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Full text of "The Diocese of Fort Wayne"

12.K CORNELL 

\^l^ UNIVERSITY 

f(, LIBRARY 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



V^. TT 



_3 1924 066 002 035 o f^ i- Y 




X^ 



i 



Cornell University 
Library 



The original of tiiis book is in 
tine Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924066002035 



Uhe 

DIOCESE 

OF 

FORT WAYNE 

Fragments of History 

VOL. II 



wOo 



By The Most Rev. John F. Noll, D. D. 
Fifth Bishop of Fort Wayne 

1941! 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Title P»Se 

Preface 

9 
Introduction 

Once Under the Diocese of Quebec '-'- 

Fort Wayne See Established ^^ 

Most Rev. John Henry Luers, D. D 64 

Julian Benoit 

Most Rev. Joseph Dwenger, D.D HO 

Very Rev. Joseph H. Brammer 132 

Most Rev. Joseph Rademacher v^ 134 

Very Rev. John H. Guendling 138 

Most Rev. Herman Joseph Alerding, D. D 140 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. J. H. Oechtering 147 

Rev. A. E. Lafontaine 149 

Most Rev. John Francis Noll 150 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. John P. Durham 161 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Edward J. Mungovan, V. G 164 

Rev. Thomas E. Dillon 165 

Diocesan Officials and Activities 166-169 

Fort Wayne Deanery 170 

Logansport Deanery 224 

Lafayette Deanery 248 

Muncie Deanery 270 

South Bend Deanery 289 

Hammond Deanery 337 

Gary Deanery 380 

Clergy Who Teach in High Schools 414 

Priests Serving in the Army and Navy 418 

Diocesan Priests Working Elsewhere 421 

Diocesan Priests Retired 424 

Deceased Priests of the Fort Wayne Diocese 430 

University of Notre Dame 436 

St. Mary's College and Academy 438 

St. Joseph's College 441 

Sisters of St. Francis Seraph 443 

Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ 445 

Divine Heart Mission House 44g 

Sisters of St. Joseph of Tipton 449 

The Society of Missionary Catechists 45O 

St. Felix Monastery, Huntington, Indiana 453 

The Oblates of Mary Immaculate 454 

Slovak Franciscan Fathers 455 

The Redeijiptorists in Indiana 456 

Franciscan Fathers 453 

polish Franciscan Fathers 459 



^t. 



,*^ 



His Holiness, Pope Pius XII 




On March 2, 1939, Eugene Cardinal Pacelli, 
Secretary of State to Pope Pius XI, was chosen 
Supreme Pontiff. 



Apostolic Delegate To The United States 




The Most Rev. Amieto Giovanni Cicognani 
Aposto ic Delegate to the United States, appoint- 
ed by the late Pope Pius XI on March 17 1933 



PREFACE 

The clergy of the Diocese of Fort Wayne are in- 
debted to my predecessor for collecting data on the 
priests who were the pioneers and trail-blazers in north- 
ern Indiana, and who prepared the way for the forma- 
tion of parishes by visiting communities in which there 
were a few scattered Catholics and by assisting them in 
the erection of churches and schools. 

Bishop Alerding's work, entitled The Diocese of 
Fort Wayne, covered the period from the establishment 
of the diocese in 1857 to the year 1907 — exactly fifty 
years. 

But during these past thirty-four years not only has 
the number of the secular clergy doubled, but only 27 
priests now survive who were ordained prior to 1907. 
Many new parishes have been formed since that time, 
and many cities having populations ranging from 60,000 
to 100,000, and now containing many churches and 
schools, were then oply small towns with few places of 
worship. 

When Bishop Luers came to Fort Wayne the town 
had about 10,000 inhabitants. When Bishop Dwenger 
was appointed Bishop in 1872, Fort Wayne was a small 
city of 19,000 people. Upon the arrival of Bishop Rade- 
macher, the city had grown to 33,000. Upon the acces- 
sion of Bishop Alerding Fort Wayne had grown to be a 
city of 45,000 people. At the time of the appointment 
of Bishop Noll its population had passed the 150,000 
mark. 

The Diocese of Fort Wayne has grown as follows: 
When Bishop Luers was consecrated the first Bishop, the 
diocese had a Catholic population of about 25,000; at 
the time of his death and the appointment of Bishop 
Dwenger, its population had grown to nearly 50,000; at 
the time of Bishop Rademacher's appointment, the Cath- 
olic population had reached about 65,000 ; at the time of 
Bishop Alerding's coming, it had reached about 75,000. 



During the incumbency of Bishop Alerding, on account 
of the great development in Lake County and the growth 
of the cities of South Bend, Mishawaka and Fort Wayne, 
the Catholic population grew to 150,000. At present it 
runs past 185,000, even according to parish reports. 

It will be remembered that after Bishop Luers re- 
ceived his appointment to the new Diocese of Indiana, 
he hesitated whether he should establish his See at Fort 
Wayne or at Lafayette. At that time the cities of Fort 
Wayne and Lafayette had a population of almost equal 
size. But the wisdom of his choice has been proved by 
time. At this writing Fort Wayne has a population of 
126,000 and Lafayette only slightly more than 30,000. 
In other words Fort Wayne's population has increased 
more than twelvefold while that of Lafayette has not 
increased more than threefold. 

It has been deemed wise to bring the records of the 
Diocese of Fort Wayne up to date, and to present a brief 
statistical story of each parish in connection with the 
Deanery in which it developed. 

The space allotted to each of the 190 parishes and 
missions must needs be extremely limited; in fact, the 
data can be only statistical if we would incorporate all 
in one volume. For full, even if condensed, reports of the 
accomplishments of priests, the brief sketch devoted to 
each parish with which they were ever connected, must 
be referred to. 

The reader will note that we trace the beginnings 
of Catholicity in the area now circumscribed by the Dio- 
cese of Fort Wayne from the time it was a part of the 
one big diocese of the United States, namely, that of 
Baltimore, and later of the Bardstown and Vincennes 
dioceses. A short sketch of each of the five Bishops who 
have governed this diocese and of their Vicars General 
is then presented. 

The brief biography of the clergy is included in the 
story of the parishes with which they are now associat- 
ed. Under a separate caption attention is given to 
priests who are serving in the Army and Navy, or in 
other fields in and outside the diocese, or who are engaged 
in teaching or who are retired. 



Even a skeleton record, fairly complete and accur- 
ate, will be of some use to the one who will undertake 
the writing of the story of separate parishes. Individual 
parish stories are written from year to year on the occas- 
ion of Golden or Diamond or Centenary Jubilees, but 
they cannot hope to elicit more than a local interest. 

During recent years many Religious Orders of men 
and women have established centers in this diocese, and 
we have included in this work a brief description of the 
origin and purpose of such Religious Orders or Congre- 
gations, and also of the important institutions which 
some of them conduct. 

The compiler trusts that, after the elapse of thirty- 
four more years, the records contained herein will be 
properly supplemented. 

4- JOHN F. NOLL 

Bishop of Fort Wayne 



HISTORY vs. HIS STORif 



Introduction 

HISTORY vs. HIS STORY 

History as it is usually written for others' instruction 
is too often "his story". Since the beginning of the 
sixteenth century, according to a brilliant scholar, it has 
been a "conspiracy against the truth." 

Nationalism and sectarianism militate against a de- 
pendable version of history. The writers in any given 
nation are inclined by their very loyalty to their flag to 
justify a war, or a persecution, or a schism, no matter 
what the pretext for it, precipitated by the ruling powers 
of their country. Their national prejudices also pre- 
vent them from furnishing a just estimate of the people 
or institutions of other countries. Next to national 
prejudice ranks religious prejudice. It is unthinkable 
that would-be historians, loyal to the realm in England, 
in Germany, in Switzerland, in Holland, in Sweden, 
in Norway, would not be swayed by prejudice in 
dealing with the Church, which was officially perse- 
cuted. There are few people who are in reality entirely 
neutral. On the occasion of a persecution they are either 
with the government or with the Church, and no version 
of history would be worth the paper it is written on if it 
was published during the heat of the trouble, when 
everyone's passions are aroused, and when all are in- 
fluenced by vehement propaganda. 

Nearly all history was made before America was dis- 
covered, and it was written in the first instance, even for 
modern consumption, by Englishmen, or Germans, or 
Frenchmen. In the religious revolt in England and in 
Germany the Catholic records were destroyed principally 
by the well-planned destruction of libraries; while on 
the other hand the government, or Protestant story, was 
written at the instigation of the civil powers and preserv- 
ed in order to remove the stigma from those who launched 
or fostered the persecution. Works on history today, which 
afford the basis for encyclopedia articles, for magazine 
stories, for textbooks in sectarian institutions, and even 



:o 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



in the public schools, are built up from these prejudicea, 
exaggerated, and usually very false records. 

To bring this home to you with clear force, let me ask 
you : Who, in America, outside the Catholic group, has 
not been misled by the recent persecution in Mexico? 
To justify its attitude the Government used every pos- 
sible means of propaganda and capitalized the prejudices 
of our non-Catholic people. Very little vi^ritten by those 
who were competent to speak for the Church reached 
non-Catholic ears. In fact no one was permitted to 
speak for the Church even in Mexico itself without being 
imprisoned and tortured. Issues of daily newspapers 
were confiscated as frequently as they spoke a word in 
behalf of the Church or gave expression to a criticism of 
the persecuting powers. Who could credit the "history" of 
this late persecution written by an admirer of Calles? But 
much "history" has been written by just such prejudiced 
writers. It is the perpetuation of the so-called historians' 
"story" which explains the deep-seated prejudice against 
the Catholic Church, the suspicions which people entertain 
concerning her, the thousand lies which they believe about 
her. 

Now in this little work we have no thought of writing 
more than a fragmentary history of the Catholic Church 
in northern Indiana. But the reader may depend on the 
accuracy of what will be written. Of course our only pur- 
pose is to bring down to date a record which ended about 
the year 1907, in the work of my predecessor of happy 
memory. But we shall first trace the succession of spir- 
itual jurisdiction exercised over what became the State of 
Indiana. 

[We are indebted to the Catholic Family Annual for the bio- 
graphical sketches of Bishops Carroll, Flaget, and Brute.] 



FORT t^'AYNE ONCE UNDER DIOCESE OF QUEBEC 11 

Part I. 

Up to the Founding of the See of Fort 

Wayne. 

Chapter I 

FORT WAYNE ONCE UNDER THE 
DIOCESE OF QUEBEC 

Territory throughout the world, no matter how 
sparsely settled, is placed under some delegated eccles- 
iastical jurisdiction by the head of the Universal Church, 
and it rests with this Bishop or Vicar Apostolic to pro- 
vide ways and means of ministering to his spiritual sub- 
jects as well as circumstances may render it possible. 

The territory now embraced by Indiana, as well as 
by half a dozen other states, was placed under the juris- 
diction of the Bishop of Quebec in the year 1674, more 
than one hundred years before the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence was signed. 

In the year George Washington was inaugurated 
as our first President, John Carroll was consecrated 
America's first Bishop, with Baltimore as his seat of 
residence, and the whole United States as his diocese. The 
Catholic population, scattered over the whole territory, 
was estimated at 20,000 at that time. 

REV. PIERRE GIBAULT 

But several years before the inauguration of our 
first President, the Bishop of Quebec provided Indiana 
and Illinois with one priest in the person of his Vicar 
General, Father Pierre Gibault. 

An early historian, after lauding the zeal of this 
priest, says: "Kaskaskia, it is true, was his home, but 
it was he who revived the faith of Vincennes." This city 
had not been visited by a priest for five years and its 
people petitioned him to locate there, which he did 
in the year 1780, where he began to make civic as well 
as ecclesiastical history. 

Vincennes, and much of the northwest territory at 
that time belonged to the English, and people of the 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



United States are indebted principally to Father Gibault 
for the acquisition from the British of the States of 
Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and part of Minne- 
sota, We are told by the historian that when George 
Rogers Clark left the falls of Ohio in 1778 to capture 
the town of Kaskaskia, he was greatly aided by Father 
Gibault, who took the people into the church and, after 
addressing them, urged that they take sides with the 
United States against the British. Through Father Gi- 
bault's assistance General Clark captured Kaskaskia 
and then marched to Vincennes, whither Father Gibault 
accompanied him, and where he rendered the same sort 
of service that he did at Kaskaskia. He assured the 
Vincennes' inhabitants that it was to their interest to 
side with the United States. 

Judge John Law, one of Indiana's historians, says: 
"Next to Generals Clark and Vigo, the United States is 
indebted more to Father Gibault for the accession of the 
states in what was originally the Northwest Territory 
than to any other man." Father Gibault, we are told, 
even furnished money to General Clark to buy food for 
his soldiers, which the General seemingly regarded as a 
gift, because the money was never returned to the priest. 
Father Gibault hints at this in a letter to General Arthur 
St. Clair, dated May 16, 1790, in which he says: "The 
undersigned has the honor to represent to your excellency 
that from the moment of the conquest of the Illinois 
country by Colonel George Rogers Clark, he has not been 
backward in venturing his life on the many occasions in 
which he found his presence was useful, and at times 
sacrificing his property, which he gave for the support 
of the troops." 

General St. Clair requested Thomas Jefferson, then 
President of the United States, to donate Father Gibault 
some land in return for money advanced, but the request 
went unheeded. 

After laboring for thirty-five years among the Red 
men of Illinois and Indiana, Father Gibault died at New 
Madrid, Missouri, in 1804. Nothing is of record con 
cerning his place of burial. 



GROWTH OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE U. S. SINCE 1775 J .3 

GROWTH OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE 
UNITED STATES SINCE 1775. 

The first Catholic missions in the present limits of 
the United States were those of the Dominicans, Jesuits, 
and Franciscans among the Indians. "The English and 
Dutch colonies," says T. D'Arcy McGee, "planted in the 
very noonday of the Reformation, inherited all its viru- 
lence against priests and Jesuits. The so-called freemen 
of New England sought Rale in his chapel by the Nor- 
ridgewock, and slew him on its threshold. Penn was cen- 
sured for allowing Mass to be celebrated in his Sylvania, 
and, in 1741, a poor man was hanged in New York for 
being a priest. The German emigrants to the Middle and 
southern States did sometimes keep a concealed priest 
among them; but, under God, it was Irish immigration 
which, overcoming the malice of the bigot and the in- 
justice of the laws, gave freedom to the altar and security 
to its ministers." 

The earliest Catholic settlers were those in Maryland 
and Pennsylvania. The Carroll family immigrated to 
Maryland about 1700. Catholic clergymen could then of- 
ficiate only in private houses, and the fathers of the Car- 
rolls had chapels under their own roofs. John Carroll, 
first bishop and archbishop in the United States, was 
born in such a chapel-house, on January 8, 1735. One of 
the first Catholic churches in Pennsylvania was connect- 
ed with the house of a Miss Elizabeth McGawley, an Irish 
lady, who, with several of her tenantry, settled on land 
on the road leading from Nicetown to Frankfort. 

In 1734 Governor Gordon and Council prohibited 
the erection of a Catholic church in Walnut Street, Phila- 
delphia. St. Joseph's Chapel was opened in 1733, how- 
ever, and St. Mary's Church was erected in 1763. In 
1758 the Catholics of Maryland were assessed for tithes 
to support the pastors of the Protestant denominations. 
In 1770 St. Peter's Church, in Baltimore, was founded. 
In 1784 the first Catholic congregation was assembled in 
Boston by the Abbe La Potherie, a Frenchman, and in 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



1788 they obtained the old French church in School 
Street. The old cathedral was dedicated in 1803 by Bis- 
hop Carroll, assisted by Dr. Cheverus. This was the be- 
ginning of the Church in the Eastern States. 

In New York, the first church, St. Peter's, was erec- 
ted in 1786. In 1791 Bishop Carroll founded St. Mary's 
College, and in 1804 obtained a charter for Baltimore 
College, which was first opened in Mulberry street in that 
city. St. Mary's is the alma mater of the Church in Ame- 
rica. 

Besides these, within the present limits of the coun- 
try, there were a few French Catholics at Detroit, Vin- 
cennes and in Illinois, and scattered trappers, with In- 
dian converts. Louisiana and Florida had their Catholic 
church organizations dating from the settlements of those 
colonies, but the total of all these was inconsiderable. In 
California the cross had just been planted. 

Such were the humble beginnings, such the difficul- 
ties encountered by the Church in laying her foundations, 
now so broad, in the United States. Let us contrast the 
Church of a century ago with that of to-day. 

When in 1784, Father John Carroll, S.J. , was conse- 
crated in England first bishop for the United States, 
there were not above six Catholic churches in the coun- 
try. One century later there were 6,920 churches, cha- 
pels, and stations. At present there are 19,000 churches 
and 27,000 priests. 

In 1785 Bishop Carroll estimated (seemingly too 
low) the Catholic population "in Maryland at 16,000, in 
Pennsylvania over 7,000, and, as far as information 
could be obtained, in other States about 15,000." One 
century later the Catholic population was over 6,000,- 
000. Today it is close to 26,000,000. 



THE MOST REV. JOHN CARROLL 



15 



THE MOST REV. JOHN CARROLL 

First Archbishop of Baltimore and of the 
United States 

This illustrious prelate, who has justly been styled 
the Patriarch of Catholicity in the United States, was 
born in Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, Mary- 



land, on the 
uary, 1735. 
Daniel Car- 
native of Ire- 
came to this 
h i s youth. 
Ar chbish- 
w e r e pious 
a n d t h e 
training 
their son 
fest in his 
mother lived 
raised to the 
c lesiastical 
h i s native 
to this good 
was ever a 
even amidst 




8th of Jan- 
H i s father, 
roll, was a 
land, and 
country i n 
The future 
op's parents 
Cat holies, 
C h r i stian 
they gave 
was mani- 
life. His 
to see him 
highest e c - 
d ignity i n 
country, and 
mother h e 
dutiful son. 



J I 

'^' t h e cares, 
labors, and honors of his exalted station. His educa- 
tion, until he arrived at the age of thirteen, was acquired 
at the Jesuit School at Bohemia, Maryland, and he was 
next sent, together with his cousin, the illustrious 
patriot, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, to the College of 
St. Omer in Flanders. His piety and attention to his 
studies were remarkable, and he won the praises of his. 
superiors and the affection of his companions. He re- 
solved to give his life to religion, and entered the Novi- 
tiate of the Society of Jesus; made his ecclesiastical 
studies at the Jesuit Colleges of Liege and Bruges ; was 
ordained a priest in 1769. He was appointed tutor to 



16 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

the son of Lord Stourton, an English nobleman, and 
with his pupil made the tour of Europe in 1772 and 
1773. He was afterwards a professor in the College of 
Bruges, and while thus engaged he heard of the sup- 
pression of his order, to which he was greatly attached. 
He bore this sorrow with perfect humility and resigna- 
tion to the decree of the supreme head of the Church. 

When he saw the American colonies resisting the 
tyranny of England, he warmly espoused the cause of 
his native country, returned to Maryland, and was a dis- 
tinguished patriot throughout the struggle. He accom- 
panied Dr. Franklin and Charles Carroll of Carrollton 
on a mission to Canada, in order to secure the alliance 
of Canada with the struggling colonies, or at least its 
neutrality; and he was a warm admirer of Washington, 
upon whom he delivered an eloquent eulogy, at the re- 
quest of Congress, in 1800. On his return to America, 
lie conducted a mission at Rock Creek, Maryland, and 
-also visited the Catholics at Aquia Creek, Virginia. He 
Tvas afterwards appointed Superior of the Catholic 
clergy of the then United Colonies, took up his residence 
in Baltimore, and rendered important services to the 
Church, and to the cause of religion and education. He 
was the founder of Georgetown College while Superior 
of the clergy, and, after his consecration as Bishop, he 
founded St. Mary's College, Baltimore, and took a 
prominent part in the founding of the Sisters of Charity 
under Mother Seton at Emmittsburg. He was appointed 
first Bishop of Baltimore in 1789, and was consecrated 
in England, August 15, 1790. 

He appointed pastors for various parts of the coun- 
try from among the clergy of Maryland and Pennsyl- 
vania, and secured the services of many excellent and 
devoted priests from Europe. He established missions, 
built churches, and sent holy missionaries to the North, 
to the South, and to the West, and governed the Church 
with wisdom and ability, reformed abuses, and promul- 
gated laws for ecclesiastical government. His diocese 
embraced the whole of the then United States, and the 
blessings of his benign and vigilant administration were 



THE MOST REV. JOHN CARROLIj 



experienced in every direction. He had the consolation 
of seeing four additional Episcopal Sees erected respec- 
tively at Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Bards- 
town, Kentucky, in 1808, and he consecrated the Bishops 
for these dioceses, except that of New York, in his epis- 
copal city of Baltimore, in 1810. The same decree that 
created these new sees erected Baltimore into a metro- 
politan see, and raised Dr. Carroll to the dignity of 
Archbishop. Finally, after a long and useful life, de- 
voted to God and His Church, Archbishop Carroll was 
summoned to his eternal reward. In his humility, he 
asked to be laid on the ground to die; he displayed 
heroic virtue to the last, and expired December 3, 1815, 
at the age of eighty. 








The new replacement (1929) of the first seminary in the United 
States, founded by Bishop Carroll. 



FRAG MENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



RT. REV. BENEDICT JOSEPH FLAGET 

Bishop of Bardstown and of Louisville, who was 
given jurisdiction over Indiana 

Few Bishops among the great and pious men who 
have adorned the episcopate in the United States have 
left a higher reputation for personal sanctity than 



Bishop 
He was 
tournat, a 
inAuvergne, 
o f Novem- 
He lost his 
before h i s 
h i s mother 
reached his 
A pious 
ever, adopt- 
hi s piety 
ing him to 
vote himself 
entered the 
Seminary at 
and, after 
tion, was re- 



Flaget. 
born at Con- 
little village 
on the 7th 
ber, 1763. 
father just 
birth, and 
before he 
third year, 
uncle, bow- 
ed him, and, 
early lead- 
seek to de- 
to God, h e 
S u 1 pician 
CI ermont, 
h i s ordina- 
ceived into 
of St. Sul- 
of the French Revolution came 




the Society 
pice. As the troubles 
on, he offered himself to Bishop Carroll, and arrived in 
Philadelphia, November 7, 1793. His first mission was 
at Vincennes, Ind., one of the oldest French settlements 
in the West, whence he was recalled in 1795 to assume 
a professorship in Georgetown College. After a visit 
to Havana, where a Sulpician College was projected, 
he returned to Baltimore, and was about to enter the 
Trappist order, when Bishop Carroll nominated him to 
the Holy See for the new diocese of Bardstown. In 
spite of his reluctance, he was consecrated November 4, 
1810. Zealous priests had labored in the field assigned 



RT. REV. BENEDICT JOSEPH FLAGET 19 

to him, but an immense labor was yet to be done to 
supply the wants of the faithful. What Bishop Flaget 
effected is to be seen to this day, not least, perhaps, in 
the spirit of utter loyalty and obedience to the Holy See 
which characterized him. His labors extended even to 
St. Louis and New Orleans, and he was instrumental in 
the establishment of a Bishop at the former city. In his 
own diocese he established a seminary, and by the aid 
of such priests as David, Nerinkx, Elder, Byrne, and the 
Dominican and Jesuit Fathers, saw institutions arising 
to meet the urgent wants of his flock. After attending 
the first Provincial Council of Baltimore in 1829, he 
resigned his see, and his resignation was accepted by 
the Holy See in 1832; but his coadjutor, Bishop David, 
resigned, and Bishop Flaget was finally reinstated, and 
Dr. Chabrat made coadjutor. Bishop Flaget then, for 
the first time, visited Rome, where the Pope received him 
with great honor, and urged him to visit France and 
Northern Italy to commend the Association for the 
Propagation of the Faith. Cures effected by his pray- 
ers, which seemed miraculous, added to the glory of his 
name and of his reputation. Returning to Kentucky, he 
resumed his toilsome labors, seeing his old friends 
succumb and die around him. After the see was re- 
moved to Louisville, Dr. Chabrat resigned, and the Rev. 
M. J. Spalding, later Archbishop of Baltimore, was 
made his coadjutor. As years increased, his active 
labors were more confined, and, after a brief illness, he 
died February 11, 1850. "He died as he had lived — a 
saint ; and the last day was, perhaps, the most interest- 
ing and impressive of his whole life," wrote a bio- 
grapher. Ten years after his consecration Bishop 
Flaget's burden was lightened by the transfer of Indi- 
ana to a new See. 



20 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Chapter II 
UNDER BISHOPS OF VINCENNES 

Soon new Episcopal Sees were created at Charleston, 
South Carolina, in 1820; at Cincinnati in 1821; at St. 
Louis in 1827; at Mobile in 1829; at Detroit in 1833; at 
Vincennes in 1834. 

The territory now constituting the diocese of Fort 
Wayne, as might be conjectured, became part of the 
diocese of Vincennes, which embraced the whole State 
of Indiana, and the eastern part of Illinois. The Right 
Reverend Simon G. Brute was selected as the first 
Bishop of this new diocese. 

The United States CATHOLIC ALMANAC OR 
DIRECTORY for 1837 gives the following summary of 
stations at which priests were stationed or at which 
Mass was said under Bishop Brute's administration: 

DIOCESE OF VINCENNES 

Churches and Clergy 

In Indiana and Eastern Illinois 

Vincennes — Cathedral of St. Francis Xavier: Rt. Rev. 
Simon G. Brute, D. D. ; Rev. Celestine De la Hailan- 
diere; Rev. James Corbe. 

Black Oak Ridgs, Davies County — St. Peter's: Rev. 
Simon Lalumiere; St. Mary's: Rev. Maurice St. 
Palais. 

Chicocos, an Indian village on the Tippecanoe — Attend- 
ed by Rev. Mr. Deseille, of Michigan. 

Duchee River — Visited occasionally. 

Dover, Dearborn County— St. John's : Every other Sun- 
day, Rev. Joseph Ferneding. 

Fort Wayne, Allen County— St. Joseph's : Rev. Francis 
J. Claude ; St. Mary's : Rev. Lewis Muller. 

Huntington — Attended from Fort Wayne. 

Logansport, Cass County; Mount Pleasant, Madison- 
Attended by Rev. Patrick O'Beirne. 



UNDER INDIANA'S FIRST BISHOP 



New Alsace, Dearborn County, St. Paul's, a large Ger- 
man congregation — Attended every other Sunday 
by Rev. Joseph Ferneding. 

New Albany and the Knobs, Floyd County — Attended 
occasionally by Rev. Ignatius Reynolds, of Ken- 
tucky, and Rev. Joseph Ferneding. 

Peru, Miamiport, Wabashtown, Salomic, Gros — Occa- 
sionally visited by Rev. M. Ruff. 

Rising Sun, Richmond, Shelbyville, Columbus, Indiana- 
polis — Occasionally attended. 

South Bend, St. Joseph County — Rev. S. T. Badin of 
Michigan ; St. Mary's of the Lake — Rev. Mr. Des- 
eilles of Michigan. 

There are stations on the Ohio River which are visited by 
Rev. Elisha Durbin and Rev. Charles Coomes of 
Kentucky. 

Terre Haute, Merom, Lafayette, Shaker's Prairie — Occa- 
sionally attended. 

Washington, Davies County — Rev. Simon Lalumiere. 

Chicago — Rev. Bernard Shaffer. 

Paris Prairie, Edgar County; Thrawl's Station; Riviere 
Au Chat; Coffee Town; Lawrenceville — Visited 
from Vincennes. 

Shawneytown, Carmi, Albion — Visited from Kentucky 
by Rev. Elisha Durbin. 

RECAPITULATION 

Churches and Stations occasionally visited 

Between 40 and 50 

Clergymen on the mission 12 

Clergymen otherwise employed 3 

Convents 1 

Female Academies 1 

You will note that Indiana and Eastern Illinois had 
only twelve priests occupied with parochial and mission 
work in the year 1836; that Fort Wayne had two resi- 
dent priests when Indianapolis had none; that Chicago 
had only one priest at that time; that South Bend and 
Fort Wayne were the only northern Indiana cities hav- 
ing a resident priest. St. Mary of the Lake, near South 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Bend, not only was the first church in what is now 
the diocese of Fort Wayne, but its pastor. Father 
Stephen Badin, was the first priest ordained in the 
United States. 

FORT WAYNE HAD PRIEST BEFORE CHICAGO 

The report which I have furnished you covered the 
year 1836, and was published therefore only two years 
after the diocese of Vincennes was established; and 
though the Church had little to boast of in the Hoosier 
State, there had been considerable progress during these 
two years, because, as I have already informed you, in 
the year 1834, the newly consecrated Bishop had only two 
priests in his whole jurisdiction. 

In the summary above it will also be noted that the 
principal little settlements occasionally visited by priests, 
were located along the Canal, then being built, but which 
has long since been drained, and which later was paral- 
leled by the Wabash Railroad. Huntington, Wabash 
(known then as Wabashtown), Peru, Logansport, Lafay- 
ette were in advance of Indianapolis and visited more fre- 
quently by priests, though much farther removed from 
Vincennes. 

Concerning Fort Wayne Bishop Brute wrote as fol- 
lows in 1837 : "They have just finished building a church 
here, 60 x 30 feet, and the congregation numbers 150 
Catholic families. I was happy to send them the Reverend 
M. Ruff from Metz, in France, recently ordained, and 
speaking three languages, French, English and German, 
Of the latter there are a good many living there and in the 
environments." It will be observed that Fort Wayne in 
the year 1837 had many more Catholics than the city of 
Chicago, and possibly more than any town in the State 
of Indiana, outside of Vincennes. The writer's grand- 
parents were one of the 150 families then living in the 
city of Fort Wayne. His uncle, Martin A. Noll, was bap- 
tized in that city in February, 1888. 

To give the reader just a little better grasp of this 
sparsely settled region, it may suffice to remind them that 



FORT WAYNE HAD PRIEST BEFORE CHICAGO 2_3 

Chicago was a little village of 400 souls, not even pos- 
sessing a resident priest at the time it was included with- 
in the province of the diocese of Vincennes. South Bend, 
on 3t. Joseph's River, was much farther advanced than 
Chicago, and gave promise of becoming even then an im- 
portant town. 

Of the area now occupied by Notre Dame, and by St. 
Mary's of the Lake, Bishop Brute wrote about this time : 

"This mission was established many years ago by 
the venerable Father Badin. Crossing the river we visited 
St. Mary-of-the-Lake, the mission house of the excellent 
Father Badin, who was lately moved to Cincinnati. He 
had a school there kept by two Sisters, who have also 
gone away leaving the place vacant. The six hundred 
twenty-five acres of land attached to it, and the small 
lake, named St. Mary's, make it a most desirable spot and 
one soon to be occupied by some prosperous institution. 
Rev. Badin has transferred it to the Bishop on the condi- 
tion of his assuming the debt, a trifling consideration 
compared with the importance of the place." 

We are all prepared to concede that Bishop Brute's 
judgment was very good; that the land immediately to 
the north of St. Joseph's River and of South Bend has 
proved to be an excellent site for two great institutions, 
famed throughout the country and the world with Catho- 
lics everywhere their debtors. The Congregation of the 
Holy Cross discovered the spot and took possession of it 
in 1842. 

The Ecclesiastical Directory, even for 1839, credits 
Chicago with only one priest, viz. the Rev. James 
O'Meara, who "visits occasionally Mt. Joliet, Grand Calu- 
met, Smallfork, Illinois Canal, etc." Chicago's first 
church stood on the southwest corner of Lake and State 
streets. 



24 



FRAGMENTS OP OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



BISHOP BRUTE 

Simon William Gabriel Brute was born at Rennes, 
in France, on the 20th of March, 1779. His family was 
of excellent lineage, and his father was superintendent 



of the royal 
B r i ttany, 
residence in 
of the Par- 
Rennes. He 
the college 
city, and, 
establish- 
broken u p 
lution, he re- 
private 
order to 
ment in a 
boys called 
the Country, 
raised dur- 
R e 1 gn of 
became a 
in a print- 




domains 1 n 
having h i s 
the Palace 
liament a t 
studied a t 
of his native 
when that 
ment was 
by the Revo- 
sorted to 
teachers. In 
avoid enrol- 
regiment of 
the Hope of 
which was 
i n g the 
Terror, h e 
compositor 
i n g o fR c e 



belonging to his mother's family. When security began 
to return, he studied medicine. He was always a labori- 
ous and patient investigator, reading with pen in hand 
and notebook beside him ; and in after-years the solidity 
and extensive range of his learning, and the readiness 
with which his vast store of knowledge was brought 
into practical use, were the astonishment of all who 
knew him. He was graduated at the famous medical 
school of Paris with the highest honors, and immedi- 
ately received an appointment to one of the government 
dispensaries; but he had resolved to devote himself to 
the priesthood, and on leaving the medical school he 
entered the Seminary of St. Sulpice. Ordained in 1808, 
he became professor of theology in the seminary at 
Rennes. After his arrival in America he taught 



BISHOP BRUTE 25 



philosophy for two years in the seminary at Baltimore, 
and was then sent to Emmittsburg to help Father 
Dubois in the management of the college of Mount St. 
Mary. The young and struggling institution owed al- 
most as much to this holy man as to its venerated 
founder. His scholarship enabled Father Dubois to ex- 
tend the course of studies; his faculty of organization 
was of incalculable value in establishing the peculiar 
system upon which the college was necessarily con- 
ducted ; his aptitude for business relieved the president 
of many pecuniary embarrassments; while his gentle 
and devout life was a shining example to the young men 
under his charge. "It is no disparagement," says Arch- 
bishop Bayley, "of those holy and eminent men who 
have adorned the annals of the Catholic Church in this 
country — of a Carroll, a Cheverus, a Dubois, and a 
Flaget — to say that no one has ever exerted a more ben- 
eficial influence in favor of the Catholic religion than 
Bishop Brute. If Mount St. Mary's, in addition to all 
the other benefits it has bestowed upon Catholicity in 
this country, has been in a remarkable degree the nur- 
sery of an intelligent, active, zealous priesthood, exactly 
such as were needed to supply the peculiar wants of the 
Church in this country, every one at all acquainted with 
the history of that institution will allow that the true 
ecclesiastical spirit was stamped upon it by Bishop 
Brute. His humility, piety, and learning made him a 
model of the Christian priest, and the impression his 
virtues made upon both ecclesiastical and lay students 
surpassed all oral instruction." Although he managed 
the involved afl'airs of the college with remarkable suc- 
cess, he seemed to know so little about money when only 
his own wants were to be provided for that he would 
begin a journey of a hundred miles on foot, forgetting 
to carry even the means to pay for a dinner. If he had 
five dollars in his pocket, it went to the first person who 
asked for it. He gave away even the clothes off his 
back, and when he visited the poor Negroes in the coun- 
try around the mountain he was often known to take oflf 
his linen to bestow it on them. In his missionary labors 



26 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY ^ 

he walked sometimes fifty miles a day, book in hand, 
praying and reading by turns. Priests and bishops, near 
and far, came to him frequently for advice. "It wag 
thus that, although apparently hidden in his mountain 
retreat, engaged in his quiet duties as a professor and 
missionary, his influence extended on every side, and the 
whole country may be said in some sense to have been 
the, field of his labor. No opportunity of doing good 
escaped his vigilant zeal." 

He was appointed first Bishop of the new see of 
Vincennes, Indiana, in 1834. The bulls reached him 
while he was giving a retreat to the Sisters of Charity 
at Emmittsburg. He went to the chapel and opened the 
documents on his knees, and the next day he began a 
retreat at Baltimore to decide whether he should, accept 
or refuse. A conviction of duty triumphed over his 
natural unwillingness to leave his beloved seminary. 
He was consecrated at St. Louis, October 28, 1834, and 
immediately took possession of his see. It was a poor 
and sadly-neglected place. The cathedral was a plain, 
unfinished building, without either plastering or paint. 
The pew-rents amounted to $100 a year ; the revenue of 
the Bishop did not exceed twenty dollars a month, and 
not all of even this small sum was paid. The episcopal 
palace consisted of one room and a closet. The diocese 
had only three priests, and contained no Catholic 
schools or other institutions, except an academy just 
opened by four Sisters of Charity in Vincennes. The 
good Bishop, besides the proper functions of his office, 
discharged the duties of a missionary priest, travelling 
on horseback all over a large extent of territory. He 
visited all the stations; he wrote twice a month to all 
his priests; he sought out all the scattered Catholic 
settlers, many of whom had not seen a priest for years ; 
he preached to the Indians ; he went to Europe and ob- 
tained twenty priests and seminarians for his diocese; 
he contributed constantly to the Catholic periodicals; 
he established a college, seminary, orphan asylum, and 
free school ; and he aided his people and clergy to build 
a numbei- of churches. 



BISHOP BRUTE 



Such extraordinary labors soon destroyed his 
health. In five years he literally wore himself out in 
God's service, and on the 26th of June, 1839, he calmly 
and happily breathed his last in the odor of sanctity. 

THE LITTLE BOY, BRUTE 

Before closing our brief sketch of the life and work 
of Right Reverend Simon Brute, the first Bishop of Vin- 
cennes, we feel that the following reference to his early 
childhood, communicated to the late Reverend Father 
Hitzelberger, S. J., and published a few years ago in the 
Ave Maria, should be reproduced here : 

"During the fearful period of the French Revolution, 
when all religion was proscribed, the fury of the rebels 
was especially directed towards priests. If they chanced 
to meet one anywhere they would seize him, hurry him 
away, and hang him to the nearest lamp-post. However, 
the zeal of the clergy was in no way abated, and daily 
instances might have been witnessed of their heroic en- 
deavors to carry the consolations of religion to those un- 
fortunate victims of the tyranny of Robespierre, who 
were imprisoned for no other crime than that of fidelity 
to their King, or, perhaps, because they belonged to the 
aristocracy. 

"Early in the morning, through the gloomy corridors 
of the Bastile, a baker, habited in white cap and apron, 
and bearing a basket of light bread, might be seen hur- 
rying along, accompanied by a bright-faced little boy of, 
perhaps, five or six summers. The guards permitted 
them to pass unchallenged, for it appears that the prison- 
ers' friends were allowed to supply them with some of 
the little comforts, or rather the necessaries of life. Hav- 
ing entered the common room of the prison, the baker 
would set down his basket, and with more than usual 
French fluency and rapid gesticulation, extol the superior 
quality of his bread, and energetically recommend it to 
his listeners. But in the midst of his apparent flourishes, 
he sometimes made the Sign of the Cross, and, on ap- 
proaching a person whom he recognized as a Catholic, he 



28 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCBSA]Sr HISTORY 

would say, in an undertone : 'My son, I am a priest, you 
may now make your confession.' The man would then 
fall on his knees beside the basket, apparently to exam- 
ine the contents ; the supposed baker bent over him, con- 
tinuing his animated gestures, under cover of which, 
when the confession and act of contrition were made, he 
gave absolution. Then, rapidly removing the Blessed 
Sacrament from its place of concealment upon the breast 
of the little boy who accompanied him, he gave his peni- 
tent the Bread of Life. 

"And day after day these sacred ministrations were 
repeated by the disguised priest, regardless of the danger 
incurred by himself and the heroic child who was his 
constant companion. 

"What light and grace must not that pure young 
heart have received from Him who made it His resting 
place, and inspired it with strength and courage at so 
early an age! Such is the inference that we may draw; 
for this child became the great and holy Bishop Brute, 
first Bishop of Vincennes." 

The reader will begin to realize by this time how 
much the Catholic Church in the middle west is indebted 
to the truly apostolic missionaries who left their belle 
France for aye in order to spread the faith here. 

FATHER BADIN REPORTS ON 
FORT WAYNE 

Even after Fort Wayne was placed under the new 
Bishop of Vincennes it continued to remain within the 
Province of Baltimore. 

At the time Fort Wayne was first visited by mis- 
sionaries practically all long trips were made by the then 
existing waterways. A route was traced by the clergy 
working out of Quebec whereby far-off Louisiana could 
be reached in the most direct manner. During this survey 
the Maumee, the Wabash and the Ohio Rivers were dis- 
covered, together with the villages and towns which had 
been established at various points along the shores. 

Even some Protestants who wrote the early history 
of Indiana seem to be certain that the first white visitor 



FATHER BADIiSr REPORTS ON FORT WAYNE 28 

to this territory was a Catholic priest ; and this appears 
to be reasonable enough in view of the fact that the year 
assigned to the visit is 1675, which coincides with the 
time Father Marquette discovered the Mississippi and 
evangelized the Indians in northern Illinois. History that 
deals with this latter region tells of the offering of the 
Holy Sacrifice of the Mass for the first time on November 
1st, 1674, a few miles from the mouth of the Chicago 
river. The officiating clergyman was none other than the 
sainted Father Marquette of the Society of Jesus, who 
had the year previous penetrated the hitherto unknown 
wilds of the northwest in company with Joliet. 

It is consoling to think that 266 years ago the Catho- 
lic Church pre-empted, so to say, the soil upon which Fort 
Wayne and Chicago are built. When Father Badin, the 
first priest ordained in the United States, came along 160 
years later, he found a large percentage of Indians deeply 
attached to the Catholic Faith. Hence, during the inter- 
vening time, concerning which very little history has been 
written, the missionary must have made frequent visits 
to the Red men, whose fathers' fathers had been baptized 
by Father Marquette and his companions. 

To protect the territory through which the mission- 
ary passed on his way to Louisiana from Canada, the 
French erected forts at strategic places, such as Detroit, 
Fort Wayne, Lafayette, Vincennes. Fort Wayne has some 
old residents who still remember the old fort at the junc- 
tion of the three rivers around which the colony of the 
Miami Indians grew up. Members of this tribe of Indians 
were still here in large numbers at the time the diocese 
of Vincennes was created. 

Fort Wayne was settled even before Vincennes, 
while the whites were more numerous in the southern 
part of Indiana, and in the southland generally speaking. 

Writing to Bishop Purcell, of Cincinnati, from Fort 
Wayne, in November, 1834, ninei months before the See 
of Vincennes was established. Father Stephen Theodore 
Badin tells of purchasing a piece of ground here for a 
little church, and reports about 100 Catholic families as 
living here. It has probably not been known to many 



30 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

that the purchase of the property for the first church in 
Fort Wayne was made by the first priest ordained in this 
country. At this time Father Badin had his headquarters 
at Indian Village near what is now South Bend. 

A few weeks later the same priest writing again to 
his Bishop, but this time from his headquarters, says that 
he must return to Fort Wayne and go thence to the forks 
of the Wabash where Irish and German Catholics were 
anxious to have a chapel. The forks of the Wabash are 
a mile west of Huntington, where the house still stands 
in which several nominal chiefs of the Miami Indians 
lived after the tribe emigrated from this region. In the 
same letter Father Badin says that from Huntington he 
must go to Wabash, Peru and Logansport where chapels 
were also needed. This errand was to be undertaken to 
solicit property as a gift or to purchase the same in case 
he could not receive it as a gift. 

The zealous missionary wrote a third letter from 
Huntington to his Bishop which bears the date of Septem- 
ber 23d, 1834, and in which he reminds the Bishop that 
he is observing on that day the 42nd anniversary of his 
ordination. He states that he personally would long to 
enter retirement in order to spend his last years in pre- 
paration for his end, but that there was still need for the 
missionary, even of his advanced age, to spend most of 
his time on horseback over difficult roads to minister to 
widely scattered people. 

In this letter Father Badin reports to his Bishop that 
the largest Indian settlements were nearest the Michigan 
state line, and that they were well cared for by Father 
de Seille. He reports that "the Indians are our best con- 
gregations." 

It seems difficult to comprehend that this situation 
obtained in the area now covered by the diocese of Fort 
Wayne less than one hundred years ago. 

HOW FEW THE PRIESTS, HOW VAST THE AREA ! 

At the time the diocese of Vincennes was established 
Catholics wer/e most numerous in the diocese of Baltii 
more, which' eornprised the State of Maryland and the 



HOW FEW THE PRIESTS, HOW 'VAST THE AREA! 31 

District of Columbia. It had forty-six priests engaged in 
mission work. Next came the See of New York, embrac- 
ing the whole State of New York, and the eastern part 
of New Jersey, with forty-three priests. Then followed 
the diocese of Philadelphia, which comprised the whole 
States of Pennsylvania and Delaware and the western 
part of New Jersey, with forty priests. New Orleans, 
embracing the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, held 
the fourth place with thirty-one priests. St. Louis and 
Boston had twenty-four priests each. The diocese of St. 
Louis comprehended the States of Missouri and Arkan- 
sas, the western part of Illinois and all the territory west 
of the Mississippi. The diocese of Boston comprised Mas- 
sachusetts, Maine, Vermont,. New Hampshire, Rhode 
Island, and Connecticut. Bardstown and Cincinnati had 
twenty-one priests each. The former embraced the 
States of Kentucky and Tennessee, and the latter com- 
prised the whole state of Ohio. Charleston, comprising 
the States of North and South Carolina and Georgia, 
had twenty priests. Detroit, embracing Michigan and 
all the northwest territory, had nineteen priests. The 
diocese of Mobile, comprehending the States of Alabama 
and East and West Florida, had ten priests. The diocese 
of Vincennes had two priests to begin with, while Bishop 
Brute procured ten priests from France during the first 
two years. The roster of priests of this diocese, as re- 
ported in the Catholic Almanac of 1837, was as follows : 

Buteux, Stanislaus, Neyron, Lewis J. 

Corbe, James, O'Beirne, Patrick, 
De la Hailandiere, Celestin, Ruff, Matthew, 

Ferneding, Joseph, St. Cyr, Irenaeus, 

Francois, J. Claude, St. Palais, Maurice, 

Lalumie're, Simon, Shaffer, Bernard, 

Muller, Lewis, Vabret, John A. 

Three of these were occupied with; other -wQrk'thali 
missionary. You will note that the names of the tWQ 
Bishops who succeeded Bishop Brute appear in this list. ..[ 

From this report the reader will be able to form 
some concept of the vast area which each priest had t6 



32 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY ^ 

cover and the almost insurmountable difficulties with 
which each had to cope. 

The Bishops of the twelve dioceses of the United 
States, which existed at this time, made frequent trips 
abroad not only to procure candidates for their ministry, 
but to procure funds from the Society for the Propa- 
gation of the Faith. People in our day hardly appreciate 
the help, absolutely indispensable, procured from that 
source, when Catholics were too much scattered to build 
humble churches in convenient places. The money was 
always given with cheer at the earnest solicitation of the 
Holy Father, who himself sent the Bishops home with 
trunk loads of sacred vessels and things needed by them 
for the proper exercise of their office on missions. 

The zeal of the Bishops and Cheir anxiety to have ev- 
ery Catholic reached by Catholic literature when it was 
impossible for them to listen to sermons and exhortations 
regularly, is evidenced by the following list of Catholic 
papers, published weekly in the United States: 

The United States Miscellany, published in Charles- 
ton; 

The Truth Teller, published in New York; 
The Catholic Telegraph, published in Cincinnati; 
The Catholic Herald, published in Philadelphia ; 
The Shepherd of the Valley, published in St. Louis ; 
The Green Banner, published in New York; 
The Catholic Advocate, published in Bardstown, Ken- 
tucky. 

That the missionaries in those days solicited sub- 
scriptions for the Catholic papers is clear from the fol- 
lowing paragraph contained in a letter written by Father 
Badin, dated Fort Wayne in the year 1834: 

"I avail myself of the present opportunity to enclose 
$10.00 for four subscriptions to the Catholic Tele- 
graph, namely, Francis Comparet, Esq., Fort Wayne; 
Messrs. Aughinbaugh and Dubois, Fort Wayne, Ind. ; 
Mrs. Coquillard, South Bend, St. Joseph Cty., Inda., and 
Mr. D. Burr, P. M., Treaty Ground, Wabash Cty, Inda. 
Mr. Burr is pursuaded in his mind of the Catholic truths, 



HOW FEW THE PRIESTS, HOW VAST THE AREA 33 

and I hope that he will become a member and a benefactor 
of the Church." 

The Comparet descendants are living in Fort Wayne 
today. Only recently the estate belonging to Coquillard 
was sold and subdivided, part of it becoming a site for a 
new church, which must soon be built in South Bend 

How slowly the mail must have moved, and with 
what difficulty the Catholic paper must have been de- 
livered to its subscribers in those days! 

FIRST ORPHAN ASYLUM IN THE NORTH- 
WEST TERRITORY BUILT BY 
FATHER BADIN 

It is not known to many that before the University 
of Notre Dame was established, the site on which the in- 
stitution now stands was an Orphan Asylum, founded by 
Father Badin in the year 1833, one year before the diocese 
cf Vincennes was formed. 

We are indebted to James E. Deery, a member of 
"The Catholic Historical Society of Indiana," for the fol- 
lowing account of the establishment of this Orphan 
Asylum. 

"The first Catholic Orphans' Home that was conducted under 
Catholic auspices in Indiana, in fact in the Northwest Territory, 
was established on the present site of Notre Dame University in 
1833 by the Reverend Stephen Theodore Badin. Father Badin, who 
was the first priest ordained in the United States, was in charge 
of the Pottowatomies Indian Mission in St. Joseph county, Indiana, 
from August, 1830, until the spring of 1836. 

"The first Orphans' Home was named St. Joseph's Orphan 
Asylum and was chartered by the legislature of Indiana as a cor- 
poration on February 2, 1833. It must have been devoted to the 
care of the children of the Indians, as there were very few white 
persons in St. Joseph County at the time. No reference is made 
to it in any of the Catholic histories, nor does Judge Howard men- 
tion it in his History of St. Joseph County. But official documen- 
tary evidence and letters written by Father Badin seem to indicate 
that the orphans' home was in fact conducted by Father Badin. This 
evidence consists of the act of the legislature which was passed by 
both houses on February 1, 1833, and approved by Governor Noble, 
February 2, 1833, (Laws of Indiana 1882-83, Ch. LXIXI, p. 75); 
the Journal of the proceedings of the Senate and house 



34 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

of the session of 1832-1833; two letters written by Father 
Badin and the deed executed by Father Badin July 31, 1835, wherein 
he conveyed the tract of land upon which the orphans' home was 
located to the Right Reverend Bishop Brute, first Bishop of the 
Diocese of Vincennes. 

"The first reference we find to the orphans' home is in a letter 
written by Father Badin to U. S. Senator John Tipton, dated at Port 
Wayne, December 29, 1832, in which he says, 'I have next to inform 
you that I have applied to the Legislature of Indiana to incorporate 
an Orphan Asylum, and that I have placed your name at the head 
of the Trustees, who according to the bill I framed, may act by 
proxy if on account of distance or affairs they could not attend the 
meeting of the Board. I will give you only the Preamble of the 
Bill.' 

■' 'WHEREAS, Stephen Theodore Badin, of St. Joseph County, 
is desirous to establish an orphan asylum in the country, and to en- 
dow the same with three hundred acres of land and other endow- 
ments, and has applied to the legislature of Indiana to have the 
institution aforesaid incorporated by law; and whereas, the said 
institution will be beneficial to society in general, and to orphans 
in particular. 

" 'THEREFORE, * * * * . (Amercan Catholic Historical Re- 
searches, N. S., Vol. 4, p. 75.) 

"In the same letter Father Badin states that if the bill is passed 
he expected to go to Baltimore to get Sisters of Charity. 

"Father Badin early in the month of December filed a petition 
with the State Senate asking that body to charter the orphans' home 
and it was referred to the committee on education. On Thursday, 
January 10, 1833, Senator Farrington, in behalf of the committee, 
submitted the following report: 

' 'Mr. President — 

" 'The committee on education to whom was referred the peti-; 
tion of Stephen Theodore Badin, for a charter of incorporation to the 
St. Joseph Orphan Asylum have the same under consideration, and 
direct me to report the following bill entitled, a bill to incorporate 
the St. Joseph Orphan Asylum.' The Journal of the Senate records 
that the bill was then read twice, the rules of the Senate being dis- 
pensed with, and on motion of Senator Whitcomb, was referred to,^ 
committee of the whole Senate as a special order of business for the 
following day. (Journal of Senate, 1882-83, p. 247.) + 

"But the next day the bill did not come up for consideration. It 
appears to have been 'put to sleep' for no further: record is made of 
it until just a few days before the end of the session. On Friday, 
February 1st, 1833, the Journal of. the Senate records that: 

"'On motion of Mr. Hanna,> the committee of the whole were 
dtecharged:froni the consideration of a bill ttji- iincbrporate the St; 



FIRST ORPHAN ASYLUM BUILT BY FATHER BADIN 35 

Joseph Orphan Asylum, and the same was committed to a select 
committee. 

'' 'Ordered, That the said committee consist of Messrs. Hanna, 
Clark and M'Carty.' (Ibid, p. 247.) 

"This special committee held a meeting immediately and their 
report was submitted the same day. The Journal reads: 

" 'Mr. Hanna, from the select committee, to which was referred 
a bill to incorporate the St. Joseph Orphan Asylum, now reported 
the same with amendments. 

" 'Which were read, concurred in and passed.' (Ibid, p. 438.) 

"The bill was immediately rushed to the House of Representa- 
tives by Senator Hanna in person, for the House Journal of the 
same afternoon of the day the bill passed the Senate, contains the 
following entries: 

■' 'A message from the Senate, by Mr. Hanna, one of their 
members: 

" 'Mr. Speaker: — 

" 'The Senate has passed an engrossed bill of the Senate, en- 
titled an act for the establishment of the St. Joseph Orphan Asy- 
lum. 

" 'In which the concurrence of the House of Representatives is 
requested. 

" 'The bill named in said message was twice read (the rules of 
the House, being dispensed with.') (Journal of House, 1832-33, 
p. 60S.) 

"After a few corrections were made the bill was read a third 
time and passed. 

"The act was signed the following day by Governor Noble, 
And thus the first orphans' home in the State of Indiana became a 
legal entity. 

"It seems clear that Father Badin not only was a great mission- 
ary but a successful lobbyist as well. It will be noted that his pe- 
tition yvas filed with the Senate some time prior to the date of his 
letter, of December 29th, 1832, to Senator Tipton, and it slumbered 
with the committee on education until January 10, 1833, on which 
date the Senate voted to make the bill a special order of business for 
the following day. Then followed more delay, as it was not until 
two days before the adjournment of the, legislature that the bill 
came up for action. The bill then was passed feyiboth houses in one 
afternoon and approved by ^he Goyernor in his last message to the 
legislature the day of adjournment, February 4, 1833. Father Badin 
was a m.an who had no need for an introduction, whether to priests 
or people, and it is safe to assume that he was present in Indianap- 
olis to personally see that his bill was not "lost" between the two 
houses or after it reached the Governor's office. The unusual 
activity of Senator Hanna at the last minute in behalf of the bill 



FRAGMENTS OP OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



would indicate that pressure was being applied by some one and 
that some one, undoubtedly, was none other than Father Badin. 
Senator Hanna represented St. Joseph County in the Senate. 

"The title to the land upon which the orphans' home was lo- 
cated was in the name of Father Badin. By a deed executed in 
Pittsburgh, July 31, 1835, he conveyed the land to Bishop Brute. 
This deed, which is recorded in Record C, page 194, in the Recorder's 
Office of St. Joseph County, Indiana, contains the following con- 
ditions : 

" 'Now the condition of this transfer is such, first that the 
grantee (Bishop Brute) above named, his heirs or assigns, shall 
apply to the said estate, its tracts * * * to the establishment 
of an orphan asylum or to such other religious charitable institu- 
tion as they will deem most proper and beneficial to humanity and 
charity; the second condition is that the grantee aforesaid (Bishop 
Brute) his heirs or assigns shall cause to be paid unto the grantor 
above named (Father Badin) Seven Hundred and Fifty Dollars 
for the building and other improvements made on said land and 
the other expenses incurred in conveyancing the said establishment 
of one orphan asylum on said land.' 

"Bishop Brute visited Father Badin's mission late in the spring 
of 1835. In a letter to the Leopoldine Association he writes, 
'crossing the river we visited St. Mary's of the Lake, the mission 
house of the excellent M. Badin, who has lately removed to Cin- 
cinnati. He had a school there kopt by two Sisters, who have also 
gone away, leaving the place vacant. The 625 acres of land at- 
tached to it, and the small lake named St. Mary's, make it a most 
desirable spot, and one soon I hope to be occupied by some prosper- 
ous institution. Rev. M. Badin has transferred it to the Bishop on 
condition of his assuming the debts, a trifling consideration com- 
pared with the importance of the place.' Seven years later Father 
Rorin established Notre Dame University on this site. With the 
departing Indians, also, it seems, disappeared all memory of Father 
Badin's St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum. 

"Most of Father Badin's papers and letters are in the library 
at Notre Dame University. Part of these have been arranged and 
about as many more are still in vertical files. Unfortunately, there 
is a break between 1830 and 1840. In one letter on file, dated Sep- 
tember, 1834, written from Huntington, Indiana, Father Badin 
writes: 'I'll close this information by adding that the Legsl. of 
Inda. has granted me a charter to establish the St. Joseph Orphan 
Asylum — Soli Deo honor and gloria. Amen.' " 



REV. BENJAMIN PETIT 



REV. BENJAMIN PETIT 

Rev. Benjamin Mary Petit was Father De Seilles' 
successor at South Bend among the Pottowatomie In- 
dians, and, it seems, he came to the United States upon 
the earnest solicitation of Bishop Brute, in 1836. There 
is a record of his ordination in the archives of the Dio- 
cese of Indianapolis as of October 14th, 1837. 

A letter written by this Father Petit to Bishop 
Rosati, of St. Louis, is our only clue to the work which he 
did in territory now contained in the diocese of Fort 
Wayne. In this letter it is recorded that the Government 
transported the Pottowatomie Indians from the banks of 
the St. Joseph river near South Bend to a point on the 
Osage River in the west. Men, women and children were 
led like so many cattle away from the homes which they 
had established. There were many sick, and some actual- 
ly dying at the time, and these were transported in wag- 
ons. The priest himself took sick and died in February, 
1839, only sixteen months after his ordination. The zeal 
and piety of Father Petit are read between the lines of 
the letter addressed to Bishop Rosati. It reads as fol- 
lows: 

LETTER TO BISHOP ROSATI 

(From the Diocesan Archives, 3810 Lindell, St. Louis, Mo.) 

Sanduskye Camp Near Danville 
19 Fbre, 1838 
Monseigneur: 

Last year Monseigneur Brute sent me to the Pottowatomie In- 
dians to replace Monsieur De Seilles whose death left them or- 
phans; that mission, in full vigor and growth, was about to be 
destroyed in Indiana by the policy of the government which seeks 
to unite all the Indians on the other side of the Mississippi. 

As a great many of these very fervent and pious Christians 
were going to emigrate at the same time, Monseigneur Brute per- 
mitted me to accompany them to their new settlement so that I may 
re-establish their church and their mission; as Vicar-General of 
your Diocese, he has given me temporarily the faculties and juris- 
diction which are necessary; today, Monseigneur, I am asking Your 
Lordship to confirm these faculties, if you find it convenient. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



An emigrant mission, complete in every way, (like a nucleus, 
entirely ready for the attachment of great hopes of the future) is 
worthy of the attention of Your Lordship and of those Jesuit Fath- 
ers who are especially charged with the Indian Missions. 

I am not coming to establish a mission in the midst of the 
good Indians for myself, although I am attached to them with all 
the affection of my priestly heart (they are my first mission) ; I am 
coming solely to hold' this mission together (so that these precious 
souls may not be lost) until I shall be able to place in your hands 
or in the hands of the Society of Jesus this infant mission to which 
I would gladly consecrate my life, if obedience, which is a happi- 
ness for a priest, did not call me for another work on the mission 
foi- which, indeed I have a far less natural inclination. 

The limit fixed by my bishop for my return is next March. Be- 
fore that time, Monseigneur, I beg you by all that God knows of 
the simplicity and the sincere piety, of the fervor and the zeal and 
the good will in the hearts of your new subjects to arrange to send 
us a priest so that these Christians, so eager for the reception of 
the Saci'aments which so many neglect, may not die of exhaustion, 
like abandoned children, deprived of the heavenly nourishment in 
v/hich their souls find so many delights. 

Your Lordship knows so much better than I can tell you how 
important it is for the subsequent development of the Indian mis- 
sions not to let them disperse and perish by the abandonment of 
that Christianity fully developed which Providence sends today into 
the midst 6f the nearby Indians. 

Our trip is a harsh experience; we have much sickness; two of 
the Indians were buried today. Monseigneur, please pray God to 
sustain us and to bless the christian resignation of these good In- 
dians deprived by force of their fatherland and of all their notions 
of blessing, the Faith excepted. 

Accept, Monseigneur, the assurance of profound respect and of 
the humble submission in Jesus Christ. 

Of your most respectful servant 

B. PETIT, 
I ptre mre, C. S. P. 

P. S. The migration wfll likely cross the Mississippi at Quincy 
and our destination is the Osage River. 

Father Petit died at the University of St. Louis, sur- 
rounded by Jesuit Fathers who had ministered to him in 
his last moments. He was brought to Vincennes for bur- 
ial, his Bishop pronouncing tlie funeral eulogy. 



RE'V. STEPHEN THEODORE BATON 



REV. STEPHEN THEODORE BADIN, 
Proto-Sacerdos Statuum Foederatorum 

Rev. Stephen Theodore Badin was born in Orleans, 
France, July 17, 1768. At the breaking out of the French 
Revolution he was a student in the Sulpician Seminary at 
Orleans, and 
dained sub- 
i n s t itution 
ved in 1791, 
ding turned 
senal. T o- 
of November 
din embark- 
deaux for 
States, hav- 
B. J. Flaget 
J. B. David 
ions in exile, 
ed Baltimore 
1792, where 
kindly re- 
Bishop Car- 




had been or- 
deacon. This 
was dissol- 
and the buil- 
into an ar- 
ward the end 
Father Ba- 
ed at Bor- 
the United 
ing the Rev. 
and the Rev. 
as compan- 
They reach- 
March 28, 
they were 
c e i v e d by 
roll. 



May 25, 1793, Stephen Theodore Badin was ordained 
priest in the old cathedral church of St. Peter's, Balti- 
more. This ordination was the first that had taken place 
in the then territory of the United States. A few months 
after bis ordination Father Badin was selected for the 
Kentucky mission. His appointment was a most suitable 
one. He was young, energetic, and, above all, fired with 
zeal for God's glory and the salvation of souls. The bis- 
hop gave him for a companion the Rev. M. Barrieres. 
Leaving Baltimore September 6, 1793, the two mission- 
aries travelled on foot to Pittsburgh, where they began 
their journey down the Ohio on a flat-boat. They passed 
Wheeling and Marietta, and reached Gallipolis after 
seven days. 

Proceeding they reached Maysville, whence they 
journeyed on foot to Lexington, a distance of sixty-five 
miles. Father Badin's first Mass in Kentucky was cele- 
brated at Lexington on the first Sunday of Advent. After 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



a brief service of four months Father Barrieres left for 
New Orleans, and for three years Father Badin remained 
the only priest in Kentucky. 

Father Badin's mission extended over hundreds of 
miles of territory, and he estimated the number of Catho- 
lic families at three hundred. He rarely lodged two con- 
secutive nights in the same house, and wherever he stop- 
ped for the night it was his invariable custom to devote 
all his available time to the religious instruction of the 
household. Between 1797 and 1803 three priests were 
added to the Kentucky mission. Two died and one left 
for Europe. Thus Father Badin was again alone, and 
from the spring of 1803 to the summer of 1805 his labors 
were so multiplied that relaxation, even for a day, was 
out of the question. 

In 1819 Father Badin visited his native land, but 
returned to Kentucky in the fall of 1829. 

Though the venerable missionary was now in his 
sixty-third year, he was in vigorous health and not afraid 
of work. In the summer Bishop Fenwick placed him in 
charge of the Pottawatomie Indian mission in Indiana. 
He reached the scene of his labors in August, and he en- 
tered at once upon his task of Christian charity. Mean- 
while he paid occasional visits to the surrounding settle- 
ments of whites in Indiana, Ohio and Michigan. Logan- 
sport, South Bend, and Fort Wayne, Indiana, were regu- 
larly visited by him during his entire pastorate among 
the Pottawatomies. After five years of unremitting toil 
among the Indians he found himself prostrated physical- 
ly, and asked to be relieved. His request was granted. In 
1837 he was made vicar-general of Bardstown, which of- 
fice he relinquished after two years, and spent the next 
ten years visiting the prominent congregations of the 
diocese. In 1846 he again severed his connection with the 
Kentucky mission and accepted a pastorate in Illinois un- 
der Bishop Quarter, but returned in 1848. 

The proto-priest and great missionary passed away 
in the house of the venerable prelate who had given him 
a home during the closing years of his life. He di^d 
April 21, 1853. 



RIGHT REV. DR. DE I.A HAILANDIBRE 



RIGHT REV. DR. DE LA HAILANDIERE 

Second Bishop of Vincennes 

Bishop Brute died after five years of service, and 
was succeeded by his Vicar General, the Reverend Celes- 
tin de la Hailandiere. His consecration took place on the 

ust, 1839, in 
chapel of the 
Convent, and 
ingly impos- 
hop of Nan- 
Reverend Dr. 
was assisted 
sion by the 
V e r sailles 
is. The Arch- 
C h alee don, 
from Rome, 
also the 
of Irenopo- 
^^^^iS munion with 
Catholic 
of Greek rite, 
legate was 
Vicar Gene- 
On this 



18th of Aug- 
Paris, in the 
Sacred Heart 
was exceed- 
ing. The Bis- 
cy, the Right 
J a n s s ons, 
on the occa- 
Bishops o f 
and Beauva- 
bishop of 
recently 
was present, 
Archbishop 
lis, in com 




the Roman n^?- ^^jTgj 

Church, but 

The Pope's 

present, also 

ral of New Orleans and the American Consul. 

occasion the East and the West were united. It was a 

noble illustration of the unity prevailing in the great 

Church of Christ, to see an American Bishop consecrated 

by a prelate of France, in presence of the representative 

of the Holy See of Peter and the Oriental Bishops of the 

Levant. 

The second Bishop of Vincennes was one of the ten 
who came to this country at the urgent solicitation of 
Bishop Brute to do pioneer missionary work on Indiana 
soil. While his administration was brief — only eight 
years — he sowed the seeds for the future far better than 
he knew. He did this by bringing to Indiana Fathers 
and Brothers of the Holy Cross, who established them- 
selves at Father Badin's Indian Village in the north, and 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



the Sisters of Providence, who laid their foundation in 
the southern part of the State. Father Edwin Sorin was 
the answer of France and of Father Moreau, head of the 
Auxiliary Priests of Mans to the appeal for clergy for 
his American diocese made by Bishop de la Hailandiere. 
Father Sorin arrived at Vincennes in September, 1841, 
was put to work for one year in that vicinity, and then 
traveled to the tract of land near the village of South 
Bend, which Father Badin had purchased as a site for a 
college, and which, in the year 1836, he transferred to 
his Bishop for that purpose. The Bishop in turn pre- 
sented the land to the Holy Cross Community on condi- 
tion that a college and Novitiate would be erected within 
two years and that the Fathers would minister to the 
white and Indian Catholics in the neighborhood. 

Notre Dame University was therefore established 
during the episcopate of Indiana's second Bishop, and in 
the year 1842. The story of its growth and developm.ent 
will be told in another place. 

At this time Fort Wayne had a most energetic resi- 
dent priest, a worthy successor of Father Badin in the 
person of the Reverend Julian Benoit, who had also 
hearkened to the call of Vincennes for workers in this 
large diocese. Father Benoit came to Fort Wayne in the 
year 1840, and from this point visited distant places in 
four directions. More will be said about him later. 

Bishop de la Hailandiere's Apostolic ministry was 
not terminated by death, but by his resignation in the 
year 1847. He retired to his native country, France, 
where he lived until the year 1882. In compliance with 
his declared wish, his remains were brought back to In- 
diana to rest under the sanctuary of the Cathedral at 
Vincennes. 



RIGHT REV. BR. DE LA HAILANDIERE 



BEAUTIFUL FAREWELL LETTER 

of the 

RIGHT REV. DR. DE LA HAILANDIERE, 

Bishop of Vincennes, 

To the Clergy and Laity of His Diocese. 

CELESTIN RENE LAURENT GUYNEMER DE LA 
HAILANDIERE, by the Grace of God, and the ap- 
pointment of the Holy See, Bishop of Vincennes, to 
the Clergy and Laity of his Diocess: 

Health and Benediction in our Lord Jesus Christ : 

Fourteen months have elapsed, dearly beloved breth- 
ren, since we submitted to our venerable Colleagues, as- 
sembled in council, at Baltimore, the motives which led 
us to desire permission to lay aside the burthen and dig- 
nity of Bishop of Vincennes. Yielding, although with 
reluctance, to our urgent and reiterated entreaties, the 
Fathers of the Council consented to aid our application; 
and we, encouraged by their acquiesence, ventured to lay 
our resignation at the feet of the Sovereign Pontiff. Since 
then, we have, in silence, anxiously awaited the decision 
of the Holy See. — Now, that the public prints announce 
the appointment of our successor, and that our relations 
with you will shortly terminate, permit us, for the last 
lime, to address you. 

Why, dearly beloved, have we desired to withdraw? 
We will tell you in all simplicity. It is because the Epis- 
copal charge, oppressive to all, and extremely so to us, 
on account of our weakness, has continued to be insup- 
portable, notwithstanding every effort we have for years 
made, to sustain ourselves under its weight. It is, because 
of the responsibility which it involves, both for time and 
eternity — a responsibility which terrifies even saints — 
if even it had not sufficiently awed us in the beginning, 
continues to do so more and more. It is because, if we 
have properly comprehended the difficulties of our posi- 
tion, and deeply felt its thorns, the strength and energy 
to conquer the former, and bear meritoriously the latter, 
have equally failed us. Again why? It is because we 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



greatly love the diocese, and believe that any other Pre- 
late will serve more advantageously than ourselvt«^. 

Our career is closed. We have done what we were 
able ; yet we have accomplished but little. We confess it 
unaffectedly, and without desiring that others, through 
personal attachment, should speak of it in terms different 
from our own. It is indeed little to have amassed a few 
stones, to have raised a few walls, or assisted to erect a 
few edifices. That which would have been much — that 
which we ardently desired — would have been, to cause 
peace and piety to inhabit them ; that from the midst of 
their sanctuaries, the harmonious voice of supplication, 
ascending to heaven, should have realized the words of 
the Prophet : Behold how good and how pleasant it is for 
brethren to dwell together in unity. 

But although we have effected little, you beloved 
fellow-laborers, you have done much; and we heartily 
rejoice on that account, for it was our desire that such 
should be the case. Oh! how well we remember it — the 
day, when, prostrate before the altar the hands of the 
Pontiffs created us Bishop, this was our prayer: "May 
God give success to their labors; humiliation to ourselves." 
Our prayer has been heard. It is indeed through your 
prayers and your preseverance that churches in great 
numbers have been erected, that congregations have been 
formed and schools established; that now religion flour- 
ishes in places which ten or twelve years ago were unin- 
habited, and in others where even the name of Catholic 
was a term of reproach. You have aided also in the foun- 
dation and development of religious institutions, which, 
if they comprehend aright their duty and are faithful to 
grace, can exercise a most salutary influence for the fu- 
ture prosperity of the diocese. To you, also, is due the 
flattering prospect for Indiana, of a native clergy — a 
prospect which we have even now the consolation of see- 
ing in part realized. It is finally through you that the 
diocese of Vincennes, so young and so poor, has been ac- 
celerated (to an equal rank with dioceses long since es- 
tablished. 

Again, fellow-laborers, that which augments your 



RIGHT REV. DR. DE LA HAILANDIERE 



merits, and should enhance your praise, is, the difficulty 
which opposed your progress : the poverty of your par^ 
ishes, the sparse state of the Catholic population, and 
the dangers to which their faith was exposed, the want 
of knowledge on the part of many of you, of the country, 
of its inhabitants and its langauge; fatigue of body and 
mind, affliction of heart, destitution even of the neces- 
saries of life. There is no form of suffering which you 
have not undergone ; and we are acquainted with no dio- 
cese in the Union, which required more sacrifices of 
every kind, and where they were encountered with a more 
unflinching courage. Dearly beloved, we have known 
your sufferings, and a g'reat cause of the sadness of our 
hearts, was our frequent inability to relieve them. We 
have been constantly astonished at your devotedness, and 
it is with satisfaction that we on this occasion proclaim 
it, not only as a tribute of duty and admiration, but also 
as a motive of edification and encouragement to those 
who will succeed you in the same laborious mission. Our 
testimonial will, we hope, be the more raadily received, 
since those who know us are well aware that we love not 
flattery either towards ourselves or others. 

But the very good you have effected — the rapid im- 
provements of your congregations — these consoling fruits 
were the very causes which impelled us still more strong- 
ly to withdraw from the administration. Do you ask 
why? This is the reason: You have advanced; we have 
remained where we were at first. You stood in need of 
one who could apppreciate your progress, and know how 
to direct your further advancement ; — one, who would not 
only be placed at your head by his office, but who could 
sustain himself there by his merit; one who should al- 
ways and in all things be your model : "in word, in con- 
versation, in charity, in- faith, in chastity, in knowledge, 
in long-suffering, in sweetness, in the Holy Ghost;" one, 
in a word, who, with a steady hand, could conduct you 
through the passage of vigorous adolescence to the per- 
fection of mature manhood, and aid in finally establish- 
ing you in all things according to the authorized constitu- 
tion of the Holy Church of Christ. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Providence, in sending you a new prelate, has, Aye 
sincerely hope, chosen in his person the one suited to your 
necessities. May you under his direction and in his com- 
pany, continue to advance, without fainting, in the way 
of usefulness, sanctifying the people confided to your 
care, without neglecting at the same time your own sal- 
vation. 

Such will be the event, dearly beloved, if you cor- 
rectly understand the duties which you owe him, and the 
strength which is derived from their performance. Re- 
ligion, you know, is the chain which connects earth with 
heaven, time with eternity, man with God. A chain 
which, extending from Jesus Christ, descends through 
Peter to the Pontiffs of Rome, and reaches through the 
Bishops and Priests to the humblest of the people. Mys- 
terious chain ! whose links, more precious than the purest 
gold, are the communion of all in one faith, and the same 
charity, and the whole rendered indissoluble by the sub- 
ordination of all to the same ministry. In this mysterious 
chain is found the strength of the Church. No, it is not 
in the talents, nor in the learning of its ministers, al- 
though for its protection God sometimes deigns to endow 
them with these gifts. Its strength is not even in the 
virtue of its Priest, although the Priest without virtue 
is nothing but a "tinkling cymbal ;" or "a broken cistern 
that can hold no water." The strength of the Church, 
we repeat it, is in this beautiful communion of its mem- 
bers, and in their harmonious subordination to its head. 
The Bishops obey Peter, Peter is obedient to Christ: in 
the same manner Priests should obey the Bishop, and the 
faithful, the Priest. Again, beloved, permit us to assure 
you, that obedience to the Bishop — submission to his 
authority, is the more necessary, as you have shown in 
all your deportment, because the spirit of independence, 
which is diffused so widely in our midst, tends strongly 
to the weakening of authority. Confide, then, in the 
guidance of your Bishop, since the successor of Peter has 
entrusted you to his direction. Do not forget, that you 
are established not to direct him, but to be directed by 
him; not to judge him, but to submit to his judgment. If 



RIGHT REV. DR. DE LA HAILANDIERE 



he judges you, do you know that he will himself be 
judged? and with what judgment! 

It is not sufficient that you have confidence in your 
Bishop; it is also necessary that you suffer him to per- 
ceive that confidence, lest if you conceal it, the enemy of 
all good may insinuate himself between him and you, and 
persuading him that he does not possess it, cast him into 
despondency. Is not your Bishop a man like yourselves, 
and like you has he not need of consolations? Ah! if you 
knew how much weighs upon the spirits and heart of a 
Bishop ! how much solicitude for the churches ! If you 
knew how much bitterness each day pours into his soul, 
you would feel for him the liveliest commisseration. If 
you knew the motives of his actions — motives often dif- 
ferent from those you imagine — which he is obliged to 
keep secret, you would not venture, I do not say to blame, 
but even to judge his conduct, for fear of being rash and 
unjust in your judgments. 

And you. Beloved Brethren, composed of all nations, 
and of every tongue, of every age, and either sex, who 
form the diocese of Vincennes, you who are strong in the 
faith, and you who walk with an unsteady step, attend to 
the last words of your Bishop, and treasure them in your 
hearts. He has thought it his duty to speak to the Priests 
of submission and confidence in their Bishop, permit him 
to address a few admonitions to you, also, on the subject 
of your duties. 

Above all, dearest brethren, understand well that 
your Priests have not usurped the charge of pastors of 
your souls, but that they have been sent to you by the 
Church which alone can confer a mission. Know that 
they are not like those ministers whom the caprice of 
man makes and unmakes ; but that they are men chosen 
and tried, whom the imposition of the hands of a Bishop, 
and the holy unction, have consecrated forever to the ser- 
vice of God and the salvation of souls : "thou art a Priest 
forever." Do not regard them merely as men, but as 
"ministers of Christ and the dispensers of the mysteries 
of God." Believe these truths, and hand them down to 
your children and your children's children. Do not be 



48 1-'RAG:MENTS of our BfOCESAN HIHTORY 

lieve them only, but reduce them to practice. Respect 
in your Priests the unction which has consecrated them 
and is never effaced, the Church which has sent them, and 
Christ, who has given them authority to bind and to loose, 
and to nourith you vv'ith his sacred body. Obey them as 
they themselves obey. Hear not their discourses with 
vain curiosity, but with the simplicity of faith. Increase 
not by murmurs an J censure, their burdens, in them- 
selves so heavy ; but rather aid them by docility and sub- 
mission, to perform the multifarious duties of their 
charge. Sustain them with your temporal goods. They 
who load you with the behedictions of heaven, and have 
renounced for you all the enjoyments of life, are entitled 
to it. Pray, I beseech you, pray for them, that they may 
be, all and always, your models and your guides : "a pat- 
tern of the flock from the heart." 

To this first disposition of respect, of confidence and 
submission towards your pastors, permit me, dear breth- 
ren, to add another: that of prudence and wisdom to- 
wards the world in the midst of which you live : Hear the 
Apostle, St. Paul: "See, therefore, brethren, how you 
walk circumspectly ; not as unwise, but as wise, redeem- 
ing the time, because the days are evil: 'Beware of false 
prophets.' " Have nothing to do with those societies which 
work in secret : — "have no fellowship with the unfruitful 
works of darkness." Fly from the midst of Babylon: 
"Enter ye in at the narrow gate, for wide is the gate and 
broad is the way that leadeth to destruction, and many 
there are who go in thereat. How narrow is the gate and 
strait is the way that leadeth to life : and few there are 
that find it!" Finally, dearly beloved, do not forget that 
the enemy has his eye constantly fixed upon you, watch- 
ing to surprise you in fault, and to triumph over your fall. 
Your works, then, should be those of light and charity, 
to the end that the adversary finding nothing to reprove, 
"may be afraid, having no evil to say of you." 

Pastors and people, priests and faithful, you have 
received our last admonitions. Soon we will be gone. We 
bid you adieu— a last farewell: it js that of a friend. The 
last twelve years of our life spent in your service, not 



RIGHT REV. DR. DE LA HAILANDIERE 4!l 

without some self sacrifice, and of which we regret not a 
single day, will, perhaps, prove that we have indeed loved 
you, and that it is impossible that the sentiment should 
«ver be effaced. It is the adieu of a father : — all his 
thoughts, all his wishes, all his actions were for you. Had 
you but known how his heart was filled with tenderness 
for you ! 

But in the moment of departure, can we forget, that 
in spite of our good intentions, we may have given dis- 
pleasure to many; that, perhaps, there are some whom 
we have wronged ? No, we do not forget : on the contrary, 
we ask pardon for it. Forgive us — forgive our frailty. 
Dispense mercy in our behalf, and do not aggravate by 
your refusal, the great account which we shall have to 
render. We pardon every one with our whole heart. 
From the bottom of our souls we offer pardon to all who 
may have any reason for self-reproach in our regard. In 
the silence of the retreat into which we shall enter, we 
will not remember wrongs — we would forget them in 
prayer. Are there any among you who believe themsel- 
ves our debtors, let them pray for us — let them beseech 
a merciful God to pardon the numerous faults of our 
administration ! — and, above all, let their prayers ascend 
when they shall learn that we have descended to the tomb. 

That we may all one day meet again, in the bosom of 
our heavenly Father to bless and love Him forever, is the 
last benediction fervently invoked upon you by your 
Bishop. 

►^ CELESTIN, R. L. 

Bishop of Vincennes. 

Vincennes, July 16, 1847. 
By order of the Bishop : 
E. Audran, Secretary. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



JOHN STEPHEN BAZIN 
Third Bishop of Vincennes 

Bishop John Stephen Bazin, the third Bishop of Vin- 
cennes, who was so warmly commended to the people in 
the admirable pastoral letter of Bishop de la Hailan- 
diere,, lived only six months — from October 24, 1847 to 
April 23, 1848. He was born in France in the year 1796, 
and shortly after his ordination was persuaded to come 
to the United States and labor on the missions in the 
diocese of Mobile. He was Vicar General to Bishop Por- 
tier of that See at the time he was recommended by the 
VI Provincial Council of Baltimore to succeed Bishop de 
la Hailand'iere. 

The state of Catholicity in America at the time of 
Bishop de la Hailandiere's retirement and the accession 
of Bishop John Stephen Bazin as the third Bishop of 
Vincennes is well told in an article written for a Catholic 
paper in the year 1846, from which we cull the following: 

CATHOLICITY IN THE UNITED STATES 
(From the Catholic News-Letter, June, 1846) 

"Among the yet unpublished decrees of the late Coun- 
cil, we learn that it has in contemplation to erect four new 
episcopal sees, to answer the wants of the Church in the 
United States. We have now twenty-one bishoprics, the 
dioceses of several of which are so large as to render the 
duties of a single bishop too onerous, and therefore re- 
quiring the assistance of coadjutors. It is estimated that 
we have 1,300,000 communicants in this country. This is 
the tree which has grown from the germ planted in the 
settlement of Maryland. The first priest ever consecrated 
in America still lives, and still exerts himself in the holy 
cause. It is with generous pride, that when looking 
around him at the present prosperous state of the 
Church, he should take pleasure in signing himself, proto 
sacerdos. Every true Catholic must feel delight at the 
present prosperous state of the Church in this country, 
revealing as it does, that God is pleased to bless the labors 
of his missionaries. The signal success which has attend- 



JOHN STEPHEN BAZIN 



ed it here despite the persecutions, the obstacles, the pre- 
judices it has had to encounter, are attributable only to 
the watchful providence of Almighty God, who has pro- 
mised to be with it even to the consummation of the 
world. From one extreme of the Union to the other, numr 
bers, fatigued with their researches for the truth through 
the labyrinthal mazes of Protestant error, are flocking to 
the one fold of the one shepherd, convinced that in the 
Catholic Church alone can be found the precious jewel 
they have sought, the true faith. Thousands are at this 
moment imitating their noble example, and there is not 
a city, not a town, not a village in the land, that does not 
count within its limits converts to the Catholic faith, 
whilst the defections are indeed few and far between. 
The character, too, of the converts merits attention. It is 
worthy of remark that in this country few persons, if 
any, have ever forsaken the Catholic religion from pure 
motives. They have found its principles and its prac- 
tices too hard, and their departure from the path of truth 
was not owing to a sincere change of religious faith, but 
rather to the fact that Catholicity required too much to be 
submitted to by persons of their violence of passions. 
But in this let no man read an argument; for God has 
said that no man is ever tempted above his strength. 
Whenever such persons abandon the Catholic religion, it 
is sooner or later to give themselves up to excesses. Most 
generally in the commencement of their apostasies they 
are fostered by bigots, in order that by their shameless 
slanders and barefaced falsehoods, they may be used for 
the purpose of throwing odium upon the Catholic Church. 
Yet even with these they do not tarry long, for the relig- 
ious sense of the public, superior to that of these bigots, 
will not permit the morals of the community to be out- 
raged by any such professor of religion, be he converted 
Jew, renegade Catholic, or what not. One or two lectures, 
"for men only," are therefore sufficient to make known 
the character of the lecturers, and that once known, they 
sink below insignificance. How different from these the 
converts to Catholicity! Their obedience to the Church, 
their zeal for the glory of God by the propagation of His 



FRAGMENTS OP OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Holy Faith, and their exemplary piety prove their con- 
trite feelings, their sincerity of purpose. To embrace Ca- 
tholicity frequently demands of them not only a sacrifice 
of pecuniary interests, but also of worldly fame, or per- 
haps exacts a severance of earthly ties and associations; 
yet all these and many other things will they, through an 
overwhelming sense of duty, forego for the true Faith. 
It is not they who crowd around the public lecture stand 
to give their experience of the Protestant faith : they ask 
not the collection of crowds of men only to detail things 
too offensive for women and boys to hear — they write not 
works so obscene as fit only to be committed to the flames 
by the hands of the public hangman. Although some few 
may fail, yet of the mass of them, humility is their char- 
actevistic, seeking to show that by the fruits of their 
Faith may the truth of their Faith be judged." 

The reader will note that much of the time of priests, 
all too few for the work, was consumed in instructing 
converts. Even in that day the country was infested with 
real or pretended apostates, such as Maria Monk, capital- 
izing the bigotry of the people as a means of obtaining 
a dishonorable living. 

NOTRE DAME'S APPEAL IN THE YEAR 1845 

The reader will be much interested in what follows, 
which appeared as an advertisement in a Catholic paper 
in the year 1845, three years after the Holy Cross 
Fathers, through their first representative. Father Sorin, 
established themselves here in 1842. 

Board and Tuition $100.00 a Year, and Nearly 

Eleven Months of School 

University of Notre Dame-du-Lac, South Bend, St. 
Joseph's County, Indiana. Under the direction of the 
Priests of the Holy Cross. 

This institution is now opened for the reception of 
Youth, under the auspices of the Rt. Rev. Bishop of 
Vincennes, who presented to the Priests of the Holy 



NOTRE PAME'S APPEAL IN THE LEAR 1845 53 

Cross, the-beautiful and elegant site upon which the 
buildings are erected. 

Notre dame-du-Lac is at a distance of one mile from 
South Bend, the county seat; 85 miles from Chicago, 
111. , 180 from Detroit, Mich., and 80 from Fort Wayne, 
Indiana. 

The erection of a Seminary here was contemplated 
many years ago ; the location being so eminently adapted 
for the purpose, but it was only within the last year 
that the Bishop was enabled to accomplish this design. 
All the advantages of convenience, attractive scenery, 
pure and invigorating air, and excellent springs, com- 
bine here to form not only a healthy abode, but also an 
agreeable solitude, which facilitates so effectually the 
intellectual improvement of youth. 

The disciplinary government is mild, yet sufficiently 
energetic to preserve that good order so essential in the 
well being of the Institution. The morals and general 
deportment of the pupils will be watched over with 
great assiduity and solicitude, and no pains will be 
spared to prepare them for fulfilling their respective 
duties in society. In their daily recreations, they will 
be always accompanied by a member of the Institution ; 
all books in their possession will be subject to the in- 
spection of the Prefect of Studies; and none will be 
allowed circulation without his consent. Corporal pun- 
ishment will never be inflicted, but more conciliatory 
and effective means of correction will be judiciously 
used ; should a pupil prove refractory, and incorrigible, 
he will be dismissed. 

The faculty will be formed from the Priests of the 
Holy Cross, and the most competent Brothers, one of 
whom will be sent every year to Europe to complete 
arrangements for any additional aid which may be 
found requisite. 

In the reception of pupils, no distinction of creed 
will be made, and the parents of those not professing the 
Catholic Faith, may rest assured that there will be no 
interference with their religious tenets; they will be 
required only to attend to the religious exercises with 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



decorum, this being in conformity with the rules of all 
Catholic Colleges in the United States. 

TERMS— Board, washing, mending and medical 
attendance, with the English Course, embracing all the 
branches of a practical education: Orthography, Read- 
ing, Writing, Arithmetic, Grammar and Composition, to 
which particular attention will be paid. Geography, 
Ancient and Modern History, the most approved method 
of Bookkeeping, Surveying, Mensuration, Mathematics, 
Astronomy, the use of the Globes, Rhetoric, Vocal Music, 
etc., $100 per annum. 

Half Boarders, $40 do. 

Day Scholars in the above course, $20 do. 

The same in the preparatory school, $16 do. 

The classical course with the higher branches of 
education, an additional sum of $20 do. 

The French, German, Spanish and Italian languages 
are taught at an extra charge of $8 do. each. 

Instrumental Music and Drawing, $20 do. each. 

DIRECTIONS FOR PARENTS— Each pupil must 
be provided with bed and bedding, (if furnished by the 
institution, they form an extra charge), six shirts, six 
pairs of stockings, six pocket handkerchiefs, six towels, 
(all of which must be marked), a knife and fork, a table 
and teaspoon, a hat and cap, two suits of clothes, an 
overcoat, a pair of shoes and a pair of boots for winter ; 
three suits and two pairs of shoes for summer. No ad- 
vances will be made by the Institution for clothing or 
other expenses. 

E. SORIN, Superior 
of the Brothers of St. Joseph, 
South Bend, St. Joseph County, Indiana. 

The Institution being incorporated and chartered 
by the legislature of the state, with full powers of Uni- 
versity degrees will be conferred every year immediately 
before the public distribution of premiums. 



The story of Notre Dame will be briefly told in an- 
other place. The Holy Cross Fathers and Brothers have 



NOTRE DAME'S APPEAIi IN THE YEAR 1845 55 

made the entire United States their debtors, but their 
good offices in behalf of religion and education in the dio- 
cese of Fort Wayne are especially appreciated. 



NEW DIOCESES 

In the whole United States in the year 1834 there 
were fewer priests than there are now at work in the 
diocese of Fort Wayne. 

In the year 1837, three new dioceses were formed, 
that of Dubuque, to whose jurisdiction the whole State of 
Iowa was assigned, and which even in the year 1840 had 
only four priests ; that of Natchez, to cover the State of 
Mississippi, which in the year 1840 had only one priest, 
and he was resident not at Natchez, but at Vicksburg; 
and that of Nashville, with the State of Tennessee as its 
territory. This diocese had only two priests in the year 
1840. Concerning the diocese of Nashville we read this 
report, published in 1840 : 

"The stations visited throughout the diocese are, 
Gallatin, Hartsville, Athens, Fayetteville, Memphis, Col- 
umbia, Jackson and Franklin. The Northwestern district 
is visited occasionally by Rev. E. Durbin, of Kentucky; 
and the Catholics m the immediate vicinity of New Mad- 
rid, Mo. are attended by Rev. A. Heim of that place. The 
number of Catholics in Tennessee is between three and 
four hundred, widely scattered over the State, and in 
small groups not exceeding ten in any particular place, 
except in Nashville, where they amount to nearly a hun- 
dred, and on the public works near Athens and Memphis." 

But the rapid growth of the Church in the United 
States between 1840 and 1850 is indicated by the official 
Catholic Almanac report of 1850. At this time the num- 
ber of dioceses had increased from fifteen to thirty-four 
distributed among six Provinces as follows: Baltimore, 
New York, New Orleans, Cincinnati, St. Louis, and Ore- 
gon City. Each of these cities became the seat of an 
Archbishop. Then there were two Vicars Apostolic. The 
detailed table below will interest the reader. 



5B FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAX HISTORY 

SUMMARY OF CATHOLICITY IN THE U. STATES 
AT END OF THE YEAR, 1850. 

Clergy- Catholic 

Dioceses. Churches, men. Population. 

Baltimore, Arch. 70 103 100,000 

Philadelphia 88 93 170,000 

Charleston 17 16 5,000 

Richmond 10 8 7,000 

Pittsburg 67 57 45,000 

Wheeling 4 6 5,000 

Savannah 13 12 5,500 

269 295 337,500 

New York, Arch. 70 109 202,000 

Boston 63 63 

Albany 70 61 80.000 

Buffalo 58 53 70.000 

Hartford 12 14 20,000 

273 298 390,000 

New Orleans, Arch. 64 82 170,000 

Mobile 9 22 11,000 

Natchez 11 n iq^qoo 

Little Rock 7 6 

Galveston 20 18 

111 139 191,000 

Cincinnati, Arch. 75 80 85,000 

Louisville 46 55 35,000 

Detroit 40 30 85,000 

Vmcennes 77 38 50.000 

Cleveland 45 40 30,000 

283 243 285,000 

St. Louis, Arch. 56 91 . 

Dubuque .'. 17 25 8 000 

St. Paul ....:. ' 

Nashville .__.. 6 9 4 000 

Chicago 74 54 ^l^^^ 

Milwaukee .._......._._ 72 54 65,000 

225 ' 233 131.000 



.su.M.\rARv OK CATHOLicrry jx the u. s. in ISSO 57 

Oregon City, Arch. f 

Nesqualy 

Walla Walla - - 

Fort Hall 

Colville 



12 15 



Monterey 30 35 

New Mexico, Ap. Vic. 40 40 

Indian Territory 2 5 

42 45 

34 Dioc— 2 Apos. Vic 1245 1303 1,334,500 

"From the figures in this table and from preceding 
statements, it follows that there were in the United States, 
6 archbishops, 26 bishops, 1303 priests, and 1245 church- 
es distributed among 34 dioceses and 2 apostolic vicar- 
iates. The figures in the above table under the head of 
Catholic population, were obtained from official, and con- 
sequently the most reliable sources. If we suppose the 
Catholic population in the dioceses of St. Louis, Boston, 
Little Rock, Galveston, Oregon Territory, Monterey, and 
the Apostolic Vicariates of New Mexico and the Indian 
Territory, to be 280,000, the total number of Catholics 
in the United States would be 1,614,500." 

IN THE SOUTHWEST 

I have been endeavoring to present to the reader a 
sort of bird's eye view of the Church's status, not only in 
the territory embraced by the diocese of Vincennes, but 
in the whole United States. But lest an erroneous impres- 
sion be left by a statement that the Detroit bishop had 
charge of all the northwest territory, and the bishop of 
St. Louis of all the southwest territory in the year 1840, 
let me say that there were spots in the southwest and 
west which had been evangelized long before the east. 

Everyone of you has heard about the work of the 
Spanish missionaries in the State of New Mexico, which 
belonged to the diocese of Durango, Mexico. 

Santa Fe is the oldest city in the United States, 
though that distinction is usually conceded to St. Augus- 
tine, Florida. It was on old Indian pueblo or village even 
when the Spaniards first visited it in 1542. This region 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



was well known to the Spaniards before Plymouth Rock 
came into the possession of the "Pilgrims". Even Colo- 
rado and Kansas were traversed by missionaries from 
Spain four hundred years ago, or within f irty years after 
America was discovered by Columbus. The city of Santa 
Fe, with only 10,000 population even at this late day, pos- 
sesses a church, a portion of which was built by the 
Franciscans in the year 1582, practically one hundred 
years before Marquette visited Wisconsin and Illinois and 
discovered the Mississippi. The writer visited this church 
a couple of years ago. New Mexico passed from the dom- 
inion of Spain to that of Old Mexico in the year 1822. It 
was not yet United States territory at the time about 
which we write, and its present boundaries were not fixed 
until 1863. 

Then the reader has also heard about the "Missions" 
in and near San Antonio, Texas, and the long chain of 
"Missions" between San Diego and San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. San Antonio was settled by the Spaniards in the 
year 1585, and they built a number of churches which, 
though now partly in ruins, amaze the visitor because of 
their beautiful architecture. The ruined Missions in 
Texas are San Antonio's pride, just as the old Mission 
churches of the Golden State are California's pride. 

The very names given to many important cities of 
the west exhibit their Catholic origin, and tell the story 
of the deep seated religious faith of their aborigines, the 
Indians. San Diego is a Spanish word for St. James; 
Los Angeles, the Spanish name for THE ANGELS ; San 
Francisco, the Spanish name for St. Francis ; San Antonio, 
the Spanish name for St. Anthony ; Santa Fe, the Spanish 
name for "Holy Faith" ; Sacramento means "The Sacra- 
ment." 

In New Mexico a large percentage of the white popu- 
lation is composed of those who are the descendants of 
the Spanish among whom the Padres of the sixteenth 
century worked, and they delight in calling themselves 
Spanish Americans. San Antonio and all of Texas south 
of that city afford a home for hundreds of thousands of 
people who have emigrated from old Mexico. They do 



SUMMARY OF CATHOLICITY IN THE U. S. IN 1850 50 

not call themselves Spanish Americans, and few of their 
number wish to be called Americans. They are slow to 
assimilate and wish to be known as Mexicans. 

It was many years after the diocese of Vincennes 
was established that Texas itself became American pro- 
perty. It had belonged to Mexico, until 1836 ; was an in- 
dependent Republic until 1845, when it was admitted 
into the Union. It seceded in 1861, and came back only in 
1870. It is quite natural that with favorable immigration 
laws, much of Texas should be populated by Mexicans. 



60 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



RT. REV. M. M. de ST. PALAIS 
Fourth Bishop of Vincennes 

On November 15, 1811, was born at La Savetat, near 
Tours, in France, Marie Maurice de St. Palais, destined 
to become one of the brightest ornaments of the Catholic 

America. Of 
ily and an 
house that 
many illus- 
to the church 
the youth 
markable for 
sion of that 
thought and 
purpose 
distinguish- 
of his order 
ality at home 
Thoroughly 
St. Sulpice, 
was ordain- 
ed priest in May, 1836. He cheerfully resigned the com- 
forts and attractions of home, friends, and country for 
the laborious life of a missionary in what was then look- 
ed upon as the backwoods of the United States. 

Under the guidance of the venerable Bishop Brute, 
who two years previously had been appointed to the new 
see of Vincennes, Indiana, and accompanied by twenty- 
one other young ecclesiastics, Father St. Palais reached 
this country and immediately entered upon the perform- 
ance of his duties. His first stations were at Boggs' 
Creek and Mount Pleasant, Ind., where he built two 
churches and collected round them comparatively large 
congregations. He was next removed to Chicago, 111., then 
a mere village, where he erected St. Mary's, afterwards 
used as a cathedral. Again we find him in Indiana, at 
Logansport, which, with its outlying missions and small 
churches and chapels, remained for several years under 
his wise and beneficent jurisdiction. Madison, Ind., a 



episcopacy m 
a noble fam- 
ancient 
had given 
trious men 
and state, 
was early re- 
the posses- 
elevation of 
singleness of 
which have 
ed so many 
and nation- 
and abroad, 
educated at 
Paris, he 




RT. RTSfV. M. M. De ST. PALAIS 



growing and prosperous town, next claimed his attention, 
till, on the accession of Bishop Bazin to the see of Vin- 
cennes (1847), he was called to that city and appointed 
Vicar-General and Superior of the Theological Seminary. 
In both these positions his prudence, energy, and .judg- 
ment were so conspicuous that, upon the untimely death 
of Dr. Bazin, he was nominated administrator of the dio- 
cese, and acted in that capacity till October 3, 1848, when 
he was preconized Bishop of Vincennes. His consecration 
took place in the cathedral, January 14, 1849, the Rt. Rev. 
Bishop Miles of Nashville, Tenn., conducting the august 
ceremony. 

But diligent and laborious as was his life as a priest, 
his career as a prelate far surpassed it in zeal, devotion, 
and personal sacrifices. Though circumscribed in its 
limits by the creation of other dioceses, that of Vincennes 
still presented a large field for missionary enterprise, 
and Bishop St. Palais cultivated it to the utmost from 
the day of his consecration to almost the very last hour 
of his life. Scattered little groups and single Catholic 
families were collected into orderly and comprict congre- 
gations; new missions were founded in the m:ct remote 
places, and old ones became well-defined parishes ; 
churches sprang up rapidly, and priests from every quar- 
ter were found to occupy them. Nor were the wants of 
the ignorant, the poor, and the afflicted neglected. Be- 
sides the diocesan seminary and the Monastery of St. 
Benedict at St. Meinrad, academies for girls were opened 
at St. Mary's of the Woods, Vincennes, Terre Haute, Ind- 
ianapolis, Washington, Evansville, and Oldenburg, while 
parochial schools were attached to every church and near- 
ly every station in the diocese. The Little Sisters of the 
Poor, the Sisters of Charity, and Sisters of the Good 
Shepherd were introduced and encouraged, two hospitals 
were opened, and two splendid orphan asylums built — 
one of the latter costing |30,000, erected entirely out of 
the good bishop's private means. 

It was while thus engaged in the arduous duties of 
his sacred calling at St. Mary's of the Woods, near Terre 
Haute, that the gifted Bishop of Vincennes was stricken 



62 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

down, June 28, 1877. His predecessor. Bishop Brute, died 
on the same day, forty-eight years before. Bishop Dwen- 
ger, in his funeral sermon, said: 

"On the morning of the day he looked forward to as 
bringing him to his dear St. Rose, in this city, he fell upon 
the ground in fatal illness. His feeble voice could but call 
to his friend, the Rev. Father Shasse, to help him and 
bear him to a couch. When there he signed to those who 
stood about that he desired the last sacrament. Father 
Benoit, Vicar-General of the diocese of Fort Wayne, one 
of the two last living of the band of heroes who came with 
the sainted Brute, administered to him the comforting 
sacrament. Calmly, peacefully, in the midst of his loving 
daughters in the Church, who ceased not their prayers, 
he fell away, filled with visions perhaps like those that 
came to Moses. Back of him lay the dark Egyptian servi- 
tude of his forty-one years of missionary life ; before him 
the glorious promised land opened its pearly gates. Ah! 
the mitre may sometimes appear a glittering jewel, but 
it is also at times a crown of thorns. Who can say what 
a fearful thing it is to answer at the great bar for a whole 
diocese ? The golden cross of the bishop may be beautiful 
and bright, but it is, too, a heavy burden upon the heart." 

On July 3 the last solemn ceremonies were perform- 
ed over the remains of the lamented prelate and his body 
was laid to rest under the high altar of the Cathedral of 
Vincennes, where for more than twenty-eight years he 
had offered up his prayers for the welfare of his spirit- 
ual children and the good of the Church in America. 



FORT WAYNE IS ESTABLISHED 



PART 11 

Fort Wayne See Established 

The first Provincial Council of Cincinnati was held 
in the year 1855 and was attended by the six suffragan 
Bishops. At the very opening session the Bishop of Vin- 
cennes made ^ a plea for 

cese, which ^^^^^^-"=^^^^1 B constituted 

the whole ^^^^ ^^^^B ^*^*^ °^ ^^^~ 

iana. He told ^M^ \^^B ^^^ brothers 

in the Epis- ^M I^^H copate of the 

ever increas- -^E ^, ^^^B ^^^ number 

ern part of m ^^1 *^^ State be- 

gration from i^^fe^^!***^ ^^B Europe. He 

thought that -.mx)^ ^^^^^^^^R^*^ ^^^ number 
of Catholics ^^^^m^^^^i -^ - ■ "^^^^ ^^ ^^- 

dianapolis f ^ff'^^S^L^^ '^'> '- ^'M numbered 

about 40,- ^ I'S^^^^K^-^M^' ^^^- "^^®" 

interrogated ^ '■ — '—^ — ^ — ^-^ about the 

place which should be named as the See City he thought 
that it should be Fort Wayne, while it might be Lafayette. 
He reported that Fort Wayne had two churches and that 
there were several towns close to that city which had 
regularly constituted parishes. 

The third Decree passed by that Provincial Council 
read as follows : 

"The Bishops believe that the time is ripe to suppli- 
cate the Holy See to constitute a new diocese at Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, by dividing the diocese of Vincennes at 
the county lines of Fountain, Montgomery, Boone, Hamil- 
ton, Madison, Delaware, Randolph and Warren, all of 
which counties were to be included in the new diocese." 



04 KRAGMEXT S OF O UR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Chapter I 

JOHN HENRY LUERS 

John Henry Luers, at that time pastor of St. Joseph's 
parish, Cincinnati, participated in the deliberations of the 
Council as a theologian to the Archbishop. He little 
dreamed when he heard it recommended that Fort Wayne 
be made a diocese, that he himself would be its first in- 
cumbent. 

John Luers was born in Westphalia, Germany, on 
September 29, 1819, whence he emigrated with his par- 
ents in the year 1833 to the United States. The little 
family settled on a farm near Piqua, Ohio, and the 14 
year old boy procured work at a store in the town. Divine 
Providence brought Archbishop Purcell and John Luers 
together when the Archbishop came to administer Con- 
firmation at the Piqua church a few years after the ar- 
rival of the Luers family from Germany. The Archbishop 
sent young Luers to St. Francis Xavier Seminary, near 
Cincinnati, where he pursued his studies most earnestly 
and cultivated the piety which characterized his later life. 

He was ordained to the priesthood in November, 
1846, at the age of twenty-seven, and was given charge of 
St. Joseph's parish, in the city of Cincinnati. A church 
under construction at the time of his appointment was 
completed by him, and after the debt was entirely paid, a 
new school was built by him. The extent to which the 
people of St. Joseph's parish became attached to Father 
Luers, the extent to which his labors were appreciated, 
was made clear at the time of his appointment to the 
Bishopric of Fort Wayne, within two years after the Pro- 
vincial Council of Cincinnati appealed to Rome for the 
division of the diocese of Vincennes. When the news was 
communicated to his parishioners, there was general 
weeping, and before the date of consecration was set the 
people had bought him many useful presents for use in 
the episcopal office. 

The Archbishop who ordained Father Luers was also 
his consecrator on January 10th, 1855. He was assisted 



JOHN HENRY LUERS 



by the Bishops of Vincennes and Covington, Kentucky. 
The sermon on the occasion was preached by the Bishop 
of Bardstown, Kentucky, the Right Rev. Martin J. Spald- 
ing. A few days later he left for Fort Wayne, alone and 
unannounced, and knocked for admission at the door of 
the residence of the Very Rev. Julian Benoit. The church 
which he selected as his Cathedral was a small frame 
structure ready to fall down, and his episcopal residence 
was the parish house of Father Benoit. He appointed this 
good French priest his Vicar General, while he became 
the missionary Bishop. The greater part of the year he 
was out over the diocese, sharing in the hardships of the 
priests of those days. 

The year following Bishop Luers' consecration the 
Second Provincial Council of Cincinnati was convened 
and the Archbishop's theologian of the first Council now 
sat as one of his suffragans. In the Fifth Decree of this 
Council we read : "On motion of the Bishops of Vincennes 
and Fort Wayne, in whose dioceses there exist only four 
Feasts of Obligation, it was voted that the Holy See be ap- 
pealed to for authorization to add four more feasts in con- 
formity wih the universal practice, namely, those of the 
Circumcision, of the Epiphany, of Corpus Christi, and of 
the Annunciation." 

The Bishop visited Rome in 1864, and en route stop- 
ped at Louvain in quest of candidates for the priesthood 
in his diocese. There were four volunteers and among 
them John H. Oechtering and Bernard Wiedau, both of 
whom labored in the diocese for nearly sixty years, under 
the five Bishops who have filled the See of Fort Wayne. 

Bishop Luers participated in the Second Plenary 
Council of Baltimore in 1864, but was excused from at- 
tending the Oecumenical Council of the Vatican in 1870 
in order that he might render service to half a dozen 
Bishops who did attend that Council. He was away from 
home at the time of his death, doing a favor for the Bis- 
hop of Cleveland. He died in Cleveland on June 29, 1871, 
after administering some of the Holy Orders to several 
seminarians. He was stricken with apoplexy and died 
within twenty minutes after receiving the last rites of 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



the Church. His funeral took place at Fort Wayne on 
July 4th, 1871, at which Archbishop Purcell, of Cincin- 
nati presided and preached the sermon. His remains 
were placed in the crypt under the sanctuary of the 
Cathedral. 

When the Bishop of Vincennes petitioned Rome for 
the creation of a diocese to cover the northern half of the 
State of Indiana, he thought that the territory housed 
about 40,000 Catholics. That he greatly overestimated 
the number is clear from the CATHOLIC DIRECTORY 
for the year 1858, from which we note that there were 
in the newly formed diocese only 26 churches ; 20 priests, 
including both secular and regular; two Religious Com- 
munities of men and two of women; there existed only 
six parochial schools, conducted by the Sisters of the Holy 
Cross and the Sisters of Providence ; there was one college 
and one academy, and the Catholic population was esti- 
mated at 25,000. 

At the close of the Second Provincial Council of Cin- 
cinnati held in the year 1858, or during the very year in 
which Bishop Luers was consecrated, a joint Pastoral of 
the Bishops of the Province was issued, which contains 
much excellent advice for the people so thinly scattered 
over five now very populous states. The Pastoral letter 
was addressed to both clergy and laity. Introductory to 
the remarks to the clergy, they wrote : 

"Venerable Brethren of the Clergy; Beloved Breth- 
ren of the Laity : 

"Assembled for the second time in Provincial Coun- 
cil, in accordance with the established discipline of the 
Holy Catholic Church, promulgated in the last General 
Council of Trent, we cannot separate and return to our 
respective Dioceses, without first addressing to you some 
words of fraternal advice and encouragement. We dis- 
charge this duty of our pastoral office the more cheer- 
fully, as We are so fully and intimately convinced of your 
faith, of your ardent Catholic zeal, and of your enlighten- 
ed obedience to the voice of your chief Pastors, 'who 
watch over you as about to render an account for your 



JOHN HENRY LUBRS 



souls.' Wherefore, as becometh brethren, We shall ad- 
dress you in plain, frank, and practical words, on the 
great duties which are incumbent alike on Pastors and 
People. We shall conceal nothing, but lay Our whole 
thoughts and counsel bare before you." 

Their appeal to the laity was as follows: 

"To you, dearly beloved Brethren of the Laity, we 
now willingly direct our words of exhortation. You are 
our glory and joy ! You are living members of Christ's 
mystical Body on earth, the Church, which He so dearly 
loved, and for which He cheerfully delivered Himself up, 
that 'He might sanctity it, cleansing it in the laver of 
water in the word of life; that He might present it to 
Himself a glorious Church, not having spot or wrinkle, 
or any such thing, but that it should be holy and without 
blemish.' This Church, His own ever young and ever 
blooming Spouse, is subject to Him in all things; and so 
should you be subject to the voice of your Pastors, whom 
you are commanded to hear as you would hear the voice 
of Christ Himself. For He has said: 'He that heareth 
you, heareth Me, and he that despiseth you, despiseth Me.' 
For you, then. Beloved Brethren, however unworthy we 
may be, our voice is but the echo of the voice of God ; for 
Christ solemnly says: 'He that heareth not the Church, 
let him be to you as a heathen and a publican.' 

"Your duties are manifold: We will briefly refer to 
some of the most obvious and important . 

"1. Ditties towards the Church. You should feel 
an earnest sympathy with whatever is calculated to pro- 
mote the interests and advance the prosperity of the 
Church. Your zeal for this noble object should be com- 
mensurate with that of your devoted clergy. Your in- 
terests are identified with theirs ; for they both have the 
same elevated objects, as well as the same powerful mo- 
tives of action. Whatever is for the increase of God's 
Church; whatever will aid in the extension of our holy 
faith , whatever will contribute to the beautifying of God's 
visible temples or churches; whatever will tend to the 



68 FRAGMENTS OF OUIt DIOCESAN HISTORY 

dissipation of error and the defense of truth ; whatever, 
in one word, will assist the Church in her world-wide 
struggle with error and vice to the end of time — all this 
should claim your zealous and generous co-operation. 

"For the building up and suitable adornment of 
churchies, wherein you and your children and your chil- 
dren's children may reverently assist at the Holy Sacri- 
fice of the New Law; for the erection of school-houses, 
wherein your children may receive a sound Christian edu- 
cation, under the sanction of the Church and under the 
shadow of her holy sanctuary ; for the founding of orphan 
asylums for children of both sexes ; for the establishment 
and support of Seminaries, wherein pious youths — your 
own beloved children — may be reared up in solid virtue 
and learning, to become priests and to minister worthily 
at God's altars for your spiritual benefit; all these excel- 
lent and necessary objects call for your substantial aid 
and co-operation ; which, it greatly consoles us to be able 
to testify, have not been withheld in times past ; and 
which relying on your well known faith, zeal, and liberal- 
ity, we feel quite assured, will not only not be withdrawn, 
but will go on continually increasing in the future. You 
could not possibly contribute to more useful or more noble 
objects than these. God, who is never outdone in gener- 
osity, and whose riches are infinite, will repay you a 
hundredfold for whatever you may bestow of your 
worldly goods for these excellent purposes, which are at 
the same time so useful to you, and so very dear to him. 

"We cannot surely carry our money with us to the 
next world; and it is infinitely better for our welfare, 
both temporal and eternal, that we spend a goodly por- 
tion of it while on earth for the promotion of pious and 
charitable enterprises. Then will it profit us unto an in- 
crease of grace here, and unto life everlasting hereafter. 
For, 'What doth it profit a man, if he gain the whole 
world, and lose his own soul?' When we will come to die, 
beloved Brethren, what good will all our money do us? 
To whom shall we leave it, and whose shall our posses- 
sions be? Will our children be always really and per- 
manently benefited by the riches we will leave them ? Will 



JOHN HENRY LUERS 61) 

they not often squander as recklessly as it has been care- 
fully amassed? Better send on a goodly portion of it be- 
fore us to be laid up in the treasury of heaven, where 
neither moth nor rust can consume, where thieves break 
not in and steal; and where it will await our coming up 
from this valley of tears into the eternal tabernacles. 

"So it was, beloved Brethren, that our pious fathers 
in the faith acted during their mortal pilgrimage; and 
their works have followed them, and their children rise 
up and call them blessed. Who erected the splendid 
cathedrals, the noble monasteries, the magnificent colleges 
and universities, the munificent hospitals and orphan asy- 
lums, which are scattered over Europe, and many of 
which, even in the ruins which the rapacious vandalic 
heresies of the sixteenth century have left of them, are 
still stately and sublime? Who but our generous and 
noble hearted Catholic ancestors, who preferred the wor- 
ship of God to that of Mammon, and who accordingly 
lavished their earthly wealth without stint or measure 
for the purposes of learning, charity and religion? From 
those solemn monuments of their zeal and truly Catholic 
liberality, they silently, but eloquently, call on their chil- 
dren living in this degenerate age of Mammonism to im- 
itate their truly munificent example. Shall they call in 
vain?" 

"2. Supporting our religious press. This is an- 
other important duty of the laity. Here, too, we may be 
stimulated to exertion by the example of our separated 
brethren, who in general liberally support their own var- 
ious sectarian papers and periodicals. The apathy and 
indifference of Catholics in this respect is, indeed, as la- 
mentable as it is inexplicable. Why is it, we ask, that 
nearly all of our religious papers are permitted to lan- 
guish for want of support? Is the truth less calculated 
to stimulate its advocates to exertion than is error ? Are 
Caholics willing to permit misrepresentation and calumny 
against themselves to go forth to the world uncorrected, 
unrebuked? Is the poison to be freely circulated without 
the antidote? Forbid it love of truth; forbid it zeal for 
God's holy Church ! 



70 FRAGilEXTS OF OUR DIOCESAX HISTORY 

"We entreat you then, beloved Brethren, to awake 
from your lethargy in this respect, and to extend a willing 
and generous support to those papers and periodicals 
which are published, with the approval of your chief pas- 
tors, for the explanation and defense of our holy Faith; 
especially for those which are published in your own 
Province or Diocese. As the Holy Father, Pius IX, says : 
'Providence seems to have given in our days a great mis- 
sion to the Catholic press. It is for it to preserve the 
principles of order and of faith where they still prevail, 
and to propagate them where impiety and cold indiffer- 
ence have caused them to be forgotten." 

"Listening to the voice of the Pontiff, suffer not so 
powerful a weapon as in our times and country is the 
press to be wielded exclusively by your adversaries. Let 
your zeal for the propagation of the truth outstrip theirs 
for the extension of error. Give to your childern whole- 
some reading, in approved Catholic books, papers, and 
periodicals, instead of the dangerous or rather positively 
noxious reading which an unscrupulous press is scatter- 
ing over the world. Alas ! The press now-a-days is but 
too often the vehicle of error and immorality, which, like 
a turbid torrent, is sweeping over the land ! Will you do 
nothing to stem its violence ? Will you sordidly prefer the 
trifling sum which a good Catholic paper would annually 
cost, to the noble consciousness of having done your duty, 
by encouraging the spread of truth? We cannot suppose 
it for a moment. Our knowledge of your faith and zeal 
forbids the thought. Let every Catholic family in the 
land, which is at all able, and nearly all are able, take a 
sound Catholic paper or periodical, and carefully pre- 
serve it on file for the reading of their children. 

"3. Rearing children. Dearly beloved Brethren, 
we exhort you to bestow special attention on the pious 
training and religious education of your children. God 
hath given them to you, and He will require their souls at 
your hands. If any one of those little ones, for whom 
Jesus died, perish through your negligence, bad example 
or other faults, you will have to answer for their souls at 
the judgment-seat of God ! It were better for you that a 



JOHN HENRY LUBRS 71 



mill-stone should be placed around your neck, and that 
you should be cast into the sea, than that one of these 
little ones should perish through your culpable neglect of 
so sacred a duty. Begin their training at a very early 
age, when their minds are yet tender and susceptible of 
good impressions; teach them diligently their prayers 
and their catechism, not merely on Sundays, but on every 
day, until they will become well instructed in their re- 
ligion ; see that they go regularly to church, and go along 
with them yourselves, in order the more effectually to 
secure their attendance; keep them out of bad company, 
for evil communications corrupt good morals; give them 
good example in word and in deed, for children are very 
observant of the conduct of their parents, and are much 
more easily influenced by example than by words; edu- 
cate them and furnish them with good and wholesome 
reading; watch carefully over their morals, especially 
when they will be near the age of puberty ; take particu- 
lar pains to direct them wisely in the choice of a state of 
life, upon which their future so much depends; and if 
they desire to embrace the married state, see in time that 
they choose wisely and in accordance with the laws of the 
holy Catholic Church, that they be not too strongly tempt- 
ed to marry those who are not of the true faith, or those 
who are within the prohibited degree of kindred; in one 
word, remember how very responsible is the position of 
a parent, and take care to discharge faithfully the mani- 
fold duties necessarily growing out of that relation. 

"Unhappy marriages, and those not sanctioned by 
the church, which are generally such, are becoming, alas ! 
too frequent among us, and the blame lies chiefly at the 
door of parents, who neglect the early education of their 
children, and then often find out, when it is too late, that 
the latter have become ungovernable, and that, instead of 
being consolation to their parents, they are likely to bring 
their grey hairs to sorrow down to the grave ! In nine 
cases out of ten, these misfortunes result from the culp- 
able neglect of parents. Sad and numerous are the de- 
fections from the Church, caused by this fatal omission 
of duty by fathers and mothers. Christian parents ! we 



72 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCEBAX HISTORY ___^ 

exhort you in the words of St. Paul: 'Provoke not your 
children to wrath, but bring them up in the discipline 
and correction of the Lord.' This is your most sacred and 
most important duty, without complying with which it 
will be very difficult, if not wholly impossible, for you to 
be saved yourself. 

"4. Giving no Scandal. Beware, dearly beloved 
Brethren of the sin of scandal. Be not, by your bad ex- 
ample, a stumbling block in the way of those who are un- 
happily outside of the Church. Give no offense to any 
man, that our ministry be not despised. Provide good 
things, not only in the sight of God, but in the sight of 
all men. Let your light so shine before men, that seeing 
your good works, they may glorify your Father Who is 
in heaven. 

"5. Temperance. Beware, above all things, of that 
degrading and shameful vice of intemperance, which in 
our own times and country has brought so much reproach 
on the Church of Christ. Remember that St. Paul reck- 
ons drunkenness with those sins of the flesh, with fornic- 
ation, idolatry, sects, and murder, which exclude the 
guilty from heaven, and say of all of them alike: 'Of 
which I foretell you, as I have foretold you, that they who 
do such things, shall not obtain the kingdom of God.' Re- 
member the awful day of judgment, when God will ren- 
der to every man according to the works done in the flesh ; 
and 'take heed to yourselves, lest perhaps your hearts be 
overcharged with surfeiting and drunkenness, and that 
day come upon you suddenly.' " 

DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE IN 1858 

At the time of the appointment of the first Bishop to 
the new See of Fort Wayne there were resident priests at 
only eleven places in the diocese, noted below by the fig- 
ures in front of towns. There were twenty-six churches, 
nearly all frame structures, and the total number of 
priests in the diocese was twenty. The Congregation of 
the Holy Cross and the Congregation of the Precious 
Blood ministered to Catholics in several places, and the 



UIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE IN 1858 



only two Religious Orders of women in the diocese were 
those of the Sisters of Holy Cross and of the Sisters of 
Providence, who taught in five parochial schools. The 
Orphan Asylum for Boys was located at Notre Dame, 
and was in charge of the Brothers of the Holy Cross. The 
Orphan Asylum for Girls was at South Bend and the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross were in charge. There was not 
a single hospital in the diocese. The Catholic population 
was estimated at 25,000. 

In the United States at large there were seven Arch- 
bishops and thirty-three Bishops in the year 1858, and 
the Catholic population was approximately 2,000,000. It 
will be remembered that Fort Wayne and South Bend had 
resident priests when there were only eleven dioceses in 
the United States, and when the total population fell 
short of 500,000. 

The summary report on the diocese of Fort Wayne 
at the end of the year 1858, or after one year of the ad- 
ministration of Right Reverend John Henry Luers, is 
herewith reproduced. 

( 1 ) Fort Wayne — Cathedral of St. Augustine, Bishop 
Luers and Rev. Julian Benoit, Pastor. 
Mother of God (German), brick church, Rev. 
Joseph Weutz. 

Attica — visited from Crawfordsville, no church. 

Avilla — attended from Ft. Wayne, frame church. 

r 2 ) Besancon — Rev. N. Deschamps, frame church. 
Columbia — attended from Fort Wayne. 
Covington — attended from Crawfordsville, no 
church. 

( 3 ) Crawfordsville — Rev. Ed. O'Flaherty, frame 

church. 
Decatur — attended by Fathers of the Precious 

Blood, frame church. 
Delphi — attended from Lafayette. 
Goshen — attended from Notre Dame, no church. 
Hessen Cassel — attended from Fort Wayne, frame 

church. 

/ 4 , Huntington — Rev. Father Schippert. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



( 5 ) Lafayette — Rev. Daniel Maloney, brick church, 
German church, attended from St. Mary's. 

( 6 ) Laporte — Rev. E. Kilroy, C. S. C, brick church. 

( 7 ) Lagro — Rev. John Ryan, frame church. 

( 8 ) Logansport — Rev. C. Zucke, stone church. 

( 9 ) Michigan City— Rev. Paul Gillan, C. S. C, frame 
church. 

(10) Mishavi'aka— Rev. John B. Mager, C. S. C. 
New France — attended from Besancon. 

(11) Notre Dame du Lac— Very Rev. Ed. Sorin, C.S.C, 

brick church. 
Peru — attended from Logansport, frame church. 
Plymouth — visited from Laporte, no church. 
South Bend — attended from Notre Dame, brick 

church. 
St. John's — attended from Mishawaka. 
Winamac — attended from Logansport, log church. 
Warsaw — attended from Lagro, no church. 

STATISTICAL REPORT COVERING YEAR 1S58. 

Churches, 26. 

Priests, 20. 

Religious Congregations of Men, 2. 

Religious Congregations of Women, 2. 

Parochial Schools, 5. 

Only a few of Bishop Luers' pastoral letters and im- 
portant papers have been preserved, and we take occasion 
to perpetuate them by including them in this volume. 

BISHOP LUERS PRAISES THE AVE MARIA, THEN 
USED AS HIS OFFICIAL ORGAN. 

Fort Wayne, February 2, 1866. 
Very Rev. and Dear Sir : 

Please accept my sincere thanks for the First Volume 
of the AVE MARIA, which you have had the kindness 
to ssnd me. The exterior shape is neat, but the lovely 
contents of its pages remind me of the words written of 
her, to whom the work is dedicated : "All the glory of the 
king's daughter is within." Ps. xliv, 14. You are ple:ised 



BISHOP LUERS PRAISES THE AVE MARIA To 

to say that if in it there is any merit, you willingly refer 
it to me ; since without my encouragement and approba- 
tion, the publication would never have been undertaken. 
I confess that from the first I have been delighted with 
the plan, and I have been your constant well-wisher in the 
pious, yet bold undertaking. Its signal success, I 
acknowledge, has surpassed my most sanguine expecta- 
tion. Without intending to detract in the least from the 
efficacy of your labors, I cannot but recognize in it an 
especial protection of our heavenly Mother. 

I rejoice from my heart that a publication, which 
promises so much good, should have originated in my 
Diocese. From its first appearance I have watched the 
growth and extension of the AVE MARIA with an in- 
creased interest, and now since so many of my venerable 
colleagues join in its praise and recommendation, I take 
an especial pleasure in bidding you to go on with more 
confidence than ever. 

But whilst I rejoice at seeing your pious messenger 
spreading the knowledge and praise of our glorious 
Mother over the land, I would be wanting in duty, if I did 
not do all in my power to see it circulated in my own Dio- 
cese, as widely as possible. My greatest happiness is to 
see religion flourish within it, and I have no greater de- 
sire than to encourage whatever tends to secure this all 
important result. 

Since you will no doubt publish this letter, permit me 
to say to the clergy of the Diocese that I request them to 
urge upon their respective flocks the importance of in- 
creasing still more the circulation of your pious and ex- 
cellent AVE MARIA. Every Catholic family which is at 
all able — and nearly all are able — should take a copy ; and 
and I shall make it my especial duty in ray visits to in- 
quire what steps have been taken and efforts raade in this 
respect. I shall do this the more, not only on account of 
the salutary reading matter which it contains, but also 
because / intend to make it the /primary channel for pub- 
lishing the official communications, -which I may deem 
proper to make from time to time to those committed to 
my care, and for whom I shall have to answer at the great 



FRAGMENTS OP OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



day. I likewise understand that, without changing the 
nature and design of the publication, original communica- 
tions and articles taken from the best Catholic sources, 
treating of the current religious and social questions of 
the day, will be admitted into its pages, besides also choice 
reading for the young, which will materially enhance the 
general usefulness and value of the work. 

This is a reading age. Read men will, especially the 
rising generation, and read they should. Therefore all 
depends upon what they read. Formerly it was otherwise, 
but now it is no longer optional with us whether we will 
or will not supply them with proper material. It has be- 
come a positive duty, and that a true Christian one, to 
multiply good publications, and to send them into every 
family. The current literature is for the most part pagan ; 
it will not, on that account, do for the Christian fireside. 

"One of the indispensable requirements of success- 
ful journaHsm," says the CATHOLIC MIRROR, "is to fill 
columns with news, no matter whether true or false, no 
matter whether decent or proper, or disgusting or ob- 
scene. Stories which pander to the most corrupt imagin- 
ation (and it might be added, advertisements of the most 
flagitious kind) are constantly spread before an immense 
circle of readers in the sensational periodicals, while the 
rogue and the profligate are raised into heroes, while the 
fashionable spendthrift and the lascivious libertine are 
lauded by venal chroniclers, while tales of seduction and 
conjugal infidelity flood the whole country, and the ex- 
ploits of thieves, murderers, rowdies and prize-fighters 
aif ord the fruitful theme of more than half the literature 
of the country. Morality is at a low ebb where such pub- 
lications receive encouragement." 

Nothing can be more calculated to debauch youth 
than such literary productions, for they place a smiling 
and a beauteous mask over the hideous features of vice 
and crime; they serve to delude the reason, whilst they 
excite the passions, and there is no doubt that in reading 
such publications the first seeds of future riiin are sown 
in many a fresh and pure mind. It is high time that we 
should attend to this. We sadly need an antidote to coun- 



BISHOP LUBRS PRAISES THE AVE MARIA 



teract the poison which is in constant and active circula- 
tion among us. This can be done by substituting proper 
reading matter in its place. Why should we hesitate, why 
be indifferent or slow in this respect, since the declared 
will of the Church of supporting our religious press is so 
well known to us? "The supporting of our religious 
press," says the Second Provincial Council of Cincinnati, 
"is another important duty of the Laity. We entreat you, 
beloved brethren, to extend a willing and generous sup- 
port to those papers, which are published with the ap- 
proval of your Chief Pastors for the explanation and de- 
fense of our Holy Faith, especially for those which are 
published in your own Province or Diocese. As the Holy 
Father, Pius IX, says : 'Providence seems to have given 
in our days a great mission to the Catholic Press. It is 
for it to preserve the principles of order and of faith 
where they still prevail, and to propagate them where im- 
piety and cold indifference have caused them to be for- 
gotten.' Listen to the voice of the Pontiff; suffer not so 
powerful a weapon, as in our times and country, is the 
press to be wielded exclusively by your adversaries. Let 
your zeal for the propagation of the truth outstrip theirs 
for the extension of error. Give to your children whole- 
some reading in approved Catholic books, papers and per- 
iodicals, instead of the dangerous or rather positively 
noxious reading which an unscrupulous press is scatter- 
ing over the world. Alas ! the press now-a-days is but too 
often the vehicle of error and immorality, which, like a 
turbid torrent, is sweeping over the land! Will you do 
nothing to stem its violence? Will you sordidly prefer the 
trifling sum which a good Catholic paper would annually 
cost, to the noble consciousness of having done your duty, 
by encouraging the spread of truth? We cannot suppose 
it for a moment. Our knowledge of your faith and zeal 
forbids the thought. Let every Catholic family then in the 
land, which is at all able, take a sound Catholic paper or 
periodical and carefully preserve it on file for the reading 
of their children." Pastoral Letter, pages 16 and 17. 

But what better reading can our people have than 
is contained in the "AVE MARIA"? Its articles are pure- 



V8 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

ly religious, and of the choicest kind. It does not clash 
with our Catholic Journals, and its terms are sufficiently- 
low to be within the reach of every one. I expect, there- 
fore, to see it in every family without delay. It will afford 
them abundant instruction and edification, and it will be 
at the same time not only an evident sign of Christian 
life, but also of that ardent devotion with which every 
Catholic should be animated toward her, who crushed the 
serpent's head, and who, after Jesus, her divine Son, 
should be our dearest hope and the object of our most 
affectionate love. 

Yours truly in Christ, 

•i" John Henry Luers, 

Bishop of Fort Wayne. 



BISHOP LUERS, MARCH, 1866, APPEALS FOR 
BETTER SEMINARY SUPPORT 

The storm of civil war has subsided, and peace rides 
triumphant throughout the land, taking up its abode in 
the spots which but very recently were the scenes of 
bloody battles. 

Many fathers, mothers, brothers, and sisters, clad in 
the garb 6f sorrow, and shedding scalding tears of grief, 
now bow down before the altars of God and utter a fer- 
vent prayer for the soul of the beloved son or brother, 
who has fallen in the din of battle, and ever and again 
do we hear the questions: "Did he make his confession"? 
"Was the priest with him?" And if, on the return of a 
surviving comrade, information is given that the son, 
the husband, or the brother was fortified with the last 
Sacraments, before his death, the relatives burst forth 
into a "God be praised," the weighty stone of anxiety is 
rolled back from the heart, and tears give expression to 
the love felt for the deceased! At our birth, the priest 
meets us at the porch of the holy Church, and receives us 
into the communion of the children of God ; and when we 
have finished our course and are about to leave this world. 



BISHOP LUERS APPEALS FOR SEMINARY SUPPORT 71) 

it is again the priest, who stretches out his hands over us, 
blesses us in the name of Jesus, the Crucified, and pro- 
vides us with the Viaticum, as a safe-guard to eternity. 
The priest alone can, in the name of the Savior, deprive 
death of all its horrors. And when contagious disease 
has driven all from the bedside of the afflicted, there still 
remains a faithful friend, and this friend is the priest. 

Although the priest is the dearest friend of human- 
ity, his office and his person are frequently misunder- 
stood, and, like his Divine Master, he meets with hatred 
and contempt, instead of love and respect. Yea, many go 
so far as to clothe themselves in the garb of false and 
hypocritical piety, and make it the aim of their lives, to 
traduce and torment the priest! Let us measure these 
persecutors and tormenters by a just standard, and we 
shall find that in them the spirit of Christianity is choked 
by the thorns of sensuality, revenge, avarice and pride. 
The pious Christian, the true Catholic, does not storm 
against the Church and the priests of the Church ; no, the 
light of truth is painful only to the spiritual eyes of him 
who is blinded, just as the bright sun oppresses the weak 
eyes of the body. Those who cry out against priests, are 
men who know little of religion, men who have made no 
progress in it, and who have uprooted the great com- 
mandment of charity, and planted hatred in its place. 
Persecution comes less frequently from the heterodox 
than from so-called Catholics. And the reason is simply 
this: When the unclean spirit has been expelled by the 
priest in the holy Sacraments of Baptism and Penance, 
and man allows him to return by falling into evil courses, 
the evil one returns with seven other spirits worse than 
himself, and then the storm bursts forth with renewed 
fury against the minister of God. 

Many young minds are thereby turned from the 
prie.sthood, and many a heart is thus destroyed by the 
language of such agents of the wicked one. Oh! these de- 
stroyers know not how far their influence extends ; they 
know not to how many souls it brings ruin. They snatch 
many a talented young man from the holy vocation of the 
priesthood, many a young man piously drawn to the altar 



80 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCBSAX HISTORY 

of God, they ruthlessly drag away, and prevent the in- 
crease of the number of our Lord's workmen ! 

Parents ! note the warning : Have a care of your 
children, for they are your own flesh and blood. Be vigil- 
ant against these corrupters ; keep your children far from 
them, and educate them in the fear of God and piety. The 
priests come forth from among you. You desire good 
pastors of souls, and you are right. This desire you can 
gratify; it is in your own hands. Educate your children 
well, and above all things teach thern to serve God. Make 
them pray daily, and pray with them. Send them to Cath- 
olic schools, cultivate religion in them and watch over 
them, as the angel kept vigil over Daniel in the lion's den. 
Go to church, particularly on the ember-days, on which 
ministers are consecrated to God ; take your children with 
you, and in fasting and prayer, join with the faithful in 
imploring holy laborers for the vineyard of the Lord. In 
this country everything is in its infancy, and the Church 
is still only rising. There are, consequently, thousands of 
sects to be contended with, and here even more th.an in 
Europe is the highly instructed clergyman in requisition. 
In order to educate such priests, there is only one source 
of assistance to fall back upon — the liberality of our be- 
loved diocesans. When our property is taxed we pay 
readily, and it is just that we should do so ; but when God 
calls upon us for contributions wherewith to maintain and 
educate His priests, we have a repetition of the scene of 
the three wise men : "Herod, hearing this, was troubled, 
and all Jerusalem with him." Instead of rejoicing at the 
birth of the Savior they are troubled, and many likewise 
tremble when urged to aid in the forming of young 
levites. 

Many murmur when there is question of collections, 
and think that they have already given almost too much, 
althoiigh God daily confers new favors on them, that they, 
in turn, may have the means wherewith to be liberal. But 
this is a temptation of Satan, who never fails to seek to 
undermine the Kingdom of God by avarice. Come for- 
ward, banish the evil spirit, and give generously. God's 
hand is ever open: learn liberality from your Heavenly. 



P.ISHOP LUERS APPEALS FOR SEMINARY SUPPORT til 

Father. As good citizens, we obey the laws of the land ; 
why then shall we ignore the sacred obligations which 
bind us to Heaven? What joy, what delight greater than 
that which fills the father's and mother's heart when they 
know that their son has consecrated himself to the ser- 
vice of the Lord? How gently and peacefully do they 
sleep in the Lord, when they know that the consecrated 
hands of their son are folded before the altar of God, and 
from his lips goes forth the prayer : "Lord ! grant them 
eternal rest !" when they know that their son is offering 
up the most holy of all sacrifices for the eternal welfare 
of their souls ! 

In order to aid in the support of the Seminary : 

1. This usual Easter collection shall be taken up for 
this purpose, and sent in as soon as possible. 

2. This circular shall be read on the preceding Sun- 
day by the pastors 'in their respective churches. 

•1- - . John Henry, 

' Bishop of Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne, Feast of St. Joseph, 1866. 



OUR FIRST ORPHAN ASYLUM, 1866— AN 
INTERESTING PASTORAL 

John Henry, By the Grace of God and favor of the Holy 

See, Bishop of Fort Wayne : 

To the Clergy and Laity of the Diocese, health and bene- 
diction: 

Dearly Beloved in Christ : 

The number of orphans in our diocese has of late 

increased to such an extent that the erection of an Asylum 

for them has become an imperative necessity. 

It is a holy duty, incumbent upon us all, to take care 

of the spiritual and bodily wants of those who have no 

longer father and mother to do it for them, and who, like 

strangers, now wander over God's wide earth imploring 

our pity, mercy and love. 



H2 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

A year ago I purchased twenty-five acres of land, 
adjoining this city, for the purpose of building such an 
Asylum upon them; but, as yet, it has not been com- 
meijced. 

On this all-important matter I consulted with the 
Clergy, lately assembled in spiritual retreat at Notre 
Dame ; and as building materials and labor are extremely 
high, the building to be erected would cost from $30,000 
to $35,000, which amount would have to be on hand imme- 
diately. To obtain this seems a matter of impossibility. 
It was, therefore, unanimously agreed to accept the favor- 
able offer of the Spitler farm, at Renssellaer, for $18,000. 

This place contains 933 acres, 650 of which are under 
fence, 200 under cultivation, 100 wood, the balance 
prairie. There are on it two dwelling-houses, one of 
which contains twelve rooms, affording accommodation 
for forty or fifty orphans ; barn, stables, excellent water, 
garden, fruit trees, shrubbery, stone for building, etc., 
etc. It is half a mile from Rensselaer, the County Seat 
of Jasper County, Indiana. The Iroquis river flows be- 
tween it and the town. All the breadstuffs and vegetables 
necessary to support the orphans can be raised on this 
farm. Milk can be used instead of tea, coffee and sugar. 
The land is admirably adapted for grazing purposes. 
Stock which, comparatively, requires little labor, and 
commands an excellent price, can be raised in abundance. 

The children can have employment suitable to their 
age and strength, and growing up with industrious 
habits, they can become men who will be an honor to the 
institution, and a source of consolation to their bene- 
factors. 

Experience teaches that not a few of those who have 
been raised in the asylums of our cities, for want of suit- 
able employment, and from other unavoidable causes, 
have not realized the expectations, considering the extra- 
ordinary care and attention bestowed upon them. To give, 
therefore, the mind and body the right direction, which 
every well-disposed person must most cordially desire, 
and in consideration of the pecuniary reasons before men- 
tioned, it was deemed best to purchase the above-named 



OUR FIRST ORPHAN ASYLUM 1866 



place. It is of easy access, and in a few hours it can be 
reached from all parts of the diocese, being sixteen miles 
from Bradford, on the Louisville, New Albany and Chi- 
cago Railroad, and twelve miles from Remington, on the 
Toledo, Logansport and Peoria Railroad. The road, es- 
pecially from this last-named place, is generally good. 
Daily stages, in connection with the trains, run from 
both places to Rensselaer, and there is, besides, every 
prospect that the Lafayette and Chicago Railroad, which 
will pass through the last-named town, will be com- 
menced at an early day. The number of Catholics in the 
county is increasing, and as the land is good, and its price 
moderate, a large settlement can reasonably be expected. 
A church will be commenced in the town this year. 

In a Pastoral Letter, last year, I drew attention to 
the necessity of an Orphan Asylum, and on this occasion 
I once more most earnestly recommend the same. Who, 
among the immigrants, has not more or less experienced 
the feelings of the orphan ? When the storm raged on the 
ocean, and the end seemed nigh; far away from home, 
from father, mother, brother, sister, kindred and 
friends, in inexpressible longing after home, weighed 
down the anxious heart, and a sense of utter loneliness 
and abandonment stole over the whole being. Friend, 
have you forgotten the journey? With the grace of God, 
you safely reached your destination — America. But here 
again, strange faces, strange manners and customs, a 
strange language, perhaps, like so many insurmountable 
barriers, rose up before you. You felt alone, discouraged, 
forsaken, in short an orphan. A longing after the lately 
abandoned fireside and friends almost overpowered you, 
and in the long, long hours of anguish and desolation, 
silently and unseen, many a hot tear trickled down your 
cheeks. How happy were you, when meeting a true friend 
who took an interest in you, and by counsel and deed came 
to your aid, "who in his love supplied the place of a 
father, mother, friend," in your regard in that trying 
hour. This raised you up, it made you what you are, and 
secured you the place and position in society which is tru- 
ly honorable, and of which you are justly proud. Had you 



ii FRAGAIENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

not met with such a friend, what might have become of 
you? What in all probability would you not be? This 
kindness and love, which in your poverty and misery you 
received from others, bestow in turn upon the orphan. 

Comparatively few came into this land blessed with 
means ; for the most part poverty and want caused them 
to abandon the home of their birth. God has blessed them 
with health, prosperty and wealth. Will, or can you for- 
get the days of youth, when want in all its hideous forms 
was your companion and lot? When one day your souls 
shall leave the body, and the bocy be consigned to the 
earth, and nothing shall remain but the tombstone to in- 
dicate your former existence on earth, the orphan child, 
which you supported like a watching angel, still remains ; 
the asylum which you helped to erect or establish, still 
stands, and all the orphans, these beloved ones of the 
Eternal Father, yet pray for you after hundreds and hun- 
dreds of years — yea, as long as the institution stands. 
Many a benefactor, otherwise careless and negligent of 
his eternal salvation, has received the grace of conversion 
through the prayers of the orphans. Not long since a 
wealthy man was received into the one true fold, who, 
during a long life of sixty or sixty-five years, had not 
only lived entirely without God and religion, but had 
moreover by no means led an irreproachable life ; all were 
as;tonished at his change. How is it possible? they said. 
But upon inquiry it was found that he had always been 
remarkably charitable to the orphans and the poor, who 
in return procured by their prayers for him the inestim- 
able grace of conversion. 

We can neither see nor measure with our corporal 
eyes the good that is done by supporting the orphans, 
otherwise we would most willingly make great sacrifices. 
But when the last day shall have dawned, — the day of 
the harvest — when the Lord shall say, for the second 
time: Fiat lux — "Let light be" (Gen. i, 3) then all the 
good and bad deeds which we shall have done in the body, 
will appear. The poor orphans, whom we have rescued, 
vdll come up to us and take us by the hand, and thank us 
for the good care we took of them, and the education 



OUR FIRST ORPHAN ASYLUM 18 



which we gave them, by means of which they saved them- 
selves and their posterity. They will accompany us before 
the Sovereign Judge and relate to Him what we have done 
in their behalf, and ask Him, Who has said : "He who re- 
ceives one such little child in My name receives Me," 
(Matth. xviii, 5) and, again, "What you did to one of the 
least of My brethren you did it to Me." (Matth. xxv, 40), 
"0 Lord, do not leave him an orphan now, but receive him 
into Thy heavenly joys." 

The reason why many are so miserly and ungenerous 
in giving, is because they are infected with the spirit of 
this world, which represents as valuable only what glit- 
ters to the eye. They walk in the footsteps of the rich 
glutton, who spent all his wealth upon his body and its 
comforts, and was, for this reason, damned, as Christ 
tells us. (Luke xvi). During these eighteen hundred 
years he has been crying out for a drop of water to put 
upon his parched tongue, without receiving it. Many of 
our men of means resemble him in spending all upon 
themselves and their pleasures. They make pleasure 
trips, pass their time at watering places and other fash- 
ionable resorts ; give costly entertainments ; build splen- 
did mansions, and furnish them sumptuously; heap 
money upon money, interest upon interest, bonds upon 
bonds; deck both themselves and families in the latest 
fashions, and live as if they were the lords of the earth, 
and everything else only for them. If the priest or the 
poor Sister ask, in the name of God, for the orphans, the 
Church, or other religious purposes, then they either give 
a sum which is really a shame for them, or, what is often- 
er the case, they say: "I have already given so and so 
much ; times are hard ; at present I can do nothing." But 
the very next day this same man can throw away any 
amount upon vanity ; or his wife adds another costly bon- 
net to the half dozen she already has, in order to progress 
with the latest fashion. The poor Lazarus, the orphan, 
or Church is told to begone ; the poor orphan cries at the 
door of the rich man for bread, and he cries into a deaf 
ear. 

In our day, many sympathize as little with poor Jesus 



S6 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

as did the Jews of old, who only longed for a rich Messiah. 
They seek Him to this day, without finding Him, as Christ 
Himself told them. The promises of God in regard to the 
poor are disregarded, because the baneful vices of avarice 
and pride have taken possession of their hearts, as was 
the case with the Jews, and their imitators in all ages. 
The spirit of religion, and the love of neighbor, impelled 
our forefathers to erect magnificent churches, schools, 
orphan asylums, hospitals, universities, and other like 
institutions, to give learned men and saints to the land. 
Within these institutions men were trained for the object 
of their existence, and while the Te Deum resounds with- 
in those time-honored walls, it is reechoed by the saints 
above, who erected those buildings. 

Those who imagine that they have no obligation to 
contribute toward the orphan asylum, be they married 
or single, because they have no children, only show an 
extreme ignorance of their religious obligations. The 
commandment says "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy- 
self" (Matth. 22, 30). Is it loving your neighbor to do 
nothing for him when in need? Those who speak thus 
are animated by an entirely irreligious spirit, because if 
they only want to assist, when they have children to send 
to it, they show that they first want to entail a burden 
upon the institution before they do anything. If all 
thought as they, an asylum could never be erected. Our 
Savior characterizes such views as downright heathenish. 
If you only love those, He says, that love you, what better 
are you than the heathens, for they do the same? (Math. 
V, 46). We need an asylum without delay, the more so on 
account of the cholera, of which we find approaching 
signs everywhere. Should this fearful scourge of God 
visit our diocese, it will throw so many orphans upon our 
hands that I hardly know what we would do with them. 
Therefore, compelled by the necessity of the times, the 
asylum must be opened as soon as possible. To build one, 
even when the means could be found, since the season is 
already so far advanced, would require an entirely too 
long a time. 

It is hard for the father and mother of a family who 



OUR FIRST ORPHAN ASYLUM 1866 



tenderly love their owi3, to go out of this world and say 
to their dear little ones : "Poor children ! we must part, 
we leave you to your hard fate, we consign you to the 
mercy of a cold, unfeeling world. Bodily perhaps you may 
be provided for, but who will take care of the all-impor- 
tant affairs of your souls, the one only thing really nec- 
essary?" (Luc. 10, 42). Oh! such a parting is heart-rend- 
ing. But when parents know that for their children a 
proper provision has been made in this respect, they can 
depart in peace. 

Into the asylum, as already stated in a previous pas- 
toral, all orphans will be admitted without distinction of 
creed as much as circumstances will permit; the pastors 
or collectors can therefore also call without hesitation 
upon all for aid. 

I expect that every Catholic, however limited his 
means may be, will contribute at least $5.00, and those in 
better circumstances more. In two or three days at most, 
this sum can be earned, and who is unwilling to give that 
much of his time to secure the orphans a home, and to 
the diocese a noble institution? Those, who have been 
blessed with means and wealth, will, as a matter of 
course, give also really respectable sums. "Charge the 
rich of this world," says St. Paul to Timothy (Bishop of 
the Church), "not to be highminded, nor so trust in un- 
certain riches, but in the living God, (Who giveth us all 
things abundantly to enjoy)." "To do good, to become 
rich in good works, to give freely, to communicate, to lay 
up for themselves a good foundation for the time to come, 
that they may lay hold on eternal life." (I Tim. 6.) 
The collectors appointed are Rev. Messrs. Cooney, Stein- 
er, Walters and Mayer. 

All pastors are earnestly solicited to assist these 
Reverend gentlemen in their arduous mission, to the best 
of their ability, and accompany them when and wherever 
possible. 

The collecting shall be commenced at once, and it is 
expected that all will have their contributions ready for 
them, especially where the amount contributed does not 
exceed the first mentioned sum. Each Pastor will invite 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



any one of the collectors without delay, and indicate the 
most suitable time for him to commence. The collectors 
can in like manner arrange the time of collection and the 
congregations among themselves as they see fit. 

This Pastoral Letter shall be read in all the churches 
and stations of the diocese as soon as it shall have been 
received, and circumstances will permit. 

A list of all the donors and the amount contributed 
by each will be published after the collection shall have 
been taken up, and a copy will be preserved in the asylum 
for future reference. 

Given at Fort Wayne on the Feast of the Assumption 
of the Blessed Virgin, A. D. 1866. 

■h JOHN HENRY, 

Bishop of Fort Wayne. 



BISHOP LUERS' CHRISTMAS APPEAL, 1866. 

Pastors of souls are earnestly requested to take up in 
their respective congregations and stations the custom- 
ary collection for the Orphans on Christmas Day. 

As it is the universal custom among Catholics to give 
presents on this day, I trust that they will not forget the 
Orphans, especially this time, since the expenses for fur- 
niture and other unavoidable outlays incidental upon 
opening the Institution for such children must necessarily 
be very heavy. 

Could you, beloved brethren of the Laity, stand by 
the bedside of a dying father or mother, as we pastors 
have so often to do, and look at those beseeching eyes, and 
listen to those imploring lips: "Father! take care of my 
little ones," I am sure we would have no difficulty in ob- 
taining for them all they need. 

I have no doubt that each one will find on Christmas 
morning for this truly noble work of charity, at least one 
dollar. 

It is gratifying to be able to state, that the subscrip- 
tion for purchasing the site for the Institution is ^'ully 



RT. REV. JOHN HENRY LUERS, D. D. 89 

realizing expectations. Those who have charge of collect- 
ing will, I trust, go through with their good but truly 
arduous task until finished. The Christmas collection must 
be remitted without delay, so that the same may be 
speedily published. 

-h JOHN HENRY, 

Bishop of Forb Wayne. 



We find the following record as of August 20, 1868, 
which will interest the clergy of the diocese of Fort 
Wayne. The practice started by that enactment is still 
observed in the diocese: 

DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 
(OFFICIAL) 

The attention of the reverend clergy is respectfully 
called to the following statute, enacted at the late con- 
ference held at Notre Dame University : 

"On the demise of any clergyman of the Diocese of 
Fort Wayne, every priest of this Diocese will be obliged 
to say three Masses for the repose of the soul of such de- 
ceased, as soon as possible thereafter." 

E. P. WALTERS, Secretary. 



The following word was sent to all the clergy by 
Bishop Luers in November of the same year : 

(OFFICIAL) 

As the acts and decrees of the late Plenary Council 
of Baltimore were promulgated at the Retreat of the 
clergy in July last, we remind the reverend clergy and the 
faithful of the diocese that the 8th of December, the 
Feast of the Immaculate Conception, is to be kept a holy- 
day of obligation. 

JOHN HENRY, 
Bishop of Fort Wayne, 
November 3, 1868. 



90 - FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

BISHOP LUERS ORDERS PRAYERS FOR THE 

HOLY FATHER, WHEN ROME IS ABOUT 

TO BE SEIZED. 

John Henry, by the Grace of God and favor of the Apos- 
tolic See, Bishop of Fort Wayne; 

To the Clergy and Laity of our Diocese: 

Our Most Holy Father, Pope Pius IX, wishes the 
entire Christian world to assemble . during three days 
before the Holy Altar of God in prayer. 

What are the reasons for this call? 

When the powers of darkness arrayed themselves 
against our Divine Savior, so as to cause Him in His 
agony to sweat blood, He retreated with His disciples to 
the Garden of Gethsemani, where, leaving them a little 
distance behind. He went alone to pray. Going back to 
His Apostles, and finding them asleep. He said to them : 
"Watch and pray lest you fall into temptation," (Matt, 
xxvi, 41). And returning He again prayed, to teach us, 
that in the storms and trials of this life, we must have 
recourse to our heavenly Father in prayer. The successor 
of St. Peter and visible head of the Church of Christ upon 
earth, by whose appointment and divine assistance he 
watches over, directs, and governs this his mystical body, 
has been for some years, and still is in great peril and 
distress ; and therefore requests us all to unite with him 
in fervent supplications to the throne of God, that the 
bitter chalice may be taken from him, and the threatened 
dangers, which now surround him, be averted. 

The descendants of the Herodians, the Scribes and 
Pharisees, with their adherents, conspire against him, to 
get him out of the way, as did their ancestors his Eivine 
Master. 

Even quite recently the abyss raised up a furious 
cut-throat, who with his red-shirted associates was to do 
this work; he was, however, only the hired tool of the 
secret societies and some wicked and unscrupulous mon- 
archs, whose aim is the overthrow of the Church of 
Christ; but He, who sits upon the throne on high, de- 
feated their machinations, and they v/ere drowned in 



RT. REV. JOHN HENRY LUERS, D. D. 91 

their own blood. The heroic defenders of the Church rid 
the territories of the Holy Father of this band of mid- 
night assassins, for which they receive the thanks and 
gratitude of the whole Christian world. What has the 
Holy Father done, that he should be persecuted? He is 
the Vicar of Christ, and as such Christ reigns through 
him. 

This is his unpardonable offence, for which Satan 
and his crew seek to crucify him. He has done no evil, but 
it is the constant aim and endeavor of the prince of dark- 
ness to obliterate and eradicate everything that is good, 
holy and heavenly upon earth, whereas that of the Church 
is to destroy error, darkness and immorality — conse- 
quently the work and kingdom of the prince of this world, 
and to set up the reign of truth, virtue and light, the 
kin.gdom of Christ, in their place. For this the Holy 
Father incessantly labors, and therefore his enemies cry : 
"Let us put wood on his bread, and cut him from the land 
of the living and let his name be remembered no more". 
(Jerem. xi, 19). 

Among men, too, many have become so habituated to 
darkness that they love the same, and hate the light. 
Their eyes can no longer bear the light of truth, nor their 
hearts purity and virtue. With indignation, therefore, 
they turn their backs upon the light, pretty much as a lot 
of hogs, bedded in the mire, start up with a great noise 
to seek quarters elsewhere, when the mild evening sun 
shines too brightly upon them ; and in their course, rouse 
up other swine which start to run likewise and make a 
noise similar to their own. 

The Pope is head of the Church and the father of 
the Christian family. When, as in duty bound, he raises 
his voice against false maxims of the world and the pre- 
vailing corruption of the age, and exhorts the nations 
to honesty, sobriety, chastity, the fear of God and the 
keeping of His commandments, the slaves of vice cry out : 
He deserves death. When he commands parents to raise 
their children in a Christian manner; children to love, 
honor and obey their parents ; the married to mutual love 
and conjugal fidelity; the unjust to make restitution, the 



92 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

monarchs not to covet each other's dominions ; and when 
he entreats all sinners to a sincere repentance and a re- 
turn to their heavenly Father, the powers of darkness cry 
out that he is an enemy of progress, that he seeks to, 
hold the nations in priestly bondage, and is trying to keep 
them in ignorance and superstition. The venerable Vicar 
of Christ is thus charged with crimes against society, 
which truly only the father of lies can invent. 

England and Russia Should First Loose Their Iron Grip 

on Ireland and Poland Before Advising the Pope 

on the Government of His Territory. 

But is it not well known that the hands of the Holy 
Father are constantly uplifted to bless the nations of the 
earth, and that he has a paternal heart for all? Does he 
not charge the rich to be bountiful to the widows, the 
orphans and the poor — kings and potentates to be just 
and merciful towards their subjects? Does he not exhort 
all men to love each other with an unfeigned and truly 
brotherly love? Is not Rome the seat and center of the 
sciences and arts? Are not the taxes in his dominions a 
mere mite in comparison to what they are in the so-called 
model States? While England officiously points out to 
him reform for his territories, it wilfully shuts its eyes 
to the deplorable condition of Ireland and its numerous 
famishing and uneducated subjects at home. Russia is 
laying its iron grip on Poland and treating its subjects 
with unheard of barbarity, and we find more or less op- 
pression and misrule in every state or country; but no 
voice is raised against them for such proceedings. The 
Holy Father alone must have no temporal possessions, 
no matter how small the territory, because it is deemed 
incompatible with his spiritual position. But let those 
who cry out the loudest against him on this account be 
their own judges. In England, a woman, even, is head of 
the Protestant law-established Church and at the same 
time Queen of the realm. In Russia the Czar is supreme 
lord both of his Church and State. In Prussia the King 
is Pope of the so-called Evangelical Church and the tem- 



RT. REV. JOHN HENRY LUERS, D. D. 93 

poral ruler of his kingdom. The same is the case in Den- 
mark, Sweden, and almost every other Protestant coun- 
try. It is a notorious fact that the reformers transferred 
the spiritual jurisdiction and authority of the true Vicar 
of Christ from him to the civil ruler, thus making the 
king, queen, or even an infant, not only supreme over 
their temporal affairs, but also their faith and con- 
sciences. If, therefore, even a woman or a mere child can 
at the same time be a temporal ruler and head of the 
Church, why may not the Holy Father likewise be both? 
It is said that the King of Italy wants the States of the 
Church to make Italy a united nation. If it is possible to 
unite that country under one government it can be done 
without taking the temporal possessions of the Holy 
Father from him. This serves only as a pretext. If this 
argument holds good, the large and wealthy farmer, 
whose lands border on all sides around the few acres of 
a poor man, would be justified in taking them upon the 
pretext that he needed them to rectify his boundaries. It 
is also alleged that the people demand it. Certainly not the 
subjects of the Pope, as they have repeatedly signified; 
besides every child knows what is understood in Europe 
by the people. If the will of the people must be gratified 
irrespective of consequences and the rights of others, why 
does not England declare Ireland independent? That 
people certainly demand it. Why did we not let the South 
go when the southern people requested it? Was it wicked 
in the North to compel them at the point of the bayonet 
to remain in the Union? 

These, therefore, cannot be the true reasons why they 
long to see the Holy Father stripped of all his temporal 
possessions ; however, their aim is obvious. With the 
sects it is envy and jealousy. They feel that the Old 
Church, from which they are separated and against 
which they still rebel, is after all the Church of which St. 
Paul says : "She is from above, she Is free and the mother 
of us all." (Gal. iv, 26)— (i. e. : the mother of all the 
tribes, nations and tongues of the earth). Theirs on the 
contrary is from below, the work of man, fettered down 
everywhere by the temporal power, and the mother of 



94 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

none. While they behold the Church of Christ in this 
proud and lofty position/and tnemselves in such bondage 
and degradation, they envy her head his independent 
condition, and would, therefore, wish to see him reduced 
to the same humiliating level with themselves. With the 
heathens and infidels it is malice. They hate the Church, 
because she condemns their works, therefore, they seek to 
destroy her ; which they suppose will be accomplished as 
soon as the head is no longer independent, but the subject 
of some temporal power. But they do not know Him Who 
has said : "Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build 
my Church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against 
her." (Matt, xvi, 15.) 

Reasons for the Power of Anti-Catholics 

But considering that the Church is spread over the 
whole globe and that it contains more than 200,000,000 
of members, how comes it that Satan and his minions 
have obtained so much power? Christ Himself explains 
it: "While men slept," He says, "the enemy came and 
sowed tares among the wheat" (Matt, xiii, 25). This is 
the case in every age, even now. How many parents, for 
instance, sleep at their post, neglecting their religious 
duties and those of their state of life, especially with re- 
gard to the Christian instruction and training of their 
children. Are all pastors likewise zealous for souls, and 
none lax and negligent? Again, do we not find timid 
Catholics everywhere so affected by human respect or 
fear, as always to say "Yes" to everything? Ever ready 
to compromise and make concessions, to compel truth to 
bow down or lay prostrate, so that the lie may pass over 
its back? The "Non possumus" (We cannot) is never 
heard from their lips ; they never utter a word in defense 
of their mother, the glorious old Church. Others, general- 
ly not leading overly chaste lives, or puffed up with van- 
ity and pride, desire to appear to be what the world and 
the flesh call enlightened, and to progress with the spirit 
of the age. But who is the spirit of the age? The evil 
one, the prince of this world. (John xii, 13) The true 
Catholic is not a child of time nor of the age, which is 



RT. REV. JOHN HENRY L.UERS, D. P. 95 

evil, but of eternity. The earth is not his home ; here he 
regards himself as a stranger and pilgrim. (I Peter ii, 
11 ; 2 Cor. v, 6) Nor does he look upon himself as belong- 
ing to the spirit of the age, but to the Holy Spirit of God, 
to whom he has sworn allegiance in holy Baptism, and 
under whose banner he wants to be found fighting during 
life and especially at the hour of his death. He knows 
too that his Church, which civilized the nations and made 
them what they are, is not opposed to real progress, but 
seeks to favor it, and that not everything which passes 
under this name, is such in reality, but much of it coun- 
terfeit, and, therefore, he is not imposed upon, but care- 
fully examines the coin when it is presented. 

Dearly beloved ! if up to this you have lived unmind- 
ful of your high vocation, arise from your spiritual sloth 
and lethargy. Stand up manfully for the rights of the 
Holy Father and in his defense, and show in deed that 
you are ready to sacrifice your life and treasure in the 
cause of that faith once delivered to the saints, and of 
our holy mother Church. When the millions and millions 
of her members once present a bold and united front, 
Pius IX will have nothing to fear, and his temporal pos- 
sessions, so necessary for him under present circum- 
stances to secure his independence, will remain, as they 
ought, his patrimony and the property of the Church. 

To testify our obedience, love and veneration for our 
Holy Father, Pius IX, we ordain : 

1st. That where it has not already taken place, a 
three days' devotion be held between this date and the 
17th of October next, in all the churches of our diocese, 
and that the faithful be admonished to come to the devo- 
tions on those days, and to approach the Holy Sacraments 
so that they may comply with the earnest desire of the 
Holy Father and gain the indulgence. The devotions will 
close each day by reciting the Litany of All Saints, and 
the prayers immediately following the same, and the 
Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. 

2d. That on Sunday, the 5th of July, which falls 
within the Octave of Sts. Peter and Paul (when also, I 
trust, work and money will be plentier than they are 



96 FHAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

now) a collection be taken up in all the churches and 
stations of the diocese for the Pope, and the amount 
transmitted to us as soon as possible. 

3d. That this circular be read by the pastors, in all 
the churches and stations of the diocese, on the first 
suitable opportunity. 

Given at Fort Wayne on the Feast of St. Joseph, 
1863. 

-h JOHN HENRY, 

Bishop of Fort Wayne. 



Urges Reading of Plenary Council Pastoral. 

Pastors of souls are hereby requested to read to their 
respective flocks the Pastoral Letter by the Second Plen- 
ary Council held at Baltimore, during the last month. As 
it is all important that the faithful should have a clear 
and definite knowledge of the grave matters of which it 
treats, it will be timely and salutary on successive Sun- 
days more fully to explain the different heads or para- 
graphs contained in the same and I desire it to be done. 

^ JOHN HENRY, 

Bishop of Fort Wayne. 

ForD Wayne, November 19, 1866. 

We have this full joint Pastoral of the American Bishops 
promulgated in 1866, but it is a little too lengthy to reproduce. 

—J. F. N. 



RT. REV. MSGR. JULIAN BBNOIT 



97 



JULIAN BENOIT 

The priest who did most for the promotion of 
Catholicity in and about Fort Wayne was the Rev. 
He labored in Northeastern Indiana 

tirely from 



Julian Benoit. 
almost en- 
th e year 
year 1885. 
Benoit, the 
eleven chil- 
born inSept- 
mount ain 
thegreat 
France, on 
of October, 
He was 
enteen when 
himself for 
theology at 
ary of Orge- 
completed his 




theological 



1840 to the 
J u 1 ian 
tenth among 
dren, was 
m o n c e 1, a 
village i n 
Jura range, 
the 17th day 
1808. 

scarcely sev- 
he presented 
the study of 
the Semin- 
let. Having 
studies before he reach- 
ed the canonical age for ordination, he taught for 
one year at the "Little Seminary" of Arinthod, and the 
year following in the Seminary of Nozeroy. Thence he 
went to Lyons, where he secured a professor's position 
in a college, which he held for four years. During these 
years he had taken Major Orders. About the close of his 
fourth year as teacher, the Right Reverend Gabriel 
Brute, Bishop of Vincennes, Indiana, came to Lyons in 
the interest of his diocese. The young Deacon, Benoit, 
having formed the acquaintance of the American Bishop, 
and having at his disposal a suite of rooms, invited the 
Prelate to make his home with him during his stay in 
Lyons, which was about two weeks. During this time 
the young host became quite charmed with his guest. 
He saw in him great learning and sanctity. 

On the last day of this visit he accompanied the 
Bishop to Fourviere, a place of pilgrimage near Lyons, 
and having served the Bishop at Mass told the Prelate 
if he could be of any use to him in America, he cheer- 



98 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

fully offered him his services. The Bishop replied to 
him : "You are a spoiled child. All I could give you in 
my diocese would be corn bread and bacon." To which 
the young man answered : "If you can endure that, why 
not I, and if you have accustomed yourself to such hard- 
ship, I will soon get used to it." Hereupon the necessary 
permission was obtained from Bishop de Chamod, of St. 
Claude, and the young Deacon was soon on his way west- 
ward, exchanging a home in his native France for one in 
the New World. Bishop Brute at this time had but two 
priests in his diocese, which embraced all of Indiana, 
and a greater part of eastern Illinois. 

He set sail at Havre de Grace, June 1, 1836. After 
a long and tedious voyage (on a sail vessel of course) of 
fifty-two days he reached New York. After a few 
months at St. Mary's Seminary, under the care of the 
Father of St. Sulpice, Baltimore, he was raised to the 
holy priesthood by the saintly Bishop Brute, on St. 
Mark's day, 1837. The ordination took place at the old 
Mountain Seminary, of Emmitsburg, Maryland. 

Starts For Indiana 

Succeeding the day of ordination, the new church 
of Fredericktown was dedicated. Father McElroy being 
the pastor. There was quite a gathering of great church- 
men on the occasion, with all of whom the young eccle- 
siastic had the honor of becoming acquainted. Right 
Reverend Bishop England, of Charleston, preached, as 
did also the Rev. John Hughes, Pastor of St. John's 
Church, Philadelphia, afterwards Bishop and Arch- 
bishop of New York. 

Bishops Brute and Purcell, Rev. Father Reynolds, 
Pastor of a church in Louisville, and afterwards Bishop 
of Charleston, and Father Benoit, after the dedication 
services, started on their journey over the mountains by 
stage to Wheeling, where they took the Ohio River to 
Cincinnati. 

At that time Cincinnati had two Catholic churches, 
St. Xavier's Cathedral, and Holy Trinity, of which 
Father Henni, afterwards Bishop and Archbishop of 



RT. REV. MSGR. JULIAN BENOIT 99 

Milwaukee, was pastor. After a sojourn here of three 
days the journey was continued to Vincennes, which 
was reached in July, 1837. 

Rev. Julian Benoit was at once appointed to Leo- 
pold, near Evansville, and as the Wabash and Erie canal 
was then being constructed, he was also to look after the 
spiritual wants of the men of these public works. 

After a time here he was sent to a little town named 
Rome, on the Ohio River, where he remained for one 
year, when he was sent to Chicago as an assistant to a 
Reverend Father O'Meara. 

From Chicago he attended Lockport, Joliet, and 
several other canal towns along the line. He was re- 
called and again sent to Leopold, his first mission. 
After three and a half years of labor on these missions, 
for which time he had received the munificent salary of 
$63.00, he was sent to Fort Wayne, where he arrived 
April 16, 1840. 

Arrived At Fort Wayne 

At Fort Wayne he found a frame church rudely 
built, not plastered, with a few rough boards for 
benches. The dimensions of the building were 35x65 
feet, and a debt of $4,367 rested upon it. Half the pre- 
sent Cathedral Square had been purchased for the 
church, but had not been paid for. In the course of 
time, under the management of Father Benoit, the other 
half of the square was secured and the whole block paid 
for. During the first six months of his stay in Fort 
Wayne, Father Benoit boarded with Francis Comparet, 
after which time he rented a small frame building and 
began his own housekeeping. 

At this time his missionary work extended in and 
beyond Fort Wayne to the present Academy, Besancon, 
Hessen Cassel, New Haven, Decatur, Lagro, Hunting- 
ton, Columbia City, Warsaw, Rome City and Lima (La- 
Grange County), Girardot Settlement and Avilla, going 
on sick calls as far as Muncie. It should be borne in 
mind that the only way to reach these places except a 
few canal towns was on horseback. 



100 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Help was sent him, as the labor was too great for 
one priest, and his first assistant was Father Hamion, 
who died in 1842. 

Visits Europe 

In 1841 Father Benoit visited Europe. On his re- 
turn he brought Father Rudolph, who remained three 
years, and afterwards became the founder of the famous 
convent and church buildings at Oldenburg. He also 
brought with him 25,000 francs, a donation from parties 
in Alsace to the Sisters of Providence in Vigo County. 

The canal between Fort Wayne and Lafayette was 
begun in 1835. In 1840 it was continued to the Ohio line. 
The Maumee fever was ravaging among the laborers and 
calls were frequent for the clergy, who endured a good 
many hardships on these sick calls. Many of the men 
died from this sickness. Sometimes their visits to the 
sick took the priests as far east as Defiance. Father 
Benoit was twice asked by Bishop Purcell, of Cincinnati, 
to attend the spiritual wants of Catholics at Defiance, 
particularly sick people; when Father Benoit repre- 
sented to the Ohio Bishop the great burden already upon 
him, an appeal was made to Bishop Brute, who forth- 
with added the new charge to Fort Wayne, and the 
orders were at once obeyed with cheerfulness. 

In 1845 he brought three Sisters of Providence to 
Fort Wayne from St. Mary's, Vigo County, who opened 
a school shortly afterwards. Their humble beginning 
in the work which their benefactor so blissfully planted, 
has since grown to great magnitude. He furnished their 
house completely. Later on he helped build the north 
wing, and in 1883 gave them towards the erection of the 
south wing of the present building the then magnificent 
sum of $5,000.00. 

He also opened a school for boys, in a shop on the 
corner of Jefferson and Clinton streets, where he after- 
wards built a brick structure, built it as he did the old 
Episcopal residence on Calhoun street, which after- 
wards gave way to Library Hall, out of his own funds. 
He also erected the late Episcopal dwelling, toward 
which the diocese contributed about $2,000.00, he fur- 



RT. REV. MSGR. JULIAN BENOIT 



nishing the house completely and expending about 
$14,000.00 upon it. 

The Miami Indians 

The remnants of the old Fort Wayne still stood 
when Father Benoit came to the village of the same 
name. The original Council House of the Miami Tribe 
of Indians still remained. It stood on East Main street, 
a little west of the Fort. The place was frequented by 
the Miamis, who lived in Northern Indiana, about Fort 
Wayne, Huntington and Peru. They had a War-Chief 
and a Peace-Chief. The name of the first was Godfrey 
who died in 1840, just previously to Father Benoit's 
reaching Fort Wayne. The name of the Peace-Chief was 
John B. DeRichardville, who lived until the autumn of 
1841. He was called the Talleyrand of the Miamis, be- 
cause of his shrewdness both among his own people and 
among the whites. 

He Leads the Indians West 

In 1848 the Indians received orders from the Gov- 
ernment to leave their reservations about Fort Wayne 
and go to the territory of Kansas. They numbered 
about eight hundred and were led by Chief Lafontaine, 
whom, together with his wife and children. Father 
Benoit had received into the Church. The Indians, how- 
ever, refused to leave unless Father Benoit would go 
with them. But Bishop De La Hailandiere refused to 
consent, desiring that Father Benoit should not leave 
his congregation. Finally the Government sent on some 
troops. The Captain called upon the Reverend Father 
and begged of him to lead the Indians away peacefully, 
"for unless you go with them," he said, "they will not 
go, and I will be obliged to hunt them down like wild 
beats and kill them." Upon these representations Father 
Benoit secured the services of Father Nevron, the only 
survivor of the band of twenty-one priests who came to 
Indiana when Father Benoit came, and started on his 
tour to please the Indians and save bloodshed. The tribe 
started overland, in the summer of 1849, and Father 



102 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Benoit went by canal boat to Cincinnati; thence over 
the Ohio and Mississippi to St. Louis, where he took the 
stage for the present Kansas City. He finally reached 
the reservation marked out for the Indians by the Gov- 
ernment and stayed in the encampment with his beloved 
children of the forest about two weeks. He returned 
home by stage the entire route, traveling nine days, day 
and night, in one continuous trip. Out of six persons 
in the group he was only one to endure the hardships of 
the trip in one continuous journey. 

Father Benoit Goes to Netv Orleans 

In 1853, whilst Bishop de St. Palais was in Europe, 
Father Benoit obtained permission from the Vicar Gen- 
eral of the Diocese to go to New Orleans, but upon the 
Bishop's return he was recalled. He went to New 
Orleans again in 1860 and remained there about seven 
months. On each occasion of his stay in that city he 
preached in his native tongue the Lenten sermons in the 
Cathedral. His visit on this last occasion was to solicit 
funds for the building of the Fort Wayne Cathedral. 

He Visits Europe Again 

In the autumn of 1865 Father Benoit started on his 
second visit to Europe and was absent thirteen months, 
four and a half of which were spent in Rome. He 
was a frequent visitor to the office of Cardinal Barnabo, 
with whom he transacted business for different parts of 
France and America. He had two private audiences 
with Pius IX. 

On his visit to France, he was offered the position 
of Vicar General of the Diocese of St. Claude, a city 
within a few miles of his birthplace, his native diocese, 
which he exchanged twenty-eight years previously for a 
life of hardship and toil in the service of God and man 
in the wilds of North America. But he preferred to 
return to the people in America. 

In 1874 he went to Europe as a member of the First 
American Pilgrimage, this being his third trip across 



RT. REV. MSGR. JULIAN BENO IT 103 

the Atlantic. He was absent from May until September. 
This visit was made shortly after the spoliation and 
sacking of Rome by Victor Emmanuel. 

Vicar General, Administrator and Theologian in the 
National Council of Baltimore 

Father Benoit's first appointment as Vicar General 
was in 1852 for the Diocese of Vincennes. When Bishop 
Luers took charge of his new diocese, he appointed 
Father Benoit his Vicar General. During Bishop Luers' 
visit to Europe in 1865, the Very Rev. Julian Benoit was 
appointed Administrator of the Diocese. 

In 1866, during the session of the Second Plenary 
Council of Baltimore, Vicar General Benoit was hon- 
ored with the office of Theologian to the Council by 
Bishop Luers. * 

At the death of Bishop Luers, June, 1871, Very Rev. 
J. Benoit became Administrator of the Diocese until the 
consecration of the new Bishop, Right Rev. Joseph 
Dwenger, April 14, 1872. 

He was also Theologian at the four Provincial 
Councils of Cincinnati. He did not attend the fifth, held 
in 1882, because of his advanced age. 

Shortly after Bishop Dwenger took charge of his 
new field of labor, he announced his intention to retain 
Father Benoit as his Vicar General, and whilst the 
Bishop was away from his Diocese paying his decennial 
visit to Rome in 1883, Father Benoit was appointed 
Administrator of the Diocese by the Bishop. 

Papal Prelate 

Very Rev. Julian Benoit was signally honored on 
the 12th of June, 1883, by Pope Leo XIII. When Bishop 
Dwenger was waited on by the Clergy of his Diocese 
just previous to his departure for Rome, he was asked 
to convey to His Holiness the desire of the clergy of 
the Fort Wayne Diocese to see Father Benoit invested 



FRAGMENTS OP OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



with the purple and receive the honors and title of Mon- 
signor. Whilst the Bishop told his clergy that such had 
already been his own plan, he heartily concurred in their 
wishes and would cheerfully present them to the Holy 
Father. Shortly after the Bishop's arrival in Rome, a 
cablegram to Father Benoit informed him of the honor 
bestowed upon him. 

Father Benoit Invited to the Third Plenary Council of 

Baltimore 

Monsignor Benoit was invited by Bishop Dwenger 
to accompany him to the Third Plenary Council of 
Baltimore, and he was invited also by Archbishop Gib- 
bons, at first through his secretary, and a second time 
through an autograph letter of the Archbishop and 
Apostolic Delegate. His great age, however, and his 
loss of hearing, prevented him accepting the several 
proffered invitations. 

Sickness and Death 

Father Benoit complained during the month of 
November, 1884, of a severe pain in his left ear, and 
from the ear he thought the pain lead to his throat. He 
would not consent to having a physician called, even 
though the pain became intensified. Upon Bishop 
Dwenger's return from the Baltimore Council, the 
malady growing worse, physicians were summoned, who 
pronounced the case cancer of the throat. With a calm 
and deliberate spirit of resignation, he began to prepare 
for his final dissolution. "If Providence desires to take 
me by the throat," he jocosely remarked, "then God's 
will be done." 

On Friday morning, January 23, the Right Reverend 
Bishop offered Mass in the room of the saintly Vicar 
General, at which the man devoutly assisted the last 
time upon earth. The evening preceding, January 22, 
he was with the household at tea, and spent half an 
hour with several of the visiting and home clergy in the 
Bishop's room, from which he returned to his own 
apartments never to leave them in life. 



RT. REV. MSGR. JULIAN BENOIT 105 

His Last Moments 

At five minutes past eight o'clock on Monday even- 
ing, January 26, 1885, the household was called together 
and notified of his fast approaching death. Just previ- 
ously to this the venerated patient uttered his last words 
on earth. Turning to Dr. Dills and Sister Vencentia, he 
said : "I am going home to my Heavenly Father. I thank 
you for your kindness to me, and when I get to Heaven 
I will pray for you." 

Right Rev. Bishop Rademacher, of Nashville, at 
one time a priest in this city and diocese, having been 
notified of the condition of Father Benoit, had reached 
the house a few hours previously. 

The Bishop of Nashville led in the reading of the 
touching prayers of the ritual, the others responding 
whilst the Bishop of Fort Wayne held the hands of the 
expiring pioneer priest clasping the crucifix, the image 
and cross of his Savior, for Whom he looked to as his 
reward in Heaven. 

The last Sacrament had been administered to him 
at his own request, in the full enjoyment of his mental 
faculties, by Rev. A. Messman, of St. Peter's church. 

On Friday morning, January 30, at 9:00 o'clock, 
the great concourse of clergy that had gathered as- 
sembled in the Sanctuary and recited the "Office of the 
Dead." 

At 9 :30 o'clock the Oflficers of the Mass filed into 
the Sanctuary. They were as follows: Celebrant, Right 
Rev. Joseph Dwenger, Bishop of Nashville; Assistant 
Priest, Rev. A. B. Oechtering, of Mishawaka; Deacon, 
Rev. John Bleckman, of Delphi; Sub-deacon, Rev. H. A. 
Hoeckelman; Masters of Ceremonies, Rev. J. H. Bram- 
mer and Rev. John F. Lang. The following distin- 
guished clergy, among many others, were in the Sanc- 
tuary: Right Rev. Joseph Dwenger, Bishop of Fort 
Wayne, orator of the day; Right Rev. H. J. Richter, 
Bishop of Grand Rapids ; Monsignor A. Bessonies, Vicar 
General, Indianapolis; Very Rev. A. Skideler, Vicar 
General, Indianapolis; Very Rev. C. J. Roche, Vicar 



106 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

General, Grand Rapids; Very Rev. E. Sorin, Superior 
General of the Order of the Holy Cross, Notre Dame. 

Father Benoit's First Recorded Baptism in Fort Wayne 

The first baptism recorded by Father Benoit reads 
thus : 

"I, the undersigned, this 29th day of the month of 
April, 1840, baptized James, legitimate son of Mary 
Carty, nee Mary Ryan, born the 27th day of the month of 
June, 1839. The sponsors were John Ryan and Mary 
Crawley. Signed : J. Benoit." 

It may be proper here to mention that his last pub- 
lic function was the burial of Peter Henry, on which 
occasion he sang a Requiem Mass (following the text 
with difficulty because of his poor eyesight), September 
9, 1884. 



BUILDING THE CATHEDRAL 
(1860) 

Just previously to his last visit to New Orleans, 
Father Benoit left $1,000.00 with the building commit- 
tee, Messrs. Henry Baker, Michael Hedekin, Morris Cody, 
and Jacob Kintz, who laid the foundation of the 
present Cathedral. Upon his return from New 
Orleans Father Benoit, together with the gentlemen 
above named, began gathering a subscription for the 
new edifice. During the several months devoted to 
this work they started a subscription calling for 
$18,000.00, of which $4,000.00 was never paid. About 
the time the building was completed a bazaar was held 
which netted $2,600.00. The building was begun in 
1860. The cornerstone was laid on Trinity Sunday by 
Rt. Rev. Bishop Luers, and the sermon was preached by 
Most Rev. Archbishop Puree) 1. The first brick was laid 
July 10th. In the autumn of 1861 tlie building was 
finished and dedicated. 



RT. RHV. MSGR. JULIAN BENOIT 107 

The architects of the church were the Rev. Julian 
Benoit and Mr. Thomas Lau. The brick work was done 
by Contractor James Silver, and the carpenter work by 
Thomas Lau. The cost of the church, exclusive of pews, 
organ and altars, was $54,000.00. The organ cost 
$3,000.00, the main altar $1,200.00, pulpit nearly as 
much, and the Bishop's throne $700.00. The large 
candlesticks on the main altar were made to order in 
Paris, and cost 4,500 francs. An exact facsimile of these 
was afterwards placed in the famous church of the 
Madeline in Paris. 

(A reader of the Ave Maria in the year 1866 describes 
the Cathedral.) 

We returned a few days ago from a pieasani visit lu 
Fort Wayne. What a change there since we first passed 
through it in 1841. From 3,000 souls the population of 
the city has now swelled to over 20,000 ; and to all ap- 
pearances, it is gaining of late more rapidly than ever 
before. We trust it increases alike in Christian habits 
and virtues as well as in numbers. 

The object of these lines, however, is not to speak of 
the flattering prospects of this flourishing city, nor even 
to show how Catholicity keeps pace with its daily growth, 
but rather to apprise our readers of a fact to which none 
of them can be indifferent — viz: that even there in the 
woods of northern Indiana, the Holy Mother of God pos- 
sesses a beautiful Cathedral dedicated to her Immaculate 
Conception. 

It was our good fortune to celebrate Mass twice in 
this new temple of faith and piety ; if, wherever we offer 
the Holy Sacrifice, we love to make a memento of the 
readers of the AVE MARIA, how much more when we 
celebrate under the immediate auspices of our glorious 
Mother! 

Although not one of the largest Cathedrals on this 
Continent, it is neat and of chaste design, and withal for 
the present, at least, sufficient for a vast congreg;ation. 
We are told,, jit fills up two or three times every Sunday 
for Mass and Vespers; that every Catholic goes to church 



108 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

twice at least on Sunday and festival days. (Would that 
we could truthfully say this to-day .-Ed.) 

Since last summer, the Very Rev. J. Benoit, V. G., 
Pastor and builder of St. Mary's, has been absent on a 
tour of Europe. But his energetic assistant, Rev. E. P. 
Walters, spares no pains to prevent persons or things 
from suffering by the protracted absence of the venerated 
senior pastor, whose name is literally identified with 
everything religious in Fort Wayne for more than a quar- 
ter of a century. To him the city is indebted, not only 
for the new Cathedral, its chief monument, but also for 
the two excellent schools attached to it — one for the boys, 
conducted by four Brothers of the Holy Cross, and the 
other for girls, under the direction of eight Sisters of 
Providence. 

The German Church, one block from the Cathedral, 
and nearly as large, is also dedicated to the Blessed Vir- 
gin, under the beautiful title of the "Mother of God." It 
is an ornament to the city and the legitimate pride of its 
exemplary congregation, and of its beloved pastor, the 
Rev. Joseph Weutz. The Sisters of Notre Dame have 
opened there lately a day school, in which they count 
already over 200 pupils. With such teachers. Catholic 
children are safe in Fort Wayne. 

We were shown by the good Bishop the beautiful 
spot on which he intends erecting, this year, an extensive 
Orphan Asylum, which will be a monument of his zeal 
and a new evidence of the good will, not alone of his own 
people, but of the entire population of the place. God 
speed the noble work! To aid it, the whole diocese will 
turn out like a man and will strain every nerve to com- 
plete it. 

Academy of the Sacred Heart. 

The object of our visit to Fort Wayne was the final 
arrangement for a new academy under the direction of 
the Sisters, a few miles from the city, in New France. 
We may as well add that it is likewise to be dedicated to 
the Blessed Virgin under the name of Notre Dame du 
Sacre Coeur. The undertaking is in the hands of the Rev. 



RT. REV. MSGR. JULIAN BENOIT 109 

August Adam, one of the most active priests in the dio- 
cese; he seems confident that, with the assistance of his 
devoted congregation and his numerous friends, he will 
be able to put up a fine and costly building for a boarding 
school, and have it ready for occupancy next fall. 

We feel right glad to find that the head of our new 
diocese takes such a stand and gives such an example of 
devotedness to the Queen of Heaven. It would be difficult 
to point out the time when this devotion in Fort Wayne 
commenced. It was certainly there before we visited the 
place 'in 1841. 

Fort Wayne is the first town in Indiana where we 
halted on our reaching the end of our journey from 
France. To this day, we remember with delight the few 
hours we spent there by the deathbed of a young priest, 
the Rev. Mr. Hammion, whom we were not to meet again 
in this world. He was then in the last stage of consump- 
tion. His angelic countenance, his admirable resignation, 
and, above all, his edifying conversation, plainly revealed 
no ordinary love of the Blessed Virgin. From all ac- 
counts, as we soon learned afterward, he was a saintly 
missionary, whose brief career had been, in words and 
actions, a most efficient preaching to the little nucleus of 
Catholics already settled there. Shortly after he died, 
as the true Servants of Mary die, the death of a pre- 
destined, of a Saint. His image is still fresh in our mind, 
as one of those first impressions to which virtue attaches 
an imperishable charm. 

Fort Wayne was the last resting place of the Indians 
in this State. (The Miami Tribe). Father Benoit himself 
accompanied them beyond the Mississippi in 1846, the 
last emigration composed of 600 souls. They say that 
those children of the forests are so skilled in the study 
of nature, that they can read in the print of a foot upon 
the sand or snow in their trackless hunting grounds v,'ho 
passed there before, whether a friend or foe. 

What prints are we going to leave behind us for our 
successors to read? Will any one ever be able even upon 
a scrupulous examination to find out by any evident mark, 
that we belonged to the family of the ever Blessed Mary? 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



THE RIGHT REV. JOSEPH DWENGER, D. D. 

THE SECOND BISHOP OF FORT WAYNE 

Thg ggg. ond Bishop 

of Fort Iffl^^^^^^^^H Wayne, the 
Right Rev. ,;■ ' '- . ..' ^'^^^H Joseph 
Dwenger, D. ... t. '^--/>^ alHi °-' ^^^ ^een 
a priest of m^s^ ^B *^® Society 

of the Free- |Bl ^B ^^"^ ^^^^^ 

before his i^R^ ^* ^^ ^H consecra- 
tion. He is i^Bfc*-'^^^ ^^B J^e™embered 
b y ' m a n V ^^Rt '^^ ^S People still 




robust fig- 
erf ul preach- 
man of de- 
will. 

D w e n ge r 
Mercer 
Ohio, on 
18 3 7. His 
emigrated in 
of the same 



many 
living as a 
ure, a pow- 
e r and a 
t e r m i n ed 
Joseph 
was born in 
County, 
September?, 
parents had 
the spring 

year from Hanover, Germany. At the age of three 
Joseph lost his father, and his mother moved with 
her family to Cincinnati where she remained until 
1849. Leaving her two older sons in that city she 
returned to Mercer County with Joseph, then twelve 
years old. But after a few months she died of 
the cholera. At the time Reverend Andrew Kunkler, 
C. PP. S. administered the last rites to her she asked 
him to take care of her boy, which he promised to do. 
This promise was executed immediately, for Father 
Kunkler took Joseph away with him and cared for him 
until he was able to enter the Novitiate of the Congre- 
gation of the Most Precious Blood. 

Joseph was ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop 
Purcell on September 4th, 1859, and celebrated his first 
Holy Mass four days later in St. John's Parish, near the 
place of his birth. 

I For some time he was professor and Rector of the 



RT. REV. JOSEPH DWENGER, D. D. Ill 

Seminary of his Congregation, during which time he 
purchased property for a more suitable seminary at Car- 
thagena. 

After filhng a pastorate at Wapokoneta for a few 
years he was placed on the Mission Band of the Fathers 
of the Precious Blood, during which time he was in 
great demand in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and in other 
states as a missionary. 

Both as a representative of his Community and as 
secretary to Archbishop Purcell, Reverend Joseph 
Dwenger attended the Second Council of Baltimore. 

When the Diocese of Fort Wayne became vacant 
through the death of its first Bishop, Father Dwenger 
was selected by Pope Pius IX as its second Bishop. He 
was consecrated in the Cathedral at Cincinnati by Arch- 
bishop Purcell on April 14th, 1872. He came to Fort 
Wayne immediately and took full charge of the diocese. 

An orphan himself Bishop Dwenger took a deep in- 
terest in homeless children, and proceeded to build new 
Orphanages, the one which had served both boys and 
girls at Rensselaer becoming inadequate. He erected an 
institution for orphan boys at Lafayette in 1875, and 
another for girls at Fort Wayne in the year 1886. 

Probably no Bishop of his day did so much to develop 
an efficient parochial school system as did Bishop Dwen- 
ger. There was scarcely a parish of thirty or forty 
families which did not have its own parochial school, 
when he died. As early as 1879 he created a Diocesan 
School Board, consisting of seven priests, to whom the 
supervision of parochial schools was entrusted, and who 
were deputed to examine the schools with punctual regu- 
larity. 

Bishop Dwenger, two years after his consecration, 
conducted the first official pilgrimage from the United 
States to Lourdes, where he left a beautiful American 
flag in the name of the Catholics in this country. 

The New York Freeman's Journal, speaking of this 
pilgrimage in the edition of May 2nd, 1874, says : 

"The First Religious Pilgrimage of the Faithful of 



112 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Christ, from the United States, goes forth in this year of 
grace, 1874. 

"However many other Pilgrimages there may be, 
the Pilgrimage of 1874, will stand, in all history, as the 
First from America ! 

"This volunteer body of Pilgrims propose to pre- 
pare for its beginning by special prayers, meditations 
and frequentation of the Holy Sacraments. They feel 
and know that the times are very serious and that repa- 
ration to Divine Justice must be made, or worse things 
will come upon us. 

"In this spirit go the Bishop of Fort Wayne, the 
Right Rev. Dr. Dwenger, and his grand Vicar General, 
Father Benoit — full of years and successful labors — who 
were the first enrolled in this voluntary Pilgrimage, and 
whose act of faith stamped on it its high character. In 
this spirit go others of the Hierarchy, Vicars General, 
and Priests honored by their long years as pastors of 
souls. In this spirit, too, go choice spirits of the laity, 
men who make sacrifices, and, in some cases, heavy sac- 
rifices, to go — not as a recreation, but as an offering 
of religious devotion." 

The Bishop also visited Rome on this same occasion. 
He went to Rome a second time in the year 1883, it being 
his official ad limina visit. But in the year 1885 he 
journeyed to Rome with two other American prelates 
in the interest of the Third Plenary Council of Balti- 
more. Three years later in the year 1888, the Bishop 
visited the Holy See the last time. 

In the year 1874, two years after his consecration, 
the Bishop called a Synod which met at Notre Dame on 
the 20th of October, 1874. The Synod opened with 
Pontifical Mass on Sunday, October 21st, at which his Ex- 
cellency was assisted by the Reverend Francis Lawler as 
assistant Priest, by the Rev. M. O'Reilly and D. Duehmig, 
as Deacons of Honor, by the Reverends A. B. Oechtering 
and A. Messmanri, Deacons of the Mass and by the Reve- 
rend§ M. E. Campion and John Bleckman as Masters of 
Ceremonies. He held a second Synod in the year 1884. 



RT. REV. JOSEPH DWBNGER, D. D. 113 

At this Synod there was considerable legislation on 
temporal matters, the principal occasion for it being the 
abuses which obtained in many parishes where lay trus- 
tees ruled. 

Before his death he induced the Fathers of the 
Precious Blood to erect a college and Preparatory Semi- 
nary near Rensselaer. It is the St. Joseph College with 
which all our readers are familiar, in which most of the 
junior clergy of the Diocese of Fort Wayne had their 
early training, and to which the diocese itself feels deep- 
ly indebted. 

Bishop Dwenger's powerful physical frame was 
stricken three years before he died and he was incapaci- 
tated for practically all work, because of heart trouble. 
His death occured on January 23rd, 1893, and he was 
buried on January 26th at a Pontifical Requiem Mass 
celebrated by Archbishop Elder, of Cincinnati. Eight 
Bishops attended the obsequies in addition to more than 
two hundred priests, a large number for that time. 

The funeral oration was delivered by Bishop Rade- 
macher, of Nashville, who preached from the text "How 
is the mighty man fallen that saved Israel" (1 Macabees 
V. 19.). 

The remains of this second Bishop were interred at 
the side of his predecessor in the crypt under the present 
Cathedral of Fort Wayne. 

OUR DIOCESE WHEN BISHOP DWENGER TOOK 
CHARGE 

Following is an accurate report of the status of the 
Diocese of Fort Wayne at the time of the accession of 
Right Reverend Joseph Dwenger, D. D., in the year 1872. 

The report shows the cities, towns, and country 
places, whose people were attended by a Catholic priest. 

It will be noted that there were three churches in 
the city of Fort Wayne. ■ 

The places which are numbered are those in which 
there was a resident priest. It will be observed that 
there were only thirty-eight such places in the diocese at 



114 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

the death of Bishop Luers and at the time of the conse- 
cration of Fort Wayne's second Bishop. 

Fort Wayne — Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. 
Right Rev. Joseph Dwenger, D. D., 
Bishop, Right Rev. Monsignor Julian 
Benoit, Vicar General, Rev. Joseph 
Henry Brammer, Rev. M. A. Meile. 
Mother of God, Rev. Joseph Weutz, 
Rev. F. Von Schwedler. 
St. Paul's, Rev. Edw. Koenig. 

Angola, attended from Avilla, 
1 — Areola, Rev. Theo. Vandepoel, 
2 — Attica, Rev. J. Bleckmann, 

Avilla, Rev. Dominic Duehmig, 

Auburn, attended from Leo, 
3 — Anderson, Rev. James Crawley, 
4 — Besancon, Rev. A. Adam, 

Biradf ord, from St. Pierre, 

Brimfield, from Avilla, 

Brookston, from Lafayette, 

Bluffton, from Fort Wayne, 

Sheldon, from Fort Wayne, 

Buck Creek, from Lafayette, 

Busher's from Kokomo, 

Bourbon, from Plymouth, 

Bristol, from Mishawaka, 

Bunker Hill, from Peru, 

Butler, from Leo. 
5 — Chesterton, Rev. William O'Rourke, 

Carlisle, from Laporte, 
6 — Columbia City, Rev. Jos. Rademacher. 

Clarke's Hill, from Lafayette, 

Colfax 

Clymer, from Logansport, 

Corona, from Avilla, 

Covington, from Attica, 
7 — Cedar Lake, Rev. Francis Siegelack. 

Cravi'fordsville, Rev. E. P. Walters, 

Crovs^n Point, attended from Turkey Creek. 



RT. REV. JOSEPH DWBNGER, D. D. 115 

8 — Decatur, Rev. John Wemhoff . 
9 — Delphi, Rev. J. H. Quinlan, 
10 — Dyer, Rev. Theodore Berg, 

Elkhart, attended from Mishawaka. 

Farmland, attended from Union City. 

Frankfort, attended from Lafayette. 

Fish Lake, attended from Laporte, 

Francisville, attended from San Pierre, 

Galveston, attended from Kokomo, 

Girardot, attended from Avilla, 
11 — Goshen, Rev. Henry Meissner, 

Hanna, attended from Valparaiso, 

Hartford, attended from Fort Wayne, 
12 — Hesse Cassel, Rev. William Worste, 

Hobart, attended from Valparaiso, 

Horse Prairie, attended from Valparaiso, 
13 — Huntington, Rev. George Steiner, 

Jonesboro, attended from Peru, 

Judson, attended from Winamac, 
14 — Kokomo, Rev. P. A. Frawley, 
15 — Kentland, Rev. A. Mersman, 

Kendallville, attended from Avilla, 

Kouts, from Valparaiso, 
16 — Lafayette, 

St. Mary's, Fathers Hamilton, Dinnen, Hallinan, 
17 — St. Boniface's, Rev. U. Beine, 

Ladoga, from Crawfordsville, 

Lebanon, from Lafayette, 

LaCrosse, from San Pierre, 

LaGrange, from Avilla, 
18— Laporte, (St. Peter's) Rev. T. O'Sullivan, 
19 — Leo, Rev. M. Zumbuelte, 

Lima, from Avilla, 

Lowell, from Turkey Creek, 
20 — Lagro, Rev. M. A. Campion, 

Ligonier, from Goshen, 
21 — Logansport, 

St. Vincent's, Rev. Francis Lawler, Rev. James 
O'Brien, 
22 — St. Joseph's, Rev. J. Mayer, 



116 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

23 — Lake Station, Rev. William Wegmeier, 

Miller's Station, attended from Calumet. 
24 — Mishawaka, Rev. Aug. Oechtering, Rev. John Oech- 

tering, 
25 — Michigan City, Rev. John Becks, 

Marion, from Peru. 

Miami, from Peru. 

Mier, from Peru, 

Mullin's Settlement, from Kokomo, 

Monticello, from Kentland, 

Marshfield, from Attica, 

Muncie, from Union City, 

Monterey, from Winamac, 

Monroeville, from Fort Wayne, 

Montpelier, from Fort Wayne, 

Maderyville, from San Pierre, 

Millersburg, from Goshen, 
26 — New France, Rev. L. Florent, C. S. C. 
27— Nevi^ Haven, Rev. W. Giedl, 

Nix Settlement, from Areola, 

North Judson, from Winamac, 
28 — Notre Dame, Very Rev. A. Granger, C. S. C. 

Noblesville, from Kokomo, 

Oxford, from Lafayette, 
29— Peru, Rev. B. Kroeger, Rev. F. Wiechman, 
30 — Plymouth, Rev. G. Zurvi^ellen, 

Pulaski, from Winamac, 

Quincy, from Anderson, 

Rome City, from Avilla, 

Reynolds, from San Pierre, 

Roanoke, from Areola, 
31 — Rensselaer, Rev. B. Rachor, 

Remington, from Kentland, 

Rochester, from Peru, 

Star City, from Winamac, 
32— South Bend, St. Patrick's, Rev. P. Coony C S C • 
Rev. D. Spillard, C. S. C. ; > • ■ ., 

Rev. P. Lauth, C. S. C. 
33— San Pierre, Rev. Joseph Stephan, 



RT. REV. JOSKPH DWENGER, U. D . 117 

34 — St. John's, Rev. A. Heitmann, 

Sharpsville, from Kokomo, 
35 — St. Mary's Home, Jay County, Rev. P. Capedar, 
C. PP. S. 

Tolleston, from Turkey Creek, 

Tipton, from Kokomo, 

Terre Coupee, from Laporte, 

Twenty Miles Prairie, from Valparaiso, 
36 — Union, Rev. L. Lamour, 
37_Valparairso, Rev. M. O'Reilly, 

Wabash, from Lagro, 

Westville, from Chesterton, 
38 — Winamac, Rev. Henry Koenig, Rev. B. Wiedau, 

Wheeler, from Valparaiso, 

Wanatah 

Walkerton, from Laporte. 

RECAPITULATION 

Secular Priests 48 

Regular Priests 21 

Churches 75 

Parish Schools 40 

Hospital 1 

Orphan Asylum 1 

Catholic Population 50,000 

The Poor Handmaids had come to the United States 
and established themselves at Fort Wayne. 

The Sisters of the Holy Cross had established Board- 
ing Schools at Crawfordsville, Laporte, Logansport, New 
Lowell, Academie, and Michigan City. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 




RT. REV. JOSEPH DWENGBR, D. D. 119 

Financial Status in 1875 

Among old papers we find a single sheet containing 
a summary of the financial status of the Diocese of Fort 
Wayne as of April 22nd, 1875, as follows : 

"Liabilities : 

Old Debt $12,146.00 

New Debt 25,986.91 

Total of debts §38,132.91 

Assets : 

Cash in bank $ 4,517.57 

Good notes and credits 9,000.00 

Total 113,517.57 

Doubtful notes and credits 870.00 

Joseph Dwenger." 

Another statement, issued on May 10th, 1876, or one 
year later, reads as follows : 

Funded debt $24,175.50 

To Father Benoit and Stehle 12,311.00 

Total Debt $36,486.50 

Cash on hand 4,000.00 

Notes 14,747.00 

Good claims over 500.00 

Total good assets independent of 

Rev. Hamilton's estate $19,247.00 

Doubtful notes and claims over 1,000.00 

Estate of Rev. G. A. Hamilton 

certainly over 14,000.00 

Thus independent of land and ground the Diocese 
has fully as much good assets as debts. 

Joseph Dwenger, 

Bp. Ft. W." 



120 FRAGaiENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

NOTICE SENT TO CLERGY IN 1875 
Rev. and Dear Sir: 

1. I desire to call your attention to the statute of 
the Diocese requiring a collection for the Pope to be taken 
up no later than this month. 

2. The collection for infirm priests will be omitted 
this year. In place of this I request you to take up a 
special collection for the building of the new orphan asy- 
lum. The jubilee alms will also be devoted to the same 
purpose. I request you also to establish orphan societies. 
Even children will be proud to form an orphan society, 
and to pay their five cents a month. Relying upon your 
well-known zeal and charity, I have undertaken the build- 
ing of an asylum, and I hope that we may succeed in or- 
ganizing in a permanent and successful manner for the 
care of our orphans. 

Fort Wayne, Feast of the Apostle, St. Barnabas, 1875. 

•h JOSEPH DWENGER, 

Bishop of Fort Wayne. 



RT. REV. JOSEPH DWENGER, D. D. 



PROGRESS OF THE CATHOLIC POPULATION OF 
THE UNITED STATES UP TO 1878. 

Father Hecker, in his excellent pamphlet, The Catho- 
lic Church in the United States: its Rise, Relations tvith 
the Republic, Groivth, and Future Prospects, gives the 
following table "to show the gradual increase of the Cath- 
olic Church, as far as data were attainable, from the time 
of the Declaration of Independence to the year 1878, in- 
clusive" : 



YEAR. 



1776. 



1790. 



1800. 



1810. 



1820. 



Archbishops - 

Bishops- -— 

Dioceses—- - - 

Apostolic Vicariates — - 

Priests - — 

Churches 

Stations and cliapels ..--- 
Ecclesiastical institutions 

Colle&es - — 

Female academies — . 

Catholic population 

Total population 



25 



25,000 
3,000,000 



34 



30,000 
3,200,000 



50 



1 
2 
1 

100,000 
5,300,000 



1 
5 
5 

70 
80 

2 
3 
3 

150,000 
7,200,000 



1 
6 
6 

150 

no 

3 

5 

300,000 
9,600,000 



Fractional part of whole 
population 



1_ 

120 



1 
107 



48 



YEAR. 


1830 


1840. 


1850. 


1860. 


1878. 


Archbishops — 

Bishops- - 

Dioceses- 

Apostolic Vicariates - 


1 

9 

11 

222 
232 

"9 

6 

20 

600,000 

13,000,000 


1 
16 
16 

482 

454 

358 

13 

9 

47 

1,500,000 

17,000,000 


6 
27 
27 

1,800 

1,100 

505 

29 

17 

91 

3,500,000 

23,200,000 


7 

42 

43 

3 

2,235 

2,385 

1,128 

30 

34 

212 

4,500,000 

31,500,000 


11 

57 

60 

8 

5,'3BO 


Churches— - - 

Stations and chapels 

Ecclesiastical institutions- 
Colleges 


5,720 

1,800 

33 

?7 


Female academies 


525 
7,000,000 




40,000,000 






Fractional part of whole 


1 
21 


1 
11 


1 
7 


1 

7 


1 
6 







FRAGMENTS OF OUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 



ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS OF UNITED STATES. 
At time of Bishop Dwenger's appointment. 

ARCHBISHOPS 
Name Archdiocese Reside-nce 

M. Rev. M. J. Spaulding, D.D -Baltimore JBaltimore, Md. 

Francis N. Blanchet, D.D.Oreg-on- Portland, Oregon 

Peter R. Kenrick, D.D ...St. Louis St. Louis, Mo. 

Jolin B. Purcell, D.D - Cincinnati Cincinnati, Ohio 

J. S. Alemany, D.D San Francisco San Francisco, Cal. 

John McCIoskey, D.D..- New York J^ew York, N. Y. 

P. A. Perche, D.D _.Kew Orleans — New Orleans, La. 

BISHOPS 
Name Diocese Residence 

M. Rev. Thadeus Amat, D. D - Monterey Los Angeles, Cal. 

David W. Bacon, D.D Portland ._ Portland, Me. 

James P. Wood, D.D Philadelphia Philadelphia, Pa. 

William H. Elder, D.D JSTatchez Natchez, Miss. 

P. N. Lynch, D. D Charleston. Charleston, S. C. 

E. P. McFarland, D.D _Hartford Providence, R. I. 

Augustine Verot, D.D St. Augustine— St. Augustine, Fla. 

James O'Gorman, D.D .JSTebraska Omaha, Neb. 

Thomas L. Grace, D.D.... St. Paul -.- St. Paul, Minn. 

John Quinlan, D.D Mobile Mobile, Ala. 

M. Domenec, D.D Pittsburgh JPittsburgh, Pa. 

S. H. Rosecrans, D.D Columbus — Columbus, Ohio 

M. Dubuis, D.D Galveston .Galveston, Texas 

Louis De Goesbriand, D.D. ..Burlington ^ Burlington, Vt. 

P. A. Feehan, D.D Nashville JSTashville, Tenn. 

John J. Conroy, D.D Albany — Albany, N. Y. 

John J. Williams, D.D Boston Boston, Mass. 

John Hennessey, D.D... _JDubuque JDubuque, Iowa 

Edward Fitzgerald, D.D .Little Rock Little Rock, Ark. 

William McCIoskey, D.D Louisville. X.ouisville, Ky. 

Richard V. Whelan, D.D .Wheeling .Wheeling, West Va. 

John M. Henni, D.D Milwaukee Milwaukee, Wis. 

M. A. Blanchet, D.D JSTesqualy Ft. Vancouver, W.T. 

M. De St. Palais, D.D _Vincennes .Vincennes, Ind. 

T. J. Foley, D.D _.Chicago ._ Chicago, 111. 

John Lamy, D.D Santa Fe Santa Pe, N. M. 

John McGill, D.D ...Richmond Richmond, Va. 

John B. Miege, D.D..... .^Kansas & E.R.M... Leavenworth, Kans. 

Louis Fink, D.D., Coadj -. " " " " " 

John Loughlin, D.D. Brooklyn Brooklyn, N. Y. 

James R. Bayley, D.D Newark Newark, N. J. 

A. Martin, D.D -Natchitoches... Natchitoches, La. 

J. W. Shanahan, D.D... _Harrisburg JHarrisburg, Pa. 

William O'Hara, D.D Scranton .Scranton, Pa. 

B. J. McQuaid, D.D .Rochester Rochester, N. Y. 

Joseph Melcher, D.D .Green Bay _...Green Bay, Wis. 

Tobias Mullen, D.D - _Erie . — JErie, Pa. 

J. F. Macheboeuf, D.D Colorado Denver City, Col. 

Thomas A. Becker, D.D .Wilmington .Wilmington, Del, 

James Gibbons, D.D - .North Carolina Wilmington, N. C. 

Michael Heiss, D.D _La Crosse La Crosse, Wis. 

John Hogan, D.D St. Joseph St. Joseph, Mo. 

Stephen V. Ryan, D.D... Buffalo Buffalo, N. Y. 

Ignatius Mrack, D.D .Marquette Marquette, Mich. 

J. Persico, D.D 1 Savannah Savannah, Ga. 

A. M. Toebbe, D.D Covington Covington, Ky. 

C. H. Borgess, D.D Detroit Detroit, Mich. 

P. J. Baltes. D.D Alton A.lton, 111. 

P. T. O'Reilly, D. D Springfield Springfield, Mass. 



ET. REV. JOS EPH DWENGER. D. D. 123 

THE CLERGY RELIEF SOCIETY 

1871 

The Clergy Relief Society of the Diocese of Fort 
Wayne, originally incorporated as the "Roman Catholic 
Benevolent Association of the Priests of the Diocese of 
Fort Wayne, Indiana," was established in April, 1871, 
with the following clergymen as its first incorporators 
and directors: J. H. Luers, Julian Benoit, J. Weutz, Ed- 
ward Koenig, J. W. Giedl, George Hamilton, George 
Steiner, Francis Lawler, M. O'Reilly, and E. P. Walters. 
The objects of this Association, according to the Articles 
of Incorporation, were "the maintenance of infirm or 
superannuated clergymen of the Roman Catholic Diocese 
of Fort Wayne, Indiana, and the establishment of retreats 
for the same if the Association shall deem proper." 

The management of the business of the Association 
was vested in a Board of seven Directors. 

It was stipulated that if the Association should 
cease to exist or fail to carry out the provisions of the 
Constitution, the management of its affairs would pass 
into the hands of a committee composed of the Right 
Reverend Bishop and the pastors of St. Mary's Church, 
Fort Wayne; of St. John's Church, New Haven; of St. 
Paul's Church, Valparaiso; of St. Vincent's Church, 
Logansport; of St. Mary's Church, Lafayette; of St. 
Paul's Church, Fort Wayne; of Ss. Peter and Paul's 
Church, Huntington, and of St. Bernard's Church, Craw- 
fordsville. These clergymen would collect all delinquent 
dues, pay all debts, and invest whatever fund might have 
resulted from all sources for the benefit of the "indigent 
secular priests of the Diocese of Fort Wayne, Indiana." 

Fort Wayne probably led all dioceses in the United 
States in providing systematic support for infirm and 
aged priests. 

This Association was a success almost from the be- 
ginning, though it lived through a few trying periods. 
Today it is probably the best and most flourishing in the 



124 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



United States, having assets amounting to $150,000.00. 
This fund has been accumulated from three sources; (1) 
from good investments of the sinking fund; (2) from an 
annual collection on the Sunday following the 15th of 
August; and (3) from the dues of contributing members. 
The outlay in some years approximates the sum total of 
these three sources of supply, owing to the fact that be- 
sides a dozen retired priests, who receive allowances of 
1720.00 a year, there are sometimes many priests on the 
sick list. For many years the allowance was $480.00, or 
$600.00 the year. 

The late Rev. Edward Koenig, founder of St. Paul's 
Parish, Fort Wayne, was a special beneficiary of this 
Society. 

Nearly all the priests of the Diocese of Fort Wayne 
are affiliated as members and, when they are ill, reap 
benefits out of all proportion to the dues which they pay 
when their health is good and they are in active service. 

In the year 1926 Bishop Noll erected a cottage on 
the Orphan Asylum property. Fort Wayne, for a retired 
priest to occupy, and OUR SUNDAY VISITOR, of Hun- 
tington, Indiana, made a similar gift, so that at present 
homes are available to two retired priests. The priests 
themselves who draw from the Clergy Benevolent Asso- 
ciation, pay whatever maintenance expenses there are 
such as house-keeper, light and fuel, etc. The donors of 
the two cottages keep the same in repair and pay the in- 
surance on the building. 

A non-Catholic woman, of New Haven, Indiana, has 
made a gift of her home with all its furnishings to the 
Diocese of Fort Wayne to be occupied by a retired priest 
or some diocesan official following her death. 



EX. REV. JOSEPH DWENGER, D. D. 125 

ORGANIZATION OF A DIOCESAN SCHOOL BOARD 

1879. 

Just as the diocese of Fort Wayne was one of the 
first, if not actually the first, to undertake systematic 
provision for the support of infirm and aged priests, so 
it was one of the first, if not actually the very first to es- 
tablish a School Board for the extension of parochial 
school education in the Diocese. 

Bishop Dwenger was an ardent champion of the 
parochial schools, his motto being, "Catholic schools now, 
or empty Churches a few years hence." 

The Diocesan School Board was formed in the spring 
of 1879, and its first members were: Very Rev. Julian 
Benoit, President ; Reverend M. O'Reilly, Secretary ; Rev. 
W. Corby, C. S. C; Rev. Edward Koenig; Rev. Joseph 
Rademacher; Rev. H. Meissner; and the Rev. John 
Oechtering. This board was ordered to make a survey of 
the existing schools, and to ascertain whether some 
parishes which had hitherto not conducted parochial 
schools were not in position to establish them. In that 
year there were fifty-three schools in the Diocese of Fort 
Wayne while the number of parishes was not much larg- 
er. 

The School Board made the following report to Bis- 
hop Dwenger on July 22d, 1879 : 

Address of School Board to Bishop 

RT. REV. BISHOP :— The members of the Diocesan 
School Board, appointed in your pastoral letter of Feb- 
ruary 9th, 1879, respectfully beg leave to submit you 
this first general report of the Schools of your Diocese. 
Taking into consideration the many obstacles necessarily 
impeding the prosecution of this duty, and the incomplete- 
ness of this attempt, the Board has every reason to feel 
confident that an important step has been taken, which, 
by judicious perseverance, must in a few years produce 
results most beneficial to all parties interested in the 
great task of Catholic education. 

By means of a well prepared annual report, Rt. Rev. 
Bishop, it will be in your power to perceive at a glance 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



what is being done for the education of Catholic youth 
in your diocese. In your hands are placed statistics from 
the most humble as well as the more opulent localities 
under your jurisdiction, which may justify a timely re- 
proof or elicit a word of encouraging approbation. The 
zeal of your priests, the charity of the religious orders, 
the commendable devotedness of the lay teachers, and the 
self-sacrificing generosity of the Catholic people, are 
all collected together, summed up and placed before you. 
These elements constitute your auxiliaries in the dis- 
charge of your God-given commission, "Go, teach all na- 
tions !" and on their efficiency, moulded and directed by 
your paternal hand, the Catholicity of coming genera- 
tions in the diocese of Fort Wayne largely depends. 

On the other hand: From a complete annual report 
of the schools you can learn where zeal begins to flag, 
or where charity begins to grow cold ; for, with indiffer- 
ence toward the Catholic education of youth, begins the 
moral death of the congregation. The remedy of these 
chilling diseases can be administered effectively only by 
you. To repair evils of this nature, you possess the 
most sublime power on earth — the authority divinely be- 
stowed on the Bishop of the Catholic Church. 

Through such a report also, the clergy of the dio- 
cese will be able to compare the effects of their chari- 
table labors with those of their neighbors. The weari- 
ness, that not infrequently accompanies well-doing in 
the arduous work of conducting and providing for the 
support of a Catholic school, may sometimes be removed 
by a knowledge of the encouraging success of a brother 
pastor, and those priests, who, by self denial, hard la- 
bor and constant vigilance, may have placed their 
schools in a respectable standing, will be afforded an 
opportunity of seeing that there is ample room for great- 
er improvement; and what is still more important — 
those who hesitate to establish schools and withhold an 
attempt to support them, can easily discover that very 
good schools flourish under circumstances no more ad- 
vantageous than their own. A comparison of the state- 
ments in the present report, with the well-known stand- 



RT. EEV. JOSEPH DWENGER, D. D. 



ing of congregations returning "No school," goes far to 
convince us, that almost every congregation in the diocese 
can support a school for its children. We are well aware 
that the ability of each congregation to sustain a school 
must be considered by itself alone, without regard to 
any other congregation ; yet the information we now pos- 
sess warrants us in saying, that the abundance of Catho- 
lic schools depends not so much on the wealth of the peo- 
ple as upon the zeal and industry of the local Pastors. 

The people are by no means indifferent to their best 
interests, and when they are once led to apprehend the 
untold blessings of a good Catholic school, the most diffi- 
cult part of the pastor's labor is ended. There are al- 
ways found in every congregation large hearts and noble 
souls, ever ready to sacrifice ease, time and money for 
the public good and the glory of God, who will step for- 
ward to aid the pastor in his good work, stimulated by the 
lofty hope, that they too may become participants in the 
glorious reward, which both heaven and earth so abund- 
antly bestow on the missionary heroes of the Church of 
God. 

As the Board did not have sufficient opportunity to 
convey to the pastors a full explanation of your views, 
many of the most important questions were left unans- 
wered. It is to be hoped that, by providing suitable 
records for the school room, and by paying more atten- 
tion to the import of the questions offered, more com- 
plete returns will be received in future. 

As the scope of the questions in the blank should 
cover all the schools of the diocese, but cannot be expected 
to apply in full to each school, the pastors and teachers 
are only required to answer the questions that may per- 
tain to their schools, and nothing else. 

In this report it is deemed necessary to allow a large 
space to the subject of text books. Much, attention has 
been paid, as far as the returns allow, to their classifica- 
tion and enumeration, that you, Rt. Rev. Bishop, the 
clergy, and the teachers, may see what a heterogeneous, 
collection the schools of the diocese afford. This di- 
versity cannot be a benefit, but is, without a doubt, su 



128 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTOR Y 

serious injury; and frequently becomes a large pecuniary 
loss to that class of our people least able to bear it. There 
is not an instance in the diocese, as far as we can now 
see, where a pupil can take a full set of text-books from 
one congregation and use them all in another. The 
floating part of the population, commonly laborers and 
mechanics, must pay the penalty of this want of unifor- 
mity. Their children either become a burden on the 
school authorities of their new home, or fail to attend 
school altogether, or else remain away waiting for new 
books, until such idle habits are acquired as render them 
very undesirable subjects for any school whatever. The 
consequence of this deplorable irregularity in the text- 
books of our schools have been too often experienced by 
every pastor and teacher to need further attention in 
pointing out the extent of the evil. Our efforts should 
be directed to remedy the matter in the most expeditious 
and at the same time the most prudent manner. 

At the present time we would not deem it judicious 
to prescribe a uniform set of text-books and command 
an immediate change. The cure would partake too much 
of the nature of the disease. We think that the good 
judgment of the pastors and teachers, on seeing the rela- 
tive merits of text-books now in use, as indicated by their 
popularity, will lead them to approach that uniformity, 
which in three or four years at most, you should make of 
obligation on all the schools of the diocese. 

While there are many things in the state of our 
schools that need improvement, we would deplore the use 
of hasty action or injudicious zeal, either on our own part, 
or the part of pastors and teachers, as the most desirable 
remedy. We hope to benefit our schools and create a 
Diocesan School System by constant perseverance and 
mutual co-operation on the part of all. 

The promptness with which the reports were filled 
and returned, the manifest interest taken in the answers, 
the valuable and kind suggestions offered, all show the 
general interest in the movement by the priests of the 
diocese. 

The board takes advantage of this opportunity to re- 



RT. REV. JOSEPH DWENGER, D. D. 



turn thanks for the courtesy extended it, and only waits 
your further approbation and blessing to have full confi- 
dence in its final success. 

DIOCESAN SCHOOL BOARD, 

Diocese of Fort Wayne, Ind. 
July 22d, 1879. 

Reply of Rt. Rev. Bishop Dv^'enger 
Very Rev. and Rev. Gentlemen of the Diocesan 
School Board: — Your address to me expresses my senti- 
ments so perfectly that I have but very little to add. It is 
my sacred duty as Bishop to knovs^ the state and condition 
of the Catholic schools in my diocese. It is my aim, 
through your co-operation, to make this information a 
source of usefulness and encouragement to all. Priests 
will see the labors and success of their brother priests, 
overcoming often very great difRculties. Without any 
onerous interference, we can gradually, in the course of 
time, recommend the best text-books, and gradually with- 
out extra expense or dilRculty we can reach uniformity. 
I feel certain that the data and facts which we collect will 
prove immensely valuable in the course of time. Hence I 
request the priests of the diocese to make the reports as 
full and complete as possible. It is very important, that 
we should have complete reports also from the convent 
schools and academies where children residing in the 
neighborhood are taught ; for although not parish schools 
in the ordinary sense of the word, yet they are Catholic 
schools in the parish. The beginning is well made. I hope 
it will prove a great, good work in the future. Thanking 
you for your labors in this good cause, I am yours in 
Christ, 

•f JOSEPH DWENGER, Bishop, 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 

CIRCULAR LETTER OF 1886 
Reverend Dear Sir: 

The decrees of the Third Plenary Council, of Balti- 
more, have been duly published and promulgated by the 
Apostolic Delegate, and are now in force and binding 
upon all the Faithful of the United States. In order to 



130 FRAGMENTS OF OUB DIOCESAN HISTORY 

carry out all the provisions of said Council, it would be 
necessary to hold a Diocesan Synod. This, at present, is 
almost impossible, as We, as well as the Priests, will be 
too busy till summer. Moreover, as we will have our regu- 
lar Retreat the week after the Assumption, B. V. M. the 
15th of August, at Notre Dame, and regular Diocesan 
Synod, it will be only a short delay till that time. We de- 
sire, however, to call your attention to immediate results 
of the Council. The feasts of the Epiphany, Annuncia- 
tion, B. V. M. and Corpus Christi cease to be holydays of 
obligation ; they should however, be kept as feasts of de- 
votion, with a high Mass where it is possible. The sol- 
emnities usually celebrated on Corpus Christi, as proces- 
sions, etc., should be transferred to the Sunday within the 
octave. You will also notice the censure and reserved case 
mentioned. Canon 124 and 127 ; also, the Commissio Cau- 
sarum ceases, and the judicial forms mentioned in the De- 
crees of the Council will be observed. 

Owing to the difficulty of observing the black fast, 
the two days required as a condition for gaining the Jubi- 
lee Indulgence, We make use of the faculty granted Us by 
the Holy See the 15th of January of this year, and grant 
to all the Faithful of Our Diocese the dispensation that on 
these two days of the Jubilee fast they may use milk, 
cheese, butter and eggs ; in other words, the Jubilee fast 
need not be a black fast, but may be kept as the ordinary 
fast and abstinence usually observed. This dispensation 
cannot be used during Lent, nor on Ember days or Vigils, 
when fasting is prescribed by the general laws of the 
Church. 

Independent of this, confessors will know when and 
in what manner they can commute the good works pre- 
scribed. We call your attention also to the fact "that each 
one should give alms according to his means," as the Holy 
Father says in His Encyclical. 

Wishing you a happy Easter, We remain yours in 
Christ, 

►I" JOSEPH DWENGER, 
Bishop of Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne, Ind.. Palm Sunday. 1886. 



DIOECESIS WAYNE CASTRENSIS 

Exercita Spiritualia Habita In Novitiatu Sancti Joseph, 
Notre Dame, Indiana, Ex Die Vicesimo Nono 
Mense Septembris Ad Diem Quintum 
Octobris A. D. 1884. 
Dabat, Rev. Aug. Stuhl, C.SS.R. 
Aderant : 
Illmus. Joseph Dwenger, D.D., Episcopus. 
Rev. J. H. Brammer, Rev. F. Lordemann, 

Rev. J. Becks, Rev. J. F. Lang, 

Rev. J. Bleckmann, Rev. F. G. Lentz, 

Rev. H. A. Boekelmann, Rev. C. Lemper, 



Rev. J. H. Bathe, 
Rev. Wm. Berg, 
Rev. J. B. Crovs^ley, 
Rev. M. E. Campion, 
Rev. P. J. Crosson, 
Rev. D. Duehmig, 
Rev. J. R. Dinnen, 
Rev. J. Dempsy, 
Rev. F. X. Ege, 
Rev. Joseph Flach, 
Rev. J. Grogan, 
Rev. G. A. Ganser, 
Rev. J. H. Guendling, 
Rev. A. Heitmann, 
Rev. J. Heuser, D.D., 
Rev. H. A. Hellhake, 
Rev. B. Hartmann, 
Rev. J. Hoss, 
Rev. M. Joy, 
Rev. E. Koenig, 
Rev. H. Koehne, 
Rev. B. Kroeger, 
Rev. F. Koerdt, 
Rev. H. F. Kroll, 
Rev. Wm. Kroeger, 
Rev. A. J. Kroeger, 



Rev. F. J. Lambert, 
Rev. H. Meisner, 
Rev. A. Messmann, 
Rev. J. A. Mark, 
Rev. L. A. Moench, 
Rev. C. Maujay, 
Rev. W. C. Miller, 
Rev. D. J. Mulcahy, 
Rev. J. Nussbaum, 
Rev. A. B. Oechtering, 
Rev. J. H. Oechtering, 
Rev. M. O'Reilly, 
Rev. H. M. Plaster, 
Rev. J. H. Quinlan, 
Rev. C. M. Romer, 
Rev. P. F. Roche, 
Rev. Wm. Schmidt, 
Rev. C. N. Stetter, D.D., 
Rev. A. J. Struder, 
Rev. James Tv^^igg, 
Rev. E. P. Walters, 
Rev. B. Wiedau, 
Rev. F. C. Wiechmann, 
Rev. H. T. Wilken, 
Rev. A. Young, 



Rev. M. Zumbulte. 
Oremus pro invicem, ut salvemur. 
All the above priests have gone to their reward. 
May they rest in peace. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUK DIOCESAN HISTORY 



VERY REVEREND JOSEPH H. BRAMMER 

Vicar-General to Bishops Dwenger and 
Rademacher 

The Very Reverend Joseph Brammer was held in 
about the same veneration and esteem during the admin- 
istration of Bishop Dwenger as was the Right Reverend 



Julian Ben- 
the incum- 
shop John 
ers. Father 
s u c c e eded 
oit as Vicar 
the year 
served the 
Parish from 
his ordina- 
until the 
death in 
F a ther 
was born in 
Germany, on 
1839, of Lu- 
ents. He was 
the Catholic 




oit during 
bency of Bi- 
Henry Lu- 
B r a m m er 
Fathejr Ben- 
General in 
1885. He 
C a t h e dral 
the day of 
tion in 1868 
time of his 
1898. 

B r a m m er 
Hanover, 
October 1st, 
theran par- 
received into 
Church at 



the age of twenty in this country, while a brother who 
also came to America entered the Lutheran ministry. 

Father Brammer was conspicuous for his charity, 
having given away during his lifetime practically every 
cent which he was able to save. He preached with 
great fervor, though always at considerable length as 
well. The late William P. Breen, himself an orator of no 
mean ability, characterized Father Brammer a "Bossuet" 
in his funeral orations. 

Father Brammer acted as administrator for the dio- 
cese during the years of 1885 and 1888 and during the 
period of Bishop Dwenger's protracted illness. 

Father Brammer was near death at the time the 



VERY REV. JO SEPH H. BRAMMER 133 

present Bishop of Fort Wayne was about to be ordained. 
His ordination was set for June 24th, 1898, but because 
Father Brammer, who was his pastor, wanted to witness 
Father Noll's ordination and to be present at his first 
Mass, he importuned Bishop Rademacher to ordain the 
Reverend deacon earlier. He was therefore summoned 
from the Seminary to be ordained on June 4th, in the 
church of his Baptism, First Communion and Confirma- 
tion. Father Brammer was present in the Sanctuary at 
both the ordination and the First Mass which occurred 
on June 5th — and the good pastor and Vicar General died 
two weeks later. He was buried in the crypt under the 
Cathedral. 

Father Brammer took a great deal of interest in the 
young people of his parish, and for the purpose of pro- 
viding them with wholesome recreation, built Library 
Hall on the Cathedral Square in the year 1880. This 
building served as the Central Catholic High School for 
boys for a quarter of a century. 

In the year 1892 he renovated the Cathedral at a cost 
of about 150,000.00 after having remitted most of the 
money subscribed because of a period of business depres- 
sion, which ensued the following year. 

If he was a poor financier it was due to his big heart. 
He was more disposed to give money to, than to take it 
from people. The result was that when he died the Cathe- 
dral parish was burdened with a very heavy debt which 
was entirely liquidated by three succeeding pastors, Fath- 
ers Roche, Quinlan and Conroy. 

The deceased pastors of the Cathedral are buried 
in the crypt underneath the sanctuary, where also the 
remains of the deceased Bishops rest. 



134 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



RIGHT REVEREND JOSEPH RADEMACHER 

Third Bishop of Fort Wayne 

The Right Reverend Joseph Rademacher was ap- 
pointed the third Bishop of Fort Wayne on July 14th, 
1893, having been transferred from the See of Nashville. 
His selection 
sal satisfac- 
priests of 




of Fort 
cause he had 
their own 
appoin't e d 
Nashville on 
1883. 

Bishop 
was born in 
Michigan, on 
3rd, 1840. 
his classical 
phical stud- 
Vincent Col- 
robe, Penn- 
and then 
Michael's 
Pittsburgh, for the study of theology. 

Bishop Luers adopted him for his diocese and or- 
dained him a priest on August 2d, 1863. He became the 
first resident pastor of Attica, with Covington as a mis- 
sion and with a large field contiguous to both these 
places. 

In 1870 he was appointed pastor of Columbia City, 
and two years later was transferred to St. Mary Church, 
Fort Wayne, after the death of the Rev. J. Weutz. Father 
Rademacher became endeared to the people of St. Mary 
Parish, but they lost him in the year 1880 when he was 
made pastor of St. Mary Church, Lafayette. It was 
from this pastorate that he was selected, three years later, 



gave umver- 
tion to the 
the Diocese 
Wayne, be- 
been one of 
until he was 
Bishop of 
June 24tl^ 

Rademacher 
Westphalia, 
De c em b er 
He pursued 
and philoso- 
ies at St.' 
lege, Lat- 
sy 1 V a n i a. 
went to St. 
Semi nary, 



RIGHT REV. JOSEPH EADEMACHER 



for the Bishopric of Nashville. He was consecrated on 
June 24th of that year. 

Bishop Rademacher shepherded the Diocese of Nash- 
ville for ten years, and follov^^ing the death of Bishop 
Dw^enger vs^as, to the great disappointment of his flock 
at Nashville, but to the great joy of the clergy and laity 
of the Diocese of Fort Wayne, appointed Bishop Dvi^en- 
ger's successor. 

A brief character sketch of Bishop Rademacher and 
of his ministry in Nashville is furnished by his Vicar 
General of that See, the late Rev. P. J. Gleeson. Of 
Bishop Rademacher, he vv^rites : 

"It gives me pleasure to do anything to honor the 
memory of Bishop Rademacher. When he took charge 
the Diocese of Nashville was still suffering from the 
effects of the yellow-fever in Memphis, where so many 
priests and religious had fallen victims to that dreaded 
scourge. His humble, hard-working zeal in meeting the 
peculiar conditions that confronted him, his readiness to 
do missionary work, and help even the humblest in 
preaching, hearing confessions, attending sick-calls, even 
taking the place of his priests who might be absent on a 
much needed rest, soon won for the Bishop the affection 
and the esteem of priests and people. This bond of 
affection between Bishop Rademacher and the priests and 
people of his diocese grew and deepened with the years, 
as his amiable, modest character became known : so that 
one and all instinctively called him GOOD Bishop Rade- 
macher. The peculiar circumstances following the yellow 
fever, coupled with the financial conditions then prevail- 
ing throughout the country, did not allow his zeal to find 
expression in the erection of church buildings. But his 
holy life, good example, his kindness to priests laboring in 
small and scattered missions, his patience and forbear- 
ance with all who came in contact with him, have built 
up a spiritual edifice in which the name of GOOD Bishop 
Rademacher is enshrined and which will last as long as 
the generation that knew him lives. All honor to his 
memory." 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The arrival of Bishop Rademacher in Fort Wayne 
on October 3d, 1893, was made the occasion of a great 
Catholic demonstration. Referring to it the FORT 
WAYNE SENTINEL, of October 4th, says : 

"For three years past the Catholic Diocese of Fort 
Wayne has been ruled from a sick bed, but now amid 
clamor of a hearty welcome from the people, Leo XIII 
sends to succeed the late lamented Bishop Dwenger, a 
man who is in every way qualified for the high office — 
Right Reverend Bishop Rademacher, transferred from 
the See of Nashville. 

"The rain which fell in steady torrents all day yester- 
day, in no way interfered with the program which had 
been arranged by the Very Rev. Joseph Brammer, and 
when, at three twenty-five P. M., a special train of three 
coaches pulled out of the Pennsylvania Company depot it 
was a merry party of clergy and laity who were aboard. 
They were bound for Lima, Ohio, where they were to 
meet the new Bishop who came north over the Cincinnati, 
Hamilton and Dayton Railway with an escort of about 
fifty clergymen. 

"The special for Fort Wayne left Lima at six fifty. 
Archbishop Elder and Bishop Rademacher, with other 
Bishops, occupying the rear coach, the clergy the second, 
and the laity the first. 

"In the presence of a large throng which gathered 
in front of the Cathedral, Father Brammer spoke these 
words to the new incumbent: 'Ever since the death of 
Bishop Dwenger, it has been the earnest wish of the 
Catholics of this diocese that you would be the chosen 
Bishop. For this reason, and because we love and re- 
spect you, our welcome is all the heartier.' " 

Following Father Brammer's greeting, the Honor- 
able William P. Breen addressed the throng in the name 
of the laity. 

Soon after entering the sanctuary, during the singing 
of the Ecce Sacerdos, Bishop Rademacher ascended the 
pulpit and addressed these words to the congregation: 



BIGHT REV. JOSEPH RADEMACHER 137 

"I need not assure you of my warm appreciation of 
the welcome which you have accorded me, despite the 
inclement weather. Yours is an ardor no rain can quench 
— yours is an enthusiasm which no water can dampen. 
Yours has been a magnificent demonstration of faith, and 
I accept the welcome as a guarantee upon the part of the 
clergy and laity. I earnestly ask for your prayers, not 
only at this time, but in the years to come, that I may 
faithfully perform the duties of my high office in a 
manner befitting the glory of our faith. In conclusion I 
can not but allude briefly to the good people of the sunny 
south from whom I have just parted. Theirs are warm 
hearts, and my ten years' service in their midst were 
years of joy. Yet, I am glad to be among you here in 
Fort Wayne, for it was my home before I left for other 
fields." 

Bishop Rademacher was installed by the late Arch- 
bishop Elder, of Cincinnati. On this occasion Bishop 
Foley, of Detroit, preached the sermon in the presence 
of Archbishop Katzer, of Milwaukee, and all the Bishops 
of the Province of Cincinnati. 

His episcopate in Fort Wayne, though brief — because 
it closed in January, 1900 — was characterized by un- 
remitting zeal for the improvement of diocesan and paro- 
chial works and for the increase of piety among the 
people. 

The present Bishop of Fort Wayne was the last 
priest ordained by Bishop Rademacher, and the last to 
receive an appointment from him, namely, the transfer 
from assistant at Elkhart to that of temporary pastor of 
St. Bridget's, Logansport. This was on January 10th, 
1899. One week later the Bishop had a breakdown which 
incapacitated him for any further work until he died. 

His newly appointed Vicar General, the Very Rev- 
erend John M. Guendling, realizing that the good Bishop 
was worrying over a diocesan debt of $25,000.00, appeal- 
ed to the clergy of the diocese to raise that amount of 
money to liquidate the debt, which they did. During his 
illness the Bishop worried a great deal over the debt on 



FRAGMENTS OF OUK DIOCESAN HISTORY 



the Cathedral parish as well. Bishop Rademacher died 
on January 12th, 1900. 

At his funeral the Pontifical Mass was celebrated by 
the Archbishop of Cincinnati, and the sermon was 
preached by Bishop Horstmann, of Cleveland, in the 
presence of many Bishops, mitred Abbots and clergy. 

His remains, as was the case with the remains of his 
predecessors, were buried in a vault beneath the Cathe- 
dral sanctuary. 

As the priests knew Bishop Rademacher he was the 
personification of kindness and gentleness, and ready to 
do more himself than he would ask of any of his priests. 



VERY REVEREND JOHN H. GUENDLING 
Vicar-General to Bishop Rademacher 

Very Rev. John H. Guendling was born on Decem- 
ber 19th, 1855, at Peru, Indiana, where later on he be- 
came pastor. He was in charge of St. Charles parish 

time of his 
on account 



there at the 
retirement 
of illness. 

F a ther 
entered St. 
Semi nary, 
in 1870, and 
Rome in 
sue the Ma- 
nary studies, 
due to ill- 
pended his 
and upon re- 
the United 
ed the Sulpi- 
nary, Balti- 
he remained 
di n a t i on. 




Guendling 
Mary Minor 
Cincinnati, 
then went to 
1876 to pur- 
j r S e m i- 
However, 
ness he sus- 
studies there, 
turning to 
States enter- 
cian Semi- 
more, where 
until his or- 
which took 



place in the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, on July 2d, 1880. 



VERY REV. JOHN H. GUENDLING 139 

Father Guendling held no pastorate from the time 
he became priest until 1898 — eighteen years. All that 
time he was chaplain and director of the St. Joseph Or- 
phan Asylum, Lafayette. But after the death of Father 
Brammer, in June, 1898, Father Guendling was appoint- 
ed pastor of the Cathedral by Bishop Rademacher, and 
after a few months he was created Vicar General. 

During the one year illness of Bishop Rademacher, 
Father Guendling governed the diocese, liquidating a dio- 
cesan debt and, in many ways, striving to relieve the 
worries of the good Bishop during his last illness. Fol- 
lowing the death of the Bishop in January, 1900, Father 
Guendling was appointed Administrator of the diocese. 
This office ended with the coming of the Right Rev. Her- 
man Joseph Alerding, the following November. Bishop 
Alerding did not retain Father Guendling as his Vicar 
General, but granted him a chance to rest, during which 
time the Rev. Patrick F. Roche succeeded him as pastor of 
the Cathedral, in May, 1901. Father Guendling accepted 
a temporary appointment at Goshen, lasting one year. 
His Bishop had been desirous of placing him in charge 
of a good parish, but there was nothing suitable vacant 
until July, 1902, when the pastor of Father Guendling's 
native town, the Rev. Henry Meissner, died. Father 
Guendling remained pastor of St. Charles' Parish, Peru, 
until his health broke in 1922, when he retired to the St. 
Elizabeth Hospital, Lafayette, where he was practically 
an invalid, occasioned by paralysis, until his death on 
July 21st, 1930. 

Father Guendling had been long a member of the 
Bishop's Council and a member of the Diocesan School 
Board. A purse presented as a gift to Bishop Noll by 
his priests on the occasion of his 5th anniversary, was 
applied to a Students Burse in memory of Father Guend- 
ling. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 



RT. REV. HERMAN JOSEPH ALERDING, D.D. 

Fourth Bishop of Fort Wayne 

Herman Joseph Alerding was born in Westphalia, 
Germany, on April 13th, 1845. He was a mere infant 
when his parents moved to the United States and settled 
at Newport, Kentucky. 
There Jo- ]! , , .^ ^ JHl seph attend- 
ed the paro- \'Oj' ' ' ' ^' Z^ chial school 
until the age ^^B^ '-' "^Hl °^ thirteen, 
when he en- ^^| ^H tered a Pre- 
paratory ^M~ ^m Seminary at 
V i n cennes, ^^^^ m Indiana, and 
upon appli- ^f ^^* i "^ ^ cation to Bi- 
shop De St. ,(' " " . Palais, he 
was accept- ^^'^ ^j/ . ed as a stu- 
dent for the ■*"-'* „„^ Diocese of 

went to St. ' ' Meinrad Ma- 
jor Seminary, situated in the diocese for which he hoped 
to be ordained. He completed his studies in 1868 and 
was elevated to the holy priesthood by Bishop M. De St. 
Palais on September 22d of that year. 

From the time of his ordination until October, 1871, 
Father Alerding was assistant at St. Joseph Church, 
Terre Haute, from which he attended several missions 
and stations. He was transferred from Terre Haute to 
the pastorate of Cambridge City in 1871, where he served 
until August, 1874. During those two years Father 
Alerding liquidated the indebtedness on the church prop- 
erty and purchased a site for a new church. From Cam- 
bridge City he attended stations at Knightstown, New 



RT. REV. HERMAN JOSEPH ALEKDING, D. P. 141 

Castle and Hagerstown. In fact he erected and paid for 
churches at Knightstown and New Castle. 

In the summer of 1874 Father Alerding was assigned 
to a new congregation at Indianapolis, which was or- 
ganized the year previous by Rev. Joseph Pettit, and 
dedicated to St. Joseph. Bishop M. De St. Palais erected a 
small seminary on this property and Father Alerding 
was to serve in the dual capacity of procurator of the 
Seminary and pastor of the congregation, which attend- 
ed Mass in the seminary chapel. This institution, how- 
ever, was abandoned after one year, and Father Alerding 
-was requested to build a new church in some other loca- 
tion, the Bishop intending to use the seminary building 
as a hospital. 

Within five years Father Alerding had purchased a 
new location and erected a church and modest rectory. 
The Sisters of Providence, who were engaged to teach 
the children, built their own St. Joseph Academy imme- 
diately south of the church. A little later Father Aler- 
ding also built a commodious school building and hall. 

In the year 1883 he compiled A History of the Cath- 
olic Church in the Diocese of Vincennes, which was well 
received. 

On September 22d, 1893, Father Alerding observed 
his Silver Jubilee in the priesthood. 

Surprised was Father Alerding when, on August 
30th, 1900, he was notified of his appointment to the See 
of Fort Wayne to succeed the late Right Rev. Joseph 
Rademacher. The Bulls of appointment reached him on 
September 27th. 

Father Alerding made arrangements for his conse- 
cration to take place on November 30th in the Cathedral, 
Fort Wayne. The consecrating prelate was Archbishop 
Henry Elder, of Cincinnati, and the co-consecrators were 
Bishop O'Donaghue, Auxiliary Bishop of Indianapolis, 
and Bishop Moeller, of Columbus, Ohio, who later became 
Archbishop of Cincinnati. All the Bishops of the Pro- 
vince of Cincinnati were present at his consecration. The 



FRAGMENTS OF OUB DIOCESAN HISTORY 



late Bishop Chartrand, then Secretary to the Bishop of 
Indianapolis, preached the sermon. 

The new Bishop was not in Fort Wayne a week 
before he sent out his first pastoral to the clergy and laity 
of the diocese; it was dated on the day of his consecra- 
tion, the feast of St. Andrew, November 30th, 1900. In 
that letter he paid recognition to his predecessors in this 
See, and praised the zeal of the priests and the people as 
noted in the flourishing condition of the Diocese of Fort 
Wayne. He particularly singled out the record of 
the Diocese of Fort Wayne for the number of parochial 
schools in relation to the total number of parishes. He 
referred to the work of the religious in their educational 
and charitable institutions and especially to the Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame. 

At the time Bishop Alerding took possession of this 
See of Fort Wayne, the Diocese counted only one-half the 
number of communicants it counts today. This rapid 
growth was due to the extraordinary development, par- 
ticularly in Lake County, where the large cities of Gary, 
East Chicago and Indiana Harbor did not so much as 
exist. Hammond and Whiting were small towns. South 
Bend doubled the number of its churches during Bishop 
Alerding's episcopate. 

From the time of the advent of Bishop Luers, the 
Bishop lived in the Cathedral Rectory, with the pastors 
and assistants. Realizing the handicap which this 
creates for a Bishop of a growing diocese, with a vast 
amount of work, the Bishop erected a Bishop's House on 
the corner of Clinton and Lewis Streets, in which he in- 
corporated his Chancery. 

A year or two later he erected a residence on a large 
island in Sylvan Lake, Rome City, where he spent most 
of his summers with the late Reverend A. E. Lafontaine, 
Superintendent of Schools, as a companion. 

In September, 1903, the Bishop presided over a 
Synod in the Cathedral, at which time new statutes were 
promulgated, after having been carefully prepared; a 
new deanery was also established. 



RT. REV. HERMAN JOSEPH ALERDING, P. D. 143 

In September, 1905, the Bishop paid his first 
Ad limina visit to Rome, the cost of which was well cover- 
ed by a purse presented by his priests. He brought home 
with him from Rome a large number of relics. 

In the year 1907 the Diocese of Fort Wayne observed 
its Golden Jubilee with considerable pomp, especially in 
the city of Fort Wayne. The Very Rev. Andrew Morris- 
sey, C. S. C, then Superior General of the Congregation 
of the Holy Cross, delivered the Jubilee Sermon in the 
Cathedral. 

At a mass meeting in Library Hall, historical and 
eulogistic addresses were delivered by several laymen, in- 
cluding the late William P. Breen, the late Judge T. E. 
Howard, the late ex-Mayor H. C. Berghoff, and by Drs. 
Dinnen and Bruggeman. The Fort Wayne newspapers 
gave generous space to all the addresses, and referred 
editorially to the late Bishop Alerding, then filling his 
seventh year as Bishop in the following words : 

"The advent of Bishop Alerding in this diocese has been glad- 
dened by an era of progress, general good will and hearty co-opera- 
tion on the part of the clergy and laity. His administration has 
been productive of inestimable good, marked by wise counsel, care- 
ful decisions and prudent judgments; the intensity of his apostolic 
zeal, the sincerity of his piety and his unswerving fidelity to duty 
have left their impress upon the seasons he has labored amongst 
us and have served as an impetus for well doing to those about 
him. His characteristic gentleness, pre-eminent sense of justice 
and paternal solicitude have rightly merited an ever increasing and 
enduring confidence, trust and love on the part of his clergy and 
his people. No effort is too trying, no labor too arduous, if through 
individual endeavor he can aid his people. His love for them and 
for his diocese finds continued expression as the seventh year of 
his holy labors in the Diocese of Fort Wayne are drawing to a 
close. May our beloved Bishop enjoy many years in the episco- 
pate. May they bring unto him countless joys and blessings 
crowned with God's choicest favors, may health and happiness and 
peace attend him and may each recurrent season serve to draw 
closer that bond of love and devotion between the zealous shepherd 
and his flock". 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



On that occasion Judge Howard dealt with Catholic 
Education in this diocese, of which he gave this sum- 
mary: 

In respect to education the diocese of Fort Wayne has walked 
in the path of progress. It has passed from the log-house school 
to the splendid modern edifice. It has passed from three schools, 
with a handful of teachers and about a hundred and fifty pupils, to 
one hundred institutions of learning, with four hundred and seven- 
ty-five teachers and professors, and fifteen thousand seven hun- 
dred children. It has passed from the teacher that was picked up 
hy chance, to a great body of pious, efficient and self-sacrificing 
men and women, destined from infancy to their high calling, and 
leaving it only at the bidding of the angel of death. It has estab- 
lished an effective system of superintendence and supervision. It 
can take the child at the age of six years, and watch over his educa- 
tion for a period of from sixteen to twenty years. If at the end 
■of the grammar school course the pupil is prevented from going 
further, he finds himself reasonably well equipped for his duties in 
life, as a good Catholic and good American citizen. If he pursues 
his studies through the high school, he enters life with a wide 
knowledge of English literature, science, mathematics and the re- 
quirements of a good business training. If a professional career 
is his choice, he will find in the university all the facilities for 
achieving success and even distinction. 

In the year of the Golden Jubilee, the Diocese of 
Fort Wayne was credited with a population of 81,000 
with 14,130 children in attendance at the parochial 
schools. At the time of its Diamond Jubilee, twenty-five 
years later, the Catholic population was more than twice 
as large and the number of children in the parochial 
schools nearly two and one halftimes as great. 

Bishop Alerding's chief interest was centered in the 
improvement of the parochial schools already existing 
and in the founding of high schools. The Central Catho- 
lic High School for Boys at Fort Wayne was started by 
him, with the Brothers of the Holy Cross in charge. He 
also prevailed on the Community Ancilla Domini to erect 
a high school for both boys and girls where Hammond 
and East Chicago meet. In the year 1922 he spent $24,- 
000.00 for repairs and alterations on the Library Hall 
building in which the high school has been located since. 



BT. REV. HERMAN JOSEPH ALERDING, D. D. 145 

The Bishop also made intensive improvements in 
both diocesan Orphan Asylums. 

We referred above to the rapid growth of Gary, 
East Chicago, and Indiana Harbor. As might be assumed 
the heaviest burden placed on the Bishop's shoulders 
during his entire career was the meeting of the prob- 
lems consequent on this rapid growth. At Gary five par- 
ishes were started at one time, each for people of a 
diiferent nationality, who, for the most part, were new 
immigrants from Europe, brought over by the United 
States Steel Corporation which, however, contributed 
$50,000.00 on two occasions to assist the people of these 
parishes to build church, school, convent and priest's 
house. But the Bishop's chief concern was to procure 
priests to shepherd these flocks, and others which imme- 
diately followed in their wake in East Chicago, Indiana 
Harbor and Hammond. 

The Bishop Alerding-Judge Gary Settlement House 
was established about 1922 with the assistance of $130,- 
000.00 contributed by the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion, but which became an immense burden on the Bishop 
and later on the diocese as such because of frequent bor- 
rowing of money with which to maintain it. At the time 
of Bishop Alerding's death it carried a debt of more than 
$200,000. 

Until his seventy-seventh year Bishop Alerding 
filled his regular Confirmation appointments, although his 
health had not been good for many years. He so arranged 
his Confirmation schedule that the entire diocese was 
covered once every three or four years. 

Reaching his seventy-fifth year the Bishop purchased 
a residence at the approach of Swinney Park, at the 
end of West Washington Boulevard, and after enlarging 
and improving it, moved into it, with the Diocesan Su- 
perintendent of Schools. He told the writer that he pur- 
chased this without any relation to its use by his suc- 
cessor, although the location was one with which his 
successor could certainly find no fault. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The use of the episcopal residence on the Cathedral 
Square was now granted to the priests in charge of the 
Cathedral in exchange for the use of the Library Hall 
as a Central Catholic High School with the understand- 
ing that some rooms of the house might be used for the 
Chancery. 

On Thanksgiving Day, 1924, the Bishop, then 
seventy-nine years old, met with an accident which 
proved fatal. The car, in which he was riding, was 
struck by a trolley car and the Bishop was quite seriously 
injured. He was taken to the hospital, where his condi- 
tion, owing to a long standing diabetic ailment, grew 
steadily worse, and he died on December 6th, 1924. 

His obsequies took place in the Cathedral on De- 
cember 11th. Archbishop Moeller, of Cincinnati, offi- 
ciated at the Pontifical Mass. The late Bishop Chart- 
rand, of Indianapolis, preached the sermon, in which he 
compared the life of Bishop Alerding to a beautiful 
mosaic, seen clearly only in its totality, but every small 
component part of which was itself full of beauty and 
merit. 

Bishop Alerding's pontificate extended over a period 
of twenty-four years, during which the diocese made 
great progress. He will long be remembered by the 
priests who knew him as a competent administrator, as 
a tender-hearted, affable, appreciative Prelate. 

The Bishop administered Confirmation to 81,527 per- 
sons during his episcopate. 



ET. REV. MSGR. J. H. OECHTERING 



RT. REV. MSGR. J. H. OECHTERING 

Vicar-General to Bishop Alerding 

At this writing Monsignor Oechtering is 
ninety-four years of age, has been a priest over sev- 
enty years, and lives with his nephew and his family 

G e r m a ny. L , '^H^mB^^^M^^ Mens ignor 
e chtering ^^^^|^^^^^P^^ I retired from 
the pastor- |^^^/ 1^ ?- ^z-*, -*^ S'te of St. 

1927, and, ^''' ' ^ jfe^"^/ ^^^%^ together 
with his sis- " ,h ' ^. ^ -^^ ter, moved 

i n t t h e -' home built 

by the lat- / ■ ^ , ter in that 

town of i ^ j^ ' i) '''■ Germany. 

John H. I ' * Ji^ |l e c htering 

wasborn'' '' M" Dece mber 

23d, 1845, at *^%-. ^ m. Lingen, Han- 

over, Ger- ^ ''^f^^m 'M I many, where 

he spent his %x^^^^^ Mi , early school 

days. At the ^Mt^m h W' ^^^ °^ ^^^^' 

teen he en- Hr^S M ms i tered college 

at Muenster and later the University in the same city. 
At the age of twenty-two he went to the American College 
at Louvain and was ordained priest for the Diocese of 
Fort Wayne by the Coadjutor Archbishop of Malines, 
May 21st, 1869, and immediately came to this country, 
where he was given charge of St. Vincent Parish, Elk- 
hart, while residing with his uncle, the Very Rev. A. B. 
Oechtering, at Mishawaka. After one year at Elkhart, 
he was transferred to St. Joseph Church, LaPorte, where 
he served for ten years, attending Otis as a mission. He 
built the priest's house at LaPorte. 

On July 4th, 1880, he was appointed pastor of St. 
Mary Church, Fort Wayne, and served there until his 



FEAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



retirement in 1927. He was the builder of the present 
whole parish plant of St. Mary's. The church erected in 
1859 by his predecessor was completely shattered by an 
explosion which took place on January 18th, 1886, as was 
also the priest's house. The new church was dedicated 
in December, 1887 by Bishop Dwenger. In 1892 Father 
Oechtering erected a new school for girls and in 1903 a 
new school for boys. 

Father Oechtering was appointed Vicar General of 
the diocese in the year 1903, and was created a Domestic 
Prelate to His Holiness, Pius X, in 1905. 

Monsignor Oechtering was an indefatigable worker, 
yet found time, because of his orderly life, to do much 
studying and writing. His little work on Church His- 
tory, published thirty years ago, is still in use in numer- 
our parochial schools. The royalties received on the sale 
of this book, published by Herder, of St. Louis, have been 
devoted from the beginning entirely to missionary work. 
The missions have always been dear to the heart of 
Monsignor Oechtering, he having been a pioneer in the 
Diocese of Fort Wayne in promoting the Society for the 
Propagation of the Faith. 

Monsignor Oechtering, still alive at this writing, is 
probably the oldest priest in the world. On December 21, 
1940, he observed his 95th birthday in his place of retire- 
ment at Riesenbeck, Westphalia, Germany, where he has 
lived with a nephew since 1927. 



REVEREND A. E. LAFONTAINE 



149 



REVEREND A. E. LAFONTAINE 
First School Superintendent 

On July 9th, 1901, the Rev. A. E. Lafontaine, a 
native of Montreal, Canada, who. completed his studies in 
Italy in the year 1892, and who was received into the 
Diocese of ^^^^__^^^^^^^^__-^_ Fort Wayne 

a p p i nted ^^HnP"^ '^Hi^HB ^ ^ ^ ti r s t 

School Sup- ^^B^ ^^^^H srintendent. 

He served ^|F ^BH continuously 

until the ^V ... j B time of his 

death. No- H| mmmB yQ-^^^^Qj- 15^ 

1928. Dur- ^B fl^H ^"^ ^^^ ^^~ 

c u m b e ncy ^K l^^l ^^^ Central 

Catholic ^H H^l ^^S^ School 

' for Boys was ^^a ^^^1 bounded in 

the city of ^Hk l^Bm "^^^^ Wayne, 

in which Fa- HH|k ^H ^^^^ Lafon- 

terest. He ^^Hh ^^H^^I succeeded in 

schools in consequence 

of which all the parochial schools of the diocese have been 
noted for their efficiency. Father Lafontaine died sud- 
denly on Nov. 15, 1928, at the residence of Bishop Noll. 

Prior to his appointment as Superintendent of 
Schools Father Lafontaine held the pastorate of St. Vin- 
cent's church, north of Fort Wayne. Feeble health pre- 
vented him from visiting schools outside the city during 
the latter part of his life, but he kept in close touch with 
all parochial schools by receiving and passing on ex- 
amination papers. Before Commencement he issued 
official diplomas to eighth grade graduates. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



MOST REVEREND JOHN FRANCIS NOLL 

Fifth Bishop of Fort Wayne 

The Most Reverend John Francis Noll, the fifth 
Bishop of the Diocese of Fort Wayne, Indiana, was born 
in that city on January 25th, 1875. His father, John G. 
Noll, was al- so born in 

Fort Wayne ^^^^HHRH|^|^^^H|| i^ ^^^ y^^i* 
1841, when ^^^^^^r^^^H^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^V be- 
longed to the ^^^^^^K^ ^^^^^^1 Diocese of 
Yin cennes. ^^^^^^^W, ^ ^^^^H His mother, 
Anna M. ^^^^^Ri^p ^^V^^^^^H Ford, was 
born in Lon- ^^^^^^^^p' J^^^^H don, of par- 
ents born in j^HH^^^^*" ^^^^^| Ii'eland. 

Bishop ^^^^m^^H^^^^^^H ^oU. as a 
boy attended ^^^^^K^^^m^^^^^^M ^be Cathe- 
parish ^^^H|^^B|hK^^^^| school, con- 
by ^^^^^^^^^^^K^^^H ^^e Brothers 
the Holy |^^^|^^^^^^B^^^H Cross, 

com- ^^^^H^^^^^^H^^^H pleting the 
1 ementary ^^^^^H^^^P^^E^^^I srades en- 
tared St. ^^^^^H^K*!^^B^^^| L a w r e nee 
College, ^^^^^|nH||kiPi^^H Mount Cal- 
vary, Wis- ^^^^^^^B^^^^^^ c nsin, in 
S e ptember, 18 8 8. He 

completed his classical studies at that institution in June, 
1893, and in September of the same year went to Mount 
St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, to pursue the 
study of philosophy and theology. 

He was ordained to the holy priesthood by Most Rev- 
erend Joseph Rademacher, the third Bishop of Fort 
Wayne, on June 4th, 1898. After serving as an assistant 
at St. Vincent's church, Elkhart, and at St. Bridget 
church, Logansport, for less than one year under the pas- 
tors Henry Boeckelmian and Bernard Kroeger respective- 
ly, he was made pastor of Ligonier, with Kendallville, 
Millersburg, Albion and Rome City as missions. In Feb- 
ruary, 1900, he moved his residence to Kendallville, thus 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



becoming its first resident pastor. In July, 1902, Father 
Noll was transferred to the parish of St. Louis, at Besan- 
con, in Allen County, and in the year 1906 was given the 
pastorate of St. John parish, Hartford City, Indiana, 
which he held for four years. His next promotion was to 
St. Mary parish, Huntington, in July, 1910, where he re- 
mained until his nomination to the Bishopric on May 13, 
1925 to succeed the late Herman Joseph Alerding, D. D., 
Fort Wayne's fourth Bishop. 

At Kendallville, his first pastorate, Father Noll be- 
came interested in mission work among non-Catholics, 
and during his Besancon pastorate was relieved of parish 
work for one year in order to conduct lecture courses for 
non-Catholics in northern Indiana. 

In the quietude of Besancon, Father Noll began a 
literary career which he pursued throughout his life. 
His first little work, entitled "Kind Words From Your 
Pastor", written in 1903, passed through twenty-four edi- 
tions. 

At Hartford City, in the year 1908, he started a par- 
ish magazine, the body of which contained reading of 
general interest, and this is still served, after thirty- 
three years, in quantities to two hundred parishes, 
scattered over the whole country. 

At Huntington, in the year 1912, Father Noll found- 
ed Our Sunday Visitor, a national Catholic weekly, which 
soon attained the largest circulation of any Catholic 
paper in the world. 

A large modern printing plant evolved quite natur- 
ally from the growth of Bishop Noll's publications, and 
the Eleemosynary Corporation, which controls it, bears 
the same name as the paper. Printing machinery and 
editorial offices occupy 40,000 square feet of space and 
are doing valuable service for the Catholic Church in the 
United States, publishing periodicals for other organiza- 
tions, besides printing and distributing more than three 
hundred pamphlets, and filling orders for weekly and 
monthly collection envelopes for several thousand par- 
ishes. Bishop Noll was also the founder of THE AGO- 



MOST REV. JOHN FRANCIS NOLL 153 

LYTE, a periodical for priests, and is the author of sev- 
eral books and numerous brochures. Books from his 
pen having wide circulation are Father Smth Instructs 
Jackson, The Fairest Argument, Catholic Facts, It Is 
Happening Here, Catechism on Birth Control, The De- 
cline of Nations, Civilization's Builder and Protector, 
Paganizing the Nation by Law, two volumes on Lewd 
Literature, this Historical work, etc. 

In January, following his consecration, the Bishop 
founded a diocesan weekly paper, which is comprised of 
the national edition of Our Sunday Visitor besides 
eight or twelve pages of diocesan and general Catholic 
news. This paper reaches most Catholic homes in the 
diocese. 

In 1939 a Youth Section of eight pages was added to 
his paper, at once commanding the largest circulation of 
any Youth periodical in the United States. 

In the year 1923 Monsignor Noll built, one mile west 
of Huntington, a Training School and Novitiate for Mis- 
sionary Catechists, at an outlay of |240,000.00. It is an 
edifice of beautiful Spanish design and commands an im- 
posing site on a high ridge overlooking the Wabash 
Valley. A California gentleman contributed $100,000 to 
this project. The Society of Missionary Catechists itself 
was founded by the Rev. J. J. Sigstein, a Chicago priest 
now retired, but it was Our Sunday Visitor which stim- 
ulated its development. This missionary organization 
counts more than 240 members, who are received and 
professed much the same as the members of all Sister- 
hoods. In the year 1928 the Holy See recognized the So- 
ciety of Missionary Catechists as a regular Religious 
Community, whose members took perpetual vows the first 
time in August, 1940. The principal field of labor of the 
Catechists is the territory in the southwest and western 
part of the United States, inhabited by nearly 2,000,000 
Mexicans, who, because of lack of priests and religious 
schools, would otherwise grow up without any knowledge 
of their faith if they would not actually be won over to 
Protestantism by the workers of several denominations 
who are provided with unlimited money to provide Pro- 



154 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

testant schools, literature, and pecuniary assistance. The 
Missionary Catechists also have establishments in Gary, 
East Chicago, Indiana Harbor, Goshen and San Pierre, 
this diocese. 

In the fall of 1940 Our Sunday Visitor purchased a 
beautiful piece of property at Redlands, Calif., on 
which is located a spacious Home, for a summer retreat 
and rest center for the more than 70 Catechists who labor 
in three dioceses of California. 

The Bishop-elect was consecrated by Cardinal Mun- 
delein on June 30th, 1925. Earlier, in October, 1921, he 
had been elevated to the rank of Domestic Prelate, with 
the title of Monsignor. He returned as Bishop to his 
native city and to the Cathedral in which he was bap- 
tized, received his first Holy Communion, was confirmed, 
was ordained, sang his first Mass and was consecrated 
Bishop. 

During the first years of his episcopate Bishop Noll 
carefully budgeted all diocesan works, and collected fifty 
Burses of |5,000.00 each to meet the expenses of poor 
boys pursuing their studies for the holy priesthood in the 
Minor Seminary. In the year 1932 he erected and paid 
for a modern Orphan Asylum in Fort Wayne to replace 
the old St. Vincent's. It consists of a group of large cot- 
tages, school, dining rooms, chapel, gymnasium, power 
house and laundry, which cost nearly $500,000, and to 
which Our Sunday Visitor and several individuals made 
generous contributions. The old St. Joseph Orphanage 
at Lafayette closed its doors in the fall of 1938. In the year 
1939 the Bishop inaugurated a Diocesan Catholic Chari- 
ties, devoted principally to the work of child placing and 
family relief. Centers are located in Fort Wayne, South 
Bend, Gary and Hammond, and are operated under the 
direction of Fathers Sweigart and Matthieu. 

Bishop Noll invited Religious Orders to erect No- 
vitiates or Juniorates at Angola, Huntington, Plymouth, 
Cedar Lake, and Academie, and other Communities to 
establish Mission Houses at Lebanon, Ligonier, Gary, and 
near Valparaiso. 



^ MOST REV. JOHN FRAN C IS NO LL 155 

Two diocesan-wide organizations of far-reaching in- 
fluence launched by Bishop Noll were The Diocesan 
Council of Catholic Women and The Catholic Youth Or- 
ganization, both of which have given great impetus to 
the study and application of the Church's principles in 
relation to modern economic, social, religious and moral 
problems. 

The Bishop purchased from the Poor Handmaids of 
Jesus Christ the High School, Convent, Priest's House 
and Gymnasium erected by that community where Ham- 
mond and East Chicago meet. To-day nearly 500 
youths from many parishes are taught by a faculty of five 
priests and fifteen Sisters of the Holy Cross. 

Bishop Noll also opened a High School for Boys at 
South Bend on the property of St. Matthew's parish. It is 
in charge of the Brothers of the Holy Cross. 

In 1938 the Bishop erected, independently of paro- 
chial or diocesan help, a commodious High School in Fort 
Wayne for all youths of both sexes in the city and its 
environs, at a cost of $545,000. Accommodating 1,400 
pupils it has a mixed faculty of secular priests. Sisters of 
Providence and School Sisters of Notre Dame. This 
school, the largest in Indiana, was solemnly dedicated on 
Jan. 8, 1939. 

In the year 1937 Bishop Noll initiated in his diocese 
a drive against lewd magazines which, he discovered, had 
a circulation of 15,000,000 copies monthly over the na- 
tion. It was 'not long until many Bishops copied his ex- 
ample, and at the annual meeting of the Catholic Hierar- 
chy in Washington in the fall of 1938 he was selected as 
Chairman of a National Committee of Bishops to launch 
his campaign throughout the United States. 

Because of the facility of arousing public opinion 
against the circulation of indecency in print it did not 
take long until there was an excellent organization in 
every diocese which, of course, meant coverage of the 
entire nation. As a result of this drive many lewd maga- 
zines discontinued publication and scores of others 
purged their pages of disreputable advertising and adopt- 
ed a policy leading to cleaner articles and stories. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



An abundance of data gathered from many quarters 
brought home to the Bishops the conviction that there 
was a definite collaboration between atheistic and anti- 
Christian agencies to destroy faith and morality among 
the rising generation through magazines designed es- 
pecially for them. 

In the year 1929 the Bishop made his first ad limina 
visit to Rome, where he had a prolonged interview with 
his Holiness. In 1930 he went to Budapest at the re- 
quest of the Hungarian government, and in 1938, by 
special permission he was allowed to anticipate by one 
year another ad limina visit. On both visits to Rome he 
had lengthy private audiences with the late Pope Pius 
XL 

Bishop Noll was one of four Bishops and Arch- 
bishops selected to launch the Legion of Decency, aimed 
at the improvement of Motion Pictures. 

Bishop Noll has been a member of the Board of 
Governors of the Catholic Church Extension Society for 
more than twenty-five years, and during the first year of 
his episcopate he was placed on the American Board of 
Catholic Missions, of which he has been Treasurer ever 
since. In 1940 he was elected to the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Catholic Church Extension Society. 

He served long as a member of the Administra- 
tive Committee of the National Catholic Welfare Con- 
ference, having been secretary of that Board and having 
been given charge of the Department of Catholic Action 
until November, 1934, when he was made Chairman of 
the Department of Lay Organizations, embracing the two 
National Organizations of the National Council of Catho- 
lic Men and the National Council of Catholic Women. He 
served in this capacity until November, 1937. 

He was Chairman of the National Committee on a 
Religious Census until it was dissolved after the decen- 
nial census gathered by the Federal government in 1940. 

On the occasion of his tenth anniversary in the epis- 
copate gifts from Our Sunday Visitor, from the priests 
of the diocese and from the Holy Name Societies of the 



MOST REV. JOHN FRANCIS NOLL 157 

city of Fort Wayne, enabled him to build an addition to 
his home comprising a library and office suite and a 
beautiful chapel over these. Our Sunday Visitor gave the 
former and the priests of the diocese the latter, the Holy 
Name Societies donating the altar. 

When the Bishop observed his fifteenth anniversary 
his clergy presented him with a purse of $15,000,000, to 
•which Our Sunday Visitor added a like amount. This 
money was at once used to assist poor churches, especially 
those conducted for Negroes and Mexicans. 

One of the latest achievements of Bishop Noll was 
the raising of a $125,000.00 fund through Our Sunday 
Visitor for the erection in Washington, D. C, of a monu- 
mental statue of Christ as "Light of the World." The new 
National Catholic Welfare Conference building was so 
constructed as to serve as a beautiful and most striking 
background for the figure of Christ. 

On the fourteenth day of March, 1941, Pope Pius XII 
conferred on Bishop Noll the title "Assistant at the 
Pontifical Throne" in recognition of his service as editor 
and writer, as sponsor of the Society of Missionary Cate- 
chists, and as the promoter of the drive which resulted in 
the raising of $125,000.00 towards the erection in the 
city of Washington of the colossal figure of Christ as Light 
of the World and the new National Catholic Welfare Con- 
ference Building, the facade of which was also purchased 
from that fund. 

The industrial depression, extending from the year 
1929 to 1939, fell during Bishop Noll's administration, 
and because of the newness of so many churches and 
schools, particularly in Lake County and South Bend, 
with their consequent heavy debts, a very difficult prob- 
lem in finances arose. By persevering effort the Bishop 
was able to have interest rates reduced on many parish 
buildings which, up to the maturity of the loans, will rep- 
resent a saving to the parishes of more than |600,000.00. 
With the aid of Our Sunday Visitor principally, the 
Bishop was able to exchange many principal pay- 
ments at a lower interest rate. Practically all parish 
financing is done now through the General Refunding 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Corporation, which was brought into being by the Bis- 
hop's efforts. It renders gratuitous service to pastors for 
refinancing of parish loans. 

He also started a Fort Wayne Diocesan Foundation 
to receive and hold property. 

The Diocese of Fort Wayne counts nearly 200,000 
Catholics, fully one-half of whom are immigrants or the 
immediate descendants of immigrants from eastern Eur- 
ope. It has no direct financial obligations at present, but 
rather a neat surplus. The aggregate of parish indebt- 
edness approximates $5,500,000 on buildings whose re- 
placement would exceed $25,000,000. 

Dedications During The Administration Of The 
Most Rev. J. F. Noll 

July 4, 1925 — Victory Noll Motherhouse and Train- 
ing School. 

Oct., 1925, St. John's church, St. John's. 

Feb. 14, 1926— St. Stephen's school, South Bend. 

April 25, 1926— St. Adalbert's church. South Bend. 

July 25, 1926 — Little Flower church. Lake Wawasee. 

August 29, 1926— St. Rita's church, Angola. 

Oct. 24, 1926— St. Stanislaus' church, Michigan City. 

Nov. 14, 1926— Mercy hospital, Elwood. 

Nov. 21, 1926 — Immaculate Conception church. 
Whiting. 

July 31, 1927— St. Mark's church- Gary. 

Sept. 18, 1927 — Assumption school. East Chicago. 

Oct. 2, 1927— St. Monica's, Mishawaka. 

Oct. 9, 1927— Sacred Heart church. Whiting. 

Oct. 30, 1927— Our Lady of Hungary school and 
convent. South Bend. 

May 15, 1927— Knights of Columbus Club, Gary. 
May 21, 1927— Consecration of St. Hedwig's church, 
South Bend. 

April, 1927 — Catholic Community Center, Fort 
Wayne. 



MOST REV. JOHN FRANCIS NOLL 



April 22, 1928— St. Catherine's hospital, East Chi- 
cago. 

St. Peter's church, Laporte. 

April 30, 1928 — Chapel, Sacred Heart Home, Avilla. 

June 24, 1928 — Grotto of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion, Whiting. 

April 2, 1929— St. Felix's Monastery, Huntington. 
Sept. 8, 1929 — New unit of St. Joseph's hospital, 
Fort Wayne. 

Oct. 13, 1929— St. Matthew's school, South Bend. 

Nov. 24, 1929 — Holy Cross school and church. South 
Bend. 

Nov. 28, 1929 — St. Joseph's convent, Garrett. 

Dec. 8, 1929 — Precious Blood school. Fort Wayne. 

March 30, 1930 — All Saints' church, Hammond. 

May 18, 1930— St. Michael's church, Schererville. 

Oct. 12, 1930— St. Peter's church, Winamac. 

Oct. 19, 1930 — St. John Baptist church and school, 
Fort Wayne. 

Nov. 2, 1930 — Holy Family church and school, Gary. 

April 19, 1931— St. Charles' school, Peru. 

May 10, 1931— St. Mary of the Lake church, Miller. 

June 21, 1931 — St. John's church. Whiting. 

Dec. 13, 1931 — St. Francis' church, Gary. 

May 30, 1932 — Crucifixion Group, Catholic cemetery. 
Fort Wayne. 

Sept. 18, 1932— St. Vincent's Villa, Fort Wayne. 

Oct. 2, 1932— St. Mary's school, Michigan City. 

March 19, 1933— Chapel, St. Joseph's hospital, Fort 
Wayne. 

June 23, 1923 — Sacred Heart church, Lakeville. 

June 10, 1934— St. Jude Shrine, Mt. Mercy Sanitar- 
ium, Hammond. 

Oct. 28, 1934 — Holy Rosary Church, Gary. 

May 26, 1935 — Christ the King Church, Roseland.. 

Sept. 9, 1935— New St. Patrick's church, Ligonier. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Sept. 15, 1935 — Immaculate Conception church, East 
Chicago. 

May 7, 1936— Grotto, St. Vincent Villa, Fort Wayne. 

May 17, 1936— St. Joseph Memorial Hospital, Koko- 
mo. 

April 21, 1938 — Monastery of Polish Franciscans, 
Cedar Lake. 

Nov. 6, 1938 — Our Lady of Perpetual Help church, 
Hessville. 

St. John Bosco church, Hammond. 

1988 — St. Joseph school, Dyer. 

Oct. 15, 1939 — National Croatian Catholic Union 
Headquarters, Gary. 

Oct. 29, 1939— College Building, Rensselaer. 

April 14, 1940 — St. Stanislaus school, Michigan City. 

May 14, 1940 — Sacred Heart school. Fowler, (re- 
dedication). 

June 2, 1940 — St. Augustine Church, Rensselaer. 

Sept. 15, 1940 — Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, 
East Chicago. 

Nov. 21, 1940 — Holy Name Church, Cedar Lake. 

April 20, 1941 — Church of the Blessed Sacrament, 
Albion. 

April 27, 1941 — St. John Bosco, Hammond. 

April 30, 1941 — New Buildings at Collegeville, Ind. 

May 11, 1941 — Sacred Heart church. East Chicago. 

May 11, 1941 — St. Jude's (colored), Indiana Harbor. 

May 25, 1941 — Mausoleum, Polish Cemetery, South 
Bend. 

June 8, 1941 — Assumption Church, New Chicago. 

June 10, 1941 — St. Margaret Church, Montpelier. 

June, 1941 — St. Augustine Church (colored). South 
Bend. 

July 6, 1941— St. Anthony's Church, Angola. 

Up to this writing Bishop Noll administered Con- 
firmation to more than 90,000; and conferred Holy Or- 
ders on nearly 300, including the religious. 



ET. REV. MSGR. JOHN P. DURHAM 



RT. REV. MSGR. JOHN P. DURHAM 
First Vicar General to Bishop Noll 

John P. Durham was born at Middletown, New 
York, on September 27th, 1867. After attending the ele- 
mentary school in his home city, he entered St. Benedict 



College, At 
sas, for his f'""^ 
dies. Then 
ing one J 
Seminary at 
went t ' 
Mary Semi- !< 







chison, Kan- 
classical stu- 
after spend- 
year at the 
Niagara, he 
Mount St. 
nary, Cincin- 
he completed 
p h i losophy 
ogy. 

adopted as a 
the Diocese 
Wayne by 
d e m a cher, 
dained by 
Elder, in 
on June, 



nati, where 
his course in 
and theol- 

He was 
student for 
of Fort 
Bishop Ra- 

but was or- ^ » 

Archbishop \ _i 

C i n cinnati, ^ | 

17th, 1897. 

He was assigned to the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, as 
assistant, where he remained until March 7th, 1901. He 
was given charge of St. Mary Church, Huntington, for a 
few months, when he was transferred to St. Mary 
Church, Union City. 

In the year 1909, Father Durham was appointed 
pastor of St. Paul Church, Marion, where he liquidated 
the parish debt, built and paid for a new school, and pur- 
chased with cash several pieces of property, whose reve- 
nues would sustain his school. He remained at Marion 
until his retirement on account of illness in October, 
1932, when he moved to Fort Wayne, where he was 
appointed Officialis of the Matrimonial Court and Di- 
rector of the Catholic Charitable Institutions of the dio- 
cese. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



In the year 1927 Father Durham was appointed 
Vicar General, and in June, 1929, he was elevated to the 
rank of Domestic Prelate. 

He was the donor of the beautiful altar and sanc- 
tuary marble at St. Vincent Villa ; also of property imme- 
diately adjacent to the Bishop's House. 

Msgr. Durham died January 23, 1940. 

Owing to his affable disposition and sense of justice, 
the Vicar General was universally loved. 




THE REV. J. F. NADOLNY 

Chancellor 

(See sketch under St. Paul's, 

Fort Wayne.) 



THE REV. CHAS. J. FELTES 

Assistant Chancellor 

And Secretary to Bishop 



The Rev. Charles J. Feltes, Assistant Chancellor 
and Secretary to the Most Reverend Bishop, was born 
at Gas City, on August 30, 1900. He prepared for the 
holy priesthood at St. Joseph College, Collegeville, and at 
Mount St. Mary Seminary, Cincinnati, and was ordained 
on May 29, 1926, by Bishop Noll. 



REV. CHAR LES J. FELTES 163 

The following month he was appointed assistant at 
St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne, under the late Monsignor 
Joseph F. Delaney, and served there until shortly after 
the death of the latter. Father Feltes was promoted to 
the post of Assistant Chancellor on February 28, 1935, 
with residence at the Cathedral Rectory. Loath to be 
separated from parish work altogether he has, during 
the past six years, heard confessions and taken his turn 
at preaching at the Cathedral. Father Feltes has ex- 
cellent order and efficiency of the highest type in the 
Chancery Office. 

Father Feltes is also Secretary of the Diocesan 
Matrimonial Court. 

Father Feltes has given a great deal of study to the 
designing and construction of buildings. He has sat with 
architects and assisted them to plan, and has supervised 
a great deal of construction work for the Bishop. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



RT. REV. MSGR. EDWARD J. MUNGOVAN, V.G. 

Successor to Vicar General Durham 
Edward J. Mungovan was one of two sons of Thomas 

Mungovan, Sr., who became priests for the Diocese of 

Fort Wayne. His elder brother Thomas A. died as pastor 

of St. Mary's, Anderson on June 13, 1917. 
Edward, 

born in Fort 

D e c e mber 

was a mem- 
second class 

the Prepar- 

nary of St. 

College, 

After finish- 

sics there he 

Mount St. 

cinnati, for 

ph ilos op hy 

ogy. He was 

the holy 

on May 24, | 

day ^' 



same 




who was 
Wayne on 
19, 18 7 6, 
ber of the 
received a t 
atory Semi- 
J OS eph 's 
Collegeville. 
ing the clas- 
w e n t to 
Mary's, Cin- 
the study of 
and t h e o 1- 
ordained to 
p riest hoo d 
19 02, the 
his brother 
pointed the 
of St. Pat- 
ana Harbor. 



was a p - 
first pastor 
rick's, Indi- 

Father Edward Mungovan served as assistant at St 
Patrick's, Fort Wayne, until June, 1907, when he was 
given the pastorate of Areola with its mission, Pierceton. 
He built the present rectory at Areola, and in 1915 was 
promoted to the pastorate of St. Paul's, Valparaiso, where 
he liquidated the indebtedness against the large church 
there. 

His next promotion was to All Saints, Hammond, on 
June 12, 1929, where he has labored since and, as noted 
elsewhere, erected the present beautiful church. 

Father Mungovan is held in the highest esteem not 
only by his fellow clergy in the Hammond Deanery, but 
by all the priests in the diocese, and they welcomed his 
appointment to his present office, on March 12, 1940. 



REV. THOMAS E. DILLON 



REV. THOMAS E. DILLON 
Second School Superintendent 

In January, 1930, Rev. Thomas Emmett Dillon, v^'ho 
had been assistant at St. Mary's Parish, Huntington, w^as 
appointed the second School Superintendent of the Dio- 
cese. Before ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_ entering up- 
young ladies. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^" St. Joseph's 
College and Preparatory Seminary, at Rensselaer, is at- 
tended by some 500 students, and Notre Dame University 
by more than 3,000. There are more than 43,000 young 
people in Catholic educational institutions in the Diocese 
of Fort Wayne. 

Father Dillon and his neighbor, Fr. Hoif, conduct a 
joint High School vi^ith Sisters belonging to two 
religious Orders in charge. He has organized a Diocesan 
School Council, constituted of representatives of many 
Teaching communities. These assist him in determining 
school policies. Fr. Dillon has continued his predecessor's 
program of submitting examination questions to all 
grade schools. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



DIOCESAN OFFICIALS— 1941 

Besides the Vicar General, the Chancellor and the 
Assistant Chancellor, who are referred to elsewhere, the 
following priests work in a diocesan capacity, but since 
they are all pastors reference to their work in the min- 
istry is made at the proper place. 

THE DEANS 

Very Rev. John G. Bennett Right Rev. Monsignor 
Very Rev. Monsignor Thomas Travers 

Michael J. Aichinger Right Rev. Monsignor 

Very Rev. Monsignor A. J. Frank Jansen 

Copenolle Right Rev. Monsignor 

Thomas Jansen 
Very Rev. John Sabo 

CONSULTORS TO THE MOST REVEREND BISHOP 

Right Rev. Monsignor Right Rev. Monsignor 

Edward Mungovan F. J. Jansen 

Right Rev. Monsignor Right Rev. Monsignor 

Thomas Conroy D. L. Monahan 

Very Rev. Monsignor Julian Skrzypinski 

THE MATRIMONIAL COURT 
Officialis : Rev. S. Joachim Ryder ; 
Pro-Synodal Judges: Rev. Charles Girardot 

Rev. John Dapp 
Rev. John F. Nadolny 
Defensor Vinculi : Very Rev. John G. Bennett 

Promotor Justitiae : Rev. George A. Hasser 
Secretarius: Charles J. Feltes. 

PRO-SNYODAL EXAMINERS 

Right Rev. Monsignor Very Rev. Monsignor 

D. L. Monahan George Moorman 

Right Rev. Monsignor Rev. Leo Scheetz 

Thomas Travers Rev. Curt Suelzer. 

Rev. John E. Dillon 



DIOCESAN OFFICIALS 167 



We do not list the names of the officers of the Clergy 
Relief Association because they change every two years. 

Other priests whose activities are diocesan in scope, 
but who hold no pastorate are the following: 

THE MISSION AGENCIES 

The Rev. John A. Costello is Diocesan Director of 
the Society for the Propagation of the Faith, and of the 
Holy Childhood Association. His business address is 1415 
W. Washington Boulevard, Fort Wayne. 

Father Costello was born at Anderson, Indiana, on 
July 21, 1886, pursuing his studies for the holy priest- 
hood at St. Joseph College, Collegeville, St. Mary's, Day- 
ton, and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordain- 
ed on June 20, 1913 by Bishop Alerding. 

His first appointment was assistant at St. Lawrence, 
Muncie, where he remained until April 1, 1917, when he 
was permitted to go to the Apostolic Mission House in 
Washington to prepare himself for work in the mission 
field. He was engaged in the conduct of missions through- 
out the country, and from collections assisted a number 
of young men through the Preparatory Seminary. It 
was during this time that he was given his present ap- 
pointment, although he served as Director of the Judge 
Gary-Bishop Alerding Settlement House from February 
6, 1930 until July, 1935, at which time he reentered the 
mission field. 

C. Y. 0. DIRECTOR 

The Rev. Joseph J. Hennes has direct charge of the 
C. Y. 0. work in the city of Fort Wayne, also directs it 
in the other Districts of the deanery and throughout the 
diocese. He has his residence at St. Vincent Villa. He 
is also charged with the responsibility of caring for the 
Catholic people resident in the County Infirmary, Irene 
Byron Sanitarium, and the State Home for Feeble- 
Minded. 

Father Hennes was born at Kentland, Indiana, on 
December 24, 1898, attending school at Earl Park and 
then entered St. Joseph College, Collegeville, and after 
finishing the classics went to Mount St. Mary Seminary, 



168 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Cincinnati. He was ordained to the holy priesthood on 
June 1, 1928, by Bishop Noll. 

Father Hennes served as assistant at St. Patrick's, 
Kokomo, from November 22, 1928, until April 12, 1929; 
then as assistant at All Saints, Hammond, until July, 
1930, at which time he was transferred to St. Mary's, 
Decatur. He was given charge of the C. Y. 0. work in 
Fort Wayne on March 1, 1937, and took up his residence 
at St. Vincent Villa on February 4, 1939. In 1940 Father 
Hennes was appointed Diocesan Director of the Con- 
fraternity of Christian Doctrine. 

CATHOLIC CHARITIES 

In October, 1934, the Rev. William Edward Sweigart 
was sent to the Catholic University of Washington to 
take a course in Social Science in view of the direction of 
Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Fort Wayne. He com- 
pleted his studies on July 1, 1936, and from that time on 
has been Diocesan Director. 

Father Sweigart was born at Muncie, Indiana, on 
April 22, 1903. He pursued his studies at St. Lavsrence 
College, Mount Calvary, and at Mount St. Mary's, Cin- 
cinnati, and was ordained on March 16. 1929, by Bishop 
Noll. 

From April, 1929, until July, 1930, he served as 
assistant at St. Joseph's, Hammond, and then was ap- 
pointed assistant to Father Costello at the Settlement 
House, Gary, and, as above mentioned, in October, 1934 
was sent to the Catholic University where he spent two 
years. Upon his return he served as chaplain at St. 
Vincent Villa for seven months, and has since had his 
home with the Superintendent of Central Catholic High 
School on the Villa property. 



The Rev. Andrew Mathieu, who also attended the 
School of Social Service at Catholic University for two 
years, was appointed to assist Father Sweigart. 

The Rev. Andrew Mathieu was born at Fort Wayne 
on October 24, 1910. He prepared for the priesthood at 
St. Joseph's, Collegeville, and at St. Meinrad's, and was 
ordained on May 22, 1937 by Bishop Noll. 



DIOCESAN OFFICIALS 169 

After serving as assistant at St. Mary's, Michigan 
City for one year and St. Paul's, Fort Wayne, for a few 
months, he went to Washington to prepare himself for 
work in the field of Catholic Charities. 



The Rev. Joachim S. Ryder, pastor of St. John's, 
Fort Wayne, fills the post of Diocesan Director of the 
Legion of Decency. 

The Very Rev. John Sabo, Dean of the South Bend 
District, is Diocesan Director of the National Organiza- 
tion for Decent Literature. 

The Rev. Leo Hildebrandt, pastor of St. Mary's, 
Griffith, is Diocesan Director of the National Council of 
Catholic Women. 

The Rev. John Schall, of St. Vincent's, Logansport, 
is Diocesan Director of the Priests' Eucharistic League. 



The statistical summary of the Diocese of Fort 
Wayne for the year 1941 is as follows : 

Parishes with 

Parochial Schools .. 116 

Pupils in High 

Schools and 

Academies 3,448 

Pupils in Colleges 

and Universities .... 4,415 
Pupils in Parochial 

Schools 24,266 

Orphanages 3 

Orphans 334 

Total Young People 

under Catholic 

Care 32,193 

Hospitals and 

Sanitariums 16 

Number of 

Patients 64,428 

Old People's Homes .. 3 

Number of Old 

People cared for.. 349 

Marriages 2,957 

Baptisms 5,625 

Converts 1,372 

Deaths 2,101 

Catholic Population 

(1940) 183, 297 



Bishop 


1 


Secular Priests 


259 


Priests of Religious 




Orders 


239 


Total 


498 


Churches with 




Resident Priests .... 


167 


Missions with 




Churches 


24 


Total 


191 


Chapels 


55 


University 


1 


Seminaries of 




Religious Orders .— 


5 


Preparatory 




Seminary 


1 


Ecclesiastical 




Students for the 




Diocese : 




In Major 




Seminary 


39 


In Preparatory 




Seminary 


32 


High Schools . 


10 


Academies for 




Young Ladies 


4 



DIVISION OF DIOCESE ACCORDING TO DEANERIES 



Fori Wayne Deanery 

Very Rev. John G. Bennett, Dean 

The Fort Wayne Deanery at present comprises 
thirty-four parishes and five missions. It is the seat of 
the St. Vincent Villa; of the Sacred Heart Academy, 
originally occupied by the Sisters of the Holy Cross but 
now a Preparatory Seminary conducted by the Crosier 
Fathers; of the Capuchin Monastery and Novitiate, just 
outside of Huntington; of the Novitiate of the Black 
Franciscans at Angola ; of the Mission Headquarters of 
the Oblate Fathers at Ligonier ; of the Home for the Aged 
at Avilla, in charge of the Sisters of St. Francis of the 
Sacred Heart ; of the Kneipp Sanitarium, Rome City, con- 
ducted by Sisters of the Precious Blood ; of the Mother- 
house and Training School of the Society of Missionary 
Catechists known as Victory-Noll, located one mile west 
of Huntington; of OUR SUNDAY VISITOR, Inc., the 
largest printing plant in the United States operated under 
Catholic auspices. Catholic Hospitals are located at Fort 
Wayne and Garrett, the former conducted by Sisters of 
the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ, and the latter by 
Franciscan Sisters of Joliet, 111. 

Practically the whole area of the Fort Wayne Dean- 
ery was once served from the city of Fort Wayne, where 
Father Badin, the first priest ordained in the United 
States, and several other priests began to work as early 
as 1831. Later a part of the territory was serviced from 
LaGro; then from Fort Wayne, LaGro and Avilla; and 
still later from Fort Wayne, LaGro, Avilla and Decatur, 
the four places in the Deanery which had resident priests 
from the year 1857. 

Rev. Julian Benoit, who was sent to Fort Wayne by 
the Bishop of Vincennes in April, 1840, had as missions 
out of Fort Wayne, LaGro, Huntington, Columbia City, 
Warsaw, Goshen, Avilla, Academic, New Haven, Besan- 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



171 



con, Hessen 
Decatur. It 
for him to 
the sick at 
more distant 
to travel the 
way. Father 
chased the 
now known 
Square and 
money, much 
the diocese, 
tion of St. 
Academy, 
Cathedral, 
copal and 
rectories. 

LaGro be- 
resident 
the coming 
rick McDer- 
y e a r 1846, 
Patrick's Parish 




Cassel and 
was common 
be called to 
points far 
when he had 
horseback 
Benoit pur- 
p r o p erty 
as Cathedral 
collected the 
of it outside 
for the erec- 
Augustine's 
the present 
the old Epis- 
C athedral 



Very Rev. John G. Bennett. 

See sketch under St. Joseph's 

Church, Garrett. 



gan to have 
priests with 
of Rev. Pat- 
mott in the 
and to St. 
LaGro, were attached the missions of 
Huntington, Wabash, Warsaw and Pierceton. 

The first resident pastor of Avilla was the Reverend 
Henry Shaefer, to whom territory reaching as far as 
Goshen to the west and the Ohio and Michigan State 
lines to the east and north respectively was confided. 

Decatur's first resident priest was Reverend Sebas- 
tian Ganther, C. PP. S., who was appointed in 1857, the 
year the Diocese of Fort Wayne was established. 

Among the first four parishes founded in the city 
of Fort Wayne, three were so-called "national" parishes, 
intended for the German speaking people, namely, St. 
Mary's, St. Paul's, St. Peter's. For some years sermons 
were preached in both German and English from the 
pulpit of the church of the Precious Blood. Today only 
St. Hyacinth's is intended for a national group, namely, 
for the Polish of the city. 

In the early days the membership of the Cathedral 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



parish was largely French, and the parishes at Academie 
and Besancon were constituted wholly of people who had 
come directly from France. Practically all other parishes 
in the immediate vicinity of Fort Wayne were composed 
largely of German speaking people, and only priests who 
could speak both English and German could pastor such 
parishes as Hessen Cassel, Yoder, Decatur, New Haven, 
Avilla, Huntington, Nix Settlement, Waterloo, Garrett 
and Auburn. 

Following are the churches now comprising the Fort 
Wayne Deanery, presided over by the Very Rev. John G. 
Bennett, of St. Joseph's Parish, Garrett: 



Fort Wayne, 


Garrett 


Cathedral 


Auburn 


St. Mary's 


Kendallville 


St. Paul's 


Rome City 


St. Peter's 


Ligonier — Albion, Lake 


St. Patrick's 


Wawasee 


Precious Blood 


Ege 


St. Andrew's 


Waterloo 


St. Hyacinth's 


Angola — LaGrange 


St. Joseph's 


Decatur 


St. Jude's 


Bluffton — Montpelier 


St. John the Baptist 


Huntington, 


Academie 


St. Mary's 


Besancon 


SS. Peter and Paul 


New Haven 


Roanoke 


Monroeville 


Nix Settlement 


Yoder (Sheldon) 


Areola 


Hessen Cassel 


Columbia City — Pierceton 


Avilla 


Warsaw 



174 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The first baptism recorded in Fort Wayne was ad- 
ministered by Father Badin, who signed himself "Vicar 
General of the Dioceses of Bardstown, Kentucky and 
Cincinnati." Translated from French the record reads: 
"At Fort Wayne, Diocese of Bardstown, I, the 
undersigned priest and missionary apostolic, bap- 
tized Peter David, born October 5, 1830, of the civil 
marriage of Peter Gibaud and Mary Gibaud. The 
sponsors were John Baptist Becket and Theresa 
Duret, his wife. 

"Step. Theod. Badin, 
V. G. of Bardst. and Cine." 

In connection with the first marriage recorded there 
is this comment: 

"In the year 1831, the 13th of February (the 
contracting parties hereinafter named, for several 
years residents of Fort Wayne, in Indiana, of the 
Diocese of Bardstown, residing far distant from a 
priest, the nearest being 130 miles, were for this 
reason obliged to contract a. civil marriage before 
William Ewing, Judge-Probate of the County of 
Allen), I the undersigned priest, having come to 
preach a mission at Fort Wayne, have given the 
nuptial benediction to James Aveline, the eldest son 
of Francis Aveline and Genevieve Cardinal, and to 
Catherine Comparet, eldest daughter of Michael 
Comparet and Agnes Jeanne, who have signed the 
present register, together with John Baptist God- 
froy, Francis Reynaud, John B. Becquette and Peter 
Courveille who have signed with us, or aif ixed their 
mark. 

"Step. Theod. Badin, Vic. Gen. of Bardst, and Cine." 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



FORT WAYNE 

Cathedral 
1837 




The Cathedral parish, Fort Wayne, is over 100 
years old, yet its second church is still in use. The 
first parish church, dedicated to Saint Augustine, was 
begun in 1837 by the Rev. Louis Mueller, first pastor of 
the parish, twenty years before the diocese of Fort Wayne 
was created. The edifice was completed by the Rev. Julian 
Benoit, who succeeded Father Mueller in 1840. Father 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Benoit remained pastor of the Cathedral congregatioJi 
for 45 years, or until his death, in 1885. 

Father Benoit was the builder of the second church, 
the present beautiful Cathedral, which was completed in 
1860 and dedicated to the Immaculate Conception. Priests 
succeeded Father Benoit as pastors of the Cathedral in 
the following order : The Rev. J. H. Brammer, the Rev. 
John H. Guendling, the Rev. Patrick Roche, the Rev. John 
R. Quinlan, and the Rt. Rev. Thomas M. Conroy. 

Besides building the Cathedral, Father Benoit also 
erected the two Cathedral parish schools, and the Cathe- 
dral rectory, the latter being razed only after the late Rt. 
Rev. Herman Joseph Alerding had moved from the Epis- 
copal residence, which he built in 1901, to the property 
which he purchased at 1415 W. Washington Blvd. in 1921. 

The first priests' house occupied the corner of Cal- 
houn and Lewis, where later the imposing structure 
known as Library Hall, was erected by Father Brammer 
in 1880. Until 1901 the Bishops of Fort Wayne lived 
with priests who served the Cathedral congregation. 

At the death of Father Brammer, known as the priest 
of charity, a heavy burden of debt was inherited by his 
successor. It was reduced in large part by Fathers 
Guendling, Roche and Quinlan, and completely liquidated 
by Father Conroy, who also made a great many improve- 
ments, including the installation of a new organ, pulpit, 
floor, pews, baptistry, the enlargement of the sacristies, 
and handsome new altars, gifts of Frank Phillips, Ed- 
ward Gilmartin and Julietta Lange Burns ; and more rec- 
ently a new boiler house and boilers. These latter rep- 
resent a second series of important improvements in the 
old Cathedral. The first thorough renovation and new 
installations were made in 1896 by Father Brammer, a 
short time before his death. Among the latter were the 
beautiful windows. Stations of the Cross, and Commun- 
ion railing. The Stations were a gift of Mrs. Helen 
Fleming- and the Communion railing of the Misses Lau. 

The former Bishop's House, built by Bishop Alerding 
in 1901 with funds realized from the sale of an old ceme- 
tery near Fort Wayne, is now occupied by the Cathedra! 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



priests; the Library Hall, erected by Father Brammer, 
and from Sept. 1909 to Jan. 1939, used as a Central 
Catholic High School for boys, was razed in 1940 after 
the completion of the commodious .new Central High 
School for Catholic boys and girls. 

The Cathedral parish is contemplating the erection 
of a new Rectory, in which event the Chancery will use 
a greater portion of the edifice, while rooms will be pro- 
vided for some teachers at Central Catholic High School. 

The Sisters of Providence, who were brought to Fort 
Wayne in 1846 by Father Benoit, have charge of the 
Cathedral Grade School for boys and girls erected during 
the pastorate of Father Quinlan, and conducted a High 
School for girls, known as St. Augustine Academy, on 
Cathedral Square until 1939. 

The Cathedral property is admirably situated. It is 
not only valuable downtown property, but is about as cen- 
trally located as it could be. 

The present Bishop of Fort Wayne, and his parents 
before him, were members of the Cathedral. Father 
Noll was the first priest of that parish to be ordained. 
He said his First Holy Mass on June 5th, 1898. 

The number of priests who have served the few pas- 
tors as assistants have been large. At present, associated 
with Monsignor Conroy are the Rev. Francis Niesen, the 
Rev. Stanley Manoski and the Rev. Lawrence Gollner. 
The Assistant Chancellor lives at the Cathedral Rectory 
and assists with Saturday and Sunday work. 

Other pastorates held by Monsignor Conroy were 
those of Portland, Monroeville, and Crawfordsville. Fath- 
er Conroy belonged to the Charter Class of St. Joseph's 
College, Rensselaer, having entered that institution in 
the year it opened in September, 1891. He was ordained 
to the Priesthood, at the age of 24, by Bishop Alerding, 
June 21, 1901. 

Honoring the Cathedral parish on the occasion of 
the Diamond Jubilee of the Diocese, Father Conroy was 
raised to the rank of a Domestic Prelate. 



Rev. Edward F. Niesen was born in Chicago, Illinois, 
on January 23, 1908. He prepared for the priesthood at 



178 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Quigley Preparatory Seminary, Kenrick Seminary, St. 
Louis, and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He 
was ordained on June 10, 1933, by Bishop Noll. On June 
30, 1933, he was appointed as assistant at St. Mary's, 
Anderson, where he remained until July 8, 1939, when 
he was transferred to the Cathedral. 

The Rev. Stanislaus Manoski was born in Wabash, 
Indiana, on August 16, 1912. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Meinrad's Seminary. He was ordained 
on June 3, 1939 by Bishop Noll and appointed assistant 
at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne, and in November, 1940, 
transferred to the Cathedral. 

Father Gollner is referred to under "Clergy Who 
Teach in High Schools." 

St. Mary's Church 
1848 

In 1848 thirty German families hitherto belonging 
to St. Augustine's church purchased property on the cor- 
ner of Lafayette and Jefferson streets for a church for 
Catholics of their nationality. Five men mortgaged their 
farms to pay for it, showing evidence of their earnestness 
and zeal. This was the beginning of St. Mary's parish, 
whose first church was completed on the 29th of Novem- 
ber 1848, with the Rev. Edward M. Faller in charge. At 
the same time a small frame house was built to serve as 
parochial residence. 

The first edifice served until 1858 when the erection 
of a more commodious building was begun. After Father 
Faller's transfer to New Albany, the Rev. Joseph Weutz 
was appointed pastor. He resigned the pastorate in 1872, 
and Bishop Dwenger appointed the Rev. Joseph Rade- 
macher to fill his place. Seven years later when Father 
Rademacher was transferred to Lafayette, the Rev. J. H. 
Oechtering succeeded him on July 14, 1880. 

On January 13, 1886, the boiler under the church ex- 
ploded killing the fireman and a little girl who was pass- 
ing the church at the time. The shock of the explosion 
was felt throughout the city and the church now pre- 
sented a disastrous scene of wreck and ruin. Father 
Oechtering began at once a new and better building, 



FOKT WAYNE DEANERY 



which was ready for dedication on the third Sunday of 
Advent, 1887. The Bishop of Nashville, a former pastor, 
took part in the solemnities. The old school house was re- 
placed by a larger one. In 1903 a large boys' school was 
built opposite the church. School Sisters of Notre Dame 
teach in both schools. 

In 1903 Father Oechtering was appointed Vicar 
General to Bishop Alerding, and was elevated to the 
rank of Domestic Prelate in 1905. 

Before he retired in 1927, and moved to Riesenbeck, 
Germany, to live with his nephew, the Monsignor had 
built up a fund for the part support of his schools. 

He was succeeded by his assistant for twelve years, 
the Rev. George Hasser, who himself was forced to retire 
from active work in July, 1935, and was appointed Chap- 
lain of Sacred Heart Hospital, Garrett. The Rev. J. N. 
Allgeier succeeded Father Hasser, and found it necessary 
to replace the heating plant and make many improve- 
ments on the property. [A brief sketch of Monsignor 
Oechtering's life appears elsewhere.] Fr. Allgeier is 
assisted by the Rev. V. J. Rosenthal. 



Father Allgeier was born at Fort Wayne Sept. 12, 
1886 ; attended St. Mary's School ; St. Joseph College and 
St. Francis Seminary. He was ordained June 17, 1911 
by Bishop Alerding. His first appointment was assistant 
at Garrett, whence he was assigned to Ege as pastor, Feb. 
5, 1919. In June 1921, he became pastor of St. Louis 
Church, Besancon, and on July 25, 1935, was appointed 
pastor of St. Mary's, Fort Wayne, of which he had been 
a parishioner. 

The Rev. V. J. Rosenthal was born July 20, 1914 at 
Hobson, Montana. He received his education at St. 
Mary's school, Crown Point, Indiana, St. Joseph College, 
St. Gregory and Mt. St. Mary Seminaries. He was or- 
dained May 18, 1940 by Bishop Noll and given his pres- 
ent appointment. 

St. Paul's Church 
1865 

The Catholics of German nationality in the western 
part of Fort Wayne, with the permission of Bishop 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Luers, purchased property on February 2, 1865, fronting 
on Fairfield Ave., at the corner of Washington, and 
erected a frame church, which was dedicated on Oct. 
1865, when Bishop Luers appointed the Rev. Edward 
Koenig as the first pastor. 

The pastor opened a parochial school less than a year 
later, January 19, 1866, with Louis Weiser as the first 
teacher. In 1868 a larger brick school house was erected. 

The present church was erected by Father Koenig 
in 1886. It was beautifully furnished in solid oak. After 
a long pastorate, Father Koenig died January 12, 1898, 
and was succeeded on February 21, by the Rev. H. F. 
Joseph Kroll, who liquidated a debt of $17,000.00, pur- 
chased a new Rectory, which he enlarged, added to the 
-school, and made many other improvements. Poor Hand- 
maids of Jesus Christ teach the school. 

Father Kroll was in ill health for many years before 
he died, and needed the help of a locum tenens. Fathers 
Franz, Bodinger, and John Nadolny filled this office in 
turn. 

In 1929 Father Kroll was elevated to the rank of 
Papal Chamberlain. He died on July 14, 1936. 

He was succeeded by the Rev. John F. Nadolny, the 
diocesan Chancellor, on March 1, 1935, who has com- 
pletely renovated the church, installed a new pipe organ, 
and made many other improvements. 

Father Nadolny is assisted by the Rev. Andrew 
Mathieu, who is assistant Director of Diocesan Charities. 



Father Nadolny was born at Elkhart, Indiana, on 
May 5, 1896; attended St. Vincent's parish school; St. 
Francis and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, and was ordained 
on May 26, 1923, by Bishop Alerding. After serving as 
assistant at Holy Angels, Gary, for four years, he was 
appointed assistant Chancellor- and in November, 1932 
was made Chancellor. On March 1, 1935 he was given 
the pastorate of St. Paul's. 

Sketch on Father Mathieu appears under "Catholic 
Charities." 



FOKT WAYNE DEANERY 181 

St. Peter's Church 
1871 

For the benefit of the German speaking people liv- 
ing south of the Pennsylvania, tracks St. Peter's Parish 
was founded in the year 1871. A large piece of property, 
known now as St. Peter's Square, running from Hanna 
to Warsaw and from St. Martin to DeWald, was pur- 
chased for the purpose. 

A combination church and school, measuring forty 
by seventy feet was erected by Rev. John Wemhoff, the 
first pastor of the parish. 

In the year 1892 the Rev. A. Messmann began the 
erection of the present large Gothic structure which was 
dedicated the next year. The Sisters' convent was built 
by Father Messmann in the year 1880. He was succeed- 
ed, in 1896, by the Rev. Ferdinand Koerdt, who, after 
some years, designed an imposing school building, one 
wing of which he erected. The school was completed by 
his successor, the Rev. Charles Thiele, who was appointed 
rector of St. Peter's in June, 1905. 

Father (later Monsignor) Thiele completely reno- 
vated the church, replacing the old altars and pulpit and 
stations with others of costly and beautiful design, and 
paid off entirely a very large debt created by the com- 
pletion of the new school and gymnasium. 

St. Peter's parish excels in congregational singing; 
in large attendance at week-day evening devotions- and 
for many years has had only male choirs. 

In the year 1929, Father Thiele was made a Papal 
Chamberlain and in September, 1933, a Domestic Prelate. 

In August, 1936, the Monsignor surrendered his 
pastorate to the Rev. John Bapst, who assumed the dut- 
ies of "acting" pastor, and who cheerfully agreed to 
share his home with the pastor "Emeritus." Msgr. Thiele 
died on April 17, 1941. 

Lay teachers were employed by St. Peter's Parish 
until the year 1881, when the School Sisters of Notre 
Dame were procured. They taught ten grades until the 
opening of Central Catholic High School in the fall of 
1938. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The pastor with his two assistants still occupy a 
frame residence which had been purchased and moved to 
its present site in 1892. 



Father Bapst was born in Garrett, Indiana, June 19, 
1894. He pursued his studies for the holy priest- 
hood at St. Lawrence College, Mt. Calvary, Wis., and 
at St. Francis' Seminary, St. Francis, Wisconsin. He 
was ordained by Bishop Alerding on May 21, 1921. After 
serving as assistant at St. Joseph's, Mishawaka, until 
April 12, 1929, he was appointed pastor first at Bluffton 
and then at Yoder- whence he was transferred to St. 
Peter's Parish, Fort Wayne. 

The Rev. Adrian Brandehoff was born in Cloverdale, 
Ohio, on June 23, 1911. He pursued his studies for the 
priesthood at the Josephinum, Columbus, Ohio. He was 
ordained by the Apostolic Delegate, the Most. Rev. Am- 
leto Cicognani, on May 26, 1935. On July 10, 1935, he 
received his first appointment as assistant at St. Peter's 
Parish, Fort Wayne. 

The Rev. Thomas Durkin was born in Decatur, Ind., 
on May 14, 1909. He pursued his studies for the priest- 
hood at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and St. Greg- 
ory's and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He 
was ordained by Bishop Noll on June 6, 1936. On July 2 
of the same year he was appointed assistant at St. Peter's 
Parish, Fort Wayne. 

St. Patrick's Church 
1890 

The opening of a school consisting of only two 
rooms, in what was known as the Bond Building, in 1886, 
may be considered the beginning of St. Patrick's. 

Three years later Bishop Dwenger purchased four 
lots on Fairfield Avenue, on which was the residence of 
Mr. Peter Owen. It was converted into four school 
rooms, and in September the children were transferred 
to the new quarters. 

In October, 1889, the Bishop decided to build a 
church and appointed Rev. Thomas M. O'Leary as the 
first pastor. 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



Father O'Leary began at once to negotiate for the 
purchase of property on DeWald Street. But he died 
three weeks after his lappointment. Then on November 
5, the Rev. Joseph F. Delaney was appointed pastor of 
the new parish. 

In April of the following year ground was broken 
for the church, the cornerstone of which was laid on 
May 20 by the Most Rev. Bishop Dwenger. This was the 
last public appearance of the Bishop, whose health short- 
ly after began to fail. 

The church was dedicated on November 22, 1891, by 
the Very Rev. Joseph H. Brammer, V.G. The cost was 
$59,000.00. In 1912, improvements costing $37,000.00 
were made on the church, consisting of new pews, a mag- 
nificent marble altar and sanctuary, and marble wains- 
coting. Later a marble pulpit and baptismal font were 
added. 

A school of eight rooms was built and was ready for 
use when the church was completed in 1891. The Sisters 
of Providence staffed the school. 

In 1901 an academy for girls was built at a cost of 
$20,000.00. In 1921 the academy was enlarged at a cost 
of $16,000.00. Its services were discontinued in 1939 
when the Central High School was opened at the corner 
of Clinton and Lewis Streets. 

The parochial residence originally cost $3,500.00, 
but some years later it was enlarged at a cost of $16,- 
000.00. 

A lot on the corner of Harrison and Butler Streets 
was secured on which was erected the present lyceum at 
a cost of $45,000.00. 

In 1915 Father Delaney purchased four lots adjoin- 
ing the lyceum on Butler Street at a cost of $39,000.00- 
and in 1917 a magnificent school consisting of sixteen 
rooms was erected at a cost of $105,250.00. The former 
school consisting of eight rooms was remodeled, music 
and classrooms were added to meet the increased num- 
ber of students in the academy, all at a cost of $18,- 
000.00. 

In 1920, Father Delaney secured the remaining lot. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 




Rt. Rev. Msgr. Jos. F. Delaney 
(deceased) 



Rt. Rev. Msgr. D. L. Monahan 
Present Rector 



on which were three residences, at a cost of $12,000.00, 
thus completing the block. 

In the year 1929 Father Delaney erected a commo- 
dious new convent at a cost of $50,000.00. 

In 1928 Father Delaney was made a Domestic Pre- 
late. He died at the age of 72 on January 25, 1935, and 
was succeeded by the Rev. D. L. Monahan, on March 1, 
1935. 

In October, 1940, St. Patrick's celebrated its Golden 
Jubilee, preparatory to which the present pastor had 
the church resurfaced exteriorly, refurnished and re- 
decorated interiorly, including a new organ and marble 
side altars to match the main altar, the latter being 
gifts of the Miller family. 

In the fall of 1938 Father Monahan was elevated to 
the rank of Domestic Prelate. 



Monsignor Monahan was born in Fort Wayne on 
September 16, 1876 ; attended the Cathedral Grade school, 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 185 

St. Joseph's College, and St. Bernard's Seminary, Roch- 
ester, New York. He was ordained June 17, 1910; 
served as assistant at St. Joseph's Parish, Mishawaka- 
and at St. Charles' Parish, Peru, and held pastorates at 
Oxford, Hartford City and St. Mary's Parish, Lafayette, 
before coming to Fort Wayne. 

Monsignor Monahan is assisted by Fathers Adler, 
Duray and Cross. 

Father Joseph Adler was born in New York City on 
April 7, 1898. He prepared for the priesthood at the 
Syracuse House of Studies, at St. Gregory's and Mount 
St. Mary's Seminaries, Cincinnati. He was ordained by 
Bishop Noll on June 10, 1933. His first appointment was 
assistant at St. Joseph's Parish, Elwood, where he re- 
mained until July 5, 1934 when he was appointed 
assistant at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne. 

The Rev. Louis Duray was born in Czechoslovakia on 
January 20, 1910. He prepared for the priesthood at St. 
Joseph's College, Rensselaer, and at St. Gregory's and 
Mount St. Mary's Seminaries, Cincinnati. He was or- 
dained by Bishop Noll on May 22, 1937, and was ap- 
pointed assistant at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne, on June 
16 of the same year. 

See sketch of Father Cross under "Clergy who teach 
in High Schools." 

Precious Blood Church 
1895 

On February 12, 1896, Bishop Rademacher assigned 
the territory north of the St. Mary's River and west of 
Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway, to the pas- 
toral care of the Fathers of the Society of the Precious 
Blood. Two years later, on October 13, 1897, the Rev. 
Frank Nigsch, C.PP.S., became the first pastor within 
the territory assigned. He immediately purchased a large 
piece of property for church, school, convent and a Mis- 
sion House. He first built a combination church and 
school, entrusting the latter to the Sisters of the Precious 
Blood. 

In the year, 1898, he erected a Mission House 
which served also as pastoral residence. A one story 



f'RAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



brick structure was erected in 1902 as an Assembly Hall, 
but was later used for school purposes. 

Under the direction of the Rev. C. Hummer, C.PP.S., 
the successor of Father Nigsch, who began his pastorate 
January, 1903, the congregation in 1911 and 1912 erect- 
ed a church at the cost of ?75,000, which was dedicated in 
August, 1912. In 1920 the Rev. S. Neiberg, C.PP.S., suc- 
ceeded the Rev. C. Hummer, C.PP.S., during which time 
a convent was built at a cost of |20,000. He was succeeded 
by the Rev. B. A. Didier, C.PP.S., who erected a large 
new school equipped with gymnasium and auditorium. 

The present pastor is the Rev. Cyril Mohr, C.PP.S., 
a former missionary, and now an efficient administrator. 
Three priests of the Congregation of the Precious Blood 
assist him in a parish which today numbers more than 
700 families. 

[In this volume we do not sketch the career- of reli- 
gious.'] 

St. Andreiv's 
1910 

In the year 1910 Bishop Alerding appointed the Rev. 
George H. Horstman to organize into a parish the Catho- 
lics resident in the eastern part of Fort Wayne, and prop- 
erty was purchased on New Haven Avenue close to sev- 
eral Fort Wayne industries. Most of these people had 
been members of St. Mary's. 

Father Horstman immediately assumed the gargan- 
tuan task of building simultaneously a new church, 
school, convent and rectory, which were dedicated in the 
year 1911, leaving the small parish under the burden 
of a debt exceeding |100,000.00. 

The people, however, responded generously and had 
reduced the debt to $76,000.00 when Father Horstman 
died in May, 1918. 

He was succeeded by the Rev. Henry A. Hoerstman 
in June, 1918. Father Henry Hoerstman has been an un- 
tiring worker and would have had the church property 
entirely out of debt had he not erected a new convent for 
the Sisters of St. Francis of Lafayette, who are in charge 
of the school, in the year 1930. 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 187 

St. Andrew Parish has a very active Parent-Teacher 
Association and is probably the only church in the dio- 
cese in which a large percentage of the parish is affiliated 
with the Legion of Mary. 

Father Hoerstman is assisted at the present time by 
the Rev. Thomas 0. Heilman. 



Rev. Henry A. Hoerstman was born at Delphos, 
Ohio, on July 26, 1882. When he was ten years old his 
parents moved to Mishawaka. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Joseph College, Collegeville, and at St. 
Francis', Milwaukee, and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati, 
and was ordained on May 22, 1907. 

Until July, 1911 he served as assistant at St. Jo- 
seph's, Logansport, at which time he was appointed 
pastor of St. Edward's, Lowell, which, at that time, had 
several missions. In June, 1918, he was promoted to the 
pastorate of St. Andrew's, Fort Wayne. 

Rev. Thomas 0. Heilman was born at Louisville, 
Kentucky, on May 16, 1914. Early in life his parents 
moved to Kokomo. He made his preparation for the holy 
priesthood at St. Joseph College, Collegeville, and at St. 
Meinrad Seminary, and was ordained on June 3, 1939. A 
month later he received his present appointment. 

St. Hyacinth's Church 
1910 

The Polish people who resided, for the most part, in 
the southeastern part of Fort Wayne, were accommodated 
for nine years in the vacated church on St. Peter's Square. 
The parish was organized by the Rev. Emmanuel Wrobel, 
who remained in charge until October, 1916 and who, in 
1912, purchased a nearby house for use as a rectory. 

The Rev. Michael Swiatkowski had charge from Oc- 
tober 1915 until November 1918, and was succeeded by 
the Rev. Ladislaus Szczukowski who, in the year 1919, 
built a combination church and school, rectory and con- 
vent on Holton Avenue, some distance from St. Peter's. 

In July 1925, the Rev. John Hosinski was placed in 
charge of St. Hyacinth's where he served two years. The 
Rev. John Wroblewski was also pastor for two years, and 



FRAGMENTS OF OUB DIOCESAN HISTORY 



the Rev. Michael Petzold from August 1929 to April 
1932. From that date until July 4, 1940, the Rev. Julian 
F. Doktor was in charge of this parish. He was succeeded 
by the Rev. Joseph Szmyt (Smith) who is the present 
pastor, and with whom the people of a declining parish 
are working splendidly. 



The Rev. Joseph Szmyt (Smith) was born at East 
Chicago, Indiana, on January 29, 1906. He prepared for 
the holy priesthood at Orchard Lake, St. Bonaventure's 
and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained on 
June 14, 1930, by Bishop Noll. 

The following month he was appointed assistant at 
St. Stanislaus', Michigan City, where he remained until 
his transfer to the pastorate of St. Hyacinth's, on July 
4, 1940. 

St. Joseph's Church 
1913 

In the year 1913 it was decided to erect a separate 
church for the Italian people of Fort Wayne with Father 
Anthony Petrilli in charge. A residence was rented at the 
corner of Fairfield Avenue and Bass Street to serve as an 
improvised church and rectory. Early in 1916 two acres 
of ground were purchased at the corner of Taylor and 
Frary Streets where a frame church, rectory and portable 
school were built. The church was dedicated on October 
8, 1916 by Right Rev. Monsignor John H. Oechtering, V. 
G. It was not long, however, before the Italians, for 
whom the church was built, lost interest in it, because it 
was far removed from many who were scattered over the 
entire city. Because of this Father Petrilli returned to his 
diocese of Benevento, Italy. Father Petrilli was suc- 
ceeded by the Rev. Edward H. Vurpillat, who had charge 
from June 1919 until April 1921. 

At this time it was deemed advisable to sell the prop- 
erty on Taylor Street and to purchase new property which 
would be more centrally located to the people whom St. 
Joseph's was designed to serve. Accordingly land was 
purchased at the intersection of Brooklyn and Hale 
Avenues in 1924, on which a combination brick church 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 189 

and school was erected and two houses on the property 
were remodeled to serve the purpose respectively of a rec- 
tory and convent. Bishop Alerding personally supervised 
the erection of this church and school and on June 2, 
1924, appointed the Rev. Robert J. Halpin pastor. The 
church and school were dedicated in October 1924. 

Father Halpin made alterations to effect a basement 
church and to place the school, for which the Sisters of 
St. Agnes were engaged, on the main floor. 

Father Halpin was succeeded on April 12, 1929, by 
the Rev. Charles F. Girardot. 

St. Joseph's serves largely a poor, but deeply reli- 
gious element, and they are cooperating splendidly with 
Father Girardot. 

Father Girardot is assisted on week-ends by the Rev. 
John J. Frawley, teacher at Central Catholic High School. 



The Rev. Charles F. Girardot was born in Fort 
Wayne on September 11, 1894. After finishing the Cathe- 
dral grade school and Central Catholic High School, of 
Fort Wayne, he entered St. Meinrad Seminary and was 
ordained to the holy priesthood on November 13, 1918 by 
Bishop Chartrand. 

His first appointment was to the post of assistant at 
St. Mary's, Michigan City, where he also served as chap- 
lain at St. Anthony's Hospital, and at the Indiana State 
Prison until January 1926, when he was appointed pastor 
of St. Joseph's, Bluffton, with Montpelier as a mission. 
On April 12, 1929, he was made pastor of St. Joseph's, 
Fort Wayne. 

For Father Frawley's sketch see "Clergy who Teach 
in High Schools." 

St. Jude's Church 
1928 

Twenty years before this parish was founded, 
Bishop Herman J. Alerding purchased property on Ken- 
tucky Avenue, Lakeside, as a site for a future parish 
north of the Maumee River. However, as time passed, a 
change of location was found to be necessary owing to 
the rapid development of the city to the northwest. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The years 1925, 1926, and 1927 witnessed a grow- 
ing demand of northeast side Catholic residents for a 
new parish, and especially for a Catholic school. 

At a meeting in the auditorium of Forest Park 
School in the spring of 1926 attended by practically all 
who had children in parochial schools. Bishop Noll 
pointed out the burden of starting a parish from the 
ground up, and only after the people expressed a willing- 
ness to meet the burden in return for the convenience, the 
Bishop authorized the formation of a new parish, even 
though it would take people away from the Cathedral and 
St. Mary's. 

Five acres of land were purchased bounded by State 
Blvd., Randalia Drive, Forest Avenue and Pemberton 
Drive to which was given the name "Sharon Terrace". 
Building operations were begun in May, 1928, by Father 
Conroy on a Spanish style combination school and chapel. 
Sisters of Providence were engaged to teach in the 
school. The chapel was dedicated to St. Jude, the Apos- 
tle. The Rev. John Dapp was appointed the first resident 
pastor of St. Jude's, in April, 1929. After a few months 
he built a rectory, and in June 1929, the Rev. Clement 
Ewald became the first assistant. 

On July 1, 1935 ground was broken for a new 
Church which was added to the center of the east end of 
the school. Under this was placed a basement with stage 
and kitchen equipment for social purposes. 

Father Dapp and his congregation have accomplish- 
ed wonders in a short time. They began with an indebt- 
edness of $170,000.00 before the erection of the new 
church, but it has been reduced to a point where it is no 
longer a burden. A fund for the erection of a new con- 
vent is growing rapidly. 

Father Dapp is assisted by the Rev. Joseph A. Jacobs. 



Father Dapp was born at Summit (Waterloo) on 
Feb. 5, 1892- and pursued his ecclesiastical studies at 
Mount Calvary, Wis., and St. Meinrad's Seminary. He 
was ordained June 16, 1916 by Bishop Alerding. He 
served as assistant at St. Peter's, Fort Wayne from June 
1916 to June 1922; then at the Cathedral until July 1, 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 191 

1927, when he was given the pastorate of St. Joan of 
Arc, Kokomo. In April 12, 1929 he became the first resi- 
dent pastor of St. Jiide's. 

Father Dapp served on the Building Committee of 
Central Catholic High School. 

The Rev. Joseph A. Jacobs was born in Mishawaka, 
on February 6, 1914. He attended St. Joseph's College, 
St. Gregory's and Mt. St. Mary Seminary, Cincinnati. He 
was ordained on May 18, 1940 by Bishop Noll. He is 
filling his first appointment, which he assumed June 28, 
1940. 

St. John Baptist Church 
1930 

In 1926 and 1927 an entire city block was purchased 
for a new parish in the growing southwest part of the 
city, and in August, 1929 Bishop Noll appointed the Rev. 
S. Joachim Ryder to take charge of the people who lived 
south of Rudisill, west of Lafayette and east of St. 
Mary's River. Father Ryder lived at the St. Vincent Or- 
phanage while organizing the congregation, but after a 
few months purchased a residence two blocks from the 
church to serve as a temporary rectory. Soon Father 
Ryder had under construction a large fireproof school- 
and chapel to serve as a temporary church, which was 
dedicated in October, 1930. The people of this new St. 
John parish responded splendidly to Father Ryder's 
efforts and reduced the indebtedness by many thousand 
dollars before 1940, when an $18,000 convent was erect- 
ed without the need of new borrowing. Sisters of Provi- 
dence have charge of the school. 

Father Ryder served on the Building Committee for 
the large Central Catholic High School; has been long 
identified with the American Legion; is Diocesan Direc- 
tor of the Legion of Decency, Officialis of the Matrimon- 
ial Court. 

Assisting Father Ryder is the Rev. Matthew J. 
Lange. 

Father Ryder was born in Fort Wayne, August 6,. 
1889; attended Brothers' high school; St. Francis Semi- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



nary, St. Francis, Wis., and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, 
Cincinnati. He was ordained on June 25, 1914 by the 
late Bishop Alerding. His first appointment was as as- 
sistant at St. Mary's, Michigan City. After returning to 
the diocese from army chaplain service, he was given 
the pastorate of St. Paul's, Columbia City, and in June, 
1922 was transferred to St. Edward's, Lowell. In No- 
vember 1927 he was given the chaplaincy at Mercy 
Hospital, Gary, and in August 1929 was appointed pastor 
of the newly established St. John Baptist parish. 

The Rev. Matthew J. Lange was born September 21, 
1912, in Chicago, where he attended St. Joseph's school 
and then Holy Angels' at Gary, Indiana. He studied at 
St. Joseph's, CoUegeville, at St. Gregory's and Mt. St. 
Mary Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordained June 11, 
1938, by Bishop Noll, was appointed assistant at St. 
Ann's, Monterey for the summer, and then transferred 
to his present position. 




Very Rev. Msgr. H. F. Jos. KroU, 

late pastor of St. Paul's church, 

Fort Wayne. 



Rt. Rev.: Msgr. Charles Thiele, 

late pastor of St. Peter's church, 

Fort Wayne. 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



ACADEME 

St. Vincent's Church 
1846 

In the year 1840 a number of French families immi- 
grated from France, settled six miles north of Fort 
Wayne, and called their community New France. 

Rev. Father Benoit, who had recently come to Fort 
Wayne, began to offer Mass for these families in 1843, 
in the home of Isadore Pichon. Father Benoit was their 
visiting pastor for eleven years, and was succeeded in 
1854 by the Rev. A. Bessonies. 

The original church was erected in 1846; the orig- 
inal cottage for the priest, in 1855. Father Dechamps 
was the first resident pastor. He died in 1858 and was 
succeeded by Father Grevin. At that time the congrega- 
tion counted eighty families. 

The Rev. A. Adam, newly arrived from France, was 
assigned as pastor in 1861. He built a new church, a 
new rectory and the present Sacred Heart Academy, of 
which the Sisters of the Holy Cross had charge until 
1938. 

In 1870 the parish was transferred to the Holy 
Cross Fathers. The Rev. B. Roche was pastor for ten 
years; he was succeeded by the Rev. J. Franciscus, C.S. 
C. Thereafter secular priests were placed in charge in 
the following succession: The Rev. A. E. Lafontaine; 
the Rev. M. P. Louen; the Rev. A. Dowd, C.PP.S., the 
Rev. Joseph A. Lynn; the Rev. E. H. Vurpillat; the Rev. 
John E. Dillon; the Rev. Joachim Baker; the Rev. E. F. 
Fallon; the Rev. Charles Keyser, and Rev. Edward 
Miller, the present pastor. 



The Rev. Edward A. Miller was born at Waterloo, 
Indiana, on June 22, 1905. He attended St. Lawrence 
College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, and Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordained on March 16, 
1929 by Bishop Noll. From April 12, 1929 to July 24, 
1935 he was assistant at St. Mary's parish, Michigan 
City, and chaplain of the Indiana State Prison; then he 



194 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

was transferred as assistant to St. Mary's, Fort Wayne. 
On July 3, 1940 he was appointed pastor of St. Vincent's, 
Academie. Father Miller has been an efficient band and 
orchestra director at Central Catholic High School, Fort 
Wayne. 

HESSEN CASSEL 

St. Joseph's Church 

1851 

Just as a French colony settled at Academie and Be- 
sancon, more than a century ago, so a German colony, 
constituted of immigrants from Hessen in the Diocese of 
Fulda, Germany, settled eight miles southeast of Fort 
Wayne in the year 1834. 

Rev. L. Mueller, the first resident priest of Fort 
Wayne, offered Mass in this community in the home of 
John Sorg. Following him Father Benoit directed the 
erection of a small church. This was replaced sixteen 
years later, in 1867, by the present brick church erected 
by the Rev. Jacob Mayer, the first resident pastor. 
Father Mayer was succeeded by Rev. Joseph Nussbaum, 
who built the rectory. He was succeeded in turn by the 
Rev. W. Woeste, Rev. John Wemhoff, Rev. W. Geers, 
Rev. J. H. Hueser, D. D., who erected the school and con- 
vent, Rev. J. A. Mark, Rev. M. Benzinger, Rev. F. J. 
flasler. Rev. Joachim Baker, and Rev. Charles Seeberger, 
the present pastor. The school is in charge of the 
Franciscan Sisters of the Sacred Heart. 



Rev. Charles Seeberger was born in Elkhart, In- 
diana, on September 13, 1897. He pursued his studies 
for the priesthood at St. Lawrence College, Mount Cal- 
vary, Wisconsin and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cin- 
cinnati. He was ordained by Bishop Howard on June 6. 
1925. After serving as assistant in Sacred Heart parish. 
Whiting, All Saints', Hammond and St. Joseph's, Mis- 
hawaka, he was appointed pastor of St. Ann's Parish, 
Kewanna, in July, 1931. On July 8, 1939, he was ap- 
pointed pastor of St. Joseph's, Hessen Cassel. 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 195 

BESANCON 

St. Louis' Church 
1851 

New France, as the first settlers called it, was settled 
by immigrants from France, and principally from the 
region around Besancon. Hence the name by which it 
later became known. 

Father A. Bessonies, of the Diocese of Vincennes, 
was the first to serve Besancon, and built its original 
church in 1851, which was dedicated to St. Louis, King 
of France. 

After the establishment of the Diocese of Fort 
Wayne, the Rev. Julian Benoit of the Cathedral parish 
ministered to the Catholics of this district. Father Gre- 
vin was Besancon's first resident pastor and built a small 
one-story rectory. Father Adam, brought from France, 
erected the present church in 1870. Five years later he 
returned to France, where he served in the Diocese of 
Tours, until the Separation Law was passed in 1903, 
whereupon he returned to the United States and made 
his home first at St. Joseph's Academy, Tipton, and later 
at the Sacred Heart Academy, near Fort Wayne, where 
he died in the year 1917. 

Following the death of the Rev. Felix Veniard, C.S.C. 
in 1893, the Rev. William Quinlan, who attended Besan- 
con from the Cathedral for some months, built a modern 
rectory, which was first occupied by the Rev. F. X. La- 
bonte, who erected a frame school and convent against 
the wish of fully one-half the older parishioners who no 
longer had children attending school. 

Father Labonte was succeeded in 1902 by Rev. John 
F. Noll, who made extensive improvements in the church 
and on the property. Rev. Charles Dhe, who succeeded 
Father Noll, in June, 1906, beautified the cemetery. In 
1908, Father M. A. Louen was assigned to this parish, 
and has to his credit the erection of the present brick 
school which is taught by the School Sisters of Notre 
Dame. The Rev. George Moorman, who accomplished 
much at Besancon during a brief pastorate, was succeed- 
ed by the Rev. Nicholas Allgeier, who filled the charge 



FRAGMENTS OF OUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 



until July, 1935, when he was transferred to St. Mary's 
Church, Fort Wayne, and was succeeded by the present 
incumbent, the Rev. Joseph A. Hession, who has made 
extensive repairs on the property, and kept it free of in- 
cumbrance. The Besancon C. Y. O. has defrayed the ex- 
pense of transportation and tuition for children of high 
school age attending the Central Catholic High School, 
Fort Wayne. 



Father Hession was born in Lafayette, Indiana, on 
October 24, 1899 ; he attended St. Mary's School, Lafay- 
ette, St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer, and Mount St. 
Mary Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordained on May 29, 
1926, by Bishop Noll. 

His first appointment was assistant at St. Mary's 
Church, Decatur, where he remained until July 2, 1930 
when he was transferred as assistant to St. Joseph's, 
Hammond. He taught at Central Catholic High School, 
Hammond, during the year 1934, and on July 25, 1935, 
received his first pastorate, St. Louis' Parish, Besancon. 

HUNTINGTON 

Ss. Peter and Paul Church 
1845 

While the first Catholic families to settle in Hunting- 
ton were Irish, the preponderance of parishioners soon 
became German, attended first by Father Julian Benoit 
of the Cathedral and by Father Faller of St. Mary's 
Church, Fort Wayne. Huntington was assigned to Lagro 
as a mission until 1857, when it received its first resident 
pastor in the person of the Rev. A. Schnippert, a convert 
from Lutheranism in Germany. The first church, of log 
construction, was built on ground donated by Francis La- 
fontaine. Chief of the Miami Indians, whose home still 
stands two miles west of Huntington. The greatest bene- 
factor of Ss. Peter and Paul's was John Roche, as his 
sister became an unusual benefactor of St. Mary's, 
cut off from Ss. Peter and Paul, in the year 1896. 

The present beautiful Gothic church was built by 
the Rev. Jacob Mayer in 1865. He was appointed pastor 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



in December 1863. The high steeple, containing a huge 
clock was erected by Father Steiner. He also built a 
school and convent for the School Sisters of Notre Dame. 
The Rev. J. H. Hueser, D. D., became pastor in 1880 
and served twenty-six years. He made extensive improve- 
ments, including a new parochial residence, three bells for 
the tower, imported stain glass windows, etc. Owing to 
ill health. Dr. Hueser resigned in August 1906, and 
moved to Carlsbad, New Mexico, where he died a few 
years later. He was succeeded by the Rev. W. C. Miller, 
who gave the brick church its present coating of imitation 
stone. Following his death in 1916 the Rev. M. A. Louen, 
the builder of the present handsome school, became pas- 
tor. Father Louen was transferred to St. Joseph parish, 
Mishawaka, on April 12th, 1929, and was followed by the 
Rev. William Hoff, who found it necessary to make ex- 
tensive repairs, preparatory to a Diamond Jubilee of the 
present church, which was celebrated on Decoration 
Day, 1940. Father Hoff collaborates with the pastor of 
St. Mary's in the conduct of Huntington Catholic High 
School. The faculty is composed of the Sisters of St. 
Francis and the School Sisters of Notre Dame. Fr. Hoff 
is assisted by the Rev. Lawrence Fettig. 



Father Hoff was born March 3, 1878 in Chicago, 
Illinois. He prepared for the priesthood at the Pontifical 
College Josephinum, Columbus, Ohio, and was ordained 
on April 8, 1905, by Bishop Hartley. 

After serving as assistant at St. Joseph's parish, 
Logansport, for two years, he was transferred to the 
Cathedral, Fort Wayne. On July 3, 1908, he was appoint- 
ed pastor of St. Bridget's, Hobart, where he remained 
until he was forced to take a leave of absence due to ill- 
ness in June, 1921. On July 30, 1924, he was made pastor 
of Alexandria, and on April 12, 1929, received his present 
appointment. 

The Rev. Lawrence Fettig was born in Logansport, 
Indiana, on December 15, 1908. He attended Columbia 
College, and St. Meinrad's Seminary, St. Meinrad, Indi- 
ana. He was ordained on June 15, 1935, by Bishop Noll, 



198 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

and on July 10 of the same year, was appointed assistant 
at Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Huntington. 

St. Mary's Church 
1896 

After the death of John Roche, his sister Bridget 
offered to build a church for the English people belong- 
ing to SS. Peter and Paul's. Bishop Rademacher accept- 
ed her offer, and a beautiful Romanesque structure was 
dedicated in 1897, and the Rev. John R. Quinlan, assist- 
ant at the Cathedral, assigned as pastor. 

In her last will Miss Roche left her residence to the 
parish for the Sisters, which was occupied for some years 
by the Sisters of Providence. Since 1912 the Sisters of 
St. Francis, of Lafayette have been in charge of the 
school. 

Members of the new parish built a school costing 
$10,000.00 and a rectory costing $11,000.00. There was 
still some debt resting on the parish when Father Quin- 
lan was transferred to the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, in 
July, 1910. He had accepted the same appointment a 
few years earlier, but after a few months, during which 
the Rev. John Durham had charge, he requested Bishop 
Alerding to allow him to return to Huntington. 

The Rev. John F. Noll replaced Father Quinlan in 
July, 1910, having been transferred from Hartford City. 

With money realized from the Bridget Roche estate, 
Father Noll installed a central heating plant at a cost of 
$11,000.00, and the people subscribed $70,000.00 for the 
erection of additional school room and a gymnasium. 

Soon a new organ and imported stain glass windows 
were installed, the church renovated interiorly, and a 
one acre park laid out where an unsightly barn had stood 
in the rear of the Convent. 

It was while pastor of St. Mary's that Father Noll 
founded OUR SUNDAY VISITOR, erected a large print- 
ing plant, and the Motherhouse and Training School for 
Missionary Catechists. In 1921, Father Noll was created 
a Domestic Prelate and in May, 1925, was appointed the 
fifth Bishop of Fort Wayne. 

Father Noll, as Bishop, appointed his ten-year long 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



assistant, the Rev. Robert E. Kelly, to succeed him at St. 
Mary's. He served well as pastor until his death in Feb- 
ruary, 1932, when he was replaced by the Rev. T. E. 
Dillon, a nephew, who had served under him as assist- 
ant- and who held the official position of Diocesan Super- 
intendent of Schools since January, 1930. St. Mary's and 
Ss. Peter and Paul's parish operate jointly a Huntington 
Catholic High School with excellent results, staffed by 
Sisters of St. Francis and Notre Dame. 

Father Dillon, upon the discontinuance of steam 
service from a central city plant, found it necessary to 
install a new central heating plant and to erect a boiler 
house. He is assisted in parish work by a Capuchin 
Father resident at St. Felix Monastery. 



The Rev. Thomas Emmett Dillon was born near 
Union City on December 28, 1893. He pursued his eccle- 
siastical studies at Niagara University and Mount St. 
Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordained in June 
1919, and appointed assistant at St. Monica's Church, 
Mishawaka, until he was transferred in the year 1925, to 
serve as assistant to St. Mary's Church, Huntington. 
Following the death of the Rev. Robert E. Kelly, he re- 
ceived the appointment as pastor. 

DECATUR 

St. Mary's Church 
1846 

Until the year 1846, the scattered Catholics in and 
about Decatur were attended from Fort Wayne. Father 
Faller, pastor of St. Mary's Church, Fort Wayne, erected 
a frame church at Decatur in 1846. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. B. H. Schul- 
teis, who came in 1852 and remained until 1856. During 
that time he erected the original priest's house. After an 
interval of ten months, the Rev. Sebastian Ganther, C. 
PP. S., was in charge for one year and then the Rev. 
Jacob Mayer served four years. Then there was an in- 
terruption of resident pastors until the Rev. John Wem- 
hoff was sent to St. Mary's parish, in 1866. He remain- 
ed until September, 1872, and laid the foundation for the 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



present church, which was completed by the Rev. F. Von 
Schwedler who served as pastor from September 1872, 
until February, 1877. The Rev. John Nussbaum was pas- 
tor from February, 1877 to July, 1880, and was succeed- 
ed by the Rev. H. T. Wilken, who served until his death 
on October 20, 1913. 

Father Wilken erected a school in the year 1881, the 
present rectory in 1885, and a convent in 1893. The Sis- 
ters of St. Agnes were engaged to teach in the school. 

Father Wilken was succeeded by the Rev. Julius A. 
Seimetz, who was the builder of the excellent new grade 
and high school, of a new convent for the Sisters and a 
home for the janitor at a cost of $260,000.00. Father 
Seimetz died after a lingering illness on December 28, 
1932, and was succeeded by his nephew, the Rev. J. J. 
Seimetz, who inherited a considerable debt which his 
people have completely liquidated in their anxiety to build 
a new church. He is assisted by the Rev. Alvin Jasinski. 



The Rev. Joseph J. Seimetz was born in Michigan 
City, Indiana, on September 3, 1884. He pursued his stud- 
ies for the priesthood at St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer, 
and at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
was ordained on June 17, 1911. After serving as as- 
sistant at St. Joseph's Church, Logansport from 1911 to 
1920, he was appointed pastor of St. Patrick's Church, 
Chesterton, whence he went to Decatur in January, 1933. 

The Rev. Alvin Jasinski was born in Michigan City, 
Indiana, on August 6, 1910. He pursued his studies for the 
priesthood at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and St. 
Meinrad's Seminary, St. Meinrad. He was ordained 
May 22, 1937, by Bishop Noll and was appointed assist- 
ant at St. Mary's parish, Decatur, on June 16 of the same 
year. 

NIX SETTLEMENT 

St. Catherine's Parish 

1850 

Mass was celebrated in this district in 1848 in the 

home of Jacob Nix, from whom the settlement received 

its name. The few German Catholic families were visit- 



FORT WA YNE DEANERY 201 

ed first from Fort Wayne, then from Huntington, then 
from Areola, then from Roanoke. In the year 1850 a 
small church was erected over half a mile distant from 
the site of the present church property, but this was des- 
troyed by fire in 1868. 

A second church of brick was built in 1869 during 
the pastorate of Father Schaefer. The Rev. W. C. Miller 
was Nix Settlement's first resident pastor, from 1881 to 
1883. He built the rectory in 1882. 

Successors to Father Miller up to the year 1895 were 
Rev. F. J. Lambert, Rev Philip Guethoff, Rev. E. J. Boc- 
card. Rev. Bruno Soengen. 

The Rev. John Biedermann, who became pastor in 
1905, erected the third church — of good construction — for 
a small country parish. He was succeeded by Rev. Peter 
Schmitt, now retired in France who in turn was succeed- 
ed by Rev. John Steger, and he by Rev. Paul Roederer. 

Nix Settlement was then attended from Roanoke for 
a few years until August 14, 1929, when the Rev. Fran- 
cis McAuliffe became resident pastor. Father McAuIiffe 
served until 1938, when Nix Settlement became a mission 
attended by Capuchin Fathers from Huntington. 

AVILLA 

St. Mary's Church 
1853 

The organizer of this parish, whose scattered people 
had been visited by a priest as far back as 1840, was the 
Reverend Edward M. Faller, pastor of St. Mary's 
Church, Fort Wayne, who erected a small frame church 
on the site of the present Catholic cemetery of Avilla. 
This was in the year 1853. 

Father Henry Schaeffer became the first resident 
pastor in the year 1858, and erected a small one-story 
residence. 

In 1863 Father Deipenbrock enlarged the little 
church. He was succeeded by the Reverend John Wem- 
hoff and the Reverend A. B. Oechtering, who were in 
charge of the parish for two years each. 

Then the Reverend Dominic Duehmig became pastor 
and remained from the year 1867 to 1905. Father Dueh- 



■202 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

mig serviced a vast territory, and built or added to small 
churches in several places. He changed the site of the 
church to its present location and erected the present 
handsome edifice, which was dedicated by Bishop Dwen- 
ger in May, 1878. In the following year a new combina- 
tion school and convent was erected, which was added to 
in the year 1900. The school is taught by Franciscan Sis- 
ters of Joliet, 111. 

In 1889 Father Duehmig built the large rectory, 
and in 1895 supervised the erection of the Old People's 
Home to which several additions have been made since. 
The Sisters of St. Francis of the Sacred Heart own and 
operate the Home. 

Father Duehmig was succeeded at Avilla in turn by 
the Reverend John H. Bathe, Reverend E. G. Werling, 
Reverend Lawrence A. Eberle, Reverend D. Leo Faurote, 
and Reverend Charles Keyser, the present pastor, who, 
at this writing, is having the church decorated. 



Father Keyser was born in Monroe, Michigan, on 
February 2, 1875. He pursued his classical studies at 
Notre Dame, and the Assumption College, Sandwich, 
Canada ; then he went to Mount St. Mary Seminary, Cin- 
cinnati, for his course in philosophy and theology and 
was ordained priest on October 11, 1902, by Bishop Aler- 
ding. He served as assistant at Elkhart and later at St. 
Joseph's, Hammond. In November, 1906, he was made 
pastor of Lowell, and transferred to North Judson on 
June 8, 1907, where he erected a beautiful church. From 
the year 1907 until 1936 he served under the Bishop of 
€rookston, Minnesota, and then returned to his own 
Diocese where he was given charge of the church at 
Academie. On July 4, 1940, he was made pastor of 
Avilla. 

St. Leo's Church 

1856 

One of the first little parishes in Allen County was 

dissolved some years ago. It was St. Leo's- which was 

erected by Father Faller, pastor of St. Mary's Church, 

Fort Wayne, and was latterly attended by the pastors 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 203 

of Academie, long known as New France. It even had 
resident pastors at intervals. The first pastor was the Rev. 
Father Holz, and after an interval, during which it was 
attended from Avilla, it had several resident pastors, 
namely, the Rev. M. Zumbuelte, the Rev. A. Young, the 
Rev. Peter Franzen. Then it was placed in charge of the 
Fathers of the Holy Cross ; was later attended by an as- 
sistant from the Cathedral for some months and finally 
made a regular mission of St. Vincent's. 

Not far from Leo was another settlement which had 
a church dedicated to St. Michael, which also, in the 
course of time, was discontinued. The coming of the auto- 
mobile and good roads made it convenient for the few 
people of St. Leo's and St. Michael's to attend Mass at 
Academie, New Haven, or Fort Wayne, every Sunday. 

SHELDON (YODER) 

St. Aloysius' Church 

1859 

Services were first held for the people of this com- 
munity in 1858 by the Rev. Jacob Mayer, of Decatur. 
Mass was offered in the home of Frederick Weaver. A 
year later the Catholic people erected their first church- 
on property donated by Christian Miller, under the pas- 
torate of the Rev. Jacob Miller. The rectory was built in 
1877 and in 1882 a two story brick school was erected 
during the pastorate of the Rev. Ferdinand Koerdt, who 
served from 1876 to 1896. The school was first taught by 
the Sisters of St. Agnes and is now taught by the Sisters 
of St. Joseph. 

Successors to Father Koerdt were, in turn, the Rev. 
Rudolph J. Denk; the Rev. J. H. Bathe; the Rev. Henry 
A. Hellhake; the Rev. John Biedermann; the Rev. John 
Steger; the Rev. Father Howland; the Rev. John Ober- 
holz ; Rev. John Bapst ; the Rev. Carl Schnitz ; Rev. Jesse 
Lothamer, the present pastor. 



The Rev. Jesse Lothamer was born at Besancon, In- 
diana, on January 8, 1895. He pursued his studies for the 
priesthood at St. Charles' College, Ellicott City, Mary- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



land; and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He 
was ordained on June 15, 1917, by Bishop Alerding. His 
first appointment was as assistant at SS. Peter and Paul 
parish, Huntington, where he remained until June 18, 
1920, when he was transferred to the Cathedral, Fort 
Wayne. On June 28, 1922, he was appointed pastor of 
Columbia City, with Wiarsaw as a mission, and on July 
25, 1935, he was transferred to Warsaw as the first resi- 
dent pastor after many years. On June 16, 1937 he re- 
ceived his appointment as pastor of St. Aloysius' parish, 
Sheldon. 

NEW HAVEN 

St. John's Church 

1859 

New Haven was attended until the year 1858 by 
priests connected with the Fort Wayne churches. During 
1860 and 1861, Father Grevin attended St. John's, New 
Haven, from St. Vincent's, Academic Station. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. Wolfgang 
Giedl, appointed in 1861. He attended Columbia City 
from New Haven. He built the first rectory at New Hav- 
en, now used as the Sisters' Convent and also the present 
school which is in charge of the Sisters of St. Agnes. He 
died in 1873, and was succeeded by the Rev. Bernard 
Wiedau, who was pastor from 1873 until 1921 when he 
retired from active work. Father Wiedau built the pres- 
ent church in 1877, and left the congregation without any 
debt. He died in a cottage, erected by the Bishop at St. 
Vincent's Villa, in 1931, at the age of 91. 

The present rectory was built under the direction of 
the Rev. George Moorman, then pastor of Besancon, and 
when it was completed the Rev. M. J. Aichinger was ap- 
pointed pastor January, 1921, who made several import- 
ant improvements. 

In March, 1926, Father Aichinger was transferred to 
St. Joseph's parish, Logansport, and was succeeded by 
the Rev. Francis Faust, who was retired in July, 1939, 
and appointed Chaplain at the Motherhouse of the Society 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



of Missionary Catechists near Huntington. The Rev. 
William J. Ehrman was then appointed pastor. He has 
accomplished much in a short time, and is assisted at 
week ends by Rev. M. J. Vichuras, teacher at Central 
Catholic High School, Fort Wayne. 



Father Ehrman was born in Fort Wayne, September 
17, 1894. He attended grade school at St. Mary's, and 
made his classical studies at St. Joseph's College, College- 
ville. He then went to Cincinnati to pursue his further 
studies for the priesthood. He was ordained by Bishop 
Alerding in the year 1922. His first appointment was 
as assistant at St. Patrick's, Kokomo, until January, 
1926, when he was appointed to St. Mary's Church, 
Michigan City and Chaplain of St. Anthony's Hospital 
and the Indiana State Prison. In April, 1929, Father 
Ehrman was given the pastorate at Kendallville where 
he remained until July 8, 1939, when he was transferred 
to New Haven. Father Vichuras' sketch appears under 
"Clergy Who Teach In High Schools." 

LIGONIER — ALBION — WAWASEE 

Ligonier 

1860 

Father Henry Shaeffer, pastor of the Avilla parish, 
erected the small church at Ligonier in 1860. Ligonier 
had a resident pastor for only two years. The small resi- 
dence erected by Father Lauer, its first pastor, in 1897, 
and used by Father Noll until 1899, was later sold because 
the parish, constituted almost entirely of farmers, was 
steadily declining. Prior to Father Lauer's time, Ligon- 
ier was attended first from Avilla, then from Elkhart, 
then from Goshen, and finally from Kendallville until the 
Oblate Fathers were located there in 1935. The Oblate 
Fathers purchased a residence on a large piece of well- 
located property and provided a new church for the small 
parish. Missionary Catechists visit Ligonier each week to 
instruct the children. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUB DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Albion 
1875 

In the year 1875, the Rev. Dominic Duehmig, of 
Avilla, erected a small church at this place and dedicated 
it to the Sacred Heart. Albion was a mission of Avilla 
until the year 1900, when it was transferred first to Ege, 
then to Auburn, and finally to Kendallville. 

There were never more than one dozen Catholic 
families here and because it was inconvenient for a priest 
to attend it on Sunday the little church was abandoned 
and later sold. When the Oblate Fathers located at Lig- 
onier, services were reopened at Albion in a room above 
the Post OflSce. A beautiful new church was dedicated 
here on April 20, 1941. It is situated in the heart of town 
and bears the name "Blessed Sacrament." A fund equal 
to one-half the cost of the new structure was raised in 
advance. Missionary Catechists instruct the Albion chil- 
dren. 

Wawasee 
1925 

There are few Catholics located in and around Lake 
Wawasee, although during the summer a large number 
of Catholics, who have summer cottages there, are pro- 
vided with Mass. 

In the year 1926 William H. Noll, of Fort Wayne, at 
his own expense, erected a beautiful mission-type church 
on the shore of the lake where two or three Masses are 
celebrated every Sunday and on the first Fridays during 
summer. 

A priest from Notre Dame had charge of the Wawa- 
see church until the mission was assigned to the Oblate 
Fathers resident at Ligonier in 1935. 

COLUMBIA CITY— PIERCETON 

Columbia City 

St. Paul of the Cross 

1860 

It is of record that the Catholics at Columbia City 

were Iprdvided with pastoral attention back in 18156. 



FO'RT WA YNE DEANERY 20T 

Father Faller, of Fort Wayne, visited them. Beginning- 
in 1857 Columbia City was attended as a mission from 
SS. Peter and Paul church, Huntington. 

The first church was erected by the Rev. Henry 
Schaeffer in 1860. At the same time he erected a resi- 
dence for the priest and a one story frame school. 

In 1867 a new church site was purchased and a 
better church erected, dedicated by Bishop Luers in Octo- 
ber of that year. In 1868 Father Schaeffer built a new 
rectory. Father Schaeffer was succeeded in 1870 by the 
Rev. Joseph Rademacher, and he by the Rev. M. Zum- 
buelte. Then Fathers Franzen and Henry A. Hellhake 
had charge in turn from 1875 to 1886. Father Hellhake 
brought the Sisters of St. Agnes to take charge of the 
school which hitherto had been taught by lay teachers. 

The Rev. A. M. Ellering became pastor in 1886, and 
remained pastor until 1909, when he was transferred to 
St. Mary's, Michigan City. Father Ellering erected a 
school at Columbia City, which was discontinued some 
years later. 

Father Ellering's successors at Columbia City were 
the Rev. John F. Kohl for eight years; Joachim Ryder- 
for four years; Jesse Lothamer, who purchased a new 
rectory and remodelled it, for thirteen years; W. J. At- 
water, for two years; F. J. Quinn, for three years. 

The pastors of Columbia City had, for many years, 
attended Warsaw as a mission, which, in keeping with 
Bishop Noll's policy to have a. resident priest in every 
county seat, was given a pastor of its own in the year 
1935. 



The present pastor at Columbia City, appointed July 
4, 1940, is the Rev. Clement Ewald, who was born at 
South Bend, Dec. 21, 1906. He prepared for the priest- 
hood at Orchard Lake, Mich., and Mount St. Mary's Sem- 
inary; was ordained on May 30, 1931, by Bishop Noll. 
He was assistant at St. Jude's- Fort Wayne, St. Mary's,. 
Lafayette, and St. Matthew's, South Bend before receiv- 
ing his first pastorate here, on July 4, 1940. 



208 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Pierceton 
St. Francis' Church 
1864 
Pierceton was originally attended from LaPorte and 
it was by the Rev. Francis Lawler that the first church 
was erected in 1864. Later it was attended in success- 
ion by pastors from Columbia City until the Rev. F. C. 
Wiedemann, who erected the church at Warsaw, became 
resident pastor there. 

Beginning with 1885 Pierceton was transferred to 
Areola as a mission, and was attended respectively by 
the many pastors who succeeded the Rev. J. H. Werdein. 
After Warsaw was given a resident priest in 1935, Pierce- 
ton was again attached to Columbia City. 

Ege 

Immaculate Conception Church 

1863 

This settlement bore the name Girardot for some 
years after the man who donated two acres of land for 
a church and cemetery. The name was changed to Ege 
in honor of a pastor bearing that name who served there 
from 1878 to 1897. 

The original church was built by the Rev. Vincent 
Schaefer, who attended Girardot as a mission. 

Ege was thereafter attended by the Avilla priests 
in the following succession: Rev. Francis Deipenbrock, 
Rev. John Wemhoff, Rev. A. B. Oechtering, and Rev. 
Dominic Duehmig. 

Father Duehmig in the year 1887 purchased four 
acres of ground somewhat removed from the cemetery, 
and built a new church. The old church was moved to 
the same property and used for a time as a school, teach- 
ers' residence and priest's house. The Sisters of St. 
Francis of the Sacred Heart had charge of this school. 

The first resident pastor of Ege was the Rev. Wil- 
liam Geers in 1876. His immediate successor was the 
Rev. Peter Franzen, who was in charge during 1877 and 
1878. 

Then came the Rev. F. X. Ege. The old school burn- 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



ed down during Father Ege's time and he erected a two 
story brick building for school and convent purposes. 
Father Ege also erected the present spacious brick rec- 
tory. A few years ago the Sisters withdrew from the 
school. 

Father Ege was succeeded in 1897 by the Rev. Fran- 
cis P. Faust, who made a number of improvements, dur- 
ing his pastorate terminating in 1909. Father Faust was 
succeeded, in turn, by the Rev. F. King; Rev. Nicholas 
Allgeier; Rev. Raphael Donnelly, who built the present 
church in the year 1923; Rev. Peter Schmidt; Rev. An- 
thony Nadolny, Rev. Joseph Suelzer and Rev. Louis 
Michalski, the present pastor, who, besides making sev- 
eral improvements and repairs- has liquidated most of 
the debt he inherited. 



The Rev. Louis W. Michalski was born at Buffalo, 
N. Y. He pursued his ecclesiastical studies at Orchard 
Lake, Mich., was ordained May 26, 1923, by Bishop Aler- 
ding. He served as assistant at St. Stanislaus, East Chi- 
cago, until he was made pastor at Ege on July 6, 1933. 

ARCOLA 

St. Patrick's Church 
1866 

The Rev. Julian Benoit visited the early settlers 
around Areola back in 1845 and held services in the home 
of Victor Munier. The people were later attended by 
the Rev. Dr. Madden at intervals for one year, when the 
Rev. Henry Schaefer, of Columbia City, attended the 
people and erected a little church. 

The first resident priest was Rev. Theodore Van der 
Poel who was in charge for five years, and was succeeded 
by the Rev. H. T. Wilken, who remained eight years. 
His successors in turn, were the Rev. Bartholomew Hart- 
mann, who built the first school, which is now in charge 
of the Sisters of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ; 
the Rev. James Twigg- the Rev. J. A. Werdein, the Rev. 
William J. Quinlan, the Rev. William Conrad Miller, the 
Rev. Robert Pratt, the builder of the present church and 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



convent; the Rev. S. M. Yenn; the Rev. Peter Schmitt; 
the Rev. Henry C. Kappel; the Rev. Edward J. Mungo- 
van, who built the present rectory; the Rev. P. A. Welch; 
the Rev. William L. Atwater; the Rev. Jacob A. Bick, 
the present pastor who has made many improve- 
ments on the property and is contemplating more 
preparatory to the observance of a parish jubilee. 

For many years the little parish at Pierceton was 
attended from Areola. 



The Rev. J. A. Bick was born in Hammond, Indiana. 
He pursued his studies for the priesthood in the Jesuit 
Order and was ordained for that Order. In 1929 he came 
to the Diocese of Fort Wayne, and after teaching in 
Central Catholic High School, Hammond, for several 
months while serving as assistant at Holy Angels' par- 
ish, Gary, he was Chaplain, in turn, at Holy Family Hos- 
pital, LaPorte; St. Catherine's Hospital, East Chicago; 
and Mercy Hospital, Gary. On August 2, 1935, he was 
appointed pastor of St. Patrick's, Areola. 

ROANOKE 

St. Joseph's Church 

1867 

As an outpost of Fort Wayne, Roanoke was attend- 
ed by a priest connected with the Cathedral and St. 
Mary's church. Fort Wayne, beginning with the year 
1840. 

The present church situated at the highest point in 
the town was purchased from Protestants in 1867. Roan- 
oke had as its first pastor. Rev. William Woeste, who at- 
tended Nix Settlement as a mission from 1870 to 1880, 
although he occupied a rented house at Roanoke. 

He was succeeded by the Rev. Cosmas Seeberger, 
C. PP. S. In 1881 the Rev. W. Conrad Miller was ap- 
pointed resident pastor at Roanoke and lived in the base- 
ment of the church for nine months, when he moved to 
Nix Settlement- and attended Roanoke as a mission from 
that point. Roanoke remained a mission until 1924, 
when Rev. P. J. Roederer built a neat brick rectory and 
made that his resident place, continuing, however, to at- 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



tend Nix Settlement. After Father Roederer's transfer 
to Hobart in August, 1925, the Rev. Michael Chapman, 
who was editor of the Acolyte, published by Our Sunday 
Visitor, was appointed resident pastor of Roanoke- but 
was relieved of Nix Settlement as a mission. The same 
arrangement continued under his successor, the Rev. 
Aquinas Knoff, who receives part of his remuneration 
from Our Sunday Visitor as editor of the Acolyte. 



The Rev. Aquinas Knoff was born in Chicago, Sept. 
11, 1896. He prepared for the holy priesthood at Cathed- 
ral College and Quigley Preparatory Seminary at that 
place, and then at Kenrick Seminary, St. Louis and Mt. 
St. Mary's, Emmitsburg, Md. He was ordained for the 
diocese of Duluth, Minn., on April 17, 1921 by Bishop 
McNicholas. He served as assistant at the Cathedral, 
Duluth for four years, when he was released for service 
in the diocese of Fort Wayne, in March 1926. 

KENDALLVILLE 

Immaculate Conception Church 

1867 

Like other towns the few Catholics at Kendallville 
were first served infrequently from Fort Wayne. Some 
of them, under severe hardships, attended the Avilla 
church. 

After the cornerstone was laid for a new church on 
other property, the Rev. A. B. Oechtering, of Avilla, pur- 
chased a Baptist church for $2,200.00 for the use of 
Catholics and moved it to its present site. Until the year 
1897, Kendallville was a mission from Avilla; in that 
year the Rev. George Lauer, ordained in 1896, was made 
the first resident pastor of Ligonier and given Kendall- 
ville as a mission. Father Lauer was succeeded in 1899 
by Rev. John F. Noll, who, after living at Ligonier one 
year, moved to Kendallville where there were more 
Catholics. He lived in a rented house there. The Rev. 
John Keller succeeded Father Noll on June 8, 1902, and 
erected the present rectory. 

Father Keller was succeeded by the Rev. John Ober- 



212 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

holz, in the year 1910, and he, in turn, was replaced by 
the Rev. George Moorman in October, 1911. From Janu- 
ary, 1914, to July, 1924, the Rev. Robert J. Halpin was 
pastor of the Immaculate Conception congregation, and 
erected the present church, which was dedicated in May, 
1923. 

Father Halpin was succeeded by Rev. C. A. StoU, 
who remained from July, 1924, to April, 1929, at which 
time the Rev. William J. Ehrman succeeded him. 

Ligonier continued to be a mission of Kendallville 
until the Oblate Fathers were given charge of that place 
with Albion and Wawasee as missions. The two latter 
missions, besides Millersburg and the summer church at 
Rome City, had been long attended from Kendallville. 

In July, 1939, Father Ehrman was transferred to 
St. John's, New Haven, and was succeeded by the Rev. 
Raymond G. Derrick, hitherto of Portland. Missionary 
Catechists teach the children here. 



Father Derrick was born in Muncie, Indiana, on May 
26, 1897; made his ecclesiastical studies at St. Lawrence 
College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, and Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary. He was ordained in the year 1925 by Bishop 
Howard, and served as assistant first at Marion, then 
at Muncie and then at Kokomo. His first pastorate was 
Portland with Dunkirk as a mission, which he left in good 
financial condition and added to the membership of both 
parishes. 

In July, 1939, he was transferred as pastor to Im- 
maculate Conception Church, Kendallville. 

MONROEVILLE 

St. Rose of Lima Church 
1868 
Although Monroeville had no resident priest prior 
to 1884, services were held in the homes of the parishion- 
ers from 1840 to 1868, when the people erected the first 
church which was attended regularly from the Cathedral, 
Fort Wayne. 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



Among those who visited this mission were the Rev. 

E. P. Walter, the Rev. J. H. Brammer, the Rev. J. M. 
Graham, the Rev. B. Hartmann. The mission was also 
attended by the Rev. H. T. Wilken from Areola. 

The Rev. John Grogan became Monroeville's first 
pastor. He was succeeded two years later by Rev. John 
Hoss, who served less than two years. 

The frame church erected in 1869 was destroyed by 
fire in 1887, and in the following year the present church, 
which was erected by Father Hartman, replaced it. 

Father Hartmann was succeeded in 1892 by the Rev. 

F. VonSchwedler. Following him, in 1897, the Rev. L. 
R. Paquet was appointed pastor, and then Father Dan- 
durand, who served from August, 1900, to July, 1904, 
and was succeeded by the Rev. T. M. Conroy, who was in 
charge until November 6, 1907. During his pastorate a 
number of improvements were made. 

The next pastor was the Rev. Norbert Felden, who, 
in July, 1922, was made pastor of Sacred Heart, Whiting, 
where he erected a beautiful church and where he died. 
He was succeeded at Monroeville by the Rev. C. W. Marr, 
July, 1922. 

The Rev. Theodore V. Fettig is the present pastor, 
appointed July, 1931, who, besides reducing the indebt- 
edness, erected a very fine rectory, purchased new prop- 
erty and beautified the entire square. 



The Rev. Theodore V. Fettig was born in Elwood, In- 
diana, on April 13, 1895. He studied for the priesthood 
at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and Mount St. 
Mary's Seminary Cincinnati. He was ordained by Bishop 
Alerding on June 10, 1922. His first appointment was as 
assistant at the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, where he re- 
mained until February 19, 1926, when he was transferred 
to St. Mary's parish, Decatur. In June of the same year 
he was transferred as assistant to St. Luke's parish, 
Gary, and on July 1, 1927, was transferred to St. Monica's 
parish, Mishawaka. On October 3, 1929, he received his 
first pastorate, St. Michael's Parish, Waterloo, where he 



214 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

remained until July, 1931, when he was given his present 
appointment. 

AUBURN 

Church of the Immaculate Conception 

1874 

The few Catholic families discovered in Auburn in 
1872 were attended by the Rev. August Young. For two 
years he celebrated Mass in the home of E. Ashley. He 
erected the church in 1874, and purchased a house adjac- 
ent to the church for his residence. 

In 1886 Father Young was changed to Garrett and 
attended Auburn as a mission until November, 1891, 
whereupon Auburn had resident priests once more as 
follows: The Rev. Rudolph Denk up to June 1892; the 
Rev. Francis P. Faust, from July, 1892 to November 
1895; the Rev. F. J. Boccard from November, 1895 
to September, 1898 ; the Rev. F. J. Dandurand from Sep- 
tember, 1898, to July, 1900; the Rev. John M. Schmitz 
from July, 1900 to June 1910; the Rev. George Anger- 
maier, who remodeled the first church, from June 1910 to 
June 1915 ; the Rev. M. J. Aichinger from 1915 to 1921 ; 
the Rev. F. X. Zerhuesen from 1921 to 1922; the Rev. 
John B. Steger from 1922 to 1923 ; the Rev. Joseph Abel 
from 1923 to 1925 ; the Rev. Leo A. Sheetz, who purchas- 
ed a large piece of property whose rents were to assist in 
the support of the parish, from 1925 to 1930; the Rev. 
Leo J. Franz from 1930 to 1935 ; and the Rev. Lawrence 
J. Weber, the present pastor, who has now quite a flour- 
ishing parish at this place. 



Rev. Lawrence Weber was born at Kendallville, In- 
diana, on August 28, 1897 ; he attended first the Univer- 
sity of Dayton and then Mt. St. Mary Seminary. He 
was ordained June 14, 1924 by Bishop Alerding, and ap- 
pointed assistant at St. Mary's, Michigan City, July 2, 
1924 until July 7, 1933, when he was made pastor of 
Sacred Heart Church, Lakeville. In September, 1935 he 
was given his present pastorate. 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 215 

BLUFFTON— MONTPELIER 
Bluff ton 
St. Joseph's Church 
1875 
Bluffton, the county seat of Wells County, had no 
resident priest until 1920 when the Rev. Nicholas Keller 
was appointed pastor and remained until June 1926. For- 
merly it was attended first from Areola by the Rev. H. T. 
Wilken from 1872 to 1876, and later on from Sheldon 
(Yoder). The first resident pastor of Bluffton was the 
Rev. N. Keller in 1915. 

The Rev. John Bapst served here from April 12, 1929 
to September 12, 1935, and was succeeded by the Rev. 
Paul Anderson, the present pastor. 

Like all other communities receiving their first resi- 
dent priest the Catholics of the community have grown 
in number and in enthusiasm for their faith. 



Father Anderson was born February 12, 1897, in 
LaGro, Indiana. He prepared for the priesthood at St. 
Patrick's Seminary, Menlo Park, California, and was or- 
dained June 22, 1909 by the late Archbishop P. W. Rior- 
dan at San Francisco. From 1909 until 1926 Father 
Anderson served various parishes in the Archdiocese of 
San Francisco. From December, 1926, until December, 
1927, he did relief work at Victory Noll, Peru, Kokomo 
and Wabash, when he was appointed pastor pro-tem at 
Wabash. On July 15, 1928, Father Anderson was named 
assistant at Sacred Heart Church, Whiting, and from 
October, 1929, to February, 1930, served as assistant at 
Holy Angels, Gary. His first pastorate was at Sacred 
Heart Church, Wanatah, where he remained from Feb- 
ruary 6, 1930, until September 22, 1933, when he was 
appointed chaplain at St. Joseph's Hospital, Logansport. 
His next appointment was to the pastorate of St. Joseph's 
Church, Bluffton, September 12, 1935. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Montpelier 

St. Margaret's Church 

1864 

Although Montpelier had a small frame church 
erected in 1864, there were never many Catholics there 
until the oil boom in the '90s, when the congregation 
grew rapidly in line with other parishes located in the 
oil and gas area. Father Dhe, pastor of Hartford City, 
erected churches simultaneously, according to the same 
pattern, at Montpelier and Dunkirk, in 1896. He also 
erected a residence next to the church in the expectation 
that Montpelier would be given a resident priest, which 
did not eventuate until many years after the rectory was 
built, when it was occupied for one year by Rev. Paul 
Welch in 1913. 

Father Dhe attended Montpelier as a mission from 
Hartford City until his transfer to Besancon in the year 
1906, at which time Father Noll was appointed to Hart- 
ford City with Montpelier as a mission. Father John 
Keller succeeded him, and was followed by the Rev. 
Lawrence Monahan. 

It was only after a resident priest was placed at 
Bluffton that Montpelier was transferred as a mission 
from Hartford City to Bluffton. 

It was because the church erected by Father Dhe 
was found to be structurally weak that arrangements 
were made to erect a new church in the heart of the town 
by the Rev. Paul Anderson. Because of the benefaction 
of Samuel Tait, Jr., the new church, dedicated in the 
spring of 1941 was named St. Margaret's Church, after 
his niece. The new church is certainly worthy of the 
present small parish, depleted by the emigration of 
former parishioners to other fields after the decline in the 
Indiana oil field. It was dedicated on June 10, 1941. 

WARSAW 

Sacred Heart Church 

1876 

From 1856 to 1874 the Catholics of Warsaw were 

attended from various centers^ — I^afayette, Plymouth, 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 217 

Avilla and Columbia City. Mass was first celebrated in 
the house of William Dinnen. In 1874 Father Wiech- 
niann of Wabash was given charge of Warsaw and at 
once purchased a piece of ground located on W. Market 
street for the present church, which was dedicated by 
Bishop Dwenger on the feast of the Sacred Heart, 1877. 
In the autumn of 1877, Father Wiechmann transferred 
his residence from Wabash, where he lived in a rented 
house until 1884. He was the first and only resident 
pastor of Warsaw, with Pierceton and Bourbon as mis- 
sions, until July, 1935, when the Rev. Jesse Lothamer 
was assigned resident pastor. 

In the interim pastors of Columbia City were in 
charge. Father Wiechmann left the small parish with a 
heavy debt which was liquidated by Father Ellering of 
Columbia City, who went out over the diocese to collect 
funds. 

Father Leo Pursley succeeded Father Lothamer as 
resident pastor in June 1937. He has done excellent work 
here, and has just completed the first rectory possessed 
by the parish. 

Father Pursley was born at Hartford City, March 
12, 1902. He attended the local parish school and then 
enrolled at St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer and later at 
Mt. St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained June 11, 
1927 by Bishop Noll. His first appointment was at St. 
Mary's, Lafayette where he had charge of the Newman 
Club at Purdue University; in April, 1929 he was ap- 
pointed assistant at St. Lawrence's, Muncie; then at St. 
Patrick's, Fort Wayne in July, 1930. In January, 1932, 
he returned to St. Mary's, Lafayette, and remained until 
June 16, 1937 when he was given his present pastorate. 

GARRETT 

St. Joseph's Church 

1876 

The original church at Garrett was erected in 1876 

by the Rev. August Young who attended the same from 

Auburn. He also erected a two story residence for the 

priest in 1886- at which time he moved from Auburn to 



218 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Garrett. Father Young built a school and convent in 
1888. Five Sisters of the Precious Blood taught 180 
pupils at the time the school was opened. In 1903 Fath- 
er Young built an addition to the church and in 1905 
enlarged the school, which today is taught by the Sisters 
of the Sacred Heart of St. Francis. 

Father Young also purchased ground for a spacious 
cemetery. Father Young retired from active parish 
work in 1919 and died in January, 1925. 

He was succeeded by the Rev. F. A. King, who began 
at once to accumulate a fund with which to build a new 
church. Father King died in April, 1927, leaving a 
treasury which materially assisted his successor, the Rev. 
John G. Bennett, to erect a very beautiful Romanesque 
church and rectory. With the erection of the new church 
the name was changed from Ss. Peter and Paul to St. 
Joseph. 

This was Father Bennett's first pastorate after serv- 
ing as assistant at St. Patrick's Church, Fort Wayne, for 
twelve years. 

In addition to the excellent pastoral care he provides 
Father Bennett has been serving as Defensor Vinculi in 
the Diocesan Matrimonial Court, which entails a vast 
amount of work and correspondence. He was appointed 
Dean of the Fort Wayne District following the death of 
Monsignor Thiele in the spring of 1941. 



The Rev. John G. Bennett was born at Dunnington, 
Ind., on Jan. 20, 1891 ; attended the local parish school 
and then enrolled at St. Joseph College ; thence he went 
to St. Meinrad's seminary. He was ordained on June 
27, 1914 by Bishop Alerding, and was sent to assist 
Father Delaney, of St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne. He served 
there nearly thirteen years before being given his present 
pastorate. 

SUMMIT (WATERLOO) 

St. Michael's Church 
1880 
A large colony of Germans settled midway between 
Waterloo and Angola prior to 1880, and were soon pro- 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



vided with a priest in the person of the Rev. August 
Young, who visited them from Garrett, and who erected 
the first church, dedicated in 1881, on property donated 
by John SchaudeL 

Father Peter Franzen had charge from January, 
1882, to May, 1882, when he died as a young priest. 
Father Young again took care of Summit as a mission 
until July, 1884, when the Rev. MaximiHan Benzinger 
was placed in charge as a resident priest, and lived dur- 
ing that time on the meager salary of $300.00 a year. In 
the year 1885 Father Benzinger built a pastoral residence 
which was destroyed by fire only a few years ago. 

He was succeeded by Rev. Herman Juraschek, who 
served until May, 1899. The Rev. Peter Schmitt was 
there a few months, after which Summit was assigned 
to Auburn as a mission attended in turn by Rev. John 
Schmitz, the Rev. George Angermaier, the Rev. Michael 
Aichinger, the Rev. Frances Zerhuesen. Later a resident 
priest was again placed at Summit in the person of Rev. 
Charles Scholl who completed the beautiful church begun 
by the Rev. Michael Aichinger. Father Scholl opened up 
a summer mission at Angola to provide Mass for people 
who patronized the many lakes in that region. 

Father Scholl was succeeded in February, 1926, by 
the Rev. Otto Peters, who remained until October, 1929, 
when the Rev. Theodore Fettig was appointed pastor. 
Rev. Gustave Hottenroth was pastor from June 26, 1931 
to July 7, 1936, when he was forced to retire from active 
parish work because of an injury sustained in an auto- 
mobile accident. Father Hottenroth was succeeded by 
the Rev. Leon Pisula, who built a new rectory in keeping 
with the elegant church. 

The small parish of Summit has furnished many 
priests to the Diocese of Fort Wayne. 



Father Leon Pisula was born at Everson, Pa., on 
Jan. 31, 1900. He made his ecclesiastical studies at St. 
John Kanty College, Erie, and at Orchard Lake, Mich. 
He was ordained June 14, 1925 by Bishop Plagens, of 
Detroit. Father Pisula served as assistant at St. Vin- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



cent's, Elkhart, and at St. Adalbert's, South Bend, before 
he was assigned to the Summit parish as pastor on July 
2, 1936. 

ROME CITY 

St. Peter's Church 

1891 

In the year 1891, the Rev. Dominic Duehmig, pastor 
of Avilla, collected funds from cottagers who had sum- 
mer residences at Sylvan Lake for the erection of a mis- 
sion church at Rome City. The church he built was a 
miniature of St. Peter's in Rome. 

In the year 1899, when Father Noll became the first 
resident pastor of Kendallville, Rome City was assigned 
to him as a mission. 

In the meantime Dr. Geiermann, who had studied 
the Kneipp method of water treatment at Woerishofen, 
Germany, purchased eighty acres of ground, on which 
was located a fish hatchery, and erected a Sanitarium. 
The large Geiermann family, besides patients at the Sani- 
tarium, necessitated regular weekly visits from the pas- 
tor at Kendallville throughout the year, although the 
Rome City church was used during the summer season 
only. After a couple of years Dr. Geiermann sold his 
property to the Sisters of the Precious Blood, whereupon 
a resident chaplain was assigned to the Sanitarium, and 
the church at Rome City became a summer mission only. 

The church was soon abandoned in favor of the more 
spacious chapel in Kneipp Sanitarium. 

There were never many Catholics at Rome City and 
Wolcottville, a short distance to the north, but they now, 
together with the lake people, have the benefit of several 
Masses on Sunday at the Sanitarium, now known as 
Kneipp Springs. The present Chaplain, Father Condon, 
C.PP.S., serves the all year round resident Catholics in a 
pastoral way. 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 



ANGOLA— LAGRANGE— LONG LAKE 
Angola 

St. Anthony's Parish 
1924 
There were very few resident Catholics in and 
around Angola, county seat of Steuben County, but the 
Rev. Charles Scholl, pastor of St. Michael's Church, 
Summit, purchased a large brick residence occupying the 
center of a block within the town and converted it into 
a church in 1926. 

In the year 1930 Bishop Noll allowed the Black 
Franciscans to open a Novitiate at Angola and assigned 
to them the care of the few resident Catholics, the lake 
people, and the Catholic students at Tri-State College. 
The number of resident Catholics has greatly increased 
since they have had a resident priest, and a new church 
has just been completed at Angola to relieve the con- 
gestion in the wholly inadequate space provided in the 
improvised church. It was dedicated on July 6, 1941. 

The Conventual Franciscans were given charge of 
the little church at Angola the time that the Bishop 
authorized them to establish a Novitiate for their order 
in July, 1931. The first pastor was the Rev. Clement 
Orth, O.M.C., who served from 1931 until 1936. He was 
succeeded by the Rev. Andrew Maas, O.M.C., who re- 
mained until July, 1939. The present pastor is the Rev. 
Ignatius Hanley, O.M.C., who, in the summer of 1940, 
began preparations for the erection of a new church 
adjoining the Novitiate property. 

LaGrange 

St. Joseph's Parish 
1936 
LaGrange, also a county seat, never had a church 
until the year 1936. In fact there was no Catholic church 
in the entire county, but the fathers of two families in 
particular, who had a large number of children, request- 
ed that they be permitted to collect funds for the erec- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



tion of a church to be attended every Sunday by one of 
the Black Franciscans from Angola. 

Under the direction of Henry Bir, who conducts a 
hotel at LaGrange, property was purchased for a church 
site on which stood a residence which might later be 
available for a resident priest. A new church dedicated 
to St. Joseph was erected, which is much appreciated 
by the few resident families, and by the people who visit 
surrounding lakes during the summer. 

Long Lake 

St. Mary of the Lake 

1937 

In the year 1937, the Rev. William Ehrman, of Ken- 

dallville, observing that a number of people who have 

cottages at Long Lake were attending Mass at his place 

every Sunday at great inconvenience urged them to rent 

a cottage located in the heart of their community so that 

a priest might say Mass in their midst. Arrangements 

were accordingly made for the attendance at Long Lake 

by one of the Franciscan Fathers at Angola. It is a 

summer mission only, but well patronized. 



Fort Wayne Deanery Priests Not Engaged In Parish 

Work 

The Rev. Patrick M. Butler was born at Drayton, 
Cosham, Hants, England, on December 11, 1890. He 
pursued his studies for the priesthood at Rockwell College 
N. U. of Ireland, and then at the Grand Scholasticate des 
Peres du St. Esprit, Chevilly, Paris, France, and was 
ordained in France by Bishop Adam on October 28, 1916. 

Father Butler taught in an institution of his Order on 
the Island of Trinidad before coming to the United States 
where he had relatives in the city of Fort Wayne. He 
was given the assignment of chaplain at St. Joseph's 
Hospital in January, 1930, and is still in charge. 



The Rev. George A. Hasser is chaplain to the Sisters 
who conduct the Sacred Heart Hospital, Garrett. 



FORT WAYNE DEANERY 223 

Father Hasser was born at Earl Park on December 
16, 1885. After finishing the elementary school at his 
birthplace he went to St. Joseph College, Collegeville, and 
then to St. Meinrad Seminary, and was ordained on June 
18, 1915, by Bishop Alerding. 

His first appointment was that of assistant at St. 
Mary's Church, Fort Wayne, on July 7, 1915, and was 
promoted to the pastorate after Monsignor Oechtering 
retired in the spring of 1927. Because of a throat infec- 
tion Father Hasser asked to be relieved of his parish. 
The request was granted on July 25, 1935 and thereupon 
he was given his present chaplaincy. 



The Rev. Joseph Utas has been Chaplain at Sacred 
Heart Home for the Aged at Avilla since July, 1940. 
Father Utas was ordained for the Diocese of Detroit, but 
was loaned to the Diocese of Fort Wayne in 1934, where 
he served as assistant at St. Hedwig's, Gary, at St. Jos- 
eph's, Dyer, at St. Bernard's, Wabash, prior to his ap- 
pointment as chaplain at the Home for the Aged. 



The Rev. Francis P. Faust is chaplain to the Mis- 
sionary Catechists at Victory-Noll, Huntington. 

He was born in Fort Wayne on February 19, 1868. 
He prepared for the holy priesthood at St. Lawrence 
College, Mount Calvary, and at Mount St. Mary's Semin- 
ary, and was ordained June 22, 1892, by Archbishop 
Elder. For the first six months after his ordination 
Father Faust had charge of Auburn, with Albion as a 
mission. Thereupon he was made assistant at SS. Peter 
and Paul, Huntington, where he served from December, 
1895, to November, 1897. He was pastor of Ege from 
November, 1897, until July, 1909, when he was appoint- 
ed pastor of St. Mary's, Alexandria, where he remained 
until July, 1924. From that date until February, 1926, 
he was pastor of St. Joseph's, Logansport. He held the 
pastorate of St. John's, New Haven, from February 
1926, until July, 1939 when he was given the chaplaincy 
at Victory-Noll. 



Logansport Deanery 

Very Rev. Msgr. Michael Aichinger, Dean 

In reporting the missionary activities of pioneer 
priests in the present Fort Wayne Deanery, we noted 
that LaGro was a center from which many places in or 
near the Wabash River were attended long before north- 
ern Indiana had a Bishop of its own. Settlements sprang 
up all along the Wabash from Huntington to the Illinois 
.State line. 

Logansport derived its name from a Shawnee In- 
dian by the name of Logan. Back as far as the year 
1838 small craft moved from Lake Erie through the 
Maumee and Erie Canal to Logansport. It is recorded 
that fifty years prior to this, namely in the year 1778, 
LaSalle settled on the site that is now Logansport. 

Father Dufrane, who prepared a very comprehen- 
sive history of the Logansport area on the occasion of 
the observance of the centenary of St. Vincent de Paul 
church, quotes from a book published by the Rev. Wm. 
McNamara to the effect that the Pottawatomi Chief, 
Pokegan, back in 1830, begged a certain Father Richard 
who visited this area from Detroit to send his tribe a 
Catholic priest. He wrote: "Father, Father, I come 
again to beseech you to give us a Black Robe who will 
make known the word of God. We are ready to leave 
whiskey and all savage customs ; you do not send us any 
Black Robes yet ; you have often promised us one. What 
then? Will it always be necessary to live and to die in 
our ignorance? If you do not have mercy on us men, 
have pity at least on our little children, who are going 
to live as we have lived, in ignorance and in vice; you 
leave us with our eyes closed and our ears shut; you 
abandon us to our ignorance while we ardently desire to 
be instructed in religion." 

This touching letter brought Father Badin, proto- 
priest of the United States, to make occasional visits to 
Logansport; and in a letter dated September 22, 1834, 



LOGANSPORT DEANERY 



226 




Father Bad- 
to Bishop 
Cincinn a t i, 
been purch- 
church 
Father 
notes that in 
there exist- 
s po r t a 
er, The Can- 
edited by a 
This was the 
which the 
Vince n n e s 
from Bards- 
er Badin is 
with saying 
in Logan- 
year 1834, 
Bishop of 
visited L o - 
next year 
ports he 
a number of 

and the year after, in 1836, Logansport received its first 
resident pastor in the person of Father Francois. 

On September 9, 1838 the first church, located on 
Buret St., was dedicated by the Bishop of Vincennes. 

From 1840 until 1844 Father Augustus Martin had 
charge of the Catholics of Logansport, Peru and Lafay- 
ette. 

In the Logansport Deanery are situated the Mother- 
house of the Sisters of St. Joseph, Tipton, the Good 
Samaritan and St. Joseph Memorial Hospitals, Kokomo, 
and St. Joseph Hospital, Logansport. 

The Logansport Deanery is comprised of the fol- 
lowing parishes: 

Logansport — St. Bridget's, St. Joseph's, St. Vincent 
de Paul ; Delphi — St. Joseph's ; Peru — St. Charles ; Koko- 



Very Rev. Msgr. M. J. Aichinger 
Sketch on Msgr. Aichinger ap- 
pears under St. Joseph's, 
Logansport 



in reported 
Purcell, f 
that lots had 
ased for a 
there. 

D u f r a n e 
thatyear 
ed in Logan- 
weekly pap- 
al Telegraph 
Catholic, 
year in 
Diocese o f 
was cut off 
town. Fath- 
credited 
thefirstMass 
sport in the 
and the new 
Vince n n e s 
^ansport the 
where he re- 
found quite 
Cath 1 i c s, 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



mo — St. Joan of Arc, St. Patrick's; Kewanna — St. 
Anne's; Lucerne — St. Elizabeth; Knox — St. Thomas, 
Hamlet; Monterey — St. Anne's; Reynolds — St. Joseph's; 
Winamac — St. Peter's; Star City — St. Joseph's; Wabash 
— St. Bernard's; LaGro — St. Patrick's — Rochester, St. 
Joseph's. 

There are mission churches in this District at Lu- 
cerne, Hamlet, Francisville and Medaryville. 

LOGANSPORT 

St. Vincent de Paul Church 

1838 

What we have written about the early ecclesiastical 
history of Logansport is applicable to St. Vincent de Paul 
church, the first parish in existence between LaGro and 
the western boundary line of the diocese. In the year 
1860 lots were procured, fronting on Spencer Street for 
the erection of St. Vincent de Paul church, which was 
completed and dedicated in 1863 under the pastorate of 
the Rev. George A. Hamilton. It replaced the original 
church erected in 1838, which still stands, but is not used 
for church purposes. The dedication of the second 
church was a solemn affair attended by Bishop Luers, the 
Bishop of Vincennes and the Bishop of Louisville. 

St. Vincent de Paul parish had a school as far back 
as 1845; it later had two schools — one conducted as an 
Academy by the Sisters of Holy Cross from the year 
1865, and the other, located on the church property, 
erected in 1868. Only recently the second Academy prop- 
erty was sold. It had operated since 1871. The Sisters 
who taught both schools resided on the Academy prop- 
erty until 1936 when a house was purchased for their use 
by Father Dufrane close to the grade school. 

The parochial residence was built by Father Walters 
in 1879. 

Father Campion built an addition to the church in 
1888; Father Crosson, his successor, made many im- 
provements. Other pastors of St. Vincent de Paul church 
have been the Rev. Francis Lawler from July 1871 to 



228 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTOEY 

May 1878; Rev. James Durham from January, 1926 to 
September 1934 who, because of ill health, was forced to 
retire from parish work and is now living in the mild 
climate of San Diego, Cal. Father Durham did much 
during his pastorate. The Rev. L. J. Dufrane was pastor 
from 1934 to June 1939 and made many improvements 
preparatory to the centenary celebration of St. Vincent's- 
which was solemnly commemorated in 1938 with the 
parish completely free of debt. 

The present pastor, the Rev. John Schall was ap- 
pointed pastor in June 1939. He has renovated the rec- 
tory, after strengthening both church and rectory which 
had been weakened by termites. Father Schall is assisted 
by the Rev. Thomas Depa. 



Father Schall was born at Fowler, March 14, 1895; 
attended the parish school in Fowler; studied at St. Jo- 
seph College, Collegeville, then Mt. St. Mary's, Cincin- 
nati. He was ordained May 21, 1921, by the Most Rev. 
Herman Joseph Alerding. Father Schall's first appoint- 
ment was as assistant at St. Patrick church, Kokomo, 
whence he was transferred to Monterey and Rochester. 
He did excellent work at Monterey and built and nearly 
paid for the church at Rochester. He was transferred to 
Logansport in June, 1939. 

The Rev. Thomas Depa was born at Hammond, June 
20, 1912; attended St. Mary's school, Hammond; St. 
Mary's Seminary, Kentucky, and Orchard Lake, Michi- 
gan ;then St. Meinrad's Seminary. He was ordained by 
the Most Rev. John F. Noll, June 3, 1939, and in July 1939 
received his present appointment. 

St. Joseph Church 
1869 
St. Vincent de Paul parish was divided in 1869, when 
the German speaking group erected the first St. Joseph 
church under the Reverend Jacob Mayer in 1869. In 
1872 the Rev. Henry Koehne was appointed pastor and 
served until 1907. After liquidating the debt on the 
original church, he built the present church which was 
completed and dedicated in 1887. Both Bishop Dwenger 



LOGANSPORT DEANERY 



and Bishop Rademacher, of Nashville, were present. 
From the year 1872 to 1892 the Cullen House was used as 
a school. But Father Koehne erected a new school in 
1892, and in 1897 engaged the School Sisters of Notre 
Dame to teach in the parish. Prior to that lay teachers 
had been employed. In 1904 Father Koehne purchased a 
house west of the church for a rectory. 

The parish was served temporarily by the Rev. Ber- 
nard Wiedau, the Rev. Joseph Von Schwedler and the 
Rev. Jos. Meili. Father Koehne was succeeded, in 1907, 
by the Rev. Jos. Kroeger who erected the present rectory. 
He was pastor until May 1921 when he was succeeded by 
the Rev. George Moorman, who served until June 1924. 
Father Moorman gathered funds for a convent for the 
Sisters. Father Francis Faust had charge from August, 
1924 to Feb. 1926; Rev. Michael Aichinger has been pas- 
tor since Feb. 1926. Father Aichinger built the large con- 
vent for the Sisters and has made other improvements. In 
the fall of 1927 the Very Rev. M. J. Aichinger was elevated 
to the rank of Papal Chamberlain with the title of 
Monsignor. Msgr. Aichinger, now Dean of the Logan- 
sport District, is assisted by the Rev. Ambrose Switzer. 



Monsignor Michael Aichinger was born in Volling, 
Bavaria, Germany, on February 20, 1892. He made his 
ecclesiastical studies at St. Lawrence College, Mt. Cal- 
vary, and at St. Francis Seminary. He was ordained 
June 13, 1908, by the Rt. Rev. H. J. Alerding. His first 
appointment was assistant at St. Peter's church, Fort 
Wayne, where he remained until 1913. During part of 
1914 and 1915 he was acting pastor at St. Paul's church. 
Fort Wayne and St. Mary's church. Crown Point. He 
was pastor of Auburn from 1915-1921; then pastor at 
St. John church, New Haven from 1921-1926, when he 
was transferred in March of that year to St. Joseph 
church, Logansport, as pastor. 

The Rev. Ambrose Switzer, assistant, was born at 
Michigan City, February 18, 1912 ; he attended St. Stan- 
islaus parish school; St. Mary's College, Kentucky, St. 
Mary's Seminary, Orchard Lake, Michigan, and St. 
Meinrad's and was ordained by Bishop Noll on May 22, 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



1937. He was appointed assistant at St. Joseph, Logan- 
sport, June 11, 1937. 

St. Bridget Church 

1875 

The property for St. Bridget's church, school and 
rectory, was purchased by Bishop Dwenger in July, 
1873. The parish had only 45 families to begin with, but 
they lived a considerable distance from St. Vincent de 
Paul church and many, not understanding the German 
language, preferred not to attend St. Joseph's. The first 
pastor was Rev. Bernard Kroeger, who erected a combi- 
nation church, school and convent in 1875. The Sisters 
of St. Joseph, Tipton, had charge of the school, but at 
present the Sisters of St. Francis, Lafayette, are the 
teachers. 

For some years, beginning with 1899 Father Kroeg- 
er, because of ill health, had assistants in the person of 
the Rev. John F. Noll, the Rev. Henry C. Kappel, the Rev. 
M. J. Ford, and the Rev. J. F. Connelly and the Rev. J. 
F. Kohl. After Father Kroeger's death in July 1907, the 
Rev. Peter J. Quinn served as pastor until June, 1925. 
He was succeeded, for six months, by the Rev. James 
Durham who was transferred to St. Vincent's, the same 
city. The Rev. Nicholas A. Keller was appointed pastor 
on Jan. 29, 1926. Father Quinn built the present beauti- 
ful church which, together, with all the other property is 
entirely free from debt. Owing to the removal of the 
Pennsylvania shops from Logansport, St. Bridget's par- 
ish has declined rather than grown during the past few 
years. 



The Rev. Nicholas A. Keller was born in Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa., on August 28, 1884. After attending paro- 
chial school in his own city, he went to St. Joseph college, 
Rensselaer, his brother John (now deceased) having 
been received into the Diocese by Bishop Rademacher; 
from St. Joseph's he went to Mt. St. Mary's, Cincinnati, 
and was ordained June 21, 1912, by Bishop Alerding. 
His first appointment was assistant at St. Patrick's, Fort 
Wayne from July 6, 1912 to June 18, 1920 when he be- 



LOGANSPORT DEANERY 



came pastor of Bluffton and Montpelier until Jan. 29, 
1926 when he received his present pastorate. 

LAGRO 

St. Patrick's Church 
1838 

As indicated elsewhere the parish at LaGro is one of 
the oldest in the Diocese. It became a center like Fort 
Wayne and South Bend for the preaching of the Gospel 
over a vast area. It was visited in 1833 by Father Badin, 
and later out of Fort Wayne by Father Benoit. The 
original church, erected in 1838, is still standing on the 
church property and is used as a hall. The Rev. Patrick 
McDermott was pastor from May 1846 to August 1847, 
and was succeeded by the Rev. M. G. Flannigan who re- 
mained one year. The Rev. John Ryan was located at 
LaGro from 1848 until 1865 and built an addition to the 
small church. Huntington, Wabash, Warsaw and Pierce- 
ton were his missions. In 1866 the Rev. Bernard Kroeger 
was appointed paster and purchased a residence for a 
small rectory. From September, 1866 until August, 1868- 
the Rev. George Steiner was pastor and opened a school 
which was taught by a lay teacher. From August, 1868 
until October 1873 the Rev. M. E. Campion was pastor 
and built the present church in 1870. The cornerstone 
was laid December 1870 although it was not dedicated 
until St. Patrick's Day, 1873. The parish now number- 
ing 30 families, then had 300. 

The Rev. John Grogan was in charge from October 
1873 to March 1882 and made a number of improve- 
ments. The Rev. M. F. Kelly, was in charge from 1882 
until 1884, and was succeeded by the Rev. P. H. Roche 
from 1884 until 1888. Father Roche was succeeded by 
the Rev A. H. Kroeger, who reopened the closed school 
and built a church at Andrews which has since been 
abandoned. The Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan was in charge 
from June, 1890, until July, 1891 and he was succeeded 
by the Rev. Julius Becks from August, 1891 to August, 
1894. Then the Rev. P. M. Kelly was pastor for one year 
followed by the Rev. Michael Hanly, who served two 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



years. In 1898 the Rev. Peter J. Quinn was appointed 
pastor who erected the present rectory. He was succeed- 
ed in 1907 by the Rev. Wm. D. Sullivan, and he, in June 
1910 by the Rev. Jos. Mutch who was relieved in favor of 
a chaplaincy in 1921. For six months the Rev. F. Ege had 
charge ; from June, 1922 to 1927 the Rev. Charles Fisher 
was pastor and he was succeeded by the Rev. Wm. At- 
water who served from June, 1927 until June 1934. The 
Rev. W. P. Mannion has been in charge since June, 1934. 
Father Wilfrid P. Mannion was born in Kokomo, 
June 3, 1902. He attended St. Patrick's school, then went 
to St. Francis Preparatory and Major Seminary; he was 
ordained June 2, 1928 by Bishop Noll. He was appointed 
assistant at St. Mary's, Michigan City June 22, 1928, 
and on Jan. 4, 1934, was given the pastorate at St. Pat- 
rick's, LaGro. 

PERU 

St. Charles Borromeo 

1838 

We have already indicated that Father Badin and 
other pioneer missionaries visited the Wabash Valley as 
early as 1834. Father Badin made several visits to Peru 
between 1824 and 1887, as did the Rev. John Corcoran 
who died there. Following him the Rev. Matthew Ruff 
visited this place, then from the year 1837 to 1842 the 
Rev. M. J. Clark served as pastor. According to the rec- 
ords the Rev. Maurice de St. Palais attended Peru from 
Logansport from 1842 until 1845. In 1845 the Rev. 
Francis Fischer had charge, and was succeeded by the 
Rev. Patrick McDermott from the year 1850 until 1852. 
The Rev. Anthony Carius attended Peru from 1852 to 
1857; the Rev. Charles Zucker, from 1857 until 1860. 
These priests attended this place from Logansport. 

A frame church was erected at Peru in 1838, but it 
received its first resident pastor in the person of the Rev. 
B. J. Force in April, 1860, who built a rectory for the 
priest in 1861, to which Father Meissner built an addi- 
tion in 1890. He was succeeded in 1864 by the Rev. 
Bernard Kroeger, who built the present brick church 



LOGANSPO'RT DEANERY 233 

which was dedicated by Bishop Luers on December 8, 
1867. In 1871 Father Meissner succeeded Father Kroe- 
ger and completed the steeple in 1888. Father Meissner 
remained until 1902, during which time he made many 
improvements on the property. The Rev. John H. Guend- 
ling was his successor. Owing to illness Father Guend- 
ling retired in 1922 and was succeeded by the Rev. J. H. 
Schmitz, who built the present parish school. Father 
Schmitz died in the year 1933 and was succeeded by the 
Rev. Paul A. Welsh, who is the present pastor. Fr. Welsh 
has placed the church property in excellent condition, 
and has furnished a new convent for the Sisters. He 
is assisted by Rev. M. J. Kelner. 

The Peru parish had a school taught by the priests 
as far back as 1840. Lay teachers continued to conduct 
a school until 1885, when Father Kroeger brought the 
Ursuline nuns to take charge of the school. They were 
succeeded in 1871 by the Sisters of Providence, who still 
have charge. 



The Rev. Paul A. Welsh was born in Fort Wayne, 
March 9, 1881. After attending St. Patrick's parish 
school, he went to St. Joseph College, Rensselaer, then 
to St. Bernard Seminary at Rochester. He was ordained 
on June 13, 1908 by Bishop Alerding. His first appoint- 
ment was assistant at St. Mary's church, Anderson, from 
July 3, 1908 until January 11, 1911 when he was trans- 
ferred to St. Patrick's church, Fort Wayne where he 
served only six months. He was then made first resident 
pastor of Montpelier with Bluffton as a mission from 
July 6, 1912 until October 30, 1914. He was appointed 
pastor of St. Patrick's church. Areola, with Pierceton as 
a mission on October 30, 1914 and remained until Janu- 
ary, 1933, when he was appointed pastor of St. Charles 
Borromeo. 

The Rev. Michael J. Kelner, assistant, was born 
October 24, 1904 at Ironwood, Michigan ; he went from 
the elementary school to St. Procopius College and thence 
to St. Francis and Mt. St. Mary Seminaries. He was or- 
dained June 10, 1933 by Bishop Noll and assigned as 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



assistant at St. Joseph church, Mishawaka June 10, 1933. 
He was appointed assistant at St. Charles church June 
16, 1937. 

STAR CITY (PULASKI) 

St. Joseph's Church 

1852 

This parish serves the settlements commonly called 
Pulaski and Indian Creeik. The first Catholics were 
Germans arriving about the year 1840, and seem to have 
been visited from Fort Wayne by Fathers Carius and 
Faller at intervals until the year 1851. 

In the year 1852 the first church, first named St. 
Ann's and later St. Francis of Assisi, was erected; it 
was a small frame building. A large frame structure 
was erected in 1870. The first church in Indian Creek 
settlement was erected in 1855, and enlarged in 1858. 
In 1866 a new frame church was built about two miles 
south of Pulaski. 

The Rev. F. X. Nigsch was sent as the first pastor to 
Pulaski in 1858, with Indian Creek, Winamac, Monterey 
as missions. In the summer of 1873 Bishop Dwenger 
placed the Fathers of the Most Precious Blood in charge 
of the churches at Pulaski and Indian Creek. Father 
Reichert, C. PP. S., who resided at Fort Wayne was the 
first priest of that congregation to serve these places. 

In 1884 Bishop Rademacher decided that it would be 
best for both parishes to be united and purchased prop- 
erty at Pulaski on which were erected a chapel and the 
present priest's house. 

School was once taught in Indian Creek- but was 
discontinued in 1890 because of lack of support. 

There were frequent changes of pastors from that 
time. Father Ehrhard Fritz, C. PP. S. built the present 
church in 1899, which was enlarged in 1919, by Father 
Lokmiller, C. PP. S. The present rectory was erected by 
Father Sliemers, C. PP. S., in 1894. 

The present pastor is Father Vitus Schuette, C. PP. 
S., who was assigned to the place in October, 1939. 



LOGANSPORT DEANERY 23S 

MONTEREY 

St. Ann's Church 
1855 

The Rev. F. A. Carius was the first priest to visit 
Monterey. He visited the place once in three months, cele- 
brating Mass in the houses of Martin Keller and others, 
from the year 1852 to 1855. In the latter year the Rev, 
F. X. Nigsch, residing at Winamac, built a little frame 
church, about two and one-half miles northwest of Mon- 
terey on the banks of the Tippecanoe river, on ground 
that had been secured in November, 1851. 

Father Nigsch continued to visit Monterey (Buena 
Vista) until 1863, when, for four years, it was attached 
to Plymouth. From 1867 to 1872 St. Ann's was visited 
by the pastors from Winamac and Plymouth. From 1873 
to 1888 ten different Fathers of the Congregation of the 
Most Precious Blood had care of Monterey. The Rev. 
George Fleisch, C. PP. S., who came in September 1880, 
was the first resident pastor and remained for five years. 
He bought the present church site and erected a brick 
church in 1884. In January Father Fleisch was succeed- 
ed by the Rev. Erhard Fritz, C. PP. S., the last Father of 
the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood to shepherd 
Monterey. 

The Rev. Charles Thiele, newly ordained, was ap- 
pointed pastor of St. Ann's church in July 1888, and re- 
mained until August 1898. The priest's house was built 
in 1889. In 1895 a combination brick school, convent and 
hall were erected on property donated by Rev. B. A. FoU- 
mar. The Sisters of St. Agnes were installed as teach- 
ers. 

The Rev. Gregory A. Zern succeeded Father Thiele, 
and during his pastorate three acres of ground were 
bought a little west of town for cemetery purposes. 

The Rev. F. Joseph Bilstein succeeded Father Zern 
in 1899, and paid the indebtedness he inherited. He re- 
mained until 1913, and attended Kouts as a mission. He 
was succeeded by the Rev. Bruno Soengen who retired in 
1929 and moved to Mainz, Germany, where he died in 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



1937. Kouts became an independent parish, and Roches- 
ter was attached to Monterey. In April 12, 1929 the 
Rev. J. P. Schall was appointed pastor. Father Schall 
erected a beautiful church in the heart of Rochester. He 
also renovated all the Monterey properties at consider- 
able cost without incurring any indebtedness. In June, 
1939, the Rev. Thomas P. Daley was placed in charge of 
Monterey and Rochester. 

Father Daley was born at Logansport on December 
17, 1904; attended St. Vincent's parish school and then 
went to St. Joseph's College and Mt. St. Mary's Semin- 
ary, Cincinnati. He was ordained on March 16, 1929 
by Bishop Noll. He served as assistant at the Cathedral 
and Holy Angels, Gary. In 1934 he was appointed pas- 
tor of St. Monica Church (colored), Gary, and on July 
8, 1939, was given the pastorate of Monterey. 

ROCHESTER 

St. Joseph's Church 

1869 

Father Bernard Kroeger of Peru visited Rochester 
and celebrated Mass for several years. He purchased 
lots just west of town and erected a frame church which 
was in use until 1930 when Father Schall replaced it 
with a very beautiful edifice on property purchased on 
a conspicuous corner of the main residential street. Roch- 
ester had been attached to Monterey as a mission and 
had, therefore, had the same pastors as Monterey. Dur- 
ing summer it is necessary to have more than one Mass 
at Rochester due to the many Catholics who spend the 
Sunday at Lake Manitou. 

In June, 1941 Rochester was given a resident pastor 
in the person of the Rev. Charles J. SchoU. 



The Rev. Charles J. Scholl was born in Schererville 
on January 27, 1887. He attended the public school at 
that place, then St. Joseph's, Teutopolis, and St. Joseph's, 
Rensselaer, and St. Meinrad's Major Seminary. He 
was ordained June 20, 1913, by Bishop Alerding. 
He served as assistant at St. Joseph's, Mishawaka until 



LOGANSPORT DEANERY 237 

September, 1915, then at St. Joseph's, Hammond, until 
June 14, 1918. His first pastorate was at Lowell from 
June, 1918 to June, 1922, when he was transferred to St. 
Michael's, Summit. In 1926 he was made pastor of the 
church at North Judson and was appointed pastor at 
Wabash June 17, 1932, where he served, except for 
periods of convalescence, until 1941. 

KEWANNA— LUCERNE 

KEWANNA 

St. Ann's Church 

1857 

For years the people of Kewanna attended a church 
erected in the country, and the area was called Grass 
Creek. Priests from Logansport were in charge until 
1857, when the Rev. F. X. Nigsch, of Pulaski, induced the 
people to build a church, although they counted only fif- 
teen families. From 1873 to 1877 the Rev. Wm. Demp- 
sey had charge and built the first rectory. The Rev. D. 
J. Mulcahy, a resident pastor, built a larger church in 
1887. In 1902 Father Ford erected a new pastoral resi- 
dence. The present church, erected on property in the 
town of Kewanna, was built by the Rev. Edmund Ley, 
in 1920. 

Father Ley was succeeded, in turn, by the Revs. M. 
Shea, Edward Boney, Charles Seeberger and Leo Breit- 
enbach, the present pastor, who assumed charge in June 
1939. 



The Rev. Leo Breitenbach was born at Wanatah on 
July 21, 1902. He pursued his studies for the priesthood 
at St. Joseph College, and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, and 
was ordained June 2, 1928 by Bishop Noll. Father 
Breitenbach served as assistant at St. Vincent's, Logans- 
port from June, 1928 until July 8, 1939 with an interrup- 
tion of ten months when he was assistant at St. Mary's, 
East Chicago. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



LUCERNE 
St. Elizabeth's Church 
1858 
The first church in this district was located about 
two miles from the town itself and built in the year 1858 
by the Rev. George A. Hamilton. It was dedicated to 
divine service by Bishop Luers in 1863, and it served un- 
til November 12, 1905, when the Rev. Edw. J. Houlihan 
purchased a building that had been erected in the town 
and adjusted it to Catholic purposes. But two priests 
have had their residence in Lucerne, namely Father 
Charles J. Maugin from April, 1868 to 1870, and Father 
Joseph O'Brien from 1870 to 1871. From that date to 
the present, the priests attending Lucerne have resided 
at Kewanna; hence it has had the same priests as Ke- 
wanna. 

KOKOMO 

St. Patrick's Church 
1860 

The Catholics who settled in Kokomo between 1850 
and 1860, were attended by various priests from differ- 
ent points, but principally from Logansport. Father 
Hamilton erected the first church in this community in 
1860, to which the Rev. P. W. Frawley added a sacristy. 
The Rev. J. H. O'Brien served Kokomo Catholics from 
October, 1871 until June, 1872, and the Rev. John Gro- 
gan from 1872, to 1873, when the Rev. F. X. Lordeman 
was appointed pastor. He served the parish a long time 
and is held in happy memory by all Catholics and non- 
Catholics who knew him. He saw the small town grow 
into a thriving city. 

Father Lordeman built a parish residence in 1874 
and a new church in 1877. In the same year he converted 
the old church into a school and then erected a new school 
in 1893, to which he added accommodations for the Sis- 
ters in 1904. The school was taught by the Sisters of 
St. Joseph at Tipton. Shortly before he died Father 
Lordeman laid the basement of the present elegant church 



LOGANSPORT DEANERY 23& 

of St. Patrick, and the funeral services were held in this 
basement church, the superstructure of which was erect- 
ed by the Rev. R. J. Pratt, his successor, who served 
from April, 1910 until February, 1929. He also built the 
present rectory and convent. Father Pratt was a con- 
vert to the Catholic faith. 

The Rev. R. J. Halpin was appointed pastor in April, 
1929 and is serving the parish well at this time. Father 
Halpin has not only liquidated the parish debt but has 
made many improvements. He is assisted at present by 
the Rev. Robert Sorg. 



The Rev. R. J. Halpin was born in Crawfordsville 
on May 8, 1884 ; attended the parochial school there and 
at Paris, 111., then went to St. Joseph college. He finish- 
ed his studies at Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati and 
was ordained June 18, 1909 by Bishop Alerding. 

Father Halpin's first appointment was assistant at 
St. Vincent's, Logansport from 1909 until 1914 when he 
was made pastor of Kendallville where he built the pres- 
ent church. He was transferred to St. Joseph's, Fort 
Wayne July 2, 1924, where he remodeled the combination 
church and school. He was made pastor of St. Patrick's 
April 12, 1929. 

The Rev. Robert Sorg, assistant, was born in Fort 
Wayne on August 14, 1911; he attended the Cathedral 
parish school and pursued his ecclesiastical studies at St. 
Joseph's college and St. Meinrad's Seminary. He was or- 
dained June 11, 1938 by Bishop Noll, and was appointed 
assistant at St. Patrick's July 7 of the same year. 

St. Joan of Arc Church 

1922 
During the pastorate of the Rev. Robert J. Pratt at 
St. Patrick's, Kokomo, a mission church was erected in 
1922, attended by the Rev. E. J. Werling, his assistant. 
The Rev. John A. Dapp became the first resident pastor 
of St. Joan of Arc church July 1, 1927. Father Dapp- 
purchased the present parish rectory and convent. On' 
April 12, 1929 the Rev. Nicholas Huemmer succeededl 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Father Dapp, who was transferred to St. Jude's, Fort 
Wayne, as its first resident pastor. Father Huemmer 
remained pastor until September, 1935, when he was 
transferred to Elwood, and the Rev. Leo J. Franz was 
given this pastorate. 

The pastor of St. Joan of Arc church has been as- 
sisted several years by the Chaplain of St. Joseph Memor- 
ial hospital, Kokomo. St. Joan of Arc parish has grown 
steadily and is in need of a larger rectory to accommo- 
date a permanent assistant. The Sisters of St. Joseph, 
Tipton, have charge of the school. 



The Rev. Leo J. Franz was born in Erie, Pa., Decem- 
Taer 23, 1897. He completed his studies for the priest- 
hood at the Josephinum, Columbus, Ohio, and was or- 
dained May 21, 1925, by the Most Rev. Joseph J. Hartley, 
Bishop of Columbus. He served as assistant at St. 
Paul's, Fort Wayne from June 1925 to September 1930, 
when he was appointed pastor at Auburn with residence 
at Sacred Heart Hospital, Garrett. On September 12, 
1935, he was made pastor of St. Joan of Arc, Kokomo, 
where he has labored hard and well despite the handicap 
of weak lungs. His present assistant is Father Traub. 

DELPHI 

St. Joseph's Church 
1860 
Prior to the year 1860 Delphi was attended, at in- 
tervals, from Lafayette, Rensselaer, or Logansport. The 
Rev. George A. Hamilton visited Delphi from Lafayette 
in the year 1860 and erected the church which is still in 
use. The little school, built in 1863, by the Rev. A. B. 
Oechtering, is also still in use, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Joseph, Tipton. The original rectory was built by 
the Rev. Timothy O'Sullivan in 1869. The Sisters' home, 
purchased by the Rev. Henry Boeckelman in 1889 was 
in bad condition when the Rev. Clifford J. Reed, who 
died in 1937, allowed the Sisters to occupy his residence 
while he strengthened the former convent and moved 
into it. Father Reed, herein mentioned, had as his pre- 



LOGANSPORT DEANE RY 241 

decessor the Rev. Boccard who was pastor for twenty- 
five years. 

The town of Delphi, although a County Seat, has not 
grown for many years and the parish is not as large to- 
day as it was forty years ago. 

The present pastor, the Rev. Simeon M. Schmitt, 
purchased property in 1938 and converted it into a Cath- 
olic Community Center. He also purchased a home for 
the janitor in 1939. Father Schmitt has, within the few 
years of his pastorate, placed 'the parish in a healthy 
financial and spiritual condition. 



Father Simeon Schmitt was born in Decatur on 
October 20, 1901. After graduating from St. Mary's 
school, he enrolled at St. Joseph's college, Rensselaer, 
and then at Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, and 
was ordained six months ahead of his class in December, 
1926, in order that he might rest for a year for his 
health's benefit. He was assistant at St. Paul's, 
Marion, from July 1927 until January, 1934, when he 
was transferred to St. Charles Borromeo's, Peru. He 
was given the pastorate at Delphi in July, 1937. 

WABASH 

St. Bernard Church 

1864 

The parish at Wabash was organized in 1864 by the 
Rev. John Ryan who attended this place from Logans- 
port beginning in 1862. After building the foundation 
for the first church Father Ryan left the completion of 
the church to his successor at LaGro. The Rev. J. Wiech- 
mann built a small frame school house in 1887, which was 
soon abandoned because of the inability of the few people 
to support it. The Rev. John H. Bathe erected a new 
house for the priest in 1888, which was enlarged in 1898 
by Father Crosson. 

During the pastorate of the Rev. Robert J. Pratt, 
from January 20, 1900 to April, 1910, a church and rec- 
tory were purchased from the Methodist congregation on 



242 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

the corner of Sinclair and Cass Sts. Father Pratt also 
purchased other property on the block in preparation for 
a convent. 

Fr. Pratt was succeeded by the Rev. Wm. D. Sullivan 
who had charge from April 1910 until June, 1921, when 
he was transferred to Crawfordsville- where he died after 
a very successful pastorate on February 14, 1937. His 
successor at Wabash was the Rev. Edmund A. Ley who 
served from 1921 to 1932, during which time he convert- 
ed the hall under the church into a school and moved 
the Sisters of St. Joseph into the house which Father 
Pratt had bought and which had hitherto been rented. 
Father Ley was succeeded in 1932 by the Rev. Charles 
J. Scholl, who exchanged residences with the Sisters to 
the advantage of the latter. The Wabash parish is now 
out of debt and is creating a fund with which to erect 
a new church and rectory under the pastorate of the 
Rev. Leo Hoffman. 



The Rev. Leo Hoffman was born in Hartford City on 
June 10, 1933. After attending Holy Family school at 
Bailey, he enrolled at Quincy College, Illinois, and then 
at St. Gregory's and Mt. St. Mary's Seminaries. He was 
ordained June 10, 1933 by Bishop Noll, and assigned as 
assistant at St. Andrew's, Fort Wayne. In 1938 Father 
Hoffman took a leave of absence forced by ill health, and 
upon his return was appointed chaplain at St. Joseph's 
Convent, Tipton. On July 4, 1940 he was given his 
present charge. 

REYNOLDS 

St. Joseph's Church 

1866 
In 1886 a dozen sturdy Irish families settled in this 
community. They were first visited by the Rev. Joseph 
Stephan who resided at San Pierre. He celebrated Mass 
in the home of Michael Vogel. The first church was 
erected about 1866 under the direction of Father Winter, 
assistant at St. Mary's, Lafayette, who was given charge 
of this mission. It served the purpose for two years 



LOGANSPOKT DEANERY 



when a new brick church was erected at an approximate 
cost of $7,000.00 under the direction of Father Dominic 
Meier, 0. F. M., of Lafayette. 

A few years later a frame school house was erected 
and the Franciscan Sisters placed in charge. The diffi- 
culty of supporting this school forced its closing a few 
years later. Father McMahon moved into the house va- 
cated by the Sisters; but the Rev. John Kubacki built a 
modern pastoral residence in 1899. 

The list of priests, having charge of St. Joseph's 
Church at Reynolds, is the following in their chronolo- 
gical order of succession : Revs. Joseph Stephan, in 1856 ; 
Joseph A. Winter, 1866 and 1867 ; John McMahon, from 
1867 till May 8, 1872; Father Burns; Anthony 
King; Anthony Messmann; Dominic Meier, 0. F. M., in 
1876; Ignatius M. Wilkens, 0. F. M.; Rev. John B. 
Schroeder, 0. F. M; Augustine Beyer, 0. F. M. ; Peter 
Welling, 0. F. M. ; Francis S. Schaefer, 0. F. M. ; Matt- 
hias Zumbuelte, from April 1888 to June 1889 ; Rev. John 
Berg, from June 1889 to June 8, 1893 ; George Schramm, 
from June 8, 1892 ; John Blum, from December 24, 1895 
to November 1, 1896; John Kubacki, from November 1, 
1896 to August 6, 1900; George Horstmann, from Aug- 
ust 6, 1900 to July 4, 1905; Rev. Julius Seimetz, from 
1905 to 1908. 

The Rev. Francis Koch, who succeeded Father Sei- 
metz, scoured a wide field to locate stray Catholics and 
with much success. He built an addition to the church in 
order that children from Reynolds and its missions — 
Francesville and Medaryville — and from Monticello 
might have a religious vacation school through the sum- 
mer. The Rev. Peter Schmitt was in charge from 1917 
until 1927. 

The Rev. V. Magsam was pastor from September, 
1930 until February, 1936. He was succeeded by Father 
Edward Fallon from February, 1936 to February 1939. 
The Rev. J. Chemma was appointed pastor but died Feb- 
ruary 14, 1939. The Rev. Francis Libert was appointed 
pastor July 8, 1989. 



FEAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The Rev. Francis Libert was born at Whiting, April 
2, 1896. He attended parochial school and then spent 
five years at St. Joseph's college ; one year at Ss. Cyril and 
Methodius College. He pursued his philosophy at St. 
Viator's and his theology at Mt. St. Mary's, Cincinnati. 
He v?as ordained May 21, 1921 by the Rt. Rev. H. J. 
Alerding. He served as assistant at St. Hedwig's, Gary 
for four years and one year at St. Stanislaus, East Chi- 
cago; chaplain at Mercy hospital, Gary during 1927, and 
in 1928 w^as appointed assistant at Assumption church, 
Indiana Harbor. In August of 1929 he was appointed 
pastor of Assumption parish, New Chicago and in 
July 1939 was appointed pastor of St. Joseph's church, 
Reynolds. 

WINAMAC 

St. Peter's Church 

1867 

Logansport was the center from which the Catholics 
of this community were attended from 1850 to 1867, when 
the first resident pastor, in the person of the Rev. Henry 
Koenig took charge of Winamac. From 1869 to 1873, 
the Rev. James Kunkel, the Rev. Bernard Wiedau and 
others had charge. Then Bishop Dwenger invited the 
Fathers of the Most Precious Blood to pastor Winamac 
and the immediate surrounding area. Father Wittmer, 
C. PP. S. built a parochial school and engaged the ser- 
vices of the Sisters of the Most Precious Blood. He was 
succeeded in 1876 by Father Schoch, C. PP. S., who re- 
mained until 1880, when Father Nigsch, C. PP. S., was 
appointed pastor- and built a brick church in 1883. The 
Rev. William Schill, C. PP. S., had charge from 1885 to 
1887, and from 1887 to 1897 Father Meissler served the 
parish. He was succeeded in turn by Fathers Linder, V. 
Schirack, V. Krull, Lawrence J. Schirack, V. Meagher, 
S. Weigand and J. J. Becker, the present pastor. 

The new school and convent were erected by Father 
Weigand in 1930, and the present rectory by the Rev. 
Lawrence Schirack in 1909. 



LOGANSPORT DEANERY 



KNOX— HAMLET 
KNOX 

St. Thomas Aquinas Church 

1922 

Knox did not have a resident priest until 1922, al- 
though it had been visited, first occasionally, and then 
more regularly, by priests from different points. It is 
recorded that the Rev. Joseph Stephan said Mass there. 
He had his residence at the Indian School, Rensselaer. 
It was later attended from Monterey, North Judson, and 
Walkerton. In June, 1922 Father Zerhusen, not a priest 
of the Diocese of Fort Wayne, vi^as in charge for one 
month. His successor, the Rev. John Lach, who was 
assigned to Knox in July, 1922 and remained until July 
1926, was actually the first pastor. 

The Rev. Charles E. Malay succeeded Father Lach 
and remained until February 4, 1932, at which time he 
was replaced by the Rev. Conrad A. Stoll, the present 
pastor. 

The present church was purchased by Father Abel 
of Walkerton, in 1915 and was remodeled by Father 
Malay in 1927. Father Abel also purchased the present 
rectory. 

Hamlet is attached to Knox as a mission. 



The Rev. Conrad A. Stoll was born at Remington 
on October 2, 1888. He attended the local parish school 
and went to St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer, and then 
to Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordain- 
ed on June 27, 1914 by the late Bishop Alerding. He 
served two years as assistant at St. Vincent's, Logans- 
port, and eight years at St. Vincent's, Elkhart, when he 
was appointed pastor of Immaculate Conception church 
at Kendallville, July 2, 1924. In April, 1929, he was 
transferred to St. Mary's, Alexandria, and thence to St. 
Thomas Aquinas, Knox, in February, 1932. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DICXJESAN HISTORY 



HAMLET 

Holy Cross Church 

1890 
The original church here was built by the Rev. Dom- 
inic ShuTik, C. PP. S., in the year 1890. Father Shunk 
was pastor at Wanatah at the time. His successors at 
Wanatah attended Hamlet until 1899, when it was at- 
tached to Walkerton as a mission. When Knox received 
its first resident pastor in 1922, Hamlet was attached to 
that place, and has, therefore, had the same pastors. The 
Rev. Charles E. Malay built a neat church here in 1927, 
and Hamlet is now a thriving little mission. 



Logansport Deanery Priests Not Engaged In Parish Work 

The Rev. Gustave Hottenroth is chaplain at St. Jos- 
eph Hospital, Logansport, having retired from parish 
work in July, 1936. 

Father Hottenroth was born at Hundeshagen, Eichs- 
feld. Saxony, Germany, on August 19, 1872. He studied 
the classics at St. Charles, near Aix-la-Chapelle ; pursued 
his philosophy at Liege, Belgium, and theology at St. 
Meinrad's Seminary and was ordained by Bishop Chatrad 
on May 30, 1896. 

He was assistant at St. Mary's, Fort Wayne, from 
June, 1896, to June, 1911, when he was given the pastor- 
ate of St. John's, Goshen, where he served until January 
15, 1920. Then he was transferred to Earl Park where 
he remained until 1923. His next pastorate was Han- 
over Center (Cedar Lake). He held this post from 
January, 1922, until July, 1931, when he was transferred 
to St. Michael's, Waterloo. A serious accident resulted 
in his retirement from parish work, and on July 2, 1936, 
he was given the chaplaincy of St. Joseph Hospital, Lo- 
gansport. 



The Rev. Francis Joseph Mutch has been chaplain 
at Good Samaritan Hospital, Kokomo, since June, 1921, 



LOGANSPOET DEAITERY 



having had to relinquish parish work because of increas- 
ing deafness. 

Father Mutch was born at Michigan City, Indiana, 
on June 13, 1880, and prepared for the holy priesthood 
at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and at Mount St. 
Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained on June 22, 1906, 
by Bishop Alerding. In the following month he was 
made assistant at St. Mary's Church, Lafayette, and on 
July 8, 1910, appointed pastor of St. Patrick's, LaGro. 
He served there until his retirement on June 8, 1921. 



Lafayette Deanery 

The Very Rev. Msgr. A. J. Copenolle, Earl Park, Dean 

The Lafayette Deanery comprises the following par- 
ishes. 

Lafayette — St. Ann's, St. Boniface, St. Lawrence, 
St. Mary's; Fowler — Sacred Heart; Attica — St. Fran- 
'cis; Covington — St. Joseph's; Crawf ordsville ^ — St. 
Bernard's; Dunnington — St. Mary's; Earl Park — St. 
John's; ^Frankfort — St. Mary's ; Goodland — Ss. Peter 
and Paul; Lebanon — St. Joseph's; Otterbein — St. Char- 
les'; Barrydale, St. Bridget's; Oxford — St. Patrick's; 
Rensselaer — St. Augustine's ; Remington — Sacred Heart ; 
Kentland — St. Joseph's; Cicero — Sacred Heart. 

There are mission churches at Veedersburg, Cicero 
and Barrydale in this district; the Soldiers' Home is at- 
tended from St. Ann's; Purdue's Catholic students- from 
St. Mary's. 

In the Lafayette Deanery are situated the Mother- 
house of the Sisters of St. Francis Seraph of Perpetual 
Adoration; St. Elizabeth Hospital; St. Francis High 
School for Girls; St. Anthony Home for the Aged; the 
former St. Joseph Orphange property; St. Joseph's Col- 
lege, Collegeville ; Purdue University with 700 Catholic 
students; the State Soldiers' Home with many Catholic 
inmates. 

A whole year elapsed before the first Bishop of Fort 
Wayne made up his mind whether to establish his Epis- 
copal See at Fort Wayne or Lafayette, both cities having 
almost equal population at the time of his appointment. 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 



249 



LAFAYETTE 

St. Mary's Church 
1844 
In 1840 fifteen Catholics of energy and enterprise 
petitioned the Bishop of Vincennes, which See compris- 
ed the whole state, for a visiting priest to serve their 
spiritual needs. In consequence Rev. Augustus Martin 

them. Later 
lumiere o f 
visited them. 
Laf a y e 1 1 e 
first resident 
Rev. Michael 
rented a 
down town 
church, 
the first 
erected and 
S s. Mary 
then a small 
purch a s e d 
destroyed by 
upon whose 
school was 
taught by a 
Father 
ed here for 

Daniel Mal- 
ceeded Fath- 



was sent to 
Father La- 
Terre Haute 

In 1843 
received the 
priest, the 
Clark, who 
small room 
for use as a 

In 1844 
church was 
dedicated to 
and Martha ; 
rectory was 
which was 
fire and 
foundation a 
built, and 
layman. 
Clark labor- 
14 years. 

The Rev. 
oney s u c - 
er Clark and remained in charge but a year and a half. 

The Rev. Edmund B. Kilroy succeeded him in 1860 
and brought the Sisters of Providence to Lafayette who 
erected their own Academy in 1860. From 1867 to 1895 
Brothers of the Holy Cross taught the boys of St. Mary's. 
Father Kilroy left his post to serve as an army 
Chaplain in 1861, and was succeeded by the Rev. George 
A. Hamilton who, during his pastorate erected the pres- 
ent church, a new rectory, the Boy's school and St. Ann's 




Very Rev. Msgr. A. J. Copenolle 
Sketch of Msgr. Copenolle ap- 
pears under Earl Park parish. 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 



Chapel. Father Hamilton died April 8, 1875, and was 
succeeded by the Rev. Matthew E. Campion who served 
four years. Father Martin Noll was next appointed but 
he died after one month. 

The Rev. Joseph Rademacher was next sent to St. 
Mary's in 1880, and in 1883 he was appointed Bishop of 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Next came the Rev. E. P. Walters who spent much 
money on improvements and repairs. After his death in 
1894 the Rev. John R. Dinnen was appointed rector of 
St. Mary's and served well during a long pastorate end- 
ing with his death in 1927. Father Dinnen added the 
steeple on the church and covered church and rectory 
with artificial stone. He was succeeded by the Rev. D. 
L. Monahan who, during a brief pastorate built up a sub- 
stantial sum for the erection of a new school. In 1935 
he was replaced by the present pastor, the Rev. M. A. 
Chapman, who immediately erected the school and reno- 
vated the church along liturgical lines. Father Chapman 
is assisted by the Revs. Edw. Holland and Francis Mee- 
ban. 



Father Chapman was born at Auburndale, Mass., 
on September 9, 1884; he attended St. Stephan College, 
Central Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church, Columbia University. After his conversion 
to the Faith, he studied at Mt. St. Mary's, Emmitsburg, 
Md., and the Catholic University, Washington, D. C. He 
was ordained May 26, 1923, by the late Bishop Alerding. 
His first appointment was assistant at Holy Angels', 
Gary, until June, 1294, when he worked on the staff of 
Our Sunday Visitor, Huntington, with residence 
at St. Mary's ; in June 1925 he was appointed pastor of 
St. Joseph's, Roanoke; then in June 1926 he went to the 
Cathedral, Fort Wayne where he remained until 1935 
when he was given the pastorate here. Father Chapman 
was the first editor of the Acolyte, and during his minis- 
try wrote several books dealing with sermons and with 
his travel experiences. 

The Rev. Edward Holland was born in Huntington 
on October 5, 1912; he attended St. Mary's parish school, 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTO'RY 



then went to St. Mary's College, Kentucky, and Mt. St. 
Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordained May 22, 
1937 by the Most Rev. J. F. Noll. He was assigned 
to St. Mary's as assistant June 16, 1937. 

The Rev. Francis Meehan was born December 21, 
1909 in Cornell, 111. ; he attended school at Cicero and St. 
Mary's, Anderson, whence he enrolled at Columbia Col- 
lege, Dubuque, Iowa, and Mt. St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He 
was ordained June 3, 1939 by Bishop Noll, who gave him 
his first appointment as assistant at St. Mary's, Lafay- 
ette. 

St. Boniface Church 

1854 

The people of German nationality were organized 
into a parish by the Rev. Philip Doyle in 1853, who after 
completing the first church in 1854 yielded to the Rev. 
Fr. Pinker s, who built a brick school. Succeeding him in 
rather rapid order were the Revs. Neuber, Wemhoff and 
Stephan; then the builder of the present church, dedi- 
cated in 1863, was named pastor, the Rev. Francis Deip- 
enbrock. In the year 1866 the care of the parish was 
transferred to the Franciscan Fathers of the Cincinnati 
Province. 

Many Fathers of St. Francis have held the pastorate 
since that day and have improved the property, erecting 
a new school, a new rectory, new convent, and complet- 
ing a spire on the church. 

The entire property of St. Boniface is at present out 
of debt and is in excellent condition. Its school is con- 
ducted by the Sisters of St. Francis. The Silver, Golden, 
and Diamond Jubilees were solemnly observed. The 
present pastor is the Rev. Fridolin Schuster, 0. F. M., 
who was appointed in July, 1939, and has since made 
many improvements in the church. 

St. Lawrence Church 
1896 
St. Lawrence Congregation was organized in 1895 
to serve the people of that area ; and its church, a com- 
bination church and school, was erected in 1896. The 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 



Franciscan Fathers of Cincinnati have charge, and its 
first pastor was the Rev. Matthias Sasse, 0. F. M. The 
Sisters of St. Francis, who reside in a wing of the build- 
ing, have charge of the school. The first priest's house 
was erected in 1895, and the present rectory in 1897. In 
1922 the present very fine church was erected by the 
Rev. Alfred Hermann, 0. F. M. The present pastor. Rev. 
Werner Krause, 0. F. M. was appointed in July, 1940. 

St. Ann's Church 

1870 

St. Ann's Chapel was a mission from St. Mary's 
from 1870 to 1884. The Rev. Geo. A. Hamilton erected a 
two story brick building to serve as temporary church 
and school. For four years the Rev. John Dempsey serv- 
ed as the first resident pastor of St. Ann's and built the 
first rectory. He was succeeded by the Rev. Patrick J. 
Roche, who built the present church which was dedicated 
in 1897. The old church continued to be used for a school 
until the Rev. Michael Byrne took charge in May, 1901, 
and erected a new school and rectory during his pastor- 
ate, which ended in September 1920, at which time Rev. 
John A. McCarthy was appointed and served until the 
fall of 1932. The Rev. John E. Dillon has been in charge 
since November of that year. Father Dillon has culti- 
vated city-wide devotion to St. Anne, the patroness 
of his church. 

The Sisters of St. Francis teach in the school of St. 
Ann's parish. 

In October, 1940 the Rev. Leo M. McHale was ap- 
pointed assistant at St. Anne's, and given charge of the 
Soldiers' Home and of a C. C. C. camp entrusted to that 
parish. 



Father Dillon was born near Union City, February 
1, 1891. He studied at Niagara University and Mt. St. 
Mary's Seminary. He was ordained March 3, 1917 by the 
Archbishop of Cincinnati. His first appointment was Sec- 
retary to Bishop Alerding and in August, 1921, he was 
made Diocesan Chancellor. In March, 1927, he was given 
the pastorate of St. Vincent's church, Academie, retain- 



254 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

ing his office as Chancellor until his appointment as pas- 
tor of St. Ann's in November, 1932. 

The Rev. Leo M. McHale was born at Kokomo on 
July 25, 1913. He prepared for the holy priesthood at 
St. Francis Minor and Major Seminaries and Vfas or- 
dained May 30, 1931 by Bishop Noll. He served as as- 
sistant at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne for 14 months and 
then was transferred to St. Joseph Orphan Asylum, La- 
fayette as Assistant Chaplain. In April, 1935 he was 
made assistant at St. Emeric, Gary and in January, 1937 
was transferred to St. Mary's, Michigan City, where he 
served until given his present appointment in October, 
1940. 

CRAWFORDSVILLE 

St. Bernard's Church 

1859 

From the year 1850 to 1859 Catholics, who had 
settled here, were visited by the Rev. J. Clark of Lafay- 
ette. In the latter year the Rev. Edward O'Flaherty built 
the original church. The present church was erected 
under the supervision of the Rev. E. P. Walters, who was 
in charge from 1874 until 1878. He was succeeded in 
1878 by the Rev. J. R. Dinnen, who remained pastor until 
1894, and erected the first school and present rectory. 
The Rev. P. J. Crosson succeeded him, and remained for 
four years. The Rev. John Dempsey was in charge from 
1898 until 1906. The Rev. W. J. Quinlan had charge for 
one year, iand was succeeded by the Rev. T. M. Conroy, 
from 1907 till 1921. Father Conroy built the present 
school. The Rev. W. D. Sullivan was pastor from 1921 
until 1937 and made a great many improvements be- 
sides liquidating the debt. 

After Father Sullivan's death on February 14, 1937, 
the Rev. Jos. C. Keating was appointed pastor, who found 
it necessary to make a number of improvements. He 
erected a new convent for the Sisters of the Holy Cross, 
who have charge of the school. 



The Rev. Joseph C. Keating was born at Lafayette 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 



on January 25, 1896. He prepared for the priesthood at 
St. Charles, Baltimore and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. He 
was ordained May 26, 1923, by the late Bishop Alerding 
and was immediately appointed assistant at St. Patrick's, 
Fort Wayne, where he served until July, 1931 when he 
was made the first pastor of Otterbein with Barrydale as 
a mission. In June, 1937 he was appointed to his present 
assignment, St. Bernard's, Crawfordsville. 

ATTICA 

St. Francis Xavier Church 

1862 

For a dozen years prior to the establishment of this 
parish, the Catholics who assisted in the building of the 
Wabash railway at this point, were visited by Fathers 
Clark, O'Flaherty and Stephan, the third of whom erect- 
ed a frame church in 1862. The first resident pastor of 
Attica was the future Bishop of Nashville, Tennessee, 
and then of Fort Wayne, the Rev. Joseph Rademacher, 
who attended Covington and other places as missions and 
stations. The Rev. John Bleckmann succeeded Father 
Rademacher in 1870, built an addition to the little church 
and used part of it for a school until it became necessary 
to discontinue it for lack of support. Father Bleckmann 
had as his successor the Rev. Thos. Cahill for one year, 
the Rev. John A. Mark for four years, the Rev. Charles 
Lemper from 1880 until 1898 ; the Rev. J. Henneberger 
for one year ; the Rev. J. Von Schwedler from 1899 until 
1911; the Rev. John Oberholtz from 1911 to 1932, and 
from 1932 until the present time the Rev. Charles E. 
Malay has been pastor. 

The first church was built in Father Stephan's time 
as also the first rectory which is still in use. The present 
church was built by Father Lemper in 1890. The church 
property in Attica is well located, is out of debt, and is in 
a healthy spiritual condition, considering that it has no, 
school. . 



The Rev. Charles E. Malay was born at Gas City, 
February 9, 1894, attended St. Joseph's College and Mt. 



256 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

St. Mary's Seminary and was ordained May 29, 1920, by 
the late Bishop Alerding. He was appointed assistant at 
St. Lawrence, Muncie in June, 1920, and made pastor of 
St. Thomas, Knox, in August, 1926, where he served 
until he was given his present pastorate. 

OXFORD 

St. Patrick's Church 
1863 

Oxford was the largest parish in the Lafayette 
Deanery outside of Lafayette at one time, but now it is 
one of the smallest parishes. The original church, erected 
by the Rev. E. B. Kilroy in the year 1863, and the original 
rectory erected by the Rev. J. R. Dinnen, in the year 
1870, are still in use, although both have been improved 
and remodeled several times. From the year 1860 to 
1863 the Rev. Joseph Stephan made occasional visits to 
the Catholics of this community. From 1863 to 1867 the 
Rev. E. B. Kilroy was pastor. He was succeeded by the 
Rev. E. C. O'Callaghan, who was the first resident priest. 
He was relieved by the Rev. J. R. Dinnen, who remained 
for five years and was followed by the Rev. M. McCarthy, 
O.S.B., for two years, and then by the Rev. John F. Lang, 
from 1877 until 1882. 

The Rev. P. J. Crosson was pastor from 1882 to 
1884; the Rev. Julius Becks for one year, and then the 
Rev. Wm. C. Miller from 1895 to 1906. The Rev. F. 
X. LaBonte served six months and died at Oxford on 
March 21, 1907. 

The Rev. Jos. Mutch had charge for three months; 
the Rev. H. C. Kappel for four months — when he died. 
The Rev. Frank Rauh was there for six months, and then 
the Rev. E. J. Houlihan from July 1908 until June 1920; 
the Rev. D. L. Monahan from July, 1920 to July 1925; 
the Rev. A. J. Kroeger from 1925 until 1927 ; the Rev. J. 
M. Fitzgerald from November 1927 until February 
1932, and then the Rev. L. Deininger from November, 
1932 to June, 1933 when he died. The Rev. Gregory N. 
Sullivan has been pastor since June, 1933. Father Sul- 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 2B7 



livan has made many improvements on the parish prop- 
erty and built up the spiritual life considerably. 

The Rev. Gregory N. Sullivan was born July 26, 
1903 in Huntington. He attended the local parish school 
and went to St. Joseph's College and Mt. St. Mary's Semi- 
nary. He was ordained June 2, 1928 by Bishop Noll. He 
served as assistant at Peru for four years; had a leave 
of absence for one year and was appointed pastor at 
Oxford on June 2, 1933. 

KENTLAND 

St. Joseph's Church 
1864 

The first church at Kentland was erected by the Rev. 
Joseph Stephan, who visited the Catholics of this com- 
munity from Rensselaer until 1870. During the previous 
three years Father Hamilton, of Logansport, had occa- 
sionally said Mass there. Kentland was given its first 
resident pastor in the person of the Rev. Anthony Mess- 
man, who served from April, 1870 to December, 1880 
and who built the first rectory, added thirty feet to the 
church and started the first school. He was succeeded by 
the Rev. F. X. Baumgartner, who remained until March, 
1883. His successor was the Rev. W. C. Miller, from 
1883 till 1891. Father Miller erected the present church 
in 1888 and the first convent the same year. In 1885 
Father Miller reopened the school which had been closed 
for several years. 

The Rev. Charles Ganzer had charge for fifteen 
months, and then the Rev. J. B. Stetter, D.D., for 26 years 
— from 1902 until 1929. Father Stetter erected a new 
school and convent and also a new rectory for the priest. 
He was succeeded in 1930 by the Rev. F. C. Rothermel, 
who remained until February, 1939, when he was re- 
placed by the Rev. Edw. T. Fallon, the present pastor. 
Father Fallon's first big problem was to so budget the 
finances as to take care of a fairly large debt. He is suc- 
ceeding very well. The school is taught by the Sisters of 
St. Francis, Lafayette. 



The Rev. Edward T. Fallon was born at Huntington, 



258 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

March 27, 1894. He attended the local parish school and 
then went to St. Joseph's, Callicoon, N. Y., and thence to 
Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. He was ordained May 29, 1920 
by Bishop Alerding. He served as assistant at St. Pat- 
rick's, Fort Wayne, for three years, then at St. Vincent's, 
Logansport for two years, when he was made Chaplain 
at St. Vincent's Orphanage, Fort Wayne. In January, 
1929, he was given the pastorate of Portland, with Dun- 
kirk as a mission; he was then transferred to Academic 
in July, 1934 and in February, 1936 was made pastor at 
Reynolds. He succeeded Father Rothermel at Kentland 
on February 4, 1939. 

COVINGTON— VEEDERSBURG 

COVINGTON 

St. Joseph's Church 

1865 
The Catholics of Covington, prior to 1865, were at- 
tended from Rensselaer, Lafayette, Crawfordsville and 
Attica. The present church was started by Father Step- 
han in 1860, and completed by Father Rademacher in 
1865. The rectory was built by the Rev. Henry Plaster 
in 1884. From that time Covington had resident priests 
as follows: The Rev. Francis King, from 1885 to 1891; 
the Rev. John Tremmel from 1891 until 1905; the Rev. 
Peter Schmitt, from 1905 until 1910; the Rev. Michael J. 
Shea from 1910 to 1912 ; the Rev. J. H. Moran from 1921 
to 1926; the Rev. Florian Del Fosse from 1926 to the 
present time. 

The Covington parish, which has Veedersburg as a 
mission, has declined to a degree that it is unable to give 
even half support to the pastor. 



The Rev. Florian Del Fosse was born in Belgium 
and served in other dioceses in this country before being 
given his present pastorate by Bishop Noll. He has been 
satisfied to have a place of residence and a scant living, 
and, therefore, even amidst many privations, he has been 
content at Covington. 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 269 



VEEDERSBURG 

St. Mary's Church 
1897 
Mass was celebrated in a public hall until the erec- 
tion of the present church in 1897 by the Rev. John 
Tremmel. Ever since Covington has had a resident 
priest, Veedersburg has been attached to it as a mission 
and services held at least twice a month. The little par- 
ish at Veedersburg never had more than a dozen families 
and today there are still fewer. They are pastored at 
present by the Rev. Florian Del Fosse, of Covington. 

LEBANON— CICERO 
LEBANON 

St. Joseph's Church 
1865 

Lebanon had no resident pastor until 1874, its few 
Catholics being attended periodically from 1862 from St. 
Mary's, Lafayette. The first church, opened in 1865, was 
a remodeled residence. 

The Rev. Thomas M. Cahill became the first resident 
pastor and was succeeded a year later by the Rev. John 
M. Ryan who remained until the end of 1878. The Rev. 
L. A. Moench was pastor from 1879 to 1882; the Rev. 
John M. Dempsey from 1882 until 1884. The Rev. D. J. 
Mulcahy held the pastorate from 1884 until 1886, and 
was succeeded by the Rev. M. F. Kelly, who served from 
1886 till 1893, when he was succeeded by the Rev. H. A. 
Hellhake, from 1893 to 1898. The Rev. W. S. Hogan had 
charge for one year, then the Rev. P. J. Crawley for six 
years. On July 1, 1905 the Rev. James M. Connelly was 
appointed pastor and remained until June, 1917, when he 
was succeeded by the Rev. D. L. Faurote, who remained 
until July 1922, when the parish was attended tempor- 
arily by the Holy Cross Fathers. The Rev. James M. 
Fitzgerald was the last diocesan priest to have charge. 
In November, 1927 Lebanon and its mission, Cicero, 
were given to the Redemptorists, who have mission head- 
quarters there. 



FKAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The present church was built by the Rev. P. J. 
Crawley in 1901, and the present rectory by the Rev. 
Father Marshall, C.S.C. 

CICERO 

Sacred Heart Church 

1863 

In 1836 some German families located in Hamilton 
County about three and one-half miles north-east of 
Cicero and called the place Buschmer Settlement. The 
Rev. Vincent Bacquelin of Shelbyville was the first priest 
to visit here. After him priests from Indianapolis at- 
tended to the spiritual wants of the Catholics for some 
time. 

Upon the establishment of the Fort Wayne Diocese 
in 1857, the Rev. Michael J. Clark of Anderson began to 
attend Buschmer Settlement. He was followed by sev- 
eral of the pioneer priests of the diocese, including 
Father B. Kroeger, Rev. Lawrence LaMoor of Peru, 
Father B. T. Borg, Rev. F. G. Lentz, Franciscan Fathers 
of Lafayette, Father B. Biegel of Elwood. 

The first church was built in 1863 and was dedicated 
by Bishop Luers the following year. At the same time a 
church was built at Mullin's Settlement, six miles north- 
west. When the Washington Glass Works came to Cicero 
in 1894, a number of Catholic settlers took up their abode 
there, and were anxious to have better church accommo- 
dations. Father Biegel was instructed by the Bishop to 
do what he could for them, and on March 3, 1898 he cele- 
brated Mass at Cicero and secured six lots in the summer 
of that year on which a church was erected during 
1901. 

Later Revs. P. J. O'Reilly, F. J. Jansen, Wm. B. Hor- 
deman, P. Biegel, Jas. F. Fitzgerald, Ed. Boney, N. 
Huemmer, attended Cicero either from Frankfort or Tip- 
ton until it was attached to Lebanon as a mission in No- 
vember, 1927, with the Redemptorist Fathers in charge. 



^ LAFAYETTE DEANERY 261 

REMINGTON 
Sacred Heart Church 
1875 
The Catholics of this town and vicinity were served 
from 1860 to 1870 from the Indian School at Rensselaer 
by the Rev. Joseph Stephan, and then by the Rev. An- 
thony Messman from Kentland. It was he who erected 
the first church in 1875. The following year the mission 
was transferred to the Franciscan Fathers, who had 
charge until 1883, when Remington was given its first 
pastor in the person of the Rev. J. H. Werdein, who 
erected the first parish house. In 1886 he was succeeded 
by the Rev. J. Hellhake, who remained until 1893 and was 
replaced by the Rev. John Berg who served until 1905. 
He built the present church in 1900, and converted the 
old church into a school. The Rev. George Horstmann 
had charge from 1905 until 1910, when the Rev. John M. 
Schmitz was appointed, and remained until 1915. The 
Rev. Joachim Baker served from 1915 till 1932. It was 
he who built the present rectory. The present pastor, the 
Rev. James M. Fitzgerald, has been in charge since No- 
vember, 1932. He recently had the church beautifully 
decorated. The school is taught by the Franciscan Sis- 
ters, Lafayette. 



Father Fitzgerald was born in Rushville, July 13, 
1891. He attended St. Joseph's College and Mt. St. 
Mary's Seminary. He was ordained on May 29, 1920, by 
Bishop Alerding. He served as assistant for one year 
at the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, and at All Saints, Ham- 
mond, for six years. On July, 1927 he was made pastor 
at St. Joseph's, Lebanon; in November, 1927 he was ap- 
pointed pastor of St. Patrick's, Oxford, and in Novem- 
ber, 1932, pastor of Sacred Heart, Remington. 

FOWLER 

Sacred Heart Church 

1875 

The town of Fowler, now an important county seat, 
was platted as late as 1872. The few Catholics there had 



262 FRAGMENTS OF QUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 

been attended from Oxford by the Rev. John R. Dinnen, 
who erected a frame church in 1875. In October of that 
year the Rev. Meinrad McCarthy, O.S.B. had charge of 
Oxford and Fowler until April 1877. The Benedictines at 
that time had intended to erect a college near Fowler. 
The Rev. John F. Lang was pastor from October, 1877 
to April, 1878, and was succeeded by the Rev. John Demp- 
sey, April 1878 to January, 1882. St. Bridget's, now 
known as Barrydale, was then attached to Fowler as a 
mission. The Rev. P. J. Crosson was pastor for a few 
months, and in June, 1882, was succeeded by the Rev. J. 
Maujay, who had charge from June, 1882 until May, 
1887. Father Maujay erected a small frame rectory and 
added twenty feet to the church. He was succeeded in 
June, 1888, by the Rev. J. Henneberger, who built a 
frame school in 1891, and placed the Sisters of St. Fran- 
cis in charge. In 1896 the present church was erected by 
Father Henneberger, the old school was converted into a 
priest's house, the old church into a school, and the old 
rectory, after being enlarged, was converted into a con- 
vent. Father Henneberger was transferred to Attica for 
two years and returned to Fowler in 1900. In 1906 the 
Rev. M. J. Louen was made pastor. In July, 1907, the 
Rev. Charles Dhe succeeded to the pastorate at Fowler, 
the parish having grown largely through an influx of 
French Canadians. Father Dhe made many improve- 
ments, including the erection of a new school and con- 
vent, the resurfacing of the church and rectory, and 
started a fund to enlarge the church considerably. After 
the death of Father Dinnen, he was made Dean of the 
Lafayette District. Father Dhe observed his Golden 
Jubilee in August, 1937, at which time he was made a 
Papal Chamberlain. He died on June 15, 1939, and was 
succeeded by the Rev. Leo J. Dufrane on July 1st. Father 
Dufrane undertook the enlargement of the church and 
brought it to a happy conclusion in May 1940. He is 
assisted by the Rev. Emil Schweier. The school was re- 
dedicated on May 14, 1940. 



Father Dufrane was born in Oswego, N. Y., on June 
25, 1892. He prepared for the priesthood at St. Joseph's 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 263 



College, St. Meinrad's and Mt. St. Mary's Seminaries, 
and was ordained June 15, 1917, by the late Bishop Aler- 
ding. He served for one year as assistant at St. Mary's, 
Lafayette when he entered the Navy as Chaplain. In 
June, 1920 he was appointed assistant at St. Charles, 
Peru, and given his first pastorate at Dunkirk in June, 
1922. He was pastor at Gas City from January, 1929 
until September, 1934, when he served as pastor at St. 
Vincent de Paul Church, Logansport. In July, 1939, he 
was assigned to the pastorate of Fowler. 

The Rev. Emil Schweier was born at Hartford City, 
Jan. 22, 1908 and prepared for the ministry at Quincy 
College and St. Gregory's and Mt. St. Mary's Seminaries. 
He was ordained June 10, 1933, by Bishop Noll, and 
immediately assigned to Sacred Heart Church. 

DUNNINGTON 

St. Mary's Church 

1876 

For a number of years the Catholic people of the 
prairieland attended services at Kentland and St. An- 
thony's. At irregular intervals missionaries from near- 
by parishes would come to celebrate Mass in private 
houses. In 1874, the Rev. John R. Dinnen, of Oxford, or- 
ganized the congregation, naming it St. Mary's. In 1877 
he was succeeded by the Rev. F. J. Lang, who built an 
addition to the church and changed the name to Holy 
Trinity. In 1882 the Rev. John Grogan was sent as resi- 
dent pastor. He built the rectory. In 1884 the Rev. A. J. 
Strueder then assumed charge and remained until 1888. 
The Rev. Francis J. Lambert, the next pastor, labored 
here for thirty years when he was forced to retire be- 
cause of ill health. He was the builder of the present par- 
ish buildings, changed the name of the new church to 
St. Mary's and delivered the care of the new school to 
the Sisters of St. Francis. He even opened a High 
School which was in later years discontinued. 

In May, 1919, the Rev. Peter A. Biegel took charge 
of the parish. He liquidated the debt, and later enlarged 
the school. He was succeeded, in 1929, by the Rev. Otto 



264 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTOBY 

Peters, the present pastor, who has endeared himself to 
his parishioners, who cooperate in every respect. 



Father Peters was born at Brookville, Indiana, on 
September 26, 1888. He prepared for the priesthood at 
St. Joseph's college, St. Meinrad and Mt. St. Mary's Semi- 
naries. He was ordained June 16, 1916 by Bishop Aler- 
ding. His first appointment was assistant at Ss. Peter 
& Paul's, Huntington, but upon the death of the Rev. W. 
C. Miller, his pastor, he was made assistant at the Cathe- 
dral, Fort Wayne, where he served nearly four years. He 
became assistant at St. Mary's, Decatur, in June, 1920, 
and in February, 1926, was appointed pastor of St. Mi- 
chael's, Summit. He was transferred to Dunnington on 
October 3, 1929. 

FRANKFORT 

St. Mary's Church 
1878 

It is of record that priests from Crawfordsville, Lo- 
gansport, Delphi and Kokomo, attended the Catholics of 
Frankfort at intervals, beginning with the year of 1859. 
The Rev. Francis Lordemann attended the Catholics here 
more or less regularly until 1888, when Kokomo needed 
his all-time attention. From 1888 until 1892, and again 
from 1896 until 1898, the Franciscan Fathers of La- 
fayette were in charge. 

The Rev. John Blum, who took charge from 1892 
until April, 1896 was the first resident pastor. The Rev. 
P. J. O'Reilly served from September 1898 to June, 1899, 
and built the present rectory. He was succeeded by the 
Rev. F. J. Jansen, who was pastor from June, 1899 until 
October, 1906. His successor, the Rev. W. B. Hordeman, 
is still in charge after thirty-four years of arduous and 
zealous service in a very beautiful city, where Catholics 
have always been comparatively few. Father Hordeman 
built the present beautiful church in 1912. He purchased 
a large building in 1930 to serve as a sort of Community 
Center. 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 265 



Father Hordeman was born at Rensselaer on Sep- 
tember 19, 1875. He prepared for the holy priesthood at 
St. Joseph's College and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. He 
was ordained June 17, 1905, by the late Bishop Alerding. 
During the first sixteen months of his priesthood, Father 
Hordeman had various temporary assignments, and in 
October 28, 1906, was made pastor of St. Mary's, this 
city. 

EARL PARK 

St. John the Baptist Church 
1880 

The Catholics of Earl Park were first attended by 
the pastor of a little church that no longer exists, but 
absorbed by the parish of Goodland. They had also been 
visited from Rensselaer, Kentland and Fowler. 

The first resident pastor of Earl Park was the Rev. 
Thomas Wagner, C.S.C, who had charge from 1887 until 
1895. He was succeeded by the Rev. Peter J. Weber who, 
during his pastorate, running from August 1895 to 
August, 1919, erected the present very beautiful church, 
converted the old church into a school and built the first 
rectory. The Rev. Francis Ege was in charge for a few 
months and then the Rev. Gustave Hottenroth served 
from January 1, 1920 until April, 1923 and was succeed- 
ed by the Rev. A. J. Copenolle who has been in charge 
ever since. Sisters of St. Francis have charge of the 
school. 

Father Copenolle erected the present school and con- 
vent, remodeled both the church and rectory at consider- 
able expense, yet the parish is practically free of indebt- 
edness. Following the death of the Very Rev. Msgr. 
Charles Dhe in June, 1939, Father Copenolle was ap- 
pointed Dean of the Lafayette District where he is 
supervising in a very splendid manner the various ac- 
tivities fostered by the Bishop. 



The Rev. A. J. Copenolle was born in Brooklyn, N. 
Y., on May 8, 1891, and prepared for the holy priesthood 
at St. Joseph's college and St. Bernard's Seminary, Roch- 
ester, N. Y., and was ordained on June 16, 1916, by 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Bishop Alerding. He served as assistant at St. Vincent's, 
Logansport from June 1916 to 1923 when he was ap- 
pointed pastor of St. John Baptist, Earl Park. In July 
1940 he was appointed Dean of the Lafayette District, 
and in June 1941 was elevated to the rank of Papal 
Chamberlain. 

RENSSELAER 

St. Augustine's Church 

1882 

Rensselaer is associated in the minds of most of us 
more with St. Joseph's College, with the site of the first 
Boys' Diocesan Orphanage, with an Indian School, than 
it is with the parish church located in the center of town. 
The Rev. M. Zumbuelte in 1882 began the erection of the 
original St. Augustine church, which was not dedicated 
until 1885. In 1888 Father Zumbuelte was succeeded by 
the Rev. George Willard for seven months whereupon 
the parish was transferred by the Bishop to the Fath- 
ers of the Precious Blood. 

It has had twelve resident pastors, all of the Precious 
Blood Community. The first school, which is still in use, 
was erected by the Rev. Thomas Meyer, C.PP.S. in 1903. 
It is in charge of Sisters of the Precious Blood. 

The first rectory, also still in use, was built by the 
Rev. Christian Daniel in 1910. The convent was pur- 
chased and moved to the church property in 1906 by 
Father Meyer. The Rev. Stanislaus Greiwe, C.PP.S., who 
was in charge from July, 1930 until May, 1939, succeed- 
ed in creating a considerable fund for the erection of a 
new church, the construction of which was placed in the 
hands of the Rev. A. A. Gerhardstein, C.PP.S., the pres- 
ent pastor. It is an ornament to the city of Rensselaer 
and is one of the finest in the Diocese. It was solemnly 
dedicated by Bishop Noll on June 2, 1940. 

OTTERBEIN— BARRYDALE 
OTTERBEIN 

St. Charles' Church 
1902 
We have here a case of the mission becoming the 



LAFAYETTE DEANERY 267 



residence place of the priest. Pl-ior to 1902 the Catholics 
at Otterbein attended Mass either at Oxford or Barry- 
dale. The Rev. Charles E. McCabe, pastor of Barrydale, 
organized the parish and in June, 1902 the present brick 
church was built. Otterbein was continued as a mission 
from Barrydale until June, 1931 when the Rev. Joseph 
C. Keating rented a house in Otterbein and became its 
first resident pastor, giving to the Barrydale people reg- 
ular Sunday Mass as theretofore. In 1939 a rectory was 
built beside the church at Otterbein by the Rev. Ladislaus 
Krause, the present pastor, who was given charge in 
June, 1937. 



Father Krause was born in Poland on June 22, 1899. 
He prepared for the priesthood at Holy Trinity High 
school and college in Chicago, and at Orchard Lake, 
Michigan. He was ordained June 14, 1925 by Bishop 
Plagens, Detroit, Mich. For three months he served as 
assistant at St. John's, Whiting, and for nine months at 
St. Mary's, Crown Point. He spent five years as assistant 
at St. John Cantius', Indiana Harbor, and in July, 1931 
was appointed temporary chaplain at Holy Family Hos- 
pital, LaPorte, and as assistant to the pastor of St. 
Peter's, that city. In September, 1931, he was assigned 
as assistant to St. Adalbert's, Whiting, and on June 16, 
1937 was appointed to his present charge. 

BARRYDALE 

St. Bridget's Church 

1873 
The settlement around St. Bridget Church was 
named Barrydale by the Rev. Charles E. McCabe, who 
was the first resident pastor, from July 1, 1901 to Jan- 
uary, 1906; it had formerly been known as the "Ditch," 
so named because of the large open ditch situated one mile 
from the church. Mass was said here by priests attached 
to St. Mary's, Lafayette, beginning about 1860. After 
Oxford received a resident pastor, Barrydale became a 
mission of that place. The present church was erected 
by the Rev. W. C. Miller in 1896, after which the old 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



church was converted into a hall. The present rectory 
was built by the Rev. Charles McCabe in 1901. Due to 
the appointment of a pastor at Otterbein in 1921, Barry- 
dale became a mission of Otterbein, and the rectory was 
sold and moved from the premises in 1939. 

The Rev. M. J. Ford was the second resident pastor 
and spent twenty-five years there, namely from January 
1906 until June, 1931 when he was retired because of ill 
health. The Rev. Joseph C. Keating attended Barrydale 
from Otterbein from June, 1931, until June, 1937, when 
he was succeeded by the Rev. Ladislaus S. Krause. 

GOODLAND 

Ss. Peter & Paul Church 
1903 
Many of the parishioners of this place formerly be- 
longed to a country parish which has been discontinued 
even as a mission, namely that which was known as St. 
Anthony's or Dehner's. A benefactor of the latter church 
was Anthony Dehner, in whose home the pioneer priests 
were wont to say Mass. During 1863 and 1864 St. An- 
thony's was attended from the Indian School at Ren- 
sselaer by the Rev. Joseph Stephan. 

Father Messman built the little church at St. An- 
thony's in 1870. The rectory at St. Anthony's was built 
in 1876 by the Rev. F. X. Ege. 

The first resident priest at Goodland was the Rev. 
Gregory A. Zern, who had charge from October, 1903 to 
Oct. 1905, and built the present church a few months be- 
fore he took up his residence there. The Rev. Ignatius 
Zircher had charge from October, 1905 until June, 1912. 
He built the present rectory in 1908. The Rev. A. Hen- 
neberger served as pastor from October 1913 to Decem- 
ber, 1921, and was followed for six months by the Rev. 
Alphonse Miller, C.PP.S. Father George Angermaier 
was pastor from June 1922 until March, 1926, and was 
succeeded by the Rev. E. F. Eisenhardt from March, 
1926 until January, 1933, who was replaced by the Rev. 
A. A. Kohne, the present pastor. 



LAFAYETTE DEANEBY 269 



Father Kohne was born at Decatur on February 6, 
1901. He pursued his ecclesiastical studies at St. Jo- 
seph's College and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. He was or- 
dained on June 11, 1927 by Bishop Noll. He served as 
assistant one year at Holy Angels, Gary, when he was 
given a leave of absence because of ill health. In July, 
1930, he became assistant at All Saints, Hammond, and 
in January, 1933, was appointed pastor at Ss. Peter and 
Paul's, Goodland. 



Lafayette Deanery Priests Not Engaged In Parish Work 

The Rev. Edward J. Freiburger was appointed chap- 
lain at St. Joseph Orphanage on January 9, 1914, and 
although the Orphanage for boys has been discontinued, 
it has not been deemed advisable to withdraw the long- 
time chaplain from considerable work still incident to 
the care of that property, and to the direction of its 
affairs. 

Father Freiburger was born at Sheldon (Yoder), 
Indiana, on October 23, 1880. He pursued his studies 
for the holy priesthood at St. Joseph's College, College- 
ville, and at Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati, and was or- 
dained on June 21, 1912, by Bishop Alerding. 

After serving as assistant at St. Mary's, Decatur, 
from July 6, 1912, to January 9, 1941, he was given the 
chaplaincy at St. Joseph's Orphans' Home. 

Father Freiburger holds the office of Diocesan Direc- 
tor of the Catholic Rural Life Conference. 



Franciscan Fathers fill chaplaincies at St. Francis 
Convent and St. Elizabeth Hospital, and also at St. 
Anthony's Home, Lafayette. 

The State Soldiers' Home is attended from St. 
Ann's parish, Lafayette. 

The Catholic students at Purdue have not as yet a 
resident chaplain, but the spiritual care of the students 
has been entrusted to the first assistant at St. Mary's. 



Muncie Deanery 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Thomas J. Travers, Anderson, Dean 

The Muncie District embraces the territory known 
as the "Gas Belt," because in the late 90's, gas, in great 
quantities was discovered in that region and led to the 
rapid growth of small towns and cities through the es- 
tablishment particularly of glass factories. The pres- 
ent Dean of this District lives at Anderson, which was 
one of the cities which profited by the gas and oil boom, 
and which underwent no special slump after these valu- 
able products of Mother Earth gave out, because other 
important industries moved into Anderson. This is 
equally true of Muncie, and in part, of Marion, and Hart- 
ford City. 

In this deanery are located St. John's Hospital, An- 
derson, of which Fr. T. A. Crumley, C. S. C. is Chaplain; 
the Mercy Hospital at Elwood; the Motherhouse of the 
Sisters of St. Joseph, at Tipton, whose Chaplain is the 
Rev. D. L. Faurote; the Ball State Teachers' College, 
located at Muncie; the National Soldiers' Home near 
Marion, the Catholic inmates of which are attended by 
the pastor at Gas City ; the State Reformatory at Pendle- 
ton, attended by the assistant of St. Mary's, Anderson. 

Fairmount is a mission attended by the Chaplain of 
St. John's Hospital, Anderson; Winchester is a mission 
attended from Portland, and Redkey is attended from 
Dunkirk. 

ANDERSON 

St. Mary's Church 

1860 
While the few Catholic people resident in and near 
Anderson were attended periodically by a priest from 
Logansport as far back as 1840, Father Clark, then resi- 
dent at Lafayette, broke ground for a little church at 
Anderson in the year 1858, but the church was not dedi- 
cated until after 1860, during the pastorate of the Rev. 



MUNCIE DEANERY 



271 



John McMa- 
ond resident 
derson. I n 
services had 
the court 

The s e c - 
for Saint 
greg a t i n 
1876, during 
ate of the 
Crawley, 
at Anderson 
to 1884. 

The Rev. 
raann s u c - 
er Crawley 
built a brick 
residence. 

In May, 
Rev. D. J. 
came pastor 
church and 
years had 
very splen- 
church, the one now in use. 



hon, the sec- 
priest of An- 
the interim 
been held in 
house. 

ond church 
Mary's con- 
was built in 
the pastor- 
Rev. J. B. 
who resided 
from 1866 

F.C. Wiech- 
ceeded Fath- 
inl884. He 
par o c h i a 1 

189 1, the 
Mulcahy be- 
of St. Mary's 
within four 
completed a 
did new 
Father Mulcahy converted 
the old church into a school and erected a new residence 
for the Sisters in 1898. 

Father Mulcahy died early in 1911, and was suceed- 
ed by the Rev. Thomas A. Mungovan, who reduced the 
existing indebtedness considerably. Father Mungovan 
died after a lingering illness in Jun«, 1917, and was suc- 
ceeded by the Rev. Thomas A. Travers the following 
month. 

Msgr. Travers has to his credit the erection of an 
excellent large school building, and an up-to-date con- 
vent for the Sisters of the Holy Cross, who conduct a 
complete High School along with the elementary school^ 
also an addition to the rectory. 




The Rt. Rev. Msgr. Thomas J. 

Travers, Dean. 

For sketch of Msgr. Travers see 

St. Mary's Church, Anderson. 



The Rt. Rev. Msgr. Thomas A. Travers was born in 
Fort Wayne, May 19, 1880. His ecclesiastical studies 



MUNCIE DEANERY 273 



were made at St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer, at the 
Seminaries of St. Paul and Rochester, New York. He 
was elevated to the holy priesthood on June 18, 1904, by 
Bishop Alerding. He was appointed assistant July 2. 
1904 to St. Vincent's, Logansport and before going to 
Anderson he held pastorates at Fairmont and Portland. 

Msgr. Travers was elevated to the rank of Domestic 
Prelate in the fall of 1938. He has served as Diocesan 
Consultor and an Officer of the Fort Wayne Diocesan 
Foundation. 

Msgr. Travers is assisted by the Rev. James Staple- 
ton, who was born at Caragher, Ohio on March 23, 1907. 
He attended St. Joseph's College and St. Gregory's and 
Mt. St. Mary's Seminaries and was ordained May 22, 
1987 by Bishop Noll. For one year he assisted the Rev. 
Frederick Westendorf at the Settlement House, Gary, 
then attended Notre Dame University for one year while 
assisting the pastor at St. Matthew's, South Bend. On 
July 8, 1939 he was appointed assistant at St. Mary's, 
Anderson. 

MUNCIE 

St. Lawrence' s Church 

1869 

The few Catholics in and around Muncie were at- 
tended from Indianapolis until 1869, when the Rev. Law- 
rence Lamoor, pastor of Union City, began the building 
of a little church on the corner of Charles and Hackley 
Streets. 

The dedication of this church, named after St. Law- 
rence, did not take place until 1873, and until the arrival 
of the Rev. Wm. G. Schmidt it remained a mission church 
attached to Anderson. 

Father Schmidt built a small frame residence for 
himself, and then a frame school house in 1881. In 1895 
he dedicated a beautiful large brick church to replace 
the earlier structure, converting the latter into school 
rooms. 

In 1899 he built the rectory now in use, and in 1901 
began the building of a new school, demolishing the old. 



274 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Since 1886 the Sisters of St. Agnes have had charge 
of the school. They succeeded the Sisters of St. Joseph. 

Father Schmidt retired from all parish work in the 
spring of 1920 and moved to California, where he died in 
December, 1931. 

On June 17th, 1920, the Rev. Edward J, Houlihan 
was appointed pastor of St. Lawrence's church. He, with 
the help of Daniel Broderick, replaced the old altars and 
communion railing with beautiful marble altars and reno- 
vated the church generally. 

Father Houlihan began the accumulation of a fund 
with which to provide a future Catholic High School, and 
with which to lend some assistance to a new parish in 
prospect. He purchased property for this purpose, al- 
though when the new parish was finally organized in 
1930, a more suitable site was purchased. Fr. Houlihan 
died August 16, 1940. On Oct. 1, 1940 the Very Rev. 
Msgr. Felix Seroczynski was appointed to succeed him. 



Monsignor Seroczynski 
Indiana, March 5, 1879. He 
studies at St. Joseph's College, 
M a r y's 
He was or- 
J u n e 18, 
shop Aler- 
p r e vio usly 
ates at North 
Hammon d, 
Mishawaka. 

In the 
The Rev. 
czynski was 
p a 1 Cham- 
Msgr. Sero- 
1 ve r of 
owns an im- 
brary. Years 
for the Cath- 
pedia the ar- y^j-y jjg^ Msgr. Fel 




was born at Warsaw, 
pursued his ecclesiastical 
Rensselaer, and at Mt. St. 
S em i nary, 
d a i n ed on 
1904, by Bi- 
ding. He had 
held pastor- 
J u d s o n, 
Elkhart and 

fall of 1938 
Felix Sero- 
made a Pa- 
b e r 1 a in. 
czynski is a 
books and 
m e n s e li- 
ago he wrote 
olic Encyclo- 
ticles deal- 



ix Seroczynski 



MUNCIE DEANERY 



ing with "Poles in the United States". 

Msgr. Seroczynski is assisted by the Rev. Jos. Lenk. 

The Rev. Joseph Lenk was born in Fort Wayne on 
September 22, 1912. He attended St. Joseph's College 
and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. He was ordained on June 
3, 1939 by Bishop Noll, and was appointed assistant at 
St. Lawrence, this city. 

St. Mary's Church 

1930 

As the city of Muncie grew westward and Catholics 
moved in that direction, it was deemed necessary to di- 
vide St. Lawrence's parish and to erect a separate church 
for them. In July, 1930 the Rev. Edgar Cyr, who had 
been assistant at St. Mary's, Anderson, was moved to 
Muncie to organize the new parish. He lived for some 
time with the pastor of St. Lawrence's, but soon pur- 
chased a residence which had belonged to a Methodist 
minister. 

Father Cyr and his committee selected very valu- 
able property for the site of their new parish buildings 
and began immediately the erection of a low-walled 
stone church, intended ultimately for a school. A portion 
of the high school fund, created by Father Houlihan, of 
St. Lawrence parish, was given to the new parish as a 
down payment on the property purchased. Considering 
that this new parish was started at the very beginning 
of the industrial depression, the people of St. Mary's, 
working with the pastor are to be commended for the 
sacrifices they made. They are now gathering subscrip- 
tions for the purpose of erecting a school. 



The Rev. Edgar Cyr was born at Fowler on Novem- 
ber 7, 1896. He made his ecclesiastical studies at St. 
Joseph's College and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, and was 
ordained May 21, 1921 by the late Bishop Alerding. He 
served as assistant at St. Mary's, Anderson, for nine 
years, and on July 3, 1930 was selected to organize what 
is now St. Mary's parish. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



UNION CITY 

St. Mary's Church 

1856 

The Catholics of this town, which is situated in two 
states, and therefore bears the name "Union" City, were 
visited in 1854 from Sidney, Ohio. When the Diocese 
was established in 1857 the question was raised whether 
this parish belonged to the Archdiocese of Cincinnati or 
to the new Diocese of Fort Wayne; but it is of record 
that priests of the Fort Wayne Diocese have had charge 
of the Catholics here from the year 1857. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. J. McMahon, 
who served from 1862 until 1867. Then came the Rev. 
M. Von Schwedler from 1867 to 1870; Rev. L. Lamour 
from 1870 to 1872 ; the Rev. M. F. Noll from 1872 until 
1875. The lattef was succeeded by the Rev. Jeremiah 
Quinlan, who was pastor for fifteen years ; the Rev. Fran- 
cis King was here for nine years ; the Rev. M. Byrne for 
two years; the Rev. J. P. Durham for eight years; the 
Rev. Joachim Baker from 1909 to 1915; the Rev. John 
Schmitz from 1915 to 1922; the Rev. James Durham 
from 1922 to 1925, and the Rev. M. Shea from 1925 to 
1935, when the Rev. Theo. J. Hammes, the present pas- 
tor, was appointed in 1935. 

Union City's first church, a log chapel, was erected 
in 1856 by Father McClare; its second church, by the 
Rev. M. J. McMahon, in 1863 ; its present church, by the 
Rev. Francis King- in 1893. The first school was erect- 
ed by the Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan in 1877, and the present 
school by the Rev. J. P. Durham in 1907. The first rec- 
tory was erected by the Rev. M. J. McMahon in 1865, 
the present rectory, by the Rev. Joachim Baker, in 1911. 
The first convent was erected by the Rev. J. Quinlan in 
1877, and the present combination convent and school by 
the Rev. J. P. Durham, in 1907. The school is taught 
by the Sisters of Holy Cross. 



The Rev. Theodore J. Hammes was born at Racine, 
Wisconsin on April 4, 1885. He attended St. Joseph's 
College, St. Francis Seminary and St. Meinrad's Semin- 



MUNCIE DEANERY 



ary, and was ordained May 21, 1912, by Bishop Alerding. 
Father Hammes assisted at St. Patrick's, Kokomo, from 
June, 1912 until September 1917, when he was made 
pastor at Sacred Heart church, Wanatah. In July, 1923, 
he organized St. Matthew parish, South Bend. In July, 
1933, he was transferred to St. John's, Goshen, and in 
September 1935 to Union City. 

BRYANT 

Holy Trinity Church 
1861 

Holy Trinity church is a model country parish where 
parishioners practically all live within two miles of the 
church, where the parochial school is attended by every 
farmer's children, and where there are no mixed mar- 
riages. The parish, has, from its foundation, been in 
charge of the Precious Blood Fathers, and, because there 
were frequent changes, the number of pastors is too large 
to enumerate here. 

The first church was built in 1861 by the Rev. 
Rochus Schueley, C. PP. S. In 1880 the first school was 
built by the Rev. Joseph Uphaus, who also built the pres- 
ent church in 1885. The present school was built by the 
Rev. P. Mayer in 1909, who also built the rectory. The 
present convent was built in 1919 after St. Mary's Home 
was vacated by the Sisters of the Precious Blood in that 
year. This Order teaches in the school. The present pas- 
tor, the Rev. Victor Wagner, C.PP.S., has had a very 
successful pastorate. 

MARION 

St. Paul's Church 
1868 
For many years priests from Peru, Wabash, Kokomo 
and Union City attended Marion as a Mission. In 1868 a 
frame church was built by Father Borg. The first resi- 
dent pastor was the Rev. P. Frawley who designed and 
started the building of the rectory. He was succeeded 
by the Rev. M. F. Kelly, 1876-1882 ; the Rev. James A. 
Tuigg, May, 1882-1883; the Rev. A. J. Strueder, from 



278 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOC ES AN HISTORY 

May 1883 to September, 1884 ; the Rev. M, Joy, Septem- 
ber 1884; the Rev. John Grogan, from October 1884 to 
January 1894; the Rev. W. J. Quinlan from January, 
1894 until 1907 ; the Rev. P. J. Cravs^ley from June, 1907 
to January, 1909, yvlaen the Rev. P. J. Durham was ap- 
pointed to succeed him. He remained until September, 
1932. 

On March 4, 1894, a second frame church at the 
corner of Ninth and Branson Sts. was dedicated by the 
Very Rev. Joseph Brammer, and on September 30, 1895, 
ground was broken for the new St. Paul's church. In 
1897 the rectory was remodeled, enlarged and furnished. 

In 1909 a school was opened by Father Durham who 
purchased a frame building of ten commodious rooms as 
a home for the teaching Sisters of St. Joseph. In 1924 
the school was enlarged. A full high school course is 
now taught at St. Paul's. 

In December 1922, a fine structure on the corner of 
Washington and Seventh streets that had been erected 
by the Marion Conservatory of Music was purchased by 
St. Paul's congregation to be used as a community hall 
for the various social activities. 

Father Durham was appointed Vicar General in 
1927 and elevated to the rank of Domestic Prelate in 
June 1928. In the fall of 1932 he retired from active 
parish work and moved to Fort Wayne, where he purch- 
ased a residence on West Washington St. For several 
years his health was very poor, and he spent the winters 
at St. Joseph's Hospital, where he died on January 28, 
1940. During his retirement Msgr. Durham acted as 
Officialis of the Matrimonial Court, and served as Direc- 
tor of Catholic Charitable institutions. 

Msgr. Durham was succeeded in October, 1932 by 
the Rev. John A. McCarthy who, assisted by the Rev. 
Maurice Foley, is continuing the fine work of his prede- 
cessor. He recently had the church beautifully frescoed. 

Father McCarthy was born on June 21, 1885 at Fort 
Wayne, and later moved with his family to Garrett, where 
he attended the parish school. He pursued his studies 
at St. Joseph's College and at St. Bernard's Seminary, 



MUNCIE DEANERY 279 



Rochester. He was ordained June 17, 1911 by the late 
Bishop Alerding. He served as assistant at the Cathed- 
ral from June 1911 until September 1920 when he was 
made pastor of St. Ann's, Lafayette. In October, 1932 
he succeeded Msgr. Durham at St. Paul's, Marion. 

The Rev. Maurice Foley was born on Sept. 26, 1907 ; 
he prepared for the priesthood at St. Francis, Wisconsin, 
and St. Gregory's and Mt. St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was 
ordained May 26, 1934. His first assignment was assist- 
ant at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne where he remained un- 
til July 2, 1936 when he was transferred to St. Paul's. 

TIPTON 

St. John's Church 

1874 

The Catholics in and around Tipton in the early days 
were visited occasionally from distant points, even from 
Indianapolis. Beginning with 1860 they were attended 
from Peru and Kokomo. The first church was erected 
by the Rev. Francis Lordemann in 1874, while pastor at 
Kokomo. 

The Rev. F. G. Lentz was the first resident pastor of 
St. John's, beginning in July, 1876. In that year he built 
a priest's house. In 1881 he built an addition to the 
little church, which was destroyed by fire in 1885. In 
the same year he erected a brick and stone school which 
is still in charge of the Sisters of St. Joseph. Since the 
Sisters had erected a rather large convent adjoining the 
church property, part of their house was used for divine 
services until the present church, dedicated August, 1891, 
was ready for the faithful. 

The Rev. Anthony J. Kroeger succeeded Father 
Lordemann before the church was quite completed. In 
1897 Father Kroeger built a new rectory. The Rev. An- 
thony Henneberger replaced Father Kroeger in January, 
1907, and remained until 1913 when the Rev. F. Joseph 
Bilstein was appointed pastor. He is still in charge after 
a pastorate of twenty-seven years, and, in June 1941, 
will observe the Golden Jubilee of his ordination to the 
holy priesthood which he has honored these fifty years. 



280 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Father Bilstein was born at Oestinghausen, Ger- 
many, on February 12, 1867. He attended a preparatory 
seminary in Europe and completed his studies for the 
holy priesthood at St. Francis, Wisconsin, and was or- 
dained on June 7, 1891, by Bishop O'Hara at Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. He served four years in the Diocese of Scran- 
ton before being received into the Diocese of Fort Wayne, 
when he was made assistant at St. Paul's, Fort Wayne, 
and then was placed over St. Anthony's, Benton County, 
until October, 1900. During the next thirteen years he 
was pastor of Monterey and Kouts, and appointed pastor 
of St. John's, Tipton, on October 1, 1913. 

PORTLAND— WINCHESTER 

PORTLAND 

Immaculate Conception Church 

1876 

The Fathers of the Precious Blood were the first to 
visit the few scattered Catholics resident in and around 
Portland, among them one who became the second Bishop 
of Fort Wayne, the Rev. Joseph Dwenger, C. PP. S. 

The Precious Blood Fathers from Fort Recovery, 
Ohio, and from St. Mary's Home, New Corydon, attend- 
ed Portland from 1856 until 1868. In 1876 the Rev. 
George Fleish, C. PP. S., built the first church which is 
still in use. In 1888 the Rev. Joachim Baker, who was 
the first Diocesan priest to serve Portland Catholics, pur- 
chased a small house and lot to serve as a priest's home. 
In 1906 the Rev. L. A. Eberle built an addition to the 
church. Alterations and extensions have been made on 
both church and rectory since that time, the latest by 
Father Derrick. Father Baker was succeeded in turn by 
the Revs. C. Maujay; James P. Lascher; T. M. Conroy; 
L. R. Paquet; L. A. Eberle; T. J. Travers; E. H. Vur- 
pillat; Charles W. Marr; Leo J. Dufrane; E. T. Fallon; 
R. G. Derrick; and F. J. McAuliffe, who was succeeded 
in the fall of 1940, by the Rev. Matthias Bodinger. 



The Rev. Matthias Bodinger was born in Hungary 
on August 27, 1901. He studied at St. Lawrence's college, 
Mt. Calvary, and at Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. He was 



MUNCIE DEANERY 281 



ordained June 11, 1927, by Bishop Noll. He served as 
assistant at Holy Trinity Hungarian church, East Chi- 
cago, for three years, and then for five years as assistant 
at St. Paul's, Fort Wayne. After seven months at St. 
Mary's, Michigan City, he was appointed assistant at 
St. Bavo's, Mishawaka, in September, 1935, and the fall of 
1940 received his present appointment. 

WINCHESTER 
St. Joseph's Church 
1882 
Winchester never had a resident pastor, but vs^as a 
mission through all the years from Union City except 
during short intervals when it was cared for by the pas- 
tor at Portland. The church was built in 1882, by the 
Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan, then the pastor of Portland. In 
the spring of 1941, when Dunkirk was given a resident 
pastor, Winchester was attached to Portland as a 
mission with the Rev. Matthias Bodinger in charge. 

The Catechists of Victory Noll have conducted vaca- 
tion schools at this place. 

ELWOOD 

St. Joseph's Church 

1881 

The pioneer Catholics of Elwood, like those of An- 
derson, received occasional spiritual attention from 
priests who came to them either from Logansport or La- 
fayette. From 1860 to 1865 Elwood was a mission of 
Anderson, although the place was called Quincy at that 
time. 

Its first church, dedicated in 1881, was erected by 
the Rev. J. B. Crawley, pastor of St. Mary's church, 
Anderson; it continued to be attended until the year 
1889 by the Rev. F. C. Wiechmann. 

Elwood's first resident pastor was appointed on 
July 29, 1889, in the person of the Rev. Balthasar Biegel. 
Father Biegel was the builder of all the parochial build- 
ings and of the Mercy Hospital at Elwood. 

School has been conducted at St. Joseph's, Elwood, 



282 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

practically from the beginning, and since the year 1894 
the Sisters of St. Joseph have had charge. 

In the year 1899 Father Biegel started the erection 
of the present handsome church which was dedicated in 
July, 1901. In that same year the first church building 
was converted into a school and the Sisters' convent was 
enlarged. A few years later Father Biegel erected a 
modern school, in which twelve grades were taught. 

The parish is partly supported by the rent of several 
pieces of property near the church owned by the congre- 
gation. 

In September, 1929, Father Biegel was made a 
Papal Chamberlain. 

In September, 1933 Monsignor Biegel sustained ser- 
ious injuries in an automobile accident from which he 
never fully recovered. He died in August, 1935, after a 
pastorate extending forty-five years from his ordination 
day. He was succeeded by the Rev. N. A. Huemmer. 

Father Biegel had begun some work on the ceme- 
tery which his successor had to complete. Father Huem- 
mer had the church renovated, and in 1940 erected an 
elegant modern convent for the school Sisters of St. 
Joseph. He is assisted by the Rev. A. Letko. 



The Rev. Nicolas A. Huemmer was born at Misha- 
waka, on March 10, 1890. He pursued his studies for 
the holy priesthood at St. Joseph's College and Mt. St. 
Mary's Seminary, and was ordained May 25,1918 by the 
late Bishop Alerding. He was assistant at St. Peter's, 
Fort Wayne, for five years; then appointed Chaplain at 
St. Joseph's Convent, Tipton, with Cicero as a mission. 
In July, 1927, he was made pastor of Monterey and 
Rochester. On April 12, 1929 he was made pastor of St 
Joan of Arc parish, Kokomo, and on September 12, 1935 
given his present charge. At present he is away from 
his parish because of illness. 

The Rev. Anthony Letko was born on January 27, 
1911 at Hammond. He studied at Columbia College, Du- 
buque, and St. Meinrad Seminary. He was ordained 
May 22, 1937, by Bishop Noll. On June 16, 1937 he was 
appointed assistant at St. Joseph's, Elwood. 



MUNCIE DEANERY 



HARTFORD CITY 

St. John Evangelist Church 

1883 

This is one of the towns which had a rapid growth 
during the days of gas and oil which flowed plentifully 
from many fields in this region. Until the year 1883, 
when the first church was erected by Father Grogan, 
Catholics were so few that Mass was celebrated only 
twice a month or less frequently. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. Charles Dhe, 
who was assigned to this pastorate in March, 1894. Be- 
fore ten years had elapsed he had erected a new church, 
school, rectory and convent besides attending the mis- 
sions of Dunkirk and Montpelier where he also built 
churches. The Sisters of Providence had charge of the 
school until 1908 when they were replaced by the Sisters 
of St. Francis, because the people were eager to have 
both their boys and girls spend ten years in a Catholic 
school. 

Father Dhe was replaced in July, 1906 by the Rev. 
John F. Noll, who during his four years, beautified the 
church and paid off most of its debt. In July, 1910 the 
Rev. John C. Keller succeeded Father Noll and remained 
until March, 1925, when he was replaced by the Rev. D. 
L. Monahan. He was succeeded in March, 1927 by the 
Rev. Edward G. Werling- and, he, in turn, by the Rev. 
Edward M. Boney, who was in charge until July, 1933 
when he was succeeded by the Rev. J. H. Moran, who is 
the pastor at the present time. 

The Rev. James H. Moran was born at Huntington 
on August 29, 1892. He made his studies for the priest- 
hood at St. Joseph's College, and Mt. St. Mary's Semin- 
ary. He was ordained to the holy priesthood on June 14, 
1919 by the late Bishop Alerding. He vs^as appointed 
assistant at Anderson where he served for two years and 
then was given the pastorate of Covington, where he 
remained for five years. In July, 1926, he was made 
pastor of St. John's, Goshen, and in July, 1933, trans- 
ferred to St. John's, Hartford City. 



284 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

GAS CITY 

Holy Family Church 

1893 

The first pastor of Gas City was the Rev. F. C. 
Wiechmann, of Civil War fame, who erected a frame 
church in 1893, and a pastoral residence in 1894. At his 
death in 1905 he left a neat sum of money for the erec- 
tion of a new church, which his successor, the Rev. Char- 
les E. McCabe, brought to a realization. Ever since 
Father Wiechmann's day the pastor of Gas City has min- 
istered to the Veterans at the National Soldiers' Home 
located about two miles from the town. Prior to that 
the Home was visited by the pastor of the Marion church. 

Father McCabe was succeeded in 1920 by the Rev. 
James H. Durham, who was in charge until 1921, when 
the Rev. John A. Sullivan was appointed pastor. He 
was replaced in 1929 by the Rev. Leo J. Dufrane, and- 
he, in turn, in 1934, by the Rev. Joseph A. Suelzer. 



Father Suelzer was born at Fort Wayne on July 5, 
1892. He pursued his classical and philosophical studies 
at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and finished his theolo- 
gical studies at St. Meinrad Seminary. He was ordained 
May 25, 1918, by the late Bishop Alerding, and appointed 
assistant at St. Joseph's, Mishawaka. In June, 1920, he 
became assistant at St. Patrick's, Kokomo. The follow- 
ing June he was appointed pastor of Kouts with the 
mission of Wheatfield and Kniman. He organized St. 
Mary's parish, Griffith, beginning June, 1928. He was 
transferred to Ege in April 1932, and to St. Vincent 
Villa, Fort Wayne, 1933; and in September, 1934, was 
transferred to Gas City. 

GENEVA 

St. Mary's Church 

1895 
The little church at Geneva was built by the Rev. 
Jos. Uphaus, in 1880, who was the first priest to hold 
regular services there, beginning in 1878. He had charge 



MUNCIE DEANERY 



for 10 years. The Fathers of the Precious Blood have 
had this small parish throughout the years. The present 
church was built by the Rev. Camillus Kloeters, C. PP. S., 
in 1918. 

The colony was known as "Irish Settlement" for 
many years; it is often called by that name today al- 
though there are few of Irish nationality there now. 

The present pastor is the Rev. Father Lenz, C. PP. S. 

The parish has declined steadily until it is one of 
the smallest in the Diocese having a resident pastor. 

In the fall of 1940 the little church was destroyed 
by fire and at this writing is being rebuilt. 

ALEXANDRIA 

St. Mary's Church 
1896 

Alexandria was a small town until natural gas was 
discovered in and around it. The eight or ten souls 
located there were first attended by the Rev. P. J. Craw- 
ley, of Anderson, up to the year 1882. The few Catholics 
continued to be attended very infrequently when Mass 
was offered either in private homes or in a rented hall. 
The Rev. B. Biegel, of Elwood, began to visit them in 
1892. 

In June, 1892 the Rev. John Berg was appointed the 
first pastor of Alexandria with residence at Elwood. He 
began to collect funds for a new church but the building 
was postponed until December, 1895 when the Rev. Joa- 
chim Baker was appointed pastor. In 1896 Father Baker 
built a two story brick combination church, school and 
Sisters' residence. The School Sisters of Notre Dame 
were engaged to teach. Until 1897 Father Baker lived 
in a rented house, but during that year built a rectory. 
In 1900 an addition was built to the school. Father 
Baker was succeeded by the Rev. F. P. Faust in June 
1909 and he by the Rev. Wm. Hoff in August, 1924, and 
from April, 1929 until October, 1931 by the Rev. C. A. 
Stoll. The present pastor, the Rev. Leo A. Scheetz, has 
served since October, 1931. Father Scheetz moved the 
church from the second to the first floor of the combina- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



tion building and by adding a sanctuary and a sacristy 
with new entrances on the ground floor, converted it into 
a handsome church. 



The Rev. Leo A. Scheetz was born at Earl Park on 
July 15, 1896. He prepared for the Holy Priesthood at 
St. Joseph's College and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. He 
was ordained on May 21, 1921 by the late Bishop Aler- 
ding. His first appointment was All Saints, Hammond. 
He was appointed Chaplain of St. Vincent's Orphanage, 
Fort Wayne in 1922 and in 1925 was appointed pastor 
of Auburn with residence at Sacred Heart Hospital, 
Garrett. During 1930 he attended the Catholic Univer- 
sity, Washington, D. C, and upon his return was ap- 
pointed pastor at St. Mary's, Alexandria. 

DUNKIRK— RED KEY 

DUNKIRK 

St. Mary's Church 

1896 

Beginning with the year 1869 Catholics here were 
visited by priests from Union City and Portland. When 
the Rev. Charles Dhe was appointed pastor at Hartford 
City in 1894 Dunkirk was attached to that place. Father 
Dhe celebrated Mass for two years in the Opera House, 
and in 1896 built the present church. In March, 1900, 
Dunkirk received its first resident pastor in the person 
of the Rev. Wm. S. Hogan. At that time Red Key and 
Albany were attached to Dunkirk as missions. 

In September, 1902 the Rev. John C. Wakefer was 
sent to Dunkirk, who made many improvements during 
his tenure, which ended in 1911. The Rev. James H. 
Durham was in charge from 1911 until 1913, when the 
Rev. C. W. Marr became the pastor and remained until 
1922. Dunkirk then again became a mission of Portland, 
of which the following priests had charge: The Revs. 
Leo J. Dufrane from 1922 until 1929 ; E. T. Fallon, from 
1929 to 1934 ; R. G. Derrick, from 1934 to 1939- and the 
Rev. F. J. McAuliffe until the spring of 1941, when Dun- 
kirk received its first resident priest. 



MUNCIE DEANERY 287 



The Rev. F. J. McAulifFe was born at Danville, 111., 
on March 16, 1887. He prepared for the priesthood in 
the Vincentian Congregation at St. Mary's Seminary and 
Apostolic School at Perryville, Mo. He was ordained 
June 12, 1913, by Archbishop Glennon. Father McAuliffe 
spent several years as professor in different educational 
establishments of his Community and served as Chap- 
lain for Soldiers at Danville, 111., for five years. He was 
admitted into the Diocese in August, 1927, and served 
as assistant at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne, until January, 
1929, when he was made temporary Chaplain at St. Vin- 
cent Villa. In August, 1929, he was given the pastorate 
at Nix Settlement and for several years had charge of 
the Children's Page in OUR SUNDAY VISITOR. In 
July, 1939, he was given the pastorate at Portland, with 
Dunkirk as a mission. In October, 1940, Dunkirk be- 
came independent of Portland and Father McAuliffe was 
transferred to that place as pastor. 

RED KEY 

St. Patrick's Church 

1898 
Red Key was attended at intervals for twenty years 
from Union City and Portland. In 1898, the Rev. C. 
Maujay, pastor of Portland, erected a small church here. 
After the Rev. Wm. S. Hogan was appointed resident 
pastor of Dunkirk in 1900, Red Key was attached to it 
as a mission. 

FAIRMOUNT 

St. Cecilia's Church 
1899 
The Catholics in Fairmount Were attended by priests 
from LaGro, Peru, Kokomo, Marion and Alexandria un- 
til the year 1899 when its first church was built during 
the pastorate of the Rev. Joachim Baker, of Alexandria,, 
who was succeeded in July, 1901 by the Rev. Henry C. 
Kappel who remained until 1905 and built a rectory m 
1902. But Father Kappel was the last resident priest.. 
Since then the care of Fairmount is assigned to the 



288 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Chaplain of St. John's Hospital, Anderson. These chap- 
lains have been in turn, the Revs. J. Boers, C.S.C. ; P. F. 
Durcan, C.S.C; G. F. Howarth, C.S.C; E. Burns, C.S.C, 
and the Rev. T. A. Crumley, the present chaplain. 



Muncie Deanery Priests Not Engaged In Parish Work 

The Rev. David L. Faurote is chaplain at St. Joseph 
Convent, Tipton, having been relieved from pastoral 
work on July 4, 1940. 

Father Faurote was born at Decatur, Indiana, on 
August 24, 1883. He pursued his classics at Valparaiso 
University, and at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and 
then went to Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was or- 
dained on June 27, 1914, by Bishop Alerding. 

Father Faurote was assistant at St. Ann's, Lafayette, 
until June, 1916, when he was appointed assistant at St. 
Mary's, Huntington. He held this post for one year, 
and then was appointed pastor of St. Joseph's, Lebanon, 
where he remained until June, 1922. His next pastorate 
was that of Sacred Heart, Wanatah, where he served 
until February 6, 1930, when he was transferred to St. 
Mary's, Avilla. He served until July 4, 1940 when he 
was given his present appointment. 



The hospital at Elwood has not a resident chaplain, 
being attended by the priests of St. Joseph's. 

The Holy Cross Fathers have, for many years, filled 
the chaplaincy at St. John's Hospital, Anderson. The 
present chaplain, the Rev. Thomas Crumley, C.S.C, also 
has charge of the Fairmount mission. 

The Soldiers' Home at Gas City is attended by the 
pastor of Holy Family Church, Gas City. 



South Bend Deanery 

The Very Rev. John Sabo, of South Bend, Dean 

The South Bend Deanery is comprised of the follow- 
ing parishes: 

South Bend — Holy Cross, Sacred Heart, St. Adal- 
bert's, St. Casimir's, St. Hedwig's, St. Joseph's, St. 
Mary's, St. Matthew's, St. Patrick's, St. Stanislaus', St. 
Stephen's, Our Lady of Hungary; Notre Dame — Sacred 
Heart, The Little Flower, Roseland, Notre Dame, St. 
Joseph Farm; Mishawaka — St. Bavo's, St. Joseph's, St. 
Monica's; Elkhart — St. Vincent's; Goshen — St. John's; 
LaPorte — St. Joseph's, St. Peter's, Sacred Heart; Lake- 
ville — Sacred Heart; Michigan City — Immaculate Con- 
ception, Sacred Heart, St. Stanislaus; North Judson — 
Ss. Cyril and Methodius; Otis — St. Mary's; Rolling 
Prairie — St. John's; San Pierre — All Saints; Terre 
Coupee — St. Stanislaus; Walkerton — St. Patrick's; 
Wanatah — Sacred Heart; Plymouth — St. Michael's; 
Francisville — St. Francis; Medaryville — St. Mary. 

In this District there are mission churches at La- 
Crosse, Bremen, Francesville and Medaryville. 

In this Deanery are located the world-renowned 
University of Notre Dame, with the General and Pro- 
vincial Houses of the Congregation of the Holy Cross; 
(The Superior General only very recently moved his 
headquarters to Washington, D. C.) St. Mary's of the 
Lake and Motherhouse of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, 
together with the Novitiate for the three Provinces of 
that Order; St. Mary's Academy and College; the Novi- 
tiate for the candidates for the Priesthood and Brother- 
hood of the Congregation of the Holy Cross, near Rolling 
Prairie; The Motherhouse of the Poor Handmaids of 
Jesus Christ, at Donaldson; St. Joseph's Hospital, South 
Bend, in charge of the Sisters of Holy Cross and chap- 
lained by a Holy Cross priest; St. Joseph's Hospital, 
Mishawaka, operated by the Sisters of the Poor Hand- 
maids of Jesus Christ; St. Anthony Hospital, Michigan 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



City, c o n - 
the Francis- 
of Lafayette 
Richard 
berg is chap- 
Family Hos- 
Porte, con- 
th e same 
where Rev. 
Shanley i s 
the State 
Mi c h i g a n 
Catholic 
the Rev. 
G r u e n e n- 
Culver Mili- 
emy, attend- 
ers from St. 
lege. In this 
also are the 
Central High 
boys and 




Very Rev. John Sabo, Dean 

See sketch of Father Sabo under 

Our Lady of Hungary parish, 

South Bend. 

Joseph's Academy for girls; St. Mary's High School for 

boys and girls at Michigan City. 



d u c t e d by 
can Sisters, 
where Rev. 
G r u e n e n- 
lain ; Holy 
p i t a 1, La- 
ducted b y 
Order and 
Francis 
ch a p 1 a i n ; 
Prison at 
City, whose 
chaplain is 
Richard 
berg; the 
tary Acad- 
ed by Fath- 
Joseph Col- 
Deanery 
Catholic 
School for 
g i rl s ; St. 



The beginning of fairly regular spiritual attendance 
to the Catholics in the South Bend area dates back to 
1830, when the Rev. Stephen Theodore Badin, first priest 
ordained in the United States, built a log chapel on prop- 
erty now belonging to Notre Dame. But as far back as 
1824 the Pottawottamie Indians were visited by the Rev. 
Claude Allouez, S. J. Even at that time a small chapel 
was erected on the border of St. Mary's Lake. Father 
Badin continued to visit here until 1832, when he was 
succeeded by the Rev. Louis DeSeille who continued his 
services until 1837. Then came the Rev. Benjamin J. 
Petit, who was the missionary in this region from 1837 
until 1839. Thereafter, from November, 1842, for many 
years the Fathers of the Holy Cross took charge and 
labored westward to the Illinois line, and to the south 
border of Lake County. Until 1853 there was no church 



TO 

Co 
o 



b3 

TO 



01 



I 

■to 

•fe- 
ci 




FRAGME^fTS OP OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



in South Bend proper — ^the Catholics of the town having 
attended Mass in a chapel at Notre Dame. 

Notre Dame 

Sacred Heart Parish 

1831 

The original church built by Father Badin, was the 
first in the diocese. It was a log chapel, built for the 
Indians; it was a mission center from which spiritual 
attention was given to the scattered Catholics in north- 
ern Indiana and southern Michigan. In 1856 the chapel 
was destroyed by fire, but because of its sacred associ- 
ations it was reproduced and has become a Shrine, to 
which many former students of Notre Dame return to 
have their marriage performed. Father Badin's remains 
are buried beneath its hallowed ground. 

The successor of the Log Chapel is the spacious and 
beautiful church of the Sacred Heart on the University 
campus, built in 1871. Not even the Cathedral of Fort 
Wayne is the scene of so many solemn ecclesiastical func- 
tions, to which its deep sanctuary and choir stalls lend 
themselves. Here the several diocesan synods have been 
held. Here Retreats of the diocesan clergy as well as 
those of the Congregation of Priests and Brothers of 
the Holy Cross have always been conducted. 

The walls of the Sacred Heart Church, as those of 
the Administration Building of Notre Dame, were dec- 
orated by the noted Italian artist Luigi Gregori. In 1933 
these exquisite frescoes were cleaned and restored and 
the sacred edifice generally renewed. 

The basement chapel under Sacred Heart church, 
the scene of many daily Masses and of hundreds of stu- 
dent Communions, has for many years been the parish 
church for people living close to Notre Dame. For ten 
years the Rev. George Finnegan, C. S. C, has been in 
charge. Two other congregations have grown out of 
this parish, namely that of the Little Flower at Roseland, 
north of Notre Dame, and a small church, east of the 
campus, erected almost in its entirety by Holy Cross 
seminarians, attended by one of the Holy Cross Fathers. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 293 

St. Joseph's Church 
1853 

The builder of St. Joseph church, the first in the 
north of South Bend, long known as Lowell, was the Rev. 
Edward Sorin, C.S.C, who, in the year 1853, erected a 
combination church and school, the former placed in 
charge of the Fathers of Holy Cross and the latter- of the 
Sisters of Holy Cross. For many years this school bore 
the name of St. Alexius and later "The Academy of the 
Assumption". 

After Father L'Etourneau erected a new frame 
church in 1867, St. Joseph's was given its first resident 
pastor in the person of the Rev. Frere in July, 1869. He 
was succeeded by the Rev. Wm. Demers, C. S. C, in 1870. 
In December, 1872, the church was destroyed by fire. 
Father Sorin then erected a brick combination church 
and school with living quarters for priests and teachers. 
Father Lauth, C. S. C, became pastor ; he had several suc- 
cessors until the Rev. F. Fallize, C.S.C, built the pres- 
ent church in 1882. In 1884 he erected a two story brick 
building for a boys' school and hall. However, in the year 
1886, the Sisters of Holy Cross took charge of the teach- 
ing of both boys and girls. 

Under the pastorate of the Rev. M. J. Stoffel- C.S.C, 
the boys' school and hall were converted into the pastor's 
residence. The St. Joseph parish had among future pas- 
tors the Revs. Peter Lauth and Patrick Carroll, the latter 
now editor of the Ave Maria. 

From the year 1922 until 1931 the Rev. Wm. Len- 
nartz, C.S.C, had charge of St. Joseph's, and in the year 
1926 erected a large modern school. He was succeeded 
by the Rev. John O'Rourke, C.S.C, who remained until 
July, 1939, when he was relieved by the Rev. Wendell 
Corcoran, C S. C, the present pastor, who has made a 
great many improvements and has succeeded very well 
in the reduction of the church debt. 

Father Corcoran has had two Fathers of the Holy 
Cross as assistants. 



294 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

St. Patrick's Church 
1859 

The second parish started in South Bend was St. 
Patrick's. The original structure was built by the Rev. 
Thomas Carroll, C. S. C, in the year 1859. It was of 
brick and measured 60 x 30. The money for the struc- 
ture was gathered throughout the country, but principal- 
ly in New Orleans. 

Father P. P. Cooney, C. S. C, built an addition to 
the church, including a transept, which served in turn 
as ,a school and a place of worship for German and Polish 
Catholics. St. Patrick's church served all the Catholics 
west of the St. Joseph River at this time. 

The Rev. D. J. Spillard, C. S. C, sold this property 
for $8,000.00 and with the money built the present par- 
ochial residence. 

In 1887 the Rev. D. J. Hagerty, C. S. C, completed 
the present Gothic church on Taylor Street at a cost of 
$45,000.00. 

St. Patrick School for Boys was built in 1898, by 
Father Clark, C. S. C. The Sisters of the Holy Cross con- 
duct a school for girls immediately adjacent to the 
church. It belongs to the Sisters and was started in 188^" 

The Rev. John V. Clark was succeeded by Father 
Hagerty in 1893, and he in turn was succeeded by the 
Rev. John De Groote, in 1899. During Father De Groote's 
pastorate the parish was divided and St. Matthew's par- 
ish was formed. In 1922 Father DeGroote was suceeded 
by Father Maloney, during whose pastorate the new Holy 
Cross parish on the northwest side was formed, St. Pat- 
rick's having contributed the money with which to pur- 
chase the site. Father Maloney was succeeded by the 
Rev. P. Maguire and he by Father F. Minnick; Father 
Maguire was returned to the parish in 1937 and in July, 
1940 was succeeded by the Rev. Patrick H. Dolan, C.S.C. 

St. Hedivig's Church 
1877 
People from Poland began to settle in South Bend 
in 1869 and, with the growth of the Studebaker and other 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 295 

industries in that city, they came in increasing numbers 
until today they support four large parishes. Until the 
year 1877 they were attended from Chicago and from 
Otis, Indiana. On July 1, 1877, the Rev. Valentine Czy- 
zewski, C. S. C, completed the original frame church 
which was destroyed by a cyclone in 1879. New property 
was purchased and the present church was completed in 
April, 1883, under the same pastor. This church was 
completely remodeled in 1898. Father Czyzewski built 
a brick school in 1894, which was destroyed by fire two 
years later, when there was erected a new school, con- 
taining twelve classrooms, which was taught until June 
1938 by the Sisters of Holy Cross, but which is now in 
charge of the Sisters of St. Francis of Kunegunda. The 
priests' rectory was purchased by Father Czyzewski and 
moved to its present site. 

Father Czyzewski remained pastor until 1918, when 
he was succeeded by the Rev. Anthony Zubowicz, C. S. C, 
who served until 1925. He was succeeded by the Rev. 
Stanislaus Gruza, C. S. C, who had the church solemnly 
consecrated. He purchased new property, built a high 
school, and erected a most modern convent for the Sis- 
ters who had heretofore resided at St. Patrick's convent. 
Father Gruza was succeeded in 1934 by the Rev. F. Luz- 
ny, who succeeded in procuring from the Mayor a fifty 
year lease, at a nominal rental, on a public school build- 
ing to which he transferred St. Hedwig's High School and 
gave it the name of South Bend Catholic High School. 

In July, 1940 Father Gruza was brought back to St. 
Hedwig's. 

St. Mary's Church 
1883 
Catholics of German nationality in South Bend are 
traceable back to the year 1850. They first attended Mass 
at Notre Dame and later at St. Patrick's. In 1882 the 
Rev. Peter Johannes, C. S. C, was appointed by his 
Community to wait on the German Catholics of that city. 
He purchased property on which he completed the erec- 
tion of a church in 1883. A school was opened simul- 



296 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

taneously, with the sacristy as a classroom. In 1884 a 
one story frame school building was erected. In Novem- 
ber, 1891 a second story was built to this structure. The 
Sisters of the Holy Cross have been in charge of the 
school since it was enlarged. Father Johannes resided 
with the pastor of St. Patrick's, which is less than two 
blocks away, until August, 1895, when he purchased a 
house and lot next to his church. 

Father Johannes was succeeded, after his death in 
1904, by the Rev. J. M. Scherer, C. S. C. In 1914 the 
church was enlarged, veneered with brick, and a central 
heating plant installed. Upon the death of Father Scher- 
er in February, 1923, the Rev. Michael Oswald was ap- 
pointed pastor. Father Oswald purchased additional 
property back of the school and also sixteen lots in the 
southwest part of South Bend as a site for a new church 
for the German Catholics, owing to the inroads made by 
the colored people into the vicinity of St. Mary's. It is 
not likely that a new national parish will be started. 

Father Oswald was succeeded in July, 1939, by the 
Rev. Wm. Lennartz, C. S. C. 

Sacred Heart Church 
1896 

Factories in Mishawaka and South Bend brought a 
number of Belgians to these two cities. When the number 
in South Bend increased to fifty families, the Rev. Henry 
Paanakker, C. S. C, was directed by his Community to 
organize them into a separate parish. He immediately 
purchased property and erected a two story structure 
to serve the purpose of both church and school. The 
pastor made his home in the sacristy. Later he bought a 
two story frame house and moved it to the church prop- 
erty. Father Paanakker died in 1906, and was succeeded 
temporarily by the Revs. Peter Kline, C.S.C, Alphonse 
Just, C. S. C, and Charles Stuer, a secular priest. There- 
after the parish continued to be pastored by Diocesan 
priests. 

The Rev. Charles Fisher was pastor from 1908 until 
1921, and erected the present school, in 1908. The Rev. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 297 



G. Lecoutere followed in 1921, and remained until 1935, 
when he retired from active parish work because of ill- 
ness. He erected the present rectory. The Dominican 
Sisters, who have charge of the school, live in a rented 
house. The Rev. E. J. Philippe was appointed pastor 
in 1936. Besides building an addition to the rectory and 
renovating the church completely. Father Philippe has 
done much to build up the spiritual life of the parish. 

Beginning in 1938 priests of the Diocese, who have 
been pursuing higher studies at the University of Notre 
Dame, have assisted Father Philippe. At present he is 
assisted at week-ends by a priest from Notre Dame. 



The Rev. Edmund Philippe who was born in Bel- 
gium, came to this country to minister to his country- 
men. Upon the retirement of Father Lecoutere, whose 
death soon followed, he was appointed pastor of Sacred 
Heart Church September 12, 1936. 

St. Stanislaus' Church 
1898 

For the convenience of Polish Catholics residing in 
the northwest section of the city, St. Stanislaus' congre- 
gation, then comprising sixty families, was formed in 
the year 1898, by the pastor of St. Hedwig's, the Rev. 
Father Czyzewski. 

The first pastor, the Rev. H. Jarzynski, C. S. C, and 
his immediate successor, the Rev. R. A. Marciniak, C. S. 
C, resided at St. Hedwig's rectory. A residence was 
built for the pastor of the new congregation in 1903. 

School was held in the basement of the church until 
1905 when the present spacious school, conducted by the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross, was built. In 1916 a convent 
was built for the Sisters and an addition was made to 
the school. 

St. Stanislaus' church, enlarged by the Rev. Roman 
Marciniak, C.S.C. in the year 1913, now serves a large 
congregation. 

In July, 1928 the Rev. B. J. Sztuczko, C. S. C, was 
appointed pastor of St. Stanislaus' church. He built an 
addition to the convent and made other improvements 



398 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

on the church and school. Father Sztuczko was succeeded 
by the Rev. S. J. Gorfca, C. S. C, and he, in turn, 
by the Rev. S. Kuszynski, C. S. C, who made 
extensive improvements on the property, purchased prop- 
erty for future use, reduced the indebtedness consider- 
ably, and following a vote by the young people, intro- 
duced an English sermon for them. 

Father Kuszynski, C. S. C, was succeeded in July, 
1940, by the Rev. Anthony Rosewicz, C. S. C. 

St. Casimir's Church 

1899 

One year after a church was built for the Polish 
people in the southeastern part of South Bend, a church 
was erected for the Poles living in the southwestern part 
of the city. Property was purchased by Father Czyzew- 
ski of St. Hedwig's, and in June, 1898, the Rev. Zubow- 
icz, C. S. C. was appointed the first pastor of the new 
parish. He erected a two story brick combination church 
and school in 1899. The following year Father Zubowicz 
was relieved by the Rev. E. Raczynski, C. S. C, who died 
three years later. During his pastorate he built the pres- 
ent rectory. Father Zubowicz was returned to the parish 
and liquidated the entire indebtedness entailed by the 
earlier building program. 

The Rev. Boniface Iwaszewski was appointed in 
1910, but served only three months when he was succeed- 
ed by the Rev. Stanislaus Gruza, who served for two 
years, when the Rev. Stanislaus Gorka became pastor in 
September, 1915. He served the parish for 16 years and 
built the convent for the Sisters of the Holy Family 
in 1919, and the present beautiful church in 1924. The 
Rev. Anthony Rosewicz succeeded Father Gorka in July, 
1931 and was succeeded by the same priest in 1937. 

St. Stephen's Church 

1900 
Hungarian Catholics began to move into South Bend 
about the year 1882 and their number steadily increased. 
In the year 1893, a special Mass was provided for them 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 299 

at St. Mary's church, while they never lost sight of the 
need of a parish of their own and began to collect money 
for this purpose several years before a pastor was pro- 
vided for them. 

In the year 1900 Bishop Alerding approved of the 
appointment of the Rev. Michael Biro, C. S. C, as the 
first pastor of the Hungarian people. This priest pur- 
chased a Methodist church located on the corner of 
Thomas and McPherson streets, which, after the neces- 
sary alterations, was dedicated to St. Stephen of Hun- 
gary. 

That same year a four classroom school was erected 
and placed in charge of lay teachers. By this time the 
congregation numbered more than four hundred families. 

With the retirement of Father Biro, in 1907, the 
Congregation of the Holy Cross surrendered the church 
to secular priests, the first of whom to have charge was 
the Rev. John Froehlich. He erected the present church 
in the year 1910 at a cost of $30,000.00. 

Unfortunately this parish was divided by an inde- 
pendent movement sponsored by the Rev. Victor Kubinyi 
and Father Froehlich resigned from the parish in 1911. 

His successor was the Rev. Louis Kovacs who re- 
mained less than one year because of the diflSculties in 
the parish. 

On May 1, 1912, the Rev. Alex Vallacky was appoint- 
ed pastor, and remained until 1915. He restored a great 
deal of order and engaged Dominican Sisters to teach in 
the school. 

Under the pastorate of the Rev. Lawrence Horvath, 
who was in charge from 1916 until 1922, the parish was 
divided and the new congregation of Our Lady of Hun- 
gary was formed. 

The Rev. Count Frederick Wenckheim succeeded in 
1922. He erected a new school building, containing four 
additional classrooms and an auditorium in 1925. He 
also substituted the Sisters of Divine Charity for Domini- 
can Nuns. 

Owing to the erection of the new school building, St. 
Stephen's parish found itself involved in a huge debt at 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



the time of the turning over of the parish to the Fran- 
ciscan Fathers by Bishop Noll. The first pastor belong- 
ing to this Order was the Rev. Lawrence Biro, O. F. M., 
who was later transferred to the Cleveland Diocese and 
was succeeded by the Rev. Tarzicius Kukla, O. F. M. 

In 1939 the Bishop turned the church back to Dio- 
cesan priests with the appointment of the Rev. Curt A. 
Suelzer, who is assisted by the Rev. Joseph Horvath. 
Father Suelzer was enthusiastically received, even 
though he was unfamiliar with the Magyar language, 
and is doing excellent work. 

Quite recently he remodeled and built an addition 
to the rectory, which is an old residence purchased 
by Father Biro in 1900 and removed to the pres- 
ent site in 1925. The convent, occupied by the Sisters 
of Divine Charity, was also a former residence purchas- 
ed and remodeled by the Rev. Lawrence Horvath. 



The Rev. Curt A. Suelzer was born at Fort Wayne 
on October 28, 1902. He pursued his studies for the 
priesthood at the Josephinum, Columbus, Ohio, and was 
ordained June 2, 1928, by Bishop Noll. Father Suelzer 
served as assistant at the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, until 
July 8, 1939 when he was given his present assignment. 

The Rev. Joseph Horvath was born at East Chicago, 
May 28, 1912. He prepared for the priesthood at Mt. 
Calvary, Wisconsin, and at St. Meinrad Seminary. He 
was ordained May 22, 1927, by Bishop Noll, and was 
appointed assistant at St. Emeric's, Gary, on June 16th, 
where he remained until July, 1938, when he was trans- 
ferred to St. Stephen's, South Bend. 

St. Adalbert's Church 

1910 
Believing that the Catholic Poles living in the south- 
west part of the city should have a separate parish some 
of their number formed St. Adalbert's Society, the pur- 
pose of which was to begin the work of organizing and 
collecting. They worked under the direction of Father 
Czyzewski, of St. Hedwig's parish, between the years 1905 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 



and 1909, when the property was bought on Olive street 
between Grace and Huron. 

The Rev. John Kubacki was assigned to the new 
church in July, 1910. 

A combination church and school was dedicated by 
the Most Rev. Paul P. Rhode, auxiliary of Chicago. Room 
was also provided in this building for the Felician Sisters 
who were to conduct the school. Father Kubacki built 
a large rectory in 1915. 

In February, 1920, the Rev. John W. Osadnik suc- 
ceeded Father Kubacki, having come from Sacred Heart 
parish, LaPorte. 

In the year 1925, probably the largest and most 
beautiful Gothic church in the diocese was begun, which 
was completed for dedication by Bishop Noll on April 
25, 1926, the patronal feast of the church. 

On the occasion of his Silver Jubilee in May, 1927, 
Father Osadnik was elevated to the rank of Domestic 
Prelate. 

In May, 1931, the pastor erected a recreational hall 
for his young people, and in the spring of 1940 because 
of ill health Monsignor Osadnik retired from active work, 
and his first assistant, the Rev. Aloysius Jarka, was ap- 
pointed acting pastor. Father Jarka had been assistant 
seventeen years at St. Adalbert's with a brief interruption 
during which he served the parish at Rolling Prairie. 

Father Jarka is assisted by the Revs. Joseph Zielin- 
ski and John Moskal. 



Monsignor John W. Osadnik was born May 2, 1876 
in Georgenberg, Germany. He pursued his studies for 
the priesthood in Cracow, Poland, and was ordained as 
a Vincentian on July 5, 1902, by John Cardinal Puzyna, 
Bishop at Cracow. He came to the United States in 
1908, and worked first in Conshohocken, Pa., and then in 
Cloquet, Minn. In 1913 he was received into the diocese 
of Fort Wayne and held the pastorate of the newly or- 
ganized Sacred Heart Parish, LaPorte, from January, 
1913, to February, 1920, at which time he was transfer- 
red to his present parish. 



302 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

The Rev. Aloysius P. Jarka was born in Chicago 
on March 2, 1891. He prepared for the priesthood at St. 
Stanislaus College, Chicago, and at Orchard Lake, Mich- 
igan. He was ordained June, 1915 by Bishop Alerding. 
For three years he was assistant at St. Hedwig's, Gary, 
and attended Sacred Heart church, Gary and the Assump- 
tion church. New Chicago. From December, 1918 to 
February, 1920, he was assistant at St. Stanislaus, East 
Chicago, and then appointed assistant at St. Adalbert, 
February, 1923. 

The Rev. Joseph Zielinski was born in Poland on 
June 28, 1881. He prepared for the priesthood at St. 
Mary's College at Detroit and Orchard Lake, Mich. He 
was ordained June 21, 1912 by Bishop Alerding. He 
served five years as assistant at St. Stanislaus', East Chi- 
cago, and was pastor for nearly six years at St. Joseph's, 
East Chicago. He was pastor of St. Adalbert's, Whit- 
ing, from February, 1923 until July, 1926, when he was 
made pastor at St. John's, Rolling Prairie. In 1937 he 
accepted an invitation from Msgr. Osadnik to serve as 
assistant at St. Adalbert's. 

The Rev. John Moskal was born at Saginaw, Mich- 
igan June 22, 1904. He prepared for the priesthood at 
Orchard Lake, Michigan, and at Mt. St. Mary's Semin- 
ary. He was ordained May 30, 1931 by Bishop Noll. He 
served three years as assistant at St. Vincent's, Elkhart, 
and for nearly two years as Chaplain at St. Vincent 
Villa, Fort Wayne. In June, 1936 he was made assist- 
ant at St. Adalbert's. 

Our Lady of Hungary 
1916 

For their greater convenience the Catholic Hungar- 
ian people of the south of South Bend erected a church 
in 1916 and named it the "Church of Our Lady of Hun- 
gary". It remained under the pastorate of St. Stephen's 
until the year 1921, when Bishop Alerding appointed the 
Rev. Geza Gyorfy as pastor. From that time the church 
functioned as a distinct parish. 

For two years services were held on Catalpa avenue. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 30S 

but in the year 1923 a church was opened on Calvert 
street. Father Gyorfy worked untiringly to provide a 
complete parish unit. In 1924 he built a rectory, and in 
1927, he dedicated a commodious and excellently ap- 
pointed new school, consisting of ten classrooms, audit- 
orium, recreation rooms and kitchen. He also erected a 
new convent for the school sisters, the Daughters of 
Divine Charity. 

At his own request Father Gyorfy was given a small- 
er parish and was succeeded in January, 1935, by the 
Rev. John Stephen Sabo, who had been his assistant from 
July 3, 1930. Father Sabo has found time to engage in 
many civic and religious activities and has been closely 
identified with the direction of the N. C. C. W. of the 
city. He was the first to bring to the entire nation's at- 
tention the great evil of lewd magazine literature, result- 
ing later in the appointment of an Episcopal Committee 
by the Bishops of the United States to promote the Na- 
tional Organization for Decent Literature. At present 
Father Sabo is the Diocesan Director of this movement. 
He is assisted by the Rev. Jerome C. Walski and the Rev. 
Edward M. Roswog. 

In November 1940 Father Sabo was appointed Dean 
of the South Bend District, succeeding the Very Rev. 
Msgr. Seroczynski, after the latter's transfer to St. 
Lawrence's parish, Muncie. 

The Rev. John Stephen Sabo was born at Crome, 
N. J., on Jan. 25, 1905, and prepared for the priesthood 
at St. Joseph's College and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. 
He was ordained on June 14, 1931, by Bishop Noll, and 
appointed as assistant at Our Lady of Hungary church. 
South Bend, where he has served ever since both as 
assistant and pastor. 

The Rev. Jerome C. Walski was born April 24, 1903 
at Hammond. He pursued his ecclesiastical studies at 
Orchard Lake, Michigan, and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary.. 
He was ordained June 2, 1928 by Bishop Noll. He serv- 
ed for one year at his present assignment and then was-. 
appointed assistant at St. Hedwig's, Gary; he served as; 
(Chaplain of St. Anthony's Hospital, Michigan City from 



304 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

July, 1933 to September, 1935, when he was brought 
back to Our Lady of Hungary. 

The Rev. Edward M. Roswog was born at Kokomo, 
on January 29, 1909. He attended St. Joseph College, 
St. Gregory's and Mt. St. Mary's Seminaries. He was 
ordained May 22, 1937 by Bishop Noll. Three weeks 
later he was appointed assistant at Our Lady of Hun- 
gary. 

St. Matthew's Church 

1922 

In July, 1921, the Rev. John F. DeGroote, then pas- 
tor of St. Patrick's, purchased property in Oak Park, 
southeast section of the city, for a new parish plant to 
serve the Catholics of that area. 

On June 28, 1922, the Rev. Theodore J. Hammes was 
named pastor of the new congregation and dedicated the 
church he built to St. Matthew. For a time Father Ham- 
mes lived with the pastor of St. Monica church, Misha- 
waka. 

The original church, dedicated on August 13, 1922 
was enlarged the very next year because of the growth 
of the congregation. 

In April, 1925 additional property was bought, in- 
cluding a number of houses, which created quite a large 
debt for the new parish. One of these houses has been 
used as a rectory and another as a convent. The people 
contributed generously, having in mind the need of re- 
ducing their indebtedness if they would realize their 
dream of a new school. Unfortunately this enterprise, 
undertaken with the enthusiasm of the whole parish, was 
started and completed within the year which will go 
down in history as the "crash" year. The school was 
dedicated in September, 1929 and the business depress- 
ion which lasted for a number of years had its begin- 
ning the very next month. 

The architect had planned a one story eight room 
school building but before he placed the roof he advised 
the building of another story which would not be 
partitioned or equipped. The architect believed this 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 



would represent economy over a period of time. But 
the burden became almost intolerable after the majority 
of the parishioners were thrown out of work. 

The Sisters of St. Joseph, Tipton, were given 
charge of the school. 

While Father Hammes worked sedulously for the 
spiritual wants of the people and for the material needs 
of the parish, in the spring of 1933 he asked Bishop Noll 
to replace him by some other pastor. 

In July, 1933 the Rev. Arnold Wibbert was appoint- 
ed second pastor of St. Matthew's parish, and the people, 
realizing the sole reason for Father Hammes' resigna- 
tion promised to back Father Wibbert at considerable 
sacrifice. He is assisted by the Rev. Wm. Voors. 

In September, 1935 the Brothers of the Holy Cross 
opened a Catholic Central High School for boys on the 
second floor of St. Matthew's school. 



Father Wibbert was born in Milwaukee on Septem- 
ber 19, 1896. He made his classical studies at Mt. Cal- 
vary and St. Francis, Wis., and was ordained June 10, 
1922 by Bishop Alerding. He served until June, 1931 
as assistant at St. Peter's, Fort Wayne, when he was 
appointed to organize the present Holy Rosary parish to 
the west of Gary. On July 7, 1935 he was transferred 
to St. Matthew, South Bend, his present pastorate. 

The Rev. Wm. Voors was born at Fort Wayne on 
January 21, 1912, and prepared for the holy priesthood 
at St. Joseph's college and St. Meinrad's Seminary and 
was ordained June 3, 1939 by Bishop Noll. He served one 
year at St. Luke's, Gary and then received his present 
assignment. 

St. Augustine's Church 

1928 
For a number of years the Rev. George O'Connor, 
C. S. C, had labored among the Negroes in Louisiana, 
and after having spent several years at the Community 
House because of ill health, he volunteered to work 
among the Negroes at South Bend, and both his Super- 



306 FRAGMENTS OF QUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 

iors and Bishop Noll encouraged him to go ahead. It 
was not long until Father O'Connor was known to all the 
colored people in that city, numbering more than 3,000, 
whom he assisted in various ways during the depression, 
especially with clothing furnished by the 3000 students 
at Notre Dame. He had considerable success with con- 
verts and on one occasion baptized more than twenty. 
For a time he said Mass in the basement chapel of St. 
Joseph's church, and later rented a storeroom in the 
heart of the colored district. He served until his death 
in July, 1939, although he was assisted for one year by 
the Rev. Claude Boehm, C. S. C, and then by the Rev. 
Thomas A. Jones, C. S. C, and for another year by the 
Rev. Victor Boisvert, C. S. C, and still another year by 
the Rev. Francis W. Sullivan, who succeeded Father 
O'Connor after his death. 

In June, 1940, a piece of property was purchased 
on which Father Sullivan recently built a church for the 
Catholic colored people in South Bend. He also purch- 
ased a residence on the adjacent lot. He was given 
some help with money raised by the clergy of the Diocese 
for Bishop Noll on the occasion of his fifteenth anniver- 
sary as Bishop. The dedication took place on June 15, 
1941. 

Holy Cross Church 
1929 

For many years the people of the northwest part of 
South Bend clamored for a church and even more for a 
school of their own. The Bishop, in the year 1928, auth- 
orized the pastor of St. Patrick's, which church most of 
them had been attending, to organize a new parish. Six 
acres of ground were purchased and paid for 
from the treasury of St. Patrick's. Father DeGroote, 
C. S. C, served as pastor of this parish for several years 
during which time he erected a large school in which he 
incorporated a beautiful chapel. He also built a rectory, 
but the Sisters who had charge of the Holy Cross school, 
resided at their Motherhouse at St. Mary's. 

When Father DeGroote was relieved of all parish 
activities, he was succeeded by the Rev. P. Beaghan, C. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 307 

S. C, who has not only successfully reduced the large in- 
debtedness he inherited, but built an addition to the 
school entailing a new expense of nearly $40,000, with- 
out creating any new debt. 

In 1939 Father Beaghan rented a large house to 
serve as a. Sisters' convent and at this time is ready to 
build a convent for them on church property. Holy 
Cross Parish has grown very rapidly and the people will 
be compelled to give very generously for some time be- 
cause the Chapel will soon be needed for extra school 
rooms, when it will be necessary to erect a new church. 

St. Joseph's Farm 
1931 

Seven miles to the northeast of South Bend is a 
1300 acre farm, owned by the Fathers of Holy Cross, 
which has long been operated for the raising of cattle to 
furnish milk to Notre Dame. Father Francois, C. S. C, 
Superior-General of the Holy Cross Congregation and 
another priest or two, besides several Brothers of Holy 
Cross who operated the farm, and the Sisters, who had 
charge of the domestic work, lived here. Since the 
chapel in the house was quite large the Catholic people 
of the neighborhood, who live too far from existing 
churches and who have no means of transportation, were 
invited to attend Mass in this chapel on Sundays. About 
fifty people received the Sacrament of Confirmation here 
in the year 1930, and because of insufficient room in the 
chapel, services were held in the barn. 

After Father Francois' death his successor moved 
to the Community House of Notre Dame, but because 
a chaplain to the Brothers and other workers on the farm 
has been retained the poor people of this district have not 
been asked to erect a church of their own. 

MICHIGAN CITY 

St. Mary's Church 
1849 
It is of record that the scattered Catholics of Mich- 
igan City were attended from 1844 to 1857 by Fathers 



308 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

of the Holy Cross. A store building, located on the cor- 
ner of Washington and Second streets, was converted 
into a little church in the year 1849. This was replaced 
in the year 1854 by Father Paul Gillen, who was appoint- 
ed Michigan City's first resident pastor in 1857, or by 
Father Martin Sherer, of LaPorte, both of whom visit- 
ed Michigan City from the year 1854 to 1857. 

The Germans of the town built a little church of 
their own in 1859, dedicated to St. Ambrose, which was 
attended from LaPorte. From 1860 to 1864 the Rev. 
George Steiner was appointed pastor of both churches. 

Father Steiner was succeeded by the Rev. Julius 
Becks. He effected a union of the two congregations in 
November, 1867, at which time preparations were made 
to build a new church on the present site. 

On February 18, 1885, the Rev. John Bleckmann 
succeeded Father Becks. Besides making many improve- 
ments, he erected a new school in 1886 and a convent 
for the Sisters of the Holy Cross, who had charge of the 
school until 1897, when they were replaced by the School 
Sisters of Notre Dame. In 1905 Father Bleckmann erec- 
ted a large rectory to replace an inadequate old frame 
residence. 

The Rev. A. M. Ellering became pastor of St. Mary's 
after Father Bleckman's death, and remained there un- 
til his retirement in July, 1924. He was succeeded by 
the Rev. George Moorman, who greatly enlarged St. 
Mary's church, installed new stone altars, pulpit and 
communion railing, the gift of the then Mrs. Barker- 
Spaulding. In addition Father Moorman remodeled the 
school, introduced a high school and left the parish free 
of debt besides a considerable fund for the erection of a 
new school when he exchanged places with the Rev. 
Joseph Lynn, of Sacred Heart parish, Whiting, in Octo- 
ber, 1931. 

During his short pastorate Father Lynn enlarged 
the school, gave his residence to the Sisters as their Con- 
vent, and erected a new rectory at a cost of more than 
$100,000. He brought back the Sisters of Holy Cross to 
conduct both grade and high school. The high school is 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 



attended by more than 250 students, taxing the capacity 
of Marquette Hall, which was built by Father Ellering-. 

The Rev. Joseph A. Lynn retired from the active 
pastorate in September, 1935, and was succeeded by the 
Rev. Edward H. Vurpillat, who reconstructed the con- 
vent, adding an extra story to make room for nearly 
thirty Sisters. 

Father Vurpillat is assisted by the Revs. J. H. Roes- 
ler, and Robert B. Weis, and a Capuchin Father. One of 
his assistants attended the State Prison as Chaplain until 
1939, when it was transferred to an assistant attached 
to St. Stanislaus. In July, 1940, the Chaplain at St. 
Anthony Hospital was given charge of the Prison. 



The Rev. Edward H. Vurpillat was born at Wina- 
mac, on June 19, 1884. He pursued his ecclesiastical 
studies at St. Joseph's college and St. Bernard's Seminary, 
Rochester. He was ordained June 17, 1911 by Bishop 
Alerding. He was appointed assistant, in turn, in June 
1911, at St. Mary's, Lafayette, then in December, 1913, 
at St. Peter's, Fort Wayne. In July, 1917, he was 
appointed pastor of Portland, and during 1918 served 
as Chaplain in the United States army. In August, 
1919 he was made pastor of St. Joseph's, Fort Wayne, 
and on June 8, 1921 made pastor of St. Vincent's, 
Academie where he remained until March 1927 when he 
was transferred to St. Mary's, East Chicago. On Decem- 
ber 12, 1935 he received his present assignment. 

The Rev. John E. Roesler was born on March 8, 
1911 at Muncie and attended the University of Dayton, 
St. Gregory's and Mt. St. Mary's Seminaries. He was or- 
dained on June 6, 1936 by Bishop Noll following which 
he was given his present appointment. 

The Rev. Robert B. Weis was born in Hammond, 
May 3, 1910. He attended St. Joseph's College and Ken- 
rick Seminary. He was ordained June 6, 1936 by Bishop 
Noll and served as assistant at St. Lawrence's, Muncie for 
two years, when he was appointed assistant at St. Mary's, 
Michigan City. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



St. Stanislaus' Church 
1892 

In July, 1890 the Rev. E. J. Wrobel was selected by 
Bishop Alerding to organize the Polish people of Mich- 
igan City into a parish of their own. He lived at St. 
Mary's rectory and held services for the Polish people 
in St. Mary's Hall. He was officially appointed their 
pastor in January, 1891, and in 1892 erected a two story 
building which served the purposes of church and school 
and Sisters' residence. In 1906 he enlarged this build- 
ing. He erected a two story rectory also. This building 
continued to be used for all three purposes until 1926, 
when the Rev. Joseph Bolka, who succeeded Father Wro- 
bel in 1909, built a very large church with complete base- 
ment. 

Then things began to happen. First in 1938 Father 
Bolka built a most modern convent for the Sisters, which 
is occupied by the School Sisters of Notre Dame who 



have charge 
and two 
in 1940, dis- 
old combina- 
a n d school 
a most mod- 
F a ther 
ed the pol- 
his ministry, 
the full 
money for 
purposes be- 
s t a r ted to 
church was 
when it was 
was also the 
school had 
rated that 
t h r i t ies 
abandon it. 
nearly one- 




The Very Rev. Msgr. Joseph 
Bolka, late pastor of St. Stan- 
islaus' Church, Michigan City. 



of the school, 
years later^ 
mantled the 
tion church 
and erected 
ern school. 
Bolka adopt- 
icy, early in 
of r a i s ing 
a m o unt of 
building 
fore he even 
b u i 1 d. The 
paid for 
dedicated as 
convent. The 
so de te rio- 
the State au- 
urged him to 
But he had 
half of the 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 311 

needed money. Hence the physical property of St. Stan- 
islaus is practically new and the debt is small. 

In July, 1940, Father Bolka was honored by being 
elevated to the rank of Papal Chamberlain ; but on April 
28, 1941, died after a brief serious illness. The parish 
will observe the Golden Jubilee of its foundation in the 
fall of 1941. It will be noted that St. Stanislaus has had 
only two pastors during the last fifty years. 

Father Bolka was assisted by the Rev. Julian Doktor 
and the Rev. Chester P. Zurawiec, the former serving 
in the capacity of acting pastor by whom he was also 
succeeded. For many years prior to June, 1940, one of 
the assistants at St. Stanislaus served as Chaplain at 
St. Anthony Hospital. 

Monsignor Joseph A. Bolka was born at Otis, Indi- 
ana, March 16, 1875. He prepared for the holy priest- 
hood at St. Francis' Preparatory and Major Seminaries 
and was ordained by Archbishop Katzer, of Milwaukee, 
on May 28, 1899. He was pastor at North Judson for 
five years and pastor at St. Stanislaus, East Chicago for 
nearly five years more. On March 10, 1909, he was given 
the pastorate of St. Stanislaus. He died April 28, 1941. 



The Rev. Julian F. Doktor was born at Three Rivers, 
Mass., October 29, 1893. He prepared for the priest- 
hood at Ss. Cyril and Methodius College and Mt. St. 
Mary's Seminary. He was ordained November 30, 1918 
by Bishop Alerding. He was assistant for three years 
at St. Adalbert's, Whiting, nearly four years at St. Casi- 
mir's, Hammond, when he was made pastor of Sacred 
Heart Church, Gary, where he erected a new church and 
school. In July, 1925 he was made pastor at Terre Cou- 
pee ; in April, 1932 he was made pastor at St. Hyacinth's, 
Fort Wayne; and in July, 1940, was appointed acting 
pastor at St. Stanislaus, Michigan City. 

The Rev. Chester Zurawiec was born at Hammond, 
Indiana, on October 7, 1912. He made his ecclesiastical 
studies at St. Mary's, Orchard Lake, and St. Meinrad 
Seminary. He was ordained June 3, 1939 by Bishop 
Noll. One month later he was appointed assistant at St. 
Stanislaus Church. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Sacred Heart Church 

1917 

In the year 1915 the Rev. Michael Abraham visited 
Michigan City to call on some of his Syrian acquaint- 
ances, and the then pastor of St. Mary's, the Rev. A. M. 
Ellering, prevailed upon Bishop Alerding to allow him 
to remain and take care of the Syrian people, particu- 
larly since they were divided between the Maronite and 
the Melchite Rites and no priest, following either one of 
these Rites, would satisfy all. Father Abraham brought 
the two groups together by having them compromise on 
the Latin Rite. While organizing the parish for the 
Syrian people, Father Abraham lived first at St. Mary's 
rectory and later at St. Anthony's Hospital, where he 
served as Chaplain. 

Until the completion of Sacred Heart church serv- 
ices were held at Marquette Hall belonging to St. Mary's 
parish. The new church was dedicated by Bishop Aler- 
ding in June, 1917. Some years later Father Abraham 
erected a fine rectory. 

There is no separate school for the Syrian children. 



The Rev. Michael Assemani Abraham was born at 
Tripoli, Syria, on March 22, 1898. He pursued his studies 
for the priesthood at Quebec, Canada, and at Jerusalem, 
Palestine, and was ordained on December 23, 1911 in the 
Holy Land. He served as a missionary for three years 
in Trans j or dania, and in 1915 came to this country and 
was given the pastorate of Sacred Heart Church, Mich- 
igan City, Indiana. 

LAPORTE 

St. Peter's Church 
1853 
St. Peter's was the first church at LaPorte, where 
Catholics settled during the construction of the Lake 
Shore and Lake Erie Railroad. They were waited on by 
priests from Notre Dame University, who celebrated 
Mass in private homes and for a while in a room of the 
Medical College and in a small public school. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 



The church, first called "The Church of the Nativity 
of the Blessed Virgin," was built by the Rev. M. P. Roon- 
ey, in 1853. The Rev. R. Wallace, C. S. C, built an addi- 
tion to the church and provided a room for the priest 
where pastors lived until 1880, when the Rev. M. E. 
Campion built a rectory, which is now occupied by the 
Sisters of Holy Cross, who have had charge of the school. 

Other pastors were the Rev. P. J. Crawley, who was 
pastor for nine years; the Rev. John Grogan, who was 
pastor for three years ; the Rev. Timothy O'Sullivan ; the 
Rev. George Schramm who was pastor from October, 
1897 until his death in 1916. He was succeeded by the 
Rev. John Wakefer, who retired because of ill health in 
February, 1936, and died within a few months. 

Father Wakefer built the present beautiful church 
in 1930. He had previously built a school and hall in 
1922, and purchased the present rectory in 1919. Father 
Wakefer was replaced in February, 1936 by the Rev. 
H. V. Magsam who is in charge at present. 



The Rev. H. Victor Magsam was born at West 
Ridge, 111., on October 23, 1893. He attended St. Jos- 
eph's college and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He 
was ordained on May 29, 1920, by Bishop Alerding. He 
served for a few months as assistant at St. Joseph's, 
Mishawaka, and from October, 1920 to January, 1929 
was assistant at St. Joseph's, Logansport, and Chaplain 
at St. Joseph's Hospital, when he was made pastor of St. 
Aloysius', Yoder. In February, 1930 he was made pas- 
tor of St. Joseph's, Reynolds, and in February, 1936, re- 
ceived his present appointment. 

St. Joseph's Chiirch 

1854 

Principally for the people of German nationality, a 
second church was erected in Laporte by the Rev. Martin 
Sherer. The Rev. Simon Bartosz was pastor from 1867 
to 1870. 

In January, 1870, the Rev. John H. Oechtering was 
appointed pastor and remained ten years, when he was 
transferred to St. Mary's, Fort Wayne, and later became 



314 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Vicar General. At this writing he is still living — and is in 
his 95th year. The Rev. Joseph Nussbaum succeeded him. 
He served the parish until his death December 26, 1895. 

The Rev. Julius Becks served the parish for about six 
months following the death of Father Nussbaum, relin- 
quishing his labors because of ill-health. 

The pastorate of the Rev. Anthony Messman, be- 
ginning in July, 1896, continued until his death on May 
22, 1912. Father Messman brought Holy Family Hos- 
pital to LaPorte and erected the present school taught by 
the Sisters of St. Francis, Lafayette. 

The Rev. Ignatius Zircher succeeded Father Mess- 
man in 1912, and served as a true shepherd until 1927. 

The Rev. August Van Rie followed Father Zircher 
in 1927, and is in charge of St. Joseph's today. He en- 
larged the church in 1928, and made many other improve- 
ments, including the enlargement of the rectory. 



Father Van Rie was born on September 27, 1879 at 
Adeghem, Belgium. He attended St. Joseph's parish 
school, Mishawaka, St. Mary's college, Kent, and Notre 
Dame University, and finished at St. Meinrad's Semin- 
ary. He was ordained June 17, 1910 by the late Bishop 
Alerding. He served as assistant at Kokomo for two 
years ; was locum tenens at Sacred Heart church. South 
Bend for two months, was assistant at the Cathedral for 
five months and was made pastor at North Judson No- 
vember 26, 1913 where he remained until June, 1926 when 
he was transferred to St. Joseph's church, LaPorte as 
pastor. 

Sacred Heart Church 
1913 

The Poles at LaPorte attended one of the other two 
churches until January, 1913, when the Rev. John Osad- 
nik organized them into a parish and built a combination 
church and school. He remained pastor until February, 
1920, when he was succeeded by the Rev. Ignatius Gap- 
czynski who served until July, 1926. He built the pres- 
ent rectory and convent, the latter in 1920 and the former 
in 1922. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 



Father Gapczynski was replaced by the Rev. Ladis- 
laus Szyzukowski in July, 1926, but returned to the par- 
ish from St. Mary's, East Hammond, on July 25, 1931. 

Father Gapczynski, who has been a very zealous 
priest, is assisted by the Rev. Roman S. Wojcicki. 

The Franciscans of St. Kunegunda have charge of 
the school. 



The Rev. Gapczynski was born in Poland, on July 
14, 1882. He prepared for the priesthood at Ss. Cyril 
and Methodius college and seminary, Orchard Lake, 
Michigan, and was ordained June 21, 1912 by Bishop 
Alerding. He served at St. Casimir's, Hammond, for one 
year; as pastor of Sacred Heart church, Gary, for five 
years, when he was transferred to Sacred Heart, La- 
Porte, where he remained until 1926, when he was trans- 
ferred to St. Mary's, Hammond, in September, 1926. He 
was reappointed pastor of Sacred Heart church, LaPorte 
in July, 1931. 

The Rev. Roman S. Wojcicki was born at Lublin, 
Poland, on April 20, 1912. He prepared for the holy min- 
istry at Orchard Lake, Michigan, and St. Meinrad Sem- 
inary. He was ordained June 3, 1939 by Bishop Noll. 
The next month he was given his present assignment. 

MISHAWAKA 

St. Joseph's Church 

1855 

There was a Catholic settlement here as in South 
Bend one hundred years ago and services had been held 
irregularly from the year 1844 by Fathers of the Holy 
Cross. The services were held in the homes of parish- 
ioners, seven years prior to the erection of the first 
church, which was built in the year 1855 and which 
was destroyed by fire in 1860. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. B. Mager in 
1857. He was succeeded in 1859 by the Rev. Henry 
Koenig, who erected a brick church in the year 1861. 
The first church was known as Holy Angels but the sec- 
ond was dedicated to St. Joseph. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Father Koenig was succeeded in May, 1867, by the 
Rev. A. B. Oechtering who, after liquidating the indebt- 
edness against the parish, purchased property at the 
corner of Fourth and Mills streets for the greater St. 
Joseph parish. In the year 1891 Fr. Oechtering began 
the erection of the present beautiful Gothic church, which 
was not dedicated until October, 1891. The same pastor 
began the erection of a new school which was not yet 
completed when he died in December, 1902. The Sisters 
of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ have charge of 
the school, as they also have charge of St. Joseph's hos- 
pital opposite the school. 

Father Oechtering was succeeded by the Rev. Louis 
A. Moench in February, 1903, who completed the new 
school which also contains a parish hall, a gymnasium 
and recreation rooms. Father Moench died in March 
1925, and was succeeded by the Rev. John C. Keller. 

After a brief pastorate Father Keller, who did ex- 
cellent work in that parish, died in March, 1929, and 
was succeeded by the Rev. Michael Louen. His pastorate 
also was very brief, ending with his death in 1931. His 
immediate successor was the Rev. Felix Seroczynski, who 
in June, 1932, at his own request, was transferred to Ss. 
Cyril and Methodius parish, North Judson, where he had 
spent a few happy years earlier in his priesthood. His 
successor and the pastor, at the present time, is the Rev. 
George A. Lauer. Father Lauer is assisted by the Rev. 
Sylvester Klein. 



The Rev. George A. Lauer was born in the city of 
Fort Wayne, August 24, 1872. His studies for the priest- 
hood were made at St. Lawrence's college, Mt. Calvary, 
Wis., and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He was 
ordained by Bishop Rademacher on June 30, 1896. He 
held pastorates at Ligonier, St. Mary's, East Chicago, 
and St. Joseph's, Dyer before his present appointment. 

The Rev. Sylvester Klein was born at South Bend 
on June 17, 1908. He prepared for the holy priesthood 
at St. Francis, Milwaukee, and Mt. St. Mary's, Cincin- 
nati. He was ordained June 15, 1935 by Bishop Noll. 
He served as assistant at St. Joseph's, Logansport, for 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 317 



two years, at St. Joseph's, Hammond, for two years, and 
on July, 1939, was appointed to St. Joseph's, Mishawaka. 

St. Bavo's Church 

1903 

Reference is made in another place to the settlement 
of Belgian immigrants especially from the Province of 
Flanders, in Mishawaka and South Bend. Many years 
ago they were employed in the rubber and pulley fac- 
tories at Mishawaka. 

The Rev. A. B. Oechtering, pastor of St. Joseph's 
church, in the year 1902 assisted the Rev. Charles Stuer, 
newly arrived from Ghent, Belgium, in organizing the 
Belgians into a separate parish. Father Stuer lived at 
St. Joseph's rectory while organizing the parish and 
building its first church, dedicated in 1903 ; and was 
disposed to discontinue his work in that field when Fath- 
er Oechtering died in September, 1902. Father Stuer 
went to Oklahoma and Bishop Meerschaert, of Okla- 
homa City, himself a Belgian, came to Mishawaka to lay 
the cornerstone of the new St. Bavo church, in May, 1904. 
The church was dedicated in January, 1905 by Bishop 
Alerding. The old church was then made into a school, 
with the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ taking charge, 
and a rectory for the priest built. 

The Rev. A. Schockaert took charge in October, 1912. 
He erected a frame school in 1923, and the Sisters' resi- 
dence in 1924. In June, 1927 he retired and returned to 
Ghent, Belgium, where he died a few years ago. 

The Rev. Otto J. Keller who had been Fr. Schock- 
aert's assistant, was appointed first acting pastor and 
later the regular pastor of St. Bavo's, where he has done 
good work. He is assisted by the Rev. S. Cvaniga. 

The Rev. Otto Keller was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 
on June 9, 1894. He pursued his studies for the priest- 
hood at St. Joseph's college, Rensselaer, and Mt. St. 
Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained June 10, 1922 by 
Bishop Alerding, and appointed assistant at St. Bavo's, 

The Rev. S. Cvaniga was born at Prior, Colorado, 
Mishawaka, and five years later was given the pastorate. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 



August 3, 1914. He pursued his studies for the priest- 
hood at St. Joseph's College and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, 
Cincinnati. He was ordained May 18, 1940 by Bishop 
Noll, and on June 28, 1940 given his present appointment. 

St. Monica's Church 
1915 

This parish was organized in 1915 by the Rev. John 
Bleckmann who, besides purchasing the property for a 
new church, also bought a building which served the 
needs of a parish church until 1927 when the present 
beautiful church was erected by the Rev. John F. Kohl, 
who succeeded Father Bleckmann in December, 1918, 
following the death of the latter. 

Father Bleckmann, during the few years he was 
pastor, also erected the present school, part of which 
was used temporarily as a church during the construc- 
tion of the present edifice by his successor. The Poor 
Handmaids of Jesus Christ were brought here to take 
charge. 

The first rectory and first convent were built by 
Father Bleckmann. The present rectory was purchased 
in 1931 and the present convent was procured by an ex- 
change of property by the Rev. Anthony Badina, the pres- 
ent pastor, who succeeded Father Kohl after he died in 
August, 1929. 

In 1939 new marble altars of great beauty were in- 
stalled at St. Monica's, a gift of a parishioner. 

Father Badina is assisted by the Rev. Jerome R. 
Bonk. 



The Rev. Anthony Badina, who has done excellent 
pastoral work at St. Monica's, was born at Alsace-Lor- 
raine, France, on June 30, 1880. He pursued his studies 
for the priesthood in this country at St. Meinrad's Minor 
and Major Seminaries. He was ordained June 13, 1908, 
by Bishop Alerding. He served for seven years as assist- 
ant at St. Joseph's, Hammond, and in 1915 was made 
pastor of St. John's Church, St. John, Indiana, and in 
August, 1929, was given the present pastorate. 

The Rev. Jerome R. Bonk was born at Newberry, 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 31ff 



Pa., on December 21, 1906. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Bonaventure's college and Mt. St. Mary's 
Seminary. Ever since his ordination, June 8, 1932, he 
has been assistant at St. Monica's. 

CHESTERTON 

St. Patrick's Church 
1858 

From the year 1825 to 1841 the Catholics of Ches- 
terton went to Mass at the Bailey Homestead, called 
Baileytown. At that time Chesterton was known as 
Coifee Creek. In 1855 it was changed to Calumet and 
was visited by priests from Notre Dame up to 1858 when 
the Rev. E. B. Kilroy built a small church in Calumet. 

The Rev. John Flynn was appointed first resident 
pastor in 1869 but died in August, 1870. From 1870 to 
1875, Chesterton was a mission in charge of priests 
from LaPorte. In 1875 the Rev. John Lang became 
resident pastor. 

The first church in Chesterton was built by the Rev. 
E. B. Kilroy in the year 1858. The present church was 
built by Father O'Reilly in the year 1874. The first 
school was erected by Father Kroll in the year 1887. 
The present school was erected by the Rev. F. Von Sch- 
wedler in the year 1902, School Sisters of Notre Dame 
having charge of same. The first rectory was built by 
Father Kilroy in the year 1859. The present convent 
was erected by the Rev. H. Juraschek in the year 1907. 
The present rectory was erected by Father Kroll in the 
year 1882. 

Below are the names of pastors from the foundation 
of this parish in the year 1868, and the time they served: 

The Rev. John Flynn from 1868 to Nov., 1869; the 
Rev. Hugh Ackerman during 1869; the Rev. F. X. 
Lawler during 1870; the Rev. W. F. O'Rourke from 
1870 to 1871; Holy Cross priests during 1872; the 
Rev. Tim O'Sullivan for 6 months in 1872; the Holy 
Cross Fathers from 1872 to 1873 ; the Rev. P. Koncz from. 
1873 to 1874; the Rev. John Lang from 1874 to 1877;: 
the Rev. C. Hardy from 1877 to 1879; the Rev. H. F. Jos., 



320 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Kroll from 1879 to 1898; the Rev. F. Von Schwedler 
from 1898 to 1899 ; the Rev. Herman Juraschek from 
1899 to 1911; the Rev. Lavirence Eberle from 1911 to 
1920 ; the Rev. J. J. Seimetz from 1920 to 1933 and the . 
present pastor, Rev. E. F. Eisenhardt. 



The Rev. Edmund F. Eisenhardt was born January 
21, 1894 in Marion, Ind. He attended the public schools 
"before making his preparatory studies for the priesthood 
at St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer. He completed his 
ecclesiastical studies at St. Mary's seminary, Cincinnati, 
and vs^as ordained by Bishop Alerding on November 30, 
1918. 

Because of ill health he w^as not given an appoint- 
ment until January 1919 when he assisted at St. Mary's, 
Lafayette. His subsequent appointments were: assistant 
at Sacred Heart, Whiting, December 3, 1919; assistant 
at St. Charles, Peru, June 28, 1922 ; Pastor of St. John's, 
Goshen, August 2, 1922; Pastor, Ss. Peter and Paul, 
Goodland, March 19, 1926, and his present pastorate on 
January 27, 1933. 

SAN PIERRE— FRANCISVILLE—MEDARYVILLE 
SAN PIERRE 

All Saints Church 

1858 

Mass was celebrated in private homes at this place 
as far back as 1856, the first priests being the Revs. 
Father McMahon and Father Burns. The first church 
had been a small barrel factory purchased in 1858 for 
fifty dollars. San Pierre had as its first resident pastor 
the Rev. Joseph Stephan. Then it was attended from 
Reynolds by the Franciscan Fathers until 1884; during 
that year the Rev. Dominic Shunk of Wanatah was plac- 
ed in charge. 

Father Shunk built the present church in 1886 and 
lived in the one-time barrel factory for eight years. Be- 
ginning in 1895 San Pierre was attended for some 
months from Wanatah when it was attached to North 
Judson, from which time it was served by the Revs. John 
Kubacki, P. Kahellek, Joseph Bolka, Felix Seroczynski, 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY " 321 



Charles Keyser, Father Rech, Father Felden, Father Van 
Rie, Father Scholl, and again by Father Seroczynski and 
his assistant, Father Bozyk. 

In 1936 Father Bozyk was made resident pastor of 
San Pierre and the missions of Francisville and Medary- 
ville which had not been attended for many years. In 
1938 the Rev. John Hosinski replaced Father Bozyk, and 
in 1940 built an addition to the church, veneered it with 
brick, and provided recreation space in the basement of 
the new part. The church was dedicated on May 4, 1941. 
Fr. Hosinski is assisted at one of the missions by a priest 
from St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer. The Missionary 
Catechists have a center here; and Sisters of the Com- 
pany of Mary are preparing to build a Novitiate at San 
Pierre. 



The Rev. John Hosinski was born at South Bend 
on June 23, 1890. He attended the University of Notre 
Dame and Orchard Lake Seminary, and was ordained 
June 27, 1914, by Bishop Alerding. After serving as 
assistant for a short time at St. Casimir's, Hammond, he 
worked in Wisconsin until March, 1919. In April, 1919, 
he was appointed pastor at St. John Cantius', Rolling 
Prairie, and in August, 1925, was appointed pastor at 
St. Hyacinth's, Fort Wayne. In July, 1927, he was ap- 
pointed pastor of St. Casimir's, Hammond; in Septem- 
ber, 1932, he was transferred to Otis, and because of ill 
health, he requested a smaller parish and exchanged 
places, on November 11, 1938, with Father Bozyk of San 
Pierre. 

FRANCISVILLE 
St. Francis' Church 

1867 
Francisville had its first recorded visit of a Catholic 
priest in 1860. Fathers Steiner, Becks and Burns attended 
the twelve Catholic families between 1860 and 1867, when 
Father Joseph Stephan visited the place regularly for 
seven years after the first little church was completed. 
During the next ten years Franciscan Fathers from La- 
fayette were in charge. Thereafter the pastors of Rey- 



322 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

nolds attended Francisville until 1920, when the church 
was closed and the people urged to attend neighborhood 
churches. In 1937 a resident pastor was stationed at 
San Pierre who reopened the church, since which time 
Mass is celebrated there every Sunday, and the congre- 
gation is growing. 

MEDARYVILLE 

St. Mary's Church 
1869 
The Catholic priests who visited here in pioneer 
days were Fathers McMahon, King and Stephan. Dur- 
ing the incumbency of the latter the church was built in 
1869. It was a frame structure 24x43 feet and supplied 
the wants of 100 souls. It was placed in charge of the 
Franciscan Fathers for ten years and then attached to 
Reynolds as a mission, having, of course, the same 
priests as Reynolds. The mission was closed for some 
years, but following the assignment of a resident priest 
to San Pierre, divine services were resumed there — ^not, 
however, on all Sundays. 

GOSHEN 

St. John's Church 
1860 

Goshen was visited by priests from Fort Wayne and 
from Notre Dame University prior to 1860, who said 
Mass either in the old courthouse or in private residences. 
The names of Rev. Alex. Granger, C. S. C., and of the 
Very Rev. Edw. Sorin, C. S. C., appear on the records. 

The Rev. Frederick J. Holtz had charge from 1861 
until 1866 as the first resident pastor. For six months 
Goshen was attended from Avilla. Then it had a resi- 
dent pastor for one year, and was reattached to Avilla 
until 1871, when it became a mission from Elkhart. In 
1878 the Rev. M. A. Boeckelmann was appointed pastor 
and remained two years. He was followed by the Rev. 
A. J. Kroeger, who served for seven years, and by the 
Rev. Adam Buchheit who served for two years. The Rev. 
S. M. Yenn was pastor from August, 1889 to February 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 



1900. During the next three years the Rev. Francis A. 
King, the Rev. Wm. S. Hogan, and the Rev. J. P. Fitz- 
patrick were in charge. 

The original church, erected in 1860, is still in use. 
The first school was built in 1867 by the Rev. J. Meissner, 
pastor at Avilla. It was taught by lay teachers until 
1881, when Father Anthony Kroeger erected a brick 
school and placed it in charge of the Sisters of Holy 
Cross. He also built the present rectory in 1894. 

Other pastors were the Rev. L. A. Eberle, who was 
in charge from 1907 to 1911 ; the Rev. Gustave Hotten- 
roth who served from 1911 until 1920; the Rev. F. T. 
Ege, who was there for one year ; the Rev. Jas. H. Dur- 
ham who was also pastor for one year; the Rev. E. F. 
Eisenhardt, from 1922 until 1926; the Rev. Ladislaus 
Szczkowski who was at St. John's for six months; the 
Rev. J. H. Moran, who was pastor from 1926 until 1933 ; 
the Rev. Theo. Hammes who was pastor from 1933 until 
1935, when he was replaced by the Rev. Herman Joseph 
Miller in October, 1935. 

The original school was used as a convent for the 
Sisters of Holy Cross until the school was closed in 1935. 
In August, 1940, the Missionary Catechists took charge 
of the instruction of the Catholic children of Goshen and 
the vicinity, with residence in the former convent. 



The Rev. Herman Joseph Miller was born near 
Waterloo on June 9, 1898. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at Mt. Calvary, Wis., and Mt. St. Mary's, 
Cincinnati. He was ordained by Bishop Howard, of 
Covington on June 6, 1925. He was assistant at St. 
Peter's, Fort Wayne from July, 1925 until June, 1936, 
when he received his present pastorate. 

PLYMOUTH 

St. Michael's Church 

1863 

Catholics in and around Plymouth were visited in 

the long ago by the Jesuit Missionaries, and about 1840 

by Father Badin. In the year 1842 the Holy Cross Fath- 



324 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

ers, newly arrived at South Bend, began to minister to 
the white and Indian Catholics in that area. 

The ground on which the present parish buildings 
stand was purchased in 1856, but Plymouth did not have 
a resident pastor until 1862 when the Rev. Gabriel Vol- 
kert was assigned to that place. He was succeeded in 
1864 by the Rev. George Steiner and he, in 1866, by the 
Rev. Francis Siegelack. The Rev. Gerard Zurwellen had 
charge from October, 1869 until February, 1883, and 
was succeeded by the Rev. Louis Moench who was pas- 
tor until July, 1898. The Rev. Charles Lemper, who 
succeeded him died in 1900. The Rev. Peter Schmitt 
served for nine months and was succeeded by the Rev. 
Simon M. Yenn, who had charge from March 1901 until 
July, 1905. The Rev. Henry Kappel served for two 
months and in September, 1905, the Rev. John Tremmel 
took charge and remained until 1930. Although during 
absences on iick leave he was replaced by Father Lenn- 
artz, C.S.C. Upon Fr. Tremmel's retirement in 1930 he 
was succeeded by the Rev. Lawrence A. Eberle, the pres- 
ent pastor. 

The Plymouth congregation has a beautiful church 
and an excellent rectory, both erected by the Rev. John 
Tremmel. The first school was erected in 1870 by the 
Rev. G. Zurwellen and has been in charge of the Sisters 
of the Holy Cross, who for many years conducted a 
boarding Academy as well. Under the present pastor this 
property was purchased from the Sisters. 

Culver had long been a mission of Plymouth and 
later was visited by the Precious Blood Fathers from St. 
Joseph's College. In July, 1940, Culver was reattached 
to Plymouth as a mission, and the Rev. Stanley A. Cak is 
now pastor of the Catholic students at Culver and assist- 
ant to the Rev. L. A. Eberle. 



The Rev. L. A. Eberle was born at Peru, on March 
13, 1875. He made his studies for the priesthood at St. 
Joseph's college and Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. He was 
ordained May 24, 1912, by Bishop Alerding. He served 
as assistant at St. Joseph's, Mishawaka, and St. Mary's, 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 



Decatur. He served as pastor of Portland and Gen- 
eva from July 1905 until July 1907, when he was given 
the pastorate at Goshen, remaining until 1911. His next 
appointment was at Chesterton where he served from 
June 1911 until July 1920. He was resident Chaplain 
to the School Sisters of Notre Dame at their Villa from 
1920 to November, 1922, when he was appointed pastor 
of St. Mary's, Avilla. In February, 1930 he received 
his present appointment. 

The Rev. Stanley A. Cak was born in Chicago on 
June 14, 1906. He prepared for the priesthood at St. 
Bonaventure's, Sturtevant, Wis., and Mt. St. Mary's Sem- 
inary and was ordained May 21, 1931 by Bishop Noll. He 
served as assistant for brief periods at St. Bavo's, Mish- 
awaka, St. Casimir's, Hammond, St. Charles', Peru, St. 
Vincent's, Logansport, St. Mary's, Michigan City. From 
July, 1935 to July, 1938 he was assistant at St. Luke's, 
Gary, and in July, 1938, was appointed Chaplain at St. 
Joseph's Hospital, Kokomo, and assistant at St. Joan of 
Arc parish. Early in 1941 he was appointed assistant at 
Plymouth with the care of Culver as a mission. His min- 
istry has been interrupted several times by attacks of 
acute arthritis. 

ELKHART 

St. Vincent's Church 
1868 
The Catholics of this City were attended from 
Mishawaka, and the priests said Mass in private homes 
until 1868, when the Rev. A. B. Oechtering, of Misha- 
waka, erected the first church. He had charge until 
1871, and was replaced by the Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan, 
who remained until 1875. He was succeeded by the Rev. 
Martin F. Noll, who was in charge until 1880. Then the 
Rev. Wm. Kroeger was appointed pastor. He erected the 
present church in 1886, and converted the old church into 
a one story school, which was placed in charge of the 
Sisters of Holy Cross. The old parochial residence, erec- 
ted in 1872, was given to the Sisters ; the present rectory 
was built by the Rev. Henry Boeckelmann, who succeed- 



326 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

ed Father Kroeger in 1881, and remained pastor until 
his death in 1906, when the Rev. F. J. Jansen was ap- 
pointed pastor and served until 1927, during which time 
he built the present large school in 1909, and provided 
the Sisters with a new convent in 1918. 

Father Jansen was replaced by the Rev. Felix Sero- 
czynski, who served for four years, when the Rev. E. G. 
Werling, the present pastor, was given charge. Father 
Werling has made many improvements on the church 
property. He is ably assisted by the Revs. Andrew 
Grutka (who has built up a model C Y organization, 
and who teaches religion in the public school for Catho- 
lic children) and the Rev. James P. Conroy. 



The Rev. Edward G. Werling was born at Tiflfin, 
Ohio on April 12, 1877. He pursued his ecclesiastical 
studies at St. Joseph's college and Mt. St. Mary's Semi- 
nary. He was ordained May 22, 1907 by Bishop Alerding. 
He served three years as assistant at St. Joseph's, Misha- 
waka, was then appointed pastor at Wanatah, where he 
served seven years when he was appointed to organize 
the new parish at Kokomo. In September, 1918, he was 
made pastor at St. Mary's, Avilla; in Novemlser, 1922, 
pastor at St. Mary's, East Chicago ; in March, 1927, pas- 
tor of St. John's, Hartford City, and received his pres- 
ent appointment in July, 1931. 

The Rev. A. G. Grutka was born at Joliet, 111., on 
November 17, 1908. He pursued his studies for the holy 
priesthood at St. Procopius college, Lisle, 111., and the 
American College, Rome, and was ordained in the Etern- 
al City in 1923. He has been assistant at St. Vincent's, 
Elkhart, since ordination. 

The Rev. James P. Conroy was born at Taylor, 
Texas, August 12, 1911. He attended St. Joseph's college, 
St. Gregory's and Mt. St. Mary's Seminaries. He was or- 
dained June 11, 1938 by Bishop Noll. The following 
month he was made assistant at St. Vincent's, Elkhart. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 327 

WALKERTON— BREMEN 
WALKERTON 

St. Patrick's Church 
1870 

Priests from Notre Dame attended the Catholics of 
this place occasionally from 1856 until 1870, when the 
Rev. Timothy D. O'SulIivan began to attend it from La- 
Porte, and built the first church and dedicated it to St. 
Henry. It was later changed to St. Patrick's. Walkerton 
was then attended by the Rev. M. E. Campion, the suc- 
cessor to Father O'SulIivan. 

Beginning in October, 1881, Walkerton was attended 
by the Rev. H. F. Joseph Kroll, from Chesterton, who 
built an addition to the church. He was succeeded in 
September, 1895, by the Rev. Dominic Shunk, C. PP. S. 
and his successors, from Wanatah, until September 1899. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. Henry C. 
Kappel, who served from September, 1899 to July, 1901. 
He purchased a residence next to the church for a rec- 
tory; then the Rev. Peter Budnik became pastor in July, 

1901, and was followed by the Rev. Joseph Abel, in June, 

1902. At that time Walkerton had Hamlet and Bremen 
as missions and Knox as a station. At present Knox has 
a resident priest who attends Hamlet. 

A Holy Cross Father had charge for several years, 
succeeding Father Abel, during which time he made a 
number of improvements which were not paid for at the 
time of the appointment of his successor, the Rev. John 
Kubacki, in February, 1927. 



The Rev. John Kubacki was born in Milwaukee, 
Wis., November 20, 1868. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Mary's College, Kansas, St. Francis' 
Milwaukee, and Mt. St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was or- 
dained by Archbishop Elder June 19, 1894. For two 
years he was pastor at North Judson with San Pierre 
and Knox as missions; then he was transferred to Rey- 
nolds as pastor, with Francisville and Medaryville as 
stations. He served temporarily in the diocese of Pitts- 



328 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

burgh, and upon his return was assigned pastor of the 
new congregation of St. Adalbert, South Bend, in July, 
1910, where he erected a combination church and school 
and a large rectory. From 1920 until 1926, he took a 
pastorate in the diocese of Cleveland and upon his return 
to the Diocese of Fort Wayne accepted his present pas- 
torate at Walkerton. 

BREMEN 
St. Dominic's Church 
1875 
The people here were attended for some time from 
Avilla whose pastor, the Rev. Dominic Duehmig built a 
church there in 1875. From 1894 until 1899 Bremen 
was attended from St. Hedwig's, South Bend, but follow- 
ing the appointment of a resident pastor at Walkerton, 
Bremen became a mission of St. Patrick's. 

OTIS 

St. Mary's Church 
1873 

The Poles, who settled adjacent to this little town, 
were served from St. Joseph's church, LaPorte, for many 
years when the Rev. John Oechtering, of that city, built 
the first church at Otis in 1873. There being no Polish 
priest in the Diocese, of Fort Wayne available to take 
charge, the services of Father Szulak, S. J., of Chicago, 
were procured. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. Peter Koncz, 
who served from 1873 until 1875, and was followed by 
the Rev. Ludwig Machdzicki, who was pastor from 1875 
to 1881. Then the Rev. Urban Raszkiewicz, a priest who 
won the hearts of all the clergy whatever their national- 
ity, served from 1881 until 1909. The Rev. Alex Buech- 
ler served for three years; the Rev. Thomas Jankowski, 
for two years, and the Rev. John Wroblewski from 1914 
to 1927. He built the present church in 1918, and the 
present rectory and parish hall in 1920. He was replac- 
ed by the Rev. John Biernacki from 1927 until 1932, 
when the Rev. John Hosinski succeeded him and remain- 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 329 



ed until 1938, when he was relieved by the Rev. Louis 
Bozyk, the present pastor. 

Otis has had a school since 1879, taught by the Feli- 
cian Sisters. 



The Rev. Louis F. Bozyk was born in Chicago, on 
August 12, 1899. He prepared for the holy priesthood at 
St. Bonaventure's and St. Mary's college and at Orchard 
Lake Seminary. He was ordained June 14, 1925, by 
Bishop Plagens, auxiliary Bishop of Detroit. His first 
appointment was assistant at St. Casimir's, Hammond. 
After one year there he volunteered to work among the 
Polish people in Northwest Canada. He returned in 
July, 1923, and was appointed assistant at North Judson 
to work in the mission field in that area. In July, 1936, he 
was appointed first pastor of All Saints, San Pierre, and 
reopened the closed churches at Francisville and Medary- 
ville. In November, 1938, he succeeded the Rev. John 
Hosinski, as pastor, at Otis. 

NORTH JUDSON 

Ss. Cyril and Methodius Church 

1881 

The first Catholics were discovered at this little 
place, where several railroads cross, in 1871. In the 
year 1874 a number of Bohemian families settled near 
by and their children still form a large portion of the 
congregation. 

A little church was built in 1881, but there was no 
resident pastor until the year 1891. During the interval 
Fathers of the Precious Blood attended North Judson. 

The Rev. Casimir Kobylinski became the first resi- 
dent pastor in 1891, and was succeeded in 1893 by the 
Rev. John F. Kubacki. Father Shunk, C. PP. S., had 
charge from 1894 to 1896 and was followed by the Rev. 
Peter A. Kahellek, who was succeeded in 1899, by the 
Rev Joseph Bolka. Father F. T. Seroczynski became 
pastor in 1904, and the Rev. C. F. Keyser, in 1907. The 
last mentioned erected the beautiful church now in use. 

Succeeding pastors were the Revs. A. C. Van Rie 
and Charles Scholl. Father Felix Seroczynski was re- 



330 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

appointed pastor of North Judson in June, 1932, upon his 
own request. For a few years he had an assistant in the 
person of Father Louis Bozyk, who took charge of the 
San Pierre church and later became the first resident 
pastor of that place. 

On Oct. 1, 1940 Fr. Seroczynski was succeeded by 
the Rev. Joseph Wonderly, who was well received, and 
who recently had the interior of the church beautifully 
renovated. 



The Rev. Joseph S. Wonderly was born in Hun- 
tington on August 26, 1894. After attending St. Mary's 
parochial school there, he received his classical training at 
St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer, and Mt. St. Mary's, Cin- 
cinnati. He was ordained by Bishop Alerding on June 
10, 1922. On August 1 of the same year he reported for 
foreign mission service at Maryknoll, but was refused 
active service because of a physical ailment. He served 
about a year at Maryknoll and then returned to the Fort 
Wayne Diocese and was made assistant at St. Charles', 
Peru. In 1928 Father Wonderly, anxious to do mission 
work, requested a leave of absence to work in the Diocese 
of Amarillo, Texas. He remained there as pastor and 
dean until the fall of 1940, when he returned to the Dio- 
cese and was given the pastorate at North Judson. 

TERRE COUPEE 

St. Stanislaus' Church 

1884 
Some of the Polish people, who lived in St. Joseph 
County, moved into the country west of South Bend and 
were attended from St. Hedwig Parish of that city. The 
original church at Terre Coupee was built by Father 
Czyzewski in 1884. Later the place was attended by 
priests from Notre Dame. In 1888 the parish was given 
a resident pastor in the person of the Rev. W. Zborow- 
ski, who built a priest's house ; then by the Rev. Anthony 
Zubowinski for four years; then by the Rev. George 
Kolasinski for seven years. In May, 1901, the Rev. Al- 
bert Buechler was appointed pastor and erected the pres- 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 331 

ent church in 1906. The old church was converted into 
a school, which was operated there for many years. At 
the present time the parish has no school, but engages 
Catechists or Sisters to conduct a Vacation School. 

The Rev. Peter Budnik succeeded Father Buechler 
and remained until 1909, when the Rev. Julian Skrzypin- 
ski was appointed pastor in March, 1909. He was suc- 
ceeded in March, 1910, by the Rev. L. Szyzukowski, who 
remained for eight years and was succeeded by the Rev. 
M. Swiatkowski, who was pastor until August, 1929. He 
erected the present rectory. 

The Rev. Julian Doktor was pastor from August, 
1929 until July, 1932 when he was replaced by the Rev. 
John Wroblewski, the present pastor. 



The Rev. John Wroblewski was born at Bremen, 
Michigan, on May 8, 1883. He attended Notre Dame 
University and Orchard Lake Seminary, and was ordain- 
ed June 21, 1912 by Bishop Alerding. He served as as- 
sistant at St. Adalbert's, South Bend, and at St. Vincent's, 
Logansport, for two years, when he was appointed pas- 
tor of St. Mary's, Otis, where he remained until July, 
1914. His next appointment was at St. Hyacinth's, Fort 
Wayne, where he remained for two years, and then was 
transferred to Sacred Heart, Gary, where he served from 
August, 1929 until April, 1932. He was appointed pastor 
at Terre Coupee on April 7th of that year. 

WANATAH— LACROSSE 
WANATAH 

Sacred Heart Church 

1887 
At one time there was a church dedicated to St. Mar- 
tin in Schimmel's, La Porte County, which was attended 
by the Catholics in the Wanatah area until 1877. In that 
year the Rev. Dominic Shunk, C.PP.S., was appointed 
resident pastor and remained until February, 1897. He 
built the church and dedicated it to the Most Precious 
Blood. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The following year Father Shunk built the frame 
school, convent and rectory for the priest. He placed 
the school in charge of the Sisters of the Precious Blood. 
This school was discontinued in June, 1904, when the 
attendance became greatly reduced. 

During Father Shunk's time Schimmel's, San Pierre, 
Walkerton, Westville, Hamlet, Wheatfield, North Jud- 
son and Knox were attended from Wanatah. 

The Fathers of the Precious Blood had charge of 
the parish until September, 1898, when the Rev. A. M. 
Buchheit, a Diocesan priest, was appointed pastor. He 
remained until 1906, and was succeeded by the Rev. John 
Rech for seven months, who was replaced by the Rev. 
John Oberholz, who served from 1907 to 1911, when he 
was relieved by the Rev. E. G. Werling, who was in 
charge until October, 1917. His successor was the Rev. 
Theodore Hammes who remained until June, 1922, when 
the Rev. Leo Faurote was appointed pastor and remain- 
ed until 1930. The Rev. Paul Anderson was in charge 
for three years and was succeeded in March, 1932, by 
the Rev. Theophilus Chemma, who remained until Feb- 
ruary, 1939, when he was succeeded by the Rev. John 
B. Steger, the present pastor. 



The Rev. John B. Steger was born in Bavaria, Ger- 
many, June 13, 1875. He prepared for the holy priest- 
hood at Mt. Calvary, St. Viator's in the Tyrol, and at St. 
Meinrad's Seminary. He was ordained June 7, 1905, by 
Bishop Alerding. He served for one year as assistant 
at St. Mary's, Decatur; for two years at St. Patrick's, 
Kokomo ; was assistant at Hartford City for a few months 
and then transferred to Garrett in June, 1909 ; to Coving- 
ton in July, 1911; to Goodland, in July, 1912; served as 
temporary assistant at St. Mary's, Fort Wayne; was 
made pastor at Yoder in November, 1915 ; pastor of Au- 
burn in July, 1922; was temporary Chaplain at Mercy 
Hospital, Gary, and St. Joseph's Hospital, Mishawaka; 
in September, 1925 was appointed pastor at Nix Settle- 
ment, and in October, 1929, of St. John's church, St. 
John, Indiana ; and on February 5, 1939, was transferred 
to Sacred Heart church, Wanatah. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 



LACROSSE 

St. Martin's Church 

1860 
A few miles from Wanatah, the village of LaCrosse 
is located, which today has a very beautiful brick church 
erected in 1932 with insurance money collected after the 
destruction by fire of an earlier church, attended as a 
mission from Wanatah. At one time this little parish had 
several farmer parishioners of considerable wealth, but 
they have either been taken by death or moved away. 

ROLLING PRAIRIE 

St. John Cantius' 
1891 

This parish was attended for a number of years from 
Terre Coupee until 1919, when the Rev. John Hosinski 
was appointed pastor. He remained until July, 1925, 
during which time he built the present rectory in 1919, 
and the present church, in 1924. The Rev. Albert Buech- 
ler built the first church, which was destroyed by fire in 
1907. 

The Rev. Aloysius Jarka was pastor from July, 1925 
until July, 1926, when he was relieved by the Rev. Jos- 
eph Zielinski who served until July, 1937, at which time 
he was replaced by the Rev. W. A. Karp, the present pas- 
tor. 



The Rev. William A. Karp was born in Chicago, on 
September 22, 1899. He prepared for the holy priesthood 
at Orchard Lake, Michigan, and was ordained on June 
14, 1925 by Bishop Plagens, auxiliary Bishop of Detroit. 
He served St. Adalbert's, South Bend, as assistant for 16 
months, and at St. Adalbert's, Whiting, for eight years. 
He was assistant at St. Joseph's, Elwood, for one year, 
when he had a leave of absence for one year because of 
poor health. He then assisted at St. Hedwig's, Gary, 
where he served until December, 1937, when he received 
his present appointment. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



LAKEVILLE 

Sacred Heart of Jesus Church 
1932 
In the year 1932 the Rev. James Burns, C. S. C, then 
Provincial of the Congregation of the Holy Cross, asked 
Bishop Noll if he would be interested in having one of 
his priests who had done considerable pioneer mission 
work to take a survey of territory beginning about five 
miles south of South Bend, and continuing to the town of 
Lakeville. Naturally the Bishop acquiesced, but proposed 
that if a parish should be developed it should be turned 
over to the Diocesan clergy. Accordingly, Father Burns 
appointed the Rev. P. J. Miner, C. S. C, who visited every 
home in the territory above mentioned and discovered 
a sufficiently large number of people who were Catholic 
in name to start a new parish, and about half of them 
were interested. 

Father Miner said Mass on Sundays for some time 
in Pleasant View School and then erected the present 
church in the year 1933, to whose construction a great 
many parishioners lent their labor since they could not 
give cash. At the same time Father Miner built the pres- 
ent rectory. 

At the completion of the church and rectory the 
Rev. Lawrence Weber was appointed first pastor and 
served from July, 1933 until September, 1935, when he 
was replaced by the Rev. Edw. Wroblewski, who remain- 
ed until July, 1939, when he was relieved by the Rev. 
John B. Schaeffer, the present pastor. 



The Rev. John B. Schaeffer was born on December 
8, 1900 at Dyer, Ind. He prepared for the holy priest- 
hood at St. Joseph's college and Mt. St. Mary's Semin- 
ary. He was ordained June 11, 1927 by Bishop Noll. 
After serving a few months at the Cathedral, he was 
appointed assistant at St. Luke's, Gary, where he remain- 
ed until July 8, 1939, when he received his present ap- 
pointment. 



SOUTH BEND DEANERY 336 

South Bend Deanery Priests Not Engaged In Parish 

Work 

St. Joseph's Hospital, South Bend, has a Father of 
the Holy Cross as Chaplain. 

Holy Cross Fathers also fill chaplaincies at St. 
Mary's Convent, St. Mary's College, and at St. Joseph's 
Novitiate near Rolling Prairie. 



Holy Family Hospital, LaPorte has as its chaplain 
the Rev. Francis Shanley. 

Father Shanley was born at Liverpool, England, on 
April 12, 1885. He joined the Irish Christian Brothers 
and taught under their auspices in Australia before pre- 
paring for the priesthood. He completed his seminary 
studies at St. Paul's Seminary, St. Paul, and was ordained 
on June 14, 1931, by Bishop Noll. 

His first appointment was to the post of assistant at 
the Cathedral. In November, 1933, because of poor 
health, he was given a leave of absence, during which he 
filled appointments in the diocese of Denver. Later he 
served for a time as chaplain at St. Joseph Memorial 
Hospital, Kokomo, and on February 4, 1939, was appoint- 
ed chaplain at Holy Family Hospital, LaPorte. 



The Rev. William L. Atwater has been chaplain of 
St. Joseph Hospital, Mishawaka, since June 16, 1937. 

Father Atwater was born in New York City on 
January 31, 1882. He prepared for the holy priesthood 
at Cathedral College and St. Joseph's, Dunwoodie, and 
was ordained on September 8, 1917, by Cardinal Farley. 

Until October, 1925, he served as assistant at St. 
Anthony's and at St. Barnabas', New York, after which 
time he was admitted into the Diocese of Fort Wayne, 
and was appointed assistant at St. Monica's, Mishawaka. 
On July 1, 1927, he was made pastor of St. Patrick's, 
LaGro. In January, 1934, he was transferred to St. 
Patrick's, Areola, and in August, 1935, to St. Paul's,. 
Columbia City. On July 16, 1937, he received his pres- 
ent appointment. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The Rev. Richard Grunenberg fills the chaplaincy at 
St. Anthony's Hospital, Michigan City, and is the non- 
resident chaplain to the Catholic inmates of the State 
Prison. 

Father Grunenberg was born in Eschenan, East 
Prussia, on February 5, 1884. He prepared for the 
priesthood in the Society of the Divine Word in Germany 
and Austria, and was ordained by Archbishop Nagel 
of Vienna, on September 29, 1910. The following year 
lie was transferred to Techny, Illinois, where he taught 
languages from 1911 to 1924. In 1925 he was loaned to 
Ihe Catholic Central High School of Hammond, where he 
iaught until June, 1936, at which time he was incardin- 
ated into the Diocese of Fort Wayne, and appointed 
■chaplain at the Lyndora Home for the Aged, Hammond, 
in June, 1936. From this place he attended the St. John 
Bosco Mission until July 4, 1940, when he was given his 
present appointment. 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



The Rt. Rev. Monsignor F. J. Jansen, Dean 

The Hammond Deanery, which formerly embraced 
all of Lake and Porter Counties, was subdivided in the 
year 1937, at which time a new Deanery was set up at 
Gary. The Hammond District now contains the following 
parishes located mostly in the western part of Lake 
County : 



Hammond 

St. Joseph's, 
All Saints', 
St. Casimir's, 
St. John Baptist, 
St. Mary's, 
St. John Bosco, 
Our Lady of Perpetual 
Help, Hessville. 



St. Joseph's, 

St. Nicholas' (Roumanian), 

St. Dimitrius (Mission — 

Roumanian), 
Immaculate Conception, 
Our Lady of Guadalupe, 
St. Jude's, 



Whiting 



Immaculate Conception, 

Sacred Heart, 
East Chicago g^ Adalbert's, 

St. Mary's, ^s. Peter and Paul, 

St. Stanislaus', 

St. Patrick's, 

Holy Trinity Hungarian, 

Assumption, 

Sacred Heart, 

Holy Trinity Croatian, 

St. John Cantius', 

St. Francis', 

In this Deanery are situated two Orphanages con- 
ducted by the Carmelite Sisters of the Divine Heart of 
Jesus, one at Hammond for boys, and one at East 
Chicago for girls; Lyndora Home for the Aged and 
Mount Mercy Sanitarium, conducted by the Sisters of 



Holy Name, Cedar Lake. 

St. Joseph's, Dyer. 

St. Edward's, Lowell. 

St. John's, St. John. 

St. Michael's, Schererville. 

St. Theresa's, Shelby. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Mercy, 
1 a i n s are 
Father John 
and Father 
banski ; the 
and Theolo- 
Polish Fran- 
Cedar Lake ; 
Ho s p i t a 1, 
in charge of 
of St. Fran- 
ette of which 
Hagenmayer 
St. Cather- 
E a s t Chi- 
charge of 
of the Poor 
of Jesus 
Donald son, 
Rev. Robert 
chaplain, the 
Central High 
accred i t e d 
tional school 




The Rt. Rev. Msgr. F. J. Jansen, 
Dean 

Monsignor Jansen's sketch ap- 
pears under St. Joseph's parish, 
Hammond. 



whose chap- 
respectively 
Bartkowski, 
Michael Ur- 
Monas t e r y 
gate of the 
ciscans near 
St. Margaret 
Hamm o n d, 
the Sisters 
cis, Lafay- 
Rev. Joseph 
is chaplain; 
ine Hospital, 
c a g 0, in 
the Sisters 
Handmai d s 
C h r i s t, of 
of which 
Emmons is 
Catholic 
School, a n 
CO- e d u c a - 
staffed b y 



five diocesan priests, a dozen Sisters of the Holy Cross and 
several lay teachers; an establishment of the Society of 
Missionary Catechists whose members assist many 
pastors. 

Mission churches in this District are Sacred Heart 
Slovak, and St. Dimitrius, Roumanian. 

Until the turn of the century Lake County, Indiana, 
which now has a population of nearly 300,000 and con- 
tains several large cities, was, in large part, an unoccu- 
pied region, because the vast stretches of yellow sand 
lent themselves neither to agriculture nor to. city habita- 
tion. The large frontage on Lake Michigan, however, and 
the proximity of Lake County to the city of Chicago, on 
which it borders, were responsible, forty years ago, 
for the bringing of many industries, principally steel 
mills, to that area. 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



The original parishes in Lake County were rural, 
and located in the south section, where the land was 
better. 

Instead of country churches having been missions 
from cities it was the reverse in Lake County since some 
of the towns were first visited by pastors of rural 
parishes. 

• HAMMOND 

St. Joseph's 

1897 

The nearest priest to the few Catholics who lived in 
what is now Hammond was located at Turkey Creek, later 
known as Lottaville. From the year 1861 until 1879 
Father Wegermeyer and later his successor. Father 
Baumgartner, of Turkey Creek, and Rev. George Steiner, 
of Michigan City, visited Hammond a few times a year 
to say Mass in a private home. 

The first small frame church was built in Hammond 
in 1897. But Hammond continued to be a mission until 
1883, when Father Baumgartner was transferred from 
Turkey Creek to be its first resident pastor. He was suc- 
ceeded after his death in May, 1885, for a few months by 
Father Philip Rothman, O.F.M. ; and on August 16, 1885, 
the Rev. Henry M. Plaster was appointed pastor and 
served until 1916 when he retired from the active minis- 
try. Father Plaster, at this writing, is still alive, having 
been permitted by the Archbishop of Los Angeles toi live 
there as a retired priest with the privilege of a chapel in 
his home. 

Father Plaster's first work was the erection of a 
small school in 1885, which, after being operated by a lay 
teacher for one year, was transferred to the Sisters of 
Providence. 

In 1888 Father Plaster replaced both the little frame 
church and school by a brick edifice which was to serve 
both as church and school. In 1894 he erected a new con- 
vent for the Sisters ; in 1899 he built an addition to both 
church and school. In 1904 he built a new rectory. 

In the year 1912 Father Plaster began the erection 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



of a very large and beautiful church, which was com- 
pleted in 1913. 

Upon his retirement Father Plaster was succeeded 
by the Rev. John Berg, who was in charge of the parish 
until his death ten years later, in 1927. Father Berg's suc- 
cessor is the present rector of the church, Right Rev. 
Monsignor F. J. Jansen, who erected a large school at a 
cost of nearly $200,000. Monsignor Jansen has made 
many other physical improvements in the parish and has, 
with the help of twa^ and later three assistants, done much 
to stimulate tha spiritual life of his large congregation. 
He has also written for several Catholic periodicals. Mon- 
signor Jansen is assisted by the Revs. Wm. Plotzki, Aloy- 
sius Phillips and Dominic Pallone. 



Right Rev. Monsignor F. J. Jansen was born May 
7, 1874, in Essen, Germany. He was brought by his par- 
ents to the United States in 1882, and attended Our Lady 
of Sorrows School in New York City. He prepared for the 
holy priesthood at St. Lawrence's College, Calvary, Wis- 
consin, and at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He was ordained on June 16, 1898, by Archbishop 
Elder in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

His first appointment was assistant at St. Mary's 
Parish, Lafayette, where he remained until June 17, 1899, 
when he was appointed pastor of Frankfort, Cicero and 
Noblesville. On October 30, 1906, he was transferred to 
St. Vincent's Parish, Elkhart. On July 15, 1927, he was 
transferred, as pastor, toi St. Joseph's, Hammond. 

On April 12, 1929, Father Jansen was appointed 
Dean of the Hammond District, and in May, 1933, he 
was invested as a Domestic Prelate. 

The Rev. William Plotzki was born November 10, 
1910, at Hammond, Indiana. He attended St. Casimir's 
School, and Catholic Central High School of that city. 
He began his studies for the holy priesthood at Orchard 
Lake, Michigan, and entered St. Meinrad's Seminary for 
theology. He was ordained on June 6, 1936, by Bishop 
Noll. On July 2, 1936, he received his first appointment 
as assistant at St. Peter's, Fort Wayne, and on August 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



22 was transferred, as assistant, at Holy Angels', Gary. 
On June 16, 1937, he was appointed chaplain of St. 
Joseph's Hospital, Kokomo, where he remained for one 
year, when he was made assistant at St. Andrew's, Fort 
Wayne. On July 8, 1939, he was appointed assistant at 
St. Joseph's, Hammond. 

Rev. Aloysius Phillips was born in Michigan City on 
September 19, 1912. He received his early education in 
St. Mary's School, Michigan City, and pursued his studies 
for the priesthood at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville 
and at St. Meinrad's Seminary. He was ordained on May 
22, 1937, by Bishop Noll at the Cathedral, Fort Wayne. 
On June 16, 1937, he was appointed assistant at St. 
Jude's, Fort Wayne, where he remained until June 28, 
1940, when he received his present appointment. 

Rev. Dominic Pallone was born in Catanzaro, Italy 
(Seville), on July 16, 1912. He received his early educa- 
tion at the Cathedral School, Fort Wayne, and pursued 
his studies for the priesthood at St. Joseph's College and 
St. Gregory's Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordained on 
May 18, 1940, by Bishop Noll. On June 28, 1940, he was 
appointed asistant at St. Joseph's, Hammond. 

All Saints 
1896 

In the year 1896 St. Joseph parish was divided and 
that of All Saints' formed, principally for people who did 
not speak the German language, since at St. Joseph's 
sermons had been preached in German. The Rev. Cook 
was placed in charge and rented a frame house on Fayette 
Street while he was building a little church for his people. 
Father Cook was replaced in February, 1897, by the Rev. 
Edward Barrett, who in the same year erected a school 
and rectory. The school was placed in charge of the 
Sisters of Providence. 

In the year 1908 Father Barrett built a large com- 
bination church and school of brick construction, and in 
the year 1917 provided the Sisters with a new convent. 

Father Barrett died following an accident in Novem- 
ber, 1928, when the Rev. Edward J. Mungovan, then 



HAMMO'ND DEANERY 343 



pastor of St. Paul's, Valparaiso, was appointed his 
successor. 

All Saints grew into a large parish and now has a 
very large and handsome church, erected by Father 
Mungovan in 1930, and which is nearly paid for. 

Following the death of the Vicar General of the 
Diocese — ^the Right Rev. Monsignor John H. Durham — 
in January, 1940, Father Mungovan was selected as his 
successor by Bishop Noll, and was elevated to the rank 
of Monsignor. His investiture was private in the chapel 
at St. Catherine's Hospital, East Chicago. 

Monsignor Mungovan is assisted by the Rev. 
Anthony Quinlisk. 



Right Rev. Monsignor Edward J. Mungovan was 
born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, on December 19, 1876. He 
pursued his studies for the priesthood at St. Joseph's 
College, Ccllegeville, and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, 
Cincinnati. He was ordained on May 24, 1902, by Bishop 
H. J. Alerding. He was assistant at St. Patrick's church. 
Fort Wayne, from June 1902 to June 1907, when he was 
appointed pastor of Areola, with Pierceton as a mission. 
On October 20, 1914, he was appointed pastor of St. 
Paul's Church, Valparaiso. In January, 1929, he was 
transferred to the pastorate cf All Saints' Church, 
Hammond. 

On June 17, 1936, he was appointed Diocesan Con- 
suitor and on March 12, 1940, was named Vicar General 
of the Diocese, being invested in the purple in September. 

Rev. Anthony M. Quinlisk was born in Lafayette, 
Indiana, on January 21, 1903. He attended St. Ann's 
School and then left to prepare for the holy priesthood 
at St. Joseph's College, and later at Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary. He was ordained on June 14, 1931, by Bishop 
Noll in the Cathedral. On July 3, 1931, he was appointed 
assistant at St. Lawrence's, Muncie, where he remained 
until July 24, 1935, when he was transferred to Holy 
Angels', Gary. He was appointed temporary assistant at 
St. Joseph's, LaPorte, and in 1936 was transferred to 
All Saints', Hammond. 



344 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTO RY 

St. Casimir's 
1890 

With the rapid development of Hammond there came 
there a great many people of Polish nationality. They 
were organized into a parish by the Rev. Urban Rasz- 
kiewicz, who was then pastor of Otis. Soon thereafter the 
Rev. C. Kobylinski, who became the first resident pastor, 
erected a combination church, school and priests' resi- 
dence, engaging the services of the Sisters of St. Francis, 
of Lafayette, to teach the school. 

St. Casimir's next pastor was the Rev. P. A. Kahel- 
lek, who took charge in July, 1897, and made a number 
of improvements. In 1901 he built a new rectory; in 1905 
he had the church frescoed. 

In 1909 Father Kahellek was transferred to Gary, 
and was succeeded by the Rev. John Kasprzykowski, who 
remained in charge until June, 1911, when the Rev. Felix 
Seroczynski was appointed pastor. 

The parish began to grow rapidly and to provide 
class rooms for the steadily increasing number of chil- 
dren. Father Seroczynski bought several frame residences 
near the church and converted them into auxiliary 
schools. In the year 1920 this priest built the present 
rectory, and in 1923 the present handsome church. 

Following his transfer to Elkhart in July, 1927, 
Father Seroczynski was succeeded by the Rev. John 
Hosinski who erected a large school which, because of the 
industrial depression which followed almost immediately 
upon its dedication, and because there was still consider- 
able indebtedness on the new church, left the parish with 
a huge debt. This is being liquidated in a surprising 
manner by Father John Biernacki who succeeded Father 
Hosinski in September, 1932. Father Biernacki is assisted 
by the Rev. Joseph Lesniak and Rev. Walter Mastej. 



Rev. John Biernacki was born March 25, 1894, in 
Lasin, Pomorze, Poland. He pursued his studies for the 
priesthood at Orchard Lake and Mount St. Mary's, Cin- 
cinnati. He was ordained on June 15, 1917, by Right Rev. 
H. J. Alerding. 

He was assistant at St. Stanislaus', Michigan City, 



HAMMOND DEANERY 3-15 



from June 1917 to June 1922, when he was transferred 
as assistant to St. Adalbert's, South Bend. In February, 
1923, he was appointed pastor of St. Joseph's, East 
Chicago. On July 15, 1927, he was given the pastorate of 
St. Mary's, Otis. In September, 1932, he was appointed 
pastor of St. Casimir's Parish, Hammond. 

Rev. Jc'Seph Lesniak was born in East Chicago, In- 
diana, on March 12, 1904. He pursued his studies for the 
priesthood at Orchard Lake and Mount St. Mary's. He 
was ordained on May 21, 1932, by Bishop Noll. 

On June 8, 1932, he was appointed assistant at St. 
Casimir's, Hammond. 

Rev. Walter Mastej was born May 14, 1914, in East 
Chicago. He pursued his studies for the priesthood at 
Orchard Lake and at St. Meinrad's. He was ordained on 
May 18, 1940, by Bishop Nell. 

On June 28, 1940, he was appointed assistant at St. 
Casimir's, Hammond. 

,5^. John Baptist 
1897 

The rapid development of Hammond and Whiting 
brought people of many nationalities in quest of work. 
Included in these was a considerable number of Slovak 
people to serve whom Bishop Rademacher invited the 
Reverend Benedict M. Rajcany to leave Hungary and to 
come to this country to take charge of the new congrega- 
tion for the Slovaks. This was in April, 1897. 

Father Raj cany 's first act was to procure property 
on which he immediately erected a small church ; in 1898 
he built a rectory and in 1900, a convent. In the same year 
he erected a larger church of frame construction. In 1901 
he built a two story frame school, and invited the Sisters 
of Providence to take charge. 

New school room was provided in 1903 by the pur- 
chase of a public school building. In 1904 Father Rajcany 
bought property for a cemetery and erected thereon a 
house for the sexton. In 1906 the rectory was destroyed 
by fire and was replaced the next year by a better house. 
Father Rajcany also started a mission church for Slovaks 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



at Indiana Harbor and another at East Chicago for the 
Hungarian people. 

In December, 1927, Father Rajcany retired from 
active parish work after hard labor among the Slovaks 
and Hungarians in the v^^hole Calumet area for thirty 
years. 

Thereupon the Precious Blood Fathers were invited 
to take charge qf the parish principally because the 
Bishop lacked priests versed in the Slovak language. The 
Rev. John Kostik, C.PP.S., was selected by his Com- 
munity to become the paster of St. John's, and he is still 
in charge. 

In the year 1930 Father Kostik erected a large and 
magnificent church, costing nearly $250,000. The people 
of this parish wanted such a church and made great sac- 
rifices to build and pay for it. 

Father Kostik is assisted by two priests of his Com- 
munity, namely, the Rev. Stephen Tatar, C.PP.S., and the 
Rev. John M. Lefko, C.PP.S. 

Father Benedict Rajcany died on the train on May 
20, 1937, upon his way home from a visit at Whiting. 

St. Mary's 
1912 

St. Mary's congregation was formed in the year 1912 
for the benefit of Polish people who lived in the east side 
of Hammond. The original buildings, which are of frame 
construction, are still in use. The church was built by 
Father Seroczynski while he was pastor of St. Casimir's, 
the same city. 

In January, 1913, St. Mary's received its own pastor 
in the person of the Rev. Anthony Gorek, who^ remained 
until June, 1915. This priest built the school, the rectory 
and the convent during the first year of his pastorate. 

In June, 1915, Rev. John Chylewski was appointed 
pastor and had charge until September, 1926, when he 
was succeeded by the Rev. Ignatius Gapczynski, who 
held the pastorate until June, 1931. 

Upon his transfer to St. Adalbert's, Whiting, the 
Rev. Ladislaus Szczukowski became his successor and 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



remained until his retirement from the active ministry 
in June, 1939. 

The Rev. Joseph Zobel was placed in charge of St. 
Mary's on July 8, 1939, and in order to introduce an extra 
Mass and also to do more effective work he asked for an 
assistant who was given to him on January 20, 1940, in 
the person of the Rev. Stanislaus Gawronski. 

Father Zobel has accomplished much in a short time, 
renovating the church completely and making other im- 
provements and repairs without increasing the parish 
indebtedness. 



Rev. Joseph Zobel was born in Joliet, 111., on April 
14, 1897. He pursued his studies for the priesthood at St. 
Mary's College, Orchard Lake, and was ordained on De- 
cember 18, 1921, by Bishop Alerding in his private 
chapel. 

On December 18, 1921, Father Zobel was appointed 
assistant at St. Stanislaus', Michigan City, where he re- 
mained until April 7, 1932, when he was named pastor 
of St. Joseph's, East Chicago. On July 8, 1939, he received 
his present pastorate — St. Mary's, Hammond. 

Rev. Stanley Gawronski was born in Michigan City, 
Indiana, on September 7, 1909. He attended St. Stanis- 
laus' School of that city, and then went to St. Mary's 
College, Orchard Lake, and later to St. Meinrad's. He was 
ordained by Bishop Noll on May 22, 1937. 

On June 16, 1937, he was appointed assistant at St. 
Adalbert's, Whiting, and remained there until July 8, 
1938, when he was transferred to St. John Cantius', East 
Chicago. On January 20, 1940, he was transferred to 
St. Mary's. He is now on leave of absence. 
St. John Bosco 
1934 

The Rev. Paul Schmid, while principal of the Catho- 
lic Central High School at Hammond, lost no opportunity 
to do pastoral service. He took an interest in people of 
many nationalities who had settled along Columbia Ave- 
nue on the outskirts of Hammond, renting a house to 
serve both as a place of instruction and for the celebra- 
tion of Sunday Mass. He placed St. John Bosco, recently 



348 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

canonized, as patron over his little congregation and 
engaged the services of the Missionary Catechists to teach 
the children and to gather a complete census of people in 
that area. 

When Father Schmid was invited by the Apostolic 
Delegate to take over the spiritual direction of the 
students at the Josephinum, at Worthington, Ohio, the 
Rev. H. James Conw^ay, who succeeded Father Schmid on 
July 15, 1934, continued to look after the spiritual wants 
of the St. John Bosco group until 1936, when the Rev. 
Richard Grunenberg was made chaplain at the Lyndora 
Home for the Aged and given the pastorate of this new 
congregation. 

In January, 1934, Father Grunenberg purchased a 
portable school building and converted it into a church 
on the property previously purchased. The congregation 
soon outgrew the little church, and in July, 1940, when 
the Rev. John Bartkowski succeeded Father Grunenberg, 
he was authorized to enlarge the church and to^ purchase 
property on which later a rectory and possibly a school 
and convent might be built. With the help of many 
friends and with the donation contributed from the 
Bishop's Jubilee Fund the cost of the improvements was 
covered. The enlarged church was dedicated on April 
27, 1941. 



Rev. John F. Bartkowski was born in South Chicago, 
on March 21, 1904. He prepared for the holy priesthood 
at Orchard Lake, Michigan, and at Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary. He was ordained on March 21, 1931, at Notre 
Dame, Indiana, by Bishop Noll. His first appointment was 
as assistant at St. Joseph's, Hammond, where he re- 
mained until he was appointed pastor of St. John Bosco 
Church, on July 4, 1940. 

Our Lady of Perpetual Help (Hessville) 

1987 
About the time services were opened on Columbia 
Avenue in a rented house for the new St. John Bosco 
congregation, the pastors of St. Joseph's and All Saints' 
rented a store building at Hessville to serve as a tem- 
porary church for Catholic people of little means who 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



often absented themselves from Mass because they did 
not have the price of transportation to the Hammond 
churches. At the same time the Missionary Catechists 
were engaged to instruct the children who were not in 
the parish schools. Mass was said regularly until 1937 by 
either the pastor or assistant of All Saints. 

Late in the year 1936 a committee representing the 
Hessville group called on Bishop Noll to apprise him that 
they were now ready to build a little church, and re- 
quested him to assign a priest to organize the people into 
a new parish. A site for the church had previously been 
donated by a Mr. Artem. Then a frame structure, hither- 
to used as a gymnasium at the Hessville High School, was 
purchased, and moved to this property. Men of the parish 
donated most of the labor expended on the new church, 
after having excavated a large basement. The frame shell 
was enlarged, veneered with brick and so treated inter- 
nally as to produce a beautiful church. 

This was all under the direction of the Rev. Alfred 
W. Reinig who, during the year 1938, completed this 
church and purchased a rectory some distance from the 
church property. In 1940 this rectory was sold and an- 
other purchased immediately adjacent to the church. 

Father Reinig, through the inspiration he gave his 
people, has secured wonderful cooperation. He must en- 
gage the service of a priest every Sunday for an extra 
Mass and now feels that he will soon be faced with an- 
other building project, namely, that of school and 
convent. 



Rev. Alfred Reinig was born October 17, 1904 at 
Summit, near Waterloo, Indiana. He received his early 
education at the local school and prepared for the priest- 
hood at St. Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, 
and at Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained on 
June 11, 1927, by Bishop Noll. He was appointed assis- 
tant at St. Mary's, Fort Wayne, on July 1, 1927, and 
remained there until July 24, 1935, when he was trans- 
ferred to St. Mary's, Michigan City. He was appointed 
the first pastor of Our Lady of Perpetual Help parish, 
Hessville, on January 5, 1937. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



EAST CHICAGO 
The city of East Chicago which now includes what 
was the separate corporation of Indiana Harbor, is only 
fifty years old. In other words, prior to the year 1889, 
there was no place by that name. Today it is a city of 
more than 60,000 people and counts fifteen Catholic 
churches. They represent many nationalities, there being 
separate churches for the Poles, Hungarians, Croatians, 
Lithuanians, Slovaks, Greek Uniates, Roumanians, Ita- 
lians, Mexicans and Negroes. St. Mary's and St. Patrick's 
are the only parishes which serve exclusively English 
congregations. 

St. Mary's 
1890 

The first congregation established by the Catholics 
of what was then the village of East Chicago was St. 
Mary's. The few Catholic families first attended Mass in 
the Todd Opera House, which was offered by the Rev. 
H. H. Plaster, of St. Joseph's, Hammond, who in the year 
1890 built the present church. The parish, which grew 
very slowly at the beginning, continued to be a mission 
for ten years, and was attended by assistants from St. 
Joseph's, Hammond, as well as by the Rev. M. J. Byrne, 
from Whiting. 

In March, 1899, the Rev. George Lauer was ap- 
pointed the first resident pastor. After making needful 
improvements on the property, he built an addition to the 
church. In 1901 Father Lauer erected a two-story frame 
school with accommodations for about two hundred chil- 
dren. The Sisters of Providence were given charge ; they 
were later replaced by the Sisters of the Poor Handmaids, 
of Donaldsom. 

Father Lauer also built a rectory and a convent for 
the Sisters. 

The Rev. E. G. Werling succeeded Father Lauer in 
the year 1923, and during his pastorate, which ended in 
1927, he built a new rectory and convent, enlarged the 
school and made improvements in the church. During the 
depression, which followed soon upon the completion of 



HAMMOND DEANERY 351 



these improvements, the parish found itself laden with a 
heavy debt. 

The Reverend Edward Vurpillat succeeded Father 
Werling in 1927 and was in charge of the parish until 
1935, at which time he was succeeded by the Rev. Michael 
F. Shea, the present pastor, with whom the congregation 
is cooperating splendidly. 

Father Shea is assisted by the Rev. John Beckman. 

In October, 1940, St. Mary's solemnly celebrated its 
Golden Jubilee. 



The Rev. Michael F. Shea was born in Fort Wayne 
on January 30, 1885. After completing elementary school 
work at St. Patrick's, that city, he went to St. Joseph's 
College and later on to St. Bernard's Seminary, Roches- 
ter, New York. He was ordained by Bishop Alerding on 
June 17, 1911. 

His first appointment was as assistant at St. Ann's, 
Lafayette, whence, after two years, he was transferred to 
St. Joseph's, Covington. He remained there until June, 
1921, when he was moved to St. Ann's, Kewanna. In July, 
1925, he was appointed pastor of St. Mary's, Union City, 
and on September 12, 1985, he was promoted to St. 
Mary's, East Chicago. 

Rev. John Beckman was born at Lowell, Indiana, on 
July 9, 1907. He attended the parochial school there and 
then went to St. Joseph's College, and thence to St. 
Gregory's and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was or- 
dained on June 10, 1933, by Bishop Noll. 

His first appointment was as assistant at St. Pat- 
rick's, Fort Wayne, where he served one year, and on July 
5, 1934, was transferred to St. Mary's, East Chicago. 

St. Stanislaus' 
1896 
St. Stanislaus', from a very humble beginning, has. 
grown into one of the largest parishes in the diocese. It 
was founded for Polish Catholics who had been attended 
from 1888 to 1900 by the priest in charge of St. Casi- 
mir's, Hammond. The original church, of frame construe- 



352 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



tion, was built by Father Kobylinski and was dedicated 
to St. Michael. 

In the year 1901, the Rev. John Kubacki became the 
first resident pastor and found it necessary to purchase 
■considerable more property for the needed expansion. 
Houses on this property were converted into a rectory 
and convent. 

Father Kubacki built a school and engaged four Sis- 
ters of St. Francis to teach it. 

After moving the church from Baring Avenue to its 
present site, the name of the church was changed to St. 
Stanislaus. 

Father Kubacki was succeeded in 1904 by the Rev. 
Joseph Bolka, who enlarged the church and made a num- 
ber of improvements. 

In 1907 the Rev. Julian Skryzpinski served as pastor 
pro tem, and in 1908, the Rev. Peter Budnik was ap- 
pointed pastor and remained until 1933 when he was 
received into the Franciscan Order. Father Budnik built 



the present 
19 12, and 
rectory. He 
the large 
in use, which 
pleted under 
sor, the Rev. 
y p i n s k i. 
e r a t i n s 
rapid and 
ings needed 
because of 
the congre- 
very large 
contracted, 
er Skrzypin- 
t h e y e a rs, 
der easy con- 
Skrzypinski 
new prop- 
t i c a 1 ly re- 
larged the 




Very Rev. Msgr. Julian 
Skrzypinski, pastor of St. Stan- 
islaus 



church in 
the present 
also started 
school now 
was c m- 
h i s succes- 
Julian Skrz- 
Building op- 
w e r e so 
the build- 
so spacious 
the size of 
gation that a 
debt was 
which Fath- 
ski has, over 
brought un- 
trol. Father 
a c q u i r ed 
e r t y, prac- 
built and en- 
Sisters' Con- 



HAMMOND DEAKERY 353 



vent. He also erected homes respectively for his organist 
and janitor. 

In the summer of 1940, the Rev. Julian Skrzypinski 
was elevated to the rank of Papal Chamberlain and vi'as 
invested on September 14 in the chapel of St. Catherine's 
Hospital. Monsignor Skrzypinski is a Diocesan Con- 
suitor. 

He is assisted by the Rev. Stanislaus F. Zjavs^inski, 
the Rev. Theodore Janicki and the Rev. Joseph Buczyna. 



Monsignor Julian Skrzypinski was born at Rogozno, 
Poznan, Poland, on January 9, 1881. He received his 
primary education in Poland, but came to this country 
before he began to prepare for the priesthood. He pur- 
sued his ecclesiastical studies at St. Lawrence's College, 
Mount Calvary, Wis., and at Mount St. Mary's, Cincin- 
nati. He was ordained on May 22, 1907, by Bishop 
Alerding. 

His first assignment was temporary pastor of St. 
Stanislaus', East Chicago. He held pastorates for short 
intervals at Crawfordsville, Michigan City, Monterey, 
Earl Park, Terre Coupee, before he was appointed paster 
of St. Adalbert's, Whiting, in September, 1911, where he 
erected the present school, rectory and convent. In Feb- 
ruary, 1923, he received his present pastorate. 

Rev. Stanislaus F. Zjawinski was born at Kamieniec, 
Poland, on November 2, 1902. He pursued his studies for 
the priesthood at St. Bonaventure's College, Wis., and at 
Mount St. Mary's Seminary, and was ordained on June 
2, 1928, by Bishop Noll. 

After serving as assistant for ten months at St. 
Joseph's, Hammond; and fourteen months at St. Hed- 
wig's, Gary, he was transferred to St. Stanislaus', East 
Chicago, on August 4, 1929. 

Rev. Theodore Janicki was born in Chicago on 
November 20, 1920. After finishing the parochial school 
at Otis, he entered St. Mary's College, Kentucky, and then 
St. Meinrad's. He was ordained on June 15, 1935, by 
Bishop Noll. 

After serving as temporary assistant at Our Lady 



354 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

of Hungary, South Bend, he was transferred to St. 
Stanislaus', here. 

Rev. Joseph Buczyna was born in Chicago on July 
13, 1908. He pursued his ecclesiastical studies at Orchard 
Lake and at St. Meinrad's and was ordained on June 6, 
1936 by Bishop Noll. Two weeks later he was appointed 
assistant at St. Stanislaus'. 

St. Patrick's 

1903 

Indiana Harbor, where St. Patrick's Church was 
built, was long a separate city, but a few years ago it 
was merged with East Chicago. 

Indiana Harbor had its beginning in 1901, and on 
May 24, 1902, the Rev. Thomas Mungovan, brother of 
the present Vicar General, was selected by Bishop Aler- 
ding to organize the new parish, although only eight 
Catholic families were found as prospects. But the 
Bishop had no doubts in his mind about the future. 
Father Mungovan resided with Rev. Charles Thiele at 
Whiting while getting a building project under way and 
completing it. 

In 1903 he erected a combination church, school and 
residence — a two-story frame building. In 1905 he erected 
the present rectory. 

Father Mungovan remained in charge until Feb- 
ruary, 1911, at which time the parish was large enough 
to replace the temporary, but substantial buildings, al- 
though the Rev. John Wakefer, who succeeded him and 
remained until July, 1917, withheld such replacements 
because of lack of funds. In July, 1917, the Rev. James 
Connelly was appointed pastor of St. Patrick's, and in 
the year 1923 erected the present church, school, and 
parish hall. He provided a new convent for the Sisters in 
1925. St. Patrick's School is taught by the Sisters of 
Holy Cross. 

St. Patrick's now has splendid buildings and the debt 
occasioned by their erection has nearly disappeared. 

Father Connelly has carried on without an assistant. 



Rev. James F. Connelly was born in Fort Wayne on 



HAMMOND DEANERY 365 



May 24, 1878. He attended the Cathedral School and then 
St. Joseph's College and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, 
Cincinnati, and was ordained by Bishop Alerding on 
May 24, 1902. 

His first appointment was as assistant at St. 
Bridget's, Logansport, where he remained from June, 
1902, until July, 1905, when he was transferred to St. 
Joseph's, Lebanon. After serving twelve years in this 
parish he was appointed pastor of St. Patrick's, Indiana 
Harbor. 

St. John Cantius' 
1906 

The Rev. John Kubacki began the organization of 
this parish by ministering to Polish people living in 
Indiana Harbor during the years 1903 and 1904. He was 
succeeded by the Rev. Peter Budnik, who remained until 
1906, and erected the first church in that year. 

The successor of Father Budnik, the Rev. Anthony 
Stachowiak, was then placed in charge and served until 
the time of his death in the spring of 1925. Father 
Stachowiak erected the present spacious basement church 
in 1917, the present rectory in 1912, and the original 
convent the same year. 

The Rev. Theofil Chemma succeeded Father Stach- 
owiak and remained until 1932. During his pastorate 
the present large school was erected and the convent con- 
siderably enlarged in 1928. About the time the school 
was dedicated the industrial depression set in, and St. 
John Cantius' Parish has had a very heavy debt load to 
carry, with reduced revenue. 

The present pastor, the Rev. Michael A. Petzold, 
was placed in charge of St. John Cantius' in the year 1932, 
and is assisted by the Rev. Louis A. Jeziorski. 



Rev. Michael A. Petzold was born in Chicago on 
September 19, 1894. His studies for the priesthood were 
pursued at St. Francis', Milwaukee, St. Joseph's College, 
Orchard Lake and Mount St. Mary's Seminaries. He was 
ordained on November 13, 1918, by Bishop Alerding, fol- 
lowing which he was appointed assistant at St. Hedwig's, 



356 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Gary. In 1921 he was transferred to St. Stanislaus', East 
Chicago; in 1923, to St. Adalbert's, South Bend; in 1925, 
to St. John Cantius', East Chicago. 

On August 1, 1926, he was appointed pastor of 
Assumption parish, New Chicago; on August 14, 1929, 
pastor of St. Hyacinth's, Fort Wayne; and on April 2, 
1932, was given the pastorate of St. John Cantius, East 
Chicago. 

Rev. Louis A. Jeziorski was born in South Bend on 
September 29, 1902. He pursued his ecclesiastical studies 
at Orchard Lake and St. Meinrad's, and was ordained on 
May 18, 1940, by Bishop Noll. He is filling his first ap- 
pointment at St. John Cantius'. 

Holy Trinity (Hungarian) 
1907 

For a time those Hungarian and Slovak people who 
were the first of their nationality to locate at East Chi- 
cago were a part of one little parish organized by Father 
Benedict Rajcany, pastor of St. John's, Hammond. Like 
all other parishes in this area that of Holy Trinity grew 
rapidly, and later two separate parishes were formed for 
the Slovak people. 

Father Rajcany erected the first Holy Trinity 
Church in the year 1906, and in December, 1907, the 
parish received its first pastor in the person of Rev. Oscar 
Szilagyi, who was a Benedictine priest. He remained 
there until June, 1909, when the Rev. Paul Bognar was 
appointed pastor. Father Bognar held the pastorate for 
three years when he was replaced by the Rev. Francis 
Fekete, who served as pastor from May, 1912, to Septem- 
ber, 1913, when he was succeeded by the Rev. Stephen 
Varga who remained in charge until November, 1916. 

The next pastor was Rev. Alexander Schaffer who 
spent ten years at Holy Trinity, when he retired in 
March, 1927, from active pastoral work and returned to 
Hungary, where he died in 1936. Father Schaffer built 
the present church in 1920 and also the present rectory 
and convent in 1922. 

In March, 1927, the Rev. Joseph P. Toth was ap- 



HAMMOND DEANERY 367 



pointed pastor and served faithfully until his sudden 
death on December 15, 1934. During Father Toth's pas- 
torate the new school was built in 1928, with the Daugh- 
ters of Divine Charity in charge. 

The present pastor, appointed on February 1, 1935, 
is the Rev. Joseph D. Sipos, who found it necessary to 
make many improvements and repairs which had been 
postponed because of the bad economic situation in this 
city. 

In 1937 Father Sipos purchased a large building, 
situated one block from the church, which has been con- 
verted into a recreation hall, and which is a source of 
considerable revenue for the parish. 

Father Sipos has been assisted since June, 1937, by 
Rev. Ralph Hoffman. 



Rev. Joseph D. Sipos was born in Joliet, Illinois, on 
May 23, 1904. After completing the elementary school, he 
attended St. Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, Wis., 
and then went to Hungary to pursue his major seminary 
studies, and was ordained in Hungary in 1929. 

His first appointment was assistant at Holy Trinity, 
where he is now pastor. After two years he was trans- 
ferred to St. Emeric's, Gary, and upon the death of 
Father Toth, returned to Holy Trinity as his successor. 

Rev. Ralph Hoffman was born in Hartford City on 
September 24, 1911. He attended the parochial school 
there and then went to St. Joseph's College to prepare 
for the priesthood ; thence he went to St. Gregory's and 
Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati, and was ordained on May 
22, 1937, by Bishop Noll. A few weeks later he was given 
his present appointment. 

St. Francis' (Lithuanian) 
1913 
The parish for the Lithuanian people of Indiana Har- 
bor was organized in 1913 by the Rev. J. Jakstys. In that 
year he erected the church which is still in use. In 1915 
Father Jakstys was succeeded temporarily by the Rev. 
Joseph Martis and by Rev. K. Ambrosartis. Then the 
Rev. J. Zablockis was placed in charge for one year, and 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Rev. J. Tiskevicius served for one year. The Rev. J. 
Ceuberkis was pastor from 1919 to 1924, and the Rev. J. 
Gervickis during part of 1924 and 1925. 

Thereupon the Rev. Casimir Bickauskas was given 
the pastorate and has held it ever since. Besides doing 
good spiritual work he has to his credit the erection of 
the rectory in 1925, the school and convent in 1927, and 
the parish hall in 1929. The school is in charge of the 
Sisters of St. Casimir. 

Father Bickauskas has been assisted since June 1939 
by the Rev. Ignatius C. Vichuras. 



The Rev. Casimir Bickauskas was born in Lithuania 
on March 27, 1888. He pursued his studies for the priest- 
hood at Seinai, Lithuania, and was ordained on January 
13, 1913. He exercised his priesthood in his native coun- 
try until the fall of 1922, when he came to the United 
States on a collecting tour for institutions in Lithuania 
which had suffered greatly during the World War. The 
Bishop of Albany prevailed on him to work among the 
Lithuanians here — of course, with the permission of his 
Ordinary. 

He held a pastorate at Schenectady from November 
1922 until March 1925, when Bishop Alerding invited 
him to fill the pastorate of St. Francis, Indiana Harbor. 

Rev. Ignatius C. Vichuras was born at Gary on Sep- 
tember 3, 1911, and prepared for the priesthood at St. 
Joseph's College and at St. Meinrad's. He was ordained 
on June 11, 1938, by Bishop Noll, and appointed assistant 
at St. Lawrence's, Muncie, where he remained for one 
year. On July 8, 1939 he was given his present appoint- 
ment. 

St. Nicholas' — St. Demetrius' 
1913 
The Roumanian people, who are served by priests 
w^ho officiate in the Greek Rite, have had spiritual atten- 
tion since the year 1913, both at East Chicago, where the 
pastor has resided, and at the mission church at Indiana 
Harbor. 

The first pastor was Rev. Hurel Bungardeau who, 



HAMMOND DEANERY 359 



during his pastorate from December 1913 to March 1921, 
built a beautiful church for the Roumanians at East 
Chicago in 1913, and another for those at the Harbor in 
1915. In 1917 he built the pastor's residence at East 
Chicago. 

He was assisted by the Rev. Alexander Pope begin- 
ning in May, 1920, who remained two months after Father 
Bungardeau's departure in 1921. 

In September 1921, the Rev. Victor Crisan was ap- 
pointed pastor and remained until January, 1983. In 
April of that year, the Rev. Victor Vamosi was borrowed 
from the Cleveland Diocese to take over the pastorate. 
He remained until February, 1935, when Bishop Noll 
effected an arrangement, through the Apostolic Delegate, 
to procure a young priest directly from Roumania. This 
priest. Father Anthony Dunca by name, is still in charge. 

Assumption — Sacred Heart 
1915 

The first pastor of the Assumption Parish is the 
priest now in charge, the Reverend Clement M. Mlinaro- 
vich. He was appointed pastor in 1915, while assistant at 
St. John's, Hammond. 

He erected the first church in the year 1917, the 
present rectory in 1919. Then in the year 1926 Father 
Mlinarovich built a combination church and school of 
brick and brought the School Sisters of St. Francis to 
teach the children. He erected a convent for them the 
same year. He is now building an addition to the rectory. 

Father Mlinarovich organized the Slovak people of 
the west side and rented space in another church for the 
holding of divine services. In December, 1940, he com- 
pleted the building of a beautiful small church for them. 

Father Mlinarovich had diocesan priests as assis- 
tants for three years, but since the year 1930 he has been 
helped on week-ends by Franciscan and Benedictine 
Fathers. 



Rev. Clement M. Mlinarovich was born at Has- 
prunka, Czecho-Slovakia, on October 11, 1887. He pre- 
pared for the priesthood at Tirnau and Pressburg 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



(Pozony), and was ordained on May 21, 1910. He came 
to this country in 1914 and was appointed assistant to 
the Rev. Benedict Rajcany, at St. John's, Hammond, and 
in 1915 was transferred to Indiana Harbor where he has 
pastored the Assumption Parish from the beginning. 

Father Mlinarovich has been active in National 
Slovak activities, and has held high office in the Slovak 
Catholic Federation. 

Sacred Heart 

1926 
The Slovak people of East Chicago had been attended 
from Assumption parish, Indiana Harbor, for many 
years without having a church of their own. But in the 
spring of 1940 Father Mlinarovich received permission to 
erect a church for them on valuable property secured a 
few years previously. This church was used for the first 
time, after completion, on December 15, 1940, and was 
dedicated by Bishop Noll on May 11, 1941. It serves 
an enthusiastic congregation whose members will soon be 
requesting their own resident pastor. 

Holy Trinity (Croatian) 

1916 

The Croatian people of East Chicago were organized 
into a separate parish in 1916, and had as their first 
pastor the Rev. Joseph Judnic, who built a church and 
school in 1917, and a convent in 1920, for the Sisters 
Adorers of the Precious Blood, who have charge of the 
school. Father Judnic continued as pastor until August, 
1922, when he was succeeded by the Rev. Francis Ba- 
horic, who served the congregation until March, 1924. 

On April 15, 1924, the present pastor, the Rev. 
Francis Podgorsek, was placed in charge of the parish. 
This priest erected the present rectory in 1925. 

Father Podgorsek labored under heavy difficulties 
during the several years of the recent depression. 



Rev. Francis Podgorsek was born in Jugoslavia 
and after his ordination came to the United States to 
work among his own people, the Croats. 



HAMMOND DEANERY 361 



Bishop Alerding placed him in charge of SS. Peter 
and Paul's, Whiting in 1910, and of the Holy Trinity 
Croatian Parish, East Chicago, in April, 1924. 

St. Joseph's 
1916 

St. Joseph Parish for the Polish people was formed 
in 1916 and had as its first pastor the Rev. Joseph Zie- 
linski. During his pastorate, which lasted until February, 
1923, he erected a frame church, rectory and convent. 
These structures were built in 1917 and 1918. 

The Rev. John Biernacki succeeded Father Zielinski 
and served until July, 1927. He built the present school. 

Rev. August Kondziela was pastor from July 1927 
until April 1932, and built a parish hall in 1930. 

On April 7, 1932, Father Joseph Zobel succeeded 
Father Kondziela and held charge until July 8, 1939. 
During the worst years of the depression Father Zobel 
was able, by hard labor, to keep the five frame buildings 
painted and to reduce the indebtedness slightly. 

Rev. Edward Wroblewski succeeded Father Zobel 
and is the present pastor. He began to make quite exten- 
sive improvements, the foremost of which was to cover 
the outside of the buildings with imitation brick and to 
insulate them so that the fuel cost would be reduced. 

This property, fronting on a prominent street, is 
badly dissected by railroad tracks. 



Rev. Edward Wroblewski was born in Chicago on 
August 2, 1898. He prepared for the priesthood at Or- 
chard Lake College and Seminary and was ordained on 
June 14, 1924, by Bishop Alerding. 

After serving for one month at St. Joseph's, Misha- 
waka, he was apointed assistant at St. Vincent's, Elkhart, 
where he remained for one year. Then he served from 
July, 1925, until September, 1935, as assistant at St. 
Stanislaus', East Chicago. Thence he was made pastor 
of Sacred Heart Church, Lakeville, where he remained 
until July, 1939, when he was given his present appoint- 
ment. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Our Lady of Guadalupe 
1927 

The first Mexicans came to Indiana Harbor in 1920 
and formed the nucleus of a colony and also of a future 
parish. Their first pastor was Father Octave Zavatta, a 
member of the Italian Congreg'ation of the Precious 
Blood. He had lived for some time in Mexico and learned 
the language well. For some time Father Zavatta said 
Mass in a store building for the Italians and Mexicans. 

The first church for the Mexican people was dedicat- 
ed on the 30th of January, 1927, on Pennsylvania Ave- 
nue. The Catechists established themselves on Block 
Avenue immediately to the rear of that church, and in 
1931 a rectory was purchased by Bishop Noll on Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue for the pastor, who at that time, was the 
Rev. Jose H. Lara. 

In the fall of 1937 the Mexican parish was turned 
over to the Fathers of the Sacred Heart. The first priest 
of this Community to serve the Mexicans was the Rev. 
Father O'Neill, who came in October, 1937. He was 
assisted by Father Zicke, to whom was entrusted the care 
of the Colored Catholics, nearly all of them converts, who 
also attended Our Lady of Guadalupe Church. These 
priests were replaced by the Rev. Paul Frichtl, S.C.J., 
and the Rev. Stanislaus Saxon, S.C.J. After a few months 
they were faced with the problem of erecting a new 
church because the church on Pennsylvania Avenue was 
destroyed by fire on September 2, 1939. 

The Mexican people besought the Bishop through 
their priests to allow them to purchase property closer to 
the heart of their settlement. This request was granted 
on condition that the Mexicans would make sacrifices to 
provide money and labor for the erection of a new church. 
Headed by their priests they actually did most of the con- 
struction work on both the church and the new rectory. 
The cornerstone of the new church was laid on the feast 
of Our Lady of Guadalupe, December 12, 1939, and the 
edifice, a very beautiful church, was dedicated amid splen- 
dor on September 15, 1940, by Bishop Noll. 

Immediately following the dedication Father Frichtl 



HAMMOND DEANERY 363 



began to restore, for the benefit of the Negroes, the 
church which had hitherto been used jointly by the Mexi- 
cans and Negroes. It was dedicated on May 11, 1941, 
and will soon have its own pastor. 

Immaculate Conception 
1935 

The Italian people of Indiana Harbor and Ham- 
mond had abundant opportunity to attend divine services 
at one of the many existing churches, and it was natural 
that they should do so because their children were, for 
the most part, in several parochial schools. 

But in the year 1933 a committee of Italians impor- 
tuned the Bishop to allow them to build a church of their 
own, with which would be connected a recreational cen- 
ter. They agreed to raise the money needed for the pur- 
chase of a site before starting the building. Then, at a 
time when many skilled laborers were out of work, the 
Italians among these agreed to donate their services in the 
erection of the structure. 

Bishop Noll assigned the Rev. Michael A. Campagna 
to work with them, and in the year 1935 they completed 
a handsome church, a rectory, a recreational center at a 
cash expenditure of less than $20,000.00— although the 
buildings would represent values three times as great. 

In the year 1936 the parish purchased a residence 
next door to the rectory for a home for the Catechists 
who have, from the time the parish was founded, been 
instructing the children on weekdays and supervising 
their recreation. 

Italians may still, of course, attend parishes nearest 
to their homes, but many of them come from Hammond 
and from East Chicago to the church at Indiana Harbor 
by bus for Sunday Mass. 



Rev. Michael A. Campagna was born in Italy on 
September 5, 1904. He pursued his ecclesiastical studies 
up to theology at Veroli and the Pontificio CoUegio in 
Rome. Then he came to the United States and studied 
theology at Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was or- 
dained on June 2, 1928 by Bishop Noll, whereupon he 



FRAGMENTS OF OUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 



went to the Catholic University for three years and then 
to Rome for one year. Upon his return he was appointed 
temporary assistant at St. Andrew's, Fort Wayne, and 
later chaplain at St. Vincent's Villa. 

On July 1, 1933, he was sent to East Chicago to 
organize the new Immaculate Conception Parish and has 
been there ever since. 

St. Jude's (Colored) 
1940 

The Missionary Catechists who settled at Indiana 
Harbor in 1927 did a great deal of social service and char- 
ity work among the Colored people, and especially during 
the first years of the depression. This benevolence led a 
number of the Colored to become interested in the Cath- 
olic religion and many converts were the result. Since 
they lived, for the most part, close to the Mexican church, 
they attended Mass there. 

After this church was partly destroyed by fire in 
September, 1939, and it was decided to provide a church 
for the Mexicans nearer to the center of their colony, 
the Bishop provided funds with which to restore the 
former Mexican church for the benefit of the Colored 
Catholics of the Harbor. 

In its restored condition it was used for the first time 
for midnight Mass on Christmas, 1940, and was dedi- 
cated on May 11, 1941. 

In the basement of the church provision is made for 
recreation. 

Since the new Mexican church bears the name that 
was given to this church it was necessary to alter the 
name of the restored church and the choice of the Colored 
people was St. Jude's. 

The Colored people are, for the present, being served 
by the same priests that wait on the Mexicans, but it is 
expected that another priest will soon be provided by the 
Fathers of the Sacred Heart, who will give all his time to 
the Colored people. 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



366 



WHITING 

Whiting, like other cities in Lake County, is still 
young. Sixty years ago it was a small hamlet known as 
Whiting's Crossing. Its development is due to the loca- 
tion there of the Standard Oil Comany in 1889, which 
soon grew into a big industry and attracted workingmen 
from far and wide. The city counts an English, two 
Slovak, a Polish and a Croatian parish. 

Sacred Heart 
1891 
In the year 1889, to the Rev. H. F. Kroll, then pastor 
of Chesterton, was entrusted the work of establishing a 
mission at Whiting. He said Mass sometimes in a pri- 
vate home, sometimes in a school house and sometimes in 
Green's Tavern. Father Kroll bought property on Cen- 
ter street, but it was left to his successor, the Rev. Mich- 
ael J. Byrne, to organize the parish and start the church. 



He p u r- 
tional prop- 
started the 
frame 
which was 
May, 1891. 
t e m b e r, 
was opened 
dren of Sac- 
parish in 
and the Sis- 
vidence were 
teach. This 
stroyed by 
when a new 
i n g was 
t a i n i n g 
rooms and 
ium. Father 
e r e c t ed a 
a r e c 1 ry 
transfer in 




Very Rev. Msgr. George Moor- 
man 



chased addi- 
e r ty and 
erection of a 
church, 
dedicated in 
In Sep- 
1895, school 
to the chil- 
red Heart 
Orient Hall 
ters of Pro- 
engaged to 
Hall was de- 
fire in 1897 
school build- 
erected con- 
three class- 
an auditor- 
Byrne also 
convent and 
prior to his 
August,1898 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Rev. Charles Thiele became Father Byrne's succes- 
sor. It was not long until the parish outgrew its build- 
ings, and it was deemed wise to move to another site 
rather than rebuild on property inconveniently located to 
most of the people. He purchased property on LaPorte 
Avenue, but was transferred to St. Peter's, Fort Wayne, 
before anything was done about building. 

The Rev. John B. Berg succeeded Father Thiele who, 
in the year 1910, erected the present school, the convent 
and rectory, using the auditorium over the school as a 
church. 

To help meet the cost the original property was sold 
to the Whiting Croatians for $12,000.00, and the name 
of the church thereafter was changed to SS. Peter and 
Paul. 

The Rev. William C. Miller succeeded Father Berg, 
in 1917. He paid the balance of the debt and started 
building a fund for a new church. Father Miller died in 
March, 1922, and was succeeded by the Rev. Norbert 
Felden, to whom the thought of the erection of a new 
church was ever present, but his health failed before the 
new temple was completed, which, with furnishings, cost 
$200,000.00. 

The church was dedicated on Ocober 9, 1927, by 
Bishop Noll. Father Felden, who had been assisted dur- 
ing his illness by Rev. Paul Anderson, retired from pas- 
toral work in July, 1929, dying at St. Catherine Hospital 
on November 3, 1931. 

The next pastor of Sacred Heart Church was Rev. 
Joseph Lynn, who- took charge in September, 1929, and 
who inherited a debt of $107,000.00. After two years 
Father Lynn, with the Bishop's permission, exchanged 
places with Rev. George Moorman, then pastor of Im- 
maculate Conception Church, Michigan City. Although 
the industrial depression was on and Father Moorman 
inherited a debt of more than $100,000.00, he had it en- 
tirely liquidated at the time the Golden Jubilee of Sacred 
Heart Church was celebrated in October, 1940. This 
achievement, within eight years, reflects great credit on 
both pastor and people. In appreciation of his accom- 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



plishments, the Holy See honored Father Moorman by 
conferring on him the rank of Papal Chamberlain. 

Father Moorman has been assisted almost from the 
beginning by the Rev. Clemens Koors. 



Rev. George Moorman was born at Millhousen, In- 
diana, October 9, 1883. He pursued his studies for the 
holy priesthood at St. Joseph, Teutopolis, 111., and at St. 
Meinrad Seminary. He was ordained on June 13, 1908, 
by Bishop Alerding. 

He served as assistant at the Cathedral for three 
years and then, after filling a temporary vacancy at St. 
Vincent's, Logansport, was given the pastorate of Ken- 
dall ville, which he held from October, 1911 to January, 
1914, when he was appointed to assist Father Noll at 
Huntington in the editing of OUR SUNDAY VISITOR, 
and in the care of St. Mary's parish. In September 
1916, he was made pastor of St. Louis', Besancon, but 
was relieved during the years 1918-1919 to serve as over- 
seas chaplain in the war. In June, 1921, he was given 
the pastorate of St. Joseph's, Logansport, and in July, 
1924, that of Immaculate Conception, Michigan City. In 
October, 1931, he was transferred to Sacred Heart, Whit- 
ing. Father Moorman is author of a very popular and 
instructive book on the Mass. 

The Rev. Clemens L. Koors was born at Tipton, Ind., 
on July 17, 1903. He prepared for the holy priesthood 
at St. Joseph College, Collegeville, and at St. Gregory's 
and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati, and was ordained on 
May 30, 1931, by Bishop Noll. His first appointment 
was to St. Joseph's, Mishawaka, whence he was transfer- 
red to Sacred Heart, Whiting, in February, 1932. 

St. Adalbert's 
1902 
Until a separate parish was established for the Pol- 
ish people of Whiting, they attended St. Casimir's, Ham- 
mond. The Rev. P. A. Kahellek, pastor of St. Casimir's,, 
organized the Whiting parish and built the church, which; 
is still in use, in the year 1902. 



FEAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTOBY 



But in June of that year, before the church was 
dedicated, the Rev. Peter Budnik was appointed the first 
resident pastor. He built the first rectory in 1903, a 
convent in 1904, and a school in 1905. 

In June, 1907, Father Felix Seroczynski was ap- 
pointed pastor and remained until September, 1911. He 
was followed by Rev. Julius Skrzypinski who, during a 
pastorate of eleven and one-half years, replaced the first 
convent by a large house in 1916, built the present rec- 
tory in 1919, and enlarged the school in 1920. 

The Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth teach 
the children of St. Adalbert's School. 

The next pastor was the Rev. Joseph Zielinski, who 
served from February, 1923, until July 1926. His suc- 
cessor, the Rev. John Chylewski, the present pastor, took 
charge in September, 1926, and in the year 1927 built a 
large parish hall. 

The original church, a frame structure, will, it is 
hoped, soon be replaced by another which will be in keep- 
ing with the other splendid buildings belonging to the 
parish. 

Father Chylewski is assisted by the Rev. Walter S. 
Pawlicki. 



The Rev. John Chylewski was born at Ostrowo, Pol- 
and, on May 13, 1885. After pursuing the classics in 
Poland, he entered the American Seminary at Louvain 
and was ordained there by a Belgian Bishop on July 9, 
1911. 

From the time of his ordination until November, 
1913, he was assistant at St. Stanislaus', Michigan City, 
and then until July, 1915, assistant at St. Hedwig's, 
Gary. He was appointed pastor of St. Mary's, Hammond, 
on July 8, 1915, where he remained until he was trans- 
ferred to St. Adalbert's, on September 21, 1926. 

The Rev. Walter S. Pawlicki was born in South Chi- 
cago, on June 25, 1904. He pursued his studies for the 
priesthood at St. Stanislaus' College, DePaul University, 
and at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, and was 
ordained on May 21, 1932, by Bishop Noll. 

From the time of his ordination until July 8, 1938, 



HAMMOND DEANERY 36a 



he was assistant at St. John Cantius', Indiana Harbor, 
and since that time has been at St. Adalbert's. 

SS. Peter and Paul's 
1910 

In our sketch dealing with Sacred Heart parish, it 
was noted that in the year 1910 the four buildings which 
had been used prior to that time by the parishioners of 
Sacred Heart were sold to the Croatians of Whiting, who 
took immediate possession. 

The first pastor of SS. Peter and Paul's was Rev. 
Francis Podgorsek who held the pastorate from July, 
1910, until August, 1924. He was succeeded by the Rev. 
Vincent Uvodic who is still in charge of the parish, which 
is now entirely free from debt. 

The school was discontinued in this parish, but most 
of the children are in attendance at existing parish 
schools. 



The Rev. Vincent Uvodic was born in Dalmatia, 
Jugoslavia, on September 15, 1888. He prepared for the 
holy priesthood at the Zara and Innsbruck Seminaries, 
and was ordained at Zara by Bishop Vincent Pulisic on 
April 8, 1916. 

After filling two pastorates in Dalmatia between 
1916 and 1921, he went to Chile, South America, to work 
among Croatians. In December, 1922, he came to the 
United States and worked for nearly two years at Kansas 
City. On August 16, 1924, he was appointed pastor of SS. 
Peter and Paul's, Whiting. 

Immaculate Conception 

1922 

St. John's Parish, Whiting, was divided in 1922, and 
property was purchased for buildings to serve the Im- 
maculate Conception parish under the Rev. Michael 
Kosko, who had been assistant to the Rev. Benjamin 
Rajcany at St. John's. 

Father Kosko erected the present rectory in 1923, 
and the present church in 1924. 

In April, 1926, Father Kosko resigned his pastorate 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



in order to accept a chaplaincy at Immaculate Conception 
Jednota, Slovak Orphan Home at Middleton, Penn. He 
was succeeded in July, 1926, by the Rev. John J. Lach, 
the present pastor, who erected the present school and 
convent in 1926, and a Grotto to the Immaculate Concep- 
tion in 1928. In May 1941 he purchased property on 
which a new convent will be erected. 

Father Lach has taken an interest in national Slovak 
activities, and became known to people of most Slovak 
parishes in the country through the excellent band which 
he organized, and which toured not only the United States 
but Europe as well. 

In September, 1940, Father Lach opened the first 
year high school which, together with the grade school, 
is taught by the Sisters of SS. Cyril and Methodius. 

Father Lach is assisted by the Rev. James Cis. 



The Rev. Joseph Lach was born at Hibernia, New 
Jersey, on June 10, 1894. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Procopius Seminary, Lisle, 111., and at 
Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati, and was ordained on June 
10, 1922, by Bishop Alerding. 

Father Lach's first appointment was to the post of 
assistant at St. Paul's, Marion, where he remained for one 
year. He was then made pastor of Knox and Hamlet in 
June, 1923, and given the pastorate of the Immaculate 
Conception Parish on June 22, 1926. 

The Rev. James Cis was born in Chicago on July 
14, 1911. He prepared for the holy priesthood at Colum- 
bia University, Dubuque, and at St. Meinrad's Seminary, 
and was ordained on June 11, 1938. The next month he 
was given the appointment which he still has. 

ST. JOHN 

St. John Evangelist Church 
1847 
Mass was said for people within the confines of what 
is now St. John's Parish more than one hundred years 
ago. It is of record that Rev. Francis Fischer from Chi- 
cago visited this area from 1839 to 1843, and that from 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



1843 to 1849 the Rev. Anthony Carius, C.S.C, was in 
charge. 

During the latter's pastorate the first church was 
built, and was dedicated by Bishop de St. Palais, of Vin- 
cennes. He also built a school in the year 1846, and placed 
it in charge of the Brothers and Sisters of the Holy 
Cross. In the year 1856 the Rev. B. J. Force, C.S.C, re- 
placed the old log structure with a brick church and 
Father B. Rachor built the first rectory in 1860. The 
Fathers of the Holy Cross continued to have charge 
until 1866. 

Diocesan priests have had charge since 1866, begin- 
ning with Rev. Henry Koenig from 1866 to 1870. Suc- 
ceeding pastors were Rev. Anthony Heitmann from 1870 
to 1906; the Rev. Charles F. Keyser until November, 
1906; the Rev. A. M. Buchheit from 1906 to 1915, who 
purchased the present school. The Rev. Anthony Badina 
was pastor from 1915 to 1929. Father Badina completed 
the present very beautiful church in 1925. He had pre- 
viously, in 1920, bought the house which is now the 
rectory. 

The Rev. John B. Steger succeeded Father Badina 
in August, 1929, and remained until until February, 1939, 
when the Rev. Fred C. Rothermel was placed in charge. 
He holds the pastorate today. 



The Rev. Fred C. Rothermel was born in Logansport, 
Indiana, on March 7, 1889, and received his early educa- 
tion at St. Joseph's parochial school there. He attended 
St. Meinrad's College and Seminary and was ordained 
June 16, 1916, by Bishop Alerding. His first appointment 
was as assistant at Michigan City, Indiana, where he had 
charge of the State Prison. On November 11, 1922, he 
was transferred to Crown Point, and on September 3, 
1925, received his first pastorate at St. Joseph's Church, 
Reynolds. On February 6, 1930 he was made pastor of 
St. Joseph's, Kentland, where he remained until February 
5, 1939, when he was given his present charge at St. 
John. While in Michigan City Father Rothermel estab- 
lished a system of records at the State Prison, and while 
at Reynolds erected the priest's house. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



CEDAR LAKE 

Holy Name 

1859 

Catholicism in this area dates back beyond one hun- 
dred years, but until the Hanover Center parish was 
organized the people attended services at St. John's, the 
mother parish of Lake County. A small frame church was 
erected in 1859, by Rev. F. X. Nigsch, and dedicated to 
St. Matthias. St. Matthias Congregation was attached to 
Crown Point as a mission until 1868, when a new church 
was erected to replace the original which was destroyed 
by fire in 1866. The new church was dedicated to St. 
Martin. 

The parish received its first pastor in the person of 
Rev. Frank Siegelack in 1869. In 1873 the Rev. F. X. 
Diemel was named pastor and remained until 1877, when 
he was succeeded by the Rev. William Berg, who pur- 
chased a public school building for summer school use 
and later converted it into a convent. 

In June, 1881, the Rev. Charles Steurer replaced 
Father Berg and he was succeeded in October, 1889, by 
the Rev. Matthias Zumbuelte. 

In July, 1902, the priest's house was struck by light- 
ning and burned to the ground. Father Zumbuelte imme- 
diately replaced the rectory with a better building. 

Father Zumbuelte opened a school in 1904 with the 
Sisters of St. Francis, Lafayette, in charge. He died at 
Hanover Center in September, 1910. 

The next pastor was the Rev. Herman Juraschek, 
who served until 1923. He erected a very beautiful church 
which was also completely destroyed by fire during the 
pastorate of the Rev. Gustave Hottenroth, who was in 
charge from 1923 to 1931. Then the Rev. Charles W. 
Marr was appointed pastor. He soon had plans drawn 
for a new church. He first built a basement church, which 
was in use until the year 1940, when he erected a super- 
structure of great beauty. The church was dedicated on 
Thanksgiving Day, 1940, by Bishop Noll. This church is 
dedicated to the Holy Name. 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



The Rev. Charles W. Marr was born at Detroit on 
March 2, 1880. He pursued his classical studies at De- 
troit College and then attended St. Meinrad Seminary, 
and was ordained June 18, 1909, by Bishop Alerding. 

His first appointment was assistant at the Cathedral. 
In September, 1910, he was transferred to St. Lawrence's 
Church, Muncie, and in July, 1913, he was made pastor 
of St. Mary's, Dunkirk. He served their until June, 1922, 
when he was given the pastorate of St. Rose's, Monroe- 
ville. In July, 1931, he was transferred to Holy Name 
Parish, Cedar Lake. 

DYER 

St. Joseph's 

1867 

The people living in and around what is now Dyer 
were attended from Turkey Creek prior to the year 
1867. The first resident pastor was Rev. Jacob Schmitz, 
who built a frame church in the year 1867, after procur- 
ing four acres of land for the church property. 

He was succeeded in July, 1870, by Rev. Theodore 
Borg, and he, in turn, by the Rev. H. Meissner, from Sep- 
tember to December, 1871 ; Rev. Bernard Wiedau from 
January to December, 1872; Rev. Anthony King from 
December, 1872 to April, 1874; Rev. F. J. Freund from 
May, 1874, to August, 1875; Rev. Charles Steurer from 
August, 1875, to January, 1878 ; Rev. Joseph Flach from 
March, 1878, to August, 1883 ; Rev. Charles Stetter, from 
August, 1883, to July, 1888 ; Rev. Joseph Flach from July, 
1888, to July, 1923 ; Rev. George Lauer from June, 1923, 
to June, 1932; the Rev. Edmund A. Ley, the present 
pastor. 

The first school and convent were erected by the Rev. 
Joseph Flach in the year 1901, who also built the present 
church in 1903. The first rectory was built by Father 
Schmitz in 1869. The rectory is still in use, but was im- 
proved several times. 

Upon his retirement in 1923 Father Flach occupied 
a residence in Dyer until his death on December 10, 1926. 

The present convent was erected by the Rev. George 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Lauer in 1924, who also built a parish hall in 1925. 

Father Ley built a modern school in 1939. The chil- 
dren are taught by the Sisters of St. Francis of Joliet. 



Rev. Edmund A. Ley was born at Landeck, Ohio, on 
May 24, 1875. He prepared for the holy priesthood at St. 
Joseph College, Collegeville, and at Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordained by Bishop 
Alerding on December 22, 1905. 

He served as assistant at St. Mary's, Anderson, from 
January, 1906, to July, 1908. During that time he was 
also chaplain of St. John's Hospital. From July, 1908, to 
June, 1921, he was pastor of St. Ann's Church, Kewanna, 
and St. Elizabeth's Church, Lucerne. From June, 1921 to 
June, 1932, he was pastor of St. Bernard's Church, 
Wabash. 

He has been in charge of St. Joseph's, Dyer, since 
June 17, 1932. 

LOWELL 

St. Edtvard's 
1870 

The first scattered Catholics in this area were visited 
by the Rev. Francis X. Deimel from Crown Point, to 
whom was assigned the work of erecting a small frame 
church in 1870. In 1878 the mission of Lowell was at- 
tached to Klaasville, of which the Rev. John A. Bathe was 
pastor. It continued to be a mission under Father Bathe's 
successor, the Rev. Charles A. Ganzer, who served the 
people until 1891. Then until 1898, the mission was trans- 
ferred to the Fathers of the Precious Blood, resident at 
Rensselaer. One of these Fathers, Rev. F. X. Schalk, built 
the second church in 1897. This was destroyed by fire in 
1914 during the pastorate of Rev. Henry Hoerstmann, 
who was in charge from 1911 to 1918. The church was re- 
placed by a combination church and school erected by 
Father Hoerstmann, who also purchased a residence for 
the Sisters the same year. 

The first resident pastor of Lowell was the Rev. Fred 
Koenig, who served from 1898 until the fall of 1905. In 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



November of that year the Rev. Charles Keyser was 
placed in charge and remained until June, 1907. The 
Rev. Alphonse Miller, C.PP.S., was pastor from June, 
1907, until 1911, when the Rev. Henry Hoerstmann, al- 
ready referred to, was given charge. He was succeeded 
by the Rev. Charles J. A. Scholl, who served from 1918 
to 1922; he was followed by the Rev. S. J. Ryder from 
1922 to 1927. The Rev. Anthony J. Kroeger was then 
placed in charge of Lowell and remained there until his 
death by an accident in July, 1937. In November of that 
year the Rev. Edward M. Boney was transferred to 
Lowell and is its present pastor. 



The Rev. Edward Mathias Boney was born in Crown 
Point, Indiana, en April 2, 1890. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Lawrence College, Mt. Calvary, Wis- 
consin, and at the Canisianum, Innsbruck, Austria. He 
was ordained on July 26, 1914, by Bishop Weitz, of Salz- 
burg. 

Father Boney was appointed assistant at St. Paul's, 
Marion, in November, 1914, and was transferred to St. 
Joseph's, Mishawaka, in August, 1915. Then he was 
transferred to St. Joseph's, Hammond, in June, 1918. He 
was appointed chaplain of St. Joseph's Convent, Tipton, 
with Cicero as a mission, in July 1919, and remained 
there until July, 1925, when he was appointed pastor of 
St. Ann's, Kewanna, where he remained for six years. 
He was then transferred to Hartford City in June, 1931. 
On November 19, 1937, he was appointed pastor of St. 
Edward's, Lowell. 

SCHERERVILLE 

St. Michael's 
1874 
Catholics in this rural district, before the first 
church was erected for them in 1874, attended divine 
services at St. John, Turkey Creek, Crown Point, or Dyer. 
The land for church and cemetery was donated by Nicho- 
las Scherer, after whom the town is named. On this pro- 
perty the Rev. Henry Meissner, then pastor of Crown 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Point, built a frame church. The next year a house for the 
priest was erected. 

The Rev. Godfrey Kueng was appointed the first 
pastor in 1875, but a year later returned to Europe. He 
was succeeded, in turn, by the Rev. John H. Bathe from 
February until August, 1877 ; the Rev. F. X. Deimel from 
August, 1877, to May, 1881 ; the Rev. William Berg from 
May, 1881, until September, 1929, the time of his death. 

Father Berg, who was made a Domestic Prelate in 
the year 1928, built the entire present parish plant. In 
1886 he procured the Sisters of St. Francis of Joliet to 
teach in the public schools. In 1888 he built a residence 
for them, and in the year 1900 the first parochial school 
was erected. It was replaced in 1916 by the present school. 
In the year 1912 he enlarged the rectory, and built a new 
convent in the year 1914. His last accomplishment was 
the building of the present church in 1929 and the erec- 
tion, in the cemetery, of a permanent altar and sanctuary 
with a very impressive approach. He and his brother 
John Berg are buried near this altar. 

The present pastor, the Rev. Peter A. Biegel, has 
been in charge since October 4, 1929. The church, which 
was not quite finished when he became pastor, is now 
complete in all its appointments, and most of the in- 
debtedness incurred in its building has been liquidated 
under Father Biegel. 



The Rev. Peter A. Biegel was born at New Cambria, 
Missouri, on April 29, 1883. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Joseph College , Collegeville, at St. 
Lawrence College, Mt. Calvary, Wisconsin, and at Mt. 
St. Mary Seminary. He was ordained bj^ Bishop Alerding 
on June 18, 1909. 

His first appointment was to the post of assistant at 
St. Joseph's, LaPorte. In June, 1912, he was made chap- 
lain at St. Joseph's Convent, Tipton, from which place he 
attended Cicero. In April, 1919, he was given the pastor- 
ate of St. Mary's, Dunnington, and on October 3, 1929, 
promoted to St. Michael's, Schererville. 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



SHELBY 

St. Theresa's 
1938 

There had long been a church at Lake Village south of 
Shelby, but it was closed and ultimately sold after most 
of the Catholics moved to cities in Lake County. Farmers 
north of Shelby had nearly always attended the church 
at Lowell, where there was a Catholic school. 

But in the year 1935 three persons, who were eager 
to have a church located at Shelby visited Bishop Noll to 
inform him that some twenty families and a number of 
individuals, who were not attending divine services any- 
where, had promised to attend Mass regularly if a small 
church were brought closer to them. 

The Bishop urged them temporarily to rent a place 
and to engage the services of a religious who was located 
about seven miles distant — just beyond the Illinois line. 

Interest soon developed and a miniature church was 
constructed by the people themselves in 1938, and dedi- 
cated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. 

In July 1939 Bishop Noll matched a $1,000 contribu- 
tion made by the Catholic Church Extension Society, and 
appointed the Rev. John Woods to direct the Shelby 
Catholics. At this writing a small church is being built 
on property secured by Father Woods, and is dedicated 
to St. Theresa of Avila in compliance with the wish of 
the donor of the gift to the Catholic Church Extension 
Society. 



The Rev. John J. Woods was ordained for the Vin- 
centian Order, and for some years was engaged in field 
work for the Bureau of Indian Missions. 

When that work was discontinued Bishop Noll per- 
mitted Father Woods to assist priests who asked for his 
services in Gary and South Bend. He served as assistant 
to Father Kukla, O. F. M., at St. Stephen's, South Bend, 
for several years, and in July, 1939, was appointed to 
organize the Catholics in and about Shelby. Father 
Woods is now building a church at Shelby. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Hammond Deanery Priests Not Engaged In Parish Work 

The Rev. Joseph Hagenmayer has been chaplain at 
St. Margaret Hospital, Hammond, conducted by the 
Sisters of St. Francis, since 1927. 

The Rev. Joseph Hagenmayer was born at Neu- 
hausen, Germany, on August 8, 1879. Father Hagen- 
mayer came to this country as a boy and entered St. 
Benedict's College, Atchison, Kansas, and then St. Mein- 
rad's and St. Francis' Seminaries. He was ordained on 
June 13, 1908, by Archbishop Quigley, of Chicago. 

Father Hagenmayer was given an appointment as 
assistant at St. Joseph's, Hammond, in 1927, and was 
appointed to St. Margaret's Hospital, on June 18, 1928. 



The Rev. John F. Bartkowski, to whom reference is 
made under St. John Bosco parish, serves as chaplain to 
the Sisters of Mercy at the Lyndora Home, Hammond. 



The Rev. Michael Urbanski is chaplain at Mount 
Mercy Sanitarium, operated by the Sisters of Mercy. 

Father Urbanski was born on September 27, 1873, 
at Kosing-Stare, Poland. He came to this country after 
finishing his primary education in his native land. He 
prepared for the holy priesthood at St. Mary's College, 
Orchard Lake ; at St. John Cantius', Philadelphia ; at St. 
Francis' Seminary, Loretto, Pennsylvania, and at SS. 
Cyril and Methodius', Orchard Lake, and was ordained by 
the late Bishop Gallagher on June 27, 1920. 

Father Urbanski served as assistant respectively at 
St. Casimir's, Hammond; St. Adalbert's, Whiting; St. 
John Cantius', Indiana Harbor; St. Adalbert's, South 
Bend; St. Stanislaus', Michigan City; St. Stanislaus', 
East Chicago; St. Hedwig's, Gary, and again at St. 
Stanislaus', Michigan City, until April, 1930, when he 
received his appointment as chaplain at Mount Mercy. 



The Rev. Robert Emmons has been chaplain at St. 
Catherine's Hospital, East Chicago (Indiana Harbor) 
since July 5, 1934. 



HAMMOND DEANERY 



Father Emmons was born at Wilmerding, Pennsyl- 
vania, on January 18, 1892. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at Duquesne University and at the Passionist 
Seminary, and was ordained for the Passionist Order by 
the late Bishop O'Connor, of Newark, on December 18, 
1920. 

Father Emmons was released from his Order in 
1932 because of the need of supporting his mother, and 
served as assistant at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne, for 
nine months. His next appointment was assistant at 
St. Joseph's, LaPorte, for three months ; at St. Vincent's, 
Logansport, for two months; at St. Mary's, Michigan 
City, for six months. Thereupon he was given the chap- 
laincy at St. Catherine's Hospital. 



Gary Deanery 



Rt. Rev. Thomas F. Jansen, Dean 

At the time the writer of this sketch was ordained 
there was no such place as Gary, Ind., which now counts 
more than 100,000 people. The hundred square miles of 
yellow sand along the shores of Lake Michigan held no 




The Rt. Rev. Msgr. Thomas F. Jansen and Holy Angels' Church, 
Gary, of which he is pastor. 



GARY DEANERY 



attraction to settlers of any kind. But the excellence of 
this magnificent lake site and its proximity to the city of 
Chicago did attract big business. There is located at 
Gary the largest unit of the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion. It has become a steel city, with practically no other 
kind of industries. 

When the city was laid out property was procured 
by Bishop Alerding for the English people resident there, 
and a little later for people of five large foreign groups. 
We call them "foreign" groups because they were brought 
directly from Hungary, Slovakia, Poland, Lithuania and 
Croatia, the United States Steel Corporation having ad- 
vertised in the newspapers of those countries for laborers. 

Bishop Alerding was assisted by the United States 
Steel Corporation in the erection of combination churches 
and schools for all these national groups, but unfortun- 
ately they were located in the same area, so that when 
the third generation will need no more than one large 
church and school there will be several. 

The Gary Deanery embraces the east half of Lake 
County and the entire County of Porter, in which are 
located the cities of Valparaiso and Chesterton. 

The Gary Deanery comprises the following parishes : 

Citij of Gary 

Holy Angels, St. Monica's, 
Holy Family, 



Holy Rosary, St. Mary's, Crown Point, 

Holy Trinity Croatian, St. Mary's, Griffith, 

Holy Trinity Slovak, g^ Bridget's, Hobart, 

Sacred Heart, g^ p^^j,^^ Valparaiso 

St. Anthonys, „, ,x , x^ x 

St. Casimir's, St. Mary s, Kouts, 

St Emeric's Sorrowful Mother, Wheat- 

St. Francis Xavier, field, 

St. Hedwig's, SS. Peter and Paul, Lotta- 

St. Luke's, ville, 

St. Mark's, Assumption, New Chicago, 

St. Mary of the Lake, St. Patrick's, Chesterton. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



GARY 

In the city of Gary are located St. Mary Mercy Hos- 
pital, conducted by the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ ; 
a large Nurses' Home; the Judge Gary-Bishop Alerding 
Settlement House, towards whose erection the United 
States Steel Corporation was a generous contributor; 
the Oblate Fathers' Mission Center, and also the Mission 
Center of the Society of Missionary Catechists; the be- 
ginnings of a Home for the Aged near Crown Point 
under the auspices of the Sisters of St. Francis of Kunge- 
gunda. Resident at the Settlement House are a number 
of Sisters of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ, who 
conduct all-day religious instruction classes in public 
elementary and high schools. They work under the di- 
rection of the Rev. Frederick Westendorf, who is assist- 
ed by Father Mooney, O.M.I. 

In Porter County, close to Gary, is located a Na- 
tional Shrine built and conducted under the auspices of 
the Slovak Franciscan Fathers. 

Holy Angels 

1907 

The Rev. Thomas F. Jansen, then pastor of Hobart, 
was selected in the year 1906 by Bishop Alerding to 
organize the Catholics who had come to the newly found- 
ed town of Gary. Even before a house was built a force 
of men was occupied with the work of grading sand dunes 
for streets and residences, of building sewage, water and 
electric systems for what was foreknown by the United 
States Steel Corporation to become a large city. 

Father Hansen secured property for Gary's first 
church facing new, unoccupied streets which were to be 
named Tyler, Polk, Sixth and Seventh. 

In May 1907, Father Jansen moved to Gary and soon 
began the building of a combination church, school and 
convent, which were dedicated to the Holy Angels. The 
School Sisters of Notre Dame were engaged to teach the 
school children. 

A house was erected on the northwest corner of the 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



block opposite for a temporary rectory. This was sold 
later. 

It was not long until Holy Angels became a large 
parish, and frequent expansion was necessary, particu- 
larly for school room. The people were accommodated in 
the original church by multiplying the number of Masses 
on Sunday. 

In the year 1923 Father Jansen erected a commodi- 
ous rectory and enlarged the convent in 1931. In 1937 
when it was found necessary to replace his heating plant, 
he spent $25,000.00 on a new boiler house and boilers 
with capacity sufficient to take care of a new church 
which was in prospect. 

An architect was recently employed to design a 
church which is expected to eclipse any other in the city. 
The parish is out of debt and has a sinking fund for the 
Ijuilding of a new church. 

Father Jansen conceived the idea of a Catholic Home 
for Delinquent Boys of the State of Indiana, and in co- 
operation with the late Bishop Chartrand of Indianapolis, 
was responsible for the founding of the Gibault Home 
near Terre Haute which, after long years of difficulty, 
is now free of debt, and filled to capacity. In the year 
1912, he established Catechist Centers in Gary, and in 
1915, with the assistance of the Rev. John B. deVille 
inaugurated Catholic Social Settlement work. In the 
year 1933 Father Jansen was appointed a Diocesan Con- 
suitor and in the same year made a Domestic Prelate. 

When the Hammond Deanery was divided in 1936, 
he became the first Dean of the Gary District. 

Monsignor Jansen is assisted at present by the Rev. 
Carl J. Schnitz, Rev. William M. Faber and Rev. James 
Elliott. 



The Right Rev. Monsignor Francis Thomas Jansen 
was born on the ocean while his parents were moving 
to the United States and to Fort Wayne, Indiana, on 
December 25, 1872. He prepared for the holy priesthood 
at St. Lawrence College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, and 
at Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained on 



GARY DEANERY 385 



July 2, 1900, by the Most Rev. Martinelli, the Apostolic 
Delegate. 

From August, 1900 to February, 1903 he was assist- 
ant at St. Mary's, Michigan City; and from February, 
1903 until May, 1907, he was pastor of Hobart. From 
May, 1907 until the present time he has been pastor of 
Holy Angels, Gary. 

Rev. Carl J. Schnitz was born at Logansport on 
June 15, 1893. His studies for the holy priesthood were 
pursued at St. Joseph College, CoUegeville, and at Mount 
St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained on June 11, 
1927, by Bishop Noll. 

After spending one year as assistant at Our Lady 
of Hungary Church, South Bend, he was appointed assist- 
ant at Holy Angels, on June 22, 1928. Father Schnitz 
had temporary appointments at St. Peter's, LaPorte, and 
at St. Aloysius', Sheldon. By his own choice he is still 
serving Monsignor Jansen as first assistant. 

The Rev. William M. Faber was born at Evanston, 
Illinois, on March 26, 1909. He pursued his studies for 
the holy priesthood at St. Joseph College, CoUegeville, 
St. Gregory's, Cincinnati, and St. Meinrad's, and was 
ordained on June 6, 1936, by Bishop Noll. He is still 
filling his first appointment as assistant at Holy Angels, 
Gary. 

The Rev. James Elliott was born at Crawfordsville, 
Indiana, on July 27, 1911. His studies for the holy priest- 
hood were made at St. Joseph College, CoUegeville; at 
St. Gregory's and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was 
ordained on May 22, 1927, and the following month was 
appointed assistant at Holy Angels, Gary. 

St. Hedwig's 

1909 

St. Hedwig's was the second parish started in the 
city of Gary. Its founding was for the benefit of the 
Polish people who had come there to work. The parish 
was organized by the Rev. A. Stachowiak in July, 1907, 
while pastor of St. John Cantius, East Chicago. 

In March, 1909, the parish received its first resident 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



pastor in the person of Rev. Peter A. Kahellek, who erect- 
ed the original church and rectory in 1909, the original 
school in 1910, and the convent in 1913. In the year 1917 
he replaced the first church by a large combination church 
and school, and built a new rectory in the year 1924. 

Father Kahellek retired from parish work in August, 
1929, and was succeeded by the Rev. Michael M. Swiat- 
kowski, who, at the present time, is building a new 
church. 

Father Swiatkowski wrecked the original church in 
1938, and the original school in 1940. In the year 1939 
he built an addition to the convent. 

St. Hedwig's had a nice sinking fund for the erec- 
tion of a new church at the beginning of the industrial 
depression in 1929, but Isecause of the complete failure 
of the financial institution where the money was de- 
posited the money was lost. However the parish now has 
a large church under construction. 

St. Hedwig's School is taught by the Franciscan 
Sisters of St. Kunegunda. 

Father Swiatkowski is assisted at this time by the 
Rev. Louis S. Madejczyk and the Rev. Joseph S. 
Dziadowicz. 



The Rev. Michael N. Swiatkowski was born in Chi- 
cago on December 23, 1887, and prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Stanislaus College, Chicago, St. Mary's, 
and SS. Cyril and Methodius Seminaries, Orchard Lake, 
Michigan, and was ordained on June 20, 1913 by Bishop 
Alerding. 

His first appointment, extending only over a few 
months, was to the church where he is now pastor. He 
then served as assistant at St. Stanislaus', Michigan City, 
for eight months. During the following year he was 
given a leave of absence because of illness. From Sep- 
tember, 1915 to November, 1918, he was pastor of St. 
Hyacinth's, Fort Wayne, and from November, 1918 to 
August, 1929, he was pastor of Terre Coupee with Rolling 
Prairie as a mission. He built the new rectory at Terre 
Coupee. 



GARY DEANERY 387 



Since August, 1929 he has been pastor of St. Hed- 
wig's, Gary. 

The Rev. Joseph E. Madejczyk was born at East 
Chicago, Indiana, on June 1, 1910. After attending St. 
Mary's, Orchard Lake, he entered St. Meinrad's, and was 
ordained on June 6, 1936, by Bishop Noll. His first ap- 
pointment was to his present charge. Father Madejczyk 
was given a leave of absence for nearly a year on account 
of illness. 

The Rev. Joseph S. Dziadowicz was born at East 
Chicago, Indiana, on May 2, 1911. He prepared for the 
holy priesthood at St. Mary's, Orchard Lake, and at St. 
Meinrad's, and was ordained on June 11, 1938. On July 
7, 1939, he was sent to St. Hedwig's as assistant. 

Holy Trinity (Croatian) 

1912 

The United States Steel Corporation allocated 
$50,000.00 to be divided equally among five parishes 
needed in the city of Gary because of the importation of 
that many national groups directly from Europe. These 
were the Holy Trinity Croatian, St. Emeric's, Hungarian ; 
Holy Trinity, Slovak; St. Casimir's, Lithuanian, and 
Sacred Heart, Polish. Later the same Corporation con- 
tributed $50,000.00 more, of which each of these parishes 
received $10,000.00. 

The first pastor of the Croatian parish, whose prop- 
erty is situated on Adams Street, was Rev. Luke Terzic, 
who remained from 1912 to 1919. He built the present 
church and the present rectory. 

He was succeeded by the Rev. Draugetin Jesih who 
was pastor from 1919 until 1922. He erected the first 
school and the convent occupied by the Sisters of St. 
Francis. 

The next pastor was the Rev. Joseph Judnic who 
served from 1922 until January, 1937. He erected the 
present school. 

In February, 1937, the parish was turned over to the 
Black Franciscans, who located two priests there, the 
Rev. V. M. Ardas, O.M.C. and the Rev. Vladimir Vlahovic, 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



O.M.C. The latter was replaced in January, 1939, by the 
Rev. Raphael Grzkovic, O.M.C. 

Father Ardas has done exceptionally good work 
among the Croatians. Besides paying off most of the in- 
debtedness, he has arranged to open a mission church in 
Glen Park where many Croatians have settled. 

Gary is the seat of the National Croatian Roman 
Catholic Union. 

Holy Trinity (Slovak) 
1911 

Holy Trinity Slovak is one of the parishes which re- 
ceived help, at the time of its formation, from the United 
States Steel Corporation. After several meetings by par- 
ishioners, a committee was sent to Bishop Alerding to 
ask for a priest to organize a parish for the Slovak people 
of Gary, and to build a church for them. 

The first pastor was the Rev. D. Major, who erected 
the present church and rectory. He served from October, 
1911, to July, 1914, and was succeeded for three months 
by the Rev. Luzar. 

The next pastor was the Rev. George Benzik, who 
was in charge from October, 1914, until February, 1916. 
He erected a convent and opened a school in the base- 
ment of the church, and procured the services of the Sis- 
ters of Ss. Cyril and Methodius as teachers. 

In February, 1916, the Rev. Michael Judt was given 
the pastorate. He built the present brick school. 

He was succeeded in April, 1919, by the Rev. Andrew 
Dziacky who pastored the people until July, 1921. 

The next pastor, who has been in charge until the 
present time, was the Rev. Ignatius Stepuncik, who, be- 
sides repairing all the buildings, purchased six lots for a 
-school playground, paid off the debt resulting from the 
building of the school and accumulated a fund in the 
amount of $115,000.00 towards the erection of a new 
church. At this writing the congregation is hesitating 
between crowding a new church on the present property 
and the purchase of a block of land elsewhere for an 
entire new set of buildings. 



GARY DEANERY 



Beginning with December, 1927, except for the in- 
terval during which the Rev. Joseph Hession was a resi- 
dent assistant (March, 1932 to July, 1934), Father Step- 
uncik has been assisted by Benedictine Fathers from 
Lisle, Illinois, at weekends. 



The Rev. Ignatius A. Stepuncik was born at Naure- 
stove, Slovakia on January 8, 1887. Although he started 
his studies for the holy priesthood in his native land, he 
finished theology at St. Meinrad's Seminary. He was 
ordained on May 21, 1910 by Bishop Denis O'Douaghris. 

After serving in the Diocese of Springfield, Illinois, 
he came to the Diocese of Fort Wayne and was made 
pastor of Holy Trinity Slovak Parish, Gary, in August. 
1921. 

St. Casimir's 
1916 

The Lithuanian Catholics of Gary were visited from 
St. Francis Church, East Chicago, by the Rev. Joseph 
Jakstys beginning in 1915. In May 1916 Bishop Alerding 
appointed the Rev. Casimir Ambrositis the first resident 
pastor, who served until October of the same year. 

He was succeeded by the Rev. Francis Rusis, who 
died as pastor in May, 1919, but who during his tenure of 
office, built the first church and hall. The latter was con- 
verted into a school by Father Martis in the year 1927. 
The Sisters of St. Casimir have charge of the school. 

The Rev. Paul Daniunas succeeded Father Rusis and 
remained until September, 1920. 

Father Martis was then appointed pastor and served 
until October 1, 1934, when he was loaned to the Arch- 
diocese of Milwaukee. Father Martis built the present 
brick church in 1927, and the convent in 1928. 

During the absence of Father Martis, the Rev. John 
Vincius served until February, 1936 ; and the Rev. Simon 
Draugelis until August, 1940, when Father Martis re- 
turned to his parish and was welcomed by the parishion- 
ers for whom he had done so much. 

Rev. Joseph S. Martis was born in Lithuania on 
August 14, 1886. He prepared for the holy priesthood 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



at Duquesne University and at SS. Cyril and Methodius 
Seminary, Orchard Lake. He was ordained by Bishop 
Alerding on June 18, 1915. 

After serving as assistant at St. Francis' Church, 
East Chicago he was appointed pastor of St. Casimir's, 
Gary, on September 15, 1920. In October, 1934, he was 
given a leave of absence to work in the Archdiocese of 
Milwaukee, but in August, 1940 he returned to this dio- 
cese and was again given charge of St. Casimir's. 

St. Emeric's 

1913 

A small church was built for the Magyars at Gary 
on the corner of Sixteenth and Monroe Streets by Father 
Bognar, who was then pastor of the Hungarian parish at 
East Chicago. Father Francis Fekete, the successor of 
Father Bognar continued to visit the St. Emeric's Mission 
at Gary until March, 1913 when the Rev. Stephen Varga 
was appointed the first resident pastor. 

This priest was transferred to East Chicago in June, 
1914, and was succeeded by Rev. Melchior Erdujhelyi. 
He purchased new property on Fifteenth Avenue to 
which he moved the church and on which he built a 
rectory. 

On August 1, 1915, Rev. Joseph P. Toth, just or- 
dained, was placed in charge of the Gary parish. In 1918 
Father Toth built a new combination church and school 
and a convent for the Sisters. The Poor Handmaids of 
Jesus Christ were engaged to teach in the school. They 
were replaced later by the Sisters of Divine Charity. 

On March 1, 1927, Father Toth was transferred to 
Holy Trinity parish, East Chicago, and was succeeded by 
the Rev. Joseph Nemeth, who did excellent work at St. 
Emeric's, where he died on December 15, 1934. 

The next pastor to shepherd this flock, and who is 
still in charge, was the Rev. Geza Gyorfy. Father Gyorfy 
is not physically strong and at his own request was trans- 
ferred from Our Lady of Hungary parish. South Bend, a 
larger parish, to that of St. Emeric's, Gary. 



GARY DEANERY 391 



Father Gyorfy is assisted by the Rev. Francis R. 
Nowak. 



The Rev. Geza Gyorfy was born in Hungary on 
August 11, 1894. He pursued his studies in the Diocese of 
Rosnaviensis in his native land, and was ordained on May 
16, 1918, for that diocese. 

Shortly after his ordination Father Gyorfy came to 
the United States where he worked in the Diocese of 
Toledo until October, 1921. He was given the pastorate 
of Our Lady of Hungary Parish, South Bend, where he 
built a large school and convent. On January 21, 1935, he 
was transferred to St. Emeric's, Gary. 

The Rev. Francis R. Nowak was born in Chicago on 
July 7, 1907. He pursued his ecclesiastical studies at St. 
Bonaventure's College, and at Mount St. Mary's Semi- 
nary, Cincinnati. He was ordained on May 21, 1932, by 
Bishop Noll. 

Father Nowak served as assistant at St. Bavo's, 
Mishawaka, from June, 1932 until September, 1935, when 
he was transferred to St. Stanislaus', Michigan City, with 
residence at St. Anthony's Hospital, where he also served 
as chaplain. In July, 1939, he was transferred to St. John 
Cantius', East Chicago, and in July, 1940, was given a 
leave of absence for some months because of ill health. 
In October, 1940 he was appointed assistant at St. 
Emeric's, Gary. 

Sacred Heart 
1913 

The Sacred Heart parish is located in that part of 
Gary long known as ToUeston. This is one of the churches 
which was a beneficiary of the contribution made by the 
United States Steel Corporation towards the founding of 
five Gary churches. From the year 1912 the Polish 
people of Tolleston had been attended from St. Hedwig's, 
Gary, under the pastorate of the Reverend Peter Kahellek. 
In the year 1913 Father Kahellek built a frame church 
which provided for school room in the basement. 

The Sisters of St. Francis of Kunegunda were en- 
gaged to teach the school. Sacred Heart Church con- 



392 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTOR Y 

tinued to be a Mission until May 1918, when the Rev- 
erend Ignatius Gapczynski was appointed the first resi- 
dent pastor. He purchased a house near by and moved 
it to its present location for the purpose of a rectory. 

From the time Sacred Heart received its first resident 
pastor the Church in New Chicago was attached to it as 
a Mission. Father Gapczynski also erected a convent in 
1919. 

In February 1920 the Reverend Theophil Chemma 
was appointed pastor and remained until July 1925. His 
successor was the Rev. Julian Doktor, who erected a new 
combination church and school in 1929, but shortly after 
the completion of this work the Rev. John Wrobleski was 
appointed pastor and served until April 1932. His suc- 
cessor, the Reverend Anthony Nadolny was in charge 
from April 1922 until July 1939, when, because of his 
illness, an acting pastor was appointed in the person of 
Rev. Casimir Moskwinski, who succeeded Father Nadolny 
at the time of his death. May 1940. This parish started 
its costly construction program just a few months before 
the city of Gary began to suffer greatly from the indus- 
trial depression through the close of all the steel mills. 
Its parishioners, therefore, have quite a large debt to 
cope with. 



Rev. Casimir B. Moskwinski was born in South Bend, 
Indiana, on March 2, 1907. He pursued his studies for 
the holy priesthood at St. Mary's College, Orchard Lake, 
and at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He was 
ordained on May 30, 1981, by Bishop Noll. 

On June 26, 1931, he was appointed assistant at St. 
Emeric's, Gary, where he remained for a year, when he 
was transferred as assistant to Holy Trinity Hungarian 
parish, East Chicago. On February 6, 1935, he was ap- 
pointed assistant at St. Mary's, Gary. On July 8, 1939, 
he was named acting pastor of Sacred Heart Church, 
Gary, and on June 24, 1940, after the death of Rev. 
Anthony Nadolny, was appointed pastor of the parish. 



GARY DEANERY 393 



St. Luke's 

1917 

In the year 1917 the Holy Angels parish was divided, 
and about one mile south property was purchased for a 
new church by the Reverend J. Gnibba, who had been 
an assistant at Holy Angels. Father Gnibba immediately 
began the erection of a complete parish plant, consisting 
of a combination church and school, and a rectory. These 
were completed in 1917. 

In the year 1921 Father Gnibba erected a convent 
for the Sisters, which was replaced by him in 1925 by a 
larger and better house. Father Gnibba died on July 26, 
1925, and was succeeded by the Rev. Raphael F. Donn- 
elly, who in the year 1929 added a second story to the 
brick school. He had previously, in 1926, joined the 
original frame school and convent and converted the 
same into a parish hall. 

Because of ill health Father Donnelly was helped a 
long time by two assistants. Since July 1940 he has had 
only one resident assistant, although the services of one 
of the Oblate Fathers are used here on Sunday. The 
present resident assistant is the Reverend Lawrence T. 
Reddington. 



The Rev. Raphael F. Donnelly was born at Mahon, 
Indiana, on February 24, 1889. He pursued his studies 
for the priesthood at St. Joseph's College, Gollegeville, 
and at Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained on 
November 18, 1913, by Bishop Alerding. 

On November 29, 1913 he was appointed assistant 
at All Saints', Hammond. His next appointment was as 
assistant at St. Mary's Church, Anderson, where he re- 
mained from August 28, 1916 until December 3, 1919, 
when he was given a leave of absence because of ill 
health. Upon his return to the Diocese on June 15, 1921, 
he was given the pastorate of the Immaculate Conception 
church, Ege. On August 25, 1925, he was appointed 
pastor of St. Luke's, Gary. 

The Rev. Lawrence Thomas Reddington was born 
in Madison County, Indiana, on April 30, 1905. He pre- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



pared for the holy priesthood at Columbia College, Dubu- 
que, and at St. Meinrad's, and was ordained on June 11, 
1938, by Bishop Noll. His first appointment was as 
assistant at St. Luke's, Gary. 

St. Mark's 
1921 

The beginnings of St. Mark's are traceable to in- 
struction classes provided for the children of the Glen 
Park district by the Rev. John B. de Ville. A small frame 
church, previously used by the German Evangelical 
Synod of North America, was purchased in May, 1921 for 
$1,100.00. The church was then moved to Thirty-ninth 
and Broadway, where four lots were purchased for the 
sum of 12,500.00. This action was taken by a group of 
lay people eager to have a church in that area ; they also 
endorsed the notes for the borrowing of money before 
Bishop Alerding was requested to furnish a pastor. 

Father de Ville was given charge of the new St. 
Mark's as a mission from 1921 until 1923, when the Rev. 
Joseph S. Ryder was made the first resident pastor, who 
immediately built a rectory adjacent to the little church. 

St. Mark's parish began to grow rapidly, and in 1926 
the location was changed again and a very beautiful new 
church and school were built on Ridge Road between 
Monroe and Jackson Streets. In the year 1929, Father 
Ryder built the present convent and engaged the Sisters 
of St. Dominic to teach. These were later replaced by the 
Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ. 

The frame rectory, which was built at the side of 
the original frame church was moved to the new prop- 
erty, and veneered with brick and is still in use. 

Because of the industrial depression which began 
soon after St. Mark's new church buildings were com- 
pleted the parish labored under a very heavy debt, but 
because its people cooperated so well with their pastor 
this has been steadily and even speedily reduced. 

Father Ryder is assisted by the Rev. Lawrence 
Grothouse. 



The Rev. Joseph Simon Ryder was born at Columbia 



GARY DEANERY 395 



City on September 8, 1887. After attending the Central 
Catholic High School for Boys in Fort Wayne, he entered 
St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, and later Mount St. 
Mary's, Cincinnati, and was ordained on June 27, 1914, 
by Bishop Alerding. 

In July, 1914, he was appointed assistant at Holy 
Angels', Gary, and on June 22, 1923, was appointed the 
first resident pastor of St. Mark's. 

The Rev. Lawrence Grothouse was born at Reynolds, 
Indiana, on February 25, 1906. He pursued his studies 
for the holy priesthood at St. Joseph's College, College- 
ville, at St. Gregory's and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati, 
and was ordained on May 22, 1937, by Bishop Noll. The 
next month he was appointed assistant at St. Mark's. 

St. Anthony's Chapel and 
The Catholic Settlement House 

1923 

As far back as 1913 William Gleason, then superin- 
tendent of the United States Steel Corporation, Gary unit, 
petitioned Bishop Alerding, through the Reverend John 
B. deVille, to organize some sort of Catholic social service 
work and to plan a center from which that work might 
emanate. The work was undertaken in a limited way, and 
the Catholic Instruction League organized. This was 
constituted of women volunteers who instructed Catholic 
children in schools, basements of churches, and in three 
centers especially built for the purpose. 

In the year 1923 with aid from the United States 
Steel Corporation the Reverend John B. deVille erected 
a Settlement House which he named after the then presi- 
dent of the Board of Directors of the Corporation, and 
after the Bishop of the Dioceses— the Judge Gary-Bishop 
Alerding Settlement House. 

In this building was incorporated a chapel intended 
especially for the Italian and Mexican people of Gary; 
also an auditorium, recreation rooms, living quarters 
for teachers and for the clergy who would have charge 
of St. Anthony's Chapel and of the Settlement House 
work. Father deVille was in charge from the year 1923 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



until 1930; the Reverend John J. Costello from March 
1930 until June 1935. The Reverend Frederick J. Wes- 
tendorf succeeded Father Costello, but in June 1936, be- 
cause of the growing demand for recreational work, was 
relieved of the pastoral care of the people attending St. 
Anthony's. 

He was succeeded on July 2, 1936 by the Reverend 
Carl J. Holsinger, under whom the work has increased, 
and because of the limited seating capacity of the Chapel, 
Father Holsinger was given an assistant in the person of 
the Rev. Fred J. Cardinali, in August 1938. 

The Missionary Catechists assisted with the work 
at the Settlement House until 1936, when they moved to 
a newly founded center in the heart of the colored area 
to work among the Negroes. They were replaced by the 
Poor Handmaids, who also conduct daily religious instruc- 
tion classes in the public schools. 



The Rev. Carl J. Holsinger was born at New Castle, 
Pennsylvania, oh February 23, 1900. He made his 
preparation for the holy priesthood at St. Joseph's Col- 
lege, Collegeville, and at the North American College in 
Rome. He was ordained in Rome on March 12, 1927, by 
Archbishop Palica. 

From August 12, 1927 until July, 1931, he served as 
assistant at St. Vincent's, Elkhart, at which time he was 
transferred to St. Peter's, Fort Wayne. On July 2, 1936, 
he was appointed pastor of St. Anthony's Chapel, Gary. 

The Rev. Fred Cardinali was born in Fort Wayne on 
August 19, 1911. He pursued his studies for the holy 
priesthood at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, at St. 
Gregory's, Cincinnati, and at the North American Col- 
lege in Rome. He was ordained in Rome on March 19, 
1938, by Bishop Hayes. On August 4, 1938 he was ap- 
pointed assistant at St. Anthony's, Gary. 

Holy Family 

1926 
For the benefit of the Polish people living in Glen 
Park a parish was founded and property purchased on 



GAEY DEANERY 397 



the corner of Ridge Road and Delaware Street, and the 
Reverend Michael C. Gadacz was appointed its first pas- 
tor. Father Gadacz was transferred from Assumption 
Church, New Chicago. He immediately began the erec- 
tion of a frame school, rectory and convent. In the year 
1929 Father Gadacz replaced the temporary church and 
school by a substantial brick structure. Because the con- 
struction work on the new building began a few months 
before the industrial depression set in, the parish found 
it difficult to liquidate to any degree the indebtedness in- 
curred by the new construction. The parish is growing 
and the reduction of the debt should create no special 
problem. 

The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. 
Francis teach in Holy Family school. 



The Rev. Michael Gadacz was born in South Bend, 
Indiana, on August 20, 1890. He pursued his studies for 
the priesthood at SS. Cyril and Methodius Seminary, 
Orchard Lake, and at Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati, and 
was ordained on June 15, 1917, by Bishop Alerding. 

His first appointment was as assistant at St. Casi- 
mir's, Hammond, where he remained until February 18, 
1920, when he became assistant at St. Stanislaus', East 
Chicago. On June 8, 1921 he was appointed pastor of 
Assumption parish. New Chicago, and on June 22, 1926 
received his present appointment as pastor of Holy Fam- 
ily Parish, Gary. 

St. Monica's (Colored) 

1928 

When the Reverend H. J. Conway was assistant at 
St. Mary's, East Chicago, he volunteered to work among 
the colored people of Gary, and the Bishop accepted his 
offer. 

In the year 1928, from Mercy Hospital, where he 
had his residence. Father Conway gathered together the 
few Negro Catholics of Gary and offered the Holy Sacri- 
fice for them on Sundays in a building located on the cor- 
ner of West 25th and Monroe Streets, which had been 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



erected some years before by the Gary Instruction League, 
an association of women who instructed children attend- 
ing the various public schools of that city. For this 
purpose three centers had been established. 

Father Conway was in charge until May 1934 and 
was succeeded by the Reverend Thomas Daley, who also 
lived at the hospital while serving the colored people at 
St. Monica's, until April 1939. 

The Oblate Fathers, who are working as missionar- 
ies among the colored in many dioceses, agreed to take 
over St. Monica's, and in April 1939 Bishop Noll cheer- 
fully accepted their good offer. 

The Reverend Daniel J. Finnegan, O.M.I., was given 
charge of St. Monica's, with residence at the Oblate Mis- 
sion Center located in the city of Gary. Both pastor and 
people are anxious to have a real church in the near future 
and are hoping that their dream will soon be realized. 

MILLER— EAST GARY 
MILLER 

St. Mary of the Lake 
1929 

The Rev. Francis X. Guerre, then assistant at Holy 
Angels, Gary, was appointed the first resident pastor of 
Miller, with St. Francis Xavier at East Gary as a mis- 
sion. Prior to this time the Catholic people of Miller 
attended Mass in an improvised church. However, Miller, 
long known as Lake Station, was attended as a mission 
from different priests beginning with the year 1861, when 
its first church was erected. 

In the year 1930, Father Guerre built a neat church 
at this place under which he provided a spacious base- 
ment containing social rooms. He lived in a rented house 
located some distance from his church until 1938, when 
he built a modern brick rectory along side the church. 

St. Mary of the Lake parish is growing steadily, and 
the congregation, augmented in the summer by visitors 
at the Lake resort, has reduced considerably the indebt- 
edness occasioned by the recent building program. 



GARY DEANERY 



The Missionary Catechists from their center at Gary 
instruct the children at Miller. Father Guerre also con- 
ducts vacation Summer Schools for the children of his 
parish. 



The Rev. Francis Xavier Guerre was born at St. Die, 
France, on July 3, 1898. While he was a child his parents 
moved to Kokomo, Indiana. He pursued his studies for 
the priesthood at St. Francis Seminary, St. Francis, Wis- 
consin, and at Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was 
ordained by Bishop Alerding on June 14, 1924. 

After serving one month as assistant at St. Vincent's, 
Elkhart, he was appointed assistant at Holy Angels', 
Gary. On August 14, 1929, he was named the first resi- 
dent pastor of St. Mary of the Lake parish, Gary, with 
St. Francis Xavier parish of East Gary as a mission. 

EAST GARY 

St. Francis Xavier 

1930 

When the parish at Miller received its first resident 
priest, the mission at East Gary, which hitherto had been 
attended from Hobart, was attached to Miller under the 
pastorate of the Rev. F. X. Guerre. Services had been 
occasionally conducted at East Gary nearly fifty years 
before the city of Gary was founded, and the mission had 
a church as far back as 1861. This church was abandoned 
in 1907, and wrecked in 1917. 

In the year 1981 Father Guerre built a new church 
at East Gary, since which time the parish has grown 
considerably in numbers. The children of the parish are 
instructed by Missionary Catechists from their center 
at Gary. 

Holy Rosary 

1931 

The Catholic people west of Ambridge were organiz- 
ed into a parish by the Rev. Arnold Wibbert in 1931. 
Father Wibbert had his residence at Mercy Hospital and 



400 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

conducted services for the new congregation in a rented 
store building until he was succeeded by the Rev. Louis 
Rataczak in 1933. 

Father Rataczak continued to hold services in this 
improvised church for two years, when he purchased a 
large piece of property from the Gary Land Company on 
which a neat frame church and rectory were built for 
Mm. This parish, like most others located in the out- 
skirts of Lake County cities, has grown rapidly. For 
several years Father Rataczak has been ill and has 
liad an assistant since July, 1940 in the person of the 
Hev. Louis J. Zenz. 

Missionary Catechists instruct the children of Holy 
Eosary parish. 



Rev. Louis J. Ratajczak was born in South Bend, 
Indiana, on July 3, 1895. He pursued his studies for the 
holy priesthood at St. Mary's, and at SS. Cyril and Meth- 
odius Seminary, Orchard Lake, Michigan, and was or- 
dained on May 26, 1923, by Bishop Alerding. 

His first appointment was as assistant at St. Stanis- 
laus', East Chicago where he remained for one year. On 
July 24, 1924 he was appointed assistant at St. Hedwig's, 
Gary, and on April 12, 1929 was transferred as assistant 
to St. John Cantius, East Chicago. After serving a few 
months as assistant at St. Casimir's, Hammond, he was 
given an appointment on April 7, 1932, as Chaplain at 
St. Anthony's Hospital, Michigan City, and as assistant 
at St. Stanislaus' parish. On July 6, 1933 he was given 
the pastorate of Holy Rosary, Gary. 

The Rev. Louis J. Zenz was born at St. Henry, Ohio, 
on November 19, 1912. He prepared for the holy priest- 
hood at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and at Mount 
St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained on June 3, 1939 
by Bishop Noll. 

His first appointment was as assistant at St. Jos- 
eph's, Hammond where he remained until June 28, 1940 
when he was transferred to Holy Rosary Church, Gary. 



GARY DEANERY 401 



CHESTERTON 

St. Patrick's 

1858 

What is now Chesterton was once called "Coffee 
Creek" ; later "Calumet." Although a priest occasionally 
visited here as far back as 1824, and offered Mass in 
Bailey's house until 1841, it had no church until 1858. 

In that year the Rev. E. B. Kilroy built the original 
church, and Chesterton was attached as a mission to 
LaPorte. Father Gillen served the people temporarily, 
and in 1868 they received their first resident pastor in 
the person of the Rev. John Flynn, who died at Chester- 
ton two years later. From 1870-1875 Chesterton was 
again a mission, attended from Notre Dame, Valparaiso 
and LaPorte; but in 1875 the Rev. John Lang was ap- 
pointed resident pastor, and served until March 1878. He 
was succeeded by the Rev. H. F. Joseph Kroll, who held 
the pastorate for nineteen years from August 1879 to 
January 1898, and built the first school and the present 
rectory. 

The present church was erected by Father O'Reilly 
in 1874, then of Valparaiso, and was enlarged by the 
Rev. Herman Juraschek, who succeeded Father Von 
Schwedler, the immediate successor of Father Kroll. 
Father Von Schwedler built the present school and Father 
Juraschek the present convent. The School Sisters of 
Notre Dame have charge of the school. 

The next pastor was the Rev. Lawerence Eberle, who 
had charge from 1911 to 1920. He was succeeded by the 
Rev. J. J. Seimetz from 1920 to 1932, who was replaced 
by the Rev. E. F. Eisenhardt in 1932, and who still 
has charge. The latter, in 1933, replaced the old heating 
plant with a modern one. 

The Chesterton parish is constituted of people speak- 
ing many tongues. 



Rev. Edmund E. Eisenhardt was born in Marion, 
Indiana, on January 21, 1894. He pursued his studies 
for the priesthood at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, 



FRAGMENTS OP OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



and at Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was ordained 
on November 30, 1918 by Bishop Alerding. 

On January 19, 1919 he was appointed assistant at 
St. Mary's, Lafayette, and on December 3, 1919 was 
transferred to Sacred Heart, Whiting. On June 28, 1922 
he was made assistant at St. Charles', Peru, and on Aug- 
ust 2 of the same year was given the pastorate of St. 
John's, Goshen. On March 19, 1926 he was appointed 
pastor of SS. Peter and Paul, Goodland where he remain- 
ed until he received his present appointment on January 
27, 1938. 

VALPARAISO 

St. Paul's 

1858 

Priests from Notre Dame began to wait on the few 
Catholics located in and around Valparaiso as far back 
as 1845, offering the Holy Sacrifice in the Court House 
and in open spaces. 

The Rev. Paul Gillen erected Valparaiso's first church 
in 1858, taking up his residence there as the first pastor 
in the same year. The building of two railroads greatly 
increased the size of the congregation. The succession 
of pastors was as follows : 

The Rev. John H. Force succeeded Father Gillen for 
six months ; the Rev. G. A. Hamilton for seven months ; 
the Rev. J. A. Botti, from August 1859 to September 
1862; the Rev. Michael O'Reilly, from January 1863 to 
August 1887, the time of his death. Father O'Reilly 
erected a school in 1867, a rectory, in 1870; a convent, 
in 1872, and the present large church, in 1883. 

The next pastor, the Rev. John Dempsey, was in 
charge from August 1887 to May 1898; the Rev. L. A. 
Moench was pastor from July 1898 to February 1903; 
the Rev. Wm. S. Hogan, from February 1903 to 1915; 
the Rev. E. J. Mungovan, from 1915 to January 1929; 
and the Rev. J. A. Sullivan from 1929 to the present time. 

St. Paul's church, one of the largest in the diocese, 
was under a heavy debt for many years. But today the 
parish has a large balance of cash on hand, thanks to the 



GARY DEANERY 403 



Revs. Mungovan and Sullivan, who have been efficient 
financial administrators, and under whom the congrega- 
tion grew both in numbers and spiritual practice. 

The Sisters of the Holy Cross teach in St. Paul's 
School. 



Rev. John A. Sullivan was born at Carnegie, Penn- 
sylvania, on September 27, 1885. After finishing his 
secondary education at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne, he 
attended St. Joseph's College, Collegeville and St. Bern- 
ard's, Rochester, New York. He was ordained on June 
17, 1911, by Bishop Alerding. 

He served as assistant at St. Mary's, Anderson from 
June 30, 1911 to August 28, 1916, when he was appoint- 
ed assistant at All Saints', Hammond. On June 8, 1912 
he received his first pastorate. Holy Family Parish, Gas 
City, and on January 11, 1929 was transferred to St. 
Paul's, Valparaiso. 

LOTTAVILLE 

SS. Peter and Paul's 

1851 

German immigrants settled here one hundred years 
ago, and had the benefit of an occasional Mass offered by 
a visiting priest in a log house. 

The Rev. B. J. Voors, C.S.C, built the first church 
in 1851, and Lottaville (Turkey Creek) continued to be 
a mission until 1858, when the Rev. Philip Wegemeyer 
was appointed a resident pastor. His successor, the Rev. 
M. P. Wehrle, built a stone church in 1863. From that 
time until 1888 Lottaville was served by eight priests, 
mostly from other points. The Rev. Charles Stetter, D.D., 
who had charge from 1888 to 1902 built the residence 
now occupied by the School Sisters of Notre Dame, who 
were placed in charge of the school. 

From 1902 to 1905 Lottaville was a mission attended 
by Father T. F. Jansen, of Hobart. Then the Rev. Fred- 
erick Koenig was assigned as resident pastor. He built 
the present beautiful church in 1916, the school in 1906, 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



the present convent in 1910, and the present rectory in 
1928. 

These improvements were nearly paid for vv^hen the 
Rev. J. M. Nickels was appointed "acting" pastor in 1932. 
Because of poor health Father Koenig tendered his res- 
ignation to the Bishop in 1936, and Father Nickels was 
placed in charge of SS. Peter & Paul's parish. In 1940 
the church was beautifully decorated. The parish has 
benefited by the expansion of the city of Gary to its very 
door. 



Rev. J. M. Nickels was born in Hammond, Indiana, 
on December 23, 1893. He pursued his studies for the 
holy priesthood at St. Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, 
Wisconsin; and at St. Meinrad Seminary. He was or- 
dained on June 14, 1919, by Bishop Alerding. 

From June, 1919 to June 22, 1927 he was assistant 
at St. Joseph's, Hammond, and teacher at St. Margaret 
School of Nursing of that city. On June 22, 1927 he was 
named pastor of St. Mary's, Kouts with Wheatfield as a 
mission. On April 7, 1932, he was appointed pastor of 
SS. Peter and Paul, Lottaville. 



GARY DEANERY 405 



CROWN POINT 

At present one of the smaller cities of Lake County, 
Crown Point remains the County seat. For several years 
during the Industrial depression period an unenviable 
stigma Vi^as attached to its name because of the com- 
petition for Chicago marriages. Its county jail was the 
last incarceration place of the notorious gangster, John 
Dillinger. 

But the residents of Crown Point are, for the most 
part, excellent, conservative and law-abiding people. This 
is particularly true of the Catholics, all of whom are 
members of St. Mary's parish. 

St. Mary's 
1865 

The Catholics of this town were visited up to the 
year 1865 from Lottaville. In the latter year the pastor 
of Lottaville, the Rev. M. P. Wehrle, was transferred to 
Crown Point as its first resident priest. He served from 
1865 to 1868 ; the Rev. L. Weiser from 1868 to 1871 ; the 
Rev. Henry Meissner from 1871 to 1875. Four priests 
served the parish during the next three years. Then 
Benedictine Fathers were in charge from 1878 to 1889. 

From 1889 until the present writing, or for 52 years, 
St. Mary's has had the same pastor in the person of Rev. 
Philip Guethoff, who, soon after his Golden Jubilee as 
priest in 1935, requested Bishop Noll to name his assist- 
ant of many years, the Rev. Joseph Hammes, "acting" 
pastor. This was done in July, 1939, on the occasion of 
Father Guethoff's Golden Jubilee as pastor of St. Mary's. 

The original priest's house was built in 1872 by 
Father Weiser, and the first school by Father Meissner 
in 1873. But the entire present plant, fully paid for, was 
erected by Father Guethoff, the church in 1890, the rec- 
tory and convent in 1911 and the school in 1916. 

During 1939, the outside walls of the buildings were 
tuckpointed and the interior of the church decorated. In 
1941 a new organ was purchased. 

The "acting" pastor. Father Hammes, is assisted by 
the Rev. Szot. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Rev. 
ton Guethoff 
London, 
N ovem,ber 
pursued his 
the holy 
at Mount 
Wis con sin 
Francis 
Wis con sin. 
d a i n e d on 
1884 by Bis- 
ger. 

15, 1884 he 
pastor of 
ment with 
a m iss io n, 
1, 1889 he 
ed pastor of 
Crown 




The Rev. Philip Guethofif 

52 years at St. Mary's, Crown 

Point 



Phillip An- 
was born in 
England, on 
18, 1856. He 
studies for 
p riesthood 
Calvary, 
and at St. 
Se min ary, 
He was or- 
J u n e 11, 
hop Dwen- 
On June 
was named 
Nix Settle- 
Roanoke as 
and on July 
was appoint- 
St. Mary's 
Point. 



Rev. Joseph H. Hammes was born at Monterey, 
Indiana, on January 5, 1900. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, and was 
ordained on May 29, 1926, by Bishop Noll. 

On June 17, 1926 he was appointed assistant at St. 
Mary's, Crown Point, and on July 8, 1939 was named as 
Acting Pastor of the same parish. 

Rev. John J. Szot was born in East Chicago, Indiana, 
on June 13, 1913. He attended St. Mary's College, Orch- 
ard Lake, and St. Meinrad's Seminary. He was ordained 
on June 11, 1938, by Bishop Noll. 

His first appointment was as assistant at Sacred 
Heart, LaPorte where he remained until August 23, 1939 
when he was appointed assistant at St. Mary's, Crown 
Point, and given the care of the Catholic patients at the 
Lake County institutions. 



GARY DEANERY 407 



KOUTS — WHEATFIELD 
KOUTS 

St. Mary's 
1884 

Prior to 1864 Kouts was occasionally attended from 
Rensselaer. From 1864 to 1887 it was a mission attached 
to Valparaiso. In 1884 Father M. O'Reilly, of that place, 
built a small church. From 1887 to 1894 priests from 
North Judson, Pulaski and Wanatah attended Kouts. 
Then the mission was attached to Monterey, and visited 
in turn by the Revs. Charles Thiele, Gregory Zern, Jos- 
eph Bilstein and Bruno Soengen. 

After the old church was destroyed by a cyclone in 
1917, Father Soengen started the erection of the present 
church in 1918 by building only its basement. In 1921 
Father Soengen was replaced by Rev. Joseph Suelzer, 
who remained in charge until June, 1928, and who, as 
the first resident priest, built a rectory in 1921 and the 
superstructure of the church in 1926. Wheatfield was 
then attached to Kouts as a mission. 

From June 1928 to April 1932 the Rev. J. M. Nichels 
was in charge. He was succeeded by Rev. Aug. Kond- 
ziela, whose energy has been expended chiefly on balan- 
cing finances because of the comparatively large debt and 
the need of many repairs. 



Rev. Augustine S. Kondziela was born at Bessemer, 
Michigan, on December 31, 1895. He prepared for the 
holy priesthood at St. Bonaventure's College, Pulaski; at 
St. Francis' Seminary, and SS. Cyril and Methodius 
Seminary, Orchard Lake. He was ordained in June, 
1920 by Bishop Gallagher. 

On July 7, 1920, he was appointed assistant at St. 
John Cantius', East Chicago, but was transferred on 
August 25, 1925, to St. Adalbert's, South Bend where he 
served until July 19, 1926, when he was appointed assist- 
ant at St. Adalbert's, Whiting. On July 15, 1927 he was 
appointed pastor of St. Joseph's, East Chicago, and on 
April 7, 1932, received his present appointment, pastor 
of St. Mary's, Kouts with Wheatfield as a mission. 



408 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

WHEATFIELD 

Our Sorrowful Mother 

1886 

This congregation, due to the proximity of Lake 
County cities, has been growing in size during recent 
years, necessitating an enlargement of the original church, 
built in 1877. This improvement was made by the pres- 
ent pastor, the Rev. A. Kondziela, who is now preparing 
to erect a hall for social purposes. 

The Catholics of Wheatfield were visited by priests 
from various points, beginning with Father Joseph Step- 
han in 1872, who, as well as many of his successors, at- 
tended the place from the Indian School located at Rens- 
selaer. 

After a resident pastor was placed at Kouts in 1921, 
Wheatfield was attached as a mission to that place. 

HOBART 

St. Bridget's 
1905 

The people of Hobart, which developed with the 
growth of Gary, had been attended, prior to the year 
1875, by the pastor of Chesterton. Services were held in a 
small frame church. From that year on until the first 
resident pastor was appointed in the person of Rev. 
Charles Stetter, D.D., Hobart was attended from Turkey 
Creek and Valparaiso. 

Father Stetter was succeeded in 1905 by the Rev. 
Thomas Jansen, who purchased the present rectory and 
property for a future church. From this point Father 
Jansen organized the first parish in Gary, and was trans- 
ferred to that place in May, 1907. 

He was succeeded by the Rev. William Hoff who, in 
1911, erected a combination church, school and convent, 
of brick construction. However the school was not opened 
until 1927 under the pastorate of Father Roederer. The 
Sisters of St. Francis, Lafayette, were engaged to teach 
the children. They were supplanted by the Mantellate 
Servants of Mary in September, 1940. 



GARY DEANERY 



The Rev. Joseph Lynn and the Rev. John Steger suc- 
ceeded Father Hoff, the former having had charge from 
1921 to January, 1925, and the latter from January to 
September, 1925. Father Lynn remodeled the church in 
1922, and purchased property south of the present rec- 
tory. Additional property vv^as purchased by the Rev. 
Paul Roederer as a site for a new convent, for the erec- 
tion of which preparations are being made at this time. 
Father Roederer has been assisted at week-ends by an- 
other priest, the Rev. W. E. Sweigart helping in that 
capacity at present. 



Rev. Paul J. Roederer was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
on December 14, 1887. He pursued his studies for the 
holy priesthood at St. Joseph's, Collegeville, St. Ignatius', 
Chicago, and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. He was or- 
dained on June 20, 1913, by Bishop Alerding. 

His first appointment was as assistant at St. Jos- 
eph's, Hammond, where he remained until January 10, 
1917, when he was transferred as assistant to Sacred 
Heart, Whiting. On June 14, 1918, he received his first 
pastorate, St. Catherine's, Nix Settlement, with Roanoke 
as a mission. On September 2, 1925, he was appointed 
pastor of St. Bridget's, Hobart. 

GRIFFITH 

St. Mary's 

1928 

Several years before a separate parish was founded 
for the Catholics of Griffith, a parish organization of men 
purchased a large tract of land at the end of that town 
and laid it out in lots, which were to be offered for sale 
for suburban homes, and the profits derived therefrom 
were to be set aside for a future parish building program. 
The Catholics of Griflfith had hitherto belonged to the 
Schererville congregation. After they had saved $9,000.00 
a committee approached Bishop Noll and requested him 
to assign a priest to Griffith, who might assist in expedit- 
ing the formation of an independent parish at that point. 

The Rev. Joseph Suelzer, pastor of Kouts, volunteer- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



ed to accept the pastorate, believing that because his 
brother was in the building-supply business and could 
purchase material at the lowest possible cost, he could 
build economically. However, because construction costs 
were at their highest in 1928, and because before the 
building program was completed, the industrial depres- 
sion had set in, the small parish, constituted largely of 
people now out of work, became rather discouraged at 
the debt they were compelled to carry after the erection 
of a brick combination church and school, a very fine 
rectory and convent. 

Father Suelzer was replaced by Rev. Leo Hildebrandt 
in April, 1932, who instilled confidence into the people, 
especially by his personal monetary sacrifices and his 
economy of operations. 

Today the parish is growing rapidly and is steadily 
reducing its debt. 

In 1939, fire destroyed most of his school and al- 
though, in rebuilding, Father Hildebrandt provided more 
school room than he had previously had, he fears he will 
be compelled to build again. The school is in charge of 
the Sisters of St. Francis of Perpetual Adoration. The 
services of another priest are needed on Sunday for a 
third Mass. 



Rev. Leo Peter Hildebrandt was born in Brunswick, 
Indiana, on April 24, 1898. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at DePaul University, Chicago; St. Joseph's 
College, Collegeville, and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati. 
He was ordained on June 14, 1924, by Bishop Alerding. 

On July 2, 1924 Father Hildebrandt was appointed 
assistant at St. Joseph's, Hammond, and on April 7, 1932 
he was named pastor of St. Mary's, Griffith. 

NEW CHICAGO 

Assumption Church 

1917 
A parish was organized in 1917 for the Polish people 
of New Chicago by the pastor of St. Hedwig's Church, 
Gary, the Rev. Peter Kabellek, who also built the first 



GARY DEANERY 



church here. In the following year, when Tolleston was 
given a resident pastor, New Chicago became a mission 
from that place. 

In 1918 Father Gapczynski built a school for the 
children and the Sisters of St. Kunegunda were placed 
in charge. A small rectory and a convent were built 
the next year by Rev. Anthony Gorek. 

The Rev. Michael Gadacz was appointed pastor in 
April, 1921, and served until May 1926. He built the 
present rectory and later donated a lot to enlarge the 
church property. The Rev. Michael Petzold held the 
pastorate from May 1926 to May 1929, and the Rev. 
Francis Libert, from May 1929 to July 1939. 

The next and present pastor, was the Rev. Valerian 
Karcz, who, during the year 1940, with the help of much 
volunteer labor contributed by parishioners, erected a 
new church and school and converted the old school into 
a convent. He has also beautified the premises. 



Rev. Valerian S. Karcz was born in Chicago on 
December 13, 1899. He pursued his studies for the 
priesthood at SS. Cyril and Methodius Seminary, Orch- 
ard Lake. He was ordained on May 29, 1926 by Bishop 
Noll. 

Alter serving as assistant at St. Vincent's, Logans- 
port, for one year, he was appointed at St. John Cantius', 
East Chicago. On July 5, 1921, he was named assist- 
ant at St. Hedwig's, Gary, and in July, 1936, went to 
Krakow, Poland, to attend the Catholic University there. 
Upon his return on September 17, 1937, he resided at 
Holy Rosary, Gary, while engaged in radio broadcasts 
over Hammond and Chicago stations. On July 8, 1929, 
he was appointed pastor of Assumption Church, New 
Chicago. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Gary Deanery Priests Not Engaged In Parish Work 

The Rev. E. Senese, who came to the Diocese of Fort 
Wayne from the Belleville Diocese, at the request of the 
Sisters of Mercy Hospital, Gary, was appointed chaplain 
of that Hospital on July 25, 1936. 

For a time he was acting pastor of the Italian people 
who attended Mass at St. Anthony's Chapel in the Settle- 
ment House. 

Because of a knee injury Father Senese was given a 
leave of absense for one year beginning July, 1940, in 
order that he might nurse his injury in a warmer climate. 

He was succeeded at Mercy Hospital by the Rev. 
Francis J. Quinn. 

Father Senese was born in Italy, and soon after his 
ordination was incardinated in the diocese of Belleville 
where he did excellent work among the Italian people in 
the much advertised town of Herrin. Later he served as 
chaplain at a hospital in the Belleville diocese, also con- 
ducted by the Sisters of the Poor Handmaids. Because 
his nephew physician practiced in the city of Gary, and 
because he had relatives in Chicago, Father Senese was 
glad to accept the invitation, with the permission of his 
Ordinary, to serve the Sisters of the Poor Handmaids at 
their Gary Hospital. 



The Rev. Francis J. Quinn, the present chaplain at 
Mercy Hospital, Gary, was born at East Chicago, on 
May 17, 1903. He prepared for the holy priesthood at 
St. Lawrence, Mount Calvary, and Mount St. Mary's, 
Cincinnati, and was ordained on March 16, 1929, by 
Bishop Noll. 

His first appointment was assistant at St. Mary's, 
Lafayette, whence he was transferred to St. Patrick's, 
Fort Wayne, where he remained until July, 1934. His 
next appointment was assistant at St. Patrick's Kokomo, 
whence he was transferred on May 1, 1936, to St. Jos- 
eph's, Elwood. On June 16, 1937, he was appointed pas- 
tor of St. Paul's, Columbia City, with Pierceton as a 



GARY DEANERY 



iriission. On July 4, 1940, he was given his present ap- 
pointment as hospital chaplain. 



The Rev. John J. Szot, to whom reference is made 
under St. Mary's, Crown Point, serves as visiting chap- 
lain to the Sisters of St. Francis of Kunegunda, at their 
Home near Crown Point. 



Clergy Who Teach In High Schools 

The Rev. H. James Conway succeeded the Rev. Paul 
Schmid as principal of Catholic Central High School, 
Hammond, on July 5, 1934, and in September, 1939 was 
given the Superintendency of the Central Catholic High 
School in Fort Wayne. 

Clergy who work under Father Conway in these two 
schools are the following: 

Rev. Gilbert Wirtz Rev. Michael J. Vichuras 

Rev. Leonard Cross Rev. Christopher Hinckley 

Rev. Herman Schnurr Rev. Alfred Junk 

Rev. John Frawley Rev. Francis Kienly 

Rev. Lawrence Gollner Rev. Everard N. Klein 

Rev. Christian Staub, C.PP.S. 

The Rev. Edward Miller directs the band and orches- 
tra; the Rev. Stanley Manoski serves as part-time Study 
Hall Supervisor, and the Rev. Father Gabriel, O.F.M. Cap. 
serves as Spiritual Director — all at Central Catholic High 
in Fort Wayne. 



The Rev. James Conway was born at Hamilton, 
Ohio, on February 2, 1900. His parents later moved to 
Fort Wayne, where he received his early education. After 
finishing Central Catholic High School at Fort Wayne, he 
entered Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, and was 
ordained to the priesthood on June 14, 1924, by Bishop 
Alerding. 

Father Conway served as assistant at St. Vincent's, 
Logansport, from July 2, 1924 to July 1, 1927. He was 
then transferred as assistant to St. Mary's, East Chicago, 
but a year later he volunteered to work among the 
colored people at Gary with residence at Mercy Hospital. 
On August 14, 1929, he was appointed Chaplain at Mercy 
Hospital, while he continued his work among the colored, 
and in July, 1934, he was appointed principal of Catholic 
Central High School, Hammond. 



CLEHGY WHO TEACH IN HIGH SCHOOLS 415 

The Rev. Gilbert Wirtz was born at Crown Point, In- 
diana, on March 9, 1911. He prepared for the priesthood 
at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and at St. Meinrad's 
Seminary, and was ordained on June 11, 1938 by Bishop 
Noll. 

He pursued graduate work at Notre Dame while 
assisting at St. Matthew's, South Bend. He then pursued 
the study of Chemistry at St. Joseph's College for one 
year, and in September, 1939, became Professor at 
Central Catholic High School with residence at St. Paul's, 
Fort Wayne. In June, 1940, his residence was changed 
to St. Vincent Villa. 



The Rev. Leonard J. Cross was born at Wilmette, 
Illinois, on March 25, 1912. Later his family moved to 
Marion, Indiana. He entered St. Joseph's College, College- 
ville, and later Basselin College and the Sulpician Semin- 
ary, Washington, and was ordained on June 11, 1938, by 
Bishop Noll. He was immediately appointed to the staff 
of Central Catholic High School, Fort Wayne, with resi- 
dence at St. Patrick's. After attending summer school at 
Notre Dame in 1939, he changed his residence to St. 
Joseph's Hospital, Fort Wayne, but is now back at St. 
Patrick's. 



The Rev. Herman Joseph Schnurr was born in Fort 
Wayne on September 18, 1912. His studies for the holy 
priesthood were pursued at St. Joseph's College, College- 
ville, at Basselin College and at the Sulpician Seminary, 
Washington, D. C. He was ordained on June 3, 1939, by 
Bishop Noll, and assigned to the staff of Central Catholic 
High School. In 1939 and 1940 he attended summer 
school at Notre Dame. During his teaching career he has 
resided successively with the pastor of St. John's, New 
Haven, and St. Paul's, Fort Wayne, and is at present re- 
siding at St. Joseph's Hospital. 



The Rev. John J. Frawley was born in Chicago on 
July 22, 1910. He pursued his classics and philosophy 
at Quigley Preparatory, and at Mundelein Major Semin- 



416 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

ary, and his theology at St. Meinrad's, and was ordained 
on June 6, 1936, by Bishop Noll. 

He served as assistant at St. Patrick's, Kokomo, 
tintil he was brought to Fort Wayne to join the staff at 
Central Catholic High School. He has been taking sum- 
mer work at Notre Dame University. He resides with 
the pastor of St. Joseph's, Fort Wayne. 



The Rev. Lawrence Gollner was born at Kokomo, 
Indiana, on February 26, 1913. He prepared for the 
priesthood at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and at St. 
Meinrad's Seminary, and was ordained on June 11, 1938, 
by Bishop Noll. 

He served as assistant for one year at Sacred Heart, 
South Bend, while attending school at Notre Dame in 
preparation for teaching. In September, 1939, he was 
given residence at the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, while 
serving as professor at Central Catholic High School. 



The Rev. Michael Joseph Vichuras was born at Gary 
on September 24, 1913. He pursued his studies at St. 
Joseph's College, Collegeville, Basselin College and the 
Sulpician Seminary at Washington, and was ordained on 
May 18, 1940, by Bishop Noll. The following September 
he was added to the teaching staff at Central Catholic 
High School, Fort Wayne, and he resides with the pastor 
of St. John's, New Haven. 



The Rev. Christian Staub belongs to the Congrega- 
tion of the Precious Blood, and was loaned to the Bishop 
to teach in the Social Science Department of Central 
Catholic High School, Fort Wayne. He had previously 
taught in institutions conducted by the Fathers of the 
Precious Blood. 



The Rev. Christopher Hinckley was born at Reading, 
Ohio, on Jan. 12, 1913. His parents later moved to Mun- 
cie, Indiana. His studies for the priesthood were pursued 
at Columbia Academy, Dubuque, and at St. Meinrad's 
Seminary. He was ordained on June 3, 1939 by Bishop 



CLERGY WHO TEACH IN HIGH SCHOOLS 417 

Noll, and the following September added to the staff at 
Catholic Central, Hammond. 



The Rev. Alfred Jacob Junk was born at Fort Wayne 
on March 6, 1906. He pursued his ecclesiastical studies 
at St. Lawrence College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, at 
St. Gregory's and Mount St. Mary's, Cincinnati, and was 
ordained on June 10, 1933, by Bishop Noll. 

He was appointed to the teaching staff at Catholic 
Central High School, Hammond, with residence at All 
Saints, Hammond. In the year 1936 he took up residence 
with Father Conway and other professors on the prop- 
erty of Catholic Central, and since September, 1939, has 
been Assistant Principal at that school. 



The Rev. Francis C. Kienly was born at Logansport, 
Indiana, on December 8, 1910. He prepared for the holy 
priesthood at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, and at St. 
Meinrad's, and was ordained on May 22, 1937, by Bishop 
Noll. 

He resided at St. Matthew's, South Bend, while pur- 
suing studies one year at Notre Dame, following which 
he was appointed professor at Catholic Central High 
School, Hammond. 



The Rev. Everard N. Klein was born in Chicago on 
April 9, 1907. After finishing the Preparatory Seminary 
in that city he entered St. Gregory's, Cincinnati, and 
then St. Meinrad's and was ordained on June 6, 1936, by 
Bishop Noll. From the time of his ordination he has 
been connected with the teaching staff at Catholic Central 
High School, Hammond. 



Priests Serving In The Army And Navy 

The Very Rev. Monsignor William Richard Arnold is 
at present the Chaplain-in-Chief in the United States 
Army. He has served in the army of the United States 
since February 1, 1913, and during his career in that 
capacity has filled the following appointments : 

First Lieutenant — April, 1913. 

Fort Washington, Maryland, June, 1913 to August, 
1915. 

Fort Mills, Philippine Islands, September, 1915 to 
July, 1918. 

Instructor, Chaplains' Training School, Camp Tay- 
lor, Louisville, Kentucky — September, 1918 to December, 
1918. 

Fort Hancock, New Jersey — January, 1919 to July, 
1925, with additional duties as transport chaplain to 
Panama, Puerto Rico, and various European and Asiatic 
ports. 

Promoted to Captain — May, 1919. 

Fort Leavenworth, Kansas — August, 1925 to April, 
1929; Director of Chaplains' Training School. 

Promoted to Major — April, 1927. 

Fort William McKinley, Philippine Islands — June, 
1929 to June, 1931 ; Department Chaplain. 

Fort Bliss, Texas — November, 1931 to June, 1937; 
First Cavalry Division Chaplain; Supervising Chaplain, 
Arizona-New Mexico-West Texas District, Civilian Con- 
servation Corps. 

Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel — April, 1933. 

Fort Leavenworth, Kansas — June, 1937 to Novem- 
ber, 1937 ; Director of Chaplains' Training School. 

War Department, Washington, D. C. — December, 
1937 to date; Promoted to Colonel, and Chief of Chap- 
lains. 

The Very Rev. Monsignor was born at Wooster, 
Ohio, on June 10, 1881. Later his parents moved to 
Muncie, Indiana, where he attended the parochial school. 



PRIESTS SERVING IN THE ARMY AND NAVY 



He then entered St. Joseph's College, Collegeville and 
later St. Bernard's Seminary, Rochester, and was or- 
dained on June 13, 1908, by Bishop Alerding. 

From that time until he entered the Army Service 
in 1913 he was stationed at St. Charles', Peru, as 
assistant. 

On November 22, 1939 he was given the honor of 
Papal Chamberlain. 



The Rev. Frederick William Meehling, with the con- 
sent of his Bishop, entered the United States Navy as 
chaplain on June 23, 1933. 

Father Meehling was born at Marshall, Illinois, on 
February 18, 1899. After attending the University of 
Illinois, he entered the St. Francis College at Syracuse, 
New York, and then entered Seminaries at Rome and 
Innsbruck. He was ordained at Innsbruck on July 26, 
1929, and continued his studies for one more year. In 
July, 1930, he was appointed assistant at St. Mary's, An- 
derson, and from that point he entered the Navy. 



The Rev. Francis A. Burke received the consent of 
his Ordinary to enter the United States Navy as chaplain 
in 1938. 

Father Burke was born in County Cork, Ireland, on 
November 30, 1904. He pursued his primary and second- 
ary school education in Ireland, and then entered St. 
Francis' Seminary, Loretto, Pennsylvania, for his theo- 
logical course and was ordained on February 1, 1931, by 
Bishop Noll. 

A few days later he was appointed assistant at 
Sacred Heart, Whiting, from which place, he was trans- 
ferred after a couple of months to St. Joseph's, Misha- 
waka. In November, 1932 he was named chaplain of 
Mount Mercy Sanitarium, Hammond, and the following 
January appointed assistant at All Saints', Hammond. 
In 1936, because of failing health, the Sisters of the Holy 
Cross, Deming, New Mexico, received him as chaplain, 
and he remained there until 1938 when he accepted a 
chaplaincy in the United States Navy. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The Rev. Frederick J. Westendorf was born in Terre 
Haute, Indiana, on May 9, 1907. He pursued his studies 
for the priesthood at St. Joseph's, Collegeville, and at St. 
Gregory's, Cincinnati. He was ordained on June 10, 1933 
by Bishop Noll. 

His first appointment was as assistant at St. Mary's, 
Michigan City where he remained until July, 1935, when 
he was appointed Director of the Settlement House, Gary, 
and Director of the Religious Instruction Work in Gary. 

In January, 1941 Father Westendorf, who had, for 
several years, been chaplain of the National Guard was 
mustered into service and sent to Camp Shelby, Missis- 
sippi, where more than 50,000 young men are stationed at 
this writing. A large percentage of these is Catholic as 
was evidenced by a mission conducted by Father Westen- 
dorf and another Catholic chaplain which was attended 
by 4,200 boys. 



Diocesan Priests Working Elsewhere 

The Rev. Michael Kosko was born at Sztankicz, 
Austria-Hungary, on January 7, 1886. Father Kosko, 
however, prepared for the holy priesthood in this coun- 
try, having attended college at St. Procopius at Lisle, Illi- 
nois, and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He was 
ordained on May 21, 1921, by Bishop Alerding. 

In June, 1921, he was appointed assistant at St. 
John's, Hammond, and in August, 1922, organized the 
Immaculate Conception Parish, Whiting. He remained 
here as pastor until April, 1926, when he accepted the 
chaplaincy of Immaculate Conception Slovak Home, 
Middletown, Pennsylvania. 



The Rev. Andrew Sucek, immediately following his 
ordination on June 14, 1924, was assigned to the teach- 
ing staff of Catholic Central High School, Hammond, but 
within the year he developed tuberculosis and was direct- 
ed by his physician to go to Colorado. He spent many 
years at a sanitarium, but never recovered sufficiently 
to return to any active work. He enjoys the privilege 
now of saying Mass quite regularly, and the Bishop of 
Denver has been very kind to him. 

Father Sucek prepared for the holy priesthood at 
the Pontifical College of the Josephinum, at Worthing- 
ton, (Columbus), Ohio. 



The Rev. Paul James Schmid, at the request of the 
Apostolic Delegate, was appointed Spiritual Director at 
the Josephinum College in July, 1934. At that time he 
was the Principal of Catholic Central High School, Ham- 
mond. 

The Rev. Paul James Schmid was born in Fort 
Wayne on September 13, 1889. Before going to the 
Pontifical College of the Josephinum for his major sem- 
inary studies. Father Schmid had attended the Univer- 
sities of Michigan, Northwestern and DePaul. He was 
ordained on June 13, 1917, by Bishop Hartley, of Colum- 



422 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTOKY 

bus. From August, 1917 to June, 1919, he was chaplain 
at St. Margaret's Hospital, Hammond. He was then 
transferred to St. Joseph's, Hammond, as assistant where 
he served from June, 1919 until September, 1923. His 
work terminated there when he assumed the direction 
of the Catholic Central High School, Hammond, where 
he remained in charge until July, 1934. 

Under the direction of Bishop Alerding Father 
Schmid was really the founder of Catholic Central High 
School. He supervised the erection of the buildings for the 
Sisters of the Poor Handmaids, which consist of a main 
building, a gymnasium to which classrooms were later 
added, a large convent and a house for the priest faculty. 

Shortly before Father Schmid's transfer the Sisters 
of the Poor Handmaids begged permission to withdraw, 
and the Sisters of the Holy Cross were procured. At 
that time the property was sold by the Ancilla Domini 
Sisters to the Bishop. 



The Rev. Joseph Judnic was born on May 19, 1878, 
in that part of Austria which is now Jugoslavia. He 
began his studies for the priesthood in Agram, Jugo- 
slavia, and finished theology at St. Paul's Seminary, and 
was ordained on July 10, 1905, by Archbishop Ireland. 

He spent two years each at Fairfax and Hot Springs, 
South Dakota, and then one year at the Apostolic Mis- 
sion House, Washington. He engaged in mission work 
in Oregon and California from 1910 to 1916. Bishop 
Alerding engaged his services for the Croatians at East 
Chicago in 1916. In 1921 he was transferred to Gary 
to look after the Croatians of that city and remained there 
until 1937, at which time he was appointed chaplain at 
St. Vincent Villa, Fort Wayne. On February 4, 1939, 
he was made chaplain at Sacred Heart Home, Avilla, and 
in the winter of 1940, because of a throat affliction, was 
given a leave of absence. He is at present resident at 
San Diego, California. 



The Rev. Robert Joseph Zahn was born at Hunting- 
ton, Indiana, on April 29, 1911. After completing the 



DIOCESAN PRIESTS WORKING ELSEWHERE 423 

high school course in his parish school, he entered St. Jo- 
seph's College, Collegeville, and later St. Meinrad's Semi- 
nary, and was ordained on June 11, 1938J by Bishop Noll. 
Shortly before his ordination Father Zahn became 
ill, and underwent sanitarium treatment for two years. 
He has recuperated considerably and, at this time, is in 
condition to accept light work. 



Diocesan Priests Retired 

The Rev. Henry M. Plaster, who, at this writing, is 
eighty-eight years of age, retired from active parish work 
in 1916, and has been living near Los Angeles. 

Father Plaster was born at Dubuque, Iowa, March 
31, 1853, and prepared for the holy priesthood at St. 
Francis', Wisconsin, and at St. John's, Minnesota. He 
was ordained by the late Bishop Dwenger on December 
12, 1877. 

Father Plaster's first appointment was to the pastor- 
ate of St. Joseph's, Covington, where he remained until 
May, 1885, at which time he was appointed pastor of St. 
Joseph's, Hammond, the only church in the little town 
at that time. During his pastorate at Hammond, Father 
Plaster erected the first school and convent, the present 
very fine church, rectory and convent. 



The Rev. Frederick Francis Koenig retired from 
active parish work because of ill health in 1932, and 
formally resigned his parish in 1936, when he was suc- 
ceeded by the Rev. J. M. Nickels. Father Koenig lives in 
a residence which he built adjacent to the church property 
at Lottaville, although during the winter months he 
moves to a warmer climate. 

Father Koenig was born at Brilon, Westphalia, Ger- 
many, on July 1, 1873. He prepared for the holy priest- 
hood in Steyl, Holland, St. Gabriel's Mission House in 
Austria, and at the American College, Louvain, and was 
ordained on June 29, 1897, at Louvain, by the late Bishop 
Maes. 

Father Koenig served a few months as assistant at 
Hartford City, and at Union City, and in September, 
1898, was appointed pastor of Lowell, where he built a 
rectory and the first school. In November, 1905, he was 
transferred to SS. Peter and Paul Church, Lottaville, 
where he served until his retirement, and where he built 
the beautiful church, the priest's house, and an addition 
to the Sisters' Convent. 



DIOCESAN PRIESTS RETIRED 



The Rev. John Kasprzykowski was retired from 
parish work in 1910, whereupon he left the diocese and 
lived in Wisconsin for a long time. 

Father Kasprzykowski was born at Grunsberg, Ger- 
many, on June 10, 1877. Coming to this country he 
entered St. Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, and later 
SS. Cyril and Methodius', Detroit, and Kenrick Seminary, 
St. Louis. He was ordained by Bishop Alerding on June 
22, 1906. 

At the time of his retirement he was assistant at St. 
Stanislaus', Michigan City. 



The Rev. Ignatius F. Zircher, a most zealous priest, 
was forced to retire from parish work because of a nerv- 
ous breakdown in April, 1926. He was then pastor of 
St. Joseph's, LaPorte. 

Father Zircher was born at Schirrheim, Germany, 
on July 31, 1875. His parents moved to Summit (Water- 
loo) during his childhood. He prepared for the priest- 
hood at St. Joseph's, Collegeville, and at Mount St. Mary's, 
Cincinnati, and was ordained by the late Bishop Alerding 
on May 24, 1902. 

After serving as assistant at SS. Peter and Paul, 
Huntington, from 1902 to 1905, he was pastor pro tem 
at Garrett, and then was appointed to assist Father Noll 
at Besancon. In October, 1905, he was given the pastor- 
ate at Goodland, where he remained until June, 1912. 
His next appointment was to St. Joseph's, LaPorte, where 
he served from 1912 until his breakdown in 1926. In 
1928 he attempted to fill a chaplaincy at St. Joseph's 
Hospital, Fort Wayne, but was unable to hold out long. 
He also filled several temporary appointments outside 
the diocese where he was resting. 



The Rev. George Angermaier was retired from par- 
ish work in 1926, while pastor of SS. Peter and Paul's, 
Goodland. 

Father Angermaier was born at Engelpolding, Bav- 
aria, on April 15, 1876. Coming to this country he enter- 
ed St. Benedict's, Atchison, Kansas and then St. Mein- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



rad's, and was ordained on June 22, 1906, by Bishop 
Alerding. 

His first appointment was to the post of assistant at 
St. Mary's, Decatur, from September, 1906 until April, 
1910, when he was transferred to St. Patrick's, Kokomo, 
as assistant. In July, 1910 he was given the pastorate 
at Immaculate Conception Church, Auburn, where he 
remained until March, 1915. For several years he was 
without a charge because of illness. In June, 1922, he 
was appointed pastor of SS. Peter and Paul's, Goodland, 
but it was necessary for him to relinquish parish work 
again in March, 1926. From that time he has had no 
formal appointment, although he has frequently assisted 
priests in the diocese. 



The Rev. Peter Schmitt retired from parish work in 
August, 1929, and moved to France, where he is still 
living. 

Father Schmitt was born on March 12, 1871 at 
Eschringen, Bavaria. He made his preparatory studies 
in Lorraine, France, studied philosophy at St. Francis', 
Wisconsin, and theology at Louvain, and was ordained 
at Louvain on June 29, 1897, by Bishop Mierschert. 

After serving as assistant at St. Joseph's, Misha- 
waka, for eight months, he was appointed pastor of St. 
Michael's, Summit, where he remained for fourteen 
months. He then had a temporary appointment at St. 
Michael's, Plymouth. From March, 1901 to September, 
1905, he was pastor of Areola, with Pierceton as a mis- 
sion; from September, 1905, to July, 1910 at Covington; 
from July, 1910 to September, 1916, at Nix Settlement, 
with Roanoke as a mission. He was then transferred to 
St. Joseph's, Reynolds, where he remained until October, 
1917. His next appointment was to the pastorate of 
Ege, where he served from October, 1917 until August, 
1927. For the next two years he served as chaplain of 
Holy Family Hospital, LaPorte, and returned to Europe 
in August, 1929. 



The Rev. Ladislaus Szczukowski retired from active 



DIOCESAN PRIESTS RETIRED 427 

parish work in July, 1939. He was then pastor of St. 
Mary's, Hammond, where he had been from June, 1931. 

Father Szczukowski was born at Lubina, Prussia, 
on October 26, 1879. Coming to this country he entered 
Assumption College, Canada, and later St. Mary's Sem- 
inary, Detroit, where he pursued philosophy. He return- 
ed to Assumption for theology and was ordained on June 
13, 1908, by Bishop Alerding. 

He served as assistant for short intervals at St. 
Stanislaus', Michigan City; Earl Park, Wabash, Garrett. 
In October, 1910 he was made pastor of Terre Coupee and 
Rolling Prairie. In November, 1918 he was transferred 
to St. Hyacinth's, Fort Wayne; he served temporarily at 
St. Mary's, Hammond, and at Goshen ; in July, 1926, was 
given the pastorate of Sacred Heart, LaPorte, and in 
June, 1921, was transferred to St. Mary's, Hammond. 



The Rev. Joseph A. Lynn retired from parish work in 
September, 1935. He was then pastor of the Immaculate 
Conception Church, Michigan City. 

Born in County Tyrone, Ireland, Father Lynn came 
to the United States as a child and lived with relatives 
at Whiting. He pursued his studies for the priesthood 
at St. Viator's, Kankakee and at Mount St. Mary's, Cin- 
cinnati, and was ordained by Bishop Alerding on June 
17, 1905. 

After serving as assistant at St. Charles', Peru, until 
June 24, 1908, he was appointed pastor of St. Vincent's, 
Academie, where he remained until June, 1921, and 
where he built the present rectory. His next appoint- 
ment was to St. Bridget's, Hobart. 

In September, 1925, because of illness, he was given 
permission to go to California where the Bishop of Los 
Angeles gave him work. He erected a church and school 
in the city of San Diego. In August, 1929, he returned 
to the diocese of Fort Wayne and was given the pastorate 
of Sacred Heart, Whiting, which he relinquished in favor 
of the Immaculate Conception, Michigan City, in October, 
1931. There he built a new school and rectory. In 1985, 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



as noted, he retired in order to conserve his health and 
moved to San Diego, California. 



The Rev. James Henry Durham retired from active 
pastoral vi^ork in September, 1934, vi^hile he was pastor of 
St. Vincent's, Logansport. 

Father Durham, a brother of the late Monsignor 
John Durham, was born at Middleton, New York, on 
November 26, 1874. He prepared for the holy priest- 
hood at St. Benedict's, Atchison, Kansas, and at Mount 
St. Mary's, Cincinnati, and was ordained on May 22, 
1907, by Bishop Alerding. 

From the time of his ordination until January, 1911, 
he was assistant at St. Patrick's, Fort Wayne. Then he 
was appointed pastor of Dunkirk, where he served until 
July, 1913. His next appointment was pastor of Gas 
City and chaplain of the National Military Home until 
June, 1921. He was then transferred to Goshen where 
he remained until August, 1922. He filled the pastorate 
of St. Mary's, Union City, from August, 1922 until July 
1925 when he was given the pastorate of St. Bridget's, 
Logansport. After six months he was transferred to 
St. Vincent's, the same city, where he did excellent work 
until his retirement because of ill health in September, 
1934. 



The Rev. Fridolin J. Hasler was chaplain at Holy 
Family Hospital, LaPorte, when he asked permission to 
return to his native country, Switzerland. This was in 
1936. 

Father Hasler was born at Tobel, Ct. Thurgan, 
Switzerland, on February 5, 1868. He pursued his 
classics at St. Bernard's College, Mehreron, Switzerland, 
and his major seminary course at Subiaco, Arkansas, and 
was ordained by Bishop Morris of Little Rock on June 8, 
1916. 

He served as chaplain at St. Vincent's Orphanage, 
Fort Wayne, from December, 1916 until June, 1922, when 
he was appointed pastor of Sheldon from June, 1922 
until July, 1927. He was then transferred to Hessen 



DIOCESAN PRIESTS RETIRED 



Cassel, where he remained until June, 1934. Father 
Hasler did a great deal of work on the parish properties 
at both Sheldon and Hessen Cassel. Because of injuries 
sustained in an automobile accident he asked for a chap- 
laincy and was placed at Sacred Heart Hospital, Garrett, 
for one year. He then was returned to Sheldon where 
he remained from July, 1935, until February, 1936, when 
he was again assigned to a chaplaincy — this time at Holy 
Family Hospital, LaPorte. During the same year he 
returned to Switzerland. 



The Rev. J. J. Sigstein, who was ordained for the 
Archdiocese of Chicago, was released to Bishop Noll in 
1922 in order that he might take over the direction of the 
Society of Missionary Catechists, the nucleus of which 
was formed by him while chaplain at St. Bernard's Hos- 
pital, Englewood. During the years 1937 and 1938 
Father Sigstein's health failed to a degree which made 
it necessary for him to retire from the work he loved, 
and to go to California where he served as part time 
chaplain to the Catechists resident at Monterey. 

The Capuchin Fathers, at Huntington, have been 
very faithful in the direction of the Postulants and 
Novices at Victory-Noll since the time of Father Sig- 
stein's retirement. 

Resident chaplains at Victory-Noll since the time of 
Father Sigstein have been the Rev. John Frawley and 
the Rev. Francis Faust. 



Deceased Priests of the Fort Wayne Diocese 

Name Place Date of Death 

Luers, H., Most Kev Fort Wayne June 29, 1871 

Dwenger, Jos., Most Rev Fort Wayne '. January 22, 1893 

Rademacher, Jos., 

Most Rev Fort Wayne January 12, 1900 

Alerding, Herman J., 

Most Rev Fort Wayne December 6, 1924 

Benoit, J. C, V. G Fort Wayne January 26, 1885 

IBrammer, Jos., V. G Fort Wayne June 20, 1898 

Deschamp, Francis St. Vincent August 19, 1858 

Force, John F Valparaiso April 4, 1863 

O'Flaherty, Ed Crawfordsville August 8, 1863 

Fuchs, Francis Klaasville October 8, 1863 

Force, Bernard Logansport June 13, 1868 

Flynn, John Chesterton August 1, 1870 

Scherer, Henry Columbia City.. 1871 

Bartoz, Simon Fort Wayne January 28, 1872 

McMahon, John Reynolds May 28, 1872 

Botti, Alex Fort Wayne September 14, 1872 

Meyer, James Peru, 111 October 31, 1872 

Giedl, Wolfgang New Haven ......May 23, 1873 

Hamilton, George Lafayette April 8, 1875 

Steiner, George Huntington June 1, 1880 

Noll, Martin Lafayette June 14, 1880 

Hartnett, James Fort Wayne October 23, 1880 

Wemhoflf, John Fort Wayne .December 1, 1880 

Deimel, Francis Schererville November 10, 1882 

Hoss, John Europe 

Zurwellen, Gerard Plymouth February 5, 1883 

Franzen, Peter Waterloo May 11, 1883 

Baumgartner, F. X Hammond May 9, 1885 

Twigg, James Areola April 22, 1886 

O'Reilly, Michael Valparaiso August 4, 1887 

O'Leary, Thomas Fort Wayne October 24, 1889 

Kelly, Michael Lebanon October 4, 1893 

Crawley, John LaPorte December 12, 1893 

.Walters, E. P Lafayette June 12, 1894 

Strueder, Anthony Portland October 25, 1894 

Nussbaum, Joseph LaPorte December 26, 1895 

Koenig, Edward Fort Wayne January 22, 1898 

Hibbilen, Theodore St. Louis January 13, 1899 

Grogan, John LaPorte January 24, 1899 

Werdein, James Benton, Mont. ..March 17, 1899 

Campion, M. E Logansport December 18, 1899 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 431 

Name Place Date of Death 

Zborowski, L Terre Coupee — . 

Lemper, Charles Plymouth December 13, 1900 

Denk, Rudolph Sheldon January 5, 1901 

Stephan, Joseph Wash., D.C September 12, 1901 

Becks, Julius Anderson March 14, 1902 

Meissner, Henry Peru July 2, 1902 

Vanderpool, Theodore St. Ann, 111 

Ganzer, Charles Kentland December 10, 1902 

Oechtering, August Mishawaka December 28, 1902 

Hartman, Bartholomew ....Alton, 111 June 12, 1903 

Mark, John November 20, 1904 

Borg, Bernard Fort Wayne December 22, 1904 

Dandurand, Frederick Kankakee, 111. ..February 26, 1905 

Koerdt, Ferdinand Fort Wayne May 6, 1905 

Duehmig, Dominic Avilla June 3, 1905 

Zern, Gregory Goodland August 27, 1905 

Wiechman, Frederick Gas City December 15, 1905 

Maujay, Constantine Cincinnati February 1, 1906 

Dempsey, John Crawfordsville ..April 4, 1906 

Boeckelmann, Henry Elkhart October 4, 1906 

Koehne, Henry ..Logansport November 24, 1906 

LaBonte, Francis Oxford March 21, 1907 

Quinlan, William Crawfordsville ..August 5, 1907 

Kappel, Henry Oxford November 20, 1907 

Guendling, Charles Lafayette February 19, 1908 

Raskiewicz, Urban Otis February 11, 1909 

Hellhake, Henry Sheldon August 12, 1909 

Bleckmann, John Michigan City ..September 29, 1909 

Kroeger, Bernard - Logansport November 9, 1909 

Lordemann, Francis Kokomo March 22, 1910 

Roche, Patrick Fort Wayne May 12, 1910 

Zumbuelte, Matthias Hanover Center September 28, 1910 

Mulcahy, Denis Anderson January 5, 1911 

Paquet, Louis Fort Wayne March 25, 1911 

Healion, J. May 31, 1911 

Heitmann, Anthony -St. John December 9, 1911 

Gromley, T. J Lafayette February 11, 1912 

Kolesinski, George 

Messmann, Anthony LaPorte May 22, 1912 

Kobylinski, Casimir November 19, 1912 

Kubiak, L. A December 30, 1912 

McCabe, Charles Barrydale August 28, 1913 

Wilken, Herman Decatur October 20, 1918. 

Flaherty, William Lafayette February 8, 1914\ 

VonSchwedler, Frederick... March 26, 1914 

Biedermann, John Sheldon November 27, 1915; 

Miller, Conrad - Huntington ......June 13, 1916 

Adam, August St. Vincent March 31, 1917' 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Name Place Date of Death 

Schramm, George - LaPorte May 12, 1917 

Mungovan, Thomas Anderson June 13, 1917 

Horstmann, George Fort Wayne May 12, 1918 

Bleckmann, John Mishawaka November 26, 1918 

Rusis, F. J Gary May 1, 1919 

Hueser, John Carlsbad, N.M...May 18, 1919 

Koch, Francis Reynolds August 8, 1919 

Weber, Peter .....Earl Park August 30, 1919 

Wrobel, Emanuel Michigan City ..February 11, 1920 

Buchheit, Adam August 7, 1920 

Byrne, Michael Lafayette January 14, 1921 

Quinlan, John Fort Wayne ....April 3, 1921 

Kroeger, Anthony Logansport May 25, 1921 

Bathe, John Avilla October 10, 1921 

Miller, William Whiting March 21, 1922 

Henneberger, Anthony Goodland March 24, 1922 

Eachor, William Michigan City ..May 24, 1923 

Ege, Francis February 8, 1924 

Young, August Garrett January 10, 1925 

Rumley, John LaPorte January 13, 1925 

Moench, Louis Mishawaka March 1, 1925 

Stachowiak, Anthony Indiana Harbor May 25, 1925 

Quinn, Peter Logansport June 12, 1925 

Gnibba, Francis Gary July 26, 1925 

Jurashek, Herman Texas August 27, 1925 

Boccard, Edward Lafayette ..June 10, 1926 

Flach, Joseph Dyer December 10, 1926 

King, Francis .Garrett April 24, 1927 

Dinnen, John ...Lafayette May 9, 1927 

Berg, John Hammond June 22, 1927 

Benziger, Maximilian Fort Wayne July 30, 1927 

Ellering, Anthony Michigan City ..December 19, 1927 

Crosson, Patrick Logansport January 18, 1928 

Barrett, Edward Hammond November 5, 1928 

LaFontaine, Albert Fort Wayne November 16, 1928 

Hogan, William Valparaiso November 19, 1928 

Blum, John Kentucky January 20, 1929 

Pratt, Robert ....Kokomo February 22, 1929 

Keller, John Mishawaka February 27, 1929 

Kohl, John Mishawaka April 2, 1929 

Berg, William Schererville September 4, 1929 

Stetter, Charles Kentland December 25, 1929 

Guendling, John Lafayette July 21, 1930 

Lambert, Francis Lafayette September 22, 1930 

Wiedau, Bernard Fort Wayne January, 1931 

Louen, Michael Mishawaka May 19, 1931 

Reinwand, Frederick Mishawaka August 29, 1931 

Felden, Norbert Whiting November 3, 1931 



DECEASED PRIESTS OF THE FORT WAYNE DIOCESE 433 

Name Place Date of Death 

Kelly, Robert Emmet Huntington February 19, 1932 

Nemeth, Joseph Gary May 2, 1932 

Maliowski, John Fort Wayne June 7, 1932 

Seimetz, Julius Decatur December 28, 1932 

DeVille, John Italy December 31, 1932 

Deininger, Leonard Oxford June 15, 1933 

Schmitz, John Peru November 9, 1933 

Sheridan, Francis Chicago July 23, 1934 

Toth, Joseph E. Chicago December 15, 1934 

belaney, Rt. Rev. 

Monsignor Joseph Fort Wayne January 25, 1935 

Soengen, Bruno Germany April 12, 1935 

Biegel, Balthasar Elwood August 12, 1935 

Oberholz, John Yoder December 15, 1935 

LeCoutere, Gustave Logansport February 6, 1936 

Wakefer, John Detroit May 13, 1936 

Kroll, H. F. Joseph Fort Wayne July 13, 1936 

Ford, Michael Lafayette January 13, 1937 

Sullivan, William Crawfordsville ..February 14, 1937 

Reed, Clifford J Delphi February 25, 1937 

Walsh, James Denver March 6, 1937 

Casey, Thomas Gary May 20, 1937 

Rajcany, Benedict On Train May 20, 1937 

Yenn, S. M Fort Wayne January 24, 1938 

Heffernan, John Elkhart March 7, 1938 

Schockaert, A Ghent, Belgium August 29, 1938 

Baker, Joachim Fort Wayne Jan. 20, 1939 

Chemma, T. F Lafayette Feb. 14, 1939 

Dhe, Very Rev. 

Monsignor Charles Fowler June 15, 1939 

Griffin, P. M Tipton A.ug. 10, 1939 

Durham, Right Rev. 

Monsignor John P., Fort Wayne January 23, 1940 

Nadolny, Anthony Fort Wayne May 20, 1940 

Ditlinger, Andrew Fort Wayne August 15, 1940 

Houlihan, Edward Muncie August 16, 1940 

Thiele, Right Rev. 

Monsignor Charles Fort Wayne April 17, 1941 

Bolka, Very Rev. 

Monsignor Joseph Michigan City .April 28, 1941 

Tremmel, John Ft. Wayne 

Fisher, Chas Belgium 

Easier, F. J 



434 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

In This Space Entry May Be Made Of Priests 
Who Die After June, 1941 



DECEASED PRIESTS OF THE FORT WAYNE DIO'CESE 435 

In This Space Entry May Be Made Of Priests 
Who Die After June, 1941 



Institutions In The Diocese Of Fort Wayne 

UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME 

Origin and Development 

The University of Notre Dame was founded in 1842, and 
was chartered two years later by the legislature of the State 
of Indiana, the foundation having been inspired by the mission- 
ary zeal of the Rev. Edward Frederick Sorin, C.S.C, and six 
Brothers of the French religious community known as the 
Congregation of Holy Cross, who came to this country in res- 
ponse to an appeal made to the Congregation by Bishop Hail- 
landiere, of Vincennes, for assistance in developing his exten- 
sive diocese. The capital of the little community amounted to 
only four hundred dollars. The land now occupied by the 
University was deeded by the bishop to Father Sorin and his 
associates on the condition that a college be built and made 
ready for students within two years. In spite of great diffi- 
culties and many personal hardships, the task was completed 
and a number of students were enrolled within the time speci- 
fied. 

As soon as the first building had been completed Father 
Sorin applied to the State authorities for a charter, which, by 
special act of the legislature of Indiana, was granted on the 
15th of January, 1844, in the following terms: 

"Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of 
Indiana, that Edward Frederick Sorin, Francis Lewis Cointet, 
Theophilus Jerome Marivault, Francis Gouesse, and their 
associates and successors in office be, and are hereby constitut- 
ed and declared to be, a body corporate and politic, by the 
name and style of the 'University of Notre Dame du Lac' and 
by that name shall have perpetual succession, with full power 
and authority to confer and grant, or cause to be conferred and 
granted, such degrees and diplomas in the liberal arts and 
sciences, and in law and medicine as are usually conferred and 
granted in other universities in the United States, provided, 
however, that no degrees shall be conferred and diplomas 
granted except to students who have acquired the same profi- 
ciency in the liberal arts and sciences, and in law and medicine 
as is customary in other universities in the United States." 

The Early Growth of the University 

The little community, with Father Sorin as head, was 
soon augmented by the arrival of other members of the Con- 
gregation from France. A church and other buildings were 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 



added, friends gave the institution important aid, and the 
enrollment of the students gradually increased. Father Serin 
served as president of the University from the founding, in 
1842, to the year 1865. His successors in office have been 
Kev. Patrick Dillon, C.S.C, 1865 to 1866 ; Rev. William Corby, 
C.S.C, 1866 to 1872; Rev. Augustus Lemonnier, C.S.C, 1872 
to 1874; Rev. Patrick Colovin, C.S.C, 1874 to 1877; Rev. Wil- 
liam Corby, C.S.C, 1877 to 1881; Rev. Thomas E. Walsh, 
C.S.C, 1881 to 1893; Rev. Andrew Morrissey, C.S.C, 1892 to 
1905; Rev. John W. Cavanaugh, C.S.C, 1905 to 1919; Rev. 
James A. Burns, C.S.C, 1919 to 1922; Rev. Matthew J. Walsh, 
C.S.C, 1922 to 1928; Rev. Charles L. O'Donnell, C.S.C, 1928 
to 1934, and Rev. John F. O'Hara, C.S.C, from June 1934 to 
June 1940. Rev. Hugh O'Donnell, C.S.C. succeeded Father 
O'Hara, and is the present head. 

Expansion and Reorganization 

Until 1865 the only courses offered at Notre Dame were 
the traditional ones in arts and letters. In that year provision 
was made for courses in science and in 1869 for a department 
of law, the first permanent department of the kind at a Cath- 
olic university in the United States. A department of civil 
engineering, likewise a pioneer effort in the Catholic institu- 
tion, was inaugurated in 1873. Departments of mechanical 
engineering, architecture, pharmacy, electrical engineering, 
and others were added before 1900. In 1897 the University was 
organized in four units — arts and letters, science, engineering, 
and law. In 1905 these divisions came to be designated as 
colleges and as such constituted the organization of the Uni- 
versity until 1920, when a college of commerce was added. The 
enrollment of students grew until the many new dormitories 
on the campus were filled to capacity — 3,200 students. 
The Grounds, Buildings and Equipment 

The University occupies a campus of 1700 acres, immedi- 
ately north of the city of South Bend, Indiana, an industrial 
center of 105,000 people, eighty-six miles east of Chicago. The 
extensive campus includes two small lakes, each about twenty- 
four acres in area. The school buildings are grouped around 
a quadrangle, to the south of the lakes. A paved avenue leads 
to South Bend on the south, and pleasant walks lead westward 
to the historic St. Joseph's River, and to St. Mary's College, 
for women, one mile west of the University. A number of 
religious shrines contribute to the general attractiveness of 
the grounds. Three large buildings, devoted mainly to the 
religious formation of the younger members of the Congrega- 
tion of Holy Cross, are situated along the shores of the twin 
lakes. At the east side of the campus are Cartier Field, the 
recreation grounds of the University, and the Notre Dame 
Stadium, which can accommodate 60,000 spectators. At the 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



west side is an eighteen-hole golf course, which provides recrea- 
tion for many students and members of the faculty. 

The University of Notre Dame, as organized at present, 
consists of a graduate school, offering advanced courses in 
seventeen departments, and an undergraduate school of five 
colleges. 

Forty-four buildings are used for University purposes. 

SAINT MARY'S COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 
Located at Holy Cross, Indiana 

By A Member of the Congregation 
In the designs of Providence a certain mustard seed was 
to develop into a tree, whose branches would reach four con- 
tinents and whose shade would bring all associates under the 
shelter of the Tree of salvation. At Le Mans, France, in 1841, 
the Congregation of the Holy Cross came into being to com- 
plete the aim of the Reverend Basil Anthony Marie Moreau 
that a religious family of priests. Brothers, and Sisters, in 
imitation of the Holy Family, might carry on special work for 
the Kingdom of God. Within two years of origin, the Sisters 
were authorized to accompany the priests and Brothers to the 
United States to assist in the foundation and work of Notre 
Dame, then in the wilderness of northern Indiana. Arrived in 
New York on July 16, 1843, four Sisters of Holy Cross opened 
the historic epoch which culminates in the centennial year of 
1941. The names of those first Sisters who bore the standard 
of the Congregation to Indiana symbolize the life of its fol- 
lowers: Bethlehem, Nazareth, Calvary, the Sacred Heart. Not 
even they in their confidence and zeal dared dream of what 
Saint Mary's-Notre Dame would some day become. God 
directed ; they labored ; He gave the increase. 

Bertrand, Michigan, marked the site of the first school 
under the direction of this community, being opened there in 
1844. Aided by a grant of five thousand francs from the 
Propagation of the Faith, a building was prepared and 
equipped and the educational career was launched. It was no 
small feat nor compliment to the work of the Sisters of the 
Holy Cross, that the school at Bertrand numbered fifty board- 
ers in 1850. Abetted by foresight and inspired by the Provi- 
dence of God, a new site, the present Saint Mary's-Notre Dame 
was secured and the school transferred in 1855. 

In February, 1855, by an Act of the General Assembly of 
Indiana, Saint Mary's Academy was authorized "for the educa- 
tion of young ladies in the various branches of arts and 
sciences usually taught in female academies of the highest 
standing; and to confer such degrees upon scholars as are 
usual in such institutions." The curriculum was both inten- 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 



sive and extensive, including courses in physiology, geology, 
chemistry, astronomy, rhetoric, botany, algebra, intellectual 
philosophy, logic, history, elocution, composition, physical 
geography, natural science, book-keeping. Languages, fancy- 
work, fine arts, and plain sewing were additional fields of en- 
deavor. First and last, religious instruction was primary in 
the lives of students of all ages. 

From the beginning, the school was organized on the 
three-department basis of age : the minim department for chil- 
dren under twelve, the junior department for children from 
twelve to fifteen, the senior department for girls over fifteen. 
Each department occupied its own particular portion of campus 
and buildings. All the departments were exclusively resident 
for practically the first seventy-five years of the school's his- 
tory; now day students from South Bend and the suburban 
area participate with girls from all parts of the United States 
in the cultural and educational opportunities offered by the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross. 

Among American Catholic schools. Saint Mary's Academy 
was a leader of first rank. When higher education in secular 
schools for young women was facing strong opposition and 
traditional prejudice. Saint Mary's-Notre Dame enlarged its 
curriculum to college level and granted the first Bachelor of 
Letters degree in June, 1898. From that time on, the college 
has been recognized throughout the American Catholic world 
as a select educational institution. Its students are drawn 
from all parts of the nation. Approximately, five hundred girls 
are enrolled each year in the college and academy. 

Just at the opening of the twentieth century, an article in 
the Southern Trade Record of Cincinnati, carried the following 
appraisal: "One of the best of such institutions in the United 
States, the atmosphere of which, mentally, morally, and 
physically, is of a known character to instill purity, and good- 
ness, and health; and which has the reputation of educating 
its pupils in a most thorough and comprehensive manner in 
every requirement of modern cultivation is Saint Mary's 
Academy, at Notre Dame, Indiana, conducted by the Sisters of 
the Holy Cross." 

In the liberal education which Saint Mary's furnishes its 
students a compherensive lecture and concert program to bring 
the best scholars and artists to the campus is always included. 
The group of prominent ecclesiastical visitors and lecturers 
form a valuable cross section of Catholic intellectual life in any 
decade. Saint Mary's counts among her guests Cardinals 
Satolli, Martinelli, Gibbons, Farley, Mundelein, Hayes; Arch- 
bishops Ryan, Keane, Riordan, Christie, Glennon, J. L. Spald- 
ing, Spellman; bishops almost without number, yet none more 
distinguished and beloved than our own prelate, His Excellency, 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



John Francis Noll of the diocese of Fort Wayne. In the decade 
of the thirties, for example, are recorded : Maisie Ward Sheed, 
Helen C. White, Lorado Taft, Maurice Lavanoux, Katharine 
Bregy, Elizabeth Drew, Christopher Hollis, Francis Sheed, Dr. 
Arthur Haas, Arnold Lunn, Comtesse de Chambrun, Alfred 
Noyes, Robert Speaight, Mortimer Adier, Dr. John A. Lapp, 
Monsieur Charles DuBos, Dr. Waldemar Gurian, Emmet 
Lavery, Maurice Leahy, Jacques Maritain. 

Saint Mary's College and Academy are located in a park- 
like campus, just outside the limits of South Bend and a mile 
and a quarter west of the University of Notre Dame. The 
campus, bounded by the Saint Joseph River and extending 
north and east, provides the natural and cultivated beauty and 
quiet ideal for a school. Facilities for the pageantry of 
academic life, cap and gown ceremonies. May Day and Corpus 
Christi processions, and other out-of-door festivals are par- 
ticularly attractive. Among the dozen or more structures 
which accommodate the schools at Saint Mary's, Le Mans Hall 
composed of five units, is the first to be seen from the avenue 
of sycamores and maples. It is a Tudor-Gothic structure of 
buff brick with Bedford stone trim. Erected in 1925 at the 
cost of a million and a half, it provides residence quarters for 
three hundred college students and classroom facilities. The 
science laboratories, Little Theatre, class and lecture rooms for 
the department of home economics, the book store, and the art 
studios are located in Holy Cross Hall. The Adaline Crowley- 
Riedinger house is a model home in which majors in home 
economics have practice in house management under the 
budget plan. A library, made possible by contributions of 
alumnae and friends to the sum of one hundred and ten thou- 
sand dollars, fittingly commemorates the centenary of the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross. Among the oldest and most impor- 
tant structures in the lives of students and Sisters is the con- 
vent church of Loretto, Romanesque in style, with high altar 
and four niched side altars of white marble; the stained glass 
windows were designed and executed by the Carmelite nuns of 
Le Mans, France. Directly behind this church is Loretto Chapel, 
a facsimile of the renowned Santa Casa in Italy and carries 
the same rich spiritual privileges. Saint Mary's rejoices in the 
blessings of six chapels on the grounds in which the Holy Sac- 
rifice of the Mass daily invokes God's graces for the student 
body, for the Sisters of Holy Cross, fifteen hundred in number, 
and for the diocese of Fort Wayne. 

This brief survey of the educational life of an institution 
older than the diocese itself and counting more than ninety 
academic years in the cause of Catholic training may be con- 
cluded with the list of accreditment and recognition: "Saint 
Mary's College is a standard college in the State of Indiana and 
holds membership in the Catholic Educational Association, the 



INSTITUTI O NS IN THE DIOCESE O F FORT WAYNE 441 

North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, 
the National Association of Commercial Teacher Training In- 
stitutions, and the American Association of University Women. 
The College is formally registered by the Board of Regents, 
State of New York, for its courses leading to the Bachelor 
degrees, and has been rated Class A by the University of 
Illinois. The State Board of Education has formally accredited 
Saint Mary's College for the four year courses in the college 
departments offering majors. This is the highest recognition 
accorded by the State Board of Education." 

Crowning Le Mans Hall is a thirteenth-century statue of 
Our Lady of the Holy Trinity, carved to express a threefold 
ideal in Saint Mary's education. In this symbolism, the young 
college student beholds the pattern of her life, the goal of her 
existence. In one hand. Our Lady holds the sceptre, to symbo- 
lize the power which the educated Catholic woman possesses 
potentially ; in the other, the hand is open to signify the stream 
of grace that flows from Mary to invigorate her children; on 
her head is a crown, to bespeak the wisdom she must exercise 
for salvation. Power, correctly guided by the truth that has 
been inculcated ; grace, infused by participation in the Mystical 
Body; wisdom, exemplified daily by the lives of self-sacrifice 
for Christ in order that Heaven may be the fulfillment of all, 
in all, by all — such is the religious heritage of the Sistei's of 
the Holy Cross in their centennial year; such is their edu- 
cational promise. 

ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE 
Rensselaer, Indiana 

By a Member of the Congregation 

St. Joseph's College, at Rensselaer, grew from a bishop's 
dream of half century ago. 

The Most Rev. Joseph Dwenger, C.PP.S., bishop of the 
diocese of Fort Wayne, visioned an institution of higher learn- 
ing on a tract of land, owned by the diocese, a mile south of 
Rensselaer. 

The land, originally known as the Spitler farm, was pur- 
chased by Bishop Luers in 1867, as a site for a diocesan 
orphanage. The children came, boys and girls to the number 
of thirty-five, in 1868, under the care of the Sisters of the 
Holy Cross. The Rev. J. Joseph Stephan, later Msgr. Stephan, 
head of the Catholic Indian Bureau, was chaplain of the in- 
stitution. 

The last of the orphans left the asylum in 1887 when the 
girls were removed to Fort Wayne. The boys had been trans- 
ferred to Lafayette in 1876. 

The Catholic Indian Bureau purchased a portion of the 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



diocesan property the year the asylum dosed. The Society of 
the Precious Blood opened the Indian School in 1888, across 
the road from where the orphans had lived. A withdrawal of 
government support closed the doors of the Indian School in 
1896. 

The Very Rev. Henry Drees, provincial of the Society of 
the Precious Blood, wanted an institution for his minor sem- 
inarians. They, as well as the major ecclesiastical students, 
were studying at the Motherhouse, St. Charles' Seminary, 
Carthagena, 0. Bishop Dwenger had his heart set on estab- 
lishing a Catholic College and diocesan seminary. So the 
Bishop offered the provincial the land on which the orphanage 
had stood with the provision that the Society of the Precious 
Blood found a college and seminary. Father Drees accepted. 
That was in 1890. 

The first scholastic year of St. Joseph's College opened 
with fifty-five students, September 3, 1891, under direction 
of the Very Rev. August Seifert, C.PP.S. 

From the time the institution was founded until 1925, 
it operated as a junior college and seminary. From 1925 until 
1933 is was a seminary only. From 1933 until 1936 it was 
again a junior college. From the latter date to the present it 
has been operating as a senior college. 

The student enrollment has grown by leaps and bounds 
since St. Joseph's became a senior college. Every year it has 
been necessary to add classrooms and residence facilities. The 
institution almost doubled the size of its plant during the past 
four years by building Seifert Hall, Science Hall, Drexel Hall, 
Xavier Hall, Noll Hall, and the fieldhouse. 

Nine presidents have directed St. Joseph's during its 
fifty year history. They are, in order of precedence, the Very 
Rev. Augustine Seifert, Benedict Boebner, Hugh Lear, Ignatius 
Wagner, Didacus Brackmann, Joseph Kenkel, Cyril Knue, Rufus 
Esser, and Aloys Dirksen. 

In conducting St. Joseph's College, the Fathers of the 
Precious Blood fulfill one of the purposes to which the society 
is dedicated — the instruction of youth. The community was 
established in Rome, August 15, 1815, by Blessed Caspar del 
Bufalo primarily as a mission band. At present, in the Ameri- 
can province, the three hundred members of the society find 
their labors almost equally divided among the work of mis- 
sionary, professor, and pastor. 

In their work as professors at St. Joseph's, they have out- 
lined for themselves a three-point program. They strive to 
give every student the greatest possible moral, mental, and 
physical development. 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 443 

THE POOR SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS SERAPH, OF THE 
PERPETUAL ADORATION 

Located at Lafayette, Indiana 

By a Member of the Order' 
Perhaps in no country has any set of laws threatened to 
be more fateful to religious organizations than the "May Laws" 
of Germany, adopted early in the last half of the nineteenth 
century. It was during tliis critical period that Providence 
guided the steps of Right Reverend Joseph Dwenger, Bishop 
of Fort Wayne, Indiana, to the Motherhouse of the Sisters of 
St. Francis of Olpe, Westphalia, Gei-many, where the saintly 
foundress Mother Teresia Bonzel was still personally directing 
her little band of followers. He offered American soil as an 
extensive and fertile field to the Sisters in which to exercise 
their labors. Owing to unsettled conditions in Germany the 
offer was warmly accepted, and in 1875 six Sisters landed in 
the United States to dedicate their lives and services to the 
cause of the American people. Unknown and almost without 
means they entered upon their work of charity at Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

While in 1876 the first buildings of the present Mother- 
house, St. Francis Convent and St. Elizabeth Hospital were 
erected on the two lots donated to the Sisters by a benefactor, 
Albert Wagner, they occupied a temporary dwelling on 10th 
and Cincinnati Streets. Under Mother M. Alphonsa's kindly di- 
rection the little Community soon prospered. Many generous 
maidens urged by a spirit of consecrated service to others so 
swelled the ranks of the Sisterhood, that soon the Convent 
quarters became too small; likewise the hospital required 
greater bed capacity. In consequence both a new convent and 
a new hospital were erected in 1879, and enlarged respectively 
in 1883, 1886, 1896, 1914, 1921 and again in 1927. At present 
the buildings comprise 320,000 sq. ft. of floor space. Besides 
the hospital at Lafayette the community manages twenty others 
distributed throughout various States. The Sisterhood en- 
deavors to keep abreast of the advance of hospital and medical 
science in its equipment, personnel and service. Thus through 
its "Class A" hospitals it endeavors to serve efficiently the 
various communities in which these function. To qualify its 
members for their work the community has established a 
training school at the Motherhouse to prepare its members to 
become registered nurses. 

Material progress is very essential as a medium for the 
congregation's activities, but this is not, however, its main 
purpose. While many objectives are set before members of 
the congregation, a few are outstanding. Foremost of these 
is, of course, the sanctification of its individual members. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Another is the Perpetual Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament 
through which the Sisters, by their prayers endeavor to atone 
for the outrages committed against the Blessed Sacrament. A 
third feature of great importance is the invocation of bless- 
ings upon priests and their labors. 

The community lends itself in a very special manner to 
the poor and needy, and above all seeks to have its members 
animated by true Christian charity and labor indefatigably, 
with unselfish devotedness, in behalf of the sick and the poor 
in hospitals, schools, orphanages, and homes for the aged. 
Since the congregation unites the contemplative with the 
active life the majority of the Sisters are trained either for 
teaching or for nursing. 

The community is active in the training and education of 
youth and has a large percentage of its Sisters employed in 
this field. It provides ample opportunity for its members to 
qualify themselves to meet the present day requirements of 
the efficient teacher. To this purpose it conducts an accredited 
College at the Motherhouse and sends many of its members 
to higher institutions of learning. At present the con- 
gregation has charge of fifty-three schools. Loyal to the 
missionary zeal of St. Francis, Venerable Mother Josepha 
extended the scope of labor in 1904 to include mission work 
among the Indians in New Mexico. The first mission was 
laid at Pena Blanca. This place comprises both Indian and 
Mexican population. Two years later another mission was 
opened at Jemes, a district huddled within the mountains. 
This town in New Mexico lies within the Indian reservations 
and hence the schools are frequented by Indians exclusively. 
Here the residences are the adobe houses so peculiarly adapted 
to the varying conditions of the climate. Owing to the Indians' 
innate distrust of the whites the enrollment in these schools 
was very meager at first, but the Sisters gradually winning 
their confidence swelled the number to such an extent that 
ampler quarters had to be provided. Since the establishment 
of the first two missions nine others have been founded in 
New Mexico, among the last is Zuni where in 1927 sixty Indian 
converts were brought into the true Church on Christmas day. 

The Sisterhood now numbers more than one thousand 
members in two Provinces, those of Lafayette and Denver, and 
conducts branch houses in the diocese of Fort Wayne, Omaha, 
Indianapolis, Leavenworth, Cleveland, Grand Island, Denver, 
Nashville, Lincoln, Louisville, and in the Archdioceses of St. 
Louis, Chicago, Santa Fe and New Orleans. 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 



POOR HANDMAIDS OF JESUS CHRIST 
Motherhouse and Normal School Located at Donaldson 

By a Member of the Community 
The Sisters, Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ, are pioneers 
in the diocese of Fort Wayne. The Fathers and the Sisters 
of the Holy Cross are the only communities who founded their 
motherhouse in this diocese before the Poor Handmaids of 
Jesus Christ established their Provincial Motherhouse at Fort 
Wayne, in 1869. The Fathers and the Sisters of the Most 
Precious Blood and the Sisters of Providence are the only 
other religious communities who had establishments in the 
diocese of Fort Wayne prior to the coming of the Poor Hand- 
maids of Jesus Christ. The community is of German origin. 

The accounts of history reveal many truly marvelous re- 
sults from small and lowly beginnings; a thought, a simple 
act, an impulse toward good has been the germ from which 
have developed great inspirations, achievements that extend 
far and wide throughout the world. The pages of the history 
of the Community of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ 
reveal a growth that has been truly blessed and guided to a 
marvelous degree by the merciful Providence of God. 

In poverty and utter simplicity, this community was 
begun eighty-five years ago by a noble-hearted, kind, but 
very poor young woman, in the small village of Dernbach, 
Germany. Her poverty was extreme ; few in the little village 
were poorer than the family of the Kaspers ; and yet this very 
poverty seemed to increase the charitable desires of the daugh- 
ter, Catherine. As a poor child she was deprived in her young- 
er days of every opportunity to acquire more than an ordinary 
common school education, but her heart was pure, and the 
Holy Ghost had kindled in it a great love of God and her 
fellow-men. 

Her charity knew no obstacles to the carrying out of 
good. She was willing to undergo privations and sufferings 
if only she might glorify God in serving others. One day, 
whilst kneeling in prayer, the thought came to Catherine's 
mind, "I cannot leave my home and serve Jesus Christ in His 
poor, for I myself am poor, but I can be a handmaid of Jesus 
Christ, a poor handmaid of Jesus ; yes, this I can and will be." 
Therefore, in addition to her own hard labor to help her family 
she would go to the home of some sufferer and nurse him, or 
offer her charity in whatever form it was needed; caring for 
the children, or doing the cooking, or the housework. Several 
young women influenced by the example and loving charity of 
the humble and unassuming Catherine soon joined her in 
nursing and caring for the sick, and the poor looked upon 



446 FRAGMENTS OF QUE DIOCESAN HISTORY 

them as angels of mercy in distress. But despite the good 
Catherine and her sisters in charity were accomplishing in th .a 
manner, she felt that the best was not yet being realized, and 
desiring to devote her entire life to God's honor in serving the 
poor and sick, she sought to fulfill her aim by seeking the 
advice of the Right Reverend Bishop of Limburg, Doctor Peter 
Joseph Blum. He listened with surprise and patience to the 
desires of the poor young woman. That one so in need should 
wish to found a community for others more in need than she, 
appealed to him as a noble idea, but he wished to test the 
sincerity of her desire. He, therefore, did not immediately 
consent to her plan, but he advised her to continue quietly in 
her work until a later day. After he had waited and watched 
the efforts of the little band of five for some time, he considered 
that their courage had been sufficiently tested, and that the 
hand of God lay on the work of the devout and humble young 
leader. In the year 1850, therefore, the little community of 
five received from the Right Reverend Bishop regulations to 
be followed in their community life and in their care of the 
sick and the poor. "Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ," the 
Right Reverend Bishop called Catherine and her four com- 
panions when he, in the year 1851, on the feast of the Assump- 
tion of the Blessed Virgin in the neighboring parish church of 
Wirges, bestowed upon them the religious habit and veil and 
received from them the profession of the religious vows of 
poverty, chastity, and obedience. 

Pope Pius IX in 1870, temporarily approved the constitu- 
tion of the community. Twenty years later, on March 23, 1890, 
His Holiness, Pope Leo XIII, confirmed the approval of his 
predecessor by issuing the Decree of Final Approbation. 

Missions were established in many dioceses of Germany 
and in 1859 the first house in Holland. In 1876 the Sisters 
opened a school in the diocese of Westminster, England. 

The "Kulturkampf" in Germany put an end to the work 
of education for approximately seven years; however, in 1884 
the work of teaching was resumed. Teaching has become for 
the community an activity that ranks with that of nursing. 
The special training required for each of these activities is 
given to those who follow one or the other calling. 

In Europe the Community has 3304 members in 295 
houses, and 180 novices. There is a novitiate in Dernbach, 
Germany and another at Lutterade, Holland. 
The Community in America 

Through the efforts of the Right Reverend Bishop Luers 
of Fort Wayne and the Reverend Father Koenig of St. Paul's 
Church of the same city, the first Poor Handmaids of Jesus 
Christ, eight in number, came to the diocese of Fort Wayne 
in 1868. They were assigned to the parish of Hessen CasseU 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF F ORT WAYNE 447 

here these pioneer sisters under great difficulties performed 
their duties of teaching and nursing in private houses. 

In October of the same year the Reverend Peter Fischer, 
Vicar General of the diocese of Chicago, made an appeal to 
the sisters to take charge of the Orphanage at Rose Hill, now 
Angel Guardian. The Angel Guardian Orphanage now counts 
800 orphans. 

The Right Reverend John Henry Luers, Bishop of Fort 
Wayne induced the Sisters to open a hospital in Fort Wayne, 
which they dedicated to St. Joseph, and also converted into the 
American Provincial House. 

The Sisters now operate hospitals at Mishawaka, LaPorte, 
Gary, and Indiana Harbor in the diocese of Fort Wayne, St. 
Elizabeth's and St. Ann's in Chicago, several others in the 
states of Illinois, Wisconsin and Minnesota. They conduct 
many schools, and have charge of several orphanages, includ- 
ing St. Vincent Villa, Fort Wayne. They founded and once 
conducted Catholic Central High School at Hammond, and 
have charge of the week-day religious classes in the Gary- 
public schools. 

The New Motherhouse 

Eight miles from Plymouth, the county seat of Marshall 
County, Indiana, and a mile and a half south of the village, 
Donaldson, lies pretty Lake Gilbraith, and on a terrace near 
its shore was located the summer resort "Lake Gilbraith 
Hotel." The sisters purchased this hotel on March 18, 1918, 
and converted it into a convent to serve as a home for con- 
valescent sisters. The grounds were named St. Amalia. On 
July 10, 1920, the corner-stone of the new convent, Ancilla 
Domini, was laid. 

Ancilla Domini with its beautiful Gothic convent-church 
was solemnly dedicated on May 24, 1923, by the Right Reverend 
Bishop of Fort Wayne in the presence of two other bishops, two 
monsignori, forty-two priests, and nearly one thousand mem- 
bers of the laity. The Motherhouse, in addition to the Noviti- 
ate, includes the high school for the teaching sisters and the 
nurses. The high school offers the four year course required 
by school law, and is affiliated to the Catholic University of 
America. 

Convent Ancilla Domini is the home of the sisters. To it 
they return annually for a few days of recreation and of re- 
treat, for the continuation of normal and college work during 
the vacation periods, and, in days of illness, for convalescence. 

There are today 626 professed religious, 48 novices, and' 
14 postulants in the Community. The spirit of the Community 
is charitable and progressive. Simplicity is a distinctive mark: 
of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ. 



448 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

DIVINE HEART MISSION HOUSE 

(Society of the Priests of the Sacred Heart, S.C.J.) 

Donaldson, Indiana 

The Divine Heart Mission House, Donaldson, Indiana 

By a Member of the Society 

The Divine Heart Mission House is the Preparatory 
Seminary of the Priests of the Sacred Heart in the United 
States. It is situated near the little hamlet of Donaldson, Mar- 
shall County, amidst fields, meadows, and woods, a scene char- 
acteristic to Indiana. 

The school was built during the summer and fall of 1935, 
and on December 4, 1935, it was opened to all who desired to 
dedicate their lives and all their faculties to the service of the 
altar, the glory of God, the salvation of souls, and the sancti- 
fication of self. Its founder was Rev. Fr. Henry Hogebach, 
S.C.J. At present there are forty-five students and nine teach- 
ers with us. The students preparing themselves for the sin- 
gular honor of becoming another Christ, follow a six years' 
course of careful training in the so-called classics. After com- 
pleting his studies, the young aspirant will enter the novitiate 
located at Sainte Marie, 111. After his novitiate the young reli- 
gious takes up his studies at the Major Seminary at Hales 
Corners, Wis. After his ordination the young priest is ready 
to be sent anywhere the Superiors see fit, in accordance with 
the aim and purpose of the Society. 

The main aim and purpose of our Society is the pro- 
moting of the spirit and practice of love and atonement, in 
short the devotion to the Sacred Heart. The Encyclical of 
Pope Pius XI of May 8, 1928 "Most Merciful Redeemer," is 
regarded by our members a proof that the Holy Father thinks 
this devotion necessary for our time, and recommends its prac- 
tice to the whole world. Apart from the general purpose of 
the Society which consists in the honoring of God and the self- 
sanctification of its members by the three simple vows of 
poverty, chastity, and obedience, the members pledge them- 
selves to cultivate an especial devotion to the Sacred Heart of 
Jesus, namely by returning His love, and by making repara- 
tion for the indignities heaped upon Him, and of which He has 
so bitterly complained. The members of the Society constantly 
practice the exercises which the Divine Lord impressed upon 
St. Margaret Mary, namely; the Mass of reparation. Com- 
munion of reparation, the celebration of the First Friday devo- 
tion, the Holy Hour each Thursday evening and the daily 
adoration before the exposed Sacrament; imitating Our 
Saviour in His life of constant immolation for mankind by 
lives of love and immolation of self, offering up all their 
prayers, works, and crosses in union with the Sacred Heart 



INSTITUTIO'NS IN THE DIOCESE O F FORT WAYNE 



with the intention thus to offer up to the Lord a sacrifice of 
expiation, praise and love. 

In the spirit of loving atonement we combine the apostolic 
and missionary life with the high ideals of the contemplative 
life. Our missionaries work with zeal among the Indians of 
South Dakota, and in the poor Negro and Mexican parishes 
of East Chicago, South America, Africa, Asia, and in those 
countries of Northern Europe which Protestantism has 
estranged from the faith and loving Heart of the Redeemer. 
Many members devote their lives to the education of youths, 
especially those of the poorer classes, and those who are called 
to the priesthood. Others regard themselves as the humble 
co-workers of the secular clergy by preaching, teaching, giving 
missions and retreats. 

If the Sacred Heart will bless, as He has promised, every 
house where His picture is venerated, then certainly. He will 
bless the diocese and the country which shelter a society de- 
voted to His Sacred Heart. 

HISTORY OF THE SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH OF TIPTON, 

INDIANA 

By a Member of the Congregation 
The Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph was founded 
at La Puy, France, in 1650, by Father John Paul Medaille, S.J., 
assisted by Rev. Henri de Maupas, a friend and disciple of St. 
Vincent de Paul, for the Christian education of children. A 
number of young women, eager for social service in religion, 
offered themselves and were received by the bishop as the first 
members of the congregation. The constitution, drawn up by 
Bishop de Maupas is based on the rules of St. Ignatius. The 
rapid growth of the congregation soon spread its benign in- 
fluence over the greater part of Europe. One hundred and 
seventy-six years later the Congregation was introduced into 
the United States by the Rt. Rev. Joseph Rosati of St. Louis, 
Mo. The Mother House at Tipton owes its foundation to the 
Rt. Rev. Joseph Dwenger, Bishop of the Ft. Wayne diocese. 
Mother Mary Gertrude Moffit, with two companions opened 
the Tipton Convent, February 15, 1888. 

True to the tenets of the original constitution this little 
band which was soon joined by others set about to engage in 
the work of social service among the laity and the Christian 
education of youth. The unselfish performance of the works 
of charity and Christian education soon manifested itself in 
the then growing parish of St. John. Four years later the first 
high school class was graduated and in 1941 the fiftieth class 
was received into the St. Joseph's Alumni Association. This 
organization numbers among its members priests, sisters, 
lawyers, teachers, nurses, and many men and women engaged 



450 F RAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

in the business world. It is gratifying to note that of the large 
number of its young women who have entered the St. Joseph's 
Novitiate, all are teaching or preparing to teach. The scholas- 
ticate is affiliated with the St. Mary's College, Notre Dame, 
Indiana. Besides the educational labors of the Community in 
the parochial schools of the diocese, the Sisters have estab- 
lished and doubled the capacity of three hospitals. The Good 
Samaritan Hospital training School is located at Kokomo. This 
school was opened in 1915 and graduates Sister nurses also. 
After becoming registered nurses those Sisters who have an 
inclination to do so finish College courses for the degree in 
nursing education. 

In connection with the Novitiate is a class of aspirants for 
girls who have completed their eighth grade and who are not 
yet sixteen years of age — the age required for entrance. The 
lack of money or education is no barrier for entrance, but the 
age limit is thirty-five years. 

The Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Tipton, 
Indiana, is a Community of diocesan right, therefore, it is 
under the direct supervision of the Most Reverend John F. 
Noll, Bishop of the diocese. 

THE SOCIETY OF MISSIONARY CATECHISTS 
Located near Huntington 

By a Member of the Society 

The Society of Missionary Catechists owes its origin to 
an interview which a certain Peter O'Donnell had with Father 
Noll at Hot Springs, Ark., in 1921. Mr. O'Donnell, who had 
been a Chicago policeman, before moving to Long Beach, Cal., 
for the benefit of his health, accumulated a little fortune in the 
latter city in a brief time by investing his modest bank account 
in real estate. Long Beach had a large Mexican population, as 
did the neighboring city of Los Angeles, and the few priests 
and Sisters who could talk their language were inadequate to 
reach a small percentage of them by catechetical work. 

Because Father Noll was the editor of a paper which had 
a national circulation, Mr. O'Donnell begged him to found a 
semi-religious Community of Sisters, who would give of their 
time to the work of instructing children who were neither in 
parochial schools nor near enough to a Catholic Church to 
attend divine services. 

Father Noll expressed himself most sympathetic towards 
the idea, but did not believe that he had the time to found, 
build up and supervise a new Religious Community. But Mr. 
O'Donnell, who offered $50,000.00 towards the founding of 
such an institution, declared that he would not be interested 
unless that institution were located at Huntington, Indiana, 
and fostered by OUR SUNDAY VISITOR. 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 461 

This meeting seemed to be very providential as was also 
a casual meeting which Father Noll had only a short time 
before with the Rev. John J. Sigstein, Chaplain at St. Ber- 
nard's Hospital, Englewood, Chicago. Father Sigstein had 
just formed the nucleus of such a Community which was con- 
stituted of three Chicago young women whom the Sisters of 
Notre Dame at their Academy at Longwood, in the south side 
of Chicago, harbored while Father Sigstein gave them spiritual 
direction. 

On his return home from Hot Springs, Father Noll carried 
the wish of Mr. O'Donnell to Father Sigstein who, of course, 
was delighted at finding both a benefactor and a sponsor, but 
he had a fear lest the Archbishop of Chicago would not release 
him for incardination in the Diocese of Fort Wayne, where 
Huntington and OUR SUNDAY VISITOR are located. 

But upon pressure from Father Noll, Archbishop Mun- 
delein gave his consent to the transfer, and OUR SUNDAY 
VISITOR provided a farm of more than 200 acres which had 
previously been purchased as a site for a Home Mission Semi- 
nary to be conducted under the auspices of the Catholic Church 
Extension Society, but which the Executive Committee of that 
Society later decided not to build. 

Father Sigstein had selected for his Community the name 
"The Society of Missionary Catechists of our Blessed Lady of 
Victory" and without consulting Father Noll named the place 
on which the building was to stand VICTORY-NOLL. 

In the year 1924, a very elegant Motherhouse, Novitiate 
and Training School was erected on this property, beautifully 
situated on an eminence overlooking the Wabash Valley. The 
building is of Spanish Mission design, and it was formally 
dedicated on July 5, 1925, just a few days after Father Noll 
was consecrated Bishop. The initial construction work and 
equipment cost $240,000.00. towards which Mr. O'Donnell 
later gave another $50,000.00. 

OUR SUNDAY VISITOR carried the balance of the cost, 
and from the beginning has paid the entire expense of main- 
taining the institution where about sixty Catechists have been 
normally housed for the past ten years. 

Mr. O'Donnell, who died in 1938, had the satisfaction of 
seeing in action a great many Catechists to whom the Bishops 
of Los Angeles, San Diego, and Monterey-Fresno have assigned 
large fields. The Catechists also labor in the Archdiocese of 
Santa Fe, the new diocese of Gallup, and in the Dioceses of 
El Paso, Amarillo, Salt Lake City and Reno. 

In the Diocese of Monterey-Fresno alone more than 
10,000 children are instructed by the Catechists, the largest 
center being that located at Redlands, California. 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



At that place OUR SUNDAY VISITOR was able to pur- 
chase for the Catechists, at a very low price, a large edifice 
seemingly built providentially for the special purpose of the 
Catechists. It is of Mission style construction, the center of 
which is surmounted by two steeples, and monastery corridors 
encircle the whole building. Besides being used by the fifteen 
Catechists who are all-time residents there, it has sufficient 
capacity to house the more than sixty Catechists working in 
California during their annual Retreat and summer school. 
The Queen of the Missions is located on a high eminence, a 
part of twenty-five acres of ground, most of which is occupied 
by orange groves. At a little distance the San Bernardino 
Mountains rise high, and add to the picturesqueness of the 
place. 

The Catechists also occupy a large building at Las Vegas, 
New Mexico, to which members of the Society working through 
New Mexico and Texas come for their annual Retreat and 
Summer School. 

In the Diocese of Fort Wayne there are large settlements 
of Mexicans in the cities of East Chicago and Gary, and the 
Catechists are located at three centers in this area, where 
they instruct Mexicans, Italians and the colored. They are 
also located at San Pierre and Goshen, Ind., from which 
centers they instruct children of a wide area who have not 
the advantage of parochial schools. Summer Vacation Schools 
are also conducted by the Catechists. 

In the year 1937 additional facilities were provided for 
the growing Society in another building erected adjacent to 
and connected with the Motherhouse at Victory-Noll. 

The Society is no longer a semi-religious, but a real Re- 
ligious Community, having had its Constitution approved by 
the Sacred Congregation of Religious in 1938. It receives 
young women between the ages of eighteen and thirty into 
its Postulancy and then into a two year Novitiate. The Cate- 
chists are well trained for their catechetical, social service and 
medical missionary work. 

The Capuchin Fathers, who conduct a Novitiate for the 
Detroit Province on the same plot of ground originally pur- 
chased for the Home Mission Seminary, serve as spiritual 
guides and an instructors for all those in training. 

The Society now counts some 250 members, with fairly 
large classes in the Novitiate and the Postulancy. 

Mr. O'Donnell believed that 1,000 members were needed in 
this Community to meet the needs even of the southwest and 
far west, and he did not overestimate that need, nor the demand 
which is being made on the Society for Catechists from all 
parts of this big country to open centers for home visiting 
and the instruction of scattered Catholic children. 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 453 

ST. FELIX MONASTERY, HUNTINGTON, INDIANA 

By Rev. Marion Roessler, O.F.M. Cap. 

The Capuchins are comparative late-comers to the Diocese 
This autonomous branch of the Friars Minor, together with 
the Observants and the Conventuals, follovirs the Rule of St, 
Francis of Assisi. Recognized as a separate reform of the 
Franciscans by Clement VII in 1528, the Capuchin Order has 
spread into all countries of the civilized world, with many 
missions in pagan lands. Founded at a time when the Church 
was in the throes of Luther's revolt, the Capuchin Order soon 
acquired a fame for apostolic zeal, and was no small factor in 
the counter-Reformation. By constitution and tradition the 
Order endeavors to be of assistance to the Bishops and their 
clergy in the fostering and spreading of the Kingdom of 
Christ. 

By invitation of His Excellency the Most Reverend Bishop 
Noll, the Province of St. Joseph of the Capuchin Order, with 
headquarters at Detroit, decided to found a house in the Diocese 
of Fort Wayne. A site about a mile west of Huntington, 
Indiana, was chosen, thirty acres being donated by Bishop 
Noll for the purpose. It was decided to erect a large monas- 
tery, to house the novitiate of the Province. 

Ground was broken for the building on February 27, 1928, 
and the cornerstone was laid by Father Benedict, then Pro- 
vincial, on May 18. The monastery was dedicated to St. Felix 
of Cantalice on April 2, 1929, with Bishop Noll officiating in 
the presence of some eighty-eight members of the clergy. 
His Excellency preached a sermon on the glorious history of 
the Capuchin Order, and closed with hearty words of welcome 
and sincere appreciation of the work done thus far by the 
Fathers of the Province. 

St. Felix is in the Florentine Renaissance style. The build- 
ing is composed of two parallel main wings, each two hundred 
and eight feet long. The west wing is reserved for novitiate 
purposes, the east for the professed religious. Between these 
two wings, and connected with them by a cross wing, are the 
chapel, boiler room, the library and infirmary- The high 
basement contains the refectory, the kitchen, storage rooms 
and various workshops. The grounds have been beautified by 
extensive planting of trees and shrubs. At present the mon- 
astery can accommodate eighty-five religious, each one occupy- 
ing a separate cell. 

Since the first class of novices moved into the building in 
1929, St. Felix has given forty-five priests and sixty-nine stu- 
dents in major studies to the Order. The novitiate lasts one 
year, during which time the young men are formed to the 
ideals of the Capuchin Order and imbued with the spirit of 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



St. Francis. During this year studies are quite subordinated 
to the main task of learning the Capuchin religious life. 

The Fathers attached to the Monastery have always been 
at the call of the diocesan clergy. During the twelve years of 
the Monastery's existence, the Fathers have responded to 
more than two thousand requests for parochial assistance on 
Sundays and Holy Days, besides substituting for absent priests 
for a total of more than sixty months. They have given twenty- 
three retreats to religious communities, twenty-six closed 
retreats to laymen, and have conducted the Forty Hours de- 
votion thirty-eight times. Besides all this they are active as 
ordinary and extraordinary confessors to several religious 
communities. 

THE DELATES OF MARY IMMACULATE 
Mission Houses at Ligonier and Gary 

By an Oblate Father 

Charles Joseph Eugene de Mazenod and three fellow dio- 
cesan priests started preaching to the poor of France in 1816. 
In ten short years, the rules and regulations of their fast 
growing community of missionaries were approved by Rome, 
February 17, 1826. They were further empowered by Pope 
Leo XII to carry the title Oblates of Mary Immaculate. These 
priests, popularly known as the Oblate Fathers, selected as 
their motto, "He hath sent me to evangelize the poor." In one 
hundred and twenty-four years, this religious congregation has 
mushroomed in such rapid fashion that today records state it 
to be standing fourth in numerical strength, numbering over 
5,500 professed religious, working on the five continents. 

From Canada, in 1848, Oblate missionaries came to the 
United States to establish a mission at Brownsville, Texas. 
Soon after houses were established in Buffalo, New York and 
also Lowell, Massachusetts. From these three centers the mis- 
sionaries went forth preaching missions among Irish and 
French immigrants from coast to coast, and in time founding 
houses in every section of the country. There are now over six 
hundred Oblate Priests and Brothers in the United States. 
They form four Provinces, one in the North and East, one in 
the Southwest, and one Franco-American and one German- 
American Province. 

In the Northern and Eastern States the Fathers of the 
First American Province have followed closely in the tradition 
of their Founder, preaching to the Poor of Christ in the large 
industrial centers and in remote rural districts. Laboring in 
such fashion, they attracted the notice of John Francis Noll, 
now Bishop of Fort Wayne. He invited these missionaries to 
establish a house in Ligonier, Indiana—from which they could 
branch out into the diocese of Fort Wayne, preaching the word 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 455 

of God. He asked them to care, also, for the small Catholic 
group which resides in Ligonier and its surrounding environs. 
Thus it was that in May, 1934, the Ligonier house was opened, 
housing six missionaries who, besides saying Mass in Ligonier 
at 8:30 A.M. each Sunday, celebrate a 10:00 A.M. Mass each 
Sunday in Albion, a mission fourteen miles southeast of 
Ligonier. Lake Wawasee, with its summer crowds, was like- 
wise entrusted to their care with four Masses being celebrated 
each Sunday during the summer, at the Little Flower Chapel 
on the Lake. Ligonier is the focal point, however, from which 
the Oblate Fathers carry on the work for which they were 
founded — that of preaching missions, retreats. Forty Hours, 
novenas, triduums, days of recollection, etc., throughout the 
Fort Wayne diocese. 

In April, 1939, Bishop Noll further entrusted to the care 
of the Oblate Fathers another of his loved endeavors — ^the 
spiritual instruction of the Negro. Thus, in April, 1939, he 
asked them to care for the Catholic Negroes in the city of Gary, 
Indiana. To this work the Oblates also brought their first 
love — that of establishing a mission house from which they 
could work out and do the work for which they were founded — 
so that in the diocese of Fort Wayne alone there are two of 
their mission houses together with two parishes, a fact which 
takes place in only one other diocese in the First American 
Province. Truly can it be said, with all humility and with due 
regard for the providence of God and the prayers of His 
Blessed Mother, that the Oblate Fathers have seen the ideal of 
their founder still upheld — for they can truthfully speak the 
other half of their motto, "The poor are being evangelized." 

COMMISSARIATE OF THE TRANSFIGURATION 
SLOVAK FRANCISCAN FATHERS 

Located near Valparaiso 

By a Member of the Commissariate 
In the year 1926, two Fathers from the Province of the 
St. Salvatoris, in Slovakia, were sent by their superior to the 
United States. They were to conduct missions among the 
Slovak people throughout the states. For two years they 
labored zealously, but had no place they could call their own. 
They depended on the generosity of the secular priests where 
they happened to be conducting missions. 

Seeing the necessity of having their home take care of 
the spiritual and temporal affairs they petitioned Rome for 
the necessary permission. On March 6, 1928 the Minister 
General at Rome granted their request. Their first Monastery 
was canonically erected October 2, 1929 in Pittsburgh, Pa.' 
There were other Slovak Franciscans already in America 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



but they were born and educated here in the United States, 
but were not affiliated with the Province in Slovakia. 

The labors of these two missionaries became so great that 
they again had recourse to Rome for assistance. Rome again 
approved on January 28, 1929. In February, 1929 the Com- 
missariate of the Holy Cross in Ljubljana (Jugo-Slavia), to 
which most of the young American Fathers belonged at the 
time granted them permission to form their own Commissar- 
iate. This Commissariate became known as that of the Trans- 
figuration by which name it is known to date. 

The Slovenian Fathers of the Holy Cross in July 22, 1929 
presented to our Fathers a parish which they conducted for 
many years. This parish and its residence in Clifton, N. J., 
is now being taken care by the Slovak Franciscan Fathers. 

In a short time it became apparent to the Fathers, that 
they must expand. New priests were being ordained and no 
place to house them. Through the kindness and generosity of 
a certain benefactor land was donated to the Franciscan 
Fathers. Plans were soon drawn up to establish a monastery 
in the diocese of Fort Wayne, Indiana. The Most Rev. John 
F. Noll, D.D., granted the necessary permission to remain and 
assist pastors of Slovak parishes in Lake County. The Minister 
General of Rome also approved of the erection of a new monas- 
tery. On July 4, 1935 the new monastery of the Friars in the 
diocese of Fort Wayne, Indiana, was completed and dedicated. 
Besides a new beautiful monastery the grounds contain a 
shrine dedicated to the Mother of Sorrows. 

Our Fathers are also located in the diocese of Buffalo, 
N. Y., where they administer to the spiritual wants of the 
Slovak people. 

Although but a short time established in this country the 
Commissariate has plans for a school and Seminary for its 
students. 

THE REDEMPTORISTS IN INDIANA 
Located at Lebanon 

By The Rev. M. Lorenz, C. SS. R. 

Most Reverend John Francis Noll, in 1927, offered the 
parishes at Lebanon and Cicero, Indiana, to the Redemptorist 
Fathers of the St. Louis Province. 

The Provincial of the Redemptorist St. Louis Province, 
Rev. Edward Cantwell, suffering at the time with a broken 
leg in a Davenport hospital, deputed Father P. E. Foerster, one 
of his Consultors, and Father C. D. McEnniry, later a Consultor 
to the Redemptorist General in Rome, for the interview. After 
Bishop Noll, at South Bend, on August 16, 1927, formally made 
them his offer. Fathers Foerster and McEnniry came to Leb- 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 457 

anon, thoroughly inspected the Church and property, and de- 
cided upon a favorable report to Father Cantwell. 

In due time Father Cantwell obtained the necessary per- 
mission from our Superior General in Rome to accept the place 
with the understanding that it could be a headquarters for 
Redemptorist missionary work. And on November 3, 1927, at 
a meeting at Fort Wayne, Indiana, Bishop Noll signed all the 
necessary documents transferring the parish of St. Joseph's in 
Lebanon and Sacred Heart, an attached mission station, in 
Cicero, to the Redemptorists. 

At the command of the Provincial, an experienced man in 
Redemptorist pioneering. Rev. Louis McKeown, came to Leb- 
anon Nov. 22, 1927 to relieve the Rev. James M. Fitzgerald, 
who was the fourteenth resident pastor since 1874. Father 
McKeown was appointed Superior over his associates in the 
first community of Lebanon: Fathers Thomas Nealon, F. 
Winderlin, L. Nugent and Brother Hubert. 

The understanding in the community was that two of the 
Fathers would be away conducting missions, Forty Hours, 
novenas and retreats, which are the particular work of the 
Redemptorist Congregation, and the other two Fathers would 
care for the Lebanon and Cicero parishes. Accordingly, Fath- 
ers McKeown and Nugent were away on missionary labors the 
greater part of the year, while Fr. Nealon took cai'e of St. 
Joseph's parish and Fr. Winderlin regularly drove to Sacred 
Heart parish each Sunday. The Bishop also had an under- 
standing with the Fathers that they would be of service, when- 
ever possible, in helping or relieving the priests in the neigh- 
boring parishes of the diocese. 

The Sons of Saint Alphonsus have carried on in the same 
smooth way for nearly thirteen years. To relate either their 
parish doings or their missionary labors would mean a record 
of names and activities that may be uninteresting to the 
reader. 

Saint Alphonsus Liguori is renowned in the Catholic 
Church as the "Doctor of Prayer." Because of his epoch- 
making "Moral Theology," he is best known, especially to 
priests as "The Prince of Moral Theologians." His "Theology," 
preeminent among his varied prolific writings, is only one 
among his many truly gi'eat works during ninety-one years of 
a tireless life. 

His principal work was to organize a group of priests and 
lay-brothers into a band of religious workers who would strive 
to attain a high form of holiness and at the same time go out 
into villages and towns to preach to others, especially the poor 
and neglected, the message of salvation. 

These workers were united into a religious congregation 
called the Congregation of the Holy Redeemer — Congregatio 



458 FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 

Sanctissimi Eedemptoris (C.Ss.E). They are popularly known 
in the United States as Redemptorists. 

They came to the United States in 1832, one hundred 
years after Saint Alphonsus founded them. The Western 
United States Province was formed in 1875, with headquarters 
at St. Louis, Mo. The twenty-third of the twenty-six founda- 
tions in the St. Louis Province was established, under Bishop 
Noll, at Lebanon, Indiana. 

FRANCISCAN FATHERS 
Located at Angola, Indiana 

By a Member of the Order 

In 1930 with the approbation of the Most Rev. John F. 
Noll, D.D., Bishop of Ft. Wayne, plans were made to establish 
in Angola the Novitiate of the newly erected province of Our 
Lady of Consolation of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual. 
Under the direction of Very Rev. Aloys M. Fish, O.M.C., Min- 
ister Provincial, the old Croxton homestead on West Maumee 
St. was purchased and alterations and additions were made to 
suit this purpose. The novitiate was canonically erected on 
September 16, 1931 and on October 7th of the same year the 
chapel and building were solemnly blessed by His Excellency, 
Bishop Noll. At the same time the parish of St. Rita in Angola 
was turned over to the care of the Friars and the name of the 
titular changed to St. Anthony of Padua. 

The first superior and Novice Master was the Rev. Clement 
Orth, O.M.C. Fr. Clement also assumed the duties of pastor of 
the parish, and remained in charge until July 26, 1936. He was 
succeeded as pastor and superior by the Rev. Andrew Maas, 
O.M.C, and Rev. Stanislaus Ronellenfitch, O.M.C, was appoint- 
ed Master of Novices. Fr. Stanislaus was forced to resign due 
to ill health in the following year and his place was taken by 
Rev. Patrick Gauchat, O.M.C. Fr. Patrick remained as Novice 
Master until the time of Fr. Stanislaus' return and then was 
transferred to the major seminary at Carey, Ohio, as professor 
of history. 

The Provincial Chapter of 1939 transferred Fr. Andrew to 
Broken Bow, Nebraska and Fr. Stanislaus to Carlsbad, New 
Mexico, and appointed as Master of Novices and pastor of the 
parish the Rev. Ignatius Hanley, O.M.C Rev. Hubert Kobun- 
ski, O.M.C, was made Socius to the Master of Novices. At 
the present time the personnel of the Novitiate consists of 
four fathers, six clerical novices and one lay brother. 

The Friars Minor Conventual are one of the three fam- 
ilies of the first order of St. Francis founded in 1209 by St. 
Francis of Assisi. Due to the fact that the color of their 
habit is black they are often referred to as the "Black Fran- 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 459 

ciscans." The first American province was canonically erected 
in 1872 and headquarters were established in Syracuse, N. Y. 
A second province was founded in 1912 with the provincial 
house in Buffalo, N. Y. The province of the Lady of Conso- 
lation, of which the novitiate in Angola is a part was separated 
from the Syracuse province in 1926 and established as an 
independent province in the same year. The provincial's 
office was set up in St. Anthony's Friary in Louisville, Ky., and 
the Very Eev. Seraphin Schlang, O.M.C., was elected the first 
provincial. In 1929 he was succeeded by the Very Rev. Aloys 
Fish, O.M.C., during whose administration the novitiate was 
erected. Fr. Aloys held office until 1935 when the Very Eev. 
Anthony Hodapp, O.M.C. was chosen to succeed him. 

The members of the province are engaged in parochial and 
missionary work in various states from Ohio to California. 
They conduct a pro seminary for aspirants to the Franciscan 
priesthood at Mt. St. Francis, Indiana, the novitiate in Angola 
and the major seminary of Our Lady of Consolation in Carey, 
Ohio. At the present time the province includes 75 priests, 
22 professed clerics and 6 clerical novices. 

POLISH FRANCISCAN FATHERS 
Located at Cedar Lake 

The Immaculate Conception B.V.M. Theological House of 

Studies and 

The Stella Maris Mission House 

By Rev. Cyril Piontek, O.F.M. 

These two Franciscan institutions are but of recent date 
in the diocese of Fort Wayne. They were established in the 
year 1938, and are located within the parish limits of the 
Holy Name Church of Cedar Lake, just one mile from the 
village of Cook and also one mile from the village of Cedar 
Lake proper, on county road "K", on the estate known in the 
past for some twenty-five years as "The Pioneer Cedar Lake 
Golf Course," or also "The Einsele Golf Course," from the 
proprietor's name, Mr. George Einsele being the originator 
and owner of same. 

The entire property consists of some 170 acres of land, 
two large and modern houses erected some fourteen years 
ago of solid building material for hotel and summer resort 
purposes, demanding an outlay of about $300,000.00 not count- 
ing the proprietor's own work and supervision during all 
these twenty-five years. 

On March 2, 1938, by a legal transaction of sale, for a 
bargain price of $51,000.00, all this property passed into the 
hands of the Franciscan Fathers' Province of Pulaski, Wis- 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



con sin, in the diocese of Green Bay, under the corporate 
name: "The Order of the Franciscan Fathers of Green Bay, 
Wisconsin," and has been recorded as such with the Kegistrar 
of Lake County at Crown Point, Indiana, on March 2, 1938. 

These two above named institutions, then, although form- 
ing a distinct unit for themselves and established for two 
different purposes, are but the subsidiaries of the motherhouse 
at Pulaski and of the Franciscan theological seminary at Green 
Bay, Wis. 

The Immaculate Conception B. V. Mary House of 
Theological Studies 

This building, erected in 1926, formerly a three stories 
clubhouse and a modern country hotel combined, represents to 
the eyes of the visitor an edifice of colonial style with an omen 
of a century's duration. It is constructed according to the 
most modern devices, of solid and concrete building material, 
of red paving brick, and in all details fire-resisting. Although 
the original proprietor of this building, when making plans 
for it, never thought that some day this edifice would be 
changed into a Franciscan friary and a theological seminary, 
yet it seems that by God's Providence everything was exactly 
planned for this purpose and today, it really makes an exquis- 
ite house of theological studies. 

This building is a structure of 154x60 feet, three stories 
high, with a living accommodation for exactly forty Franciscan 
friars. The one half of the first fioor contains a large hotel 
kitchen with all the modern equipments, a cozy dining room 
where some 150 persons may be served simultaneously; the 
other half of the entire space on the first floor was mapped 
out for a commodious dance hall with two convenient guest 
rooms, now converted into a spacious oratory with a capacity 
or 200 chairs, whilst one of these rooms makes at present a 
convenient sacristy, and the other a side chapel with two small 
altars for saying Mass and also a fine place for a Reed organ 
and a choir of the Franciscan theologians. The second floor, 
with an ample corridor going lengthwise through the whole 
building, and symmetrically divided into twenty rooms, having 
ten on each side of the corridor, was originally destined for 
hotel and summer resort accommodations now, however, making 
a convenient Franciscan friary with twenty rooms for the 
Fathers and Brothers assigned for this house. The third floor, 
when bought, was left unfinished, but also had a general out- 
lay for another twenty convenient hotel rooms. After the 
purchase of this property, plans were made and operations 
immediately started to finish this third floor and have these 
twenty rooms ready for the opening of the school year at 
the beginning of next September, all this work being done 
mostly by the friars themselves. The third floor, then, ac- 



INSTITUTIONS IN THE DIOCESE OF FORT WAYNE 461 

commodates the Franciscan students of the first year in theo- 
logy, being at the same time a filial to the theological house 
at Green Bay, which, however, due to the lack of space, can- 
not house more than thirty theologians besides the necessary 
number of Fathers and Lay-Brothers at this institution at 
Green Bay, Wisconsin. 

When the first six friars from Pulaski arrived at this 
place on March 2, 1938, having with them just small hand- 
bags, they immediately felt at home, because the former 
hotel and surroundings appealed to them as being built for mon- 
astery purposes. And moreover, the seller of this property, 
Mrs. George Einsele, welcomed them with a warm heart, 
handing to them also all the movable property, equipments, 
furniture, kitchen and hotel rooms utensils and all the various 
items on the entire propei'ty as a personal gift. 

On April 21, 1938, this being Thursday within the octave 
of Easter, the first solemn event at this institution took place, 
namely that of a solemn dedication of the oratory and the 
whole institution. The ceremonies began at 9 o'clock A. M., 
by His Excellency, the Most Eev. Bishop Noll, the Ordinary of 
the Fort Wayne diocese. 

At present, there are twenty students of theology at this 
place, thus filling all available space of this institution. 

Sunday and Monday, May 19th and 20th, 1940, are also 
eventful days and of special historical value for this institu- 
tion. His Excellency, Bishop Noll of the Fort Wayne diocese 
arrived at this place in order to confer, for the first time, to 
the twenty Franciscan students of this seminary the tonsure 
and the first two minor orders. 

The Stella Maris Mission House 
This building, 164x62 feet, erected originally in the style 
of a "Chinese pagoda," was planned by the original proprietor, 
Mr. Einsele, for a permanent hotel for amateurs of outdoor 
sun baths. It also represented a solid building, erected of 
red paving brick. But when the depression came and the 
Taanks were closed, this structure was left unfinished with 
the exception of the middle tower, covered with a temporary 
and cheap paper roof. 

It is located about 1,000 feet from the first institution, in 
the midst of a 54 acre stretch of oak-woods, containing six 
various species of oak; two artificial small lakes, just in front 
of the building, and some sixteen acres of land for garden 
and farming purposes, give it a magnificent and majestic 
appearance. Left, however, without further care, it was des- 
tined for inevitable ruins. 

After the completion of this building the first entire fioor 
will offer a larger oratory, dining room, halls of larger meet- 



PEAGMENTS OP OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



ings. With the consent of His Excellency, the Most Rev. 
Bishop Noll, this building, when finished, should serve as a 
retreat house for laymen. It was solemnly blessed on May 12, 
1941, by Bishop Noll. 



INDEX 



Abraham, Rev. M 312 

Aeademie, St. Vincent 193 

Acolyte, The 152 

Adler, Rev. J. C 185 

Aichinger, Very Rev. M 

225-229 

Albion, Sacred Heart 206 

Alerding, D.D., Most Rev. 
Herman J. — Fourth Bishop 

of Fort Wayne 140-146 

Alexandria, St. Mary 285 

Allgeier, Rev. J. N 179 

Anderson, St. Mary 270 

Anderson, Rev. P 215-216 

Angermaier, Rev. George 

—Retired ._.. 425 

Angola, St. Anthony 221 

Areola, St. Patrick 209 

Ardas, Rev. V. - 388 

Attica, St. Francis Xavier ....255 

Atwater, Rev. W. L 335 

Auburn, Im. Conception 214 

Avilla, St. Mary 201 

B 
Badin, V.G., Very Rev. S. T. 

28 to 40 

Badina, Rev. A ....318 

Bapst, Rev. J 182 

Barrydale, St. Bridget 267 

Bartkowski, Rev. John F. 

338-348-378 

Bazin, D.D., Rt. Rev. John S. 
Third Bishop of Vincennes 

50 to 52 

Beaghan, Rev. P., C.S.C 307 

Becker, Rev. J.J., C.PP.S ....244 

Beckman, Rev. John 351 

Benoit, V.G., Rt. Rev. Msgr. 

Julian 97-109 

Bennett, Vy. Rev. J G 

...166-171-218 

Besancon, St. Louis 195 

Bick, Rev. John 210 

Bickauskas, Rev. C 358 

Biegel, Rev. P. A 376 

Biernacki, Rev. H 344 

Bilstein, Rev. F. J 279 

Bluffton, St. Joseph 215 

Bodinger, Rev. M 280 

Boney, Rev. E 375 

Bonk, Rev. J 318 

Bozyk, Rev. L 329 

Brandehoff, Rev. A. 182 



Brothers of the Holy Cross, 

The 53-54-55-144-437 

Brammer, V.G., Very Rev. 

Joseph H 132-133 

Breitenbach, Rev. L 237 

Bremen 328 

Brute, Rt. Rev. William G. 

24 to 28 

Bryant, Holy Trinity 277 

Buczyna, Rev. J 354 

Butler, Rev. P. M 222 



Cak, Rev. S 325 

Campagna, Rev. M. A 363 

Cardinali, Rev. F. J 396 

Carroll, Most Rev. John — 

First Archbishop 15-16-17 

Catholic Charities 168 

Catholic Youth Organization 

167 

Catholicity, Summary of — • 

1850 56 to 59 

Cedar Lake (Hanover Center) 

Holy Name 372 

Chaplains, Army and Navy 

Arnold, Vy. Rev. Wm 418 

Burke, Rev. Francis A 419 

Meehling, Rev. F. W 419 

Westendorf, Rev. F. J 420 

Chapman, Rev. M. A 210-251 

Chesterton, St. Patrick 319-401 

Chylewski, Rev. J. N 368 

Cicero 260 

Cis, Rev. J 270 

Clergy High School Teach- 
ers 414-417 

Convifay, Rev. James 414 

Cross, Rev. Leonard J. 185-415 

Frawley, Rev. J. J 189-415 

Gollner, Rev. Lawrence 

177-178-416 

Gabriel, Rev. Father, 

O.F.M. Cap 414 

Hinckley, Rev. Christopher 

416 

Kienly, Rev. Francis C. 

305-417 

Klein, Rev. E. N 417 

Junk, Rev. Alfred J 417 

Schnurr, Rev. H. J 415 

Staub, Rev. C 416 

Vichuras, Rev. M. J 

205-358-415-416 

Clergy Relief Society 123 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Columbia City, St. Paul 206 

Commissariate of the Trans- 
figuration — Slovak Fran- 
ciscan Frs 455-456 

Condon, Rev. B., C.PP.S ...220 

Connelly, Rev. J. F 354 

Congregation of the Precious 

Blood, The 442 

Conroy, Rev. James 326 

Conroy, Rt. Rev. Thomas 175-177 
Copenolle, Very Rev. 

Msgr. A. J 249-265 

Corcoran, Rev. W., C.S.C. 293 

Costello, Rev. John 167 

Covington, St. Joseph 258 

Crawfordsville, St. Bernard 254 

Crown Point, St. Mary 405 

Crumley, Rev. T. A., C.S.C. 288 

Cvaniga, Rev. S 317 

Cyr Rev. E 275 

D 

Daley, Rev. T 236 

Dapp, Rev. J. A 166-190 

Decatur, St. Mary 199 

Deceased Priests 430-433 

DelFosse, Rev. F 258 

Delphi, St. Joseph 240 

Depa, Rev. T 228 

Derrick, Rev. R 212 

Dillon, Rev. J. E 166-2.';3 

Dillon, Rev. T. E 165-199 

Diocesan Directors — 
Legion of Decency 
National Organization for 

Decent Literature 
National Council of Cath- 
olic Women 
Priests' Eucharistic League 

169 

Diocesan School Board, 1879 

125-130 

Diocesan School Superin- 
tendent 149-165 

Divine Heart Mission House, 

The 448-9 

Doktor, Rev. Julian 311 

Dolan, Rev. P. H., C.S.C 294 

Donnelly, Rev. R. F 393 

Dufrane, Rev. L 262 

Dunca, Rev. A. 359 

Dunkirk, St. Mary 286 

Dunnington, St. Mary 263 

Durham, Rev. James H. — 

Retired 428 

Durham, V.G., Rt. Rev. John 

P 161 

Dwenger, D.D., Most Rev. 
Joseph — Second Bishop of 
Fort Wayne 110-131 



Durkin, Rev. T. L 182 

Duray, Rev. L. J 185 

Dyer, St. Joseph 373 

Dziadowicz, Rev. Joseph F. 387 

E 
Earl Park, St. John Baptist 265 
East Chicago, 350: — 

Assumption 359 

Sacred Heart 360 

Holy Trinity (Hung.) 356 

Holy Trinity (Croat.) 360 

Immaculate Conception ....363 
Our Lady of Guadalupe ....362 
St. Francis (Lithuanian) 357 

St. John Cantius 355 

St. Joseph 361 

St. Mary 350 

St. Nicholas 358 

St. Dimitrius 358 

St. Patrick 354 

St. Stanislaus 350 

St. Jude 364 

East Gary: — 

St. Francis Xavier 399 

Eberle, Rev. L. A 324 

Ege (La Otto) Immaculate 

Conception 208 

Ehrman, Rev. W 205 

Eisenhardt, Rev. E 320-401 

Elkhart, St. Vincent 325 

Elliott, Rev. J 385 

Elwood, St. Joseph 281 

Emmons, Rev. Robert ....338-378 
Ewald Rev. C 207 

F 

Faber, Rev. W 385 

Fairmount, St. Cecilia 287 

Fallon, Rev. E ......258 

Faurote, Rev. D. Leo 288 

Faust, Rev. Francis P. 223-249 
St. Felix Monastery 171-453-454 

Feltes, Rev. Charles 162-166 

Fettig, Rev. Lawrence 197 

Fettig, Rev. T. 213 

Finnegan, Rev. Daniel, 

O.M.I 398 

Finnegan, Rev. Geo., C.S.C. 292 

Fitzgerald, Rev. J 261 

Flaget, Most Rev. Benedict 
Joseph, Bishop of Bards- 
town and Louisville 18-19 

Foley, Rev. M 279 

Fort Wayne Deanery — Vy. 
Rev. John Bennett, Dean 

170-223 

Fort Wayne, 22-63:— 

Cathedral of the Immacu- 
late Conception 106-175 

Most Precious Blood 185 



INDEX 



St. Andrew 186 

St. Hyacinth 187 

St. John Baptist 191 

St. Joseph 188 

St. Jude 189 

St. Mary 178 

St. Patrick 182 

St. Paul 179 

St. Peter 181 

Fowler, Sacred Heart 261 

Franciscan Fathers (Ango- 
la) 458 

Francisville .289-321 

Frankfort, St. Mary 264 

Franz, Rev. L 240 

Frawley, Rev. J 189-249 

Freiburger, Rev. Edward ....269 

Frichtl, Rev. P 362 

G 

Gadacz, Rev. M. C 397 

Gallagan, Rev. J., C.S.C 307 

Gapczynski, Rev. I. J ..315 

Garrett, St. Joseph 217 

Gary Deanery— Rt. Rev. T. F. 

Jansen, Bean 380-411 

Gary, 380:— 

Holy Angels 382 

Holy Family 396 

Holy Trinity (Croatian) ....387 

Holy Trinity (Slovak) 288 

Holy Rosary 399 

Sacred Heart (Tolleston) 391 

St. Mary of the Lake 398 

St. Anthony 395 

St. Casimir 389 

St. Emeric 390 

St. Hedwig 385 

St. Luke 393 

St. Mark -394 

St. Monica 397 

Judge Gary-Bishop Alerd- 
ing Settlement House.... 

145-381-395 

Gas City, Holy Family 284 

Gawronski, Rev. S 347 

Geneva, St. Mary 284 

Gerhardstein, Rev. A 266 

Girardot, Rev. C 166-189 

Goodland, SS. Peter & Paul 268 

Gorka, Rev. S. J., C.S.C. 298 

Goshen, St. John 323 

Griffith, St. Mary 409 

Grothouse, Rev. L 395 

Growth of Catholic Church 

in U. S. Since 1775 13-14 

Grunenberg, Rev. Richard ....336 

Grutka, Rev. A 326 

Gruza, Rev. S., C.S.C 295 

Guerre, Rev. F. X 399 



Guendling, V.G., Very Rev. 

John H 138-139 

Guethoff, Rev. Gustave 406 

Gyorfy, Rev. G 381 

H 

Hagenmayer, Rev. Jos. 338-378 
Hailandiere, Most Rev. Dr. 
de la — Second Bishop of 

Vincennes 41 to 49 

Halpin, Rev. R. J. 239 

Hamlet 246 

Hammes, Rev. Joseph 406 

Hammes, Rev. Theo 276 

Hammond Deanery — Rt. Rev. 

F. J. Jansen, Dean ....337-379 
Hammond, 336: — 

All Saints 342 

St. Casimir ....344 

St. Joseph 339 

St. John Baptist 345 

St. John Bosco 347 

St. Mary's 346 

Our Lady of Perpetual 

Help (Hessville) 348 

Hartford City, St. John Bap- 
tist 283 

Hasler, Rev. F. J., Retired 428 

Hasser, Rev. George A 223 

Heilman, Rev. T. 187 

Hessen Cassel, St. Joseph ....194 

Hession, Rev. Jos. 196 

Hennes, Rev. J 167 

Hildebrandt, Rev. Leo ....169-410 

Hobart, St. Bridget 408 

Hoerstman, Rev. H. A 187 

Hoff, Rev. Wm 197 

Hoffman, Rev. Leo 242 

Hoffman, Rev. R. 357 

Holland, Rev. Edward 251 

Holsinger, Rev. C 396 

Homes for the Aged Poor: — 
Sacred Heart, Avilla 170-223 
St. Anthony, Lafayette ....248 
Lyndora Home, Hammond 337 

Hordemann, Rev. W. B 265 

Horvath, Rev. Jos 300 

Hosinski, Rev. J 321 

Hospitals: — 

Good Samaritan, Kokomo 225 
Holy Family, LaPorte 290-335 
Kneipp Sanitarium, Rome 

City 220 

Mt. Mercy, Hammond 337 

Mercy, Elwood 270 

Sacred Heart, Garrett 170-222 
St. Anthony, Michigan 

City 289-336 

St. Catherine, E. Chicago 338 
St. Elizabeth, Lafayette -.248 



466 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



St. John, Anderson 270 

St. Joseph Memorial, 

Kokomo -.225 

St. Joseph, Ft. Wayne 170-223 
St. Joseph, Logansport ....225 
St. Joseph, Mishawaka 289-335 
St. Joseph, So. Bend 289-335 
St. Margaret, Hammond 338 

St. Mary Mercy, Gary 382 

Hottenroth, Rev. Gustave ....246 

Huemmer, Rev. N - 282 

Huntington: St. Mary 198 

SS. Peter & Paul 193 

I 

Introduction 1-24 

J 

Jacobs, Rev. J 191 

Janicki, Rev. T 353 

Jansen, Rt. Rev. F. J 

166-338-341 

Jansen, Rt. Rev. T. F 

....166-380-384 

Jarka, Rev. A 302 

Jasinski, Rev. A 200 

Jeziorski, Rev. L. A. 356 

St. Joseph College — 

Rensselaer 248-441-442 

St. John: St. John Church ....370 

Judnic, Rev. Joseph 422 

K 

Karcz, Rev. V 411 

Karp, Rev. W. A 333 

Kasprzykowski, Rev. J. — 

Retired 425 

Keating, Rev. J 255 

Keller, Rev. N 230 

Keller, Rev. 317 

Kelner, Rev. M 233 

Kendallville, Immaculate 

Conception Church 211 

Kentland, St. Joseph 257 

Kewanna, St. Ann 237 

Keyser, Rev. C 202 

Klein, Rev. S 316 

Knoflf, Rev. A 210 

Knox, St. Thomas 245 

Koenig, Rev. Fred — Retired 424 

Kohne, Rev. A 268 

Kokomo: St. Joan of Arc ....239 

St. Patrick 238 

Kondziela, Rev. A 407 

Koors, Rev. C 367 

Kosko, Rev. Michael 421 

Kostik, Rev. J., C.PP.S 346 

Kouts, St. Mary 407 

Krause, Rev. L 267 

Krause, Rev. W., O.F.M ....252 

Kubacki, Rev. J 327 



L 

Lach, Rev. J. J 370 

La Crosse 333 

Lafayette Deanery, Very Rev. 
Msgr. A. J. Copenolle, 

Dean 248-269 

Lafayette, 248:— 

St. Ann 253 

St. Boniface 252 

St. Lawrence 252 

St. Mary 249 

St. Joseph Orphanage 33 

Soldiers Home 

La Grange 221 

Lagro: St. Patrick 231 

Lange, Rev. M 192 

LaPorte, 289: — 

St. Joseph :J13 

St. Peter 312 

Sacred Heart 314 

Lauer, Rev. Geo 316 

Lebanon: St. Joseph 259 

Lefko, Rev. J 346 

Lenk, Rev. J 275 

Lennartz, Rev. W. P., C.S.C. 296 

Lesniak, Rev. J 345 

Letko, Rev. A 282 

Ley, Rev. E. A 374 

Libert, Rev. F 244 

Ligonier: St. Patrick 205 

Logansport Deanery — Very 
Rev. Michael J. Aichinger, 

Dean 224-247 

Logansport, 224: — 

St. Bridget 230 

St. Joseph 228 

St. Vincent de Paul 226 

Long Lake 222 

Lothamer, Rev. J 203 

Lottaville: SS. Peter & Paul 403 

Lowell: St. Edward 374 

Lucerne 238 

Luers, D.D., Most Rev. John 
Henry — 1st Bishop of Ft. 

Wayne 63 to 96 

Lynn, Rev. Joseph A. — Re- 
tired 427 

Me 

McAuliffe, Rev. F 287 

McCarthy, Rev. J. A 278 

McHale, Rev. L 254 

M 

Madejczyk, Rev. L 387 

Magsam, Rev. H. V 313 

Malay, Rev. C. E 255 

Mannion, Rev. W 232 

Manoski, Rev. S 178-414 

Marion: St. Paul 277-278 

U. S. Veteran Hospital ....284 



INDEX 



St. Mary's College and 

Academy 289-438-439-440-441 

Marr, Rev. C. W 372 

Martis, Rev; Jos. S 389 

Matthieu, Rev. Andrew 

154-168-180 

Mastej, Rev. W 345 

Medaryville 289-322 

Meehan, Rev. F. J 252 

Michalski, Rev. L 209 

Michigan City, 289: — 
Immaculate Conception ....307 

St. Stanislaus 310 

Sacred Heart 312 

Miller: St. Mary of the Lake 398 

Miller, Rev. Edw 193-414 

Miller, Rev. H. J 323 

Mishawaka, 289: — 

St. Bavo 317 

St. Joseph 315 

St. Monica 318 

Mlinarovich, Rev. C. M 359 

Mohr, Rev. C, C.PP.S 186 

Monahan, Rt. Rev. D. L 

_..166-184-185 

Monroeville: St. Rose of 

Lima 212 

Monterey: St. Ann 235 

Montpelier: St. Margaret ....216 

Moorman, Vy. Rev. Geo 

..166-365-367 

Moran, Rev. J. H 283 

Moskal, Rev. J 302 

Moskwinski, Rev. C. B 392 

Muncie Deanery. — Rt. Rev. 
Thomas J. Travers, Dean 

270-288 

Muncie (270): — 

St. Lawrence 273 

St. Mary 275 

Mungovan, V.G., Rt. Rev. 

E. J 164-166-343 

Mutch, Rev. F. Joseph 246 

N 
Nadolny, Rev. J. F. 162-166-180 
New Chicago: Assumption 410 
New Haven: St. John Bap- 
tist 204 

Nickels, Rev. J. M 404 

Niesen, Rev. E. F 177 

Nix Settlement: St. Cather- 
ine 200 

Noll, Most Rev. J. F., D.D. 

150 to 160 

North Judson: SS. Cyril & 

Methodius 329 

Notre Dame: Sacred Heart 

Church 289-292 

Nowak, Rev. F 391 



O 

O'Brien, Rev. Francis, O.M.I. 

205 

Oblates of Mary Immaculate 

Ligonier — Gary ....171-4^4-455 
Oechtering, V.G., Rt. Rev. 

J. H. (Retired) 147-148 

Officials, Diocesan 166 

Orphanages — First 81-88 

St. Joseph Home for Home- 
less Girls, E. Chicago ....337 
St. Joseph Home for Home- 
less Boys, Hammond ....337 
St. Vincent Villa, Fort 

Wayne ....171-447 

Osadnik, Rt. Rev. Msgr. J. 301 

Otis: St. Mary 328 

Otterbein: St. Charles 266 

Our Sunday Visitor 152-157-170 

Oxford: St. Patrick 256 

P 

Pallone, Rev. D 342 

Pawlicki, Rev. W 368 

Peru: St. Charles Borromeo 232 

Peters, Rev. 264 

Pettit, Rev. Benjamin 37-38 

Petzold, Rev. M 355 

Phillips, Rev. A 342 

Philippe, Rev. E. J 297 

Pierceton: St. Francis Xav. 208 

Pisula, Rev. Leo 219 

Plaster, Rev. H. M. (Re- 
tired) 424 

Plotzki, Rev. W 341 

Plymouth: St. Michael 323 

Polish Franciscan Fathers 459 
Poor Handmaids of Jesus 

Christ, The 289-445-446 

New Motherhouse — Ancilla 

Domini 447 

Poor Sisters of St. Francis 
Seraph of the Perpetual 

Adoration, The 443-444 

Podgorsek, Rev. F 360 

Portland: Immaculate Con- 
ception 280 

Pursley, Rev. Leo ....217 

Q 

Quinlisk, Rev. A 343 

Quinn, Rev. Francis J. ........412 

R 
Rademacher, D.D., Most Rev. 
Joseph — Third Bishop of 

Fort Wayne 134-138 

Ratajczak, Rev. L 400 

Reddington, Rev. L 393 

Redkey 287 

Redemptorists in Indiana, 
The— Lebanon 456-457 



i68 



FRAGMENTS OF OUR DIOCESAN HISTORY 



Reinig, Rev. A 349 

Remington: Sacred Heart ...261 
Rensselaer: St. Augustine 266 

Reynolds: St. Joseph 242 

Roanoke: St. Joseph 210 

Rochester: St. Joseph 236 

Roederer, Rev. P 409 

Roesler, Rev. J 309 

Rolling Prairie 333 

Rome City: Mother of 

Mercy -.220 

Rosenthal, Rev. V. J 179 

Rosewicz, Rev. A. J., C.S.C. 298 

Rosvsrog, Rev. E 304 

Rothermel, Rev. F. C 371 

Ryder, Rev. Jos. S 394 

Ryder, Rev. S. J 169-191 

S 

Sabo, Rev. J 166-169-290-303 

San Pierre 289-319 

Saxon, Rev. S., S.C.J 362 

Schaeffer, Rev. J 334 

Schall, Rev. J 169-228 

Schererville: St. Michael 375 

Schmid, Rev. Paul J ....421 

Schmitt, Rev. Peter (Re- 
tired) 426 

Schmitt, Rev. S 241 

Schnitz, Rev. C 385 

Scholl, Rev. C. J 236 

Schuster, Rev. F., O.F.M 252 

Schweier, Rev. E 263 

Seeberger, Rev. Chas ..194 

Seimetz, Rev. J 200 

Senese, Rev. E 412 

Seroczynski, Rev. F 274 

Shanley, Rev. F. M 335 

Shea, Rev. M 351 

Sheetz, Rev. Leo 166-286 

Shelby: St. Theresa 377 

Sheldon (Yoder) : St. Aloys- 

ius 203 

Sipos, Rev. Jos. 357 

Sisters of St. Joseph, The 

Tipton -. 270-449-50 

St. Joseph Academy 270 

Sigstein, Rev. John J. (Re- 
tired) 153-429 

Sisters Of 

St. Agnes 

189-200-204-235-274-405 

St. Casimir 358-389 

SS. Cyril & Methodius .... 

370-388 

St. Francis Seraph, La- 
fayette 186-198-213- 

230-252-253-257-261-262-265 
283- 314- 329- 349- 372- 375- 
408-443-444 



St. Dominic ....297-299-303-357 
Franciscans of St. Kune- 
gunda 295- 

315-346-355-361-386-387-391 
St. Francis of the Sacred 
Heart 170-190-202-208-374-376 
St. Joseph of the Third 
Order of St. Francis 352-397 
School Sisters of St. Fran- 
cis 359 

Holy Cross 21-23-226-254-271- 

276-289-293-294-296-297-306 

308- 313- 324- 325- 354- 371- 

403-441 
Holy Family of Nazareth 

298-368 

St. Joseph 203- 

238-240-242-278-279-282-305 
School Sisters of N. D. 
....155-179-181-188-195-197- 

229-285-311-319-384-393-401 
Precious Blood 

170-185-218-244-266-277-360 
Poor Handmaids 144-155- 

180- 209- 316- 317- 318- 390- 

394-445 
Providence 

100-141-155-177-183-190-191 

233-251-339-342-345-350-366 

Skrzypinski, Rev. J 

166-352-353 

Smith, Rev. Jos 188 

Sorg, Rev. R 239 

South Bend Deanery — Very 

Rev. John Sabo, Dean 289-336 
South Bend (289):— 

Sacred Heart 296 

Christ the King 307 

Holy Cross 306 

St. Adalbert 300 

St. Augustine 305 

St. Casimir 298 

St. Hedwig ....294 

St. Joseph -• 293-313 

St. Mary 295 

St. Matthew 304 

St. Patrick 294 

St. Stanislaus 297 

St. Stephen 298 

Our Lady of Hungary 302 

Society of Missionary Cate- 

chists 153-158-170-223-384- 

450-451-452 

St. Palais, D.D., Rt. Rev. M. 
de — Fourth Bishop of Vin- 

cennes 60-61-62 

Stapleton, Rev. J 273 

Star City (Pulaski): St. 
Joseph 234 



INDEX 



Steger, Rev. J. B 332 

Stepuncik, Rev. I. A 389 

Stoll, Rev. C. A 245 

Sucek, Rev. Andrew, 421 

Suelzer, Rev. C 166-300 

Suelzer, Rev. Jos 284 

Sullivan, Rev. F. W., C.S.C. 306 

Sullivan, Rev. G. N 256 

Sullivan, Rev. John A 403 

Summary, Statistical 169 

Swiatkowski, Rev. M. M 386 

Sweigart, Rev. W. E 154-168 

Switzer, Rev. A 229 

Szczukowski, Rev. L. (Re- 
tired) 426 

Szot, Rev. J 406-413 

T 

Tatar, Rev. S 346 

Traub, Rev. Robert 240 

Travers, Rt. Rev. T 271 

Terre Coupee: St. Joseph .—330 

Tipton: St. John 279 

U 

Urbanski, Rev. M 338-378 

Utas, Rev. Joseph 223 

Uvodic, Rev. V 369 

Union City: St. Mary 276 

University of Notre 

Dame 52-53-54-55-436-438 

V 

Valparaiso: St. Paul 402 

Van Rie, Rev. A 314 

Veedersburg 259 

Vincennes, Under Bishops of 

20 to 23 

Vlahovic, Rev. V., O.M.C 387 

Voors, Rev. W 305 



Vurpillat, Rev. E. H. 309 

W 

Wabash: St. Bernard 241 

Wagner, Rev. V. C 277 

Walkerton: St. Patrick 327 

Walski, Rev. J 303 

Wanatah: Sacred Heart 331 

Warsaw: Sacred Heart 216 

Waterloo: St. Michael 218 

Wawasee: Little Flower 208 

Weber, Rev. L. J 214 

Weis, Rev. Robert B 309 

Welsh, Rev. P. A. 233 

Werling, Rev. E. G 326 

Wheatfleld 407 

Whiting : — 

Sacred Heart 365 

Immaculate Conception ....369 

St. Adalbert 367 

SS. Peter & Paul (Croat.) 3G9 

Wibbert, Rev. A 305 

Winamac: St. Peter 244 

Winchester ......281 

Wojcicki, Rev. R 315 

Wolcottville 220 

Wonderly, Rev. Jos 330 

Woods, Rev. John 377 

Wroblewski, Rev. E 361 

Wroblewski, Rev. J 331 

Z 

Zahn, Rev. Robert J 422 

Zenz, Rev. L. J 400 

Zielinski, Rev. Jos 302 

Zircher, Rev. I. F. (Retired) 

425 

Zjawinski, Rev. S 353 

Zobel, Rev. J 347 

Zurawiec, Rev. C 311