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Full text of "American millionaires : the Tribune's list of persons reputed to worth a million or more. Lines of business in which the fortunes were made"

BOUGHT WITH THE INCOME 
FROM THE 

SAGE ENDOWMENT FUND 

THE GIFT OF 

fiends m. Sage 

X891 



■A.-'i^.tJl^ ^AiiA..^.L.. 



Cornell University Library 
HC102.5.A2 N53 
+ 
American millionaires : the Tribune's ii 




3 1924 029 948 258 

olin Overs 



3^2 




^^ 



Cornell University 
Library 



The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924029948258 



/\ ■ M--^ 4-^-6 



No. 6. 




American' Millionaires. 



The Tribune'!^ liist of all Persons 

in the United states Repnteil to 

be Worth a Million or More. 



LIBRARY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



COPYRIGHT, i8g2, BY THE TRIBUNE ASSOCIATION. 



2ap A YEAR-^iy^GLE Copies 2§ (js 

'^ TM& TRIBVUE A530CJATI0/Sa 

Entered at New York Poat-Office as Second-Class Matter. 



4. 5 9^-0; I ^ 

1;^ Ijf^ iQSuraQ^e poliey Et)e 
U/orld l^as beep U/aitlp^ for/' 



"V 



THE 

New-York Life Insurance 

Company 

Vi/HICH, in i860, originated and introduced the first Non-forfeitable 
Policy, now makes another RADICAL DEPARTURE in favor 
of the insured. 

Life insurance is safe or possible only on the principle that life is 
more precious than money; but no life company has heretofore fully 
accepted this principle. 

The NEW-YORK LIFE, believing from its experience that the 
time has come when this principle should be fully accepted, now an- 
nounces that, the physical conditions, habits, etc. , of an applicant being 
.satisfactory, if will insure him without future limitations. The Com- 
pany's new contract, the 

- " ACCUMULATION POLICY." 

contains no restrictions whatever respecting Occupation, Residence, 
Travel, Habits of Life, or Manner of Death. The only condition of the 
policy is that the premiums be paid as agreed. If the insured pays the 
premiums the Cofnpany will pay the policy. 

Full particulars given on application to the Company or its agents. 

NEW- YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

346 & 348 Broadway, New York. 

Charles C. Whitney, John A. McCall, 

SECRETARY. PRESIDENT. 

"A Company of the policy-holder, by the policy-holder and for the policy- 
holder." 

" Under an administration which thus broadly announces the fundamental prin- 
ciple that is to control its policy for the future, this Company now enters the forty- 
eighth year of an honorable buginess career." 

JAMES F. PIERCE, Superintendent. 
\_From the State Insurance Superintendent's Report to the Legislature, May 2, 1802.'] 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



THE 

NATIONAL PARK BANK 
OF NEW YORK. 

Capital, = = $2,000,000 
Surplus, = = 2,800,000 



SUPERIOR COLLECTION FACILITIES. 

BUY AND SELL FOREIGN EXCHANGE. 



EXTESfSIVE SAFETY VAUIiTS FOR THE COST- 

VENIEIVCE OF DEPOSITORS ASTD 

INVESTORS. 

1^^ Entrance only through the bank. ,^^^| 



EBENEZER K. WRIGHT, President. 

ARTHUR LEARY, Vice-President. 

GEORGE S. HICKOK, Cashier. 

EDWARD J. BALDWIN, Asst. Cashier. 



DIRECTORS: 



Arthur Leary, Charles Scribner, 

Eugene Kelly, Edward C. Hoyt, 

Ebenezer K. Wright, Edward E. Poor, 

Joseph T. Moore, W. Rockhill Potts, 

Stuyvesant Fish, August Belmont, 

George S. Hart, Richard Delafield, 

Charles Sternbach, Francis R, Appleton. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



LAMPRECHT BROTHERS & CO., 



CLEYELAND, NEW YOEK, BOSTON, 

1 1 3 Superior Street. 1 8 Wall Street. 5 3 State' Street. 



A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED. 

The Purchase and Sale of 

Municipal Bonds a Specialty. 



IVe Negotiate Bonds of Corporations having 
Municipal Franchises. 



We Solicit Correspondence with Holders ot 

Bank, Trust and Private Funds Seeking 

Investment, and with Municipal and 

Corporation Officers Desiring to place Bonds. 



fi Jeleeted Ijst purpist^ed 09 ^pplieatioi). 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



GEORGE COPPELL, GERALD L. HOYT, DALLAS B. PRATT, 

Member of New York Stock Exchange. 

MAITLAND, PHELPS & CO., 

22 and 24 EXCHANGE PLACE, 



Transact a General Banking Business. 

Orders Rxecuted for Investment Securities. 
Act as Agents of Corporations 

and Negotiate and Issue loans. 



BlliliS OF EXCHANGE, 

TELEGRAPHIC TRANSFERS 

and LETTERS OF CREDIT 
ON 

Messrs. SMITH, PAYNE & SMITHS, London. 
Messrs. MALLET FRERES & Cie., Paris. 
EL BANCO NACIONAL DE MEXICO, 

Mexico, and its Branches. 



AGENTS OF THE BANK OF AUSTRALASIA. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



SIMON BORG & CO., 

BANKERS, 

fio. 20 f/assad Street, ffew Yorl^, 

Dealers in all Classes of 

PRIME INVESTMENTS. 

Railroad, . Municipal, . and . State . Securities. 



Special Attention Given to All Southern Securities. 

THE 

PHENIX NATIONAL BANK 

OF THE 

CITY OF NEW YORK. 

4:0 ISTsill street. 

INCORPORATED 1812. NATIONAL 1865. 

CAPITAL, . . $1,000,000 

SURPLUS, . . 400,000 

EUGENE DUTILH, President. 
WM. H. MALE, Vice-President. 
ALFRED M. BULL, Cashier. 
PIERSON G. DODD, Asst. Cashier. 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVED ON FATORABL.E TERMS. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Shakespeare's Works, CtJiiiplete. 

Tenuyson's Complete Poetical Works. 
Hood's Poems. 

Moore's Poems, 

Heman's Poetical Works, 
Colerifljje's Poems. 
Thackeray's Poem's. Milton's Poems. 



XHSXI-XC^SiT. 



Byron's Poems. 

Chaucer's Poetical Works. 
Shelley's Complete Works. 
Pope's Iliad of Homer. 

Pope's Odyssey of Homer. 
Dante's Divine Comedy. 
Browning's Poems. 



Ingelow's Poems- 
Proctor's Poems. 



Goldsmith's Works. Cowper's Poems 

Campbell's Poetical Works. Kehle's Christian Year 
Burn's Poems. Liucile. 

Wordsworth's Poems. Familiar Quotations. 

Owen Meredith's Poems. Gems from the Poets. 

Pope's Complete Works. Sacred Gems from the Poets. 

Scott's Poetical Works. Whittier's Early Poems. 

Goethe's Poetical Works. L/O'igfellow's Early Poems. 

Schiller's Poems. Robert Browning's Poems. 

The above books are bound as follows : CLOTH GILT, GILT EDGE, per vol., $ I .50. STAMPED RUSSIA 
(Clover Leaf) ; large 12mo volume, padded, red line, gilt edge", round cornered, gold litle on side, illustrated, new 
and attractive ; per volume in box, $2 50. TREE CALF EDITION : Large 12mo, extra tree calf, gilt edges, etc., 
an elegant volume ;" price per volume, in neat paper box, $4.00. 

3NiflCiso©lX«.ixe>o-u.s !Sta.ixc3La<3rca. X*VL"lc>Xioa-tioxi.s. 

Payne's Business Educator, cloth $2.00 

Electrical Instrument Making ( Bottone) cloth 75 

Electric Bells (S. B. Bottone) cloth 7i 



Electro-Motors (Bottone-Beale) cloth. 

Electro-Plating (E. Trevert) 60 

Electricity and its Recent Applications 2.00 

Electricians' Pocket Companion (A. Jamieson) 75 

The Gunsmith's Manual 2.00 

American Game (Frank Forester) cloth 1.50 

Field Sports (Frank Forester) cloth 4.00 

Fish and Fishing (Frank Forester) cloth 2.50 



Any of the above books sent postpaid on receipt of price. 



Gun, Rod and Saddle, cloth 81-00 

How to Hunt and Trap (Batty) cloth 1.50 

Manual for Young Sportsmen (Frank Forester) cloth 2.00 

Practical Trout Culture, cloth 1.00 

The Brefch-Loader, cloth 1.25 

The Crack shot; The Rifle; or, Young Rifleman's Com- 
plete Guide, cloth 1.26 

The Dead Shot; The Gun; or. Sportsman's Guide, clo. 1.25 
The Dog. By Dinks, Mayhew and Hutchinson. 600 

pages, cloth 3.00 

Fishing in American Waters (Genio C. Scott) 2.50 



JSTTX>^Xl.XOXl fO .<9l.XjXj Ol'XXXifl.SI. 




t^lwUbroteb ?^?>JWGuttkneclrti 



ai piicttL^"^^ 





J. W. GUTTKNECHT'S STENOGRAPH LEAD PENCILS 




|. m. rMttthnctl;t's STENOGRAPH frab f Eiirils 
v-n fc The .4tiiericiiii Me^vs Company, 

I SOLE AGENTS FOR THE U. S. AND CANADAS. 




are the only Lead Pencils which combine in the highest degree all the necessary qualities 
required by the profession. Entire absence of grit. The proper consistency of the graphite to 
prevent the rapid wear of the point. Depth of color without blurring. Yielding easy to the 
application of rubber. Size and shape suited to steady, rapid use, without tiring the hand- 
One trial makes it indispensable to any Phonographer, Bookkeeper, 

A+^ ftto fit^ 

THE AMERICAN NEWS COMPANY, 

39 and 41 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



BLAIR & CO., 

BANKERS. 



MUNICIPAL AND RAILROAD 

■.:■■■■■■■■ BONDS :::::: 



BILLS ON LONDON AND PARIS. 



2 2 Wall Street, 

New York. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



HENRY W. POOR. JOHN GREENOUGH, 

POOR & GREENOUGH, 

Bankers, 

20 WALL STREET. NEW YORK. 



Orders Executed for all Securities Dealt in at the New 

York Stock Exchange. 

RAILWAY INVESTMENT 

A Specialty. 



CHOICE SECURITIES ALWAYS ON HAND 



We are in correspondence with nearly every Railroad 

Company in the Country through our 

connection with 



a 



POOR'S MANUAL OF RAILROADS," 



which gives us special advantages for information for the 
benefit of our customers. 



Correspondence Invited. Interest allowed on Deposits, subject to Check at sight. 



20 WALL STREET, NEW YORK. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WM. C. NOYES, 

96 Broadway, N. Y. 

DEALER IN 

NEW YORK AND BROOKLYN 

FINANCIAL 

TRUST CO.'S STOCKS. 

The increase of Book value from December 31, 1885, to December 31, 1891—6 years— exclusive of divi- 
dends paid during same period, on five of tlie oldest New York Trust Go's for comparison, is as follows : 



NAME 


Capital De- 
cember 31, 

1886. 


Surplus De- 
cember 31, 
1885. 


Surplus De- 
cember 31, 
1891. 


Increase of 
S urpl u 8 
during last 
six years. 


Average 
Increase of 
Surplus per 
year during 
last six 
years. 


Increase of 
Book value 
on basis of 
$100 per 
share dur- 
ing last six 
years. 


Amount of 
Dlv'ds paid 
including ad- 
ditions to Sur- 
plus during 
last six years. 


Bate of 
Dlvi'da 

paid 
Per ct. 

1892. 


Central 

Farmers' Loan & Trust. .6 
N. Y. Life Ins. & Trust... c 

Union Trust a 

United States e 


$1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
2,000,000 


$1,909,627 
1,637,818 
1,032,292 
2,020,441 
5,700,558 


$5,022,553 
3,905,728 
2,147,583 
4,002,519 
8,253,328 


$3,112,926 
2,367,910 
1,115,291 
1,982,078 
2,.552,768 


$518,821 
394,6.51 
185,883 

■330,346 
425,'i68 


311 

237 
112 
198 
128 


$4,702,926 
3,767,910 
2,615,291 
3,042,678 
5,552,768 


50 
30 
25 
20 
28^ 


Totals 


$6,000,000 


$12,200,736 


$23,331,709 


$11,130,973 


$1,855,469 




$19,681,573 





a chartered in 1873 ; b in 1822 ; c in 1830 ; d in 1864 ; e in 1853. 
THE ABOVE OFFICIAL STATISTICS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 
These Trust Companies — my specialties for twenty -three years — are peerless among all the 
monied institutions of the United States, as the extraordinary profits carried to surplus, in addition to 
the phenomenal dividends paid during the last six years (to December 31, 1891), as shovrn above, 
abundantly confirms. The high prices of their stocks indicate the popular estimate of their value as 
investments. It is not uncommon for my clients to see an average advance from 10 to 35 poiats (and 
in some instances much more), on these and other Trust stocks, in addition to their respective 
dividends, for every consecutive year during the last decade. 



NEW YORK A. BROOKLYN FINANCIAL TRUST COMPANIES STOCKS. 

Corrected Daily by WM. C. NOYES, 96 Broadway. 

[Specialties for Twenty-three Years.] 



NAME OF COMPANY. 



Atlartic Trust, Res. $500M 

Brooklyn " 

Oentrai, " 

OOHTINENTAL TRUST ReS. $2oOM 

Farmers' Loan and Trust 

Franklin Trust 

Hamilton " Res. $300M 

Holland " Res. $500M 

Kings County Trust, Res. |350M 

Knickerbocker " 

Long Island Loan and Trust 

Manhattan Trust 

Metropolitan " 

Mercantile " 

Nassau " 

N. Y. Guaranty & Indemnity, Res. $50UM 

N. Y. Life Ins. & Trust 

N. Y. Security & Trust Res. $500M 

Peoples' Trust Res. $600.\I 

Real Estate Loan & Trust, . .Res. $250M 

State Trust Res. $500M 

United States Trust 

Union Trust 

Washington Trust, Res. $800M 



Capital. 



$500,000 

1,000,000 

1,000,000 

.500,000 

1,000,000 

1,000.000 

500,000 

.500,000 

.500,000 

7."i0,000 

500,000 

1,000,000 

1,000,000 

2,000,000 

500,000 

2,000.000 

1,000,000 

1,000,000 

1,000,000 

500,000 

1,000,000 

2,000,000 

1,000,000 

500,000 



Capital Re- p 
serve and 
Surplus Value. 
June 30, 1892. 



$1,240,195 
3,435,000 
6,133,529 

793,503 
5,015,615 
1,846,905 

810,815 



938,914 
1,087,410 

760,049 
1,378,262 
1,865,575 
3,631,000 

666,707 
2,764,173 
3,300,411 
1,866,637 
1,740,356 

788,761 
1,764,870 
10,475,000 
5,094.070 

815,048 



Last 
Div'd. 



$100 
100 
100 
100 
25 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
30 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



3 

5 
15* 



lot 



2H 

3 

3 

2 

2)4 



15 



3 

16 

5 



Last 
Payment. 



Q. July, 1892 
Q. July, 1892 
Bi -mo. July, '92 
New 

Q.May, 1892 
Q. July, 1892 
New 

Q.May. 1892 
May, 1893 
July, 1892 
Q July, 1892 
July, 1892 
July, 1892 
July, 1892 
Feb., 1892 
New 

June, 1892 
New 

Q. May, 1892 
New 

Feb , 1892 
July, 1892 
Q. July, 1892 



Bid. 



335x 

iiooi' 



735 

360x 

165 



215 

175x 

205x 



150 
275 



195 
365 
150 



175 



Ask. 
Value. 



485x 

1200* 

150 



190 



180 

210 

130x 

290x 

305 



705 
205 



155 
210 



SOC'x 
200 



Q.— Quarterly; others semi-annually. *— 10 per cent, extra, 5 per cent, regular. 

t — 5 per cent, extra, 5 per cent regular. 

July 25, 



1892. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PRIVATE WIRES. TELEPHOJ^E, 

296J/. CORTLAJ^DT. 

CLAPP & CO,, 

BANKERS AND BROKERS, 

60 Broadway and 21 New St. 

BRANCH OFFICE: 37 COLLEGE PLACE, NFW/^ YORK" 



STOCKS, COTTON, 

GRAIN, PROVISIONS, 



Correspondence Invited. Orders and Accounts Solicited. 



1. ■. EDMl a iO.. 



li Wall lte©©t|, MBW ¥@KK. 

Established 1865. 

MEMBERS N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE. 

Allow Interest on Deposits subject to Sight Check. 

BUY AND SELL ON COMMISSION 

STOCKS AND BONDS, 

EITHER FOR CASH OR ON MARGIN, AND DEAL IN 

HVVESTMENT SECURITIES. 

A. M. KIDDER, CHAS. D. MARVIN, 

H. J. MORSE, W. M. KIDDER. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



UNLIS TED SECU RITIES. 

W e make a Specialty 

of dealing in all Securities which have been dis- 
tributed and now have no active market. In 
addition to this we are dealing in good underly- 
ing Railroad and Industrial Bonds and Guaran- 
teed Stocks, which are not listed at the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

QUOTATIONS FURNISHED. 

TOBEY $t KIRK, ... 8 Broad Stret^t, 

NEW YORK. 



WORK, STRONG & CO.. 



BANKERS 



36 Broad Street, 
. . . New York City. . . . 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WILLIAn H. MALE, President. 
JOHN L. RIKER, Vice-President. 



JAflES S. SUVDAn, Secretary. 
JAriES D. FOWLER, Asst. Secretary. 



ATLANTIC TRUST 
^ t t COMPANY, 

CABLE ADDRESS, "KITHARA," NEW YORK. TELEPHONE NO. 2 133. CORDTLANDT 



CAPITAL. $500,000. SURPLUS, $800,000. 

TOTAL. $1,300,000. 



Deposits received on Time or Subject to Check 
[Checks on this Company will be paid through the 
New York Clearing House]. 

INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS. 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, Trustee, 
Registrar or Transfer Agent for Railroad Companies or 
Municipalities, or as Trustee for Railroad or other Cor- 
poration Mortgages. 

Will take the Custody of Real and Personal Securities, 

Collection of Rents, Coupons and Dividends, 

Which will be Credited to Depositors. 



CLASS OF '92. 

Term expires January, 1893. 
W. H. MALE, 
THOMAS HITCHCOCK, 
H. H. ROGERS, 
C. D. LEVERICH, 
ALFRED WAGSTAFF, 
MATTHIAS NICOLL. 



TRUSTEES. 

CLASS OF '93. 

Term expires January, 1894. 
LEWIS CASS LEDYARD, 
H. A. V. POST, 
DEAN SAGE, 
W. H. H. MOORE, 
W. R. T. JONES, 
JOHN L. RIKER, 
WM. AUG. WHITE. 
(All Subject to Re-election, 



CLASS OF '94. 

Term expires January, 1895. 
ALEX. M. WHITE, 
E. H. R. LYMAN, 
DONALDiMACKAY, 
CLIFFORD A. HAND, 
JOSEPH H. CHAPMAN, 
J. LANGDON WARD, 
ANTON A. RAVEN. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLARENCE H. "WILDES, 

No. 34 Wall Street, New York. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES, 



A Specialty made of Comfyiercial Stocks of 
Representative Industries. 



HIGH GRADE SECURITIES OF THIS DESCRIPTION BOUGHT AND SOLD. 



Complete statements of earnings of well known corporations, 
whose stocks are paying 6 per cent., 8 per cent, and lo per cent, divi- 
dends, furnished on application. 



Lombard Investment Company, 



Capital fully paid $4,000,000. 



Offices : 
^EW YORK, BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA, KANSAS CITY. 



pO/ Guaranteed Western Mortgages PO/ 

(J/q Debenture Bonds. U/O 

{Atlantic Trust Company, New York, Trustee.') 



^SVKITE FOR PAMPHLET DESCRIBING SECURITIES. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. xiU 



CLARK, DODGE & CO., 

Bankers, 

51 Wall Street, = = New York City. 



Dealers in Rail Road and other Investment Securities. 
Agents of the Omaha & Grant Smelting Co. 



AlilVAYS have Securities examiived before making Transactions 
in them, and DO not be controlled eivtireIjY by 

GENERAL PRICES AND IMPRESSIONS. 



BAUD'S RATIHB ABENCY 

For Giving Value of Railway and other Securities. 



Accurate Detail Information fur- 
nished CONCERNING THE CONDITION OF 

Railroads or Stocks, Terms of their 
Bonds, Mortgages and Leases, Reports of 
Transactions of the Officers and Direc- 
tors, and Legality of same when desired. 




E. C. M. RAND, 



MUNICIPAL AND OTHER SECURITIES ALSO RailWay ExpCrt, 

EXAMINED AND REPORTED UPON. . No. 35 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



R. T. WILSON & CO., 

BANKERS AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

33 irt£HI-I_ STREET, 

NEW YORK. 

Fifth Avenue Safe Deposit Co. 

ENTRANCE THROUGH 

THE SECOND NATIONAL BANK, 

FIFTH AVENUE, Corner 23rd STREET. 



The Collection of Interest, Coupons and Dividends, 

for Depositors will receive Special Attention. 



GEOKGE MONTAGUE, President. JOSEPH S. CASE, Cashier. 

Ladies' Carriage Entrance, 23d Street. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



OF THE CITY OF NE1¥ YORK. 



Capital, $500,000. 

Depository for the United States, 

State of Hew Yorl( and City 

of New Torlc. 



S. a. BAYNE, President. 

S. G. NELSON, Vice-President. 

J. F. THOMPSON, Casliier. 

O. C. THOMPSON, Asst. Cashier. 

DiBECTOHS. 

Samuel G. Bayne, Joseph Seep, 
T. Wistar Brown, Alex. E. Orr, 
Daniel O'Day, Wm. A. Ross. 

S. G. Nelson, Geo. Milmine, 

S. T. Hubbard, Jr., Edw. V. Loew. 
Henry Thompson. 



The Bank acts as Reserve Agent 
for Banks throughout the country, 
and solicits correspondence of 
Banks, Bankers, Merchants, Cor- 
porations, etc. 

Orders for the purchase of Secur- 
ities will receive careful attention, 
and he executed promptly. 

Special attention is given to the 
deposit and exchange of Bonds at 
Washington for INational Banks. 



iS!i'OTri~iiHr " 



*"3 

f, 



r 






Ilk 



■TS '1 



^|j/_^tii,yn|rf 




Surplus $230,000. 



<?orre8poi>dept5. 

CHICAGO, 
Metropolitan National Bank. 

BOSTON, 
Boston National Bank. 



PHILADELPHIA, 
Central N&tional Bank. 

NEW ORLEANS, 
State National Bank. 

BALTIMORE, MD., 
American National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

First National Bank of Saa 

Francisco. 



Collections made 
Promptly and Economi- 
cally. 



SEND YOUR BUSINESS TO 
THIS BANK, AND YOU WILL 
FIND IT PROMPT, ACCURATE, 
AND ACCOMMODATING. 



Metropolitan Trust Company 

OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 
NO- 3T St 39 iAiML-I- STREET. 



Capital and Surplus, 



$1,800,000. 



■DESIGNATED by order of the Supreme Court as a legal depository. Will receive 
deposits of money on interest, act as fiscal or transfer agent, or trustee for 
Corporations, and accept and execute any legal trusts from Persons or Corporations 
on as favorable terms as other similar companies. 

THOMAS HILLHOUSE, President. FREDERICK D. TAPPEN. Vice-President. 

CHAS. M. JESUP, Second Vice-Pres. BEVERLY CHEW, Secretary. 
GEORGE D. COANEY, Asst. Secretary. 



MORRIS K. JESUP, 
A. GRACIE KiNG, 
WALTER T. hrtTCK, 
DUDLEY OLCOTT, 
GEORGE A. HARDIN, 
JOSEPH OGDEN, 
EDWARD B. JUDSON, 



TRUSTEES. 

THOMAS HILLHOUSE, 
J. W. ELLIS, 
ROBERT HOE, 
JOHN T. TERRY, 
D. O. MILLS, 
FREDERICK D. TAPPEN, 
BRADLEY MARTIN, 



HEBER R. BISHOP, 
J. HOWARD KING, 
HENRY B. PLANT, 
WILLIAM A. SLATER, 
C. P. HUNTINGTON, 
WILLIAM H. TILLINGHAST, 
WILLIAM L. BULL. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Drake, Mastin & Co., 

Members of N- Y- Stock Exchange, 

Bankers and Dealers in Investment Securities, 

3 Broad Street (drexel building). 



NEW YORK CITY. 



All classes of Government, Bank, Railroad and In- 
dustrial Securities, Bought and Sold on Commission. 



JAMES M. DRAKE. J. EDWARD MASTIN. 

E. Q. CHEVERTON. HENRY C. CARVER. 

Cheverton & Carver^ 

Bonds and Investment Securities, 
Stone, Timber and Mineral 

Lands, 

SUITE 77, 187-igi LA SALLE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 

We offer only high grade Investments such as 
will bear close scrutiny and commend themselves 
to Conservative Investors. 

GUARANTEED LOANS PLACED FOR OUTSIDE CAPITAL. 

REFERENCES BY PERMISSION. 

Mr. Lyman J. Gage, President First National Bank, Chicago. 

Mr. J. W. DoANE, President Merchants' Loan and Trust Co. , Chicago. 

Mr. W. C. D. Grannis, President Atlas National Bank, Chicago. 

Messrs. Sprague, Warner & Co., Wholesale Grocers, Chicago. 

Mr. F. O. Matthiessen, American Sugar Refining Co. , New York. 



ADVERTISEMENTS, 



XV] 1 




The American 
Newspaper Pub- 
lishers' Association 
is composed of 
about 150 of the 
leading news- 
papers of the 
United States and 
Canada. A com- 
mittee of experts 
was recently 
appointed by this 
association to 
decide upon the 
best typewriter. 
The committee 
have reported 
unanimously in 
favor of the 
adoption of the 
Remington, 
stating that they 
find it superior to 
all others in all 
important 
respects, and that 
it is generally 
regarded as the 
standard. The 
placing of orders 
for several hun- 
dred machines for 
the use of the 
members of the 
association has 
been awaiting the 
decision of the 
committee." 

N. Y. Triiune, 
Afay jg, iSgs. 



2^emington 

For 

Excellence of Workmanship, 

Superiority of Design, 

Great Simplicity, 

Easy Manipulation, 

Durability, 

Speed, 

The Remington Typewriter 
is absolutely unrivalled. 



SEND FOR AN ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 
SOLD THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, 

327 Broadway, 
New=York. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THEODORE B. STARR, 




A 



T all times we have, for the inspection of buyers and visitors, one of the most 
extensive stocks in the United States of choice Diamonds and other 
Precious Stones, artistically mounted after original designs belonging 
exclusively to this house. 

Persons who have no thought of purchasing, but are interested in pre- 
cious stones, and the art of their appropriate setting and treatment, are as 
welcome visitors as those who come with purchases in view. 



Western National Bank 

OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 



120 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 



DEPOSITORY OF PUBLIC MONEYS OF THE UNITED STATES, THE STATE 
OF NEW YORK, THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 



BRAYTON IVES, President. 
H. A. SMITH, Cashier. 



V. P. SNYOER, Vice-President. 
THOS. J. BRENNAN, Asst. Cashier. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



BRAYTON IVES, President. 

CHARLES J. CANDA, Ex-Assistant Treasurer of tlie 
United States. 

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW, President of N. Y. Cen- 
tral & Hudson R. R. Co. 

MARCELLUS HARTLEY (Hartley & Graham), 19 
Maiden Lane. 

WM. C. WHITNEY, Ex-Secretary of the Navy. 

F. O. MATTHIESSEN, of F. O. Matthiessen & 
Wiechers Sugar Refining Co., 106 Wall St. 

W, A. LOMBARD, Banker. 



WM. N. COLER, JR., of W. N. Coler & Co., 11 
Pine St. 

LOUIS FITZGERALD, President Mercantile Trust 
Co. 

V. P. SNYDER, Vice-President. 

HENRY B. HYDE, President Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Society. 

JOHN E. SEARLES, JR., President Havemeyer's 
Sugar Refining Co. 

SIDNEY F. TYLER, President Fourth Street Na- 
tional Bank, Philadelphia. 



Accounts of Mercantile Firms, as well as those of Banks and Bankers, are solicited, and will receive 

Careful Attention. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




i>^: 



HOTEL SAN REMO 



Central Park West and 75th St., New York. 



HIS beautiful, new, 
and absolute- 
ly Fir e-p roof 

Hotel, occupies an 
ideal location on the 
South-west corner of 
Central Park West, 
and T5th Street. It 
commands the finest 
view of any point on 
tlie entire Central 
Park Front; overlook- 
ing the Park, where 
the Bridle path and 
Driveway curve 
around tbe beautiful 
lake ; and the pic- 
turesque scenery is a 
perennial delight. 

From the upper 
stories of the hotel 
the waters of the 
Hudson, and those 
marvels of nature, the 
"Giant Palisades," 
can be plainly seen. 

The 72nd "L" sta- 
tion is but two min- 
utes' walk from the 
Hotel. 

This model family 
hotel has no parallel 
in its unique and 
splendid appoint- 
ments. It is the high- 
est example of evolu- 
tion from the hotels 
oi a few years ago, 
that art, comfort and 
refinement, can sug- 
gest. 

Each and every 
apartment has a pri- 
vate bath, with all 
m. o d e r n conveni- 
ences ; every room in 
the house having di- 
rect outer light and 



The Hotel is conducted solely for families who wish to avoid the annoyances and 
inconveniences of "housekeeping-," and for that reason the suites will not be furnished, 

BUT EVERY SERVICE. INCLUDING ELECTRIC LIGHT, STEAM HEAT AND CHAMBER SERVICE 
WILL BE FURNISHED FREE OF CHARGE. 

The suites will rent from $700 to $2,000 per annum. There wiU be no duties, no cares, no eternal worry 
about servants, and yet each apartment, will be a " home " in itself, 

Where comfort, like a noble sybarite. 

Reposes in each quiet turn and nook; 
Where nervous cares have long since taken flight, 

And " keeping house" is soothing as a book. 

The CriSlNE and ^:;ER VICE are UNSURPASSED; the meals being served on the American plan at reasonable rates. 
All the water uted in the hotel for cooking and drinking purposes is filtered by the celebrated " Buhring" system 
of wa'er purifying. 

WILSON C. MORRIS, Proprietor. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



GEORGE LEASK. JULIAN W. BOBBINS. 

GEORGE LEASK & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

COMMERCIAL PAPER AND INVESTMENT SECURITIES, 

NO. 35 WALL STREET, 

LEASK & CO., NEW YORK 

STOCK BROKERS. x ^ j— « » » j. \^xvx>.. 



Correspondence Solicited with Officials Contemplating 

the Issue of Bonds. 



^ 



I. & S. WORMSER. 
BANKERS, 

MILLS BUILDING, .. .. 

- . •• 15 BROAD ST., N. Y. 

Deal in First-class Investment Securities. 

Buy and Sell Bills of Exchange on London and the 
Continent. 

Issue Circular Letters of Credit for Travelers available 
i in all parts of the World. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



F. EQERTON WEBB. JOHN H. PRALL, 

riember N. Y. Stock Exchange. 



Webb & Prall, 

Bankers - and - Brokers, 

37 & 39 WALL STREET, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



Branch Office, 32 EAST 42d STREET, LINCOLN BANK BUILDING. 

Private Wire. 



Speculation Securities Bought and Sold on Margin. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



BOUGHT AND SOLD. 



Lists of high grade Investment Securities to suit any 
Circumstances furnished upon Application, 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



La Montagne, Clarke lb Co., 

(Members New York Stock Exchange), 

;. BANKERS ;. 

IS BROAD STREET, Mills Building, 



RECEIVE deposits subject to check at sight. Inter- 
est allowed on Daily Balances. 

EXECUTE orders for the purchase of Stocks and 
Bonds for Investment or on Margin. 

Connected by Private Wire with Branch Oflaces in Montreal 
and Toronto, Canada ; also Burlington and Rutland, Vermont. 

Correspondents in Chicago, Boston, PJiiladeipiiia and Buffalo. 

JOS. T. THOMPSON & CO., 

BANKERS 

AND 

Dealers in Investment Securities, 

15 BROAD STREET, N. Y. 

(Members of N. Y. Stock and N. Y. Produce Exchanges.) 



Deposits received subject to check on demand. 

Interest allowed on daily balances. 

Securities bought and sold on Commission for cash 



or on margm. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




.f- 









Fifth Avenue Hotel, 

MADISON SQUARE, - - - - NEW YORK. 



THE LARGEST, BEST APPOINTED AND MOST LIBERALLY MAN- 
AGED HOTEL IN THE CITY, WITH THE MOST CENTRAL 
AND DELIGHTFUL LOCATION, 



A. B. OARLING. 
CHARLES N, VILAS. 
E. A DARLING. 
HIRAM HITCHCOCK. 



HITCHCOCK, DARLING & CO. 



5 HIS noble pile of white marble, Corinthian architecture, covering eighteen full 
city lots and accomodating one thon.sand guest.s, marks a place in the heart of 

the great City of New York, and an era in the history of the Nation's 
wealth and advancement. It is located in the centre of the City, upon the 
charming Madison Square and at the intersection of the two great streets, Broadway 
anei P'ifth Avenue, and convenient to the most important points of interest in the 
Metropolis. 

Its patrons include the names of the most prominent men and women in 
America — The Presidents, hundreds of Government Officials, Senators, Congressmen, 
Judges, Army and Navy Officers, Divines, Physicians, Authors, and in fact all who 
have attained prominence and celebrity in public and private life, both at home and 
abroad; and the most distinguished Europeans of rank and title \\'ho ha\"e \'isited 
this country. 

It has been the centre of all the great public occasions which the City has 
witnessed for thirt\' years. 

Years have come and gone, new hotels have multiplied with inno\"ations 
and features introduced to affect and influence patronage, but the Fifth Avenue 
is as new and fresh as the most recent hotel construction, with more liberal 
accomodations than an}' of them, and its well-earned reputation as the leading 
Hotel of the world, is more and more assured. 

— A'if7i^''s Ha7iiIbook of t^ie J_ 'jji/eJ States. 



xxiv ADVERT1SEMKNT8 

Edward P. Grout, 

FOR CHURCH and HOME. 

Falck Art. Glass ¥/orks, 
66 Libefty Street, - - Near Broadway, 

Opp. Real Estate Exchange. NEW YORK CITY 

MEMORIALS. 




Manufacturer of Ladies' and Qentlemen's 

Riding Boots, Polo Boots, 

Hunting Boots, Jocl<:ey Boots, 

COACHMEN'S BOOTS AND TOPS, 

And all other kinds of Foot Wear. 

125 CHAMBERS STREET, .-. 

NEW YORK, 

UNDER COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL. 



Special Discount to Clubs, Troops, Riding Schools, and all Other Mounted Organizations. 



ADVERTISEMENTS . 



GEO. H. PRENTISS 1^ CO., 

37 WILLIAM STREET, N. Y., 

AND 

208 MONTAGUE STREET, B'KLYN, 

DEALERS IN 

Local Investment Securities. 



MEMBERS OF THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE. 



E. D. SHEPARD & CO., 



SUCCESSORS TO 



^^ BANKER 



Drexel Building, Broad Street, - NEW YORK. 



STATE, COUNTY AND CITY BONDS. 



We endeavor to furnish conservative investors with reliable, care- 
fully selected securities, paying fair rate of interest. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JAMES D. SMITH. FRANKLIN M. JONES. ARCHIBALD H. SMITH. 

JAflES D. SMITH & CO., 

BAISTKIERS and BROKERS, 

4.2 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK. 

Deposits re(;eiued Subject to Draft at 5'^'?t- 

5toeK5 apd Bopds Bou^l^t ai)d 5old 09 ^ommissioi). 
Ipue5tmei)t ir? tl?e Best 56(;urities a Specialty. 

MEMBERS OF THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE. 



P. O. BOX 2948. 

1/39 Embijr(^l7 9 /^tterbury, 

BANKERS & BROKERS, 

NOS. 17 & 19 BROAD STREET, 

AND 

10 WEST 23D STREET, 

N E iA£ VORK OITY. 



D. B. VAN EMBURQH. 

J. T. ATTERBURY. S. B. FRENCH, Special- 



AD V ERTISEM ENTS. 



FRANKLIN TRUST COMPANY, 

MONTAGUE STREET, Cor. of CLINTON. BROOKLYN. 

CAPITAL,, . . $1,000,000. 

SURl'LUS over ' 650,000. 

Authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator, Trustee, 
Guardian, or Committee, and offers special advantages as such. 

IS A LEGAL DEPOSITORY FOR COURT MONEYS. 

ALLOWS INTEREST ON DEPOSITS. 

Offers its services on favorable terms as Trustee of Corporation 
Mortgages, Register or Transfer Agent for Corporations or Municipalities. 

Checks on this company will be paid through the New York Clearing House. 

GEO. H. SOUTHARD, President. 

WILLIAM H. WALLACE, Vice-President. 

JAS. R. COWING, Second Vice-President and Secretary. 

CROWELL IIADDEN, Jr., Assistant Secretary. 

TRUSTEES. 

A. A. LOW, JOHN B. WOODWARD, WILLIAM MARSHALL, 

EDWIN PACKARD, WILLIAM H. WALLACE, GEORGE M. OLCOTT, 

JOHN WINSLOW, FRANKLIN E. TAYLOR, GEORGE H. SOUTHARD, 

S. E. HUNTINGTON, D. H. HOUGHTALING, W. A. READ, 

DARWIN R. JAMES, ALBRO J. NEWTON, THEODORE DREIER, 

ALEXANDER E. ORR, CROWELL HADDEN, THOMAS E. STILLMAN. 

JOSEPH E. BROWN, H. E. PIERREPONT, 



LODNSBERY & COMPANY. 

BAJVl^EI^S /. UNO .'. Bl^Ol^E^S, 

MILLS BUILDING, 15 BROAD STREET, 

.... NEW YORK 



R. P. LOUNSBERY, Member N. Y. Stock Exchange. W. DEADY. 



Transfer Agents : Ontario silver M'g Co., Daly M'g Co., 
Homestake M'g Co., Deadv/ood Terra M'g Co. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



UNION TRUST COMPANY 



OF ST. LOUIS. 



CAPITAL, $1,000,000, 

FULL PAID. 



OFFICES SOUTHWEST COR, 9tli and OLIVE STS,, 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 





DIRECTORS. 


CARLOS S. GREELEY, 


Pres. Greeley-Burnham Gro. Co. 


GEO. A. BAKER, 


Pres. Continental Nat. Bank. 


GEO. E. LEIGHTON, 


Pres. Bridge & Beach Mfg. Co. 


A. L. SHAPLEIGH, 


A. F. Shapleigh Hardware Co. 


GEO. S. MYERS, 


Pres. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 


GEO. W. PARKER, 


Pres. St. L., A. & Terre Haute R. R. 


B. B. GRAHAM, 


Pres. Graham Paper Co. 


WM. H. LEE, 


Pres. Merchants' National Bank. 


EZRA H. LINLEY, 


E. H. Linley. 


M. M. BUCK, 


M. M. Buck & Co. 


CHAS. H. TURNER, 


C. H. Turner & Co. 


C. F. GAUSS, 


Pres. Gauss-Shelton Hat Co. 


WM. TAUSSIG, 


Pres. Terminal Ry. Co. 


H. L. MORRILL, 


Gen. Manager St. L. & S. F. Ry. Co 


HUGH A, CRAWFORD, 


Pres. Sligo Furnace Co. 


WM. M. SENTER, 


Senter & Co. 


JEROME HILL, 


Hill, Fontaine & Co. 


HUGH McKITTRICK, 


Hargadine-McKittrick Dry Goods Co. 


JOSEPH HILL, 


Gen. Manager Vandalia R. R. 


EDW. MALLINCKRODT, 


Mallinckrodt Chemical Works. 


WM. E 


. HUGHES, President. 



Co. 



C. TOMPKINS, Secretary and Treasurer. 



JAMES L. BLAIR, Counsel. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Knickerbocker Trust Company, 

234 FIFTH AVENDE, COR. 27tli STREET, 

BRANCH OFFICE, 18 V^ALL STREET AND 3 NASSAU STREET, 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, . . . |i,ooo,ooo. 

Designated Legal Depository. 

INTEREST allowed on time deposits. Deposits received subject to Checks ok 
Demand, which pass through the Clearing-House like, those upon any City bank. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES TO RENT IN FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF VAULT. 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, Quardian, Receiver, Registrar, Transfer and Financial Agent, 

and accepts other Trusts in conformity with the Law of any 

State, or of the United States. 

BUSINESS AND PERSONAL ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

JOHN P. TOWNSEND, Pres. CHARLES T. BARNEY, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH T. BROWN, Second Vice-Pres. 

DIRECTOPiS: 

Joseph S. Auerdach, Henry W. T. Mali, E. V. Loew, Robert Maclay, 

Harry B. Hollins, Andrew H. Sands, Henry F. Dimock, C. Lawrence Perkins, 

Jacob Hays, James H. Breslin, John P. Townsend, Edward Wood, 

Charles T. Barney, Gen. Geo. J. Magee, Charles F. Watson, Wm. H. Beadleston, 

A. Foster Higgins, I. Townsend Burden, David H. King, Jr., Alfred L. White. 

Robert G. Remsen, John S. Tilney, Frederick G. Bourne, 

FRED'K L. ELDRIDGE, Secretary. J. HENRY TOWNSEND, Ass't Secretary. 



BANKERS, 

96 Broadway and 6 Wall Street, 

Members New York Stock Exchange. NEW YORK. 



Stocks and Bonds Bought and Sold for Cash or on 

Margin. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES A SPECIALTY. 

A full line of Municipal, Street R. R. and Industrial Securities always on hand. 



CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 






m 



OF BALTIMORE. 




Authorized Capital, $2,000,000. 

Paid up Capital, $1,000,000. 

Surplus, $4:00,000. 

Legal Depository for floney. Transfer Agent for Corporations. 
Guardian, Trustee of Estates, etc. 

Burglar-Proof Safes and Boxes-Rent $iO to $200. Also Vaults for Storage. 



JOHN GILL, 

President. 



W. W. SPENCE, 

Vice-President. 



C. FISCHER, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



Executive and Finance Committee. 



ANDREW REID, 



LOUIS McLANE. Chairman 
BERNARD CAHN, JOHN A. HAMBLETON, J. WILLCOX BROWN. 



W. W. SPENCE, 
CHRISTIAN DEVRIES, 
C. MORTON STEWART, 
ROBERT GARRETT, 
CHAS. D. FISHER, 
ANDREW REID, 
LOUIS iMcLANE, 



Directors. 

WESLEY A. TUCKER, 
WM. H. WHITRIDGE, 
JOHN A. HAMBLETON, 
THOMAS DEFORD, 
JOHN E. HURST, 
STEWART BROWN, 
WM. H. PERKI.NS, 
LAWRASON RIGGS, 



Building N. E. Cor. German and Calvert Sts. 



WM. H. BLACKFORD, 

E. AUSTIN JENKINS," ' 

BERNARD CAHN, 

J. WILLCOX BROWN, 

ALEXANDER FRANK, 

JOHN GILL, 

R. C. HOFFMAN, 

■ALEXANDER SHAW. 

OFFICE HOURS g A. M. to 4 P. M. 



EXECUTION OF TRUSTS. 

The Company is also empowered by Charter to act as F.xecutor, Administrator, Guardian, Assignee, Re- 
ceiver, Committee of a Lunatic, etc., to execute all manner of Trusts, and to manage and settle Estates. 

The Officers of the Company are at all times prepared to confer with and advise persons desirous of making 
settlements of property. Interviews are especially solicited with those proposing to make disposition of their 
estate, either by Deed of Trust or Will. Any legal or other information will be given, or legal papers and deeds 
drawn lor this purpose, accompanied by such directions as may lead to the avoidence of future trouble and 
litigation. 

MORTGAGE TRUSTS. 

Accepts the transfer agency and registry of stocks, and acts as Trustee of Mortgages of Corporations. 
Southern business especially solicited. 

A LEGAL DEPOSITORY FOR TRUSTEES, ETC. 

The Company is authorized by Act to receive moneys and securities on deposit from Trustees, Public 
Officers, etc. Interest allowed on deposits. 

COLLECTION OF INCOME. 

The Company acts as agent for the collection of income and the management of estates for parties who, 
from absence, ill health or other reasons, desire such service. • 

, POLICIES OF LIFE INSURANCE. 

Policies of Life Insurance can be made payable to this Company, either as Trustee. Executor or Guardian; 
thus thj insured can make provision in the event of his death to relieve his family from trouble or embarrassment 
■in regard to collecting the share of the insurance money belonging to the minor children. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 



OF NE3«I YORK. 



NO. 54 WALL STREET, 



CAPITAL 
SURPLUS, 



$1,000,000. 

$5'i33'52S.74- 



Allows Interest on Deposits, returnable on demand, or at 
Specified Dates. 

Is a legal Depository for Money paid into Court. Is author= 
ized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or any other 
position of Trust. 

Also as Registrar or Transfer Agent of Stocks and Bonds, 
and as Trustee for Railroad and other Mortgages. 



F. P. OLCOTT, President. GEO. SHERMAN, Vice-President. 

E. F. HYDE, Second Vice-President. C. H. P. BABCOCK, Secretary. 
B. G. IVIITCHELL, Ass't Secretary. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



SAMUEL D. BABCOCK, 

CORNELIUS N. BLISS, 



THE PRESIDENT. 
CHARLES LANIER, 
ADRIAN ISELIN, JR., 
A. D. JUILLIARD. 



JNO. S. KENNEDY. 
SAMUEL THORNE, 



Class of 1893. 

A. A. LOW, 

WM. ALLEN BUTLER, 

PERCY R. PYNE, 

WM. H. APPLE TON, 

G. MACCULLOCH MILLER, 

CORNELIUS N. BLISS, 

OLIVER HARKIMAN, 

B. G. MITCHELL. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Class of I 894. 

SAM'L. D. BABCOCK, 
JAMES P. WALLACE, 
JO.SIAH M. FISKE, 
HENRY F. SPAULDING, 
JOHN S KENNEDY, 
SAMUEL THORNE, 
ADRIAN ISELIN, JR., 
E. F. HYDE. 



Class of 1899. 

CHAS. LANIER, 
CHAS. G. LANDON, 
WM. H. WEBB, 
F. P. OLCOTT, 
HENRY TALMADGE, 
GEORGE SHERMAN, 
A. D. JUILLIARD. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WM. M. HARRIMAN, Member New York Stock Exchange. 

NICHOLAS FISH. OLIVER HARRIMAN, Jr. 



Harriman & Co., 

No. 120 Broadway New York, 

Equitable Building, 

BANKERS AND BROKERS. 



Transact a General Banking and Stock Exchange 

Business. 

L. C. LATHROP, OSCAR B. SMITH. JAS. H. OLIPHANT, 

Member N. Y. Cotton Exchange. Member N. Y. Stock Exchange. 

Lathrop, Smith & Oliphant, 

. . . BANKERS, . . . 

37 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK. 



guy and Sell, on Commission, Railway and other 
Corporate Securities. 

]y[ake advances on approved collateral, marketable 
at the New York Stock Exchange. 

(^ive particular attention to Investment Business. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



I. B. Newcombe. ESTABLISHED 1865. Camille Weidenfeld- 

I. B. NEWCOMBE & CO., 

BANKERS AND BROKERIS, 

Central Trust Company Building, 

54 Wall St., New York City. 



A general Banking and Stock 

Exchange Business Transacted, 



Deal in First-class Investment 

Securities. 



Interest allowed on Deposits. 



lifxxxiv ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Coffin & Stanton, 

BANKERS, 

No. 72 Broadway, NEW YORK. 



STATE, MUNICIPAL, 

and WATER BONDS, 



COFFIN & STANTON, Ltd 

No. 43 Threadneedle Street, 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



NEW YORK. CAPITAL, $500,000.00. 

CHICAGO. SURPLUS, 1304,303.75- 

Moffet, Hodgkins & Clarke Company, 

FARMERS' LOAN & TRUST CO. BLDG., 

16-22 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK. 

We make a Specialty of 

WATER, 

GAS, jO^ 

ELECTRIC LIGHT, 

AND 

STREET RAILWAY 

Payable semi-annually in New York, principal and 
interest payable in gold coin. 




We never offer an Issue of Bonds for Sale until 
we have made most careful personal Examina= 
tion, aided by the best Talent in the Engineer= 
ing and Legal Professions, and have satisfied 
ourselves that they are thoroughly safe. 

Out of over $12,000,000 of Bonds sold by us in the past ten years 
not one has defaulted in principal or interest. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE 



NEW YORK 

Stock Exchange 



ACCEPTS WORK 

OF THE 



InternationaL 



Bank Note Co. 



(STANDARD GUARANTEED) 

I 8 BROADWAY 

NEW YORK CITY 

U. S. A. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



American Bank Reporter, Anthony Stumpf & Co., Publishers 43 

American Casualty Insurance & Security Co. (Insurance) 46 

Accident Association (Insurance) 5 1 

American News Co. - - . 5 

Astor Place Bank . - 60 

Atlantic Trust Co. - - 11 

Benedict, E. C. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 45 

Blair & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - - 6 

Borg, Simon, & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 4 

Bonnell, J. Harper, Co. (Printers' Inks) 62 

Burnham & Phillips, Tailors 59 

Clapp & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 9 

Clews, Henry & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 65 

Central National Bank 5° 

Chemical National Bank 56 

Chatham National Bank 56 

Central Trust Co. 3^ 

Clark, Dodge & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - 13 

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Co. 64 

Coffin & Stanton (Bankers, etc.) - 34 

Columbia Bank - 60 

Chandler & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - 55 

Cheverton & Carver (Brokers, etc.) - - 16 

Corcoran, Andrew J. (Windmills) - 54 

Dominick & Dickerman (Bankers, etc.) 49 

Drake, Mastin & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - 16 

Devoe, F. W. & Co. (Paints, etc.) - 53 

Demmler, E. (Riding Boots, etc.) 24 

Farlee, J. S., & Brother (Brokers, etc.) 66 

Fisk, Harvey & Sons (Bankers) 67 

Foley, John & Son (Real Estate) 44 

Fourth National Bank 5 8 

Fifth Avenue Hotel - 23 

Fifth Avenue Safe Deposit Co. 14 

Franklin Trust Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 27 

Grout, Edward P. (Stained Glass) 24 

Gerlach Hotel 59 

Hatch & Foote (Bankers, etc.) 43 

Harriman & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 32 

Hotel San Remo, - 19 

Harris, N. W. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 40 

International Bank Note Co. - - 36 

Jones, Edward C. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - Inside Back Cover 

Kidder, A. M. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 9 

Knickerbocker Trust Co. - - 29 

Lamprecht Brothers & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 2 

Lombard Investment Co. (Bankers, etc.) 12 

Leask, George, & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - 20 

Lounsbery & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - 27 

La Montagne, Clark & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 22 

Lathrop, Smith & Oliphant - 32 

Mutual Life Insurance Co. (Insurance) Back Cover 

Marquand & Skehan (Bankers, etc.) - 46 



INDEX. 



Maitland, Phelps & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - - 3 

Manhattan Trust Co. - - - 39 

McMilHn, Emerson & Co. (Bankers, etc.) ^r . . 47 

Moore & Schley (Bankers, etc.) - - - 49 

Metropolitan Trust Co. - - - - 15 

Mercantile Trust & Deposit Co. - - - - 30 

Mercantile National Bank, The, of the City of New York - - 3^ 

Miller, Roswell President of Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Co. 64 

Morris, Wilson C, Proprietor San Remo Hotel - - 19 

Murray Hill Hotel - - 63 

Moffet, Hodgkins & Clarke Co. (Bankers) - - - 35 

New York Life Insurance Co. - - Inside Front Cover 

National Park Bank - . ' . . . I 

New York Guaranty & Indemnity Co. - - - 37 

National Bank of Deposit - - - 57 

Newcombe, I. B. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 33 

Noyes, Wm. C. (Broker, etc.) - - 8 

Plaza Hotel . - . 41 

Plaza Bank - - 41 

Poor Si Greenough (Bankers, etc.) - - - - 7 

Prentiss, George H. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - 25 

Prescott, F. W. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - - 65 

Phenix National Bank - - 4 

Passaic Rolling Mill Co. (Steel & Iron Manufacturers) - 52 

Rollins, E. H. & Sons (Bankers, etc.) - - - - 45 

Rand, E. C. M. (Rating Agency) - - - 13 

Steck, G. A. & Co. (Pianos) - - - 54 

Sancton, W. B, (Banker, etc.) - - 48 

Smith, James D. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 26 

Seaboard National Bank- - - 15 

Sloane, W. & J. (Carpets) - - - - 52 

Shepard, E. D. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - - - 25 

Second National Bank - 14 

Starr, Theodore B. (Diamonds, etc.) - ^ - 18 

Taintor & Holt (Bankers, etc.) 66 

Tobey & Kirk (Brokers, etc.) - 10 

Todd, Louis L., Proprietor Hotel - - 42 

Thompson, Joseph T. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) 22 

Tribune Association, The N. Y. (Publishers) - . - 61 

Typewriter, Remington .... ly 

Union Trust Co. of St. Louis, Mo. .... 28 

United States Mutual Accident - . -51 

Van Emburgh & Atterbury (Bankers, etc.) . 26 

Wing, Charles T. & Co. (Brokers, etc.) 47 

White, C. H. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - 4g 

Wilson, R. T. & Co. (Bankers, etc.) . 14 

Wildes, Clarence H. (Broker, etc.) - - - 12 

Western National Bank ..... jg 

Wormser, I. & S. (Bankers, etc.) ..... 20 

Work, Strong & Co. (Bankers, etc.) - - - - jq 

Wood, Huestis & Co. (Brokers, etc.) - 57 

Weil, A. J. & Co. (Bankers, etc.), ... 29 

Webb & Prall (Bankers, etc.) ... 21 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict (Typewriters) - - 17 

Young & Nelson (Brokers) .... ee 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



New York 

Guaranty and Indemnity Company, 

59 CEDAR STREET, NEW YORK, 

MUTUAL LIFE BUILDING. 



Capital $2,000,000. 

Surplus $5oo,ooo. 

TRANSACTS a general Banking and Trust 
Company Business, acts as Trustee for 
Corporation Mortgages, and solicits the accounts 
of Corporations, Firms and Individuals. 

INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS. 

EDWIN PACKARD, Pres. ADRIAN ISELIN, Jr., Vice-Pres. 

GEO. R. TURNBULL, Second Vice-Pres. HENRY A. MURRAY, Treas. and Sec'y 

J. NELSON BORLAND, Assist. Sec'y. 

DIRECTORS: 

Samuel D. Babcock, R. Somers Hayes, Edwin Packard, 

Frederic Cromwell, Charles R. Henderson, Henry H. Rogers, 

Josiah M. Fiske, Adrian Iselin, Jr., Henry W. Smith, 

Walter R. Gillette, Augustus D. Juilliard, H. McK. Twombly, 

Robert Goelet, James N. Jarvie, Frederick W. Vanderbilt, 

George Griswold Haven, Richard A. McCurdy, William C. Whitney, 

Oliver Harriman, Alexander E. Orr, J. Hood Wright. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

Samuel D. Babcock, Adrian Iselin, Jr., Edwin Packard, 

Frederic Cromwell, Augustus D. Juilliard, Henry H. Rogers, 

George Griswold Haven, Richard A. McCurdy, H. McK. Twombly. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE 



Mercantile National Bank 

OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 

CAPITAL, - - - $1,000,000 

SURPLUS & PROFITS, $1,050,000 

DEPOSITS, TOTAL $12,162,909.05 



^1- • ACCOUNTS SOL.ICITED • t^ 



WM. P. ST. JOHN, President. 
FR£D'K B. SCHENCK, Cashier. 
JAMES V. liOTT, Ass't Cashier. 



DIRECTORS. 



WILLIAM C. BROWNING, EMANUEL LEHMAN, CHARLES M. VAIL, 

CHARLES T. BARNEY, SETH M. MILLIKEN, ISAAC WALLACH, 

CHARLES L. COLBY, JAMES E. NICHOLS, JAMES M. WENTZ, 

GEORGE W. GROSSMAN, GEORGE H. SARGENT, RICHARD H. WILLIAMS, 

WILLIAM P. ST. JOHN, FREDERICK B.'SCHENCK. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



MANHATTAN TRUST COMPANY, 

Cor. Wall and Nassau Streets, 
NEW YORK CITY. 




CAPITAL AWD SURPLUS. 



$r,250,000 



The Coiupany is authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, Recei^"e^ and Trustee ; as Fiscal and 
Transfer Agent, and as Registrar of Stocks and Bonds. The Company offers to Executors and Trustees of Estates, 
and to Religious and Benevolent Institutions, exceptional facilities for "the transaction of their business. 



OFFICERS. 

FRANCIS O. FRENCH, Prexiile.nt. ,T((HN I. WATERBURY, Vice-Preindent. 

A. T. FRENCH, Secrctaru and Treasurer. 



LIBERAL RATES OF INTEREST PAID ON BALANCES. 



DIRECTORS, 18Q2. 



AUGUST BELMONT, of Messrs. August Belmont & Co., 

New York 

C C. BALI)\VIN New York 

H W. CANNON, Pres. Chase Nat. Bank New Y'ork 

T J COOLIDGE, Jr., Pres. Old Colony Trust Co., Boston 
r' .1 CROSS of Messrs. Morton, Bliss & Co. . ..New Y'ork 

JOHN R. FORD New York 

FRANCIS ORMOND FRENCH, President. .. .New York 

JOHN N. A. GRISWOLD New Y'ork 

H L HKtGINSON, of Messrs. Lee, Hig<?insnn & Co., 

Boston 
JOHN KEAN, Jr., Pres. Nat. State Bank, Elizabeth, N. J. 



H. O. NORTHCOTE, of Messrs. J. Kennedy, Tod & Co., 

New Y^ork 

E. D. RANDOLPH, Pres. Continental Nat. Bank,. N. Y. 

A. a. RO.SENBAUM, of Messrs. A. S. Rosenbau-m & Co., 

New York 

JAMES O. SHELDON New Y'ork 

SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY, Pres. Prov. Life and Trust Co., 

Philadelphia 

CHARLES F. TAG, of Messrs. Charles F. Tag & Soh, 

New Y'ork 

R. T.WILSON, of Messrs. R T. Wilson & Co., NewY'OBk 

JOHN I. WATERBURY, Yice-President New York 



COUNSEL. 
JOHN L. CADWALADER. 



A.TTORNEYS. 

STRONG & CADWALADER, 



CORRESF"OiS:iDENTS. 

OLD COLONY TRUST CO., BOSTON, MASS. 
ILLINOIS TRUST i: SAVINGS BANK. CHICAGO. ILL. 



xl ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Municipal Bonds 



ARE ATTRACTING THE ATTENTION 
OF conservative' people, as IN- 
VESTMENTS FOR PERSONAL AND 
TRUST FUNDS ::::::::: 



See May, 18(^2, N^Lmber Municipal Sitpplemenf 



Financial Chronicle. 



FOR QUOTATIONS AND LIST 
OF HIGH GRADE BONDS 
CALL ON OR ADDRESS : : 



^ 



N. W. HARRIS & CO., 



15 Wall Street, N. Y. 

CHICAGO, BOSTON. 



THE TRIBUNrMONTHLY 



VOL. IV. JUNE, 1892. /f COI?IV/ r-r*! \W^<>- ^' 







V -yj 



American nillionatfes. 



The Tribune's List of Persons 

Reputed to be Worth! a 

Million or More. 



Lines of Business in wliicli the Fortunes were made. 



LIBRARY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



$2 a Year. Single Copies, 25 Cents. 



COPYRIGHT i8q2 15Y Til?: TRIBUNE ASSOCIATION^ 

NEW YORK 



INDEX OF CONTENTS. 



Past. 
A-dvertisemems, InSex of...rollowlng advertising page 36 

Alabama, List for ^ 

Summary of 85 

Alaska 5i 85 

AUegheny City, Lts't for 45 

Arizona - 5, 85 

Arkansas, List tor 5 

Summary of 85 

Baltimore, City of. List for 18 

Boston. City of. List for 19 

Brooklyn, City of. List for 33 

Buffalo, City of. List for '. iS8 

California, List for 5 

Summary of 85 

CMoago, City of. List tor 12 

Cincinnati. City of, List for 41 

Cleveland, City of. List for 42 

Colorado, List for 8 

Summary of 85 

Connecticut, List for 8 

Summary of 86 

Delaware, List tor 10 

Summary of 86 

Denver, City of, List for 8 

Detroit, City of, List for 24 

District ol Columbia, List for 10 

Summary of 86 

Fiorfda, List lor 11 

Summary of 86 

Fortunes and the Tariff 91 

Galveston, City of. List for 54 

General Recapitulation yo 

Oeorgia, List for li 

Siunmary of ". 80 

Horr, Boswell »., Comments by Ml 

Idalu), List for 11 

Summary of 86 

Illinois, List for 11 

Summary of 8U 

Indiana, List for 15 

Siimmary of .7 86 

Indian Territory 15, 8B 

Introduction ". 3 

Iowa, List for 16 

Summary of 86 

Kansas 17, 86 

Kansas City. Mov, City of, List for 27 

Kentucky, List for 17 

Summary of. .77 87 

Lines of Business, in detail, by States 85 

Louisiana, List for... 17 

Summary of 87 

LouisvlUe, City of. List for 17 

Haine, List for 18 

Summary of 87 

Maryland, List for 18 

Summary of 87 

Massackusetts, List for 19 

Summary of 87 

Michigan, List for 24 

Summaiy of 87 

Milwaukee, City of. List for 56 

Minneapolis, City of, List for 26 

Minnesota, List for 25 

Summary of .' 87 

Mississippi, List tor 27 

Summary ol 87 

Missouri, List for 7. 27 



Pase. 

Summary of 87 

Montana, List for 28 

Summary of 88 

Nebraska, List lor 29 

Summir/ of 88 

Nevada, List for 29,88 

Newark, City of, List lor 31 

New-Hampshire, List for 29 

Summary ol 88 

New-Jersey, List for 29 

Summary of 88 

New-Mexico, List for 32 

Summary of 88 

New-Orleans, City of. List for 17 

New-Tork, List for 32 

Summary of 8S 

New-Tork City, List of 57 

Summary of 80 

North Carolina, List tor , 40 

Summary of , 88 

North Dakota, List lor 41 

Summary of , 88 

Ohio, List for 41 

Summary of , B8 

Oklahoma 44, 89 

Omaha, List for 29 

Oregon, List for 44 

Summary of , 69 

Pennsylvania, List for 45 

Summary of , 7 b9 

Philadelphia, City of. List for 46 

Pittsburg, City ol. List for 50 

Providence, city of, List for 52 

Rhode Island, List for 51 

Summary of b9 

Biclimond, City of. List for 55 

Rochester, City of. List for 39 

San Antonio, City of. List for 54 

Son Francisco, City of. List lor 6 

Seattle, City of. List for ^ 55 

South Carolina, List for 53 

Summary of 39 

South Dakota 53, 39 

St. Joseph, City of. List for 27 

St. Louis, City of. List tor 28 

St. Paul, City ol, List for 29 

Syracuse, List for 39 

Tacoma, City of. List for 56 

Tennessee, List for 53 

Summary of. 89 

Texas, List for 53 

Summary of 89 

Troy, City of. List tor 39 

Utah, List tor 54 

Summary of 89 

Vermont, List for 54 

Summary of §9 

Virginia, List for 55 

Summary of 39 

■Washington, City of, Ust for 10 

Waishington, State of. List tor 55 

Summary of 39 

"West Virginia, List lor 5(j 

Summaiy ol 90 

Wisconsin, List for 50 

Summary ol 93 

Wyoming, List for 5- 

Summary of go 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



OCCUPATIONS IN WHICH MEN OF WEALTH 
HAVE MADE THEIR FORTUNES. 



THE TARIFF NOT THE SOURCE OF THE GREATEST NUMBER 

OF MILLIONS. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The Tribune presents to the piiblic in the fol- 
lowing pages a list of the persons in the United 
States who are reputed, by their friends and 
neighbors and by well-informed authorities in 
the communities in which they reside, to be 
worth a mUlion or more of money or property, 
or in yery close proximity to a million. 

A few words of explanation aJre appropriate. 

In the fall of 1890, a newspaper in New-Yoik 
City, unfriendly to the Protective Tariff, ptib- 
Ushed the names of 122 persons, estimated by 
that paper to be worth from $5,000,000 to 
$125,000,000 each. The estimates of wealth 
were enormously and ridiculously exaggerated, 
as popular estimates of private fortunes are apt 
to be. Nevertheless, the 122 persons 'named 
were, most of them, men of wealth and the pos- 
sessors of at least a million each. A great 
deal lias been said in the last few years by the 
opponents of a Protective Tariff concerning the 
origin of fortunes in the United States, the 
great majority of which have been, by them, 
attributed to the operations of the Protective 
Tariff. " Your thieving tariff" and the " tribute 
wrung from the people by your protected robber 
barons" are expressions which have been flung 
at the Republican party and the friends of Pro- 
tection for many years. Free trade orators and 
newspapers have denoimced the "robbery" of 
the Tariff and the supposed large profits of 
.manufa/cturers, and have apparently sought to 
create the belief that, were it not for the Tariff, 
great fortunes would be comparatively unknown 
in the United States, and, as they say, " wealth 
would be more evenly distributed among the 
people." In view of these and similar charges, 
curiosity led The Tribune to analyze the 
sources of the respective fortunes enjoyed by 
the 122 persons above referred to. The 
Teibune discovered, as expected, that not to 
exceed 30 of the whole 122 men of great wealth 
had made their fortunes in industries protected 



by the Tariff. It published its conclusions 
and challenged a reply. No reply was ever 
made. 

The attacks on the " Tariff robbers" did not 
cease, however, and the Farmers' Alliance be- 
gan to assert that there were 31,000 "million- 
aires" in the United States, aU of them having 
accumulated their wealth by the " robbery" of 
the people. In October, 1890, The Tribune 
resolved in the interest of the public at large, 
especially of the Republican party of the United 
States, to ottain the exact facts about this whole-, 
question, and to ascertain, once for all, first, how 
many " millionaires" there actually are in the 
United States, and secondly, the " lines of busi- 
ness" in which their fortunes have been ac- 
guired, discriminating between the occupations- 
protected by the Tariff and those not protected. 
Accordingly for more than a year and a half 
The Tribune has conducted a careful, ener- 
getic and exhaustive investigation extending to 
every State and Territory of the country. More 
than 1,500 well-informed persons, in different 
parts of the United States, have assisted cheer- 
fully in the compilation— merchants, bankers, 
commercial agencies, lawyers, surrogates of 
counties, trustees, and other citizens in a position, 
to know the facts reported by them. Some of 
them have taken great trouble on behalf of 
The Tribune ; and this paper thanks them 
heartily. 

May 1, 1892, The Tribune began the pub- 
lication of the names and " lings of business" in 
which the several fortunes have been made. 
Five instalments were printed, a week apart. 
With each instalment The Tribune extended 
a cordial invitation to all under whose in- 
spection the lists should fall to report omissions 
and corrections. More than 200,000 people 
have read the Hsts ; and the whole exhibit has 
been under the criticism of the public for a full 
month. Every person mentioned in the lists, as 
published, was also asked, by circular sent to 
him by mail, to report corrections. These in- 
vitations have been accepted by several hundred 



LIBRARY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



people in a]] ; and, in its revised and corrected 
form, the list is now given to the public in this 
pamphlet. 

While every effort has been put forth to make 
this publication complete and accurate, and 
while we believe that it is now substantially cor- 
rect, The Teibunb does not pretend that it is 
absolutely free from errors. There are possibly 
a few omissions even yet, on the one hand, and 
on the other there are undoubtedly a few cases 
of overrating. Exactly what is claimed for this 
list is, that it is a substantially complete and 
correct catalogue of the persons in the United 
States who are reputed, by their friends and 
neighbors, and by weU-informed business men 
in their respective communities, to be worth a 
million or more of property, or in very close 
proximity to a million ; and it is accompanied in 
almost every case with a statement of the " Unes 
of business" in which the respective fortunes 
have been accumulated. The Tribune is con- 
fident that this pamphlet errs, if at all, on the 
side of fairness, and shows rather more than 
the actual number of " millionaires" rather than 
less. There has been, with reference to some 
names, a conflict of authorities. If some of the 
persons herein named are not actually '' million- 
aires," they may know, at any rate, that the.y 
are " reputed" so to be. 

On the whole, the list may be taken as fairly 
complete and accurate. 

No attempt has beerf made to estimate the ex- 
act wealth of the persons who are named in these 
lists. The fact is, no one can teU exactly how 
much any man is woith, until after he has 
passed away ' and his executors have paid his 
debts and settled up the estate. A man's profits, 
or his opportunities, or his style of living, some- 
times lead to the popular belief that he is worth 
many millions. But no one knows about his 
losses ; or whether he really took advantage of 
his opportuniti 3S ; or what sums of money he has 
given away to public institutions or his re- 
latives ; or what sums of money he is owing for. 
Popular estimates of the exact wealth of dif- 
erent persons are exceedingly wide of the truth, 
most of the time, and it would be so difficult, 
expensive, and, in fact, inquisitive, to obtain 
expert estimates, that it is better not to go into 
that branch of the subject at all. A case in 
point will show how mistaken is the popular 
idea of S3me people's wealth. The president 
of one of the great railroads of the country was 
lately mentioned in a published list of a few 
hundred " millionaires" as worth the enormous 
sum of $20,000,000. If this upright, able and 
honorable man had actually taken advantage of 
the opportunities he has had of operating for his 
own benefit, he might possibly have accumu- 
lated the sum of money named. But he has al- 
ways managed the road in the interest of its 
stockholders ; and he is actually worth not more 



than a million, if, indeed, he is worth that. 
Some of the man reported, a year ago, when this 
investigation first began, as worth a mUlion, 
have died since then ; and their estates have 
been found far below the million mark. It is 
hard, therefore, to say, who is certainly worth 
a million. It is sufficient for the purposes of 
this investigation if a man is reputed, by care- 
ful and weU-informed neighbors, to be worth 
in close proximity to a miUion— or more. 

A number of " estates" have been included in 
the list, because either they are those of persons 
(most of them lately deceased), whose property 
remains undivided, or else they are those o* 
persons who did not leave so large an. amount 
as a mmion to any single legatee, so far as can 
be discovered. Estates like those of Stephen 
Girard, of Philadelphia, are not referred to. 
They belong to that remote period of time be^ 
fore the Civil War, and have no bearing on the 
issues of the present day. 

In the following exhibit, wherever the fortune 
has been made in an industry whose existence 
or profitable pursuit is due to the Protective 
Tariff, the fact is indicated by an asterisk pre- 
C3ding the name. 

In a nimber of c:se; tw j aster-sks precsde the 
name. Th3se a e instacc-S where the f jriune has 
been made in a business in which, while there is 
a duty on the competing foreign product, there 
is, nevertheless, a doubt whether the Tariff is 
necessary to the profitable pursuit of the busi- 
ness. Is cattle raising on the plains of the 
West a "protected industry"? The duty on 
foreign cattle protects the American farmers 
living near the Canada line, but does it protect 
the cattle raiser on the plains? Is the manu- 
facture of a Yankee invention, whose sale in 
this country is protected by a patent, a " pro- 
tectsd industry ?" A doubt exists ; and these 
cases are therefore separated from the others. 

The "science of wealth" is the proper study 
of every man, whose activity lies in any 
field, like that of statesmanihip or journalism, 
in which what he does affects the welfare of 
the community at large. That which creates 
wealth in any country is of the deepest im- 
portance to all. If all of the fortunes of the 
United States were the product of the Pro- 
tsctive Tariff, that fact might be a powerful 
argument for that kind of a tariff. But, The 
Tiibuna's investigation has proved that the 
tariff is not the source of more than about 
ons-fouith of the fortunes of its prosperous 
citizens. The final tabulation at the end of 
these lists sho-svs that very clearly ; and the 
lists themselves present a variety of curious and 
interesting data on this point. 

A tabulation of the " lines of business" fol- 
lows the lists themselves ; and this publication 
win close with a discussion of the general sub- 
ject by RosweU G. Horr. 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



THE ROLL OF NAMES. 



DR. HUGH GLENX.— Wheat-farming on a large scale, 
una Innds. 



CHINO EASCH. 

A .LiA-L>A.\i A. EICHAKD GIRD.— Ranches soil farming. 

ANNISTON. RIVERSIDE. 

*A. L. TYLER.— Mining and rise In leal estate. .Eat. Dr. JAMES P. GEEVES.— Iron and copper mining 

BIRMINGHAM. In Lalie Superior region; silver mines in Nevaxia, 

•HENRY P. DE BARDELEBEN.— Chiefly in coal and and lands in CaUiornla. 

Iron properties. He has a large amcimt ol property LqS ANGELES, 

and is engaged in several large industrial enterprises jiaERIS NEWM ARK. —Dealing In -wool and hides. 

In c6al, Iron and land. He is the controlling owner jj_ ^ HELLMAN.— Wholesale groceries and llguors. 

Iti the De Bardeleben Coal and Iron Company. KASPAR KOHN.— Dealing in wool and lildes. 

DE. HENRY M. CALDWELL.— Chiefly real estate and ..jujs. R. s. BAKER.— From her first imsband, Don 

lumber. He Is president of Elyton Land Company, j^^iei Stearns. Made in city real estate and stoct- 

and Birmingham Trust and Savings Company. raising. Owner in vast cattle and grai-' ranches. 

W. A. WALKER.— Rise In real estate. "'^COLONEL R. S. BAKER.-Cattle ral-.iiig and real 

rC. T. HILLMAN.-Iron manufacturing. estate. He has great cattle and grain ranches and 

•JOHN T. MiLNER.— Pine and coal lands. valuable city real estate. 

GADSDEN. MAJOB GEORGE H. BONEBEAKE.— Eeal esta+e and 

•EGBERT B. KY'LE.— Sawmills and real estate. banWng. President of tha Los Angeles National 

MONTGOMERY. Bank and of the State Loan and Trust Company. 

JOSIAH MORRIS.- Private banking and real-estate D- rRBBMAX.-Farming on a large scale and real 

speculation In Birmlngliaro. He organlztxl the Ely- estate. 

ton Land Company and is its largest stocliholder. L. PHILLIPS.— Farming on a large scale and real estate. 

The company has been a great success on account of E. F. SPEKCE.— Banliing and real estate. President of 

the founding of tlie city and Its subseciuent growth. the First National Banli and of the Savings Bank of 

RWfAPTTlTT ATION Southern California. 

„ , , . , ac.'^oj.i.i.ij^^x ^ . . J. B. LANKEESHIM.-Real estate and banking. Presi- 

Malnlv In protected industiius ^ ^ ^ , ^, ,r • o. ^ c. • o , ^ -„ ^ 

In non-protected 3 ^^'^'^ o' ^''^ Nam Street Savings Bank and Trust 

— Company. 

Total 8 isAIAS W. HELLMAN.-Banking and real estate. Presl- 

* ■ dent of the Farmers and Merchants" Bank. 

ALASKA . L. L. BRADBURY.— Reputed to be the richest man In 

Alaska has great possibiUUes, but so far has not pro- Southern California. California mines; stocks and 

duced a mimonalre. ' ''-^1 ^^^^^ '"■ O^^^l-^nA and fouthern Cahfornia. 

, JOHN S. VOSBURG.— Arizona mines and Southern 

. -nrvrv-KT * California real estate. 

L. J. POsP^.— Fruit -raising, wine-maklng and lands. 

There are no millionaires in Arizona. He sold his famous "Sunny Slope" fruit ranch In 

• San Gabriel Valley during the boom of 1887 to an 

AKKANSAS. English syndicate for over a million dollars. 

CITY OF LITTLE EOCK. OAKLAND. 

LOGAN H. EOOTS.-Banklng; mall carrying; rail- Est Mrs. CATHEEINEGARCELON.-^he was a sister 

roads ; real estate ; and introducing telephone ser- <^ D^- f',^"'"^! '";™.**' "■ F°rty-Nmer, who left her 

vice in Texas and Arkansas. His first efforts were ^3,000,000. Made in hotel business, real estate, 

in cotton-raising after tlie war. He is a director In ^""^ loans. 

Ste Arkansas and Gulf Railroad, St. Louis, Iron "GEORGE W. GRAYSON (of Grayson Owens <t Co.)- 

Mountain and Southern Railroad; ConsoUdaled Ee- SUver mines, wine dealing; but cinefly lands and 

P 'T'^^O-^-^BZlnTootton raising, real estate, Bst. HOEACE H. SEATON.-Merchandislng and trade. 

at J- C. AINSWORTH.-Steamboatlng on the Columbia 

COLONEL ZEBTJLON WiUJD.-Cotton plantations and tf Willamette rivers In partnership with R R. 

leasing penitentiaries. ^ Thompson and S. »• Kead ; raal estate in Portland, 

E. W. MARTIN.-Trading and loaning money on plan- '^'^- ^^'^ '^ ^^^ State of Waslnngton, and banking. 

tatlons and real estate. SACRAMENTO. 

W. J. THOMPSON.— Trading and loaning money on EDGAR MILLS.— President of D. O. Mills <fc Co.'s bank; 

plantations and Investments in real estate. Banking and real estate. 

STEPHEN W. DO RSEY'.— Railroads In Arkansas ; stage MRS. MARGARET B. CROCKER (widow of Judge E. B. 

maU contracts; mining speculations; and ranch Crockerj.-Made in Central Pacific Railroad. 

and cattle In New-Mexico. NEWTON BOOTH.— Wholesale importation of groceries 

RECAPITULATION '^^^ dealing In tlie same. He is still a member of 

otocted Industries ' ... ^^^ '^ ^^"^ "' Booth & Co., wholesale grocers. 

In mm-protected l.idartrYe's."...'.— ...".'i.iii.ii.'.'.".'.'-"." 6 A. COOLOT.— Importing tobacco, cigars, ammunition 

~ and notions, in part. His wealth came largely, how- 
Total ^ ever, Irom the Central Pacific Railroad, of which he 

was an original stockholder. 

CALIFORNIA. WILLIAM land.— Hotel business and loans. 

BAKERSFIELD. "FREDERICK COX (of Cox & Clark).— Cattle-raising 

•J B HAGGIN.— Stock farm ; Anaconda copper mine, ^^'^ land. 

and real estate "'^- '^^ CLAEK (of Cox & Clark).-Cattle-ralsing and 

CHICO. land. 

JOHN BIDWELL.— Surveying, lanches, and fruit grow- JEFFERSON WILCOXSON.— DeaUng In cattle and 

Ing. sheep; real estate, loans and warehouse at Williams. 



6 



LIBEAi?.Y OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



"AtiLEN TOWLE.— Tiniier land and lumber manu- 
facturing In Placer County. 

"AUGUST HEILBEON.— Raising and s!auglitering cat- 
tle, and hardware business. 

**E. HEILEEON.— Raising and slaughtering cattle and 
hardware mei chandising in partneisliip with August 
HeUbron. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

JOHN W. ALL YNE.— Oils and real estate. 



O. D. BALDWIN.— Mines and real estate. 

•L. L. BAKER.— Manufacturing agricultural machinery 
and wholesale haKlware. 

J. BRANDERSTBUN.— Merchandising and lands. 

••Est. ARCH. BORLAND (of Grayson & Co.}.— Land, 
cattle-raising and mines. 

Est. ALPHEUS BULL.— Insurance ; silver and other 
mines ; speculation and banting. He was interested 
in the Big Bonanza mines and left an festate of sev- 
eral millions. 

E. J. BALDWIN.— Hotels, mining and real estate. 

THOMAS BELL.— Qulclisilver mines and commission 
merchandising. 

W. B. BOURNE.— Real estate and investments. 

HENRY BABCOCK.— Merchandising and real estate. 

Est. T. H. BLYTHE.— City real estate. He made a 
fortune of several millions. 

J. T. BOYD.— Real estate and street railroads. 

ALFRED BOREL (of Alfred Boiel & Co.).— Private 
banlilng, and lands. 

DAVID BIXLEE.— Silver and gold mines, and real- 
estate investments. 

■EDWARD BARRON.— Quietailver mines. 



PRINCESS GALATIO COLONNA (Paris).— From her 
father, John W. Maohay, made in the Bonanza silver 
mines. 

Est. ALFRED A. COHEN.— Attorney for Central Par 
clfio and other roads. In Oakland Ferry, real 
estate, etc. 

JULES CERF.— Real estate. 

GEORGE W. CROCKER.— Railroads and lands. 

MRS. CLARK W. CROCKER.- Railroads and lands. 

E. D. CHANDLER.- DeaUne in coal and T)lg iron. 

*W. H. COWELL.— Manufaetuiing lime and Investments 
In timber lands. 

JOHN CAEEOLL.— Merchandising and real estate. 

CHARLES F. CROCKER.- Inherited from Charles 
Orooljer, who made a great fortune in the Central 
Pacific Railroad and lands. Charles F. Crocker is 
vloe-presldent of that road and a director In 
Weils, Fai'go & Go's. Express Company. 

WILLIAM H. CROCKER.— Inherited from Charles 
Crocker and made In the Central Pacific Railroad, 
and lands. 

FREDERICK CEOCKEE.— Rallioads and lands. In- 
herited from Charles Crocker. 

MARIA COLEMAN (Sister of W. S. O'Brien).— Mines, 
etc. 

JAMES v. COLEMAN.— Rise m real estate. 



MRS. ARCHIBALD C. D. DICK (London).— From her 

father, Parrott. the banker. Made in mines, banking 

and real estate. 
*J. S. DOE.— Real estate and manufacturing doors, 

sashes, blinds and buUdlne. 
Est. COLL. DEANE.— Banking, brokerage and specu- 

tlon. 
••WILLIAM DUNPHY.— Wholesale cattle and lands. 
Est. S. P. DEWEY.— Speculation In mining shares. 
•MRS. PETEm DONAHUE.— Iron manufacturing, gas 

and investments. 
•MBS. J. MEEVYN DONAHUE.— Inherited from her 

husband. Made in gas stoci. Iron manufacturing, 

etc. 



C. J. DEMPSTER.— Merchandising and real estate. 

J. A. DONOHUE.— Private banking, real estate, gas 
and mines. 

*BARTLETT DOE.— Manufacturing doors, sashes and 
blinds, building and real estate. 

WAl/fBE E. DBANE.— Made in mines. 

A. E. DAVIS.— Railroads and mines. 

•HORACE DAVIS.— Flour-milling chiefly. 

M. H. DE YOUNG.— Publishing "The Dally Chron- 
icle," and Investments In real estate. 



J. ENEIGHT.— Real estate and lands. 
B. E. EYEE.— Mines and speculation. 
J. O. EAELE.— Speculation in mining shares. 



JAMES G. FAIR, Jr.— Silver mines and speculation. 
Inherited from his father, .Tames G. Fair, who wa» 
interested In the Big Bonanza mines. 

CHARLES FAIR.— Silver mines and speculation. In- 
herited fiom James G. Fair. 

MISS VIRGINIA FAIR.- Silver mines and specula- 
tion. Tnheriled. 

MRS. JAMES C. FLOOD.— Silver and gold mines ; bank- 
ing and real estate. Inherits from her husband. 

MISS CORA JANE FLOOD.— Inherited from her 
father, James C. Flood. Made In mines, banldng 
and real-estate. 

JAMES L. FLOOD.— Inherited from James C. Flood. 
mines, binking and real estate. 

0. N. FBLTON.— Mines and real esiate. 

LADY FLORENCE EMILY FENNOR-HESKETH (wUfr 
of Sir Thomas G. F. Fennor-Hesketh, England).— 
From her father, Williara Sharon. Made in silver 
mines, banliing, railroads, etc. 

W. P. PULLER (of Whittier, Fuller & Co.).— Made a. 
large fortune In dealing in paints, oils and glass. 



*E. L. GOLDSTEIN (of B. Dreyfus & Co.) Mfg. Cali- 
fornia wines and very valuable city real estate. 

LEWIS GERSTLE.— Importing furs and merchandis- 
ing in the Alaska Commercial Company. 

ADAM GRANT.— Mercliandlslng, drygoods nnd lands. 

•Est. WILLIAM T. GARRATT.— Foundry business; 
then railroads, steamship investments and mining. 

ALVINZA HA YWARD.— Silver and gold mines; Gold 
HIU Water Company ; railroads and real estate. 

S. C. HASTINGS.— Law and Investments. 

CHARLES WEBB HOWARD.-Water company and 
stocks. 

B. S. HELLER.- Wholesale drygoods. 

A. P. HOTALING.— Wholesale liquors and real estate. 

E. W. HOPKINS.-Made in the Central Pacific Railroad. 

TIMOTHY HOPKINS.-Mlnes and the Central Paolflo 
Railroad. He was the adopted son of Mark Hopkins, 
from whom he received a large legacy ; and he ob- 
tained $3,000,000 from the estate of Mrs. HopMns- 
Searles, to whom Marii HopMns left tlie bulk of his 
great fortune of over $20,000,000. Treasurer of the- 
Central Pacific EaUroad and director in the Southern 
Pacific. 

Est. MOSES HOPKINS.-Inherited from Mark Hopkins, 
who made a great foitune in the Central Pacific EaU- 
road and in mines. 

WILLIAM S. HOPKINS .-Fiom Mark HopWns, wfio- 
made a great fortune In the Central Paclfio Railroad 
and in mines. 

C. F. D. HASTINGS.-Made In merohaUdislng and real- 
estate. 

MR. HUTCHINSON.-Head of the Alaska Fur Company- 
Made in the fur business. 

Est. GEORGE HEAEST.— Silver, gold and copper 
mines, banking and real estate. 

W. E. HEAi! &T.— Sliver, gold and copper mins^ 
bajilang ajid real estate. 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



Est. W. S. HOBART.— Silver mines, speculation and Golo 

Hill Water Co. 
A. E. HEAD.— Speculation in mining shares. 

Est. JAMES IKVINE.— Meroliandlslng and land. 
JOHN P. JONES.— Silver and gold mines, speculation 

and banMng. 
M. P. JONES.— Merchandising and real estate. 
Est. ROBERT JOHNSON.— Merchandising iron. 
"JEFFERSON G. JAIMES.— Cattle raising and lands. 

J. G. KITTLE.— Merchandising and real estate. 
Est. MICHAEL J. KELLY.-Made in lands and real 
estate. 



MRS. M. A. PAEROTT.— Banlung, mines, real estat«, 
etc. John Parrott, her husband, was a pioneer. 

'GEORGE W. PRFiSCOlT.— Made In the Union Iron 
Worfes and investments. 

HENRY PIERCE.— Dealing in grain and judicious in- 
vestments. 



WILLIAM M. LENT.— Silver and other mines m CaU. 
lornia and Colorado and speculation. 

Est. NICHOLAS LUNING.— Real estate and loans. 

"■Est. CHARLES LUX (of Miller .% Lux).— Cattle-ralslng 
and lands. 

MR. LEWIS (of Allen & Lewis).— Commission grain. 

JEROME LINCOLN.— Merchandising and banlslng. 

Est. JAMES LICK.— Merchandising and rise in real 
estate. He owned an enormous amount of real 
estate, Including fifty lots in San Francisco, a large 
tract In Placer County, and th,3 island o: C.i-r.ta, Cat:.- 
line, containing 30,000 acres, lying ofl Los Angeles. 
He founded tlie lick Observatory. 

JOHN W. MACKAY.— Made In the Big Bonanza sUver 
mines, banMng and speculation. Director in the 
Commercial Cable Company. 

J. L, MOODY.- Merchandising and real estate. 

ANDREW B. McCREARY.— Speculation In mining 
shares and real estate. 

■"CHARLES MAIN (Of Main & Winchester).- Manufactur- 
ing harness In Portsmouth, N. H., and sale of goods 
here. Added to by Investments in real estate. 

ROBERT P. MORROW.— Silver and other mines and 
speculation. 

DANIEL MEYER.— Banking and investments. 

"HENRY MILLER (ol MUler & Lux).— Wholesale cattle- 
ralslng and Is-uds. 

DR. E. H. Mcdonald (of the Pacific BanlsO.- Finance 
and banMng. 

THOMAS MAGEE.— Real estate. 

Est. CHARLES MCLAUGHLIN.— Railroads and lands. 

Est. MRS. McDONOUGH.-From W. S. O'Brien. Made 
in silver mines, etc. 

JAME- M. McDOiNALD.— Merchandising, mines and 
real estate. 

DR. JOHN R. NIGHTINGALE.— Investments IQ real 

FRANCIS G. NEWLANDS.— From WUliam Sharon. Made 
In silver mines, etc. 

WILLIAM NOREIS.— Made in overland express busi- 
ness and banMng In Wells, Fargo & Co. Secretary 
ol the company. 

CORNELIUS O'CONNOR.— Real estate and stoots. 

JAMES F. OETMAN.— Groceries and real estate. 

TIBURCIO PARROTT.— Inherited. Made In mines, 
buildings, real estate and banhing. 

JOHN PARROTT.— Made in mines, banliing and real 
estate. , 

JAMES PHELAN.— A '49er. For tlUrty years an im- 
porter and dealer in merchandise and has Invest- 
ments In real estate. Is worth several millions. 

GEORGE C. PERKINS.- Merchandising and mines. 

Est. EDMUND PATTEN.— Speculation In mining shares. 

MRS. JOHN A. PAXTON.— BanMng and mines. 

•Est. A. J. POPE (of Pope & Talbot).— Manufacturing 
lumber; timber lands, and vessels. The firm has 
large Interests at Port Gamble, Wash. 

DR. E. B. PERRIN.— Lands. 



Est. MOSES EOSENBATTM.— Real estate and morchan- 
dlsing. 

Est. WILLIAM C. RALSTON- SUver mines, speculation 
and banMng. 

ISAAC L. REQUA.— Mines and speculation. 

DR. WASHINGTON M. EYER.— Made in real-estate In- 
vestments. 

A. G. RUSS.— Made in meichandising and real estate. 

Est. GEORGE W. RIDLEY.— Extensive wheat farmer 



and land-o^wner In Butte County. 

LOUIS SACHS.— Wholesale drygoods and clothing in 
Saelis Brothers & Co., here, and in Stiefel, Sachs & 
Co., New- York City. 

"CLAUS SPRECKELS.— Sugar refining. 

JOHN D. SPEECKELS.-Reoelved the gift of $1,000,000 
from iMs father, Claus Spreckels, ,who by his fight 
with the Eastern Sugai Trust compelled the latter to 
buy his Philadelphia sugar refinery at an advance of 
$3,000,000 over wliat he paid for it. 

MISS SPRECKELS.— Received a gilt of $1,000,000, made 
as above. 

Est. JOHN SKAE — Silver mines and speculation. 
San Fiuncisco and New- York City. Added to In reai 
estate. 

LEVI STRAUSS.— Merchandise drygoods and men's fur- 
nishing goods In the firm of Levi Strauss & Co., of 

GUSTAVE SUTRO— Mines and real estate. 

WILLIAM SHIELS— Else in real estate. 

Est. THOMAS SUNDERLAND.— SpeculaaoQ in mlnlna 
shares. 

ADOLPH ISUTRO.— Silver inines, speaulatlon, tth 
Sutro Tunnel and real estate. 

*A. M. SIMPSON.— Lumber m.«inufacturing and lands. 

LOUIS SLOSS.— Furs and merchandising in the Alaska 
Commercial Company. 

LELAND STANIX)RD.— Made a large fortune in build- 
ing and operating the Central Pacific Railroad ; in the 
Wells, Fargo & Co. Express ; In mines, and various 
Investments. President of the Central Pacific and 
director in the Southern Pacific, Wells, Fargo & 
Co., etc. 

PEED. W. SHARON.— Mines and real estate. 

ROBERT SHERWOOD.— Jewelry business and specu- 
lation in Comstock shares. 



MRS. J. D. TALLENT.— Banktnc. etc. 

"Est. W. C. TALBOT (of Pope & Talbot) .—Manufactur- 
ing, lumber, timber lands and vessels. The firm has 
sawmills and other large interests at Port Gamble, 
Wash. 

HIRAM TUBES.- Merchandising and lands. 

R. R. THOMPSON.— Mines and real estate. 

Est. RICHARD TOBIN.— Law practice, banMng and 
investments. 

Est. JAJttES P. TREADWELL.— Law practice, large 
fees, lo.ins, and city real estate. 

"WILLIAM H. TAYLOR.— Iron manufacturing. Presi- 
dent of the Risdon Iron Works. 

LLOYD TBVIS.— Made In the Wells, Fargo & Co. Ex- 
press, Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Bank and branches; 
banking, real estate and mines. President of Wells, 
Fargo & Co. 



N. VAN BERGEN (of N. Van Bergen & Co.).— ^Vhole- 
sale liquors and large Investments in real estate. 

MRS. J. H. VAJSr SCHEOEDEE.— Inherited. Ga» 
stock, etc. 



LIBRARY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



"•Est. JOHN WIELAJSTD (of the John Wieland Bre'wing 

Co.).— Brewing. 
J. C. WILMERDING.— Wholesale liquors and real estate. 
Est. ANDREW WELCH.— Shipping and commission. 
. Est. JOSEPH WOODWOETPl.— Speculation in mining 

shares. 
WHLIAM WAKEELEY.— aty real estate. 
Est. E. B. WOODWAED.— Hotel and real estate. 
WILLIAM H. WHITE.— Oils and real estate. 
Est. GENERAL THOJIAS H. WILLIAMS.— Sliver mines 

In Nevada. 
Est. EX-GO VEENOE E. H. WATEEM AN.— Mines and 

railroads. 
Est. S. M. WILSON.— Law and Inveatmemts. 
ME. WHia?TIER (of Wliittier & Fuller).— Dealing in 

paints, oOs and window glass. 
SAN" JOSE. 
"Est. DANIEL T. MT'EPHY.— Formerly Mayor of San 

Jose. Made a fortune In ranclie lands, cattle-raising 

and city real estate. 

WILLIAMS. 
JESSE C. SXOVALL (of Stovall & Wllcoxson).— Dealing 
In cattle and sheep ; loans, real estate and ware- 
housing. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Mainly in protected Industries 22 

Made in cattle-raising and Lands 13 

In non-protected industries 157 

Total 192 

COLORADO. 



COLOEADO SPEINGS. 

*J. J. HAGEEMAN.— Formerly one of the owners of tlie 
Chapln Iron mine In Wisconsin. Increased his 
wealth by sUver mines in Colorado, and railroad de- 
velopment. Director in the Aspen Mining and 
Smelting Company, Colorado Midland Railway, etc. 
CREEDE. 

N. 0. CREEDE.- Founder of the Creede Mining Camp, 
^vho is the owner of mines of great value. 
DENVER. 

N. P. HILL.— Boston and Colorado Smelting Company. 
Smelting and mining. 

•'J. S. BROWN.— Cattle and Avholesale groceries. 

W. M. CLAYTON.— Mnd? In real estate. 

G. W. CLAYTON.— Local real estate. 

DONALD FLETCHER.— Real estate. 

H. A. W. TABOR.- Gold and sliver mines. 

WILLIAM GILPIN.— Real estate, Spanish grant. 

Est. JEROME B. CHAFFEE.— Mercantile business and 
banMng, and finally in Colorado gold mines. 

ISAAC E. BLAKE.— Oil reilning and real estate. He 
Is connected ^vlth the Continental OE Company, a 
branch of the Standard Oil Company. 

MORITZ BAETH.— Made in real e5tate. 

DAVID H. MOFFAT, JR.— Banlnng, Colorado mines 
and railroads. President of the First National 
Banli, and of tlie Denv<Jr and Eio Giande Eailrpad. 

WILLIAM EARTH.— First in selling boots and shoes ; 
then in real estate, in wliioh his fortune has been 
chiefly nn.ade. President of the City National Banft. 

HENRY R. W0I£!OTT.— Mines, telephone and street 
railway stocli and real estate. Vice-President of the 
National Baafe of Commerce. Director In the Equita- 
ble Life Assmance Society of New-York. President 
of the Colorado Telephone Company, and director in 
many other corporations. 

Est. WILLIAM B. DANIELS.— Merchandising. Founder 
of the leading drygoods and cari)ets House of the 
plains. 

**DENNIS SULLIVAN.— Made in Colorado mines and 
cattle-iaislng. 



"HENEY' M. PORTER,.— Cattle-raising, real estate and 
mines. He Is the owner of a Mexican grant. 

S. N. WOOD.-Made in banlilng. 

**F. P. EENE&T.— Cattle-raising and real estate. 

JOB A. COOPER.-Eeal es'ate and banlung. President 
of the National Bank of Commerce. 

**Est. ME. ILIFF.— Made in cattle-ral&ing and real 
estate. 

GEORGE C. SCHLEIER,— Made ill real estate. 

F. A. KEENER.- Real estate and advance In values. 

J. B. GRANT (of the Omaha and Grant Smelting ahd 
Eeflnlng Company).— Mining first, and then smelting. 

E. EIIJ3Y (of the Omaha and Grant Smelting and Re- 
fining Company).— Coioiado mines and smelting. 

WILLIAM S. JAMES (of the Omaha and Grant Smelt- 
ing and Refining Company).— First in Colorado mines 
and then in smelting. 

CHARLES B. KOUNTZE.— Banldng, real estate, rail- 
loads, Colorado mines and smelting. President of 
the Colorado National Bank, and interested in the 
Globe Smelting and Eeflning Company. A large 
owner of leal estate. 

HBNEY C. BROWN.— Made in real estate and invests 
nients. Obtained by pre-emption 160 acres now in 
the heart of the city. Owner of the Henry C Brown 
Hotel, as weU as of other valuable property . 

JOHN J. RIETHMANN.— Banking, real estate and 
Colorado mines. President of the German National 
Bank. 

WALTER S. CHEESMAN.— Partly in mines and bank- 
ing, but mainly in real estate. Vice-President of 
the First National Bank. 

JOHN EVANS (ex-Governor of Colorado).- Made in 
railroad building, and In real estate at Evanston, 
111., and elsewhere. 

*E. F. HALLACK.— SawmiUs and lumber. 

"JOSEPH A. THATCHER.— Banking here and catLie- 
raising at Pueblo. Pietldent of the' Denver Nationa.1 
Bank and member of Thatclier Brothers. 

SAMUEL B. MOEGAN.— Colorado mines, and fortunate 
investments In real estate. 

GEORGETOWN. 

H. M. GRIFFIN.— He made a mUllon or thereabouts in 
sliver mining. 

MANITOU SPEINGS. 

JOHN HULBERT.— Mining brokerage and real estate. 

DR. WILLIAM A. BELL.— Railroads and real estate. 
PUEULO. 

"MAHLON D. THATCHEE.-BanMng and ca tie rais- 
ing in the firm of Thatcher Brothers. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries 2 

In cattle-raising and lands "'" 7 

In non-protected industries '..', 30 

Total i^ 



CONNECTICUT. 



ANSONIA. 
*FEANKLIN PAREELL.— Foundry and machine busi- 
ness. 

BEIDGEPORT. 

Est. P. T. BAENUM.— Museum and circus business. 

HENEY SANFOED.— Made in Adams Express Com- 
pany. 

CLAPP SPOONEE.— Eallroads and stocks. 

E. C. BASSICK.— Colorado mines. 

G. F. GILMAN.— In the tea business and investments. 

W. D. BISHOP.— Eallroads, stocks and Western Union 
Telegraph Company. Director in tile New-York, 
New-Haven and Hartford Railroad; Western Union, 
Telegraph Company, etc. 

"NATILANIEL WHEELEE.-Made Di the Wheeler dt 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



Wilson sewing machines, and investments. Director 
in tlie New-Yorl?, New-Haven and Hartford Railroad. 
••WILLIAM H. PEEEY.— Made In tlie Wlxeeler & Wil- 
son sewing machines, and investments. 
••Est. BENJAMIN B. HOTCHKISS.— Manufacturing 
firearms and machine guns. 

Est. ELIAS HOWE.— Eoyalties on sewing machine 
needles. 

CROMWELL. 
Est. JUSTIN STOCKING.— Made over $2,000,000, 
chiefly in railroads. 

FAIRFIELD. 

•MRS. HENEY S. GLOVER.- Made In the Cornwall ore 
tanlr, Pennsylvania. 

GREENWICH. 

CORNELIUS BENEDICT.— Stocks and brokerage. 

A. FOSTER HIGGINS.— Made in the practice of his pro- 
fession as adjuster and in insurance and Investments. 
HARTFORD. 

••CALDWELL H. COLT.— Manufacturing firearms. 

•LEONARD DANIELS.— Flour milling and Inveslr 
ments. 

Est. GFJSTERAIi CHARLES E. HILLYEE.— Eanlilng 

and Investments. 
SAMUEL L. CLEMENS (Imown In literature as " Marji 
Twain")-- Made in the publication of liis own boolcs, 
in the firm of Cliarles L. Webster & Co., New-Yorlc 
City. 

•Est. MARSHALL JEWELL.— Manufacture of belting 
and other lines of goods. 

•'MRS. SARAH COLT (widow of Samuel Colt).— Manu- 
facturing firearms. 

JAMES G. BATTERSON.— Insurance, building and 
contracting. 

BOLAND MATHER.— Merchandise, drygoods and bank- 
In B. 

HENRY KENEY.— Wholesale groceries, In partnership 
with Walter Keney, and investments in banks, in- 
surance companies, railroads, etc. 

Mrs. WALTER KENEY.— From her husband, wlio left 
to her his entire estate. Made in partnerslilp with 
HeUry Keney, as above. 

LIME ROCK. 

*Bst. WILLIAM H. BAENUM.— Manufacturing car- 
wheels and Iron foundry business. 
MEEIDEN. 

*N. L. BRADLEY.— Manufacturing gas and kerosene 
fixtures, lamps, bronzes, etc. He is the treasurer 
of the Bradley & Hubbard Manufacturing Co. 

•EDWAED MILLEE.— Manufacturing gas and kerosene 
fixtures, lamps, bronzes, etc. 

JOHN D. BILLARD.— Merchandising, coal and lumber, 
building 'Jtnd banking. President of the First 
National Bank aUd the City Savings Bank. 

•OHARLES PARKER.— Iron foundry, guns, wood- 
screws, lamps, vises, etc. President of the Cliarles 
Parker Co., Iron founders ; and m Parker Brothers, 
guns, and the Parlwr & Whipple Co., hardware 
mafiufacturers. 

•WALTER HUBBARD (President of Bradley-Hubbard 
Manufacturing Co.).— Manufacturing gas and kero- 
sene fixtures. 

•JOHN SUTLIFF (President, Foster & Merilam Co.).— 
Manufacturmg cabinet hardware. 

•Est. HORACE C. WILCOX.— Manufacturing plated 
ware. 

•Est. LEMUEL J. CURTIS.— Manufacturing plated 

ware. 

MIDDLETOWN. 

Est. JULIUS WADSWORTH.— Packing In Cldcago, 
merchandising; In New-Orleans, and railroads. 

•Est. HENRY G. HUBBARD.— Manufacturing and 
banUsg. 



Est. JAMES W. ALSOP.— Made in the West India 
Trade, real estate in New- York and railroads. 
NAUGATCCK. 

•JOHN H. WHITTEMORE (of the Tuttle & Whitte- 
more Malleable Iron Company).— Made in the manu- 
facture of Iron. The company is a large concern 
and has branches in several otner cities. 

NEW-BRITAIN. 

•Est. CORNELIUS B. ERWIX.— Manufafturijig hard- 
ware in the Russell & Erwin Manufactiiring Company. 
NEW-HAVEN. 

EZBKIEL H. TROWBRIDGE.— Shipping, West India 
trade and Investments. New-Haven Railroad, etc. 

DANIEL TROWBRIDGE.— Made in shipping iind the 
sale of groceries. 

HOADLEY B. IVES.— Mainly in railroad investments. 

*J. B. SARGENT (of Sargent & Co.).— Manufacturing 
hardware. 

TREDWELL KETCHAM.— BanMng and brokerage. 

Est. MRS. ARTHUR N. GIFFOED.— Inherited from her 
father, Plillip Manett, a merchant in Boston. 

Est. EICHARD S. FELLOWS.-Whoiesale merchant of 
cloolis and watches In New- York City, and In gas 
companies and factories in Connecticut. 

Est. HENRY FARNAM.— Canal and railroad building. 

•HENRY P. ENGLISH.— Inlierited. Lumber during the 
war, manufacturing clocks, etc., and a Uttle in ship- 
ping. 

•PIERCE N. WELCH.— Banking and manufacturing. 

•JUSTUS S. HOTCHKISS.-Largely inherited. Partly 
made In manufacturing and in lumber. 

Dr. HENRY BRONSON.— Long life of judicious invest- 
ments In real estate and securities. 

•«Est< OLIVER V. WINCHESTER^— ManufactUTlnB 
patent shirts in Boston, and then manufacturer of 
fire-arms in New-Haven. 

NORWALK. 

Est. HANFORD SMITH.— Partly in real estate. 
NORWICH. 

•WILLIAM A. SLATER.— Inherited. Made In cotton 
maliulactiuing by his 'father, John F. Slater, who 
left an estate ot sever.il mffllons, and who gave 
$1,000,000 for the education of the colored race in 
the South. 

Est. EDWARD CHAPPELL.— Merchandising ; lumber 
and coal. 

•A. P. STURTEVANT.— WooUen manufacturing in Con- 
necticut; and real estate, including the Sturtevant 
House, In Kew-Yorif City. 

•CHARLES L. HUBBARD.— From his fatlier, James L. 
Hubbard. Made in tlie manufacture of paper. 

•Est. LORENZO BLACKSTONE.— Made in cotton manu- 
facturing and Investments. 

PORTLAND. 

Est. DAVID HALL.— Chlefiy made in real estate In New- 
York City. 

ROCKVILLE. 

•Est. CYRUS WHITE.— Manufacturing envelopes and 
ginghams, rise In real estate, etc. 
SOUTHPORT. 

Est. FREDERICK MARQUAND.— Jewelry business In 
New-York City and investments in real estate. 
STAMFORD. 

GEORGE H. CHASE.— Stock brokerage business In New- 
York City. 

"WALTON FERGUSON.— Iron manufacturing at Pitts- 
burg. 

•Est. GEORGE A. HOYT.— Merchandise, clothing, min- 
ing coal, and real estate. 

•JOSEPH B. HOYT (of Schuiz & Hoyt, hide and leather 
merchants, New-York City).— Partly Inherited from 
Josepli B. Hoyt, lUs lather, manufacturer of leather 



10 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



belting, tanner and dealer in leather, who founded 
the firm of Hoyt Brotliers, and was associated with 
Ladew and Fayerweather as J. B. Hoyt a.-. Co. 

•THE EEV. T. H. POETBE.— Inherited ; tanning and 
leather. 

J. I. EAYMOND.— Importing at New- York. 

HBNEY K. McHAEG.— Brolierage business In New- 
York, railroads, and investments ; is In Wabash Rail- 
road, Colorado Coal and Iron Coonpany, Morning Star 
Consolidated Mining Company, Evening Star Mining 
Company, etc. 

•*HENRY E. TOWNE (president Yale & Towne Manu- 
facturing Company).— Manufacturing patented lochs. 

•FRANK SWAN".— Iron manufacturing in Joliet. 

WILLIAM HUBBARD.— Mercliandislng in New-York 
City. 

HIEAM DEWING-.— Stoclcs. 

W. A. LOTTIMEE.— Inlierlted ; made in merchandizing 
drygoods, and in stocks. 

••JOHN V. HECKER.— SeU-raislng flour, mining In 
New-Y'ork ty his fatlier and himself. President of 
the George V. Hecker Company. 

"W. W. SKIDDY (president of Stamford Manufacturing 
Company).— Manufacturing licorice and extracts. 

JAMES D. SMITH (of James D. Smith & Co., New- 
York).— Brokerage and banlring business and stoclts. 

FRANK PHELPS.— Importation of merchandise. In 
business in New-York City. 
(For otlier wealthy men who liave a summer resi- 

deiice in Stamford, see New- York City.) 
THOMASTON. 

••Est. SETH THOMAS.— Manufacturing clocks. 
WEST WINSTED. 

**Est. WILLIAM L. GILBERT.— For fifty years presi- 
dent of the Gilbert Clock Company. Had other factory 
and banking interests. He was a member of Gilbert 
& Gay, bankers, now Holmes & Gay. 
RECAPITULATION. 

Mainly in probected industries '. 29 

In manufacture of patented articles 10 

In nonprotected industries 39 

Total .; 78 



DELAWARE. 



RECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries 6 

In non-protected industries 5 

Total 11 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 



WILMINGTON. 

•JOSEPH SWIFT.- Manufacturing matches. 

•WILLIAM K. SWIFT.— Manufacturing matches. 

MSS. E. B. McCOMB (widow of Henry S. McComb).— 
Made in railroad building and railroad stocks chiefly. 
Some in tanning. 

JAMES C, McCOMB.— Made in railroad building and 
railroad stocks chiefly. Some in tanning. 

MISS HANNAH SHIPLEY.-Made in banMng by her 
brother, Joseph Shipley, an Englishman. 

•COLONEL H. A. DUPONT.— Fi-om Ms father. General 
Henry Dupont, head of tlie Dupont Powder Works, 
and made in tlie manufacture of gunpowder and in- 
vestment of accumulations. Colonel Dupont is 
president of the Wilmington and Northern Eailroad 
Company. 

•WILLIAM DUPONT.— Inherited. Fortune made In 
manufacturing powder. 

•Est. SAMUEL HARLAN (of Harlan & Hollingsworth 
Company).— Iron shipbuilding. 

THOMAS JACKSON (of Harlan & Hollingsworth Com- 
pany).— Iron shlDbuiltlinK. 

Eat. COLONEL JOSHUA CLAYTON.— Planting and farm 
lands. 

LEWES. 

Est. HARBESON HICKMAlSr.— Land Investments In the 
West, and vessels and lands in Delaware. 



MRS. NICHOLAS L. ANDERSON.— From Nicholas 

Longworth, of Cincinnati. Made In real estate and 

Investments. 
ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL.— Made In the BeU 

telephone, jjatented. 
MRS. ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL.— Made tn the 

Bell telephone, patented. Her husband transferred 

to her ?10,000,000 or more of the stock of the Bell 

Telephone Company. 
'REV. JOHN A. ASPINWALL.— From his father, William 

H. Asi)inwall. Made in coas .ing vessels, the Panama 

Railroad, etc. 
A. L. BARBER.— Asplialt street pavements. The 

Bai'ber Asphalt Paving Company has branches In 

New- York City, Long Island City, Harrisburgh, Chi- 
cago, St. Louis, St. Joseph and Omaha. 
Est. W. W. CORCORAN.- Banking and negotiation of 

United States bonds. 
MRS. ZACHAEIAH CHANDLER.— Wholesale drygoods 

and speculation In United States bonds. 
MATTHEW G. EMERY.— Real estate and banking, 

president of Second National Bonk. 
CHARLES C. GLC)VER (of Riggs & Co., bankers) —Made 

a fortune in banking and sagacious investments in 

real estate. 
GARDINER. G. HUBBARD.— Made in the BeU tele- 
phone maijily, but lie is also extensively interested 

In city and suburban real estate in Washington. 
-CHRISTIAN HEURICH.-Brewlng and real estate. 
GEORGE E. LEMON.— Pension agency business and his 

weekly newspaper. i | : '^ 

JOHN T. LENMAX.-Eeal estate. He owns the Leh- 
man BxUlding and a large amount of other local 

property. 
MRS. DAVID B. MORGAN.-Made bv her husband In 

WaU Street. 
•Kst. HENRY McSHANE.— Bell and brass foundry 

business. 
•Est. SAMUEL NOEMBNT.— Lumber manufacturing, 

Insurance and real estate. Was president of 

Central National Bank. 
Est. PEOFESSOE PATTEN.-Western railroads and 

lands. 
E. FRANCIS EIGGS.-IMvate banking. Inherited from 

George W. Riggs, the banker, who was associated 

with W. W. Corcoran in Riggs & Co., and who left 

an estate of over $3,000,000. 
•JAMES N. EICHAEDS.— Manufacturing brloki^ 
COLONEL HBNEY STEONG.-Eeal estate, etc. 
JOHN W. THOMPSON.-Plnmbing, real estate, local 

corporations and railroads. President of National 

Metropolitan Bank. 
MES. EDWARD TEMPLE.-From her father. WilUam 

Gunton. Made in real estate and banking. 
O-VLEB C. WILLARD.-One of the three Willard 

brothers, who have figiu^ here for half a century 

and own tlio Willard Hotel and some of the finest of 

Washington property. 
JOSEPH WILLARD.-lnotel-keeplng, real estate and 

local corporations. 
HENRY A.. WILLARD. -Hotel-keeping, rfal estate and 

local corporations. 
MRS. JOHN HAY.— Inherited from Amf.sa Stone, lieir 

father. Made in bridge-building and railroads and 

miscellaneous enterprises. 
GENERAL EDWARD P. BEALE.— Lanfls in CaUtornla 

(Spanish grants) and local Investments. He was 



AMERICAN HOLLIONAIEES. 



:i 



appointed Surveyor-General of California by Presi- 
dent Grant and thus became acquainted with the op- 
portimlties ■wfficli led to his great fortune. He has 
real estate here. 

Est. JOHN ELLIOTT.— Banhlng, merchandising and 
investments. 

Est. COLONEL WILLIAM M. STEWART.— Law nractlce 
In California, banlts In the South, etc. 

"MISS SARAH H. COLEMAN.— Made in Pennsylvania 
In the almost Inexhaustible Cornwall iron-ore hills. 
See Cornwall, Penn. 

ilRS. MARGARET C. FREEMAN (born Coleman and 
widow of Colonel W. G. Freeman, U. S. A.)— Her 
fortune comes from the Cornwall iron-ore hills. See 
Cornwall, Penn. 

HUGH McCTJLLOCH.- Made in banliing and rail- 
roa<ls. Was with Jay Cooke <fe Co. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries mainly 7 

in non-protected industries S5 

Total 32 

FLOEIDA. 

KEY WEST. 

•EDWARD H. GATO— CigarmaMng. 

•WILLIAM CURRY- Shipbuilding and merchandising, 

groceries and provisions. 

OCALA. 

JOHN F. DUNN— Phosphate lands, orange groves and 

banldng. Is president of Merchants' Natloaial 

Bank. 

PENSACOLA. 

•MARTIN H. SULLIVAN— Partly Inherited. Made In 
sawmills, export of lumber and banldng. He is 
president of First National Bank. 
ST. AUGUSTINE. 
I. 6. ORUFTS— Hotel and real estate. He has several 
hotels in different parts of the country. 
SAHTFORD. 
HENEY S. SANFORD— Real estate and banking. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries mainly 3 

In non-protected industries 3 

Total 6 

GEORGIA. 

CITY OP ATLANTA. 
HUGH T. INMAN.— Merchandising and Investments. 
S. M. INMAN.— Commission cotton business. 
'EX-SENATOE .JOSEPH E. BROWN.— Made in railroads 
ahd real estate, iron and coal propei-ty In the South, 
and Atlanta real estate. 
CAPTAIN W. D. GRANT.— Railroad buUding; leasing 
convicts ; and Atlanta real estate, of whicli lie is 
probably the largest single holder. 
AUGUSTA. 
J. B. WHITE.— Wholesale and retail drygoods, cloth- 
ing and boots and shoes. 

GEOVETON. 
"HAEMON EOWLEY.— Interested In foundry business, 
real estate and investments. 

LITHIA SPEINGS. 
E. W. MAEbH.— Hotel business and real estate. 

SAVANNAH. 
ME. FRANK.— Wholesale drygoods. 
ME. MEINHARD.— Wholesale clothing. 
RECAPITULATION. 

Mainly in protected industries 3 

In non-piotected Industries 7 

Total 9 



IDAHO. 

BOISE CITY. 
J. R. D. LAMAR.- Mines (gold and silver). 
•JOHN LEMP.— Brewing and banking. He is president 
of the First National Bank of Idaho. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries mainly 1 

In non-protected industries 1 

Total 2 



ILLINOIS. 



BLOOMINGTON. 
Est. MATTHEW W. SCOTT.— Dealing in coal and tim- 
ber lands, and large areas of farm land. 
•*Est. CYRENUS WAKEFIELD.— Manufacture of pro- 
prietary medicines. 

CABLE. 
MRS. MARY I. CABLE.— Merchandising and Invest- 
ments. 

CAIRO. 
WILLIAM P. HALLIDAY.— Forwarding, grain and 
lumber, banking, and real estate. Is president of 
City National Bank. 

DECATUR. 

W. H. ENNIS.— Railroad building and contracting main- 
ly. He helped construct the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, and bought lands along the line and sold 
them at a large profit. He inherited large tracts of 
land aiid is the owner of many improved farms. 

LEWIS B. CASNER.— Made in farmtng. lands, and In- 
herl ance from brothers, who made their money in 
the same way. 

ORLANDO POWERS.— Country and city real estate. 
He owns blocks of business property In Decatur, 
including the Powers Opera House, which he built, 
and has some valuable farming lands. 
DE KALB. 

••ISAAC L. ELWOOD.— Manufacturing patented ar- 
ticles and barbed wire. He is worth several millions. 

•*W. L. ELWOOD.— Manufacturing patented articles and 
barbed wire in partnership with his father, Isaac L. 
Elwood ; and importing and selling horses. 

*J. P. GLIDDEN.— Made in iron manufactm'ing and in- 
vestments. Owner in the De Ivalb Eollihg Mills, 
and In the Glidden House. 

ELGIN. 

MARK W. DUNHAM.— Breeding of Percheron horses, 
and stock farm of 2,000 acres. 

••MATTHEW W. DU BOIS.— Cattle raising in Texas, 
and farm at Elgin. He made his first $50,000 in 
the drygoods business. 

•Est. MARTIN EYEESON.— Manufacturing Elgin 
watches. 

FERNWOOD. 

*E. F. GILLETTE.— Flour milling. 

MOLINE. 
•CHARLES H. DEERE (of I>eer6 & Co.)— Manu- 
facturing ploughs and agricultural Implements. 
NATIONAL STOCK YAEDS. 
FRANCIS WHITAKER.— Pork packing. 

PANA. 

WILLIAM EUGENE HAYWARD.— Mostly Inherited 

from Ills father, .John S. Haywaixl. All made la 

banking, real estate and loans. 

PEORIA. 

JOHN C. PROCTOR.— Lumber dealing, real estate and 

presldenit of First National Bank. 
•MARTIN KINGMAN.— Manufacturing agricultural Im- 
plements, and president of Central National Bank. 
Est. JACOB DARST.— Made in real estate- 



12 



LIBRAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



•MRS. LYDIA BEADLBY.— From her husband; made 
In distilling and real estate. 

CHARLES P. KING.— BanMng and real estate; presi- 
dent of Peoria National BanlJ. 

'PHILrP ZELL.— Banting and distilling. 

••MRS. JAI^E GCTH.— (Inlierited from her lather). 
Distilling. 

QUJNCY. 

H. J. F. RICKEE.— Banking and real estate. 

EUOWAED WELLS.— Pork-packing and real estate. 

MRS. SAEAH M. MOFFATT.— Real estate. 

JAMES WOODEDFF.— Real estate and stocks. 
ROCK ISLAND. 

*FREDER1CK WEYERHAUSER (of Weyerhauser <Js 
Denckman).— SawiulUs a.t Chippewa Falls, Wis., and 
advance In value oil large tracts of pLne timber lands. 
The firm has a branch at Davenport, Iowa. 

*F. C. A. DENCKMAJST.— Lumber manufaoturing in Wis- 
consin, and pine lands. 

BENJAMIN T. CABLE.— Merchandising and invest- 
ments. 

SPRINGFIELD. 

GEORGE PASSFIELD.— Loaning money, and buying 
farms and real estate. 

TAYLDESVILLE. 

HORATIO M. VANDEVEER .-Principal owner in H. M. 
Vandeveer & Co., banltei'S. Made a large fortune in 
buying farms, loaning money and banliing. 

WARSAW. 
WILLIAM HILL.— BaBMng in the firm of HIU, Doige 

& Co. 
JAMES B. DODGE.— Banking. President of the bank 

of HIU, Dodge <fc Co. 

WATJKEGAIT. 

•VINCENT C. PRICE.— Manufacture of baking powder 
and flavoring extracts. 

CITY OF CHICAGO. 

ENOS AYRES— Rise in real estate. 

•LEOPOLD AUSTRIAN— Commission business and 
Lake Supsrior steamers. Has an inteivst in a mirror 
f actor j' . 

JAMES M. ADSIT— Building and banking. 

JOHN Q, ADAMS— Commission Kiain. 

•J. MCGREGOR ADAMS— President of Adams <fc 
Westlake Manufacturing Company. Made In manu- 
facturing ironworlj, Un cans and utensils. 

PHILIP D. AEMOUE (of Armour & Co.).— Has made a 
large fortune, as have also other members of the 
firm, in the wholesale provision and commission 
business; packing and speculation. 

PHILIP D. AEMOXIR, JR.- Packing, speculation and 
railroads. Director in the Clilcago, Milwaukee and 
St. Paul Eiiilway. 

J. O. AEMOUE- Pacliing, speculation and railroads. 

ALBERT J. AVEEILL— Real estate. 

•Est. E. 6. ALEXANDER- Manufaoturing paints, etc. 

EDWARD E. AYEK.— EaUroad ties and telegraph poles. 

SAMUEL W. ALLEETON— Dealing in live-stock, pack- 
ing and speculation. 



CHAUNCEY J. BLAIB.— Merchandising and banldng. 
President of the Merchants' National Bank. 

TIMOTHY B. BLACKSTONE.— President of the Ch'cago 
and Alton Railroad. Made in railroads. 

HEEVEY BOTSFOED.— Packine and real esta.te. 

WILLIAM BLAIE.— Wliolesale hardware. 

ALBERT M. BILLINGS.— Gasworks and banking. 
President of Home National Bank. 

•SAMUEL E. BARRETT.— Manufacturing and Invest- 
ments. Principal owner in the S. E. Barrett Manu- 
facturing Coaapany, manufactm'ers of roofing ma- 
terials, with branches in Beloit, Kansas City, Minne- 
apolis and Louisville. 



WILLIAM T. BAKER.— Grain and Commission. 

E. BUCKINGHAM.— Elevators and banking. 

JOHN C. BLiVCK.— Packing and banking. President of 
the Continental National Bank. 

MRS. JOSEPH T. BOWEN.— Inherited. Made In bank- 
ing, real estate and railroads. 

ADOLPHUS C. BAETLETT.— Wholesale hardware. 

ADDISON BALLAED.— Building and dealing In lum- 
ber. 

ALFRED BOOTH (of the A. Booth PacMng Company). 
—Made in the sale and packing of fish, oysters, etc. 

••JAMES BOLTON.- Made a fortune as agent for the 
Singer Sewing Macliine Company. 

DR. ALVIN BROOKS.— Made in medical practice, hotel- 
keeping at Hot Springs, Ark., and real estate In' Chi- 
cago. 

W. H. BEIDLEE.— Dealing in lumber. 

JACOB BEIDLEE.— Banking, lumber dealins, real es- 
tate, etc. 

•MICHAEL BEAND.— Brewing and real estate. 

•EUDOLPH BRAND.— Brewing and real estate. 

•GEOEGE BULLEN.— Maltine and real estate. 

JEEOME BEECHER.— Merchandising, boots, shoes and 
leather; then railroads and real estate. 

JOHN BUCHLEE.— Merchandising and banking. 

WILLIAM BOEDEN.— Mining speculations and real 
estate. 

W. H. BRADLEY.— Eeal estate and stocks. Partly 
maclo at Galena, 111. 

LEOPOLD BLOOM.— Speculation In produce. 

Est. WILLIAM BEOSS.— Newspaper publishing. 

*F. BAJITHOLOMAC (of the Bartholomac and Eoesing 
Brewing and Malting Company).— Made in brewing, 
malting and real ©state. 

ARTHUR G. 1; HE LEY.— Made in wholesale and retail 
crockoiy and glassware. 

JOHN BORDEN.— Law practice and speculation In 
Colorado gold mines. 

••Est. EDWIN LEE BROWN.— Manufacture of pat- 
ented articles. 

RANSOME E. CABLE.— Originally in merchancllsing 
but later In railroads. I'resldent of the CMcago, 
Eook Island and Pacific Eallroad. 

ANDBEW CRAWFOED.— Made in local railroads. Was 
president oi the Cliicago and Western Indiana Belt 
Line. 

EDWAED A. CUDAHY.— Packing and speculation. 

JOHN CUDAHY.— Packing and speculation 

MICHAEL CUDAHY.— Packing and speculation. 

CHAELES COITN.SBLMAN.— Commission grain, with 
branclies at Des Moines and New-Y'ork City. 

COLUMBUS E. CUMMINGS.— Eallroad building; spec- 
ulation and banking; President of Union National 
Bank formerly. Interested In manufacturing to 
some extent. 

••EICHAED T. CRANE.— Manufacturing iron and pat- 
ented elevators. 

Est. HENRY COEWITH.— Some lead-mining and lum- 
ber, but mostly real estate and pine lands. 

AUGUSTUS A. CAEPENTEE.— Lumber dealing. 

JOHN V. CLARKE.- Banking. President of Hiber- 
nian Banldng Association. 

Est. ALFEES) CO WLES.— Publishing "The Chicago 
Tribune" and real estate. 

SAMUEL B. CHASE.— Abstracts of title and real estate. 

•W. J. CHALMEES.— Manufacturing and deaUng in 
Iron. 

•Est. JOHN CEEEAE.— Manufacturing. 

JUDGE JOHN D. CATON— Telegraph, foundry and 
glassworks in Canada, cutting granite with a patent 
macliine. 
Est. -JOHN B. CARSON. -Made in railroads. 
Est. BENJAMIN H. CAMPBELL .-Steamboats, horse 
railroad^, groceries and safe manufacturing. 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



13 



SILAS B. COBB.— Harness maker and leather dealer. 

Afterward real estate and Investments. 
*JOHN M. CLAKK.— Leather dealing and tanning. 
PAXIL COEWBLL.— Law and real estate Investments. 
Est. TAilES C. CLEMENT.— Merchandising and real 



•THOMAS CHALMERS (of Fraser & Chalmers).— Made 
in the manufacture of mining and other machinery. 
They have branches at Denver, Helena, Salt Lake 
City, City ol Mexico and Chlhauhau. 



JOHN DUPEE, JE.— Commission grain and specula- 
tion. 

*WLRT DEXTER.— La-w practice, timber lands and 
lumber manufacturing. 

Est. JOHN L. DUBRIBL.— Real estate. 

WILLIAM M. DERBY.— Railroad building and real es- 
tate. 

JOHN H. DUNHAM.— Wholesale groceries, banking 
and real estate. 

*GEOEGE E. P. DODGE (of Phelps, Dodge & Palmer 
Co.).- Manufacturing boots and shoes. 

**W1LLIAM DEERING.— Manufacturing of patented 
reapers and mowers. 

JOHN B. DRAKE (of Drake, X-'arker <fc Co.).— Grand 
Pacific Hotel ; banking, railroads and real estate. 

J-\MES H. DOLE.— Grain elevators, ice business and 
real estate. 

HENRY C. DURAND.— Wholesale groceries. 

JOHN DE KOVEN.— Banking, railroads and real estate. 
Director in tlie American Surety Company, Chicago, 
Rode Island and Pacific Railroad, etc. 

Jf »HN W. DOANE.— Wholesale tea and groceries, etc. ; 
president ol Merchant's Loan and Trust Company. 
Director In Pullman's Palace Car Company. 

GEORGE L. DUNLAP.— Made a fortune in the firm of 
George L. Dunlap & Co., iu tlie grain elevator busi- 
ness. 



JOHN W. ELLSWORTH.— Dealing In coal. 
HENRY F. EAMES.— Banking ; president or tlie Com- 
mercial National Bank. 

♦WILLIAM A. FULLER— Manufacturing sah. doors, 
blinds, etc. 

'CHARLES H. FARGO— Manufacturing boots and 
shoes, etc. 

J. Q. FAELIN— Miscellaneous investments. 

*D. E. FRASER (Of Fraser <t Chabners).— Made in the 
manufaetvire of mining and other machinery. They 
liave branches at Denver, Helena, Salt Lake City, 
City ol Mexico and Chihuahua. 

■*N. D. FRASER— Manufacturing machinery. 

Est. L. C. PAINE FREER— Real estate and loans. 

CHARLES W. FULLERTON— Made in land and real 
estate investments. 

EJ\IANi:EL FIIANKENTHAL- Wl:ol:sale tobacco. 

H. J. FURBEIv— Speculation. 

Est. HENRY FIELD.— Merclianfllslng, drygoods. 

H. GEBHAED FOREMAN- Private banking. 

MARSHALL FIELD (of Field. Leiter & Co.)— Whole- 
sale and retail drygoods, and Investments. He is 
a, director in the Chcago, Rock Island and Pacific 
Railroad, Duluth and Iron Range Railroad, Minnesota 
Iron Co-Tipany, Pullman's Palace Car Company, etc. 

Est. DAVID B. FISK— Wholesale millinery. 

NATHANIEL K. FAJRBANK— Refining lard and cot 
ton oil, soap, mining speculation, and Chicago and 
Nortliwestem Railroad. 

JOl-lN V. FARWELL (ol the John V. Farwell Com- 
pany).— Made in wholesale drygoods. They are one 
111 the great drygoods concerns of the Northwest. 

CHARLES B. FARWELL— Wliolesale drygoods. 

RC)EEET D. FOWLER— Packing meats. 



•*J J. GLESSNEE.— Manufacturing patented farm Im- 
plements. 
^VILLIAM A. GILIS.— Wholesale and retail Jewelry. 
FR-VNKLIN D. GRAY.— Wholesale groceries. 
ELIAS GREENEBAUM.— Banking and loans. 

G. H. HAMMOND.— Merchandising dressed beef. 

'CHARLES M. HENDERSON.— Manufacturing boots 
and shoes. 

WILLIAM G. HIBBAED (ol Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett 
& Co.).— Wholesale hardware. 

BENJAMIN P. HUTCHINSON.— Produce and specula 
tion. 

WILLIAM M. HOYT.— Wholesale groceries. 

HAELOW N. lUGGINBOTHAM.— Drygoods. 

CAETER H. HARRISON.— Railroads and land. 

MRS. NOLAN HATHAWAY (born Bowen).— Banking. 

ANTO.N" C. HBSING.— " Staats Zeitung" newspaper. 

MRS. IRA HOLMES.— From her lather, a Ilguor mei^ 
chant. 

PHILANDER C. HANFORD.— Oil refining and trans- 
portation. 

P. E. HINKLEY.— Railroads. 

WILLIAM B. HOWARD.— Contracting and raUroads. 

CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON.— Banking (president Com 
Excliange Bank) and speculation. 

TAELINGTON W. HARVEY.— Lumber dealing. 

PERRY HANNAH.— Lumber dealing. 

Est. CHARLES J. HALL.— Irivestments In real estate. 

nviLLIAM A. HAVEJIBYER.— Sugar refining. 

GEORGE F. HARDING.— Inherited from his father. 
Made in real estate. Is himsell a large operator la 
real estate and builder. 

Est. CHARLES B. HOSMER.— Rise in real estate. 

VAN H. HIGGINS.— Real estate speculations. 

MARVIN HUGHlTr.— Railroads, especially Cldcago and 
Northwestern, ol which he is the president. Presi- 
dent also ol the Chicago, St. Paul, Mirmeajpolis and 
Omaiha Railway. Director in the Union Pacific and 
other roads. 

DAVID K. HILL.— Merchandising, clotlilng. 

Est. MRS. MATILDA C. HALE.— Inherited. Made in 
real estate. 

'Est. FREDERICK HASKELL.— EuUding railroad cars. 

JAMES B. HOBBS.— Operations on Board ol Trade, 
later. Investments in real estate. President ol the 
Commercial Loan and Trust Company. 

*FRAN'KL1N H. HEAD.— Iron ores and iron manu- 
laoturing. 

AMOS L. HOPKINS.— Made in railroads. President ol 
the Peoria and Peltln Union Railway. Director in 
the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern RaUroad, 
the Texas and Pacific, and other roads. 



D-U'ID W. IRWIN (of Irwin, Green & Co.).— Commis- 
sion grain. 

FERNANDO JONES.— Examination ol titles to real 
estate; abstracts ol title; and Investments In real 
estate. 

J. RUSSELL JONES.— Railroads. 

NAT. C. JONBS.-Commlssion grain. 

Est. JOHN D. JENNINGS.— Jlerchandise, etc. 



»V. C. GODDY'.— Law practice, real estate and raUroads. 



'JAMES A. KIRK (of James S. Kirk & Co.).— Made In 
the mannlaoture of high-class soaps and perltunery. 

ALBERT E. KENT.— Speculation In produce, etc. 

DAVID KELLOGG.— Real estate. 

•MICHAEL W. KERWIN.— DistUUug and real estate. 

SIDNEY' A. KENT.— Real estate, gas works and si>3cula- 
tlou. 

EDSON KEITH (ol Edson Keith & Co.).— Made In whole- 
sale millinery. 

HENRY KEEP.— Railroads and merchandising. 

JOSEPH A. KOHN (ol Kolm Brothers).— Made iu whole- 
sale clothes and clotlilng. 



14 



LIBRARY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



DAVID A. KOHN.— Wholesale clothing. 

ALBERT KEEP.— Railroads and speculation. 

"HENRY W. KING.— Manuiacturlng and sale ol clotliing. 

JOHN A. KING.— Wholesale drygoods and banldng. 
President of the Fort Dearhorn National Bank. 

•JOHN C. KING.— Sawmills and lumber. 

HERMAN H. KOHLSAAT.— Real estate at Galena, 111. 

ELBRIDGE G. KEITH.— Wholesale millinery, hats, 
gloves, etc., and banldng. President of the Metro- 
politan National Bank. 

•WILLIAM W. KIMBALL (of W. W. KlmbaU & Co.).— 
Principal owner of the concern. Made In manu- 
facturing pianos and organs, and Investment of ac- 
cumulations. 

SENECA D. KIMBARK.— Wholesale Iron carriage mar 
terial. 

Est. JOHN T. LESTER (of J. T. Lester & Co.).— Oom- 

missloiL grain and stoc]5)5i. 
VICrOK LAWSON.— Publishing "The Dally News." 
LEVI Z. LEITEE.— ^Vliolesale and retail drygoods, real 

estate and speculation In mines. 
MATTHIEW LAPLIN.— Real eatate and investments. 
GEORGE H. LAPLIN.— Real estate and investments. 
LYCURGUS LAPLIN.— Real estate aed investments. 
ROBERT LAW.— Dealing In pig-iron and coal. 
VOHN MASON LOOMIS.— Saw-miUs and lumber. 
ERNEST J. LEHMAN.— Merchandising and real ©sbaite. 
•A. TRACY LAY.— Manufacturing lumber. 
ROBERT LINDBLOM.— Grain and commission. 
THOMAS LYNCH.— Distilling. 
CHARLES P. LIBBY.— Pacljlng meals. 
•LUDINGTON ESTATE.— Lumber manufacturing and 

banldng. 

NELSON MORRIS.— PacMng and dressed meats. 

JOHN J. MITCHELL.— Banldng. President of the 
Illinois Tmst and Savings Banli. 

•SAMUEL K. MAJBTIN.— Sawmills and lumber. 

ALBERT L. MUNGER.— Inherited warehousing. 

**CYETJS H. McCORMlCK (01 the McCormick Harvest- 
ing Machine Company).— Manufacturing patented 
mowers and reapers. 

**MES. C. H. MCCORMICK.— Manufacturing patented 
mowers and reapers. 

••LEANDBR J. McCOEMICK.— Manufacturing patented 
mowers and reapers. 

•JAY C. MORSE— Rolling mill and Bessemer steel 
manufacturing. President of the Illinois Steel Com- 
pany. Director In tlie Minnesota Iron Company. 

THOMAS MURDOCK.— AYholesale groceries. 

ROBERT MEADOWCEOFT (of Meadowcroft Brothers). 
—Made in private banking and Investments. 

THOMAS MACKIN.— Contracting and building. 

ANDREW McNALLY (of Rand, McNally & Co.).— Pub- 
lishing copyrighted books. 

FRANKLIN McVEAGH.^Grocerles. 

MICHAEL C. McDonald.— Speculation, and Invest- 
ments in real estate, elevated roads. 

EDWARD MANDBL (Of Mandel Brothers).— Wholesale 
and retail drygoods. 

•JOHN H. MoAVOY.— Brewing and real estate. 

JOSEPH MEDILL.— PubUshlng "The Chicago Tribune." 

EZEKIEL MORRISON.— Early Investments lu real 
estate. 

•EDWIN NORTON (of Norton Brothers).- Mcnufacturing 
japanned ware, and canning. 

•SAMUEL M. NICKBRSON.— Disttlllng and banking. 
Formerly president of Fli-st National Bank. 

WILLIAM PENN NIXON.— Publishing "The Inter- 
Ocean" newspaper. 

JOHN O'MALLEY.— Packing meats. 
JUDGE LUCIUS B. OTIS.— Loaning money, and real 
estate Investments, especially In valuable corner lots. 



which he has improved and rented at liigh prices. 
JOHN OLIVER.— Lumber and merchandising. 

J. IRVING PEARCE.— Hotel and real estate. 
•ORRIN W. POTTER.— Iron manufacturing. 
FERDINAND PECK.— Merchandising and real estate. 
CLARENCE PECK.— Merchandising and real estate. 
WALTER PECK.— Merchandising and real estate. 
•HENEY H. Pl^ltTER.— Manufacturing Bessemer steel, 

and railroad stocks. 
EUGENE PIKE,— Made in real estate. 
EDWIN PAEDRIDGE.— Drj-goods. 
CHARLES W. PAETEIDGE.— Drygoods. 
•GEOECTji: K. PULLMAN (Of the Pullman. Palace Car 

Company).— Building palace cars and Improvement 

of real estate. Director In the American Surety 

Company. 
WALTER PEOBY.— Drygoods. 
CHARLES D. PEACOCK.— Merchandising jewelry. 
DANIEL K. Px^iivoONS.- Real estate. 
*EESKINE M. PHELPS.— Manufacturing boots and 

shoes, etc. 
POTTER PALMEE.— Drygoods, hotel, and real estate. 



W. J. QUAN.— Grocery business at Galena, apd in- 
vestments. 

JACOB ROSENBERG.— Merchandising. 

*B. ROESING (of the Bartholomac and Eoesing Brewing 

and Malting Company).— Brewing and real estate. 
••JAMES H. RICE.- Manufacture and sale of plate glass. 
MARTIN A. RYERSON.— Made In part by his father. 

ao early Indian trader, and in part by himself in 

pine lands, lumber and Iron. 
Est. WILLIAM H. RYDER.— Real estate Investments.. 
NORMAN B. REAM.— Grain and provisions. 
SIMON REID (of Reid, Murdock & Co.).— AVholesale 

groceries. 
•WILLIAM P. REND.— Coal-mining. 
WILLIAM H. RAND.— PubUshlng copyrighted books. 

(Rand, McNally &, Co.) 
•JACOB REHM.— Distilling, street railroads, and roali 

estate. 
Est. SHERMAN RICKEE.— Packing and provisions. 



•WILLIAM C. SEIPP.— Brewing. 

GODFREY SNYDACKEE.— Private banking and real 
estate. 

•PETER SCHUTTLER (of Schuttler & Hotz).- Manu- 
facturing wagons. 

ROBERT SCOTT.— Dealer in drygoods. 

•GILBERT B. SHAW.— Lumber and sawmills, In the 
firm of G. B. Shaw & Co. ; and banldng. President 
of the American Trust and Savings Bank. 

LAZARCS SILVERMAN.— Private banking and invest- 
ments. Director in the Duluth and Iron Range Rail- 
road. 

'MORRIS SELZ (of Selz, Schwab & Co.).— Boots andl 
shoes. 

•HENRY H. SHUFELDT.— Distilling. 

G. F. SWIFT (of Swm & Co.).— Packing moats an* 
speculation. 

•JESSE SPALDING.— Lumber manufacturing. 

WILLIAM E. STRONG.— Real estate and merchandising. 

OTHO S. A. SPRAGUE.— Wholesale groceries. 

ALBERT A. SPRAGUE.— Wholesale groceries. 

BYEON L. SMITH.— Banldng and Inheritance. 

CHARLES SCHWARTZ.— Grain and commission. 

•Est. MARCUS C. STEARNS.— Lime and cement dealer ; 
manufacturing afterward ; and real estate.. 

•JOHN M. SMYTH.— Lumber and sawmUls.. 

HERMAN SCHAFFNEIi.— Banking. 

GEORGE SCHNEIDER.— Banking. 

Est. A. J. SNELL.— Real estate. 

MRS. SNELL.— From her husband ;. made In contracttog 
and real-estate Investments.. 



AMEEICAJSr MTLLIONAIEES. 



15 



FRANKLIN P. SPENCEE.— Merchandising ; wholesale 

hardware. 
Est. FRANCIS C. SHERMAN.— Real estate. 
•ALBERT SOPER.— Lumber and sawmills. 
Est. MARK SKINNER.— Real-estate Investments, loans, 

and law. 
JOHN SPRY,— Lumber dealing. 
•CHARLES H. SCHWAB (of Selz, Schwab & Co.).— Boots 

and shoes. 
MliS. H. V. SMITH (widow ol Harlow P. Smith).— Made 

In law, loans and real estate. 
Est. HORATIO O. STONE.— Merchandising and real 

estate. 
GEORGE A. SEAVERNS.— Grain elevators. 
•PETER E. STUDEBAKER.— Manulacture of wagons, 

In Cliicago and Soutlii Bend. 
Est. GEORGE BTURGES.— Real estate and banking. 

President of Northwestern National Banls. 
JOHN E. SHERMAN.— Stocliyards. 
E. C. SWIFT.— PacMng meats. 

"PATRICK J. SAXTON.— Contracting and brlct manu- 
facturing. 
Est. WILBUR P. STORY.— PubUslilng "The Chicago 

Times" and investments In real estate, etc 
JAMES STINSON.— Real estate and banliing. 



ABNER TAYLOR.- Merchandising, contracting and 

real estate. 
LAMBERT TREE.- Merchandising and real estate. 
VALENTINE C. TURNER.— Railroads, etc. 
HOBAJST CHATFIBLD TAYLOR.— Inherited from his 

father. 



'ANTHONY G. VAN SCHAICK.— Lumber and saw- 
mills. 



HUGH WILSON.— Merchandising, clothing. 

Est. TOLEMAN WHEELER.— Grain business and real 
estate. 

MONT. WARD.— Merchandising. 

Est. MR. WALLER.— Real estate. 

MOSES WENTWORTH.— From John Wentworth. Made 
In real estate. 

MISS EOXANNA WENTWORTH.— From John Went- 
worth, from her mother and her grandfather, Loomls, 
Made In real estate chiefly. 

MOSEo D. WELLS.— Merchandising boots and shoes. 

JAMES H. WALKER.— Wholesale drygoods. 

FREDERICK H. WINSTON.— Law practice, real estate 
and Investments. Fresdent of the Chicago Junction 
Railways and Stooli Yards Company. 

CHARLES L. WILLOUGHBY.— Merchandising clothing. 

JAMES L. WOODWARD.— Merchandising hats, caps, 
gloves, etc. 

Est. ELI B. WILLIAMS .-Merchandising and real 
estate. 

JOHN R. WAIBH.— Merchandising boois and news- 
papers, and banliing. Manager of the Northwestern 
News Company and president of the Chicago Na- 
tional Banlr. 

EZRA J. WARNER.- Wholesale groceries. 

HENRY J. WILLING.— Drygoods and real estate. 

W. D. WALKER.— Law practice and investments. 

Est. JOHN WILLIAMS.— Largely made In contracting; 
dealing in lands of the Illinois Central Railroad ; and 
later in real estate and building operations iti Chi- 
cago. 

GEORGE H. WEBSTER (of Armour & Co.).— Wholesale 
provisions, pacljing, and speculation. 



RECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries taalnly fiS 

In making patented articles 11 

In cattle-raising 1 

Origin of the fortune unknown 1 

In non-protected lndu,slries 235 

Total 316 



INDIAN TEEEITORY. 



If there are any millionaires in Indian Territory 
their existence Is not suspected at present. 



INDIANA. 



OTTO YOUNG.— Merchandising Jewelry, etc. 
CHARLES T. YERKES.— Street railroads. 
PETER L. YOE.— Merchandising, banMng and real 
estate. 



CITY OF DELPHI. * 

Est. ABNER H. BOWEN.— Made In banking and vari- 
ous Investments. 

A. T. BOWEN.— Made in banldng and various invest- 
ments. 

EVANSVILLE. 

Est. WILLIAM HEILMAN.- Railroad building and 
stocks, maclilne shops, local real estate, etc. 

DAVID J. MACKEY.— Wholesale drygoods, hotel, 
real estate and railroads. In the firm of Mackey, 
Nlsbit & Co., wholesale drygoods ; Mackey & Huston, 
hotel and drugs ; and the king of the Mackey system 
of railroads. 

*J. A. EEITZ.— Saw mill and lumber. 

CHARLES VEILE.— Wholesale groceries and local real 
estate Investments. President of the First National 
Bank. 

SAMUEL BAY'ARD.— Banking, gas works and electri* 
light. President of the Old National Bank. 

"FREDERICK W. COOK.— Breweries and bottling. 

•CHARLES SCHULTE.— Brewing, lumber and real 
estate. 

FORT WAYNE. 

•JOHN H. BASH.— Foundry business and Iron man- 
ufacturing. Principal owner In the Bass Foundry 
and Machine Works, and president of file First Na- 
tional Bank. He began life as a bookkeeper. 

JUDGE J. H. CHENEY.— EaUroads and speculation in. 
»l^)Cks. President of the Fort WajTie Artificial Gas 
Company, which lie controls. At one time director 
in the Wabash Railroad, etc. 

GREENFIELD. 

SILAS DAVIS.— Inherited from an English estate. 

INDIANAPOLIS. 

VOI/NEY T. MALOTT.— Made in banking and railroads. 
President of the Indiana National Bank. 

S. J. FLETCHER (of Fletcher & Cheeseman).— Made In 
private banking. 

WILLIAM H. ENGLISH.— Acgulred chiefly in banking 
and the investment of accumulations in real estate. 

JOHN C. WRIGHT.— Banking, and Investments in real 
estate. 

Est. CHARLES MAYER.— Mercliandislng. 

ALLEN M. FLETCHER.— Gas, natui'al and artificial, 
and real estata. 

CHARLES W. FAIRBANKS.- Law practice (for cor- 
porations) and investments. 

LAFAYETTE. 

F.St. W. F. KEV.NXjLDS.— Wholesale groceries first; but 
the bulk ol his $3,000,000 was made In the old 
Indianapolis Railroad, a portion of the "Big Four,'' 
which was sold to that corporation at a great ad- 
vance. 

Est. MOSES FOWLER.- Wholesale groceries In partner- 
slilp with W. F. Eeynolds ; banking, the Fowler Na- 
tional Bank having been established by him ; and ad- 



56 



LIBEAJRY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



Vance in valae of about 20,000 acres of land In 
Benton County, bought by lilm at a dollar or two an 
acre, and now worth $40 to $50 an acre. 

MADISON. 
Est. NATHAN POWELL.— Made over $1,000,000 In 

banMng, Insurance and pork-paoWng. 
MES. JOHN E. CEAVENS.— Inherited from her father, 

J. (F. D. Lanier, of New- York City, and made In 

banWng and stoolfs. 

NEW-ALBANY. 

♦NEWLANd T. DE PAUW.— Glass manufacturing, 
real estate and purchase of Grovernment bonds wMle 
the price was low. Inherited from Washington C. 
De Pauw, Ms father. President of the Merchants' 
National Bank of New-Albany, and of the Baiik of 
Commerce of Indianapolis. 

'CHARLES W. DE PAUW.— Glass manufacturing, real 
estate and purcliase of Government bonds at low 
prices. Inherited from Washington C. De Pauw, Ills 
father. 

Est. WILLIAM S. CULBEETSON.— Made in merchan- 
dising and banking. He left several millions. 

PEEU. 
Est. ELBEET H. SHIEK.— A large property, made 
mostly in merchandising, banking and dealing in 
lands and real estate. It has a Half-interest in the 
Citizens' Bank of Monticello (Shirk & McLean) ; a 
half-interest to. the Tipton County Bank at Tipton, 
the Citizens' Banlt at Delplil, and nearly all the stock 
In the First National Bank of Peru— all banks to 
Indiana. 

RICHMOND. 
AMEEICUS L. POGUE (of Pogue, Miller & Co., Rich- 
mond, and Poffue & Pocue. Morocco, Ind.)— Made 
in retail queensware, live-stock and general tradtog. 

SOUTH BEND. 

*CLEMENCE STDDEBAKER (Of the Studebaker Bros. 
Manufacturing Company).— Originally a blacksmith, 
and got a start through a Government contract for 
wagons. Acquli'ed a large fortune in partnership 
with his brothers in manufacturing wagons. They 
have the largest wagon factory in the world, with 
branches in New- York City, Chicago, San Francisco, 
Salt Lake City, Kansas City and Wichita. 

*J. M. STUDEEAICEE (ol! the Studebaker Brothers 
Manufacturing Company).— Made a fortune to manu- 
fafcturlng wagons. 

■'•''JAJVIES OLIVER (of the South Bend Iron Works and 
the Oliver Chilled Plough Works).— Has made several 
millions to the manufacture of ploughs. He is the 
inventor of th,e method of clillling cast iron, so as to 
make It hard as steel, and the "Oliver chlUed 
ploughs" are celebrated and have had an Immense 
sale, 

TEREE HAUTE. 

HERMAN HULMAN.— Wholesale groceries and liquors. 
MES. SARAH C. DEMING.— Real estate, acquired when 

the country was lirst settled. 
JOSEPHUS COLLETT.— Made to railroads. 
W. E. MoKEEN.— Railroads and large Investments in 

improved and unimproved real estate. He has a 

stock-farm in which over $200,000 Is Invested. 

Pi'esident of the Vandalla Railroad. 
Est. CHAUNCEY ROSE.— Made in railroads. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected indnstries mainly 8 

Manufactnrlug patented articles 1 

In non-protected industries 27 

Total 36 



IOWA. 

CITY OF ATTON. 

SETH RICHARDS.- Made in merchandising drygoods 
and groceries. 

BtTRLINGTON. 

CHARLES E. PERKINS.— Made to railroads. Is presi- 
dent of the C. B. and Q. E. R. 

DAAQD W. GRIMES.— Land and loans principally. 
CEDAR RAPIDS. 

Est. T. M. SINCLAIR.— Wholesale provisions and pork- 
packer. 

SAMPSON C. BEVER.— Merchandising and banlung. 
President of the City National Bank. 

S. L. DOWS.— Railroad building. 
CLINTON. 

•C. LAMB (of C. Lamb A Sons).— Lumber producing 
and sale. 

•ARTEMUS LAMB (of C. Lamb & Sons).— Production 
and sale of lumber. 

•LAFAYETTE LAMB (same firm).— Manufacturer of 
lumber. 

•WILLIAM J. YOUNG.— Sawmills, lumber and banking. 
President of the Clinton Savings Bank. 
CHARITON. 

SMITH H. MAI;LORY.— Railroad contracting and build- 
ing, and banMng. President of the First National 
Bank. 

COUNCIL BLUFFS. 

JOHN T. STEWART.— Wbolesale groceries and various 
Investments. 

DES MOINES. 

F. M. HUBBELL.— Real estate, water worlis and loans. 

JAMES CALLANAN.— Made in real estate. 

Est. J. B. BROWN.- Paving, loans and real estate. 

J. C. NEWTON.— Railroading and investments. 
DUBUQUE. 

•HENRY L. STOUT (of Knapp, Stout & Co.).— Manu- 
facturing lumber, pine lands, railrDads and live 
stock. The money comes chlefiy from a remarkable 
Increase of value of timber lands, of which the firm 
has about 200,000 acres in Wisconsin and 70,000 
acres in Arkansas. 

•Est. of MR. KNAPP (of Knapp, S|;out & Co.).— Manu- 
facturing lumber, pine lands, railroads and live 
stock. 

KEOSANQUA. 

EDWIN MANNING.— Merchandising, Investments in 
real estate, and banMng. President of Manning's 
Bank, at Keosanqua, and the Chariton Bank at 
Chariton, Iowa. 

LYONS. 

•D. JOYCE.— Sawmills, lumber and coal. 
OTTUMWA. 

SETH RICHARDS.— Merchandising, with branch stores 
at other points on the Des Moines River, and large 
Investments in real estate on tlu-ee sides of the city, 
which he refuses to sell, and which tlie tahabltants 
are exceedingly anxious to have Ijlm dispose of, at 
least in part, so that the city can grow. 
SIOUX CITY. 

D. T. HEDGES (of E. Hasklnson & Co.).— Packing, live 
stock, banking and real estate. 

THOMAS J. STONE.— Made In real estate and banktog. 
President of the First National Bank and the Sioux 
City Savtogs Bank. 

A. S. GARRETSON.— Made to real estate, banktog and 
railroads. 

C. C. ORR.— Made to rise of real estate. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries 7 

In non-protected industries 18 

Total 25 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIEES. 



17 



KANSAS 



Tliere are fifteen or twenty men In Kansas wlio are 
certMlnly wortli half a million or more, and of these The 
Tribune printed the names of eleven la Its origtaal list. 
The Tribune has heard from the majority of them per- 
sonally and has received assurances from others that 
th;re is not an actual "mlUlonaire" In Kansas. The 
names are therefore all omitted In this revised list. 

KENTUCKY. 

CITY OP ASHLAND. 
♦Est. THOMAS MEANS.-lron smeltins and man 
uiacturing. 

COTIKGTON. 
AMOS SHINKLE.— Steamboats, coal, real estate In 
Cincinnati, and banking. President ot the First Na- 
tional Banlt. 
"JAMES WALSH.— Distilling and rectllying. 

FRANKFORT. 

EX-GOVEENOR S. B. BUCKNER.— His -ivite, Mary 
Kingsbury, Inherited from Major Henry Klngsbm'y, 
ClJicago. Made In California in earlv days and in 
Chicago real estate. 

HENDERSON. 

JOHN H. BARRETT.— Tobacco dealing and hotel. 
LOUISVILLE. 

*B. F. AVFiRY.— Manufacturing ploTiglis and Imple- 
ments. The firm of B. P. Avery & Sons has offices 
in New- York City, New-Orleans, Fort Worth, Houston 
and Austin, and their Louisville concern is the 
largest plough factory in the world. 

E. A. ROBINSON (oJ the former Arm of R. A. Robinson 
<B Co.).— Wholesale drugs and real-estate invest- 
ments. \ I . 

Est. WILLIAM G-. MEIR.— Tobacco buying and invest- 
ments In real estate. 

"DENNIS LONG.— Union Foundry and Pipe Works ; and, 
in addition to a very large pipe-foundry business, 
contracting to ibuild water works. 

Est. GEORGE W. NORTON.— Began life as a merchant ; 
went into banking; bought largely of Western 
lands, notably in Duluth, which advanced In value. 
He died worth over $3,000,000. 

Est. W. F. NORTON.— Merchandising, banking and 
lands. 

•'Est. JAMES TODD.— Merchanillsing, the manufacture 
of j:aas ; banking, anl purjliasss of real estate, which 
advanced in value. 

W. C. HALL.— Texas lands and Texas Pacific Railroad. 

*C. P. MOORMAN.- Distilling and wliiskey commission 
business. 

Est. B. FRANK GUTHRIE.— Pork and speculation. 

•GEORGE H. MOORE.— Wliiskey dlstiUlng, banking, 
kinds, etc. President of the People's Bank of Ken- 
tucky. 

W. H. DULANEY'.— Real estate, through his wife. He 
is the largest single-tax payer in tlie city. 

Est. DR. W. B. CALDWELL.— Made by in the in- 
crease in value of real estate. He was a success- 
fiil piactitioner of medicine, and brought outlying 
lands, wliich are now valuable. 

W. N. HALDE31AN.— PubUshing "The Louisville 
Courier-Journal," of wliicli lie is almost the sole 
©■vvner ; investments in successful corporations ; 
and hotel, buildings, and 8,000 acres of land in 
Florida. 

Est. NATHAN BLOOM.— Made in merchandising dry 
goods. 

PARIS. 

Est. SAMUEL CLAY.— Plantations and lands. Had 
20,000 acres. 



PADUCAH. 
BENJAMIN H. WISDOM.— Mainly made In real estate, 
but some In tobacco dealing and in commission 
business in New- York City. 

EECAPITULATJ ON. 

In protected Industries chlefiy 7 

In non-protected Industries 15 

Total 22 



]:,OUISIANA. 



CITY OF NEW-ORLEANS. 

HENRY ABRAHAM.- Merchandising, in the firm of 
Henry Abraham & Soij, cotton factors and commis- 
sion mercliants. 

CHARLES A. ALTER.— WLolesale llauor dealing. 

ALBERT BALDWIN.— Merchandising hardware and 
banking. President of The New-Orleans National 
Bank. 

E. CONBRY (of E. Conery & Son).— Wholesale groceries 
and ship chandlery. 

P. J. GASQUET.— Operating in city real estate. 

*LEON GfODCHAUX.- Made In sale of clothing, and 
sugar planting. 

MRS. W. W. GORDON.— Cotton plantations. 

S. GUMBEL.— Made in the firm of S. Gumbel & Co., 
cotton factors and commission merchants. 

Est. MRS. MYRA CLARK GAINES.— From her father, 
Daniel Clark. Real estate, worth five or six million 
dollars. 

JOHN T. BARDIE.- Cotton factor and banker. 

E. J. HART.— Made In the wholesale drug business. 

J. L. HERWIG.— Brokerage business and real estate. 

e. F. HERWIG.— Made In brokerage business and In- 
vestments. 

D. H. HOLMES.— Merchandising, drygoods. 

MRS. CHARLES T. HOWARD.— Made in the Louisi- 
ana State Lottery Company. 

FRANK T. HOWARD.— Rise In real estate. 

'A. C. HUTCHINSON.— Made in coasting steamshlipg 
and railroads. 

C. H. HYAMS.— Banking and brokerage business. 

*Bst. DUNCAN F. KE^STNER.- Large sugar planta- 
tions. 

A. LANATA.— Importing wines, and commission busi- 
ness. 

I. L. LY'ONS.— Made In wholesale drug business. 

"D. C. McCANN.— Foundry business. 

A. H. MAY'.— Dealing In cotton. 

RICHARD MILLIKEN.— Dealing In sugar and 
molasses. 

ROBERT MOORE (of Moore, Hyams & Co.)— Broker- 
age and exchange business. 

JOHN A. MORRIS.— Made in Louisiana State Lottery 
Company. 

ISADORE NEWMAN.- Brokerage, stocks and bonds. 

CHARLES P. RICHARDSON.— Cotton plantations. 

JAMES B. RICHARDSON.— Cotton plantations. 

v\'ILLIAM P. RICHARDSON.— Cotton plantations. 

Est. of MRS. BERTRAND SALOY.— Made in real es- 
tate. 

W. B. SCHMIDT.— Importing groceries. 

THOMAS SMITH.— Made In large grocery business. 

I. H. STAUFFEE.— Hardware merchandising. 

JULIUS ^VEIS.— Made in J. Weis & Co., cotton factors 
and commissioii merchants. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries 4 

In non-protected Industries 31 

Total 35 



LIRKAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTEAS. 



MAINE. 

CITY OF AUGUSTA. 
•BLIAS MILLIKEN.— Lumber and sawmills. 

EANGOK. 
EDWARD H. BLAKE.— Inherited from WilUam Blalte 
Ms father and Samuel H. Blalie his uncle. Made 
In ffSaling In and owning wild lands and banMng. 
He is president of Merchants' National Bank. 
♦Est. SAMUEL F. HEK6EY (of Hersey & Bean, Still- 
water, Minn.) — He made a fortune In Maine in 
timber lands and lumbering. He afterward Invested 
In pine lands and lumbering in the West, and in- 
creased his fortune largely. 
BATH. 
ARTHUR SEWALL.— Building salHng ships for Ills 
own use, ocean freighting, banldng and railroads. 
President of the Each National Bank. Director 
in the Boston and Maine, and other railroads. 
BELFAST. 
Est. RALPH C. JOHNSON.— BanMng and miscella- 
neous Investments. 

CALAIS. 
TRANKLIN H. EATON.— Lumber, sawmills and tim- 
ber lands. 
*E. C. GATES.— Lumber business, sawmills and lands. 

CAMDEN. 
J. B. STEARNS.— His wealth has been made chiefly 
in telegraph patents from wlilch he receives royal- 
ties, and in lands in California. 
DEERING. 
*J. S. EICKER.— Tanning leather, and railroad and 
other Investments. 

EAST WINTHEOP. 
'CHARLES M. BAILEY (of C. M. Bailey's Sons & 
Co.)— Manufacturing oilcloths and investments in 

banks, etc. 

GARDINER. 

NATHANIEL M. WHITMOEE.— Law practice and 
loaning money on mortgages, etc. 
POETLAND. 

Est. JOHN W. LANE.- Telegraph Interests, Provi- 
dence horse railroads, real estate and houses in 
Portland, and other interests. 

*Est. J. B. BEOWN.— The richest man in Maine. His 
fortune was founded by a modest start in a grocery 
store, followed by importing sugar and West India 
goods, and then, naturally, by sugar refining in 
Portland, and the Investment of profits. He went 
into banking, real estate, hotels, lailroads, and 
steamship Unes. He was a large owner in the 
Boston and Maine Railroad. 

THOMASTON. 

Est. EDWARD O'BRIEN.— Building sailing ships for 
his own use, ocean freighting, lime kilns, and bank- 
ing. He was president of a bank. 
SKOWHEGAN. 

Est. EX-GOVBENOR OOBUEN.— Made in the purchase 
of low-priced pine lands, of which he was one of 
the largest owners in Maine, and the sale of logs 
therefrom. 

EECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries chiefly 7 

In non-protected industries 8 

Total 15 



MARYLAND, 



EDWIN F. ABELL.— Publishing "The Sun," daily news- 
paper. 

GEORGE W. ABELL.— Publishing "The Sun," daily 
newspaper. 

*Est. HOEACE ABBOTT.— Iron manufacturing and 
building monitors, etc. 

'Mrs. F. W. BENNETT.— From her husband, F. Vf. 
Bennett. Made in auction business and mining 
propel ty. 

Est. GENERAL GEORGE S. BROWN (of Alex. Brown 
& Son).— Banking and Investments. 

"WALTER B. BEOOKS.— Manufacturing and railroad In- 
vestments. 

"D. L. BAETLETT.— Made In iron manufacturing, etc. 



BERNAED CAHN (of Cahn, Belt & Co.).— Importing 

liquors. 
WILLIAM F. BUENS.— Banking; president ot Eutaw 

Savings Bank. 



GABEIEL D. CLARK.— Wholesale and retaU jeweller. 



B. FEANK DEFOED.— Wholesale leather. 

THOMAS DEFORD (of Deford & Co.).— 'Wholesale 

leather. 
'Est. FRANCIS DENMEAD.— Manufacture of malt, and 

dealing in hops. 

CHAELES D. FISHEE (of Gill & Fisher).— Shipping and 

commission business. 



dTY OF BALTIMORE. 
•Est. CHEISTIAN AX (of Gail & Ax).— Tobacco manu- 
facturing. 
GEOEGE J. APPOLD.— Wholesale leather and hides. 



Est. JOHN S. GITTINGS.— Large real estate Invest- 
ments, banliing and stocks of corpora'.ions. Largest 
cwncr of rcfil estate in M.ni'vLind ; senior member- 
of Jolm S. Gittings & Co., bankers ; and director 
in many corporations. 

*JAMES A. GARY (of James S. Gary & Sons).— Cotton 
goods manufacturing. 

*G. W. GAIL (of G. W. Gail & Ax).— Tobacco manu- 
facturing. 

ROBERT GARRETT.— Merchandising, banking, audi 
railroads, but chiefly in The Baltimore and Oliio 
Railroad. He is a member of Eobert Garrett & 
Sons, private bankers. They money was largely 
Inherited from Ills father, John W. Garrett, who 
made an immense fortune as above. 

Est. T. HAERISON GAEEETT.— Inherited from John 
W. Garrett, and made in merchandising, bankings 
and the development of the Baltimore and Oliio 
Railroad. 

MISS MARY B. GAEEETT.— Inherited from John W. 
Garrett and made as above. She is the founder 
and sole support of the Bryn Maivr Female Academy 
of Baltimore. 

JAMES GEEGG.— Made in gi'oceries. 

MAURICE GEEGG.— Loans and investments. 

JOHN GILL.— President of Mercantile Trust Company ; 
banking. 

MES. GANN M. HUTTON (Celeste Winans).— From her 
father, Thomas Winans. Made in railroad building 
and contracts in Russia. 

JOHN A. HAMBLETON.— Private banking In the firm 
of Jolm A. Hambleton & Co. 

*Est. W1LLIA3I E. HOOPER.— Cotton manufacturing. 

Est. JOHNS HOPKINS.— Merchandising groceries first,. 

then railroads, especially the Baltimore and Olilo, In 
which his fortune was cliiefly made. 

GEORGE JENKINS.— Leather dealing. 

MICHAEL JENKINS.— Leather dealing. 

HENRY JAMES.— Lumber dealing and banking. Presi- 
dent of the Citizens' National Bank. 

•WILLIAM KNABB (of William Knabe & Co. Manu- 
facturing Company).— Piano manufacturing. 

Est. FRANCIS T. KING.-Banking and real estate; 
president of the Central Savings Bank. Althougl* 



AMEEICAN inLLtONAIEES. 



he died worth less than a, milUon, this -was because 
he gave so much money for philanthropic objects. 

♦WILLIAM KEYSER.— Copper manufacturing. 

*H. lEVlN E. KEYSER.— Copper manufacturlDg. 

■THOMAS M. LANAHAN.— Practice ol law and real 
estate Investments. 

LOUIS McLANE.— Made originally In California. En- 
gaged here In looMng after Ms investments. Was 
vice-president of the Mercantile Trust and Deposit 
Company. 

C. S. MALTBY.— Merchandising, oysters and groceries 
and shlp-ohandlery goods. 

*OHAELES F. MAY"EE (president B. and O. Railroad).— 
Railroads, coal mines, and Western Union Telegrapli 
Company. 

BENJAMIN r. NEWCOMER.— Wholesale flour and rail- 
roads. President of the Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company. 

ENOCH PRATT.— Banlsing; wholesale iron and real 
estate ; president of National Farmers' and Planters' 
Banlt. 

ANDREW RELD.— Importing sugar and cofee. 

JOSEPH H. EIEMAN.— FacMng and real estate. 

WILLIAM S. RAYNES.— Krst in retaU drygoods, fol- 
lowed by extensive pm-chases ol suburban real 
estate, wliich has risen in value. 

Est. GrEORGE SMAIL.— South American trade, deep- 
sea ship^ and miscellaneous investments. 

W. W. SPENCE.— Importing sugar and coffee and in- 
vestments. Is vice-president of the Mercantile 
Trust and Deposit Company. 

Est. SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER.- JIade In Adams Ex- 
press business. 

•JESSE TYSON.— Manufacttire of chemicals. 

•*Est. CHARLES A. VOGELER.— Proprietary medicine 
manufacturing. 

W. T. WALTERS.— Wholesale whiskey and railroad in- 
vestments. Is vice-president of the Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company. 

DE WITT CLINTON WINANS.— Inherited from Ross 
Wlnans. Made In foreign railroad building and 
Lfovernment contracts. 

WALTER SCOTT \\'1NANS.— Inherited from Ross 
Winans. Made in foreign railroad building and 
Government contracts. 

WILLIAM WINANS.— Inherited. Railroad building 
and Government oonti'acts abroad. 

Rt)6S R. WINANS.— Inherited. Railroad building and 
Government contracts abroad. 

FRANCIS WHITE.— Rise in values of real estate. 
CHESTERTOWN. 

Kst. GEORGE B. WESTCOTT.— BanMng and invesl> 
mentB. 

CUMBERLAND. 

JACOB HUMBIRD.— Railroad building in South Amer- 
ica, etc. 

PORT DEPOSIT. 

•JACOB TOME.— Saw mills, lumber and banldng. 
President of CecU National Bank. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected lndus.tries mainly 15 

In manufacture of patented articles 1 

In non-protected industries 43 

Total 59 



MASSACHUSETTS 



CITY OF BOSTON. 
FREDERICK L. AMES.— Richest man in the city of 
Boston. Inherited a large fortiune and has lb- 
creased It. All made in railroads, real estate, 
telegraph lines and investments. He is a director 



in the Clilcago and Northwestern Railway, Ameri- 
can Telegraph and Cable Compamy, Mercantile 
Trust Company, Missouri Pacific Railway, Union 
Pacific Railroad, Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany, etc., etc. 

'OLIVER AMES.— Inherited, and increased by himself ; 
all made in manufacturing shovels, plows, etc., and 
raih-oad and otlier investments. 

'OAKES A. AMES.- Inherited and Increased by him- 
self ; aU made in manufacturing shovels, plows, 
etc., and raUroad and other investments. 

"Est. WILLIAM AMORY.— Cotton manufacturing. 

EDWARD P. ATKINS.— Railroads and merchandising. 

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS.— Inherited. Made in 
real estate and investments in railroads, ete 

Est. WALDO ADAMS.— Inherited from his father. 
Made in the Adams Express Company, 

J. EDWARD ADDICKS.— Made in the Bay State and 
Boston Gas Companies. 

PRANK W. ANDREWS.— Inherited from his fatlier, 
who made his money in merchandising and real 
estate. 

**DAN1EL F. APPLETON (of Robblns, Appleton & 
Co.).— Manufacturing Waltham watches. 

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.— Largely inherited. Made In 
real estate and railroads. Director in the Boston, 
Housao Tunnel and Western Railroad, the Chicago 
.Junction Railways and Stock Yards Company, etc. 

B. A. ATKINSON (of B. A. Atkinson & Co. ).— Promi- 
nent for many years in the furniture and house- 
furnishing business. 

MRS. JOHN F. ANDREWS.— From her father, Na^ 
thaniel Thayer, who made a great fortune in ship- 
ping, foreign trade, banking and railroads. 

"SAMUEL ATHEETON.— Tanning and leather, and in- 
vestments. 

JOHN L. BREMER.— Commission drygoods. 

Est. GARDNER BREWER.- Commission drygoods, 
and agency of New-England MiUs, with large in- 
vestments in real estate. 

Est. jAilES M. BEEBB.— Drygoods and investments 
in real estate, wliich is now worth over $1,000,000. 

"GEENVILLE T. W. BEAMAN.— Back Bay real estate 
and cotton manufacturing. 

MAETIN BEIMMBE (Trustee).— Inherited valuable 
real estate from his father of ihe same name. Fam- 
ily has been rich for several generations. 

E. WILSON BLAKE.— Cracker baking and operations 
on Boai'd of Trade in Chicago. 

Est. T. O. H. P. BUENHAM.— Bookselling and real 
estate. 

EGBERT B. BRIGHAM.— Restaurant business and In- 
vestments in real estate. 

Est. CAPTAIN JOSIAH P. BRADLEE.— Shipping and 
foreign trade. 

JOHN BROWN.— The "West End millionaire." Real 
estate, etc. 

CHARLES P. BOWDITCH.— Partly inherited from J. 
IngersoU Bowdltcli. Made in the West India trade 
and BeU telephone. 

MRS. ELIZABETH B. BOWDITCH.— Same as last 
above. 

FEEDERICK EUTTERFIELD.— Importation of dry- 
goods. 

WILLIAM O. BLAKE.— Real estate Investments. 

MARIA C. BLAKE.— Real estate investments. 

*W. L. BRADLEY.- Manufacturer of fertilizers. 

JASON S. BAILETy.— Else in real estate and Invest- 
ments. 

Est. JOSHUA BENNETT.— Eeal estate and. Invest- 
ments. 

•FRANCIS BARTLETT.— Partly Inherited from his 
father. Sidney Bartlett. Made in mines, invest- 
ments in Illln(«s Steel Company, etc., etc. 



20 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTEAS. 



ISAAC T. BURE.— Railroads and investments. 
JAMES H. BEAL.— Banking and Investments. 
JOHN D. BATES.— Made in tlie sale of dry Koods. 
Est. EICHARD BAICER.— Made in deep-sea ships, 

ocean frelgh.tiDg, and foreign trade. He was with 

WllUam F. Weld & Co. 
EDWARD BANGS.— Real estate and law practice. 
'Est. GEORGE N. BLACK.— Pine lands, saw mills 

and lumber. 
Est. JOHN BRYANT.— Made in shipping and ocean 

freighting. 
Est. EZRA BAKER.— Ocean shipping, trade in fruit, 

and railroads. 



Est. BARNEY COREY.— Made in the wine business. 

CHARLES U. COTTING.— Manager lor the "Fifty As- 
sociates." Made in real estate, 

MRS. J. RANDOLPH COOLIDGE.— From her father, 
Jolm L. Gardner. Merchandising and real estate. 

NATHAN CtrSHING.— Accumulated a fortune in the 
wholesale grocery business. 

•T. JEFFERSON COOLIDGE.— First in the East Indies 
trade, tlien in cotton manufactuilng, and part of 
the time in railroads. Treasurer of the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company. President of the Emery 
and the Lawrence Manufacturing Companies. Direc- 
tor in Dwight Manufacturing Company, Boston and 
LoweU Railroad, Chicago, Burlington and Qulncy 
Railroad, Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis 
Railroad, etc., etc. 

•ELISHA S. CONVERSE.- Treasurer of Boston Rubber 
Shoe Company ; rubber shoe manufacturing. 

•JAMES W. CONVERSE.- President of Boston Land 
Company, and of Boston Rubber Shoe Company. 
Made In manufacturing, etc. 

LEONARD E. CTjTTEE.— Real estate. 

BENJAMIN P. CHENEY'.— Made in the express busi- 
ness. 

•ALEXANDER COCHRANE.- Manufacturing and im- 
porting chemicals. 

Est. NELSON CURTIS. 

*<JBORGE B. CLAPP.— Tanning and leather, and specu- 
lation. 

DANIEL B. CLAFLIN.— Merchandising small wares, 
hosiery, gloves, etc. 

B. W. CONVERSE (of Converse, Stanton & Cullen).— 
Commission drygoods and rise of National Tube 
Works stock. 

1. L. CRAGIN.— Made in the manufacture of soap. 

URIEL H. CEOCiCEE.- Inherited from his father, 
Uriel Crocker, of Crocker & Brewster, once the 
great publishers of Boston. Made in publishing and 
Investments in railroads and real estate. 

MRS. AMY H. CABOT (Brookline).— Fortune made in 
mercantile business, the China trade, and invest- 
ments In real estate. 



P. GORDON DEXTER.— Inherited and increased his 

fortune by investments in real estate and railroads. 

He is in Union Paciflc and other Western roads. 
DANIEL L. DEMMON.— Real estate, of wliioh he is a 

large holder, including tne " Boston Tavern" ; and 

mining stocks, etc. 
•Est. MOSES DAY.— Cliiefly in manufacturing cordage. 
Est. OLIVEl^ DlTSON.- Music publishing and real 

estate. 
MRS. FRANKLIN DEXTER.— Real estate. (Inlierited 

from her husband.) 
•Est. WILLIAM DENNISON.— Tag manufacturing and 

real estate. 

MRS. ELIZABETH T. ELDRBDGE.— From her grand- 
father, Williams, of J. D. &, M. WlUlams, tlie famous 
wine merchants. Partly made In rise In real estate. 

•JACOB EDWARDS, Treasurer of the Bates Manufactur- 
ing Company.— Manufacturing. 



WILLIAM ENDICOTX, Jr.— Chierly.in commission dry- 
goods and Western railroads and lands. Is presi- 
dent of New-England Trust Company. 

NATHANIEL H. EMMONS.-Inherited from his father 
and from Thomas B. Wales, liia grandfather. Mad- 
in merchandising and real estate. 

MOSES ELLIS.— Merchandising and real estate In Cali- 
fornia and Boston. 

•ROBERT D. EVANS.— Manufactaring rubber. Presi- 
dent of the American Rubber Company. 

EUSTACE C. FITZ (of Fitz, Dana & Co.).— Merchandis- 
ing iron, steel and metal :_ and Investments. Presi- 
dent of the lilackstone National Bank. Director In 
Ihe Equitable Life Assurance Society. 

•GEORGE F. FABYAN, of Bliss, Fabyan & Co.— Com- 
mission drj'goods, and, to some extent, manufactur- 
ing cotton. 

CHARLES FAULKNER, sr., of Faulkner, Page A C >.— 
Commission drygoods. 

J. V. FLETCHER— Provisions and banking, etc. 
Prosldent of Faneuil HaU National Bank. 

Est. CAPTAIN ROBERT E. FORBES.— Made in tile 
China trade, deep-sea shipping and ocean freighting, 

JOHN M. FORBES.— Some of his fortune made in 
the China trade,, but most of it in railroads, especi- 
ally Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, also In tlie 
Bell telephone. 

WILLIAM H. FORBES (of J. M. Forbes & Co.).— Made 
in the China trade and the Bell telephone. 

DANIEL S. FORD.— PubUslUng "The Youth's Com- 
panion" and real estate. He has about a million of 
real estate alone. 

Est. .lOSEPH N. FISKE.-Real estate ejid loans. 
Taxed oh $1,300,000 of real estate alone. 

ISAAC FENNO.— In the sale of clothing, and in real 
estate. 

JONATHAN FRENCH.-From his father of the same 
name, and Investments in real esta e. 

JOHN FOSTER.— Dealing in wines, and real estate in- 
ves ments. 

Est. .TOHN S. FARLOW.-In the East India trade, fol- 
lowed by investments in railroads. 



•*W. O. GEOVER.— Made in tlie manufacture of Grover 

& Baker sewing macMnes, and Investments. 
Est. DAVID GRBBNOUGH.-Real estate Improve- 

ment. 
JOHN L. GARDNER.— Largely inherited. Made in 

merchandising and real estate. 
GEORGE A. GAEDNEE.-Inherited from his father; 

money made in mercliandislng and Boston real estate, 

etc. 
HON. WILLIAM GASTON.-Law. real estate, etc. 



'Est. A. L. HOLLINGSWOETH.-Partly inherited from 
his father, and all made in the paj)er business. 

JOHN C. HAYNES.— Music publishing (with Ditson), 
and real esta/fce and other Investments. President 
of Charles H. Ditson & Co. 

LOUIS HECHT.— Commission wool and banking. 

H. HOLLIS HJJNNEWELL.-Mercliandising and In- 
vestments in real estate, but made mostly In West- 
ern lands and railroads. 

••EDGAR HOUGHTON (of Houghton, Coolidge & Co.).- 
Manutacturing boots and shoes. 

H. O. HOUGHTON (of Houghton, Mifflin & Co.).-Pub. 
lishing magazines and copyrighted books. 

WILLIAM H. HILL (of Richardson, HIU & Co., bank- 
ers).— Par:ly inherited from his father of the same 
name; but his wealth was acquired by himself be- 
fore his 1'ather's death, in banMug ahd investments 
In real estate, etc. President of the Boston and 
Bangor Steamship Company. Direotor In the First 
National Bank, American Rubber Company, Marine 
Insurance Company, Assobet Manufactuiring Com- 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIEBS. 



21 



pany, Windsor Company, International Steamship 
Company ; and gas, wharf and other companies. 

EDGAE HAKDING (01' Harding, Wtulman & Co.)-— Dry- 
goods commission business. 

GEORGE D. HOWE.— Merchandising and real estate. 

Est. ALFRED C. HKRSEY.— Merchandising, wliarl 
hnstness, shlp-ownlnij and inveitonents la railroads 
and cotton mlUs. 

CHARLES P. HEMENWAY, trustee of Augustus Hem- 
enway estate. Made In tlie Chill trade and merclian- 
dlslng, real estate Investments. The estate owns 
nearly $3,000,000 of real estate. 

Est.. F. B. HAYES.— Law, real ©state, railroads, etc. 

«H. L. HIGGIKSON (ol Lee, Hlgglnson & Co.).— 
Banldng, copper mining, etc. 

Est. GEORGE O. HOVEY.— Made In drygoods. 

Est. ROBERT C. HOOPER.— 

Est. SAMUEL HOOPER.— 

JACOB H. HEOHT.— Merchandising and real ©state. 
He is a large owner of propeirty In N«w-York Olty. 

J. D. W. JOY (of Joy, Langdon & Co.).— Drygoodsi, 

commission business and real estate. 
•JOHN C. JESSUP.— Manufiacturing (Dlghton mills), 

etc. 
SAMUEL JOHNSON (of C. F. Hovey & Co.).— Inherited ; 

made in drygoods and real e^itate. 
EBEN D. JORDAN (Jordan, Mareh & Co.).— Large 

business In drygoods, and InvOitments. 
Est. MISS ANNA JAQUES.— Inlierited from her 

brothers and sisters. 



'LEOPOLD MORSE (of Leopold Morse & Co.).— Whole- 
sale and retail clothing; and the manufacture ot 
clothing. 

CHARLES J. MORRILL.— Shipping business and Ln- 
Viestments. President of the Provident Institution, 
for Savings. 

CHARLES MERE lAM.— Drygoods and railroads. Trus- 
tee of the Nathaniel Thayer ©state. 

WILLIAM MINOT.— Beal estate. 



DANIEL R. NOYBS (J. L. Bremer <fc Co.).— Commission 

dry goods. 
GEORGE H. NOEMAN.— Contracting and building 

water works. 
Est. WILLIAM J. NILES.— Rise In real estate chiefly. 
THOMAS NICKERSON.— Originally in deep-sea slilp- 

plng and foreign trade, then in railroads in the 

West and Mexico. 
MRS. ELIZA S. NEVINS.— From her husband, David 

Nevins. Drygoods. 
DAVID NEVINS, Jr.— Inlierited from his father. Made- 

In drygoods. 
ALBERT W. NICKERSON.— Largely Inherited. Made- 

In shipping, railroad investments, etc. 



JOSEPH S. KENDALL (of E'aulkner, Page & Co.).— 

Oommlssion, drygoods and tnvestment-j. 
EEANKLIN KING.— Wholesale drugs and paints, and 

real estate. 
Est. HENRY P. KIDDEE (of Kidder, Peabody & Co.). 

—Banking and brokerage. 
FRANK A. KENNEDY, Cambridge.— Cracker-balling. 
Est. JEROME KIDDER.— Banldng and investments. 
Est. DAVID KIMBALL.— Mostly In real estate. 
MOSES KIMBALL.— Originally In drygoods; then In 

real estate. Including the "Boston Museum," and 

railroads, etc. 

SAMUEL LITTLE.— M'ostly in real ©state, but h« has 
other Interesls. President oi£ the Rockland Bank. 

President of the Howard. Watoh Company. 
•HENRY LEE (of Lee. Hlgglnson & Co.)— Banking ; 

Safe Deposit Company; Calumet and Hecla copper 

mines at Lake Superior ; and railroads. 
•GEORGE C. LEE (of Lee, Higginson & Co.— Banking; 

Safe Deposit Company; Calumet and Hecla copper 

mines at Lake Superior; and railroadB. 
•ARTHUR T. LYMAN.— Manufaoluiing. Treasurer of 

the Lowell Manufacturing Company. 
JAMES M. LITTLE.— Made in drygoods and. real estate. 
•SAMUEL C. LAWRENCE.— Inherited. The family 

have for several generations been in the Medford 

ram business ; some of the money made in distilling 

In South Carolina and rise in real estate. His real 

estate Interests alone amount to more than a 

million. 
Est. ELISHA T. LOEING.— Trade with South America 

and deep-sea ships olilefly. Some in copper mining 

at Lake Superior. 
FRANCIS C. LOWELL.— Inherited. Eeal estate mostly. 
AMORY A. LAWRENCE.— Commission drygoods, etc. 
ABBOTT LAWRENCE.— Commission drygoods, etc. 
AUGUSTUS LOWELL.— Commission drygoods, etc. 

Est. ROBERT C. MACKAY.— East India trade and 
vessel owning. 

HENRY L. MILLIS— Inherited. Made in railroads, etc. 

THOMAS MOTLEY (Catlln <$: Co.).— Commission dry- 
goods. 1 I 



Est. HARVEY D. PARKER.-Hotel bustoess. (Parker 
House.) 

SAMUEL B. PIERCE.— Sale of CTOckery. Added to by 
real estate investments. 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE.— Inherited and acciimulated. 
Is hlmselT engaged in law. 

•Est RALPH POMEROY.— Boots and shoes; and raU- 
noads. 

•'COLONEL ALBERT A. POPE (of The Pope Manu- 
facturing Company).- Made in the manufacture of 
the Columbia bicycles. The founder of the bustoe'ss 
in America, and an Inventor of many patented 
dertces. 

Est. THOMAS W. PIERCE.- Drygoods first, and then 
railroads and stocks. 

ISAAC PRATT, Jr.— Iron merchandising, real estata 
and banking. President of the Atlantic National 
Bank. 

MRS. JOHN F. PEARSON.— From her father, Samuel 
B. Hale. Made in South American trade and bank- 
ing. 

•THOMAS E. PROCTOB.— Tanning and leather. 

GEORGE F. PARKMAN.— Mortgages, real estate and 
law. 

OLIVER W. PEABODY.— Banking and Investments. 

CHARLES J. PAINE.— Inherited some and made money 
In railroad stocks. His wife is a daughter of John 
Bryant, East India merchant, who left $2,000,000. 

FRANCIS H. PEABODY.— Banking and Investments. 

Est. JOHN C. PHILLIPS.— Eeal estate and securities 
inherited for several generations. The real estate 
alone amounts to more than two millions. 

Est. JAMES PARKER.— Largely made in rise in real 
estate. 

•HENRY L. PIERCE (of Walter Baker & Co.)— Choo 
late business. 



•W. B. RICE (of Rice & Hutchlns).— Manufacturing 

boots and shoes and Investments. 
•WILLIAM A. RUSSELL.— Chiefly In manufacturing 

paper. 
••ROYAL B. EOBBINS.— Treasurer of the American 

Waltham Watch Company. Manufacturing patented 

watches by machinery. 
GEOEGE P. EICHAEDSON.— Chiefly In real estate. 
Est. P. J. REGGIO.— m the Smyrna trade and invest- 
ments In real estate. 
•H. E. REED (Nash, Spauldtns & Co.).— Sugar refining 

and wharf property. 
ISAAC B. RICH.— Publishing business and theatrical 

management. 



22 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTEAS. 



COLONEL HEKEY S. EIJSSELL— Inherited. Made In 
the China trade, and the Bell telephone. 

JAMES S. STONE.— Real estate mostly. 

*QUINCY A. SHAW.— Inherited. Made chiefly In 
Western lands and the Calumet and Hecla copper 
mines. Owns nearly a million of real estate ta 
Boston. 

FREDERICK R. SEARS.— Inherited from David Sears. 
Made in merchandising and real estate Investments. 
He has more than a million dollars' worth of real 
estate in Boston. 

JOSEPH SAWYER (of Sawyer, Manning & Co.).— Com- 
mission drygoods. 

JOSHUA MONTGOMERY SEARS.— Inlierlted. Made 
in merchandising and real estate. He is taxed on 
$4,500,000 of real estate. 

JOHN P. SQUIRE.— Porli pacldng. 

WILLIAM SOHIER.— Real estate mostly. Has over 
a million dollars' worth. 

Est. DAVID SNOW.— Largely made in real estate. 

JAMES STEVENSON.— Real estate investments. 

ORACE STEVENSON.— Real, estate investments. 

*J. P. SPAULDING (Nash, Spaulding & Co.).— Sugar re- 
fining and wliaif property. 

Est. MRS. HENRIETTA S. SARGENT (BrooMine).— 
Merchandising by her husband, Ignatius Sargent, 
and investments in real estate. 

*A. SHUMAN ffll A. Shranan & Co.).— Wholesale and 
retail doithlng and manufacturing thereof. 

JOHN STETSON.— Made in the printing and publish- 
ing business; banliing, and theatrical management. 

•Est. JOHN SIMMONS.— Made several millions in 
wholesale ready-made clothing and real estate. The 
estate pays taxes on $2,250,000 of buildings and 
lots. 

JOHN SHEiPARD.- Made in merchandising dry gools, 
and investments. Director in the Lamson Cons. 
Store Service Company. 

MRS. FRANCIS SKINNER.— From her father, John L. 
Gaidner. Merchandising and real estate. 

•BAETHOLD SCHLESINGER (of Naylor & Co.).— Iron 
business. 

A. W. SPENCER.— BanMng and investments. 

Est. WILLIAM SHEAFE.— Real estate. 



GEORGE P. UPHAM.— Dry goorts business. 



**ELIHU THOMSON (Thomson-Houston Electric Com- 
pany).— Invention and manufacture of patented elec- 
trical machinery. 

•BENJAMIN F. THOMPSON.— Tanning and leatlier. 

Est. JAMES THORNDIKE.— Real estate mostly. 

JOHN E. THAYER.— Inherited from Nathaniel Thayer, 
his father, who began his business career in ship- 
ping and, foreign trade, but made his great fortune 
chiefly in banliing and railroad investments ; he 
controlled the Philadelpliia, Wilmington and Balti- 
more RaUroad, and sold it to the Pennsylvaoia 
Railroad; he was Interested in the New- York Cen- 
tral EaUroad also, the Michigan Central, and the 
Chicago, Burlington and Qulncy, and also in Western 
lands. 

BAY'AUD THAYEiR.— Inherited from Nathaniel Thayer, 
and made as above explained. 

EUGENE V. R. THAYrEE.— Inherited from Nathaniel 
Thayer, his father. Made in shipping, railroads, 
banliing and lands. 

NATHANIEL THAYER.— Inherited from Nathaniel 
Thayer, his father. Made as above explained. He 
has also an Interest in the Illinois Steel Company. 

Est. CAPTAIN JOSEPH B. THOMAS.— Merchandising 
in California in early days, In which he made a 
million ; then sugar refining In Boston. 

Est. JOHN TAPPAN.— Mercliandlslng on a large scale. 

H. C. THACHER (of H. C. Thaeher & Co.).— Merchan- 
dising, cotton and wool, and loans. 



ROGER WOLCOTT.— Inherited from his father, J. 
Huntington Wolcott. Made in commission drygoods 
In the firm of A. & S. Lawrence & Co. and in Invest- 
ments. 

Est. CHARLES WHITNEY.— Lumber deaUng and real 
estate investments; over a million dollars of real 
estate. 

Est. SOLOMON WILDES.— In merchandising and In- 
vestments in real estate. 

IIBNEY M. WHITNEY.— Mostly In West End street 
railroad enterprise and coasting steamers; Is large 
owner in Metropolitan Steamship Company. 

J. REED WHIPPLE.— Hotel business cMefly (Young's 
Hotel and Parlier House). 

"Est. SAMUEL D. WARREN.— Paper manufacturing. 

WILLIAM G. WELD.— From his father, who made sev- 
eral millions in deep-sea ships, ocean freighting, the 
East India trade and real estate in Boston and New- 
Yorlj City. 

Est. N. WHITING.— In the sale of clothing, and in- 
vestments in real estate. 

RALPH H. WHITE (of E. H. White & Co.).— Made in 
dry goods. 

ARIOCH WENTWORTH.— Marble business and real 
estate. About $2,000,000 worth of real estate. 

'JAMES A. WOOESON (of William Claflin, Coburn & 
Co., and Rogers. Wood. Loring & Co.).— Manufactur- 
ing boots and shoes, loans, and Investments. 

Est. MOSES WILLIAMS.— Wines, liquors and real 
estate, there being over a million of the latter. 

FRANCIS C. WELCH.— He succeeded his fatlier as 
trustee of old estates and made Ms fortune in that 
business and by inheritance, and In various invest- 
ments. 

EOBEET C. WINTHEOP.— Lar^y from his wife, who 
was Mrs. John E. Tliayer. Mr. Thayer was a banker. 

THOMAS WIGGLESWORTH.— Made In East India trade 
and merchandising by his father. 

JOSEPH H. WHITE (of Wlilte, Payson & Co.) .-Com- 
mission drygoods and real estate. 

JOHN W. WHEELWEIGHT.— Made in 'dry goods. 

WILLIAM F. WELD.— Inherited. Made In ships, 
ocean freights, foreign trade and real estate. 

CHARLES G. WELD.— Inherited,. Same as last above. 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL WATTS (formerly of Thomaston, 
Maine.).— Deep sea slilpplng, which he buUt for Ms 
-own use ; ocean freighting, and investments. 
CAMBRIDGE. 

•DANIEL E. SAETWELL.-DistiUing and Investments. 

•PROFESSOR ALEXANDER AGASSIZ.-Made his for- 
tune in the great Calumet and Hecla copper mines 
at Lake Superior. 

DALTON. 

"W. MURRAY CRANE (of Z. & W. M. Crane).-Manu- 
facturing paper. 

'ZENAS CRANE (of Z. & W. M. Crane). -Paper 
manufacturing. 

•Est. JAMES B. CRANE.— Paper manufacturing. 

•WESTON BRYON.-Paper manufacturing. 

EAST HAMPTON. 
•Est. SAMUEL WlLUSTON.-MaHufaoturing buttons 
upon a, plan suggested by Us wUe. 

FRANKLIN. 
•JAMES P. RAY.- Manufacture of cotton-batting and 
shoddy, banking, etc. President of tile Franklin 
National Bank, and large owner in railroad stocks. 
He recently sold 2,000 shares in the Rhode Island 
and Massachusetts Railroad to Messrs. Rockefeller 
and Morgan, of New- York. 

FITCHBURG. 
•CHARLES T. CROCKER (of Crocker, Burbank & 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIEES. 



23 



Co.).— Partly Inherited. Made In manufacturing' 
paper, railroads, etc. 

"J.'VMBS PHILLIPS, 3r.-Wool'.en manufacturing and 
dealing in wool, wltli other Investments. Owner of 
" The New- York Press." 

*KODNEY WALLACE.— Manufacturing paper, railroads, 
etc. 

•GEOEGB N. PROCTOE.— Manufacturing wool, gold 
mine investments, and coal. 

FAUL EIVEB. 

*Est. MES. MABY BEAYTON YOUNG (widow of Brad- 
lord M. C. Durfee).— A fortune of many millions, 
made in cotton and iron manufacturing. 
GREAT BARRINGTON. 

EDWIN r. SEAELES.— Inherited from Ills wife, the 
widow of Mart HopMns, of San Francisco, an enor- 
mous fortune. Made in California mines and rail- 
roads. 

GEOVELAND. 
^Est. E. J. M. HALE.- Woollen mills and real estate. 

HOPED ALE. 
•WILLIAM F. DRAPER.- Partly loheilted, but all 
made in managing cotton mills and manufacture ol 
patented cotton machinery. 

HOLYOKE. 
"MRS. J. C. PARSONS.— Paper manufacturing. 
-WILLIAM WHITING (Of the Whiting Paper Com- 
pany).— Paper manufacturing. 
*E. C. TAFT.— Manufacturing lJ«P3r. 

"TIMOTHY MERRICK Thread manufacturing, etc. 

'WILLIAM SKINNER.— SiUi manufacturing. 
LANCASTER. 

MES. NATHANIEL THAYER.— She has a large fortune 
in her own right, Inherited from her family, the 
Van Eensselaers of New-Yorii State, wlio owned a, 
great landed estate around Albany. 
LINN. 

'CHARLES ALBERT COFFIN.- Manufacturing shoes; 
and the Thomson-Houston Electric Company. 

'HENRY A. PEVFLAR.— Manufacturing morocco, and 
in Thomson-Houston Electrtc Company. 

•JOSEPH N. SMITH.— Made in shoe manufacturing and 
in Tliomson-Houston Electric Company. 

•BENJAMIN F. SPINNEY.— Made in manufacturing 
shoes, banking, and in Thomson-Houston Electric 
Company. 

•JOHN B. ALLEY'.- Manufacturing and dealing in sole 
leather ; and railroad investments. 

•FRANCIS W. BREED.— Manufacturing, and has in- 
vestments in Tennessee Land Company and other 
enterprises. 

LOWELL. 

BENJAMIN F. BUTLER.— Law practice and Invest- 
ments. 

NESMITH ESTATE.— 

METHUEN. 

•C. H. TENNEY.— Hat manufacturing. 
MONSON. 

•RICE MUNN REYNOLDS (of E. M. & T. Eeyno.ds), 
—Wool manufacturing, etc., etc. 

•Est. CYEUS W. HOLMES.— Manufacturing wooUens 
and president of Monson National Banii. 
NOETH ATTLEBOROUGK. 

•HENRY P. BARROWS.— Manufacturing jewelry, 
banMng, etc. ; president of North Attleborough Na- 
tional Bank, 

GEORGE ST. JOHN SHEFFIELD.— From his father. 
James E. Sheftteld, who made a large fortune in 
merchandising at Mobile, Ala., and In railroad and 
Mndred Investments In tlie North. 



NOETH ADA3IS. 
'A. C. HOUGHTON (president of the Arnold Print 
Co.).— Manufacturing cotton goods. 

NORTH ANDOVEE. 

•Hon. MOSES T. STEVENS^- Jfanulactuiing. 
NEWTON. 

*N. P. COBUEN (of A. Coburn, Son & Co.. of Hopldn- 
ton).— Shoe mannfactming. 

NBW-liEDFOED. 

WILLIAM J. EOTi:H.— Whaling and investments. Has 
interest In Illinois Steel Co. 

EDWAED D. MANDELL.— SliipplDg and ocean frdghts. 

MISS MARY L. JONES.— Inherited a fortune made in 
whaling and Bast India trade. 

MES. WILLIAM A. ABBE.— Made in whaling and deep 
sea ships. 

MISS EMILA H. BOURNE.— 31ade in whaling and atev 
sea ships. 

MRS. THOMAS G. HI.T5T.— Made in whaUng and deep 
sea ships. 

Est. JONATHAN BOURNE.— Made in whaling, deep sea 
ships and various investments. President of Mer- 
chants' National Bani. 

FRANCIS HATHAWAY.-Inherited from his father. 
Made in deep sea ships and trade with China and 
the East Indies. 

HORATIO HATHAWAY.— Merchant. Inherited fi-om 
his father. Made in deep sea ships and trade with 
China and East Indies. 

ORANGE. 

"WILLIAM L. GRANT.— Made in the New Home sew- 
ing machines. 

"JOHN W. WHEELER.— Made in the New Home sew- 
ing machines. 

"Est. ANDEEW J. CLARK.- Made in the New Home 
sewing machines. 

PEPPER ELL. 

•S. D. WARREN.— Manufacturing paper and invest- 
ments. 

SALEM. 

'Est. LEONARD B. HARRINGTON.— Tanning and 
leather business and banlilng. 

Est. GEORGE PEABODY.— Inherited from Joseph Pea- 
body, his father, a merchant, and increased it by in- 
vestments. 

Est. FRANCIS C. BERTEAM.— Made in South Ameri- 
can and African trade and deep sea sMps. 

Est. JOHN BERTRAM.— Merchandising, foreign trad* 
and deep sea ships. 

Est. DAVID PINGEEB.— Principally made in owner- 
ship of pine lands in Maine and New-Hampsliiro 
and sale of logs therefrom. There are about 
1,200,000 acres of this land in Maine alone. 
SPEINGFIBLD. 

MRS. J. M. THOMPSON.- From her husband, who 
made a fortune in Adams Express Company. 

•Est. GEORGE R. DICKINSON.— Paper manufacturing. 

**D. B. WESSON (ol Smith & Wesson).— Manufacturing 
revolvers (patented). 

•"HORACE SMITH (ol Smiith & Wesson) .-Manufactur- 
Ing revolvers and President ol Chicopee National 
Bank. 

MES. WILLIAM BLISS.— From her father. Chester W. 
Chapln. Made in the Boston and Albany Railroad, 
the Union Pacific Railroad, and other railroad^ 
canal and steamboat enterorises. 

MES. J. A. EUMRILL.— From her father. Chester W, 
Chapln. Made in the Boston and Albany Railroad, 
the Union Pacific Railroad, and other railroad., 
canal and steamboat enterprises. 
TAUNTON. 

•Est. WILLIAM MA50N.— Building locomotives and 



24 



LLBEABY OF TKIBDNE EXTRAS. 



other machinery ; real estate In Boston, etc. There 
are $650,000 of real estate hi Boston (Mason Ma- 
chine Worlis). 

WHITINSVILLE. 

•JAMES F. WHITIN.— Manufacturine; cotton and mar 
chine shODS. 

WEBSTER 
•HORATIO SLATER.— Manufacturing woollen* and In- 
vestments. 

WORCESTER. 

STEPHEN SALISJJDRY.— Inherited from his father, of 
the same name. Made in banhlng, railroads and 
real estate. President of Worcester National Banli. 

JONAS G. CLARK.— Sale of fmniture m California, and 
real estate investments. 

"GEORGE S. BARTON.— Iron manufacturing. 

GEORGE HENRY WHITCOMB.— Inherited from his 
father, David WMtoomh, who made his fortune in re- 
tailing hardware and then became a manufacturer of 
envelopes. Increased by investments In real estate. 
East and West. 

Est. WILLIAM GILES.— Law, railroads and Invest- 
ments. He left $2,000,000. 

"Est. lOHABOD WASHBURN.— Made in the manu- 
facture of barbed wire, by Inventions and processes, 
for the use of which the Washburn & Moen Manu- 
facturing Company are stlU paid royalties by. con- 
cerns all over the country. 

•JOSEPH H. WALKER.— Tanning and the manufact- 
ure of boots and shoes. 

"EDWARD L. DAVIS.— inherl.ed. Made tn car- wheel 
manufacturing. 

•WILLIAM E. RICE.- Manufacturing wire. 

•JESSE MOORE.— Distaiing in Kentuchy. 

R. C. TAYLOR.— Real estate and Mndred investments. 

••Est. PHILIP L. MOEN.— Manufacturing barbed wire 
and patented Implements. 

••Est. r. B. KNOWLBS.— Manufacturing patented 
looms. 

WALTHAM. 

•Est. THEOPHILUS WALKER.— Manufacturing glue 
and also interested in the Danvers Bleachery and 
Dye Works. He left an estate of .93,000,000. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries mainly 87 

In manufacture of patented articles 13 

Origin of the fortunes not reported 6 

In non-protected Industries 190 

Totlll j296 



MICHIGAN. 



CITY OP ALPENA. 

•FRANK W. GILCHRIST.— Pine lands and lake vessels. 

•GEORGE N. FLETCHER.— Pine lands, saw mills, real 
estate and sulphite factory. 

•A. W. COMSTOCK.— Pine lands and saw mUls. Presi- 
dent of Alpena Banlring Company. 

•A. N. SPRATT.— Pine lands, saw nSUs, mining land in 
Montana, etc. 

MRS. DIANA RICHARDSON.— Pine lands and sale of 
stnmpage. From her late husband. 

HENRY BOLTON (Of Bolton & McRae).— Wholesale 
general merchandise, cedar trees, telegraph poles, 
etc. 

DONALD McEAE (of Bolton & McEae).— General mer- 
chandise, cedar trees, telegraph poles, etc. 

W. B. COMSTOCK.— Ptne lands, sale ot stumpage, and 
banMng. 

ALMA. 

*A, W. WRIGHT (of the A. W. Wright Lumber Com- 
pany.).— Saw mlUSj lumber, pine lands, baiiking and 
Tallroada, .. l _ 



BAY CITY. 

'N. B. BRADLEY.— SawmlUs ; manufacture of lumber ; 
and pine lands. 

•Est. F. P. CHESEBROUGH (of Chesebrough & Charl- 
ton).~Pine lands, manufacturing lumber, and invest- 
ments. 

•Est. ALEXANDER FOLSOM (of Folsom & Arnold).— 
Lumber; saw mills, pine lands; and banking. 

CHEBOYGAN. 
•Est. THOMPSON SMITH.— Lumber, manufacturing, 
pine lands and vessels. 

DETROIT. 
•GEN. E. A. ALGER.— Pine lands, manufacturing, 
lumber and investments. Director In the United 
States Express Company. 
•Est. NEWELL AVERY.— Manufacturing, lumber and 

pine lands. 
E. ALFRED BRUSH.— Inherited -a large fortune from 
his fattier, who made the money In real estate la 
Detroit. 
•LUTHEE BEECHEE.— Eailroewls, mines and real 

estate. 
CHEISTIAN H. BUHL (of Buhl, Sons & Co.).— Whole- 
sale hardware and tinware ; manufacturing iron and 
investments ; president of Detroit National Bank. 
*C. C; BOWEN (of D. M. Ferry & Co.).— Ealslng and 

dealing in seeds, and Investments. 
MRS. DR. BOOK.— Inherited several nuUlons from her 
father, Francis Palms, sr., who made his fortune la 
dealing In mineral and pine lands, sale of stumpage, 
banking, etc. 
•Est. JOHN J. BAGLEY.— Manufacturing tobacco an4 

real estate. 
WM. A. BUTLER.- President of Mechanics' Bank; 

city real estate. 
THEO. H. EATON.— Wiliiolesale drugs, chemicals, etc. 
•D. M. FERRY (of D. M. Perry & Co.).— Ealslng. anS 

dealing in seeds, banking, real estate, etc. 
Est. JACOB S. FARRAND (of the former firm of 
Farrand, Williams & Co.)— Wholesale drugs, paints 
and oils ; banlsing and real estate. 
PETER HENKEL.— WhDlesale lictuors and groceries. 
Est. GEORGE H. HAMMOND.— Pork packing and real 

estate. 
•COL. P. J. HECKEE, president of the Peninsular (3ar 

Company.- Made in building railroad oars. 
BELA HUBBARD.— Real estate investments. 
GEORGE HENDRIE.— City railroads, banking, con- 
tracting, etc. 
JAMES F. JOY, formerly president of the Michigan 
Central EaUroad.— Made In railroads and Invest- 
ments. 
EDWARD KANTBR.— Banking and real estate. Presi- 
dent of German-American Bank. 
G. V. N. LOTHEOP.— Law practice, Investments in 

real estate, etc. 
WILLIAM B. MORAN.— Real estate, inherited In part 
W. K. MUIE.— Street railroads and real estate. 
•JAMES MCMILLAN.— He Is at the head of fifteen or 
twenty companies and factories. Made his fortune 
in railroads, oar building, and manufacturing. 
•HUGH MCMILLAN.— President of Commercial National 
Bank. Made his fortune in railroads, car building 
and manufacturing. 
*S. J. MURPHY.— Pine lands, sawmills and lumber. 
•Est. JOHN S. NEWBERRY.— Car buUding, railroads, 

banking and real estate. 
FRANCIS PALMS.— Inherited from his father. Money 
made in dealing In pdne and mineral lands, banking, 
etc. 
T. W. PALMEK.— Dealing In pine lands, real estate 
and banking. Partly by gift. All made In the 
same way. II, Mill 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



MES. T. W. PALMEE (born Merrill).— From her father. 
Made In deaUng Ln ptae lands, etc. 

WILLIAJVE H. STEVENS.— JCanMng and stocli farm. 
President of Third, National BanK and of American 
Banldng and Savings Association. 

•M. S. SMITH .^Jewelry, lumber manufacturing and 
pine lands. 

•DANIEL SCX3TTEN.— Tobacco manufacturing. 

ALLAN SHELDON.— Wholesale drj goods, real estate, 
banMng, etc. 

TEANGOTT SCHMIDT.-Tanning and leather, dealing 
in wool, furs, etc. 

ALAN30N SHELEY (of Williams, Davis, Broolis 
& Co.)— Wholesale drugs, paints and oil, real esiate, 
banldng, etc. 

MISS LILLIB THOMPSON.— Inherited from her grand- 
father. Brush. Made in real estate in Detroit. 

*E. W. VOIGHT.— Bre-wlng, real estate and Invest- 
ments. 

Est. WILLIAM B. WESSON.— Real es,tate and banMng. 
Was president of a savings banli and Trust, Security 
and. Safe Deposit company. / 

•DAVID WHITNEY. Jr.— Reputed to be the richest 
man in Michigan. Fortune made in saw mills, 
lumber, vessels on the lalies, hanliing, Detroit real 
estate, etc. 

•HIRAM WALKER.— Distilling. 

DAVID WARD.— Dealing in lumber and in pine and 
mineral lands, silver mines In Utah and Investments. 

W. O. YAWKEY.— Dealing In lumber and pine lands. 
PUNT. 

•Est. ALEXANDER MoFARLAN.— Manufacturing lum- 
ber and pine lands. 

GRAND HAVEN. 

•DWIGHT CUTLER.— Saw mills, lumber, dealing In 
real estate, etc. Pi'esident of Cutler & Savldge, 
lumber manufacturers. President of First National 
Bank. 

GRAND RAPIDS. 

•J. W. CONVERSE.— Manufacturing iumoer and In the 
O. E. Brown Flour Milling Company. 

DANIEL H. WATERS.— Real estate, pine lands, etc. 

*D. A. BLODGETT.— Lumber, saw mills and private 
banU at Cadillac, 

JACKSON. 

*H. A. HAYDEN.— Milling, real estate and banMng. 

•WILEY R. REYNOLDS.— Mining, banMng and real 



•WILLIAM D. THOMPSON.— Manufacturing Interests 

and president of Jactson City Bank. 
LUDINGTON. 
THOMAS E. LYON.— SawmiUs, lumber, grocery-store, 

etc. 

MARINE CITY. 
•Est. WILLIAM E. MOELEY.— Shipbuilding ; vessel 

owning on the Lakes ; freighting, etc. 
MARQUETTE. 
JOHN M. LONGYEAR.— Dealing la pine lands, iron-ore 

lands, etc. 
URS. MARY BREITUNG.— From her husband, Edward 

Breltnng. Made In dealing,. In Iron-mlnlng lands 

and pine lands. 

MUSKEGON. 
•CHAELIS H. HACKLEY (of Hackley & Hume).— Saw- 
mills and lumber; president of Muskegon National 

Bank. 
•T. D. STIMSON.— Mahufactorlng and selling lumber. 
•JOHN TORRENT.— Pine lands, sawmills, lumber, 

stoves, etc. 
•JONATHAN BOY^CE.— Manufacturing, lumber and 



mills and hotels ; vice-president of The Klrby-Car- 
penter Co. and president of First National Bank. 

MANISTIQUE. 
•J. D. WESTON.— SawmiUs ; lumber; manufacturing 

sashes, doors, etc. 

MANISTEE. 
CHARLES F. RUGGLES.— Pine lands, stumpage and 

sale of rough timber. 
•JOHN CAXFIELD (of the Canfield Salt and Lumber 

Company).— Manufacturing lumber and salt, aTid tug 

hne on the lakes. 
*B. G. FILER (of D. L. Filer & Sons).— Sawmill, pine 

lumber and grocery store. 
•LOUIS SANDS.— Sawmill, pine lumber and grocery 

store. 
*D. W. FILER (of D. L. FUer & Sons).— Lumber, saw- 

mlE and grocery store. 
•JAMES DEMPSEY.— Pine lands and manufac uring 

lumber. 
"EDWARD BUCKLEY.— Pine lands and manufacturing 

lumber. 

NILES. 
*H. A. CHAPIN.— Owner lof the famous Chapin irjn 

mine, which he leases. He has also made money 

in real estate and loans. 

SAGINAW. 
•AMASA RUST (of Rust Bros. & Co.'.,— Sawmill ; 

lumber and salt. 
*W. R. BURT.— DeaUng in pine lands, sawmills and 

lumber. 
•DANIFJj HARDIN.— Manufacturing salt, planing 

mill, pine lands, banMng, etc., president of Com- 
mercial National Bank. 
•EZRA RUST.— Sawmills, pine lands. 
ARTHUR HILL.— Dealing In timber and pine lands 

principally. 
THOMAS MERRILL.— Dealing In timber and pine 

lands principally. 
GEORGE L. BURROWS.- Private banking and plna 

lands. Inherited a large sum from his fattter. 

SAINT JOHN'S. 

ROBERT M. STEEL.-Made In buflding raOroads 

mainly (Union Pacific and Northern Pacific); also 

In banMng, dealing In pine lands, and furniture 

manuf acturln g. 

TRAVERSE CITY. 
•PERRY QANNAH (of Hannah, Lay & Oo.).-Manu- 
facturing lumber; dealing In pine lands; banldng; 
real estate, and hotel. 

RECAPITALATION. 

In protected industries , 53 

In non-protected Industries 37 

Total ~5o 



JIINNESOTA. 



planing. 



\ 



MENOMINEE. 
•6, M. STEPHENSON.— Mines, dealing in lands, saw- 



ClTY OP DULUTH. 

•JOSEPH SELLWOOD.— Made in iron mines and real 
estate. 

A. M. MILLER.— Started in a logging camp, and made 
money by real estate Investments. 

JOHN D. HOWARD.— Originally a gi-ooery store at 
Superior. Then investing in real estate in Superior 
and Duluth. 

LUTHER MENDENHALL.— BanMng and real estate. 
President of Duluth Union National Bank. 
MANKATO. 

JOHN A. WILLARD.— Law practice and real estate 
cMefly. He made Ms first money 111 Winnebago 
Reservation lands and next in Sioux lands on the 
Minnesota River. At one time he owned about 
12,000 acres in Blue Earth County, and 19,000 



26 



LIBRARY OF I'EIBUNE EXTRAS. 



acres In Yellow Medicine, Redwood and Brown 
counties, Minnesota. In 1873 wltti R. I>. Hubbard 
and anotner partner, Jie built tiie linseed oil mill 
here, and made some money tli.erein. Since 1878 
be bas been president of the First National Ban!:. 

Also interested in a bripli yard,. the ManSato Knlttng 
Woriis, and the Standard Flbreware Co. 
*R. D. HUBBARD (of Hubbard & Gere, oil millers and 

R. D. Hubl>ard & Co., tlour millers.)— Made his 

money in oil and flour milling; cattle raising in 

Montana; real estate, in Duluth and Chicago, etc. 

Director and owner In the First National Bank. 
MINNEAPOLIS. 
H. VV. BROWN.— Gasworks and local enterprises. 
'H. C. AKELEY.— Manufacturing lumber. 
•Est. JOSEPH DEAN.— Lumber business, loans and 

mortgages. 
L. F. MENAGE.— Rise In real estate and loans. 
THOMAS LOWRY.— Real estate and street railways. 
P. G. WINSTON.— Railroad contracting. 
P. G. WINSTON.— Railroad contracting. 
•T. B. WALKER.— Kne lands. sawmlUs. lumber and 

banldng. President of Plour City National Bank. 
JOHN C. OSWALD.— The sale of Uauors, wholesale, 

and Investments. 
L. M. STEWABT.— Law practice for many years and 

investments. 
*H. P. BROWN.-fiawmUls and lumber. 
C. G. GOODRICH.— Street railroads and rise In the 

value of inherited real estate. 
*S. G. COOK.— Lumber manufacturing. 
J. H. THOMPSON.— IMade in the sale of clothing. 
*S. T. Mcknight.— Sawmills and lumber. 
'JOHN MARTIN.— Sawmills and lumber. 
Est. A. J. SAWYER.- Made in the grain business. 
•GEORGE H. CHRISTIAN.— Flour miUlng. 
*W. S. BENTON.— Linseed oil manufacturing, 
J. B. GILPILLAN.— Real estate investments, 
•J. W. JOHNSON.— Iron manufactuiing 
*W. H. DUNMOODY.— Flour milling and dealing In 

grain. 
C. H. PRIOR.— Real estate investments. 
H. T. WELLES.— Investments in local real estate. 
F. H. PEAVBY.— Deahng in grain. 
*W. W. EASTMAN.— Manufacturing, real estate and 

loans. 
H. G. SIDLE.— Made in real estate and banMng. 
•Est. C. C. W.ASHBURN.— Flour milling. 
GEORGE R. NEWELL.— Wholesale groceries. 
LEVI L. COOK.— Made by the advance in values of 

real estate. 
•D. MORRISON.— Made a large fortune in pine lands 

and their advance in valae ; and manufacturing. 
•CLINTON MORRISON.— Presented with a fortuna made 

by Ills father, D. Morrison, In pine lands and manu. 

facturing, which, has been added to by himself by 

Investments in real estate, etc. President of the 

Farmers and Mechanics' Savings Bant. 
Est WILLIAM MoNAIR.— Law practice and real 

estate. 
J. W. PENCE.— Made $400,000 by investment in 

whiskey just before the Government tax was put 

on In war times ; and Increased his fortune by 

purchases of real estate which has risen in value, 

and Investments In mines. 
•JOHN S. PILLSBURY.— Made in milling flour. 
•GEORGE A. PILLSBURY.— Flour milling. 
•CHARLES A. PILLSliURY.— Plour miUlng. 
SAMUEL C. GALE.— Rise in real estate; loans and 

Insurance business. 
E. B. LANGDON.— Made in contraeting and railroad 

building. 
T. B. CASEY.— Made In the sale of drygoods and bank- 
ing. 



PETER WOLPOBD.— Real estate Investments and 

loans, the latter being his principal business. 
A. H. LINTON.— Railway contracting ajid building. 
RICHARD CHUTE.— Real estate and Investments. 
H. B. FLETCHER.- Inheritance and real estate 
chiefly, but has also made money in milling. 
ROCHESTER. 
GEORGE W. VAN DUSEN.— Buying grain extensively 
from farmers and slUpplng it; also engaged in the 
grain elevator business. 

RED WING. 
JAMES LA WTHER.— Dealing in coal, and insurance 
business. 

ST. CLOUD. 
N. P. CLARKE.— Logging and prlva'.e banking. 

ST. PAUL. 
"^FREDERICK WEYERHAUSER.— The buUi of his for- 
tune made In pine lands. Some in manufactuiing 
lumber. 
•R. C. JEFFERSON.— Sawmills, lumber and pine lands. 
H. P. UPHAM.— BanMng and dealings In railroad se- 
curities. 
JAMES J. HILL.— Probably the richest man of the 
Northwest. Made entirely In railroads. President 
of the Great Northern BaQway, and of the St. 
Paul, Mijmeapohs and Manitoba Railway. Is 
largely Interested in other roads. Has absolute 
control of 4,000 miles of road, and is now building 
800 miles to the Pactflc coast. 
MRS. JAMES J. HILL.— She received an anniversary 
present of a million dollars in Government bonds 
from her husband. Made In raUroads. 
Est. NORMAN T. KITTSON.— He left a fortune of 
$4,500,000, accumulated in steamboating, railroads 
and real estate. 
WILLIAM DAWSON.— Made his money almost enfirels 

in real estate. President of Bank of Minnesota. 
CRAWFORD LIVINGSTON.- Made in gas and electric 

light business. 
D. C. SHEPAED (of Griggs, Cooper & Co.).— Merchan- 
dising, groceries and railroad contracting. 
PETER SIEMS.— Railroad contracting and buUding. 
DENNIS RYAN. -Money made in selling sUver and 

other mining properties. 
A. H. WILDER.— Made his money in Government con- 
tracts, and increased it in ranches and real estate. 
C. W. GRIGGS (of Griggs, Cooper & Co.).— Merchan- 
dising, groceries and lumber, and real estate Invest- 
ments. 

ANSEL OPPENHEIM.— Made in ralh'oads and real 
estate. 

A. B. STICKNEY.-Made in railroads. 

SAMUEL MAYALL.— Obtained his footing by Govern- 
ment contracts for suppUes, and Increased his for- 
tune by investments in real estate. 

W. R. MBRRIAM.— Contracte and banldng. President 
of Merchants' National Bank. 

P. H. "Kelly.- Made in the grocery business and real 
estate. 

C. D. GILPILLAN.— Made in the city waterworks and 
in banking. 

Est. E. F. DRAKE.— Made some money in law and in 
banking in Xenla, Ohio. Then embarked in rail- 
road building In Minnesota, and brought to the 
State, the first rails, cars, and locomotives ever 
seen there. He built the St. Paul and St. Anthony 
road, and became largely interested in the St. 
Paul and Sioux City Railroad, of wMoh he become 
the president. He was also Interested in lumber- 
ing in Wisconsin ; stone quarries ; a fine stock 
farm In Southwestern Minnesota, and valuable 
real estate in St. Paul. 

THEODORE L. SOHUBMEIER.— Iniheilted imm. his 
fatlier-ln-law, In paint', Hals been enigaged in mer- 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



chamlii^ng dry-Eoods and cilotlling, manuteiturlng ISAAC N. RIDGE. -Rise In real estate, 

toots and sJiioes, etc. GEORGE SHEIDLEY.— Rise in real estate. 

COLONEL JOHN MElRRIAM.— Contracts, real estate LAMON V. IIARKNESS (of Harlmess, Wyman & Rus. 

and Investments. sell)'.— Banldng ; lie Is worth several millions. 

Est. HORACE THOMPSON.— Made In railroads, banll- AD.,iM LONG.— First In wholesale Broceries (firm ol 

Ing and real estate. Long Brothers); then In profitable Investments In 

Est. HENRY HALE.— Rise in value ol real estate. real estate. 

•Est. CONRAD GOTZIAN.— Manufacturing boots and JOHN LONG.— First In wholesale groceries (firm of 

shoes. Long Brothers) ; then In profitable Investments in 

Est. W. F. DAVIDSON.— Steamboating and real estate. real estate. 

CHARLES E. DE GRAFF.— RaUroad contracting and Est. GEORGE FOWLER.— Paching meats. The firm 

real estate. of Geoige Fowler & Sons have a plant worth several 

Est. WILLIAM LINDEKE.— Merchandising and real nuUions. 

estate. "•DAVID T. BEALS.— Stock ranches, cattle-ralslng and 

STILLWATER. investments. 

ISAAC STAPLES.- Pine lands, lumber, sawmills and A. L. MASON.— General merchandising and rise hi real 

store; president of Lumberman's National Banli estate. 

and of a savings banlt. THOMAS H. SWOPE.— Made In rise In real estate. 

'JACOB BEAN (of Hersey & Bean).— Pine lands, saw- THOMAS CORRIGAN.— Street railroad franchises and 

mills, etc. real estate. 

*Est. SAMUEL HERSEY (of Hereey & Bean).- See GEORGE F. WINTER.— Rise In real estate. 

B&iigor, Matoe, wtoere he is rated. **W. S. WOODS.— Banliing and stock-raising In South 

WINONA. Dakota. 

H. W. LAMBERTON.-Presldent of the Winona De- ^^^'^?^ WADDINGHAM.-Cattle-raising and stock 

posit Bank. Made in "banking and Investments. ranches. 

V. SIMPSON.-Made In real estate, loans, etc.. ST. .JOSEPH. 

*M. G. NORTON (of Laliid, Norton & Oo.).— Made in MRS. KATE TOOTLE.— Made by her husband, the Iat« 

pine lands, saw-mills and lumber. Milton Tootle, In wholesale drygoods and real es- 

*JAMES L. NORTON (oif Laird. Norton & Co.).— Made tate Investments. 

In pdme lands, saiw mills anid lumber. MISS FANNIE TOOTLE.— Inherited from her father, 

•WILLLAM H. LAIIBD (of Laird, Norton & Oo.).— Milton Tootle. Made in merchandising and real 

Pine lands, saw mills and lumber. estate. 

RECAPITULATION. MILTON TOOTLE, JR.— Inherited from his father, Mil- 

In protected InduiStries 28 ton Tootle. Made in merchandising and real estate. 

In non-pinotected tndustrlies ." 60 JOHN TOOTLE.— Inlierited from Jlilton Tootle. Mada 

_.. . -. -~ in merchandising and real estate. 

" JAMES MoCORD, SB.— Made in wholesaJe grocery busl- 

• ness. 

MISSISSIPPI. A. N. SCHUSTER.-Wholesale clothing and private 

_^___ banking. He is also a partner in stores in Hanni- 

NA'rcilEZ. nlbal, Mb. ; Colorado, Texas ; Pueblo, Colo. ; and 

E. 6. McCLUEE.— Loans on notes and other securities. Marysville, Kan. President of the Schuster-Hax 

STTEPHEN DUNCAN.— Inherited. Son of the late Dr. National Bank. 

Stephen Duncan, one of the largest and wealthiest *JOHN S. LOGAN.— Made in mines. 

planters in the South. "RUFUS L. McDONALD (of R. L. McDonald & Co.) — 

RECAPITULATION Manufacturing wooUen and duck wear. Largest 

In protected industries .' manufacturer of this class of goods in the West. 

In non-protected Industries 2 Also merchandising drygoods and notions. 

— 'WILLIAM M. WYETH.— President of Wyeth Hardware 

''^ and Manufacturing Co. Made in manufacturing. 

»■ — — **J. C. PRYOR.— Made In cattle-raising. 

,,,-'C!/-\TTT.T WILLIAM G. FAIRLEIGH.— Merchandising, drygoods 

M ISSOUR I ^^^ investments. 

T,.^T,TTT,.T GEORGE T. HOAGLAND.— Made in lumber trade and 

HANNIBAL. money-lending. 

•JOHN GARTH.-Manufacturing and seUing lumber. DUDLEY M. STEfELE.-Wholesale groceries and land. 

JOPLIN. He is a partner in stores in Wichita and Omaha, 

•J. C. LERCY.— Made in the ownership of land, which a2gQ_ 

turned out to have a zinc mine. OHAJM.ES B. FRANCE.- Banking and Investmenta. 

KANSAS CITY. President of the State National Bank. 

S. B. ARMOUR (of Armour Brothers Packing Com- LOUIS HAX.— Of the Louis Hax Furniture Company. 

pany).— Packing beef and pork. Made in merchandising carpets, the manufacture of 

Est. A. W. ARMOUR (of Aumour Brotiheips' PacJdng furniture and banking. President of the Centrai 

Oomipany).- PacMnig beef amid pork. Savings Bank. 

VICTOR B. BUCK.— Merchandising boots and shoes and N. P OGDEN.— Banking and investments tn real estate. 

rise in real estate. President of the Commercial National Bank. 

Est. KERSEY COATES.— Hotel and rise in real estate. THOMAS E. TOOTLE.— \\Tiolesale drygoods. 

J. C. GATES.— Merchandising boots and shoes, and rise CALVIN F. BURNES.— Law practice, real estate in- 

In real estate. vestments, and banking. President of the National 

W. E. HALL.— Rise in value of real estate. Bank of St. Joseph. 

JAMES F. HOLMES.— Rise In value of real estate. Est JAMES N. BURNES.— Made in real estate invest- 

ALBERT MARTY.- Rise in value of real estate. ments. Daniel D. Burnes and Calvin C. Burnes are 

JAMES B. PORTER.— Rise In value ol real estate. legatees. 

L. J. PORTER.— Rise in value of real estate, ABRAM NAVE.— Wholesale groceries. 



28 



LIBEAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



ST. LOUIS. 

WILLIAM D. GRISWOLD.— Real estate and Invest- 
ments. 

"CHARLES CLARK.— Mining properties. 

'CHARLES McCLURE.— Granite Mountain mines. 

*SAMUEL OUPPLES (of Samuel Oipples Woodenware 
Co.) — Manulacturing woodenware. 

HUGH MoKITTRICK (of tile Hargadlne-MoKlttriok 
Drygoods Co.) — Drygoods. 

W. A. HARGADINE (ol last above).— Drygoods. 

•WIIXIAM J. LEMP.— Proprietor of Lemp's Western 
Brewery. Made la that business. 

*ADOLPHUS BUSCH (ol Anbeuser-Busch Brewing As- 
sociatlon).- Brewing fine beors. 

*W. F. NOLKER.-Brewing. 

WILLIAM BARR (of the WUliam Barr Drygoods Co.) — 
Wholesale and retaU drygoods and investments. 

C. P. G. MYER.— Wholesale drugs. 

JOHN T. DAVIS (01 Samuel C. Davis & Co.).— Whole- 
sale drygoods. 

JOHN WHirrAKER (of Francis Whlttalier & Sons).— 
PacMng meats. 

•L. M. RUMSK.Y (of the L. M. Runisey Mfg. Co.) - 
Manufacturing maclilne pumps and milling 
machjnery. 

•MOSES RUMSBY (of last above).— Manufactm-lng 
machine pumps and mining macliinery. 

"JOHN R. LIONBERGBR.— Mining and banMng. 

•E. C. STERLING.— Brlcii manufacturer. 

"Brt. GERARD B, ALLOEIN.— Iron manufaoturlng and 
steamboiats. 

JOHN J. MTIKHELL.- Railroads, principally the Chi- 
cago and Alton. 

•OLlVBiR HART.— Made In real estate and coal lands. 

"GEORGE E. LEIGHTON, who married a da.ughter of 
Hudson E. Bridges.- Iron foundry business and real 
estate speculations. 

"GILBERT CHAPMAN, bemeflclary of the Bridges es- 
tate.— Iron foundry business and lumber. 

MRS. JULIA MAFFITT.— Made in the Indian trade 
and real estate investments by Pierre Chouteau, In 
early days. 

CHARLES P. CHOUTEAU.— Made in Indian trade and 
'-■eal estate Investments in early days. 

GOVERNOR D. R. FRANCIS.— Grain options, etc. 

W. H. PECK.— Made in contracting, building and in- 
surance. 

JOHN A. SCUDDER.— Steamboatlng on the rivers. 

Est. M. TYLER.— Made In rise In real estate. 

J. J. ROE.— Made a fortune in packing meats. 

ROBERT CAMPBELL.— Made lu banldng and brokerage 
businesi!!. 

ERASTUS WELLS.— Street railroads. 

"J. B. M. KEHLOR (of Kehlor Brothers).— La«lede 
flour mills. 

JOHN SCULLIN.— Street railroads. 

"JAMES T. DRUMMOND (of the Drummond Tobacco 
Company).— Tobacco manufaotaring. 

"DANIEL CATLIN (of Catlln Tobacco Company).— 
Totiaoco manufacturing. 

•JAMES E. LIGGITT (of the Liggitt & Myers Tobacco 
Company). — Tobaccio manufaotming. 

"GEORGE S. MYERS (of last above).— Tobacco manu- 
facturing. 

MRS. SAMUEL L. VINING.— Inherited. Awarded to 
lier from French Spoliation Claims. Made originally 
in shipping and foreign trade. 

Est, JOSEPH WEIL.— Drygoods business and real es- 
tate investments. 
Est. ROBERT A. BARNES.— Merchandising and real 
estate. 

Est. HENRY SHAW.— Made a large fortune in the im- 
portation and sale of hardware, in which business 
he was engaged lor twenty years; and In the pur- 



chase at low price of downtown and suburban 

real estate, which has now become valuable. 
:MRS. THOMAS ALLEN.— Made in the Iron Mountain 

RaDroad and In various Investments, Including 

mines. 
WILLIAM R. ALLEN.— From his father, Thomas Allen. 

Made in railroads and investments. 
MISS ANNIE ALLEN.— Same as the last. 
MRS. CHARLES ATWATER.— From her father, Thomas 

Allen. Made in railroads mainly. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries 24 

In cattle raising and lands 4 

In non-protected industries 62 

Total 90 



MONTANA. 



CITY OF BOZEMAN, 

"*NBLSON STORY.— Made in stock-raising, real estate, 
banking aud a variety of enterprises. President of 
the Gallatin Valley National Bank. 
BUTTE CITY. 

W. A, CLARK.— Made a large fortune in banking, re- 
duction and mines. Also in forwarding. 

S. E. LARABIE.— Banking. He lias made a 

large fortune. 

Est. ANDREW J. DAVIS.— Made a fortune of about 
teu millions la mines, real estate and banking. Was 
president of the Silver Bbw Bank. 

MARCUS DALY.— Gold and silver mines, smelting and 
banking. He also has a large Interest in the 
profitable Anaconda copper mines. 
DEER LODGES. 

CHAELES X. LARABIE.— Banliing and mining. He 
has made a large fortune. 

FORT BENTON. 

ISAAC G. BAKER (of Isaac G. Baker & Co.)— Mer- 
chandising, forwarding and banMng. 
HELENA. 

THOMAS C. POWER.— Made in freighting, contracting 
for supplies to United States posts, banking, cattle- 
raising, etc. President of the American National 
Bank. 

SjVMUEL T. HAUSER.— Mostly made in bauislag. 
President of the First National Bank. 

Est. C. A. BROADWATER.— Freighting, contracting 
for supplies to Umted States posts, cattle-raising, 
banking, hotel and real estate investments. He had 
a large Interest in mines and president of the 
Montana National Banb;. 

C. W. CANNON.— Rise in value of real estate. 

THOMAS CRUSE.- Mostly In mining and banMng. 
President of tlie Thomas Cruse Savings Bank. He 
sold his mines to an English syndicate for over a 
million dollars. 

WILLIAM A. CHESSMAN.— Rise In value of local 
real estate. 

E. S. HALE.- Mines, water and drug store. 

A. M. HOLTEK.— The sale of hardware, and looai 
mines. 

MISSOULA. 

E. L. BONNER.— Ttte sale of lumber, banking, etc. 

A. B. HAMMOND.— Made in the sale of lumber, and 
banking. 

Est. C. P. HIGGINS.— Merchandising and banking. 

EECAPITU LATION. 

In protected industries o 

In cattle raising mainly i 

In non-protected Indnstrles .'.'.".'.'."." IT 

Total ~ii 



AiMEEICAJSr MILliIONAIRES. 



29 



NEBBASKA. 



NJiiVADA. 



CITY OF BEATRICE, 

Est. JOHN W. KILPATRICK (of Kllpatrlclc Bros. & 
Collins).— Railroad, contriictlag chiefly. He built 
the Central Paclflo, or & large part of it. 
PALLS CITY. 

S. B. MILES.— Made his start In a pony express Irom 
the Missouri River to the lar West, and then In- 
vested everything In the purchase of low-priced lands 
In Eastern Nebraslsa and Eastern Kansas, of which hs 
lias atout 80,000 acres which has imcrcased greatly 
la value. He leases part of the land and farms the 
re.st, raising a large amount or grain and stocli. 
LINCOLN. 

H. T. CLARK.— Chiefly made in merchandising. 

JOHN FITZGERALD.- Made a large fortune in con- 
tracting, raUroad building, etc. He is president of 
the First National Bank. 

NEBBASKA CITY. 

■"■ISAAC COE.— Tie contracting, cattle raising, etc. 
OMAHA. 

TEEDERICK KRUG.— Made in brewing and real es- 
tate. 

S. P. MORSE.— Made In drygoods( 
WILLIAM A. PAXTON.— Army supplies, contract- 
ing, cattle, real estate and banlilng. He is presi- 
dent of tile Union Trust Company. An officer in tISe 
Union Stecte Yai'ds Banlt, Paxton and Vierling Iron 
Wjrhs, Union Stooli Yards Company, First National 
Banlt and Soutli Omalia Land Company. 

JOHM A. CEEIGHTON.— Contracting, building West- 
ern Union Telegraph lines, cattle raising, real 
estate, and vice-president of First National Banlr. 

OE(. RGB E. BARKER.— President of Banlc of Com- 
marce; Banking and real estate. 

EY'RON REED.— Made In real e.^tate investments. 

SAMUEL B. ROGERS.— Made in real estate invest- 
ments. 

HERMAN KOUNTZE.— Made a large fortune in real 
estate and banking. President of the First Na- 
tional Bank. 

■GUy C. BARTON.— Made in part in cattle raising, but 
chiefly smelting and refining, etc. President of the 
Omaha and Grant Smelting and Refining Company. 
Vice-president of the Omalia Street Railway Com- 
pany. 

©R. S. D. MERCER.— Made principally in purchases 
of low-priced real estate wlilclr afterward rose in 
■value; electric and cable street railroads in Omaha 
and otlier cities In Nebraska ; and sUent partner in 
several mercantile houses. O^wner of one of the 
largest Inte's in the city. 

H. T. CLARKE,— MerchaDdlslng, contracting, slook 
raising, farming and advance In value of lands. 

FRANK MURPHY'.— Banking, street railroads, gas- 
works, real estate, etc. President of tlie Omaha 
Street Railroad Company and the Omalia Gas Manu- 
facturing Company. 

ANDREW J. POPPLETON.— Law practice and real 
estate. He was ' formerly the attorney of the 
InioD Pacific Railroad. 

|ICS.-EPH; JMILLARD.— Banking land real estate. 
1-resident of the Omaha National Bank. Director 
in the Union Pacific RaUroad. 

J. A. HORBACH.— Advance In value of real estate. 

A. J. HANSCOM.— Real estate. 

B. F. SMITH.— Investments in real estate. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries .:. 1 

In cattle raising chiefly 1 

In non-protected industries 20 

Total 22 



The enormously valuable silver mines of Nevada 
have laid the foundation of a large number of private 
fortunes ; but the possessors of tliem now live In other 
States, the majority in San Francisco and New-Yorli 
City. 



NEW-HAMPSHIRK. 



CITY OF ANDOVER. 

*Est. JOHN PROCTOR.- Made a fortune in manufactur- 
ing screws. 

CLAREMONT. 

JOHN L. FAR WELL.- Made in real estate, railroads and 
banking. President of Claremont National Bank and 
Treasurer o'f Sullivan Savings Institution. 
CONCORD. 

Est. NATHANIEL WHITE.— Began Ufe as a stage 
driver. Then in the United States and Canada Ex- 
press Company, wiiloh consolidated with the Ameri- 
can Express Company and gave him a fortune. 

'Est. JAJfES B. HILL.— Manuf.aoture of harnes.'S and 
contracts therefor -with the Government, and Invest- 
ments in lots and buildings in Concord. 

DOVER. 
*Est. JONATHAN SAWYER.— Made in manufacturing 
woollen goods. 

LANCASTER. 
•■GEOEGE VAN DYKE.— Sa-wmiiy, lumber and timber 
lands. 

LISBON. 
-Est. WILLIAM H. CUMMINGS.— Banking, lumbering 
and manufacturing. 

MANCHESTER. 
"ARETAS BLOOD.— Made a large fortune in building 
the Amoskeag fire engines and locomotives. Con- 
t oiling owner of the Manchester Locomotive Worlis. 
President of the Second National Bank. 

PORTSMOUTH. 

'E. H. WINCHESTER (of Main & Winchester).— Har- 
ness manufacturing here, and real estate investment? 
In San Francisco. 

"FRANK JONES.— Began life as a pedler. Went into 
brewing and made a gi'eat fortune. Has Invested In 
banks, railroads, etc. Pi'esldent of th,e„ Boston and 
Maine Railroad. ^ 

'CHARLES A. SINCLAIR.— In brewl'fig business with 
Frank Jones. Has also made much money in rail- 
roads. 

ROCHESTER. 

'E. G. WALLACE (of E. G. * E, Wallace).— Tanning 
and leather, and nianu.'acluring boots and slioes. 

"EDWm WALLACE (of E. G. & E. Wa'lace).- Tanning 
and leather, and manui'acturing boots and shoes. 
President of the Rochester Loan and Banldng 
Company. 

■TILTON. 

CHARLES E. TILTON.— Made several millions In the 
wholesale liquor business in New-York City : then lu 
banldng In Portland, Ore. : and in raUi-oads and other 
enterprises. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries mainly 11 

in nonprotected industries 3 

Total 14 



NEW-JER?EY. 



ASBURY". 
*Est. DAVID RUNKLE.— IrC'U manufacturing. Was 
president and principal owner of the Warren 
foundry of cast-iron pipe at Phillipsburg, N. J. ; 



30 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTEAS. 



ooie of the toundeis and diirectopsi of the Thomas 
Iron Oompamy ; ana owner in gas and warter -wwrte, 
etc. 

ASBUEY PAEK. 

JAMES A. BRADLEY.— Pantliy In thje majuufajoture of 
teiutelheB ; but matoly in the development of the real 
estate amd ho-tel interests of Asihury Park. 
BUTLER VILLAGE. 

•GENERAL FRANCIS S. KIKNEY.— Maiiufaotiirlng 
cigarettes and Investments In real estate In New- 
York City and In New-Jersey. Has IiaU a million 
of property on Broadwiay alone. Dikector of tlie 
Ameirlcan Tobajcoo Company. 

r.ERNARDSVILLE. 

MRS. J. COLEMAN DRAYTON.— fYom the Astors of 
New-Yorfc Made In. real estate Investments. 
BAYONNE. 

SOLON HUMPHREYS (E. D Morgan & Co., New- 
York).— Importing tea, sugar and coHee, and bank- 
ing and negotiation of bonds. Has many invest- 
ments In street railways, lo«al honids, etc. Joihn 
T. Terry and Mr. Humphreys are now the only 
partners In the old firm. Director In the Peoria and 
PeMn Union Railway ; Pittsburg and Western Rail- 
road, etc., etc. 

Est. GARRET W1NANTS.--City contracting, real estate 
and railroads. 

Est. ETJFUS STORY.— Grain business, IsTKei transactions 
In pepper amd spices, and real estate. 
BLAIRSTOWN. 

JOHN I. BLAIR.— Contracting, railro.-vd building and 
banking. He is In the Chicago and Northiwestern 
Railroad; New-York, Snsquelianna and Western Rail- 
road ; New-York, Lackawanna and Western Ealh-oad : 
Oregon Pacific RaHroald; Dedaware, Laelmwamna 
end Wesitern Railroad, and many oither eniterpTises. 
CAMDEN. 

SAMUEL C. COOPER.— Inherited. Made in real estate 
and stocks. 

EAST ORANGE. 

HRS. WILLIAM M. FRANKLIN.— From her father, 
Israel Sheldon. Made In Western lands and gas 
stocks. Her husband Is prdsMent of th/e People's 
Bank. 

CHARLES A. STERLING.- In the National Storage 
Connpany, of which ho Is president, succeeding his 
lather in that place. 

ELIZABETH. 

COLONEL JOHN KEAN.— Inherited In part. Added 
to his fortune by Investments In gas and water 
works, real estate and railroads, which have risen 
to value. He Is president of the National State Bank 
fmd was for years vice-president of the Central Rail- 
road of New-Jersey. 

MRS. JOHN KEAN.— Inlierlted from the Fish estate, in 
New- York. Made in real estate. 

JOHN DAVIDSON— Law practice; real estate invest- 
ments in New- York, Brooklyn and elsewhere; and 
railroads and otler Investments. 
ENGLEWOOD. 

HON. WILLIAM WALTER PHELPS.— Pjirtly Inherfted 
from his father, a. large di-y goods merchitnt. Added 
to by himself by pui-uhnse« of real estate along the 
Northern Railroad of New-Jersey, where he has es- 
tablished several villages ; and by Investments in rail- 
ttoadB, securities, etc. Direcloir in tihe National CBty 
Bank, New York ; United States Trust Company, etc. 

MRS. WILLIAM WALTER PHELPS.— Inherited from 
her father, James E. Shefflefd, of New-Haven, whole- 
sale merchant of olotliing anil investor in railroads, 
etc. 

DONALD MACK AY (of Vermllye & Co.. bankers. New- 



York aty).— Made in banltlng and numerous Invest- 
ments. Director in the Attontio Trust Company, 
Merchants' National Bank, New-York Stock Ex- 
change Budldlng Company, etc., etc. President of 
the Oltizens' National Bank of Engle-wiood. 

MRS. JOHN VAN BUEEN.— Inherited. Made In law 
practice and real estate chiefly. 

*E. A. BRLNCKEBHOFF.-JOortton mamufaotnirifflg. He 
was onie of the first to esitabHsh cotton nulls in fch© 
Soiuitih. Pant of his fortune comes through Ms wife 
by Inheritance. 

HARRISON. 

•"STEWART HAETSHORNE.— Made In manufacturing 
shade rollers, patented. 

HACKENSACK. 

Est. CHRISTIAN ZABRIoKIE.— Made In rise In value 
of real estate and Investments. 

Eat. JOHN L. MOORE.— 

HOBOKEN. 

JOHN STEVENS.— Acquired by his father, the late Ed- 
win A. Stevens, In the Hoboken Ferry Company andl 
In railroad enterprises, and In the rise in value of 
a large quantity of water frontage and land. In- 
herited from Colonel John Stevens. Edwin A. 
Stevens was president ot the Hoboken Ferry Com- 
pany. 

ROBERT L. STBVBNIS.- Inherited from Edwin A. 
Stevens. Director in the Hoboken Ferry Company. 

C. ALBERT STEVENS.— Mainly Inherited from Edwin 
A. Stevens. 

RICHARD STEVENS.— Same as last above. 

MRS. EDWIN A. STEVENS.— Prom her Iiusband. Made 
as above. 

Est. JOSEPH L. LEWIS.— Fortune made In the West 
Indies, In part, and by the closest economy and pur- 
chase of securities here. He left $1,000,000 to the 
United States Government to help pay the National 
debt. 

HOLLYWOOD. 

JOHN HOEY.— Made in the Adams Express Company 
of which he was president for many years ; railroads ; 
and real estate improvement at Hollywood. Di- 
rector in the Chicago Junction Railways and Stock 
Yards Company. 

HIGHLANDS. 

•BENJAMIN HARTSHORNE.— Partly made in Cali- 
fornia In coasting vessels, but largely the result ot 
rise In value of lands near the Highlands of Never- 
sink, N. J. 

JERSEY CITY. 

••Est GEORGE R. McKENZIE.— Made in the manuK 
facture of Singer sewing machines, patented. 

Est. CHARLES G. SISSON.— Groceries, railroad build- 
ing, railroad stocks, and real estate. He was largely 
Interested in New-Jersey raUroads. He biillt the 
Northern Railroad of New-Jersey and owned tha 
largest part of Its stock. 

Est. CORNELIUS V. TEAPHAGEN.-One of the llrst 
settlers of Jersey City, and at his death one of its 
wealtliiest citizens. His fortune was made cWellv 
in advance In value of real estate, of which ho 
owned large tracts. 

LAKEWOOD. 

CAIT. S. D. DAVIS.— Banking in New- York City, and 
local investments at Lakewood. 

FRANCIS P. FREEMAN.— Made in brokerage and bank- 
ing In New- York City ; real estate at Lakewood, etc. 
Director In the New- York and Harlem Railroad. 
(Other residents of Lakewood are quoted elsewhere.) 
MONTCLAIR. 

WILLIAM W. EGBERT.-Made in stDck speculation, 
brokerage business and rise In the value of real 



AMEEICAJSr MILLIONAIRES. 



31 



estate. He Is a member of the New-York Stock 
Excliange. 

MOREISTOWTN. 

HENRY S. VAN BUKEN.-Inherlted. Made In New- 
York real estate. 

FREDERICK VAN BUREN .—Inherited. Made In 
New- York real estate. 

GEORGE J. KIP.— Banking In New-York and real 
estate In Denver and Omaha. 

R. KISSELL.— A relative of VanderbUt family. Made 
In railroads and stocks. 

•JOHN T. FOOTE.— Distilling, and CJinolnnaU real 
estate. 

GEORGE F. 6T0NE.— Rallraads and stocks. 

Est. SAHTtEL I. HUNT.— 

•Est. JOHN H. SWIFT.— Manufacturing bats and caps. 

CC)RNELIUS FELLOWES.- Inherited from his father, 
William Fellowes, of New-York. Director in the 
Equitable Manufacturing and Electric Company. 

Etet. RUFUS B. GRAVES.— Merchandise and cotton. 

•MRS. AUGUSTUS S. VAN WICKLB.— From' her fether, 
Ario Pardee, of Haaleton, Penn., who made a fortune 
of more tlian $10,000,000 in hard and soft coal 
mines, iron mines, and lumber. 
MADISON. 

Est. WILLIAM HAYWARD. GIBBONS.— Largely In- 
herited. Money made mostly lu real estate. 
NEWARK. 

•BENJAMIN ATHA.— Manufacturing steel. 

EDWARD BALBACK.— Smelting ores. 

JOHN RADEL.— Made In Newark and South Orange 
street railroad, and hfvestmenls. 

EUGENE VANDERPOOL (president of the Newark 
Gas Light Company).— Made his fortune In gas- 
works, etc. 

Est. EX-GOVEENOE MARCUS L. WARD.— Made In 
real estate largely. 

•EDWIN LESTER.— Made In manufacturing agricul- 
tural Implements. 

•WILLIAM CLARK.— Made In maniifacturlng Clark's 
thread. 

•Est. JAMES CLARK.— Made In manufacturing thread. 

•JOHN H. BALLANTINB (of P. Ballantine & Sons).— 
Brewing. Largely inherited from Peter Ballantine. 

•ROBERT P. BALLANTINE (with his brother, the sole 
partner in P. Earantlne & Sons;.— Brewing. Largely 
Inherited from Peter Ballantine. 

•MRS. PETER B. 'IIaLLANTINE.— Brewing. Largely 
Inherited from- Peter Ballantine. 

•GOTTFRIED KRUEGER.— Brewing and real estate. 

•JOSEPH HENSLER.— Brewing and real estate. 

Est. A. L. DENNIS.- Loans on mortgage, real estate, 
stocks and bonds, railroads, etc. Director In the 
Pennsylvania Railroad and president of a, plank- 
road company. 

••Est. INSLEB A. HOPPER.— In malTufacturlng Singer 
sewing machines, silk mUls, banks, etc. His wile 
was a daughter of Isaac M. Singer. 

THOMAS T. KINNEY.— Publishing "The Newark Ad- 
vertiser"; and Investment of profits In real estate 
and securities. 

EUb. STAFFORD R. W. HEATH.— 

BERNARD M. SHANLEY.— Contracting and buUdlng. 

•MRS. CHRISTIAN TREFY.— Made In brewing and 
real estate. 

JOHN H. CASE.— Insurance business and president 
of Firemen's Insurance Company. 

Est. JOHN BRISBIN.— Law practice and railroads. 

JACOB SHINKLE.— Merchandising, and real estate 
Investments. 

Est. THEODORE MACKNET.— Partly Inherited from 
his father, Charles Macknet, who had the largest 
business in wholesale and retail hardware in the 



city. The son carried on the business many years, 
and invested largely tu financial Instltutigns. Was 
president of National State Bank, and once of 
Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company. 

MES. FREDERICK T. FEELINGHCYSEN.— Inherited. 
NEW-BRUNSWICK. 

•Est. CHRISTOPHER MEYER.— Made a great fortune 
of several millions In manuiacturlng rubber goods, 
and In Investments In stocks and securities. 

Est. S. COVAS.— Made by Importation of merchandise 
In New-York City. 

ORANGE. 

OLIVER S. CARTEE.— Importing tea and coffee In 
New- York, and banldng. Insurance and other stocks. 
Director In the Home Insurance Company, National 
Bank of the Eepubllc. 

AAEON CARTER.— Jewelry business In New-York. 

SAMUEL LORD.— Wholesale and retail drygoods ia 
New-Y'ork City. 

'SAMUEL COLGATE (of Colgate & Co.)— Made in 
manufacturing fine soap. I • 

HENEY GRAVES.— Banking and brokerage business 
and speculation. Is In several railroads. 

MES. JOHN S. TILNEY.— Inherited from her father, 
Israel Sheldon. Mad4 in Western lands and ga» 
stocks. 

JOSEPH W. STICKLER.— The owner of a large 
fortune, made by Inheritance of valuable real 
estate on Broad-st. and Exchange (Place, New- 
York- York City, other real estate In Hoboken and 
Orange, and bank stocks and securities. He has 
added considerably to his inheritance by his owe 
good management. / I I i nl 

•JOHN WATSON.— Made in tanning and cotton busi- 
ness In New- York City and Investment of accumula- 
tions in real estate. II i [ 

Est WM. G. BOULTON (Boulton, BUss & Dallett).— 
Trade with South America and "Red D" line of 
steamers. 

PASSAIC. 

•PETER REID (of Eeid & Barry).— Fortune mada 
during the past twenty years In dyeing prints and 
calicos. 11 I 

•Est. HEiNRY A. BARRY (of Reid & BarryT— Made to 
dyeing prints and calicos. 

•HOSES E. WORTHEN (of Worthen <fc Aldrich).— 
Manufacturing satlnettes. 

F. A. SOULE.— Made In Inherited real estate and ship 
owning. 

P. W. SOULE.— Made in Inherited real estate and ship 
owning. 

Est. JOHN M. HOWE.— Real estate. 

EDO KIPP.— Made in real estate. 

HLBS. RUTH BCHULTING.— From her husband. Madff 
first In drygoods, then In real estate. 
PATERSON. 

W. G. FENNER (of the New- York Auction House of 
Field, Chapman & Fenner).— Auctioneering drygoods. 

MRS. MARY E. RYLE— Inherited from her husband, 
William Ryle, and her father, Charles Danforth. 
Made In the Importation of raw silk. 

CHARLES RYLE DANFORTH.— Importation of raw 
silk. 

WILLIAM T. RYLE.— From his father. WUllam Ryle. 
Made in Importing raw sUk. 

•ROBERT BARUOUR (of the Barbour Flax Spinning 
Company and the Barbour Bros. Co).— Made in 
manufacturing flax. 
•JACOB S. ROGERS (of the Rogers Locomotive andl 
Machine Works).- Made many millions in the build- 
ing of locomotives. 
*W. T. A. STRANGE.— Made in silk manufacturing. 

•Est. CHARLES DANFORTH.- Manufacturing spin^ 



32 



LIBEAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



lug frames and locomotives. He sold Us spln.- 
nlng frames both ta the United States and Europe ; 
and was the founder of the Danforth Locomotive 
and Machine Company. 

Est. MICHAEL MOEEIS.— Made In merchandising cot- 
ton waste and oil, and Judicious Investment of hla 
accumulations. 

PLAINFIELD. 

J. H. McGEE.— Oil reflnlug and transportation. 

CHARLES HYDE.— Banting and Investments. 

•G-EOEGE H. BABCOCK.— Manufacturing steam boil- 
ers. President of the Babcock & WUcox Company, 
headquarters in New-York City with branches In 
Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, Pittsburg Cleve- 
land and Chicago. 

♦JAMES M. CLARK.— Made In tanning and leather at 
St. Louis, Mo. 

SOMERVILLE. 

Est. ISAAC C. ANDEESON.— Importing French gooda 
at New-Yoric; some umbrella and silk manufactur- 
ing, and real estate Investemnts. 
SHOET HILLS. 

JAMES E. PrrCHEE.— Partly inherited; and Increased 
by investments In real estate and various business 
entreprises, including the Tradesmen's Banlc, Mer- 
chants Credit and Guarantee Company, National 
*rutual Building and Loan Association, New-Yorli 
Leather Belting Co., etc., etc. He is a director or 
an officer in these and other companies, and bas 
about 1,000 acres of land at Short Hills. 
SCOTCH PLAINS. 

*WAEEEN ACKEEMAN.— Made in the Lawrence 
Cement Company, New-Yorli: City. 
SPOTTSWOOD. 

Est. LEONARD APPLEBY.— Merchandising tobacco 

and snufl in New-Yorlc; then insurance business. 

TEENTON. 

At'GUSTUS C. EICHEY.— Law and real estate invest- 
ments. 

•WASHINGTON A. EOBBLING.— Made In manufact- 
uring iron and steel wire. His firm supplied the 
wire for the ISrooMyn Bridge. 

•FERDINAND W. EOEBLING.^Made In manufact- 
xiring iron and steel wire. 

•CHAELBS ROEBLING.— Made in manufacturing iron 
and steel wire. 

EDWARD H. STOKES.— Real estate Investments. 

•SAMUEL K. WILSON.— Made In wooUen manufacturing 
and In Investments in real estate, which has in- 
creased largely In value. 

JOHN S. CHAMBBiRS.— Operation sot gas wortes, and 
investments. 

ABNEE E. CHAMBEES.— By Investments In real 
estate, wMch is now included in the city. 

CHARLES E. GEEBN (from John C. Green).— Made 
in the Clilna trade and Investments. 

MES. PAXTON (wife of the Eev. W. M. Paxton).— 
Inherited from the James O'Hara estate at Pitts* 
burgh. Made in rise In value of real estate. 
WEEHAWKEN. 

Est. JOHN H. BONN.— Made in street railroads, real 
estate, and other local enterprises. 

CHAELBS F. TAG.— AVholesale tobacco in New-York, 
and investments. Direcior in Manhattan Trust Com- 
pany, Equitable Gas Light Company, United States 
Equitable Gas Company, Colorado Central Consol- 
idated Mining Company, and Toledo, St. Louis and 
Kansas City EaUroad, Exchange Place Seal Estate 
Company. 

WOODBURY. 

•"GEORGE G. GEEENE.— Mantifacturlng patent med- 
icines. 



WEST OEANGE. 
Est. JOHN BURKE (of Edward & John Burhe).— Made 
as American agent of the Guinness ales and porters 
of Dublin and importer of other liquors. He left a 
fortune of about $3,000,000. 
HENRY A. PAGE (of Faullmer, Page & Co.).— Com- 
mission, drygoods. 
JOHN PETTIT.— Real estate and building. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries mainly 34 

In manufacture of patented articles 4 

In non-protected industries 81 

Origin of the'fortune not reported 5 

Total 124 



NEW-MEXICO. 



FORT BASCOM. 
""WILSON WADDINGHAM.— Made In banMng, Cattle- 
raising and landsi. 

SANTA FE. 
T. B. CATRON.— Practice of law, and large land gran.ts, 

Which have increased greatly in value. 
A. STAAB.— T\Tiolesale merchandising of groceries, etc. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries 

In cattle-raising 1 

In non-protected industries 2 

Total 3 



NEW YOEK. 



CITY OP ALBANY. 

•ERASTUS CORNING.— Inherited from his father. 
Made, first, in merchandising hardware; then In 
manufacturing iron in the Albany Iron Worts and 
in banting; but the buBi of It tn the New-York 
Central EaUroad, and pine lands. The senior 
Corning was the master spirit in the consolidation 
of the New-York Central Railroad. The pres- 
ent Mr. Coming is president of the Albany City 
National Bank and director in the New- York Central 
and Hudson River Railroad, United States Trust 
Company, etc. 

JAMES B. JERMAIN.— Inherited. Made in raHroads 
and Investments. He has several millions and Is 
the richest man In Albany. 

Est. CHARLES B. LANSING.— Real estate, insurance 
and banlJlng. He was the largest individual tax- 
payer in Albany at the time of his death. 

ANTHONY N. BRADY.— Made in contracting and In- 
vestment of accumulations. 

JOHN G. M,YBES.— Made in wholesale and retail dry- 
goods aijd investments in banks, railroads, express 
companies, etc. 

ROBERT C. PRUYN.— Made in banking and invest- 
ments. President of the National Commercial Bank. 
AMSTERDAM. 

•STEPHEN SANFORD.— Manufacturing of carpets, etc. 

Pi-esident of the Amsterdam City National Bank. 

ANDES. 

DA^TD BALLENTINE.— Banking and railroads. Presi- 
dent of the First National Bank. 
AUBURN. 

NELSON BEARDSLEY.- Banking, loans and real 
estate. President of Cayuga County National Bank. 

*Est. THEODORE P. CASE.— Made a, fortune In 
manufacturing clocks, in the Oswego Starch Com- 
pany, and waterworks and other investments. 

**Bst. D. M. OSBORNE.- Made In the manufacture of 
patented mowing machines and reapers. 

•Est. Dr. SY'LVESTER WILLAED.— Made in tne 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



33 



Oswego Starch Company, cloolt mahuiaoturing and 
numerous Investments. 

Est. N. P. BUEE.— Merchandising and contracts. 
AlIEOEA, CAYUGA COUNTY. 

Est. EDWIN B. MORGAN.— Made In the Wells, Fargo 
& Co. Express Company. 

BALLSTON SPA. 

'GEORGE WEST.— Manufacture ol paper and paper 
hags, and Investments. President of the First Na- 
tional Banli. 

Est. JOHN W. THOMPSON.— BanMng, raUroad In- 
vestments, etc. He was heavily Interested in the 
Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, New-Yorlc 
Centi-al, etc. 

BATAVIA. 

Mrs. DEAN RICHMOND.- From her husband. Made 
in railroads and investjaents. 
BATH. 

IRA DAVENPOET.— Inheiited. Made In real estate 
In Iowa and banMug and various investments. 

JOHN DAVENPORT.— Inherited. Made in real estate 
in Iowa, banting and investments. 
BAY' SIDE. 

Mrs. G, ROWLAND LEAVITT.— From her lather, Rob- 
ert Wllletts. Made in real estate, gas companies, 
street railroads, etc. 

Est. OLIVER CHAELICK.— Started In dealing In 
liquors. Then, managed George Law's steamers 
to California. Then in the Eighth Avenue Street 
Railroad in New-Yorli City, wlilch he developed into 
a paying property. Then he went into the Long 
Island Railroad, and became Its president. He was 
also interested in the Harlem and Hudson Eiver 
railroads, Pacific MaU, steamboats between New- 
Y'ork and the Eastern States, real estate in New- 
Y'orlr and on Long Island, etc. He also made 
considerable money in speculation in Wall Street. 

BINGHAMTON. 

*ABEL BENNETT.— Manufacturing overalls and cloth- 
ing business. 

HORACE H. CEAEY.— Largely Inlerested in tanneries 
(of which there are ten) ; but ills wealth came from 
hemlooli timber lands, on which oil and natural 
gas were discovered after the limber had been cleared 
off and the land had become a brnxlen on the hands 
of Ills firm. 

M. HORTON (of llorton, Crary & Co.).— In part In 
tanneiles, but mainly in oil lands. 

BEDFOED. 

Est. WILLIAM P. ' WOODCOCK.— Made in real estate 
in New-Y'ork City and BroolUyn. 

BROOKPOET. 

**DAYTON S. MOEGAN (ol D. S. Morgan & Co.1.— 
Manufacturing reapers and mowers ; and rise In 
Chiica/gO real estate. The fiilit fifty maoh'lmes 
ever used were made at their works for McCor- 
micli. 

BEONXVILLE. 

Est. DANIEL G. ALGER.- In the broUerage business 
and real estate. 

BROOKLYN. 

ABRAHAM ABRAHAMS (of' Weclisler & Abrahams.).— 
Large retail drygoods business. 

LEWIS P. ATKINSON.— Stoclis in Wall Street. 

Est. CHARLES ARBUCKLE —Importing coffee and 
real t state investments. He was a member ol 
Arbuclile Brotliers, and Tlie ArbucMe Brothers 
Coffee Company. 

JOHN ARBUCKLE.— Importing coffee: and 
real estate investments. A member of ArbuoMe 
Brothers, and The ArbucMe Brothers Coffee Com- 



pany. Director In the Importers and Traders' 
National Bank. 



CHARLES W. BETTS.— Inherited land, which has 
since been improved. 

Est. DEMAS BARNES.— Merchandising and invest- 
ments. 

OLIVER T. BEARD.— Inherited. Made In wharfage 
and stores around the Atlantic Basin. 

COLONEL WILLIAJI HENEY BEAItD.— Inherited. 
Made in contracting and wlmrlage and stores around 
tlie Atlantic Basin. 

HENEY BATTEEMAN.— In his large retail drygoods 
store in the Eastern District; and investments. 
President of tlie ]?roadway Bank. 

Est. ARTHUR W. BENSON.— Trustee of estates. Had 
Investments in real estate, gas companies and tlnan- 
cial institutions. 

EUGENE G. BLACKFORD.— Fulton Market fish busi- 
ness in New-Y'ork City, real estate, banking and In- 
vestments. President of the Bedford Bank. 

•Est. JAMES BRADY'.— Manufacture of clotliing and 
loans on mortgages. 

COLONEL A. D. BAIRD.— fitone yards, banking and In- 
vestments. 

*E. W. BLISS.— Has made a large fortune In the man- 
ufacjiure of presses, dies, patents, etc. He sup- 
plied some of the material for the big bridge; has 
contracts with the United States for projectiles 
and torpedoes ; and is largely interested in Im- 
proved real estate and Broolilyn City railroads. 

HENRY D. BROOKMAN. (of H. D. & John U. Brook- 
man, merchants).— Began his fortune in deep-sea 
shipping. Afterward made much money in stock 
and real estate investments. 

•Est. JOHN BULLAED.— Tanning and leather business 
In New- York City. 

FRANKLIN BAETLETT.— Docks and elevators on the 
East Elver front. 

ME3. LYDIA R. BABBOTT.— From Charles Pratt Oil 
refining and transportation. 

DAVID H. BROWN.— Real estate Investments. 

EDWIN BEERS.— Street railroads and banking. 

DAVID A. BOODY'.— Banlung and stocks. 

Est. ALFEED S. BAENES.— Publislilng copyrighted 
books. 

THOMAS D. CAEMAN.— Exporting stoves to Australia 
when the gold lever broke out, followed by further 
business ol a similar nature. 

CHESTER W. COLLINS.- Contracting (with Kllpatrlck 
Brothers in Beatrice, Neb.) ; real estate and catUo 
raising. 

MRS. AGNES CLAFLIN (widow of Horace B. Claflln).— 
Made by her husband in wholesale drygoods in New- 
York City ; and large investments in real estate 
above the Harlem Elver, and in Brooklyn. 

Est. EICHAED S. CHAPEL.— Slllpping goods to the 
West from Hartford In early days; then wholesale 
clothing in Brooklyn. 

ISAAC F. CHAPMAN.— Deep-sea shipping arid ocean 
freighting and trade, and real estate. Formerly in 
Chapman & Flint. 

JOHN CLAFLIN (ol H. B. Claflin & Co., New- York).— 
Commission drygoods and investments. Director In 
American Exchange National Bank, Commonwealth 
Insurance Company, Continental Insurance Com- 
pany, Fourteenth Street District Eailway Company, 
Home Life Insurance Company, New- York Life In- 
surance Company, Liberty Insurance Company. 
Owns a large amount ol real estate. 

Est. S. B. CHITTENDEN.— Drygoods. 

Est. PETEE C. COENELL.— Mostly in local gasworks, 
ferries and banks, but partly in manufacturing gun- 
powder, i 1 1 



34 



LIKRAEY OF TEIBITNE EXTRAS. 



•FELIX CAMPBELL.— JTanufacturing Iron fliting^, etc. ; 

real estate investments, including the Park Tlieatre ; 

Union Ferry Company, etc. 
H. T. COX.— Mercliandlsing gas fixtures in New-Yort. 



Est. EDMUND DEIGGS.— Began in sloop transporta- 
tion on the Hudson. Then liad a grocery store in 
New-Yorir. Invested In real estate, and opened 
large storage ■warehouses In BrooMyn, In wlilch his 
wealth was chiefly made. Had Investments in 
banks, Insurance companies, etc. 

Est. JAMBS DAKRAGH (of Darragh & Small).— Im- 
portation ol merchandise. 

Est. CORNELIUS DONELLON.— Building and real 
estate . 

•ANDREW DOUGHERTY.- Manufacturing playing 
cards. 

"JACOB G. DBTTMER.- Manufacturing baking pow- 
der; banlsing and real estate. Is in People's Trust 
Company and the Bedford Bank. 

'WILLIAM DICK (of Dick & Meyer).- Sugar refining, in 
which he has made several mlUions. Director in 
Th« American Sugar Reflnlne Comnanv. 

JOHN DELMAR.— Real estate and politics. 

Est. SAMUEL B. DURYEA.— Made largley In rise in 
value of Brooklyn real estate, of which he was a 
large owner. He left a fortune of more than 
$3,000,000. 

•JOHN ENGLIS.— SliipbuUdmg and repairing and in- 
vestments. Is Interested In the Wallabout Bank. 

•JOHN R. ELY.— Distilling and real estate. 

EDWARD E. EAMES (of H. B. Claflln & Co., New- 
York).— Commission drygoods. 



Est. BENJAMIN FLINT.— Deep-sea shipping, ocean 

freighting and trad«, and real estate. 
•JOSEPH FAHY.— Watch-case manufacturing. 

HENRY GINNEL.— Importing watches and jewelry, 
New- York Cltr. 

JOHN GIBB (of Mills & Glbb, New- York City).— Im- 
porting laces and, drygoods. 

•Est. ROBERT GRAVES.— Manufacturing wall-paper. 

SAMUEL N. HOYT.— From his brother. Jesse Hoyt. the 
grain merchant. 

JOHN H. HARBECK.— Made in warehousing and 
stores. 

GEORGE HAGEMEYER.— Made In the sale of hard- 
wood lumber. 

6. H. :.HEiRBa3VtAN.-^By..lnberlta7ice. and Investments. 

•JBst. OTTO HUBER.— Brewing and real filaie. 

•DR. CORNELIUS N. HOAGLAND.— Made a very large 
fortune in the manufacture of cream of tartar and 
baking powder, and investm'ents in financial institu- 
tions and local real estate. President of the Cleve- 
land BaMng Powder Company. 

•J. C. HOAGLAND.— Made a very large fortune In 
the manufacture of cream of tartar and baldne pow- 
der, and Investments In financial Institutions and 
local real estate. 

HENRY HENTZ.— Commission coffee business and In- 
vestments. Director In Bank of New- York. Com- 
monwealth Insurance Company, Housatonlc Rail- 
road, Mechanics' National Baoik and other corpo- 
rations. 

•MARK HOYT (of Hoyt Brothers).— Made In tanning 
and leather. 

DAVID H. HOUGHTALING.— Tea Importation and In- 
vestments. Is director In United States Lite Insur- 
ance Company. Bank of North America, and vari- 
ous railroads. Richmond Railway and. Electric Com- 
pany. 

•HENRY C. HULBBRT.— Made In paper manufactur- 
ing and Investments. Director ta United States 



Life Insurance Company, Importers and Traders' 

National Bank. New-York Mutual Insurance Com- 
■pany, Pullman Palace Car Company. Celluloid Con>. 

pany. etc.. etc. 
Est. SEYMOUR L. HUSTED.— Street raUroads and the- 

Brooklyn and New- York Ferry investments. 
JOHN HILLS.— Importer of fruits. 
THOMAS A. HOWELL (of B. H. Howell, Son <fc Co.). 

-Merchandising molasses and sugar In New- York 

aty. 

BENJAMIN H. HOWELL (of B. H. Howell. Sen <fc 
Co.).— Merchandising sugar and molasses In New- 
York City. Director in the Market and Fultott 
National Bank. 

W. M, INGEAHAM.— Real estate and law practice.. 

THEODORE T. JACKSON.— Real estate, law. and man- 
agement of estates. 

Est. HENRY T. JOURNEAY (of Journeay & Bum- 
ham).— Merchandising drygoods. 

•EDWIN F. KNOWLTON.— He was a partner with Ms- 
father, now deceased, in the firm of William Knowl- 
ton & Sons, manufacturers of straw goods. 

•EBEN J. KNOWLTON.— In the firm of William Knowl- 
ton & Sons, manufacturers of straw goods. In 
partnership with his father. 

Est. -ABNBR C. KEENEY.— Building docks, sewers, 
etc. ; and investments. 

•Est., JOSEPH F. KNAPP.— Made In the lithographing 
business, and the Metropolitan Lite Insurance- 
Comipany. He was president of the last named' 
company. 

P. J. KENEDY.— Publishing copyrighted boolis 
(CathoUc). 

•Est. MARTIN KALBFLEISCH.— Manufacturing chem- 
icals. 

HENRY A. KENT.-^Merchandlslng, real estate, and 
Investments In banks, etc. 

GENEiRAL WILLIAM H. LYON.— Wholesale fancy- 
goods and notions ; Western real estate ; and bank- 
ing. Vice-President of the Hamiltott Trust Com- 
pany. Director in the Bedford Bank and the Brook- 
lyn LUe Insurance Company. 

WILLIAM H. LANGLEY (of W. C. Langley & Co.. 
New-York City).— Inherited In large part from hl& 
father, WUliam C. Langley. All made In merchan- 
dising woollens and rise In real estate. 

MRS. ELIZABETH DE W. LEONARD (wife of Louls- 
H. Leonaid).-Jnherited from. Jeremiah P. Robin- 
son, and made in merchandising groceries andi 
salt; largely In the storage business and BroolUyn 
real estate. 

Est. DAVID LEAVITT.— Importation of tea; man- 
ufacture of lead; banks, ferries. Insurance com- 
panies, etc. He built a war vessel for the Co- 
lombian Government and made about $100,000' 
thereon. He started the Brooklyn White Lead Com- 
pany, controlled the Brooklyn Ferry Company, was 
President of the Fulton Bank and Interested in the 
American Exchange Bank, and had stocks in rail- 
roads and many other corporations. 

*Est. SAMUEL LIEBMAN (of S. Llebman <fc Sons' 
Brewing Co.)— Brewing and real estate. 

ABIEL A. LOW.— One of the richest men In Brooklyn. 
Made chiefly in Importation of tea In New-York City, 
but added to by Investments In financial Institu- 
tions, real estate and local street railroads. Director 
in .American Fire Insurance Company, Central Trust 
Company, Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, 
Greenwich Insurance Company, Low Moor Iron Com- 
pany, Nassau Fire Insurance Company, National 
Bank of Commerce, Old Dominion Land Comi>any,. 
Greenwood Cemetery Company, Home Life Insuranca- 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



35 



Company, Union Trust CJompany, Washington Life 

InsurancB Company. 
JOliN LOU&HIiAN.— Real estate speculations, etc. Is 

president of Manufacturers' National BanU. 
KDWABD r. LINTON.— Dealing in and investments In 

real estate. 
JOHN LBFPERTS.— Real estate. Inherited, wlilch lias 

risen In value. 
JOSIAH O. LOW.— Made In the tea business wltli his 

brother, A. A. Low. 
EDWARD H. E. LYMAN.— Made in Importing tea, and 

investments. Director in Atlantic Trust Company, 

Low Moor Iron Company, New-York Mutual In- 
surance Company, etc., etc. 
FREDERICK LOESER.— Drygoods merchandising. 
JAMES LOW.— Tea business, etc. Is in Atlantic Mutual 

Insurance Company,' United States Trust Company 

and other corporations. 



Bank of Commerce ; New-York Produce Exchange 
Safe Deposit and Storage Company, and Union 
Pactflo Railway. 
Est. PETER J. O'DONOHUE.— Importing coffee, and 
stock in Brooklyn Ferry and other companies. 



**Est. JOHN MATTHEWS.— Mad.e In the manufacture 
of patented soda water apparatus. 

•CHAUNOEY MARSHALL (of L. Waterbury & Co., 
New-York).— Made in the manufacture of cordage. 

MRS. VICTORIA A. McKENZIE (wife of John D. Mo- 
Kenzie).— From the estate of Francis W. Lasak, lier 
father, who "was engaged in the fur business with 
the original John Jacob Astor, and wlio had large 
investments in real estate. 

HUGH Mclaughlin.— Politics, law and real estate. 

»\\'ILLIAM MARSHALL.— Manufacturing rope and 
paper ; and investments. 

FRANCIS MARKEY.— Made in the liquor trade. 

'WILLIAM H. MAIRS.— Manufacturing paper hangings 
and investments In real estate. Has nearly a million 
in real estate. 

•JOHN W. MASURY.— Manufacturing paints and var- 
nislies. 

*Est. of CORD MEYER (of Dick & M6yer).-Sugar 
refining. 

JOHN T. MARTIN.— Government contracts for clothing 
during tlie war, in part, but cliiefly railroad reor- 
ganization schemes ; and water front and other real 
estate. Director in tlie Home Lite Insurance Com- 
pany. 

MOSES MAY.— Abattoir business, sale of meat, and in- 
vestments. Director in First National Bank, Will- 
iamsburg Fire Insurance (Company, etc. 

EUGENE MAXWELL.— Made in railroad supplies. 

•JAMES L. MORGAN.— Manufacturing cliemicals. 

Est. JOHN McCONNVILLE.— Drygoods in New- York. 

NORMAN L. MUNRO.— Publishing story papers and 
books in New-York City. 

J. ROGERS MAXWELL (of Maxwell & Graves, New- 
York City).— Brokerage business, raUroads ana stooiis. 
Director in Long Island Railroad, Lehigh and Hud- 
son River Railway, Elmlra, Cortland and Northern 
Railroad, New-Yorii and, Long Branch Railroad, R03k- 
away Beach Railroad, New-York, Brooklyn and Man- 
hattan Beach Railway Company, Fidelity and Casu- 
alty Company, Central Railroad of New-Jersey, New- 
Jersey Southern Railroad, American Exchange Na- 
tional Bank, Ohio Southern Railroad, Lehigh and 
Wilkesbarre Coal Company; Long Beach Hotel and 
Cottage Company, Manhattan Beach Hotel and Land 
Company. 

HENRY E. NESMITH (of Nesmith & Sons, New- 
York).— Shipping and commission business. 



ALEXANDER E. ORR.— Gram commission and specu- 
lation with David Dows, and Investments in stocks. 
Director in the United States Trust Company ; 
Annerican Fire Insurance Company ; Chicago, Rock 
Island and Pacific Railroad; Fidelity and Casualty 
Company ; Mechanics' National Bank ; National 



'Est. HARRIET L. PACKER.— From her husband. 
Made in real estate and the manufacture of hats. 

MRS. MARY H. PRATT (widow of Charles Pratt).— 
From her late husband, the richest man in Brooklyn. 
Made in oil refining and transportation, and the in- 
vestment of accumulafions in commercial enterprises, 
railroads, street-car lines, banks, steamship com- 
panies, and real estate East and West. He left a 
foriune of about $20,000,000. 

CH.^RLES M. PRATT.— Inherited a fortune from 
Charles Pratt. Made in oil refining and transporta- 
tion. He had, however, a fortune of his own, partly 
by gift from his father, and greatly increased in 
real estate and shares in business concerns. Dl- 
reo.or in the Mechanics' National Bank, and the 
Brazil Mail Steamship Company. 

FREDERICK B. PRATT.— Inherited from Charles Pratt. 
Made in oil refining and transportation. 

MRS. FREDERICK B. PRATT.— By gift from ber 
father, ex-Senator Ladd, of Portland, Ore. Made In 
real estate and banking, in wbich it is stUl Invested. 

GEORGE D. PRATr.— Inherited from Charles Pratt. 
Ma<l5 in oil renning and transportation. 

HERBERT L. PRATT.— Inherited from Charles Pratt. 
Made in oil refining and transportation. 

JOHN S. PRATT.— Inherited from Charles Pratt. 
Made in oil refining and transportation. 

HAROLD I. PRATT.— Inherited from Cliarles Pratt. 
Made in oil refining and transportation. 

MISS HELEN F. PRATT.— Inherited from Charles Pratt. 
Made in oil refining and transportation. 

FRiU^CB PAIRS.— Merchandising. 

ALFRED J. POUCH.— OU refining and transportation, 
real estate and cotton oU. 

FOSTER PETTIT.— Restaurant business and real estate. 

"LOWELL M. PALMER.— Cooperage business for the 
sugar refineries. 

JOHN JAY. PIERREPONT.— Inherited. Investments In 
real estate. Director in the Greenwood Cemetery 
Company. 

HENRY E. PIERREPONT.— Inherited. Inves ments In 
real estate. Director in the Home Lite Insurance 
Company. 

FREDERICK H. POUCH.— Oil refining and .transporta- 
tion, and Investments in real estate. 



ENOS RICHARDSON.— Jewelry business in New- York 
and investments. 

JOHN P. ROLFE.— Real estate and investments. 

AARON S. ROBBINS (of Calhoun, Robblns & Co., New- 
York).- Importing and jobbing fancy drygoods. 

Est. MRS. MARIA C. ROBBINS (widow of Eli Rob- 
bins).— Fulton Market poultry b^lness. 

'Est. LORING A. ROBERTSON.— Tanning and leatlier 
business in New- York City. 

JOHN RUSZITS.— Merchandising fuis. 



Est. ALEXANDER STUDWELL.— Began Ws fortune 
in shoe-findings. Increased it by Investments In 
bank stock, city railroads, etc., etc. Director In the 
New-York Lite Insurance Company, Broadway Bank, 
and Brooklyn City RaUroad Company. 

±)E2fJAMIN D. SILLIMAN.— Law practice. In which 
he earned some very large fees, with investaients. 

Est. JOHN J. STUDWELL.— Lumber business and bank- 
ing. 

COLONEL N. T. SPRAGUE.— Partly inherited. His 
fortune lias been chiefly made, however, by real 
estate investments, especially in apartment houses, of 



36 



LIBEAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



which he has more than flity. President of Sprague 
National Eanlt. 

•JOHN E. SBARLES.— Sugar Trust and sugai^reflnlng. 

HENRY K. SHELDON.— Miscellaneous stocks and in- 
vestments. 

MES. MAKY J. SPEOULE.— Inherited from lier husband 
and an uncle. 

ADRIAN H. SUYDAM.— Made by rise in value of real 
estate. 

J. S. T. STEANAHAN.— Real-estate speculations chiefly, 
and Investments in corporations. Director in tile 
Pidellly and Casualty Company, Home Life Insur- 
ance Company. 

JOHN SCHULZ.— Made In the bakery business, one of 
the largest in the country. 

HENRY STEERS (of John C. Orr * Co.)— Lumber mer- 
chandising, etc. 

*H. B. SCHARMANN.— Brewing and real estate. 

Est. AUGUSTUS STORRS.— Commission merchant. 

•FREEBORN G. SMITH.— Manufacturing pianos. 

WILLIAM VAN E. SMITH (of ArbucMe Bro.'s).— Im- 
porting groceries, especially coffee. 

FRANKLIN E. TAYLOR (Of Lawrence, Taylor & Co., 
New-York City).— Wholesale drygoods business In 
this firm and in its predecessors, Woodward, Law- 
rence & Co. 

MRS. GEORGE A. THAYER.— Inherited from David 
Jones, the great brewer, who had a large amount of 
real estate, and large investments In corporations. 

•WILLIAM ULMER.— Brewing and real estate. 

Est. SAMUEL WOOD.— Fur business and real estate. 
Est. MISS JULIA WATEEBUEY.— Inherited. Made In 

real estate. 
•HENRY WEIL.— Furniture maldng and very large 

real estate and other Investments. 
C. D. WOOD.— Banking and securities. Was formerly 

with Vermilye & Co.. New- York City. 
A. M. WHITE.— Inheritance and Investments. 
OLIN G. WALBRIDGE (of Calhoun, Eobbins & Co., 

New-York).- Importing and jobbing fancy drygoods, 

and Investments in insurance companies, etc. Di- 
rector in the Liberty Insurance Company, Mahat- 

tan Life Insurance Company. 
PETER WYCKOFF.— Real estate, inherited from hla 

father, which has since been Improved. 
WILLIAM H. WALLACE.— Iron business, banlts and 

railroads. Vic«3-president of the Franklin Trust 

Company. 

•WILLIAM ZIBGLER.— Manufacturing cream of tartar 
f and baking powder ; and real estate, of which he is 

one of the largest owners in BroolUyn. 
BUFFALO. 
J. J. ALBRIGHT.— Wholesale dealing In coal, real 

estate, and asphalt paving business. 
MRS. TEUMAN G. AVERY.— Inherited a large fortune 

from her father, Stephen G. Austin, who made hla 

money in real estate, loans, etc. 
PHILIP BECKER.— Grocery business and real estate. 
MILLS W. BAESE.— Inherited from his father, who 

made It in the oil regions mostly. Is himself a 

banker. 
•JOHN BLOCKER.— Manufacturing leather and boots 

and shoes. 
MES. L. B. BUER.— Inherited a fortune from an Eng- 
lish relative. 
Est. THOMAS BROWN. 

JACOB DOLD.— Pork-pacldng In Kansas City, etc. 
•ROBERT L. FllYBR (of Gratwick & Fryer).- SawmlUs, 

lumber, and prachase of low-priced pine-lands. 
GEORGE S. FIELD.- Brldge-bulldlng. 
«W. H. GRATWICK (of Gratwick & Fryer).— SawmlUs, 

lumber, and purchase of low-priced plne-lahds. 



*F. H. GOODYEAR.— Manufacturing lumber. 

'C. J. HAMLIN.— Began as a drygoods merchant, ana 
thpn emb3''kpd lai-gely in the manufacture of glu- 
cose. Has large real estate Investments also. 

•NELSON HOLLAND.— Lumber business and other enter- 
prises. 

•SHERMAJSr S. JEWETT.— Mannfaoturlng stoves and 
ranges, and, banlilng and narrow-gauge raUroads in 
oil regions. Has other Investments. He Is presi- 
dent of the Hank of Buffalo, and director in tha 
New- York Central and Hudson River Railroad. 

*J. H. LEE (of Lee, Holland & Co.).— Partly inherited. 
Made in planing-miU, the sale of lumber, and real 
estate. 

A. D. A. MILLER (of MlDer, Grelner & Co.).— Made In 
the wholesale grocery business and advance In value 
of real estate. 

•PASCAL P. PRATT (of Pratt <fc Letchworth).— Made 
In manufacturing saddlery hardware In part, but 
also in suburban real estate which lias increased in 
value. In several banks. President of the Manu- 
facturers and Traders' Bank. 

**DE. EAY V. PIEECE.-Manufacture of proprietary 
medicines, and Investments. President of Buffala 
Loan, Trust and Safe Deposit Company. 

•FEAKCIS H. ROOT (of Root & Keating, formerly of 
Jewett <fc Root).— First in manufacturing stoves and 
ranges ; then in tanning and leather, 

*B. C. RUMSEY.— Tanning, leather and real estate 

*D. P. RUMSEY.— Tanning, leather and real estate. 

JEWETT M. RICHMOND.— Dealing In grain, real estate 
and banking. 

SIDNEY SHEPAED.— Merchandising hardware and 
investments in railroads and telegraph lines. 

*J. X. 6CH0ELLK0PP.— First in tanning, then in brew- 
ing, and also in chemical works and mining. 

•JACOB SCHEU.— Brewing and real estate. 

•Est. JONATHAN SCO VILLE.—Cai^ wheel manulactui^ 
ing and outside investments. 

JOHN SATTEEFIELD (of H. L. Taylor & Co.).— OH 
producing. 

MES. ROBERT SQUIRES.- From her father, William 
G. Fargo. Made in express business. 

ELBIUDGE G. SPAULDING.-Banliing in part, but 
largely In real est-ite and other investments. Presi- 
dent of the Farmers and Mechanics' National Bank. 

HASKEL L. TAYLOR (of H. L. Taylor & Co.).— Made 
In oil-producing. 

•GEORGE URBAN.— Flour mlU and real estate. 
Largely inherited from his father, George Urban, sr. 

GEORGE L. WILLIAMS.— From his father, the lata 
Gibson T. WlUlams, who made a fortune In ship- 
chandlery busine-B and tanning originally; biut the 
bulk of it In real estate and banking. 

C. H. \VILLIAMS.— CapitaUst. 

JOHN WILKESON.— Grain elevator and real estate. 
CANANDAIGUA. 

•Est. JAMES McKECHNIE.— Brewing. 

•Est. ALEXANDER McKECHNIE.— Brewing. 
CHATBAUGAY LAKE. 

•SMITH M. WEED.— Made in iron mining. President 
of The Chateaugay Ore and Iron Company ; Hudson 
River Ore and Iron Company ; New- York Mutual 
Savings and Loan Association. Director In th» 
Nlcaraugua Canal Construction Company, etc 
CORNING. 

•AMORY HOUGHTON, JR.— Manufacturing glassware, 
coal mines, etc. 

Q. W. WELLINGTON.— Private banking and Invest- 
ments in real estate. 

T. A. DRAKE.— Pennsylvania coal-mines, railroads 
and merchandising. 

Est JOSEPH FELLOWS.— Real estate, etc. He was 



AMEEICAJSr MILLIONAIEES. 



3T 



agent of the Pulteney estate and other great landed 
Interests. 

CORTLAND. 

Est. WILLIAM EANDALL.— Private banhlng, merchan- 
dising, real estate, etc. 

COOPEESTOWN. , 

MRS. WILLIAM CONSTABLE.— From her father, Henry 
Barclay, of New- York, who made a fortune In real 
estate. 

•ALFRED C. CLARK.— Planing mlUs and luwber. 
DOLGEVILLE. 

•ALFRED DOLGB.— MamufactuiTlng piano materials 
and rise In value of real estate. 
DOBBS PERRY. 

**J. JENNINGS McCOMB.— Manufacture of the pat- 
ented Iron cotton tie, with Investments In real es- 
tate In New- York caty. Clilef owner of the Na- 
varro apartment houses. 

JOSEPH STINER (of Joseph SMner & Co., New- 
Yorli).— Tea merchant. Has fifteen or more branch 
stores. 

PEEDEEICK J. STONE.— Stocks and law practice. 
EAST CHESTER. 

GEORGE P. CLAPP.— From Ills late wife, Mrs. Desler 
A. Clapp, who inherited about four mUllons from 
lier uncle, the late John Alstyne, whose fortune 
was made In banldng and real estate. 
ELMIRA. 

MATTHEW H. ARNOT.— From his father, John Ar- 
not, the banker. Worth several millions. Presi- 
dent of the Chemung Canal Bank. 

THOMAS BEIGGS.— In the brewing business. 

•HENRY C. SPAOLDING.— Manufacturing lumber 
and d^eallng In same. 

•SOLOMON GILLET.— Manufacturing. 

•Est. DE. EDWIN ELDRIDGH.— Iron manuiactorlng, 
coal mines and Erie railroad. 
FLUSHING. 

FREDERICK A. PALMER.— President of the Broad- 
way Savings Bank In New- York City. Made In 
banking. 

Est. JOHN W. LAWRENCE.— Partly Inherited, this 

part of liis fortune being made In real estate. He 

was lilmselt a successful merchant in New-York 

City. 

GARDEN CITY. 

•HIRAM DUR YEA.— Starch manufacturing at Glen 
Cove, Long Island. He Is president of the Nation- 
al Starch Manufacturing Company, and of the 
United States Trade Mark Association. Director 
In the Glen Cove Machine Company. 
GENEVA. 
JOHN D. PATTERSON.— Made chiefly in real estate 
In California. 

GLENS FALLS. 
•JEREMIAH W. FINCH (of Finch <fc Pruyn).— Saw- 
mills, lumber and banldng. President of the Glens 
Falls National Bank. 

GOSHEN. 
W. T. RUSSELL.— Partly inherited. BanMng. 
GEORGE MURRAY'.- Partly Inherited. BanMng. 
••MRS. E. S. BACON.— From her father, Brandreth. 
Made In manufacture of proprietary medicines. 
HIGHLAND. 
lEA SHAFER.— Law practice, real estate, and Invest- 
ments en dividend paying securities. 
HR. ROBERTS.— Made in railroad sectirlties. 

HOOSICK FALLS. 
••WALTER A. WOOD.— Manufacturing patented mowers 
and reapers. 

HUNT'S POINT. 
PAUL N. SPOFFORD.— Inherited. Made to the com- 



mission business and real estate. Director In tlie 
Ninth Avenue Railroad, New- York City. 

JOSEPH L. SPOFFOED.— Inherited. Made In the com- 
mission business and real estate. 
lEVINGTON. 

DAVID DOWS, JR.— Inherited from his father, Davl* 
Dows, who made a large fortune in grain in New- 
York City, railroads and banking. Director in the 
Chicago, Rock Island and PacLflc Railroad and Cora 
Exchange Bank. 

MI^ MARY DOWS.— Inherited from her father, David 
Dows, who made a large fortune In grain in New- 
York City, railroads and banking. 

TRACY DOWS.— Inherited from his lather, David 
DowB, who mad;e a large fortune in grain in New- 
York City, railroads and banking. 

MRS. MAR,GARET W. DUNHAM (wUe of Dr. Carroll 
Dunham).— Inherited from her father. David Dows- 
who made a large fortune in grain in New-York. 
City, raUroads and banking. 

GEORGE B. COOKSEY.— From his wife, a daughter 
ol David Dows. 

ARTHUR L. BARNEY.- Made in the express business- 
and freighting on the lakes. 

JOHN T. TEEEY (of E. D. Morgan & Co.).— Importing 
tea, coffee and sugar; negotiation of bonds and 
banking. Director in Bank of New-Amsterdam, 
American Exchange National Bank, American Fire 
Insurance Company, Texas and Pacific Eailroad,. 
Wabash Eailroad, Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany, International Ocean Telegraph Company^ 
Peoria and Peldn Union Eailroad, American Tele- 
graph and Cable Company, Central Park, North and 
East River EaUroad, Mercantile Trust Company,. 
Metropolitan Trust Company, St. Louis, Iron 
Mountain and Southern Eailroad. 
ISLIP. 

MRS. MARIA WHITNEY LIVINGSTON (wife of Robert 

C. Livingston).— By inheritance from the estate of 

Stephen Wliitney, the great New-York merchant. 

Made in merchandising, real estate and, Investmenta. 

ITHACA. 

HENRY W. SAGE.— Made many mUIions In the pur- 
chase of cheap pine lands In Michigan aad sale ot 
lumber therefrom. 

WILLIAM H. SAGE.— Made In pine lands In Michigan, 
and sale of lumber tlierefrom. 

ANDREW D. WHITE.— Largely Inherited. Made in- 
banking and Investments. 

Est. EX-JUDGE DOUGLASS BOARDMAN.— Law, 
banking and Investments. He was president of the 
First National Bank. 

Est. JOHN RUMSEY.— Banking and railroads. 

PEOFESSOE WILLAED FISKE.— Inheritance through 
his wife from John McGraw. Made to lumber and- 
pine lands. 

Est. EZRA CORNELL.— Telegraph lines, banks, rail- 
roads, etc. 

KINGSTON. 

Est. JOHN H. COEDTS.— Local real estate, banks, 
water works and brick-yards. 
LAS-AiLE. 

Est. A. M. CHESEBEOUGH. 

LANSINGBURGH. 
•EDWARD TEACY.-Malting, brewing and real estate 
Investments. 

MANHANBET. 
Est. HORATIO G. ONDEEDONK.-Mostly real estate. 

MIDDLETOWN. 
ROBERT H. BERDELL.— Made In the Erie Railroad 

and speculation. 
Est. HENEY E. LOW.— Eaih-oad buUdlng, railroads^ 
real estate and Investments In factories. 



38 



LIBEAHY OF TEIBTJNE EXTRAS. 



MAMAEONBCK, 

WATSON B. DICKERMAN.— Brokerage business and 
stocks. President of New- York Stock Exchange. 

WILLIAM G. BEAD.— Stocks and brokerage business. 

F. F. OAEBS.— 

NEWBURGH. 

JAMES M. WENTZ.— Importation of drygoods, cMefly. 
Director In tlie Mercantile National Bank, New- 
York. Vice-president of a large savings bank in 
Newburg to wlilclx li,e devotes muck time. 

WARREN BELANO.— Made in the China tea trade, 
with Investment of profits. 

CHARLES S. JBNKINS.-Ship chandlery and shipping 
business and Investments. 

NEW-HAMBURGH. 

Est. FRANCIS R. RIVES.— Partly by inheritance. Was 
for many years with Alexander Hamilton, mainly 
In real-estate law. He left over $2,000,000, mainly 
in real estate. 

NEW-ROCHELLE. 

Est. CLABKSON N. POTTER.— Partly inherited. Made 
in law practice and investments. 

•ADRIAN A. POTTIEE (of Pettier, Stymus & Co., New- 
Y'ork).— Mann&cture of hlgli-class furniture and rise 
in real estate. 

•WILLIAM B. KENDALL.— Manufacturing carpets ; 
banks, railroads, insurance companies, etc. 

Est. CHARLES G. MILLER.— Banking in WaU-st., New- 
York. 

NEW-YORK CITY. 
(The Ust for New-York City will be published last, 

after the lists for the rest of the United States.) 

NORTHPOET. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS CHBSEBROUGH.— Inherited 
from his mother, Mrs. Margaret Chesebrough, widow 
of Andronicus Chesebrbugh, a large quantity of real 
estate at Fort Washington, New- York City,, and else- 
where. The estate was valued at $4,000,000. 
NYACK. 

•Est. ROBERT H. ARKEINBURGH.— Cigar manufactur- 
ing, wholesale leaf trade, and real estate In New- 
York City. 

GEORGE M. HARD.— Banking In New-York and in- 
vestments. President of Chatham National Bank. 
Director In Phoenix Insurance Company, New- 
York, Connecticut and Eastern Railroad, Consol- 
idated Refrigerating Ctompany, D. G. YuengUng, Jr., 
Brewing Compaitiy, etc., etc. 

•WILLIAM DURYEA.— Starch manufacturing. Direc- 
tor in the National Starch Manufacturing Company. 
OYSTER BAY. 

PERRY BELMONT.- Inherited from August Belmont. 
Made In banldng In New- York City. 
OSWEGO. 

•SWITS CONDBE.— ManulacturlDg woollen knit goods. 

•aSHOMPSON KINGSFORD.— M<ide In the Oswego staroli 
factory and a planing mill, box factory and store. 

THOMAS S. MOTT.— Made in the grain commission busi- 
ness, vessels, gas and water works, etc. President 
of the First National Banlc. 

GEORGE B. SLOAN.— Made In the grain commission 
Duslness chiefly, a little In Oswego Sliade Cloth Fac- 
tory. President of the (Second National Bank. 
Director in the American Surety Comi>any. 

THEODORE IRAVIN.— In (he grain commission busi- 
ness; a little in Oswego Shade Clctli Factory wltU 
Mr. Sloan. 

ONEONTA. 

Est. DAVID WILBER.— Large dealers In hops. Also 
In farming, banldng and land Investments. 
PAINTED POST. 

•ABIJAH WESTON.— Has made several millions In the 



ptU'Chase of low-priced pine lands on the upper 
peninsula of Michigan and in the production of 
lumber. He Is a large operator, and is the heaviest 
holder of stock in the Chicago Lumbering Company 
and the Weston Lumbering Company, which have 
large sawmills at Manistigue, Mich. He Is a. large 
owner also In Weston, Dean & Aldrioh, Gouvemeur, 
N. Y. ; Bronsons & Weston, Ottawa, Out., and vari- 
ous other lumbering and manufacturing concerns. 

PAWLING. 
JOHN B. DUTCHEE.— Made chiefly In railroads. He 
is a director In many of the Vanderbllt railroads, and 
owns a large dairy farm near Pawling. 
PBEKSKILL. 
•CYRUS FROST.- Brick manufacturing and investments. 
President of the Westchester County Bank. 
PORT CHESTER. 
•WILLIAM J. TINGUE (of Tlngne, House & Co., New- 
York) .—Woollen manufacturing. 
JOHN A. MERRTTT.— Speculation, In cattle chiefly. 

POET HENEY. 
•Est. SILAS H. WITHERBEE.— Began in the transpor- 
tation business on Lake Champlain, then went into 
iron mines and iron manufaoturing. 
*G. E. SHERMAN.— Iron mines and iron manufactur- 
ing. 

PORT JERVIS. 
Est. HENEY H. F/vENUM.— Made In developinj; ths 
local real estate, gas and water works, banks, etc.. jt 
the city. 

POUGHKEEPSTE. 

•MES. ARCHIBALD ROGERS (born Coleman).— From 
Iron mines In Pennsylvania. (See Cornwall, Penn.) 

•Est. JOHN F. WINSLOW.— Manufactming Bessemer 
steel, etc. He began life In New-Jersey, making 
pig iron. A few years later her engaged In iron 
manufacturing in Albany with Erastus Coming, and 
they made enormous quantities of railroad and other 
Iron. With John A. Griswold he then supplied the 
financial aid for building the Monitor and six tur- 
reted ironclads ; and, later, with Griswold, bought the 
Bessemer steel patents and manufactured steel on a 
large scale. 

•Est. JOHN O. WHITEH<1USE.-Made In manufacturing 
boots and shoes. 

•Est. MATTHEW VASSAR (founder of Vassar CoUege). 
—Made in brewing. 

•Est. JOHN GUY' VASSAR.-Made in brewing, with his 
uncle, Matthew Vassar. 

••Est. JOHN P. ADRIANCE (of Adrlance, Piatt & Co.)— 
Manufacturing the Buckeye reaper and mower, etc. 

•JOSEPH TUCKEEMAN TOWER.— From his brother, 
Albert E. Tower, who was president of the Pough- 
keepsie Iron Works. Treasurer of the Port Henry 
Iron Ore Company, etc. Made in mineral lands, etc. 

•A. E. TOWER.— Prom his father of the same name. 
Made in mines, manufeicturlng, etc. 
RIVEUDALE. 

CHARLES M. McGILL.— IVade In royalties on brass 
fasteners for documents and law papers. 
RHINEBECK. 

ALFRED DE WlTT.-ParUy Inherited from Ms brother, 
a lawyer. Most of his fortune made by himself In 
California in early days by merchandising, specula- 
tions in real estate, lumber, etc., followed by pur- 
chases of real estate at Elizabeth, N. J., and in- 
vestments In securities. 

EOCK CITY. 
•CHAUNCEY KILMER.— Paper manufacturing. 
EOTTEEDAM. 

COLONEL DANIEL DAVID CAMPBELL.-Inherlted. 
Made In fine stock-raising and lands. 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



39 



EONDOUT. 
MRS. SAMUEL D. COYKENDALL.— From her lather, 
Thomas Cornell. Made in steamhoatlng. 
EOCHESTER. 

HIRAM W. SIBLEY.— Inherited more than a million 
from his father, Hiram Sibley, who made a great 
fortune in the 'Westem Union Telegraph Company 
when it was formed ; was also In the wholesale seed 
btistness. ftesldent of the Banlr of Monroe. 

MRS. HIRAM SIBLEY.— Inherited from her late hus- 
band. Made as above described. 

**H. H. WARNER.— Made in the manufacture of pro- 
prietary medicines. 

•HENRY BAETHOLOMAY.— Founder and principal 
owner of the Bartholomay Brewing Company, until 
it was sold to an English syndicate. 

'■WILLIAM S. KIMBALL.— Manufactuatng cigarettes and 
investments. President of the Union Banli. 

*»JTJNIUS JUIVSON.— Manufacture of the Judson steam 
govemoirs In the firm of Junius Judson & Son. 

•MRS. EARJD B. PUTNAM.— From her father, Charle- 
miagne Tower. Made in law pracWce, the purchase 
of coal and mineral lands, and railiioad building, 
railroaxls, etc. 

MAMES C. HART.— Manufacturing cigarettes. 

C. a. WOODWORTH.— Street railway franchise In 
Rochester. 

•GEORGE ELLWANGER (of Ellwanger <fc Barry).— 
Made in the nursery business. 

Est. DON ALONZO WATSON.— The ricnest man In 
Rochester. Made several millions In handling West- 
em Union Telegraph Company stock. 

MRS. JAMES S. WATSON.— Inherited over a million 
from her father, Hiram Sibley. 

GEORGE C. BUELL.— Made In wholesale groceries. 

D. W. POWERS.— Chiefly in real estate, Powers Hotel, 
and banldng. President of Powers' Bani. 

CHARLES J. BURKE.— Drygoods merchandising. 

••GEORGE EASTMAN.- Made In the manufacrture of 
photographic outfits. 

•Est. PATRICK BARRY.— Nursery business. 

••WILSON SOULE.— Inherited from his father. Made 
In the manufacture of. "Hop Bitters," and in West- 
ern railroads and canals. 

MORTIMER F. REYNOLDS (the first white male child 
born In Rochester).— Made In advance In value of 
real estate Inherited from his father. 

EDMUND OCUMPAUGH.— Made In the sale of gentle- 
men's furnishing goods, and real estafe. 

A. G. YATES.— Wholesale and retail dealing In coal. 

MICHAEL FILON (president of the East Side Savings 
Bant).— UanMng and real estate. 

SIMON L. BREWSTER (president of Traders' National 
Bank).— Made In banking and loans. 

•HENRY A. STRONG.— Manufacturing whips In the 
Strong & Woodbury Whip Company, originally ; now 
a large owner in the Eastman Dry Plate and Film 
Company. 

EOSSVILLE. 
JAMES J. WINANTS.— Contracting. 

RYE. 
JOSEPH PARK (of Park & Tllford, New- York City).— 
Wholesale and retail groceries, chiefly, added to by 
investments In banks, insurance companies, real 
estate, etc. Director in the New-York, New-Haven 
and Hartford Railroad, Sixth National Bank, etc. 
E. B. WESLEY.- Made In stocks. 

SARATOGA. 
WILLL4JM W. DURANT.— From Dr. Thomas C. Durant. 
Made first In shipping, but chiefly In railroads In the 
West and Northern New- York. Director In the 
Adirondacks Railway. i i 



SING SING. 

••Est. BENJAMIN BEANDRETH.— Manufacturing medi- 
cines and, porous plasters. 

•Est. HENRY J. BAKER.— Merchandising drugs In 
Baltimore and manufacturing castor oU In Jersey 
City, and saltpetre in BreoMyn and several other 
places. He had complete control of those two trades 
for many years. The Baker Oas^bxr OU Company 
Eiffll continues In busiiness. 

SCHENECTADY. 

•CHARLES G. ELLIS.— Made in the Schenectady Loco- 
motive Works. President of the company. 

•EDWARD ELLIS.— Made in the Schenectady Locomo- 
tive Works. Is treasurer of the company. 

SYRACUSE. 
D. EDG-AJl CROUSE.— Richest man in the city. Partly 
Inherited from his father, John Grouse, and his 
brother, John J. Made in wholesale grocery busi- 
ness, followed by Investments in express and other 
companies. 
JAMES J. BELDEN.— Made In State and G^jvernment 
contracts In firm of Denlson, Belden & Co. Now in 
banking. President of the Robert Gere Bank. 
JACOB CROUSE.— Wholesale groceries and real estate. 
ALEXANDER H. DAVIS .—Partly inherited. Made In 

(railroads, landed property and coal. 
A. C. BELDEN.— Public contract work with James J. 

Belden. 
•Est. ROBERT N. GERE.— Ironworks, saltworks and 

banking. 
GEORGE N, KENNEDY.— Law practice and fortunat* 
real estate investments, and partly through his wUe. 
He Is president of the Merchants' National Bank. 
•GEORGE BARNES (of the Wliitman & Barnes Co.).— 

Made In manulacturing and Investments. 
HORACE K. WHITE.— Stock speculation and real 
estate. 

TARRYTOWN. 
•BAINBEIDGE S. CLARK.— Made In carpet manu- 
facturing, with EUas S. Higgins. 
FREDERICK S. FOSTEE.— Made In California. 
•MRS. KATE ANDERSON.— Prom the estate of her hus- 
band, John Anderson, the tobacco manufacturer. 
FREDERICK W. GUITEAU.— Grain commission busi- 
ness and railroads. 
•Est. WILLIAM P. HAZLETON.— Made Id piano manu- 

faotoring. ' 
ROBERT E. HOPKINS.— Made in oU pipelines and 

kindred enterprises. 
•EUGENE JONES (Jones & Co., New-York).— Floor 

nulling. 
•GEORGE B. liTEWTON.- Mining and shipping coal. 
MRS. ELIZABETH S. PATON.— From her husband, 

FrancJis Paton. Made in linen importing. 
EEV. EDWARD C. BULL.— Fortune partly lnheri,ted, 
but added to by various Investments. He is a re- 
tlred Episcopal clergyman. 
JOHN SUSrOLAIE.— Made in provisions. 
D. O. BRADLEY.- BanMng and investments In real 
estate. President of the Tarrytown National Bonk. 
(Other persons, summer residents of Tarrytown, will 
be referred to in the New-York City list.) 

TIVOLI. 
Est. MRS. CORA LIVINGSTON BARTON.— Inherited 
from the Livingston family. Made In real estate. 
She was the daughter of Edward Livingston and 
widow of Thomas P. Barton. 
TROY. 
•Est. JOHN J. JOSLIN.— Manufacturing hemp, flax and 

wool ; lands In the West and real estate here. 
•EDWARD MURPHY, JE (of Kennedy & Murphy).- 
Brewing and real estate. 



40 



LIBEAJRY OF TEIBIINE EXTRAS. 



•^V]1.L1AJM KENNEDY (ol Kennedy 4 Murphy).— Brew- 
ing and real estate. 

Est. GEORGE M. TIBBITTS.— Made In part In the tal- 
low chandlery husiness, hut chiefly In farms and real 
estate In various localities in Northern New-York. 

•JUSTUS MILLER (of Miller, Hall & Hartwell).— Manu- 
facturing shirts and collars ; real estate and stoclis. 

'JOSEPH M. WABREN.— Made In manufacturing stoves 
and hardware. 

•WILLIAM F. BURDEN.— Inherited from his father, 
■WlUlam P. Burden, er. Iron and iQines, foundries 
and machine shops. 

GEORGE H. CRAMER.— Banking, stock In the mowtog 
machine factory of Walter A. Wood, and Investments 
In railroads, etc. Presidenit of the United National 
Bank. 

•Est. WILLIAM POWERS.— Made In manufaoturlng 
paints and oils, oil reiinteg, manufacturing oU 
cloths, and private banking at Lansdngbmrg, N. Y. 

WILLIAM H. PREAH.— Merchandising, drygoods. 

•'I. TOWNSEND BURDEN.— Inihodted. Made In the 
Invention and manufacture of patemted articles, tn- 
cludlng the first cultivator ever used In tEe UlnSted 
States, a maohlne fotr making wrought Iron spikes. 
Director In International BoUer Ciompany and Knlck- 
lerbocker Tmisit Com,pany. 

•'JAMES A. BURDEN.— Inherited. Made In Inventions 
and maMng of patented articles, cultivators, machine 
for making horseshoes, hook-head Iron spikes, etc. ; 
also In Iron mines. Director In lie CJhateaugay 
Ore and Iron Company. ' 

Est. JOHN L. THOMPSON.— Merchandising drugs. 

•'N. G. LUDLOW.— Manufacturing valves. 

NATHAN B. WARREN.— Inherited. Made In real es- 
tate, banking, etc. 

Est. STEPHEN WARREN.— Inherited Made In real 
estate, banking, etc. 

uncA. 

•JOHN THORN.— Made In the manufacture of soap 
and candles, and railroad Investments. 

LEWIS H. LAvATlENCE.— Lumber dealing and rail- 
roads. 

Est. THEO. e. FAXTON.— Stage and telegraph lines. 

•MRS. JAMBS WATSON WILLIAMS.— Inherited. Made 
In Pennsylvania coal lands and stock Investments. 

JOSHUA MATHER.— Merchandising first; then bahk- 
Ing, the purchase of real estate and street rail- 
roads, electric light, etc. President of A. D. 
Mather & Co.'s Bank. 

•MRS. DR. HENRY GOLDTHWAITE (Cornelia C. 
Munson).— Inherited. Made in Pennsylvania opal 
lands and Investments In stocks. 

WASSAIC. 
•'Est. GAIL BORDEN.— Made a large fortune In man- 
ufacture of condensed milk (patented) at Wassalc, 
WallMU, and Brewster's, N. Y., and Elgin, 111. 
WATERVILLE. 
••JAMES R. WHITING.— Made In the manufacture of 
"Hop Extract." 

WATKINS. 
•GEORGE I. MAGEE.— Pennsylvania coal mines, etc. 

WBEDSPORT. 
B. H. HACK.— Merchandising and Investments. 

WESTCHESTER. 

Est. GEORGE T. ADEE.— He left several millions, 

made In mercantile business in New-York City, 

banking, and large purchases of real estate. ' 

WOOD8IDE. 

Est. JOHN C. JACKSON.— Merchandising Iron and coal. 

YONKERS. 
Est. ABIJAH CUBTISS.— Street railroads In New- 
York Cltjr and investments. 



Est. FEED. K. AGATE.— Inherited from his father, 
Joseph Agate. Made In merchandising and Invest- 
ments In real estate. 

Est. EDWARD J. KING.— Fur business and real 
estate in New- York City. 

Est. HENRY E. ROBINSON.— Made In business In Cali- 
fornia. 

JAMES B. COLGATE.— Banking and bullion dealing In 
New-York aty. 

MRS. JOHN TREVOR.- Prom her husband. Made In 
banking, railroads and stocks. 

MARY T. TREVOR.- From her father, John B. Trevor. 
Made in banking, railroads and stocks. 

EMILY H. TREVOR.— From her father, John B. 
Trevor. Hade in banking, railroads and stocks. 

'WARREN SMITH.— From his father, Alexander Smith, 
of Alex. Smith & Sons' Carpet Co., and the Smith 
Moquette Loom Co. Made in manufacturing carpets 
and looms. 

•MRS. WILLIAM F. COCHRAN.— From her father, 
Alexander Smith. Made In manufacturing caiT>3ts 
and looms. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries mainly 121 

In manufacture of patented articles 19 

Origin of the fortunes not repoi-ted 8 

In non-protected industries 257 

Total , 405 



NORTH CAROUNA. 



CITY OF ASHEVILLE. 
•FRANK COXE.— Mines in Pennsylvania: real estate, 
banking and hotel at Ashevllle, and Interest in 
many other enterprises. 

BURLINGTON. 
•LAWRENCE HOLT.— Made In raw; cotton and cotton 

manufacturing. 
'JAMES HOLT.— Made in raw cotton and cotton 

manufacturing. 
•WILLIAM E. HOLT.— Made in raw cotton and cotton 
manufacturing. 

CHARLOTTE. 
Mrs. WESTMORELAND.— Inherited. Made In real 
estate in Virginia. 

DURHAM. 

'GEORGE W. WATTS.— Made in manufacturing to- 
bacco. President of the Fidelity Bank. 

•JULIAN S. CARR.— Manufacturing tobacco ; and presi- 
dent of First National Bank. 

'WASHINGTON DUKE.— Manufacturing tobacco. 

'JAMES B. DUKE.— Manufacturing tobacco. President 
of the American Tobacco Company. 

'BENJAMIN M. DUKE.— Manufacturing tobacco. Di- 
rector In the American Tobacco Company. 

'B. L. DUKE.— Manufacturing tobacco. 
RALEIGH. 

Est. PAUL C. CAMERON.— Largely Inherited through 
several generations. Increased by himselt Made 
in plantations, banldng and railroads. Was presi- 
dent of the North Carolina RaUroad, and director 
in several rallroeids and banks. 
WILMINGTON. 

K. M. MURCHISON.— Made In cotton and naval stores, 
and in real estate. Including the Orton House. 

'Est WILLIAM BUSH.— Made in manufactuitng moroc- 
co, and banking. Was president of the Equitable 
Guarantee and Trust Company. 

RECAPITULATION . 

In protected industries n 

In non-protected Industries ...!"!! 3 

Total :. - "il 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



41 



NORTH DAKOTA. 



FARGO. 
Colonel CIIAELES A. MOETON.— BanMng and Invest- 
ments. He Is president of the Exchange Bank. 
EECAPITULATION. 

In protected Indnstrtes 72 '.T..Z.. O 

in non-profccted Industries l 

Total.... '.'...::.... 1 



cotton manufaictyaring ; then railroad Investments, 

etc. 
•CHAELES PLEISCHMANN.-Whlstey dlslUlIng ana 

yeast. 
JtTLIUS FEEIBEEG.— Made In wholesale liQuors. 



OHIO. 



CITY OF AKEON. 

*0. C. BARBER (president of the Diamond Match Com- 
pany).— Manufacturing matches. 

♦LOXnS MILLER (superintendent of Aultman, Miller 
& Co.).— Manufacturing agricultural implements. 

♦A. L. CONGEE (of the Whitman <fc Barnes Manufact- 
uring Company).— Manufacturing agricultural Imple- 
ments. 

•FERDINAND SCHUMACHER (of the Ferdinand Schu- 
macher MUllng Company).— Manufacturing oatmeal, 
and flour mUUng. Has Investments in the East 
Tennessee Land Company, etc. 

*JOHN F. SIEBEELING.— Mowing machine manulact- 
tiring. 

•GEORGE W. GROUSE (president of Aul'man, MlUer 
A Co.) — Manufacturing agricultural implements. 
President of the City National Banh. 

THOMAS W. CORNELL.- BanMng and gas companies 
In Atoon and BrooMyn, N. Y. ; president of First 
National Bank of Atoon, and Akron Gas Company. 
CAIW?ON. 

•Est. CORNELIUS AULTMAN.— Manufacturing reapers 
and agricultural Implements. 

CINCINNATI. 

MRS. CATHERINE L. ANDERSON.— By Inheritance 
from Nicholas Longworth, who founded a great 
fortune by purchases of real estate. 

■W. P. ANDERSON.- Made In real estate and cotton 
oil ; Inheritance from Nicholas Longworth largely. 

E. B. BOWLES.— By Inheritance from his father, who 
made hie money largely in Ihe Kentucliy Centra] 
Railroad ; and from his mother, a sister of Elliott H. 
and George H. Pendleton, whose money was made 
in real estate. 

MULIUS MALKE.— Made in the mannfactare of billiard 
tables in the Brunswlck-Baike-CoUender Company. 

LEOPOLD BURCKHAEDT.— OU producing, et«. 

•CHRISTIAN BASS.— Made in brewing, and In real 
estate. 

•Est. A. D. BULLOCK.— Made In manufacturing cot- 
ton, wool and hair bristles. 



POWELL CROSBY.- Made in real estate investments. 



ALEXANDER M. DONALD.— Made a large fortune In 
petroleum producing, refining, etc. 

THOMAS J. EMERY.— While engaged In mannfaoturtag 
candles, etc., his wealth has been made almost 
wholly in real estate, with some other Investments. 

J. J. EMERY.- Made almost wholly in real estate. Is 
engaged in manufacturing candles to some extent. 

MISS KEZIAH EMERY.— Made almost entirely in real 
estate. 

•ALBERT ERKENBEECTEE.— Made In manufacturing 
starch. Director In the National Starch Manufactur- 
ing Company. 

•JACOB ELSAS.— Tanning and leather, and real estate. 

•FEED ECKSTEIN.- Manufaoturing white lead. 

Est. SETH EVANS.- BacMng meats and real estate. 



•Est. JAMES W. GAET— Made over two millions In 
the MIU Creek Distilling Company, the Perih-Gaff 
Manufacturing Company, Third National Bank, and 
other enterprises. 

Est. WILLIAM GLENN.— Meroliandislng, and raUroad 
and other Investments. 

•Est. JAMES N. GAMBLE (Of the Proctor & Gamble 
Co.).— Manufacturing soap and candles; and In- 
vestments. 

WILHAM S. GEOESBBCK.— Groceries, steamboats and 
real estate. 

MES. LAURETTA BODMAN GIBSON.— From her 
brother, Ferdinand Bodman, a tobacco mercliant, 
money lender and real estate owner. 



L. B. HARRISON.— Made a large fortune in banking 
and Investments. He Is president of the First 
National Bank. 

W. H. HARRISON.- Made in real estate Investments. 

A. H. HINKLE.— Made in publishing copyrighted 
school books. Director in the American Book Com- 
pany. 

•JOHN HAUCK.— Brewing and banldng. Is president 
of the German National Bank. 



M. B. INGALLS.— Made a large fortune in railroads. 

J. N. KINNEY.— Packing meats and real estate. 
CHARLES H. KILGOUR.— Street raUroads and bank- 
ing. 
S. KUHN (of S. Kuhn & Sons).— Private banking. 



HERMAN LACKMAN.— Made in the sale of liquors at 

wholesale. 
MRS. NICHOLAS LONGWORTH.- By inheritance from 

Nicholas Longworth, who laid the basis of a great 

fortune by early Investments in real estate. 
•HENRY LEWIS.— Manufacturing hair goods and real 

estate. 

•CHRISTIAN MOEELEIN (of the C. Moerlein Brewing 
Co.).— Brewing and bottling. 

•ROBERT MITCHELL (of the Robert Mitchell Puml- 
ture Co.).— Made in tie manufacture of furniture. 

STERN MAYER.— Wholesale clothing and cloths. 

•GOTTLIEB MUHLHAUSEE.— Brewing and real es- 
tate. 

HENRY MARTIN.— Drygoods merchandising 

J. E. McLean.— Made in publishing "Hie Cmcinnati 
Dally Enquirer"; and Washington real estate. 

HENRY MACK (of Mack, Stadler & Co.)— Wholesale 
cloth and clothing. 

•J. J. MOONEY.— Made In tanning and leather; real 
estate, cofSn-making, etc. 

•MRS. MARY J. PERIN (widow of Oliver Perln).— 
Inherited a large fortune, accumulated in the Mill 
Creek Distilling Co., the Perin-Gaft Manufactur- 
ing Co., the TMrd National Bank, etc. 

ELLIOT H. PENDLETON.— By Inheritance. Mad» 
in real estate and banking. 

HENRY PEOBASCO.— Made In the hardware busi- 
ness. He was a partner of Tyler Davidson, whose 
Sister he married. 

•HAELEY T. PROCTOR (of the Proctor <fc (Jambl» 
Co.).— Manufacturing soap and candles. 

•WILLIAM N. PROOTOE (of the Proctor & Garnbl* 
Co.).— Manufacturing soap and candles. 



JOSEPH EAWSON.— Packing meats. 



•Es*. SAMUEL FOSDICK.— Merchandishig first; then MRS. BELLAMY STOEER.— By inheritance from 



42 



LIBEAUY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



Nicholas Longworth, wlio laid the foundation of u. 
great fortune by early purchases of real estate. 

Est. EEtTBEN E. SPEINGER.— Merchandising first, 
then railroads, real estate, and miscellaneous In- 
vestments. 

•WILLIAM StJMNEE.— Manufacturing se-wing ma- 
chines. 

JOHN L. STETTINIUS.— By Inheritance from Nicholas 
Longworth, who laid the basis of a large fortune, 
by early purchases of real estate. 

W. W. SCAEBOEOTIGH.— BanMng and real estate. 

LEWIS SEASONGOOD.— Wholesale cloth and cloth- 
ing. 

•DAVID SINTON.— Made many milUons in iron man- 
ufacturing. 

6TEWAET SHILLITO.— Made In drygoods, and by 
Inheritance. 

EDWAED SAEGrENT.— Publishing copyrighted school 
boots. 

•Est. GEOEGE K. SCHOENBEEGEE.— Made over four 
miUions In iron -naniifacturlng. 

LOUIS STIX.— Wholesale drygoods. 

Est. BEIGGS SWIFT.— Port-pacldng, his fortune having 
been augmented by fortunate investments in real 
estate. 

**Est. J. C. TULLIS.— Largely in the manufacture of the 
rebounding ball; in part by speculation in horses 
during the war, and real estate Investments. 

LEWIS VAN ANTWEEP.— Educational publications, 
copyrighted. 

MICHAEL WEEK.— Wholesale wines and soap, 

•JAMES WALSH.— Distilling and redistilling, and 
wholesale liciuors. 

M. MOERIS WHITE.— BanMng. He is president of the 
Fourth National Bant. 

O. J. WILSON.— Copyrighted school boots publishing. 

A. 6. WINSLOW.— Bantling and investments. 

DANIEL WOLF.— WTiolesale clothing and real estate. 

••DE. N. B. WOLFE.— Manufacturing proprietary medi- 
cines. 

E. ZIMMEEMAN.— Made in lumber dealing. 

CLEVELAND. 
SAMUEL ANDEEWS.— Made a. large fortune in oil re- 
fining, producing and transportation, in the Standard 
Oil Company. 

••CHAELES F. BEUSH.— Manufacture of electric light 

machinery invented and patented by himself. 
STEVENSON BURKE.- Law practice, railroads, real 
estate and investments in mining and manufacturing 
companies. President of the Cleveland and Mahon- 
ing VaUoy Eailway ; Toledo and Ohio Central Eall- 
way ; Toledo, Columbus and Cincinnati Eailway ; 
Kanawha and Michigan Eailway, and Central On- 
tario Eailway. Interested largely in nlolsel mines. 
E. 1. BALDWIN (of E. I. Baldwin, Hatch. & Co.).— .Made 
In a large drygoods business and Investments In real 
estate. 
MES. W. J. BOAEDMAN.— From her father, James E. 
Sheffield, of New-Haven, Conn. Made in merchan- 
dising in the South and railroads, etc., in the North. 
•M. A. BRADLEY.- Vessel property on the lalies. 
Est. T. S EECKWITH.— Engaged In merchandlslngj 
heavily Interostod in banldng business; and a large 
owner of gas stock during the many yi;ars when it 
paid great dividends. 
*MBS. C. S. BliSSELL.— Prom her father, Dr. Wicte. 

MaSe in iron manufacturing at Leetonia, Ohio. 
MES. MARY S. BRADFORD.— From her father, who 
bought real estate in the early days of the city, 
which has now become valuable. 
DUDLEY BALDWIN.— One of the "-ery early settlers 
of Cleveland. For many years the only vender of 



seeds and, agricultural implements in that region. 
The bullr of his fortune has been acquired In real 
estate. Has other investments. Vice-President of 
the Wicli Banldng and Trust Co. 



•WILLIAM COHISHOLM (of Wm. dilsholm & Sons,, 
etc.).— EolUng mills and other manufacturing; ore 
mining; and, vessel.?. 

Est. SFJLAH CHAMBERLAIN.— Contracting and rail- 
road building, and investments in railroads, canals, 
real estate, and iron mines. 

•Est. AHIRA COBB.— Vessels on the Lates ; merchan- 
dising ; and real estate. He was a large owner of real 
estate. 

Est. LEONAED CASE— Inherits from Ms father, 
Leonard Case, senior, who accumulated a large for- 
tune in real estate, principally, in which he was a 
large dealer and owner. The son left the buBc of 
Ms estate to the Case Library and the Case School 
of Applied Science. . 

Est. JAMES F CLAEK.— Merchandising hardware, loajis,. 
and banMng, but chiefly in building, organizing 
railroads. Some in coal mines. 

JAMES COEEIGAN.— He has interests lu propellers on 
the lalres and in Irom mines ; but the great bult of 
his fortune comes from refining oU and stock of 
the Standard Oil Company, In which he Is a large 
owner. 

•WAEEEN H. COENING.-Distilling. A member of 
the Whiskey Ti-ust. 

T. D. CEOCKEE.— Petroleum oil, banMng, and 
fortunate Investments. 



DAN P. EELLS.— President and Vice-President of the 
Commercial National Bank for nearly thirty years. 
Made chiefly in banMng, but acquired some property 
In railroading and express companies and various 
Mnds of manufacturing. Director In tlfe United 
States Ex]5ress Company. 



•JULIUS E. FEENCH.- Distilling. A member of the 
Whiskey Trust; and manufacturing tar roofing for 
railroad cars, and car wheels. 



W. J. GOEDON.— Wholesale groceries and liquors, 
added to by Investments In iron and copper mines in 
Lake Superior region. 

Est. S. V. HAEKNESS.— Made in oil producing, refining 
and transportation In the Standard Oil Company. 

JOHN HUNTINGTON.— Made in oil producing, refining 
and transportation in the Standard Oil Company. 

L. E. HOLDEN.— Silver mines In Utah and other mine 
Investments. 

MARCUS A. HANNA (of M. A. Hanna & Co.).— Made 
In handling coal and Iron ore, and Investments in 
banks, street railroads, the Union Pacific Railroad, 
etc. Pi-esldent of the Union National Bank. 

•Est. CHAELES HICKOX.— Originally in fiour 
milling. Later, a large buyer of real estate and 
railroad buUder, and owner in Iron mines. 

Est. E. B. HALE.— BanMng and western real estate. 

R. K. HAWLEY.— Made m lumber de.aling. 

JAMES M. HOYT.— Real estate, purchased In early 
days. 

•Est. JAMES HAEMON.— Iron manufacturing. 

Est. H. B. HUELBUT.— BanMng and railroad stoolts. 

•MELVILLE H. HANNA.— Iron manufacturing and 
Iron ship building. He Is the head of the Globe 
Iron Comiiaiiy, and the Globe Iron Ship Building 
Company. 

'THOMAS L. JOHNSON.-mterpsted in iron mills at 
Jolmstown, Pa., and a buUdcr and owner of 
street railroads. 

•PHILANDER L. JOHNSON .-Lake slilpplng and real 
estate. 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIEBS. 



43 



*ZENAS KING.— Founder and President of tlie Kijug 

Iron Bridge and Mamilacturing Oompany. 
Est. LEVI KERE.— Partly by inheritance. Made by 
blmseli In the oil business, steamers to the West 
Indies and various other enterprises. 
■C. G. KING.— Made In tile lumljer trade, real estate 

and banWng. 

*I. P. LAWSON.— Made In manufacturing nuts and 

bolts. 
**W. H. LAWEENCE.— Made in Brush Electric Co. 
stoek ; maiiufacturo of cordage ; and real estate. 
•ISAAC LEISY.— Bre-wing and real estate. 



•SAMUEL MATHEE (of PIclJands, Mather & Co.)— Iron 
ore investments and vessel property on the lalies. 

MRS. SAMUEL MATHER.— From her father, Amas^ 
Stone. Made in bridge building, railroads and in- 
vestments. Amasa Stone was a man of reniarliablo 
ability and enterprise. He began life by building 
railroad bridges, and was for a wliile Superintendent 
of the New Haven, Hartford and Springfield Eail- 
roat He then went into railroad building in the 
"West. For several years managing director of the 
X.ato Shore Eiillroad. He was once .i director in 
the Westejm Union Telegraph Co., and In the 
Standard Oil Compa;ny. He had an interest tn 
several banlss, and founded roUing mills, woUem 
factories and otiier business enterprises. He died 
worth about $4,000,000. 



•CHARLES A. OTIS.— Manufacturing iron and steel 
He Is president of the Otis Steel Company , 

J. B. PEEKl'NS.— Advance in value of real estate, in- 
herited through several generations. 
IIENEY B. PAYNE.— Chiefly in real estate, but .^lso in 

law practice, banldng, railroadp, etc. 
•»GBOEGE Vf. PACK (of Paclc, Woods & Co.)— Sawmills 

and lumlier. 
COLONEL OLIVBE H. PAYNE.— Made in oil producing, 

refining and tr.ansportatlon, in the Standard Oil 

Company. 
■*JAMEiS PICKANDS.— Large investments in iron ore 

antnes, especially in the celebrated Gogebic range. 
"A. J. POPE.— I'Kin manufajcturlng. Presidenlt and 

founder of the Malleable Iron Company. 



Est. E. E. EOOT.— Wholesale drygoods. 

*W. J. RAINEY.— Coal mines and colie. 

•ROBERT R. RHODES.— Made In iron, coal and ves- 
sels on the lalies. President of the People's Saviugs 
and Loan Association. 



«*GEOEGE W. STOCKLY'.— Manufacture of the Brush 

electric light machinery, patented. 
Est. W. P. SOUTHWORTH.— Made in the sale of 

groceries and- Investments. Was president of the 

National City Banli. 
'LEONARD SGHLATHER (o!t the Leonard Sohlather 

Brewing Co.)— Brewing and re.il estate. 
Mat. SILAS S. STONE.— iRise in value of real estate 

whJicai lie bought in early days and developed. 
T)R. W. S. STREATOR.— Real estate and railroads. 
-•W. C. SCOFIELD.— Petroleum oil and rolUng mitis. 
<;HARLES J. SHEFFIELD.— From his fatlier, James B. 

Sheffield, of New-Haven, Conn. Merchandising In 

tlie South and railroads, etc.. In the North. 



•JOHN TOD.— Coal and Iron mines. 



•JOHN L. WOODS (of Paclc, Woods A, Co.)— Saw mlUs 
and lumber and investments. President of the 
Euclid Avenue National Banli. 

OHARLES W. WASON.— street rah-oads. real estate 
and, to some extent, iron manufacturing. 

■*THOMAS WILSON.— Vessels on the lakes, of which 



Sjpecies of property he is one of the largest owners. 
J. H. WADE, jr.- From his grandfather, Jeptha H. 

Waxie, who made a fortune of several mtUiions la 

telegraph lines, railroads and banldng. 
^WILLIAM J. WHITE.— Made mainly tu the manufact- 
ure of chewing gum. 
MRS. ELIZA A WIOT.- Prom her husband. StlUimaii 

Witt, who left a large fortime, made in raUroad 

building. 
HENRY WICK.— BanMng. One of the veteran banli- 

ers of the city. President of the Wlct Banldng 

and Trust Co. 
Est. S. f\\1LLIAMS0N.— Real estate, banldng and 

law. 

*Es"t. MOSES C. YOUNGLOVB.— First in book pub- 
lishing. Then lu manufacturing agricultural imple- 
ments. Also an original owner of profitable gas 
company stock. 

COLUMBUS. 
•BENJAMIN S. BROWN.- ManufaoturlnE and invest- 
ments. 
WILLIAM G. DESHLER.— Banking and Investments. 

He is president of the National Exchange Bank. 
•WILLIAM MONEYPENNY.— Formerly lu dlstiUlng. 
He ,put his profits into other lines of business 
enterprise. Now in banking and various in- 
vestments. President of the First National Bank. 
MRS. WILLIAM DENNISON (widow of .the late Gov- 
ernor Dennlson).— Inherited nearly $1,000,000 of 
real estate alone. 
Est. FRANCIS C. SESSIONS.— Banking and real estate. 
Was President of the Commercial National Bank. 
EDWARD T. MITHOFP.— An early buyer of real 
estate, which Is now valuable, much of whl<Jh he 
has improved. He is said to be the largest tax- 
payer in the county. 
•WILLIAM B. HAYDEN.— Mainly Inherited from Peter 
Hayden, Ms father, and made by him in the 
mauuJiactiu'e at saddlery hardware, in Columbus, 
Ohio, Auburn, N. Y., and elsewhere. Added to 
both by father and son, in banking and Invest- 
ments. 
•CHARLES HAYDEN.— Inherited from Peter Hayden, 
the saddlery hardware manufacturer, and added 
to by Mmself. 
HENRY' T. CHITTENDEN.— Partly in business, but 
very largely in real estate, Includtng a hotel, a 
theatre and a memorial hall. 
ROBERT E. NEIL.- Inherited, and added to by him- 
self in judicious Investments. 
•LOUIS HOSTEIE.— Made in the L. Hoster Brewing 

Company and in real estate. 
P. W. HUNTINGTON.— Made la his private banking 

house and lu judicious Investments. 
JONAB M'CUNB.— In various business enterprises. 

DAYTON. 
•EUGENE BARNEY.— Car mauufactui-ing. 
JOHN HARRIS.- Miscellaneous investments. 
«W. P. CALLIHAN.— Machinist business. 
JOHN K. McINTIRE.— Wholesale groceries in Dayton, 
for forty years president of the Third National 
Bank. 
••JOHN W. STODDAED.— Made in manufacturing 
agricultural implements, protected by a. patent. 
HARPSTER. 

•DAVID HAEPSTER.— The largest Individual worker 
of farm lands and wool grower in Ohio. 
LIMA. 
BENJAJaiN C. FAUROT.— Dealing in mules and horaes 
dm-lng the War, etc. President of Lima National 
Bank. 
CALVIN S. BRICB.— See New- York city, where he Is 
rated. 



44 



LDBEAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



MANSFIELD. 
DE. WILLIAM BUSHNELL.— Startea !n the practice 
of medicine. Bouglit thousands of acres of praMe 
land near Des Moines, Iowa, which has tncreased 
In value, and has Invested In railroads, etc. 
Est. B. P. STUEGES.— Made In a general country store, 
and purchases of real estate, and private banMng. 
JOHN SHEEMAN.— Eeal estate here, and In St. Paul 
and Washington, D. C, street railways, hank stoohs, 
railroads and other Investments. 
MI0DLETOWN. 
•DANIEL MoCALLAY.— Banlriug ana tobacco manu- 
facturing. President of First National Bant. 
MASSILLON. 
•N. S. EUSSELL (of Eussell & Co.).— Mai.iufaoturlng 
agricultural implements. 

SANDUSKY. 
•WATSON HUBBARD.— Sawmills and lumber in Michi- 
gan, and real estate. 
EUSH E. SLOANE.— EaUroads and investments. 
•EOLLIN B. HUBBARD.— Sawmills, lumber, real es- 
tat* and banMng. President of the Second Na- 
tional Bank. 
•JACOB KUEBLEE.— Brewing and real estate in the 

firm of J. Kuebler iSs Co. 
•AUGUST KUEBLEE.— Brewing and real estate in the 

firm of J. Kuebler & Co. 
J. O. MAES.— Made In banMng and railroads. 
•JAMES WOOLWOETH.— Manufacturing handles dur- 
ing the War, and real estate since, 
•Est. F. T. BAENEY.— Made In manufacture and sale 

of hardware. 
LAWEENCE CABLE.— Merchandising, real estate and 
banMng. President of the Third National Bank. 
SPEINGFIELD, 
•JOHN W. BOOKWALTEB.— Controlling owner In 
James Leflell & Co. Manufacturing patented water- 
iwheols. Also In the Bookwaliter Steel and Iron 
Ooonirainy of New-Jersey, of which he is President. 
•General ASA S. BUSHNELL (of Wardner. BushneU 
A Glessner Co ).— Manufacturing agrloultm'al Im. 
plements. 
•B. H. WAEDNER (of Wardner, Bushnell & Co.).— 
lyTamifaoturlng agricultural implements. President 
of the Mrst National Bank. 
V. H. THOMAS (of Wardner, Bushnell <fc Co.).— 

Manufacturing agricultural implements. 
•DAVID L. SNYDEE.— Flour milling and Investments. 
•PHINEAS P. MAST.— Principally In manufacturing 
agricultural Implements, but also In publishing, 
banMng, etc. In the firms of P. P. Mast & Co., 
manufacturers, and Mast, Crowell <fe Kirlipatrick, 
publishers. Also president of the Springfield Na- 
tional Banlc 

TOLEDO. 
Mrs. VALENTINE H. KETCHAM.— Prom her late hus- 
band, long the president of the First National Bank 
and a great owner of real estate. 
•DENNIS COGHLIN.— Brewing, real estate and bank- 
ing. President of the Buckeye Brewing Company. 
•WILLIAM PETERS.— He has made several milUons 
In pine lands in Michigan, sawmUls here, salt, real 
estate, and Investment of his accumulations. 
PHAELES L. REYNOLDS (of Eeynolds Bm)s.).^W!Wh 
Ms brother he does the largest (bTiEineSB in actual 
(handling of grain in ithe world. They are grain 
and commission merchants. 
SHELDON C. EEYNOLDS.— Made In grain and com- 
mlsseon business and rebates from the Wabash road. 
GEOEGE H. KETCHAM.— Inherited $750,000 from 
V. II. Ketcham, his father, and has added to It by 
investments in real estate, banMng, stock farm, etc. 
•Kst. CALVIN EEONSON.— Tobacco manufacturing 



in Toledo and CentrevUle and real estate in Chicago. 

GEOEGE W. DAVIS.— Eeal estate and banMng. Presi- 
dent of Second National Bank. 

JOHN B. KETCHAM, 2d.— Inherited $750,000 from 
V. H. Ketcham. Real estate and banMng. Presi- 
dent of Ketcham's National Bank. 

MES. MAEY E. NEAEING.— Inherited from V. H. 
Ketcham. Made In real estate, banking, etc. 

JOHN T. NEWTON.— Real estate and banking. 

HORACE S. WALBEIDGE.— Started in the grain trade 
origi'nally, but made Ms ifortune principally in real 
estate. Has various interests. 

SAMUEL M. YOUNG,— Prlnolipal owner in the Toledo 
Gas Company. Made in gas works and real eistate. 
WAEEEN. 

•H. B. PEEHINS.— Iron manufacturing and rolling 
mills, 

WOOSTEE. 

EDWARD QUINBY.— Partly inherited. Eeal estattt 
and loans. 

YOUNGSTOWN. 

•CHAUNGBY H. ANDEEWS (of 0. H. & W. C. An- 
drews).— In the iron business, coal and railroads. 
President of Commercial National Bank. 

CHAELES D. AEMS.— SEver mines in Colorado. 

WILLIAM T. CAREINGTON.— Produce and railroads. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected indinstirie-s 86 

In manufacture of patented articles <> 

IiAerlted J 

Jin non-pi-oteoted industries n* 

""' Total....r 207 



OKLAHOMA. 



There wSH be plenty of fort;unes in OMahoma In due- 
time. But they are unknown now. 



OEEGON. 



ASTORIA. 
GEORGE FLAVEL.— Eeal estate, steamboats and bank- 
ing. President of the First National Bank. 
POETLAND. 

Est. HENRY D. GEEEN.— Gasworks, waterworks, real 
estate and Mndred enterprises. 

L. FLiEISCHNER (of Pleischner, Mayer & Co.).— Dry- 
goods, millinery and fancy goods, and real estate. 

0. H. LEWIS.— Wharf property, storage business and 
merchandising. 

W. S. LADD (of Ladd & TUton, bankers).— Banking and 
purchases of real estate. 

HENRY FAILING.— Merchandising, banMng and real 
estate. President of the First National Bank. 

H. W. CORBETT (of Corbett, Falling & Co.).— Hardware 
merchandising, real estate and banldng. President 
of the Security Savings and Trust Company. 

FRANK DEKUM.— Made in merchandising, banking anff 
Investments. President of the Portland Savings Bank. 

JACOB KAMM.— Made in merchandising and steamboatr^ 
Ing. 

W. K. SMITH.- Made in merchandising, steamboatlngr 
and banking. 

AMOS KING.— Real estate investments. 

DONALD MoCLEAY.— Real estate and banMng an* 
merchandising. President of the United States Na- 
tional Bank. 

H. S. PnroCK.- Eeal estate and newspaper publlsUng. 

EIOHAED WILLIAMS.— Eeal estate and law practice. 

LEWIS LOVE.— Purchases of now-valuable real estate. 

VAN B. DE LASHMUTT.— Eeal estate, mining and 
banMng. President of the Oregon National Bank 
and the Alblna National Bank. 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



45, 



DAVID P. THOMPSON.— Contracting, real estate and WILLIAM J. KOUNTZE.— Made in transportation by 

banking. President ol the Commercial National steamboats and rail. 

Bank. *JACOB KLEE.— Manuiacture and sale of clotlilng. 

SALEM. 'JAMES LAUGHLIN, JE. (of Jones and LaugUlln).— 

A. BUSH.— Private banWng and investments. Manufacture of Iron and steel. 

RECAPITULATION. WILLIAM MULLINS.— Made in railroad Interests. 

In protected todustrles "JAMBS McCUTCHEON.— Cliiefly in Iron mannfactur- 

In non-protected industries 18 Ing. President of the First National Bamk. 

„ ^ , — *P. H. MILLER.— In the building of locomotives and 

Total 1« steam m&nes. 

"• " "H. SELLER McKEE (of McKf>e & Brothers).— Manu- 

FENNSYLVANIA. facturlng flint glass and traction i-oads. He la 

, president of tlie First National Bamk of Birmingham. 

ALLEGHENY CITY. MRS. JACOB N. McCULLOUGH.— From her iHisband 

COLONEL JAMES ANDREWS.— Engineer and general "^ho was vice-president of the Pennsylvania Company, 

contractor on the Eads jetties and other public '^'^^ 1° railrc-ads and stock operations. Originally 

^orks. to merchandising, groceries, and banking. 

•ALEXANDER M. BYERS.— Manufacturing Iron pipe, JOHN PORTERFIELD.— Merchandising and groceries. 

In WesUnghouse Electric and Manufacturing Com- *HENRY PHIPPS, JR.- Made in iron and steel manu- 

pany and In banking. President of the Iron City factoring and bridge building. 

•JOSEPH S. BROWN.— Manufacturing iron and steel. *MIiS. JAMBS PABK, JR.— Cotton, copper and, steel 

National Bank In Pittsburg. manufacturing. Inherited. 

rFELIX R. BRUNOT.— Inherited from his father, and *I>AVID E. PARK.-Ohlefly inherited. Cotton, copper 

made In manufacturing white and red lead. ^^^ steel manufacturing. 

•JOHN W. CHALF ANT.— Manufacturing iron, steel and *!CHARLES PARK.— Chiefly Inherited. Cotton, copper 

pipe. President of the People's National Bank, In ^^^ steel manufacturing. 

Pittsburg. "TVILLIAM G. PARK.— Chiefly Inherited. Cotton, copper 

JOHN DUNLAP.— Importing tin, metals and japanned ^^^ steel manufacturing. 

goods. *JAMES PARK.-<Ihlefly inherited. Cotton, copper 

••MRS. HERBERT DU PUY.— Inherlled from her father, ^^^ steel manufacturing. 

David Hostetter. Made in manufacturing proprietary *A. E. W. PAINTER.— Made In Iron manufacturing 

medicines and bitters, and in railroad Investments. and Investments. President of the Safe Deposit 

MRS. ELIZABETH DARLINGTON.— Inherited from "md Trust Company of' Pittsburg. 

Jacob N. MoCullough, vice-president of the Penn- "JACOB PAINTER.— Made In Iron manufacturing, 

sylvania Company, who made nine millions In rail- "JOSHUA RHODES.— Iron pipe manufacturing, 

roads and stock operations. His start was made in *WILLIAM H. SINGER (of Singer, Mmick & Co.).— 

merchandising, groceries and banking. Steel manufacturing. 

HARRY DARLINGTON, JR.— Inherited from Jacob N. *MRS. DAVID A. STEWART.— From her husband, who 

McCuUough, vice-president of the Pennsylvania was connected with the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 

Company, who made nine millions In railroads and pany, the Pittsburg Locomotive Works, and th« 

stock operations. His start was made in merchan- Carnegie Interests. 

dislng groceries and banldng. •JOHN WALKER.- Manufacturing soap, candles, etc. ; 

REBECCA DARLINGTON.- Inherited from Jacob N. cotton oil refining, and steel maldng. 

MoCullough, vice-president of the Pennsylvania JOSEPH WALTON.- Coal merchant; fortune made 

Comfpany, who made nine millions in railroad^ and largely during the war. He is president ol the 

stock operations. His start was made in merchan- Farmers' Deposit Bank, Pittsburg. 

dislng, groceries and banldng. BELLEFONTE. 

Est. DAVID GREGG.— Made in the sale of drygoods JAMES MILLIKEN.— Dealing in stocks, especially In 

and Investments in real estate. that of the Western Union Telegraph Company. Has 

•A. GUCKENHEIMER.— Distming. large holdings In that Company, and In the United 

•ABRAHAM GARRISON.— Foundry and machine busl- States and National Express Companies, etc. 

ness and Investments. President of Diamond Na- WILLIAM F REYNOLDS.- Merchandising, real estate 

tional Bank and Safe Deposit Company of Pittsburg. and banking. He engaged a long time ago In iron 

MRS. J. COSH GRAHAM (born Annette McKee).— In- manufactiuing and lost money therein, resolving 

herited from her father, Thomas McKee. Made in never to Invest another dollar In manufacturing. 

real estate. He has also had flour milling interests, but made no 

JOSEPH HORNE.— Made in drygoods merchandising. money therein. His wealth comes entirely from 

••MRS. DAVID HOSTETTER.— From David Hostetter. non-protected Industries. 

Made In proprietary medicines and bitters, real estate BERWICK. 

and railroad stoclts. *MORDBCAI W. JACKSON.— Partly In car-bulldlng. 

•*D. HERBERT HOSTETTER.— From David Hostetter. President of the First National Bank. 

Made In proprietary medicines and bitters, real estate BRADFORD, 

and railroad stocks. He is President of the Hostet- J. T. JONES.— Has made nearly a million. It not quite, 

ter Company. In oil producing. 

••THEODORE HOSTETTER.- From David Hostetter. L. EMORY, JR.-Oll producing mainly, but has many 

Made In proprietary medicines and bitters, real estate other interests. 

and railroad stocks. JAMES AMM.— OH producing. 

ROBERT HAYS.— Made in steamboating on the rivers CARLISLE. 

«nd canal transportation. ••Est. JAMES W. BOSLER.— Mainly In Indian contracts 

THOMAS O. JENKINS.— Made In wholesale groceries and th,e Palo BUnco cattle ranch, which was alter- 

and flour. ward sold to Stephen W. Dorsey. 

•BENJAMIN F. JONES (of Laughlln <fc Co.).— Made CHEST "^It. 

In Iron and steel manufacturing. "SAMUEL A, CROZER.— Has made a large fortune In 

J. KAUFMAN.— Made In the sale of clothing. cotton manufacturing at UpteTil, Penn. 



46 



LIBEAHY OF TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



•EOBEET WETHEEILL (ol E. WetlierUl & Co.) — 
Haaufactnre of steam engines and boilers. 
CONNELLSVILLE. 
'J. W. MOOEE.— Made in coke manufacture. 

CX3ENWALL. 
•EOBEET H. COLEMAN.— Has a sixth Interest in tlie 
famous Cornwall Iron ore Mils, in whldi, the State 
GoologiSit reports, there are more than 30,000,000 
tons of iron ore, above water level, and a larger 
amount below. Tlie ore is worth about $2 a ton. 
*ANNIE COLEiMAN.— A sixth interest In the Cornwall 

Iron ore hills. 
*MES. AIJ3EE.— A sixteenth interest in the Cornwall 
iron ore banla. 

CUETVENSVILLE. 
•JOHN PATTON.— Lumbering, banMng and increase in 
value of coal and timber lands. 
DANVILLE. 
•Est. THOMAS BEAVER.— Coal and iron and mer- 
chandising. 

DAWSON. 
*W. J. EAINEY.— Coal mines, coke and banldng. 

DUBOIS. 
•JOHN E. DUBOIS.— SawmiUs, lumber, tanning and 

leather, and otlier interests. 
EASTON. 
JOHN N. HUTCHINSON.— Made in railroads. 

EHIE. 
HON. WILLIAM A. GALBEAITH.— Mostly in Chicago 

real estate. President of Erie Dime Savings and 

Loan Company. 
•GEOEGE SELDEN.— Chief proprietor of the largest 

boiler and engine shop in the world. 
'Est. WILLIAM L. SCOTT, the richest man la the city. 

—Made in railroads, coal mines and real esiate in 

tile city and elsewhere. His fortune was mo7'e than 

ten millions. 
MES. WILLIAM L. SCOTT.— By inheritance from John 

F. Tracy, increased by investments in the Eock 

Island Eallroad. 
•H. P. WATSON.— Mode In the manulacturo of building 

and rooilng paper. 
CHARLES M. EEED.— Erie City real estate, inherited 

from C. M. Eeed, Ms father. 
MES. GENEEAL EEED.— Erie City real esiate, in- 
herited from C. M. Eeed. 
Est. JAMES CASEY.— Partly fi-om Ms brother John, 

who was his partner, and made by both in railroad 

contracting and building. 

FOXBUEG. 
JOSEPH M. POX.— Inheritance of oU lands. Fortune 

made in oU producing and private bauliln([. Presi- 
dent of th» PoxbuTE Bank. 
HANNAH FOX.— Inheritance of oU lands. 

FRANKLIN. 
*S. P. McCALMONT.— Law practice, coal Interests, 

etc. 

HAEEISBUEG. 

•J. DONALD CAMERON.— Partly Inherited from Simon 
Cameron. Added to by investments in real estat* 
and tn Iron manufacturing. He is president of the 
National Bank ol Mlddletown. 

•C. L. BAILEY.— Iron manufacturing. 

HENRY McCOEMICK.— By inheritance from James 
MoCormlck, the rlches.t maS In tUs section ol thi 
State, who made a fortune In law practice and real 
estate speculation. Added to by the son In iron 
mannfacturing. 

IAMBS McCOEMICK.— By Inheritance ffom James 
McCormlcIil, the riches,t man In this section of th« 
State, who made a fortune In law practice and real 



estate speculation. Added to by the son in Iron 
manufacturing. 

JACOB C. BOMBEEGEE.— Banking. 
HAZLETON. 

•Est. GEO. H. MAEKLB.— Made about $3,000,000 in 
coal mining and railroads, which he left to five 
sons and daughters. 

•CAPT. FEANK PAEDEE.— From Ms father, Ario 
Pardee, who made a very large fortune, exceed- 
ing $10,000,000, in hard and soft coal mines, iron 
mines and lumber. 

KINGSTON. 

•DANIEL EDWARDS.— Mines, store and other Invest- 
ments. 

LEWI3BUEG. 

•Est. WILLIAM GAMEEON.— Land, banMng, manu- 
facturing and investments. 

LANCASTER. 

•CHAELES B. GEUBB.— Inherited from Clement B. 
Grubb, who left $7,000,000. Made in Iron furnaces 
and part ownersMp In the famous Cornwall Iron ore 
Mils. (See Cornwall.) 

BERNARD J. McGEANN.— Made In raUroad contracts 
private banMng, etc. 

MIDDLETOWN. 

JAMES YOUNG.— Merchandising, lumber, coal, to- 
bacco, etc., and Investments. 

McKEESPOET. 

ME. KUHN (of Kuhn Bros.).— Banker and controller 
of the American Water Works and Guarantee Com- 
pany. They control thirty or forty plants. 
MAUCH CHUNK. 

'GENERAL WILLIAM LILLY.— Coal mining. 

•EDWARD B. LEISENEING.— Coal mining. 

MES. CHAELE6 H. CUMMINGS.— The only daughter 
of the late Judge Asa Packer, from whom she in- 
herited a fortune, made la raUroads, specially the 
LeMgh Valley EaUroad. 

OIL CITY. 

•M. GEARY (ol D. O'Day & M. Geary OU City Boiler 
Works).— Boiler manufacturing. 

MR. VANDEEGEIFT (of Vandergrlft, Young & Co.).— 
Oil producing. 

^\^ESLEY CHAMBERS.— Oil property and mining 
speculation. 

CrTY OF PHILADELPHIA. 
MRS. J. C. lAUDENEEID.— Inherited. 
J. B. ALTEMl'S (Coffln, Altemus & Co.).— Commis- 
sion dry goods. 
•Est. WILLIAM C. ALLISON.— Car building, mainly. 

*C. W. BEEGNER (ol the Bergner & Engel Brewing 

Co.).— Brewing and real estate. 
•Est. JOHN BOHLBN.— Brewing and real estate. 
•SAMUEL BAUGH.— Tanning and leather and railways 

In the firm of Prichett, Baugh & Co. 
•JOHN P. BETZ.— Brewing and investments. A verj 

rich man. 
*T. WISTAR BEOWN (of John Farnum & Co.).— Manu 

facturing dry goods. Treasurer of Morris, Taskei 

<fc Co., manufacturers ol iron pipes, tubes, etc 

President of the Provident Lite and Trust Company 
ALEXANDER BIDDLB.— Inlierited. Made In th( 

Pennsylvania Railroad, banldng and investments 
•JOHN T. BAILEY (of John T. Bailey & Co.).— Mad( 

In the manufacture of ropes, bags and twine. 
•Est. CIL4JRLES BAEDER (of Baeder, Adamson i 

Co.).— Manufacture of glue, curled hair, sand 

paper, etc. ; and investments. 
•OONYEES BUTTON.- Inherited. Made In the manu 

facture of knit goods and hosiery. 
ALEXANDEE BEOWN.— Banldng and Investments 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



47 



In. the firm ol Brawn Bros., having branches In 
New-York, Philadelphia and Baltunore. 

EDWIN N. BENSON (ol Benson & Townsend).— Private 
banking, stocks and Investments. 

MKS. AlyPKED G. BAKEE,— From her lather, George 
Fales. Made in dry goods commission business 
and insurance, 

*Est. CHARLES F. BEEWIND.— Coal mines and rail- 
roads. 

MES. JULIA BEADFOED.— Prom her husband, first 
president of the Philadelphia and Eeadlng Eailroad. 
She is the owner ol a large fortune. 

•MJES. MATTHEW BAIEID.— From her husband, a loco- 
motive buUder. 

Est. WILLIAM 6, BOYD.— Made a fortune in the 
grocery business. 

*JOHN H. BEOMLEY (of John Bromley & Sons, carpet 
manufacturers, and the Bromley Manufacturing 
Company, upholstery goods).— Has made a fortune 
in manufacturing. 

••JOSEPH H. BEOMLEY.— Manufacturing curtains and 
carpets in John Bromley & Sons and the Bromley 
Manufacturing Company. 

*BAEONESS VON BILDT (Sweden).— From her lather, 
J. Bloomfleld Moore. Made In manutecturlng. 

"LOUIS BERGDOLL (ol the Louis BergdoU Brewing 
Company).— Brewing aijd real estate. 

♦DANIEL EAUGH.— Originally in tanning and leather ; 
then In the manufacture of animal charcoal for 
sugar refining and kindred products, chemicals and 
glue. 

*Est. HENEY BOTTOMLEY.— Made in the manu- 
facture ol woollen goods. 

*WILLIAM B. BEMBNT.— Made a fortune ol $1,300,000 
In tool manufacturing and foundry business. While 
he lias reduced his fortune largely by gifts to his 
children, lie should probably be mentioned here. 

•COL. JOSEPH M. BENNETT.— Before and during the 
war, engaged in tlie wholesale clothing business. 
He founded the clothing store known as Tower HaU, 
now owned by another firm. He Is the owner of 
Chestnut Street Opera House and other valuable 
real estate, 

•GBOBGE W. BLABON.— Manufacturing oil cloths. 

*GEOEGB BUKNHAM (of Burnham, WlUiams &s Co.).— 
Locomotive building. 

*MES. AETHUE BEOCK.— From her father, G. Dawson 
Coleman. Has a part ownership in the famous 
Cornwall Iron-ore Mils. (See Cornwall, Penn.) 

*MES. HOEACE BEOCK.— From her father, G. Dawson 
Coleman. Has a part ownership In the famous 
Cornwall Iron-ore hills. (See Cornwall, Penn.) 

JOHN BAIED.— Marble business and investments. 

JOHN A. BEOWN, JE.— Private banking and invest- 
ments. 

Est. WILLIAM BUCKNELL.-jOrlglnally a wood carver 
and worked -with his apron untU worth $50,000. 
Th«n built gas works under contract in various 
parts ol the country and took part payment in the 
Block, which rose rapidly In value. Then in broker- 
age business in Philadelphia, and dealt In securities 
and made large purchases of unimproved real estate, 
which afterward became valuable. 



A. J. CASSATT.— Made tn railroads and the Westing- 
house brake. President ol the New- York, Phila- 
delphia' and Norfolk E. E. 

*\\t;LLIAM CRAMP (ol William Cramp & Sons).— Pariay 
Inherited. Made originally in building wooden 
vessels. Then in building and repairing Iron steam- 
ships and war vessels. In which the firm have a 
very large business and a great reputation. Their 
plant is worth many millions. 

*CHARLES H. CRAMP (ol William Cramp & Sons).- 



Partially inherited. Made originally in building 
wooden vessels, then tn building and repairing 
Iron steamships and war vessels, in which the firm 
ha;ve a very large business and a great reputation. 
Their plant Is worth many millions, 

JAY COOKE.— Banking, negotiation ol Government 
bonds during the war; railroad enterprises, and 
various Investments, including silver mines. 

HARRISON K. CANEE.— Inherited. 

*WILLIAM T. CARTER.- Coal mining; iron furnace at 
Eedington, Penn. and Investments. 

*Mrs. G. DAWSON COLEMAN.— Prom her husband. 
Has an Interest In the famous Iron ore hUls at 
Cornwall, Penn. (See Cornwall.) 

*B. DAWSON COLEMAN.— Inherited from G. Dawson 
Coleman an interest in the Cornwall iron-ore hills 
large enough to make him a millionaire. (See 
Cornwall, Penn.) 

*EDWARD COLEMAN.— Inherited from G. Dawson 
Coleman an interest tn the Cornwall Iron-ore hills 
large enough to make him a miUlonaire. (See 
Cornwall, Penn.) 

*Mlss FANNIE COLEMAN.— Inherited from G. Dawson 
Coleman an interest in the Cornwall Iron-ore hills 
large enough to make her a millionaire. (See 
Cornwall, Penn.) 

*Mlss ANNIE COLEMAN.— Inherited from G. Dawson 
Coleman an interest in the Cornwall Iron-ore hills 
large enough to make her a millionaire. (See 
Cornwall, Penn.) 

"ROBERT COLEMAN (now living in Paris).— He has 
a sixth Interest in the Cornwall iron-ore hUls. (See 
Cornwall, Penn.) 

Est. SAMUEL F. COELIES.— Partly inherited and In- 
creased by judicious investments. 

*Est. GEORGE CAMPBELL.— Manufacturing yarns. 

THEODOEE C. CAREY (of Carey Bros.).- Made In 
the manufacture of wall paper and stationery. 

G. M. COATES (of Coates Bros., merchants, and Porter 
& Coates, booksellers).— Commission wool and book- 
selling. 

LEMUEL COFFIN.— (of Coffin, Altemus & Co.).— Made 
in commission drygoods 

WILLIAM M. COATES (of Coates Bros.) .-Commission 
wool. 

*ECKLBY B. COXE.— One ol the wealthiest citizens ol 
Philadelphia. Partner in Coxe Bros. & Co., owners 
ol coal lands at Hazleton, mining plant, etc. He 
is in railroads and many other enterprises. 

•ALEXANDER B. COXE (ol Coxe Bros. & Co.).— Coal 
mines at Hazleton, Penn. 

*BRINTON COXE (ol Coxe Bros. & Co.).— Coal mines 
at Hazleton, Penn. 

*Mlss COXE (ol Coxe Bros. & Co.).— Coal mines at 
Hazleton, Penn. 

GEOEGE W. CHILDS.— Publication ol "The Public 
Ledger," Irom which he derives a very large Income. 

•Est. CALEB COPE.— Vessel-owning, freighting and in- 
vestments. 

Est. JAMES C. COOPER.— Show and circus business. 

•JOHN H. CONVERSE (Of Burnham, WiUlams &, Co.).— 
Locomotive building. 

•CHARLES I. CEAGIN.— Manufacturing soap. 

ISAAC H CLOTHIEE (ol Strawbridge & Clothier).— 
Wholly in wholesale and retaU drygoods. 

Est. COFFIN COLKETT.— Made in local city i>assenger 
roads. 

Est. HUGH CEAIG.— Made in the wholesale liCLUOr 
and merchandise brokerage business. His warehouse 
was the first freight depot of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road In Philadelphia. 

CLAJRENCE H. CLARKE.— Banking and brokerage 
business. Formerly in the firm of E. H. Clarke & 
Co., bankers. 



is 



LIBEAitY OF TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



EICHABD J. DOBBINS— Building and real estate. The 
owner ol nearly 300 houses. 

ANTHONY J. DBEXEL.— BMiMng, in the firm ol 
Drexel, Morgan & Ck)., New-Yori City, and Drexel & 
Co., Philadelphia. Has large Investments and Is a 
very large owner In the Pennsylvania Eallioad. 

ANTHOISTY J. DEEXBL, JR.— Largely by Inheritance. 
Made in banldng with the Drexels. 

mSS KATE DiEEXEL.— Inherited,; made In hanking. 
She Is now a nun. 

THOMAS DOLAN.— Manufacturing cotton and wool, In 
the firm of Thomas Dolan & Co. Has many other 
Industrial interests. 

•JOHN DOBSON (of John & James Dohson).— Manu- 
facturing carpets, blankets and woollen cloth. 

•JAMES DOBSON (of John & James Dobson).— Manu- 
facturing carpets, blankets and woollen cloth. 

•HAMILTON DIS3TON (of Henry Disston & Sons, two 
concerns).— Manufacturing saws, files and tools in 
one, and iron and steel In the other. (Keystone 
Saw, File and Tool Works.) 

♦HORACE C. DISSTON (of Henry Disston & Sons, two 
concerns).— Manufacturing saws, files and tools In 
one, and iron and steel In the other. (Keystone 
Saw, File and Tool Works.) 

Est. JAMES DUFFY.- Dealing In logs, speculating la 
stocks, army contracting, freighting, etc. 

•Est. THOMAS DRAKE.— Manufecturing and invest- 
ments. 

WILLIAM L. ELKBSrS.— OH refining, real estate, con- 
tracting, local gas and street-car franchises, and 
investments. President of the Pennsylvania Globe 
Gas Light Company and ol blie Continental Passenger 
Railway. Vice-President of the Phlladelpliiia Trac- 
tion Company. Is largely interested in street rail- 
roads in New- York Qty also. 

•Est. MICHAEL EHEET.— Distillation o£ the prod- 
ucts of coal tar. 

Est. CLAYTON FRENCH (of French, Richards <fe Co.).— 
Made a large fortune In the wholesale drug busi- 
ness, supplemented by judicious investments in real 
estate, etc. 

MAJOR CHARLES L. FLANAGAN.— Inherited $1,100,- 
OOO from a brother in Liverpool. Made in wharves, 
stevedoring and local steajn vessels. 

•EDWIN H. FITLBR (ol E. H. Fitler & Co.).— Manu- 
facturing cordage. 

WILLIAM M. FARR,— Inheritance and Investments. 

•W. W. FRAZIER.— Made in the Franlfllu Sugar Re- 
finery of which he Is treasurer. 

W M FULLER.— Exportation of cattle and heel. 

•JOHN R. FELL (of Pardee & Co.).— Coal and Iron 
mines. 

MRS. JOHN E. FELL (born Drexel).- Inherited; made 
in banking and Investments. 

Esi. ADAM FOREPAUGH.— Buying and selling horses ; 
real estate in Brooklyn and Philadelphia; show 
business. 

CLEMENT A. GRISCOM (of Peter Wright & Sons).— 
Made In steamship hues to England, and in railroads. 
PresSdent cf the International Navigation Company. 

•Est. W. E. GARRETT.— Manufacture of tobacco and 
snuir. 

•Est. HENRY C. GIBSON.— Distilling, and railroad and 
other Investments. 

ROBERT GLENDINNING.— Private banking and 
stocks. 

•CHARLES H. GRAHAM.— Made in mines. 

JOSEPH E. GILLINGHAM.— Pi-lncipaUy in real estate 
Investments, but he has otiier interests. Senior 
partner in Gillingham, Garrison & CD., Ld., saw mill 
and. lumber. President ol the ChesapeaTie and Dela- 
ware Canal Company. 



•JOHN GARDINER.- Brewing and Investments. Pres- 
ident of the Continental Brewing Company. In the 
firm ol John Gardiner & Co., seedsmen. President 
ol the Southwestern National Banli and ol the Dime 
Saving Fund and Trust Company. 

Est. DANIEL HADDOCK.— Made a large fortune In 

m^canitUe business. 
•Est. JAMES HOGKJ.— Manulaoturlng carpets. 
Est. CHARLES J. HAREAH.— Contracting and rail- 
road building In Brazil. 
•WILLIAM P. HENSZEY (Ol Bumham, Williams <fc 

<3).).— Locomotive building. 
MRS. JOSEPH HARRISON.— Inherited. Made !n 

engineering works and concessions, in Russia, In 

complany with Boss WInans. 
HENRY H. HOUSTON Made In railroads; oil; real 

esltate; transportatton, etc. 
Est. ADOLPH HELLER.— MHUnery business. 
•ALFRED C. HARRISON.— Made in the Franklin 

sugar refinery. 
•WILLIAM W. HAEEISON.— Made in the Franklin 

sugar reiinery. 
•CHAELES C. HAEEISON.— Made In the Franklin 

sugar refinery of which he is president. 
•MITCHELL HARRISON.- Made in the Franklin 

sugar refinery. 
•MRS. J. CAMPBELL HARRIS.— By Inheritance from 

Thomas H. Powers, of Powers & Welghtman. Made 

In manufacturing chemicals. 
PETER HEVENER.— Eaih-oad bridge building and 

guano, etc.. In Peru. 
•Est. WILLIAM H. HORSTMAN.— Manufacture of 

trimmings. 
Est., EiDWARD'. M. HOPKINS.— Brokerage business and 

sitO'Cks. 

Est. ISAAC JEANS.— Wholesale groceries, etc. 
••MRS. DAVID JAYNE.— From her husband, and 
made In the manufacture ol proprietary medicines. 

•EDWARD C. KNIGHT.— Importation and refining of 

sugar ; and investments in railroad bonds. 
Est. WILLIAM H. KEMBLE.— Street ralhoads and 

banking. 
Est. JOSIAH KISTERBOCK.— Manufacturer ol stoves, 

ranges, etc. He was President ol City National 

JScink. 



JOHN D. LANKENAU.— Made a fortune In bamMng 
with the DrexelE. He has given hall a million to 
the German Hospital. 

•Est. CHAELES LENNIG.— Manufacturing chemicals. 

J. BERTRAM LIPPINCOTT (ol J. B. Llpplncott <fc 
Co).— Publication ol copyrighted books and of their 
magazine; and ]ob printing. 

CEAIGE LIPPINCOTT (Of J. B. Llpplncott & Co.).— 
Publication ol copyrighted books and of their maga- 
zine; and job printing. 

HENRY C. LEA.— PubUshtng medical works, copy- 
righted. 

GEORGE T. LEWIS (Ol George T. Lewis & Sons).— 
Commission white and red lead. 

•J. DUNDAS LIPPINCOTT.— Inherited from Joshua 
Llpplncott, who made a fortune In the iron trade. 

MRS. JOSHUA LIPPINCOTT.- From her lather. James, 
Dundas. Made in the linen trade. 

•EDWAED LONGSTRETH (formerly of Baldwin Loco- 
motive Works).— Manufacturing locomotives. 

•SIRS. RICHAEiD HENRY LEE.— Prom her father, 
Oharlemagne Tower, who made a great fortune In 
lai'lroads, railroad building and mineral lands. 



Est. CHARLES MACALBSTEE.— Made In brokerage 

Ibiusiness and stocks. 
•THOMAS MACKELLAE (President ol MackeUar- 



AMEEICAiN MILLIONAIEES. 



4» 



SmltU's & Jordan. Co.).— Made In the type foundry 
business. 

MES. EDWAED DE V. MOEEELL (born Drelxel).— Pri- 
vate banMng. Inherited Irom her father, Francis 
A. Drexel. 

ANDREW M. MOORE (of Moore & Sinnott).— Whole- 
sale liquors and distllUng. President of the Teutonla 
]Flre Insurance Oompany. 

•Est. JAMES S. MASON.— Made In the manufacture of 
blacMng. 

*C. J. MILNE.— Manufacturing canned goods. 

JAMES MoMANES.— Local gas companies. 

•MES. BLOOMPIELD H. MOOEE.— From her husband, 
a partner In the Jessup & Moore Paper Company. 
Made In manjufactmlng paper. 

•Est. J. BAKLOW MOOEEHEAD.— Eallroads and 
canals, gas companies and Iron manufactnrliul- 

•Est. WILLIAM MASSEY.— BreTvtng and real estate. 

JOSEPH J. MARTIN (of Martin. Fuller & Co.)-— 
Exportation of beef and live cattle. Treasurer of 
the Quaker City Storage and Warehouse Co. 

PEANK M'LAUGHLIN.— Publishing "The Plilladel- 
phia Tunes." 

•HENEY PEATT McKEAN.— Inherited. Sugar refining 
and investments. 

♦THOMAS MCKEAN.— Inherited. Sugar refining and 
Investments. 

•THEODOEE H. MOEEIS.— Iron foundry business (war 
prices). In the firm of Morris, Wheeler & Oo. 
Also In railroads. 

•BYEON P. MOULTON (of Eeybum, Hunter & Co.).— 
Lightning rod business and various local invest- 
ments. 

•HENEY NOEEIS.— Prom his father, Richard Norrls, 
Made la locomotive building by the father; added 
to In Investments by the son. 

•JACOB NAYLOE.— Iron foundry business and Invest- 
ments. President of the Eighth National Bank. 



•Est. GENEEAL EOBEET PATTEESON.— Cotton man- 
ufacturing and investments. 
Est. WILLIAM P. POTTS.— Iron and tin merchandising. 
•J. W. PATTERSON.- Made In the manufacture of 

morocco. 
J. SERGEANT PEICE.— Inherited from Ell K. Price, a 

lawyer. HlmseU engaged In law practice, and has 

made money In real estate. Vice-President of the 

Land Title and Trust Company. 
•Est. THOMAS POTTER (of Thomas Potter, Sons &. 

Co.),— Manufacture of oilcloths. 
JAMES W. PAUL, JE.— Made In banMng with the 

Drexels. 
•Est. CHAELES T. PARRY (of the former firm of 

Bumham, Parry, WUliams & Co.).— Made In buUding 

locomotives. 
•CALVIN PARDEE.-From his father, Arlo Pardee, 

of Hazelton, Penn., who left a fortune of more 

than $10,000,000, made tn coal and Iron mines 

and lumber. 
•JOSEPH D. POTTS.— Made in Iron manufacturing. 

President of the Chester Pipe and Tube Company; 

also of the Enterprise Transit Company. 
Est. GEORGE PEPPER.— Left about $3,000,000. which 

he had Inherited and accumulated. 



•MES. THOMAS A. REILLY.— Ftom her father, Charle- 
magne Tower, who made a great fortune In rail- 
road building, raUroads, etc. I 

JACOB E. RIDGWAY.— Street railways, real estates 
and sMpplng. President of the Quaker City Na- 
tional Bank. 

GEORGE B. ROBERTS.— President of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad. Made in railroads and real esisite. Partly 
Inherited. 



FAIRMAN EODGEES.— Inherited. Made In mer- 
chandising and the Investment of accumulations. 

*W. S. EEYBUEN (of Eeybum, Hunter & Co.).-Mado 
in manufacture of lightning rods ; real estate ; street 
raUroads ; gas companies, etc. 

•PBBCrVAL EOBEETS.— Manufacturing bridge and 
architectural iron In the Pencoyd Iron Works, 
owned by A. and P. Eoberts & Co. 

ROBERT W. RYEESS.— Inherited. li)"V>ved by in- 
vestments tn real estate ; and loans. 

•Est. JOHN G. READING.— Made a StJi't In retail 
merchandising at Flemington, N. J. He then went 
Into the lumber business at WUllamspori, Penn., 
and made a large part of his fortune In the pur- 
chase and control of large tracts of coal and timber 
lands. He had a controlling Interest in the log 
boom and gas works at WUllamsport and was also 
In the Beach Creek Railroad. 

Est. CHARLES H. ROGERS.- Banking. He owned 
the Tradesman's National Bank. 



WILLIAM M. SINGERLY.— Publication of "The Phila- 
delphia Record"; added to, to some extent, by 
manufacturing newspaper for MmseU and selling 
the suriilus product of his mill to the Government 
and other buyers. President of the Chestnut Street 
National Bank and of the Chestnut Street Trust 
Company and Saving Fund Company. 

HENRY W. SHAEPLESS.— ^Vhol6sale and retaU dry- 
goods. 

MRS. THOMAS A. SCOTT.— From her husband, th» 
famous President of the Pennsylvania BaUxoad, wh(» 
built up tljat system and left a fortune of over $10, 
000,000. 

JAMES P. SCOTT.- Largely from Thomas A. Scott, his 
father. He has added to his fortune by his own 
enterprise, and has large interests In Florida. 

JUSTUS C. STRAWBRIDGE (of Srawbridge <S» 
Clothier).- Wholesale and retail dryKOods. 

Est. EDWIN SWIFT.— He left $3,360,000. 

*SETH B. STITT (of Seth B. Stltt & Co.).— Manu- 
faoturing woollen goods. 

MRS. JAMES C. SMITH (bom Drexel).— Private bMik- 
tng. 

•WILLIAM SELLERS.— Foundry business and maMng 
machinists' tools. 

•JAMBS SIMPSON (of WlUlam Smpson & Sons).— Manu- 
facturing cotton goods. President of the Eddy- 
stone Manufacturing Company. 

Est. WILLIAM L. SCHAFFEE.- Banking and invest- 
ments. 

•JOHN B. STETSON.— Has made a fortune In manu- 
facturing. President of the John B. Stetson Com- 
pany, hat manufacturers, and Interested In Erben, 
Search & Co., yarns. 

CHARLES SMITH (of Charles Smith & Sons).— Bank- 
ing and brokerage business. 

•WILLIAM SIMPSON (of William Simpson & Sons).— 
Manufacturing cotton goods. 

•JOSEPH P. SINNOTT (of Moore <fc Sinnott).— Distil- 
ling and wholesale liq.uors. 

EDWAED T. STOTESBUEY.— Private banMng with 
Drexel, Morgan & Co. 

*J. WESLEY SUPPLEE.— Flour milling and banltlng. 
President of the Corn Exchange and National Banks. 

•MES. CHAELEMAGNE TOWEE.— From her husband, 
Charlemagne Tower, a man of great energy and 
enterprise, who made a fortune of about $10,000,- 
000 in law, railroads and the purchase of coal and 
mineral lands. 

•CHARLEMAGNE TOWEE, JR.- From Ms father Char- 
lemagne Tower. Made as above described. 

•MISS HENRIETTA PAGE TOWEE.— From her father, 
Charlemagne Tower. See above. 



30 



LIBEAUY OF TRIBUNE EXTEAS. 



MKS. JOSEPH E. THEOPP.— From her father, Thomas 
A. Scott. Made in the Pennsylvania ilaUroad. 

GEOE&E C. THOMAS.— Piivate banMng with the 
Drexels. 

*GEOBGE F. TYLER.— Mining and selling coai. 

JIEANK THOMSON.-Made in raUroads, real estate In- 
vestments, etc. 

JOSEPH B. TOWNSEND.— Law and investments. 



JOHN WANAMAKER, (Postmaster General ol the 

Unltea States).— Has made a large fortune in his 

great dry goods store. 

Est. ISjUAH V. WILLIAMSON.— Merclmndlslng dry 

goods first, followed by investments in railroads, 

coal and Iron, lands and factories. He left a fortnne 

of several millions. 

iPETER A. B. WIDBNER.— Oil refining, real estate, 

gas and street car franchises, etc. President of 

the Philadelphia Traction Comi)an.v, and has large 

investments in street railroads in New- York city. 

•Est. ISAAC S. WATERMAN.— Wholesale groceries and 

operations in iron and coal. 
•JOSEPH WHARTON.— NicSel mining, manufacturing 

7ino and glass, and investments. 
•*MES. WILLIAM P. WILSTACK.— From her husband. 

iWade in saddlery and hardware. 
•WILLIAM WEIGHTMAN (of Powers & Weight- 
man).— Made a. great fortune In the manufacture 
of chemicals. Considered by many the richest man 
in Philadelpliia. 
C. B. WRIGHT.— Made in the Philadelphia and Erie 
EaUroad, and Northern Pacific Railroad. President 
of the Tacoma Land Company. 
WILLIAM G. WAEDEN.^Has made a fortame In 
refining petroleum oil. President of the Atlantic 
Refining Company, which is identical with the 
Standard Oil Compamy. President also of the 
Spring Garden Insurance Company. 
JOHN S. WOOD (of John S, Wood & Sons, hides, and 
Wood Bro's & Co., wool).— Dealing in hides and 
wool. 
•THEODORE \VEENWAG.— Made in lu^porting and dry- 
goods commission business, and Investments in real 
estate. 
"•WILLIAM WOOD.— Manufacturing cotton and woollen 
goods, and investments. President ol the Merchants' 
National Eanli. 
JOHN LCWBER WELSH.— Inherited from S. & J. 
Welsh. iSanking, trade In sugar, and investments. 
•ANDREW WHEELER.— Made in the iron foundry 
business (war prloe.s). President of Morris, Tasher 
& Co. 
•MRS. CHARLES WHEELEE.— Iron fotmdry business 

(war prices). 
JOHN WYETH (of John Wyeth <fc C').).-Wholesale and 

retail dinig business. 
•EDWARD H. WILLIAMS (of Buiunam, WUllams & 

Co.).— Locomotive building. 
JAMBS A. WRIGHT < of Peter Wright & Sons).— Deep 

sea steam shipping and ocean freighting. 
♦RICHARD D. WOOD (of R. D. Wood & Co., and 
Wood, Brown & Co.).— Iron foundry business In 
one concern, and wholesale cotton goods in the 
other. Real estate also. 
MES. EDWARD S. WILLING.-From her father, the 
late Dr. John Rhea Barton. The fortune of Dr. 
Barton was founded, in the Revolutionary i>erlod by 
merchandising and purchases of real estate, and had 
been added to since by accumulations and invest- 
ments, 
aiENRY B. WELSH.— Made In the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road and various Investments. 
•JOHN WEIGHT (of Wright Bros. & Co.).— Manu- 
facture of umbrellas, parasols and canes, and real 



estate and other investments. The firm are all 
good financiers and Interested in banks, etc. 
Est. CHRISTIAN H. WOLFPE.— Hardware business. 

PITTSBUEG. 
CHAELES AEBUTHNOT (of Arbuthnot, Stephenson 

& Co.).— Acquired In wholesale drygoods. 
•ALEXANDER BRADLEY.— Manufacturing stoves, and 
investments. President of the Tradesmen's Na- 
tional Bank. 
MES. BEEERTON.— Inherited from the O'Hara estate. 
Made in real estate whieli has come down through 
four generations. 
•HAERY OBEOWN.- River steamboats and mining and 

shipping coal, etc. 
JOSEPH CRAIG.— Made in petroleum. 
CHARILES J. CLARKE.— Inherited a smaU part of his 
fortune 25 years ago, and, has added several millions 
to It by Investments in railroad securities and real 
estate. 
•MES. THOMAS M. CARNEGIE.— From her late hus- 
band, who accumulated a fortune in manufacturing 
iron and steel, and In raUroad operations. 
Est. WILLIAM CARN.— Manufacturing and real es- 
tate. 
•Est. JAMES CALLERY.— Tanning and leather, and 

investments in railroads, etc. 
"CHARLES DONNELLY.— Coke manufacturing. In the 

McClure Coke Co. 
MRS. O'HARA DENNY.— From the O'Hara estate. 
Made In real estate which has come down through 
four generations and advanced greatly in value. 
H. D. DENNY.— From the O'Hara estate. Made ta 
real estate which has come down thi'ough four gen- 
erations and advanced greatly In value. 
MISS MATILDA DENNY.— From the O'Hara estate 
which has come down through four generations, 
and advanced greatly in value. 
*H. C. FRICK (of the H. C. Frick Coke Company).— 
Coke making, wliioh has brought Mm a very large 
fortune. He is a partner of Andrew Carnegie. 
WILLIAM FLINN.— Contracting and building. 
J. M. GTJFFY.— Made a fortune In petroleum, 
MRS. J. M. GUSKY.— Tlie sale ol clothing. 
E. M. HUKILL.— Petroleum oU. 
"REWARD HAYS.— Inherited a fortune made in coal 

mining. 
*MES. THOMAS M. HOWE.— From her husband, <x£ 
Howe, Brown & Co., manufacturers of steel. Was 
also in copper mining. 
«DE. C. G. HUSSEY.— The richest copper man in the 
United States. His fortune was made In the copper 
mines at Lake Superior. 
*H. A. LAUGHLIN (Laughlin & Co.).— Iron and steel 

manufacturing. 
'GEORGE M. LAUGHLIN (Laughlin & Co.).— Iron and 

steel manufaottiring. 
•CHARLES LOCKHART (of Lockhart & Frew, oil; aaid 
Hubbard & Co., saw manufacturers).— Petroleum oil 
and refining ; and manufacturing saws, shovels, axes, 
etc. 
CHRIS. L. MAGEE.— Newspaper, and tractiOTi roads. 
JUDGE THOMAS MELLON.— Real estate, banMng, coal 

lands, and money investments. 
THOMAS lA. MELLON.— Son of Judge Mellon. By his 
own efl!orts he has made more than a million In 
real estate, railroads, coal, lumber and buildings. 
JAMES R. MELLON.— Railroads, coal, lumber, build- 
ings, and dealing In real estate. Also a son of 
Judge Mellon. Mainly in real estate. 
ANDREW W. MELLON.— Another member of this re- 
markable and able family. Son ol Judge Mellon. 
He has made his own fortune In real estate, bank- 
ing and lumber. 
R. B. MELLON.— Son of Judge Mellon. Like his 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIEES. 



51 



toothers, he has accumulated, wealth by his own 
efforts In real estate, banldng and railroad invest- 
ments. 
W. L. MELLON.— A son of James E. Mellon. Has 
made a fortune In oil pipe-lines, real estate and 
loans. 
•Est. MICHAEL M'CtlLLOUGH.-Manufacturlng steel- 
melting crucibles, and Investments In real estate, etc. 
MES. ROBERT M'KNIGHT.— Inherited from the O'Hara 

estate. Made in rise in value of real estate. 
ROBERT PITCAIEN.— Railroads and investments. 
•G-XLBERT T. RAFFERTY.— Cote-making In the Mc- 

dure Cohe Company. 
D. P. RBIGHARD.— Petroleum and Investments. 

President of the Central Banlt. 
MRS. MARY E. SOHENLEY.— Inherited from her 
father. Captain William Croghan, real estate which 
Is now immensely vialuable, estimated, in feet, to 
be worth more than $15,000,000. She lives at 
present in London, England. 
•COLONEL J. M. SCHOONMAliER.— CoKe-maMng. He 
sold his interests to H. C. Pricli & Co., in return 
for the payment of $100,000 a year for fom^een 
years. 
MES. MARY SPRING.— Inherited from the O'Hara 
estate. Made in rise in value of real estate, which 
has come down through four generations. 
Est. WILLIAM THAW.— This enterprising man made 
a great fortune in the tinion Transportation line, 
the Pennsylvania Railroad, and leased lines west 
of Pittsburg. He left an estate of $8,000,000 to 
$10,000,000; estimated by some even higher than 
that. It was divided among the members of a large 
family, none of whom, except Mrs. Thaw, received 
a million. 
J. J. VANDBRGRIFT.— Petroleum and investments. 

President of the Keystone Eanli. 
••GEORGE W. WESTINGHOt'SE, Jr.— Made in th,e 
manufacture of the Westinghouse patented airbrakes. 
«W. DEWEES WOOD.— Manufacturing sheetlron. 
•CALVIN WELLS.— Iron manufacturing; Westinghouse 
airbrake; and "The Pliiladelplua Press," newspaper. 
POTTSVILLE. 
Est. CHARLES BABER.— Gas and water works, street 

railroads, and other local enterprises. 
•THOMAS GOOCH.— Iron furnaces and powder manu- 
facturing. 

READING. 
•HENRY' S. ECKERT— Iron malrtng (the Henry Clay 
furnace) and banldng. He is president of the 
Farmers' National Bank. 

SAINT MARY'S. 
•J. K. P. HALL (of HaU, Kaul & Co.).— The largest 
part odf his fortune is from lumber. Also in tan- 
neries, bltnmimous coal mines and banldng. 
*■ •ANDREW KAUL (of Hall, Kaul & Co.)— Made in the 
same line of business Ss his partner 
SCOTTDALE. 
•W. J. EAINEY.— Coke making. 

SCRANTON. 
"WILLIAM CONNELL.— Coal operations, banldng and 
grocery business. President of the Third National 
Bank. 
•JOHN JEEMYN.— Coal operations. 
JAMES BLAIR.— Railroads, banking, and investments. 
President of Scranton Savings Bank. 
SHIPPENSBDEG. 
Est. CHRISTIAN LONG.— He left several minions. 

STARUCCA. 
•ELISHA P. STRONG.- By Inheritance from Loring 
A. Eobertson, of New-York City. Made in tanning 
and leather. 



TIDIOUTE 

J. L. GRANDIN (of Grandtn Brotners, bankers).— Iir 
early days in petroleum ; then in loans, banking, 
large wheat farms on the Red Elver and at MayvlUe,. 
N. D., and investments ; In the Missouri Lumber and. 
Mining Company and stocks and bonds. 

E. B. GEANDIN (of Grandtn Brothers, bankers).— In 
the same business as above set forth. 

W. J. GRANDIN.— In the same business as above. 
TITUSVILLE. 

CHARLES HYDE.— Banking. In the firm of Charles 
Hyde & Son, bankers, and president of the Second 
National Bank. 

COLONEL JOHN J. CARTER.- OE producing in th& 
Bradford field ; large real estate Investments, includ- 
ing the local opera house; banking and other in- 
terests. 

E. T. ROBERTS.— Inherited from Dr. W. B. Roberts.. 
Torpedoing oU weUs ; oil producing, banldng, etc. 

JOSEPH SEEP.— Oil producing, refining and transporta- 
tion. Director in the Standard Oil Company. 

JOHN EERTIG.— Oil producing and refining, and in- 
vestments. President of the National Oil Company. 
WASHINGTON. 

Est. JOHN McKEOWN.— Oil producing and lands, and 
real estate In Boston, New-York, Baltimore, Wasii- 
ington and Cliicago. 

WILLIAMSPORT. 
•HENRY COCHRAN.— Private banldng in the firm of 
Cochran, Payne & McOormack; and lumber pro- 
ducing. 
*E. R. PAYNE.— In the lumber business. 
•GEORGE W. LENTZ (of White, Lentz & White.)— 

Lumber business. 
•JAMES V. BEOWN.— Manufacturing lumber at 
Mehoopany. 

WILKES-BARRE. 
*L. MYERS.— By inheritance of coal lands and their 

advance in price. 
•ABEAM NESBITT.— Inherited. Anthracite coal lands. 

President of the Second National Bank. 
WILLIAM L. CONYNGHAM.— Made as coal sales agent 

of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 
'JOHN WELLES HOLLENBAOK.-Eeal estate and in- 
herited coal lands. President People's Bank. 
•HON. L. D. SHOEMAKER.- Inherited coal lands. 
•DANIEL EDWARDS.— Made in mmtng coal. 
•GEORGE S. BENNETT.— Coal mines and real estate. 
•JOHN B. PHELPS.— Coal mining and real estate. 

Y'ORK. 
•Est. DAVID E. SMALL.— Lumber dealing; car build- 
ing; and investments m the Pennsylvania, the 
Denver and Rio Grande and other railroads. 
'Est. AETEMUS A^TLHELM.— Started in building fur- 
naces for the Coleman estate at Cornwall. In 
time became manager of the estate, and then made 
Investments in rolling mUls, nail mills, etc. 
EECAPirULATION. 

In protected Industries chiefly 197 

In making patent articles 6 

In cattle raising, etc 1 

Origin of the fortune unknown 8 

In noh-protected Industries 167 

Total 379 

RHODE ISLAND, 



CITY OP NEWPORT, 

GEORGE R. FEARING.- Inherited from Daniel B. 
Fearing, of New- York City, who made a fortune in 
mercantile business and large investments in real 
estate. 

MES. GEOEGE E. FEARING.— From her father, WIU- 



52 



LIBEAEY or TEIBIINE EXTRAS. 



lam E. Travers, wlio made a large fortune In Wall 
Street, 

DANIEL B. FBAEING.— From Ills fattier, Daniel B. 
Fearing, of New-York City. Made In mercantile 
business and real estate. 

H. F. FEAEING.— Made chiefly In real estate In New- 
York City. 

Est. CHEISTOPHER TOWNSEND.— Made In business 
In New-York City. 

Est. HENRY S. FEAEING.— Large real estate Interests 
in Newport. 

GEOEGB H. NORMAN.— Contracting, buUding water 
works and Investments. 

Mrs. EDWAED KING.— Inherited. Made In the China 
trade. In tea and sUi especially. 

GEORGE PEABODY WETMORE,— Inherited several 
millions from Ms father, W. S. Wetmore. Made 
originally in the China trade and added to by In- 
vestments. 

WILLIAM GAMMELL.— From Brown & Ives. Made in 
the East India trade In early times, and cotton 
mannfacturing since. 

"Mrs. WILLIAM GAMMELL.— From her father. Eohert 
Ives, of Brown <fe Ives. Made In the Bast India 
trade in early ttmes, and In real esfclte and manu- 
facturing Investments at a later period. Robert 
Ives left a fortune of over $20,000,000. 

*Mrs. JOKN CARTER BEOWN.— Inherited from the 
firm of Brown & Ives. Made In the East India 
trade, and subsequent Investment in real estate and 
manufactories. John Carter Brown left more than 
$20,000,000. 

Est. ALFRED SMITH.— Made In dealing In real estate, 
chiefly at Newport 

*LORILLARD SPENCER.— Inherited. Made In to- 
bacco manufacturing and real estate. He has 
numerous Investments ; ahd is president of the 
Illustrated American Publishing Company. 

Est. SBTH BATBMAN.— Banking. 

(For many summer residents of Newport, see list 

for New-York City.) 

PASOOAG. 

•ALBERT L. SAYLES.— Manufacturing woollen goods. 
Interested In A. L. Sayles & Co. and F. L. Sayles 
& Co., both cotton manufacturers. 

PAWTUCKET. 

DAVID GOFP (of D. Goff & Sons).— Made first In the 
manufacture of cotton wadding, the company mak- 
ing a great deal of money during the war. In 1861 
they started the manufacture of worsted braid, 
which would have been a failure except for the 
tariff of 1867. Ten years ago tliey added the mak- 
ing of mohair plushes. The tariff had nothing to 
do with the foundation of this fortune. 

*WILLIAM F. SAYLES (of W. F. and P. C. Sayles).— 
Bleaching and dyeing; and banldng. President of 
the Slater National Bank. 

*F. C. SAYLES.— Bleaching and dyeing. In partner- 
ship with WlUlam F. Sayles. 

PEACEDALE. 

*Est. ROWLAND G. HAZARD.— Made over two mill- 
ions In the manufacture of woollen goods and 
shawls ; and Investments In real estate, railroads, 
etc. 

PROVIDENCE. 

•Est. LAUEISTON HALL.— Partly made In manu- 
facturing In Providence, but largely In lands In 
Minnesota. 

**E3t. GEORGE H. COELISS.— Manufacturing the 
famous Corliss steam engine; patents. 



•WILLIAM GODDARD.— Fortune founded In the East 
India trade with Brown & Ives ; increased latterly In 
cotton manufacturing and various Investments. 
President of the Providence National Bank and tlie 
Providence Institution for Savings. The Goddard 
Brothers are agents of the Lonsdale Company. 
*T. P. I. GODDARD.— Fortune founded by Brown <b 
Ives tu the East India trade, and Increased by cot- 
ton manufacturing and Investments. The Goddard 
Brothers are agents of tiLe Lonsdale Company. 
'ROBERT GODDAED.— Fortune forwarded by Brown 
& Ives lu the East India trade, and Increased by 
cotton manufacturing and investments. The 
Goddard Brothers are agents of the Lonsdale Com- 
pany 

Est. J. B. BAENABY.— Made In the sale of clothing. 

*J. NICHOLAS BEOWN.— Fortune founded by Brown 
& Ives In the East India trade, and increased latterly 
by cotton manufacturing. 

*E. H. GAMMELL.— FortuntB founded by Brown <S> 
Ives In the East India trade, and Increased latterly 
by cotton manufacturing. 

*HAEOLD BEOWN.— Fortune founded by Brown <b 
Ives In the East India trade, and increased latterly 
by cotton manufacturing. 

•BENJAMIN B. KNIGHT (of B. B. & E. Knight).— 
Manufacture and bleaching of cotton goods. Presi- 
dent of Butchers and Drovers' Bank. 

*EOBEET KNIGHT (of B. B. & K. Knight).— Oottoii 
manufacturing and bleaching, etc. President of 
National Bank of Commerce and the People's 
Savings Bank. 

•HENEY LIPPITT (of Henry Llppltt & Co.).— Manu- 
facturing cotton and woollen goods. President of 
Ehode Island National Bank. 

•HENEY G. RUISELL.— Made In shipping and manu- 
facturing, etc. President of the Union Bank. 

•JOHN W. SLATER.— Manufacturing cotton and woollen 
goods. 

•JOSEPH BANIGAJN.— Manufacturing ruMjer goods. 

•AMOS C. BARSTOW.— Stove, furnace and general Iron 
manufacturing. President of the City National 
Bank, 

Est. CYRUS BUTLER.- Real estate and banking. 

••Est. EDMUND DAVIS.— Mamifacturing "Pain KlUer" 
and other proprietary medicines. 

•CHARLES FLETCHER.— Manufacturing woollen goods. 

•Est. DR. WILLIA3I GROSVENOE.— Manufacturing 
cotton goods. 

•EDWAED HAIM.— WooUen manufacturing. 

HENEY S. HIDDEN.— (3otton cloth dealings and bank- 
ing. 

•JESSE METCALF.— Woollen mannfacturing. Presi- 
dent of the National Bank of North America. 

•Est. HENEY J. STEEEE.— Maniifaoturlng woollens ; ' 
banks, horse raUroads, etc. Had an Interest to. the 
American Screw Company, which conducted an Im- 
mense business In the manufacture of patented gim- 
let pointed screws. 

MAESHALL WOODE.— Real estate and banking. 

WOONSOCKET. 
•Est. EDWAED HAREIS.— Made several mUllona in 
the manufacture of woollen cloth for men's cloth- 
ing. The Harris cloths were famous; and he had 
the largest woollen factory In the United iStates. 

EECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries.. .". 2S 

In manufacture of patented articles 2 

In non-protected Ifldustries 16 

Total ■..*. 46 



AMERICAN MTLLIONAIEES. 



53 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 



ABBEVILLE. 
Est. JAMES S. CALHOUN.— Largest land owner In tlie 
State. He liad 190,000 acres in alir having spent 
Ills life in accumulating land. 

CHAELESTON. 

F. J. FELZEK (of Pelzer, Eodgers & Co.).— In the cot- 
ton factor and commission business and private bank- 
ing cMefly. Has Investments In fertilizer comi>anles 
and cotton mUls. 

P. S. EODGEES (of Pelzer, Eodgers & Co.).— In tlie cot- 
ton factor and commission business and private bank- 
ing cMefly. Has Investments In fertilizer companies 
and cotton mills. 

Est. WILLIAM B. SlilTH.— The richest man In Charles- 
ton, and Indeed In the State. He died recently, 
leaving about $3,000,000. Made as a cotton factor 
amd In banldng. 

OEOEGE W. WILLIAMS.— BanMng. President Of the 
Carolina Savings Banli. 

Est. DE. ANDEEW SIMONDS.— BanMng and merchan- 
dising. Was president of the First National Bank. 

T. W. WAGENEE.— In cotton factorage, and wholesale 
groceries and liquors. 

Est. GEOEaE M. MILLEE.— Drygoods, and banla In 
New-York City, etc. 

COLUMBIA. 
HON. T. J. EGBEETSON.— 

EECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries .". .7..... 

In non-protected Industries 9 

Total 9 



JAMES LEE, JE.— Steamboats and real estate (largely 
Inherited). 

MES. E. B. SNOWDEN.— Inherited real estate. Includ- 
ing a hotel. 

NASHVILLE. 
*S. M. MURPHY.— Manufacture and sale of whiskey 

in Cincinnati, Ohio. 
COLONEL E. W. COLR— Deals in railroad shares. 

having been connected with raUroads all Ms lite. 
•DE. WILLIAM MOEEOW (of Cherry, Morrow & 

Co,).— Made In mining and leasing of labor from 

the Tennessee State prisons. 

EECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries ; ;;.. 3 

In non-protected Industries 14 

Total ...; - 17 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 



There are no millionaires In South Dakota. 



TENNESSEE. 



CEDAE HILL. 

COLONEL GEOEGE A. WASHINGTON.— One-half by 
Inheritance from his father, and the rest by purchase 
and sale of gold and stocks after the war. 
GEAHAM'S STATION. 

SAMUEL L. GEAHAM.— Warehousing, flour mUling and 
general merchandising. 

KNOXVILLE. 

EDWAED J. SANFOED.— Merchandising first, then In 
Southern raUroads. He Is largely Interested In all 
the enterprises about KnoxvlUe, and Is president of 
the KnoxvUle and Ohio EaUroad. 
MEMPHIS. 

JOHN T. FAEGASON.— Wholesale groceries and cotton 
factorage business. 

J. C. NEELEY (of Brooks, Neeley <fc Co.).— Wholesale 
groceries and cotton factorage business. 

D. P. POETEE (of Porter, Porter & Macrae).— Whole- 
sale groceries, banldng and cotton factorage business. 

ANDEEW GWYNNE (of Stewart, Gwynne & Co.).— 
Wholesale groceries and cotton factorage business. 

W. D. BBTHELL.— Made In Inherited real estate and 
Investments. 

JfAPOLEON HILL (of HUl, Fontaine & Co.).— Whole- 
sale groceries and cotton factorage business. 

•ENOCH ENSLEY.— Made In iron mines. 

JOHN OVEETON.— Inherited real estate which lias ad- 
vanced In value. 

THOMAS BAEEETT.— Speculation In stocks and cotton 
futures. 



TEXAS. 



CITY OF AUSTIN. 
••MAJOE GEOEGE W. LITTLEPIELD.— First In law 

practice; then In merchandising: and finally In 

cattle raising. In which he made the bulk of his 

fortune. President of the American National 

Bank. 
•COLONEL L. A. ELLIS.— Made In sugar and cotton 

plantations, and leastng labor from the State nen- 

Itentlarles. 

BONHAM. 
••Est. THOMAS C. BEAN.— Land, and stock raising. 

He had between 80,000 and 100,000 acres of land. 

COLUMBUS. 

••Est. E. R STAPFOED.— Private banMng; stock rais- 
ing; and lamls. 

DALLAS. 

MES. S. H. COCERELL.— Else In the value of real 
estate, which was bought when Dallas was a ham- 
let. She Is the largest taxnayer in the city. 

••JAMES C. O'CONNOE.— Cattle raising; banking; 
large Investments in real estate; and local gas 
company. President of the City National Bank. 

WILLIAM H. GASTON.— Banking and real estate. 
He was an early settler, and Ms real estate has 
Increased In value with the growth of the city. 

••JOHN A. SIMPSON.— Cattle raising and banMng. 

T. L. MAESALIS.— Real estate and wholesale groceries. 
He Is the founder of Oak Cllft. 

•*C. C. SLAUGHTEE.— Cattle raising and banMng. 

•*J. B. WILSON.— Cattle raising and banMng. 

•*W. B. HUGHES.— He is a lawyer; but has made his 
fortune in cattle raising, ranches and real estate. 

ALEXANDER SANGEE (of Sanger Brothers).— 
Wholesale and retail drygoods. 

PHILIP SANGEE (Of Sanger Brothers).— 
Wholesale and retail drygoods. 
DENISON. 

W. B. MUNBON.— Made In the purchase of Texas and 

other Western lands; and railroad development. 

POET WORTH. 

••JOHN E. HOXIE.— Made In banMng and cattle 
raising largely. Has Investments amounting to 
several millions In CUcago cable raUroads : and In 
lands, cattle, local electric Ught and gas com- 
panies, and banking. President of the Farmers 
and Mechanics' National Bank. 

ROBERT E. MADDOX.— Trading In mules first; then 
real estate, stoclifarms, etc. 

MES. SALLIE HUFFMAN.— Infierited from her hus- 
band, Walter A. Huffman, and from her brother. 
Made In real estate, street raUroads and stocks. 
She owns "The Fort Worth Gazette," and has re- 



54 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



maritable 'business talent, devotlne her time ably 
to her business Interests. 

GALVESTON. 

R. S. WILLIS.— Made In tlie cotton factorage business. 
Also In drygoofls, groceries, etc., and banting. 
President ol the Texas Banlting and Insurance Com- 
pany. 

LEON BLUM.— Importing and dealing In drygoods'; 
cotton, and real estate. 

SYLVAIN BLUM.— Made 1ti mercantile business and 
Investments. 

J. H. HUTCHINGS (of Ball, HutcMngs & Co.).— C!otton 
speculation dnrlnf; the war ; banldns, and real estate. 

MES. GEORGE BALL.— Inherited from Ball, Hutohlngs 
& Co. Cotton speculation during Uie war: real 
estate, antl banltlng. 

H. KEMPNER.— Cotton and commission business, and 
Investments. President of the Islaiid City Savings 
Banlr. 

J. HENRY ROSENBERG.— Private banlting, drygoods 
and real estate. 

J. M. BURROUGHS.— Law practice, and speculation In 
wharf stoolt and United Slates bonds. 

JAMES M. BROWN.— Made In the sale of hardware. 

JOHN CHARLES LHAGUB.— Merchandising, etc. 

J. L. DARRAGH.— Speculation In wharf stock and real 
estate. 

MRS. J. L. DARRAGH.— Real estate and baiildng. 

WALTER GRESHAM.— Speculation in real estate and 
railroads. 

MRS. JOHN SEALY.— Inherited from Ball, Hutch- 
In gs & Co. Made in cotton speculation during tlie 
war; real estate and banlilng. 

MES. ISADORE DYER.— Real estate and banWng. 

MRS. ISABELLA EAPPBRL.— Real estate and bahldng. 

W. L. MOODY (of W. L. Moody & Co.).— Private banlt- 
ing and Investments. 

GEORGE SEALY.— Made in banMng in the firm of 
Ball, Hutchlngs & Co. 

HOUSTON. 

T. W. HOUSE.— Private banMng, speculation In cot- 
ton, etc. 

B. A. SHEPHERD.— Merchandising and banMng. 
President of the First National Bant. 

•*H. B. SANBORN.— Merchandising, cattle-ralslrig and 

real estate. I j' ; ' 

LAREDO. 

**Est. GEORGE W. MORTON.— Large ranches and 
cattle business. 

SAN ANTONIO. 

GEORGE W. BRACKENUIDGE.— Richest man In Sin 
Antonio. Has made several millions In cotton 
speculation, real estate and banWng. Owns the 
local waterworks. President of the San Antonio 
National Bank. 

H. D. ADAMS.— Made in army contracts for trans- 
portation during the war; and real estate. 

E. D. E. WICKES.— Army sutler during the war, and 
real estate. 

RICHARD WOOLLEY, Jr.— Merchandising. 

MRS. ELEANOR STEIBLING.— Inherited. Made In 
merchandising and real estate. 

HERMAN D. KAMPMANN.— Inherited from Ms father, 
who was a contractor and had a sash and blind 
factory. , 

SAMUEL MAVERICK.— BanMng and real estate. 
President of Maverick Bank and Ssife Deposit Com- 
pany. 

ALBERT MAVERICK.— Real estate. 

WILLIAM MAVERICK.— Made In rise In real estate, 

JAY E. ADAMS.— Real-estate Investments. 

MRS. E. H. TERRILL.— Inherited from the Mavericks. 
Made In real estate. 



**MES. KING.— The "cattle queen of Texas." From 
her husband, who had one of the largest cattle 
ranches in Texas. 
M. KENNEDY.— Steamboats on the Rio Grande: 
DR. F. HEEFF, Sr.— Inheiltance and local real estate. 

SAN DIEGO. 

**N. G. COLLINS.— Made In cattle-raising chiefly. 
'*F. K. RIDDER.— Stock-raising. 

WACO. 
WILLIAM CAMERON.— Mostly made In the retaU lum- 
ber business, and rebates from railroads. Increased 
by rnvestments. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries ." 1 

In cattle raising, etc 14 

In non-protected Industries 4* 

Total 57 

UTAH. 



CITY OF OGDEN. 

•D. H. PEERY.— MilUng, manufacturing and banMng. 
President of the First National Bank and the 
Ogden Savings Bank. 

•DAVID ECCLES.— SawmUls and lumber. 

**J. C. ARMSTRONG.— Cattle raising, real estate, and 
banking. President of the Commercial National 
Bank. 

JOHN 6. LEWIS.— Made In the Jewelry business and 
real estate. 

W. G. CHILD.— General contracting and real estate. 

•BARNARD WHITE.— Sawmills and lumber, and mer- 
chandising. 

WARREN W. COREY.— Railroad contracting, and In- 
vestments. President of the Citizens' Bank. 

FREDERICK J. KIESBL.— Wholesale groceries and 
liquors and real estate. 

SALT LAKE CITY. 

Est. BEIGHAM YOUNG.— Made by the apostle of the 
Mormons, largely. In real estate. 

R. C. CHAMBERS.— Mines of precious metals. 

L. E. HOLDEN.— Mines of precious metals. 

JOSEPH R. WALKER.- Merchandising, mining and 
banking. President of the Union National Bank. 

JOHN SHARP.— Railroads and banMng. President of 
the Deseret National Bank, and the Deseret Sav- 
ings Bank. 

"TV. e. McCORNICK.— Private banking and cattle 
raising. 

MATTHEW H. WALKER.— Merchandising and bank- 
ing. 

JOHN Q. PACKARD.— Made in mining. 
RECAPITULATION. 

In protected Industries 3 

In cattle raising, etc., 3 

In non-protected Industries 11 

Total IS 

VEEMONT. 



CITY OF BRATTLEBOBO. 

•JULIUS J. ESTEY (Estey Organ Co.)— Manufacturing 
cabinet organs; real estate, and Investments. Presi- 
dent of the People's National Bank. Director tu 
the Estey Piano Company. 

•LEVI K. FULLER (Estey Organ Co.).— Manufacturing 
cabinet organs. Director In tlie Estey Piano Com- 
pany. 

BURLINGTON. 

•J. E. BOOTH.— SawmlUs and lumber. 



AMBEICAN inLLIONAIEES. 



53 



LYNDONVILLE. 
Est. SUMNER S. THOMPSON.-Eallroads in Canada 
and tlie West. 

MONTPELIEE. 
•JAMES E. LANGDON.— Flour milling flr-t; then rail- 
roads, a slate quarry at Falrhaven, and bauMng. 
President ol the Montpeller National Bank. 
RUTLAND. 
HUGH H. BAXTER.— Inherited from his father, Gen- 
eral H. H. Baxter, of New-York City. Made in 
railroad building and stooiis. 
•CHARLES CLEMBiNT.— Marble quarrying and rail- 
roads. President of the Clement National Bank and 
of the Rutland Trust Company. 
•P. W. CLEMENT.— Marble quarrying, railroads and 

banking. 
JOHN \V. CRAMTON.— Investments of many kinds. 
Is president of the Baxter National Bank and part 
owner In a hotel, a, grocery store and a stove 
and tinware store. 

ST. ALBANS. 
Est. JOHN GREGORY SMITH.— Made in railroads. 
President of the Vermont Central nearly forty 
years. Also president of the Velden National 
Bank. 

ST. JOHNSBURY. 
••COLONEL FRANKLIN FAIRBANKS (of E. & T. Fair- 
banks & Co.)— Made in the nlanufacture of patented 
scales. President of the First National Bank. 
•'HENRY FAIRBANKS (of concern above named).— 
Manufacturing scales. 

WOODSTOCK. 
Est. of FREDERICK BILLINGS (estimated at over 
$5,000,000).— Law practice lu California with Gen- 
eral HaUeck and Trenor W. Park ; then In Mariposa 
Mine, and then in Northern Pacific and other rail- 
roads. He was president of the Woodstock National 
Banlc. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protefcted industries 6 

In the manufacture of patented articles 2 

In non-protected industries 5 

Total 13 

VIRGINIA. 



FREDERICK E. SCOTT.— Dealing In grain; banking 

a-^d stock speculation. He is president of the 

Richmond and Petersburg Railroad. 
•JOSEPH R. ANDERSON.— Iron manufacturing. He 

Is president of the Tredegar Iron Worlis. 
•Est. JAMEiS THOMAS.— Manufacturing tobacco. 
Est. JOHN STEWART.— Speculations in cotton and 

leaf tobacco. 
Est. DANIEL K. STEWART.— Speculations in cotton 

and leaf tobacco. 
•JAMES B. PACE.— Made In tile manufacture of plug 

tobacco mainly, added to by speculatloa In rail- 
road stocks and W banking. President of the 

Planters' National Bank. 
•CHARLES E. WHITLOCK.— Manufacturing tobacco 

boxes and dealing in sycamore lumber. 
JOHN P. BRANCH.— Dealing in grain, speculation In 

stocks, and banking. President of the Merdiants' 

National Bank. 
•P. H. MAYO (President of P. H. Mayo & Brother).— 

Made in manufacturing plug tobacco. 
Est. WILLIAM GRAY.— Dealing in tobacco. 
•D. M. LEA.— Manufacturing tobacco bo.xes, 

ROANOKE CITY. 
•PEYTON L. TERRY.— Tobacco grower and speculator. 

President of Roanoke Trust, Loan and Safe Deposit 

Company. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protected industries 11 

In non-protected Industries lii 

Total 23 



BLAND COURTHOUSE. 
•HARMON NEWBERRY.— Tobacco growing and specu- 
lation. 

ELK GARDEN. 
S. A. HANCOCK.— Manufacturing and real estate. 

GLOUCESTER. 
ROBERT C. SELDEN.— Real estate cUefly. 

LYNCHBURG. 
•JOHN D. LANGHORNE.— Tobacco growing and specii- 
latlon. 

NORFOLK. 
RICHARD DICKERSON.— Real estate and other In- 
vestments. 

PETERSBURG. 
•WILLIAM CAMERON.— Tobacco Manufacturing and 
exporting. 

RICHMOND. 
THOMAS M. LOGAN.— Law, and building, and man- 
agement of railroads. Is an officer in many 
Southern roads. 
JAMBS H. DOOLEY.— Law, and building, and man- 
agement of railroads. Is an officer in many 
Southern roads. 
•LEWIS GINTER (of Allen &■ GInter).— The richest man 
In Richmond. Has made several millions in the 
manufacture of cigarettes. 
JOHN C. SHAETJR.— Merchant tailor and real estate. 
EDWAED T. CANNON.— Real estate and law. 



AVASHINGTON. 



CITY OF SEATTLE. 

ARTHUR A. DENNY.— Richest man in the State. One 
of Seattle's oldest settlers. His fortune comes 
from rise In real estate. 

D. T. DENNY.— Real estate chiefly. He Is an old 
settler. 

•WILLIAM REUTON.— Sawmills, fir, .timber lands, 
real estate and vessels. 

•CYRUS WALKER.— SawmUls and lumber, flr, timber 
lands and vessels. 

H. L. YESLER.— The founder of Seattle. Made in 
real estate. 

BAILEY GATZERT (of Schwabacker <fc Co.)— Whole- 
sale groceries and hardware. He is the leading 
merchant of the State. President of the Puget 
Sound National Bank and the People's Savings Bank. 

Est. W. C. HILL.— Real estate. 

WATSON C. SQUIRE.— Made in rise in value of real 
estate. 

MRS. MARY M. MILLER.— The richest woman In the 
State. Made in rise In value of lands and bank 
stock. 

THOMAS BURKE.— Real estate and ralh-oads. 

L3I1GH S. J. HUNT.— Real estate, newspaper, street 
railroads, etc. President of the Guarantee Loan 
and Trust Company. 

JACOB FURTH.— Real estate and bank stock. He is 
Interested In three of the largest banks at the city. 
SPOKANE FALLS. 

Est. E. J. BRICKBIL.— Real estate ; local waterworks ; 
Traders' National Bank; and mines. He left over 
$650,000 in securities alone. 

FRANK E. MOORE.— Silver mlnins and real estate. 

J. J. BROWNE.— Real estate and banMng (Browne's 
National Bank). 

A. M. CANNON.— Real estate, banking and railroads. 
President of Bank of Spokane Falls, and of Spo- 
kane Falls Loan. Trnst and Savings Bank. 



56 



lilBEAUY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



JAMES N. GLOVER.— Real estate and banMng. Presi- 
dent of the First National Bank. 

X. W. FORREST.— Made In real eslaite ^nd banldng. 
TACOMA. 

ALLEN C. MASON.— Real estate and Mndred invest- 
ments. 

NELSON BENNETT.— Railroads, hctel, real estate, 
and Investments In various enterprises. 

WALTER J. THOMPSON.— Real estate and banldng. 
President of tlie Merchants' National Bant. 

HENRY HEWITT, JR.^Seveual times a mimonalre. 
His fortune has been made entirely in the ■wonderful 
itlmber lands of that couuitry, otf which class of prop- 
o.rty he Is one of the largest ownere In the United 
States. 

W. H. FIFE.- Made In the rise In valu« of real estate 
In Tacoma. He owns a hotel among other parcels 
of real estate. 

CHESTER THORNE.— Inherited from his father. 

OHAUNCEY W. GRIGGS.— Made In real estate, mer- 
ciliaadlising and banking. President ot the St. Paul 
and Tacoma Lumiber Company. 

WALLA WALLA. 

MILES 0. MOORE.— Railroads, real estate and, banMng. 

JOHN F. BOYEB (of Baker & Boyes).— BanMng, rail- 
roads, lands, etc. 

RECAPITtTLATION. 

In protected industries 3 

In non-protected Industries 25 

Total ; 27 

Wy.'iT VIRGINIA. 



therefrom, and banMng. President of the CUppewa 
Valley Bank. 
■'WILLIAM A. RUST.— Partly by inheritance. The 
rest in the lumber business, mercliapdislng and bank- 
ing. President ol the Bank of Eau Claire. 
*ORRIN H. INGRAM.— Sawmills, pine lands and lum- 
ber, and banMng. President of the Empire Lumber 
Company and the Eau Claire National Bank. 
*J. A. SCHONWEILER.-Sawmllls, pine lands and lum- 
ber. Owner of the Northwestern Lumber Company. 
Est. SIGMUND A. QUAIE.— Dealing In unimproved 
lands. He bought a large quantity of the land of 
the West Wisconsin (now Chicago, St. Paul, Minne- 
apolis and Omaha) Railroad, in certain counties, pay- 
ing for It with his paper, secured by mortgage, and 
sold the land at an advance to Scandinavian settlers. 
He then bought the Gaslin farm, near Miilne"apolis, 
which soon became Immensely valuable. He after- 
ward bought State pine and hardwood lands In north 
Wisconsin, wMch rose in value; and had real estate 
In Chicago and elsewhere. 

FOND DU LAC. 

*J. T. BOYLE.- Part owner In the Northwestern Yeast 

Company and manufacturer of Y'east Foam. His 

fortune has been partly made, ho^wever, in outside 

investments in real estate and securities. 

'WOODMAN C. HAMILTON (of Hamilton, Merriman & 

Co.)— Sawmills at Marinette and lumber. 
•ANDREW C. MERRIMAN (of Hamilton, Merriman & 
Co.).— Sawmills and lumber. 

LA CROSSE. 
JASON C. EASTON.— Made in loans to farmers ; stock 
of the Southern Minnesota Railroad, and other securl- 

ties. 

PAEKERSBURG. CHARLES, L. COLMAN.— Made In the purchase of lo^w- 

j^Oj^— JOHNSON N. CAMDEN.— Has made a large priced pine lands and sale of timber therefrom. 

fortune in oil producing and refining In the &1DEON C. HIXON.— Pine lands and sale of logs, and 
Standard OH Company, but is also extensively in- banMng. Presiuent of the La Crosse National Bank. 

terested in West Virginia Railroads, and real estate *JOHN PAUL (of the John Paul Lumber Company).— 
speculation and banMng. President of the First Made in lumbering, puie lands and merchandising 

National Bank. He is cei'fcainly worth $2,500,000. drygoods. 

'PIEDMONT CAPTAIN PEYTON S. DAVIDSON.-Made a fortune In 

♦HENRY G. DAVIS.-Eanldng, coal mining, raUroads, '^,^1^^/^*'"^ ^'^*' ^°*^ ^'^'^ '^'"'* ^^° ^^^ ^"'°^^'" 

etc. President of the Bank of Piedmont. , „™„®1^^ t, „ ^ . ,,,..,,., 

ABNBR GILE.— Made In sale of timber from pine lands, 

WHEELING. bought when the price was low. 

*J. NELSON VANCE.— Jlanulaoturing iron and real iwA-nTonw 

estate. President of the Exchange Bank. twriTTinTx. tt-tt ao r^ , *■' . , 

JOSEPH W. PAXTON.-'\\nieellng and CWcago real WILLIAM P. VILAS.-Speoulations In pine lands and 

agtate. lumber business. He Is United States Senator from 

*Est. MICHAEL RBILLY.— Wholesale groceries and Wisconsin. 

distiUing. MARINETTE. 

RECAPITULATION. *Est. A. C. BROWN.— Iron mining and lumber business. 

In protected Industries '....3 'ISAAC STEPHENSON.— Made in production of lumber 

111 non-protected Industries 2 and Investments. President of the Stephenson Na- 

Total : Zi tlonalBank. 

^ MENOMINEE. 

A. TAINTER (of Tainter & Son).— Private banking and 

Investments. 

MILWAUKEE. 

'CAPTAIN FRED PABST (of the Pabst Brewing Com- 
pany).— Has made a large fortune in brewing. They 
have the largest lager beer brewery In the world. 

•VALENTINE BLATZ (president of the Valentine Blatz 
Brewing Company).— Bre^wlng and real estate. Presi- 
dent of the Second Ward Savings Bank. 

•AUGUST U1HLEIN.-Made in the Joseph Schlltz Brew- 
ing Company. 

•HENRY TilHLElN.— Made In the Joseph Schlltz Brew- 
ing Company. 

•ALFRED riHLElN.— Made In the Joseph Schlltz Brew- 
ing Company. 

'JOHN H. VAN DYKE.— Law, real estate Investments 
and mines. , , : 1 1 



WI^GOXSIN. 



CITY OF ASHLAND. 
•MRS. E. VAUGHN MACKINNON.— Mining and real 

estate. 
THOMAS BAEDEN.— BanMng and real estate. Presi- 
dent of the Ashland National Bank. 
•CAPTAIN JOHN McKAY.— From tlie Colby iron mine 
and sale of ore on royalty. 

CHIPPEWA FALLS. 
W. E. McCORD.— Pine lands and sale of logs therefrom. 

EAU CLAIRE. 
'WILLIAM CARSON (of Carson & Rand, and president 
of the Valley Lumber Company).— Sa-wmlUs and 
lumber. 
HENRY C. PUTNAM.— Pine lands and sale of logs 



AMBEICAJSr MTLLIONAIEES. 



57 



'GEOEGE HILE6.— Pine lands, sawmills, lumber and 

railroads. 
"CHAELES T. BRADLEY (of Bradley & Mctcalt).— Man- 
nfaeturtng boots and shoes. President oi the Mil- 
waukee National Bank ol Wisconsin. 
•VV. H. METCALF (at Bradley & Metcalf).— Manufactur- 
ing boots and shoes. 
MES. W. H. METCALF.— Inherited from Eastern rela- 
tives, engaged in the sUlpplng business, 
JOHN L. MITCHELL.— Inherited from hii father, Alei- 
ander Mitchell. Made In banlung. President of the 
Wisconsin Marine and Fire Insurance Company 
Bank, the oldest bank in tile West. 
»MES. GUIDO PFISTBE.— From her husband, a member 
of the Pfister & Vogel Leather Co. Made in tannins 
and leather. 
*MRS. 0. P. PILLSBUEY.— From iior husband. Made 

in pine lands and lumber. 
Est. JOHN PLANKINTON.— Packing, speculation, hotel 

property and Plauklnton bank. 
ANGUS SMITH.— Elevators, real estate and mining. 
"HAEEISON LUDlNGTON (of Ludlngton, Wells & Van 

Schaiok).— Sawmills, pine lands and lumber. 
*DAVII> WELLS, Jr.— SawmlUs and lumber. 
EPHRAI'M MAEINEE.— Law practice, large lnve.it- 

mente in real estate, pine lands and railroads. 
*W. H. BEADLEY (of Bradley Bros.)— Made In lumber- 

ir?. 
*EDWAED BEADLEY (of Bradley Bros.)— Made in 

lumbering. 
*,T. W. BEADLEY (of Bradley Bros.)- Made In lumber- 
ing. 
"MES. EMIL SCHANDEIN.— Inherited fi'om her hus- 
band, who was a partner in the Phillip Best Brew- 
li.g Co. Made in brewing. 
■*D. M. BENJAMIN,- Pine lands and lumber. 
Est. S. S. MEKEILL.— Inlierited from her husband,. 

Made in railroads and i-eal estate. 
Est. E. H. BRODHBAD.— Eallroads, banking and real 

estate. 
ALBERT CONEC— Contraoling and Investments. 
EGBERT ELIOT.— Grain commission business, real 

estate, etc. 
*Est. GEOEGE BUENHAM.— Brick making, real estate. 

etc. 

HERMAN G. SCHMIDT.— A newcomer In Milwaukee. 

Made a large fortune in the nitrate beds of Chill. 

NEENAH. 

"HENRY SHERRY.- Pine lands, logs and lumber. 

•HAVILAH BABCOCK.— Manufacturing paper in the 

firm of Kimberly, Clark & Co. 
•J. S. KIMBEELY (of Kimberly, Clark & Co.)— Paper 

manufacturing. 
*Est. C. B. CLARK (of Kimberly, Clark & Co.)— Paper 
maimfactiu'ing. 

OSHKOSH. 
HON. PHILETUS SAWYEE.— Pine lands, logs, bank- 
ing and railroad speculation. 
EDGAR P. SAWYEE.— Pine lands, logs, banking and 

railroad speculation. 
GILBERT W. ROE.— Pine and land speculations and 
investments. President of the Cjmmerolal Bank. 
EACINE. 
•Est. JEEOME I. CASE.— Made In the manufacture of 
thresMng machines, etc., and investments. Presi- 
dent of the Manufacturers' National Bank. Also 
President of the Granite National Bank, Monrovia, 
Colo. 
*M. B. ERSKINE.— Manufacturing threslilng machines. 
•L. S. BLAKE.— ManufactiiTing fanning mUls and real 

estate. 
"MRS. R. H. BAKER.— From her Busbaud, Robert Baker. 
■Manufacturing thresulng machines and speculation. 



*0. R. JOHNSON.— Lumber, lake shipping and bank- 
ing. President of Union National Bank. 
WATTSAU. 
•ALEXANDER STEWART.— Lumbering and pine lands. 
•DANIEL L. PLUMMER.— Mining, lumber and president 
of the First National Bank. 

WAUKESHA. 
MORRIS D. CUTLER.— The first white settler of 
Waukesha. Made in rise in value of real estate. 
WHITEWATER. 
O. P. POSEY.— Money made in silver mining at Silver- 
ton, Colo. 

EECAPITUI A TION. 

In protected Industries 43 

In non-pr3tected industries 25 

Total 68 

WYOMING. 



CITY OF CHEYENNE. 
Est. A. E. CONTEIESE.— Cattle and banldng. 

RECAl>ITULATION. 
In catfe-raislng, etc 



Total 



NEW-TOBK CITY. 



WILLIAM WALDORF ASTOR.— Inherited througli 
Intermediate generations from John Jacob Astor, tlie 
great fur mercliant, wlio Invested his aocumnlatiom 
in real estate in New-York City. The family have 
continued to buy and improve real estate, which lia« 
increased enormously in value ; and Mr. ,i^stor now 
owns many hundred houses, several hotels, and • 
large quantity of business property. He is director 
in the United States Trust Company, Delawaiia, 
Ijaoliawanna and Western Railroad, Illinois Central 
Railway, New- York Life Insurance and Trust Comr 
pany, Gallatin National Bank, and has other kindred 
in vestments. 
JOHN JACOB ASTOR.— Inherited, as above, throng 

intermediate generations from John Jacob Astor. 
MRS. WILLIAM ASTOR.— From her late husband. 
William Astor, and made originally as explained 
abOTe. 
HERMAN O. AEMOUE (of H. O. Armour & Co., New- 
York City, and Armour Bros., Chicago).— Made In 
packing, provisions and commission business. Di- 
rector In the American Pig Iron Storage Warrant 
Company. He has numerous otlier Investments. 
•WALLACE C. ANDREWS.— Started In mining coal 
in Ohio with his brother, now of Youngstown, Ohio. 
They formed and floated several coal and railroad 
companies, and were Interested in a large deal for 
the sale of coal lands to the Hocking Valley EaJl- 
roa^l. Later engaged in large local enterprises In 
New- York City. President of the New- York Steam 
Company, and ex-president of Standard Gas Light 
Company. Director In the New- York Ice Company, 
Southern Natural Gas atKi Oil Company, National 
Bank of the Republic, National Iron Fence Company, 
Electric Secret Service Company, Hudson River Stone 
Supply Company, New- York Lumber and Wood Work- 
ing Company, etc., etc. 
FRANKLIN ACKER (of Acker. MerraU <fc Condlt).— 
Made in the wholesale grocery business. Partly 
Inherited from his father, David D. Acker. 
Est. CHARLES L. ACKEE (Of Acker, MerraU <fc Con- 
dlt).— Wholesale grocery business. 
BENJAMIN ALTMAN (of B. Altman & Co.)— Made in 
retail drygoods. Is in Garfield Sate Deposit Com- 
pany, and has ather Interests. 



58 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



GUSTAV AJVISINCK (of Gustav Amsincfc & Ck).).— Pri- 
vate hanlilng and Importation of rubber and South 
American products. Director in the Bank ol New- 
Ybrk, Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company, etc.,etc. 
•COUNTESS I>I AGREDA.— iYom George L. Lorlllaa'd, 
her first husband, whose fortune was made in to- 
bacco manufacturing. 
Est. WILLIAM ARNOLD (of Arnold, Constable <fc Co.).— 
Impoi ting 'and selling drygoods, with Investments in 
real estate. 
HICKS ARNOLD (of Arnold, Constable & Co.)— Im- 
porting and selling drygoods, with investments in 
real estate. Director in Bank ol tile Metropoliii, 
etc. 
JUAN APARICIO.— Coffee raising in Venezuela and 

importing oolfee to the United States. 
Est. 'WILLIAM AUSTIN.— Made in merchafldising 

linens. 
JOHN D. ARCHBOLD.— Production, refining and 
transportation of petroleum oil. Has numerous 
investments. Director In the Standard Oil Com- 
pany. 
OLIVER H. P. ARCHER.— Made in railroads and in 
express and f relghtln g ; and rise In value of rea 1 
estate, of whlcli he is now a very large owner. 
JOHN E. ALEXANDRE.- Inherited from his lather, 
P. Alexandre. Made in sailing ships aind steam 
vessels In the Mexican and West India trade. 
Director in the Mexican Telegraph Company. 
JOSEPH J. ALEXANDRE.— Inherited from Ms father, 

F. Alexandre. 
J. HENRY ALEXANDRE.— Inherited from F. Alex- 

andre,, his father. 
"MRS. JOSEPHINE S. AYER.— From her hus- 
band, James C. Ayer. Made in manufacturing 
proprietary medicines in Lowell, Mass., and large 
investments in real estate in Boston, New-York 
City and Chicago. He left a great fortume. 
•♦FREDERICK F. AYER.— Inherited froin James C. 

Ayer. 
••HENRY S. AYER.— Inherited from James C. Ayer. 
MRS. GEORGE P. ANDREWS (a daughter of Com- 
modore Garrison).— Inherited a fortune made In 
railroads and steam shipping. 
Est. MRS. RICHARD K. ANTHONY.— Inherited from 
her brother, John B. Dash. Made in merchandising 
and real estate. 
MRS. RICHARD T. AUCHMUTY.— From Peter Scherm- 
erhom, who had an old ropewalk in what Is now 
Schermerhom-st. In Brooklyn, and who had a great 
deal of real estate in New- York and Brooldyn (In- 
cluding wlmt is now Greenwood Cemetery). Also 
from Edmund H. Schermerhorn. Made in advance 
in value of real estate. 
6ARAH E. APPLEBY.— Made in real estate. 
•Est. JAMES ALEXANDER.— Tobacco manufacturing 

and real egtate. 
•JOHN CHARLES ANDERSON.— Inherited from John 
Anderson, who made a, fortune of $8,000,000 in 
tobacco manufacturing, use of lead foil to wrap 
tobacco, and large investments In real estate. 
Mrs. ELIZABETH W. ALDRICH.— From her husband, 
Herman D. Aldiloh, who made a fortune In the dry- 
goods business, and large Investments in now 
valuable real estate. 
MATTHIAS H. ARNOT.— Inherited from his father, 
John Arnot, of Elmira, N. Y. Made in banking and 
investments. 
CONSTANT A. ANDREWS.— Partly inherited from His 
father, a leather merchant, but added to in crlvate 
banking in thie firm of Constant A. Andrews & Co., 
and in coking coal land investments. President 
, of the United States Savings Bank and ol the 
EUthDm Valley Coal Land Company. Director in 



the Second Avenue Street Railroad Company, etc. 
Est. HUGH AUCHINCLOSe.— Dry goods and impor- 
tation of thread. 
WILLIAM H. APPLETON (of D. Appleton & Co., pub- 
lishers).— Partly inherited. All made in the pub- 
lication of copyrighted books and printing. Presi- 
dent ol the Manhattan Safe Deposit and Storage 
Company. Director in the American Book Com- 
pany ; Delaware, Lackawanna and Western RaJl- 
road ; Central Trust Company ; New- York Life In- 
surance Company ; New-Y'ork Security and Trust 
Company, etc., etc. 
COLONEL DANIEL S. APPLETON (of D. Appleton & 
Co.).- Partly inherited. All made in publishing 
copyrighted books and .printing. Director in the 
American Book Company. 
WILLIAM W. APPLETON (ol D. Appleton <fc Co.).— 
Partly inherited. All made in publishing copy- 
righted books and printing. Director In the Amer- 
ican Book Company. 
HENRY ALLEN (ol Henry AUen & Co.).— Brokerage 

business, railroads and stocks. 
EDWARD D. ADAMS (ol Winslow, Lanier & Co.).— 
Banking and investments. Director In American 
Cotton on Company ; National Cotton OU Company ; 
Lehigh and Wllkesbarre Coal Company ; Liberty In- 
surance Company ; West Shore Railroad ; Lehigh ana 
Hudson River Railway; Central RaOroad of New- 
Jersey ; Central and South American Telegraph Com- 
pany ; New-Jersey Southern Railroad ; New-York and 
Long Branch Railroad, etc., etc. 
HENRY M. ALEXANDER.— Law practice, especially 
In insurance business, and investments. Director 
in the Equitable Life Assurance Society ; Mercantile 
Trust Company ; McDougall Electrical and Manu- 
facturing Company , etc., etc. 
MRS. CHARLES B. ALEXANDER.— Inherited a fortune 
from Charles Crocker, who with C. P. Huntington, 
Leland Stanford and others built the Central Pacific 
Railroad. Made in rallioads and lands. 
•Est. LORING ANDREWS.— Tanning and leather busi- 
ness, and InvHstments in real estate, banks, etc. 
•Est. General LLOYD ASPINW ALL.— From his father, 
William H. Aspinwali. Made in sail and steam, 
shipping and trade with the Pacific Coast; then in 
the Panama and other railroads, and finally bank- 
ing. Director In the Mexican National Railroad. 
Rst. ELBERT J. ANDERSON.— Merchandis'.ng, In- 
surance, banks, etc. 
Est. JACOB W. ANDERSON.— Merchandising and large 

Investments in real estate. 
*Est. JAMBS P. ALLAIRE.— Made a fortune In Iron- 
works and the building of marine steam engines. 
He had the largest marine engine works in the 
United States at the time. 



GEORGE F. BAKER.— Has made a fortune Of several 
mUlions during a long Ule of banking, negotiation ol 
Government and other loans, and investment. Pres- 
ident of the famous old First National UanTr, and of 
the New- York and Long Branch Railro .41. Director 
in the Central Railroad of New-Jersey, atlzens' In- 
surance Company, New-Jersey Southern Railroad, 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, Bankers' Sato De- 
posit Company, National Water Works Investment 
Company, Lake Erie and Western Railroad, Lehigh 
and Hudson River Railway, Lehigh and WUkesbarre 
Coal Company, etc., etc. 

FREDERIC BRONSON.-Inherlted. Has numeroua 
Investmenls. Director in the New-York Life insur- 
ance and Trust Company, Institution lor Savings ol 
Merchants' Clerks, American Jersey Cattle Club 
New- York Oab Company, etc 

JAMES GORDON BENNETT.-Largely Inherited from 
James Gorden Bennett, his lather. Made in pub- 



AMEEIOAN MILLIONAIRES. 



59 



lishlDg Tile New- York Herald and In investments 
in real estate. The present Mr. Bennett lins a 
large Ipvestment in the Commercial Cable Com- 
pany. 
•WILLIAM V. BROKAW (of Broltaw Brothers).— Manu- 
facture and sale ol clothing. 
♦ISAAC V. BEOKAW (of Broltaw Brothers).— Manu- 
facture and sale of clotlilng. 
MRS. JAMES H. BANKER.- From her husband, a 
banher and brolter, interested In the Vanderbllt rail- 
roads. 
HENRY BISCHOFF.-Made in the banldng business 

and real estate Investmenls. 
Est. SARAH BURR.— AU by Inheritance, and all made 

in real estate. 
"Est. HENRY A. BURR.- Made in manufacturing hat 
bodies, and by investmenls in banks, insurance com- 
panies, etc. 
Est. THEEON R. BUTLER.- Merchandising drygoods 
first. Money made chiefly In the Sixth Avenue Rail- 
road, of which he was president for many years. 
Had other investments in railroads. He was a 
director in the Erie RaUroad. 
Est. CHARLES BARLOW.— Made in th.' Dun, Barlow 
& Co. Mercantile Agency, inves!me:(ts in real 
estate, and other operations. 
*Est. SAMUEL H. JJROWN.— First in early days In 

California, then in coaj mining In Pennsylvania. 
MRS. MARY A. LA BAU-BEEGER (wife of Francis 
nerger) .— From the estate of Commodore Vanderbllt. 
Made In railroads. 
•WILLIAM BROOKFIELD, 83 Fulton-st. (proprietor of 
ihe Bushwich Glass Works).— Partly in manufact- 
uring glass; partly tlirough his vrite Kate Mor- 
gan, a daughter of Henry Morgan, of Aurora, N. Y., 
who made a fortune in manufacturing and In the 
express business. Director in tlie Kings County 
Fire Insurance Company. 
D/iVID WOLFE BISHOP.-Largely from the estate of 
John David Wolfe, the great hardware merchant and 
real estate investor. 
I>AVID WOLFE BRUCE.- Largely from the estate of 
John David Wolfe, the great hardware merchant and 
real estate investor. Mr. Bruce had. however, a 
comfortable property before receiving tliis inher- 
itance which he had made In Georee Brace's Son 
Co., type founders. 
CATHERINE W. BRUCE.— Largely from the estate of 
John David Wolfe, tlie great hardware merchant and 
real estate investor. 
MATILDA W. BRUCE.— Largely from the estate of 
John David Wolfe, the great hardware merchant and 
real estate investor. 
Est. GEORGE WOLJ-E BRUCE.— From the estate ot 
John D. Wolfe. Ho left an estate of nearly two 
millions. 
ELIAS C. BENEDICT (ot E. C. Benedict <fc Co.. bank- 
ers).— Banking and investments. He made a ereat 
deal of money In Clucaso gas stock. PormeTly 
President of the New-York Stock Exol;anee. 
FREDERICK H. BENEDICT (of E. C. Benedict &. Co., 
bankers).— Partly from his wife, a daughter of the 
late Henry M. Flagler. Partly in the banking 
business. 
E«t. FREDERICK BUTTERITELD.— Made several 

millions in the dry g03ds business. 
SIMON BORG (of S. Borg & Co., bankers.)— Made In 
banking. Investment securities, and railroads. 
President of the New- York Susquehanna & Western 
Railroad. Director in many rai'raads and corpora- 
tions. 
Est. A. BLUM.— Began life as a merchant in St. Paul, 
Minn., but meeting with no success, went to Gal- 
vestPBj where he engaged in the importation and 



sale of dry g^ods on a large scale, and made a large 
fortune. He removed to New-York, invested his 
profits judiciously and died a wealthy man. 

FRANCIS M. BACON (of Bacon, Baldwin & Co.)— 
Made in CDmmission dry goods. 

*T. BROWNELL BURNHAM.— Inherited from Ids father, 
Gordon W. Bui-nham, who marie his fortune In manu- 
facturing brass and copi>er in Connecticut. Director 
in Holmes, Booth <t Haydens, brass manufacturers, 
Waterbury, Conn.. 

"DOUGLAS W. BURNHA.M.— Inherited from Gordon W. 
Burnham, and made In manufacturing brass and 
copper. Director in Holmes, Booth & Haydens. 

'HENRY MORTIMER BROOKS.— Inherited in part from 
Ills father, John Brooks ; made in manufacture and 
sale of clothing. Also a partner, formerly, in E. S. 
Iliggins ik Co., manufacturers of carpets. 

•MRS. JOSEPHINE WHITNEY BROOKS (wife of Henry 
Mortimer Broolis).— Inherited from the estate of 
Ellas S. Higgins. Made in the manufacture of car- 
pets, rise in value of real estate, and investments. 

Est. MATTHEW BYRNES.— OriglnaUy in carriage-mak- 
ing, then in merchandising in Ca'.lfornia ; cliieiiy, 
however, made in real estate investments and build- 
ing in New-York City. 

I'lSTBR T. BARLOW.— Oliiefly from his father, S. L. M. 
Barlow, who mode a fortune in law practice, enor- 
mous fees from railroads and clients, and invest- 
ments. 

JABEZ A. BOSTWICK.— Made in refining and trans- 
porting petroleum oil. Has other interests. 

.U )HN S. BARNES.— Banking and investments. 

Bst. BARTOLMI BLANCO.— Plantations in Cuba and 
large real estate investments in New-York. 

'WILLIAM BARBOUR (of the Barbour Flax Spinning 
Company and the Barbour Brotliers Company).— 
Made in the manufacture of thread at Paterson, 
N. J., and investments in corporations. Director in 
the National Bank of the Republic, Citizens' insur- 
ance Company, etc. 

l.'OBEET LENOX BELKNAP.— Inherited. Has made 
money in real estate and other investments. Presi- 
dent of the Union Electric Traction Company. 

IIKBER R. BISHOP.— Refining and transporting petro- 
leum oil, and railroads and investments. Director 
In Minnesota Iron Company, Metropohtan Trust 
Company, Chicago, Eock Island and Pacific Eailway. 
Dniuth and Iron Eange Railroad and other com- 
panies. 

CHARLES T. BAENEY, No. 84 Broadway.- Made by 
Ills father in railroads and the express business. Is 
himself a banker. He is a director in the Northern 
Pacific Railroad, Safe Deposit Company of New- York, 
New- York Loan and Improvement Company, Mer- 
cantile National Bank, Hudson Eiver Bank, Don 
Enrique Mining Company, Knickerbocker Ti-ust Com- 
pany, etc. 

CALVIN S. BRICE.— Has made a large fortune in rail- 
road development, in which he has been engaged 
since 1876. Director in East Tennessee, Virginia 
and Georgia Railway, Mobile and Birmingham Rail- 
road, Mempliis and Cluirleston Eailroad, Lake Erie 
and Western RaUroad, Duluth, South Shore and At- 
lantic Railway, Knoxvllle and Ohio Railroad, Pacific 
Mail Steamship Company, and has many other inter- 
ests of kindred nature. 

•MATTHEW C. D. BORDEN (of Bliss, Fabyan & Co.).— 
Manufacturing cotton goods in Fall Eiver, and gen- 
eral commission drygoods business here. Director 
in Lincoln National Bank, Lincoln Safe Deposit Com- 
pany, New-Yorlc Security and Trust Company and 
other corporations. 
J, BOSKOWITZ (of J. & S. Boskowlte.)— Made in the 
sale of furs, robes, etc. They have a branch also 
iu Chicago, 



60 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



Est, SEMON BACHE— Left a large fortune, aocum- 
mulated In tile Importation of plate elass and vrin- 
dOTv glass. 

Est. WILLIAM v. BEADY.— Formerly Mayor of Neyr- 
York. Accumulated a fortune In real estate and 
Investments In stocta. 

Est. CALVIN BURR.— Made cMefly In advance In 
values of real estate. He owned a ereat deal 
of property in BrooMyn. 

BIRDSEYE BLAKEMAN (of Ivlson, BlaSeman & Co.).— 
Publlsliing copyrighted books, especially school 
books. Is president of the Spenoerian Pen Company 
and the American Book Company. 

•WILLIAM H. BEADLESTON.— Brewing. Director In 
the Bowery Savings Bank, Pacific Bank, Pacific Fire 
Insurance Company, etc. 

•ALFRED N. BEADLESTON.— Brewing and real estate. 

JULIUS BEER (of WeU & Co.).— Made in tha sale of 
leaf tobacco. 

CHARLES A. BAUDOUINE.— His fortune has been 
made chiefly in the advance In value of real estate, of 
which he owns about $2,000,000. 

SAMUEL D. BABCOCK.— Has made a large fortune in 
railroads, steamboats, banking and Investments. 
Has a large quantity of real estate at Blverdale. 
President of the New- York, Providence and Boston 
Railroad, United States Mortgage Company, and the 
International Bell Telephone Company. Director 
In American Exchange National Bank, Bank of New- 
Amsterdam, Central Trust Comirany, Continental In- 
soirance Company, Mutual Life Insurance Company, 

i New- York and Harlem Railroad, Central Real Estate 
Association, Greenwood Cemetery, Manhattan Real 
Estate Association, New- York Real Estate Associa- 
tion, Manufacturing Investment Company, Provi- 
dence and Stonington Steamship Company, etc. 

CX5ENELIUS N. BLISS (of BUsB, Fabyan <fe Co.).— Com- 
mission drygoods and investments. Director In the 
American Surety Company, Central Trust Company, 
Eqnitable Life Assurance Society, Manhattan Safe 
Deposit and Storage Company, Fourth National 
Bank, Home Insurance Company, etc. 

GEORGE BLISS (of Morton, Bliss & Co., bankers).— 
Originally engaged In merchandising ; then went into 
private banking and real estate. Director in the 
Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company, Continental 
Insurance Company, Delaware, Lackawanna and 

, Western Railroad, Great Northern Railway, United 
States Trust Company, New- York, Lackawanna and 
Western RaUroad, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Mani- 
toba Railway, Copper Queen Consolidated Mining 
Company, Mutual Life Insurance Company, etc. 

Est. JOSIAH BELDEN.— Made in California, in mer- 
chandising and real estate. 

DR. JOHN C. BAEEON.— Inherited. Has various in- 
vestments. Interested in cattle-raising in the West. 
President of the Kentucky Coal, Iron and Develop- 
ment C-ompany. Director in the Electric Secret Ser- 
vice Company, etc. 

MISS HELEN C. BUTLER.-A niece of Mrs. A. T. Stew- 
art, from whom she Inherited over $3,000,000. Made 
in merchandising drygoods, and investments in real 
estate. 

PRESCOTT HALL BUTLER.- Inherited from Mrs. A. T. 
Stewart. 

JOSS ROSALIE BUTLER.- Inherited from Mrs. A. T. 
Stewart. 

MISS VIRGINIA BUTLER.- Inherited from Mrs. A. T. 
Stewart. 

M. E. BUTLER.— Inherited from Mrs. A. T. Stewart. 

"Est. PATRICK BLTLBR (of A. H. Hart & Co.).— Made 
in manufacturing twine. 

ROBERT C. BILLINGS (of Faulkner, Page & Co.).— 
Commission drygoods. 



MRS. SARAH BOREEL (wile Of the Marquis de Boreel, 
of France).— Inherited from the Astor family. Made 
entirely in real estate, of wlilch she owns consider- 
ably more than a million dollars' worth. 

JOHN U. BROOKMAN (of H. D. & John U. Brookman, 
shipping merchants).— Made in deep sea shins, and 
fortunate investments in stocks and real estate. 

•MRS. REBECCA BABBI'IT.— Widow of B. T. Babbitt, 
from whom she inherited. Made in the manufacture 
of soda, saleratus, potash and soap. 

Est. VAN WYCK BEINKERHOFF.— Importation of 
drugs and shellacs. 

MRS. ANDREW G. BENINGER.— Inherited from John 
B. Dash, her brother. Made in merchandising hard- 
ware and investments in real estate. 

JAMBS L. BARCLAY.— Inherited from Ms fatiier,. 
Henry Barclay, and made entirely in rise in value oi 
real estate. 

HENRY A. BARCLAY.— Inherited from Henry Barclay. 
Made in real estate. 

SACKETT M. BARCLAY.— From Henry Barclay. Real 
estate. 

Est. SOIXJMON BEUTHNEE.— Called the "King or 
New-Mexico." Made in mines and lands In New- 
Mexico. 

Est. JAMES BLAKELY.— Wholesale paint business and 
rise in value of real estate. 

«MILO M. BELDING (of Belding Brothers & Co.).— 
Made in the manufacture of sewing silt, with some- 
investments in corporations. 

ARTHUR W. BLAKE (of Blake Brothers & Co.).— Pri- 
vate banking and stocks. 

ADOLPH BERNHEIMER.— Commission, brown cot- 
tons. 

SIMON E. BERNHEIMER (of Bernhelmer <fc Schmld). 
—Originally In drygDods. Now in brewing and real 
estate. (Lion Brewery.) 

SIMON BERNHEIMER.— Formerly engaeed in th* 
sale of clothing. Now retired. Worti over a 
million. 

ISAAC BERNHEIMER.— Made in the sale of clothine. 

FERDINAND BLUMENTHAL (Of F. Blumentlial & Co.). 
—Importation of leather. 

VERNON H. BROWN (of Vernon H. Brown & Co.).- 
Shipping, ocean transportation and Investments itt 
corporations. 

GEORGE S. BOWDOIN (of Drexel, Morgan & Co.).— 
Partly inherited. Made in banking and invest- 
ments to corporations. Director In the New-Yorlj, 
Life Insurance and Trust Company, etc. 

AUGUST BELMONT (of August Belmont ifc Co.).— In- 
herited from August Belmont. Made in private- 
banking and investments. Director in Bank of tha 
State of New-York; National Park Bank"; Cliicago_ 
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway ; Kings County- 
Elevated Railway : LouisviUe and Nashville ' Rail- 
road ; Manhattan Trust Compnny, etc. 

OLIVER H. P. BELMONT (of August Belmont & 
Co.).— Inherited from his father, August Belmont. 
Made in private banking. 

JOHN CROSBY BROWN (of Brown Brothers & Co.).— 
Private banking and foreign excliange. Director 
in tile United .States Trust Company, Iron Car- 
Equipment Company, etc. 

[Est. JAMES M. BROWN (of Brown Brothers & Co.).— 
Banking and investments. 

BENJAMIN BREWSTER.— Refining and transportation, 
of petroleum oil, and Investments. Director in th.> 
Duluth and Iron Range Railroad; Cliicago, Rock 
Island and Pacific Railway ; Keokiik and Des Moines- 
Railway : Minnesota Iron Company, etc.. Vice-Presi- 
dent of Wm. Cramp & Sons Ship and Engine Buil- 
ding Co., Philadelphia. 
HENEY E. BEEKMAN.— Inherited. Made in rise ta 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIEES. 



61 



valtie of real estate owned by the Beehman family. 

Est. JAMES W. EEEKMAN.— Made In advance of tlie 
values of real estiite In New- York City. 

JOSEPH BALLIN.-Made in tlie wholesale drygoods 
buslne»-. 

OSCAR E. BALLIN (of Ballin & Co., bankers and 
biokers).— Partly Inherited from Ills father, Eugene 
S. Ballin. All made in banlting and broKerage 
business and Investments. Director In the Iron 
Steamboat Company. 

■WILLIAM O. BROWNING (of Browning, King & Co.). 
—Partly Inherited. Chiefly made In the manufacture 
and sale of clothing. The firm had large contracts 
during tile war. Largely added to by investments. 
Director in the Hamilton Bank, Hamilton Loan and 
Trust Company, Mercantile National Bank, Northern 
BaUroad of New- Jersey, etc. 

WALSTON H. BKOWN (of Walston H. Bro%vn & Co., 
bankers, and Brown, Thomas & Co., contractors).— 
Made In contracting, railroad building and banking. 
PiBsident of the Cinclnuall, Jackson and Mackinaw 
Eallroad. Director in tlie Buffalo, Eocherter & 
Pittsburgh Railway, etc. 

UBS. MARY ANN BALDWIN.— Inherited from her 
father, Jacob D. Vermilye, who made a fortune In 
banking, stocks and Insurance. 

^\T:LL1AM LANMAN bull (of Edward Sweet & Co.).— 
Brokerage business and the investment of money 
for foreign houses. He has been president of the 
New-York Gtock Exchange twice. Director in 
the Northern Pacific Railroad, East Tennessee. 
Virginia and Georgia Railway, Metropolitan Trust 
Company, etc. 

Est. NEDSON M. EECKWITH.— Made in the China 
trade and importation of spices and coffee. Was 
at one tune In China with EusseU & Co. 

ISAAC BELL.— Shipping and Investments. 

Est. JOHN M. BIXBY.— Law practice and rise in 
value of real estate. 

WILLIAM BUCHANAN (of Buchanan <t Lyall).— Im- 
portation of tobacco. 

WILUAJM M. BLISS.— Drygoods ; Importation and job- 
bing. Interested In telegraph stocks, and Eaulta^ 
able Life Assurance Society, etc. 

CHARLES BANKS.— Has inlierited from several 
sources. Was once in business. 

ROBERT BONNER.— Publishing "The New- York 
Ledger" and Investments in real estate. 

*Est. CLARENCE BEOOKS.— Manufacturing varnish at 
No. 403 West Twelfth-st. 

Est. JOHN L. BROWN.— City contracts, building, etc. 

Est. HENRY A. BOORAEM.— Merchandising, drygoods. 

PELHAM ST. GEORGE BISSELL.— By inheritance, 
chiefly, of real estate, and rapid increase of values 
of such property in tills city. 



•ANDREW CAENEGIE (of Carnegie Bros. <fe Co., and 
Carnegie, Phipps & Co.).— Made a large fortune in 
(,he manufacture of Iron and steel, and coke. Di- 
rector In the Music Hall Company in New- York 
City. 

AUSTIN COEBIN.— Made In railroads, banking and 
real estate Improvement. Principal owner In the 
Corbin Banking Company. President of the Long 
Island Eailroad ; Elmira, Cortland and Northern 
Eallroad; Spokane Fails and Northern EaUroad; 
Manhattan Beach Company ; Manhattan Beach 
Hotel and Land Company ; New- York and Eocka- 
way Beach Eadlway, etc. Formerly President of 
the Pliiladelphia and Eeadlng Eailroad. Director 
In the American Exchange National Bank ; Clilcago 
and Oliio River Eailroad; Peoria and PeUln Union 
Railway ; Western Union Telegrapli Company ; Cen- 
tral Railroad of New-Jersey ; ^'ew-YorlI, Brooldyn 



and Manhattan Beach Railway ; Nassau Ftre In- 
surance Company ; Long Beach Hotel and Cottage 
Company ; New- Jersey Southern Eailroad ; Lehigh 
and Hudson River Railway ; Mercantile Trust Com- 
pany, etc., etc. 

EDWAED B. COBB.— Rise in real estate and law 
practice. 

Est. AMOS COTTING.— Made a fortune In merchandising 
In St. Louis ; and banking in Neiv-Yoik. in the iirm 
of Jameson, Smith & Cutting. 

•Est JOHN J. CRANE.— Made a fortune In merchand- 
ising, distilling and banldug. 

ARTHUE B. CLAFLIN. —inherited In part from Horace 
B. Claflin, who made a fortune In drygoods. Added 
to by hlmseU in the brokerage business. The 
Claflins also own a great deal of real estate above 
the Harlem and In Brooldyn. 

IIENEY H. COOK.— I'artly by Inheritance. Made 
money himself in Wall Street. Director in Union Pacific 
Eailroad, Sixth Avenue Bank, Lank of New-Am- 
sterdam, Mexican Surety Co., Buffalo, New-York 
and Erie Eailroad, etc. 

CHEPTEE W. CHAPIN.— Inherited largely from his 
fathter, of same name, whs made a large fortune, 
beginning modestly with stage mall contracts, and 
local steamboats and railroads in the Connecticut 
river valley, and then building up IntD a great 
property the Boston and Albany Railroad In which 
his wealth was chiefly made ; he was also interested 
in the New- York Central and other railroads and 
steamboats on Lsug Island Sound. Mr. Chapiu is a 
director la the Boston and Albany Eailroad. Spokane 
Falls and Northern Railway, United States Book 
Company, National Starch Manufacturine Co., 
Manhattan Elevated Railway, New-Haven Steam- 
boat Co., S(5rew Dock Co., etc. 

JULIUS CATLIN.— Made in drysoods. Has many In- 
vestments. Director In the United States Life In- 
surance Co., Importers and Traders' National Bank, 
Greenwich Savings Banli, and other enterprLses. 

SIR EODEEICK W. CAMEEON (of R. W. Cameron <fc 
Co.).— Importation of merchandise. 

Est. GENERAL GEORGE W. CULLUM.— Inherited 
from his wife, a member of the Hamilton family, 
who received a fortune from her flrst husband. Gen- 
eral Halleok, of San Francisco. Made in law prac- 
tice, the Maripo'a mine, and real estate. 

•LE GRAND B. CANNON.— Made in Iron mines, steam- 
boats on Lake Champlain and railroads. Director 
In the American Fire Insurance Co., Delaware and 
Hudson Canal Co., Chateauguy Ore and Iron Co., 
etc. 

MRS. HARRY LE GEAND CANNON (Elizabeth M. 
Thompson).— Prom relatives in Detroit. Made in 
real estate. 

••GEORGE N. CURTIS.— Patent medicines and street 
railroad and ottier Investments, 

GEORGE A. CEOCKEE.— Importing metals and bank- 
ing. Director in the Bank of North America, Han- 
over Fire Insurance Co. and other companies. 

•FEEDEEIC CEOMWELL.— Made in the Cromwell 
Steamship Line of coasting steamers and investments. 
Treasurer of the Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

MISS LAUEA R. CONKLING.— Inherited from Catherine 
Wolfe. Made by John D. Wolfe, in importing hard- 
ware, and in real estate. 

•EDWAED COOPER (of (hooper, Hewitt & Co.).— Largely 
Inlierited from his father, Peter Cnoper. Made In 
manufacturing iron, Isinglass and glue. Peter 
Cooper was the only man in the United States, It Is 
believed, who made a milUon dollars In manu- 
facturing glue alone. Edward Cooper is a di- 
rector in the United States Trust Co., Ameri- 
can Sulphur Co., New- Jersey Steel and Iron 



62 



LIBEAUY OP TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



Co., New-York and Greenwood Lalie Railway, 
American Electric Elevator Co., Chrysolite Silver 
Mining Co., Metropolitan Opera House Co., etc. 

JAMES M. CONSTABLE (of Arnold, CoilstaWe & Co.).— 
Importing and merchandising, drygoods and outside 
investments In real estate, etc. Director in tlie 
Bank of New- York, tlie Institution tor the Savings 
of Merchants' Clerks, etc. 

PEEBEEICK A. CONSTABLE (of Arnold, Constable 
& Co.).— Merchandising, drygoods and rise in value 
of real estate. 

JOHN W. CONDIT (of Acker, Merrall & Condit).- 
Wholesale groceries and various investments. 

WASHINGTON E. CONNOE.— Made in railroads, tele- 
graph companies and o'ean cables. 

ADDISON OAMMACK.— Brokerage business, stocks and 
speculation. Is in the Central Crosstown Eaili-oad, 
Manhattan Storage and Warehouse Co., etc. 

JCHN D. CKIMMIXS (of J. D. & T. E. Crimmins).— 
Principally in contracting and building gas worlvs, 
cable amd elevated i-ailroads. subways, etc : judicious 
investments in real estate; street railroads, and 
work for estates. President for the Houston. West 
Street amd I?avonla Perry Eailroad, and of the Essex 
and Hudson Laoid and Improvement Company. Di- 
rector of the Fifth Avenue Bank, United States 
Savings Banlt: : and inemiber of the Oliamber of Com- 
merce, Eeal Estate Exchange, etc., etc.. etc. 

•HENRY' B. COXE (of Coxe Bros. <fc Co.).— Coal lands 
and railroads 

WILLIAM G. CHEieriE.- Else in real estate. 

MRS. NELLIE L. CAEPENTEE (wife of Robert B. 
Carpenter).— Inherited from her father, Thomas 
Cornell. Made in Hudson River stea.mboatmg. 

HENEY CLEWS.— Brokerage business, stocks, and 
speculation in Wall Street. 

*E. PEANK COE.— Manufacturing fertilizers. 

'BENJAMIN G. CLAEKB.— Iron manufacturing and 
investments. President of the Thomas Iron Com- 
pany. Director in the Delaware, Lackawanna and 
Western Eailroad; New-Jersey Zinc and Iron Man- 
ufacturing Company ; Hudson River Ore and Iron 
Company, etc., etc. 

MRS. SAEAH K. COWDIN.— Prom her husband, El- 
liott C. Cowdin, importer of sUks and ribbons. 
Some of his fortune was made In real estate. 

HENRY A. CRAM.— Law practice and rise In value of 
inherited real estate. 

THOMAS GUSHING (formerly of Boston).— Inherited 
a fortune, wlilch was made in the China trade 
originally. 

•WILLIAM P. CLYDE (of Wm. P. Clyde & Co.)— 
Made in the Clyde line of coasting steamers, estab- 
lished by his father and ably managed by the 
present firm. 

♦JOHN M. CORNELL (Of J. B. <fe J. M. Cornell).— 
Made in architectural iron works, building of ele- 
vated railroads in New- York City, etc. 

•ALPEED A. COWLES.— Made in the Ansonla Brass 
and Copper Company, etc. 

MES. JOHN R. CARTER.— From her father, David B. 
Morgan, whose fortune was made in Wall Street. 

Est. MRS. ELIZABETH U. COLES.— 

GENEEAL WILLIAM CUTTING.— Inherited from the 
Cutting family. Made in law, stocks, and real 
estate. Is Iilmself u. lawyer. 

COLONEL WALTEE L. CUTTING.— Inherited. Made 
in stocks, and real estate 
• K. PULTON CLTTING.- Inherited largely fi'om 
the Cutting family, and made in law, real estate, 
and stocks. Director in the Florida Central and 
Pennsylvania Railroad, Hygeia Sparkling DlstUled 
Water Company, St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute 
EaUroad, etc, , , 



HENRY M. CUTTING.— Inherited from the Cutting 
family. Made as above. 

ROBERT L. CUTTING.— Inherited from the Cutting 
family. Made in law, real estate, brokerage and 
stoclts. Is himself a broker. Has many invest- 
ments. Director in the International Boiler Com- 
pany, etc. 

WILLIAM EAYAED CUTTING.— Partly inherited from 
Francis B. Cutting, the great lawyer. Made In law, 
real estate and stocks. Is liimseU in law, banldng, 
real estate and railroads. Director in American 
Exchange National Bank, United States Trust Com- 
pany ; St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute Eailroad ; 
New- York and Brooklyn Ferry Company; SouOn 
Brooklyn Eaib-oad ; Florida Central and Peninsula 
Eailroad, etc., etc. 

FRANCIS BROCKHOLST CUTTING.— Inherited from the 
Cutting family. Made in real estate, law and, stocks. 

MRS. LYDIA M. CUTTING (widow of Heyward Cut- 
ting).— Inherited from the Oattmg and Mason families. 
Law, real estate and stocks. 

Est. .TOHN WINTHROP CHANLER.— Derived from the 
Astor family and made in real estate Improvements. 

Est. RICHARD P. CARMAN .-Else in value of sub- 
urban (now city) real estate. 

Est. NELSON CHASE.— Inherited the mUlions of Mme. 
Jumel. Made in rise in value of real estate at 
Llberty-st. and Bro.adway and on Washington Heights. 

•CHARLES T. COOK (of Tiffany & Co.).— Manufacture 
and sale of jewelry and silverwai'e. 

".rtLFEED CORNING CLARK.— Inherited from his 
father, Edward Clark, who made a fortune in the 
manufacture and sale of Singer sewing machines 
and investments In real estate. Edward Clark 
aided Singer to establish his rights to his patents 
in tlie courts and took an interest in the business. 

LIECTENANT WILLIAM P. CLASON (U. 6. N.).— 
Entirely by inneritance from different relatives. 

Est. JOHN CASTEEE.— Forty years ago, one of the 
leading retail grjcers of New-York City. Increased 
his fortune by purchases of real estate, wliioh after- 
ward became valuable, especially in the fifth. 
Eighth and Sixteenth wards. Was president of 
thie Irving National Bank and Irving Savings Trust. 

GEORGE COPPELL (of Maltfand, Phelps & Co., 
commission merchants and bankers.)— Made In 
general banking and commission business, and in 
investments. Chairman of Board of Directors of 
the Denver and Rio Grande Railway. President 
of the Railroad Equipment Co., of Minnesota and 
of the Duplex Street Railway Track Company. 
Vice-President of the Denver CDnsolidated Gas Co. 
Director in the Flint & Pere MarcLuette Railroad; 
East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad: 
the New- York and Northern ; etc., etc. 

Est. GEORGE W. COMSTOCK.— Made in the wholesale 
drug business, wit't branches in Philadelphia, 
New-Orleans, and other cities. 

MRS. CARRINGTON (wile of Captain Carrington, Eng- 
land).— From her father, Francis Warden, who made 
a, fortuTie In importing drygoods, in partnership 
with A. T. Stewart. 

•'■DUCHESS DE CAMPOSELICE.— Prom her first hus- 
band, Isaac M. Singer. Made in manufacture of 
Ills sewing machines. 

Est. GEORGE C. COLLINS.— Importing tea, jobbing 
gi'oceries, and Investments In banks, insurance com- 
panies, etc. He was one of the largest tea im- 
porters In the city. 

Est. JOHN CAREY.— Made in real estate chiefly. 

Est. HORACE P. CLARK.— Law practice first. Then 
in tile Harlem Railroad, which he built up into a 
great property. Then with Vanderbllt, In other 
railroads. President of the Lake Shore, Miclilgan 



AMEEICAN MIliLIONAIRES. 



63 



Soutlieni and Northern Indiana railroads. Director 
In tlie New-Yorlf Central, the Harlem, the New- 
Haven, the Chicago and Northwestern, and other 
railroads ; Wejitcm Union Telegraph Company ;. 
Union Trust Company, and other enterprises. He 
was also a heavy and successlul operator In Wall 
Street. 

Est. E]CIL\RD B. CONNOLLY.— He made more tlian 
$3,000,000 in the operations of the Tweed ring 
In New- York aty. 

*HBNRY CLAUSES, Jr. (of the H. Clausen & Son 
Brewing Company).— Made In brewing and real 
estate. Director in the Murray HIE Bank, Con- 
solidated Gas Company, Harney Peak Tin Mining 
and Manufacturing Company, and other conce.ns. 

*SAMUEL J. COI-GATE.— Inherited. Made in the 
Atlantic White l;ead and Linseed Oil Company ; 
m6rchIlncll^ing and investments. 

•ROBERT COLGATE.— Same as the last above. 

'PATRICK C. COSTELLO.— Tanning and leatlier busi- 
ness. 

'ROBERT A. CHIBEBROUGH.— Made in manufactur- 
ing vaseline. President of the Chesebrougli Manu- 
facturing Company. Director in tlie Panama Rail- 
road and other companies. 

JOSEPH CLARK.— Speculation in mining shares In 
San Francisco. 

•CHARLES L. COLLY.— Has made a large fortune, 
principally in railioatls. Director in the Mexican 
National Railroad, North American Company and 
other enterprises. 

Est. DON ALONZO CUSHMAN.— Merchandising dry- 
goods, and investments in real estate, banks, in- 
surance, etc. He left a large fortune. 

CHARLES H. CONTOIT.— Inherited. Made in the 
restaurant business and investments in Broadway 
and other r^eal estate. 

MRS. CORDELIA CHAUVET.— From her father, 
Francis W. Lasak, who was engaged in the fur 
business with John Jacob Astor, and who, like 
Mr. Astor, invested largely in real estate, wliioli Is 
now valuable, and died worth several millions. 

MRS. OPHELIA J. CUTHBERT.— From her fatl;»3r, 
Francis W. Lasak. Made in the fur business, and 
early investments in real estate. 



■•JEREMIAH W. DIMMICK.— Carpet manufacturing. 

'PETER DOELG-EE.- Made in brewing and real estate, 

CHARLES D, DICKEY (of Brown Brothers & Co.).— 
Private banking and in vestments. 

WILLIAM P. DOUGLAS.— Inherited. Has invest- 
ments In Insurance companies and real estate in 
tWs city amd on Long Island. 

■•WILLIAM DICK.— Sugar r-eiiniug arrd Investments. 

MEJ3. MARY ANNA P. DRAPER (widow nf Henry 
Draper).- InJrerited from Cortlandt Palmer, and from 
her husband. The fortune was made first in mer- 
chandising liardware and then In real estate iu- 
vestments. 

JAMES G. K. DUER (of James C. Klarg's Sons).- 
Partly inherited from Denning Duer. Made in 
real estate, private banking, railroads, and in- 
vestments. President of the King Granite Company. 
Director in the Long Island Railroad, etc. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER DUER.— Partly Inherited 
from Denning Duer, a descemdant of Lord Stirling, 
who had a large estate on Long Island. Director 
in the Union Trust Company, National Bank of 
Commerce, Jerome 'Vina Site and Improvement Com- 
pany, and other concerns. 

MRS. WILLIAM ALEXANDER DUER.— From her 
father, William E. Travers, who made a great fortune 
in Wall Street. 

CHARLES A. DANA.— Publishing "The New- York 
Sun," ■with Investment of accumulations. 



ALFRED B. DARLING (of Hitchcock, Darling & Co.). 
—Largely made in the Fifth Avenue Hotel and real 
estate and other Investments. Director In the Aztec 
Land and Cattle Company ; Fifth Avenue Safe De- 
posit Company ; Second National Bank, etc. 

LAWRENCE DRAKE.— Inherited from Mrs. Ann Drake 
Seaman (horn Morgan), widow of John F. Seaman. 
The property was in real estate in New- York City 
and Clilcago. 

Est. JOHN T. DALY.— Gold mines in California and 
real estate in New-York City. A little distilling 
and warehousing. 

P. HENRY DUGRO.— Inherited from his father, An- 
thony Dngro. Made In building and investments 
in real estate. Owner of the Hotel Savoy. 

Est. JOHN B. DICKINSON.— Merchandising In the 
California trade, and Investments in banlis, In- 
surance companies, Brooklyn ferry, etc. 

FREDERICK DE BARY (of Fred. De Bary & Co.).— Im- 
portation of wines and champagnes. Agent for 
G. H. Mumm & Co. 

'"Est. MARY H. DRAKE.- Made In, the famous "S 
T.— 1860— X.," Drake's Plantation Bitters and in- 
vestments In real estate. 

WILLIAM B. DINSMORE.— Inherited from his father, 
William B. Dinsmore, who made a fortune in the 
Adams Express Company and in investments In 
banks, and street and other railroads. 

CLARENCE G. DINSMORE.— From his father, William 
B. Dinsmore. Made as above. 

Est. JOSEPH W. DREXBL.— Banking and Investments. 

Est. CHARLES DELMONICO.— Made In the Delmonioo 
restam'anfs. 

•FREDERICK W. DEVOE (of F. W. Devoe & Co.)— 
Manufacture and sale of paints and colors. Director 
In the Market and Fulton National Bank, etc. 

JOHN H. DAVIS.— Brokerage business In Wall-st., also 
by Inheritance, the latter pa.rt of his fortune having 
been made in real estate. 

MRS. JOHN W. DAVIS.— Fortune made in real estate 
She has a very large property. 

DUCHESS DE DINO (Adele L. Sampson).— Inherited 
from the Sampson estate. Made In the auction 
business and the Chemical Bank. She married Fred. 
A. Stevens, and then the Marquis de Talleyi'anl- 
Perlgord, whose title was changed to Duke de DIno. 

ARTHUR M. DODGE (of Dodge, Meigs & Co.)— Largely 
Inherited from his father, William E. Dodge, who 
made a fortune In importing metals and purchase of 
lumber lands. Added to by himself in exportation 
of lumber. 

CLEVELAND H. DODGE (of Phelps, Dodge & Co.— 
Made In Importing metals and in the Ansonia Brass 
and Copper Company ; director of the Commercial 
Mining Company, Copper Queen Consohdated Min- 
ing Co., National City Bank, etc., etc. 

NORMAN W. DODGE.— Largely inherited from Will- 
iam E. Dodge, who made a large fortune in import- 
ing metals and the purchase of low-priced lumber 
lands. Added to- by himself in the exportation of 
lumber. Director in the Hilton & Dodge inmber 
Company, of Georgia, Pr^esldent of the Normandale 
Lumber Company. 

GEORGE E. DODGE (of Dodge, Meigs & Co.).— Largely 
inherited from William E. Dodge. Added to by ex- 
portation of lumber by himself. 

MRS. GEORGE E. DODGE.— From her father, Frederick 
H. Cossitt, who made a fortime in merchandising 
and real estate. 

WILLLVM E. DODGE JR. (of Phelps, Dodge & Co.— 
Largely Inherited, from his father, Wilham E. Dodge, 
who made a fortune in Importing metals and pur- 
chase of lumber lands. Added to by himself In Im- 
porting metals. Director in the Ansonia Brass and 



64 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTEAS. 



Copper Company, Copiper Queen Consol. Mining Com 
pany, Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company, Com- 
mercial Mining Company, Detroit Copper Mining 
Company, New-Yorli Life Insurance and Trust Com- 
pany, etc., etc., 

EEV. DAVID STUAKT DODGE.— From liis i!atlier, 
WlUlam E. Dodge, made in importing metals and 
purchase at lumber lands. 

CHAELBS €. DODGE.— From Ms lather. William E. 
Dodge. Made as above explains.- 

HENRY DAY.— Law praotlce and investments. 

ALFRED DB CORDOVA (of Alfred De Cordova & Son). 
—Stock brokerage business. 

Est. SIDNEY DILLON.— Made in liie building and man- 
agememt of railroadiS. President of the Union Paciflc 
Railroad. Director in the Canada Soutliern Rail- 
road, Chicago, Rock Island and Paciflc Railroad, 
DeCawapa, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, 
Wabash Railroad, Mercantile Trust Company, Sale 
Deposit Company of New- York. New- York, Lacka- 
wanna and Western Railroad, Western Union Tele- 
graph ComiKiny, etc., etc., 

FLORENCE DELAPLAINE.— Largely inherited from 
John W. Delaplalne. Made in shipping and rise in 
value of real estate. 

•Est. THOMAS DICKSON.— Coal mines in Pennsylvania 
and iron mines In New-York and Pennsylvania. 
Director In the Delawars and Hulson Canal Company. 

Est. PATRICK DICKIE.— He left a fortune of about 
$2,750,000, made in the drug business and invest- 
ments in real estate, etc. 

CHAUNCBY M. DEPEW.— Made in railroads, of a large 
number of which he is either president or director. 
President of the New- York Central and Hudson River 
Railroad, the New- York and Harlem Railroad, West 
Share Railroad, and Dunkirk, Alleghany Valley and 
Pittsburg Railroad. Director in the Chicago Junc- 
tion Railways and Stockyards Company ; Chicago and 
Northwestern Railway; ChioagJ, St. Paul, Minneap- 
olis and Omaha Railway ; Equitable Life Assurance 
Society ; Delaware and Hudson Canal Company ; 
Merchants' Dispatch Transpoitalion Company : Mich- 
igan Central Railroad; New-York, Chicago and St. 
Louis Railroad ; New- York, New-Haven and llarttord 
Railroad ; Pine Creek Railway ; Syracuse, Geneva 
and Corning Railroad ; Union Trust Company ; West- 
ern National Bank; Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany ; and Kenslco Cemetery Company, etc., etc. 

Mrs. HORTBNSE P. DOUGLAS.— From her husband, 
Horton Douglas. Made in real estate. 

ROBERT G. DUN (of R. G. Dun & Co. Mercantile 
Agency).— Made in successful real estate operations 
In city property and in Mercantile Agency reporting 
on credits, resulting solely from the creation of in- 
ternal commerce. 

Est. CH.4RLES DEVLIN.— Made in building railroads 
and other public works. 

Est. CHARLES W. DURANT.— Railroads and invest- 
ments in real estate. 

Est. JOHN DELAMATEUl.- BuUdlng, and Investments 
in baihs. Insurance companies, etc. 

JOHNSON DE PEYSTEE.— Inherited. Made in real 
estate chiefly. 

General JOHN WATTS DE PEYSTER.-Inherlted from 
Ms father, Frederic De Peysler. Made almost 
wholly In real estate. 

Est. NICHOLAS DE PEYSTEE.- Partly inherited, but 
he made a fortune for lUmself in California. 

FEEDEEIC DE PEYSTEE.— Inherited from the family 
estate. Made In real estate. 

Est. HENEY McBEIDE DAVIDSON.-Manufacturing 
in Albany, but chiefly in steamboating on the Hud- 
son with Van Santvoord, and Investments in real 
estate. 



Mrs. MAEGAEET E. DOWS.— Widow of David Dows> 
from whom she Inherited. Made in grain, railroads 
and banking. 

•JOHN DWIGHT.— Manufacturing soda and saleratus; 
and investments in real esta'e. 

I5st. HEIS'RY J. DAVISON.— Engineering works ; build- 
ing gas plants ; and exporting steamboats and ma- 
chinery to South America. 

FEEDEEICK W. DUNTON.— Eailroads. Director in, 
tlie Clucago and Ohio Eiver Eailroad, Elmira, Cort- 
land and Northern Eaili'oad, New-York and Rocka- 
way Beach Railroad, New- York, Brooklyn and Man- 
hattan Beech Railroad, etc.. etc. 

HENRY DEXTER.— Merchandising newspapers and 
books, and investments in real estate. He is an 
ofBoer in the American News Company. 

JOICN P. DUNCAN (of John Duncan's Sons).— Made in 
Importation of groceries and wholesale dealing in 
same. Also, rise in real estate. 

JAMES H. DUNHAM (of Dunliam, Buckley & Co.).— 
Importation and sale of dry goods and outside In- 
vestments. Director in the EqiUtable Life Assur- 
ance Society, etc. 

HENEY P. DEGRAAF.— Made in banking, furnitme 
and real estate. President of the Bowery 
Bank. Director In the De Graaf & Taylor Co. etc. 

Jj4MES M. DAVIS.— Brokerage business in Wall Street. 

•"DUCHESS DBCAZES (Isabella Singer).- From her 
father, Isaac M. Singer. Made in the manulaotur* 
of the Singer Sewing Machine. 

GEORGE B DE FOREST.- Made in railroads and 
stocks. Inherited. 

Est. BENJAMIN L. DE FOEE'-T.-Enilroads nnd stocks. 

*MES. SUSANNA J. DANNATT (widow of William H. 
Dannatt, a wealthy lumber dealer).- Principially fronv 
iher brother, David Jones, the great brewer, who 
conducted an enormous business and had large in- 
vestments in real estaite, telegraph and insurance- 
companies, banks, etc. 

M'ES. HENEY DALLEY, JR.— Inherited from several 
wealthy relatives. 

•DAVID L. EINSTEIN.— Made in the manufacture 
and sale of woollen goods. Director in the Swan 
Incandescent Electric Light Company ; Brush Elec- 
tric Illuminating Company ; Brush-Swan Electric 
Light Company, etc. 

AMOS R. ENO.— Merchandising diygoods first; but 
chiefly in real estate, including the Fifth Avenue- 
Hotel, and banking. Has large investments. Di- 
rector in the Second National Bank. Worth many 
millions. 

AMOS F. ENO.— Real estate and investments. Di- 
rector in the Jefferson Insurance Company, etc. 

.rOHN W. ELLIS (of Charles D. Lanier & Co.).— Bank- 
ing. Director in the Metropolitan Trust Company 
and has other investments. 

'PHILIP EBLING (of the Philip & William Ebling^ 
Brewing Ctompany).— Made in brewing and real estate. 

•JOHN EICHLEE.— Brewing and real estate. Presi- 
dent of the John Eicliler Brewing Company. 

Est. JMISS MARY A. EDSON.— 

STEPHEN B. ELKI.NS.- Made a start in New-Mexico- 
in banking, law, land, and other local interests. 
Then came East and engaged in coal mining, rail- 
roads, etc.. In West Virginia. Director in the West 
Virginia Coal Company ; Small Hopes Consolidated 
Mining Company (silver), Leadvllle Consolidated 
Mining-Company, et-c., etc. Now Secretary of War. 

EICHARD H. EWAET (of WiUiam Ewart & Son).— 
Importing linen goods. 

•SMITH ELY.— Tanning and leather, and Investments. 
In real estate. 

*El;WIN EINSTEIN.— Manufacturing woollen goods, 
rresident of the Swan Incandesant Electric Light 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



65- 



Company. Director In the Alabama Mineral Land 
Company, Brush-Swan Electric Light Company, etc. 

•AMBROSE K. ELY.— Tanning and leather. 

•JAMES EVEEARD.— llrewlng and real estate. Di- 
rector In the Fiftli National Bant. 

TIMOTHY C. EASTMAN (of Eastman's Co.).— Exporta- 
tion of cattle and dressed heel. Director In the West 
Side Banlc, and has many real estate and other In- 
vestments. 

•TTHOMAS A. EDISON.— Inventions of telegraphic and 
electric light apparatus, from which he receives a 
royalty, or which he has sold to the companies in 
which he Is Interested. Director In The Edison Elec- 
tric Illuminating Company, Edison Electric Light 
Company, General Edison Electric Company, Edi- 
son Ore Milling Company, Edison Spanish Colonial 
Light Company. 

WILLIAM P. EARLE.— Made originally In Earie's Hotel, 
and added to by investments in real estate, etc. 

•GEORGE EH RET.— Made in brewing and real estate. 
His fortune amounts to several millions. 

THOMAS J. ECKERT.— Has made a fortune in te'egraph 
and railroad development. Director In tlie Western 
Union Telegraph Company, American Telegraph and 
Cahle Company, Gold and Stock Telegraph.' Com- 
pany, New-Yorli Mutual Telegraph Company, 
Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company, 
American District Telegraph Company, Interna- 
tional Ocean Telegraph Company, Texas and Paciflo 
Railway, Missouri Pacific Railway, Mercantile Trust 
Company, etc., etc. 

•Est. DANIEIL E. ELDER.— Sugar refining. 

HENEY M. FLAGLER.— Has made one of the great 
fortunes of the United States in petroleum oil pro- 
ducing, refining and transporting. Has numerous 
Investments in the best-paying railroad and other 
companies, and large hotel, land and railroad Inter- 
ests In Florida. Director In tlie Standard OH Co., 
Chicago, Rook Island and Pacific Railway, Florida 
Construction Co., Minnesota Iron Co., Duluth & Iron 
Range Railroad, Western Union Telegraph Co., 
International Panic Note Co., Jacksonville, Tampa 
and Key West Railway^ etc.. etc. 

JOHN H. FLAGLER.^Produolng, refining and trans- 
porting petroleum oil, and investments. Director 
In the Bank of North America, etc. 

E. B. FABBEI (of Drexel, Morgan & Co.).— Made in 
banking and investments. Partly inherited. 

MESS SOPHIA E. FUENISS.— Inherited from her 
father, William P. Pumiss, who made a fortune in 
shipping and real estate. 

MISS CLEMENTINA FUENISS.- From her father, 
William P. Fumlss. Made as above. 

MES. CAEOLINE FEAME (wife of Charles P. Frame). 
Inherited from hex grandfather, Samuel Willetts. 
Made In nierchandising hardware, whaling, and in- 
vestments In real estate and securities. 

•Est. MAXIMILIAN FLEISCHMANN (of Flelschmann 
Bros.).- Manufacture of compressed yeast. 

•CHARLES B. FOSDiCK.— Tanning and leather chiefly, 
but added to by judicious investment of accummula- 
tions. President of the Hide and Leather National 
Bank. Director In tlie Second National Bank, 
Fifth' Avenue Safe Deposit Co., Oregon Railway 
and Na\''igatton Co., and other companies, 

JOHN E. FOED.— Made in rubber and other business 
enterprises. Director in tlie Home Insurance Co., 
New-York Mutual Gas light Co., etc. 

•PATRICK FLANNAGAN.— Brewing and real estate. 

MES. EOSWELL P. FLOWEli.- From her father, Henry 
Keep, who made a fortune in railroads. 

EOSWELL P. FLOWER (of R. P. Flower & Co., brok- 
ers).— Made in railroads, stock brokerage, and trus- 
teeship of tlie Henry Keep estate. Director in the 



Duluth and Iron Range Railroad, Chicago, Eoclt 
Island and Pacific Railroad, Minnesota Iron Co.,. 
N. Y. Security and Trust Co., H. H. Babcock Co., etc. 

HARRIS C. FAHNSTOCK.— Banking and Invest- 
ments. President of the Bankers' Safe De- 
posit Company. Director In the First National 
Bank, New-Jersey Southern Railroad. Central 
EaUroad of New-Jersey, Tide Water Pipe- 
Company, Bankers' Safe Deposit Company, Na- 
tional Water Works Investment Company, New- 
York and Long Branch Eailroaxl Company, etc. 

CHAELES M. FEY.— Banking. President of the Banlc 
of New- York. Director In the American Contracting 
and Dredging Company, Atlantic and Charlotte Air- 
Line Eailway, iE^lultabie Ga»s-Llght Company, etc. 

BIRNEY FELLOWES.— Inherited from William Fel- 
lowes, his father. 

Est. TERENCE FARLEY.- Contracting, building an* 
real estate. 

CHARLES FARGO.— Partly Inherited, and all made uv 
the express business, with investment of accumula- 
Uons. Director in the American Expiress Compa y. 
Wells, Fargo & Co., Merchanits' Dispatch Traics- 
portatlon Company, etc. Interested in the Elgin. 
Watch factory. 

JAMES C. FARGO.— Partly Inherited and aU made Id. 
the express business. Director in the American,. 
National, and Wells, Fargo & Co. express com- 
panies, and the Merchants' Dispatch Transportation- 
Company. 

MRS. GEORGIANA FAHGO.— From her father,. 
WUllam G. Fargo, of Buffalo, N. Y., who made 
a fortune of three or four millions in the Wells, 
Fargo <fc Co. express company. 

•ALEXANDEB J. FOEBES-LEITH.— Made mainly in- 
manufacturing iron and steel, especially Bessemer 
steel, at Joliet, lH. Director lin the Illinois Steel 
Company. 

STUYVESANT FISH.— Inherited a fortune made 
chiefly in real estate. He has added to It largely 
by investments and great business abUity. Presi- 
dent of the Illinois Central and the Chicago, St. 
Louis and New-Orleans railroads. Director in the 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, National Part 
Bank, New- York Lite Insurance and Trust Com- 
pany, etc. 

BENJAMIN H. FIELD.- Made In the China trade an* 
Investment of accumulations. Director in the 
Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company, Bank for 
Savings, Greenwood Cemetery Company. 

MRS. CORTLAND DE PEYSTER FIELD (Virginia. 
Hamersly).— From her father, John W. Hameirsiy. 
Made in lands in this city and their rise in value- 
with the growth of the to-win. 

HICKSON W. FIELD.— Made in rise in value of real 
estate. Part owner In the New-York Hotel prop- 
erty, among other things. 

HAMILTON FISH.— Made in inherited real estate and 
law practice. 

•ELISHA M. FULTOi-*.— Made In the manufacture of 
cordage. President of the Elizabethport, N. J., 
Cordage Company . 

CHARLES R. FLINT (of Flint & C>.).— Made in deep- 
sea sailing ships, which the firm built in their own 
yards in Maine, for ihemselves, and In South Ameri- 
can trade. Director in the Export Lumber Com- 
pany, Mutual District Messenger Company, National 
Bank of the Republic, State Trust Company, United, 
S ates and BrazU Mail Steamship Company, etc. 

HEEMAN FLEITMAN (of Fleltman & C'V.).— Imports, 
tlon and sale of drygoods. 

Est. MRS. ELIZABETH F. FLOYD.— 

Est. WILLIAM DOUGLAS FAEWELL.— Merclmndislng: 
drygoods. 



■ee 



LIBRARY .OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



Est. WILLIAil H. FOG-G.— Drygoods commission busi- 
ness, trade with Clilna, and. Importation of tea and 
sini. He left a fortune of $3,000,000. 

Elst. BENJAMIN FITCH.— Meroliandislng di'ygoods. 

.Est. CHRISTIAN F. FUNCH.— Ocean transportation. 

-C. P. FISCHER.— Made in Impor'lng sugar and coffee, 
and in coasting steamers. 

*Est. D. B. FAYERWEATHEE.— Made In tanning and 
leatHer. Several millions. 

Kst. JOHN T. FARISH.— Merchandising and Invest- 
ments. 

•*Est. THOMAS PATE.— Manufacture of paper-hang- 
ings, and advance In value of real estate, of which 
he was a large owner. He had about thirty acres 
on the Island of Manhattan. 

iHAEVEY P. FAKEINGTON.— Made in steamboatlng, 
lc«, and Investments. Director in the Hudson Klver 
Line of Steamboats, Lincoln Safe Deposit Company, 
etc. 

•JOSIAH M. FISKE.— Grain and flour, with outside in- 
vestments. Director in the American Exchange Nar 
tlonal Bank, Brush Electric Illuminating Company, 
Peoria and Buncan Valley EaUroad, etc., etc. 

Est. GEOEGE FOLSOM;^Made a fortune In law, 
banMng and investments In silver mining, real 
estate, etc. 

Est. JOHN C. FUEMAN.— Left over a, million, made 
by advance In value of real estate. 

^st. CHAELES N. FEAEING.— Made In the drygoods 
business. 

.Est. JOHN F. FLANAGAN.— Made In the great gro- 
cery business conducted by him. 



-JAY GOtllyD.- Possessor of one of the lending fortunes 
of the United States. Made his start In Delaware 
County, N. Y., in merchandising maps and a local 
lilstory written by himself. Then In larger opera- 
tions, including speculation In Wall Street In stoclis 
and gold, and In railroad and telegraph comblna- 
itlons and development. President of the Missouri 
Paclflc Railway, Manhattan Elevated Railway, and 
the Texas and Pacific EaUway. Director and large 
■owner In the Western Union Telegraph Company, 
Gold and Stocli Telegraph Company, Oregon Shore 
line and Utah Railroad, Peoria and PeMn Union 
Railway Company, St. Louis, Iron Mountain and 
Southern Railroad, Union Pacific Railway, American 
Telegraph and Cable Company, Paclflc MaU Steam- 
ship Company, etc.. etc. 

!Est. MRS. JAY GOULD.— ParUy inberited from her 
father, a great grocery merchant, and Increased by 
her husband by Investments. 

■GEORGE J. GOULD.— Chiefly from his father. Jay 
Gould, In many of whose companieB the son Is a 
part owner and director. He has added to his 
fortune by his own operations. He is vice-president; 
of the Manhattan Elevated Railway, a.id director In 
the East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railway, 
Missouri Pacific Railway, Texas and PaclHc Railway, 
Gold and Stock Telegraph Company, International 
Ocean Telegraph Company, New-Yorli Bank Note 
Company, New-York Mutual Telegrajfli Company, 
Pacific Mall Steamship Company, St. Louis, Iron 
Mountain and Southern Railway, Wabash EaUroad, 
■Western Union Telegraph Company. Ameilcan Dis- 
trict Telegraph Company, American Speaking Tele- 
phone Company, and olher concerns. 

EDWIN GOULD.— Chiefly from his father, Jay Gould, 
in several of whose companies he has an Interest 
and » share in the management. Director In the 
International Ocean Telegraph Company, Manhattan 
Elevated Railway, St. Louis, Arkansas and Texas 
Railway, Western Union Telegraph Company, Ameri- 
can District Telegraph Company, American Speak- 
■iDfi Telephone Company, etc. 



"MRS MARY J. GRIFFITHS.— Prom David Jones, the 
great brewer, who had several large establishments, 
and large investments in banks, telegraph and In- 
surance companies, real estate, etc. 

MRS. HANNAH G. GERRY (widow of Thomas E. 
Gerry).- Inherited from her brothers, Peter and 
Robert Goelet. Made in merchandising and rise in 
value of real estate. She has a very large quan- 
tity of real estate. 

ELBRIDGE T. GERRY.— Inherited from the Goelets. 
Made In merchandising and real estate and various 
investments. Is himself In law. 

MRS. ELBEIDGE T. GERRY (Louisa M. Livingston).— 
From her father, Robert J. Livingston. Made in 
Investments in real estate chiefly. 

EGBERT GOELET.— One of the leading men of wealth 
of New- York City. His fortune has been inherited 
from the Goelet lamHy. It was founded originally 
in merchandising, followed by purchases of real 
estate, then low-priced, but now enormously valu- 
able, situated on Broadway and in others of the 
best parts of the city. Director in the Chemical 
Bank, Metropolitan Opera House. New-York life 
Insurance and Trust Company, etc. 

OGDEN GOELET.— Inherited a great fortune fi'Om the 
Goelet family. Made as above. 

FRANCIS P. GUNTHEE (Of C. G. Gunther & Sons).— 
Inherited from his father. Christian G. Gunther. 
Made In the sale of furs and real estate Invest- 
ments. 

JOHN CHARLES GUNTHER (of C. G. Gunther & 
Sons).— Inherited. Made In the fur business and 
. real estate. 

ERNEST E. GUNTHEE (of C. G. Gunther & Sons).— 
Sale of furs and rise in real estate. 

PEANKLIN L. GUNTHEE (of C. G. Gunther & Sons).— 
Sale of furs and rise In real estate. 

JOHN A. C. GRAY.— Made in. drygoods, real estate, etc. 

ALBERT H. GALLATIN.— Inherited from Albert E. 
Gallatin. Made in banking and real estate. 

•JOHN GOOD.— Cordage manufacturing. His plants 
are In Brooklyn and Eavenswood. 

WALTER S. GUENEE.— Made In banking, brokerage, 
mining and raUroads. Director In the United Smelt- 
ing and Refining Company, Colorado Smelting Com- 
pany, Chrysolite Silver Mining Company, American 
Surety Company, Montana Smelting Company, etc. 
etc. 

MRS. LETITIA E. GAE.EISON.— From her late hus- 
band, Cornelius K. Garrison. Made in ocean 
steamers and railroads. 

MES. WM. E. GARRISON.- From her husband, Wm. 
R. Garrison and his father. Cornelius K. Garri- 
son. Made in ocean steamers and railroads. 

MALCOLM GRAJIAM (of the former firm of Schuyler, 
Hartley & Graham, now known as Hartley & Gra- 
ham).— Made in the wholesale jewelry business and 
dealing in fire arms. Now has an Interest In the 
Remington Arms ((Company. He Inherited some 
money from his father. Colonel John L. Graham, a 
merchant. 

FREDERIC GALLATIN.— Inherited from Albert E. 
Gallatin. Made in banking and real estate. 

JAMBS GALLATIN.— Inherited from Albert; R. GaUatln, 
banking and real estate. 

MES. CHAELOTWE MATILDA GOODRIDGB (wife of 
Frederic Goodrldge).— From her mother, Matilda Ann 
Grosvenor. Made in merchandising and real 
estate. 

MRS. RACHEL M. GILSEY (-widow of John GUsey).— 
Made by Peter GUsey, first In merchandising cigars 
and tobacco at retail, but chiefly in Investments in 
real estate, on Broadway, including the Gllsey 
House, now exceedingly valuable. 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



67- 



Est. ANDREW GILSEY.— Inherited from Peter GUsey. 

Made In merchandlslns and real estate. 
CHARLES GII-SEY.— Inherited from Peter Gilsey. Made 

as ahove. 
PETER GILSEY.— Inherited Irom Peter Gilsey. Made 

as above. 
HETSfEY GILSEY.— Inherited from Peter GUsey. Made 

as ahove. 
MRS. LUCY GILSEY (wife of Henry Gilsey).— In- 
herited from her father, George M. Varian, a large 
quantity of real estate, part of an old farm, now 
overgrown by the city. 
GEORGE F. GILMAN.— Merchandising tea, and In- 
heritance from his father, Nathaniel Gllman, the 
leather merchant and tanner. 
JAMES A. GARLAND.- Has made a large fortune in 
banldng and investments. Vice-President of the 
First National Bank. Director in the Central Rail- 
road of New-Jersey, LeMgh Valley and, Willies- 
barre Coal Company, New Yorli and Long Branch 
Railroad, Bankers Safe Deposit Company, etc. 
WILLIAM R. GRACE (of William R. Grace & Co.).— 
Has made several milUons In the export and import 
trade with South America, and In shipping. Has 
many Investipents. Director in the Lincoln National 
Bamk, Lincoln Safe Deposit OompaJiy, New-Yorlj 
Bank Note Company, American Sulphur Company 
of West Virginia, etc. 
MICHAEL P. GRACE (of WUllam R. Grace & Co.).— 
Made Ln trade with South America and shipping. 
JOHN W. GRACE (of WlUiam R. Grace &, Co.).— Trade 

with South America and shipping. 
RANDOLPH GUGG-ENHElMER.— In the pfactise of law 

and promoting. 
Est. JOHN GRBEN.-jOontracting, street rallTOadl*, and 
for several years president of the Central Safe De- 
posit Company. 
MRS. SARAH HELEN GREEN (widow of Jolm C. 
Gireen).— From her husband, who made a fortune of 
seveoial mlUlons in the Ohtna trade, first with N. L. 
& G. Grii;wold, in New- York City, and then in tlie 
hoTise of RusseU & Co., in China. He returned 
later to New- York and engaged In busLnp,ss here, 
having nmjnerous tavesbments in banks and either 
companies. 
"CHESTER GRISWOLD.— From his father, John A. 
Grlswold, of Troy, who with John F. Winslow owned 
the patents for manufacturing Bessemer steel tn this 
country. John A. Griswoid began lite In the whole- 
sale and retail drug business ; a partner next In the 
Rensselaer Iron Company ; and then, by oonsolldar 
tlon with Erastus Corning, the owner of the largest 
rolling mill and iron works in the country, with 
Bessemer steel works at Troy ; blast furnaces at Fort 
Edward and on the Hudson, and an Iron mine In tho 
Champiain region. Chester Grlswold is a director 
tn tlie Hudson Elver Ore and Iron Company ; Col- 
orado Coal and Iron Company ; Adirondack Rail- 
way, and other enterprises ; pr&sldent of the Crown 
Point Iron Company. 
•MRS. HARRIET A. GARNER (widow of Thomas Gar- 
ner).— From her husband, who made a great fortune, 
amounting to more than $5,000,000, in manufactur- 
ing cotton goods. He had large mlUs at Cohoes, 
N. Y., and others tn Rochester, Little Falls, Pleasant 
Valley and Newburgh, N. Y., and Reading, Pa., 
with print works at Wappuiger's PaUs and Haver- 
straw, N. Y. 
WILLIAM H. GEBHAED.— Importations of foreign 
liquors and wines. Has numerous investments, in- 
cluding about a million of real estate. Director in 
the Equitable Gaslight Company. 
FEEDERICK GERHARD.— Inherited. Made in im- 
porting liquors and in real estate. 



•LADY GOEDON-CL'MMING (Florence Garner).— From. 
Thomas Garner, througii ills son. WUliam T. Garner 
her father. Made in manufacturing cotton Koods- 

MAYEE GOLDSMITH.— Exportation of cattle. 

R. SUYDA:« GRANT.- Banking, raUroads and Invest- 
ments. Director in tlie Delaware and Hudson Canal 
Company. President of the Adirondack Railway. In- 
other companies. 

Est. WILLIAJI GRAY.— Made in dealing in sulphur. 

MRS. JOHN C. GRAY (Grace Townsend-Tumbull).— In- 
herited from the Townsend family, erf Ne"wport. 

Est. JOHN GARCIA.— General commission merchandis- 
ing. Had a large estate in Spain. 

Est. FREDERIC E. GIBEET.— Inherited from Ms- 
father, a merchant, and invested by lilra in real 
estate, storehouses, etc. 

DE. NORVIN GEEEN.— Made tn telegraph lines an* 
Investments. President of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, Grolden Stock Telegraph Com- 
pany and Internatonal Ocean Telegraph Company- 
Director In the Southern EeU Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, Dives Pelican Mining Company,. 
American Speaking Telephone Company, Mercan- 
tile Trust Company, etc. 

HES. HETTY GEEEN.— One of the wealthiest women 
in the world. She inherited several millions from 
her farther, Edward Mott Robinson, of New-Y'ork,. 
and her aunt, Sylvia Ann Howiand, of New-Bed- 
ford. The principal part of the money inherite*. 
by her was made in whaling, shlpptog, foreign trade, 
etc., and she has increased her foa-tune greatlc by 
■shirewd investmenits. She Is a keen and sharp, 
business woman. Has several minions of real; 
estate in Cliicago. 
Est. JAMEB LOEIMER GRAHAM.— President of the- 

Metropolitan Insurance Company, and investor. 
Est. JAMES W. GERARD.— Law practice and invest- 
ments in real estate and various business enterprises. - 
He .had an interest in the Vermont Central RaUroadi 
and the Boston Sugar Refinery. 

«Est. EOCLES GILLBNDEE.— Made in tobacco manu- 
facturing. 

JOHN GREBNOUGH (of Poor & Greenough).- Made- 
hls foirtune in l>anlning and raih-oads. Has extensive- 
inteiests aE over the cfiuntry, and is president of 
several investment companies in London, which in- 
vest their money in thls^ country. 



•HENRY O. HAVEMEYBH.— Partly Inherited. AU; 
made in sugar refining and Investment of accumula- 
tions. An owner in the Havemeyer Sugar Refining- 
Company, and the Havemeyers & Eider Sugar Ee- 
fining Company. Director in the American Sugar 
Refining Company. 

'MES. HENEY' O. HAVEMEYER (Maria Louisa Elder). 
—From her father, Daniel E. Elder. Made In sugar 
refining -with the Havemeyers, and investments. 

•THEODORE A. HAVEMEYER.— Made tn sugar 
refining with the Havemeyers and Elder. Was ». 
director in the American Sugar Refining Company. 

•WILLIAM M. H.4.VEMEYER.— Made in sugar refining, 
with the Havemeyers and Elder. 

•WILLIAM P. HAVEMEYER.— Partly Inherited from 
Hector C. Havemeyer. All made In sugar refining - 
and investments. 

THOMAS J. HAVEMEYER.- Partly Inherited from 
his father, Frederick C. Havemeyer. All made in- 
sugar refining and investments. 

•Est. FREDERIC C. HAVEMEYER.— Sugar refining. 

Est. LOUIS S. HARGOrs.— Jiade a, fortune In banking 
in Mexico and subsequently In Investments in 
New- York City. 

JOHN H. HEWSON (of Hewson & White).- Privata- 
banidng and investments. 



■€8 



LIBEAJBY OF TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



■HENRY HAET.— Local street railroads, stocljs, real 
estate and various other investments. Director 
in the Third Avenue Railroad and Pacific Mall 
Steamship Company. 
ANSON W. HARD (of Hard & Rand).— Importing 
coffee. Director in the Atlantic Mutual Insurancs 
Company, Bank of New-Yorli, and other concerns. 
Est. JOHN H. HALL.— Wholesale paper business at 
first. Then In elevated raUroads In New- York 
City ; Southern railroads, and other Investments. 
Was a director in the Georgia Central Railroad: 
East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad: 
Richmond and DanviUe Rallroal ; KnoxvUle and 
Ohio Railroad ; etc., etc. 
■EEV. CHARLES F. HOFFMAN.— Inherited from Ills 
father, Samuel V. Hoffman. Made in real estate, 
Inherited for several generations. 
VERY REV. EUGENE A. HOFFMAN.— Inherited from 
his father, Samuel V. Hoffman. Made in real es- 
tate. Inherited for several generations. 
■Est. AAEON HEESHFIELD.— First In mercantile busi- 
ness ; then in investments in real estate, and build- 
ing houses. 
«EUGENE HIGGINS (of E. S. Hlgglns & Co.).— In- 
herited several millions froDi Ills father, Ellas 6. 
Hlgglns. Made first In merchandising carpets ; then 
in manufacturing them ; accompanied by large pur- 
chases of rfeal estate, and the Investment of accu- 
mulations. Eugene Higgins is a member of the 
old firm, and director In the Delaware, Lackawanna 
and Western Railroad; Consolidated Gas Company 
of New- York; Lackawanna and Western Railroad; 
Liberty Insurance Company, Central National Bank, 
etc., etc. 
Est. RUSSELL H. HOADLEY.— Commission mer- 
chandising and trade with South America. He had 
numerous investments in insurance companies, etc. 
Est. JOHN C. HAMILTON.— Inherited from the Alex- 
ander Hamilton estate. Real estate chiefly. 
WILLIAM HILLS (of Hills Brothers).— Importation of 

fruits. 
Est. HENRY W. HUBBELL.— Made in the China trade 

and sliips to foreign lands. 
"HENRY HILTON.— Law practice, and Inheritance 
from Alexander T. Stewart, the drygoods merchant. 
Director in the Merchants' National Bank. 
JAMES HARRIMAN.— Made a fortune In Importing 

drygoods. 
-J. LOW HARRIMAN.- Importing drygoods. 
OLIVER HARRIMAN (of Low, Harriman & Co.).— 
Commission merchandising, and investments. Di- 
recior in the IlUnols Central Railroad; Central 
Trust Company, Bank of America, Bank for Sav- 
ings, Mutual Life Insurance Company and other 
corporations. 
WILSON G. HUNT.— Made in merchandising woollens 
and Investment of profits. Director In the United 
States Trust Company, National Park Bank, Con- 
solidated Gas Company, Eagle Fire Insurance Com- 
pany ; New- York Life Insurance and Trust Company ; 
N"ew-YQ|rk:„ New-Haven and Hartford Railroad. 
Globe Fire Insurance Company, Washington life 
Insurance Company; Delaware, Lackawanna and 
Western RaUroad, etc., etc. 
JCSEPH W. HARPER (of Harper & Bros.).— Pabliehihg 
copyrighted books and the "Magazine," "Weekly," 
"Bazar" and "Young People" issued by this great 
house. 
JOSEPH ABNER HARPER (of Harper & Bros.).-Made 

in the publishing business, as above. 
JOHN W. HARPER (of Harper & Bros.).- Made In the 

pubUsJilng business, as above. 
jrOHN HARPER.— Made in Harper <fc Bros., publishers. 



JOSEPH HENRY HARPER.— Made in the pubUshing 

business in the firm of Harper & Bros. 
aOLLIS P. HUNTINGTON.- A. man of very great for- 
time, amassed chiefly in building and managing the 
Central Pacific and Southern Paciflc railroads. He 
has large interests in railroads rumilng to the Paclflo 
Ocean and in the Soutli. Presldeiit of the Southern 
Paciflc Railroad ; Chesapeake, Ohio and Southwestern 
Railroad ; Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio 
Railway; Guatemala Central RaUroad, and the 
Mexican International Railroad. Large owner and 
director in the Pacific Mail Steamship Company; 
Texas and New- Orleans Railroad Company; United 
States and Brazil Mall Steamship Company; Central 
Pacific Railroad Company; Southern Paciflc Com- 
pany ; Old Dominion Land Company ; Chesapeake 
Central RaUroad; Morgan's Lousiana and Texas 
RaUroad and Steamship Company ; Western Union 
Telegraph Company; Metropolitan Trust Comjiany; 
Newport News and Mississippi VaUey Company, 
etc., etc. 

PRINCESS HATZFELD.— From her father, CoUis P. 
Huntington. 

JOHN E. HOFFMIRE (of John E. Hoffmlie & Sons).— 
Joinery business, river steamboating and street raU- 
roads. Has numerous Investments, is in the New- 
York and Norwalk Steamboat Company. 

IllKAM HITCHCOCK (of Hitchcock, Darling & Co.).— 
Made largely in the Flltli Avenue Hotel. Director 
in the Nicaragua Canal Company ; Garfleld National 
Bank ; Gaifield Safe Deposit Company ; Indianapolis, 
Decatur and Quinoy Railway ; Madison Saoare Garden 
Company, etc. 

Est. BENJAMIN H. HUTTON.-Importing French sUks, 
and large investments In real estate. He liad more 
than $1,000,000 worUi of real estate. 

WILLIAM S. m\.WK.-Made chiefly in the hotel busi- 
ness. Inherited from Ms lather, Samuel Hawk. 

Est. CHjUILES C. HASTINGSl-Clothing business In 
San Francisco and real-estate investments here. 

MRS. LAURA p. HAZAllD (wife ol WUham A. Hazard). 
-Inherited from Samuel J. TUden, who made a for- 
tune in law, elevated roads, etc. 

WiLLLiVM H. HALL (of Hall & Ruckel).-Wholesale 
drags. 

MARCELLUS HARTLEY (of the old firm of Schuyler, 
Hartley & Graham, now Hartley & Graham).— Has 
made a fortune in the wholesale jewelry business, 
and sale of firearms. President of the Remmgton 
Arms Company. Director in the Equitable Life 
Assurance Society ; German-American Baiik ; Liberty 
Insurance Company; Lincoln National Bank; United 
States Electric Lighting Company ; Western National 
Bank; Mercantile Trust Company, etc., etc. Presi- 
dent of tlie Mutual District Telegraph Company and 
Mutual District Messenger Company. 

ALFRED S. HEIDELBACH (of Heldeibach, lekeUiel- 
mer & Co.).— Private banking and stocks 

•MRS. CLARENCE E. HYDE.-Inherited from E T 
Babbitt, her father. Made in the manufacture of 
soda, saleratus, potash and soap. 

'MRS. FREDERICK E. HYDE.-Inherited from her 
father, B. T. Babbitt. Made in the manufacture of 
soda, saleratus. potash and soap. 

MRS. MATILDA HALLGARTEN.-From lier late hus- 
band, Julius Hallgarten, of HaUgarten & Co the 
Broad-st. brolterd. 

ALBERT HALLGARTEN.-From his father, Julius 
HaUgarten. Banking, brokerage and stocks 

**DR. FREDERICK HUMPHREYB.-Manufacture of 
homoaopatlifto family medicines. Pi'esldent of 
Humphreys HomoeDpathic Medicine Company 

EDGAR HENDRICKS (of Hendricks Brotliers).lM6tal 
merchandising. 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



69 



EIDMUND HENDEICKS (ol Hendrlcte Bros. I. —Metal 
merchandislne. 

IIAERY E. HOLLINS (of H. B. HoUins & Co.)— Bank- 
ing and investments. President of the Metropolitan 
Ferry Company ; director In the Knlclierboc(ker 
Trust Company, etc. 

MES. ANNIE L. HOE.— From her father, David Dows. 
Slade In grain and railroads. 

Est. EDWAED HAIGHT.— Made In importing cloth 
and tailors' trimmings, and investments in banks, 
etcT 

Est. DAVID HENEY HAIGHT.— Merchandising dry- 
goods and hatters' supp'les, with large investments 
In real estate. He had over $1,000,000 of real 
estate in Broadway alone. 

*ABEAM S. HEWITT (of Cooper, Hewitt & Co.).-Made 
in the manufacture of iron. Isinglass and glue. 
Director In the Chrysolite Silver Mining Company ; 
Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company ; Montana 
Smelting Company ; New- York and Greenwood Lake 
Eailway; American Eleofrlo Elevator Company; 
Uniled Smelting and Eeflning Company, etc., etc. 

'Mrs. SAEAH AMELIA HEWITT (wife of Abram S. 
Hewitt).— Inherited from her father, Peter Cooper. 
Made in manufacturing iron, itinglass and glue. 

Mrs. SUSAN HEETER (wife of Christian A. Herter, 
M. D.) .—Inherited from her father, David Dows. 
Made In grain and railroads. 

THOMAS V. HITCHCOCK.— Part owner of "The New- 
York Sun." Partly inherited, and added to by 
shrewd investments in real estate, stocks and cor- 
porations. 

**EOBERT HOE (of E. Hoe & Co.).— Manufacturing 
patented printing presses. Has investments in 
various corporations. Director in the Metropolitan 
Trust Company, etc. 

MES. EOBEET HOE (Olivia P. James).— Prom her 
father, the London member of the firm of Phelps, 
Dodge & Co. 

Mrs. HELEN MAEIA HOYT (widow of Jesse Hoyt).— 
From her husband, who made a great fortune in the 
grain and flour commission business, and in in- 
vestments in pine lands and real estate In Mich- 
igan, and in railroads. He bought large tracts of 
pine in Michigan ; and East Saginaw is built on 
land owned by hlra. Built hotels, cottages and 
banks. Was in many Michigan and Minnesota rail- 
roads and the Chesapeake and Ohio Eailroad. 

ALFRED M. HOYT.— In the grain and flour commis- 
sion business vrtth his brotlier, Jesse Hoyt, and in 
banking afterward. Also by inlierltance from Jesse 
Hoyt. 

EEUBEN HOYT.— From his brother, Jesse Hoyt. 

LOUIS T. HOYT.— Made in the stock brokerage busi- 
ness. 

•WILLIAM HOYT (of Hoyt Brothers).- Tanning and 
leather business. 

•EDWAED C. HOYT (of Hoyt Brothers).— Made in 
tanning and leather. 

Mrs. MAEY W. HAMILTON (widow of James A. Ham- 
ilton) .-Inherited from her father, Thomas SuJIern, 
a linen importer and merchant and investor In real 
estate. 

*Est. ALVIN HIGGINS.— Made In carpet manufacturing 
with his brother, E. S. Higglns ; and in real estate 
investments. 

JAMES HOOKEE HAMEESLEY.— Inheri'ed thr:uthhis 
father, John W. Hamersley. Made in real estate. 

JACOB HAYS.— Partly inherited from his father, Will- 
iam H. Hays. Made In banking; the Eighth and 
Ninth Avenue street railroads ; gas companies ; the 
People's Line of steamboats on the Hudson ; rail- 
roads ; the Brooklyn Ferry Company, etc. Jacob is a 
director In the Consolidated Electric Light Company, 



Eighth Avenue Eailroad; Brooklyn and New-York 
Ferry; Knickerbocker Trust Company, etc., etc. 

E. ST. JOHN HAYS (of E. St. John Hays & Co., 
bankers and brokers).— Partly Inherited from his 
father, William H. Hays, and made as above. Di- 
rector in the Eighth Avenue Railroad; engaged In 
banking and brokerage. 

Est. HENRY L. HOGUET.— Banking, brokerage and 
Investments In real estate and securities. 

GEORGE G. HAVEN.— Banking and Investments. Di- 
rector in the Bank of New- Amsterdam ; Manufactur- 
ing Investment Company ; Metropolitan Opera 
House Company ; New- York, Providence and Boston 
Eailroad ; Providence and Stjnlngton Steamship Com- 
pany ; New- York and Northern Eailway ; QulcksUver 
Mining Company, etc., etc. 

MES. GEORGE G. HAVEN.— From her father, John 
Amot, of Elmlra, the great banker. Made In bank- 
ing. 

Est. EDWAED HEN.— Merchandising tobacco and 
smokers' articles ; exportation of American goods to 
the Isthmus, and speculation in Wall Street. 

MES. ANNETTE W. W. HICKS-LOED.-From her late 
husband, Thomas Lord, who made a fortune In mer- 
chandising and real estate. 

'HENRY A. HDRLBUT.-Made a fortune In the man- 
ufacture of hats and caps, and Investment of profits. 
Director lo the Second National Bank; Fifth Ave- 
nue Safe Deposit Company; Mercantile Safe De- 
posit Company ; Mercantile Trust Company ; Equit- 
able Life Assurance Society ; Fidelity and Casualty 
Company; Forty-second Street and Grand Street 
Ferry (Railroad; Home Insurance Company, etc., 
etc. 

Est. GEORGE HARDIN.-Importatlou of linen and 
mercliandlsng drygoods. 

MRS. MARY M. HECKSOHER (wife of John G. Heck- 
soher).— From her father, WUllam E. Travers. Made 
in Wall Street. 

Est. WILLIAM HEGEMAN.— Merchandising di-ugs. 

•Es.t. EDGAR HOLLIDAY (of Eead, HolUday & Sons). 
—In the manufacture of aniline dyes, and In real 
estate, electric light and other investments. He Is 
president of the company. 

Est. CHARLES G. HAVENS.-Inherited a large for- 
tune from his wife. 

WILLIAM H. HAEBECK.-Has made a large fortune 
in ships, ocean freighting, staves, etc. 



ADEIAN ISELIN.— Made a large fortune In the im- 
portation of drygoods, and Judicious Investment of 
profits; in banking, etc. Director In Metro- 
ipohtan Opera House and Manhattan Storage Ware- 
house Company. 

ADRIAN ISELIN, JR. (of A. IseUn <fc Co.).— Made 
originally in the importartion of drygoods, followed 
by banking and investments In laUroads, etc. 
Director in the Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburg 
Railway, Central Trust Company, Gallatin National 
Bank, Mobile and Ohio Railroad, Sixth National 
Bank, Manhattan Storage and Warehouse Company, 
etc. President of the Metropolitan Improvement 
Company. 

WILLIAM E. ISELIN (of William Iselin & Co.).— Im- 
portation of drygoods. 

ISAAC ISELIN.— iHade in banking, brokerage and 
stocks. 

*MRS. C. OLIVER ISELIN.— By Inheritance from 
WiUlam T. Gamer, her father. Made In cotton 
manufacturing. 

COLUMBUS O'D. ISELIN.— Banking, brokerage and 
stocks. 

RICHAIiD IRVIN (of Richard Irvin & Co.).— Banking 
and investments. Director In the Commercial Com- 



LIBEAEY OF TEIBLWB EXTRAS. 



pany ; New-Yort, Ontario and Western Eailroad, 
etc. 
'WILLIAM B. ISHAM.— Tanning and leather, and in- 
vestments In stochs. 
BEAYTON IVES (of J. B. Metcalf & Co.).— Made In 
banMng and brolierage business. President of the 
Western National Banli. Director in the Mercantile 
Trust Company ; New- York Stocli Exchange Build- 
ing Company, etc. 
SAMUEL INSLEE (of Calhoun, Bobbins & Co.).— Mer- 
chandising fancy drygoods, and advance in value 
of real estate. 
JOHN H. INMAN (of Inman. Swan & Co.).— Partly 
inherited from his father, a cotton merchant. 
Largely increased by himseU by his own great busi- 
ness ability, first in the cotton commission business 
and, after 1884, in railroads. President of the 
Richmond and DanvlUe Eailroad. Director In 
nearly aU the railroads of the South, among them 
the Louisville and Nashville; East Tennessee, Vir- 
ginia and Georgia; and Memphis and Charleston. 
Also director in the American Cotton Oil Company ; 
American Surety Company ; Fourth National Bank ; 
Home and Liberty Insurance companies, etc. One 
of the founders of the Cotton Exchange in New- 
YorS City. 
ISAAC ICKELHEIMEE (of Heidelbach, IcheUieimer <fc 
Co.).— Private banking. Director In the Importers 
and Traders' National Bank. 
Mrs. ADELIA DUANE P. IRELAND (wUe of John B. 
Ireland).— Inherited from the Pell family. Made in 
real estate. 
D. •mLLlS JAMES (of Phelps, Dodge & Co.).— Partly 
Inherited from Ws father, who was the London 
member of the firm. Added to largely by himself. 
The fortune has been made In the Importation ol 
metals, and investments. Director in the Ansonia 
Brass and Copper Company, Copper Queen Consol- 
idated Mining Company, United States Trust Com- 
.pany, etc., etc. 

JOHN JAY.— Real estate, inherited. President of the 
Robinson Consolidated Mining Company. 

JOHN TAYLOR JOHNSTON.— Merchandising by his 
father, and railroads by himself. Director in the 
New- York Life Insurance and Trust Company, Cen- 
tral New-Jersey Land Improvement Company, Dol- 
phin Mannfaclurtng Company (Jute goods), etc., etc. 

MBS. LAUEA HALL .JENNINGS (wife of Frederick B. 
Jennings).- From her father, Trenor W. Park, who 
made a fortune, first, in law, then in the Mariposa 
Mine and real estate iu California, then In railroads 
In Vermont, and in the Panama Railroad, which "he 
sold 10 the De Lesseps C.inal Company at a large 
profit. 

MES. EMMA L. JACOB {wUe of Leonard Jacob).— In- 
herited from her fatlier, J. R. Lawrence. Made 
in merchandising and real estate. 

JOHN D. JONES.— Made in Insurance and investments. 
President of the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany. Director in the Citizens' Insurance Com- 
pany, ManhaLtan Savings Institution, Equitable Life 
Assurance Society, etc., etc. 

Est. GEORGE JONES.— Publishing "The New- York 
Times," and investments In real estate. 

Est. MARY S. JONES.— From her brother, John Q. 
Jones, who was president of the Chemical Bank. 
Made in banking and railroads. 

MASON EENSHAW JONES.— Inherited. Made in bank- 
ing and real estate. 

OLIVEB LIVINGSTON JONES.— Prom Oliver H. Jones. 
Made in rise in value of real estate. 

Est. GEORGE JONES.— Inherited from Joshua Jones, 
who made a fortune in the Chemical Bank, and in 
real estate and other investments. 



Est. MARY MASON JONES (widow of Isaac Jones).— 
Inherited from Joshua and Isaac Jonps. jyfade in 
the Chemical Bank, and investments in real esta e 
and stocks. 
♦JOHN J. JONES.— From David Jones, the brewer. 
He had breweries in Williamsburg, New-Rochelle, 
Jersey City and New- York; and larze investments 
in real estate and securities. He was in telegraph 
and insurance companies, banks, etc. 
'MARGARET J. JONES.— From David Jones, the 

brewer. 
Est. MRS. MARY MASON JONES.— Largely from her 
father, John Mason, who owned a great deal of real 
estate, the rise in value of which made her very 
wealthy. She left an estate of several millions, Ed- 
ward Renshaw Jones being her princliml heir. 
FREDERICK EHINELANDBR JONES.— By Inheritance 
from the Rhlnelander and Joshni Jones families. 
Made in real estate, banldng and investments. 
Est. JOSEPH A. JAMESON.— Merchandising in St. 
Louis and banking and investments in New- York 
City. 
ERAZM J. XERZMANOWSKI.— Gas making. President 
of the Equitable Gas Light Company and of the 
United States Equitable Gas Company. 
MORRIS K. JESUP (of John Paton & Co., banJiers).— 
Importation of iron, banking and investmeits. 
Director in the Metropolitan Trust Company, New- 
York, Lake Erie and Western Eailroad, etc. 
Est. EDWAED S. JAFFEAY (of E. S. Jaflray <fc Co.).— 
Importing drygoods, and investments in real 
estate. 
OLIVER B. JENNINGS.— Went to San Francisco in 
1849; was there engaged in the wholesale clothing 
business; retired In 1865 and moved East. He 
then became Interested in the Standard Oil Com- 
pany and was made a director. The larger part of 
his fortune has been made in the Standard Oil 
Company, in the production, transportation and re- 
fining of petroleum. Director In the Manhattan 
Company, tie Connecticut National Bank at Bridge- 
port, Troy Steel and Iron Company, and other cor- 
porations. 
•AUGUSTUS D. JUILLIARD (of A. D. Jullllard & 
Co.).— Has made a large fortune tn wholesale dry- 
goods and manufactiiring woollens. Director in the- 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, Bank of America, 
Central Trust Company, Hanover Fire Tusurance 
Company, etc. 
MES. A. D. JUILLIARD.— Prom her father, Fred- 
erick H. Cossltt, who made a fortune In merchandis- 
ing and fortunate Investments in real estate. 
Est. HOWARD L. JOHNSON.— Tobacco merchan/- 

dislng. 
WILLIAM M. JOHNSTON (of R. T. Wilson & Co., 
bankers, of New- York City, ajnd of I. B. English 
& Co., of Macon, Ga.).— BanMng and cotton 
pressing. 
ROBERT JOHNSTON.-Largely inherited from John 
Johnston (of J. & 0. Johnston), to whom his 
brother Charles, In the same firm, also left his 
fortune. AU made in merchandising drygoods. 
ALGERNON S. JARVIS.— Tobacco Inspection business.. 
Est. JOSIAH JEX.— Made in the Shipping business 
and investments in real estate now very valuable. 
HUGH J. JEWETT.— Made in railroads, especially in 
' the Erie, of wUch he was president. 
Est. FREDERICK P. JAMES.-Left an estate of 
$1,250,000, accumulated in banking and invest- 
ments In securities and real estate. 



EDWAED KING.— Made In financial Instltiitlons. H& 
is president of the Union Trust Company. Director 
In the Manhattan Savings Institution, etc. 



AMEEICAN JOXLIONAIEES. 



EUGENE KELLY (of Eugene KeUy & Co., bankers 
and brokers).— Began life In the drygoods business 
In San Francisco. Came East, Invested Ms accu- 
mulations la corporations and has operated largely 
In Wall Street, amassing a fortune ol several 
millions. Director In the American Contracting 
and Dredging Company, Bank of New- York, Emi- 
grant Industrial Savings Bank, Equitable Gas Light 
Company, Equitable Life Assurance Society, Na- 
tional Park Bank, Title Guarantee and Trust Com- 
pany, Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line EaUway, etc., 
etc. 

A. GEACIE KING (of James G. King's Sons).— Private 
banking and investments. Director in the Metro- 
politan Trust Company. 

JAMBS B. KEENE.— Silver mtnea and speculation In 
San Francisco, and operations in Wan Street In 
New- York. 

•MRS. LOUISA M. KEENOCHAN (widow of John A. 
Kemoohan).— inherited. She received a fortune 
from the Lorillard and Marshall families. Partly 
made In tobacco maaufactiiring. 

'MBS. JAMES P. KERNOCHAN.— Inherited from the 
Lorillard family. Made In tobacco manufacturing. 

JOHN STEWAET KENNEDY.— Inherited. 

WILLIAM M. KINGSLAND (of A. C. Kingsland & 
Sons).— Made a fortune in shippine. merchandise and 
rise in value M real estate. Director in the Leather 
Manufacturers' National Bank. 

GEORGE L. KINGSLAND (of A. C. Kingsland & 
Sons).— Inherited from Ambrose C. Kingsland, 
shipping merchant and large owner of Hudson 
River and suburban real estate. 

WALTER F. KINGSLAND (of A. C. Kingsland & 
Sons).— From Ambrose C Kingsland. See last 
above. 

MRS. AMBROSE C. KINGSLAND (Catherine Aspln- 
wall). — From her late husband, and also from Will- 
iam H. Asplnwall, her father. Made in shipping 
and trade, railroads, and real estate and other in- 
vestments. 

•GEORGE KEMP.— Manufacturing drugs and Florida 
water. Special partner In the firm of Lanman & 
Kemp. 

Est. WILLIAM C. KIMBALL.— Inherited a fortune and 
added to It In Wall Street. 

Est. ISAAC C. KENDALL.— Left over $1,000,000 in 
real estate. 

JOHN ALSOP KING (of James G. King's Sons).— 
Private banking and Investments. 

Est. EUGENE KETELTAS.— Else in value of local 
real estate, and Investments. 

Est. HARTEY KENNEDY.- Brokerage business and 
stock operations, especially In the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna and Western, In which road he was a large 
owner. He left a fortune of $2,300,000. 

Est. JOHN B. KENNEDY.— His fortune was made 
chiefly in Illuminating gas works. President of 
the Mutual Gas Light Company. He also owned 
a machine shop, and made Hazieton and other 
boUers. 

RICHARD KELLY.— Made In street railroads In New- 
York City and banking. President of the Fifth 
National Bank. 

Est. FREDERICK KUEHNE.— Banking and Invest- 
ments. 

DAVID KING.— Contracting and building; and real 
estate Investments. 

•MRS. EVA KIP (wife of Colonel Lawrence Kip).— From 
her brother, Pleirre Lorillard. Made in the tobacco 
manufacture and real estate. 

Est. AUGUSTUS KOL'NTZB (of Kountze Bros.).— Private 
banking and railroads. President of the Boston, 



Hoosac Tunnel and Western Railway. Director 
in the National Security and Trust Company, and 
other enterprises. 

LUTHER KOUNTZE (of Kountze Bros., bankers).— 
Partly by Inheritance. The rest In banking and real 
estate Investments. 

GUSTAV E. KtSSEI, (of Kessler & Co.).— Commis- 
sion merchandising, banking and stocks. Partly in- 
herited from his father, a merchant. 

COLONEL DELAJJCEY KANE.— Inherited through his 
mother, who was a member of the Astor f'.mlly. 
He married Miss Iselin, who also inherited money. 
Made In real estate and banking chiefly. 

Est ROBERT LENOX KENNEDY.— Made in banking, 
trust companies, syndicates and corporations. 

JOHN H. KEMP (of Kemp, Day <fe Co.).— Partly In- 
herited. Made In importing tea, sugar and coffee, 
and In canning provisions. 

Est. HENRY A. KERR.— Made in the grocery busi- 
ness and Investments. 

Est. ABRAHAM KUHN.-FJrst, in the clothing business 
in Cincinnati. Then a banker in New-York. 
Founder of the house of Kuhn, Loeb & Co. 



EMANUEL LEHMAN (of Lehman Bros.).— Made by 
buying cotton in the South and exporting it to 
Europe, and investing in the reorganization of 
Southern raUroads. Now in banking and broker- 
age business. Director In the Metropolitan 
Ferry Company ; Tenth and Twenty-third sta. Feiry 
Company ; Mercantile National Banii ; Alabama 
Mineral Land Company ; Berry-Boice Cattle Com- 
pany, etc. 

MAYER LEHMAN (of Lehman Bros.).— Made In the 
exportation of cotton; cotton oil; banking, etc. 
Director In the Hamilton Bank; American Cotton 
OH Company, etc. 

ARTHUR LEARY.— Inherited. Made the bulk of it 
in shipping, but some Id feal estate and banking. 
Director in the National Park Bank; New-York 
Mutual Gas Light Company, etc. 

Est. HARRISON J. LIBBY (of H. J. Libby <fc 
Company).— Commission drygoods. 

ADOLPH LADENBURG (of Ladenburg, Tlialmann <Si 
Company).— Private banking and real estate. Has 
many investments. Is in the Madison Square 
Garden Company, etc. 

STEPHEN R. LESHER (of Lesher, Whitman & Com- 
pany).— Importation of tailors' trimmings. 

CHARLES G. LANDON.— Has made a large fortune 
in the importation of drygoods and Investments. 
Director in the Central Trust Company ; Bank ol 
America; Equitable Life Assm-ance Society; G<?r- 
man American Insurance Company; Gutta Percha 
ifc Rubber Manufacturing Company ; Gold & Stock 
Telegraph Company; Hanover Fire Insurance Com- 
pany ; Sixth Avenue Eailroad Company ; Sixth 
National Bank, etc., etc. 

WILLIAM LIBBEY.— Made in wholesale and retail 
drygoods, as partner of A. T. Stewart. Director 
in the American Pig Iron Storage & Warrant 
Company; Colorado Midland Railway; National 
Bank of Commerce; New- York, Lake Erie and 
Western Railway, United States Trust Compiiny, 
etc., etc. 

CHARLES LANIER (Of Winslow, Lanier & Company) .— 
Private banldng and investments. Dirtc'.'&r In tlie 
Central Eailraad of New-Jersey ; Central Trast 
Oomx>any ; Central and South American Telegraph 
Company ; Madison Square G.irrten Company ; 
National Bank of Commerce; New- York and Long 
Branch Railroad ; West Shore Railroad ; Third 
National Bank; Western Union Telegraph Company, 
etc., etc. 



LIBEAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



•COUNTESS VON LINDEN (Isabella Andrews;. - 
From her father, Loring Andrews. Made in tanning 
and leather. 

SOLOMON LOEB (of Kulin, Loeb & Co.).— Banlsing and 
rise in real estate. 

Est. DAVID LANE.— Merchandising, foreign trade, 
and Investments in bants, insurance companies, etc. 

EICHARD LATHEES.— Insurance business clilefly. 

LAZARUS LEVY (of L. Levy & Co., stock brokers).— 
Made in dealing in stocks and in brokerage business, 
mainly. He starlei in Mampliis, Ttnn. 

EDWAED V. LOEW.— Banking and financial corpora- 
tions. President of the Manufacturers and Build- 
ers' Fire Insurance Company. Director In the 
American Surety Company, Eleventh Ward Bank, 
Knickerbocker Trust Company, New-York Mutual 
Savings Loan Association, Seaboard National Bank, 
Batopllas Mining Company, etc., etc. 

*LOUIS L. LOEILLAED.— Inherited from the Lorll- 
lard and Wolfe estates. Made in tobacco manu- 
faoturlng, hardware merchandising and real estate. 
Director In the Honduras Commercial Company, 
etc. 

•PIERRE LOEILLAED.- Inherited a large fortune 
from the Lorlllard family, and increased by him- 
self. Made In tobacco manufacturing. 

GEORGE LAW.— Partly from his father, George Law, 
the builder of High Bridge and of part of the 
Croton Aqueduct, and part of the Panama Eallroad, 
and added to by himself. Made first In building 
roads and public works ; then in railroading and 
banking; in part In steam-shipping to California; 
and finally In street railroads and ferries in New- 
York City. President of Oie Eighth and the Ninth 
Avenue Eailroads. 

DANIEL LORD.— Inherited from his father In part. 
Increased by law practice and trusteeship of es- 
tates in the Astor family, etc. Director In the Long 
Island Railroad. 

JAMES LOW (Low, Harriman & Co.).— Made a 
fortune In the drygoo'ds business. Director in the 
Equitable Life Assurance Society, Hanover Fire 
Insurance Company, Safe Deposit Company of 
New-York, etc. 

DAVID C. LYALL (of Buclianan & Lyall).— Imponta- 
tion of tobacco. 

WILLIAM LUMMIS.— Banldng. Director In the Emi- 
grant Industrial Savings Bank; Rome, Watertown 
and Ogd.ensbTirg Eallroad; New- York and New- 
England Eallroad ; Washimgton Trust Company ; and 
Bond and Mortgage Guarantee Co. Vice-president 
of the Newburgh, Dutchess and Connecticut Eallroad. 

Est. HENEIETTA LENOX.— Inherited from her brother 
James Lenox. Made in merchandising and invest- 
ments in real estate by their father, Robert Lenox. 

Est. GEOEGE GEAHAM LAKE.— Importation of dry- 
goods first; then street railroads and gas companies 
in various cities. 

JOHN H. LUNING.— Inherited a fortune from his 
father, Nicholas Lunins. of San Francisco. Made 
in loans, real estate and banking. 

•Est. NATHAN UTTAUEE (of Llttauer Bros.)— Man- 
ufaotuilng gloves and merchandising fancy dry- 
goods. 

•JOHN J. LAPHAM (of H. G. Lapham & Co.)— Tan- 
ning and merchandising leather. Largely Inherited 
from Henry G. Lapham. 

•LEWIS H. LAPHAM (of H. G. Lapham & Co.)— Tan- 
king and merchandising leather. Largely Inherited 
from Henry G. Lapham. 

JOSEPH F. 1X)UBAT.— Partly by Inheritance from lili 
father, a tea merchant, who Invested his accumu- 
lations In now valuable real estate. Owns over a 
mlUlon of real estate In New- York City. 



"Est. THOMAS LEWIS.— Made about $3,000,000 In the 
manufacture of roofing materials and investments In 
real estate. He lived quietly, and none knew of 
his great wealth un,tU after Ms death. 

MRS. GEOEGE LEWIS. JE. (Mary Taylor).— Inherited 
several millions from her father. Moses Taylor, 
made In importing sugar and In shipping first, but 
chiefly In railroads, gas, banks and coal invest- 
ments. 

PHINEAS C. LOUNSBURY (ex-Governor of Cou- 
necticut).— Law practice, banking, and Investments. 
President of the Merchants' Exchange Bank here. 

•BENJAMIN LICHTENSTEIN.— Manufacturing cigar- 
ettes and tobacco, and investments In real estate. 
President of the (consolidated Cigarette Company. 

Est. JOHN LAWRENCE.- Partly inherited. Made in 
drygoods and insurance, and In trusteeship of the 
Garner es.ate. 

Est. H0RA;C10 IRELAND LAWRENCE.— Partly in- 
herited. Made in drygoods and trading In Michigan 
lands. 

JOHN LAWRFTNCE.- From his father, J. E. Lawrence. 
Partly made in rise in real estate. 

"PRESCOTT LAWRENCE (formerly of Groton, Mass.). 
—Inherited from Massachusetts relatives. Manu- 
facturing. ' 

•MBS. FRANCIS C. LAWEENCE.— From her father, 
William T. Garner, son of Thomas Garner, the 
great manufacturer of cotton goods. (See Mrs. 
Harriet A. Garner.) 

CHAELES H. LFU^AND.— Made originally in the trade 
witli Cuba. Added to in banking. President of the 
Sixtli National iSank. Director in the Union Trust 
Company, etc. 

MES. WOODBUEY LANGDON (Helen Colford Jones).— 
From her husband, whose fortune was partly In- 
lierited from tlie Asters, and from her father. Made 
in real estate cliiefly. 

WOODBUEY LANGDON (of Joy, Langdon & Co.).— 
Partly Inherited, but made In part In commission 
drygoods and investments. Director in the Central 
National Bank. 

WILLIAM H. LEE (of Lee, Tweedy & Co.).— Drygoods. 
Director in the Fifth Avenue Bank, Hanover Fire 
Insurance Company, etc. 

•EDWARD E. LA DEW.— Tanning and leather. 

•JOSEPH H. LADEW.— Tanning and leather. 

JOHNSTON LIVINGSTON.— His fortune came originally 
by inheritance, but has been added to largely by 
himself. In railroads, express companies and In- 
vestments In real estate, during a long and active 
life. Director In the American Express Company, 
Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, National Ex- 
press Company, etc. 

Est. ROBERT E. LIVINGSTON.— Else in real estate 
clilefly. 

LEONARD LEWISOHN (of Lewlsohn Brothers).- 
Made by Importing, first, ostrich and other feathers, 
hair, bristles, etc. ; then the firm became sales agent 
for a number of copper companies ; president of the 
Lewlsohn Importing and Trading Company. 

ADOLPH LEVrasOHN (of Lewlsohn iirothers).- 
Importation of metals. 

PHILIP LEWISOHN (of Lewlsohn brothers).— 
Importation of metals. A member also of the 
Lewlsohn Importing and Trading Company. 

EDWAED LIVINGSTON.-Inherited. Made chiefly m 
real estate. He Is a very large owner of this 
class of property. 

JOSEPH MILBANK.— Inlierited about $2,000,000 from 
his father, Jeremiah Milbank, who made a largo 
fortune, first in groceries, then in banking, a share 
in Borden's condensed-milk factories, and railroads. 
Joseph Milbank is a director In tlie Chicago, Mil- 



AJIEEICAJv' MILLIONAIEES. 



73 



Hobokea Ferry 



■whaling and 
president of the Seamen's ;6a«- 



waulsee and St. Paul Railway, and one of its largest 
owners; Hamilton Bank; Quicksilver Mining Com- 
pany ; Borden's Condensed Milk Company, etc. 
Est Mrs. ELIZABETH L. MILBANK.-From her hus- 
band, Jeremiah Mllliank. Made as above explained. 
•■WAENEK MILLER.— Made in manufacturing printing 
paper and wood pulp. Interested in the Hudson 
Elver Paper and Pulp Company, and the Herkimer 
Paper Company. President now of the Nicaragua 
Canal ConstructiOQ Company. Director in the 
Nicaragua Canal Company ; New- York Mutual Sav- 
ings and Loan Association, etc. 
WILLIAM J. MEERALL (of Acker, Merrall & Condit).- 
Made in wholesale and retail groceries. Now the 
principal owner In the firm. 
Mrs. CAROLINE L. MACY.-From her husband, Josiah 
Macy. Made in producing, refining and transport- 
ing petroleum oU, in the Standard Oil Company. 
WILLIAM A. MACY.— Made In banking, 

Company, etc. 
Est. WILLIAM H. MACY.-Sbip-ownini 
banking. He was 

ings Bank. , i . 

Est. Dr. WILLIAM H. MUNN.-Made in the Chemical 

Bank. 
Est. ROBERT McCOSKEY.-Made in the Chemical 

Bank. . , 

ROBERT MACLAY.-Made in the enormous business of 
the Knickerbocker Ice Company, of which he is 
president. 

LEWIS MAY.— Brokerage business and investments. 
In street railroads, etc. Director in the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company; Continental Construction 
and improvement Company ; Harney Peak Tin Mm- 
ing. Milling and Manufacturing Company, etc. 

COUr'tLANDT D. MOSS (of Lawrence, Taylor & Co.).— 
Commission dry-goods, and Investments in a num- 
ber of corporations. 

•CHRISTOPHER MOLLER.— Sugar refining. 

ALONZO C. MONSON.— Long Island real estate. 

HENRY G. MARQUAND.-Wholesale jewelry and im- 
porting, ai.d investments in real estate and stocks. 
Director in the Mercantile Tmst Company ; Missouri 
Paclflo Railroad ; American Fire Insurance Company ; 
Equitable Life Assurauoe Society; Metropolitan 
Opera House Company, etc. 

«SBTH M. MILLIKFJ^ (of Deering, Milliken & Co.).- 
Started in a country store in Maine ; then engaged 
in commission dry-goods In Boston; finally, in tlie 
same business In New-York City. Has a large In- 
terest in woollen and cotton factories in New-Eng- 
land. Director in the Mercantile National Bank, 
etc. 

DUCHESS OF MARLBOROUGH.— From her first huSr 
band, Louis C. Haraersley, who inherited from his 
father, Gordon Hamersley, a great fortune, made in 
the advance In value of real estate here. 

JOHN G. MOORE (of Moore & Schley, one of the 
largest banking firms in Wall Street).— Made money 
In contracting, especially in building the Mutual 
Union Telegraph Company, which he sold to the 
Western Union Telegraph Company; and in South- 
ern railroads. Director in the East Tennessee, Vir- 
ginia and Georgia Railroad; Knoxville and Ohio 
Railroad ; Lake Erie and Western Railroad ; .Western 
Union Telegraph Company ; New- York Mutual Tele- 
graph Company; Chase National Bank; Inter- 
national Bank Note Company, etc., etc. 
D. O. MILLS.— Banker, from the age of 18 ; first in 
partnership with his cousin in Buffalo ; then In Cali- 
fornia, wMther he went In 1849. Added to his 
profits by Investments in mines, i^ailways and real- 
estate. 



Est. JOHN J. MORRIS.— Merchandising, groceries and 
Investments in real estate. Was in the Globe Fire 
Insurance Company. 
Est. JOHN MEEKS.— Rlso in value of city and sul>- 

urban real estate. 
Est. JOSEPH W. MEEKS.— Rise in value of city and 

suburban real estate. 
MRS. MARY ELY MILLER (wife of Charles Addison 
Miller).— From her father, David J. Ely, coffee Im- 
poitier. 
Est. JOHN W. MITCHELL.— Investments In real estate. 
•Est. NATHANIEL McCREADY.— Coasting shipping 
and commission. Was In the Old Dominion Steam- 
slilp Company, etc. 
J. PIERPONT MORGAN (of Drexel, Morgan & Co.).— 
Partly Inherited from J. S. Morgan. Made In 
private banking and Investments In railroads, etc. 
Director in the Central Trust Company, Manhattan 
Elevated Railway Company, Mexican Telegraph Com- 
pany, New- York Central and Hudson River Railroad 
Company, New- York, Pro\Tdence and Boston Rail- 
road, West Shore Railroad, Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, NatlDnal Bank of Commerce, Cen- 
tral and South American Telegraph Company, Mad- 
ison Square Garden Company, Manufacturing Invest- 
ment Company, etc. 
GEORGE A. MORRISON.- Merchandising, linen and 
investments. Is in the American Cotton Oil Com- 
pany. 
Est. EX-JUDGE JOHN H. McCANN.— Speculation in 
real estate and law practice. Had an estate In 
Ireland also. 
CHARLES M. McGHEE.— Before the war a large land 
and shive owner in the South. After tlie war he 
went into railroad development in the South, In com- 
pany with Richard T. Wilson and others, and reor- 
ganized and built up many Southern roads. Direc- 
tor in the East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia 
Railroad, Knoxville and Ohio Railroad, Memphis 
and Charleston Railroad, Texas and Pacific Eallroad, 
Cincinnati, Jackson and Mackinaw Eallroad, Western 
Union Beef Company, etc. 
"GEORGE C. MAGOUN (of the old firm of Kidder, Pea- 
body & Co., bankers). — Private banking and sugar 
refining. Director in the Chicago, Milwaukee and 
St. Paul Railroad, Equitable Life Assurance Society, 
Union Trust Company, Colorado Midland Railway, 
American Sugar Refining Company, Don Enrigue 
Mining Company, etc. 
JOHN L. MACAULAY.— Cotton Exchange business, 
cotton oil, Housatonic RaUroad, Nicaragua Canal 
Company, etc. 
EDWARD A. MORRISON.— In the business of import- 
ing laces, ribbons, etc., for over thirty years ; and in 
large real estate investments. 
PBTFJl MARIE.— BanMng In the vicinity of Wall 
Street; large negotiations in Government bonds, for 
the United States Government; and investments. 
He was a large owner of railroad securities. 
Est. RALPH MEAD, SE.— Eallroad building and 

similar enterprises. 
MES. ELIZA HALL MoCULLOUGH (wife of General 
John G. McCullough).— From her father, Trenor W. 
Park, who made a fortune In law, tlie Mariposa mine, 
leal estate and railroads in California; then in rail- 
roads in Vermont, then in the Panama Eallroad and 
sale of the same to the De LessejK Canal Company. 
MISS E. T. MINTURN.— Inherited. Made In shipping, 

ocean trade, banldng, and investments. 
MRS. ROBERT B. MINTURN (Susanna Shawj.— Inher- 
ited from her husband, who left his whole fortune to 
her. Made in shipping and ocean trade. 
ROBERT S. MINTURN.— Inherited. Made In shipping 
and ocean trade. 



74 



lilBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTEAS. 



MES. JOHN W. MINTUEN (Louisa Asplnwall).— Inlier- 
Ited in part from her lather, William H. Aspinwall, 
and In part from her hushand, of whose entire estate 
she has the Income. All made In sliipplng, ocean 
trade, railroads and Investments. 
Est. JOHN C. MINTUEN.— Made In shiijping and ocean 

trade. 
MAECHIONESS DE MOEES (Medora Marie Hoffman).— 

From her father, J. Hoffman, the banker. 
•DAVID H. McALPIN (of D. H. McAlpm & Oo.).— Man- 
ufacturing tobacco, real estate (of ■which he has an 
enormous quantity), and Investments. Director in 
Home Insurance Company, Manhattan Life Insur- 
ance Company, National Bank of the Eepubllc, Eut- 
gers Fire Insurance Company, Union Trust Company, 
etc. 
♦COLONEL EDWIN__A. McALPIN (of D. H. McAlpln & 
Co.).— Made In tobacco manufacturing and real estate. 
Director m Sixth National Bank, Hygeia Sparkling 
Distilled Water Company, State Trust Company, etc. 
LEVI P. MORTON (of Morton, Bliss & Co.).- Made his 
start in a country store in New-England, then en- 
gaged in the drygoods business in Boston, then In 
New-York in importing and jobbing drygoods, and 
then in banking. Director In the Equitable Life 
Assurance Society, Washington Life Assurance Com- 
pany, Home Insurance Company and other corpora- 
tions. 
THEODOEE W. MYERS (of Theodore W. Myers & 

Co.).— Private banldng, stocks and investments. 
JAJMES McCREERY.— Made in his large wholesale and 
retail drygoods store. Is in the Liberty Insurance 
Company, etc. 
GEORGE MUNEO.— Publishing story papers and books. 
•JORDAN L. MOTT (Of the Jordan L. Mott Iron- 
works).— Partly Inlierited from his father, Jordan L. 
Mott, who was the first man to make a stove in 
which anthracite coal could be burned. Added to 
by himself in the same business, namely the manu- 
facture of coal stoves and ornamental Iron ware. 
Interested in the Nortli American Iron Works. Direc- 
tor in the Forty-second Street and Grand Street Rail- 
way Company, Central Gaslight Company, Dreber 
Manufacturing Company, oils; North New-York 
lighting Company and owner of a large quantity of 
real estate. 
Est. DE. VALENTINE MOTT.— Made in the practice 
of medicine and rise in value of real estate, of 
which he owned a, large quantity. 
HOPPER STEIKEE MOTT.— His large fortune origi- 
nated in the rise in value of the old "Hopper 
fajm," wMch has been In the family since 1643 
and extended from near Fifth-ave. to the Hudson 
Elver and across to the uplands on the Jersey 
side. From his uncle, Jordan Mott. 
EDWIN D. MOEGAN, ]r.— From his uncle, Edwin 
V'. Morgan, nearly the whole of whose great 
fortune he inherited. Made in Importing tea, 
coffee, and sugar, first; then in negotiation of 
public bonds, and, finally. In general banking. 
Est. GEOEGE D. MOEGAN (of E. D. Morgan & 
Co.).— Importing tea, coffee, and sugar; negotia^ 
tion of bonds ; a;nd banking. 
•Est. MiA.EY' JANE MORGAN.- From her husband, 
Charles Morgan, the founder of Morgan's fleet of 
coasting steamers and Morgan's Louisiana and 
Texas railroads. 
•MES. ANGELICA L. H. MOEGAN (widow of 
William D. Morgein).— From her husband. Made 
in sail and steam coasting vessels ; Louisiana and 
Texas railroads ; banks, etc. 
•Est. EICHAED J. MORGAN.- From Charles Mor- 
gan. Made In sail and steam coasting vessels 
I and Louisiana and Texas railroads. 



Est. ROLAND G. MITCHELL.— Partly inherited 
from Ills father, Jethro, who was one at the largest 
ship owners in the United States. The son was- 
in insurance in Cincinnati; then came to New- 
Y'^rk, and married Conaelia Park, daughter of 
the founder of Grinnell, Mintum & Co. He 
Invested in a patent for stearic acid and glycerine^ 
and manufactured those articles and candles for 
many years. 
WILLIAM MOIE.— Made in the Jewelry business. 
•MES. WILLIAM MOIE.— Prom heir sister, Mary Jane- 
Morgan, widow of Charles Morgan, who was thei 
founder of Morgan's steamship Unes and Morgan's 
Louisiana and Texas nallroads. 
•FEANCIS O. MATTHIESSEN.— Made In sugar 
refining in the F. O. Matthiessen & Wiechers Sugar 
Eefining Company. Director in the American 
Sugar Eefining Company ; Western National Bank. 
EICHAED MOETIMER.— Inherited from Elchard, 
Mortimer, who made a fortune in importing mer- 
chandise and in real estate investments. 
STANLEY MORTIMER.- Inherited from Elchard 
Mortimer, who mjade a fortune in importing mer- 
chandise and in real estate investments. 
WILLIAM YATES MORTIMER.- Inherited from Elch- 
ard Mortimer, who made a fortune in importing mer- 
chandise, and in real estate investments. 
MES. JOSEPHINE MAY (widow of Charles A. May>. 
—From her father, Georgfe Law, who made a 
fortune in building public works ; banking ; ocean 
transportation; railroads; street railroads and fer- 
ries, etc. 
NEWBOLD MORRIS.— Inherited. Made in Import- 
ing metals and rise la real estate. 
•HENRY E. MALLORY (of C. H. Mallory & Co.). 
Inherited In part from Charles Mallory. Made in 
ship building at Mystic, Conn., and in saUmg ves- 
sels aind steam lines down tlie coast and to the: 
West Indies. 
•CHARLES H. MALLOEY (of C. H. Mallory & Co.). 
—Partly Inherited from Charles Mallory. Made in. 
ship building and vessels In the coasting and 
West India trades. 
•EGBERT MALLORY (of C. H. MaUory & Co.).— 
Partly Inherited from Charles Mallorv. Made in. 
ship building and vessels in the coasting and West 
India trades. 
Est. GOU'S^ERNEUR MORRIS.— KaUroad building ; 
railroads ; and real estate. Inherited some prop- 
erty from the Morris family. 
Est. JOHN P. MOORE.- Made in the sale of guns an4 

revolvers. 
KENNETH M. MUECI-USON (of Murchlsoa & Co.).— 

Cotton commission business. 
GIOVANNI P. MOEOSINI. -Stocks and speculation. 
'MRS. BRADLEY MARTIN.— Inlierited from her father,. 
Isaac Sherman, manufactm-er of stoves on a large 
scale, and large investor in the best classes of 
securities. 
WILLIAM DE FOREST MANICE.— Inherited. Made 

in rise in value of real estate. 
EDWAED S. MANICE.— Made by inheritance of real 

estate now very valuable. 
FEEDEiRICK MEAD (of Frederick Mead <fc Co.).— Tea- 
Importation. Director in the Fourth National Bank, 
etc. 
Est. MRS. JOHN KEMBLE MASON (born Cram).— 

Rise In real estate. 
Est. HENRY MASON.— Inherited. Made in banldng, 

stocks and rise in real estate. 
Est. ALEXANDER MoCOMB.— Made principaUy in, 

real estate. 
Est. CHARLES D. MATTHEWS.- Merchandizing andl 
investments. 



AMERICAN MILLIONArBBS. 



75 



Est. MULFOKD MARTIN.— Made by large purcliases 
ol real estate, which advanced In va'.ue, and in 
storage wareliouses on the North and East rivers. 

■**Est. W. B. MOFFATT.— Made in the manufacture of 
proprietary medicines and pUls, and investments in 
real estate, etc. 



H. VICTOB, NEWCOMB.— Partly inherited, and made 
in banking, railroads and si>eculatlon. 

M;ES. belle NEILSON.— Inherited from the Gebliard 
fortune. Mad,e in importing -wines, etc. 

Est. ADAM NOERIE.— ImiK)rtation of iron and lnvesl> 
ments in banks, insurance companies. Western 
lands, railroads, etc. 

JOSEPH NAYLOE.— Importing iron, and investments 
in real estate. He has made a large fortune. 

*Est. STEWAKT NEWELL.— Eeal estate in Texas and 
coal lands In Pemnsylvania. 

Est. OF BENJAMIN NATHAN.— Stoclis, street rail- 
roads and investments. 

ECKSTEIN NORTON.— The possessor of a lai'ge fortune, 
made in banMng and railroads. Director in the 
Bank of the State of New-York, Chesapeake, Ohio 
and Southwestern Railway, Kentucky Central Rail- 
way, Louisville and Nashville EaUi'oad, Manhattan 
Trust Company, and Mechanics' National Bank, etc., 
etc. 

J. WARREN NASH.— Largely inherited. All made by 
advance in value of real estate, with other Invest- 
ments. 

Est. SAMUEL T. NOESWOETHY.— Made in real estate, 
of which class of property he had over $2,000,000 
worth. 

HENRY NEWMAN (of Henry Newman & Co.).— Im- 
portation and sale of clothiers' supplies and trim- 
mings. 

»*MAX NATHAN (of the Nathan Mamifacturing Com- 
pany, manufactui'ers of patent injectors and lubri- 
cators).— Made mainly in royalties on his "injectors," 
which are an essential p.'<rt of every steam engine. 



DANIEL O'DAY.— Producing, refining and transport- 
ing petroleum oil. Director in the Seaboard. National 
Bank, etc. 
WILLIAM O'GORMAN.— Made in advance in value of 
real estate. 

■••ROBERT M. OLYPHANT.— EaUroads and iron mining. 
President of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Com- 
pany. Direct>or in the Adirondacks Railway, 
Chateaugay Ore and Iron Company, Crown Point 
Iron Company, Hudson River Ore and Iron Com- 
I>any, etc. 

JAMES F. O'SHAUGHNESSY.— Eeal estate and rail- 
roads in the South and cotton on. Director in the 
Kentucky and Arkansas Land and Industrial Com- 
pany, Nicaragua Canal Construction Company, etc. 

"WILLIAM OITMAN tol Eastman's Company).— Ex- 
portation of cattle and beef. Director in the Citizens' 
Savings Bank, G-ermania Bank, Stuyvesant Insur- 
ance Company, Butchers' Hide and Melting As- 
sociation, etc. 

S'EEDEEIC P. OLOOTT.— Pilvate banking and stocks. 
Partly inherited from his father in Albany, and in- 
creased, by him by investment. President of the 
Central Trust Company. Director in the Eio Grande 
'Western Eallway, Bank of America, Sixth Avenue 
.Street Railroad, United States National Bank and 
other corporations. 

'OSWALD OTTENDORFER.— Publisher of "The Staats 
Zeiting." Has Investments in real estate and stocks. 
.Inherited largely from Ills wife, the widow of Jacob 
Vhl, who created the paper. 

3IES. VIRGINIA R. OSBORN (wife of WilUam H. 
Osbc-m).- Inherited from her fathe;', Jonathan Sturges, 
.the great meicliant of tea, coffee and groceries. 



Est. GEORGE A. OSGOOD.— Made in Wall Street amd 
railroad stocks. Partly by Inheritance. 

Est. WILLIAM F. OAKEY.— Merchandising. 

Est. WILLIAM O'BRIEN (of WiUlam & John O'Bilen).— 
Banking and Investments. 

JOHN O'BRIBN (of WHliam & John O'Brien).— Private 
banking and real estate. 

JOHN V. O'DONOHDE (of John O'Donohue's Sons).— 
Wholesale tea and coffee. 

CHARLES A. O'DONOHUE.— Wholesale tea and coilee. 

HUGH O'NEILL.— Made in his great retail drygoods 
store. 

J015EPH J. O'DONOHUE.— Importing tea and coffee; 
and investments. President of the Brooklyn and 
New- York FeiTy Company ; director in the Eighth 
Avenue EHliroad, etc. 

MRS. WILLIAM B. OGDEN.— From her father, John 
Arnot, of Elmira, N. Y., who made a largo fortune 
in banking. She inherited also from lior late 
husband a fortune made in real estate and rail- 
roads, and now owns property worth severaJ 
millions. Her husband was formerly president ol 
the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. 

Est. GEORGE OPDYKE (Of George Opdylso & Co.. 
bankers).— He began as an Importer of drygoods. 
Retiring from that business, he started the private 
bank named above. They were fiscal agents of the 
New- York and Oswego Midland Railroad and placed 
most of its bonds. He left a little over a mUllon. 

Est. Mrs. MIRIAM A. OSBORN.— From her husband, 
C. J. Osborn, one of Jay Gould's brokers. Made in 
brokerage and stocks. 

HERMAN OELEICHS.— Made a fortune in the North 
German Line of steamers to Europe. Has an in. 
terest in the Madison Square Garden, etc. 

MES. THERESA ALICE OELEICHS (wife of Herman 
Oelrlchs).— From her mother, Mrs. Theresa Fair, 
and her father, James G. Fair. Made in the 
Bonanza silver mines. 

EDWARD OPPENHEIMEE.— Made chiefly in real 
estate. 

MME. FRANCES AMELIA BAETLETT OVIEDO (now 
the wife of Colonel von Gulmer, of the Mexican 
Army). — From her first husband, and made In plan- 
tations in Cuba. Her "diamond wedding" wl.h her 
first husband was a social sensation in New- York 
City at the time. 

Est. ELIAS E. POWERS.— Inherited from his brother, 
Henry Powers. Made in hotels and real estate. 

•Est. COLONEL WALTER W. PRICE.— Brewmg and 
real estate. 

Est. ROYAL PHELPS.— Merchandising and trade with 
the Isthmus, and real estate investments. 

"Est. SAMUEL B. PLATT.— Partly inherited from his 
father, Isaac L. Piatt, one of the founders of the 
Chemical Bank and the Pennsylvania Coal Company, 
who made a fortime first in hardware in Adrlance, 
Piatt & Co., and then in banking and coal mJnliig. 

PERCY E. PYNE.— Banking, railroads and in 
vestments. Formerly president of the National Olty 
Bank. Director in the Central Trust Company, 
Western Union Telegraph Company, Chicago and 
Northwestern RaOway, Consolidated Gas Company, 
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, Mexi- 
can Telegraph Company, New-York, Lackawanna and 
Western Railroad, New-Jersey Zinc and Iron Com- 
pany, etc., etc. 

MES. ALBEETINA S. PYNE (wife of Percy E. Pyne).— 
From her father, Moses Taylor, wno made his 
fortune in imirorting sugar, but chiefly in railroad 
investments, and in gas, coal and baifiia. 

GEORGE H. PENNIMAN.— Partly in linseed oil man- 
ufacturing, but mainly in real estate, in which at 
least two-thirds ot his fortune has been accumulated. 



76 



LIBEAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTEAS. 



EDWAED A. PRICE (ol Frad. Butterfield & Co.).— Im- 
porting drygoods and investments. Director In tlie 
Mftli Avenue Eant, Importers and Traders' National 
Bank; and lias other interests. 

Est. JAMES W. PAUL.— Banldng. 

WILLIAM POST.— Real estate operations. 

WHiLIAM A. PEMBROOK (Sweetser, Pembrooli & 
Co.).— Drygoods at wholesale. 

Est. MRS. 6DSAN W. PROUDFIT.— 

Est. FELIX GOTIN Y PINTO.— Made largely In planta- 
Uons and land in Cuba; la part in real estate in 
New- York City, In whlcli he liad large dealings. 

JAMES C. PARRISH.— Rise in value of real estate, ol 
wMoh he is a large owner. 

DANIEL PARRISH, .Jr.- Made in inherited real estate. 
From his father, who was a cotion merchant, and 
invested his profits In real estate. 

Est. ELEAZEE PARMLY.— Made almost wholly in rise 
In value of real estate. 

•MRS. ELLEN M. PIKE.— From her husband, Samuel 
N. Plie. Made in distilling In (Jlncinnatl and New- 
Yorii, and large investments in real estate in New- 
York City, Cincinnati, etc. Had several thousand 
acres of the Jersey meadows. 

•Est. FREDERIC A. POTTS.— Coal mining and rail- 
roads. 

TKENOR L. PARK.— From his father, Treuor W. 
Park, who made a fortime in law, real estate, the 
Mariposa mine, aad railroads in California, railroads 
in Vermont, and the Panama Railroad. 

"•ORLANDO B. POTTER.— Made his first million in 
the manufacture of the Grover & Baker sewing 
machines. Has doubled his foxtune in real estate 
and law. 

Est. W. A. PULLMAN.— Producing oU, banking and 
Investments. He was president of the Seaboard 
National Bank. 

JAMES H. PARKER.— Made in raw cotton, banking, 
etc. Director in the National Park Bank, etc. 

JAMES V. PARKER.— Made in merchiamdlsing and 
investment of profits. 

FREDERIC PRENTICE.— Made in oU, lumber and real 
estate cliiefly, but added to in brownstone from 
Ashland, Wis., in the sale of wliich he is now en- 
gaged. 

Est. PRESTON B. PLUMB.— Law. speculation, bank- 
ing, cattle and various investments. Was in the 
Mutual Life Insurance Company : silver mines, etc. 
His business life was spent chiefly in Kansas, of 
wliich State he was a United States Senator at his 
death. 

FRANCIS A. PALMER.— President of the National 
Broadway Bank. Made In bankliig and investments. 

JAMES E. PLUM.— Made in hides, director in the 
United States Life Insurance Company ; FUth Avenue 
Bank; Importers and Traders- National Bank, etc. 

EDWARD H. PERKINS, JR.— BanUng, president of 
the ImpDrters and Traders' National Bank. Director 
In the United States Lite Insurance Company ; Filth 
Avenue Bank, etc. 

Bst. DUNCAN C. PELL.— Made in merchandising and 
real estate. 

JOSEPH PULITZER.— Made in the publication of 
"The New- York World," and investments in real 
estate. 

MRS. ANNA PHELPS.— From her husband, Isaas N. 
Phelps, of Phelps, Dodge & Co. Importatiou of 
metals, etc. 

JOHN E. PARSONS.— Law practice. Counsel for the 
Bugar Tnist, from which he has earned enormous 
fees. 

PHILUPS PHOENIX.— Fi'om ills brother Stephen W. 
Phoenix, who Inherited a part of the Whitney 
fortunes. . i 



LLOYD PHOENIX.— Inherited from his brotlier, Stephen 
W. Phoenix, son-in-law ol Stephen Wliltney, who 
made a great fortune in merchandising and real es- 
tate. / 

Est. JAMES PHALEN.— 

'*MRS. LESLIE JOSEPHINE PEARSON (widow of Fred- 
erick Pearson, Commander U. S. N).— From her 
father, James 0. Ayer. Made in manufacturing pro- 
prietary medicines ; and investments in real estate. 

Est. NATIONAL PRIME.- Made In WaU Street, and 
real estate. 

♦WILLIAM H. PARSONS.— Paper manufacturing, at 
Brunswick, Me. President of the Bowdoln Paper 
Manufacturing Company. 

Est. FREDERICK W. PAULDING .—Real estate, and in- 
surance and other investments. 

Est. GEORGE POMEROY.— Wholesale dealing in dry- 
goods. 

Est. COURTLANDT PALMER.— From Ms father, 
Courtlanxlt Palmer. Made in hardware and reai 
estate. 

HOWARD POTTER (of Brown Bros., bankers).— Madet 
In banking and foreign exchanges. 

Est. GEORGE W. PRATT.— Left a fortune made in 
wholesale jewelry and gold assaying, during th& 
Civil War. 



•JSIRS. GEORGE W. QUINTARD.— From her father,. 

Charles Morgan, the founder of Morgan's great line 

of coasting steamers, and Morgan's Louisiana and. 

Texas raUroads. 
Est. JOHN W. QUINCY.— Made in the sale of haiU- 

ware; and iuvesi-ments. 



Est. DANIEL S. RIKER (of J. L. & D. S. Riker).— 
Commission drug business. 

JOHN L. RiKjiii (Of J. L. RUter).— Merchandioing. 
drugs ; and investments. Director lu the New-York 
I/yewood Extract and Chomical Company; Atlantic 
Mutual Insurance Company ; Atlantic Ti-usc Com- 
pany; Fidedty and Casualty Comptiny ; Green wicli 
Insurance Company ; Hanover Fire Insurance Com- 
pany; New-Jersey Zinc and Iron Company; Second. 
National Bank; United States Fire Insurance Com- 
pany ; Bank of New-Amsterdajn ; Fifth Avenue bafe- 
Deposit Company ; New- York, Providence and Bos- 
ton Railroad; etc., etc. 

'Est. JAMES A. RAYNOR.— Made in steamships, rail- 
roads; and real estate. 

Est. THEODORE ROOSEVELT.— Importation of gla.s ;. 
banking ; and real estate. 

Est. ALFRED ROOSEVELT.— Inherited largely. Made, 
in importing glass ; private banking ; and rise in 
real estate. Director in the GaUatin Na;tional Bank ; 
Metropolitan Improvement Company; Sixth Na- 
tional Bank; etc. 

W. EMLEN ROOSEVELT.— Largely inherited. Made- 
in importing glass ; private banldng ; and rise in 
real estate. Director in the Union Trust Company ;. 
Institution for Savings of Merchants' Clerks ; Mex- 
ican Telegraph Company ; etc. 

JAMES A. ROOSEVELT (of Roosevelt & Son).— Fortune- 
partly Inherited from Cornelius S. V. Roosevelt, his- 
father. Made in private banking ; importing glass ;. 
real estate; and Investments. Director in the- 
Chemioal National Bank; New- York Lite Insurance 
and Trust Company; New- York, Chicago and St.. 
Louis Railroad; Bank of New-Amiterdam ; Met- 
ropolitan Opera House ; Delaware and Hudson Canal. 
Company; etc.. etc. 

ROBERT B. RlOOSE^TiLT.-Partly inherited from 
Cornelius S. V. Roosevelt, his father. Made in;. 
Importing glass and banking liy Cornelius. Rob- 
ert B. Roosevelt has increased Ills fortune by 
banking and investments It. real estate, president 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIEES. 



of Holland Trust Company ; director In tlie Brig- 
antlne Beach EaUroad; Brlgantine Building and Im- 
provement Association ; Brigantine Company ; Jeffer- 
son Insurance Company, etc., etc. 

PREDBEICK ROOSEVELT.— Inherited. Made In real 
estate chiefly. Largely Interested In the Scrlba 
patent, centrai New- York. 

JEREMIAH P. ROBINSON.— From his lather of the 
same name. Made in the sale of groceries and 
salt, and In the storage business, and BrooUlyii 
real estate. 

I. E. EOBINSON.— From his father, JeremiaJi P. Rob- 
inson, sr. Made as above. 

BDWARD A. RIDLEY (of Edward Ridley & Sons). 
—Largely Inherited from his tdther, Edward Rid- 
ley. All made in merchandising drygoods and 
rise In the value of real eslate. 

ARTHUR J. RIDLEY (of Edward Ridley <fc Sons). 
—Largely .inherited from rirtwa'd Ridley. Mafle 
In drygoods and real estate. 

•MISS MARY M. ROBERTS.— From her father, Mar- 
sliaU O. Roberts. Made in steam vessels In the 
California ti'ade, and in telegraa)>h lines and rail- 
roads. 

JAMBS A. RICHMOND.— Local street railroads, ete., 
with Jacob Sharp. Director :ii the Cliristopher 
.".nd Fulton Street road. 

MRS. J. HAMPDEN ROEB (CorneUa V. R. Thayer). 
—Inherited from her father, Nathaniel Thayer, of 
Boston , who amassed a great fortune in foreign trade 
and shipping first, and tlien In banlilng and in 
the New-York Central, the Michigan Central, the 
Chicago, Burlington and Qulncy, the Philadelphia, 
Wilmington and Baltimore and other railroads. 

THOMAS F. RYAN.— Brokerage business; stocks and 
street railroads. 

CHARLES BRO.(,.DWAY RODSS.— Jobbing drygoods 
and fancy goods, and rise In v^ahie of real estate. 

•JACOB RUPPERT.— Brewing and real estate. 

•CHARLES T. EAYNOLDS.— Manufacturing and sell- 
ing paints. 

THOMAS RUTTER.— Merchandising ; railroads; gas- 
works, and investments. Director in the Consol- 
idated Gas Company ; Louisville and Nashville Rail- 
road ; Washington Trust Company ; American Pig 
Iron Storage Warrant Company ; Bank of State of 
New-York ; New-Yorlt ajid New-Jersey Terminal 
Railroad Company ; Housatonic Railroad ; Kentucky 
Central Railway ; etc., etc. 

HENRY H. ROGERS.— Producing, refining and trans- 
porting petroleum oU. Director in the Atlantic 
Trust Company ; Cheesebrough Ma,:;ufacturlng Com- 
pany ; and has other interests. 

Est. CAPTAIN BENJAMIN RICHARDSON.— Sale of 
hardware in New- York and Sacramento ; speculation 
In mines ; real estate in Qalifornia and New- York, 
and con/tractlng ; wajs with John W. Young, the 
son of Brlgham Young, in land Investemnts, and 
the Utah Central Railroad. 

JOSEPH RICHARDSON (brother of Captain Benjamin 
Richardson).— Oontraciing ahd building. Builder 
and principal owner of tlie BrliJgeport Water Worlts. 
Formally President of the Hannibal and St. Joseph 
Railroad. Largely Inte eeted In raUroals in Mexico 
and the Mexican Telegraph Company. 

•Est. JOSEPH EICKENDORFER.— Made in manu- 
facturing lead pencils, in the Eagle Pencil Company. 

MISS SERENA RHINELANDER.— From her father, 
William C. Rhinelander. Made in real estate. 

WILLIAM RHINELANDER.— From his father, WUllam 
C. Rhinelander. Made in real estate. 

JULIA RHINELANDER.— From William C. Rlrlne- 
lander. Real estate. 



WILLIAM R. RHINELANDER.- Inherited from the 
Rhinelander estate. Made In the advance In value 
of real estate. 

PHILIP RHINELANDER.— Inherited from the Rhine- 
lander estate. Made In the advance of value of 
real estate. 

T. J. OAKLEY RHINELANDER.— Inherited from the 
Rhinelander estate. Made in the advance in value 
of real estate. 

•MRS. N. F. REYNAL (wife of Jules Reynal).— From 
her father, Nathaniel D. Higgins, partner with E. 
S. Hlgglns In manufacturing carpets. By Inher- 
itance from her father. 

CHRISTOPHER R. ROBERT, JR.— From his father, 
Christopher R. Robert, sr., a merchant and land 
owner, and founder of Robert's College, Constanti- 
nople. 

FREDERICK ROBERT.— From Christopher E. Robert. 
Made in mercantile business and real estate. 

HOWELL W. ROBERT.— From Christopher R. Robert. 
Made in mercantile business and real estate. 

"HENRY E. RUSSELL (of the Russell & Erwln Man- 
ufacturing Company, New-Britain, Conn.).— Made 
in the manufacture of hardware. 

WILLIAM G. READ.— First In the drygoods business ; 
but chiefly, in partnership with Jasper r. Van 
Vleck in the banking business on Wall-st., of 
which they made a good, solid success. 

WILLIAM ROCKEFELLER.— The possessor of one of 
the greiart fortunes of the United States. Made in 
producing, refining and transporting petroleum oU, 
and Investment of profits in real estate and Ure best 
paying companies. Director In the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee and St. PaiU Railway; Consolidated Gas 
Company ; Delaware, Lackawanna and Weistem Rail- 
road; Hanover National Bank; Leather Manufact- 
urers' National Bank; New- York, New-Haven and 
Hartford Railroad ; United States Trust Company ; 
etc., etc. 

JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER.- Has made one of the 
largest fortunes in the United States, in the de- 
velopment of the Standard Oil Company and the 
Standar-d Oil Trust. He was President of tire 
Trust, which recently dissolved. His enormous 
profits have been in\nested in the best paying se- 
curities and developing various important and 
usefrrl busanesis interests. 

DR. ROBERT G. REMSEN.— Largely Inherited. Made 
in real estate and the Third Avenue Street Railroad 
chiefly. Director in the Knickerbocker Trust Com- 
pany ; Union Trust Company ; Third Avenue Street 
Railroad ; Manhattan Savings Institution ; etc. 

WILLIAM REMSEN.— Largely inherited. Made in 
real estate and the Third Avenue Street Railroad 
chiefly. Director in the Greenwich Savings Bank; 
Harney Peak Tin Mining and Milling Company; 
Holland Trrrst Company ; Third Avenue Street Rail- 
road; and has other interests. 

•Est. JOHN ROACH.— Made flrst in building boilers 
and engines, and then iron ship building and re- 
pairing. Owner of the Morgan Iron Works in this 
city and the great iron shipyard at Chester, Penn. 

JACOB ROTHSCHILD.— MlHinery ; and rise In value 
of real estate. 

•ALBERT S. ROSENBAUM.— Manufacturing tobacco 
and cigars ; and Investments in street railroads. 
Director in the Twenty-third Street Railway and 
Third Avenue Street Railway. 

EDWARD R06ENWALD (of E. Rosenwald & Brother). 
—Tobacco buying on a large scale. 

WILLIAM M. RICE.— Tobacco buying on a large 
scale. 

Est. FREDERICK ROLL WAGEN.— Made in the market 
business and Investments In real estate. 



78 



LIBRAKY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



*Est. SAMUEL RAYNOE.— ManuIactuTlng envelopes, 
and investments In banks, Insurance companies, etc. 

COUNTESS PRAJfCISA SEEAFINA DE EODA (for- 
merly Madame de Barrios).— Prom lier first hus- 
band, General de Barrios. President ol Guatemala, 
who made a large fortune In concessions, contracts, 
plantations, etc., In Guatemala. 

J. L. ROBERTSON .—Made mainly In the building ol 
the Chattanooga Southern Railroad, and investments 
in Southern enterprises, and the brokerage business 
here. 

*ANNA LLOYD EENWICK.— From her father, William 
H. Aspinwall. Made In shipping and trade, the 
Panama and other railroads, and investments in real 
estate, etc. 

Es\. EGBERT RAY.— Made chiefly in banking as a 
silent pantner In Prime, Ward & King, bankers. Had 
also large investments in real estate. 

Es". LEWIS M. EUTHERFURD.— Inherited. Made In 
real estate mainly. He was passionately fond of 
astronomy, and had a private observatory at his 
country-house at Tranquility, N. J. 



EUSSELL SAGE.— This able and daring operator Has 
made a fortune of many millions m railroad and 
telegraph comblnatioms and development, and in 
stock speculation in Wall Street. Largely inter- 
ested in many of the greait corporations of the day. 
President of the Iowa Central Railway. Director 
amd large owner In the Delaware, Lackawanna and 
Western EaUroad, Gold and Stock Telegraph Com- 
pany, Importers' and Traders' National Bank; In- 
ternational Ocean Telegraph Company; Missouri 
Pacific Eailway, Manhattan Elevated Eailway, 
New- York Bant Note Company, New- York, Lacka- 
wanna and Westenn EaUroad, Paeiflo Mali Steam- 
sWp Company, Standard Gas Light Compmy, St. 
Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern EaUroad, Texas 
and Pacific Railroad ; Union Pacific Eailway, Wabash 
Railroad, Western Union Telegraph Company, Amer- 
ican Telegraph Cable Company, Mercantile Trust 
Company, New-York Mutual Telegraph Company, 
American Speaking Telephone Company, etc. 

GUSTAV H. SCHWAB.- Largely Inherited from Gus- 
tav Schwab, who made a fortune in the North 
German Lloyd steamers. Director In the German 
Savings Bank, United States Trust Company, Key- 
stone Gold Mining Company, New- York Produce 
Exchange Safe Deposit and Storage Company, Ameri- 
can Champagne Company, Merchants' National 
Bank, etc. 

WILLIAM L. SKIDMORE (of Jeremiah Skldmore's 
Sons).— Merchandising coal. Is director In the 
American Savings Bank, Columbia Bank, and haa 
other Interests. 

FRANCIS A. STOUT.— Importing business. 

SAMUEL SLOAN.— Has made a large fortune In rail- 
roads. President of the Delaware, Lackawanna and 
Western EaUroad and of the New- York, Lackawanna 
and Western EaUroad. Director In the Consolidated 
Gas Company ; Missouri Pacific Eailway ; Missouri, 
Kansas and Texas RaUway; National City Bank; 
Texas and Pacific EaUroad; United States Trust 
Company; Western Union Teleigraph Company; 
Manhattan Elevated Railway, etc., etc. 

JOHN A. STEWART.— Banking and Investments. Pre- 
sident of the United States Trust Company ; director 
in the Greenwich Savings Bank; Merchants' Na- 
tional Bank ; National Fire In surance Company ; 
Eq^ultable Lite Assurance Society, etc. 

J. EDWARD SIMMONS.— Brokerage business, banking 
and investments. President of the Fourth National 
Bank. Director in the Panama Railroad and has 
"t.her Interests. 



GENERAL HENRY W. SLOCUM.— Made a start la 
salt works In Syracuse, and Increased his fortune 
by street raUroads In Brooklyn, and law practice 
In New- York City. Director In the Anglo-American 
Savings and Loan Association; Chatham National 
Bank; WUllamsburgh City Fire Insurance Company, 
etc., etc., 

MBS. LILLIAN SWAN.— Inherited from her aunt, Mrs. 
A. T. Stewart, over $3,000,000. Made In dry 
goods and real estate Investments. 

COLONEL WILLIAM L. STEONG.— Made In commis- 
sion dry goods and investments. President of the 
Homer Lee Bank Note Company and Central National 
Bank. Director to. the Adlrondaoks EaUway ; Mer- 
cantUe Trust Company ; Swan Incandescent Electric 
Light Company ; Brush-Swan Electric Light Com- 
pany ; Hanover Fire Insurance Company ; New- 
York Security and Trust Company ; New- York, 
LaJie Erie and Western Railroad, etc. 

Mrs. MAEGAEET LOUISE SHEPARD (wife of Colonel 
Elliott F. Shepard).— From her father, WiUlam H. 
Vanderbllt, from whom she inherited $10,000,000. 
Made in railroads. 

CHARLES F. 80UTHMAYD (law partner of ex-Sec- 
retary Evarts).— Law practice and investments. 

JOHN H. STARIN.— Elver steamboats and harbor trans- 
portation. 

*Mrs. ALICE E. SCHOENBERGER.— From her hus- 
band, John H. Schoenberger, who made a fortune In 
iron manufacturing at Pittsburg. 

Est. SCHUYLER SKAATS.— Merchandising: stock- 
brokerage business, and real estate investments. 

•CAEOLINE SCHMID (of Bernhelmer & Sohmid) .— Made 
in brewing and real estate, in the Lion Brewery. 

'EDWAED C. SCHAEFEE (president of the F. & M. 
Schaefer Brewing Company).— Brewing and real es- 
tate. Director in the Germanla Bank, etc. 

Est. GEOEGE K. SISTAEE.— Made in Wall Street, and 
dealing in investment securities. 

JESSE SELIGMAN.— Originally made in the importa- 
tion of clothing, foUowed by banking. In which latter 
the Sellgmans have become famous. 

JAMES SELIGMAN.— Originally made in the importa- 
tion of clothing, followed by banking, in which latter 
the Sellgmans have become famous. 

WILLIAM SBLIGMAN.-OriginaUy made in the Importa- 
tion of clothing, foUowed by banking, in which latter 
the Sellgmans have become famous. 

Est. SAMUEL STIL WELL.— City and country real es- 
tate, and Investments. 

Est. HENEY SMITH.— First in groceries and canal 
stores at PultonvUle, N. Y. Then agent of the Al- 
bany Merchants' Line of Canalboats, on the Erie 
Canal. Then with Abram Van Santvoord in towing 
on the Hudson Elver. Then with Alfred Van Sant- 
voord In the same business and steamboatlng to 
Albany ; and in banks and stocks. 

'AUGUSTINE SMITH (of Augustine Smith & Co.).— 
Paper manufacturing and Investments. Director in 
the Nassau Bank, etc. 

FEANCIS SMITH.— Has made a large fortjune, with his 
brother, George W. Smith, in railroads, stocks, 
bonds, Omaha real estate and Western lands. 

GEORGE WARREN SMITH.— Railroads, securities, 
Omaha real estate and Western lands. 

CHARLES S. SMITH.— Importing and wholesale dry- 
goods, first ; then In banking and financial corpora- 
tions. Director in the Equitable Life Assurance So- 
ciety ; FUth Avenue Bank ; Fourth National Bank ; 
Greenwich Savings Bank ; Merchants' National Bank ; 
United States Trust Company; Manhattan Safe De- 
posit and Storage Company, etc., etc. President of 
the Chamber of Commerce. 



AMBEICAN MILLIONAIEES. 



79 



FEANCIS S. SMITH— PubUshlng "The New-Yorlt 
WeeMy," a story paper. 

Mrs. F. LBIROY SATTEELEE.— From her father, Henry 
Suydam, who made a fortime In Importing tea, wine 
and coHeo. 

LAZAKUS STRAUS (of L. Straus & Sons).— Importing 
clilna, pot ery, glassware, clocks and bronzes. 

ISIDOK STRAUS (of L. Straus & Sons, Importers of 
<ih!na, etc., and of R. H. Macy & Co., retail dry- 
ioods, toys, etc.).— His fortune was founded In im- 
porting china, etc. He then became one of the 
owners of E. H. Macy & Co., and Invested In real 
estate and hotel property at Lakewood, N. J., and 
in banks, etc. Director In the Hanover National 
and the New-York County National banks. 

WATHAN STRAUS (of L. Straus & Sons, importers of 
china, etc., and of R. H. Macy & Co., drygoods).— 
Made in importing china, etc., and tlie retail dry- 
goods business. 

Est. DAVID L. SUYDAM.— Partly inherited from his 
latlier, shipping man and flour manufacturer. In- 
creased by himself In importing silks and other 
goods from France. 

JOSEPH SCHWARZSCIIILD (of Schwarzsclilld & Suli- 
berger) .— Made in the sale of meat, tallow and hides. 

Est. FRANCIS P. SCHOALS.-Bookbinding first; his 
wealth came, however, chiefly from banking and 
stocks. Was president of the Broadway Savings 
Bank. 

THOMAS STURGIS.— Made in the East India trade, 
real estate and investments. Director in the West- 
ern Union Beef Company ; Electric Street Service 
Comijany ; Maryland Ice Company ; New-York and 
New-Jersey Terminal Railroad Company, etc. 

FREDERICK &TUKGE3.— Inherited from .Jonathan 
Sturges, the grocery, tea and coffee merchant. 
Director In tlie National Bank of Commerce; New- 
York Warehouse and Security Company, and has 
other interests. 

EGBERT STURGIS (formerly of Boston).— Made in 
foreign trade. Director In the Nicaragua Canal 
Construction Company, etc. 

FRANK K. STURGia (of Work, Strong <£.- Co.).— Bank- 
ing and brokerage business and stocks. 

<3-ENEEAL DANIEL E. SICKLES.— Inherited from his 
father, (Jeorge G, Sickles, and made in real estate 
and houses. 

Est. WILLIAM J. SYMS.— Originally a gunmaker, but 
made his fortune In the Metropolitan Gas Company, 
street railroads and telegraph lines. 

Est. FREDERICK A. SEAMAN.— Merchandising tea. 

Est. JOHN H. SHERWOOD.— Merchandising in part, 
but chiefly in large real estate operations. Also in, 
banking. 

ANSON PHELPS STOKES.— Partly inherited from his 
father, James Stokes, a partner in Phelps, Dodge & 
Co., who withdrew finally from tliat firm to form the 
bank of Phelps, Stokes & Co. He was in the 
Ansonia Brass and Copper Company, Pennsylvania 
Land and Lumber Company, and various other busi- 
ness organizations. The fortune was made in im- 
porting metals, bainking, Micliigan and Pennsylvania 
timber lands, and investments. Anson PheljB 
Stokes is a director in the Ansonia Brass and Copper 
Company, Mutual District Messenger Company, 
Mutual District Telegraph Company, United States 
Electric Lighting Company, United States Trust 
Company, etc,, etc. 

MRS. ANSON PHELPS STOKES.— From her father, 
Isaac N. Phelps, the great banker. Made in import- 
ing metals, banking and investments. 

"THOMAS STOKES.— Partly inherited from James Stokes, 
and made in importation of metals, banking and 
miscellaneous Investments. 



JAMES STOKES.— Partly inherited from James Stokes. 
Made in importing metals, banking, Michigan lands, 
etc. Is himself a banker. Director In the Liberty 
Insurance Company, Mercantile Trust Company and 
other companies. 

WILLIAM E. D. STOKES.— Partly Inherited from James 
Stokes. Made in importing metals, banking and 
miscellaneous enterprises. Director in the Kensico 
Cemetery Company. 

JOSEPH S. STOUT.— Largely inherited fiom his father, 
Andrew V. Stout, merchant, banker and investor, 
Joseph S. Stout Is in the brokerage business, stocks, 
and Investments. Director in the American Bank 
Note Company, Holland Trast Company, New-York 
Mutual Gas Light Company, National Shoe and 
Leather Bank, etc., etc. 

Est. HENEY SPINGLEE.— Began as a market gardener 
west of Union Square. Owned land which has 
risen enormously in value. 

Est. ME. STKYKER.— Rise In value of the old Stryker 
bay farm within the limits of the present New-York 
City, near Flftieth-st. 

Est. URIAH J. SMITH.— Mgde mainly in real estate. 

WILLIAM C. SCHERMEEHOEN.— Made in Inherited 
real estate. From Peter and Edmund H. Schermer- 
horn. Peter had an old ropewalk upon wlmt is 
now Schermerhorn-st. in Brooklyn, and a large 
quantity of real estate, now exceedingly valuable. In 
New- York and Brooklyn, Including what is now 
Greenwood Cemetery. Director in the New-York 
LUe Insurance and Trust: Company. 

F. AUGUSTUS SCHEEMERHOEN.— Made In Inherited 
real estate. From Peter and Edmund H. Sohermer- 
horn. 

Est. GEOEGE S. SCHERMEEHOEN.— Made in real 
estate inherited from his father, Peter Sohermerhorn. 

J. EGMONT SCHEEMEEHOEN.— From his father. 
John Schermerhoru. Made chiefly in rise in value 
of real estate. 

Est. HOEATIO SCHERMEEHOEN.- From his father, 
John P. Sohermerhorn, merchant of ship stores. 

MRS. ANTOINETTE L. SCHERMERHOKX.— From the 
estate of her lather, Fi'ancis W. Lasak, who made 
a fortune of several millions In the fur business 
■with the original ,Tohn Jacob Astor, and in early 
investments in real estate. 

MRS. MAEY EOGEES EHINELANDEE STEWAET 
(widow of Llspenard Stewart).— From her father, 
William C. Ehinelander. Made in rise in value of 
real estate. 

'JIES. WILLIAM WATTS SHERMAN.— From the John 
Carter Brown estate, Rhode Island. Made In foreign 
trade in part, but chiefly in manrttacturlng. 

Est. EDWAEDS S. SANFOED.— Made In the Adams 
Express Company. 

WILLIAM H. STAEBUCK.— Shipping and railroads. 
President of the Housatonlo EaUroad and Oregon 
Improvement Comi>any. Has other Interests. 

JAMBS O. SHELDON.— Fine stock farm at Geneva, 
N. Y., from which he made some wonderful sales ; 
and Investments. Director In the Manhattan Trust 
Company, etc. 

•MAMES M. SIGAFUS.— Cattle raising in the West and 
Investments. Is Interested In F. I. Kaldenberg 
& Co. 

HENEY B. SLAVEN.— He Is president of the American 
Contracting and Dredging Company, and has made 
■1 fortune in work on the Panama Canal, etc. 

PHILIP SCHUYLER.— Inherited from Schuyler and 
Hamilton families. Made in real estate. 

'GEORGE H. SAEGENT (of Sargent & Co.).-Manu- 
factnring house furnishing hardware, and Invest- 
ments. Their factory is one of the largest in the 
Cni'.ed States of Its class. 



80 



LIBEAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



ISAAC STERN (of Stem Bros.).— Made In their great 
drygoods store. 

LOUIS STEEN (of Stem Bros.).— Made In their great 
drj'goods store. 

BENJAMIN STERN (of Stem Bros.).— Made In their 
great drygoods store. 

LEOPOLD 8 CHEPP.— Importing coooacuts. 

ALFRED ST:rLLY.— In railroads. He made a large, 
sum In the Reading Railroad reorganization, and 
■was at one time the largest holder of the securities 
of the road. Director in the New-Yorlt, Susque- 
hanna and Western Railroad, the Chlo Southern, 
and many other roads. 

Est. CYRUS STRONG.— Bakery business. 

JOHN D. SLAYBACK.— Brolrerago business, and In- 
vestments. Treasurer of the Carbon Iron Company, 
etc. 

•DAVID STEVENSON.— Brewing and real estate. 

Est. B. B. SHERMAN.— Made a fortune in wholesale 
groceries first, and added to it in banlring and trust 
stocks. His estate amounted to about $1,200,000. 

JAMES STILLMAN (of Woodward & StUlman).— Made 
In dealing In raw cotton and railroads. 

Est. JACOB SHARP.— Local street railroads. 

JARVIS SLADE.— Made a large fortune in drygoods and 
real estate. 

JOSEPH STERN (of the old firm of Stem & Metzger).— 
He was a leading wholesale dealer in meats and 
manufacturer of oleomargarine. 

ABRAHAM STEINHAED.— Investments in and dealing 
In real estate. 

Est. LOUIS STIEPEL.— Made In San Francisco and 
New-York City in dealing in drygoods. 

WILLIAM E. STRONG (of Work, Strong & Co.).— 
Brokerage and banking business and stocks. 

JOHN SLOANB (of W. & J. Sloane).— Head it Hie 
firm. Merchandising carpets ; real estate ; and in- 
vestments. 

Est. THOMAS C. SLOANE.— From her husband, a 
partner In W. & J. Sloan o, the carpet mercha,nts. 

HENRY T. SLOANE (of W. & J. Sloane).— Merchandis- 
ing eai^pets ", real estate : etc. 

WILLIAM D. SLOANE (of W. & J. Sloane).— Mer- 
chandising carpets ; real estate and other invest- 
ments. Director in the Aspen Mining and Smelting 
Company ; Hanover Fire Insurance Company ; Unit«l 
States Trust Company, etc. 

MRS. WILLIAM D. SLOANE.-From her father, Will- 
lam H. Vanderbilt. who bequeathed to her $10,000,- 
000. Made In railroads. 

WILLIAM SCHOLLE (of SchoUe Bros., bankers).— 
First In mercantile business and real estate in San 
Francisco ; then In real estate Investments here. 
and in banking. 

JACOB SCHOLLE (of SchoUe Bros., bankers).— Has 
made a large fortune in the same business as his 
brother WUlIam. The firm are worth sevei'al 
millions. 

WILLIAM H. SCHIEFPELIN (of W. H. Schleffelln & 
Co.).— Wholesale drugs. 

SAMUEL B. SCHIEFFELIN (of W. H. Schleffelln & 
Co.).— Wholesale drugs. 

MRS. GEORGE R. SCHIEFFEUN (.Inlla M. Delaplalne). 
—Inherited from John W. Delaplalne, a fortune 
made In shipping and rise In real estate. 

Est. HENRY M. SCHIEFFELIN.— Wholesale drugs; 
and rise In value of real estate, in which he had 
large investments. 

•ELIHU SPICER (of C. H. Mallory & do.).— Made In 
steam shipping and merchandising. 

MRS. SCHLEY.— Inherited from her first husband, 
Henry Keep. Made in railroad?, especially In the 
Michigan Southern. , 



Eat. FRANCIS S. STREET.— Publishing "The New- 
York Weekly," a story paper. 

ROBERT R. STXJYVBSANT.— By advance In the value- 
of the real estate left by his great-grandiather, the- 
last Dutch Captain -General of New- York. 

RUTHERFORD STUYVESANT.— Inherited from the. 
Stuyvesant estate. Made. In real estate. 

GERARD STUYVESANT.— Made In Inherited real 
estate. 

MRS. MARIETTA REED STEVENS.— From her hus- 
band, Paran Stevens. Made In hotel keeping, and" 
rise in value in real estate. Had over a million of 
real estate. He had the Fifth Avenue Hotel in 
New- York, the Continental in Philadelphia, and the 
Tremont and Revere hotels In Boston. 

GEORGTB S. SCOTT.— Railroads, Wall Street, Insur- 
ance, etc. 

MRS. SCOVILLE.— From her father. Judge James J. 
Roosevelt. 

MRS. FLORENCE SUTTON, (wife of James P. Sut- 
ton).— From her father, Rowland H. Macy, the dry- 
goods merchant. 

J, P. SPAULDING.— Merchandising and shipping. 

JOSEPH STICKNEY.— Made In dealing In coal. 

HENRY F. SPAULDING.— Drygoods commission busi- 
ness ; and Investments. Director In- the Central 
Trust Company ; Continental Insurance Company ; 
Mechanics' National Bank; and has other Interests. 

JAMES SWANN, (of Inman, Swann & Co.).— Cotton 
commission business and railroads. Director In tfie 
East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad ; 
Knoxvlle and Ohio Railroad ; and many other- 
Southern railroads. 

MRS. CHARLES D. STICKNEY (Helen Reade Hamers- 
ley).— Inherited real estate and advance in value 
thereof. 

ROBERT SCHELL.— Partly inherited from his brother, 
Augustus ScheU. Made In railroads, banking, and' 
other Investments. Robert ScheU Is president of 
the National Bank of the Metropolis. Director 
In the German Savings Bank; New- York and Har- 
lem Railroad; etc. 

EDWARD SCHELL.— Inherited from Augustus Schell,. 
his brother. Made in railroads, banking, etc. Presi- 
dent of the Manhattan Savings Institution, etc., etc. 
Director in the Manliattan Life Insurance Company,. 
Union Trust Company, Citizen's Nank, Butchers 
and Drovers' Bank and Tliird National Bank. Treas- 
urer of St. Lulie's Hospital, St. John's Guild and the 
American Institute. 

JACOB H. SCHIFF, (of Kuhu, Loeb & Co.).— Private 
banking and Investments. Director In the Louis- 
ville and NashvUle Railroad; and has other in- 
terests. 

*Est. MRS. MARY JLACRAE STUART.-From her hus- 
band, Robert L. Stuart, who made a large fortune 
in the manufacturing of candy, first, then In refining- 
sugar, and In Investments in real estate. He left 
about ?5,000,000, of which $1,250,000 was In real 
estate. 

"Est. ALEXANDER STUART.— Made In the manufact- 
ure of candy, refining sugar, and Investments In. 
real estate. He lef ' it aU to his brother Robert. 

CHARLES F. SCHMIDT (of Charles F. Schmidt <fc 
Peters).— Importing ^Tines and liquors. 

WILLIAM SCHLESINGER (of Schlcslnger Brothers).— 
Merchandising Iron ores. 

'WILLIAM STEINWAY (of Stelnway & Sons) .-Manu- 
facturing pianos, Investments in banliS, etc. 
Director In the German Savings Bank, and has: 
various o her Interests. 

"Conrad STEIN.-Made in brewing and real estate. 
. Director in the Germanla Bank, 

\ 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



St 



JOHN H. SWEETSEE (ol Sweetser, Pembroot & Co.).— 

Drygoods at wholesfvle. 
Est. EFFINGHAM B. SITTON (of Suttx>n & Co.).— 
First In drygoods, but chiefly in Sutton's line oj 
sailing clippers in the ocean freighting of the world. 
•Est. JACKSON S. SCHULTZ.— Tanning and leather. 
BAKONESS DE SEILLIEEE (formerly Mrs. Charles F. 
Llvermore).— From her first huibanfl. a banlser and 
real estate owner. 
Est. THOMAS SUNDEELAND.— Law practice In Cali- 
fornia, first, and Investments. 
Est. EDWIN H. SHELDON.— Made in railroads and 

large Investments in real estate. 
Est. LOUISIANA ST. JOHN.— This extremely rich 
woman's wealth may be said to have come largely 
by gift and rise in value of real estate. 
1 i' ••PRINCESS SCEY-MDNTUELIARD (Winnaretta 
' Singer).— From her father, Isaac M. Singer, and made 

in tlie manufacture of the Singer sewing maoMne. 
She lives In France. 
Est. THOMAS V. SMITH.— Made a start In merchan- 
dising, and added to his fortune as president of the 
Mercantile Trust Company and by investments in 
real estate. 
Est. JONAS STEAUSS.— Made a large fortune, first in 
drygoods and clothing In Roches er. N. Y., then In 
general drygoods In New- York City. 
JOHN B. SIMPSON.— Inherited from his father, Will- 
lam Simpson, and his uncle, John B. Simpson. They 
cams to this country, from England in 1822 and 
founded the pawn brokerage business, which they 
pursued for upward of half a century. Investing their 
profits principally in re^l estate on the Bowery and 
in what was formerly Westchester County. This 
real estate is now exceedingly valuable. 
WILLIAM SIMPSON.— Inherited from William and John 
B. Simpson, and made as above explained. 

MRS. CATHERINE \VILSON TAYLOR.- From her 
husbaind, Mcees Taylor, who left an estate of ^0,- 
000,000. He began life In importing sugar from 
Cuba, and bought vessels to employ In the trade. 
His great wealth was made, however, In the de- 
velopment of the railroads leading from the coal 
regions of Northern Pennsylvamia. He bought a 
large quantity of stock of the Delaware, Lackawanna 
and Western Eailroad, when it was down to about 
$5 share during the panic of 1857, and its sub- 
. sequent Increase in value made him enormously 
wealthy. He also gained control of the Manhattan 
Gras Light Company in about the same way, and 
owned largely in the Lackawanna Iron and Coal 
Company. Had investments In banks and many 
other companies. He was one of the five men who 
formed the company to lay the first Atlantic cable. 

HENEY A. C. TAYLOR.— Inherited from Moses Taylor, 
whose fortune was made as above explained. He 
Is a director in the Delaware, Lackawanna and 
Western Eailroad, National City Banlt, etc., etc. 

GEORGE C. TAYLOR.— Inherited from Moses Taylor. 

•CHARLES L. TIFFANY (of Tiffany & Co.).— Manu- 
facture and sale of Mgh-olass jewelry and silver- 
ware, with Investment of savings. Director in the 
American Surety Company, State Trust Company, 
and has real estate and other interests. 

COLONEL WILLIAM P. THOMPSON (formerly of 
Paikersbnrg, W. Va.).— Refining, production and 
transportation of petroleum oil. Director in the 
United States National Barak, American Pig Iron 
Storage Warrant Company, National Lead and Oil 
Company, and has other interests. 

CHAELBS H. TENNY (of Charles H. Tenny & Co.. 
hats, and Tenmy & Dupee, hats.)— Commission hats 
and straw goods. Director of the National Citi- 
zens' Bank, etc. 



DE. CHARLES A. TINKEK.— Money made originally 
In clipper sailing ships. Director In the Americoji- 
District Telegraph Company, American Speaking: 
Telephone Company, Gold and Stock Telegraph 
Company, Holmes Electric Protective Company, 
etc., etc. 

LAWEENCE TDRNURE (of Lawrence Tomure & Co.).— 
Commission shipping, insurance, banking, sugars, 
and corporations. Director in the Atlantic Mutual' 
Insurance Company, Continental Insuramce Com- 
pany, National City Bank, etc., etc. 

•DANIEIL P. TIEMANN (of D. F. Tlemamn & Co.).— 
Merchandising and manufacturing paints. 

MRS. FLORENCE ADELE TWOMBLY.— (wife of Ham- 
ilton McK. Twombly).— From her father, WUliam 
H. VanderbUt, from whom she Inherited $10,000^- 
000. Made in railroads. 

HORACE K. THURBER.— Has made a large fortune ln< 
ithe great wholesale grocery and canned goods busi- 
ness established by himself and his brother, Francis- 
B. Thurber, followed by Investment of savings la 
many large enterurises. President of the United' 
States and Brazil Mall Steamship Company and th» 
United States Book Company. Director in the Spo- 
kajie Falls and Northern Railway, United States Life- 
insurance Company, Importers and Traders' Na- 
tional Bank. National Starch Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Trow City Directory Company, " American 
Grocer" Publishing Association, Safety Insulated 
Wire and Cable Company, etc., etc. 

FEANCIS B. THUEBEE.— Has become very rich In the- 
wholesale grocery and canned goods business witU' 
his brother. President of I'hurber, Whyland & Co., 
wholesale grocers. Director In the Condensed Coffee 
Company, Jackson Cold Drawn Steel Company, etc., 
etc. 

FRANK TILFOED (of Park & TUford).— Made in the- 
wholesale and retail grocery business and invest- 
ments. They are the principal retail grocery mer- 
chants of New- York City. 

CH.AELES E. TILFOED (of Park & TUford).— Made In- 
the wholesale and retail grocery business. 

HENEY T.AXM.ADGE.— Banking and investments. 

•Est. J. MONEOE TAYLOR.— Made In the manu- 
facture of salerat'ns and baking soda and real 
estate. 

J.AMES TALCOTT.— Domestic silks and drygoods,. 
commission business, and Investments. Director 
in the National Broadway Banlt. 

•Est. WILLIAM TIIJ5EN.— ■V^arnish manufacturing. 

WILLIAM TOEL (of Watjen, Toel & Co.)— Foreign ex- 
change and banldng. 

•GENEEAL SAMUEL THOMAS (of Brown, Thomas & 
Co., contractors, and the Thomas Iron Company). — 
First In manufacturing and coal mining la- 
Central Oliio. Then after 1873 In railroads and- 
coal and Iron development In the South. Director 
In the Texas and Pacific Railway, Western Union- 
Beef Company, Dnluth, Soutli Shore and Atlantic 
Railway. East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Rail- 
way, Hudson River Ore and Iron Company, Knox- 
vUIe and Ohio Railroad, Lake Erie and Western 
Eailroad, Memplils and Charleston Railroad, Cin- 
cinnati, Jackson and Mackinaw EaUroad, Pacific Mail' 
Steamship Company, Texas and Pacific EaUway, the 
Thomas Iron Company, etc., etc. 

JAMES A. TEOWBRIDGE (of VermUye & Co.)— Pri- 
vate banking and Investments. 

WILLIAJM H. TAYLOR.— Made in San Francisco in the-- 
sale of petroleum, paints, whiskey, etc. 

Est. FREDERICK B. TAYLOR.— Made in San Franciscc»- 
in the sale of petroleum, paints, whiskey, etc. 

EEVEEDY J. TEAVEES.— From his fatlier, WiUiam R. 
Travers. Made in Wall Street. 



•82 



LIBEAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



"WILLIAM E. TRAVERS, JR.— Prom Ills father, WlUiam 
E. Travers. Made in Wall Street. 

Est. WILLIAM TURNBDLL.— EaUroads. 

J!st. GIDEON TUCKER.— Else in value of a large quan- 
Uty of real estate in the vicinity of Tenth and 
Twelfth sts., Hfth-ave. and the Bowery. 

JUES. DANIEL TORRANOE.— Inherited from Commo- 
dore Vanderbilt, her father, and from her hushand. 
Made In railroads and importation of tea. 

3IES. KATE L. TERRY.— Inherited from Juan Pedro 
Terry, her husband. Made in colfee and sugar-rais- 
ing in Cuba and investments in real estate and 
stoolrs here. 

,ANTONIO TEREY.— Inherited from Juan Pedro Terry. 
Made as above. 

HENRY G. TREVOR.— From Ms father, John R. 
Trevor. Made in banldng, railroads and stochs. 

Est. ERASTUS D. iTBFFT.— Made in wholesale dry- 
goods and real estate investments. 

3IES. EMILY THORN (widow of WiUiam K. Thorn).— 
From the Vanderbilt estate. Made In railroads. 

"•JONATHAN THORNE (of J. & W. Thorne).— Largely 
Inherited from his fatlier, Jonathan Thorne. Made 
ia merchandising. In tanning and leather and invest- 
ments in banlis, gas companies, railroads, etc. 

-•William thorne (of J. & W. Thome).— Largely in- 
lierited from his father, Jonathan Thorne. Made In 
merchandising, in tanning and leather, and invest- 
ments in banks, gas companies, railroads, etc. 

■**L. MORTIMER THORN.— Made a mUlion by the dis- 
covery of a fast dye for calico. 

••EDWIN THORNE.— Largely inherited. Merchandising 
drygoods first, then tanning leather, and investments 
in gas, street railroads, etc. 

■•SA3IUEL THORNE.— Largely inherited. Made In the 
tanning and leather business, real estate, gas, street 
railroads and other investments. Director in the 
Sixth Avenue Railroad, Hanover Fire Insurance 
Company, Pennsylvania Coal Company, Banii of 
America, New-Y'ork Mutual Gashght Company, etc. 

EDWARD N. TAILER.— Importing and merchandising 
drygoods. 

-MES. AGNES TAILEE (wife of Edward N. Tailer).— 
From her father, Tlxomas Suffern, importing mer- 
chant and Investor in real estate. 

.ROBERT W. TAILER.— Importing merchant. Part of 
his large fortune came from inheritance and Invest- 
ments in street railroads, real estate, etc. Director 
in the Third Avenue Railroad. 

XUCrUS TUCKERMAN.-Made in the iron trade and In 
investments in real estate, of which he Is a large 
owner. 

MRS. SINCLAIR TOUSEY.— Made in the American 
News Company. Inherited from her late husband. 
Wholesale handling of boohs and papers. 
WESLEY H. TILFOUD.— Producing, refining and trans- 
porting petroleum oil in the Standard Oil Company. 

J. KENNEDY TOD (of J. Kennedy Tod & Co.).— Pri- 
vate baniiing, railroads and real estate. Director in 
the Cincinnati, Jackson and Mackinaw Railroad, 
Great Northern Railway, Eio Grande Western Rail- 
way, Bull'alo, Rochester and Pittsburg Railway, etc. 

.Est. GEORGE F. TALLMAN.— Rise in value of real 

estate and improvement thereof. 
l^OUIS L. TODD.— Made In part in Wall Street in the 
brokerage business and partly in real estate Invest- 
ments. He Is a lajge owner of real estate. 
Builder and owner of the Hotel Marlborough and the 
Hotel Vendome. 
ERNEST W. TABOE.-Ei-.portation of cattle and beef. 



Est. BENJAMIN F. UI.,LMAN.— Made in the Unuor trade 
and in pawnbroldng establishments. 

JOSEPH ULLMAN.-Furs and hides. 

SIMON UHLMAN (of S. & F. Uhlman).— His regular 
business is that of dealer In hops, but a large 
amount of money lias been made in Brooklyn ele- 
vated railroads and in other investments. 



EDMUND TEQUHART.-Made In shipping and invest- 
ments. Dii-ector In the American Cotton Oil Com- 
-Paiiy- .ill li i_u 



MRS. WILLIAM H. VANDERBILT.— From her Husband, 
WilUam H. VanderbUt. Made in the development 
of the railroads of the Vanderbilt system. 

CORNELIUS VANDERBILT.— One Of the richest men 
in America. Inherited from WiUiam H. Vander- 
bilt, his father, and made in the development of 
the New- York Central and Hudson Elver, the Har- 
lem, the Lake Erie and Mlcliigan Southern, and 
Other railroads of the Vanderbilt system. President 
of tile Canada Southern and Mlcliigan Central rail- 
road. Director and large owner in the New-York 
Central and Hudson River Railroad ; New- York 
and Harlem Railroad; West Shore RaUroad; Dun- 
kirk, Alleghany Valley and Pittsburg Railroad ; Lake 
Shore and Michigan Southern E. R. ; Chicago, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha R. E. ; N. Y., Chicago 
and St. Louis E. E. ; Union Txnst Co. ; Pine Creek 
RaUroad ; New- York Mutual Gas Light Company, 
etc., etc. 

WILLIAM K. VANDERBILT.— Inherited an enormous 
fortune from William H. Vanderbilt, his father, 
Made in tlie railroaxis of the VanderbUt system. 
Director in nearly all the same railroads as Cor- 
nelius Vanderbilt, but also in the Chicago and North- 
western EaUway; the Metropolitan Opera House 
Company ; Merchants' Dispatch Transportation Com- 
pany, etc., etc. 

FREDERICK W. VANDERBILT.- Inlierited a fortune 
from Ms father, "William H. Vanderbilt. 
Director in aU the roads of the Vanderbilt 
system, and has various investments of his own. 

GEORGE W. VANDERBILT.- Inherited a fortune from 
Ms father. WiUiam H. Vanderbilt. 

•JOHN D. VERMUELE.— Chiefly In manufacturing. 
President of the Goodj ear's Rubber Manufacturing 
Company and of Goodyear' s India Rubber Glove 
MauuHaotuilng Company. Diiector In Anglo- 
American Saving and Loan Association; Bank of 
New-Amsterdam: etc., etc. 

•MRS. MiARY J. VAN DOREN.— Inherited from her 
father, Jordan L. Mott, sr. Made in manufacturing 
stoves and ironwork. Increased by real estate 
investments. Owner of the Holland House. 

Est. PHILLIP VAN VOLKENBURG.— Commission dry- 
goods and Investments in banks, insurance com- 
panies, real estate, etc. 

GEORGE F. \TETOR (of Frederick Victor & Achelis).' 
—Importation of drygoods. 

ALEX. T. VAN NEST (of A. R. Van Nest & Co.).— 
Wliolesale hardware and investments. Is in the 
DolpMn Manufacturing Company (jute goods) also ; 
and Slxth-ave. raUroad, etc. 

Est. of A. R. VAN NEST (of A. R. Van Nest & Co.).— 
Made several nillUons in the wholesale hardware 
business and Investments in street railroads, in- 
surance, etc. 

WARNER VAN NORDEN.— BanMng and investments. 
President of the National Bank of North America. 
Director in the Home Insurance Company, Mobile 
and Ohio Railroad, Duluth and Superior Loan Com- 
pany, HoUand Ti'ust Company, Pueblo Smelting 
and Eeflning Company, American Savings Bank, 
Plymouth Consolidated Gold Mining Company, etc. 
President of the South Yuba Water Company. 

JAMES J. VAN ALEN.— Inherited a fortune tlirough 
his wife from the Astor estate. Made in real estate. 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIEES. 



83. 



CORTLANDT S. VAN RENNSELAEE— Inherited. 
Made In real estate. 

•MRS. SUSAN L. VIVIAN, (wife Of Colonel Ralph 
Vivian).— From her first husband, Marshall O. 
Roberts. Made In steam slilpping In the California 
trade, telegraph lines, and railroads. 

Elst. ASHLEY A. VAN TINE.— Importing Japanese and 
Chinese goods. 

A. E. VANDERPOEL.— Largely inherited, and made in 
the rise in value of real estate. 

LOUIS A. VON HOFFMAN.— Private banMng, and in- 
vestments of various Mnds. Had an interest at one 
time in cattle-raising in the West. Director In the 
International BeU Telephone Company. 

E. H. VAN INGEN.— Made in tlie importation of 
woollen goods. 

HENRY VILLARD.— Made a large fortune in raOroads, 
especially in the Northern Pacific and connecting 
lines, a large part of which he lost, but a portion 
of which he retains. Director now in the Edison 
Electric Light Company ; Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company ; Edison General Electric Company ; and 
has other interests. 

ALFRED VA-N SANTVOORD.— Has made several 
millions, originally in to%ving, but later In tlie 
" Hndson River Line" of steamboats on the Hudson 
River, with careful Investment of Ills profits. Direc- 
tor in the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company ; 
Chicago, Milwauliee and St. Paul- Railway; N. Y. 
and Harlem E. E. ; Lincoln National Bank, etc., 
etc. 

Est. CHAUNCEY VIBBjVRD.— Dealing in railroad 
supplies; Hudson River steamboats to Albany; ele- 
vated railroads in New-York City ; and in the South- 
em Pacific Railroad, and Southern and Central 
American enterprises. 

THEODORE N. VAIL.— Made in introducing the tele- 
phone and in telegraphing. Director In tlie New- 
York and Xew-Jeriey Telephone Company ; Southern 
BeU Telephone and Telegraph Company ; American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company ; Consolidated 
Telegraph and Electrical Subway Company ; National 
Heating Company ; Dives Pelican Mining Company, 
etc. President of the Accumulator Compmy. 



DR. WILLIAM SEWARD WEBB.— Presideut of the 
Wagner Palace Car Company and owner or director 
In several railroads. He inherited tlirough his 
mother from tlie Cram estate (radAe in real estate), 
and added to hi^ means, first, In the brokerage busi- 
ness In Wall Street, and then in the Palace Car 
Company and in railroads. Director in the Lincola 
Safe Deposit Company. 

MRS. ELIZA O. WEBB (wife of Dr. WilUam Seward 
Webb.— From her father, WlUlam H. '^anderbilt, 
from whom she Inherited $10,000,000, made In the 
development ol the New- York Central and other 
railroads. 

CLARENCE WARDEN.— From his father, Francis War- 
den, who was next to Stewart in the partnership of 
A. T. Stewart & C, and who for many years selected 
in Paris the slll?s, laces, shawls and carpets the 
flim imported to New- York, and died worth more 
than $8,000,000. 

WILLIAM WARDEN.— From his father, Francis War- 
den, partner of A. T. Stewart. See last above. 

MRS. FANNIE S. WHITEHOUSE.— From William B. 
Ogden. Made in Chicago and New- York City real 
estate and in raUroads. He was formerly the 
president of the Illinois Central RaUroad. 

JOHN G. WENDELL.— Inherited from his lather, John 
D. Wendell, who was related to the Astors, and who 
made a fortune in the rise in value and improvement 
of real estat*. 



MRS. DR. FANEUIL D. WBISSE.— From her father, 
Henry Suydam, Importer ol tea, coffee and wine. 

Est. WILLIAM WATSON.— He left over $5,000,000^'' 
made in drygoods and investment ol his aooumula- 
tlonu 

JACOB WENDELL.— Made a fortune In commission; 
drygoods, banMng, etc. Director in the Continedtat' 
Insurance Company, Manhattan Real Estate Asso- 
ciation, New-York Real Estate Association, etc. 

THOMAS H. WHEELER.— Made in the sale of dresSe* 
beef. President ol the New- York Beef Company. 

*JAMES E. WARD (ol James E. Ward & Co.).— Made a 
fortune in coasting lines ol steamers. Director in 
the New- York and Cuba Mail Steamship Company. 

•LUCIEN C. WARNER (ol Warner Brothers).— Manu- 
facturing corsets, and investments In banks, etc> 
President of the Hamilton Bank. Director in the- 
Twelfth Ward Savings Bank, International Phosphate- 
Company, etc. 

Est. GEORGE HENRY WARREN.— Through his wife,, 
who inherited a fortune from the estate ol Stephen 
Whitney, an old-time merchant. 

MRS. CATHERINE WINTHROP (wife of Robert Wtn- 
throp, the banker).- Inherited a fortune from her 
father, Moses Taylor. Made in part In Imitortlng^ 
sugar and in shipping, but chiefly in the Delaware, 
Lackawanna and Western Railroads, gas, banks, an* 
coal companies. 

Est. BENJAMIN R. WINTHROP.— Inherited from his- 
lather and his mother (a Stuyvesant) ; made In the 
rise in value ol real estate ; increased by himself by 
investments. 

Est. DAVID D. WITHERS.— Partly Inherited. In- 
creased by him in Louisiana In gas works, railroads,, 
etc. 

•Est. HERBERT D. WARD (ol Ward <fc Olyphant).— 
Made in coal mining. 

MES. SARAH WILLIAMS.— Inherited Irom George 
Law, and made in contracting and building, rail- 
roads, etc. 

MRS. ANNA P. WRIGHT.— From George Law. Made 
as above. 

MES. MIRIAil P. WILDE (wife of WUUam Wilde).— 
From her first husband,' Frank Leslie. Made in. 
Frank Leslie's newspaper and other publications.. 

•WILLIAM H. WEBB.— One of New- York City's great- 
est ship builders, who before the War conducted, 
an extensive busines?, and brought more milllons- 
ol dollars to America by building great war ves- 
sels lor European powers than any other American, 
ever engaged In that Industry. His accumulations, 
have been increased by Investment in street rail- 
roads, real estate, apartment houses, etc. Director- 
In the Central Trust Company, Pennsylvania Coal 
Company, Atlantic Mutual In.surance Company,. 
New-York Balance Dock Company, and has other 
Interests. 

J. HOOD WRIGHT (of Drexel, Morgan <fc Co.).— Bank- 
ing and Investments. Director In the ChloagOv 
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway, Edison Electric 
Light Company, Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany, West Shore Railroad, etc. 

RICHARD T. WILSON (of R. L. Wilson & Co.).-Com- 
mission cotton business, cotton oil, private bank- 
ing, and railroad development in the South. Di- 
rector in the Cincinnati, Jackson and Mackinaw 
Railroad, Union Trust Company, Western Union. 
Beef Company, American Cotton Oil Company, Den- 
ver and Rio Grande Railroad, Fourth. National 
Bank, Manhattan T-.ust Company, etc., etc. 

JEROME B. WHEELER .-Silver mines, banks and 
Investments. President of the Grand River Coal 
and Coke CompaiJy, and the Aspen Mining and 
Smelting Company. Director In the Equitable Gas- 
Light Company, and has other interests. 



84 



LTBRAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTRAS. 



K}DOE WOKMSEE.— Banlitag, brolrerage asd stocLis. 
SIMON WOEMBER.— BaDking, brokerage business 'and, 
stocks. Director In tbe Manhattan Elevated Hall- 
way. 
*Est. MES. CHAELES A. WHITNEY.— From her 
father, Charles Morgan, who made a fortune In 
ooastlng vessels, sail and steam, and Louisiana and 
Texas railroads, and from her husband, who was the 
majiager of those Interests. 
BENJAMIN WOOD.— Originally in lotteries. Then in 

pubUsliing "The New-Yorli Dally News." 
Kst. JAMES WOOD.— Real estate in Harlem. 
MES. CAROLINE S. WILSON (wife of Marshall Orme 
Wilson).— A daughter of William Astor, from whom 
she received a fortune. Made in r6al estate. 
Est. PEEDERICK S. WINSTON.— Began in drygoods. 
Then embarked in the Mutual Life Insurance Co., 
•of which he was president about thirty years. 
Tttreotor in the Michigan Central Eailroad., etc. 
FEANK WOEK (of Work, Strong & Co.).— Private bank- 
ing and brokerage business. 
'Est. WILLIAM ALFEED WIECHEES.— Sugar re- 
lining. 
MES. ANNIE WOERISHOFEE (widow of C. F. Woe- 

rishofer.)— Made in brokerage business and stocks. 
SVILLIAM A. WHEELOCK.— Drygoods Importing; 
afterward In banking and various investments; 
director in the ECLUitable Lite Assurance Society ; 
-New-York, Lake Erie and Western Eailroad; Ameri- 
can Surety Co. ; Central National Bank ; Gold and 
Stock Telegraph Company, etc., etc. 
"Est. WILLIAM L. WALLACE.— Manufacturing candy. 
TMES. SAEAH A. WILLETS.— Daughter-ln-law of 
Samuel WiUets, from whom she Inherited. Made 
in merchandising, whaling and Investments. 
FREDERICK WILLETS.— Inherited from his grand- 
father, Samuel WlUets, hardware merchant, wh^ling- 
shlp, owner, and Investor in real estate and secoiities. 
iEDWARD WILLETS.— From Samuel WUlets. Made 

as above. 
■WALTER E. WILLETS.— Inlierited a fortune from 
Ills grandfather, Samuel WUlets, the liardware 
merchant, whaUng-shJp owner and Investor in real 
estate and securities. Is himself engaged In deal- 
ing In grain. 
"BUCHANAN WINTHEOP.— Inherited a fortune. 
EGEETON L. WINTHEOP.— Has Inherited a fortune. 
JOHN WOLFE.- Inherited. Made in merchandising 

and real estate. 
TVIRS. JOHN WOLFE.— From her brother John B. 
Dash, made in part in merchandising, but cMefly 
in real estate. 
WILLIAM C. WHITNEY.— Law practice, railroads and 

investments. 
MRS. FLORA PAINE WHITNEY (wife of WiUiam C. 
Whitney).— By gift from her brother and father. 
Made in producing, refining and transporting petro- 
leum oU. 
lEst. WILLIAM WALDEON.— Else In value of real 

estate. 
lEst. WALTER B. WALDEON.— Building and real es- 
tate. 
EDWAED WINSLOW, (of Wlnslow. Lanier & Co).— 

Private banking and investments. 
WILLIAM WHITEWEIGHT.— Made a fortune in mer- 
chandising. Has an Interest In the Union Trust 
Company ; New- York, LaJje Erie and Western 
Eallway, etc., etc. 
"B. B. WESLEY.— Brokerage business and Interest In 
"The New- York Times," director In the Union Trust 
Company. 
JILBEET E. WHYLAND (Of Thurber, Whyland & 
Co.).— Wholesale groceries and the Trow City Di- 
rectory Company ; has other interests. 



ANTHONY WALLACH.— Made In jCNvelry; dli-ector 
in the Ujiited states Life Insurance Comp.iny ; 
Importers and Traders' National Bank; New-York 
Life Insurance Company ; American Grocers' Pub- 
Usliing Association, etc., etc. 
"CHAELES C. WOETHINGTON.— Manufacturing steam 

pumps. 
JOHN T. WILLETS.— Made in Merchandising, bank- 
ing and real estate; president of the Leatiier Man- 
ufacturers' National Bank. 
•JAMES M. WATEEBURY.— Manufacturing ropes and 
cordage, and investments; president of the Nassau 
Ferry Company ; is in the New- York Bagging Com- 
pany, etc. 
LORENZO G. WOODHOUSE (formerly of Field, Leiter 
&, Co., Chicago).— Has made a large fortune in dry- 
goods. 
GEOEGE G. WILLIAMS.-Has male a large fortune 
in banking and investments ; president of the 
Chemical National I;ank: director In the United 
States Life Insurance Company; New-York Life 
Insurance Company; Union Trust Company; Fi- 
delity and Casualty Company; Eagle Fire Insur- 
ance Company; Peck, Stow & WUcox Company; 
Title Guarantee and Ti-ust Company; Institution 
for Savings of Merchants' Clerks; Pennsylvania 
Coal Company ; United States and Brazil Mail 
Steamship Company, etc., etc. 
EEASTUS WIMAN (of R. G. Dun & Co.).-Made by 
very successful raOroad and real estate enterprises 
on staten Island; fortunate telegraph deals, and 
a liberal Incume from the E. G. Dun & Co. Mercan- 
tile Agency^ of which he has been for years the 
mainspring; director In the Westerri Union Tele- 
graph Company; the Unl,6d States Book Company; 
Staten Island Eapid Transit Company, etc., etc. 
MES. MAEIA L. WADSWOETH (wUe of James S. 
Wadsworth).— Inherited a fortune from William E. 
Travers, her father. Made in WaU Street. 
Est. MES. FEEDEEICKA W. WAEING. 
MES. WILLIAM WHITNEY.-From Stephen Whitney, 
the great merchant. Made in merchandising and 
investments In what was formerly suburban real 
estate, but now Is part of the city. 
EDWARD J. W0QJ£BY.-Els6 in real estate. 
Est. SAMUEL WYMAN.— Merchandising drygoods and 

investments In real estate. 
FRANK T. WHITE (of Hewson & White).— Private 

banking and Investments. 
WILLIAM WHITE.— Made In street railroads chiefly. 
WILLLAM STORRS WELLES.-Inherited a fortune 

made In real estate. 
MRS. EHINELANDER WALDO.-Inherited a fortune 

made In real estate. 
JACOB WEEKS.— Coal merchandising. 
Est. CHARLES WATROUS.-Deallng In lumber and 

builders' suppUes in San Francisco and New-York. 
JOHN BRISBEN WAXKEE.-Made principaUy in the 
cultivation of a Colorado alfalfa farm, and In the 
rescue of a considerable tract of worthless river-bed 
in Denver by certain engineering operations. Added 
to m publlsliing The CosmopoUtan Magazine in New- 
York City ; and Increase in value of farm and city 
land, incident to the growth of Denver, Colo. 
Est. WILLIAM WATSON.-Made In drygoods and In- 
vestments In real estate. 
Est. JAMES WINSLOW (Wlnslow. Lanier & Co.).- 

Made In banking and investments. 
ABRAHAM WOLFF (of Kuhn, Loeb <fc Co.)-Bank- 

ing and Investments. 
HENRY WELSH .-Formerly In the wholesale gro- 
cery business. In which he made a, fortune; which 
he has since increased by investment. 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIEES. 



85 



Est. JOHN S. YOUNG.— MercUandisine and real estate 
Investments. 



AIRS. MARGAEET ZIMMERMAN (widow of Jolin E. 
Zimmerman).— Inherited from Jier father, William P. 
Fm'niss, who made a fortune in shipbuilding and 
real estate. 

■ELLIOTT ZBOROWSKI.— Inherited. Made in real 
estate. Has more than $1,000,000 of that class of 
property. 

ANDREW C. ZABRISKIE.— Inherited from the Ayorigg 
estate. Jane Ayorigg was the daughter of Thomas 
B. Gardner, who owned much real estate in New- 
York City, wUch 'has since grown enormously in 
value. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In protectel industries 179 

In cattle-raising, patented artleles, etc 19 

Origin of the fortone unknown 20 

In non-protected industries 885 

Total 1,103 



ZIN£:S OF BUSINESS, IN DETAIL. 

CLASSIFICATION, BY STATES. 
Who can teU exactly how to classify some 
lortunes? Levi P. Morton began as a c'eck in 
a little dry goods store in a country village of 
New-England ; lie showed aptitude for business, 
was sent to Boston to buy goods lor the store, 
did so well that lie finally went to Boston to op- 
erate ; built up a retail business into 
a wholesale business ; removed to New- 
York and grew rich there as a wholesale 
dry-goods merchant ; retired from trade, and went 
into banldng; and with his partners, as banker, 
negotiator of loans, and manager of reorganiza- 
tion schemes, added, to an already large fortune, 
a, larger one. ShaU he be classified as a " mer- 
chant" or a "banker?" 

The original John Jacob Astor was a buyer of furs 
from the Indians and trappers, and a vender of 
them at home and in Europe ; he grew rich in 
this profitable trade and invested all his earn- 
ings in real estate ; and the enormous growth of 
■Kew-York City and continued purchases of subur- 
ban land by his descendants have created the 
greatest two properties in real estate anywhere 
to be found in America. Are the Astor fortunes 
due to " merchandising" or " advance in value of 
real estate." 

George Law began life as a laborer in building 
the Erie canal. He then took contracts to build 
small sections of that canal. He then became a 
railroad builder and contractor ; built part of the 
Croton aqueduct at New-York City and the High 
'Bridge ; invested in a bank, and purchased a con- 
trolling interest in the Harlem and Mohawk Eail- 
road. He then went into lines of steamers to 
the Isthmus of Panama in the California trade, 
this being part of the coasting trade, and protected 
by our navigation laws. He built the Eastern 
«nd of the Panama Eailroad, a very profitable 
contract, and then built the Kighth and Ninth 
Avenue street railrpads in New-York City, and 
had a profitable ferry line across the East Kiver. 
He died worth several millions. Everything he 
touched made money for him. Was his fortune 



due to any "protected" industry, or to "non- 
protected" industries? 

It will readily be seen that a number of knotty 
questions have arisen in the attempt to classify 
some of the fortunes named in the preceding pages. 
The principle followed by the compiler has been 
to seek out the controlling factor in the creation 
of the fortune as far as possible. In oases of 
doubt, the fortune has been classified as made 
under the Protective Tariff, so as to remove every 
possible ground for challenging the fairness of 
The Tribune's conclusions. We believe that fewer 
fortuces have been made in protected industries 
than are here shown, but tiiis only makes the 
figures below the stronger. 



JiJ^:CA Fl T ULA TION . 



ALABAMA. 

'Saw mills and lunibei' business i 

'Coal and iron mines mainly 3 

"Mainly in manulacturing l 

Real estate chiefly 3 

"Protected, 5. Non-protected, 3. Total 8 



ALASKA AND AEIZONA. 



None reported in these territories. 



ARKANSAS. 

Banldng mainly, but -svith other Interests 2 

tlantatlons and leasing convicts 1 

Merchandising, loans, etc 2 

Mail contracts, cattle ranches, etc 1 

Total 6 

Protected. 0. Not protected, 6. 

^, 

CALIFOENIA. 

Manufacturing mainly ii 

'i\jlnl:,g, protected 4 

"Flour mulling i 

'Saw mills, lumber, etc. 4 

'Brewing and, real estate 1 

'sugar refining i 

'■'Cattle raising and lands mainly 13 

Merchandising, sometimes with other Investments.. 43 

Banking and investments 16 

Railroads, railroad lands, fete 13 

ciiver and gold mines, and speculation in their 

shares 45 

Law practice and, investments s 

Local gas and water worlsB, street railroads and kindred 

enterprises 3 

Express business mainly 2 

Publishing newspapers I 

gteamboatlng, real estate, etc 1 

Oil refining, etc 3 

Advance in value and im'provement of real estate" 14 

Farming and ranches 7 

Hotel business, real estate, etc 3 

By gift from a relative 2 

Total 192 

♦Protected,, 22. «*Oattle, 13. Not protected, 157. 

COLORADO. 

'Saw miUs and lumber 1 

"Iron and coal mines, etc 1 

"Cattle raising and land, etc 7 

Merchandising and investments 2 

Banking and Investments 4 

Silver and gold mines mainly 6 

Petroleum oil and real estate 1 

Railroads and railroad lands 2 

Smelting and refining ; 4 

Real estate, advance in value and improvement of.! 11 

Total ..::..•.". 39 

•Protected, 2. •'Cattle, 7. Not protected, 30. 



86 



LIBEAEY OF TEIBUNE EXTEAS. 



GCNNECTIQUT. 



TTiTJNOIS. 



'Manufacturing mainly 24 

'Tanning and leatlier ^ 

*Fiour milling 1 

•Protected mining 2 

**ManuIacture of special patented articles 10 

Merchandising and Investments 17 

BanMng and investments 3 

Brokerage business and stocljs 5 

EaUroads mainly 4 

Insurance buslnass, etc 2 

Contracting and building 1 

Publishing copyrighted, books 1 

Royalty on the sewing machine needle 1 

Eeal estate Investments 2 

Miscellaneous Investments 1 

Show, museum and circus business 1 

Express companies 1 

Gold and silver mines in the West 1 

Total : 78 

•Protected, 29. **Patents, 10. Not protected, 39. 



DELAWARE. 



•Manufacturing mainly 6 

Railroad building and Investments 2 

Farming, lands, etc 2 

Banking and Investments 1 

Total 11 

•Protected, 6. Not protected, 5. 



DISTEICT OF COLUMBIA. 



'Coasting vessels and railroads 1 

•Iron mines 2 

•Brewing and real estate 1 

•Manufacturing mainly 2 

•Saw mUls and, lumber 1 

Real estate, advance In value and improvement of. . 6 

Hotel business and real ©state 3 

Telephone patents 3 

Street pavements (asphalt) 1 

Banking and Investments 5 

Merchandising mainly 1 

Pension Agency business 1 

Brldge-bnlldlng and railroads 1 

Rallroacls and lands 1 

Gas, water and Idndred local enterprises 1 

Law practice and investments 1 

Stbcks and speculation 1 

Total 32 

•Protected, 7. Not protected, 25. 



FLOEIDA. 



•Cigar manufacturing 1 

•Shipbuilding and repairing, etc 1 

•Sawmiills and lumber, etc 1 

Phosphate lands, banldng, etc 1 

Hotel business and real estate 1 

Eeal estate, rise in value of: 1 

Total 6 

'Protected, 3. Not protected, 3. 



GEOEGIA. 



•Poumdry business mainly 1 

•Iron and coal lands, railroads, etc 1 

Merchandising, and Investments 5 

Railroad building, leasing convict labor and land.. 1 

Hotel business and real estate 1 

Total 9 

•Protected, 2. Not protected, 7. 



IDAHO. 



•Manufacturing, mainly 3& 

'Distilling, and real estate 8 

'Brewing and real estate 5 

•Malting business, etc 1 

'Hour mUUng i 

•Sugar refining i 

•Lake shipping i 

'Protected mines i 

•Tanning and leather i 

'Saw mills and lumber 13 

"Manufacture of special patented articles 11 

"Cattle raising and land 1 

Merchandising, mainly 102 

EaUroad development 10 

Farming and lands 1 

Real estate, advance in value and improvement of.. 38 

Flue stock raising, mainly „ i 

Packing and provisions 19 

■ffanking and investments 21 

Loans and lands ; 4 

Local enterprises, gas, water, street railroads, etc.. 4, 

Grain elevator business 4 

.publication ryt newspapers ■ T 

Publication of copyrighted books 2 

Hotel business and real estate 3 

Law and investments 3 

Oil, petroleum, refining, etc 1 

Warehouse business, mainly '.'...'.'. 1 

Contraicttng and building, mainly..'....".'.'.'.'.'.'.".". '" s 

ATjstracts of title and real estatie 2 

Unprotected manufacturing 1 

Miscellaneous Investment ' 1 

Rlvair steamboats, etc ".' .""" x 

Refining lard, cotton oil, etc "" 3 

Inherited ].]'.' ] 

Total ..316 

*ln protected industries 68 

"In patented articles ',] 11 

"In cattle raising ] '_" 1 

Origin of the fortune unknown 1 

Not .protected 235 



INDIANA. 



'Manufac luring, mainly 5 

'Saw mill and lumber '.'..'.."." 1 

•Brewing and real estate . 2 

"Making special patented articles 1 

Banking and investments ^ 

Railroad building, railroads, etc....!! 1 

Railroads and inveslments 5 

Merchandising, mainly 7 

Local enterprises, gas, water, street"raiiroads',"e"t'o" 2 

Real estate Investments 1 

Law practice and investments.. 1 

Inherited ."..'...!!!!!!!!!!! 1 

Total - - ~7^ 

•In protected industries.... g 

•'In making patented articles !!!! 1 

Origin of the fortune unknown ... i 

Not protected., gg 



INDIAN TEEErrOEY. 



No millionaires are Iniown to reside in Indian Iterrl- 

tory. 



IOWA. 



'Saw mills and lumber - 7 

Merchandising, mainly ! g 

Railroads, etc 2 

Contracting, railroad building, etc".!!!!!!!!!!! 2 

Real estate investments, mainly 5 

Real estate and loan business 2 

Packing and provisions !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 1 

Total - ~^ 

'Protected, 7; not protected, 'iS, 



•Brewing and real estate 1 

Gold and silver mines 1 KANSAS. 

Total .................. ... - -. 2 There are several persons of comfoi-table wealth in 

'Protected, 1. Not protected, 1. Kansas, but no milUonalres. 



AMEEIOAN MILLIONAIRES. 



87 



KENTUCKY. 



Pine lands, etc. J 

T..aw practice and. Investments — 4 

. Loans and real estate ..n 1 

*In manufaoturing, mainly f Inherited 2 

•Distilling and real estate ° Origin of tlie fortune unknown 4 

Meroliandising, mainly J 

River transportation l »In protected industries 87 

Real estate investments, mainly 4 *«in maljing patented articles 13 

Railroads and lands l Inlieritecl 2 

Plantations and farming.... 1 Origin of the fortune unknown * 

Publishing a newspaper, etc l in industries, not protected 180 



Total 22 

♦Protected, 7. Not protected, 15. 



LOUISIANA. 

•Sugar raising --.- 2 

•Manufacturing, mainly. 1 

•Coasting steamship Imes, etc 1 

Merchandising, etc 1<> 

Real estate investments 4 

Cotton raising and lands 4 

Louisiana lottery business 2 

Banking and investments 1 

Brokerage business 4 

Total 35 

•Protected, 4. Not protected, 31. 



MAINE. 



•Saw mills and lumber 4 

•Tanning and leather 1 

•Manufacturing, mainly 1 

•Sugar refining, etc. 1 

Wild lands and banldng 2 

Ocean transportation and sliips 2 

Banking, etc 1 

Royalties on telegraph patents, etc 1 

Law practice, loans and investments 1 

Local enterpilses, gas, water, street railroads etc., 1 

Total 15 

'Protected, 7. Not protected, 8. 



MARYLAND. 



•Manufacturing, nuiinly ." 11 

•Protected mining and investments 2 

•Saw mills and l»mber 1 

•Malting business 1 

•"Malcing proprietary medicines 1 

Foreign contracts and engineering works 6 

Express business 1 

BxHIiroad development 4 

Merchandising and investments ,. 16 

Newspaper pablishing 2 

Banking and investments 8 

Real estate, banking, etc 3 

Loans and Investments 1 

Packing, provisions and real estate 1 

Law practice and real estate .; i 

Total - 50 

•Pi'otectcd, 15. **Patents, 1. Not protected. 43. 



.MASSACHUSETTS. 



•Manufacturing, mainly 69 

•Distilling and real estate 3 

Tanning and leather 7 

•Sawmills and lumber 1 

•Sugar refining ; 2 

•Protected mining 5 

••Making special ■ patented articles 13 

Merchandising and Investments 79 

Deep sea shipping, ocean transpoi-tation and for- 
eign trade .31 

Railroad development and lands 7 

Banlilng and investments 9 

Real estate, advance in value and improvement of 34 

Local enterprises, gas, water, street railroads, etc.. 2 

Hotels and restaurant business and real estate : 3 

Express business 3 

Cracker-baMng ' 2 

Publishing copyrighted books and general printing 6 

Newspaper publishing 1 

Contracting and btillding .'. 1 

Packing and provisions 1 

Trusteeship of estates.. 1 

Whaling, ships and Investments 4 



Total 



.296 



MICHIGAN. 



•Saw mills and lumber 37 

•Manufacturing mainly 7 

'Lake V6bse;s, shipbuilding, etc 2 

'Nursery and seed business 2 

'Mining, protected 2 

Tanning and. leather 1 

"Brewing and real estate 1 

•Distilling and re:Q estate 1 

Dealing in pine or mineral lands 11 

Pine lands and sale of timber therefrom 3 

Merchandising, mainly » — 8 

Packing, provisions and real estate 1 

Banlilng and investments 3 

Real estate investments 7 

Contracting and building 1 

Railroad development 1 

Local enterprises, gas, water, steel railway, etc.. 2 

Tctal 90 

•Protected, 53. Not protected, 37. 



MINNESOTA. 



•Saw mills and lumber 15 

•Flour milling 6 

•Manufacturing, mainly 6 

•Protected mining 1 

Law practice and real estate. 2 

Merchandising, mainly IB 

Real estate, advance in value and improvement of.. 16 

Local enterprises, gas, water, street railroads, etc 5 

Eanchfs, Government contracts, etc ; 1 

Railroads 6 

Contracting and, building 7 

Banldng. and Investments 3 

River transportation, real estate, etc 2 

Total 88 

•Protected, 28. Not protected, 60. 



MISSISSIPPI. 



Plantations and lands i 

IX)ans X 

Total 2 

•Protected, 0. Not protected, 2. 



MISSOURI. 



•Protected mining g 

'Manufacturing, mainly ." 13 

•Flour milling ! '_' 1 

•Saw mills and luml^er " 1 

•Brewing and real estate 3 

•'Cattle raising, mainly 4 

Merchandising, mainly 28 

Law practice and investments in real estate and 

banks 1 

Banlilng and Investments '' 4 

Real estate, advance In value and Improvement of 12 

Ocean ships and foreign trade 1 

Packing and provisions 5 

Hotel business and real estate 1 

Railroads 5 

River transportation 1 

Local enterprises, gas, water, etc 3 

Contracting and building i 

•In protected industries 24 

•*In cattle-raising, mainly 4 

In industries not protected 62 

Total 90 



88 



LIBRAEY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



MONTANA. 



NEW-YORK STATE. 



•'Cattle raising and lands 1 

Gold and silver mines 4 

Eeal estate, advance in value and impi'Ovement ol 2 

Banking and investments 4 

Merchandising 7 

Tot 1 18 

••Cattle. 1. Not protected, 17. 



NEBRASKA. 



•Brewing amd real estate 1 

**Cattle raising and land 1 

Slercliandising. mainly 4 

Smelting and refining metals 1 

Local enterprises, gas, water, street raUroads. etc. 1 

Contracting and building 3 

BanMng and real estate 4 

Law practice and investments in real estate, etc... 1 

Pony express, and lands 1 

Eeal estate, advance in value and Improvement of 5 

Total .. 22 
•R-otected," i. ' ''Cattie, i. Not Vro'tected. 20. 



NEVADA. 



The millionaires of Nevada 11%'e in other Sta.tos, and 
are there named. 



NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



"Saw mills and lumber ~. 2 

"Manufacturing, ma'nly 5 

•Brewing, banliing, etc 2 

Tanning and Isather 2 

Express business and real estate 1 

Railroads, real estate, banlring, etc 1 

Merchandising and Investments in banks, etc 1 

Total .??. 14 

•Protected, 11. Not protected, 3. 



NEW-JERSEY. 



-JManufacturing. mainly 23 

•Tanning and leather 2 

•Protected mining : 1 

•Brewing and real estate 6 

•Distilling and real estate 1 

•Coasting vessels and land 1 

••Manufacturing special patented articles 4 

Merchandifiing, mainly 23 

Oil producing and refining 1 

Western lands and local gas stocks 2 

Smelting and refining 1 

Storage business 1 

Local enterprises, gas, water, street railroads, etc., 10 

Insurance business, mainly 1 

Express business 1 

Newspaper publBshlng 1 

Contractins and building 4 

Law practice and investments 4 

RaUroads 2 

Real estate, advance in value and improvement of.. 31 

BanMng and investments 6 

Stocks, real estate, etc 1 

Made in the West Indies 1 

Inherited 2 

Origin of the fortune unknown 4 

•In protected industries 34 

**In making patented 'articles 4 

Inherited 2 

Origin of the fortune unknown 4 

In non-protected industries 80 

Total 124 



NEW-MEXICO. 



••Cattle raising and banking ] 

Land grants, chielly 1 

Merchandslng 1 

Total 3 

"Cattle, 1. Not protected, 2. 



The following are tlie flgui-es for all of New- York 
outside of New- York City : 

•Manufacturing, mainly ,. 71 

•Ttonlng and leatJier 6 

•Saw mills and lumber , 9 

•Brewing and real estate 15 

•Distilling and real estate 1 

"fLtthographitng business ■. 1 

"Seeds and nursery business 2 

•Plour milling 2 

•PiOtectel mining 10 

•Sugar refining 3 

•Sliip building and repairing 1 

**Malrlng special patented articles 19 

Merchandising, mainly 102 

Banliing and Investments 27 

Brokerage and stocks 7 

Railroad development 9 

Contracting and building 9 

Local enterprises, gas, water, street railroads, etc. 9 

Telegraph tusinos; 5 

Express business 3 

Elevators, warehouses, storage, etc 6 

Real estate, advance In value and Improvement of.. 33 

Oil production and refining 18 

Royalties on patents '. 1 

Pnbllshing copyrighted books 2 

Publishing newspapers 1 

Local liver transportation 1 

PaoMng and provisions 1 

Law practice and investments 10 

Hotel and restaurant business and real estate 1 

Hne stock raising, lands, etc 1 

Ocean ships and foreign trade 3 

Pine lands and sale of logs therefrom 3 

California mines, etc 2 

Miscellaneous Investment 2 

Ealcerv business i 

Inherited 5 

Origin of the fortune entirely unknown '.... 3 

•In protected industries 121 

••Making patented articles 19 

Inherited ■ .'...".'.'.' 6 

Origin of the fortune unknown """" 3 

In Industries, not protected 257 

Total J55 



NORTH CAROUNA. 



"Manufacturing, mainly 10 

'Iron mines and real estate 1 

Fail'oads !!!!.!!!! 1 

Real estate Investments 1 

Naval stores and hotel ."...] j 

Total ., - . ~T7 

"Protected, 11. Not protected, 3. 



NORTH DAKOTA. 



BanMng and Investments 1 

Tctal - - 7 

'Protected, 0. Not Iprotected, i. 



OHIO. 



•Mauufaoturing, mainly 4a 

"Saw mills and lumber 5 

*T,annlng and leather ', o 

"Brewing and real ©state . in 

•Distilling, etc ...: ;;; q 

•Lake vessels and teinsportaiion 5 

•Wool growing and farm land 1 

"Flour and meal milling o 

•Mines, protected "' 5 

"•Mailing patented articles q 

Merchandising, sometimes with other investmeiite" 36 

BanMng and Invesitmente 14 

Oil produeitlon and refining .' .." g 

Real estate investments so 

Railroads "..■..■■.■■.■■■'" 5 

Local enterprises, gas, waterV street 'railroads' 'etc'.'" 3 

Contracting and building, mainly 3 

Packing and provisions ■■" 4 

Publisiilng copyright books '... 4 

Publishing newspaper 1 

Silver mines, etc o 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



89 



Miscellaneous enterprises 2 

Inherited 1 

'In protected Industples . 86 

•'Mailing patented articles : 6 

Inherited 1 

In non-protected industrieis 114 

Total 207 

OKLAHOMA. 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 



This prairie country h.as not yet developed a man of 

wealth. 

— ♦ — ~- 

OREGON. 

Warehousing, storage, etc 1 

Steamboats, banMng, etc 1 

Merchandising, in some cases with other invest- 
ments 6 

Beal estate, advance in value and improvem/jnt oit 5 

Local enterprises, gas, water, street railroads, etc. 1 

Banhing and Investments 3 

Contracting, real estate and banking 1 

Total 18 

'Protected, 0. Not protected, 18. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

'Manrnfacturmg, mainly 117 

'Brewing and real es ate 6 

'DistUlln? 3 

'I'rot'oted mines, coal and iron 48 

Timning and leather 5 

'Flour milling, etc : 1 

,'CoastIng vessels 1 

'Sawmills and lumber 8 

*3agar refinimg, etc 8 

"Making patented articles li 

"Cattle raising, land, etc 1 

MercJiandising, in some eases with other inves - 

ments 41 

BanWng and investments 24 

Brokerage, stocks and speculation 3 

Eallroads 22 

Contracting and building 11 

Eeal estate, advance in value and Improvement of 23 

.Oil production and refining ■ 23 

Local en erprlses, gas, water, afreet railroads, etc.. 9 

Publishing copyrtghted books 3 

Publishing newspapers 3 

Show and circus business, wltti other enterprises 

added S^ 

' Steamboating and canals 1 

Steamboat and railroad transportafon 1 

Ocean ships and freighting 1 

Inherited 5 

Origin of Ihe fortune entirely imlmown 3 

'In protected industries 197 

"In making patented articles 6 

"In cattle raising 1 

■Inherited .5 

Origin of <he fortune unknown 3 

In industries not protected 167 

To:al 379 

RHODE ISLAND. 

'Manufacturing, mainly 28 

"Making patented articles 2 

Contracting and buUdlng 1 

Unprotected manufacturing 1 

Merchandising, in some cases with real estate and 

other Investments 7 

WaJl Street and stocks 1 

Real estate Investments 5 

■BanMng and investments 1 

Total 46 

'Protected, 28. "Patents, 2. Not protected, 16. 



SOUTH OAROLENA. 

Merchandising and Investments 5 

Banking 2 

Slantatlons and land 1 

Origin of the fortune unknown 1 

Total 9 

Unknown, 1. Not protected, 8. 



This great and thriving State will in due time 
produce many large private fortunes. At present 
It has no millionaires. 



TENNESSEE. 



*Mines and related interests 2 

'DlitUllng 1 

Stcclcs and miscellaneous enterprises 1 

Keal estate Investments 3 

Mercliandising, etc 7 

Kaiiroads and stociis 2 

Steamboats and real estaie 1 

Total 17 

'Protected, 3. Not protected, 14. 



TEXAS. 



'Sugar planting, and leasing of convicts 1 

"Cattie-raising and land 14 

Heal estate and lands 14 

Merchandising, etc 18 

Local enterprises, gas, wharf, etc 3 

Banking and investments 4 

Contracting and building a 

Elver steamboats, etc 1 

Total 57 

'Protected, 1. -'Cattle, 14. Not protected, 42. 



UT.iH. 



'Sawmills and lumber .^ i2 

'Manufactui'tng, mainly , 1 

"Cattle-raising and land \ 2 

Merchandising, etc 4 

Gold and silver mines 3 

Railroads i 

Real estate i 

Conti-acting and building 3 

Total 16 

'Protected, 3. "Cattle, 2. Not protected, 11. 



VERMONT. 



•Sawmills and lumber 1 

'Manufacturing, etc 2 

Tliour-inllllng 1 

'Marble quarries and railroads 2 

"Patented articles 2 

EaUroads and investments 3 

CaUfornia mines and railroads 1 

Local enterprises, gas, wafer, street railroads, etc.. 1 

Total 13 

'Protected, 6. "Patents, 2. Not protected, S. 



VIRGINIA. 



'■Manufacturing, mainly :: 8 

■'Tobacco-ralsrng, etc 3 

Merchaiidlslng, mainly 7 

Real estate Investments 2 

Railroads ., 3 

Tot'l : 7. 23 

'Protected, 11. Not protected, 12. 



WASHINGTON. 



'Sawmills and lumber 2 

Merchandising 1 

Eailroads, banking and real estate 2 

Eeal estate, advance In value of 19 

Silver mining t 

Timber lands ] 

Inherited ] 

Total .;.... 27 

'Protected, 2. Inherited,!. Not protected. 24. 



90 



LIBE^iiSY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



WEST VIRGINIA. 



GMNEMAL liJSGA Fl TULA TIUJ>i. 



'Manufacturing 

•"Distilling, etc 

"Mines, but witli other Interests 

Eeal estate 

Oil producing, bui witli oilier Interests. 

Total ^ 

"Protected, 3. Not protected, ij. 



WISCONSIN. 



"Iton mines, etc 4 

•Saw mills and lumlier 21 

'Manufacturing, mainly 11 

•Tanning and leatlier 1 

•Brewing and real estate i> 

Banliing, etc 3 

Nitrate beds in Clilli 1 

Paclilng and provisions 1 

Silver mines m C>/lorado 1 

Eailioads and land 3 

Eeal estate, advance in \alue and improvement of 3 

Pine lands and sale tlierefrom 8 

Shipping and commls-jioii 1 

Mercliandising 1 

Elevator business 1 

Elver steamboats 1 

Cointraoiing, etc 1 

Total 68 

•Protectefl, 43. Not protected, 25. 



WYOMING 



'Cattle raising and banlung.. 
L'uit'ie',"l.""' 



Total 

Protected, 0. 



XEW-YORK CITY. 

'Manufacturing, mainly 93 

•Brewing and real estate 19 

•Distilling, mainly 2 

•Coasting vjssels, mainly 19 

•Tanning business and leather 19 

'Sugar veflnliig, mainly 13 

"teotected mrnes, co-al, iron, etc H 

'ShlpbuildiDg and invtstmente 1 

••Cattle raising in tlie West, mainly 1 

••Mailing patented and proprietary articles 18 

Merchandising, with Investment of profits In real 

estate, securities, leto 35H 

EanMng and investments 113 

Brolierage business and stocks 34 

Eeal estate, advance In value and improvement of 134 

Railroads 69 

Sliver and gold mines 6 

Ocean ships, freighting, and foreign trade 37 

Local gas, railroad, ferry, and lundred enterprises 10 

Hotel and restaurant business and real estate B 

Insurance busljiess, mainly 3 

Contracting and building, mainly 16 

Oil refining, production and tramspoitatlon 17 

Law practice and Investments 28 

Storage, warehousing, etc 3 

Publisliing news and story papers 12 

Publishing copyriglited boote 9 

West India and South American plantations, etc.. 5 

Bakery bu-slness 1 

Medical praplice and fortunate real estate ui- 

vestmenits 1 

Mercantile agency business, witli investment of 

profits 3 

Tweed ring 1 

Elver and haibor boats 7 

Express business 6 

Telegraph and telephone business 3 

Ice business, mainly 1 

Live stock raising, witli investment of profits 1 

PawnbroMng and real estate 3 

Inlierited from relatives 14 

Origin of the fortune entirely imknown 6 

•In protected ln<ius;rie=!, mainly 179 

••In cattle raising 1 

••Patented and proprietary articles 18 

Ijlherited, business In wMcIi the fortune was 

made unknown 14 

Origin of the fortune entirely unknown 6 

In industries not protected 885 

Total .:.... '.7..." 1,103 



■'Manufacturing mainly, but in many oases with 
investments lu leai estate, uaniiing, and other 

uon-i.rot.cted buslntss 619. 

•Saw mills and lumuer, KOmetimes wl'ih otlier in- 

vts m^nts 138. 

'Brewing and real estate, mainly 79 

"Dlsuihng, maiiiiy 32 . 

Mailing 2. 

•Ooal, iron, 2,iiic, lead, copi)er, or iiuicksilver 

mines 113 • 

'Sugar rennlng, n ainly 2!) • 

'Shipbuilding aud repa.ring 3. 

Tanning and leather uusljcss 49 

"••Ocasting and lake shipping, mainly 31» 

'ilour milling 16* 

•Marble quairies., but with other invesinjaiits.... 2- 

'beeds and nursery business, mainly 4. 

•Sugar plantations in the touth 3- 

•Ldmograpiilng, but wiiiii insm'anee business in 

addition 1« 

Tobacco growing in the South, and lands 3. 

•Wool growing In Ohio, and land^s 1 • 

••Malting special patented and proprietary articles 93 ■ 

•'Cattle raising In the West, and iaruls, mainly.. 47- 

Merchandising mainly, with, in the great majority 

of cases, tiie iuvestiiitnt o^ pi'ottts lu reaj tstate, 

bainks ai.d secur.ti.s generally 986 . 

Eeal 'estate, advance an va.ue with the growth of 

populaiion and imi,rovement of 468' 

Loaning money and r^al estate 9' 

Eailroads, development, consolidation and maji- 

agtment of 186- 

Coniiacting and bulloiug, I'ailroads, streets, and 

pubUo and private works generally 77 ' 

Banking and the investment of profits- in real 

estate and securities, mainly 294' 

Brokerage business and stocks 56» 

Express business 18» 

Mercantile agency business and, investments 2, 

Telegraph and telephone development 13" 

Silver and gold niMies 73" 

Local enterprises, gas works, water works, street 

railroaxls, ferries, etc., etc ^ 70^ 

Law practice and investment of profits in real 

estate and s:curttle'< 65.» 

Deep sea shipping, ocean freighting, in some cases 

combined with foreign trade on the owner's ac- 
count 75 

Whaling, deep sea ships, and, ocean tirade 4 ■ 

Packing and provisions 34, 

Ice business, mainly i' 

Oil producing, refining and t-ansportation... ..".'.'.".'. 72» 
Hotel and rC'S^taurant business, TVith real estate 

investmrnts '. 24- 

Pine lands and the sale of logs and timber ther&- 

fjom x9* 

Dealing in timber and mineral lands...............'. 11« 

Publisliing news and story papers . so. 
Publisliing copyright books, with general piinting 

added in some cases 25* 

Publishing copyrighted music " 2- 

Steamboating on the rivers and in the harbors ".'. 20 ■ 

Plantations, farming and land 15 . 

Cracker and bread baking ' 4 

Nltrata beds in Chili 1 

Louisiana lotterv bnsin"ss 3 

Mail contracts in the West, with other 'business', 

ranches, mines, etc ■ .. 1. 

Smelting and refining metals '. 6- 

InsurancB business, mainly s' 

Royalties on patents 3 

MiscEllaneous investment, mcstly in non-prote'c't'ed 

fines of business q* 

Show and circus business, with Inve'stment "oi 

profits m real estate, securities, etc 3 . 

Asphalt street pavements ' " i' 

Pension agency business, with a weekly newspaper 

in connection therewith.. j 
Contracts for railroad building and" equipment! 

etc., in foreign lands 6» 

Plantations In tfie West Indies and sdu't'h Amer- 
ica, mainly g 1 

Phosphate land In Florida,' 'bariljiiig, " and" "real 

estate j. 

Pine stock raising and fortunate "in vestiiien'ts'l'n 

lands and securities 3,. 

Grain elevator, storage warehouses and wiiarf 

business jj. 

Medical practice and investments in rea'l'es'tat'e'' 1 

unprotected manufacturing " ^i 

PawnbroMng and real estate o 

Eeflnlng lard, cottonoll, etc., etc " 1 

Cotton raising in the South 4 



AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



91 



Made In the T^veed ring, New-York City 1. 

Pony express over the plains, and lands 1< 

By Inheritance and gift, original sources of the 

fortune nnhnwrn 34» 

Origin of the fortune entirely unlmown 21 

*In protected Ind.ustrles, iKialn:y 1,125 

"In cattle raising and lands, mainly 47 

•*In making special patentsd and proprietary 

articles 93 

Inherited, nrigiiial business in which the fortune 

was male llnI^lo^TO 34 

Origin of tile fortune entirely unknown 21 

In Industries not in the Isast protjcled 2,727 

Grand total 4.047 



FORTUNES AND THE TARIFF. 



NOT SO MANY "MILLIONAIRES" IN THE 
UNITED STATES AS HAS BEEN SUPPOSED. 



NOX-PKOTECTED OCCUP.^TIO.VS THE ORI&IX OW 

THREE-POURTHS OF ALTj THE GREAT 

FORTUNE- OF THE COUXTRT — THE 

TARIFF PLAYS A MIXOR PART IX 

THE ACCUMULATIOX OF 

GR:^AT WEALTH. 

The Tribune lias completed the publication of 
its lists of the "millionaires" of the United State-.. 
The name of each " millionaire " has been printed 
(to show that The Tribune's conclusions rest on 
facts), and a statement has been made of the 
trades, occupations or industry in which each 
person's great wealth has been accumulated. I 
desire to say, that while the lists have been com- 
piled with great care, and at th'> cost of long 
and patient labor, and while every effort has 
been made to discover ard correct every error, 
there are, no doubt, even yet some names in the 
lists of persons who are refiuted to be worth more 
than they really are, and possibly s-ome persons 
have been overlooked who ought to have been 
named. The total number of these mistakes, how- 
ever, there is every reason to believe, is cvceed- 
ingly few, and the general result would probably 
not be changed in the slightest degree by the 
final correction of every error. 

If any reader feels inclined, because he knows 
of one, two or three ei-rors in these lists, to 
declare that the whole exhibit is vitiate 1 thTCby, 
let me say ti him : Take anj' one State and 
compile a list of its actual or reputed "million- 
aires" yourself! Make out tlie list from such 
data as you may be able to collect! You will 
learn two things. First, you will find the task 
no easy one, and next, you will become convinced 
that The Tribune's lists are, after all, sulistan- 
tially correct, and you will be inspired with 
respect for the work of an honest and thorough- 
going compiler, who has performed this same tasic 
for each one of the whole forty-four States and 



for all of tlie Territories. So much tor the 
Accuracy of the work. 

Now for some of tlie lessons which this publica- 
tion teaches. 

WHY MEN SEEK WEALTH. 

Every human being feels the need of a cer- 
tain amount of wealth over and above that which 
is required to satisfy his actual needs day by day. 
Food, clothing and shelter are actual necessities. 
These every man must have to preserve his liealth 
and maintain his life, day by day. But no human 
being is satisfied with merely this. Provision 
must be made by the accumulation of surplus 
wealth for periods of siclcncss, when a man cannot 
work, for vacations, and for old age, when the 
capacity for hard work has passed. I'liere is a 
craving for wealth even beyond this. Every in- 
dividual has in'.elleotual and spiritual wants which 
can be gratified only by expenditures in excess of 
what are required by his absolute necessities. 
And wlien all of our individual wants have been 
provided for, theft there is the community at large 
—the town, the State, and tlie Nation. Wagon- 
roads are required, stage and railroad lines, forti- 
fications, safe depositories for money, and the 
thousand and one other things which are neces- 
sary to the welfare of a community as 
a whole which can never be provided for by a 
single man, but must be created by the joint 
investment of the surplus wealth accumulated 
))y a large number of separate individuals. In 
the infancy of communities every individual is 
poor and the State is poor. Those things which 
tend to bring wealth to individuals, and thus 
to that aggregate of individuals, the community 
at large, are therefore of the highest importance 
to all. 

The science of wealth, the study of those 
causes which tend to create prosperity, has oc- 
cupied the attention of the public men of the 
whole world from the earliest times to the pres- 
ent day,' and must continue always to do so. 
Every form of human activitj' which promotes 
the wealth of the individual and those of the 
Nation is of the deepest importance to the peo- 
ple and to every student of public affairs; and 
statesmen who are wise and patriotic will not 
ignore any one of them. The country which 
lias in operation within its borders the largest 
number of means for producing wealth will grow 
rich the most rapidly, and its people should be 
the most happy, powerful and great. 

Now, in the accumulation of wealth, some in- 
dividuals will grow rich more rapidly than others. 
Natural talents, opportunity, the inheritance of 
a little capital with which to begin business with- 
out the delay caused by the necessity of earning 
and saving, inventions, etc., wUl alwaj's favor 
some men more than others. The genius of man 
even leads from time to time to the accumula- 
tion, here and there, of a colossal fortune. Now^ 
up to a certain point, aU men agree 
that the growth in wealth of individuals 
is a positive benclit to the community at 



93 



LIBRARY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



large, because it makes possible the oonstruotiou 
of great public works and tbe creation of great 
facilities for production, bj- means of wbtcb the 
cost of living is reduced for the whole com- 
munity ; it provides comforts ; and it beautifies 
tihe homes of the city and the country. 

ONLX 4,047 MILLIONAIRES. 

But some people contend fihat, beyond a cer- 
t€iin point, the growth of wealth in the possession 
of individuals ceases to be a public benefit. 
If the bulk of the property of any given country, 
or even a half or a quarter of it, should fall into 
the possession of a few hundred or a few thou- 
sand persons (as is the case in England), the 
power of the few persons would be so great 
that the rights of the people at large might bo 
disregarded by them and trespassed upon. It 
is claimed, and has been claimed over amd 
over again, during the last three months, that 
that time has Virtually come in the United 
States; that there are in this country the im- 
mense number of from 30,000 to 31,000 " million- 
^res;" that a formidalbje proportion of the 
property of the country is in their possession; 
and that the majority of these men have accumu- 
lated their wealth by engaging in industries pro- 
tected by the tariff, which, as they say, " legalizes 
the robbery of the people." I have repeatedly 
shown in these columns that the protective tariff 
is not only not a tax upon or robbery of the 
I>eople, but a positive benefit to them. The Trili- 
une's lists of " millionaires" now disposes, once 
for all, and forever, of the claim that there are 
31,000 millionaires in the United States, owning 
nearly half of the property of the country. In 
place of 31,000, there are only 4,047, about one- 
eighth as many as these modern croakers are wont 
to claim. And of the 4,047 only 
1,125 obtained their wealth through 
"protected" industries (the great majority of 
even these having made a large part of their wealth 
by investing their savings in non-protected indus- 
tries). Of the total number, 140 have become rich 
in cattle raising and in the manufacture of pat^ 
en ted articles, proprietary medicines, etc., which 
are not clearly in the protected list; in 55 cases 
the origin of the fortune is not reported : while 
the great number of 2,727 obtained their wealth 
in occupations which are not protected at all, 
such as the purchase and sale of goods, the build- 
ing and management of railroads, real estate de- 
velopment, mines, and other such enterprises. Let 
us hear no more clamor about the great fortunes 
all being due to the "robbery" of the people 
under a protective tariff. 

So far from half the property of the country 
being in the ownership of "millionaires," not to 
exceed one-tenth part of even that which is 
assessed by the tax gatherer is in the ownership 
of these persons. 

A Protectionist might be able to claim, with 
some show of proof, that even if all the fortunes 
of the United States, large and small, had been 
made uHder the protective tariff, that fact might 



be a powerful argument in favor of such a tariff. 
Large fortunes can be made only when the people 
at large are prosperous, buying large CLuantities 
of goods every year at good prices, and spending 
money freely for recreation and health ; and the 
Protectionist believes that the prosperity 
of the American people is largely due to the 
protective tariff. But it is the fact that not 
more than about 28 per cent of the rich men of 
the United States have made their money in 
protected industries. And the lesson which this 
teaches is import:int. The Tribune's exhibit leaves 
no chance for doubt that large fortunes can be. 
and are, accumulated by good business manage- 
ment without regard to special protection to pe- 
culiar industries extended by the laws of the coun- 
try. Good judgment and close adherence to cor- 
rect bueiness principles lead to success in all Idndss 
of business alike. 

EICH, XET HONETT. 

The common statement that no man can make 
a large fortune honestly is not true. Money is 
often made in large sums by men who never 
wronged a fellow-man out of a single cent. I am 
writing this article on the oars between Helena 
and Bismarck. Attached to our train is the pri- 
vate car of one of these "millionaires," George 
W. Childs, of Philadelphia. At twelve years of 
age Mr. Ohilds landed in Philadelphia with only 
$3 in his pocket, and went to work at §3 a week, 
paying §2 50 a week for his board. To-day he 
owns, individuallj-, one of the great newspapei'S of 
this country. His income is enormous. He has given 
away in worthy charities monej' enough to maike 
several large fortunes . To see him is to 
love him. I do not believe that he ever wronged 
a fellow-man out of a single dollar, Yet he la 
rich, very rich, as the world goes. He combines 
the gentleness and warm-heartedness of a woman 
vrith the keen sense ot a No. 1 business man. 
The charm of his conversation is simply fascinat- 
ing. He took "The Public Ledger" when it 
was losing money rapidly. By untiring industry, 
good judgment and marvellous business sense, he 
converted that journal into one of the ablest 
newspapers of this country, and in doing s» he 
made for himself a very large fortune. His in- 
come is princely. He is noted for lilierality and 
fair dealing with all who work in his establish- 
ment. Every man who has purchased one of hia 
papers has always received his money's worth. 
His materials have always been paid for at the 
market price. Those who advertise in Ids columns 
have had value received. And yet he has ac- 
cumulated great wealth . 

There are men who constantlj' assert tliat no 
man can become as rich as George W. Childs with- 
out robbing some one. Will these gentlemen 
point out what human being Mi-. Childs has 
wronged, whom of his fellow-creatuies he has 
robbed ? I doubt if there Uves the man who 
can say that he was ever wronged by Mr. Childs 
out of a dollar. I cannot for the life of me see 
why Mr. Childs is not just as much entitled to 



AMEEICAN MILLIONAIRES. 



93 



his millions aa I am to the few dollars only 
which I have saved. If he is not, vphy not? 
Some men accumulate great wealth; a much 
larger number remain poor. I wish every one 
had a competency, enough to live on comfortably. 
Because they do not, it by no means follows that 
those who succeed do so by robbing others. 

CAN FORTUNES BE LIMITED? 

It sometimes seems to me that the aocumula^ 
tion of very large fortunes should be prevented. 
I then ask myself how and why. Suppose that 
Mr. Childs shall so manage as ta double the cir- 
culation and patronage of his great daily. His 
income would instantly double and his wealth 
would be greatly increased. Would any one be 
done a wrong by ffioh an occurrence.!' Who has 
the right to control hie efforts or limit his en- 
deavors ? • The more I study this problem the 
more I become satisfied that whatever a man ac- 
cumulates honestly that he should have the rigiht 
to own and control. If not, why not? Is not 
the possibility of accumulating wealth the great 
inducement to industry, energy and perseverance ? 

The proper distribution of the wealth created 
by joint action of a large number of people is a 
problem, which has engaged a great deal of at- 
tention. I do not believe it wiU ever be solved 
by limiting the amount of wealth which any one 
individiial shall be permitted to accumulate. 
Once enter upon that road and the liability is 
that there will be no stop short of preventing 



all accumulation. I cannot believe that such a 
result would benefit the human race or end in 
human progress and happiness. The distribution 
of accumulations aJt the time of a man's death, 
however, may receive the attention of law-makers, 
and is liJcely to do so in the future. I may refer 
to this again in a future article, as well as to 
other features of the general subject of "million- 
aires." This article is suflSciently long already. 

Before closing^ let me say that The Tribune 
thanks most sincerely the nearly 1,500 persons 
who have kindly written letters and aided 
in the completion of these lists of " millionaires. " 
They have been consulted on account of their great 
experience and large know. edge about the men aai 
business of their localities. Their kind and 
courteous replies are hereby acknowledged with 
sincere thanks. There are a few people who 
think the publication of a list of " millionaires" 
indecorous. It is amazing how any business man 
or person of sense can take such \ view of this 
undertaking. The same reasoning would put 
a stop to the taking of every census, and to everj 
effort to measure the growth and prosperity of 
any country. 

Men of brains who study great eoonomlo 
question; are never weary in seeking all possible 
data to aid them in the solution of financial ques- 
tions. 01 what great importance it would be to 
the student of social life in this country, if he 
could possess a list of all the persons worth 
$5,000 and upward in the United States! How 
such a list would spike the guns of agitators like 
General Weaver and Jerry Simpson! 

E. G. HOUR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



xli 



PLAZA* 



And Fronting on Fifth Avenue and r>8th and 5'Jtli Streets. 



NEW YORK'S 

NEW AVONDER 

OF THE AVORLI). 

" Ivepresents an expendi- 
ture of over $3,000,000." — 
A', v. Trill line. 

"The most niagiiificently 
and luxuriously appointed, 
and most perfectly efjuipped 
hotel in the World." — ^\'. 
I'. Ilolfl A;\;is/ir. 







"—C^ 



HOTEL OF THE 
HIGHEST CLASS, 

'■ The Plaza Hotel uses 
water and ice made from 
vapor, thus avoiding all 
chance of liisease from that 
srjurce. The evaporating 
apparatus and ice machine 
can be seen working on the 
premises at any time." — 
Boslou Sii/np'i/dv Ev-^nin;^ 
Gazette. 



Fifth Avenue Stages and Belt Line Horse Cars pass the doors. Terminal Station Sixth Avenue Elevated road 
within half a block. 

THIS HOTEL IS ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF. CONDUCTED ON AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLANS. 

F. A. HAMMOND. 



\^'^.C.BRD/ST£R. 
PR£SID£NT. 







WOaOBURY D\ L/INGDON 
V/CE FPEST. 



W M^MASTCR MILLS, 
1 CASII/En. 







"^=^ 



hP> 




RECEIVED ON DEPOSIT AS CASH. ^ 
LETTERS OF CmiT GUARANTEED. 




xlii 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Broadway, 36th and 37th Streets, 



NEW YORK. 




mil 



KC 



""x* 










400 R.O<Z>3Vfl:S 

SINGLE AND EN SUITE WITH PRIVATE BATH. 

Conducted on both the 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN 

With a Restaurant of unsurpassed excellence. 

LOUIS L. TODD, Proprietor, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



xliii 



D. B. HATCH. 



Members N. Y. Stock Exchange. 



C. B. FOOTE. 



HATCH & FOOTE, 



» • 



Bankers. 



INVESTMENT 
SECURITIES. 



4- 
X 
+ 



/ Pine Street, 

NEW YORK. 



OLDEST AND MOST WIDELY CIRCULATED 
PUBLICATIONS IN AMERICA. 



BANK 



The American Bank Reporter. 

Published Every Sixty Days. 

Containing a complete list of all banks in the united States 
and Canada, together with a list of the more important foreign 
institutions, givina: names ot ofacers, correspondents, and capi- 
tal, surplus, etc. List of towns without banliing facilities with 
nearest banking points. Bank directors in the principal cities. 
List of reliable attorneys in the United States ana Canadfi. 
Synopsis of banking and commercial laws of the various States 
and Territories. Alphabetical list of all oflBcers, and much other 
valuable information. 

Subscription Price. $4.0O per Annum. 



Business Established 1 836. 



The American Bankerj 

ISSUED WEEKLY. 



The best financial advertising medium. Its circulation 
treble that of any similar publication. _ 

A 40 page weekly Supplement to The American Bank 
Reporter, a complete epitome of all the banking and mone- 
tary affairs of the country. Special Treasury reports, including 
NEW and CLOSED BANKS, also latest changes in banks, 
which are published immediately on receipt of advice. 
Subscription Price, S4.00 per Annum. 



ANTHONY STUItfPP. 



CHAS. D. STEUKER. 



Anthony Stumpf & Co. 

PUBLISHERS, 
48 Church St., New York City. 



]P. O. Bojc ^1 1. 



Underwood's Counterfeit Reporter. 

ISSUED BI-MONTHLY. 

Only Reliable AutUority on Counterfeits. 

Contains a list of Counterfeit National Bank Notes ; Stolen 
Notes : Numbers of Genuine National Bank Notes that have 
been Counterfeited ; Counterfeit U. S. Notes, Silver Certificates 
and U.S. Bonds; Canadian Bank Notes, Stolen Notes, Raised 
Bills, and Banks that have failed or discontinued, value of 
foreign gold, silver, and bank notes, etc., etc. 

Subscription Price, SS.OO per Annum, 



xliv 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JOHN R. FOLEY, 
Member of Real Estate Exchange and 
Auction Rooms (Limited). 



JOHN R. FOLEY, JR. 



Telephone Call, 1788 Cortlandt. 




REAL ESTATE 



PROPERTY AP- 
PRAISED ■ IN ■ ALL 
PARTS • OF ■ THE 
UNITED ■ STATES : 




RENTING • & • COL- 
LECTING ■ INSUR- 
ANCE : ESTATES 
MANAGED : LOANS 
NEGOTIATED : : : 



KEW TOHK EEAI. ISTATB ESOHAKGE BUTLDrNG. 



153 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



New York City Business Property for Sale 
Paying 7 and 8 per cent. Net. 



Investments profitably made 

for Estates and Foreign Capitalists. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. xlv 



CONCORD, N. H. CHICAGO. DENVER, C0L,O. 

e. h. rollins £ sons, 

-^ Bankers,^ 

36 Wall Street, New York. 

Dealers in High Grade Investment Securities, 
Municipal and Railroad Bonds a Specialty. . 
Investment Lists Fu^nisked on Application. . 

E. C. Benedict. J. H. Benedict. F. H. Benedict. 

E. C. Benedict & Co.. 

ESTABLISHED 1857. 

29 BROAD STREET. 



BONDS & STOCKS 

Bought and Sold for Cash or on Margin. 



DEALERS IN HIGH GRADE INVESTMENT SECURITIES. 



xlvi ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Marquand & Skehan, 

BANKERS & BROKERS, 

Investment Bonds and Stocks, 

Members N. Y. Stock Exchange, 

16 BROAD STREET, 

NEW YORK. 

RUSSELL MARQUAND. JAMES B. SKEHAN. 

American Casualty Insurance and Security 
Company of Baltimore City. 

CASH CAPITAL,, $1,000,000 00. 

HAZARDS INSURED .- 
Em-ployers Liability. 

Contribution Insurance (indemnity to employees). 

Boiler Explosion. 

Elevator Accidents. 

General Casualty Clause (engines^ shaftings belting, 
elevators, etc.) 

Automatic Sprinkler Losses. 

Horse a^td Vehicle [Public Liability, 
Life and Property). 
Railroads, steam and surface {Employers, Individual Accident. 

Passengers and Public Liability). Fidelity Bonds. 

Steamboat (Employers, Passengers, and Public Liability). 

B£ECHER, SCHENCK & COMPAIVY, General Managers, 

4=0-44 PINE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. xlvii 



EMERSON McMILLIN. HENRY B. WILSON 

EMERSON McMILLIN & CO., 

40 Wall Street, new york. 



BC/V AND SELL 

Gas, Electric^ Water, 

Street Railway, Coal, 

Iron and Industrial Properties. 

CHARLES T. WING & CO. 

18 Wall Street, 



FRANK E. WING. 
HENRY A. GLASSFORD 



EDWARD N. GIBBS, NEW YORK. 



Special 



DEAIiERS IIV HI€}H CliASS 



Railroad and Municipal Bonds 

AND Guaranteed Stocks. 



LISTS AND FULL DISCRIPTION FURNISHED ON APPLICATION. 



xlviii ADVERTISEMENTS. 



W. B. SANCTON, 



.: BANKER & BROKER, .-. 



52 BROADWAY, 



Hember of the XT T^\A/^ VOT? T<r 

New York Stock Exchange. • • • • 1>1-^VV IV^TVIV. 



C. H. WHITE & CO., 

BANKERS, 
72 & 74 Broadway, N. Y. 

MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK BUILDING, TACOMA, WASHINGTON. 



BUY and SELL CITY, COUNTY, SCHOOL DISTRICT and 
FIRST-CLASS RAILROAD BONDS. 

Correspondence Solicited of Officials having Loans to Negotiate. 

List of desirable Investments furnished ttpon application. 

ALL MUNICIPAL BONDS Sold by us have OUR ATTORNEY'S 
OPINION SHO WING LEGALITY. 



ADVERTISEMENTS, xlis ] 



W. Q. DOMINICK, I ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ r „7 MONROE ST.. Chicago. 

W. B. DICKERMAN., V 4 150 WALNUT ST.. Cincinnati, 

B. DOniNlCK. ) ^- ^- ^^''^^ Exchange. Offices: ( ^^g BROADWAY. New York. 



BANKERS .-. AND .-. BROKERS. 

74 BROADWAY and 
9 NEW STREET, . . 

NEW YORK CITY. 



MOORE & SCHLEY, 

BANKERS, 

80 Broadway, New York City. 



JOHN G. MOORE, GRANT B. SCHLEY, 

WILLIAM H. DUFF, ELVERTON R. CHAPMAN, 

HENRY G. TIMMERMANN. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 



UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY. 



Transcript from the Books on the Morning of 

June 30th, 1892. 

RESOURCES : 

Loans and Discounts, $9,109,481 66 

United States Bonds, 450,000 00 

Other Stocks and Bonds, 72,19260 

Premium, 40,000 00 

Bank Building, 700,000 00 

Other Real Estate, 86,000 00 

Cash, $3,466,595 51 

" Exchange (Due from Banks), . 1,196,07327 4,662,66878 

$15,120,343 04 

LIABILITIES : 

Capital Stock, $2,000,000 00 

Surplus Fund and Profits, 594,624 44 

Circulation, 225,000 00 

Deposits, 12,300,718 60 

$15,120,343 04 

This Bank will be pleased to receive the accounts of 
mercantile firms, individuals, banks and corporations. 

WILLIAM L. STRONG, President. 

EDWIN LANQDON, Vice-President. 
C. S. VOUNQ, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS: 

WILLIAM A. WHEELOCK, SIMON BERNHEIMER, WILLIAM L. STKONG, JAMES H. DUNHAM 
WILLIAM M. BLISS, JAMES W. SMITH, EDWARD C. SAMPSON, EDWIN LANGDON.;' 

WOODBURY LANGDON, JOHN CLATLIN, JOHN A. MoCALL, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The Best Accident Policy Ever Issued. 

THE UNITEDlfATES MUTUAL 

ACCIDENT ASSOCIATION, 

320 TO 326 BROADWAY, NE^A^ YORK, 

Offers to Professional and Business Men a 

$10,000 POLICY 

^24 A YEAR 

payable eitlpcr /lpi>ually or Quarterly ii) /lduai>e^. 

It insures against accidents generally, whether occuring in travel, 
at home, about one's business or recreation. 

The following table shows the indemnities provided by this 

Special Full Indemnity Policy. 



Death by Accident 

Loss of Hand and Foot 

Loss of Both Hands 

Loss of Both Feet 

Loss of Both Eyes 

Loss of Right Hand . 

Loss of Either Leg 

Loss of One Foot 

Loss of Left Hand 

Loss of One Eye 

Permanent Total Disability 

Weekly Indennnity (52 weeks) 



$ 1 0,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

2,500 

2,500 

1,000 

1,000 

650 

2,500 

25 



lii 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



^\^^. &J.SLOANE- 



Carpetings •.* Rugs •/ Upholstery 

Exclusive Patterns in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CARPETS, 



AX MINSTER, 
WILTON, 

VELVET. 
MOQUETTE and 
BRUSSELS 
CARPETS, 



AXMINSTER and! 
AUBUSSON WHOLE jj 
CARPETS in Special, m. 
Designs TO ORDER. 




Cfioice Specimens of 

ORIENTAL 
CARPETS and RUGS. 



^L New Designs and 

Color Effects in 
UPHOLSTERY 
MATERIAL 
for Wall, Window and 
Door Hangings and 
Furniture Coverings. 



BROADWAY, iSth and 19th streets, NEW YORK. 



WATTS COOKE, Pres. 
A C. FAIRCHILO, Sec'y. 



W. O. FAYERWEATHER, VIce-Pres. and Treas. 
JOHN K. COOKE, Superintendent. 



The = Passaic - Rolling = flill - Co., 

Paterson, New Jersey, 

STEEL AND IRON MANUFACTURERS. 



Steel Beams 4. inch to 20 tJick deep, and other 
Structural Shapes. 
Builders of Railway Bridges and Viaducts, 
Turntables, Roofs, etc. 



NEW YORK OFFICE, NO. 45 BROADWAY. 

PLANS AND ESTIMATES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




ip 



i 



S 



us 



F.V.DEVOEE^^. 

ESTABLISHED 1S?2 



lianufciclurers of 



^-Prr*^, 



a^^ 




3-^ 








^^i 



Correspondence inviied 
Caialooues of our various deparimenis 
^'^ to responsible parties \ 



r Offices > 
FulioriSt. Coi; 
Villieini ^ 



,^*fe'*&t3(ia,aiii*-:!^^^r(' - 



n — "I" — ■^'' — '^"" '"'" *^'"' """ ^'"' """' 



1 



i 




Uv 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



STECK PIANOS 

USED by hundreds of Academies, Colleges, Schools, etc., for more 
than 35 years in preference to all others, because the 
STECK PIANOS have proved to be the Most Reliable In- 
struments after the severest test. 



WHAT SOME OF THE LEADING ARTISTS SAY: 

WACllVER. — " Everywhere acknowledged to be excellent." 
lilSZT. — "They give the liveliest satisfaction." 
ESSIPOFF.— "The very best piano made." 
TWIIiHEIiMJ. — " Rank far above all possible competition." 
IjUCCA. — " Are unparalleled for the majestic singing quality of tone." 

ARDIXI. — " Without fear of contradiction the Steck ranks higher than all other 
instruments now manufactured." 



GEORGE STECK & CO., Manufacturers, 

WAREROOMS, Steck Hall, 11 East 14th Street, New York. 

THE CORCORAN 

Storm Defying Improved WINDMILL 




THIRTEEN SIZES. 



^ Awarded Five Medals. 



The only Windmill made principally of steel. 

The only Windmill having anti-friction metal bearings. 

The only Windmill having adjustable boxes for taking up lost 
motion. 

The only Windmill, the woodwork of which is treated with wood, 
preserving material. 

The only Windmill having an anti-friction turntable. 

The only Windmill having the *' X" governor. 

The only Windmill not handled by middlemen and guaranteea 
by the inventor and manufacturer. 

The only Windmill made in the Eastern or Middle states. 

No correspondence solicited on the pretense that my Windmills, 
and Pumps are low-priced for I do not make such grades. 

For prices, catalogues, estimates, etc., address 

A. J. CORCORAN, 

75 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK CITf. 

FACTORY. JERSEY AVE.. JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. Iv 



T. S. YOUNG, Jr., W. S. NELSON. 

^ Member N. Y. Stock Exchange. 

YOUNG & NELSON, 

46 WALL STREET, 

NEW YORK. 

T^EALERS in Investment Securities. 

List of Investment Securities published monthly 
and forwarded on application. 

Personal attention given at N. Y. Stock Exchange 
for the purchase and sale on Commission of Stocks 
and Bonds for cash, or on Margin. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

Principal safe and Income good in Chicago Mortgages . 

p. R. CHANDLER. ESTABLISHED 1 8 58. F. R. CHANDLER. 

CHANDLER & COMPANY 

MORTGAGE BANKERS, 
no Dearborn Street, CHICAGO. 



First Mortgage Gold Loans on Chicago Real Estate. 

Choice Investments for Savings' Banks, Trustees, Guardians, Executors and 
Individuals. 

Over thirty years' experience in Chicago. 
Members of the Chicago Real Estate Board. 



BUY AND SELL MORTGAGES. 



AGENTS IN CHICAGO FOR OUR BANKERS. 

The Vermont Savings Bank, Brattleboro, Vt. Union National Bank, Chicago. 

The Brattleboro Savings Bank, " " Atlas National Bank, Chicago. 

The Sullivan Savings Institution of Claremont.N.H. Chemical National Bank, New York. 

The Lebanon Savings Bank, of Lebanon, N. H. Messrs. Drexel, Morgan & Co., New York. 

The Bellows Falls Savings Institution, Vt. The National Bank of the Commonwealth, Boston. 

And Private Capitalists of London, Paris, New York Globe National Bank, Boston, 
and Boston. Cable address: ROSALIE, CHICAGO. 



M ADVERTISEMENTS 



Geo. G. Williams, President. 
Wm. J. QuiNLAN, Jr., Cashier. 



CHEMICAL NATIONAL BANK of N. Y. 



Capital $300,000. 
Surplus and Undivided Profits, $6,800,000. 



DIRECTORS : 

G. G. Williams, Jas. A. Roosevelt. Frederic W. Stevens, 
Robert Goelet, Wm. J. Quinlan, Jr. 

CHATHAIVI * NATIONAL * BANK, 

NEW YORK, 

CAPITAL STOCK, $450,000. 

SURPLUS, $800,000. 



DEPOSITS. 

1882 $4,300,000 

1883 4,600,000 

1884 5,200,000 

1885 5,200,000 

1886 6,000,000 

1887 6,000,000 

1888 6,200,000 

1889 6,400, 000 

1890 6,800,000 

1891 7,100,000 

1892 7,400,000 



SURPLUS. 

1882 $150,000 

1883 175,000 

1884 225,000 

1885 275,000 

1886 350, 000 

1887 400, 000 

1888 450,000 

1889 500, 000 

1890 600,000 

1891 , 700,000 

1892 800,000 



DIRECTORS. 

GEORGE M. HARD, THOMAS W. ADAMS, HENRY M. ANTHONY, 

ALFRED F. CROSS, DAN. B. SMITH, HENRY RANDEL, 

JOHN H. WASHBURN, P. H. KELLY, HENRY P. DOREMUS, 

SANFORD H. STEELE, GEN'L HENRY W. SLOCUM. 



€E0. M. HARD, President. HENRY P. DOREMUS, Cashier. W. H. STRAWN, Ass't Cashier. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. Mi 



Wood, Huestis & Co, 

NO. 31 F»I]MK^ STREiET, N E^ WT YORK. 



Commission Brokers 

and 

Dealers in Investment Securities. 



C. H. HUESTIS, 



L. M. SWAN, 
EDW. H. LADD, Jr., 



Member N. Y. Stock Exchange, „ „ CD. WOOD, 

T c-iirATVT ^ General Partners. f,„„„, ., t. ' 



Special Partner. 



LEWIS E. RANSOM, President. H. B. MOORE, Vice-President. 

THE 

NATIONAL BANK OF DEPOSIT 

OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 
NO. 35 LIBERTY ST., COR. NASSAU. 



CAPITAL, $300,000.00 

SURPLUS and PROFITS, . . . $81,387.42 

Accounts of Banks, Bankers, Corporations 
and Firms, received on Favorable Terms. 

DIRECTORS. 

JOHN H. QILBERT, Qilbertsvilie, N. Y. NOAH CORNWELL ROGERS, of Merrill & Rogers. 

OEO. W. HOAQLAND, 60 Broadway. P. R. SIMHONS, of Henry Ginnel & Co. 

ALFRED C. MINTRAM, oI James H. Taft & Co. RICHARD A. ANTHONY, of E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. 

COL. E. S. ORMSBY, Pres. First Nat. Bank, Emmetsb'g, la. J. W. SIMONS, Pres. FirstNat. Bank, Constantine, Hich. 

AUGUSTUS K. SLOAN, of Carter, Sloan & Co. STEPHEN H. HILLS, of S. H. Hills & Co. 

THOS. E. SLOAN, Cashier National Express Co. LEWIS E. RANSOM, President. 

LEOPOLD STERN, of Stern Bros. & Co. H. B. HOORE, Vice-President. 



Iviii 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE FOURTH NATIONAL BANK 



OF THE 



City of New York. 



Statement at the Close of Business, May 1 7th, 1892. 



REPORT TO THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY— CONDENSED. 



Resources, 



Discounts and Time Loans 

United States Bonds to secure circulation 

Other Securities 

Banking Houses 

Gold 

Legal Tenders - 

Five per cent Fund - 

Due from Treasurer U. S. 

Due from Banks 

Exchanges - - - 

Demand Loans . . . . 



$16,013,844 37 

50,000 00 

124,663 08 

600,000 oo 



^5,480,608 50 
1,407,260 52 
2,250 00 
15,000 00 
1,638,399 66 
5,850,855 45 
7,853,392 28 



22,247,766 41 
$39,036,273 86 



Liabilities. 



Capital Stock 
Surplus 
Profits, net 

Circulation 

Due Depositors viz : 

Banks 

Individuals 

Deposits held for acceptances 



P3, 200,000 00 

1,500,000 00 

393,094 66 



$5,093,094 66 
45,000 00 



^17,284,568 01 
13,853,27s 63 



-31,^37,843 64 
2,760,33s 56 

$39,036,273 86 



J. EDWARD SinMONS, President. 
CORNELIUS N. BLISS, Vice-President. C. H. PATTERSON, Cashier. 

JAMES Q. CANNON, Vice-President. J. A. HILTNER, Ass't Cashier. 



CORNER PINE and NASSAU STREETS. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



lix 



M. A. BURNHAM. 



S. D. PHILLIPS. 



B URN HAM & PHILLIPS, 

FINE APPAREL FOR GENTLEMEN'S WEAR, 



7e/i\pli? (^ourt /lr)i>ex, 



119 NASSAU ST., 



NEW YORK. 



Ciuerl^S, l^9i<$l?ts Ji^mplar apd 1^9i(5l7t8 of pytl7ias iJpiforms. 



EXCLUSIVELY CUSTOM MADE- 



^l^THE CERLACH FAMILY HOTEL 



49 to 55 West 27th Street, 

Near Broadway. 




AMERICAN & EUROPEAN 
PLAN. 



pireproof. 




Desirable FAMILY Apartments ; 
Special rates by the year for engage- 
ments made on or before September. 



The building is designed as to be abso- 
lutely fireproof, and it has been erected, 
under the alert supervision of Mr. Ger- 
lach. It is a building remarkable for sol- 
idity, elegance and convenience. — N. Y^ 
Commercial Advertiser. 



I have examined a good many of the most improved modern systems of sanitary plumbing, but in no case have I 
seen such perfection as in " The Gerlach."— Toitn Topics. 

"The Gerlach" is an elegant structure, absolutely fireproof, and furnished with every convenience that can add 
to the comfort and enjoyment of those who are under its roof. It offers a striking contrast, in its appointnients and 
In the nerfectinn of its arrangements, to the accommodations, which, even a few years ago, were considered the per- 
f^ction'^ofluxurtous ease and tie height of tasteful ornamentation in hotel structures. TEIs, too, is the case with the- 
culsine and service of " The Gerlach."— iVoi! and Express. 

Besides the ordinary caravansaries for transient guests there are many magnificent and spacious family hotels 
so-called which will be'^availlble for the World's Fair of '93. Among the finest of these in the point of location, ap- 
pointment and management is " The Gerlach."— iVeit' I orK Pres.f. 

" The (}erlach " has among the permanent guests, a high order of people from the financial circles, among which, 
are several well-known bankers of this city and elsewhere, with their families. As a. home there is nothing extant 
in this country, where so much real domestic luxury can be realized, and no other hotel so nearly approaches one s own. 
flreside. Respictobility, refinement and elegance, are most happily combined in this home of all hotel homes, and it, 
is a true pleasure to live there.— Daily FiTwincia! News. 



Ix ADVERTISEMENTS. 

A5T0RPLACE BANK 

CLINTON HALL • 

Astor Place and Eighth Street, N. Y. 

Capital = = = = ^ $250,000. 
Surplus and Profits = $387,000. 



Invites business and personal accounts. Offers depositors every 
"facility which their balances and responsibility justify. Issues Inter- 
est-bearing of certificates of deposit. Sells foreign drafts and letters 
of credit available everywhere. 



ALFRED C. BARNES, President 



FRANCIS L. HINE, Vice-President 



JOHN T. PERKINS, Cashier 



COLUMBIA BANK, 

501 FIFTH AVENUE, Corner 42d STREET, 

NEW YORK CITY. 

CAPITAL STOCK, .... $300,000 
SURPLUS, 373,000 

DESIGNATED RESER VE AGENT FOR N. Y. STATE BANK. 

Individual, Business and Corporation Accounts Solicited. 
Special Department for the Convenient Direction of Ladies' Accounts. 

Drafts issued on Europe. 



JOSEPH FOX, President, 

DANIEL T. HOAG, ) vice-Presidents 
MYER S. ISAACS, ) ^"^^ rtesidents. 

BOARD OF 

JOHN H. WATSON, Residence 671 Fifth Ave. 
WILLIAM L. SKIDMORE. Residence, 49 West 52d 

Street. 
HENRY GITTERMAN, of Sulzbacher, Gitterman & 

Wedeles, importers, 70 and 72 Worth Street. 
JOHN S. FOSTER, President 42d St. Railroad Co. 
MYER S. ISAACS, of Isaacs & Sanger, 115 Broadway. 
CHARLES REED, of Pettit & Reed, 228 Fulton St. 
HOFFMAN MILLER, of Miller, Peckham & Dixon, 

29 Wall Street. 
L. J. FITZGERALD, Ex-Treasurer State of New 

York, Cortland, N. Y. 



D. H. ROWLAND, Cashier, ! 

W. S. GRIFFIFTH, Asst. -Cashier. 

DIRECTORS. 

J. W. MACK, of Nathan M'fg Co., 94 Liberty St. 
LEONARD FRIEDMAN, of L. Friedman & Co., 

Tobacco, 203 Pearl Street. 
MAX J. LISSAUER, of Lissauer & Sondheim, 12 

Maiden Lane. 
THOMAS P. FISKE, of Fiske Bros., oils, 61 Water 

Street. 
SIMEON FORD, of Grand Union Hotel, 42d Street 

and Park Avenue. 
LEWIS SEASONGOOD, of J. & L. Seasongood 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
D. H. ROWLAND, 501 Fifth Avenue. 



A.D V ERTISEMENTS . 



Ixi 



i« 



o 



**Our CMnceg"; 



UR CHAUNCEV" is Chauncey M. Depew, the masterly leader of the Harrison forces at Minneapolis, 
who made the principal speech there renominating the President. Mr. Depew is acknowledged to 

be the foremost of American orators, brilliant, spark- 
ling, sound and sagacious. His after-dinner 
both the models and despair of his 







f^^ii^"-- 



are 



^jv^~ 



speeches 
rivals. 

"Our Chauncey" is a poem, by Isaac H. 

, L-Jromley, illustrated profusely and comically^by Dan 

Beard and C. D. Gibson, two of the best pen-and-ink artists in New York 

City. When first read in New York City, before the Yale College boys, it 

was received with one prolonged burst of laughter and applause, which 

lasted to the end. It describes the fatigue of great Jupiter over the average 

common-place after-dinner speech, and his determination, announced in a 

voice of thunder, on Olympus to all the assembled court, to produce an 

orator who would not talk common-place. He discovers Chauncey M. 

Depew in his cradle, to the delight ol the whole Olympian throng, and his bringing up 

and education as an orator are delightfully and amusingly told in the poem. It is a 

poem for college men, club men, politicians, and every lover of a bright, amusing, 

handsomely illustrated book. 

No doubt every admirer of "Our Chauncey" will be delighted to be able to 
possess the poem in a permanent and really beautiful form, embellished by capital 
drawings and enriched by the poet with a series of excruciating notes. It is a 

delicious piece 
of fun, and it is 
moreover thor- 
oughly posses- 
sed of a spirit of 
genial and sin- 
cere admiration 
for its eloquent 
subject. Mr. 
Bromley's hu- 
mor, whether in 



prose or verse, is 
too well known 
and too highly 
and generally 
appreciated t o 

need special comment ; but it is doubtful whether he has ever done his wit more credit than in these dashing, 

rollicking and brilliant verses. 

Retail price, $i a copy. The book has been offered as a premium to the readers of the " Weekly 

Tribune;" and any actual susbcribers to the Daily may now obtain it on the same terms, viz: 80 cents a copy in 

addition to his subscription. The book is sent in a paper bo.x. 

Tribune Almanac, 1802. — A magnificent number. The standand book of reference for politics, 
finance, election returns, and general statistics. 350 pages, 25 cents a copy. 

Presbyterian General Assembly, 1892.— The proceedings in full. 25 centsacopy. 91 pages. 

Ne\V Tariff Laws. — The McKinley bill, old and new rates compared. 10 cents a copy. 

After Dinner Speeches.— The best of those delivered at public dinners in New York City, 1 891-2. 
84 pages. 25 cents. 

Tribune War Stories.— Forty stories of actual experience in the Civil War. E.Kcitmg, pathetic, 
thrilling, they constitute a magnificent collection. 104 pages. 25 cents. 

Village Improvement.— 5 cents a copy. 

Knitting- and Crocbet.— The Tribune's latest on this subject. 25 cents. 

For other Extras of THE TRIBUNE, 20 or 30 in number, send for a circular. 



THE TRIBUNE, new york. 



Ixii ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE PRINTING INK 

USED by the BEST PRINTED DAILIES, 

AS FOR EXAMPLE, THE FOLLOWING: 



Philadelphia Public Ledger, 

Philadelphia Record, 

Saturday Night, &c.. &c., 

New York Commercial Advertiser, 

New York Tribune, 

New York Daily News, &c., &c., 



Chicago Inter-Ocean, 

Chicago Times, 

Chicago Illinois Staats Zeitung, &c., 

Pittsburg Dispatch, 

Pittsburg Commercial Gazette, 

Pittsburg Leader, &c., &c. 



Is Manufactured by 



JJARPER BONNELL COMPANY , 

11 and 13 Vandewater Street, 

NEW YORK. 



Mr. J. Harper Bonnell has furnished all the ink for Frank Leslie's 
'Illustrated Weekly for many years to the entire satisfaction of the 
publishers, and since the formation of his new company he has 
excelled himself. The inks made by the J. Harper Bonnell Company 
are specially adapted for fine engraving and half-tone printing. This 
week's paper is a sample of the kind of work these inks can do, and give 
us the utmost satisfaction. 



" AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES " IS PRINTED WITH INK MADE 
BY J. HARPER BONNELL CO., N. Y. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



bdii 




l}PSl|- 



~llli#^ 



^otek) 



— »— HUMXlNieAND HAMMOMD. — »~ 



i 



OCATED one block from Grand Central Station, and on highest 
grade of Land in the City. 



f\ fiote! of superior exeellepei^ 09 botl; pmi^rieap 
ai}d European plains. 



The Water and Ice used is vaporized and frozen and 

Free from Disease Germs. 



Patrops of tt)(i /r\ijrray fiill f<ot(^l \)av(^ t\)e\r Ba^^a(5^ trans- 
ferred to aF>d fro(T\ t\)<^ (Jrapd <$eptral Statiop 



FREE OF CHARGE. 



Cable Address: MURRAY HILL, NEW YORK. 



Ixiv ADVERTISEMENTS, 



THE CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUL RAILWAY COMPANY 

now operates over SIXTY-ONE HUNDRED MILES of thoroughly 
equipped road in 

ILLINOIS, WISCONSIN, NORTHERN MICHIGAN, MIN- 
NESOTA, IOWA, MISSOURI, SOUTH & NORTH DAKOTA. 

Each recurring year its lines are extended in all directions to meet the 
necessities of the rapidly populating sections of country west, northwest 
and southwest of Chicago, and to furnish a market for the products of the 
greatest agricultural and stock raising districts of the world. 

In Illinois it operates 317 miles of track; in Wiscon- 
sin, 1,636 miles; in Northern Michigan 96 miles; 
in Iowa 1,551 miles; in Minnesota 1,115 miles; in 
South Dakota 1,092 miles; in North Dakota 118 
miles; in Missouri 140 miles, 

and the end is not yet. It has terminals in such large cities as 

Chicago, Milwaukee, La Crosse, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Fargo, 
Sioux City, Council Bluffs, Omaha and Kansas City, and St. 
Joseph, Mo., 

and along its lines are hundreds of large and small thriving cities, towns, 
and villages. Manufacturing interests are cultivated, and all branches of 
trade find encouragement. The Railway Company has a just appreciation 
of the value of its patrons, and its magnificent earnings are the result of 
the good business tact which characterizes the management of its affairs. 

M^HE popularity of the line is attested by the fact that notwithstanding the 
^^ strongest kind of competition of old and new lines, the 

Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway continues 
to carry the greater proportion of all the business be- 
tween Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Minneapolis 

It is the best patronized route between Chicago, Council Bluffs and Omaha, and 
to and from all points in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Dakota and Iowa, and its Kansas 
City and St. Joseph line has taken equal rank with the older lines leading to and 
from the Southwest. 

On all its through lines of travel the Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul 
Railway runs the most perfectly equipped trains of Sleeping, Parlor and 
Dining Cars and Coaches. The through trains on all its lines are syste- 
matically heated by steam. No effort is spared to furnish the best accomoda°' 
tions for the least money, and, in addition, patrons of the road are sure of 
courteous treatment from its employes. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. Ixv 



F. W. PRESCOTT & CO., 

Bankers and Brokers. 

Ames Building, Boston, 

42 Weybosset St., Providence, 

60 Broadway, Room 303, 
New York City. 

TEIiEFHOlVE 311. 



Interest allowed on deposit subject to check. 

Orders executed for cash or on margin in Stocks and Bonds listed on the 
New York, Philadelphia and Boston Stock Exchanges. 

Customers can telegraph orders or instructions at our expense. 
Send for Circular and Telegraphic Code. 

SOLICITORS AND NEGOTIATORS, 

NEW YORK OFFICE, 

57 and 59 William Street. 



BANKING HOUSE 

OF 

HENRY CLEWS & CO., 

II, 13, 15, BROAD STREET, 
NEW YORK. 

MEMBERS OF THE 

N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE, N. Y. PRODUCE EXCHANGE, 
N. Y. COFFEE EXCHANGE, N. Y. COTTON EXCHANGE 
AND CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE : : : : : 



DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS RECEIVED SUBJECT TO CHECK AT SIGHT. 

INTEREST ALLOWED ON ALL DAILY BALANCES. 

PRIVATE WIRES TO BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA AND CHICAGO. 



Ixvi ADVERTISEMENTS. 



"TAINTOR & HOLT, 

^ *|v BANKERS, 

II WALL STREET, - - NEW YORK, 

Transact a General Banking and 
Stock Exchange Business. 



Deposits Received and Interest Allowed on Balances. 

A Selected List of Investment Securities furnished upon 
Application. Correspondence Solicited from Officials 
Contemplating the Placing of Securities. 



PRIVATE TELEGRAPH WIRE TO PROVIDENCE AXD BOSTOj!f. 



J. S. FARLEE. ROBERT D. FARLEE. 

J. S. Farlee >& Brother, 

No. II WALL STREET, 

P. O. Box 1466. NEW YORK. 



BROKERS and Dealers in Investment Bonds 
and Stocks. State, Municipal and Approved 
Railroad Bonds, on hand for immediate delivery, 
suitable for Savings Banks, Trust Funds and other 
Conservative Investors. Correspondence Solicited. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. Ixvii 



HARVEY FISK & SONS, 

No. 28 Nassau Street, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



DEALERS IN 

UNITED STATES BONDS 

AND OTHER SECURITIES. 



UNITED STA TES BONDS, 

MUNICIPAL BONDS [New York City a Specialty^ 

RAIL WA Y BONDS, 

STATE BONDS, 

BOUGHT AND SOLD. 



PRICE LIST OF SELECTED 
BONDS ON APPLICATION. 



SELECTIONS MADE TO 
SUIT ANY REQUIREMENTS. 



iiwin '& itiii t oa, 



811 1 



-DEALERS IN- 



STATE, MUNICIPAL 

AND 

RAILWAY BONDS. 



SUITABLE FOR THE INVESTMENT OF SAVINGS BANK/ 
TRUST OR PRIVATE FUNDS. 

WE SOLICIT THE CORRESPONDENCE OF MUNICIPAL 
AND RAILWAY OFFICIALS HAVING BOND ISSUES TO NE- 
GOTIATE. 

LIST OF BONDS FOR SALE FURNISHED INVESTORS ON 
APPLICATION. 



"THE GREATEST OF ALL THE COMPANIES." 

THE MUTUAL LIFE 

OK KKW YORK. 
RICHARD A.-McCURDY, President. ROBERT A. GRANNISS, Vice-PresidenL 



ASSETS OVER $160,000,000.00 

THE "CONSOL" ISSUED BY THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANT?. COMPANY 

OF NEW YORK COMBINIs 'm6RE ADVANTAGES WITH FEWER RESTRICTIONS 

THAN ANY INVESTMENT INSURANCE CONTRACT EVER OFFERED. 
•IT CONSOLIDATES 

Insurance Against Death 

or an Endowment in Life. 

An Investment Without Risk 

and Annual Income Without Fail. 

XO OTHER COMPANY OFPBRS THIS POI^ICY. 

APPLY TO THE HOME OFFICE OF THE COMPANY, 32 NASSAU STREET, "^ 
WEW YORK, OR TO ITS NEAREST AGENT, FOR DETAILS AND RATES. | 



"The Mutual Life" 

PAID NEARLY $19,000,000.00 IN CASH TO 

ITS POLICY-HOLDERS IN 1891, AND IS IN THE MINDS OF THE DISCRIMINATING 

INSURING PUBLIC THE BEST OF ALL THE COMPANIES. 

The Best Company is the one that does the Most Good.