
who were there taught the different trades and industries. On the 8th of Janu- 
ary, 1889, by order of the secretary of the interior and commissioner of Indian 
affairs, Mr. Scott was transferred to the superintendency of the Chilocco Indian 
Training School at Chilocco, Indian Territory, with an annual increase of salary 
of three hundred dollars. At the time that was one of the largest Indian train- 
ing schools in the service, having an enrollment of some three hundred boys and 
girls. General John H. Oberly had charge of the Indian affairs and the Hon. 
William Vilas was secretary of the interior. Mr. Scott remained in charge of 
the school until December i, 1889, when he resigned to devote his attention to 
the reading of law. At the school he had had thirty-five employes under him, 
had conducted a farm of five hundred acres, had carried on stock-raising quite 
extensively and had superintended all the manual and graded school work. He 
was one of the pioneers in the work of the Indian training schools and suc- 
ceeded in demonstrating their worth in the civilizing of the red race. 

While thus engaged Mr. Scott read law in his leisure moments. His read- 
ing was directed by C. T. Atkinson, at Arkansas City, Kansas, and after his 
admission to the bar, on the 20th of April, 1890, he practiced there until April, 
1 89 1, when he was elected justice of the peace, which position he continued to 
fill tmtil elected county attorney, January i, 1893. He filled the latter position 
for two years and following his retirement from office removed to Davenport 
on the 1st of February, 1895, and has since been a representative of the bar in 
this city. While engaged in teaching and also while pursuing his studies Mr. 
Scott devoted some time to the newspaper business, being correspondent for the 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 27 

Bloomington Bulletin. He also worked for the Pekin (Illinois) Times and 
while in Kansas he was for a time associate editor of the Arkansas City Val- 
ley Democrat and correspondent for a number of years for other papers. Dur- 
ing the fifteen years of his connection with the legal profession of Davenport 
he has made substantial advance and has conducted many important litigated in- 
terests. He formed a partnership with William Theophilus which continued 
itntil April i, 1898, when Mr. Scott was appointed city attorney at Davenport, 
holding the position until April i, 1900. He was then engaged in the practice 
of law alone until January i, 1905, when he formed partnership relations with 
B. I. Salinger and William Theophilus under the firm name of Salinger, Scott 
& Theophilus, which relation was maintained until May 17, 1909. On the ist 
of April, 1906, Mr. Scott was appointed city attorney of Davenport, which office 
he held until the election of 1908, when he was chosen to the highest official 
position in the gift of the city, being elected mayor for a two years' term. In 
1904 he was the democratic nominee for county attorney but was defeated by one 
hundred and eighty-one votes. He ran far ahead of his ticket, however, as is 
indicated in the fact that Roosevelt in the same year was given a majority of 
twenty-five hundred. 

On the 5th of January, 1887, Mr. Scott was married to Miss Rosemary Spier, 
of Peoria, Illinois, and they have six children: Walter Howell, Maris Stella, 
Coaina Marie, Eunice Marie, Sylvester Hackney, and George Winans. The 
family are members of the Catholic church and Mr. Scott holds membership with 
the Modern Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of the World, the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, the National Union, the Modem Brotherhood of America, 
the Odd Fellows' society and the Elks, and has filled nearly all of the chairs in 
nearly all of these organizations. He was exalted ruler of the Elks lodge for 
two years, was district deputy of the southern division of Iowa and was one of 
the board of directors of the Elks Building Association. He has also been a mem- 
ber of the Elks grand lodge. He has taken a very active part in society and 
political affairs and has been called upon to deliver many speeches and ora- 
tions, both in the lodges and during political campaigns. He has been attorney 
for a number of corporations in this city and has met with eminent success as 
a criminal lawyer. He stands as a splendid representative of the men whose 
strength of character and ability have enabled them to work their way upward. 
Mr. Scott provided for his own education and though he has met with many 
hardships and difficulties in life, he has made continuous advancement and is 
today a forceful character in the professional and political circles of his adopted 
city. 



HENRY MOELLER. 

Henry Moeller is one of the most prominent and wealthy of the many suc- 
cessful agriculturists of Cleona township, although he has now forsaken the 
active work of the farm, to which he devoted himself with such energy for so 
many years and now makes his home in the village of Walcott. He was bom 
in the province of Mecklenburg, Germany, September 17, 1848. His parents. 



28 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

John and Caroline Moeller, were also natives of the fatherland and came to the 
United States in 1854. Immediately after their arrival in this country they came 
to Scott county, Iowa, locating in Blue Grass township, where Mrs. Moeller died. 
She was not able to withstand the hardships of travel in those early days when 
there was nothing to shorten the tiresome journey across the ocean, and the means 
of crossing the mountains and prairies were most primitive. Mr. Moeller him- 
self did not live to see the great change which transformed the character of 
this county for he passed away seven years after his advent here. Only two 
sons were bom to him and his wife — Henry, the subject of this review; and 
Charles, a resident of Shelby, Iowa. 

Henry Moeller, when being deprived of his father's guidance in his youth, 
found employment and a home upon his uncle's farm, where he remained until 
he reached man's estate, ,and, having married, was filled with the natural desire 
to make a home of his own. Accordingly he bought a large tract of land in 
Cleona township, to whose cultivation he devoted himself assiduously until 
May 22, 1906, when he felt that a large income, the generous return of his 
years of labor, entitled him to the respite from toil he desired and he took up his 
residence in Walcott. He had previously built a fine residence, whose many 
modern conveniences indicate the progressive spirit which was as potent a fac- 
tor in his success as the industry and frugality. In addition to operating his 
own place, Mr. Moeller improved and cultivated a fine tract of one hundred and 
thirty-four acres belonging to his wife and another of sixty acres owned by his 
mother-in-law. 

On the 6th of February, 1875, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Moeller 
and Miss Caroline Feuerbach, who was born in Cleona township, this county,' 
April 14, 1858, and is a daughter of John and Mary Elizabeth (Dietz) Feuer- 
bach. Her father was a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, where his birth 
occurred May 20, 1817, and he came to the United States in 1853. He was ac- 
companied by his sister Lizzie, who later became the wife of Jacob Adomey and 
was the only other member of his family to come to America. She like her hus- 
band has now passed away. Mr. Feuerbach had learned the trade of a carpenter 
in the land of his birth, but after coming to this country worked in the mines 
of Pennsylvania while that state was his home, and when he took up his resi- 
dence in Scott county, Iowa, devoted himself exclusively to agricultural pur- 
suits. He first bought forty-eight acres of land in Cleona township, to which he 
added extensively in the course of years until at the time of his death he owned 
five hundred acres. This is now in the possession of his widow and part of it 
is operated by his son Henry. In Pennsylvania, July 11, 1853, Mr. Feuerbach 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary Elizabeth Dietz, who was also born in 
Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, December 18, 1832. In 1853 she came to America 
with her parents, John and Marie Elizabeth (Mock) Dietz, who settled in the 
Keystone state and latter came to Scott county, where they passed the remainder 
of their lives. Caroline, who is the wife of Mr. Moeller, and Henry, of whom 
mention is made elsewhere in this work, were the children granted to Mr. and 
Mrs. Feuerbach. 

Mr. and Mrs. Moeller have seven children, namely: Willie, who resides upon 
his father's farm ; Bertha, who is the wife of John Hein, of Cleona township ; 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 29 

Amelia, the wife of Louis Gibson, of Blue Grass township; Theresa, who mar- 
ried Julius Hein, a brother of John Hein, and a resident of Cleona township; 
Elizabeth, the wife of Adolph Rodgens, of Cleona township; Ella, who mar- 
ried George Reisen, of Fulton township, Muscatine county, Iowa; and Fer- 
dinand, who lives with his brother Willie on the home farm. 

Mr. Moeller is one of the most substantial representatives of the German 
race who have come to this country, and through the strong traits of their char- 
acter have raised the standard of citizenship here, while at the same time they 
have contributed to the sum total of the prosperity which distinguishes this 
county and state. 



JOHN W. JAMISON. 



John W. Jamison, residing at No. 1019 Scott street in Davenport, has lived 
retired for more than two decades and is one of the oldest residents of the city. 
His birth occurred in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, on the 2Sth of July, 1822, 
his parents being Francis and Nancy (Wallace) Jamison, who were natives of 
Ireland and America respectively. The father was a farmer and miller by occu- 
pation. John W. Jamison obtained his education in the schools of his native 
county and after putting aside his text-books worked with his father on the farm 
and in the mill. He likewise learned the shoemaker's trade and worked at that 
occupation in Allegheny county until his removal to Scott county, Iowa, in 1855. 
After a residence O'f three months in this county he returned to the Keystone state 
for his wife and children and on establishing his home in Davenport obtained em- 
ployment in a mill. Subsequently he entered the service of Dawson & Greggs, a 
shoe concern, with whom he remained for about five years, on the expiration of 
which period he opened a shoe factory in association with Mr. Murdock. Several 
years later they dissolved partnership and for a long time Mr. Jamison remained 
the sole proprietor of the enterprise. Later he became associated with his son, 
George W. Jamison, and thus continued an active factor in commercial circles 
until his retirement from the shoe business in 1877. During the following ten 
years he was employed in a clerical capacity by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 
Railway but since severing his connection with that corporation he has lived in 
honorable retirement. 

On the nth of February, 1845, Mr. Jamison was united in marriage to Miss 
Rebecca Kelso, who was bom in Pennsylvania on the 8th of September, 1816, her 
parents being Geoirge Washington and Nancy (Murdock) Kelso. Her graiid- 
father participated in the Revolutionary war. Mr. and Mrs. Jamison became the 
parents of six children, the record of whom is as follows : George W., the eldest, 
is now a resident of St. Louis. At the time of the Civil war, when but eighteen 
years of age, he enlisted for one hundred days' service in the Union army and 
reenlisted in 1864, becoming a member of Company G, Twentieth Iowa Volunteer 
Infantry. He participated in a number of hotly contested engagements and when 
the supremacy of the Union had been established was honorably discharged. He 
married Miss Matilda Hartung, by whom he has four children, namely : Lottie, 



30 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

the wife of Edward Owens; Edmund K., a resident of Moline, Illinois, who 
wedded Miss Emma Barroclough and has one child, Raymond; Archie, who 
makes his home in St. Louis; and Wliliam, who is in the United States navy. 
Francis Jamison, who lives in Moline, Illinois, wedded Miss Mary Binder and 
has three children : Ida, who is the wife of George Sauni and has three children — 
Mabel, Margaret and Mary ; Minnie, a twin sister of Ida ; and Amy, who gave 
her hand in marriage to Charles Berry and has one child, Beatrice. The other 
children of Mr. Jamison of this review were : John, who has passed away ; Robert, 
who makes his home in California; Benjamin, who is likewise deceased; and 
Nancy, at home. Mrs. Rebecca Jamison passed away on the 25th of March, 
1907, and her loss was deeply and sincerely mourned by all who knew her. 

Mr. Jamison is a stalwart democrat in his political views and held the office 
of city assessor in 1877. He joined the Masonic fraternity in 1858 and is one 
of the oldest representatives of the craft here. He belongs to all the branches 
of the order, has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is 
past grand treasurer of the grand lodge of Masons. He is likewise past 
grand chancellor of the Knights of Pythias lodge. For many years he served 
as superintendent of the Sunday school of the United Presbyterian church and 
has always been one of its most active and valued members, holding various 
official positions therein. He assisted in the erection of the first house of worship 
and was one of the two men who contributed the funds for the seating of the 
edifice. He is now in the eighty-eighth year of his age and is one of the most 
venerable as well as respected residents of Davenport, which city has remained 
his home for fifty-five years. His record as a business man and as a private 
citizen has been so honorable that he has gained the confidence and good will of 
all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



COLONEL HENRY EGBERT. 

Henry Egbert, "a peer among men," with a wide acquaintance, and honored 
wherever he was known, left his impress for good upon the city which he made 
his home and which was stimulated in its growth and progress along many 
lines by his cooperation, his keen business insight and his unselfish devotion to 
all that contributes to the welfare of the individual and the community. A 
successful business man, his commercial and financial interests represented to 
him but the one phase of life. There was something higher and of more worth 
for him in life than the accumulation of wealth, and with the passing years he 
used every opportunity to aid his fellowmen, to alleviate human suffering, to 
ameliorate the hard conditions of life for the individual, and to heighten those 
joys and pleasures which are of real value to man. All these things contributed 
to give to Colonel Henry Egbert a hold on the affection of his fellowmen that 
was rare and notable, causing the news of his death to be received with a sense 
of personal bereavement throughout the entire city. 

A native of Delaware, Colonel Egbert was born in New Castle, December 
22, 1826, a son of Christian and Elizabeth (Austin) Egbert. The father was 




£^((l€<-^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 33 

a native of Amsterdam, Holland, and came alone to America at the age of four- 
teen years. From that time forward he was dependent entirely upon his own 
resources, and following the sea for years, finally became captain of sea-going 
craft. 

Colonel Egbert, one of a family of three children, spent his early boyhood in 
his father's home, attending school until bereft by death of both parents. At 
fifteen years of age he went to Philadelphia and, though but a youth in years, 
soon engaged in the grocery business, which occupied his attention until he 
attained his majority. Continuing on his westward way, in 1847 he went to 
Hocking river, seven miles from Logan, Ohio, and there operated a sawmill. 
While residing in that locality, he was married on the 12th of May, 1850, to 
Miss Elizabeth G. Sudlow, a daughter of Richard and Hannah Sudlow and a 
native of New York. They began their domestic life near Logan, where they 
remained until 1856, when they came to Scott county, Iowa. It was still in 
some respects a frontier district, although the seeds of civilization had been 
planted many years before and were already bearing good fruit. 

Colonel Egbert purchased a farm in Cleona township and gave his time and 
labors to the cultivation and improvement of the fields until August 14, 1861, 
when, aroused by the spirit of patriotism, he abandoned the plow and offered 
his services to the government. His military record is one of which any man 
might be proud and well serves to perpetuate the memory of Colonel Egbert in 
Iowa. He enlisted in Company C, Second Iowa Cavalry, August 14, 1861, as 
first sergeant and seven days later was elected captain of his company. At the 
battle of Farmington, Mississippi, he was severely wounded, a piece of shell 
striking him in the left leg. He was compelled to return home on sick fur- 
lough, but all the time he was anxious for recovery that he might again engage 
in active service for his country. Forty days from the date of his home-coming 
found him on his way back to the field and after rejoining his regiment he par- 
ticipated in all of its battles until May, 1863, when he was again compelled by 
wounds and illness to return to his home. He did not leave the service per- 
manently, however, but in 1864 again went into the field as lieutenant colonel 
of the Forty-fourth Iowa Infantry and on the ist of March was appointed pro- 
vost marshal of the second district of Iowa. In that capacity he closed up the 
provost marshal business of the entire state and on January i, 1866, received 
his honorable discharge from the service. 

The war ended, Colonel Egbert quietly resumed the pursuits of civil life, 
again taking up the work of the farm, to which he gave his attention until the 
fall of 1869, when his fellow citizens gave expression of their desire for his 
service in a public capacity by electing him treasurer of Scott county. He held 
that responsible position for four years and about the close of his term engaged 
in the printing, binding and blank book business as the senior member of the 
firm of Egbert, Fidlar & Chambers. In the fall of 1879 he was elected on the 
republican ticket as Scott county's representative to the Iowa legislature, and his 
course in the general assembly was characterized by the same loyalty and fidelity 
which had marked him in other offices, both civil and military. He was from 
its founding deeply interested in the Soldier's Orphans' Home at Davenport, and 
while a member of the legislature worked earnestly and successfully to secure 



34 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

such enactments as would insure the permanency and still greater usefulness of 
that institution. For several years he was the locall member and president of 
its board of trustees. 

In politics Colonel Egbert was always a stanch supporter of the republican 
party, thoroughly conversant with the issues of the day and ready at all times 
to support his position by intelligent argument. In addition to his other ofifices 
he served as postmaster of Davenport during the Harrison administration. In 
his later years he was prominently known as a representative of the banking 
interests of the city, becoming president of the Davenport National Bank and 
Union Savings Bank. The complex problems of banking were quickly and cor- 
rectly solved by him and he remained at the head of these institutions to the 
time of his demise. 

Colonel Egbert was a prominent and popular member of Davenport Lodge, 
No. 37, A. F. & A. M., manifesting in his life the beneficent spirit of this 
society. He belonged to the Loyal Legion and always gave it hearty support. 
He was a firm believer in Christianity, had strong religious convictions, and ex- 
emplified them fully in his daily life. In early manhood he became a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and continued to render active and loyal 
service therein until the end. His first membership was in the Wharton Street 
church in Philadelphia. Thereafter it was in the First Methodist, later the 
Central Methodist church, of Davenport, Iowa. The church was very dear to 
him, and he gave to it liberally, both in time and means. 

He was a lover of the quiet and freedom of life in the country and this led 
him in later years to again make his home there. He chose a sightly spot on the 
river bluffs above the city, within easy reach of its activities, and there built a 
home and surrounded it with those things which, with him, made best for life's 
true enjoyment, and here he spent the last five years of his busy life. Here he 
and his cherished wife and helpmeet lived to celebrate their golden wedding an- 
niversary. May 12, 1900. The death of Henry Egbert occurred on the 23d of 
February, 1901. 

"He was one of the finest men that ever lived in Davenport," was the opin- 
ion uniformly held throughout the city. Kindly and generous, the extent of his 
good works will never be known, but they have won for him a place in the hearts 
of his fellows that is more to be coveted than the honors of the statesman or the 
success of the captain of industry. He stood for all that is highest and best 
in citizenship, in business and in social life, and though he has passed away, 
his memory will be enshrined for years in the hearts of those who knew him. 



HENRY F. WUNDER. 



In a history of Blue Grass it is imperative that mention be made of Henry F. 
Wunder, its present mayor, who has occupied that office since the incorporation 
of the town in 1903, and is also serving as the efficient cashier of the Blue Grass. 
Savings Bank, while he is at the same time identified with other financial and in- 
dustrial enterprises. One of Scott county's native sons, his birth occurred on 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 35 

the 4th of September, 1859, his parents being WiUiam and Catherine (Schlap- 
kohl) Wunder, both of whom were born in Holstein, Germany, the former on 
the 25th of March, 1823, and the latter on the 13th of May, 1822. The father 
crossed the Atlantic to America in 1851, locating first in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 
where he remained for one year and then came to Scott county, where he worked 
at the carpenter's trade until 1859. In that year he purchased a farm in Blue 
Grass township, to which he removed and upon which he resided until 1886, 
when he put aside the active work of the fields and lived retired in Davenport 
until he passed away on the 4th of July, 1907. The demise of his wife had 
occurred in this city on the 12th of October, 1891. 

In the district schools of Scott county Henry F. Wunder acquired his pre- 
liminary education and later benefited by study at the Littlebridge Business 
College of Davenport, completing the course in 1878 and being thus well equipped 
to take up the practical and responsible duties of life. Returning home, he took 
charge of the homestead farm for his father and was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until the organization of the Blue Grass Savings Bank, when he was 
elected cashier of that institution and has so continued to the present day. The 
bank, which opened for business on the 6th of January, 1902, was first capitalized- 
for fourteen thousand dollars, but its growth has been so rapid during the inter- 
vening years that on the 22d of June, 1909, its capital was increased to twenty- 
five thousand dollars. It is today one of the safe, reliable and well known banks 
of the community and in the capacity of cashier Mr. Wunder has proven himself 
a very capable and faithful official. His accuracy and business ability, combined 
with integrity and fidelity to the interests of the bank, have won for him the 
appreciation and high regard of the other officials, while his uniform courtesy 
and promptness in the discharge of all business have made him very popular with 
the patrons of the institution. He is furthermore a stockholder in the Guaranty 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of Davenport and a director in the Blue Grass 
Repair & Implement Company, both of which organizations have profited materi- 
ally by his wise counsel and business sagacity. Upon the cieath of his father in 1907 
he came into possession of the old homestead farm, which he still owns and which 
annually returns to him gratifying rental. His various business interests, carefully 
managed, have brought him a most gratifying measure of success and today he 
stands among the substantial, influential and representative citizens of the com- 
munity. 

Mr. Wunder belpngs to Hillside Camp, No. 2470, M. W. A., of Blue Grass, 
and is a prominent and active member thereof. He cast his first presidential vote 
for Garfield and since that time has voted a mixed ticket. His fellow citizens, 
recognizing his personal worth, have called him to various offices of trust and 
he served for six years as township clerk and as a member of the school board for 
ten years. In 1903, at the time of the incorporation of the town of Blue Grass, 
his fellowmen conferred upon him the greatest honor in their power to bestow, 
electing him mayor of the town, in which office he has since continued to serve. 
He has made an excellent record during his incumbency in that office, giving to 
the town a businesslike, progressive and beneficial administration. He has also 
inaugurated many reforms and improvements and in the discharge of his public 
duties has ever been true to the trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. 



36 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

In the business circles of Blue Grass few men are more prominent or more 
widely known, and his prosperity is well deserved, as in him are embraced the 
characteristics of an unbending integrity, unabating energy and industry that 
never flags. 



JUDGE G. C. R. MITCHELL. 

A scholar in the breadth of his own wisdom and the appreciation of knowl- 
edge, a statesman in his understanding of the vital problems of government, a 
lawyer of superior ability and a gentleman because of the innate refinement of 
his nature that rejected everything opposed to good taste, the names of Gilbert 
Chris Russell Mitchell is written large on the pages of Davenport's early his- 
tory and his influence was a most potent element in shaping the early progress 
of the city in professional, social, educational and moral lines. The intensely 
human side of his nature, that which held friendship inviolable and expressed 
itself in acts of kindness and deeds of generosity, was never in any way over- 
shadowed by the strength of his intellect, which, however, was far in advance 
of the great majority of men of his day. Born in Dandridge, Jefferson county, 
Tennessee, December 26, 1803, he was the only son of Nathaniel and Ann 
(Rhea) Mitchell. The father was born in Albemarle, now Nelson county, Vir- 
ginia, in 1778. During the war the records in the courthouses of Virginia wei'e 
burned, consequently little is known of his ancestry but many of the name of 
Mitchell from Virginia are on the Revolutionary honor roll. The family is of 
Scotch lineage. The father was a man of sterling qualities, honorable and high 
minded. He served in the war of 1812, holding the rank of colonel. His wife 
was born in New River county, Virginia, in 1783 and was a daughter of Archi- 
bald Rhea. Later the family removed to Tennessee, settling about a mile above 
Knoxville, and it was in Knox county that she became the wife of Nathaniel 
Mitchell. The progenitor of the Rhea family belonged to the Scotch house of 
Argylle — Matthew Campbell by name. Known as "The Rebel," he fought in 
many wars in Scotland and was finally obliged to flee to the north of Ireland, 
where he changed his name to Rhea. Members of the Rhea family were re- 
markable for attaining influence and honor wherever they lived in this country. 
Coming of Scotch covenanter stock, there was a strong tendency toward the 
Presbyterian ministry. In a single generation not only one son but two or three 
would enter upon that calling. Mrs. Ann Mitchell was a devoted Presbyterian 
and became one of the ten charter members of the Presbyterian church of Daven- 
port in 1839 and assisted in building the first chapel. The Rhea family were very- 
prominent in the upbuilding and development of the south. 

It was among the "over mountain people" that G. C. R. Mitchell spent his 
boyhood and early manhood. Though the early settlers of that locality are rec- 
ognized as having been of an unusually high type, it is rather surprising that 
almost before the echo of the Indian war cry died away, it was possible for a 
boy to be as finely educated as was Gilbert Mitchell. As a child he was sin- 
gularly beautiful. His health was delicate, so that he was carefully nurtured and 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 39 

during these early years he was laying the foundations for his thorough mental 
attainments and accomplishments. He spoke French and German and was- 
versed in Greek and Latin ; in his boyhood he learned to play the flute and the 
violin, and also understood surveying. For a time the family lived in Russell- 
ville, Alabama, and in 1818, then fifteen years of age. Judge Mitchell was attending 
school in Knoxville. He was afterward a student at East Tennesee College, now 
the University of Tennessee, where the curriculum was highly academic, and was a 
member of the first graduating class in the fall of 1822. He was always an apt 
student, at the head of his classes, and the fine "speeches" which he delivered 
in those days show that he was already thinking out along broad lines relative 
to the country, its development and welfare. He was particularly interested in 
the Mississippi river country, for even in boyhood his thoughts were turned to 
the west. Some of his college speeches are still preserved and are well worthy 
of perusal, showing a marked difference from the present in habits of thought ; 
all show a remarkable command of language and clearness of thought, qualities 
which were afterward of value to him in his legal career. He also wrote verses, 
but whether at this period or later is not known. 

Following his graduation Mr. Mitchell went to Moulton, Lawrence county, 
Alabama, where his parents were then living, and took up the study of law in the 
office of Judge A. F. Hopkins. He was admitted to the bar in 1825 and prac- 
ticed successfully in Alabama for several years while living in Moulton. Here 
he was a partner of David A. Smith. For the greater part of that period he 
was clerk of the circuit court and was a candidate for the office of circuit judge 
but was defeated. In 1828 he traveled in the west with the idea of settling there. 
He returned, however, to Alabama and was living in Courtland in 1830 but he 
had not given up the idea of going west. In 1832 he went again to St. Louis 
but returned to Courtland, where he lived until 1834, in the meantime selling his 
land, with the idea of leaving there permanently. Investigation into possibilities 
of the middle west at length brought him to Davenport and from the time that 
he came to the city he sprang into instant prominence. However, he spent a year 
in a tour among eastern cities before coming west permanently but did not find 
that section of the country attractive to him. While living in the south he was 
seriously ill with typhoid fever and a change of climate was advised. This gave 
him his opportunity. He visited St. Louis, Fort Dearborn (Chicago), Galena 
and Dubuque, then came to Stevenson, as Rock Island was called, in May, 1835. 
In that year he purchased a squatter's right in Davenport — the tract of land which 
was later known as Mitchell's addition. He built thereon a little pioneer home, 
which he occupied until 1837. His parents followed him to Davenport in 1836 
and his father bought land also. An old record seems to indicate that he pur- 
chased land of Antoine LeClaire but most of his property was obtained by tak- 
ing up a regular squatter's claim and then buying from the government when 
the land was placed on the market. When this was done the claims that had 
been taken up by the early settlers did not conform to the government surveys, 
which were made about 1840. The land office was opened at Dubuque and the 
settlers of Davenport and vicinity agreed that Judge Mitchell should purchase 
all the lands that were thus conveyed. Thus by a mutual give and take system 
each owner was bounded by the section lines of the survey. As Judge Mitchell 



40 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

had the confidence of all, his dictum settled all discontent. There were many 
instances in the early history of the community where Judge Mitchell was called 
upon to settle difficulties, his legal knowledge and fair-mindedness giving him 
unusual equipment for arbitrator. He was, moreover, "the leading practitioner 
of law in Davenport from his earliest settlement." On the 23d of February, 
1836, a meeting was held, presumably at the home of Colonel George Davenport, 
on Government Island, to found the town of Davenport, on which occasion Judge 
Mitchell was present. The instrument was executed in his fine, clear hand- 
writing and is now in possession of Louis A. LeClaire, a nephew of Antoine 
LeClaire. In an account of Davenport in 1836 the Democrat-Gazette of 1889 
in speaking of Judge Mitchell said: "Our first lawyer had no taste for office. 
Attractive in ways of chat, scholarly, intelligent, at home in classic lore or 
modern thought, a thorough jurist, observant of the country's men and laws and 
politics, quick to see, faithful 'in memory, yet shunning the crowd he loved his 
home, his papers and his books. With these he constantly communed. His 
library was the best in Davenport and its owner knew its contents." 

At this time Iowa was a part of the territory of Wisconsin and there is in 
existence a document executed February 15, 1837, by Henry Dodge, governor of 
the territory of Wisconsin, appointing G. C. R. Mitchell master in chancery of 
the county of EHibuque. This office carried with it the title of judge. At the 
time that Rockingham and Davenport each sought to become the county seat 
Judge Mitchell was nominated for representative to the legislature but was de- 
feated. However, it was acknowledged that he was "largely instrumental in 
securing for Davenport the enviable distinction of being made the county seat of 
Scott county." With all that pertains to the early life of the city and the upbuild- 
ing of this section of the state Judge Mitchell was closely identified. Although 
not a Catholic at the time, he gave liberally toward the building of St. Anthony's 
church, which was dedicated May 23, 1838. It was for many years the largest 
public edifice in the town and was used by all large assemblies to deliberate 
upon matters of public interest. It was there that the first district court met. 
Father Pelamourgues, the priest in charge, "deemed it no desecration of the 
holy place to have it temporarily used as a temple of justice." 

G. C. R. Mitchell and Jonathan Parker were the lawyers for the defense 
in the first case docketed in the Scott county district court and the answer of the 
defense is in the plain, leisurely written hand of Judge Mitchell. He also wrote 
the document and his was the first signature to an agreement made October 9, 
1838, by the members of the Iowa bar regarding the return of court notices. In 
1838 or 1839 Judge Mitchell became one of three directors of what was called 
"the Rock River and Mississippi Steam Navigation Company," an enterprise 
that did not prove a profitable venture. In 1840 he was one of three who issued 
a call to organize an Agricultural Society and became its vice president. He 
was also among the first to advertise in the Iowa Sun, which was printed in 1838. 
This publication was succeeded by the Davenport Gazette in 1841. In the Daven- 
port Academy of Science are now found bound volumes of the Burlington Haw- 
keye of 1843 and 1844, which are Judge Mitchell's copies. When the Judge died 

one room in his house was entirely filled with files of newspapers in perfect order 

a notable collection — and the most valuable of these files was that of the Niles 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 41 

Register, published in Baltimore during the period following the Revolution. 
At his death the Register was given to St. Ambrose College. 

Judge Mitchell never sought office and in fact preferred to leave office hold- 
mg to others. Yet he had no patience with those who evaded public duties. 
When he was nominated for judge the Iowa State Democrat said : "Judge Mit- 
chell is a man who never seeks office and has never shown any desire for official 
honors but such men are just the proper persons to be nominated and they have 
no right to decline, unless the sacrifice of accepting office is too great." In 1843 
Judge Mitchell was again a candidate for the territorial legislature on the whig 
ticket. When that party dissolved Judge Mitchell affiliated with the democratic 
party. He was elected as representative of Scott county to the sixth territorial 
legislature which convened in Iowa City, December 4, 1843. If the life of a 
people is reflected in the laws they frame the proceedings of a legislature are 
a valuable index to the times. In his message the governor made reference to 
the removal of the Sac and Fox Indians to the "west of the temporary boundary 
of Iowa" and deplored the vicious habits of the Winnebagoes. He also spoke of 
health conditions in the state and urged ascertaining the wishes of the people in 
regard to framing a state constitution. This matter was taken up during the 
session and referred to a select committee, on which Judge Mitchell served. He 
was also prominent on the committee to which was referred the protection of 
the frontier, for at that time militia officers were negligent in reporting the num- 
ber and equipment of their respective commands, so that it was impossible for 
the war department to furnish them with the arms to which proper returns would 
entitle them. Judge Mitchell was on three standing committees, the judiciary, 
military affairs and engrossing bills. He was also on a committee of one from 
each electoral district to prepare rules for the government of the house and later 
when the standing committee on the library was appointed he served on it. The 
judiciary committee has always been the most important and his work in that 
connection was evidence of his great ability in legal matters. He was chair- 
man of a special committee to which was referred a bill to amend the law then 
in force regarding grand and petit jurors, and served on a committee of three 
appointed to report on such alterations of the law regulating wills and adminis- 
trators as might be deemed necessary. To the judiciary committee was referred 
a bill to district the county of Scott for the election of county commissioners ; a 
bill to amend an act for the election of constables and the defining of their duties ; 
and a bill relative to proceedings in chancery, Judge Mitchell was one of two 
appointed as committee of conference regarding the last named bill. The judi- 
ciary committee dealt also with a bill to amend an act defining crimes and punish- 
ments. All these questions show more or less clearly the formative condition 
which then prevailed and Judge Mitchell was active in framing laws and in- 
stituting measures which have been important forces in the state's development 
and government. Among' the petitions presented by Judge Mitchell from Scott 
county was one praying for the establishment of a "territorial road" between 
Davenport and Iowa City. He introduced a memorial to the postmaster general 
for additional mail facilities, and most important of all was the bill he introduced 
for the purpose of abolishing imprisonment for debt, supplementary to a law on 
the same subject previously passed. Several divorces were applied for and re- 



42 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

ferred to the committee on judiciary. The legislature had heretofore granted 
divorces. The committee offered a resolution to the effect that in their opinion 
such matters should be brought before a judicial tribunal rather than before the 
legislature. The report made on the subject is voluminous and reflects the 
universal seriousness with which divorce was then regarded. 

In 1846 Judge Mitchell received the whig nomination for congressman at 
large from the state. The Gazette of that date says : "G. C. R. Mitchell, Esquire, 
is so well and favorably known from his long residence in the territory — having 
lived here when it was embraced in that of Wisconsin — that it is needless for u? 
to speak of his qualifications. As a jurist, a scholar and an honest man we doubt 
if Mr. Mitchell has a superior in the territory. The whigs can rest assured that 
in him they will find a faithful exponent of their principles. As representative 
from this county to the legislature he gave general satisfaction." He was, how- 
ever, defeated by the democratic candidate. Throughout these years Judge 
Mitchell continued in the practice of law, occupying his place as "the foremost 
lawyer of Davenport in the early days." 

On the 14th of April, ,1852, G. C. R. Mitchell was married in St. Anthony's 
church to Miss Rose Anna Clarke, daughter of William and Catherine Clarke. 
She was born December 23, 1823, near the town of TuUamore, Kings county, 
Ireland, and in her early girlhood her parents brought the family to this country, 
settling near Cincinnati, in Brown county, Ohio. Her eldest sister, Mary, be- 
came the wife of George Meyers, one of the earliest residents of Rock Island, and 
a second sister, Sarah A., married George L. Davenport. Theirs was the first 
in the record of marriages of St. Anthony's church. When Rose Clarke was 
eighteen years of age she came to Davenport by steamboat from St. Louis in 
1842, and for ten years she lived with her sister, Mrs. Davenport. Judge Mitchell 
was the first gentleman she met after her arrival. The fame of her beautiful 
voice had preceded her and for years she was a prominent member of St. An- 
thony's choir, to which Judge Mitchell also belonged. There was no organ or 
no melodeon in those days but they had flute, clarionet, 'cello and violin. Later 
when St. Anthony's secured a melodeon. Rose Clarke played on it, singing while 
she played. She was also an accompHshed horsewoman and rode a great deal in 
her younger days. Judge Mitchell and his bride went south for their wedding 
trip. It is said that while they were in St. Louis they spent one thousand dollars 
in furnishing their new home, which was then considered a very unusual outlay. 
Most of this furniture was finely carved mahogany and a mahogany rocking 
chair which was a wedding gift from George L. Davenport is now in possession 
of their daughter, Mrs. William J. McCullough. After living for a time on the 
west side of Main street, between Fourth and Fifth streets, Judge Mitchell and 
his family removed to the corner of Eighth and Marquette streets. Separate 
from the house but on the same grounds was the office, built so after the soulhern 
custom. Later, removal was made to the present location of St. Mary's Home. 
Mrs. Mitchell and Mrs. Davenport, the "Qarke sisters," were considered the 
best housekeepers in Davenport. 

Recognizing the needs of the city in many directions, Judge Mitchell devoted 
and found time to support and cooperate in movements that met these needs. 
In 1854 he became engaged in a new venture, becoming associated with C. S. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 43 

Whisler in establishing a ferry after obtaining a ten years' charter from Iowa. 
In the winter of 1854-55 they made an effort to obtain a charter from the Illinois 
legislature but failed. Having authority to carry but one way, business was un- 
profitable but in the latter year they sold their Iowa franchise to their competi- 
tors for two thousand dollars and afterward disposed of their boat, the lone. It 
was also in 1854 that Charles E. Putnam came to Davenport and studied law 
under Judge Mitchell, by whom he was admitted to a partnership that existed 
until 1857, when Mr. Mitchell became district judge. From 1855 until 1857 his 
activity in public life reached its height. Old files show that on the ist of March, 
185s, a meeting of Scott county democrats was called by.G. C. R. Mitchell, G. E. 
Hubbell and others, for the formation of a democratic club. In the same year 
he was a member of the city council. At that time Davenport was plunged into 
bonded indebtedness beyond its constitutional limit. Judge Mitchell was very 
conservative and opposed increasing the indebtedness in all the votes he gave as 
alderman. In 1856 he was elected mayor and in his official capacity appointed 
a corrtmittee to commence action, enjoining the continuance of the bonded in- 
debtedness. The action succeeded and the injunction was made perpetual. The 
following spring a bar convention held in Lyons offered him the nomination for 
judge of the fourteenth judicial district. This was the first attempt in the dis- 
trict to take the election of judges out of politics, a plan now followed. In the 
Iowa State Democrat appeared the following editorial comment: "G. C. R. 
Mitchell is too well known in all the three counties of this district to render it 
necessary to speak of his abilities. He has one of the best judicial minds of any 
man in the district- and he is the soul of honor. His most intimate and dearest 
friend could never move him to any act of partiality so long as he should wear the 
ermine. So spotless is his reputation in this respect that no man will be found 
with hardihood enough to question it." Another newspaper characterized him 
as a man "of eminent qualifications for the post to which he had been nominated." 
Though the Gazette tried to make the election a party issue. Judge Mitchell was 
elected by a handsome majority — a fact indicative of his personal popularity and 
the high regard entertained for him in a professional way, for he was the only 
democrat elected. Though he resigned from the office of judge in the fall of 
the year in which he went upon the bench, he left a strong and lasting impression 
upon the judicial history of Iowa. Davenport Past and Present, in a biography 
of Judge Mitchell published before his death, says : "As a jurist Judge Mitchell 
takes a high position. He is profoundly discriminative, a keen, careful analyst, 
and one whose deductions are always reliably correct. His mental processes are 
seemingly slow but in reality rapid, for while others would dash to a conclusion 
(often the wrong one) with an imperfect view of a few contiguous facts, he- 
traverses the whole ground, omitting nothing, however seemingly trivial or great ; 
and although he may be twice as long in evolving a question as another, he per- 
forms ten times the labor and his conclusion is in the same proportion more 
worthy of credence. If he has one trait more prominent than another, it is his 
thorough comprehensiveness, his ability to include everything in his examination 
of a subject, and add to this a nice instinctive and cultivated perception of the 
character and weight of a fact, and one may see why he rarely goes wrong, or 



44 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

commits errors in conclusions." Elsewhere the statement is found that he 
stood the peer of the greatest men of his time in Iowa." 

In December, 1858, Judge Mitchell was called upon to go as a ilelegate from 
Scott county to the general convention at Iowa City to consider taking action 
regarding state aid to railroads. He was chairman of the meeting and was 
also a member of the committee of five which memorialized the governor 
to call an extra session of the legislature relative to the matter. In 
the later years of his life Judge Mitchell lived quietly, happy in his home life 
with his family and his friends and his books around him. Unto him and his wife 
were born six children, of whom Henry M., Anna M. E., Mary Catherine and 
Martha M. died in childhood. The eldest son, Nathaniel Stephen, lived to the 
age of thirty-three and at his death left a wife and five children. He inherited 
brilliant gifts of mind and while at college was considered an exceptional student 
in all the branches of general education. He was talented along artistic lines 
and was an excellent musician. For many years he directed the choir at St. 
Marguerite's church. He was a lawyer by profession. The only living child of 
Judge and Mrs. Mitchell is Josephine Mary, the wife of William J. McCullough. 
She is convent bred, having received an excellent education, and is a woman of 
great beauty. She is also an artist of ability. She has a gentle, serene nature 
and above all else is the devoted wife and mother. Mr. and Mrs. McCullough 
are the parents of six children. 

On one occasion Judge Mitchell lost ten thousand dollars, all of the cash 
which he possessed, in a bank failure, but he was the owner of valuable property 
that included a large tract of land north of his residence and known as Mitchell's 
Bluff. He was very liberal with his wealth, gave generously to the poor and often 
loaned money when he knew it would never be returned. He never refused his 
professional service to those unable to pay and when he died there was sixty 
thousand dollars due him as fees which was never collected. He was especially 
generous to the church, gave the land on which St. Kunigunda's (now St. 
Joseph's) church was built in 1855 '"•"^ ^^so the land on which the new church 
building next to the old one was erected. Mrs. Mitchell after her husband's 
death was a most generous supporter of St. Mary's church, for which she selected 
the name. Judge Mitchell and George L. Davenport donated ten acres of land 
to the Sisters of Charity, on which in 1859 was established a school for yoiing 
ladies that was the beginning of what is now the Immaculate Conception Acad^ 
emy. Judge Mitchell possessed one of the finest private libraries in the state 
and was ever a man of broad and liberal culture, thoroughly informed concerning 
philosophy and kindred subjects, history and general branches of learning and 
research. He was extremely modest regarding his gifts of mind and would never 
attempt to write on law or literature, although his friends frequently urged him 
to do so. He spent some time in travel, especially in the south. To slavery as 
an institution he was strongly opposed but did not take an active part in slavery 
agitation. He suflfered a stroke of apoplexy December 6, 1865, and died on the 
evening of that day. Funeral services were held December 8th, the impressive 
rites of the Catholic church being celebrated over the remains at St. Kuni- 
gunda's church, on which occasion Father Pelamourgues delivered a feeling and 
appropriate address, while the members of the Old Settlers Association attended 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 45 

the services in a body. Mrs. Mitchell survived her husband almost forty-two 
years. She was a woman of strong qualities, possessing a fine, grave nature. 
After his death she developed an unusual business ability, was a splendid man- 
ager and, like Judge Mitchell, was very generous. One of the newspapers of 
recent years said : "Mrs. Rose A. Mitchell lived on one of the city's most beau- 
tiful eminences, where she passed her declining years in works of quiet charity 
and the profoundest piety." She died March 23, 1907, after a week's illness at 
the home of her daughter, Mrs. McCullough, and the funeral services were held 
in St. Mary's church on the 26th of March. 

The Schmalhaus portrait of Judge Mitchell, which was taken from a daguer- 
reotype of an early day, was placed in the courthouse at the request of the 
members of the Scott county bar. Judge Mitchell was far above the 
mediocre, the commonplace. Such men as he are rare. In the story of his 
life can be found nothing discreditable or ignoble. Of wonderful fineness and 
sensitiveness of nature, remarkably gifted mind and endearing qualities, public- 
spirited, honorable and high-minded, he stands out vividly as an incentive and an 
inspiration. So long as the history of Davenport and Scott county is remem- 
bered will the name of Judge Mitchell be held in honor. 

(Note: — This sketct was taken from a biographical article written by M. Elizabeth 
McCullough, a granddaughter of Judge Mitchell.) 



HENRY ROHLF. 



Henry Rohlf, who devoted his time and energies to farming throughout his 
active business career, has lived in honorable retirement for the past fifteen years, 
making his home at No. 704 Main street in Davenport. He was born in Holstein, 
Germany, on the 25th of February, 1840, a son of Henry and Catherine Rohlf. 
The father, who was a laborer, served as a soldier of the German army. In 1854 
he brought his family to the United States and after landing at New York came 
direct to Davenport, Iowa, arriving in this city on the 3d of June. He secured 
employment as a farm hand and continued to reside in this county until called to 
his final rest in 1887, having for fifteen years survived his wife, who passed away 
in 1872. Unto this worthy couple were born five children, namely: Henry, of 
this review; Amos, who is a resident of Clay county, Iowa; Fred, of Sheridan 
township, Scott county; August, living in Davenport; and Wilham, who makes 
his home in Davenport township, Scott county. 

Henry Rohlf attended the schools of the fatherland until fourteen years of 
age, when he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the new world. Af- 
ter coming to Scott county he continued his studies during two winter terms of 
school and then devoted his entire attention to farm work. In 1862 he purchased 
forty acres of land in Pleasant Valley township and was actively engaged in its 
cultivation for two years, when he sold the property and bought a tract of fifty- 
five acres on the Jersey Ridge road. As his financial resources increased he ex- 
tended the boundaries of the farm to include one hundred and seventy and a. half 



46 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

acres and made his home thereon for nineteen years, placing many fine improve- 
ments on the property. On disposing of that farm he purchased a quarter section 
of land in Muscatine county, where he successfully carried on his agricultural 
interests for ten years, when he put aside the active work of the fields and has 
since lived retired in Davenport. He still retains possession of the farm in 
Muscatine county and also owns one hundred and sixty acres of land in Sheridan 
township, Scott county, which he purchased subsequent to his retirement. 

On the 20th of December, 1864, Mr. Rohlf was united in marriage to Miss 
Malinda Heath, whose birth occurred in Pennsylvania in 1841. They became the 
parents of four children, the record of whom is as follows. Ida, the eldest, 
passed away when but two years of age. Ella is the wife of Andrew Krambeck, 
of Dysart, Tama county, Iowa, and has two children, Ida and Emma. Sadie, 
who gave her hand in marriage to William Schroeder, of Blue Grass, is now de- 
ceased. Her children were four in number; one who died in infancy; Freda; 
Ella; and Hulda. Otto L., who operates his father's farm in Muscatine county, 
wedded Miss Emma Schroeder, by whom he has four children: Elsie, Arthur, 
Lester and Bessie. The wife and mother was called to her final rest in 1886. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Rohlf has given his 
political allegiance to the republican party. He proved a capable incumbent in 
the office of assessor of Davenport township and has done much to advance the 
cause of education during his many years' service as a school director. The 
period of his residence in this part of the state covers fifty-six years and he is 
widely recognized as a prosperous and esteemed citizen. The German Pioneers 
Association numbers him among its worthy members. 



JENS LORENZEN. 



While Jens Lorenzen came to be recognized as one di the foremost repre- 
sentatives of commercial and financial interests in Davenport there were also 
certain other qualities which gained him a firm hold upon the regard of his fel- 
low townsmen. A genial and sympathetic nature caused him to make friends with 
all and his life was, therefore, the exposition of the Emersonian philosophy that 
"the way to win a friend is to be one." So widely and favorably was he known 
that his history cannot fail to prove of general interest and, moreover, his life 
work constitutes an important chapter in the business development of Davenport. 

Mr. Lorenzen was born in Luegumkloster, Schleswig, Germany, April 6, 
1833. His early schooling gave him a splendid business education and, actuateS 
by the spirit of ambition and energy, he sought the opportunities of the new world 
when twenty-one years of age, crossing the Atlantic with a large party of his 
fellow countrymen. Landing at New Orleans, he made his way to Chicago, 
where he engaged in business for a time, but in 1856 arrived in Davenport. He 
was thenceforth until his death connected with the commercial interests of the 
city, extending the scope of his interests proportionately with the growth and 
development of this part of the state. His initial step in business circles here 
was made in 1857 as proprietor of a little porcelain, glass and stoneware store. 




^^^^^ '/^'^^^^^^^ 




HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 49 

his stock of goods being placed upon display in a frame building on Harrison 
above Second street. From that humble start he developed a mammoth enter- 
prise which had become a very profitable concern long before he turned it over 
to his successors in the later years of his life. It passed through the financial 
crisis of 1857 and, although not all days were equally bright and at times the 
storm clouds seemed to gather, he nevertheless held to his purpose with a firm 
and steady hand and his keen business insight, together with his well known 
honesty and honorable methods, soon won for hini the respect and confidence of 
the entire community. His place of business, therefore, became a popular shop- 
ping center and each year witnessed an increase in the volume of trade. He was 
soon obliged to seek larger quarters and removed to the corner of Third and Hai^- 
rison streets. Even here the building which he occupied was found to be too 
small owing to the rapid and substantial growth of the business, and in i860 he 
removed to 217 Harrison street. In 1871 Mr. Lorenzen replaced the old build- 
ing with the present modern block at 223 West Third street, to which he added 
the corner in 1890. He also owned the property to the south. The business 
was at length reorganized under the name of the Jens Lorenzen Crockery Company 
and so continued until 1907, when Mr. Lorenzen retired, disposing of his inter- 
ests to the present owners. He, however, retained the ownership of the building. 
As his financial resources increased he extended his efforts to other fields and 
became one of the organizers and a member of the first board of directors of the 
German Savings Bank, of which he was president from 1901 to 1906. He was 
also one of the founders of the Security Fire Insurance Company, of which he 
was a director and for nine years vice president. He was also a director 
of the Davenport Water Company and one of the founders and first presi- 
dent of the Mutual Insurance Company. For over forty years he was a 
director of the Citizens Bank and vice president from 1900 to 1906. What- 
ever he undertook seemed to prosper under his careful guidance. His suc- 
cess, however, was not due to any fortunate combination of circumstances 
but to the sound judgment which he displayed. He had the ability to combine 
seemingly diverse interests into a harmonious whole and, watchful of every 
detail, at the same time he recognized the more salient features of the business 
and gave to them their due relative importance. 

Mr. Lorenzen was the possessor of those qualities that render the individual 
a favorite with his fellows and was popular in the Davenport Turngemeinde, 
the Davenport Shooting Association, owners of Schuetzen park. He also be- 
longed to the German-American Pioneers Association. For thirty years he served 
as treasurer of the school district. One of the local papers said of him: "Mr. 
Lorenzen was looked upon by those who knew him best as the ideal American 
citizen. Broad minded, liberal, sincere, honest, progressive, he at all times 
stood squarely upon these principles. In his death Davenport loses one who has 
done much to further its growth and development. He will also be greatly 
missed in the community at large for all those who have met him either socially 
or through business channels have learned to regard him as their friend." 

Mr. Lorenzen was twice married, his first wife being Laura Priester, by 
whom he had two children, Mrs. Elise Berger and Theodore. He was married 
April 15, 1868, to 'Agnes, a stepdaughter of Lieutenant Governor Rusch, and 



50 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

their children were: Mrs. Martha Brandt, Mrs. Elsie Dueser, Marie, Laura, 
Herle, Hilda and Paul. 

To his family the death of Mr. Lorenzen came as an almost insupportable 
blow. He passed away at the family home at No. 629 West Sixth street, October 
10, 1909, when he reached the age of seventy-six years. For more than a half 
century he had been an honored and respected resident of Davenport and all 
with whom he came in contact enjoyed his courtesy, his geniality and his kindly 
spirit, but his best traits of character were reserved for his own home and fire- 
side. There he was a devoted husband and father, a courteous host and faithful 
friend. He is spoken of in terms of highest regard by all who knew him and 
considering the various attributes of his character no more fitting epitaph for him 
could be written than this : 

"His life was gentle and the elements 

So mixed in him that nature might stand up 

And say to all the world 'This was a man.' " 



CAPTAIN CHARLES FALKNER. 

Captain Charles Falkner, a retired river and police captain whose life history 
has ha.d many unusual and some exciting chapters, constituting a stoiy that is 
evidence of the old adage that "truth is stranger than fiction," was bom in 
Prussia, Germany, October 18, 1844. His parents, William and Fredrica (Det- 
man) Falkner, both died in Germany. In the fatherland. Captain Falkner attended 
school to the age of fourteen years, when he entered upon the life of a sailor, his 
first trip being on a sailing vessel to London, England. He ran away from the 
ship there, however, and spent three days in London without food. Finally ait the 
back door of a hotel he met a cook who could speak German ajid after giving 
Captain Falkner food took him to a sailors' boarding house, where he soon made 
arrangements to ship on board a vessel bound for Quebec, Canada. He ran away 
again and shipped under Captain Huston on the Mary Ann, which eventually 
landed at Boston, Massachusetts. There he reembarked on another vessel whidh 
bore him to San FranciscO', California, in 1859. His voyages were not over, how- 
ever, for he sailed through the Golden Gate for Qiina and Japan, also visited 
Manila and afterward returned to New York, Later he sailed for the West 
Indies and then to Liverpool, England, and again returned to New York, whence 
he made his way to Mobile and Key West. Later he was at Philadelphia and 
afterward sailed for Pensacola, Rorida. From that point the vessel proceeded 
down the coast a little distance and loaded with cotton. This was the ship Eureka 
under Captain Bellford. While on their return to New York the vessel was 
struck by lightning during a terrible storm and the cotton was set on fire. Five 
times the vessel was blown back while attempting to round Cape Hatteras, but 
they managed to hold the fire in check and finally succeeded in docking at pier 
No. 8, North river. New York, and the fire department extinguished the blaze, 
although nearly all of the cotton was burned. This was in 1863. Immediately 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 51 

afterward Captain Falkner enlisted in the United States navy at the Brooklyn 
navy yards and shipped on the sloop of war Brooklyn as an able seaman. The 
vessel belonged to Admiral Farragut's fleet and he served for twelve months on 
tliat ship and was at the battle of Mobile Bay and also in the engagements at Fort 
Morgan and Fort Gaines. The Brooklyn had four hundred and fifty men aboard 
but after they had anchored at Fort Morgan there were only one hundred and 
fifty of the number able for duty under Captain Irving, whoi was in command. 
After the battle Captain Falkner was promoted to quartermaster on board the 
gunboat Owasco, which was stationed near Galveston, Texas, doing blockade 
duty and looking for the Alabama. They saw that ship once and fired on her with 
an eleven-inch gun but after the smoke cleared away they could see nothing of 
her. Captain Falkner landed at New York, July 4, 1866, and on the afternoon 
of the 6th was honorably discharged. 

On the 8th of September, 1865, Captain Falkner wa^ married tO' Miss Christina 
Schroeder, who passed away twO' years later. For his second wife he chose Mrs. 
Louisa (Richer) Shoel, the widow of Hans Shoel, who died in the army. It 
was with his first wife that he removed to Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, there 
working in a coal mine. Just before that, however, he made two trips tO' Brazil 
and thus gained knowledge of South American countries to add to the knowledge 
which he had obtained of other lands as he had sailed around the globe. From 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, he came to Davenport, Iowa, where he arrived 
March 14, 1866. He then became a pilot on the Mississippi river and after serv- 
ing in that capacity on different boats later purchased the vessel Louisa in 1874. 
After running on the river for some time he returned tO' Davenport, sold the 
boat and obtained an appointment on the police force under Mayor Dow, serving 
as a patrolman for four years, as city detective two years and as night captain for 
fifteen years. Since then he has been foreman for different construction com- 
panies, street inspector of Davenport and private watchman for banks and other 
business houses. At the present time, however, he is living retired, enjoying a 
well earned rest. His experiences have been of a varied character as he has 
sailed the high seas in the interests of trade and commerce or in defense of his 
adopted country. In his young days he was injured while going from England 
to Odessa on the Black sea and was in a hospital at Constantinople for about six 
weeks, but recovered in time to sail again to Germany on the same ship, the 
Rengende Jacob, which had been laid by during that time for repairs. 

By his second marriage Captain Falkner had three children : Charles, a resi- 
dent of Canada, who married Louisa Binger and has three children — Carl, Fred- 
erick and Elizabeth ; Louisa, the wife of Jacob Stoft, of Moline, Illinois, by whom 
she has one daughter, Mary Louisa, now the widow of Frank Williams ; and Her- 
man, of Davenport. By her former marriage the second Mrs. Falkner had two 
cliildren: Emma, who is now living in San Francisco, California; and Wil'iam, 
who is superintendent of the waterworks at Keokuk, Iowa. For his third wife 
Captain Falkner chose Dora Buck, a daughter of John Buck and the widow of 
Emil Uthoflf. They were married February 22, 1904. By her former marriage 
Mrs. Falkner had two daughters and a son : Adelia, the wife of William Ort, by 
whom she has three children — Rolland, Hetta and Chalma; Alma, who married 
August Jans ; and William, living iri Rock Island. 



52 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Captain Falkner is a member of several social and fraternal organizations. 
He is connected with the Masonic lodge, the Knights of Pythias, the Davenport 
Boat Club and the Turners and was a member of the old volunteer fire Comp?,ny. 
He now derives his income largely from town property, having in former years 
made judicious investment in real estate, so that he is now enabled to live retired, 
enjoying in well earned rest many of the comforts of life. 



JAMES T. LANE. 



Among the older members of the Davenport bar who won well merited fame 
and distinction during the thirty-five years of his practice in the courts of Iowa 
was James T. Lane. While the practice of law was his real life work, his strong 
and forceful nature, broad minded and intelligent appreciation of the real values 
of life brought him prominently before the people in other connections and he 
became widely known in fraternal, political, social and church circles. He was 
born March i6, 1830, at Freeport, Pennsylvania. His father was proprietor of 
a general store and the son assisted him, as clerk behind the counter and in other 
ways through the period of vacation and after school hours until seventeen years 
of age, the remainder of his time being given to the acquirement of an education. 
He was ambitious, however, to enjoy better educational privileges than had here 
been afforded him, and with an elder brother he entered the university at Lewis- 
burg, at that time a Baptist institution of note. It required six days to make the 
journey from Freeport to Lewisburg by stage coach and canal, for such was 
the primitive method of travel at that time. Mr. Lane was a close and apt 
student, a lover of books, quick and able in debate even in his school days. He 
eagerly embraced the advantages which were offered him and acquired a knowl- 
edge that constituted an excellent foundation upon which to build the success 
of his later life. Following his graduation he returned home and, with the de- 
sire to make the legal profession his life work, spent two years in Butler, Penn- 
sylvania, in reading law under the direction of General Purviance afterward at- 
torney general of the state. 

Admitted to the bar, Mr. Lane came to Davenport, February 23, 1854. He 
was a passenger on the first through train from Chicago to Rock Island, which 
was then the western terminus of the road. At once he opened an office and for 
thirty-five years continued in active practice here. In the spring of 1855, he re- 
turned to Butler, where he married Annie J. Reed, whom he brought as his 
bride to Davenport. They became the parents of a son and daughter. Joe 
R. Lane, the former, is a prominent member of the Davenport bar, while the 
latter was Mrs. lies. With the added stimulus of having a home to provide for, 
he bent every energy toward building up a good practice and recognized that this 
must be done by making his professional labor of value to his clients. He 
was very careful and earnest in the preparation of cases, was always accurate 
in the application of a legal principle and in debate was strong, forceful and 
logical. In 1856 he was appointed city attorney, which position he filled for a 
year. Later other political honors were conferred upon him. On the 4th of 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 55 

September, 1861, he was nominated by the republicans of the county for repre- 
sentative to the state legislature and was elected. He served during 1867 and 
1868 as county attorney and the following year became a member of the school 
board, his incumbency continuing through 1871. He also took a keen interest in 
education and was the champion of every measure which he believed beneficial 
to the interests of the schools. In 1873 the republican state convention nominated 
him as one of the eleven presidential electors and in the campaign that followed 
he took an active part, as he always did, for he was ever an active, loyal and 
stalwart supporter of the principles in which he believed. In the same year 
President Grant nominated him for the position of United States district at- 
torney for Iowa, the duties of the position being at that time much more onerous 
and important than at the present. During his term of office he was called in to 
the federal courts all over the state and his reputation was heightened by the 
able service which he rendered and the comprehensive knowledge of law which 
he displayed. As United States district attorney he gained valuable experience 
and wide acquaintance that proved of inestimable benefit to him as he continued 
in the practice of his profession. 

The law partnership of Davison & Lane was formed in April, 1873, and con- 
tinued until November i, 1889, when it was dissolved by the withdrawal of Mr. 
Lane on account of impaired health. He died March 19, 1890, in Denver, Colo- 
rado, and throughout Davenport there swept a feeling of intense regret and sor- 
row. He had practiced law in this city for more than a generation. He was a 
man of notable mental and physical strength and utilized his time and his talents 
not only for the promotion of his individual interests but for the benefit of the 
general public as well. He was recognized as one of the leading republicans in 
the state and his opinions always carried weight in the councils of his party. As 
an orator he displayed an eloquence that never failed to leave its impress upon his 
hearers, his speech frequently thrilling those who listened to him, his ability in 
this direction proving a potent force in his addresses to the jury. He was always 
kind and courteous to his professional brethren, considerate of a witness and 
deferential to the court, believing that the dignity of the law should ever be 
sustained. 

For over thirty years Mr. Lane was connected with nearly all of the organi- 
zations which had for their object the improvement or betterment of Daven- 
port. To mention these in detail would be to give a history of the state. Suffice 
it to say that all who are familiar with the annals of the state know how impor- 
tant and valuable a part he took in its upbuilding. He was a prominent and 
helpful member of the Baptist church and an enthusiastic, exemplary Mason, 
becoming one of the earliest members of Davenport Lodge, A. F. & A. M. When 
Fraternal Lodge was organized he became one of its charter members and was 
elected its first worshipful master. He was also a member of Davenport Chap- 
ter, No. 16, R. A. M., and a Sir Knight of St. Simon of Cyrene Commandery, K. 
T., of which he was a past commander. He was also made deputy grand com- 
mander of the Iowa Commandery and acted as a delegate from this state to the 
triennial conclave at San Francisco in 1883. AH these varied interests brought 
him a large acquaintance and it is said that he knew personally every prominent 
man in Iowa. When death claimed him he was mourned as a great lawyer, as a 



56 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

distinguished political leader, as an exemplary brother of the Masonic fraternity 
and more than all as a good man. He manifested the qualities that have come 
to be known as those of a practical idealist, for, while he labored to secure the 
adoption of measures and projects which represented the highest standards, he 
knew how to use the means at hand for the accomplishment of this purpose. His 
integrity in no relation of life was ever called into question and the simple weight 
of his character and ability carried him into most important and prominent 
relations. 



FRANK X. BEH. 



Frank X. Beh, for many years an important factor in agricultural circles, is 
now living retired, enjoying the quietude that comes of labor well performed. He 
is a native of Scott county, born in Buffalo, September i8, 1861, a son of Francis 
X. and Caroline (Heckley) Beh, who were prominent pioneer settlers of Scott 
county. The father was born in the southern part of Germany in the year 1826 
and pursued his studies in the schools of his native country. He also learned th^ 
stonecutter's trade and about 1850, with his wife and one child, emigrated to the 
United States. He made his way to Detroit, Michigan, but after a year there 
spent took up his abode in Buffalo, Iowa, where he worked at stonecutting and 
lime burning for a number of years. He cut the stone that was used in the 
erection of the Catholic church in Buffalo and also in a number of other build- 
ings erected in this village. In 1867 he engaged in farming, having purchased 
one hundred and twenty acres in Buffalo township, sixty acres of which was im- 
proved. He served as justice of the peace, road supervisor and school director 
in Buffalo township and in many other ways his influence was felt in community 
interests. He was a prominent member of the Catholic church at Buffalo and gave 
liberally of both time and means in support of the church. He also kept the 
records of the church for many years prior to his death, which occurred in 1899. 
His wife, also a communicant of the Catholic church, donated the bell and our 
subject and his brother were the first to ring the bell after it was placed in the 
tower. The mother died in 1904, at the age of seventy-two years. The family 
record is as follows: Henry R., of Muscatine county; Anna, the wife of Morris 
Barnick, who also lives in Muscatine county; Joseph, who is engaged in mer- 
chandising in Harlan, Shelby county, Iowa; Frank X., of this review; Katherine, 
the wife of Adolph Strohbehn, who resides on a part of the old homestead farm 
in Blue Grass township ; Charles C, of Dickinson county ; Benjamin, of Buffalo 
township; and Mary, the wife of Harry Schiele, a resident of Muscatine county, 
this state. 

Frank X. Beh, the immediate subject of this review, was reared on the home 
farm and acquired his preliminary education in the schools of Buffalo and Oak 
Hill, while later he pursued a course in Ambrose College at Davenport. He then 
returned home and resumed farming with his father, remaining under the parental 
roof until his marriage, when he began work on his own account. Eventually 
he became the owner of land and followed farming for many years. He still 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 57 

owns an interest in the home farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Buffalo town- 
ship and also owns residence property in Davenport, where he now lives retired. 

Mr. Beh chose as a companion for the journey of Hfe, Miss Alvina Weise, 
a daughter of Fritz and Christina (Schnack) Weise, who were early settlers of 
Scott county. The father conducted a livery stable in Davenport for forty 
years and died in 1899, at the age of sixty-three. The mother is still living and 
is a communicant of the Protestant church. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Beh, 
which was celebrated June 25, 1896, has been blessed with six children, Alvin F., 
Clarence M., Frank B., Leon Beh, Raymond and Eddie, but the last named is 
deceased. 

Mr. Beh, inheriting the sterling characteristics of a long line of German an- 
cestry and endowed by nature with a good constitution, early developed all the 
attributes which make the successful man. His home at 1419 Marquette street, 
in Davenport, is a hospitable one and the family take great pleasure in entertaining 
their many friends. 



HENRY WIESE. 



Henry Wiese, who has lived retired in his pleasant home at No. 835 Harri- 
son street in Davenport since 1900, won his prosperity as an agriculturist and is 
still the owner of five hundred and twenty acres of rich and productive farming 
land in Benton county, Iowa. His birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, on the 
i6th of October, 1840, his parents being Marx and Lucy Wiese. The father, 
who was born in 1800, learned the blacksmith's trade and in early manhood served 
as a soldier of the German army. In 1853, in company with his wife and chil- 
dren, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, landing at New York. Thence 
he made his way direct to Moline, Rock Island county, Illinois, where the family 
home was maintained for about twenty years. They first took up their abode 
in a log cabin which stood on a tract of eighty acres of land which the father 
had purchased, about twenty acres of which were improved. As his financial re- 
sources increased, owing to his well directed industry and capable management, 
Marx Wiese added to his landed holdings in Rock Island county and brought his 
fields under a high state of cultivation and improvement. He passed away in 
1886, having for four years survived his wife who was called to her final rest in 
1882, when seventy-two years of age. Unto them were born three sons and one 
daughter, namely : Fred, who is deceased ; Henry, of this review ; John, who is a 
resident of Geneseo, Illinois; and Anna, the wife of Henry Operdicke, of Port 
Byron, IlHnois. 

Henry Wiese pursued his education in the schools of his native land until 
thirteen years of age and then came to the new world with his parents. He 
continued his studies to some extent in Rock Island county, Illinois, but owing to 
the sparsely settled condition of the country, schools were few and far between 
and he did not find much opportunity to attend. He assisted his father in the work 
of the home farm until twenty-five years of age, when he was married and started 
out in life on his own account, purchasing and locating upon a tract of one hun- 



58 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

dred and sixty acres of prairie land in Coe township, Rock Island county. It was 
raw land upon which no improvements had been made, but with characteristic 
energy he began its development and cultivation and soon converted it into a 
productive farm. He likewise erected a house and put up fences and later bought 
an additional tract of eighty acres adjoining. In 1874 he disposed of the property 
and removed to Benton county, Iowa, purchasing three hundred and twenty 
acres of land in Cedar township. The place had been improved to some extent 
and there were several small buildings upon it. There he carried on his agri- 
cultural interests energetically and successfully until 1900, since which time he 
has lived retired in Davenport, enjoying the fruits of his former toil in well 
earned ease. Prospering in his undertakings, he added to his holdings by addi- 
tional purchase and is still the owner of five hundred and twenty acres of fine 
farming land in Benton county. 

On the 4th of January, 1865, Mr. Wiese was united in marriage to Miss 
Kathryn Kahler, a native of Holstein, Germany, where her birth occurred on 
the 1 6th of June, 1846. In 1852, when six years of age, she was brought to. the 
United States by her parents, Mathias and Lena Kahler, who took up their abode 
in Rock Island county, Illinois. They were farming people and both passed away 
in Benton county, Iowa. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Wiese were born eight children, 
as follows : Anna, Charles and Elizabeth, all of whom are deceased ; John, who 
is a resident of Davenport ; Louisa and Albert, both at home ; Augusta, the wife 
of Charles Stelk, of Virginia; and Dorothy, who is likewise still under the par- 
ental roof. 

Mr. Wiese is a stanch democrat in his political views and has capably served 
in a number of township offices, including those of road supervisor and school 
director. He is a member of the German Pioneers Society of Scott county. In 
his business career he has displayed excellent ability and unfaltering diligence and 
as the years have passed his labor has been the measure of a gratifying success. 
He and his wife are people of the highest respectability, whose good qualities 
of heart and mind have won for them the confidence and friendly regard of all 
who know them. 



RUDOLPH SCHLAPKOHL. 

Agricultural interests of Qeona township find a worthy representative in 
Rudolph Schlapkohl, who has spent his entire life on the farm upon which he 
now resides, his birth there occurring on the 28th of January, 1871. His parents 
were Jurgens and Katharine (Kumerfeldt) Schlapkohl, both natives of Schles- 
wig-Holstein, Germany, born on the ist of May, 1823, and the 24th of November, 
1826, respectively. They were reared and married' in the old country and came 
to the United States in the fall of 1853, locating in Rock Island, Illinois. The 
father farmed for Billy Davenport on Government island for nine or ten years 
and then came to Cleona township, Scott county, Iowa, where he purchased the 
present homestead. Although a poor man when he came to this country, at the 
time of his death he was the owner of two other farms beside the home farm, 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 59 

one consisting of one hundred and eighty acres adjoining the latter, and the other 
comprising'one hundred and sixty acres in Muscatine county— a fact which clearly 
indicates the success that came to him as the result of perseverance, industry 
and diligence. Both parents are now deceased, the father passing away on the 
28th of April, 1895, and the mother on the 22d of October, 1903. Their family 
consisted of four children, namely: Betsy, the wife of Henry Schumann, of 
Pottawattamie county, Iowa ; Herman, a farmer of Cedar county, whose home is 
near Durant; George, a resident of Muscatine county; and Rudolph, of this 
review. 

No event of special importance came to vary the routine of life for Rudolph 
Schlapkohl during the period of his boyhood and youth, which was passed upon 
his father's farm, and at the usual age he was sent as a pupil to the disitritt 
schools for the acquirement of an education. When not busy with his text-books 
he worked in the fields, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling 
the soil, and continued to give his father the benefit of his assistance until the 
latter 's death, when he took charge of the home farm and has since directed his 
efforts towards its further development. It consists of two hundred acres located 
on sections 8 and 17, and had been well improved by his father. Under his care, 
however, it has been put under still higher cultivation and is numbered among 
the valuable and desirable properties of the township. He carries on general 
farming and stock-raising, and his interests, which are conducted along strictly 
up-to-date and progressive lines, are a source of gratifying remuneration to him. 

It was on December 20, 1899, that Mr. Schlapkohl was united in marriage to 
Olga Ladehofif, a native of Cleona township, her birth occurring on the 2Sth of 
August, 1877. She is a daughter of Henry and Ida (Lamp) Ladehofif, residents 
of Cleona township, who were both born in Germany, the mother coming to the 
new world in early childhood, while the father arrived when about twenty years 
of age. In his political views Mr. Schlapkohl has always been a republican, 
believing that the principles of this party are most conductive to good govern- 
ment. He has not, however, been an aspirant for public office, preferring to 
concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, which, carefully managed, are 
bringing to him a large measure of success. Having passed his entire life in 
this state, he is a t)^ical lowan, alert and enterprising, who recognizes the fact 
that upon individual effort depends success and is therefore laboring earnestly 
to advance to the goal of prosperity. 



HANS F. MUHS. 



Hans F. Muhs, who is now living retired in Davenport, was in former years 
actively and successfully identified with the commercial interests of the city, con- 
ducting a merchant tailoring establishment on Second street for more than a 
third of a century. His birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, on the 6th of June, 
1835, his parents being Jochim and Anna Muhs. The father died when our 
subject was but six weeks old. H. F. Muhs obtained his education in the schools 
of his native land and there learned the tailor's trade. In 1856, when a young 



60 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

man of twenty-one years, he set sail for the new world in company with his 
mother, landing at New Orleans after an ocean voyage of eight weeks. He then 
started up the Mississippi river for Davenport, reaching his destination at the 
end of three weeks. For about a year after his arrival he worked as a farm hand 
in Sheridan township for his brother Peter, who had come to this county in 
1853. He then took up his abode in Davenport and secured employment at his 
trade, remaining in the service of John Bartimeier for ten years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he embarked in business as a merchant tailor on his own 
account, opening a shop on Second street which he conducted successfully for 
about thirty-five years, when he sold out to his sons, who still carry on the busi- 
ness in a commendable manner. Since disposing of his tailoring establishment 
Mr. Muhs has lived retired in the enjoyment of well earned ease. 

On the 9th of April, 1857, Mr. Muhs was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Mahl, who was born in Holstein, Germany, on the 9th of April, 1831, her parents 
being Max and Esther Mahl, of Germany. Miss Mahl was a passenger on the 
same boat on which her future husband sailed for the United States. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Muhs were bom eight children, four of whom still survive. Edward, 
who is a resident of Davenport, wedded Miss Mary Stormi, by whom he has 
seven children, namely : Mabel, Edna, Hattie, Roy, Laurence, Maxine and Veneta. 
Lewis, the next in order of birth, likewise makes his home in Davenport. Ben- 
jamin, living in Davenport, married Miss Mamie Wendt and has two children, 
Martha and Arthur. Hugo, who is a resident of Missouri, married Miss Mamie 
Murphy. On the 9th of April, 1907, Mr. and Mrs. Muhs celebrated their golden 
wedding and the presence of their children and grandchildren helped to make 
the occasion a most joyful one. 

Fraternally Mr. Muhs is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Knights of Pythias and he is also a well known member of the 
German Pioneers Society. He is now in the seventy-fifth year of his age and in 
the evening of life can look back over an active, useful and honorable career. 
Coming to the new world in early manhood, he availed himself of the oppor- 
tunities here offered and soon won a place among the substantial and respected 
citizens of his community. 



WILLIAM LARNED ALLEN, M. D. 

Equipped by thorough training at home and abroad. Dr. William Earned 
Allen in the practice of his profession has demonstrated his ability to cope with 
the intricate problems which are continually confronting the physician and sur- 
geon. His broad study and research, his correct application of scientific knowl- 
edge and his wide experience have given him eminence in his chosen calling and 
he is moreover entitled to public recognition as the promoter of the electric street 
car system in this city. Born in Davenport on the 7th of June, 1858, Dr. Allen is 
a son of William and Augusta Dorrance Allen, nee Seabury. The father, who 
was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in 1824, served as chief paymaster of the 
district of Cumberland from 1861 until 1865. Coming to this city at an early 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 63 

day, he was active in its substantial development and progress and from 1870 
until 1874 was a partner in the firm of Mandeville & Allen, railroad contractors. 
His death occurred the following year and he was long survived by his wife. 
She was born in Portland, Maine, in 1830, and died in Davenport in 1899. Among 
the early American ancestors of Dr. Allen are Governor Bradford, of Massachu- 
setts, and the Rev. Thomas Allen, of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, the great-grand- 
father, who was called "the fighting parson" because of his action in 1777 at the 
battle of Bennington. 

Dr. Allen supplemented his early education, acquired in the common schools, 
by study in Griswold College of Davenport, and in preparation for a professional 
career entered the medical department of the Iowa State University, from which 
he was graduated in 188 1. He afterward spent two years in Vienna, Austria, 
in special work in surgery and gynecology. He has always remained a closa 
student of the profession, keeping in touch with the advanced thought that marks 
the onward march of the medical fraternity, and the ability which comes through 
wide study, careful analysis and broad experience is his, making him one of the 
prominent and successful physicians of Davenport. His experiences in other 
lines have also been of a somewhat varied nature. In early manhood he spent 
one year on a farm in Iowa and one year in managing a plantation in Arkansas, 
being called to this task on account of the death of his father and his father's 
partner. Having inherited some stock in a street railway company in Davenport 
and having seen the successful trial of an electric car in Richmond, Virginia, he 
bought up all the stock owned by parties who would not consent to adopt elec- 
tricity as a motive power and equipped the Davenport Central Railway with elec- 
tric cars in August, 1888. This was the second road to be thus fully equipped in 
the United States. The undertaking required nearly all of Dr. Allen's capital. The 
attempt to operate lines in Stillwater, Minnesota, and another in Dubuque, Iowa, 
which he had equipped, together with the necessity of purchasing new motors 
which had soon to be replaced with more powerful ones, required more capital 
than he could command and the electric supply companies and his banker forced 
him to give up his property, which was then carrying only a small bonded debt, 
and which a few years later was sold to an eastern syndicate for several million 
dollars. The early change to electricty gave Davenport a widespread reputation, 
but few of the citizens were willing to put any money into the electric venture, 
believing that it would be impossible to thus run cars up the heavy grades. 
Resuming the practice of medicine and surgery, Dr. Allen has since confined his 
attention almost exclusively to his professional duties and in 1895 founded St. 
Luke's Hospital and was elected president of its medical board and chairman of 
the executive committee, which position he still retains. He has done notable 
work along surgical lines, prominent among his operations being the removal in 
1895 by gastrotomy of a hairball from a girl's stomach, it being the largest foreign 
body ever successfully removed from the human stomach. Other operations 
which he has performed have been almost equally notable and have brought him 
wide reputation as a skilled surgeon. For twenty years he has been surgeon of 
the State Orphans Home and for a similar period of the Tri City Railway Com- 
pany. For two decades he has been a member of the state, district and county 
medical associations and for fifteen years of the American Medical Association. 



64 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

He was the president of the Davenport Academy of Natural Science for three 
years, from 1893 until 1895 inclusively, and in the latter year was chosen president 
of the Scott County Medical Association. In 1900 he was elected to the presi- 
dency of the Iowa & Illinois District. Medical Society and in 1908 became the 
chief executive of the Second District Medical Association. 

In his political views Dr. Allen is a stalwart supporter of the republican party 
and, though not an office seeker, has been concerned in various public movements 
of widespread benefit, acting as president of the Davenport Business Men's 
Association in 1889 and cooperating in various projects for general progress. 

On the 1st of October, 1885, Dr. Allen was married to Miss Alice Van Patten, 
a daughter of John P. Van Patten. Their children are : Larned V. P., Elizabeth 
M. and William Seabury. The family are Episcopalian in religious faith and 
Dr. Allen is prominent in the various departments of the church work, serving 
as a member of the vestry and also as president of the Men's Club of the cathe- 
dral. He joined Trinity Lodge, A. F. & A. M., in 1888 and has ever been ail 
exemplary representative of the craft, utilizing the opportunities which his prac- 
tice affords for the exemplification of its basic principles of mutual helpfulness 
and brotherly kindness. 



F. E. PETO. 



F. E. Peto, who in former years was an active factor in commercial circles 
of Davenport, conducting an extensive and profitable business as a shoe mer-chant, 
is now living retired save for the supervision which he gives to his real-estate 
interests. His birth occurred in the town of Koenigsberg, Prussia, Germany, on 
the 1st of May, 1838, his parents being Frederick and Henrietta Peto, both of 
whom passed away in that country. The father, whoi was engaged in business 
as a shoe merchant, served as a soldier in the war of 1830 between Poland and 
Prussia. 

F. E. Peto attended the schools of hisi native land in the acquirement of an 
education and afterward worked for his father, under whose direction he gained 
a thorough knowledge of the shoe business. He likewise served in the German 
army, participating in the war with Denmark in 1863-4 and in the war of 1866 
against Austria. The many favorable reports which reached him concerning 
the opportunities and advantages of the new world led him to the determination 
to establish his home on this side of the Atlantic and in 1870 he set sail for 
American shores. After landing at New York he came direct to Davenport, 
arriving in this city on the 30th of June. He first spent about two years in the 
employ of John Jamison, who was engaged in the shoe business, and then 
started out on his own account, conducting a leather business on Second street 
for three years. Subsequently he was engaged in the same business in the 
Hahnemann building for about three years and then purchased a building at No. 
415 West Second street, where he successfully carried on business until the 
time of his retirement in 1904. He purchased two more buildings on either side 
of the one which first came into his possession and likewise bought considerable 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 65 

other property and, though living largely retired for the past six years., still gives 
his supervision to his extensive real-estate interests. 

In January, 1858, Mr. Peto was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Dahms, a 
daughter of Peter and Helena Dahms. Unto them were bom seven children, 
four of whom passed away in early life. Edward, who is a resident of Chicago, 
wedded Miss Minnie Miller and has a daughter, Edith. Frank, who died at the 
age of thirty-seven years, had married Miss Laura Wiese, by whom he had two 
children, Alice E. and Camilla. Henry, living in Davenport, wedded Miss Anna 
Klode and has two sons, Harry and Orr. 

Since becoming a naturalized American citizen Mr. Peto has given his politi- 
cal allegiance to the repubilcan party, while fraternally he is identified with the 
Modem Woodmen of America. Though bom across the water, he is thoroughly 
American in thought and feeling, and is patriotic and sincere in his love for the 
stars and stripes. For four decades he has made his home in Scott county, where 
he has acquired a competence and where he is an honored and respected citizen. 
In business his course has been characterized by the strictest fidelity to principle 
and in social relations he displays an unfailing courtesy and a genial cordiality 
that have won for him many friends. 



THEODOR HARTZ. 



Theodor Hartz, secretary, treasurer and manager of the Otto Albrecht Com- 
pany, manufacturers of fine cigars, was born in Altona, Holstein, Germany, April 
24, 1857, a son of Theodor and Emilie (Gottschau) Hartz, who came to America, 
settling in Rock Island, Illinois, on the 27th of July, 1872. The father was a 
carpenter and joiner and both he and his wife spent their remaining days in 
Rock Island, their graves being made in Chipawanie cemetery of that city. 

Theodor Hartz was reared in his native land, attending the city schools and 
also taking up the study of English under private instmction ere he left Germany 
for the new world. He had therefore learned to speak the language of this 
country fairly well when he accompanied his parents on the trip across the 
Atlantic. They reached Rock Island on Saturday, and on the following Mondav 
he secured a position in the dry-goods store of Louis Kiesow, with whom he 
remained for seven years — a trusted and valued employe whose fidelity and 
ability was indicated by the fact of his long retention in the house. He was 
originally given his board and clothing as compensation for his services, and the 
proprietor also bestowed upon him a dollar somewhat as an honorarium. On 
Christmas he was given two dollars and at the end of the year he had eighty-five 
cents left out of his cash capital of three dollars. During the second year he 
was paid twelve and a half dollars a month and board, while the third year he 
was given fifteen dollars per month and board. Later he received an increase to 
fifteen dollars per week and boarded himself. The appreciation of his services 
on the part of his employer is indicated in his continued promotion and increase 
in salary. 



66 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

In July, 1879, ^J"- Hartz came to Davenport, where he secured a position as 
draft clerk in the Citizens National Bank, there remaining until August, 1880, 
when he became connected with his present line of business in association with 
Otto Albrecht, who established the enterprise in 1854. Mr. Hartz represented 
the business upon the road as a traveUng salesman for two and a half years, 
selling cigars, and later was employed in the house. In 1897 the firm was in- 
corporated and Mr. Hartz, being admitted to a partnership, was chosen secretarji 
and treasurer. In the meantime, on the loth of November, 1881, he married 
Miss Emma, a daughter of Otto Albrecht. The father became president of the 
new company, with Mrs. Hartz as vice president. On the 26th of February, 
1904, Mr. Albrecht passed away. He had willed his interest in the business to 
Theodor Hartz personally, and the latter has since managed the enterprise, mak- 
ing his wife president and his daughter, Paula Dunker, vice president, while be 
retains his old official connection with the business as secretary and treasurer. 
The company owns a well equipped factory and employs about thirty people in 
the manufacture of various kinds of cigars, which find a ready market in Iowa, 
Illinois and part of Minnesota and South Dakota. Great care and attention are 
paid to the excellence of the product and the systematic business methods of the 
house and the well known reliability of the company have constituted strong ele- 
ments in its success. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hartz have been bom eleven children of whom ten are 
yet living: Paula, the wife of WiUiam Dunker; Joa; Hans W. ; Gertrude; Nellie; 
Emilie; Gesa; Ina; Hildegard; and Emma. One child. Otto Albrecht, died in 
December, 1897. The family are members of the Ethical Society of Davenport. 
Mr. Hartz has been a member of the school board for nine years and the cause 
of education finds in him a warm champion, his labors being effective in advanc- 
ing the school interests of this city. He is also a member of the Davenport Com- 
mercial Club and of the Turngemeinde. He exemplifies in his life many of the 
sterling characteristics of his German ancestry, having the persistent purpose and 
indefatigable energy which, have ever marked the Teutonic race. His diligence 
has brought him the success which is now his, while his keen discernment in 
business affairs enables him to capably control and develop the interests which 
are under his charge. 



WILLIAM COOKE WADSWORTH. 

William Cooke Wadsworth, deceased, was the organizer of the Citizens Nat- 
ional Bank and a prominent figure in financial circles in Davenport, but was per- 
haps even more widely known in the development of extensive mercantile in- 
terests which constituted an important feature in commercial circles here. He 
was born June 27, 1826, in Litchfield, Connecticut, and at the usual age entered 
the public schools there, continuing his studies to the age of eighteen. He then 
went to New Haven and made his initial step in the business world by becoming 
connected with a dry-goods enterprise, with which he was associated until 1848. 
Macon, Georgia, was his next place of residence and he remained there in a 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 69 

similar line of business until 1855, when he came to Davenport. This city was. 
then comparatively small and of little commercial and industrial importance. 
Mr. Wadsworth became an active factor in its substantial advancement and in its 
natural and healthy expansion in the lines of commercial activity. He opened 
a retail dry-goods store at No. 127 West Second street and such was the success 
of the original undertaking that he soon afterward established a second store in 
Rock Island, Illinois. Both enterprises proved profitable from the beginning 
and in 1861 he opened a wholesale house, conducting the three stores in a suc- 
cessful manner until 1868. He then disposed of the retail stores and thereafter 
devoted his entire attention to the large wholesale business at Nos. 109, in and 
113 East Second street. Untiring and of persistent purpose, full of ambition 
and of progressive, modern ideas, he carefully formulated his plans and carried 
them forward to successful completion, building up his enterprise upon sound 
business principles until it was second to none in the city in the extent and char- 
acter of the trade enjoyed by the house. At the outset of his career he adopted 
certain business policies, the value of which were demonstrated in his success. 
He never made engagements which he did not keep nor incurred obligations which 
he did not meet ; he regarded no detail as too unimportant to receive his attention 
and he demanded on the part of his representatives a uniform courtesy and con- 
sideration for all patrons. He won the allegiance of his employes by his fair and 
just treatment of them and his recognition of their worth by promotion as op- 
portunity offered. In the conduct of his business he held to high standards in 
the personnel of the house, in the line of goods carried and in the relations to 
the public. Mr. Wadsworth was also interested in various other business enter- 
prises, many of which profited by the stimulus of his cooperation and the adop- 
tion of his sound business principles. He became one of the organizers of the 
Citizens National Bank, was a director for nearly forty years and for two years 
acted as its president. 

On the 26th of October, 1859, Mr. Wadsworth was married to Miss Anna 
Mitchell, of Rock Island, and they became parents of four children: William 
M., Henry T. ; Mary Hall and Walter C, who died in early life. Mr. Wads- 
worth was preeminently a man of domestic tastes, devoted to his family, and he 
also held friendship inviolable. He attended the services of the Congregational 
church. His political allegiance was given to the democracy and to him would 
have been accorded high political honors had he not continually refused to be- 
come an active participant in politics as an office holder. Several times he re- 
fused the candidacy for mayor, although his fellow townsmen urgently requested 
him to accept the offilce, knowing that he would give to the city a businesslike 
and progressive administration, free from misrule and the domination of sel- 
fish interests. He was very firm and positive in his beliefs and unequivocal in 
the expression of his sentiments, yet he accorded to others the privilege which 
he reserved to himself of forming and supporting unbiased opinions. He worked 
harder than any other man to raise money for the new bridge across the river 
and it was mainly owing to his efforts that this enterprise was carried to a suc- 
cessful termination. He was a great reader, finding delight in literature and 
scientific research, and thus his intellectual forces were being continually aug- 
mented. He educated many young men in his employ to be expert business men 



70 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

and when the occasion was timely frequently gave to them friendly and valuable 
advice. He died at Indianapolis, Indiana, February 12, 1907, when on his way 
to the south, and Davenport's loss was a great one because of his marked busi- 
ness enterprise, his public-spirited devotion to the general good and his worth 
as a man. His record was an honor to the city which honored him and it would 
be difficult to find a resident of Davenport who was more uniformly beloved. 



JOHN B. FIDLAR. 



The consensus of pubHc opinion accords to John B. Fidlar a prominent posi- 
tion in the ranks of Davenport's progressive, enterprising and successful business 
men. While perhaps best known as cashier of the First National Bank, a position 
which he occupied for seventeen years, he was also associated with various other 
corporate interests and his colleagues and contemporaries came to know him as 
a man notable, prompt, energetic and honorable. He was born May 16, 1839, in 
Hebron, Licking county, Ohio, where he spent the first fifteen years of his Hfe. 
In 1854 he accompanied his parents on their removal to Delaware, Ohio, where he 
remained for five years and in the meantime supplemented his public school edu- 
cation by a two years' course in the Ohio Wesleyan University. On the 7th of 
April, 1859, he came to Davenport with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel P. 
Fidlar, entering the business circles of this city as a young man of twenty years. 
He was first employed as patrol guard on the old bridge here and afterward 
went to Burlington, where for a year or more he occupied the position of clerk in 
the old Barrett Souse, which was then the leading hotel in that section of the 
state. 

After the outbreak of the Civil war Mr. Fidlar, constrained by the spirit of 
patriotism, offered his services to the government, enlisting on the 14th of August, 
1862, as a member of Company D, Twenty-fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. For 
gallant military service he was advanced through successive grades of promotion 
until he became captain of his company. His war record was one of unflinching 
bravery and on one occasion he was wounded by a musket ball in his arm, which 
troubled him to the day of his death. Iowa never sent a more loyal, valiant 
soldier into the field. He performed an act of gallantry before Vicksburg which 
alone would entitle him to the military honors which were conferred upon him in 
his promotion to the~ captaincy. When the Union troops had been disorganized 
by a fierce fire in front of them and some flanking movements of the enemy and 
were falling back in a retreat that promised to become a rout he hurled his com- 
pany against the retreating masses in a fierce bayonet charge, stopped them, held 
them firm a few minutes and maintained the position so taken until there was 
time to reform the columns and get into action again, thus saving the day. This 
incident was characteristic of his record as a soldier and also of the qualities which 
he displayed in the business world, for he attacked every business problem with 
vigor and with keen insight recognized the advantages and possibilities of the 
situation. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 71 

After the war Mr. Fidlar located in Burlington and for a time acted as cash- 
ier for the American Express Company, while later he was upon the road as ex- 
press messenger between Burlington and Council Bluffs. On the 4th of January, 
1871, he returned to Davenport, where he accepted the position of discount clerk 
in the First National Bank, filling the position acceptably and faithfully for seven 
years, when he was promoted to cashier, He remained in that position for seven- 
teen years and then tendered his resignation. His life record was an untarnished 
one and there was never a thought of anything but straightforward business in 
all of his connection with the bank. Early in his identification with the institu- 
tion he made it his purpose to thoroughly master every department of banking 
and for a long period he was regarded as one of the foremost representatives of 
financial interests in the city. 

As the years passed Mr. Fidlar extended his efforts into other fields, for he 
was a man of resourceful business ability, capable of controlling varied interests 
and at all times proving his worth in his sound opinions relative to commercial 
and financial affairs. After he retired from the bank he was identified with the 
insurance interests and was treasurer of the Davenport Safety Deposit Com- 
pany, of the Register Life and Annuity Company, of the Merchants and Mechanics 
Building, Loan and Savings Association and a director in all three. 

On the i6th of September, 1868, Mr. Fidlar was married in Burlington to 
Miss Lovenia Harper, a daughter of WiUiam Harper of that place. Unto this 
marriage was born a son, William Harper Fidlar, who married Bessie Sloan Alt- 
man, and died in 1900, leaving a son, John Brainard, who makes his home in 
Davenport. Mr. Fidlar was a member of Trinity Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and of 
the various Masonic bodies in this city, being an exemplary representative of the 
craft. In politics he was a stalwart repubhcan from the time when age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise, believing firmly in the principles of the party 
which stood by the Union during the dark days of the Civil war and has always 
been the party of reform and progress. He belonged to the Grand Army of the 
Republic and the Loyal Legion. In matters of citizenship he was public-spirited 
in an eminent degree. His labors were prompted not only by civic pride but by 
that stronger element of citizenship — the constant, steady determination to bring 
about the very best conditions of city life for all the people. When the country 
was engaged in the Civil war he feared not to face the enemy on the field of battle. 
In the days of peace his influence was as a quiet, steady, moving force, accomplish- 
ing results. He was honored wherever known and most of all where best known. 



CHRISTIAN MUELLER. 

There is no man among Davenport's honored dead who deserves more promi- 
nent mention than Christian Mueller, who for many years figured as one of the 
kading lumber merchants of the city and while conducting an extensive business 
enterprise found opportunity for active and effective cooperation in many move- 
ments which have left their impress upon the city's growth and substantial develop- 
ment. Moreover, the salient qualities of his character were such as made him 



72 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

respected and beloved by all who knew him. Born in Holstein, Germany, on the 
1st of March, 1823, he was sixteen years of age when he was apprenticed to a 
mercantile concern and thus laid the foundation for his business career in the 
thorough commercial training which he there received. Wisely utilizing his 
opportunities and husbanding his resources, in 1844 he was enabled to engage in 
merchandising on his own account, opening a store in Kiel. While there he also 
took active interest in athletics and was the instructor in a turners' society. 
Moreover, he was keenly interested in the vital questions and issues of the day 
relative to the government policy and, holding decided views concerning many 
public affairs, during the winter of 1847-8 he organized a company of volunteers 
to aid the forces operating to secure greater freedom from the oppression of the 
Danish monarchy. In the latter year he joined some Schleswig-Holstein soldiers 
and other volunteers and this heroic band attacked a fortified post at Rendsburg, 
Holstein, which they captured. In the rebellion which followed he was wounded 
three times and in July, 1850, was taken prisoner, after which he laid for nine 
months in a hospital in Denmark. After peace had been declared he spent some 
time recuperating his health and in 1852 he sailed for the United States, deter- 
mined to enjoy in the new' world the liberty which was denied him in his native 
land. 

Mr. Mueller reached Davenport in July of that year and soon after his 
arrival established a vinegar factory on the present site of the Kohrs Packing 
Company. This was destroyed by fire in 1854 and he lost all he had, but he did 
not become discouraged and with resolute spirit set to work to retrieve his losses. 
A few months later he married Elfrieda Claussen, a daughter of Hans Reimer 
Claussen, and with the added stimulus of having a home of his own to provide 
for he started again in the business world. 

It was at this time that Mr. Mueller obtained his first experience in connection 
with the lumber trade, securing a position in a sawmill and thus gaining a knowl- 
edge of the business which stood him in good stead in later years. He worked 
for a time in a sawmill in Davenport and afterward operated a flour mill in 
Lyons, Iowa. On his return to this city, in 1857, he accepted a position as fore- 
man and salesman with the lumber firm of French & Davis and when that failed 
in 1858 he was given charge of the disposition of their stock. In i860 he became 
salesman for several lumber firms and from 1863 until 1868 engaged in the grain 
business on his own account. He had found the lumber trade congenial, how- 
ever, and in March of the latter year he purchased the Dessaint interest in the 
lumber firm of Dessaint & Schricker, while in July, 1883, on the death of Mr. 
Schricker, he became sole proprietor. On the ist of January, 1895, he associated 
his three sons, Frank W., Edward C, and William L., with him in the business, 
which was then continued under the name of Chris Mueller & Sons. He ranked 
as one of the leading lumber merchants of the west, the firm enjoying a reputa- 
tion from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The straightforward, honorable business 
policy which he instituted at the commencement of his career was ever main- 
tained, and the reliability of the house constituted one of the most potent forces 
in its continued and growing success. 

The death of Mr. Mueller occurred on the loth of September, 1901, and was 
the occasion of deep and widespread regret. He was one of the most prominent 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 73 

and most beloved citizens of Davenport, his personal traits of character gaining 
him a firm hold on the affections of those with whom he was associated. His 
name was regarded as synonymous with business integrity and enterprise, and 
in social circles he was ever a welcome guest. He enjoyed association with his 
old friends but home was never forgotten and his happiest hours were spent at 
his own fireside. He was one of the founders and the first president of the 
Davenport Turngemeinde and was looked upon as the father of the organiza- 
tion. He was also one of the oldest members of the Davenport Schuetzen 
Gesellschaft. In public affairs relative to the city's growth and improvement he 
was deeply interested, as was manifest by his tangible support of many movements 
for the public good. 



FR/*.NK W. MUELLER. 

Frank W. Mueller, the eldest son of Christian and Elfrieda Mueller, was 
born in Davenport, October i8, 1863. His boyhood days were spent in his 
father's home, during which time he attended the public schools of the city, while 
later he enjoyed the advantage of instruction in the Iowa State University, from 
which he was graduated. His education complete, he became associated with his 
father in the lumber business and in order to gain comprehensive knowledge 
thereof passed through every department, thus fitting himself for his present 
important position. Since his father's death he has been called to the presidency 
of the Mueller Lumber Company and is thus in control of one of the most ex- 
tensive and important lumber concerns not only of Davenport but of the middle 
west. He is likewise the vice president of the Mueller Land & Timber Company 
and in business affairs his judgment is regarded as most sound. He is a member 
of the Turners and the Schuetzen societies and is also well known in Masonic 
circles. 



ED C. MUELLER. 



Ed C. Mueller, associated with his brothers in the Mueller Lumber Company, 
was born January 8, 1865, in this city, and pursued his education through suc- 
cessive grades in the public schools until he undertook the mastery of the branches 
taught in the high school. He afterward attended the Duncan Business College 
and when his course was completed, like his brothers, became connected with 
the father's business. All were thoroughly trained in the various departments 
of the business and the result is that the enterprise has continued to grow under 
their management since the father's death. From 1886 until 1907 Ed C. Mueller 
had charge of the manufacturing interests in the summer and was superintendent 
of the logging in the winter. He thus gained intimate and comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the business in its operative department and since 1907 has looked after 
the buying for the Mueller Lumber Company, of which he is now the secretary 
and treasurer. He also has considerable supervision over the interests of the 



74 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Mueller Land & Timber Company, of which he is the president. The latter 
company has very large interests in Oregon and the scope of both business en- 
terprises is being gradually extended, while the firm has become widely known 
throughout the middle portion of the country and even far into the west. 

In 1889 Mr. Mueller was married to Miss Clara Bruhn, a native of Daven- 
port and a daughter of John Bruhn, one of the old residents of the city. They 
have two children : Walter, bom July 5, 1896 ; and EHnore, born August 19, 1902. 



W. L. MUELLER. 



W. L. Mueller was born February 21, 1867, and is a son of Christian Mueller, 
of whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this volume. The public schools 
afforded him his early educational privileges and he afterward attended Gris- 
wold College. He then became connected with the lumber business which was 
founded and conducted by his father, spending the first year on the river and in 
keeping books. Like his brothers, he passed through every department of the 
business in order that he might thoroughly acquaint himself with the trade, not 
only in the management of the financial interests but also in the value of lumber. 
It was in 1895 that he was admitted to a partnership and since the death of the 
father the business has been carried on by the sons, W. L. Mueller being now the 
vice president of the Mueller Lumber Company. He gives his undivided time 
and attention to the management and development of the buisness and his efforts 
have constituted an important factor in its expansion and substantial growth. 

In 1893 Mr. Mueller was married to Miss Bernhardine Lennhuis, a native of 
Davenport and a daughter of Bernhard Lennhuis, one of the old settlers of Scott 
county. They now have two children, Ben and Annie. Mr. Mueller belongs to 
the Turners and other societies, in which his social qualities and generous spirit 
have rendered him popular. 



ALEXANDER FRASER WILLIAMS. 

Alexander Eraser Wilhams, deceased, who stood as a splendid example of the 
enterprising, thrifty and loyal citizen and a faithful follower of the church, whose 
life did much to inspire and encourage others and whose memory is cherished 
in the hearts of all who knew him, was born in Westfield, New Jersey, on the 
15th of June, 1826. His life record covered sixty-one years, his death occurring 
in Atlantic, Iowa, December 15, 1887. His parents were Charles Clark Wil- 
laims and Eliza High Miller, who were married in Westfield, New Jersey, in 
1818. They became the parents of seven daughters and three sons but only two 
are now living: William Belden, a resident of Nebraska; and Mrs. Margaret 
Dougherty, of Iowa. Most of the ancestors of the family were farming people 
and all bear honorable records as honest, hard-working men and women, living in 
a quiet, humble way. The Williams branch of the family were Welsh. Nathaniel 




\:^:i.^z^ ^::^^-n^ tx^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 77 

Williams, the grandfather of A. F. Williams, had three children : a son who died 
in early manhood ; a daughter Ann, who became the wife of Willard Barrows, one 
of Iowa's prominent pioneer residents; and Charles Clark. For a number of 
years Nathaniel Williams lived in Davenport with his daughter, Mrs. Barrows, 
and there passed away in 1864, when more than eighty years of age. His mother 
was of American birth, a daughter of Charles Clark, who served throughout the 
Revolutionary war. That he must have held rank as an officer is indicated by the 
fact that he wore a sword, the silver handle of which was afterward melted into 
six tablespoons, two of which were given to each of his three grandchildren — 
Samuel Clark, Charles Clark Williams and Betsy Smith. This was about eighty 
years ago and the spoons are still highly prized by the present generation. 

In the maternal line A. F. Williams comes of English ancestry through his 
grandfather, Ezra Miller, while his grandmother, Mrs. Mary (High) Miller, was 
of German descent, her father, John High, having left Germany when a little boy. 

Charles Clark Williams, the father of Alexander Eraser Williams, was a man 
highly esteemed by. all who knew him because of his upright life and fidelity to 
manly principles. An earnest Christian, he was for many years an elder in the 
Presbyterian church in Westfield and in Newark, New Jersey, and for several 
years was also one of the elders of the First Presbyterian church in Davenport, 
Iowa, where he died of cholera in 1852. All who knew him felt that he was a 
martyr to the unselfish care which he bestowed upon the laboring men who were 
victims of that terrible scourge. He had a most faithful and loving wife, who to 
her family was a devoted mother, her salient characteristics being such as en- 
deared her to ajl who knew her. She made her home in Davenport and its vicin- 
ity for over thirty years and spent the last few years of her life in the home of 
her daughter in Nebraska, there passing away in 1878. 

Alexander Fraser Williams spent his youthful days on his father's farm near 
Westfield, New Jersey, and was eleven years of age at the time of the removal 
of the family to Newark. There he spent several years attending the private 
schools and academy, and for one year was a student in a good school in Caldwell, 
New Jersey, so that he obtained a fair education. He was seventeen years of age 
when in 1843 the family removed to Davenport, Iowa, which was then regarded 
as the far west. He remained there for four years, assisting his father upon the 
farm, and also spent several months in making surveying tours through Iowa 
with his uncle, Willard ' Barrows. He did not find agricultural pursuits con- 
genial and, believing that he would obtain more pleasure and profit from com- 
mercial life, in 1847 he entered the dry-goods store of his uncle, Moses Miller, 
at Racine, Wisconsin. After two years there passed his longing for the east 
decided him to return to New York city, where he secured a situation in the 
wholesale hardware store of John C. Tucker, in whose service he remained for 
three years, acquiring a good knowledge of the business during that period and 
thus becoming well equipped for the line of work to which he devoted the greater 
part of his' life. In 1852, receiving a more advantageous business ofifer, he en- 
tered the employ of Ely, Bow en & McConnell, wholesale dry-goods merchants, 
conducting business on Broadway, New York. For six years he continued with 
that firm and during half the time had charge of the white goods department, 
making purchases for the same In the financial crash of 1858, following the 



78 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

widespread panic of the previous year, the New York firm failed and about the 
same time Mr. Williams received an offer to go into business in Davenport, where 
his widowed mother and family lived. This influenced him to return to the west. 

On the 17th of February, 1858, Mr. Williams was united in marriage to Miss 
Frances Mary Robinson, of Chicago, and after spending some two months in the 
east, purchasing his stock of dry goods, thus combining pleasure with business, 
he returned with his bride to Davenport and in May, 1858, became the junior 
partner of the firm of Eldridge & Williams, at No. 123 Brady street. During the 
succeeding three years the business increased rapidly, necessitating trips to New 
York and Boston, which Mr. Williams made three or four times each year in or- 
der to purchase goods in eastern markets. They were enjoying substantial success 
at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. Within a few months nearly all 
business was paralyzed and failures were the order of the day. Eldridge & Wil- 
liams were among the unfortunate ones and were obliged to succumb to the pres- 
sure. 

The financial outlook was dark and discouraging but Mr. Williams was of an 
optimistic nature and believed that the obstacles and difficulties could be over- 
come by persistent, determined and honorable effort. He desired to take part in the 
struggle in which his country was engaged, but his only brotlier, Belden Williams, 
and Frank C. Robinson, his wife's only brother, were among the first to enhst, 
serving faithfully through the long four years of the war. With those two at 
the front Mr. Williams felt convinced that his duty must lie at home in the care 
of his widowed mother and his young wife and child. Accordingly in the fall of 
1 86 1 he accepted a position with Sickles & Preston, a prominent hardware firm 
of Davenport, with whom he continued for about four years, two of which he spent 
upon the road as traveling reprsentative of their wholesale house that had just been 
established in Chicago. At the end of that time he received an offer from the well 
known hardware firm of William Blair & Company, of Chicago, bringing him a 
large advance in salary. He traveled for that firm for four years, at the expira- 
tion of which time he was quite ready to settle down in the city of his choice — 
Davenport — where his family had continued to reside during the six years which 
he had spent upon the road, giving the best powers and strength of his young 
manhood to the honorable canceling of all of his indebtedness. 

In 1869 Mr. Williams formed a partnership in the wholesale heavy hardware 
trade with R. Sieg, under the firm style of Sieg & Williams. His comprehensive 
knowledge of the business naturally made him the buyer for the house and during 
the eighteen years in which he was connected with the business he contributed 
largely to the upbuilding of a profitable enterprise which is still continued under 
the name of the Sieg Iron Company. The firm of Sieg & Williams were extensive 
jobbers in heavy wagon stock and other manufacturers' hardware, and in addi- 
tion to his mercantile interests Mr. Williams was a director of the Security Fire 
Insurance Company, a member of the Board of Trade and was connected with 
other business organizations. As the years went by he prospered in his undertak- 
ings, becoming recognized as one of the foremost merchants and leading business 
men of the city. His name stood as a synonym for commercial integrity, for he 
never made engagements that he did not fill nor incurred obligations that he did 
not meet. His methods were progressive and his course won for him the ad- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 79 

miration and respect of his contemporaries and colleagues. Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liams became the parents of four children, namely: Ella, who gave her hand in 
marriage to J. S. Thompson and now resides in Escondido, California ; Anna, the 
wife of Dr. J. P. Crawford, whose sketch appears on another page of this work; 
Frederick Crosby, who passed away in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on the 21st of 
September, 1894, when twenty-four years of age ; and Joseph Robinson, who died 
on the 19th of February, 1894, when a youth of eighteen years. 

Mr. Williams passed away at Atlantic, Iowa, December 15, 1887, after a brief 
illness of ten days. He had for nearly thirty years been intimately associated 
with the growth and development of Davenport and was deeply interested in 
everything which promoted its prosperity. He felt a special interest in the Hen- 
nepin canal project and the building of the Davenport, Iowa & Dakota Rail- 
road and was one of its directors. His cooperation could always be counted 
upon to further movements for the public good and he gave of his time and 
means, as it was possible, to aid in the work of general improvement. While 
in business in New York he became a member of the Baptist church and for 
more than three decades was a consistent and active worker in the denomination. 
He served for a number of years as senior trustee in the Calvary Baptist church 
of Davenport. While he became known as a prominent and representative busi- 
ness man, it was his Christian spirit that made him most honored, for he molded 
his entire life in conformity with the teachings of his Master, ministering to 
others as the occasion offered and giving freely of his means to the support of 
the church and charity. He was one of the teachers in the Sunday school, a 
worker in the Young Men's Christian Association and at the time of his death 
was taking a most active and helpful interest in the work of erecting a house 
of worship for the Baptist people, acting as chairman of the building committee. 
It has been said : "Not the good that comes to us but the good that comes to 
the world through us is the measure of our success," and judged by this standard 

Alexander Eraser Williams was a most successful man. 

J no-" 



AUGUST PAUSTIAN. 



One of the native sons of Hickory Grove township, whose bountiful harvests 
sustain the reputation of this section of Iowa as an agricultural center is August 
Paustian, who was born March 2, 1856, a son of Frederick and Christina (Roehs) 
Paustian. They were both natives of Holstein, Germany, the former having been 
bom January 14, 1820, the latter August 28, 1825. In the country of their birth 
they were reared and married, coming to the United States in 185 1. On their 
arrival they made their way to Scott county, Iowa, locating upon a farm in 
Hickory Grove township, which had belonged to Mr. Paustian's father-in-law. 
He had learned the trade of a mason in the fatherland and this he pursued to 
some extent in this country in connection with the general farming, to which he 
devoted himself more and more as it proved a remunerative occupation. In the 
course of time he became very well-to-do and highly respected among the pioneers 
of this county, which remained his home until January 27, 1886, when at the age 



80 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

of sixty-five years he passed away. His wife, who survived him about fifteen 
years, died July 21, 1900, when she was seventy-five years of age. They had a 
family of twelve children, but two died in childhood. The others are: Caroline, 
the wife of Martin Greenwood, of Cleona township; Fred, who resides in Minne- 
sota; August, the subject of this sketch; Emma, the wife of Christ Paustian, of 
Cleona township; Louis, who makes his home in Cedar county, Iowa; Sophia, 
the wife of William Buhmann, of O'Brien county, Iowa; James, who resides in 
Hickory Grove township; Charles, also a farmer in Hickory Grove township; 
Minnie, the wife of Herman Meinert, of Cleona township ; and Bertha, the wife 
of Henry Paulsen of Muscatine county, Iowa. 

August Paustian has spent all his life in Hickory Grove township and attended 
the district school near his home. He assisted his father in the cultivation of the 
fields constituting the homestead until he was married. Accordingly, he went 
to Cedar county, Iowa, where he remained for three years, at the expiration of 
that period returning to Hickory Grove township, Scott county. Here he operates 
a tract of one hundred and sixty acres on section 34 belonging to his father-in- 
law, but he owns one hundred and fifty-three acres of land on section 19, Liberty 
township, a landholding of no inconsiderable value. His wife recently bought 
one hundred and sixty acres on section 33, Hickory Grove township, a farm that 
was formerly known as the Goetsch homestead, so that in the aggregate Mr. 
Paustian has a large amount of land under his control. In addition tO' his agri- 
cultural interest he holds stock in the Farmers Elevator of Walcott, one of the 
progressive enterprises of that village. 

In 1884 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Paustian and Miss Matilda 
Lamp, who was bom in Hickory Grove township, April 30, 1863. She is a 
daughter of Claus H. Lamp, who was one of the prominent farmers of his sec- 
tion of Scott county but has now retired from active life and lives at 1026 West 
Fourteenth street, Davenport. He was the parent of seven children: one who 
died in infancy, Matilda, Caroline, Julius, Gustav, Clara and Adolph. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Paustian were born eleven children, of whom seven are living, namely: 
Meta, Wilma, Julius, August, Martha, Hilda and Clarence. Hugo died at the 
age of six years. Harry was three and a half when he passed away. Alma died 
when three years old, and Edward was only two months when he died. 

Although other tracts embrace a larger area none express more careful and 
thorough cultivation of the soil than does that which is Mr. Paustian's. He has 
not spared industry to make it productive and as he cultivates the fields with in- 
telligence he knows how to bring from them the largest harvests. 



THOMAS F. HALLIGAN. 

Davenport, the commercial center of Iowa and the home of many extensive 
wholesale houses, finds one of its prominent representatives in Thomas F. 
Halligan, president of the Halligan Coflfee Company, an enterprise of large and 
extensive proportions, in the development of which he has been a most important 
factor. In commercial affairs he displays marked ability in discriminating be- 





'a.£c^ 



^/ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 83 

tween the essential and non-essential and bringing into close harmony the varied 
forces that constitute the interests of the enterprise with which he has been 
associated. He is one of the city's native sons, born October 25, 1855. His 
father, Patrick Joseph Halligan, was a native of Ireland, born in Summerhill, 
County Meath, August 31, 1825. He came to the United States as a young man 
of twenty-four years, settling in Paterson, New Jersey, in 1849. He there re- 
sided for two years, during which time he was married, on the 27th of October, 
1850, to Miss Ellen McNally, a native of Clonard, County Kildare, Ireland, 
who came to the United States in 1850 and died in 1897. In 1851 Patrick J. 
Halligan and his young wife removed from Paterson, New Jersey, to Peru, 
Illinois, where for two years he was connected with the gas business. On the 
17th of August, 1853, he arrived in Davenport and was superintendent of the 
gas company here from 1858 until 1888, or for a period of thirty years, at the 
end of which time he retired. He enjoyed in unqualified measure the confidence 
and trust of those whom he represented and gave to them an efficient and valu- 
able service, which was indicated in his long connection with the company. He 
enjoyed, moreover, the unqualified good will and esteem of all with whom he 
came in contact outside of business relations. He had a strong love for the 
land of his birth and was a member of the Sarsfield Guards when in Ireland, 
but was ever a most loyal American, in full sympathy with the republican form 
of government and the liberal principles for which this country stands. He 
died in 1893. 

Thomas F. Halligan was the third in a family of six children, all of whom were 
born in Davenport with the exception of the eldest son, John. In St. Mar- 
guerite's parochial school Thomas F. Halligan pursued his studies until fifteen 
years of age, when he accepted a position in a flour and feed store, where he 
continued for a year. He then became delivery clerk in the grocery store of 
Morrison & Glaspell and thus obtained his initial knowledge of the business, with 
which he has been more or less intimately associated since that time. He re- 
mained with the firm and their successors for five years and in June, 1875, ac- 
cepted a position with Milton J. Glaspell. On the ist of January, 1884, he en- 
tered into partnership with Mr. Glaspell in the grocery business at No. 16 East 
Third street under the firm name of Glaspell & Halligan. They were very suc- 
cessful, the firm enjoying a growing trade until 1887, when Mr. HalHgan sold 
his interest and with G. J. Washburn organized the Washburn-Halligan Coffee 
Company, carrying a large line of teas, coffees and spices. This undertaking 
also proved profitable from its inception and after five years at their original 
location the firm in 1892 removed from Third street to larger quarters at No. 
215 East Second street. On two occasions they suffered losses through fire but 
with resolute purpose they conducted their interests, the business continuing to 
prosper and grow until there was a pressing demand for still more commodious 
quarters. In 1907 the present magnificent building was erected and the busi- 
ness is now carried on extensively on East Fourth street. This is one of the 
most complete and attractive wholesale buildings in Davenport, where the whole^ 
sale trade of this section of the country largely centers. Mr. Washburn retired 
in 1896 and the business was then reorganized under the name of the Halligan 
Coffee Company, with Thomas F. Halligan as president, R. F. Miller, vice pres- 



84 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

ident, William Lillis, secretary, and Joseph E. Halligan, treasurer. The trade 
today extends largely over Iowa, Missouri, the Dakotas, Minnesota and Ill- 
inois. The house sustains an unassailable reputation for the reliability of its 
business methods, and the spirit of enterprise and industry which dominates every 
department constitutes the basic element in the development of what is today one 
of the largest and most important wholesale concerns of the city. 

On the 17th of August, 1886, Mr. Halligan was married to Miss Mary, a 
daughter of John and Bridget Lillis. Mrs. Halligan was bom in Davenport 
and by her marriage has become the mother of six children: Gilbert L., Eugene 
J., Grace, Camilla, Thomas, Francis and Angela. 

Mr. Halligan's social nature finds expression in his membership with the 
Commercial Club, the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of Columbus, 
and his standing in business circles is indicated in the fact that he has been 
elected to the presidency of the Jobbers & Manufacturers Association. He is 
active in every project concerning the welfare of the city and is a loyal son of 
Davenport, doing everything in his power to promote her welfare along the 
lines of substantial and permanent growth and improvement. He is recognized 
by friends and business associates as a man of high character and sterling qual- 
ities and his life record exemplifies many traits of character which are well worthy 
of emulation. 



BERNARD A. HUSCHKE. 

Bernard A. Huschke, who has lived retired at No. 1207 Grand avenue in 
Davenport for the past twelve years, successfully followed fanning throughout 
his active business career. He is a native of Germany, his birth having occurred 
in Prussia on the 12th of September, 1831. He lost his parents, Charles and 
Margaret Huschke, when still very young. His father held a court offce in 
Germany and served as an army official for about nineteen years. Mr. Huschke 
of this review obtained his education in the schools of his native land and there 
also learned the blacksmith's trade. When a young man of twenty- four years he 
set sail for the new world, landing at New York on the 7th of October, 1855, after 
an ocean voyage of sixty-four days. He first located in Cincinnati but, being 
unable to obtain satisfactory employment, left the city at the end O'f two months 
and went to Ferdinand, Indiana, where he worked at his trade until the following 
spring. On leaving the Hoosier state he came to Davenport and here began work 
at the blacksmith's trade but after a couple of weeks secured employment as a 
farm hand at a wage of twelve dollars per month. Later he hired out at a 
salary of one hundred and twenty dollars per year and continued working as a 
farm hand until the time oi his marriage in 1858. Following that important 
event in his life he began the operation of a rented farm of eighty acres in 
Davenport township and at the end of two years purchased the property, making 
his home thereon for about eight years. On the expiration of that period he 
sold the place and purchased and located upon a quarter section of land in 
Pleasant Valley township, to the further cultivation and improvement of which 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY , 35 

be devoted his attention until 1898, making it a rich and productive farming 
property. In 1898 he disposed of the place and took up his abode in Davenport, 
bemg incapacitated for further active work because of injuries which he had re- 
ceived in a runaway accident. He won a gratifying measure of prosperity in the 
conduct of his agricultural interests and has long been numbered among the sub- 
stantial and respected citizens of Scott county. 

On the I2th of July, 1858, Mr. Huschke was united in marriage to Miss 
Barbara Wachter, who was born in Switzerland on the 9th of October, 1839, her 
father being Frank Wachter, who settled in this county in 1848. ' Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Huschke were born twelve children, the record of whom is as follows. 
Casper, who makes his home in Minnesota, married Miss Theresa Wager and 
has three children: Beatrice, Genevieve and Herbert. John, living in Iowa, 
wedded Miss Mary Schmidt, by whom he has six children.. Louisa, the next in 
order of birth, is at home. Marie gave her hand in marriage to Henry Meyer, 
of Stuart, Iowa, and is now the mother of four children. Amelia is the wife of 
Ludwig Schmidt, of Davenport, and has three children : Walter, Gertrude and 
Lucy. Leo, who wedded Miss Rose Baldwin, is a resident of Washington. 
Elizabeth, living in Portland, Oregon, is the wife of Benjamin Klotz, by whom 
she has four children: Rose, Leo, Frank and Anton. The Misses Margaret, 
Carrie and Amanda Huschke are still under the parental roof. Clara is now in 
a convent of Dubuque. Constantine, who died at the age of thirty-seven years, 
had married Miss Lottie Ryan, who is also deceased. The two childreh of this 
union, Ermentrude and Allen, make their home with our subject. 

Since becoming a naturalized American citizen Mr. Huschke has given his 
political allegiance to the democratic party. He is a faithful communicant of the 
Catholic church and also belongs to the German Pioneers Society. Though born 
across the water and .maintaining a love for his native land, he is yet thoroughly 
American in spirit and interests and loyal to the institutions of his adopted 
country. He has now passed the seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey and 
is well and favorably known throughout the county in which he has resided for 
more than a half century. 



HENRY VOLLMER. 



Henry Vollmer, long a respected resident and active business man of Daven- 
port, learned the printer's trade as the initial step in his business career and from 
a hum.ble position worked his way steadily upward until he gained that success 
which comes from the capable management of large and important printing in- 
terests. He was a native of Germany and one of a family of several children. 
When little more than three years of age he was brought by his parents to the 
new world, the family home being estabHshed in St. Louis, where the days of 
his boyhood and youth were passed and his education was acquired. In early 
manhood he learned the printer's trade, which he followed in St. Louis and 
nearby towns until 1861, when he came to Davenport. Here he took a position 
with the German Democrat, being made foreman of the composing room, and for 



86 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

almost a score of years he remained on that paper, his long connection therewith 
being incontrovertible proof of his capability and fidelity in discharging the du- 
ties that devolved upon him. In 1880 he resigned to engage in business on his 
own account and purchased an interest with J. M. Buck in a rubber stamp man- 
ufacturing enterprise. They extended the scope of their activities to include 
job printing and the partnership relation was maintained for some time, but 
eventually Mr. Buck sold his interest to A. L. Mossman and the firm of Mossman 
& Vollmer was formed. Under that style the business was continued until the 
death of Henry Vollmer, although for about a year prior to his demise his son 
Emil took his place in the active management of the business. Throughout his 
life Mr. Vollmer was actuated by laudable ambition and his earnest purpo.se and 
unfaltering industry constituted a force which won for him a gratifying measure 
of success. 

In 1863 occurred the marriage of Henry Vollmer and Miss Dorothea Plam- 
beck, of Davenport, and unto tliem were born seven children : Emil, Henry, 
Carl, Fred, Arthur, Agnes and Dora. The children have all been provided with 
good educational privileges, not only in the schools of Davenport but also at 
Iowa City. Mrs. Vollmer was brought to this city when seven years of age by 
her parents and her father died three years later. The death of Mr. Vollmer 
occurred December 12, 1890, and thus passed away a man whose sterling worth 
was recognized by all who knew him. He belonged to the Turners Society, the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and to the Knights of Pythias, and he was 
also known and honored for his activity and faithfulness in political circles. In 
1883 he was elected. to the ofiice of county recorder, in which position he served 
for two terms, retiring in 1887 with the confidence and good will of all con- 
cerned. He was a man of strict probity and upright character, who at all times 
and under all circumstances could be depended upon to conserve the iest inter- 
ests of any movement or measure with which he was connected. He won sub- 
stantial success in business and more than that he gained the confidence and 
good will of his fellowmen, leaving to his family the priceless heritage of an 
untarnished name. 



CLAUS KROEGER. 



Claus Kroeger is numbered among those representative German-American 
citizens who came to this country from the fatherland and here found the op- 
portunities for advancement which they sought along business lines. He is 
numbered among the old German settlers of Scott county and for almost four 
decades was actively and helpfully identified with its agricultural interests. As 
the result of energy, perseverance and well directed efforts he is now able to 
spend the evening of life in retirement, enjoying in well earned rest the fruits of 
former years of toil. Born in Holstein, Germany, on the, 14th of April, 1829, 
he is a son of Hans and Lena Kroeger, whose entire lives were spent in the father- 
land. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 87 

For the educational advantages which Mr. Kroeger enjoyed during the period 
of his boyhood and youth he is indebted to the common schools of his native 
country, and he remained under the parental roof until the outbreak of the war 
of 1848-50 with Denmark, when he joined the German army and served through- 
out the period of hostilities. Returning home, he remained with his parents 
until 1854, when he responded to the call of the new world and, bidding adieu 
to home and fatherland, sailed for the United States, hoping to find better op- 
portunities for advancement in business than were offered in the old world. He 
left Germany on the 15th of March and upon arriving in this country came direct 
to Davenport, which point he reached on the 20th of May, more than two 
months being consumed by the journey. His first work here was in the capacity 
of farm hand and thus he labored by the month for about six years. His in- 
herent characteristic of thrift prompted him to carefully save his earnings and 
at the expiration of that period, feeling that the capital which he had accumu- 
lated was suffcient to justify such a step, he established a home of his own by his 
marriage, on the 21st of August, i860, to Miss Anna Lage, who was born in 
Germany on the 9th of March, 1839, a daughter of Henry and Anna Lage, old 
German settlers of Scott county. In 1847, when a little maiden of eight years, 
she came with her parents to the United States, the family landing at New Or- 
leans, whence they came up the Mississippi river to St. Louis. After remaining 
m that city for about six weeks they continued their northward journey until 
they arrived in Scott county, Iowa, where the father purchased a tract of wild 
praire land which, by means of untiring industry, indefatigable energy and un- 
ceasing perseverance, he converted into a highly cultivated farm and which later 
became the home of our subject. 

After his marriage Mr. Kroeger took up his abode upon the farm in Daven- 
port township upon which his father-in-law originally located, continuing to de- 
vote his time and energies to its development for more than thirty years. In the 
meantime he made a thorough study of agriculture, practiced rotation of crops 
and carried on his farming interests in a capable and businesslike way that brought 
most desirable results. Annually his fields yielded rich harvests as a reward for 
the care and labor bestowed upon them, and his agricultural interests proved a 
source of gratifying revenue. He purchased a farm in Lyon county, Iowa, which 
he later sold at a very advantageous price. That his efforts were crowned with 
a very substantial success is indicated by the fact that in 1893 he was able to 
retire from further active work. He removed to Davenport, purchasing a home 
at 1 162 Fourteenth street, where he has since resided, a goodly competence mak- 
ing it possible for him to enjoy the comforts of life without further recourse 
to labor. 

With the passing of the years the home of Mr. and Mrs. Kroeger was blessed 
with six children, as follows : Henry, a progressive farmer operating the old 
homestead, mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume; Lewis, of Lyon 
county, Iowa ; Emma, the wife of Henry Goettsch, of Lyon county ; Gustav, also 
residing in Lyon county; Minnie, the deceased wife of Henry Bolt, of Davenport; 
and one who died in infancy. Politically Mr. Kroeger is independent and while 
still active in the world's work held several township offices. He holds member- 
ship in the German Pioneers Association and also in the Schleswig-Holstein So- 



88 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

ciety, and he is widely known throughout Davenport township, where his circle 
of friends is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. He has 
never had occasion to regret his determination to seek his fortune in this country, 
for here he found the opportunities which he sought and by earnest, persistent 
and unfaltering efifort carried himself forward to the goal of success. He has 
now passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey and can look back upon a 
past that has been characterized by honest labor and honorable purposes. 



W. F. PECK, M. D. 



Those best acquainted with the early history of medicine in Iowa will agree 
that no one man has done more to advance the standing of the profession in the 
state than Dr. W. F. Peck. Setting a high mark for individual attainment, mak- 
ing his own name as a surgeon second to none in the west, he was at the same 
time far-seeing and active in the furtherance of measures for the collective ad- 
vancement of his calling. He did the effective organizing work and largely in- 
fluenced the legislation which gave the university its medical department; he 
was among the foremost in procuring the medical license law and board of medi- 
cal examiners; his counsels live in the state board of health, State Medical So- 
ciety and State Orphans' Home ; and Iowa's efficient railroad surgical service, in 
which work this state was a pioneer, was organized by him. 

Washington Freeman Peck was born in Galen, Wayne county. New York, 
January 22, 1841. His parents, William H. and Alida (Hawes) Peck, both 
natives of the Empire state, were, the former of English and Scotch, the latter 
of Dutch descent. His great-grandfather, Nathan Peck, was a soldier of the 
Revolutionary war and a descendant of Deacon William Peck, a London mer- 
chant who, with his wife and son Jeremiah, came to this country on the ship Hec- 
tor in company with Governor Eaton, John Davenport and other stanch Puri- 
tans, arriving in Boston in the spring of 1637. The next year Deacon William 
and his associates founded the New Haven colony, and Jeremiah became the 
first teacher in the New Haven collegiate school. 

Dr. Peck, though lacking the advantages of a general education, beyond that 
to be obtained in the common schools, was a tireless student in the school of life. 
By keenly observing and diligently applying the lessons there learned he accom- 
plished results beyond those achieved by most college graduates, and the degree 
of A. M. later conferred on him was exceptionally well eariled. 

He was graduated from Bellevue Hospital Medical College in the spring of 
1863, with the highest honors of his class, being the first student to matriculate 
in this the first medical college in the land to successfully combine clinical with 
didactic teaching. During his three years at medical college he secured, together 
with lectures from the foremost professional celebrities of the day, three months' 
service each in the hospitals on Blackwell's and Randall's islands and eighteen 
months of invaluable experience in the wards of Bellevue. Also, just before 
graduating, he availed himself of a trip as ship surgeon to Havana and back, 
and at the close of his Bellevue service entered Lincoln General Hospital, Wash- 




•.•«^ VV 




HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 91 

ington, D. C, as a contract surgeon. Here he did good work and made valuable 
acquaintances until, weakened by an attack of pneumonia, he was compelled to 
resign from the very arduous duties of the place in May, 1864. While treating 
a neglected gunshot wound during his service in Washington he had the mis- 
fortune to infect his right index finger, resulting in permanent anchylosis. M 
less courageous man might have been disheartened; but he was thankful to es- 
cape without the threatened loss of his hand, and the crippled finger learned to 
do excellent work. 

Returning to the parental home at Clyde in his native county, he allowed him- 
self only a few weeks for recuperation, then set his face to the west and arrived 
at Rock Island, June 9, 1864, in his twenty- fourth year and ready to work. This 
place he had chosen as his prospective field of labor, but after inspecting both 
towns he was better pleased with Davenport across the river. Here he fitted up 
an office on Third street near Brady, making a sleeping room of his "sanctum" 
and taking board at the old "Burtis." By July 2d, as his journal records, he had 
taken part in a consultation ; had joined the "Hawkeye Club ;" was about to affili- 
ate with the local Masons, having taken the Master's degree as a student; and 
was able to write : "My office business up to date has paid my expenses." Thus 
promptly did he become identified with the community his name was to honor. 

Though barely out of his teens when he began hospital work and study in 
the great city his journal of that period plainly reveals the traits which marked 
his character through life. Fully realizing that right success means persistent 
hard work, together with habits conservative of bodily health and strength, ha 
chose "Success" as his motto and, yielding to no indulgence, losing no opportunity 
and sparing no effort, he bent all his energies to attain it. Working early and 
late in the wards and at study, that he might find time for clinics and such lectures 
as he selected to attend; never avoiding but rather courting work; planning, 
even scheming, for additional tasks ; eager for the additional knowledge and train- 
ing they would afford ; perfecting his hand on every occasion in minor surgical man- 
ipulations; always ready to assist in, or himself to conduct an operation; losing 
no opportunity to make post mortem examinations and carefully to note their 
impressive lessons, he reaped much fuller returns from his student years than 
if, modestly retiring, or allowing himself to be pushed aside, he had done only 
the work needed to obtain his diploma. 

Keenly alive to the stirring news and events of the day, both on the field and 
in the halls of congress, Dr. Peck's deepest interest was still in medical affairs and. 
medical men. Self-assured but unassuming, he made good use of his almost 
daily association with the foremost lecturers and surgeons of the land. Such 
men as J. R. Wood, the Motts and the Flints ; Hamilton, Sayre, Parker and Smith ; 
Professor Silliman, of Yale, and Drs. Gross and Pancoast, of Philadelphia, took 
an especial interest in the bright, energetic youth, and he suffered no needless 
reticence to deprive him of the full advantage of his association with them. He 
did not neglect social duties, however, exchanged frequent letters with mother, 
sister and brother ; visited relatives and friends in the city ; heard a sermon when 
he could ; enjoyed a play now and then, and indulged rarely in a friendly game of 
whist. 



92 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

His student days over and a successful career as a surgeon opening up brightly 
before him in the west, Dr. Peck returned to his native state at the end of his 
first year of practice and was united in marriage, September i8, 1865, to Miss 
Maria Purdy, of Butler, Wayne county. New York, who became his ever effi- 
cient helper thereafter to the close of his life, and who, with one daughter, Mrs. 
Henry Vollmer, of Davenport, survives him. Another daughter and an only son 
died in early youth. 

In 1866 Dr. Peck was made secretary of the Scott County Medical Society, 
became its president a few years later, and in 1876 was elected to the presi- 
dency of the State Medical Society, thus rapidly advancing to the front rank of 
his profession. He became an active member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, served as its vice president and was honored with the chairmanship of its 
surgical section, being also chosen a member of the American Surgical Association, 
an organization whose membership is limited to one hundred. 

The story of Dr. Peck's surgical and educational work was well and concisely 
told in an article prepared for the "Biographical History and Portrait Gallery of 
Scott County, Iowa," 1895, by the late Dr. W. D. Middleton, his first student, 
his life-long friend and associate, and his worthy successor as dean of the medical 
faculty of the State University of Iowa. Dr. Middleton writes : 

"To the educational work of the profession Dr. Peck at once addressed him- 
self with the ardor of an enthusiast, and to him the state of Iowa is indebted for 
the medical department of its State University an institution which reflects credit 
on its founder and upon the great state by which it is fostered and supported. In 
1868 he conceived the idea of building up a medical college in Iowa which would 
afford facilities for the first-class education of young men desiring to enter the 
medical profession, and in order that the institution might be established upon a 
permanent basis, he determined to make it a department of the State University 
at Iowa City. He first laid his plans before Judge John F. Dillon, now of New 
York, then a distinguished citizen of Davenport, and secured his hearty coopera- 
tion. Then, in June of 1869, a comparatively unknown young man, he presented 
himself before the trustees of the university and proposed the creation of a medi- 
cal department. He came before the board unheralded but full of the subject 
with which he had to deal, enthusiastic in his expectations and eloquent in his 
appeals for liberal treatment of his profession by the officials of what should be 
a university in fact as well as in name. Surprising as it may seem he carried the 
board with him, and the preliminary steps were taken toward the establishment 
of the medical school. In those days, however, the university was poor, and from 
the day it was founded the medical department was in financial straits. An or- 
ganization was not effected, or at least perfected, until 1870, and this was ac- 
complished in the face of difficulties of the most discouraging and perplexing 
kind. When the organization was finally completed Dr. Peck was made professor 
of surgery, and became dean of the faculty and the executive head of the de- 
partment of medicine. Then came the struggle to secure the needed assistance 
from the State Legislature, to overcome hostility engendered by professional riv- 
alry, and to carry on at the same time a work which would compel recognition and 
approval of the project. At another city in the state a medical college had been 
established at an earlier date, calling itself a department of the State University 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 93 

and with an ambition to be recognized as such. The charter of the university, 
however, precluded such recognition of an institution not located at Iowa City, 
and the plan proposed by Dr. Peck was the only feasible proposition for connect- 
ing a medical course with the university course. Nevertheless new antagonisms 
and sectional jealousies were aroused to such an extent that at times the advance- 
ment of the project seemed almost hopeless. Year after year the struggle con- 
tinued, and the indomitable will power, the high courage and ceaseless effort of 
Dr. Peck contributed more than anything else to final success. Supported by a 
loyal and competent faculty he made the medical department an institution which 
commanded the respect and admiration of all those who were interested in the 
general upbuilding of the university, and by and by the opposition to it ceased, 
appropriations for its maintenance were freely made, and its founders realized 
the full fruition of their hopes." 

In this connection the Hon. John P. Irish, then one of the University board 
of trustees, now naval officer of customs at the port of San Francisco, who was 
an active co-worker in the project of the new school, and without whose efficient 
aid it would probably have failed, writes : 

"The real founder of the medical department of the State University of Iowa 
was Dr. Peck. The suggestion of the foundation came from myself, * * * 
I made of its (the University's) interests a specialty in the legislature and se- 
cured for it the first appropriation that it ever received from the state treasury." 
In working for this appropriation Mr. Irish had in view, as he says, the es- 
tablishing of both a legal, and a medical department of the university, rightly rea- 
soning that through them he would enlist for it the sympathy and support of 
most of the influential men of the state. 

"Something over fifty thousand dollars" was voted and the law department, 
under Chancellor Hammond, was started in 1868. Later "the first concrete 
action" was taken toward the establishing of a medical department when Dr. 
Peck, Mr. Irish and Professor Gustavus Hinrichs met in Mr. Irish's office to dis- 
cuss the project. The outlook was not an encouraging one. There was no money 
in sight, a faculty had to be secured who would serve without pay, and the deter- 
mined opposition of the Keokuk Medical School had to be met. It proved a 
strong opposition, both in the legislature and throughout the state, and "the early 
years (of the department) were passed in storm and tempest." But Dr. Peck 
was a fighter, and he was ably seconded. From the legislature of 1870 Mr. Irish 
secured a second appropriation of sixty-three thousand dollars, and by the most 
strenuous elifort prevented the passage of a proviso that none of it should be 
used for the medical department. The victory was won; but, as Mr. Irish de- 
clares: "There would have been no medical school but for Dr. Peck. It was 
founded in his professional zeal, his enormous capacity for work, his command 
of the art of persuasion, his sleepless vigilance, his right intuitions and his spirit 
of sacrifice." 

To quote further from Dr. Middleton's article: 

"Soon after he came to Davenport Dr. Peck was made local surgeon of the 
Rock Island Railroad Company. At that time the company had no organized 
medical department, nor is it probable that any such department was connected 
with a western railroad, if indeed any of the railway corporations of the country 



94 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

had gi-ogressed to that extent. The work which came to Dr. Peck, however, as 
local railway surgeon was well done ; so well that it commended him to the great 
and constantly growing corporation, and in 1875 he was designated to act as sur- 
geon-in-chief of the company and to him was assigned the task of organizing its 
medical and surgical department. To this task he addressed himself with an 
energy and tenacity of purpose which precluded the possibility of failure, evincing 
an executive ability of as high character as his professional attainments, and the 
result was the organization of a medical department of the Rock Island Railway 
Company, which is today pronounced by competent judges the best and most ef- 
ficient organization of its kind in the United States. As chief of this department 
Dr. Peck had on his surgical staff during the later years of his life, nearly one 
hundred surgeons located at different points on the lines of the railway company, 
and his personal attention was given to a vast amount of surgical work. His la- 
bors in this field gained for him wide distinction, and when he summed up the 
results of his experience and observation in a paper read before the American 
Medical Association, while acting as chairman of the surgical section of the as- 
sociation, his paper was published in all the leading medical journals of America 
and also in the principal medical journals of Europe, translated in numerous for- 
eign languages. 

"With the extension of his practice, with surgery as his specialty, the character, 
of the operations successfully performed by Dr. Peck attracted attention and 
made him famous not only among his professional brethren but among the people 
at large. As early as 1882 he had successfully performed the operation for the 
relief of appendicitis. * * * It is not known that Dr. Peck (whose modesty 
was a distinguishing characteristic) ever made any claim of originality of method 
in this operation, but the statement of other eminent physicians is to the effect 
that the operation was the first of the kind performed in the United States. 
* * * In 1886 he went abroad to find that his fame had preceded him, and that 
physicians, scientists and public officials in the old world were by no means unfa- 
miliar with his name and achievements. At this time he spent six months in study 
and travel on the continent, and in England, Scotland and Ireland ; and in 1890 he 
again went abroad as a delegate to the International Medical Congress held in Ber- 
lin, and to the British Medical Association, which met at Birmingham." 

Of Mercy Hospital, Davenport, and Mercy Hospital, Iowa City, Dr. Peck 
was the honored founder and trusted adviser. Having secured for both the 
efficient management of the Sisters of Mercy, he served till his death at the head 
of their medical boards. Of the former institution which, almost equally with 
the university medical department, stands as a monument to his professional and 
philanthropic zeal, the story is an interesting one. Almost at once on coming 
to Davenport he was impressed by the need of some better provision for the sick 
and the injured, especially among the friendless poor, and he enHsted the aid of 
prominent citizens — among them John L. Davies and C. S. Watkins, mem- 
bers of the county board of supervisors, in a movement to secure the establish- 
ment of a city hospital. They were successful to the extent that the board au» 
thorized the purchase of a building located at Eighth and Brown streets to be 
used for the purpose ; but this action was later rescinded. Dr. Peck then sought 
to induce Father Borlando, head of a Catholic institution at Georgetown, D. C, 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 95 

to establish a Sisters hospital here. Borlando came, but, after due consideration, 
decided against the project. Soon after, however, the Sisters of Mercy from 
De Witt proposed to open an asylum here for the insane paupers, then kept in 
the poor house. Dr. Peck saw his opportunity and offered his gratuitous 
services, with those of an associate medical board, for the conducting of a gen- 
eral hospital, thus securing for the city an institution which has now no superior 
of its kind in the west. At his suggestion it was located on the grounds pur- 
chased in 1867 by Father Pelamourgues, of blessed memory, for the Sisters of The 
Immaculate Conception. 

Mr. Watkins, who was one of Dr. Peck's earliest patrons and friends, in 
Davenport, and who contributes in substance, the above account of the origin of 
Mercy Hospital, gives also an interesting picture of the man as he knew him. 
His general conversation and all his energies, writes JNIr. Watkins, were in the 
line of his profession. He took, or seemed to take, little interest in poHtics, busi- 
ness or religion. -Without egotism he loved appreciation, but was most concerned 
to win self -approval. Easy to be imposed on in money matters and giving little 
thought to personal profit, "I have never in all my experience," says Mr. Watkins, 
"met with any one so completely and practically a friend of humanity as Dr. 
Peck." He would pick up deformed children on the streets, advise their parents 
as to what might be done for them, and care for the little unfortunates, often re- 
gardless of recompense or expense. The sick and suffering poor, if worthy, al- 
ways found in him a friend; he would give them his best services freely and 
seek to lighten their afflictions even when overburdened with troubles of his own.. 
Although by contact with the world he developed a husk, at it were, which was 
not always so ea_sily opened, he remained, to all who knew him in those earlier 
days, "the genial, kind-hearted and truly affectionate Dr. Peck." 

In 1888, over-taxed by the demands of his large practice and his extensive 
charitable and educational work , his health began to fail, and by the summer of 
1891 he was obliged to retire from active life. Made professor emeritus of surgery 
on his resignation from the medical department he had founded, it was hoped he 
might be long spared to give it his counsel ; but, his health continuing to fail, he died 
at his home in Davenport, December 12, 1891. 

The writer of this sketch spent some months in Dr. Peck's office when first 
starting in practice in Davenport, assisting him in caring for the first sufferers of 
the cholera epidemic of 1873, and enjoyed his friendship thereafter to the close 
of his life. Having known him thus intimately I do not find the warm words in 
his praise above quoted to be in any way too strong — he deserved them all. He 
had his enemies, it is true, and they found in him a good fighter. Determined 
and courageous but always fair, having engaged in a just cause he spared no one 
who stood in his way to "success." Though giving little time or thought to gen- 
eral business matters he yet knew how to bind to him loyal friends who cared 
for his interests as their own. His power to attract and interest young men 
especially was phenomenal, and under his inspiring leadership many adopted and 
followed up the laborious paths which conduct to honor and success in the medi- 
cal profession. Though always ready with his best services and sympathy for 
the afflicted he held it right to charge roundly for good work, where there was 
ability to pay, and he generally made sure of his fees in advance, especially from 



96 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

those belonging to the profligate or dead-beat class. With little use for new 
remedies as a rule, giving comparatively little medicine of any kind, indeed, 
prescribing only when the indications were plain, and then, for the most part; 
single drugs, he inspired a confidence and cheer in his patients which were bet- 
ter than medicine, and which made his very presence in the sickroom curative. 
He was sometimes accused by those less careful and less courageous than him- 
self, of cutting ruthlessly for the sake of cutting. No one, I think, could have- 
been less deserving of this accusation. His first care was always to consider 
well both the need for and the probable outcome of an operation. These decided 
in its favor he went ahead fearlessly and did his best. But he would often de- 
cide against operations which others less considerate and less skilled in diagnosis 
were quite ready to undertake. Born to, and loving his profession, he strongly 
opposed any lowering of its ethical standards, and gave the hand of fellowship 
only to those he esteemed worthy. Too busy to be a great reader (save from the 
page of living pathology ever open before him), even the medical books and 
journals — the best of vfhich he kept always about him — would often accumulate 
unread on his table. Genial socially, loved and respected by all clases, there was 
yet a certain reserve, amounting almost to hauteur, about him which prevented 
his becoming the hail-fellow well-met so common in the medical profession. Of 
medium height and build, his decided step and voice, sharp but kindly blue eye, 
and commanding presence proclaimed him the leader in any assembly he attended, 
and he was seldom absent from an important council of his fellows. His short 
fifty years were crowded full of achievement. May Iowa be blessed with many 
more such workers. 

Charles Hicklen Preston. 



JENNINGS PRICE CRAWFORD, M. D. 

The life work of Dr. Jennings Price Crawford was of signal service to his 
f ellowmen in the city in which he long made his home. Not only his professional 
skill and ability but his social characteristics and his genuine personal worth en- 
deared him to all who knew him. He was kindly and sympathetic in nature and 
he wisely used the talents with which he was endowed for the benefit of those with 
whom he came in contact. His history, therefore, cannot fail to prove of interest 
to many of our readers. He came of an old New England family, the ancestry 
being traced back to John Crawford, who left his home in the Scottish highlands 
and settled in the new world during its early colonization. To the same family 
belonged Colonel William Crawford, who figured in both the colonial and Revo- 
lutionary wars, his military service covering thirty years. 

Dr. Crawford was born near Marion, Iowa, August 27, 1855. He and his 
twin brother. Dr. A. J. Crawford, now deceased but formerly a distinguished phy- 
sician of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, were the sons of Jennings and Sarah (Price) Craw- 
ford. In his youthful days Dr. Crawford, of this review, mastered the branches 
of learning in the public schools of his native county, thus spending a portion of 
each year in study until he reached the age of seventeen, when he had opportunity 




^ d 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 99 

to attend Western College at Western, Iowa, and in that institution completed his 
literary course. His professional education was acquired in the medical depart- 
ment of the Iowa State University, from which he was graduated in 1883 on the 
completion of a four years' course with the valedictory honors of his class. Dur- 
ing the two vacations he had acted as house physician at Mercy Hospital in Daven- 
port and thus to his theoretical training added the broad and invaluable experience 
of hospital practice. The late Dr. W. F. Peck was his preceptor and professor in 
surgery and, no doubt, he inspired Dr. Crawford with his preference for surgical 
work as the latter always had the greatest admiration for his teacher, who was a 
noted surgeon. He took a post-graduate course at Bellevue Hospital College, New 
York city. 

Opening an office in Davenport in 1883, Dr. Crawford steadily advanced in his 
chosen field, winning high professional honors that made him regarded as one of 
the eminent physicians and surgeons of Davenport up to the time of his death. He 
never ceased to be a student of his profession but throughout his life read broadly 
and with thoughtful consideration carried his researches into the realms of scien- 
tific knowledge, doing everything in his power to promote his own efficiency and 
add to that general knowledge of medicine and surgery which constitutes a source 
of public health. He stood high in the ranks of his profession, not only in this 
city but in the state, and was not unknown beyond the borders of Iowa. He held 
membership in the American Medical Association and frequently attended its 
meetings. He was also seen in the meetings of the Iowa State Medical Society, 
the Iowa and Illinois District Medical Association and the Scott County Medical 
Society. He was a frequent contributor to medical Hterature and one of his last 
public appearances was for the presentation of a paper which he had prepared on 
surgery before the Iowa State Medical Society, at Des Moines. The addresses 
which he delivered in such meetings were frequently published in the leading medi- 
cal journals, for they were carefully prepared and presented not only the results 
of his own experience but also of his wide research. He served as a member of 
the staff of both Mercy and St. Luke's Hospitals and was one of the most active 
promoters of the interest of those two institutions. His large surgical practice 
took him to the hospitals almost daily and his skill and ability were of such high 
order that his death came as a distinct loss to both. He acted as district surgeon 
for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad and took a prominent part in 
arranging for the meeting of the Iowa State Medical Society, which was held in 
Davenport about two years before his death — an important meeting still pleas- 
antly remembered by the physicians of this vicinity who shared with him in the 
honors and responsibilities of being the entertainers on that occasion. The Illi- 
nois Society met in Rock Island at the same time and joint gatherings were fea- 
tures of their meetings. As his health began to fail Dr. Crawford gradually with- 
drew from his professional service, for he realized the advance that was being 
made by the disease which eventually terminated his life. 

In no other environment did Dr. Crawford find the happiness and contentment 
which came to him in his own home, for he was a man of domestic tastes and his 
greatest joy was in the companionship of his wife and children. On the 14th of 
October, 1885, he married Miss A!tina Williams, a daughter of A. F. Williams, who 
at one time was a member of the Seig Iron Company and prominent in the busi- 



100 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

ness circles of Davenport. He died many years ago but is still survived by his 
widow, who spends the summer seasons in Davenport and the winter months in 
California, where she has a daughter living. Unto Dr. and Mrs. Crawford were 
born five children, Frances Louise, Genevieve, Helen, Dorothy and Margaret, the 
last two being twins. 

Dr. Crawford held membership in the Calvary Baptist church, in which he was 
an active and loyal worker, being a trustee of the church and superintendent of 
the Sunday school for many years. He was also one of the charter members of 
the San Grail Club and belonged to the Masonic fraternity. He was interested in 
all those movements which had for their object the betterment of mankind and he 
was also a stalwart champion of projects for the public good, rejoicing in the 
growth, advancement and welfare of his city. He was so widely known and such 
was the hold which he had upon the affection of his fellow townsmen that his 
death, which occurred in 1907, brought a sense of personal bereavement to the 
large majority of Davenport's citizens. On the Sunday following his demise, in 
place of the regular lesson in the Sunday school of the Calvary Baptist church, 
there was held a memorial service in his honor, in which many who had known him 
long and well testified to his goodness of heart and the honor of his life, which in 
all of its phases was of such high character as to constitute an example that is well 
worthy of emulation. 



WILLIAM H. GEHRMANN. 

William H. Gehrmann, starting in business life in America at a salary of eight 
dollars per month, is today the vice president and general manager of the Kohrs 
Packing Company of Davenport, in which connection he is active in the control 
of one of the leading enterprises of the city. His business affairs have been so 
carefully managed that success has placed him in a prominent position among 
Davenport's representative men. He was born in Uetersen, Germany, March 
15, 1858, and is a son of Dietrich and Anna (Dieckman) Gehrmann, also natives 
of Germany. The father was a manufacturer of chicory, a root treated and used 
as a substitute for coffee. He was quite a prominent citizen of his native coun- 
try, in which both he and his wife spent their entire lives. 

William H. Gehrmann was educated in the private schools of his native town 
and afterward learned bookkeeping, which he followed for two years. In 1875, 
when a youth of seventeen years, he sailed for America,, making the voyage 
alone as a passenger on the steamship Schiller. This was the last complete trip 
which she made, as she was lost at sea on her return trip, being wrecked on the 
Needles off the English coast. Mr. Gehrmann landed at New York city and 
soon afterward started for the middle west, going to St. Louis, Missouri, where 
he secured a place in a grocery store at a salary of eight dollars per month. He 
afterward was employed in a wholesale grocery house of that city, with which 
he was connected until 1879, when he went to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and entered 
the training school of the Turners Academy for the training of teachers of 
gymnastics. Following his graduation in 1880 he returned to St. Louis and ac- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 101 

cepted a position as teacher in the gymnasium of the Toensfeldt Institute and 
St. Louis Turn Verein. There he continued until the spring of 1887, when he 
went to Walkerville, Montana, and with the capital he had saved from his earn- 
ings engaged in the butchering business on his own account. In this undertaking 
he prospered but in 1895 he sought a broader field of labor in Anaconda, Mon- 
tana, where he organized the Montana Meat Company in connection with Mar- 
cus Daly and Conrad Kohrs. In 1898, however, he sold out his interest to his 
partners and came to Davenport, where he assumed the management of the in- 
terests of the Kohrs Packing Company, which had been established in 1874 by 
Henry Kohrs. He is now the vice president and general manager of what is 
today one of the extensive business concerns of the city, employing about one 
hundred people. The output of the market is known throughout Iowa, Illinois 
and Missouri and all points in the south. They do their own killing, dressing 
and packing and the establishment is under government inspection. Everything 
is conducted with the strictest regard to sanitation and the excellence of the prod- 
ucts insures a continuance of a liberal and growing patronage. 

On the 7th of September, 1887, Mr. Gehrmann was united in marriage to 
Miss Helen Kohrs, a daughter of Henry Kohrs, and they have two sons, Wil- 
liam C. and Harry John. Fraternally Mr. Gehrmann is connected with the Elks 
and the Masons and is prominent as a club man in this city. He has taken an 
active interest in all public affairs as one of the leading representatives of trade 
interests in Davenport. He also figures in financial circles as a director of the 
Iowa National Bank. He is prominent among the German-American citizens 
here as the president of the Davenport Turner Society and is interested in the 
educational progress of the city, doing effective work in behalf of the public 
schools as a member of the board of education since 1901. His record has been 
characterized by continuous progress along every line to which he has directed 
his activity and most of all he is known as a representative and prominent busi- 
ness man who accomplishes what he undertakes by reason of well formulated 
plans and close and unremitting application. 



JXMES FRANCIS PHELPS. 

The history of Davenport and its leading citizens contains no name which 
awakens a feeling of more sincere respect and honest regard than that of James 
Francis Phelps, who, in the years of his connection with the city, came to be 
recognized as an influential factor in business circles and also as one whose ef- 
forts in other directions were of far-reaching and beneficial import. He was 
born October 6, 1821, at Schroon, New York. The public school system of 
that state afforded him his educational privileges and his experiences in youth 
were those of agricultural life, for he remained upon his father's farm until 
thirty years of age. Thinking to find broader opportunities in different busi- 
ness lines, he then removed to West Troy and engaged in the lumber business. 
From that time until his death he was identified with the lumber trade save for 
a brief period. He continued to make his home in the Empire state until 1876, 



102 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

when he removed to Middlebury, Vermont, settling on a farm with the hope 
that the experiences of outdoor life might prove beneficial to his health, which 
had become impaired. The year 1885 witnessed his arrival in Davenport, where 
he retained his residence until his demise. Since first embarking in the lumber 
business he retained his interest in the business and became a prominent repre- 
sentative of the lumber trade in this section of the country. He was a leading 
stockholder in the Lindsey & Phelps Lumber Company and also in the Cloquet 
Lumber Company of Cloquet, Minnesota. In business affairs his judgment was 
sound, his sagacity keen and his enterprise unfailing, and in the years of an 
active career he won substantial success, his record being that of a man whose 
course in business affairs measured up at all times to the full standard of honor- 
able, upright manhood. 

At Schroon, New York, in 1848, Mr. Phelps was united in marriage to 
Miss Lucina Tyrrell, and unto them was bom a son, A. T. Phelphs, who is now 
cashier of the National Bank of Watervliet, New York. The wife and mother 
died April 5, 1853, and on the 20th of December, 1854, Mr. Phelps married Miss 
Jeanette Finch. 

Mr. Phelps attended and supported the Methodist church. He was a man 
of high ideals, progressive in citizenship and ready at all times to give loyal 
support to those projects and movements which are intended for the better- 
ment of the community. He traveled extensively, finding great pleasure in vis- 
iting points of scenic and historic interest, especially in his own country. His 
attachment for America was one of the deep-rooted interests of his life, his love 
of country being the expression of an unfaltering patriotism. He continued 
his residence in Davenport until his death, which occurred April 3, 1906, and 
was the occasion of deep regret to many who knew and honored him. The 
physical and moral life were intensely vital in him and the ringing response which 
his character gave to every test made him a man honored and respected wherever 
known and most of all where best known. While he won for himself a substan- 
tial and creditable position in business circles, he also applied his knowledge and 
working powers to wider and more impersonal interests in which the general 
public was largely the beneficiary. 



RUDOLPH LANGE. 



There are few men who pass from this life that leave behind them among 
their friends a sense of such uniform sorrow as did Rudolph Lange when he 
was called to the home beyond. He had for many years been a resident of Dav- 
enport and his good qualities had endeared him to all with whom he came in 
contact. He was born in Kassel, Germany, March 7, 1832, and acquired his 
education in that country, where the period of his minority was spent. He was 
a young man of twentyrtwo years when in 1854 he bade adieu to the father- 
land and sailed for the United States, landing at New York, where he remained 
for a brief period. He then started westward, going first to Pittsburg, where he 
continued for a time, and later proceeding to Fort Madison, Iowa. Soon after- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 105 

ward he removed to the vicinity of Buriing-ton and while there residing was 
united in marriage to Miss CaroHne Schlapp, thus laying the foundation for a 
happy home life. While there residing he established and conducted a grocery 
store until the latter part of the '60s, when he removed to St. Louis, where he 
remained until 1870. In the latter year he came to Davenport and soon acquired 
the interests of Henry Knoepper and George H. Schlapp in the Arsenal Brew- 
ery in East Davenport. About 1872 the firm of Koehler & Lange was formed 
and the operation of this brewery was continued by the firm until they sold out 
in 1896 to the Davenport Malting Company. The business was carefully con- 
ducted along systematic lines and the enterprise, diligence and close applica- 
tion of Mr. Lange contributed in large measure to their success. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lange were born three children : Emil, who is now Hv- 
ing in Los Angeles, California ; Adelia, the wife of Dr. H. Pape ; and Ella, at 
home. Mr. Lange erected a fine residence on Fulton avenue, which is occupied 
his his widow and daughter, and he delighted to dispense its hospitality to his 
many friends. He was quiet and unostentatious in manner, but those who came 
within the circle of his friendship found him a genial, courteous and considerate 
gentleman, while in his own home he exemplified the spirit of an ideal husband 
and father. He held membership in Damon Lodge, No. 10, K. P., and also in the 
East Davenport Turner Society. He never courted favor and probably never 
weighed a single act of his life in the scale of public policy but he had high 
standing among the business men of the city, and at his death which occurred 
December 18, 1897, left no enemies. His political allegiance was given to the 
democracy and he was a public-spirited man in that he endorsed and supported 
all measures and movements for the general good. 



CHARLES N. VOSS. 



Germany has furnished her full quota to the citizenship of Davenport, and 
prominent among those who claim the fatherland as the place of their nativity 
is Charles N. Voss, who with German intelligence and pertinacity has con- 
ducted his business aiifairs to successful completion, rising from a comparatively 
humble place to the presidency of the German Savings Bank. He was born in 
Neustadt, Holstein, Germany, on the 13th of October, 1847, and pursued his 
education in the public and private, schools of his native town. He made his 
initial step in the business world in connection with the di'ry-goods trade, in 
which he continued until coming to America in 1867. Landing at New York 
city, he made his way to Petersburg, Illinois, where he was employed as clerk 
in a store until 1869, when he came to Davenport and again secured a position 
as salesman, entering the service of Kehoe & Carhart, one of the leading dry- 
goods firms in this city, with which he continued until they retired from business 
about 1873. The following year he engaged as teller in the Davenport Sav- 
ings Bank, there remaining until 1880, when he went to Avoca, Iowa, where 
he followed the milling business, for a few years. In 1883 he assisted in the 
organization of the Avoca Bank, which succeeded to the banking business of 



106 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

J. W. and E. W. Davis, and in this institution Mr. Voss accepted the position of 
cashier, so continuing until 1891. 

Returning to Davenport in that year, Mr. Voss accepted the cashiership of the 
Iowa National Bank, with which he continued until the ist of January, 1893, 
when he became cashier of the German Savings Bank. In 1906, when the Citi- 
zens National Bank was consolidated with the German Savings Bank, he was 
elected to the presidency and still remains as the chief executive officer of what 
is today recognized as one of the strongest and most important financial con- 
cerns of the city. He is also the president of the German Trust Company, which 
was promoted and conducted by the stockholders of the German Savings Bank. 
He is likewise financially interested in various other business enterprises and 
concerns, which profit by his knowledge and keen discernment, for his judg- 
men is always sound and his business methods progressive. He is today ac- 
counted one of the foremost representatives of banking circles in Iowa. 

In 1873 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Voss and Miss Louise Hoerring, 
a native of Davenport. They have four children: Hertha L., instructor of 
foreign languages in the State University of Iowa; Otto R., a practicing physi- 
cian of Walnut, Iowa; Agneta, the wife of Arnold L. Peterson; and Carl H., 
a graduate of St. John's Military Academy., The family are prominent socially 
and Mr. Voss is known as one of Davenport's leading citizens, his opinions carry- 
ing weight in various councils relative to municipal interests and business devel- 
opment. 



FRED VOLLMER. 



During thirteen years' connection with, the bar of Davenport, Fred Vollmer 
has made steady progress, recognizing the fact that in law advancement must 
depend upon individual efifort and merit. He was born in this city, December 
12, 1874. His father, Henry Vollmer, was a native of Bremen, Germany, and 
came to the United States in 1853, when three years of age, his parents crossing 
the Atlantic to America and settling in Davenport. After attaining to years, of 
maturity, Henry Vollmer became a prominent citizen, both in his commercial 
connections and in his association with public afifairs. For many years he con- 
ducted a printing business and the enterprise was one of large and profitable 
proportions. As a citizen he took active and helpful interest in various measures 
for the public good and for four years served as county recorder. He married 
Dora Plambeck and continued a resident of Davenport from 1853 until 1890, 
when he was called to his final rest. 

Reared in the city of /his nativity, Fred Vollmer at the usual age began his 
education in the public schools and passed through consecutive grades until he 
was qualified to enter the Iowa State University. It was in that institution that 
he prepared for a professional career, being graduated from the law department 
with the class of 1896. He was then admitted to practice and opened an office 
in Davenport, where he has since remained. He has always engaged in the 
general practice of law, keeping well informed on various branches of juris- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 107 

prudence and his continued research and investigation along professional lines 
has given him rank among the more able and successful lawyers of the city. 

Mr. Vollmer is also active in politics as a supporter of the democratic party 
and his labors have been an effective force in promoting its success. In 1908 he 
was elected county attorney, which position he is still filling and neither fear nor 
favor can swerve him in the faithful performance of his duties. His social 
relations are with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and outside of 
fraternal organizations he has many warm friends, having always resided in the 
city where he yet makes his home. 



CORNELIUS H. MURPHY. 

Cornelius H. Murphy, self-educated and self-made, is now a leading lawyer 
of the Davenport bar, having a large and representative clientage. He was bom 
in Wilmington, Delaware, on the 15th of March, 1857. His father, Dennis 
Murphy, a native of County Cork, Ireland, came to the United States in 1848 
and for some years was in the employ of Cornelius Vanderbilt. He afterward 
removed to Wilmington, Delaware, and in 1867 came to Iowa, settling in Dewitt, 
Clinton county, where he established a grocery store, which he conducted with 
continuous success for many years. He remained a resident of that city until 
his death in 1907. He had for about eighteen years survived his wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Ellen Harkin and was a native of County Donegal, Ireland. 

Cornelius H. Murphy was a youth of ten years when he accompanied his 
parents on their westward removal to Dewitt, Iowa, where in the public schools 
he continued his education until he began preparation for the practice of law as 
a student in the State University, from which he was graduated in the law class 
of 1889. He had to work^his own way through school, employment on the rail- 
road giving him funds which enabled him to pursue his education. Laudable 
ambition, however, prompted him to qualify for a professional career, while de- 
termination and energy enabled him to set at naught the difficulties and obstacles 
which barred his path. Following his graduation he entered the office of P. B. 
Wolfe, at Dewitt, where he remained for a year, after which he spent two years 
in law practice on the Pacific coast. 

On the expiration of that period Mr. Murphy came to Davenport, where he 
has since been located, and his success at the bar is the best evidence of his 
ability. He prepares his cases with great thoroughness and care, is strong in 
argument and logical in his deductions and as the years have passed he has en- 
joyed a continually growing practice that has connected him with much of the 
important litigation tried in the courts of the district. He also figures promi- 
nently in republican circles, has served as a member of the central committees of 
the party and his opinions carry weight in its councils. For four years he filled 
the off-ce of assistant county attorney, but has no desire for political preferment 
outside the strict path of his profession. He is, however, deeply interested in 
the political questions of the day and is thoroughly grounded in the principles 
that divide the two great parties. 



108 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

On the 24th of May, 1893, Mr. Murphy was united in marriage to Miss Jessie 
Webster, a native of Muscatine, Iowa, and a daughter of W. W. and Eliza J. 
Webster. They are well known in the social circles of the city and Mr. Murphy 
is a prominent Mason, belonging to Trinity Lodge, A. F. & A. M., while in 
Zarepath Consistory he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish 
Rite. He is now senior warden of the eighteenth degree and he also belongs to 
Kaaba Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise a past chancellor of Damon 
Lodge, No. 10, K. P., is a member of the Pythian grand lodge and is serving on 
the judiciary and other important committees. He is also a stalwart champion 
of the temperance cause and his influence is ever found on the side of right and 
progress, reform and advancement. During the years of his residence in Daven- 
port he has made many friends and is one of the popular as well as one of the 
leading members of the bar. 



LEVI RICHARD BANNISTER. 

The birth of Levi Richard Bannister occurred in Blair, Nebraska, September 
2, 1870, his parents being Chester and Johanna Bannister, who were married in 
Illinois, the native state of the mother, but went to Nebraska to live, being among 
the pioneer settlers in that state. He was the youngest of their nine children, his 
brothers and sisters being: Miles, deceased; Cal, living in Nebraska; William, 
a resident of Kansas; Marion, in Nebraska; La Fayette, deceased; Julia, living 
in Omaha ; Mary, in Black Hills ; and Bell, in Nebraska. 

At the age of sixteen years Mr. Bannister began to look about him for a' 
means of livelihood. He went to Kansas but remained in the Jayhawker state 
for only a short time and then returned to Nebraska. Three years later he re- 
moved to Scott county, Iowa, where he has ever since resided and where he 
speedily established a home for himself. Upon his arrival in Iowa' he worked 
as a farm hand until his marriage in 1900, when he located on the farm where he 
now resides. It belongs to his wife and is a tract of one hundred and tlwenty 
acres on section 32, Hickory Grove township. It is a valuable property, being 
fertile and well improved. Aside from his general farming Mr. Bannister has 
had great success as a breeder of Scotch shorthorn cattle, and he is a stockholder 
in the Farmers Elevator Company of Walcott. 

On May 5, 1895, Mr. Bannister married Miss Caroline Magdaline Arp, who 
was born on the farm they now occupy, August 14, 1861. Her parents were 
Timm and Bertha (Arp) Arp, both natives of Holstein, Germany, though resident 
in different towns. They were married across the water and came direct to Daven- 
port on landing in New Orleans, making the journey up the Mississippi river 
in 1851. They spent two years in Davenport, the father working at the carpenter 
trade and among other things assisting in the construction of the First Lutheran 
church. Upon his removal to the country Mr. Arp took up the new vocation of 
farming which proved congenial and profitable. Beside the farm now owned 
by his daughter, he owned another of one hundred and twenty acres adjoining. 
He has five children as follows : Paul William, of Hickory Grove township, occu- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 109 

pying a neighboring farm to the subject of the sketch; Johannas Adolph, also a 
neighbor ; Henry Peter, of Glyndon, Minnesota ; Mrs. Bannister ; and Ferdinand 
Theo, of Tea, South Dakota. Mr. Arp was bom May 23, 1819, and died Septem- 
ber 21, 1890, and Mrs. Arp was born March 31, 1830, and died March 14, 1899. 
The union of Mr. and Mrs. Bannister has been blessed by the birth of five chil- 
dren: Birdie Johanna; William Chester; Carlisle Timm; Catherine Margaret, 
who died in infancy; and Emil Qifford. 

Mr. Bannister gives a stanch adherence to the policies and principles of 
democracy. He is now serving his third term as constable, in which capacity 
he has given most efficient service. Fraternally he is identified with the Eagles 
and the Modem Woodmen of America in their Walcott camps. Mr. Bannister 
has many friends and is well regarded, being a public-spirited man, strong in his 
advocacy of those measures he believes will bring the greatest good to the greatest 
number. 



HANS KRUSE. 



Among the residents of Davenport who are now living retired, their present 
comfortable financial position being the direct result of former activity and enter- 
prise along agricultural lines, is numbered Hans Kruse. He is one of those 
sturdy, industrious and frugal German citizens who through their untiring 
efforts, indefatigable energy and strong purpose have lived their lives to good 
advantage and are entitled to a place among the substantial and representative 
citizens of Scott county. Born in Holstein, Germany, on the 7th of September, 
1838, he is a son of Jochira and Anna Kruse. The father, who was a blacksmith 
by trade, came to the United States with his family in 1854, the ocean voyage 
requiring fifty-six days. After landing at New York the family did not tarry in 
the eastern metropolis but came by rail direct to Rock Island, Illinois, and then 
across the river to Davenport. In this city the father established a blacksmith 
shop on Fourth street and there followed his trade for about two years. At the 
expiration of that period he sold out and took up agricultural pursuits as a renter 
in Davenport township. Later he purchased land in Iowa county and developed 
a good farm, upon which he and his wife passed their remaining days. His death 
occurred when he had reached his seventy-third year, while his wife survived un- 
til ninety-one years of age. In their family were six children: Hans, the subject 
of this review; Claus, now deceased; Jochim, also deceased; Peter, of Iowa 
county; Brant, a resident of Alaska; and Lena, the wife of Henry Martin, of 
Davenport. 

Hans Kruse acquired a good education in the common schools of Germany 
and was a lad of fifteen years when he accompanied his parents on their emigra- 
tion to the new world. After his arrival in Scott county he was employed as a 
farm hand for about four years, at the expiration of which period he went to work 
on the farm which his father had rented in Davenport township. There he re- 
mained for about six years and then, on the 12th of November, 1867, established 
pleasant home relations of his own through his marriage to Miss Ida Hahn, a 
daughter of Wolfe Hahn, of Davenport township. After their marriage the 



110 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

young couple took up their abode on a farm of eighty acres which Mr. Kruse had 
purchased in Blue Grass township. When it came into his possession it was all 
wild prairie land, but with characteristic energy he fenced it in, erected a house 
and began the cultivation of the soil, breaking the sod and transforming the land 
into fertile and productive fields. With the passing of the years he brought the 
farm under a high state of cultivation and became so prosperous by reason of 
the careful conduct of his agricultural interests that he was able eventually to 
purchase more land in that township. He continued to make his home on that 
place for twenty years and then purchased a farm in Davenport township, to 
which he removed, leaving one of his sons to operate the old homestead. He re- 
mained on the new farm for eleven years, devoting his energies to general farm- 
ing pursuits with such success that at the end of that time he was able to with- 
draw from active life and retire from business with a competency sufficient to 
supply him with all of the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. He came 
to Davenport in 1898 and here erected a fine residence on Brown street, where 
he has since made his home. A farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Davenport 
township, another of one hundred and twenty acres in Blue Grass township, and 
valuable town property are the visible evidence of a life of thrift and industry 
on the part of Mr. Kruse, whose success has come to him as the legitimate and 
logical result of intelligently applied labor and well directed eflforts. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Kruse were born two sons, namely: Charles, operating 
his father's farm in Davenport township, who married Katie Rugi, by whom he 
has two children, Erma and Ella ; and Henry, on the old homestead in Blue Grass 
township, who married Amelia Rilk and has three children — Hilda, Ella and 
Norma. The wife and mother, who was born in 1847, passed away on the 3d of 
April, 1906, her remains being interred at Fairmount cemetery. 

Mr. Kruse, whose residence in Scott county extends over a period of more 
than a half century, is numbered among the old settlers of this district, where 
he has gained an extensive circle of warm friends, and he is one of the prominent 
and honored members of the German Pioneers Association. Since age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise he has given stalwart support to the men and 
measures of the democracy but has never sought nor desired public office as a 
reward for party fealty. He has, however, at all times been most public-spirited 
in his citizenship and although born across the water, has ever been thoroughly 
identified with American interests and institutions, while Scott county has no 
more worthy and representative citizen than this adopted son. 



PROFESSOR JAMES MADISON DE ARMOND. 

No history of educational interests of Davenport would be complete with- 
out extended reference to the life work of James Madison DeArmond, who for 
many years was connected with the ward schools of the city as principal. He 
stood for all that is highest and best in educational work and his aims, his pur- 
poses and his labors inspired other teachers and pupils, so that the results of his 
achievements are yet seen in the lives of those with whom he came in contact. 




Tct ^- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 113 

leaving the impress of his strong individuality and laudable ambition upon them. 
A native of Pennsylvania, Professor DeArmond was born in Blair county on 
the 7th of September, 1846. His grandfather's brother, Michael DeArmond, was 
a brave soldier of the Revolutionary war, doing active duty with Company B, 
Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers. He took part with his company irf 
the battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776, and also in other important engage- 
ments. The father was James DeArmond, who for many years followed gen- 
eral farming in Pennsylvania, leaving that state about 1864. His identification 
with agricultural interests in Iowa continued until 1871, when he removed to 
Greenfield, Missouri, where he established his home. There his remaining days 
were passed, his death occurring in 1885, when he had reached the very venerable 
age of ninety-five years. His widow survived him and for a long period made 
her home with Judge DeArmond of Butler, Missouri. She has now passed away. 
Judge DeArmond, congressman from Missouri, W. W. DeArmond, an attorney 
of Chicago, and Dr. J. A. DeArmond, of Davenport, were brothers of our subject. 
Professor James Madison DeArmond was reared upon the old homestead in 
the Keystone state, early becoming familiar with the duties and labors incident 
to the development of the fields. He received such education as the common 
schools aflForded and remained on the home farm until his eighteenth year, and 
when he left home for the first time he attended college in Williamsport, Penn- 
sylvania. He had been a student in that institution for a year when his parents 
removed to Scott county, Iowa, and he accompanied them. He continued his 
education here and within a year was graduated from the high school of Daven- 
port. Entering upon educational work, he was appointed principal of public 
school No. 6, and his success in that field of labor was most marked. He was 
afterward made principal of school No. 5 and creditably filled that position until 
he was appointed postmaster of the city by President Cleveland in 1885. He 
served with distinction in that position, his administration being generally satis- 
factory to the public, for his efficiency, systematic labors and intelligently directed 
methods of conducting business made this a model office. On the expiration of 
his four years' term he retired and for a year thereafter was engaged in no 
business. He was then again placed on the roll of school superintendents as the 
head of school No. 3, which position he continued to fill until his death. He 
held to high ideals in his work, continuously seeking out new methods which 
would prove of practical value in the conduct and advancement of the schools. 
He had a great passion for history and made himself authority especially upon 
the history of his own country, while upon that of foreign lands he was scarcely 
less versed. In 1874 he became a member of the Iowa State Teachers Associa- 
tion, of which he served as secretary for a year. He was prominent among the 
organizers of the Iowa Reading Circle and did much to advance its interests as 
long as his health permitted. 

In 1869 Professor DeArmond was married to Miss Rachel Scott, a daughter 
of Colonel Thomas Scott, and they became the parents of four children, who are 
all now deceased. Professor DeArmond was for many years a member of 
Trinity Lodge, F. & A. M., and in his Hfe exempHfied the beneficent spirit of 
the craft, which is based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness. He 
was always a stanch democrat in his political faith and undoubtedly would have 



114 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

been chosen for the office of mayor had he not been too modest to accept the 
honor. At all times he rejoiced in Davenport's advancement and cooperated in 
many movements for its progress. His labors were of a most effective charac- 
ter, for while he held to high ideals he utilized practical methods in achieving 
results. During the periods of vacation he did much newspaper work in connec- 
tion with the Democrat. He attended the Presbyterian church and held member- 
ship with the Sons of the American Revolution. He always took great interest 
in young people and performed his professional services with a sense of conscien- 
tious obligation, reaHzing how important is the training of the young as a prepar- 
ation for life's work. He knew that he was implanting in the minds of pupils 
seeds of knowledge and truth which in due time would bear fruit, and he was 
therefore most careful to give them that which in later life would be most 
helpful. 



JOHANNES A. ARP. 



Johannes A. Arp, one of the progressive agriculturists of Hickory Grove 
township, was born in Davenport, November 9, 1855, but removed, with his par- 
ents, to the farm he now operates shortly after his birth. His father, Timm Arp, 
was a native of Holstein, Germany, and there married Miss Bertha Arp, also 
a native of that province. Shortly after their marriage they embarked upon 
their journey to this country, crossing the ocean by the southern route and land- 
ing at New Orleans, whence they made their way up the Mississippi to Daven- 
port, reaching the city some time in 1851. Here Mr. Arp followed his trade 
of a carpenter for a couple of years, assisting in the construction of several of 
the more important buildings, among them being the First Lutheran church. 
Later he engaged in farming in conjunction with his brother Jochim, upon a tract 
of two hundred and forty acres in Hickory Grove township, which they operated 
successfully for a number of years. Later they divided the property, half of it 
falling, in the course of time to the heritage of Johannes A. Arp, the subject 
of this sketch. In the family were five children : Paul WilUam, a sketch of whose 
life follows: Johannes A., the subject of this review; Henry Peter, of Glyndon, 
Minnesota ; Caroline Magdaline, the wife of Levi Richard Bannister, of Hickory 
Grove township; and Ferdinand Theo, of Tea, South Dakota. 

Johannes A. Arp has passed the greater part of his life upon the land he 
now cultivates. In his early years he assisted his father in the cultivation of 
its fields, even during the period when many boys give little thought to the seri- 
ous responsibilities of life and are devoting all their time to school and lessons. 
When he married in 1879, he assumed full charge of the farm, which has since 
been his concern. The improvements which his father and uncle instituted 
upon the place, he has bettered, while he has, through care and skill, brought the 
fertility of the soil to its most productive state. He has been an earnest, indus- 
trious and thrifty farmer and is now in the enjoyment of an income which is 
a just recompense for his toil. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Arp married Miss Amelia Puck, likewise a native of Scott 
county and a daughter of Egger Puck. They have four children : Adolph, Emil, 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 115 

Theo and Gustave. The eldest is residing in South Dakota, but the others are 
at home. After the death of his wife, Mr. Arp wedded Miss Dora Hansen, who 
was bom in Schleswig, Germany, October 20, 1872. In 1891 she and a brother, 
Detlief, and a sister came to Davenport. The former is now a resident of North 
Dakota, and the latter is Mrs. Thomas Daily, of Davenport. A sister Maggie, 
who is the wife of John Westphal, of Davenport, and a brother Hans, now of 
Jackson county, Minnesota, had preceded Mrs. Arp to the United States, as they 
came in 1883. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Arp was celebrated November 
6, 1906, and has been blessed with one son, Qifford. 

Mr. Arp has given his unqualified support in political matters to the demo- 
cratic party but has taken no active part in the public life of his community. He 
is, however, a man of considerable spirit and is deeply concerned for the welfare 
of his fellow citizens, whose respect and esteem he enjoys. 



PAUL WILLIAM ARP. 

Paul William Arp, a brother of Johannes A., was born in Davenport, January 
II, 1853, ^^d was little more than an infant when his parents removed to t|he 
farm adjoining that on which he now lives. He assisted with the cultivation of 
the homestead until he was married when he engaged in farming for himself, 
purchasing the eighty acres of land he now owns. He has instituted all the im- 
provements which adorn the place and in the cultivation of the fields displays 
the skill of the husbandman who is born as well as reared to his vocation. While 
not one of the larger tracts of land in Hickory Grove township, it may compare 
favorably with any as regards to fertility and the condition in which Mr. Arp 
maintains his fields and buildings. He is thrifty, industrious and progressive, 
and in consequence has won a well merited success from his farming. 

In 1903 Mr. Arp was united in marriage tO' Miss Anna Wellendorf, who was 
born in Prepstei, Holstein, Germany, January 2, 1857. She came to America in 
1901, reaching Davenport July 7 of that year, and there she joined her brother 
James Wellendorf, who is a resident of that city. 

Mr. Arp is a representative of the sturdy German race whose unremitting 
toil has done so much toward developing the resources of Scott county, and of 
Hickory Grove township in particular to their highest degree. He enjoys the 
well earned esteem of his associates and fellow agriculturists. He is a democrat 
in his pohtical preferences. 



COLONEL THOMAS SCOTT. 

Colonel Thomas Scott, one of the most honorable and genial business men 
and popular residents of Davenport, passed away May 26, 1905. He was born 
in Lawrence county, Ohio, June 3, 1823, and, removing to Indiana, was there 
married in 1845. He continued his residence in that state until 1857, when he 



116 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

came to Davenport, where he entered the wholesale grocery business as a member 
of the firm of Ryan, Scott & McCann. Later he engaged in the live stock and 
commission business and in 1880 removed to Chicago to become a commission 
merchant in that line at the Union Stock Yards. For seventeen years he suc- 
cessfully conducted business in that city, after which he returned to Davenport 
in 1897 and lived retired here until called to his final rest. His success was due 
to his capable management and indefatigable energy. He was one of the twelve 
organizers of the First National Bank of this city, which was also the first national 
bank established in the United States. For years he served as one of the directors 
of the Davenport Savings Bank and his name was ever an honored one in finan- 
cial circles and on commercial paper. 

Prominent in public aflFairs, he represented the first ward as alderman for 
several terms and while a member of the city council exercised his official pre- 
rogatives in support of many measures and movements for the pubHc good. His 
political^ allegiance was given to the republican party, which at one time honored 
him with the nomination for mayor. He stood as a splendid type of American 
manhood and citizenship, loyal at all times to his honest convictions and to the 
best interests of the community at large. 

In the family of Colonel and Mrs. Scott were the following children: Mrs. 
Selinda Hewitt, Mrs. Rachel De Armond, Thomas Winfield, Warren W., Mrs. 
Cora S. Smith and Charles L. 



JOHN L. ZOECKLER. 



The industrial and commercial history of Davenport would be incomplete 
were there failure to make prominent reference to John L. Zoeckler, who was 
the founder of the packing-house interests of this city and the promoter of a 
business which in the course of years grew to large proportions and constituted 
not only a source of individual wealth but of public prosperity as well. , Mr. 
Zoeckler was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, and was sixty-eight years of age 
at the time of his death, which occurred May 28, 1906. His youthful days were 
spent in his native city and its public schools afforded him his educational privi- 
leges. When a young man of twenty-eight years he came to Davenport and 
from that time forward was associated with business interests here. After a brief 
period he established a packing house which constituted the nucleus of the pack- 
ing industry and as the years passed the enterprise grew until the firm name of 
John L. Zoeckler & Sons became widely known. In the course of years he 
associated his boys with him in the business but remained as the chief executive 
head of the enterprise until 1906, when he retired from active life. Some time 
later the plant was sold to the Kohrs Packing Company. Placing his dependence 
upon the safe, substantial qualities of energy and wise management, Mr. Zoeckler 
made steady progress in the business world and his name came to be widely known 
and honored on commercial paper. His efforts constituted an important element 
in making Davenport a leading commercial and industrial center of Iowa. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 117 

In early manhood Mr. Zoeckler was wedded to Miss Veronica Orth, by whom 
he had two sons and two daughters, namely: Charles, Mrs. Julius Brammer, 
Mrs. John F. Kehrman and John H. The last named died, leaving a widow and 
children. Following the death of his first wife Mr. Zoeckler was again married, 
in 1898, his second union being with Miss Anna BraunHck, a daughter of H. G. 
Braunlick, who is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. Mr. Zoeckler also had 
several grandchildren, with whom he was ever a favorite because of the interest 
which he displayed in their joys and sorrows. He was devoted to his family 
and did everything in his power to promote their happiness. For years he 
resided at No. 1337 West Second street, where he reared his children, but later 
removed to Eighth street and Western avenue, where he erected a modern home 
that he occupied up to the time of his death. He was prominent in local Masonic 
circles and held several offices in the lodge. He passed away when in Denver, 
Colorado, his remains being brought back to Davenport for interment. He 
was a man of genial nature, whose friends were legion, so that his death was 
widely and deeply deplored in this city, where he had long made his home. To 
every test his character gave ringing response and in no utterance of his life was 
there anything equivocal, while in his entire career there was not a single esoteric 
phase to be found. He dealt justly with all men and even generously and at 
the same time managed his business affairs so capably that the interests of his 
family were wisely conserved and to them he left a very substantial competence. 



OTTO DENKMANN. 



Otto Denkmann, who has spent practically his entire life in Scott county and 
was successfully identified with general agricultural pursuits throughout his active 
business career, is now living retired in Davenport. He was born in Prussia, 
Germany, on the 17th of August, 1847, a son of John and Marie Denkmann. 
In 1847 the mother set sail for the United States with her infant son and reached 
American shores after an ocean voyage of about nine weeks, landing at New 
Orleans three days before Christmas. In the Crescent City she joined her hus- 
band, who had previously emigrated to this country. They made their way up 
the Mississippi river to St. Louis, where they were compelled to tarry until 
spring on account of the ice in the river. After arriving in Davenport in the 
spring of 1848, John Denkmann purchased about one thousand acres of prairie 
land within nine miles of the city, erected a shanty and there spent the remainder 
of his life. His widow afterward took up her abode in Davenport and here 
passed away in her sixty-eighth year. Unto this worthy couple were born eight 
children, namely: William, who is deceased; Erminie;. Charles, who has also 
been called to his final rest; Anna, who is the widow of Dr. Brunner and re- 
sides in Fremont, Nebraska; Julius, living in Davenport township; Frederick, 
who makes his home in Walcott, Iowa ; Otto, of this review ; and Amelia, the 
wife of Carl Rocco, of Rock Island. 

Otto Denkmann, whose name initiates this review, was scarcely a year old 
when brought to Scott county by his parents and he has since continued to reside 



118 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

within its borders. In pursuit of an education he attended school at Walcott 
and after putting aside his text-books turned his attention to farming, which 
branch of activity claimed his energies throughout his active business career. 
His farm in Blue Grass township remained his home until he disposed of the 
property about 1874 and took up his abode in Davenport. He is now living re- 
tired but still has important financial interests, being a stockholder in the Farm- 
ers & Mechanics Bank of Davenport and also in the Rock Island Savings Bank. 
He also owns considerable city property. 

On the I2th of October, 1869, Mr. Denkmann was united in marriage to 
Miss Helena Paul, whose birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, on the 17th of 
January, 1850, and who came to Scott county with her parents in 1866. Her 
father, Christopher Paul, was a prosperous agriculturist of Buffalo township and 
was likewise prominent in public affairs, serving as justice of the peace and also 
as assessor. He was the president of the German Insurance Company and was 
widely recognized as an influential and respected citizen of his community. His 
demise occurred in 1894, when he had attained the age of seventy-six years, while 
his wife was fifty- four years old when called to her final rest. Their children 
were twelve in number, as follows : Margaret, who is deceased ; Anna ; Eggert ; 
Mrs. Denkmann ; Christ, who has likewise passed away ; Elsie ; Christina ; Louisa ; 
Johanna; Henry; Wilhelm; and Lewis. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Denkmann have 
been born seven children, the record of whom is as follows. Theresa, living in 
Illinois, married William Scranton and is now the mother of five children : Ray- 
mond, Earl, Etta, Loen and Lillian. Tillie is the widow of Robert Napset and 
has one daughter, Corinne. Hugo, who resides in Fullerton, Nebraska, wedded 
Miss Olive Parker and has two children, Dorothy and Perry. Charles, who 
makes his home in Davenport, married Miss Agnes Courtney. Alma is the wife 
of G. P. Stebolt, of California. Oscar, living in Davenport, married Miss Ella 
Bearris and has one son, C. O. Alfreda Denkmann is deceased. 

In his political views Mr. Denkmann is a republican and on that ticket he was 
elected to the position of trustee in Davenport township. He is a member of 
the German Shooting Club and also belongs to the Old German Settlers Asso- 
xiation. The period of his residence in this county now covers more than six 
decades and he has long been numbered among its successful, respected and rep- 
resentative citizens. 



DWIGHT G. KREUL, M. D. 

Dr. D wight G. Kreul, a well known and successful medical practitioner of 
Davenport, was born in Wisconsin on the nth of December, 1870, his parents 
being John C. and Theresa (Schmidt) Kreul. The father, a native of Saxony, 
Germany, obtained his education in that country and was a graduate of Prague 
University. In early manhood he set sail for the United States and after landing 
on the shores of the new world took up his abode in the state of Wisconsin. 
There he was actively and successfully engaged in mercantile pursuits through- 
out the remainder of his life, passing away in 1871. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 121 

Dwight G. Kreul supplemented his preliminary education, obtained in the 
public schools, by a course of study in the normal school, while subsequently he 
entered the University of Wisconsin. After completing his more specifically lit- 
erary education he took up the study of medicine at .Marquette and in 1897 won 
the degree of M. D. Locating for practice in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, he there 
remained for a year, on the expiration of which period he went to Europe and 
spent about twelve months in post-graduate work at London and Vienna. On 
returning to the United States he opened an. office in Davenport, Iowa, and has 
here been engaged in the general practice of medicine to the present time, his 
patronage steadily growing in volume and importance as he has demonstrated 
his ability to cope with the intricate problems which continually confront the 
physician. 

In 1901 Dr. Kreul was united in marriage to Miss Emma Schmidt, a native 
of Davenport and a daughter of Robert Schmidt. They are now the parents of 
two children, Phyllis and Gregor. Dr. Kreul is a worthy member of the Masonic 
fraternity, exemplifying its teachings in his daily life. Realizing fully the obli- 
gations that devolve upon him in his professional capacity, he performs all du- 
ties with a sense of conscientious obligation and has won favorable regard by 
reason of his skill and his personal worth. 



HENRY C. PLAMBECK. 

Henry C. Plambeck, a retired cigar manufacturer of Davenport, has lived in 
well earned ease for the past fifteen years. His birth occurred at Preetz, Hol- 
stein, Germany, on the 28th of April, 1841, his parents being Detlef and Mar- 
garet (Brooks) Plambeck. The father, who was born in 181 1, was engaged in 
the shoe and tanning business in Germany, although his ancestors had followed 
general agricultural pursuits. He likewise served as a soldier in the Danish army, 
as his country was at that time under Danish rule. In 1852, in company with his 
wife and children, he set sail for the new world, landing at New Orleans after an 
ocean voyage of eight weeks. The trip up the Mississippi to Davenport con- 
sumed four weeks, for the ice in the river impeded the progress of their boat and 
several stops were necessary. On arriving in this city Detlef Plambeck opened 
a shoe shop but soon afterward his health became impaired and after lying ill 
for about two and a half years he passed away in 1855. His widow still sur- 
vives at the remarkable age of ninety-seven years, her birth having occurred on 
the 28th of February, 1813. She is the oldest person living in Scott county and has 
a very wide acquaintance within its borders. She became the mother of seven 
children, three of whom died in infancy. The others were as follows : Detlefine, 
who is deceased, as is also her husband, Louis Feid; Henry C, of this review; 
Dorothea, the widow of Henry Vollmer ; and Minnie, who is the widow of Lud- 
wig Bruning. 

Henry C. Plambeck did not begin his education until he was a lad of about 
eight, as he suffered from ill health during the early years of his life. He was 
eleven years of age at the time he accompanied his parents on their emigration to 



122 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

the United States, and for about two months he attended a German school in 
Davenport but on account of the illness of his father was compelled to abandon 
his studies and assist in the support of the family. He was first employed as a 
farm hand, clearing hazel brush at a wage of twenty-five cents per day, and sub- 
sequently worked in the vicinity of Davenport at various occupations, scorning 
no employment that would yield him an honest living. In 1855 he began learn- 
ing the cigar maker's trade and was continuously identified with that line of ac- 
tivity for four decades or until the time of his retirement in 1895. He was in 
the service of the Kuhnen Cigar Company for about thirty years, acting in the 
capacity of foreman for about twenty-three years of that time. At two different 
intervals he was engaged in business at Davenport as a cigar manufacturer on 
his own account and also conducted an enterprise of that character in Denver, 
Colorado, for about a year. When his untiring energy and capable management 
had brought him a handsome competence he put aside business cares and for the 
past fifteen years has lived in honorable retirement at Davenport, making his 
home with his mother. 

Mr. Plambeck belongs to the German Pioneers Society and is also a worthy 
exemplar of the Masonic fraternity. He has a very wide acquaintance in the 
county which has been his home for more than a half century and enjoys the 
respect of all with whom business or social relations have brought him in contact. 



MRS. CATHRINA LAGE. 

Mrs. Cathrina Lage, who resides at No. 1445 West Third street, is the widow 
of Jochem Lage, who was one of the early German settlers of Scott county, and 
she also belonged to a family who came here among the pioneers. She was 
born in Holstein, Germany, August i, 1843, a daughter of Claus and Anna Weise. 
Her father died when she was very young and her mother married again. In 1852 
the family emigrated to America and, landing at New Orleans, ascended the Mis- 
sissippi river to Davenport. Her stepfather remained for a time in Scott county 
and then removed to Clinton county, Iowa, where he bought a tract of farm land 
upon which he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. 

Mrs. Lage grew to womanhood in Iowa and became very conversant with 
agricultural methods, for when she came here in the early days there was much 
to be done and a large share of the work fell to the daughters of a family. On 
the 26th of June, 1864, she gave her hand in marriage to Jochem Lage. He was 
born in Holstein, Germany, October 24, 1838, and was about nine years of age 
when in 1847 his parents, Henry and Anna Lage sailed for America. Choosing 
the southern route, they landed at New Orleans, whence they took a boat up the 
Mississippi river to St. Louis, Missouri. They remained in that city a few months 
and then came to Davenport. In Qeona township, Scott county, Henry Lage, 
bought eighty acres of prairie land, on which he built a small house and made 
other improvements, living there until his death in 1858. 

Jochem Lage continued to live with his parents, assisting his father in the 
farm work and later assuming some of the responsibilty in the operation of the 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 123 

homestead, until he married. Then he and his wife started housekeeping upon 
eighty acres of land adjoining the parental place, which had been given to him by 
his father. He resided there eight years and then he removed to Davenport, 
where he engaged in the real-estate business, to which he devoted his attention 
profitably for a number of years. He died January 24, 1892, having witnessed in 
the forty odd years he had been a resident of Scott county the great development 
of its agricultural possibilities and participated in the growth of Davenport from 
villagehood to a flourishing commercial center. 

Mrs. Lage became the mother of nine children, as follows: Henry, who is 
married and lives in Richmond, Missouri; Laura, who makes her home with her 
mother; Emma, who is the widow of Amiel Fick and has three children, Laura 
and the twins, Harry and Hattie ; Otto and Louisa, both at home ; Clara, the wife 
of Joseph Nadler, of Moline, Illinois ; Hugo, at home ; and two who died in in- 
fancy. Having experienced many of the hardships of pioneer life in her youth, 
Mrs. Lage derives added pleasure from the comforts she now enjoys, and from 
the knowledge that her several children are well established in their respective 
positions in life. In politics Mr. Lage was a democrat. 



A. W. ELMER, M. D. 



Dr. A. W. Elmer, who since 1886 has engaged in the practice of medicine in 
Davenport, making a specialty of the treatment of the diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose and throat, for which he is qualified by thorough study both at home and 
abroad, was born in Harrisville, Alcona county, Michigan, February 11, 1858. 
His father, D. J. Elmer, a native of the state of New York, sailed on the Great 
Lakes and also on the high seas. When young he removed to Michigan and in 
1868 came to Scott county, Iowa, establishing his home near Big Rock, where 
he secured a tract of land and engaged in farming for more than a quarter of a 
century. In 1894, however, he put aside the active work of the fields and re- 
moved to Onawa, Iowa, where he is now living retired at the age of eighty-four 
years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Jane Sellick, is also still living. 

Dr. Elmer began his education in the district schools of this county after the 
removal of the family to Iowa, when he was a lad of ten years. Later he entered 
Griswold College and was graduated in 1883 with the B. A. degree. Two years 
he devoted to the study of medicine in the Michigan State University at Ann 
Arbor, after which he entered the University of Pennsylvania and graduated in 
1886 on the completion of the medical course. The same year he located for 
practice in Davenport, where he has since resided and in the intervening years 
has enjoyed a large and growing patronage which has come to him in recognition 
of the skill and ability that he has displayed in handling important cases. He 
manifests conscientious obligation in the discharge of his professional duties, and 
broad reading has kept him in touch with the advance of the medical fraternity 
as science has yielded up its secrets for the benefit of mankind. He has always 
made a specialty of the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat 
and has come to be regarded in Davenport as authority upon those branches. 



124 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

He spent the year 1897 in study in Vienna, where he was under the instruction 
and attended the clinics of some of the most eminent speciaHsts of the old world. 
In addition to a large private practice he is acting as oculist to the two leading 
hospitals of Davenport and also for the Rock Island Railroad. 

In 1890 Dr. Elmer was married to Miss Kate Hart, a native of Adrian, Mich- 
igan, and unto them were born two children, William Hart and Katherine. 
They have gained many friends in the city where they have resided throughout 
the period of their married life. Dr. Elmer has little leisure for outside interests 
and yet is always courteous in manner and kindly in spirit. His attention is 
largely given to his professional duties, however, and to the end of furthering his 
knowledge and promoting his efficiency he holds membership in the County, 
State and American Medical Associations. 



WILLIAM B. MURRAY. 

William B. Murray, a well known and prosperous citizen residing at No. 
2012 Ripley street in Davenport, has lived retired since 1892 but was formerly 
actively engaged in general agricultural pursuits and is still the owner of two 
hundred and thirty acres of fine farming land in Lincoln and Sheridan town- 
ships. His birth occurred ten miles east of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, on the 30th 
of March, 1834, his parents being George and Esther Murray. The latter 
passed away in the Keystone state in 1853. George Murray, who followed mer- 
chandising and railroad contracting while in Pennsylvania, came to Scott county, 
Iowa, in 1855 and purchased two hundred and forty acres of improved land in 
Davenport township, the other members of his family joining him soon afterward. 
He later bought a tract of three hundred and seventy acres near Mount Joy but 
continued to reside on his original purchase until he took up his abode in Daven- 
port, where his demise occurred on the ist of May, 1887. His children were ten 
in number but four of his daughters passed away in Pennsylvania while yet 
young in years. Those who came to this state were as follows : William B., of 
this review ; Anna, who is now deceased, as is also her husband, Albert Kratzer ; 
Thomas, who died in the army; George, who has likewise been called to his final 
rest; James, a resident of Davenport; and Mary E., who is deceased, as is also 
her husband, John Hyland. 

William B. Murray obtained his education in the schools of Johnstown and 
Summerhill, Pennsylvania, and after putting aside his text-books worked for his 
father in the store and also acted as timekeeper for the railroad men. On coming 
to this county he turned his attention to farming and after living with his father 
for a short time took up his abode on a portion of the three hundred and seventy 
acre tract near Mount Jay, which he broke up and improved. He built a nice 
residence and there carried on his agricultural interests energetically and success- 
fully until the time of his retirement from active life in 1892, since which year 
he has made his home in Davenport. As the years passed and he prospered in 
his undertakings he added to his landed holdings by additional purchase and also 
received some property from his father. He is still the owner of two hundred 



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HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 127 

and thirty acres of valuable land in Lincoln and Sheridan townships and is 
likewise a stockholder in the Iowa National Bank and the Davenport Savings 
Bank. 

On the 30th of October, 1862, Mr. Murray was united in marriage to Miss 
Carrie Criswell, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of James and Jane 
Criswell. Her mother passed away in Pennsylvania in 1856 and the following 
year she accompanied her father on the removal to Scott county. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Murray were born seven children. George, the eldest, who makes his 
home in Grinnell, Iowa, wedded Miss Eliza Coapley and has four children: 
Vera, Grace, Elsie and Mabel. Minnie died at the age of six years. James E., 
who is likewise deceased, married Miss Ida Garner, by whom he had four chil- 
dren : Walter ; Hazel ; and Martha C. and James E., both of whom have passed 
away. Albert, who wedded Miss Stella Regnitter, resides in Davenport. Elsie 
died in 1879, when but two years of age. Frank passed away when only eleven 
months old. William died in infancy. 

Mr. Murray is a democrat in his political views and has been an active worker 
in the local ranks of the party. While living on the farm he held nearly all of the 
township offices, including those of justice of the peace, trustee and school di-s 
rector. During his two years' term of service as county supervisor the court- 
house was erected and his name is inscribed on the comer stone of that struc- 
ture. In the winter of 1894 he was the representative from this district to the 
general assembly at Des Moines. Public-spirited and loyal to a marked degree, 
he proved a faithful and efficient incumbent in the various offices to whjch his 
fellow townsmen called him. He and his wife are consistent members of the 
English Lutheran church, exemplifying its teachings in their daily lives. In the 
county where he has now made his home for more than a half century he is very 
widely and favorably known, for the salient traits of his character are such as 
have won for him the respect and friendship of all with whom he has come in 
contact. 



EDWARD F. STROHBEHN, M. D. 

The circumstances which surrounded the birth and early environment of Dr. 
Edward F. Strohbehn have had little to do with the success which he has at- 
tained in the medical profession, for he has so used his talents and powers in 
former years that he has come to be known as one of the foremost physicians 
and surgeons of eastern Iowa, now practicing in Davenport. Dr. Strohbehn 
was born in Hamburg, Germany, July 24, 1865, a son of F. William and Louise 
(Zapf) Strohbehn. The father, who was born in Holstein, Germany, began to 
learn the shoemaker's trade ere he had completed his education. As was the 
custom in foreign lands, he served in the Danish army before that province be- 
came a part of Germany. After serving for three years he went to Hamburg 
and, after passing a rigid examination, became a citizen of that place. In 1869 
he emigrated with his family to America and, locating in Davenport, continued 
working at his trade until the time of his death, which occurred May 6, 1890. 



128 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Edward F. Strohbehn was a little lad of six and a half years when he was 
brought by the parents to Davenport, and in the schools of this city he began his 
education. Ambitious to acquire a higher education than was afforded by the 
common schools, he sought and found employment with John Berwald, of 
Davenport, and from his earnings saved the money that enabled him to pursue 
a course in the Iowa State University. He then engaged in teaching for a time 
and in this way earned the capital that enabled him to take up the study of medi- 
cine in the medical department of the State University. He was graduated 
from that institution in March, 1891. For a time thereafter he acted as interne 
in Mercy Hospital of Davenport, while still later he was an assistant in the 
Iowa State Hospital for the Insane at Mount Pleasant. In the fall of 1891 he 
went to Vienna, Austria, and there took a post-graduate course in medicine, and 
subsequent to his return opened an office in Davenport, where he has been suc- 
cessfully practicing to the present time. During the years that have passed he 
has displayed marked ability and familiarity with the most modern and advanced 
methods of the medical profession and has a patronage that is most gratifying. 
In addition to his private practice he is also medical examiner for the Germania 
Kranken Verein and the Claus Groth Gilde. 

On the 13th of November, 1895, Dr. Strohbehn was married to Miss Alice 
Lynde, a daughter of Edward A. and Ophelia D. Lynde, of Sterling, Massa- 
chusetts. Dr. and Mrs. Strohbehn have six children : Louise, Edward L., Mary 
Ella, Vallie Davis, Elizabeth and Walter William. The Doctor has attained 
the thirty-second degree in Masonry and belongs to various medical societies. 
Of studious nature, he is ever seeking to advance his knowledge along the Hne 
of his profession and today is recognized as one of the able and successful phy- 
sicians of the state, and by his labors, his high professional attainments and his 
sterling characteristics has justified the respect and confidence in which he is held 
by the medical fraternity and the local public. 



WILLIAM J. MANN. 



William J. Mann, who was for more than a third of , a century actively 
identified with the industrial interests of Scott county as a carriage builder, has 
lived retired in Davenport since October, 1906. His birth occurred in Waldeck, 
Germany, on the 27th of September, 1833, his parents being Jacob and Anna 
Kathrina Mann, who spent their entire lives in that country. The father fol- 
lowed farming throughout his active business career. After completing his 
education William J. Mann turned his attention to the mastery of the wagon 
maker's trade. In 1851, when a youth of eighteen years, he set sail for the 
United States, landing at Baltimore, Maryland, on the 9th of May, after an 
ocean voyage of six weeks. He worked at his trade in Baltimore for about 
four and a half years and then went to Chicago, Illinois, where he was employed 
as a wagon maker for one year. In 1856 he came to Davenport and fob" four 
years worked in a carriage shop on Fourth street. During the next seven years 
he followed his trade in Muscatine and in 1867 embarked in business on his own 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 129 

account, opening a shop at Walcott, Iowa. Later he also opened an implement 
store there and conducted the same successfully for a period of thirty-five years, 
when he sold out and retired to private life. He continued to reside in Wal- 
cott for about five years after his retirement and on the loth of October, 1906, 
came to Davenport, now making- his home in the handsome modern residence 
which he erected at No. 221 1 Ripley street. 

On the 6th of November, 1857, Mr. Mann was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Schaeffer, who was born in Germany on the i8th of September, 1838, 
and whose parents passed away in that country. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Mann were 
born seven children, the record of whom is as follows. Mary, who wedded 
Charles Yust of Colorado, is now the mother of eight children, namely: Charles, 
Clara, William, Henry, Dorothy, George, Edward and Carter. William, liv- 
ing in Minnesota, married Miss Caroline Stoltenberg, by whom he has five 
children: William, Walter, Myrtle, Nina and Winnie. Amelia, who gave her 
hand in marriage to Edward Meyer of Hickory Grove township, has five chil- 
dren : Lillie, Hilda, William, Herbert and Arthur. George, who makes his home 
in Redfield, South Dakota, wedded Miss Nina Armstrong and has four chil- 
dren: Eva, Dorothy, Millie and a baby. Louis, living in Osmond, Nebraska, 
married Miss Agnes Graham, by whom he has two children, Winnie and Lulu. 
Edward, who resides at Calumet, O'Brien county, Iowa, wedded Miss Tena 
Benedix and has one son, Randolph. Miss Hilda Mann is at home. The wife 
and mother was called to her final rest on the 3d of February, 1901, and her 
loss was sincerely mourned by all who knew her. 

Politically Mr. Mann is independent and while residing in Walcott he served 
as a school director for about twelve years. He is a well known member of 
the German Pioneer Association of Scott county, and has now passed the 
seventy-sixth milestone on life's journey. Coming to the new world in early 
manhood, he utilized his opportunities to the best advantage and gradually 
worked his way upward until he gained a place among the prosperous, respected 
and representative citizens of his community. 



HUGO G. BRAUNLICK. 

The development of musical taste and talent in Davenport was attributable 
in large degree to Hugo G. Braunlick, who for many years was recognized as 
one of the leading music teachers of this city. He possessed the love for and 
ability in the interpretation of the art that is so characteristic of the German 
people. His birth occurred in Saxony, German, January 16, 1831, and he was 
a representative of a prominent family there. He studied both forestry and 
music in Meissen and Dresden and, like the young men of the period, was in- 
tensely interested in the political situation of the country. The spirit of politi- 
cal unrest which was felt throughout Europe found expression in Germany in 
the war of 1848, and Mr. Braunlick, interested in the movemem for the attain- 
ment of larger liberties for the German people, acted as aide to one of the rev- 



130 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

olutionary leaders. Subsequent to this time the family crossed the Atlantic 
to America and his parents spent their last days in Brooklyn, New York. 

Hugo G. Braunlick, however, continued his westwardly way to Davenport, 
where he arrived in 1853 and no man took a more active or influential part in 
developing the early musical tastes of this city than he. For a long period 
he engaged in teaching music, in which profession he held high rank. At one 
time he was a contributor to the Democrat, his articles being of a practical 
nature. As a landscape gardner, in which connection he became widely known, 
he laid out the grounds of many of the best residences. His training in forestry 
and his natural artistic talent both well qualified him for work of this charac- 
ter and his services were in great demand. 

In 1857 Mr. Braunlick was married to Miss Eliza Uchtorf, and unto them 
were born six children : Dr. H. U., Hugo, Mrs. John L. Zoeckler, Freda, Emily 
and Mrs. J. C. Gude. 

Mr. Braunlick held membership in the DeBeroit Club and was a leader of 
the Maennerchor of Davenport for many years. In his youth there were many 
stirring and thrilling experiences especially in cotmection with his military his- 
tory, but in later years his life was of a more quiet character and, pursuing the 
even tenor of his way, with regard at all times for the rights and privileges of 
others, he commanded the good will and esteem of those with whom he was as- 
sociated and won for himself many friends among Davenport's leading citizens. 



NICKLAUS JANSEN. 



Nicklaus Jansen, who has lived retired in Davenport for the past eight years, 
won his competence as an agriculturist and is still the owner of a fine farm of 
one hundred and twenty acres of land in Aliens Grove township, where he also 
has a timber tract comprising seven and a half acres. His birth occurred in Hol- 
stein, Germany, on the 4th of May, 1846. In his youthful days he attended the 
schools of his native land and after putting aside his text-books began learning 
the carpenter's trade. In 1867, when a young man of twenty-one years, he set 
sail for the new world and after landing at New York came direct to Davenport, 
Iowa. Here he began work at the carpenter's trade but in a short time turned 
his attention to general agricultural pursuits and was employed as a farm hand 
for about ten years. On the expiration of that period he purchased and located 
upon the farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Aliens Grove township 
which has since remained in his possession. The property was well improved 
and he made his home thereon for twenty-three years, annually gathering bounte- 
ous harvests as a reward for the care and labor which he bestowed upon the fields. 
He next bought a sixty-acre tract of land in Aliens Grove township, on which he 
resided for two years, at the end of which time he disposed of the place to his 
son-in-law and took up his abode in Davenport. Here he has lived retired since 
1902, enjoying in well earned ease the fruits of his former toil. 

On the 13th of February, 1877, Mr. Jansen was united in marriage to Miss 
Julia Krousa, a native of Holstein, Germany, and a daughter of Henry and 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 131 

Anna (Hensen) Krousa. The father passed away when his daughter Julia 
was but five years of age and the mother afterward married again, becoming 
the wife of John Kardell. In 1852 Mrs. Jansen was brought to the United 
States by her parents, who became early settlers of Davenport. Unto our 
subject and his wife have been born three children, namely: Alvina, who gave 
her hand in marriage to Ferd Weisenberg, by whom she has three children- 
Arnold, Ellis and Orville; Carrie, who married George Thoem, of Davenport, 
Iowa, and is likewise the mother of three children — Edna, Harry and Leroy; and 
Celia D., who is still at home. Mr. Jensen has lived in this county for more 
than four decades and is a well known member of the German Pioneers Associa- 
tion. The hope that led him to leave his native land and seek a home in America has 
been more than realized. He found the opportunities he sought and through 
their wise utilization worked his way steadily upward until he gained a place among 
the substantial and respected citizens of his community. 



HERMANN D. EHLMANN. 

Hermann D. Ehlmann, residing at No. 1803 Washington street in Davenport, 
is now living retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil as an agriculturist. 
His birth occurred in Hanover, Germany, on the 7th of November, 1827, his 
parents being Gerhardt and Marguereta Ehlmann, both of whom passed away 
in the fatherland. After his education had been completed he worked as a 
farm hand until the time of his emigration to the United States in 1851, land- 
ing at New Orleans after an ocean voyage of six weeks and two days. From the. 
Crescent City he made his way to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was married 
and where he remained for four and a half years, being employed in a tobacco 
factory. On coming to Davenport, Iowa, in 1856, he first worked in a brick- 
yard and in fact scorned no employment at which he could earn an honest living. 
Later in the same year he purchased forty acres of timber land in Montpelier 
township, Muscatine county, and erected a house thereon, residing on the place 
for nine years. On the expiration of that period he disposed of the property 
and for two years devoted his time and energies to the operation of a rented 
farm in Buffalo township, Scott county. He then purchased and located upon 
a farm of eighty acres in Fulton township, Muscatine county, and afterward 
bought two more tracts of similar size in the same township, where he carried 
on his agricultural interests energetically and successfully for about thirty-five 
years. Having won a handsome competence by reason of his unremitting in- 
dustry and capable management, he then put aside the active work of the fields 
and took up his abode in Davenport, where he has since lived retired. 

On the 25th of August, 1852, in St. Louis, Missouri, Mr. Ehlmann was 
united in marriage to Miss Anna Catherine Neyhaus, who was bom in Han- 
over, Germany, on the 4th of February, 1825. Mr. and Mrs. Ehlmann became 
the parents of five children, the record of whom is as follows. The first born 
died in infancy. Henry, who is a resident of Oklahoma, first wedded Miss Caro- 
line Harter, by whom he had three children : Anna, Herman and John. For his 



132 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

second wife he chose Miss Margaret Neve and their union has been blessed with 
two children, Helen and Emma. Margaret Emma Ehlmann gave her hand in 
marriage to Albert Eourthouse, of Oklahoma, and is now the mother of six 
children, namely : Theodore, Hugo, August, Lulu, Wanda and Clarence. Emilie, 
who is the wife of John Hartz, makes her home in Davenport. John D. Ehl- 
mann has passed away. Mrs. Ehlmann, the wife of our subject, was called to 
her final rest on the 28th of October, 1893, and Mr. Ehlmann now makes his 
home with his daughter, Mrs. John Hartz. 

At the polls Mr. Ehlmann casts his ballot in support of the men and measures 
of the democratic party. The cause of education has ever found in him a stal- 
wart champion and while residing in Muscatine county he served as a school 
director of Fulton township for seven years. He is now in the eighty-third 
year of his age and receives the veneration and respect which should ever be 
accorded one who has traveled thus far on life's journey and whose career 
has at all times been upright and honorable. The period of his residence in this 
part of the state covers more than a half century, and he is well known and highly 
esteemed as a man who owes his present prosperity entirely to his own well 
directed labor and indefatigable energy. 



SIMON KOCH. 



Simon Koch, who at the time of his death was the possessor of more business 
property than almost any other capitalist of Davenport, reached his enviable finan- 
cial standing through the avenue of indefatigable and honorable business activity, 
and his life record, therefore, may serve as a splendid example to the ambitious 
young man who desires to attain success without infringing upon the rights of 
others. Mr. Koch was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, October 28, 1834, and 
was in his eighteenth year when he bade adieu to the fatherland and sailed for the 
United States. He located in Pennsylvania in 1852, retaining his residence in that 
state for two years, after which he came to Davenport. He made his home in this 
city for about sixteen years and in that time was married, in 1869, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Harrison, a daughter of Peter Harrison, who came from England to the new 
world in 1850 with his father, John Harrison, who established the family home in 
Scott county. The latter was engaged in farming here and continued to occupy 
the old homestead place until he was called to his final rest. His son, Peter Har- 
rison, in response to the country's call for troops, enlisted for service in an Iowa 
regiment and did active duty at the front until the close of the war, when he 
returned to Davenport. After a short time, however, he went south to live. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Koch were bom six children: Mrs. J. Ryan, Lillian, Mat- 
thias, Otto S., William and Frank. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Koch remained in Davenport until the 
early '70s, when they removed to Chicago and there Mr. Koch engaged in contract 
work for the Union Pacific Railroad Company in partnership with the father of P. 
W. McManus. They were engaged extensively in building bridges and trestles 
and doing important engineering work. It was through that avenue of business 





^?-XK? (H^V 



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HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 135 

that he gained the monetary influence which he held until his death, his success 
being evidenced in his extensive investments in real estate, which made him the 
possessor of more down town property than was held by the great majority of cap- 
italists in this city. He was a man of keen business discernment, seldom, if ever, 
at fault in a matter of judgment, and his sagacity and enterprise enabled him to 
win success where others met with failure. He seemed to know just when, where 
and how to place his invested interests and the rise in realty values consequent on 
the growth of the city has made his property a constantly increasing source of 
profit. His political allegiance was given to the democracy and his religious faith 
was manifest in his membership in the Catholic church. He was generous in his 
support thereof and was also the patron of many worthy organized charities. 



D. P. PEEKENSCHNEIDER. 

D. P. Peekenschneider, now living retired in Davenport, was in former 
years actively identified with general agricultural pursuits and is still in pos- 
session of considerable farming property, owning three hundred and forty-seven 
acres of valuable land in Cleona township, Scott county, one hundred and sixty 
acres in Cedar county and one hundred and sixty acres in Cherokee county, Iowa. 
He was born in Holstein, Germany, on the 26. of September, 1833, his parents be- 
ing Hans and Elizabeth Peekenschneider. The father, who was engaged in 
farming on a small scale, served as a soldier in the Danish army. In the year 
1862 he and his wife crossed the Atlantic to the United States and both passed 
away in this country. 

D. P. Peekenschneider obtained his education in the fatherland and after 
leaving school learned the miller's trade. In 1857 he and his brother William 
embarked on a sailing vessel bound for American shores, landing at New York 
after an ocean voyage of forty-six days. They made their way at once to 
Davenport, Iowa, here joining a brother, Charles Peekenschneider, who had 
come to the new world in 1853. Following his arrival in this county Mr. Peek- 
enschneider of this review worked as a farm hand for about seven years, en- 
gaging in threshing, breaking prairie, etc. He then devoted his attention to. 
the operation of a rented farm in Hickory Grove township for about two 
years and on the expiration of that period, in 1863, bought a half section of 
land in Cleona township in association with his two brothers. Half of the land 
had been broken and there was a small house on the property. The three broth- 
ers took up their abode thereon and after improving the land divided it and 
erected the necessary buildings. Our subject there continuously carried on his 
farming interests until 1909, when he put aside the active work of the fields and 
came to Davenport, having won a handsome competence through his well di- 
rected labors as an agriculturist. As he prospered in his undertakings he added 
to his landed holdings from time to time and is still the owner of three 
hundred and forty-seven acres in Cleona township, this county, one hundred and 
sixty acres in Cedar county and a quarter section of land in Cherokee county, 
this state. 



136 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

On the nth of November, 1865, Mr. Peekenschneider was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Wilhelmina Woolfretz whose birth occurred in Prussia, Germany, 
on the 25th of November, 1846, and who came to the United States with her 
mother in 1865, her father having passed away in Germany. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Peekenschneider were born twelve children, namely: Charles, who died 
at the age of twenty-three years ; Frederick, living in Cleona township, who 
wedded Miss Emma Mangert, by whom he has nine children— Hertha, Olga, 
Otto, Herbert, Elsie, Anna, Meta, Fred and William; Herman, who is a resi- 
dent of Cherokee county, Iowa, and wedded Miss Louisa Moon, by whom he has 
seven children— Wilhelmina, Hugo, Alma, Edna, Harry, LilHan and Arthur; 
August, who makes his home in Cedar county and who married Miss Louisa 
Hansen, by whom he has one child, Adeline; Emma, who died at the age of 
twenty-four years; Caroline, who passed away when thirty years of age; Detlef, 
who lives in this county ; Ferdinand, who died when a lad of nine years ; Amelia, 
who is the wife of Fred Cooper and lives on the old home place ; Robert and 
Ella, both at home ; and Walter, who died at the age of two years. 

Since becoming a naturalized American citizen Mr. Peekenschneider has ex- 
ercised his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the demo- 
cratic party. From 1868 until 1909, or for more than four decades, he acted as 
treasurer of the school board of Hickory Grove township and in this connection 
did valuable service for the cause of education. He is widely and favorably 
known throughout the county which has been his home for more than a half 
century, having won the warm regard and esteem of all with whom he has come 
in contact. 



JOSEPH SHOREY. 



Among Davenport's lawyers whose worth is evidenced in the extent and 
importance of litigated interests entrusted to their care, is numbered Joseph 
Shorey, who in connection with the Davenport Loan, Building and Savings 
Association and also in political circles is likewise demonstrating his worth as 
a man and citizen. He was bom here on the nth of July, 1870. His father, 
Joseph G. Shorey, a native of Jonesboro, Maine, was born July 24, 1826, and 
came to Davenport in November, 1855, accompanied by his wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Abigail Newhall and was a native of Lynn, Massachusetts. 
There were also two children in the family at that time. The father was a car- 
penter and worked at his trade for a period, but afterward turned his attention to 
pumpmaking. He was quite successful and after a continued and prosperous 
business for a number of years retired from active life and is now enjoying a well 
earned rest. His life in a manner has been quietly and uneventfully passed, 
for he has never sought to figure prominently before the public. On the con- 
trary he concentrated his time and energies upon his business relations until 
his retirement and has since devoted his attention to those things which afford 
him interest and recreation. In the family were seven children, four sons and 
three daughters, but only two are now living, the elder brother being A. O. 
Shorey. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 137 

Joseph Shorey was the youngest of the family and was educated in the pub- 
lic schools, pursuing his course until he graduated from the high school with 
the class of 1889. The following year he entered the University of Iowa and 
completed the latter course in 1892. For practical experience he then entered 
the ofiSce of Bills & Hass, with whom he remained for seven years, at the end 
of which time he establisheid himself in an independent practice, opening his 
office in August, 1899. He has since secured a good clientage and has made 
steady progress along professional lines. He has also been officially connected 
with the Davenport Loan, Building and Savings Association since 1900 as its 
secretary. This association was organized in 1877 and is one of the oldest and 
most useful institutions of the character in the city. Mr. Shorey also figures 
prominently in political circles, giving loyal allegiance to the republican party 
and taking active interest in local affairs. In 1900 he was elected alderman 
from the fourth ward but whether in office or out of it he does effective work 
for general improvement and advancement. 

On the 7th of September, 1898, Mr. Shorey was united in marriage to 
Miss Henrietta Hapke, a native of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and unto them have 
been born two sons, Wilson H., whose birth occurred August i, 1900; and 
Joseph Robert, born September 2, 1904. Mr. Shorey is connected with the 
Modern Woodmen of America and while club and fraternal relations have played 
little part in his hfe, he is recognized as a man of social, genial nature and by 
his genuine worth has made many a warm friend. 



WILLIAM DE WITT WELLS. 

The world has little use for the misanthropist — he who sees little chance 
for doing good nor uses his opportunities to benefit his fellowmen. The worth 
of the individual is determined by the value of his labors as a factor in the 
world's progress and judged by this standard Professor William DeWitt Wells 
constituted an important factor in educational advancement, leaving the im- 
press of his individuality and his ability upon the public-school system of Iowa 
where his labors were put forth. At the time of his demise he was serving as 
superintendent of schools in Scott county and, working toward high ideals, was 
doing much toward promoting the efficiency of the system of public education 
here. 

A native of Pennsylvania, he was born in Rutland, August 23, 1858, and was 
a son of Sanford and Jane (DeWitt) Wells. The father was a contractor and 
bridge builder and at one time engaged in teaching school near Waterloo, Iowa, 
removing with his family to that place when his son William was but two years 
of age. He had made his way northward from Missouri, having been driven out 
of that state by the Confederates, and all through his life W. D. Wells wf>re a 
scar on his brow caused by a bullet that struck him as he lay in his cradle, the 
family home being under bombardment there. 

Educated in the schools of East Waterloo, Professor Wells eventually com- 
pleted the high school course and received his first teacher's certificate in 1874, 



138 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

when sixteen years of age. He then engaged to teach school two miles from 
Cedar Falls and later was identified with the schools of Finchford and Jesup, 
acting as principal at the latter place for three years save for a term spent in 
the normal school at Cedar Falls in order that the improvement of his own edu- 
cation might make him more capable to superintend and direct the education 
of others. From Jesup he went to Ames, where he was graduated in 1883. The 
following year Professor Wells came to Scott county and was principal of the 
schools at LeClaire for four years, during which period he won many warm 
friends there. In 1888 he went to Grundy Center, where he engaged in teaching 
for eight years, and in 1897 he came to Davenport to accept the principalship of 
public school No. 3. In the summer, several years before, he had come to this 
city as an instructor in the Scott County Normal Institute and his lectures were 
regarded as among the best delivered by the many strong men who were gathered 
here in educational work. After three years he was promoted and became prin- 
cipal of the Davenport high school. In this capacity he found an opportunity 
to apply his talents, realize his ambitions and exercise his abilities as an educator. 
Under his guidance the high school as an institution took an enormous stride 
forward ; education was placed upon an advanced and scientific basis and a better 
grade of scholarship attained. The development of the high school became a 
passion with Mr. Wells. With infinite pains, with personal sacrifices, with un- 
bounded energy and enthusiasm, he devoted himself to his task. Whatever was 
in him of knowledge, of strength, of peculiar personal fitness, he faithfully and 
earnestly offered for the advancement of his school. During his tenure of office 
the new high school was built, and its eminence as an institution of learning is a 
splendid monument to the brains and genius of Mr. Wells. In 1906 he was 
elected county superintendent of schools and reelected in 1908. He had re- 
ceived a life diploma from the state in 1891 and this brought him recognition as 
one of the foremost educators of Iowa connected with her public-school system. 
He manifested untiring zeal in his work and his own enthusiasm was an in- 
spiration to the teachers with whom he was associated. He held to his high stand- 
ard and while always kind and forbearing, he yet maintained that discipline 
which would not permit the student to shirk his work, realizing that the greatest 
kindness which he could show to the pupil was to demand of him conscientious 
and capable performance of his schoolroom duties. 

On the 30th of March, 1886, in LeQaire, Professor Wells was married to 
Miss Kate Moore, a daughter of B. F. and Catharine Moore. They became par- 
ents of eight children : Lois, Leon, Ben, Edvena, DeWitt, Lydia and two who died 
in infancy. Mr. Well's home was ever one of refinement and culture and con- 
stituted an attractive place of meeting for the many friends of the family. 

Professor Wells was regarded as one of the most prominent representatives 
of the Masonic fraternity in Scott county. He was received as an entered ap- 
prentice in Snow Lodge, No. 44, A. F. & A. M., at LeClaire, January 9, 1885, 
and on the 6th of February was admitted to fellowcraft, while on the 6th of 
March he became a Master Mason. In 1892 he took the four degrees of capitu- 
lar Masonry in Ionic Chapter, No. 100, R. A. M., at Grundy Center, Iowa, and in 
1896 he was made a member of Ruth Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star. 
He received the degree of the Red Cross in St. Simon of Cyrene Commandery, 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 139 

No. 9, K. T., May 7, 1902, and was knighted in the same order on the 21st of 
May, receiving the Knight of Malta and St. John of Jerusalem, March 5, 1903. 
In September of the same year he attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite and thus was familiar with all branches of Masonry. He served 
as master of Trinity Lodge in 1892, 1893 and 1894 and he belonged Kaaba Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine. He was also a member of the Woodmen camp. In 
church circles he was equally well known, his membership in his later years be- 
ing with the First Presbyterian church of Davenport, in the work of which he 
took active and helpful part. He was the first teacher and practically the founder 
of the Brotherhood Bible class of that church and his influence and aid were given 
in support of the various projects instituted to promote the growth and extend 
the influence of the church. Professor Wells' position on any vital question was 
never an equivocal one. He stood for all that is upright and honorable in man's 
relations with his fellowmen, and more than that tempered justice with mercy, 
consideration with kindness, and righteousness with the spirit of charity. Thus 
his became an honored name because of the qualities which he displayed in his 
life, and when he passed away, April 25, 1909, his name was inscribed with those 
who had made the world better for their having lived. 



JAMES H. CLEMENT. 

On the pages of history from the earliest ages have appeared the names of 
those renowned for personal bravery — men who have dared to face the imple- 
ments of war in defense of principle or country. Among Davenport's citizens 
whose military record is such as elicits praise and honor is numbered James H. 
Clement, a veteran of the Mexican war and for a considerable period a repre- 
sentative of the United States navy. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
in 1 82 1, and spent his early life in the east, becoming connected with the navy, 
with which he did active duty for a number of years. When the country became 
involved in war with Mexico he stanchly defended the interests of the Federal 
government and enlisted from Pennsylvania. He was wounded while in the 
army but with the spirit of the true soldier again took his place on active duty 
as soon as his health permitted. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Clement arrived in Davenport and for many years thereafter 
held a position on Government Island, although he retired some time before 
his demise. 

In 1867, in Blackhawk county, Iowa, Mr. Clement was married to Miss Mary 
A. Dorian, whose father, Robert Dorian, was one of the pioneers of Iowa, com- 
ing to this state at an early day from Indiana. He was a native of Pennsylvania 
but was closely identified with the development of the middle west, first in 
Indiana and afterward in Iowa, where his labors constituted an effective force 
in supplanting pioneer conditions with the evidences of a modern civilization. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Qement were born a daughter and son: Caroline, who is 
now Mrs. W. E. Scott; and William, whd died in 1904. The mother has con- 
tinued to make her home in Davenport since the death of her husband, which 



140 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

occurred on the 24th of September, 1897. He was a self-made man, charitable 
and public-spirited, and possessed a strong and impressive character. He held 
membership in the Methodist church and his life was in consistent harmony with 
his professions. He was devoted to his family and his home and while his 
chief interests in life centered there, he yet found opportunity to do good to his 
fellowmen, giving throughout his life many tangible evidences of a helpful,, 
charitable and benevolent spirit. 



T. w. McClelland. 



In a history of the men whose labors have constituted a salient feature in 
Davenport's upbuilding and development, mention should be accorded T. W. Mc- 
Clelland, who, coming to this city in early manhood and empty handed, made 
steady progress through the long years of an active business^ career and came to 
be known as one of the most potent forces in Davenport's commercial activity. 
A native of Pennsylvania, he was born near the city of Pittsburg, July 31, 183 1. 
His father, Archibald McClelland, was a native of Belfast, Ireland, and became 
the founder of the family in the new world. The opportunities which T. W. Mc- 
Clelland received in his youth were somewhat limited, for in his boyhood days he 
began earning his livelihood by working in a store. He afterward learned the 
carpenter's trade and for a time engaged in contracting with his father, but the 
opportunities of the rapidly growing west proved too alluring for him to remain 
longer in his Pennsylvania home and in 1852 he came to Davenport by way of 
Cleveland, Ohio. The city was then comparatively small but seemed to have a 
bright future before it and Mr. McClelland therefore regarded it as a favorable 
place of location. Here he first worked at his trade but, watchful of opportuni- 
ties for advancement in business lines, he established, in 1855, the sash, door and 
blind factory which constituted the nucleus of the extensive business which is 
still carried on by his son Wilson, under the style of the T. W. McClelland Com- 
pany. The late John Hornby was his partner for a time but through the greater 
portion of forty-seven years the business was carried on by Mr. McClelland. Un- 
der his capable management it developed rapidly and from time to time extensive 
alterations and additions were made that the plant might be adequate to cope with 
the demands of the trade. On the organization of the business Mr. McClelland 
inculcated as its standard thoroughness in workmanship, substantiality in product 
and reliability in trade relations, and from the inception this business policy has 
been steadily continued. In his more active days he erected many residences and 
business buildings in Davenport, a large part of which still stand as monuments 
to his skill and ability. The reputation which he enjoyed for honest dealing is 
indicated in the fact that on many occasions the men employing him made no 
contract whatever, knowing that he could be depended upon to conserve their best 
interests and welfare, having no trouble at the time of settlement. He built the 
stockade and the enclosed buildings on Rock Island, in which the Confederate pris- 
oners were confined during the war. He also erected the First National Bank 
building, the Parker residence, which is now the home of C. A. Ficke, and in 




tkj^UJ.^ 



■<^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 143 

many other instances gave evidence of his skill in the line of Davenport's archi- 
tectural development. He was, moreover, one of the original stockholders and 
directors of the old Citizens National Bank and was interested in a number of 
Davenport enterprises. His judgments in business matters were always the out- 
come of careful consideration and his record constitutes an example which inay 
well be followed by those who wish to attain success through honorable methods. 
In this city, in 1857, Mr. McClelland was united in marriage to Miss Anna B. 
Knapp, and here they always maintained their home, its hospitality being greatly 
enjoyed by their many friends. Throughout the years of his residence here Mr. 
McClelland took an active interest in all that pertained to the benefit of the city. 
In early days he did his part as a member of a volunteer fire department and in 
1869 he was awarded official honors in his election as alderman of the fifth ward. 
In 1873 he was called to represent the fourth ward in the city council and was 
again elected in 1874. His death occurred January 26, 1902. A man of quiet 
and unobtrusive manner, he was nevertheless a fast friend and his course at the 
same time was characterized by great kindness and courtesy. His was a familiar 
face in many places where the most interesting men gathered in Davenport and in 
his demise the community lost one of its most honored and useful citizens, for 
he was a representative of that group of men whose lives are conspicuous for abil- 
ity, force of character, integrity and generous aims. Mrs. McQelland is still 
living in Davenport. 



FRANK J. PETO. 



The name of Frank J. Peto deserves place on the list of Davenport's honored 
dead because of the fact that he was a reliable and progressive business man, 
long connected with the wholesale and retail saddlery trade of this city. The 
growth and development of a community does not depend upon a single individual 
or even upon a few but upon the aggregate efforts of the many, and by his dili- 
gence, determination and intelligent effort Frank J. Peto not only won success 
for himself but also contributed his full share to the work of general advance- 
ment. He resided for many years at No. 424 West Eighth street. He was one 
of Davenport's native sons, his parents, Frank J. and Louisa (Dames) Peto, 
having been early citizens here. In fact the father was one of the first settlers 
of the town and aided in promoting its early progress. At the usual age Frank 
J. Peto was sent to the public schools and after putting aside his text-books 
joined his father in business and was associated with him up to the time of his 
death. They conducted a wholesale and retail saddlery enterprise and the ex- 
cellence of their product insured them a ready sale on the market. Moreover, 
their business methods were such as would bear close investigation and scrutiny, 
the firm enjoying high reputation for reliability. 

On the i8th of March, 1901, Mr. Peto was united in marriage to Miss Laura 
Wiese, a daughter of Fred and Christiana (Schnock) Wiese, who, as the name 
indicates, were of German lineage. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Peto was 
blessed with two children, Alice E. and Camilla. Mr. Peto was popular and 



144 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

prominent in local fraternal organizations, holding membership with the Knights 
of Pythias, the Modem Woodmen of America and the I. C. M. A. He was a 
man of even terperament, of social disposition, of genial and kindly nature and 
at all times was considerate of the rights and privileges of others. These qualities 
won him high regard and in Davenport, the city of his residence, he had a circle 
of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances. 



C. A. FICKE. 



C. A. Ficke, a self-made man whose life record constitutes a most creditable 
chapter in Davenport's history, is enrolled among the eminent representatives of 
the bar and in various other lines of business activity has given evidence of his 
quick recognition and utilization of opportunity. Such is the position which he 
holds in public regard that his opinions are always an influencing factor in the 
consideration of vital municipal questions. A native of the duchy of Mecklen- 
burg, Germany, he was born April 21, 1850, in Boitzenburg, his parents being 
Christopher H. and Elizabeth (Praesent) Ficke. The father was a merchant who 
in 1852 came to the United States with his family, after which he took up his 
abode on a farm in Scott county, Iowa. 

C. A. Ficke, but two years of age when the family came to the new world, 
was reared amid rural surroundings and obtained his early education in the coun- 
try schools. He found farm work too narrow for his taste and ambition, how- 
ever, and at the age of twelve years he entered a store in Lowden, Cedar county, 
where he was employed for a year. Realizing the need of a more comprehensive 
education than he had already acquired, he entered the public schools of Daven- 
port at the age of thirteen years and made his expenses by working outside of 
school hours. Thus he obtained a good English education and by clerking in a 
dry-goods store and carefully saving his earnings was enabled to pursue a com- 
mercial course in Bryant & Stratton Business College of this city. Thus fitted 
by education for important duties in life, he obtained a situation in the United 
States assessor's office, where he continued until 1869, when he entered the Dav- 
enport National Bank. There he was promoted through intermediate positions 
until he became discount clerk. It was his ambition, however, to become a mem- 
ber of the bar and out of business hours he spent his time in studying and reading 
law in the office of H. R. Claussen. Resigning his position in the bank in 1876, 
he entered the New York Law School at Albany, where he pursued the regular 
course and was graduated with the class of 1877. 

Mr. Ficke afterward spent six months in travel in Europe and on returning 
to Davenport entered upon active practice. No dreary novitiate awaited him. He 
was successful from the first, seeming to possess a ready and natural discrimina- 
tion as to legal problems. Moreover, he prepared his cases with great thorough- 
ness and care, determining with accuracy the salient features and giving to each 
point bearing upon his case its due relative prominence. His practice has been 
of an extensive and important character and he is recognized as one of the lead- 
ing representatives of the Davenport bar. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 145 

Always interested in public affairs, in which connection his opinions have 
been regarded as sound and progressive, Mr. Ficke has been honored with numer- 
ous offices. At one time he was affiliated with the republican party and was 
"hairman of its county and congressional committees, but a change in his poHtical 
opinions led him in 1880 to become a strong supporter of Grover Qeveland for 
the presidency. In 1886 he was elected county attorney for Scott county and in 
1890, against his protest, was nominated and elected to the mayoralty. When 
convinced by the public that he was the choice of the people for the office, he bent 
his energies to the faithful performance of the duties that devolved upon him as 
the chief executive of the municipality and such was his service that in 1891 he 
was renominated by acclamation and elected by the largest majority ever re- 
ceived by any mayor of Davenport. At the close of his second term he declined a 
third nomination. His was a vigorous, businesslike administration, in which many 
improvements were secured for the city, including paving, sewer building and the 
execution of other public projects. 

In addition to his law practice Mr. Ficke is largely interested in loaning money 
and devotes much of his time to his numerous real-estate interests. He has made 
most extensive investments and his judgment is seldom, if ever, at fault concerning 
the value of property. He regards real estate as the safest of all investments and 
the judicious use he has made of his opportunities in this direction has placed him 
among Davenport's most successful men. 

On the 24th of March, 1882, Mr. Ficke was united in marriage to Miss Fan- 
nie Davison, a daughter of Abner Davison, a prominent attorney of this city. 
They have three children, one of whom is Arthur D., a rising young lawyer asso- 
ciated with his father in practice. Mr. Ficke is a man of simple habits, devoted 
to his family and loyal to his friends. He is broad minded and well read — a 
cultured, genial gentleman who has traveled extensively and with whom associa- 
tion means expansion and elevation. He is keenly alive to all the vital interests 
of the times and has never counted as a source of happiness those things which 
minister merely to self without regard to the duties and obligations of citizenship. 



MRS. IDA HORST. 



Mrs. Ida Horst, who has made her home in the city of Davenport for the past 
two decades, is the widow of Qaus Horst, who carried on farming and stock- 
raising in Davenport township and was quite an extensive landowner. Mr. Horst 
was born in Holstein, Germany, on the 30th of December, 1819, his parents 
being Hans and Margaret (Goetch) Horst, who spent their entire lives in the 
fatherland. He obtained his education in the schools of his native land and con- 
tinued to reside there until 1847, when as a young man of twenty-eight he crossed 
the Atlantic to the United States, landing at New Orleans in November. He 
made his way as far up the river as St. Louis and there worked on a dairy farm 
during the winter, having gained a thorough knowledge of dairying in Germany, 
In the spring, when the ice in the river had melted, he came to Davenport, Iowa, 
and here worked at various occupations for a time. In 1850 he purchased eighty 



146 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

acres of prairie land in Davenport township, which he broke and on which he 
erected a dwelling, taking up his abode therein. That farm remained his place 
of residence throughout the remainder of his life but as time passed by and his 
financial resources increased, owing to his well directed industry and capable 
management, he added to his holdings by additional purchase until at his death 
he was the owner of five hundred and sixty acres of valuable land in Scott 
county and also had a farm in Lucas county, this state. In addition to cultivating 
the cereals best adapted to soil and climate he was also engaged in the raising of 
cattle, which branch of his business added materially to his income. 

On the 17th of May, 1850, Mr. Horst was united in marriage to Miss Ida 
Hahn, whose birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, on the 20th of February, 
1828, her parents being Johann and Margaret (Boege) Hahn. She was still 
young when her father died and her mother afterward married again. In 1847 
the family emigrated to America, landing at New Orleans, whence they went to 
St. Louis and then came to Davenport, arriving in this city on the 21st of June 
of that year. Mrs. Horst went to live with an EnglisTi family and thus learned 
to talk and read the language. By her marriage she became the mother of seven 
children, the record of whom is as follows : Louisa, residing in Davenport, is the 
widow of Herman Voss and has one son, Bernhardt. Adolph, who makes his 
home in Sheridan township, wedded Miss Alvina Misfeldt and has four chil- 
dren : Viola, Edna, Albert and Bennie. Therese, who now lives with her mother, 
is the widow of Henry Horst, whose demise occurred on the 2d of April, 1905. 
Edward, living in Sheridan township, married Miss Katherine Kahler, by whom 
he has five children : Herman, Hugo, Emil, Sadie and Elsie. Henry H., who 
resides in Davenport township, married Miss Amelia Sueverkrubbe and has five 
children, namely: Martha; Malinda, who is deceased; Herbert; Alfred; and Alma. 
One child of Claus and Ida (Hahn) Horst died in infancy. Henry was acci- 
dentally killed when but thirteen years of age. 

Mr. Horst was independent in his political views and held several positions 
of public trust in Davenport township, including that of road supervisor. His 
demise, which occurred on the 24th of May, 1881, was the occasion of deep and 
widespread regret, for he had gained many warm friends during the long period 
of his residence in this county. His widow continued to reside on the farm until 
1889, since which time she has made her home in Davenport. She is widely 
known in Scott county, where she has now lived for more than six decades and 
throughout this entire period she has enjoyed the respect and esteem of those 
with whom she has come in contact. 



PHINEAS CURTIS. 



Phineas Curtis is now living retired in Davenport. In every relation of life 
he has been faithful to the duties that have devolved upon him and he truly de- 
serves the rest that has now come to him in the evening of his days. He was 
born in Otsego county. New York, June 10, 1830, and is a son of Daniel and 
Mehitable (Masters) Curtis. His early American ancestors in the paternal line 




'-/^^^/^^'-^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 149 

came from England in 1642 and in the maternal line in 1716, the Masters family- 
coming from the isle of Guernsey. 

The early boyhood home of Phineas Curtis was near Cherry Valley, New 
York, and there he lived with his parents until seven years of age, when a re- 
moval was made to the vicinity of Johnsonville, New York. There he attended 
select and public schools, making his home there until twenty years of age, when 
he came to the middle west, his destination being Quincy, Illinois. For three 
terms he engaged in teaching in the district schools near that city and in 1851 
arrived in Scott county, Iowa. Here he began teaching in Buffalo township, 
but after devoting his time to that work for one term he took up the occupation 
of farming, purchasing a quarter section of land in Aliens Grove township near 
Donahue. This he purchased for one dollar per acre. It was entirely wild and 
uncultivated and he built thereon a house, fenced the fields and with character- 
istic energy began to till the soil. As the years passed his labors brought him 
good results, transforming the once wild prairie into a highly cultivated farm, 
upon which he continued to reside until 1890, selling it the following year. He 
had not been actively engaged in the cultivation of his fields, however, since 1872, 
for other duties had occupied his attention. While in Aliens Grove township he 
served as assessor for several years and was also made collector of the money to 
build schoolhouses. He filled the position of justice of the peace for a long 
period and when he put aside the duties of general farming in 1872 he purchased 
a small stock of goods and opened a general store in Donahue. He soon in- 
creased his stock by extensive purchases in the city wholesale districts and con- 
ducted the business successfully for ten years. On the expiration of that period 
he sold out and built tile works at Aliens Grove. For six years he operated the 
plant there and then disposed of it. In all of his business undertakings he has 
been successful, carefully managing and controlling his interests until he won 
thereby a creditable and desirable measure of success that enables him to live 
retired. For twelve years he served as postmaster of Donahue and was also station 
agent and express agent on the Davenport & St. Paul Railroad for two years. 
While serving as postmaster and express agent he never had a report come back 
to him for correction. In 1890 he took up his abode in Davenport, where he has 
since made his home, erecting a fine residence here in 1894. He has built a large 
number of houses in the city and their rental is principally the source of his 
gratifying income, enabling him to put aside all the active duties of business 
life. 

On the 27th of February, 1853, Air. Curtis was married to Miss Laura L. 
Fuller, a daughter of Dennis R. and Lovancia (Bradley) Fuller, of Aliens Grove. 
She was born in that township November 15, 1837, and it is thought that she 
was the first white female child born in Scott county. It was indeed at that 
time a wild pioneer region, into which few settlers had penetrated, although the 
Indians were still numerous in this part of the state. She lived to witness re- 
markable changes in the years which covered her life record, extending to the 
5th of January, 1902, when she was called to her final rest. Unto Mr, and Mrs-. 
Curtis were born seven children. Enola M., who was born April 19, 1855, was 
married September 14, 1874, to George P. Maw, of Davenport, and they have 
five children: Louisa J., born August 8, 1875; Maria C, August 26, 1878; Phin- 



150 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

eas J., August lo, 18881 ; Orange S., August 16, 1886; and Grace L., June 10, 
1889. Lovancia M., the second member of the family, was born October 22, 
1857, and on the i8th of February, 1878, became the wife of A. A. Fuller, of 
Davenport, by whom she had three children: Blanche E., born November 23, 
1880; Laura, born September 5, 1883; and Curtis, February 5, 1887. Dennis 
D., born January 19, 1862, and now living in Davenport, was married March 
20, 1891, to Emma Keppe, and they had five children: Madge A., born Sep- 
tember 29, 1893; Charles D., June 23, 1895; Ned B., April 26, 1897; Ralph D., 
August 19, 1899; and Frank R., July 12, 1902. Frank R. Curtis, the fourth 
child of Phineas Curtis, was born February 28, 1864, and was married March 
15, 1885, to Tillie Madden. They had one son Loraine, who was born 
November 27, 1887, and lives at Moline, Illinois. Abram B., who was born April 
4, 1867, at Donahue, Iowa, was married April 4, 1887, to Miss Margaret Mad- 
den. They have three children: Lovina A., born August 21, 1890; Clarence D., 
November 14, 1893; and Margery M., July 14, 1897. Lottie M., born January 
13, 1870, was married October 6, 1889, to John R. Randall, who died July 28, 
1894, leaving one child. Worth B., who was born December 26, 1890. Ora E., 
born June 25, 1878, was married June 29, 1898, to G. L. Hostetler, and they 
live in Des Moines, Iowa. They have two children : Roger H., born October 12, 
1902; and Helen L., born April 3, 1906. There have been four deaths in the 
family circle. Lottie, the sixth child of the family, died February 13, 1898, 
while Mrs. Tillie Curtis, the wife of Frank R. Curtis, passed away April 16, 
1897, Mrs. Dennis Curtis, April 27, 1907, and A. A. Fuller on the 8th of October, 
1897. For his second wife Mr. Curtis chose Mary A. (Weed) Davis, a daughter 
of Hiland and Amanda Weed, of Fayetteville, New York. She was born in 
Jordan, Onondaga county, New York, and on the 22d of June, 1905, became the 
wife of Mr. Curtis. 

In his political views Mr. Curtis has been a stalwart republican since the or- 
ganization of the party and has filled a number of local offices, the duties of 
which he has discharged with promptness and fidelity. He holds membership 
in the Christian church, in which he is serving as elder and in its work he takes 
active and helpful interest, while his entire life has been guided by its principles 
and teachings. 



GEORGE W. LEAMER. 

George W. Leamer, long connected with agricultural interests, is now living 
retired in Davenport but is still the owner of eighty acres of fine farm land in 
LeClaire township. His life of well directed energy and thrift has brought him 
a creditable measure of success, while his fidelity to upright principles has gained 
him the respect of his fellowmen. 

Mr. Leamer was born in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, February 14, 1830, 
and has, therefore, passed the eightieth milestone on life's journey. His parents, 
George and Mary (Seibers) Leamer, were both natives of Pennsylvania and of 
German descent. The father was a farmer by occupation and both he and his 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 151 

wife spent their entire lives in the Keystone state. Their son, George W. Learner, 
pursued his education in the schools of his native county and through the periods 
of vacation worked with his father on the farm and continued to aid in the 
cultivation of the fields of the old homestead until he came to the middle west 
in 1856, settling in LeClaire township, Scott county. More than half a century, 
has since come and gone and he has witnessed many changes as this district has 
become thickly settled and all of the improvements and advantages of the older 
east have been introduced. He was influenced to choose this county as a place 
of residence from the fact that he had two older brothers living here, one of whom 
bought the farm for Mr. Learner. After cultivating his land for a year Mr. 
Leamer returned to Pennsylvania and was married in 1857. Immediately after- 
ward he started back with his bride, whom he had wedded on the 4th of June. 
She bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Jane Smiley and was a daughter of 
William and Jane Smiley, of Pennsylvania. Arriving in Scott county, they 
began their domestic life upon a farm which was a tract of eighty acres, only 
partially improved. Mr. Leamer continued to cultivate that farm until 1886 
and in the interim purchased other land, for he prospered as the years went by 
and in the course of time acquired a comfortable competence that now enables 
him to enjoy a well earned rest. His life has been one of diligence and industry 
and his success has come as the merited reward of earnest, honest labor. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Leamer were born four children. William A., who' lives 
upon the old homestead, married Anna Shellenberger and they have five chil- 
dren: Herbert, Lillian, Mildred, Cecil and Duane. Emma is the widow of 
George Reid. Jennie died at the age of one year. Bertha J. is the wife of L. 
W. McCowen of Davenport, by whom she has three children : Ethel, Russell and 
Eugene. Mr. and Mrs. Leamer celebrated their golden wedding in June, 1907. 

Mr. Leamer has served as a school director and has always been a champion 
of the cause of public education. He has been a lifelong member of the Baptist 
church, in which he has served as deacon and has ever been loyal to its teachings. 
His life has been a busy, useful and honorable one and his sterling qualities have 
gained him the respect and good will of all who know him. 



STEPHEN P. BAWDEN. 

The law has become so complex that it would be difficult for any individual 
to be equally at home in all departments of practice and, while a lawyer may 
continue in several fields, it is the tendency of the times to concentrate one's 
energies upon a special branch. This Stephen P. Bawden does in his attention 
to probate and title deed branches of law and yet he has won success in other 
fields and may be termed a general practitioner. 

Mr. Bawden is one of Davenport's native sons and his parents were Stephen 
and Mary E. (Woodward) Bawden, the former being of English parentage and 
the latter a native of Pennsylvania. Their removal to the west and settlement 
at Davenport made this city the scene of the youthful efforts and activities of 
S. P. Bawden as well as of his later years. Having acquired his literary education 



152 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

in the public schools, he continued his studies in preparation for the bar and after 
his admission to practice in the courts of the state opened an office in Davenport, 
where he has since remained. His natural predilection tends him toward probate 
and similar departments of the law and for five years he devoted almost his en- 
tire time to those branches in the office of Davison & Lane. Inclination and 
opportunity were thus satisfied and his thoroughness and capability in this 
branch of the profession have won him deserved success. His two most domi- 
nant characteristics are determined persistence and thorough and honest exact- 
ness. In law and especially in real-estate law these traits are of prime importance 
and guarantee progress. Mr. Bawden has met with good success because of 
these qualities and is one of the best known of the younger members of the bar 
in this field of practice. He enjoys the good fellowship of his brethren of the 
legal fraternity here and all recognize that his advancement has come as the 
merited and legitimate reward of his efforts and ability. 



MRS. CHRISTINE WIESE. 

Mrs. Christine Wiese, now living in Davenport, where she is widely known 
and has many friends, is the widow of Peter Wiese, long a resident of Scott 
county. He served as postmaster of Mount Joy for over thirty years and had a 
wide acquaintance in the rural districts as well as in the city. He was born in 
Holstein, Germany, September 4, 1832, and was a son of James and Gretchen 
Wiese. His father was a shoemaker in Germany and, in accordance with the 
laws of that country, served in the army. He continued his residence in his 
native land throughout his entire life. 

In the schools of Germany, Peter Wiese acquired his education, after which 
he worked as a farm hand in his native country until' 185 1, when, attracted by 
the opportunities of the new world, he came alone to the United States. He 
was at that time a young man of about nineteen years. He landed at New 
Orleans, made his way up the Mississippi river to St. Louis and remained there 
for a time, owing to the fact that his brother, Claus H. Wiese, was residing 
there. The next spring, however, Peter Wiese continued on his way to Daven- 
port and after reaching this city secured employment as a farm hand by the 
month. Later he purchased a threshing machine and engaged in threshing and 
farming for about thirteen years. He then went to Mount Joy and took charge 
of the hotel there, conducting it until it was destroyed by fire on the nth of 
February, 1896. He continued to live at Mount Joy until his death, which oc- 
curred on the 6th of December, 1897. He was one of the best known men in 
that part of the country. He served for over thirty years as postmaster of 
Mount Joy and was also township clerk of Sheridan township. He likewise 
held other offices and at all times was loyal to the trust reposed in him, whether 
in connection with public affairs or otherwise. He took a contract to build forty 
miles of Milwaukee railroad and successfully executed it. In part payment for 
his services he took five hundred and sixty acres of land in Pottawattamie 
county, but later sold that property. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 153 

On the 24th of January, 1859, Mr. Wiese was united in marriage to Miss 
Christine Pieper. She was bom in Holstein, Germany, April 23, 1840, near the 
birthplace of her husband, and was a daughter of Henry and Anna Pieper. Her 
mothed died in Germany but the father afterward came to the United States in 
1856, accompanied by Mrs. Wiese. They landed at New York and, crossing the 
country, made their way to Davenport, where Mr. Pieper engaged in shoemak- 
ing. Later he became proprietor of a hotel at Mount Joy, where he lived until 
The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Wiese was blessed with seven children. Meta, 
the wife of John Ploehn, of Davenport, has four children : John H., who married 
his death on the 27th of October, 1886, when he was seventy-eight years of age. 
Grace Gilchrist ; Elsie C. ; Carl ; and Camilla. Anna is the wife of Henry Priester, 
of Davenport, and has three children: Walter C, who married Nora Boecken 
and has two children, Roma and Allen ; Wilma, who is the wife of Frank Jung- 
gohan and has four children. Vera, Lula, Carl and Fred ; and Cora. Julius, living 
at Eldridge, married Anna Goertz and has two children, Elsinda B. and Rollie P. 
Emil, of Minnesota, married Emma Wellendorf and they have nine children: 
Rona ; Herle ; Alvin P. ; Thorwald ; Herbert ; Ruth and Rubie, twins ; Ethel ; and 
Lillian. Henry, living in Eldridge, married Lena Cabel and has three children; 
Lois, Hazel and Donald. Christian, of Davenport, wedded Tecla Miller and 
they have two sons, Arnold and Otis. Helena is the wife of Herman Baustan, 
of Sheridan township, and has one son, Wilbert. 

All through his life, save for the brief period spent in St. Louis, Peter Wiese 
remained a resident of Scott county after coming to the United States, and the 
success which he achieved is attributable entirely to his own labors, for his 
resources were very limited when he crossed the Atlantic. As the years went by 
his carefully directed labors brought him substantial success, enabling him to leave 
his family in comfortable financial circumstances. He possessed a genial, social 
nature and courteous manner, and these qualities were an element in bringing 
to him the extended circle of friends who through his life enjoyed his com- 
panionship and since his death have only respect and commendable words for 
him. 



HENRY F. LEMBKE. 



Although Henry F. Lembke has reached the age of seventy-two years, he is 
still an active factor in the world's work, being well known in Davenport as a 
carpenter and contractor, with which business he has long been associated. He 
was born in Holstein, Germany, November 10, 1837, and is a son of Christian 
and Margaret Lembke.' The father followed farming in Germany, where he 
continued to reside until called to his final rest. Amid the quiet environment of 
the home farm Henry F. Lembke was reared, while in his youth he attended the 
public schools, there acquiring his education. He learned the carpenter's trade 
at Kiel, serving a three years' apprenticeship, after which he worked as a journey- 
man carpenter in different cities for five years. In 1863 he became a member of 
the Danish army and was engaged in military duty for a year, participating in 
the war in which Denmark, Prussia and Austria were involved. 



154 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

After the war Henry F. Lembke resumed work at his trade, which he followed 
in Hamburg and other cities until 1865, when he came to the United States, land- 
ing- at New York. He did not tarry on the Atlantic coast, however, but made 
his way at once to Davenport, where he arrived on the 12th of March. He again 
resorted to his trade for a livelihood and has since followed it, being active in 
the erection of a large number of houses and other buildings in Scott county and 
also in Ida county. He has ever been recognized as a good workman, his labors 
standing the test of time, and this has enabled him to keep busily employed as 
the years have gone by. He erected his own residence about 1891. 

In 1865, soon after coming to Davenport, Mr. Lembke was married to Miss 
Marie Jensen, who was born in Holstein, Germany, April 27, 1840, a daughter 
of Jochim and Anna Lena Jensen. They have become parents of seven children : 
Emil, of Boone, Iowa, who is married and has two children — ^Joseph and a baby; 
Agnes, the wife of Peter Hargett, of Coon Rapids, Iowa, by whom she has three 
children — Walter, Clara and Helen; Julius, at home; Rhoda, the wife of Charles 
Parker, of Waterloo, Iowa ; Anna, who married Fred Warrenton, of Davenport, 
and has one child, Leon; Matilda, at home; and Anna, who died at the age of 
two years. 

Mr. Lembke is a member of the Carpenters Union, No. 554, and has held 
office in that order. He has always been a busy man, working earnestly and per- 
sistently, and undoubtedly one feature of his progress is the fact that he has 
always continued in the line of business in which he embarked as a young trades- 
man, thus gaining comprehensive knowledge of the trade and manifesting marked 
skill in his work. 



REV. ANTHONY NIERMANN. 

Rev. Anthony Niermann, for over fifty years the revered pastor of St. 
Joseph's parish, was born in Germany, August 9, 1831, a son of John Henry 
and Fransica (Witting) Niermann, life-long residents of Germany. He is one 
of a family of six children, four daughters and two sons. His early studies were 
pursued in Germany. He was perfected in philosophy and theology, and, ow- 
ing to the strictness of the examinations, his education was thorough in every 
respect. 

While he long desired to come to America, Father Niermann remained in 
Germany until his father's death. In the meanwhile the demand for young 
German priests was growing, owing to the tide of German emigration which 
swept over the United States, and when he was ready to come here, he was 
received into the diocese of Dubuque. Upon his arrivel he continued his studies 
at a Catholic academy in St. Louis, under Rev. Hennessey, afterward archbishop, 
and a strong friendship sprung up between the two, which only the death of 
the latter severed. Father Niermann was ordained at Dubuque by Bishop 
Clement Smith, and on April 2, 1859, was sent to Davenport. For many 
years before the building of the church, services were held in the small structure 
now used as a schoolhouse. The cornerstone of St. Joseph's church was laid 





C-S-^-L.t/'^' 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 157 

in 1881. Many changes have taken place since Father Niermann came here to 
take charge of what is now St. Joseph's parish, but was then a part of the parish 
of St. Cunegonda. The populous district where the church stands, in the center 
of the -city, was then on the outskirts. Father Niermann states that he often 
shot quails and rabbits in his own dooryard. 

This venerable old priest is beloved, and deservedly so, by the people he has 
labored among so long. Genial and entertaining, he also shows the marks of tlie 
scholar and churchman. IXiring his whole career in the priesthood, this good 
man has labored solely for his people in Davenport, never having been assigned 
to another charge, nor will he be. St. Joseph parish is the child of his heart 
and brain and nothing but death will separate them. 



FRANZ HAGEMANN. 



For more than forty-two- years Franz Hagemann was continuously in the 
employ of the Rock Island Railroad Company. He then retired from that busi- 
ness but as indolence and idleness are. utterly foreign to his nature, he could not 
be content without some business duties and is now connected with a bakery and 
confectionery establishment. He has a very extensive acquaintance among rail- 
road men here and his faithfulness, reliability and freedom from ostentation have 
ever won for him the respect and good will of those with whom he has been 
associated. He was bom in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, January 28, 1840, 
and is a son of Cort and Margaret Hagemann, who spent their entire lives in 
that country, where the father conducted farming on a small scale. Franz Hage- 
mann attended school in Germany and there learned the carpenter's trade. He 
came to the United States in 1867, landing at New York. The favorable reports 
which he heard concerning business opportunities in America proved irresistibly 
attractive to him and with the desire of benefiting his financial condition on this 
side of the Atlantic he sailed for the United States. He did not tarry on the 
eastern coast, however, but at once made his way into the interior of the country, 
arriving at Davenport on the 14th of May, 1867, accompanied by his wife and 
one child. He had two brothers here — Hans, who is now living in California, 
and Hermann, who is now deceased. 

After reaching Davenport Mr. Hagemann was employed for two weeks at 
his trade and on the 28th of June, 1867, he entered the employ of the Rock 
Island Railroad Company as a carpenter in connection with the building of freight 
cars. He was employed in that way for about three years after which he was 
transferred to the passenger coach department and on the ist of April, 1883, he 
was promoted to the position of foreman of that department and so continued 
for more than twenty-six years, or until the 31st of December, 1909, when he 
retired. In recognition of his long and faithful service the company gave him 
a pension. He only worked two places in fifty-four years, being in the service 
of one employer in Germany for twelve years and through practically his entire 
residence in Davenport being in the employ of the Rock Island Railroad Com- 
pany. On his retirement he was presented with a fine gold watch, chain and 



158 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

locket by his fellow workmen. He is now engaged in the bakery and confection- 
ery business and has already made a good start in that line. When he entered 
the employ of the railroad the line was then being built west to Council Bluffs and 
was finished about as far as Des Moines. Its president at the time was Mr. 
Tracey, with Hugh Riddle as vice president, while A. Kimball was superintendent 
and Tom Twombley acted as master mechanic at this place. 

On the 6th of October, 1865, Mr. Hagemann was married to Miss Johanna 
Peters, a daughter of Peter Peters, who died in Germany. They have become 
parents of nine children : Amelia, who is the wife of Louis Schwenke, of Daven- 
port, and has six children — Ernest, Luella, Lillian, Edna, Walter and Lewis; 
Mrs. Clara Martin, a widow who has two children, Florence and Loretta; C. 
A., of Davenport, who married Ella Stramp and has two daughters, Norma and 
Mildred; Lewis, of Davenport, who married Meta Jeske and has two children, 
Ruby and Vera; Harry, of Davenport, who wedded Minnie Munike; and four 
who died in childhood. 

Mr. Hagemann is a member of the Claus Groth Gilde and Germania Kranken 
Verein. He is a very active man and appears at least ten years younger than his 
age. Being of a cheerful and friendly disposition, he is well liked by all who 
come in contact with him. Few men have more intimate knowledge of the early 
history of the Rock Island railroad and he can relate many interesting incidents 
concerning the happenings of that period. He has never regretted his deter- 
mination to seek a home in this country, for he here found good business oppor- 
tunities. He was not misled by any hope of winning success without earnest 
and continuous effort but by reason of his diligence and fidelity he worked his 
way upward and whatever success he has enjoyed has been richly merited. 



WILSON McClelland. 

Wilson McClelland, as the chief executive head of the T. W. McClelland Com- 
pany, is one of the best known representatives of commercial interests in Daven- 
port, and his salient qualities as a business man and citizen entitle him to definlx 
consideration in connection with the city's history. He was born in Davenport, 
March 28, 1864, a son of T. W. McClelland, for many years one of the most 
prominent and well known business men and manufacturers of the city, of 
whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this volume. When he had 
mastered the branches of learning taught in the public schools here Wilson Mc- 
Clelland went east and continued his education in the Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute of Troy, New York, from which he was graduated in the class of 
1886, winning the degree of Civil Engineer. Returning to Davenport, he be- 
came associated with his father's business, making it his purpose to thoroughly 
master the same in every particular. He studied the methods of the extensive 
plant as well as the; financial side of the business, and gained such intimate and 
accurate knowledge thereof that at his father's death he was enabled to assume 
control and successfully conduct the extensive and increasing business. On 
the death of his father he was chosen to the presidency of the T. W. McClelland 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 159 

Company and such is his connection with the business interests of Davenport at 
the present time. In 1903 the continued growth of the enterprise necessitated 
the removal to larger quarters, which were found in the large and modern build- 
ing which the company now occupies on East Third street and which was built 
especially for the requirements of the business. For several years the company 
conducted a contracting business in connection with the manufacturing inter- 
ests, but in recent years that department has been discontinued and attention has 
been concentrated upon the sash, door and mill work departments, in which the 
output is now very large. This is in fact one of the leading productive industries 
of the city, with a plant thoroughly equipped with modern machinery and every 
accessory to facilitate the work and to make its output of the highest character. 
A force of one hundred and fifty skilled workmen are employed and the ship- 
ments cover a wide territory. Mr. McClelland is an extremely busy man, con- 
nected with a number of financial and manufacturing concerns which profit by 
his sound judgment and clear, keen discernment. He is a director of the First 
National Bank and the Davenport Machinery & Foundry Company, is vice presi- 
dent of the White Lily Manufacturing Company and a financial factor in other 
enterprises. 

In i8go Mr. McClelland was married to Miss Anna Richardson, a native of 
Davenport and a daughter of D. N. Richardson. They now have three sons: 
Thomas Wilson, David Nelson and Robert Richardson. Mr. McClelland is 
well known as a club man, his narrie being on the membership of the Ousting, 
Commercial and other clubs, and of the Commercial he was president for two 
years. Hie also belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is 
a member of the school board but takes little active part in politics. Honored 
and respected by all, there is no man who occupies a more enviable position in 
the manufacturing and financial circles of this city, not alone by reason of the 
success which he has achieved but also owing to the straightforward business 
policy which he has ever followed. It is true that he entered upon a business 
already established, but in enlarging and controlling this many a man of less 
resolute spirit would have failed. Mr. McClelland, however, has met the con- 
ditions of the times and in the further development of his enterprise has given 
incontrovertible proof of his ability for successful management. 



H. J. HIGH. 



Business enterprise finds a worthy exponent in H. J. High, the president 
of the Dr. Dicks Malted Stock Food Company, and a member of the Tri-City 
Mill & Feed Company. In the conduct of business afifairs he manifests much of 
the spirit of the initiative, seeking out new plans for the conduct of business in- 
terests and meeting success through that close application which is undeterred 
by any obstacles or difficulties that may arise. He is equally well known as a 
local political leader and in various offices has proven his loyaty to those things 
which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



160 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Mr. High was born in Davenport, July lo, 1864, and is a son of James L. 
and Sarah (BowHng) High. The mother was a daughter of the late Mayor 
James M. Bowling, who was one of Davenport's most prominent and honored 
citizens. James L. High engaged in the livery business in Davenport, establish- 
ing a barn at No. 114 Harrison street in 1854. For a long period he continued 
in that department of business but his life's labors were ended in death in 
October, 1876. 

After benefiting by the instruction afforded in the public schools H. J. High 
attended Griswold College and his advanced course there well supplemented 
him for life's practical and responsible duties. He has made good use of his time, 
his talents and his opportunities since starting in business life and in 1905 he 
was one of the organizers of Dr. Dick's Malted Stock Food Company, of which 
he is now the president. This company is engaged in the manufacture of stock 
food which finds a ready sale on the market, its excellence insuring a liberal pat- 
ronage. As its chief executive officer, Mr. High displays good business ability 
and keen foresight, which enables him to formulate business plans and policies 
in such a manner that substantial results are achieved. Moreover, he is a member 
of the Tri-City Mill & Feed Company and is taking an active interest in the 
development and expansion of the business. 

In September, 1892, Mr. High was married to Miss Marie Amould, a daughter 
of Lewis and Cotilde (Huot) Arnould, both of whom are still living. Her father 
was one of the early contractors of the city and many substantial structures of 
Davenport still stand as monuments to his skill and handiwork. 

Mr. High takes a very active interest in politics and is well versed on the 
leading questions and issues of the day. He has always given his support to the 
republican party, has served as committeeman from his ward for a number of 
years and is recognized as one of the local party leaders. On various occasions 
he was called to public office, the duties of which he has discharged with prompt- 
ness and fidelity. He was appointed census enumerator in his ward, was city 
health officer for four and a half years, was bailiff of the district court for two 
and a half years and is now city milk inspector, while for thirteen years he has 
occupied this position in connection with the state service. He regards a public 
office as a public trust — and no trust reposed in H. J. High has ever been be- 
trayed in the slightest degree. 



GUSTAVE BECKER. 



Attracted by the business opportunities offered by the new world, Gustave 
Becker, when a young man of twenty-one, crossed the Atlantic and for more 
than three decades was well known in business circles in Davenport, where his 
indefatigable energy and wise investment brought him success that placed him 
among the most prosperous residents of the city. Mr. Becker was born Decem- 
ber 8, 1848, in Silesia, Germany, a son of Karl and Anna Rosina (Wahnelt) 
Becker. In the family were two sons and four daughters, the brother of our 
subject being Charles Becker, while the sisters were Mrs. Louise Herald, Mrs. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 161 

Bertha Gerboth, Mrs. Emily Dittschlag and Mrs. Anna Seller, of Germany. 
During the early boyhood of their son Gustave the parents removed to Tschi- 
mare, Germany, where he attended school, being recognized as one of the bright- 
est pupils in his class, manifesting special aptitude in his studies. When fourteen 
years of age he and his brother Charles went to Berlin, where they became con- 
nected with mercantile interests, and in 1869, when Gustave Becker was about 
twenty-one years of age, he and his brother crossed the Atlantic to America, 
hoping to benefit their financial condition by the opportunities which they heard 
could be enjoyed in the new world. For a short time they resided in New York 
and then made their way westward to Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Becker afterward 
traveled for a number of years for a wholesale wine, liquor and cigar house 
and was successful in introducing the products of the house upon the market. 
On the 1st of March, 1876, he arrived in Davenjort, where he remained until 
his demise. He was in business in this city for about thirty-one years and his 
interests were of a character that contributed in large measure to general prog- 
ress and improvement as well as to individual success. He was for a time as- 
sociated with others in the ownership and management of the Grand Opera House, 
holding a third interest. He also held a similar interest for a time in the Burtis 
Opera House and on the ist of April, 1891, he purchased the property at the 
corner of Second and Brady streets, which eventually became one of the most 
valuable corners in the city. He still owned this building at the time of his 
death and derived therefrom a substantial annual income. At one time he also 
conducted a high class cafe and delicatessen store but was most widely knovv-n 
because of his invested interests in real estate. In this he displayed keen and dis- 
criminating judgment and notable sagacity, making no error of opinion con- 
cerning the value of realty and its possible rise. 

On the 20th of June, 1872, Mr. Becker was united in marriage to Miss Wil- 
helmina Ruehle, of Detroit. Her father, John Valentine Ruehle, was a dis- 
tinguished citizen of Michigan and left the impress of his individuality upon the 
history of that state as one of its early legislators. Coming to the west, he 
was closely associated with its pioneer development and drove to Chicago in 
a two wheeled cart when there were only log houses in that city. His brother, 
Frederick R. Ruehle, was alderman of Detroit and a prominent factor in its 
upbuilding. John V. Ruehle acted as water commissioner of the city and was 
closely associated with many movements, political measures and business projects 
for the substantial development of the city and state in which he made his home. 
He had crossed the Atlantic from Baden-Baden, Germany, and was fifty-three 
days on a sailing vessel ere he reached American shores. He found Indians in 
Michigan on his arrival there but lived to see a wonderful transformation in 
the state as the homes of the white settlers replaced the Indian tepees and the 
work of civilization was carried on by a progressive and enterprising people. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Phoebe Snyder, was a native of Bavaria, 
Germany. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Becker were born five children, of whom three 
are living: Oswald, Mrs. Lina Thies and Alice. 

Mr. Becker held a prominent position among the German-American residents 
of Davenport. He was active in support of the German free schools, belonged 
to the Davenport Turngemeinde and the Schuetzen Verein. He also held mem- 



162 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

bership with the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the Masonic lodge. He was ever strictly reliable in his business 
dealings, his commercial integrity standing as an unquestioned fact in his life. 
His success came to him through the judicious improvement of opportunities 
which others pass by heedlessly and through unremitting energy and persever- 
ance, which are always indispensable factors in success. 



TIMM ECKMANN. 



On the list of retired citizens of Davenport may be found the name of Timm 
Eckmann, whose extensive landed possessions in Scott county supply him with all 
the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. Born in Holstein, Germany, Jan- 
uary 30, 1829, his parents were Claus and Abel (Johnson) Eckmann, who were 
farming people of Germany and spent their entire lives in the fatherland. The 
son was reared on the home farm and acquired his education in the public schools. 
He also served in the German army from 1848 until 1850 and two years later de- 
cided to try his fortune in the new world. 

Landing in New York city, Mr. Eckmann made his way direct to Davenport, 
reaching his destination on the 7th of July, 1852. His first employment was at 
farm labor near Davenport, but after a short time he returned to this city and 
fuund employment in a brickyard, which occupied his attention for a time. He 
then spent a short time on a steamboat which plied the Mississippi river. Anxious 
to become more firmly established in business, he opened a saloon which he con- 
ducted for two years, but at the end of that time, having purchased sixty acres 
of land in Clinton county, Iowa, he removed to that farm and spent two years in 
its improvement and cultivation. Farm life did not prove congenial to him, 
however, and disposing of his property to good advantage, he returned once 
more to Davenport and spent four years in the employ of P. B. Harvey in a 
warehouse. During all the years that he had been employed by others, he care- 
fully saved his earnings, having ever before him the aim of some day engaging 
in business on his own account in Davenport. He eventually opened a grocery 
store on the corner of Third and Warren streets and for thirty years was iden- 
tified with that business. He built up an excellent trade, always studying the 
demands of his patrons and following honorable methods in his dealings, so that- 
success attended his labors. In the meantime he invested his profits in Scott 
county land and now owns three farms of one hundred and sixty acres each in 
Blue Grass township, and a farm of two hundred acres in Davenport township. 
Having spent thirty busy and active years in the grocery business, and having 
acquired a good competence for declining age, Mr. Eckmann felt justified in 
leading a more quiet life and now rests in ease in a comfortable residence in 
Davenport, while the store which he established is now conducted by his son. 

It was about five years after his arrival in the new world that Mr. Eckmann 
was married on the, 6th of July, 1857, to Miss Weipka Keil, a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Claus Keil, of Germany. Mrs. Eckmann was likewise born in the father- 
land and emigrated to the new world in the year of her marriage. Two sons 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 165 

have been born of this union but the eldest, Charles, died when a little lad of 
seven years. The surviving son, George H., wedded Miss Louisa Lemcool and 
they have one daughter, Nettie. 

Mr. Eckmann belongs to the German Pioneer Society of Scott county. A 
man of great natural ability, his success from the beginning of his residence in 
Scott county has been uniform and rapid. Possessing a quick, alert spirit, he 
eagerly availed himself of every opportunity and now in the evening of life he 
and his estimable wife are living contented and happy lives in a nice modern 
home and are surrounded by many warm and admiring friends. 



FRITZ PRIESTER. 



Fritz Priester, who since 1900 has lived retired in his fine home at No. 1102 
West Fourteenth street in Davenport, was actively engaged in general agricul- 
tural pursuits throughout his entire business career and is still the owner of 
three hundred and twenty acres of valuable land in Lincoln township, Scott 
county. He was born in Holstein, Germany, on the 22d of March, 1844, his 
parents being Carl and Eliza Priester. The father was a farmer by occupation 
and also served as a soldier in the Germany army. In 1857, in company with 
his wife and children, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, landing at 
New York, whence he came direct to Davenport, Iowa. He purchased and estab- 
lished his home on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres of improved land in 
Lincoln township, which is now in possession of our subject, and there success- 
fully carried on his agricultural interests until the time of his demise, his death 
being occasioned by injuries which he received in a runaway accident in 1864. 
A year afterward his widow went to live with her son Adoloh in Davenport, 
where she made her home until called to her final rest in 1891, when eighty-three 
years of age. 

Fritz Priester, who was one of a family of twelve children, received his early 
education in the schools of his native land and after coming to this country con- 
tinued his studies throughout one winter season. He early became familiar with 
the duties and labors which fall to the lot of the agriculturist through the assis- 
tance which he rendered in the work of the home farm and after his father's 
death took charge of the place, devoting his time and energies to its further 
cultivation and improvement throughout the remainder of his active business 
career. The property still remains in his possession and the other tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres which he owns in Lincoln township was given to his 
wife by her father. His place is lacking in none of the conveniences and im- 
provements of a model farm of the twentieth century and he recently erected 
thereon a fine residence and substantial barn. It was in 1900 that he put aside 
the active work of the fields and took up his abode in a residence which he pur- 
chased at No. 1 102 West Fourteenth street in Davenport, where he has since 
lived retired in the enjoyment of well earned rest. 

On the 8th of February, 1867, Mr. Priester was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Hacker, whose birth occurred in Mecklenburg, Germany, January 14, 



166 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

1849, and who was therefore but three years of age when in 1852 she was brought 
to the United States by her parents, Christopher and Fredericka Hacker. Af- 
ter landing in New Orleans Mr. and Mrs. Hacker made their way direct to this 
county, locating on a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land which 
the former purchased in Butler township. Subsequently he bought one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Lincoln township, where he made his home for a great 
many years, meeting with a gratifying measure of success in his farming opera- 
tions. His demise occurred at Eldridge in 1908, when he had attained the age of 
eighty-seven years, while his wife passed away in Davenport in 1894 at the age 
of seventy-four years. They had two children who grew to maturity, namely: 
Mrs. Priester; and Fredericka, the wife of Emil Rohlf, of Eldridge. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Priester have been born nine children, the record of whom is as fol- 
lows : Laura is now the wife of Gustavus Wellendorf and resides in Minnesota. 
Herman, an agriculturist of. Sheridan township, wedded Miss Laura Fellener, by 
whom he has two children, Herbert and Lillian. Adolph, living in Wisconsin, 
married Miss Sophia Meier and has one son, Arnold. Louisa gave her hand in 
marriage to Henry Fellener, of Sheridan township, and is now the mother of 
four children : Fred, Walter, Harvey and Leila. Matilda, living in Lincoln 
township, is the wife of Julius Greenwald, by whom she has three children — El- 
mer, Linta and Eleanor. Emil, who resides on the old home farm in Lincoln 
township, married Miss Louisa Lepten, by whom he had three children, namely: 
Wilma; Altha, deceased; and Elna. Ferdinand, whose birth occurred on the 
loth of July, 1880, passed away December 19, 1902. Alma is the wife of August 
Rauch, of Davenport, Iowa, and has two children. Vera and Mervin. Ella, also 
living in Davenport, is the wife of William Claussen and has one child, Evelyn. 

In his political views Mr. Priester is a stanch democrat, loyally supporting 
the men and measures of that party. He has held the office of township trustee 
and acted as school treasurer for two years, while for nine years he was a school 
director, ever proving a faithful and capable public official. As a citizen he is 
public spirited to an eminent degree, deeply interested in the welfare and pros- 
perity of the county in which he has now resided for more than a half century. 
His many good qualities are displayed by the friendship which is uniformly ac- 
corded him by those who know him. 



CLARENCE C. HETZEL, M. D. 

This is preeminently an age of specialization. Comparatively few men in any 
profession attempt to cover the entire field of practice but give their attention 
to a particular line, thus gaining skill and ability therein that could not be acquired 
if time and energy had to be divided with other interests. Dr. Hetzel has in 
his practice made a specialty of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat and his 
broad study and comprehensive understanding have gained for him a skill that 
is the source of the large practice that is accorded him. He was bom in Avoca, 
Iowa, May 10, 1877. His father, Fred G. Hetzel, was a native of Wheeling, West 
Virginia, born June 10, 1846. When a boy he came to Davenport with his father, 
Charles Hetzel, who engaged in farming on Telegraph road, about six miles 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 167 

from the city, and there reared his family. He brought his farm into a good 
state of cultivation, erected thereon a substantial residence and become one of 
the prosperous and respected citizens of the community. It was on the old 
homestead there that Fred G. Hetzel was reared and after attaining his majority 
he turned his attention to the grain business. In 1871 he removed to Avoca, 
where he established a hardware store and has since remained a successful mer- 
chant in that place. He married Miss Belle Boyd, who was bom at Wilton, Iowa, 
October 30, 1854, and their family numbers five children, three daughters and 
two sons. 

Clarence C. Hetzel, the second in order of birth, pursued his education through 
successive grades in the Avoca schools until he was graduated from the high 
school in 1895, while later he entered the Iowa State University and completed 
the medical course by graduation with the class of 1903. He has further qualified 
for his chosen profession by study in the Polyclinic and in Wills Eye Hospital in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was also for one year in the hospital at Iowa 
City, where he added to his theoretical knowledge the broad and valuable ex- 
perience of hospital practice. He established his office in Davenport in 1904 and 
makes a specialty of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. In that depart- 
ment he is thoroughly qualified and his reading upon the subject has been ex- 
tensive, bringing him broad and thorough knowledge. He is a member of the 
American Academy of Ophthalmology, Otology and Laryngology. He also be- 
longs to the County, State and District Medical Societies. 

Dr. Hetzel was married July 27, 1907, to Miss Alta S. Smith, a native of Har- 
lan, Iowa. He belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and in 
all social relations manifests a genial spirit and unfeigned cordiality. In his 
practice he holds to a high standard of professional ethics and therefore enjoys 
the respect of his brethren of the medical fraternity as well as of the general public. 



MRS. ELISE OVERDIECK. 

Mrs. Elise Overdieck, occupying one of the fine residences of Davenport, 
has been a resident of this city for more than a half century, living on the site 
of her present home since 1854. She is the widow of Gustave Overdieck, who 
was born in the village of Preetz, Holstein, Germany, January 18, 18 18. His par- 
ents, Ludarino and Dora Overdieck, spent their entire lives in Germany, the father 
following merchandising. Gustave Overdieck, reared in his native land, came 
to the United States in 1848, when about thirty years of age. He landed at 
New Orleans, whence he made his way northward to Davenport, but, purchas- 
ing a small tract of land in the vicinity of the city, took up his abode there and 
resided thereon until 1854. In that year he purchased an acre and a quarter of 
land in the city and built thereon a house, which was later destroyed by fire. He 
then erected the present fine residence occupied by his widow. His death oc- 
curred on the 29th of March, 1877. 

Mr. Overdieck was married in this county to Miss Elise Anderson, a daughter 
of D. J. and Marie Anderson, who came to Iowa with their family in 1848, 



168 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

having previously been residents of Kiel, Germany. The father purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in Pleasant Valley township. It was nicely 
improved with substantial buildings and an orchard and as the years passed Mr. 
Anderson continued to devote his time and energies to the further development 
of the place. He only Hved for a short time after his arrival, however, nor did 
his wife survive for very long. Their daughter Elise was born on the i8th 
of November, 1829, and it was in the spring of 1851 that she gave her hand in 
marriage to Mr. Overdieck. They became the parents of five children: Harriet, 
at home; Frederick, who departed this life in 1876; Charlotte, the widow of 
O. S. McNeil, of Davenport; Ellen, the wife of L. F. Robinson, of Davenport, 
by whom she has a daughter, Amy; and Albert, at home. Mrs. Overdieck is 
now one of the esteemed old ladies of Davenport, having passed the eightieth mile- 
stone on life's journey and fifty-five years of that period has been spent as a resi- 
dent of this city, while for sixty-one years she has lived in the county. She is 
therefore familiar with much of its history and relates many interesting inci- 
dents of the early days before the evidences of pioneer life had been entirely re- 
placed by the improvements of a modern civilization. 



THIES SINDT. 



After a career characterized by industry and thrift it is the happy lot of 
Thies Sindt, one of Davenport's retired citizens to spend the evening of Hfe 
free from pecuniary cares and removed from commercial strivings, amid the 
comforts and refinements of an attractive home which his former efforts have 
given to him. Like so many of Scott county's adopted citizens he is a native of 
Hqlstein, his birth having occurred there November 19, 1824, his parents being 
Hans and Anna Sindt. The former, a timber overseer, came to the United 
States in 1854, his son having preceded him by a number of years, but he was 
permitted to enjoy his new home only for the short period of four years, his 
death occurring in 1858. 

Thies Sindt obtained his education in the public schools whose excellence so 
materially adds to Germany's high standing among the nations. Then, in the 
custom of the country, he set about him to learn a trade, his choice falling upon 
the tinner's trade. When a little past his majority he decided to cast his for- 
tunes on this side of the Atlantic and June 21, 1847, he arrived in New Orleans, 
coming up the Mississippi river to Davenport. Here he speedily secured work in 
a tinner's shop and continued to follow that occupation until 1854, when he be- 
came a landholder, buying an eighty acre tract in Davenport township. No easy 
lot confronted him for the land was unbroken prairie and it was necessary to 
expend great labor upon it before it could be brought to a cultivable condition. 
Nothing daunted, Mr. Sindt proceeded to do this and in the following year built 
a house and went there to live. As opportunity and means presented he bought 
more land and now owns one hundred and twenty acres in Davenport town- 
ship, two hundred acres in Benton county, Iowa, and six hundred and forty in 
Ida county, this state, these making him one of Davenport's extensive property 




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HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 171 

owners. His residence on his Scott county farm extended over nearly half a 
century, in which time he witnessed most remarkable changes and did his share 
toward the growth and progress. 

In recognition of his public spirit and trustworthiness Mr. Sindt was made 
school director and sei-ved so efficiently that he held the office for twenty-five 
years. He was also a member of the board of supervisors. In 1900 he con- 
cluded that advanced years justified his giving up active life and he retired and 
came to Davenport, where he owns a fine home at 1506 South street. 

In February, 1850, in the early days of his life in Davenport, Mr. Sindt was 
united in marriage to Miss Able Stoltenberg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hans 
Stoltenberg, German people, who were among Scott county's pioneer settlers. 
Nine children were born to this union. Henry, deceased, married Trena Horst 
and was the father of three children, August, Clara and Alma. Minnie is at home. 
William, residing in Algona, Iowa, married Ella Bey and has two children, 
Nora and Elsie. Theodore married Anna Brauch and lives in Davenport. He 
has two children, Howard and Erwin. Meta is at home. Herman B., a resident 
of Walcott, married Anna Wiese and has a family of five children, Hilda, Velma, 
Norma, Arnold and Alfred. Lewis E. married Mary Soering and lives on the 
old homestead. Clara C. married Henry Arp, of Davenport. The youngest 
child died in infancy. Mrs. Sindt passed to her reward in 1872 at the age of 
forty-eight years. 

Mr. Sindt's interests are not limited to the supervision of his property. He is 
a stockholder in the German Savings Bank of Davenport and the Savings Bank 
of Walcott. Socially he is affiliated with the Society of Old German Settlers. 
His long life has been its own reward, for now wearing his years with ease and 
dignity, he has time and means to spend his remaining days in the cultivation 
of the finer things of life and in the society of children, grandchildren and the 
friends, of whom he possesses fully his share. 



PRESLEY B. NEBERGALL. 

That the life history of Presley B. Nebergall is the record of success is due 
to the persistent effort and intelligently directed industry which he displayed 
through the many years of his connection with agricultural interests in Scott 
county. He was born in West Virginia, in 1834, and pursued his education in his 
native state. In 1854, when a young man of twenty years, he came to Scott county 
with his father, Jacob Nebergall, who settled in Blue Grass township, where he 
purchased a partially improved farm. Later he bought more land at dififerent times 
and improved his acreage, devoting his remaining days to general agricultural 
pursuits. 

After coming to Iowa, Presley B. Nebergall lived with his parents on the home 
farm and assisted his father in the cultivation and improvement of the fields until 
his marriage, which was celebrated on the 27th of January, 1859. On that date he 
wedded Miss Felicity B. Van Bibber, who was also a native of West Virginia. 
They began their domestic life on a farm of one hundred and twenty acres near 



172 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

the home of his father and there Mr. Nebergall continued to cultivate his fields until 
his Hf e's labors were ended in death on the 22d of September, 1878. He was dili- 
gent and persevering and, working on persistently year by year, he won that 
measure of prosperity which always crowns earnest and indefatigable effort. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Nebergall were born six children, but one son, George, died 
at the age of twenty-two years. The others are: J. F. and Jacob A., both of 
whom are now residents of Davenport ; Mrs. Eugenia Whittaker, who is living in 
Grinnell, Iowa ; Edward Lee ; and Mrs. Grace Porter, whose home is in Canada. 
There are also twelve grandchildren in the family. 

When Mr. Nebergall purchased the home farm he paid thirty-five dollars 
per acre for it, but with the settlement of the county and owing to the improve- 
ments placed upon the farm its value increased until Mrs. Nebergall sold it some 
years after her husband's death for one hundred and twenty-five dollars per acre. 
Following her husband's demise she resided thereon for fifteen years, or until 
1893, when she removed to this city and purchased a tract of land within the city 
limits upon which she has since made her home. It was at that time that she dis- 
posed of her farm, obtaining therefor a substantial price which places her in com- 
fortable financial circumstances. 

In his political views Mr. Nebergall was a stalwart democrat, believing that the 
adoption of the principles of that party would best conserve the interests of good 
governmeot. He served as president of the school board in his township and was a 
stanch champion of the cause of public education. He held membership in the Bap- 
tist church, in which he was a deacon, and at all times was a public-spirited man, 
active in support of measures that contributed to the social, educational and moral 
progress of the community. All who knew him respected him for his sterling 
worth and he left to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



JOHN H. J. HAMANN. 

John H. J. Hamann, who has lived retired in Davenport since 1896, was 
formerly actively and successfully identified with agricultural interests and is still 
the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Sheridan township. 
His birth occurred in Schleswig, Germany, on the 5th of October, 1824, his parents 
being Hans D. and Ida E. Hamann, who spent their entire lives in the fatherland. 
He acquired his education in the schools of his native land and after putting aside 
his text-books began farming in association with his father. During the Schles- 
wig-Holstein wars, from 1848 until 1850, he served as a teamster. In 1857, when 
a young man of thirty-three years, he determined to establish his home in the new 
world and set sail for the United States, landing at New York. His brother, 
Hans Hamann, who had emigrated to this country about 1848, was living in Dav- 
enport and this fact induced our subject to come direct to Iowa. He immediately 
went to work for his brother on a farm in Davenport township and for a time 
was busily employed as a farm hand, being engaged in threshing, etc. Subse- 
quently he rented a tract of land in Davenport township from his brother, making 
his home thereon for six years, while during the following eleven years he devoted 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 173 

his time and energies to the cultivation of a rented farm in Sheridan township. 
On the expiration of that period he had accumulated sufficient capital to enable him 
to buy land of his own and in 1875 he came into possession of an adjoining 
farm of 160 acres, taking up his abode thereon. As there were only a few 
improvements on the property, he erected a house, barns, etc., and soon the 
place was lacking in none of the equipments and conveniences of a model farm of 
the twentieth century. He won a gratifying measure of success in the conduct of 
his agricultural interests and was actively engaged in the work of the fields until 
1896, when he removed to Davenport, where he has since lived retired. For 
about fifteen years he served as one of the trustees of the Farmers' Insurance 
Company. 

On the 17th of April, 1857, just prior to his emigration to America, Mr. 
Hamann was united in marriage to Miss Louisa H. Grimm, who was born on 
the 22d of January, 1828, her parents being Hans and Carolina A. Grimm. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Hamann were born seven children. John A., residing in Daven- 
port, wedded Miss Carolina Wors, by whom he has a daughter, Hilda. Lewis 
C, who makes his home in Lyon county, married Miss Lena Roheff and has four 
children: Clara, Grover, Herbert and Ella. Alvina C, who gave her hand in 
marriage to Hugo Kuehl, of Eldridge, is now the mother of four children : Emil, 
Hugo, Adelia and Alma. Adelia wedded Otto Dehn, of Lyon county, and also 
has four children, namely: Lewis, Mello, Herbert and Alma. Henry, who re- 
sides on the old homestead farm in Sheridan township, married Miss Anna Hintz, 
by whom he has six children — Alma, Cynthia, Elva, Maletto, Cora and Blanche. 
Louisa and Meta Hamann have both passed away. 

Since becoming a naturalized American citizen Mr. Hamann has given his 
political allegiance to the republican party and his fellow townsmen, recognizing 
his worth and ability, have, called him to several positions of public trust, includ- 
ing those of school director and road supervisor. He has long been a prominent 
member of the German Pioneers' association of Scott county and has recently 
been honored with its presidency. The period of his residence in this county 
covers more than a half century and he is widely recognized as one of its most, 
respected and venerable citizens, having now passed the eighty-fifth milestone; 
on life's journey. He is numbered among those who left the fatherland to 
identify themselves with American life and institutions, who have pushed their 
way to the front and who are a credit alike to the land of their birth and that 
of their adoption. 



WILLIAM STEWARD. 



William Steward, a retired farmer living at No. 1405 LeClaire street in 
Davenport, has been enjoying well earned rest since the spring of 1889, but for 
many years previously was actively engaged in general agricultural pursuits and 
at one time owned 480 acres of rich and productive land in Aliens Grove town- 
ship. His birth occurred in County Norfolk, England, on December i, 1827, 
his parents being James and Frances (Green) Steward. The father, a farmer 



174 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

and horse trader, died when his son William was but four years of age. The 
mother's demise occurred in Scott county, Iowa, and her remains were interred 
at Aliens Grove. 

William Steward attended a private school in England until thirteen years 
of age and after putting aside his text-books learned the trade of wagon making. 
In the fall of 1850, when a young man of about twenty-three years, he crossed 
the Atlantic to the United States in company with his mother and wife, having 
been married three weeks previously. They reached New York about November 
20th with one shilling in cash, two good watches, and some silver spoons, which 
they sold in order to obtain sufficient money to take them to Rochester. There 
Mr. Steward worked at the carpenter's trade for six years, on the expiration of 
which period he came to this county, reaching Davenport in the fall of 1857. 
Here he was employed as a carpenter by Thomas McClellan, his first work 
being in connection with the construction of what is now the First National 
Bank. He followed that trade until i860, and his last work as a carpenter was 
on the county poorhouse in the employ of John Hornby. In i860 he rented a 
tract of prairie land in Aliens Grove township where the town of Donahue 
now stands, and all that he possessed on starting out as a farmer was a good 
team. The man who owned the property built a house thereon and for four 
years Mr. Steward leased the place, which embraced a quarter section of land. 
About 1868 he bought the farm and as his financial resources increased he 
extended its boundaries by additional purchases from time to time until he 
owned 480 acres of land. He successfully carried on his agricultural interests 
there for a period of twenty-nine years, or until the spring of 1889, when, having 
accumulated a handsome competence by reason of his well directed labor and 
good management, he put aside the work of the fields and has since lived retired 
in Davenport. 

On the 26th of September, 1850, Mr. Steward was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah Taylor, a daughter of George Taylor, who spent his entire life in 
England. They became the parents of seven children, namely: Sarah, who 
wedded George Dayton, of Clinton, Iowa, and has three sons — William, John and 
George; Elizabeth, who gave her hand in marriage to Jeremiah Binford, of Min- 
nesota, and now has four children — ^Edna, George, Harry and Frank; Fannie, 
who wedded John Madden and who is now deceased, as is also her husband; 
George, who has likewise passed away and who had four children by his marriage 
to Martha Mickelwright ; Christopher, residing in Aliens Grove township, who 
married Miss Ethel Foster ; Charles, who lives on the old home place and wed- 
ded Miss Naomi Snyder, by whom he has five children ; and John T., who died 
when about a year old. The wife and mother passed away on December 29, 
1901, when sixty-nine years of age, her birth having occurred May 3, 1832. 
On September 9, 1903, Mr. Steward was again married, his second union being 
with Mrs. Delilah Burch, the widow of Henry Burch. 

Mr. Steward gives his political allegiance to the republican party and during 
almost the entire period of his residence in Aliens Grove township he served as 
either road supervisor or school director, discharging his official duties in a prompt 
and capable manner. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in 
the Congregational church, in which he is serving as a deacon. He joined the 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 175 

Ancient Order of United Workmen at Dixon in 1873, now belongs to lodge No. 
321 at Davenport and has held all the offices. He has now passed the eighty- 
second milestone on life's journey, and for more than a half century has made 
his home within the borders of Scott county. Coming to America in early man- 
hood empty handed and unknown, he faced conditions which would dishearten 
many a man of less resolute and determined spirit. However, he possessed 
heroic qualities in his determination to win success and as the years have gone 
by he has not only carved out a comfortable fortune for himself, but has also 
made an honored name, his record winning for him the confidence, good will 
and admiration of those who know him. 



WILLIAM THEOPHILUS. 

William Theophilus, counselor at law of Davenport, was born at Troedyrhiw, 
in the parish of Llansadwrn, Carmarthenshire, Wales, August 6, 1858, and is a 
son of Daniel and Margaret Theophilus. His maternal grandmother was a Wil- 
liams, born in the same village as Roger Williams, the American champion of 
religious liberty, and came of the same ancestry. 

William Theophilus began his education in the schools of his native land, but 
in his youthful days left the little rock-ribbed country of Wales and came to the 
new world with his parents in 1868. The family home was established on a farm 
near Lime Spring, in Howard county, Iowa, and there he resumed his inter- 
rupted education. For twenty years he resided there, his time being given to 
study and teaching, following the latter profession for a number of terms. He 
received little assistance but laudable ambition prompted him to put forth his 
efforts along lines demanding intellectual strength and activity, and the wise 
use of his opportunities has brought him to the creditable position which he now 
occupied as one of the leading counselors at law at the Davenport bar. After 
teaching for some time in his early manhood, he was elected clerk of the courts 
of Howard county in 1882 and was reelected in 1884, serving until January, 1887. 
During that period he devoted the hours which are usually termed leisure to the 
study of law, becoming versed in its principles and practice. Through these 
years his work and worth were leaving their impress upon the public notice and 
his fellow townsmen manifested appreciation of his value as a citizen in electing 
him to the state legislature in 1887, so that he served in the twenty-second gen- 
eral assembly. The previous year he had been the democratic candidate for 
clerk of the supreme court and, although defeated, ran considerably ahead of his 
ticket. After serving for about a term in the legislature, he resigned in 1889 
and removed to Arkansas City, Kansas, where he entered upon the practice of 
law, being there admitted to the bar. He remained an active member of the 
profession in that place for nearly five years and there became acquainted with 
George W. Scott — the beginning of a friendship which has outlasted all changes 
since. He was elected city attorney of Arkansas City at the time when im- 
portant litigation was pending concerning the issuance of city bonds for water- 
works and railways. These cases were tried in the federal courts and in their 



176 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

conduct he established a reputation for energy, skill and knowledge of the law, 
which the intervening years have but solidified. 

Mr. Theophilus became a resident of Davenport in May, 1894, and was here 
joined the following year by Mr. Scott, at which time the firm of Scott & The- 
ophilus was formed, the association being maintained until Mr. Scott's election to 
the office of city attorney in 1898. Mr. Theophilus, also taking prominent part 
in political work, was elected to the Iowa legislature in 1899 and during his term 
of office gave careful consideration to the questions which came up for settle- 
ment in the twenty-eighth general assembly and stanchly advocated those which 
he believed to be for the benefit of the commonwealth. Retiring from his posi- 
tion of legislator, he resumed the active practice of law, remaining alone until 
1905, when he entered into partnership with George W. Scott and Benjamin I. 
Salinger, under the firm style of Salinger, Scott & Theophilus. Since May, 1909, 
he has been practicing alone. One of the local newspapers has said of him: 
"Mr. Theophilus is by nature thoughtful, methodical, exact and technical, a con- 
struer of the law and a constructive attorney, loving rather the advisory and 
counseling work of the office, land title, estates and corporation law than tljp 
court procedure. He is the counselor of many prominent business men and cor- 
porations and has made for himself an enviable position at the Davenport bar." 

In 1888 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Theophilus and Miss Minnie 
Agnes Thompson, of Le Roy, Minnesota. Their social acquaintance is large and 
embraces many of the most prominent people of the state. Mr. Theophilus finds 
his chief recreation in the meetings of the Davenport Whist Club and also be- 
longs to the Outing and Commercial Clubs. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Masons, the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. His standing in the profes- 
sion is indicated by the fact that he has been honored with the presidency of the 
Scott County Bar Association, being its chief official at the present time. As a 
lawyer he perhaps possesses none of those dazzling meteoric qualities which have 
often riveted the attention of the public for a moment, but there is in his work 
a substantiality which produces continuity of success and awakens attention by 
its quiet forcefulness. 



M. F. ROHLFF. 



M. Frederick Rohlff, who has lived retired in Davenport since 1904, was for 
many years numbered among the active and successful agriculturists of Scott 
county and is still the owner of two hundred and ninety acres of valuable land 
in Sheridan township as well as a tract of three hundred and twenty acres in 
Lyon county, this state. He is one of the worthy pioneer settlers of this county, 
having continuously made his home here since 1855, and is now the president of 
the German Pioneers Society. His birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, on the 
1st of September, 1829, his parents being Asmus and Anna (Litchie) Rohlil, 
who spent their entire lives in the fatherland. Their children were six in num- 
ber, namely : Christ and Henry, both of whom passed away in Germany ; M. F., 
of this review ; John, whose demise also occurred in Germany ; Asmus, who died 



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HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 179 

in this country ; and James, who was called to his final rest while still a resident 
of the fatherland. 

M. F. Rohlff attended the schools of his native land in pursuit of an educa- 
tion. From 1848 until 1850 he participated in the Schleswig-Holstein wars, hold- 
ing the rank of sergeant. In 1855, when a young man of twenty-six years, he 
determined to establish his home in the United States and set sail for the new 
world, eventually landing at New York. Thence he made his way direct to 
Davenport, Iowa, and here secured employment as a farm laborer, being thus 
engaged for about a year. On the expiration of that period in 1857, he was 
married and began the operation of a rented tract of land, giving his attention to 
its cultivation for two years. At the end of that time he purchased eighty acres 
of partly improved land in Sheridan township and took up his abode in a small 
house which stood upon the place. As time passed by he brought the property 
under a high state of cultivation and improvement and also replaced the original 
dwelling by a commodious and substantial residence. He likewise added to his 
landed holdings as his financial resources increased and successfully carried 
on his agricultural interests until 1904, when he put aside the active work of the 
fields and bought property in Davenport, where he has since lived retired. He 
now leases his fine farm of two hundred and ninety acres in Sheridan township, 
and is also the owner of a half section of land in Lyon county. While living in 
Sheridan township he acted as agent for the German Fire Insurance Company 
for about twenty-five years. 

On the 1 2th of April, 1857, Mr. Rohlfif was united in marriage to Miss Ber- 
tha Schneckloth, who was about ten years old when she came from Germany 
to this country with her parents, Hans and Celia Schneckloth, who located upon 
the farm in Sheridan township which later became the homestead place of our 
subject. Hans Schneckloth lived thereon until called to his final rest at the 
age of ninety-three years, and his wife was eighty-two years old when she passed 
away. Mr. and Mrs. Rohlff have become the parents of eight children, the record 
of whom is as follows : Anna, the eldest, is now the wife of William Halle, of 
Davenport, and has four children: Julius, Ida, Hattie and Norma. Lena, the 
wife of Louis Harmon, of Lyon county, Iowa, is now the mother of four chil- 
dren : Clara, Grover, Ella and Harvey. John, who is a resident of Lyon county, 
wedded Miss Dora Heintz, by whom he has five children: Minnie, Richard, 
Edna, Dora and Alma. Clara Rohlff, the next in order of birth, is at home. Hu- 
ger married Miss Clara Palmer and has two children, Arnold and Linda. Richer 
lives in Lyon county. Alfred is still under the parental roof. Herman who is 
engaged in the hardware business with his brother Huger, wedded Miss 
Clara Willie and has two children, Wilbur and Bernice. In 1907, at the 
Turner Hall in Davenport, Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Rohlfif and Mr. and Mrs. Claus 
Schneckloth celebrated their golden wedding and on this happy occasion were 
gathered together all of their children and grandchildren as well as many promi- 
nent German-American residents of Scott county. After the supper had been 
served a dance was held and the occasion proved a very merry one. 

Mr. Rohlff exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the republican party and has ably served his fellow townsmen in the capacity 
of road supervisor. He is a member of the Schleswig-Holstein Society of Scott 



180 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

county. Except for the aid of his estimable wife, he owes his present splendid 
prosperity entirely to his untiring perseverance and excellent business manage- 
ment, for when he came to the United States he was empty-handed and has since 
achieved the success which entitles him to a prominent place in the history of the 
representative and enterprising residents of this county. 



MAJOR MORTON L. MARIAS. 

Major Morton L. Marks, whose title is indicative of faithful and long con- 
tinued service in the Union army during the Civil war, has for more than four 
decades been a representative of commercial life in Davenport. A progressive 
spirit has always been tempered by a safe conservatism, and evenly balanced 
judgment has constituted the forceful element in the success which has made 
him one of the leading wholesale merchants of the city. He was born on a farm 
in New York, his parents being Enoch and Margaret (Welton) Marks. His 
ancestral history is one of early connection with the settlement of Connec- 
ticut. It was in that state that his grandfather followed farming in the vicinity 
of Burlington. Enoch Marks was born in Connecticut in 1803, was reared to 
agricultural pursuits arid subsequently removed to New York, where he carried 
on farming, while later he engaged in the real-estate business in Chicago, making 
his home in the suburb of Oak Park. While there he made some very profitable 
investments in real estate. He afterward came to Davenport, where he lived 
retired, passing away in this city at the venerable age of eighty-three years. 

Major Marks was a Httle lad of four years when the family removed to Cam- 
illus. New York, and his early education, which was there acquired, was com- 
pleted in the high school at Syracuse, New York. He afterward came to the 
middle west and lived with a brother on a farm near La Salle, Illinois. He after- 
ward engaged in teaching school for about three years in Mount Carmel, after 
which he took up the study of law, devoting about a year to his reading. The 
outbreak of the Civil war however, caused him to put aside all business and 
personal interests that he might defend the Union cause and, enlisting in the 
One Hundred and Twenty-second New York Volunteer Infantry as a private, 
he went to the front. He was chosen by his company for the position of first 
lieutenant and was afterward promoted to the captaincy of Company B. Later 
he was transferred to Company H as its captain and he now has his three com- 
missions. At the close of the war he was brevetted major in honor of his gal- 
lant and meritorious service. During most of the time he was on active duty with 
the Army of the Potomac and served with distinction, participating in various 
important battles, including the engagements at Antietam, Fredericksburg and 
Gettysburg. In the winter of 1863-4 he was in Sandusky, Ohio, where his 
regiment guarded rebel prisoners. While there he became ill but as soon as 
possible again went south, rejoining his regiment just after the Battle of the 
Wilderness. He then participated in the engagements at Culpeper Court House, 
Cold Harbor and Petersburg. When General Early was making his dash through 
the Shenandoah valley. Major Marks' regiment was sent back and met the enemy 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 181 

at Fort Steven, repulsing the Confederate forces. They then proceeded south- 
ward as far as Harper's Ferry and took part in the battle of Winchester. Major 
Marks was in command of his company at that battle and during a charge was 
wounded and was in the hospital for about thirty days. On the expiration of 
that period he rejoined his regiment, which took part in the fight at Cedar Creek 
and later returned to Washington, where the winter was spent. Later Major 
Marks joined the Army of the Potomac, with which he remained until the close 
of the war. His regiment then went to Danville, Kentucky, where he served as 
provost marshal. Subsequently he returned to Washington, where he was hon- 
orably discharged. He has always maintained pleasant relations with his com- 
rades who wore the blue through his membership in the Grand Army of the 
Republic and in the Loyal Legion and he has served as quartermaster commander 
of the post in this city. 

Removing to Davenport, Major Marks bought out the senior partner in Al- 
bert & Van Patten's Grocery Company in the year 1867. He organized the pres- 
ent wholesale grocery company in 1903, became its president and in its manage- 
ment has met with excellent success, extending its trade interests to embrace a 
wide territory. Its sales annually reach a large figure and the policy of the 
house is such as to commend it to the confidence and support of all. 

On the 20th of January, 1869, Major Marks was united in marriage to Miss 
Helen Sanders, of Yonkers, New York, a daughter of Joseph P. Sanders, who 
was one of the distinguished members of the Odd Fellows society in the east, 
attending all the annual meetings for fifty consecutive years. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Elvira Ferguson, is still Hving in New York, at the 
age of eighty-eight years. Unto Major and Mrs. Marks were born four children: 
Margaret and James, now deceased; Lewis M., who married Georgia White and 
has three children, Margaret, Morton and George; and Charles R., of the Se- 
curity Fire Insurance Company of Davenport, who married Lola Fisher. 

Since coming to Davenport in 1867, Mr. Marks has been closely identified 
with the business interests of the city and in public affairs has wielded a wide 
influence, his support always being cast on the side of progress, reform and 
improvement. He is not only most practical in private business interests 'but in 
all of his relations to the public and has therefore done good service for the 
upbuilding and progress of the city. Honored and respected by all, there is no 
man who occupies a more enviable position in commercial and financial circles 
in Davenport than Major Morton L. Marks. 



ADOLPH W. HOLLAND. 

Adolph W. Holland, a retired agriculturist of Davenport, where he has made 
his home for the past seven years, is still the owner of a well-improved and valuable 
farm of one hundred and fifty-five acres in Winfield township and also has ten 
acres of land in Aliens Grove township, as well as some town property. His birth 
occurred in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, on the 28th of August, 1842, his 
parents being Adolph and Carolina Holland. The father was a furniture maker 



182 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

in that country . Having determined to bring his family to the new world, he took 
passage on a vessel at Hamburg, which reached New York on the 3d of August, 
1 85 1, after an ocean voyage of seven weeks. It was on the 20th of that month 
that he arrived in Scott county, Iowa, and here he purchased and located upon 
a partly improved farm of one hundred and fifty-five acres in Winfield town- 
ship, being actively engaged in its further cultivation and development until the 
time of his retirement in 1882. His remaining days were spent in Davenport, 
where he passed away on the 29th of October, 1888, when seventy-eight years 
of age. His wife, whose birth occurred in 1818, was called to her final rest in 
1874. Unto this worthy couple were born two children, namely: Henry, who 
passed away in 1903 ; and Adolph W., of this review. 

The last named attended the schools of his native land until nine years of age 
and after coming to this country continued his studies in Scott county for a year 
and a half. After putting aside his text-books he turned his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits and the work of the fields claimed his attention throughout, 
his entire business career. Subsequent to his marriage he rented his father's place 
in Winfield township, and, inheriting the property at the time of his father's death, 
there carried on his farming interests continuously and successfully until 1903, 
when he retired and took up his abode in Davenport. As the years passed he placed 
many substantial improvements on the farm and it is now a highly developed and 
valuable property, comprising one hundred and fifty-five acres of land in Winfield 
township. His is likewise the owner of a tract of ten acres in Aliens Grove 
township and also has some town property. Through the careful conduct of his 
agricultural interests he won the competence that now enables him to live retired 
and he has long been numbered among the substantial, respected and representa- 
tive citizens of this county. 

On the 25th of February, 1868, Mr. Holland was imited in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Helkenn, who was born in Holstein, Germany, on the 6th of September, 
1849, her parents being Henry and Magdalene (Rush) Helkenn. The father, who 
served in the Schleswig-Holstein wars from 1848 until 1850, brought his family to 
the United States in 1858 and at once came to Scott county, Iowa. Two years later 
he purchased a farm of two hundred acres in Sheridan township and forty acres 
of timber land in Winfield township and throughout the remainder of his life de- 
voted his energies to agricultural pursuits. His demise occurred on the 9th of 
September, 1909, when he had attained the venerable age of eighty-eight, years 
and ten days. His wife, who was a sister of Lieutenant Governor Rush of Iowa, 
passed away in 1892 when sixty-eight years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Holland are 
the parents of twelve children. 

Carolina, who gave her hand in marriage to Henry Rheimers, of Long Grove, 
is/now the mother of eight children, namely: Effie, Louisa, Rudolph, Rosie, Henry, 
Laura, Adolph and Harry. Ella, residing in Davenport, is the wife of Henry 
Reichter, by whom she has four children, as follows : Rosie, .who is the wife of 
Oliver Sampson and has one child, William; Margaret; Henry; and Adolph. 
Adolph, who wedded Miss Clara Nutting, makes his home in Davenport, Iowa. 
Amelia is the wife of Claus Hanson, of Long Grove, and has four chil- 
dren : Adolph, Edna, Nonie and Lester. Laura, who is the wife of Henry 
F. Dorman, of Big Rock, Scott county, likewise has four children, as follows: 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 183 

Emma, Martha, Albert and Charley. Augusta, the wife of Fritz Hanson, re- 
sides in Winfield township. Emma is the wife of John Erps, with whom she lives 
on her father's farm in Winfield township. Frank W., Louis F., Nettie M., 
LiUie J. and Martha M. Holland are all still under the parental roof. All of 
these children have been provided with good educational advantages. Mrs. 
Holland has an interesting photograph showing five generations of her father's 
family. 

Mr. Holland is independent in his political views and has served as the effi- 
cient incumbent in various positions of public trust and responsibility. He held 
most of the township offices and did much to advance the cause of education 
during his thirty-three years' service as a school director. He hkewise acted as 
treasurer of the school board and also capably discharged the duties devolving 
upon him as justice of the peace and township clerk. His religious faith is indi- 
cated by his membership in the Lutheran church, with which his wife is also 
affiliated. Fraternally he is identified with the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men, being receiver of the local lodge. He is likewise a prominent member of 
the German Pioneers association. He has now made his home in Scott county 
for more than fifty-eight years and has gained an extensive circle of friends 
within its borders, his genuine personal worth commending him to the confi- 
dence and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. 



ISAAC PETERSBERGER. 

Isaac Petersberger, forceful and resourceful, his broad general education as 
well as his comprehensive knowledge of the law enabling him to stand in the fore- 
most ranks of the legal profession in Davenport, was born in Dixon, Illinois, 
June 28, 1874. His father, Emanuel Petersberger, was a native of Germany 
and on coming to the United States in 1852 took up his abode in Dixon, where he 
continued his residence to the time of his death in 1890. He there engaged in 
merchandising and was recognized as one of the leading representatives of com- 
mercial interests in that city, winning substantial success in his undertaking. He 
married Bertha Ochs, a native of Germany, who came to Davenport in her girl- 
hood days with her father, John Ochs, who was one of this city's oldest and most 
respected citizens. 

Isaac Petersberger attended the public schools of Dixon until fifteen years of 
age, when he came tO' Davenport with his widowed mother, continuing his studies 
in this city. Later he entered the University of Iowa, from which institution 
he was graduated with the class of 1897, completing both the collegiate and law 
courses in four years. 

Having determined upon the practice of law as his life work, in 1897 he 
opened an office in Davenport, where he has since remained, achieving an en- 
viable success as a representative of the bar. His practice is of an extensive 
and important character. He is notable among lawyers for the wide research 
and provident care with which he prepares his cases. At no time has his reading 
ever been confined to the limitation of the questions at issue. It has gone beyond 



184 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

and compassed every contingency and provided not alone for the expected but 
for the unexpected, which happens in the courts quite as frequently as out of 
them. His legal learning, his analytical mind and the readiness with which he 
grasps the points in an argument all combine to make him one of the strong ad- 
vocates before the bar and he is also regarded as a most safe counselor. 

In 1899 Mr. Petersberger was married to Miss Hattie Goldstein, of Milford, 
Illinois, and they have two children, Richard and Louise. Mr. Petersberger be- 
longs to the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and to other fraternal and social organizations. He has the warm regard of fel- 
low practitioners and the friendship of many whom he meets in social relations, 
for his salient qualities as a man and citizen are those which in every land and 
clime win respect and honor. 



SEVERIN MILLER. 



The life record of Severin Miller seems in harmony with nature's laws, for 
nature evidently intended that the evening of life should be quietly and restfuUy 
spent following years of well directed activity. Earnest, indefatigable labor, intel- 
ligently directed through many years, will always in the end win success and it has 
been by this means that Severin Miller acquired the competence that now enables 
him at the age of eighty-six years to live retired. He was born in Prussia, Ger- 
many, October 17, 1824, and is a son of Bartholomew and Anna Marie Miller, both 
of whom died in that country. Severin Miller attended school there and learned 
the machinist's trade under the direction of his father. He was a young man of 
twenty-two years when in 1846 he came to the United States, landing at New York 
after a long and tedious voyage of three months on a sailing vessel. He went to 
Philadelphia, where he secured employment at his trade and subsequently removed 
westward to St. Louis, where he entered the service of Beard & Brother, safe man- 
ufacturers, as a machinist. He was thus employed until about 1850, when he 
came to Davenport but after a brief period he returned to St. Louis, where he 
resided until 1857. In that year he again came to Davenport and built a shop and 
dwelling house on a lot at the corner of Gaines and Second streets, which he had 
purchased in 1852. There he started in business for himself, giving his attention 
mostly to repair work, doing much work on threshing machines and other farm 
machinery. He afterward admitted Charles Schaeffer to a partnership but after 
a short time they dissolved partnership and Mr. Miller continued the business alone 
until 1875, when he sold out and retired. In the meantime, however, he had ex- 
tended the scope of his activities to include the manufacture of pumps and had also 
carried on a foundry business. He wisely used the opportunities that were pre- 
sented and by his close attention to his business and his honorable methods secured 
a large trade. 

On the 24th of June, 1862, Mr. Miller was married in Davenport to Miss Chris- 
tina Baussmann, who was born in Hessen, Germany, in 1835, and died in 1872, leav- 
ing four children : Cornelia, now the wife of Dr. E. M. Singleton, of Marshalltown, 
Iowa, by whom she has one daughter, Miriam ; Severin, a resident of San Frafl- 




r/'ryv ;/ 



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HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 187 

Cisco; and Julia and Helen, at home. Mr. Miller erected his present residence 
during war times and has occupied it for more than forty years. It is one of the 
old landmarks of his section of the city and has ever been a hospitable home, open 
for the reception of the many friends of the family. 



ARTHUR GLADSTONE BUSH. 

Arthur Gladstone Bush, a member of the law firm of Ely & Bush, has through 
his varied activities become recognized as one of the leading and influential citi- 
zens of Davenport. He was born in Concord, now Garner, Hancock county, 
Iowa, December 21, 1870. His father, Henry H. Bush, was a native of Randolph, 
Cattaraugus county. New York, born July 2, 1837. He removed to Galva, Illi- 
nois, just prior to the Civil war and after the outbreak of hostilities was mustered 
in as captain of Company D of the Seventeenth Illinois Infantry, with which 
he served for three years, taking an active part in the conflict. At the siege of 
Vicksburg he was detailed in charge of the Pioneer Corps and at Fort Donelson, 
in the absence of the colonel, he commanded the regiment with credit and ability. 
He participated in a number of the hotly contested engagements and never fal- 
tered in the performance of any duty, his own valor and loyalty inspiring those 
who served under him. He was mustered out with the rank of captain and with 
a most creditable military record returned home. Later he studied law in Galva 
under the direction of A. H. Veeder, an attorney of that city, after which he 
removed to Concord, Iowa, where he commenced practice in 1869. Until a short 
time prior to his death he followed his profession and his knowledge of the law 
and careful preparation of his cases gained him a skill that led to his connection 
with much of the important litigation tried in the district. During his later years 
he owned and published the Hancock Signal, which paper he purchased from 
Senator Hayward. Prominent in the political circles of the state, he represented 
Hancock county in the general assembly, also filled the offices of referee , in 
bankruptcy, postmaster and mayor of Concord. He was likewise a member of 
the county board of supervisors and his efforts did much to hold the county seat 
at Concord, now Garner. Over the record of his official career there fell no 
shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil, for in all of his public service he was 
actuated by a spirit of devotion to the general good that was manifest in many 
tangible ways. Preeminently a man of affairs, he wielded a wide influence in 
thought and action. He was a man of strong character and ability and a natural 
leader, and he devoted his efforts untiringly for the benefit of his town and com- 
munity. He died September 15, 1895, respected and honored by all who knew 
him. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Minerva Wright, was a native of 
Illinois. 

Arthur Gladstone Bush pursued his education in the public schools of Garner 
until he completed the high-school course. He then engaged in teaching for a 
year in Hancock county and at the same time studied shorthand and qualified 
for the position of a court reporter. For five years he acted as district court 
reporter and during that time became interested in and took up the study of law. 



188 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

He afterward attended the State University of Iowa and pursued special work 
in the Garner Academy. He was graduated from the law department of the 
former institution in 1895 and, coming to Davenport, formed a partnership with 
N. D. Ely, who had been his classmate in the university. The court records show 
that he has had a liberal share of the legal business of the city and that he has 
been successful in its conduct, winning many verdicts favorable to his clients, to 
whom his devotion is proverbial. He is a loyal republican but no office seeker, 
preferring to give his time and energies to his law practice and as a consequence 
the firm of Ely & Bush is prosperous, with a business that is extensive and of a 
distinctively representative character. In addition he is a director and secre- 
tary of the Iowa & Eastern Colorado Land Company and is likewise interested 
in a number of financial enterprises. 

In August, 1894, Mr. Bush was united in marriage to Miss Eunice Curtis, 
a native of Clayton county. Her grandfather, T. P. Olmstead, was one of the 
oldest settlers of the county, arriving there in the early '30s. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Bush have been born two sons, Arthur Curtis and HoUis H. Mr. Bush is a 
Mason, holding membership in the lodge, chapter and commandery and the Shrine, 
and in the commandery he is filling the office of generalissimo. He likewise be- 
longs to Prosperity Lodge, No. 704, I. O. O. F., and is a United States commis- 
sioner. He is a director of the Young Men's Christian Association of the Ed- 
wards Congregational church and a teacher of the Bible class. His interests, 
therefore, are not confined to the material things but have to do with the moral 
progress of the community, and his own life is an exemplification of his belief 
that the thing most worth while is character development. Although compara- 
tively young, he is recognized as a man of mark in Davenport, his ability and 
well developed powers carrying him into important relations. 



JOHN DANIELS. 



John Daniels was for many years identified with the agricultural interests of 
Scott county but for the past year he has lived retired in a beautiful home in 
Davenport. Throughout his career of continued and far-reaching usefulness 
his duties have been performed with the greatest care, and business interests have 
been so managed as to win him the confidence of the public and the prosperity 
which should always attend honorable effort. Mr. Daniels is a native of Eng- 
land, his birth having occurred in Gloucestershire, on the 18th of April, 1845. 
His parents, Walter and Elizabeth (Baker) Daniels, were farming people of 
that country and lived and died there, the father passing away in 1891, when 
seventy-five years of age, and the mother in 1895, at the same age. 

John Daniels remained in his native country during the period of his boy- 
hood and youth, assisting his father in the operation of the home farm and in 
carrying on a butcher shop, which the latter conducted. When twenty-one years 
old, foreseeing no future in the land of his nativity and having heard and read 
a great deal about the freedom and the opportunity for advancement in this 
country, he decided to leave home. Setting sail for the United States, it was in 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 189 

March, 1866, that he landed in New York city, whence he made his way to Dav- 
enport, where Hved an uncle, James Baker, who was one of the early settlers of 
this section of the state. Mr. Daniels worked for him during the succeeding sum- 
mer and later was employed by others at truck gardening until 1870, when he 
was married and he then rented a tract of land which he cultivated for six years. 
He was largely engaged in raising sugar cane and also engaged in the dairy 
business.. In the fall of 1875, having saved a sum of money that justified the 
purchase of land, he became owner of twenty acres, which at that time was in 
Davenport township but is now included in the city limits and is known as the 
West Home addition to the city. This tract was only slightly improved, but Mr. 
Daniels built a small house containing two rooms, and in this little dwelling he 
and his family took up their abode. After four years he added to the house and 
in later years replaced his first dwelling with a more pretentious and modern 
structure. He was engaged in farming that land until 1883, when he purchased 
the place known as the Hunter farm, located a mile and a half from the city 
limits, in Davenport township, this tract comprising eighty acres. Mr. Daniels 
then took up his abode on that farm but after two years returned to his first 
tract. In August, 1909, he put aside all business cares and removed to the city, 
where he occupies a nice home. In former years he led a busy, active and use- 
ful life and his labors, carefully managed, have brought to him a gratifying 
reward. 

It was in 1870 that Mr. Daniels was married to Miss Elizabeth Baker, who 
was likewise born in Gloucestershire, England, a daughter of Thomas and Anna 
(Fawkes) Baker. The Baker family came to Davenport about 1856 and it was 
here that the marriage of the daughter occurred. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Daniels 
have been born two sons and one daughter, namely : Walter, who resides in Dav- 
enport and wedded Miss Anna Kelling, by whom he has a son and daughter, 
Robert and Alice; John, who wedded Miss Sarah Kober and who lives on his 
father's farm on Harrison street, just outside of the city; and Elizabeth, at 
home. The parents are communicants of the Episcopal church, in which Mr. 
Daniels has long served as a vestrjrman. Coming to America in early manhood, 
Mr. Daniels made good use of every opportunity that presented for advancement 
and today he is surrounded by all the comforts that go to make life worth living. 
The family home at No. 1415 Farnam street is one of hospitality and good cheer 
and all who enter its doors are given a cordial welcome. 



IRA R. TABOR. 



Ira R. Tabor, who for eighteen years has been a representative of the Dav- 
enport bar and now with a large practice is giving proof of his ability in handling 
the intricate problems of the law, was born* in Jones county, Iowa, September 4, 
1864. His father, James Tabor, a native of Indiana, came to Davenport in 1849, 
arriving in this state only a few years after its admission to the Union. He 
crossed the river on the ice in company with two brothers and went to Jones 
county, where he took up government land and' there engaged in farming until 



190 HISTORY OF. SCOTT COUNTY 

his death on the 7th of April, 1887. In his farming operations he met with suc- 
cess and became a large landowner, having a section and a half of land. He 
wisely placed his surplus earnings in the safest of all investments — real estate — 
and his business enterprise and diligence brought him to a prominent position 
among the men of affluence of the county. A leading and influential citizen in 
his community, he held a number of township offices and at all times was loyal 
to the public trust. He married Miss Margaret Keller, a native of Indiana, in 
which state the wedding was celebrated. Her birth occurred October 11, 1828, 
and on the 17th of April, 1899,^ she passed away. 

Ira R. Tabor was the fifth in order of birth in a family of six children. He 
attended the country schools while spending his youthful days upon the home 
farm and afterward had the opportunity of continuing his education in the schools 
of Monmouth, Illinois, and Maquoketa, Iowa. Later he pursued a classical 
course in the University of Indiana and prepared for a professional career as a 
law student in the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which in- 
stitution he was graduated on the 26th of June, 1891. He then came to Daven- 
port and entered the law office of J. W. Stewart, to whose practice he succeeded 
upon the death of Mr. Stewart in 1894. He is well versed in the principles of 
jurisprudence and is always accurate in their application to the points in litiga- 
tion. The zeal and earnestness with which he controls his law business, the care- 
ful regard evinced for his clients' interests and his close and discriminating logic 
in the discussion of a case before court or jury are elements in the success which 
has attended him from the beginning. 

Mr. Tabor is active in public affairs but is not an office seeker, preferring to 
give his attention to the law and to investments. He is, however, well known in 
the Masonic fraternity, beloning to Trinity Lodge, No. 208, A. F. & A. M. ; Dav- 
enport Chapter, No. 17, R. A. M. ; St. Simon of Cyrene Commandery, No. 9, 
K. T. ; Davenport Consistory, No. 4, S. P. R. S. ; and Kaaba Temple, A. A. O. N. 
M. S. He is likewise affiliated with other societies, whose basic principles are 
such as win the respect and approval of all who have regard for honorable, up- 
right manhood. 



BENONI S. BALDWIN. 

Benoni S. Baldwin, a retired contractor and manufacturer of Davenport, 
whose persistent labor has constituted for him the key that has unlocked the por- 
tals of success, was born in Harrison county, Ohio, November 8, 1834, and is a 
son of Joseph D. and Sarah S. (Shields) Baldwin. The father was born in Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1801 and removed westward to Ohio about 1828, accom- 
panied by his wife. He settled in Harrison county and there followed the stone- 
mason's trade, which he had previously learned in the Keystone state. He died 
in 1876 and his wife, who was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1808, 
passed away in 1844. She was the mother of four children: Thomas H., now 
deceased ; Benoni S. ; George W., who is living in Hopedale, Harrison county, 
Ohio; and William, a resident of Sheridan, Iowa. 



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HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 193 

Benoni S. Baldwin was a pupil in the district schools of his native county and 
therein became familiar with those branches of learning which are necessary to 
advancement in any line of life as well as to business success. He left school 
early, however, and in 1851, when a youth of sixteen years, left home in order to 
learn the carpenter's trade.' He applied himself diligently to the tasks assigned 
him and became an expert workman. Thinking to find better business opportuni- 
ties in the new but rapidly growing and developing west, he came to Iowa in 
1856, arriving at Davenport on the 24th of April of that year. He first began 
to work at his trade in the employ of others but later felt that his experience and 
skill justified him in engaging in business on his own account and turned his 
attention to contracting, in which connection he has erected a large number of 
buildings. He also assisted in building the old Christian chapel in 1889. Further 
extending the field of his activities, he bought a half interest in the Davenport 
Ladder Company and acted as superintendent of the plant for about fourteen 
years, at the end of which time he sold out to W. C. Hayward and since that time 
has lived retired. The years brought him substantial success as the reward of per- 
sistent and indefatigable labor and he is now in possession of a comfortable 
competence. 

^t the time of the Civil war Mr. Baldwin put aside business and personal 
considerations in 1864 and enlisted as a member of Company C, Fourteenth Iowa 
Infantry. His company was detailed for service at Camp McClellan on guard 
duty and there Mr. Baldwin remained until mustered out in 1865. He maintains 
pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership in the 
Grand Army of the Republic- 

On the 6th of December, 1866, Mr. Baldwin was married to Miss Mary A. 
Jenkins, who was born in Rockingham township, this county, a daughter of Rich- 
ard R. and Mary (Blackman) Jenkins. Her parents were early settlers here, 
coming to this county from Canada in 1842. They were farming people and the 
father took up raw land which he converted into rich and productive fields. 
Both he and his wife died in Davenport. In their family were eight children: 
Hiram H., now living in Nebraska ; Mrs. Maria J. Carpenter, who is a widow 
and lives in South Omaha; Mary A., now Mrs. Baldwin; James, whose home 
is in South Dakota ; George W., of Minneapolis ; Frank, who is living in Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin; Etta, who is the wife of John A. Wheeler and resides in 
Davenport; and Annie L., deceased. Sarah Eleanor, the only child of Mr. and 
Mrs. Baldwin, died when but seven months old. They are members of the Old 
Settlers Society of Scott county, composed of people who came here in 1846 
or before and have lived here since the admission of the state into the Union. 
Mr. Baldwin also belongs to the Fremont Club, composed of those who voted 
for John C. Fremont in 1856. He is now treasurer of that society. He built his 
present residence about thirty years ago, set out trees and has in other ways 
adorned the place. He has also built a number of other houses for himself and 
from his property interests has derived a good income. His has been an active 
and useful life and his fellow townsmen have naught to say of him except in 
terms of good will and high regard. Great have been the changes which have 
occurred during the period of his residence in Iowa. In the decades which have 
since been added to the centuries he has seen Iowa transformed from a frontier 



194 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

state into one of the thickly populated regions of the middle west, leading the 
entire country in the matter of corn production, in the number and efficiency of 
its public schools and in other fields of activity of a most creditable nature. Mr. 
Baldwin has always done his full share of public work as a citizen, giving loyal 
support to every movement calculated to benefit and upbuild the city and county. 



REV. FRANCIS I. MOFFATT. 

Rev. Francis I. Moffatt is now living retired in Davenport, but for many, 
years gave his time to the work of the Presbyterian ministry. He now derives 
his income from a good farm which he owns in Cedar county. He was born 
in New Castle, Pennsylvania, September 8, 1835, his parents being James and 
Hannah (Mofifat) Moffatt. So far as the ancestry records show, the family 
originated in Scotland. Both parents died at New Castle, where the father fol- 
lowed farming as a life work. They were the parents of seven children, but the 
only one still living is Francis I., of this review. W. J., a twin brother of our 
subject, was a minister of the gospel and passed away on the 25th of January, 
1910. His health became impaired while he was a missionary in Indian Terri- 
tory and prior to his demise he lived retired at New Castle, Pennsylvania. Hannah 
K., Sarah J., Mary and Eliza J. are all deceased. Robert T., the youngest, died 
from the effects of military experience. He was a prisoner at Libby and Ander- 
sonville for a considerable time during the Civil war and when paroled returned 
home and died soon afterward. 

Rev. Francis I. Moffatt remained a resident of his native town until about 
eighteen years of age and then entered the Westminster Collegiate Institute at 
New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, to supplement the education which he had 
already acquired in the public schools. The year of his matriculation was 1854 
and of his graduation, 1857. He there pursued a general course and afterward 
entered the Western Theological Seminary at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where 
he studied for the ministry, completing a three years' course by graduation in 
i860. He was licensed to preach on the 20th of June of that year as a minister 
of what was then known as the Free Presbyterian church. His first charge was 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia, where he remained for 
about two years. He afterward had charge of different churches in Pennsyl- 
vania and in 1866 made his way westward to Illinois, where he took charge of 
the Irish Grove church in Sangamon county near Springfield. In the meantime 
he had withdrawn from the Free Presbyterian church and entered the regular 
Presbyterian church on account of its attitude concerning the question of 
slavery. He remained as pastor of the Irish Grove church for six years, 
after which he took up his abode at Cornwall, Henry county, Illinois, 
where he continued in pastoral labors for eleven years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he became minister of the Red Oak church in Cedar 
county, Iowa, where he continued, for five years, after which he came to 
Scott county and took charge of the Summit church in Lincoln township. He 
lived in the parsonage there for five years, during which time he earnestly and 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 195 

zealously pursued his ministerial labors, after which he retired and removed to 
the town. He continued to supply the church, however, for about a year, or 
until they could obtain a regular minister. He also acted as supply in the church 
at Eldridge. Conscientious, earnest and consecrated in all of his labors, his 
work in behalf of the church was of a beneficial character with far-reaching 
effects. Logical and entertaining in address, strong and imfaltering in purpose 
and actuated at all times by a deep love of humanity, he put forth his efforts in 
pastorate work and as a preacher labored for the benefit of all mankind, nor was 
he denied the rich harvest nor the aftermath. 

Rev. Moffatt was married October 12, 1878, to Miss Elizabeth Orr, a daughter 
of Mathew and Susanna Orr, of Henry county, Illinois. They have become 
parents of seven children. William, noW living in Oklahoma, married Julia 
Brown Shillito, and they have one son, Philip J. Florence M. is the wife of 
William B. Bennett, of Madison, Wisconsin, and they have one child, Florence 
Louise. John J., now living in Muskogee, Oklahoma, married Hazel Woods and 
is engaged with his brother William in the real-estate business. Robert T., who 
married Delia Booth, is living on his father'^ farm. Mary E. and Edwin are 
at home, and Foster O. died July 31, 1897, at the age of four years. Four. chil- 
dren of the family were graduated from the Wisconsin University, where they 
pursued literary and scientific courses. All have been liberally educated and the 
Moffatt home has ever been one of advanced, intelligent culture, emanating an 
influence for good that is felt throughout the community. Actuated by the higher 
purposes of life. Rev. Moffatt has given his attention to a work that has made 
him a man of far-reaching influence and his precept and example have been 
factors in promoting righteousness, justice, truth and rnorality among his fel- 
lowmen. 



WILLIAM G. CABEL. 



William G. Cabel, a retired farmer of German birth, now living in Daven- 
port, still derives a substantial income from valuable farming property com- 
prising one hundred acres of rich land in Hickory Grove township. The years were 
fraught with earnest, persistent labor until a recent date, when he put aside the 
more active duties of the farm and has since given his time to those pursuits and 
interests which afford him rest, recreation and entertainment. He was born in 
Holstein, Germany, June 7, 1838, and is, therefore, in the seventy-second year 
of his age. His parents were Lewis and Lottie Cabel. The former, a farmer of 
Germany, came to the United States with his family in 1856, landing, however, 
at -Quebec, Canada, whence he made his way to Davenport. In the vicinity of 
the city he rented land and continued farming until his death, both he and his 
wife passing away in 1863. They were the parents of eight children : Henry and 
Dora, both deceased ; William G. ; Lottie, who has also passed away ; Lewis, of 
Chicago; August, deceased; Emma, the widow of Fred Sharlow; and Herman, 

of Davenport. 

William G. Cabel attended school in Germany through the period of his 
boyhood and youth and when eighteen years of age accompanied his parents on 



196 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

their emigration to the new world. He has made farming his life work, his 
time being devoted to the improvement and development of farming land in 
Scott county until his enlistment for service in the Civil war on the 13th o£, 
September, 1861. He became a member of Company I, Twelfth Missouri Infan- 
try, at Davenport. He enlisted for three years, joining the regiment at St. Louis, 
where the troops were encamped for two weeks. They then went to Evansville 
and later to Sedalia, Missouri, after which they proceeded to Springfield, where 
two weeks were passed. They next spent two months at Raleigh, Missouri, and 
in January, 1862, started from Raleigh to Springfield, whence they went to 
Arkansas, soon afterward participating in the. battle of Pea Ridge. Later Mr. 
Cabel took part in the engagements at Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post and Vicks- 
burg. At the last named place he was taken ill, was sent home on a furlough 
and honorably discharged in January, 1864. Subsequently he engaged in team- 
ing in Davenport for a short time, after which he began farming on his own 
account. For about twenty years he cultivated rented land and then purchased 
a farm of one hundred acres in Hickory Grove township, but never made his home 
thereon. He has been practical, energetic and determined in all that he has 
undertaken and his success has resulted from capable and careful management. 

On the 2d of December, 1868, William G. Cabel was married to Miss Dorothy 
Bergerdt, a daughter of Jacob and Christina Bergerdt. Unto them have been 
born seven children. Augusta is the wife of Charles Detrich, of Liberty town- 
ship, by whom she has four children ; Hugo, John, Raymond and William. Meta 
is the wife of Theodore Schroder, of Hickory Grove township, and they have 
five children : Armil, Minnie, Clarence, Adelia and Helmerdt. Laura and Emma 
are at home. Henry, living in Hickory Grove township, married Freda Whit- 
mer and they have two children, Elsie and Robert. William resides in Hickory 
Grove township. Herman is at home. 

Mr. Cabel is a member of the Old German Settlers Society and is well known 
among people of his own nationality. His friends, however, are not limited 
to those of his own race, but include the majority of those with whom business 
or social relations have brought him in contact. His life has been a busy and 
useful one and his success is well merited. 



REV. ROBERT NIXON EARHART. 

Rev. Robert Nixon Earhart, a Methodist Episcopal minister of the upper 
Iowa conference, whose life in its noble purposes and influences was of far- 
reaching effect for good, was born in Indiana, Pennsylvania, a son of David and 
Catharine (Altman) Earhart. The father was a merchant who continued a 
resident of Pennsylvania, his native state, until he had reached middle age, when 
he came to Iowa and settled in Pleasant Valley, where he reared the younger 
members of his family. 

Robert N. Earhart after pursuing his early education prepared for college 
in Dubuque, Iowa, and then returned east for further instruction, entering Dick- 
inson College, of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in the 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 197 

class of 1859. His classical course there gave him broad knowledge that served 
him well in his life work in later years, enabling him to draw from a rich foun- 
tain of information to illustrate or explain or elucidate the points which he was 
attempting to make in his sermons. He pursued his theological course in the 
Garrett Biblical Institute at Evanston, Illinois, and when he had qualified for 
holy orders was ordained to the Methodist ministry and joined the upper Iowa 
conference. Forty-one years were devoted to the work of proclaiming the gospel 
and in various pastorates he labored earnestly and effectually, speaking with 
clearness and force to his congregations upon the vital questions of life and its 
problems in the relations of man to his fellowman and his Maker. Earnest and 
zealous, his work was of marked influence in the Christian progress of northern 
Iowa. Becorning ill in his last year, he took up his abode in Davenport, where 
he spent his remaining days with his family and passed away on the 29th of July, 
1907, his remains being interred in Oakdale cemetery. 

It was on the 20th of October, 1868, that the Rev. R. N. Earhart was married 
to Miss Frances Fidlar, who was born in Columbus, Ohio, but has spent the 
greater part of her life in Davenport. Their only child, Robert F., after at- 
taining manhood married Darline Scofield and unto them have been born two 
children, Daniel and Robert Nixon. The father is a graduate of the Northwest- 
ern University of Evanston, Illinois, and also spent a year in Johns Hopkins 
University. At the age of thirty-six years he is a professor in the Ohio State 
University and is a young man of marked intellectual force and high ideals. 

In the passing of Robert Nixon Earhart, Iowa lost one of her most honored 
citizens and one of the leading representatives of the Methodist ministry. Thor- 
oughly versed in the history, discipline and doctrine of the church, he took of 
religion that wider view which places the fundamental truths of Christianity 
above all else and in his ministry taught Christian charity, patience, kindliness 
and love — qualities which are the living influences in the world, counteracting 
the effect of sin, degradation and all wrongdoing. The words of wisdom which 
he spoke sank deep into many hearts and his memory remains as a blessed bene- 
diction to all who knew him. 



HERMAN HENRY MEYER. 

Death often removes from our midst those whom we can ill afford to lose, 
and the sudden demise of Herman Henry Meyer removed from Davenport one 
who occupied a prominent place in the business circles of the city, sharing in the 
honor and respect of his associates and colleagues. He was the secretary and 
treasurer of the Davenport Foundry & Machine Company and instituted this 
enterprise, which takes rank with the leading productive industries of the city. 
He was one of those men of substantial character and sterling worth that Ger- 
many has furnished to Iowa and in his boyhood days he accompanied his parents 
on their emigration from the fatherland to the new world, arriving in this coun- 
try in the '50s. For a brief period they made their home in a Wisconsin town 
and afterward removed to St. Louis, but Herman H. Meyer soon came from that 



198 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

city to Davenport. Here he was united in marriage to Miss Lida Lerchen in 
1865, and they established a home in which domestic fehcity and happiness ever 
reigned. During eight or ten years Mr. Meyer acted as bookkeeper at the Klam- 
bach grain depot and on removing from Davenport in 1867 he became a resident 
of Denver, Colorado, where he secured a position as bookkeeper in the German 
Savings bank. Subsequently he was a partner in the Handy & Meyer machinery 
building concern, but eventually returned to this city to organize the Davenport 
Foundry & Machine Company. From its inception he managed its growing 
business and its development was attributable in large measure to his enterprise 
and powers of organization. He continued in business until the time of his 
death, which occurred when he was fifty-three years of age. He was thus cut 
off in the prime of his usefulness and his loss was deeply felt in business circles 
as well as by friends and relatives. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Meyer were born two children : Harry H., who was edu- 
cated in the State University at Champaign, Illinois ; and a daughter. In Octo- 
ber, 1892, Mr. Meyer went to Quincy, Illinois, to visit a brother and while there 
became ill and passed away on the 22d of the month — a life of usefulness and 
honorable activity being thus ended. 

Mrs. Meyer is a daughter of Charles Lerchen, who came to this city from 
Wheeling, West Virginia, August 29, 1850, and was engaged in the saddlery 
business here for many years. He afterward went to Colorado, where he spent 
his remaining days. Since her husband's death Mrs. Meyer has made her home 
in Davenport, where she has a wide acquaintance including many warm friends. 



DANIEL GOULD. 



In a review of Davenport's history it becomes evident that Daniel Gould de- 
serves prominent mention among its builders and promoters. Coming to this 
city at an early period in its development, he took an active part not only in its 
material but also in its intellectual and moral progress, and the influence of his 
character and work is yet felt in the lives of those with whom he was associated, 
and in the business and intellectual activities which were stimulated through bis 
labors. He was born at Middletown, near Newport, Rhode Island, in the year 
1814. His father, George Gould, and his mother, Lydia Shove Gould, were both 
of English ancestry. The Goulds of Rhode Island came from Dorchester, Eng- 
land, in 1637, A. D. The old manor house, called "Upway Manor," has been re- 
placed by a much more modern edifice. The coat of arms of the Gould family is 
a lion rampant with the insignia "Probitate et Lahore," honesty and labor. Jere- 
miah Gould and Priscilla Gould were the first ancestors to settle in this country. 
Daniel, their eldest son, settled at Middletown, Rhode Island, on a farm a portion 
of which has until recently remained in the possession of the Gould family. He 
married Wate, daughter of John Coggeshall (first president of the colony), on 
the i8th of Jvme, 1651. Daniel Gould was a sturdy adherent of the principles of 
the Friends Society. He had great strength of character, as evidenced by having 
been one of a company of Quakers (as they were then called in derision) to be 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 201 

scoffed and mocked by a rude mob at Charlestown Ferry. He, with others, re- 
ceived thirty stripes upon the naked back, was cast into prison and made to He with 
his bleeding back upon the bare boards. The only crimes of the sufferers were 
that they "were Friends in their religious belief." This ancestor was gifted in 
writing both prose and poetry. He traveled as a preacher on "truth's account" in 
Maryland and Virginia. The extracts from his memoirs are very interesting. 

There were seven generations between this first Daniel Gould and the one of 
the present sketch, the name being handed down direct except in one generation. 
The Goulds and their descendants were always landowners in and around the 
island of Rhode Island. There is an island called Gould in Narragansett bay, 
which belonged to the family of Goulds one hundred years after the first settle- 
ment. The parents of Daniel Gould of this sketch removed from Rhode Island 
to Cranston, Rhode Island, where the son spent his boyhood, assisting his father 
to carry on a farm. His education consisted in what he could gain at school in the 
winter months. He attended the Friends school of Providence, Rhode Island, 
which is still in existence, being carried on in an up-to-date manner. The desire 
and ambition of Mr. Gould was to become a lawyer. He, however, gave up his 
own cherished plan in order to assist his parents. He was next to the eldest of 
eleven children and from early boyhood the one always to be depended upon. 
Nature had endowed him with a wonderfully robust constitution, else he must 
otherwise have succumbed to the many accidents which befell him. Born with a 
happy, buoyant disposition, he was ever the favorite among his comrades, as he 
was also the trusty friend in after years. 

In 1836 Mr. Gould married Miss Susan L. Baker, who died soon after, in 1837. 
In 1840 he married Miss Sarah Earle, a daughter of John and Rhoda Earle, of 
Providence, Rhode Island. Her ancestors were also of English descent and of the 
Society of Friends and were among the early settlers on the Island of Nantucket. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gould lived in several of the manufacturing villages near Cranston. 
Mr. Gould had charge of some of the large stores connected with the mills. Here 
three of their children were born. Lydia Shove, born in 1843, died four years 
later. In 1852 Mr. Gould removed with his family to Providence, Rhode Island, 
where they remained until 1857, when they went west and settled at Davenport 
Iowa. Their youngest daughter, Lillie, was born here. An old friend, Robert 
Steare, of Providence, came west at the same time and went into partnership with 
Mr. Gould in a large carpet and furnishing business at the corner of Perry and 
Second streets, the building owned by Mr. Dessaint. During the Civil war Mr. 
Gould put up two stores of his own, adjoining the block on the northeast corner of 
Brady and Second streets, where he carried on business until he retired in 1881. 
The partnership between Mr. Gould and Mr. Steare was dissolved after a year's 
time, Mr. Gould continuing the business alone. Mr. Gould was also a manufac- 
turer of furniture and owned his own factory on East River street, located next to 
the woolen mill. 

One of Davenport's most respected and honored citizens, Mr. Gould was re- 
peatedly urged to take the office of mayor of the city, but what time he could 
spare from his business was devoted to the school interests. For fifteen years he 
was a member of the school board — the longest time of service with one exception 
any member had ever been upon the board. He served both as president and 



202 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

director, and as chairman of the building committee he had the satisfaction of 
planning and overseeing several of the largest school buildings of the city. When 
he resigned from the board he was presented with a gold headed cane, beautifully 
engraved — a present from the teachers of the city, by whom he was much re- 
spected and beloved. He was the only member of the board ever to be thus hon- 
ored. He was called the Father of the Teachers. His portrait, presented by his 
daughters to the school board, may be seen in the library of the new high school, 
where it is hoped it may be an inspiration and example to others. 

Mr. Gould was among the first organizers of the German Savings and Citizens 
Banks of Davenport. His support and influence were eagerly sought by all new 
enterprises. After his death, by request, his portrait was presented to these banks 
and was placed in the reception room of the German Savings Bank. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gould gave their interest and financial support to the organization of the First 
Unitarian church of Davenport, but their loyalty to the Friends Society prevented 
their ever becoming members. Mr. Gould was a good story teller. He entered 
heartily into the spirit of his anecdotes, which never failed to interest his audience. 
He and his wife were in sympathy with the early movements of the temperance 
cause. They both took an active part in the movement for the abolition of slavery, 
for their hearts were ever open to the cries of the distressed and oppressed. Their 
thoughts and desires were toward progression in all directions. 

Naturally their children, brought up under such influences, could but follow in 
the same footsteps. The eldest daughter, Mary Elizabeth, was married to George 
Wing, of New Bedford. She was finely educated and prepared to become a leader 
and as such was always acknowledged. At one time she was the president of 
many of the leading clubs and societies of Davenport, where she made her home 
for some years. Afterward the family removed to Lincoln, Nebraska, where Mrs. 
Wing died in 1895. The foundation of the Davenport public library was due in 
no small measure to her efforts and counsel in its early days. Mr. and Mrs. Wing 
had five children and all except one are now living. Daniel Gould Wing is the 
president of the First National Bank of Boston and resides at West Newton, Mas- 
sachusetts. Alice Earle is not married. She has devoted her life unselfishly to 
others. Elizabeth Russell married Professor De Witte Bristol Brace, of Lincoln, 
Nebraska, who filled an eminent position as chemist in the state university. He 
had attained more than a national reputation in his profession. Thomas Ellwood 
is a prominent lawyer of New York city. Ellen Maria Gould, the third daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Gould, has devoted her life to philanthropy. Sarah Lydia, 
the youngest daughter, married Henry E. Lewis, of Claremont, New Hampshire. 
They settled at Lincoln, Nebraska. They have had six children, four of whom 
are now living. The eldest son, Harold Gould Lewis, is a graduate of the elec- 
trica,l engineering department of Columbia University of New York city. The 
eldest daughter, Edith Larabee, is a graduate of Smith College — a highly gifted 
young woman with literary talent that has led her to do magazine work and places 
her on the corps of editors of one of our prominent magazines. Ruth Stewart 
and Helen Chace are promising young ladies, still occupied with their school work. 

Mr. Gould retired from business in 1881. He was presented with a very hand- 
some gold watch chain by his employes, many of whom had been with him from 
youth to manhood. Mr. Gould was greatly surprised and pleased wiith this testi- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 203 

monial of their respect and good wishes. The anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. 
Gould's golden wedding occurred December 4, 1890, but, owing to Mrs. Gould's 
feeble condition, it was celebrated very quietly. The last ten years of Mr. Gould's 
life were devoted to his invalid wife. His attentions were of such a nature that 
they attracted the observation of the community and remain a lasting monument to 
the love and devotion of a very noble man to a faithful, devoted wife. Mrs. Gould 
died April 13, 1897, and was soon followed by her husband, who died August 28, 
1897. 



WILLIAM JOHNSON. 



William Johnson, who is now living retired in Davenport, was for many 
years identified with the industrial interests of the city as a carpenter. His birth 
occurred in Ireland on the 23d of November, 1829, his parents being Thomas 
and Eleanor Johnson. The father, who was a farmer and weaver by occupation, 
brought his family to the United States in 1849, locating at Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, where he worked as a weaver. Four years later, in 1853, he came to 
Davenport, Iowa, settling on a tract of thirty acres which he purchased near 
Walcott. The land was all wild prairie but he set resolutely to work, erected 
a house, fenced the fields and improved the property. He was not long permit- 
ted to enjoy his new home, however, passing away about a year after his arrival 
in Scott county. The demise of his wife also occurred about the same time. 

William Johnson obtained his education in the schools of his native land and 
was a young man of twenty when he accompanied his parents on their emigration 
to the new world. While in Philadelphia he worked at the weaver's trade but 
after coming to this county turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits 
and was thus engaged for about five years. Subsequently he acted as a colpor- 
teur for the Presbyterian church for about five years, on the expiration of which 
period, in 1866, he was married and took up his abode in Davenport. He then 
learned the carpenter's trade and worked at that occupation for many years, 
erecting a number of houses. When at length, owing to his untiring industry and 
good business ability, he had accumulated a handsome competence he retired 
from active life and has since enjoyed the fruits of his former toil in well earned 
ease. 

On the 28th of March, 1866, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Steel, who was born in Ireland in 1848, and came to this country about 
1865. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson became the parents of five children, the record of 
whom is as follows : Brice, who is a grocer of Davenport, has been twice mar- 
ried, his first union being with Miss Ruth Hage, by whom he had a daughter, 
Elizabeth Ruth. For his second wife he chose Miss Rose Lingerfeldt and they 
had a son who is now deceased. George, living in Davenport, married Miss 
Elizabeth Blair, by whom he has two children. William R. Johnson is still under 
the parental roof. Cora follows the profession of school teaching in Davenport. 
William passed away when about two years of age. 

Mr. Johnson of this review has now attained the venerable age of eighty years 
and lias lived within the borders of Scott county for more than a half century. 



204 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Coming to the United States in early manhood, he found the opportunities which 
he sought and through their wise utilization won a measure of success that now 
enables him to spend his declining years in retirement — surrounded by all of 
the comforts and many of the luxuries that go to make life worth living. 



HENRY CHRISTIAN STRUCK, JR. 

Henry Christian Struck, Jr., whose connection with financial interests in 
Davenport has been of signal benefit to the city, is now one of the managing 
board of the Clearing House, and such has been his experience and study in the 
field of finance that his opinions have in large measure become regarded as author- 
ity upon financial problems. He is a representative of the progressive type of 
German citizens who, seeking the opportunities of the new world, have not only 
won individual advancement but have contributed as well to general progress 
and improvement. He was born at Seelent, in the province of Schleswig-HolT 
stein, August 20, 1853, the eldest son in a family of eight children, whose parents 
were Henry Christian and Johanna Dorathea Sophia (Strellner) Struck. In the 
year 1855 the father started with his family for the United States, arriving at 
New Orleans in October. The ensuing winter months were there passed and in 
May, 1856, they ascended the Mississippi river to Davenport, where they remained 
for a brief period, after which they took up their abode upon a farm in Cleona 
township, Scott county. 

On the old homestead there Henry Christian Struck of this review spent his 
boyhood, acquiring his preliminary education in the district schools, while at the 
age of twelve years he became a pupil in a private school at Davenport, where 
he had better opportunities to study German and other languages and also pursue 
special courses which were not then taught in country schools. He likewise pur- 
sued special courses in mathematics and civil engineering at Professor Thomp- 
son's Institute and in order to gain further knowledge bearing directly upon 
business life he entered Bryant & Stratton Commercial College on November i, 
1869. He was graduated therefrom May 14, 1870, and on the i8th of May he 
joined the United States Hydrographical Engineer Corps, with which he was 
connected until the close of the season, December i, 1870. On the ist of the fol- 
lowing January he became bookkeeper in the employ of August Steifen, a grain 
and produce dealer, with whom he remained until Mr. Steffen retired from busi- 
ness on the 1st of August, 1872. At that time Mr. Struck entered the employ of 
George Ott & Company, wholesale dealers in sash, doors and blinds, in the ca- 
pacity of bookkeeper and traveling salesman, filling the position until October i, 
1875, when at the offer of August Steffen, his former employer, who was then 
one of the largest stockholders of the Davenport Plow Company, he became 
bookkeeper for that concern, remaining with the company until January i, 1878, 
when at the advice of his physician he resigned to seek employment more con- 
ducive to his health, which had suffered in the close confinement of office work. 

On the 1st of June, 1878, Mr. Struck entered upon an independent venture by 
purchasing the interest of the junior partner in the hardware business of Werner 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 205 

& Brammer, at No. 309 West Second street. The firm of Werner & Struck main- 
tamed an existence until January i, 1880, when Henry C. Struck, Sr., purchased 
Mr. Werner's interest and carried on the business under the firm style of Henry 
C. Struck & Son until October 25, 1885, at which date the entire business was 
sold to W. P. Bissell, Mr. Struck, Jr., however, remaining with the new firm until 
March, 1886. 

Henry C. Struck became connected with city service at the solicitation of his 
many friends, including a number of the most prominent people of Davenport. 
They requested him to become a candidate for city collector and on the 7th of 
April, 1886, he was appointed by the city council to that position, which he con- 
tinued to fill until January i, 1890. No more capable incumbent has ever occu- 
pied the office, his efficient service winning the commendation of his colleagues, 
associates and of the general public. So capably did he discharge his duties that 
he was nominated and elected to the office of county treasurer in the fall of 1889, 
assuming the duties of the position on the ist of January following. His effi- 
ciency during his first term led to reelection and when the votes were counted it 
was found that he received every vote cast in Cleona township, the place of his 
boyhood, not a single ballot being cast against him even by the opposition party. 
He continued in charge of the public exchequer until January i, 1894, when he 
retired from the office as he had entered it — with the confidence and regard of 
all concerned. 

In September, 1892, Mr. Struck was prevailed upon to accept the position of 
cashier and secretary of the Davenport Savings Bank, a position offered him by 
the bank directors, all of whom were his personal friends and had informed 
themselves as to his ability as an officer and accountant. His previous training 
in the city service, as well as in business lines, enabled him to creditably discharge 
the duties that now devolved upon him and on the 7th of January, 1895, he was 
elected by the stockholders of the Davenport Savings Bank to the directorate of 
that institution, and on the organization of the Davenport Clearing House, Sep- 
tember I, 1895, he was chosen a member of the managing board and has so con- 
tinued to the present time, covering a period of fifteen years. 

On the I2th of October, 1878, Mr. Struck was married in this city to Miss 
Johanna Wessel, a daughter of Dr. H. Wessel, Sr., and they became parents of 
four children, Alice B., Kuno H., Wally and Henry W., but Alice and Wally died 
in infancy. Kuno H. Struck, born in Davenport, October 4, 1883, was educated 
in the public schools and was graduated from the high school with valedictorian 
honors in 1902. He afterward entered the Iowa State University and was grad- 
uated from the medical department in 1906. He afterward spent a season with 
his cousin. Dr. Arp of Moline, putting his theoretical knowledge to the practical 
test. In December, 1906, he began practice in Davenport. While in the uni- 
versity he had made a specialty of the study of bacteriology and pathology and 
had also taught in those branches. He is a member of all the various medical 
societies and of the Turners Society and other social organizations. 

Politically H. C. Struck is a democrat, supporting the party since casting his 
first presidential ballot for Samuel J. Tilden. He belongs to the Davenport 
Turner Society, which he joined April ir, 1872, and on the ist of January, 1897, 
he received a diploma as honorary member in recognition of his twenty-five 



206 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

years' connection therewith. On the ist of May, 1892, he became a Master 
Mason of Fraternal Lodge, No. 221, A. F. & A. M., and for ten years filled the 
office of treasurer. As a financier he has always counseled a safe and conserva- 
tive policy rather than that progressiveness which tends toward risk, and his 
clear insight and sound judgment have constituted valuable factors in the solution 
of various problems which are continually arising in financial circles. A man of 
well balanced capacities and powers, correctly judging life's contacts and experi- 
ences, his ability has carried him into important public relations and the simple 
weight of his character has won him the honor and respect of all with whom he 
has been associated. 



WILLIAM C. SCHAEFER. 

Prominent among those who gain a livelihood from the rich soil of Scott county 
may be mentioned William C. Schaef er, who owns ninety acres of land in Daven- 
port township, where he resides, and one hundred and fifty- four acres in Pleasant 
Valley township, besides other farm and city property. As the name indicates, he 
is of German birth, his parents being Edward and Mary (Bishop) Schaefer, who 
were pioneer settlers of Scott county. The former was born in Germany in 1810 
and came to the United States when a young man, alone. He spent one year 
thereafter in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and then sought a location in Scott county. 
He bought forty acres of raw land on the Jersey Ridge road on Duck creek but 
prior to making the purchase he had built a crude dwelling in the midst of the wil- 
derness. This house stood on the land which he later bought. It was about this 
time that he wedded Miss Mary Bishop and they began their domestic life in the 
pioneer home which Mr. Schaefer had prepared. Mrs. Schaefer had come to the 
new world with her parents when she was a young girl. To them were born four 
sons : William C, Fred, Charles and Edward. The two last named are deceased, 
the former passing away when but fourteen years of age, while the latter was 
thirty-six years of age at the time of his demise. 

When the parents settled in their new home they began work in earnest, toiling 
from early morning until late at night. It was a long and strenuous task that was 
presented to them but they met it with a steady, unwavering resolution that was 
chara:cteristic of the early pioneer settlers. From a wilderness the father con- 
verted his land into richly cultivated fields and as the time passed and his sons grew 
in years and strength they rendered valuable assistance to him in caring for his 
crops, through the sale of which he added to his financial resources and was able 
from time to time to increase his land holdings. He accumulated two hundred and 
eighty acres of fine land and in course of years replaced his pioneer home with a 
more pretentious and modern dwelling. At the time of his death, which occurred 
March 3, 1900, he left to each of his two living sons a good farm and left his widow 
in comfortable circumstances as well. She still survives at the advanced age of 
eighty years. As she looks about her she sees few of the settlers that came here 
in pioneer times but she has many warm friends among the younger generations 




--':-'\' 'AR LZ s 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 209 

who through their kindly interest and affection help to brighten her path in her 
declining years. 

William C. Schaefer, the elder son, was born on the home farm on Duck creek, 
February 3, 1854, and in his boyhood and youth shared with the other members of 
the family in the privations and struggles that surround the early settlers in a new 
country. He attended the district schools of the neighborhood and later the Ger- 
man school in Davenport. He has made farming his life work and his home place, 
which he inherited from his father's estate, comprises ninety acres, this being lo- 
cated in Davenport township. He also owns five acres across the road from his 
home and one hundred and fifty-four acres in Pleasant Valley township, while he 
likewise has city property in Davenport. He carries on general farming and 
stock raising, his specialty being Poland China hogs and shorthorn cattle. 

Mr. Schaefer was married April 17, 1879, to Miss Emma Kurtzfeldt, a daughter' 
of Mr. and Mrs. John Kurtzfeldt. She was born in Davenport township, her people 
being among the early settlers of this section. Six children grace the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Schaefer : May, Edward, Adolph, Charles, Delia, and Lillian. All are at 
home with the exception of the eldest daughter. May, the wife of William Bertram, 
who operates her father's farm in Pleasant Valley township. She is the mother of 
four children, Harold, Esther, Earl and Lucile. 

Mr. Schaefer can well remember when he was a boy how this district appeared. 
Much of the land was still unclaimed, the homes of the settlers were widely scat- 
tered and many of the present thriving towns and villages Were then unheard 
of. As the years have passed he has seen this section of the county develop 
into a rich farming center, dotted here and there with modern and attractive 
homes, and he can take a just pride in what has been accomplished, for he has 
been an important factor in bringing this about. Today he stands crowned with 
honors and success, and his honesty of purpose, his clean record and his devo- 
tion to all that is manly and upright has gained for him many warm friends. 



JOHN HEINZ. 



Allegiance to a high standard of commercial ethics and intelligent appre- 
ciation for and improvement of opportunity have gained for John Heinz a credit- 
able position in the ranks of Davenport's leading business men. Bom in this 
city on the 19th of March, i860, he is a son of Bonaventura and Margeretha 
(Trenkenshuh) Heinz, the former a native of Baden, Germany, and the latter 
of Bavaria. The father came to the United States in 1845 and took up his abode 
in St. Louis. Soon afterward he enlisted for service in the Mexican war and 
following the close of hostilities returned to St. Louis, where he remained until 
1855, when he made his way up the river to Davenport on the Golden Era. From 
that time until he retired, at an advanced age, he was connected with river trans- 
portation and was also wharf master for a number of years. He was likewise 
active in public afifairs and was influential among all classes. He came to be 
known as a rhan whose word could be implicitly relied upon and his keen insight 
made his judgment such as awakened public confidence. His death occurred in 



210 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

1901, when he had reached the age of seventy-two years. In St. Louis he mar- 
ried Margeretha Trenkenshuh and their children were: Fred; Carrie, who died 
in 1901 as the result of an operation; Henry, who is now the publisher of the 
Muscatine (Iowa) Journal; and John, of this review. 

The last named was a public school student and then became associated in 
various lines of business with his brother Fred. In 1885 he was appointed United 
States gauger, which office he still fills, twenty-five years' service in this capacity 
standing as incontrovertible proof of his trustworthiness and ability. He has 
embraced his opportunities for the attainment of success through active connec- 
tion with various business concerns and is now a director of the Farmers & Me- 
chanics Bank, a member of the firm of L. M. Fisher, and also is successfully en- 
gaged in the loan business. Whatever he undertakes he carries forward to suc- 
cessful completion, brooking no obstacles that can be overcome by determined 
purpose. 

In June, 1886, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Heinz and Miss Emma 
Kruse, a native of Davenport and a daughter of John Kruse, who was well 
known in the transfer business here. Their two children, Cora I. and Grace C, 
are yet at home. Mr. Heinz belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and to the Knights of Pythias fraternity and is a trustee of the Davenport 
Turnverein. He was also one of the firemen of this city in the old days of the 
volunteer department and is a popular and well known member of the Veteran 
Volunteer Firemen's Association, the Schuetzen Verein, the Davenport Boat Club 
and the Pastime Club. At all times he has stood for progressive methods in 
municipal affairs, manifesting a deep interest in those projects which are a 
matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



JACOB JOHANNSEN. 



Jacob Johannsen, who in the years of an active business life followed farm- 
ing but is now living retired in Davenport, has demonstrated in his life record 
that success is not a matter of genius, as held by some, but is rather the outcome 
of clear judgment, experience and intelligently directed industry. He was born 
in Holstein, Germany, February 6, 1836, and is a son of Jacob and Margarethe 
Johannsen, who spent their entire lives in their native country. The subject of 
this review attended school in Germany and through the periods of vacation 
worked on the home farm. The favorable reports which he heard concerning 
America and its opportunities led him to the belief that no country held out as 
great inducement, and accordingly he made arrangements to cross the Atlantic. 
Bidding adieu to home and friends, he landed at New York on the 25th of May, 
1857, but did not tarry on the eastern coast. He at once made his way into the 
interior of the country, arriving in Davenport on the.ist of June. His lack of 
financial resources made it imperative that he at once seek employment and he 
began work as a farm hand, spending five years in that way. He was then mar- 
ried and rented land until his industry and economy enabled him to secure capital 
sufficient to purchase a farm. In 1868 he bought eighty acres in Davenport town- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 211 

ship, to which he removed. The farm was improved and he at once began its 
further development and cultivation, making his home thereon until 1880. In 
the meantime he had added to the place and retained the ownership thereof until 
1885, when he sold. He had retired in 1880, however, and in that year took 
up his abode in Davenport, where he has since lived, enjoying a well earned rest. 
On the 17th of March, 1862, Mr. Johannsen was married to Miss Dora Hein, 
a daughter of Henry and Catherine Hein, who were natives of Germany. Mr. 
Johannsen is a member of the German Pioneers association. For more than a 
half century he has lived in this county and has therefore witnessed much of 
its growth and progress as the work of development has been carried forward 
by the enterprising and progressive class of people who came here to enjoy the 
natural advantages offered. Working resolutely and persistently day after day, 
Jacob Johannsen at length became the possessor of a comfortable competence 
that now supplies him with all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 
He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, 
for he found good opportunities here and in their improvement reached a place 
among the substantial citizens of Scott county. 



MRS. ANNE H. HAGEN. 

Germany has furnished to Davenport a large percentage of her citizens and 
among the number is Mrs. Anne H. Hagen, who, however, has lived in Scott 
county since her girlhood days. She is the widow of Herman Hagen, who was 
bom in Holstein, Germany, December 5, 1861. He was a son of Jacob and 
Magdalene (Neimier) Hagen, who came from Germany to Scott county in 
1868, with their family of seven children, and settled in Sheridan township. For 
many years the father devoted his time and energies to general farming and be- 
came recognized as one of the representative agriculturists of the community. 
He died in March, 1894, while his wife, surviving him for two years, passed away 
in 1896. They celebrated their golden wedding, having been married in 1844. 

Herman Hagen was the youngest of their seven children and was but six 
years of age at the time the family crossed the Atlantic to the new world. He 
pursued his education in the district schools of Sheridan township and in Dun- 
can's Business College in Davenport. The periods of vacation had been de- 
voted to the work of the fields and when he put aside his text-books he resumed 
farming, which he followed throughout the remainder of his life. He contin- 
ued to assist in the cultivation of the old homestead until about thirty years of 
age, when his father retired and he took charge of the farm. In 1896 he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Sheridan township and removed 
to that farm, upon which he made his home until March, 1906, when he be- 
came a resident of Davenport. He was not long permitted to enjoy his city 
home, however, for his death occurred on the nth of the following month. 

It was on the 30th of January, 1892, that Mr. Hagen was united in marriage 
to Miss Anne H. Wiese, a daughter of John and Catherine Wiese, of Scott 
county. Mrs. Hagen was born in Germany and was brought to this county by 



212 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

her father during her early girlhood, her mother having previously died in Ger- 
many, when Mrs. Hagen was but seven years of age. Her father then made 
arrangements to seek a home in the new world and started for America accom- 
panied by his three children : Dorothy, who is now the wife of Lewis Specht and 
Hves in O'Brien county, Iowa; Mrs. Hagen; and Emily, the widow of Christ 
Misfeldt, of Durant, Iowa. The father engaged in farming to some extent in 
this country. He had been a cigar maker in Germany and had served in the 
army. He died in 1907. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hagen were born four children, Hilda, Lillian, Magda- 
lene and Norma, but the last named is now deceased. Herman Hagen was a 
member of the German Lutheran church and a man of upright life and sterling 
qualities, honored and respected by all who knew him. He served as school di- 
rector while living on the farm and in other local offices, the duties of which 
he ever discharged with promptness and fidelity. Coming to Scott county when 
but six years of age, he practically spent his entire life here and his stanchest 
friends were numbered among those who knew him from his boyhood, a fact in- 
dicative of a well ordered and well spent life. 



MATHIAS PROUDFOOT. 

Mathias Proudfoot was for many years identified with the agricultural inter- 
ests of Scott county but is now living retired, having in former years accumulated 
a good farming property of two hundred and forty acres, lying in Lincoln, Le 
Claire and Davenport townships. He is a native of Pennsylvania, born in Cam- 
bria county. May 24, 1834, and is second in order of birth in a family of seven 
children, whose parents were Richard J. and Rebecca Proudfoot. In 1861 the 
father removed with his family, numbering wife and several children, to Scott 
county and located a farm in Lincoln township, this tract now being owned by our 
subject. The father erected a good house and outbuildings on the place and in 
due time had his fields in a cultivable condition, each year harvesting good crops. 
The farm continued to be his home throughout his remaining years. Both parents 
lived to be eighty years old and were highly respected in the community. Three 
of their children died in infancy, while the others are : Richard, who has also de- 
parted this life; Mathias, of this review; Eliza, the wife of Thomas Douglass 
and a resident of Wyoming, Iowa; and Emeline, the wife of J. W. Baker. 

Mathias Proudfoot was reared in the Keystone state and acquired his education 
in the public schools. In his early manhood he learned the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed for a time in the east. In 1861, when a young man of twenty- 
six years, he came with his parents to Scott county and became identified with 
farming. His father purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land, which con- 
stitutes a portion of his present acreage, and after this came into his possession he 
added one hundred and twenty acres more, so that he now owns altogether two 
hundred and forty acres, located in Lincoln, LeClaire and Davenport townships. 
For many years he gave his entire time to the operation of this land and has 
become a very successful man. He recently put aside business cares and makes 




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V ' fr/J ; r f 




CI I /u no 



y /'-Cifr 



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HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 215 

his home with his sister Mrs. Baker. However, he still owns his land, which he 
rents. 

Mr. Proudfoot was married in May, 1884, to Miss Eliza Walker, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. WiUiam Walker, of Scott county. Her death occurred ten years 
later. Mr. Proudfoot votes with the republican party but is not active in public 
affairs. He has led a busy, energetic and useful life and his labors have been 
rewarded by a competency that enables him to withdraw from active business. 



CAPTAIN ALVAH O. DAY. 

One of the best known representatives of the shipping interests on the Missis- 
sippi river is Captain Alvah O. Day, of Davenport, who has gained a wide 
acquaintance as commander of river vessels plying between St. Paul and St. 
Louis. He is the owner of two steamboats, the B. Hershie and the Everett. He 
was born near Rochester, Dodge county, Minnesota, August i, 1866, and is a 
son of Lewis and Pauline (Henry) Day. The father was a native of Deerfield, 
Ohio, born September 9, 1837. His people had gone to that state from Deerfield, 
^Massachusetts, and the town of Deerfield, Ohio, was nam'ed by them in honor of 
their old home. Captain Day's father retained his residence there until about 
i860, when he removed with his family to Winnebago county, Wisconsin, where 
he purchased land and began farming. At the outbreak of the Civil war, how- 
ever, he put aside all business and personal considerations, enlisting as a private 
in the Fifth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which he served throughout the 
war, his meritorious conduct on the field of battle and his unfaltering valor win- 
ning him promotion to the rank of lieutenant. It was about 1864 that the Day 
family removed to Minnesota and from the government entered land near Roches- 
ter. At the close of the war the father joined his family there and continued to 
make his home in that locality until 1871, when he came to Scott county, set- 
tling at Le Claire. He was also a steamboat man and purchased one of the first 
boats that floated down the Wisconsin river. He used it in the navigation of 
Mississippi waters and was one of the early steamboat captains of this section, 
making his first trip down the river in 1859. The family continued ta reside at 
Le Qaire until 1892. On the 24th of March of that year the mother passed 
away, being then forty-eight years of age, her birth having occurred in Medina 
county, Ohio, in 1844. After her death Lewis Day retired and made his home 
with his son Alvah. They were the parents of six children : Alvah O. ; Lewis, 
who is living in Rock Island, Illinois; George, whose home is in San Francisco, 
California; Alice, the wife of William Kingsbury, of Wyoming; and Zoe and 
Emma, both deceased. 

Captain Day of this review was only about five years old when the family 
removed from Minnesota to Iowa, so that his early education was acquired in the 
public schools of Le Qaire. He afterward attended Port Byron College, while 
his training in navigation was received from, his father. He obtained his license 
as master pilot at the age of twenty-one years and has since followed the river, 
being today one of the oldest and best known river men in Scott county. He 



216 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

has not only worked his way upward in positions of increased responsibility, 
serving as captain for a long period, but has also advanced along material lines, 
being now the owner of two steamboats, the B. Hershie and the Everett, both 
of which are stanch river crafts and are liberally patronized by the carrying trade. 

Captain Day was married November i6, 1892, to Miss Winifred Davenport, 
a daughter of James H. and Savilla (Reynolds) Davenport, of Scott county. 
Mrs. Day was born in Le Claire, Iowa. Her father was the first white child 
born in Scott county, his natal day being May 4, 1838. His death occurred 
April 7, 1905. His parents, Adrian L. and Harriet (Lane) Davenport, were 
among the first settlers in this part of the state and took an active part in the 
work of pioneer development and improvement, as the rich natural resources 
of the state were utilized in the eififort to plant the seeds of civilization and prog- 
ress here. Captain and Mrs. Day have two sons : Lewis, born January 23, 
1894; and Davenport, born November 4, 1898. 

Captain Day is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership with the 
Modern Woodmen, the Knights of Pythias and the Masons. In the Masonic 
order he has taken the degrees of the Scottish Rite. He is also connected with 
the Sons of Veterans and in religious faith is an Episcopalian, belonging to 
Grace cathedral. Having practically spent his entire life in this county, Captain 
Day is widely and favorably known, and is recognized as a man of his word 
who, without sham or pretense in any particular, stands fearlessly in support 
of what he believes to be right, manifesting a spirit of utmost. honor and integ- 
rity in his business affairs as well as in his social relations. 



B. W. GARTSIDE. 



B. W. Gartside, who since 1889 has been vice president of the T. W. McClel- 
land Company, while his identification with the business dates from 1878, was 
born in New Jersey, a son of Benjamin and Caroline (Measey) Gartside. In 
his childhood days he accompanied his parents to Davenport and the public 
schools afforded him his literary education. He afterward studied architecture 
and in 1878 became connected with the T. W. McClelland Company, which at 
that time in addition to mill work was conducting an extensive business as con- 
tractors, architects and designers. Mr. Gartside took charge of the architectural 
and designing department but of recent years, owing to the increase of their 
business along other lines, the company has given up the other branches and is 
now giving undivided attention to the mill work. In 1889 Mr. Gartside was 
elected to the vice presidency of the company and as the second officer is doing 
much to shape the policy of the house and extend its business connections. He 
is a man of unfaltering enterprise and keen discernment, laboring earnestly to se- 
cure that success which is the goal of all laudable endeavor. 

In 1882 occurred the marriage of B. W. Gartside and Miss Emma Van Home, 
a native of Galesburg, Illinois. They have one son, Benjamin W., Jr., a young 
man of promise who is now with the Bettendorf Company. He studied archi- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 217 

tecture and was for some years connected with the McClelland Company, and in 
the field of his chosen labor he is making substantial progress. 

Mr. Gartside holds membership in the Commercial and Outing Clubs. In 
manner he is unassuming, free from ostentation and display, yet the genuine 
worth of his character is manifest to all who have business or social relations 
with him. He places a correct valuation upon life and its opportunities, recog- 
nizes the obUgations and duties of citizenship and manifests his interest in the 
welfare of Davenport by active and substantial cooperation in various move- 
ments for the general good. 



J. B. MORGAN, D. D. S. 

Dr. J. B. Morgan, who enjoys the distinction of being the oldest practitioner 
in dentistry in Davenport, was also one of the first of Iowa's sons to go to the 
support of the Union when the great struggle between the north and south was 
inaugurated. He was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, July 6, 1839. His 
father, James B. Morgan, was a native of England and came to the United 
States when about eighteen years of age. He settled in Pennsylvania and there 
married Miss Margaret C. Boyd, who in her girlhood days had left Ireland, her 
native country, and had become a resident of the Keystone state. When Dr. 
Morgan was but six months old his father died and the mother afterward mar- 
ried again. In 1844 she came to Iowa, settling in Delaware county, where she 
continued to make her home until the time of her removal to Dakota a few years 
prior to her demise. 

Dr. J. B. Morgan, who was but five years of age when brought to Iowa, was 
reared upon the home farm in Delaware county and after mastering the branches 
of learning taught in the district schools attended Lenox College at Hopkinton. 
When the first call for troops was issued by President Lincoln he made quick 
response, enlisting on the 20th of April, 1861, as a member of Company I, First 
Iowa Infantry. On the expiration of his term of service he was honorably dis- 
charged August 21, 1861, but soon reenlisted, becoming a private of Company 
K, Twelfth Iowa Infantry, on the 7th of September. On the 25th of November 
of the same year he was promoted to the rank of first sergeant. Later he was 
discharged and reenlisted as a veteran volunteer of Company K, Twelfth Iowa 
Infantry, February 17, 1864, and on the 5th of February, 1865, he was promoted 
to the rank of first lieutenant of that company, with which he remained until his 
military service was ended in March, 1866. The First Iowa Infantry was the 
only three months' regiment that went from this state. It was organized at 
Camp Elsworth, Keokuk, and left Iowa, June 12, 1861, being assigned to duty 
along the Hannibal & St. Joe Railroad from Hannibal to Mason City. The 
troops were there relieved in order to join General Lyon at Boonville, and an 
advance was made on Springfield, Missouri, from June 2^ to July 5. Dr. Mor- 
gan participated in the action at Forsyth, Missouri, on the 22d of July and at 
Dug Springs, August 2, followed by the battle of Wilson's Creek on the loth of 
August. 



218 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

The Twelfth Iowa Infantry, his second regiment, was organized at Dubuque 
and mustered into service November 25, 1861. They moved to St. Louis, Novem- 
ber 28, and were on duty at Benton Barracks until January 27, 1862. Proceeding 
to Cairo, Illinois, they thence went to Smithland, Kentucky, and were on duty 
with the First Brigade, Second Division of the District of West Tennessee, from 
February until April, 1862 ; with the Union Brigade, District of Corinth, Depart- 
ment of Tennessee, to December, 1862; First Brigade, District of Corinth, Six- 
teenth Army Corps, of the Tennessee, to January, 1863 ; Third Brigade, Third 
Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, April to December, 1863 ; Third Brigade, 
First Division, right wing Sixteenth Army Corps, to November, 1864; Third 
Brigade, First Division, detachment Sixteenth Corps, to February, 1865 ; Third 
Brigade, First Division, Sixteenth Corps, Army of the Gulf, service; expedition 
up Tennessee river, February 5-6, 1862 ; capture of Fort Henry, Tennessee, 
February 6; Fort Donelson, Tennessee, February 13-16; duty at Fort Donel- 
son until March 12; moved to Pittsburg Landing, March 12-21 ; battle of Shiloh, 
April 6-7; advance and siege of Corinth, Mississippi, April 26 to May 30; pur- 
suit to Brownsville, May 31 to June 12; duty at Corinth until December 18;. 
battle of Corinth, October 3-4; pursuit to Ripley, October 5-12; ordered to Daven- 
port, Iowa, December 18; defense of Jackson, Tennessee, December 20, 1862, to 
January 4, 1863 ; moved to Davenport, Iowa, January 4-7, and on duty there 
until March 27th; thence to Duck Port, Louisiana, April 9-14; movement on 
Bruensburg and turning Grand Gulf, May 2-12; Jackson, May 14; Big Black 
river. May 17; siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, May 18- July 4; assault on Vicks- 
burg, May 19-22 ; surrender of Vicksburg, July 4 ; advance on Jackson, July 
S-io; siege of Jackson, July 10-15; Brandon, July 19-20; camp at Big Black 
river until November expedition to Brownsville, October 16; moved to Mem- 
phis, November 7-12; on general duty to January, 1864; moved to Vicksburg, 
Mississippi, February 1-6; expedition to Canton, February 25-March 4; on 
veteran's furlough, March and April; moved to Memphis, April 28-May 2; 
Smith's expedition through Mississippi, June 16- July 18; Pontotoc, July 11; 
Harrisburg, July 13; Tupelo, July 14-15; Old Town Creek, July 15; expedition 
to Oxford, July 31-August 23; Tallahatchie river, August 7-9; Abbeville and 
Oxford, August 12; Hurricane, August 13-14; College Hill, August 21-22; 
Abbeville, August 23 ; moved to Duvall's Blufif, September i ; pursuit of Price 
through Missouri, September 7-November 15; moved to Nashville, Tennessee, 
November 23-December i ; battle of Nashville, December 15-16; pursuit of Hood 
to the Tennessee river, December 17-30; duty at Clifton, Tennessee, and East- 
port, Mississippi, until February 7, 1865 ; moved to New Orleans, Louisiana, 
February 7-22; thence to Dauphine Island, Alabama, March 7-8; siege of Span- 
ish Fort and Fort Blakely, March 25-April 8 ; Fort Blakely, April 9 ; capture of 
Mobile, April 12; march to Montgomery, April 13-25; duty there until May 12; 
moved to Selma, May 12, and duty there and district of the Talladega until De- 
cember; and detached at Selma for duty in the organization of the Freedman's 
Bureau. 

Such in brief is the history of Dr. Morgan's connection with the Union army 
but it tells little of the long, hard marches, the difficult sieges and the long and 
weary waiting in winter quarters. All the experiences meted out to the soldier 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 219 

were his, but never did he falter in the performance of any duty and from first 
to last was at the front valiantly defending- the Union cause. 

Upon leaving the army Dr. Morgan returned to the pursuits of civil life. 
In the fall of 1866 he began attending lectures at Rush Medical College, of Chi- 
cago, with the intention of making the practice of medicine his profession. After 
attending one course of lectures he decided to take up the study of dentistry and 
accordingly entered the Philadelphia Dental College, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1868. The same year he came to Davenport, which has since been the 
scene of his professional activities. On the ist of June, 1869, he purchased the 
office and practice of Dr. Gunckle, and the forty years of his labors here make 
him the oldest dentist in the three cities which are linked by common interests. 
He is not only the dean of the profession but has remained throughout the years 
a foremost representative in all that indicates progress and capability. Reading, 
research and study have kept him in touch with the onward march of the pro- 
fession, his methods of practice today being utterly dissimilar to those which 
were in vogue when he started out four decades ago. His office is equipped with 
the latest appliances and at all times he has enjoyed the highest regard of his 
fellow practitioners as well as the general public. 

On the 28th of September, 1871, Dr. Morgan was united in marriage to 
Miss Minnie C. Harris, a native of Sag Harbor, New York. He has long been 
a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, of the Loyal Legion and of the 
Union Veterans Union, thus maintaining pleasant relations with his old army 
comrades. He is indeed a wonderful man for his age, faithful, cheerful and 
vigorous, as fond of a fishing trip or outing as many a one of fewer years and 
enjoying hfe with the full zest of his juniors. He stands high both profession- 
ally and socially and in citizenship is as loyal to his county as he was when he 
followed the old flag on southern battlefields. 



ANDREW WASHINGTON BOWMAN, M. D. 

Dr. Andrew Washington Bowman, who in the years of his connection with 
the medical fraternity of Davenport was one of the city's most busy, capable, 
successful and respected practitioners, was born in Andalusia, Rock Island county, 
Illinois, in January, 1847. His father, Edward H. Bowman, was also a physician 
and, locating in Rock Island county in 1843, became a prominent representative 
of the medical fraternity there, enjoying a large and growing practice for many 
years. He filled the office of circuit clerk of that county and served with dis- 
tinction as an army surgeon throughout the Civil war. He also spent several 
years in mining in California following the discovery of gold on the Pacific 
coast, and for a considerable period was Indian agent in the Indian Territory. 

After completing his literary education Dr. Andrew W. Bowman traveled 
through California and Mexico before deciding upon the calling or profession 
which he wished to make his life work. When in Mexico an epidemic of small- 
pox broke out where he was staying and thus he had an opportunity of using 
the knowledge of medicine he had obtained in connection with his father's prac- 



220 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

tice. He treated several hundred cases with success and received numerous in- 
ducements to remain, but he had decided to become a physician and follow the 
profession in the United States, for he did not naturally like the surroundings 
and environment of a Mexican home. He then entered Ann Arbor for a course 
in medicine and afterward studied in the Rush Medical College, from which 
he was graduated with honors in the class of 1878. In 1880 he came to Daven- 
port and almost immediately was accorded an extensive practice, which grew 
with the passing years until he was one of the city's most busy and respected 
physicians. He was very careful in the diagnosis of a case and in the applica- 
tion of remedial agencies. Moreover, he was familiar with the component parts 
of the human body and every phase of anatomy and his conscientious performance 
of duty marked an improved epoch in the standard of medical service in this 
city. 

On the nth of August, 1879, Dr. Bowman was married, to Miss Marie Max- 
well, a daughter of the late Dr. A. S. Maxwell, a former resident of Daven- 
port. He was a long-time member of the Masonic fraternity, the beneficent 
principles of which he exemplified in his life, finding ample opportunity to dem- 
onstrate his belief in the brotherhood of man. He died July 16, 1906, at the age 
of fifty-nine years, and a useful career was thus brought to a close. His friendly 
and courteous spirit and his kindly disposition had made him esteemed by all 
•who knew him and most of all where he was best known. 



M. L. SIEBENGARTNER. 

Among the German citizens of the little village of Bettendorf who have 
proved that though America is not their native land it commands from them 
the most effective loyalty is M. L. Siebengartner, a retired farmer. He owns 
five acres within the boundaries of the town, this constituting his place of resi- 
dence, and other real estate here. He was born in Bavaria, Germany, Septem- 
ber 19, 1840, a son of Marcus and Theresa (Shoenmaier) Siebengartner, 
both of whom spent all their lives in their native country. 

Mr. Siebengartner was well advanced in years before he sought a home in 
America. After having, received the fundamental education provided by the 
public schools of the fatherland he attended college at Naunten, Germany, there- 
after devoting himself to agricultural pursuits in the vicinity of his birthplace. 
It was not until the 28th of July, 1884, that he reached Davenport, having brought 
his family to the United States with him, and there he found work as a team- 
ster. Three years later he removed to Bettendorf, where he rented a tract of 
land and later bought the place on which he now lives. He has cultivated the 
soil with profit to himself and has intimately identified himself with public in- 
terests for he is a man of progressive ideas and large public spirit so that every 
enterprise which is calculated to advance the welfare and better the conditions 
of the community has received his support. 

While living in Germany, October 2, 1865, Mr. Siebengartner married Miss 
Francise Hrabmaer and they have had seven children. Barbara, who married 




/ et'-e / 1 cjci y-t 1 1 e 7'- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 223 

George Weinzell and lives in Germany, has five children, George, Max, Mary, 
Anna and Joe. Michael, a business man of Chicago, Illinois, married Allenia 
Dipple and they have four children, Elizabeth, Max, Alma and Clara. Marcus 
was ordained a priest of the Catholic church at Regensburg, Bavaria, and is now 
a professor of theology in a Catholic academy in his native land. Francise mar- 
ried John Holzner and lives at Bettendorf . Frank C. has remained at home and 
has followed in the footsteps of his father as regards interest in public affairs, 
being identified with some of the more important organizations of the village. 
He is vice president of the Bettendorf Savings Bank, is commissioner of the 
streets, assessor, secretary of the Bettendorf fire department, and treasurer of 
school board. Louis M. lives at home and assumes the management of the 
farm. Emma married Michael Flashman, a farmer of Davenport township. 

Mr. Siebengartner was one of the men who was instrumental in building the 
Catholic church of the village. It was erected in 1901, with Father Dr. George 
Ginglinger as pastor. There were only ten Catholic families there at the time, 
most of them German, but the little congregation has prospered largely through 
Mr. Siebengartner's efforts, for besides contributing to its support he has under- 
taken to care for the church. He was also one of the first of the councilmen of 
the village and served three terms as treasurer of the school board. His inter- 
est in educational matters is especially keen, for, being a product of the German 
schools which enjoy an international reputation for their excellence, he is anx- 
ious to raise the standard of the local institutions of learning as high as possible. 
In the quarter of a century in which he has lived here his influence has been 
felt in many ways and, being wholly worthy, he enjoys the utmost confidence 
of those who have watched his life from day to day. 



WILLIAM WATTS. 



William Watts, who in former years was prominently connected with building 
operations in Davenport, conducting an extensive business as a contractor, is 
now living retired. Like many of the residents of the city of an older generation, 
he is of foreign birth, the place of his nativity being Norfolkshire, England, and 
his natal day the 31st of August, 1837. He has, therefore, passed the seventy- 
second milestone on life's journey. His parents, Robert and Matilda (Gower) 
Watts, came to the United States in 1848, landing in New York, after which they 
made their way westward by the canal to Buffalo and took up their abode upon 
a farm near that city. 

William Watts had begun his education in the schools of his native country 
at the time the family crossed the Atlantic to the new world and continued his 
studies in the Empire state. He resided upon the home farm in the vicinity of 
Buffalo until 1856, when, at the age of nineteen years, he left home, believing that 
he would have better opportunities to more quickly secure a competence in the 
middle west. He then left the Empire state and came to Scott county, Iowa, 
where his brother, Robert J. Watts, was then living, having arrived here in the 
spring of that year, while William Watts established his home in Davenport in 



224 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

the fall of 1856. He had learned the wagon maker's trade in the east and after 
coming to the west began work at the carpenter's trade, being first employed on 
a house on Lucust street between Brady and Main streets, which is still stand- 
ing. He was afterward employed in the shops of the Rock Island Railroad 
Company as coach builder for about fourteen years and has also aided in the 
construction of a large number of buildings in Davenport, including the Metro- 
politan hall. During the panic of 1857, he went south to Memphis, Tennessee, 
where he remained for a year, and during the period of the Civil war he assisted 
in building Camp McClelland. He has built about twenty houses for himself 
and also many others, and his business as a speculative builder has proven very 
profitable. He still owns considerable property, from which he derives a sub- 
stantial annual income. His investments have ever been judiciously made, while 
the evidences of his handiwork have secured to him a liberal patronage as a gen- 
eral contractor. 

On the 6th of June, 1859, ^r. Watts was united in marriage to Miss Ma- 
tilda Parsonage and unto them were born seven children: Sidney, who is living 
in Benton county, Iowa, married Hattie Southerland and they have four chil- 
dren : Guy, Ray, Jessie and Hazel. Mary, the second of the family, is deceased. 
Emma is the widow of D. M. West, who was an attorney of Council Bluffs, and 
she now lives with her father. Anna L. is also at home. William A., of Dav- 
enport, married Lillian De Foy and they have three children: Margaret, Helen 
and Clement. James E., of Mason City, married Helen Johnson. Jessie G. com- 
pletes the family. The wife and mother, who was born in December, 1839, died 
on the 26th of March, 1879. 

Mr. Watts has been a republican since age conferred upon him the right of 
franchise, never faltering in his allegiance to the party because he believes its 
platform to contain the best principles of good government. His life has been 
one of continuous activity, in which has been accorded due recognition of labor, 
and today he is numbered among the substantial citizens of his county. His 
interests are thoroughly identified with those of Davenport and at all times he 
is ready to lend his aid and cooperation to any movement calculated to benefit 
this section of the country or advance its wonderful development. A man of 
great natural ability, his success in business from the beginning of his residence 
here has been uniform and rapid. He has persevered in the pursuit of a per- 
sistent purpose and has gained a most satisfactory reward. 



CLAUS HELL. 



Claus Hell, a retired agriculturist residing in Davenport, has made his home 
at No. 705 West Sixth street for the past thirty-six years. For many years he 
was actively identified with general agricultural pursuits and is still the owner 
of a tract of two hundred acres of fine farm land, eighty acres of which lies 
in Cleona township, Scott county, and one hundred and twenty acres in 
Cedar county. His birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, on the 17th 
of June, 1837, his parents being John and Anna Hell, who spent their entire 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 225 

lives in that country. The father was a laborer and also engaged in farming on 
a small scale. 

Glaus' Hell obtained his education in the schools of his native land and after 
putting aside his text-books worked as a farm hand for about a year. In 1854, 
when a youth of seventeen years, he set sail for the new world in company with 
his brother John, landing at New York after an ocean voyage of fifty-two days. 
Another brother, Moses Hell, had emigrated to the United States the previous 
year and had established his home in Davenport, Iowa. Mr. Hell of this re- 
view therefore made his way at once to this city and, securing employment as a 
farm laborer, thus worked for about two years. Then he and his brother 
John purchased ten steers and broke prairie for various agriculturists of the 
community for about six years. On the expiration of that period, in 1862, the 
two brothers. bought one hundred and six:ty acres of prairie land in Cleona town- 
ship, broke it up and erected a small house thereon. They lived together for 
about a year and then divided the farm and conducted their interests separately. 
Glaus Hell was married in 1865 and continued to reside on his place of eighty 
acres until 1869, when he purchased and located upon a tract of fourteen acres 
of improved land in Davenport township near the city of Davenport., At the 
end of five years he disposed of the property and took up his abode in his pres- 
ent home at No. 705 West Sixth street in Davenport, where he has lived contin- 
uously since 1874. He won a gratifying and commendable degree of prosperity 
in the conduct of his agricultural interests and is now enabled to spend his re- 
maining days in well earned ease without recourse to further labor. As above 
stated, his holdings include two hundred acres of highly improved and valuable 
land, which, though lying in both, Scott and Cedar counties, is all in one body. 

On the 7th of February, 1865, Mr. Hell was united in marriage to Miss Kath- 
rina Schmaucher, a daughter of Jasper and Minnie Schmaucher, both of whom 
passed away in Germany. Mr. Hell has resided with the borders of Scott county 
for fifty-six years and is a valued member of the German Pioneers Society. Ar- 
riving in the United States with no capital save a stout heart and willing hands, 
he realized the fact that while in this country labor is unhampered by caste or 
class it is only by unfaltering diligence, guided by sound judgment, that success 
can be secured. Through the exercise of these qualities he made steady progress 
and is now one of the substantial and respected citizens of his community. 



KASPER WACHTER. 



Kasper Wachter, who has lived retired in Davenport since 1887, was for- 
merly actively and successfully identified with agricultural interests in this 
county. He was born in Mels, Switzerland, a little town at the foot of the moun- 
tains of which he still has a picture. His birth occurred on the 4th of August, 
1834, his parents being Frank and Barbara Wachter. The father, who was a 
farmer by occupation, brought his family to the United States in 1845, reach- 
ing New York a month after leaving the land of the Alps. The journey from 



226 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

the Empire state to Iowa likewise consumed about a month, the family traveling 
via the lakes to Chicago and thence to Davenport, Scott county, by prairie 
schooner. After arriving here Frank Wachter purchased eighty acres of prairie 
land near the present site of the poorhouse and also bought an old log cabin at 
Rockingham, which he moved to his farm and in which he took up his abode. 
In 1852 he remodeled the dwelling and continued to reside therein until called to 
his final rest in 1856, when fifty-four years of age. His wife, whom he survived 
for a decade, passed away in 1846. Their children were seven in number, namely: 
Antone, who died in California; Frank, a resident of Wisconsin; Anna, whose 
demise occurred in 1849; Kasper, of this review; Joseph, who lives in Kentucky; 
Barbara, the wife of Bernhard Huskey, of Davenport ; and Amanda, who passed 
away in 1868. 

Kasper Wachter, who was a lad of eleven years when he accompanied his 
parents on their emigration to the new world, attended school in Davenport for a 
time but his advantages in this direction were somewhat limited. He studied 
under' the preceptorship of Father Pelamourgues, an early priest of the com- 
munity. After putting aside his text-books he was busily engaged in farm work 
until October, 1861, when he enhsted in the Union army, joining Company 
G, Tenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, at Black River Falls, Wisconsin. The 
regiment was equipped at Milwaukee, camped there for a time and subsequently 
marched all the way to Huntsville, Alabama, arriving at that place in the month 
of May. Mr. Wachter participated in the battles of Perryville, Kentucky, and 
Stone River and in the latter engagement was shot through the left shoulder, 
thus sustaining an injury which necessitated his removal to the regiment hos- 
pital. He was later transferred to a hospital near Cincinnati and when he had 
recovered was sent back to his regiment at Murfreesboro, where he was hon- 
orably discharged in May, 1863. After returning to Scott county he once more 
turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits and following his marriage, 
which was celebrated in 1864, he took up his abode on a farm of one hundred 
and fifty acres on Lost Grove road, to the operation of which he devoted his 
energies throughout the remainder of his active business career. In 1887 he dis- 
posed of the property and has since lived retired in Davenport, having won 
a competence that enables him to spend his declining years in well earned ease 
without recourse to further labor. 

Mr. Wachter has been married twice. On the 31st of May, 1864, he wedded 
Mrs. Elizabeth Freund, the widow of Paul Freund, and their union was blessed 
with seven children, the record of whom is as follows. Carrie, who is the widow 
of Jacob Gittion, has three children, namely: Lillian, Leonard and Francis. 
Katherine is the wife of Rudolph Shepler, of Davenport, by whom she has four 
children; Clara, Agnes, Aloysius and Bernice. Kasper L. Wachter has passed 
away. Antone, who resides in Davenport, wedded Miss Clara Court and has 
one child, Marie. Edward makes his home in Davenport. The other two chil- 
dren of the family died in early Hfe. The wife and mother was called to her 
final rest on the 8th of December, 1899, and on the nth of May, I90i,-Mr. 
Wachter was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Emma Wilson, 
whose parents were Noah and Leah Rudy, of Pennsylvania. Her first husband, 
Seth Wilson, of New York, died in 1894. By him she had two children, namely: 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 227 

Clara, living in Pasadena, California ; and Luella, who married Frank Ruefer, of 
Davenport, and has four children: Gertrude, Georgia, Marie and Raymond. 

Politically Mr. Wachter is a stanch advocate of the democratic party and 
while living on the farm he capably served his fellow townsmen in the capacity 
of road supervisor and also as a school director. In religious faith he is a 
Catholic. He has now passed the seventy-fifth milestone on life's journey and 
receives the veneration and respect which should always be accorded one who 
has traveled thus far on this earthly pilgrimage and whose career has ever been 
upright and honorable. He is widely and favorably known throughout the 
county which has remained his home for almost two-thirds of a century and of 
the growth and development of which he has been an interested witness. 



EDWARD J. DOUGHERTY. 

In the development of the natural resources of Iowa and in the promotion 
of business interests which have had much to do with the upbuilding and ad- 
vancement of Davenport and the state at large, Edward J. Dougherty took ac- 
tive and prominent part and came to be recognized as most influential in the pro- 
motion of business interests, as a leader in financial circles and as a promoter of 
various mining projects. The extent and importance of his work well entitled 
him to rank with the representative residents of this city. Mr. Dougherty was 
born in County Tipperary, Ireland, March 17, 1846, a son of William Dougherty, 
who in 185 1 bade adieu to the Emerald isle and with his family sailed for the. new 
world. Becoming a resident of Davenport, he started the first brickyard in this 
city. Two years later he established his family upon a farm on the Utica road 
and there Edward J. Dougherty remained until twenty-six years of age, his 
youthful experiences being those that usually fall to the lot of the farm lad. He 
acquired his education in the public schools and through the summer months 
worked in the fields. 

Two years before leaving the old homestead Edward J. Dougherty was mar- 
ried to Miss Alice E. Glynn, whose father was a prominent farmer of Long 
Grove. After leaving the old home place Mr. Dougherty and his family resided on 
a farm in Sheridan township until 1888, when he purchased the old Brownlie 
farm on Brady street. There he made his hom.e until he removed to this city 
and took up his residence in the old Dr. J. L. Reed homestead at No. 1504 Main 
street. He was one of the organizers of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings 
Bank and at the time of his death was a director and the chairman of the execu- 
tive committee of the bank. The extent and variety of his business interests 
and connections made him one of the most prominent residents of Scott county. 
His labors contributed in large and substantial measure to public progress and 
improvement and he well deserves mention with those who have been the real 
upbuilders of this section of the state. He promoted the Davenport and South- 
ern Railroad and was its first president, continuing in that office until his demise. 
He promoted and financed the Guaranty Mutual Life Insurance Company, be- 
coming one of its directors, and was chairman of its executive committee. He 



228 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

was also the president of the Scott County Coal Mining Company, the president 
of Schick's Express & Storage Company, president of the Silvis Coal Mining- 
Company of Carbon Cliff, Illinois, and a director of the Norris Coal Mining 
Company. As his financial resources increased he made extensive investment 
in realty and became one of the largest landowners of the county, holding title 
to twelve hundred and thirty acres in Princeton township, one hundred and sixty- 
two acres in Butler township, two hundred acres in Sheridan township and one 
hundred and sixty acres in Lincoln township. He also had extensive holdings 
in the Dakotas and Nebraska, together with much real estate in Davenport. 
Whatever he undertook he carried forward to successful completion and his 
business affairs were ever of a constructive nature, contributing to the general 
growth and prosperity of the community. He was a man of strong character, 
of domestic virtues and of moral and religious spirit. He was widely known as 
an efficient pubhc official, serving for several terms as supervisor during his res- 
idence in Sheridan township. In religious faith he was a Catholic and gave gen- 
erously to the support of the church and its charities. He stood as a splendid 
example of the type of self-made man. Reared in the growing west, he saw 
and improved the advantages which Iowa afforded her citizens and in the estab- 
lishment and conduct of important business interests he became recognized as 
one of the foremost men of Scott county, his labors being of far-reaching and 
beneficial effect in relation to public welfare and at the same time constituting a 
source of substantial individual profit. 



WILLIAM S. CHENOWETH. 

For a period of over forty-one years William S. Chenoweth has been a resi- 
dent of Davenport and through intelligently directed activity in his chosen field 
of labor, came to be recognized as one of the most prominent representatives of 
the Aetna Fire Insurance Company of Connecticut. He is today one of the 
oldest insurance men in the state, but is now living retired, his success in former 
years enabling him to enjoy many of the comforts of life without recourse to 
further labor. He has passed his eighty-fourth milestone on life's journey. 
During twenty-eight years and a half he averaged twenty-five thousand miles a 
year on the road for the Aetna Insurance Company. 

His birth occurred in New Castle, Pennsylvania, September 26, 1825, his 
parents being Arthur and Rebecca (Reynolds) Chenoweth. His father was one 
of the early settlers of Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, and named this county 
before his death, which occurred over eighty-two years ago, and the family has 
long been represented in that state. He had previously lived near Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, when he removed to Pennsylvania. 

William S. Chenoweth was educated in the schools of his native city, and in 
the year 1844 sought the opportunities of the middle west, first establishing his 
home near La Harpe, Illinois. He afterward lived at different points in that 
state and was associated with different lines of business until eventually he 
turned his attention to insurance. He is today one of the oldest insurance men 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 231 

in the state of Iowa and one of the best known in the western and southern 
states. The rebelUon destroyed the large insurance business of the Aetna Fire 
Insurance Company in southern states and nearly forty years ago he was sent 
by the Aetna Insurance Company to open up the insurance business for this 
company in the different southern states. It was a hard place to travel then, as 
the railroads were put in bad condition by the war. He entered this field in a 
humble way, but gradually advanced as he proved his usefulness and worth in 
this field. He thoroughly familiarized himself with every phase of the insur- 
ance business and with firm belief in its value, to the insured as well as the 
members of the company promoting insurance, he was enabled to build up an 
extensive clientage and secure a business, the volume of which brought him, in 
the course of years, to a prominent position among the insurance men of the 
state, securing for him at the same time a substantial financial reward for his 
labors. 

On the 17th of April, 1851, Mr. Chenoweth was united in marriage to Miss 
Caroline Webster Painter. Her father, like Mr. Chenoweth's, had come to the 
middle west in the hope of bettering his fortune. Mr. and Mrs. Chenoweth can 
both remember spending the day together at her home over seventy-four years 
ago, when she was five and he was ten years of age. By this marriage there were 
bom four children: Alice, the oldest, is living at home. Mary P. became the 
wife of J. B. Johnson, who for twenty-eight years was an attorney of Des 
Moines and is now living in Oklahoma City. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have three 
children: Arthur, who is married and has a son, Donald; Hazel, the wife of 
John H. Fowler, by whom she has one son, William H. ; and Ernest C, at home. 
Louise, the third member of the family, died in childhood. Henrietta B., the 
youngest of the family, is the wife of Oren Bradshaw Waite, a minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and they have two daughters. Marguerite and 
Dorothy. 

Sixty-three years ago Mr. Chenoweth joined the ranks of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and has since maintained active membership in that 
fraternity, heartily endorsing the beneficent principles which constitute its basic 
elements. He has always been a generous contributor to the churches and his 
influence has ever been on the side of justice, truth and right. His political 
allegiance was given to the whig party in early manhood, and in 1844 he heard 
Henry Clay make a speech from the steps of the old Planters House in St. 
Louis. He joined the republican party on its organization and has since been 
one of its stalwart advocates. 

He has lived in the Mississippi valley for fifty-three years, and his life record 
covers almost eight-five years, so that he has been a witness of many events 
which to the great majority are matters of history. He can remember the 
building of the early railroads in this section of the country and of being in 
Chicago Ihe day the books were opened to sell stock in the first Chicago rail- 
road (the Chicago & Galena Railroad) and the day when the emigrants to the 
west traveled in the old moving wagons. Chicago then had fourteen thousand 
inhabitants. Many of the homes in this section of the country were log cabins 
and sod houses and there were vast tracts of land yet unclaimed and unculti- 
vated. 



232 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Mr. Chenoweth has lived to witness the remarkable changes which have 
occurred and has always maintained a deep interest in the work of progress 
that has brought Illinois and Iowa to their present advanced position. It is 
these places that the greater part of his life has been passed in and he has 
always felt that he made a wise move when he came to this section of the coun- 
try, rich in its natural resources and affording boundless opportunities to the 
early settlers as well as to the later day residents. While his able managed in- 
dividual interests have brought to him success, he has always contributed in no 
small degree toward promoting general progress through the course of years. 



JOSEPH N. GREENE. 



There are many admirable traits of character exemplified in the life of Joseph 
N. Greene, who is now one of the patriarchal citizens of Davenport, having 
reached the age of eighty-four years. Much of his life was devoted to the art 
of photography but since 1894 he has lived retired. A native of Pennsylvania, 
Joseph N. Greene was born in Clearfield county, March 6, 1826, and is a son of 
Isaac and Elizabeth (Liebengood) Greene. The father was a carpenter by 
trade and during the latter part of his life engaged in boat building on the canal 
at Blairsville, to which place he removed with his family soon after the birth of 
his son Joseph. The latter there resided until about 1862 and acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools of that town. He now has in his possession a pic- 
ture of the old log school building which was erected in 1830 and was used as a 
church and place of public meetings as well as for educational purposes. His 
father built the first house in Blairsville and the family were closely associated 
with the development and progress of the town. Both the father and mother 
died there, the former passing away at the age of fifty years, while the latter, 
long surviving him, reached the very advanced age of ninety-four years. Her 
parents were among the first settlers of western Pennsylvania and as pioneer 
residents aided in planting the seeds of civilization in a virgin soil. 

Joseph N. Greene, who was the fourth in a family of nine children, after 
pursuing his education in the schools of Blairsville, learned the trade of boat 
making under his father and followed it until after his father's death. He built 
a boat for himself about 1848 and used it on the canal there. In 1861 he organ- 
ized a company at Blairsville for service in the Civil war, for his patriotic spirit 
was aroused by the attempt of the south to overthrow the Union. The organi- 
zation became known as Company I of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry. They enlisted at Blairsville and went into camp at Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania, Mr. Greene being elected captain of the company. They remained in 
Harrisburg for about four months and then proceeded to Washington, D. C, 
joining the Army of the Potomac. Mr. Greene was in^ a number of skirmishes 
up to the time when he was honorably discharged on account of ill health in 1863. 

Returning to Pennsylvania, he established his home in Allegheny, where he 
turned his attention to photography. In 1865 he removed to Geneseo, Illinois, 
and conducted a photograph gallery there until 1879, after which he went to 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 233 

Morrison and later to Sterling, Illinois, where he remained for two years. On 
the expiration of that period he came to Davenport and since 1894 has continu- 
ously lived retired. During his active connection with the photographic art he 
■kept in touch with all the modern processes of taking pictures and, with keen 
appreciation for the effects of light and shade as well as for pose, he produced 
excellent work that gained for him a liberal patronage and made his business a 
profitable venture. 

"X)n the 13th of November, 1862, Mr. Greene was married in Davenport to 
Miss Susan Brown, a daughter of Squire James and Mary (Donley) Brown. 
Mrs. Greene was born in Pennsylvania and in her infancy was brought to Scott 
county, Iowa. Her father first came to this county in the fall of 1844 and the 
mother brought their children the following spring to the new home which he 
had prepared. Mr. Brown rented a farm on Duck Creek, which he occupied for 
two years and then purchased an adjoining tract of land of one hundred and 
sixty acres, where he made his home for some time. Eventually he sold that 
property, however, and removed nearer Davenport, where he bought another 
farm, residing thereon until the death of his wife about 1882. He then retired 
from active life and took up his abode in the city. He was not only a prominent 
agriculturist but also took an active part in public affairs, serving as justice of 
the peace of Pleasant Valley township for a long period, during which time his 
fair and impartial decisions won him high encomiums. He was also school 
director and held other offices in the township. He gave his political support to 
the democracy and his allegiance to the Catholic church, in the faith of which he 
died in 1893 at the age of eighty-six years. His wife had passed away at the age 
of seventy-four years. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Greene were born eight children: Carrie, who is a Sister 
of Mercy in the Mercy Convent at St. Louis; Josephine, who is the wife of W. A. 
Craft, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and has two children, Dora and Gertrude; 
!/Vgnes, Pius and Lourde, all now deceased ; Mattie, the wife of James Shelby, of 
Davenport, and the mother of eight children: — Harold, Hugh, Hildegard, 
Jerome, Lourde, Barthela, Monica and Regina; Gertrude, the wife of Albert 
Osterman, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Isaac, at home. Mr. Greene has 
belonged to a large number of fraternal orders but is not affiliated with any at 
the present time. He is a prominent member of the Catholic church and his 
life has been in harmony with the teachings thereof. For eighty-four years he 
has traveled life's journey, faithfully performing the duties that each day has 
brought, and his trustworthiness, his energy and his reliability have gained him 
the high and favorable regard of all with whom he has been associated. 



FRANK W. MUNDT. 



Frank W. Mundt is numbered among those who in the opening years of the 
Civil war offered their services to the government and for three years were en- 
gaged in active military duty. He is now living retired in Davenport and is 
numbered among the worthy citizens that Germany has furnished to this state. 



234 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

His birth occurred in the city of Mecklenburg, October i6, 1834, and his par- 
ents, who were also natives of that country, spent their entire lives there. 

Frank W. Mundt acquired his education in the schools of Germany and was 
a young man of about twenty years when he made the voyage to the new world, 
landing at New Orleans. He thence proceeded up the Mississippi river to Dav- 
enport and, unafraid of hard work, immediately sought employment that would 
enable him to meet his expenses and make a good start in life. He was epi- 
ployed at different kinds of labor both in town and on the farms. At the time of 
the Civil war, however, he put aside all business and personal considerations and 
in September, 1861, at San Francisco, California, enlisted as a member of Com- 
pany K, Second Cavalry Volunteers. They went across the plains to Salt 
Lake and were engaged in fighting the Indians most of the time until mustered 
out at Salt Lake City, October 8, 1864, after which Mr. Mundt returned, to 
Davenport. 

It was on the 30th of September, 1868, that Mr. Mundt was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Anna Pahl, who was born in Holstein, Germany, a daughter of 
Claus and Marie Pahl. Her parents died in the fatherland and she came alone 
to the United States in 1866. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Mundt have been born ten 
children: Emma, the wife of John Brooks of Portland, Oregon, by whom she 
has three children — ^Dorothy, William and Selma; Anna, the wife of Robert 
Armil of Davenport, by whom she has seven children — Bessie, Etta, Earl, Ruth, 
Paul, Robert and Marie ; William, of this city, who wedded Nellie I. Oschaugh- 
nessy, now deceased, by whom he had two children — ^Julia and Alfred; Louisa, 
the wife of Louis Eckhardt, sherifif of Scott county, and the mother of two chil- 
dren — Louisa and Herbert; Selma and Frank, at home; Freda, the wife of Fred 
Volz of Davenport and the mother of two children — Margaret and Marie; and 
Paula, Emil and Alfred, all at home. 

Mr. Mundt is a member of the Grand Army Post at Davenport and takes 
pleasure in the camp fires. He is widely known in this city, where he has long 
made his home and where he stands as an excellent type of the German-Ameri- 
can citizens who have done so much for Davenport's improvement and up- 
building. 



J. W. BETTENDORF. 



As some one has expressed it, "To know Davenport is to know Bettendorf." 
In other words, the name of Bettendorf is inseparably interwoven with the history 
of the city, its commercial enterprise and business development, through almost a 
quarter of a century. The student of biography must inevitably reach the conclu- 
sion that the mass of men seem content to remain in the position in which they 
are placed by birth, experience and environment. Laudable ambition, ready 
adaptability and the capacity for hard work are essential elements of success and 
in none of these requirements has J. W. Bettendorf been found lacking. It is not 
a matter of marvel, therefore, that he occupies a prominent position among the 
real builders of this city and the eminence to which he has attained is due to the 
fact that he possesses the ability to recognize the opportune moment and to cor- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 237 

rectly appraise the value of a situation and determine its possible outcome. It is 
these qualities which have led him, in association with his brother, to enter upon 
the great work of establishing the mammoth enterprise that is now conducted under 
the name of the Bettendorf 'Axle Company, and as secretary, treasurer and man- 
ager of the company he is giving his attention to constructive effort and executive 
ability along lines that have produced what is uniformly conceded to be the most 
important industrial concern of this city. 

A native of Leavenworth, Kansas, Mr. Bettendorf was born October lo, 1864. 
His father, M. Bettendorf, a native of Germany, came to America when eighteen 
years of age, taking up his abode at Mendota, Illinois. He was a school teacher 
by profession and followed that pursuit in Illinois but subsequent to his removal 
to Sedalia, Missouri, conducted a grocery business and general store. Later he 
became a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas, and engaged in clerking for the gov- 
ernment at Fort Leavenworth. He is now living retired in the town of Bettendorf, 
a suburb of Davenport and the location of the extensive works which his sons 
have developed. He married Catharine Reck, also a native of Germany, and they 
became parents of a daughter and three sons, but only two of the family are now 
living, the elder brother being W. P. Bettendorf, president of the Bettendorf Axle 
Company. 

J. W. Bettendorf, the third child and second son, was nine years of age when 
the family left Kansas and became residents of Peru, Illinois, where he remained 
until he attained his majority. His education was largely acquired in the schools 
of Peru and when eighteen years of age he secured " a situation in the plow 
works of that place. His initial service was that of a machinist, while 
later he became foreman of the assembling department. In 1886 he came to Dav- 
enport, where in connection with his brother he organized the Bettendorf Metal 
Wheel Company. For two years he worked as a machinist and then became su- 
perintendent of the plant. In 1890 he went to Springfield, Ohio, as manager of 
the branch of the business at that place, but in the fall of 1893 returned to Daven- 
port and in association with W. P. Bettendorf turned his attention to the manu- 
facture of steel gear wagons. In January, 1895, their interests were incorporated 
under the name of Bettendorf Axle Company, with J. W. Bettendorf as secretary. 
Something of the extent and prominence of the business is indicated in a humor- 
ous reply recently made to a Davenport man in Pittsburg. When asked where he 
was from and telling the city of his residence the inquirer said, "Oh, yes, Daven- 
port — ^that is near Bettendorf, isn't it?" This indicates how widely the town of 
Bettendorf — ^and the town is practically the great Bettendorf works — is known. 
The volume of its business has made the name a familiar one to the iron trade, not 
only of America but of Europe. J. W. Bettendorf continued to serve as secretary 
and manager of the company from 1899 until 1906, when he was also elected 

treasurer. 

In 1888 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Bettendorf and Miss Elizabeth 
Ohl, a daughter of George and Sibilla Ohl. They have two sons, Edwin J. and 
William E., aged respectively twenty and seven years. Mr. Bettendorf is one of 
the charter members of the Elks lodge and is prominent in the social life of the 
city, while in all those things which pertain to the city's substantial growth and 
progress he is deeply and actively interested. Many measures which are of strictly 



238 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

impersonal character have received his endorsement and' cooperation and the city 
has been benefited thereby. In this age of marked industry and activity he has 
made for himself an honored name but it is not his success alone that entitles him 
to the high regard of his friends. He has never allowed the accumulation of 
wealth to affect in any way his manner toward those less fortunate, and entrance 
to his circle of friends is gained by character worth and not by material posses- 
sions. His associates know him as a most genial and kindly gentleman and while 
his business relations have brought him the acquaintance of many men distin- 
guished in commercial circles, he holds as his most priceless treasure the friendship 
and respect of his fellow townsmen, among whom he has now resided for almost a 
quarter of a century. 



GEORGE W. VALENTINE. 

George W. Valentine, long and favorably known in the business circles of 
Davenport, where he is conducting an extensive contracting business as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Garstang & Valentine, bricklayers, was born at Buffalo, New 
York, July 8, 1834, and is a son of William and Katherine (Mee) Valentine. 
The father was a bricklayer in the east and the mother died during the residence 
of the family in that part of the country. The father came to Davenport after 
the arrival of his son George here and spent his last days in this city. 

George W. Valentine pursued his education in the public schools of Buffalo 
and afterward learned the bricklayer's trade under the direction of his father. 
Noting the rapid improvement and settlement of the middle west and believing 
that it would offer a good field of labor for one in his line of work, he came to 
Davenport alone in 1856, when a young man of but twenty-two years of age. 
Here he began work at his trade and has since been connected with this line of 
business. He aided in building the old Methodist church, was employed on the 
construction of the First National Bank, also of the Burtis Opera House, the 
Kimball Hotel and a large number of other buildings. About thirty years ago 
he formed a partnership with Frank Garstang and during this period they have 
been awarded contracts for the erection of many large and important buildings 
in the city. They sustain an unassailable reputation because of the excellent 
workmanship which is done under their supervision and because of their un- 
faltering fidelity to the terms of a contract. Their patronage is now extensive 
and the business has long been conducted upon a profitable basis. 

On the 4th of June, 1857, Mr. Valentine was united.in marriage to Miss Mary 
Snow, a daughter of William and Louisa (Clark) Show. She was born in 
Chautauqua county, New York, and came to Scott county, Iowa, in 1856. For 
fifty-three years, therefore, Mr. and Mrs. Valentine have traveled life's journey 
together and as time passed on their marriage was blessed with five children: 
Leon, who married Anna Russell and has one daughter, Mary ; Carrie, the wife 
of Joseph O. Bradney, of Belmont, New York; Martha, the wife of William 
Davis, of Livingston, Montana, by whom she has three children — Leon, Marion 
and Carrie; George, of Evanston, Illinois, who married Lottie Wells and has 
three children— Wells W., George S. and Mary; and Ella, who died at the age 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 239 

of fourteen months. The parents began their domestic life in the same house in 
which they still reside. 

Mr. Valentine and his wife are members of the Unitarian church. In mat- 
ters of citizenship he has always been interested and his support has been given 
to those projects and measures which he has deemed of importance and of vital 
significance to the community. He has ever favored progress and improvement 
and those qualities have been manifest in his own life. His reliability in business 
and his fidelity in other relations have won for him a creditable standing in public 
regard. 



RIGHT REV. THEODORE X. -AIORRISON, D. D. 

The Right Rev. Theodore N. Morrison, Episcopal bishop of Iowa, was born 
in Ottawa, Illinois, February i8, 1850. His father, Theodore Morrison, a native 
of Pennsylvania, was brought to Illinois in 1835 by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Morrison, who settled at Tremont. Theodore Morrison, Sr., became a rep- 
resentative of the Episcopal ministry, being ordained by Bishop Chase in 1848, 
after which he labored for many years in Aurora, Jacksonville and Bloomington, 
Illinois. A life consecrated to this holy calling was closed in 1888 when, at the 
age of sixty-two years, he passed away. In early manhood he had wedded Anna 
Eliza Howland, a native of New York and a daughter of Allen A. Howland, M. 
D., who settled in Ottawa, Illinois, in 1832. 

Bishop ]\Iorrison, whose name introduces this review, was the eldest in a 
family of three sons and two daughters. In his youthful days he attended the 
public schools of Jacksonville and in 1870 was graduated from the Illinois Col- 
lege of that city, having completed the literary and scientific courses. Determin- 
ing to devote his life to the ministry, he entered the General Seminary of New 
York city and in 1873 was made deacon. The same year he took charge of St. 
Paul's Episcopal church in Pekin, lUinios, and in 1875 was advanced to the 
priesthood. In 1876 he became rector of the Church of the Epiphany in Chicago, 
where he remained until February, 1899, or for a period of almost twenty-three 
years. His work there was characterized by continuous growth in the various 
lines of church activity and the Epiphany became one of the strong churches in 
Chicago. His parishioners were loath to part with him yet rejoiced in the honor 
that was conferred upon him when on February 22, 1899, he was consecrated 
bishop of Iowa. He then came to Davenport, where he has since resided, care- 
fully guiding the destinies of the churches under his direction with the same zeal 
and earnestness which he manifested when in charge of the Church of the Epi- 
phany in Chicago. He holds the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Illinois Col- 
lege and from General Seminary, and the degree of S. T. D. from the Western 
Theological Seminary. 

On the 28th of October, 1879, Dr. Morrison was married to Miss Sarah B. 
Swazey. a daughter of the Rev. Arthur Swazey, for many years pastor of the 
Third Presbyterian church of Chicago, and the first editor of The Interior. Dr. 
and Mrs. Morrison have six children, namely: Rev. Cameron S., who resides in 



240 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

the state of Washington; Mrs. Zay B. Curtis, living in Little Rock, Arkansas; 
Nevin S. ; Arthur S.; Theodore N.; and Sarah. 

Dr. Morrison is a man of strong executive ability, marked ecclesiastical force 
and with that broad general culture which makes him the peer not only of the 
leading representatives of the clergy but also of those men whose thought is 
given to the solution of problems of grave import to mankind. Transcending 
every other interest in his life, however, is the work to which he has been devoted 
from early manhood and, conscientiously and zealously utilizing and consecrat- 
ing the powers with which nature endowed him, his labors have come to be rec- 
ognized as a strong force in the development of the Episcopal church in the 
middle west. 



HANS J. EHLERT. 



Ernest, persistent labor is the secret of the success which constitutes the 
crowning feature of the business record of Hans J. Ehlert, who for many years 
diligently engaged in gardening and in the nursery business. He was born near 
Dannewerk, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, April 4, 1839. His parents, Chris- 
tian and Anna Ehlert, both died in Germany. They were farming people of that 
country and owned a fine tract of land there. Their son Hans still has a picture 
of the old home and also the church and churchyard in which his parents He 
buried. He acquired his education in the schools of his native land, was reared 
to the occupation of farming and followed that pursuit during his residence in 
the fatherland. He owned two hundred acres of land there, which he sold on 
coming to America, the year 1881 witnessing his arrival in New York. He made 
his way direct to Davenport, where lived his uncle, Jens Peter Stebold. His 
first work here was for a Mr. Putnam, whom he served as gardener, and to that 
business he continued to devote his energies for many years. He also served as 
sexton of the West Davenport cemetery for nearly seven years and made many 
improvements while there, employing the art of the landscape gardener to make 
it a beautiful silent city. In the spring of 1899 he erected his present fine resi- 
dence, which he has since occupied. 

Mr. Ehlert was married on the 2d of May, 1861, to Miss Christina Harmsen, 
a native of Germany, who was born May 24, 1836, and died January 23, 1889. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ehlert became the parents of nine children but the irst two died 
in infancy. The others were : Anna, the wife of Hans Anderson, of Springfield, 
Missouri, and the mother of two children — Nelson and Christ; John, of Daven- 
port, who married Leona Peterson and has two children — Flora and Irma; 
Christ, of Davenport, who wedded Laura Peters, who died, leaving two chil- 
dren — Ella and Minnie — after which he wedded Mary Jens; Marie, at home; 
Chrissie, the wife of William Murray, of Batesville, Arkansas, by whom she has 
one child — Gladys; Julius, at home; and Henry, who died at the age of nine 
years. 

Mr. Ehlert is a prominent member of Davenport Lodge, No. 50, K. P., in 
which he has been honored with all of the offices. His diligent life, enterprising 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 241 

spirit and reliable business methods have constituted the chief features in a suc- 
cess which is as honorable as it is desirable. For many years he carried on gar- 
dening and the nursery business until his labors brought him a substantial suc- 
cess, permitting of his present retirement from business cares. 



HEINRICH and CARL MATTHEY, M. D. 

The interests and life history of Drs. Heinrich and Carl Matthey are so in- 
separably associated that it would be impossible to record the career of one 
without giving extended mention of the other. Twin brothers, they are natives 
of Prussia, born on the 20th of October, 1852. Their parents were Heinrich and 
Emilie (Kuntz) Matthey. The father was one of the German patriots of 1848 
and was active in the revolution of that year, but was not destined to go to the 
front, for they were captured and disarmed ere they took part in active military 
service. Heinrich Matthey was a man of education, and it was that he might 
enjoy the benefits of a more liberal government that were denied him in his native 
country that he sought a home in the new world. Settling in Davenport, he 
engaged in literary work, being for many years the editor and publisher of the 
Sternah Banner, which he established in 1876. He still makes his home in 
this city, and is one of its most respected and honored German residents. 

The brothers, Drs. Heinrich and Carl Matthey, acquired their preliminary 
education in Germany, where they resided with their parents until twenty-one 
years of age, at which time the family came to the United States, first settling 
in Milwaukee. Heinrich Matthey accompanied his parents, for he had already 
finished his elementary education, and had adopted journalism as his profession. 
With that field of labor he was connected until 1882. Dr. Carl Matthey elected 
to remain in Germany until he had finished his education. The family home 
was maintained in Milwaukee from 1873 until 1876, when a removal was made 
to Davenport. Dr.. Heinrich Matthey was associated with his father for some 
time on the Sternan Banner, and in 1880 went to Sterling, Illinois, where he 
published the Sterling Beobachter, which he conducted successfully for two 
years. He then sold out and went to Germany to study medicine, pursuing a 
course in medicine and surgery in Leipsic and in Wuerzburg Universities, being 
graduated from the latter with the class of 1887. In the meantime Dr. Carl 
Matthey had studied at the universities in Munich, Marburg and Zurich, being 
graduated from the university in the last named place in 1880. He then came 
to America and opened an ofifice in Davenport. Dr. Heinrich Matthey returned 
to Davenport in 1887 and for two years practiced alone, but in 1889 the brothers 
formed a partnership and have since been associated in the practice of medicine 
and surgery. They have made continuous progress in their chosen field of labor, 
becoming more firmly established each year and increasing as well the scope, 
extent and value of their professional practice. They have always remained 
close and discriminating students and by research and investigation have kept 
in touch with the marvelous advance in knowledge, methods, appliances and 
mechanical auxiliaries made in the past few years. At times they have gone 



242 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

abroad to visit the best and most progressive hospitals of Europe, and while at 
home new distinctions, new work, and new public duties in their profession have 
been theirs, finding them ready to give their best efforts and meet in 
full each duty that has devolved upon them. Their practice is now extensive 
and the profession as well as the public accords them high rank as distinguished 
physicians and surgeons. Both hold membership in the Scott County, the Iowa 
and Illinois Central District, the Iowa State and American Medical Associations. 
They are also serving on the staff of Mercy and St. Luke's Hospitals. 

In 1882 Dr. Carl Matthey was married to Miss Meta StefFen, a daughter of 
August Steffen, Sr., and to them have been born two sons and a daughter. In 
1890 Dr. Heinrich Matthey wedded Miss Hilda Mueller, a daughter of Chris 
Mueller, and they now have two children. The families are prominent socially 
and the brothers are identified with several clubs and social organizations. Dr. 
Heinrich Matthey belongs to the Commercial Club and is much interested in its 
success. He is also a member of the park commission, and by appointment of 
the governor has served as a member of the state board of health for eight years. 
Dr. Carl Matthey was a member of the school board for two terms, or six 
years, and both are interested in promoting the best interests of good govern- 
ment and municipal improvement, yet are without personal ambition for office. 
In the positions to which they have been called, however, they have done excel- 
lent work for public benefit, their service being marked by many tangible evi- 
dences of their devotion to the general good. Although born across the water, 
they stand as a splendid type of American manhood and citizenship, and are 
neglectful of no opportunity to advance the public welfare, while their deepest 
interests, their ambitions, and their natural inclinations are bound up in their 
profession, in which they are honored, and in which they have achieved enviable 
distinction. 



CAPTAIN W. A. BLAIR. 

Prompted always by the laudable ambition of eventually attaining success, 
Captain W. A. Blair, as the result of his energy and capability, has gradually 
advanced in business circles until he is today one of the best known of the river 
men in the Mississippi valley. He has for a number of years been president of 
the Carnival City Packet Company. For thirty-two years he has been con- 
nected with the shipping and passenger service and has been an interested 
witness of the changes which have constituted features in the history of 
shipping on this great natural highway. Few, if any, are more competent to 
speak authoritatively upon the subject for practically throughout his entire 
business career Captain Blair has been actively connected with marine interests, 
conforming his business to changing conditions and utilizing the various oppor- 
tunities offered for success. 

He was born in Galena, Illinois, November 17, 1856. His father. Andrew 
Blair, a native of Ireland, came to America when fifteen years of age and in 
this country wedded Margaret A. Henry, a native of Baltimore, Maryland, who 
is now living in Davenport. Captain Blair is the eldest of seven children, four 



-X- 





a^rr^ll^ 



n- 




HISTORY Of SCOTT COUNTY 245 

sons and three daughters. His boyhood days were spent in and around Galena 
and the aptitude which he displayed in the acquirement of an education enabled 
him, at the age of eighteen years, to secure a teacher's certificate. He then 
engaged in teaching in and near Princeton, Iowa, following that profession for 
nine terms. During the last four terms he taught only in the winter months, 
while the summer seasons were spent on the Mississippi river, and thus he en- 
tered the department of labor which was to claim the major portion of his at- 
tention throughout the remainder of his active life. 

When twenty-one years of age he secured the position of clerk on the tow- 
boat Le Claire Belle, of which ex-Governor Van Sant was part owner and man- 
ager. He spent four seasons in the employ of Governor Van Sant, by which 
time he had thoroughly learned the river, so that he was granted a pilot's and 
master's, license to navigate the river between St. Louis and St. Paul. It was 
at that time that Captain Blair joined Captain Van Sant in a partnership under 
the name of the Le Claire Navigation Company. This was in 1882. They be- 
came actively engaged in towing logs and lumber and at one time operated seven 
boats, while Mr. Van Sant owned also four other boats independent of the 
company's interests. Thus together they handled one-fifth of the output of logs 
at Beef Slough in its palmy days. Their iausiness grew to extensive and profit- 
able proportions, and they were regarded as one of the most reliable, capable 
and enterprising firms connected with river interests. The decline of the log- 
ging business, due to the exhaustion of the supply of pine, induced Captain Blair 
to sell his stock in the towboats at a sacrifice. 

He then turned his attention to the local packet business and organized the 
Carnival City Packet Company in 1892, its board of directors consisting of Cap- 
tain August Reimers, L. M. Fisher, F. W. Smith, M. L. Marks and Captain 
W. A. Blair. There has been but one change in the board since the organiza- 
tion, that occurring in the winter of 1908, when G. M. Bechtel was elected to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Captain August Reimers. In the intervening 
years the company has owned and operated nine different boats, plying between 
Davenport and Burlington, Keokuk and Burlington, and Keokuk and Quincy. 
They now own and operate the following river craft : the Columbia, Helen Blair, 
Wenona and Keokuk and the Black Hawk, a new boat. The business has steadily 
grown, and they now handle about one hundred and twenty-five thousand pas- 
sengers and fifteen thousand tons of freight annually. They have had two losses 
by fire but never a mishap resulting in the loss of a single passenger. Captain Blair 
during the thirty-two years' experience has never had occasion to use a life pre- 
server. He is regarded as one of the most careful and reliable river captains, giving 
frequent and thorough inspection to his vessels in every department, his long and 
practical experience enabling him to correctly judge of the worth and substan- 
tiality of each part of the boat and also of the value of the services of the men 
who are in charge. 

In 1882 Captain Blair was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Bard, a 
daughter of Richard and Phebe Bard, of Le Claire, Iowa. They have two sons 
and a daughter : George W., Gertrude Helen and Burdette. 

Captain Blair is a member of the Masonic fraternity in Davenport and has 
always been much interested in public affairs of the city, giving active and loyal 



246 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

support to every project and movement which he deems of value in upholding 
civic virtue and civic pride. For more than a half century he has witnessed 
the growth and progress of this and other cities along the river and has been a 
factor in the business activity which has promoted the commercial and industrial 
progress. His chosen life work has brought him a wide acquaintance among 
leading business men and wherever known he is highly esteemed, winning the 
respect and admiration of his fellowmen by reason of his fidelity to high and 
honorable principles. 



O. C. ROGERS, M. D. 



Dr. O. C. Rogers, engaged in the practice of medicine in Davenport since 
1892, was born in Pennsylvania on the nth of February, i860. His father, Wil- 
liam Rogers, was likewise a native of the Keystone state and a representative of 
the medical profession. He visited Scott county in the '50s, carefully looked 
over the situation and then returned to the east. The memory of the pleasing 
western country, however, remained with him and at length proved an irresistible 
attraction, so that in 1862 he returned with his family and took up his abode in 
this county. He continued to practice in Slopertown until the early '80s, when 
he removed to Pleasant Valley, where he remained for two years and then came 
to Davenport, passing away in this city in 1892. He married Sarah Coiiklin, 
also a native of Pennsylvania. 

The country schools afforded Dr. Rogers his early educational privileges, 
while later he had the benefit of instruction in the Davenport high school. De- 
siring a professional career, he studied medicine in the oiifice of Dr. H. L. Baw- 
den, of Davenport, who directed his preHminary reading, while subsequently he 
attended the Iowa State University. He next entered the Creighton College at 
Omaha, from which he was graduated, and when seven years had been devoted 
to practice at Pleasant Valley, Iowa, he removed to Davenport in 1892 and has 
since been engaged in general practice in this city. 

In 1889 Dr. Rogers was married to Miss Mary B. Finefield, a native of Iowa, 
and unto them have been born two children. Bertha and William. Having spent 
practically his entire life in this county, Dr. Rogers is well known and has made 
many friends during the years of his residence in Davenport. 



S. H. MOORHEAD. 



It is seldom that an individual wins distinction in more than one line of busi- 
ness or has time to devote himself to more than one line of activity. An excep- 
tion to this rule, however, is found in the life record of S. H. Moorhead, who 
not only is identified with various lines of business in Buffalo, but is also a well 
known and influential figure in financial and political circles of the community. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 247 

Scott county, Iowa, numbers him among her native sons, his birth occurring 
in Buffalo township on the 28th of October, 1861, a son of H. C. and Mary 
Moorhead. The former came to Scott county in 1835, from Zanesville, Ohio, 
and here purchased what was then known as the Campbell place, consisting of 
three hundred and twelve acres of land in Buffalo township, just west of the 
village of Buffalo. There he reared his family and spent his remaining days. 
Our subject was one of a family of four sons and two daughters born unto Mr. 
and Mrs. H. C. Moorhead, and of this number three sons and two daughters 
lived to reach mature years. The brother, William Moorhead, who still survives, 
makes his home on a portion of the old homestead, while one sister, Mrs. D. B. 
Morehouse, of Davenport, is now deceased. 

On his father's farm S. H. Moorhead was reared to manhood; acquiring his 
education in the public schools of Buffalo, and devoting the time not given to 
his text-books to the work of the fields, early becoming familiar with the tasks 
that fall to the lot of the farm lad. Amid the busy activities of the farm he 
learned many lessons concerning the value of industry, integrity and persever- 
ance — lessons which served as an excellent foundation stone upon which to build 
his future business success. After leaving school he devoted several years to 
the occupation to which he had been reared, engaging as a farm hand, and then, 
on the ist of September, 1886, in connection with his brother-in-law, Mr. Dor- 
man, started his present lumber business. In 1889 he purchased his brother- 
in-law's interest in the business and has since conducted the enterprise alone. 
He does a general business in lumber and building materials, having an exten- 
sive trade, not only throughout Buffalo township, but also in several Illinois 
towns lying across the river. A man of excellent business ability and wise 
sagacity, he has made a close study of the demands of the trade and has ever 
kept in close touch with the lumber market, so that he not only knows where 
and when to purchase, but also how to sell to the best advantage, and has be- 
come a well known and prominent figure in lumber circles of Scott county. 

Mr. Moorhead has also found time to direct his attention to other business 
channels and has dealt considerably in real estate. He is the owner of a section 
of land in Canada and also owns a part of the old homestead farm, upon which 
his brother William resides. In April, 1909, he became the prime mover in the 
organization of the Buffalo Savings Bank and was elected its first president, in 
which office he is still incumbent. This bank has already become an important 
factor in financial circles, taking its place among the safe and reliable moneyed 
institutions of the community, and much of its rapid progress and success is due 
to the well directed efforts of its president, whose reputation for integrity and 
honesty in all business dealings is universally conceded. He is thoroughly identi- 
fied with its interests and is doing everything in his power to increase its in- 
fluence and standing in the locality. 

In June, 1891, in Buffalo, Mr. Moorhead was united in marriage to Miss 
Amelia Dorman, a daughter of Henry Dorman, of Buffalo, and this union has 
been blessed with one daughter. Flora, who is at present a student in the Daven- 
port high school. 

The religious connection of Mr. Moorhead is indicated by the fact that he 
was baptized in the faith of the Episcopal church, while fraternally he holds 



248 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

membership in Banner Lodge, No. i6, K. P., and in Buffalo Camp of Modern 
Woodmen of America. Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, he 
has given stalwart allegiance to the republican party and has been called by his 
fellow citizens to fill various local offices, including that of councilman. He has 
also served as a member of the school board, the cause of education ever finding 
in him a stanch advocate. Preeminently a man of business, his efforts in con- 
nection with various enterprises have served as potent factors in stimulating ac- 
tivity along those lines, and he justly deserves a foremost place among the sub- 
stantial, influential and representative citizens of Buffalo township, within whose 
borders his entire life has been spent and where he is respected, trusted and ad- 
mired by an extensive circle of warm friends. 



ESEK STEERE BALLORD. 

One of the most prominent of the older generation of the citizens of Daven- 
port is Esek Steere Ballord, who for upward of half a century has been con- 
nected with the business life here. During that time he conducted a drug store 
at one locality, although the firm name was changed several times, but more 
than that he has identified himself with those interests that are calculated to 
promote the intellectual and moral advancement of his fellow citizens. He is 
a descendant of a family for many years associated with the history of this 
country. The first of his name to settle upon American shores was William 
Ballard, from whom were descended in direct line Nathaniel, William, Zaccheus 
and Lynde, who was the grandfather of our subject. His son John was one 
of the first graduates from Colgate University and became a minister of the 
Baptist church. He wedded Miss Augusta Maria Oilman, who was descended 
from colonial ancestors, for Moses Oilman came from England in 1635, settling 
in what is now known as Hingham, Massachusetts. 

Esek Steere Ballord was born in Bloomfield, Connecticut, July 26, 1830, and 
received his education at Bacon Academy. Later he went to Hartford, where 
he learned the drug business. Having attained a certain efficiency in what was 
to be his vocation he went to New York city, where he became an apothecary 
for a charitable institution. After two years' experience there lie went to Cleve- 
land, Ohio, but remained only two years before he continued his western jour- 
ney and came to Davenport. Here he engaged in the drug business, with which 
he was connected for forty-five years, dispensing healing medicines and other 
sundries at the same place throughout that period. The name was first Taylor 
& Ballord, but was later changed to E. S. Ballord & Company, by the admis^ 
sion of his cousin John W. Ballard. E. S. Ballord retired from the company 
in 1903, when it was continued by John W. Ballard and his son Harry in the 
firm name of Ballard Drug & Dental Company. Upon retiring from active 
participation in the business, Mr. Ballord devoted himself to farming, for the 
estate he owns in Davenport is one of the largest in the city. It embraces six 
acres and is known as the Birches. There are in all thirty varieties of trees 
planted upon the grounds to enhance their beauty, many of them having been 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 249 

brought from Connecticut. While he never spared any means to advance his 
own prosperity, Mr. Ballord has found time to devote to other matters, for 
during a long period of years he occupied the position of trustee of the C. C. 
Cook Home for the Friendless and for a number of years was the president, 
vice president and director of the Davenport National Bank. 

On September 4, 1862, Mr. Ballord was united in marriage to Miss Frances 
Webb, a daughter of Zerah Webb and a descendant in the eighth generation 
of Christopher Webb, of Braintree, Massachusetts. She is also a descendant in 
the seventh generation of Henry Adams, of Braintree and Quincy, Massachu- 
setts, who was the ancestor of the two presidents, John and John Quincy 
Adams, and also of Samuel Adams. Five children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Ballord. Katharin Augusta is the wife of Leon M. Allen, passenger traffic 
manager of the Rock Island system, and they live in Kenilworth. Illinois. They 
have three children, Leon, Priscilla and Francis. Bessie W. is a graduate of 
Wellesley College of the class of 1887. She has traveled widely abroad, but 
makes her home in Davenport. Belle became the wife of Jenness B. Richardson, 
who is manager of the Davenport Democrat. They have one son, David Nel- 
son. John Oilman married Marie Cooper Adams, and they have a son, John 
Adams. Webb Rysee wedded Gertrude Jones, of San Francisco, and is a grad- 
uate of the Webb Naval Academy, but completed his education in Glasgow, 
Scotland. He is a naval architect by profession, and is now manager of the 
Canon Lumber Company of Everett, Washington. 

The family are members of the Baptist church, in the work of which, they 
take an active interest. Mr. Ballord belongs to the Iowa Sons of the Revolu- 
tion and of the Colonial Wars. He was one of the founders of the Runnemede 
and a member of the New England Historical Society of Boston. With his 
daughter, Bessie W., he is a life member in the Davenport Academy of Science. 
He also took out a life membership certificate in the American Sunday School 
Union, as he was fully in sympathy with the principles which lay at the bot- 
tom of this organization. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, be- 
longing to Trinity Lodge, No. 208. Mrs. Ballord belongs to the Mayflower and 
Colonial Dames through her descent from Governor William Bradford and 
John Alden and takes an active part both in the work of the local society and 
in the national body. Her daughters Katharin and Belle are also members of 
Colonial Dames. One of the more prominent families of Davenport, Mr. Bal- 
lord's home at 226 East Locust street, is frequently the scene of congenial gath- 
erings of friends, in whose midst Mrs. Ballord shows that she is a hostess of 
charming qualities. 



EDWARD MEYER. 



Among the leading men of his part of Scott county must be numbered 
Edward Meyer, who was born in Davenport township, September 19, 1859, his 
parents being Hans and Cecelia (Stoltenberg) Meyer, natives of Holstein, Ger- 
many. Both of them came to America in 1847, she in company with her parents 



250 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

and he alone. They were married in Davenport and lived on a farm in Daven- 
port township until 1867, when they moved into Blue Grass township, only a 
short distance from the city, the father engaging in farming there. In 1897 he 
died at the age of seventy-seven, and upon the consequent breaking up of the 
home, the mother returned to Davenport, living there until 1904, in which year 
she entered into her heavenly rest. This estimable couple were the parents of 
seven children: Matilda, wife of Hans Hansen, of Davenport; Martha MoUie, 
unmarried, residing in Davenport; Adelia, wife of William Koberg, of this 
county; William of Blue Grass township; Caroline, wife of William F. Frye, 
of this county; Theresa, wife of Fred Rehder, of Lake Park, Iowa; and the 
subject of the sketch who is the fifth in order of birth. 

Edward Meyer resided under the parental roof in Davenport and Blue Grass 
township, assisting his father and becoming well grounded in the manifold 
branches of the agricultural science. In 1886 he deemed it expedient to make 
himself more independent and took possession of the farm upon which he still 
resides. This valuable property consists of two hundred and twenty-five acres 
and is located on sections 22 and 14. It is exceptionally well improved and 
adorned with an attractive residence. Mr. Meyer engages successfully in gen- 
eral farming, stock-raising and dairying. As additional interests, he is a director 
in the Farmers' Savings Bank of Walcott and the Farmers' Elevator Company 
of the same place. 

On the 24th of February, 1886, Mr. Meyer was united in marriage to Miss 
Amelia Mann. Mrs. Meyer was born April 15, 1864, and is the daughter of 
William and Elizabeth (Schaffer) Mann, both of them natives of Waldeck, 
Germany. The mother is deceased, the father now residing in Davenport. A 
family of five children brightens the home of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer, these being 
by name: Lilly, Hilda, William F., Herbert H., Arthur E., all of whom reside 
still with their parents. They also lost a daughter, Adelia, who died at the age 
of ten years. 

Mr. Meyer is a loyal democrat and at present holds the office of township 
assessor in which capacity he has served for two terms. He has also been a 
member of the school board for twelve years. He is progressive both in the 
management of his own affairs and in his ideas for the advancement of the 
community in which he lives, which is only another fashion of saying that he is 
a valuable citizen. 



CHARLES FRANCIS. 



Charles Francis, who in the practice of his profession, that of civil engineering, 
has traveled extensively, thus gaining a comprehensive knowledge of the country 
and at the same time giving proof of his ability in his chosen field of labor, was 
born in Lowell, Massachusetts, August 10, 1842. His father, James B. Francis, 
was a native of Oxford, England, born on the isth of May, 1815. He came to 
the United States in 1833 when a youth of eighteen years and after studying 
hydraulic engineering followed that profession with headquarters in Lowell, Mass- 





cu/t 



A^ 




HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 253 

achusetts, for fifty-five years. He was a man of keen intellect and brilliant 
attainments, who became very eminent in his profession. Without prestige or 
influence to aid him at the outset of his career, as the result of his earnest study 
and notable ability, he came to rank with the foremost representatives of engineer- 
ing in New England, his-opinions upon professional subjects largely being accepted 
as authority. His superior skill also won him that financial success which is the 
legitimate goal of all business endeavor. He died in 1892, his wife surviving him 
until 1904. In her maidenhood she was Miss S. W. Brownell, a native of Wal- 
tham, Massachusetts, born in 181 7. 

Re&red in his native city Charles Francis pursued his studies until he had com- 
pleted a course in the Lowell high school, after which he entered Harvard in i860 
and was graduated with the class of 1864. In the meantime, however, he served 
his country as a soldier of the Union Army, enlisting in 1861 in the Forty-fourth 
Massachusetts Regiment. He was assigned to Company F, with which he con- 
tinued for one year, when he was honorably discharged. After leaving college he 
entered the Lowell Machine Shop and learned the trade, for he had decided to 
follow his father's profession and determined to qualify therefor by actual prac- 
tice as well as by theory. He afterward had the invaluable advantage of several 
years' experience and business training with his father. His first public work of 
importance was assisting in the construction of a dam in the Connecticut river at 
Turners Falls, and later was engaged on the building of the Provincetown dike. 
He afterward went to Chicago, where he remained until the time of the great fire 
of 1871, when he removed to California and did much work on the Pacific coast, 
principally in the construction of mining ditches and other work relative to the 
development of mining interests. He remained there for nine years, after which 
he went to Mexico and was connected with the Mexican Central Railroad from 
1879 until 1883. He then returned to Lowell and was again associated with his 
father until 1889. 

In that year Mr. Francis came to Davenport under government appointment as 
engineer in charge of the dam at the Rock Island Arsenal. On the completion of 
that work he decided to make Davenport his home and has never had occasion to 
regret his determination to remain here. He has done much work of importance 
in this city along professional lines and has also taken an active and helpful part in 
public affairs. He has practiced here as a construction engineer, in which capacity 
many contracts have been awarded him, and for eight or nine years he has been 
working on the development of the water power in this city. He was for seven 
years a member of the state board of health and from 1891 until 1892 was com- 
missioner of public works. His professional and public services have alike been 
of an important character and have constituted elements in the city's advancement 
and improvement. 

In 1869 Mr. Francis was united in marriage to Miss S. C. Crosby, a native of 
Lowell, Massachusetts, and unto them has been born a daughter, Fanny C. Mr. 
Francis is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained high rank, 
being connected with the Knights Templar and the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is also a member of the Contemporary Club. The consensus of public opinion 
regarding Mr. Francis is of most favorable character. Davenport feels that she 
gained a valuable addition to her citizens when he determined to make his home 



254 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

here. His public-spirited devotion to the city .has been manifest in many tangi- 
ble and practical ways and his work has been of far-reaching and beneficial effect. 
In his profession, stimulated by the example of his father, he has long since passed 
beyond the ranks of the many and stands among the successful few. 



GEORGE LUEDERS. 



No history of Liberty township would be complete without mention of 
George Lueders, the present mayor of the town of New Liberty, who is well 
known in financial circles as the cashier of the German Savings Bank. He 
claims Germany as the place of his nativity, his birth occurring in Holstein on 
the 30th of January, 1861. A son of Michael and Lena (Brade) Lueders, the 
parents were both born in Holstein, Germany, the former on the 4th of March, 
1828, and the latter on November 12, 1831. They came to the United States 
in 1875, making their way direct to Davenport, Iowa, where they resided until 
1887, and then came to New Liberty. The father had been a musician, playing 
in a band in both the old country and after coming to Iowa, and was thus en- 
gaged until he entered the hotel and saloon business, with which he was con- 
nected for some time. Later he withdrew from active life and returned to 
Davenport, where he spent his remaining days in retirement. He passed away 
on the nth of January, 1899, while his widow died November 3, 1909, having 
made her home with our subject for several years. They were the parents of 
four children, namely: John, a resident of Madison, Wisconsin; Christ, whose 
death occurred in California about ten years ago ; Lena, the wife of H. B. Arp, 
of West Liberty; and George, of this review. 

George Lueders was a lad of fourteen years when he came with his parents 
to America, and his education, which had been begun in the schools of the 
fatherland, was completed in the common schools of Davenport. After laying 
aside his text-books he was engaged as a farm hand for a few years, and then 
for ten years assisted his father in his hotel and saloon business in New Liberty. 
At the expiration of that period he inaugurated a live stock, lumber and farm 
implement business at this place, becoming an extensive dealer in those com- 
modities, in which connection he continued until he became identified with the 
banking business in 1905. In that year the German Savings Bank of New 
Liberty was organized, with W. Treimer, president, J. C. Bolte, vice-presi- 
dent, and Mr. Lueders as cashier and general manager, which office he has 
held since its inceptiori. The bank was capitalized for ten thousand dollars, 
while its annual statement for 1909 shows deposits amounting to more than 
one hundred and sixty thousand dollars. Its safe, conservative policy recom- 
mends it to the judgment of the public, and has made it one of the sound and 
reliable moneyed institutions of the township. Its steady and rapid develop- 
ment has been due in no small measure to the efforts of Mr. Lueders, who in 
the capacity of cashier has proven a most capable official who, through his 
ability and fidelity to the interests of the house, has won the esteem and confi- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 255 

dence of his fellow officers, and by his unfailing courtesy and promptness in 
the discharge of his duties has become popular with the patrons of the bank. 

It was on the 24th of October, 1889, that Mr. Lueders was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Alvina Roehlk, a native of Scott county, born on the 24th of June, 
1871. She is a daughter of Hans and Bertha (Giese) Roehlk, who were both 
born in Holstein, Germany, but now make their home in New Liberty. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Lueders is identified with the Knights of Pythias lodge at Bennett, 
and also holds membership in the camp of the Modern Woodmen of America 
at New Liberty, being an active and exemplary member of both organizations. 
Politically he exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the republican party, and has served as justice of the peace for the past 
five years. At the incorporation of the town of New Liberty, which occurred 
in 1909, his fellow townsmen manifested their regard for him in electing him 
mayor, in which office he is now the incumbent. In the discharge of his duties 
in that capacity he is proving a worthy official, justifying the trust reposed in 
him by his fellow citizens and fulfilling every obligation that devolves upon hifti 
with the same spirit of thoroughness and fidelity that characterizes his business 
career. A man of resourceful ability, constantly watchful of opportunities, he 
has seized legitimate advantages as they have arisen and has never hesitated to 
take a forward step when the way was open. Fortunate in possessing ability 
and character that inspired confidence, the simple weight of his character and 
ability has brought him into positions of trust and responsibility, and he ranks 
high among the well known and valued citizens of Liberty township. 



CLAUS ECKMANN. 



The life history of Claus Eckmann is that of a self-made man who, diligent 
and persevering, worked his way steadily upward from a humble financial posi- 
tion until he was able to spend his last days in retirement in Davenport, where 
as a respected and worthy citizen he lived until called to his final rest on the 
I2th of April, 1902. He was born in Holstein, Germany, February 12, 1827, 
and was a son of Claus Eckmann, Sr. Both of his parents died in the father- 
land, where the subject of this review spent his youth, acquiring his education 
and learning the cabinetmaker's trade. He afterward served in the Schleswig- 
Holstein war in 1848-50. He continued his residence in Germany until about 
1862, when he came to the United States with his wife and two children, for 
he had been married in the meantime to Miss Catherine Pahl, a daughter of 
Glaus Pahl, of Germany. Mrs. Eckmann was born December 24, 1831. 

On crossing the Atlantic to America, Mr. Eckmann came direct to Davenport 
with his family and for a time worked at the cooper's trade. About 1876, how- 
ever, he purchased a dairy farm near the mile racing track and lived thereon 
for many years, successfully conducting business as a dairyman and general 
agriculturist. From time to time he bought other land, which he rented, and this 
added materially to his income. At length he retired and took up his abode in 
Davenport in 1892, living there for about ten years ere called to his final rest. 



256 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Eckmann were born seven children. William, who was 
a graduate of the State University and became a practicing physician of Man- 
ning, Iowa, died in 1892. Margaret died while the parents were crossing the 
Atlantic to the new world. Emma is the wife of Henry Schwenck, of Lyon 
county, Iowa. Alvina and Bertha were twins and the latter is now deceased, 
while the former is the wife of Charles L. Haller, of Oklahoma city. Carl has 
also passed away, and Clara C. completes the family. 

The death of the father occurred April 12, 1902, while his wife survived 
until June 18, 1904. He was a member of the German Odd Fellows lodge, in 
which he held office, and was also a member of the Schleswig-Holstein Society. 
His life was well spent, his diligence and industry bringing to him a substantial 
measure of success, while his business probity gained him the respect and con- 
fidence of all with whom he was associated. 



EDGAR H. RYAN. 



Edgar H. Ryan, although he is now retired from manufacturing interests, 
with which he was long identified, is still financially concerned in many impor- 
tant business enterprises which have direct bearing upon the progress and com- 
mercial development of Davenport. His industry and keen perception have 
enabled him to make his way steadily to the foremost ranks of the city's dis- 
tinguished and honored business men, in which connection he is justly entitled 
to definite mention in the annals of Iowa. He was born in Warren county, 
Indiana, January 13, 1851. His father, Edgar Ryan, Sr., was a native of Ohio, 
his birth having occurred near Columbus on the loth of June, 1820. When a 
young man he went to Indiana, where he engaged in farming and stock-raising, 
in which undertaking he was quite successful. In the fall of 1855 he came to 
Davenport, where the following year he was joined by his wife and children, 
the family home being since maintained here. The father engaged in the whole- 
sale grocery business in the old Burrows & Prettyman block on the river, under 
the firm name of Ryan & McCarn. During a flood, while working to remove 
his goods to a place of safety, he contracted a severe cold which resulted in 
his death in June, 1857. Although the period of his residence here was of com- 
paratively short duration, during that time he gained the good will and respect 
of his neighbors and business associates and had every promise of a successful 
career. He was married in Ohio to Miss Celinda Osbom, a native of Colum- 
bus, Ohio, who died in January, 1895. She had been a resident of Davenport 
for many years and following her husband's death had carefully reared her 
family of five sons. 

Edgar H. Ryan, the youngest of the family, was but five years of age when 
the mother and her children joined the husband and father in this city. Here 
he was educated in the public schools and at the age of twenty-one years be- 
came a recognized factor in the business circles of this city as proprietor of a 
hat, furnishing goods and fur store at Second and Main streets. There he 
remained until 1885, when he withdrew from that field of labor to engage in the 





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HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 259 

gfrain business and for eleven years was a partner in the Bosch-Ryan Grain 
Company. He next turned his attention to manufacturing interests, engaging 
in the manufacture of Portland cement at lola, Kansas, with the principal office 
of the company at Davenport. After a successful and active business career in 
this field he retired in January, 1906, but still has many financial interests and 
investments, including farm lands in Nebraska, Minnesota and Kansas, and 
large land holdings in Mexico, the supervision of which makes him a busy man. 
In 1888 he erected the Ryan building, now known as the South Putnam build- 
ing. He has long been interested in Davenport real estate, becoming a member 
of the Davenport Real Estate Company, and has laid out many additions and 
done much to improve the city. He is also interested in banks and industrial 
concerns and his sound judgment constitutes a valuable feature in the pros- 
perous control of these undertakings. Opportunities which others pass by heed- 
lessly he recognizes and utilizes and his intelligent and well directed activity 
have brought him prominently to the front in relation to the business life of 
the city whereon Davenport's growth and development rest. He is now the 
secretary and treasurer of the Davenport Real Estate & Town Lot Company, 
which has laid out Park Lawn in its first, second and third additions, also the 
valuable tract north of Central Park and Cook's Home addition. For fifteen 
years he was the secretary and treasurer of the Davenport Safety Deposit 
Company. 

In June, 1873, Mr. Ryan was married to Miss Ella Coleman, a daughter of 
Thomas Coleman, a prominent banker of La Fayette, Indiana, and they have 
one child, Julia. The family home is a fine residence on Brady street. Mr. 
Ryan has lived to witness remarkable changes in the city, which was a small 
town of comparatively little industrial or commercial importance at the time of 
his arrival here. His father's home was on Seventh and Brown streets and the 
business center was largely along the river. Taking his place in commercial 
circles when he attained his majority, Mr. Ryan's activities have since been 
of a nature that have contributed in substantial measure to the city's business 
and financial growth as well as his individual prosperity. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Masons, attaining the Knight Templar degree in the comman- 
dery, and he is also a member of the Mystic Shrine. Politics have little interest 
for him, for he has always preferred to concentrate his energies upon his busi- 
ness and by industry, close application and determination he has become one 
of the foremost citizens of Davenport. 



M. J. TOBIN. 



Since 1852, or for a period of fifty-seven years, M. J. Tobin has been closely 
identified with the agricultural interests of Scott county and his possessions, now 
embracing five hundred and sixty acres in Winfield township, make him one of 
the substantial citizens of eastern Iowa. He was bom in Kilkenny, Ireland, in 
183s, a son of Richard and Mary (Cody) Tobin, who emigrated with their 
family to the new world in 1852, in which year they settled in Scott county. 



260 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

They made the journey from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, to this district by boat, 
and in Winfield township the father entered one hundred and sixty acres of 
raw land, which he broke with ox-teams, in due time making it a cultivable prop- 
erty, continuing his work as a farmer throughout his entire business career. He 
passed away in 1897, having reached a very advanced age. He was one of the 
influential and valued citizens of Scott county and at his death the community 
mourned the loss of one whom it had come to love and honor. 

M. J. Tobin was a youth of seventeen years when he accompanied his 
parents to the new world. When they located on the farm in Winfield town- 
ship the son rendered valuable assistance in the work of developing and improv- 
ing the tract on which substantial buildings were erected. When starting out in 
life on his own account he chose the occupation to which he had been reared and 
the original farm is now in his possession, and the additional purchases he has 
made finds him today the owner of five hundred and sixty acres. All this is 
well improved land and the first buildings which were put upon the farm have 
been replaced with those of more modern type, so that the farm is now one of 
the valuable properties in eastern Iowa. In connection with general farming 
Mr. Tobin has also given much attention to the raising of stock, making a spe- 
cialty of cattle, and through this means he has greatly augmented his financial 
resources. 

Mr. Tobin has been married twice. He first wedded Miss Anna Moore, their 
marriage ceremony being performed in St. Ann's Catholic church at Long 
Grove. Four children were born of this union : Richard, Mary Ellen, Sarah and 
Margaret. For his second wife Mr. Tobin chose Mary Doyle, and there are 
four sons of this marriage: Martin, Thomas, John and Arthur. He has given 
all his children good educational advantages, the sons having attended St. Am- 
brose College, while the daughters were educated in a Catholic convent. 

Mr. Tobin has been a life-long democrat and for six years served as trustee 
of Winfield township. He is a communicant of St. Ann's church. Public- 
spirited in an eminent degree, no pioneer of Scott county is deserving of more 
prominent mention in a history of this character than is Mr. Tobin. In him 
are embodied the virtues of the early pioneers — the steadfast purpose, rugged 
integrity and religious zeal — virtues to which the splendid civilization of this 
great state is indebted for its wonderful development and its glorious progress. 
He has led a busy, active and useful life and now, at the age of seventy-five 
years, he stands crowned with honors and years, one of the most respected pio- 
neer citizens of Scott county and Winfield township. 



JOHN B. CROUCH, M. D. 

Dr. John B. Crouch, one of the successful representatives of the medical 
profession in Eldridge, was born in Davenport in 1880. His father, Fred 
Crouch, is a member of the Walsh Construction Company, who are among the 
prominent contractors of that city. There Dr. Crouch spent his childhood and 
youth, attending the common schools, in which he derived his early education, 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 261 

and then entering the high school where he prepared for the college course that 
should fit him for the medical profession. He spent two years at the Iowa Col- 
lege at Grinnell ; one year in the medical department of the State University ; and 
then transferred his credits to the Northwestern University Medical School at 
Chicago, from which he was graduated with the class of 1905. He immediately 
engaged in his professional labors, and after about two months' experience, suc- 
ceeded Dr. Kemmerer, who had long been known as one of the oldest practi- 
tioners of Eldridge. The four years of his residence here have been productive 
of large returns; he has built up a large and remunerative practice; and has 
gained the respect and confidence of his patients and colleagues, while the drug 
store, which he has conducted in conjunction with his professional duties, is 
one of the thriving business concerns of the village. He is a man who by na- 
ture and training is especially adapted for general practice, although he is at 
the same time a deep student, which has enabled him to 'become almost a spe- 
cialist in those fields of his art which appeal most strongly to him. In diagnosis 
he is careful and thorough, as a practitioner he is painstaking, while his per- 
sonality, his enthusiasm and his cheerfulness make him ever welcome in a sick 
room. 

Dr. Crouch belongs to several of the college fraternal organizations, for he 
was ever a man to make stanch friends, and as a member of the County and 
American Medical Associations keeps well informed upon the progress in his 
profession and the interests with which his co-workers are concerned. In 1905 
in Davenport was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Crouch and Miss Martha 
Frances Ballard, whose parents are residents of that city. One daughter, Rhoda 
Bliss, now about one year old, has been born to the couple. 



HENRY ROHWER. 



The agricultural interests of this state were formerly well represented by 
Henry Rohwer, who gave many years of his life to the tilling of the soil. He 
is now living retired, however, in Davenport, having passed the seventy-fourth 
milestone on life's journey, so that he is well entitled to the rest that has been 
vouchsafed him. A great majority of Davenport's German citizens came from 
Schleswig-Holstein, which province was also the birthplace of Henry Rohwer, 
whose natal day was June 4, 1835. His father was Jochim Rohwer. His mother 
died during his early childhood, which was spent in Germany. After attending 
the public schools he began learning the shoemaker's trade, and in 1857 came to 
the United States, for he had heard favorable reports concerning America and 
its opportunities and hoped to acquire a comfortable competence more rapidly 
in this country than he could expect to do on the other side of the Atlantic. 
Bidding adieu to home and friends, he sailed alone for the western world, land- 
ing at New York, after which he made his way to Davenport. He at first 
worked at his trade in this city, being engaged in shoemaking until 1862, when 
he crossed the plains to California with teams. It required three months to 
make the trip even at that day. He remained for two and a half years on the 



262 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Pacific coast and then returned to the east by way of the Isthmus of Panama, 
eventually landing at New York city. From that point he continued across the 
country to Davenport, where he again engaged in shoemaking until 1882. He 
next turned his attention to farming in Iowa, investing in eighty acres, upon 
which he took up his abode. The work of tilling the soil then engaged his at- 
tention and he made his home thereon until 1906, carefully cultivating his crops 
and gathering large harvests. He then sold out and returned to Davenport, 
where he has since made his home. 

In politics Mr. Rohwer has always been a stalwart republican and he served 
as township trustee for six years and also as school director in Crystal town- 
ship. 

Mr. Rohwer has been married twice. On the 17th of August, 1865, he 
wedded Miss Catherine Barofsky, who died in 1885. They were the parents 
of eight children. Julius, living in Ida Grove, Iowa, married Emma Vogt and 
they have seven children. Gustave, now located in Moline, married Emma Corth 
and has seven children. Theodore, whose home is in Schleswig, Crawford 
county, Iowa, is married and has seven children. Henry is married and is lo- 
cated in Seattle, Washington. Amanda is the wife of Fred Fick, of Ida county, 
Iowa, and has one son. The other children died in infancy with the exception 
of George, who passed away at the age of twenty-two years. For his second 
wife Mr. Rohwer chose Whipke Stelk, whom he wedded in April, 1887. She 
was the widow of John Stelk and by her former marriage had four children: 
Anna, the wife of R. A. Madison, of Ottumwa county, Iowa, by whom she has 
one child; Emma, the wife of Rudolph Meinert, of Davenport, by whom she 
has one child; John, at home; and Charles, who married Gusta Weis and lives 
in Virginia. 

Mr. Rohwer belongs to the association known as the Old German Pioneers, 
Coming to the new world soon after attaining his majority, he readily adapted 
himself to changed conditions, made haste to master the language of -the people 
and acquaint himself with American customs and habits. In all of his business 
life he has displayed the energy and perseverance characteristic of the German 
people and, improving the opportunities which to him seemed to point to suc- 
cess, he eventually reached a position among the men of affluence in Scott county 
and is now numbered among the substantial citizens of Davenport, where he 
makes his home, his leisure being devoted to those pursuits which afford him 
recreation and interest. 



HENRY C. COOK. 



One of the well cultivated farms of Sheridan township is that of ninety 
acres belonging to Henry C. Cook, one of the sturdy sons of the fatherland 
who did so much toward developing the fertility of Scott county in the early 
years of its settlement. He was born in Holstein, Germany, September 17, 
1840, a son of Hans and Kathryn Cook. The father was engaged in agricul- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 263 

tural pursuits in the old country, but in the hope of bettering his own fortunes 
and of providing larger opportunities for his children, he with his family emi- 
grated to the United States in 1847. They disembarked at New York, whence 
they came west to Chicago, completing their journey to Iowa by wagon. Upon 
reaching Scott county, Mr. Cook entered four hundred acres of prairie land, 
but he was not permitted to enjoy his new property, for he died thirteen days 
after arriving here, and his claim, made out in his name in Washington, D. C., 
was paid for by his friend, Nicholas Rusch, who later married his widow. 

Mr. Rusch became a prominent factor in the public life of Scott county. He 
was born in Holstein, Germany, February 16, 1822, and received a good educa- 
tion in the land of his birth, for after leaving the elementary school at Marne, 
he entered the gymnasium at Meldorf, later attended the Segeberg Seminary, 
and finally became a student in the University of Kiel, where he specialized in 
theology. He afterward taught as a private tutor in Holstein. He came to this 
country on the same ship with Mr. Cook, expecting to teach here. After Mr. 
Cook's death he assumed the management of the farm, making all the improve- 
ments and bringing it to a high state of fertility, and there he lived until after 
the inauguration of the Civil war. He was a successful farmer, and also pos- 
sessed the personality that made him a man in whom the people placed the ut- 
most confidence. He was an ardent republican in his political sympathies, and 
upon that party's ticket was elected to various township offices. In 1859 he was 
the choice of his district for state senator, and although he served only until 
i860, he was concerned with some important legislation. In that year the re- 
publican party elected him lieutenant governor of Iowa, at the same time that 
Mr. Kirkwood was elected governor, and he held that position until 1862, when 
he resigned to accept the appointment as commissioner of immigration, which 
was made by Governor Kirkwood. Mr. Rusch had his headquarters in New 
York city for ten months, and then as immigration had fallen off on account 
of the war, he returned to Iowa and was appointed assistant quartermaster, with 
the rank of captain, for the troops of this state. During the course of the war 
he went to Vicksburg, Mississippi, was made chief quartermaster of the Iowa 
troops there and died there September 22, 1864, while in active service. He 
was a man of great force of character and left his impress upon the affairs of 
his time and locality, bequeathing to the generation who followed him a record 
for public service and patriotism which should be inspiring. Educational in- 
terests in Scott county were also furthered by him, for he donated the land for 
and helped build the first school in his neighborhood. 

Mr. Rusch became the father of three children, namely: Emily, who is the 
wife of J. E. Meyers, of Davenport; Minnie, who was the wife of Joseph Keck, 
formerly of Washington, Iowa, but now like his wife deceased; and Gustav C, 
a prominent farmer of Sheridan township, thus county. His wife, who had 
previously married Hans Cook, had six children by her first union, as follows: 
Louisa, who married Henry Berg, now deceased, but formerly a resident of 
Davenport; Augusta, who married Henry Landt, of Tama county, Iowa; Julia, 
who is the widow of Cornelius Axelson and lives in Mississippi; Henry C, 
whose name introduces this review; Eliza, the wife of Martin Banthen, of 
Durant, Iowa ; and Agnes, who married Jens Lorenzen, of Davenport. 



264 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Henry C. Cook received his early education in Germany before his parents 
emigrated to this country, for he was about seven years of age when they 
started upon their journey, and after he came to Scott county he attended the 
district school near his home in Sheridan township, where he completed his 
training for the responsibilities of manhood. He was early initiated into the 
methods of cultivating the soil, and in the years that he has been a resident 
of this county has lived upon this same farm. He assisted his stepfather in 
operating it during the lifetime of the latter, and then, after his death he as- 
sumed the full charge of it. In the period, amounting now to almost half a 
century, that the place has been under his control, he has worked earnestly and 
diligently to make it one of the most productive tracts of land in his vicinity, 
and as enterprise and determination have been salient features in his success, 
he is well deserving of the comfortable income which his labors have brought 
him. 

On the 6th of October, 1869, Mr. Cook was married to Miss Kathryn Emise, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Emise, who were among the early German 
settlers of Scott county. Both are now deceased. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cook 
have been born three children. Carl F., who is engaged in the telephone busi- 
ness in Eldridge, Iowa, wedded Miss Eliza Peterson and they had one child who 
died in infancy. Harry and Carrie are both at home, and the latter is a grad- 
uate of Brown's Business College, of Davenport. 

Mr. Cook has served as trustee of Sheridan township and has filled other 
offices within the gift of the people, with the same carefulness and honor that 
has distinguished his private life, and the fact that many of his closest friends 
are those who have known him from boyhood is an evidence that his life has 
been directed in accordance with high principles of manhood and citizenship. 



OTTO CLAUSEN. 



Davenport has always acknowledged her indebtedness to her German- 
American citizens for much of her progress in the fields of commerce and in- 
dustry, and prominent among those who have been leaders in manufacturing 
circles was numbered Otto Clausen, for many years general manager of the 
H. F. Brammer Manufacturing Company. He was bom June 14, 1850, in 
Schonhorst, Kirchspiel Brugga, near Kiel, a son of Claus and Johanna (Car- 
stens) Clausen. His father was the oldest son of Claus Clausen, teacher in Ox- 
boll on the island Alsen. The mother of Otto Clausen was a daughter of Jo- 
hann Carstens, teacher at Michaelis Donn, north Ditmarsch. 

Mr. Clausen's childhood was spent in Dollerup, Kirchspiel, Grundshoff, An- 
geln, Boel Angeln, and at Atzeballig, near Augustenburg, he being confirmed 
at the latter place. On the ist of May, 1869, when nineteen years of age, he 
sailed for America, landing at Montreal. He arrived in Davenport on the ist 
of June, his choice of a location being influenced by the fact that he had a dis- 
tant relative, Emil Geisler, living here. After spending some time here he 
went to St. Louis by steamboat and later journeyed to Memphis, Tennessee. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 267 

There he accepted a position as bookkeeper in a private hospital (St. Joseph's 
Infirmary), working during the day and attending the commercial college at 
night in order that he might learn the English language and become qualified 
for active work in commercial and industrial circles, for in the schools of his 
native country he had acquired a good education in his mother tongue. Later 
he became clerk in the Central Hotel at Memphis, there remaining for seven 
years. When he had saved enough of his earnings he returned to Europe in 
1872 and brought his parents, sisters and one brother to the new world with 
him, the family settling in Memphis. The following year yellow fever broke 
out in that city and Mr. Clausen volunteered as a nurse, taking care of many 
who were afflicted by that dread disease — a heroic act for which he deserved high 
praise. In 1876 he started his own grocery business, which he conducted with 
success until 1885. 

On the 20th of January, 1880, Mr. Clausen was married to Adele Geisler, 
who was a daughter of Emil and Sophia (Halkins) Geisler and who died July 
4, 1886. There were two children by that marriage, one of whom died in in- 
fancy, while the other, Adele, is now the wife of H. W. Hubers of Davenport 
and has one child, Marjorie Del. Mr. Clausen continued in business in Mem- 
phis until 1886, when he came to this city and purchased the present home of 
the family. On the nth of August, 1887, he married Eveline Steinberg, a 
daughter of Louis W. and Anna Wilhelmina (Hagen) Steinberg. By this union 
there was born a son, who died in infancy. In 1888 Mr. Clausen accepted the 
position of bookkeeper and treasurer of the H. F. Brammer Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and in 1895 became its general manager. He remained the executive head 
of the enterprise until 1901, when he retired from the active control of the 
business and throughout his remaining days enjoyed the fruits of his former 
toil in well earned retirement. 

Mr. Clausen was a member of the Turner Society and had a very extensive 
acquaintance among the German-American residents of this city. He won a 
creditable position in business circles, was ever charitable, brave and fearless in 
the face of danger, trustworthy in the performance of duty and diligent in the 
accomplishment of every task which he undertook. These qualities gained him 
a firm hold on the affections of his fellow townsmen, so that his memory is 
cherished by all who knew him. He loved his home and was a most kind and 
loving father and husband. His death occurred on the 30th of April, 1905, 
at his southern home, Ottonia Park, Santa Rosa county, Florida. His remains 
were brought to Davenport for interment. 



OTTO KLUG. 



Otto Klug, a capitalist, who during the years of his residence in Davenport 
largely obtained his income from real estate investments and continued through 
the period of his life as one of the influential and honored citizens here, was 
born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, August i, 1822. His life record covered 
the intervening years to the 25th of May, 1899, when he was called to his final 



268 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

rest. Educated in the public schools of his native country, he remained there 
through the great revolutionary struggle of 1848, in which he took an active 
part. In 1849, the revolutionists being frustrated in their plans to secure greater 
political liberty and privileges, Mr. Klug determined to come to America, where 
he might enjoy the fruits of independence denied him in his native country. 
He therefore crossed the Atlantic to America and established his home in Daven- 
port. In Germany he had been engaged in the dry-goods business and upon 
coming to this city he opened a store on Front street, stocked in part with 
goods which he had brought over from Hamburg. Two years later he removed 
to a store on Second street, where he continued a profitable and growing busi- 
ness until 1868, when he sold out to Christian Toerring and retired from mer- 
chandising, finding that his real estate and other interests demanded the greater 
part of his time. He had as the years went by made investment in property 
until his holdings were such as to claim the greater part of his attention in their 
successful management and control. He was seldom if ever at fault in mat- 
ters of business judgment and hence his labors and his investments brought him 
success which was substantial as well as creditable. He owned several large 
business blocks beside valuable residences and unimproved property in this city 
and at the time of his death he was also the secretary of the Davenport Plate 
Glass Insurance Company, of which he was the founder and one of the direc- 
tors. He was also one of the founders of the Scott County Savings Bank and 
a director until called to his final rest. 

On the 14th of August, 1852, Mr. Klug was married to Miss Fredericka 
Schricker, who came to America in 1849, landing in St. Louis, and coming to 
Davenport in 1851. Their children are: Clara, now the wife of H. F. Petersen; 
Agnes, the wife of William Haase; Lillie, at home; Thekla, the wife of Robert 
Wagner; Otto; Elfrieda, at home; and Henrietta, who died at the age of nine 
years. After residing in America for forty years Mr. Klug returned with his 
family to visit his native town in Germany. He was greatly interested therein, 
but while he always maintained a deep love for the fatherland he was still more 
strongly attached to the land of his adoption, for it was here that he won his 
success, while in his social relations he gained a circle of friends that bound him 
closely to this country. He was, moreover, in sympathy with its form of gov- 
ernment and eagerly and enthusiastically championed the salient features in the 
American republic. His first trip to the new world was made on a sailing ves- 
sel, from which he landed at New Orleans, and then came up the river to Daven- 
port. In the forty years that elapsed before he again went to Germany, there 
had been marvelous changes made in marine transportation, and he crossed the 
Atlantic in one of the ocean greyhounds which brought him to his destination 
in a few days. 

Mr. Klug was always closely identified with the growth of Davenport, and 
his cooperation could always be counted upon to further any measure for the 
general good. For six years he served on the board of education, and for ten 
years represented his ward in the city council, being several times elected alder- 
man. He was a member of the volunteer fire department for sixteen years, and 
at one time was its chief. He was also treasurer of the first German free 
school, which he organized in 1853, acting as custodian of its funds until his 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 269 

demise. He belonged to the Schleswig-Holstein Kampfgenossen Verein and was 
its vice president until he departed this life. He was also a member of the 
Turners Society and had he lived for another year would have received a diploma 
which the Turners give to all who work for their interests for a quarter of a 
century. An expert marksman, he belonged to the Davenport Shooting Club 
and was recognized as king of the association, having been winner in many 
contests. 

While Mr. Klug took an active part in public affairs, his best traits of char- 
acter were reserved for his own fireside, and the allurements of club and social 
life were not sufficient to dim for him the joys of the family circle. He was 
most devoted to the welfare of his wife and children, and erected in Davenport 
one of the finest homes in this city, standing on the bluff and overlooking the 
river and surrounding country. He also purchased an attractive country home 
where he planted fine orchards and vineyards, taking great pride in his agricul- 
tural and horticultural interests there. He was one of the best known men in 
the city and had a large circle of admiring friends. His strong character im- 
pressed itself upon all with whom he was associated and the honesty of his 
motives was never called into question. He lived to see the hopes that brought 
him to the new world more than realized and while he won notable success here, 
he also belonged to that class of citizens who gave of their labor for the benefit 
of their adopted country. He lingers in the minds of his fellow citizens as one 
of Davenport's most prominent and honored residents. 



JAMES H. MARRIOTT. 

An enterprising and progressive business man of Long Grove is James H. 
Marriott, who was born in Newmarket, Maryland, in 1857, and is a son of Au- 
gustus Marriott, who was engaged in the shoe business in that city. There he 
received his early education and lived until the approach of manhood, when 
he removed to the advancing west. For a time he resided in Newman, Illinois, 
and subsequently located in Eldridge, Iowa, where he was engaged in the paint- 
ing business. 

In 1887 he came to Long Grove as a clerk for George W. Curtis. After 
two years' experience there, in which he proved that he was endowed with con- 
siderable business acumen, he was taken into partnership by his employer, and 
together they conducted the general store for a number of years. Mr. Marriott 
finally purchased Mr. Curtis' interest. After conducting the store for a num- 
ber of years by himself he reorganized a company, incorporating it under the 
name of Marriott, Wolf & Briceland. During the two years of its existence, 
they have built up a large and profitable mercantile establishment, filling a long- 
felt need in the community of Long Grove. Mr. Marriott is its president and 
manager, so that to his ability and progressive spirit is due the large and up-to- 
date line of general merchandise to be found upon its counters and shelves. He 
makes every effort to satisfy the wants of his patrons and has, in consequence, 
met with a generous support from them. In 1890, with others, he organized 



270 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

the Long Grove Creamery Company, of which he is the president. It has a 
capacity of from one thousand to two thousand pounds of butter each day and 
employs a large number of men. The product of the creamery finds a ready 
market in Davenport and Chicago. 

Since 1900 Mr. Marriott has been the postmaster of Long Grove, fulfilling 
his duties with the care and abiUty which has characterized his operations in 
the mercantile world. Whenever he has occasion to exercise his right of fran- 
chise he casts his vote for the candidate of the republican party, feeling in great- 
est sympathy with its principles. He has ever been distinguished by a desire to 
promote the welfare of his fellow citizens, whose unqualified respect he enjoys. 



KARL VOLLMER, M. D. 

Davenport, his native city, numbers among her honored and successful 
physicians Dr. Karl VoUmer, who by reason of his ability and thorough training 
has attained foremost rank among the representatives of the medical profes- 
sion in this city. Born on the 20th of November, 1869, he is a son of Henry 
and Dorothea (Plambeck) VoUmer, extended mention of whom is made on an- 
other page of this volume, and a brother of Henry Vollmer, attorney and coun- 
sellor of this city. 

In the public schools of Davenport Dr. Vollmer acquired his preliminary edu- 
cation and later, deciding upon the practice of medicine as his life work, became 
a student under the direction of Surgeon-in-Chief Peck, of the Rock Island Rail- 
way, and was the last one to study under that well known physician, who was 
recognized as one of the best medical practitioners of his day. Under his guid- 
ance Dr. Vollmer became imbued with the importance of his profession and also 
its beauty, mystery and unselfishness, and it was his ambition to follow in the 
footsteps of him who was his principal inspiration. With this end in view he 
entered the medical department of the Iowa State University, from which he 
was graduated in 1892, and then went abroad, spending a season at the Alle- 
gemeine Krankenhause in Vienna in post-graduate work. This was followed 
by a season as assistant in the Royal Opthalmic Hospital in London, after 
which he returned to Davenport, and in the fall of 1893, thus well equipped, 
entered upon the practice of his profession in this city. His study abroad had 
been confined principally to the eye, ear, nose and throat, and along this line he 
has since continued to specialize, his office in the Schmidt building being thor- 
oughly equipped with every modern and up-to-date accessory for carrying on 
this branch of the medical profession. In 1906 he again went abroad and sup- 
plemented his former study by work at Warzburg University. He keeps in 
close touch with his professional brethren through his membership in the Na- 
tional, State and County Medical Societies, and the high place which he occupies 
in medical circles is indicated by the fact that in 1907 he was elected to the 
presidency of the latter organization. 

It was in 1897 that Dr. Vollmer was united in marriage in Davenport to 
Miss Paula Koehler, a daughter of Henry and Ottilie Koehler, mention of whom 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 271 

will be found elsewhere in this volume. This union has been blessed by the 
birth of one son, born on the 20th of October, 1902, who is the life and light 
of the household. The family reside in an attractive home at No. 817 West 
Seventh street, and are very prominent in the social circles of the community. 
Dr. Vollmer is on the staff of Mercy and St. Luke's Hospitals, and with a 
large private practice demanding his time and talents, he has little time for 
the amenities of life, yet he takes time to keep up his interest in things municipal 
and social and gives hearty support to the democratic party, while he is a mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club, the Outing Club, the Davenport Turn Verein and 
many local social societies of lesser note. His principal interest, however, is in 
his profession, the duties of which he performs in a conscientious and thorough 
manner, fully realizing the heavy responsibilities that rest upon him in the con- 
duct of his chosen calling. Davenport has watched with interest his rapid and 
substantial rise and this city, in which he was reared and which has been the 
center of his efforts and activities, recognizes him as one of her most valuable 
citizens and an honor to his profession. 



WILLIAM DE LAP. 



William De Lap, who, since 1908, has served as mayor of Buffalo, is also 
successfully engaged in the real estate and insurance business at that place. He 
was born in Millville, Wisconsin, November 14, 1857, a son of Elijah and 
Amanda (Swain) De Lap, both of whom were natives of Steuben county, New 
York, the former born in 1818 and the latter in 1821. The father, who was a 
physician, came to Buffalo in 1870 and engaged in practice here until the time 
of his death, being numbered among the representatives of homeopathy. The 
mother still survives and makes her home with a daughter, Mrs. A. N. Darman. 

William De Lap accompanied his parents on their removal to Scott county 
and his education was acquired in the schools of Buffalo. After putting aside 
his text-books he engaged in farming and also did a general teaming business 
for several years, but for the past few years he has engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business. He is demonstrating his ability in these lines, is fa- 
miliar with the values of property in this section, so that he can buy and sell 
advantageously, and also writes a large number of insurance policies each year. 
He is also a stockholder in the Buffalo Savings Bank. 

In addition to his business interests Mr. De Lap is also giving of his time to 
community affairs, having in 1908 been elected mayor of Buffalo. He is quali- 
fied to fill the office to the satisfaction of the people and with credit to himself 
as has been demonstrated in the past year. He ever advocates a movement 
which he believes will promote the interests of the community and in many 
ways manifests "his public spirit. 

Mr. De Lap is a republican in his political views and for some years served 
as a member of the city council. His fraternal relations are with Banner Lodge, 
No. 16, K. P., at Buffalo. He possesses unusual will power, undaunted tenacity 
and a high order of business talent, and is affable and approachable, always 



272 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

glad to receive suggestions from any one along lines of advancement for the 
general good, so that no man of Buffalo is held in higher esteem than is Mr. 
De Lap. 

In his family are three children: Mamie, who died in infancy; Sadie, who 
is the wife of John Murer, of Buffalo township; and Williard, who married 
Daisy Oard, of Jamestown, this county, and resides in Buffalo. 



ROBERT M. ABBOTT. 

Among the older citizens of Davenport who have retired from the active pur- 
suits of business must be numbered Robert M. Abbott, who was for many years 
prominent as a grain and produce merchant. He is a descendant of one of the 
earliest families to settle in America. The first of his name to cross the ocean 
were George and Hannah (Chandler) Abbott, who settled in this country in 1640. 
They were natives of Yorkshire and Puritans in their religious, faith and upon 
reaching Massachusetts located in Andover, where their house was a garrison 
during the early Indian troubles. Indeed, George Abbott became one of the im- 
portant members of the little colony in those days and a monument was erected 
in his memory as is recorded in the annals of Andover. His son William mar- 
ried Elizabeth Geary, from whom was descended Philip Abbott, who was born 
April 3, 1699. He married Abigail Bickford and died in 1748, having been a 
participant in the struggles of the colonists. His son John enjoyed the distinction 
of having erected the first dwelling house in Wilkes Barre, Luzerne county Penn- 
sylvania. It was erected in 1769 and was standing uritil 1812. There he was 
killed during the Indian troubles. He wedded Alice Fuller and of their union 
was born Stephen Abbott, the grandfather of our subject. He served in the 
war of the revolution and after its close returned to the estate his father had 
procured, where he followed the vocation of a farmer. He married Abigail 
Searls, July 14, 1799, and of their union was born John Abbott, the father of 
our subject. His birth occurred at the opening of the nineteenth century. Like 
his father he was a farmer and as he gained a success in his life's work he be- 
came a financier and a man prominent in his locality. He married Hannah Court- 
right in early manhood and died November 23, i860. 

Robert M. Abbott, having as his heritage the record of ancestors who had 
become prominent in Wilkes Barre, was born in that city, June 17, 1837. He 
received his early education in the place of his birth, which remained his home 
for several years after the death of his father. He engaged in agriculture, in 
which he attained proficiency, and about 1865 came to Iowa, locating in Daven- 
port. Here he became connected with the grain business but after two years 
embarked in the hardware business, in which he remained for some time with 
Mr. Collamer. He then returned to the grain and produce business, to which he 
gave his attention until advancing years and a large competence suggested to 
him the feasibility of retiring from active life. During the years in which he 
was engaged in mercantile pursuits he evinced a keen appreciation of the value 
of grain and the operations upon the stock market, but, while he was never at 





1/ 



(L£H^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 275 

a loss to profit by opportunity for bettering himself, the record of his dealings 
was never marred by any act which he might desire to keep hidden. His home 
is now at 1026 Brady street, where guests are made welcome and hospitably 
entertained. 

On the 29th of December, 1864, Mr. Abbott was united in marriage to Miss 
Caroline Courtright. Like her husband she is a descendant of colonial ancestors. 
In the annals of Harlem the first member of the family bore the name of Se- 
bastian Van Kortryck. He had come toi this country from West Flanders, Hol- 
land, his people having gone there fi-om Belgium in the seventeenth century. 
He was a man of wealth and social position and his descendants became promi- 
nent in the New Amsterdam colony. His son was known as Jan Bastian Van 
Kortryck, who in the course of years was the father of Hendrick Jans Van Kort- 
ryck. His son Cornelius wedded Christiana Rosencrans, and of their union was 
bom Benjamin Courtright, the great-grandfather of Mrs. Abbott. He married 
Catherine* Cuddebeck, and of their union was born John Courtright. He mar- 
ried Alice Abbott, nee Fuller, and became the father of Cornelius Courtright, 
the father of Mrs. Abbott. He in turn married Harriet Bailey, among whose 
children was Caroline Courtright, who on December 29, 1864, married Mr. Ab- 
bott and became the mother of three children. John Howard, was long known 
as one of the best young men in Davenport, where he was engaged in different 
pursuits. Recently, however, he has taken up his residence in Kansas City, 
where he is now engaged in the real estate business. Carrie Helene makes her 
home with her parents. She belongs to the Colonial Dames and takes an active 
part in the affairs of the society, while Mrs. Abbott belongs to the Daughters of 
the American Revolution and also' to the Colonial Dames. Robert Bruce is now 
in St. Paul, where for the past ten years he has been connected with a large 
department store. 

Mr. Abbott has always been prominent in the public affairs of Davenport 
and many of the improvements of the city are the result of his suggestion or 
active work. In consequence he enjoys a large reputation besides the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that his sons profit by his example and are well advanced along 
the road to useful and successful lives. 



LOUIS SCHROEDER. 



Louis Schroeder, who is living retired at No. 1557 Prairie street, in Daven- 
port, followed farming in this county for many years, and through the careful 
conduct of his agricultural interests won the competence that now enables him 
to spend the evening of life in the enjoyment of well earned rest. He was born 
in Germany on the i6th of April, 1839, his parents being Anton and Martha 
Schroeder, both of whom passed away in the fatherland. 

Louis Schroeder spent his youthful days in the acquirement of an education 
and when his text-books had been laid aside he learned the stonemason's trade, 
following that occupation in Germany until the time of his emigration to the 
new world in 1867. He was accompanied on the voyage by his wife and one 



276 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

child and after landing at New York made his way at once to Davenport, Iowa, 
where he secured employment at his trade. A short time afterward, however, 
he turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits and was actively engaged 
in the operation of a rented farm in Davenport township for seven years, on the 
expiration of which period he purchased a small tract of land in the same town- 
ship, devoting his time and energies to its cultivation for thirteen years. At the 
end of that time he traded the property for sixty-six and a half acres of fine 
farming land on the Jersey Ridge road, where he likewise carried on his agri- 
cultural interests energetically and successfully for about thirteen years. He 
then sold the place and bought his present property on Prairie street in Daven- 
port, where he has since lived retired without recourse to further labor. 

On the 14th of February, 1866, Mr. Schroeder was united in marriage to 
Miss Lena Miller, by whom he had six children, namely: Louisa, who wedded 
Henry Leonard, of Rock Island, Illinois, and has one child — Charles; August, 
who follows farming near Walcott, Iowa, and who is married and has eight 
children; William, who wedded Miss Mary Seaman and resides in Davenport; 
Emma; Edward, at home; and Albert, living in Davenport, who is married and 
has one child. The wife and mother was called to her final rest on the 30th of 
November, 1909, when she had attained the age of seventy-two years, six 
months and nine days. 

Mr. Schroeder has made his home in Scott county for more than four de- 
cades and is widely recognized as one of its substantial and esteemed citizens. 
The hope that led him to leave his native land and seek a home in America has 
been more than realized. He found the opportunities he sought, which, by the 
way, are always open to the ambitious, energetic man — and making the best of 
these he has steadily worked his way upward. 



JOHN BANGERT. 



Among the successful and representative agriculturists of Cleona township 
who claim Germany as the place of their nativity, is John Bangert, whose birth 
occurred in Hesse-Darmstadt on the 12th of November, 1852. His parents 
were Henry and Marie (Wanda) Bangert, also natives of the father- 
land, whose entire lives were spent in that country. The father was a 
distiller by trade, being engaged in that line of activity for twenty-one years. 
John Bangert, of this review, was the second in order of birth in a family of 
six children, he and a sister Mary being the only ones of that number to come 
to this country. 

In the common schools of Germany John Bangert acquired a good educa- 
tion and remained under the parental roof until fifteen years of age, when he 
came alone to America. Here he joined an uncle, John Wanda, who resided in 
Muscatine county, Iowa, near Blue Grass, with whom he continued to make 
his home until twenty-one years of age. On attaining his majority he took up 
agricultural pursuits on his own account and for four years operated a farm 
belonging to his aunt in Muscatine county. At the expiration of that period he 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 277 

came to Scott county, where he rented a farm in Bufifalo township for two years. 
He then returned to Muscatine county and there engaged in farming in the 
capacity of renter until about eleven years ago, when he purchased his present 
farm, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres located on the northwest quar- 
ter of section 34, Cleona township. He has since directed his efforts toward 
the further development of this farm, which under his wise and careful man- 
agement has been brought to a high state of cultivation, it being one of the well 
improved properties of the township. He practices rotation of crops, has made 
a thorough study of the cereals best adapted to the soil and climate and the 
proper cultivation of the same, and is systematic, methodical and progressive in 
his methods, so that with the passing of the years he has won a most gratifying 
measure of success in agricultural lines. 

Mr. Bangert laid the foundation for a happy home life by his marriage, Oc- 
tober 23, 1879, to Miss Katharine Shulte, who was born in Buffalo township, 
Scott county, Iowa, on the ist of May, 1858, and is a daughter of Henry and 
Marie (Gaass) Shulte, both natives of Germany. The parents came to New 
York in 1850 and were there married, after which they removed to Cleveland, 
Ohio, and thence to Davenport. The father died at the age of sixty-eight years, 
his death occurring on the ocean while on a trip back to the fatherland, while 
the mother survived for several years, passing away when eighty-three years 
of age. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bangert were born six children, namely: August, 
of Cleona township ; Marie, the wife of Henry Bierkamp of Cedar county ; Anna, 
who married Henry Lehms of Muscatine county; Clara, the wife of Hugo 
Schneckloth, a resident of Muscatine county; and Henry and Lena, both at 
home. 

Politically Mr. Bangert has given stalwart support to the democratic party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, but he has never been an 
aspirant for public office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon the con- 
duct of his business affairs. He is public-spirited in his citizenship, however, 
and although born across the waters is thoroughly identified with the interests 
of his adopted country and is numbered among her loyal, representative and sub- 
stantial citizens. 



PETER N. JACOBSEN. 

Few among the older German settlers of Davenport enjoy a larger number 
of friends and a more universal respect than does Peter N. Jacobsen, who, after 
a life of diligence and well repaid toil, is living in retirement at 1823 Division 
street. He was bom in Eckernfoerder, Germany, March 24, 1833, a son of 
Claus and Dorothy (Miller) Jacobsen. His paternal grandfather, Peter Jacob- 
sen, was one of the very wealthy and prominent men in his section of Germany 
and served in the war with Russia. He married Miss Anna Maria Jochensen 
from Kollebig, Germany. Claus Jacobsen, a miller by trade, never left the land 
of his birth. He was the father of thirteen children, of whom Peter N. is the 
eldest and the only one who came to this country besides his youngest sister. 



278 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

There is but one other survivor of this large family, a daughter, living in Ger- 
many. 

Peter N. Jacobsen received all of his education in the land of his birth, for 
he attended a private school near his home. In early life he learned the mil- 
ler's trade, later becoming an overseer who traveled through the country super- 
intending factories for different concerns. He went to Schube, Germany, where 
he remained for a time; from there to Pretsch; thence to Oldenburg, and then 
to Wohedurst. He removed finally to Copenhagen, Denmark, where he re- 
mained until he returned home to enter the German army. After his period of 
service, in 1857, he sailed for America, making his way immediately to Daven- 
port after landing upon our shores. First he worked as a farm hand and then 
rented land in this county, finally buying eighty acres in Princeton township. 
His life having been for so long devoted to milling, he shortly afterward took 
charge of the Rush mill, which he operated and then rented. In i860 he sold 
his property and came to Davenport, where he secured a mill, which he conducted 
for several years. This he also sold and embarked in the saloon business, to 
which he devoted his attention until his son was old enough to assume its re- 
sponsibilities. He then retired from active life and has since devoted himself 
entirely to matters which were calculated to advance the interests of his com- 
patriots in this county. 

Mr. Jacobsen has been twice married. In 1857 he wedded Miss Anna Goetz 
and to them were born seven children : Charley F. ; Dora L. ; Peter N., deceased ; 
Anna; Peter N., Jr.; Claus; and Henry. Mrs. Jacobsen died in 1885, and sub- 
sequently Mr. Jacobsen wedded Mrs. Paulina Heunger. She had a daughter, 
Anna, who became the wife of one of Mr. Jacobsen's sons. 

Mr. Jacobsen has always been very active in the public affairs and has been 
prominent in the numerous organizations which have been formed by his com- 
patriots for social or beneficent reasons. He belongs to the Northwest Daven- 
port Relief Society, Noto Themp Society and its relief corps, the Davenport 
Singing Society (Liedertael), the German Relief, the German Pioneer Society, 
of which he is vice president, the German School Society, and the German and 
American Alliance. 



A. P. DOE. 



It has been urged, and with some reason, that the spirit of commercialism 
is rife in America to the exclusion of the humanitarian recognition of the ob- 
ligations which the individual owes to his fellowmen. To this general rule there 
are, however, many notable exceptions and such a one is found in the life record 
of A. P. Doe, no less esteemed for his success and prominence than for his hearty 
and helpful cooperation in lines of public work that have constituted a bene- 
ficial factor in the city's development and for his earnest and efficient work for 
the Orphans Home. His life history had its beginning at Windham, Maine, 
March 31, 1837. His father, Charles Doe, was born in the same house and 
comes of a family of English origin, connected, however, with American in- 






^:^-ll- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY ' 281 

terests since 1636, when the first representative of the family came to the United 
States, arriving at Gloucester, Massachusetts. Through succeeding generations 
the family was represented in New England and A. P. Doe spent his youthful 
days in the Pine Tree state, there acquired his education and afterward learned 
the machinist's trade, becoming a skilled mechanic. Subsequently he removed 
to Meriden, Connecticut, where he was engaged in the manufacture of rifles 
during the period of the Civil war. 

The opportunities of the west, however, attracted him and in 1866 he arrived 
in Davenport, where he became identified with the business interests of the city 
as a wholesale shoe merchant. For thirty-five years he continued in that line 
of trade, enjoying not only a successful patronage but also an unassailable; rep- 
utation for business enterprise and commercial integrity. His careful manage- 
ment resulted in continual development of the business along substantial lines 
until the trade of the house was represented by a large figure annually. Mr. 
Doe continued in that field of activity until 1901, when he retired. In the mean- 
time he had become closely associated with financial interests as one of the or- 
ganizers of the Iowa National Bank, of which he served as vice president until 
1901, when he was elected to the presidency and so continues. He was also one 
of the organizers of the Scott County Savings Bank and a member of its direc- 
torate for a quarter of a century. His business judgment has always been re- 
garded as sound, his keen insight enabling him to correctly solve the intricate 
problems of commerce and finance. 

In 1864 Mr. Doe was married to Miss Julia M. Bryant, a native of Windsor, 
Maine, and unto them was born a daughter, Alice M., now the wife of George 
B. Butterfield, a banker of Norfolk, Nebraska. The death of Mrs. Doe occurred 
in March, 1905, and was the occasion of deep regret to many friends, for her 
estimable qualities had endeared her to those with whom she was associated. 

Mr. Doe is well known in Masonic circles, having joined the local lodge at 
Bethlehem, Maine, in 1858, since which time he has been an exemplary rep- 
resentative of the fraternity. He has filled the chairs in the blue lodge and chap- 
ter at Davenport and has taken the degrees of the Knight Templar commandery 
and of the Mystic Shrine. While his' business interests have been of considerable 
extent and importance, he has always found time and opportunity for coopera- 
tion in public measures, has done effective service for the city as a progressive 
member of the council, has several times served as a member of the school board 
and was president of the board of trustees of the Orphans Home for ten years. 
If one were to attempt to characterize the life of A. P. Doe outside of his bus- 
iness connection it might perhaps be best done in saying that he is a lover of 
children and the practical manifestation of this has been found in many specific 
instances, but none of greater magnitude than his work with the Orphans Home, 
which he was instrumental in establishing. He was a member of the legislature 
at the time the matter was brought up before the general assembly and from the 
inception of the home to the present he has been one of the most active factors 
in its upbuilding. At the beginning a single room constituted the home and at 
times light and heat were scarce, but through the unflagging energy of Mr. Doe 
and his associates the immense establishment known as the Orphans Home 
has been developed to what it now is. He is particularly interested in the 
manual training department, which is being developed along lines that point to 



282 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

perfection. His great love for the child and his recognition of its possibilities 
have permitted him to do service that is of inestimable value to the state, as 
well as to the city, in surrounding the young with such environment as shall 
develop honorable manhood and womanhood and thus reclaim them from lives 
of wrongdoing, into which want or idleness and lack of education might have 
driven them. 

Mr. Doe was elected to the legislature, in which he served with the same spirit 
of loyalty that has ever characterized his performance of the duties devolving 
upon him. He does not court notoriety but manifests a justifiable pride in 
Davenport and its stability, feeling that no city can boast of more solid financial 
conditions and, although he disclaims special credit therefor, it is but just to say 
that this condition is due in no small measure to his efforts. Such in brief is 
the history of Mr. Doe. While he has made a success in business, there has 
come to him no greater satisfaction than that which has arrived out of the work 
that he has done for the Orphans Home. 



ERNEST S. CARL. 



From a long line of German architects and builders there came to Daven- 
port a man, who was to be a builder of sound institutions and of enduring busi- 
ness confidence. For more than forty years and particularly during the quarter 
century that he acted as cashier of the Citizens National Bank, E. S. Carl was 
acknowledged one of the leading representatives of that fine integrity which was 
preparing the city for a permanent greatness. 

Ernest S. Carl was born January 4, 1842, in Coburg, Germany, where he 
received a thorough, practical education. At the age of sixteen, in 1858, after 
the death of his mother, he sailed for New York, remaining there only a few 
months before he came straight to Davenport. In i860, after some months' 
employment in the general store of his brother-in-law, August Steffen, he 
started for California by way of the Isthmus of Panama, but on the steamer 
met John E. Lovejoy, United States consul to Callao, Peru, with whom he 
engaged as assistant secretary. A few months later he became assistant to 
Dr. Charles F. Winslow, of Boston, the American consul to Paita, Peru, where 
he remained two years till Dr. Winslow's resignation. These years in South 
America, during which Mr. Carl not only learned Spanish, but completely mas- 
tered the English language so that ever after he seemed as much an American 
as any of his fellow citizens, were a broadening influence in his whole life. 

In 1863 Mr. Carl returned to Davenport, erected a warehouse at 224 West 
Front street and entered the grain business. In 1868 he accepted the position 
of teller in the Davenport National Bank, where he demonstrated his true talent 
for banking. In 1870 he became assistant cashier of the First National Bank, 
and finally, in 1875, ^t the age of thirty- three, he was appointed cashier of the 
Citizens National Bank. It was in this last position, which he held till failing 
health compelled him to retire in 1899, that Mr. Carl became known not only 
as one of the ablest bankers in the state but as a helpful public servant, whose 
kindly aid was bestowed without reserve upon all who sought. His adminis- 
trative qualities won the bank fame for its sound and rapid progress, and his 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 283 

broad human qualities brought a varied and enthusiastic patronage. He inau- 
gurated the system of currency distribution by which Davenport has become a 
financial center for the smaller country banks that formerly looked to Chicago; 
and, during his term of office, the Citizens National Bank became the leading 
banking institution in Iowa. 

In 1861 Mr. Carl married Miss Sarah Marckley, who had removed in 1851 
with her parents, William H. and Harriet (Allison) Marckley, from their home 
in Alexandria, Virginia, to Davenport. Mr. Marckley was a contractor and 
builder, whose work became a substantial improvement to the city in the early 
days. Mrs. Carl, like her husband, was a person of generous instincts and an 
agreeable, social nature. Her incessant charities, quietly performed, made her 
known to rich and poor alike ; and her unbounded hospitality, together with Mr. 
Carl's, in the beautiful residence at Sixth and Perry streets, has left happy 
memories throughout the city. 

After a year spent in Colorado seeking health, Mr. Carl returned to Daven- 
port for a short visit, and on October 15, 1900, was stricken dead in the very 
bank where he had spent the best years of his life. Five months later, on the 
24th of March, 1901, Mrs. Carl answered the same call. There are left only 
the daughter, Mrs. Rosa Oberholtzer, and her son, Ernest Carl Oberholtzer. 

Mr. Carl's activities were by no means confined to banking. He was a pub- 
lic-spirited citizen, believing in Davenport and its people and supporting all 
measures for its best progress. He was one of the founders of the Phoenix 
Milling Company and of many other successful enterprises, an ardent and effec- 
tive promoter of the Hennepin canal, a friend of the Davenport Academy of 
Sciences, .a director of the Oakdale cemetery, and though a member of no 
church yet a supporter of many. He was a Turner, an Odd Fellow, a Mason and 
a member of several intimately social clubs. Next to his home and friends, 
which were his chief delight throughout life, his greatest pleasure was music, 
of which he was always a lover and patron. Mr. Carl, in brief, was not only 
one of the most trusted but one of the most beloved men in Davenport. 



J. P. OBERLEITNER. 



In the years, amounting to almost a quarter of a century, that J. P. Ober- 
leitner has been connected with the life of Liberty township, he has proved him- 
self a public-spirited and valuable citizen. As manager of the H. O. Seiffert 
Lumber Company's branch here, he has been instrumental in advancing the 
business activity of the recently established village of New Liberty in whose 
welfare he has taken an active interest. This man of industry, energy and 
enterprise was born in Kaltenkirchen, Holstein, Germany, August 17, i86g, 
and is a son of Christian H. and EHzabeth (Schmidt) Oberleitner, both natives 
of the same province as their son. In 1876 they came to the United States, 
coming directly to Davenport which remained their home until they moved to 
New Liberty. Here the mother passed away, in January, 1902, when she was 
seventy-five years old, and here the father still lives, pursuing the carpenter's 
trade, to which his whole life has been devoted. A daughter, Catherine, was 
born to him and his wife, and she has passed away. 



284 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

J. P. Oberleitner, the only son, was about seven years of age when his 
parents settled in Davenport, where he attended the public schools, in which he 
received a good education, and in that city also learned the carpenter's trade. 
About twenty-three years ago he came to Liberty township, which has since 
been his home and the scene of his labors. He was accounted a good workman, 
and a good man of business, who had developed the power to guide others 
during the years in which he had worked here. These were the very qualities 
for which the H. O. Seiffert Company sought when they opened a branch of 
their Davenport house here. The company are extensive dealers in lumber, 
coal, builders' hardware, bricks, tile and sun-proof paints, so that a wide field 
of operations demanded a manager of pronounced ability. Such a one they 
believed they had discovered in Mr. Oberleitner, and in the last seven years, 
during which he has filled that position, there has never been any indication that 
their judgment was at fault. Mr. Oberleitner has proved that he was the man 
for the place, and has conducted the interests of his employers here with profit. 
At the same time he has advanced the welfare of the little community in 
which he lives, for when the establishment of a bank here was agitated he be- 
came one of the organizers and is still one of the directors of the German 
Savings Bank of New Liberty. 

On the 8th of July, 1893, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Oberleitner 
and Miss Lizzie Arp, who was born in Davenport, July 23, 1870. Her parents, 
Heinrich and Trina (Bock) Arp, were natives of Probstei, but after coming to 
this country settled in Davenport, whence they moved to New Liberty, which 
is now their home. Mr. Oberleitner is a democrat in his political affiliations, 
and upon that party's ticket was elected to the position of township clerk, in 
which capacity he is now serving his second term. When the village of New 
Liberty was organized in August, 1909, he was also elected its clerk, as the 
record of his work in the township warranted the placing of additional respon- 
sibilities upon his shoulders. 



JOHN T. NOEL. 



John T. Noel possesses the distinction of being the oldest living man born 
in Scott county, his birth having occurred in Davenport on the 27th of November, 
1837. His father, Adam Noel, was a native of Pennsylvania, who, upon coming 
to the west, lived for a short time in Rock Island, and then in 1835 removed to 
Davenport. The mother, who before her marriage was Susanna Lindsey, was 
also a native of Pennsylvania and is still living at the advanced age of ninety- 
four years. Upon coming to Davenport Adam Noel bought the property upon 
which Mercy Hospital now stands and also entered a tract of land where Central 
park is now located, which is known as Noel's addition to the city. He was a 
progressive, public-spirited man, prominent in the life of the budding city, and 
first in every movement which had to do with its advancement. This good 
citizen passed on to his reward in 1872. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 285 

John T. Noel was educated in the subscription schools, which were an in- 
stitution of the early days. He did not remain in Davenport but desiring to 
engage in agricultural pursuits took possession of a tract of land in Winfield 
township in 1856, which his father had purchased in 1855. Ninety acres of this 
was broken ground and the remainder Mr. Noel proceeded to put under culti- 
vation by means of ox-teams. From that day to this he has continually im- 
proved his farm and has added to it from time to time until he now possesses 
five hundred and seventeen acres of most desirable property. He engaged 
throughout his active years in general farming but a few years ago retired for 
the enjoyment of a well earned leisure. It is a comment on the progress ot the 
county that until 1861 Mr. Noel conveyed all his crops to the Davenport mattcet 
by team. 

In i860 in Winfield township, Mr. Noel was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary McGuire, a native of the state of New York. To this marriage eleven 
children were bom, nine of whom are living. They are Joseph, of Winfield 
township; Celia, now Mrs. Navin, of Seattle, Washington; Stella, the wife of 
Mickel Wright; John T., of Butler township; WilHam, of Winfield township; 
Rosalie, now Mrs. Doyle, of Davenport; Naomi and Elmer, both of whom are 
located in Sea;ttle; and Edward, on the home farm. Mr. Noel has twenty-three 
grandchildren. 

The household are devoted members of St. Ann's Catholic church, whose 
edifice Mr. Noel assisted in building. He is a stanch adherent of the democratic 
party, to which he has given a long and unfaltering loyalty. He has filled several 
public trusts among them that of township trustee. Noel's Statiorj, the junction 
of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway and the Chicago, Milwaukee 
and St. Paul was named in compliment to him. Like his father he is a man 
designed by nature to play a prominent part among his fellowmen, and he 
enjoys the respect of the community to whose prosperity he has materially 
contributed. 



IRA BURCH. 



Though more than two decades have passed since Ira Burch was called to 
his final rest, he is still remembered by many of Scott county's older residents 
as a prominent agriculturist and extensive landowner as well as a man of genu- 
ine personal worth. His birth occurred in Rensselaer county. New York, on the 
28th of January, 1819, his parents being James and Aurelia Burch, who were 
farming people of that county. He obtained his education in the district schools 
of his home locality and after putting aside his tex:t-books assisted his father in 
the work of the fields, thus early becoming familiar with the duties and labors 
that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. About the year 1855 he journeyed west- 
ward in company with his wife, locating in Hickory Grove township, Scott 
county, Iowa, where he purchased some partly improved land. The work of 
farming claimed his attention throughout his entire business career and as he 
prospered in his undertakings he added to his landholdings by additional 



286 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

purchase from time to time until he had accumulated considerable property in 
Scott and other counties. His demise occurred on the loth of February, 1889, 
and thus the community lost one of its most substantial, enterprising and re- 
spected citizens. 

Mr. Burch was married twice. By his first wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Katherine Deyoe, he had five children, as follows : Esther, the deceased wife 
of John E. Dempster, by whom she had three children — Emma, Mary and John; 
LeRoy, who is likewise deceased and who wedded Miss JuHa Roberts, by whom 
he had three children — Nellie, Leslie and Essie ; Daniel D., who is a resident of 
California; and Abbie and Mary, both of whom have passed away. On the 
19th of February, 1873, Mr. Burch was again married, his second union being 
with Miss Cynthia C. Curtis, a native of Rensselaer county, New York. Unto 
them were born four children, two of whom died in infancy, Robert and Irene. 
Ira C, who makes his home in Davenport, wedded Miss Laura Klein and has 
two children, Ira W. and Beatrice C. Hettie May gave her hand in marriage 
to Edward U. Meyer, of Davenport and is now the mother of three children, 
namely: Irene C, Robert B. and Shelton E. 

Mrs. Burch has won a host of warm friends during the long period of her 
residence in this county and now resides at No. 744 East Thirteenth street in 
Davenport. 



JOSEPH FRANKLIN PORTER. 

Few of the citizens of Davenport represent larger business interests nor have 
devoted a greater number of years to developing resources of communities, than 
Joseph Franklin Porter, who is the president of several of the public service 
companies in this city. He was born in Harrison county, Iowa, June 27, 1863, 
and is a son of F. J. and Lucy (Francis) Porter, the former a native of New 
York, the later of Ohio. F. J. Porter came to Iowa in 1857, devoting himself 
assiduously to agricultural pursuits for a number of years. He has now retired 
from active farm life, however, and, with his wife, lives in the enjoyment of 
many comforts in the village of Woodbine. He has identified himself closely 
with the interests of his community and is president of the Peoples Savings 
Bank of that town. Eleven children were born to him and his wife. Ten of 
these grew to maturity and nine are still living. 

J. F. Porter was reared on a farm and received his first introduction into 
the world of letters while a pupil at the district school at Biggler's Grove, Har- 
rison county, Iowa. Later he attended the high school at Logan, going from 
there to the State College at Ames, from which institution he was graduated 
as a civil engineer in the class of 1884. For some time after the completion of 
his college course, Mr. Porter engaged as cashier of a bank at Woodbine. In 
1885 he decided to engage in engineering pursuits and went to Des Moines, 
Iowa, where he became interested in electricity and its application to the needs 
of man, and where he acquired some practical experience in electric lighting. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 289 

During his stay in Des Moines he held the position of oiler and general utility 
man, starting with a salary of twenty dollars per month. After six months 
experience in the Des Moines station, he went to Appleton, Wisconsin, where 
he worked on the installation of an electric lighting plant. In the spring of 1886 
he went to Chicago in the employ of the representatives of the Edison interests, 
and from there went to Abeline, Kansas, where he spent the winter of 1886-7. 
In the spring of 1887 he removed to St. Louis as foreman for a contractor for 
the Edison Company, which remained in business until the fall of 1887, when 
it moved its headquarters to Kansas City. When the company for which he 
was employed moved to Kansas City, Mr. Porter decided to engage in the elec- 
tric construction business for himself, in which business he continued until the 
fall of 1889, when he sold his construction company to the Edison Company 
and went to New York to enter the employ of the Edison Company as depart- 
ment manager. 

In the summer of 1890 Mr. Porter was sent to Salem, Mississippi, as su- 
perintendent of construction of the Naumnkeag Street Railway, the construction 
of which was one of the largest contracts which the Edison Company had at 
that time. On the completion of his contract with the Edison Company, Mr. 
Porter returned to New York to enter in the street railway supply business in 
partnership with J. G. White. After operating the New York office for some 
time it was decided to move to the manufacturing plant at Allegheny, Penn- 
sylvania, where the business is now conducted as a Westinghouse interest. In 
the fall of 1892 Mr. Porter, together with Mr. White, secured a contract for 
the equipment of the Kansas City Elevated Railroad, which road at that time 
was independent of the other railways of Kansas City and operated between the 
business district of Kansas City and the smaller cities on the Kansas side. After 
completing the contract on the Kansas City elevated, Mr. Porter moved to 
Alton, Illinois, for the purpose of developing the street railway, gas, electric 
light and power business of that locality, which property, in 1893, consisted of 
a small horse and dummy line and an inefificient gas and electric plant. The 
work of developing these properties occupied Mr. Porter's attention for thir- 
teen years, at the end of which time he had a street railway of sixty-three miles 
reaching from Alton to Edwardsville, Granite City, Madison, Venice, East St. 
Louis and intermediate points and an efficient gas and electric plant. As evi- 
dence of the fact, it was taken over by the East St. Louis & Suburban system 
at five million dollars. 

On the 1st of May, 1906, Mr. Porter removed to Davenport as president of 
the Tri-City Railway & Light Company and its subsidiary companies, which 
are the Peoples Light Company, Davenport Gas & Electric Company, Tri-City 
Railway Company, Peoples Power Company of Rock Island and Moline, and 
the Moline, East Moline & Watertown Railway Company. Since the spring of 
igo6 the above mentioned properties have been extensively developed, because 
of the confidence which the bankers have in the community, as proven by the 
increase of earnings under the existing management. His has been the kind of 
enterprise which has been the making of the west and which is still active 
in obtaining illimitable resources from the fields, the mountains and the air. 
He has never hesitated before obstacles but has regarded disappointment and 



290 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

discouragements as merely stepping-stones to larger opportunity to exert his 
talents. 

In 1888 Mr. Porter was united in marriage to Miss Jennie R. Henderson, 
a daughter of Robert and Polly Henderson, of Monticello, Iowa. Of the six 
children born to the couple, five are living, namely: Clyde H., Dugald G., Mar- 
gory, Joseph F. and Ralph E. The family are members of the Congregational 
church. 

Mr. Porter gives his support to the republican party. He has had little time 
to devote to public concerns but is a member of several organizations of a fra- 
ternal and social nature and others which are calculated to advance his interests 
in a business way. He is a member of Fraternal Lodge, No. 221, A. F. & A. M., 
and is a thirty-second degree Mason and member of Kaaba Temple, Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member. of Davenport Lodge, No. 293, B. P. 
O. E., and local camp of Mo.dern Woodmen. Of the semi-professional asso- 
ciations he belongs to the Engineering Club of St. Louis and American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers. He is also a member of the Rock Island Ar- 
senal Golf Club, Davenport Commercial Club, Rock Island Qub, Moline Club, 
Automobile Club of America and the American Academy of Political and Social 
Sciences. The number and varied character of these organizations exhibit the 
extent of his interests and the manner in which he keeps abreast of the times 
and the questions that occupy the minds and attention of his fellow citizens. 



JOHN F. ROTH. 



John F. Roth is one of Scott county's native sons and has always been loyal 
to her interests and her welfare. He is a prominent farmer of Rockingham town- 
ship, where he owns one hundred acres of rich and well cultivated land. His 
birth occurred in Buffalo township, September 14, 1862, his parents being Peter 
and Julia (Fischer) Roth, who were early settlers of this part of the state. 
The father came to Scott county when a boy of fourteen years and he and his 
wife lived here until called to their final rest, Mr. Roth passing away when about 
seventy-three years of age. In their family were seven children: Frank, of 
Muscatine county; Anna, the wife of Charles- Winn, of Muscatine county; Mary, 
the widow of Mr. Comstock, of Cambridge, Illinois ; John F., the subject of this 
sketch; Ferdinand, a resident of Rock Island; Edward, living in Bufifalo town- 
ship; and Minnie, who lives in Illinois. 

John F. Roth, who has been a lifelong resident of Scott county, acquired his 
education in the district schools and afterward learned the trade of a stationary 
engineer. Later he removed to Davenport, where he lived for several years, 
following that line of business. In 1897, however, he resolved to make a change 
and bought his present homestead, upon which he has made numerous im- 
provements. Here he carries on general agricultural pursuits with good results. 
His fields bring forth rich harvests as the reward of his energy and labor and 
the place presents a neat and attractive appearance, which is the result of the 
earnest efforts and unfaltering diligence of the owner. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 291 

On the 2ist of February, 1888, Mr. Roth was united in marriage to Miss 
Lucinda Garner, a daughter of PhilHp and Susan Garner, who previously lived 
upon the farm now occupied by Mr. Roth. Her father was born in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, May 15, 1829, and was there reared. On coming to 
Scott county in 1865 he settled in Lincoln township, where he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land. His time and energies were devoted to the 
further improvement of that place during the eight years in which he resided 
thereon. Later he removed to Rockingham township, where he bought an im- 
proved tract of land of two hundred acres, making his home there until his 
death, which occurred on the nth of November, 1897. In early life he had 
learned and followed the carpenter's trade, but after coming to Scott county 
devoted his attention to general farming and was very careful in the manage- 
ment of his place and won substantial results as the reward of his industry. In 
Blair county, Pennsylvania, he married Miss Susan Acker, who was bom in 
that county, April 5, 1832, and died on the ist of August, 1895. In his political 
views Mr. Garner was an earnest republican but never held or desired public 
office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. Both 
he and his wife held membership in the Reformed church while in Pennsylvania 
and after coming to Scott county joined the Lutheran church. In their family 
were six children, of whom four are yet living: Annetta, the wife of John 
Jacobs, a resident of Rockingham township; Belle, who is the widow of R. S. 
Garner and lives in Rockingham township; Mrs. Roth; and Harry, who makes 
his home with his sister, Mrs. Roth. The two children of the family now de- 
ceased are Frank, who died at the age of twelve years, and Arilla, who passed 
away at the age of eight years. Mr. and Mrs. Roth have no children of their 
own but have reared an adopted daughter, May. Their home is a most hospit- 
able one, ever open for the reception of their many friends. Both have long 
been residents of the county, for Mrs. Roth arrived here in her girlhood days 
and Mr. Roth has always resided within the borders of the county. In business 
he is reliable and is developing his place along lines of modern scientific farming 
and practicing the rotation of crops and other methods which have produced 
substantial results in the agricultural development of the county. 



AUGUST H. LAMP. 



August H. Lamp, a prominent agriculturist and leading citizen of Sheridan 
township, there owns and resides upon a valuable farm of two hundred and 
forty acres, which has remained his place of abode from his birth to the present 
time. He was born on the 28th of June, 1863, and is a representative of one of 
the old and prominent German-American families of Scott county, his parents 
being Asmus H. and Whipke (Kindt) Lamp. A sketch of the father, who is 
now Hving retired in Davenport, appears on another page of this volume. 

In bis youthful days August H. Lamp attended the district schools in the 
acquirement of an education and subsequently pursued a course at Duncan's 
.Business College of Davenport. He early became familiar with the duties and 



292 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist and has devoted his time and ener- 
gies to the work of farming throughout his entire business career, now owning 
a tract of two hundred and forty acres of well improved and productive land in 
Sheridan township. In addition to raising the cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate, he is also engaged in feeding stock and both branches of his business 
return to him a gratifying annual income. A man of enterprise and excellent 
executive ability, he has likewise put forth his energies in other directions and 
is now one of the directors of the Eldridge Savings Bank and the president of 
the Farmers Elevator Company. The latter concern has ninety-seven local 
stockholders and was organized about a year ago with a capital stock of ten 
thousand dollars. Its officers are as follows: August H. Lamp, president; Gus 
Schneckloth, vice president; Julius Weise, secretary; and Joseph McDowell, 
treasurer. Mr. Lamp also acts as appraiser for the German Insurance Company 
of Scott county and is widely recognized as one of the prosperous, progressive 
and influential citizens of his community. 

On the 22d of February, 1888, Mr. Lamp was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Mary Fellener, a daughter of Henry and Margaret (Gertz) Fellener, who were 
early settlers of this county. Mr. and Mrs. Lamp now have four children, 
namely : Henry, Hilda, Frank and Francis, all of whom are still under the parental 
roof. They have been provided with liberal educational advantages. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Lamp has sup- 
ported the men and measures of the republican party, believing that its principles 
are most conductive to good government. His fellow townsmen, recognizing 
his worth and ability, have called him to various positions of public trust and 
he is now serving as a trustee of Sheridan township and likewise as president 
of the school board. He has also acted as the efficient incumbent in the office 
of road supervisor. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias, 
belonging to lodge No. 118 at Eldridge, Iowa. His entire life has been passed 
here and he is widely recognized as a straightforward and reliable business man 
and an enterprising, progressive citizen, who well merits the esteem that is 
universally accorded him. 



ALONZO BRYSON. 



Alonzo Bryson, who since March, 1903, has served in the office of postmaster 
at Davenport, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 23d of July, 1840, his parents 
being Isaac and Jane (Kerr) Bryson, who were natives of Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and Ohio respectively. When a youth the father removed to 
Ohio with his parents and spent the remainder of his life in that state and in 
Kentucky. Throughout his entire business career he was actively engaged as 
a captain and pilot. His demise occurred in Lawrence county, Ohio, in 1899, 
when he had attained the age of seventy-five years. 

Alonzo Bryson obtained his education in the public schools of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and Newport, Kentucky, likewise attended a private institution of learn- 
ing and later pursued a course of study in a commercial school. In 1856 he 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 293 

became identified with river pursuits, and with the exception of a period of two 
or three years, followed steamboating continuously until 1876. In that year 
he came to Davenport as agent of the St. Louis Sz; St. Paul Packet Company, 
acting in that capacity until 1890, when he turned his attention to the coal and 
grain business. He was thus successfully engaged in mercantile pursuits until 
1897, when he was elected county recorder and for a period of six years capably 
discharged the duties devolving upon him in that connection. In March, 1903, 
he was appointed postmaster and in this office has likewise made a most credit- 
able record, his efficiency and trustworthiness being widely acknowledged. 

In October, 1861, Mr. Bryson was united in marriage to Miss Valeria M. 
Wright, a native of Ohio. Their children are four in number, as follows : Elmer 
E., who is a resident of Omaha, Nebraska ; Robert H., who makes his home in 
Indianapolis, and is serving as postmaster there; May V., the wife of James J. 
Duffy, of St. Louis; and Pearl M., at home. 

Mr. Bryson is a valued member of the Commercial and other clubs, and in 
1903 served as president of the Business Association of Davenport. The period 
of his residence in Davenport now covers a third of a century and he is a 
most public-spirited and loyal citizen, giving his cooperation to every movement 
or measure which tends to promote the general welfare. In manner courteous 
and genial, he wins good will and kindly regard wherever he goes, and the circle 
of his friends is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances. 



L. G. EGGER. 



L. G. Egger, a button manufacturer of Buffalo, his native city, is the pro- 
prietor of the largest manufacturing plant in Buffalo township and occupies an 
important place in industrial circles of the community. His natal day was the 
28th of February, 1884, his parents being M. and Mary (Willi) Egger, both 
natives of Switzerland, where the latter was born in 1845. The father came to 
Buffalo in 1877 and here engaged in the cooperage business for some time. In 
his family were seven sons and four daughters, of whom one brother of our 
subject is engaged in agricultural pursuits in Minnesota and another is a farmer 
residing in Colorado. The sisters are: Elizabeth, the deceased wife of Frank 
Moss, of Davenport; Anna, who married C. E. Reed, of Rock Island; Mary,, 
residing in Buffalo; and Bessie, deceased. 

Reared to manhood in the city of his nativity, L. G. Egger attended the pub- 
lic schools in the acquirement of his education, gaining a good knowledge of 
the various branches of English learning. The period of his boyhood was de- 
voted to the duties of the school-room, the pleasures of the playground, and 
the tasks assigned to him by parental authority. Upon the completion of his- 
education in 1903, he entered the button manufacturing business in connection 
with his father, and in this line of activity has been most successful. With 
the passing of the years this enterprise has flourished, its business steadily but 
rapidly increasing in volume and importance until today it is the largest manu- 
facturing industry in Buffalo. The plant which is owned by Mr. Egger is the 



294 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUiMTY 

largest in the township, twenty-two machines being in operation, and it is the 
only finishing plant in Buffalo. The factory turns out two hundred gross of 
finished and four hundred gross of unfinished product per day, the latter being 
taken to Muscatine for the finishing process. Most of the mussel shells from 
which the buttons are made are secured in the Illinois river, although a large 
number are found in the Mississippi near Buffalo. A man of keen discrimina- 
tion and sound judgment, Mr. Egger's excellent business ability and good man- 
agement have brought to the concern of which he is the head a large degree of 
success, and he is today recognized as one of the enterprising, progressive and 
representative business men of the township. 

The religious views of Mr. Egger are indicated in his membership in the 
Buffalo parish Catholic church, while politically he casts his ballot in behalf of 
the best candidate of either party at the polls, although he has never desired nor 
sought to take any active part in politics. Having passed his entire life in Buf- 
falo, covering a period of twenty-five years, he has become widely known 
throughout the community, where his circle of friends is almost coextensive 
with the circle of his acquaintances. A young man, he possesses the enterprising 
spirit of the west, which has been the dominant factor in producing the wonder- 
ful development of this section of the country. Brooking no obstacles that 
honest effort can overcome, he has steadily worked his way upward in the busi- 
ness world until, having left the ranks of the many, he has already won a place 
among the successful few. 



DAVID N. RICHARDSON. 

David N. Richardson was born in Orange, Vermont, March 19, 1832. He 
was reared on a farm and completed his education by two terms at an academy. 
He taught school when eighteen years of age and later entered a printing office 
in Illinois, where he learned the trade. In 1854 he came to Davenport, Iowa, 
where, in company with James T. Hildreth and George R. West, he purchased 
the democratic newspaper establishment and began the publication of the Daily 
Iowa State Democrat. Here for nearly forty years Mr. Richardson was en- 
gaged in conducting one of the foremost newspapers of Iowa. He was for 
many years a regent of the State University and was untiring in his efforts to 
make that the foremost educational institution in the state. He was also one of 
the original members of the state commission to plan and erect the Iowa Sol- 
diers' Monument, serving until the work was completed. During the period of 
eighteen years, in which Mr. Richardson was a regent of the State Univer- 
sity, he was one of its most intelligent and effective promoters. It was an often 
expressed desire of his to live to see our State University equal to any in 
America. That institution never had a more devoted friend or more useful 
officer. 

Mr. Richardson was a graceful and accomplished writer and one of the ablest 
of Iowa editors. He became an extensive traveler in foreign countries and his 
letters descriptive of the lands and cities visited were of absorbing interest. His 




X^.Tt^C^LC/ia^S. 



u 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 297 

acquaintance with the public men of Iowa was very wide, and although he was a 
life-long democrat and an active and influential leader in his party for more than 
forty years, he won and retained the confidence and personal friendship of his 
political opponents everywhere. He died on the 4th of July, 1898. 



CHRISTINA WIESE. 



The student of history doesn't carry his investigation far into the records 
of Scott county without learning that the German element in its citizenship has 
played a most important part in its upbuilding and progress. One of the repre- 
sentatives of the Teutonic race, Fritz Wiese long resided in Davenport, where 
for more than a quarter of a century he was connected with the livery business. 
He was born in Holstein, Germany, June 17, 1838, a son of Max and Lucy 
Wiese. At the usual age he entered school in his native country and when 
fourteen years of age came to the United States with his parents, who settled 
in Moline, Illinois. From that time forth Fritz Wiese was dependent upon his 
own resources. He secured employment with the Deere works as a blacksmith, 
being one of the first engaged for the shop. In time the business was developed 
into the great enterprise known as the Deere Plow Works. Mr. Wiese con- 
tinued to live at Moline for about three years, at the end of which time his 
parents purchased a farm in Rock Island county and he took up his abode there. 
His parents remained occupants of the old home place until called to their 
final rest. 

On the 2d of January, 1863, Mr. Wiese was married and continued to live 
on the old farm in Illinois for about five years, after which he made his home in 
the vicinity of Rock Island until 1868. He then purchased a farm near Mount 
Joy, where he made his home for seven years, and on the expiration of that 
period he rented his land and took up his abode in Mount Joy. He turned his 
attention to the cattle business at Davenport and later engaged in the livery 
business, which he continued for about thirty years, at the end of which time 
he retired, turning over the business to his son. His remaining days were 
spent in the enjo)mient of well earned rest, his death occurring February 17, 
1898. 

It was on the 2d of January, 1863, that Mr. Wiese was united in marriage to 
Miss Christina Schnack. She was born near Kiel, Germany, June 24, 1840, a 
daughter of James and Christina Schnack. Mrs. Wiese came to the United 
States with her brother John and an aunt in i860, landing in New York, after 
which she made her way westward to Davenport. Here she was married and 
became the mother of five children. Lewis, of Davenport, who is now conduct- 
ing the livery business and is serving as alderman from the fourth ward, mar- 
ried Bertha Springmier and has three children: Fred and Henry, twins; and 
Lillie. Laura is the widow of Frank Peto and has two children, Ellis and Cam- 
ello; with whom she resides in Davenport. Emil, of this city, wedded Bertha 
Ruge, who died, leaving one child, Thelma. Alvina is the wife of Frank Bey, of 
Davenport, and has five children: Alvin, Clarence, Frank, Lawrence and Ray- 



298 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

mond. Anna is the widow of William Brandt and has three children: Lucile, 
Lillie and Isabelle. 

Mr. Wiese was a member of the Turner Society and the German Shooting 
Society. He was a man of liberal and generous spirit who gave freely of his 
means to advance worthy public movements and at the same time rendered aid 
in many individual cases. His good qualities were numerous and won for him a 
circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances. 



LOUIS GOLLNITZ. 



Louis GoUnitz, a well known farmer of Liberty township, was born in Meck- 
lenburg, Germany, July 16, 1868, a son of Fritz and Sophia (Frunt) GoUnitz. 
They spent their entire lives in the land of their birth and died when their son 
Louis was about twelve years of age. Six children were born to them. One 
died in infancy and the other five came to America about 1882. They were: 
Ricka, who became the wife of Fritz Benning of Davenport ; Fritz, who died in 
Davenport in February, 1909, at the age of fifty-nine years, leaving two sons 
and two daughters; Chris, a resident of Davenport; Louis, the subject of this 
sketch ; and Ida, who became the wife of Ernest Loraine, of Davenport. 

Louis GoUnitz, who was about twelve years of age when he was left an 
orphan, remained for two more years in the fatherland, where he received his 
education. At the age of fourteen he and his brothers and sisters embarked 
upon their journey to America. They came directly to Scott county, where 
Louis GoUnitz obtained work upon a farm. After he had worked for others for 
about nine years, gaining experience in agriculture and familiarity with the 
customs and language of this country, he married and came to live upon the 
land where he now resides. It is a tract of one hundred and sixty acres be- 
longing to his wife and is situated on section 31, Liberty township. Here he 
pursues general farming, winning a well deserved success from his labors. H'e 
has brought his farm to a high state of cultivation and has instituted many subr 
stantial improvements. 

On the 24th of February, 1894, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. GoU- 
nitz and Miss Meta Arp, who was born in Davenport township, Scott county, 
October 15, 1871, her parents being Claus and Doris (Sienknecht) Arp. Her 
father was born in Holstein, Germany, August 23, 1827, while her mother was 
born near the city of Kiel, September 2, 1832. They came to this country about 
fifty years ago, settling in Davenport, where they were married April 14, 1868. 
Mr. Arp bought a large amount of land, which was procured at a low price in 
those days, owning at one time five good farms, which amounted to seven hun- 
dred and forty acres. This property was the result of his own labors, for he 
came to America a poor boy, and it indicates with what success he operated his 
farm in the vicinity of Davenport. About fifteen years ago he felt he was 
justified in retiring from active life and, accordingly, took up his residence in 
Davenport, which is still his home. Mr. and Mrs. Arp are the parents of seven 
children: Theodore, who lives in Colorado; Hannes, who lives near West Lib- 
erty; Minnie, the wife of Julius Kuelper, of Walcott; Herman, who resides 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 299 

in Stockton, Muscatine county, Iowa; Meta, now Mrs. Gollnitz; Otto, who re- 
sides on the homestead near Davenport; and Delia, who lives with her parents. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Gollnitz have been born two children, Ray and Edna. 

The early life of Mr. Gollnitz was one of many hardships and privations, 
but from his struggles he learned the lesson of industry and making the best 
use of his opportunities. In consequence he has attained a well earned suc- 
cess in his field of occupation and one of which he may be pardonably proud. 
Indeed, he deserves to be numbered among the numerous citizens of this land 
who wear with distinction the title of a self-made man. 



ZEBULON HENRY WICKS. 

Zebulon Henry Wicks, whose identification with the Davenport Woolen 
Mills as traveling representative brought him a wide acquaintance, was highly 
esteemed wherever known for the possession of those sterling traits of charac- 
ter which constitute the chief forces in honorable manhood. He was born in 
Bristol, England, September 22, 1828. His father, Dr. Zebulon Wicks, gave 
his attention to the practice of medicine and after the arrival of his son and 
namesake in this country, he crossed the Atlantic and established his home at 
Morristown, Ohio. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Letitia Lashley, 
was also a native of England. 

Reared in a home surrounded by culture and affluence, Zebulon H. Wicks 
was afforded liberal educational advantages, supplementing his early instruction 
by study at St. Mellow, France. He took a very active part in politics in his 
native land and assisted in putting Charles Reed in parliament. He was pre- 
eminently a man of affairs and one who wielded a wide influence. His interest 
in America led him to come to the new world on a visit in 1873, and he was so 
pleased with the country that he decided to remain and established his home 
in Davenport. He immediately became connected with the Davenport Woolen 
Mills, first as bookkeeper and later as traveling salesman. In that connection he 
did valuable service for the enterprise throughout his remaining days. He was 
not only a business man of keen discernment and undaunted enterprise, but 
possessed genial, friendly qualities which made him very, popular with the many 
patrons whom he secured. 

At St. Catherine's, Hampshire, England, in 1853, Mr. Wicks was married 
to Miss Theresa Burden, a daughter of Robert and Nancy (Hartnell) Burden, 
of Hampshire. Her father was a landowner and was also a Methodist preacher, 
proclaiming the gospel in a small chapel, of which he was the owner. In the 
family of Mr. and Mrs. Wicks were ten children, of whom five are now living: 
Mrs. Theresa L. Godwin; Alfred H., a resident of Detroit; Sidney H., who is 
living in St. Paul, Minnesota; Archibald, a resident of Murphysboro, Illinois; 
and Clarence H., who is employed on Government Island here. 

Mr. Wicks' study of the political issues, situation and conditions of the coun- 
try led him to give stalwart allegiance to the republican party. He was an 
active and devoted member of the Baptist church, a public-spirited citizen, and 



300 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

a patron of various benevolent institutions which Davenport maintains. Fra- 
ternally he was connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Royal Arch Masons. A man of broad and liberal culture, he placed correct 
valuation upon life and its opportunities. His career was marked by continuous 
progress and characterized by the esteem which was uniformly tendered him 
to the time of his death, which occurred February 17, 1896. 



MILTON R. PARKHURST. 

Milton R. Parkhurst, in former years a merchant of Davenport, belongs to 
that class of prominent, enterprising and far-sighted business men to whom the 
commercial upbuilding of the city is rightly attributed. Throughout his entire 
life he has been identified with manufacturing and mercantile interests in this 
county. 

He was bom at Le Claire, Iowa, a son of Waldo- and Liddie Emeline (Rus- 
sell) Parkhurst, who were among the early settlers of that place. The father 
was born at Milford, Massachusetts, September 28, 1812, attended the school 
there but at an early age was compelled to put aside his text-books because of 
his father's death, whereby there devolved upon him the necessity of aiding in 
support of the family. He went to New York city when very young and there 
secured a situation as clerk in a dry-goods store, which constituted his business 
training. In 1838 he came to the middle west, making his way to the territory 
of Iowa, and after looking over the field to some extent settled at Le Qaire, 
where he opened a general store. He there conducted a successful mercantile 
enterprise for over forty years and in early days he did quite a business in killing 
hogs and shipping the pork down the Mississippi river by steamer to St. Louis. 
He was, moreover, one of the leading men of the town, active and efficient in 
promoting the various interests which were of vital significance to the commu- 
nity. He held a number of offices, serving as justice of the peace for several 
years, acting as postmaster during the '503 and serving as a member and trustee 
of the school board for a number of years. He belonged to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and to the Presbyterian church of Le Claire and thus 
sought to promote the fraternal and Christian spirit of the community. In 1881 
he retired from active business life and removed to Davenport, where he made 
his home with his two children until his death, on the 21st of March, 1881. His 
wife was born at Sodus Point, New York, in 1820. Her father, Nehemiah Rus- 
sell, came west about 1840 and settled on a farm in Clinton county, Iowa, just 
across the line from Scott county. The parents of Milton R. Parkhurst were 
married in Qinton county in 1841. Mrs. Parkhurst had been one of the early 
school teachers of Scott county, having taught first in Pleasant Valley township 
and later at Le Claire. She was a lady of strong intellectual development and 
of many attractive characteristics. She died December 14, 1890, and is still sur- 
vived by her two children, Milton R. and Mary E., both of whom are now resi- 
dents of Davenport. 




yi£iU>f fu^^^y^u/6 i a/m4t^fAAA/) 






HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 303 

Milton R. Parkhurst attended school at Le Claire and later continued his 
studies in Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa. He then returned to Le 
Claire and taught school for a number of years. Later he was employed as 
bookkeeper by a Le Claire firm but, embracing every opportunity for advance- 
ment in business lines, he subsequently became a stockholder and secretary of the 
Le Claire Milling & Manufacturing Company. He was also engaged in the river 
business for a number of years and then, seeking the broader field of labor 
offered by the city, he came to Davenport in 1874. In East Davenport he estab- 
lished a retail grocery business, which he conducted successfully for about thirty 
years, after which he was in the same line of business on Brady street for two 
years and then sold out. The passing years had chronicled his success, which 
increasing as time passed on, had made him one of the men of affluence of the 
community. He has made several trips to Seattle, Washington, where he has 
business interests. His judgment is sound, his insight keen, and the success 
which has attended his efforts has been the logical result of intelligently directed 
thrift and enterprise. 

Mr. Parkhurst aside from commercial connections has been prominent in the 
community. He was four times elected alderman from the sixth ward on the 
republican ticket and supported many reforms and progressive measures while a 
member of the council. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
taken the degrees of the lodge, chapter, commandery and Mystic Shrine. He is 
also a member of the Congregational church, in which he has held a number of 
offices, including that of deacon, trustee and member of the board. 

His sister, Mary E. Parkhurst, also a native of Le Qaire, attended school 
there and afterward engaged successfully in teaching for a number of years at 
school No. I in Le Claire township, at Princeton and in the town of Le Claire. 
She came to Davenport in 1880 and was of great assistance to her brother in his 
business. She also had charge of the Blue Grass, Downey, Lone Tree and Zion 
Baptist churches as pastor and was also assistant pastor of the Temple Baptist 
church of Seattle, Washington, from October, 1908, until April, 1909, Rev. 
George Robert Cairns being pastor. At present she is assistant pastor of the 
Calvary Baptist church of Davenport, Iowa. She is also an interesting writer 
both in prose and poetry and has contributed many articles to the local papers 
regarding church work and eastern travels, and was also the author of the sketch 
of Le Claire, which was recently published in the Davenport Democrat for the 
Half Century Democrat. 



FERDINAND HAAK. 



If the prosperity of the city be measured by the enterprise of some of its 
more important manufacturing concerns Davenport owes no little of its reputa- 
tion as being the home of successful business men to Ferdinand Haak, who is 
president of one of the largest cigar factories west of the Mississippi. The 
enviable position he holds has been entirely the work of his own hands and 
brain, being a patent example of the value of industry, economy and wise fore- 



304 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

sight. He was born in 1845 at Elmshorn, about four miles from Hamburg, 
Germany, a son of Carsten and Lesette (Oldendorf ) Haak. The father brought 
his family to America in 1857 and selected Scott county, Iowa, as a place of 
residence. He bought considerable land here and farmed with profit until his 
death, which occurred in 1888. 

Ferdinand Haak was about twelve years of age when his family came to the 
United States. He h3.d attended the schools of his native land and after he 
came to Scott county was enrolled as a pupil in the public schools of Davenport. 
For a number of years he worked upon the home farm and then decided to start 
in life for himself as a cigarmaker. He served an apprenticeship for about four 
years, in that time becoming a most efficient workman, and then secured a posi- 
tion as foreman in a factory, but although he enjoyed the confidence of his em- 
ployers he was not satisfied for he was ambitious to make a name for himself. 
Accordingly; in 1870, he opened a factory of his own, and although he began 
business in a small way, through concentration of his powers, business acumen 
and determination to succeed he has built it up so that now it is one of the 
largest in the west. He has won from it a most gratifying income. 

In 1867 Mr. Haak was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Kohrdt, and of 
their union have been born seven children: Minnie, now the wife of Charles 
Meyer; Pauline, who became the wife of Gene Gruenewald and has one child; 
John, who is in business with his father, and is married and has three children, 
John, Ferdinand and Minna; Richard, who is also in business with his father, 
and has two daughters, Irma and Elsie ; Edna and Elsie, who are living at home ; 
and Theckla, who is the wife of Frank Hetzl, of Sioux City, Iowa. Mr. Haak 
belongs to the Turners and is one of the directors of the Iowa National Bank. 
Shortly after his arrival in this country he enlisted in Company B, Eighth Iowa 
Infantry, but saw only one year's service on the field of battle. It, however, 
was sufficient to attach him closely to the government, so that he is an interested 
spectator of all national interests. His home is at 824 West Vine street, where 
he and his wife extend a gracious hospitality to all guests. 



CLAUS J. B. HANSEN. 



The strong characteristics of the German race, industry, frugality and per- 
serverance, are conspicuous in the life history of Claus J. B. Hansen, a farmer 
of Winfield township. He was born in Detmarchen, Germany, August 3, 1864, 
and is a son of Peter and Margaretta Hansen. The father was a laborer in the 
old country, but after Claus Hansen had come to America, he and another of 
his sons came here and for many years he was actively engaged in farming in 
Scott county, Iowa. 

Claus J. B. Hansen attended the public schools of Germany in his boyhood, 
thereby obtaining a fair education in his native tongue, and when he put aside 
his text-books he worked by the month as a farm hand. Stories of the oppor- 
tunities that awaited the ambitious and industrious young man in America had 
reached him, however, and by 1881 he could no longer resist the call of the 



HISTORY DF SCOTT COUNTY 305 

new world, so he joined a party of friends and embarked upon the voyage to 
the United States. He landed at New York, April 6, 1881, and coming direct to 
Scott county, Iowa, reached Davenport April 9. 

Although he could not speak English Mr. Hansen lost no time in securing 
employment, but the day after his arrival, at 3 p. m., he started to work as a 
farm hand near Donahue. He was employed at that kind of labor for six years, 
at the end of which tithe he joined his father and brother Fred, who had come 
to the county and had rented land on the banks of the Wapsipinicon. They re- 
mained at that location for five years and then removed to a farm near Eld- 
ridge, which they also rented and on which they lived for four years. Another 
change was then made to a place near Donahue, where Claus Hansen lived for 
two years, or until he was married, when he engaged in farming for himself. 
For one year he lived on a rented farm near Donahue and then for two years 
lived on another place in the same locality, after which, as the result of his 
well directed economy, he bought the land on which he now lives from Bartley 
Schwackle. It is a tract of eighty-four* and twenty-seven hundredth acres, 
which Mr. Hansen has greatly improved, tiling the fields, erecting new buildings 
and in other ways making it thoroughly modern and in keeping with the pro- 
gressive spirit of the times. He carries on general farming, in which he has met 
with success, for he brings to his work intense energy intelligently directed. 

It was on the 15th of February, 1898, Mr. Hansen was united in marriage to 
Miss Emily Holland, a daughter of Adolph Holland, of Davenport, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this volume. Four children have been born to the 
couple, namely: Adolph, Edna, Nonie and Lester, all of whom are at home. 

Mr. Hansen belongs to the Court of Honor of Long Grove, in which organi- 
zation he has a large number of friends, although these are not limited to its 
membership, for he possesses those sterling traits of character which command 
respect in every part of the world. His principles in life and business are wise 
and well worthy of emulation, for what he now owns he has gained through 
his own labor and by honorable and straightforward methods. 



WILLIAM S. COLLINS. 

William Sheridan Collins came to Scott county, Iowa, from New York, 
in August, 1838. He was born February 15, 1806, at Litchfield, Connecticut, 
a son of David and Jerusha (Wright) Collins. David Collins became a mer- 
chant of New York and at one time a member of congress. In 1826 William 
S. Collins went from Connecticut to Albany, New York, where he learned and 
followed the carpenter's trade. He was married there in 1831 to Miss Orphia 
Jackson and unto them were born two children, Miles A. and Orphia L. The 
latter became the wife of Newton J. Field arid had one son Newton Miles 
Field, who was killed in a railway accident. 

Orphia Jackson, the first wife of William S. Collins died in 1836 and Mr. 
Collins was influenced to come to Iowa by the fact that his brother Lucius Col- 
lins was a farmer of this state, living near the Summit. William S. Collins was 



306 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

a contractor and carpenter in Davenport and erected a large number of busi- 
ness blocks, including the former McManus building at Second and Main streets, 
the Perry and Mcintosh blocks, the old Baptist church at Sixth and Main, and 
the brick residence at Fifth and Rock Island streets. A number of the struc- 
tures which show forth his handiwork are still standing. He became recognized 
as one of the leading contractors and builders of this part of the state and did 
much in promoting the substantial improvements of this district. In 1842 he 
married Eliza Dillion, and they had three children, of whom two died in in- 
fancy, while the other, Chester Worthington Collins is a banker of Brooklyn, 
New York. The mother, who was born in the Empire state in 1823, passed away 
in 1846. For his third wife Mr. Collins chose Mrs. Eleanor Bird, who was 
born in New York city in 181 5 and was the widow of William Bird. There were 
two children of this marriage namely: Sarah Ella, now the widow of Watson 
Graham, who died in Davenport; and McManus W., of Denver, Colorado. The 
third wife of William S. Collins has also passed away. 

William S. Collins was one of the charter members of the Edwards Con- 
gregational church and its first clerk. He donated money for the erection of 
the church and took an active part in the organization of the first Sunday school. 
His political allegiance was given to the whig party until its dissolution, when 
he joined the ranks of the new republican party. He served as alderman of 
Davenport from the third ward from 1846 to 1849, and from the iifth ward in 
1859. He also was trustee of the poor. He was a very earnest and zealous 
worker in the organization known as the Sons of Temperance for twenty years, 
and from 1848 until his death on August 9, 1887, he was an exemplary repre- 
sentative of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



MILES A. COLLINS. 



One of Scott county's pioneer farmers was Miles Augustus Collins, who 
lead an industrious and prosperous life in the live stock business. Mr. Collins 
was born in Albany, New York, September i, 1832. When but four years old 
his mother, Orphia (Jackson) Collins, died, and he went to live with his grand- 
father, David Collins, upon a farm at Blanford, Massachusetts, and was there 
reared, early becoming familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of 
the agriculturist. Following his grandfather's death he took charge of the home 
farm at Blanford, Massachusetts, there remaining until 1854, when he sought a 
home in the middle west and came to Scott county, Iowa, where he worked at 
the carpenter's trade with his father for a year. He then engaged in farming. 
He also established one of the first cheese factories in Scott county. His life 
was a busy and useful one. At diflferent times he owned several farms in Scott 
county and was quite successful in his dealings in real estate. In i860 he pur- 
chased the farm just north of town upon which he spent his remaining days, his 
death there occurring June 5, 1908. He was diligent and enterprising, making 
good use of his opportunities, and as time passed on he won a creditable measure 
of prosperity. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 307 

It was on the isth of June, 1870, that Mr. Collins was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Amy George Wilson, the widow of George Wilson and the daughter of 
William George and Nancy (Reed) George. William George was a native of, 
and formerly lived in Columbiana county, Ohio, whence he removed with his 
family in 1853 to Scott county and settled near Big Rock, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Collins became the parents of six children: Mina Rusha, who 
is now a teacher of English in the high school at St. Louis, Missouri ; Vera Elva, 
who is the wife of Fred A. Garrison, field secretary of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association for Arkansas and Oklahoma; Eleanor Harriet, at home; Miles 
William ; Amy George, the wife of William C. Rowse, a professor of engineering 
in the State University at Madison, Wisconsin; and Ruth Elizabeth, who is a 
pupil in the Grinnell Iowa College. . All of the children are graduates of that 
college, and Miles is a graduate of the University of Chicago law department, 
having received the degree of Doctor of Laws. Mina was also a student of the 
University of Chicago, where she pursued post-graduate work in English. 



DETLEF PETERSEN. 



Detlef Petersen, the owner of a well improved and valuable farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Sheridan township, is numbered among the worthy 
pioneer settlers of Scott county, having made his home within its borders for 
more than a half century. His birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, on the 
19th of September, 1834, his parents being Henry and Margaret Petersen. The 
father passed away in that country but the mother later took up her abode in 
the United States and spent her remaining days in this county. 

Detlef Petersen spent the first twenty-three years of his life in the land of 
his nativity and in 1857 crossed the Atlantic to the United States, wishing to 
test the truth of the many favorable reports which he had heard concerning 
the advantages of the new world. After landing in New York he made his 
way direct to Davenport, Scott county, Iowa, having friends here. He first 
worked in this county as a farm laborer but later rented land and about 1870 
had accumulated sufficient capital to enable him to purchase a farm of his own, 
coming into possession of eighty acres of his present home place in Sheridan 
township. He has erected all of the buildings and made all of the improve- 
ments which are now seen upon the property and likewise planted the trees, 
of which he has many fine specimens. The one tree which was on the property 
when he first located thereon is still standing. Wishing to extend the' boun- 
daries of his farm, he bought an adjoining tract of eighty acres, so that his 
holdings now embrace one hundred and sixty acres of rich and arable land. His 
labors as an agriculturist are capably conducted and the fields annually yield 
golden harvests in return for the care which he bestows upon them. 

Mr. Petersen has been twice married. In 1862 he wedded Miss Louise Har- 
man, who passed away twenty years later. Their children were five in number, 
namely: Henry and William, both of whom are at home; Elizabeth, the wife of 
Carl Koch, of Eldridge, Iowa; and Laura and Emma, who are also at home. 



308 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

On the 27th of June, 1886, Mr. Petersen was again married, his second union 
being with Miss Hannah Johnson, by whom he has one child, Walborg, at 
home. 

At the polls Mr. Petersen casts his ballot in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the democratic party and has capably served his fellow townsmen as a 
school director and also in the position of road supervisor. He has never had 
occasion to regret his determination to come to America, for in this country 
he has found the opportunities which he sought and through their utilization has 
worked his way upward, his life indicating what may be accomplished by de- 
termination and well directed energy. He has now passed the seventy-fifth mile- 
stone on life's journey and receives the respect and veneration which should 
always be accorded one who has traveled thus far on this earthly pilgrimage and 
whose career has ever been upright and honorable. 



J. SIEWERT WEBER, M. D., PH. G. 

Dr. J. Siewert Weber, one of the builders, promoters and owners of the Dav- 
enport Hospital, whose skill in surgery as well as in the general practice of med- 
icine has brought him more than local fame, was born in Fond du Lac, Wiscon- 
sin, April II, 1877. His father, John G. Weber, was a native of Germany and 
when a young man came to the United States. After two years spent in New 
York he removed westward to Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, in 1848, and there con- 
tinued his residence until called to his final rest in 1906 when sixty-six years of 
age. He married Agnes Carstensen, a native of Heligoland, who passed away 
in 1878. 

Dr. Weber was only three years of age at the time of his mother's death but 
it was his good fortune to be entrusted to the guidance of his aunt, Miss Catha- 
rine Carstensen, in whom he found the sympathy of a foster mother. His 
youthful days were spent in his native city, where he acquired his early educa- 
tion in the public schools, while his collegiate course was pursued in Drake Uni- 
versity and from that institution he was graduated on the completion of a phar- 
maceutical course. He then took up the study of medicine in Rush Medical Col- 
lege, of the University of Chicago, and was graduated in 1901, after which he 
spent six months in original research along the lines of bacteriology and path- 
ology before he engaged in active practice. He afterward became associate sur- 
geon at the hospital of the Illinos Steel Works at Joliet, Illinois, and this brought 
him broad experience in surgical practice. 

In 1902 Dr. Weber came to Davenport, opening an office for general practice. 
He has, however, made surgery his specialty, has devoted much study to it and 
has had much success in difficult and unusual cases. He is thoroughly conver- 
sant with the subject of anatomy and the component parts of the human body 
and the onslaughts made upon it by disease. Moreover, his touch is characterized 
by tenderness as well as precision, and, calm and well poised, he is thoroughly 
qualified for the difficult work which he undertakes. His office is of a most 
modern character, supplied with all the latest improved appliances and instru- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 311 

ments necessary for the work which he has undertaken. In connection with Dr. 
C. E. Glynn he organized and built the Davenport Hospital that he might better 
handle and care for surgical and medical cases, giving to them the best attention 
possible in an establishment especially equipped therefor, and he is now surgeon 
in that hospital. He belongs to the County, State and National Medical Asso- 
ciations and the Second District Medical Society, and is also a member of the 
University Alliance. Dr. Weber is a member of the Bureau of Medical Legis- 
lation of the American Medical Association. 

In 1903 Dr. Weber was married to Miss Rhoda Mae Thomas, a native of Des 
Moines who at the time of her marriage was a student of the Iowa State Normal 
College at Cedar Falls, Iowa. They have two daughters, Kathryn Lucile and 
Florence Elizabeth. 

Dr. Weber is connected with several fraternal organizations and those who 
meet him socially find him a pleasant, genial gentleman, while those who come 
in contact with him professionally know him as a sympathetic, capable practi- 
tioner, able and conscientious in the performance of his duty and at the same 
time closely conforming in his practice to the highest standard of professional 
ethics. 



THOMAS MARTINDALE. 

In the death of Thomas Martindale, Long Grove and Scott county lost one 
of the pioneer settlers. While he never sought to figure prominently in public 
life, his neighbors and friends knew him as a man of worth, industrious and 
enterprising, and at all times reliable. He was born in Hutton, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, December 16, 1832, a son of Thomas and Jane Martindale, who spent 
their entire lives in England, as did all their children with the exception of 
Thomas and Matthew E. The latter came to the new world and died in 
Canada. 

Thomas Martindale acquired his education in the schools of Hutton and 
there learned the blacksmith's trade under the direction of his father. He left 
England at the age of twenty-two years in company with his brother Matthew 
and they sailed on the same ship on which his future wife was a pas-enger. 
Landing at New York, they made their way to Oswego, New York, in which 
locality Thomas Martindale remained for about three weeks but could not se- 
cure work and therefore went to Canada to join his brother, who was a shoe- 
maker. He remained in the Dominion for about two years, after which he came 
to Davenport and secured employment with John Suiter, an Englishman, who 
was conducting a blacksmith shop. For a year Mr. Martindale remained in his 
employ, after which he was married and removed to a farm at Slopertown, 
about seven miles from Davenport. He purchased forty acres of land only 
partially improved but at once started to break the prairie with ox-teams and 
soon the track of the plow was seen across his fields, indicating that the work 
of improvement had been begun. Later they removed to a farm of eighty acres, 
which they rented about three miles from Davenport, and subsequently took up 



312 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

their abode in the city, where Mr. Martindale secured work at his. trade. In 
1863 they removed to Long Grove and purchased the tract of land of four 
acres upon which Mrs. Martindale now resides. There was an old black- 
smith shop on the place and a house had also been built but it has since been 
greatly enlarged and improved, Mr. Martindale at once began work in the 
shop and continued to work at his trade for about thirty-eight years. In 1900 
he built a new shop and he continued actively in business until 1902, after which 
he practically retired. He secured the diploma and first prize at the Mount 
Joy fair in 1900 for having the best shod horse. He was always regarded as an 
expert workman in his line and because of this and his honorable business 
methods he was accorded a liberal patronage and made a good living. 

On the 26th of March, 1857, Mr. Martindale was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary A. Barnby, who survives him. They became the parents of seven 
children, namely; Mary Jane, the eldest, is the wife of David Hardie, of Pier- 
son, Woodbury county, Iowa. They have three children, Clara, Ethel and 
Jeneva. Anna Elizabeth became the wife of Samuel Dennett and died leaving 
one son, LeRoy. Minnie M. is the wife of George Curtis, of Long Grove, who 
is mentioned elsewhere in this work. They have seven children, Raymond, Bes- 
sie, LeRoy, Edith, Harold, Margaret and Robert. John W. died at the age of 
seventeen months. Thomas is also deceased. Albert W. is a resident of An- 
ders, Nebraska. He wedded Libbie Riley and they have seven children, Melvin, 
Lester, Esther, Ruth, Thomas, Aline and Alice, the last two being twins. Ira 
George Martindale is still at home. 

The death of Mr. Martindale, which occurred February 8, 19 10, was occa- 
sioned by a paralytic stroke, and he was laid to rest in Long Grove cemetery. 
His residence in the county, covering more than a half century, made him famil- 
iar with the records and events which are to others a matter of history but were 
to him matters of personal knowledge or experience. He could relate many 
interesting incidents of the early days and his reminiscences often had to do 
with events that figured in the history of the county. He was widely known 
and respected and there was much that was commendable in his active and well 
spent life. 



C. R. SPINK. 



Prominent among Davenport's builders is C. R. Spink, who occupies a posi- 
tion of distinction as one of the leading architects of the city. Prompted by 
laudable ambition, his enterprise augmented by thorough practical training, he 
has so utilized his talents and directed his efforts that success has followed and 
at the same time the public has been a large indirect beneficiary, in that his 
labors have added much to the improvement and adornment of the city. 

Mr. Spink was born in Davenport, August 8, 1869. His father, Henry Spink, 
was a native of Hull, England, and crossing the Atlantic to the United States 
in 1849, established his home in Clinton county, Iowa, where he lived for two 
years. In 1851 he removed to Davenport, where he made his home until 1897. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 313 

He was a painter by trade and although a man who never sought to figure promi- 
nently in public life, yet commanded the respect and confidence of his friends 
and neighbors by fidelity to honorable, upright principles. His wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Emily Rebecca Godwin, was a native of London, England. 

C. R. Spink at the usual age entered the public schools and when his more 
specifically literary course was completed he studied architecture in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, from which institution he was graduated with the class of 
1901. After spending a year in the offices of leading architects in Chicago, he 
returned to his native city and entered upon the active practice of his profes- 
sion. He thoroughly qualified for this business by learning the carpenter's 
and machinist's trades, acquainting himself with both the theory and practice 
His ability is pronounced and has won for him a success which is most de- 
sirable and practical. He has erected many of the most beautiful homes of Dav- 
enport, including the palatial residence of W. P. Bettendorf. His handiwork 
is seen in many buildings of a public character and as an architect and builder 
he occupies a prominent position. 

On the 26th of December, 1906, Mr. Spink was married to Miss Harriet 
Dennis, a native of Princeton, Scott county, Iowa, and a daughter of J. D. Den- 
nis of that place. They now have one child, Harriet Elizabeth, who was born 
December 8, 1908. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Spink is an Odd Fellow and is also connected 
with the Woodmen of the World. He enjoys the companionship of a large 
circle of friends but allows no outside interest to interfere with the faithful exe- 
cution of his contracts in the conduct of a business which has constantly de- 
veloped in extent and importance. 



JOHN G. DUTCHER. 



John G. Dutcher is a worthy representative of one of the oldest and most 
prominent families of Scott county and has been identified with its farming in- 
terests throughout a long period. The family originated in Holland, whence 
the first of the name emigrated to New York in 1632. There are still many of 
the name living in and near Otsego county, that state, and a number are promi- 
nent representatives of the various professions. There is in possession of the 
Dutcher family a will signed by Ruloof Dutcher, bearing date January 17, 1736, 
and also copies of land transfers as far back as the year 1757. 

John G. Dutcher of this review was born in Otsego county. New York, 
in 1846, a son of D. C. and Laney E. (Wagner) Dutcher, both of whom were 
natives of the same place, the former born in November, 1830, and the latter 
in August, 1832. The parents journeyed west in December, 1854, first settling 
in Rock Island, Illinois, where they spent a few years, while in April, 1858, they 
continued their journey just across the state line into Scott county, Iowa. Here 
the father purchased a tract of land, which is now owned by two of his 
sons. 



314 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

John G. Dutcher was a little lad of eight years when he was brought from 
his native state to the west and was twelve 3'ears of age when the family home 
was established in Scott county. He was educated in the distiict schools of Buf- 
falo township and completed his studies in a business college of Davenport. Dur- 
ing the periods of vacation he was trained in the duties that usually fall to the 
farm lad and thus as his age and strength increased he became more and more 
familiar with the methods of agriculture. After putting aside his text-books he 
took entire charge of the home farm for his father, who was an invalid, and the 
place is now owned by himself and his brother J. E. They likewise own large 
tracts of timber land in Arkansas and farm lands in various other sections. 
For many years Mr. Dutcher was busily employed at farm labor but is now 
leaving the active work to others, while he merely superintends his invested in- 
terests. His excellent business ability has been manifest in many ways and 
today he is classed with the representative and substantial residents of Scott 
county. In addition to his landed possessions he is also a stockholder in the 
Savings Bank at Buffalo, of which he is acting as vice president. 

Mr. Dutcher was united in marriage to Miss Josephine Marsdorph, who still 
survives. He is a democrat in his political views and in 1892 was elected .to 
the board of county supervisors, serving six years, while in 1906 he was once 
more elected and is now serving his second term. He is a Mason, belonging to 
lodge No. 37, at Davenport; to Banner Lodge, No. 16, Knights of Pythias at 
Buffalo; Davenport Lodge, No. 7, I. O. O. F. ; and to the Woodmen of the 
World. 

J. E. Dutcher, the brother, makes his home on the same farm and together 
they are managing their extensive interests. He wedded Miss Mary Mitch, a 
daughter of Frederick Mitch, of Peoria, Illinois. Their union has been blessed 
with one son and two daughters: Charles E., who operates the farm for his 
father and uncle; Nancy, the wife of Richard Tarbit, of Syracuse, New York; 
and Laney, at home. 



AUGUST F. MARTZAHN. 

August F. Martzahn, the president and manager of the Davenport Slaughter 
& Rendering Company, is one of the prosperous citizens of this city, which was 
his birthplace and has since been his home. His father, Fred Martzahn, was 
born in Mecklenburg, Germany, and with his parents came to this country 
when a young man. He was a carpenter by trade and after landing at New 
Orleans made his way slowly up the Mississippi river to Scott county, where 
the family were numbered among the early German settlers. Fred Martzahn 
took an active part in local affairs of Scott county and, feeling in sympathy with 
the views advocated by Lincoln and having come under the spell of his per- 
sonality, exerted great influence in the campaign preceding the election of the 
martyred president. He married Miss Elizabeth Beyer and of their union were 
born six children: Emma, August F., Amelia, Frank, Ella and Dora. Amelia 
has passed away and Frank is a dairyman in Davenport. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 315 

It was on the 26th of January, 1861, that August F. Martzahn was born. 
He attended the common schools of Davenport and also received a good busi- 
ness training. After his school days were over he learned the butcher's trade, 
to which he has since devoted his energies for the last thirty-three years. He 
was but eighteen years of age when he opened his first shop at 1701 West Third 
street. It was very small and Mr. Martzahn himself waited upon his custo- 
mers. Later as he attained success and saw opportunity, he organized the pres- 
ent company, being the sole owner at the beginning, but later he made it a stock 
concern, himself holding the position of president and general manager. It 
is the only firm of its kind in the city of Davenport and is one of the large 
houses in this section of the state. The plant has a capacity of twenty-five head 
of cattle, thirty hogs and ten calves, the company makes a specialty of rendering 
and dealing in hides. In the ten years of its existence it has become one of the 
substantial and profitable business houses here for it has been operated upon 
sound principles and the quality of their goods has secured the trade of a large 
percentage of the population. 

On the i6th of October, 1884, Mr. Martzahn was united in marriage to 
Miss Minnie Schmidt, a daughter of Carl and Sophia (Moeller) Schmidt. One 
son, Carl, has been born to them. He completed the course of study in the 
grammar schools, was graduated from the high school and then attended Brown 
College. He is now a bookkeeper in the employ of the government, working at 
the Arsenal. Mr. Martzahn belongs to several of the Masonic bodies here and 
is also a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. He occupies a comfortable 
home at 1620 West Third street, where he is most hospitable in entertaining his 
many , friends. 



JOHN SCHLICHTING. 



John Schlichting, who with good results has tilled his farm in Liberty town- 
ship, was born thereon December i, 1874, a son of John and Anna (Stark) 
Schlichting, who were born in Holstein, Germany, the former February 14, 
1830, and the latter August i, 1833. They came to the United States in June, 
1865 and made their way to Scott county and were married in Davenport. For 
the first year after his arrival Mr. Schlichting worked as a laborer in the city, 
but the following spring engaged in farming for himself near Plainview. Later 
he came to Liberty township, where he bought the place on which his son John 
is now residing. It remained his home until the spring of 1894, when, having 
reaped large harvests and secured a generous income, he retired from active 
life and moved to New Liberty. There his death occurred December 30, 1901. 
His wife survived him several years, or until February 20, 1907, when she also 
passed away. Mr. Schlichting had come here a poor man, but through indus- 
try and frugality had secured not only the farm previously mentioned but an- 
other tract of one hundred and sixty acres, just north of the village of New 
Liberty, and a third farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Cedar county. 
Three children were born to him and his wife: Mrs. Ida Hensen, who is a 



316 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

widow living in Walcott; Dora, who is the wife of Gus Lamp, of New Liberty; 
and John, who is the subject of this sketch. 

John Schlichting was reared upon the farm he now occupies, and here has 
always made his home. He attended the district schools of Liberty township, 
in which he derived a fair training in the rudimentary branches of English edu- 
cation. From his childhood days he did his full share of the chores and work 
upon the farm and as soon as he was able assisted in the tilling of the fields. 
When his father desired to retire from active life he was entrusted with the 
operation of the home place, which is a tract of two hundred and forty acres 
lying upon section 30. Mr. Schlichting, Sr., had already put in the greater 
number of improvements, but these have been increased in the years of his 
son's occupation, and the cultivation of the soil has also been improved, so that 
the place is one of the valuable farm properties in Liberty township. 

It was November 20, 1901, that Mr. Schlichting was married to Miss Ma- 
tilda Misfeldt, who was born in Butler township, Scott county. May 12, 1882, 
and is a daughter of Fred and Catherine (Koch) Misfeldt, both of whom were 
natives of Holstein, Germany. They came to America in 1865, taking up their 
residence in this county, where Mr. Misfeldt engaged in farming. He won a 
well deserved success and passed away September 19, 1908, at sixty-eight years 
of age, for he was born January 22, 1840. His widow now resides in New Lib- 
erty. Three children have been born to Mr. Schlichting and his wife, Ella Anna 
Catherine, Elmer Fredrich, Johann and Lawrence John Henry. Mr. Schlich- 
ting is one of the substantial farmers of his locality, winning a large return in his 
cultivation of the fields and enjoying the respect of his fellow citizens. 



CHRIS TOERRING. 



Chris Toerring, now deceased, well deserves mention among those whose 
labors have constituted a source of the city's pride and improvement, for as one 
of the park commissioners he did for Davenport a work the value of which can- 
not be overestimated. He stood at all times for that which is best in civic af- 
fairs and was one of the most efficient officers that Davenport has ever had. 
As the name indicates, he was a representative of the Danish race, which has 
furnished to Iowa a proportion of its worthy residents. He was a native of 
Denmark and when he had acquired a good practical education in the schools 
of his native country he obtained business experience along mercantile lines there. 
In the year 1861 he came to America, attracted by the broader opportunities 
offered on this side the Atlantic. The tales which he heard proved so enticing 
that he resolved that he would benefit by the advantages here offered and yet 
he was not deceived by any false hope of gaining wealth without labor. He 
accepted a position with the Jens Lorenzen Crockery Company, with which he 
remained for four years, and then became connected with the dry-goods busi- 
ness as a salesman in the employ of the firm of Herzberg & Company. In 1867 
he purchased the store of Otto Klug, Sr., an establishment that stood on the 
present site of the store occupied by Silberstein Brothers. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 319 

In the same year Mr. Toerring was united in marriage to Miss Dorothea 
Burmeister, of this city, who still survives him. They never had any children of 
their own but adopted two nephews, sons-of his brother, and to these two boys, 
Frederick, of St. Louis, and Chris, of Philadelphia, they gave all the care, love 
and attention that would have been bestowed upon children of their own. 

Mr. Toerring was a prominent Mason, his membership being in Fraternal 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., in which he was honored with all of the offices, includ- 
ing that of master. He likewise belonged to the Davenport Turngemeinde and 
for a number of years held the office of first speaker of that soci^ety. He was 
also a member of the Schuetzen Society of Davenport. It was in his connection 
with municipal affairs, however, that he was most prominently known and his 
course was characterized by such loyalty and practical service that it won for 
him the honor and respect of all. From 1871 until 1875 he held the office of 
city treasurer. On the organization of the park commission he became one of 
its members and it was in this connection that he did his greatest work for 
Davenport, devoting much of his time to the establishment and beautifying of 
the public parks. He saw what might be accomplished along those lines and 
with high ideals labored to improve the park system in such a manner that it 
would remain for years to come as the most attractive feature of the municipal 
life. The death of Mr. Toerring occurred in 1898. He had never had occasion 
to regret his determination to seek a home in the new world, for here he had 
not only found improved and good business opportunities but had also gained a 
large circle of warm friends that made his residence here of a most pleasant 
character. 



JOHN GRANT ROBERTSON. 

The student of history cannot carry his investigations far into the records of 
Scott county without learning that the Robertsons have long been a well known 
and honored family here. In 1844 a colony of Scotchmen, headed by Mrs. 
Robertson, a grandmother of him whose name introduces this review, left their 
old homes on the banks of the Clyde and started for America. In the party 
were four families, the Robertsons, John Pollock and his family, John Grieve 
and his family, and H. M. Thomson and his family. Mrs. Robertson was ac- 
companied by her son John, the father of our subject, and four daughters, who 
were respectively the wives of the three gentlemen mentioned above. It was the 
custom then in Scotland to bind the younger members of the family out as ap- 
prentices, and in order to keep her children all together Mrs. Robertson planned 
the emigration to the new world. They sailed for New Orleans, thence made 
their way up the Mississippi river and landed at Long Grove, Scott county, 
Iowa, where each family took up forty acres of prairie land that up to that time 
had always been in possession of the government. This was two years before 
the admission of the state into the Union. 

John Robertson, the father of John Grant Robertson, lived with Mr. Pol- 
lock until he was married, on the 22d of December, 1849, to Miss Mary Ann 
Neal. He and his bride then took up their abode in the house which he had 



320 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

built and he added to his original forty acres, buying other land as his financial 
resources afforded until he became the owner of a good farm, well improved. 
Within the boundaries of the place were comprised one hundred and forty acres, 
to the further cultivation of which he earnestly devoted his efforts so that rich 
crops were annually gathered. The farm is still the property of his widow and 
is now being operated by his son and namesake. John Robertson was a member 
of the Presbyterian church in Scotland. On coming to this county they found 
that there was no congregation of the denomination in their neighborhood and 
he was one of those who organized a little church which held its services in the 
schoolhouse or in different private homes. He always remained loyal to his 
belief, and it was characteristic of Mr. Robertson that he was ever a firm de- 
fender of the right as he understood it. He served as school director and in 
other local offices, but his time and energies were mostly given to general farm- 
ing. His wife was born about seven miles from Edinburgh, Scotland, April 
4, 1824, and was a daughter of William and Elizabeth Neal. Her father was a 
stone-mason by trade and followed that pursuit in Scotland until 1832, when 
with his family he sailed for the new world, landing at Montreal, Canada. They 
lived in several places in that country but the father died soon after coming to 
the new world. Her brother, who was also a stone-mason by trade, then took 
charge of the family and in 1847 they came to Long Grove, Iowa, where Mrs. 
Robertson has since made her home. She is now living with her son William 
M., a prosperous farmer and stockman of Winfield township. She is the mother 
of eight children: Elizabeth, the wife of Robert Johnson, of Long Grove, by 
whom she has two children, Anna and Grant ; Jennie, who is the wife of Andrew 
Thompson, of Nebraska, and has three children, Mary, Myrtle and John; John, 
who died at the age of two years; James, of Davenport, who married Eliza- 
beth Gilmore and has five children. Bertha, Ollie, Mary, Harry and Daisy ; Anna, 
who lives with her mother and is the wife of Frank O'Conner, their children 
being four in number, Frank, John, Charles and Roderic ; WilHam M., a farmer 
and stockman, of Winfield township, who owns and cultivates one hundred and 
ten acres of fine farm land and makes a specialty of raising Poland China hogs ; 
John Grant, of this review; and one who died in infancy. 

The birth of John Grant Robertson occurred January 19, 1870, on the old 
homestead farm on which he yet makes his home. He is indebted to the public- 
school system of the county for the educational privileges which he enjoyed 
and to a business college of Davenport, so that he was thus well qualified for the 
practical and responsible duties which have devolved upon him since starting 
in business. Since putting aside his text-books he has continuously engaged in 
farming and, following the father's retirement, he and his brother William took 
charge of the old homestead, which they continued to cultivate together until 
1902, when his brother William purchased his present farm, and John G. Rob- 
ertson has since managed the home place alone: He carries on general agri- 
cultural pursuits and makes a specialty of the raising of shorthorn cattle and 
Poland China hogs. He is diligent and persevering in business, allowing no 
obstacle to bar his path if it can be overcome by earnest and persistent effort. 

On the 2d of April, 1896, Mr. Robertson was married to Miss Alma Klop- 
penburg, a daughter of Herman and Elizabeth Kloppenburg, who were early 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 321 

settlers of Butler township and are now living at Long Grove. Upon their 
former farm in Butler township Mrs. Robertson was born and reared. She has 
become the mother of three children : Winnie, Earl and Lucille, all at home. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Robertson are consistent members of the Christian 
church of Long Grove and take an active and helpful part in its work. Mr. Rob- 
ertson has served as deacon and was also church treasurer. He filled the office 
of school director for a number of years and the cause of education finds in 
him a stalwart champion. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, his membership being in the lodge at Long Grove, of which he has served 
as secretary and in other offices. He also belongs to Grove Camp, No. 6197, 
M. W. A., and both he and his wife are members of the Court of Honor of 
Long Grove. They are highly esteemed in these different organizations and 
have an extensive circle of friends throughout the county, winning the regard 
which is ever accorded in recognition of sterling worth and upright principles. 



JOHN LENSCH. 



It seems to have been the fate of Holstein, Germany to have lost more than 
her share of good citizens to the United States and among this number is John 
Lensch, one of Scott county's pioneers. He was born January 29, 1835, his 
parents being Claus and Magdalina Lensch, both of whom lived and died in 
the fatherland. His, school days were passed in Germany and even before he 
severed home ties he had some practical training as a farmer. 

In 1857 when a very little past his majority Mr. Lensch became imbued 
with the prevalent idea that greater opportunity awaited him across the water 
and he took passage for America, landing in New York and coming from that 
city to Davenport. His first employment was in a brickyard, but country life, 
which he had previously enjoyed, appealing to him, he secured work on a farm 
and subsequently rented land in Lincoln township which he managed on his 
own account. In 1862 he became one of Scott county's property holders through 
the purchase of eighty acres of improved land. After about two years he sold 
that place and bought another eighty acres in Lincoln township, upon which he 
made his home for ten years. Again Mr. Lensch disposed of his land and be- 
came the proprietor of a larger tract of two hundred acres in Sheridan town- 
ship, near the town of Eldridge. There he and his family made their home for 
the twenty years between 1876 and 1896, but at the end of this time he decided 
to give up active life and retire to enjoy a greater leisure than the preceding 
years had permitted him. He was then among Scott county's considerable prop- 
erty holders, owning four hundred acres of splendid land. 

The joyous Christmas-tide has an unusual significance for Mr. and Mrs. 
Lensch for it was upon that day in 1865 that they united their hands and for- 
tunes in marriage. Mrs. Lensch was before her marriage Miss Dora Schnor, 
a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Schnor, German citizens who lived through- 
out life in their native country. Mrs. Lensch who was born September 20, 
1832, came to America alone in 1865 — the year of her marriage. The following 



322 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

six children were born of this union: Mollie, Laura, Matie and Hattie, all de- 
ceased; Gustav, of Sheridan township, who married Meta Misfeldt and is the 
father of four children, Nora, Lettie, Anna, and John; and John, a resident of 
Sheridan township, who married Clara Brockmann and has five children, Mar- 
tha, Amiel, Leona, Raymond and Edna. It is thus apparent that Mr. and Mrs. 
Lensch are abundantly entitled to the pleasant roles of grandfather and grand- 
mother. 

The fact that Mr. Lensch has abandoned the strenuous life of an active agri- 
culturist is by no means indicative that he is no longer a real factor in the life 
of his community. Taking a keen and intelligent interest in public affairs and a 
student of those questions which pertain to the acquisition of the greatest good 
for the greatest number, he constitutes in himself an admirable citizen, as well 
as one to whom consideration is due for his past progressive agricultural achieve- 
ments. 



LORENZO SCHRICKER. 

In a review of Davenport's history it becomes evident that Lorenzo Schricker 
deserves mention among those who were her builders and promoters. Taking 
advantage of the natural resources offered by the country, he planned and pro- 
moted business enterprises of far-reaching effect and benefit. With keen in- 
sight he foresaw the possibilities of trade, utilized the opportunities which were 
afforded by existing conditions and as the years passed on developed and ex- 
panded his commercial and manufacturing interests until he occupied a conspic- 
uous place among the leading lumbermen of the middle west and also in finan- 
cial and other business circles into which he directed his energies. Many impor- 
tant public and private concerns were stimulated by his activities and he stood 
as a high type of the business man whose record is conclusive proof of the fact 
that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously. 

From the days of his early manhood the life of Lorenzo Schricker was one 
of hard work, of close application and of intense energy. He was born Novem- 
ber 12, 1825, in Bavaria, Germany, a son of Christian and Eva Schricker. He 
attended school at Weisdorf, later the polytechnic school of Nuremberg and 
completed his education in the School of Agriculture and Industry at Hof. He 
afterward served a four years' apprenticeship in a dry-goods store and later was 
engaged as bookkeeper by a railroad company at a salary of twelve dollars per 
month. When he was but nineteen years of age he took a contract to build a 
railroad and thus in early manhood he gave proof of the elemental strength of 
his character, which was to carry him into important relations in later years. 

America — the land of promise — attracted him. Hearing and heeding the 
call of the western world, he sailed for the United States in the spring of 1848 
and, settling in Cincinnati, Ohio, there engaged in the confectionery business 
until the succeeding fall, when he removed to St. Louis, where he was engaged 
in the dry-goods trade until the fall of 1849. He then returned to Germany and 
upon again coming to America was accompanied by his mother, three sisters and 
a brother, his father having previously joined him in St. Louis. The year 1850 




iP^'^'' y^ 



^^i,^ if^^e^l^^^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 325 

witnessed the arrival of Lorenzo Schricker in Davenport. He became con- 
nected with the commercial interests of the city as the senior partner of the firm 
of Schricker & Uibeleisen, proprietors of a general store. The following year 
he entered into partnership in the same line of business with his brother-in-law, 
John Schmidt, and when that association was dissolved he established a store of 
his own and also entered the field of banking. Every undertaking was crowned 
with success, for he appHed himself with untiring energy to the management and 
control of his business interests and won public confidence and patronage 
through the most honorable business methods. His fellow townsmen in 1858 
elected him city treasurer — the only public office he ever held — and after two 
years' service he retired from the position. In 1864 he formed a partnership 
with L. C. Dessaint in the business of lumber manufacturing, the firm purchas- 
ing the mill at the foot of Scott street. In 1868 Mr. Dessaint was succeeded by 
Christian Mueller and the firm of Schricker & Mueller was in existence until 
the death of the senior partner. Mr. Schricker became widely known as a rep- 
resentative of the lumber industry of the middle west. Noting and utilizing 
opportunities which others passed by heedlessly, his trade interests expanded to 
mammoth proportions and he came to be recognized as an authority upon ques- 
tions of moment to lumbermen. He was the originator of the lumber manufac- 
turers' combinations in the logging business on the Mississippi river. Previous 
to 1870 the manufacturers bought their log supplies as best they could — every 
man for himself — at the mouths of the Black, Wisconsin, Chippewa and St. 
Croix rivers. Mr. Schricker, in company with Mr. Weyerhauser, of Rock Is- 
land, spent two years in conjointly purchasing extensive supplies and found their 
cooperation so profitable that they easily induced other sawmill proprietors in 
the three cities to unite with them. The result was the organization of the 
Upper Mississippi Logging Company in 1871, at a meeting of the manufacturers 
held at the old Burtis House in Davenport, with Mr. Schricker as president of 
the company. The great logging works at Beef Slough were built by this asso- 
ciation. Lumber interests received added stimulus and impetus from this organ- 
ization, with which Mr. Schricker continued until 1874, when he withdrew in 
order to devote his undivided time and attention to the extensive tracts of pine 
lands in Wisconsin, which he had purchased, and to his manufacturing and finan- 
cial interests in Davenport. In 1864 he had become an active factor in banking 
circles in this city, being a stockholder and director in several banks and also 
vice president of the First National Bank for years. The most of his time for 
six years previous to his death was spent in the pineries of Wisconsin and there 
was one period of two years in which he did not pass a fortnight altogether in 
his home at Davenport. His business methods were in some respects unique 
and peculiar. He kept no books but carried notes, agreements, data and every- 
thing pertaining to his private affairs in a large wallet in his coat pocket and 
thus at any time he could make immediate reference to a paper for information 
or if any business matter was under discussion. One day, in the heart of the 
Chippewa pineries, a prominent lumberman met him and as they were traveling 
through the woods the man said: "Mr. Schricker, that note of mine is a little 
overdue, but I will attend to it as soon as I get home. Just send me the whole 
amount of interest due when you are back in Davenport and I will pay the 



326 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

interest and principal." Mr. Schricker replied: "O, I can fix that right here," 
and, seating himself on a log, he took out his wallet, selected the note, calculated 
the interest to the very day and then and there received the cEeck for the amount, 
which the next day was presented to and paid at the bank of Eau Claire. 

Mr. Schricker was three times married. He first wedded Mary Hansen. 
Their children were: August, deceased; William E., a banker at La Conner, 
Washington; Ottilie, whose first husband was Major Steflfen, later Steffen 
Pascha, adjutant general to the sultan. He died in Constantinople and his 
widow became the wife of Admiral Von Pietruski, who died in Pola, Austria. 
For his second wife Mr. Schricker chose Sophia Kahl, and their children were : 
Richard, now in Davenport; Laelius, deceased; and Harriet, whose husband was 
a naval oflScer, Korvettenkapitan Frank Dvorak, who until recently resided in 
Pola, Austria, but is at present living at Hietzing, Vienna, Austria. For his 
third wife Mr. Schricker chose Johanna Matthes. There was only one child, 
Selma, by that marriage. The mother, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 
1841, died April 2, 1898. For many years Mr. Schricker resided with his family 
at No. 714 Farnam street, but for two years previous to his death he occupied 
a palatial home on the Heights, just west of the junction of De Soto and Mar- 
quette streets. He passed away on the 12th of July, 1883, leaving a handsome 
estate, consisting of bank stock, notes, mortgages, Wisconsin pine lands and coal 
lands in Clearfield and Cambria counties, Pennsylvania. Resolutions of respect 
and sympathy were passed by various companies with which he was connected, 
all expressive of the deep regret felt at the passing of Mr. Schricker. For a 
third of a century he had been a resident of Davenport. Coming to the city 
during its formative period, he introduced into its business circles a progressive 
element that bore fruit not only in the attainment of personal success but also 
in the stimulus given to business interests throughout the city. Strong in his 
ability to plan and perform, strong in his honor and good name, his worth was 
widely acknowledged. In the contests which are invariably a feature of business 
life men often bear the marks and scars of the battle, but Mr. Schricker stood in 
his later years, as he did in his early manhood, for all that was loyal in citizen- 
ship, progressive and honorable in business and straightforward in every trans- 
action. He was a man of marked individuality and notable force of character, 
his strongly marked traits being such as awakened for him the respect and admir- 
ation of all and gained for him the friendship of many. 



MRS. MARIA SCHMIDT. 

Among Davenport's prominent citizens must be numbered Mrs. Maria 
Schmidt, who represents one of the oldest and best known German families in 
the city, and in fact throughout Scott county. She was born in Germany, De- 
cember 30, 1847, her parents being Frederick and Elsie (Brandt) Weiss, the 
former of whom was the proprietor of a paint shop in that country. In 1850 
Mr. Weiss brought his family to America, landing at New Orleans and making 
the rest of the journey to Davenport up the broad waters of the Mississippi. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 327 

As soon as possible he established himself in his old business, his location being 
upon Second street, and he continued thus actively engaged until January 21, 
1879, when he passed away, his wife having preceded him in 1853. They were 
the parents of three children. Katherine is the widow of Theodore Petersen 
and makes her home in Davenport. Henry, the third in order of birth, met his 
death while hunting in Scott county. May 17, 1867. 

Mrs. Schmidt received her education in the Davenport schools and grew to 
womanhood here. When about twenty-six years of age she went to California 
and it was while in the west that her marriage took place. The man to whom 
she gave her hand was Carl Theodore Marx Schmidt, their union being cele- 
brated September 20, 1883, at Paradise Valley, Humboldt county, Nevada. Mr. 
Schmidt was a native of Germany, born in Mecklenburg, August 31, 1844, and 
he came to the United States after having served the usual time in the Ger- 
man army. After some experience as a sailor, he went to California in 1865 
and for twenty years was employed in the gold and silver mines of California 
and Nevada. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt continued to reside in the far west for a number of 
years after their marriage, but in October, 1892, they located in Davenport and 
for about five years he had charge of the Davenport Outing Club. He subse- 
quently had charge of various buildings in the city, among them being the Peter- 
sen. Mr. Schmidt was Lutheran in faith and fraternally was identified with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He died May 18, 1903, and was interred 
in Fairmont cemetery. 

Mrs. Schmidt is the mother of two children. The elder, Carl F., was born 
in 1884 and is now a prominent plumber, his business being located at the corner 
of Twenty-Second and Brown streets. He was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Deher, and they have a daughter, Louise Marie. The younger son, Theodore 
George, was born February 5, 1888, and lives at home. The brothers are well 
known and popular members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belong- 
ing to Davenport Lodge, No. 7. Not only is Mrs. Schmidt a valuable member 
of society, but she has accomplished the even finer service of motherhood and 
has reared her sons to good citizenship. 



PETER STOLTENBERG. 

The agricultural interests of Scott county find a worthy and successful repre- 
sentative in Peter Stoltenberg, who owns and operates a fine farm of one hun- 
dred and forty acres in Sheridan township. His birth occurred in Holstein, 
Germany, on the 12th of November, 1854, his parents being Martin and Cather- 
ine Stoltenberg. About 1863 the father embarked on the voyage to the new 
world with his wife and children and after landing at New York made his way 
to Illinois, where he was actively engaged in the operation of a rented farm 
of eighty acres for about ten years. On the expiration of that period he came 
to Scott county, Iowa, and here also became identified with general agricultural 
pursuits as a renter. He has continuously made his home in this county to the 



328 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

present time and is now a well known and respected resident of Eldridge. His 
wife was called to her final rest in 1907, when she had attained the age of sev- 
enty-six years. Their children were five in number, namely: Lena, the widow 
of Hans Schneckloth; Peter, of this review; Henry, living in Eldridge, Iowa; 
George, who is a resident of Davenport; and Theodore, of Sheridan township. 

Peter Stoltenberg began his education in the schools of his native land and 
afterward continued his studies in Illinois, being a lad of but nine years when 
he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the United States. After 
putting aside his text-books he turned his attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits and has since been successfully identified with farming interests, being 
now the owner of one hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land in 
Sheridan township, Scott county, Iowa. He has a handsome and commodious 
residence and the neat and thrifty appearance of his farm indicates the super- 
vision of a practical and progressive owner. 

On the 7th of February, 1885, Mr. Stoltenberg was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma Meier, a daughter of Henry and Lena (Weise) Meier, who were 
early settlers of Scott county. They were natives of Hanover and Holstein, 
Germany, respectively. Henry Meier, who was brought to this country by his 
parents when about ten years of age, was the owner of the present home farm 
of our subject before it came into the latter's possession. He was also promi- 
nent in public affairs and held a number of official positions- in Sheridan town- 
ship, including that of school director. He passed away in 1884 when fifty- 
nine years of age, while the demise of his wife occurred in 1906, when she 
was sixty-one years old. They reared a family of four children, as follows: 
Mrs. Stoltenberg; Henry, who resides at Long Grove; Augusta, the wife of 
August Lefrantz, of Eldridge; and Edward, living in Sheridan township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Stoltenberg are likewise the parents of four children, namely: Ma- 
linda, who is the wife of Henry Hinze, of Sheridan township, and has a son, 
Harold; and Viola, Albert and Henry, all at home. Both Mr. and Mrs. Stol- 
tenberg have a wide and favorable acquaintance throughout the community, hav- 
ing ever displayed those sterling traits of character which in every land and 
clime awaken admiration and regard. 



WALTER M. BALLUFF. 

Among the younger representatives of Davenport's legal fraternity is num- 
bered Walter M. Balluff, who, however, in the years of his connection with the 
bar in this city has made substantial progress, augmenting his ability by thor- 
ough study and research, and working his way upward by merit. He was born 
in Scott county, September 18, 1880, a son of August A. and Josephine E. 
Ballufif, the former a native of this county and the latter of Muscatine county, 
Iowa. 

Spending his boyhood days under the parental roof, Walter M. Balluff pur- 
sued his education in the public schools of Davenport, continuing his studies 
through consecutive grades until he was graduated from the high school with 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 329 

the class of 1899. Reflection concerning the business world and the various op- 
portunities therein offered along many lines of industrial, commercial and pro- 
fessional activities, led him to the determination to make the practice of law 
his life work and to this end he entered the State University, wherein he com- 
pleted the law course in 1901. Following his graduation he was admitted to 
the bar and for practical. experience entered the ofBce of Cook & Dodge, with 
whom he remained as assistant until 1906, when he was admitted to the firm. 
Since the ist of June, 1909, the firm has been Cook & Balluff. In no profes- 
sion does advancement depend more largely upon individual merit and with the 
realization of the fact that his labor must constitute the foundation upon which 
to build success, he devotes himself with great earnestness to the preparation 
of his cases and in their presentation leaves no point undefended that he can 
fortify by the citation of precedent or law principle. 

Mr. Balluff in his political allegiance is a democrat, and his social relations 
are with the Elks and the Knights of Columbus. 



WILLIAM I. VANDERVEER, M. D. 

Dr. William I. Vanderveer, a well known and efficient practitioner of Blue 
Grass, also figures prominently in the financial circles of the city as president 
of the Blue Grass Savings Bank, in which position he has been incumbent since 
its inception. His birth occurred in Rock Island county, Illinois, on the nth of 
July, 1859, his parents being John and Delilah (Aikens) Vanderveer, both na- 
tives of Darke county, Ohio, where the former was born in 1823 and the latter 
in 1824. They came west to Rock Island county, Illinois, some time during the 
'50s, locating on a farm where they made their home during the remainder of 
their Hves. 

In the district schools of his native county Dr. Vanderveer acquired a good 
knowledge of the various branches of English learffing and during the periods 
of vacation assisted his father in the work of the home farm. Occasionally he 
was employed in a store at Andalusia, Illinois, and later benefited by study at 
the Iowa State University, attending that institution during the school year of 
1891-92. The following year he went to St. Louis and entered the Homeopathic 
Medical College of Missouri, from which he was graduated on the 23d of March, 
1893. His father had passed away in November, 1892, and therefore, upon 
leaving school, he returned home to care for his mother. In the fall of 1894, 
however, he came to Blue Grass, where he opened an office for the practice of 
his profession and has been thus engaged to the present time. He is naturally 
well fitted for his chosen life work, possessing those traits of personality so nec- 
essary to the successful physician, while his training has been thorough and 
comprehensive, and he is ever extending his knowledge by broad reading, re- 
search and experience. He keeps in close touch with what is going on in the 
medical world and is thorough and faithful in the discharge of his professional 
duties, fully realizing the obUgations and responsibilities that rest upon him in 
his chosen calling. 



330 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Although Dr. Vanderveer gives the greater portion of his attention to his 
profession, nevertheless he has found time to devote to other Hnes of activity 
and was the prime mover in the organization of the Blue Grass Savings Bank, 
being elected its first president in 190 1. He has since continued in that office, 
in which capacity he has manifested excellent administrative ability and execu- 
tive control. The safe conservative policy which he has inaugurated commends 
itself to the judgment of all and has secured to the bank with which he is con- 
nected a very extensive and representative patronage and has placed it among 
the reliable moneyed institutions of the community. 

It was in 1895 that Dr. Vanderveer was united in marriage to Miss Agnes 
Jakeman, a daughter of Frank Jakeman, of Blue Grass township, and unto 
this union has been born one son, Raymond, whose birth occurred on the 21st 
of November, 1901. Mrs. Vanderveer is a member of the Presbyterian church 
and a most estimable lady, being held in high regard and esteem throughout the 
community. 

The Doctor gives his political allegiance to the republican party in all na- 
tional matters, but where local issues are at stake casts his ballot in behalf of 
the best man regardless of party ties. He has never been an aspirant for public 
office, preferring to devote himself entirely to the conduct of business and the 
performance of professional duties, with the result that today he stands high in 
the financial and medical circles of the county, his success being due entirely to 
his own unaided efforts and well directed energies. 



DIEDRICH BUSCH. 



Investigation into the history of Davenport indicates that the Teutonic race 
has constituted an important element in her citizenship and among the promi- 
nent representatives of the fatherland was Diedrich Busch, whose life of well 
directed labor and honesty in all business connections won him the unqualified 
respect and confidence of his fellowmen. He was born in Hamminkeln, Des- 
seldorf, Prussia, February i, 1827, and was reared in a household where the 
parents realized that the best thing they could give their children was a knowl- 
edge of the value of industry, perseverance and economy. He was therefore 
taught to work when a member of his father's household and was apprenticed 
to the shoemaker's trade, which he followed during the greater part of his ac- 
tive life. He learned the trade well, closely applied himself to the conduct of 
the business, and in turn it rendered him independent of labor in his later years. 
The business opportunities of the fatherland did not appeal to his ambitious 
nature for he believed that better advantages could be found on this side the 
Atlantic, and therefore in 1853 he made arrangements to seek a home in America, 
landing at New York on the 3d of July. Soon afterward he made his way 
westward to Davenport and later returned to Germany in order to bring his 
parents to the new world, for whom he carefully provided throughout the re- 
mainder of their days. He again visited his native land in 1873. 





^t^' 




HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 333 

Mr. Busch was married in this country in early manhood but his first wife 
died over forty-six years ago, leaving a daughter, Louise, who died at the age 
of twenty-two years. She was an accomplished artist, who painted largely in 
oil. Following the demise of his first wife, Mr. Busch wedded Miss Emma 
Balcke, on the 19th of January, 1866. She is a daughter of the Rev. Henry 
Balcke, at one time a prominent minister of the German Methodist Episcopal 
church. In his later years he retired from the work of the ministry and for a 
long period made his home with Mrs. Busch, passing away at the venerable age 
of eighty-eight years. 

In 1883 Mr. Busch retired from active life, giving up all business interests 
aside from those necessary for the management of his property. He had in- 
vested quite extensively in East Davenport real estate through the days of his 
early residence here and had engaged largely in the building of residences and 
stores. In this and other ways he assisted materially in work which promoted 
the development of that section of the city. His own home was a fine resi- 
dence on Eddy street which he erected and which is still occupied by Mrs. Busch. 
She is an active member of the German Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Busch was a kind-hearted, liberal man and his attitude toward the public 
was that of a benefactor for his labors were an effective element in promoting 
many interests that largely benefited the city. His history, too, is an indication 
of what can be accomplished when one has the will to dare and to do. He 
recognized the fact that in America labor is king and, bending his energies 
toward the task of earning a living and providing for a future, he at length 
became possessed of a handsome competence that enabled him at his death to 
leave his widow in comfortable, financial circumstances. He passed away on 
the 13th of September, 1893. 



MRS. KATHRYN DIEDRICH. 

For fifteen years Mrs. Kathryn Diedrich operated a large tract of fine, arable 
land in Sheridan township, continuing the work begun by her husband, the late 
Frederick Diedrich. She was born in Props ter, Holstein, Germany, November 
6, 1840. Her parents, Peter and Margaret Dettmer, were also natives of the 
fatherland and spent all their lives in the old country. A son, Peter Dettmer, 
and Mrs. Diedrich, however, came to the United States in 1864. They landed 
in New York and shortly afterward came to Scott county, Iowa, for they had 
an uncle living in Davenport. On the 22d of February, 1866, she gave her hand 
in marriage to Frederick Diedrich, who, like herself was a native of Germany. 
He had, however, been a resident of Scott county, for a much longer time, for 
he had come with his parents, Frederick and Wilhelmina Diedrich, in early 
manhood. They were among the early German settlers of this county, and after 
their arrival here bought the one hundred and sixty acres of land on which Mrs. 
Diedrich lived after her marriage. 

This farm was the home of Frederick Diedrich throughout the greater part 
of his life. He assisted his father in tilling its soil and later assumed the full 



334 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

responsibilities of its operation. While not one of the largest in its vicinity, it 
was very productive, is well improved and especially adapted to general farm- 
ing, which he pursued. His death occurred in 1895, when he was well advanced 
in years, for his natal day was March 20, 1837. 

Twelve children had been born to Mr. and Mrs. Diedrich. William has 
passed away. Minnie is the wife of Orval Goodwin, of Cass county, Iowa, and 
the children born to them are Etta and Eva deceased, Bert, Nettie, Ruby, Har- 
vey and Leona. Henry, a resident of Davenport, wedded Miss Thressa Klaus 
and they have two sons, Edward and Lester. Emma became the wife of George 
Kloppenburg and they have three children, Mabel E., Clarence S. and Leroy V. 
MoUie is the wife of Paul Lohrmann of Watertown, Illinois, and they had 
six children — Viola; Anna; Katie; Raymond, deceased; Bernice and Minnie. 
Mary became the wife of Willis Hopson of Illinois. Louis and Lillian are at 
home, and Anna, Frederick, Adolph and William have passed away. Mrs. Died- 
rich has sold her farm and now is staying with her daughter Mrs. Kloppenburg. 
In the many years that she managed the farm interests, she proved herself to be 
a woman of no inconsiderable business ability, able to conserve as well as im- 
prove, the property entrusted to her hands. 



CHARLES BECKER. 



Charles Becker, who is engaged in the retail liquor business at the corner 
of Fourth and Harrison streets, is the last member of his branch of this old Ger- 
man family in America. He was born September 29, 1850, in Kraschen, Pro- 
vinz Silesia, Germany, and is a son of Carl and Anna Rosina (Wahnelt) Becker. 
His father, a commission merchant, was a self-made man and one who achieved 
prosperity and the confidence of his neighbors. He had a family of seven chil- 
dren, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth. 

Charles Becker received his education in Germany's excellent public schools 
and when eighteen years of age followed the example set by so many of his 
associates and came across the sea. He landed in New York and in a short 
time went to Detroit, where he secured a business footing in the cigar trade. 
Ten years later, in the spring of 1879, he came to Davenport and entered into 
business with his brother Gustav. This association was later dissolved and 
Mr. Becker removed to Sigourney, Iowa, where he engaged in the dry-goods 
business for three years and then returned to Davenport. He then secured a 
position as traveling salesman and was on the road for several years for a 
Davenport dry-goods house. Following this he and his brother undertook the 
management of the Turner Hall, which they conducted successfully for three 
years. They also managed the Burtis Opera House, which was Davenport's 
largest theater up to the year 1896. The death of Gustav Becker occurred Aug- 
ust 26, 1908. After his experience as a manager, Charles Becker enjoyed a 
short retirement and then went on the road again. For seven years he remained 
in the capacity of traveling man but abandoned this in 1903 to open up the re- 
tail liquor store which he has ever since carried on. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 335 

On October 31, 1871, Mr. Becker was united in marriage to Christine Mar- 
tens, and seven children have blessed this union : Bertha, who is employed as a 
dentist's assistant; Amelia, at home; Charles, who died when eight years of 
age; Fritz, at home; Gustav, who died when two years of age; and Anna and 
Carl, at home. Mr. Becker has many friends and enjoys pleasant social affilia- 
tions as a Turner and an Elk. 



OTTO FORTH. 



Otto Forth had had considerable experience as a farmer before he finally 
bought his place in Liberty township, on which he has lived for the past sixteen 
years. As he has gained large returns from its cultivation he has had no rea- 
son to regret the purchase of it. He was born near Coblenz, Germany, April 
15, 1854, a son of Carl and Elizabeth (Bassack) Forth, both natives of Prus- 
sia, the father's birth having occurred in the city of Berlin. In the fall of 
1855 they came to America, settling first in Hampton, IlHnois. They remained 
there for about five years and then came to Iowa, locating in CHnton county. 
There the father secured a section of land in Olive township, upon which he 
engaged in farming with such large profits that he was able to buy in addi- 
tion three quarters of a section in Minnesota. Shortly before his death he re- 
tired from active life, taking up his residence in Davenport, which was his 
home during the remaining years allotted to him. He was twice married, having 
by his first wife, who was the mother of our subject, four children and by his 
second eight. 

Otto Forth, who was but a little over a year old when his parents came to 
this country and about six years old when they removed to Iowa, has spent the 
greater part of his life in this state. His mother died when he was nine years 
of age, but he continued to live upon the homestead in Clinton county until he 
reached man's estate. He went first to Davenport, where he secured work as a 
laborer for four years, and then removed to the northwest part of the state, 
where for one year he worked at his trade of a carpenter. He was not satis- 
fied with the prospects there, however, and returned to Davenport. In that 
city he secured employment with an ice company during the summer and during 
the winter in the packing business of John Suglers. In this way three years 
were spent, at the end of which period he returned to the homestead in Clin- 
ton county, which he farmed for two years. He then returned to Scott county, 
becoming a tenant on a farm near Flainview, which he conducted for five years. 
While this experience was not wholly without profit he went to Cedar county and 
upon a tract of rented land two miles west of the village of New Liberty, en- 
gaged in farming for five years. Then, in 1893, he purchased the place which 
he now owns. It comprises one hundred and sixty acres on section 11, Liberty 
township. It is a rich and arable tract, well adapted to diversified farming which 
Mr. Forth pursues thereon. He has made a number of improvements upon the 
place, has brought the fertility of the soil to its highest productive power and 



336 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

as his industry is the measure of his success he is one of the prosperous farmers 
of his locahty. 

In early manhood in 1879, Mr. Forth was united in marriage to Miss Ernestine 
Magiber, who was born in Holstein, Germany, November 5, i860. At the age of 
twelve she came to this country with her parents, Fred and Dora (Brady) 
Magiber, who settled in Davenport, which remained their home until their death. 
Seven girls were born to them. Mr. and Mrs. Forth have had fifteen children: 
Adella, Alfred, Carl, Martha, Lizzie, Rudolph, Otto, Jr., Rosa, Bertha, Leo and 
Fred, and four who died in infancy. The eldest is the wife of John Smallifield, 
of South Dakota, which is also the place of residence of the third child, Carl. 

By hard work Mr. Forth has proved his right to be numbered among the 
more prosperous farmers of Liberty township and, in as much as his good for- 
tune is the result of his own efforts, there is no bitterness attached to it but, in- 
stead, he has the general approbation of those who have watched his progress. 



CLAUS ARF. 



Among the early German pioneers of Scott county is Claus Arp, who has re- 
tired from farming, which he pursued so profitably in Davenport township for 
upwards of forty years, and has taken up his residence in the city of Daven- 
port. In that time he put to the test the fine qualities of the German race, 
achieved distinction and identified himself closely with the local interests, so that 
his influence, ever exerted for the betterment of the conditions surrounding his 
fellowmen, was felt throughout the township. 

He was born in Holstein, Germany, August 23, 1827, a son of Detlef and 
Abel Arp, who -died in the land of their birth. There Mr. Arp grew to man- 
hood and attended schools. He also learned the weaver's trade and, having at- 
tained the age of manhood, was enrolled as a soldier in the army of the father- 
land. During his two and a half years of service he participated in the war with 
Denmark during 1849 ^nd 1850 holding an ofiice equivalent to that of sergeant in 
the American army. 

In 1851 Mr. Arp came to the United States. Landing at New Orleans, he 
came up the Mississippi river to Davenport, which he reached November 14, 
of that year. A brother had previously come here, so that he was not utterly 
a stranger in the new country. Immediately after his arrival he began to work 
for a farmer, receiving one hundred dollars a year. After two years' experi- 
ence with that employer, he and his brother Henry bought eighty acres of un- 
cultivated land in Davenport township. His sister had come from Germany 
about that time so that it was a little family of three that took up their residence 
upon this first piece of property Mr. Arp owned. For about five years they 
operated it in conjunction, the duties of housekeeping devolving upon the sister, 
and then divided the place. Thereupon Mr. Arp bought eighty acres of land 
in Davenport township, which he traded later for one hundred and forty acres 
there. It remained his home for the thirty-five years he was actively engaged 
in agricultural pursuits and constitutes what is now known as the Arp home- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 337 

stead. He had, however, during that time bought considerable other property 
in the township, for he had won a pronounced success in the cultivation of 
the soil, at one time owning seven hundred and fifty acres of land in Scott and 
Cedar counties, Iowa. Thus he felt justified in relinquishing the responsibilities 
of life and in 1894 he took up his residence in Davenport, where he owns some 
valuable property. 

It was on the 14th of April, 1868, that Mr. Arp married Dora Sienknecht, 
a daughter of Henry and Lena Sienknecht. They have had seven children. 
Theodore is in Denver, Colorado, Hannes married Lena Luders. They live 
in Scott county and have two children. Alma and Theodore. Minnie became 
the wife of Julius Kuelper and they have three children, Vera, Alice and Lil- 
lian. Herman married Theresa Oldenburg and lives in Cleona township. They 
have one daughter, Hulda. Meta became the wife of Louis Goellnitz of Lib- 
erty township. They have two children, Roy and Edna. Otto lives in Daven- 
port township on a farm. He married Mary Hien and they have three sons, 
Elmer, Theodore and Clarence. Adela is at home. 

Having become a naturalized citizen of this republic, Mr. Arp identified him- 
self closely with the best interests of his community, for during the period 
in which he was a resident of Davenport he served as school director and treas- 
urer of the school board for about twenty years and also acted as road super- 
visor. He is a member of German Lodge, No. 37, I. O. O. F., of Davenport, 
also of the Verein Schleswig-Holstein, which is composed of veterans of the 
German war of 1848-50, and the German Old Settlers Society. Quietly and 
unostentatiously he pursued the calling he chose as his vocation and with pa- 
tience and hard work gained a competence which entitles him to be numbered 
among the successful men of the county. 



WILLIAM F. BOWSER, M. D. 

In no profession is there demanded a more thorough knowledge of scientific 
principles than that of medicine. The successful practitioner must also possess a 
kindly, sunny nature, physical endurance and a clear intellect. Possessing all 
these requisites. Dr. William F. Bowser has in the few years in which he has been 
located in Blue Grass built up a lucrative practice that is increasing as the months 
and years go by. He was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, May 21, 1873, 
a son of Frank S. and Anna (Davidson) Bowser, who were likewise natives of 
Armstrong county, the former born in 1843 ^^^ the latter in 1852. The father 
is at present postmaster at Buffalo, Iowa. 

Like the majority of men who enter professional circles. Dr. Bowser was 
reared to farm life. He began his education in the schools of his native • county 
and being but a youth at the time the family located in Muscatine county, Iowa, 
he also attended school in the latter place, completing the high-school course in 
Muscatine by graduation with the class of 1893. He then entered Parsons College 
at Fairfield, Iowa, and after completing a four years' course was graduated from' 
that institution in 1898 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Having decided upon 



338 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

the practice of medicine as a life work, in 1898 he began teaching in the schools 
of Muscatine county that he might earn the necessary funds to enter a medical 
college. He was thus engaged until 1905, but in the meantime, in the fall of 1899, 
he entered the Iowa State University and also read medicine with several leading 
physicians at and near his home. He was graduated from the university in 1905 
and shortly afterward, on the 30th of August of that year, began practice in Buf- 
falo and Blue Grass, but since 1907 has confined his attention to his office in the 
latter village. He is meeting with merited success and his practice is increasing 
as time passes. , 

Dr. Bowser was married November 14, 1906, to Miss Mary Lucinda Moor- 
head, a daughter of M. E. Moorhead, of Blue Grass township. The Doctor is a 
republican in his political views but the demands of his practice leave him little 
time for active participation in public affairs. He belongs to Banner Lodge, No. 
16, Knights of Pythias, to the Modern Brotherhood of America at Buffalo and to 
the Modern Woodman camp at Blue Grass, while in the line of his profession he 
is a member of the American Medical Association, the Iowa State Medical Asso- 
ciation and the Scott County Medical Association. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church at Blue Grass. 



GEORGE MENGEL. 



George Mengel, in early manhood recognizing the value of close application, 
unfaltering purpose and indefatigable energy, has utilized those qualities in the 
attainment of the responsible position which he now occupies in business circles 
— a position that has made him one of the successful business men of Daven- 
port. He is today the president of the Tri-City Plate Ice & Cold Storage Com- 
pany and has been identified with a number of other interests which have been 
factors in the city's commercial growth. 

He was born in Schwabsburg, Germany, a country that for centuries through 
the emigration of its sons has planted the seeds of civilization in all parts of 
the world. His natal day was March i, 1848. His parents were Jacob and 
Anna (Maurer) Mengel, the former a cooper by trade, who also controlled a 
vineyard and engaged in the cultivation of grapes for the purpose of winemak- 
ing. He was a man of prominence in his community, active in public affairs as 
well as in business life. He reared a large family and his five sons came to the 
new world while the five daughters remained in the fatherland. 

George Mengel was educated in the schools of Germany and came to the 
United States in 1865, when a young man of seventeen years. He first estab- 
lished his home in Terre Haute, Indiana, where he was connected with the brew- 
ing business: But the climate there did not agree with him and he went to Wis- 
consin and subsequently removed to Chicago, where he acted as superintendent 
of a malt house for about three years, but on the expiration of that period he went 
to Omaha, where he also spent three years. He next became a resident of Fort 
Dodge, Iowa, where he remained for two years, and then came to Davenport, pur- 
chasing the Littig Brewery on West Fifth street and thus entering the business cir- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 341 

cles of this city. He conducted it until the consoUdation of the brewing interests of 
Davenport, after which he became vice president and general manager of the 
Davenport Malting & Brewing Company, continuing as the second executive of- 
ficer until about three years ago. He was one of the prime movers of the con- 
solidation of the brewing interests of Davenport and has stood as a leading 
representative of that branch of business in this city. After disposing of his 
interests in the Davenport Malting & Brewing Company he organized the Tri- 
City Plate Ice & Cold Storage Company, of which he has since been president. 
This has become one of the important industrial and commercial enterprises of 
Davenport, with an extensive patronage and a volume of business that places it 
among the leading trade concerns of the city. He was one of the originators 
of the Davenport Water Power Company, was one of the organizers of the 
Davenport Grain & Malting Company, and was one of the first directors of the 
Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank. 

In 1869 Mr. Mengel was married to Miss Anna Buettner, a daughter of Gott- 
lieb Buettner, who came from Prussia, Germany. Unto Mr. and Mrs.. Mengel 
were bom two children, George and Anna, but both are now deceased. 

Mr. Mengel gives his political support to the democratic party and keeps 
well informed on the questions of the day. He is a member of the Turner So- 
ciety and an honorary member of the Schuetzen Verein Society. He is an Odd 
Fellow in his fraternal relations and is in hearty sympathy with the principles 
of the order. He also belongs to the German Relief Society and therein gives 
manifestation of his humanitarian principles which prompt him to go to the as- 
sistance of those in need and to extend a helping hand whenever the occasion 
demands. He has never regretted his determination to come to the new world 
for in this land of constantly widening opportunity, where effort is unham- 
pered by caste or class, he has made steady progress until he has reached a 
gratifying place among the most successful business men of his adopted city. 



HEINRICH WIESE. 



Heinrich Wiese, a well known and prosperous agriculturist of Davenport 
township, is the owner of an excellent farm comprising one hundred and sixty 
acres of rich and productive land. His birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, 
on the 25th of January, 1838, his parents being James and Katherine Wiese. 
The father was a weaver by trade and followed that occupation in his native 
land. In 1859, in company with his wife and children, he set sail for the United 
States and after crossing the ocean landed at New Orleans, Louisiana, whence 
he made his way up the Mississippi river to Davenport, Iowa, arriving here in the 
month of June. Subsequently he devoted his attention to the operation of rented 
land in Clinton county, this state, where the demise of his wife occurred. Later 
he removed to Carroll county, Iowa, and there made his home with a son until 
called to his final rest. Unto him and his wife were born three children, as 
follows : Heinrich, of this review ; Claus, living in Minnesota ; and James, who 
is a resident of Carroll county, Iowa. 



342 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Heinrich Wiese, who obtained his education in the schools of the fatherland, 
was a young man of twenty-one when he accompanied his parents on their emi- 
gration to the new world in 1859, since which time he has been a resident of 
Scott county, Iowa. He first secured employment as a farm hand and later 
rented the place of one hundred and sixty acres in Davenport township which 
he now owns but which was then in the possession of a Mr. Hershel. About the 
year 1878 he purchased the property, erected a commodious and attractive resi- 
dence and has made many other substantial improvements on the place, so that 
it is now lacking in none of the conveniences and accessories of a model farm of 
the twentieth century. As the years have passed by he has won a gratifying meas- 
ure of success in the conduct of his agricultural interests and has long been 
numbered among the prosperous and respected citizens of the community. 

On the 15th of March, 1865, Mr. Wiese was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet Arp, a native of Holstein, Germany, who was but three years of age when 
brought to this country by her parents, Peter and Dora Arp, the family home 
being established in Scott county, Iowa. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Wiese have been 
born seven children, the record of whom is as follows: Herman, who is a resi- 
dent of Linn county and wedded Miss Emma Kirby, by whom he has two chil- 
dren. Hazel and Erma; Gustaf, likewise of Linn county, Iowa, who married 
Miss Emma Paustian and has three children, Henry, Arnold and Louisa; Julius, 
who makes his home in Muscatine county, Iowa, and wedded Miss Freda Tah, 
by whom he has a son, Raymond ; Otto, who is at home ; Rudolph, who is a resi- 
dent of Sheridan township and has one son by his marriage to Miss Kobaugh; 
and Dora and Hugo, who are yet under the parental rooi. 

Mr. Wiese is a stanch democrat in his political views and has capably served 
as a school director and also in the office of road supervisor. The period of his 
residence in this county now covers a half century and he is therefore widely 
and favorably known within its borders. The hope that led him to leave his na- 
tive land and seek a home in America has been more than realized. He found 
the opportunities he sought, which, by the way, are always open to the ambitious, 
energetic man, and, making the best of these, he has steadily worked his way 
upward. 



HUGH BRICELAND. 



Hugh Briceland, a retired farmer living at 1923 Harrison street, is one of 
Davenport's estimable citizens, a man who possesses hosts of friends and the 
confidence of all those with whom he comes in contact. He is a Scotchman 
by birth, having been born January 26, 1834, in the city of Glasgow, his par- 
ents being Hugh and Anna (Leach) Briceland. The father was a merchant, 
who played a prominent part in the life of the city where he made his home. 
Hugh Briceland as a lad did not enjoy good health and physicians advised a 
change of climate, suggesting America. The wisdom of their counsel has 
amply proved itself for he is living and enjoying health at an advanced age. He 
landed at New Orleans and came up the river to Davenport in 1846 in company 
with a friend, Davy Hardy, who became prominent in this city. Mr. Briceland 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 343 

secured employment with the farmers near Davenport, at first gaining little re- 
muneration aside from his board. By the exercise of thrift and the natural 
industry with which he was endowed, he made himself independent and later 
purchased a farm where by employing advanced methods of agriculture he 
gained a signal success. About twelve years ago he sold this property and went 
to Eldridge, where he lived for six years. About four years ago he came to 
Davenport which he had chosen for a permanent home and where he is now en- 
joying a well earned retirement, surrounded by family and friends. 

On October 21, 1862, Mr. Briceland was married to Anna Emeis, a daughter 
of Dr. August Julius and Charlotte (Peters) Emeis. Her father was a physician 
who came from Germany and was among the pioneer settlers of this county. 
Eight children were born to this marriage, namely: Mary, who married George 
M. Madden and died leaving two children, Bessie and Lottie; Lena, who is the 
wife of Edward Blythe and has two daughters, Carrie and Josie, the former 
now Mrs. O. Parmell, who has given three great-grandchildren to Mr, Brice- 
land. Harry, who married Miss Nellie Neil and has four children, Neil B., 
Harold, Hugh and Jack; Ella and Fannie, both deceased; Hugo, who married 
Miss Alice Yokum; Frank G, a bookkeeper and real-estate man; and George 
W., a resident of Wichita, Kansas. 

Mr. Briceland has been honored by election to the presidency of the Pioneer 
Society. He is a man of strong personality and sterling worth and his interest- 
ing family is a credit to him as well as to the community. Starting out in life 
for himself empty-handed, his success has been won through his own unaided 
efforts and he deserves to be classed with the self-made men of the city. He has 
lived peaceably with his fellowmen, having never had a lawsuit, and he is honored 
and respected by all who know him. 



GUSTAV ECKERMANN. 

Among the German citizens of Davenport perhaps few hold so prominent a 
place in the hearts of all as does Gustav Eckermann. For a quarter of a century 
he was connected with the agricultural interests here, achieving success in his 
vocation as a representative of the best farmers, but it is as a man of hospitable 
instincts that he will be best remembered by the citizens of Davenport township. 

He was born in Germany, March 16, 1832, a son of Claus Eckermann, who 
came to this country and died here. He attended school in Germany, where he 
learned the carpenter's trade and then, in 1852, came to the United States. He 
landed at New Orleans and came up the Mississippi to Davenport. He found 
employment on a farm across the river in Illinois but after three months' experi- 
ence came back to Davenport, where he worked at the carpenter's trade for about 
fourteen years, in that time assisting in building many of the prominent residences 
here. As the result of his savings, he was then able to buy forty acres of land in 
Davenport township, on which he lived for about twenty-five years. As he con- 
ducted a salon and dance hall there, his place was the scene of many social events 
among the Germans and was generally regarded as their place of meeting in that 



344 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

locality. Indeed, it was there that Mr. Eckermann and his wife celebrated their 
silver wedding. The anniversary was attended by over two hundred relatives and 
friends and lasted all day, with plenty to eat and drink. The celebration was con- 
cluded by a dance in the hall and everyone present enjoyed a most delightful day. 
While Mr. Eckermann made a wide reputation for himself as a host, he was not 
neglectful of his private concerns but in the course of years became the owner of 
ninety-two acres of farm land in Lincoln township, eighty acres in Butler town- 
ship, and, when he retired from active life in 1892 and took up his residence in 
Davenport, he bought the property where he lives. 

At Moline, Illinois, November 21, 1854, was celebrated Mr. Eckermann's mar- 
riage to Miss Eliza Grantz, a daughter of August Magdalena Grantz. They had 
come from Germany to Scott county in 1852, but after remaining a few years in 
Le Claire township removed to Moline, lUinois, which remained their home until 
their death. Of their family, the first three children died in infancy. The 
others are : Clara, who married Fred Schseffer, lives in Davenport and is the 
mother of three children, Eliza, Harry and Minnie. Gustav, Jr., of Lincoln town- 
ship, married Bertha Weise and they have four children, Minnie, Hugo, Valentine 
and Harold. Laura is the wife of Henry Lage, of Pleasant Valley township, and 
the mother of four children, Clara, Harry, Lillie and Herbert. Elizabeth married 
Alex Schaf er, of Pleasant Valley township, and has three sons, Ernest, Waldo and 
Leroy. Hugo married Adelia Metzen and they have two children, Eleanor and 
Raymond. They live on a farm in this county. Otto married Emma Kraftmyer 
and lives in Davenport, where he is rearing two daughters, Clara and Helen. Mr. 
and Mrs. Eckermann celebrated their golden wedding, which, however, was at- 
tended only by their children, grandchildren and near relatives as the death of 
Mrs. Eckermann's mother prevented their inviting any of their numerous friends. 

While Mr. Eckermann was living in Davenport township he was elected road 
supervisor, serving for two years. His life record and the long period during 
which he has been identified with the interests of the county has secured his mem- 
bership in the German Pioneer Association, of which he was president in 1908 and 
on whose board of directors he has served for sometime. An exponent of the best 
traits of character belonging distinctively to his nation, a man whose citizenship 
compares favorably with the best of the native Americans, Mr. Eckermann enjoys 
the friendship of a large number of people in Davenport and in the township where 
he was so widely known. 



HENRY KLINDT. 



Among the citizens of Davenport who are enjoying a well earned rest after 
many years of profitable labor is Henry Klindt, one of the prominent Germans 
of the city. He came to this country with little money but with the determina- 
tion to get ahead, grateful at the outset to receive work of any kind. Endowed 
with the characteristics which belong in sO' high degree to the members of his 
nation, he has won a pronounced success from everything he has attempted. 
At present he is residing at No. 834 Marquette street, Davenport. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 347 

He was bom in the village of Fiefbergen, Holstein, Germany, October 8, 
1839, a son of Thies and Wiepke (Mundt) Klindt. After he had received his 
education in his native land Henry Klindt came to this country, arriving here 
in the spring of 1856. As a farm boy he started to work in Scott county, but was 
willing to perform any job that came in his way. In the winter he worked in 
Dayton but tlien went back to the country, where he found employment in a 
sawmill. He also did teaming for a time until the outbreak of the Civil war. 

Notwithstanding the fact that he was of foreign birth, Mr. Klindt enlisted 
in the Missouri artillery under Captain Feninghouse, becoming a member of 
the First Missouri Flying Battery. Throughout the course of the war he served 
as a private with great distinction and at its close was honorably discharged. 
When the Union no longer needed his support, he returned to Davenport, where 
he engaged in teaming. Later he opened a grain and feed store, this being his 
first business venture. He gained from it the success he anticipated and then 
engaged in operating the Eagle brewery, belonging to J. Lange & Company. To 
it he devoted his entire time until 1891, when he sold his interest in that concern. 
He is now president of the Malt & Grain Company, of which he was one of the 
organizers. 

Mr. Klindt was united in marriage to Miss Catherina Schnoor, May 9, 1863. 
One son, George, has been bom to them. He married Miss Julia Hahn, and they 
have a daughter. Norma. Mr. Klindt is one of the active members of the local 
lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and belongs tO' the German So- 
ciety of Turners, and to the German Pioneer Society. He was also a member 
of the old fire company in 1858. The record of his life is a most gratifying 
evidence of the large returns which may be gained from hard work, determina- 
tion and unassailable courage. He never spared himself during the years of his 
early life and now, having won a large competence, enjoys a well deserved rest. The 
amiable qualities of his personality have also won recognition and he is ac- 
counted a stanch friend of many. 



CHRIS MARTI. 



Among the citizens of Scott county who have put aside the heavier respon- 
sibilities of life and are living in the enjoyment of a well deserved rest is Chris 
Marti, for a long period actively identified with the best agricultural interests of 
Winfield township, where he owns two hundred and forty acres of land. A man 
of conspicuous success in his private affairs, he was honored by the citizens of 
his locality, for on several occasions he was chosen their representative to the 
general assembly at Des Moines, there exerting his influence consistently in be- 
half of the best interests of his constituents. His public record was without 
shadow, as his private life is without dishonor, the mere fact that he has served 
continuously since 1872 as secretary of the school board being indicative of the 
esteem in which he is held in his locality. 

A native of Switzerland, Chris Marti was bom May 27, 1845, his parents 
being Bartholome and Anna Barbara (Slagel) Marti. The former was born 



348 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

in February, 1820, in the same country as his son, and there learned the trade of 
a cabinetmaker, following that occupation until he was called to serve in the 
army of 1848. In 1852 he emigrated with his family to America, and after 
landing at New Orleans ascended the Mississippi to Scott county, which he reached 
in April. For the first two years after his arrival he worked at his trade and 
then bought one hundred acres of prairie land in Winfield township, for which 
he paid a dollar and a quarter an acre. He built thereon a small house, prepared 
the fields for cultivation and there Hved until the fall of 1855, when he sold it 
and removed to Davenport, there working at his carpenter's trade during the 
winter. The following spring he resumed farming, purchasing eighty acres 
of land from a Mr. Clawsen, who was a lawyer of this county. The tract was 
situated on section 28, Winfield township, and only ten acres of it had been 
broken. With the assistance of his son Chris, Mr. Marti broke the remaining 
acres, fenced his fields and improved the place which remained his home until 
1898, when he came to live with his son on the farm the latter now occupies. 
In the meantime, however, he had invested in considerable real estate as his in- 
come justified the purchase of land, and at one time owned two hundred and 
forty acres. The last two years of his life were passed at the home of his son, 
and there he died December 3, 1900. Although not a native of this country, 
he was loyal to its ideals, ever giving the best of his labor to the development 
of the state in which he lived and having been elected to the office of school di- 
rector on the republican ticket, served his township faithfully in that capacity. 
His wife had preceded him to the grave by some years, for she passed away in 
1893 when seventy-one years of age. She was the mother of five children, as 
follows : Margaret, the wife of Jacob Engler, a retired farmer of Minden, Pot- 
tawattamie county, Iowa; Chris, the subject of this sketch; Christina, the wife 
of William Murrison, of Sheridan township, Scott county; Bartley, who died in 
1887; and John M., who is living upon the old homestead in Winfield township. 
Chris Marti had attended school in Switzerland for three months before the 
removal of the family to America and after arriving in Scott county was en- 
rolled as a pupil in the district schools near his home. Not all of his time was 
given to the preparation of lessons, however, for he assisted his father in break- 
ing the land and improving the farm he had purchased and later in cultivating 
the fields, so that, at the age of twenty-two years, he was well prepared to 
engage in farming on his own account. Upon leaving the parental roof, with the 
assistance of his father he bought a tract of one hundred acres on section 16, 
Sheridan township, which had been broken but on which no buildings had been 
erected. Mr. Marti made whatever improvements were necessary and lived 
thereon until 1869, when he disposed of that place and bought of his father the 
farm on section 33 on which he now lives. He continued the improvements 
which had been begun, and as the result of his care and diligence was soon reap- 
ing annually large harvests that netted him a comfortable income. Later ho 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land adjoining the homestead, making 
a total of two hundred and forty acres he owns in Scott county. He owns 
twenty acres in Aliens Grove township, while another indication of his pros- 
perity is afforded by the fact that he is a director of the Long Grove Bank. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 349 

He has now retired from active participation in the cultivation of his fields, hav- 
ing rented his land to his sons, who are carrying on the work. 

While the extent of these landholdings affords a palpable evidence of Mr. 
Marti's skill as a farmer and the good judgment which has distinguished his 
business operations, an even greater indication of his success in the world's 
work is seen in the high regard in which he is held by the men in whose midst 
he has lived and who were pleased to bestow upon him many marks of their 
approval. He served as clerk of Winfield township for four years, in 1872 was 
elected secretary of the school board of the independent district of Winfield, an 
oifice he has filled continuously to the present, and in 1889 was elected to the 
twenty-third general assembly at Des Moines, Iowa. He was reelected to the 
twenty-fourth assembly, did not serve in the twenty-fifth, but returned to the 
twenty-sixth. He also served in the call session summoned by Governor Drake. 
In 1898 he was nominated upon the democratic ticket for state senator but was 
defeated by W. E. Hayward. He always remained true to what he believed 
to be for the interests of his constituent's and in accord with his owa ideals of 
honor and uprightness, and the record of his public acts is one of which any 
man might be proud. , 

Mr. Marti has been twice married. On the 13th of December, 1866, he 
wedded Miss Ellen Madden, who was born in Liverpool, England, August 16, 
1847, and was brought to this country by her parents, John and Ellen Madden, 
in 1850. Of this union there were four children, George D., the eldest, now re- 
siding in Austin, Minnesota, married first Miss Emma Clapp, by whom he 
had a daughter. Vera. Mrs. Emma Marti died in July, 1900, and he later mar- 
ried Miss Evelyn Williamson. Howard B. lives with his father. John S. also 
lives upon part of his father's farm. He wedded Miss Mary A. Neil, and they 
have two daughters, Jennie and Helen. Delbert C, a resident of Winfield 
township, married Miss Dorothea Hendricksen and unto them has been bom 
a daughter. Myrtle. On the 5th of December, 1888, Mr. Marti was called to 
mourn the death of his wife, who had been a faithful helpmate and companion 
for more than twenty years and was laid to rest at Long Grove. On October 
22, 1890, he married again, his second wife having been Miss Anie B. Thompson, 
a daughter of Hugh M. and Jennie (Robinson) Thompson, who had come to 
Long Grove, Scott county, from England, in 1844, among the early settlers of 
the state. They were of Scotch descent. The father became closely identified 
with the interests of his locality and was generally known as the Hon. H. M. 
Thompson, for he served in the general assembly at Des Moines and was ap- 
pointed superintendent of the agricultural department of the Iowa State College 
at Ames. He passed away in 1887, but his widow is still living at the venerable 
age of ninety-five years and makes her home with Mr. Marti. Two daughters 
have been bom to Mr. Marti's second union, namely: Nellie, who is attending 
the high school in Davenport, and Anie T., who is at home. 

Mr. Marti voted for Governor Cummins the first time he was the candidate 
for state executive and has since voted with the republican party. Fraternally 
he belongs to the Long Grove Camp of the Woodmen of the World and to the 
Modern Brotherhood of America at Eldridge, while he maintains intimate as- 
sociation with his fellow agriculturists through his membership in the Sheridan 



350 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Grange. His religious support is given to the Christian church of Long Grove, 
of which he is trustee. The saUent traits of his character are energy, perse- 
verance and the capacity to work, united with high ideals of honorable man- 
hood and progressive citizenship. He has been true to all trusts imposed upon 
him, and now in the evening of life may well enjoy the rest he so well deserves, 
assured of the respect, good will and esteem of the citizens of Winfield town- 
ship, in whose midst the most of his years have been spent. 



JACOB IRA CROOK. 



Jacob I. Crook was connected with what has become one of the most important 
laundry concerns in Iowa, being associated in this with his two sons, Lester J. and 
Rolland W. Crook, who are the principal factors in the business, which is con- 
ducted under the name of Crook Brothers on East Third street. Mr. Crook was 
born in Steuben county, New York, July ii, 1836. He enlisted in the United 
States army on the i6th of August, 1861, and was a member of Company A of the 
Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry. He served three years as private and was hon- 
orably discharged in 1864, reentered the army at Hartford, Connecticut, February 
8, 1865, in the capacity of sergeant, and was honorably discharged after the close 
of the war, on the 7th of February, 1866. 

On the 1st of November, 1864, at Peoria, Illinois, Mr. Crook was united in 
marriage to Miss Louisa H. Stringer. To this union four children were born, 
two sons and two daughters. After locating with his family in Davenport, Mr. 
Crook was engaged in various business pursuits. One of the daughters, Olive L., 
was born in Peoria county, Illinois, June 6, 1866, and on the 27th of November, 
1897, at Dubuque, Iowa, was married to David N. Albaugh. One son, Jacob Ira, 
was born to this union. They reside in Davenport. Martha J., whose birth 
occurred in Atkinson, Illinois, February 16, 1871, was married at Davenport, 
Iowa, on the 30th of January, 1890, to Alonzo S. Collins. They live in Buffalo, 
New York, and have one son, Alonzo WilUam. 

Lester J., the eldest son, was born in Henry county, Illinois, March 16, 1868. 
He acquired his education in the public schools and in his early manhood was 
employed as a clerk in a dry-goods establishment. He then abandoned that posi- 
tion and entered the emplqy of the firm which formerly conducted the laundry of 
which he is now one of the proprietors. He was first employed as driver on the 
delivery wagon for this concern. From the beginning he seemed alert to every 
point by which he might learn more concerning the laundry business and this alert- 
ness, coupled with his generosity of service, was soon noted by his employers and 
in a short time he was put in charge as manager of the laundry. He was not long 
in proving himself capable of handling the affairs of this concern in managing its 
financial interests and in directing the labors of the employes over whom he had 
supervision. Although when he took charge the business was one of insignifi- 
cance, Mr. Crook soon built up the trade and eventually purchased a half interest. 
Wishing to become more firmly established in trade circles, he then found a man 
to purchase the other half interest in the concern, the latter acting as a silent part- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 351 

ner. Still later Mr. Crook induced his brother, RoUand W., who was a photog- 
rapher, to purchase the interest of the silent partner. The two then set to work 
to make theirs an important industry. They rebuilt the plant of twenty-two by 
seventy-five feet of room to their present quarters of twenty thousand feet of 
work space, using both floors and equipping the plant with modern machinery. 
They now have an outfit for doing first-class work, the earning capacity being 
second to none in the state. The business is located at No. 221 East Third street 
and is conducted under the name of Crook Brothers. Their patronage is not only 
drawn from Davenport but extends to other districts within a radius of one hun- 
dred miles, and their laundry is now one of the largest in the state. 

Lester J. Crook was married at Rock Island, on the 29th of September, 1893, 
to Miss Katharine C. Scott. One daughter, Louisa K., was born to this union. 
Mr. Crook belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Elks and the Red Men and is 
popular with his brethren in these various societies. 

RoUand W. Crook was born in "Atkinson, Illinois, on the 4th of October, 1873. 
He acquired his education in the public schools and when but a lad entered the 
employ of Frank Hastings, the photographer, remaining in that line of activity 
until he entered the laundry business. On the 3d of June, 1907, at Davenport, he 
was married to Miss Dorothy K. Eberly. His fraternal relations are with the 
Masons and the Elks. The brothers are alert, enterprising men, putting forth 
every endeavor to make today find them further advanced than yesterday and 
their constant progression rapidly brings them toward the wished for goal. They 
take an active part in the city's welfare and have become recognized as prominent 
business men of Davenport. 



ED S. BOWMAN, M. D. 

Dr. Ed S. Bowman, who established the county hospital of Scott county and 
is a successful general practitioner who continuously augments his knowledge 
and efficiency by study and investigation along the lines of medical science, was 
bom in Andalusia, Illinois, October 14, 1868. His father, Ed H. Bowman, 
was a native of Rock Island county, Illinois, and a son of Dr. E. H. Bowman, 
of Rock Island county. The father still resides in the place of his nativity, where 
he is largely engaged in real-estate business. He married Ellen Sumet,- also 
a native of Rock Island county. 

Passing through the consecutive grades of the public schools. Dr. E. S. 
Bowman of this review eventually became a high school student in Rock Island 
and received his early business training in the office of his father, who was at 
that time clefk of the circuit court. Subsequently he engaged in journalism on 
the Rock Island Argus for two years and then went to Bennett, Iowa, where he 
clerked in the drug store of an uncle. Dr. S. C. Bowman. At the same time he 
studied medicine and, becoming convinced that the practice of medicine and sur- 
gery would prove a congenial vocation, he entered the State University of Iowa, 
where he spent three years and was graduated in 1893. He then joined his uncle, 
Dr. A. W. Bowman, in Davenport, and at his death continued his practice. 



352 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

He continually reads and studies along those lines that will promote his efficiency 
and that his practice has given uniform satisfaction is indicated in his constantly 
increasing patronage. He belongs to the Scott County Medical Society, the 
Iowa State Medical Society, the National Medical Association and the Iowa 
& Illinois Medical Society, of which he was secretary for a number of years. 

Dr. Bowman takes active interest in politics and is a stalwart republican. 
The Bowman family on the whole have been interested in political questions 
and activities and thus Dr. Bowman's record is in keeping with that of others 
of the name. In 1898 he became county physician of Scott county and thus 
served until 1904, during which time he established the county hospital, which 
has developed from modest proportions into an important institution, doing 
excellent work in conserving the public health. He also assisted in the organiza- 
tion of the Visiting Nurses Association, secured the present city ambulance and 
instituted many other improvements that are of great benefit to Davenport from 
the health standpoint. In 1897 he wa:s appointed United States examiner and 
still holds that office. 

It was also in 1897 that Dr. Bowman was married to Miss Evelyn Stan- 
ton, a native of Rock Island, and they have one daughter, Beulah, who was 
bom March 4, 1901. Dr. Bowman is prominent in Masonry, having attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is also a leading representa- 
tive of the Knights of Pythias, a charter member of Columbian Lodge and 
brigade surgeon of the Iowa Brigade of the uniformed rank, Knights of Py- 
thias. He likewise holds membership with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Foresters. In his life 
work he has put into practice his belief that earnest labor and thorough appli- 
cation are the fundamentals of success and he possesses in a high degree the 
confidence of a large clientele. 



LOUIS P. BEST. 



The promotion which follows skilled labor and close application brought 
Louis P. Best to a position where upon him devolved administrative direction and 
executive control in connection with a number of the most important industrial 
and financial enterprises of Davenport. His abilities, at all times adequate to 
the demands made upon him, enabled him to so direct interests with which he 
was concerned as to win most substantial results, and at length by reason of the 
success to which he attained he was enabled to put aside business cares and is 
now practically retired. He is, however, still financially interested in some en- 
terprises in which he was formerly a member, with active voice in management. 
He was born in Germany on the 7th of April, 1848, and acquired his education 
largely in the schools of Stuttgart and Berlin. Coming to the United States 
in 1869 as a young man of twenty-one years, he landed at New York, where he 
spent five years, being first employed as a chemist with the Brunjes & Ockers- 
hausen Sugar Refining Company, while subsequently he was identified with 
the importing business. In 1874 he made his way to Davenport, being called 




oc ^ y ■ yh'^-^^^ 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 355 

to this city to take charge of the works of the Glucose Manufacturing Company. 
He then bought an interest in the business and, increasing his holdings therein, 
was for a considerable period one of the chief stockholders. In an official ca- 
pacity he was active in its management and control, taking important part in 
formulating the policy and plans whereby the business became one of the lead- 
ing enterprises of eastern Iowa. When he became connected therewith the 
business was in its infancy but was reorganized in the fall of 1874, Mr. Best 
acting as general manager from that time until his retirement, on the ist of 
January, 1898. To his knowledge and skill as a chemist were added excellent 
executive ability and keen discrimination. As his powers became recognized Mr. 
Best's cooperation was sought along various other lines and at one time he was 
president of the Davenport Machinery & Foundry Company, of which he is 
still a director. He is also a member of the Bettendorf 'Axle Company and 
served as its treasurer until obliged to resign that position on account of ill 
health, after which he traveled in Europe for two years, being greatly benefited 
by his sojourn abroad. While connected with the glucose trade he built a new 
glucose factory at Granite City, Illinois, which he afterward sold. He was for- 
merly interested in the Hawkeye Electric Company and was a director of the 
Citizens National Bank. 

While Mr. Best established his place as one of the foremost representatives 
of business interests in Davenport, he did not fail to heed the call of citizenship 
and, in fact, has taken active part in furthering many progressive public projects. 
For six years he served on the school board and for four years was its presi- 
dent, in which connection he was active in holding to a high standard the sys- 
tem of public instruction in the city, bringing to bear in the discharge, of his 
duties the same businesslike qualities which have characterized his conduct 
of individual interests. 

In 1871 Mr. Best was united in marriage to Miss Louise Heck, the wedding 
being celebrated in London, England. Their only child, Rudolph, resides in 
Fort Scott, Kansas. For his second wife Mr. Best chose Miss Krause and to them 
have been born a son and daughter, Louis and Margaret. The family residence 
is situated on Ripley street and the evidences of cultured and refined taste, as 
well as of wealth, make it most attractive to the many friends of the family. 
The wise use of time, talents and opportunity has brought Mr. Best to his 
present enviable position with a name that has remained untarnished through 
all the years of his connection with commercial interests. 



JAMES R. THOMSON. 



Unfaltering perseverance and unabating energy have brought James R. Thom- 
son a gratifying measure of success and he is now classed with the highly re- 
spected and progressive farmers of Winfield township, where he owns two hun- 
dred and forty acres in the farm upon which he now resides, which is the old 
homestead, on sections 25 and 26, about a half mile northeast of Long Grove. 



356 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

It was upon this farm and in this county that he was born, March 19, 1854, 
his parents being Hon. Hugh M. and Jean (Robertson) Thomson, both of whom 
were natives of Scotland. The father, who was born July 4, 1812, was a son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Thomson, who spent their entire lives in the land of 
hills and heather. Hugh M. Thomson acquired his education in his native country 
and in his early manhood had the friendship and patronage of a nobleman who 
took great interest in him and obtained for him a position on the police force 
in Liverpool, England. Later he was promoted to police inspector, occupying 
that position until he came to the United States in 1844. He landed at New 
Orleans after a voyage of nine weeks and then came up the Mississippi river 
to Davenport, where he landed in the month of June. He was accompanied by 
his wife and five children and he made the trip to the new world in order to 
keep the family together, believing that he would receive a more adequate re- 
muneration for his labor in this country. Three families had emigrated to- 
gether. Mr. Thomson took up forty acres of land as did each of the others — 
John Grieve, John Pollock and John Robertson. The forty acres which Mr. 
Thomson secured is now a part of the J. G. Robertson place in Winfield town- 
ship. It was all open prairie then and his land was too low to build a house thereon, 
so that he soon afterward entered eighty acres more in Winfield township. 
Upon the latter tract he erected a log cabin and the families of John Pollock, 
John Robertson and Mr. Thomson all occupied it. Mr. Thomson lived there 
for about seven years, after which he entered the farm upon which his son 
James now resides. In the intervening years he had experienced all the hard- 
ships and privations of pioneer life but now the country was beginning to be 
settled and he was offered six hundred dollars for his eighty acre tract, so that 
he sold it, considering this a good price for the property. He then made invest- 
ment in three hundred and twenty acres of land on sections 25 and 26, Winfield 
township, for which he paid a dollar and a quarter per acre and then had two 
hundred dollars remaining from the sale price of his former farm. He built his 
house and from time to time added to the improvements upon the farm, which 
under his careful direction was transferred into a productive tract of land, 
annually yielding him generous harvests. He lived upon the place all his life 
but later sold eighty acres of the original tract. He carried on general farming 
and was very progressive in his methods. He was one of the first to introduce 
shorthorn cattle into the county, buying stock of that class about 1857. He was 
also prominent in community affairs and held nearly all of the township offices, 
including that of justice of the peace, township trustee and school director. He 
was also president of the school board at one time and still higher official honors 
were conferred upon him, for in 1863 he was elected to represent his district 
in the state legislature and thus served until 1866. He was chosen to the office 
on the republican ticket and later he was appointed superintendent of the Agri- 
cultural Farm at Ames, Iowa, remaining in charge for four years. He then 
returned to Scott county and his fellow townsmen desirous of again benefiting 
by his official service elected him a member of the board of county supervisors 
in 1879. He filled the position for about a year and a half, after which he with- 
drew from public life and concentrated his energies upon his farming interests. 
Over the record of his official career there falls no shadow of wrong or sus- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 357 

picion of evil. He was always loyal to the interests entrusted to his care and 
progressive in his support of beneficial public measures. He held membership 
in the Odd Fellows lodge while in Liverpool but took no active part in lodge 
affairs while in Iowa. He and his wife held membership in the Presbyterian 
church in Scotland but as there was no congregation of their denomination near 
their home in Scott county they attended the Christian church. The death of 
Mr. Thomson occurred March i, 1887, and his remains were interred in the 
Long Grove cemetery. His wife, who was born June 20, 1814, is still living in 
Scott county. 

In their family were nine children: M. L., of Hewins, Kansas; Jean, the 
wife of Gavin Long, of Brooklyn, Iowa; John R., who is mayor of Earlham, 
Iowa ; Elizabeth, who became the wife of A. W. Brownlee, and is now deceased ; 
Agnes, who became the wife of Herman Ficke, of Davenport, but died in 1907; 
Andrew L., a resident of Stuart, Nebraska; Annie, the wife of Chris Marti 
of Scott county; Hugh M., who makes his home in Moville, Iowa; and James 
R., of this review. 

James R. Thomson has always lived in the county which is yet his home and 
the place is therefore endeared to him by the memories of boyhood as well as the 
associations of later years. He acquired his education in the district schools 
and the Agricultural College at Ames, after which he returned to the old home- 
stead and has since engaged in general farming, assuming the management of 
the farm in 1885. He is first vice president of the Stockman's. Bank of Long 
Grove. 

On the 30th of September, 1891, Mr. Thomson was married to Miss Emma 
Evans, who was born in Butler township and is a daughter of John and Clarinda 
(Baughman) Evans. Her father was born in Pennsylvania and became one 
of the early settlers of this county, arriving here when fourteen years of age. 
He is still living, at the age of sixty-six years, but his wife, who was born in 
Winfield township, this county, passed away in June, 1906. In their family 
were six children: Dr. S. J. Evans, who is a resident of Davenport; Bert E., 
making his home in Long Grove; Mrs. Thomson; Effie, the wife of Charles 
Clapp, of Sheridan township ; George, who died in March, 1904 ; and Lottie, also 
living in Sheridan township. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Thomson has been born one son, Frank Evans, whose 
natal day was December 7, 1893, and who is now a high-school pupil in Daven- 
port. Mr. Thomson strongly advocates higher education and is a stalwart sup- 
porter of the public-school system. He has served for four years as a school 
director and he takes an active part in politics as a supporter of the republican 
party. He has been committeeman for his township on the county central com- 
mittee for twenty years and does all in his power to further the interests and 
promote the success of the republican party in this county. He holds membership 
with the Modern Woodmen of America at Long Grove and has attained high 
rank in Masonry, his membership being in De Witt Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M. ; 
Kilwinning Chapter No. 56, R. A. M., also of De Witt; St. Simon's Cyrene 
Commandery, No. 9, K. T., of Davenport; and Kaaba Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. His life is in harmony with the beneficent teachings of the craft which 
is based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness. He enjoys in large 



358 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

measure the high regard of his brethren of the Masonic fraternity and, moreover, 
has the warm esteem of his fellow citizens throughout his part of the county. 
He is a worthy representative of one of the oldest pioneer families, and for more 
than a half century the name of Thomson has been associated with all that is 
progressive and commendable in citizenship as well as in business life. 



RAY R. KULP, M. D. 



Dr. Ray R. Kulp entered upon the practice of medicine at Davenport in July, 
1905, as a member of the firm of Kulp, Kulp & Kulp, his associates being his 
father, Dr. John H. Kulp, and his brother, Dr. Oliver W. Kulp. Since the death 
of Dr. John H. Klilp, which occurred in March, 1906, the sons have taken care of 
the extensive practice of their father and have already gained enviable recogni- 
tion among the skilled and able members of the medical profession. 

Dr. Ray R. Kulp of this review is numbered among the worthy native sons 
of Scott county, his birth having occurred in Davenport on the 2d of March, 1879. 
His father. Dr. John H. Kulp, was born in Sherman, Summit county, Ohio, on 
the 2ist of June, 1849. He obtained his literary education in the Mennonite Acad- 
emy at Wadsworth, Ohio, and in 1869 came to Iowa, taking up the study of medi; 
cine in the medical department of the University of Iowa, which institution con- 
ferred upon him the degree of M. D. in 1872. He had studied under the direction 
of Professor Robertson, of Muscatine, Iowa, who was professor of the theory 
and practice of medicine in the University of Iowa. Prior to his graduation he 
entered the State Hospital for the Insane at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, as apothe- 
cary and hospital clerk and after receiving his degree he was appointed second 
assistant physician of that institution, which position he held for two and a half 
years, when he was made first assistant. He likewise spent one season at post 
graduate work in Bellevue Hospital of New York city. 

In January, 1874, Dr. John H. Kulp opened an office at Davenport, Iowa, 
continuing a successful and prominent practitioner of medicine here until the time 
of his demise. He gradually began specializing in nervous and mental diseases 
and diseases of women and eventually devoted his attention exclusively to those 
branches. For more than twenty years he acted as trustee of Mount Pleasant 
Hospital, was a member of the consulting board of St. Luke's Hospital and served 
as alienist of the insane department at Mercy Hospital. He was likewise surgeon 
for the BurHngton, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railroad. For two terms he acted 
as president of the Scott County Medical Society, while in the Iowa and Illinois 
Central District Medical Society he was also elected to that responsible position, 
serving for one term. 

On the 24th of September, 1873, Dr. John H. Kulp was joined in wedlock to 
Miss Mary E. Cauffman, of Mount Pleasant, Iowa, by whom he had two sons : 
Oliver W., who was born July 4, 1874 ; and Ray Ranney, of this review. Both 
have followed in the professional footsteps of their father. John H. Kulp was 
a republican in his political views, while fraternally he was identified with the 
Masons and the Knights of Pythias. He was a man of splendid physique, digni- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 359 

fied and prepossessing, and when he was called to his final rest his professional 
brethren felt that they had lost one of their most distinguished representatives. 

Dr. Ray R. Kulp, whose name initiates this review, spent his youthful days as 
a student in the public schools, being graduated from the high school at Daven- 
port in 1899. Entering the medical department of the University of Iowa, he was 
graduated from that institution in 1904 and subsequently spent a year as house 
physician of Mercy Hospital in this city. In July, 1905, he began the practice of 
his profession in partnership with his father and brother and after the death of 
the former was for a time associated with his brother. He is now enjoying a very 
extensive and gratifying patronage. He acts as official anaesthetizer at Mercy 
Hospital, and keeps in close touch with the progress that is being continually made 
by the medical fraternity through his membership in the County, State and 
National medical societies and the Iowa and Illinois Central District Medical 
Society. 

In 1906 Dr. Kulp was united in marriage to Miss Bessie G. Piatt, a native of 
Davenport and a daughter of Benjamin F. Piatt, who was formerly a resident of 
this city but now makes his home in Minneapolis. Dr. Kulp belongs to the Phi 
Rho Sigma, having joined the Phi Rho Sigma and the Tau Delta Tau fraternities 
at college. He is well known and popular socially, while in professional circles 
he has won a measure of success which many an older practitioner might well envy. 



CHARLES H. WENZEL. 

Charles H. Wenzel, who conducts a business in farm implements in addition 
to the cultivation of his fields in Liberty township, was born in Hampshire town- 
ship, Clinton county, Iowa, December 28, 1862, his parents being Fred and Mary 
(Smith) Wenzel. They were both natives of Prussia, where they grew to ma- 
turity and were married, and in i860 started upon their journey to America. 
In December, of that year, they reached Iowa, locating in Clinton county, where 
the father secured a large farm, which Mr. Wenzel operated until his death. It 
occurred in 1905, when he was seventy years of age. His widow is still living 
on the homestead. They were the parents of six children: Charles H., who is 
the subject of this sketch; August, who is a partner with his brother Charles 
in the implement business; Bertha, who became the wife of Hans Hagge, of 
Clinton, Clinton county, Iowa ; Annie, who is the wife of R. C. Hultz, of Boone, 
Iowa ; Augusta, who married Nicholas Schwartz, of Clinton county ; and Minnie, 
who is the wife of John Wascher and lives upon the homestead in CUnton 
county. 

Charles H. Wenzel was reared upon the homestead in Clinton county and 
in the district schools of Hampshire township attained a good education. Until 
he was thirty he worked with his father upon the farm and then started out in- 
dependently. At first he was engaged in the implement business, which he con- 
ducted in conjunction with a saloon in Low Moor, Clinton county, for about 
seven years. About four years ago he came to Liberty township, Scott county, 
where he continued to sell farm implements and also engaged in agricultural 



360 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

pursuits upon the tract of land on which he now Hves and which belongs to his 
wife. It embraces two hundred and forty acres, lying upon sections i8 and 19, 
and is one of the rich farms of this township. He pursues a general line of 
agriculture and is now accounted one of the successful men of his locality. 

In 1907 Mr. Wenzel wedded Mrs. Anna Arp, the widow of Johannes Arp 
and a daughter of Fred and Catherine (Koch) Misfeldt. They were both born 
in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, the former January 22, 1823, and the latter 
March 7, 1843. I^ their native province they were married and there two of 
their children were born. In 1865 they crossed the Atlantic and came directly 
to Scott county, where Mr. Misfeldt engaged in farming. Here he died Sep- 
tember 19, 1908, and his widow is now living in New Liberty. Twelve chil- 
dren were born to them, eight of whom are now living. Their daughter Anna 
was born in Butler township, Scott county, March 10, 1872, and in 1892 gave 
her hand in marriage to Johannes Arp, who was born in Lincoln township, Scott 
county, August 2, 1868. He was a son of Deitlef and Bertha (Weis) Arp, 
both of whom were natives of Germany. They came to this country after having 
reached their maturity, were married here and took up their residence in Scott 
county, where Mr. Arp engaged in farming. Eight children were born to them, 
but two only grew to maturity : Johannes and Adolph, the latter living upon the 
homestead in Lincoln township. Johannes Arp remained with his parents until 
his marriage, when he bought the farm of two hundred and forty acres on 
which Mr. and Mrs. Wenzel are now living. All the improvements are the 
result of his labors with the exception of the dwelling house which his widow 
built about two years ago. In addition to this place he owned two hundred and 
forty acres on section 6, of Liberty township, and was accounted one of the 
most prosperous and influential men in his locality. He was a democrat in his 
political views, and upon that party's ticket had been elected justice of the 
peace, in which capacity he served for seven years. He was later chosen town- 
ship clerk — an office he held at the time of his death. He passed away in 
Liberty township, August 30, 1906, and by his demise the community lost one 
of its valued citizens. Six children had been born to him and his wife: Hilda, 
Harry, Louis, Raymond, Elsie and Herman. Louis died at the age of four 
years and four months, but the other children are living with their mother. 

Mr. and Mrs-. Wenzel are the parents of one son, Fred. While his cultiva- 
tion of the soil has brought him a generous income his implement business is 
also profitable and supplies a long-felt want in this community. The implements 
which he sells are of high grade and he makes every effort to satisfy the wants 
of his customers, who find him always a man of honorable intentions and acts. 



JOHN BRUHN. 



A life of industry, crowned with success, enabled John Bruhn to spend his 
last years in honorable retirement, enjoying the fruits of his former toil. He 
was indeed a self-made man and in his youth met many hardships and difficulties, 
but gradually he worked his way up until he won prosperity as the reward of 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 363 

his diligence. He was born at Liitjenburg, Holstein, Germany, in 1827, and 
in early life learned the butcher's trade. He was twenty-one years of age when 
in 1848 he joined the army, serving as a soldier throughout the Schleswig-Hol- 
stein war against Denmark. In 1852 he determined to come to America and 
left Hamburg in a sailing vessel, which reached New Orleans after a voyage of 
thirteen weeks. In company with several traveling companions he went up the 
Mississippi river to St. Louis, and as he had no money began looking for em- 
ployment. He did not succeed in his search for work there and so went to 
Bunker Hill with a countryman, Louis Jansen, who was likewise a butcher by 
trade and who' had a brother who was engaged in the tailoring business in 
Bunker Hill. The two young men eagerly accepted any work which they could 
secure. They worked on farms, on the railroad and also as bricklayers' help- 
ers. Their wages were very small — ^not more than fifty cents a day. At the 
end of two weeks their fingers were so sore that they were compelled to give 
up work for a time. When they did somewhat recuperate, a prominent Scotch- 
man of Bunker Hill, who was hostile to the resident Irish butcher, asked them 
if they would not establish a butcher shop there. They said they would like 
to, but did not have the necessary money, so the Scotchman supplied them with 
capital, a horse and wagon and equipped a small shop for them, so that the new 
business was begun. It was in June, 1853, that they opened their shop and 
they remained together until November, making quite a little money. In the 
latter month Mr. Jansen came to Davenport with four hundred dollars, while 
Mr. Bruhn remained at Bunker Hill until January, 1854. He then came to Dav- 
enport at the request of Mr. Jansen, who had secured employment with Chris- 
tian Hannemann, an uncle of Louis and Charles Hansen. Mr. Bruhn and Mr. 
Jansen bought out the business of Mr. Hannemann, and were so successful in 
its conduct that in 1855 Mr. Jansen sailed for Germany with four thousand 
dollars. 

Mr. Bruhn, then left alone, discontinued the butchering business and began 
buying hogs for Mr. Graham and was becoming properous when Mr. Graham 
failed. Mr. Bruhn, with two other men, had signed a note of twenty-eight thou- 
sand dollars for his employer and when Mr. Graham went into bankruptcy all 
of Mr. Bruhn's hard earned savings were taken to meet the note. In 1857 
Mr. Jansen returned to America, for Germany was no longer to his liking. He 
had already expended half of his capital, but with the remainder he and Mr. 
Bruhn again established themselves in the butchering business with renewed zeal. 
They prospered and in 1858 went to California, but times were bad and they 
remained in the Golden state for only about six months. On returning to Dav- 
enport, Mr. Bruhn became associated with two Americans in the live-stock busi- 
ness, shipping to Chicago, but the undertaking was unsuccessful and at the end 
of a year he had lost nearly all of his capital of five thousand dollars. This was 
in i860. 

In the fall of that year Mr. Bruhn made the acquaintance of the young lady, 
Miss Maria Lohmann, who became his wife on the 19th of April, 1861. At 
that time he had no more money than was necessafy to begin housekeeping. 
However, he had the friendship of a Mr. Sellen, who established Mr. Bruhn in 
the butchering business and hence again he started in that line with Diedrich 



364 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Eckhardt as his partner. They soon, had a liberal patronage and became pros- 
perous. After about two years Mr. Bruhn disposed of his interest to Mr. Jan- 
sen and turned his attention to the live-stock business, making shipments to Chi- 
cago. In 1864 he purchased a house on Third street, near the Turner hall, and 
took up his abode there in May, 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Bruhn at that time had 
two children and four were added to the family while they maintained their 
residence on Third street. In 1874 they removed to the Bluff, where until 1896 
they occupied a large dwelling. During that period their four daughters were 
married and the sons removed to the west. 

The decade between 1880 and 1890 was devoted by Mr. Bruhn to dealing in 
farm lands, and purchasing a farm for himself on Mud creek, he there engaged 
in feeding stock during the winter seasons. In May he led the cattle out to 
pasture and in the following fall shipped them to Chicago. The farm, com- 
prising two hundred acres, he sold to W. Kardel in 1893, and during the re- 
mainder of his life lived practically retired. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruhn traveled life's journey happily together for forty-six 
years, their mutual love and confidence increasing as time went by. Mr. Bruhn 
had reached his eightieth year when he was called to his final rest and a life of 
usefulness and activity was thus ended, when, in 1907, he passed away. He 
never had occasion to regret his determination to seek a home in the new world, 
for here he found the opportunities which were offered and in their improve- 
ment he worked his way upward. In all of his business affairs he was thoroughly 
reliable and in his social relations manifested the sterling qualities of the true 
gentleman. 



CHARLES F. EMLER. 



Charles F. Emler, well known in financial circles as the efficient cashier of 
the Farmers Savings Bank of Walcott, serving in this capacity since its incep- 
tion, has also taken a prominent part in public affairs of the community and is 
recognized as one of the substantial and representative citizens of the com- 
munity. One of Scott county's native sons, he was born in Rockingham on the 
7th of January, i860, a son of George W. and Hannah (Griffith) Emler. The 
father's birth occurred in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, June 5, 1809, and he 
came to Iowa, locating in Davenport, in April, 1855, having made his way down 
the Ohio river and up the Mississippi. He was a millwright by occupation and 
followed that trade until 1863, when he took up farming in Qeona township. 
His wife was also a native of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, where she was 
born on the 23d of February, 1819, and in the Keystone state in 1839 gave her 
hand in marriage to Mr. Emler. 

No event of special importance came to vary the routine of life for Charles 
F. Emler during the period of his boyhood and youth, which was spent under 
the parental roof. He acquired his education in the public schools of Durant 
and after laying aside his text-books became identified with railroad interests 
as telegraph operator for the Rock Island Railroad, in which capacity he served 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 365 

for about twenty-five years. In 1884 he came to Walcott, arriving here on the 
9th of January, and was first employed as operator and later as agent, and the 
long period of his service with this company is ample proof of the capable and 
faithful manner in which he discharged his duties. On the loth of February, 
1904, he severed his connection with railroad interests to take charge of the 
organization of the Farmers Savings Bank of Walcott, of which he was one of 
the principal founders. It was organized on the ist of April, 1904, with a 
capital of twenty-five thousand dollars, and he was appointed its first cashier, in 
which capacity he has continuously served to the present time. He has made 
an excellent record during the meantime, being accurate, prompt and faithful in 
the discharge of his duties, while he is always genial and courteous with all who 
have business with the house, qualities which have made him popular alike with 
the patrons and the officials of the bank. His efforts in behalf of the institution 
have been potent elements in insuring its growth and progress and it stands today 
as one of the safe and reliable financial organizations of his section of the 
county. 

In 1886 Mr. Emler was united in marriage to Miss Eibe Wohlenberg, a daugh- 
ter of Jacob Wohlenberg, of Walcott, and unto their union have been born five 
children, Edith I., Sewel H., Lucy E., Alice M., and C. Franklin. 

Fraternally Mr. Emler is identified with Walcott Lodge, No. 312, Knights 
of Pythias, and also with Walcott Lodge, No. 22, Modern Brotherhood, in the 
affairs of which organizations he takes a deep and active interest. Politically 
he gives stalwart support to the democracy and has served as township clerk 
for two terms. He was the first treasurer and recorder of the town of Wal- 
cott, and has ever taken a helpful interest in community affairs, his influence 
being on the side of improvement, reform and progress. Thoroughly identified 
with the interests of Walcott, the city has benefited by his efforts in her behalf, 
and he is classed among her foremost representatives. 



PASQUALE PUCCINELLI. 

Pasquale PuccinelH, whose demise occurred on the 21st of April, 1906, was 
for twelve years prior to his death prominently identified with the business in; 
terests of Davenport in connection with a macaroni factory. He was born in 
Italy in 1845, his parents being Alexander and Annie Marie (Battiala) Puc- 
cinelH. He obtained his education in the schools of his native land and in early 
manhood crossed the Atlantic to the United States, coming direct to Daven- 
port, Iowa. On arriving in this city he entered the service of the Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railway Company and eventually was made foreman. About 
the year 1894 he commenced working in a macaroni factory and was connected 
with that enterprise until his demise. He was honored and respected by all 
who knew him. 

On the 28th of January, 1880, Mr. PuccinelH was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Mary Burns, a daughter of Bernard and Margaret (O'Hare) Burns, natives of 
Ireland. The father, who crossed the ocean to America when a young man. 



366 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

became a prosperous business man and influential citizen of Chillicothe, Ohio. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Puccinelli were born four children, namely: Nora, who is 
deceased; Margaret, residing at home, who has taken a course in music and 
is now engaged in teaching the art ; Francis, likewise at home ; and Edward, de- 
ceased. Mrs. Puccinelli has gained an extensive circle of friends in this city 
during the long period of her residence here, having won the kindly regard and 
esteem of all with whom she has come in contact. 



W. P. BETTENDORF. 



Through the inherent force of his own character, his strong determination 
and his close application to the duties that have devolved upon him, combined 
with the development of his native powers along the lines of invention, W. P. 
Bettendorf has won distinction and honors in his native land. He is today presi- 
dent of the Bettendorf Axle Company, controlling the most important industrial 
enterprise of Davenport, and the extent of his business has made him one of the 
best known men of the state. He was born in Mendota, Illinois, July i, 1857, 
and is the eldest of four children, whose parents were M. and Catharine (Reck) 
Bettendorf, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father was a young 
man of eighteen years when he crossed the Atlantic to America and took up 
his abode in Mendota, Illinois, where he engaged in school teaching. Later he 
removed to Missouri, and, settling at Sedalia, there established a grocery store. 
He was afterward employed as a government clerk at Fort Leavenworth, Kan- 
sas, and is now living retired in Bettendorf, the town which is the home of the 
great enterprise that was established and is being conducted by his sons. Of the 
family of four children, the only two living are W. P. and J. W., who are part- 
ners in the conduct of a business which in extent and magnitude has no equal 
in Davenport. 

W. P. Bettendorf accompanied his parents on their removal to Missouri and 
to Kansas and in these states acquired the greater part of his education. He at- 
tended for a time the St. Mary's Mission School, which was an Indian school 
in the latter state. In 1870 he began providing for his own support as a mes- 
senger boy at Humboldt, Kansas, and about 1872 he accepted a clerkship in the 
hardware store of A. L. Shepard at Peru, Illinois. He filled that position for 
two years, after which he became an apprentice to the machinist's trade with 
the Peru Plow Company. This was more in accordance with the natural bent 
of his nature and he served his full term of indenture, becoming an expert 
workman. Later he left Peru and entered the employ of the Moline Plow Com- 
pany, with which he remained for ten months, at the end of which time he ac- 
cepted the position of foreman of the fitting department of the Parlin & Oren- 
dorff Company at Canton, Illinois, manufacturers of plows and agricultural im- 
plements. Not only did he faithfully execute the tasks assigned him but unlike 
many workmen — and they are of the class who never progress — ^he gave active 
attention to every duty and thought out along original lines until as the result 
of experiment and research he invented, in 1878, the first power lift sulky plow. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 369 

He was still in the employ of the Peru Plow Company at that time. His in- 
vention was adopted by most of the plow manufacturing plants. After leaving 
Canton, Illinois, in 1882, he returned to Peru to accept the superintendency of 
the establishment in which he had served his apprenticeship and while thus con- 
nected he invented the Bettendorf metal wheel, together with the necessary 
machinery for its manufacture. He then granted a shop right to the Peru Plow 
Company and as the metal wheel branch of the business soon assumed large pro- 
portions it was decided to change the name of the company to the Peru Plow 
& Wheel Company. This company, however, was slow to increase its capacity 
for the inanufacture of metal wheels, the demand for which was constantly in- 
creasing, and Mr. Bettendorf therefore saw the necessity of looking around for 
other interests that would undertake the manufacture on a greater scale, keep- 
ing up with the market demand. He made the acquaintance of E. P. Lynch, 
who was president of the Eagle Manufacturing Company at Davenport, and 
they entered into negotiations which resulted in the establishment of a wheel 
manufacturing plant in this city. Therefore in 1886 the two brothers, W. P. 
and T. W. Bettendorf, came to Davenport and undertook the manufacture of 
metal wheels, in which particular line they continued with substantial success 
until 1899. In that year the Bettendorf Metal Wheel Company was incorporated 
and there was established an enterprise which is today the largest manufacturing 
concern in Davenport. Being of an inventive turn of mind, W. P. Bettendorf 
was constantly on the alert for opportunities to improve their output and to fur- 
ther the use of metal wheels and steel construction for farm equipment. He 
therefore developed a steel gear for farm wagons in 1892 and the manufacture 
of this was at once undertaken. He severed his connection with the Bettendorf 
Metal Wheel Company and after three years' experimental work resigned and 
built necessary machinery for the manufacture of steel gears. This machinery 
was sold to the International Harvester Company in 1905 but the Davenport 
company stih manufactures for the former corporation. In addition to the 
manufacture of steel wagon gears, the company manufactures steel car trucks 
and steel underframes for cars as well as complete cars. The Bettendorf Axle 
Company was organized and incorporated January i, 1895, with W. P. Betten- 
dorf as the president. The history of the development of this enterprise con- 
stitutes a most important chapter in the business annals of Davenport. From 
the beginning the business has continually grown and such is the success of the 
company that in the year 1909 the plant was increased in size threefold. Its 
equipment is of the most modern character and eight hundred employes are 
continually busy in turning out the output, which covers a wide range of iron 
manufacture, Mr. Bettendorf of this review has in large measure been a potent 
force in the development and success of the business. The two brothers, how- 
ever, work together in utmost harmony, the talents of each being such as well 
qualify them for the conduct of the especial interests under their charge. 

In January, 1895, their interests were incorporated under the name of the 
Bettendorf Axle Company, with J. W. Bettendorf as secretary. The business 
factory and main offices were then located on First street, between Ripley and 
Scott, and there, on the 28th of January, 1902, they suffered heavy losses 
through fire. In May of the same year a second disastrous fire occurred, destroy- 



370 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

ing their plant, and as the business was constantly increasing it was decided to 
locate elsewhere. At length they determined to establish their plant at the town 
of Gilbert, now Bettendorf, about three miles east of Davenport. Here they 
are controlling the largest manufacturing establishment of the kind in the west 
and perhaps in the entire country, employment being given to eight hundred men. 
Recently they have made extensive additions to the plant through the erection 
of a foundry four hundred and thirty-six by four hundred and forty feet, each 
of its departments being larger than the average completed foundry. No pro- 
vision for the economical handling of the immense volume of work done in the 
building — the avoidance of congestion and the delay that attends upon it — has 
been overlooked. The buildings are heated by steam and every regard has been 
paid to the comfort of the employes, for whom in a large separate building com- 
modious lockers and lavatories have been established. There are two regenera- 
tive open-hearth basic steel furnaces, having a capacity of twenty-five tons of 
heat, with an output daily of about one hundred tons of finished steel castings, 
which the company use in the steel car construction. They have also recently 
built an erection shop two hundred and forty-six by seven hundred feet, with a 
further extension fourteen hundred by two hundred and fifty-six feet, giving 
the building a total length of two thousand and one hundred feet. The entire 
amount of ground covered by the foundry and erection shop and the buildings 
for the storage of materials is forty-two hundred feet, or about four-fifths of a 
mile in length, along the Davenport, Rock Island & Northwestern tracks. Their 
grounds comprise two hundred forty-seven acres and there is nothing lacking in 
the equipment of this extensive plant, every modern device being employed that 
will facilitate the work or improve the character of the output. Something of 
the growth of the business is indicated in the fact that in 1909 the plant was in- 
creased to three times its original size. The seventy acres of ground that the 
company's shops and tracks occupy were originally laid out with a thought to 
the additions that have recently been made. Careful consideration was given 
to locating the buildings and the tracks laid to and from them so as to handle 
the material quickly and at the lowest cost. From the great piles of steel at the 
east of the shop locomotive cranes carry the material to the east end of the 
shop, where other traveling cranes reach down powerful magnets, take up the 
immense bars that would defy the lifting strength of many men, and carry 
them to various machines, until they issue from the west end of the shop in 
the Bettendorf steel car, underframes and trucks, which have been pronounced 
by railroad men generally as the finest cars of the kind ever produced. 

In 1879 occurred the marriage of W. P. Bettendorf and Miss Mary Wort- 
man, of Peru, Illinois, a daughter of John and Etta Wortman. They became 
parents of two children, Etta and Henry, but the mother and both the children 
have passed away, Mrs. Bettendorf dying in August, 1901. In 1908 Mr. Bet- 
tendorf was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Elizabeth Staby. 
Mr. Bettendorf is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
but the extent and importance of his business interests leaves him little leisure 
for activity in fraternal circles. He stands today as a splendid exatnple of what 
may be accomplished when one has determination and energy. Opportunities 
that others have passed by heedlessly he has noted and improved. Modest 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 371 

and unostentatious in demeanor, he is nevertheless spoken of in terms of ad- 
miration and respect, for his life work has been so varied in its scope, so hon- 
orable in its purposes and so far reaching in its effects that it has become an 
integral part of the history of Davenport. In all of his business career he has 
held to high standards and should he at once retire from business the extent and 
importance of his activities thus far would leave the indelible impress of his 
individuality upon the history of the state. 



HENRY H. HORST. 



Henry H. Horst, a prominent and representative agriculturist of Scott county, 
owns a fine farm of one hundred and seventy-seven and a half acres in Daven- 
port and Sheridan townships and devotes his energies to the work of farming 
and threshing with gratifying results. He was born on the 31st of October, 
1867, and the place on which he now resides has been his home from his birth 
to the present time. 

His parents, Claus and Ida (Hahn) Horst, were both natives of Germany, 
the former being born on the 30th of December, 1819, and the latter on the 
20th of February, 1828. Hans and Margaret (Goetch) Horst, the paternal 
grandparents, both passed away in Germany. Claus Horst, the father of our 
subject, obtained his education in the schools of his native land and was a young 
man of twenty-eight when in 1847 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States. 
After landing at New Orleans he made his way up the Mississippi river as far 
as St. Louis and there spent the winter. The following spring witnessed his 
arrival in Scott county, Iowa, and here he was employed at breaking prairie, 
etc., receiving a wage of ten dollars per month. In 1850 he was married and 
purchased a tract of eighty acres of prairie land in Davenport township, which 
is now in possession of his son Henry and on which he built a small house. As 
the years passed by he brought the farm under a high state of cultivation and 
improvement and gradually added to his landed holdings by additional pur- 
chase from time to time until at his death he owned five hundred and sixty acres 
of rich and productive land. In 1880 he went to New York city for medical 
treatment, as his health had been broken down by his many years of unremitting 
toil, but died in the eastern metropolis on the 24th of May, 1881. His remains 
were interred at Davenport, where his widow has made her home since 1889. 
The latter, a daughter of John and Margaret Hahn, lost her father in 1845. Her 
mother afterward married again, becoming the wife of Oswald Maas, with whom 
she came to Scott county in the year 1847. A sketch of Mrs. Ida Horst appears 
on another page of this volume. She was the mother of six children, as follows : 
Louisa M., who is the widow of Herman Voss; Adolph J., living in Sheridan 
township; Theresa A. C, the widow of Henry Horst; Edward N., who is a 
resident of Sheridan township ; Henry H., of this review ; and one who died in 

infancy. 

Henry H. Horst acquired his early education in the district schools and 
later pursued a course of study in the business college at Davenport. Since 



372 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

putting aside his text-books he has devoted his attention to the work of farming 
and for the past fifteen years has also been engaged in threshing, meeting with 
a well merited and creditable measure of success in his undertakings. His 
home farm comprises one hundred and seventy-seven and a half acres in Daven- 
port and Sheridan townships and he is likewise the owner of a quarter section 
of land in Dakota. 

On the 25th of February, 1891, Mr. Horst was united in marriage to Miss 
Emily Sueverkriiebbe, a native of Germany and a daughter of Qaus and Kath- 
erine (Ames) Sueverkriiebbe, who crossed the Atlantic to the United States 
and took up their abode in Scott county in 1881. The father still survives and 
is a worthy and respected resident here, but the mother was called to her final 
rest on the 29th of April, 1904. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Horst have been born 
five children, namely: Martha, Herbert, Alfred, Elmer and Malinda, all of 
whom are at home with exception of Malinda who is deceased. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Horst has given 
his political allegiance to the men and measures of the republican .party. The 
cause of education has ever found in him a stalwart champion and he has served 
as president of the school board since 1893. His entire life has been passed 
in this county, where he is now widely known, and the fact that many of his 
warmest friends are those with whom he has been acquainted since his boy- 
hood days indicates that his career has always been upright and honorable. 



CHARLES L. SCHIELE. 

The fourteen hundred acres of excellent farm land in Cedar county, Iowa, and 
the fine town residence on Main street, Davenport, are an indication of the success 
which attended the agricultural operations of Charles L. Schiele. He has been 
closely identified with the public affairs and although America is but the country 
of his adoption, he was one of those who offered his life in suppport of the Union 
during the years of the great struggle between the north and south. 

Mr. Schiele was born in Prussia, Germany, December 16, 1840, a son of Carl 
and Wilhelmina (Waltenburg) Schiele. The father, who was born in 181 1, 
served in the German army and followed the baker's trade in his native land. In 
1854 he started upon his journey to the United States with his family, disembark- 
ing at New Orleans. They traveled up the Mississippi river to Davenport, where 
they landed June 20, 1854, and then went to Muscatine county, Iowa, almost imme- 
diately for Mr. Schiele had friends there who persuaded him to buy eighty acres 
of timber land. With the help of his sons he built thereon a log cabin, which 
remained the family home for several years. Later he bought eighty acres more 
and again eighty acres in the same township, upon which he lived until his death 
in 1887. After his demise the mother lived with her son Otto until her death 
in 1907 when she was ninety-four years of age. They were the parents of five 
children : Charles L. ; Frederick, deceased ; Wilhelmina, deceased ; Julius, who lives 
on the old homestead in Montpelier township, Muscatine county ; and Otto, who 
lives near Durant in Cedar county. 



• HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 373 

Charles L. Schiele attended the public schools of Germany before the family 
came to this country. Being but fourteen years of age, however, at the time of 
their arrival, he was enrolled as a pupil in the public schools of Muscatine county, 
but during the progress of the Civil war he decided to join the forces of the north. 
Accordingly, in the fall of 1864, he enlisted in Company C, Second Tennessee In- 
fantry, at St. Louis, Missouri, whence he went to Nashville, Tennessee, participat- 
ing in the famous battle there. Then he went to Franklin Crossroads, where he 
became infected with typhoid fever and was sent back to the hospital at Nashville. 
He remained there several months and, having recovered, was discharged May 10, 
1865. Thereupon he returned to his home, where he remained until 1869. 

In the meantime, Mr. Schiele and his brother rented one hundred and sixty 
acres of land' from their father, which they operated until about 1867, when Mr. 
Schiele bought a wild tract of equal area in Farmington to\ynship. Cedar county. 
The year 1868 he spent in breaking it and preparing it for cultivation, and in 1869 
he married, built a house upon his land and took up his residence there. It re- 
mained his home for thirty-six years, but in the meantime, as the result of his 
unceasing labor and his economy, he had accumulated the fourteen hundred acres 
which he still owns. While this is the record of the success he gained in his pri- 
vate life it affords no indication of the respect and confidence he has won from 
his fellow citizens, who have witnessed his advancement. They elected him on the 
democratic ticket as county supervisor and assessor and he also served as justice 
of the peace for sixteen years. After his removal to Davenport in the spring of 
1907, he was elected trustee of the city, holding the position to the present. 

-On the 1st of June, 1869, Mr. Schiele wedded Miss Elizabeth Barneck, who 
was born in Germany and is a daughter of Moritz and Elizabeth Barneck, of Mus- 
catine county. They have become the parents of six children. Charles, the eld- 
est, married Emma Miller and lives in Cedar county. They have two children, 
Carl and Helen. Gustavus, who lives upon the old home place in Cedar county, 
married Bertha Clawson and they have three sons, Otto, Richard and John. Mor- 
ris resides in Chicago, Illinois. Richard is deceased. Rudolph married Stella 
Carl and lives in Cedar county. Clara E. lives with her parents. 

Faithful in the performance of his duties and endowed with the noble qualities 
of honesty and integrity, Mr. Schiele deserves the high regard in which he is held 
by those with whom he has come in contact. His success in his vocation redounds 
to the agricultural prosperity of the state of Iowa, while his life record is a high 
tribute to the citizenship of Davenport. 



HENRY SINDT. 



Few men have won a more marked success from years of persistent cultiva- 
tion of the soil than has Henry Sindt, who owns two hundred and forty acres 
of fine farm land in Hickory Grove township but has now retired from active 
life and lives in Davenport. He was bom in Holstein, Germany, March 29, 
1821, a son of Hans and Anna Sindt. He received his education in the public 
schools of his native land and when he reached manhood rendered the military 



374 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

service exacted of all German born males. He served in the Holstein war 
with Denmark and at the expiration of his period of enlistment he came to the 
United States. 

It was in 1851 that Mr. Sindt landed at New Orleans, where he took a 
boat upon the Mississippi river to St. Louis. There he remained two days 
and then reembarked upon the river and came to Davenport. Twelve weeks 
had elapsed from the time he left the old country until he reached his destina- 
tion. Upon his arrival here he secured work as a farm laborer, but after a 
little experience he decided to rent land and himself obtain the compensation 
for his own toil. He was industrious and thrifty, besides being ambitious, and 
in 1856 he was able to buy one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land in Hick- 
ory Grove township. He built a house thereon, to which he brought his wife, 
and it remained his home until 1894, when he retired from the active pursuits 
of farming. In the course of years, however, he had invested heavily in land 
until he owned three hundred and twenty acres at one time. Fifteen years ago 
he bought the excellent town property where he now makes his home and has 
since lived in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. 

Shortly after his arrival in this country Mr. Sindt was united in marriage 
to Miss Bertha Weisi, June 26, 1852. She, like her husband, is a native of Hol- 
stein, Germany, where she was born in January, 1823. ■ Seven children were 
born to them. Johannes, who is living in Lyon county, Iowa, married Katie 
Klindt, and they have three children: Hugo, Theodore and Carolina. Heinrich, 
also a resident of Lyon county, married Miss Augusta Baldt, and they have 
four children: Hugo, Herbert, Amanda and Malona. Celia became the wife of 
Henry Klindt, of Scott county, and they have three children: Albert, Meta and 
Henry. Emma is the wife of Henry Lage, and they have seven children : Theo- 
dore, Laura, Mary, Hattie, Anna, Emma and Lura. Alvina is the wife of Theo- 
dore Meyer, of Hickory Grove township, and has become the mother of six 
children : Emil, Alma, Grover, Martha, Frank and Stella. Edward, a farmer 
of Hickory Grove township, wedded Miss Bertha Croft, and they have three 
children. Gustave, residing in California, married Miss Helena Kroft, and they 
have two daughters. 

In the half century or more of his residence in Scott county, Mr. Sindt 
took an active part in local affairs, serving as school director and road super- 
visor for long periods. He was faithful in the performance of his duties and 
gained the good will of his fellow citizens. 



PATRICK T. WALSH. 



Who does not know and like Patrick T. Walsh? The root of the uniform 
regard in which he is held is found in his own life, sterling traits of character 
winning him the confidence and good will of the rich, his kindliness and charity 
the friendship and gratitude of the poor. Perhaps the real test of a man is 
found in his relation to his employes. The opportunity of overbearance and 
for strict and inconsiderate regulations is his as well as the opportunity for the 





< 




HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 377 

exercise of a spirit of fraternal appreciation and helpfulness. In this Patrick 
T. Walsh has chosen the better part and no greater loyalty is to be anywhere 
found than is manifest toward him by his employes from the humblest to the 
highest. In the business world he is known as the head of ten construction 
companies operating throughout the entire country on various lines of construc- 
tion work. Wealth and success have crowned him in his later years, but his 
early experiences brought him want and hardships. It is this perhaps that has 
made him sympathetic and helpful toward those who are undergoing a struggle 
similar to that which he experienced. 

Davenport is proud to number him as a citizen and as a native son. He 
was here born March 17, 1855, his parents being John and Mary (Burns) Walsh, 
both of whom were natives of County Clare, Ireland. The father came to this 
city from the old country in 1848, having crossed the Atlantic on a sailing vessel 
which was six weeks in completing that voyage. He landed at New Orleans 
and made his way up the Mississippi river to Davenport. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Catholic church. His death occurred in 1887, when he 
was seventy-seven years of age. In their family were eight children, of whom 
only two are now living, the sister being Margaret, the wife of John Cody, 
of Davenport. 

The surviving son, Patrick T. Walsh, was educated in Father Pelamorgour's 
Catholic school and when eleven years of age began work in the French and 
Davies sawmill, where he spent two summers in packing shingles and later car- 
ried water on the big cut in west Davenport for one summer. He next became 
an apprenticed stonecutter on the Rock Island arsenal. He remained at the ar- 
senal for eleven years and then occurred a circumstance which forced him to 
seek other employment. It was in the '80s that the stonecutters of Davenport 
and vicinity determined to make a stand for eight hours per day and Mr. Walsh 
became a leader among his fellow workmen. The men succeeded at last in win- 
ning that for which they were contesting, but Mr. Walsh at the end of the time 
was labeled as an agitator and was forced to seek other employment. It was 
this that eventually led him into the construction business. He had not planned 
to enter the field but, when losing his position . at Rock Island, he turned his at- 
tention to any work that he could find, doing such minor and unpretentious 
jobs as digging cellars, running drains, digging sewers and street work generally. 
Gradually he extended his efforts and in the course of years has built up one 
of the notable successes of the country. To the opportunity then presented there 
was supplemented the sterling character of the man of pluck, that quality which 
scales barriers and wins victories on every field of human endeavor. Gradually 
his business extended, and it was not long before he had gained a foothold in 
the construction field. To him was awarded a contract for a "fill" on the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad at Galva, Illinois, and since that time he 
has had many gangs of steam-shovel men at work. It has ever been char- 
acteristic of Mr. Walsh that he has promoted his men as they have shown capa- 
bility and fidelity, and many who entered his service as shovel men have become 
high-class superintendents and master mechanics. Among the things in which 
he takes especial delight is the substantial advance made by his faithful subor- 
dinates. He has awakened unfaltering support by his belief in his men, has 



378 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

constantly spoken to them words of encouragement and appreciation and the 
men on their part give to him the utmost fidehty and the best service of which 
they are capable. Possibly it is owing to this factor that the Walsh Construction 
Company can afford to give better terms than many of its competitors. Zeal 
and loyalty count in a construction proposition as well as in other walks. The 
growth of the business has continued year by year until interests are conducted 
under ten separate corporations, of all of which Mr. Walsh is the president, and 
every one of the various adjuncts has grown up under his fostering care and 
careful guidance. The relationship which exists in a well ordered family only 
adequately reflects the harmony and understanding that dwells in this great or- 
ganization, which is doubtless the keynote to its big success. At the present 
these construction companies are engaged in building railroads from coast to 
coast. Mr. Walsh has been awarded many contracts for the erection of build- 
ings, the one in which he takes special pride being the Sacred Heart Catholic 
Cathedral of Davenport, Iowa. There are a few industries of Davenport of 
any importance that have not felt the stimulus of his cooperation and have 
benefited by his assistance and counsel. He is also connected with the Scott 
County Bank and three other banking institutions. 

On the 1st of June, 1881, Mr. Walsh was married to Miss Catherine Beecher, 
and they have five living children : Mary, the wife of E. J. Walsh ; Thomas, who 
is with his father in business; Katherine, Gertrude and Edward, at home. He 
and his family are members of the Catholic church. 

It is known that Mr. Walsh favors every project for the public good and 
cooperates liberally and influentially in support of movements that have been of 
the utmost benefit to the city. He is of a kindly nature, of genial and jovial 
disposition, and like many self-made men is easy to approach and displays 
thoughtful consideration of others. His life experiences have made him a phil- 
osopher. A trade- magazine comments on this phase of his life in the following 
words : "He is simple and unaffected in manner yet deep and profound in his 
conclusions on important topics. Speaking of gaining success in life, he said 
success can be classified as that quality which prompts the average individual 
to 'move up' as he enters the crowded street car of life. 'About the entrance the 
crowd huddles together and the congestion is being gradually added to by the 
incoming passengers,' said Mr. Walsh. 'Finally some one gets aboard whose 
disposition and temperament is to "move up" where there is more room, and, 
while he bumps some of the passengers and gets jostled himself, he reaches the 
place where there is more room and a. better atmosphere and really makes it 
more satisfactory for the crowd he passed on his way to comfort.' How true 
this is." 

The same paper in commenting upon other features in his life history says: 
"The example set by the Walsh Construction Company in providing so generously 
for its employes has set a standard which other companies have had approxi- 
mately to reach, so that a benefit has been conferred upon the whole line of the 
dirt-moving contingent. Treating men with consideration for their needs and 
supplying them with the best that is going is a big factor in maintaining efficiency, 
and with a force working at a high pitch results obtained are often a subject of 
wonderment even to those interested. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 379 

"Mr. Walsh has put many a discouraged man on his feet and he has given 
the hand of recognition to the forlorn which gave them a new start in life. 
His influence has been shown in encouraging a civic pride in Davenport and 
many of the city's developments owe a great deal to his timely interest and broad 
generosity." 



DAVID J. CLAPP. 



The agricultural interests of Scott county find a worthy representative in David 
J. Clapp, who owns and operates a fine tract of two hundred acres of arable land in 
Sheridan township, near the village of Eldridge. He is well known in his locality, 
where he has spent his entire life and is a worthy son of one of the pioneers of 
this section of the state, for his father, Charles F. Clapp, came to Scott county in 
1854. He was born in Fulton county, Illinois, February 28, 1838, his parents 
being Spencer and Tilma (Bond) Clapp. The Clapp family came originally from 
Europe, being established on American soil many years ago by three brothers, 
from whom all of the name in this country are descended. In 1869 a reunion was 
held in Massachusetts and it was then discovered that there were more than twelve 
hundred members of the family here, many of whom left their eastern home and 
are now numbered among the early settlers of the middle west. 

Spencer Clapp, the grandfather of David J. Clapp, and his father, Selah Clapp, 
came west as far as Ohio in 1820, settling in Portage county, where the latter 
bought a farm, which is still in the, possession of his descendants. There Spencer 
Clapp grew to manhood, learning the shoemaker's trade, and there he was married 
and lived until 1837, when he and his wife and his brother-in-law, Seldon Bond, 
went by wagon to Fulton county, Illinois. There he secured one hundred and 
sixty acres of government land and Mr. Bond three hundred and twenty, for which 
they paid one dollar and a quarter an acre. Upon it they built a house, made other 
improvements and hved until 1839, when Mr. Clapp was called to Ohio by the ill- 
ness of his father. Upon the latter's death he sold his property in Fulton county, 
Illinois, and operated the old homestead in Portage county, Ohio, until 1854, when 
he came to Scott county, Iowa, taking up his residence in Davenport. There, on 
Locust street, near Brady, he built a house, which by the way is still standing, and 
rented ten acres near where Central Park is now situated, which he planted in 
corn. The next year he rented forty acres more, agreeing to give Dr. Hall, the 
landlord, two-fifths of the crops. For the next three years he hved in Davenport, 
in which time he sold the house he had built first, put up another on a lot he had 
purchased on Main street, and then traded that for forty acres in Sheridan town- 
ship. After moving his family to the farm, putting up a house and establishing 
his home there, it was discovered that the title to the land was defective, and they 
lost their property. They kept the house, however, for with thirty-two yoke of 
cattle and the assistance of friends and neighbors Mr. Clapp moved it into the 
road. There he and his family lived for about a year. 

Charles F. Clapp, who had accompanied his father upon his several removals, 
married about that time and his first home was that house standing in the middle 



380 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

of the road. He had been able to get two crops from the land before the 
mortgage was foreclosed. Later, in 1863, he bought forty acres from Mr. Hartzel, 
built thereon a house, and then as he was drafted into the army he sold his place 
for twelve hundred dollars. He was not called into service, however, and with 
his money he bought eighty acres of land in Sheridan township, which is now 
included in the farm of his son, D. J. Clapp. He engaged in other real-estate 
transactions, buying finally one hundred and sixty acres of land in Sheridan town- 
ship, on which he lived until 1896, when he retired from active life. He is now 
living in Davenport but still retains his interest in agricultural pursuits, as he owns 
two hundred and forty acres in that township. 

On Christmas day, i860, Mr. Clapp wedded Miss Elizabeth Knouse, who was 
born near Carlisle, Pennsylvania, January 28, 1842. Her parents were David 
and Mary (Stump) Knouse, who came to Scott county in 1850. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clapp have had nine children, namely : Samuel, who is living at Aredale, Iowa, and 
is the father of six children ; Anna, who married L. B. Guy, of Davenport, and has 
three children; Emma, the deceased wife of George Marti; Bertha, the deceased 
wife of Milton Drenter ; Seldon, who resides in St. Joseph, Missouri, and is the 
father of two sons; David J. and Charles S., who are twins, the former being 
mentioned below and the latter living upon the old home place in Sheridan town- 
ship ; Archie, who is a physician of Muscatine, Iowa ; and Nellie, who is living with 
her parents. Mr. Clapp served as road supervisor and as school director for about 
ten years, and fraternally is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
and with the Modern Woodmen of America. In 1854 he joined the Christian 
church of Davenport and is now the oldest member of the congregation. He was 
treasurer of the church for a number of years, and wherever he is known he is 
respected as a man of sterling integrity and noble life. 

David J. Clapp, whose name stands at the head of this review, was born upon 
the farm whose fields he now cultivates, June 11, 1874, and has spent his entire 
life in the vicinity of his birthplace. When of suitable age he was enrolled as a 
pupil of the public school of district No. i, of which he is now a director, and 
later attended school in Davenport. The following three winters he went to busi- 
ness college, while in the summer he devoted himself to agriculture, which has 
always been his vocation. He is a young man imbued with progressive ideas, one 
who knows the value of industry and perseverance, and through the aid of these 
qualities and a good business judgment he has been able to make his farming 
profitable. He also owns in conjunction with his brother, Charles S., twenty acres 
of timber land on the Wapsipinicon river, this county. Mr. Clapp wedded, Decem- 
ber I, 1896, Miss Jennie Neil, a daughter of James Neil and a relative of Chris 
Marti. The latter is one of the well known citizens of Scott county, and was for 
a long period identified with the agricultural interests of Winfield township. He 
was a native of Switzerland and was about seven years of age when in 1852 he 
accompanied his father upon the journey to the new world. At the age of twenty- 
two he started to make his own way in the world as a farmer, and to this end pro- 
cured some unimproved land in Sheridan township. Later he bought the two hun- 
dred and forty acres he still owns in Winfield township. He was successful in 
his undertakings and, having rented his farm to his sons, enjoys a well earned 
rest. He was also a conspicuous figure in the public affairs of this county, for in 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 381 

addition to filling several of the minor offices he was elected to the general assem- 
bly at Des Moines, sitting in the twenty-third, twenty-fourth and twenty-sixth ses- 
sions, and in the call session summoned by Governor Drake. He received the nom- 
ination on the democratic ticket in 1898 for state senator but was not elected. 
However, the fact he has held the office of secretary of the school board continu- 
ously since 1872, is an indication of the confidence the people place in him. He 
is a man of sterling integrity, one who has ever proved true to the trust of his 
constituents and has ever acted as he believed right. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clapp are the parents of one son, Neil, who was born September 
12, 1900. Politically Mr. Clapp allies himself with the republican party and has 
served the township for the past eight years as a member of the school board. 
Fraternally he is identified with several organizations. He belongs to the Long 
Grove lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is serving as noble 
grand, while he is a member and banker of the camp of the Woodmen of the World 
of Long Grove. He also belongs to the Modern Brotherhood of America, holding 
membership in the lodge at Eldridge. He gives his allegiance in religious matters 
to the Christian church of Long Grove, of which he is a deacon and in the work of 
which he is very active. Endowed by nature with a strong intellectual force, 
prompted by a laudable ambition to succeed in his occupation, and unafraid of 
hard, persevering work, he has already made substantial progress in his life work, 
and there is every reason for him to look forward to a bright and successful future. 



JOHN H. SIEVERS. 



One of the important agriculturists and stock men of Liberty township is 
John H. Sievers, who was born in Schleswig, Germany, January 29, 1853, his 
parents being Henry and Annie (Francen) Sievers. The father died in the land 
of his birth, but the mother came to America and here passed her last years, dy- 
ing about eight years ago. Four children were born to them : John H., the 
subject of this sketch ; Annie, the wife of Peter Frederick, of Holstein, Iowa ; 
Hans ; and Katie, the wife of Peter Pawser, of Manning, Iowa. 

John H. Sievers came to this country alone in 1873 after he had obtained 
his education in his native land and served the required term in the army. He 
made his way directly to Davenport and here for the first two weeks after his 
arrival worked as a laborer on the streets. Then he found employment upon a 
farm and after two years' experience, in which he gained a practical acquaintance 
with our language and customs, he rented forty acres of land and began to 
raise corn. Four years later he married and then leased sixty acres of his 
father-in-law in Liberty township, where he lived for another period of four 
years. Then he bought one hundred and sixty acres near New Liberty, upon 
which he toiled most assiduously for sixteen years, at the end of that time pur- 
chasing the four hundred and five acres upon which he now resides. Later he 1 
bought two hundred and eighty acres adjoining the home place, bringing his 
land holdings in Liberty township up to a total of eight hundred and forty-one 
acres. On this property there are three distinct sets of buildings, the character 



382 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

of those upon the home place being especially fine for he has remodeled the out- 
buildings and a few years ago erected a large stone house of fourteen rooms. 
One hundred and sixty acres of his land Mr. Sievers rents, but the balance is 
planted in grain or is used as pasture land for his stock, for he feeds annually 
large numbers of steers and hogs, which he ships to the more important markets. 
When the German Savings Bank was organized in New Liberty Mr. Sievers 
was one of its promoters and became a director, but now he only owns stock 
in the concern. Nevertheless, he is' one of the most prosperous of the farmers 
in his locality and enjoys the high esteem of his fellowmen. 

In 1879 Mr. Sievers was united in marriage to Miss Anna Earnhardt, who 
was born in Clinton county, Iowa, November 28, 1858. Her parents, John and 
Mary Earnhardt, were both natives of Schleswig-Holstein, but they came to 
this country in the early '50s and passed the remainder of their lives here. Four 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sievers, namely: Willie, Charles, 
Hugo and Nellie. The eldest wedded Miss Frieda Hochmuth, of Liberty town- 
ship, but the others are at home. 

Industry and frugality have been among the leading characteristics of Mr. 
Sievers and have been largely accountable, for his success. He has spared no 
effort to make his farm the most productive of any in his locality nor to obtain 
the highest grade of stock possible. He is progressive as well as energetic, so 
that the Round Grove stock farm, which is the name he has bestowed upon his 
place, is one of the most modern and thoroughly up-to-date establishments of 
its kind in this section of the state. 



EMIL N. J. GEISLER. 



In the beautiful semi-tropical and sunny land of southern California Emil 
N. J. Geisler is now spending the evening of life, but for many years was so 
closely and prominently associated with the growth and progress of Davenport 
and of Scott county as to render his history and integral chapter in the annals 
of this part of the state. 

He has passed the eighty-second milestone on life's journey, having been born 
on the nth of April, 1828, in Lunden, Dithmarschen, Schleswig-Holstein, Ger- 
many, in which country his father engaged in teaching. After his confirmation 
the son completed his studies at a university and then became a private teacher. 
In 1848 he enlisted for service in the war in which Germany was then involved 
and served as sergeant until the close of hostilities in 1851. Soon afterward he 
started for the United States to enjoy the liberties offered in the land of the 
free. He landed at New Orleans in June, 1852, and then came northward from 
the Crescent city to Davenport, which was then a small town of comparatively 
little commercial and industrial importance. He therefore accepted whatever 
work offered itself and was at different times employed at farming, in clerking 
and in private teaching. 

The years thus passed until 1857, during which time Mr. Geisler saved 
enough money with which to enter the grocery business on his own account. 




=:mil. geisle! 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 385 

For seven years he conducted his store with good success, and in 1864 he sold 
the business and invested in a vineyard in West Davenport. He also gave his 
attention to the contracting business, building and selling houses, and his efforts 
as a speculative builder materially increased his financial resources. In 1875 
he invested in farm lands. and in company with several others laid out the now 
flourishing town of Marne. In all of his business affairs his efforts were so uni- 
formly and capably directed that prosperity attended him and at the same time 
his efforts were of a character that promoted the welfare of the community as 
well as his individual success. In 1904 he removed to Coronado, California, where 
he now lives. 

Aside from business affairs Mr. Geisler was active in many ways whereby 
Davenport's interests were promoted. He assisted in bringing into existence the 
German free school and for many years was its president. He was also active 
in the erection of the Davenport Crematorium and served as its vice president. 
He became an enthusiastic member of the Academy of Science and his efforts 
in its behalf largely promoted its interests. He also joined the Turner Society 
and was ever an influential factor among the German people of this city. He 
has been made honorary member of various organizations, these societies being 
proud to have his name upon their membership roll. 

Mr. Geisler was married in Davenport on the 24th of December, 1855, to 
Miss Sophia Halkins, and in 1905 they celebrated their golden wedding in Co- 
ronado, California, their family, at that time consisting of a daughter and grand- 
daughter, being present. Of their four children, two died in infancy, while one 
daughter, Adele, who became the wife of Otto Clausen, died in 1886. Mr. 
Geisler makes his home with his other daughter, Mrs. J. Clausen, his wife hav- 
ing passed away on the 15th of March, 1908. 

While now eighty-two years of age Mr. Geisler possesses uncommon vigor 
and activity for one of his years and in 1909 he made a trip to his old home in 
Germany, traveling all alone. Throughout his life he has been a man of friendly 
spirit, of hospitable disposition, and has ever looked upon the bright side, and 
because of his sterling qualities of manhood as well as his business activity and 
public spirit, he has won a host of friends who entertain for him the highest honor 
and respect. 



THOMAS DOUGHERTY. 

Thomas Dougherty, president of Schick's Express & Transfer Company of 
Davenport, is numbered among the native sons of Scott county and his life 
history is familiar to his fellow citizens, who have watched his development 
from boyhood days. He is lacking in none of those qualities which constitute 
the resourceful and successful business man and in his present position of ex- 
ecutive control is proving that his administration accomplishes the utmost for the 
interests invested. 

Mr. Dougherty was born in Scott county, October 30, 1865, and his educa- 
tion was acquired in St. AmbYose school and in the Davenport Business College. 



386 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUInITY 

He became collector for the Schick's Express & Transfer Company in 1903 and 
bent every effort toward familiarizing himself with and mastering the business 
in order that he might be qualified for enlarged duties when the opportunity 
came for advancement. In 1905, when the company was reorganized, he be- 
came president and manager and has since carefully and successfully controlled 
the interests of the business. On the 22d of September, 1904, Mr. Dougherty 
was married to Miss Eula Carmichael, a native of Davenport and a daughter 
of Henry Carmichael, one of the old residents of this city who has long been 
associated with the Boston Store. Mr. Dougherty belongs to the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks and to the Woodmen of the World, and is well 
known socially in this city, where the greater part of his life has been passed. 



GEORGE AND DAVID NUGENT. 

Among the many earnest men who are daily proving the fertility of the soil 
of Blue Grass township, are George and David Nugent, who in conjunction own 
and operate the farm upon which they live. Natives of this county, they were 
born in 1858 and 1861, respectively, being the sons of John and M. J. Nugent. 
The father was born in Ireland in 1821, and in 1848, at the beginning of the hard 
times which oppressed his native isle for the next few years, came to the United 
States. First he settled in New Jersey, where he lived for about five years, and 
then in 1853 came to Scott county, Iowa. During the first two years after his 
arrival he worked on various farms in Blue Grass township, and then, in 1855, 
having married he bought the place on which his two sons are living today. It 
remained his home for the next sixteen years of his life, and though his death 
occurred in 1878, he had lived long enough to obtain some idea of the progress 
which would transform the appearance of the country in the course of years. He 
and his wife were the parents of five children, those besides the subjects of this 
sketch being Thomas, who is also a resident of Blue Grass township ; James, who 
lives in Casey, Iowa ; and Mary, who is the. wife of Charles Plett, of Muscatine, 
Iowa. 

Natives of this county, George and David Nugent have passed their entire lives 
within its confines. They were pupils in the public schools of their locality and the 
education they received was supplemented by practical training in f arrn work, which 
they acquired under the guidance of their father. Indeed, as they were both 
young when they were deprived of his love and care, they had to early assume 
responsibilities which in many cases fall to the lot of men. The place which had 
been associated with memories of childhood and which they had come to know 
thoroughly through the passage of years, has remained their home to the present. 
It is a rich and arable tract, is well improved and cultivated with a skill that be- 
speaks the character of the born husbandman. They have been sparing of neither 
industry nor expense to bring their place to a productive state and may feel justly 
recompensed by the size of the harvest and the consequent generous income that 
falls to their share annually. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 387 

In early manhood George Nugent wedded Miss Ella Fridley, but she died two 
years after her marriage, while David Nugent has never married. They have 
steadfastly given their support to the republican party, in the years that they have 
been able to exercise their right of franchise, but though interested have taken 
little part in local affairs. George, however, served one term as trustee of the 
township but has never desired further evidence of the respect and good opinion 
of his fellow citizens. Industrious and excellent managers, both George and 
David Nugent may be pardoned a moderate pride in their achievements, for in 
addition to maintaining the home place in a good condition they have been able to 
purchase one hundred and sixty acres in Yuma county, Colorado. 



HERMAN H. FRYE. 



During his active life Herman H. Frye was one of the more prosperous 
farmers of this county, and when advancing years and a large income sug- 
gested the wisdom of retiring he took up his residence in Davenport, where his 
death occurred November 2, 1903. One of the early German settlers of this sec- 
tion of Iowa, he had been born in what was known as Klein Dreele, Hanover, 
Germany, February 4, 1830, a son of Bernard and Adeline (Brockman) Frye. 

At the age of sixteen, in 1846, he came to the United States alone, and 
having chosen the southern route for crossing the ocean, landed at New Orleans. 
He spent the winter in that city and in the spring ascended the Mississippi to 
St. Louis, Missouri, which remained his home for the next decade. There, in 
1856, he was married and shortly afterward, in the same year, came to Daven- 
port, opening a brickyard, which he operated for about a year. Then he traded 
it for one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land in Sheridan township, Scott 
county, on which he built a house, broke his land and prepared it for cultivation, 
deriving from his labors a rich return that placed him among the most success- 
ful agriculturists of this section. As the years brought their full measure of 
success, he invested extensively in land, until at his death he was in possession 
of about one thousand acres besides some town property. He had been among 
the first to settle in the county, which has proved to be so rich agriculturally, 
and witnessing its development he also participated in its improvement and his 
name appears upon the roll of those who rendered their fellowmen substantial 
and invaluable service. 

While living in St. Louis, on the 14th of March, 1856, Mr. Frye was united 
in marriage to Miss Louisa Rier, a daughter of WilHam and Maria (Gran- 
naman) Rier. She had been born in Nordhammen, Westphalia, Germany, 
April 28, 1834, and came to this country in her young womanhood, although her 
parents remained in the fatherland. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Frye. George D., living upon the old homestead, wedded Miss Thrissa Stutt, 
now deceased, and they had four children: Hermanza, who became the wife of 
Julius F. Rochau, of Oklahoma, and has one child, Blanch Louise; George D., 
Jr. ; Blanch, the wife of Henry Olliver, of CaUfornia ; and Harry. William F. 
resides in Hickory Grove township. In his young manhood he married Miss 



388 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Carolina Meyer and they have eight children: Wilbert, Alfred, Arnold, Carl, 
Elsie, Frances, Norman Scott and Adelia. The eldest, Wilbert, married Miss 
Hilda Hahn and lives at Independence, Iowa. Charles, the third of the Frye 
family, married Miss Emma Lamp and lives at Seattle, Washington. Emma 
is deceased. Frank F. married Miss Augusta Lamp and lives in Seattle, Wash- 
ington. They have one child, Marion. Louisa and Alfred are deceased; Julia 
is at home. Elizabeth M. became the wife of H. C. Lage, of Davenport. The 
youngest died in infancy. 

Not only was Mr. Frye one of the prosperous farmers of Scott county, but 
he was also intimately connected with its public life and prominent in such 
enterprises as were calculated to develop the interests and promote the welfare 
of the community in which he lived. He served as county supervisor for a con- 
siderable period and was a school director. He assisted in the organization of 
the German Fire Insurance Company of Scott county, of which he was treas- 
urer for a number of years, and was a member of the German Pioneer Associa- 
tion. In 1889 he retiredT from active life and removed to Davenport, where the 
last years of his life were past in comfort and with the knowledge that the 
past had been well spent. 



JACOB HUGH HARRISON. 

The business progress of Davenport has not been conserved by one or two 
individuals but has resulted from the combined efforts of a large number of 
business men whose activity has been the source of the city's commercial ad- 
vancement and improvement. In this connection Jacob Hugh Harrison deserves 
more than passing notice, for to the time of his death he was recognized as one 
of the foremost representatives of mercantile interests in Davenport. He was- 
born in Carrollton, Kentucky, Decenjber 25, 1840, and was a son of William 
Henry Harrison, a cousin of President Harrison of the same name. The father 
was a native of Prince William county, Virginia, born in 1810. He had two 
brothers, Benjamin Franklin and George Washington Harrison, and they were 
sons of John and Elizabeth (Harris) Harrison, the latter a daughter of John 
Harris and the former a son of Obadiah Harrison, a native of Virginia. Wil- 
liam Henry Harrison, reared and educated in the south, was married to Miss 
Eleanor Moore Mimich, a daughter of Richard and Sarah (Lester) Mimich and 
a granddaughter of John and Elizabeth Mimich, who were natives of Maryland. 
It will thus be seen that Jacob H. Harrison was a representative of some of the 
oldest southern families. He was one of ten children, five of whom reached years 
. of maturity, namely : Mary ; Richard ; Mrs. Sarah Hayden ; Jacob ; and Charles 
Emery, who is living in Davenport. 

When he was thirteen years of age and still attending school Jacob Hugh 
Harrison entered the drug store of his uncle at Carrollton, Kentucky, and under 
his direction thoroughly learned the business. His educational opportunities 
were those afforded by the schools and academy of his native city. All through 
life, however, he remained a student and broad reader and accumulated a large 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 391 

and valuable library, with the contents of which he was thoroughly familiar. 
The business pursuit to which he was reared he made his life work. In 1861 
he and his brother Richard purchased the business of their deceased uncle and 
conducted the store until the following year, when Richard Harrison died. The 
subject of this review then carried on the business alone until 1867, when he dis- 
posed of his interests in Kentucky and came to Davenport. Here he at once 
became engaged in the retail drug business, becoming at first connected with 
the firm of Harrison & Stark, while later he was senior partner of the firm of 
Harrison & Holman. The latter firm was located in the Hill block at the corner 
of Third and Brady streets, but this was destroyed by fire on the night of Feb- 
ruary 22, 1876. In the fall of 1878 Mr. Harrison again established a business, 
which under the name of Harrison's Pharmacy was for fourteen years located 
at No. 305 Brady street. He then removed to No. 312 Brady street, where he 
remained for eight years, or until the time of his retirement from active mer- 
cantile life, disposing of his store to L. P. Carstens in January, 1901. Soon after 
Mr. Harrison and Mr. Holman established their store on Brady street, follow- 
ing the fire, Mr. Harrison admitted his brother Charles to a partnership in the 
business. They afterward had a store erected purposely for them near the site 
on which the business is still carried on, and later Mr. Harrison built a store 
which is still utilized for the business. Altogether he established six different 
stores, which he continued to own and manage until his death. For forty years 
he had been closely associated with the drug trade as proprietor, and even prior 
to that time had been an employe in that field of labor. He enjoyed the reputa- 
tion of being the most competent druggist in the state of Iowa, having intimate 
knowledge of all the drugs and medicinal remedies which he handled, knowing 
fully their properties and the results which might be attained by their use. 

On the i6th, of May, 1865, Mr. 'Harrison was united in marriage to Miss 
Frances Elizabeth McCallister, who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was a 
daughter of Dr. William R. McCallister, formerly a physician of Troy, Ten- 
nessee, now deceased. The McCallisters were of Scotch lineage. The marriage 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison took place at Carrollton, Kentucky, and was the first 
Protestant church wedding celebrated in that town. Her paternal grandfather, 
Dr. Charles McCallister, married EHzabeth Clark, of Baltimore. The mother of 
Mrs. Harrison was Frances Elizabeth Sims Reader, whose uncle was the author 
of the Sims Theory, while her great-uncle was the father-in-law of President 
Harrison. Mrs. Harrison was born in Cincinnati but was reared in Tennessee. 
By her marriage she became the mother of nine children : Minnie Ingaloe, who 
was born February '26, 1866, is now the wife of Oscar P. Judd, of Reno, Nevada, 
Mary Eleanor, who was born May 11, 1868, is the wife of W. H. Snyder, of 
Davenport; Cora Sims, who was born July 21, 1870, is the wife of George H. 
Schaflfer, of Fort Madison, Iowa; William Henry, who was born March i, 1872, 
died when only two weeks old ; Juliana was born April 26, 1873 ; Sarah Hay den 
was born September 3, 1875 ; Edward Reader was born July 14, 1879 ; Wilfred 
Hugh and Frances Elizabeth, twins, were born July i, 1882. The former wedded 
Miss Mary Gibbons, of St. Paul, and the latter is the wife of Bert G. Powell. 
There are now five grandchildren in the family. Mr. Harrison was a man of 
considerable literary ability and was the author of a number of poems of more 



392 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

than ordinary merit. His reading covered a wide range and made him well in- 
formed concerning a variety of subjects. At the time of his marriage he joined 
the Methodist church and remained a consistent representative thereof until 
his death, his earnest Christian faith being the permeating influence in an hon- 
orable, upright life. His public spirit was manifest in his active support of 
many measures for the public good and Davenport gained a valuable citizen 
when he established his home within her borders. 



HENRICH SPETH. 



Henrich Speth, a retired agriculturist, has made his home in Davenport since 
1893 and is the owner of the property on which he resides. His birth occurred in 
Holstein, Germany, on the 12th of August, 1832, his parents being Eben and Antya 
(Arp) Speth. The father spent his entire life in the fatherland, but the mother 
came to this country and died in Iowa. Their children were five in number, 
namely : Elsbie and Katherina, both of whom are now deceased ; Claus, living in 
Germany ; Henrich, of this review ; and Lena, who has also passed away. 

Henrich Speth, who obtained his education in Germany, spent the first twenty- 
two years of his life in that country and in 1854 crossed the ocean to the United 
States, landing at New Orleans. Thence he made his way up the Mississippi river 
to Davenport, Iowa, arriving here in the month of September. ' He first secured 
employment on a flat boat but soon afterward became identified with agricultural 
interests as a farm hand, being thus engaged for several years. Subsequently he 
devoted his attention to the cultivation of rented land and broke prairie. In 1863 
he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of improved land in Cleona township 
and the following year bought an adjoining tract of forty acres, but never lived 
thereon. He leased his property for a number of years and did not take up his 
abode upon his first purchase until 1869. He had been married in 1859 ^^'^ ^^ 
sided on the Miller farm in Blue Grass township until 1869, when he established 
his home on his farm in Cleona township, erecting a commodious and substantial 
residence and otherwise improving the place. At the end of about six years he 
put aside the active work of the fields and removed to Durant, Iowa, where he 
lived retired for eighteen years. On the expiration of that period, in 1893, he 
came to Davenport and has here since continued to reside. He is a stockholder 
in the Durant Savings Bank and is well known and highly esteemed as one of the 
prosperous and representative citizens of his community. 

On the 29th of December, 1859, Mr. Speth was united in marriage to Miss 
Bertha Nissen, a daughter of John and Maria Nissen. The mother passed away 
in Germany and the father afterward came to the United States, landing at New 
York in 1852. Mrs. Speth lived with an uncle at Jersey City for about four years 
and then came to Scott county, Iowa, with her father. The latter's demise oc- 
curred in 187s while he was enroute to Germany on a visit. Mrs. Speth was one 
of a family of four children, two of whom died in Germany. The other, Christina, 
who gave her hand in marriage to Fritz F. Gerken, is also now deceased. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 393 

Politically Mr. Speth is a stanch advocate of the democratic party. While liv- 
ing in Durant he served as a member of the council and proved a faithful and 
capable public official. He belongs to the Old German Settlers Association and is 
a valued member thereof. Germany has furnished to the United States many 
bright, enterprising young men who have left the fatherland to enter the business 
circles of this country with its more progressive methods, livelier competition and 
advancement more quickly secured. Mr. Speth found the opportunity he sought 
in the freedom and appreciation of the growing country. Though born across the 
water, he is thoroughly American in thought and feeling, and is patriotic and sin- 
cere in his love for the stars and stripes. His career is identified with the history 
of Scott county, where he has acquired a competence and where he is an honored 
and respected citizen. He has now passed the seventy-seventh milestone on this 
earthly pilgrimage and his life has ever been such that he can look back over the 
past without regret and forward to the future without fear. 



HUGO G. SCHAEFER. 



For a number of years Hugo G. Schaefer was a resident of Sheridan township, 
where he farmed for ten years, but for the last decade and more he has been a 
resident of the city of Davenport. A native of this county, he was born in Pleasant 
Valley township, his parents being WiUiam and Lena (Houseman) Schssfer, who 
were born' in Germany and shortly after their marriage emigrated to America. 
They came to Scott county almost immediately and here the father rented land for 
a time. Later he purchased one hundred and thirty acres in Pleasant Valley 
township, and after a residence of about seven years thereon bought another farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres in Davenport township. On it he lived during 
the remainder of his active life, improving it and operating it with a marked suc- 
cess. He had, however, in the course of years invested heavily in real estate, so 
that at the time of his death he was in the possession of four hundred and sixty 
acres. He was an eager participant in the public life of his township, having 
served as road commissioner for a long period and was a member of the Old Ger- 
man Settlers Society. The last years of his life were spent in Davenport and 
there he passed away December 5, 1908, in the seventy-fifth year of his age. His 
widow still survives. They were the parents of the following children : William, 
who is engaged in farming in Pleasant Valley township ; Richard, an agriculturist 
of Davenport township ; Alexander, who also resides in Pleasant Valley township ; 
Hugo, in city of Davenport; Otto, of Pleasant Valley township ; Albert, a resident 
of Davenport township ; Meta, who is the wife of WilHam Carsen, of Davenport ; 
Emil, who died at the age of fourteen years ; and two who died in infancy. 

Hugo G. Schaefer has spent a large part of his life in Scott county. As soon 
as he was of suitable age he became a pupil in the district school near his home, 
later attending a German school and a business college. At the age of fifteen he 
put aside his text-books, left the farm and came to Davenport, that he might begin 
his business career. For the first four years he was clerk in a store and then se- 
cured a position as traveling salesman, in this capacity becoming familiar with the 



394 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

greater part of the south and west. In 1894 he opened a general store in Dixon, 
this county, which he conducted profitably during the next two J^ears, but as his 
health had failed he was compelled to sell his interests and so turned to agriculture. 
He was not a man, however, to confine his work to one field if he saw other oppor- 
tunities for advancement. As a result several industries and enterprises in Scott 
county received his support. 

On the 30th of April, 1895, Mr. Schaefer wedded Miss Adele Hagedorn, a 
daughter of Christian and Mary (Schlotfeldt) Hagedorn, who are old German 
settlers of Scott county. One son, Clarence A., has been born to the couple. Mr. 
Schaefer is a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge, of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles and of the Turner Society. His energies have never been exerted sel- 
fishly but always in such a manner that his fellow citizens profited from them. 



HANS SOENKE. 



Among the old residents of Scott county who are now living in retirement in 
Davenport, Hans Soenke is numbered. He was formerly engaged in farming 
and still owns valuable and extensive lands in the state. He was born in Hol- 
stein, Germany, January 31, 1836, a son of Hans and Christina (Jacobs) Soenke. 
The father emigrated with his family to the new world in 1853, and, landing at 
New York city, made his way direct to St. Louis, whence he went up the river 
about a hundred miles, where lived some friends, with whom the Soenke family 
remained for a few months. The father then sought a location and, deciding 
upon Iowa as a suitable place to settle, he rented land in Hickory Grove town- 
ship, Scott county, where he spent the first winter and then removed to Blue 
Grass township, living there for four years, and then operated a farm in Hickory 
Grove township. He next leased four hundred and eighty acres in Blue Grass 
township, this being divided into two farms, which lay about three miles apart. 
This was all prairie but Mr. Soenke at once began to place the fields under cul- 
tivation, having fenced the place and erected a house. In course of years he 
purchased this land and carried on farming on an extensive scale until his de- 
mise. His family numbered eight children: Mary, deceased; Anna, who became 
the wife of Fred Hanson but is now deceased ; Peter, who has also passed away ; 
Hans, of this review ; Christina, the wife of John Foucht, a resident of Musca- 
tine county, this state; John, deceased; Margaret, who became the wife of 
J. Brothers and has also departed this life; and Katherine, the deceased wife 
of Henry Timm. Both the parents died many years ago. The father, who was 
born August 8, 1803, died in 1881 on the seventy-eighth anniversary of his birth. 
The mother, who was likewise born in 1803, passed away in 1863. 

Hans Soenke, whose name introduces this review, was a youth of seventeen 
years when he accompanied his parents on their trip to the new world. After 
their arrival here, he located with them in Scott county, where he found em- 
ployment during the harvesting season. While thus engaged he had the mis- 
fortune to lose his right arm. When the father rented a farm the son assisted 
him in his work and accompanied him on his various removals after coming to 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 395 

Scott county, assisting in the work of the different farms. After the father's 
demise, Mr. Soenke took charge of the place and made it his home until 1898, 
since which time he has lived retired in Davenport. He still retains possession 
of the farm of two hundred and forty acres in Blue Grass township and owns 
a similar amount in Clay county, this state. This is all valuable land and sup- 
plies him with a good competency, which enables him to enjoy all the comforts 
and many of the luxuries of Hfe. 

Mr. Soenke was married December 20, 1865, to Miss Anna Inbeck, a daugh- 
ter of John and Augustina Margaret Inbeck, whose parents located in Davenport 
in 1863. They have become the parents of the following named. Christina is 
the deceased wife of Louis Koechert, who lives on Mr. Soenke's farm in Clay 
county. She was the mother of a daughter and two sons, Ida, Albert, and Her- 
man. Hans, the next member of the family, wedded Helen Puck but is .now 
deceased. Henry, who lives on the homestead place in Blue Grass township, 
wedded Miss Minnie Sulk and they have two children, Karma and a baby. Wil- 
helmina is the wife of Henry Faurback and they reside in Cleona township, Scott 
county. They have five children, Fred, Mary Ann, Elmer, Ida and Loyd. Agnes 
Soenke is the wife of William Ruge, of Walcott, Iowa, and is the mother of 
five children, Walter, Clarence, Hans, Etta and Boeta. Ida, the sixth mernber 
of the family, is with her parents. Herman, the youngest, wedded Ella Dean 
and they have a daughter, Erma. 

While still a resident of Blue Grass township, Mr. Soenke served as school 
director for a number of years and was formerly on the directorate of the Wal- 
cott Savings Bank and the Walcott Creamery Company and he still is a stock- 
holder in these two concerns. He has been treasurer of the German Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company of Walcott since 1882. In former years his life was 
one of continuous activity, in which was accorded due recognition of labor, and 
today he is numbered among the substantial citizens of Davenport and Scott 
county. His interests have at all times been thoroughly identified with those of 
Scott county, and at all times he is ready to lend his aid and cooperation to any 
movement calculated to benefit this section of the country or advance its won- 
derful development. He is a member of the German Pioneers Association and 
in politics is a democrat. 



ALLEN R. BOUDINOT. 

Allen R. Boudinot, a civil engineer of Davenport, who is also acting as county 
drainage engineer, has been accorded a gratifying patronage in this connection in 
recognition of his superior ability and knowledge. His birth occurred in Marion 
county, Iowa, his parents being H. Raymond and Ella J. Boudinot. He attended 
the schools of his native county but most of his education was obtained in the city 
of his adoption, where he located at the age of ten years. After attending the Dav- 
enport high school he became enrolled as a student in the Iowa State College at 
Ames, being graduated therefrom as a civil engineer in the year 1905. 



396 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Stibsequently Mr. Boudinot spent about two years in Chicago as an employe 
of the American Bridge Company but on the expiration of that period returned 
to Davenport and has since practiced his profession here. His rapid and substan- 
tial rise in his caUing is attributable to the thoroughness with which he has mas- 
tered everything bearing upon the subject of civil engineering, combined with his 
unwearied industry and his professional integrity. 

On the 26th of September, 1906, Mr. Boudinot was united in marriage to Miss 
Luverna Walston, a daughter of William and Sarah (Waite) Walston, who were 
numbered among the pioneer settlers of Jones county, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. 
Boudinot are now the parents of two children, William W. and Donald J. 



ROBERT KRAUSE. 



The activities of today become the history of tomorrow, and thus it is that 
the name of Robert Krause is enrolled among those who have left their impress 
upon the annals of Davenport through the part which they have taken in de- 
veloping the industrial, commercial and financial projects of the city. Progres- 
sive in business, his initiative spirit and constructive measures enabled him to es- 
tablish one of Davenport's leading industries in founding and promoting the 
Krause Shirt Company. He came to be known, moreover, in financial circles 
as vice president of the Citizens Savings Bank, and he belonged to that class of 
men who have proven the value of the German element in our American citi- 
zenship. He was born in Walkenreid, in the province of Brunswick, Germany, 
November 13, 1834, a son of Conrad Behrend and Francisca (Osthaus) Krause. 
In the mind of the father the idea of establishing a home in America at length 
took firm hold. He was a man of culture and education and the belief that the 
United States would present greater opportunities for his children led him to 
sever his association with the land of his birth and come with his family to the 
new world. 

Robert Krause was but fourteen years of age at the time of this change of 
residence. Landing in New York, they proceeded by way of Buffalo to Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and afterward to Mansfield, Ohio, where they lived for about twelve 
years, and eventually came to Davenport. Robert Krause had begun his edu- 
cation in the schools of the fatherland and continued his studies in Ohio, at 
length becoming a pupil in Kenyon College, his course there completing his edu- 
cation. Early in life he manifested splendid commercial talent. He came to 
Davenport with his brother William and identified himself with the interests of 
the city, at length founding and promoting the Krause Shirt Company, which 
was and is one of Davenport's leading industries and was carried on by him 
with entire success. He, was one of the promoters of the glucose industry here 
and later became a factor in financial circles as the vice president of the Citizens 
Bank, to which he gave the benefit of his services for thirty years. In fact, he 
was thoroughly identified with many business projects in this city and thus be- 
came one of its foremost builders. 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 399 

On New Year's day of i860 Mr. Krause was united in marriage to Miss 
Louise Steinhelber, a daughter of Ezekiel and Wilhelmina Steinhelber, who be- 
came pioneer residents of this city and were of great assistance in advising and 
befriending many of the early German residents of Scott county. Mr. Stein- 
helber engaged in the real-estate business here, also conducted a hotel, was the 
owner of the first ice house and also of the first livery stable. Later he invested 
in farm lands until he became the owner of eight hundred acres in Scott county, 
upon which he spent the last thirty years of his life, save for a brief period 
of five and a half months which were passed in California for the benefit of 
his health. He was practically empty handed when he came to the United 
States but his carefully directed business efforts and wise investments brought 
him substantial success, making him one of the men of affluence of the county. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Krause were born two daughters. Emelia V. is the de- 
ceased wife of Paul Karlowa, by whom she had three children, namely: Robert 
Krause, Carolyn and Clara. The second daughter, Clara L., is the wife of L. P. 
Best, of Davenport, and has two children, Louis Phillip and Gretchen. 

The death of Mr. Krause occurred July 5, 1900. Mrs. Krause still survives 
and resides at No. 527 West Eighth street. He was a man of genial nature, and 
though he preferred a home life to clubs and social organizations, he was never- 
theless a valued and interested member of the Turner Society and also of the 
Schuetzen Verein. Long a resident of Davenport, all who knew him recognized 
the soundness of his business principles and the value of his activities as factors 
in the upbuilding of the city. Well descended and well bred, he manifested 
throughout his life those sterling traits of character which in every land and 
clime awaken confidence and regard. While he attained a prominent position 
in commercial and industrial circles, the most envious could not grudge him his 
success, so worthily was it won and so honorably used. 



P. A. BEND'IXEN, M. D. 

Dr. P. A. Bendixen, a successful and progressive young medical practitioner 
of Davenport, has followed his profession here since January, 1907, having made 
a specialty of surgery. He was born in this city on the 8th of October, 1881, his 
parents being Peter and Catherine (Beenk) Bendixen, both of whom are na- 
tives of Germany. They were married, however, in Davenport, the father mak- 
ing his way to this city in 1872. He was a cabinet maker by trade but secured 
a position as foreman in the Davenport Plough Works, acting in that capacity 
for a number of years. Subsequently he took up his abode in Gladbrook, Iowa, 
where he has been successfully engaged in the furniture business to the present 
time. Unto him and his wife were born three children but the two daughters 

died in infancy. 

P. A. Bendixen, who was the youngest child in his father's family, obtained 
his education in the public schools of Gladbrook and after being graduated from 
the high school he entered the Chicago University, completing the scientific 
course at that institution in 1902. Having determined upon the practice of 



400 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

medicine as a life work, he became enrolled as a student at Rush Medical Col- 
lege and in 1905 the degree of M. D. was conferred upon him. He then had 
charge of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Hospital in Chicago until 1906, 
when he went to Europe and for eight months pursued post graduate work at 
Berlin, Paris and Vienna, devoting special attention to the study of surgery, 
of which branch of practice he has since made a specialty. In January, 1907, he 
opened an office in Davenport, Iowa, and this city has since remained the scene 
of his professional labors. That he keeps in touch with the profession in its 
advancement, experimentation and experience is indicated through his mem- 
bership with the Scott County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society, 
the American Medical Association, the Iowa and Illinois Central District Medical 
Society, the Iowa Union Medical Society, the Second District Medical Society, 
the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Surgical Association and the American 
Association of Railway Surgeons. He acts as surgeon for the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul Railroad and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
and also for a number of manufacturing concerns and is examiner for the 
Northwestern Insurance Company. 

In October, 1907, Dr. Bendixen was united in marriage to Miss Jane Elspeth 
Shuler, a native of Rapids City, Illinois. They now have a daughter, Jane 
Elspeth, whose birth occurred on the 23d of September, 1908. 

Dr. Bendixen belongs to Davenport Lodge, No. 37, A. F. & A. M. ; Davenport 
Chapter, No. 16, R. A. M. ; Zarephath Consistory, No. 4; and Kaaba Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S. ; and is likewise a valued and popular member of the Daven- 
port Commercial Club and the Davenport Outing Club. While yet a young 
man, he has already attained a creditable position in professional circles, and 
the salient characteristics of his manhood are such as have brought him the 
warm regard of those with whom he has been otherwise associated. 



FRITZ KUELPER. 



Fritz Kuelper, one of the old German settlers of Sheridan township, lives 
upon an excellent farm of eighty acres which he owns, and despite his advanc- 
ing years continues to retain the responsibility of its cultivation. He was born 
in Mecklenburg, Germany, November 24, 1828, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. 
Christ Kuelper, both natives of the fatherland. The father was a farmer in the 
old country and about 1853 decided to try his fortune in America. Accordingly 
in that year he and his family embarked upon the long ocean voyage, and, after 
having landed in New York, came directly to Iowa. In Davenport Mr. Kuelper 
found employment and later rented land in Blue Grass township, where he 
devoted himself to farming. In his family were five children: Henry, who is 
deceased; Fritz, the subject of this review; Marie, who became the wife of Wil- 
Ham Orth, of Rock Island, Illinois; Minnie, deceased; and Christ, who is resid- 
ing in Belle Plain, Iowa. 

Fritz Kuelper was about twenty-five years of age when he came to this 
country, so that he had previously obtained his education and had some experi- 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 401 

ence in the struggles of life. After his arrival in Scott county he found work 
in Davenport and upon the farms surrounding the city. Later he rented land, 
and, as the result of his savings, in 1879 bought the eighty acres on which he 
now lives. Some improvements had already been made upon it at the time of 
purchase, but these Mr. Kuelper carried forward, erecting fine barns, granaries 
and other buildings, and remodeling those already standing. He found the 
soil best adapted to general farming and to such he has devoted his attention, 
gaining in the course of years a well merited success. 

After he had firmly established himself in this new country, Mr. Kuelper 
married Miss Dorothy Harder, a native of Germany. Their union was cele- 
brated in December, 1866, and was blessed with eight children. Meta be- 
came the wife of William Oldenburg, of Lester, Iowa, and they have five chil- 
dren, Stella, Linda, Esther, Wilbur and Amanda. Julius, a resident of Wal- 
cott, Iowa, wedded Miss Minnie Arp, and they have three children. Vera, Alice 
and Lillian. Emma became the wife of Herman Weise, of Rock Rapids, Iowa, 
and they have two daughters. Hazel and Alma. Amanda is at home. Frank 
married Miss Amanda Detrick and lives in Davenport. Edward is at home. 
Emelia became the wife of Otto Schwab, and they have two sons, Harland 
and Russell. Theodore died in infancy. Mrs. Kuelper has also passed away, 
her death having occurred July 28, 1898, when she was fifty-six years of age. 

Mr. Kuelper is a member of the German Old Settlers Society, and while 
he has always been interested in local affairs has not in any sense of the word 
been an aspirant for political office, although he filled satisfactorily the position 
of road supervisor for a period of years. He has spent his life quietly and un- 
ostentatiously, performing each day's tasks as they came and winning in return 
for industry and diligence an income that makes the higher enjoyment of life 
possible. 



JESSE R. PORTER, M. D. 

Davenport numbers among her well known and prominent physicians Dr. Jesse 
R. Porter, who during his residence in this city, which extends over a period of 
about thirteen years, has built up a large and lucrative practice which is constantly 
growing in volume and importance. The Porter family has longJbeen represented 
in America, having come to this country from the north of Ireland in 1645, owing 
to the unsettled and troubled condition of that country at that time. 

His father. Dr. Joseph Porter, was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, and came 
to Scott county in 1854, locating in Blue Grass township, where he continued to 
practice his profession until the time of his demise. He had acquired his medical 
training in the State University of Ohio, at Columbus,, and had come west for the 
purpose of opening an office but because of ill health was compelled to give up that 
plan, being engaged as a surveyor for several years. Later, however, he followed 
his profession in Blue Grass, where he practiced for thirty-nine years, and accord- 
ing to length of time was the oldest practitioner, with one exception in this county 
at the time of his death. He also took an active part in community affairs, being 
prominent and influential in local republican ranks, serving in various public offi- 



402 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

ces. He also represented his district in the state legislature during the period 
of the Civil war and was at all times prominently identified with the interests of the 
community in which he resided. The mother of our subject was born on a sailing 
vessel en route from Hamburg to New York, and, after a short time spent in 
Pennsylvania, came with her parents to Scott county, about 1850, where she gave 
her hand in marriage to Dr. Joseph Porter. They became the parents of seven 
sons and one daughter, three sons beside our subject being now engaged in the 
practice of medicine in Iowa, namely : Leroy V., of Bondurant ; and Clarence M. 
and Charles E., both practicing in Menlo. 

Jesse R. Porter, whose birth occurred in Blue Grass township on the 20th of 
January, 1870, was reared under the parental roof and at the usual age was sent 
as a pupil to the public schools, completing his preliminary education by his grad- 
uation from high school. He then pursued a collegiate course at Drake Univer- 
sity, after which he was engaged in teaching school for two years With the 
money thus acquired he was able to take a course of study in the medical depart- 
ment of Drake University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1897, 
with the M. D, degree. He at once located in Davenport and has since continued 
here in the practice of his profession. From the start he has been most successful, 
becoming well known throughout the city as a conscientious and efficient physician 
and surgeon, and the extensive practice which has been awarded him is both grati- 
fying and remunerative. He keeps in close touch with what is going on in the 
medical world through his membership in the Iowa State and Scott County Medi- 
cal Societies and has ever remained a close student of the fundamental principles 
of medicine, anything which tends to form the key to the mystery which we call 
life being of special interest to him. In addition to a most gratifying private 
practice he is also acting as examiner for the Washington Life Insurance Company 
of New York. 

Although Dr. Porter has never taken an active part in the public affairs of 
Davenport, nevertheless he is public-spirited in his citizenship and gives stalwart 
support to the principles of the republican party. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Masonic body and is a most exemplary and valued member of that organiza- 
tion. During his residence in this city he has become well known and honored 
because of his excellent attainment in the line of his profession, and his fidelity to 
all principles of honorable and upright manhood has gained him the respect, confi- 
dence and good will of all with whom he has come in contact in both professional 
and private relations. 



CHARLES KEPPE. 



When Charles Keppe first came to Scott county, it was before it had given full 
evidence of the prosperity which has since distinguished it as an agricultural cen- 
ter and before Davenport had developed beyond village Hfe. Indeed, one of the 
vivid memories of his youth, in connection with this locality, is the sight of Mr. 
Fulton and Antoine LeQaire pushing on wheelbarrows the first two loads of dirt 
which had been dug preparatory to the construction of the first railroad in this 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 403 

state. For many years he engaged in farming successfully upon a large tract of 
land in Sheridan township, but has now retired from active life and makes his 
home in Davenport. 

Mr. Keppe was born at Neustadt-bei-Magdeburg, Germany, August i, 1839, ^ 
son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Hepfner) Keppe. The former was born in the 
fatherland in 1797 and could remember many incidents connected with Napoleon's 
German war and in particular the excitement contingent upon his defeat of 1813. 
On the 1st of September, 1852, he and his family embarked at Hamburg for the 
voyage to America. Two months later, on the ist of November, they touched at 
New Orleans, and then continued on their way to Davenport, which they reached 
on the i8th of the month, for their progress up the Mississippi was very slow on 
account of the ice. From the time they left Germany until they arrived here they 
had not landed. It had been a long and tedious trip, throughout which, both for 
his future reference and for the enlightenment of his sons, Mr. Keppe kept a diary 
in which the weather and the incidents of passage were set down. In the old 
country he had been a farmer, and when he came to Scott county, after spending 
one year in Davenport, he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land in Sheridan 
township, which had been partly improved and for which he paid forty dollars an 
acre. There the mother died May 25, 1858, in the thirty-eighth year of her age, 
and there the father resided for twenty-five years, or until he retired from active 
life and removed to Davenport, where he died at the age of eighty-four. The old 
homestead has descended to his grandson, Henry Keppe. 

Charles Keppe has lived in Scott county since he was about thirteen years of 
age. He had attended the schools of Germany for five years before the family 
came to this country, and after they located here he had three months' training in 
the district schools of Blue Grass township. Until 1861 he remained with his 
father upon the farm, and then, during the course of the Civil war, worked at the 
butcher's trade in Davenport in the employ of Henry Kohrs and Heller Brothers. 
After his marriage he bought one hundred acres of improved land in Sheridan 
township, upon which he lived until 1895, when he returned to Davenport to 
occupy the fine residence he had built there. As the years brought him large re- 
turns for his labor, he invested extensively in real estate until now he has six hun- 
dred and forty acres of fine arable land in the township which was for so long his 
home. He also owns two valuable pieces of town property, on one of which he 
lives. 

On the 9th of October, 1867, Mr. Keppe was married to Miss Wilhelmina 
Richard, a daughter of Christian and Dorothy Richard. She was born in Ger- 
many, May 18, 1847, and came to America with her parents in 1854. Her life 
was brought to a close April 20, 1904. The four children who were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Keppe have also passed away and all are buried in the cemetery at Oak- 
dale. Charles, the eldest of the family, married Miss Minnie Wonder, of Daven- 
port, and left one daughter, Elsie. Emma became the wife of Dennis Curtis, of 
Davenport, and is survived by five children: Madge, Charles, Nettie, Ralph and 
Frank. Adeline died unmarried at the age of twenty-five years. Agnes lived to 
be seven years old. 

During the many years Mr. Keppe was a resident of Sheridan township, he 
was intimately identified with its public life. He was a republican in his political 



404 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

views and upon that party's ticket was elected to all of the various offices within 
the gift of the people. He belongs to the association of the old German settlers 
and is a man highly esteemed by those who have come into contact with him in 
public or private life, for honesty and integrity ever marked his acts. 



LOUIS WILLIAM STEINBERG. 

Louis William Steinberg was born on the 3d of November, 1822, in Miin- 
den, Hanover, Germany. He came to America with his parents at the age of 
ten years and landed at Baltimore, where he received his schooling and later 
went to Cincinnati, Ohio, there following the trade of a tailor and cutter. In 
1848 he married Anna Wilhelmine Hagen, who was born in Cuxhaven, Germany, 
on the 25th of March, 1822. Being left an orphan at a tender age, she was 
reared in the family of Dr. Ronneberg, of Hamburg. At the age of eighteen 
she came to America as companion to Mrs. Jackson, a relative of the celebrated 
statesman. General Andrew Jackson. They landed at New Orleans after being 
at sea nine weeks, making the voyage in a sail boat. In 1852 Mr. and Mrs. 
Steinberg came to Davenport, where they resided for nearly fifty years. 

L. W. Steinberg was one of the first and most active members of the Maen- 
nerchor of this city. He was also a member of Scott Lodge of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and was one of a committee of two to translate the con- 
stitution into the German language for the use of the lodge. Though quiet and 
retiring in his habits, he was passionately fond of music and flowers, and many 
there were who enjoyed the hospitality of his home, with its beautiful rose garden. 
He died November 5, 1895, missed and mourned by all who knew him. His 
wife, who survived him for ten years, passed away on the 23d of October, 1905, 
at the age of eighty-three years, honored and revered by all relatives and a host 
of friends. Five daughters are left to cherish the memory of a loving father 
and devoted mother. They are as follows: Pauline, the wife of E. H. Schmidt; 
Bertha, the widow of G. A. Doellinger; Cornelia, the widow of Ed James; Eve- 
line, the widow of Otto Clausen; and Miss Tillie Steinberg. All are residents 
of Davenport. 



CHARLES MURRAY. 



Charles Murray, one of the prominent and highly respected farmers of Daven- 
port township, was born in Scotland, April 8, 1850, and is a son of Charles and 
Barbara Murray. In the year 1856 the parents brought their family to the United 
States, landing at Philadelphia, whence they made their way to Scott county, Iowa, 
influenced in their choice of a destination by the fact that the father had a brother, 
George Murray, living in this locality. On reaching Scott county he rented land 
from his brother George until his savings were sufficient to enable him to purchase 
a farm, and in time he became the owner of two farms in Hickory Grove township. 



..' 







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'vi^O-^yy 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 407 

He afterward sold those properties and bought the farm upon which his son 
Charles now resides. At one time it comprised three hundred and twenty acres 
of fine land, highly improved, and the parents made their home upon this place 
until they were called to their final rest, the father passing away at the age of 
seventy-five years, while the mother was seventy years of age at the time of her 
death. 

Charles Murray, who was one of a family of nine children, has lived in Scott 
county from the age of six years. He had begun his education in the schools of 
Scotland, but the greater part of his technical knowledge was received in the public 
schools of this county. He was trained in the work of the fields under the direc- 
tion of his father and early became familiar with all the duties and labors that fall 
to the lot of the agriculturist as he plows his land and cultivates and harvests his 
crops. Throughout his entire Ufe Mr. Murray has carried on general farming and 
stock-raising, making a specialty of Poland China hogs and red polled cattle. He 
now owns eighty acres of arable land and his careful cultivation of his fields 
enables him to gather rich harvests annually. 

In November, 1872, Mr. Murray was united in marriage to Miss Christina 
Rigg, a daughter of William and Mary Rigg, of Sheridan township, and they have 
become parents of five children : William C, Margaret, Louisa, Edward and Elsie. 
All are yet at home with the exception of the elder son, William, who is living in 
Lincoln township. He married Lillie Clay and has two children. Clay C. and 
Clyde. 

Mr. Murray has always been a champion of the cause of education and is now 
serving as president of the school board. He has also acted for several years as 
school director, has been road supervisor and township trustee and in these various 
offices has discharged his duties with promptness and fidelity. He attends the 
Presbyterian church and holds membership with the Mystic Toilers of Davenport. 
A resident of the county for more than half a century, he is well known here, many 
of his stanchest friends being those with whom he has been acquainted from boy- 
hood, a fact which indicates a well spent and honorable life. Moreover, he has 
been an interested witness of events which have shaped the history of the county 
and on many occasions has given his support to movements for the public good. 



OLIVER W. KULP, M. D. 

Dr. Oliver W. Kulp, physician and surgeon of Davenport, his native city, was 
born July 4, 1874, the son of Dr. John H. Kulp, who was a native of Sherman, 
Summit county, Ohio, born on the 21st of June, 1849. John H. Kulp obtained his 
literary education in the Mennonite Academy at Wadsworth, Ohio, and in 1869 
came to Iowa, taking up the study of medicine in the medical department of the 
University of Iowa, which institution conferred upon him the degree of M. D. in 
1872. He had studied under the direction of Professor Robertson, of Muscatine, 
Iowa, who was professor of the theory and practice of medicine in the University 
of Iowa. Prior to his graduation he entered the State Hospital for the Insane at 
Mount Pleasant, Iowa, as apothecary and hospital clerk and after receiving his 



408 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

degree he was appointed second assistant physician of that institution, which posi- 
tion he held for two and a half years, when he was made first assistant. He like- 
wise spent one season at post-graduate work in Bellevue Hospital of New York 
city and in 1874 opened an office at Davenport, Iowa, continuing a successful and 
prominent practitioner of medicine here until the time of his demise. He gradu- 
ually began specializing in nervous and mental diseases and diseases of women and 
eventually devoted his attention exclusively to those branches. For more than 
twenty years he acted as trustee of Mount Pleasant Hospital, was a member of the 
consulting board of St. Luke's Hospital and served as alienist of the insane depart- 
ment at Mercy Hospital. He was likewise surgeon for the Burlington, Cedar 
Rapids & Northern Railroad. For two terms he acted as president of the Scott 
County Medical Society, while in the Iowa and Illinois Central District Medical 
Society he was also elected to that responsible position, serving for one term. 

On the 24th of September, 1873, Dr. John H. Kulp was joined in wedlock to 
Miss Mary E. Cauffman, of Mount Pleasant, Iowa, by whom he had two sons: 
Oliver W., of this review; and Ray Ranney, who is mentioned elsewhere in this 
work. Both have followed in the professional footsteps of their father. John H. 
Kulp was a republican in his political views, while fraternally he was identified 
with the Masons and the Knights of Pythias. 

Oliver W. Kulp was educated in the public schools, wherein he continued his 
course until graduating from the high school. He then entered upon the study of 
medicine in the Iowa State University and was graduated in the class of 1896, 
after which he entered his father's office and practiced as his partner until the out- 
break of the Spanish-American war, when he enlisted as a private of Company B, 
Fiftieth Iowa Infantry, with which he served until stricken with swamp fever. 
He still remained an active member of the National Guard, holding the rank of 
captain until February 10, 1910, when he resigned Since his return home he has 
devoted his attention to his practice. He is also vice president of the Tri City 
Concrete Company. He takes a deep interest in public aiifairs but is not an office 
seeker. His political support is given to the republican party where national issues 
are involved but at local elections he casts an independent ballot. 

In 1902 Dr. Kulp wedded Miss May Bettendorf, a daughter of W. P. Betten- 
dorf, and they have one son, John William. Dr. Kulp is identified with the Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks and with other fraternal societies. 



HENRY DIEHN, SR. 



Henry Diehn, Sr., the vice president of the Davenport Cigar Box Company, 
one of the flourishing industries of the city, was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, 
June 6, 1837, and is a son of John and Margaret Diehn. He received his education 
in the public schools of his native land, later finding employment in the brickyards 
there. In 1868 he determined to try the opportunities for advancement said to be 
found here and accordingly sailed for America. He landed at New York, came 
almost immediately to Davenport, where the first employment he was able to secure 
was in a brewery. He worked there five years and then became connected with 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 409 

Moeller's cigar box factory, in which he learned the business thoroughly. He was 
ever eager to better his fortunes and establish himself securely in the commercial 
world, and accordingly, about 1884, he and two friends, George Krabenhoflfer and 
Christ Neimand, organized the Davenport Cigar Box Company, with a factory on 
Western avenue. A year and a half later Mr. Neimand sold his interests to The- 
odore Krabenhoffer and retired, and in 1896 the present company was incorpo- 
rated with other stockholders and local capital. From the beginning it has been 
a prosperous concern, doing each year an amount of business in excess of that of 
the preceding year and fully justifying Mr. Diehn's confidence in his ability, his 
sagacity and in his power to wrest from circumstances surrounding him the means 
for advancement, for he has been largely instrumental in its success. 

Before he came to the United States Mr. Diehn wedded Miss Fredrica Vick- 
bolt, whose birth occurred October 24, 1840. She passed away July 26, 1907, and 
is survived by five of her six children, Christ, employed in the box factory, married 
Miss Emma Timming, and they have one son, Jiilius. Mary became the wife of 
Herman Goetsch and they have three children, Arthur, Herbert and Ella. Henry, 
Jr., foreman in the factory, married Miss Louise Schraeder and they have a daugh- 
ter, Leona. August, a resident of Ottumwa county, Iowa, was married to Miss 
Charlotte Schoffenburg and is the father of three children, Verona, Barnhart and 
August. Herman, who lives in Davenport, wedded Miss Dora Ehlers. Louisa is, 
deceased. 

While Mr. Diehn has been most closely identified with the concern of which he 
is vice president and which he was active in promoting from the beginning, he has 
not been blind to the business opportunities aflforded by other firms, but has become 
a stockholder in the Farmers Bank and in the Independent Brewing Company. He 
has always been active in the commercial affairs of Davenport, although of recent 
years he has taken less part than in the past. He came to the city with the deter- 
mination to make a place for himself and despite competitors may feel gratified 
with the success the past has brought him. 



RT. REV. JAMES DAVIS, D. D. 

The Right Rev. James Davis, bishop of Iowa, was born in November, 1852, in 
County Kilkenny, Ireland, a son of James and Margaret Davis, who were devoted 
to their church and their children were reared in a strong religious atmosphere. 
The eldest, Thomas, who died October 4, 1904, entered the religious order of the 
Carmelites and rose to the rank of provincial in Ireland. Richard is an esteemed 
Catholic priest of Louisville, Kentucky. Three sisters are connected with religious 
orders, one being Superior of Sacred Heart convent at Sag Harbor, Long Island. 
Another, St. Sebastian, is a member of the same order at Befie, France, and a 
third. Sister Constance, is Superior of the Immaculate Conception Academy at 
Newport, Kentucky. 

The early religious instruction of Bishop Davis was received under the direc- 
tion of the very Rev. F. Fogarly, P. P., at Donemagin. He began his studies for 
the church at Mt. Carmelite College, Knocktopher, under the direction of the Car- 



410 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

melite Fathers. After completing his classical courses, he entered St. Patrick's 
Ecclesiastical College in Carlow, where he completed his theological course. His 
ordination to the priesthood took place June 21, 1878, the Right Rev. Bishop 
Welch, of the diocese of Kildare and Longhlain, officiating. 

Soon thereafter he came to the United States and entered upon his clerical 
duties in Iowa, he having been adopted by the Right Rev. Bishop Hennessey, of 
Dubuque, during the time he was studying in Carlow. After a short period spent 
at the cathedral in Dubuque, Bishop Davis was assigned to St. Peter's church at 
Windham, Iowa, where he remained for two years. He was then at St. Mary's 
church at Oxford, Iowa, for four years, and it was while he was there that the 
original diocese of Dubuque, then embracing the whole state, was divided and Dav- 
enport made the see city of the new diocese. The Right Rev. McMullen, D. D., 
was the first bishop, he being succeeded by the Right Rev. A. Cosgrove, who in 
1884 assigned Father Davis to St. Michael's church at Holbrook, Iowa. There 
he was given full opportunity to demonstrate his ability as an organizer and upon 
the resignation of the Very Rev. A. Trevis of Cathedral, Father Davis was ap- 
pointed in November, 1889, to preside over the Cathedral congregation at Daven- 
port. From the beginning he faced hard work, the erection of the Sacred Heart 
church. He brought to bear his magnificent powers of organization, worked un- 
ceasingly with faithful zeal, and had the satisfaction of participating in its dedica- 
tion. After six years of remarkable work. Father Davis was appointed to the office 
of vicar general made vacant by the death of the Very Rev. A. Trevis, December 
18, 1895. In the years that followed he continued to labor faithfully for his 
church and the people under his charge, and November 30, 1904, he was conse- 
crated bishop to succeed Bishop Cosgrove. 

Probably there is no dignitary of the church in Amwica who is more univer- 
sally honored and beloved, irrespective of religious beliefs, than Bishop Davis. 
Learned, experienced and sympathetic, he not only is laboring for the good of his 
own people but to advance Davenport and Iowa and to maintain the highest pos- 
sible standard of morality. 



D. J. McCarthy, m. d. 

Dr. D. J. McCarthy, one of the leading members of the medical fraternity 
in Davenport, has here been engaged in general practice since December, 1900, 
making a specialty of surgery. His birth occurred in South Groveland, Mas- 
sachusetts, on the i8th of March, 1874, his parents being Philip and Cecilia 
(Duffy) McCarthy, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Massachu- 
setts. The father is still a resident of the old Bay state. 

D. J. McCarthy supplemented his preliminary education, obtained in the 
public schools of his native state, by a course in Holy Cross College of Worces- 
ter, Massachusetts. Subsequently he entered Georgetown University at Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he received the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master 
of Arts, while in 1899 the degree of M. D. was conferred upon him. In addi- 
tion to this very thorough collegiate work he was a believer, as he is still, in the 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 413 

doctrine of a sound mind in a sound body; and to this end he became a leader 
on the athletic field, leading the varsity baseball nine in its now famous victo- 
ries against the eastern college teams, and being otherwise prominent in athletic 
circles. After leaving college he served on the university medical staff at 
Georgetown and the hospital staff at Providence hospital, in Washington, which 
is known as one of the strongest and most thorough hospitals in the United 
States. In December, 1900, he located for practice at Davenport, Iowa, and 
has here since remained, being now widely recognized as one of the most promi- 
nent representatives of his profession in this 'city. He makes a specialty of sur- 
gery and in this branch of practice has established an enviable reputation. He 
keeps in touch with the onward march of the profession through his member- 
ship in the various medical societies, and is a member of the board of Mercy 
Hospital and of St. Luke's Hospital. He is also visiting physician to St. Vin- 
cent's Orphanage and Immaculate Conception Academy. The splendid prac- 
tice which he now enjoys has come to him in recognition of his skill and abiUty 
in the field of labor which he has chosen as a life work. 

Fraternally Dr. McCarthy is identified with the Knights of Columbus and 
the Knights of Father Mathew. He is a man of marked individuality, of 
strong character and stalwart purpose, who in citizenship and professional 
circles and in private life commands the respect of all with whom he has been 
brought in contact. 



WILLIAM M. SMITH. 



To William M. Smith, Civil war veteran and survivor of some of its fiercest 
conflicts, Scott county pioneer, and formerly one of Davenport's foremost busi- 
ness men, must be accorded a prominent place on the list of her retired citizens; 
After a well spent, industrious life, it is his happy fate to enjoy the peace and 
leisure of retirement in his declining years. 

He was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 25, 1837, and 
is of German descent, his parents, Daniel and Barbara (Weinkle) Smith, being 
by birth subjects of the German emperor. The father was educated in the Ger- 
man schools, learned the trade of a blacksmith and entered the German army, 
where he served for the prescribed time. When still a young man he became a 
citizen of the United States, locating in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
where he followed his trade until 1854, when he brought his family to Scott 
county, Iowa. In Davenport he engaged in blacksmithing for several years, and 
both he and his wife died in this city. 

William M. Smith received his education in the schools of the county in which 
he was born and after the family's removal to Iowa worked in sawmills until 
the breaking out of the Rebellion. In 1862 he enlisted in Company C, Twentieth 
Iowa Infantry, his service continuing until the close of the war. Joining the regi- 
ment at Clinton, Iowa, he went into camp with it at Camp McClellan for a short 
time. It was then ordered to St. Louis, Missouri, and after remaining there for 
a time, was in active service in that state. It subsequently participated in a number 



414 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

of engagements, among them Prairie Grove, Arkansas; Vicksburg and Fort 
Blakeley. He was mustered out at the close of the war at Mobile, Alabama. 

During the trying reconstruction period Mr. Smith came back to Davenport 
and established himself in business as a manufacturer of vinegar. In partner- 
ship with Edward Fay, he opened a store on Front street, deahng in wrapping 
paper and grocery sundries, and they continued together until 1882, in which year 
the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Smith organized the Amazon Vinegar & 
Pickling Company, a local company with a capital stock of thirty thousand dol- 
lars. For four years our subject acted as business manager, but in 1886 he sev- 
ered his connection with the company and bought three hundred and twenty acres 
of farm land in Butler township, where he lived and engaged in agriculture until 
1901, when he retired from active life and returned to Davenport. 

In August, 1863, Mr. Smith married Miss Clara Goetch, a daughter of Herman 
Goetch, one of Davenport's pioneers. Thirteen children were born of the union, 
seven of them being deceased. Those living are: W. H. Smith, of Davenport, 
his wife having been before her marriage Miss Anna Miller ; Hilda, who married 
Matthew Schnell, of Chicago; Gustave, a resident of Rock Island; Ella, the wife 
of John Jeske, of Davenport ; Arthur, who is married and living in Davenport ; 
and Freda, who married Henry Toppendorf, of Rock Island. 

The social is not wanting from Mr. Smith's nature and he is identified with 
several organizations, among them the Legion of Honor and the Knights of 
Pythias lodge No. 10, of Davenport. A self-made man, he has a successful life 
to look back upon. 



J. P. VAN PATTEN. 



J. P. Van Patten, vice president of the First National Bank and president of 
the grocery firm of J. P. Van Patten & Company, occupies a prominent posi- 
tion in financial and commercial circles in Davenport. Said one who knew 
him well — himself a commanding factor in the business world — "His word is 
as good as his bond; he is the soul of honor and the better one knows him the 
greater the respect and the warmer the friendship." He was born in Jordan, 
New York, September 24, 1833. His father, John Van Patten, a native of Schen- 
ectady, New York, was born in 1786, while the mother, Mrs. EHzabeth Van Pat- 
ten, whose family name was also the same, was born in 1796. The Van Patten 
family is of Holland Dutch stock and was established in Schenectady in i66i. 
John Van Patten was an architect by profession and attained prominence in 
that field in New York city. In 1834 he removed to the west, establishing his 
home at Centerville, St. Joseph county, Michigan, where he lived for a short time 
and then went to Fawn River, in the same county. There he practiced his pro- 
fession and erected a number of public buildings, his death occurring at Fawn 
River in 1840. 

J. P. Van Patten was the youngest in a family of four children. His eldest 
sister married C. C. Alvord, of Fawn River, and went to reside in Davenport, 
Iowa, in the late '30s. Following the death of the father, the family decided to 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 415 

make Davenport their home. The mother was accompanied by her three sons : 
Philip, then sixteen years of age; Nelson, aged eleven years; and John P., nine 
years of age. They left Fawn River and made the journey to Davenport in a 
prairie schooner, traveling through Chicago, then a town of seven thousand in- 
habitants. They reached the Mississippi river at Albany, Illinois, crossed on the 
ice and arrived in Davenport, November i6, 1842. That season was a record 
breaker for ice, which did not float down the river until the 7th of April. In the 
spring of 1843 J- ?■ Van Patten secured employment on the farm of Mr. Alvord, 
his sister's father-in-law, where he worked for his board. He remained there 
almost a year, working hard and obtaining what meager education he could. In 
1844 his mother decided to go east and J. P. Van Patten accompanied her to 
Canandaigua, New York. They proceeded down the Mississippi by steamboat, 
thence up the Ohio and by canal crossed the state of Ohio to Lake Erie, where 
they took boat to Buffalo and thence continued on their way to Canandaigua by 
canal. These trips at that time were full of interest and adventure to a young 
boy whose experiences in life were thus far Hmited. He remained in the east for 
four years and during three years of that time was a student in the Canandaigua 
Academy, after which he engaged in clerking for a year in a book store. But 
the west was attractive to him and he determined to return to Davenport, going 
by steamer from Buffalo to Chicago, by canal to Peru and by steamer to Daven- 
port. His brother-in-law, C. C. Alvord, had a farm near Long Grove, Scott 
county, and Mr. Van Patten worked on that farm until the 12th of August, 1848. 
He then put aside the labors of the field and again came to the city, where for 
three years he engaged in clerking for B. Sandford, a grocer and druggist on Front 
street. That his services were satisfactory and that his reliabihty was a pro- 
nounced feature in his service is indicated in the fact that in 185 1 he was ad- 
mitted to a partnership. With renewed purpose he bent his energies toward the 
expansion and development of the business and hi's labors were a potent ele- 
ment in its growth. In 1854 Mr. Sandford retired from the firm, selling his in- 
terest to C. C. Alvord, and the firm style of Alvord & Van Patten was then as- 
sumed and was so continued until 1867. In that year the senior partner sold out 
to Morton L. Marks and the firm became Van Patten & Marks, wholesale gro- 
cers. They conducted a prosperous and growing business until 1903, when the 
partnership was discontinued and Mr. Van Patten reorganized the busi- 
ness as a corporation under the style of J. P. Van Patten & Sons, three of his 
sons, John N., Edward H. and Alfred Schuyler, becoming associated with him in 
the ownership and conduct of the enterprise. This is today one of the leading 
houses of its character in Davenport. Mr. Van Patten has come to be recognized 
as one of the representative merchants here and a business man of pronounced 
ability, whose activities are further evidenced in his service as vice president of 
the First National Bank. 

While his life has been a busy and useful one and from an early age he has 
been dependent upon his own resources, so that unfaltering industry and ready 
adaptability have constituted the foundation of his success, yet he has found 
time and opportunity for cooperation in public affairs and has long been an active 
and influential factor in politics. He is a loyal republican but not an office seeker. 
He has been a delegate to county and state conventions on many occasions and 



416 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

his counsel and advice have been many times sought and often heeded. He has re- 
fused the nomination for mayor and other positions of high preferment, but 
for many years has been treasurer of the republican county central committee 
and in a private capacity has done everything possible to promote the growth 
and insure the success of the party. Every movement for the benefit of the city 
receives his endorsement and his cooperation is of a practical character that has 
led to substantial results. 

In 1859 Mr. Van Patten was married to Miss Dorothy Hartzell, a daughter of 
the Rev. Jonas Hartzell of Ohio. Their children are as follows : Mrs. Florence 
Sweeney ; Elizabeth, who died at the age of eighteen years ; Mrs. Marion Harper, 
also deceased; Alice, now the wife of Dr. W. L. Allen; John N. ; Alfred; and 
Philip. 

The life and labors of J. P. Van Patten should be a source of inspiration to 
the young. Through difficulties and disadvantages of which one who has not 
had similar experiences can form little idea, he has steadily worked his way 
upward until he stands today as one of Davenport's foremost citizens. He is a 
man of resolute purpose and when one avenue of opportunity has seemed closed 
he has sought out other paths to success and has eventually reached his objective 
point. He is today one of the most honored as well as one of the 'most prosper- 
ous merchants and business men of Davenport. 



J. H. HASS. 



One of the native sons of Davenport, who has risen to a position of honor and 
respect not only in this city but throughout the state, holds the responsible offices 
of vice president and cashier of the Scott County National Bank. His father, 
Detlef Hass, was born in northern Germany and came to the United States in 
1852. As he had chosen the southern route, he landed at New Orleans and 
ascended the Mississippi river to Davenport, where he engaged in the building 
and contracting business. Having won a pronounced success from his operations, 
he retired from active life in 1886, and in September, ten years later, passed 
away. His wife, who was Miss Margarita Schroeder in her maidenhood, had 
died many years before, for she passed away in 1859. They were married in 
Germany, where their eldest child, Louisa, was born. She is now Mrs. Stibolt. 

J. H. Hass, the only son, was born October 14, 1854. He attended the public 
schools of the city and, having completed the education they afforded, in 1872 
entered the law office of Bills & Block, with whom he remained two years. He 
was not destined for the legal profession, however, and at the end of that time, 
in 1874, became assistant bookkeeper in the Citizens National Bank, and to bank- 
ing and kindred fields of activities Mr. Hass has since devoted all his energies. 
After ten years' experience in the employ of the Citizens National, on the ist 
of December, 1883, when the Scott County Savings Bank was organized, he was 
put in charge of the concern, being then the only employe. He has, in the sub- 
sequent years, been closely identified with the institution, having proved his effi- 
ciency in every position attd contributed in no small degree toward making the 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 417 

concern the splendid financial institution it is today. In 1884, after only a year's 
experience, he was made cashier, and in 1908 was made second vice president. 
When the Iowa National Bank was organized he was made a director, which 
position he still holds. Previously he was connected with P. T. Walsh in the 
establishment of the Walsh Construction Company, of which he is treasurer. 
Mr. Hass is a man in whom others intuitively place confidence and upon whose 
judgment they are willing to rely. 

In September, 1881, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hass and Miss Emma 
E. Hanssen, a daughter of Louis Hanssen, one of the old and respected pioneers 
of Davenport. Two children have been born to them. Leon H., now a student 
at Yale College; and Clara Louise, attending the high school of Davenport. 
Since 1884, Mr. Hass has been a member of lodge No. 37, A. F. & A. M., and 
also of Zarephath Consistory. He is a member of the executive committee of 
the savings banks section of the American Bankers Association and as there 
are only nine in this body and they chosen from the whole United States, he may 
be pardonably proud of this distinction which his coworkers have placed upon 
him. Politically he is a democrat of the Cleveland type, but he is not an office 
seeker, for his private interests make him a busy man and leave little time for 
other concerns, and yet, in reviewing the record of his life, his fellow citizens 
have profited by his work and the standard of manhood has been raised by his 
endeavors. Personally he is endowed with those characteristics which make a 
man always welcome among his associates, and he is one of the active members 
of the Outing Club. In religious matters he finds the tenets of the Unitarian 
church in accord with the breadth of his views. 



TIMOTHY A. MURPHY. 

Timothy A". Murphy, engaged in the general practice of law and also in 
charge of a large collection business in Davenport, was born in Marengo, Iowa, 
March 30, 1862, and is a son of Jeremiah H. and Mary A. (Green) Murphy. 
The father was a native of Massachusetts and, as the name indicates, is descended 
from Irish ancestry, while the mother is of English birth and parentage. 

The public schools of Davenport aflForded Timothy A. Murphy his early edu- 
cational privileges, his studies being pursued through consecutive grades until he 
had completed the work of the high school. He then took a collegiate course in 
the Iowa State University and was admitted to practice law in 1888 before the 
supreme court in Des Moines. He had prepared for examination as a law student 
in his father's office, the' firm being then ElHs, Murphy & Gould. When Jere- 
miah H. Murphy was elected to congress the firm became Gould & Murphy, 
with Timothy A. Murphy as the junior partner. This association was maintained 
until the death of Mr. Gould, when William A. White became a member of the 
firm and was thus associated until 1892, when Mr. Murphy formed a partner- 
ship with Louis G. Susemihl under the firm name of Murphy & Susemihl. Mr. 
Murphy is now attorney for R. G. Dun & Company and in addition to conducting 
a general practice does a large collecting business. He is also a director in the 



418 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

German Savings Bank and his interests are of a varied character, making him a 
man of affairs. 

In his political views Mr. Murphy is a democrat and has served as United 
States commissioner of the second congressional district. He is always conversant 
with the vital principles and questions of the day and able to support his position 
by intelligent argument, yet political interests are but a side issue in his life, as 
he prefers to concentrate his time and energies upon the profession of the law and 
the other business affairs to which he has directed his attention. Endowed by 
nature with strong intellect, he has made wise use of his time and talents and he 
is granted a creditable position among Davenport's representative men. 



E. B. HAYWARD. 



Among those who have come from eastern districts to Scott county to be- 
come identified with its business interests may be numbered Major E. B. Hay- 
ward, who is well known as a successful lumber manufacturer of Davenport. 
His success in all his undertakings has been so marked that his methods are of 
interest to the commercial world, and investigation into his history shows that 
he has based his business principles and actions upon strict adherence to the rules 
which govern economy, industry and unswerving integrity. 

Born in Essex county. New York, October 25, 1842, he comes of a family 
that has long lived in the eastern states and has also been prominent in military 
circles. Tracing the ancestry back through four generations in the paternal line, 
we come to the • great-grandparents, Ephraim and Phoebe (Dickerson) Hay- 
ward. The former was born in New Jersey in 1760 and served in Washing- 
ton's army throughout the Revolutionary war. He passed away at EUenburg, 
New York, in 1849, when he had reached the very advanced age of eighty-nine 
years. His family included David Hayward, the grandfather of our subject, 
who was born in July, 1790, and was married to Miss Lucretia Chapman. David 
Hayward was a prominent lumberman of Essex county. The father, William 
J. Hayward, was born in 1813. He engaged in merchandising and also followed 
the occupation of farming and the lumber business, becoming a very success- 
ful man. His wife bore the maiden name of Betsy Leland and was a grand- 
daughter of Thomas Leland, one of the Lexington Minute Men. In 1876 Mr. 
and Mrs. Hayward left the east and removed to Davenport, spending their re- 
maining years in this city. 

E. B. Hayward was reared under the parental roof and acquired his educa- 
tion in the schools of Essex county. He enlisted there as a member of the 
Fifth New York Cavalry in 1861 for service in the Civil war. He became a 
private but was promoted to captain and later to brevet major in the Army of 
the Potomac. He served faithfully and valiantly for four years, after which he 
received an honorable discharge. 

Following his return from the field of battle, Mr. Hayward engaged in 
business in New York for one year and subsequently removed with his family 
to Wisconsin, where he spent two years. He still sought another field, in 




a' 



"a^c 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 421 

which to give scope to his activity and accordingly made a permanent location 
in April, 1869, at Davenport. He here engaged in the lumber business with 
the firm of Lindsay & Phelps Company, while later he assisted in organizing 
the Eagle Lumber Company and Hayward Timber Company of Arkansas, the 
Hayward Lumber Company of Texas and the State Lumber Company of Van- 
couver, British Columbia. He seems well fitted for leadership in this line and 
has made a close study of the lumber trade in all its branches. He is now 
doing business along this line in Davenport, being numbered among the ic- 
cessful merchants in this particular branch in this city. 

Mr. Hayward was married on the 7th of April, 1864, to Miss Ellen Phelps, 
a daughter of Elihu and Margaret (Cruickshank) Phelps. They have one 
daughter and one son, Elmer Leland, who wedded Miss May Pierce, by whom 
he has one daughter. Lulu ; and Ellen I., who married W. H. Kimball and has 
two children, Herbert H. and William P. 

Mr. Hayward is an active member of St. John Methodist Episcopal church, 
having been chairman of the building committee during the construction of 
the church and parsonage on the corner of Fourteenth and Brady streets. Mr. 
Hayward is not given to participation to any great extent with fraternal orders, 
the only society to which he belongs being that of the Loyal Legion. He is, 
however, a thorough business man with a talent for leading, which is one of the 
highest attributes of man and a necessity in these days of close competition. 



CHARLES F. HETZEL. 

Charles F, Hetzel by a career of honor and usefulness has left an indelible 
impress on the history of Blue Grass township. This estimable gentleman, now 
deceased, was born in the province of Baden, Germany, August 19, 1907. Early 
in life he came to the United States, landing in New York, October 27, 1830. In 
that city he met his wife-to-be, Regina Bayha, a native of Stuttgart, Wurtemberg, 
whose birth occurred February 4, 1812. They were married in New York July 
21, 1834, and for some time resided there. In 1837 they removed to Wheeling, 
West Virginia, where they lived for the next fourteen years. On September 15, 
185 1, they came to Scott county, Iowa, of which they had heard favorable reports, 
and were so entirely satisfied with what they found that it became their permanent 
home and that of the most of their children. Mr. Hetzel became quite an exten- 
sive landowner, purchasing three hundred and twenty acres of land in Blue Grass 
township and eighty in Rockingham. 

They were the parents of eleven children. Five of them have never married 
but live together on the old homestead. They are Rosina C, Minnie R., Anna B., 
Regina S. and Henry A. Charles L. married Anna Albright and lives in Daven- 
port ; John C. is a resident of Harlan, Iowa ; George D. went west and is a citizen 
of Grand Island, Nebraska ; Frederick G. makes his home in Avoca, Iowa ; and 
Mary E. is the widow of Frank Haller of Davenport. One is deceased. Only 
the three youngest children, Anna B., Henry A. and Regina S. were born in Scott 
county, the others having first seen the light of day in Wheeling, West Virginia. 



422 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

Mr. Hetzel was a man who took a lively interest in current events and gave 
an intelligent consideration to all such problems as effected the public welfare. 
He served for a number of years as justice of the peace. In Wheeling he was 
pleasantly affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He and his 
family were all members of the Lutheran church, in which they were recognized 
as faithful, sincere and efficient members. Their home is one of the finest and 
most substantial country residences in the locality and was constructed from 
brick made on the farm. On June 5, 1886, Mr. Hetzel passed to his reward, his 
widow following August 12, 1891. They will long hold an enviable place in the 
history and memory of Scott county. They celebrated their golden wedding 
at the old homestead in 1884, at which time all the children and grandchildren 
were present. 



ASMUS H. LAMP. 



To few of the European nations which have contributed to the citizenship of 
this country do we owe more than to the German. Successful in business, its 
sons have also achieved distinction in agriculture, for the stable qualities of in- 
dustry and frugality, which are dominant in their makeup, prove to be the char- 
acteristics which win the largest returns from the cultivation of the soil. Among 
the Germans who have settled in this county and whose worth have contributed 
so large a share to the general prosperity of this section of Iowa is Asmus- H. 
Lamp, who retired from active life some years ago and now lives in Davenport. 

He was born January 18, 1836, a son of Claus and Celia (Gutch) Lamp. The 
father was a carpenter in Germany, but about 1847 decided to come to this coun- 
try. The family landed at New Orleans on Christmas day, after having spent 
twelve weeks and four days in crossing the Atlantic. They traveled up the Mis- 
sissippi river the day following their arrival and when they reached St. Louis 
spent the rest of the winter there. In the- early spring they continued their 
journey to Davenport, where on Fouth street the father bought a lot and erected 
a house. That remained the home of the family for some years while he worked 
at his carpenter trade. Later he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
Davenport township near the northwest corner, for which he paid one hundred 
and forty dollars as it was all raw land. After having erected a house Asmus 
Lamp and his brother lived there during the summer, but closed the place in the 
winter, bringing the cattle to town, where the sons attended school. In this 
manner several years passed, during which time the father continued to do car- 
pentering in the town, but finally, the land having been well cultivated, the family 
moved to the farm, on which they resided until the death of the mother at the age 
of seventy. Thereafter the father lived with his children until his death at the 
age of ninety- four years. They had four children : Trena, the deceased wife of 
Henry Stoltenberg, also deceased; Asmus H., the subject of this sketch; Claus 
H., of Davenport ; and Peter, of Port Arthur, Texas. 

Asmus H. Lamp had attended school in Germany before he came to this coun- 
try and after he reached Davenport he spent a few winters in the schools. The 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 423 

most of his life has been devoted to farming. For more than thirty years he 
lived upon the first farm of one hundred and sixty acres his father had bought 
in Sheridan township. It had been procured from John Van Patten, who entered 
it from the government. The first year after it came into possession of the 
Lamp family Asmus broke it and the next year, that of 1858, he married and 
took up his permanent residence upon it. As he gained large returns from his 
labors he bought other land so that now he owns four farms in Scott county: 
one in Hickory Grove township ; three in Sheridan township, one of one hundred 
and sixty acres, the other two contiguous comprising three hundred and sixty 
acres — two hundred and one hundred and sixty acres respectively — aggregating a 
total of six hundred and eighty acres. He also owns the valuable town property 
where he lives, having bought it about 1888, when he retired from active life. In 
that year he gave his homestead to one of his sons and, moving to the town, bought 
stock in the Davenport Elevator Company, in which he worked for some time. 
Later when the buildings were torn down and a new company organized Mr. 
Lamp became its president. The concern has about thirty elevators operated in 
several states. He is also a stockholder in the German Savings Bank, the Union 
Savings Bank and the Scott Couhty Bank of Davenport, besides being interested 
in sawmills in Louisiana and cement works in Kansas. As these large interests 
and the income of which they are productive are the result of his own efforts they 
certainly bespeak a life record that is most gratifying. 

In April, 1858, Mr. Lamp married Miss Wipke Klindt, a daughter of Hans 
and Dora Klindt. At the age of twenty she came to the United States. Four 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lamp. Minnie married Lon Seaman 
and passed away, leaving four children, Melinda, Nellie, Arthur and Frank. 
Anna became the wife of Charles Frye and they live in Seattle, Washington, 
where he is in the wholesale meat packing business. August married Miss Mary 
Fulner. They live near Eldridge, this county, and have four children, Henry, 
Hilda, Frank and Francis. Augusta is the wife of Frank Frye, of Seattle, Wash- 
ington, who is engaged in the wholesale meat business, and they have one daughter, 
Marian. 

Mr. Lamp has ' consistently given his support to the republican party but 
has himself taken no part in local affairs. Indeed, aside from looking 
after his various interests he holds little intercourse with the world of busi- 
ness, for having passed the allotted age of three score years and ten he feels he is 
justified in enjoying the results of his previous labor. 



JOSEF A. LE CLAIRE. 

Josef A. Le Claire, since 1885 a representative of fire insurance in Davenport 
and also prominent and active in political circles, was born in St. Charles county, 
Missouri, October 15, 1833. His father, Francis Le Claire was a native of St. 
Joseph, Michigan. His father was Francois Le Claire, a brother of Antoine Le 
Claire. When a young man he removed to St. Charles county, Missouri, and 
became one of the first pilots on the Mississippi river, running between St. Louis 



424 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

and Galena. At length, however, he abandoned the water and spent the latter 
part of his life on a farm. He was born in 1793 and lived to the age of seventy- 
five years, passing away in 1868. He married Eulalie Manval, a native of Por- 
tage des Sioux, where her girlhood days were passed. She was his second wife 
and by the first union was born a daughter and two sons. 

Josef A. Le Claire was the youngest child of the family. On the 21st of Oc- 
tober, 1841, he came with his half brother, Henry, to Davenport to live with 
Antoine Le Claire and here attended school. He also looked after the business 
interests of Antoine Le Claire until the latter's death in 1861. The following 
year Josef Le Claire went to the west, traveling extensively throughout that sec- 
tion of the country. Since 1885 he has been engaged in the insurance business in 
Davenport and has one of the leading and most successful agencies of the city, 
writing a large amount of insurance annually. He has always taken an active 
interest in public affairs and has filled a number of offices, to which he has been 
called by the vote of his fellow townsmen. In the early '60s he served as alder- 
man of the fifth ward and in 1871 he was elected marshal and collector for the 
city and served seven years as county recorder. He was also elected magistrate 
and filled that position for several terms and has figured prominently in official 
circles of the city, while his public service has brought him a wide acquaintance. 
Few men have more intimate knowledge of Davenport and her history through a 
period of sixty-eight years than Josef A. Le Claire, who arrived here in 1841 
and through the intervening years has been an interested witness of all the great 
changes that have occurred. 



HENRY RUNGE. 



Henry Runge is conducting a well established undertaking business at No. 
824 West Third street in Davenport. The high quality of goods he handles and 
his moderate prices have built up a good trade and made this concern one of 
the best known in the city. Mr. Runge is a native of Davenport, born June 7, 
1861, of the marriage of Martin L. and Wilhelmina (ScHwartz) Runge, in 
whose family were nine children, but only two sons and one daughter now sur- 
vive. The father emigrated from his native land, Germany, to the United States 
at an early day, the trip being made in a sail boat, which required fourteen weeks 
to cross the Atlantic. Arriving in the new world after his long and wearisome 
voyage, he spent a short time in Chicago, Illinois, whence he made his way to 
Davenport, where lived a half-brother of Mrs. Runge. He was first engaged in 
the packing business in this city but afterward worked in the old Davis mill, 
where he continued throughout his business career. Both he and his wife have 
passed away. 

Henry Runge was reared under the parental roof and was given the advantage 
of a common-school education. After completing his studies he took up the task 
of learning the upholsterer's trade and at the same time attended a night school 
in order that he might have a better education to meet the responsibilities of a 
business career. After learning his trade he worked at the same for twenty 




BUILDING OF HENRY ETTNGE 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 427 

years. He then went to Des Moines and pursued a course in embalming that 
he might engage in the undertaking business on his own account. Subsequently 
he returned to Davenport and in October, 1895, organized the firm of Weiss & 
Runge. The partnership continued for but a brief period, however, for in the 
following December Mr. Runge sold his interest to his partner and in February, 
1896, engaged in business alone, since which time he has conducted a successful 
enterprise. He possesses excellent business ability, undertands thoroughly the 
art of embalming, and this, coupled with a prompt response to all calls made 
upon him, has gained for him an extensive patronage. The business is now con- 
ducted in a large, modern, two-story brick structure known as the Runge build- 
ing, which was erected in 1902, and here Mr. Runge keeps on hand a good line 
of burial caskets and supplies and can meet all demands made upon him. 

Mr. Runge was married in May, 1883, to Miss Emma Tess, who passed away 
a few years later. There is a daughter and son of this marriage : Augusta, now 
the wife of John Olsen, a city fireman of Davenport, by whom she has a daughter, 
Anita; and Louis F., who is his father's assistant in business. Mr. Runge was 
married a second time on the 9th of October, 1891, Christina M. Juergensen be- 
coming his wife. There are five children by this union : Edna, who is a high- 
school graduate ; Martin L. ; Henry, who has passed away ; Harry H. ; and Henri- 
etta. 

The family belong to the Lutheran church, while Mr. Runge's fraternal con- 
nections are with the Turners, Elks, Eagles, Knights of Pythias, Modern Brother- 
hood of America, the Germania Society, Claus Groth Gilde, Teutonia and the Odd 
Fellows, in all of which he is a valued member. In the midst of a busy life he 
always finds time for courtesy, and an opportunity to give audience to his friends, 
and all with whom he is brought in contact have for him high regard. 



PETER ARP. 



Peter Arp, a retired German farmer who has taken up his residence in Daven- 
port, was born in Holstein, Germany, February 5, 1830, a son of Peter and Wipke 
Arp, both of whom spent their entire lives in the fatherland. The father was a 
tailorby trade. Peter Arp was about twenty years of age when he decided to 
come to America, the fame of whose opportunities had pierced the most remote 
corners of his native land. He disembarked at New Orleans after crossing the 
ocean and then took a boat up the Mississippi to Davenport. It was two months, 
however, before he reached his destination as quantities of ice in the river im- 
peded their progress. 

On the 9th of March, 1850, Mr. Arp landed in Davenport, where a sister 
was already living, she having come to this country in 1847. After his advent Mr. 
Arp obtained work in a brickyard and later secured employment upon a farm, by 
the month. He was industrious and frugal and after the expiration of a few 
years he was able to buy one hundred and twenty acres of prairie land in Sheri- 
dan township. In 1853 he married and that he and his wife might have a home 
he bought an old dwelling which he moved to his land, making it serve as a resi- 



428 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

dence for a couple of years, or until he was able to put up a better structure. 
The land he had secured was in its pristine state and Mr. Arp had to break the 
soil before he could plant his grain. Nevertheless, it proved a valuable property 
for during the five years it was his place of residence it made him gratifying re- 
turns for his labors. When it was well improved he traded it for one hundred 
and sixty-five acres in Winfield township, about twelve miles from Davenport on 
the Dubuque road. It had a small house upon it and had been partly improved, 
but Mr. Arp brought it up to a higher state of cultivation and sold it after four 
years. He then returned to Sheridan township, where he owned a tract of 
fifty acres and rented some land from Benjamin Barr, on which they lived for a 
year. At the end of that time he removed to his fifty acre tract, added another 
fifty, built a house and made it his home for the next twenty-six years, or during 
the remainder of the time he was engaged in the active pursuit of farming. Dur- 
ing that period, however, he bought land as he was able and at one time owned 
more than half a section, and in addition to being successful he was also a con- 
spicuous figure in the public life of Sheridan township, enjoying the good will 
of his associates. In October, 1892, he removed to Davenport. 

On the 2d of September, 1853, Mr. Arp wedded Miss Minnie Fellener, a 
daughter of Earnhardt and Fredrica Fellener. She had come to this country 
from Germany when about nineteen years of age. Seven children were born 
unto the couple. Charles, now deceased, married Kathryn Roenfeldt and they 
had two children, Minnie and Charles. Emma became the wife of Henry Jar- 
chow, "of Davenport, and they have two sons, Edward and William. Henry mar- 
ried Miss Louisa Petersen and lives in Minnesota, where he is rearing his two 
children, Mary and Paul. William married Miss Elizabeth Soil and lives upon 
the father's farm. They have two children, Walter and Viola. John married 
Miss Bertha Wiese and lives on the old homestead in Sheridan township. They 
have four children, Ella, Alfred, Elmer and Edward. Elizabeth became the wife 
of Henry Soil, of Davenport, and they have two children, Hugo and Edna. The 
other died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Arp celebrated their golden wedding on 
the 2d of September, 1903. 

When he became a citizen of this country Mr. Arp decided to give his sup- 
port to the democratic party and has since been stanch in his allegiance to it, 
being elected upon its ticket to the office of trustee of Sheridan township. So- 
cially he is a member of the German Society and with his wife is a member 
of the Lutheran church, in whose faith he has conscientiously reared his children 



JOSEPH C. METZGER. 

Joseph C. Metzger is the genial proprietor of a hotel in Buflfalo and is one 
of the most enterprising and wide-awake business men of the village. He was 
born in Buffalo, July 23, 1875, a son of Christian and Mary Metzger, both of 
whom were natives of Germany, the former born in Baden on the loth of August, 
1829, while the latter claims Hohenzollern as the place of her nativity, and she 
was born in 1831. The father was a youth of thirteen years when he emigrated to 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 429 

the United States and established his home in Baltimore, Maryland, where he 
learned and followed the cooper's trade. Later he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
he was married, and in 1855 he and his wife came west, spending two years in 
Rock Island, Illinois. Subsequently, in 1857, they crossed the border into Iowa, 
establishing their home in Bufifalo, where the father engaged in the cooperage 
business for many years. 

Joseph C. Metzger is one of a family of eight sons and three daughters, six 
of whom are deceased. Those having passed away are : Mary, John Christian, 
Joseph, Adolf, Otilda, and one who died in infancy. Those living are : Fred, a 
cigar manufacturer, of Quincy, Illinois; Henry, a resident of Denver, Colorado; 
Theodore, of Blue Grass, Scott county ; and Catherine, the wife of Joseph Mohr, 
also of Blue Grass. Joseph C. at the usual age entered the public schools of 
Buffalo and completed his education in the Davenport schools. After putting 
aside his text-books he went to Chicago, in May, 1893, remaining in the metrop- 
olis four years. In March, 1897, desirous of visiting the land of his ancestors, he 
set sail for Germany, spending several months in that country. Returning once 
more to Buffalo, he engaged in business pursuits here in the latter part of 1897. 
In 1904 he built a modern brick residence and two years later, in 1906, purchased 
the hotel adjoining his residence property and has since conducted the same. He 
conducts his hostelry in the most modern and up-to-date style, is continually look- 
ing after the comforts and welfare of his guests and is popular with the traveling 
public. 

Mr. Metzger was married in 1900 to Miss Sadie Gold, a daughter of Pres- 
ton Gold, of Buffalo. They have a daughter. Marguerite, who attends school in 
Davenport. Mr. Metzger is a director of the Buffalo Savings Bank. He is a 
communicant of St. Peter's Catholic church, while his fraternal relations are with 
Banner Lodg, No. 16, K. P., and with lodge No. 235, Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
at Davenport. Mr. and Mrs. Metzger are well known in Buffalo, for they have 
spent their entire lives here and their social qualities have won them many 
friends. 



W. G. NOTH. 



W. G. Noth, who has been the capable incumbent in the office of city treasurer 
of Davenport since 1906, was born in this city on the 13th of May, 1870, his 
parents being John and Wilhelmina (Keis) Noth, the former a native of Ger- 
many and the latter of Quincy, Illinois. It was late in the '40s that John Noth 
crossed the Atlantic to the United States, locating in Quincy, Illinois, while in 
1869 he accompanied his father, George W. Noth, to Davenport, Iowa. The lat- 
ter here established Noth's Brewery and thus became one of the pioneer repre- 
sentatives of brewing interests in this part of the state. John Noth, who had been 
in charge of the brewery, abandoned that line of activity after his father's demise 
and turned his attention to the grain business, with which he is still successfully 
identified. He is highly respected as a prosperous business man and substantial 
citizen and both he and his wife are well known and esteemed throughout Daven- 
port, having now resided here for a period of forty years. 



430 HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 

W. G. Noth, who was the eldest in a family of six children, supplemented 
his preliminary education by a course in the Davenport high school. After put- 
ting aside his text-books he entered the service of the Citizens National Bank 
and continued with that financial institution for eight years. He was then made 
deputy county treasurer and capably served in that position for four years, after 
which he was elected to the office of county clerk, discharging the duties devolving 
upon him in that connection for two years. In 1906 he was elected city treasurer 
and still remains in that position, proving by his able administration of the af- 
fairs of the office that the confidence and trust reposed in him by his constituents 
was not misplaced. He is a popular and unassuming young man and has won 
an extensive circle of warm friends in the city where his entire life has been spent. 



WILLIAM GARDNER SMITH. 

William Gardner Smith during the years of his manhood in Davenport was 
a familiar figure in those circles where the intelligent and interesting men of 
the city were wont to gather. He was long closely associated with commercial 
interests here and sustained an unassailable reputation, owing to the fact that 
he never made engagements that he did not keep nor incur obligations that he 
did not meet. He enjoyed to the fullest extent the respect of his contemporaries 
and associates. 

Mr. Smith was born in this city, July 19, 1861, a son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. 
Smith, long prominent and honored residents here. After attending the schools 
of Davnport and acquiring therein a good English education, well fitting him 
for life's practical and responsible duties, he went to North Dakota, but after 
a year returned home and accepted the position of bookkeeper with the firm of 
Smith & McCullough, furniture dealers, his father being the senior member. 
This was one of the oldest and best established houses of the city and after the 
death of Mr. McCullough William G. Smith entered into partnership relations 
with his father, the enterprise being then conducted under the firm name of A. 
J. Smith & Son. Following the father's death in 1898 the business was incor- 
porated and William G. Smith remained at its head, occupied with the interests 
of successful management, until 1901, when his health failed and he disposed 
of the store. He was a man of good business judgment, very accurate, system- 
atic and methodical, and his enterprise led him to continually broaden the scope 
of his activities and thereby increase his usefulness. A short time prior to his 
death he aided in organizing and establishing the E. W. Gates Lumber Company. 
With keen sagacity he saw and utilized opportunities that others passed by heed- 
lessly and in his entire business career he exemplified the truth of the old adage 
that "honesty is the best policy." 

On the nth of November, 1887, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Cora Scott, 
a daughter of Colonel and Mrs. Thomas Scott, of Davenport. The marriage of 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith was blessed with one child, Eugene Gardner, who is at home 
with his mother. 




WILLIAM G. SMITH 



HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY 433 

Mr. Smith was an active member of the Business Men's Association of Daven- 
port and cooperated in all its various projects for the benefit of the city and the 
extension of its trade relations. He likewise belonged to the Irrawaddy Canoe 
Club and was always a popular factor in the outings of that organization. His 
genial manner, unfailing courtesy and ready adaptability won him many friends, 
while his enterprise in business circles gained him high standing among the 
prominent representatives of commercial and industrial interests of Davenport. 



HENRY L. HOLLAND. 

Henry L. Holland was for many years one of the respected and worthy citi- 
zens of Scott county and, though he has now passed away, he is yet remembered 
by many who knew him and who prized his friendship. He was born in Meck- 
lenburg, Germany, November 24, 1840, and was a son of Adolph and Carolina 
(Schutz) Holland. The family came to the United States in 1851, landing at New 
York, whence they made their way direct to Scott county, casting in their lot 
with its early settlers. They remained for two weeks in Davenport and then took 
up their abode in Winfield township, the father purchasing the farm upon which 
Mrs. Henry L. Holland now resides. He at first bought one hundred and fifty-five 
acres of land and energetically began its development and improvement. For a 
long period he successfully carried on general agricultural pursuits but at length 
retired from active business life. His death occurred in Davenport and his wife 
died while a patient in Mercy Hospital. 

He