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Full text of "Drawn thread work"

LIBRARY 

ANNEX 
M2 



d 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARV 




924 058 948 94B 




I Cornell University 
^ Library 



The original of tiiis book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924058948948 



DMC LIBRARY 



Drawn 
Thread Work 



St 



Series 




ALBERi R. fVIAiv^ 
LIBRARY 



TjRNELL UNIVFP' 



EDITIONS TH. de DILLMONT 

Societe a responsabilite limitee 
MULHOUSE (France) 



All rights reserved 



538 




openwork insertion with knotted clusters set contrariwise, 
overcast bars and festoons in darning stitch. 



Dra^vn Thread Work 



The empty spaces produced in linen b}' grouping together 
with stitches several threads, isolated by the drawing out of 
warp or woof threads or both, constitutes what is known as 
" drawn thread work ". 

By grouping together and covering the isolated threads 
with different stitches the most varied combinations and the 
richest patterns can be produced, suitable either as sole 
decoration or as a finish to cross stitch or other embroidery. 

The simplest kind of drawn work is known as "hem-stitching" 
which consists in drawing out a few parallel threads of the 
material at the head of a hem and fastening up the upper and 
last cross-thread to the folded hem above it, so as to prevent 
its ravelling downwards ; thus leaving small open spaces 
between each of the clusters of threads. The borders, inser- 
tions and grounds, the Italian cut stitch, the different kinds 
of American, Danish and Norwegian openwork (•*) and, finally, 
the Reticella cut work of Italian and Greek origin, are all 
more complicated and elaborate forms of drawn or openwork ; 
the latter being a transition from openwork on linen to lace work. 

The patterns of modern work of this kind are very similar 
to certain lace patterns, they resemble the American ones and 
contain, like these, stitches and figures often employed in the 
Teneriffe lace. 

(*) See, at the end of this album, the Ust of the pubUcations of the D-M-C library, 
containing a great variety of patterns for every kind of work. 



4 DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 

Viewed as regards the execution there are two kinds of 
openwork on linen : the one is produced by drawing out a 
certain number of either the warp or the woof threads, this is 
known as drawn work (the ItaHan punto tirato) ; the other 
requires the removal of both warp and woof threads and is 
known as cut work (the Italian punto tagliato). 

Materials. — Openwork on linen is done on woven stuffs, 
the warp and woof threads of which should as far as possible 
be of equal size so that the spaces left by the removal of 
the threads may be regular in form. For table, bed and toilet 
linen, all the different kinds of white, cream or ecru linens, 
used for embroidery, are suitable : for decorative articles, 
coloured linen known as English or Scotch linens are preferable. 
The different kinds of tammj'- cloth serve for chair-backs, 
curtains and blinds ; gauze and cambric, for dress trimmings. 

For the openwork, when the threads of the stuff have been 
removed, a strong, twisted thread should always be used, one or 
other of the following articles, bearing the D-M-C trade mark; 
D-M-C Alsatian thread (Fil d'Alsace) (*), D-M-C Alsatian twist 
(Retors d'Alsace), D-M-C Alsatian cordonnet (Cordonnet 
d'Alsace), D-M-C Cotton lace thread (Fil a dentelles), D-M-C 
Crochet cotton 6 cord (Cordonnet 6 fils), D-M-C Special crochet 
cotton (Cordonnet special), D-M-C Crochet cotton, bell mark 
(Cordonnet a la cloche), D-M-C Alsatia, D-M-C Knotting cotton 
(Fil a pointer), D-M-C Alsa, D-M-C Flax lace thread (Din pour 
dentelles) or D-M-C Flax thread for knitting and crochet 
(Din pour tricoter et crocheter). The working thread should, 
generally speaking, be of the same size as the threads of the stuff 
but for the raised parts which are to stand out in special relief a 
coarser thread should be used. For all the fillings and decorative 
figures in darning stitch, a loose pliable thread should be selected, 
such as D-M-C Special stranded cotton (Mouline special), com- 
posed of several strands, of which one or more can be used as 
required, or else D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle), D-M-C Floss 
flax or flourishing thread (Din floche) and D-M-C Rayon for 
embroider}^ (Raj'onne a broder) all with a slight twist. 

Openwork on linen is generally done in one colour only, 
white on white, or in the same shade as the stuff ; but we should 
recommend white thread for cream and ecru stuffs and a 



(*) The French names, in brackets, are those stamped on the labels of the 
DM-C articles. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Fig. 2. Another single hem-stitch. 



slightly tinted thread for the coloured lines. Openwork on 
linen in several colours is not often met with. 

To facilitate the reproduction of our patterns, directions as 
regards the course of the work and the materials to be used 
are given, either beneath the engravings in the text or, in the 
case of the plates, at the back of each plate. 

Insertions (punto tirato). 

Insertions are made, as we have 
already said, by drawing out 
either the horizontal or the ver- 
tical threads. The openwork 
hems form the starting point 
of this kind of work. 

These hems often take the 
place of the ordinary hem when 
a richer effect is desired. Wider 
insertions are used as a trimming 
for bed and table-linen instead 
of embroidery or lace insertion. 

Rows of hem-stitch wor- 
ked with the machine. — 
Rows of hem-stitch can be more 
quickly worked by machine 
than by hand. 

Narrow rows can be worked 
without being mounted on a 
frame. In this case it is ad- 
visable to stretch the shuttle 
thread very tightly. 

For the shuttle thread use 
D-M-C Machine thread (Fil pour 
machine) No. 150, for the top thread D-M-C Alsatian twist 
(Retors d'Alsace), D-M-C Alsatian cordonnet (Cordonnet 
d'Alsace) and D-M-C Alsa for the bands of hem-stitch. 

Single hem-stitch (figs, i and 2). — Draw out two threads 
beneath the foldover, then tack down the hem above the iso- 
lated threads. P'asten in the working thread on the left, then 
slip the needle from right to left under three isolated threads, 
draw it out and pass it, upwards from below, under two threads 
of the fold of the hem. (See fig. i.) 

For the hem fig. 2, prepare it like the preceding one, and 




Fig. 4. Serpentine hem-stitch. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 






Four-sided stitcli. 




Fig. 6. Crossed back-stitch 
Right side. 



work as before from left to right, except that after having slipped 
j^our needle under the two perpendicular threads j^ou insert 
it into the hem, downwards froni above, over one thread, so 
that it comes out exactly at the verj^ edge 
of the fold. These stitches, which ma^^ also 
be made on the wrong side of the work, 
form a kind of cord beneath the hem. 
Ladder hem-stitch (fig. 3). — After 
making the first row of stitches, as shewn 
in fig. I, draw out a few more threads, 5 in 
all. Then turn the work and make a second 
row of stitches like the first. You collect 
the same threads as in the first row thus 
forming vertical rungs or steps. 

Serpentine hem-stitch (fig. 4). — 
Here again the first row of stitches is 
made as in fig. i, bj' taking up each time 
an even number of threads. For the se- 
cond row take up half the threads of two 
clusters, so as to divide the rungs or steps 
which will thus form a serpentine line. 
How to secure the edges of the 
stuff in openwork. — After drawing 
out the threads for a hem or an insertion, 
you must secure the threads of the stuff 
on both sides of the openwork, so as to 
keep them in their place and prevent their 
slipping into the openwork part. This is 
an indispensable precaution in the case of 
wide hems or insertions ; for small articles 
of fancy-work it is not so necessary. 

The simplest way of securing the edges 
is shewn in figs, i and 3, it can also be 
done by straight and oblique stroke stitches, 
set singly or grouped together in the shape 
of scallops or squares (see plates I and IV). 
For the openwork parts, combined 
with embroidery in colours, use cross 
stitch and plaited stitch (see plates XIII and XIX). In work 
of a more minute description the edges are button-holed or 
overcast, as has been done in the patterns represented in 






Fig. 7. Crossed back-stiteh. 
Wrong side. 




Fig, S. 

Fancy stitch worked in 

one journey. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Fig. 9. Fancy stitch 
worked in two journeys. 




Fig. 10. 

\MioIe clusters interverted 

once. 



plates II, III, VIII, IX, XI, XII and 
XVIII, where the stitches are thickly 
padded, thus producing a raised effect. 

Figs. 5 to 9 also illustrate some 
stitches that may be used for this work. 

Four-sided stitch (fig. 5). — Draw 
out one thread of the stuff, skip three 
threads and draw out one. 

The stitches are made in a row from 
right to left. Begin with a vertical stitch 
upwards over the three isolated threads, 
then carry the needle on the wrong side 
of the work three threads downwards 
to the left, make one horizontal stitch 
to the right which will touch the verti- 
cal stitch at the top, and finally bring 
out the needle below to the left of the 
horizontal stitch. Then make a vertical 
stitch again and so on. Bj^ drawing the 
thread tight you get small square stit- 
ches accompanied above and below by 
little eyelet holes. In looselj' woven .stuffs 
it is not necessar}^ to draw out a thread 
top and bottom, the openwork effect 
results of itself by the threads being 
drawn closely together. 

Crossed back-stitch (figs. 6 and 7). Divided clusters interverted 

The right and the wrong side of this 
stitch both serve for securing the edges 
of the stuff. Leave a band of stuff, 
three threads deep, then draw out one 
thread above and below. 

For the execution described by the 
engraving, fig. 6, you insert the needle 
as for ordinary back-stitch, .slip it under 
the stuff, slanting it a little towards 
the second outline of the drawing, and 
bringing it out one thread beyond the Kg- i.^- Two whole clusters 

^ ^ .... interverted once 

first stitch. After making one back-stitch ,vith two haif-ciusters. 







DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



over two threads of the stuff, sHp the needle upwards 
again under the stuff and bring it out two threads further 
on for a new stitch. 





Fig. 13. Two whole clusters 

interverted once with four 

half-clusters. 



Fig. 14. 

Four clusters once interverted and 

once crossed. 



The intercrossing of the threads and the way this stitch 
is worked on the wrong side are shewn in fig. 7. 





Fig. 15- 

Four clusters ouce interv^erted 

and twice crossed. 



Fig. 16. 

Whole clusters once interverted 

and three times crossed. 



Fancy stitch worked in one journey (fig. 8). — Here 
again the band of stuff is three threads deep, but two threads 
of the stuff must be drawn out both above and below. 

Beginning below on the right, make two back-stitches 
from left to right over four disengaged threads, these are 
followed by two stitches over three horizontal threads and 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



two vertical ones, sloped to the right ; after which you make 
two horizontal back-stitches over four threads at the top to 
come back to the first line with two slanting stitches over 





Fig. 17. Two clusters 
once iuterverted in two rows. 



Fig. iS. Four clusters 
doubly iuterverted in two rows. 



three horizontal and two vertical stitches, sloped to the right. 
Continue in this manner drawing the stitches very tight and 
the open parts will come out very distinctly. 

Fancy stitch k^'"-"^' 
worked in two 
journeys (fig. 9) 
The stitchesare made 
over five horizontal 

threads, and one 

thread is drawn out 

top and bottom 

The first row 
consists of single 
stitches, see figs, i 
to 3, one of which 
is worked upwards 
and the other down 
wards (see also the 
explanatory 
on the left side of 
the engraving). In the second journey j^ou add a row of 
oblique stitches in the middle of the band, set between 
the stitches of the first row; in the engraving these stitches 
are shewn by a dark thread. 




Fie; 19 Three lowed mserti n 

with diMded clusters once inter\Lrted and little 

waved insertions between. 

detail Materials : Coarse linen with double threads, in ecru, 

and D-M-C Pearl cotton No. 5, in Corn yellow 712. 



10 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



Different ways of 
openworking the bands 
of drawn stitch. — The 

openwork can be produced 
in various waj^s : 

1° By drawing the 

li^teStii^ta^ffi^iiiffiliMiffl clusters of threads opposite 

waj's ; 

2° 




Fig. 2o. Insertion with interverted 

clusters in two rows. 

llaterials : Coarse tammy cloth with double 

threads, in ecru, and D-M-C Special crochet 

cotton No. 3, in Snow-White. 




By knotting the 
clusters ; 

3° Bj' embroidering over 
the clusters ; 

4° By linking the 
clusters together with 
small decorative subjects. 

Different w^ays of 
drawing the clusters 
together interverted (figs. 

10, II, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 

17, 18). — You draw the 
clusters together opposite 
ways bj^ slipping a needle 
and coarse thread under one 
cluster which you then slip 
over one of the next clusters. 
To keep the clusters in their 
new position you pass the 
coarse thread between the clusters 
that are interverted. 

You can draw the clusters opposite 
ways in one journey or in several 
parallel lines, then you can take either 
whole clusters, or divided ones, or 
several clusters at once as will be 
seen from the following examples. 

We begin with the small strips made 
ill one journej'; fig. 10 shews us the 
plainest one, two whole clusters once 
interverted. 

For this you draw, as we have just said, the second cluster 
over the first and the coarse thread passes over the second 



Fig. 21, Insertion Mith interverted clusters 

crossed three times and embroidered over. 

^Materials : Coarse Unen, in ecru, and D-M-C 

Flax thread for knitting and crochet Xo. R, 

in white. 






Fig. 22. 

Triple clusters knotted 

once with a vertical thread. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



II 




Fig. 23. Triple clusters 

knotted twice with two parallel 

vertical threads. 



cluster and under the first. For the stripe fig. 11 the clusters 
are divided before they are interverted ; this pattern 
presents a less open efiiect than the j 
preceding one. 

The engraving fig. 12 shews two 
whole clusters interverted with two 
half-clusters and fig. 13 a design 
consisting of two whole and four 
half clusters. 

The patterns of figs. 14 and 15 
are formed of four clusters inter- 
verted at the same time. For fig. 14 
you draw the third and fourth clus- 
ters over the first and the second, 
which gives a subject crossed once, 
whilst for fig. 15 you intervert the 
third and the fourth clusters and 
the fourth and the second ; in this 
way the clusters appear crossed twice. 

Finally fig. 16 shews how to 
execute in one journey a row crossed 
three times. To get this effect you 
intervert the fourth and first clusters, 
the sixth and the third, the eighth 
and the fifth and so on. 

Two more patterns are added in 
which the clusters are interverted in two 
parallel rows. Fig. 17 shews a double row 
of the motives of fig. 10, and fig. 18 a 
double row of the motives of fig. 15. The 
position of the needle shows the working 
of the second row. 

Three-rowed insertion ■with divided 
clusters once interverted and little 
waved insertions between (fig. 19). — 
The following patterns are to shew the 
uses to which the different crossed open- 
work stitches just described can be put. For the three-rowed 
insertion, fig. 19, repeat the stitch illustrated by fig. 3 six 
times ; the first and sixth time for beginning and finishing 
the insertion, the second and fifth time after having drawn 




Fig. 24. Quadruple clusters, 

divided, knotted twdce ^^'ith two 

vertical threads. 




Fig. 25. single clusters 

knotted once in a serpentine 

line without overcasting 

stitches. 



12 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Fig. 26. 

Double clusters knotted once 

in a serpentine line 

with overcasting stitches. 




Fig. 27. 

Quadruple clusters once 

knotted in a serpentine line with 

overcasting stitches. 




Fig. 28. Sextuple clusters 

twice knotted with a pattern consisting 

of button-holed squares. 



out six threads of the stuff, the third 
and the fourth time after drawing out 
eight threads. All the clusters must 
consist of four threads of the stuff. 
The first and the third rows must be 
worked after fig. 4, the middle row 
after fig. 11. 

Insertion with interverted 
clusters in two rows (fig. 20). — After 
drawing out twelve threads of the stuff 
and securing the edges with the stitch 
shewn in fig. 3 worked over three 
disengaged threads, you make two 
series of stitches interverting the 
whole clusters as shewn in fig. 17. 
Insertion with interverted 
clusters crossed three times 
and embroidered over (fig. 21). 
Draw out twenty-five threads of 
the stuff ; the isolated threads 
on both sides are then secured 
by oblique stroke stitches over 
six threads. 

The clusters are then crossed 
in the middle of their height by 
means of the stitch represented 
m fig. 16, after which you 
introduce another thread each 
side of the first, following the 
clusters proceeding from the 
first assemblage. After draw- 
ing the first threads through 
you surround the clusters 
with overcast stitches by 
means of a second thread, 
thus enclosing them between 
two threads. 

Different w^ays of knot- 
ting the clusters (figs. 22, 
23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31). 
The insertions with knotted 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



13 




Fig. 29. 

Single clusters knotted with 

the Turkish knot. 



clusters constitute a second variety of drawn thread work on 

linen. The knotted clusters can be made in one or more parallel 

rows, and the auxiliary thread that 

serves to make the knots, may be 

visible and form at the same time 

part of the pattern, or maj^ be used 

only for the knots and pass more or 

less invisibly from one cluster to 

another. For a single row you connect 

the clusters by a knot formed by an 

interverted chain stitch, in more 

elaborate patterns you can use both 

overcasting and button-hole stitch. 

We recommend all these kinds of 
openwork being done on the wrong 
side, in this way it will be found 
easier to carry the thread invisibly 
from one cluster to another and the 
chain stitch will also present a 
better appearance. 

We begin our series of patterns by 
those with knotted clusters worked 
in one row and in which the auxiliary 
thread is visible ; fig. 22 shows the 
making of a knot with an interverted 
chain stitch in an insertion formed 
by triple clusters, once knotted. The 
thread with which j'ou make the collect- 
ing knots descends vertically and links 
the clusters together. 

In fig. 23 the clusters appear much 
longer, they are knotted twice, which 
forms a pattern with horizontal bars in 
the middle of the insertion. 

For fig. 24 you draw four clusters 
together and these are afterwards divided 
in the second row so as to form in 
the middle a serpentine pattern. 

In the next figures the thread that served to make the 
knots is carried over the clusters without shewing in the 
empty spaces between. 




Fig. 30. 

Double clusters knotted with 

the Turkish knot. 




Fig. 31. Clusters knotted 

in serpentine line 

by horizontal stitches. 



14 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Fig. 32. Insertion formed 

of two rows of triple clusters once knotted. 

Materials : Coarse tamni}' cloth with double threads, 

in ecru, D-M-C Floss flax or flourishing thread 

No. 16, in Cream 579. 



The little insertion fig. 25 is a specimen of single openwork 
without the edges being overcast or secured in any way by 
stitches, as in small articles of fancy-work. The clusters of 
threads are knotted in a zig-zag line by means of single chain 
stitches and without overcasting stitches between these latter. 

Fig. 26 shews a si- 
milar pattern but with 
the edges secured against 
fraying and the clusters 
encircled in the middle 
by an overcasting stitch. 

For the insertion 
illustrated by fig. 27 
you each time knot four 
clusters together ; the 
serpentine bars in the 
middle of the strip are 
lightly overcast. 

Fig. 28 shews an in- 
sertion consisting of a 
double row of sextuple 
clusters, the middle bars 
set in the shape of lo- 
zenges are encircled with 
fill button-hole stitches. 

The single Turkish 
I knot, fig. 29, is often 



used when the edges of 
a wide insertion are to 
be ornamented with a 
row of eyelet holes. After 
drawing out two or three 
threads of the stuff col- 
lect three or five together 
by means of the knot explained by the engraving, and 
the result will be a row of small round holes. 

Fig. 30 shews the use of the Turkish knot to collect two 
clusters in a wider insertion. In this way small isolated crosses 
are formed, the opposite to those in fig. 22, where the clusters 
are visibly connected by the thread that served to make the 
collecting knot. 




Fig. 33. Insertion of knotted clusters 

with vertical bars. 

Materials : Coarse tammy cloth, in cream, 

D-M-C Crochet cotton, special quality, No. 5. 

in Cream 579. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Finall}', in fig. 31, we give a narrow serpentine insertion 
where the pattern is formed solely by horizontal overcasting 
stitches ; this work is not very strong and we cannot recommend 
its use save in certain fancy articles not exposed to much wear. 

The ensuing pattern of insertions will shew the use of 
the stitches we have been 
described. 

Insertion formed 
of twro rows of triple 
clusters once knotted 
(fig. 32). — Draw out twice 
twelve threads of the stuff 
with an interval of four 
threads, and secure the 
edges from frajdng by 
stitches over 2 threads, as 
in fig. 3. After fastening 
in the thread, knot three 
clusters together by means 
of three interverted chain 
stitches, see also fig. 22. 
The thread that crosses the 
middle of the empty spaces 
between must always be 
given a little play. 

Insertion of knotted 
clusters writh vertical 
bars (fig. 33). — The 
stitches to secure the edges 
are to be worked over four 
threads, you then draw out 
twenty threads between the 
edges. The pattern itself is 
worked after fig. 23, only instead of knotting the clusters 
together with only one chain stitch you do it with three. 

Turkish insertion with two rows of isolated clusters 
(fig. 34). — After securing the edges by stitches set over three 
horizontal and four vertical threads, draw out for each band 
sixteen threads of the stuff. The crossed figures of the second 
band are interverted as regards those of the first band. Fig. 30 
shows the working of the stitch. 



Fig. 34. Turkis _ 

with two rows of isolated clusters. 
Materials : Ivinen of medium coarseness, in white, 
D-M-C Pearl cotton No. 5, in Golden yellow 782. 







FiK 3 ^ 


Fig 36 


Lorded isolated 


Corded bars m 


bars. 


zig-zag line. 



i6 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



^31 


i^gt 


TlStJkJ.^::^ =Na=^^^^H 


i - K H K ►— -^V— s-^^^E^fc .CL 


IMp-^^f^ 



Fig. 37. Bars covered 
with darnine stitches. 



Different ways of embroidering the clusters (figs. 35, 
36, 37, 38). — The third class of drawn work comprises the 
insertions with embroidered clusters ; this work requires more 
trouble and patience than the preceding kind, for the 
clusters of threads entirely disappear under the embroidery 
that forms the pattern. 

The stitch most frequently used for 
this embroidery is darning stitch, together 
sometimes with overcasting and button- 
hole stitches. 

Fig. 35 explains the making of the 
little corded bars used either for orna- 
menting a narrow hem or for making 
latticed grounds in works of a larger size. 
(See also the grounds figs. 72 to 78, and 
the borders figs. 97 to 99.) — As seen in 
fig- 35. tfie thread is carried downwards 
from above in the middle of the cluster to be corded; be- 
ginning at the bottom, you completely surround the cluster, 
consisting in this instance of four threads of the stuff, with 

overcasting stitches. 

Fig. 36 shews the corded bars 
placed in a zig-zag line. Here the 
bars are worked alternately up- 
wards and downwards, and over 
clusters of three threads onh^ At 
the junction of two bars you 
connect them by two overcasting 
stitches over the six threads they 
are composed of ; in this way you 
have an insertion of serpentine bars. 
The bars covered with darning 
stitches, fig. 37, always require 
clusters made of an even nuinber 
of threads. The bars are made from 
right to left, to and fro, the needle 
being always inserted in the middle of the threads of the cluster. 
Insert the needle, eye foremost, the point turned against 
the thimble, this facilitates the work and prevents you from 
splitting the threads of the clusters. When the bar is finished, 
turn the work round, so as always to work in the same 




Fig. 38. Pyramids covered with 
daruing stitches. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



17 




direction, that is to say, having the finished part on the 
right of your needle. 

To shew how larger figures are worked in darning stitch, 
we give in fig. 38 an insertion composed of pyramids in course 
of execution and shewing the work in progress. The needle 
travels to and fro over a settled number of clusters till all 
the threads of the stuff are entirely covered. 
Insertion in 



darning stitch. — The 

following patterns repre- 
sent insertions of Slav or 
Hungarian origin ; they 
are executed in darning 
stitch. These insertions 
are employed as borders 
for trimming house-linen 
and wearing apparel 
they are mostly executed 
in white on ecru linen 
more rarelj' in colourb 
In the latter case, verj 
bright decided colourb 
are preferable : red, blue, 
green and orange, some 
parts are even embroide- 



red in black. In addition 'i^SirMSSfMSS^^'i^MmiMvfi^^^ 



Fig. 40. Insertion with three rows of bars in 

darning stitch in three colours. 

Materials : Coarse tammy cloth with double threads, 

in white, D'M-C Pearl cotton No. 5, 

in Scarlet 304, Pistachio green 319 and 

Mandarin j^ellow 741. 



Fig. 39. Insertion with two rows of bars in 

darning stitch in one colour. 

Materials • Coarse linen in cream 

D M C Crochet c ittou bell mark No =; m ecru 




to these patterns we give 
a series of Persian subjects 
copied from the ancient 
veils, which are famous 
for their great beauty. 

In these kinds of drawn work it often happens that the 
embroidery stitches that cover the clusters fill up the whole 
width of the insertion, it will therefore in these cases be 
unnecessary to secure the threads of the edges by over- 
casting stitches. 

Insertion ■with tivo ro'ws of bars in darning stitch in 
one colour (fig. 39). — Draw out 14 threads. Pass the working 
thread so that it may disappear under the darning stitches 
made to and fro over ten threads, in sufficient number to cover 
the isolated threads to half their height. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Fig. 41. Insertion with three ro\^"S of bars 

of different lengths in darning stitch. 

Materials : Coarse linen with double threads, 

in w-hite, D-]M-C Floss flax or flourishing thread 

No. 8, in Golden bronze 5S8. 



To reach the second cluster, reinsert the needle under the 
last darning stitches, carry the thread under the isolated threads 
and begin the second cluster by dividing the threads as the 
figure indicates. Fig. 37 also explains the execution of the 
^^!^4:i^^^L^u^L^u^L-^ bars in darning stitch. 

Insertion with 
three rows of bars in 
darning stitch in three 
colours (fig. 40). — After 
drawing out 18 threads of 
the stuff, collect the ver- 
tical threads and work 
the darning stitches over 
the ten threads as in tig. 
39, but in three colours 
instead of one, using al- 
ways the same colour for 

.tp three clusters in a dia- 

i^ gonal line. 

Insertion Avith three 
rows of bars of diffe- 
rent lengths in darning 

stitch (fig. 41). — vSecure 
the edges with stroke 
stitches set slanting over 
four threads of the stuft", 
then draw twenty hori- 
.,v,x^ zontal threads for the 
'^" openwork. The bars of the 

Fig. 42. Insertion in darning stitch. . -u ■ v 

Diagonalrowsof bars of two sizes form the pattern. ^WO exterior roWS, whlch 

Materials : Linen of medium coarseness, in white, are longer than thoSC of 

DM-C Flax lace thread No. i6, in white. ,1 -j n j 1 

the middle row, take a 
few more stitches to cover them than the middle ones which 
are nearly square. 

Insertion in darning stitch. Diagonal rows of bars of 
two sizes form the pattern (fig. 42). — The edges are se- 
cured by oblique stitches over four threads of the stuff and 
28 threads are then removed for the openwork. The pattern 
is composed of two diagonal rows of five bars covered with 
darning stitches worked over two clusters of threads, which 




DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



19 



alternate with one diagonal row of five squares worked over 
3 clusters of threads. 

Insertion in darning stitch writh pattern of pyramids 

(fig 43) — Heie too the edges are first secured bv oblique 




Fis: 43 liisLition m daminc; ^titeh \mUi p^ ItLiii oi juiiuud^ 
Materials Coaise linen, m white, D M C Floss flax or flounshm^ thread No 8, 
in Golden bronze 588 or D-M-C Special stranded cotton, in Hazel-nut brown 423. 




Li^\\i'Xj-^\ 



t5i?S \a U5ta ^liaSta^iiJi^ tirilid"3iai:iT5id& 



Fig. 44. Insertion in darning stitch in three colours. 

Materials : Einen of medium coarseness, in white, D-M-C Floss flax or flourishing thread 

No. 8, in Indigo 311, Geranium red 349 and Saffron 725. 

stitches over four threads ; the oi^enwork requires the removal 
of thirty threads of the stufl". 

The pyramids are worked over twelve clusters of threads, 
the little squares placed in diagonal lines over two. 



20 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



Insertion in darning stitch in three colours (fig. 44). — • 
The pattern requires the removal of thirty threads and 
the edges are secured by oblique stitches over three threads 
of the stuff. One subject of this insertion takes twenty 
clusters; you begin by the wide parts forming the pyramids, 

iHiim4|a^^u^]lKgilg.M^^ ^J^i^^ ^ ^'^'^ . covered 

5|!^iy;t_,;Ti^.^.^i-5-yn^^ with darning stit- 

ches in dark blue 
over three clusters. 
The inside bars of 
the pyramids are 
worked in red, 
the bars between 
them in yellow, 
the latter taking 
two clusters of 
threads. 

Insertion in 
darning stitch 
with lozenge pat- 
tern (fig. 45). — 
^^ tj i^iH, For this figure draw 
out 32 threads and 




Fig. 45. Insertion in darning stitch with lozenge pattern. 

Materials : Coarse linen with donble threads, in cream, 

D-M-C Pearl cotton No. 5, in Royal blue 797, 

("cranium red 340 and T^n-^crine yellow "4'' 



w w %p w "^w '^^''1^ ^Tr n'' ^'f-r 

.-.=^ „<j_ „ ^.., ,.^„ _-iy . „.™ -vvith oblique stit- 



T\u 4'' III *-rti n funned J; i olatcd clu ter 

111 darning blitch. 

Materials : Coarse tammy cloth witli double threads 

in cream, D-M-C Special stranded cotton No. 25, 

in Hazel-nut bro^vn 424. 



ches over three 
threads of the stuft". 
One subject occu- 
pies 22 clusters of 
threads. The lo- 
zenges are em- 
broidered in blue ; 
the intermediate 



figures in red and the framing of the lozenges in yellow. 

Insertion formed of isolated clusters in darning stitch 

(fig. 46). — Draw out twenty' threads. The square stitches 
that secure the edges are made over four threads, see fig. 5. 
Three clusters secured and collected together at the edges are 
covered, in the middle, with ten to twelve darning stitches. 
The thread is fastened off after each bar. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



21 









Insertion with the pattern in darning stitch worked 
in four colours (fig. 47). — Draw out 28 threads. The 
pjaamids take six clusters of three threads each, in a medium 
shade and a dark shade of green. For centre figure, worked 
in Dawn red, you collect three clusters on the right and three 
on the left. The middle is in black. 

Insertion in darning stitch and corded stitch (fig. 48). 
Draw out twenty threads. Overcasting stitches, over three 
threads in height and three in width, edge the insertion. 
At the bottom a second row of overcasting stitches succeeds 
to the first ; these, set parallel to the others, are made over 
, three, six and nine threads. The first cluster of three threads 
of the stuff must 
be encircled six 
times by the wor- 
king thread, which 
is then carried up- 
wards to the edge. 
Passing then to the 
second and third 
cluster you cover 
them with six darn- 
ing stitches, suc- 
ceeded by twelve 
stitches on the first 
and the second 

cluster until there UM-C Pearl cotton No. 5, in Scarab green 3348 and 3345, 
1 Dawn red 360 and Black fast dye 310. 

remains only space 

enough uncovered for the six overcasting stitches. The second 

part is done in the same way only reversed. 

Different w^ays of connecting the clusters by decora- 
tive figures. — In this last series of insertions the clusters 
of threads are connected by different combinations of stitches 
made with the needle, admitting of great variety. Those 
employed in Renaissance and Teneriffe lace and in embroidered 
net are adaptable here. 

The ones most frequently used are wheels or spiders, either 
detached or connected by knotted lines, and next to these come 
rounds and festoons, corded or embroidered in relief, picots 
and rosettes in post stitch, &c. 




Fig. 47. Insertion with the pattern in darning stitch 

worked in four colours. 

Materials : Coarse linen with double threads, iu white, 



-22 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



i%m 




Fig. 48. Insertion in darning stitch and corded stitch. 

Materials: Coarse tamni}' cloth, in ecru, 

D M C Spf-ial crochet cotton No 'i in ecru 




Fig. 49. Insertion ^Mtn wheels. 

Materials : Fine tammy cloth, in cream, 

D-M-C Cotton lace thread No ^o in ecru 



,'4*^1-^74 T 



.4.4 







Fig 50 In crlicn with h <_1 ml niii n ladder 

inbLrtioiih, top and bottom. 

Materials : Coarse linen, in ecru, D-M-C Flax thread 

for knitting and crochet No. 8, in white. 



Insertion with 

wheels (fig. 49). — 
The edges are secured 
with cross stitch, see 
fig. 7. You connect 
four clusters for a 
wheel. The thread 
fastened on in the 
middle of the inser- 
tion jDasses alterna- 
teh^ over and under a 
cluster. You make se- 
veral rows as in darn- 
ing, stopping there 
where the thread en- 
tered to form the 
wheel, and you pass 
under the wheel to 
reach the next four 
clusters, see also figs. 
81 and 82. 

Insertion w^ith 
wheels and narrow 
ladder insertions , 
top and bottom (fig. 
50). — Draw out 5 
threads for the nar- 
row insertions and 
22 for the wide one. 
P'or the exterior 
borders connect four 
threads of the stuff, 
see fig. 3, the strips 
of stuff are edged 
with cross stitches, 
see fig. 6. The middle 
clusters are connected 
on both sides by a 
knotted back-stitch 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



m 



represented in the 
figure, then you 
collect always four 
and four at half 
their length by 
three interverted 
chain stitches, see 
fig. 22, and then 
pass the thread at 
the intersection of 
the threads of the 
two first rows of 
stitches to form a 
■wheel there, over 
5 threads, before 
going on to the 
next bars. 

Insertion with 
whole and half- 
wheels (fig. 51). 
r'or the insertion 
draw out 24 threads 
of the stuff, the 
edges are secured 
by half- wheels ; 
you begin by car- 
rying the working 
thread over the two 

middle threads, 
j'ou then advance 
successively from 
both sides until 
3'ou have eight 
threads in the half 
circle. The whole 
wheels are made 
separately and over 
the same clusters 
of threads as the 
half-wheels. 




Fig 51 Insertion %Mth \Ahole and half wheels 

Materials ; Fine tammy cloth, in cream, 

D-M-C Special stranded cotton. No. 25, in Red brown 923. 




Fi 



T-i 



'^ tT ^^ iHli:''^"''^^^'^ 



luscition %Mth barb m darnm,, stitch 
and cuided eyelet-holeb. 
Materials : Coarse linen with double threads, 
ill cream D-M-C Flax lace thread No ''S in white 




Fig. 53. Insertion with bars and rosettes ornamented 

with winding stitch. 

Materials: L^inen of medium coarseness, in white, 

D-M-C Flax lace thread No. i6, in Cream 579. 



24 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



Insertion with bars in darning stitch and corded 
eyelet-holes (fig. 52). — Draw out 28 threads. The edges are 
secured by stroke stitches set vertically over two to five threads. 
The pattern itself is begun in the middle, on nine threads of 
the stuff with eight to nine corded stitches, then you divide 




Fig. 54. How to cut and isolate 
the threads at the corners. 



Fig. 55. Securing the threads at a 
corner by button-hole stitches. 





Fig. 56. Turning down the threads on 
the wrong side and fastening them off. 



Fig. 57. How to form the corner of 
the insertion lig. lo. 



the threads into three equal parts and add, on each side of 
the first stitches, twelve to fourteen darning stitches, thus 
leaving at most only J inch of isolated threads uncovered. 
When two bars in darning stitch are finished, you connect 
them by four button-hole stitches — one loop stitch — then 
you wind the single thread round several times more and cover 
the ring closely with corded stitches. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



25 



Insertion with bars and rosettes ornamented with 
winding stitch (fig. 53). — Draw out 24 threads. The edges 
are ornamented with vertical stroke stitches over two, three, 
four and five threads. Count four threads for the corded bars, 
eight for the bar in darning stitch ornamented with picots in 
winding stitch, and sixteen threads for the ground of the rosette. 
Collect the threads of the stuff for a wheel and then cover it 
entirelj^ with winding stitch. The loop that connects one bar 
with the other is made as you work. Having reached the desired 
point, carry the thread towards the first bar and come back to 




*■>'■*'- **v - 







w to form the corner 
of the insertion fig. 50. 



Fig. 59. How to form the corner 
of the insertion fig. 32. 



finish it. As the engraving shews the pattern may also be 
worked in two colours. 

Arrangement of the insertions at the corners (figs. 54, 
55. 56)- — When insertions form the borders to a square piece 
of work, you begin by cutting the threads to within a | inch 
of the edge of the hem or of the insertion itself, then you iso- 
late them as fig. 54 shews. You introduce the isolated threads 
into the foldover of the hem and fix them there with button- 
hole stitches, fig. 55, or else if the hem stitching is not to be 
interrupted, you turn the threads down at the back and sew 
them down there with a few stitches, fig. 56. 

Formation of the corners of insertions of one row^ 

(fig. 57). — By drawing out both the warp and the woof threads 
you get an empty square at the corner which is then filled by 
a small decorative figure. As an example we give, in fig. 57, 
the small insertion with interverted clusters, fig. 10, the empty 



26 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 






^^^»^ 



,11'^^=^" IV" mi I 







Fl-, 6o Cutting 

out the threads inside the 

square of stiiff. 



square at the corner of which is ornamented by a wheel with 
eight spokes, j^ou carry the thread of the first insertion to the 
opposite edge, insert it into the hem, then carry it back to the 
centre of the wheel that is to be made ; trace the five other 
spokes, make the wheel on seven threads, fasten the thread on 
the opposite side of the second insertion, pass it under the 
wheel and make the eighth spoke by taking the thread across 

to the second insertion. 

Forming the corners of insertions 
consisting of several rows (figs. 58 
and 59). — In the case of insertions 
consisting of several rows, you can 
make the corners in two different ways ; 
either you cut the threads right up 
to each strip of stuff, or you draw out 
all the threads up to the hem. We give 
examples of both ways. 

Fig. 58 shews the corner of inser- 
tion fig. 50 for which the threads have 
been cut up to each strip of stuff. The 
small corners are filled with a small 
wheel of four spokes, the big one with 
a wheel of twelve spokes richly orna- 
mented, see also fig. 84. 

The corner fig. 59 of the insertion 
fig. 32 is more troublesome to make. 
For it, all the threads near the hem 
have been cut ; the disengaged threads 
from the middle strips of stuff are 
Fig. 61. Drawing transformed into bars in darning stitch, 

out the threads throughout the and the four empty corners are filled 

whole surface of the stuff. .,, , , r ■ t j_ i 

With wheels of eight spokes. 

Cut stitch (Punto tagliato). — For cut stitch embroidery 
you draw out both the warp and the woof threads. 

The number of threads to be drawn out depends not only 
on the pattern chosen, but also on the stuft' on which the 
embroidery is to be done. 

The threads remaining between the empty spaces then 
serve as canvas for the different kinds of stuff. You must be 
careful only to choose stuffs with the warp and woof threads 
of equal size, so that the spaces left by the removal of the 




DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



27 



threads may be exactly square ; otherwise the appearance of 
the work, when finished, will suffer considerably. 

Cut stitch done -with the machine. — As in the case 
of the patterns done in drawn stitch those in cut stitch can 
also be done with the machine. For their execution see 
directions given on page 5. 

Cutting out the threads inside the square of stuff 
(fig. 60). — Often embroideries in cut stitch are framed in 
other kinds of embroidery. In such cases, you cut the threads 
to about one inch within the work, and only then isolate them 
so as to preserve the inside edges of the stuff intact. You must 
draw out an equal number of threads both ways. For most 




Fig b- Fc^tconcd ed^L liir cut stitch 
cnibr( ndcr\ 



Corded edge for ciit-stitch 
embroidery. 



patterns you have to leave as many threads as you remove. 
Fig. 60 shews four threads removed and four left. 

Drawing out the threads throughout the w^hole surface 
of the stuff (fig. 61.) — In fig. 61, where the threads are drawn 
out to the edge, you will observe four threads drawn out for 
every three left. This difference is admissible when you want 
to make the work more transparent than it would be by removing 
and covering the same number of threads. 

Festooned edge for cut-stitch embroidery (fig. 62). — To 
prevent the cut edges of stuffs from unravelling they should be 
festooned or button-holed, as shewn in the engraving fig. 62. 

Corded edge for cut-stitch embroidery (fig. 63). — A 
small cord or overcasting is almost better than festooning for 
strengthening the edges in the more elaborate patterns. You 
calculate, before cutting into the stuff, how many threads you 



28 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 




Fig. 64. First openwork ground. 
^^^ith horizontal and vertical bars. 



have to remove, then trace out your pattern with tacking 
stitches ; this done you cut to within two threads of the tracing 
stitches, the stuff to be removed, and immediately overcast 
the cut edge with stitches made over one or two padding threads, 

which gives a slight relief to 

the edges. 

Grounds. — The sixteen 
subjects we are now going to 
describe, designated "grounds", 
are chiefly used to ornament 
the openwork parts in pieces 
of work of a certain importance 
as regards size, see plate XVI ; 
they can always be used as 
insertions or scalloped borders, 
as has been done for the 
patterns illustrated by our 
plates XI and XII. 

The easiest subjects are 
those in which the clusters are 
only partly embroidered over 
or merely knotted like those 
of our first figures. They are 
followed by patterns in which 
the ground consists of corded 
bars or bars worked in darning 
stitch, copied from old pieces of 
needlework of Italian or Persian 
origin. These are rather long 
and difficult to do but workers 
will be rewarded for their 
trouble by the solidity and 
beauty of the result. 
First openvrork ground. With horizontal and vertical 
bars (fig. 64). — Cut three horizontal and three vertical threads, 
leaving an interval of three threads between. 

By drawing out the cut threads you get an open ground 
resembling net. The isolated threads are overcast in diagonal 
rows so as to make round bars. The intersections of the threads 
are covered by an oblique stitch ; the bars, according to their 




Fig. 65. Second openwork ground. 

with clusters connected together : 

diagonal rows. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



29 




Fig. 66. Third openworis: ground. 
With interverted loop stitches. 



direction, by two vertical or two horizontal stitches, as the 
engraving shews. 

Second openwork ground. With clusters connected 
together in diagonal rows (fig. 65.) — In height and breadth: 
cut four threads leaving an interval of four threads. 

Here likewise the ground 
is worked in diagonal rows ; 
the pattern is formed by con- 
necting the clusters together 
by a single knot in a coarse 
thread. The engraving ex- 
plains how the knot is made. 

Third openwork 
ground. With interverted 
loop stitches (fig. 66). — 
In height and breadth : cut 
four threads leaving an in- 
terval of four threads. Here 
the pattern is produced b}^ 
isolated loop stitches placed 
in every alternate emptj^ 
space and which embrace 
each way the four disen- 
gaged threads of the net. 

As seen in the engraving, 
these stitches are worked in 
diagonal rows, and the thread 
in its passage from stitch to 
stitch is hidden under the 
little square of stuff. 

Fourth openwork 
ground. With loop stitches 
set in lines (fig. 67). — In 
height and breadth : cut six 
threads leaving an interval 
of six threads. This ground 
is more covered than the foregoing one, each empty space is 
filled by a loop stitch interlaced over only three disengaged 
threads of the net and worked in vertical rows. By the 
clusters being divided in this manner, you get oval eyelet 
holes between the squares of stuff. 




Fig. 67. Fourtli openwork ground. 
With loop stitches set in lines. 



30 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 




Fig. 68. Fifth openworlj ground. 
With diagonal net. 



Fifth openwork grovmd. With diagonal net (fig. 68). — In 
height and breadth : cut four threads leaving an interval of 
four threads. Begin by making the diagonal net, for which 
you lay a thread covered afterwards by overcasting stitches 

set very wide apart. 

In the engraving, all the 
threads running from right to 
left are laid and overcast, 
likewise some of the threads 
from left to right crossing 
the first ones ; it shews too 
how to lay the thread and 
overcast it. 

When the net is quite 
finished, 5'ou frame each 
square of stuff — which 
seems covered with a thread 
stretched across diagonally 
— with square stitches to be 
worked in horizontal rows. 
Sixth openwork ground. 
With knotted clusters and 
filling of single spiders 
(fig. 6g). — In height and 
breadth : cut nine threads 
leaving an interval of nine 
threads. With the disengaged 
threads form clusters con- 
nected once horizontally or 
vertically by means of a knot 
described for the ground 
fig. 65, or by an interverted 
chain stitch. 

When all the clusters are 
knotted, stretch across the 
diagonal threads that com- 
plete the spiders. Here the thread passes — always diagonally 
— over the ist, 2nd and 3rd, under the 4th, 5th and 6th, 
and over the 7th, 8th and 9th of the nine threads of the 
squares of stuff, which gives greater firmness to this openwork. 
You begin by stretching the threads across from left to 




Fig. 69. Sixtli opcnworl: ground. 

With knotted clusters and filling of 

single spiders. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



31 




70. Seventh openwork ground. 
With interverted clusters 



right, and this layer iinished you stretch the threads across 
in the opposite direction, taking care to connect them in 
the middle by a knot and thus putting a small spider with 
six legs in each empty space. 

Seventh openwork 
ground. With interverted 
clusters and filling of 
single spiders and wheels 
in darning stitch (fig. 70). 
In height and breadth : cut 
twelve threads leaving an in- 
terval of twelve threads. 

The disengaged threads, 
divided into three equal 
clusters, are to be divided 
and interverted in horizontal 
and vertical rows. When all 
the clusters are interverted, 

you begin by stretching the ^nd eUmg of smgle spiders and wheels 
J • 1 . 1 T in daruine stitch. 

diagonal threads across, 
passing them over the ist 
to the 4th, under the 5th to 
the 8th and over the 9th to 
the I2th of the threads of 
the squares of stuff. 

Where the threads cross 
each other you connect 
them b}? a single knot, thus 
forming spiders. Finally? the 
squares of stuff are orna- 
mented with a little wheel in 
darning stitch, for which you 
pass the thread four times 
under the diagonal threads. 

Eighth openwork 
ground. With knotted 
clusters, spiders in loop stitch and lozenges in flat 
stitch (fig. 71). — In height and breadth: cut twelve threads 
leaving an interval of twelve threads. 

The disengaged threads are to be divided into two equal 
groups and knotted in the middle by a single knot in a horizontal 




Fig. 71. Eighth openw-ork ground. 

With knotted clusters, spiders in loop stitch 

and lozenges in flat stitch. 



32 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 




Fig. 72. Ninth ground. 
Willi corded bars and little overcast 



direction. The empty spaces are filled by a loop stitch 
placed in the corners of the squares of stuff and connected each 
time with the stretched threads by a single knot. I^astl^^ you 
ornament the squares of stuff by a lozenge formed of stroke 

stitches, alternately vertical 
and horizontal. 

Ninth ground. With 
corded bars and little 
overcast crosses (fig. 72). 
In height and breadth : cut 
four threads leaving an in- 
terval of four threads. 

Begin by the vertical rows 
of corded bars, executed 
according to the indications 
given for fig. 35 ; on reaching 
the middle of everj'' second 
bar lay a horizontal thread 
to form the overcast bars for 
the little crosses. In making 
the rows of horizontal bars, 
lay the vertical threads which 
are to intersect the horizontal 
bars so as to form little crosses 
(note the position of the needle 
in the engraving). 

Tenth ground. With 
corded bars and squares 
of little overcast crosses 

(fig. 73). — In height and 
breadth : cut four threads 
leaving an interval of four 
threads. 

In this pattern four empty 

spaces alternate regularly with 

four which are ornamented 

with little overcast squares. 

This ground is worked like the preceding one : 3'ou begin by 

making the rows of vertical bars with the overcast horizontal 

ones, then in cording the horizontal bars you complete the 

little crosses by the vertical bars. 







1 






M 




™Ls 










1 e 


IMS 




sit^ 1 














Ifc^3 


ud 


M i^ iiwt* 


111 ' IS ^ ^ 






r^-~— saj^-' ---4 






sS^^^^^^^^~j 


L t 






i 






















^ 






^^^^ 



Fig. 73. Tenth ground. 

With corded bars and squares of little 

overcast crosses. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



33 




Fig. 74. Eleventh ground. 

With corded bars and interverted loop 

stitches. 



Eleventh ground. With corded bars and interverted 
loop stitches (fig. 74). — In height and breadth: cut four 
threads leaving an interval of four threads. 

This pattern which is very like fig. 66, is also ornamented 
with loop stitches. You begin 
by finishing all the vertical 
rows of corded bars, then 
whilst working the horizontal 
rows, you add a loop stitch 
in every second emptj^ space, 
beginning it alwaj^s in the 
middle of a bar. 

Twelfth ground. With 
corded bars and diagonal 
crosses of overcast bars 

(fig. 75). — In height and 
breadth : cut four threads 
leaving an interval of four 
threads. Our engraving iig. 75 
represents a ground of corded 
bars with diagonal crosses of 
overcast bars which recalls 
the pattern of fig. 68. 

You first complete the 
corded ground, then indepen- 
dently of it you add the over- 
cast crosses. For these crosses 
3^ou begin by making all the 
diagonal bars in every second 
empty space, that slant from 
right to left, then you com- 
plete the crosses by adding 
the rows of bars that slant 
from left to right (note also 
the position of the needle in 
the engraving). 

Thirteenth ground. With corded bars and overcast 
diagonal bars (fig. 76). — In height and breadth: cut four 
threads leaving an interval of four threads. 

This ground looks rather more transparent than the preceding 
one, for the empty spaces are only ornamented with overcast 




Fig. 75. Twelfth ground. 

\^'ith corded bars and diagonal crosses 

of overcast bars. 



34 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Fig. 76. Thirteenth ground. 

With corded bars 
and overcast diagonal bars. 



bars. The corded ground is here worked in diagonal rows, 
see tig. 64, then, starting from the middle of the little squares 
of stuff, you make the overcast bars at the same time. 

Fourteenth ground. 
With corded bars and 
oblique crosses formed 
of bars in darning stitch 
(fig. 77). — In height and 
breadth : cut four threads 
leaving an interval of four 
threads. 

This ground consists again 
of four empty squares alter- 
nating with four squares filled 
with a cross of bars in darn- 
ing stitch. 

Having finished the ground 
of corded bars, you make 
diagonal rows, to and fro, of 
bars in darning stitch over 
the whole surface. For each 
bar you lay two threads ; the 
darning stitches are made as 
indicated for fig. ■^'] . 

Fifteenth ground. With 
double corded bars and 
spiders in single darning 

stitch (fig. 78). — In height 
and breadth : cut six threads 
leaving an interval of six 
threads. 

For this pattern you begin 
by completing all the double 
rows of corded vertical bars ; 
in course of doing which you 
make two horizontal stitches 
over three threads in the 
middle of the little squares of stuft' that form themselves at 
the intersection of the bars. As you make the horizontal bars 
you set the two vertical stitches and at the same time the 
spiders in single darning stitch. 





^^ 




^ 




^fU#44^ 




iiU: Jj- J 






m 


g 


i 




^3/ 




1 






1 




up 


S 




E plf A . 




L 


1^ 


ft 


'^j 




I 


i 




1 


IIMH 




y 



Fig. 77. Fourteenth ground. 

\^^itli corded bars and oblique crosses 

formed of bars in darning stitgh. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIKS 



35 



Sixteenth ground. With bars in interverted darning 
stitch and spiders in single darning stitch (fig. 79). — In 
height and breadth : cut six threads, leaving an interval of 



^ 






^^^^^ 


m 


1 i(^^ 




^B 


^^^ 




^ ^c^ii'^iii^^^^ 


K 




aV^^ilV->'^ 


\^m 


^^^ 




Mm 




^^^^^^m 


m 




awi' i 1 




^^ 






^^^^^^s 


1 


LwHH 





Fiu;. 78. Fifteenth ground. 

With double corded bars and spiders in 

single darning stitch. 

six threads. The ground of bars 
in interverted darning stitch is 
made in diagonal rows ; you 
make alternately one liorizontal 
and one vertical bar, see fig. 37. 









^ 


i^ 




pw^^^ 


mm 


'^^^^^ 


P 


















^CrTTTm?^ 


i/sM/'^^^m 








lj^'jLlUjf^^lj^fflV^if;lJ,iJau ' 












^^^mIWB 










MWfflSpffi 


^ffl 
















k 


^^^S 


^ 










i 










m 


1^^ ' 






k| 










jjaj^ 



Fit; 7<j Sixteenth ground. 

With barb lu interverted darning stitch and 

spiders in single darning stitch. 




Fig So Jlcw to stretch and 
overcLtst the ravs. 




Fig. 81. How to make the spiders 
in interverted darning stitch. 




Fig S 

bpidcr with eight legb or la^^b. 

Completed. 



36 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Fig. 



83. How to stretch the rays 
of single thread. 




84. How to add tlie run 
of knots. 



5r 


gllllllll 


WW 


:,::[ 






^i^^m^i 


4 


8 


■'.''. 


M'^^^^^^wp - 


- - _i 


^^a /i^sw^w^Sa^w*B/^^ " - 


-ir 


^^S^'^^yJ^^^^v^K^^'^ - 






-CJ3 (i*^^ -^ li^-*. JXL "■" c 


j::: 


Sf 




-EBl ^ ^ *3^''c'ES'i ^V "^ 








^^^8 


1 



Fig. S5. How to make the row 

of Uttle spiders in single darning 

stitch. 



Various subjects. — It re- 
mains for us to describe the 
working of some of the subjects 
frequently used for decorating the 
corners in simple insertions, or 
tilling the empty spaces in more 
elaborate drawn thread work in 
cut stitch. In the latter the warp 
and woof threads are entirely re- 
moved and the ornamental subjects 
are executed in the vacant spaces 
as in needle-made lace work ; 
it is only in the case of large 
pieces of openwork that clusters 
of threads are sometimes left hj 
means of which the vacant space 
to be filled is subdivided into 
equal parts. 

Spider with eight legs 
(figs. 80, 81, 83). — The simplest 
subjects are wheels or spiders. 
Fig. 80 explains the laying of the 
overcast rays or spider legs : you 
fasten on the thread on the left 
at the bottom corner, then carrj' 
it diagonally to the right to the 
top corner and overcast it half- 
wa3^ then stretch the horizontal 
rays to the right and left, the 
diagonal rays going to the left 
towards the top and to the right 
at the bottom, and lastly the 
vertical rays. 

The spider, properly speaking, 
is worked in interverted darning 
stitch ; you pass the thread alter- 
natelj'' over all the diagonal rays 
in one row and over all the 
straight rays in the next row ■ 
always taking up two raj^s at 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



37 



the end of each row, so as to get rows of interverted stitches. 
Fig. 82 shews an eight-legged spider completed. 
Rosette composed of one big and tvirelve little spiders 

(figs. 83, 84, 85). — This figure requires a web of twelve 
rays formed of a single thread. 

Begin at the bottom on the left and carry the thread to the 




Fig 



Fig Sb 
Spiral subject. 




How to intLi\Lrt thi 
threads ot the raj s. 



(1( uble 



mufimuimmmmmsi 


^ 




\ yTyyp 


g 




vIy m 






Mr W 


^i 




nK ^ 


S 




/\ i 






/^V^ 5 






^^ 



Fig. 87. How to strctchi tlie rays 
of double tlireads. 




Fie: 89 Spider witii 
raj s iiiter\ crted once, completed. 



right to the top corner, bring the needle out in the top edge at 
a third of the distance from the corner, lay the second ray 
downwards, bring the needle out at the bottom at the same 
distance from the corner on the right, lay the ray upwards, 
then to the left corner and so on. The centre is ornamented 
with a spider in interverted darning stitch ; at a very little 



38 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



^g 






m 


^ 








^Sf 




'^^^mM 


^ES 








iir^^^^ 












fife^ 



Fig. 90. Stretched web with spider in the middle. 

How to add the row 

of knots in intervcrted chain stitcli. 



distance from the latter you make, over the rays, a row of 
knots in interverted chain stitch, see fig. 84, over which in a 

succeeding row you make 
little wheels in single 
darning stitch, see fig. 85. 

Spiral subject 

(fig. 86). — We meet 
with this spiral subject in 
works of American origin. 
After laying sixteen rays 
of single thread you con- 
nect them in the middle 
by a little spider in inter- 
verted darning stitch and 
with the same thread 
continue to make rows 
of spiral-shaped knots in 
interverted chain-stitch, 
until j'ou reach the edge 
of the stuff. 

Spider with rays in- 
terverted once (figs. 87, 
88, 89). — Here the rays 
consist of double threads 
stretched in the same 
ways as in Tenerift'e lace 
(see also the explanatory 
engraving, fig. 87). The 
spider itself in interverted 
darning stitch is made 
over the double threads. 
I-'ig. 88 explains how to 
divide the double threads 
of the rays and inter- 
vext them once, and 
fig. 89 shows the subject 
completed. 

Quadruple subject with ornaments in darning stitch 
(figs. 90 and 91). — Here the empty space is divided equally 
into four little squares by six vertical and six horizontal threads, 
that have been retained. In each square you stretch five ra3's 




Fig. 91 



How to add the triangles 
darning stitch. 



in interverted 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



39 



of single thread, that meet in the middle where you make a 
spider in interverted darning stitch. You further add, exactly 
in the middle of the space between the wheel and the edge, 
a circular row of knots in interverted chain stitch ; the clusters. 




Fig 92 

Ho^^ to festoon the 

scallops 



consisting of six threads of the stuff, are divided and knotted 
together in two parts, the rays of stretched threads on 
the contrary are collected together bj' a single knot, see 
fig. 90. To complete the subject you add in each corner. 




Fig. 93. 

How to cord the 

scallops. 



outside the collecting knot, a triangle in interverted darning 
stitch, see fig. 91. 

Scalloped edge. — If you wish to finish off a piece of 
drawn thread work with small scallops, the edges must be 
carefully secured from fraying by a row of button-hole or 
cording stitches, according to the engraving, and that before 
you cut away the stuff beyond. 



40 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



How to festoon the scallops (fig. 92). — Make a double 
tracing of running stitches — the one completing the other — 
in the middle of the stuff to be festooned and then simply 
carrj^ the threads over the clusters of threads. The button- 
hole or festooning stitches must be executed over each thread 
of the stuff and are set in very close rows over the disengaged 
clusters, see fig. 92. When the scallops are finished, you cut 
away the stuff' beyond. 

How to cord the scallops (fig. 93). — To make corded 
scallops it is equally advisable to begin by making a tracing. 
Moreover, to give greater relief to the edges, you should lay 




Fig. 94. Border iu cut stitch and straight stitch. 

Materials: I,inen of medium coarseness, in cream, D-M-C Flax lace thread 

and D-M-C Special stranded cotton, in white. 

down a coarse thread, strongly twisted, over which you make 
the cording stitches. In the engravings figs. 92 and 93, the 
button-hole and cording stitches are only made in the stuff 
over four threads, but you cover six threads for the clusters of 
disengaged threads ; at the corners you round the passing from 
one part to the other by means of a few auxiliary stitches. 

Border in cut stitch and straight stitch (fig. 94). — The 
pattern, worked on the linen, is finished off top and bottom 
by a row of square stitches openworked, fig. 5, on three threads 
of the stuff' ; by means of the same stitch, executed in a diagonal 
line, the inside of the border is divided into squares and triangles. 
You begin by filling the triangles with a pattern in horizontal 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



41 




Fig. 95. Border. Norwegian work "Hardanger". 

Materials: Coarse linen with double threads, in cream, D-M-C Pearl cotton No. 5 

and the scalloped openwork in D-M-C Flax lace thread No. 25, in white. 

straight stitch, then you cut out the 
threads for the openwork figure and 
overcast the edges, see fig. 63. 

The clusters of threads are to be 
overcast so as to form them into bars, 
see fig. 35, then you ornament the inside 
with a wheel in darning stitch, and in 
the eight empty squares touching this 
wheel you embroider little crosses, con- 
sisting of two overcast bars intercrossed, J^^f ^^^ ^Snf tfctars 

see also figs. 72 and 73. in darning stitch 

., and the spiders in loop stitch. 

With regard to materials, use a Detail of the border fig. 95. 




3* 



42 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 




Fig. 97. Border in cut slilcli witli ground of corded bars 

and pattern reserved in linen stitcli. 

Materials : I^inen of medium coarseness, in cream, 

D-M-C Floss flax or flourishing thread, in Indigo 334 

and Corn yellow 711. 



lightly twisted thread, D-M-C Flax lace thread (Lin pour 
dentelles), for the cut stitch work; a loose thread, D-M-C 

Special stranded cotton (Mouline special), for the straight stitch. 

;:•.;;:;.;:- j: ■ . Border. Nor- 

AA^egian work 
"Har danger" 

(figs. 95 and 96). 
This border re- 
presents the Nor- 
wegian drawn 
thread work 
known under the 
name of "Har- 
danger". For the 
ground take a 
coarse cream-co- 
loured linen, and 
for the embroi- 
dery in straight 

stitch D-M-C 
Pearl cotton (Co- 
ton perle) No. 5, 
in white ; for the 
bars in darning 
stitch and for the 
loop stitch use 
D-M-C Flax lace 
thread (I^in pour 
dentelles) No. 25. 
Begin by embroi- 
dering the out- 
lin.es in flat stitch 
with ornamental 
stitches over four 
threads of the 
stuff ; then onlj^ 
when all the outlines are done, remove carefully with a sharp 
pair of scissors, the threads for the openwork parts, contrary 
to what is done in the case of drawn thread work on linen 
properly speaking, where you cut the threads first and then 
embroider the outlines. Fig. 96 shews how to make the bars 




Fig. gS. AA'orking of the linen stitch 

to reserve a pattern in the cut stitch. 

(Detail of fig. 97.) 



DRAWN THREAD WORK ~ 1st SERIES 



43 




Fig. 99. Border in cut stitch with ground of corded bars and pattern 

reserved in darning stitch. 

Materials: Fine linen, in white, DMC Pearl cotton No. 5, in Red brown 923 

and D-M-C Special stranded cotton No. 25, in Grey blue 593. 

in darning stitch and 
to place the spiders 
in loop stitch. 

Border in cut 
stitch with ground & 
of corded bars and g^ 
pattern reserved 
in linen stitch (figs 
97 and 98). — There 
are a great man}, 
embroideries in cut 
stitch where the pat- 
tern is what is ter- 
med "reserved". This 
means the pattern being left bare, in the midst of an em- 
broidered ground. It is verj' difficult especially when the 




t-^T^ 



Fit? 100 W orkmt, ct tHe dainiii^ ^titLh 

to reserve a pattern in the cut stitch. 

(DetaU of fig. 99.) 



44 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 




Fig. loi. Border in cut stitch. Italian Rctioella stj^le. 

Materials : Fine linen, in white, D-M-C Flax thread for knitting and crochet, 

D-M-C Alsatia or D-M-C Alsatian thread, in white. 

pattern is at all elaborate and made up of little details to 
cut away the threads of the linen without injuring the linen 

foundation. It is best there- 
fore in such cases to withdraw 
the threads indicated by the 
pattern throughout the whole 
surface and after finishing all 
the bars draw in with the 
needle the threads that are 
wanting in the stuff. The way 
to remake the linen ground 
is shewn in fig. 98, where, 
more clearly to explain how 
the threads intersect each 
other, the threads of the stuff 
are printed light and those 
introduced for the linen stitch, 
dark. If combined with cross- 
stitch embroidery, the little 
bars should be of the same 
colour as the embroidery. 
The actual pattern in linen 
stitch may be worked in 
white or in ecru, according 
to the ground on which you 




Fjg. 



102. Detail for the -nurking 
of border fig. loi. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



45 



are embroidering. As regards the execution of the ground 
see figs. 35 and 72 to 77. 

Border in cut stitch Avith ground of corded bars and 
pattern reserved in darning stitch(figs. gg and 100). — The 
stitch shewn in fig. 100 is easier and pleasanter to work than the 
preceding one. It is done in the same way as the darning stitch 
described in fig. 38, that is by taking up the bars of the stuff 




Fig. 103. Border in cut stitch. Greek Reticella style. 

Materials: Fine linen, in white, D-M-C Flax thread for knitting and crochet, 

D-M-C Alsatia or D-M-C Alsatian thread, in white or ecru. 

as many times as you have dropped them. Use a loose thread 
in Grey blue for this filling and a more twisted coloured thread 
for the bars, Red brown in this case. The way to make the 
stitches may be clearly seen from the engraving. Here also the 
bars must be made first and the pattern only filled in afterwards. 
The details of fig. 100 render further explanations super- 
fluous. If the work is done on a white ground and is to be 
added to a white embroidery or stuff, a very refined effect will 



46 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



be obtained by emplojdng cream thread for the bars and snow- 
white thread for filling in the pattern which should shew up 
very distinctly from the ground. 

Border in cut stitch. Italian Reticella style (figs. loi 
and 102). — The variety of stitches used in this work makes 
it resemble lace; it is likewise known by the name of "Reticella 
drawn thread work". The course of the work is explained in 







.'^-;r ^ 













W^^''^^^''"^^^^£^^i^^'^.'^^^^^f4^tp} ' '''ri''&SE;V 



Materials 



Fig. 104. Small table-cloth. Mexican drawn thread work. 

Fine linen, in white, D-M-C Floss flax or flourishing thread No. 



D-M-C Alsatia No. 30 or D-M-C Alsatian thread ^.o. 30, in white. 



30, 



fig. 102. You draw out ten threads each way, leaving six threads 
to serve as foundation for the bars. The threads of the cut 
edges are covered by a close overcasting, as in fig. 63 and a 
rolled hem borders the pattern top and bottom. 

The rings in festoon stitch are made over three auxiliary 
threads, stretched from one bar to the other when they 
are half finished. You begin the wheels or spiders in the 
corner of a square, and finish them, as the arrow indicates, 
at the same place. 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



47 



Border in cut stitch. Greek Reticella style (fig. 103). 
After all the preceding explanations, there can be no difficulty 
in copying this classical design of Greek origin. 

In the original we counted 48 threads drawn out for the 
big squares leaving six for the bars. 

For the narrow border we counted 21 threads removed 
both ways. The cut edges are corded, between the two edges of 
stitches four threads of linen remain forming a narrow insertion 
over which a cross stitch seam is made as seen in fig. 6. The 
long bars that cross 
each other in the 
second square are 
made with a double 
festoon, ornamen- 
ted with picots (*). 

Small table- 
cloth. Mexican 
drawn thread 
work (figs. 104 
and 105). — Our 
engraving fig. 104 
represents a parti- 
cular kind of open- 
work on linen very 
popular in S. Ame- 
rica, principall}^ in 
the Spanish speak- 
ing part of the 

country. It is 
commonly called 
"Mexican drawn 
thread work". The following is a descri23tion of our model. 
After securing the inside edges by means of button-hole 
stitches, see fig. 62, draw out seven times twenty threads 
of the stuff both ways, leaving six intervals of twelve threads, 
so as to get a web with large empty spaces. 

Then begin the embroidery at the bottom in the left hand 
corner, by a long diagonal stitch, to the centre of the first 
square of stuff, returning to the starting-point with a second 




05. Working of the openwork ground 
of the small table-cloth fig. 104. 



(*) See "Point lace", "Embroidery on Net, 1st and Ilnd Series", and 
"Encyclopedia of Needlework" by Th. de Dillmont. 



48 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st SERIES 



diagonal stitch ; at tlie tliird diagonal stitch, you connect tlie 
two stretched threads top and bottom by a festoon stitch. All 
the empty spaces are successively filled in this manner by 
three long diagonal stitches from left to right. The second row 
is begun at the bottom in the right hand corner and worked 
like the preceding row only that you connect the stitches 




Fig. 1 06. Small table-cloth. Danish drawn thread work ,,Hedebo". 

Materials: I^ineu of medium coarseness, in white, D-MC Flax thread for knitting 

and crochet No. 30 or D-M-C Alsatia No. 40, in white. 

together wherever the threads cross each other. (See the ex- 
planatory detail, fig. 105.) When the whole ground is covered 
with diagonal threads in this manner, you work the little leaves 
in darning stitch, hiding the thread on the wrong side, at the 
back of the squares of stuff. Lastly you add the rings made 
of foundation threads and knots in interverted chain stitch. 
Those that touch the little leaves in darning stitch are made 
in a single row; the others, the larger ones that surround the 



DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 



49 



squares of stuff without ornament, take two rows. For the 
outside decoration, leave a strip of stuff about 2 inches 
wide ornamented by an openwork insertion, see fig. 26, then 
having edged the outside border of the linen strip with 
the stitch fig. 3, draw out the horizontal threads to a 
depth of il inches to form the fringes. 




Fig. 107. A quarter of the small table-cloth fig. io6. Reduced by one third. 

Small table-cloth. Danish drawn thread work 
"Hedebo" (figs. 106 and 107). — This is a specimen of drawn 
work of Danish origin, called "Hedebo", a small table-cloth 
adorned with triangles of handsome openwork, bordered with 
a narrow insertion and needle-made lace. 

For the foundation for the triangles, cut twelve times 
twenty-eight threads of the stuff, leaving eleven intervals of 



50 DRAWN THREAD WORK - 1st SERIES 

twelve threads, and then festoon the edges. The web of thread 
is to be converted into bars in darning stitch, see also figs, "^y 
and 79, and the actual pattern is to be executed bit by bit as 
you complete the bars. The model shews three big stars ; the 
two side ones consist of eight triangles in darning stitch, worked 
over a thread stretched diagonally round a centre formed of 
four spiders ; the corner star consists of four little pyramids 
and semicircles in button-hole stitch ornarhented with picots, 
besides different spiders formed by overcast bars. 

For the small insertion draw out fifteen threads of the stuff ; 
the disengaged threads are connected by overcasting stitches, 
as shewn in the engraving. For the lace we refer our workers 
to the chapter on Needle-made laces in the "Encyclopedia of 
Needlework" by Th. de Dillmont, figs. 958 and 959. 

In addition to the plates in this album, a large selection of 
patterns for drawn thread work will be found in the following 
publications of the D-M-C Fibrary : Drawn thread work, Ilnd 
Series, Openwork Embroideries and Works of various kinds. 



Those who wish for more complete instructions as regards the execution of the 

patterns contained in DRAWN THREAD WORK 

or the materials mentioned in the same, liave only to adress themselves 

to the firm of 

COMPTOIR ALSACIEN DE BRODERIE 
anct TH. DE DILLMONT, MULHOUSE (France) 

where the necessary information will be immediately supplied. 



Drawn Thread Work 

I St Series 

Plates I to XX. 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate I: 

Ground of wide and narrow stripes for curtains and window- 
blinds, worked on coarse tamm}' cloth 
with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 3 and 
D-M-C Knotting cotton (Fil a pointer) Nos. 10 and 20. 
(vSee explanatory details, ligs. 10, 15 and 18.) 



Count 9 horizontal threads for the single rows and 15 for 
the double rows of scallops in flat stitch embroidered with 
D-:M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 3. 

Draw out 10 horizontal threads in the big border for the 
narrow insertions, 28 for the wide one and 16 for the insertion 
in the narrow border. 

The interverted clusters consist of three threads of the stuff. 
The thread that is run through the wide insertions is a cord 
of two threads of D-M-C Knotting cotton (Fil a pointer) No. 10, 
twisted together, the one that runs through the narrow inser- 
tions is a cord made of two threads of D-il-C Knotting cotton 
(Fil a pointer) No. 20. 



All rights reserved 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st Series 




Tor working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DODDFUS-MIECx & C'e, Societe anonyme 



MTTLHUTTSE-BKLFORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate II: 

Ground with border for little table-cloths and traj'-cloths, 

worked on linen of medium coarseness 

with D-M-C Special stranded cotton (Mouline special) No. 25 

and D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet 

special) No. 25. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 4, 6, 46, 50, 63, 84 and 85). 



Embroider the straight outside lines over 3 threads of the 
stuff with two threads of D-M-C Special stranded cotton 
(Mouline special) No. 25. 

Draw out 5 threads for the narrow insertions in serpentine 
lines and 18 threads for the wide insertion ; the clusters are 
formed of 4 threads of the stuff. In the inside of the sc^uares 
draw out 4 threads both ways and leave twice 4 intermediate 
threads. 

Do the needlework with D-M-C vSpecial crochet cotton 
(Cordonnet special) No. 20, with the exception of the connect- 
ing together of the clusters which is done with D-]\I-C vSpecial 
stranded cotton (Mouline special) No. 25. 



All rights reserved 



Plate II 



DRAWX THREAD WORK — ist Series 






>-v5«(,-:;~>5^ 







inr5::a:::;-.Tr 



For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DOEEFUS-MIEG & C'^ vSociete anonyme 

MULIIOUSE-BELFOKT-PARIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate III: 

Border with knotted fringe for chamber-towels, dresser-cloths 

and sideboard covers, worked 

on linen of medium coarseness with D-!!M-C vSpecial crochet 

cotton (Cordonnet special) Nos. 3 and 20. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 25, 50 and 84.) 



Embroider the straight lines over 3 threads of the stuff with 
D-]M-C vSpecial crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 20. 

Draw out 8 threads for the narrow insertions, the clusters 
of which number 6 threads, and 24 threads for the wide in- 
sertion in which the clusters are formed of 3 threads of the 
stuff. The two rows of dots embroidered with D-M-C Special 
crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 3 take 12 horizontal 
threads, the border turned to the fringe also takes 12 threads. 

The needlework is done with D-M-C Special crochet cotton 
(Cordonnet special) No. 20. 



All rights reserved 



Plate in 



DRAWN THRPZAD WORK 



1st .Series 




For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DOLLFUS-MIEG & C'^, Societe anonyme 

MULHOUSE-EELFORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate IV: 

Part of a sofa- veil, worked on coarse tammy cloth with double 

threads with D-M-C v'^pecial crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) Nos. i, 2 and 10. 

(See explanatory details, tigs. 5, 30, ^J and 71.) 



Embroider the rows of four-sided stitches over 3 threads 
of the stuff with D-M-C vSpecial crochet cotton (Cordonnet 
special) Xo. 10. 

Draw out twice 7 threads for the little crossed insertions, and 
leave 5 threads between for the strip of tammy cloth to be 
covered with vertical stitches made with D-M-C Special crochet 
cotton (Cordonnet special) No. i. 

Embroider the triangular frame with D-AI-C Special crochet 
cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 2. 

Draw out 14 threads for the empty squares and leave 6 
threads for the intermediate bars. 

Do the needlework with D-il-C .Special crochet cotton 
(Cordonnet special) No. 10. 



All rii-hts l■ese^^■ed 



PUac IV 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — 1st Series 









l-l^i^^^^^^i^*' 



11 

< .! » 

» . » 

' « ,! r 

• t , y 



mMm 




►i^,V»«>--v<^^:;'^;^.'',;'-'-''''^'' ''"''■' 






For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DOLLFUv^-MIEG & C'^, .Societe anonyme 

MULHOUSE-BELFORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate V: 

Border with corner, for table-napkins and tray-cloth, 

worked on coarse tammy cloth with double threads with 

D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) 

Nos. 2, 10 and 20. 
(See explanatory details, figs. 8, '^'j , 90 and 91.) 



Embroider the scalloped outside edge in darning stitch with 
D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 2 over 
7 threads of the stuff. 

Draw out twice 16 horizontal threads leaving 6 threads of the 
stuff between. Draw out 16 vertical threads leaving alternately 
6 and 12 threads between. 

Do the needlework with D-M-C Special crochet cotton 
(Cordonnet special) Xo. 10 and the connecting outlines in 
Russian stitch with D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet 
special) Xo. 20. 

In the inside, leave an interval of 10 threads, draw out twice 
2 threads leaving 3 threads between. 

Make the openwork seam over clusters of 4 threads. 



All rights reserved 



Plate V 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st Series 










mi 







'-w; -»--T?t; : : ; : : :::;::;••■-::•:;::::•■; 

^'SftW'^t ■ ,,. ,• ; . ,. ,■ .•; (; ;; ).. 1. ) >, 
■:.:( f//->'}y''*''-Jq:-''m\'\>'" ;■•' ■■■■',> ','*(•' '■'.''■/.■.■I 



9' 



For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DODDFUvS-MIEG & O^ , Societe anonyme 

.MULHOUSE-BELPORT-P.iRIS 



Directions for working the patterns 
on Plate VI: 

Four rivieres for toilette articles, worked on coarse linen 

with double threads with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) 

Xo. 3 and D-M-C vSpecial crochet cotton 

(Cordonuet special) Nos. 2 and 3. 

(See explanatory details, tigs. 5, 6, 7, 10, 22, 27, 31, 37 and 38.) 



First riviere — Draw out 8 threads in the middle, lea\-e 

2 threads top and bottom for the two rows of crossed stitches 
and draw out i thread. 

Second riviere — Draw out 14 threads in the middle, leave 

3 threads top and bottom for the rows of four-sided stitches 
worked over 3 threads in height and 2 threads in width and 
draw out I thread. 

Third riviere — L~)raw out 10 threads in the middle, leave 

2 threads top and bottom for the two rows of four-sided stitches 
and draw oiit i thread. 

I'ourth riviere — Draw out 18 threads in the middle, leaA'e 

3 threads on each side, then draw out 3 threads at the top 
and bottom, lea\-e 3 more threads and draw out i thread. 
The crossed stitches are done over 2 threads in width and 
3 threads in height. 

Use the D-;\I-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) 
No. 3 for the lace stitches, the D-]\I-C vSpecial crochet cotton 
No. 2 for the \^aA-ed line in the third riviere and the D-M-C 
Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 3 for the darned motifs in 
the fourth ri\-iere. 



All riss'hts reserved 



I'latc VI 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — 1st Series 






BJM>»-* »■ »- «' » » »-«^».*-HM7*-»-*r*-*:*"*-*-*-*-* t^.^-*^ »<^<l;4~*-JM>''*'-*-*-'k'«-Ji'-»Hk*-«r^ 



• » •» »•• 1 •«• e •••»•• »i »:••»»*»» • »» » »••••••»«•••»•• » » » I 








^'■iri-»^**-t,4.-*** a.'«-«^»-*-*-** •^»'ih-|h|ri--t-*-«r»4. A-lKIMHt-ft-^-i-ft a.-*"«,»-»4"»-(M 



ii.'V.' «:*■-«:» ••*.«.«.• *-• v.o « • V « V •'« « » 9 ■:«-•,•'« v.* «.« 4 9 f;* » « 9 v,«-v^ « v IT 




t.-»HM. • *» * «-»#»"»*^ »«-»»**> «.«.♦» ». «-^ •'••.^i-*^** «»• »***«' <»l 



(T;--; 







tt^tt^'^ 



t.-^^ A-t^. S—t ^.^ »■ 



-J-*.*--*-^-* >-*--*..*-*-* .4-4..*-+ -V*-* *- 4- »-»^»^-fc.t,^*-t-4. *-*-»-* 






For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DODU'UvS-MIEG & C'<", Societe anoiiyme 

mUUKII'Sr.-BELFDRT-PARIS 



Directions for working the patterns 
on Plate VII: 

Two borders for curtains and sash-blinds, 

worked on coarse tammy cloth with D-M-C Special crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) Nos. 3 and 20 and D-M-C Pearl cotton 

(Coton perle) No. 3. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 22, '^'] and 38.) 



First border — Draw out 24 threads for the wide riviere, 
leave 10 threads, then draw out 12 threads top and bottom. 

The clusters number 3 threads and are held together with 
D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 20. 
Work aU the other stitches with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton 
perle) No. 3. 

Second border — Draw out 15 threads for the wide riviere, 
leave 7 threads top and bottom, draw out 8 threads, leave 
7 threads and draw out 9 more threads. The clusters consist 
of 3 threads and are fastened with D-M-C Special crochet 
cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 20. 

Work the wheels with D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cor- 
donnet special) No. 3, all the other stitches with D-M-C Pearl 
cotton (Coton perle) No. 3. 



All rights reserved 



rune VII 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — ist Series 




For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DOU.FUS-MIEG & C'^, Societe anonyme 

MULHUUSF.-BI'lLFORT -PARIS 



Directions for working the patterns 
on Plate VIII: 

Three borders for table- and house-linen, worked on 

linen of medium coarseness with D-]M-C Special crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) Xo. 3 and D-M-C Pearl cotton 

(Coton perle) Xo. 3. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 5, 22, 23, 37, 38, 63, 81, iiZ, 

84 and 85.) 



First border — \\'ork the rows of vertical and four-sided 
stitches o\-er 3 horizontal threads. Draw out 35 horizontal 
threads, then in the direction of the length leave alternately 
28 threads and cut 8 threads. 

Second border — Work the rows of vertical stitches over 
4 horizontal threads, the rows of four-sided ones o^•er 3 hori- 
zontal and 4 vertical threads. Draw out 45 horizontal threads, 
then in the direction of the length, lea\-e alternately ^2 threads 
and cut 20. 

Third border — "Work the rows of \-ertical stitches over 4 
horizontal threads, the rows of four-sided ones over 3 hori- 
zontal and 4 \-ertical threads. Draw out 60 horizontal threads, 
and then in the direction of the length, leave alternately 40 
threads and cut 25. 

Do all the work ^^■ith D-^M-C Special crochet cotton (Cor- 
donnet special) X^'o. 3, excepting the thick parts in darning 
stitch which are done with D-]\rC Pearl cotton (Coton perle) 
Xo. 3. 



All rights reserved 



Plate VIII 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — 1st Series 







For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DODDI'UvS-MIEG & C^^, Societe anonjaiie 

IMULIIUUSE-BELFORT- PARIS 



Directions for working the patterns 
on Plate IX: 

Two grounds for cushions, pincushions, chair-backs 

and table-centres, 

worked on linen of medium coarseness with D-M-C Pearl cotton 

(Coton perle) No. 8 and D-M-C Special crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) No. lo. 
(vSee explanatorj' details, figs. 38, 63, 83, 84 and 85.) 



First ground — Do the framing of the figures with D-M-C 
Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 8 over 3 threads of the stuff 
and draw out 20 threads both ways inside the squares, leaving 
an interval of 8 threads between the figures. Work the orna- 
mental figures with D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet 
special) No. 10. 

Second ground — Do the framing of the figures with D-M-C 
Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 8 over 3 threads of the stuft". 
For the big empty space in the middle, draw out 12 threads 
both ways, leave 3 threads between and draw out 5 threads. 

Do the ornamental figures with D-^M-C Special crochet 
cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 10. 



AH rights reserved 



Plate IX 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st Series 



f-^^^A 







■^2S?^.- "^^^srEir- i?5*nF jEias-' .c"K-::' miy-cu- iS;^-3£- 









iiasii 










m 



r-sffl^ 



?-i^kS^:vi 













"ts,m^^ 



•^«#W»^'^ 







>'*"'~-"'""'''ii± « -SIa 






^^ 



l'"or working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DOLIJ<'UvS-MlEG & C'^ vSociete anonyme 

MTTLirOITSE-BELFftRT- PARIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate X: 

Ground for cushions and chair-backs, worked on coarse linen 

with double threads with D-M-C vSpecial crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) No. 3. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 3, 6, 23, 37 and 38.) 



!Leave 12 threads for the big squares of linen, draw out 3 
threads for the narrow insertions, leave 3 for the strips of 
stuff and draw out g for the wide insertions. 

The clusters consist of 2 threads of the stuff. 

Do all the embroidery with D-M-C Special crochet cotton 
(Cordonnet special) No. 3. 



All rights ruscrvud 



Plate X 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — ist Series 




vtl 




•■^4E."Cfc<.r.'^A*-.' 



Mmmm 









^p.<m0''-' 



For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DODLI'UvS-MlEG & C'e, Societe anonyme 

MULHODSE-EELFORT-PARIS 




iL^ 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate XI: 

Border with corner for table-cloth and napkins, 

worked on linen of medium coarseness with D-^I-C Pearl cotton 

(Coton perle) Nos. 5 and S and 

D-^I-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) 

Nos. I and 5. 
(vSee explanatory details, tigs. 10, 35, 38 and 63.) 



Do the rows of flat stitches that border the work with D-;\I-C 
Pearl cotton (Coton perle) Xo. S o\'er 3 threads of the stuff. 

Draw out 12 threads of the stuff both ways for the openwork 
parts and leave 12 for the squares of linen in which you em- 
broider the little squares with D-;M-C vSpecial crochet cotton 
(Cordonnet special) Xo. 5. 

Take D-^I-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) Xo. i 
for the thread that runs through the interverted clusters, com- 
posed of 4 threads each, and D-]\I-C Special crochet cotton 
(Cordonnet special) Xo. 5 for the threads that form the skeleton 
of the flowers in darning stitch, which are worked in D-M-C 
Pearl cotton (Coton perle) Xo. 5. 



All riehls reserved 



Plate XI 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st Series 




For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DODLFUS-MIEG & C^e, Societe anonyme 

MULHOUSE-BELFORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the patterns 
on Plate XII: 

Insertion and scalloped edge for table-linen, worked 

on linen of medium coarseness with D-^I-C Pearl cotton (Coton 

perle) No. 8 and D-M-C Special crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) Nos. 3 and 10. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 30, 35, 38, 63, 67 and 93.) 



Insertion — ]*Iake the straight rows over 3 threads of the 
stuff, with D-:\I-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 8. Leave 24 
threads for the squares in the middle of the border, then draw 
out 24 threads abo\-e and below and leave 12 ; in length, leave 
24 threads and cut 24 alternately. 

Count 12 threads for the middle clusters and 6 each time 
for the outside clusters. 

Take I)-;\I-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) 
No. ID for the threads to be stretched across the empty spaces 
and D-;\I-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 8 for the parts in 
darning stitch. 

Scalloped edge — Work the right row o\-er 3 threads of the 
stuff, leave b threads, then draw out 5 times 12 threads and 
leave four times 12 ; in length, leave 12 threads and cut 12 
alternately. Work the scalloped edge alternately over the 
clusters of 6 threads and over 3 threads of the stuff, with D-M-C 
Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 8. 

;\Iake the loop stitches o\-er the clusters of 6 threads with 
I)-]M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 3. 

Pea^•e 18 threads at the top, then draw out 8 for the insertion 
of little bars ; these latter are corded over 6 threads with 
D-;\I-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 10. 



All rii;lit^ reserved 



Plate XII 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — 1st Series 









For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DOLDFU.S-MIEG & C'^, Societe anonyme 

MTTLHOUSr;-BF-LFORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate XIII: 

vScalloped border with knotted fringe for table-cloth and 

chamber-towels, worked on coarse linen with double threads 

with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 5 and 

D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 10 

(vSee explanatory detail, fig. 30.) 



Work all the lines of knotted stitch over a quadruple thread 
of the stuff, the stars over 3 threads with D-M-C Pearl cotton 
(Coton perle) No. 5. 

Draw out 5 threads for all the openwork parts, leave 9 
threads for the linen sc^uares and 3 for the big scallops of the 
edge. Count 3 c|uadruple threads for the clusters which are 
knotted with D-M-C .Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) 
No. ID. 



All rights reserved 



Plate XIII 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — 1st Series 



^. 




For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DOI.DFUS-MIEG & O'^ , Societe anoiiyme 

MULHOUSr.-BKLFI )RT-P.\RIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate XIV: 

Gromid for cushions, chair-backs and work-bags, worked 

on linen of medium coarseness with D-]*I-C vSpecial crochet 

cotton (Cordonnet special) Xo. 5. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 5, 22, ^'^, 82 and 86.) 



Work the two rows of four-sided stitches over 4 threads of 
the stuff. 

Draw out both ways '^2 threads of the stuft' for the openwork 
parts and leave 32 for the linen scpiares. 

Do all the embroidery with D-;\rC Special crochet cotton 
(Cordonnet special) Xo. 5. 



All riiihts reserved 



Plate XIV 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st vSenes 















For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DOLDFUvS-MlEG & C'^, Societe anonyme 

JIULHOUSE-BKLFORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate XV: 

\\'ide border for hangings and floorcloth, 

worked on coarse linen with D-M-C vSpecial crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) Xo. 2 and D-M-C Pearl cotton 

(Coton perle) No. 5. 
(See explanatory details, figs. 3, 22, 2q, 38 and 62.) 



Dra\\- out 6 horizontal threads of the stuff for the Greek 
openwork, the clusters of which number 3 quadruple threads; 
the whole border takes 30 \-ertical threads. Leave 6 threads on 
each side, then draw out 2 for the little open rounds \Ahich 
are also worked with 3 quadruple threads. Leave 4 threads, 
draw out 3 and finish the edges by making clusters of 2 
quadruple threads. 

Use D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 5 the same shade 
as the stuff for finishing oft' the edges and for the little open 
rounds, and D-;\LC Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) 
No. 2 for all the other stitches. 



All rights reserved 



Plate XV 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st vSeries 







rf 









For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DODDFUv'^-MIECt & C"5, Societe anonynie 

MULIIOUSE-BELFORT-PAEIS 



Directions for working the patterns 
on Plate XVI: 

Two borders with corners, for table-cover, worked 

on coarse linen with D-M-C Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet 

special) No. i and D-M-C Pearl cotton 

(Coton perle) No. 5. 

(.See explanatory details, figs. 3, 29, 62 and 66.) 



First border — Draw out twice 2 threads for the outside 
and inside insertions, the clusters of which consist of 3 threads, 
and leave 2 threads between. 

Count 53 threads of the stuff for the inside of the border ; 
in the openworked lozenges cut five times 3 threads, leave 6 
times 3 threads, at the corners cut 2 threads more. 

For the centre of the little ornamental figures cut 2 threads 
both ways. Finish off the edges and knot the clusters in the 
little insertions with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 5, 
the shade of the stuff. 

Do the lace stitches and the embroidery with D-il-C Special 
crochet cotton (Cordonnet special) No. i. 

Second border — Draw out 3 times 5 cjuadruple threads 
and leave twice 3 threads for the square figures with button- 
holed edges. 

The linen border numbers 10 threads. 

Draw out 3 threads for the ladder insertions, the clusters 
in which consist of 2 quadruple threads, there will remain 2 
threads of the stuff between the 2 little insertions. 



All rights reserved 



Plate XVI 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st vSeries 




®^^^|inimitiH!ini!ij5i!iiniiiiiii{»mii>i-iniinin5inminTi^ 




1 itr, ^•ffl^a^g^'^ sb** 



; s*i^^4 







For working, t:se the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DODDFU.S-MIEG & C'^, Societe anonyme 



MTJLHOUSK-BKLrORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the patterns 
on Plate XVII: 

Two borders for trimming articles of dress, 
worked on fine tammy cloth with D-^I-C Pearl cotton (Coton 

perle) Nos. 5 and 8. 
(See explanatory details, figs. 8, 9, 22, 38, 50, 81, 82 and 84.) 



Narrow border — Work the two rows of finishing-off 
stitches over 6 horizontal threads and 4 vertical ones with 
D-]M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 5. 

Draw out 40 threads for the openworked insertion ; the 
needlework is done with D-il-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 8, 
excepting the little horizontal bars in darning stitch, which are 
worked with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 5. 

AMde border — Do the two rows of finishing-off stitches 
and the supplementary row of the hem of 6 horizontal and 4 
vertical threads, with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) No. 5. 

Draw out 75 threads for the wide insertion and 8 for the 
narrow ones, the intermediate strips of stuff number 12 threads, 
the needlework is done with D-i\I-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) 
No. 8. 



All rights reserved 



Plate XVII 




<4««<549«f««l«1l«lf«««4€€^ 




W4 

.« I&i! £ ■•k'^ A^'A' ^< AS A -A- A?-&i a!' A« A ^ ^- ^ lA'-A'^ '^ "■^ 




For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DOIJJ'US-MIEG & C'f, v'^ociete anonyme 

MULIIOUSE-BELFORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the patterns 
on Plate XVIII: 

Border and square for table-linen, worked 

on linen of medium coarseness with D-M-C v'^pecial crochet 

cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 3 and D-M-C Pearl 

cotton (Coton perle) No. 5. 

(See explanatory details, tigs. 22, 3S and 63.) 



Border — Do the framing of the sc[uares over 4 threads of 
the stuff and lea\-e 56 vertical threads between the figures. 

In the inside, draw out each way three times S threads and 
lea\-e twice 8 threads. 

Beave 12 threads of the stuff abo\-e and below, draw out 3 
threads for the narrow insertions, the clusters of which consist 
of 4 threads. 

vScjuare figures — A^'ork the framing of the squares over 3 
threads of the stuff with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) 
No. 5 ; leave an interval of 8 threads between the squares. 

Do the work with D-^BC Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet 
special) No. 3, excepting the parts in darning stitch which are 
to be done in D-;\BC Bearl cotton (Coton joerle) No. 5. 



All riyhts rL'Scrvcd 



Platr xviir 



DRAWN THREAD WORK 



1st vSenes 












LW^-'f 
















m 







iiipiipippiisiii: 






«*yi-«li:il!i!iili 






1^^ 






•1, 






'-■■■ : 'J. 



a/:- 



^wm^i^ 






f.^- 







6 ';;;-:-?!*lB0r ■ S 






W««T.;;t;.;;;|7 - 



\M."f}^'^-y} 




For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DODLFUS-MIEG c& C'^, Societe anonyme 

mulhousi:-bi:lfort-paris 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate XIX: 

Big ground for carpet, bed- and cradle-spreads, &c., 
worked on coarse linen with D-M-C Special crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) No. i and D-J\rC Pearl 

cotton (Coton perle) Nos. i and 3 and D-M-C vSpecial stranded 

cotton (Mouline special) No. 25. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 87, 88 and 89.) 



Draw out 14 threads for the large openwork parts and leave 
28 threads for the linen squares, the edges of which are finished 
off with D-M-C Special stranded cotton (Mouline special) No. 25, 
with stitches over 2 quadruple threads. 

Work the edge of the little squares, for which you cut 6 
threads inside both ways, in plaited stitch with D-M-C Pearl 
cotton (Coton perle) No. 3, over a quadruple thread. Do the 
leaves in darning stitch with D-M-C Pearl cotton (Coton perle) 
No. I, the spiders in the middle of the figures and the isolated 
loop stitches with D-M-C vSpecial crochet cotton (Cordonnet 
special) No. i, and the intermediate figures with 10 strands of 
D-M-C Special stranded cotton (Mouline special) No. 25 in the 
same shade as the stuff. 



AIJ rights reserved 



Plate XIX 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — 1st Series 




For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 



DODDFUS-MIEG & O^, .Societe anonyme 

MULHOUSE-BELPORT-PARIS 



Directions for working the pattern 
on Plate XX: 

Triple border for table and bed-linen, worked on 

linen of medium coarseness with D-]\I-C .Special crochet cotton 

(Cordonnet special) Xo. 40. 

(See explanatory details, figs. 35 and 38.) 



Draw out 50 threads of the stuff for the wide insertion and 
2^ for the two narrow insertions lea\-ing five times 13 stitches 
between each. 

Finish off the edges with button-hole stitches connecting 
clusters of 3 threads each. 

Do the whole of the work with D-M-C Special crochet 
cotton (Cordonnet special) No. 40. 



All rights restrved 



Plate XX 



DRAWN THREAD WORK — 1st Series 




For working, use the D-M-C Cotton and Flax threads 

DOIJJ'US-MIKG & Cie, Societe anonyme 

MULIIOUSE-BELFORT-PARIS 



D'M-C LIBRARY 



In the endeavour to develop the taste for fancy needlework 
and to make better known the use of the numerous articles 
made especially for sewing, embroidery, crochet work, 
knitting, &c., by the Societe anonyme Doi.i,Fus-MiEG & Ci", 
the Company has published a series of works, which together 
form a complete library of information dealing with every 
known kind of needlework. 

Although these publications surpass all that has ever been 
done in this way before — by their artistic value, the choice 
of the designs, and the attention applied to their execution — 
yet, they are sold at a price quite inferior to their real value. 
They could not have been produced at such favorable prices, 
had it not been for the numerous editions published and the 
aim they are intended to serve. 

Each album is edited in several languages and is composed 
of a series of unpublished and much varied designs accompanied 
by explanatory texts. 

Ladies who do not find in our assortment the languages 
with which they are acquainted, will nevertheless be able to 
use successfully the albums of the D-M-C Library. Owing to 
the clearness as well as the perfection of the designs, the text 
becomes a secondary question and it will always be easy to 
execute most of the patterns shown in these albums without 
having need of the text. 

Further on will be found a description of these publications, 
which can be obtained of booksellers, mercers and at needlework 
depots or direct from the Comptoir AlsaciEn de BrodEriE, 
anc* Th. dE Dielmont, Muehouse (France). 



List of the publications 



OF THE 



D • M • C L.I BRARY 



* Encyclopedia of Needlework. A handsome volume in-16^0 

of about 800 pages, illustrated by 1107 engravings and 
13 coloured plates. English binding. Gilt top. 

* The ABC of sewing. Pamphlet in-8°, 12 pages of text, 

23 explanatory illustrations and a plate of letters. 

* The ABC of knitting. Pamphlet in-80, 16 pages of text, 

17 explanatory illustrations. 

Albums for Cross Stitch Embroidery, 1st, Ilnd and 
Ilird Series (Albums de Broderies au Point de 
Croix). 1st Series: 32 plates. Ilnd Series: 40 plates with 
coloured designs. Ilird Series : 40 plates. In-4°. 

* Cross Stitch • New Designs, 1st Series. Album in-8°, 

containing 24 coloured plates, composed of grounds, 
borders, &c. 

* Cross Stitch ■ New Designs, Ilnd, Ilird and IVth Series. 

Three albums in large octavo, each containing 20 coloured 
plates. 

* Cross Stitch ■ New Designs, Vth Series. Album in 

large octavo, containing 16 coloured plates of borders, 
backgrounds, &c. 

* Marking Stitch, 1st Series. Album in-8° of 12 coloured plates. 

* Marking Stitch, Ilnd, Ilird and IVth Series. Three 

albums in-8° each containing 16 coloured plates. 

(*) The publications marked with an asterisk (*) are edited in English. 



IJST OF THE PUBI,ICATIONS OF THE D-M-C I<IBRARY 

The Embroiderer's Alphabet. An album iii-8°, containing 
82 coloured plates composed of alphabets, monograms 
and patterns for counted stitch embroideries, followed 
by ID plates of monograms and scallops with tracings 
for white embroidery. 

* The same album is also edited in-i6™°. 

* Monograms and Alphabets for combination. Album in-8°, 

31 plates of alphabets for combination and monograms. 

Alphabets and Monograms , 1st Series (Alphabets et Mono- 
grammes). Album in-4°, 60 plates with explanatory text. 

* Alphabets and Monograms, Ilnd Series. Album in large 

octavo, containing 17 plates and an explanatory text. 

Motifs for Embroideries, 1st and ^ Ilnd Series (Motifs 
pour Broderies). Two albums in-8°, each containing 

32 coloured plates, composed of various designs for tapestry 
and embroidery. 

* Motifs for Embroideries, Ilird and IVth Series. Two 

albums in large octavo, each containing 20 coloured plates 
of various designs. 

* Motifs for Embroideries, Vth Series. Album in large 

octavo, 15 coloured plates, a text and a series of drawings. 

-X- Motifs for Embroideries, 6th Series. Album in-8°, 
containing 16 coloured plates, composed of various designs 
in modern style. 

* Colbert Embroideries. Album in large octavo, 16 plates 

printed in colour and a series of drawings. 

* Czecho-Slovakian Embroideries. Album in large octavo, 

20 plates printed in colour and a series of drawings. 

* Jugoslavian Embroideries, 1st and Ilnd Series. Two 

albums in large octavo, each containing 20 plates printed 
in colour. 

•X- Turkish Embroideries. Album in large octavo, 24 plates 
printed in colour, a text and a series of drawings. 

* Bulgarian Embroideries. Album in large octavo, 16 plates 

printed in colour, consisting of 88 patterns. 

(*) The publications marked with an asterisk (^) are edited in English. 



I,IST OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE D-M-C LIBRARY 

* Morocco Embroideries. Album in large octavo, i8 plates 

printed in colour, composed of 6i models of borders, grounds 
and motifs. 

* Assisi Embroideries. Album in-4°, containing 24 plates 

printed in colour and a text with explanatory iigures. 

* Ecclesiastical vestments and Altar linen. Album in 

large octavo, containing, printed in colour, 10 plates and 
various detailed figures for three sets of vestments, a 
dalmatic with deacon's stole, a cope, a humeral veil, an 
altar hanging and sacred linen, as well as an explanatory 
text. 6 supplementary sheets, with plans, designs and 
tracings for the execution of the articles. 

* Irish Crochet Lace. Album in large octavo, 52 pages of 

text, 7 plates of patterns and tracings on linen. 

Crochet Work, 1st and Ilnd Series (Le Crochet). 1st Series : 

8 plates composed of 64 patterns and explanatory text. 
Ilnd Series : 8 plates composed of 57 patterns and 
explanatory text. In-4°. 

* Crochet Work, Ilird Series. Album in large octavo, 

containing 13 plates, 70 pages of explanatory text and 
numerous figures. 

* Crochet Work, IVth Series. Album in large octavo, 

containing 11 plates composed of 57 patterns and 
65 pages of text. 

* Crochet Work, Vth Series (Coarse crochet). Album in-4°, 

9 principal plates, 13 supplementary plates and text. 

* Crochet Work, Vlth Series. Album in-8°, 8 plates composed 

of 60 models of lace edgings and narrow insertions. 

Knitting, 1st and Ilnd Series (Le Tricot). 1st Series: 

10 plates with 72 patterns and explanatory text. — 
Ilnd Series : 10 plates with 63 patterns and explanatory 
text. In-40. 

* Knitting, Ilird Series. Album in-S°, containing 12 plates 

composed of 46 knitting patterns accompanied by 
56 pages of text. 

(*) The publications marked with an asterisk (*> are edited in English. 



I<IST OF THE rUBI^ICATIONS OF THE DMC I,IBRARY 



-:«• Knitting, IVth Series. Album in-8o, containing 51 patterns, 
with explanatory text. Additional leaflets showing finished 
models. 

French Net Work (Le Filet-Richelieu). Album in-40, 
30 plates containing 171 patterns with explanatory text. 

* Embroidery on Net (The Net Work), 1st Series. 26 pages 

of text and 20 plates with various patterns. In-8°. 

* Embroidery on Net, Ilnd Series. Album in-40, containing 

59 models, a detailed text and explanatory figures. 

* Filet-Guipure. Album in large octavo, containing 20 plates 

with 68 patterns and a text with 17 explanatory figures. 

Net Work Embroidery, 1st and Ilnd Series (La Broderie 

sur Lacis). 1st Series: composed of 41 patterns. — 
Ilnd Series : composed of 38 patterns. Both with explanatory 
text. In-40. 

((Macrame)) (Le Macrame). Album containing 32 plates, 
composed of 188 patterns with explanatory text. In-4<'. 

"■ Knotted Fringes. Album in-4°, containing upon 20 plates 
20 patterns and a text with explanatory figures. 

* Hardanger Embroideries, 1st Series. Album in large 

octavo, containing 36 plates and a text with explanatory 
figures. 
-:j Hardanger Embroideries, Ilnd Series. Album in large 
octavo, containing 25 plates and a text with explanatory 
figures. 

■H- Openwork Embroideries. Album in large octavo, composed 
of 48 patterns and 10 pages of text. 

-"- Drawn thread Work, 1st Series. Album in-8°, containing 
50 pages of text with explanatory figures and 20 plates 
of patterns. 

* Drawn thread Work, Ilnd Series. Album in-80, consisting 

of II pages of text with explanatory figures and 32 plates 
of patterns. 

Flat Stitch Embroidery (La Broderie au Passe). 

Album in-4°, composed of 27 patterns, with tracings and 
explanatory text. 

(*) The publications marked with an asterisk (*) are edited in English. 



LIST OF THB PUBI.ICATIONS OF THE D-M-C LIBRARY 

* Embroidery on Tulle, 1st Series. Album in large octavo, 

containing 24 plates, 8 coloured, and an explanatory text. 

Motifs for Coptic Embroidery, 1st, Ilnd and Ilird Parts 
(Motifs de Broderie copte). Each Part is composed 
of 30 plates, one coloured, with explanatory text. In-4°. 

Pillow Laces, 1st and Ilnd Series (Les Dentelles aux 
Fuseaux). 1st Series, octavo volume, containing 184 
pages of text, 8 plates with patterns of laces, and 55 tracings. 
— Ilnd Series, album in large octavo, containing 58 pages 
of text, 18 plates with 25 patterns, and 66 tracings. 

* Needle-made Laces, 1st Series. Album in large octavo, 

containing 15 plates, a series of patterns, and a text with 
explanatory figures. 

Point Lace (La Dentelle Renaissance). Album in-8°, 
containing 76 pages of text with explanatory figures, 
10 plates without text and 10 patterns. 

* Teneriffe Lace Work. Album in-8°, of 20 plates of patterns 

and a text with explanatory figures. 

* New Patterns in Old Style. Work composed of 12 plates, 

accompanied by an explanatory text and figures. In-4°. 

* Tatting. Album in-8°, containing 8 plates presenting 

38 models, and a text with explanatory figures. 

Works of various kinds (Recueil d'ouvrages divers). 

Album in-4°, containing 242 engravings with explan- 
atory text. 



I*) The publications marked with an asterisk (*) are edited in English. 



List of special articles 

IN COTTON, LINEN AND SILK 

intended for embroidery, 
sewing, knitting, crociet and for all kinds of needlework in general, 

manufactured and put on sale under the trade mark 

DMC 

Cotton: 6 cord Alsatian sewing cottons (Fils d' Alsace). — 6 cord cotton I<ace 
Thread (Fil ii dentelles 6 brins), — 3 cord Alsatian sewing cotton {Demi- Alsace). — 
2 cord Alsatian sewing cotton {Tiers- Alsace). — Bell mark cotton (Fil a la cloche). 

— Sewing and tacking cottons, bell mark {Cotons a coudre et a batir a la cloche). 

— Special Threads for sewing machines {Fils speciaux pour machines il coudre). — 
Alsa. — Embroidery Twist (Retors a broder). — Embroidery cotton (Coton k broder). 

— Embroidery cottons, special quality (Cotons k broder, qualit(S speciale). — Pearl 
cottons (Cotons perles). — Shaded pearl cotton (Perle ombre). — Special stranded 
cotton (Coton mouUne special). — Special shaded stranded cotton (Mouline special 
ombre). — Floss crochet (Crochet fioche). — Machine Embroidery cotton, special 
quality (Coton a broder pour machines, qualite speciale). — Marking cotton (Coton 
a marquer). — Marking cottons, special quaUty (Cotons a marquer, qualite speciale). — 
Knotting cotton (Fil a pointer), — Crochet cotton 6 cord (Cordonnet 5 fils). — Crochet 
cottons 6 cord, special quality (Cordonnets 6 fils, qualite speciale). — Crochet cotton, 
bell mark (Cordonnet £1 la cloche). — Silky Cotton for fine Hosiery (Sole de coton pour 
bonneterie fine). — Special Twist for fine Hosiery (Retors special pour bonneterie 
fine). — Crochet cotton (Coton pour crochet). — Knitting Twist (Retors pour tricot). 

— Knitting cotton, special quality (Coton A tricoter, qualite speciale). — Knitting 
cottons, bell mark (Retors pour mercerie). — Knitting cotton, bell mark, special 
quality (Retors special pour mercerie). — Alsatia. — Darning cottons (Cotons a 
repriser). — Darning cottons, special quality (Repriser special). — Superfine 
Darning cotton (Repriser superfin). — Stranded Darning cottons 8 threads (Cotons 
mouhnes 8 fils). — Alsatian Twist, special quality (Retors d'Alsace, quality spdciale). 

— Alsatian Cordonnet, special quality (Cordonnet d'Alsace, qualite speciale). 

— Superfine Braid (I<acet superfin d'Alsace). — Cotton Braid first quaUty (I,acet- 
Coton, premiere qualite). 

Flax Thread: Floss Flax or Flourishing Thread (I^in floche). — Flax 
Thread for knitting and crochet (I^in pour tricoter et crocheter). — Flax I,ace 
Thread (I<in pour dentelles). 

Pxire Silk: Persian Silk (Sole de Perse). 

Rayon: Rayon for embroidery (Rayonne k broder). 

These articles are supplied in all sizes in ecru, white, black and all colours. 

They can be obtained at the drapers', needlework shops, &c. ; however, the variety 
of articles bearing the D-MC trade mark is so great that it is impossible, even for the 
best furnished shops, to keep them all in stock. 

Nevertheless, merchants in touch with the manufacturers, the Societe anonyme 
DoLLFUS-MiEG & C'e, Or their agents being able to procure any of these articles, even 
in fairly small quantities, consumers can always be supplied through them with 
what they require. 



Printed by the Societe anonyme 

DOI<I<FUS-MIEG & C'f 

MuLHOtJSE (France) 



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